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Full text of "The Canadian Almanac and Directory 1856-1867"




(taCLEAB & CO/S 



CANADIAN ALMANAC, 




AND 



AIM.U 

i 

(Rcpo^itorg of Jlseful Huowlebge, 



FOR THE YEAR 






1856, 

BEINGS LE^LlP YEA.H, 



CONTAINING FULL AND AUTHENTIC COMMERCIAL, STATISTICAL, ASTRONOMICAL, 
DEPARTMENTAL, ECCLESIASTICAL, EDUCATIONAL, FINANCIAL, AND 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 



THE ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS, WHICH ARE SUITED TO EYERY PART OF 

THE BRITISH PROVINCES IN NORTH AMERICA, HAVE BEEN MADE 

EXPRESSLY FOR THE CANADIAN ALMANAC. 



TORONTO: 

MACLEAR & CO., 16, KING STREET EAST. 

SOLD BY BOOKSELLERS AND STOREKEEEPERS GENERALLY THROUGHOUT 
THE BRITISH AMERICAN PROVINCES. 



Ccr/0 Canadian SVlmanac, 

FOR THE YEAR 1856. 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES, &c., 1856. 


FIXED AND MOVEABLE FEASTS, &C., 


1856. 






FE 

14 
11 

2 - , 
17 

185 
0569 
1856 

1-:,.; 
5860 
5616 
7364 

2 >:J2 
2603 
1856 

185G 


Septungefima Sunday 


fan y 20 






Quinquagepima Sunday 


IVb v :; 








IVh v f. 






Onadra. First Sunday in Lent 


1 






Mjd Lent Sunday, 


>Vb y 24 


. 






Mar. 16 






Friday 


: ir 21 






i: Si NJiVi 


Mar. 23 


IT <.ftlu- Jewish Era com. Sept. :;uth 
The year Iii7o of rheMuhom. Era com. Sept. 1st 

^ \ " r (, f tht- WorM i I sbor) -- -- 


Low Sunday 


M :r :;< 


KoL-ation Sunday 
s ton l*ay Holy Thursday 


April 27 
. ... May 1 






Whit Sunday Peutucost 


May 11 






Trinity Sunday 


.. M. 


V 1" ( i HuiMin r of Kome) 




Corpus Christ i 


Juno 22 






Middle day of the Year 


July 1 






Advent Sunday 


Nov. 30 


: lh-r Ma;t :n begins June 20th... 
The 81st of the Indep. of the U. S. begins July 4th... 




May - 


Birth of Prince Albert 


. Ail". 2 j 






THE SEASONS, 1856. TORONTO. 


THE SEASONS 1850. TORONTO. 


D. 
Winter Sols*ice i 1SVY> December 2 


H. M. 

3 31 
4 32 
1 21 
3 36 

9 22 
1 1 


mor. 
mor. 
mor. 

even. 
mor. 
mor. 


Sun in Sprin " Si r ns 


I>. 11. M. 

( ,y -\] -f) 


V Tini -larch 20 1856 


Sun in Summer Si r iis 


ft:; u 15 




Sun in Autumnal Si nis 


17 4t> 




Tropical Year 


1C 5 51 




Sun North of Equator 


isij 11 4 


Sun in Winter Sk ns 89 


Sun South of Equator 


178 18 47 






MORNING STARS, 1856. 


EVENING STAI;S. I 


vJ6. 
Mars until April 1st, 1856. 
Jupiter from .March 5 to Sept. 26. 
Saturn from June 24 to Dec. 31. 


Venus from July 19th to May loth. ls;,7. 
Mars from April 1st to June 7th, 1807. 
Jupiter until March 5th. and from Sept. 
Saturn until June 24th. 1850. 


20th, to April 
[llth. 1857. 



TO THE READER. 

SUN S T.i -ix". AND SETTING. There are two kinds of time used in common Almanacs, for tho Sun s Rising and Setting. 

One ;.ue, and the other is J/<, "i-< ;</ or Sun time. Clack time is alw<iy.< riii/it. while Sun ti 

day, a -nately too -Fast or too " Slow." Hence it is that two Almanacs mad. by the same calculator, for 

the same year and place, will give the Sun s rising and setting very differently, if a <//// . rni! kind of time is used in 

each, I ci sons nK-vrving this must not think that either is wrong. According to apparent time the sun will always 

at six o clock", at the time of its crossing the equinoctial; but this is never tho case according to Clock time, 

or true time. If the sun was in the meridian, or at the noon mark, at 12 o clock every day. then < ime would 

d the sun would always rise and set at t> o clock, when at the equinoxes. People generally suppose it 

is 12 o el .vk when the sun is in mid-heaven, or at the noon mark. In this there is a givat mistake, tor the sun is so- 

irregular. li at i! does not come to these points at 12 o clock oftenerthan four times in a whole year. In I/iff Almanac 

ive the time exact to the nearest second that a correct clock must show, when the sun is in the meridian and 

y day in the year. AVhen the sun isat the noon mark it is noon, but not tv.elve o clock 

To ascertain the Length of the Day ami Niglit. 

At any thne of the year add 12 hours to the time of the Sun s setting, and from the sum su!>( n -t the tiino of rising 
for the length of the day. 

Subtract the time of setting from 12 hours, and to the remainder add the time of rising next niornin;. . for the length 
of the ni^ht. Tlie-e rules are equally true for apparent time. 

Explanation of the Signs nsel in this Almanac. 

Q New Moon, rind Moon generally. First Quarter. Q Full Moon. O Last Quarter. 
^ Moon s ascending Node. 3 Descending Node. in Apogee farthest irom the Earth. 
^ in perigee nearest to the earth. Highest Moon farthest North. Lowest Moon 
farthest South, fy Saturn. 9 Venus. Near together. ^J Jupiter. $ Mercury. D^O 
apart. Opposition, or 180 apart. Mars. 7* Stars. Sun. $ Herschel. Neptune. 

Directions for finding the True Timj. 

The Sun. as we h ive stated before, is on the meridian at 12 o clock on four days only of the year. It is sometim 
much .is 1 i 1 , minutes K-fore or after twelve, when its shadow strikes the noon mark on the sun-dial. On each calendar 
ii lhis Alurina is shown the evi. t. tinr> when the sun reaches the meridian, or the shadow the noon mark : ami 
ik or watch correctly, it must, when it is noon by the sun dial or noon mark, he set at, the time 



ited ill the Almanac. Thus, on the 25th of January, when the sun is on the noon mark, ihe wa ch must > 
>2 minutes and 34 se,-o nds past 12, which will be the true time. Tho Practice of setting time-pieces h> the rising 
ttin, of the San <>r Moon, is not strictly correct ; as the unevenn, ss of the earth s surface and Intervening 
s. such as hills and forests, near the points of rising and settin : r. occasion a deviation, SIM from the 

time in the Almanac, which time is adapted to a smooth, level hori/.on. The only means Of Keeping correct 

time, is by the use of a noon-mark or a meridian-line. 

Astronomical Notes for 185G. 

Th ill run lowest this v,-ar on October 6th, to the 3rd degree of Sagittarius, having a deciinai \ m of 28 36 

1 " soirh H will run huhest October ISth, to the 3rd degree of Gemini, having a declination of 28 35 32.2 north. 

[90] 






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PAT IOS 




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ll e ti 
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time, i; 



Th j 1 



MACLEAR & CO. S CANADIAN ALMANAC. 



This declination is a maximum, by which the Moon can run north or south farther than the sun can. Longitude of 
Moon s Ascending Node, Jan. 1, is 30 11.1 , and December 31, it will be 10 51 4. Apparent Obliquity of Ecliptic July 
9, is 23 27 36.11". 

Distance of Sun, July 2nd, 96702364 miles. Its mean distance March 31, and Oct. 3rd is 96103800 miles. The Sun 
will be north of the equator this tropical year 186 days 11 h. 4 m., and south of it 178 d. 18 h. 47 m., shewing a differ 
ence of 7 d. 10 h. 17 m., caused by the slower motion of the earth when in or near the aphelion. 

Mercury will be brightest, and visible iu the west soon after sunset, about January 29, May 23, and Sept. 19. Also 
in the east just before sunrise about March IS, July 16, and November 5th. The first and last dates quite 
unfavourable. 

N. B. The constellation Pisces is the first sign in the zodiac. Aries was first once, but is now 30 east of the 
equinox. In consequence of not knowing this, some think the Almanac is wrong. 

TABLE, 

Shewing the Illuminated Portion of the Discs of Venus and Mars. 

The numbers given in this table represent the sizes of the Illuminated portion of the Discs the apparent diameters 
of the planets being considered at unity. 



1856. 


Venus. Mars. 


1856. 


Venus. 


Mars. 


January 15. 
February 14. 
March 15. 
April 15. 
May 15. 
June 15. 


-656 
-759 
-S38 
-903 
-052 
-986 


-907 
-9*5 
Q -985 
-991 
-933 
-886 


July 15. 
August 15. 
September 15. 
October 15. 
November 15. 
December 15. 


1 -000 
-992 
-9C4 
-922 
-864 
-792 


870 
-872 
-884 
-900 
-919 
-938 



Star Table. 

To ascertain when any star found in the following table will be on the meridian, add the numbers opposite in the 
left-hand column of figures to the preceding meridian transit of the north Star found in the calendar pages. For the 
RISING of a star, subtract the number opposite in the right-hand column of figures from its meridian passage. For the 

SETTING of a Star, add the same number to its meridian passage. Those marked ( ) revolve in a circle of perpetual 

apparition, and do not rise or set north of the latitude of Toronto (Lat. 43 39 35" N.) for which latitude the semi 
diurnal arcs are calculated and corrected. The civil day begins at the preceding midnight, and consequently 24 hours 
after midnight, or 12 hours from n ion, is morning of the succeeding day ; and 24 to 36 hours from noon, is evening of 
the next day. This table is arranged in the order of culmination. 



Stars. 


Constellation 


InMu 


K&S 


Stars. 


Donstellation 


InMe 


R&S 


Stars. 


Constellation 


InMe 


R&S 






i. m. 


a. m. 


*Pointers 




i. m. 


h. m. 






ii. m. 


h. m. 


Almaach 


Andromeda 


48 


9 50 


t rocyon 


?anis Minor 


6 24 


6 20 


Beta 


[Trsa Minor 


13 43 





Alpha 


Aries 


52 


7 33 


Pollux 


Gemini 


6 29 


8 3 


Zubenelg 


Libra 


14 1 


5 25 


Mini 


1 ht! Whale 


1 6 


5 46 


Acubens 


dancer 


6 51 


2 31 


Alphacca 


N. Crown 


14 20 


7 56 


Menkar 


The Whale 


1 48 


6 13 


Xaos 


The Ship 


7 43 


6 48 


Antares 


Scorpio 


15 12 


4 8 


Algol 


Perseus 


1 52 


9 36 


Alphard 


Hydra 


8 13 


5 28 


Alpha 


Hercules 


15 59 


6 56 


Algenib 


Perseus 


2 7 


... ... 


Regulus 


Leo 


8 53 


6 48 


Alpha 


Ophiuchus 


16 19 


6 48 


Alcyone 


7 Stars 


2 32 


7 38 


f Merak 1 ... 


Big Dipper 


9 45 





Vega 


Lyra 


17 23 


9 18 


Aldebaran 


Taurus 


3 21 


7 3 


(Dubhej 


Big Dipper 


9 47 


... ... 


Beta 


Lyra 


17 36 


8 33 


Cape! la 


Auriga 


3 51 


11 16 


Danebola 


Leo 


10 34 


7 


Altair 


Aquila 


IS :U 


6 31 


Rigel 


Orion 


4 1 


5 27 


Phad. 


Big Dipper 


10 38 


... ... 


Deneb 


Cygnus 


19 27 


10 43 


M Ivath 


Taurus 


4 10 


8 3 


Algorab 


The Crow 


11 14 


4 57 


Fomalhaut 


SFish 


21 40 


5 43 


lifllatrix 


Orion 


4 10 


6 23 


Alioth 


Big Dipper 


11 39 





Scheat 


Pegasus 


21 47 


7 57 


Mintaka 


1 Irion 


4 18 


5 58 


Spica 


Virgo 


12 9 


5 19 


Markab 


Pegasus 


21 48 


6 5(5 


Phaet 


The Dove 


4 2S 


3 18 


Mixar 


Big Dipper 


12 Id 





Vr. Equinox 


Pisces 


22 50 


5 59 


IViaKi uese 


Orion 


4 40 


6 27 


Benetnasch 


Big Dipper 


12 34 





Algimib 


Pegasua 


22 51) 


6 56 


Sirius 


Canis Minor 


5 32 


4 54 


Arcturus 


Bootes 


13 1 


7 20 


Schedir 


Cassiopeia 


23 22 




Castor 


Gemini 


6 18 


8 27 


Mirac 


Bootes 


13 30 


7 59 


Mirach 


Andromeda 


23 51 


s i s 



Explanation of the Articles in the Calendar. 

These Pages are calculated for Toronto, and for a point midway between Montreal and Quebec, which point is about 
on the latitude of Three Rivers and Fredericton. They will serve very accurately for every City and Town in the British 
Provinces and North America. 

THE SUN S RISING AND SETTING, is given in mean time; and for Toronto, it is corrected for a mean horizontal refraction 
of 36 min. 6.86 sec., of arc, and is also suited to the upper limb. Its declination is for mean noon. 

TUE MOON S RISING is given from Full to Change, and the Setting from Change to Full. 

MOON S PLACE. The symbols and numbers in this column indicate the Moon s place in the signs or Constellations of 
the Zodiac, to the nearest degree of longitude, at 7 o clock P. M. Toronto Time. Pisces being regarded ihejirst of the 
signs. 

MOON S AGE. This column shows to the nearest tenth of a day, the Moon s Age at noon, Toronto. 
MOON SOUTH. This column shows the time the Moon is " south," or in the meridian of Toronto, and is nearly the 
same for all parts of the Provinces. 

TWIUIIIT. This table shows at intervals of six days, the times of beginning of Twilight in the morning, and of the 
end at evening the sun, at the computed instants, being 8 degrees below the horizon. 

THE MOON S PHASES. This table shows the time for two meridians, when the Moon passes the geocentric longitudes 
of dg., 90 dg., 180 dg., and 270 dg., from the Sun. 

THE COLUMN OF " POLE STAR IN MERIDIAN," shows for every day in the year, the exact tune when the North Star 
makes its transit over the upper meridian of longitude, 5 h. 8 m. 12 s. west of Greenwich, and is sufficiently exact for 
ordinary use in all of the British Provinces. 

Th^ time of the Lower TRANSIT for any given day may be found by adding 11 h. 58 m. 2.045 s. to the time of the 
preceding Upper Transit. This column is designed to facilitate the computation of the Rising, Setting, and Meridian 
Passage of din brightest Fixed Stars, by using the numbers opposite the same in the Star Table. It will also be found 
of some service to surveyors and astronomers. When great exactness is required, the meridian passage of the Pole 
Star, for several places, may be obtained by applying the following corrections to the times expressed in the calendar 

[91] 



MACLEAR & CO. S CANADIAN ALMANAC. 



pages. For Toronto, subtract 2.55 seconds ; for Kingston, add 0.22 sec. ; for Montreal add 2.24 sec. ; for Quebec, add 3.36 
sec.; for Fredricton, add 6.32 sec.; and for Halifax, add 8.78 sec. 

The times of greatest eastern elongation of the Polar Star, may be found for any day by snlih-m-tiii/j the following 
constants from the time of Upper Transit; and the time of greatest Western elongation may be found by adding the 
game constants. For Toronto, 5 h. 53 m. 26.9 sec. ; fi-r Kingston, 5 h. 53 m. 21.4 sec. ; for Halifax, 5 h. 53 m. 15 sec; for 
Montreal 5 h. 53 m. 4.4 s. ; for Fredericton, 5 h. 52 m. 56.8 s. ; and for Quebec 5 h. 52 m. 46.75 s. In computing these 
constants, the mean polar distance of the North Star for 1855 was assumed at 1 28 , and the slight variations in that 
distance will not produce an error of more than two seconds in the constants, when the variations have their greatest 



Te re is not sufficient room for a table of the " Azimuth of G reatest Elongation " of the Pole Star. But this can be 
very easily found for any place by the following formula, the star s polar distance, and the co-latitude of the place wing 
known ; the former of which is given for every day in this Almanac. 

Log. Sine Azimuth = 10+ Log. Sine Polar distance Log. Sine co-Lat. 

Eclipses for tlie Year IS. 50. 

There will be two Eclipses of the sun, and two of the Moon this year as follows : 

I. A Total Eclipse of the Sun, April 5th, invisible. 

II \. partial Eclipse of the Moon, April 20th, in the morning, visible. The Moon will set in the Canada! at about 
5 h 9 m. with 1.2 digits eclipsed. Size at the Middle 8.544 digits on the northern limb, See the Table In-low. 

III. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, September 2Sth, invi.-iblu in Canada. 

IV. A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, October 13, in the Evening, visible. The Moon will rise at 5h. 11 m. with 
digits eclipsed. Size when largest, 11.976 digits on the Southern limb, gee the Table below. 



PLACES. 


j 4 
ECLIPSE OP APRIL 20. 


ECTLPffl OF OCT. 13. 


Begins. 


Middle. 


Middle. 


Ends. 




h. m. 
4 5 
3 20 
3 7 
I 49 
2 41 
2 40 
2 :;:> 
2 ",1 
2 30 
2 27 
2 25 
2 17 
2 14 
2 9 


h. m. 
5 37 
4 52 
4 39 
4 21 
4 16 
4 12 
4 7 
4 4 
4 2 
3 59 
3 57 
3 49 
2 46 
3 41 


h. m. 
7 25 
6 40 

6 27 
6 9 
6 4 
6 
5 55 
5 02 
5 50 
5 47 
5 45 
5 37 
5 34 
5 29 


h. m. 
8 59 
8 14 

8 1 
7 4:; 
7 38 
7 34 
7 21) 
7 26 
7 24 
7 21 
7 19 
7 11 
7 8 
7 3 


























London C. W 



mathematical Acknowledgements. 

We have the pleasure to notice a very large number of Solutions of the Problems in the Almanac for 1855 fron 

correspondents We connot print the Solutions for want of room, nor was this our design, as we do not 

intend fa Xffi Almanac take the place or character of a mathematical work. The Answers of the Problems will be 

^ubished and those who solve them correctly will be noticed. In examining the solutions, we have discarded 

Sstikw in the oner tions, where the principles of working were correct. In such cases we accord to the author the 

fur of a ri ht P soluUon We cannot pledge ourselves to look for such errors when the answers are wrong and 

n , ^nondents are requested to be very careful in the operations. In some instances we may have overlooked the 

Z-Hs of our coriespondens where their results have been wrong, not from any want of skill but from some snu.ll 

esZy have made The majority of the solutions sent were correct. Particular notice is due to M.-ssrs. Jordan, 

e Cowan Clar a Ph, Somerville and Sheehan, for full solutions, andfinely executed diagrams. > , e Rive tiwteifl 

of tZ sdums the answers n literal formula as far as possible, by which rules can be made. \\ e invite all to semi 

ll-sellted problems, with solutions on separate sheets of paper and it approved will 

S^hW SSSfSXX aftS^". theoretical. 

Persons who^ 

Toronto, before July 1st, 1850, will have the same publicly acknowledged mthe issue for lbu<. 

We have received correct solutions from our Correspondents as shown below :- 

^K^1^ 

. 29; 31, 32,1 , 34, 35,36, 3?; 38 39, 40, 41. 42, 43/44, 45, 46,47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, M, 65, 56, 57, 58, and Geom. 

P M;:. WH.LIAM COWAN, School Teacher, No. 6, Guelph Probs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 9 ^ 11 12 (in I ^l ^. ^ > 

S % % t fWffiA 5; S S $3; T^tf^WW^W^ ### ft 



w 

42, 43, 46, 48, 49, 50, 52, 53, 54, 56, and Geom. Prob. 1. 

NE, of St. James, and Teacher in No. 4, Onomla 1 ml*. 1 ,2. 3 .4 ,5 6, , , 80, 1, 12, II 14, 15, , 







Mr ROBERT SoMEimLLE, School Teacher, in Darlington. Probs .2, 5 6 7, 8 JO . 1*. 3i and Exs. I, 2, 3, 4, 6, ,, 
8 10 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20, 22, 24, 25, 26, 28, 29, 33, 40, 42, 4.5, 46, 48, 49, 50, 5.3, oi. 

[92] 



MACLEAR & CO. S. CANADIAN ALMANAC. 5 

Mr. JAMES A. LTNAM, Teacher, Pond Mills, Westminster, Probs. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 13, 17, 18, 22, 31, 32, 34; and 
Exs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20, 22, 26. 28, 29, 31, 33, 34, 37, 39, 40, 48, 49, 50, 53, 54, 56. 

Mr. WALTER HENDERSON, C. S. T., Wainfleet, Welland Co., Probs. 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 15. 31. 35; and Exs. 6, 8, 10, 
11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 23, 24, 26, 28, 29, 30, 34, 37, 40, 43, 46, 49, 54, 57. 

Mr. V. M. CLEMENTI, Peterboro, Exs, 4, 6, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15 16, 26, 29, 46, and Geoin Prob. 1. 

Mr. DENIS SMITH, Pensioner, No. 7 Tower, Quebec, Probs. 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 6, 8, 9, 10, and Exs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 
12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and Geom. Prob. 1. Also Prob, 19, in the Almanac of 1854. 

Mr. JAMES SUTHERLAND, of Carradoc. Probs. 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 17, 24. 29, 31, and Exs. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, II, 12, 13, 
14, 15, 16, 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 26, 28, 29, 30, 31, 34, 39, 40, 48, 50, 54, 56, and Geom. Prob. 1. 

Mr. THOMAS MAGINNIS, St. Andrews, Probs. 2, 5, 6, 7, 14, 22, and Exs. 6, 7, 8, 11. 12. 13, 14, 15, 16. 17, 19, 20, 22, 24 

2tj, 29, 30, 31, 46, 48, 49, 50, 54, 58. 

Mr. JAMLS MCCLELLAND, Teacher, No. 10, Scarborough, Probs. 1, 2, 5, 6, 10, 13, 22, and Exs. 1. 5, 6, 8, 48, and Geom. 
Prob. 1. 

Mr. JOSEPH OSBORNE, S. T., Enniskillen, Probs. 2, 5, 6, 22, 31, 32. 
Mr. JOHN JERRETT, S. T., of Elmgrove, Essa, Probs, 5, 6, 7, 10, 13, 22. 
MR. BENJAMIN WALDEN, C. S. T., Elginfield, Probs. 2, 5, 10, 22. 
Mr. THOMAS RAMAGE, Etobicoke Probs, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 14, 22. ,. 

Mr. JAMES GAHAN, York, Probs. 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, 31, 32, 33, and Exs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 

5, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 22, 24, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33. 

Mr. JOHN CAMPBELL, Teacher, Carradoc, Probs. 1, 2. 4. 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 22, 24, 29, 31, 32 , 34, (in part) 
and Exs. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 2(3, 28, 29, 30, 31, 34, 39, 40, 43, 44 
48, 49, 50, 53, 54, 55, 5t> and Geom. Prob. 1. 

MART CAMPBELL, of Carradoc, Probs. 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 11, 12 (in part), 13, 15, 22, 24, 31, 32, 34, (i > part.) 
Mr. CHARLES CAMPBELL, Mapleton, Prob. 8, and Exs. 1, 2, 5, 6, 7. 

Mr. GEORGE THOMSON, of Tuckersmith, Probs. 2, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 14. 15, 22; and Exs. 4. 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, 14. 15, 16, 19, 20, 

25, 28, 43, 56. 

Mr. NICHOLAS DOWN, S. T., Cobourg, Probs. 2, 5, 6, 7, 13. 14, 20, 31, 34.35, and Exs. 6, 13, 14, 15, 16, 26, 29, 40. 
Mr. GEORGE T. EVANS, C. S. T., Missouri West, Probs. 2, 5, 6, 9, 14, 15, 33, and Exs. 4, 5, 6. 7, 8. 10. 13, 14, 18, 19, 20. 
2i, 26, 29, 30, 33, 37, 40, 43, 46, 49, 50, and Geom. Prob. 1. 

Mr. JAMES DEVLIN, F.C. Teacher, Maidstone, Probs. 7, 20, 32, 35 ; and Exs. 10, 41. 
Mr. JOHN IRELAND, C. S. T., Deleware, Probs. 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 12, 31, 24, 13, 14, 15, 32, and Ex. 2. 

Mr. JOHN MILLS, C. S. T., Portsmouth, Probs. 2, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13, 14, 15, 16, 22, 28, 32, 34, 35. and Exs. 2, 4, 5, C, 8, 10, 
12, 13, 24, 25, 26, 28, 29, 33, 46. (Mr. Mills name, last year was printed Niles.) 

Mr. DAVID TROWBRIDGE, Waterburgh, N. Y., Probs. 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 19, 22, 21, 26, 28, 29, 30, 31, 33, 
35. 

Mr. WILLIAM MCDONNELL, P. L. S., St. Andrews, C. E., Probs. 2, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13, 14, 22, 31, 32, 35; and Exs 23456 
7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 19, 20, 24, 26, 29, 30, 34, 37, 39, 40, 43, 46, 48, 49, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58. 

_ Mr. A. C. OllEiLLET, of Wainfleet, Probs. 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 22, and Exs. 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 

lOj 16) 19, "2\jy 29, 30j 43 3 4o 3 48^ oOj 58. 

Mr. G. W. SHELDON, C. S. T., Harwich, Probs. 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 13, 16, and Exs. 1, 3, 5, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 24, 26, 29, 42, 40, 
and Geom. Prob. 1. ( 

Mr. BERNARD DE SCUDAMORE, Newburg, Probs. 1, 2, 5, 6, 9, 13, 14, 15, 17, 22, 24, 27, 28, 31, 32, 33, and Exs 1 2 3 4 

6, 7, 8, 11, 13, 16, 18, 19, 22, 24, 25, 28, 32, 37, 40, 42 ; 43, 44, 48, 49, 54. 

Mr. GEORGE L. LITTLEJOHNS, Yonge, Probs. 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 13, 22, 34, and Exs. 5, 13, 16, 29. 

Mr. MARSHALL MACKLIN, Sen., of Scarborough, Probs. 2, 5, 6, 10, 13, 31. 32, 34, 

Mr. WM. LEWIS, of Lorraine, Probs. 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 13. 

Mr. ARCHIBALD MCLELLAN, Dumfries, Probs. 2, 5, 6, 22. 

Mr. D. MURRAY, Junior, Montreal, Probs. 2, 5, 6. 

Mr. JAMES BURGESS, Etobicoke, Prob. 34. 

Mr. JAMES TURNBULL, EastZorra, Probs. 2,5, 6, 8,13, 22, and Exs. 1, 8, 12, 13, 16, 40, 49, 54^ and Geom. Prob. 1. 

Mr. JOHN CARET, Plympton, Probs. 1, 2, 5, 6, 10, 13, 14, and Exs. 4, 5, 6, 10, 28, and Geom. Prob. 1, and 32 of 1854, 
nearly. 

Mr. JAMBS R. DAVIS, Cobourg, Probs. 2, 6, 5, 22, 33, 35, and Exs. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 18 19 20 24 25 
26, 31, 29. 4J, 42, 43, 46, 49, 50, 53, 54, 56, 57, and Gem. Prob. 1. 

Mr. J UN JACQUES, of Scarboro, Probs. 6, 22, 5, 34, and Geom. Prob. 1. (in part.) 

Mr. JOHN MURRAT, St. Andrews, Probs. 2, 6, 22, and Exs. 8, 16, 24. 

Mr. DANIEL DONOGHUE, of Emily, Prob. 2, 5, 6. 

Mr. JOHN LORRANER, of Verulam, Prob. 2, 5, 10, 32. 

Mr. JAMES FURGUSON, of Kingston, Probs. 5, 6. 

Mr. CHARLES RTND, C. S. T., Blanshard, Probs. 2, 5, 6, 22, 32. 

Mr. WM. HARRIS, of Morris, Probs. 2, 5. 

Mr. PETER SCOTT, of Esquesing, P.obs. 5, 6, 31, 32, and Geom. Prob. 1. 

Mr. DONALD McGiLLis, of St. Andrews, Probs. 2, 6, 22; and Exs. 8, 11, 16. 

Mr. ANGUS MCDONALD, of St. Andrews, Probs. 2, 6, 7 ; and Exs. S, 20, 24, 26. 

Mr. WILSON S. WILLIAMS, of Grantham, Probs. 5, 6, 13, 10 ; Geom. Prob. 1, in part. 

Mr. MALCOLM CURRIE, S. T., Sunnidale, Probs. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8. 9, 22, 31, 32, 35 ; and 32 of 1854. 

NOTE. The Problems for 1854. 1855, and 1856, are, with a very few exceptions, entirely original with ourselves, and 
the formula we publish this year are also, for the most part new. It is quite possible that iii these there may be some 
errors, and if any we will thank our friends to point them out. We shall depend hereafter, upon the friends of the 
; Exact Science," for problems for the Mathematical department. 

Ju,y loth, 1855. SAMUEL H. WRIGUT. 

[93] 



JANUARY HAS THIRTY-ONE DAYS. 



[1856. 



3 












a 








Polar 




o 


Day of 
AVeek. 


Remarkable Events. 


ASTRONOMICAL NOTES. 


Distance 
of 


MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 










Pole Star. 




< 












1 


Tuesd. 


Oircumdsion. 


Mars near equator. 


/ // 

1 27 10 


PR. 1. It is required 


2 


Wed. 


(1) Ed. Burke born, 1730. 


Saturn South, 10.52 ev. 


1 27 10 


to divide 1 into four parts, 


3 


Thur. 


(4) Earthquake in Canada, 1663. 


Venus South, 8.52 mo. 


1 27 10 


such that the sum of the 


4 


Friday 


West Indies discovered, 1492. 


Venus near Moon. 


1 27 10 


square roots of the parts 


5 


Satur. 


Treaty bet n Britain & U. S. 1784. 


4th ^ in Aphelion. 


1 27 10 


will be to 1 as 17 to 11. 


6 


SUND. 


Epiphany. 


Moon farthest South. 


1 27 10 


PR. 2. In trying to 


7 


Mond. 


St. Anthony died, aged 105. 


Moon near Mercury. 


1 27 10 


find the largest number 


8 


Tuesd. 


St. Lucian. 


Venus in Scorpio. 


1 27 10 


that will divide two other 


9 


Wed. 


Mexican Independence, 1825. 


Saturn South, 10.22 ev. 


1 27 10 


numbers, without re 


10 


Thur. 


Penny Postage com. in Engl. 1840. 


Moon in perigee, 1J.6 ~]) 


1 27 10 


mainder, my quotients 


11 


Friday 


First Public Lottery drawn 1569. 


Moon near Neptune. 


4 27 10 


were 2, 3, 1, 2, 1, 5, 3. 


12 


Satur. 


Sir C. Bagot, Gov. Gen, 1842. 


Mars in Virgo. 


1 27 10 


Required those numbers. 


13 


SUND. 


1st Sunday after Epiphany. * 




1 27 10 


PR. 3. A can mow 1 


14 


Mond. 


Ilalley died 1742. 


Uranus in Taurus. 


1 27 10 


acre in 5 hours, B, 1J- 


15 


Tuesd. 


Gen. Wolfe born 1726. 


Saturn South, 9.57 eve. 


1 27 10 


acres in 8 hours and 


16 


Wed. 


Lindley Murray died 1826. 


Moon ^ Uranus. 


1 27 10 


C. 1 acre in 9j hours. In 


17 


Thur. 


Benjamin Franklin born 1706. 


Venus South 9.3 mo. 


1 27 10 


what time will they, 


18 


Friday 


Old Twelfth Day. 


Saturn near Moon. 


1 27 10 


working together, cut 9 


19 


Satur. 


(20) Amer. Indep. acknowl. 1783. 


Moon farthest North. 


1 27 10 


and five-sixth acres, and 


20 


SUND. 


Septuagesima. 


Sun enters Capricornus. 


1 27 10 


how much will each cut ? 


21 


Mond. 


Louis XVI. guillotined 1793. 


Jupiter in Aquarius. 


1 27 10 


PR. 4. How high 


22 


Tuesd. 


St. Vincent. 


Saturn South 9-27 eve. 


1 27 10 


above the earth s surface 


23 


Wed. 


Duke of Kent died, 1820. 




1 27 10 


must a man be to see \ 


24 


Thur. 


South Sea Bubble exploded, 1721. 


Moon near Regulus. 


1 27 10 


of its surface ? 


25 


Friday 


Conversion of St. Paul. 


Uranus stationary. 


1 27 10 


PR. 5. A globe whose 


26 


Satur. 


Jenner died 1823. 


Moon in Apogee. 


1 27 10 


diameter is 4 is dropped 


27 


SUND. 


Sexagesima. 


Saturn in Taurus. 


1 27 10 


into a conical glass full of 


28 


Mond. 


Admiral Byng shot, 1757. 


Mars near Moon. 


1 27 10 


water, its depth being 6 


29 


Tuesd. 


(30) The Life-boat first used, 1790. 


Saturn South, 8 58. ev. 


1 27 10 


and diameter 5. How 


30 


Wed. 


Charles I. beheaded, 1643. 


Venus South, 9.17 mo. 


1 27 10 


much water will run 


31 


Thur. 


Guy Fawkes executed, 1606. 


Mercury in Ascen. Node 


1 27 11 


over? 



PROS. 1. 
PROB. 2. 
PROB. 3. 



PROB. 4. 
PROB. 5. 



PROB. G. 
PROB. 7. 



ANSWERS TO THE PROBLEMS FOR 18">">. 

-1st $3382.705 ; 2nd $3872.875 ; 3rd $4744.42 Ans. 

-+=7-=-24= what both do in 1 day, and in 3 days will do 3X7-f-24=7|. Ans. 

-Let 4=a, then the side of the required pentugon=2a-=- 

=1.47263 feet Ans. 
Or 0-5-2.7162194=1.47263 Ans. 

-Let each side =12,=2<z, and x=side of the square required, then x=2 a (3 i/3) 
= 15.21539 Ans. 

-The heirs will share the estate in the ratio of 16,000, 12,000, and 8,000, or as 4. 3, 2 
Now 4+3+2=9. 

And 9:4:: 20,000 : 8888 8-9=1 st. ) 
" 9:3:: 20,000 : 6G66 2-3=2nd. [ Ans. 
" 9:2:: 20,000 : 4444 4-9=3rd. J 

-24+l=sum of extremes. 25X24-n2=300 Ans. 



^ 
T 

46 



9 
10 



13 
20 



46 
: 20 



46 



13 



Novr 2 =l= 



A. s work. 



18 



~2 ===r twice B s 



46 



and ~ 



15 



PROB. 8. 



4 

20 ~ X ^>0 = T 

once the work of each will be J, \, and f, and they must share the pay in 
ratio, which is as 10, 5, and 8. Again 10+5+8=23. Now 23 : 10 : : 26.45 
$11.50=A. s, 23 : 5 : : 26,45 : $5.75=B. s, and 23 : 8 : : 26.45 $9.20=C. s Ans. 
-Let 18=a, then the side of the square =^ay/2=12.7279 Ans. 

[94] 



Second Winter Month. 



JANUARY, 1856. 



MOON S PHASES. 


D. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Twilight or Daylight lee/ins and ends at 


X 

-: 

- 

1 

[1! 

20 
30 


Toronto. 


Halifax. (Montreal. (Fredrict ii 


Quebec. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End. 

P. M. 


Beg. 

\. M. 


End. 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End. 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End. 

L>. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End. 

P. M. 




7 
1 ! 
21 
30 
10 
26 


h m 
6 Oev 
10 25 mo 
10 11 ev 
3 17 mo 
4 45 mo 
3 45 mo 


h m 
6 32 ev 
10 58 mo 
10 44 ev 
3 50 mo 
5 17mo 
4 17 mo 


) First Quarter ... 
O Full Moon 
O Last Quarter ... 
(T Perigee... 


h m 
5 50 
5 50 
5 47 

5 41 


h rii 
6 17 
I. 2- 
6 35 
6 4fi 


\ m 
5 52 

- 2: 
5 48 
5 41 


h m 
6 16 
6 24 
6 34 
6 43 


h m 
5 53 
5 52 
5 49 
o 41 


h m 
G 14 
6 24 

6 33 
r> 45 


A W< 

5 54 
5 54 
j 5( 

> 43 


4 w 

-> ]:; 
G 22 

ti 44 


h m 
.-> >< 
r, 55 
.-> 5<> 
5 43 


A 7rt 

G 12 

G 21 
G 31 
7 44 


(T -Anocree.. 



Ephemeris of the Planets* &<: 





Vjnus 


Marri 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Sun s 


Sun s 


Venus 


Mars 


.Jupit r 


Saturn 


Venus 


Mars .lupit r 


Saturn 


Day Mo. 


S. uth 


South 


South 


South 


Longi 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Decl. 


Decl. Bed. 


Decl. 




Morn 


Morn. 


Even. 


Even. 


tude. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Aseen. 


Ascen 


South 


South. South 


-North. 




h m 


A m 


h m 


h m 


o / 


A n, 


i m 


A m 


A m 


A 17 


o / 


/ / 


/ 


1 ... 


8 51 


5 53 


3 31 


10 56 


281 33 


18 4t 


15 33 


12 34 


22 13 


5 4C 


16 H 


L 1212 7 


22 11 


7 ... 


8 55 


5 39 


3 12 


10 31 


286 40 


19 11 


16 1 


12 43 


22 18 


5 3 


17 4( 


2 611 41 


22 11 


13 ... 


9 OC 


5 23 


2 53 


10 5 


292 47 


19 3S 


16 29 


12 52 


22 23 


5 31 


19 t 


2 6411 14 


22 11 


19 ... 


9 5 


5 8 


2 34 


9 40 


298 54 


20 4 


16 58 


13 G 


22 28 


5 3c 


20 IS 


3 38 10 45 


22 11 


25 ... 


9 11 


4 51 


2 15 


9 15 


305 


20 21 


17 28 


13 7 


22 33 


5 33 


21 8 4 15 10 16 


22 11 


31 ... 


9 18 


4 33 


1 57 


8 50 


311 5 


20 54 


17 58 


13 13 


22 38 


5 32 


21 39 4 47|9 45 


22 12 




Day of 
Week. 


t 


Calendar for 




Calendar for 


DEPARTMENT FOR ALL OF UPPER AND I.OWKR CANADA. 


1 


- 


Upper Canada and 


Lower Canada and 


a 


> 


Nora Scotia. 


New Brunswick. 


Pole Star 


Shadow at 


Mu s 


Moon 


Moon s 


Sun s 


^ 





.1UU 





uu 




ion 


Suii 


Sun 


Moon 


in Meridian 


Noon Mark. 


Age 


South. 


Place at 


iVcIi nation 


A 


- 


, <ises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Evening. 


Evening. 


N oon. 


Morn. 


7 P. M. 


South. 










A m 


A 


m 


A 


m 


A 


m 


A m 


A R 


h m 


s 


h 


771 * 


days 


A m 


S. 


o 


/ // 


1 


Tuesd 




7 36 


! 


32 




52 


7 48 


4 20 


54 


6 23 


20 


12 


3 42 


23.3 


6 38 


TO 27 


23 


2 26 


2 


Wed 


. 


2 


7 36 


1 


33 


1 


55 


7 48 


4 21 


1 58 


6 19 


23 


12 


4 11 


24.3 


7 20 


== 10 


22 


57 21 


3 


1 hur. 




7 36 


1 


34 


3 


1 


7 48 


4 22 


3 7 


6 15 


2612 


4 39 


25. ?, 


8 6 


do. 22 


22 


51 49 


4 


Frida y 




7 36 


1 


35 


1 


12 


7 47 


4 23 


4 20 


6 11 


29 1 2 


5 6 


26.3 


8 56 


ttl (: 


22 


45 49 


5 


Satin- 


. 


7 36 


; 


36 


5 


26 


7 47 


4 24 


5 36 


6 7 


33 


12 


5 34 


27.3 


9 51 


do. 19 


22 


39 23 


6 


SUND. 





7 36 


1 


37 


G 


37 


7 47 


4 25 


6 48 


6 3 


36 


12 


6 


28.3 


10 51 


f ; ; 


20 


30 30 


7 


Mond. 


7 


7 35 


1 


38 


Sets 


7 47 


4 2G 


Sets. 


5 59 


39 


12 


6 27 


29.3 


11 54 


do. 17 


2-2 


25 9 


8 


Tues I. 


- 


7 35 


1 


39 


5 


2G 


7 47 


4 28 


5 16 


5 55 


42 


12 


6 53 


0.7 


Ev.56 


V? 2 




17 23 


9 


Wed 


. 


i 




7 35 




40 


6 


46 


7 47 


4 29 


6 39 


5 51 


45 


12 


7 18 


1.7 


1 57 


do. 17 


22 


9 10 


10 


I hur. 


U 


7 35 


1 


41 


8 


8 


7 46 


4 30 


8 3 


5 47 


49 


12 


7 43 


2.7 


2 53 


/wt- ^ 


22 


31 


11 


I ridny 


i i 


7 34 


i 


42 


9 


27 


7 46 


4 31 


9 25 


5 43 


52 


12 


8 7 


3.7 


3 45 


do. 1C 


21 


51 26 


12 


.Satin-. 


L2 


7 34 


; 


43 


10 


45 


7 46 


4 32 


10 44 


5 39 


55 


12 


8 31 


4.7 


4 35 


X 


21 


41 55 


13 


SUND. 


Li 


7 34 


i 


45 


11 


57 


7 45 


4 34 


11 59 


5 35 


58 


12 


8 54 


5.7 


5 22 


do. 15 


21 


32 


14 


Mou 1. 


i i 


7 33 


1 


46 


Morn 


7 45 


4 36 


Morn 


5 32 


2 


12 


9 16 


6.7 


6 10 


do. 29 


21 


21 39 


15 


I uesd. 


: 


7 33 


1 


47 


1 


12 


7 44 


4 37 


1 16 


5 28 


5 


12 


9 38 


7.7 


6 59 


<Y> 12 


21 


10 54 


16 


Wed 




H 


7 32 


; 


48 


i 


24 


7 43 


4 38 


2 31 


5 24 


8 


12 


9 59 


8.7 


7 50 


do. 2G 


20 


59 45 


17 


Thurs. 


i: 


7 31 


t 


50 


3 


40 


7 42 


4 39 


4 45 


5 20 


11 


12 


10 19 


9.7 


8 43 


8 9 


20 


48 11 


18 


Friday 


18 


7 31 


I 


51 


4 


47 


7 42 


4 40 


4 57 


5 16 


1512 


10 38 


10.7 


9 38 


do. 2 2 


20 


:?( 14 


19 


Sahir. 


1! 


7 30 


i 


52 


5 


51 


7 41 


4 41 


6 3 


5 12 


1812 


10 57 


11.7 


10 34 


n 4 


20 


23 54 


20 


BUND. 


21 


7 ^70 


i 


53 


G 


47 


7 40 


4 42 


6 59 


5 8 


2112 


11 15 


12.7 


11 29 


do. 17 


20 


11 10 


21 


Mond. 


.: 


7 2< ; 


! 


55 


Rises 


7 39 


4 43 Rises 


5 4 


2412 


11 33 


13.7 


Morn 


do. 30 


19 


58 4 


22 


Tuesd. 


.::. 


7 28 


1 


56 


5 


26 


7 38 


4 45 


5 17 


5 


28 


12 


11 49 


14.7 


21 


25 12 


19 


44 36 


23 


Wed. 


- 



7 27 


i 


57 


6 


30 


7 37 


4 47 


6 24 


4 56 


31 


12 


12 5 


15.7 


1 9 


do. 24 


19 


30 46 


24 


Thurs. 


24 


7 26 


! 


59 


7 


32 


7 36 


4 48 


7 28 


4 52 


34 


12 


12 20 


16.7 


1 54 


SI 6 


19 


16 31 


25 


Fri lay 


>- 


7 25 


5 


00 


8 


34 


7 35 


4 50 


8 32 


4 48 


37 


12 


12 34 


17.7 


2 36 


O\J 

do. 18 


19 


2 1 


26 


Salur. 




7 24 


5 


01 


g 


86 


7 34 


4 52 


9 35 


4 44 


4112 


12 47 


18.7 


3 16 


do. 30 


18 


47 7 


27 


SUND. 


27 


7 23 


5 


03 


LO 


30 


7 33 


\ 63 


10 32 


4 40 


4412 


13 


19.7 


3 55 


TO 11 


18 


31 52 


2S 


Mond. 


28 


7 22 


5 


04 


11 


37 


7 32 


4 5 1 


11 41 


4 36 


4712 


13 12 


20.7 


4 34 


do. 2:! 


18 


16 18 


29 


Tuesd 


2< 


7 21 


5 


06 


Morn 


7 31 


4 56 


Morn 


4 32 


51 12 


13 23 


21.7 


5 14 


*, 5 


18 


23 


30 


Wed 


! 


7 20 


5 


07 




43 


7 30 


48 


4 28 


6412 


13 33 


22.7 


5 57 


do. 18 


17 


44 9 


31 


Thurs. 


11 


7 19 


: > 


08 


: 


53 


7 29 


4 59 2 


4 24 


5712 


13 42 


23.7 


6 44 


do. 3017 


27 37 



PROS. 6. The bulge diameter of a cheese is 
19 inches, and side diameter 18 inches. It is 
G in. deep at the C l ics, ;md 7 in. at the centre of 
the side.s. Required its ^<ilid contents. 

I IIOB. 7. The three lines drawn from the 
angles of a triangle perpendicular to the oppo 



site sides, meet in a point if the length oftlieso 
lines from the angles to the point where th; 
meet are 1, j/6, and -j/6 respectively, it ii 
required to determine the sides of the triangle 
by quadratic equations. 

PROB. 8. Given z 4 2x 3 -fx=2, to find z. 



[95] 



8 



FEBRUARY HAS TWENTY-NINE DAYS. 



[1856. 



| DayofMonthll 


Day of 

\\ ut k. 


Remarkable Events. 


ASTRONOMICAL NOTES. 


Polar 
Distance 
of 
Pole Star. 


MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 










o / // 




1 


Friday 


Vork Cathedral Fired 1829. 


g Gr. elong. E. 1817 / 


1 27 11 


PROS. 9. The sides of 


2 


Satur. 


C andlciiic.<. 


Saturn South 8 42 ev. 


1 27 11 


a triangle are 13, 14, 


3 


SUND. 


/tar/esima. 


Venus near Moon morn 


1 27 11 


and 15. If a line drawn 


4 


Mond. 


3) Spanish Inquisition abol. 1813. 


$ in perihelion [lowest 


1 27 11 


parallel to the longest 


5 


Tuesd. 


Shrove Tuesday. 


Venus farthest South. 


1 27 11 


side cuts off an area of 


G 


Wed. 


.Ix/i Wednesday. 


$ 90 East of Sun. 


1 27 11 


24, what are the sides 


7 


Thur. 


Mary Queen of Scots beh. 1587. 


5 perigee. 5^ g&2 


1 27 11 


enclosing the area ? 


8 


Friday 


I ythagoras born, 586 B.C. 


Neptune near Moon. 


1 27 12 


PROB. 10. How much 


9 


Satur. 


(lO)Queen Victoria married, 1840 


Saturn South 8-13 eve. 


1 27 12 


more surface will a circle 


10 
11 
12 


80ND. 

Mond. 
Tuesd. 


\.st Sunday in Lent. 
\Vashington born, 1733. 
Lady Jane Grey & husb. beh. 1551. 


Venus in Sagittarius. 
Venus South, 9-31 mo. 
Moon near Uranus. 


1 27 12 
1 27 12 
1 27 12 


contain than a square, 
the perimeter of each 
being 400 rods ? 


13 
14 
15 
1C 

17 


Wed. 
Thur. 
Friday 
Satur. 
SUND. 


Massacre of Glencoe, 1691. 
V. Valentine. 
Xational Debt of Eng. com. 1500. 
17)Michael Angelo died, 1564. 
2nd Sunday in Lent. 


Mars in Virgo. 
Jupiter in Aquarius. 
Moon near Saturn. 
Moon farthest North. 
Inf. ($ Sun. 


1 27 12 
1 27 13 
1 27 13 
1 27 13 
1 27 13 


PROB. 11. If 3 J times 
3J yards cost H times li 
dollars, what will \ times 
theoftheofl2fyard? 


18 


Mond. 


Martin Luther died, 1546. 


Saturn South 7.37J ev. 


1 27 13 


cost ? 


19 


Tuesd. 


ialileo born, 1564. 


Sun enters Aquarius. 


1 27 14 


PROB. 12. How many 


20 


Wed. 


Voltaire born, 1694. 


Moon near Regulus. 


1 27 14 


acres of land in a tract 


21 


Thur. 


Archbishop Cranmer burnt 1556. 


Saturn South 7.26 CT. 


1 27 14 


bounded by the parallels 


22 


Friday 


jir Joshua Reynolds died 1792. 


Moon in Apogee. 


1 27 14 


of 40 and 50 of north 


23 


Satur. 


Louis Philippe abdicated 1848. 


Jj stationary. 


1 27 14 


latitude, and by the me 


24 


SUND. 


Ird Sunday in Lent. 


Mars stationary. 


1 27 15 


ridians of 80 and 90 of 


25 


Mond. 


Sir Christopher Wren died, 1723. 


(24) Moon near Mars. 


1 27 15 


longitude ? 


26 


Tuesd. 


Vapoleon escaped from Elba, 1815 


Venus South 9.49 mo. 


1 27 15 


PROB. 13. How many 


27 


Wed. 


ias used in London streets, 1829. 


Saturn South 7.2 eve. 


1 27 15 


balls in a triangular pile, 


28 


Thur. 


27) Sir J. Colborne, Adm. 1838. 


Saturn in Taurus. 


1 27 16 


there being 12 on each 


29 


Friday 


"ntercalated Day. 


Mercury stationary. 


1 27 16 


side of the base ? 



ANSWERS TO THE PROBLEMS FOR 1855. 

PROB. 9. Let 20=fl, then the side of the octagon =a( T /2 1)=8.28427 Ans. 

PROB. 10. 814467.504 Ans. 

PROB. 11. Let r=4000X r >280 feet; <7=32, then the time = ,} (3.1416) /r-:- ^=1272.81 

seconds, Ans. 

Velocity 1 /^-=400 j/4246=26064-533 feet Ans. 

PROB. 12. Number of bounds will be infinite. Distance moved 36 feet, or 24 feet in descent, and 
12 in ascent. The times of ascent and descent are computed in conformity to the 
law of falling bodies, and it (the time) is =5.034472866 seconds, or about l-12th 
of a minute, Ans. 

PEOB. 13. (3X3X 14 X 4 X 9 X 1 2)-K18X5X 15 X i X 6 )= 9 3-5 hours Ans. 
PR<>B. 14 



PROB. 15. 
. 16. 



PROB. 17. 



-Dividing line =13,583 inches. Length of the pieces 5.C676894 feet, and 6.3323106 
feet, Ans. 

-Let z= radius of semicircle, then xy / 2=radius of quadrant. Now z 2 =j/a=10, in 
which the area 100=a. Hence diameter =20, Ans. ; and a: 1 /2=14.142136 Ans. 

-The length of x>lane must be twice the height, since the sine of 30=. , radius. Now 
let x=the height, then 1 /(2X32J r X 2: )= 600 ? hence 64J=8600, and z==6596. 
feet, and twice this=11191.71 feet, Ans. 

Let32=t/, 43=a, 45=6, 40=c, and the required height _:.r= / ( a 

V ) 

a 2_j_ 6 2_j_ c 2) j I 37.974f cc t Ans. 
[96] 



Third Winter Month. 



FEBRUARY, 1856. 



9 



MOON PHASES. 


I). 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Twilight or Daylight begins and ends at 


Toronto. 


Halifax, i Montreal. 


t redrictnj Quebec. 


Beg. 

^ A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


Knot 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


niud 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


hnd 

P. M. 




( 

12 
21 

21 

- . 

>- 


i m 
5 19 mo 
8 54 ev 
4 23 ev 
8 24 ev 
9 21 mo 
1 45 ev 


h m 
5 51 mo 
9 27 ev 
4 55 ev 
8 56 ev 
9 53 mo 
2 17 ev 


O First Quarter ... 
O Full Moon 
O Last Quarter ... 
"\\ Perisree . 


h m 
15 39 

105 29 
205 14 

28J5 2 


h m 
6 48 
6 59 
7 14 

7 22 


h m 
5 39 
5 30 
5 16 
5 2 


h m 
6 48 
6 59 
7 12 
7 23 


h m 
5 49 
5 30 
5 16 

5 2 


A m 
6 47 
6 59 
7 12 

7 22 


A m 
5 41 
5 30 
5 16 
5 1 


h m 
6 47 
6 59 
7 12 

7 25 


h m 
5 41 
5 30 
5 16 
5 


h m 
6 47 
6 59 

7 12 
7 25 


J) Apotree 



JGpIiemcris of tlie Planets, &c. 





Vc-iius 


Mara 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Buns 


Bull s 


\ onus 


Mars 


Jupit i 


saturu 


\ en us 


-Mars 


.) uplt 1 


saturn 


Day Mo. 


South 


South 


South 


South 


Longi 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 




Morn. 


Morn 


Even. 


Even. 


tude. 


Ascen 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


South. 


South. 


South. 


North. 




h m 


h n 


i h m 


h 


m 


o / 


h, m 


h m 


h m 


h m i 


\ m 


o / 


/ 


o 


/ 


/ 


1 ... 


9 19 


4 31 


) 1 54 


8 


16 


312 6 


20 58 


18 3 


13 14 


22 39 


5 32 


21 43 


4 52 


9 


40 


22 12 


7 ... 


9 26 


4 1. 


2 I 35 


8 


-2 


318 11 


21 23 


18 34 


13 18 


22 44 


5 31 


21 49 


5 15 


9 


! 


22 12 


13 ... 


9 34 


3 5 


2 1 17 


7 


57 


324 15 


21 4b 


19 5 


13 22 


22 49 


5 30 


21 33 


5 31 


8 


37 


22 13 


19 ... 


9 41 


3 3 


3 1 2 


7 


8 i 


330 18 


22 10 


19 36 


13 24 


22 54 


5 30 


20 54 


5 39 


8 


4 


22 14 


25 ... 


9 48 


3 


7 41 


7 


LO 


336 20 


22 35 


20 7 


13 25 


23 


5 30 


19 54 


5 39 


7 


31 


22 15 


29 ... 


9 52 


2 5 


1 28 


6 


54 


340 21 


22 47 


20 27 


13 24 


23 3 


5 30 


19 2 


5 34 


7 


o 


22 16 


I 

M 


Duv of 


S 


Calendar for 
Upper Canada and 


Calender for 
Lower Canada and 


DEPARTMENT FOR ALL or UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 




\Veek. 


V 


Nova Scotia. 




New Brunswick. 


Pole Star 


Shadow at 


Mn s 


Moon 


Moon s 


Sun s 









^ 


SUIl 


BUIl 


AlOOll 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


n Meridiai. 


Soon Mark. 


Age 


South, 


Place at 


Declination 


,5 






.- 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Evening. 


Evening. 


\oon. Morn. 


7 P. M. 


South. 










h m i 


i m 


- 


m 


h 


m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


s 


h 


m s 


days h m 


S 





o 


/ // 


1 


Friday 


12 


7 18 


3 10 


8 


2 


7 28 


3 


3 12 


4 21 





2 


13 51 


24.1 7 35! 


n\, 


13 


17 


10 45 


2 


IT 

Satur. 


337 17 


3 11 


4 


147 26 


3 2 


4 24 


4 17 


o 
O 


2 


13 59 


25. 7 8 32: 


do. 


27 


16 


53 36 


3 


SUND. 


347 16 


5 13 


5 


22 


7 25 


5 3 


5 34 


4 13 


7 


2 


14 6 


26. 7 9 33 


/ 11110 


36 8 


4 


Mond. 


357 14 


5 14 


6 


197 23 


5 5 


6 31 


4 9 


1C 


!2 


14 12 


27. 7 10 35 


do. 


25 


16 


18 23 


5 


Tuesd. 


367 13 


5 16 


Sets 


7 22 


3 6 


Sets 


4 5 


18 


L2 


14 17 


28.711 38 


itf 


10 


16 


22 


6 


Wed. 


J7 


7 12 


3 17 


5 


40 


7 20 


3 8 


5 34 


4 1 


i; 


12 


14 22 


0. 3ev. 27 


do. 


25 


15 


42 3 


7 


Thur. 


:- 


7 11 


3 18 


7 


37 


L9 


3 9 


7 


3 57 


20 


L2 


14 26 


1.3 1 33 


AMI 

vw 


10 


15 


23 9 


8 


Friday 


!9 


7 8 


5 19 


s 


29 


7 


L9 


3 11 


8 27 


3 53 


2S 


12 


14 28 


2. 3 2 25 


do. 


25 


15 


4 39 


9 


Satur. 


in 


7 7 


3 21 


9 


41 


7 


17 


5 13 


9 41 


3 49 


27 


12 


14 31 


3.3 3 16 


X 


10 


14 


45 34 


10 


SUND. 


M 


7 6 


3 22 


10 


57 


7 


16 


3 14 


11 1 


3 45 


30 


12 


14 32 


4. 3 4 5 


do. 


25 


14 


26 14 


11 


Mond. 


12 


7 4 


3 24 


Morn 


7 


16 


3 15 


Morn 


3 41 


38 


L2 


14 32 


5. 3 4 55 


r 


9 


14 


6 39 


12 


Tuesd. 


I:; 


7 3 


5 25 




12 


7 


i i 


5 16 


18 


3 37 


37 


L2 


14 32 


6. 3 5 46 


do. 


22 


13 


46 51 


13 


Wed. 


44 


7 2 


3 27 


1 


27 


7 


12 


3 18 


1 36 3 33 


40 


12 


14 31 


7. 3 6 39 


8 


6il3 


26 49 


14 


Thur. 


45 7 1 


3 28 


2 


397 


9 


5 20 


2 48! 3 29 


44 


12 


14 29 


8.3 7 34 


do. 


19 


13 


6 35 


15 


Friday 


4(17 


5 29 


3 


467 


8 


5 21 


3 57 


3 25 


47 


12 


14 27 


9. 3 8 30 


n 


1 


12 


46 8 


16 


Satur . 


176 58 


5 31 


I 


457 


i: 


5 23 


4 47 


3 21 


5< 


12 


14 23 


10. 3 9 24 


do. 


14 


12 


25 28 


17 


SUND. 


486 56 


5 32 


5 


337 


5 


5 2:; 


5 45 


3 17 


54 


L2 


14 19 


11.310 16 


do. 


26 


12 


4 37 


18 


Mond. 


496 55 


5 33 


6 127 


3 


* ) 


6 22 


3 13 


57 


12 


14 14 


12.311 5 


25 


9 


11 


43 34 


19 


Tuesd. 


506 53 


5 35 


6 45 


7 


2 


5 26 


6 53 


3 10 


1 


12 


14 9 


13.311 51 


do. 


21 


11 


22 20 


20 


Wed. 


516 52 


5 36 


Rises 


7 





5 28 


Rises 


3 6 


4 


12 


14 3 


14. 3 Morn 


SI 


3 


11 


56 


21 


Thur. 


526 50 


5 37 


6 25 


6 


58 


5 30 


6 22 


3 2 


8 


12 


13 56 


15.3 


34 


do. 


15 


10 


39 22 


22 


Friday 


536 49 


5 39 


7 266 


51 


5 32 


7 25 


2 58 


11 


12 


13 48 


16.3 


1 14 


do. 


26 


10 


17 38 


23 


Satur. 


546 47 


5 40 


8 276 


j 


5 3:, 


8 28 


2 54 


14 


1-2 


13 40 


17.3 


1 53 


TTJ> 


O 


9 


55 44 


24 


SUND 


556 45 


5 42 


9 306 


54 


5 34 


9 32 


2 50 


18 


12 


13 32 


18.3 


2 32 


do. 


20| 9 


33 41 


25 


Mond. 


566 44 


5 4: 


10 326 


:>l 


5 35 


10 37 


2 46 


22 


12 


13 22 


19.3 


3 12 


-A- 


2 


9 


11 30 


26 


Tuesd. 


576 42 


5 44 


11 386 


r, 


5 37 


11 45 


2 42 


25 


12 


13 12 


20.3 


3 53 


do. 


14 


8 


49 10 


27 


Wed. 


586 40 


5 46 


Morn 


6 


17 


5 39 


Morn 


2 38 29 


12 13 2 


21.3 


4 38 


do. 


26 


8 


26 42 


28 


Thur. 


596 39 


5 4" 


486 45 


5 41 


56 


2 34 3-_ 


12 12 51 


22.3 


5 26 


TTL 


9 


8 


4 7 


29 


Friday 


606 38 


5 48 


576 


! 


5 42 


1 7 


2 30 36 


12 12 4C 


23.3 


6 19 


do. 


22 


7 


41 25 



PROS. 14. A loaf of bread in the shape of a 
hemisphere of radius 9=a, is to be baked until 
it is half crust, which must be of the same 
thickness top and bottom. How thick will it be? 

PUOB. 15. Required the dimensions of the 
strongest rectangular beam that can be sawed 
from a log 4 feet in diameter. 

PROB. 16. A bar of iron of uniform dimen 



sions, weighing 300 Ibs., is fastened to a vertical 
wall at one end by a hook, the other end being 
attached to a pulley fixed in a horizontal line 
with the hook, and at a distance from it equal 
to the length of the bar. If the pulley rope 
have a weight of 100 Ibs. attached to it, what 
angle of inclination to the horizon will the bar 
take? 

[97] 



10 



MARCH HAS THIRTY-ONE DAYS. 



[1856. 



ofMonthll 


Day of 

Week. 


Remarkable Events. 


ASTRONOMICAL NOTES. 


Polar 

Distance 
of 


MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 


5 1 








Pole Star. 




P 




















/ // 




1 

3 
4 
o 
6 

7 
8 


Satur. 
SUND. 
Mond. 
Tuesd., 
Wed. 
Thur. 
Friday 
Satur. 


St. David. 
Un Sunday in Lent. 
( 2) Emperor of Russia died, 1855 
First Congress of U. S. 1789. 
(6) York changed to Toronto, 1834 
Michael Angelo born, 1475. 
Bank of Eng. stopped paym. 1797 
Raphael born 1483. 


Saturn South 6.51 ev. 
Moon farthest South. 
Venus in Desc. Node. 
Moon near Venus & $ 
Jupiter <4 Sun. 
Moon perigee, ^ ^ 
in Desc. Node. 
Saturn South 6.24 ev. 


1 27 16 
1 27 16 
1 27 17 
1 27 17 
1 27 17 
1 27 17 
1 27 18 
1 27 18 


PROB. 17. Two wheels 
whose diameters are 48 
and 6, stand upright and 
touch each other at their 
rims. If they stand upon 
the same level, where 
will they touch ? 


9 
10 
11 


SUND. 
Mond. 
Tuesd. 

ITT -I 


Wi Sunday in Lent. 
(9) David Rizzioassass. 1566. 
Benjamin West died, 1820. 


Uranus near Moon. 
Saturn South 6.16 ev. 
Mars in Virgo. 


1 27 18 
1 27 18 
1 27 19 


PROB. 18. Required 
the surface and solidity 
of a solid that will ex 


12 

13 
14 
15 


\V ed. 
Thur. 
Friday 
Satur. 


Priestly born, 1733. 
14) York (Toronto)market 1. 1814 
Klopstock died 1803. 
16) Battle of Culloden, 1746. 


Venus South 10.4 Mo. 
Saturn 90 E. of Sun. 
Moon Highest. 
Jupiter in Aquarius. 


1 27 19 
1 27 19 
1 27 20 
1 27 20 


actly fill the largest 
square hole that can be 
made through a globe 2 
feet in diameter. 


16 


SUND. 


Palm Sunday. 


Saturn in Taurus. 


1 27 20 




17 


Mond. 


St. Patrick. 


^Jonly 1 from Neptune 


1 27 20 


PROB. 19. If a wheel 


18 


Tuesd. 


Princess Louisa born, 1848. 


Moon near Regulus. 


1 27 21 


5 feet in diameter rolls 


19 
20 


Wed. 
Thur. 


Le Brun born, 1618, died 1690. 
F. Stone Toronto Exch. laid, 1855 


Mercury in Aphelion. 
Sun enters Pisces. 


1 27 21 
1 27 21 


10J- times over, how far 
will a spike in the tire 


21 

22 


Friday 
Satur. 


Good Friday. 
Goethe died, 1832. 


20th. Moon in apogee. 
Moon near Mars. 


1 27 22 
1 27 22 


move, and what space 
will it enclose at each 


23 


SUND. 


Easter Sunday. 


Uranus in Taurus. 


1 27 22 


revolution ? 


24 


Mond. 


Earl of Chesterfield died, 1773. 


Venus in Aquarius. 


1 27 22 




25 


Tuesd. 


Lady Day. 




1 27 23 


PROB. 20. If a circle 


26 


Wed. 


Duke of Cambridge born, 1819. 


Venus South, 10.16 mo. 


1 27 23 


2 feet in diameter revolve 


27 


Thur. 


Gunpowder introduced, 1380. 




1 27 23 


around a line tangent to 


28 
29 


Friday 
Satur. 


Canada ceded to France, 1632. 
Siege of Acre, 1799. 


Moon farthest South. 


1 27 24 
1 27 24 


its circumference, what 
will be the surface and 


30 
31 


SUND. 
Mond. 


1st Sunday after Easter. 
Beethoven died 1827 


near Neptune. 
Venus South 10.19 mo. 


1 27 24 
1 27 25 


solidity of the body pro 
duced ? 



ANSWERS TO THE PROBLEMS FOR 1855. 
PROB. 18. Let 28=a, 30=6, 34=c, 60=d, and length of pole=z, 

Then z= / j 1 ( a 

=42.36144 feet, Ans. 

Let the distances from the corners to the foot of the pole be y, z, and s, then 

y= ~d^ { " (~ a b ~~ IV ~ ^ 2 +a 4 +^+c 4 +^+^ ( 2 J -f 6 2 +c 2 ) ) 
=31-7882 feet Ans. 



=29.90804 feet, Ans. 

and s- / ! J ( a^ 2 6 2 c 2 a=c 



2 2c 2 )) ] 



25-2684 feet, Ans. 

PROB. 19. Let P=30 Ibs., a=6, and $ of 4=6, then the horizontal force on the upper hinge 
outward, and on the lower one inward, is=P i-^-a=10 Ibs. The downward force is 
15 on each hinge. Hence the first force is-f-10 Ibs. and 10 Ibs. 

PROB. 20. Sides 29, 29, 40, in one; in the other 37, 37, 24. Ans. 

Note. This we think has an indefinite number of answers ; thus two triangles whose 
sides are 10, 10, 12, and 11.38, 11.38, 9.231 proves, according to Mr. Cowan; 
as also 58, 58, 80, and 74, 74, 48 according to Mr Gahan. 
PROB. 21. Ans. 12, 15, and 20. 

[98] 



First Spring Month. 



MARCH, 1856. 



11 



MOON S PHASES. 


D. 


Toronto, 


Quebec. 


Twilight or Daylight begins and ends at 


i 

~: 

- 

1 
10 
20 
30 


Toronto. 


Halifax. Montreal. 


Fredric n. 


Quebec. 


Beg. End 

A. M. P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. SI. 


Jieg. 

A. M. 


biui 

P. M. 




Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


Jbutl 

P. M. 


New Moon . . . 
) First Quarter . 
O Full Mooii . . . 
O Last Quarter . . 
T) Perigee 


6 

L3 
22 
29 
6 
20 


h m 
3 22 ev 
9 19 mo 
10 47 mo 
9 14 mo 
8 9ev 
3 21 ev 


h m 
3 54 ev 
9 51 mo 
11 20 mo 
9 47 mo 
8 41 ev 
3 53 ev 


h m h m 
5 9.7 17 

4 47 7 36 
4 267 49 
4782 


h m 
5 
4 44 
4 24 
4 4 


h m 
1 25 
7 37 
7 51 
8 5 


h m 
4 59 
4 42 
4 22 
4 1 


h m 
1 26 
7 38 
7 53 
8 7 


h m 
4 59 
4 42 
4 21 
4 


h m 
1 26 
7 39 
7 54 
8 9 


h m 
4 58 
4 41 
4 20 
3 58 


h m 
1 27 
7 40 
7 55 
8 11 


1) Apogee . 



Ephemcris of the Planets, fcc. 





Venus 


Mars 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Sun s 


Sun s 


Venus Mars 


Jupit r 


Saturn Venus 


Mars 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Day Mo. 


South 


South 


South 


South 


Longi 


Eight 


Right ! Right 


Right 


Right Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 




Morn. 


Morn. 


Even. 


Even. 


tude. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. South. 


South. 


South. 


North. 




h m 


h n 


i h m 


h m 


o / 


h m 


h m h m 


h m 


h m / 


/ 


o / 


/ 


1 ... 


9 54 


2 4$ 


! 25 


6 51 


341 21 


22 51 


20 3213 24 


23 4 


5 30 


18 48 


5 30 


7 3 


22 17 


7 ... 


10 


2 21 


7 


6 27 


347 22 


23 14 


21 213 21 


23 10 


5 3117 11 


5 15 


6 30 


22 18 


13 ... 


10 5 


1 55 


i Morn 


6 5 


353 21 


23 36 


21 31 13 17 


23 15 


5 215 16 


4 49 


5 56 


22 20 


19 ... 


10 11 


1 2J 


ill 31 


5 42 


359 19 


23 57 


22 013 11 


23 20 


5 3313 6 


4 15 


5 23 


22 22 


25 ... 


10 15 


4 , 


11 12 


5 20 


6 15 


19 


22 2813 3 


23 26 


5 3410 43 


3 28 


4 4!) 


22 24 


31 ... 


10 19 


21 


.10 54 


4 58 


11 11 


41 


22 5612 56 


23 31 


5 36 8 9 


2 52 


4 16 


22 26 



a 

c 


Day of 
Week. 


^ 


Calendar for 
Upper Canada and 


Calendar for 
Lover Canada and 


DEPARTMENT FOR ALL OP TIPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


a 


z 


Nova Scotia. 


New Brunswick. 










Pole Star 


Shadow at 


Mn s 


Moon 


Moon s 


Sun s 


o 
fr-> 


>. .Sun 1 Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon n Meridian 


Noon Mark; 


Age 


South, 


Place at 


Declination 


G 


p Rises. Sets. 


Rises. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Evening. 


Evening. 


Xoon. 


Morn. 


7 P. M. 


South. 










h m i 


\ m 


h 


m 


h 


m 


h m 


h m 


h m s 


h 


m s 


days 


h m 


* 


o 





/ // 


1 


Satur. 


616 37, 


3 48 


:. 


5 


\ 


I-: 


5 43 


3 16 


2 26 39 


L2 


12 28 


24.3 


7 16 


f 


5 


7 


18 36 


2 


SUND. 


626 35, 


3 40 


4 





6 


, i 


5 44 


4 11 


2 22 43 


12 


12 15 


25.3 


8 10 


do. 


19 


6 


55 40 


3 


Mond. 


636 33 


3 51 


4 56 


e 


89 


5 45 


5 7 


2 18 46 


L2 


12 2 


26.3 


9 17 


>J 


3 


6 


32 39 


4 


Tues. 


G46 325 52 


5 


39 


i 


38 


5 46 


5 47 


2 14 50 


12 


11 49 


27.3 


10 17 


do. 


18 


6 


9 32 


5 


Wed. 


656 305 53 


6 1.1 


. 


::; 


5 47 


6 18 


2 10 54 


12 


11 35 


28.3 


11 15 


AMI 
*w 


3 


5 


46 20 


6 


Thur. 


666 285 55 


Sets 


i 


36 


5 48 


Sets 


2 6 57 


12 11 21 


29.3 


ev. 9 


do. 


19 


5 


23 4 


7 


Friday 


676 265 50 


7 15 


. 


38 


5 49 


7 15 


231 


12 11 6 


0.9 


1 2 


K 


4 


4 


59 42 


8 


Satur. 


686 255 57 


8 33 




32 


5 50 


8 35 


1 59 5 


12 10 51 


1.9 


1 53 


do. 


19 


4 


36 18 


9 


SUND. 


696 235 59 


9 52 


3 


3Q 


5 52 


9 57 


1 55 8 


12 10 36 


2.9 


2 44 


T 


4 


4 


12 49 


10 Mond. 


706 21 


6 


11 10 


. 


27 


o 53 


11 17 


1 51 12 


12 10 20 


3.9 


3 37 


do. 


18 


3 


49 18 


11 


Tues. 


716 19 


6 1 


Morn 


C* 

< 


26 


5 54 


Morn 


1 47 16 


12 10 4 


4.9 


4 32 


H 


2 


3 


25 43 


12 


Wed. 


726 17 


6 2 




27 


ft 

> 


24 


5 56 


36 


1 43 19 


12 9 48 


5.9 


5 28 


do. 


15 


3 


2 7 


13 


Thur. 


736 16 


6 3 


1 37 


i 


22 


5 5& 


1 49 


1 39 23 


12 9 31 


6.9 


6 24 


do. 


28 


2 


38 29 


14 


Friday 


746 14 


6 4 


2 40 


1 


19 


5 59 


2 52 


1 35 27 


12 9 14 


7.9 


7 20 


n 


11 


2 


14 49 


16 


Satur. 


756 12 


6 6 


3 33 


6 


17 


6 1 


3 46 


1 31 31 


12 8 57 


8.9 


8 13 


do. 


23 


1 


51 8 


16 


SUND. 


766 10 


6 7 


4 15 


i 


1C 


6 3 


4 24 


1 27 35 


12 8 39 


9.9 


9 3 


25 


6 


1 


27 27 


17 


Mond. 


776 8 


6 8 


4 49 


6 


ia 


6 4 


4 57 


1 23 38 


12 8 22 


10.9 


9 49 


do. 


18 


1 


3 45 


18 


Tuesd. 


786 6 


6 9 


5 16 


8 


12 


6 5 


5 22 


1 19 42 


12 8 4 


11.9 


10 33 


do. 


30 





40 2 


19 


Wed. 


796 5 


6 10 


5 38 


6 


K 


6 6 


5 43 


1 15 46 


12 7 46 


12.9 


11 44 


si 


12 


S 


16 21 


20 


Thur. 


806 3 


6 11 


5 58 


6 


3 


6 8 


6 


1 11 50 


12 7 28 


13.9 


11 53 


do. 


23 


N 


7 21 


21 


Friday 


81 1 


6 12 


6 16 


6 


6 


6 9 


6 16 


1 7 54 


12 7 9 


14.9 


Morn 


n& 


5 





31 1 


22 


Satur. 


825 59 


6 14 


Rises 


6 


! 


6 10 


Rises 


1 3 58 


12 6 51 


15.9 


32 


do. 


17 





54 40 


23 


SUND. 


835 57 


6 15 


8 25 


6 


3 


6 11 


8 28 


102 


12 6 33 


16.9 


1 11 


do. 


29 





18 17 


24 


Mond. 


845 55 


6 16 


9 30 


6 


i 


6 12 


9 36 


56 5 


12 6 14 


17.9 


1 52 


_n_ 


11 


1 


21 53 


25 


Tues. 


855 54 


6 17 


10 38 


. ) 


68 


6 13 


10 46 


52 9 


12 5 55 


18.9 


2 35 


do. 


23 


2 


5 36 


26 


Wed. 


865 52 


6 19 


11 45 


5 


57 


6 14 


11 55 


48 13 


12 6 37 


19.9 


3 33 


*i 


5 


2 


28 56 


27 


Thur. 


87 


5 50 


6 20 


Morn 


5 


.V 


6 15 


Morn 


44 17 


12 5 18 


20.9 


4 13 


do. 


18 


2 


52 23 


28 


Friday 


88 


5 48 


6 21 




63 


3 


:,: 


6 17 


1 5 


40 21 


12 5 


21.9 


5 7 


t 


1 


3 


15 48 


29 


Satur. 


K! 


5 46 


6 22 


1 55 


5 


51 


6 20 


2 7 


36 2512 4 41 


22.9 


6 5 


do. 


14 


3 


39 8 


30 


SUND. 


. 


5 45 


6 23 


2 50 


-> 


is 


6 22 


3 1 


32 2912 4 23 


23.9 


7 4 


do. 


28 


4 


2 25 


31 


Mond. 


11] 


5 43 


6 25 


3 32 


") 


ie 


6 23 


3 42 


28 3312 4 6 


24.9 


8 2 





12 


4 


25 37 



PROB. 21. A pile driver -weighs 2\ tons, and 
falls upon a pile with a descent of 10 feet. 
Required its driving force. 

PROB. 22. Required the sides of three right 
angled triangles, in whole numbers, such that 
their areas shall all be equal. 



PROB. 23. The base A B, of a triangle, is 16, 
and a line drawn from a point C, in the line 
A B, to the vertical angle D, measures 11 ; the 
diameter of the circumscribing circle is 20, and 
AC is to B C as A D is to B D. Hence A D 
and B D are required. 



[99] 



12 



APRIL HAS THIRTY DAYS. 



[1856. 



d 












| 








Polar 




"s 


Day of 
Week. 


Remarkable Events. 


ASTRONOMICAL NOTES. 


Distance 
of 


MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 


d 








Pole Star. 




i 


Tucsd. 


All Fools Day. 


Mars brightest <p Sun. 


o / // 

1 27 25 


PROB. 24. If a trian 


2 


Wed. 


Mirabeau died, 1791. 


Jupiter near 9 (3 3 


1 27 25 


gle whose base is 8, and 


3 


Thur. 


Xapier died 1617. 


Moon ,3 Jupiter. 


1 27 25 


other two sides 4 and 6, 


4 


Friday 


(5) Goldsmith died. 1774. 


Moon in Perigee. . 


1 27 26 


revolve about the base, 


5 


Satur. 


Canada discovered, 1499. 


Venus South 10.22 mo. 


1 27 26 


what will be the surface 


6 


SUND. 


2nd Sunday after Easter. 


Venus in Aphelion. 


1 27 26 


and solidity of the body 


7 


Mond. 


Don Pedro, Emp. Brazil abd. 1831 


Moon near Uranus. 


1 27 27 


produced ? 


8 


Tuesd. 


Hudson s Bay Co. estab. 1672. 


Mars South 11-32 ev. 


1 27 27 


PROB. 25. If the tri 


9 


Wed. 


Lord Bacon died 10213. 


Jupiter 27 N. of Venus. 


1 27 27 


angle in Problem 24 re 


10 


Thur. 


Catholic Emancip. B. passed 1829. 


Moon farthest North. 


1 27 28 


volve about a line per 


11 


Friday 


Napoleon abdicated 1814. 


Venus South 10.26 mo. 


1 27 28 


pendicular to either end 


12 


Satur. 


America discovered, 1492. 


Venus in Aquarius. 


1 27 28 of the base, what will be 


13 


SUND. 


3rd Sunday after Easter. 


Mars in Virgo. 


1 27 28 the surface and solidity 


14 


Mmd. 


13) Vaccination introduced, 1796. 


Moon near Regulus. 


1 27 29j of the body generated? 


15 


Tuesd. 


Mutiny at Spithead, 1797. 


Venus South 10.28 mo: 


1 27 291 PROB. 26. If a risrht- 


16 


Wed. 


liuffon died 1788. 


Moon in Apogee. 


1 27 29 


angled triangle, whose 


17 


Thur. 


Abernethy died, 1831. 


Venus on equator. 


1 27 30 


sides are 6, 8, and 10, 


18 


Friday 


First Newspaper in America, 170J 


Moon near Mars. 


1 27 30 


revolve about a line rer- 


19 


Satur. 


American Revolution, 1775. 


Sun enters Aries. 


1 27 30 pendicular to the vertex 


20 


SUND. 


tih Sunday after Easter. 


Moon eclipsed. 


1 27 30 


at the base, what will be 


21 


Mond. 


(22) Earl Dalhousie born, 1812. 


Jupiter in Aquarius. 


1 27 31 


the solidity and surface 


22 


Tuesd. 


Duke of Sussex died, 1843. 


Venus South 10-32 Mo. 


1 27 31 of the solid thus gene- 


23 


Wed. 


St. George s Day. 


Mars South 10.14 ev. 


1 27 31 rated? 


24 


Thur. 


(23) Shakspere b. 1564; d. 1616. 


Saturn in Taurus. 


1 27 32 PROB. 27. If a right- 


25 


Friday 


(24) Oliver Cromwell born 1599. 


Moon lowest. 


1 27 32 angled triangle whose 


26 


Satur. 


Jeremy Collier died, 1726. 


$ Sup. conj. sun. 


1 27 32 base is 6 and perpendicu- 


27 


SUND. 


Rogation Sunday. 


Uranus in Taurus. 


1 27 32 lar 8, revolve abcut its 


28 


Mond. 


,27) Battle of York, XT. C., 1813. 


Mercury in Ascen. node 


1 27 33 base, what will be the 


29 


Tues. 


Dr. Babingon died 1833. 


Mars South 9-45 ev. 


1 27 33 ! surface and solidity of 


30 


Wrd. 


Steamer Ocean Wave burnt 1853. 


Moon near Neptune. 


1 27 33 the body generated ? 



ANSWERS TO THE PROBLEMS FOR 1855. 
PROB. 22. Let 6=a, 24=6, then -/aS=12 Ibs. Ans. 

PROB. 23. Let 30=a, 20=6, 10=c, then the side required = 2 v /j,i(a 2 -f6 2 -}-c 2 ]/ -J 6(a 2 6 2 -f 

) 3(a-j-i*+c*) }-)} =20/7=52.9150262 rods. 



=(7.57772225 acres, Ans. 
PROB. 24. Let z=the seconds, the second body had fallen when it overtakes the other ; then 

(r+2)*(16 l-12th)=z 2 (16 1-12)+100, whence z=ljjl = .5544 of a second, Ans. 

1 Ji) 

PROB. 25. Let z=the radius of the garden, and _p=3. 1416, then (2z-^ 3 -f-6)-)-(j;y -^-2=43560 
square feet. 

Hence 2z=Diameter=82-11796 feet, Ans. and 
xpthe rope=128-9908915 Ans. 

Note. This question involves the quadrature of the involute of a circle, which we 
cannot explain here. We have had but one solution of this, and but two 
of No. 19, and we believe but one to No. 26 of the Probs. 
PROB. 26. The sag=p(l cos. a)=26.68 feet, Ans. 

In this formula, jt>=the tension or pressure at the lowest point of the rope, which 
takes the form of the catenary curve, and a= the angle of inclination, of lowest 
point, with the fixed point. To find a, we have, Hyperbol. log. (0.43429) (80) 

-f- 100=0. 347432=aXlog. ( {l+i/(H-l) }-*-), in which we find by a few 
trials that a=.67, and this corresponds to the Nat. Cot of 50 10 . 
Again jt?=100-f-(2 sin a), =60.24, and 1 cos a=. 443221. Hence p(l cos a)= 
26.68 feet, Ans. 

[100] 



Second Spring Month. 



APRIL, 1856. 



13 



MOON S PHASES. 


D. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Twilight or Daylight begins and ends at 


A 

. 

-i 


Toronto. 


Halifax. 


Montreal. 


Fredric n. 


Quebec. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Q New Moon 
) First Quarter ... 
O Full Moon 


5 
11 
20 

27 
4 
16 


h m 
35 mo 
11 35 ev 
3 56 mo 
6 9ev 
7 21 mo 
11 27 ev 


h m 
1 8mo 
7ev 
4 29 mo 
6 41 ev 
4 53 mo 
11 59 ev 


1 
10 
20 
30 


h m 
4 1 
3 42 
3 21 
3 


h m 
8 
8 20 
8 36 
8 54 


h m 
3 57 
3 39 
3 17 

2 55 


h m 

8 8 
8 28 
8 40 
8 59 


A OT 

3 56 
3 36 
3 19 

2 56 


A 771 

8 11 

8 27 
8 39 
8 58 


h m 
3 55 
3 34 
3 10 

2 47 


h m 
8 13 
8 29 
8 47 
9 7 


A m 
3 32 
3 31 
3 6 

2 40 


h m 
8 12 
8 30 
8 52 
9 15 


(^ Last Quarter ... 
J) Perigee 


1) Apogee . 



Kphcmeris of tlie Planets^ <fcc. 





\ onus 


Mars 


Jupit r 


Saturn 1 Sun s 


Sun s 


kenus 


Mars 


Jupit r Saturn Aenus 


Mars 


Jupit r 


saturu 


Day Mo. 


South 


South 


South 


South Longi- 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Right Right 


Deel. 


Decl. 


Ded. 


Decl. 




Morn. 


Morn. 


Morn. 


Even. tude. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. Ascen. South 


South. 


South. 


North. 




h m 


h m 


A m 


A m 


h m 


h m h m 


h m h m 


/ 


/ 


o / 


/ 


1 ... 


10 20 


15 


10 51 


4 54 12 10 


45: 


3 


12 54 


23 32 5 36 


7 4[ 


2 44 


4 n 


22 26 


7 ... 


10 24 Even. 


10 33 


4 32 18 4 


1 7: 


!3 28 


12 44 


23 37 5 38 5 ( 


1 53 


3 38 


22 28 


13 ... 


10 27 11 5 


10 14 


4 11 23 57 


1 29: 


.3 5512 35 


23 42 5 40 2 1] 


1 14 


3 C 


22 30 


19 ... 


10 3010 34 


9 55 


3 50 29 49 


1 51 


22 


12 28 


23 47 5 42 N 4< 


41 2 35 


22 32 


25 ... 


103410 4 


9 36 


3 28 35 39 


2 13 


49 


12 22 


23 52 5 44 3 3: 


18 


2 10 


22 34 


30 ... 


10 37 


9 41 


9 21 


3 ll| 40 30 


2 32 


1 12 


12 18 


23 56 5 47 5 6< 


7| 1 40 


22 36 


a 

| 


Day of 

Week. 


|H 


Calendar for 
Upper Canada and 


Calendar for 
Lower Canada and 


DEPARTMENT FOR ALL OP UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


S 


o 


Nova Scotia. 


New IJrunswick. 


Pole 


Star 


Shadow at 


Mn s 


Moon 


Moon s 


tiun s 


O 


>> 


S,l:l 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


in Meridian 


Xoon Mark. 


Age 


South, 


Place 


at 


Declination 


p 


(3 


Uses. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


iises. 


Sets 




Rises. 


Evening. 


.Evening. 


Noon. 


Morn. 


7 P. M. 


North. 










h m 


h m 


A 7?! 


h m 


h m 


A m 


h m s 


h m s 


days 


h m 


S 





o 


/ // 


1 


Tuesd. 


92 


5 41 


6 27 


4 18 


5 44 


6 24 


4 25 


24 37 


12 3 47 


25.9 


8 59 


VJ 


27 


4 


48 45 


2 


Wed. 


93 


5 39 


6 28 


4 37 


3 43 


G 25 


4 42 


20 41 


12 3 29 


26.9 


9 53 


AW 
VW 


12 


5 


11 47 


3 


Thurs. 


94 


5 37 


6 29 


4 53 


5 42 


6 26 


4 55 


16 45 


12 3 11 


27.9 


10 45 


do. 


27 


5 


34 45 


4 


Friday 


95 


5 36 


6 30 


Sets 


5 39 


6 27 


Sets 


12 50 


12 2 53 


28.9 


11 37 


X 


12 


5 


57 36 


5 


Satur. 


96 


5 34 


G 32 


7 23 


5 38 


6 28 


7 26 


8 54 


12 2 36 


0.5 


Ev. 29 


do. 


27 


6 


20 21 


6 


SUND. 


97 


5 32 


6 33 


8 43 


5 35 


6 29 


8 49 


4 58 


12 2 18 


1.5 


1 22 


T 


12 


6 


43 


7 


Mond. 


98 


5 30 


6 34 


10 3 


5 33 


6 31 


10 11 





1 2 


12 2 1 


2.5 


2 17 


do. 


26 


7 


5 32 


8 


Tuesd. 


99 


5 28 


6 36 


11 18 


5 32 


6 32 


11 28 


Morning. 


12 1 44 


3.5 


3 14 


8 


10 


7 


27 56 


9 


Wed. 


100 


o 26 


6 37 


Morn 


5 30 


6 34 


Morn 


11 53 10 


12 1 28 


4.5 


4 13 


do. 


24 


7 


50 14 


10 


Thur. 


101 


5 24 


6 38 




45 


5 28 


6 35 


57 


11 49 14 


12 1 11 


5.5 


5 11 


n 


7 


8 


12 23 


11 


Friday 


102 


5 23 


6 39 




1 27 


3 26 


6 36 


1 39 


11 45 19 


12 55 


6.5 


6 7 


do. 


20 


8 


34 23 


12 


Satur. 


103 


5 21 


6 40 


2 14 


5 25 


6 37 


2 24 


11 41 23 


12 39 


7.5 


6 59 


25 


2 


8 


56 15 


13 


SUND. 


104 


5 19 


6 42 




2 51 


5 23 


6 38 


3 


11 37 27 


12 24 


8.5 


7 47 


do. 


15 


9 


17 58 


14 


Mond. 


105 


5 18 


6 43 




3 22 


5 21 


G 39 


3 29 


11 33 31 


12 9 


9.5 


8 31 


do. 


27 


9 


39 31 


15 


Tuesd. 


106 


5 16 


6 44 




3 44 


5 19 


6 41 


3 50 


11 29 36 


Morning. 


10.5 


9 13 


SI 


8 


10 


55 


16 


Wed. 


107 


") 14 


6 45 




4 5 


5 18 


G 42 


4 


11 25 40 


11 59 39 


11.5 


9 52 


do. 


20 


10 


22 9 


17 


Thur. 


108 


5 12 


6 47 




4 22 


5 15 


6 44 


4 24 


11 21 44 


11 59 25 


12.5 


10 31 


tnj 


2 


10 


43 12 


18 


Friday 


W, 


5 11 


6 48 




4 39 


5 13 


6 4 


- 



4 3 


11 17 48 


11 59 11 


13.5 


11 10 


do. 


14 


11 


4 5 


19 


Satur. 


11C 


5 9 


6 49 


Rises 


5 11 


6 4 


7 


Rises 


11 13 53 


11 58 58 


14.5 


11 51 


do. 


26 


11 


24 47 


20 


SUND 


111 


o 7 


6 50 




7 21 


5 10 


6 48 


7 27 


11 


9 5711 58 45 


15.5 


Morn 


, 


8 


11 


45 Is 


21 


Mond. 


112 


r 


6 51 




8 28 


5 8 


6 50 


8 3t 


11 


6 2 


11 58 32 


16.5 


34 


do. 


20 


12 


5 87 


22 


Tuesd. 


113 


5 4 


G 53 




9 8f 


5 5 


6 51 


9 4 


10 


2 6 


11 58 20 


17.5 


1 20 


n 


3 


12 


25 4 5 


23 


Wed. 


11^ 


5 3 


6 54 


10 46 


5 4 


6 52 


10 5 


10 58 10 


11 58 9 


18.5 


2 9 


do. 


15 


12 


45 4Q 


24 


Thurs. 


IK 


5 1 


6 55 


11 49 


5 3 


6 53 


Morn 


10 54 15 


11 57 57 


19.5 


3 3 


do. 


28 


13 


5 2 3 


25 


Fridaj 


ne 


4 59 


G 56 


Morn 


5 2 


6 54 


1 


10 50 19 


11 57 47 


20.5 


3 59 


f 


11 


13 


24 5 3 


26 


Satur. 


117 


4 58 


6 57 




45 


5 


6 56 


47 


10 46 24 


11 57 37 


21.5 


4 57 


do. 


24 


13 


44 IQ 


27 


SUND 


ne 


4 56 


6 5f 




1 29 


4 58 


6 58 


1 3 


10 42 28 


11 57 27 


22.5 


5 54 


VJ 


8 


14 


3 13 


28 


Mond. 


11? 


4 55 


7 




2 7 


4 56 


6 58 


2 16 


10 38 33 


11 57 18 


23.5 


6 50 


do. 


22 


14 


22 3 


29 


Tuesd. 


12C 


4 53 


7 1 




2 38 


4 55 


6 51- 


2 44 


10 34 3711 57 9 


24.5 


7 43 


AW 


6 


14 


40 89 


30 


Wed. 


121 


4 52 


7 2 




3 2 


4 54 


7 


i 


3 


10 30 41 11 57 1 


25.5 


8 34 


So. 


21 


14 


59 o 



PROB. 28. A ladder 100 feet long, of 
uniform thickness, weighs 100 Ibs., and bears 
against a vertical building at an angle of 60 
to the horizon. If a person weighing 150 Ibs. 
ascends it 40 feet, what will be the pressure at 
the top, and thrust at the bottom of it ? 

PEOB. 29. Each side of a pentagon is 20. 



Required its circumscribed, and largest in 
scribed equilateral triangle. 

PROB. 30. The sides of a pentagon are 12 
each. Required the greatest and least diameter, 
the distances of the centre from the vertices, 
and from the middle of each side, and the 
longest and shortest chord, also the area. 



[101] 



14 



MAY HAS THIRTY-ONE DAYS. 



[1856. 



1 

c 


Day of 
Week. 


Remarkable Events. 


ASTRONOMICAL NOTES. 


Polar 
distance 
of 


MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 


1 








Pole Star. 




1 

2 
3 
4 


Thur. 
Friday 
Satur. 
SUND 


Ascension. 
(I) Duke of Wellington b. 1760. 
Clocks introduced in 1368. 
1st Sunday after Ascension. 


Moon near Jupiter. 
Moon in Perigee. 
$ near Mercury. 
Moon near $ 


o / // 

1 27 33 
1 27 34 
1 27 34 
1 27 34 


PROB. 31. How many 
balls in a pile whose base 
is square, with 20 on 
each side 1 


5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 


Mond. 
Tuesd. 
Wed. 
Thur. 
Friday 
Satur. 
SUND. 


N apoleon died, 1821. 
Oswego taken, 1S14. 
Jamaica taken by England, 1655 
Ice stationary at Quebec, 1836. 
Columbus s fourth A oyage. 
Battle ofLodi, 1706. 
Wkit Sunday. 


Moon near Mercury. 
y crosses the colure. 
Moon near Saturn. 
Moon highest. 
Mars South 9.1 even. 
Venus South 10.43 mo. 
$ ^ sun. 


1 27 34 

1 27 34 
1 27 34 
1 27 35 
1 27 35 
1 27 35 
1 27 3C 


PROB. 32. If a square 
whose sides are 4 feet, 
revolve about one of its 
sides, what will be the 
surface and solidity of 
the body generated ? 


12 


Mond. 


t erceval assassinated, 1812. 


Moon east of Regulus. 


1 27 3G 


PROB. 33. If a semi 


13 


Tuesd. 


Old May Day. 


Mars south, 8.45 eve. 


1 27 3C 


circle, whose radius is 1, 


14 


Wed. 


Henry Grattan died, 1820. 


Mars stat. j) apogee. 


1 27 3G 


revolve about its base, 


15 


Thur. 


Cuvier died, 1832. 


Moon near Mars. 


1 27 3G 


what will be the surface 


16 


Friday 


Talleyrand died, 1838. 


Mars South 8.33 even. 


1 27 37 


and solidity of the body 


17 


Satur. 


Jenner born, 1749. 


Venus in Pisces. 


1 27 37 


generated. 


18 


SUND. 


Trinity Sunday. 


Mars in Virgo. 


1 27 37 


PROB. 34. If a seg 


19 


Mond. 


Sir Charles Bagot died, 1843. 


Jupiter in Pisces. 


1 27 37 


ment of a circle, whose 


20 


Tuesd. 


Columbus died 1506. 


Sun enters Taurus. 


1 27 37 


base is 4, and height 1, 


21 


Wed. 


tiots at Montreal, 1S32. 


Saturn in Taurus. 


1 27 37 


revolve about its base, 


22 


Fhur. 


Alexander Pope born, 1688. 


Moon farthest South. 


1 27 37 


what will be the surface 


23 


Mlay 


Dr. Paley died, 1805. 


y crosses equator. 


1 27 38 


and solidity of the body 


24 


Satur. 


Queen Victoria born, 1819. 




1 27 38 


generated ? 


25 


SUND. 


st Sunday after Trinity. 




1 27 38 


PROB. 35. If a semi 


20 


Mond. 


St. Augustin, Archb.Canterb. d 


Gr. Elong. E. 2257 / 


1 27 38 


circle whose radius is 1, 


27 


?uesd. 


<*ort George taken, 1814. 


fcnus near $ ( 9 47 / S.) 


1 27 38 


revolve around a line 


28 


Ved. 


Villiam Pitt born, 1756. 


Moon near Jupiter.. 


1 27 38 


tangent to the middle of 


29 


1 


30) Joan of Arc burnt, 1431. 


Jranus in Taurus. 


1 27 38 


its arc, what will be the 


30 
31 


? riday 
Satur. 


Mr P. Maitlaud died, 1854. 
Alexander Cruden born, 1700. 


Moon in Perigee. 
Mars South 7.40 eve. 


1 27 39 
1 27 39 


surface and solidity of 
the body generated ? 



ANSWERS TO THE PROBLEMS FOR 1855. 

PROB. 27. Area of a transverse section of the ring =0-12520953 (nearly = l-f-80) ; distance of 
the centre of gravity of that section from the base of it=1000 -=-24352=0 04106 
to this add the radius of the ring=(7-f-20)=.35, and we have .39106. " Twice this 
=.78212, and then multiply by 3.1416 =2-4071, and this multiplied bv the 
sectional area 0-12526953=0-03084 solid inches, Ans. 

Note. This is worked by the Centrobaryc Method, and the external surface is 
supposed to be convex of course, as all wedding rings are, we suppose. Most of our 
correspondents have worked this supposing it to have tu-o flat surfaces. 

PROB. 28. Let the mean radius of the Earth=20887680 feet=a, and 5 miles=26 400 ft=6 
16 l-12=m. Then 1 /(2a?n)=25920.783,=the velocity the ball must have if 
discharged at the surface of the earth, with which velocity its centrifugal force 
just balances the centripetal. But gravity acts with less power above the surface 
hence 25920.783 v /(aH-a-j-6)=25904.1936 feet, Ans. 

Note. The velocity a body would acquire in falling (7912-f 10) miles is that 
which answers our purpose. But the action of gravity at the commencement of 
motion will be less than 16 l-12th per second. It will be=16 1-12( 3956-^39G1V 
=16-0428 feet. 

PROB. 29. Let 4=0, 6=2. Then l /(af+6) 3 =8. 35864 feet Ans. 

PROB. 30. Let 100 rods=a feet, and 1=6, then a 2 -=-i=2722500 feet=515 miles, Ans. 

Note. This question requires the rectification of the line called the involute of 
a circle. 
PROB. 31. Ans. 59. 

Note. This may be worked by Indeterminate Analysis, or by the least common 
multiple. 

[102] 



Third Spring Month. 



MAY, 1856. 



15 



MOON S PHASES. 


D. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Twilight or Daylight begins or ends at 


>" 
-. 

P 


Toronto. 


Halifax. 


Montreal. 


Fredricton 


Quebec. 


Q New Moon... 
g) First Quarter 
O Full Moon... 
O Last Quarter 
"I Perigee .... 


4 
11 
19 

27 
2 

i ! 


A 7?i 
9 25 mo 
3 28 ev 
6 39 ev 
16 mo 
1 21 ev 
2 27 ev 


A 771 

9 57mo 
4 Oev 
7 11 ev 
49 mo 
1 53 ev 
2 59 ev 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 
p. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


1 

11! 

20 

to 


h m 
2 57 
2 40 

2 22 
1 8 


A m 
8 54 
9 12 
9 30 
9 48 


A m 
2 52 
2 40 
2 14 

1 58 


A m 
9 1 
9 12 

9 88 
9 5f 


A TM 

2 46 
2 27 
1 6 
1 49 


A 7W 

9 5 
9 25 
9 46 
10 6 


A m 
2 44 
2 24 
2 1 
1 41 


A i 
9 9 
9 21 
9 51 
10 13 


A m 
2 39 
2 17 
1 54 
1 35? 


A m 
9 14 
9 35 
9 59 
10 22 


D Apogee ., 





Epliemeris of tile Planets, <fec. 



Day Mo. 


\ euus 
South 


Mars 
South 


Jupit r 
South 


Saturn 
South 


Sun s 
Longi 


Sun s Venus 
Right Right 


Mars 

Right 


Jupit r Satvirn 
Right Right 


Venus 
Decl. 


Mars 
Decl. 


Jupit r 
Decl. 


Saturn 
Decl. 




Morn. 


Even. 


Morn. 


Even. 


tude- j 


Lscen. Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. Ascen. 


North. 


South. 


South. 


North. 




h m 


h m 


A m 


A m 


o / 


h m h m 


A 7ft 


h m h m 


o / 


o / 


o / 


o / 


1 ... 


10 37 


9 36 


9 18 


3 7 


41 29 


2 36 1 16 


12 17 


23 51 5 47 


6 22 


5 


1 31 


22 36 


7 ... 


10 41 


9 10 


8 58 


2 47 


47 17 


2 59 1 44112 14 


2 5 48 


9 8 


3 


i r. 


22 38 


13 ... 


10 45 


8 45 


8 39 


2 26 


53 4 


3 23 2 11 


12 13 


5 53 


11 46 


11 


36 


22 39 


19 ... 


10 50 


8 22 


8 20 


2 5 


58 51 


3 46 2 40 


12 13 


10 5 56 


14 15 


31 


S 1C 


22 40 


25 ... 


10 55 


8 


8 


1 45 


64 37 


4 11 3 9 


12 16 


14 5 59 


16 31 


59 


N 13 


22 41 


31 ... 


11 1 


7 40 


7 40 


1 25 


70 22 


4 35 3 38 


12 19 


17 6 2 


18 33 


1 36 


36 


22 42 


g 


3Sf 


!a 


Calendar for 




Calendar for 


DEPARTMENT FOR ALL OF UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


a 


a 


Upper Canada and 


Lower Canada and 


~f 


r^ 


Nova Scotia. 


New Rrnnswiclr 


- 1 













Pole 


SLUT 


g 


tmdow at 


Mn s 


Moon 


A ! i >< . i 


1 U 


s 


ini e- 


a 





Sun 


Sun Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


in Meridian 


Noon Mark. 


Age 


South 


Place at 


O tin o 

Declination 




a 


Kise.s. 


s-ts. Rises. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Morning. 


Mi Tiling. 


.Venn. 


Morn. 


7 P. M. 


North. 








h m 


h m h 


m 


A 


m 


h m 


h m 


h m s 


k 


771 * 


days 


h m 


S 





o 


/ // 


i 


Thur. 


1224 50 


1 4 


3 25 


1 


53 


7 I 


3 26 


10 26 46 


11 56 54 


26.5 


9 24 


V 


6 


15 


17 7 


2 


Friday 


1234 49 


7 5 


3 48 


I 


51 


i. s 


3 47 


10 22 51 


11 56 47 


27.5 


10 14 


S^ 

do. 


20 


15 


34 59 


8 


Bator. 


1244 47 


7 6 


4 12 


! 


49 


7 5 


4 9 


10 18 55 


11 56 41 


28.5 


11 6 


T 


5 


15 


52 35 


4 


SUND. 


1254 46 


7 7 


Sets. 


! 


48 


7 6 


Sets 


10 15 


11 56 35 


0.1 


12 


do. 


20 


16 


9 65 


E 


Mond. 


126:4 457 8 


i 


3 53 


i 


47 


7 7 


9 3 


10 11 4 


11 56 30 


J.I 


Ev.57 




4 


16 


27 


a 


Tuesd. 


1274 43 


7 9 


10 7 


i 


45 


7 9 


10 18 


10 


7 9 


11 56 25 


2.1 


1 56 


do. 


18 


16 


43 48 


7 


Wed 


. 


1284 42 


7 11 


11 12 


1 


43 


7 9 


11 24 


10 3 13 


11 56 21 


3.1 


2 56 


n 


2 


17 


20 


e 


Thur. 


12!) 4 41 


7 12 


Morn 


! 


42 


7 10 


Morn 


9 59 18 


11 56 17 


4.1 


3 54 


do. 


15 


17 


16 84 


9 


Friday 


1304 39 


7 13 




6 


i 


40 


7 12 


17 


9 55 22 


11 56 14 


5.1 


4 50 


do. 


28 


17 


32 31 


10 


Satur. 


131 4 38 


7 14 




48 


1 


39 


7 13 


58 


9 51 27 


11 5G 12 


6.1 


5 40 


25 


11 


17 


48 10 


11 


SUND. 


1324 37 


7 16 


1 22 


1 


37 


7 15 


1 31 


9 47 32 


11 56 10 


7.1 


6 27 


do. 


23 


18 


3 32 


12 


Mond. 


133 


4 36 


7 17 




I 47 


i 


367 16 


1 54 


9 43 37 


11 56 9 


8.1 


7 10 


Q 


5 


18 


18 35 


i 8 


Tuesd. 


134 


4 35 


7 18 


2 9 


1 


347 l. 1 - 


2 13 


9 39 41 


11 56 8 


9.1 


7 50 


O\t 

do. 


17 


18 


33 19 


! 1 


Wed. 


135 


4 34 


7 19 


2 28 


I 


337 19 


2 30 


9 35 46 


11 56 8 


10.1 


8 29 


do. 


29 


18 


47 45 


16 


Thur. 


136 


4 32 


7 20 


2 44 


1 


32 


7 20 


2 44 


9 31 50 


11 56 8 


11.1 


9 8 




10 


19 


1 52 


16 


Friday 


137 


4 31 


7 21 


3 2 


! 


31 


7 21 


3 


9 27 50 


11 56 9 


12 1 


9 48 


do. 


22 


19 


15 40 


l i 


Satur. 


138 


4 30 


7 22 


3 20 


! 


30 


7 22 


3 17 


9 24 


11 56 10 


13.1 


10 30 




4 


19 


29 7 


18 


SUND. 


139 


4 29 


7 23 


3 41 


1 


29 


7 23 


3 36 


9 20 5 


11 56 12 


14.1 


11 15 


do. 


17 


19 


42 16 


19 


Mond. 


140 


4 28 


7 24 


Rises 


! 


28 


7 24 


Rises 


9 16 . 


11 56 15 


15.1 


Morn 


do. 


29 


19 


55 4 


20 


Tuesd. 


141 


4 27 


7 25 




3 35 


! 


27 


7 25 


8 45 


9 12 1411 56 18 


16.1 


4 


m 


12 


20 


7 32 


2! 


Wed. 


142 


4 26 


7 26 


9 43 


1 


26 


7 26 


9 55 


9 8 19 


11 56 22 


17.1 


57 


u 
do. 


25 


20 


19 39 


22 


Thur. 


143 


4 25 


7 27 


10 41 


i 


25 


7 27 


10 53 


9 4 24 


11 56 26 


18.1 


1 54 


t 


8 


20 


31 25 


28 


Friday 


144 


4 25 


7 28 


11 31 


! 


24 


7 28 


11 41 


9 28 


11 56 30 


19.1 


2 52 


L 


21 


20 


42 51 


24 


Satur. 


145 


4 24 


7 29 


Morn 


i 


24 


7 30 


Morn 


8 56 33 


11 56 30 


20.] 


3 50 




5 


20 


53 55 


25 


SUND. 


146 


4 23 


7 30 




c 


1 


23 


7 31 


17 


8 52 38 


11 56 42 


21.1 


4 46 


do. 




21 


4 38 


26 


Mond. 


147 


4 22 


7 31 




41 


1 


22 


7 32 


47 


8 48 43 


11 56 48 


22.1 


5 39 


AW 


!! 


21 


14 59 


27 


Tuesd. 


148 


4 21 


7 32 


1 6 


t 


21 


7 33 


1 10 


8 44 17 


11 56 55 


23.1 


6 29 


WV 

do. 


17 


21 


24 59 


28 


Wed. 


149 


4 21 


7 33 




1 30 


1 


20 


7 34 


1 32 


8 40 52 


11 57 2 


24.1 


7 18 


V 


1 


21 


34 36 


29 


Thur. 


150 


4 20 


7 34 


1 51 


1 


19 


7 35 


1 51 


8 36 57 


11 57 10 


25.1 


8 6 


x\ 

do. 


16 


21 


43 51 


80 


Friday 


151 


4 20 


7 35 


2 14 


f 


19 


7 35 


2 12 


8 33 2 


11 57 18 


26.1 


8 56 


do. 


30 


21 


52 43 


n 


Satur . 


1524 19| 


7 36 


2 39 


! 


187 36 


2 34 


8 29 7 


11 57 26 


27.1 


9 47 




14 


22 


1 12 


PROB. 30. The three lines drawn from the 
vertices of a triangle, perpendicular to the sides 


angles it is 54, 100, and 60 rods. Required the 
sides. 


opposite, are 19, 13, and 10. Required the 
sides of the triangle. 
PROB. 37. The angles of a triangle are 82, 
56, and 42. From a point within to these 


PROB. 38. The sides of a triangular field are 
60, 55, and 44 rods. Required the place of a 
well, within, that is equally distant from the 
corners. 



[103] 



16 



JUNE HAS THIRTY DAYS. 



[1856. 



Day of Month j 


Day of 
Week. 


Remarkable Events. 


ASTRONOMICAL NOTES. 


Polar 
Distance 
of 
Pole Star. 


MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 










o / // 




1 


SUND. 


2nd Sunday after Trinity. 


Moon near Venus. 


1 27 39 


PROB. 39. Given to 


2 


Mond. 


The Gordon Riots com. 1780. 


Venus in Aries. 


1 27 39 


find x and y ; x-\-y=5, 


3 


Tuescl. 


William Harvey died, 1C57. 




1 27 39 


and x*+y* 1241. 


4 


Wed. 


Kingdom of Netherlands div.1831 


Moon farthest North. 


1 27 39 


PROB. 40. How many 


5 


Thur. 


(6)AlexandertheGreatb.B.C. 356 


Mercury in Desc. node. 


1 27 39 


balls in a rectangular 


6 


Friday 


Jeremy Bentham died, 1832. 




1 27 39 


pile of 50 courses, there 


7 


Satur. 


Weber died, 1826. 


Mars in Virgo. 


1 27 39 


being 20 balls in the top 


8 


SUND. 


3;-d Sunday after Trinity. 


Mercury stationary. 


1 27 39 


row ? 


9 


Mond. 


(8) Mrs. Siddons died, 1831. 


Saturn farthest North. 


1 27 39 


PROB. 41. If a, sec- 


10 


Tuesd. 


Gavazzi Riots in Montreal, 1853. 


Moon in apogee. 


1 27 40 


O 

ment of a circle, whose 


11 


Wed. 


Ben Jonson born, 1575. 


Neptune 90 W. Sun. 


1 27 40 


base is 4, and height 1, 


12 


Thur. 


Magnu Charta signed, 1215. 




1 27 40 


revolve about a perpen 


13 


Friday 


Battle of Marengo, 1800. 


Jupiter in Pisces. 


1 27 40 


dicular bisectingthe base 


14 


Satur" Battle of Aaseby, 1G4.3. 




1 27 40 


what will be the surface 


15 


SUND. 


4M Sunday after Trinity. 


Mars, in Desc. node. 


1 27 40 


and solidity of the body 


1C 


Mond. 


(15) Luther excom. 1520. 


Saturn near Mercury. 


1 27 40 


produced ? 


17 


Tuesd. 


John Wesley born, 1703. 




1 27 40 


PROB. 42. If the seg 


18 


Wed. 


Battle of Waterloo, 1815. 


Moon lowest. 


1 27 40 


ment in Problem 41, re 


19 


Thur. 


Sir Joseph Banks died, 1820. 




1 27 40 


volve around a line per 


20 


Friday 


Queen Victoria s Accession, 1837. 


21st Inf. Sun. 


1 27 40 


pendicular to the end of 


21 


Satur. 


Proclamation of Q. Victoria, 1837. 


Sun enters Gemini. 


1 27 40 


the base, what will be the 


22 


SUND. 


5th Sunday after Trinity. 


Saturn in Gemini. 


1 27 40 


surface and solidity of 


23 


Mond. 


Leibnitz born, 1040. 


Neptune stationary. 


1 27 40 


the body generated ? 


24 


Tuesd. 


John Hampden died, lt 43. 


Saturn ^ Sun. 


1 27 40 


PROB. 43. If a figure 


25 


Wed. 


Battle of Bannockburn, 1314. 


Moon in Perigee. 


1 27 40 


of 6 equal sides, each of 


2G 


Thur. 


George IV. died, 1830. 


25th. J n( 2ar Mercury. 


1 27 40 


which is 2 feet, revolve 


27 


Friday 


Allan Cunningham died, 1840. 




1 27 40 


about one of its sides, 


28 


Satur. 


Coronation of the Queen, 1838. 


Uranus in Taurus. 


1 27 40 


what will be the surface 


29 


SUND. 


6<7i Sunday after Trinity. 


Jupiter 90 W. Sun. 


1 27 40 


and solidity of the body 


30 


Mond. 


Earl of Argyle beheaded, 1685. 


Moon highest. 


1 27 40 


generated ? 



ANSWERS TO THE PROBLEMS FOR 1855. 
PROB. 32. Let 15=2a, and GG825=i, then the numbers will be 



~ 2 =K 1 5)K3)=9 or 6 Ans. 



PROB. 33. Let z=the required velocity. Then (2)*(16 l-12)-f 2z=400. Hence z=167 5-Gths, Ans. 

PROB. 34. 5 weights, if used on both scales, viz. 1, 3, 9, 27, 81 Ibs. But if used in one only 
7 weights, viz. 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 37 Ibs. Ans. 

Note. The most general mode of solving questions of this nature, is by the 
ternary scale of notation. See "Barlow s Theory of Numbers," Chap. 10. 

PROB. 35. Let z 2 -)-?/ 2 *>e the numbers=a cube. Now let x=rz, and y=sz, then r 2 z 2 -f-s 2 2 2 =x 2 4- 
y- =a cube. Put (z 3 ~v 3 )=r-z i ^-s 2 z 2 , then z=(r ! +* 2 ), x=rv 3 (r2-j-s 2 ), and y= 
.vt; 3 (r2-f-s 2 ), in which r, s, and v, are any numbers we choose to make them. If 
r= l, s=l, and =1, then z=10, y 5, and hence z 2 =100, / 2 =25, Ans. 

PROB. 19, of 1854. By Dennis Smith, Quebec, Given x 6 y s ~ z 12 =9728 and z 2 ?/ 5 -f-zV=40320 
to find x and y. Put y=x 2 r. Then a; 12 /- 8 z 12 =9728, and z 12 r^-f-z 1 V 2 =40320. 
Hence z 12 =9728-^-(r 3 I)=40320-^(r 5 -fr 2 ). Therefore 9728r 2 (r 3 -f 1) 40320 
_|_( r 3_i)=rO. Hence 7=1.5. 
Then z 12 =9728-f-(2.375)=409G. Hence x=2, and x 2 r=y=G. Ans. 

Note. This solution is the only one received, yet it is not complete, for the 
determination of r is not plain. Will others furnish short solutious ? 

GEOM. PROB. 1. Let 8=a, 2=b, and 3.1416=jo. Then the surface=6j 2 (a-f 6)=197.392 
inches Ans. 

Solidity=i 6y(a-f&)=:98-696 cubic inches, Ans. 

[104] 



First Summer Month, 



JUNE, 1856. 



17 



MOON S 
PHASES. 


D. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Twilight or Daylight begins and ends at 



>> 

I 


Toronto. 


Halifax. 


Montreal. 


Fredrictoii 


Quebec. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End. 

P. M 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


New Moon. 
f) First Quar. 
O Full Moon. 
(3 Last Quar. 
j) Apogee ... 
J) Perigee ... 


_> 
In 
IN 

26 

M 

25 


h m 
6 23 ev 
8 33 mo 
6 34nio 
5 Omo 
8 9 mo 
3 51 mo 


h m 
6 54 ev 
9 5 mo 
7 7 mo 
5 32 mo 
8 41 mo 
4 43 mo 


1 
LO 
21 

30 


h, m 
2 5 
1 57 
1 55 
2 


h m 
9 50 
10 1 
10 7 
10 6 


h m 
1 55 
1 46 
1 43 
1 50 


h m 
10 
10 12 
10 19 
10 17 


h m 
1 45 
1 36 
1 32 
1 38 


h m 
10 9 
10 17 
10 31 
10 29 


h m 
1 39 
1 28 
1 24 
1 31 


h m 
10 16 
10 30 
10 38 
10 30 


h m 
1 29 
1 19 
1 16 
1 24 


h m 
10 26 
10 39 
10 46 
10 43 



Epliemeris of the Planets; <fcc. 





V enus 


Mars 


Jupit r 


Sikturn 


Sun s 


Sun s Venu? 


Mars 


Jupit r [Saturn 


Venus .M-u s 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


D.iy Mo. 


Smith 


South 


Bob 


:, 


South 


Iiongl- 


Right 


Righ. 


Right 


Right 


Eight 


Deci. 


Di .:l. 


Decl. 


Decl. 




Morn. 


Kyen. 


Morn. 


Even. 


tude. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


North. 


South. 


North. 


North. 




h m 


h n 


i h 


m 


h m 


o / 


h m 


h m 


h m 


A m 


h m 


/ 


/ 


o / 


o / 


1 ... 


11 2 


7 3< 


1 37 


1 21 


71 19 


4 39 


3 43 


12 20 


18 


6 3 


18 52 


1 43 


39 


22 42 


7 ... 


11 9 


7 1J 


1 7 17 


1 1 


75 9 


5 4 


4 14 


12 25 


21 


6 6 


20 33 


2 28 


59 


22 42 


13 ... 


11 16 


7 ] 


6 56 


41 


82 48 


5 29 4 45 


12 31 


24 


6 9 


21 54 


3 19 


1 18 


22 42 


19 ... 


11 24 


6 4? 


6 35 


20 


88 31 


5 54 5 16 


12 38 


27 


6 13 


22 54 


4 16 


1 34 


22 42 


25 ... 


11 32 


6 3( 


) 6 14 


morn 


94 14 


6 18 5 48 


12 47 


30 


6 16 


23 29 


5 18 


1 47 


22 41 


30 ... 


11 39 


6 17 


5 56 


11 43 


99 


6 39 6 15 


12 54 


31 


6 19 


23 40 


6 13 


1 57 


22 40 


fl 


Day of 

Week. 


i. 


Calendar for 




Calendar for 


DEPARTMENT FOR ALL OF UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


| 


i 


Upper Canada and 


Lower Canada and 


Q 


8 


Nova Scotia. 


New Brunswick. 


. Pole Star 


Shadow at 


Mn s 


Moon 


Moon s 


Sun s 




? 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun Sun 


Moon 


a Meridian 


Noon Mark, 


Age 


South 


i lace at 


Declination 


A 


a 


P.ises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Morning. 


Morning. 


Noon 


Morn. 


7 P. M. 


North. 










h m 


h m 


h 


77? 


h 


77! 


h m 


h m 


h m s 


h m s 


days 


h m 


S 




o 


/ // 


i 


SUND. 


153 


4 18 


7 37 


3 7 


1 


18 


7 36 


2 59 


8 25 11 


11 57 35 


28.1 


10 41 


<yj 


29 


22 


9 19 


2 


Mond. 


154 


4 18 


7 37 


Sets 


! 


18 


7 38 


Sets 


8 21 16 


11 57 45 


29.1 


11 39 


8 


13 


22 


17 2 


3 


Tuesd. 


155 


4 17 


7 38 


8 54 


1 


17 


7 39 


9 6 


8 17 21 


11 57 55 


0.7 


Ev.39 


do. 


27 


22 


24 22 


4 


Wed 




156 


4 17 


7 39 


9 54 


t 


17 


7 39 


10 6 


8 13 26 


11 58 


f, 


1.7 


1 39 


n 


LO 


22 


31 19 


5 


Thur. 


157 


4 17 


7 4010 44 


1 


16 


7 40 


10 54 


8 9 3111 58 15 


2.7 


2 37 


do. 23 


22 


37 52 


6 


Friday 


158 


4 16 


7 41 


11 20 


t 


16 


7 40 


11 28 


8 5 3611 58 26 


3.7 


3 31 


25 


6 


22 4,4 1 


7 


Satur. 


159 


4 16 


7 41 


11 49 


I 


1 


7 41 11 57 


8 1 


4l!ll 58 37 


4.7 


4 20 


do. 


19 


22 49 41 


8 


SUND. 


160 


4 16 


7 42 


Morn 


t 


15 


7 41 


Morn 


7 57 45 


11 58 49 


5.7 


5 5 


SI 


1 


22 55 7 


9 


Mond. 


161 


4 16 


7 42 




13 


1 


15 


7 42 


18 


7 53 50 


11 59 


> 


6.7 


5 46 


do. 


13 


23 


4 


10 


Tuesd. 


1624 15 


7 43 




32 


1 


15 


7 43 


34 


7 49 55 


11 59 12 


7.7 


6 26 


do. 25 


23 


4 36 


11 


Wed 




1634 15 


7 43 




51 


1 


15 


7 43 


51 


7 46 


11 59 24 


8.7 


7 5 


rrp 


i 


23 


8 44 


12 


Thur. 


1044 15 


7 44! 1 8 


!: 


15 


7 43 


1 7 


7 42 5 


11 59 36 


9.7 


7 44 


do. 


18 


23 12 28 


13 


Friday 


1654 15 


7 44 


1 25 


t 


15 


7 43 


1 23 


7 38 1011 59 49 


10.7 


8 25 


do. 30 


23 15 47 


14 


Satur. 


1664 15 


7 45 


1 44 


1 


15 


7 44 


1 40 


7 34 15 After 12 


11.7 


9 9 


== 13 


23 18 42 


15 


SUND. 


1674 15 


7 46 


2 6 


1 


15 


7 45 


1 58 


7 30 20 


12 14 


12.7 


9 56 


do. 25 


23 21 12 


16 


Mond. 


1684 15 


7 46 


2 33 


I 


15 


7 45 


2 25 


7 26 25 


13 27 


13.7 


10 48 


n^ 


8 


23 23 17 


17 


Tuesd. 


1694 15 


7 46 Rises 


t 


15 


7 46 


Rises 


7 22 30 


12 39 


14.7 


11 44 


do. 21 


23 24 58 


18 


Wed 




170 


4 15 


7 47 


8 33 


1 


15 


7 47 


8 45 


7 18 34 


12 52 


15.7 


Morn 


t 


i 


23 26 13 


19 


Thur. 


1714 15 


7 47 


9 26 


1 


15 


7 47 


9 38 


7 14 39 


12 1 5 


16.7 


43 


do. 17 


23 27 4 


20 


Friday 


1724 15 


7 47 


10 8 


i 


14 


7 48 


10 18 


7 10 44 


12 1 18 


17.7 


1 43 


>J 


2 


23 27 31 


21 


Satur. 


1734 15 


7 48 


10 44 


1 


14 


7 48 


10 51 


7 6 49 


12 1 31 


18.7 


2 40 


do. 16 


23 27 32 


22 


SUND. 


1744 16 


7 48 


11 10 


1 


15 


7 49 


11 15 


7 2 54 


12 1 44 


19.7 


3 35 


do. 30 


23 2.7 9. 


23 


Mond. 


1754 16 


7 48 


11 24 


t 


15 


7 49 


11 26 


6 58 59 


12 1 57 


20.7 


4 27 


ZZ 14 


23 26 21 


24 


Tuesd. 


1764 16 


7 48 


11 56 


I 


16 


7 49 


11 57 


6 55 4 


12 2 9 


21.7 


5 16 


do. 28 


23 25 8 


25 


Wed. 


1774 16 


7 48 


Morn 


1 


16 


7 48 


Morn 


6 51 9 


12 2 22 


22.7 


6 4 


X 12 


23 23 31 


26 


Thur. 


1784 17 


7 48 




18 


1 


16 


7 48 


16 


6 47 14 


12 2 35 


23.7 


6 52 


do. 26 


23 21 29 


27 


Friday 


1794 17 


7 48 




41 


I 


17 


7 48 


37 


6 43 19 


12 2 47 


24.7 


7 41 


<Y> 10 


23 19 2 


28 


Satur. 


180 


4 18 


7 48 


1 


7 


1 


18 


7 48 


1 1 


6 39 24 


12 2 59 


25.7 


8 33 


do. 24 


23 16 11 


29 


SUND. 


181 


4 18 


7 48 


1 


41 


I 


18 


7 48 


1 32 


6 35 29 


12 3 11 


26.7 


9 28 


8 


* 


23 12 55 


30 


Mond. 


182 


4 19 


7 48 


2 20 


I 


18 


7 48 


2 10 


6 31 34 


12 3 23 


27.7 


10 26 


do. 2223 


9 15, 



PROB. 44. Suppose a man starts from London 
at 12 o clock Monday noon, and travels westward 
with a speed that will carry him around the 
earth in twenty-four hours, where or in what 
longitude will the inhabitants first tell him 
that it is Tuesday noon ? 
PROB. 45. If the diameter of the earth were 



8,000 miles, and it were divested of all seg 
ments so as to render it a solid of 20 equal sides, 
it would have 12 similar and equal pyramidal 
mountains. What would be their height ? 

PROB. 46. Required the smallest four figures 
which being divided by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and ; 
9, will leave 1 each time. 



[105] 



18 



JULY HAS THIRTY-ONE DAYS. 



[1856. 



Day of Month] 


Day of 
Week. 


Remarkable Events. 


ASTRONOMICAL NOTES. 


Polar 
Distance 
of 
Pole Star. 


MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 










o / // 




1 


Tuesd. 


Battle of the Nile, 1798. 


D6 9,h.$- $6 


1 27 40 


PROB. 47. If the figure 


2 


Wed. 


Pilgrim Fathers sailed, 1620. 


iarth farthest Sun. 


1 27 39 


of Problem 55, revolve 


3 


Thur. 


iu died, 1778. 


1st. Venus farthest N. 


1 27 39 


about a perpendicular to 


4 


Friday 


American Independence, 1776. 




1 27 39 


its longest diagonal, -what 


5 


Satur. 


.Sovereigns first issued, 1817. 


Venus in Gemini. 


1 27 39 


area and solidity will be 


6 


SUND. 


th Sunday after Trinity. 




1 27 39 


produced? 


7 


Mond. 


Col. Simcoe Lt. GOT. 1792. 


[Jranus in Taurus. 


1 2T 39 


PROS. 48. The sides 


8 
9 


Tuesd. 
Wed. 


(7) Sheridan died, 1816. 
Queen of the West," burnt, 1853 


Moon in Apogee. 


1 27 39 
1 27 39 


of an equilateral are each 
2 feet. If it revolve 


10 


Thur. iDaguerre died 1851. 


Moon near Mars. 


1 27 39 


about one side, what 


11 


Friday 


(10) Old Loud. Bridge burnt 1212 


Mars 90 E. of Sun. 


1 27 39 


surface and solidity will 


12 


Satur. 


Rattle of theBoyne, 1690. 


$Gr.Elong.W.(2027 ) 


1 27 a ( J 


w 

it generate ? 


13 


SUN !>. ^ tfl Sunday after Trinity. 


Mars in Virgo 


1 27 38 


D 

P-ROT? AQ Tf the tri- 


14 
15 
1G 
17 
18 
19 
20 


Mond. 
Tuesd. 
Wed. 
Thur. 
Friday 
Satur. 
SUND. 


The Bastile destroyed, 1789. 
St. Sioithun. 
Detroit taken, 1812. 
Dr. Watts born, 1674. 
Petrarch died, 1374. 
Kirk takes Quebec, 1629. 
9th Sunday after Trinity. 


Moon farthest South. 

Mercury near Saturn. 
Venus Conj. Sun. 
D near Neptune. 


1 27 38 
1 27 38 
1 27 38 
1 27 38 
1 27 38 
1 27 38 
1 27 37 


J. JXVJii. A.U t 4-1. bl\ VA A 

angle in Problem 48 
revolve about a line per 
pendicular to the end of 
one side, what will be the 
surface and solidity of 
the body produced. 


21 


Mond. 


Union of Engl. & Scotland, 170G. 


Js I 

22nd. ">Z near Moon. 


1 27 37 


PROS. 50. If an ellipse 


22 


Tuesd. 


liauk of B. N. A. estab. 1839. 


* r 1 

Sun enters Cancer. 


1 27 37 


whose transverse and 


23 


Wed. 


Canada Union assented to, 1840, 


Jupiter in Pisces. 


1 27 37 


conjugate diameters are 


24 


Thur. 


Irish Rebellion, 1803. 




1 27 37 


6 and 4 feet, revolve 


25 


Friday 


Battle of Lundy s Lane, 1813. 


Venus in Ascen. node. 


1 27 37 


about its transverse axis, 


20 


ti 

iur. 


Colridge died, 1834. 


Saturn in Gemini. 


1 27 30 


what will be the surface 


27 


SUND. 


Wtk Sunday after Trinity. 


Venus in perihelion. 


1 27 30 


and solidity of the sphe 


23 


Mond. [Robespierre guillotined, 1794. 


Moon highest. 


1 27 30 


roid thus produced ? 


29 


Tuesd. 2S ) Lor( i Durham died, 1840. 


^ Stationary. } <$ ^ 


1 27 36 


PROB. 51. Given to 


30 


Wed. PPi* English Newspaper, 1588. 


j) near Mercury. 


1 27 30 


find x; s 8r+19z= 


3^ 


Thur. Charles X. dethroned, 1830. 


Aloon near Venus. 


1 27 35 


12. 



ANSWERS TO THE EXAMPLES FOP, 1855. 

Ex. 1. Let 39=a, and 216, and z=a side of the required square; then x=ab~(a-\- S) 
13 13-20tks. Ans. 

Ex. 2. Let 40 a, and 3=6, then the sides about the right anglcs= (^a+6)-j/{j(Ja 6) 2 



- 6 j=15, or 8, and hence the hypothenuse=17. Ans. 
Ex. 3. Let 4=a, 8=6, 12 c, then the required chord =( 1 /(4c 2 a 2 )6-f a v / (4c 2 i 2 ))-r- 



=11.676. Ans. 
2c 

Ex. 4. _ Let 29=a, 35=6, 48=c, tnen the radius required=we~?--/ J4a - c 2 (a 2 -fc 2 6 2 )j = 

24. Ans. 
Ex. 5. Superficial area=J/[(a-|-&-f c)(<z+c 6)(a-f 6 c)(i-fc a), or if 2p=a+6+c, then 

area=j/ $p(p a}(p li)(p c). Ans. 
Ex. 6. Let 13=a, 20=6, 21=c, then the perpendicular required=i/ j(a+i-{- c)(a-\-b c) 

. (a_6+c)( a+6-i-c)|-^-2c==12. Ans. 
Ex. 7. Let 25 a, 51=6, 52=c, then the diameter required=j/ j( a-(-6-fc)(a b-\- c ) 

(a-f 6 c ) J-i- v /(a+6+c)=19J Ans. 
Ex. 8. Let 3=a, 5=6, and 6 = c, then diagonal required = /|2a 2 +26 2 c 2 | =4^2= 

5-6568 Ans. 

Note. This question was impossible as it reads. If one diagonal be 6, then the 
other is as above. 

[106] 



Second Summer Month. 



JULY, 1856. 



19 



MOON S 
PHASES. 


!>. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Twilight or Daylight begins and ends at 


-/. 

>. 


- 


Toronto. 


Halifax. 


Montreal. 


Fredricton 


Quebec. 


9 New Moon. 
g) First Quar. 
O Full Moon. 
Last Qua r. 
Q New Moon. 
( Apogee ... 
( Perigee ... 


2 
10 

17 
_!! 
31 
9 
2] 


A wi 
4 13 mo 
2 5 mo 
4 14 ev 
9 45 mo 
3 51 ev 
1 39 mo 
3 21 mo 


h m 
4 45 mo 
2 37 mo 
4 46 ev 
10 17 mo 
4 23 ev 
2 11 mo 
3 53 mo 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


1 
10 
20 
80 


h m 
2 1 
2 14 
2 28 
2 46 


h m 
10 6 
9 56 
9 44 
9 26 


h m 
1 50 
2 2 
2 20 
2 4! 


h m 
10 17 
10 8 
9 54 
9 31 


h m 
1 39 
1 52 
2 12 
2 33 


h m 
10 26 
10 18 
10 1 
9 39 


h m 
1 32 
1 40 
2 6 

2 28 


h m 
10 35 

10 24 
10 6 
9 44 


h m 
1 20 
1 36 
1 58 
I 22 


h m 
10 47 
10 34 
10 14 

9 50 



KpUemeris of the Planets, <fcc. 





V eiius 


Mart 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Sun s 


Sun s 


Venus 


Mars 


Jupit r Saturn 


Venus 


Mars 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Day Mo. 


South 


South 


, South. 


South. 


Longi 


Right 


Bight 


Right 


Right Right 


Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 




Morn. 


Even. 


Morn. 


Morn. 


tude. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. Ascen. 


North. 


South. 


North. 


North. 




A m 


A n 


l A m 


A m 


o / 


A m 


A m 


A m 


h m h m 


o / 


/ 


/ 


/ 


1 ... 


11 41 


6 li 


> 5 53 


11 40 


99 58 


6 43 


6 20 


12 56 


32 6 20 


23 40 


6 24 


1 59 


22 40 


7 ... 


11 49 


6 ; 


[ 5 31 


11 20 


105 41 


7 8 


6 53 


13 6 


33 6 23 


23 26 


7 32 


2 8 


22 39 


13 ... 


11 58 


5 4i 


3 5 9 


11 59 


111 24 


1 O 


7 25 


13 16 


35 6 27 


22 46 


8 44 


2 14 


22 37 


19 ... 


Ev. 6 


5 8( 


> 4 46 


10 39 


117 7 


7 57 


7 56 


13 27 


36 6 30 


21 43 


9 58 


2 18 


22 35 


25 ... 


13 


5 2< 


t 4 19 


10 19 


122 51 


8 21 


8 27 


13 39 


36 6 33 


20 16 


11 13 


2 19 


22 33 


31 ... 


20 


5 H 


! 3 59 


9 58 


128 36 


8 44 


8 58 


13 52 


36 6 36 


18 29 


12 29 


2 18 


22 31 


^ 


Day of 
Week. 


j 


Calendar fo r 




PnlAnrt- > fin* 


DEPARTMENT FOB ALL OF UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


c 
o 


i 


Upper Canada 


and 


Lower Canada and 





O 


Nova Scotia. 


New Brunswick. 


Pole 


Star 


Shadow at 


Mil s 


Moon 


Moon 


s 


Sun s 


j 




Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


in Meridian 


Noon Mark, 


Age 


South 


Place. 


Declination 


1 


fl 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Morning. 


Evening. 


Noon 


Morn. 


7 1 . M. 


North. 










A m 


A m 


A 


m 


A 


m 


A m 


h m 


h m s 


k m s 


days 


A m 


5 


- 


o 


/ // 


1 


Tuesd. 183 


4 19 


1 48 


Sets 


! 


197 47 


Sets 


6 27 39 


12 3 35 


28.7 


11 26 


n 


6 


23 


5 10 


2 


Wed 


184 


4 20 


7 48 


8 33 


! 


20 


7 47 


8 4o 


6 23 44 


12 3 46 


0.3 


Ev.24 


do. 


] ; 


23 


41 


3 


Thur. 


185 


4 20 


7 47 


9 16 


[ 


21 


7 47 


9 26 


6 19 50 


12 3 58 


1.3 


1 20 


25 


L 


22 


55 48 


4 


Friday i "C t 21 


7 47 


9 48 








7 47 55 


6 15 54 


12 4 8 


2.3 


2 11 


do. 


1 ! 


22 


50 81 


5 


Satur. 16 T 4 22 


7 47 


10 15 


\ 


22 


7 46 


10 20 


6 11 58 


12 4 19 


3.3 


2 58 


do. 


1:7 


22 


44 50 


6 


SUND. 188 


4 22 


7 46 


10 35 


1 


28 


7 46 


10 38 


683 


12 4 29 


4.3 


3 41 


SI 


< 

u 


22 


38 45 


7 


Mond. 189 


4 23 


7 40 


10 54 


1 


24 


7 46 


10 56 


648 


12 4 39 


5.3 


4 22 


do. 


2] 


22 


32 17 


8 


Tuesd. 190 


4 24 


7 46 


11 124 25 


7 46 


11 12 


6 13 


12 4 48 


6.3 


5 1 


tru 


g 


22 


25 26 


9 


Wed. 191 


4 25 


7 45 


11 29 


! 


26 


7 45 


11 27 


5 56 18 


12 4 57 


7.3 


5 40 


do. 


If 


22 


18 11 


10 


Thur. 192 


4 25 


7 45 


11 47 


1 


25 


7 45 


11 44 


5 52 23 


12 5 5 


8.3 


6 20 


do. 


26 


22 


10 33 


11 


Friday 1. Q 


4 26 


7 44 


Morn 


! 


26 


7 44 


Horn 


5 48 28 


12 5 13 


9.3 


7 2 


-TV. 


8 


22 


2 32 


12 


Saturl 194 


4 27 


7 44 




8 


[ 


26 


7 44 


1 


5 44 33 


12 5 21 


10.8 


7 47 


do. 


2] 


21 


54 9 


13 


SUND. 195 


4 28 


7 43 




33 


4 


27 


7 43 


24 


5 40 38 


12 6 28 


11.3 


8 37 


HI 


: 


21 


45 23 




Mond. 196 


4 29 


7 42 


1 


5 


t 


28 


7 42 


55 


5 36 43 


12 5 3512.3 


9 31 


do. 


16 


21 


36 15 


15 


Tuesd. 197 


4 30 


7 41 


1 


45 


I 


29 


7 42 


i 34 


5 32 48 


12 5 4113.3 


10 29 


do. 


29 


21 


26 45 


16 


Wed. 




198 


4 30 


7 41 


2 40 


1 


80 


7 42 


2 28 


5 28 53 


12 5 46 


14. 


11 29 


t 


18 


21 


16 53 


17 


Thur. 199 


4 31 


7 40 


Rises 


1 


8] 


7 41 


Rises 


5 24 58 


12 5 51 


15.3 


Morn 


do. 27 


21 


6 39 


18 


Friday 200 


4 32 


7 39 


8 42 


1 


82 


7 40 


8 51 


5 21 8 


12 5 56 


16.3 


29 


V? 


11 


20 


56 4 


19 


Satrtr. 201 


4 33 


7 39 


9 12 


1 


83 


7 39 


9 17 


5 17 8 


12 6 


17.3 


1 27 


do. 26 


20 


45 8 


20 


SUND. 202 


4 34 


7 38 


9 37 


1 


;; s 


7 38 


9 40 


5 13 13 


12 6 3 


18.3 


2 21 


AVfc 
WV 


10 


20 


33 51 


21 


Mond. 203 


4 35 


7 37 


10 


J 


16 


7 37 


10 


5 9 18 


12 6 6 


19.3 


3 12 


do. 24 


20 


22 13 


22 


Tuesd. 


204 


4 36 


7 36 


10 22 


1 


36 


7 36 


lu 21 


5 5 22 


12 6 8 


20.3 


4 1 


3 


9 


20 


10 15 


23 


Wed. 




205 


4 37 


7 35 


10 44 


I 


377 35 


10 41 


5 1 27 


12 6 10 


21.3 


4 49 


do. 23 


19 57-56 


24 


Thur. 


2064 38 


7 34 


11 10 


1 


387 84 


11 5 


4 57 32 


12 6 11 


22.3 


5 38 


T 


7 


19 45 17 


25 


Friday 


207 


4 39 


7 33 


11 41 


1 


397 33 


11 33 


4 53 37 


12 6 12 


23.3 


6 9 


do. 21 


19 32 19 


26 


Satur. 


208 


4 40 


7 32 


Morn 


1 


40 


7 32 


Morn 


4 49 42 


12 6 12 


24.3 


7 23 


V 


6 


19 19 1 


27 


SUND. 


209 


4 41 


7 31 




17 


t 


41 


7 31 


8 


4 45 47 


12 6 11 


25.3 


8 19 


do. 18 


19 


5 23 


28 


Mond. 


210 


4 43 


7 30 


1 


4 


1 


42 


7 30 


52 


4 41 52 


12 6 10 


26.3 


9 17 


n 


1 


18 51 27 


29 


Tuesd. 


211 


4 44 


7 28 


2 


1 


43 


7 29 


1 47 


4 37 57 


12 6 9 


27.3 


10 15 


do. 15 


18 37 12 


30 


Wed. 




212 


4 45 


7 27 


3 2 


t 


447 28 


2 50 


4 34 2 


12 6 6 


28.3 


11 11 


do. 28 


18 22 38 


31 


Thin 




213 


4 46 


7 26 Sets. 


1 


46 


7 26 


Sets. 


4 30 7 


12 6 4 


29.3 


Eve. 3 


55 10 


18 


7 47 



PEOB. 52. Required the smallest four figures 
which being divided by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 
will leave 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 

PROB. 53. The base of a triangular pyramid 
is 4, 5, and 6 feet, and altitude 12. Required 



the largest cube, and largest globe, that can be | of the triangle ? 

[107] 



cut out of it, the cube being cut from the lower 
part, and the globe adjoining above. 

PROB. 54. The three lines drawn from the 
vertices of an equilateral triangle to a point 
within, are 10, 12, and 10. What are the sides 



20 



AUGUST HAS THIRTY-ONE DAYS. 



[1856. 



DayofMonthlj 


Day of 
Week. 


Remarkable Events. 


ASTRONOMICAL NOTES. 


Polar 
Distance 
of 
Pole Star. 


MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 










/ // 




1 


Friday 


Lammas. 


Venus in Cancer. 


1 27 35 


PROB. 55. If the el 


2 


Satur. 


(1) Negro Emancipation. 




1 27 35 


lipse of Problem 50 re 


3 


SUND. 


llth Sunday after Trinity. 


Mars in Libra. 


1 27 35 


volve about its conjugate 


4 


Mond. 


Shelly born, 1692. 




1 27 34 


axis, what will be the 


5 


Tuesd. 


Battle of Brownston, 1812. 


Moon in Apogee. 


1 27 34 


surface and solidity of 


6 


AVed. 


Transfiguration. 




1 27 34 


the spheroid thus pro 


7 


Thur. 


Queen Caroline died, 1821. 


Moon near Mars. 


1 27 34 


duced ? 


8 


Friday 


Marsha: !7e; sto USlS. 




1 27 Si 




9 


Satur. 


Louis Philippe decl. King, 1830. 


Mercury up. ^ Sun. 


1 27 33 


PROB. 56. If the el 


10 


SUND. 


12th. Sunday after Trinity. 




1 27 33 


lipse of Problem 57 re 


11 


Mond. 


Charleston Convent destr. 1S31. 


Jupiter in Pisces. 


1 27 33 


volve about a line per 


12 


Tuesd 


George IV. born, 1762. 


Moon farthest South. 


1 27 32 


pendicular to the end of 


13 


Wed. 


Queen Adelaide born, 1792. 


Venus near Regulus. 


1 27 32 


the transverse axis, what 


14 


Thur. 


Printing Invented, 1437. 




1 27 32 


will be the surface and 


15 


Friday 


Sir Walter Scott born, 1771. 




1 27 32 


solidity of the body thus 


16 


Satur. 


Ben Johnson died, 1637. 


Venus near Mercury. 


1 27 31 


generated ? 


17 


SUND. 


\Wi Sunday after Trinity. 


$ 90 AVest of Sun. 


1 27 31 




18 


Mond. 


Beattie died, 1803. 


17th. Moon in Perigee. 


1 27 31 


PROB. 57. If the el 


19 


Tues. 


Count Rumford died, 1814. 


Moon near Jupiter. 


1 27 31 


lipse of Problem 50 re 


20 


Wed. 


Robert Bloomfield died, 1823. 




1 27 30 


volve about a line per 


21 


Thur. 


(20) Treaty of Washington, 1842. 


Saturn in Gemini. 


1 27 30 


pendicular to the end of 


22 


Friday 


Warren Hastings died, 1818. 


Sun enters Leo. 


1 27 30 


its conjugate axis, what 


23 


tf 

Satur. 


American War com. 1775. 




1 27 29 


will be the surface and 


24 


SUND. 


Hth Sunday after Trinity. 


Venus in Leo. 


1 27 29 


solidity thus generated ? 


25 


Mond. 


David Hume died, 1776. 


Moon Highest. J 6 Sa 


1 27 29 




26 


Tues. 


Prince Albert born, 1819. 


turn. 


1 27 28 


PROB. 58. Required 


27 


Wed. 


(28) Br. Slavery Abol. Bill, 1833. 




1 27 28 


the solidity of an upper 


28 


Thur. 


Goethe died, 1749. 


Uranus in Taurus. 


1 27 28 


conjugate segment of the 


29 


Friday 


John Baptist, beheaded. 




1 27 27 


spheroid of Problem 50, 


30 


Satur. 


Dutch Fleet taken 1799. 


Uranus stationary. 


1 27 27 


its height being 1 foot. 


31 


SUND. 


\5th Sunday after Trinity. 


Moon near Venus & 


1 27 27 





ANSWERS TO THE EXAMPLES FOR 1855. 
Ex. 9. Let o=60, 6=91, and c=161=the two sides, the three being=252. 

Then v/{a 2 +^(6c/(c 2 4a 2 6 2 )--(c 2 6 2 )) }=100, or 61. Ans. 
Ex. 10. Let a, b, c, be the numbers 17, 25, 28, then the distance of the point from the corners 

=abc-+-y {(a+b+c)(b a-fc)(a 6-fc)(a-f6 C )J=14J. 

Ex. 11. Let a=13, 6=20, c=21, r=4 2-3rds, then the radius of circumscribed circle=a6e-H 

2r(a4-6+c)=10 5-6ths. Ans. 

Ex. 12. Let 109=a, 302=26, then the sides required=j{iv / (2a 2 6 2 ) j=91 or 60. Ans. 

Ex. 13. Let 100=r, then the sides of the octagon required=r 1 /(2 1 /2)=76.536. Ans. 

Ex. 14. Let 100=a. The side of the pentagon required=^ay / (10 2 > /5)=117.558. Ans. 

Ex. 15. Let 100=a, then the side of decagon required=a (/(&) 1)=61.8034. Ans. 

Ex. 16. Let 100=a. Side of triangle=fl|/3=173.205. Ans. 

Ex. 17. Let 60=a, 6=15, c=34 17-30ths; then the base=26 v /(2ac 46c 6 2 )-=-(a 26)=43. 
The sum of the other sides=2(a 6)/(2ac 46c 6 2 )-v-(a 26)=129. Their 
product=2ac, from which it is found that the sides required=08, and 61. Ans. 

Ex. 18. Let 4/3=a, then the diameter of the required circle=2 1 /(a 1 /3)=6.928. Ans. 

Note. In this case the vertex of the triangle is supposed to lay in the middle 
point of the arc. If the entire base of the semi-circle be the base of the triangle, 

then it =2 T/ ( 4- VA=^- Ans - 
\ A I 

[108] 



Third Summer Month. 



AUGUST, 1856. 



21 



MOON S PHASES. 


D. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Twilight or Daylight begins and ends at 


BO 

-: 

- 


Toronto. 


Halifax. 


Montreal. 


Fredrict n 


Quebec. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. H. 


) First Quarter ... 
O Full Moon 


8 
16 

22 
30 

5 

17 


h m 
7 5ev 
38 mo 
3 50 ev 
5 57 mo 
7 21 ev 
9 Oev 


h m 
7 37 ev 
1 10 mo 
4 23 ev 
6 29 mo 
7 53 ev 
9 32 ev 


1 
LO 
20 
30 


h m 
2 49 
3 6 
3 22 
3 42 


h m 
9 23 
9 4 
8 43 
8 19 


h m 
2 43 
3 
3 18 
3 38 


h m 
9 29 
9 10 

8 4& 
8 23 


h m 
2 36 
2 55 
3 14 
3 32 


h m 
9 36 
9 15 
8 52 
8 29 


h m 
2 32 
2 51 
3 11 
3 30 


h m 
9 39 
9 181 
8 55 
8 31 


h m 
2 29 
2 47 
3 7 
3 26 


h m 
9 43 
9 23 
8 59 
8 34 


O Last Quarter ... 
New Moon 


li Apogee 


1) Perigee 



Epliemeris of the Planets* &c. 





Venus 


Mars 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Sun s 


Sun s 


("enus 


Mar s 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Venus 


Mars 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Day Mo. 


South 


South 


South, 


South, 


Longi 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 




Even. 


t.ven. 


Morn. 


Morn. 


tude. 


Ascen, 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


North. 


South. 


North. 


North 




h m 


h m 


A m 


h m 


o / 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


1 ... 


21 


5 11 


3 59 


9 55 


129 33 


8 48 


9 3 


13 54 


36 


6 37 


18 9 


12 21 


2 17 


22 31 


7 ... 


27 


5 1 


3 55 


9 34 


135 18 


9 11 


9 33 


14 7 


35 


6 40 


16 1 


13 57 


2 12 


22 28 


13 ... 


32 


4 51 


3 31 


9 13 


141 4 


9 341 


.0 2 


14 20 


35 


6 43 


13 36 


15 11 


2 4 


22 26 


19 ... 


37 


4 42 


2 42 


8 53 


146 50 


9 561 


.0 30 


14 35 


33 


6 45 


10 58 


16 25 


1 54 


22 23 


25 ... 


41 


4 33 


2 17 


8 32 


152 37 


10 18] 


.0 58 


14 50 


32 


6 48 


8 9 


17 36 


1 42 


22 20 


31 ... 


45 


4 25 


1 51 


8 10 


158 25 10 40 ] 


.1 25 


15 6 


30 


6 50 


5 13 


18 45 


1 27 


22 18 


a 


Day of 
Week. 


c 


Calendar for 




Pfllmirlar fnr 


DEPARTMENT FOR ALL OF UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


I 


M 


Upper Canada and 


Lower Canada and 


a 


3 


Nova Scotia. 


New Brunswick. 


Pole 


Star 


Shadow at 


Mn s 


Moon 


Moon s 


Sun s 


^ 


, 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


in Meridian 


Xoon Mark. 


Age, 


South 


Place, 


Declination 


I 





Rises. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Se+s. 


Morning. 


Evening. 


Noon. 


Even. 


7 P. M. 


North. 










h m 


h m 


h m 


h 


m 


h m 


h m 


h m s 


h m s 


days 


h m 


S 


p 


o 


/ // 


1 


Friday 


214 


4 47 


7 25 


8 16 


t 


47 


1 25 


8 23 


4 26 11 


12 6 


<> 


0.8 


52 


25 


28 


17 


52 37 


2 


Satur. 


215 


4 48 


7 24 


8 39 


, 


48 


7 24 


8 43 


4 22 16 


12 5 56 


1.8 


1 36 


SI 


5 


17 


37 10 


3 


SUND. 


216 


4 49 


7 22 


8 58 


1 


50 


7 22 


9 


4 18 21 


12 5 51 


2.8 


2 18 


do. 


17 


17 


21 26 


4 


Mond. 


217 


4 50 


7 21 


9 16 


\ 


51 


7 21 


9 17 


4 14 26 


12 5 46 


3.8 


2 58 


do. 


29 


17 


5 25 


5 


Tuesd. 


218 


4 51 


7 20 


9 33 


1 


52 


7 20 


9 31 


4 10 31 


12 5 40 


4.8 


3 37 


TTJ7 


11 


16 


49 7 


6 


Wed. 


219 


4 53 


7 19 


9 51 


I 


54 


7 18 


9 48 


4 6 35 


12 5 34 


5.8 


4 16 


do. 


28 


16 


32 33 


7 


Thur. 


220 


4 54 


7 1710 10 


1 


64 


7 16 


10 5 


4 2 40 


12 5 26 


6.8 


4 56 


-A. 


4 


16 


15 43 


8 


Friday 


221 


4 55 


7 1610 31 


I 


56 


7 14 


10 24 


3 58 45 


12 5 19 


7.8 


5 40 


do. 


I 1 . 


15 


58 37 


9 


Satur. 


222 


4 56 


7 1411 1 


! 


57 


7 13 


10 52 


3 54 50 


12 5 10 


8.8 


6 27 


do. 


29 


15 


41 16 


10 


SUND. 


223 


4 57 


7 1311 37 


( 


59 


7 11 


11 27 


3 50 55 


12 5 


1 


9.8 


7 18 


"I 


1! 


15 


23 40 


11 


Mond. 


2244 58 


7 12 Morn 


5 





7 10 


Morn 


3 47 


12 4 52 


10.8 


8 14 


do. 


24 


15 


5 50 


12 


Tuesd. 


225 


4 59 


7 10 




24 


5 


1 


7 9 


12 


3 43 4 


12 4 42 


11.8 


9 12 


t 


7 


14 


47 45 


13 


Wed. 


226 


5 1 


7 9 




I 24 


5 


2 


7 8 


1 12 


3 39 9 


12 4 31 


12.8 


10 13 


do. 


21 


14 


29 26 


14 


Thur. 


227 


5 2 


7 7 


2 35 


. , 


3 


7 5 


2 25 


3 35 14 


12 4 20 


13.8 


11 12 


VJ 


5 


14 


10 53 


15 


Friday 


228 


5 3 


7 5 


Rises 


5 


4 


7 4 


Rises 


3 31 19 


12 4 


8 


14.8 


Morn 


do. 


20 


13 


52 7 


16 


Satur. 


229 


5 4 


7 4 


7 40 


5 


6 


7 2 


7 44 


3 27 24 


12 3 56 


15.8 


8 


wv 


5 


13 


33 7 


17 


SUND. 


230 


5 5 


7 2 


8 2 


5 


8 


7 


8 4 


3 23 28 


12 3 43 


16.8 


1 2 


do. 


20 


13 


13 55 


18 


Mond. 


231 


5 6 


6 1 


8 26 


."> 


9 


6 59 


8 25 


3 19 33 


12 3 30 


17.8 


1 53 


X 


-1 


12 


54 30 


19 


Tuesd. 


232 


5 8 


6 59 


8 48 


5 


9 


6 57 


8 45 


3 15 38 


12 3 17 


18.8 


2 43 


do. 


19 


12 


34 53 


20 


Wed. 


233 


5 9 


6 57 


9 14 


5 


10 


6 56 


9 9 


3 11 43 


12 3 


2 


19.8 


3 33 


T 


8 


12 


15 3 


21 


Thur. 


234 


5 10 


6 56 


9 41 


5 


12 


6 54 


9 34 


3 7 47 


12 2 48 


20.8 


4 25 


do. 


is 


11 


55 2 


22 


Friday 


235 


5 11 


6 54 


10 18 


5 


13 


6 53 


10 8 


3 3 52 


12 2 33 


21.3 


5 18 


y 


2 


11 


34 49 


23 


Satur. 


236 


5 12 


6 53 


11 


5 


14 


6 50 


10 49 


2 59 57 


12 2 17 


22.8 


6 14 


do. 


l-"i 


11 


14 26 


24 


SUND. 


237 


5 13 


6 51 


11 63 


.", 


16 


6 48 


11 41 


2 56 1 12 2 1 


23.8 


7 12 


do. 


28 


10 


53 51 


25 


Mond. 


238 


5 14 


6 49 


Morn 


.-> 


17 


6 47 


Morn 


2 52 6 


12 1 45 


24.8 


8 10 


n 


11 


10 


33 6 


26 


Tuesd. 


239 


5 16 


6 48 




52 


5 


18 


6 46 


40 


2 48 11 


12 1 28 


25.8 


9 G 


do. 


24 


10 


12 11 


27 


Wed. 


240 


5 17 


6 46 


1 58 


5 


19 


6 43 


1 48 


2 44 15 


12 1 11 


26.8 


9 59 


25 


7 


9 


51 6 


28 


Thur. 


241 


5 18 


6 44 


3 6 


,", 


20 


6 42 


2 58 


2 40 20 


12 54 


27.8 


10 48 


do. 


19 


9 


29 51 


29 


Friday 


242 


5 19 


6 42 


4 11 


5 


21 


6 41 


4 5 


2 36 25 


12 36 


28.8 


11 33 


si 


2 


9 


8 27 


SO 


Satur. 


243 


5 20 


6 40 Sets. 


> 


22 


6 38 


Sets. 


2 32 29 


12 18 


0.2 


Ev.16 


do. 


M 


8 


46 55 


31 


SUND. 


244 


5 21 


6 39 


7 22 


5 


236 37 


7 23 


2 28 34 


12 





1.2 


56 


do. 


26 


8 


25 14 


PEOB 


. 59. From a cask containing 324 gal- 


the 


cask. 


How 


much wine was 


drawn 


each 


Ions of wine, a certain quantity 


is drawn, and 


time? 


then it 


is filled with water, and then the same 


PEOB. 60. In an isoceles triangle there are 


quantity of the mixture is 


drawn 


, and so on for 


inscribed 


3 circles ; the radius of 


the largest 


four times, filling up with water at every 


and 


smallest are 16 and 9. Required the size 


draught, when 81 gallons 


of pure wine 


was in 


of the triangle. 



[109] 



22 



SEPTEMBER HAS THIRTY DAYS. 



[1856. 



DayofMontbJ 


Day of 
Week. 


Remarkable Events. 


ASTRONOMICAL NOTES. 


Polar 

Distance 
of 
Pole Star. 


MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 










/ // 




1 


Mond. 


Cartier discovered Saguenay, 1535 


Mercury in Desc. node. 


1 27 26 


PROB. 61. Required 


2 


Tuesd. 


London burnt, 1666. 


Moon in Apogee. 


1 27 26 


the solidity of an upper 


3 


Wed. 


Cromwell died, 1658. 


Venus in Leo. 


1 27 26 


transverse t segment of 


4 


Thur. 


Blake born, 1657. 


Venus South, 0.47 Eve. 


1 27 25 


the spheroid of Prob 


5 


Friday 


Lord Metcalf died, 18-16. 


Moon near Mars. 


1 27 25 


lem 50, its height being 


6 


Satur. 


James II. died, 1701. (Uranusin Taurus. 


1 27 25 


2 feet. 


7 


sum 


IGth Sunday after Trinity. 


Mars in Libra. 


1 27 24 


PROB. 62. If a trans 


8 


Mond. 


Nativity B. V. M. 


Moon farthest South. 


1 27 24 


verse segment of the el 


9 


Tuesd. 


William the Conqueror died, 1087 




1 27 24 


lipse of Problem 50, re 


10 


Wed. 


Mungo Park died, 1771. 


Venus on Equator. 


1 27 23 


volve about its transverse 


11 


Thur. 


Lord Thurlow died, 1S06. 


Mercury in Aphelion. 


1 27 23 


axis, what surface and 


12 


Friday 


Siege of Vienna, 1683. 




1 27 23 


solidity will it produce, 


13 


Satur. 


Battle Quebec. Wolf killed 1759- 


Jupiter in Pisces. 


1 27 22 


the height of the segment 


14 


SUND. 


Yith Sunday after Trinity. 


15th. Moon in Perigee. 


1 27 22 


being 2 feet ? 


15 
16 


Mond. 
Tuesd. 


Malta taken 1800. 
George I. landed in England, 1714 


Moon near Jupiter. 
Venus South, 0.54 Eve. 


1 27 22 
1 27 21 


PROB. 63. Given to 

"Pi Tl f\ f * 


17 


Wed. 


Siege of Gibralter ended, 1782. 




1 27 21 


i I 11! I JL: , 

f 1 /I \ 1 "* 1 


ISiThur. 


Lawrence Sterne died, 1766. 


M near Moon. 


1 27 20 


f i LL_i*l 


19iFriday 


Battle of Poictiers, 1359. 




1 27 20 


u+z U-HW f 


20Satur. 


Battle of Newbury, 1643. 


Moon farthest North. 


1 27 20 

1f\ t-r 1O 


T/2z 


21.SUND. 


ISth Sunday after Trinity. 


22nd. Moon near lj 


2< 19 


12 


22 


Mond. 


George III. crowned, 1761. 


Sun enters Virgo. 


1 27 19 




23 


Tuesd. 


Battle of Assaye, 1803. 


22nd. g Gr. Elong. E. 


1 27 19 


PROB. 64. If a con 


24 


Wed. 


(25) Person died, 1808. 


Moon near Regulus. 


1 27 18 


jugate segment of the 


25 


Thur. 


Colurubus s second voyage, 1492. Saturn in Gemini. 


1 27 18 


ellipse of Problem 50, 


26 


Friday 


Philadelphia captured, 1777. 


Jupiter cP Sun. 


1 27 171 revolve about its con- 


27 


Satur. 


Nelson born, 1758. 


Venus South, 1.1 Eve. 


1 27 17| jugate axis, what will be 


28 


SUND. 


IQth Sunday after Trinity. 


Sun eclipsed, invisible. 


1 27 17 


the solidity of the body 


29 


Mond. 


Michaelmas. 


Moon in Apogee. 


1 27 16 


produced, its height be 


30 


Tuesd. 


Maj. Gen. Sir J. Brock, Pres.1811 


Moon near Venus. 


1 27 16 


ing 1 foot ? 



ANSWERS TO THE EXAMPLES FOR 1855. 

Ex. 19. Let 52=2(7, 104=6, 1 /(2029)=c, then the sides=6/(a 2 -f c 2 6 2 )=53 and 51. Ans. 
Ex. 20. Let 75=<z, 61=6, -/(3889)=c, then thebase=2 1 / |^( a 2_j_6 2 ) c2J=56. Ans. 

Ex. 21. Let 194=6, 66=a, and 200=rZ, then the one side=/ j (a z ?i4-mn-} \ =81.3656, and 

( m ) 

the other = / j - (a 2 m -f nm 2 ) I =157.4895. 

In these formula?, m=$b-\-%-{/(b 2 lr 2 ) and n=ll> \^/ (V 1 4r 2 ), and r=the 
product of the segments of the base, or r=a\y (\a--\-de) \a, in which e=|/ 



Ex. 22. Let 12=a, 7=r, then the sum of the legs=2r 2 -=-(2r a)=49, and their product=2r 2 a 
^-(2r a)=588. The legs will be expressed by r jri/(r 2 4ra-f-2a 2 ) j-r- 
(2r a),=21, or 28. Ans. 
The hypothenuse=2r(a r)-^-(2r a)=35. Ans. 

Ex. 23. Let 12=cz, then the radii of the circles required=a(2|/3 3)=5.568. Aus. 
Ex. 24. Let 4=ce, then a {K 3 ^ 5 )} =10.472, or 6.472. Ans. 

Note. As the question reads, it is immaterial about the base. 

Ex. 25. Let 39=a, 6=24, and 8 : 5 : : m : n, then one side=j/( 6 2 -f (am 2 -r-(w 2 2 )i: 
m 4_ f .( m 2_ n 2^_ a 2 m 2_ H ( m 2_ w 2)_ i 2 J. ) 2 J=40. The other side=40/i-v-i=25 A 

[HO] 



Ans. 



First Fall Month. 



SEPTEMBER, 1856. 



MOON S PHASES. 


!>. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Twilight or Daylight begins and 


ends at 


CQ 

>. 

r- 
- 


Toronto. 


Halifax. [Montreal. 


Fredrict n! Quebec. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End. 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. JI. 


End 

P. M. 


First Quarter ... 
O Full Moon 


7 
1 ! 
21 
28 
2 
L6 


A ra 
10 39 mo 
8 51 mo 
31 mo 
10 31 ev 
10 21 mo 
2 33 mo 


h m 
11 12mo 
9 23 mo 
1 3 mo 
11 3ev 
10 53 mo 
3 5 mo 


1 

LO 
20 
30 


h m 
3 41 
3 55 
4 8 
4 21 


h m 
8 19 
7 58 
7 38 
7 19 


h m 
3 38 
3 52 
4 7 
4 20 


h m 
8 21 
8 1 
7 39 
7 20 


h m 
3 35 
3 50 
4 3 

4 18 


h m 
8 24 
8 3 
7 44 
7 21 


A m 
3 33 
3 48 
4 4 
4 18 


A w 
8 26 
8 5 
7 43 
- 02 


h m 
3 30 
3 4G 
4 
4 17 


h m 
8 2H 

8 8 

7 4(i 

7 :;"! 


O Last Quarter ... 
New Moon 
3 Apogee .. 


1) Peri nee 



Epliemeris of the Planets, ifcc. 





\enus 


Mars 


Jupit r Saturi 


i Sun s 


Sun s 1 


k enus 


Mar s 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Venue 


Mar s 


Jupit i 


Saturn 


Day Mo. 


South f 


>outh, 


South, South 


. Longi- ! 


Jight 


Right 


Kight 


Kight 


Kight 


Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 




Even. 


.Even. 


Morn. Morn 


tude. 1 


Lsceu. . 


Lscen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


North. 


South. 


North. 


North. 




h m 


h m 


h m h 11 


l f 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


/ 


o / 


/ 


/ 


1 ... 


46 


4 23 


1 41 8 


?159 241 


441 


1 30 


15 8 


29 


6 51 


4 43] 


8 56 


1 25 


22 17 


7 ... 


49 


4 16 


1 21 7 4 


5165 131 


1 61 


1 57 


15 24 


27 


6 53 


<tl 4020 


1 822 15 


13 ... 


53 


4 8 


59 7 2 


1171 31 


1 271 


2 24 


15 41 


24 


6 55 


si 2421 


5022 12 


19 ... 


56 


4 2 


28 7 


2176 551 


1 49] 


[2 51 


15 58 


21 


6 57 


4 21)21 54 


31 


22 10 


25 ... 


1 


3 56 


Even. 6 4 


0182 4812 10: 


L3 19 


16 15 


18 


6 58 


7 3022 43 


N 12 


22 8 


30 ... 


1 3 


3 51 


11 36 62 


1 187 4312 28 


3 42 


16 30 


16 


6 59 


9 5723 18 


S 4122 7 


g 






gj 


Calendar for 


Calendar for 














g 


T\ 




1 


Upper Canada and 


Lower Canada and 


DEPARTMENT FOR 


AIL OF UPPER A:JD LOUVER CANADA. 




Uav 






Nova Scotia 
















G 


Week. 


*o 







1 ole 


Star 


Shadow at 


Mn s 


Aii ion 


Moon s 


Sun s 


^ 






>^ 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


in Meridian 


\oon Mark, 


Age 


South, 


Place 


at 


)eclination 


f 






p 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Sets. 1 


Uses. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Morning. 


Morning. 


Noon. 


Even. 


7 P. M. 


South. 










h m 


h m 


h m i 


i m 


h m 


h m 


h m s 


h m S 


days 


h m 


S 


o 





/ // 


1 


Mond. 


245 


5 23 


6 37 


7 39- 


) 25 


6 35 


7 39 


2 24 39 


11 59 41 


2.2 


1 35 


TT^ 


7 


8 


3 24 


2 


Tuesd. 


246 


5 24 


6 35 


7 55. 


3 26 


6 32 


7 53 


2 20 43 


11 59 22 


3.2| 2 14 


do. 


19 


7 


41 27 


3 


Wed. 


247 


5 25 


6 33 


8 17 


3 28 


6 30 


8 13 


2 16 48 


11 59 


3 


4.2 


2 53 


_. 


1 


7 


19 22 


4 


Thar. 


248 


5 26 


6 31 


8 35 


5 30 


6 28 


8 29 


2 12 53 


11 58 43 


5.2 


3 35 


do. 


13 


6 


57 10 


5 


Friday 


249 


5 27 


6 30 


9 


5 31 


6 27 


8 52 


2 8 57 


11 58 23 


6.2 


4 20 


do. 


25 


6 


34 53 


6 


Satur. 


250 


5 28 


6 28 


9 31 


5 32 


6 24 


9 21 


252 


11 58 


8 


7.2 


5 9 


m, 


7 


6 


12 28 


7 


SUND. 


251 


5 306 26 


10 135 33 


6 23 


10 


216 


11 57 43 


8.2 


6 1 


do. 


19 


6 


49 57 


8 


Mond. 


2525 8l|6 24 


11 65 34 


6 22 


11 54 


1 57 11 


11 57 23 


9.2 


6 57 


t 


o 


5 


27 21 


9 


Tucsd. 


253 


5 3216 22 


Morn 


5 35 


6 19 


12 


1 53 15 


11 57 


2 


10.2 


7 56 


do. 


16 


5 


4 39 


10 


Wed. 


254 


5 336 20 


11 


5 36 


6 18 


Morn 


1 49 19 


11 56 41 


11.2 


8 54 


do. 


29 


! 


41 53 


11 


Thur. 


255 


5 346 19 


1 265 37 


6 15 


1 16 


1 45 24 


11 56 20 


12.2 


9 51 


Y3 


13 


4 


19 1 


12 


Friday 


256 


5 356 17 


2 465 80 


6 13 


2 38 


1 41 29 


11 55 59 


13.2 


10 46 


do. 


28 


3 


56 6 


13 


Satur. 


257 


5 376 15 


Rises 5 40 


6 12 


Rises 


1 37 34 


11 55 3814.2 


11 39 


AW 

vw 


13 


3 


33 5 


14 


SUND. 


258 


5 386 13 


6 27 


5 41 


6 9 


6 27 


1 33 38 


11 55 17 


15.2 


Morn 


do. 


28 


3 


10 1 


15 


Mond. 


259 


5 396 11 


6 495 43 


6 7 


6 47 


1 29 43 


11 54 56 


16.2 


31 


K 


13 


2 


46 54 


16 


Tuesd. 


260 


5 406 9 


7 15 


5 44 


6 6 


7 10 


1 25 47 


11 54 35 


17.2 


1 22 


do. 


28 


2 


23 43 


17 


Wed. 


261 


5 416 7 


7 41 


5 45 


6 3 


7 35 


1 21 51 


11 54 13 


18.2 


2 15 


V 


13 


2 


29 


18 


Thur. 


262 


5 426 6 


8 155 46 


6 2 


8 C 


1 17 56 


11 53 52 


19.2 


3 9 


do. 


27 


1 


37 13 


19 


Friday 


263 


5 446 4 


8 57 


5 48 


6 C 


8 45 


1 14 


11 53 31 


20.2 


4 6 


^ 


12 


1 


13 54 


20 


Satur. 


264 


r> 456 2 


9 47 


5 49 


5 57 


9 35 


1 10 5 


11 53 19 


21.2 5 5 


do. 


25 





50 34 


21 


SUND 


265 


5 466 


10 46 


5 51 


5 55 


10 34 


1 


6 9 


11 52 49 


22. 2 6 4 


n 


8 





27 11 


22 


Mond. 


266 


5 475 58 


11 50 


5 52 


5 53 


11 4C 


1 


2 13 


11 52 28 


23.2 7 2 


do. 


21 





3 48 


23 


Tuesd. 


267 


5 485 5f 


Morn 


5 52 


5 52 


Morn 


58 18 


11 52 


7 


24.2 7 56 


23 


4 


El 


.19 37 


24 


Wed. 


268 


5 49 ! 5 54 


53 


5 54 


5 5C 


4E 


54 22 


11 51 47 


25. 2 8 46 


do. 


16 





43 2 


25 


Thur. 


26! 


5 505 52 


2 3 


5 56 


5 48 


1 5t 


50 27 


11 51 26 


26. 2 9 32 


do. 


29 


1 


6 28 


26 


Friday 


27C 


5 52 5 51 


3 8 


5 56 


5 4C 


3 


46 31 


11 51 


6 


27.210 15 


SI 


11 


1 


29 53 


27 


Satur. 


271 


5 535 49 


4 11 


5 57 


5 4 


4 c 


42 35 


11 50 46 


28.210 55 


do. 


22 


1 


53 18 


28 


SUND 


272 


5 545 47 


Sets 


5 59 


5 4? 


Sets 


38 40 


11 50 27 


29.211 84 


nj; 


4 


2 


16 42 


29 


Mond. 


27 


5 555 45 


6 46 ( 


5 40 


6 1 


34 44 


11 50 


7 


0. 5Ev.l8 


do. 


16 


2 


40 5 


30 


Tuesd 


274 


5 575 43 


6 186 2 


5 38 


6 14 


30 48 


11 49 48 


1.5 ; 52 


do. 


28 


3 


3 27 



PKOB. 65. The sum of 6 numbers in arith 
metical progression is 33, and the sum of their 
squares is 199. Required the numbers. 

PROB. 66. From a point in a square county 
to the corners, are 13, 27, 21, and 31.6385 
miles. What is the size of the county ? 

PROS. 67. With -what Telocity per second 



must a ball be discharged in a vertical direction, 
that it may never return, the earth s radius being 
3956.2 miles, no resisting medium being con 
sidered ? 

PROB. 68. The radius of a circle is 100 ; -what 
is the radius of 15 equal circles inscribed within 
it, tangent to it and to each other ? 



[HI] 



OCTOBER HAS THIRTY-ONE DAYS. 



[1856. 



t 



Day of 
Week. 



Remarkable Events. 



i 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Wed. 
Thur. 
Friday 
Satur. 

SUND. 
Moncl. 
7 Tuesd. 



Corneille died, 1684. 

|Cartier arrived at Montreal, 1535 

Old St. Matthew. 

(3) Dey of Algiers strangled, 1817 

20t7i Sunday after Trinity, 

Louis Philippe born, 1773. 

Great Fire at Miramichi, 1825. 



Wed. Sheridan born, 1751. 
Thur. ! Dutch Fleet defeated, 1797. 
Friday Benjamin West born, 1783. 
Satur" .Canova died, 1822. 
SUND. l 2lst Sunday after Trinity. 
Mond. Battle of Queenston, 1812. 
Tuesd. Battle of Hastings, 10G6. 
Wed. Murat shot, 1815. 
Thur. Kosciusko died, 1817. 
Friday sir Miillip Sydney killed, 1586. 
Satur. i Battle of Leipsic, 1813. 
SUNDJ 2 - nd Sunday after Trinity. 
Mond. i Battle of Navai-ino, 1827. 
Tuesd. Battle of Trafalgar, 1805. 
Wed. L l Holland died, 1840. 
Thur. Battle of Edgehill, 1842. 
Friday Edict of Nantes revoked, 1685. 
Satur. ( 2G ) Hogarth died, 1764. 
SUND. - 3rd Sunday after Trinity. 
Mond. Sir Walter Raleigh beh. 1618. 
Tuesd. Alfred the Great died, 900. 
Wed. Morland died, 1804. 
Thur. C 29 ) Battle of Fort Erie. 
Friday A11 hallow Eve. 



ASTRONOMICAL NOTES. 



Moon near Mercury. 
Venus in Libra. 
Venus South, 1.5 Eve. 
Moon near Mars 9 6 $ 
Mercury Stationary. 
Saturn 90 W. of Sun. 
6th. Moon lowest. 
Jupiter South, 11 Eve. 
Mars in Scorpio. 
Venus South, 1.11 Eve. 
Moon near Neptune. 
Moon near Jupiter. 
Moon perigee. 
1 3th. Moon eclipsed. 
Moon near Uranus. 
Venus South, 1.1 6 Eve. 

Inf. <$ Sun. 
Moon highest. 
Saturn near Moon. 
Jupiter South, 10.8 Ev. 

in Ascen. node. 
Moon near Regulus. 
Sun efaters Libra. 
Venus South, 1.24 Eve. 
Mercury Stationary. 
Saturn Stationary. 
Moon (5 Mercury, 
Jupiter South, 9.33 Ev. 
Mars farthest South. 
Venus South 1-32 Eve. 
Moon near Regulus. 



Polar 
Distance 

of 
Pole Star. 



o /. // 



1 27 

1 27 
1 27 
1 27 
1 27 
1 27 
1 27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
1 27 
1 27 
1 27 
1 27 
1 27 



MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 



PROB. G9. " Given z* 
2^-1- a:=132" to find z. 
PROB. 70. If a trans- 



14 verse segment of the el- 



! I 
i I 
13 
L8 
12 
L2 
12 
1 i 
1 1 
1 1 
LO 
10 



8 



lipse of Problem 50, 
whose height is 2 feet, 
revolve about its base, 
what will be the solidity 
of the body thus made ? 

PROB. 71. If a conju 
gate segment of the el 
lipse of Problem 50, 
whose height is 1 foot, 
revolve about its base, 
what will be the solidity 
of the body thus pro 
duced ? 

PROB. 72. If the base 
of a parabola be 6 feet, 
and its height or axis 8 



8 feet, and it revolve about 
8 its axis, what will be the 
surface and solidity of 
the body it will make ? 

PROB. 73. If an hy 
perbola, whose height is 
6 8 feet and base 6 feet, 
revolvo about its axis, 
what will be the surface 
and solidity of the body 
generated ? 



Ex. 26. 
Ex. 27. 

Ex. 28. 
Ex. 29. 
Ex. 30. 



Ex. 31. 
Ex. 32 



ANSWERS TO THE EXAMPLES FOR 1855. 

Let 21 a, 30=, and 80=A, then the area=Ja6 sin A=310.214457. Ans. 

Area= Bx^=}^/2(Bx^-J r x&c), or Gx*x= l /2(Sx*z-- X te). Hence dividing by x& we get 
.j/2 (a;2*-4-3)=6. Squaring both sides, after transposing, we get xkr=l> (54 36^/2). 
Therefore J Sx^=^(Sl 54 1 /2)=2.3162328. Ans. 

Let 108=a 2 , then sides will=|a 1 /6=9 l /2 ; %a l /6=12 l /2 ; and |a l /2=15 v /2. Ans. 

Let 10=a, the side=a v /(2 /3)=5-17687064. Ans. 

Let 4140=Ja, 202=6, 41=c. The perpendicular falling upon c=a-=-c; and the third 
side=/|c 2 +6 2 2 v /(6 2 c 2 a 2 )|=207, or 205.234. Ans. 

Note. Mr. Sheehan has furnished a formula for this problem substantially the 
same as the above. 



Let 25=a, 35=6, 31=c, 19=d, and z=diagonal, then z 2 =J(a 2 +c 2 ) 
( C 2_ a 2)2 j. =(37-9)2. and Jz 2 =}(37-9) 2 =718-205 area required. Ans. 

Let 20.2825=a, and 3z=perp. and 4z the base, then 5z hypoth., and 2r=diameter 

12 
of inscribed circle. Then z=side of inscribed square. Hence z 2 X3.1416 

/ 1 o r \2 ( ) 

f ~-\ =a, and x=tf | a -=- (3.1416144 -t- 49) J =10. Hence 3x=30, 4z=40, 

5x=50. Ans. 

Ex. 33. The area enclosed by the circumferences of the two circles is intended to bo under 
stood. Ans. 12115.06, the two small segments being=765.5. 
Can some one give us a literal formula for this ? 

[112] 



Second Fall Month. 



OCTOBER, 1856. 



25 



MOON S PHASES. 


H. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Twilight or Daylight begins and ends at 


CO 

-. 
^ 


Toronto. 


Halifax. 


Montreal. 


Fredrictn 


Quebec. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

\. M. 


End 

P. M. 


) First Quarter ... 
O Full Moon 
@ Last Quarter ... 
@ \ew Moon 


7 
13 
20 
28 
L8 
26 


A m 
20 mo 
5 42 ev 
49 ev 
4 37 ev 
1 15 ev 
9 21 ev 


h m 
53 mo 
6 14 ev 
1 22 ev 
5 10 ev 
1 47 ev 
9 53 ev 


1 
LO 
20 
30 


h m 
4 22 
4 34 
4 45 
4 56 


h m 
7 16 
7 
6 44 

6 27 


h m 
4 21 
4 33 
4 45 
4 56 


h m 
1 18 
7 1 
6 40 

6 27 


h m 
4 21 
4 32 
4 45 

5 9 


h m 
7 18 
7 2 
6 45 
6 23 


h m 
4 19 
4 31 
4 46 
5 5 


h m 
7 20 
7 2 
6 43 
6 21 


h m 
4 18 
4 31 
4 44 
4 57 


h m 
7 21 
7 3 
6 45 
6 29 


J) Perigee 


T> Anoeee 



ISphemerli of the Planets, <fcc. 





Venus 


Mars 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Sun s 


Sun s 


Venus 


Mars 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Venus 


Mars 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Day Mo. 


South. 


South 


South, 


South 


Longi 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Right, 


Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl, 




Even. 


Even. 


Even. 


Morn. 


tude. 


Asceu. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


South. 


South. 


South. 


North. 




h m 


h IT 


h m 


A 771 


o / 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


/ 


o / 


/ 


o / 


1 ... 


1 4 


3 5C 


11 31 


6 18 


188 42 


12 32- 


L8 46 


16 33 


15 


6 59 


10 26 


23 25 


7 


22 7 


7 ... 


1 8 


3 4 


11 5 


5 55 


194 37 


L2 5414 14 


16 52 


12 


7 


13 13 


24 


25 


22 5 


13 ... 


1 13 


3 4C 


10 38 


5 32 


200 33 


13 1614 43 


17 11 


9 


7 1 


15 49 


24 26 


42 


22 4 


19 ... 


1 19 


3 36 


10 12 


5 


g 


206 31 


L3 3815 13 


17 30 


7 


7 1 


18 12 


24 45 


58 


22 4 


2 . ... 


1 26 


3 35 


9 46 


4 46 


212 30 


14 116 43 


17 49 


5 


7 2 


20.17 


24 54 


1 11 


22 4 


31 ... 


1 33 


3 28 


9 21 


4 22 


218 30 


4 2416 14 


18 9 


3 


7 1 


1-1 -1 


24 54 


1 22 


22 4 


a 


Day of 
Week. 


.. 


Calendar for 




r*nlon(lr fnr 


DEPARTMENT FOR ALL OF UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


e 

c 


3 


Upper Canada and 


Lower Canada and 


S 


5 


Nova Scotia. 


New Brunswick. 


i ole Star 


Shadow at 


Mn s 


Moon 


Muou s 


Sun s 


c 




Sun 


Sun 


Moou 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


in Meridian 


Noon Mark. 


Age 


South, 


Place 


:.: 


Declination 


S 


a 


Rises. 


Bet* 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Morning. 


Morning. 


Noon. 


Even. 


7 P. M. 


South. 










h m 


h m 


h m 


A 


m 


h m 


h m 


h m s 


h m 


t 


days 


h m 


S 








/ // 


1 


Wed 




275 


5 58 


5 41 


6 40 


6 


4 


3 30 


6 34 


26 52 


11 49 29 


2.5 


I 34 


-n- 


n 


3 


26 46 


2 


Thur. 


276 


5 59 


5 40 


7 3 


6 


5 


5 33 


6 55 


22 57 


11 49 10 


3.5 


2 17 


do. 


22 


3 


50 4 


3 


Friday 


277 


6 


5 38 


7 326 


6 


5 32 


7 22 


19 1 


11 48 52 


4.5 


3 4 


"I 


4 


4 


13 18 


4 


Satur. 


2786 1 


5 36 


8 9 


6 


7 


o 31 


7 58 


15 5 


11 48 34 


5.5 


3 55 


do. 


16 


4 


36 29 


5 


SUND. 


279 


6 3 


5 34 


f 


3 57 


6 


8 


3 28 


8 45 


11 10 


11 48 16 


6.5 


4 48 


do. 


21 


4 


59 37 


6 


Mond. 


280 


6 4 


5 32 


9 55 


6 


9 


5 27 


9 43 


7 14 


11 47 59 


7.5 


5 44 


f 


; i 


5 


22 41 


7 


Tuesd. 


281 


6 5 


5 30 


11 3 


6 


11 


5 25 


10 53 


Evening 


11 47 42 


8.5 6 41 


do. 


24 


5 


45 40 


8 


Wed 




282 


6 6 


5 29 


Morn 


6 


13 


5 23 


Morn 


11 55 26 


11 47 25 


9.5 


7 37 


VJ 


8 


6 


8 35 


9 


Thur. 


283 


6 7 


5 27 


206 


14 


o 20 


11 


11 51 31 


11 47 9 


10.5 


8 31 


do. 


22 


6 


31 26 


10 


Frid 




284 


6 9 


5 25 


] 


L 37 


6 


15 


5 19 


1 31 


11 47 35 


11 46 53 


11.5 


9 23 


(VW 


6 


6 


54 10 


11 


Satur. 


285 


6 10 


5 23 


2 586 


16 


5 18 


2 55 


11 43 39 


11 46 38 


12.5 


10 15 


do. 


21 


7 


16 50 


12 


SUND. 


2866 11 


5 22 


4 16 


6 


18 


5 16 


4 16 


11 39 43 


11 46 24 


13.5 


11 6 


K 


6 


7 


39 23 


13 


Mond. 


2876 12 


5 20 


Rises 


8 


19 


3 13 


Rises 


11 35 37 


11 46 


g 


14.5 


11 58 


do. 


21 


8 


1 50 


14 


Tuesd. 


288 


6 14 


5 18 


5 386 


21 


5 11 


5 33 


11 31 51 


11 45 56 


15.5 


Morn 


T 


7 


8 


24 9 


15 


Wed 




2896 15 


5 17 


6 116 


23 


5 9 


6 3 


11 27 55 


11 45 43 


16.5 


53 


do. 


22 


8 


46 22 


16 


Thur. 


290 


6 16 


5 15 


6 496 


24 


5 8 


6 40 


11 24 


11 45 31 


17.5 


1 51 


H 


6 


9 


8 28 


17 


Friday 


291 


6 18 


5 13 


7 396 


25 


5 6 


7 27 


11 20 4 


11 45 18 


18.5 


2 51 


do. 


21 


9 


30 26 


18 


Satur. 


292 


6 19 


5 12 


8 366 


26 


5 4 


8 24 


11 16 8 


11 45 


7 


19.5 


3 53 


n 


i 


9 


52 15 


19 


SUND. 


293 


6 20 


5 10 


9 406 


27 


5 3 


9 28 


11 12 12 


11 44 56 


20.5 


4 53 


do. 


!- 


10 


13 56 


20 


Mond. 


2946 21 


5 8 


10 486 


28 


5 2 


10 38 


11 8 15 


11 44 46 


21.5 


5 50 


25 


i 


10 


35 28 


21 


Tuesd. 


2956 23 


5 7 


11 556 


30 


5 C 


11 48 


11 4 20 


11 44 37 


22.5 


6 42 


do. 


18 


10 


57 51 


22 


Wed 




296 


6 24 


5 5 


Morn 


n 


31 


4 59 


Morn 


11 24 


11 44 28 


23.5 


7 30 


do. 


26 


11 


18 4 


23 


Thur. 


297 


6 25 


5 3 




59 


i; 


32 


4 56 


54 


10 56 28 


11 44 20 


24.5 


8 14 


SI 


i 


11 


39 8 


24 


Friday 


298 


6 27 


5 2 


2 46 


34 


4 54 


2 1 


10 52 32 


11 44 13 


25.5 


8 55 


do. 


21 


12 





25 


Satur. 


299 


6 28 


5 


3 56 


35 


4 53 


3 3 


10 48 36 


11 44 


7 


26.5 


9 34 


TTJJ 


] 


12 


20 42 


26 


SUND 


300 


6 29 


4 59 


4 5 


6 


37 


4 51 


4 6 


10 44 40 


11 44 


1 


27.5 


10 13 


do. 


18 


12 


41 12 


27 


Mond. 


301 


6 31 


4 57 


5 6 


6 


39 


4 49 


5 8 


10 40 44 


11 43 56 


28.5 


10 52 


do. 


26 


13 


1 13 


28 


Tuesd. 


302 


6 32 


4 56 


Sets. 


6 


41 


4 47 


Sets 


10 36 48 


11 43 52 


29.5 


11 32 


-A- 


7 


13 


21 37 


29 


Wed 




303 


6 33 


4 54 


5 7 


6 


43 


4 4-- 


5 


10 32 52 


11 43 48 


0.8 


Ev.15 


do. 


19 


13 


41 31 


SO 


Thur. 


304 


6 35 


4 53 


5 34 


6 


44 


4 44 


3 25 


10 28 56 


11 43 55 


1.8 


1 1 


"I 


I 


14 


1 12 


31 


Friday 


305 


6 36 


4 51 


6 106 


45 


4 43 


6 


10 25 


11 43 43 


2.8 


1 51 


do. 


1." 


14 


20 39 



PROS. 74. A triangular field, whose sides 
are 100, 120, and 160 rods, is required to be 
divided into 3 equal parts, by lines drawn from 
the corners, and meeting at a point within. 
Required the lengths of said lines. 

PROB. 75. A ship sails north 7 miles per 



hour, another sails east 10 miles per hour, for 
5 hours ; she then tacks to cut the other off, or 
to overtake her. How far must she sail to do 
it, and on what course ? 

PROB. 76. Required all the integral values 
of x, and y, when llz-(-5y=254. 



[113] 



26 



NOVEMBER HAS THIRTY DAYS. 



[1856. 



ofMonth l 


Day of 

Week. 


IlcmarJka?>le Events. 


ASTRONOMICAL NOTES. 


Polar 
Distance 
of 


MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 


1 








Pole Star. 




1 


Satin-. 


All Saints. 


Moon lowest. 


o / // 
1 27 4 


PROB. 77. If a cy 
cloid, whose height is 5 


2 


SUND. 


2Wi Sunday after Trinity. 


$ Gr. Elong. West. 


1 27 3 


feet, revolve about its 


3 


Mond. 


Sir Samuel Romilley died 1818. 


Jupiter South, 9.8 Ev. 


1 27 3 


base, what surface and 


4 
6 


Tuesd. 
Wed. 


(3) St. Jean d Acre taken, 1840. 
Battle of Inkerinann, 1854. 


Venus in Scorpio. 
Venus South, 1.39 Ev. 


1 27 3 
1 27 2 


solidity will it generate ? 
PROB. 78. What is 


G 


Thur. 


Princess Charlotte died, 1817. 


Moon in Sagittarius. 


1 27 2 


the solidity and surface 


7 


Friday 


First Newspaper at Oxford, 1665. 


Moon near Neptune. 


1 27 2 


of a wedge, whose base 


8 


Satur. 


(7) Milton died, 1074. 


Moon near Jupiter. 


1 27 1 


is 5 feet long and 1 foot 


9 


SUND. 


2M/4 Sunday after Trinity. 


Saturn in Gemini. 


1 27 1 


broad, the height being 


10 


Mond. 


Martin Luther born, 1483. 


Jupiter South, 8.39 Ev. 


1 27 1 


2 feet and length of edge 


11 


Tuesd. 


Wattle of Wiiliamsburg, 1813. 


Moon perigee. 


1 27 


o o 

3 feet ? 


12 


Wed. 


Montreal taken, 1775. 


Uranus near Moon. 


1 27 


PROB. 79. If the ruler 


13 


Thur. 


Curran died, 1817. 


Venus South, 1.51 Eve. 


1 27 


of Problem 85 be sawed 


14 


Friday 


Source of Nile discov. 1770. 


Uranus 180 E. of Sun. 


1 26 59 


in two obliquely cross 


15 


Satur. 


Great Fire in New York, 1835. 


Moon near Saturn. 


1 26 59 


wise, making the height 


16 


SUND. 


26i/t Sun/lay after Trinity. 


15th. Moon highest. 


1 26 59 


O O 

of the smallest part 6 


17 


Mond. 


(16) Reubens born, 1577. 


Jupiter South, 8.11 Ev. 


1 26 58 


inches, and nothing; 


18 


Tuesd. 


Cardinal YToolsey died, 1530. 


Venus South, 1.58 Ev. 


1 26 58 


what will be the surface 


19 


Wed. 


Battle of Navarino, 1827. 


Moon near Regulus. 


1 20 58 


and solidity of each part, 


20 


Thur. 


Cape doubled, 1497. 


Jupiter in Pisces. 


1 26 57 


and the distance around 


21 


Friday 


Princess Royal born, 1840. 


Sun enters Scorpio. 


1 26 57 


t]*e sawed part ? 


22 


Satur. 


Tillotson died, 1694. 


Venus farthest South. 


1 26 57 


PROB. 80. If the ruler 


23 


SUND. 


2~th Sunday after Trinity. 


Moon in apogee. 


1 26 56 


of Problem 85 be cut by a 


24 


Mond. 


John Kuox died, 1572. 


Jupiter Stationary. 


1 26 56 


plane through its side 


25 


Tuesd. 


British evacuated N. York, 1783. 


Jupiter South, 7.39Ev. 


1 26 50 


and end, making the 


26 


Wed. 


Dr. Watts died, 1748. 


Moon near Mercury. 


1 26 56 


height of the smaller 


27 


Thur. 


Frontenac died at Quebec, 1698. 


Neptune Stationary. 


1 26 55 


body six inches, and its 


28 


Friday 


Goldsmith born, 1713. 


Mercury in Des. node. 


1 26 55 


base an inch wide, what 


29 


Satur. 


(30) St. Andrew s Day. 


Moon farthest South. 


1 26 55 


will be the surface and 


80 


SUND. 


Ad-cent Sunday. 


Moon near Venus. 


1 20 44 


solidity of each part? 



ANSWERS TO THE EXAMPLES FOR 1855. 

2 
Ex 34. Let 100=<z, 65=6, 55 = c, then one line= 1 /(26 2 +2c 2 2 )=22.3606797 ; another 

2 2 

= l /(2a 2 +2& 2 c^oS.15 ; and the other= 1 /(2a 2 -f 2c 2 ^ 0=49.244. Ans. 

Ex. 35. Let 50=a, 1560=46, base=z, then z 3 + ^ax 2 =b 2 -~2a ; from which z=39, and p.erp. 
=80. Ans. 

Will some one give us a simpler formula ? 

Let 100=a, 109=6, c=50, then the base=(a6 c 2 )(a-)-6)H-(a6+c 2 )=131 ]-G7th. Ans. 
Let 100=o, diameter=7912=2r, then he can see a~2(r-\- )=25-r-2028 of the 
surface. Ans. 

Let 95=o, 98=6, 100=c, z=base. Then z=2 2 6/c-r- 1 /(2o l 6 2 c 2 4-2o 2 6 2 c*+2a 2 6V 
2aM 6*c 4 )=115.99519. Ans. 

-Let 100=a 2 , then one Ieg=a 1 /(y / (2/5 2))=12-5392; theotitier=a v /(l / (V 5 2)) 
=15.9498. Ans. 

Let 2=o, 3=6, 5=c, then the perpendicular=(a-f 6-f c)=10; the sidc=i/3 
(a+6+c)=l 1.547. Ans. 

Area=Jj/3 (o+6-)-c) 2 =J(100 > / 3 )=57.735. Ans. 
35.80737, 47.40728, and 59.41143. Ans. 

Note. Will some one find a set of formulas for this ? 
One Ieg=r2 1 /(4a 2 6 2 )-H/15, the other=2 1 /(4i 2 a^-n/lG, and LypothenuFC 



Ex. 36. 
Ex. 37 

Ex. 38. 
Ex. 39. 

Ex. 40. 

Ex. 41. 
Ex. 42 



Ex. 43. Let o=18, 5=17, and G : 5 : : m : n ; then one side=mj/(a 2 i 2 )^-]/ 
the other side=ni/(a 2 6 2 )-j-T/(m 2 w 2 )=25. Ans. 

[114] 



Third Fall Month. 



NOVEMBER. 1858. 



27 



MOON S PHASES. 


i), 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Twilight or Daylight begins and ends at 


> 

- 


Toronto. 


Halifax. 


Montreal. 


Fredric n. 


Quebec. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 
P. M. 


> First Quarter ... 
O Full Moon 
Last Quarter ... 
@ New Moon 


5 

1-J 

19 

^ 

23 


A ni 
5ev 
3 38 ev 
5 17 mo 
10 44 mo 
11 51 ev 
6 15 mo 


h m 
38 ev 
4 10 ev 
5 49 mo 
11 16 mo 
23 mo 
6 47 mo 


1 
10 
20 

30 


h m 
5 
5 10 
5 21 
5 81 


h m 
6 28 
6 18 
6 11 
6 7 


h m 
5 
5 10 

5 22 
5 34 


h m 
6 28 
6 18 
6 10 
6 4 


h m 
5 
5 7 
5 23 
5 34 


h m 
6 27 
6 22 
6 9 
6 4 


h m 
5 1 
5 11 

5 23 
3 34 


h m 
6 27 
6 17 
6 9 
6 4 


h m 
5 
5 12 
5 26 
5 35 


h m 
6 27 
6 16 
6 8 
6 3 


1) Perigee... 


1) AtlOffee . 





Epliemeria of the Planets, &c. 





\enus 


.Mars 


Jupit i 


Saturu 


Mini. 


bun s 


Venuf 


Mars 


Jupit i 


Batumi Venus 


Mars 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Day Mo. 


South 


South 


South 


South 


Longi 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 




Even. 


Even. 


Even. 


Morn. 


tude. 


Yscen. 


4.scen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. South. 


South. 


South. 


North. 




h m 


h rr 


h m 


A Tn 


/ 


h Tit 


A m 


h 


m 


A n< 


A m 


o / 


/ 


o / 


1 ... 


1 34 


3 27 


9 17 


4 18 


219 30 


L4 28 


16 19 


18 12 


8 


7 1 


22 18 


25 


1 24 


22 4 


7 ... 


1 42 


3 2S 


8 52 


3 54 


225 31 


L4 52 


16 51 


18 32 


1 


7 1 


23 37 


24 54 


1 32 


22 5 


13 ... 


1 51 


3 2C 


8 27 


3 30 


231 34 


L5 16 


17 23 


18 52 





7 24 32 


24 45 


1 37 


22 7 


19 ... 


2 


3 ie 


8 3 


3 9 


237 37 


L5 41 


17 55 


19 12 


C 


6 59 ; 25 


24 26 


1 39 


22 8 


25 ... 


2 8 


3 12 


7 39 


2 41 


243 41 


16 7 


18 28 


19 32 


Q 


6 5825 2 


24 


1 38 


22 10 


.30 ... 


2 16 


3 e 


7 20 


2 20 


248 45 


L6 28 


18 55 


19 49 





6 57,24 42 


23 25 


1 31 


22 13 









= 


Calendar for 




Calendar for 





















T\ ^.T 








Upper Canada and 


Lower Canada and 


DEPARTMENT FOK 


ALL OF UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


f^ 


Day 


" 


<t-i 


Nova Scoti 


1. 




Vew Brunswick. 


















<g 


We ek. 













Pole Star 


Shadow at 


Mn s I Moon Moon s 


Sun s 


x 






08 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


in Meridian 


Noon Mark, 


Age South Place 


- 


Declination 


P 






(3 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Evening. 


Morning. 


Noon. Even. 


7 P. M. 


North. 








A m 


A m 


A m 


A 


m 


h m 


A m\ h m s 


A m s 


days h m 


3 


i 


o 


/ // 


1 


Satur. 


3066 37 


4 60 


6 54 


6 


464 42 


6 4210 21 3 


11 43 42 


3.8 


2 44 


"I 


26 


14 


39 52 


2 


SUND. 


3076 39 


4 49 


7 48 


6 


47 


4 41 


7 36,10 17 7 


11 43 42 


4.8 


3 39 


/ 


8 


14 


58 51 


3 


Mond. 


3086 40 


4 47 


8 52 


6 


484 40 


8 4210 13 11 


11 43 42 


5.8 


4 34 


do. 


21 


15 


17 35 


4 


Tuesd. 


3096 41 


4 4610 46 


494 39 


9 5510 9 15 


11 43 44 


6.8 


5 29 


k? 


415 


36 4 


5 


Wed. 


3106 43 


4 4511 196 


51 


4 3711 11.10 5 19 


11 43 46 


7.8 


6 22 


do. 


17,15 


54 17 


6 


Thur. 


311 6 44 


4 44 Morn 


6 


53 4 35 Morn 10 ] 


L 23 


11 43 49 


8.8 


7 13 


AJ* 


1 16 


12 16 


7 


Friday 


3126 45 


4 42 




35 


6 


65 


4 33 


31 


9 57 26 


11 43 52 


9.8 


8 3 


do. 


1-316 


29 56 


8 


Satur. 


3136 47 


4 41 


] 


L 42 


6 


56 


4 32 


1 40 9 53 30 


11 43 57 


10.8 


8 52 


do. 


3016 


47 20 


9 


SUND. 


3146 48 


4 40 


3 8 





58 


4 30 


3 9 9 49 34 


11 44 


2 


11.8 9 42 


> 


15 


17 


4 27 


10 


Mond. 


315 


6 49 


4 39 4 26 


8 


594 29 


4 28 9 45 38 


11 44 


s 


12.810 35 


do. 30 


17 


21 16 


11 


Tuesd. 


3166 51 


4 39 Rises 


7 


04 28 


Rises 9 41 41 


11 44 15 


13.811 31 


cys 


16 


17 


37 48 


12 


Wed 




3176 52 


4 38 


4 40 


7 


14 27 


4 31 9 37 45 


11 44 23 


14.8 


Morn 


do. 


80 


17 


54 1 


13 


Thur. 


318 


6 53 


4 37 


5 25 


7 


24 26 


5 13 


9 33 49 


11 44 32 


15.8 


31 


^ 


] i 


18 


9 55 


14 


Friday 


319 


6 55 


4 36 


6 20 


7 


4 


4 25 


6 8 9 29 63 


11 44 41 


16.8 


1 34 


do. 


29 


18 


25 31 


15 


Satur. 


320 


6 56 


4 35 


7 23 


7 


6 


4 24 


7 11 9 25 56 


11 44 62 


17.8 


2 37 


n 


i:; 


18 


40 47 


16 


SUND. 


321 


6 57 


4 34 


8 32 


7 


8 


4 22 


8 22 9 22 


11 45 


8 


18.8 


3 37 


do. 


26 


18 


55 43 


17 


Mond. 


322 


6 59 


4 33 9 41 


7 


9 


4 21 


9 32 9 18 4 


11 45 15 


19.8 


4 83 


25 


9 


19 


10 19 


18 


Tuesd. 


323 


7 


4 3210 48 


7 


10 


4 2010 42 


9 14 7 


11 45 28 


20.8 


5 24 


do. 22 


19 


24 35 


19 


Wed 


. 


324 


7 1 


4 3111 54 


7 


13 


4 19 


11 49 


9 10 11 


11 45 42 


21.8 


6 10 & 


419 


38 30 


20 


Thur. 


325 


7 3 


4 30 Morn 


7 


144 18 


Morn 


9 6 15 


11 45 57 


22.8 


6 53 do. 


1619 


52 3 


21 


Friday 


3267 4 


4 29 




56 


7 


154 17 


64 


9 2 18 


11 46 12 


23.8 


7 33 do. 


28 


20 


5 14 


22 


Satur. 


3277 5 


4 29 


1 57 


7 


16 


4 16 


1 57 


8 58 22 


11 46 28 


24.8 


8 12 nj> 


H, 


20 


18 4 


23 


SUND. 


328|7 6 


4 27 


2 57 


7 


18 


4 16 


2 59 


8 54 26 


11 46 4625.8 


8 50 do. 22 


20 


30 31 


24 


Mond. 


3297 8 


4 26 


4 


7 


19 


4 15 


4 3 


8 50 29 


11 47 


326.8 


9 30 


._ 


i i 


20 42 36 


25 


Tuesd. 


330 7 9 


4 26 


5 6 


7 


20 


4 14 


5 10 


8 46 33 


11 47 22 


27.8 


10 13 


do. 


1520 54 17 


26 


Wed 


. 


331 


7 10 


4 25i 6 10 


7 


22 


4 14 


6 18 


8 42 36 


11 47 42 


28.8 


10 58 


do. 27,21 


5 35 


27 


Thur. 


332 


7 11 


4 25 


Sets. 


7 


23 


4 13 


Sets. 


8 38 40 


11 48 


2 


0.1 


11 47 


"I 


1021 


16 29 


28 


Friday 


:;: ,; 


7 13 


4 24 


4 50 


7 


24 


4 12 


4 38 


8 34 43 


11 48 22 


1.1 


Ev.39 


do 2221 26 58 


29 


Satur. 


334 


7 14 


4 24 


5 43 


7 


264 12 


5 31 


8 30 47 


11 48 44 


2.1 


1 34 


/ 521 37 3 


80 


SUND. 


335 


7 154 23 


6 46 


7 


274 11 


6 34 8 26 66 


11 49 


G 


3.1 


2 30 


do. 18 21 46 44 



PROB. 81. What is the 5th root of 32a; 5 



PROB. 82. If the the measure of Problem 
88 be emptied so as to let 3 inches of the 
bottom appear, what will be the convex surface 
and solidity of the empty and filled space ? 

PROB. 83. If the measure of Problem 88 be 



emptied so as to show 4 inches of the bottom, 
what will be the solidity and entire surface of 
the filled and empty space, and the distance 
around the edge of the water ? 

PROB. 84. Required the surface and solidity 
of a solid bounded by four equilateral triangle.s, 
each side being six feet. 



[115] 



28 



DECEMBER HAS THIRTY-ONE DAYS. 



[1856. 



& 



Day of 
\Veok. 



Mond. 
Tuesd. 
Wed. 

4 Thur. 

5 Friday 

6 Satur. 
7! SUND. 
8 Mond. 



9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



Tuesd. 

Wed. 

Thur. 

Friday 

Satur. 

SUND. 

Mond. 

Tuesd. 



17 Wed. 



18 
IP 

20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
81 



Thur. 

Friday 

batur. 

SUND. 

Mond. 

Tuesd. 

Wed. 

Thur. 

Friday 

Satur. 

SUND. 

Mond. 

Tuesd. 

Wed. 



Remarkable Events. 



Alexander of Russia died, 1825. 
Buonaparte crowned, 1804. 
St. Paul s Cathedral finished, 
(3) Flaxmau died, 1826. 
Mozart died, 1792. 
(7) Sidney beheaded, 1683. 
2nd Sunday in Advent. 
Mary Queen of Scots born, 1542. 
Milton born, 1C08. 
(9) Gay died, 1732. 
Charles XII. killed, 1718. 
Brunei died, 1849. 
Dr. Johnson died, 1784. 
3rd Sunday in Advent. 
Earl Stanhope died, 1816. 
(15) St. Eustache destroyed, 1837. 
First L. C. Parliament, 1792. 
Bolivar died, 1830. 
Lycho Brahe born, 1586. 
iGray died, 1716. 
th Sunday in Advent. 
Schiller died, 1805. 
Abdication of James II. 1688. 
Treaty of Ghent, 1814. 
CHRISTMAS. 
St. Stephen. 

Riots at Kingston Jamaica, 1841 
1st Sunday after Christmas. 
Lord Stafford beheaded, 1689. 
Order of Jesuits established, 1535. 
St. Sylvester. 



ASTRONOMICAL NOTES. 



Moon near Mars. 
Jupiter South, 7.12 Ev. 
1710 Venus in Sagittarius. 
Venus South, 2.21 Ev. 
Moon near Neptune. 
Moon near Jupiter. 
Mars in Capricorn. 
Mercury in Aphelion. 
Moon in perigee. 
9th. g Sup. . Sun. 
Neptune 90 E. Sun. 
Moon highest. $ peri. 
Moon near Saturn. 

Venus South, 2.36 Ev. 
Moon near Regulus. 
Saturn in Gemini. 
Jupiter South, 6.12 Ev. 
Uranus in Taurus. 
Venus South, 2.41 Ev. 
Sun enters Sagittarius. 
21st. Moon in apogee. 
Jupiter South, 5.54 Ev. 
Jupiter in Pisces. 

Venus South, 2.47 Ev. 
Moon near Mercury. 
Mars near Venus. 
Jupiter South, 5.33 Ev. 
Moon n r Venus & Mars 
Saturn <p Sun. 



Polar 
Distance 

of 
Pole Star. 



26 
26 

26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 



1 26 



26 
26 
26 



M 

:, i 
64 
68 
68 
68 
68 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
M 
. .I 
6] 
61 

60 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 



MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS. 



PROS. 85. If a round 
ruler, whose length is 1 
foot and diameter 2 in 
ches be sawed in two, 
lengthwise, the saw en 
tering an inch from the 
centre of the end, and 
going straight through, 
what will be the surface 
and solidity of each 
part? 

PROS. 86. If the ruler 
of Problem 85 be cut by 
a plane running through 
both ends, at J an inch 
from the centre of one, 
and J of an inch from 
the centre of the other 
end, on opposite sides of 
the axis, what will be the 
solidity and convex sur 
face of each part ? 

PROB. 87. The paral 
lel sides of a trapezoid 
are 6 and 8 feet, and its 
height is 5 feet. If it 
revolve about the per 
pendicular that bisects 
the parallel sides, what 
will be the surface and 
solidity of the solid thus 
made? 



ANSWERS TO THE EXAMPLES FOR 1855. 
Ex. 44. Let 29=a, 10 and 10-41ths b ; then the sides required^ {bi/(a?-}-l*) or 

jj a 2_ij2 =F |5 v /( a 2_^j2)J. = 21 or 20. Ans. 
Ex. 45. z=4.016698 ; y=2.825716. Ans. 
Ex. 46. Let 10=a, then the diameter=l-5th a y / (50+10/5)=17.013. Ans. 

Ex. 47. Let 17=2<z, then 8$=a; and diameter of circle=3.28976=6. Then 4az 2 bx s =4 

in which the base=z 4. 27612. The other sides=8.19412 each, and the angles= 
3032 / , and 7444 / , and 7444 / . Ans. 

Note. We think the question will allow of several answers. 

Ex. 48. Let 20=a, 97=5, then the legs wi\l=a+%b or=p j/(6 2 4a5 4a 2 )=72 or 65. Ans. 

Ex. 49. Let 4^/3=a, then the side of the required inscribed triangle=J aj/3=6, and of the 
circumscribed=aj/3=12. Ans. 

Ex. 50. Let 137=a, 111=5, 124=c, then the radius required=J/{ ((5+c a) (a i-fc) 

Ex. 51. Let 8=a, 6=6, 7=c, z=radius required ; then z s +x 2 f Ir + oT + ^j^^ abc > from 
which we find ^=3.443963. The sides are 11.01, 12.13644, and 13.31718. Ans. 

Note. Will some one favor us with full formulae for this problem ? 
Ex. 52. Let 29=a, 6=^/29 (2/23), and z=one of the lines, and y=the other, then z= b 

Now put m=x, and n=y, then radius of circle=|/ jm 2 (o 2 -|-m 2 w 2 )-f-4a 2 j=6, 
from wkence the sides are easily determined. They are 21 and 20. Ans. 

[116] 



First Winter Month. 



DECEMBER, 1856. 



29 



MOON S PHASES. 


D. 

4 

11 

I- 
27 
9 
21 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Twilight or Daylight begins and ends at 


/" 





1 

10 

J(> 
80 


Toronto. 


Halifax. 


Montreal. 


FredrictiJ 


Quebec. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


f>) First Quarter ... 
O Full Moon 
O Last Quarter ... 
Q New Moon 


h m 
10 9ev 
2 56 ev 
1 26 mo 
3 28 mo 
5 51 mo 
27 mo 


h m 
10 41 ev 
3 28 ev 
1 59 mo 
4 Omo 
6 23mo 
59 mo 


h m 
5 32 
5 40 
5 46 
5 50 


h m 
6 7 
6 7 
6 10 
6 16 


h m 
5 29 
5 41 
5 47 
5 51 


h m 
6 10 
6 5 
6 9 
6 15 


h m 
5 34 
5 42 

5 48 
5 53 


h m 

6 5 
6 4 
6 7 
6 13 


h m 
5 35 
5 48 
5 5C 
5 55 


h m 
8 4 
6 3 
6 6 
6 11 


h m 

5 3(; 

5 4 
5 51 
5 5 


h m 
6 3 
3 2 
(5 5 
3 11 


1) Perigee... 


T) Apogee.., 



Epliemeris of tlie Planets, &e. 





Venus 


Mars 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Sun s 


S n s 


Venus 


Mars 


.Jupit r 


Saturn 


\< uu .^i- irs 


Jupit r 


Saturn 


Day Mn. 


South 


South 


South 


South 


Longi 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Right 


Decl. i Decl. 


Decl. 


Decl. 




Even. 


Even. 


Even. 


Morn. 


tude. 


Ascen. j 


Vscen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


Ascen. 


South. South. 


South. 


North. 




h m 


h m 


h m 


h m 


o / 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h in 


h m 


/ / 


o / 


o / 


1 ... 


2 17 


3 8 


7 16 


2 16 


249 46 


16 321 


9 


19 52 





6 56: 


24 3622 21 


1 34 


22 13 


7 ... 


2 25 


3 4 


6 53 


1 50 


255 52 


16 59 1 


9 32 


20 11 


1 


6 55: 


23 4421 2 


1 27 


22 16 


13 ... 


2 33 


3 


6 31 


1 25 


261 58 


17 252 


3 


20 31 


1 2 


6 53: 


22 2720 1C 


1 17 


22 18 


19 ... 


2 40 


2 56 


6 9 


59 


268 4 


17 525 


34 


20 50 


4 


6 51! 


20 47 19 1 


1 5 


22 21 


25 ... 


2 46 


2 51 


5 47 


34 


274 11 


18 182 


1 421 9 


6 


6 49 


L8 4717 4( 


50 


22 25 


30 ... 


2 51 


2 46 5 26 


08 


279 17 


18 455 


1 33 


21 24 


8 


6 47 


16 2816 26 


32 


22 28 


f 


Day of 
Week. 


1 


Calendar for 
Upper Canada and 


Calendar for 
Lower Canada and 


DEPARTMENT FOR ALL OF UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


1 


o 


Nova Scotia. 


New Brunswick. 














Pole 


Star 


Shadow at 


Mn s 


Moon 


Moon s 


Bun s 


o 


>> 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun \ 


Moon 


n Meridiai: 


VoonMark, 


Age 


South 


Place at 


Declination 


f 

O 


p 


Uses. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets 




Sets. 


Evening. 


Morning. 


Voon. 


Even. 


7 P. M. 


South. 










h m 


h m 


\ 


m 


h 


m 


h m 


h m 


A TO S 


h m S 


days 


h m 


s 


o 


o 


/ // 


1 


Mond. 


336 


7 16 


4 23 


1 55 


7 


28 


4 10 


1 46 


8 22 54 


11 49 29 


4.1 


3 25 


VJ 


1 


21 


55 59 


2 


Tuesd. 


337 


7 17 


4 22 


9 8 


7 


29 


4 10 


9 1 


8 18 58 


11 49 52 


5.1 


4 18 


do. 


14 


22 


4 49 


3 


Wed. 


338 


7 18 


4 22 


10 23 


7 


30 


4 10 


10 18 


8 15 1 


11 50 16 


6.1 


5 9 


do 


2822 


13 13 


4 


Thurs. 


339 


7 19 


4 22 


11 37 


7 


31 


4 10 


11 35 


8 11 4 


11 50 41 


7.1 


5 57 


AW 

vw 


11 


22 


21 11 


5 


Friday 


UO 


7 20 


4 22 


VIorn 


7 


32 


4 10 


Morn 


8 7 8 


11 51 


c> 


8.1 


6 45 


do. 


25 


22 


28 44 


6 


Satur. 


341 


7 21 


4 22 




62 


7 


33 


4 10 


51 


8 3 12 


11 51 32 


9.1 


7 38 


X 


9 


22 


35 49 


7 


SUND. 


342 


7 22 


4 22 


2 6 


7 


34 


4 10 


2 8 


7 59 IE 


11 51 58 


10.1 


8 22 


do. 


24 


22 


42 28 


8 


Mond. 


343 


7 23 


4 22 




3 23 


7 


35 


4 10 


3 27 


7 55 18 


11 52 24 


11.1 


9 15 


T 


8 


22 


48 41 


9 


Tuesd. 


344 


7 24 


4 21 




4 41 


7 


36 


4 10 


4 48 


7 51 22 


11 52 51 


12.1 


10 11 


do. 


23J22 


54 26 


10 


Wed. 


345 


7 25 


4 21 




6 2 


7 


37 


4 10 


6 11 


7 47 25 


11 53 19 


13.1 


11 12 


8 


8 


22 


59 44 


11 


Thur. 


346 


7 26 


4 21 


Rises 


7 


38 


4 10 


Rises 


7 43 29 


11 53 47 


14.1 


Morn 


do. 


22 


23 


4 35 


12 


Friday 


347 


7 27 


4 22 




5 3 


7 


38 


4 10 


4 51 


7 3 


9 32 


11 54 15 


15.1 


16 


n 


7 


23 


8 59 


13 


Satur. 


348 


7 28 


4 22 




6 9 


7 


39 


4 10 


5 57 


7 35 35 


11 54 43 


16.1 


1 19 


do. 


21 


23 


12 55 


14 


SUND. 


349 


7 28 


4 22 




7 21 


7 


40 


4 10 


7.12 


7 31 39 


11 55 12 


17.1 


2 18 


25 


4 


23 


16 23 


15 


Mond. 


350 


7 29 


4 22 




8 33 


7 


40 


4 10 


8 25 


7 27 42 


11 55 41 


18.1 


3 13 


do. 


17 


23 


19 23 


16 


Tuesd. 


351 


7 30 


4 22 




9 39 


7 


41 


4 10 


9 34 


7 28 45 


11 56 10 


19.1 


4 2 


do. 


30 


23 


21 56 


17 


Wed. 


352 


7 30 


4 23 


10 44 


7 


42 


4 10 


10 42 


7 19 4t 


11 56 40 


20.1 


4 47 


a 


12 


23 


24 


18 


Thur. 


353 


7 31 


4 23 


11 45 


7 


43 


4 11 


11 45 


7 15 52 


11 57 


j 


21.1 


5 29 


do. 


24 


23 


25 36 


19 


Friday 


354 


7 32 


4 23 


Morn 


7 


43 


4 11 


Morn 


7 11 56 


11 57 39 


22.1 


6 8 


t 


6 


23 


26 44 


20 


Satur. 


355 


7 32 


4 24 




46 


7 


44 


4 11 


46 


7 


7 59 


11 58 9 


23.1 


6 47 


do. 


18 


23 


27 24 


21 


SUND. 


356 


7 33 


4 24 




1 48 


7 


45 


4 11 


1 52 


7 


4 2 




1 58 39 


24.1 


7 27 


do. 


30 


23 


27 35 


22 Mond. 


357 


7 33 


4 25 




2 52 


7 


41 


4 12 


2 57 


7 


6 


11 59 


j 


25.1 


8 8 


-A- 


1323 


27 18 


23 Tuesd. 


358 


7 33 


4 25 




3 56 


7 46 


4 13 


4 4 


6 56 9 


11 59 39 


26.1 


8 52 


do. 


2423 


26 33 


24 


Wed. 


359 


7 34 


4 26 




5 4 


7 46 


4 14 


5 13 


6 52 12 


Evening. 


27.1 


9 39 


"I 


623 


25 19 


25 


Thur. 


36C 


7 34 


4 26 




6 12 


7 46 


4 14 


6 22 


6 48 16 


12 40 


28.1 


10 31 


do. 


18J23 


23 38 


26 


Friday 


361 


7 35 


4 27 




7 16 


7 


46 


4 14 


7 28 


6 44 19 


12 1 


j 


29.1 


11 26 


t 


1 


23 


21 27 


27 


Satur. 


36$ 


7 35 


4 28 


Sets. 


7 46 


4 16 


Sets. 


6 40 22 


12 1 39 


0.3 


Ev.23 


do. 


14 


23 


18 49 


28 


SUND 


36 


7 35 


4 29 




5 44 


7 47 


4 17 


5 34 


6 36 25 


12 2 


i 


1.3 


1 IS 


do. 


27 


23 


15 42 


29 


Mond. 


364 


[1 35 


4 29 




6 59 


7 47 


4 1 


7 


6 4C 


6 32 2 . 


12 2 38 


2.8 


2 14 


^3 


11 


23 


12 8 


30 


Tuesd. 


36E 


,7 36 


4 30 




8 14 


7 48 


4 18 


8 8 


6 28 3L 


12 3 


7 


3.8 


3 6 


do. 


24 


23 


8 5 


81 


Wed. 


36f 


,7 36 


4 31 




9 29 


7 48 


4 19 


9 2, c 


6 24 35 


12 3 36 


4.8 


3 55 


At* 
VW 


8 


23 


3 34 



PROB. 88. The diameter at the top of a 
round tin-measure is 4 inches and at the bottom 
10 inches; its height is 4 inches. If it be 
filled with water, and then it be poured out 
until the bottom appears, what will be the 



convex surface and solidity of the water left in, 
and of the empty space. 

PROB. 89. Required the surface and solidity 
of a solid bounded by eight equilateral triangles 
each side of which is 8 feet. 



[117] 



30 



METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS. 



ABSTRACT OF METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS, 

MADE AT THE 

Maguetical Observatory Toronto, Canada "West, 

FROM 1840 TO 1855 INCLUSIVE. 
Calculated and arranged -from the original observations and private memoranda, by Serj. JAMES WALKER, Royal Artillery. 



: 

H 


Month. 


Temperature. 


Warmst 
Day. 


Coldest 
Day. 


8 
I 

.9 
_g 

.9 
3 

M 


| No. days Kain. || 


^ 

1. 

> 





o 

/- 


I 

i 


Month. 


Temperature. 


Warmst 
Day. 


Coldest 
Day. 


1 
Ilain in inches. 


d 
- 

/ 

!? 

9 

: 
Z 


| No. days Snow. II 


d 

8 

S 


x 

03 

S 



g 




S 

- 


P. 

S 


- 
-. 


i. 

I 


m 


d 
g 


a 

i 


i 

I 

M 


jj 

1 


A 

1 

H 


a 

- 
- 


c. 
H 









O 


o 







o 




o 















o 


o 







o 




o 










Jan. 


17.7 


36.7 


-18.6 


55.3 




32.10 


I 


-3.85 


1.395 


.: 


11 




Jan. 


20.67 


45.3 


-7.2 


52.5 


in 


37.45 


2. 


0.2S 


3.005 


7 


:; 




;*eb. 


2: i.O 


50.3 


-10.5 


60.8 


it 


43A5 


i 


3.30 


1.475 


g 


6 




Feb. 


27.72 


47.9 


0.6 


47.3 


20 


B.33 





12.04 


0.430 


i 


7 




Mar 


33.4 


68.6 


9^ 


404 


4 


14.20 


1 , 


20.60 


1-640 


8 


B 




.Mar. 


31.83 


50.8 


9.6 


41.2 


! 


40.90 


| 


16.63 


2.470 


> 


g 




April 


42. r 


38.7 


22.8 


45.9 


: 


60.30 


7 


31.30 


3.420 


M 


a 


April 


48.11 


74.6 


14.9 


59.7 


13 


59.08 


1 


32.79 


1.515 


in 


1 


;; 


May 


54.2 


re.4 


31.2 


45.2 


> 


66.60 


9 


41.90 


4.150 







4 


May 


54.22 


78.4 


28.7 


49.7 


2fi 


65.88 


a 


10.87 


5.670 


14 ... 


. 


June 


60.3 


79.9 


36.7 


432 


_-. 


70.70 


- 


50.70 


4.860 


i; 







June 


60.41 


83.3 


33.2 


50.1 


i- 


70.62 


! 


49.71 


3.535 


9 


... 


1 

. 


July 


66.3 


82.3 


47.0 


35.3 


! 


73.10 


- 


57.70 


5.270 


6 


... 


x 


July 


66.08 


86.6 


40.1 


46.5 


.1 


72.75 




56.05 


2.815 


L2 





B 


\ug. 


65.1 


82.4 


47.7 


34.7 


< 


73.00 


.:, 


56.80 


2.905 


r.: 





p* 


Aug. 


61.16 


86.8 


43.5 


43.3 


U 


71.30 


2 


")7.49 


*.. 


17 


... 


^" 


Sept. 


54.4 


"3.6 


30.2 


43.4 


1 


o2.60 


ji 


40.40 


1.380 


1 






Sept. 


58.47 


81.8 


28.2 


53.6 


20 


70.06 


2-, 


10.57 


... 


-1 


... 




Oct. 


44.9 


73.0 


23.0 


50.0 


() 


60.10 


2< 


30.60 


1.860 


L3 


;; 




Oct. 


43.06 


71-6 


15.9 


55.7 


B 


:,5.2l 


- 


28.40 


1.245 


7 


1 




Nov. 


36.0 


56.8 


19.0 


37.8 





47.00 


27 


27.70 


1.220 


5 


- 




Xov. 


34.92 


56.0 


12.1 


43.9 


7 


43.30 


z; 


17.42 


... 


8 


i 




Dec. 


24.S 


42.1 


-8.6 


50.7 


< 


37.90 


1- 


10.40 


0.000 


3 


i 1 - 




Dec. 


28.93 


48.5 


1.6 


46.9 


6 


35.84 


i. 


17.96 


... 


6 


6 




Sum 






Jan 




- 
gj 






M 












Sum 






Jan. 




_ 
B 




V 

ff 




h 

B 








or 




Aug 




- 






o 










or 




Au? 


c 




- 








P.^ 


; 






Mean 


U.07 


v. .J 18.6 45.97 


i> 


73.10 


us 


3.85 


29.575 


97 


56 




Mean 


44.68 


86.8 


7.2 


19.20 


tl 


72.75 


- . 


0.28 


S g 

IH <3 


: 



M 




Tan. 


25.5 


42.3 


-6.4 


48.7 


: 


38.60 


1 


7.30 


2.150 


2 


U 




Jan. 


26.68 


45-7 


-0.2 


45.9 


3 


37.58 





7.36 




5 


; . 




Feb. 


23.2 


44.1 -1.3 


45.4 


:-j 


35.50 


11 


6.70 


0.000 


1 


. 




Feb. 


26.45 


49.1 


-4.2 


53.3 


2 


,2.i .i 1 


7.02 


... 


5 


9 




Mar. 


28.2 


54.6 


-6.7 


61.3 


1" 


45.10 


LG 


11.80 


1.170 


6 


7 




Mar. 


16.08 


59.8 


6.6 


53.2 


1 


54.1 8 


1 


20.66 


... 


5 


8 




April 


39.4 


64.8 19.9 


41.9 


zc 


52.40 


LO 


28.60 


1.370 


i 


:; 




April 


42.13 


66.7 


15.5 


51.2 


J- 


56.30 


i 


24.70 


3.290 


i 


4 




ttay 


51.1 


78.0 26.5 


51.5 


Jl 


64.10 


:; 


32.60 


2.350 


i! 


1 


I* 


May 


50.23 


77.8 


27.8 


50.0 


12 


oS.Ol 





57.26 


2.:;i" 


B 


... 





June 


66.0 


i:U 45.:; 


47.8 


29 


77.00 


12 


55.60 


1.560 


9 




- 


June 


61.32 


84.6 


39.6 


45.0 


9 


19.77 


1 


52.00 


3.718 


u 


... 


1 


July 


65.5 


S9.0 


39.9 


49.1 


: 


75.20 


30 


58.40 


8.150 


W 


... 


fe 


July 


60.74 


95.0 


isrr 


49.3 


15 


82.32 




55.95 


2.1W 


7 


... 


- 


Vu , . 


64.<j 


84.8 


45.7 


39.1 


; 


70.40 


Jl 


59.90 


6.170 


9 


... 




Aug. 


67.86 


S4.8 


41.5 


43.3 


9 




1 




1.725 


1 







Sept, 


61.5 


80.2 


37.7 


42.5 


9 


70.42 


27 


47.82 


3.340 


9 




fH 


Sep. 


55.91 


79.6 


34.0 


45.6 


3 


!7.62 


. 


18.10 


8.246 


U 







Jet. 


41.S 


>9.7 


20.C 


39.1 


. 1 


M).90 


28 


28.83 


1.360 


6 


"2 




Vt. 


411.49 


64.0 


19.7 


44.3 


LI 


57.65 


21 


28.50 


1.780 


Ll 






N T ov. 


86.4 


-13.8 


8.5 


55.3 


1 


54.76 


29 


19.95 


2.450 


8 


5 




Xov. 


36.45 


59.5 


7.6 


51.9 


11 


50.25 


M 




1.105 


7 


1 




Dec. 


20.9 


46.1 


3.1 


43.0 


: ; 


41.95 


Jl 


11.12 


6.600 


1 


5 




Dec. 


21.49 


39.7 


-2.4 


42.1 


LI 


:J4.58 


. 1 


o.lo 


inapp. 


S 


U 




Sum 






Mar 




IH 





- 












Mllll 






Feb. 




: 




-- 




u 
o 








or 




Jun 


o 




~ 




- 












or 




J ly 


o 












|Li 








Mean 


14.34 


93.1 


6.7 


47.31 


fl 


77.00 


i i 


6.70 


36.670 


- 







M<ian 


44.79 


95.0 


4.2 


47.92 


; 


2.82 


1! 


5.10 


= ~t 
1-1 


7 


7 




Jan. 


27. S 


49.4 


1.9 


47.5 


29 


11.23 


B 


11.82 


2.170 


! 






Jan. 


20.10 


44.0 


-1.3 


45.3 




: ,,V,2 




9.27 


2.335 


- 







fob. 


27.0 


50.2 


2.9 


47.3 


O 


43.02 


17 


11.03 


3.625 


- 







Feb. 


20. SI) 


41.9 


-16.7 


5S.O 


: 


35.09 


J 


-3.68 


none 


i 


L3 




Mar. 


36.3 


70.3 15.1 


55.2 


;n 


47.47 


L2 


24.70 


3.150 


4 


- 




Mar. 


33.43 


49.6 


7.S 


41.8 


1-. 




, 


17.11 


1.96S 


i 


, 




April 


43.4 


S9.8 20.1 


69.7 


52 


;:i.45 


1 


31.53 


3.740 


8 


:. 




April 


44.11 


81.8 


24.2 


57.6 


_ 


57.78 




11.24 


1.30( 


[1 


_ 


f 


May 


49.8 


74.2 27.:; 


46.9 


L8 


59.34 


9 


41.12 


1.275 


7 


... 


C5 


May 


55.77 


79.7 


33.1 


46.6 


27 


68.08 


i 


41.70 


4.8W 


1 




_ 


June 


56.4 


76.0 28.1 


47.9 


10 


15.74 


11 


45.32 


5.755 


16 




u 


June 


63.82 


S4.2 


39.1 


45.1 




73.05 


6 


-,l.i:4 


1.921 


: 




-j 


July 


64.7 


91.0 


42.5 


48.5 


Jl 


73.94 


6 


55.85 


3.050 


i 




V 


July 


68.22 


94.6 


44.5 


50.1 


Ll 


78.82 


14 


56.47 


2.895 


1 






Aug. 


65.9 


81.8 


43.9 


37.9 


K 


72.68 


1 


57.92 


2.500 


c 




00 


Aug. 


68.41 


86.4 


49.5 


36.9 


. 


78.67 


IS 


-,7.44 


1.77C 


9 


... 




Sept. 


55.6 


82.6 


27.9 


54.7 


i 


72.85 


22 


36.66 


6.160 


12 


... 


rt 


Sept. 


ii3.41 


84.3 


37.3 


47.0 


2 


74.85 




57.51 


4.595 


M 


... 




Get. 


4:,.:; 


08.6 


27.5 


41.1 


7 


56.93 


20 


37.27 


5.175 


- 






Oct. 


44.81 


70.1 


20.7 


49.4 


7 


63.58 


Jj 


10.61 


4.18C 


1 ! 


2 




N ov. 


33.2 


56.8 


8.1 


48.7 


1 


45.74 


2- 


19.93 


5.310 





in 




Xov. 


40.82 


55.7 


18.0 


37.7 


Ll 


52.4] 


28 


2055 


5.805 


12 


2 




Dec. 


25.8 


40.5 


4.1 


36.4 


2 


34.74 


22 


9.57 


0.880 


3 


17 




Dec. 


27. C4 


49.4 


3.9 


45.5 


2 


40.91 


i 


15.64 


1.215 


5 


9 




>um 















- 












Sum 






Feb. 




-. 

















or 




Jl y 


Jan 


- 




| 












or 




Jl y 


o 









3 


o 










!eai: 


U.34 


91.0 


1.9 


4S.4S 


-| 


73-94 


jj 


9.57 


42.790 


M 


v. 




Mean 


46.44 


94.6 


16.7 


46.80 


10 


78.82 




3.68 


32.355 





1 




Tan. 




15.4 


1.8 


53.6 


ji 


40.78 


:; 


11.67 


4.295 


6 


12 




Jan. 


22.87 


42.9 


-29 


45.8 


Lfi 


39.67 


Jl 


8.07 


2.135 


7 


S 




Feb. 


15.92 


38.5 


-9.4 


47.9 


10 


28.54 


te 


4.96 


0.475 


1 


21 


] 


Fob. 


32.48 


41.1 


-0.9 


42.0 


2 


37.65 


23 


6.60 


0.550 


2 


13 




Mar. 


- 2.36 


39.fi 


-2.5 


42.4 


Ll 


32-52 


2 


12.45 


0.625 


2 


1- 




Mar. 


3BJJ6 


13.9 


5.4 


38.5 


28 


37.13 


11 


15.41 


0.850 




i 




April 


11.29 


71.6 


147 


56.9 


28 


55.48 


i 


26.12 


3.185 


7 


6 




April 


39.06 


65.1 


9.3 


55.8 


21 


55.05 


1 


28.12 


2$70 


B 


2 




May 


19.73 


79.8 


29.2 


50.6 


[{ 


03.10 


1 


38.61 


1.570 


5 


... 


. 


May 


54.55 


72.1 


26.7 


45.4 


28 


62.44 


1 


39.90 


2.040 


L2 


... 




June 


"i8.94 


83.3 


28.2 


55.1 


27 


71.68 


1 


40.32 


4.595 


1-J 


... 


t 

1 .. 


June 


58.13 


77.8 


36.0 


41.8 


2i 


69.88 


! . 


45.70 


2.625 


l i 


... 


m 
"" 


July 




86.8 


38.7 


48.1 


18 


72.28 


i ! 


55.81 


4.605 


8 


... 


* 


July 


I17.H2 


87.0 


43.2 


43.8 


1 


76.86 


26 


53.97 


3.355 


8 


... 


f j 


\U. 




83.1 


44.0 


39:1 


31 


74.01 


1 


59.16 


4.850 


i 


... 


X 


Aug. 


63.93 


82.6 


44.6 


38.0 


Ll 


72.77 


81 


54.06 


2.140 


10 


... 





Sept. 


58.98 


S9.0 


82.2 


56.8 


L 


74.11 


J7 


40.92 


9.7 CO 


10 




rt 


Sept. 


54.91 


74.5 


35.0 


39.5 


8 


4.37 


u 


15.43 


6.665 


L6 


... 




Oct. 


H .92 


:S.O 24.2 


43.8 


i 


56.72 


J7 


31.17 


3.790 


12 


-! 




Oct. 


43.71 


64.6 


20.2 


"44.4 


. 


59J.3 


21 


2H.24 


4.390 


1" 


1 




Xov. 




52.ti 14.1 


38.5 


Jl 


39.95 


27 


20.95 


4.765 


10 


7 




Xov. 


38.04 


57.9 


8.4 


49.5 


2 


51.46 


29 


13.89 


3.155 


n 


3 




Dec. 


iO.83 


48.5 3.1 


45.4 


2l 


37.53 


u 


12.55 


1.040 


6 


S 




Dec. 


30.02 


49.6 


-0.3 


49.9 


;;i 


43.43 


20 


12.29 


1.185 


7 


1 




Sum 




Feb. 




- 

















Sum 






Jan. 




- 

E 




- 












or 




Sept 









- 












or 






o 








- 






* 






Mean 


12.76 


89.0, 9.4 


18.18 


- 


74.11 


. 


4.9G 


43.555 


B 






Mean 


43.46 


S7.0 


2.9 


44.53 


S 


W.8fl 


. 


6.60 


31.900 


-H 


1 



[118] 



METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS. 



31 

















Temperature. 


Warmst 


Coldest 


O 

1 


| 


~ 






Temperature. 


\Varms 


Coldest 


CO 

Q 


p 


fe 








Day. 


Day. 


i 





oo 








Day. 




U 


- 




-t < 


1 


i 


e 




- 


to 

a 


i 


I 


. 


P, 


.2 
d 


/, 

9 


00 
>. 




fl - 


. 






> 




i 




P. 


.9 
a 


j 
-- 


/. 

f 


* 


g 




% 


i 




H 


-. 





& 


I 


| 


; 


~ 


- 
-. 



g 


1 


03 
13 


g 




I 


CD 

tl 


I 


1 


3 
H 


i 
ft 








o 


o 


o 


o 






















o 


O 


o 


o 




O 














at 

~ 
f 

H 


Jan. 

Feb. 
Mar. 
April 
May 
June 
July 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Due. 


27.41 
26.28 
28.68 
40.67 
53.74 
82.64 
05.37 
68.34 
53.39 
46.38 

29.12 


51.1 

46.6 
61.6 
65.1 

78.0 
92.0 
S2.2 
S7.0 
S0.4 
61.8 
49.0 
48.8 


-11.4 
0.0 

0.0 
22.7 
31.2 
37.4 
44.1 
48.7 
28.1 
24.5 
15.9 
-1.1 


62.5 
46.6 
61.6 
42.4 
40.8 
54.6 
38.1 
38.3 
52.3 
37.3 
33.1 
49.9 


1 41.27 
21 38.02 
31 46.55 
10 54.35 
20 63.13 
15 77.43 
20 73.47 
14 76.65 
4 68.90 
1657.00 
4 42.27 
8 42.20 


LO 

ii 
14 
18 

L2 

1 
1 
20 
L8 
9 

2 


-4.50 
10.88 
9.80 
29.70 
39.96 
49.21 
54.70 
61.10 
38.00 
34.15 
21.78 
10.15 


2.245 

0.775 
1.220 
1.455 
2.520 
1.810 
1.890 
0.855 
3.115 
1.55C 
2.02t 
2.75C 


; 
8 

1. 
- 

Ll 

U 

. 
. 


B 

> 

e 

L 

... 

: 
7 


H 


Jan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
April 
May 
June 
July 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Xov. 
Dec. 


18.54 
23.82 
27.79 
38.29 
51.67 
60.88 
66.68 
65.35 
56.92 
48.09 
35.80 
32.27 


37.3 
41.2 
44.8 
53.8 
73.3 
86.1 
90.1 
81.2 
81.8 
70.7 
50.4 
51.0 


-10.6 
-6.2 
-6.0 
20.0 
32.0 
37.2 
48.5 
45.8 
35.8 
23.8 
18.2 
13.2 


47.9 
47.4 
60.8 
33.8 
41.3 
48.9 
41.6 
35.4 
46.0 
46.9 
32.2 
37.8 


29 34.58 
4,37.30 
13 39.9i 
2147.58 
2i 01.82 
1574.33 
21 76.72 
23 72.92 
271.53 
2 59.57 
1 43.97 
7 47.05 


f 


20 
Li 

a 

. 

^. 
i 

2 


0.85 
2.73 
12.70 
27 .48 
41.18 
48.10 
56.47 
57.38 
44.07 
36.5S 
25.65 
16.72 


0.000 
0.65C 
3.080 
1.990 
1.125 
3.160 
4.025 
2.695 
3.630 
5.28 
1.77 
3.99 


1 

: 

e 

i 

7 
H 
t 
1 
11 
12 
7 
7 


L9 

Ll 

12 

4 
1 

3 




Sum 

or 




Jun 


Jan. 






in 

d 




- 


o 










Sum 






Jan 




- 




- 












ML-IU, 


44.6:3 


!.0 


11.4 


43.96 


To 7 7. 43 


iu 


4.50 


22.205 


us 


, 




or 
Mean 


43.84 


Jl> 
90.1 


10.6 


42.5C 


.! 


76.72 


a 


0.85 


8L40 


7 


BO 


at 

H 


Jan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
April 
May 
June 
July 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 


18.49 
19.99 
33.24 
38.74 
48.30 
o3.01 
67.82 
65.08 
57.04 
44.94 
11.87 
26.56 


39.5 

40.6 
53.0 
72.0 
72.2 
84.4 
88.6 
79.0 
80.1 
58.9 
56.4 
40.8 


-14.2 
-9.8 
15.1 
15.5 
27.9 
35.2 
47.3 
45.2 
32.7 
25.2 
24.2 
-6.5 


53.7 
50.4 
37.9 
56.5 
44.3 
49.2 
41.3 
33.8 
47.4 
33.7 
32.2 
47.3 


25 35.61 
28 36.50 
30 41.11 
iO 49.66 
21 57.17 
21<74.60 
1278.27 
SO 70.37 
5 08.37 
1654.07 
5 53.46 
20 37.11 


U 

3 

I-! 
2 
5 

a 

27 

28 

21 


-2.10 
2.67 
20.67 
24.23 
39.25 
52.77 
59.25 
56.68 
45.18 
28.71 
29.77 
12.43 


1.175 

0.241 
1.526 
2.655 
5.115 
2.02C 
3.415 
4.970 
1.480 
5.965 
2.815 
0.840 


4 

t 

I 

11 

U 

t 

Ll 

9 

l: 
Ll 

F, 




LO 
L3 
2 

2 

"i 

2 

L2 


H 


Jan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
April 
May 
June 
July 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 


22.98 
24.06 
30.65 
41.92 
50.87 
65.49 
65.60 
68.61 
58.81 
44.40 
38.68 
25.32 


40.9 
43.4 

56.3 
65.7 
78.4 
89.5 
91.3 
94.9 
85.5 
04.7 
55.6 
46.4 


-9.7 
-1.4 
-0.1 

25.0 
32.2 
39.2 
41.6 
42.5 
33.9 
23.4 
12.8 
-8.4 


50.6 
44.8 
56.4 
40.7 
46.2 
50.3 
49.7 
52.4 
51.6 
41.3 
42.8 
54.8 


11 32.55 

437.58 
5043.95 
28 57.05 
28 65.07 
1475.22 
4,72.67 
1279.83 
575.22 
457.07 
19 52.20 
12 37.00 


J: 

\ 

Ll 

; 
Ll 

: 
I 



D 

M 




3.72 
11.20 
12.65 
33.37 

41.2:, 
. ,1.4,^ 
58.57 
56.C5 
42.30 
32.70 
20.25 
2.43 


0.29C 
1.030 
1.081 
2.026 
4.420 
1.550 
0.915 

5.14i 
0.875 
2.42o 
0.625 


] ( 

L 

ii 
11 
I! 

U 


B 
16 

8 
I 
1 

2 
L3 




Sum 
or 

Mean 


43.76 


J ly 

88.6 


Jan. 
o 

14.2 


43.97 






78.27 




P 


o 
2.10 


32.215 





12 




um 
or 

Mear 




Aug 

14.9 


Jan 



9.7 


48.47 


-- 


79.! 


e 


2.4 


. 




. 


c 

IQ 
B 


Jan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
April 
May 
June 
July 

Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Doc. 


29.26 
20.58 
29.73 
38.30 
18.61 
84.86 
69.04 

o6M 

45.00 
38.7! 
22.75 


45.4 
I.I 
.: 
65.7 
77.8 
85.6 
86.2 
85.0 
76.0 
7 

48.S 


9.9 
1.2 
7.2 
18.0 
27.5 
34.2 
51.6 
41.0 
29.5 
22.4 
11.0 
-9.0 


36.5 

48.4 
39.3 
47.7 
50.3 
51.4 
34.6 
44.0 
46.5 
44.3 
51.8 
57.8 


2537.20 
26 38.82 
1439.08 
27 53.08 
28:64.05 
19 73.35 
24 75.58 

23 67.48 
17 55.49 
5 54.S2 
340.01 


w 

t 
J 

8 

j. 
1 



;t 

2, 
22 


17.88 
7.52 
19.01 
25.83 
37.02 
53.12 
60.10 
55-06 
46.20 
33.37 
27.53 
8.22 


1.250 
1.235 
0.745 
4.72C 
0.545 
3.345 
5.27d 
4.355 
1.735 
2.085 
2.955 
0.190 


i 
j 
7 

7 

10 
12 
l; 

] ; 
Li 

7 

r 

- 


g 

i 

2 
1 


- 

X 
r- 


Tan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
April 
May 
June 
July 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Vov. 
Dec. 


23.57 

21.09 
30.68 
41.04 
52.20 
64.12 
72.47 
68.03 
61.04 
49.52 
36.84 
21.88 


46.4 
42.8 
55.1 
65.1 
71.4 
92.5 
98.0 
99.2 
93.6 
75.4 
55.4 
44.8 


-5.4 
-10.8 

7.- 1 

2ul 
35.- 
42.5 
46.( 
35.8 
20.4 
13.8 
-7.0 


51.8 
53.6 
47.7 
44.9 
46.2 
57.3 
55.5 

5L8 
49.0 

-r 


4 39.42 

13 44^00 
. 554.15 
L362.43 

2075.07 

80.43 
5(77.96 

7 61.48 

j 38.28 


. 

- 

2 


- 
: 
7 
: 
, 
, 
Ll 


1.58 

4.62 
17.17 
32.50 

53.60 
61.98 
58.60 
48.52 
35.78 
20.77 
2.02 


1.270 
1.46C 
2.425 
2.6SC 
4.630 
1.460 
I.SOJ 
0.45f 
5.375 
1.495 
1.115 


l 
i: 

i 

| 
1 
1 

14 
Ll 
Li 

1 

t 


U 
16 
3 

4 

4 

.. - 




Sum 






Dec 




t- 











































or 




J lv 







- 




i 

- 












Sum 






Feb. 




- 




: 












Mean 


44.72 


86.2 


9.0 


46.05 


A 


75.58 


; 


7.52 


28.430 


: 


16 




Mean 


45.21 


99.2 


10.8 


50.90 


3 


81.32 


is 


1.58 


27.765 






52 





Jan. 
Feb. 

Mar. 
April 
May 
June 
July 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 


25.82 
28.42 
.",3.14 
41.67 
52.48 
59.84 

63.T1 

47.83 


43.4 

50.2 
59.3 
59.3 
73.3 
79.2 
82.7 
79.8 
S6.3 
00.2 


-12.8 
1.2 
12.0 
25.8 
2R.O 
37.0 
46.5 
42.1 
32.0 
25.2 


56.2 
49.0 
47.3 
33.5 
45.3 
42.2 
36.2 
37.7 
54.3 
41.0 


9 
JO 

27 

J! 

13 

:; 

17 
7 
12 

M 


37.87 
38.48 
52.26 
50.22 
61.35 
68.45 
73.43 
69.73 
75.48 
57.80 


10 



11 

2 
3 

:; 

27 
2! 

!7 


-1.25 
10.75 
22.16 
31.81 
37.53 
50.97 
57.75 
55.60 
43.52 
3222 


1.275 
2.600 
0.770 
2.295 
2.950 
2.695 
3.625 
1.360 
2.665 
1.680 


4 

r~ 
t 

1] 

12 

1 
. 

1 
1 


In 
j 

1 







Tan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
April 
May 
Tune 
Tuly 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct 


25.95 
15.41 
28.46 
42.43 
53.07 
59.93 
67.95 
64.06 


49.0 
39.0 
49.4 
69.4 
77.5 
91.5 
92.8 
83.5 


-5.4 
-25.4 
-2.9 
10.7 
33.0 
36.2 
49.2 
40.0 


54.4 
64.4 

52.3 
58.7 
44.5 
55.3 
43.6 
43.5 


- 

il 
. 
,1 
! 
, 
: 


41-87 

34.S-: 

55.02 

00.25 
78.72 
79.45 
74.67 


; 

1 

. 

2 

- 
> 
7 
:7 


9.9 
14.38 

17.15 
22.10 
37.68 
48.65 
59. 3 
52-93 


0.525 
1.770 
1.485 
2.030 
2.565 
4.070 
3245 
1.455 


5 
i 

i 

\ 
7 

7 


18 

i 
1 
3 
2 




Nov. 


32.80 


50.2 


13.8 


36.4 


1 


44.42 


I) 


2408 


3.885 


t 


i 




Vov 


























Dec. 


21.58 


44.0 


-14.S 


58.8 


H 


39.35 


26 


0.83 


1.075 


i 


:. 




Dec. 


























Sum 
or 






Dec. 

o 









:- 













Sum 


























Mean 


44.41 


86.3 


14.8 


44.83 


12 


75.48 


to 


1.25 


26.875 


- 


i i 




or 
Mean 

























PROVINCIAL OBSERVATORY TORONTO. 

Latitude, 43. 39 .4 North. Longitude, 79. 2V. 5. West, or 5 honrs, 17 minutes, 26 seconds Slow of Greenwich Time. 

ion above Lake Ontario, 108 feet. Approximate Elevation above the Sea, 342 feet 

The PwvlncW Observatory is now attached to the University of Toronto, and is in the charge of Prof. K-vosroa and 

three Assistants. 
[119] 



32 



SEMI-DIURXAL ARCS. 



[1856. 



TABLE OF SEMI-DIURNAL ARCS, 

Calculated far the Pi-incipal Places in British North America. 



Duel. 

; 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 
7 

8 


10 

11 

12 

13 
140 

15 

16 

17 
IS 

19 

20 

21 

22 o 
230 
240 



TORONTO. 
N. 43 3 J .4. 


KINGSTON. 
N. 40 SO .O. 


HALIFAX, X. S. 
N. 44 = , 39 .3. 


MONTREAL. 
N. 45 31 . 


FREDERICTON. 
N. 46 3 . 


QUEBEC. 
N. 46 49 .2. 


North. 


South. 


Psorth. 


South. 


North. 


South. 


North. 


South. 


>,orth. 


South. 


North. 


South. 


h. in. 
3-8 


h. m. 

5 50-2 


h. TO. 
6 3-9 


h. TO. 
5 50-1 


h. m. 
6 4-0 


h. m. 
5 56-0 


/(. TO. 

6 4-1 


h. TO. 
5 55-9 


h. TO. 
6 4-1 


h. m. 

5 55-9 


/(. TO. 

4-3 


h. TO. 

5 55-7 


7-0 
6 11-5 
6 15-3 
6 19-1 
22-8 
6 26-7 
6 30-5 


5 52-4 
5 48-5 
5 44-7 
5 40-9 
5 37-1 
5 33-3 
5 29-5 


6 7-7 
6 11-7 
6 15-5 
6 19-i 
6 23-3 
6 27-2 
6 31-1 


5 52-3 
5 48-3 
5 44-5 
5 40-6 
5 36-7 
5 32-8 
5 28-9 


6 7-9 
6 11-9 
6 15-9 
6 19-9 
6 23-8 
6 27-8 
6 31-8 


5 52-1 
5 4S-1 
5 44-1 
5 40-1 
5 36-2 
5 32-2. 
5 2S-? 


6 8-3 
6 12-2 
6 16-3 
6 20-3 
6 24-4 
6 28-5 
6 32-6 


5 51-7 

5 47-8 
5 43-7 
5 39-7 
5 35-15 
5 31-5 
5 27-4 


6 8-3 
6 12-5 
6 16-6 
6 20-7 
6 24-9 
6 29-1 
6 33-1 


5 51-7 
5 47-5 
5 434 
5 39-3 
5 35-1 
5 39-9 


6 8-5 
6 12-7 
6 17-1 
6 21-3 


5 51-5 
5 47-3 

5 42-9 
5 3S-7 
5 344 
5 30-2 


6 34-8 
6 38-7 
6 42-7 
6 46-8 


5 25-- 
5 21-3 
5 17-3 
5 13-2 



6 3u-4 
6 43-5 
6 47-6 


5 24-7 
5 20-6 
5 16-5 
5 12-4 


6 36-2 
6 40-3 
6 44-5 
6 48-2 


5 23- - 
5 19-7 
5 15-5 
5 11-8 


6 27-1 
6 41-4 
6 45-7 
6 50-0 


5 22-9 
5 18-6 
5 14-3 
5 10-0 


6 37-9 
6 42-2 
6 46-5 
6 50-9 


5 .2-1 
5 17-8 
5 13-5 
5 9-1 


(i 38-lt 
43-3 
6 47-8 
6 524 


5 21 -I 
5 16-7 
5 12-2 
5 7-0 


6 51-0 


5 9-0 


6 51-8 


5 8-2 


6 53-0 


5 7-0 


6 54-4 


5 5-6 


6 554 


5 4-6 


50-3 


5 3-7 


6 55-1 


o 4-9 


6 56-0 


5 4-0 


6 57-4 


5 2-6 


6 58-8 


5 1-2 


6 59-9 


5 0-1 


7 1-0 


4 5S4 


5U-2 


5 0-8 


7 0-2 


4 59-8 


7 1-7 


4 58-3 


7 3-2 


4 56-8 


7 4-5 


4 55-5 




4 53-7 


7 3-6 


4 50-4 


7 4-7 


4 55-3 


7 6-2 


4 53-8 


7 7-9 


4 52-1 


7 9-2 


4 50-8 


7 114 


4 48-6 


7 8-0 


4 52-0 


7 .9-0 


4 51-0 


7 10-7 


4 49-3 


7 12-6 


4 47-4 


7 14-1 


4 45-9 


7 10-0 


4 41-0 


7 12-3 


4 47-7 


7 13-5 


4 46-5 


7 15-4 


4 44-6 


7 17-3 


4 42-7 


7 18-7 


4 41-3 


7 21-0 


4 39-0 


7 16-7 


4 4:5-3 


7 18-1 


4 41-9 


7 20-1 


4 36-9 


7 22-0 


4 38-0 


7 23-7 


4 30-3 


7 2C"-1 


4 334 


7 21-2 


4 38-8 


7 22-6 


4 37-4 


7 24-8 


4 35-2 


7 26-9 


4 33-1 


7 28-5 


4 31-5 


7 31-3 


4 2S-7 


7 26-0 


4 34-0 


7 27-5 


4 32-5 


7 29-7 


4 30-3 


7 32-1 


4 27-9 


7 34-0 


A 2f>0 


7 36-6 


4 23-9 


7 30-7 


4 29-3 


7 32-3 


4 27-7 


7 34-7 


4 25-3 


7 37-2 


4 22-8 


7 39-1 


4 20-9 


7 41-7 


4 18-3 


7 35-0 


4 24-i 


7 37-3 


4 22-7 


7 39-8 


4 20^2 


7 42-4 


4 17-0 


7 44-5 


4 15-5 


7 47-6 


4 124 


7 40-4 


4 19-6 


7 42-3 


4 17-7 


7 44-9 


4 15-1 


7 47-8 


4 12-2 


7 50-0 


4 10-0 


7 534 


4 6-0 







Ex. 54 
Ex. 55. 



ANSWERS TO THE EXAMPLES FOR 1855. 

(Concluded from page 29.) 

Ex. 53. Let 245=6, 120=jo, and 343=s, z=difference of sides ; then x=b-/ { (s 2 i 2 4/> 2 )-s- 
(V i 2 ) j =5. The sides are s JV { (* 2 i 2 4^ 2 (-^).s 2 i 2 ) j =169, or 1 74. Ans. 

Let 2|/5=^a, then the side of required square=l-5th aj/5=4. Ans. 
Let 72=a, and perimeter=3GO=j9. (The number 258 was -wrong.) The sides=.|j0 
(-f iP)-K-|-/>) or q=^v/{(a }j) 2 2a 2 |-H-(a-f^)=120 or 90. Ans. 
Sum of the legs==p(a Jj9)-f-(a-j-^)=210. Hypothenuse=p 2 -=-(a4-j0)=150. An. 
Ex. 56. Let 9 a, 12=5, 15=c, and x, y, and z, the required sides. 
Then 2 :=| l /(26 2 -(-2c 2 <z 2 )=17.088. Ans. 
yzi=| 1 /(2a 2 -f2c 2 6 2 )=14.422. Ans. 
z =| v /(2a 2 -|-26 2 c 2 )=10. Ans. 

Let 24=j3, 25=6, 40=c, z=4 base, then*base=2:c=2i/(< 2 n 
200 1 /14-^7=106.903. Ans. 

In this rc= l /(c 2 p 2 )=32, and ? =r/( c 2 p 2 ) /(J 2 ^ 2 )=25. 
Another side=/ {(ra-j-z) 2 +j9 2 j =88.750. Ans. 
A third side= v / {(* ) 2 +p 2 } =32.188. Ans. 

Ex. 58. Let a=6, b=4, c=5, <t=3, and r=radius ; then j/ j(a54-T)(ac-|- 
* )( 5 )0 c )0 <*)} =l-40th v /(17290)=3.2875. Ans. 



Ex. 57. 



^-./(n q)= 



) ]-=-]/ 



Ex. 59. Let 10=a, 20=5, 30=c, z=J side, then the side=2z=y / (2(a 2 -f 5 2 -j-c 2 ) 1y 
J6(a 2 5 2 -f 5 2 c 2 +c 2 o 2 ) 3(a*+ 5*-fc*) } ) =20/7=52.9150202. Ans. 

^Vote. If the given point had been within, the 4- sign should have been used 
before the radical. 



REMARK. Owing to the difficulty of putting mathematical formulae in type, no doubt there will 1> > obsi-urities and 
errors in the foregoing pages, but we trust due allowance will be made for such. Any errors we have pointed out to 
us we shall be thankful for. There is not another set of so extensive and useful formuhe. published in the English 
language, that we are aware of, and we trust they may be acceptahje to our frie nds. \Ve have received a few problems 
for 1*56 (but too late for insertion), which will appear next year. AVe request correspondents to ff&uraUte tbeir 
solutions for 1856, as far as possible, by using or making literal formulie. the answers then serve for all similar 
problems. 

[120] 



1856.] 



THE FUTURE OF WESTERN CANADA. 



33 



THE FUTURE OF WESTERN CANADA. 



You are perhaps an Immigrant from Europe, and have 
landed on the shores of Lake Ontario with a view to 
establish for yourself a new and permanent Canadian 
home. Like tens of thousands who seek and reach the 
banks of rh<; ,St. Lawrence, or the region of the Great 
Lakes, you hire no distinct idea of the country, its pro 
ductions, its inhabitants, or its scenery. You are anxious 
to acquire some information which will enable you to 
shape ;::i .jj.iuionas to the spot best adapted to meet your 
views and circumstances. If you could enjoy a birds-eye 
view of tae country, and grasp distinctly many of its 
leading physical features, it would, doubtless, assist you 
in maki.ig choice of a suitable spot fora future home; 
although you would be wise enough, perhaps, not to be led 
by actual appearances altogether, but would resolve, after 
the first favourable impression had been produced, to dis 
cover whether the social and even political tendencies of 
the inhabitants ware such as you could sympathize with 
and enjoy. 

Place a map of Canada and of the Northern States of the 
Union before you, aud accept me for a guide ; if what you 
.see and hoar does not please or convince, you will only 
have to regret the loss of an hour s attention, which the 
most industrious can generally find time to spare. 

We will select Toronto, the capital of Western Canada, 
as our starting point; and proceeding nearly due north by 
the Northern .Railway, we shall arrive in three-and-a-half 
hours at Coliingwood liar bo ur, in Georgian Bay, a part of 
Lake Huron. To our left are the Blue Mountains : let us 
ascend them until we attain an altitude of nearly 1,000 
feet above Lako Huron, in the township of Euphrasia, and 
some ten miles from Coliingwood Harbour. You are now 
.^Utuding on the highest land in that part of Western 
Canada which lies to the south of the distant, rugged, 
northern shores of Lake Huron. Our view is still circum 
scribed, and exhibits no other features beyond a blue 
expanse of water tar to the north, and forest, forest, forest, 
all around us. From this elevated and central spot, how 
ever, we may contemplate with our mind s eye the whole 
expanse of \Vestern Canada, and see throughout the short 
future of the next ten years to come, the wonderful 
changes which will have been worked out in the va.-t 
iv^ion at our feet. But where are the boundaries of 
\\VstA-ra Canada? where the mineral region? where the 
lamed agricultural region? and where the exhaustless 
timber region? 

The boundary line of Upper Canada runs through the 
centre of all the great lakes and their junction rivers; so 
that starting from Pigeon River on Lake Superior, near its 
most westerly extremity, you may, with a steamboat, fol 
low for more than a thousand miles, the imaginary line 
which separates Western Canada from the United States. 
Lot us trace out this immense water communication and 
see how it invests the country on all sides. From Pigeon 
River, 1,9 JO miles from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and 000 
feet above the sea, we steam across Lake Superior, and 
reach the Sault Ste. Marie Canal, descend 17 feet through 
lucks 70 ferf .broad and 350 feet long, pass on into Lake 
Huron and through the River St. Glair, Lake St. Clair and 
Detroit River, thus sweeping round the southern extre 
mity of the great peninsula of Western Canada. On then 
through Lake Erie to the mouth of the Welland Canal; 
here we descend 350 feet through 27 locks, each 150 feet 
by 26 ^ feet, to the deep waters of Lake Ontario ; then 
through the exquisite scenery of the thousand islands, 
until we arrive at the St. Lawrence Canals, through which 
we pass by means of 19 locks 200 feet long by 45 feet 
broad, letting us slowly down upwards of 150 feet to 
the level of the Ottawa, where it joins the mighty St. 
Lawrence. We have now reached the utmost eastern 
boundary of Western Canada, and must steam up the 
great river of the north, (Ottawa,) overcoming its rapids 
by means of locks, until we reach the City of Ottawa ; and 
thus, without cb.uu.riag our steamer, we have traversed in 
the direction of two sides of a triangle, at least two-thirds 
of the boundary of Western Canada. But we may still 
progress up ttw noble north-eastern boundary, in steamer 
or canoe, until we reach Lake Tamiscamang. Here we 
have arrived at the height of laud which separates the 
waters flowing into the Gulf of St. Lawrence from those 
which reach the Hudson s Bay. From Lake Taniiscamang 
to Pigeon River, an imaginary curved line, following 
pretty accurately the direction of the shores of Lakes 
Huron and Superior, forms the last link of the boundary 
of Western Canada. This vast region occupies an area of 



G 



about 147,000 square miles, and extends over sixteen 
degrees of longitude and eight degrees of latitude. 

We are now in latitude 44 30 ; and if we trace the 
continuation of this parallel through Western Canada we 
shall find to the south of it lying the great agricultural 
region, distinguished in a remarkable manner for the fer 
tility of its soil, and the adaptation of its climate to the 
purposes of husbandry. Is there any reason for this arbi- 
tary division you will ask. Yes, a great geological reason 
to account for its fertility, and a great climatological reason 
to account for its adaptation to vegetable growth. 

1. The parallel of latitude before named, marks the 
northern limit of the sedimentary rocks in Western Ca 
nada ; rocks which have been deposited at the bottom of 
ancient seas, and have in great part retained their flat 
surfaces undisturbed. Upon the level groundwork of 
these rocks have accumulated vast deposits of drift clays, 
which have been produced by the grinding up and slow 
decay of the granite rocks north of this parallel (44 30 ). 
The sedimentary rocks themselves consist of limestone 
and shale, giving rise after disintegration and decay, to 
abundance of those necessary components of soil which 
plants require for their nourishment and support. 

2. The 44th parallel of latitude cuts off a peninsula 
portion from Western Canada, and you may extend 
the term peninsula to that entire part south of the 
parallel where we now stand. If we trace the 44th parallel 
through Europe, we shall find that it intersects the south 
of France and Tuscany, countries rich in olives, the cereal* 
and the grape. The most southern portion of Western 
Canada is touched by the 42nd parallel, which, when con 
tinued through Europe, is found to intersect the northern 
part of Spain and the Roman States. Those vast inland 
seas, Huron, Erie, and Ontario, which almost encircle the 
peninsula portion of Western Canada, soften summer heat, 
temper winter cold, and preserve a moist atmosphere in 
which vegetables luxuriate. The adaptation of these con 
ditions to secure the excellence we claim for Westera 
Canada as an agricultural country, you will shortly better 
appreciate when we have completed our external survey, 
and travel southwards through the interior of the country. 

North of the 44 30 parallel is a mixed mineral and 
timber region, where are millions of acres in the valleys of 
the tributaries of the Ottawa and the rivers flowing into 
Lake Huron, capable of yielding a rich harvest of lumber 
for a century to come. Now draw an imaginary air line 
from where we stand on the Blue Mountains, to the 
county of Essex, the most westerly portion of Western 
Canada. Let this line revolve about ourselves as a pivot, 
first to the left, until its extremity rests near Kiugstort^and 
then back again to the right, until it rests near the Bruce 
Mines. You see you have swept over nearly the whole of 
the agricultural region of Western Canada, with the ex 
ception of the Valley of the Ottawa before mentioned, occu 
pying about 10,000 square miles. Now from the- Bruce 
Mines, let your imaginary air line sweep over the country 
towards the north and east, until it again rests its extre 
mity near Kingston. You have traversed the mixed mine 
ral and lumber region ; and beyond the Bruce Mines, all 
along the northern shore of Lake Huron and the northern 
shore of Lake Superior lies the great mineral- region. 

If we had leisure we might pause to reason upon the 
extraordinary difference which may arise hi course of 
time, between the characters and social position of the 
future inhabitants of these diverse regions, but that is a 
speculation which coming events render difficult indeed. 

We have now examined and traced out the boundaries 
of our country, let us proceed to establish our relationship 
to neighbouring States and Provinces which may influence 
our industrial or social position. North-east lies Eastern 
Canada, north-west the trackless regions of the Hudson s 
Bay Company s territories. Every other part of Western 
Canada is surrounded by the several States of the Ameri 
can Union. In order, proceeding from east to west, these 
are New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, 
Illinois, Wisconsin and Minnesota. We lie like a wedge 
between them New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio on one 
side, Michigan and Wisconsin on the other our commu 
nication by water complete with all that have been men 
tioned, and with the ocean, without obstruction, by means 
of the St. Lawrence ; or by numerous railroads and canal* 
with the Atlantic seaboard. And herein lies our strength 
and the hopes of our future. Set aside the advantages of 
position iu relation to the neighbouring States of the 
Union and the ocean, and the progress of this country 
would be like the slow, yet steady flow of the rivers which 



[121] 



TUB FUTURE OF WESTERN CANADA. 



[1856. 



glide to the south, compared with the tumultuous rush 
of those we see hurry lug on to the north and west. 
And what use have we yet made of this great advantage 
or position; little indeed as jot; but the beginning has 
ooen auspiciously entered oil, and tnis advantage will sud 
denly ana convulsively increase to results which at the first 
glance appear too astonishing and overwhelming lor be 
lief, lo our east lies a vast consuming country, incapable 
ol satiety ; from its circumstances incapable of supplying 
its own wants ; and Iroiu a spirit, nay, a necessity ol accu 
mulation, always seeking, and instantly absorbing what 
ever we have to offer. To our south and west, and north 
west, lies an equally vast producing country, capable of 
indefinite extensiuv ; aud from a spirit of restless activity, 
and an unquenchable thirst for gain, always producing 
and setting in motion the accumulations of its industry tu 
supply the necessities of the east, and receiving, as we do, 
iii return, the varied results of mechanical skill. We lie 
between these extremes; the nearer they are brought to 
one another the greater gain to both, and the greater 
stimulant to both to p-u-sue then- incessant interchange 
of rude industry on the one hand and capital and skill on 
the other. We know how astonishingly the influence of 
rapid aud uninterupted comniuuicauon between distant 
centres of industry is developing itself around us; to 
whatever country we look, examples without number start 
up before us in testimony of the life and vigour which is in 
fused as soon as rapidity and perlect freedom of communi 
cation is established, .besides this great advantage of posi 
tion, we have immediate and uncontrolled communication 
with the sea, the highway ol nations. W hen the east or the 
west lails us, or are temporarily incapable of relieving us 
of surplus productions, we can always find ourselves in a 
better position than our western neighbour, because we 
are nearer to the markets abroad. And lastly, may we 
not look upon re? Circes within ourselves? Have we not 
the power of inc. -ing tenfold the products of our u 
our lorests, and our larms. 

The relation of our country to the North-Western and 
Western States of the Union is most remarkable; and in 
order to understand this important question in its wide 
extent, you must lauiiiiiuize yourself with a few general 
truths v, liich a little quiet reflection will render almost 
self-evident. What has led to the construction of the 
Sault Ste. Marie Canal. You will answer, the great mining 
region of Lake Superior copper in iuexhaustable abun 
dance, auu iron distributed in mountain masses, not only 
on the shures of that cold Iresh-water sea, but profusely 
scatt . ihout northern Michigan and Wisconsin! 

Think y thai tile v".t demand lor iron i I the new 
North-w^ierii ;s.ite- \.iii allow those rich m.^^s of metal 
to remain iule. \V ill it be cheaper to bring the coal of 
Ohio and Illinois to Chicago, Milwaukee, Superior City, or 
take the ore to the Losieru States, smelt it, manufacture 
it, and then send it back again to the lar west. Mo the 
region of the great lakes will manufacture its own rail 
road iron as soon as speedy and cheap means of communi 
cation are opened out and maintained. 1 rom Chicago or 
Milwaukee to ine mining region of Lake Superior, a railroad 
is now contemplated, and a few months on this continent 
will teach yuu that to contemplate " in such matters 
signifies " to construct." Kroin Milwaukee to Copper- 
range is about auU miles, ; ; - t of the line runs through 
the richest iron regioL ; ana when all things are depend 
ant upon iron, the south shore of Lake Superior must j 
soon Imd that population aud iudust " lor which it is so , 
remarkably adapted ; and then follow Jae north, the great | 
mineral region 01 \VesternCanada.Butlookbeyondthelakes 
see Iowa, Minnesota, \\ iscousiu and Illinois, what we they 
to do w ith their surplus grain; It must all seek the lake ports. 
It must be stored where there is no prospect of growth 
and fermentation taking place. The damp and warm voy 
age over the heated waters of the Gulf stream is impracti 
cable. The Mississippi aud its affluent the Missouri, are 
useless in great part as avenues for the exportation of 
the wheat of the west. This I us led to that wonderful 
tar-work ol railways which r; ..ites from Chicago for, as 
a general rule, ail traffic follows the direction of a leadtny 
traffic. Intending into the rich prairies of Illinois, In- ; 
diaua, Iowa aud \\ iscoiism, not less than thirteen different ! 
railway.-- radiate Irum Chicago, a city which has sprung up 
as it were in a night; in 1640 it had 4,479 inhabitants, 
it now embraces a^uuo souls, an increase absolutely with 
out parallel ou this continent, and yet a true reflection 
of the commerce, industry aud activity of the west. In 
.like proportion, railways from Milwaukee and from Green 
Bay ramify into the interior. The same argument applies 
to the lake ports of Huron, St. Clair, and iirie, resulting 



in the general proposition, that the region of the Great 
Lake draws to itself a mighty traffic which naturally be 
longs to other water sheds. Uuce on the lakes whither do 
these accumulations tend : You will answer to the sea 
board, for home consumption, or fur exportation to Great 
liritaiu, Ireland, or the W est India Islands, .but in seek 
ing the sea-board they have to tiiid the easiest and spee 
diest route in their descent to the sea level. In Lake 
Superior, Lake Michigan, and northern parts of Lake 
Huron, every cargo ol western produce is o7U feet above 
the sea. It must be let down step by step until it reaches 
this universal level. This may be etiected by a short, sate 
aud rapid step, nearly in a straight line, or it may be 
ellecti-u by a circuitous route, and by a long and often 
precarious descent. .No one doubts that the more rapid 
and sale the communication between east and west, the 
more sudden and elastic will be the ebb and flow of that 
mighty commercial stream whose course, if wisely, though 
ever so gently directed in the first instance, will soon 
carry away every obstruction and impediment to its per 
fect freedom. .Now IOOK at Western Canada, and see the 
barrier which this wedge-shaped country introduces be 
tween the east and west; happily it is only a physical 
ban iir; formerly it was also a political and commercial 
one. As a physical barrier what lias high art and generous 
enterprise done to bring nean-r in one another the. fruitful 
west and the insatiable east. We have now in active opera 
tion the Great M esteru, (Lake Huron and Lake Ontario 
at Hamilton; and State of .New Vork at ^suspension 
Bridge, ~ M miles,) the >ortuern Jtailway (.Lake Huron and 
Lake Ontario Vtb miles,) traversing the barrier; and the 
Wellaud Canal, (Lake iirie and Ontario,) letting down 
the produce of the west to the level of Lake Ontario, 
without breaking bulk. Are these means of communica 
tion taxed to the full ; the Weiland Canal thronged to the 
utmost, answers lor itself; the Great Western Kailway 
lor half its length as a mere preliminary step, has to be 
immediately doubled in capacity by means of a new branch 
from London to Samia, with double track from London to 
Hamilton; the Ivorthern, which a jear ago was thought 
to be a weak and exotic Hedging, has already taken wiug 
with a power and vigour indicative of great inherent 
strength; the Lake Union aud liultalo llailway, the An 
glican name lor the late Uutlaio, iirautfoid and Goderich 
Kailway (Lake Erie to Lake Huron 16V miles, b A now open,) 
will be finished in a twelvemonth; the Grand TrunK 
which stretches its long length through ihe centre of the 
m st fertile part of Western Canada, and thence onward 
to the sea, will soon unite the upper lakes with the At 
lantic; and yet all these connecting links between the 
west and east will be insufficient to serve that vast com 
mercial expansion which treads so rapidly upon, and fills 
to repletion the present artificial means ol communication. 
There arr additional stupeuduous works iu "contempla 
tion." iirst, a ship canal connecting Georgian Bay, the 
northern part of Lake Huron, with l^ake Ontario at To 
ronto, (second, a ship canal connecting the head of Lake 
Huron by the route of Lake Mippissiug, with the Ottawa, 
and theiic with the sea or Lane Ontario. Third, the 
Great Southern Hallway, establishing a third line of com 
munication between the head of Lake .trie aud the Niagara 
Kiver. You may well smile at the interpretation given to 
the word "contemplate" with us, yet think that all the 
railways just named were only contemplated" some three 
or four years ago, and now they may be said to be con 
structed, bo in live years to come you will liud that vast 
change to have occurred in relation to these new projects, 
which the wonderlul growth of th<j Great VV est is now forc 
ing upon our attention. Whatever each succeeding year 
is doing for the Great West it is doing for Canada. It is 
not only increasing population by the iul ux of strangers, 
to a degree totally unparalleled, but opening out new 
fields of enterprise, and establishing new centres of in 
dustry, where live years before existed desolate and un 
inhabited wilds. Lvery mine opened on the south shore 
of Lake Superior, benefits us on account of our geographi 
cal position; aud whatever may be said of the prospective 
wealth and importance of that extensive mineral region of 
our neighbour s may be said with equal confidence of our 
own. So with respect to every additional acre cultivated 
in Iowa or Minnesota; it adds its mite to the traffic which 
is filling to excess every avenue of communication we have 
opened between the west aud east ; aud our future difficulty 
will be to keep pace with the increase of those accumula 
tions which w ill seek t be set in motion from the commer 
cial centres of the north-western lakes. It will be well to 
examine in as brief a manner as possible, the present as 
certained commerce of the lakes, in order to see if our ex- 



[122] 



1856.] 



THE FUTURE OF WESTERN CANADA. 



35 



pectatioiis of the future are likely to be borne out by fact, 
in IBol, Mr. Andrews (Report to United States Govern 
ment,,) estimated the value of the commerce of the great 
lakes to be about 0,UOu,ObO. We are now at the close of 
the year lt3, very nearly lour years have elapsed since 
Mr. Andrews made his calculation and report, and during 
that short space of time 30,000,000 have been added to 
the value of lake commerce ; or in other words, at the 
present moment the commerce of the great lakes is esti 
mated at one hundred and ten millions currency. The 
imports and exports of this region by the .River St. Law 
rence alone, exceeded in 1853 ,bOu,000, and they were 
exclusively Canadian. There is much of promise in this 
lor the future, much to induce us to be up and stirring, 
in order to secure our position and render it immovable. 

The construction of railways, the increase of population, 
the high price ot grain, and the removal of fiscal regula 
tions, have elfecled, during the past two years, so startling 
a change iu the prospects lor the future of this country, 
that it has become a matter of difficulty to select an 
appropriate subject for the purpose of illustrating the 
curious eit ects ot our progress, effects which we ail leei and 
see arouud us for the lime being, but are not much in the 
habit of searching lur live or ten years ahead, and of their 
probable influence then* Take the item, fire-wood. The 
number 01 laiiiilies in -Western Canada, reckoning live 
persons to a lainily, in aoout i:5b,\JOO. Each laniily con 
sumes lor fire-wood, or destroys in the process of clearing, 
at the lowest average twenty cords ol wood per annum, 
in other words, 5,uuOjOOO cords of wood are annually 
annihilated by this means alone. The consumption of 
our railroads at the close of the present year will be about 
200.000 cords; steam boats consume at least an equal 
amount; to that the total quantity is 5,400,000 cords, 
which at sixty cords per acre is equal to the growth of 
J0,000 acres, in 1S&1-2, the area of wooded and wild land 
surveyed and held was b ,123,lc;2 acres ; aud we may with 
justice assume, that notwithstanding the annual additions 
to the surveyed lauds, yet the acdmmUlt portion of our 
wouded land at present does not exceed 5,OUO,000 acres, or 
enough to last lor fire-wood purposes not longer than 
twenty-live years, making due allowance for increase of 
population, and consumption in various ways. Will this 
consumption take place ( Certainly not ; rise in price will 
check it; the more valuable woods will gradually be pre 
served lor exportation and manuiaoturing purposes. The 
i-aris exhibition, in which we have so signally distin 
guished ourselves as a practical, common-sense people, 
\vill secure this new field of industry for us. What then 
is to be ILu substitute? Coal, the coal of Ohio and I ejin- 
sylvauia; perhaps us years roll on the coal of Illinois; it 
may be too that the coal of Michigan will yet be found 
serviceable. The future commerce in coal is an easy prob 
lem. The great west, though possessing boundless prairies 
and mines, has but little timber, and many of the coal 
fields are imaginary. JXot less than three-lburths of the 
so-called coal-nelds of Dr. Owen will have to be swept from 
the map. she must look to the East, to the Lake region, 
lor her fuel for most purposes. Chicago now requires for 
1S55, bOjUUO tons, Milwaukee 30,000, Toronto 17 ,0^0 tons; 
aud in short the great lakes generally, including the 
towns on tlwir coasts aud the steamers on their waters, no 
less an amount than 700,000 tons if What will be the 
requirement in ISuo t What in ISb o ? 

Again, take the item iron. Our railways are groaning 
under their incessant burdens ; but iron, strong as it is, 
cannot endure tor ever; and you may sai ely say that the 
average pel iod of the durability of the iron of a railroad 
dues not exceed five years. This is an ascertained tact, and 
a most important one; it amounts to this that before 
IbbO all tlie railways in ftorth America will require on an 
average to renew their iron tracks I Where is the Iron to 
come iromr Can Europe supply her own increasing want 
and ours besides; or will not rather enterprise and 
necessity open out that vast mineral region of Superior, 
and give our own manufacturers iron within the borders 
of the great Lakes! In Ibol the United States imported 
lS8,b 2b tons 01 iron, of :in agregate value of $4,900,000, and 
at a cost of -;2t> per ton. In iSa4 the same country im 
ported 282,Suti tons, having a value of ^12,020,000, and, 
including duty, at a cost of $4y 4 Jc, per ton, or not lar 
short of double tha price in 18ol. 

f have selected two items, coal and iron, because they 
are at the foundation of all modern enterprise; they con 
stitute in themselves the crude yet mighty means by 
which ;he Lulled Kingdom has reached its incalcula 
ble wealth and gigantic power. They are equally the 
means by which tuu United States of America and the 



Canadas have arrived at their present position, and on 
which they found their hopes for future greatness. Of 
what value would the richest prairies loaded with grain 
be, if means of export were closed? Of what value is that 
prostrate pine, which lies in huge magnificence at our 
leet, as long as there exists no hope of conveying it where 
it may be made to serve some useiul purpose. It will rot 
where the storm has laid it, and so will thousands around 
us until means of communication are opened out ; then 
they become of value, and the nearer they are to market 
the greater their worth. It has pleased Providence to 
withhold one of these mighty engines of enterprise and 
wealth from us. Coal no doubc once existed iu vast 
abundance in Western Canada, but it has long since been 
swept away, and the outlying patches in the United 
States just touch our borders. Hut in our deprivation we 
find another strong necessity for extending our means of 
communication, to supply not only ourselves but the ports 
and cities of Lake Ontario Valley. A very large portion 
of our mineral region is covered with trees which are not 
fit for commercial purposes, but may be converted into 
charcoal with the greatest advantage, and thus meet in 
some degree, as far n;= iron and copper is concerned, the 
want of coal. All the excellent Sweedish iron is smelted 
b; leans of charcoal, and as soon as means of communi- 
ca.iou render our mineral region commercially accessible, 
charcoal can be manufactured at one-fourth ol the prke it 
obtains in Europe. The Huron, Lake Aippissing and 
Ottawa Canal, will change that dreary wilderness into a 
bustling centre of industry. 

.Now imagine, for the sake of grasping this subject more 
easily, that a ship canal between Lake Huron and Lake 
Ontario were constructed; that it were capable of letting 
down the produce of Lake Huron some 36o feet into Lake 
Ontario, in propellers or screws, carrying at least 1,000 ton?. 
The length of the canal would be ab. r luu miles, and it 
would save in actual distance alon not less than 300 
miles. It would become one of the great high ways for mer 
chandize of every description going to the East, and from 
the East going to the West. Its extremities would be 
converted into depots of coal to supply the steamers 
running to and from Oswego, Rochester, and Ogdensburg, 
being on the line of traffic, and the nearest points to the 
mines of Ohio, from which they must derive then- supplies. 
Chicago, which in 1854 shipped nearly 13,000,000 bushels 
of wheat, would send every grain by that short route to 
Oswego and the St. Lawrence ports. But .it Chicago 
shipped 13,000,000 in 1864, what will she do in 1800 ; and 
what will the other ports of L- i Michigan, emulating her 
in enterprize and courage, BH- . to swell the traffic which 
must cross the great barrier of Western Canada, to find 
the cheapest route by way of Oswego and the St. Lawrence, 
to the most profitable markets in the East, and beyond 
the seas? Whatever argument applies to exports, holds 
good with imports; an equal tide of traffic will return 
by the same route for Lalte Michigan aud Lake Huron 
forts; iu a word for the great Isorth West. The rush 
for land is even greater in the Western States than in 
Western Canada. In 1864 the United States govern- 
me^t sold the enormous area of 3,27b ,000 acres in Iowa 
alone, at an average price of $1 24 cents the acre. In 
-Missouri, 2,fc Jb,000 acres were sold during the same period, 
at an average price of 43 cents per acre. The total amount 
of land sold in the United States ai.i its territo 
ries during 1854 amounted to 14,8by,368 acres, payment 
being made in cash, tl . receipts being $105,4y,ooo. It is 
a most fortunate circumstance for W estern Canada, that 
her form is that of a wedge, penetrating among the 
Southern States ot the Lake region. That single geogra 
phical condition secures to her a large share of the traffic 
between these States and the East, as already exemplified 
on the Great Western railway ; thus leaving for Central 
Western Canada and the Ottawa Valley the commerce of 
Lake Michigan ports led directly into Lake Ontario. This 
subject might be greatly amplified, and with advantage, 
but time warns us to limit these encouraging speculations, 
and to turn our attention to the internal condition and 
prospects of the country we are surveying. 

A new state of affairs has arisen in VV estern Canada 
during the past two years. High prices have had a 
marvellous effect, and one which is not without hazard to 
the larmer, whose industry lies at some distance from the 
leading lines of traffic. As an illustration we may take 
Toronto markets, and trace the effects of high prices 
among many of the smaller lanners of that neighbourhood. 
The illustration will hold good for every other town an I 
village in the country. 

It is necessary to remind you that the majority of the 



[123] 



86 



THE FUTURE OF WESTERN CANADA. 



[1856. 



farmers of Canada have once belonged to the class either of 
labouring men, or mechanics. They have purchased their 
farms, probably as wild land, at a time when land could 
be obtaned from 10s. to 20s. per acre. The gradual settle 
ment of the country, added to the results of their own 
labour, has placed them not only in an independent posi 
tion, but often made them comparatively wealthy men. 
How have they expended their wealth? First, in sur 
rounding themselves with comforts; secondly, in pur- 
elding fresh farms (wild land) for their children or them- 
s 1 ves. Generally they have retained the primitive method 
of simply accumulating dollar by dollar the necessary 
funds, and retaining it in their own homes until a favora- 
; "oortunity for expending it occurred. This hoarding 
process, though very general, has not xintil lately exhibited 
any evil effects, because the accumulations wore slowly 
made, small in amount and limited in number. But 
during the past two years, high prices have enabled 
firmers to accumulate rapidly and to a large amount. As 
heretofore, their gains have been expended in the purchase 
of wild land, and the price of land has risen enormously. 
Suppose that in one day the farmers about Toronto receive 
in cash 2,000 for the wheat they bring to market: this 
sum with a very small deduction disappears at once from 
circulation ; so on day by day until the recipients have 
accumulated sufficient to make fresh purchases of land, 
probably in some remote township. Payments are gene 
rally made by instalments; and under the prospect of con 
tinued high prices, the temptation to secure "lots" of land 
is irresistable. Not only is a very large sum of money thus 
withdrawn from circulation, producing a pressure upon 
commercial transactions, but tens of thousands render 
themselves liable for payments which the bare occurrence 
of a decline in the price of wheat to a dollar the bushel 
would make it difficult, perhaps impossible, for them to 
moet. It is easy to see how this condition of affairs would 
react upon the small storekeepers throughout the country, 
and ultimately upon the merchants. Again it may be ob 
served that during the past two years the value of every 
kind of farming produce has risen in the same proportion 
as products adapted for exportation, and must so continue 
until our great lines of traffic are completed through the 
great barriur. When these are ia active operation, it is 
possible but not very probable that a reduction may take 
place. The great increase of population in the Atlantic 
States, the remarkable falling off in their capabilities to sup 
ply themselves, and " reciprocity," will most probably ope 
rate in maintaining present remunerative prices for all 
articles not dependent upon foreign demands. We possess 
a strong sprit of nationality which keeps us within our own 
borders. The American, so called, cares not whether he 
makes his home in Ohio or in Minnesota, in Indiana or in 
Iowa; he is still in the Union, and knows no home tie suffi 
ciently strong to overcome the desire for gain to be won by 
moving a thousand miles to the West. Our farmers, it is 
true, are continually selling out and going deeper into the 
bush, but this is a process which must gradually exhaust 
itself, as far as the agricultural region is concerned. They 
remain, however, in Canada ultimately, as permanent set 
tlers, and become, under the instruction of a continual 
stream of practical farmers and labourers from the old con- 
try, excellent husbandmen. The importance of this feeling 
of Nationality is liable to be overlooked ; it is essentially 
valuable as conducive to the improvement of the soil and 
the prevalence of good husbandry. An American of the 
great producing Western States, rapidly exhausts his farm 
by repeated croppings, sells out, and seeks new land ; a 
general rise in price, owing to increase of population, set 
tlement, railroads, &c., amply remunerating him for his 
improvements." This goes on continually, and the march 
of the pioneer farmer is always westward. The result is, 
that the average amount of crops raised in the older 
states has been continually diminishing for years past; 
and those which are considered the most advantageously 
situated with regard to soil, climate, and means of com 
munication, such as Ohio for instance, are positively be 
hind Western Canada in average production. We are 
continually increasing our averages and improving our 
farms; ameliorating rather than deteriorating the con 
dition of the soil, because we are a comparatively 
stationary people. In the States of the Union, the contrary 
decidedly prevails. We shall soon exceed in absolute 
production any single state of the American Union, as we 
now exceed them in relative production. We possess 
many singular advantages as an agricultural country 
which are not generally enjoyed by our neighbours. Kx- 
actly crossing the centre of Western Canada is a vast series 
of gypsum beds, from which the excellent fertilizer may 



be extracted in a state of great purity at a trilling 
expense : the same rocks extend as a stripe into .New 
York on the one hand and Northern Michigan on the 
other. In nearly every part of Western Canada we find 
limestone, and if not always in the form of massive beds, 
still as layers between beds of argillaceous shale, a::-.l. 
sufficiently pure for agricultural purposes. In the drift 
clays which cover the country, lies, however, our chief 
wealth: over the whole oftheagricultur.il region, with 
the exception of pine-clothed sand ridges, these drift clays 
constitute the subsoil, sometimes ten, sometimes two 
hundred feet thick, and holding up that priceless treasure, 
pure spring water. So marked is the influence of the 
Lakes which surround us on our climate, that spec:, sot 
trees which in the Atlantic states only reach the 
latitude of the middle of Ohio, are found growing 
in the utmost luxuriance in the valley of the Thames 
in Western Canada. Neither have we so frequently 
to lament the occurrence of drought, or of sudden 
deluges of rain, which distinguish the climates of the 
North Western States. Under these circumstances of 
climate, soil, and people, is it not reasonable to anticipate;) 
bright future for the agricultural industry of Western 
Canada? What then will be the position of this country in 
1800 ? Is this a problem diinculb of solution, or is it not 
partially worked out iu the lessbns which the past two 
years have taught us ? Let us dwell for a few moments on 
the scene around us, and then draw conclusions as to 
what we may be permitted to see before the close of another 
decade. Yonder to the north, the dividing ridge between 
the Ottawa Valley and Lake Huron is already gained by 
the adventurous lumber-men, and the farmers are following 
from the Ottawa rapidly iu their footsteps. Hitherto the 
rivers and streams flowing to the East have borue, during 
each spring freshet, the labours of the winter towards the 
St. Lawrence. The summit ridge has been gained, how 
ever, and Lak Huron, begins to receive the treasures of 
our forests to supply the wants of the WEST. The crest of 
the dividing ridge, at the head waters of the Ktav,a\v,e 
and Matawa, great affluents of the Ottawa, gives ri.-e 
to the Muskoka, the Maganetawan and French Kiver, 
which flow into Lake Huron, and down these noble 
rivers the first instalment of a vast supply of lumber i.-: 
preparing for its spring journey to tho West, while here 
and there along the north coast, at the mouths of tho 
rivers, mills are being erected, and the site of future 
towns marked out. We know what has led to the con 
struction of the slides on the Ottawa; the same necessity 
will soon overcome tho obstacles to be met with in tiiu 
course oj the most important rivers flowing into Lake 
Huron. Now turn to the south and glance along the lines 
of railway already completed. See, where the thick forest 
held absolute sway two years ago, thousands of bright 
spots illuminated by the sunlight which now reaches 
them, and growing into little life-giving centres to the 
scattered industry which has hitherto existed in loneliness 
and hardship, almost cut off from the humanities of life. 
Watch these expanding day by day, diffusing life, vigour 
and hope all around them, and along the great lines of traffic 
continually increasing in number, and growing in strength, 
converting silent woods into bustling farms, and pushing 
the blessings of industry and civilization into the cold 
heart of the wilderness on every side. Lastly, glance at 
the Ottawa Valley, and thence to the shores of Lakes Huron 
and Superior along our wild north-eastern and northern 
boundary. See how our mineral wealth is already glitter 
ing on the surface, won from inexhaustible stores uf 
copper and iron, of more worth to us than " wedges of 
gold" or " heaps of pearl." One word more before we part. 
There is nothing illusory in the scene you have been sur 
veying. No mirage to bring out into unnatural relief the 
brighter spots of the picture; all is solid and s< 
The nature and extent of the useful part you may lu-r>.>- 
after play in tho future of Western Canada, depends en 
tirely upon yourself. All varieties of scene and occupation 
are open to you, each anxiously seeking to adopt and claim 
you for its own. And as year heart begins to warm 
towards those among whom you may chouse to cast your 
lot, seek to acquire and spread a feeling of r. 
and affection for your new Canadian home, not so 
much on account of the gifts it so freely unl 
erously offers, but for the independent future it pro 
mises to yourself and your children. Kemember tint yu 
have become one of a PEOPLE, and that you have a proud tc 1- 
ing of nationality to reverence in others and acquire for 
yourself, which some day, perhaps, may come upon you 
unawares, bringing with it deep thankfulness for the bless 
ings you have so peacefully won. 



[124] 



1856.] 



PROVINCE OF CANADA. 



37 



THE ROYAL FAMILY. 



HER MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY (ALEXANDRINA-) VICTORIA, 
By the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great 
Britain and Ireland Queen, Defender of the Faith. Her 
Majesty, the only child of His Royal Highness Edward 
Duke of Kent, fourth son of King George III., was born 
on the 24th of May, 1819 ; succeeded to the Crown on the 
demise of her uncle, his late Majesty William IV., on the 
20th June. 1837, and married Feb. 10, 1840, Francis-Albert 
Augustus-Charles-Emmanuel, Duke of Saxe, Prince of Co- 



burg and Gotha, who was born August 26, 1819. Iggue : 
Victoria-Adelaide-Mary-Louisa, Princess Royal, b. Nov. 21, 
1840; Albert-Edward, Prince of Wales, b. Nov. 9, 1841; 
Alice-Maud-Mary, b. April 25, 1843; Alfred-Ernest-Albert, 
b. Aug. 6, 1844; Helena-Avgusta-Victoria, b. May 25, 1846; 
Louisa-Caroline-Alberta, b. March 18, 1848 ; Arthur- William- 
Patrick-Albert, b. May 1, 1850; Leopold-George-Duncan- 
Albert, b. April 7, 1853. 



PROVINCE OF CANADA. 

SEAT OP GOVERNMENT TORONTO. 



GOVERNOR GENERAL His Excellency Sir Edmund Walker 
Head, Bart, Governor General of British North America, 
and Captain General and Governor-in-Chief of the Provin 
ces of Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and the Island 
of Prince Edward, &c. &c. &c. Viscount Bury, Governor 
General s Secretary. Capt. Retallack, 16th Regt., A. D. C., 
Military Secretary, and Principal Aide-de-Camp. Colo 
nel Irvine, Provincial Aide-de-Camp. Lieut. Col. Duchesnay, 
extra Provincial Aide-de-Camp. 

CIVIL SECRETARY S OFFICE. Viscount Bury, Secretary ; 
Henry Cotton, Chief Clerk; Philip Hill, Office Keeper; 
John Boxall, Messenger. 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 

President of the Council and Minister of Agriculture Hon. 

Sir A. N. MacNab, Knt. 
Receiver General Hon. E. P. Tache. 
Attorney General East Hon. L. T. Drummond. 
SpeoJcer Legislative Council Hon. John Ross. 
Inspector General^- Hon. William Cayley. 
Attorney General West Hon. John A. Macdonald. 
Postmaster General Hon. Robert Spence. 
Commissioner of Crown Lands Hon. Joseph Cauchon. 
Chief Commissioner Public Works Hon. Frangois Lemieux. 
Provincial Secretary Hon. George E. Cartier. 

OFFICERS. William H. Lee, Clerk of Executive Council; 
William A. Himsworth, Confidential Clerk; Moore A. lli^- 
gins, F. Valleraud, and Oliver Cote, Clerks; Michael Naugh- 
ton, Doorkeeper ; James Ryan, Messenger. 

PROVINCIAL SECRETARY S OFFICE. Hon. George E. Cartier, 
Provincial Secretary ; Ettiene Parent, Assistant Secretary 
East; Edmund A. Meredrth, Assistant Secretary West; 
T. D. Harrington, Chief Clerk; G. Powell, first do., West; 
H. E. Steele, second do.; C. J. Birch, third do.; Thomas 
Koss, first do. East ; Henry Jarmy, second do. ; William 
H. Jones, third do. ; Alfred R. Roche, fourth do. ; S. Tetu, 
fifth do. ; George S. Bertrand, sixth do. 

PROVINCIAL REGISTRAR S OFFICE. Provincial Registrar 
the Provincial Secretary for the time being; Thomas 
Amidt, Esq., Deputy do.; William Kent, Chief Clerk: G. 
H. Lane, Second do.; Amable Belanger, Assistant do.; 
Maxime Valiijuette, Messenger. 

RECEIVER GENERAL S OFFICE. Hon. E. P. Tache, Receiver 
General; Charles E. Anderson, Deputy do. ; Theo. Dufort, 
1st Clerk and Book-keeper ; J. B. Stanton, 2nd, or Warrant 
Clerk ; G. C. Reiffjnstein, 3rd, or Debenture Clerk ; Wil 
liam Hedge, 4th, and Bank Account Clerk ; J. F. Pellant, 
5th, General Clerk; L. F. Dufresne, 6th Clerk, in charge 
of Municipal Loan Fund of Upper Canada; Charles W. 
Shay, Assistant Book-keeper and General Clerk; Frederick 
liraun, Clerk in charge of Municipal Loan Fund of Lower 
Canada; F. L. Casault, Messenger; J. Irwin, Assistant do. 

INSPECTOR GENERAL S OFFICE William Dickenson, Actin" 
Deputy Inspector General; David A. Ross, 1st Clerk; 
Morris Godard, 2nd Book-koeper ; John Drysdale, 2nd 
Clerk; Archibald Gary, 3rd do.; W. C. Crofton, Compiler 
of Blue Book ; Charles Green, extra Clerk ; F. G. Scott, do. ; 
D. Ryan, Office-keeper. 

Customs Department R. S. M. Bouchette, Commissioner; 
T. Worthington, Inspector of Ports for Upper Canada; 

Matthew Ryan, do. for Lower Canada; 1st 

Clerk; II. II. Duffill, 2nd do.; J. R. Audy, Clerk; J. A. 
Green, Check do.; J. M. Muckle, do. do.; J. W. Peachy, 
extra do. 

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURE AND STATISTICS. Hon. Sir A. N. 
Mc.Nab, Head of Bureau; William Hutton, Secretary ; E. 
Campbell, 1st Clerk ; N. F. Laurent, 2nd do. ; P. De^uise, 
3rd do.; D. McLeod, 4th do. 



[125] 



DEPARTJIENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. Hon. F. Lemieux. 
Chief Commissioner; lion. H. H. Killaly, Assistant do.; 
T. A. Begly, Secretary. 

Engineering Branch. John Page, Chi if Engineer; F. P. 
Rubidge, Engineer and Draftsman; P. Gauvreau, Clerk of 
Works. 

Corresponding Branch. C. D. Shanly, Chief Clerk; J. 
Guy, Clerk; J. W. Harper, Clerk. 

Financial Branch. S. Strang, Book-keeper and Ac 
countant; J. Turnbull, Assistant do. 

Board of Railway Commissioners. Chairman The Hon. 
the Receiver General; The Hon. the Inspector General; 
The Hon. the Postmaster General; The Hon. the Chief 
Commissioner of Public Works. The Hon. the Assistant 
Commissioner of Public Works. Secretary The Secretary 
of Public Works. 

CROWN LAND DEPARTMENT. The Hon. Joseph Cauchon, 
Commissioner ; E. A. Genereux, Secretary to Commissioner ; 
John Morphy, Registrar to Department. 

Accountant s Branch. William Ford, Accountant; Jere 
miah Alley, Assistant do. ; C. J. WaJcot, Clerk ; B. Powell, 
do. ; P. M. Partridge, Temporary Accountant. 

Correspondence West.J. C. Tarbutt, 1st Clerk ; A. Kirk- 
wood, 2nd do. ; A. J. Taylor, 3rd do. 

Correspondence, Accounts and Sales East. W. F. Collins, 

1st English Clerk ; , 1st French do. ; V. E. 

Tessier, 2nd do. ; T. Cherrier, 3rd do. ; F. D. Dugal, Tem 
porary Assistant ; F. Chasse, do. ; Thomas Hammond, Re 
gistrar. 

Surveys West. Andrew Russell. Senr. Surveyor and 
Draughtsman; Thomas Devine, 1st do.; John" Joseph 
Prendergast, Copying Clerk. 

Surveys East. Joseph Bouchette, Senr. Surveyor and 
Draughtsman; E. T. Fletcher, 1st do.; G. G. Dunlevie, 
2nd do.; J. F. Bouchette, Assistant do.; S. P. Bauset, 
do.; J. B. R. Raymond, Copying Clerk. 

Late Surveyor General s Office. William Spragge, 1st 
Clerk; Thomas Hector, 2nd do. ; H. J. Jones, 3rd do.; F 
T. Roche, 4th do. ; F. A. Hall, 5th do. 

Woods and Forests -W. M. D. Dawson, 1st Clerk; L. A. 
Robitaille, 2nd do. ; John Tolmie, Accountant. 

Jesuit s Estates and Queen s Domain in Lower Canada. 
Felix Fortier, 1st Clerk ; F. T. Judah, 2nd do. ; L. R. For- 
tier, Temporary Clerk. 

BOARDS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYORS 

Upper Canada Board. The Hon. The Commissioner of 
Crown Lands, ex-ojjlcio; Joseph Bouchette and A.Russell, 
Senior Surveyors and Draftsmen, Crown Lands Depart 
ment ; John Booth, Elizabethtown ; Sandford F. Fleming, 
Toronto ; David Gibson, Township of York ; William Haw 
kins, Toronto; John Stoughton Dennis, Weston; and 
John Knatchbull Roche, Port Hope, Provincial Land Sur 
veyors ; Secretary, F. F. Passinore, Toronto. 

Lower Canada Board. The Hon. The Commissioner of 
Crown Lands, ex-officio; Joseph Bouchette and Andrew 
Russell, Senior Surveyors and Draftsmen, Crown Lands 
Department; Adolphus Lame, Quebec ; Charles Frangois, 
Fornis, St. Jean Port Joli ; Joseph Hamel, Quebec ; and 
John Ostell, Montreal, Provincial Land Surveyors; Secre 
tary, E. T. Fletcher, Quebec. 

CROWN TIMBER OFEICE. McLean Stewart, Collector; 
Archibald Douglas, Assistant Collector. 

CROWN LAW DEPARTMENT. 

Canada West. Hon. John A. Macdonald, Attorney 
General; Henry Smith, Jr., Solicitor General; Robert A. 
Harrison, Clerk; Patrick Lynch, Messenger. 



38 



PROVINCE OF CANADA. 



[1856. 



Canada East. lion. L.T.Drummond, Attorney General ; 
Dunbar Ross, Solicitor General ; George Futvoye, Clerk of 
Department; George Baby, Clerk. 

ADJUTANT GENERAL S OFFICE. Colonel Baron de Rotten- 
burg, Adjutant General; Lieut. Col. Donald Macdonell, 
Deputy Adjutant General, C.W.; Lieut Colonel the Hon. 
A. M. de Salaberry, Deputy Adjutant General, C. E. ; 
Robert Berry, Clerk to the Adjutant General ; Capt. Chas. 
Petitelair, and Capt. Peter L. Macdonnell, Clerks to Deputy 
Adjutant General Canada West and Canada East ; Henry 
Smeaton, Office Messenger. 

INDIAN DEPARTMENT. The Right Hon. Lord Bury, Su 
perintendent General of Indian Affairs; S. Y. Chesley, 
Assistant do. ; Michael Turner, Chief Clerk ; Thomas G. 
Anderson, Daniel Thorburn, Duncan C. Napier, George 
Ironside, Froom Talfourd, Superintendents ; H. P. Chase, 
Francis Assickenac, Interpreters. W. R. Bartlett, Agent 
Saugeen Land Sales. 

GENERAL POST OFFICE. Hon. Robert Spence, Postmaster 



General ; William H. Griffin, Secretary ; E. F. King, Chief 
Clerk ; E. J. King, Accountant ; P. Lesueur, Superinten 
dent Money Order Branch ; J. F. McCuaig, Inspector Dead 
Letters; Edward S. Freer, Inspector Montreal Division; 
H. A. Wicksteed, Inspector Kingston Division; John 
Dewe, Inspector Toronto Division ; G. E. Griffin, Inspector 
London Division. 

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT C. W. For the general admi 
nistration of the Gramnii and Common School Laws. 
Rev. Egerton Ryerson, D.D., Chief Superintendent of 
Schools; John George Hodgins, Deputy Superintendent of 
Schools; Thomas Hodgins, Second Clerk ; A. J. William 
son, Clerk of Correspondence; Alexander Marling. Clerk 
ot Accounts : Samuel P. May, Clerk of Libraries ; Thomas 
C. Sc Vble, Assistant Clerk. Offices in the Normal School 
Buildings, Toronto. 

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. W. E. Logan, F.R.S., Provincial 
Geologist; Alexander Murray, Assistant do., T. S. Hunt, 
Chemist. (This Office is at Montreal.) 



LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF CANADA. 



NAMES 4 RESIDENCES. 

Hon. P. B. DeBlaquier, Toronto. 
" Peter McGill, Montreal. 
" Rene E. Caron, Quebec. 
" W. Morris, Montreal. 
" J. Crooks, Flamboro West. 
" A. Fergusson, Flamboro East. 
" J. Macaulay, Kingston. 

J. Hamilton, Kingston, 

A. Ferrie, Doon. 

P. H. Knowlton, Brome. 

P. H. Moore, Phillipsburgh. 

3. Dionne, St. P rs Us Becguet. 

G. J. Goodhue, London. 

W. Walker, Quebec. 

C. Widmer, Toronto. 

J. M. Irving, Newmarlcei. 

P. Boucher DeBoucherville, Bou- 
cherrille. 

J. Morris, BrockviUe. 

J. Gordon, Toronto. 

H. Pinhey, March. 



HON. JOHN Ross, Toronto, Speaker. 

NAMES 4 RESIDENCES. 

Hon. J. Ferrier, Montreal. 
" R. Matheson, Perth. 
G. S. Boulton, Cobourg. 

D. B. Tiger, Montreal. 

E. P. Tache, Quebec. 
James Leslie, Montreal. 
Frederick A. Quesnel, Montreal. 
J. Bourret, Montreal. 

G. S. DeBeaujeu, Coteau du Lac. 
L. Methot, St. Oroix. 
3. 0. Turgeon, Terrebonne. 
S. Crane, Prescott. 
S. Mills, Hamilton. 
Louis Panet, Quebec. 
Narcisse F. Belleau, Quebec. 
Charles Wilson, Montreal. 
Benjamin Seymour, Bath. 
David M. Armstrong, Berthier. 
Ebenezer Perry, Cobourg. 
Eusebe Cartier, St. Hyacinths. 
Walter H. Dickson, Niagara. 



PERMANENT OFFICERS. J. F. Taylor 
Clerk, and Master in Chancery; Robt 
LeMoine, Deputy and Assistant Clerk 
Master in Chancery, and French Trans 
lator; Fennings Taylor, Additional 
Assistant Clerk, and Chief Office Clerk; 
E. L. Montizambert, Law Clerk, and 
English Translator ; J. E. Doucet, Ad 
ditional Assistant Clerk, and Assistant 
French Translator ; W. A, Maingy, do. 
and 2nd Office Clerk: James Adam- 
son, Clerk of the English Journals ; 
J. G. Couillard, Clerk of the French 
Journals ; Rene Kimber, Gentleman 
Usher of the Black Rod : Olivier Val. 
lerand, Serjeant-at-Arms; Rev. W. A. 
Adamson, D.C.L., Chaplain and Libra! 
rian; Michael Keating, Chief Messen 
ger; Edward Botterell, Doorkeeper. 
Antoine, Lachance, Messenger; Timol 
thy Neary, do. ; Samuel Skinner, do. 
James Doherty, do.; John Stanley 
do. ; F. Jit mlet, do . 



do.; John Young 
ADDEESS. To the Honourable the Legislative Council of the Province of Canada, in Parliament assembled. 



The 



Humbly sheweth, 
[Place and date. ] 



That, &c. 



Petition of - 



LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF CANADA. 

Louis VICTOR SICOTTE, Speaker. 



CONSTITUENCIES. NAMES. 

Argenteuil. . . Sidney Bellingham. 
Bagot ..... Timothe Brodeur. 
Beauce ..... Dunbar Ross. 
Beauharnois. . CharlesDaoust. 
0. C. Fortier. 
Pierre Bust. Dostaler. 
Thomas Meagher. 
David Christie. 
Herbert Biggar. 

Brockville (Town) George Crawford. 
Carletrm .... Wm. F. Powell. 

Noel Darche. 
. Thomas Marchildon. 
. Jacob DeWitt 

I David E. Price. 
) 

John Sewall Sajiborn. 



Jiettechasse 
Bertheir . . . 
Jlonaventure 
Brant (E. R.) 
Brant ( W. R.) 



Chambly .. 
Champlain 
Chateanguai 



Tadoussac. 
Comptnn 



Cornwall (7oum) Roderick McDonald. 
Dorchester. . . Barthelemi Pouliot. 



Drummd < 1 
sl;a j 



. D rf 
Arthabasl;a j 

is .... John Pliny Crysler. 

Durham (E. H.} Francis II. Burton. 
p/tr/i" Henry Munro. 

Elijin ( K. A .) George Southwick. 
Elffia ( W. R.) George MacBeth. 
...... Arthur Rankin. 

Frontenac . . . Henry Smith. 
Gaspe ...... John LeBoutillii-r. 

Glengary . . . Hon. J.S. Macdonald. 
Grenvilte (S. /;.)Wm. Patrick. 



CONSTITUENCIES. NAMES. 

Grey George Jackson. 

Haldimand . . Wm. Lyon Mackenzie. 

Halton Geo. K. Chisholm. 

Hamilton (City) Sir A. N. MacNab. 
Hastings (N.R.) Edmund Murney. 
Hastings (S.R.) BUla Flint. 
Huntingdon . . R. Brown Somerville. 
Huron & Bruce,. Hon. W. Cayley. 

Ibervilte Chas. Joseph Labergo 

JolieUe Joseph H. Jobin. 

Kaniouraslca . . Jean Chas. Chapais. 

Kent Edwin Larwill. 

Kinr/fton (City). Hon. J.A.Macdonald. 
Lambton .... George Brown. 
Lanark (2f. R.} Robert Bell 
Lanark (S. R.) James Shaw. 
Laprarie, . . . . T. J. J. Loranger. 
L Assomption . Joseph Papin. 
Lnval Pierre Labelle. 



l!a>il R. Church 



,i: HU t m ; David Roblin. 

Grenville) 
(North Riding) j 

> . A.) Jesse Delong. 

Lecis Francois Lemieux. 

/i. . . . Hon." W. II. Merritt. 
L islft .... Chas F. Fournier. 

(City) John Wilson. 
f. ill>inere. . . John O FanvlI. 
Miifi,intii-fiK . Joseph E. Tnrcotte. 
Megantic. . . Wm. Rhodes. 



CONSTITUENCIES. 

Middlesex (E. If.) Wm. 
Middlesex ( IK R.) John Scatcherd. 
Missisquoi (E. R.) Jas. M. Kenes. 
Missisqum(W.R.) II. II. Whitney. 
Montcalm . . Joseph Dufresne. 
Montmagny . Napoleon Casault. 
Montmorency. Joseph Cauchon. 

i Antoine A. Dorion. 
Luther H. Helton. 
Hon. John Young. 

) 1 ^seph Laporte. 



Jacques 0. Bureau. 
jVia0oro(2bwn)JoBeph C. M-m-ison. 
Nicolet .... Thomas Ktirtier. 
Norfolk . . . Hon. John R<>!ph. 
Northumberland)-, -,, 
(Ktft Riding) j J 

5Jg ; Sidney Smith. 

pli (lonld. 

Ontarin i .v. Riding)]. McV. Lumsden. 
Ottawa (City) . . Agar Ycilding. 

Ottawa Alan 

Oxford (N. Riding)T>on aid Mat heson. 
i-lphntim CtKik. 

\ Jam. .- C. Aikins. 

Thos. May no Daly. 

Peterborough . . John Laugton. 



[126] 



1856.] 



POST OFFICE DEPAKTMENT. 



CONSTITUENCIES. NAMES. 

Pontiac ..... John Egan. 
Portneuf .... Jos.ElieThibaudeau 
Prescott ..... Henry W. McCann. 
Prince Edward . David B. Stevenson. 

}.Tean Blanchet. 
Charles Alleyn. 
Hon. Jean Chabot. 

Quebec (County) . Francois Evanturelle 
Renfrew ..... -- 

Richelieu .... Jean B. Guevermont 

Rimouski .... Joseph C. Tache. 

Rouvitte ..... Joseph N. Poulin. 

Russell ...... Geo. Byron Lyon. 

Saguenay .... Pierre Gabriel Hunt. 

Saint Hyacintlie. Louis Victor Sicotte. 
Saint John s . . . Francois Bourassa. 
Saint Maurice . L. L. L. Desaulniers. 
SJiefford ..... Hon.L.T.Drummond 

Sherbrooke(Town)A.\ex. T. Salt. 

and Wm. L. Felton. 



Simcoe(N. Riding) Angus Morrison. 
Simcoe (S.Riding)llon. W.B.Robinson. 
Soulanges .... Luc II. Masson. 
Stanstead . . . . Timothy L. Terrill. 
Stormont .... William Mattice. 
Temiscouata . . Benjamin Dionne. 
Terrebrmne . . . Gt. M. Prevost. 
ThreeRivers(Towri)AQtoiue Polette. 

v n ~t if^t \ I Hon. J. II. Cameron. 
Toronto (City) }j. G . Bowes . 

Two Mountains . J. B. Daoust. 



CONSTITUENCIES. NAMES. 

Verclieres .... Geo. E. Cartier, 

Vict H-ia. James Smith. 

Witsrloo (N. R.) M. H. Foley. 
Waterloo (X 7?.) Robert Ferrie. 

W. llond John Frazer. 

WHKngton(If.RJ Wm. Clarke. 
Wellington (S.R.) A. J. Ferguson 
Wentworth(N.R. ) H.on. R. Spence. 
W, nf>i-orth (S.R.) S. B. Freeman. 
I lmvsl.-fi .... Ignace Gil. 
r<irl; I .V. Rnff)Joeph Hartman. 
York (E. Ri lir>g)Amos Wright. 
i fork ( W. I}idiny)John W. Gamble. 

PERMANENT OFFICERS. 

Chief Department. W. B. Lindsay, 
Clerk; W. B. Lindsay, Jun., Clerk As 
sistant; W. Ross, Deputy do.; T. 
Vaux, Accountant; C. Langevin, As 
sistant do. 

General Department. W. P. Patrick, 
Chief Office Clerk; H.Hartney, Assist, 
do.; William Spink, Routine and Re 
cord Clerk; II. B. Stuart, English 
Writing do.: E. Denichaud, French 
do.; W. B. Ross, Junior Clerk; Her 
mann Poetter, do.; A. Laperriere, As 
sistant French Writing Clerk. 

General Committee Department. 
Alfred Patrick, Clerk of Committees 
and of Controverted Elections ; J. P. 
Leprohon, First Assistant Clerk of 
Committees ; F. X. Blanchet, 2nd do. 



Pi-indf. Bill Department. A. Todd. 
Clerk of Private Bills : T. Patrick. As 
sistant do. and Clerk of Railway Com 
mittee. 

Translators. G. Levesque, French 
Translator of the Laws ; A. (>. Lajoie. 
\s=isMnt do.: D. P. Myrand, French 
Translator of Documents ; E. P. Dorion, 
Assistant do. : W. Fanning, French 
Translator of Journals and Routine 
Business: F. Badgley, English Trann- 
lator; W. Wilson, Assistant do.; W. 
P. Power, Extra do. 

Journals. G. M.Muir, Clerk of Eng 
lish Journals; P. E. Gaynon. Clerk of 
French da : W. II. LeMoine. Assistant 
Clerk of French Journals ; W. C. Bur- 
rage Assistant Clerk of English do, 

Lilrary. W. Winder, Librarian ; 
Alpheus Todd, Assistant Librarian; 
J. Curran, Library Keeper. 

Serjea nt-at-Arms Department. D . 
W. MacDonell, Sergeant-at-Arms ; A. 
L. Cardinal, Chief Messenger and 
House Keepar ; M. McCarthy, Assist 
ant Messenger; 0. Vincent, do.; J. 
O Connor, Door-keeper ; J. Cameron. 
Assistant do. 

Post Office Department. R. Defries, 
Post Master ; Joseph Blais, Assistant 
Post Master; P. Laliberte, Messen 
ger. 



Fdudreuil . . . . J. B. Mongenais. 

ADDRESS To the Honourable the Legislative Assembly of Canada in Provincial Parliament Assembled : 

The Petition of 

Humbly Sheweth, That, &c. 

Wherefore your Petitioners humbly pray, &c, 
[Place and Date.] 

4=- No Petition to the Legislative Assembly will be received unless there be three genuine signatures on the sheet 
of paper or Parchment on which the conclusion of the Petition is written or printed. The usage has been, in the 
Legislative Assembly, to receive only written Petitions, but at a late session (1853), the Assembly adopted a resolution 
to receive printed Petitions in that House. All Petitions must be dated. 

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT. 



NEWSPAPEBS. 

All newspapers published within the Province of Canada, 
pass by mail free of postage within the Province, whether 
posted from the office of publication or otherwise. 

Newspapers posted In Canada for either of the other 
British North American Provinces, or coining from thence 
into Canada, pass free of charge. 

Newspapers passing from Canada to the United King 
dom are, if conveyed by the ordinary weel ; English mail 
by way of the States, liable to a charge of one penny each 
on delivery, being the transit rate fevied by the United 
States; and newspapers from the United Kingdom to 
Canada, conveyed by the same route, must be pre-paid 
two pence each in Great Britain. 

Newspapers posted in Canada for the United States, pass 
free to the Frontier. United Stjtes newspapers coming 
into this province are liable to charge at the rate of one 
penny for every four numbers to regular subscribers, and 
to %d. each on transput papers, to be collected by the 
delivering postmaster. 

Newspapers for foreign countries and parts abroad, pass 
under the regulations and rates of charge prescribed by 
the Imperial Post Office. 

Newspapers re-posted in Canada pass free within the 
Province. 

Publishers of newspapers and periodicals may send to 
their subscribers inclosed in their publications, accounts 
for subscription and receipts for the same, free of charge. 

Newspapers when posted, must be so put up as to shew 
clearly that the packet or envelope covers i 
only no marks or s : .rpose of written 

communication will be permitted, either on the pap-jr itself 
or on the cover, nor any writing other than th" address to 
which the paper is to be sent, and the name of the sender 
and V these conditions are not complied with, the news 
paper will be iable to charge as a letter by wi -r. lit. 

As much irregularity and disappointment in forwarding 
newspapers by post is frequently oc.-isiniie.l. when the 
parcels are insecurely made up or carelessly addressed for 



the post, at the offices of publication, postmasters are en 
joined, whenever such want of due consideration for the 
nature of the service to be performed by the post office i? 
frequently manifested, to call the attention of the pub 
lisher to the circumstance and request that greater care 
may be exercised. 

Magazines, Periodical and other Printe l Matter. 

On each magazine or other periodical publication pass 
ing between any post office in Canada and any place in 
British North America, the United States or British West 
Indies, the Ordinary postage rate is 

If not exceeding 3 oz. in weight %d. 

If over 3 oz. in weight 2d. 

If the postage on periodicals published in Canada, b* 
paid quarterly in advance, either at the office where posted 
or at the office of delivery, one half the above rates are 
charged. 

Periodicals when sent in packets to one address within 
the limit of 4 Ibs. to each packet, pass at the rate of 3d. 
per Ib. or fraction of a Ib. 

The regulations of January 1854, (see last C. Almanac, 
p. 40.) exempting periodical publications exclusively de 
voted to the promotion of Science, Education, Temperance, 
or of Agricultural instruction, from postage charge, remain 
in force. 

Printed circulars, prices current or hand bills, and other 
printed matter of a like description, and books bound or 
unbound, passing as above, are charged a rate of one hall- 
penny per ounce or fraction of an ounce, whether sent 
singly or in packets to one address, under the weight 
limit of 4 Ibs. per packet. 

Pre-payment of the foregoing rates on periodicals and 
circulars and all other printed matter is optional, except 
when addressed to the United States or British West 
Indies, and in such cases the charge must invariably be 
pre-paid; further, on all such printed matter received from 
the United States and British West Indies, the Canada 
rate always remains to be collected by the delivering post 
master in this province. 



[1271 



40 



PROVINCE OF CANADA. 



[1856. 



Circulars and other printed papers must be sent tin- 
sealed to pass as such, and pamphlets, periodicals, maga 
zines, boo!;?, etc., must be put up in covers open at the 
ends or sides, so that the character of the matter may he 
seen, and are subject to the same restrictions as to the 
presence of -writing and penalty of letter postage for in 
fringement of regulations, which are hereinbefore detailed 
as applying to newspapers. 

The ivcul-tiious under which prices current and com 
mercial liiits, books, <fec., are transmitted to and from 
the United Kingdom remain unchanged. 

Letters, <Cf., to and from the. Gmernmeni, and Legislature of 
the Province. 

All letters and other mailable matter addressed to or 
sent by the Governor of this Province, or sent to or by 
any Public Department at the Seat of Government are 
exempt from provincial postage. 

All letters and other mailable matter addressed to or 

?<>nt by til- Speaker or Chief Clerk of the Legislative 

i! or of the Legislative Assembly or by or to any 



member of the said branches of the legislature during 
any session of the legislature, and letters. &c., so ad 
dressed or sent to the same at the seat of government 
ten days prior to the day fixed for any meetin<* of the 
legislature for the despatch of business, and for ten days 
subsequent to the close of any session of the same are 
free of provincial postage. 

All public documents and printed papers may be sent 
by the speaker or chief clerk of the legislative council, or 
of the legislative assembly, to any member of either of the 
said branches of the Legislature of Canada, during the 
recess of Parliament, free of postage. 

Members of either brtnch of the legislature may send 
during the recess of parliament, by mail, free of postaee 
all papers printed by order of either branch of the Lewis 
lature of Canada. 

The public documents and printed papers sent under 
this clause should bear as part of the superscription the 
/,,//,/, signature of the Speaker, Chief C erk (or officer 
specially deputed for this purpose to act for those func 
tionaries.) or member sending the same. 



REGULATIONS OF MONEY-ORDER OFFICES. 

Tlie following Post Offices are authorized to grant and pay Money Orders for any sum not exceeding 25 Currency : 

LIST OF MONEY-ORDER OFFICES. 
Coaticook. Kemptville. 

Cobourg. Kingston. 

Compton. L Orignal. 

Cornwall. Lachine. 

Dereham. Laehute. 

Drummodville,UC Lacolle. 
Dundas. Laprairie. 

Dunville. Leeds. 

Elora. Lenoxville. 

Etobicoke. Lindsay. 

Fergus. London. 

Gait. Longueuil. 

Gananoque. Lyn. 

Markham. 

Melbourne. 

Milton, U. C. 

Mitchell. 

Montreal. 

Morpeth. 



Amherstburg. 

Aurora. 

Avlmer, L. C. 

Ayr. 

Barrie. 

liath. 

Uayfield. 

Beachville. 

Beamsville. 

Belleville. 

Bentinck. 

Berlin. 

Berthier (en hauf). 



Bowmaiiville. 

Bradford. 

Brampton. 

Brantford. 

Brighton. 

Brockville. 

Brooklin. 

Burford. 

Carlton Place. 

Cayuga. 

Chambly. 

Chatham, U. C. 

Chippawa. 

Clinton. 



Georgetown. 

Goderich. 

Granby. 

Grimsby. 

Guelph. 

Haldimand. 

Hamilton. 

Hatley. 

Hawkesbury. 

Holland Landing. 

Huntingdon. 

Indiana. 

Ingersoll. 

Kamouraska. 



Morrisburg. 

Napauee. 

Napierville. 

Newboro . 

Newburg. 

Newcastle. 

Newmarket. 

Niagara. 



Nicolet. 


Preston. 


Stanstead. 


Norwich. 


Quebec. 


Stoney Creek. 


Oakville. 


Ramsay. 


Stouitville. 


Orillia. 


Renfrew. 


Strabane. 


Oshawa. 


Richmond Hill. 


Stratford. 


Otouabee. 


Rigaud. 


Streetsville. 


Ottawa. 
Owen s Sound. 


Rimouski. 
Riviere du Loup 


Suspension Bridge 
Terrebonne. 


Pakenham. 


(en bas.) 


Thornhill. 


Palermo. 


St.Catherines,U.C. 


Thorold. 


Paris. 


St. Eustache. 


Three Rivers. 


Pembroke. 


St. George, Brant. 


Toronto. 


Penetanguishene. 


St. Hyacinthe. 


Trenton. 


Perth. 


St. John s, L. C. 


VanleekhilL 


Peter boro. 


St. Mary s Blan- 


Vienna. 


Philipsburg. 


chard. 


Vittoria. 


Pickering. 


Ste Therese de 


Waterdown, 


Picton. 


Blainville. 


Waterford. 


Pike I iver. 


St. Thomas, Mont- 


Waterloo, L. C. 


Port Dalhousie. 
Port Dov, r. 


mazny. 
St. Thomas, U.C. 


WelUngtonSqnan 

West Flamboro. 


Port Hope. 


Saugeen. 


Whitby. 


Port Robinson. 


Sandwich. 


William Henry, 


Port Rowan. 


Seneca. 


rSorel). 


Poit. Sarnia. 


Sherbrooke. 


Windsor. U. C. 


Port Stanley. 


Simcoe. 


Woodstock. 


Prescott. 


Smith s Falls. 


York. 



The Commission chargeable on Money Orders is according to the follow ing &al<>: 
COMMISSION CHARGEABLE ON MONEY-ORDERS. 



*. d. 

3 
6 


3 
B 



For Orders not exceeding 2. 10s 

Do. over 2 10s., and not exceeding 5 ] 

Do. over 5 and not exceeding 7. 10s 

Do. over 7 10s. and not exceeding 10 1 

Do. over 10. and not exceeding 12 10s !.. "."". .""!. 1 

Do. over 12 10s. and not exceeding 15 1 

Do. over 15 and not exceeding 17 10s j 

Do. over 17 10s. and not exceeding 20 o jj 

Do. over 20 and not exceeding 22 10s ......!!.].......... 2 ;; 

Do. over 22 10s and not exceeding 25 2 <; 

Money Orders are issued and paid at the Money Order Offices between the the hours of!) n. m. aivi I p. 1:1.. and alsu, 
at the larger Offices, on Mondays and Thursdays, from 6 to 8 p. m. 

Any number of Money Orders may be issued to any one person, but no single Order shall > < C.!.", e y. 

Money Orders may be transferred by the Payee endorsing the same, payable to another 

Money Order must be obtained before the expiration of the month following that in whirl ; ;i new 

Order must be obtained, for which the usual commission will be charged. 

Money Orders are not granted for fractional parts of a penny. 

A Money Order may he repaid at the Office from which issued, but only to the party wl .1 if. 

These economical modes have been devised expressly with a view to the security of j-t 
expected that all persons having occasion to transmit money will avail themselves of th 
and in no case. In/ committing property UNREGISTERED to the 7. n, r //</./<.<;, RISK ITS LOSS. 

Letti ,-s r..!n;iining valuable matter may be registered on the pro-payment of Id. The wc-r 
no longer of any use for the sure transmission of letters. 

POSTAGE RATES ON LETTERS FROM CANADA TO EUROPE. 



RedwAi>,n r,f prmfar/? rafca on Irtfersfrom Canada to France, 
ami to certain countries in Europe, sent from England 
through. France. 



other British North American Provin.es for France, or H.I 
the undermentioned countries when intended to be f>r- 
I from Kngland via France, will fi-r (he future be 



Under a postage convention recently concluded between snl..j.->-t to the i< .11.. wing rates, when ; ;dinary 

Great Britain and France, letters from Canada and the closed n:;iJN bv British mail steamers: 



1856.] 



POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT. 



41 



Cora TRIES. 


Not 
exceeding 
MOZ. 
in weight. 


Exceeding 
MOZ. 
and not over 
J^oz. 


Exceeding 
J^oz. 
and not over 
%oz. 


Exceeding 
%oz. 
and not over 
1 oz. 


Exceeding 
1 oz. 
andnotovei 
1^ oz. 


Exceeding 

\y oz. 

andnotovei 
1^ oz. 


Exceeding 
l^oz. 
andnotovei 

m 


Exceeding 
l%oz. 
and notover 
2oz. 


France & Algeria 
Luxemberg 


(ls.4^d.Stg. 
-< equal to 
( Is. 8d. Cy. 


2s. 7d. Stg. 
or. 
3s. 2d. Cy. 


Ss.ll^d. St. 
or 
4s. lOd. Cy. 


os. 2d. Stg. 
or 
6s. 4d. Cy. 


6s. 8% Stg. 
or 
8s. 2d. Cy. 


7s. lid. Stg. 
or 
9s. Sd. Cy. 


9s. iy,d. St 
or 
11s. 2d. Cy 


10s. 4d. Stg. 
or 
12s. Sd. Cy. 


Is. 8d. Stg. 
or 
2s. Id. Cy. 


3s. 2d. Stg. 
or 
3s. lid. Cy. 


4s, lOd. Stg. 
or 
5s. lid. Cy. 


6s. 4d. Stg. 
or 
7s. 9d. Cy. 


8s. 2d. Stg. 
or 
10s. Cy. 


9s. Sd. Stg. 
or 
11s. lOd. Cy. 


11s. 2d. Stg. 
or 
13s. 8d. Cy. 


12s. 8d. Stg. 
or 
15s. 6d. Cy. 


Holland 






Wurtemberg . ... 
Switzerland 
German States* . 

Sardinia 


(Is. lOd. Stg. 
i or 
1 2s. Gd. Cy. 


3s. 6d. Stg. 
or 
4s. 4d. Cy. 


5s. 4d. Stg. 
or 
Cs. 6d. Cy. 


7s. Stg. 
or 
8s. 7d. Cy. 


9s. Stg. 
or 
11s. Cy. 


10s. 8d. Stg. 
or 
13s. Cy. 


11s. 8d. Stg. 
or 
14s. 3d. Cy. 


14s. Stg. 
or 
17s. Id. Cy. 


( Is. Td. Stg. 
or 
1 2s. Cy. 


3s. Stg. 
or 
3s. 8d. Cy. 


4s. 7d. Stg. 
or 
5s. 7d. Cy. 


6s. Stg. 
or 
7s. 4d. Cy. 


7s. 9d. Stg. 
or 
9s. 6d. Cy. 


9s. 2d. Stg. 
or 
11s. 2d. Cy. 


10s. 7d. Stg. 
or 
13s. Cy. 


12s. Stg, 
or 
14s. Sd. Cy. 




Two Sicilies 
Tuscany 


2s. Id. Stg. 
or 
2s. 7d. Cy. 


4s. Stg. 
or 
4s. lid. Cy. 


6s. Id. Stg. 
or 
7s. Gd.Cy. 


8s. Stg. 
or 
9s. lOd. Cy. 


10s. 3d. Stg. 
or 
12s. 6d. Cy. 


12s. 2d. Stg. 
or 
14s. 10s. Cy. 


14s. Id. Stg. 
or 
17s. 2d. Cy. 


16s. Stg. 
or 
19s. 8d. Cy. 


Parma & Modena 
Papal States 
Austrian Domin. 


Ionian Islands... 
Northern States 
of Europe"!* 


Moldavia 
Wallachia 
Turkey in Europe 

Constantinople... 
Dardanelles 


( 2s. Td. Stg. 
or 
(. 3s. 2d. Cy. 


5s. Stg. 
or 
6s. Id. Cy. 


7s; 7d. Stg. 
or 
9s. 5d. Cy. 


10s. Stg. 
or 
12s. 2d. Cy. 


12s. 9d. Stg. 
or 
15s. 7d. Cy. 


15s. 2d. Stg. 
or 
18s. 6d.Cy. 


16s. lid. St. 
or 
20s. 8d. Cy. 


19s. 4d. Stg. 
or 
23s. 6d. Cy. 


2s. Stg. 
I or 
2s. 6d. Cy. 


3s. lOd. Stg. 
or 
4s. 9d. Cy. 


3s. lOd. Stg. 
or 
7s. 2d. Cy. 


7s. 8d. Stg. 
or 
9s. 5d. Cy. 


9s. lOd. Stg. 
or 
12s. Cy. 


11s. 8d. Stg. 
or 
14s. 3d. Cy. 


13s. 6d. Stg. 
or 
16s. 6d. Cy. 


15s. 4d. Stg. 
or 
18s. Sd. Cy. 


Beyrout 




Ale v andriti 


Mytelene 
Qallipoli 


( 2s. Id. Stg. 
or 
( 2s. 7d. Cy. 


4s. Stg. 
or 
4s. lid. Cy. 


6s. Id. Stg. 
or 
7s. 6d. Cy. 


8s. Stg. 
or 
9s. lOd. Cy. 


10s. 3d. Stg. 
or 
12s. 6d. Cy. 


12s. 2d. Stg. 
or 
14s.10d.Cy. 


14s. Id. Stg. 
or 
17s. 2d. Cy. 


16s. Stg. 
or 
19s. Sd. Cy. 





OBSERVATIONS. 

Letters for Luxemberg, Holland, Prussia, and the German States, intended to be sent via France, must be so directed. 
Letters for Cadiz and Vigo, are forwarded by Peninsular Packet, unless specially addressed via France. 
Letters for Portugal, intended to be sent via France, must be so directed. 

Letters for Venetian Lombardy are forwarded through France, unless otherwise addressed ; but letters for any other 
part of the Austrian dominions, intended to be sent via France, must be so directed. 

Letters for the Ionian Islands and the Northern States of Europe, intended to be sent via France, must be so directed. 
Letters for Alexandria intended to be sent by the French Mediterranean Packets, must be so directed. 
The Postage upon letters for Spain and Portugal, as well as those intended to be sent via Austria to Parma, Modena, 
Greece, and the Ionian Islands, must be paid in advance ; but letters addressed to any other of the above mentioned 
countries and places may either be paid in advance or forwarded unpaid, at the option of the sender. 

f Letters for France, or for any of the countries above named, via France, are forwarded from Canada by Quebec and 

lidliiax, or by Canadian steamer, there will be a reduction on the firegoing rates of: 

On each Letter weighing not exceeding % oz 2d. Sterling. 

do. over % oz., and not exceeding 1 oz . 4d. Sterling. 

toi do. over l"oz., and not exceeding 2 oz Sd. Sterling. 

Being the transit rate payable to the TJnited States, on letters sent in the ordinary closed Mails via Boston. 
\Vlien such letters are forwarded in the closed Mails by way of New York for conveyance to England by American 
\ acket, the charge will be Is. Sterling per oz., in addition to the rates calculated for the transmission by 
IVistxm British I afkpt. J 



POSTAGE RATE ON LETTERS TO AND FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM. 



In consequence of the withdrawal of many of the Atlan 
tic Steamers belonging to the Cunard line, to meet the 
of the war, the mails between America and 
England have, since last autumn, been carried in alternate 
weeks by British and United States Government Packets 
the former plying once a fortnight to Boston and the latter 



to New York the postage rate upon letters between Ca 
nada and the United Kingdom, when sent in the weeks 
supplied by the British Packets, is Sd. sterling, (lOd. cur 
rency) per i/ oz.; but when transmitted by the mails sent 
in the weeks served by the United States Government 
Steamers the rate is Is. 2d. stg. (Is. 4d. currency) per Y 2 oz. 



* Ilohenzollern, Birkenfeld, Hesse Homburg, Lippe Detmold, Schwartzburg, Rudolstadt, Reuss, Anhalt. Nassau, 
jotha, .Saxe Memmgen, Hildburg, Hausen, Ilesse (Electoral), Hesse Darmstadt, Saxe Weimar Eisenach 
Frankfort on the .Maine, Hamburg, Bremen, and Lubeck. 

MecUenbur S n strelitz > Brunswick, Oldenburgh (except Birkenfeld), 

[129] 



42 



PROVINCE OF CANADA. 



[1856. 



Letters forwarded through the United Kingdom, between Canada and 
Her Majesty s forces in Turkey, Greece, the Black Sea, (including the 
Crimea) the Baltic and the White Sea, must be invariably pre-paid : 


When sent in Mails 
carried by British 
Packets via Boston. 


When sent in Mails 
carried by U. States 
Backets no New York. 


GREECE, TURRET, AND BLACK SEA, INCLUDIXGI THE CRIMEA. 


Sterling. 


Equal to 
Currency. 


Sterling. 


r-ijual to 
Currency. 


Letters for or from Commis- 1 
sioned or non Commisson- 
ed Officers, Soldiers, Sea 




Os. lid. 
Is. 2d. 
2s. 4d. 


Is. 2d. 
Is. 6d. 
2s. lid. 


Is. 5d. 
Is. 8d. 
3s. 4d. 


Is. 9d. 
2s. Id. 
4s. 2d. 


Fxceeding 1 /^ oz. and not exceeding % oz. 
do. % oz. and not do. 1 oz. 


men, or any other person 


do. l" oz. and not do. 2 oz. 


3s. lOd. 


4s. lOd. 


5s. lOd. 


7s. 4d. 


belonging to the Army, 
Navy, Ordnance, Commis 
sariat, Medical Depart 
ment, Land Transport 
Corps, Army Work Corps, 
or Turkish Contingent. 


do. 2 oz. and not do. 3 oz. 
do. 3 oz. and not do. 3%oz. 
do. 3%oz. and not do. 4 oz, 
do. 4 oz. and not do. 5 oz. 
do. 5 oz. and not do. 6 oz. 


5s. 4d. 
6s. lOd. 
7s. Sd. 
9s. 2d. 
10s. 8d. 


6s. Sd. 
8s. 7d. 
9s. 7d. 
11s. Cd. 
13s. 4d. 


8s. 4d. 
10s. lOd. 
11s. 8d. 
14s. 2d. 

Ins. 8d. 


10s. 5d. 
13s. 6d. 
14s. 7d. 
17s. 9d- 
20s. lOd. 


BALTIC, WHITE SEA, AND HELIGOLAND. 










Letters to or from Commis- 










sioned or Warrant Officers, 













Seamen or any other per 




Os. lid. 


Is. 2d. 


Is. 5d. 


Is. 9d. 


son serving on board Her 


Exceeding !/t oz. and not exceeding ~y> oz. 


Is. 2d. 


Is. 6d. 


Is. 8d. 


2s. Id. 


Majesty s Fleets in the 


do. X| oz. and not do. % oz. 


2s. Id. 


2s. 7d. 


3s. Id. 


3s. lOd. 


Baltic and White Sea, and 


do. 94 oz. and not do. 1 oz. 


2s. 4d. 


2s. lid. 


3s. 4d. 


4s. 2d. 


to or from Commissioned 


do. 1 oz. and not do. l^oz. 


3s. lid. 


4s. lOd. 


5s. lid. 


7s. 4d. 


or non-Commissioned Offi 


do. 1^ oz. and not do. l^oz. 


4s. 2d. 


5s. 2d. 


fis. 2d. 


7s. 8d- 


cers, Soldiers or any other 


do. lj|oz.andnot do. l^cz 


4s. 5d. 


5s. 6d. 


Cs. 5d. 


8s. Od. 


person serving in the For 


do. 1^1 oz. and not do. 2 oz 


4s. 8d. 


5s. lOd. 


6s. 8d. 


8s. 4d. 


eign Legion at Heligoland. 













Letters addressed to non-commissioned officers, soldiers or seamen, serving in Her Majesty s forces at the Seat of 
War, may be forwarded from Canada via Quebec and Halifax, on payment of one penny at the time of posting pro 
vided that the letter does not exceed half an ounce in weight ; if above that weight, letters so addressed are liable to 
the ordinary postage rates as laid down in the foregoing tables. 

BOOK POST WITH ENGLAND. 



Printed books, magazines, reviews or pamphlets, whether 
British, Colonial or Foreign, may be sent through the post 
between Canada and the United Kingdom, under the fol 
lowing regulations : 

A book packet may contain any number of separate 
books, publications, works of literature or art, almanacs, 
maps or prints, and any quantity of paper, vellum or parch 
ment (to the exclusion of letters whether sealed or open), 
and the books, maps, paper, &c., may either be written, 
printed or plain, or any mixture of the three, and may be 
either British. Colonial or Foreign. 

The name and address of the sender, or anything else 
not in the nature of a letter, may also be written or printed 
upon the envelope or cover of the packet in addition to 
the name and address of the person to whom it may be 
forwarded. 

All legitimate binding, mounting or covering of the 
same, or of a portion thereof, will be allowed as part 
of the packet, whether such binding, Ac., be loose or 
attached, as also rollers, in the case of prints and maps, 
and whatever may be necessary for the safe transmission 
of literary or artistic matter, or usually appertains thereto, 
and the postage is to be rated upon the gross weight of the 
packet. 

The rates of postage on book packets remain as at pre 
sent, viz. : 



For each packet not exceeding % Ib Cd. stg., 1}/A. cy. 

Do. above % Ib., and not ex. lib. Is. stg., Is. 3d. cy . 

Do. above 1 Ib., and not ex. 2 Ibs. 2s. stg., 2s. 6d. cy . 

Do. above 2 Ibs. and not ex. 3 ll.s. :!s. st.u 1 .. :is. 9d. cy,. 
and so on, adding Is. sterling for each additional Ib. weight. 

The following conditions must be carefully observed, as 
prescribed by the Imperial Post Office : 

Every book packet must be either without a cover, or in 
a cover open at the ends or sides. 

It must not contain any letter, open or sealed, or any 
sealed enclosure whatever. 

No packet must exceed two feet in length, breadth or 
width. 

The postage of book packets must be paid in advance. 

Printed votes and proceedings of the Imperial Parlia 
ment and Colonial Legislatures are subject to the abovs 
charges and regulations when sent by book post between 
Canada and the United Kingdom. 

All book post matter intended to be sent to the United 
Kingdom fiom Canada, must, as heretofore, bo forwarded 
upon Quebec for transmission either via Halifax; or In 
summer, by Canadian steamer. 

Books cannot be forwarded except at letter postage 
rates by the mails sent to England through the United 
States. 



FINANCIAL. 



Statement shelving the Cost of the Chief Provincial Works. 

St. Lawrence Canals 1,670,342 4 6 

Welland Canal 1,671,776 6 3 

Chambly Canal and River Richelieu 104,66216 

Lake St. Peter 73,55815 5 

Burlington Bay Canal 52,773 7 2 

Ottawa Works 145,99415 1 

Harbours A Light Houses 299,242 15 10 

Montreal Harbour 120,35(3 13 4 

419,599 9 2 

Improvements of the Trent 133,62611 

Roads and Bridges, U. C 513,07016 4 

Do. do. L. C. ...222,106 1 8 

Do. Montreal Turnpike 

Trust 50,750 

Do. Quebec do 33,882 

306,738 



Provincial Penitentiary :! 1.207 

Miscellaneous 174,914 



1 
15 





5,307,864 17 8 



Statement of Debentures issued on behalf of various Special 
Accounts, for which the Government it partially liable, up 
to 31st January, 1855. 

Quebec Fire Lean C8 V; 11 1 

Law Society, Upper Canada 

Lunatic Asylum 

Upper Canada Building Fund 

Court Houses, Lower Canada 

St. Lawrence and Atlantic Railroad 



24,250 
30,000 
17,157 



9 10 



486,66 



Great Western Railroad J; ; 1 -, (H ". ,!, 

Huron, Ontario, and Simcoe Railroad ... 677.918 l< 

Grand Trunk Railroad 2,203,991 13 

Consolidated Municipal Loan 1,172,9U> J. 



i 3 2 

The Public Debt for the Year ending 31st January, 1*55. 
Sterling Debentures in England 3.511. ;s> - 

PrnvinM.il n. hon turns in P m.ldn . MIO 



4,353,949 5 9 



1130] 



1856.] 



DIVISION COURTS ACT. 



43 



ACT TO EXTEND 



JURISDICTION OF 

[Assented to 30th May, 1855.] 



DIVISION COURTS. 



I. Any suit or cause of action cognizable in a Division 
Court in amount, may be entered and tried in the Court 
holden in the Division in which the cause of action arose, or 
in the Court holden in the Division in which the defendant, 
or either of them when there are more than one, shall reside 
or can y 0:1 l;is business at the time the action is brought, 
notwithstanding that the defendant or defendant may 
at such time reside in a different county or division, or 
different counties or divisions, from that in which the 
cause of action arose : and all such proceedings shall be 
taken for the obtaining judgment and the recovery thereof, 
and in the same manner to all intents and purposes as if 
the defendant or defendants resided, and the cause of 
action arose in the same division, except that no writ in 
the nature of a writ of Fieri Facias or attachment, shall 
be executed out of the limits of the county or united 
counties over which the Judge of the Court from which 
the same issued, shall have jurisdiction: Provided that 
when the defendant, or when there is more than one de 
fendant, when one of them resides in a county adjoining 
the one in which the action is brought, and none of the 
defendants resides in the last mentioned county, the sum 
mons shall be served fifteen days, and when the defendant 
does not, nor does either defendant where there is more 
than one, reside in the county, where the action is brought, 
or an adjoining county, the summons must be served 
twenty days at least before the holding of the court at 
which the cause is to be tried, and if the defendant or 
defendants desire to make any defence mentioned in the 
forty-third section of the Upper Cauada Division Court* 
Act of 1850, he, or one of them, shall give notice thereof 
in writing to the Clerk of the Division Court in which the 
action is to be tried, in the manner provided by that sec 
tion, at least five days before the holding of such court ; 
provided that if it shall appear to the Judge that such notice 
had not been given, without the wilful default of the de 
fendant or defendants, and that injustice would be done 
unless such defence should be allowed, he may adjourn 
the hearing of the cause, or such defence thereto, or any 
part thereof, until the next sitting of the court, upon such 
terms as to payment of costs as shall appear to him to be 
just. 

II. The Bailiff of any Division Court in Tipper Canada 
may, and he is hereby authorized and required to serve 
and execute all summonses, writs and orders of any Divi 
sion Court that shall be delivered to him for service, 
although the same may have been issued from a Division 
Court of which he is not Bailiff, and to return the same to 
the Clerk of the Court of which he is Bailiff: Provided 
that he shall not be required to travel beyond the limits 
of the Division of which he is Bailiff, or allowed to charge 
milage for any distance travelled beyond the limits of the 
county in which the Court of which he is Bailiff is situated, 
in the service or execution of such process : And provided 
that nothing herein contained shall be construed so as to 
alter the law for the issuing or execution of attachments 
as provided for by the said Division Courts Act of 1850. 

III. It shall be the duty of the Clerk of any Division 
Court in Upper Canada, upon the application of the plain 
tiff or defendant, or one of them when there are more than 
one, having an unsatisfied Judgment in his favour in 
such Court, or his agent, to prepare a transcript of the 
entry of such Judgment in such Court, and to send the 
same to the Clerk of any other Division Court, in any 
other county in Upper Canada, with a certificate at the 
foot thereof, signed by such Clerk and attested by the seal 
of the said Court, stating the amount unpaid upon such 
Judgment, and the date at which the same was recovered, 
which certificate shall be addressed to the Clerk of the 
Division Court to whom it is intended to be delivered; and 
it shall be his duty upon the receipt of such transcript and 
certificate, to enter the transcript in a book to be kept in 
his office for such purpose, and the amount due on such 
Judgment according to such certificate; and all other 
proceedings shall and may be had or taken for the enforc 
ing and collecting such Judgment in such Division Court, 
by the officers thereof, that can be had or taken, under the 
Upper Canada Division Courts Acts, upon Judgments re 
covered in any Division Court, for the like purpose; such 
Clerk shall also be bound when required, to forward all 
summonses to the Clerk of any other Division Court for 
service, and to receive the same when returned, and to 
receive those sent to him by any other Division Court 
Clerk for service, and to enter them in a book to be kept 
for that purpose, and to hand the same to the Bailiff for 



service, and to receive them from the Bailiff, and to return 
them to the Clerk from whom he received them ; and also 
to give to any party to a suit, or his agent, copies of sub 
poenas for his witnesses, when requested so to do. 

IV. All the provisions of the Upper Canada Division 
Courts Acts, in reference to costs in any suit brought in 
any Superior Court for a cause of action cognizable in a 
Division Court under those Acts, shall apply to any action 
which shall be so brought for any cause of action cogniza 
ble in the Division Courts under this Act. 

V. And whereas it is desirable to increase the fees of the 
Clerks and the Bailiffs of the said Courts: Be it enacted, 
that from ard after this Act shall come into force, the said 
Clerks shall be entitled to the fees enumerated in the 
Schedule A, hereto annexed, for the services therein men 
tioned, instead of the fees mentioned in the said Acts : and 
that the Bailiffs shall be entitled to five pence per mile in 
stead of the milage allowed by the said Act. 

VI. This Act shall come into force ou the first day of 
July next after the passing thereof. 

SCHEDULE A. 





Not 
Exceed 
ing 5. 


Exceed 
ing 5, 
and not 
15. 


Exceed 
ing 15. 


Entering every Account and 


s. d. 
010 


s. d. 
016 


s. d. 
020 


Copy of Summons, Particulars 
of Demand or Set Off, each... 
Every Summons to Witnesses 
with any number of Names 
Entering Bailiff s returns to 
Summons to Defendant 
Every copy of Subpoena when 


006 
006 
003 
S 


009 
006 
003 
003 


010 
006 
008 
003 


Entering Set Off or other De 
fence requiring notice to 
Plaintiff 


009 


010 



010 


Adjournment of any Cause ... 
Entering every Judgment or 


010 
009 


010 
010 


010 
013 


Taking Confession of Judge- 


009 


009 


090 


Every Warrant, Attachment or 


013 


016 


020 


Every copy of Judgment to 


013 


013 


013 


Transcript or Certificate of 
Judgment for Registration 
in the County Registry Office 
Entering and giving notice of 


013 
010 


013 

013 


013 
016 


Making out Summons to Jury. 


006 


006 


006 


For every Affidavit taken, and 


010 


010 


010 


Returns to Treasurer, to be 
paid out of the Fee Fund, 
including attendance on the 
Judge to audit the same, 
each, and to be retained from 
the Fee Fund in his hands. . 
Every search on behalf of a 
person not a party to a suit, 
to be paid by the Applicant. 
Every search for a party to a 
Suit when the proceedings 


100 
006 
006 


100 
006 
006 


100 
006 

f. 


Transmitting papers for service 
to another County or Divi 
sion, in addition to the ne 
cessary Postage on trans- 


010 


010 


010 


Receiving papers from another 
County or Division for ser 
vice, entering same in a 
book, handing the same to 
to the Bailiff, and receiving 
his return, to be paid when 
the claim is filed or defence 
entered . 


010 


010 


010 



[131] 



44 



PATENTS. 



[1856. 



CANADIAN PATENTS, 

by t!ie Bureau of Agriculture and Statistics, from Gift July, 1842, to 50th June, 1855. 



George Riloy An improved method of brewing ale, beer, 
Porter and other malt liquors. July 6, 1842. 

W. Arms Smut machine for clearing grain. July 26, 1842. 

Edward Belanger Machine hung with nets, for fishing 
and taking eels. August 25, 1842. 

David Alexander Improvement to the stoves cast in 
Scotland and Three Rivers in Canada, commonly called 
Canada box stoves. August 31, 1842. 

Jacob Baker An improvement in the construction of pen 
stocks and water wheel. September 20, 1842. 

John Lamb A new and useful description of water wheel, 
on a new principle, possessing many advantages over 
those now in use. October 3, 1842. 

Harvey Tripp New and useful method of constructing 
wheels to be driven by water. December 12, 1S42. 

D. A. McDonald Drilling machine, for the purpose of 
boring and drilling holes &c., in rock canal quarries, or 
for any other purposes. December 19, 1842. 

Asa II. Hough Improvement upon a newly constructed 
suction and forcing pump. Feb. 20, 1843. 

William Creighton Improvement in the rotary steam en- 
pine, heretofore in use. March 31, 1843. 

John Lamb New and improved water-wheel. Ap. 3, 1843. 

Louis Lemoine Fire-engine. June 1, 1843. 

John 0. Brown Improved trusses. July 5, 1843. 

Peter R. Lamb Improved washing machine. July 7, 1843. 

John Montgomery Composition for preventing and ex 
tinguishing fires. August 9, 1843. 

Isaac Gouvernair Ogden Machine for propelling vessels or 
other floating bodies by the action of heated air, gasses, 
steam, or other expansive or explosive materials on the 
fluid in which they are intended to act. Augt. 14, 1843. 

Edward Gingras A new and useful method of construct 
ing springs for carriages. September 16, 1843. 

Hiram Bigelow Revolving drying kiln for the purpose of 
drying wheat or other grain. September 29, 1843. 

Alexander Carpenter New mode of applying heat in the 
process of cooking with stoves by means of a horizontal 
and perpendicular return flue. October 10, 1843. 

Georjje T. Meckellean New construction of mangle for 
mangling clothes. November 24, 1843. 

George Riley New mode of distilling and rectifying spiri 
tuous liquors. December 15, 1843. 

A. Adams Machine for grinding clay. Jan. 8, 1844. 

Hiram Bigelow New and improved revolving drying 
kiln. January 9, 1844. 

Frederick HullSelf propelling gate. January 27, 1844. 

J. M. Holland Spike machine. March 6, 1844. 

William McCall Mode by which power to be derived from 
the use of the wheel and screw may be applied lo any 
kind of machinery. May 30, 1844. 

William Langmead Improvement in the manufacture of 
cooking stoves. June 29, 1844. 

John Hearle Engine pump or fire engine. June 29, 1844. 

William Armstrong Portable fire extinguishing machine. 
September 3, 1844. 

Thomas Proudlock Method of pumping ships and other 
vessels, called " The Seaman s Friend." Oct. 14, 1844. 

George Milligan New method of constructing piano 
fortes. November 21, 1844. 

Joseph Smolinski A new cast-iron cooking and calorifer- 
ous stove; and an alteration in the construction of the 
crockery or brick stove, being an improvement on the 
stove introduced by one John Vannerous. Nov. 21, 1844. 

Chandos Hoskys An improvement in the truss for the 
alleviation and cure of Hernea, Jan. 31, 1845. 

Jean F. C. Oullet New method of propelling vessels, car 
riages, Ac., by machinery, without the agency of fuel. 
March 6, 1845. 

Elias Nichols New method of constructing water wheels. 
April 4, 1845. 

Ebenezer E. Gilbert A new and useful method of con 
structing counter balance machines. May 21, 1845. 

Nicol Hugh Baird New method of constructing paddle 
wheels, cfthe description termed sweeping paddle wheels, 
for propelling steam and other vessels. May 30, 1845. 

E. E. Gilbert Counter balance machines. June 25, 1845. 
Eamuel R. Warren Method of constructing harmonic 

attachments for piano fortes. July 9, 1845. 
J. Griffiths Improvement in riding saddle. July 14, 1845. 
Lewis Ives Improved capstan for loading or unloading 

merchandize or timber from vessels, denominated "Ives s 

connected capstan. July 16, 1845. 



Lewis Ives Improved method of loading and unloading 
timber vessels. July 19, 1845. 

William Watts Potatoe digger. July 19, 1845. 

John Harris Revolving horse rake. August 4, 1845. 

John Maitland New principle of distillation and rectifica 
tion. August 12, 1845. 

Albert Young Metalic coil spring-tooth horse rake. Au 
gust 16, 1845. 

Albert Young New method of making rakes for making 
hay and grain. August 22, 1845. 

James McKay New and improved steam engine. Sept. 
10, 1845. 

Francois Nadeau New and improved mode of construct 
ing windows. September 18, 1845. 

AlexesIIebert New and improved sawing machine. Oct. 
10,1845. _ 

Moyse Morin New and improved nets for taking seals 
and porpoises. October 15, 1845. 

Benjamin F. Tibbetts New and improved steam engine. 
November 10, 1845. 

James Cull, Jr., and Charles Cull New principle in the 
construction of a still. November 29, 1845. 

Jasper Ball New and improved churn. Jan. 7, 1S46. 

Jenkins Lloyd Cast iron plough. January 17, 1846. 

Albert Young House pump or fire engine. Feb. 14, 1846. 

George K. Burrows New method of making presses for the 
purpose of pressing clay and other ductile substances. 
February 27, 1846. 

W. McKinlay Horse thrashing machines. Feb. 27, 1848. 

A. Trepanier Machine for working stone. March 4, 1846. 

Francis Gore Wilson Important improvements in the 
tanning mill. March 13, 1846. 

George Riley Still for distilling and rectifying spirituous 
liquors. March 18, 1846. 

Horatio A. Rockwell Yoke for Oxen. March 24, 184fi. 

Louis Lemoine. Apparatus for raising all kinds of nets 
or other instruments used in taking porpoises and other 
species of fish. April 6, 1846. 

Richard H. Gates Improved method of making mill 
stones. April 25, 1846. 

David J. Ellis Machine for making brick. April 25, 1846. 

Henry Iluttan Furnace by which houses and other build 
ings may be heated by hot air. May 2, 1840. 

Ephraim Duell New and improved churn. May 6, 1846. 

William McLean Revolving battery. May 26, 1846. 

Jonas Philip Lee Improvement in the method of con 
structing knitting looms. June 4, 184(3. 

Samuel S. Jones Cooking stove. June 13, 1846. 

Harrison Colby Gfk generator. June 22, 1846. 

James Campbell Towing machine, for towing vessels up 
rapids. June 22, 1846. 

G. Warren Johnson Hoisting Machine. June 24, 1S46. 

Gordon Warren Johnson Improved hoisting machine. 
June 26, 1846. 

Noah Shaw Portable Grist Mills. August 3rd, 1846. 

Charles Midgley Planing machine. August 10, 1846. 

Henry Ruttan Hot air generator. August 23, 1846. 

John Mills Improved method of generating and distri 
buting heated air. Septemb ;r 1, 1846. 

Joseph Paradee Revolving joint tooth horse rake. Sep 
tember 24, 1846. 

Amos Tyler Coupling machines for railroad cars, or self- 
detachers. September 26, 1846. 

Amos Tyler New method for constructing bee-hives. 
September 26, 1846. 

Amos Tyler Snow excavator, for removing the snow from 
the track of rails. September 26, 1846. 

A. Tyler Spark arrester and extinguisher. Sept. 26. 1846. 

George Riley Stills for distilling and rectifying spiritous 
liquors. October 1, 1846. 

Joseph Paradee. A new method of constructing rakes fbr 
making hay and grain, called the improved revolving 
joint-tooth spring lever horse rake. Oct. 8, 1M< >. 

John Mills Hot-air furnaces. October 10, 1846. 

William T. Barnes Improved description of "tue iron" 
to be used in blacksmith s forges. October 21, 1846. 

Stephen Mills Improvement in constructing wooden 
bridges. Nov. 28, 1846. 

Harrison Colby New gas generator. December 12, 1846. 

John Livingston New description of water wheel. Decem 
ber 14, 1846. 

Henry Ruttan Inventor of a metal heater fur houses, Ac. ; 
a cooking range, and hot-air, and vapour generator. 
December 15, 1846. 



[1321 



1856.] 



PATENTS. 



William McLean Steamboat regulator. Dec. 17, 1816. 
J. McLaren Improved stump extractor. Jan. 11, 1847. 

Daniel Cleal New mode of setting boilers and arranging 
the flues for applying heat to the same, for steam en 
gines. January 23, 1817. 

Louis Lemieu Machine for making wooden shavings, 
suitable tor the fabrication of band-boxes for hats, 
matches, and cases of all descriptions. Jan. 25, 1847. 

Henry Kuttan Improved cooking range and hot-air va 
pour generator. January 27, 1847. 

1. Carter Hot air cooking and heating stove. Mar. 13, 1847 

Jonathan 15. Massey New and improved method of con 
structing cisterns. April 3, 1847. 

Horace H. J)avison Improved heelring for fastening the 
scythe to the snath. April 10, 1847. 

Horace H. Davison Improved double flue steam generator 
and boiler for locomotives, steamboats and other pur 
poses. April 10, 1847. 

Horace H. Davison Improved portable lamp fluid. April 
10, 1847. 

Jason C. Gillett Machine for cutting shingles, staves, 
\eneres, &c. May 1, 1847. 

Wm. Armstrong Portable fire extinguishing machine. 
May 3, 1847. 

J. Westman Machine usually named bellows. May 9, 1847. 

iSandford A. 1 leming New method of propelling locomo 
tives. June 4, 1847. 

Gilbert McMicken Certain improvements in the use and 
application of the principle of the electro-magnetic tele 
graph. June 8, 1847. 

Peter Fraer New description of machine for churning. 
June 26, 1847. 

Gilbert McMicken Improvement in the method of con 
structing electro-magnetic telegraph. June 29, 1847. 

Peter 11. Beaupre Improvement in the manner of making, 
using and working a lifting and floating marine dock. 
July 19, 1847. 

James McGee New and useful method of rotting hemp 
and flax by artificial means. August 6, 1847. 

Peter Deal Preparation for all kinds of oil paints, for 
house painting and other kinds of painting, and espe 
cially to be used with lead paints. August 7, 1847. 

Melzer T. Thomas Improved churn. August 14, 1847. 

A. Adams A revolver brick receiver. August 14, 1847. 

James McGee New method or process of rotting of hemp 
and flax by^artiflcial means. August 14, 1847. 

E. S. DeRottermund Improvement in constructing grist 
mills. Aug. 21, 1847. 

E. S. DeRottermund 1 lour sifters. August 26, 1847. 

Thos. Brill A screw right and left reversed water-wheel. 
September 3, 1847. 

G. Fabes Prouse Hot-air furnace. September 11, 1847. 

Win. Muir New mode of constructing the bed plates of end 
working fire engines, and iu the method of placing the 
supply and delivery valves of such engines. Oct. 27, 1847. 

Michael Dyer Shower-baths November 10, 1847, 

Peleg Bowen New coiled spring tooth revolving horse 
rake. December 13, 1847. 

William Walsh Horse collar. January 8, 1848. 

T. Brown Smut mill for cleaning grain. March 2, 1848. 

James Baillie Saw gates for saw mills. April 12, 1848. 

Horace H. Davison Double revertable flue steam gene 
rators and boilers. April 19, 1848. 

William Partridge Ditching machine. April 22, 1848. 

John Butler Improved machine for manufacturing bricks. 
May 2, 1848. 

Johu McJIichael Improvement or addition to a stump 
extracting machine. May 20, 1S4S. 

Antipas M. Byron Hay rakes. June 19, 18-18. 

John Kitchie Saw mills for slabing logs and sawing slabs. 
June 19, 1848. 

Henry Kuttan Discoverer of the true philosophical prin 
ciples upon which buildings may be ventilated; and 
also of machinery by which the ventilating air may be 
warmed. June 23, 1848. 

John Helm Certain improvements in the construction of 
mills for the manufacture of lumber with circular saws. 
June24, 1848. 

Angus McQueen Economical power machine or hydraulic 
force pump machine for raising buildings, stumps, &c. 
June 24, 1848. 

Peter R. Lamb Improved method of manufacturing glue. 
June 26, 1848. 

Edward T. Jones An improvement in the construction of 
four-wheeled carriages, to wit, a plan for facilitating th 
turning of the same in a short space. June 27, 1848. 

Henry Ruttan The Canadian ventilator. July 25, 1848. 



Reuben P. Cotton Improvement on Buck & Ilatha way s 
patent cook stove. August 1, 1848. 

R. P. Colton Improved air-tight box stove. Aug. 1, 1848, 

Nathan Wharton New process for tempering and harden 
ing the teeth of saws used for milling and other pur 
poses. August 1, 1848. 

Charles Midgley New and improved paddle wheel for 
steam boats and horse boats, and for propelling vessels. 
August 10, 1848. 

George P. Warren A useful method of constructing the 
apparatus for taking of the friction of the axle of a bell, 
and for making the tongue of a bell strike the top when 
elevated. August 14, 1848. 

Walter Perkins Newman Hydro-pneumatic water wheel. 
September 5, 1848. 

Martin Pierce Washing machine for washing clothes, &c. 
September 15, 1848. 

James Stuart Improved method of constructing horse 
power to be applied to thrashing machines and other 
descriptions of machinery. October 14, 1848. 

0. LaGrange Carriage and waggon wheel. Nov. 6, 1848. 

Peleg Bowen Coiled spring tooth revolving horse-rake. 
November 14, 1848. 

Walter H. Wells Aeroform or atmospheric churn. Novem 
ber 17, 1848. 

John. P. Bostwick Office sliding calendar. Nov. 20, 1848. 

Patrick McQuilkin & Joseph Henry Improvement in the 
machinery of ship s windlass. January 20, 1849. 

C. Midgley New and useful paddle wheel lor steam boats, 
horse boats, and for propelling vessels. Jan. 27, 1849. 

Ananias Smith Air distributor or grate. Jan. 30, 1849. 

Nirum W. Rockwell A limited horse swing. 1 eb. 5, 1849. 

Elias J. Severance Thrashing machines. March 6. 1849. 

John Baird Certain improvements in the arrangement 
and construction of the steam engine. May 5, 1849. 

Elias J. Severance Improvement in the manufacture of 
thrashing and winnowing machines. May 5, 1849. 

Charles M. Tate Improved method of raising and lower 
ing weights. May 11, 1849. 

Charles Midgley Improved hinge. August 2, 1849. 

Charles Midgley New and useful saw-mill. Aug. 13, 1849. 

C. Midgley Improved accoucheurs assistant, Aug. 13, 1849. 

Peter R. Higley Improved churn called the propeller 
churn. Aug. 30, 1849. 

Daniel Mandigo Japan varnish called the chemical elastic 
japan varnish. August 31, 1849. 

Charles M. Tate New and improved method of raising 
and lowering weights. September 3, 1849. 

John Angell Cull Certain important inventions and im 
provements in the art of starch making, whereby the 
process is greatly improved, and rendered more certain 
and effectual. September 24, 1849. 

Richard Tremain Improved straw cutter. Sept. 24, 1849. 

John Winger Pump surpassing all others heretofore made, 
In utility. September 28, 1849. 

John Gihnour New method of constructing capstans, 
called and designated " Gilmour s Parent Capstan." Dec. 
11, 1849. 

William Arms New and useful machine for tilling land, 
called the " Lion Plough." December 28, 1849. 

Daniel Mandigo Improved carriage spring. Jan. 22, 1850. 

Daniel Mandigo Improved plough, ealled " Mandigo s 
Improved Plough." Jan. 30, 1850. 

Wm. Nixon Improved drilling machine. Teh. 28, 1850. 

James Henry Sampson New and useful machine or appa 
ratus for cutting men s boots, and determining with 
accuracy the situation of the spring in centre upon 
which the foot moves. March 6, 1850. 

Thomas Penney Improvement in the process of tanning 

leather. March 6, 1850. 
Alexander Carpenter A portable and stationary safe for 

holding ashes. March 13, 1850. 
I. Carter Improved summer and winter ventilating air 

stove. March 13, 1850. 
David P. Bonnell An improvement in the process of 

grinding and manufacturing wheat and other grain 

into meal and flour. March 20, 1850. 
Alfred Wilbur A materially improved heater of water 

and other liquids. March 20, 1850. 
Nor bert St. Onge Machine called " Saint On^e s Stump 

Extractor." March 22, 1850. 
Alfred Wilbur An improvement in cooking stoves. March 

27, 1850. 
W. R. Seaver Seaver s improved stave dresser. April 2, 

1850. 
W. R. Seaver Seaver s improved stave joiner. April 2, 

1S50. 



[133] 



46 



PATENTS. 



[1856. 



Alexander i leck Heck s new and improved plough, or 
subsoil grubber May 26, 1850. 

John C. Lloyd Obstetrical supporter. May 27, 1850. 

L. Howick improvement in lauuiug mills. May 21, 1850. 

Albert Ueuuett fceli-pi otecting bee-hive. June 12, IboU. 

Jacob Uarues An apparatus serviceable as a blast regula 
tor, applicable to smith s lorges. June 13, 1850. 

James Irchuarue Portable saw-mills, lor sawing timber. 
June 27, IboU. 

James K. Armstrong Cooking stove. June 28, 1850. 

L. llouck Improvement in tanning Mills. July 22,1850. 

John counter. Mauulacturer ol Stoves of a new pattern, 
and 011 a new principle, discovered and invented iuthis 
Province by one Charles Tripp, a citizen of the United 
States ol America. August 2a, 1860. 

James Muclarau iile lor covering houses and other build 
ings. October 5, 1&50. 

Henry Trout Improvement in the principle of propelling 
locomotives along inclined planes, and also iu the whet Is 
of locomotives, and rail lor railroads, by means of which 
locomotives can be propelled along inclined plai.es. 
October 7, I860. 

David ividd Portable grist mill. October 14, 1850. 

Sauil. Hurlbert improvement in the agricultural plough. 
October 17, 1850. 

Oliver litiauy Certain improvements in apparatus for 
warming air lor warming nouses and ventilating houses 
and other inhabited apartments, for green-houses, grain, 
fruit, maltrdrying and other kilns and other uses. Oct. 
au, Is50. 

Charles Midgley The spark, killer and heat retainer. 
.Nov. 2, 18ou. 

llhamar 1". Smith New and improved combination of 
machinery for a cutting- box for cutting straw, hay, or 
stalks. December 7, ibou. 

Thomas llewaoii Improved method ot making horse-shoes. 

December a, 18i>0. 

Janies Hamilton An improved plough. Dec. 13, 1850. 
.husebe Dupout New and improved pump. Dec. 17, 1850. 
Daniel Maihias Lamb Improved machine for making 

nuts and washers. December 28, 1860. 
George i abes 1 rowse The Prowsonian hot-air cooking 

range or furnace. Jan. 7th, 151. 
George Hooper Mead Improved method of constructing 

piano fortes. January 8, 1861. 

\\ illiaiu Uiittin A clover-seed gatherer. Jan. 9, 1851. 
Joseph Watsou An improvement on an old patent bed 
stead for the sick and wounded. Jan. 31, ISol. 
John Hearle Improvements on engine pumps and fire- 
engines. Jan ol, 1851. 
John Darling A new and useful composition to be used 

as a soap for the saving of labour iu washing clothes. 

Jan. 31, Idol. 
lienry Kuttan A machine which he calls a ventilating 

stove, and also of the means by which the ventilating 

air may be made to circulate under a floor and between 

the joists. January 31, Isol. 
James Kent Grimu Several important improvements iu 

cooking stoves, and in the method of apply ing and using 

heat for cooking purposes. March 13, iSul. 
William Holtoii -.sew kind of plough. March 15, 1851. 
John Angul Cull Certain machines which he calls a 

rouser and bran washer, to be used in the manufacture 

of starch. March 17,1861. 
John Angel Cull Certain improvements in the method 

of making starch. March li , 1851. 
John JKiely .New kind of suspension truss, to be applied 

in constructing bridges and roots. March 2,1, 1851. 
A. J. Thompson New and useful improvement upon the 

plough. March 24, 1851. 
W. J. iiohnes .New and useful improvement on the 

method of applying the heat generated in stoves or tire 

places to the purpose of warming apartments or houses. 

April 12, 1861. 
Thomas S. lox A rabbeted complete revolving air and 

water tight joint. April 12, 18oi. 
James .Rogers Armstrong A ew and improved cooking 

stove, to be called " The Giant Cooking btove." April 

17, isal. 
John Kourke Self-acting ribbed warp knitting looms. 

May 1, 1851. 
Thomas llewson McLean New shape of bar-iron for horse 

shoes. May 1, Isol. 
Daniel Mandigo New and unproved method of cutting 

hay, straw, chatf or other vegetable food for cattle. 

May 2, 1851. 
Chester Shattuck Cross-cutting machine. May 21, 1851. 



J. 11. McKenzie New mode of constructing a cider-mill 
and press. June 10, 1S61. 

Sherman S. Jewett Improved iron stove for heating 
rooms and for other purposes. June lo, 1851. 

Edwin Jeuney New and useful machine for cutting and 
sawing staves with unprecedented rapidity and correct 
ness. June 10, 1861. 

Koswell Tompkius New and useful machine for separating 
and cleaning wheat and other grain. June lo, 1851. 

Thomas J. iuiler .New and improved cooking stove, to be 
called " The Salamander Cooking Stove." June 18, 1851. 

Charles Lenion .New and unproved plough, which he 
calls a double iron beam plough. June i;4, 1851. 

C. I aluier Improved weighing machine. June 3U, 1851. 

Geo. Haw ley chingle-maKmg machine. July 4, 1851. 

Henry Markle Certain improvements in the construction 
of agricultural plough. July 12, 1851. 

James i rehearue .New method ol running the perpendi 
cular saw for sawing timber. August 21, 1861. 

Isaac Carter Cooking stove, the hot air iroiu which is 
by him now for the hrst time successfully applic d to 
heating purposes. August 21, 1861. 

Keuben x. Colton New and improved method of con 
structing cooking stoves as exeinpiitied in what he call* 
The Brockville air-tight cook stove." Sept. 8, 1851. 

Benjamin .Fuller .New and improved whirlpool wheel or 
pressure water power. .November o, 1861. 

Thomas J. 1 ulier New and improved machine called thu 
Excelsior cylindrical thrasner ;" also, a new and useful 
machine called " The iixcelsior horse power." Nov. 0,1861. 

William Coleman Circular and stiaight moulding, rab 
beting, ploughing and archill ave machine. Nov. b, 1861. 

Peter K. Lanib New and improved machine for the manu 
facture of laths. November 0, 1851. 

Peter K. Higiey New and improved machine for cutting 
hay and straw. November o, 1661. 

Thomas Mills New method of constructing carriages and 
other vehicles by which they are enabled to turn in 
much less space than formerly. November 25, 1851. 

James Maclareu Improved mode of making bricks and 
architectural Ornaments. January 8, 1852. 

Joseph Paguuelo Improved fuiuace. Jan. 8, 1852. 

Prudent Nicol and Thomas Nicol Improved thrashing 
mill. January 14, 1852. 

N eveus Jones ^New and useful improvement in the con 
struction of waggons, combining the springs and coup 
ling. January iy, 1852. 

Alexander Anderson Certain improvements to a machino 
called a grain separator. January ly, 1862. 

James Anderson New and useful plan of building houses. 
January la, 1852. 

Asa V\ iliard Butter machine. January 23, 1852. 

Justus S. Jones New and improved nitthou of construct 
ing carriages. March 20, I6d2. 

Charles Dawson Improvements iu the manner of work 
ing Mulay saws and the machinery attached thereto. 
March 20, 1852. 

Charles Lemon New and improved method of construct 
ing ploughs. March 31, Iu2. 

Samuel Culler New and improved apparatus or lamp for 
burning benzole or hydrocarbons. April 1 J, 1852. 

William Perry Direct action lire engine. April 30, 1852. 

Horatio A. Kockwell New and uselul method ol construct 
ing yokes lor oxen. May 8, 1862. 

Thomas C. Gregory Selt-acting apparatus for disconnect 
ing the carriages of a railway train from the tender upon 
the engine leaving the rails. May 28, 1862. 

Peter Murdock improvement in the composition and 
form of wheels for all kinds of carriages. aia> *8, 1862. 

Louis Lemoiue New and useful improvement in the ina- 
nutacture and construction of steam generating appa 
ratus. June 9, 1852. 

Benjamin Gumear Churn called the reciprocating churn. 
June 15, 1862. 

Lawrence Hager New and useful improvement to the 
seed drill, &c. June 30, lb&2. 

Lawrence Hager increasing twist and curvilinear mould 
board for Canadian ploughs, on the principle of a con 
tinuous increasing curvilinear twist irorn the point of 
shear to the back end and on sole ol mould board. J uue 
3l>, 1862. 

Abram Longbottom New and useful mode of purifying 
illuminating gas. July 2y, ib52. 

Robert Might K. Might s portable, horizontal and self- 
meting sawing machine. August 10, 1N>2. 

Samuel Andres New and scientific mode of constructing 
flues or chimneys. August 12, 1862. 



1856.] 



PATENTS. 



47 



George William Lester Improved draft and damper box 
smoothing iron. August 24, 1852. 

John Rourke Millstone pickers. August 24, 1852. 

Edward Irenholm Trenholm s elevator. Aug. 2b , 1852. 

Thomas J. fuller New and useful improvement in Mulay 
saw mills. August 31, 1852. 

R. Lossiug W ashing and churning machine. Aug. 31, 1852. 

James K. Griffin Several new and useful improvements 
on cooking stoves. September 7, 1852. 

Samuel Ilurlbert Improvement on the plough for which 
he has already obtained a patent, dated 17th October, 
I860. September 20, 1852. 

Alfred Gillord New and useful improvement on a ma 
chine for cuttiui; straw, patented to Kichard Tremaiu 
the 24th September, 1849, and now owned by Lonsou 
Butterneld, of the village of Oshawa, county of Ontario. 
September 20, 1802. 

George M. Sperry Improved method of constructing com 
crackers. September 21, 1862. 

Edward C. hums, .Machine for making carriage wheels. 
September cO, 1852. 

11. bernier N e w and improved cooking stove. Oct. 5, 1852, 

Samuel 1. Russell Mew aud improved harrow. Oct. 8, 1802. 

Charles Uot-juliu ^~uw arid useful improvement iu the 
mode of constructing double stoves. October 13, 1852. 

Joseph Paradis .New and useful improvement in the 
method of constructing thrashing machines. Oct. 15, 1862. 

Charles Midgley Improved churn. October 27 , 1852. 

Charles Midgiev Improved bee hive. October 27, 1802. 

^\ illiam Brown New and useful improvement in making 
grain rakes. November b, 1852. 

Frederick Tiuany New and improved apparatus for warm 
ing air, and tor warming and ventilating houses and 
other inhabited apartments. November 0, 1802. 

Patrick Flinn Compound action waterwheel. Nov. 8, 1852. 

George Stacy New and useful method of constructing 
spite machines. January 20, 1853. 

"William Allchiu Improved scythe holder. Jan. 26, 1853. 

G. Ausley Ceutrilugal and centripetal churn. Feb. 8, 1853. 

Ezekiel Hurley Improvement on the wooden plough. 
February 14, ISoo. 

Daniijl Mandigo New and useful improvement in the 
construction of lightning rods. February 10, 1853. 

Albert Kouuds New aud useful improvement in the con 
struction of lightning conductors. February 16, 1853. 

Peter K. Higley New and improved machine for cutting 
hay aud straw. March 7, Io3. 

Aretus A. \\ilcler New and useful machine for planing, 
tonguing aud "roving boards. March 7, 1853. 

Peter Aim-dock New and improved running gear for 
vehicles. April 15, 1853. 

George Anslaj Portable hot-air furnace and cooking 
stove. April 15, 1863. 

James Russell New and useful machine called Russell s 
corn crusher. April 15, 1853. 

Peter Murdock New and improved seed drill to be attach 
ed to a plough. April 15, 1803. 

Charles Lemon Improvement in construction of ploughs. 
April 15, 1863. 

Charles 11. i etu New and useful process of manufactur 
ing leather from the skin of the whale or porpoise. 
April 10, Ib53. 

Charles II. Tetu New and useful mode of manufacturing 
whale and porpoise oil. April Itj, 1863. 

Joseph Paradis Useful improvement in the construction 
of thrashing machines. April 29, 1863. 

William C. liuttau Improved gun barrel and projectile. 
April 29, 1*63. 

Edmund Kichard Machine for sawing straight and crooked 
wood of equal and unequal dimensions. April 29, 1853. 

DaTid Bell Press or machine for the manufacture of 
earthenware, pipes and draining tiles. April 29, 1853. 

Joseph Planionuou Machine for cutting tobacco, without 
moistening it. April 29, 1853. 

Daniel P. Brigham New and useful improvement in the 
construction of limning mills. April 29, 1853. 

Asaph Buck Sell -gigging, self-setting and selt-regulating 
saw-mill. April 29, 1853. 

John Dean Double reflector for baking purposes. April 
29, 1853. 

Daniel Smith New and improved carriage and feeding 
and glgging-back-workfl for steam and water saw mills. 
May 11, 1863. 

Zenas Everitt Improved ladder. May 12, 1353. 

Vi illiaui A. llolwell Improvement in the construction of 

n ins or bridles to be called the Duplex safety rein 

May 12, 1803. 



Joseph Woods New and improved cant hook tor piling 
and otherwise handling and disposing of railway iron 
bars. May 28, 1853. 

Benjamin 1. libbetts Improved mode of constructing 
Steam engines. June 11, 1853. 

Nirum W. Kockwell Limited horse swing. June 11, 1853. 

Charles W. Smith New and uselul improvements in the 
construction ot harvesting machines. June M, 1853. 

John Morley Improved mould-board for ploughs. June 
20, 1853. 

Jackson Mclntyre File-cutting machine. June 20, 1853. 

Charles S. Roiiier New and uselul improvement in the 
construction of trashing machines. J uue 20, 1853. 

John W. Armstrong New and uselul improvement in the 
construction of ploughs. J une 21, IsOo. 

J. Ilaudford Improved threshing machine. June 21, 1853. 

Calvin P. Ladd Jletaiic burial case. July 8, 1863. 

Robert Thomas Paddle box tubular ran. July 19, 1853. 

Alexander S. \\albridge New and uselul machine tor 
sawing and planing, by one operation, of ail lumber. 
July 20, 1853. 

Geo. Urquhart Improvement in metalic carriage springs, 
called The Urquhart elliptic springs. 1 Jui,) 20, ISoii. 

Win. J. Spence sell-adjusting paddle w heel. J uly 2b, 1853. 

Alexis Kobitaille New ana improved apparatus an ) 
method of working lor, obtaining, and producing gas fo; 
the purposes of illumination, from rosin and oil, and 
other substances of like nature, aud from the decompo 
sition of water. September 2, 1863. 

John Dean Improvement in the mode o: constructing th 
double reflector for baking purposes, h. , ented by him 
for which letters patent were issued on the 29th April 
1853. September 7, I8o3. 

Alexander Anderson New and useful machine lor plant 
ing potatoes. September 15, 1863. 

Masa li. Southwick New and useful apparatus for, and 
method of, crushing, drying, and otherwise preparing 
potatoes and other vegetable substances as well as Iruils 
and meats, lor the purposes of food. Sept. 15, 1853. 

Lewis Reese New aud usetul improvement in the manu 
facture of straw-cutting machines. Septembei 19, 1853. 

Alexander Turnbu 1 New and useful improvement in the 
construction of Canadian ploughs. October 6, 1853. 

Nathan Buchan nan New aud useful apparatus lor, and 
method of desiccating lumber and other materials. 
October 6, 180U. 

Robert E. Stephens New and unproved excavator for the 
purpose of cutting or excavating and moving clay, sand, 
gravel or other MiLstances. October b , Itioli, 

John Parsons Improved machine lor making bricks 
October b, 1853. 

John Parsons Apparatus for the purpose of cleansing or 
drawing off beer irom the fermenting tuns. Oct. 13, 1853 

Dalrymple Crawlbrd Improved machinery for arrestiu" 
the progress of railway trains. October 10, ^63. 

Isaac Modeland New a-d uselul improvement in the con 
struction of ploughs. October 19, i853. 

Jacob Wood New and us-eful improvement in the present 
mode of constructing churns. February 2, 1864. 

Levi Howell New and useful improvements in the con 
struction of the cider mill and press. Feb. 2, 1864 

J. T. Forbes Improved elevating bedstead. Feb. 2 1854 

William Bowman Improvement in railway cars and car 
riages. February 2, 1854. 

Lewis Armsbur> New and useful improvement in the 
construction of churns. February 2, 1864. 

Stanistlas Kwesuefcki Prize hot-air and cookine furnace 
February 8, 1864. 

George Dunham Improved method of running naddln 
wheels. February 11, 1854. 

Antoine St. Jacques New and useful improvement in 
the construction of post augers. February 22, 1864. 

John Winer New and uselul improvement lor hea tini; 
air for warming apartments by the waste heat of a stove 
or other fire grates, to be denominated " V> iner s nvr- 
pneumatic tire grate. March 22, 1864. 
Benjamin Cole New way of closing shop window shutter" 
March 23, 1854. 

Iliram Scovell Cider mill and press. March 28, 1854. 

William H. Soper Improvement in the grooving and in 
side finishing ol rifle barrels. March a>, 1864. 

Lewis Reese New and useful improvement in the con 
struction of a machine lor cut ting hay or straw. March 
30, 1854. 

George Williston New and useful machine for straight 
ening or curving rails. April 4, 1804. 
Pierre Gauvreau New and useful cement to be called 
"Gauvreau s Canadian hydraulic cement." April 5 1&C4 



[135] 



48 



PATENTS. 



[1856. 



Jonas P. Lee New and useful improvement in a machiiie 
called "Double acting knitting machine." April 10, 1854. 

John II. Charnock New and useful machine for mould 
ing all descriptions of tiles, pipes and bricks for drain 
age, sewerage, building or other purposes, from clay or 
other plastic substances. April 17, 1854. 

Peter Murdoch Compound carriage BO constructed as that 
all kiuds of wheel carriages may be converted into sleighs. 
April 18, 1854. 

Peter Murdoch Improvement in double dash churn. 
April 18, 1S54. 

R. Lossing Rolling screen fanning mill. April 21, 1854. 

John Parsons Apparatus for cooking, for bakers ovens, 
for drying and roasting malt and other vegetable pro 
duce, seasoning timber, drying room with self-acting 
ventilator, for laundries, hatching poultry, heating irons, 
and keeping cooking provisions hot by the application 
of gas. April 28, 1854. 

Joseph Thirkell Improvements in the forming, shaping 
and casting of iron ploughs. May 29, 1854. 

Benjamin Wait Combination of machinery for the making 
of barrels, kegs, tubs and other bilge works. June 6, 1854. 

Joseph Scobell New and improved method of manufac 
turing peat>bog, by drying, pressing and cooking for 
fuel and other purposes. June 7, 1854. 

Daily Seleck New and useful improvement in the con 
struction of churns. June 14, 1854. 

Joseph Scobell New and improved method of covering 
roots with slate. June 14, 1854. 

Rich-rd D. Chatterton Floating gangway, boat launch 
and life raft. June 19, 1854. 

R. lloyt Improved obstetrical supporter. June 29, 1854. 

William J. lluckett Improved signal light for railways. 
June 30, 1854. 

Richard Muchall Machine for working irregular surfaces, 
so as to form a piece of timber to any required shape. 
July 13, 1854. 

Thomas Murgatroyd New and useful improvement on 
carriages. July 21, 1854. 

John Brown Seed sower. July 21, 1854. 

D Arcy Porter New and improved sewing machine. July 
21, 1854. 

John Pye New and improved method of constructing 
water closets. August 14, 1854. 

Stephen R. Andres New art of manufacturing paper from 
tha plant known by the Linnean-generic name of 
Gnaphalium, and vulgarly called cud-weed or life-ever 
lasting. August 25, 1854. 

Michael Egan New and improved mode of making moulds 
for copper, brass and composition castings. Aug. 26, 1854. 

John II. Gatis New and useful improvement in the ap 
paratus for cleaning and scouring wheat, rye and buck 
wheat. August 28, 1854. 

Joel B. llayden Improved hub for carriage and waggon 
wheels. September 4, 1854. 

William Nixon Potato and seed drill. Sept. 4, 18a4. 

John Brown Improved straw cutler. September 4, 1854. 

Henry Miller New and useful machine for expeditiously 
arresting the progress of railway cars by almost sudden 
steam brakes. September 19, 1854. 

Lewis B. Carpenter Improved hand-lantern. Oct. 6, 1854. 

Henry C. Lindo New and useful process for depriving 
hides and skins of the hair, wool fur or bristles, pre 
paratory to being tanned. October 19, 1854. 

Robert Romaine Certain improvements in machinery or 
apparatus for effecting agricultural operations. October 
19, 1804. 

Robert E. Stephens Improved bedstead. Oct. 20, 1854. 

J. II. Gatis Central discharge water-wheel. Oct. 28, 1854. 

Charles DuBerger New mode of preventing railroad cars 
from running off the track or rail, consisting of a safety- 
hook. November 7, 1854. 

Samuel Cutter New and improved method of making gas 
and applying it to, and for the purpose of illumination, 
or heating, &c. November 7, 1864. 

Charles II. Waterous Machine for making nuts and 
washers from a heated bar of metal. Nov. 8, 1854. 

Leon A. Lemire New polishing bull called the wheel or 
hand buff, for daguerreotype purposes. Nov. 14. 1854. 

Robert Thomas Machine for clearing snow from off rail 
way tracks, to be called " Thomas s snow exterminator." 
November 30, 1854. 

James B. Smith New and useful Improvement in the 
construction of portable or stationary steam or water 
mills. December 6, 1854. 

Rodolphus Lounsburg Canadian thistle-killer and culti 
vator. December 8, 1854. 



Alexander Anderson Potato digger. DeLv.p.lirr i:;, 1S54. 

William Bowmuu New and uselul improvements in thu 
construction of railway cars. January 12, 1855. 

Homer P. Brown Improvement on the chaff cutter or 
cutting box. January 19, 1855. 

John Helm, the younger, and John Wade Machine fbr 
boring holes in the ground for fence posts or other pur 
poses. January 20, 1855. 

Ruth Adams Reverse cooking stove. January 20, 1855. 

William Fitzpatrick Certain improvements in nail ma 
chine feeder. January 20. 1855. 

James Overholt Horizontal sawing machine for cross- 
cutting logs of wood. January 20, 1 

Benjamin McBeth Longitudinal motioned fanning mill. 
1 ebruary 3, 1855. 

Henry Cowing Certain improvements upon machinery. 
February 8, 1855. 

Jacob Pingle Potato digger. 1 ebruary 8, i 

John McDougall Cooking and boiling apparut us. March C, 

1855. 
I Thomas S. Fox Switching apparatus, &e. March 6, 1855. 

Alexander Anderson Improved cultivator. March 0, l>Gii. 

Leonard Robinson and James Woolbridge safety lever 
buckle. March 13, 1855. 

A. Palmer New & useful reaping machine. March 13, 1855. 

Henry Markle New and improved double dasher churn. 
March 15, 1855. 

Charles Petch Improvements in machinery for manufac 
turing -waggon spokes and other articles irregular in 
their form. March 22, 1855. 

James Atkinson Improvement upon the drill and broad 
cast sowing machine. March 22, lsv>. 

William Fitzpatrick New and useful improvements ill 
nail machine feeders. March 22, 1855. 

Henry Sewell New and useful machine for picking oakuin. 
March 22, 1855. 

Dalrymple Crawford Improved machinery for filling 
steam boilers with water. March 24, 1865. 

Michael Egan New and improved method of oiling car 
journals. March 27, 1855. 

Samuel Darling Art of raising sunken vessels or other 
objects, by means of buoys and weights. April 5, l. v .>;">. 

Charles Dorion New and improved method of constructing 
cutters, for the purpose of racing. April 10, 1S55. 

Nicholas Lacroix New and improved water wheel, called 
" Turbine helicoide." April 10, 1850. 

A. D. C ole New and useful water wheel. April 10, 1855. 

Thomas D. Flood New and improved method of construct 
ing that part of the action of a pianoforte called the 
hopper. April 10, 1855. 

Charles S. Rodier New and useful machine for sawing 
wood. April 10, 1855. 

Abraham Steers New and improved method of quick 
tanning. April 20, 1855. 

A. Steers New and improved method of manufacturing 
the dye, saccharine salts or extracts of vegetable sub 
stances, without the usual evaporation. April 21, 1855. 

John Williams New and useful improvement in the blast 
of locomotive engines. April 24, 1855. 

Samuel Morse Improved plough. April 28, 1855. 

William Holborn Washing machine. April 28, 1855. 

Joaiah, James, and John Dennis Washing machine. 
May 4, 1855. 

Eli B. Hungerford Cast iron fastener for the putting to 
gether of posts aad rails of bedsteads. May 8, 1855. 

James B. Young, Richard S. Brown, and Henry I^n is 
New and useful invention for propelling bunts against 
the wind, and in all directions with tho same wind. 
May 9, 1855. 

Isaac G. Ogden New and useful improvement in the con 
struction of water wheels. Blay 15, 1855. 

William Bowman New and useful mode of constructing 
railway car wheels. May 15, 1855. 

William Niblock Improvement in the manner of con 
structing horse rakes for raking hay. May 26, 1855. 

Jonas P. Leo Kound rotary or circular knitting loom. 
May 28, 1855. 

Robert Pooler New and useful improvement in the con 
struction of a breech loading fire-arm, either rifle or 
smooth bored. June 4, 1855. 

Ruther McDougall Improved oil box for oiling axles of. 
rail car wheels. June 8, 1855. 

Jacob Barnes Reciprocal acting pump. June 14, 1S55. 

James B. Young, Richard S. Brown and Henry Davis 
Self-opening railway gate. June 14, 1855. 



[136] 



1856.] 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



49 



MUNICIPALITIES, CANADA WEST. 

In the following compilation will be found all that is either useful or important, relative to the Counties and Union 
of Counties in Canada West. Similar information was applied for to the municipal authorities of Canada East, 
but could not be obtained sufficiently full for publication, owing to the new Municipal Act of Lower Canada 
coming so recently into force ; the Compiler, however, tenders his sincere thanks to all those gentlemen in Lower 
Canada, who so kindly afforded him such information as was in their power. For the lists of Magistrates, we are 
indebted to the courtesy of the Provincial Secretary, who remarks : " I have not specified in the list the 
Magistrates who have qualified, as it would not have been in my power, from the returns sent to this office, to 
have given you a perfectly correct statement in that respect." We would also mention that the names of those 
who have died since their appointment, have not in all cases been left out ; but errors of this kind have been 
corrected as far as the means at our command permitted. 



1. Braut. 

Acres 1,218,852. 
Population in ISi.VJ 25,426. 
Assessed Value in 1S55 1,255,129. 
Liabilities None. 

County Officials. 

Warden Allen Good, Brantford. 

Treasurer-Hamilton Biggar, Brantford 

Registrar T. S. Shenstone, Brantford. 

Clerk John Cameron, Brautford. 

Solicitors Cameron & Rubridge, do. 

Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar 
ter Sessions S. J. Jones, Brantford. 

Sheriff John Smith, Brantford. 

Clerk of Peace J. Cameron, Brantford. 

Clerk of Co. Court and Deputy Clerk 
of Crown, Duncan Cameron. 

Judge Surrogate Stephen J. Jones, 
Brantford. 

Deputy Registrar Surrogate Walter 
Rubridge, Brantford. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. Henry Racey, Brantford. 
Division II. John A. Penton, Paris. 
Division III. S. Stanton. St. George. 
Division IV. W. M. Whitehead, Bur- 
ford. 

Division V. James Malcolm. Scotland. 
Division VI. T. Butler, Tuscarora. 

County Town BRANTFORD. 

Chief Magistrate William Mathews, 

Brantford. 

Clerk George Varey, Brantford. 
Population 5.800. 
Assessed Value in 1855 40,324. 
Taxes per Annual Value 3s. 

Municipalities. 

Townships Brantford, Burford, Dum" 
fries South, Oakland, Onondaga, 
Tuscarora; Towns of Brantford and 
Paris. 

Magistrates. 

Jones, Stephen James. Brantford. 

Stanton George, South Dumfries 

Moyle, Henry, Brantford Township. 

Wilkes, John Asten, Brantford Town. 

Digby, Alfred, do. 

Cook Abraham, do. 

Capron, Hiram, Paris. 

Christie Robert, South Dumfries. 

Smith, Abraham K., Brantford Town. 

Smith John. Paris. 

Biggar Herbert, Brantford Township. 

Wyld James C., do. 

Shenstone Thomas S., do. 

Malcolm, Eliakim, Oakland. 

Toyne, John, do. 

Eddy John, do. 

Daniels, Lawrence, Burford. 

Pertey Charles S., do. 

Foster Alouzo, dp. 

Oswald, James, do. 

Beemer, George, do. 

Horner, Henry, do. 

Malcolm, James, Oakland. 

Chapin, Charles, do. 

Thompson, Wm., do. 

Finlayson, Hugh, Paris. 

Totten, Daniel, do. 

D 



Spottiswoode, Alex. Paris. 

Hamilton, Norman, do. 

Anderson. Daniel, South Dumfries. 

Mullen William, do. 

Roy. William, do. 

O Niel, Daniel, do. 

Latshaw, Henry, do. 

Sharp. James, do. 

j Cope, David, do. 

Kitchin, Edward, do. 

j Burt, Robert, do. 

Smith, Carleton C., do. 

| Beemer, Joseph, do. 

Burnet, Arthur, do. 

Clement. Joseph D., Brantford Town. 
; Kirklaud, Alexander, do. 

Cockshutt. Ignatius, do. 

Huntingdon, Arnnah, do. 

Strobridge, Richard R. do. 

Dalton, Joseph, do. 

Sproule, Robert. do. 

Muirhead. William, do. 

Mr>ore, John Henry, do. 

Wilkes, James, do. 

Smith Arthur, Onondaga. 
I Soules William D., do. 

Conboy, Thomas, do. 
MeN aughten, Dan. do. 
j Algar, William N. do. 

Kelly, Alpheus, J., do. 

Butler, Thomas. do. 

Hill, Amos, Brantford Township. 

Campbell John, do. 

Batsou, Thomas D., do. 

Smith, George, do. 

Weaver. Peter, do. 

Brown, David, do. 

i Hawley Harvey, do. 

\ Tufford, John, do. 

j Maxwell James, do. 

j Griffin, Nathaniel F., da 
j Tapley, Samuel, do. 

Cook, Thomas, do. 

\ Phelps, Hiram, do. 

Chapin Lyman, do. 

Smith, Thaddeus, do. 

Keith, James, do. 

Muir Robert, Burford. 

Horner, Thomas, do. 

Smith, Russell, do. 

Kelly John, do. 

Kerby William, K. do. 

Ross, Hervey, do. 

Hedges Charles, do. 

Kinney Hiram, do. 

Vanderlip, Edward, Brantford Town p. 

Likins. John, do. 

Lampkins. John, do. 

Hawley, Abraham, do. 

Wilkes, John A., Brantford. 
Digby, Alfred, do. 

Smith, Abraham K. do. 
Clement, Joseph D. do. 
Steele, John, do. 

Kirklands, Alexander, do. 



2. Carletoii. 

Acres 574,520. 

Population 31,882. 

Liabilities 099 10s. 4d. 

Amount of Debent. issued 464 17s 

L137] 



County Officials. 

Warden Joseph Illnton, Richmond. 

Treasurer Daniel O Conner, Ottawa. 

Registrar Edward Sherwood, Ottawa. 

Clerk Charles H. Pinhey, Ottawa. 

Solicitor John Bower Lewis, Ottawa. 

Surveyor Isaac Mactaggart, Ottawa. 

Judge County Court and Chairman 
Quarter Sessions Christopher Arm 
strong, Ottawa. 

Sheriff Simon Fraser, Ottawa. 

Clerk of Peace F. C. Powell, Ottawa. 

Clerk of Co. Court an Deputy Clerk 
of Crown H. J. Friel, Ottawa. 

Judge Surrogate Christ. Armstrong. 

Registrar Surrogate H. J. Friel. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 
Division I. George R. Burke, Ottawa. 
Division II. J. A. Bryson, Richmond. 
Division III John Feuton, Huntley. 
Division IV. Wm. D. Pigott, Fitzroy 

Harbour. 

Division V. W. Cowan, North Gower. 
Division VI. Thomas Baillie, Osgoode. 

County Town. OTTAWA. 

Chief Magistrate John Bower Lewis. 
Clerk William P. Lett. 
Population Above 10,000. 
Assessed Value, 1855. 38,805 12s. 5d. 
Taxes per Annual Value, 3s. 

Municipalities. 

Townships Fitzroy, Gloucester, Goul- 
buru, Huntley, March, Maiibo- 
rough, Nepean, North Gower, Os 
goode, Torbolton ; City of Ottawa 
and Village of Richmond. 

Magistrates. 
Armstrong, Christopher, Ottawa. 
Eastman, John, North Gower. 
McDonell, Alexander, Osgoode. 
Shirreff, Robert, Fitzroy. 
Richey John, do. 
Baker, George W., Nepean. 
O Connor, Daniel, Ottawa. 
McNaughton, John, do. 
?tevenson, James, do. 
Stewart, William, do. 
1 hitty, John, do. 

McLaren, David, Torbolton. 
Campbell, William, Marlboroush. 
Bradly, William B., Huntley. 
VIcArthur, Donald, Ottawa. 
Thompson, William H., do. 
Buckham, John, Torbolton. 
Thomson, William, Nep. an. 
McNabb, John, Osgoode. 
lanna, Henry, do. 

iobertson, John, Nepean. 
iobinson, Nelson G., do. 
joodman, John G., March, 
ftnton, Joseph, Goulburn. 
ijumner, John, do. 

Jrant, Robert, do. 

HcBride, Henry, nuntley. 
Hanyon, John, do. 
x>wry, Hamilton, Fitzroy 
Taylor, William P., do. 
iIcDonell, Angus R., do. 
ving, George, do. 

Smyth, William, Gloucester. 



50 

Bradley, Clements, Gloucester. 
Nelllgan, Patrick, do. 
Mc.Nabh. I 1 . Osgoode. 

Cameron, Daniel, do. 
! rant, Robert. do. 

Hippinstall, Richard, do. 
Barritt, Ueorpv L., Marlborough. 
McKie, Wi do. 

Bottuia. Elijah, do. 

Crate, . anu s, North Gower. 
Besserer. Louis T., Ottawa. 
Barrt iile. J 1-1 n. do - 

Patterson. George, do. 
Porter, John, do. 

Lindsay, Jani^s, North Gower. 
Thompson, John, do. 

l.Wlins. De. iiis, .Marlborough. 
Hill, Hamnet, Ottawa. 
Malloch, Edward, do. 
Shillin-ton. Thomas, North Gower. 
MeLachlin, Daniel, Ottawa. 

Farley, R > do. 

Workman, Alexander, do. 

Scott, Alexander, do. 

Beaubi-n. C., do. 

Kennedy, Donald, do. 

Friel, Henry S.. do. 

Wood, Leonard, Gloucester. 

Bearman, Thomas, do. 

Lang, Gen do. 

Allen, Arthur. Osgoodo. 

Kangley, Thomas, do. 

Baker, Adam, do. 

Dow, John, do. 

McLellan, William, do. 

Arnold.*:. Nepr-an. 

Byere, William, do. 

Baine, Ge> do - 

Davisou, Samuel, do. 

Fogerty,.! do. 

Lyon, William P.. E., Goulburn 

Lewis, Thomas, 

Torney, John, 

.Henderson, James. do. 
. no, James, i U/.roy. 

Carss, Robert, do. 
M S^ius. Tliom.is, March. 

Smith, John. Torlxilton. 

Skeffington. Michael, Gloucester. 

O- Meara, John, > n \ awa, 

Douglas, Archibald, do. 
Soarrow, Charl< s. do. 

Russell, Alexander J., do. 
Coffin, William F. do. 

Turseon, Joseph B., Ottawa City. 

Masse, Edward. do. 

Varin, Eus -l" 

Farley, Robert, do. 

Bell, Robert, do. 

Grant, Donald M., do. 

Workman, Alexander, do. 

McGilvray. Ivlwaid, do. 

Foster, Archibald, 

Bur wash, Nathaniel, do. 

3 Elgin. 



A^i*;S rTL jt- Ji* 

Population in 185226,418. 

Assessed Value 1855, 1,579,978. 

Uabilities-37,000. 

Amount of Debc-nt. issued- 12,000. 

i/ Officials. 

Warden Thomas Locker, Aylmer. 
Treasurer Henry Black, St. Thomas. 
Ke -istrar- .Mm McKay, St. Thomas. 
nJrk William McKay, St. Thomas. 
Surveyor ( . Fraser, Port Rowan. 
Judge i Countv Court and Chairman 

Quarter Sessions D. J. Hughes, St. 

Thomas. 

Sheriff Colin Munro, St. Thomas. 
Clerk of Pt-are James Farley, ot. 



or "bounty Court and Deputy 
Clerk of Crown I eter Murtaugh, 
St. Thoii. 



MUNICIPALITIES. 

Judge Surrogate D. J. Hughes. 
Registrar Surrogate Peter Murtaugh. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. Simon Newcombe,Vienna. 

Division II Win. Cambell, Aylmer. 

Division III. J. Powell, St. Thomas. 

Divi-ion IV. William Harris, lona. 

Division V. Finlay McDearniid, Ald- 
horough. 

County TfiwnSi. THOMAS. 

Chief Magistrate David Parish, St. 
Thomas. 

Clerk James Stanton, St. Thomas. 

Population 2,500. 

Assessed value in 1855 1 

Taxes per A Annual Value, 2s. bd. 
Municipalities. 

rowuships-Aldborougb.Bayham, Dor 
chester South, Dunwich, Malahide, 
Southwold, Yarmouth; Town ot fct. 
Thomas and Village of A ieuna. 

Magistrates. 
Hughes, David John, St. Thomas. 
Dobbie, Andrew. 
Wrong Gilbert, Malahide. 
Wilson, Benjamin, Yarmouth. 
Knnatinger, Edward, St. Thomas. 
Hodgkinson, Philip. Malahide. 
Munro George, Aldborough. 
P.ellairs, James P. 
Robb, George, Southwold. 
liurwell. Leonidas, Bayham. 
Saxon, Alexander, do. 
Fowler, Levi, Southwold. 
McKenzie, Murdock. 
Hanvey Daniel, St. Thomas. 
Alexander, Johu, Vienna. 
Edison Thomas. 
Moore, Andrew, Bayham. 
Cline, Jacob. 
Coyne Thomas G., London. 

Davis, Wm. llampstead, Malahide. 

Harvey, Joseph, 

Clayton, Peter, O!0 - 

Beiitley, Kandall. 

King, Hooper, St. Thomas. 

Hodge, Alexander. 

Kent, John. 

McKay, John, St. Thomas. 

Southwick, George. 

Hodge, Thomas. 

Lanning John, iarmoutn. 

Fordyce, Asa. 

Johnson, Kandolph. Yarmouth. . 

Ganson, Elisha S. Malahide. 

Kepp, Jesse, Yarmouth. 

Brown James, Malahide. 

Hai"ht, James. 

Crawford, John Matthew, Vienna. 

Thompson Bryc. 

Bostwick, Joseph R., Yarmouth. 

Paul, Eltham, St. Thomas. 

Claris, George T., do. 

Gustin, Henry A., Vicuna, 

Shore, William. 

Bannerman, George. 

Wrong, John W. 

Clark, John, Dunwich. 

Hutton, James. 

Moore, Lindley. 

Minor, Samuel. 

Willey, Moses, Dunwich. 

McPherson, Peter. 

Gunn, Hugh, Dunwich. 

Finn, James, South Dorchester. 

Ross, William, St. Thomas. 

1 orsyth, John. 

McLaughlin, James, Southwold. 

Molloy, George, do. 

Burns, Patrick, do. 

Bobier Pat ick, Yarmouth. 

Cameron, Ewen, Southwold. 

Locker Thomas. Malahide. 



[1856. 



Moore, Martial Timothy, St. Thomas. 
Mclntyre. Hugh, Yarmouth. 
Sells. William, Southwold. 
McCall, Nichol, do. 



4. Essex. 

Acres 433,300. 
Population 16,817. 

s,.d Value In 1855 720,000. 

Liabilities 8,000. 

Amount of Del ..-n! aivs issued 8,000. 

County Officials. 

Warden S. S. Macdonell, Windsor. 
Treasurer George Bullock, Sandwich. 
i;,->stvar Col. .1. Asfciu, Sandwich. 
Q er k_j. II. Wilkinson, Sandwich. 
Solicitor J. II. Wilkinson, do. 
Surveyor P. S. Donnelly, do. 
Judge County Court and Chairman 

yiiarter Sessions Alex. Chewett. 

sandwich. 

Sheriff William D. Baby, Sandwich. 
Clerk of Peace Charles Baby, do. 
Ck-fk of County Court John McEwan, 

Windsor. 
Deputy Clerk of the Crown Pierre H. 

Morin, Sandwich. 
Judge Surrogate John A. Wilkinson, 

Sandwich. 
Registrar Surrogate James Asfcin. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 
Division P. Joseph Mercer, Sandwich. 
Division II. Alauson Batsford, Am- 

bentburg. 

Division 111. J. King, Kmgsville. 
Division IV. Guidon Buchanan, Col- 

cllr 

Division V. J.Wkrfield, Mersea. 
Division VI. F. Gruhain, Rochester. 

( , nly Ti,wn SANDWICH. 
(Not Incorporated.) 

jfunicipatitiet. 

s. Anderdou. Colchester, 
Gostield, Maidstono, Maiden, Mer 
sea, Rochester, Sandwich, Tilbury 
\\ist; Town of Auiherstburg and 
Village of Windsor. 



Chewett, Alexander, Sandwich. 
Elliott, Charles. do. 

Dull , William. Amherstlmrg. 
Prince John, Sandwich. 
Wilkinson. John A.. Sandwich. 
Reynolds Robert. Amherstburg. 
;jloan, John. Anderdon. 
Moriii. 1 ieri-e 11.. Sandwich. 
Laliberte, Jean B., .Maiden. 
Klliott, Robert B. do. 
Caron, Francois, do. 
Buchanan, John G., Colchester. 
llower, Martin, (joslield. 
Foster Rolph. Mersea. 
Crant Duncan. Maiil.stone. 
Gattield, William, Anderdon. 
Wright, Henry. do. 

Woodbridge, 1 homas, Sandwich. 
Rankin. Arthur, do. 

Cornwall, Charles, Colchester. 
Brush, John, do. 

Gravelin, Joseph. do. 

Udwcll. Aimer, do. 

Ferries, John, Jan., no. 
Buchannan. Gordon, do. 
Boyle. Tliomas, do. 

Hawkins, Tho mas. do. 
Dougall, James, Amheistburg. 
Taylor. Peter. do. 

Rheaume. Oliver, do. 

Aldrich. SchyL-r, do. 

Morehouse. Daniel, Gosfield. 
Sheldon, Joseph. do. 

Coatsworth, Joseph, do. 



[138] 



1856.] 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



51 



Sheldon, Waley, Gosfield. 

Brunei-, Abraham, do. 

Grant, Dune-an, Maidstoue. 

Ainslie. Gi-orge. Mersea. 

Maisonville. Olivier. Sandwich. 

Strong, Jusiah. Colchester. 

Boydell, Leopold. 

Langton, Dominique. Sandwich. 

Paxton, J homas, Maiden. 

Askew, Isaac, do. 

Anderson. Robert, do. 

Wilson. William, Rochester. 

Malotte, Joseph. Gosfield. 

Malotte, Theodore, Mersea. 

Ambiidge Frederick, do. 

Ferris, Matthew, Colchester. 

Banwell. Henry. Sandwich. 

McLeod John, Maiden. 

McCormick. Alexander, Point au Pelee. 

Park. Thomas F., Amherstburg. 

Reynolds, Ebonezer, Maiden. 

Scratch. Peter, Gosfield. 

Struthers, James, Maidstone. 

Downing, Denis, do. 

Cuthbertson. James, Sandwich. 

McEwen. John, Windsor. 

Wigle, Windle, Gosfield. 

Wilkinson, Alexander, Mersea. 

Wilcox Asa, Colchester. 

Bell, James. do. 

Wright. Philip S. do. 

Kedsdale John, do. 

Bratt, Joseph, do. 

Morin, Joseph, Amherstburg. 

McKenny. Henry, do. 

I artlett, William, do. 

Demai, Vital T., do. 

Lafferty, Felix. 

King, James. Gosf.eld. 

Thompson. Lennox, Colchester. 

Grenier. John B. 

Noble, James, Jun., Amherstburg. 

Kplfage, John G. 

Bostford. Daniel, Anderdon. 

Quick, Cornelius, Colchester. 

Hunt. Charles, Windsor. 

Hall, William G. Windsor. 

Kennedy, Henry, do. 

Crow, Henry John, Gosfield. 

Salmoni, lacunas, Amherstburg. 

Donaldson, Robert, Anderdon. 

Peel, Spencer, do. 

5 FronJenac, Lennox, and 
Aldington. 

Acres 1,335,640. 
Population in 1852 42,270. 
Assessed Value in 1855 1,759,000. 
Liabilities -2/J20, (including 18,100 
taken by United Counties in Roads.) 
Amount of Debentures issued 

County Officials. 

Warden D. Roblin, Napanee. 
Treasurer W. Ferguson, Kingston. 
Registrar of Frontenac James Du- 

rand, Kingston. 
Registrar of Lennox and Addington 

Isaac Fraser, Milhaven. 
Clerk George II. Detlor, Kingston or 

Napanee. 

Golidtor Thos. Kirkpatrick, King 
ston. 

Surveyor D. C. Smith, Mill Creek. 
Judge County Court and Chairman 

Quarter Sessions K. Mackenzie, 

Q. C., Kingston. 

Sheriff Thomas A. Corbett, Kingston. 
Clerk of Peace J. Waudby, Kingston. 
Clerk of County Court and Deputy 

Clerk of Crown Peter O Reilly, 

Kingston. 
Judge Surrogate George A. Cum- 

mings, Kingston. 
Registrar Surrogate Isaac Fraser, 

Milhaven. 



Clerl-s of Division Courts. 

Division I. E. A. Burrowes, Kingston. 

Division II. Edward Wright, Bath. 

Division III. Edwin Mallory, Fred- 
ricksburgh. 

Division IV. G. S. Clapp, Napanee. 

Division V. W. Whelan, Centreville. 
i Division VI. Edward Upham, Lough- 
borough. 

Division VII. Peter McKim, Waterloo 

Division VIII. F. Selden, Tamworth. 

Division IX. Edwin Mallory, Fred- 
ricksburgh. 

Division X. Samuel Stewart, Spike s 
Corners. 

Division XI. Ilenry Pultz, Wilton. 

Division XII. Hugh Campbell, Stor- 
rington. 

County Town KINGSTON. 

Mayor 0. S. Gildersleeve, Kingston. 

Police Magistrate Thomas W. Robi- 
son, M.D., Kingston. 

Clerk Michael Flanagan, Kingston. 

Population about 15,000. 

Assessed Value in 1855, 78,436 Is. 6d. 

Taxes per Annual Value 2s. 7d. 

Municipalities. 

Townships in Frontenac. Barrie, Bed- 
ford,Clarendon,Hiuchinbrooke,Howe 
Island, Kennebec, Kingston, Lough- 
borough, Olden, Oso, Palmerston, 
Pittsburgh, Portland, Storrington, 
Wolfe Island, and City of Kingston. 
Townships in Lennox Adolphustown, 

Fredricksburgh, Richmond. 
Townships in Addington Amherst 
Island, Anglesea, Camden, Ernest 
Town, Kaladar, Sheffield. 

Magistrates. 

McKenzie, Kenneth, Kingston. 
Fraser, Isaac, Ernest Town. 
Church John, Fredericksburg. 
Dorlaud Samuel, Adolphustown. 
McPherson, Allan, Richmond. 
Sampson, James, Kingston. 
McKenzie, Colin, Bath. 
Rombough Jacob, Camden. 
Marks, John B., Pittsburg. 
Hancox, Orton, Bath. 
Clarke, Samuel, Camden. 
Caton, Archibald, Richmond. 
Casey, Samuel, Adolphustown. 
McDonnell, Archibald, Sheffield. 
Seymour, Benjamin, Bath. 
Holditch, William, Loughborough. 
Simkins, William, do. 

Yeomans, Horace, Kingston. 
Cowan, Alexander, Sen., Pittsburg. 
Askew, Thomas, Kingston. 
Wilson, William, do. 
Mowat, John, do. 

Beith. Duncan, do. 
Asselstine, Michael, Ernest Town, 
Fairfield, William Joseph, do. 
Ruttan, Matthew, Adolphustown. 
Dorland, Peter V., do. 

Garrett, William, Kingston. 
Sadlier, Henry, do. 

Counter, John, do. 

Harper, Francis A., do. 
Asselstine John, Ernest Town. 
Ham, Benjamin, do. 

Smith, Darius, C. do. 

Wilson, James, Richmond. 
Schermahorn, Amos, do. 
Cameron, Angus, Wolfe Island. 
Huffman, Elijah, Camden. 
Hawley, Joseph C. Fredericksburg. 
Switzer, Elijah, Ernest Town. 
Campbell, Samuel, Loughborough. 
Miller, Cephas II. Camden. 
Warner, Sidney, Ernest Town. 
Roblin, David. Napanee. 
Ashley John, Kingston. 
Beamish, William, do. 

[139] 



Spring John, Loughborough. 

Radcliffe, William, Amherst Island. 

Scott, Thomas, do. 

Benson John, Richmond. 

Palmer Noble. Kingston. 

Daverne, Richard, Adolphustown. 

Esson, Robert, do. 

Wright, Paul, do. 

Ham, Richard, Fredericksburg. 

Hayward, William, do. 

Davy, Peter, Ernest Town. 

Fisk, Milton, do. 

Fraser, Charles, do. 

Stewart Robert, do. 

Bell, William, 51., Camden. 

Sisson, Edmond J., do. 

McKinty. John, Amherst Island. 

Howai d Geo ge, do. 

Bruce, Joseph, Kingston. 

Brown, James W., Kingston Town p, 

Denis, Thomas, Portland. 

Purdy, Samuel D., Ernest Town. 

Rourke, Matthew, Kingston. 

Stewart, Neil, Sheffield. 

Smith, Jacob, do. 

Grier, John H., Kingston. 

Williamson, James, do. 

Robison, Thomas W., do. 

Chamberlain. John, Frederlckeburg. 
! Diamond William. do. 

Grange William, Richmond. 

Miller, Thomas, Camden. 

Price, Thomas, do. 

Keller, Frederick, Ernest Town, 

Parks David, Fredericksbur;;. 

Oliver, Frederick A.. Richmond. 

Miller, John, Ernest Town. 

Outivater, Belgat, Fredericksburg. 
Gordanier John, Ernest Town. 
Clarke, John C., do. 

Ford, William, Jun., Kingston. 
Fellows, Nathan, Ernest Town. 
Waudby, John, Kingston. 
Thibodo, Augustus, do. 
Haines, John Josiah, do. 
Ingersoll, Isaac, Fredericksburg. 
Hardy, George H.. Kingston. 
Mallory, Edwin, Fredericksburg. 
Waters, Bulkley, Loughborough. 
Amey, Nicholas, do. 

Clarke, Benjamin, Ernest Town. 
Bowen James, Richmond. 
Carruthers. John, Kingston. 
Heath, Charles, do. 

Anglen, Robert, do. 

Coy, John, do. 

Morley, Samuel, do. 

Mat hews, Robert, do. 
Lenier, Peter, do. 

Baker Thomas, do. 

Briggs, Thomas, do. 

Calvin, Dexter D., Wolfe Island. 
Holden, Sylvester, Loughborough. 
Madden, Hugh, do. 

Rale, Thomas, do. 

Ash, David, do. 

Shibley, Edwin, Portland. 
Lake, Denis, do. 

Shibley, John, do. 

Day, Absalom, do. 
McKim, Peter, Kingston Township. 
Wartman, Peter, do. 

Campbell, James, Storrington. 
Bond, Francis, do. 

Bhooner, Reuben, do. 
Ferguson, William, Pittsburg. 
Foster, Joseph, Camden. 
Akins, George, do. 

Whalan, W r illiam, do. 
Lucas, Joseph, do. 
Miller, George, do. 
Stevenson John, do. 
Dowling John, do. 
Thompson, Robert, do. 
Hawley, James F., do. 
Lasher John, Ernest Town 
Davy, William H. do. 
Timmerman, P. S., do. 



52 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



[1856. 



Perry, Ebenezer, Ernest Town. 
Booth. Philip D., do. 
Fralick, Smith. do. 

Neville, Mitchell. do. 
Williams. Richard, do. 
Sconten. Jacob, do. 

Miller, John, Jun., do. 
Priest, Ezra D. do. 

Warner, Charles, do. 
Sills. George E.. Jun., Fredericksburg. 
Hawley, Keul on C., do. 

Huffman, Henry. do. 

McGillivray. William, do. 

Barnhart. John, do. 

Aylesworth. John, do. 

Forshee. 1 cter J., do. 

McEwen, William, Sheffield. 
Murphy John, do. 

Clapp. Gilbert S., Richmond. 
Martin. RoVrt, do. 

McNeill, Archibald, do. 
Chamberlain, George, do. 
Jieeman, Ira. do. 

Height, Samuel D., Adolphustown. 
Curlett, Edward II., do. 

Sweetman, William, do. 

Borland, John P., do. 

Taggart, Joseph, Bedford. 

Counter, John, Kingston. 
Campbell, Alexander, do. 
Flanigan, John, do. 

Jenkins, John, do. 

McCunniffe, Michael, do. 
MrDoiifll. Archibald J., do. 
O Reilly, James, do. 



6. Grey. 

Acres 1,485,905. 

Population about 20,000. 

Assessed Value in 1855 500,000. 

Liabilities 7.474. 

Amount of Debentures issued None. 



Brown, Ezra. Sydenham. 
Herriuian, Nathaniel, Derby. 
Nc-elands, William, do. 
Mitchell, Thomas. Sullivan. 
Watson, William, St. \incent. 
Jorley, William. do. 

Kerr, James. Euphrasia. 
Williams, John, St. Vincent. 
Stephens, Alexander, M., Sydenham. 
Corbet. George, do. 

Christie, David. do. 

Ilorton. Thomas B., do. 

Stephens. William, A. do. 

Ross, James, do. 

Cooper John, do. 

Grierson llobert, do. 

Riely. Henry, do. 

Inglis, Peter, Derby, 
( a rdwell. Henry, Holland. 
Sproule, John, do. 

Halliday, William, Sullivan. 
Jackson, David. Glenelg. 
McNab. Alexander. B., do. 
Allan. Thomas, Beutinck. 
Legate Samuel, E., do. 
Brown, James. Egremont. 
Rogers. Benjamin, do. 
Bates. Henry, Melancthon. 
Armstrong. George, Artemesia. 
Kleslier, William, K. do. 
Johnson, John. do. 

Abercrombie, Hugh, Euphrasia. 
Horton. Edward. Osprey. 
Hay. Sir James D. H.. Bart,, Osprey. 
Purdy, Jesse, T., St. Vincent, 
Layton. David L., do. 
Trout, William, do. 

Stnart, Charles. Collingwood. 
Smith, Benjamin, E., do. 
Kankin, Charles, Sydenham. 
Coulter, Hugh, Derby. 
Devitt, George. Holland. 
Fergusson, William, Artemesia. 



County Officials. 

Warden W. K. Flesher, Artemisia. 
Treasurer F. Le Pan, Owen Souud. 
Registrar, Thomas Lunn, Owen Sound 
Clerk George James Gale, do. 
Solicitors Pattuu & Civa.sor. do. 
Surveyor Charles Rankin, do. 
Judge Co. Court & Chairman Quarter 

Sessions Frederick T. Wilkes. 
Sheriff George Snider. 
Clerk of Peace William Armstrong. 
Clerk of County Court and Deputy 

Clerk of Crown Peter Inglis. 
Judge Surrogate Frederick T. Wilkes. 
Registrar Surrogate P.ter Inglis. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. G. J. Gale, Owen Sound. 
Divisiun II. W. Jackson, Bentiuck, 
Division 111. J. Williams. St. Viucent. 
Division IV. T. Rorke, Collingwood. 
Division V. G. Armstrong, Artemisia. 

County Town STDENHAM. 
(Not Incorporated.) 

Municipalities. 

Townships Artemesia, Bentinck, Col- 
liugwood, Derby, Egremont, Euphra 
sia, Glenelg,, Holland, Mdoncthon, 
Normanby. Osprey, Proton, St. Vin 
cent, Sullivan, Sydenham. 

Magistrates. 

Wilkes, Frederick Thomas, Sydenham- 
Brown, George. do. 

Carney, Richard, do. 

Frost John, do. 

Jackson. George, Bentinck. 
J ladden Robert, Sydenham. 
Lunn. Thomas, do. 
Me Laren, Arch. do. 
Patterson, Robert, do. 



teele, William, Walpole. 
iirk, John, Moulton. 
jittle, James, Seneca, 
mlac. William James, Dunn. 
tirdsall, Samuel. Canboro. 
lall, Geoffry B., Walpole. 
itch, William, Canboro. 
Irmour John, Moulton. 
Blott, William, Dunn. 
:ook. William. South Cayuga. 
tilwell Silas. Walpole. 
foung. William, Oneida. 
larcourt Michael, Seneca, 
fackson, John, do. 
[)eCew, Edmund, J., N. Cftyoga 
ollmsbee, John. Canboro. 
layatt, Hezekiah, Moulton. 
jyres, William. Sherbrooke. 
Jyde, Frederick, Dunn. 
Nash. Abraham. South Cayuga. 
loasburgt r, Isaac. Rainhaui. 
Jowan, John S.. Walpole. 
Liesttr, Thomas, Seneca. 
A au Every, William B.. Seneca. 
1 helps, Oliver S., North Cayu^n. 
Root, John, Sherbrooke. 
Kent, James, Rainham. 
Heasman, John. Walpuli-. 
McPherson, William, Seneca. 
Turner, Jacob, do. 

Smith, James P., Rainham. 
Woods, David, Walpole. 
Park, Paul, Seneca. 
McKinnon, Ronald, Seneca. 
Scobie, Alexander, do. 



7. HaldimaniL 

Acres 289,233. 

Population 20,000. 

Assessed Value in 1854, 879.530 Is.Cd 

Liabilities 7,519 18s. 

Amount Debent. issued 7519 18s. 

County Officials. 

Warden William Cook.SouthCayuga 

Treasurer Agnew P. Farrell, Cavug; 

Registrar Agnew P Farrell, do. 

Clerk Francis J. Stevenson, do. 

Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar 
ter Sessions John G. Stevenson, 
Cayuga. 

Sheriff Richard Martin, Cayuga. 

Clerk of Peace J. W. K. Graham, 
Cayuga. 

Clerk of Co. Court and Deputy Clerk 
of Crown R. V. Griffith. Cayuga. 

Judge Surrogate John G. Stevenson. 

Registrar Surrogate R. V. Griffith. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 
Division I. W. Thompson, Caledonia. 
Division II. Dune. Campbell, Cay.ua. 
Division III. J. Armour. DumvilV. 
Division IV. E. Kent, Williamsville. 

County Town CATUQA. 
(Not Incorporated.) 

Municipalities. 
Townships-Canborough,CayngaNorth 
Cay uga South, Dunn. Moulton. i "IK! 
da^ I .ainham, Seneca, Sherl 
Walpole; and Village of Caledonia. 

Magistrates. 

Stevenson. John G., Cayuga. 
Field, David McFarlane, Walpole. 
Farrell, Agnew P., Cayuga. 
Jarron, John, Moulton. 

[140] 



8. Halton. 

Acres 229,700. 
Population About 20,000. 

Bed Value in 1805, 1,090.000. 
Avragu Amount Taxes 2143 1?. 7d. 
Liabilities (No Return.) 
Amount of Debeut. issued 3 !) HI. 

County Officials. 

Warden Robert Miller, Milton. 
Treasurer George Brown, Milton. 
Registrar Thomas Racey, ililtun. 
Clerk Francis Hamburgh. Milton. 
Solicitor Gilbert Tice Bastedo. Milton. 
Surveyor Henry Winter, Milton. 
Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar 
ter Sessions Joseph Davis, Milton. 
Sheriff Levi WihsMii, Milton. 
Ilerk of Peace Gilbert Tice Bastedo. 
Jlerk of Co. Court and Deputy Clerk 

of Crown W. L. P. Kager. Mildm. 
Judge Surrogate Jos. Davis. Milton. 
Registrar Surrogate W. L. P. Ea . t r. 
Crown Lauds Agent Samuel Clarke, 
Milton. 

ClerJct of Division Courts. 
Division I. John Holgate, Milton. 
Division II. llobert Balmer. Oakvilh 1 . 
Division III. 11. Young. Stewart town. 
Division IV. L. McDonald. Acton. 
Division V. E. Bla -k. Campbt-llsvillo. 
Division VI. William Mc-Cay, Nelson. 

County Trnun MILTON. 
(Not incorporated.) 

Municipalities. 

Townships Esquesing, Nassagaweya, 
Nelson, Trafalgar. 



Davis. Joseph. Milton. 
McKay, William. Nelson. 
TyfTe, Thomas, Trafalgar. 
Brown, George, do. 
Harwood. Henry do. 
Kinney. Peter, do. 
Williams. Justus. W. Oakville. 
I .acey Thomas, Milton. 
Willson, Levi, do. 



1856.] 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



53 



Howell, John T., Trafelgar. 
Barber, William. Georgetown. 
Springer, David. R., Nelson. 
White, John, Milton. 
Fisher, Peter, Nelson. 
Cleaver. James, do. 
Buck, John, Trafalgar. 
Sovereign, Charles, Bronte. 
Gage James P., Wellington Square. 
Bowman, Samuel, Trafalgar. 
Applebee, James, do. 
Clarke. Samuel, do. 
Chisholm, George K., Oakville. 
Chisholm, Robert K., do. 
Cobban. James, Milton. 
Sprout Adam. Esquesitig. 
Ireland. Joseph, Nelson. 
Patton, Andrew, do. 
Jarvis. John, Trafalgar. 
Orr, John F., do. 
Bray. Ezra, Bronte. 
Wilmot, Henry, Milton. 
Jull, Thomas, Oakville. 
Smith, Thompson, do. 
Culham Chai les, do. 
Hagaman, Benjamin, Bronte. 
Davis. William. Nelson. 
Lawrence. Jacob, Trafalgar. 
Hunter, John, Esquesing. 
JIcNaughton, John, do. 
Menzies, James, do. 
Hall, Robert S., Hornby. 
Crawford, John C., Trafalgar. 
Grant, Alexander, Acton. 
Stewart, John, Esquesing. 
White, James, Trafalgar. 
Stewart, Duncan, Efequesing. 
Williams, Charles, Glen William 
McPherson, Allan, Esquesing. 
McXaughton, Alex., Nassagaweya. 
Eastbrook. Thomas, do. 

McNair, James, do. 

M alters, James, do. 

Campbell, Archibald, do. 
Fletcher, Joseph, ^ do. 

Freeman, Joshua, Kelson. 
Simmerman, Henry P., do. 
Spence, William, do. 

Miller, Robert, do. 

McLeod, Daniel, do. 

Douglas, Thomas, do. 

Buntin, William, do. 

Ghent, George, do. 

Brown, Alexander, Esquesing. 
Center, Socrates, do. 

Hall, Asa, Trafalgar. 
Kennedy, George, Georgetown. 
Bessey John, Trafalgar. _ 
Freeman John, Esquesing 

McDonald, Lachlin, do. 

Adams, Rufus, do. 

Day foot Philo, do. 

Clay, William, do. 

Joyce, William, do. 

Bell, Nathaniel, Nelson. 

Smith, Hiram, Wellington Square. 

Thomas Edward, Trafalgar. 

Robinson, William, do. 

Beatty, William, do. 

McKindsay, Geo. C. do. 

Gillis John, Nassagaweya. 

Panton, William, Nelson. 

Hill, Robert, Trafalgar. 

Fraser James, Esquesing. 

Young, James, Georgetown. 

Switzer, Harvey M., Palermo. 

Chisholm, A. M., Wellington Square. 

Youart John, Nassagaweya. 

Kiuney, John, Lowville. 

Smith, Robert, Oakville. 

Thompson, George, Esquesing. 

Hutcheon. William, Nassagaweya. 

Feathurstim. Joseph, Nelson. 

Pettit, William G.. Oakville. 

Bowes, Thomas. Milton. 

Lucas, John, Merton. 

Calvert, George, Nassagaweya. 

LaiOlaw, Walter, Milton. 



axton, William, Esquesing. 

lamburg, Francis, Milton. 

iaxter, Thomas, Wellington Square. 

Vilson, John, Oakville. 

)uff, David, do. 

lason, Hugh, Hornby, 
llarlatt, Samuel, Trafalgar. 
Jowin, Richard, Hornby. 
McGregor, John, Lowville. 

^ummings, T. G., Wellington Square. 
Mclntosh, John, Norval. 
Arnot, James, Oakville. 
McTavish, Duncan, Ballinafad. 

>oss, David, Esquesing. 

Cameron, James, Acton. 

ient, Francis, Norval. 

Elliot, Thomas. Nassagaweya. 

Jigger, John L., Traialgar. 
Switzer, Samuel, Norval. 

iriffin, John, do. 

Cracey Richard, Esquesing. 

Douglas, Robert, Merton. 
McKinnon, John, Norval. 



9. Hastings. 

Acres 847,800. 

Population in 1851 31,977. (Probably 

now 37,000.) 

Assessed Value in 1S55, 1,652,885. 
Liabilities 7501 7s. Id. 
Amount Debent. issued, 7,301 7s. Id. 

Omnty Officials. 

Warden George Benjamin, Belleville. 

Treasurer F. McAnnany, Belleville. 

Registrar W. H. Ponton, Belleville. 

Clerk Thomas Wills, Belleville. 

Solicitors Ross & Bell, Belleville. _ 

Surveyor James Jamieson, Belleville. 

Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar 
ter Sessions William H. Smart, 
Belleville. 

Sheriff J. W. Hoodie, Dunbar. 

Clerk of Peace J. O Hare, Belleville. 

Clerk of Co. Court and Deputy Clerk of 
Crown A. G. Northrup, Belleville. 

Judge Surrogate John B. Crowe, 
Frankford. 

Registrar Surrogate William Bowen, 
Frankford. 

Olerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. Arch. Ponton, Belleville. 

Division II. Ketcheson, Sidney. 

Division III. H. Holden, Tyendinaga. 

Division IV. Rob. McCammon, Hun 
gerford. 

Division V. William Judd, Stirling. 

Division VI. Cyrus Riggs, Hastings. 

Division VII. James J. Ryan, Moira. 

Division VIII. S. M. Washburn, Can- 
niffville. 

Division IX. H. Bleecher, Trenton. 

County Town BELLEVILLE. 

Chief Magistrate J.O Hare, Belleville. 
Clerk R. Maitland Roy, Belleville. 
Population About 6,000. 
Assessed Value in 1855 35,600. 
Taxes per annual Value 2s. 6d. 

Municipalities. 

Townships. Elzevir, Grimsthrope, 
Hungerford, Huntingdon, Lake, 
Madoc, Marmora, Kawdon, Sidney, 
Thurlow, Tudor, Tyendinaga; Town 
of Belleville and Village of Trenton. 

Jf-iyislrates. 

Smart, William, Belleville. 
Turnbull, John, do. 
KetchfSon, William, Sidnoy. 
Boweii. William, Belleville. 
Ridley, George N., do. 
Portt, John, Tyendinaga. 
Fidlar, Edward, Rawdon. 



[141] 



Ketcheson, Elijah, Sidney. 
Appleby, Thomas D., Tyendinaga. 
Johns, Solomon, Marmora. 
Bleeker, George, Belleville. 
Purdy, Ruliff, Sidney. 
McCarmon, Robert, Hungerford. 
Davis, James. Tyendinaga. 
Hagerman, Henry, Sidney. 
Hutton, William, Sidney. 
Davy. Benjamin F., Belleville. 
Holden Rufus, do. 

Gilbert John, Sidney. 

Turner, Gideon, do. 

Lockwood, Joseph N., do. 
Gilbert, Caleb, do. 

Fairman, William, Thurlow. 
Canniff, Joseph, do. 
Robinson, Samuel W., do. 
Chard, W., Rawdon. 
O Hara, James, Madoc. 
Neal Michael, Tyendinaga. 
Herchmer, Charles L. Belleville. 
White, Patrick, Sidney. 
Durken, Owen, Hungerford. 
Seymour, Uriah, Madoc. 
Campion, William, Marmora. 
Ostrom, Simeon, Sidney. 
Purdy, John, do. 

Huffman, John S., do. 
Gilbert, Stephen G., do. 
Bonnisteel, Charles, do. 
Jones, David, do. 

Clapp, David, Thurlow. 
Jamieson James, do. 
McKinn, Thomas, do. 
Taylor, George, do. 
Chisholm, Qolin, do. 
Hicks, Philip D., do. 
Whitetbrd, James, Belleville. 
Benjamin, George, do. 
McAnnanny, Francis, do. * 
Holden, Erastus, do. 
Flint, Billa, Jun. do. 
Lazier, Richard, Tyendinaga. 
McFarlane, John do. 
Mordan, James C., do. 
Blair, Hugh, Madoc. 
I arker, Robert, Rawdon. 
Hubbell. John, do. 
Lake, Nicholas, do. 
Maybee, Emanuel, do. 
Hilton, William, do. 
Reid, Nesbit, Huntingdon. 
Luke, Philip, do. 

Ketcheson, Owen, do. 
Archibald, James, dv. 
Downing, William, Hungerford. 
Hart, George, do. 

Broadwlth, Isaac, Marmora. 
Hope, William, Belleville. 
Reynolds, Nelson G., do. 
Donahue, John, do. 

Yeomans, Osa, do. 

Holton, Ezra Williams, do. 
Robertson, Peter, do. 

Bonter, Jacob, do. 

Connor, William, do. 

McGinnis, Hugh, do. 

Hunt, Burleigh, do. 

McCurdy, Jonathan, do. 
Smith, AVIiert L., do. 

Ponton, William II., do. 
Stevens, Samud, do. 

Monro, Royal, do. 

Fairfield, John K., Thurlow. 
Farlay, James J., do. 

Phillips. George, do. 

Sills, William, do. 

Ponton, James, do. 

McTaggart, James, do. 
Ross, Archibald, do. 

Huffman, William, do. 
Casey, Samuel T., do. 

Koss, Leonard, do. 

Clapp, Dorland, do. 

Beuiuger, John, do. 

Campbell, William, do. 
Leavins, Hector, do. 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



[1856. 



Bird, Robert, Sidney. 

Farlav, Thomas D., do. 
Fralick, Thomas T., do. 
Meyers, Tobias J. W., do. 
McMullen, Alexander, do. 
Merritt, Joseph, do. 

Roblin, Marshall B., do. 
Lord, John, do. 

Wright, Anson, do. 

Davis, Richard, do. 

llogle, Stephen II., do. 
Roblin, David, do. 

Zwick, George T., do. 

Vandervoort, David, do. 
Holdeu, Hiram, Tyendinaga. 
Allison. Benju. J., do. 
Emmons, William, do. 
Lally, John, do. 

Hart, Orlean, do. 

Morden, Joseph W., do. 
Hanley, John, do. 

Egan, John, do. 

Allen, James, Ilangerford. 
Caton, William, do. 

Roblin, Joy, do. 

Larkin, Paul, do. 

Howell, David S., do. 
Whitaker. Josiah W., do. 
Holgate, Thomas, Huntingdon. 
Clarke, Timothy do. 

Struter, Merritt, do. 

Ketcheson Aaron, do. 
Fuller, Beujamin R., do. 
Woodward, Daniel, do. 
McTaggart, Allan, do. 
Roes, Daniel, do. 

Pringle, Ard, do. 

llaggarty, James, do. 

Leggitt, Joseph, Marmora. 
Crawford, Hugh, do. 
Hughes, t,aughlin, do. 
Stewart John, Rawdon. 

Smith, Henry, do. 

Bush, Joseph R., do. 
Sine, William, do. 

Cummings. Jedediah, do. 
Vankleek, Barnabas, Madoc. 
Olmsted. George A., do. 
Allen William, do. 

10. Huron and Bnice. 

Acres, Huron 892,709 \ H ,07 r.vt 

,, T. CO! "PI I -l^y ,OOO. 

" Bruce 634, < t>4 j 
Population in 185222,045. 
Assessed Value in 1854 1,463,778. 
Liabilities 82.515. 
Amount Debent. issued 81,950. 

County Officials. 

Warden John Holmes. Ilolmesville. 
Treasurer George Brown, Goderich. 
Registrar John Gait, Goderich. 
Clerk David Hood Ritchie, Goderich 

or Bayfield. 

Solicitor John Stracnan, Goderich. 
Surveyor William Perceval, Goderi -h. 
Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar- , 

ter Sessions \ acant. 
Sheriff John McDonald. Goderich. 
Clerk of Peace Dan. Llziurs, Goderich. 
Clerk of Co. Court and Deputy Clerk 

of Crown Hugh Johnson, Goderich. 
Judge Surrogote Vacant. 
Registrar Surrogates-Hugh Johnson, 

Goderich. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 
Division I. W. A. Williams. Goderich. 
Division II. L. Meyers, Harpurhay. 
Division III. C. Barker, Kincardine. 
Division IV. T. Carter, McGillivray. 
Division V. Tin .mas Trivitt. Devon. 
Divi.-i .n VI. John Clark. Wawanosh. 
Division VII. D. II. Ritchie, Bayfield. 

County Twin GODERICH. 

Chief Magistrate -Robert Gibbons. 
Clerk Thomas Kydd. 



Assessed Value in 1854 151,165. 
Taxes per Annual Value 3s. 

Municipalities. 

Townships in Huron Ashfield. Bid- 

dulph, Colborne, Goderich, Grey, 
Howich, Hay, Ilullett, Morris, Me 
Gillivray, McKillop, Stanley, Ste 
phen, Tuckersmith, Turnberry, Us- 
borne, Wawanosh; and Town of 
Goderich. 

Townships in Bruce Arran, Brant, 
Bruce, Carrick, Culross, Elderslle, 
Greenock, Huron, Kincardine, Kin- 
loss, Saugeen. 

Magistrates. 
Scott, John. 

Bell, Robert, Tuckersmith. 
Brown, George, God-rioh. 
Chalk, William, Tuckersmith. 
Holmes, John, Godiiich. 
Longworth, John, do. 
Murray, James, Hay. 
Meyer, Ludwig, McKillop. 
Piper, William, Gjderieh Mills. 
Ritchie, David H., do. 
Scott, James, Usborne. 
Thompson. George, Ilullett. 
Clark. David, Col borne. 
Van Egmond, C. L., Hullett. 
Watson. James, Goderich. 
Jones. Thomas M., do. 
Broadfoot, Alexander, Tuckersmith. 
Gordon, James, do. 

Creswtll, James, do. 

Mclntosh, John, do. 

(jlirvin, Charles. Wawanosh. 
Lamb, Thomas, Usborne. 
Bryden, James, McKillop. 
Murray, James, Jr., Usborne. 
Scott, Robert, Sen., McKillop. 
Elliott, George, Goderich. 

O Connor, Hamilton B., do. 
Parsons, Benjamin, do. 

Gibbons, Robert, do. 

McMahon, James, do. 

Seegmiller, Jacob, do. 

Herr, Joseph, do. 

Shoff, Daniel, Biddulph. 
Willis, Castor, Hay. 
Grant, Peter, Stanley. 
Calloway, Joshua, do. 
Wilkie, James, Hay. 
Brace, Harvey, Colborne. 
Arnaud, John, Jr., do. 
Barber, James, McGillivray. 
Downey, Dennis, McKillop. 
Monteith, Andrew, Colborne. 
Dickson, James, Tucktrsmith. 



11. Kent. 

Acres 488,284. 

Population in 185117. 

Assessed Value in 1855 1,120,145. 

Liabilities 7,400. 

Amount of Debentures issued 7,400. 

County Officials. 

Warden James Smith, Dawn Mills. 

Treasurer A. Charteri*. Chatham. 

Ue.L-istrar Alex. Kuapp, Chatham. 

(, krk William Cosgrave. Chatham. 

.lu<l- o Co. Court and Chairman Quar 
ter Sessions W. B. Wells. Chatham. 

Sheriff John Mercer. Chatham. 

Clerk of Peace G. Duck, Jr. Chatham. 

Cierk of County Court and Deputy 
( lerk of Crown Thomas A. Ireland, 
Chatham. 

Judge Surrogate William B. Wells. 
rar Surrogate George Williams. 



Division IV. George Young, Harwich. 

Dhi>iou V. James Little, Deal Town. 
Division VI. R. Mitchell, Dover. 

County Town CHATHAM. 

Mayor Alex. D. McLean. 
Clerk Duncan McCcll. 
Population About 4.000. 
Assessed Value in 1855 335.500. 
Taxes per Annual Value 2s. Id. 

Municipal Hit .s 

Townships. Camden. Chatham. Dover 
East, Dover West. Harwich. Howard, 
Orford, Raleigh, Romney, Tilbury 
East, Zone; and Town of Chatham. 

Magistrates. 

Wells, William B., Chatham. 

McCrae, Thomas, do. 

Duck, George, Morpeth. 

McKellar, Archibald. Chatham. 

Dillon, Timothy, Raleigh. 

Mclntyre, Thomas. HarwMi. 

Mitchell, Robert, Dover East. 

Ingalls, Otis, CannUu. 

Shaw, James G., do. 

Smith, James, do. (Gore.) 

Smith, Thomas W., Dun r. 

Robertson. Alex. 11., Chatham (Town.) 

Burns, James, do. 

Baby, William L., Harwich. 

Delmege, John F., do. 

Young, George, do. 

Patterson, Walter, Howard. 

Decow, William, do. 

Unsworth. John, do. 

Ridley, Edward, Orford. 

Ronalds, Henry. Raleuh. 

Keating, John W., Chatham (Town.) 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



do. Township. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Clerks of Division Courts. 
Division T.T.Glpndenning, Chatham. 
Divi.-ion II. G. Duck, Morpeth. 
Division III. D. Wallace, Dawn Mills. , Jacob, John, Dover. 



Dolsen, John L., do. 

Vosburg, John S., do. 

Holmes, Abraham S., o o. 

Sal ter, Albert P., do. 

Everitt, William A., 

Arnold, Samuel, 

Fisher, John, 

McLean, William, 

Knapp, Solomon M., 

AVilliams, John B., 

McVicar, Duncan. 

Ridley, Henry, Harw ch. 

Moorehouse. Daniel, Orford. 

Lattimer, William, Howard. 

Richardson, Joseph, do. 

Rushton, Riobard, do. 

White, Stephen, Harwich. 

Jei>ner, Thomas, do. 

Handy, Eben M., do. 

Smith, Thomas, do. 

Dolsen, John M., do. 

Kinney, Stephen, do. 

Smith," David B., /one. 

Stephenson, Richard, do. 

Sherman, David, Camden. 

Merrill, J. P. Platt, do. 
j Chambers, William, do. 
I Pardo, Thomas, Ralci,:h. 

Smith, Joseph, do. 

Drake, Francis, do. 

Smith, Robert, do. 

Simpson, Peter, Tilbury Last. 

McGregor, Alexander, do. 

Smith, John, Chatham. 

King, Gilnian. llowaid. 
j Hughson, Nathaniel, Harwi.- i. 

Mills, Joseph, Camden. 

!ordon William, Dover. 

M c.Michael, John, Harwich. 

Sbackleton, William, do. 
1 Jackson, Thomas, Koin . i 

lienwick, Thomas, do. 
! Thomas, George, Chatham. 

f harteris, Alexander, <lo. 

Mlh-rts, Ji do. 



[142] 



1856.] 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



Andrews, Phillip, Raleigh. 
Waddell, John, Chatham. 
Northwood, Joseph, do. 



13. Lambton. 

Acres 699,826. 

Population in 185210,811. 

Assessed Value in 1S55 789,, 28. 

Liabilities 4,000. 

Amount of Debentures issued none. 

County Officials. 

Warden Alfred P. Toulmin, Sombra. 
Treasurer Alexander Vidal, Port 

Sarnia. 

Registrar Henry Glass, Port Sarnia. 
Clerk Alexander Scott, Port Sarnia. 
Surveyor K. K. Jones, Port Sarnia. 
Jud"e Co. Court and Chairman Quar 

ter Sessions, Charles Kobinson, Port 

Sarnia. 

Sheriff James Flintoft, Port Sarnia. 
Clerk of Peace P. T. Poussett, Port 

Saruia. 
Clerk of County Court and Deputy 

Clerk of Crown J. ll.Gemmill, Port 

Sarnia. 
Judge Surrogate Charles Robinson, 

Port Sarnia. 

Registrar Surrogate J. R, Gemmill, 
Port Sarnia. 

Clerks of Division (burls. 
Division I. T. Forsyth, Port Sarnia. 
Division II. J. F. Elliott, Warwick. 
Division III. G. M. Webster. Dresden. 
Division IV. T. Carolan, Wallaceburg. 
(jaunty T<iwn PORT SAKXIA. 
( Not incorporated.) 



Trip, Jonathan, Bosanquet. 

Kennedy, Allen, do. 

Crawford, Simeon, do. 

Stone. Charles, do. 

Watson, William, Brooke. 
McGregor, Archibald, do. 

Boylan, William, Dawn, 

Gibson, James. do. 

Scarlett, Charles. do. 

Walker, William, do. 

Procter, John, do. 
Housten. William, Enniskillen. 

Oliver, William, do. 

Francher, John, Euphemia. 
Moorehouse. William, do. 

Dobbyn, Richard do. 

Clemmern, William, do. 

Webster, William, do. 

Kirby, Edwin, do. 

Toulmiu, Alfred P., Sombra. 

Johnson, James, do. 

Palmer, John, do. 

Ramsay, George, do. 

Smith, Calvin, do. 

Meyer, Daniel, do. 

McDonald, Daniel, do. 
Featherstone, William, Moore. 

Galoway, John, do. 

Jackson, John, do. 

Vidal, Alexander T., do. 

Johnston, George B. do. 

Gibb. Robert, do. 

Wight, George, do. 

Kiuney, Georgo, do. 



Township? Bosanquet. Brooke. Dawn, 
Enniskillen, Euphemia, Moore, 
Plympton, Sarnia, Sombra, War 
wick. 

Magistrates. 

Robinson, Charles, Port Sarnia. 
Wright, William B., Moore. 
Durand, George, Sarnia. 
Hyde, George, Plympton. 
Talfourd, Froome, Moore. 
Biddle, Joseph, do. 

Baby, James, do. 

Duncan, Charles, do. 
Hill, Thomas L. Plympton. 
Dunlop, James, do. 

Watson, Wellington, do. 
Eastman, Mai, Bosanquet. 
Vidal, (Jr.) Alexander, Port Saruia. 
Porter, James, do. 

McDonald, Duncan, Sombra. 
Merritt, Peter W., do. 

Eccles, John D., Warwick. 

narrower, George, do. 

Alison, Harry, do. 

Hill, Robert, do. 

Glass. Henry, Sarnia. 

Fraithorn. Robert, do. 

McGregor, Alexander, do. 

Vidal, Alexander, do. 

McCall, David, do. 

Copeland, James, do. 

Skelbeek, Robert, do. 

Watson, Ebenezer, do. 

Fisher, Alfred, do. 

Fisher, John. Plympton. 

Crooke. Thomas L., do. 

Hill, Samuel C., do. 

Dewar, Alexander, do. 

Casey, John. do. 

Symington, William, do. 

Carroll, Hamilton M., Warwick. 

McAljiine, William. do. 

Hay, Alexander, do. 

Ilalno, Robert, do. 



13. Lanark ami Renfrew. 

Acres Lanark, 365537; Renfrew 

172.0-49; Total 537,586. 
opulation Lanark, 27,352 ; Renfrew 

about 12,000. 

Assessed Value, 1855, 935,985 9s. 9d. 
Liabilities 20,000 Sterling. 
Amount of Debent. issued 20,000 
Sterling. 

Ommty Officials. 

Warden R.JE.Matheson, Perth. 
Treasurer W. H. Radenherst, Perth. 
Registrar James Bell, Perth. 
Clerk Wm. N. F. Berford, Perth. 
Surveyor W. R. F. Berford, Perth. 
Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar 

ter Sessions J . G. Malloch, Perth. 
Sheriff James Thompson, Perth, 
lerk of Peace Wm. R. F. Berford 

J erth. 
Clerk of County Court and Deputy 

Clerk of Crown C. H. Sache, Perth 
Judge Surrogate D. McMartin, Perth 
Registrar Surrogate C. II. Sache 

Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division T. Charles H. Sache, Perth. 
Division If. W. Robertson, Lanark. 
Division III. J. C. Poole, Carleton 

Place. 
Division IV. Robinson Harper, 

Smith s Falls. 

Division V. W. Taylor, Pakenham. 
Division VI. George Ross, Renfrew 
Division VII D. Ferguson, Bromley. 
Division VIII. A. Irving, Pembroke 

County TOUTO PERTH. 

Chief Magistrate James S. Nichol 

Mai-or. Perth. 

Clerk Thomas Brookes, Perth. 
Population 2,300. 

(1 Value in 1855, 84,600. 
Taxes par Annual Value 3s. 

Municipalities 

Townships inLanark Bathurst, Beck 

willi. liurgess North, Dalhousie 

Dariiug, Drummond, Elmsley North 



Lanark, Lavant, Montague, Packen- 
ham, Ramsey, Sherbrooke North, 
Sherbrooke South; the Town of 
Perth and Village of Smith s Falls, 
ownships in Renfrew Admaston. 
Ba"ot, Blythefield. Bromley, Broug 
ham, Grattan, H -rton, McNabb, 
Pembroke, Ross, Stafford, West- 
meath, Wilberforce. 

ifagistratet. 

lalloch, John G., Perth. 
Leslie, Anthony, do. 
raser, Donald, Lanark, 
jeach, Matthew, do. 
"ennant, George, do. 
Idams, Joshua, Bathursl. 
Jrooke, William, Buruvss. 
5haw, James, Elmsley. 
impson, William, do. 
losamond. James, Beckwith. 
IcGregor, Peter, do. 
Bell, Robert, Carleton Place. 
IcDonell, Alexander, Macnab. 
Smith, John, Lanark. 
Vallare, William. Ramsay. 
tfcCaffry, Thomas, Drummond. 
Jampbell, Patrick. Bathurst. 
Airth, Henry, Horton. 
Dickson. Hugh, PakenhKm. 
Ulan, William, Drummond. 
Bennett, Richard, Bathurst. 
I layfair, Andrew W., do. 
iVizelle, Sutton, Drummoud. 
lalladay, John, Burgess. 
James, William, Lanark. 
Jones, William, Montague. 
iavis, Robert, Beckwith. 
UcLaren, Colin, do. 

AlcLaren, Alexander, do. 
Houston, William, Ramsay. 
Moffatt, Alexander, Westmeath. 
Richards, William, Drummond. 
Jackson, James, do., llth con. 

Ay ton, Hophney, do. 
Halfpenny, William, Lanark. 
Robertson, John, Darling. 
Couboy, John, Beckwith. 
Knapp, Reuben A., Montague. 
Shields, James, do. 

Harper, Robinson, Smith s Falls. 
Gillhully, James, Montague. 
Bell, James, Perth. 
Grant, John P., do. 
Doran, John, do. 
Mair, James, do. 
Tempi eton, James, Drummond. 
Mansfield, Thomas. do. 

Ferguson, Alexander, do. 
Ferguson, Henry, do. 

Robertson, Hugh, do. 

McDonald, Hem y, do. 

Dowdall Patrick, do. 

Richey, Josias, Bathurst, 
Lees, William, do. 

Kitchie, John, do. 

Motherwell, John, do. 
Adams, John W., do. 

Noonan, James, do. 

Lake, Henry, Klmsley. 
Nichol. Thomas, do. 
Ward, Abel 1!., do. 

Wilson, John, Burgess. 
Allan, John, dp. 

Byrnes, Patrick, do. 

Purdon. William, Dalhousie. 
]!lair George, d<>. 

McCrea, Edward, Jr., Montague. 
Shields, Peter, do. 

McCrea, James N., do. 

Bi.-si-ll. Alpheus, do. 

Kelly, Michael, do. 

Foster, John, do. 

Andrews, Rufus, do. 

Dorland Edward, Beckwitb. 
Scott. William, Ln;i:n-k. 
Uoln-rtson, Robert, do. 
Anderson, Jean W., do. 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



[1856. 



Smith, James, North Sherbrooke. 
Wilson, David, do. 

Smith, Robert, do. 

Adams, Aloah, South Sherbrooke. 
Campl)ell, David, Kamsay. 
Robertson, John, do. 

Toshack. Givville, do. 

Coleman, Smith, do. 

Lowland, John. do. 

Murphy, Michael, Innisville. 
Blair, George. Darling. 
Murphy, John, do. 
McArthur. Arthur, Pakenham, 
Russell, Andre", do. 

Boyce, Charles. do. 

Brown, Hubert. do. 

Patterson, Archibald, Admaston. 
iloore. Kli.is. do. 

German, Thomas, do. 

Hose. K;-.ra. Bagot. 

Fraser, Alexander, do. 
McCrea. Gerrard, do. 
Ferguson. Duncan, Bromley, 
Fitzpatrick, Henry, do. 
Murphy, Johu, do. 

Paris. John, McXab. 

Morris, James. Jr., do. 
Rochester. (ie:rge, do. 
Brown, David T., do. 

White, Peter. Pembroke. 
Moffatt, William, do. 
Fraser, Hu-ih, do. 

Olmstead, Ephraim, Ross. 
Grant, James, do. 

McLaren, John, Portage du Fort. 
Shaw, John, Unsurveyed Lands. 
King, John Wilberforce. 
Bellows. Calb S., Westineath. 
Chamberlain. Hiram, do. 
Hamilton, Hugh do. 

Mclntyiv. i;oln-rt, Renfrew Village. 
Brady Thomas, Mount St. Patrick. 
Nichol, James S., Perth, 
Hall, Frauds G., do. 

Allan, James, do. 

McDougall, Archibald, Smith s Falls. 
Beckwith, J. T., do. 

Deacon, John, South Sherbrooke. 
Stevenson, John, Lanark, llth con. 
Hall, John, do. 

Tennant, Thomas, do. 
Ste-venson Alexander, Bellamy s Mills. 
Gilbraith, David, Ramsay. 
Smith, Robert, Bromley. 
Bell, John, Bembrooke. 
Supple, John, do. 
Young, James, Bathurst. 
Shaw, John, Ramsay. 
Burrows, James, Franktown. 
Maitland, James, Montague. 
Bates, Joshua, do. 

Wylie, James II., Ramsay. 
Duncan. James, Beckwith. 
Morris, William. McXab. 
Vandusen, Charles, Montague. 
Giff, Thomas, do. 

Merrick, Simon D., do. 

Mcl bail, Archibald, do. 

Stewart, John, do. 

Maitland, Peter, do. 

Hickey, Michael J., Egauville. 
McDou _ralI. John Lorn. 
Clark. Peter. Montague. 
Woods. David, do. 

Chambers. Gabriel, do. 
Andrews. Silas, do. 

14:. Leerts and Greiiville. 

A.ow-730,825. 

Population in 185260 

Assessed Value in 1V>:> 1.7Sfi,869. 
Liabilities, exclusive of Debentures, 

2204. 13s. 
Amount of Debent. issued 14.175. 

.Warden Kleazir 11. Whitrnarsh, Mer- 
rickville. 



Treasurer J. L. Schofleld, Brockville. 

Registrar for Leeds David Jones, 
Brockville. 

Registrar for Grenville John Patton, 
Prescott. 

Clerk James Jessup. Brockville. 

Surveyor for Leeds Edward Robert 
son, Brockville. 

Surveyor for Grenville Michael Kelly 
Merrickville. 

Judge County Court and Chairman 
Quarter Sessions George Malloch, 
Brockville. 

Sheriff Adiel Sherwood, Brockville. 

Clerk of Peace J. Jessup Brockville. 

Clerk of County Court and Deputy 
Clerk of Crown Thomas D. Camp 
bell, Brockville. 

Judge Surrogate George Malloch, 
Brockville. 

Registrar Surrogate James Jessup, 
Brockville. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 
Division I. John B. Jones, Brockville. 
Division IT. V. Knapp, Prescott. 
Division III. Joseph McKelvey, Gar 

nanoque. 

Division IV. R. Leslie, Kemptville. 
Division V. M. Kelly, Merrickville. 
Division VI. John Warren. Beverly. 
Division VII. H. McCrea, Frankville. 
Division VIII. James B. Stevens, 

Newborough. 

Division IX. W. King, Farmersville. 
Division X. Thomas Robertson, Spen- 

cerville. 

Division XI. W. Lyman, N. Augusta. 
i Division XII. Alfred A. Munro, Mal- 

lorytovm. 

County Town BROCKVILLE, 

Mayor John Crawford. 
j Clerk George S. Maclean. 
Population About 4,500. 
Assessed value in 1855 225,824. 

Municifialities. 

Townships in Leeds B*stard. Crosby 
North, Crosby South, Elizabeth- 
town, Elmsly, Escott, Kitley, Lands- 
town, Leeds, South Burgess, Yonge ; 
and Town of Brockville. 

Townships in Grenville Augusta, 
Edwardsbur - h, Gower South, Ox 
ford, Wolford ; and Town of Pres 
cott. 



Malloch, George, Brockville. 
Bottom. William. 11., Oxford. 
Hurd, Truman, do. 

Weatherhead, John, Brockville. 
McLean, Archibald, Yonge. 
Jones, Dunham, Augusta. 
Brown, William, Wolford. 
Church, Basil R., do. 
Mcllmoyle, James, Edwardsburgh. 
Schofield, Peter, Eastard. 
Leggatt, John, North Crosby. 
Powell, Robert, Eliza! >eth town. 
Glasford, Paul, do. 

Reade, John L., Wolford. 
Jessup, Hamilton D., Augusta. 
Bradtield, Henry, Elizaliethtown. 
.v-h .iield, James L., Brockville. 
Horton, Nicholas, Eli/.abethtown. 
Sheffield, Thomas, Jr., Cn.sby. 
Kilburn, John, do., or Wexford. 

Shaw, James, South Crosby. 
Johnston, Richard, Landsdown. 
Gofl. Joseph. Elizabetliti.wn. 
Brisee, Nicholas, Bastard. 
McCrea, Alexander. Wolford. 
Mrl argn, Milo, South Gou 
Reynolds, Samuel, Brockville. 
Dunham, Ephraim, do. 
Pennock, Philemon, Augu 

[144] 



McCargar, Thomas. Oxford. 
Blakely. John, Bastard. 
Tett, Benjamin, Cros!>\. 
McDonald, William S.. Gananoque. 
McLean, John, Elizabethtown. 
Buell, William, Bvockville. 
Booth, John G.. Klizabethtown. 
Bates, Joshua, Yonge. 
Willse, Joseph, do. 
Merrick, Aaron, Wolford. 
Gainfort, Thomas, Prescott. 
Howard, Matthew M., Elizabethtown. 
Lee, Palmer, Yonge. 
Crow, John, Edwardsburg. 
Booth, John, Yonge. 
Purvis, Thomas, do. 
McSweeny, Peter. South Gower. 
Brooker, James, Yonge. 
Dougherty, George. Oxford. 
t;ar\ey, William. Maitland. 
Chamberlain. \Vyatt, Kitley. 
Holmes, Kichard, do. 

Adams, Peter, Edwardsburg. 
Bellamy, Samuel J.. Augusta. 
Simpson, William. Klmsley, South. 
.McCrea. Walter. Wolford. 
Riddle, William, Elmsley. South. 
Merrick, Stephen II.. Wolford. 
Green, Win., Laiul-drtwn. or Yonge. 
Delong, Jesse, South Crosby. 
Howard, William M., Landsdown. 
Fox, Arthur, Yonge. 
Ketchum, John, Elizabethtown. 
Landon, Elisha. Ehnsley. 
Uoldon, John, I rescott. 
Adams, Joshua. South Gower. 
Arnold. George W.. 1 rm-kville. 
Blanchard, Hiram W.. l.li/.abethtown 
Bolton, Richard, Wolford. 
Bryan, William, do. 
Burritt, Edmund, do. 
Campbell, William, Oxford. 
(. arson. Andrew, do. 
Cook, Roswell, Edwnrdsburg. 
Coller, Elisha, Woliord. 
Craig, John, Oxford 
Davis. Peter, Elixal ethtown. 
Earl, William, Lan rsdown. 
I Mgar. James. Kitley. 
Ferguson, Kobert. KilJc-y. 
Griffin, Asa II., Wolford. 
Green, Edward, Leeds. 
Headlem. Robert. Augusta. 
IIJL L ins, James. I lv-rctt. 
Hill. Thomas. Eli/.abethtown. 
Halliday, Noah, North Crosby. 
Hooker, Alfred, Augusta. 
Johnston, John, Escott. 
Keeler, James, Edwardgbnrg. 
Kernehan, Robert. uxt"rd. 
Landon. Ileman, Elizabethtown. 
Mair, Thomas, Brockulle. 
Mallory, Ira. Yonge. 
Meneaily. William. Auirusta. 
Muses. William, South Gower. 
Moulton, William, Yonge. 
Oslmrne, Kichard do. 
Parkin, William. BrockvilV. 
I armenter. James W.. < iananoque. 
Peden, Kol>ert, Brock\ il e. 
Pivslon. Richard. Suth Crosby. 
Reid, John, BrocUville. 
linrison. Kobert I>. 
Soper, Septimus. Killey. 
Spencer. John. Elizabethtown. 

. Allan. L 

Thomjison. Jann-s. K.-cott. 
Vaiiston. Tliomas, do. 
Webster. William. Lamilown. 
Wells. Isaac i>r >la. 

Whitmarsh. Elea/.er H.. Wolford. 
Wright, Ji.seph. Aiu:usta. 
Vongi-, Jolm. \ i 

. William. I astard. 
Howard, Kd-;ird, EllsabethtowB. 
llmiirli. John W., il;i. 

Wilt ri nis. Liberty, do. 
Earl, Keuben, do. 



1856.] 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



5T 



Bell, Thomas. Elizal:ethtown. 

Landon, William, do. 

Stoue.l. Oliver 0., do. 

Man-ial. Ira. do. 

Breakeuridge. James, do. 
Chambers. James A., do. 
King. Smith. do. 

Dowling. William, do. 

Alguiiv. Harmonious, Yonge. 
WiiiLT- Phillip, do. 

Giles. William II., do. 

Gardiner, Charles, do. 

Parish, Arza, do. 

Pu rv is. John, do. 

Kennedy. William, do. 

McNisb, George. do. 

McDonald. Daniel, Escott. 
Moore, Thomas, Kitley. 

WillUms. Horatio, do. 

Marshall. Abial. do. 

Leahey, Gideon, do. 

O Connor, Patrick, do. 

Smith, William, do. 

Scovil, George C., do. 

Tracy, Thomas, do. 

McCarthy. Florence, do. 
Hicock, Philo, do. 

Chamberlain, Asher A., do. 
Roe, Oliver, do. 

Scovil, Samuel S., do. 

Y<-ir_iv, Miles, Bastard, 
Elliott, Alexander, do. 
Britton, D F. Leeds Landsdown, front 
Richmond. Thomas, do. 

Darling. Thomas, do. 

Webster. Robert, do. 

McKelvey. George, do. 

Landon, Simcoe, do. 

Nuttle, Joiiu. do. 

Landoii, William, do. 

Howard, Alpheus R., do. rear. 

Cameron, Alexander, do. 

Sliter, Washington L., do. 
Strut hers, Calvin, do. 

Washburn, Seneca, do. 

O Connor, Daniel, do. 

Honnigan, James, Elmsley. 
Riddle, John, do. 

Moorhouse, John, do. 
Ward, Abel B., do. 

Kennedy, James, South Crosby. 
Wing, Gushorn, do. 

Ripley, Thomas, do. 

Fredinburg. William II., do. 
Kwinjr. Peter, do. 

Tazgart, Alba, do. 

Patton, John, Augusta. 

Howard, James. do. 

Pennook, William, do. 

Read, Moses. do. 

Alder, Robert, do. 

Patrick, William, do. 

Free], Thomas. do. 

Peck, Chaunry II., do. 

McMahon, William. do. 
Dickenson. Walter D., do. 
McLean. Hornet-, do. 

Mclntoth, Matthew, do. 
Moran, Peter. do. 

Stevenson, Isaiah, do. 

ireeland. Ilenry, do. 

Wood, William S., do. 

Spencer, David, Edwardsburg. 
Adams, Aliel II., do. 

Hunter, Allen, do. 

Snail. William, do. 

Akin, William S., do. 

Imrie, Wiiliam B., do. 

Wharton, Nathan, do. 

Bower, Joseph, Oxford. 

Bishop, Ira, do. 

Gibson. Joseph C., do. 
Bel!, Robert, dn. 

O Neill. Peter, do. 

Holmes, lii do. 

in, Daniel, do. 

Tait, Alfred, do. 

Collins. Dennis, do. 



Kelly, Michael, Wolford. 
Fortune, William, do. 
Holden. Charles, do. 

Davis, John C., do. 

McCrea, Colonel, do. 

Brown, Reuben, do. 

Brundige, Abraham, do. 
Buchannan, William, South Gower. 
Byce, John, do. 

Adams. William, do. 

McCargar, Alexander, do. 
Schaik, David, do. 

Denant, Walter II., Bastard. 
Seaman, Stephen, do. 
Soper, S. L., Leeds & Landsdown, rear. 
Whalen, Walter, North Crosby. 
Devitt, Thomas, do. 

Wickwire, Philip, Wolford. 
Bates, Ninian, Yonge. 
Murray, Patrick. Elizabethtown. 
Manhard (2nd.) II., do., Lot 9, 6th con. 
McEathron, Stephen, North Crosby. 
Belten, James, do. 

Yates, Philip, Bastard. 
Fairbairn, David, Brockville. 
Row, David, Augusta. 

Pardee, Aaron B., do. 
Bass, Joseph, do. 

Wright, Isaiah, do. 

Lane, Charles, do. 

Bellamy. John B., do. 
Maley, Thomas, Oxford. 
Leeming, Joseph, do. 

Hurd, Tyrus, do. 

Beach, Malhon, do. 

Hutchins, Horace. do. 
Wells, John, Edwardsburg. 
Adams, Levi, do. 

Adams, John, do. 

White, Bartholomew, Prescott. 
Cowan, Joseph, do. 



15. Lincoln and "VVelland. 

Acres 125.250. 

Population 44,000. 

Assessed Value in 1855 3,667,780. 

Liabilities 1,200. 

Amount of Decent, issued 12,000. 

County Officials. 

Warden John Simpson, Niagara. 

Treasurer Daniel McDougal, N iagara. 

Registrar John Powell, Niagara. 

Clerk Joseph A. Woodruff, Niagara. 

Solicitor John M. Lawder, Niag.-ira. 

Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar 
ter Sessions Edward C. Campbell, 
Niagara. 
heriff William Kingsmill, Niagara. 

Clerk of Peace Joseph Woodruff, 
Niagara. 

Clerk of County Court J. Clench, 
Niagara. 

Deputy Clerk of Crown W. D. Miller, 
Niagara. 

Judge Surrogate W. Claus, Niagara. 

Registrar Surrogate Charles B. Hurd, 
Queenston. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. W. B.Winterbottom, Nia 
gara. 

Division II. T. Burns. St. Catherines. 
Division III. A. Morse, Smithville. 
Division IV. Jacob Keefer, Thorold. 
Division V. E. Burton, Chippawa. 
Division VI. J. Stanton, Fort Erie. 

County Town NIAGARA. 

Mayor John Simpson. 
1 lerk Isaac II. Johnson. 
Population 3,280. 

.d Annual value in 1855 
14,425. 
Taxes per Annual Value 2s. 4d. 



[145] 



Municipalities. 

Townships in Lincoln Caistor, Clin 
ton, Gainsborough, Grantham, 
Grimsby, Louth; and Towns of 
Niagara and St. Catherines. 

Townships in Welland Bertie, Crow- 
land, Humberstone, Pelham, Stam 
ford, Thorold, Wainfleet, Willough- 
by; and Villages of Chippewa and 
Thorold. 

Jt&gittratet. 

Campbell, Edward C., Niagara. 
Keefer, Geoi ge, Thorold. 
Cummings, James. Chippawa. 
Merritt., William H., St. Catherines. 
McDougall, Daniel. Niagara. 
Clark, John, Port Dalhousie. 
Ball, John C., Niagara Township. 
Keefer, Jacob, Thorold. 
Rykert, George, St. Catherines. 
I Mittleberger, Ilenry, do. 
Adams, William, Louth. 
Clark, James. W. 0., do. 
MrGlashan, John, Jr., Pelham. 
Adams, Elias S., St. Catherines. 
McFarland, Duncan, Thorold. 
Pawling, Nathan, Grantham. 
Gibson, John, do. 

Ball, William M., Niagara. 
Robinson, William B., St. Catherines. 
Patterson, John J., Clinton. 
McMicking, John, Stamford. 
Tisdale, James, Caistor. 
Graybiel, John, Wainfleet. 
Hellems, John, Crowland. 
Radcliffe, John, Drummondville. 
McLean, John, Clinton. 
Nelles, Warner II.. Jr., Grantham. 
Clement, Peter Ball, Niagara. 
Servos, William Street, do. 
Kirkpatrick, John, Stamford. 
Woolverton, Dennis, Grimsby. 
Kilburn, Rowley, Clinton. 
Nfcles, Peter Ball, Grimsby. 
Street, Thomas C., Niagara Falls, 
Osborne, John B., Beamsville. 
Woodruff, William, St. Davids. 
Misener, Jacob, Wainfiect. 
McFarland, John, Sen., Niagara. 
Kerr, John, Grantham. 
Beamer, Daniel, Louth. 
Ilenry, Robert, Clinton. 
Bridgnmn, John Pettit, Grimsby. 
Kerr, Jacob, Caistor. 
Misener Leonard, Jun., Wainfleet. 
Scholfield, John, Pelham. 
Hobson, Robert, Thorokl. 
Rowe, George, Stamford. 
Dickson, Walter II. Niagara. 
Smith, Ilenry, Grimsby. 
Kennedy, Jacob, Gainsborough. 
I faun, Isaac, Bertie. 
O Reilly. John Brown, Wainfleet. 
Brookfield, Jacob, Cowlaud. 
Wilson, Lewis, Pelham. 
Turney, John, Thorold. 
Lemon, John, Stamford. 
Morse, Abisbah, Grimsby. 
Secord, George, Gainsborough. 
Brown, David P., Crowland. 
Thompson, Archibald, Stamford. 
McMicking, William, Stamford. 
Garner, Jacob, do. 

Ball, John W., Niagara. 
Boomer, Anthony Knox, Grantham. 
Howey, Iliram, Stamford. 
Lowell. William, Stamford. 
Parke, Thomas, Port Colborne. 
Ball, John W., Niagara. 
Benson, James II., St. Catherines. 
Ball, George Peter Mann, Louth. 
Douglas, Alexander, Fort Erie. 
Stanton, James, do. 

Macklem, James. Cliippawa. 
Dittrick, Walter. Grantham. 
Ilnlstt der, Abraham, do. 
Beamer, Philip, Louth. 



58 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



[1856. 



Adams, Elias Smith. St. Catherines. 
Mittleberger, John F., do. 
Chisholm, William Austin, do. 

Marren, Patrick. do. 

Clarke, Richard A., do. 

Phelps, Calvin. do. 

Diekson. Walter II., Niagara. 

Campbell, Edard C., do. 

Davidson, Alexander, do. 

Heron, Anrirew, do. 

Simpson, John. do. 

Harvey, James, do. 

Blain, James, do. 

IG.-Midillescx. 

Acres 650,698. 
Population 39.899. 
Assessed Value in 1855 1,064,202. 
Liabilities 122.400. 
Amount of Debent, issued 100,000. 
Officials. 



Warden Holcroft Clench, Delaware. 

Treasurer W. W. Street, London. 

Registrar H. Bin-well, London. 

Clerk Wilson Mills, London. 

Solicitor John Wilson. London. 

Surveyor Win. Mackintosh, London. 

Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar 
ter Sessions Hon. James E. Small, 
London. 

Sheriff .Tames Hamilton. London. 

Clerk of Peace J. B. Askin, London. 

Clerk of County Court and Deputy 
Clerk of Crown John B. Askin. 

Judge Surrogate W. Allen. Niagara. 

Registrar Surrogate John Fitz John 
Harris, Londjn. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. J. C. Meredeth, London. 
Division II. John Irvine, Lono. 
Division III. James Reily, Junction, 

Westminster. 

Division IV. W. F. Bullen, Delaware. 
Division V. A. Ilatchi, Wardsville. 
Division VI. J. Keefer, Strathroy. 

County Town LONDON. 

Mayor Murray Anderson, London. 
Clerk John Doyle. London. 
Population About 12.000. 
Assessed value in 1S5.", 95.000. 
Taxes per Annual Value, 2s. 4^d. 

Municipalities. 

Townships Adelaide. Carradoc, Dela 
ware. Dorchester. Kkfrid. Lobo, Lon 
don, Metcalf. Missouri West, M> sa. 
Westminster, Williams; and City 
of London. 

Magistrates. 

Small, lion. James E., London. 
Bostwick, John, Port Stanley. 
McKemie, Duncan, London. 
Clench, Joseph I)., Carradoc. 
Beer, Christopher. Adelaide. 
Springer, Benjamin, Delaware. 
Lawrason. Lawrence, L/ondoii. 
Shore, John, Westminster. 
Buchannan, John S., Adelaide. 
Ball, Thomas II.. London. 
Hall, Cyrenhis, Westminster. 
Webb, Richard, Delaware. 
McDougall, John, Lobo. 
McArthur. James, Williams. 
Pegley, llobert, Adelaide. 
Strathy, Alexander, Westminster. 
Anderson, Alexander, London. 
Odell,JoFiah L. Westminster. 
Johnston. John, Delaware. 
Morrill, Simeon, London. 
Telfer, Adam, do. 

Brennan, R. W., Ad-. laidi or Metcalfe. 
Matthews. Kd-.v.ud, London. 
Strathy. James I ,., do. 

Montserratt, Charles, do. 



Kent, John, London Township. 
Johnstone, William McK. Adelaide 

or Metcalfe. 

Shcwick, Henry, Westminster. 
Winlow, J. B., Adelaide or Metcalfe. 
Carmiehael, Hugh, Lobo. 
Murray, James, Adelaide. 
Ccok, Timothy, do. 
Skoan, John A. do. 
McKirdy, James, Carradoc. 
McKellar, Duncan, do. 
Campbell. Arch. do. 
Niles, William, Dorchester. 
Putnam, Thomas, do. 
Putnam, Joshua, do. 
Miller, Archibald, Ekfrid. 
Cambell, John do. 
Mclntyre, James, do. 
Lockwood, Daniel, do. 
Adamson, Robert, Lobo. 
Jacobs, Nathan, London. 
Smith, Patrick, do. 
Thompson. Robert, Mosa. 
Grant, Benjamin, do. 
Gardiner, James, do. 
Simos, William, do. 

Campbell, Isaac, Westminster. 
Beatty, Thomas, do. 

Burtch, Calvin. do. 

Mclntosh. Donald, Williams. 
Climas, David, do. 

Ilaijht, James, London. 
Ridout, Lionel, do. 
Fraser, John, do. 
Michie. John, do. 



17. Norfolk. 

Acres 384.000. 
! Population About 25,000. 
i Assessed value in 1856 1,211,000. 
1 Liabilities 1,625. 

Amount of Debentures Issued, 1,525. 

County Officials. 

Warden L. II. Hunt, Simcoe. 

Treasurer Henry Groff, Simcoe. 
! Registrar F. L. Walsh, Simcoe. 
i Clerk Stephen J. Fuller, Simcoe. 

Surveyor Thomas W. Walsh, Simcoe, 

Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar 
ter Sessions Win. Salmon, Simcoe. 

Sheriff H. V. A. Rapelje. Simcoe. 

Clerk of Peace W. M. Wilson. Simcoe, 

Clerk of County Court William M. 
Wilson, Simcoe. 

Deputy Clerk of Crown Abram B, 

Rapelje, Simcoe. 
; Judge Surrogate W. Salmon. Simcoe, 

Registrar Surrogate W. M. Wilson. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. A. B. Hapelje, Simcoe. 
Division II. Oliver Blake, Waterford 
Division III. D. Dodge, Windham 

Centre. 

Division IV. Thos. Jenkins, Rolph. 

Division V. William Hewitt, Vittorin. 

1 Division VI. Andrew M. Lennan. 

Tort Rowan. 

| Division VII. Thomas Chamberlin, 
Houghton Centre. 

County Town SIMCOE. 
Chief Magistrate J. G. Wilson, Town 

Keeve. 

Clerk D. Tisd:\le. 
Population About 3.000. 
Assessed Value in lSo5-.Cbr2.000. 
Taxes psr Annual Value 2s. i;d. 

Municipalities. 

Townships Charlotteville, Houghton. 
MidJletown, Townseiid. Wal.-ing 
ham, Windham, Woodhouse, and 
Town of Simcoe. 



[146] 



- 1 - 1 

a almon, William, Simcoe. 
Jackhouse. William. WaHngbam. 
tyerse, Edward 1 .. Woodlv 
lutchinson, John li., Walsingham. 
^overnton, James, Charlottcville. 
I isdale, Joseph, do. 

Williams, Titus. Wafelngbam. 
\ndcrson. Walter, Charlottevillfi. 
3rown, James, Middleton. 
>ouse, John B., Simcne. 
Potts, Jacob, Charlotteville. 
Marr, David, Jun., Woodhouse. 
Mulkins. Thomas J., do. 
Walker, James, do. 

Killmaster, George A., Walsingham. 
Reach, John. Middletn. 
Hunt, Lawrence II., Wiiidham. 
O C avr. Peter. Towns-end. 
While, Moses W., Houghton. 
Killmaster, Henry J., Walsingham. 
Wood, Jacob, Charlottevillc. 
Van Norman, Remain F.. do. 
Waters, Henry. Woodhousc. 
Freeman, Daniel, W., Windham. 
Wallace, John, do. 

Green. James L.. Townsend. 
Walker, William, do. 
Duncomlie. David, do. 
Kitchie, James W., Woodhouse. 
Austin, Philip, do. 

Waddell, Robert, do. 
Parney, John, Townsend. 
Williams. John O., <lo. 
Robins, John. WiiuihaTii. 
Matthews, Daniel, do. 
Lowry, Matthew, do. 
McCall, Simpson, Charlotteville. 
Covernton, Charles W., do. 
Maybee, Oliver, Jun., do. 
Killmaster, John, Walsingham. 
Burger, Isaac, Houshfon, 
Crysler. Roger. Midd!< 
Decow, John, Woodh<> 
Thompson, Andrew, do. 
Smith, Richard, do. 
Lawson, Peter, do. 

Lemon, Jacob, do. 

Smith Cornelius, W. do. 
Owner, Abncr. do. 

Clark, Thomas, W.. Townsend. 
Taylor, Gilbert, do. 

Barbom, Henry J., do. 
Owen, Joel W.. do. 

Johnson, Joseph, do. 

Blake. Oliver, do. 

Kellum, Jason, do. 

Shaw. Benjamin C. do. 
Michael, Richard M., do. 
Becker, Barton, do. 

Vastbinder, John N.. Windham. 
Vastbinder, Philip do. 

Mclntosh, John B., do. 

House, Richard M., do. 

Lanirs, Ja-ob. do. 

Kelly, Samuel, d i. 

Biuk ley. Elijah, do. 

McCalL William. Charlottevflle. 
Dresser, Frederick. do. 
Slanht, Job, 
Shearer, Gabriel. 
I orgusson. Jolin W.. dn. 
Md>on;<ld. Aniiretv. do. 
Andenon, John, 
Robinson, Thomas, Middletou. 
W.xxl, Henry, do. 

Boughner. Edward, d >. 
Cook, I. do. 

Anderson, Williai .. Wa! linghwn. 
Stone, Joseph. 

Foslcr. Ed do. 

Spencer. Lot. do. 

Gla<by. William. 
Backhouse. J. A., Jo. 

Hunter. .loli.i. do. 

Ooughell, ivtcr. nought 
Bridgman, Jonathan, do. 



1856.] 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



59 



Elsworth, John, Haughton. 

Lyons, James A., Sim :ue. 

Parke, James, do. 

Austin, John S., do. 

Armstrong, Cornelias, Walsingham. 

Decow, Samu-I, .Simcoe. 

Van Norman Delavan D., Simcoe. 

1 8. Nortlmmfocrlaiitl and 
Durham. 

Acres assessed 794.200. 
Persons assessed 11,647. 
Assessed Value in 1855 3,190,807. 
Liabilities 312,822 IGs. Id. 

Count;/ Officials. 
Warden James Smith, M.P.P., Port 

Hope. 

Treasurer Asa A. Burnham, Cobourg. 
Registrar fjr Northumberland Hon. 

G. S. Boulton. Cobourg. 
Rigistrar for Durham George C. 

Ward Port Hope. 
Clerk Morgan Jellett, Cobourg. 
Solicitors Messrs. Smith & Armour, 

Cobourg. 

Engineer Thomas S. Gore, Rice Lake. 
Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar 
ter Sessions, G. M. Boswell, Cobourg. 
Sheriff Henry Ruttan, Cobourg. 
Clerk of Peace T. W.ird. Port Hope. 
Clerk of County Couit and Deputy 

Clerk of Crown R. D. Chatterton, 

Cobourg. 

Judge Surrogate George M. Boswell. 
Registrar Surrogate M. F.Whitehead, 

Port Hope. 

Clerics of Division Courts. 

Division I. C. C. Neville, Bowman- 

ville. 

Division II. S. Wilmot, Newcastle. 
Division III. J. T. Day, Port Hope. 
Division IV. I. M. Brodte, Millbrook. 
Division V. Thomas Eyre, Cobourg. 
Division VI. Jas. G. Rogers, Grat ton. 
Division VII. G. S. Burrell, Colborne. 
Division VIH. John Douglas, Percy. 
Division IX. E. II. Smith, Brighton. 

County Town COBOURO. 

Chief Magistrate D Arcy E. Boulton, 

Cobourg. 

Clerk David Brodie, Cobonrg. 
Assessed Annual Value in 1855 

27,370. 
Taxes per Annual Value 

Municipalities. 

Townships in Northumberland Aln- 
wick, Brighton, Cramahe, Haldi 
mand, Hamilton, Monaghan South, 
Murray, Percy, Seymour; and Town 
of Cobourg. 

Townships in Durham Cartwright, 
Cavan, Clarke, Darlington, Hope, 
Manvers ; Town of Port Hope and 
Village of Bowmanviile. 

Magistrates. 

Boswell, George Morss, Cobourg. 
Macdonald, Archibald, Hamilton. 
Hawley. Sheldon, Murray. 
Keeler, Joseph A., Cramahe. 
Maguire, Patrick, Cavan. 
Rogers, James (}., Haldimand. 
Thompson, John, Cavan. 
Perry, Ebenezer, Cobourg. 
Boucher, Robert P., Seymour. 
Knowlson, John, Cavan. 
Wilmott, Allan, Clarke. 
Munro. Henry, do. 
Burnham, Asa A., Cobourg. 
Meyers. Elijah W., Murray. 
Goalee, James I)., Cramahe. 
McKyes. Willis. Hamilton. 
Murphy, John V., Murray. 



Landon, John, Seymour. 
Saott, Thomas, Cobourg. 
Harris, Myndert, Sen., Hopa. 
Fox, William II., Murray. 
Jeffrey, Andrew, Cobourg. 
Robertson, James, Port Hope, 
Strong, 0., Cramahe. 
Simpson, John, Darlington. 
Clarke, Edward, Clarke. 
Weller, William, Cobourg. 
Young, Stephen, Murray. 
McCarty, Henry, Cobourg. 
Smart, John. Darlington. 
Blackstock, Moses, Cavan. 
Middleton, John, Clarke. 
Waddell, Robert, South Monaghan. 
Preston, Porter, Manvers. 
Eyre, Thomas, Cobourg. 
Burnham, Mark, Port Hope. 
Barnard, John, South Monaghan. 
Blair, John, Percy. 
Allen, W. II., Hope. 
McAu ay, Alexander, Murray. 
Broadfoot, Alexander, Hope. 
Burke. David F., Darlington. 
Spencer, Charles W., Clarke. 
Gumming, James, Murray. 
Lang, James, Hope. 
Humphries. Israel, Percy. 
Boswell, John Crease, Hamilton. 
Phillips, Joseph, do. 

Crawford, Angus, do. 

Page, Thomas, do. 

Hare, Donald, Haldimand. 
Vernon, Charles H.. do. 
Colleton, Thomas W., do. 
Doolittle, Ephraim, do. 
Innis, John S., do. 

Grover, John M., Cramahe. 
Stephens, Richard, do. 
Platt, Isaac S., Percy. 
Ewing, Benjamin F., Percy. 
Meyers, W. W., Seymour. 
Cooley. Samuel, Murray. 
Walbridge. Asa E., Clarke. 
Robson, John G., do. 
Low, George H., Darlington. 
Jones, Richard, do. 
Mann, James, do. 

Armstrong, William, Cavan. 
Swain, John do. 

Preston, Alexander, Manners. 
Jones, Henry, do. 

Hill, Richard, Seymour. 
Patterson, John, do. 
Blair, George W., Percy. 
Black, Andrew, do. 
Biggar, James, Murray. 
Ham, John V., do. 
Peterson, Joseph, S., Murray. 
Way. Aloah, do. 

Brundridge. Harvey, do. 
Butler, William, do. 

Comstock. David, do. 

Betts, Joseph. Sen., Cramahe. 
Franklin, Bildad, do. 

Merriman, James M., do. 
Strong. James S., do. 

Spalding. John, Haldimand. 
Clarke, John R., do. 
Massey, Hart, do. 

Wilson, John, do. 

Heenan, Thomas, do. 
Malery, Caleb, Hamilton. 
Wade, John, do. 

Carpenter. Austin B., do. 
Creighton, John, do. 
Stanton. Oliver, do. 

Campbell. Samuel, do. 
Boswell, George G., do. 
Burnet, William, do. 
Strong. William G., do. 
Gilchrist. James R., do. 
McCallum, Peter, do. 
Milne, Andrew, do. 

Stephens, George, do. 
Burnham, Harris, do. 



[147] 



Morrow, Alexander, Hups. 
Marsh, Wm. S. do. 

Sissons, W. do. 

Waddell, Robert N., do. 
Choat, Nathan, do. 

Powers, Samuel S., do. 
Grant, James, do. 

Hill, Edwin, do. 

Might, John, do. 

Fisher, Alexander, do. 
Choat, Aaron, do. 

McMurtry, John, do. 

Corbet, Samuel, do. 

Peters, Wm. do. 

Home, Joseph, South Monaghan. 
Bernard, Joseph, do. 

Thompson, William, do. 
Hovey, David. Cartwright. 
Armstrong, Robert, Cavan. 
Armstrong, William, do. 
Knowlson, Matthew, do. 
Chalmers, James, do. 

Cain, George, do. 

Armstrong, Joseph, do. 
Scott, Adam. do. 

Wallis, William, Mairvers. 
Magill, Robert, do. 
Mclntosh, William, C arke. 
Hodges, Hiram, do. 

Short, John, do. 

Toms, John, do. 

Milligan, Andrew, S., do. 
Smith, Nobld, C., do. 
Cameron, Donald, Darlington. 
Elliott, Henry, do." 

Galbraith, Daniel do. 
Trail, John C., do. 

Wilson, Ira P., do. 

McMurtry, William, do. 
Washington, Anth. do. 
Jones, Matthew, do. 
Quintan, Cornelius, Port Hope. 

Weller, William, Cobourg. 

Eyre, Thomas. do. 

Perry, George. do. 

Wallace, Patrick, do. 

Strong, William G., do. 

Beatty, John, do. 

Dinnan, Terence, do. 

Wright, John, Port Hope. 
McDermott, John R., do. 

Qulnlan, Cornelius, do. 

Grant, James, do. 
Waddell, Robert N., do. 

Burton, Francis H., do. 

Hughes, Charles, do. 

^Benson, Thomas. do. 



19. Ontario. 

Acres assessed 45i ; ,796. 
Population iu 185230,076. 
Assessed Value in 1855 1,412,847. 
Liabilities 11.400. 
Amount of Debent. issued 11,400. 
County Officials. 

Warden Thomas N. Gibhs, Oshawa. 

Treasurer William Paxton, Whitby. 

Registrar John Ham IVrry. U hitby. 

Clerk H. J. Macdonnell. Whitby. 

Surveyor John Shier. Whitby. 

Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar 
ter Session Z. Burnham. Whitby. 

Sheriff N. G. Reynolds. Whitby. 

Clerk of Peace B. F. Hall. Whitby. 

Clerk of County Court and Deputy 
Clerk of Crown J. V. Ham, Whitby. 

Judge Surrogate Zaccheus Burnham, 
Whitby. 

Registrar Surrogate John Vaudal 
Ham, Whitby. 

Clerks of Division Oiurls. 

Division I. Levi Fairbanks. Whitby. 
Division II. J. Wilsi n, Pickering. 
Division III. 11. Lund, Port Perry. 



60 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



[1856. 



Division IV. J. L. Gould, Uxbridge. 
Division V. J. Metcalf, Canuiagton. 
Division VI. C. Robinson, Beaverton 

County Town WHITBY. 

Chief Magistrate .lames Rowe, Mayor- 
Clerk Benjamin Yarnold. 
Population About 3.000. 
Assessed Value in 1855 9,423. 

Municipalities. 

Townships Brock, Mara, Pickering 
Rama. Reach. Scott, Scugog. Thorahj 
Uxbrid-e, Whitby; Town of Whitby 
and Village of Oshawa. 

Magistrates. 

Burnham. Zacheus, Whitby. 
Warren, Jolin B., do. 
Mossington. Thomas, Georgina. 
Bagshaw, William Brock, 
Cowan, Matthew, do. 
McDonough. Michael, Thorah or Mara. 
Ba /shaw, Abraham, Uxbridge. 
Allison, William, Whitby. 
Campbell, Alexander, Pickering. 
McMillan, Archibald, Thorah. 
Thompson, John H., Brock. 
Hurd. Abner. Reach. 
Campbell. John, Whitby. 
Robertson. Charles, Thorah. 
Johnson. Kobert. Georgina. 
Dunbur, William. Pickering. 
Dryden, James. Whitby. 
Truax. John. Reach. 
Rickey, James. Brock. 
Whitney. Paul. Pickering. 
Campbell. Robert, Whitby. 
Bostwick. George, Pickering. 
Mackey, Levi, do. 

Mason, Andrew, Whitby. 
Birrell, Kbenezer. Pickering. 
Moore. William F., Whitby. 
Spears, Roiert, do. 

Green. Frederick. Pickering. 
Dow, William. Whitby. 
Hunter. James, do. 
Gibbs, William II., Columbus. 
Foot, Jonathan, Reach. 
Fullerton. Adam. Pickering. 
Port. George W., do. 
Major, Henry, do. 

White, Trueman P., do. 
Clerk e, John, do. 

Michell, W. H., do. 
Taylor, Peter, do. 

Vail, Ira, do. 

Churchill, Leviua, do. 
Carpenter. Ira B., do. 
Nicol, John, Whitby. 

Burns, James, do. 

Campbell. Aaron, do. 
Campbell. Calvin, do, 
Farwell, Abraham, do. 
Annes, Ezra, do. 

Perry, John H., do. 

Lynde, Carleton, do. 

Willcox, John S. M., do. 
Gunn. RoU-rt John, do. 
Hepburne, John, do. 
Harnden, L., Jun., do. 
Ratcliff. John, do. 

Brabazon, George, Brock. 
Gibbs, Charles, do. 

Cowan, Matt., Jun., do. 
Way, Reuben, do. 

Gillespie. Malcolm, do. 
Boucher, .lames O Brien, Georgina. 
Johnson. James, do. 

Bathgate. James, do. 

Paxton, Thomas, Reach. 
Powson. William, do. 
Wells, Kcbert, do. 

Burnham. Jacob, do. 

Lund, l!i"hard, do. 

Currio, George, do. 

Vernon, James K., do. 



Card, Levi, Reach. 
McPherson, James. Mara. 
Garnett, James S., Rama. 
Smith, George, Thorah. 
Proctor, George, do. 
Cameron. Kenneth, do. 
McCasklll, William, do. 
Cameron, Donald, do. 
Gould, Joseph, Uxbridge. 
Spear, Robert, do. 
Wideman, John, do. 
Randall, William, do. 



20 Oxford. 

Acres 397,362. 

Population in 185232,638. 

Assessed A alue in 1855 2,170,950. 

Liabilities 30,000. 

Amount of Debent. issued 25,000. 
County Ojjicials. 

Warden D. Matheson, M.P.P., Embro. 

Treasurer James Kintrea, Woodstock. 

Registrar J. Ingersoll, Woodstock. 

ClerK W. II. Landon Woodstock. 

Judge Co. Court and Chairman, Quar 
ter Sessions D. S. McQueen, Wood 
stock. 

Sheriff James Carrall, Woodstock. 

Clerk of Peace William Lapenotier, 
Woodstock. 

Clerk of County Court and Deputy 
Clerk of Crown James Kintrea, 
Woodstock. 

Judge Surrogate William Lap^notier, 
Woodstock. 

Registrar Surrogate J. G. Vansittart. 
Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. G. Whitchead. Woodstock. 
Division II. J. Cowan. Princeton. 
Division III. D. Matheson, Etnbro. 
Division IV. James Barr, Norwich. 
Division V. David Caufield, Ingersoll. 
Division VI. Charles Hawkins, Til- 
sonburg. 

County Town WOODSTOCK. 

Chief Magistrate Wm. Grey, Reeve. 

Clerk John Greig. 

Population 2,540. 

Assessed Value in 1S55 18,303. 

Taxes per Annual Value, 1854, 3s. 

Municipalities. 

Townships Blaiiford, Blenheim, Den- 
ham,Missouii East, Norwicn, Oxford 
East, Oxford North, Oxford West, 
Zora East, Zora West; Town of 
Woodstock and Village of Ingersoll. 

Magistrates. 
McQueen, David S. 
Hatch John, East Oxford. 
Gordon, William, West Zorra. 
Riddell, Robert, Zorra. 
Carroll. John, West Zorra. 
Jackson, John, Blenheim. 
Deedes. Edmund, West Oxford. 
Vansittart, John G., do. 
Scatchard, John. Missouri. 
Johnson. Moses, Wilmot. 
Vannonnan, Benjamin, Dereham. 
Martin, Calvin, West Oxford. 
Burtch, Archibald. East Oxford. 
Vining, Jared, Nissouri. 
Harrington, John, Zorra. 
Pickle. Nicholas, Blenheim. 
Bodnell. James, Jun., Dereham. 
Slower. Gilbert, Norwich, 
Chambers, George, West Oxford. 
Cautield. David, do. 

Cameron, Robert, Nissouri. 
Swazey. Benjamin, do. 
Ingersoll. James, Woodstock. 
Mills. Walter M., N. Oxford. 
Grotty. Henry, do. 
Stroud. Robert, Dereham. 

[148J 



Hawkins. Charles, Dcreham. 
Wallace, Thomas, Norwich. 
Carroll, William, do. 
Root, Henry, do. 

Carder, George W. do. 
Wkkham, James, do. 
Mott, Moses. do. 

Shenstone, Thomas S., Woodstock. 
Horning, Joseph, Norwich. 
Kilborn, Jared, Blenheim. 
Dickson, William, do. 
Corner. Jerembh. do. 
Barwk-k. Hugh C.. Woodstock. 
Goble, William, Blenheim. 
Malcolm, Francis, Zorra East. 
McDonald. Robert, do. llth Con. 
Munro, Angus. Zorra West. 
Matheson, Donald, do. 
Sutherland, Wm., do. 
Lewis. Seneca, 1 Con. Zorra West. 
McKay, John, Lot 14, 6th Con.ZorraW 
Horseman, Denis, Nissouri. 
Allen, .Nathan P., do. 
Bayne, John, 1 Con. Zorra W. 
Thornton, Benjamin, Oxford West. 
Phelan, Daniel, do. 

May bee. Walter B., do. 

Hook, William, Sen., do. 
Bodnell, Andrew, Dereham. 
Smith, William, do. 
Chadwick, Charles E.. do. 
Tripp, Jonathan, Oxford East. 
Burgess, William, do. 
Hall. Valentine, do. 

Laycock, James, Blandford. 
Wilson, William, do. 
Overholt, Michael, do. 



21. Pcrtli. 

Acres 446,728. 

Population in 185215,545. 

Ass.M Ssed Value in 1855 830,347. 

Liabilities SO,150. 

Amount of Debunt. issued 8,615. 

County Officials. 

Warden Thos. B. Guest, St. Mary s. 
Treasurer Alex. McGregor, Stratford. 
Registrar William Smith, Stratford. 
Clerk Stewart Campbell, Stratford. 
Solicitor E. F. Ryerson, Stratford. 
Surveyor Charles James, Stratford. 
Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar 

ter Sessions R Burrett, Stratford. 
Sheriff Robert Modurwell, Stratford. 
i Clerk of Peace J. Linton, St atford. 
| Cierk of County Court and Deputj 

Clerk of Crown Alex. McGregor 

Stratford. 

Judge Surrogate R Burrett, Stratforc 
Registrar Surrogate Alex. McGregor 

Stratford. 
Crown Lands Agent John Shannan 

Stratford. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. Raby Williams, Stratford 
Division II. T. Matthieson, Mitchell. 
Division III. Dr. Colt-man. St. Mary s 
Division IV. W. Cossey. Shakespere. 
DivisionV. Samuel Whaley, Mlllbank 

County Town STRATFOUD. 

Chief Magistrate W. F. McCulloch. 
Clerk Samuel L. l:<>i 
Population Nearly 2.000. 
Assessed value in 1855 87,720. 
Taxes per Annual Value 2s. lid. 

Mimi 

Townships Blanc-hard. l>ownk>, Easl 

hope North, EastliDpi South, Ellkf 

Elma, Fullerton, Gore, Hibbert 

in. Mornin.Ljton Wallace; ant 

Town of Stratford. 



1856.] 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



61 



Magistrates. 

Burritt, Read, Stafford. 
Daly, John C. \\ ., Nurth Easthope. 
Helmer, Andrew, South. do. 
Kastner. Peter, i-llice. 
McCullocb, William i ., Stratford. 
Mcl herson, Daniel, EUice. 
Sparlhig, Juhu, Blanchard. 
Sebring, John, Eliioe. 
Wood, George, Downie. 
Stewart, Juhu, Morth Easthope. 
Brown, Thomas, Downie. 
Grant, Alexander, >.orth Easthope. 
Kaukin, James, do. 

Hamilton, Alexander, do. 
Crerar, Peter, do. 

Mclntyre, John, Fullarton. 
Seeguiiller, Adam, Stratford. 
Sharman, Johu, do. 

Daly, Thomas SI., do. 

Mickle, Alexander F., do. 
Thompson, Johu, Downie. 
Christie, Thomas. St. Mary s. 
Mitchell, Alexander, Stratford. 
Zenkauu, John, .North Easthope. 
Fisher, Alexander, do. 
Curtis, John, do. 

Eryfogle, Sebastian, South Easthope. 
Cossey, William, do. 

Woods, Peter, Downie. 
Kelson, Matthew, do. 
Orr, Alexander 15.. Stratford. 
Monteith, Andrew, Downie. 
Weber, Jacob, lillice. 

Gourlay, Alexander, do. 
Henry, Robert, do. 

Ballentine, Robert, do. 
Hill, James, Fullartou. 
Brown, James, do. 
Porteous, Robert, do. 
Morgan, Andrew, llibbert. 
SlcCann, Petor, do. 
Doukin, Robert, do. 
Cameron, Donald, Blanchard. 

Clendiuuing. James K., do. 
Long, Edward, do. 

Moscrip, William, do. 

Ban-on, \Villi.im, do. 

Fitzgerald, John. Stratford. 



23. i ctcrboro antl Victoria. 

Acres 1,121,500. 

Population i.-i 1652 26,894. 

Assessed Value in ISoa l,304.Jsj. 

Liabilities l.uuO. 

Amount of Debeut. issued, 1,600. 

(Jfninty oyicials. 

Warden William Cottingham. 

Treasurer Walter Sheridan. 

Registrar Charles Rubridge. 

Clerk Walter cheridan. 

Surveyor Johu Reid. 

Judge Co. Court and Chairman. Quar 
ter Se ss ous George B. Hall. 

Sheriff Wils.m S. Couger, Esq. 

Clerk of Peace and Deputy Clerk of the 
Crown and Pk-as \V. H. Wrighton. 

Clerk of County Court Thos. Fortye. 

Judge Surrogate George B. Hall. 

Registrar Surrogate Thomas Fortye. 

Crown Land Agent Walter Crawford 
Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. J. Hall, Sen., Peterboro. 

Division II. James Foley, Norwood. 

Division 111. (Jeorge Keid Otonabee. 

Division IV. T. Matchett, Meteilfe. 

Division V. W. J. Logie, Lindsay. 

Division VI. John Lytle, 0_kwood. 

Division VII. I. Ferguson,Woodville 
County Imvn PETERBOROUGH. 

Chief Magistrate James Hall, Mayor 
Clerk Ivan O Beirne. 
Population About 3.500. 
Assessed Value iu 1855 13,544. 
Taxes per annual value 2s. 



Municipalities. 

L ownships in Peterboro Asphodel, 
Belmout, Burleigh, Douro, Dummer, 
Eunismbre, Uarvey,Methuen, Mona- 
gliau North, Otonabee, Smith; and 
Town of Peterborough. 

Townships in Victoria liixley, Eldon, 
Emily. Fenelon, Mariposa, Ops, So- 
merville, and Verulaiu. 

Magistrates. 

rlall, George B.. Peterborough. 
iubridge, Charles, Otonabee- 
"touuin, Francis, do. 
3irdsall, Richard, Asphodel. 
Wallis, James, Fenelon. 
b raser, Andrew. S., Verulam. 
Langton, John. Fenelon Falls. 
Scott, Walter, Asphodel, 
^hoat, Thomas. Dummer. 
Stark, Adam, Otonabee. 
Campbell, Alexauder, Eldon. 
Davidson, Samuel, Mariposa. 
iiest. William. Emily. 
Sullivan, Patrick, Eunismore. 
Hall, James, Peterborough. 
Ridley, Robert, do. 

Ferguson, Frederick, do. 
Perry, Charles, do. 

Harvey, James, do. 

Harvey John, Smith. 

Fitzgerald, Thomas, do. 
Walton, John, do. 

Bell, Thomas, do. 

Tully Andrew, do. 

Cottingham. William. Emily. * 
Knowlson. Christopher, do. 
McDonnell, William, Ops. 
Keenan, Thomas, do. 

McDonald, Hector, Mariposa. 
McPherson. James, Eldon. 
Ferguson, Israel, do. 
Costello, Daniel, Ennisniore. 
Bates. Roger, Otonaliee. 

Bawbell, Henry, do. 

Stewart, William, Sen., do. 
Strickland, Samuel, Douro. 
Clarke. George, do. 

Lukie, Sampson, Dummer. 
Manly. William, do. 
Dunsford, James W., Terulam. 
Wickham, Henry T., do. 
Chambers. Thomas, Peterborough. 
Ryan. Patrick, do. 

Wigmore. William. Dummer. 
Humphries Robert C., Asphodel, 
Cannon. Patrick, do. 

Foulds. Henry, do. 

Fife, James, do. 

Best, Hamilton, Emily. 
Lehane. Michael. do. 
McFayclen. Archibald, Eldcn. 
Grant. Hector, do. 

Jackson, Archibald, do. 
Campbell, John G., do. 
McDonald, John, do. 

Walton, Joseph, Monaghan. 
Tully, John. Jr., do. 

Gilrnour, John W r ., do. 
McNeilly, John, Ops. 
Low, Charles, do. 
Ray, Thomas W., do. 
Short, Thomas, Otonabee. 
Ellsworth. Aaron, do. 
Doris, James. do. 

Learmont, William. do. 
McFarlane. Alexander, do. 
P.iMwn, Edward, Douro. 
Carlow, George. do. 
llogan. James, do. 

Hill, George A., Dummer. 
Carew, Michael, Ennismore. 
Brick, Patrick, do. 

Jacobs, John, Mariposa. 
Rogers. Obadiah. d >. 
Whitsides. Robert F., do. 
Clarke, William, do. 

[149] 



Pearson, Joseph B., Mariposa. 
Campbell, John, do. 

Mchoils, Robert, Peterborough. 
Jlaxton, W illiam, du. 

31111 burn, John, Smith it Harvey. 
Garbutt, Isaac, du. 

liae, William, do. 

Sanderson, Francis, do. 
Hall, John, do. 

jloore, William H., do. 

Hudson, Charles, Peterborough. 
Perry, Egerton, do. 

Hughes, Kichard, do. 

Easuand, William, do. 

Suyder, William, do. 



23. Prcscott aud Kussell. 

Acres assessed 414,41o. 
1 opulatiou iu Ibo2 iii,610. 
Assessed Value in ISoo 3^8,880. 
Liabilities N one. 
Amount of Debentures issued Xone. 

County Ojjiciula. 
Warden A. Petrie, Cumberland. 
Treasurer Neil Stewart, L oiigual. 
Registrar for Prescott u. D. lieed, 

1 rescott, L Origual. 
Registrar 1 or Rus-ell James Keays, 

Duncansville. 

Clerk Peter O Brien, L Origual. 
Judge Co. Court and Chairman i;ii.-i;-- 

ter Sessions Peter Free), L Ori ual. 
Sheriff C. P. Treadweli, L Oiignui. 
Clerk of Peace Donald McDonald (F) 
Clerk of County Court aud Deputy 

Clerk of Crown J. W. Mai stun, 

L Orignal. 
Judge surrogate W T . K. McKenzie, 

Vaukleekhill. 
itc-istrar Surrogate J. W. Marston, 

L Orignal. 

Clerks qfJCHvision O-urts. 

DivWou 1. S. M. Cushman, L Orij i:al. 

Dhi.sion II. C. Waters, \ aukleeknill. 

Division 111. C. 3. Ouiiuetto, Huwkes- 
bury Village. 

Division IV. A. Ilagar, Plantagenet. 

Division V. Johu S. Cameron, Cum 
berland. 

County ToicnL Oma XAL. 
(Not Incorporated.^ 

Municipalities. 

Townships in Prescott Alfred. Caledo 
nia. Hawkesbury East, liawkesbury 
West, Lougueil, Plautagenet Aortli. 
Plantageuet South. 

Townships in Russell. Cambridge, 
Clarence, Cumberland and KnttelL, 

Magistrates. 

Freel, Peter, L Orignal. 
Johnson, Chauncy, Longueil. 
Kearnes, John, Plautagenet. 
Stewart, Xeil, Hawkesbury West. 
Low, Charles A., do. 

Coffin, William, do. 

Stirling, Peter, Caledoi.ia. 
Siirling, Archibald, lluwkesljury W. 
Wait, William, Longutdl. 
Ltersey, Charles, L Orignal. 
Petrie, Archibald, Cumberland. 
Robertson, t arquhar, llawkesbury E. 
St. Julien, Edward. 
-Mc.Master, John, Caledonia. 
McLaurin, Peter, do. Scotch Mills. 
Higginson, Thomas, IlawkeKhury K. 
Jameson, William, do. 

Waddell, John, ti i. 

\Vells, James I ., llawkesbury W. 
Kirby, William, llawkesliury E. 
Allison, Andrew, do. 

Bradley, William, Caledonia. 
Frith, James, Plantageuet. 



62 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



[1856. 



Tweed, Charles II., Ilawkesbury E. 
Marston, John W., L Origual. 
Brown, Elijah, Ilawkesbury W. 
Lough, Hugh, Jr., do. 
Cameron, Ewen, L Orignal. 
Laudriaux, Autoine, do. 
Gibson, James, Ilawkesbury W. 
Edwards, William, Clarence. 
McCaul, James, do. 

Cook, James W., Russell. 
Mattice, John, do. 
Conway, Jjmies, do. 
Castleman, Martin, Cambridge. 
Holmes, John, Alfred. 
Pattee, John, Longuiel. 
Ilamilton, George, Ilawkesbury Mills. 
Sterling, James, do. West. 

Walker, Ileury, Vankleekhill. 
Hamilton, John, Ilawkesbury Mills. 
Cross, George, do. West. 

Johnson, Thomas II., Vaukleekhill. 
McNab, John, Ilawkesbury West. 
Hersey, Zepheniah, S. M., do. 
Shearman, Jonathan, Hawkesbury E. 
Burwash, Nelson, do. 

W T yman, Hiram B., do. 

Everett, Cotton M. do. 

Ramsay, John, Longuiel. 
Johnson. Chimney, Juu., L Orignal. 
Wilkinson, John L., Caledonia Springs 
Cross, James, do. 

Renwick, James, do. 

McLeod, Duncan, do. (rear.) 

Hughes. Humphrey, Alfred. 
Erratt, Henry, N. i j lantagenet. 
Smith, William, do. 

Beggs, John, do. 

Georgen, Peter, do. 

McGregor, Duncan, S. Plantagenet. 
McCann, Ileury W., Hawkesbury W. 
Hairer Aimer, N. Plautagenet. 
McDonald, Arch., Hawkesbury E. 

84:. Prince Edward. 

Acres 240,150. 

Population in 185218,887. 

Assessed Value in 1855 974,053. 

Liabilities None. 

Amount of Debentures issued None. 
County Officials. 

Warden Win. llubbs Bloonifield. 

Treasurer R. J. Chapman, Picton. 

Registrar John P. Koblin, Picton. 

Clerk R. J. Chapman, Picton. 

Judge Co. Court aud Chairman Quar 
ter Sessions D. L. Fairfield, Picton. 

Sheriff James McDonald, Picton. 

Clerk of Peace Philip Low, Picton. 

Clerk of County Court and Deputy 
Clerk of Crown C. Mortimer, Picton. 

Judge Surrogate Simeon Washburn, 
Picton. 

Registrar Surrogate Samuel Merrill. 
Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. John P. Downes, Picton. 

Division II. Thomas Cook, Milford. 

Division III. S. Solmus, Northport. 

Division IV. R.C. II. Cotter, Amelias- 
burgh. 

Division V. W. Young, Wellington. 

Division VI. Harvey Spafford, Cherry 
Valley. 

Division VII. J. Cadman. Consecon. 

Division VI II. E. W. Wright, Bon- 
gards Corners. 

County Town PICTON. 

Chief Magistrate Charles S. Wilson. 

Clerk John Twigg. 

Population 1,900. 

Assessed Value in 1855 5,094. 

Taxes per Annual Value Is. 8d. 
Municipalities. 

Townships Ameliasburg, Athol, Hal- 
lowell, Hillier, Marysburg, Sophias- 
burg ; aud Town of Pictou. 



Magistrates. 

Fairfield, David L., Picton. 

McDonell, Alexander, Marysburgh. 

Dingman, Henry, do. 

llubbs, Benjamin, Picton. 

Solmes, Samuel, Sophiasburgh. 

Biggar, Charles, Ameliasburgh. 

McFaul, Archibald, Picton. 

Stevenson, David B. do. 

Dougall, William. do. 

Stinson, David, do. 

Lane, James T., Hillier. 

Flayler, Thomas, do. 

Clapp, Paul, do. 

Roblin, John P., Ameliasburgh. 

Way, John B., do. 

I Lane, John, Marysburgh. 
I Vandusen, Henry, do. 
! Howell, Jacob, Sophiasburgh. 

Ruttan, Peter W., Sophiasburgh. 

Drewry, George, do. 

Weller, Benjamin, Ameliasburgh. 

Howell, John, Sophiasburgh. 

Thirkell, John, Ilallowell. 

Bougard, Conrad, Marysburgh. 

Lazier, Abraham, Ilallowell. 

Williams, Caleb, do. 

Conger, David, do. 

Stapleton, John, Hillier. 
t Murney, John, Ilallowell, 

Bentley, Wilson, Athol. 

Wright, Edward W., Marysburgh. 

Allison, John, Sophiasburgh. 

Palin, William A., Athol. 

Ballard, Norman, Picton. 

Conger, Roger B., Ilallowell. 

Davis, Thomas, Sophiasburgh. 



Noxon, Isaac, 
Gilbert, Daniel, 
Roblin, (2nd) Philip, 
Boulter, George, 
Moran, David, 
Bougard, John, 
Rattan, Jacob, 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

Marysburgh. 
do. 



Wellbanks, Thomas, do. 
Rose, John, do. 

Stanton, Dyer, Athol. 

Yoremans, Arthur, do. 
Mandeville, Francis W., Hallowell. 
Platt, Henry, do. 

McDonald, Alexander, do. 
Leavens, Daniel, do. 

Herington, Jeremiah, do. 
Raynor, Jotham, Hillier. 
Pettet, Daniel, Jr., do. 
Pennock, Samuel, do, 
Scully, Jeremiah, do. 
Roblin, Owen, Ameliasburgh. 
Peterson, Samuel, do. 

Dempsey, Peter, Jr., do. 



Roblin, Philip, 
Williams, Isaac, 
Moore, Thomas, 
Wycott, James, 
Pier, Calvin, 
Mortimer, Cecil, 
Greely, Absalom, 



do. 

do. 

Picton. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Morden, John II., Ameliasburgh. 
Miller, James, do. 



25. Simcoc. 

Acres 1,159,400. 

Population 30,000. 

Assessed Value in 1854 1,053,828. 

County Officials. 

Warden James Sanson, Orilli. i. 
Treasurer Edmund Lally. Barrie. 
Registrar George Lount, Barrie. 
Clerk John Strathy, Barrie. 
Solicitor John Strathy, Barrie. 
Surveyor Henry Creswick, liarrie. 
Judge Co. Court and Chai-man. Quar 
ter Sessions J. R. Gowan, Barrie. 
Sheriff B. W. Smith, Barrie. 
Clerk of Peace Wm. McVity. Barrie. 



[150J 



Clerk of County Court Jonathan 

Lane, Barrie. 
Deputy Clerk of Crown H. H. Gowan, 

Barrie. 

Judge Surrogate J.R. Gowan, Barrie. 
Registrar Surrogate J. Lane, Barrie. 

Ckrks of Division Courts. 
Division I. Thomas Lloyd, Burrie. 
Division II. T. Maconchy, Bradford. 
Division 111. F. Stephens, Tecumseth. 
Division IV. Andrew Jardine, Notta- 

wasaira. 

Division \. John Craig, Flos, 
Division VI. Adam Patersou, Orillia. 
Division VII. John Little, Mulmer. 
Division VIII. George McManus, 

Mono Mills. 

County Town BARRIE. 

Chief Magistrate T. D. McConkey, 

Barrie. 

Clerk George Lane, Barrie. 
Population About 2.000. 
Assessed Value in 1855 66,290. 
Taxes per Annual Value 2s. Id. 

Municipalities. 

Townships Adjala, Essa, Flos, Gwil- 
limbury West. Inuisnl, Matchedash, 
Medonte, Mono, Mulmer, Nottawa- 
saga, Orillia, Oro, Sunnidale, Tay, 
Tucumseth, Tiny, Tossoronto, Ves- 
pra; and Town of Barrie. 

Magistrates. 

(Sciwan, James R,, Barrie. 

Louiit. George, W. GwilJiuibury. 

Dawson, John, do. 

Steele, Elmes, Medonte. 

Thomson, John, Orilliu. 

Stephens, Frederick, Tecumseth. 

\Vic.kens, James, Jr., Vespra. 

Alley, Gerald, Orillia. 

Goodfellow, Adam, W. Gwillimbury. 

Thompson, Charles, Barrie. 

Hume, William Charles, Orillia. 

Richey, Wellesley, Nottawasaga. 

Coates, Matthew, Barrie. 

Campaign, William, Mulinur. 

Darling James, liny. 

Ross, Benjamin. Inuisfil. 

West, Thomas, W. Gwillimbury. 

Craig, John, Flos. 

Drury, Richard, Oro. 

Moffatt, Andrew, Orillia. 

Armson, William, W. Gwillimbury. 

White, Peter, \ < -s]>ri. 

Partridge, Charles. Uarriu. 

Soles, David, Innisnl. 

Garbutt, John. W. Gwillimbury. 

Ryan, Michael, Adjula. 

West, Benjamin, W. Gwillimbury. 

Cunningham, Andrew, Tecumseth. 

Stephenson, William, St. Vincent. 

Wilson, George, Medonte. 

Simpson, William. Penetanguishine. 

McLaughlin, Michael, Mouo. 

Dallas, James, Orillia. 

Gaviller, Alexander. Tecumseth. 

Sanson, James, Orillia. 

Walker, Edward A., Barrie. 

Hamilton, Win. B. Penotanguishinc. 

Drinkwater, John II. 3., North Orillia. 

Moon, Edmund. Medonte. 

McConkey, Thomas, Innisfil. 

Parker, Thomas, W. Gwillimbury. 

Barwick, John, do. 

Watson, William, St. Vincent. 

Stephens, James D., Nottawasaga. 

Strong, William, Kssa. 

Gamble, Thomas, Tecumseth. 

Brown, William. W. 

Maconchy, Thomas. Bradford. 

ICvans, David, Tecurnseth. 

Wilson, Alfred, Jnui.-fil. 

Gillard, William. Barrio. 

Gilinore, John, Tosoronto. 



1856.] 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



63 



Whitley, James, Mulmur. 
Corley, William, St. Vincent. 
<3athay, George, Sunnidale. 
Jackson, George, Nuttawasaga. 
Hay, William Kussell, Oro. 
HcManus, George, Mono. 
McWatt, John, Barrio. 
Kyall, Edward, Oro. 
Sandford, Sidney M., Barrie. 
Nalty, William, Nottawasaga. 
Beatty, William, Adjala. 
Armstrong, John, W. Gwillimbury. 
Alexander, John, Barrie. 
Rogers, Isaac B., W. Gwillimbury. 
Scanton, Mark, do. 

Kerr, James, Euphrasia. 
McGlashau, J. I 1 ., Nottawasaga. 
McArthur, Arthur. St. Albans. 
Drury, Thomas, Essa. 
Williams, John, St. Vincent. 
Jeff, Robert. I euetauguishine. 
Clement, Lewis, Ennisnl. 



86. Stormoiit, Duiulas, autl 
Gieiigary. 

Acres 770. 

Population 4 

Assessed Value \\\ l Jo5 1,384,000. 

Liabilities > one. 

Amount of Debentures issued None. 

County Officials. 

Warden William Colquhoun, Dickin 
son s Landing. 

Treasurer it. McDonald, Cornwall. 

Registrar for Stormont George C. 
Wood, Cornwall. 

Registrar lor Dundas Alexander 
McDonell. iiorrisburgh. 

Registrar for Glengary Donald A. 
McDonald, Alexandria. 

Clerk P. J. McDonell, Cornwall. 

Isolicitor P. J. McDonell, Cornwall. 

Surveyor John S. Bruce, Cornwall. 

Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar 
ter Sessions William Ross. 

Sheriff Daniel K. Mclutyre, Cornwall 

Clerk of Peace J. Priugle. Cornwall. 

Clerk of Co Court and Deputy Clerk o 
Crown L. McDonald, Cornwall. 

Judge Surrogate George McDonell 
Cornwall. 

Registrar Surrogate Alex. McLean 
Cornwall. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. J. McRae, Williamstown 
Division II. J. McPherson, Alexandria 
Division 111. W. M. Park, Cornwall. 
Division IV. ,). Bockus, Osnabruck. 
Division V. J..,hu W. Louchs, Will 

iamsburgh. 
Division VJ. Henry Stacey, Matilda. 
Division VII. \V. Kidley, Mountain. 
Division V11I. J. A. Cockburn, Finch 
Division IX. PeUr Stuart, Lancaster 
Division X. J. McQuaig, Winchester 

County Tuwn CORNWALL. 

Chief Magistrate Jacob Farraad Prin 

gle, Cornwall. 

Clerk Charles Poole, Cornwall. 
Population 1,016. 
Assessed Value in 1855 70.000. 
Taxes per Annual Value 2s. Od. 

Municipalities. 
Townships in Stormont Coruwal 

Finch, Os.ialiruck, Roxburgh; an 

Town of Cornwall. 
Townships ill iundas Matilda, Moun 

tain, Williaiiisburgh, Winchester. 
Townships in Glengary. Charlotte 

burgh, Indian Reserve, Kcnyor 

Lancaster, 



Magistrates. 

ai-vis, George S., Cornwall, 
ankoughnet, Philip, do. 
[cGillvray, John, Charlottenburg. 
rysler, John, Finch. 
[cDonell, Duncan, Charlottenburg. 
Vood, Guy C., Cornwall, 
lacklock, Ambrose, do. 
rysler, John P., Williamsburg. 
haver, Peter, Matilda. 
[cDonald, John, Gray s Creek. 
[cLennan, John, Lancaster, 
ameron, John, Charlottenburg. 
Archibald, John, Osnabruck. 
line, William, Cornwall. 
IcBean, John, Lancaster, 
attanach, Donald, Kenyon. 
^attanach, Angus, Lancaster, 
lattice, William, Cornwall. 
IcCargar, Hugh, Mountain. 
3rouse, Jacob, Matilda, 
larkley, George, Williamsburg. 
-Ceeler, Isaac. Matilda. 
IcRae, John, Charlottenburg. 
leDonald, Donald Alexander, Lochiel. 
raser, Alexander, do. 

IcLean, Alexander, Cornwall. 
jOckburn, Adam, Finch, 
lllar, Michael, Williamsburg. 
lose, Isaac N., do. 

haver, Samuel, Matilda. 
>rouse, Edward, do. 
Vest, James, do. 

i"ox, Charles James, do. 
>aing, George, do. 

.IcDonald, R., Dr., Cornwall. 
lart, Samuel, do. 

AIcDonnell, Donald, do. 
( rench, Benjamin G., do. Township. 
Armstrong, Thomas, Mountain, 
larkness. John, Matilda. 
Jell, David, do. 

3rouse, George, Mountain. 
Sell. Walter, Williamsburg. 
tlolden, James, Matilda, 
ilammell, George, Winchester, 
[tyiidvnan, Joseph, Mountain. 
" hristie, Archibald, do. 
McPherson, Murdock, Lancaster. 
Le Clair, Charles, do. 

McDonald, Ronald S., do. 
McLennan, F. B., Charlottenburg 
McLachlan, Kenneth, do. 

Hay, John, do. 

McPherson, Donald, do. 

McDonald, James, do. 

Cummings, James, do. 

Aitken, John, do. 

McDonell, Alex., Indian Reserves. 
McDougall, Daniel, do. 

Stewart, John, Lochiel, 

Robertson, Donald, do. 
McDonell, Alexander, do. 
Quigley, Owen, do. 

McLennan, Kenneth, Kenyon. 
Rattray, Charles, Cornwall. 

McDougall, Alexander, do. 
Park, William M., do. 

Elliot, Andrew, Matilda, 
Rose, Jesse W., Williamsburg. 
Croil, James, do. 

Shaver, Henry, Osnabruck. 
Warner, William, do. 

Ault, Samuel, do. 

Grant, George C., do. 

Campbell, James K. do. 
Grant, Robert, do. 

Ilawley, Ira, do. 

Whyatt, Nicholas, do. 

Johnston, Adam, Cornwall. 
McDonald, John, Sen., do. 
McDonald, Donald, do. 

McDonell, James, do. 

Bennett, Thomas, Roxborough. 
Sproul, James, do. 

[151] 



37. Waterloo. 



icres 328,463. 
opulatiou in 1852 



-20,537. 



.ssessed Value in 1855 1,630,728. 
labilities 2,000. 
Vrnount of Debeut. issued 2,000. 

County OJicials. 

Varden John Scott, Berlin. 

reasurer Christian Enslin, Berlin. 
Registrar David S. Shoemaker, Berlin 

lerk William UavidFo.., Berlin. 

olicitor JEuiilius Irving, Gait. 

udge Co. Court and Chairman Quar. 
ter Sessions "William Miller, Berlin- 

heriff George l):u idson, Berlin. 

lerk of Peace jEmilius Irving, Gait. 

lerk of Co. Court and Deputy Clerk of 
Crown James Coiquhoun, Berlin. 

udge Surrogate Win. Miller, Berlin 

legistrar Surrogate C. Enslin, Berlin. 

Clerics of Division Courts. 
Jivision I. John Davidson, Berlin. 
Mvision II. Otto Klotz. Preston. 
Mvision III. .Henry Mocruni, Gait. 
Division IV .George Colcleuvh, Ayr. 
Division V J. Allchin, New Hamburg. 
Mvision VI M.P. Empey, Hawksville. 
Jivi.-i-jn VII. James Mirrielees, Ca. 
nestogo. 

County Town BERLIN. 
Chief Magistrate John Scott, M.D., 

Reeve. 

Clerk William Davidson, Esq.. 
Population About 2,000. 

i.l Value in IS.j.V 8,417. 
I axes per Annual Value 2s. 6d. 

Municipalities. 
Cownships Dumfries North, Water 
loo, Wellesley, Wilmot, Woolwich; 
the Town of Berlin and Villages of 
Gait and Preston. 

Magistrates. 

Miller, William, Berlin. 
Reynolds, William. NYoolwich. 
Uowan, James, Waterloo. 
Uettschiu, Jacob. Wilmot. 
Pbin, James, Waterloo. 
Hespeler, Jacob, do. 
Puddicombe, Henry. Wilmot. 
Bowman, Samuel B., Waterloo. 
Bowman, Jonathan B., do. 
Ahrens, Charles II., do. 
Hoffman, John, clo. 

1 Vrrie, Robert, dj. 

Snider, Henry, do. 

Tagge, Peter X., do. 

Iluber, Henry, do. 

Kaiser, Anthony, Wilmot. 
Doering, Christopher, do. 
Meyers, John, Wo.>lwich. 
Ross, Jam do. 

Curtis, Burton, do. 
Caldwell, Gavin, do. 
Mitchell. William, do. 
Grain, Thomas, do. 
Taylor, George, do. 
Cunningham, William. Wellesley. 
Davidson, William, Waterloo. 
Beck, Jacob, do. 

Hamilton, Thomas, do. 
Eby, Henry, do. 

Richardson, 1 homns, do. 
Davidson, Alexander, do. 
Schnarr, Hartman. do. 
Romback, Ferdinand, do. 
Klopher, Jao<>!>. do. 

Springer, M do. 

McGeorge, Charles, North Dumfries. 
Colcleugh, George, do. 

! Manley, Dani 1. do. 

Walker, James W. do. 

Hall, John, do. 

Lutz, Morris C., do. 



64 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



[1856. 



Crombie, James, North Dumfries. 
Cook, Peier, do. 

Sampson. Theophilus, do. 
Scott, William, \\ilmot. 
Nevills, Titus G., do. 
Masters, John, do. 
Erust, John, do. 

Cutten, Edward L. do. 
Meyer, John, Woolwich. 
Winger, 1 eter, do. 
Hemlry, Charles, do. 
Seaton, John, do., do. 
Bristow, Edward, do. 
Smith, Kobert, do. 
Hawk, John, Well, sl.-y. 

Hawk, Pea iv. . do. 

McKinley, William, do. 
Buchanan, Alexander, do. 
Hastings. William, do. 
Empey, Michael, i ., do. 
Taylor, George, (2) do. 
Shade, Absalom, Halt. 

Bowman, Wendell, North Dumfries. 
Buchanan, Alexander, do. 
Elliott, Andrew, do. 

Climens, Isaac, Waterloo. 
Klotzz, Otto, do. 

Wylie, Robert, North Dumfries. 
Watson, John, do. 

Kilgour, Joseph, do. 
Potter, David, do. 

Sharp, James, do. 



28. Wcntwortli. 

Acres 272,200. 

Population 28.507. 

Assessed Value in 1866-*1,681^19. 

Liabilities 33,952 

Amount of Debent. issued 33 ; 9<)2. 

County Officials. 

Warden John Hes!p. Ancaster. 

Treasurer J. Kirlipatrick. Hamilton. 

Registrar A. Stuart, Hamilton. 

Ci er k Charles O Counsell, Hamilton. 

Solicitor J.O. Halt, Esq.. Hamilton. 

Surveyor F. J. Kasirick, Hamilton. 

Judge Co. Court and Chairmen Quar 
ter Sessions A. Logie, Hamilton. 

Sheriff E. C. Thomas. Hamilton. 

Clerk of Peace V. B. Spobn, Hamilton. 

Clerk of County Court and Deputy 
Clerk of Crown Andrew Stewart, 
Hamilton. 

Judge Surrogate Oliver Springer, 
Hamilton. 

Registrar Surrogate George Rolph, 
Dundas. 

Emigration Agent Thomas C. Dixon, 
Hamilton. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. W. R. McDonald, Hamil 
ton. 

Division II. A. F. Begue. Dundas. 

Division III. A. Hall, Waterdown. 

Division IV. Wm.W. Barlow. Beverly. 

Division V. J. Bradley. Stoney Creek. 
Cuuntj TiM n HAMILTON. 

Chief Magisti ate Geo. II. Armstrong. 

Cleric Thomas licasley. 

Population About 2". 

Assessed Value in 1S55 190,480. 

Taxes per Annual Value us. 
Jfunicipdtitiei. 

Townships Ancaster, Barton, Be 
verly, Biubrooke, FlainboroughEast, 
Flamborough West, Glaiit nrd, Salt- 
fleet; the City of Hamilton and 
Town of Dundas. 

MOj 

Logie, Alexander, Hamilton. 
Wilson, John, Salt fleet. 
Wilson, Hugh, do. 



Secord, John, Barton. 
Servos, Daniel K., do. 
Ritchie, Edmund, Hamilton. 
Ferrie, Colin C., do. 

Williamson, John, Stoney Creek. 
Aikiuan, John, Ancaster. 
Ewart, James B., Dundas. 
Hammill, Thomas, Ancaster. 

. Preserved, do. 
Gourlay, William, Barton. 
McNab, Sir Allan N., Hamilton. 
Ste\eii. Andrew, do. 

Binghaui, Elisha, Glanford. 
Morgan, Henry, Binbrook. 
Smith, Harmanus. Ancaster. 
Davidson, John, Hamilton. 
Young, John, do. 

McN ab, Daniel, do. 

Spauu, Philip, Ancaster. 
I aterson, John, Dundas. 
\\iner. John, Hamilton. 
Maclem, AVilliam, Barton. 
Hopkins, Gabriel, E. Flamborough. 
Craigie, William, Hamilton. 
Kvans, Edward. Watertown. 
Kerr, Archibald. Hamilton. 
Heslop, Robert, Ancaster. 
Armstrong, George II., Hamilton. 
McCoy, Burge, Ancaster. 

llogaboom, Geor do. 

Stinson, Ebenezer. Hamilton. 
Holt, Robert, Dundas. 
Jackson, Edward, Hamilton. 
Hamilton, Robert J., do. 
Gunn, Daniel C., do. 

Kyrkman, John, do. 

Battersby, John, Ancaster. 
Gott, William A., Hamilton. 
Hamilton James, Dundas. 
Waddle, Thomas. Ilarton. 
(ireen, Samuel, Saltlleet. 
Hughson, Nathaniel. K. Flamborough. 
Lobridge, Kobert, M aterdown. 
Kirkpatriek, James. Hamilton. 
Hammill, Robert, Copetown. 
O Beirne, Martin J., Ilamilton. 
Lewis, Daniel, Stoney Creek. 
Walker, James, Hamilton. 
Freeman, William, Saltfleet. 
Birely. Lewis 1).. Hamilton. 
Soules, Benjamin, Salttleet. 
Davis, James <!.. Hamilton. 
Van Wagner, Peter S.. Saltneet. 
Triller, John, Hamilton. 

Aikman, Michael, do. 

Horning, William, Barton. 
Rymal, Jacob, do. 

Buchanan, Isaac, Hamilton. 
Carroll. Peter, E. Elamborough. 
Case, Horatio N., Hamilton. 

Carpenter, Alexander, do. 
Mcllroy, Robert, do. 

Counsel!, Charles 0., do. 

Park, George. do. 

Ford, Nehemiah II., do. 

Kerr, William G., do. 

Williams. James M., do. 

Moore, John F., do. 

Davis, Milton, do. 

Calder, James, Ancaster. 

Cameron, Franfi?, do. 

Binkley, Jacob. do. 

llowell, Moses II., do. 

Smith, William M., do. 

Rymal, John, do. 

Shaver, William. do. 

Hendershot, Abraham, do. 
Dreper, Jasper, do. 

llowell, Peter, do. 

Heslop, John, do. 

Shaver, Daniel, do. 

Finline, Brooke, Binbrooke. 
Ptolemy, Charles, do. 

Hall, Henry, do. 

Spittal. James. do. 

Sidey. John, do. 

Flood, James, do. 

[152] 



Binkley, Alex., Glanford. 
Springer, Richard, do. 
Hannon, Joseph, do. 

Smith, Gideon, do. 

,ube, Seth, do. 

MoKenzie, Simou, Beverley. 
Sager. Malachi, do. 

Bennett, John, do. 

Jones. ( ieorge. do. 

Nesl.itt, Stephen, do. 

Diekson, William, do. 
Vallance, John, d;>. 

Mizner, Adam, do. 

Inksetter, Kobert, do. 
Christie, Kobert, Jr., W. Flamboro . 
Logie, James, do. 

Spence, Robert, Dundas. 
Colman, James, do. 
Miller, William, West Flamboro . 
Thornton, John M., DUIUIU.S. 
Quarry. John, do. 

Mitchell, James. do. 

Campbell, Daniel. do. 

Overfield. Benjamin, do. 
Keagy, John, Dundas. 
Bain. Walter, West Flamboro . 
Itiukley, Samuel, do. 
Sanderson, Hugh, do. 
Smith, Thomas, Waterdown. 
Stock. Thomas, do. 

Me Monies, James, do. 

Alray, George, do. 

(iraliam. Henry F., d i. 

Stevenson, James, Jr., Hamilton. 
Ualbraith, Dayid B., do. 

Dayfoot, George C., do. 

Williamson, David, Stoney 
Green, Samuel K.. do. 

Waddel, Kobert, Hamilton. 
Smith, Lewis, Barton. 
McQueen, James, Beverly. 
Fcrrie, John, Hamilton. 

Osborne, William, do. 
Gordon, James, do. 

Mills. John, do. 

Bickell, Tristam, do. 
Osborne, James, do. 

Lister, Joseph, do. 

Cummings. James, do. 
Stinson, Thomas, do. 
Moore, Hugh, Dundas. 
Brown, Michael W., Hamilton. 
Leslie, John, Dundas. 
Tisdale, Marvin, D. L., Ancaster. 
liigelow, Albert, Hamilton. 
McLaren, Wm. P., do. 

Nicholls, Willoughby H. do. 

Fisher, John, Hamilton. 

Baker, Hugh C., di>. 

Clement, Joseph S., do. 
Ford, Nehamiah, do. 
Sunley, Geor.:". do. 

McKenzie, Thomas II., Dundas. 
Coleman, James, do. 

Overtield, Samuel, do. 

Irvine, Adam. do. 

Spence, Kobert, do. 

Sernburgh, Ephraim. do. 



29. Wellington. 

Acres 791.H it. 
Population in 18522 
Assessed Value in 1855 1,302.411. 
Liabilities .C">,t)ii<i. ex. ivbi-nt. 
Amount of Debent. issued i;!,!." !). 
County Officials. 

Warden Charles Allan, K! 

urer William Ih-wat. (im-lph. 

irar II. W. Prtersnn, (im Iph. 
Clerk A. D.Ferrier,Guelph or Fergus. 
Solicitors Fergusson and Kingsmill, 

Guelph. 

Surveyor Frar;cis Kerr. 
Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar- 

-essions Archibald Macdonald. 



1856.] 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



65 



Sheriff George J. Grange. 

Clerk of Peace Th mi.ts launders. 

Clerk of County Court and Deputy 

Clerk of Crowa -ia,jie.- II >ugh. 
Judge Surrogat, A. Al.i .-d .maid. 
Registrar Surrogate Th jmas Keating. 

Cltrks of L> ..-, m tirti. 

Division I. Alfred A. Baker. Guelph. \ 
Division II. Willi.tm I, -He. I usliuch. 
Division III. Andre .v Hjwat, Ilu. -k- 

wood, Eramosn. 

Division IV. ). 0:nl.--iu. aa, Fergus, j 
Division V. William I vler, Erin. 
Division VI.- ,J..h. -i,.l, Elora. j 

Division VII. John i > jiu.ian. Allans- i 

ville. 
Division VIII 0. ) Cal!a :h-m, Arthur. 

County T Hi n jv ;LPH. 

Chief Magistrate J.jliii Smith. 
Clerk and Treasurer James Houjh. 
Population 3.0- h). 
Assessed Value in 185.3 13.513. 

Mum 

Townships Amaranih. Arthur. Kra- 
mosa, Erin, (ifi-.i.a . i. Guelph, Lu 
ther, Maryborou.li. Miuto, Xichol, 
Peel, Pilkinif ii. i unlinch ; and 
Town of Gueiph. 

Jfoffixtra 

William Reynolds. i iil<ington. 

William HeVat. Uii 

Edward Murton. d >. 

James Webster, d > 

Alexander DrysJale G.ir ifraxa, 
I Thomas Webster, do. 

Alexander D. Fe -ri-.-r, Vji:*iol. 

Henry Strange. Er , 

Richard Ja^ksou, . u-lph. 

William Clarke. a > . 

Charles J. Mickle. 

George Armstrong, i^raiiiosa. 

James Hodgert, GueljiU. 

John Hat-land, d >. 

James Wrirht, ii >. 

Thomas W. Valentin, . Niuhol. 

Thomas Mair. S.-:ii if, do. 

Peter Me Gill. Erin. 

Edmund F. Heatii, I uslinch. 

John Hammersly, do. 

Alexander Harvey. Ni iiol. 

William Leslie. I usiineli. 

Henry AV. Peters 11 Guelph. 

David Allan, do. 

Alfred A. Baker, do. 

John McCrea, 
A Frederick W. Stone, d ). 

John Smith, 

William Armstr.>u _:. ./.-aniosa. 

Robert Royce, do. 

James Loghrin, do. 

William Phinn. do. 

Adam L. Ar.ro. Ni -Vn.i. 

John Cockburn. i usliii^-b. 

Thomas Ellis. do. 

Charles Mickle, do. 

David Striton, -i>. 

Charles Allan. PilUin. ton. 

George Barron, Ni.-hol. 

Sem Wipler, I >. 

Alexander Watt. ii->. 

John Watt, da 

Thomas Dow, 

Thomas Loghrin <i >. 

William Clark. I, tin. 

George Henshaw. I j. 

William Tyler, il >. 

Charles McMill.m >l>. 

John Wilkie. <i;> if asa. 

Kelson Hughs in s 

George Allan. 1 < 

Garret Molloy, il . 

William Gunn. lr hur. 

Kiehard Hatfield. d >. 

Andrew Mitchell- do. 

E 



30 Yorlt and Peel. 

Acres in York 515,342. 
Acres in Peel 279,743. 
Population in 1852 (exclusive of City 

of Toronto): York, 79,719; Peel, 

24,816. 
Assessed Value in 1855: York, 

:;.260,855; Peel, 1,543,018. 
Total Am nt of Taxes : York, 9,037 ; 

Peel, 5,307. 

Liabilities York, 1,954 ; Peel. 689. 
Amount of Debentures issued York, 

1,149 ; Peel, 5i>4. 

Ontnty Officials. 

Warden J. Hartman, M.P.P. Aurora. 

Treasurer J. S. Howard, Toronto. 

Registrar John Ridout, Toronto. 

Clerk John Elliot, Toronto. 

Judge Co. Court and Chairman Quar 
ter Sessions Samuel Bealey Harri 
son, Toronto. 

Sheriff W. Botsford Jarvis, Toronto. 

Deputy Sheriff F. W. Jarvis. 

Clerk of Peace G.Gurnett, Toronto. 

Deputy Clerk of Peace^J. H. S. Dol- 
mage. , 

Clerk of County Court Walter Me 
Keuzie, Toronto. 

Judge Surrogate S. B. Harrison, To 
ronto. 

Registrar Surrogate W. J. FitzGerald, 
Toronto. 

Clerks of Division Courts. 

Division I. A. McL. Howard, Toronto. 

Division II. C. Keller, Unionville. 

Division III. J. Grieve, Richmond 
Hill. 

Division IV. J. C. Hogaboom^ New 
market. 

Division V. Mark Mossington, North 
Gwillimbury. 

Division VI. A. Armstrong, Noble- 
ton. 

Division VTI. A. Agar, Barnside. 

Division VIII. John Paul, Weston. 

Division IX. A. Simpson, Streetsville. 

Division X. T. McKenna, Brampton. 

Division XI. T. Switzer, Sandhill. 

County Town TOKOXIO. 
Chief Magistrate G. W. Allan, Mayor. 
Police Magistrate George Gurnett. 
Clerk Charles Daly. 
Population About 50,000. 
Taxes per Annual Value 2s. lOd. 

Municipalities. 

Townships in Y ork Etobicoke, Geor- 
gina, Gwillimbury East, Gwillim- 
bury North. King, Markham, Scar 
borough, Vaughan, Whitchurch, 
York ; City of Toronto and Village 
of Yorkville. 

Townships in Peel Albion, Caledon, 
Chinguacousy, Toronto, Toronto 
Gore; and Village of Brampton. 

Magistrates. 

Harrison, Samuel B., Toronto. 
Crockshank, George, do. 
Elmsley, John, do. 

Baldwin, Augustus, do. 
Adamson, Peter, Toronto Township. 
Thompson, William, do. 
Gamble, John W., Vaughan. 
McQuarrie, Hector, do. 

;er, Benjamin, Chinguacousy. 
Gamble, William, Etobicoke. 
Monro, George, Toronto. 

Chewett, James G., do. 
Kidout, Thomas G., do. 
Denison, George T., do. 
Gapper, Richard C., Markham. 
Baldwin,Connell J., Toronto Gore. 
Lynch, John, Chinguacousy. 
Campbell, Francis, do. 

[153] 



Button, John, Markham. 
Thomson, Edward \V~., York. 
Gamble. James, Whitchurch. 
Fisher. Thomas, Etobicoke. 
O Brien, Lu -ius. Toronto. 
McQuarrie. Donald, Caledon. 
Boyd, Frauds, Toronto. 
Grahame, Win. 11.. Vauirhan. 
Paterson, James. Streetsville. 
Berczy. Charles, Toronto. 
Crewe, William, Cooksville. 
Gardiner, Joseph, Chinguacousy. 
Mc-Dou-iall. Daniel, Yaughan. 
Bell, George. Caledon. 
Clark, William, Scarbpro . 
Johnson. James, Albion. 
Rogers, Joseph, Toronto. 
Sanderson, John Streetsville. 
Gorham, Eli. Whitchurch. 
Hawkins. John, Toronto Township. 
Tomlinson, Joseph. Markham. 
Shaver, Peter, Etobicoke. 
Kline, John N., Vaughan. 
Brett. Thomas. Caledon. 
St .-wai-t. Henry, King. 
Lesslie. James, Toronto. 
Bell, Thomas, do. 

Willson, John, York. 
Maclem, John, Whitchurch. 
McKechanie, Alexander, Vaughan. 
II:irrold, Samuel, East Gwillimbury. 
Baldwin, Wm. A., Toronto. 
Brooke, Daniel, do. 

Cook, Jacob, Toronto Township. 
Cummer, John, York. 
Heat y. James. Toronto. 
Devenish, William, Scarborough. 
Monkman, James, Albion. 
Phillips, Samuel E., King. 
Graham, Jeremiah, EastGwillirabury. 
Ridout, George P., Toronto. 
Reeve, Wm. B., Toronto Township. 
Thompson, Charles. Yo -k. 
Crosby. Chauncey, Markham. 
Thorn", John. Toronto. 

Peri-in, Wm! L., do. 

Eccles. Hugh, do. 

Howard, John G. do. 

Wakefield. William, do. 
Woodill, John, Toronto Gore. 
Holden, Sinclair. Markham. 
Burr, Rowland, Yaughan. 
Pearson, Nathaniel, King. 
Freelaud, Peter, Toronto. 
Howard. James S., do. 
Silverthorne, Aaron, Toronto Towu p. 
D ...el. John, do. 

Dennis. Joseph, Y ork. 
Helliwell, Thomas, Toronto. 
Nation, James, do. 

Lawrence. Peter, York. 
Cameron, John, Toronto. 
Preston, Thomas J., do. 
Cut heart, Robert, do. 

Lynn. Samuel G., do. 

Switzer, Benjamin, Toronto Town p. 
Price, Samuel, do. 

Cott m. Robert. do. 

Birdsall. William, do. 

Adams, William. Albion. 
Kent, Francis, Chinguacousy. 
Wright, George, do. 
Ci asar, John, do. 

Milburn, Thomas, Albion. 
Srt itzer, Daniel, do. 
Taylor, James, York. 
Arnold, Abner, Markham. 
Crosby, Henry, do. 

Marr, Benjamin, do. 
Reesor, Christopher, do. 
White, Ira, do. 

Wideman, Henry. Whitchurch. 
Button, William M., Markham. 
Harris, James B., Toronto Township 
Crumble, John, do. 

Ogden, Samuel, G., do. 
:-. Robert, do. 

Simpson, Adam, do. 



MUNICIPALITIES. 



[1856. 



Wright, Joseph, Toronto Township. 
Duggan, William, do. 
Todd, John, do. 
Gardner, Robert, do. 
Johnston, William, do. 
Pointer, Richard, do. 
Price, Samuel, do. 
Spiers, Wm., Chinguacousy. 
Rowland, Peleg, do. 
Holmes, John, do. 
Lenrmont, William, do. 

Allan, William, do. 
Haggard, Thomas, do. 

Buckham, Andrew, do. 

Sinclair, Archibald, do. 

Young, Thomas, do. 

Lindsay, Samuel, Caledon. 
Kirkwood, John, do. 
Russel, Thomas, do. 
McGregor, John, do. 
Dick, David, do. 
Bolton, James, Albion. 
Wallace, Edward, do. 
Roadhouse, William, do. 
McDougall, Joseph, do. 
Aikinfe, James C., Toronto Gore. 
Bowman, Kobert, do. 
Somerset, John, do. 
Slightholm, James, do. 
Figg, Joseph, do. 
Rowland, William P., Etobicoke. 
Smith, Joseph, do. 

McFarlane, Alexander, do. 
Musson, Thomas, do. 

Bagwell, John B., do. 

Grubb, William, do. 



Wadsworth, William, Etobicoke. 
Price, James Ilervey, York. 
Bloor, Joseph, do. 
Denison, Richard L., do. 
Gilmor, Isaac C., do. 
Alcorn, Samuel, do. 
Parker, Reuben A., do. 
Selby, William, East Gwillimbury. 
Sloan, W. J. do. 
Bowes, John G., Toronto. 
Whittemore, Ezekiel F., do. 
McDonnell, Duncan, do. 
Workman, Joseph, do. 
Mitchell, James, do. 
O Neill, Terence J., do. 
Hayes, James J., do. 
Wright, Amos, Markham. 
Miller, Henry, do. 
Reid, John, do. 
Nichols, William, do. 
Pringle, Jacob, Jr., do. 
Reesor, David, do. 
Eckhardt, Frederick, do. 
Wright, S. Reid, do. 
Clarkson, Hilary, do. 
Barker, Archibald, do. 
Post, Jordon, Scarborough. 
Wheeler, John P., do. 
Glendinning, Archibald, do. 
Snider, Martin, do. 
Purvis, James, do. 
llelliwell, William, do. 
Teefy, Matthew, Taughan. 
Dickson, George P., do. 
Cook, Thomas, do. 
Bunt, Frances, do. 



Hughes, Job, East Gwillimbury, 
Knight, Moses, do. 

Stiles, Henry D., do. 

Jakeway, Aaron. do. 

McMaster, Arthur, do. 

Laughton, William, do. 

Sprague, David, North do. 
Terry, William B., do. 

Payson, Ephraim H., do. 
Wilson, Hugh T., do. 

Irwin, Jared, King. 

Smith, James II., do. 
Tyson, John, do. 

Irwin, Robert, P. do. 
Wells, William, do. 

Sharpe, John, do. 

Noble, Thomas, do. 

Mcljeod, Martin, do. 
Hartman, Joseph, Whitchurch. 
Jones, Norman, do. 

Wheeler, Edward, do. 

Smith, Robert II., do. 

Playter, George, do. 

Brodie, Georcv. do. 

James, William. York. 

Mulholland, William, do. 
Johnson, Abraham, do. 
McMullin, James, do. 

Bridgeland, Clark B., do. 
Tyrrell, William, do. 

Lee, William, do. 

Pease, Elihu, do. 

Gurnett, George, Toronto. 

Duggan, George, Jun, do. 
Bowes, John, George. do. 



CLERGY OF CANADA. 



United Church of England 
and Ireland. 

DIOCESE OF QUEBEC. 

DISTRICT OF QUEBEC. 

Lord Bishop of Quebec Right Rev. G. 
J. Mountain, D.D., D.C.L. Bishop s 
Official and Examining Chaplain 
Rev. Geo. Mackie, D.D.; Chaplains 
Rev. S. 8. Wood, M.A., Rev. Jasper 
H. Nicolls, M. A., Rev. Armine W. 
Mountain, M.A. 

Quebec Lord Bishop, Rector; George 
Mackie, D.D.. Cathedral District; E. 
W. Sewell, Holy Trinity Chapel ; D. 
Robertson, Chaplain to II. M. Forces; 
W. A. Adams, D.C.L., Cathedral Lec 
turer, (Secretary to Church Society) ; 
G. Percy, B.A., St. Peter s Chapel; 
R. G. Plees, St. Paul s Chapel; A.W. 
Mountain, M.A., and H. Roe, B.A., 
Curates, having each a Chapel; C. L. 
F. Haeusel, Evening Lecturer, Holy 
Trinity Chapel; R. A. Carden, As 
sistant, do. 

2\nnt LeiyJ. Carry, B.D. 

Montmorenci Falls C. L. F. Haensel. 

Valcartitr E. C. Parkin. 

Stnneham d- Lake Beaufort R. Short. 

Bourg Louis and Port Keuf W. Bi- 
net, B.A. 

Upper Ireland, <fc. Vacant. 

Leeds Vacant. 

ft-ampton, <&:. R. S. Birtch. 

Riviere du LmtpE. G. W. Ross. 

Acting Okaplain la Quarantine Station 
A. W. Mountain, M.A. 

DISTRICT OF THREE MVERS. 

Three Rivers S. S. Wood, M. A., Rector 
Rn-ure du Loup en liaut W. Mer 

rick, B.A. 

Nicoletr-ll. Burges, B.A. 
JJrummondviUe and Lower Durham 

W. M. Ross, (Acting.) 

DISTRICT OF ST. FRANCIS. 

Kingsey & Upper Durham A.. Balfbur 

Richmond and Melbourne D. Fal 

loon, D.D. 



Ihtrbrooke C. P. Reid. 

LennoxvilleL. Doolittle, M.A., G. Pen- 
nefather, B.A., (and at Bishop s Col 
lege, J. H. Nicolls, M.A., and H. C. 
Thomson, M.A.) 

Compton, &;. A. A. Allen. 

HatleyR. G. Burrage. 

Eaton J. Dalziel. 

Bury, dx. J. Kemp, B.D. 

Dudswett <& Ham T. S. Chapman. 

DISTRICT OF GASPE. 

New Carlisle, cfc. G. Milne, M.A. 
Gape Cove and Perce Sep. Jones. 
Sandy Beach, etc. F. A. Smith. 
Gaspe Basin, <fc. W. Arnold, (retired,) 

F. De La Mare. 
Magdalen Islands T. Boyle. 

DIOCESE OF MONTREAL. 

DISTRICT OF MONTREAL. 

Lord Bishop of Montreal Right Rev. 
Francis Fulford, D.D. Residence 
See House, Montreal. 

City of Montreal Cathedral, Dean,Very 
Rev. J.Bethune, D.D.; Senior Canon, 
Ven. Archdeacon Lower, M.A.; Ju 
nior Canon, Rev. S. Gilson, M.A. ; 
Honorary Canons, Rev. J. Reid, D.D., 
Rev. M. Townsend, M.A., Rev.W.T. 
Leach, D.C.L., Rev. C. Bancroft, M.A. 

Archdeacon of Montreal, Ven. II. M. 
Lower, M.A. 

Bishop s Chaplains, Ven. Archdeacon 
Lower, M.A., Rev. J. Scott, M.A. 

Bishop s Secretary, Rev. Canon Gil- 
son, M.A. 

St. George s Ohurch Rev. Canon Leach, 
D.C.L. ; Rev. W. B. Bond, M.A., As 
sistant Minister. 

Trinity Church Rev. A. D. Camp 
bell, M.A. 

St. Stephen s Church -Rev. Jacob Elle- 
good, M.A. 

St. Luke s Church Rev. Canon Gil- 
son, M.A. 

Garrison Chaplain Rev. E. Rogers. 

Abbotsford and Raugemont Robert F. 
Robinson. 



[154] 



Aylnwr and Hull Rev. J. Johnston. 
Berthier and Brandon Rev. W. Mer- 

rick, M.A., Mr. Benson, Catechist. 
Bedford Rev. J, Jones. 
Brome Rev. R. Lindsay, M.A. 
Buclcingham Rev. W. Morris. 
ChamblyRHv. J. P. White, Rector. 
Christievilleltev. J. A. McLeod. 
ClarenceviUe Rev.M.Townsend,M.A.. 

Rector. 

Clarendon Rev. J. S. Sykes. 
Coteau du Lac Rev. J. Mountain, M.A . 
Cbwansvitteand ChurchriUe Rev. J. C. 
Davidson. 

Dunham Rev. J. Scott, M.A., Rector. 
Edwardsiown Rev. E. Sutton. 
Farnham&St.Brigide Rev. W.Jones. 
Frost Village and Stu^eley Rev. D. 

Lindsay. 

Gore Rev. G. Griffin. 
Granby Rv. T. Machin. 
Grenville Rev. C. Forest. 
Uemmingford Rev. G. de Oourcy 

O Qrady, M.A. 

Henryville Rev. E. Duvernet, M.A. 
Huntingdon Rev. F. S. Neve. 
L Acadie Rev. F. E. Judd, M.A. 
Lachine Rev. J. Flanagan. 
Lacolle Rev. C. Morice. 
Laprairie Rev. R. Lonsdell. 
Mascouche and Terrcbonne Her. R. 

Cornwall. 

Milton Rev. G. Slack, M.A. 
New Glasgow & Kilkenny Rev. A. D. 

Lockhart. 

Ormstown Rev. W. Brethour, M.A. 
Rawdnn and Kildare Rev. C. Rolllt. 
Russelltoivn Rev. J. Fulton. 
Sabrevois Mr. Moulpied, Catechist. 
St. Andrew s Rev. W. Abbott, Rector. 
St. Armand East Rev. Canon Reid, 

D.D., Rector. 
St. Armand West^- Rev. R. Whitwtll. 

M.A., Rector; Rev. C. A. Wetheral), 

B.A., Assistant. 

St. Hyacinthe & Upton Rev. J. Godden. 
St. John s Rev. Canon Bancroft, M.A., 

Rector. 



1856.] 



CLERGY. 



67 



.. Martin s and St. Iherese Rev. T. A. 

Young. 

Sherrington Rev. T. Mussen, B.A. 
Sard Kev. W. Anderson, Rector ; Rev. 

P. S. Williams, Assistant for parts 

adjacent. 

Stantiridge East Rev. T. Constantino. 
Satton Rev. 11. Montgomery. 
Vaudreuil Rev. J. tyke. 
Waterloo and She/ord Rev. A. T. 

Whitten. 

DIOCESE OF TORONTO. 

Lord Bis/top of Toronto The Hon. and 
lit. Rev. John Strachan, D.I). LL.D. 
Archdeacon of Kingston, Venerable 
George O lvill Stuart, D.D., LL.D. 
Archdeacon of York, Venerable A. N. 
Bethune, D.D. Examining and Do 
mestic Chaplain and Secretary to the 
Lord Bishop, the Rev. H. J. Grasett, 
B.D. 

City of Toronto H. J. Grasett, B.D., 
Rector ; Edmund Baldwin, M. A., 
Assistant Minister of St. James; 
J. G. D. Mackenzie, M.A., Minister of 
St. Paul s Church ; W. A. Johnson, 
Assistant Minister of St. Paul s; 
Alex. Sanson, Minister of Trinity 
Church ; Stephen Lett, LL.D., Minis 
ter of St. George s Church ; Henry 
tSf adding, D.D., Minister of Church 
of the Holy Trinity, and Chaplain to 
the Lord Bishop; W. S. Darling, 
Assistant Minister of the Church of 
the Holy Trinity ; T. S. Kennedy, 
Secretary of the Church Society; 
G. Whittaker, M.A., Provost of Tri 
nity College; G. C. Irving, M.A., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

EtolricokeH. C. Cooper, B.A, Rector. 

Toronto Towns/tip S. Givins, Rector. 

York Mills H. Mitchele, M.A., Rector. 

StreetswUe Rob, J. Macgeorge. 

ThornhillD. E. Blake, A.B., Rector. 

Markham G. S. J. Hill, Rector. 

Newmarket S. F. Ramsey, M.A. 

Georgina William Ritchie. 

Brock R. Garrett. 

Whitby John Pentland, A.B. 

" V. B. Mayerhotfer, superan. 

Scarboro W. Belt, B.A. 

Norway Mills James Beaven, D.D. 

Lloydtuwn Henry Bath Ostler. 

Chingiiacousy J. G. Armstrong. 

Cariion Walter Stennett, M.A. 

SIMCOE DISTRICT. 

Barrie and Shanty BayS. B. Ardagh, 
A.M., Rector ; Morgan, Assistant 
Minister. 

TecumsethF. L. Ostler, M.A. 

West Gwillimoury Arthur Hill, B A 

Orillia T. Bolton Read. 

PenetanguisheneQ:. Hallen, B A 

Mono J. Fletcher, A.B. 

Nottawasaga John Langtry, B.A. 

GORE DISTRICT. 

r-JQ. Geddes, M.A, Rector ; 
fii J . , M - w - Blackman, Assistant 

T T} S ^J Church of the Ascension, 
J-IIebden A.M.; F. Heise, PI. D. 
Minister to the German Congreg* 
tion; John Butler, M A 
Barton G. A. Bull. 

<Binbrook-3. L. Alexander. 
r and Dundas-Vf. McMurray, 
.., Rector. 
Brantford-J. C. Usher. Rector. 
Mount Pleasant-K. R. Stimson. 

T - Greene, A.B., 



Gait M. Boomer, A.B. 
Paris Adam Townley. 
QafcofHe-Kobert Shanklin. 
Ihtora Francis Tremayne, Jun. 
NorwOr-f. W. Marsh. B.A. 



Missionaries to the Six Nations Indians! 
on the Grand River Abraham Kel- 
les, Adam Elliott. 

WELLINGTON DISTRICT. 

Gfuelph A. Palmer, A.B., Rector ; E. 
M. Stewart, M.A., Assist. Minister. 
Elora John Smithurst. 
Owen Sound A. H. R. Mulholland. 
1 Vilmot F. Van Linge. 
Travelling Missionary J. P. Hodge. 

NIAGARA DISTRICT. 

Niagara T. Creen, Rector. 

Grimsby F. J. Luudy, D.C.L., Rector. 

Chippewa, Stamford, and Drummond- 
viUeVi. Leeming, Rector; C. L. 
Ingles, B.A., Assistant. 

Queenston E. Denroche, B.A. 

Thai-old T. B. Fuller, Rector. 

fort Erie ft. Grasett, M.A, Rector. 

St.Catherines A. F. Atkinson, Rector; 
T. P. Robarts, Assistant. 

Louth Alexander Dixon, B.A. , Rector. 

Port Maitland and Dunnville John 
Flood. 

Settlements on Grand River B. Cud- 
more Hill, M. A. 

GmntlMinH.. N. Phillips. 

TALBOT DISTRICT. 

Simcoe Francis Evans, Rector; Geo. 

Salmon, Superannuated. 
Walpole T. S. Campbell. 

LONDON DISTRICT. 

London B. Cronyn, M.A, Rector, H. 

Hayward, Assistant, M. M. Dillon, 

Missionary to Fugitive Slaves. 
London Township C. C. Brough, A.B, 

Rector. 
St. Thomas George Caulfield, A.B, 

Rector. 

Adelaide A. Mortimer, Rector. 
Carradoc R. Flood, M.A, Rector, and 

Missionary to the Muncey Town 

Indians. 

Port Burwett H. Bate Jessopp, M.A. 
TyrconneU, <c. Henry Holland. 
Malahide C. Brown. 
Port Stanley J. A. Preston, M.A. 

BROCK DISTRICT. 

Woodstock W. Bettridge, B.D, Rector, 
J. Chambers Gibson, Assistant. 

Burford Vacant. 

Oxford J. W. Marsh ; Henry Resell, 
A.B, Superannuated. 

Zorra F D Fauquier. 

HCB.OS DISTRICT. 

Ooderich E. L. Elwood, M.A. 
Bayjtitd R.. F. Campbell, M.A. 
Stratford Ephraim Patterson. 
Blanchard Arch d Lampman. 

WESTERN DISTRICT. 

Sandwich E. W. Dewar, M.A. 
Amherstburgh F. Mack, Rector. 
Colchester F. Gore Elliott. 
Chatham F. W. Sandys, Rector. 
Warwick J. Smyth. 
Walpole Island Andrew Jamieson. 
Dawn, tfc. JohnGunne. 
PlymptvnJ. G. R. Salter, B.A. 
Morpeth C. C. Johnson. 
Mersea John Kennedy. 

NEWCASTLE DISTRICT. 

Cobourg A. N. Bethune, D.D., Rector, 
and Chaplain to the Lord Bishop; 
Charles Ruttan, Assistant. 

Rice LakeJ. W. R. Beck. 

Port Hope Jonathan Shortt, Rector. 

Oavan T. W. Allen, Rector. 

Darlington A. McNab, D.D, Rector. 

Clarke H. Brent, Rector. 

Graf ton and Colborne John Wilson. 

Cartwright and Manners W. Logan. 

[155] 



COLBORNE DISTRICT. 

Peterborough M. Burnham, B.A. Bee- 
tor. 

Emily Robert Harding. 
Fenelon Falls John liickie. 
Norwood, Asphodel John Hilton. 

VICTORIA DISTRICT. 

Belleville John Grier, M.A. 

Port Trent, Frankfort, etc. W. Bleas- 

dell, A.M. 
liawdon F. J. S. Groves. 

PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT. 

Picton W. Macaulay, Rector. 
Murray J. Padfleld. 
Marysburgh J. R. Tooke. 
~\YdMngton R. G. Cox. 
Northport Thomas Bousfield. 

MIDLAND DISTRICT. 

Kingston George O Kill Stuart, LLJ). 
Rector; ^y. M. Herchmer, M.A, As 
sistant Minister and Chaplain to the 
Lord Bishop; W. David, M.A, act 
ing; R. V. Rogers, Minister of St. 
James Church; T. H. M. Bartlett, 
M.A, Officiating Chaplain to the 
Forces; W. Greig, Minister of St. 
Paul s Church; E. C. Bower, Min- 
ister of St. Mark s Church, Barrie- 
field ; II. Mulkins, Chaplain to the 
Provincial Penitentiary. 

Portsmouth F. W. Dobbs. 

BathW. F. S. Harper, Rector. 

Napance W. B. Lauder, A.B., Rector. 

Amtierst Island John Rothwell, A.B. 

Cdmden, Loughborough and Portland 
Paul Shirley. 

JOHNSTOWN DISTRICT. 

BrockviHe J. Travers Lewis, LL.D. 
1 Elizabeth TownYi. C. Clarke. 
! Prescott Robert Blakey, Rector; R. 

Leech, Assistant Minister. 
KemptviUe H. E. Plees, Rector. 
Smit/i s falls J. B. Worrell. 
Travelling Missionaries N. Watkins, 

F. Tremayne. 
Gananogue John Carroll. 

BATHtJSST DISTRICT. 

Perth Alexander Pyne, Rector; II. 

Harris, M.A, superannuated. 
Pranktown R. Lewis. 
Pakenham and Fitzroy J. A. Morris. 
MerrickviUe Ebenezer Morris. 

DALHOUSIE DISTRICT. 

BytownS. S. Strong, D.D, Rector. 
Richmond G. B. Pettit, B.A., Rector. 
March Matthew Ker. 

EASTERN DISTRICT. 

Cornwall Henry Patton, Rectoi. 
Williamsburgh E. J. Boswell, Rector. 
Osnabruck Romaine Rolph. 
Mountain < Edwardsburgh3. Harris. 

OTTAWA DISTRICT. 

West Hawkesbury R. L. Stephenson. 
Pembroke Baker. 

MANITODLIN ISLAND. 

F. A. O Meara, LL.D. 



Roman Catholio Church. 

DIOCESE OB 1 QUEBEC. 
Monseigneur P. F. Turgeon, Arebe- 

veque de Quebec. 
Monseigneur C. F. Baillargeon, Eveque 

de Tloa, Administrateur. 
Vicaires-Generaux MM. A. Mailloui, 

M. Chauvin, (J. Gauvreau, C. f. Oa- 

zeau, L. J. Casault. 
A. I Archeveche MM. 0. F. Caieau, 

Vicaire-General; J. B. A. Ferland, 

P. H. Uarkin, Thomas Roy, E. Lange- 

vin, Secretaire du Diocese; J. Catel- 

lier, sous-secretaire. 



CLERGY. 



[1856. 



Seminaire de Quebec MM. L. J. Ca- 
gault, Superieur; Louis Gingras, 
Leon Giugras, M. Forgues, Procu- 



COTE DU SUD. 

St. Jean Deschaillons L. Noel. 
Lotbiniere E. Faucher. 



C. Laverdiere, 0. Audet, T. 

Hamel. 
College de Sainle Anne MM. C. Gauv- 

reau, V. G.; F. Pilote, Superieur; A. 

Blanchette, A. Pelletier, P. Lagace, 

T. Beaulieu. 
Notre-Vame de Quebec MM. Jos. Au- 

clair, cure; G.F. E. Drolet, D. Racine, 

J. R. L. Hamelin, vicaires. 
Enlist St. Patrice MM. J. Nelligan, 

Chap.; E. Bonneau, J. N. Campbell, 

J. P. Golfer. 
Eglise St. Jean MM. A.Raciue,Chap., 

F. Brunei, Vicaire. 
Ohapelle S. Laurent G. Drolet. 



Schneider, J. Beaudry, J. Braun, J. 

B. Faleur. 

Vrsvlines M. G. L. Lemoine. 
Hotel-Dif.u MM. Lemieux, Chap., M. 

A. Lefrangois. 
EopitalrGeneral M. E. G. Plante, ! 

Chap., M. L. T. Bedard, Anc. Chap. 
La. Pointe a Pizeau et Hnpitaux Mili- 

taires M. P. H. Harkin. 
8t. Roche MM. Z. Charest, cure: J. B. 

Z. Bolduc, J. Martel, P. Dionhe, vi- 

caires. 

Hopital de la Marine -3. B. Z. Bolduc. 
Congregation de St. RochR. f- J. B. 

Faleur. 
Eglise St. Sauveur RR. PP. F. Duro- 

cher, F. A. Grenier, H. Pinc-t, O.M.J. 

DISTRICT DE QUEBEC ISLE D OKLEAXS. 

St. Pierre MM. Jos. Tardif. 

St. Laurent J. Naud. 

St. Jean A. Gosselin. 

St. Francois T. F. Destroismaisons. 

Ste. FamiUeG. H. Besserer. 

COTE DU NORD. 

Grandines G. S. Derotne. 
St. Casimir N. Guertin. 
Deschambautt et St. AlbanC. E. Poire. 
Oap-Sante E. Morin. 
St. BasileJ. Sasseville. 
Jkureuils Z. Gingras. 
Pointe-aux-TremUes L. E. Parent. 
St. Raymond P. J. Bedard. 
St. Auguslin A. Milette. 
Sle Catherine W. Dunn. 
Ste FbyeP. Huot. 
Ancienne-Lorette J. Laberge. 
St. Ambroise F. Boucher. 
Charlebourg E. Payment. 
Lac Beauport et Laval 0. Paradis. 
Valcartier et Stone/tarn P. T. Clarke. 
Beauport 3. Langevin. 
Ange Gardien F. X. Leduc; J. Asse- 
lin, anc. cure. 

Chateau-Richer E. E. Parant. 

Ste. Anne P. Gariepy. 

St. ftrreof E. Richard. 

St. Joachim L. Prorencher. 

Petite-Riviere I. Larouche. 

Bait. St. Paul M. Chauvin ; L. Otisse, 
Vicaire. 

St. Urbain P. Clement. 

Ste Agnes J. Lagneux. 

BboulmentsC. Gagnon; G. Beauleu, 
Vicaire. 

Isle-aux-Coudres J. B. Pelletier. 

St. IrenteC. Pouliot. 

MaU>aieA.. Beaudry. 

& Fideh, dx. F. Morissette. 

OliMxrutimiT?. A. Blouin. 

Grand B rule A.. Casgraiu. 

Grande-Bav. L. GUI. 

Let Eswumins, les postei du rot RR. 
PP. Babel and Arnaud. 

Labrador- U. Pinet, 



; B. Robin. 
St. 2, icolas E. Baillargeon. 
Halifax, dc. J. M. Bernier. 
Ste Sophie F. Plamondon. 
St. Giles, d-c.yf. Richardson. 
Ste Julie J. Beland. 
Somerset, dx. C. Trudel. 
Leeds, d-c. F. McDonald. 
St. Silvestre3. O Grady ; M. Dowling. 
St. Ji an Chrysostomei . Beaumont. 
St. RomualdP. Sax. 
.ZV. D. de Levy J. D. Deziel ; B. Mac- 

gauran, G. Gaudin. 
Pointe Levy 3. H. Routier; J. B. Cote. 
St. Henri 3. B. Grenier; J. P. Lefran- 

Qois, anc. cure ; J. Couture, anc. cure. 
St. Lambert 0. Brunet. 
St. Isidore L. Pculin. 
St. Anselme J. B. Bernier. 
Ste. Marie de la BeauceL. Proulx. 
St. Shear L. H. Grenier. 
St. Bernard H. Moore. 
St. Joseph de la Beauce D. Martiueau. 
St. Frederic F. Caron. 
St. Francois de la Beauce F. X. Tessier. 
La.rn.bton N. Godbout. 
Forsyth, dx. E. Begin. 
TringC. Roy. 
St. George A. Campeau. 
Frampton M. Kerrigan. 
Ste Claire L. F. Bernard; J. Rioux, 

Vicaire. 

Ste Marguerite E. Halle. 
Sle HenedineChs. Beaumont. 
St. GervaisP. Pouliot; K V. Dion, 

Vicaire. 

St. Lazare E. Dufour. 
St. Charles P. Villeneuve; A. Mail- 

loux, V. G. 

Beaumont L. Lahaie. 
St. Michel N. C. Fortier. 
St. ValierA. L. Proulx. 
St. Raphael, dv.J. B. Perras. 
BcrtMer J. Bonenfant. 
St. Francois Riv du Sudlj. L. Belle- 
isle. 

St. Pierre Rw du Sud L. Sirois. 
St. Thomas J.L.Beaubien; N.Leclair, 

Vicaire. 
Isle-aux-GruesC. Tardif. 
Cap St. fgnace J. E. Cecil. 
Islet et St. CyrilleV. P. Delage. 
St. Jean Port-JoliL. Parent ; M. For- 

tin, Vicaire. 

St. Rocli des AulnetsD. H. Tetu; Jos. 
Berube, Vicaire. 

DISTRICT DE KAMOUBASKA. 

Ste Anne Lapocatiere L. A. Bourret. 

Riviere-OuelleC. Begin. 

St. Paanne et JV. D. Mont CarmdV. 

X. Begin. 

St. Denis K Quertier. 
Kamourasl-a N. Hubert; F.O. Hebert, 

Assistant. 
St. Paschal P. Patry: C. Gauvreau, 

A icar General. 
fit. Alexandre J. Matte. 
Ste Hdene I. Doueut. 
St. Andre N. Doucet. 
Rii iere-du-Loup, cfe. > T . Beaubien. 
Cacouna J. C. Cloutier. 
St. itodeste B.. Potvin. 
St. Arsene N. Belanger. 
hle-Verte3 . B. C.agnon. 
St. Eloif. A. De Gaspe. 
Trriis-Piitoles Deon Roy. 
St. Simon G. S. Marceau. 
Sle Cecilelj. Marceau. 
RimousJdG. Tanguay. 
Ste Luce G. Nadeau. 
Ste FlavieT<l. Duguay. 

[156] 



MUif3. B. Blanchette. 
Atatane, <c. P. Boucher. 

DISTIilCT BE C.iSPE, 

Ste Anne drs Mi!s, (t-r. K. PiO 
Riviere au }, -F. Oliva. 

Douglastawn, itr. K. S. Fatard. 
Perce, cfe. N. Gingras. 
Grande-Riviere, <(V. L. Desjardins. 
Paspcbiac, d-c. K. P. Lapointe. 
Bonavcnture, <fc. J. L. Alain. 
CarlctonN. Audrt. 
Ristlgouvlie, <fc. F. Dumontier. 

DIOCESE DES TROIS RIVIERES. 

des Triris Rivieres Monseig- 
neur Thomas Cooke. 

Chaplain de.s Vrmdincs M. F. G. Lo 
ranger, Vicairu General. 

A V K<-ec.hc MM. J. Aubry, D.D.; Ed. 
Chabot, Procureur ; S. Loupit, F. 
Baillargeon, Vkaires; Is. Guilmette. 
desservant, St. Ktieune ; Ph. 0. Geli- 
nas, Sec. 

Seminaire de J\ ic >lft Superieur et Di 
rect, JIM. Thos. Caron, Direct du 
Grand Sem. Chs. Dion, Prefet. des 
etudes, A. A". Bellinair, Procureur, 
F. K. Cote, F. Desaulniers, S.D.A.M. 

COTE DU NOKD. 

St. DidaccF. Turgeon. 
Maslinmigc. et St. Justin G. Ed. Bois. 
Ste Ursula A. Mayrand. 
St. Pculin .1. H. Lottinville. 
Riviere du Lvup J. Boucher; J. Le- 

bourdais, L. Marcoux, anc. cures. 
St. Leon L. Aubry. 
1 antachichc. .1. H. Dorion. 
St. Severe R. A. Nuisi-ux. desservant. 
St. Barnabe J. E. Sirois. 
1 iHnti du Lac D. Paradis. 
Cap de la Magddeiwe L. 0. DesiMs. 
St. Maurice 1. O. Prince. 
U ham plain D. M. Marcoux. 
St. Nardsse A. Charest. 
Batiscan W. Frechette. 
Ste GeneviereV. H. Cote. 
St. Stanislas et St. Juste J. S. Otemmpe . 

COTE DU NOKIX 

St. Pro!.perL. Souri^ny. 
Ste Anne de la P,:rad> A. Dupuig; T, 
Lacoursiere, Vicaire. 

COTE DU SUP. 

St. Pierre li:s Hecynets Jos. Bailey; A. 

Leclerc, anciun. cure. 
Gentilty1.. II. Dostie. 
Sic GertntckP. > .e 
Jieeancourt L. S. Malo. 
St. GregaireJ. Harper; C. Z.Garoeau, 

Vicaire. 

St. Piere, Cdestin J. C. 3Tarqni. 
Nicolet7:. Rousseau. 
Bait du, FcljrrcM. Carrier. 
St. Zephirin A. Marcoux. 
St. Thomas de Pierrerille et le Villayt 

des J J. llaureault. 

St. Francuix dit Lac J. Paradis. 
St. Michrl d Y<niMs!,uG.3. Lebrun. 
St. I): i- ">reT. Bte. Chartre. 

St. Guillaumf d ljiton N. Keroack. 
Dntmmandrilh, <f?.0. Belcourt. 
Shiptnn, d-c.L. Trahan. 
Durham, d-c. A.. II. Lassiserage, d-^- 

servant. 

WMm. rfc. 0. Duhault. 
KingseyJ. B. Luclerc. 
St. GhristopKe. if-c.Ph. H. Suzor; A. 

Bouchard. Viraire. 
St. lfr/rl>r.rt d ArthabatlfnY. Roy. 
StunfoM, rfc. N. Pelli-ti./r. 

DIOCESE DE MONTREAL. 
Slonseigr. I.Bourgrt. Everiuede Mont 
real. Moiiseigr. J. Larocque, Ereque 
de Cydonia, Coad. 



1856.] 



CLERGY. 



. A. F. Truteau, J. 0. 
Pare, Secretaire, L. A. Pinsonault. 
Archidiacre. T. Plamondon, Procu- 
reur, V. Pilon. H. Moreau, E. C. 
Fabre, P. Leblanc, sous- secretaire. 

Vicaires Generanx MM. A. Manseau, 
P. L. Arehiunbault, P.Billaudele, A. 
F. Truteau. 

Seminaire de MmtredV. Billaudele. 
V. G. Superieur. J. Comte, Procu- 
reur, J. B. St. Pierre. S. R. Larre. J. 
V. Arraud, L. Regourd. L. Ville- 
neuve, B. Granjon, J. Toupin. A. 
Nercam, E. Picard, M. C. L. Bonis- 
sant, A. L. Barbarin, A. Mercier. 
Econ., L. Pelii-sier, J. J. Connoly, II. 
Prevost, cure u office, V. Rousselot, 
V. Daniel. J. J. Perrault, J. F. Lacan, 
C. Desmazures. C. J. Bardey, C. D. 
Tambareau. C. Lenoir, P. Dowd, M. 
O Brien, P. Murphy, Ualley. 

Eglise de St Pierre lisa RR. PP. Ob- 
lats. Santoni. Superieur, J. B. Ho- 
norat. Leonard, Lagier, Kouge, Pro. 
Rouisse, Royer. 

Grand Seminaire J Bayle, D. Granet, 
Direct. 67 e tudiants en theologie. 

College, de Montreal^~P. P. Denis, Di- 
rectuer, L. L. Billion, J. J. Palatin, 
J. De la Vigne, B. Larue, P. Rous 
seau. 

Lac des Deux Montagnes N. Dufresne, 
A. Cuoq. 

QMege des JesuilesKR. PP. Martin, 
A. Havequez. A. Larcher, Vignon, 
Ouellet, Vetter, Reily, Hersen, 
Cicatery, Michel, Begnier. 

Nmiciat des Jesuits ait Sault au Re- 
cottetP. Sache^, Dessiardins. 

Hospice St. Joseph, a la Lrmgue Pmnte 
J. M. Bellenger, 0. S. Paq.uet, P. 
Mercure. 

College de CliamblyP. M. Mignault, 
Superieur, F. T. Lahaye, Directeur. 

Cottage de I Assomption A Dupuis. 
Direct., N. Barret, Vezina. Laporte. 

CWegede Ste. ThereseS. Tasse, Supe 
rieur, Duquet. Procureur, L. Dage- 
nais, H. A. Verrean. 

CuUege de V Industrie, E. Champag- 
neur, Superieur, P. Lajoie. Directeur. 

CbUege Alassnn O.Renaud, Directeur. 

Coteau St. Louis Institut des Sourds 
et Muets, C. 1. Lagorce. 

ISLE DE MONTREAL. 

St. Laurent MM. St. Germain ; Veni- 

ard, vicaire. 

Sup. des Freres St. Jnsrplt J. Reze. 
Ste. Geneviereli. Lefebvre. 
Ste. Anne J. Lasnier. 
Pointe Claire L. Pominyille. 
LachineA. Duransuan. 
Longue-Pointe I. B. Drapeau ; Kug. 

Desmarais viraive. 
Pointe-aux- Trembles T. Porlier. 
Riv des Prairies L. J. Martel. 
Sault-au-RwlletJ. J. Viaet. 
Isle Biza.nl Quevillon. 
Isle PerrotC. Aubry. 

ISLE JESUS. 

St. Martin MM. P. C. Dube. 

Ste. Kosc P. Brunet. 

St. Vincent N. Lavallee ; L. Pietto, 

vicaire. 

Chap des D. S. C. E. Divoie. 
St. Francois de Sales A.. 0. Giroux. 

COTE I)U NOE.D. 

,. Barthdf. V. Papineau ; R. Four- 

nier, vicaire. 

Berthier J. F. Gaanon; Belair, vieaire. 
Isledu Parls Y. Kilialrault, 
St. Cuffibert.\. I i- 
St. Gabriel Jos. 
M. Felix 3. S. Aubin. 
St. Jean de Mntlia. Ance. 
St. IhnmasG. 1^- 



Industrie A. Manseau; F. Richard, 

Vicaire. 

Ste Elisabeth L. Guyon. 
St. Nm-bert1. E. Dagenais. 
LavaUrie II. Marcotte. 
Lanoraie J. 0. Girous. 
St. SulpiceEt. Sirs. 
St. PauL-T. L. Brassard. 
Kildare D. Laporte. 
Ste Melanie F. Jeannotte. 
Repentigny3. B. Labelle ; F. et E. 

Labelle, Anciens Cures. 
L Assamption F. Dorsal. 
St. Jacques de VAchigan J. R. Pare ; 

J. Ferrault, Tic. 
Chap des sceurs de Ste. Anne D. Mare- 

chal. 

St. Liguori J. Barrette. 
St. Alexis V. Clement. 
Ste. Julienne C. Loranger. 
Bawdon J. Quinn. 
St. Alphonse 

St. Roch de l AchiganEt. Hicks. 
St. Linf. Hurteau. 
St. CulixteH. Morin. 
St. Espritr^l. Charron. 
St. Henry J. M. Cheviguy ; L. Gagne, 

Ancien Cure. 
Lachenaie E. Normandin ; M. Morin, 

Ancien Cure. 
Terrebonne A Theberge. 
Ste. Anne des PlainesG. Champoux. 
St. Jerome M. Brunet. 
Ste. Sophie. D. J. Brosnan. 
St. SauveurJ. Watier. 
St. Colamban J. Falyey. 
SU. Therese J. Duquet. 
St. Janvier S. Theberge. 
St. Augustin J. B. Champeau. 
St. EustacheP. Gastineau; C. Le- 

febvre, Vicaire. 
St. Benefit A. F. Groulx. 
St. P .acide Alfred Toupin. 
SU. ScholastiqueV. Plinguet; [E. Bo- 

nin, Ancien Cure. 
St. Andre A. ThibaUdier. 
St. Hermas P. Poulin. 
Vandreuil P. Archambault ; N. Per 
rault, Vicaire. 
Rigaud P. Belanger. 
Ste. Marthe A. J. Martineau. 
Les Cedres M. Eoux. 
Coteau du Lac T. Brassard. 
St. CletC. E. Marsolais. 
St. Polycarpe B. F. Cholette; Bour- 

geault, Vicaire. 
St. ZotiqueC. Dufour. 
St. Regis F. X. Marcoux. 
St. Anicet I. Poirier. 
St. TimotheJ. Archambault ; L. Ga- 

riepy, Vicaire. 
St. Clement D. Charland; Perrault, 

vicaire. 

St. Louis de Gonz J. Seguin. 
Ste. MartineE. Blyth. 
St. Urbain U. Archambault. 
St. Jean Chrysnstcme H. Beaudry ; M. 

Caisse, Vicaire. 
Ormstmvn, (c. E. Doyle. 
G/iatcai/f/uay J. Dequoy. 
Ste. Philomene L. Turcot. 
St. Isidore N. Trudel. 
Sault St. Louis P. Antoine 
St. Philippe A.. Proulx. 
St. Ednuard L. J. Huot, Vicaire; 

Ed. Barjard. 
St. Michel M. Foisy. 
Sherrington J. Graton. 
St. Constant G. L. Vinet. 
St. RemiP. Bedard; J. B. Lemonde, 

Viraire. 

St. Jean Dnrch C. Larocque ; M. Quin 
tal. Ancien Cure. 
St. Luc Menard, Cure. 
BlairfindieV.. Robert. 
St. Jacqites Le Min.- J. Morin. 
St. Cyprien C. F. Morrison ; Chagnou, 
Vicaire. 

[157] 



St. Valentine L. Ltrssier. 
St. Bernard F. E,ochette. 
Laprairie J. Gravel ; F. X. Bourbon- 

nais, Vicaire. 
Lonffiieuil G. Thibault; A. Thibatdt, 

Vicaire. 

Ch. des Saurs J. M.T. Caron. 
BoucherviUe1. Pepin ; D. Berard, 

Vicaire. 

St. Bruno M. Piette. 
Varennes Jos. Desautels ; T. Berard, 

Vicaire. 

Ste. Julie J. Theoret. 
Vercheres R. 0. Bruneau ; Z. Gascon, 

Vicaire. 

Ormtrecoiur F. L Heureux. 
St. Antoine M. Cusson. 
St. Marc J. E. Leveque. 
Belceil E. Durocher. 
ChamblyP. M. Mignault; J. 0. Chi- 

coine, Vicaire. 

DIOCESE DE ST. HYACIXTHE. 

Mgr. J. C. Prince, Eveque de St. Hy- 
cinthe, Evech3 et Paroisse da St. 
Hyacinthe. 

MM. P. Lafrance, G. Marchesseau, Pro 
cureur; L. Z. Moreau, Secretaire; G. 
L.Chevrefils, P. Eve. Sous Secretaire. 

Vicaires Generaux MM. F. Demers,Bi. 
Crevier, J. S. Raymond. 

Seminarie de St. ByaffMkatOL I. S. 
Desauliners, Superieur; J. S. Ray 
mond, V. G.; P. Leveque, Directeur: 
F. Tettreau, P. Dufresne, P. 0. Al 
laire, J. J. Prince, H. Millier, P. S. 
Gendron, E. Birs, cure anc., de Ste 
Rosali. 

CURES, MISSIOXNATRES, VICAIRES. 

JV. D. de St. SyacintheJ. Z. Resther. 
Sorel J. M. Limogesj R. Lame, Vi 
caire. 

Kte. Victoire A. Lemay. 
St. Ours 3. B. Belanger. 
Si. Denis F. Demers, V. G. 
St. CharksP. J. Crevier. 
St. Hilaire 0. Mouet ; A. Brais, anc. 

cure. 

St. MatkiasL. B. Brien. 
St. Athanase J. B. Dupuy. 
St. George T. St. Aubiu. 
Stanbridge B. J. Leclaire. 
St. Alexandre 0. Desorey. 
St. Gregoire J. II. Noiseux. 
St. Briffidell. Drolet. 
Ste Marie V. Crevier, V. G.; G. S. 

Kertson, Vicaire. 
St. Jean BajitisteS. C. Hotti. 
St. DamaseV. X. Brunet. 
Presentation J. Beauregard. 
St. Barnabe N. Hardy. 
St. Jude3. Batthazard. 
St. Anne E. Lecours; J. Z. Dumontier, 

Vicaire. 
St. Ihigues L. M. Ai-chambault; J. 

Gaboury, Vicaire. 
Sit iSimon H. L. Gironard. 
St. llosalie J. Desno) ers. 
St. Dominique P. A. Sylvestre. 
St. PietS. Crevier. 
St. Ctsaire J. A. Provencal; M. Go 

dard, Vicaire. 
Farnkam T. H. Clement. 
Dunham \V. Fitzgerald. 
Granby J. Quin. 
Stulelyy. Tremblay. 
Ely J. Leblanc. 
Stanstead 0. Pelletier. 
Sherbrooke A. E. Dufresne ; C. E. for- 

tier, Vicairo. 
Jfnxton J. Mirhon. 
Milton V. Refoin. 

DIOCESE OF BYTOWN. 

Monseigneur Eugene Goigues, Erequt 

de By town. 
Rev. Pere Aubert, Vic. Gen. 



70 



CLERGY. 



[1856. 



OoUege ofBytown Re^. J. Tabaret, Pre 
sident ; Key. A. Soulerin, Professeur 
de Rhetorique; Kev. Hector Mau- 
roist, Professeur de Belles Lettres 
et de Mathematiques ; Rev. John 
Gillie, Professeur de Method. Re 
gents Thomas Mangau, Professeur 
d Anglais ; Pierre Collins, do. ; Fran- i 
gois Duhamel, Professeur DeFran- \ 
cais ; P. O Brien, Surveillant. 

Mission de la Bait d? Hudson. RR. 
Aug. Garin ; Regis Deleage. 

Mission des Chantiers RR. Medard 
Bourassa; Fr. Reboul. 

Cathedrale de Bytown Damage Dan- 

durand Cure d Office; Michael Mol- 
loy, P. Moloney. 

East Hawkesbury Joseph Collins. 

L Orignal Ant. O Malley; Aug. Eb- 
rard, Vicaire. 

Flantagenet Louis Almeras; Joseph 
Sterkendries, Pretre Assistant. 

Cumberland Joseph Michel. 

Glocester Thomas O Boyle ; F. Hand, 
yicaire. 

Richmond P. O Connel. 

Huntly Ed. Vaughan. 

Fitz Roy Bernard McFeely. 

Renfrew Mich. Byrne. 

Broomly James Strain. 

Pembrook M<ch. Lynch. 

Attumett s Island James Lynch. 

Oalumet Louis Ouellet. 

Portage du Fort Joseph Bouvier. 

Aylmer Mich. Lynch. 

Chelsea James Hughes. 

La Peche Fr. Lauzier. 

Wakefield Pat. McGoey. 

Riviere du Desert Regis Deleage, F. 
Andrieux, Jos. Reboul. 

Ga.tinM.u- Louis S. G i iguet. 

Buckingham John Brady. 

St. Andre Avellin Joseph David. 

Bon Secours (Petite Nation) Arthur 
Mignault. 

DIOCESE OF KINGSTON. 

Right Rer. R. Oaulin, Bishop of King 
ston, (Infirm 

Rt. Rev. P. Phelan, Bishop of Carrhpe, 
Administrator Apostolic of the Dio 
cese of Kingston. 

Kingston Very Rev. P. Dollard, V.G., 
Rev. J. S. O Connor, Secretary, Rev. 
Michael Clune, Very Rev. Apgus 
McDonnell, V. G. Chaplain of Pro 
vincial Penitentiary. 

Regiopolis College V. R. Aug. McDo- 
nell, Professor of Theology ; John 
O Brien, Henry Begins, Professors. 

St. Raphael Very Rev. John McDon 
ald, V. G. 

Pictan Murt Lalor. 

BtUevitte Michael Brennan. 

St. Andrews Q. Hay. 

Perth J. H. McDonough. 

Smith s Falls T. Smith. 

Tyandenagua C. Burk. 

Prescott Edward P. Roche. 

Brockvitte Oliver Kelly. 

Oobourg Michael Timlin. 

Kemptmtte Daniel Farrelly. 

Loborouffh Patrick McEvay. 

Oornwa.il JEneas McDonald. 

HungerfordE. B. Lalor. 

Peterborough .John Farrell. 

Lindsay James Chisholm, D.D. 

Wincliester, d-c. Bernard Coyle. 

Oamden Bernard Higprins. 

Bedford John Foley ; P. O Reilly, (in 
firm.) 

Trenton H. Brettirgh. 

Gananoque J. R. Kossiter. 

Duro Michael Macky. 

Asphodd James Farrelly. 

Emily John Burk. 

Wolfe Island John Foley. 

Pert Hope Kyran O Keeffe. 



Lochiel John Meade. 
Alexandria John McLachlan. 
Napanee Thomas McMahon. 
Wittiamstown F. McDonagh. 
Kingston Thomas Walsh, Jas. Quin- 

lan, Alex. McDonnell, (infirm.) 
Sheffield John Gallagher. 

DIOCESE OF TORONTO. 

Right Reverend Armand Francis Mary 
De Charbonnel, Bishop of Toronto ; 
Very Revs. E. Gordon and P. Point, 
Vicars General; Ven. and Rev. P. 
Molony, Archdeacon. 

Cathedral of St. Michael Right Rev. 
A. F. M. DeCharhonnel ; Revs. J. M. 
Bruyere, J. Joyce, and F. Wardy. 

St. Paul s Thomas Fitzhenry. 

St. Mary s John O Neill. 

College of St. Michael J. M. Soulerin, 
Superior ; J. Malbos, Treasurer ; 
P. Molony W. Flannery and C. Vin 
cent, Professors; George North- 
graves, M. Rooney, M. J. O Dea, 
and Charles Livermann, Ecclesias 
tics. 

Oshawa J. B. Proulx. 

Adjala X. Pourret. 

Toronto Gore Eugene O Reilly. 

Niagara and Snapp Louis Musart. 

St. Catharines B. Grattan and P. 

Conway. 
Hamilton Edward Gordon, V.G., and 

A. Cai ayon 
DundasJ. O Reilly. 
Brantford J. Ryan. 
Ingersoll R. Keleher. 
London T. T. Kirwin, Rural Dean, 

and Peter Crennan. 
St. Thomas J. D. Ryan. 
Chatham 3. V. Jaffre, S. J. 
Raleigh M. Raynel. 
Amherstburgh M. J. Daudet ; C. An- 

gelvi. 
Sandwich P. Point V. G., S. J. ; J. 

Maingui, S. J. ; J. Grimau, S. J. ; P. 

Cornelian, S. J. 
Goderich Peter Schneider. 
Manitoulin J. Hanipaux, S. J. ; N. 

Point, S. J. 
Sault Ste Marie J. B. Menet, S. J., A. 

Kohler, S. J. 
Missions of Lake Superior D. Duran- 

quet, S. J. ; P. Chone, S. J. 
Penetanguishene Claude Ternet. 
Wettesley C. Mesner, St. Clement. 
New Germany J. B. Bauingartner. 
Orillia J. F. Synnot. 
Brock J. Walsh. 
Barrie J. Jamot and J. Hoban. 
Stratford -P. Kearney. 
Tecumseth Rattigan. 
Wilmat R. F. Ebner, S. J., St. Agatha. 
Gudvh J. Holzer, S. J. ; F. Matoga, 

S.J. 
Diocesan Missionaries John McNulty, 

M. Moncoq. 

Retired at Sandwich A. Vervais. 
Superannuated J. O Flynn. 



Presbyterian CHurcH of 
Canada. 

IX CONNECTION WITH TUB CHURCH Of 
SCOTLAND. 

Synod meets at Kingston on last Wed 
nesday of May. 1856. 

Rev. Alexander Mackid, Goderich, Mo 
derator. 

Rev. Andrew Bell, L Orignal, Synod 
Clerk. 

John Cameron, Esq., Toronto, Trea 
surer. 

MONTREAL PRESBYTERY. 

Meets at Montreal on the First Wed 
nesday of February, May, August 
and November. 



Thomas Haig, Beauharnois, Clerk. 
Montreal, St. Andrews A. Mathie- 

son, D.D. 

hatfiam and Grenville Wm. Mair. 
Ormstown James Anderson. 
Georgetown James C. Muir. 
Quebec, St. Andrews John Cook, D.D. 
Lachine William Simpson. 
Hemmingford Johu Merlin. 
Huntingdon Alexander Wallace, A.B. 
Montreal, St. Paul s R. McGill, D.D. 
New Richmond John Davidson. 
St. Louis James T. Paul. 
Beauharnois Thomas Haig. 
Melbourne Thomas Morrison. 
Valcartier David Shanks. 
Beech Ridge John McDonald. 
Point Levi Duncan Anderson, A.M. 
Three Rivers George D. Ferguson. 
Vacant Charges Norvaltown & Rus- 

selltown, Laprairie, Dundee. 
French Missionary within the bounds of 

Presbytery T. J. Charbonell. 

PRESBYTERY OF OLENQARY. 

Meets on the Third Wednesday of 
January, May and September. 

T. McPherson, A.M., Lancaster, Clerk. 

Cornwall Hugh Urquhart, A.M. 

Lancaster Thomas McPherson, A.M. 

Cote St. George JEneas McLean. 

Pinch Donald Munro. 

Williamsburgh Thomas Scott. 

L Orignal < Plantagenet A. Bell. 

Osnabruck Robert Dobie. 

Vacant Charges Williamstown, Mar- 
tintown, Lochiel, Indian Lands, Co- 
teau du Lac, Vankleek Hill, Dalhou- 
sie Mills. 

PRESBYTERY OF HAMILTON. 

Meets at Hamilton on the Second Wed 
nesday in January, May and Sep 
tember. 

John B. Mowat, A.M., Niagara, Clerk. 

Goderich Alexander Mackid. 

Guelph Colin Gregor. 

Stratford &N. East/iopeW. Bell, A.M. 

Simcoe George Bell, A.B. 

Niagara John B. Mowat, A.M. 

Gait Hamilton Gibson. 

Chatham John Robb. 

Woodstock and Norwich F. P. Sim. 

Saltjleet and Binbrook William John 
son, A.M. 

Dundas dj Ancaster Kenneth McLen 
nan, A.B. 

London John Skinner, D.D. 

Hamilton Robert Burnet. 

North Dorchester W. McEwen, A.M. 

Wawanosh James Stewart. 

Westminster James McEwen, A.M. 

Woolwich James Thorn. 

Fergus George MacDonnell. 

Vacant. Charges Nelson and Water- 
down, Williams, Amherstburgh Clin 
ton, Dover, Lyuedoch, St. Thomas, 
Wellesley, Brantford, Puslinch, Yar 
mouth, Aldborough, Kincardine, Ar 
thur, Elderslie, Greenock & Culross. 

Retired Ministers William King and 
George McClatchty. 

PRESBYTERY OF B.YTHURST. 

Meets at Perth and Ottawa City alter 
nately on the Second Wednesday in 
January, May and September. 

William Bain, A.M.. Perth, Clerk. 

P,.rth 1st Church William Bell, A.M. 

South Gower Joseph Anderson, A.M. 

Pakenham Alexander Mann, A.M. 

Kittey David Evans. 

Lanark Thomas Fraser. 

Perth, St. Andrew s Wm. Bain, A.M. 

Ramsay John McMorien. 

Byt iwn Alexander Speii v. 

Siitith s Falls Solomon Mylne. 

Brockvitte John Whyte. 

Beckwith Duncan Morrison. 



[158] 



1856.] 



CLERGY. 



71 



McNab & HortonQr. Thompson, A.M. 
Jfichmond Peter Lindsay. 
Litchfidd John Lindsay. 
Vacant Charges Cumberland Buck 
ingham, Huntley. 
Ordained Missionary James Sinclair. 

PRESBYTERY OF KINGSTON-. 

Meets at Kingston on the First Wed 
nesday of every month. 

George Weir, A.M.. Kingston, Clerk. 

Kingston John Machar, D.D. 

Seymour Robert Neill. 

Queen s College. J. Williamson, LL.D., 
John Smith, A.M., James George. 

BeUeviUe Archibald Walker. 

Vacant Charge Camden. 

PKESBTTERT OF TORONTO. 

Meets at Toronto on the Third Tues 
day of February, May, August and 
November. 

J. Barclay, D.D., Toronto, Clerk. 

Pickering Peter McNaughton, A.M. 

Esquesing < Milton Peter Ferguson. 

King John Tawse, A.M. 

Chinguacousy Thomas Johnson. 

Mono Alexander Lewis. 

Eldon John McMurchy. 

Toronto John Barclay, D.D. 

Gwillimbury West Alexander Ross. 

Clarke and Hope Samuel Porter. 

Hornby William Barr. 

Jfottawasaga John Campbell, A.M. 

Thora David Watson, A.M. 

Darlington John H. MeKerras, A.M. 

Mulmur Archibald Colquhoun. 

Scott and Uxbridge William Clelaud. 

Newmarket John Brown. 

Markham James Gordon, A.M. 

Scarboro James Bain. 

Vacant Charges Vaughan, Brock and 
Reach. 

Synod of the Presbyterian 
CHnrtH of Canada. 

Officers of Synod, 1855-6. Rev. Thos. 
Lowry, Bradford, Moderator; Rev. 
W. Reid, Toronto, Clerk of Synod, 
and General Agent for Schemes of 
Church. 

PRESBYTERY OF TORONTO. 

Toronto, Knnx sC/iurch R. Burns, D.D. 

Wliitby James Findlay. 

West Gwillimbury Thorn is Lowry. 

Vaughan William Meldrum. 

Chinguacousy A. T. Holmes. 

York Mills Thomas Wightman. 

Thorah and Eldon John McTavish. 

Acton John Me Lachlan. 

Oakville James Msbet. 

Streetsville Robert lire. 

Oro and Orillia John Gray. 

ITnian & Norcul J. Alexander, A.M. 

King James Adams. 

Barrie and Jntwt d Rob. McXenzie. 

Scarboro John La ing. 

ReA Hirer John Black. 

M. Willis, D.D., Professor of Theology, 

Knox s College ; G. 1 . Young, do. 
Jauies Harris, without charge. 
W. Rid, Synod Clerk, &c. 
T. AVightman, Presbytery Clerk. 

FRKSBYTERY OF COB9URO. 

Oibnurg Donald McLeod. 

South Cavern James Douglass. 

Peterboro John M. Ro . 

Orafton and Otlborne I. W. Smith. 

Darlington John Smith. 

Baltimore and Coldsnri:iijs W. J. 

McKenzie. 

Otonabce Francis Andrews. 
Cartwrifiht !.: .Mnu-. n Hob. Boag. 
Jforth CM an William } . 
Norwood James Bowie. 
Trenton J. Thompson. 
J. W. Smith, Presbytery Clerk. 



PRESBYTERY OP KINGSTON. 

Gananoque Henry Gordon. 
Demorestville James Rogers. 
Belleville William Gregg, A.M. 

Kingston, Chalmers Church 

" Brock Street And. Wi.son. 
Madoc James W. Chesnut. 
Picton Thomas Chambers. 
W. Gregg, Presbytery Clerk. 

PRESBYTERY OP BROCKVILLE 4 OTTAWA. 

Prescott R. Boyd, A.M. 

Brock-ville J. McMurray. 

South GowerW. 3. Macdowell. 

Osgoode and Gloucester W. Lochead. 

Dalhousie James Geggie. 

Macnab and Horton, S. C. Fraser, M.A. 

Ottawa Thomas Wardrope. 

Pembroke Andrew Melville. 

Wakefield John Corbett. 

Beckwith Peter Gray. 

Perth James B. Duncan. 

Aylmer and Nepean J. L. Gourlay. 

Ramsay James Smith, M. A. 

Bristol David Wardrope. 

Without Charge W. Smart. 

S. C. Fraser, Presbytery Clerk. 

PRESBYTERY OF MONTREAL. 

Metis W. McAlister. 

Quebec W. B. Clark. 

St. Therese de BlainvilleDwiil Black. 

Lachute Thomas Henry. 

Indian Lands David Gordon. 

Richmond R. C. Swinton, Missionary. 

Osnabruck J. C. Quin. 

Montreal, Cote Street T). Fraser, A.M. 

St. Bustaclie, d-c. William Scott. 

Winslow, <tc. Ewan McLean, Miss y. 

Lochiel Duncan Cameron. 

Leeds James McConechy. 

Cornwall Hugh Campbell. 

Lancaster, d-c. John Anderson. 

Durham and St. Louis de Gonzague 

Robert McArthur. 
English River John Milne. 
Laguerre J. Crombie. 
Montreal, St. Gabriel Sti . A. F. Kemp 
Rev. D. Fraser, Presbytery Clerk. 

PRESBYTERY OF LONDON. 

Zorra Donald McKenzie. 
North Easlhope Daniel Allan. 
Stratford Thomas McPherson. 
Eymondville William Graham. 
Ingersoll Robert Wallace. 
E/cfrid and Mosa W. R. Sutherland. 
C/iatham Angus McColl. 
Wittiams Lachlan McPhergon. 
Woodstock Wm. S. Ball. 
Aldborough Duncan McMillan. 
London John Scott. 
Buxton William King. 
Brucefield John Ross. 
Woodstock Duncan McDiarmid. 
Amherstburgh William McLaren. 
Blandford Andrew Tolmie. 
Plympton William Porterficld. 
Sarnia David Walker. 
Port Stanley William Doak. 
Suugeen James II. McNaughton. 
J. Scott, Presbytery Clerk. 

PRESBYTERY OF HAMILTON. 

SaV fleet and Binbrook Geo. Cheyne. 
DvndasM. Y. Stark. 
Gait John Bayne, D.D. 
Hamilton, Knox s Church R. Irvine. 
" McNab Street David Inglis. 
Fergus George Smellie. 
Cumminsville and Nairn A. McLean 
Guelph Samuel Youn<r. 
Owen s Sound John McKinnon. 
Ayr Duncan McRuar. 
Caledonia and Allan s Settlement Jas. 

Black. 

Brantford John Alexander., 
Nassagaweya Andrew J. McAuley. 



Niagara James Pirie. 
Paris Andrew Stevens. 
Wellesley John McKay. 
Blenheim John Gillespie. 
St. Catherines R. F. Burns. 
M. Y. Stark, Presbytery Clerk. 



United Presbyterian. Cliurcli 
in Canada. 

Next meeting of Synod to be held in 
Hamilton, on Tuesday, June 3, 1856. 
at half-past seven o clock, P.M. 

Robert Torrance, Moderator. 

William Fraser, Clerk. 

PRESBYTERY OF LONDON. 

Bethel, English Settlement J. Skinner 
London John J. A. Proudfoot, Clerfc. 
Warrcnsville, Brucefield John Logic. 
Cfoderich John Fraser. 
St. Mary s, Downie William Cavan. 
Adelaide, Warwick William Deas. 
McKillop Matthew Barr. 
Harwich Alexander W. Waddell. 
Ingersoll, Woodstock Archibald Cross. 
Detroit, Mich. John Hogg. 
Bayfield James Duncan. 
Vacancies Westminster, Chatham. 
Hibbert, Flat Creek, Tilbury. 

PRESBYTERY OF FLAMBORO . 

Plamboro , Dundas, Thos. Christie. 
Caledonia, Indiana, Oneida Andrew 

Ferrier, D.D. 

West Dumfries Alexander Ritchie. 
Beverly John Porteous, Clerk. 
Chippawa William M. Christie. 
Thorold William Dickson. 
Ancaster John Lees. 
Vacancies Hamilton, St. George, Dan 

ville. 

PRESBYTERY OF TORONTO. 

Toronto, Ind Johu Taylor, M.D. 
West Gwillimbury, Tecumseth, Essa 

William Fraser. 

Dunbarton < Canton Alex. Kennedy. 
Chinyuacousy, 1st &1nd D. Coutts. 
Toronto, Irf John Jennings. 
Richmond/nil James Dick, Clerk. 
Toronto Township <Brampton James 

Priugle. 

Vaughan, Albion Peter Glassford. 
Vacancies Pickering, Caledon. 

PRESBYTERY OF CANADA EAST. 

Montreal William Taylor, D.D. 
New Glasgow Alex. Lowden, Clerk. 
Madrid, N.Y. John Morrison. 
Lachute Walter Scott. 
Huntingdon James Watson. 
Vacancies Hemmingford, Shemmin^- 
ton. 

PRESBYTERY OF LANARK. 

Smith s F .tlls William Aitken. 
Pitzroy Harbor, Tnrbolton Alexandor 

Henderson, Clerk. 
Vacancies Pakenham, Arnprior. 

PRESBYTERY OF DURHAM. 



[159] 



R. H. Thornton, Clerk. 
Port Hope John Cassie. 
Clarke George Lawrence. 
Emily, Munre.rs, Ops John Ewinp. 
Mariposa, Lindsay, Verulam Gilbert 

Tweedie. 

Ernestown, Frcdericklntrgh J. Scott. 
N- vt-tn, Newcastle Win. C. Young. 
Amhtrft Ifland James Macintosh. 
Vacancies Darlington, Oakhills. 

PRESBYTERY OF WELLINGTON. 

Elora John Duff. 
Eramnsa William Barrio. 

-;/ J. F. A. 3. 
b ayette. 

Holx-rt Torrance. Clerk. 
Lake Shm Rol?rt D^w.:r. 

/,-.- KS.J nosing, Brant, Syden- 
: ham, Sable I .iver. 



72 



CLERGY. 



[1856. 



PRESBYTERY OF BRANT. 

Bland/ord Joseph Scott. 
Paris David Caw. 
Blenheim George Murray. 
lirant/urd Alexander A. Drummond, 

Clerk. 

Norwich viUe K obertBodgers. 
Glenmorris John Dunbar. 
Mount Pleasant Patrick Greig. 



Wesleyan Methodist Cliurtli 
ill Canada. 

Knoch Wood, President of the Confer 
ence, and General Superintendent 
of Missions; John Kyerson, Co-Dele 
gate J S. D. Rice, Secretary. 

TORONTO DISTRICT. 

Toronto East John Gemley, John 
Bredin ; A nson Green, D.D., Super 
annuated; George R. Sanderson, 
James Spencer, Egerton Ryerson, 
D.D , Lachlia Taylor. 

Toronto W st John Borland, Charles 
Lavell, George McKitchie. 

Yonge Street Kichard Jones. Benjamin 
Jones, J. Sanders; Horace Dean, 
Superannuated. 

Humber Robert Lochead. 

Brampton Samuel C. Philp, William 
Andrews. 

CooJfsvillc Benjamin Nankeville; Jo 
nathan Scott, Supernumerary. 

Whitby D. B. Madden, A. Drennan. 

Markham Thomas Jeffers, R. Fowler ; 
David Yeomans, Superannuated. 

Nelson Thomas Campbell ; D. Wright, 
Superannuated. 

Milton John Hunt. 

Georgetown John Law. 

Skwffvillc Ashton Fletcher. 

Prince Albert Thomas Demorest. 

Richard Jones, Chairman. 

HAMILTON DISTRICT. 

Hamilton James Elliott, Ephraim B. 
Harper; S. Belton, Superannuated. 

Dundas G. Goodson. E. II. Dewart. 

Waterdown Joseph Messmore. 

Gtandford and &neca T. Williams, 
U. .lohnson. 

Nanticole J. Goodfellow, J. W r ilson. 

Dunmille Luther U. liice. 

Oayuga James Armstrong. 

Urimsby S Huntingdon. T. Cobb. 

Stoney Greek John English ; William 
Haw, Supernumerary. 

Suspension Bridge Peter Ker, Super 
annuated. 

fit. Calhcrinif Keiim-dy Cn.-Lhton. 

Thorold Thomas Bevitt, K. J. Fore 
man. 

Drunimondrin Alexander T. Green. 

Niagara G. N. A. F. T. Dixon. 

Welland James Harris; .John I 
Reuben E. Tupper. Superannuated. 

C<t!nsville William Sutton. 

Thomas Bevitt Chairman. 

BRANTFORD DISTRICT. 

Jlrantford I. B. Howard; II. Biivar. 

Mount Pleasant W. S. Gviilin: II. 
Ileyland. Superannuated; C. Byrne. 
Supernumerary. 

] ,,ris0. H. Ellsworth. 

Woodstock W. McCullough, J. Shaw, 
John Wakofield. 

ftt. George Thomas Fawcett. 

Halt George Kennedy. 

Jngersoll O/.ias Ilarber. W. Williams. 

Norwich Peter (ierman, I). M. Hill. 

Simcoe Joseph M) -|)ley. 

Dover E. M. Hyers in. .Sniiernuin y. 

WaUingham Matthew Swarm ; Mat 
thias Holtby. Supernumerary. 

Frtdertektburg I ssutc On > i <-. 

Aylmer Francis Berry, Jas. Morgan. 



Edwin Clement. 

-Matthew Whiting. 
Hirer W. Kyerson, P. Jones. 
W. McCullough, Chairman. 

LONDON DISTRICT. 

Lmidrm Henry Wilkinson, Jos. E. 

Sanderson. 
Lmi luii Circuit Thomas Cleghorn, J. 

W. Savage; E. Stoney, sup d. 
Westminster and Fingal John Hutch- 

insou, T. Hoskin. 
St. Thomas William Price; Thomas 

Harmon, superannuated. 
Xtrt tltroy 1. K. Williston. 
Warwick ThOtsat Crews. 
Port Stanley Francis Chapman. 
/ r:,>is/iire J.Webster, W.K.Morden. 

mt William Savage. 
Henry Wilkinson, Chairman. 

CHATHAM DISTRICT. 

f !iatJ>amX. F. English, W. Hawke. 
MnMit Elgin and Muncey S. Rose, J. 

Sunday, Abraham Sickles. 
l\ (ir<lm-iite William Ames. 
1 \ a lln ri l, urgli Aaron Miller. 
M /rjiiih William Dignam, Kichard 

Phelps, Superannuated. 
Gnsjidd W il 1 iam Chapman. 
tiandwich d: Windsor Edward White. 
Ainh<-rfVnti-<jh E. L. Koyle. 
Port Sarnia John G. Laird, Thomas 

Pearson. 

St. Clair Solomon Waldron. 
Samuel Rose, Chairman. 

GVKLPII DISTRICT. 

Guelph Lewis Warner, A. Edwards. 

ElM-u Charles Sylvester. 

Berlin tiii l r.ii-nheim Thomas Robson, : 

Andrew Smith. 
PeelC. W. M. Gilbert, Ezra Adams, 

Superannuated. 
Straiford George Case. 
SI. Afary f Henry Reid. 
( I illicit A K-:;ainler Campbell. 

li John S. Evans, James Berry. 
I. B. Aylesworth, M.D. 
Kincardine S. D. Maudsley. 
Arthur Thomas Lawson. 
Mimii Richard Pinch, Peter Empey. 
Erin Kobert Corson. 
W-ilexky W illiam Glass. 
Cfrey - Jas. E. Dyer, J. Armstrong, 1st, 

Superannuated. 
/V/-/-(V Jc hn A. Dowler. 
Wi ll icc and llowick James Clarke. 

- a</t 

Mount Hire d 

Lewis Warner, Chairman. 

OWE.V.S SOUND DISTRICT. 

fli Conrad "Vandusen. 

. X Jmy 

Owen s Sound Samuel Fear, W. M. C. 

in Neelands. Sup y. 
XI. Yinmit Thomas Culbert. 
// Jdhn Kahbeege. 

illiam jkiehardson. 
Ix-rh;/ (icov.e .lai-ques. 
.. Joseph Hill. 
, .!/;/;, \vi!ljam R. Dyre. 
John L. Kerr. 
l.ivid Hunt. 
.I, //.. .. .). sejih Forsyth. 
(;.ii-iti-it Jiii-rrt oti, ^V . McDousrall. 
Lake iV/ / i i\i,r, ~\i<i-tli Shore < 
Blal 

I \ andusen, Chairman. 

V.ARKir, DISTRICT. 

-.T( hn Don.~e. 

Ijbs. 

. ^Y. McDonagh. 
i V. Williams. 
i. Willoughby, John 

George Cochran. 



Snake Ifluxl David Costellow. 
Brock George T. Richardson. 



[160] 



Fins ainl (Ji-illic Stephen Brownell, 

Alexander R Campbell. 
Penetanffuishene Lund and Beausoh ei 

Island Kdwani fallows. 

I n iifl, liiicr - 
CnHinfiinr,(n/ " "> J 
John Douse, Chairman. 

COBOURi! DISTRICT. 

Cobourg George H. Davis; J. Beatty. 

Superannuated. 
Victoria CW7^e Sainl. S. Nelles, A.M., 

Principal: Samuel D. H ice, Governor. 
Pi ni linn A. W. McCollum, Georga 

Briers. 
Bowmam-ittr- Ihos. Cosford, Samuel 

Tucker. 

Newcastle \Viiliaui S. Blackstock. 
Cartwrtght <ni ,Vf i,<<. T. Karma. 
Millbrook James Hughes, H. Black- 

stock. Supeinuuuiary. 
Peteriormiyh \V. 11. I oole. 
Xinit/i Le\i Vai.di-iburg. 
liice Laic William iluikimer. 
Alnwick .liinus Musgrove, Win. Case. 
Alim-ick Circuit- limit s Iveson. 
CMorne Cliarlrs Taggart. 
Lindsay 3. C. tsbome. W. II. Laird. 
Aletcalfe William Briden. 
Norwood George Crr. Amos E. Buss. 
Kee.nc Henry McDowell. 
J. Musgrove, Chairmau. 

I .KI.I.KVIU.K DISTRICT. 

Belleville John Carre 11. 

Consecon M. Fawcett, P. Germain. 

Picton3. 0. Slater. V\ illiam TomHn, 

Gilbert Miller. Daniel McMullen, 

Supernumaties. 

Xidni a .Jolin Lever, David Johnson. 
Jirifiltton William McFadden, Jalez 

Bunting Keough. 
DemorfxMlle Vincent B. Howard, C. 

R. Allison, Superannuated. 
Khannonvillc N elscn Brown. 
ilniii/i .rj i fd Michael Baxter. 
JUatioc J. Sanderson; Stephen Mik S, 

Superannuated. 
Stirling John lllack. 
Percett and Seymour W. II. Williams, 

J. Youman c. 
William McFadden, Chairman. 

KINGSTON DISTRICT. 

on .lohii I L\ erson, G. Douglass, 

Henry Byers. Supernumerary, 
NapaneeQ. F. Ha\ dr. A. Fletcher, Jr. 
Wilton and Lfii;/jl,Li,ri Francis Cole- 

jiuiii, A. DavDinn. G. J. Dingman. 
Batk awl Amlitrst /.-/< David C. Clap- 

)iisi)n. William Shannon. 
Wiitfiinn-l\iii : /:t n\\ illiam Philp. 

,,, iii/ir Charles TUI-VIT. 
Newbwmigli William M. I attyson. 
J- -irmersviUc ( << i-^e Beyncn, J. >T. 

German. 

\i irl,tin//i Charles Fi>h. 
Sh$fflekt3ohn Mills. 

-.I. Thompson. 
John l.ywson, Co-Bdi-yate, Chairman. 

KV1LLE DISTRICT. 
flrot lritlf r.ichard Whiting. 

-. / JJriiry L. iDtdi). 
Maitland Asharl Ilurllairt, E. Peake. 
Pn-t/i David C. McDowell. 

illi .lami-s linviiiT; J. Mas- 
sun ; II. Shnler. SuperannUAted. 
Mnlilili: ,, iimi -s Gra\, John B. Arm- 

Btroi 
Smith s Full* Sylvcstt-r Ilurlburt ; 

Wm. Ilr nvn. Supernumerary. 
Ci/rl/ ni J l.irr J< n-| h Tcynolds. 

ii il-c Wm. 

Burns; A. Adams. Supernumerary. 
-I .ul.ert 



1856.] 



CLERGY. 



J/em rf r ittc Rol ert BrewsW. 
Cornwall John Howes, Eich. K- 
TKinc/ic.<<f Krastus Huvlburt. 
Ashael Hurlburt, Chairman. 

OTTAWA DISTRICT. 

Ottawa City James Brock. 
Aylmvr Robert Robinson. 
Richmond William Coltman, John 

Bradon. 

L Orignal "Wm. Morton, James Roy. 
Lochaber David ITardie. 
Osgoode William McGill, J. Latimer. 
Gattineau Silas Huntingdon. 
Clarendon awl Portage du Fork 

Luther Houghton, Wm. Scales. 
Westmeath Kit-hard Hammond. 
Hunttey Thomas McMullen 
Grenville John D. Pvigh. 
James Brock, Chairman. 

MONTREAL DISTRICT. 

Montreal Centre Wellington Jeffers ; 

John Douglas, Supernumerary. 
Montreal West George Young. 
Montreal East Joseph Jones. 
Kawdon and Wa-l ycilk W. Creieli- 

ton, James Morris. 
St. John s Kobert Cooney, A.M. 
tfiambly David Jennings. 
Odett Town Wm. Scott. 
Hemmingford Richard Clarke. 
Eussdtown Richard Wilson. 
Hantington Isaac Barber, J. Sweet. 
at. Andrews James H. Bishop, And. 

Armstrong. 

Caviynall Win, Hewitt. 
Wellington Jeffers, Chairman. 

QUEBEC DISTRICT. 

Quebec William Pollard. 
1 iniit Levi Wm. Uansford. 
Three Rivers Wm. Steer. 
Leeds John Armstrong. 
Chaudiere Edward Cragg. 
Melbourne T. W. Constable, B. Cole. 

Danville 

iffierlrooke Benjamin Slight, A.M. 
Eaton Kobert Graham. 

Diulsivdl 

Gazpe E. F. Ingalls, Supernumerary. 
Benjamin Slight, A.M., Chirruaa. 

STAN STEAD DISTRICT. 

ftanstead Malcolm McDonald. 

Campion John B. Selley, M:D. 

Ilatlcy 

Coaticoke John Fugh. 

East Jiolton Joseph Ilewgill. 

OJieJt ord Gifl ord Dorey. 

Granby 

Dunham Kufus A. Flanders. 
Samuel E. Phillips; Barnabas Hitch 
cock, Supernumerary. 
if Francis Hunt. 

. ( Armand James Norrif. 

Clarenccvitlc John Tomkius. 

John Tomkins, Chairman. 

HUDSON S i>AY TKRRITORY. 

Knrv:ay House, Lale Winncpcij Thos. 

Hurlburt. 

O.rfirrd 1-Iouit Kobert Brooking. 
Lac-La-Pluic Allan Salt, 
Edmonton Hmise and Rocky M- 
Thomas Woolsey and H. Stei::haur. 
Thomas Hurlburt, Chairman. 

Metliotlist IVew Connection. 

TORONTO WblRlCT. 

Tm onto D. Savage. 
YarkmUe J. Dent. 
Wldlchurch J. Caswell. 
Trafalgar J. Simpson. 
Caledcn G. Langiord. 
Brock N. C. Gowan. 
Hilton W. Webb. 
J. Caswell, Chairman of District. 



HAMILTON DISTRICT. 

/, W. McClure, .7. Bi-tnnan> 
Supernumerary. 

.:; D. Betles, J. Eetilo, J. 

ii .:, Supernunu 

./ CanulZ. Williai B, \\ . Y. il- 
lianjp. 

J. Wilkiri:-! ii 

J. Bell. 
M , J. McAlisUa-. 

Hie man Otden. 

Lale J :> J. A. Miller. 

W. McCiure, Chairman. 

LONDON DISTRICT. 

LGI:I~I ,\ J. II. Robinson. J. fcV 

- -~i .". 1 
HowaidQ. I!Muh ; V, . 

/(/ F. G. Weaver. 
!< - 
BlfridC. Curry. 

T. 0. AdkiiO> J. " alkcr. 
< i - 
J. H. BobiiiKon, Chaiiirun. 

WATEEFORD TUSTEICT. 

- -n? T. Gol<?.fni h, J. Hill, W. 
ii:e, SupernuniC iary. 
mas ,1. B. Kei^ 
,-][. WilV.ii fon. 
icti Thomas Rump. 
Thomas Goldsmith, Chairman. 

JOHNSTOWN KtlEICT. 

an W. Barnutt, J. C. SVarren, 
Supernumerary. 

i:-n D. D. liolston. 
i W. Gundy. 

, T. Reid, j . Doel, J. Hales, Su 
pernumerary. 



art it;, /i.j. E 
W. Gundy, Chairman. 

CAVAN DISTRICT: 
Jc li i liiston. 

J. Viniiijr, J. Crawford. 
^ i-:-:Ui-/tf W. JJothwell. 

-O. Whitcomb. 
J. Ilisttu. Chairman, 



. ,rt!>rr A. Clark. 

:n T. M. .IclTiies. 
HI J. (Jaddis. 
, > . S. GUI.- 
. / - 

Thomas M. Jeffries. Cliaiilnan. 
.- -.!. G. W:,Hs. 

cf.rs .f. II. R:,b5r\pon, 
-al Suj--:-inteii(Ji Tit of Mi: 
W. JScCluu-. A f Mstant do.; T. Lott- 
e, Tn-asurcr of the Connexion; 
31. II. Brvtt. Financial Secretary . 
31. Aiknian, Mi- -lary. 



uui.st Episcopal Cluurcli 
in Canada. 



John R;-\ nolds, Iielk-Tillt-. and I hilan- 
inith, BrookJrn, General Super- 
intendaiits. 

NIAGARA ANNUAL CONFia^NCE. 

TOEOXTO DISTRICT. 

Isnnc Brock Richardson, . IVesiding 
ler. 

! , I irritte. 

. K. B. Cock; C. W. Fraser, 
Snperannnated. 

; 

- i ,-i \], 
n A. L. Thurston. 

: J. Rich 
ards >). : rji.-i. i]ii;iiuttd. 

nrd. 
J. 5!. Ccllins. 

ylor. 
, xa J. Foster. 

[161 j 



NIAGARA DISTRICT. 

T. W. Jacobs, Presiding Eld, r. 

1 umiUon- G. Shephard, S. Morrison: 
T. Wecster, Supernumerary. 

Barton W. D. Brown. 

Niagara H.Taylor; E. Swea?.y, Su 
pernumerary. 

Wdland J. Wood. 

Canboro G. Bennett, H. Kelly. 

Gainsboro E. Bartram. 

Xiltfieet W. F. Lowe. 

TutcaroraS. Dunr.ett. 

Caledonia. E. Brown. 

OXFORD DISTRICT. 

E. Bristol Presiding Elder. 

Dumj ries J. McLean : B. Markle, 
Superannuated; S. Steward. Super 
numerary. 

Blenheim J. Ormcrod ; W. Cape, Su 
pernumerary. 

Oullund E. Louusberry; J. Owen, 
Superannuated. 

yfirwich J. Gibson. 

Straffordville A. E. GrrJEil:. 

Bmighttm Wm. Yokum. 

Vienna J. Curts; E. Harris, Super 
annuated. 

JUalahide\f. D. Hughson ; C. Petti,, 
Superannuated. 

Dorchester L. P. Smith, M. Benson. 

ft. Mary s Thomas Dawes. 

Oxford G. Abbs, S. J. Wright. 

Embro A. Houslmrger. 

LONDON DISTRICT. 

G. P. Harris, Presiding Elder. 
London Station J. Tufl ord; J. Bally. 

Superannuated. 
London Circuit A. Jors; D. Gulp, 

Superannuated. 
Maitland N. A.Fraserj 
Stanley J. W. Byam. 
Soitthwold E. Draper. 
Howard T. Atkinson. 
Thames B. Lawrence. 
M. Clair R. Yokum. 
Bosanquet N. Roy. 
Dover 0. G. Collamore. 

HURON DISTRICT. 

W. Woodward, Presiding Elder. 
St. Vincent S. L.Kerr. 
Arthur IS.. L. Tiudall. 
Kincardine A. Bradfhaw. 
Oillinywocd M. D. Archer. 
Durham Vf. Campbell. 

BAY QUINTE CONFERENCE. 

BAT QUINTE DIS ITUCT. 

J. Gardener, Presiding Elder. 

Hope Circuit W. Graham; T.Lewis. 

Superannuated. 
Colourg A. McLaren; J. Gatchell, 

Superannuated. 
Briylilon J. F . Wilson. John Pomroj : 

S. W. Ladue, Superannuated. 
Percy and Seymour W. E. Norman. 

Eli Woodcock. 
Kawdon John A. Ropers. 
Huntingdon it-Elzi.vir N. H. Howard. 
Sidney S. Young. 
J3cUeritteV. Wilson; W. Bird, Agent 

for Belleville Seminary. 
Ha.lowellG. W 7 . B Ian chard, J. Q. 

Adams ; F^. Orser. Supernumerary. 
Consecon R. Sanderson. 

KINGSTON DISTRICT. 

Benson Smith, Presiding Elder. 

Tyendinaga II. Williams, J. Rom- 
bough ; D. Brown, Supernumerary. 

Napanee R. Earl. 

Bay QuinteJ. G. Bull, W. A. SillB: 
R. Perry, Superannuated. 

Hinchinbrool Ihomas I lato. 

Waterloo 3. Tuke. W H. Graham. 

KiiKjsiim J. B. Aylsworth ; J. H. 
Johnson, General Agent for Bella- 
ville Seminary. 



CLERGY. 



[1856. 



Wolfe Island J. N. D. West. 
Gananoque and Escotte J. C. Burnell. 

AUGUSTA DISTRICT. 

A. Wright, Presiding Elder. 

Brockville P. P. Poineroy. 

Augusta W. Brown. 

ElizabetJitownK. Lane.; G. Bissell, 
Superannuated. 

Farmersville G. Jones. 

Crosby Daniel Pomroy. 

Rideau3. D. Bell. 

Matilda and StormontJ. W. Sills, A. 
Hunt ; M. Davy, Superannuated. 

Winchester Daniel Smith. 

Ottawa and La Chute D. N. Robinson, 
C. W. Lent; J. McNally, Supernu 
merary. 

Ottawa City C. Manson. 

Westmealh James Smith. 

Bonna Cheur and Eganville J. P. 
Sparrow ; E. J. Feelford. 

Primitive Methodist Church 
in Canada. 

The Conference of 1856. to be held at 

Hamilton, April 11. 
T. Adams, President. 
E. Barrass, Secretary. 

TORONTO DISTRICT. 

Toronto E. Barrass. 

Yarkvitte R. Cade. 

EtoUcokeJ. Garner, W. Gledhill, W. 

Jolley, Sup. 
Jfarkham J. Lacey, T. Foster, J. 

Clarke. 

Darlington J. Edgar. 
Albion J. Nattrass, J. Haldershaw. 
Scarboro R. Poulter. 
Reach W. Lyle, W. Cooke. 
Kingston T. Crompton, J. Markham. 
Ftrrtland J. Simpson, J. Milner. 
Nafomet G. Wood. 
Montreal 

HAMILTON DISTRICT. 

Bramptonn. Boyle, R. Stevenson; 

Hamilton W. Roe. 

Walpole W. J. Dean, R. Paintin, J. G. 
Montgomery. 

Blenheim W. Newton. 

OaU and Guelph J. Davison. R,. Paul. 

OrangevuleT. Dudley. 

Peel c WellesleyS. Driffill, J. G. Mont 
gomery, R. Paintin, J. R. Swift, J. 
Fowler, Sup. 

Woodstock R. Parsons. 

London W. Stephenson, R. Stephen- 
son. 

Paris and BrantfordT. Adams. 

Brant W. Lomas. 

Bosanquet J. Ryder. 

St. Vincent T. Nattrass. 



Congregational 
Denomination. 

The Annual Meeting of the Congrega 
tional Union of Canada, will be held 
in Hamilton, on the Second Wed 
nesday in June, 1856. 

W. F. Clarke, London, Chairman of 
Union. 

Kenneth M. Fenwick, Kingston, Secre 
tary and Treasurer. 

Abbotsford <f; Qranby G. B. Beecher. 

Albion J. Wheeler. 

Belleville U. D. Powia. 

BrantfordJ. Wood. 

Brock 

BroclcviUe J. Fraser. 

Brome < Oowansvitte S. Rattray. 

BowmanviUe Thomas lleikie. 

Galedon R. J. Williams. 

Ohinguacousy John McLean 

Cbbourg Thomas Snell. 

Cold Springs William Ilayden. 

Golpoy s B^nj Sky. 



Danville d- Shipton A. J. Parker. 

Durham D. Dunkerley. 

Eaton E. J. Sherrill. 

Elora James Middleton. 

Eramosa Enoch Barker. 

Esquesing J. Armour. 

Georgetown, Trafalgar, Churchtown, 
and Stewartown J. Unsworth. 

Georgeville & Potton L. P. Adams. 

G Ian ford 

Hawkesbury E. A. Noble. 

Hamilton E. Ebbs. 

Indian Lands, Gkngary3. Campbell. 

Inverness 

Kingston K. M. Fenwick. 

Lanark, 1st Church R. K. Black. 

Lanark Village II. Lancashire. 

London W. F. Clarke. 

Markham J. B. Robinson. 

Martintown J. McKillican. 

Melbourne Thomas Bayne. 

Montreal, 1st ChurdiQ.. Wilkes, D.D. 

Montreal, 2nd Church 

Newcastle 

Newmarket T. Baker. 

NfMawassaga N. McKinnon. 

Norwood 

Owen Sound L. Kribs. 

Oro A. Raymond. 

Paris and Burford J. Vincent. 

PltillipsburghJ. Buckham. 

Port Sarnia. 

Port Stanley 

Quebec W. II. Hugh de Burgh. 

Ritsseltown G. Ritchie. 

Saugeen J. Johnson. 

Scotland William Hay. 

Simcoe Samuel Harris. 

Sherbrooke J. Robertson. 

Springford H. Denny. 

Southwold W. Burgess. 

Stanstead (North) R. V. Hall. 

St. Andrews A. Sim, M.A. 

St. Francis P. P. Osunkhirhine. 

Stouffville J. Durrant. 

Stratford S. Snider. 

Toronto, 1st Church 

Toronto, 2nd Church . II. Marling. 
Toronto Theological Institute A. 
Lillie, D.D., and A. Wickson, M.A. 
Vaughan A. J. Jupp. 
Warwick D. McCallum. 

Windsor 

WMtbyJ. T. Byrne. 
Ministers without stated charges H. 
Wilson, Missionary, St. Catherines; 
J. Nail, Agent of Tract Society, Brant- 
ford ; W. P. Wastell, Agent French 
Canadian Missionary Society ; John 
Roaf, Toronto; W. Clarke, London; 
John Climie, Bowmanville ; S. King, 
Hamilton; S. Ward, Toronto; T. 
Searight, Norwood; W. All worth, J. 
Hay. 



Canada Christian . 
Conference. 

Conference meets at Oshawa, on the 
Jast Wednesday in June, 1856. 

G. W. Colston, President; J. W. Col 
lins, Secretary, Newmarket. 

Oshawa Thomas Henry and J. R. 
Hoag. 

Brougham J. W. Sharard; Jehiel 
Churehil. 

BowmanviUe Jesso Tancamp. 

Bondhead Hyrain Hayward. 

BmoklinQ. W. Colston, L. C. Thomas. 

Wnitby B. F. Perry. 

Castleton Elisha Alger. 

Graf ton J. W. Noble, J. L. Russ, B. 
L. Bradley. 

G-irmsle fs Corners John Macklem. 

Newmarl.-clll. H. Willson. 

QueensviUe Squire Morton. 

Keswick Jesse Tatton, C. P. McMillan. 
f. B. Rolf, Wm. Henry. 

[162] 



Straffordville John Earl. 
Little Britain N. C. Earl. 
Beverly Joseph Godkin. 
Scotland Charles Hayner. 
Btirgessvitte Sylvenus Nicholls. 
Attensville J. Liburtis. 



Bible Christian Church in 
Canada \Vest. 

Conference meets at Guideboard, Hope, 
the First Thursday in June, 1856. 

COBOURG DISTRICT. 

Cobourg J. B. Tapp, Chairman, J. 
Pinch, J. Hughes, J. Langdon, Su 
perannuated. 

Peterborough John Hodgson. 

Dummer Henry Stevens. 

Huntingdon T. Green. 

Seymour A. Morris. 

Hungerford A. Doble. 

BOWMANVILLE DISTRICT. 

Darlington (East) W. Hooper, S. P. 
Robins. 

Darlington (West) H. Ebbott, J. Hoo 
per. 

Mariposa J. H. Eynon, R. Miller. 

Pickering V. Robins, Chairman; T. 
Hull. 

HURON DISTRICT. 

Mitchell R. Hurley, Chairman; T. 

Robbins. 

Tfsborne J. Williams, J. Dix. 
Clinton J. Edwards, D. Cantlin. 
London R. L. Tucker. 
Without Charge G. Haycroft. 



Baptist Denomination. 

South Monoghan James Baird. 
Coaticook Joseph Chandler. 
Mount Elgin Vi. B. Chapel. 
Montreal Benjamin Davies, Ph. D. 
Picton Alexander Dick, M.A. 
Toronto James Dick, Robert Dick, 

Alexander Lorimer. 
Clfirence John Edwards. 
Peterboro John Gilinour. 
Brougham Thomas Gostick. 
Simcoe Charles Hallam. 
Woodstock W. H. Landou. 
Quebec David Marsh. 
Owen Sound Peter McDonald. 
Weston Mai com McYickar. 
Nithburg Walter Milne. 
Innerkip L. S. Parmelee. 
Peterboro E. Roberts. 
Cobourg Samuel Tapscott. 

Ministers who affiliate with the preced 
ing, yet wish to avoid all tectarian 
names. 

Weston James Brooke. 
Brampton William Millard. 



Ilegular Baptist Denomina 
tion in Canada. 

Amherstburg A. Bingel & I. J. Eke. 
Ancaster Elijah Clarke. 
Arthur Walter Millar. 
Artemesia Thomas J. Jones. 
A tifjusta Robert Hamilton. 
Aylmer Joseph Glutton. 
Barnston, C. E. - 
Bastard Alexander Anderson. 
Beamsville William Ilewson, A.M. 
Berlin Henry Schnidor. 
Beverly Ephraim Smith. 
Binbrook Job Moxsom. 
Jili>.n!<eim David Cunvy. 
Bloomsburg James Stotliard. 
Boston, C. W. Thomas Jf. Owou. 
Bosanr/uct Alfred Chute. 
Jlrantford Thos. L. D.tvHson, A.M. 
ilbane - 



]lri<fht<mA.. Si:: 



. M.D. 



1856.] 



COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS. 



75 



Bronte John Oakley. 
Brock Alexander Slclntyre. 
Oaledon Hugh Keid. 
Qjinboro David Way. 
( <irleton-PlaceIi. Holcroft, 
Cliatham, C.E.John King. 
Chatham, C. W H. H. Hawkins, A. 

Campbell & S. White. 
CayugaS. T. Atkins. 
Oolchester Jacob Her & Or. Simpson. 

Oramahe 

Crosby E. McEarthin. 
Dawn W. P. Newman. 
Dereham Mark W. Hopkins. 
Dorchester Job Gibson. 
Drummondville John Roberts. 
Dundas d- E. Flamboro l. 3. Hoile. 
Durham Alexander Stewart. 
East Oxford Edward Topping. 

East Gwillimbury 

East Hope Milne 8. Bagley. 
Eaton, C.E. Archibald Gillies. 
Elma Edmund R. Phillips. 
Elmsley Duncan McNab. 
Esquesing3. Clark & T. Pickard. 
Fdnnersviue Hugh Nichols. 
Fingal Abram Duncan. 
Font Hitt3. W. Pritehard. 
Fbrestville Jonathan Williams. 
Fredericksburgh W. McClellan. 
Gananoque J. Cheetham. 
Godmanchester James Green. 
Oosfield Thomas Corlett. 
Grande Ligne L. Normandeau, C. 

Roux, it, T. Reindeau. 
naUimand Daniel Wait. 
Hamilton A. Booker & P. Broadwater. 
Hartford Jacob Van Loon, Sen. 
Hawksville James Sim. 
Henryville, C.E. James X. Williams. 
HULsburg John Clarke. 



Houghton M illiam McDermaird. 

Howick William Hulbert. 

Ingersoll W. C. Beardsall. 

Kempville W. K. Anderson. 

Kincardine William Frazer. 

King 

Kingston Thomas H. Facer. 

Lawrenceville George Wilson. 

Leeds Abel Stevens. 

Lobo William Wilkinson, A.M. 

Lochaber John Edwards. 

London C. Campbell & D. A. Turner. 

Malahide Shook McConnell. 

Mariposa Malcombe Gillespie. 

Markham and Pickering C. G. Pur- 
rett. 

McGittivray W. George, Thos. Paul. 

Mersea Robert Herrington. 

Montreal T. R. Jones, Narcisse Cyr. 

Newmarket Vacan t. 

New Sarum Abram Smith. 

Niagara F. Lacey. 

North East Hope. W. L. Baily. 

Norwich W. McClellan. 

Oakland William Haviland. 

Onondaga J. Painter, W. Hooper. 

Onondaga Village B. H. Carryer. 

Oro Hector McLean. 

Osgoode Daniel McPhail. 

Osnabruck Vacant. 

Paris John Nesbit. 

Pdham S. W. Folger. 

Perth Vacant. 

Port Hope B.. Lloyd, A.B. 

Port Rowan Heman Fitch. 

Port fiyerse George J. Ryerse. 

JKawdon William Geary. 

Reach W. Hurlburt, J. Holman. 

Sandwich S. Robinson H. Brown. 

Scotland and Burford John Winter- 
bottom. 



Sidney 

Silver Hill George Curtis. 

Simcoe Abram Austin. 

St. Andrews, C. E. J. Dempsey. 

St. Catharines J. E. Kyorson. 

St. George William Smith. 

St. Mary s, C. E. Louis Roussy. 

St. Pie, G. E. Theodora Lafleur. 

St. Thomas D. W. Rowland. 

Stanbridge, G. E.E. N. Jersey. 

StansteadE. Mitchel. 

Tilsonburg H. A. Conrad. 

Toronto James Pyper, D.D. 

Tuscarora James, N. Cusick. 

Villa Nova J. Goble, and J. Van 

Loon, Jun. 

Viltoria Charles Walker. 
Walpole Thomas Stillwell. 
Waterford Aaron Slaght. 
Waterloo George Patten. 
Whitby John Gerrie. 
West Oxford II. E. Ford. 
Woodstock J. Cooper, G. Duncan. 
Woolwich Burton H. Curtis. 
Yarmouth Thomas Mills. 
Tonge Street J. Gooderham. 
Zone Mills Alezander M. Facey. 

Ministers without Pastoral Charges 
Anthony Scott, Agent of Missionary 
Convention : Jno. Cameron, Francis 
Pickle, Blenheim; John Harris, 
Mount Pleasant ; Samuel Read, 
Brantford; W. Jackson, do.; S. 
Baker, Itinerant; Daniel Wright, 
Itinerant ; J. S. Cox, Itinerant ; Z. 
W. Caufield, Boston, C. W. ; P. Fair- 
childs, do.; J. Rainboth, Indian 
Lands; T. H. Thompson, Itine 
rant. 



COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS, CANADA. 

Those marked thus* are WareJiousing Ports. 



Amherst* J. J. Fox. 
Amherstburgh,* E. Anderson 
Bath, W. J. Fairfield. 
Beauce, T. Taschereau. 
Belleville* S. S. Finden. 
Brantford* D. Curtis, Jr. 
Brighton, J. Verner. 
BrocJ-:ville* W. B. Simpson. 
Bruce, J. J. Penefather. 
Bytown,* Duncan Graham. 
Chatham,* W. Cosgrove. 
Chippewa,* F. H. Haycock. 
ClarenceviUe, Chas. Stewart. 
fjubourg* W. II. Kitson. 
Cornwall* G. C. Wood. 
Coteau du Lac, P. E. Waiter. 
Dickenson s L g, R. II. Bullock 
Dtmnville, W. B. Sheehan. 
Dundas,* W. B. Gwyn. 
Dundee, J. Cameron. 
Elgin, A. McMillan. 



FM, Erie, T. Kerby. 
Prelighsburgh, A. Kemp. 
Gananoque, Wm. Brough. 
Gaspe* J. C. Belleau. 
Goderich,* D. Lawson. 
Grafton* S. S. Walsh. 
Georgeville, C. Bullock. 
Hamilton, 3. Davidson. 
HalloweU,orFicton,* J.Roblin 



Newcastle,(B. Head} Smith 

OalsciOe, R. K. Chisholm. 

Oshawa, C. Walsh. 

Owen Sound, W. Stephens. 

Penetanguishene W. Simpson. 

Phillipsburg, P. P. Russell. 

Prescott, A. Jones. 

Port Burwett, J. P. Bellairs. 

Port Cramahe, A. Lennon. 



Hemmingford, C. N. Johnson ! Port Saugeen, J. McLean. 



Hereford, R. Vincent. 
Huntingdon, James Bothain. 
Kingston,* James Hopkirk. 
Lacolle, T. Gordon. 
L Me Verte, J. W. Heath. 
Maittand,* D. Jones. 
Maria Town, A. McDonnell. 
Montreal* T. Bouthillier. 
Napanee, Henry Acton. 
Niagara,* T. McCormick. 
New Carlisle, John Fraser. 



Port Trenton,* A. Macaulay . 
Port Coaticook,* J. Thompson 
Port Credit, W. Donohue, 
Port Colborne,* T. Parke. 
Port Darlington, D. Fisher. 
Port Dalhousie,* J. Clark. 
Port Dover* E. Webster. 
Port Hope* M. Whitehead. 

Port Milford, 

Port Morrisburg, A. M Donell 
Port Suiton, B. Seaton. 



Port Sarnia* T. Forsyth. 
Port Stanley,* R. Smith. 
Port Rowan, 6. J. Readr. 
Potton. J. H. McVay. 
Queenston* P. B. Clement. 
Quebec,* J. W. Dunscomb. 
RiisseUown, 3. Davidson. 
Riviere aux Raisins, W. Bo- 

binson. 

Rondeau, George Duck. 
Rimouski, S. Gauvreau. 
Sandwich* 3. F. Elliott. 
Sault Ste. Marie,* J. Wilson. 
Stanstead, 3. Thompson. 
St. Regis, G. R. Andy. 
St. Johns* W. McCrae. 
Stamford,* G. McMicken. 
Toronto* W. F. Meudell. 
WaUaceburgh, John Bell. 
Wellington, 3. R. Yeilding. 
Whitby, W. Warren. 



TARIFF OF CUSTOMS. 



Specific. AdYal. 
Almonds, Currants, Figs, Nuts, Raisins, 

Prunes and other Dried Fruits Id p Ib. 

All Une numerated Spices 3d p Ib. 

Allspice Id p Ib. 

Acids, Strong Fluid, including Muriatic, 

Nitric, Oxalic, and Sulphuric 

Alu m 

Alabaster Busts, Casts of Free 

Anchors Free 

Animals, of all kinds Free 

Anatomical Preparations Free 

Antiquities, Collections of. Free 

Apparel, Wearing, in use of parties coming 

to settle in the Province free 

Apparel, Wearing of British Subjects dying 

abroad Free 

Apparatus, Philosophical Free 



Specific. AdVal. 

Army and Navy Arms, Amunition and 
Clothing for Free 

Ashes, Pot, Pearl and Soda Free 

Agricultural Utensils (see Farming Utensils) 

Artificial Slate and Metallic Paint, being 
the produce and manufacture of Nova 
Scotia, when imported direct from Great 
Britain or British North American Colo 
nies only Free 

Artificial Flowers 

All Goods, Wares and Merchandises, not 
otherwise charged with Duty, and not 
declared to be exempt from Duty 

All Packages in which the Goods are not 
usually exposed for sale, or which do not 
necessarily or generally accompany the 
Goods when sold Free 



[163] 



76 



TARIFF OF CUSTOMS. 



[185(5. 



Axles, Roush 

Axles and Wh : i way purposes only 

Ammunition, Anus. I tensiis of War, ex 

cept from Great Britain and British 

Possessions ...................................... 

Brandy, the gallon ................................. 

Bar Iron ................................................ 

Bar, Railroad .......................................... 

Blue, Ultra Marino and Taste .................. 

Bleaching Powder ................................... 

Boiler Plates .......................................... 

Borax ................................................... 

Brimstone or Roll Sulphur ...................... 

Brick, Fire ............................................. 

Brass, Pig or Sheet ................................. 

Brass and Copper Tubes, when import oil lor 

Locomotives only ................................. 

Bark ................................................... 

Barley and Barley Meal ........................... 

Berries, used in dyeing ........................... 

Busts and Casts of Alabaster, Bronze, 

Plaster of Paris and Marble ............. :.... 

Botany, Specimens of .............................. 

Beer and Bigg ....................................... 

Books of immoral or indecent character ...... 

Books, printed (except copyright) ............ 

Books, Copyright .................................... 

Bran and Shorts .................................... 

Beans ................................................... 

Bristles ................................................ 

Broom Corn .......................................... 

Bronze, Busts and Casts of ..................... 

Burr Stone, unwrouirht ........................... 

Burr Stone, hewn, wrought or unwrought, 

the produce of and from United States 

only ................................................ 

Burr Stone, wrought, from other Countries 
Bunting ............................................ 

Bulbs and Roots .................................... 

Bullion and Coins ................................. 

Bastard Sugar (se -, sugar) 

Breadstuff s of all kinds ........................... 

Biscuit and Bread, from Great Britain and 

British North American Colonies only ... 
Biscuit and Bread from other countries ... 
Book-Binders tools and presses, and Imple 

ments of all Kinds .............................. 

Butter ................................................ 

Black and Bright Varnish only ............... 

Base and Counterfeit Coin ..................... 

Blasting Powder .................................... 

Boots, fishermen .................................... 

Buckwheat and Buckwheat Meal ........... ; 

Bridge and Telegraph Wire ..................... 

Burning Fluid, the gallon ........................ 

Canada Plates ........................... 

Cakes, Oil ............................................. 

Casts of Bronze. Alabaster and Plaster of 

Paris ................................................ 

Cabinets of Coins .................................... 

Coffee, green, per Ib ............................... 

Coffee, other than green, per Ib ................ 

Cigars per Ib ........................................ 

Cordials, Liqueurs, and Spirits sweetened 

or mixed with any other articles, per 

gallon ............................................. 

Cassia, Cinnamon. Cloves and Ginger, per Ib. 
Chains, Iron of all sorts (except Chain 

Cables) ........................ .. ..... . ............ 

Charcoal, made or refined ........................ 

Cochineal .......................................... 

Coperaa ................................. ............... 

Connection Ri<ls in pieces, for Locomo 

tives only .......................................... 

Cotton Warp and Wick .............. ....."...... 

Cranks, wrought iron, cwt, and upwards 
Cotton Yarn ..................... . .......... * ........ 

Coin and Bullion .................................... 

Coins, Base and Counterfeit ..... ................ 

Collections of Antiquities ........................ 

Clothing for Army. \.nvy and Indian ...... 

Corn, formakin. Brooms ........................ 

Corn, Indian and Meal .......................... 

Chain Cables .......................................... 

Carriages of Travellers ........................... 

Caoutchouc .......................................... 

Cement Marine .................................... 



. ^.( IW. 



Prohibited. 

. 



Free 
Free 

Free 

Free 

Free 

Free 

Prohibited. 

Free 

Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 



Free 

Free 
Free 
Free 

Free 
Free 



Free 
Free 
Free 
Prohibited. 



Free 
4s Od 



Free 
Free 






2s 



4s 
Gd 



Prolii; 

Freo 

Free 

Free 
Free 

Free 



Clay, Fire and Pipe Free 

Coal and Coke Free 

Cordage, of all kinds Free 

. in bar, rod or sheet Free 

Cotton and Flax, waste Free 

Cotton Wool : Free 

Cars (see Locomotives). 

Cheese Free 

Chocolate and Cocoa Paste, the produce < , , 
and when imported direct from Great 
Britain and British North American Colo 
nies only Free 

Chocolate, &c., from other Couutiies 

Candy (see Sugar). 

Casks, Ships Water Free 

Carpenter s Tools, Wood for manut.-icturn of Free 

Cocoanut Oil Free 

Copyrights, Works, Foreign He-Prints of 

British 

Commissariat Storts I m- 

Copper Tubes (see Brass). 
Crushed Sugar (see Sugar.) 
Crates, containing Glassware and Earthen 
ware Freo 

Confectionary, of all sorts 

Currants, per Ib Id 

Cotton Manufactures of all kinds VI 

Coney Wool, and Wool, except from United 

States and Colonies 2 

Coney Wool, and Wool the produce of 
United States and British North Ameri 
can Colonies only Free 

Draining Tyles i 

Donations of Clothing, for Gratuitous Dis 
tribution by Chaiitable Societies Free 

Drawings, Paintings and Lithographs Free 

Drugs and Woods, used solely for Dyeing Free 
Dye-Stuffs of all kinds, the product) of 

United States only Free 

Drawings, of immoral or indecent chaiacter. Prohibited. 
Earths and Ochres, the produce of, and 
from British North American Colonies 

only Free 

Earths and Ochres, from all other countries, 

Engravings and Etchings Free 

Eggs, the produce of, and from the United 

States only Free 

Eggs, from other countries 

; Felts 

Fishermen s Boots 

Farming utensils and implements of hus 
bandry, when imported by Incorporated 
Agricultural Societies for encouragement 

of agriculture Free 

Fire Bricks 

Fishing Nets and Seines 

Fishing Hooks 

frames and Pedestals, rough from the forge, 

when imported for locomotives only 

Fire Clay .". Free 

Flax and Cotton Waste Free 

Felt Sheeting Free 

Flax, Hemp and Tow, undressed Free 

Flour Free 

Fruit, green Free 

Fruit, other than the produce of, and from 
the United States and British North 

American Colonies only Free 

Fruits preserved in sugar candy or molasses, 
Fruit, dried, from other countries, (see 

almonds.) 

Fish Oil, Fish, fresh or salted, clri.d or 
pickled, the produce of, ar.d frmu < 
Britain, United States and British North 

American Colonies only Free 

Fish, &c,, from other countries 

Furs or Skins, the produce offish and 
tures living in the sea. di.-ssed or un 
dressed, the produce of. and when im 
ported directly from Great Britain and 
British North American 0< .lonies onlv.... 
Fur Skins, Pelts and Tails. uielress-.l. tlie. 
produce of. and from United States. 
Britain and British North American < 

only 

Fur Skins, dressed or undressed. tVom < 
countries 












* 



[1C41 



1856.] 



TARIFF OF CUSTOMS. 



77 



Free 



Specific. 

Firewood from Great Britain, United States, 
and British No th American Colonies 

only 

Firewood from all other countries 

Kish. products of. and of a!l creatures living 
in the water, the produce of, and from 

United States only Free 

Fish,&c. fish from other countries 

Figs, the Ib Id. 

Green Coffee, the Ib \<A. 

Geneva or Gin. or other Spirits, or Strong 
Water, not being whisky, ruin, or brandy, 

the gallon 2s. 6d. 

Galvanized Iron 

Grains, of all kinds Free 

Ginger, Cassia, Cinnamon, Cloves, the Ib... 3d. 
Grindstone and Stones, of all kinds, the 
produce of, and from United States and 
British North American Colonies only... Free 

Grindstones, &c., from other countries 

Green Fruits Free 

Gems and Medals Free 

Grease and Scraps Free 

Gypsum, ground or un^rouud. the produce 
x of, and from Great Britain. United States, 

and B. N. American Colonies only Free 

Gypsum, &c., from oiher countries 

Goods, unenumerated 

Gunpowder, except from Great Britain, or 

British possessions only Prohibited. 

Hams Free 

Hooks, Fishing 

Hoop, Iron 

Hoop or Tyre, for driving wheels, bent or 

welded, for locomotives only 

Ilemp, Flax and Tow. undressed Free 

Hemp, Yarn, Russia Free 

Hides Free 

Household effects in use. of persons coming 
to settle in the Province, or of British 

subjects dying abroad Free 

Hay and Hops Free 

Horns, the produce of. and from Great 
Britain, United States, and British North 

American Colonies only Free 

Horns, from other coint.i./s 

Hardware manufactures 

Indigo Free 

Instruments, phiiosopliual Free 

Implements, and Tools of trade, of handy- 

craftmen Free 

Iron, Pig Free 

iron Chains of all sorts except, chain cables 

Iron Bar, sheet or rid 

Iron Hoop 

Iron, Galvanized 

Iron Moulds and Shares (plough) 

Iron, Roll Plate, from 4 inch to iy 2 inch 

in thickness 

Iron, Old and Scraps 

Iron. Round and Square, from 4 inches and 
upwards, suitable tor shafts and other 

parts of Machinery 

Ink, Printing Free 

Instruments, Mn-i.-al specially imported 

for use of Military Bands Free 

Immoral and Ind cent I .-i.ksor Drawings, Prohibited. 
Implements of Husbandry, imported by In 
corporated Agricultural Societies Free 

Indian Corn and Meal Free 

Junk and Oakuin Free 

Joiners and Carpentes Tools. Wood for... Free 

Lithographs and Drawri/s Fres 

Lead, Pig and Sheet Free 

Lines, Twines and o.i-.la:,- ..fall kinds Free 



, 
- Hi 



Specific. AdVal. 

Lard n-..> 

Logs, Saw Free 

Lime Water Free 

Lime, the produce of, and from Biitish 

American Colonies only Free 

Lime, from other countries l^ 1 ^ 

Lumber, (see Timber.) 
Locomotives, Passengers, Baggage & Freight 
Cars, running upon any lines of Railroad, 

crossing the frontier Free 

Locomotives, &c., <tc., others 12)^ 

Liqueurs, Cordials and Spirits sweetened 
or mixed with any other articles, per gall. 4s. 

Linen Manufacture 12% 

Mace and Nutmegs, the Ib 7%d. 

Maccaroni and Vermicelli, the Ib Id. 

Marble, in blocks and slabs, unpolished... Free 

Marine Cement Free 

Maps and Engravings Free 

Manures of all kinds Free 

Marble Busts Free 

Meals of all kinds Free 

Medals and Gems Free 

Metal, Ores of all kinds of Free 

Metal, yellow, bar, sheet or rod Free 

Metal, type in blocks or pigs Free 

Metallic Paint, (see artificial. &c.) 

Models of Machinery, and other inventions 

and improvements in the arts Free 

Meat of all kinds Free 

Machinery for the Manufacture of doors, 
window-sashes, blinds, and other wood 
works for building purposes 1M 

Moulds and Shares, for Ploughs 2}-4 

Mineralogy, specimens of Free 

Musical Instruments (see Instruments.) 

Muriatic Acid Z 1 A 

Molasses the gallon ". 2d. 

Merchandize, unenumerated 

Navy and Army Arms, Clothing, <tc. for... Free 

Natural History, specimens of. Free 

Nets, Old Free 

Nets and Seines, Fishing 

Nitric Acid 

Nitre and Salt Petre 

Nuts, used in Dyeing Free 

Nutmegs and Mace, the Ib 7]/d 

Nuts, Prunes, Raisins, and other Dried 

Fruits, the Ib Id. 

Oil Paintings Free 

Oil, Cocoa-nut, Palm and Pine Free 

Oil. Fish, the produce of, and from Great 
Britain, United States, and British North 

American Colonies only Free 

j Oil, Fish, from other countries 

Oakum and Junk Free 

Ores, of all kinds of Metals Free 

Old Nets and Ropes Free 

Oats and Oat meal Free 

Ochres, the produce of, and from British 

North Ameiican Colonies only Free 

Ochivs, &c., from other countries 

Oxalic Acid 

i oil-Cakes 

Ore. Dressing Machines 

Old Iron 

Ordnance Stores Free 

Packages.* 

Paint. Ac,., (see Artificial Slate.) 

Paint, other 

Paper, Printing 

Paintings Free 

Pastes, (gpe Blue.) 

Philosophical Instruments and Apparatus, Free 

Pot Ashes Free 



121$ 



I 






212 



12 



* It is ordered that tin- following packages be chargeable with duty, viz: all Packages containing Spirits, Wines, 
(Cordials or Liquids of any kind in Wood, Bottles, Flasks; and all packages of Glassware or Karthenware, Sugar, 
Molasses, Syrups Tn; u-le Code?, Rice, Tobacco, Flour, Provisions, and no deduction to be allowed for the weight or 
value of the paper or string covering Sugar, &c. All Packages containing Soap, Candles, Pipes, Nails, Chains, Paints, 
Spieea, Nuts, Verm; :-oni. Glass, Tin, Canada Plates, Ting, Trunks and Jars containing merchandise, and all 

other Packages in which the goods are usually exposed for sale, or which necessarily or generally accompany the 
goods, when sol 1. A;al ih.it the following Packages are to be exempt frcm. the payment of duty, viz: Bales, TTUSSPP, 
Cases covering Casks <>i \\ im. .s or Brandy in Wood, Cases and Casks containing Dry Goods. Hardware or Cutlery, 
Crates and Casks con .ti inn Glassware or Earthenware. Cases containing Bottled Wines or Bottled Spirits, and a\l 
other Packages in wUich uie goods are not usually exposed for sale, or which do not necessarily or generally accompany 
the goods when sold. 

[1G5] 



78 



TARIFF OF CUSTOMS. 



[1856. 



Specific. AdVal. 

Pearl Ashes Free 

Pig Iron Free 

Pipe Clay ^ee 

Pi" Lead nee 

Printer s Ink, Presses, Types, and Imple 
ments, of all kinds Free 

Plaster of Paris, Manures Free 

Plaster of Paris, Busts and Casts of. Free 

Peas * ree 

Pitch Free 

Pelts, (see Furs.) 

Plants ims 

Powder, Blasting ~A 

Plate, Boiler 4Q 

Plate, Canada ~A 

Plough Shares and Moulds *"fa 

Plate, Iron *A 

Phosphorus ~A 

Prussiate of Potash *A 

Prepared Rigging 7S 

Preparations, Anatomical I ree 

Pedestals (see Frames). 

Preserves lz /2 

Printed Books, (except Copyrights) Free 

Printing Paper *n 

Prunes, Rabins, Figs, and Nuts, the pound Id 
Pimento, Allspice, and Pepper, the pound . Id 

Pine and Palm Oil Free 

Potash, Prussiate of */a 

Quince (see Fruits.) 



Rags . 

Railroad Bars 

Rigging of Ships, prepared " "V 

Rods Connecting (see Connection Hods). 

Hod Iron 

Roll Sulphur or Brimstone 

Roots and Bulbs 

Hopes of all kinds 

Resin and Rosin 

Russia Hemp Yarn 

Rye and Rye Meal 

Rock Salt VT "-TJ 

Rice, the produce of, and trom United 
States only 

Rice, from all other countries 

Rum, the gallon 

Raising, Nuts, Prunes, &c., the ID 

Haw Coffee, the pound 

Refined or made Charcoal 

Refined Sugar (see sugar.) 

Saltpetre and Nitre 

gal Amoniac 

Sails 

Salt and Rock Salt 

Sawlogs 

Sailcloth 

Seeds, of all kinds 

Soda-ash 

Specimens of Botany 

Specimens of Natural History 

Specimens of Mineralogy 

ghorts or Bran .................. 

gtone in its crude or unwrought state, the 
produce of and from United States and 
British North American Colonies only ... 

gtone, &c , from other countries 

ghips Water Casks, in use 

Scraps and Grease 

gkins (see furs). 

Shrubs and Trees ""- 

Slate, the Produce of and from United 
States only 

glate, from all other countries 

Slate, Artificial (see artificial slate). 

Sheet Lead ". 

gpirit of Turpentine (see Turpentine.) 
Straw, from British North American Colo 
nies only 

Straw, from other places 

Settlers Effects, in use 

Sulphuric Acid 

Straps, for Walking Beams 

Seines and Nets 

Scrap Iron 

Sheet Iron 

Shellac 

Spike-rods 



Free 



Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 

Free 

Is8d 
Id 



Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 
l ree 
Free 
Free 



Free 

Free 
Free 

Free 
Free 

Free 

Free 

Free 
Free 



izy. 



:. AdVal. 
Steel . 

Spelter 

Sugar, refined in loafs, crushed or candy, 
or other Sugar rendered equal thereto 

by any process, the cwt 12s 

Sugar, white and brown, clayed or yellow 
bastard sugar rendered by any process 

equal in quality thereto, the cwt.. 8s Cd 

Sugar raw, and other kinds not Veing 
equal to white or brown, clayed or yellow, 

bastard sugar, the cwt 6s Cd 

Snuff, the cwt 4d 

Sweet-Meats or fruits preserved in sugar, 
candy, or Molasses. & other confectionary 
Spirits (see Gin and Cordials). 

Silk, Manufacture 

Spices, unenumerated CJ 

Tar Free 

Tallow Free 

Teazles Free 

Tew, undressed Free 

Tools of Trade or Handycraftsmen Free 

Tools, Bookbinders, and implements of all 

kinds Free 

Tools, wood for Free 

Type Metals in Blocks or Pigs Free 

Types, Printing Free 

Tails (see furs). 

Trees and Shrubs Free 

Tree-nails Free 

Twines and Lines Free 

Timber and Lumber of all kinds, the pro 
duce of, and from Great Britain, United 
States, and B. N. American Colonies only I ree 

Timber and &c., from other countries 

Turpentine, the manufacture of, and from 

United States only Free 

Turpentine from other countries 

Tobacco, unmanufactured, the produce of, 

and from United States only Free 

Tobacco, manufactured or unmanufactured, 
other than cigars and snuff, from all 
countries, except unmanufactured from 

United States, the Ib 2d. 

Tobacco, Cigars, the Ib 2s. 

Tobacco, Snuff, the Ib 4d. 

Tea, the Ib 2d. 

Tyre or hoop for driving wheels, bent or 
welded, rough from the forge, for locomo 
tives only 

Telegraph Insulators, Relay, Magnets, Re- 

eisters and Batteries 

Telegraph and Bridge Wire, when bonajide 
imported to he used as such in Canada. . 

Tin 

Tiles, draining 

Tubes of all kinds (except brass and copper.) 

Ultra Marine and Paste Blue 

Undressed Skins, (see Furs.) 
Undried Fruits and Dried Fruits, the pro 
duce of, and from British North American 

Colonies and United States only Free 

Undried Fruits <fe Dried Fruits, (see fruits.) 
Utensils, (see farming utensils.) 

Vinegar, the gallon 3d. 

Vitriol 

Vegetables Free 

A egetables used in dyeing Free 

Veneers Free 

Varnish, Black and Bright only Free 

Varnish, other 

Vermicelli and Maccoroni, the Ib Id. 

Wines and Merchandise not enumerated. . 

Warp Cotton 

Water Lime Free 

Wine of all kinds, in wood or other vessels, 
not being in bottles, not exceeding in 
value 15 on the Pipe of 126 gallons, the 

gallon Is. Od. 

Wine exceeding 15 on the Pipe of 120 gal- 
gallons, the gallon Is. Gd. 

Wines of all kinds, in bottles, per doz. qts. 7s. 6d. 

Wines, per dozen pints 3s. 9d. 

Wines for Officers Mess Free 

Whisky, the gallon 5d. 

Wrought Iron, wheels and axles for railway 
purposes only 



2k 



2k 



[1G6] 



1856.] 



BANKS. 



79 



Specific. 

Wick, Cotton 

Wrought Iron Cranks, 6 cwt. and upwards, 

Wire, Telegraph and Bridge 

Wool, Cotton Free 

Wool, the produce of, and from the United 
States and British North American Colo 
nies only Free 

Wool from all other countries 

Woollen Manufacture 

Wearing Apparel in use of persons coming 




Specific. 
to settle in the Province, or of British 

subjects, dying abroad Free 

Wood for Carpenters and Joiners Tools . . . Free 
Woods and Drugs used solely in dyeing . . . Free 
Wood, fire, (see firewood.) 

Wheat and wheat-meal, not bolted Free 

Yellow Metals, in bar, sheet or rod Free 

Yarn, Cotton 

Yarn, Russia Hemp Free 

Zinc 



BANKS IN CANADA WITH THEIR AGENCIES, &c. 



PLACES. 

Barrie . . 
" .. 
BdleviEe 



Berlin . . 
Bowmanville 



Bradford . 
llrantfwd 

" . 

Brockville . 



Bytovm . 



Chat uim 

" . 

" . 
Cliippawa 
Cobourg . 
Oornwatt 

" 

Dundas . 
Elgin . 
&aU .. 

" . 
Goderich 

" . 
Gudph . 

" . 
Hamilton 



Kingston 



Lindsay 
London . 



Montreal 



Picton . . 
Port Jlope . 



Port Stanley 
I rescoU . . 
" .. 
Quebec . . 



NAMES OF BANKS. OFFICERS. 

. Upper Canada E. Lally. Agent. 

. Comme cial . S. M. Sanford, Agent. 

. Upper Canada E. Holden, Agent. 

. Commercial . R. Findlay, Agent. 

. Montreal . . Q. McNider, Agent. 

. Upper Canada George Davidson, Agent. 

. Upper Canada George Mearns, Agent. 

. Montreal . . John Simpson, Agent. 

. City Bank . . Robert Armour, Agent. 

. City Bank . . A. McMaster, Agent. 

. B. N. America C. F. Smithers, Manager. 

. Montreal . . A. Greer, Agent. 

. Upper Canada R. F. Church, Agent. 

. Commercial . Andrew Thompson, Agent. 

. Montreal . . F. M. Holmes, Agent. 

. Upper Canada R. S. Cassells, Agent. 

. B. N. America A. C. Kelty, Agent. 

. Montreal . . P. P. Harris, Agent. 

. Quebec . . . H. V. Noel, Agent. 

. Upper Canada George Thomas, Cashier. 

. Commercial . Thomas McCrae, Agent. 

. Gore .... A. Charteriss, Agent. 

. Upper Canada James Macklem, Agent. 

. Montreal . . C. H. Morgan, Agent. 

. Upper Canada J. F. Pringle, Agent. 

. Montreal . . W. Mattice, Agent. 

. B. N. America William Lash, Agent. 

. Zimmerman s. G. McMicking, Cashier. 

. Gore .... John Davidson, Agent. 

. Commercial . Adam Ainslie, Agent. 

. Upper Canada John McDonald, Agent. 

. Montreal . . T. M. Jones, Agent. 

. Gore . . . . T. Sandilands, Agent. 

. Montreal . . J. McLean, Agent. 

. Gore .... A. Steven, Cashier. 

. Upper Canada Alfred Stow, Cashier. 

. B. N. America R. C. Fergusson. Manager. 

. Montreal . . Thomas Lee, Agent. 

. Commercial . H. McKinstry, Cashier. 

. Commercial . C. S. Ross, Cashier. 

. Upper Canada W. G. Hind, Cashier. 

. B. N. America S. Taylor, Manager. 

. Montreal . . A. Drummond, Agent. 

. Upper Canada J. McKibbie, Agent. 

. Upper Canada James Hamilton. Cashier. 

. B. N. America George Taylor, Manager. 

. Commercial . J. G. Harper, Agent. 

. H. C. Barwick, Agent. 

. W. W. Street, Agent. 

. D. Davidson, Cashier. 

. F. McCulloch, Cashier. 

. B. H. Lemoine, Cashier. 

. W. Sache, Cashier. 
. Upper Canada Joseph Wenham, Manager. 
. B. N. America R. Cassels, Manager. 
. Commercial . A. H. Campbell, Cashier. 
. Upper Canada T. McCormick, Agent. 
. Quebec . . . L. M. Cresse, Agent. 
. Commercial . James Laing, Agent. 

. James Nimmo, Agent. 

. A. Leslie, Agent. 

. J. Mclntyre, Agent. 

. Wm. Cluxton, Agent. 

. R. Nicholls, Agent. 

. C. Mortimer, Agent. 
. Upper Canada E. P. Smith, Agent. 
. Commercial . W. F. Harper, Agent. 

. R. N. Waddell, Agent. 

. E. E. Warren, Agent. 

. John Patton, Agent. 

. W. D. Dickenson, Agent. 

. C. Gethings, Cashier. 



. Montreal 
. Gore . . . 
. Montreal . 
. City Bank . 
. DuPeuple. 
. Molson s . 



Jfiagara 

Nicolet . 

Ottawa . 

Paris . . . Gore 

ParVi . . . Commercial 
" . . Montreal . 

Peterborough . Commercial 
. Montreal 
. Montreal 



. Montreal 
. Montreal . 
. Commercial 
. Montreal . 
. Quebec 



. Upper Canada J. F. Bradshaw, Manager. 



PLACES. NAMES OF BANKS. OFFICERS. 

Quebec . . . B. N. America F. W. Wood, Manager. 
" ... Montreal . . W. Gunn, Manager. 
" ... City Bank . . Daniel McGie, Agent. 
Sarnia . . . Upper Canada Alexander \idal, Agent. 

" ... Commercial . G. W. Thomas, Agent. 
Sault Ste Marie B. N. America J. Ballenden, Agent. 
Sherbrooke . City Bank . . W. Ritchie, Agent. 
Simcoe . . . Gore . . . . D. Campbell, Agent. 
Southampton . Upper Canada Alexander McNabb, Agent. 
M. Catlui-ines. Niagara Dist. . John Smart, Cashier. 

. Upper Canada T. L. Helliwell, Cashier. 
" . Commercial . George Rykert, Agent. 

. Montreal . . E. M. Yarwood, Agent. 

. Upper Canada J. C. W. Daly, Agent. 

. Upper Canada DeMoulin, Agent. 

. B. N. America W. Scougall, Agent. 

. Montreal . . J. L. McNair, Agent. 

. City Bank . . James Dickson, Agent. 

. Quebec . . . John McDougall, Agent. 

. Upper Canada T. G. Ridout, Cashier. 

. B. N. America W. G. Cassells, Manager. 

. Commercial . C. J. Campbell, Cashier. 

. Montreal . . J. Stevenson, Cashier. 

. City Bank . . Thomas Woodside, Manager. 

. Quebec . . . W. W. Ransom, Manager. 

. Du Peuple . . E. F. Whittemore, Agent. 

. Molson s. John Glass, Agent. 
Trenton . . Montreal . . J. Cumming, Agent. 
Whitby . . Montreal . . Thomas Dow, Agent. 
Woodstock . . Gore .... James Ingersol, Agent. 

"... Montreal . . W. P. Street, Agent. 
Windsor . . Upper Canada Thomas E. Trew, Agent. 

FOREIGN AGENTS. 

London (Eng) B. N. America Head Office. 

Upper Canada Glyn, Mills & Co. 

Commercial . London Joint Stock Bank. 
Montreal , 

Quebec . , 
City Bank , 
Gore . . , 



St. Thomas 
Stratford . 

2 Aree Hirers 

n 



Toronto 



Liverpool ( 



Glyn, Mills & Co. 
Glyn, Mills & Co. 
Glyn, Mills & Co. 
Glyn, Mills & Co. 
Bank of Liverpool. 



Montreal 
" " Commercial 

" " Gore . . . 

Glasgow (Scot.) Montreal . 
" " . Commercial 



Edinburgh (Sc) Upper Canada British Linen Company. 

British Linen Company. 
Commercial Bank. 
Union Bank. 
British Linen Company. 
Western Bank of Scotland. 

and Clydsdale Bank, 
DulVn (Ire.) . Commercial . Boyle, Low, Pun & Co. 

" " .City Bank. . National Bank of Ireland. 
.Aero York . . Upper Canada J. G. King and Sons. 

. . B. N. America Richard Bell, H. E. Ransom . 

& F. H. Grain, Agents. 
. . Commercial . Merchant s Bank. 
" . . Montreal . . Bank of Commerce. 
" . . Quebec . . . Maitland, Phelps, & Co. 
" . .City Bank. . Bank of the Republic. 
" . .Gore. . . . Ward & Co.,and Merch-Bk. 
Bostmi . i. , Montreal . . S. Henshaw & Sons. 

" ... Commercial . Merchant s Bank. 
Albany . . . Upper Canada New York State Bank. 
" ... Commercial . New York State Bank. 
" ... Gore .... New York State Bank. 
Oswego . . . Upper Canada Luther Wright s Bank. 
Rochester . . Upper Canada Rochester City Bank. 
St.John(N.B.) B. N. America Bank of B. N. America. 

" Quebec . . . Commercial Bank, N. B. 
Halifax(N.S.) B. N. Ameiica Bank of B. N. America. 

" " Montreal . . Bank of Nova Scotia. 
St.John(N.F.) B. N. America Bank of B. N. America. 

" " Montreal . . Union Bank, 
Fredericton (N.H.~) Quebec . . Central Bank. 



[167] 



80 



RAILWAYS. 



[1856. 



RAILWAYS.* 



TRUNK RAILWAY. Directors in Ln:>:lnn, Thomas 
ing, Esq., M.P., Georgo C. Glyua, Esq.. M.P., II. \V .l 
on Blake, Esq.. Robert McCalmont, Esq., Kirktnan D. 



Barin 

laston , 

Hodgson, Esq., William Chapman, Esq. Directors in 
Oa.na.da, Hon. John Boss, President; Benjamin 1! 
Esq.. Vice-President; Hon. F. Hinoks, Hon. F. Lernieux, 
Hon. W.Cayley, Sir A. McNab, Hon. Peter MeGHI, Hon. L. T. 
Drummond, George Crawford, Esq., M.P.P., W. II. Ponton, 

ONTARIO, SIMCOE AND HURON RAILROAD. 
MuMly Comparative Statement of Earnings of the, a jov: 13f/t October, Years 1854 and 1855. 



Esq., E F. Whittemore. ICsq., Henry LeMesurier; Secre 
tary, SirO. i . Rom-y; Assistant Secretary, J. M. Grant: 
Kugirut-!-. A. M. !lr-s: Assistant Engineer, Samuel Keefer; 



. . . 

tiuuerul M.:n;v.rer, S. P. Bidder; Accountant W. W. A. 
l)a\ i m -v s and General Manager s Offices, 22, 

Little at James Siiv.-l ; Engineer s Office, Gosford Street, 
Montreal. 



Mouth. 


From 1st April to 13th October, 1855, 
94 miles open. 


From 1st April to 13th October, 1854, 
.;iies upon. 


Increase in 1855. 


Earnings per mile 
per month in 1855. 


Earnings per mile 
per month in 1854. 


Increase in 1866. 


No. of Pas 
sengers. 


j. 

H 



Ofe 

^ 


Earnings from 


1 *" 

s 

- a 

i> 

o to 

<5 


*- 
9^ 
Hf, 

p 


i 


zi. 

tfi qj 

a 

A 


MI ,5 
g dg 

PH 


3 

1 


? / 
& 3 

od Ui 
CH 


-** 
d 

S ; 

R 


3 

i 


April 
May 
June 
July 


12535 
14075 
19987 
17446 
17830 
21175 

9920 


.3092 
7908 
3879 
3770 
0430 
3729 

4281 



8639.56 
11573.00 
19540.05 
17909.00 
18206.51 
i5965.ll 

11577.65 


15705.33 
15197.31 
18823.46 
9799.53 
9888.65 
18708.17 

9340.75 


21H44.S9 
26770.31 

2770*. 5:; 
2SO:>5.16 
44733.28 

20918.40 


8060 
10094 
13415 
10040 
9498 
14012 

6403 

L 


225-; 

B70 

52:10 

3730 

2071 
2643 

1498 


nl^l . 

7151.31 
7166.53 

ossi 1 1 
9443.01 

4319.05 


$ 

i,7i .t.40 


$ 

8731.24 

13950.71 
12002.88. 
1094 i.50 
159G7.27 

7735.33 


S 
15613.65 
15725.66 
24412.80 
15705.65 
17154.06 
2766.01 

13183.07 


$ 
2:>-.9!l 
284.78 
408.03 
294.35 
298.91 
475.88 

222.54 


$ 
138.58 
175.31 
J19.20 
190.6(< 
173.65 
255.65 

121.5S 


120.43 
109.47 
188.83 
103.75 
125.23 
220.23 

100.9C 


gept 


1st to 13th 
Oct., 2 We. 





COBOTOO AND PETBEBOP.O RAILWAY The Cobourg ad 
Peterborough Railway was built by the inhabitants and 
municipality of Cobourg, under a charter obtained in 
November 1852; it is completed to Peterboro , a distance 
of twenty-eight miles, with privilege of extension up the 
Otanaboe River to the various extensive mills now i 
active opsration, and on which are a succession of mill 
privileges of vast power; also, by amended charter, to 
extend a branch to the Marmora Iron Works, which is 
now under survey. An important feature in this Railroad 
is the connection of the north and south shores of Rice 
Lake, three miles apart, by a pile and truss bridge, thus 
overcoming a barrier to the trade of the back country, 
with Cobourg its nearest port. This road did not got into, 
working operation before 1st of June, 1855, since which 
there has been transported over it 18,705 tens of freight, 
including 9,553,161 feet of lumber and 7,254 passengers, 
the gross receipts for which amount to $2 ,,154 81 Jths, 
or, $60.34 per mile per week. 

Peterboro , the present terminus of the railway, is a 
town of rising importance; and in addition to Us usual 
exports of grain and flour, must supply an immense quan 
tity of lumber and timber from the unbroken forests sur 
rounding and connected with it by water communication 
throu"hlakes and rivers to the unsurveyed forests reach- 
in" tothe sources of the Ottawa River. 

Cobourg, through this connection, must rapidly increase 



ill pOpuUli 1011 ULIU UUUHL* j mu v* . j.4 .. -- j - 

j nrr ,,ii, -no seventy acres in the heart of the town, 

pttrp oi ing a c<.atral depot of more than ordinary 

extent. The harbour is entirely artificial, of beautiful 
construction and position, accessible throughout winter. 
I his work, like the railway, is the property of the town, 
and to a of rapidly increasing wealth. By the 

,-neut in January, the property of the town WHS 

I at 450,370 10 

The estimated value of the harbour, as] 

repri)s..:i!....l bv last year s nett reve- V 50,000 

nue of >:;. ) 

Corpor.it i ? UUU " " 

Invested in .iy 125,001 

Tnla l 636,370 10 

The li il.iii. l S of the Town are 

TothoMm, : Fund 125,001 

ToOrdi hires 28,001 

T()tu i 153,000 

The ab )V3 works (The Cobourg and Peterboro Railway, 
and Cob >urg Uarl.our.) of so much public importance, ara 
thefrun-; of v 11 directed local enterprise, entitling the 
popuUiriii of t a,. town of Cobourg, of some five thousand 
people. li> much credit. 



(<<mrt of Appeal Judges, the Judges of the Superior 
iV.urta of Law and Equity. Clerk, the Begfttrar of the 
Court of Chancery, Toronto. 

Omrt of Qwxrts Bench. Chief Jtistu-o, Hon. sir J. B 
Robinson, Bart. Puisne Judges, Hon. W II. Draper and 
R E Burns. Clerk of the Crown and Pleas, 0. 0. bmall. 
Reporter, J. Lukin Robinson, Toronto. 

Court of Chancery. Chancellor, Hon. AY. H. Blake. 
Vice-Chancellors, Hon. J. C. P. Esten and J. G Spragge. 
Master, A. N. Buell. Registrar and Reporter, V. Qfttot. 
Long vacation from 1st July to 21st August. 

Court of Common Pleas. Chief Justice, Hon. J. B. Ma- 
eaulay. Puisne Judges, Hons. A. McLean and \V. B. 
Richards. Clerk of the Crown and Pleas. L. Hey.t.-i. 
Reporter, E. C. Jones, Toronto. Clerk in Chambers, \V . B. 
Ueward, Toronto 

Clerks of Assize W. A. Campbell. Toronto : the Deputy 
Clerks of the Crown are ex officio Clerks of Assiie and 
Marshals in their respective counties. 



JUDICIARY UPPER CANADA. 



fijju,, ( Crown. The Clerks of the County 

Courts willl -io Deputy Clerks of the Crown and 

l>l eas , .; , eral counties as the present incumbent* 

vacate- <; otherwise. 

L,LW fer-.ns. Hilary begins first Monday in February, 
and end-; f the ensuing week; Easter begin* 

1st Mini 1 1\ iu Juno, and ends Saturday of the ensuing 
ttvel-- Trinity I) i,:- last Monday in August, and ends on 
the Sat-urd ensuing week; Michaelmas begin 

third .M >n !- iy !l November and ends Saturday of the 
ensuin. -v.-k. T^ng vacation comineuces 1st July, and 

Circuit* . Che Circuits are held twice a year m each 
Count-. Hilary and Easter Terms, and between 

Trinity .<ud Mi.-haelmas Terms, except in the County of 
York wi,. three in each year, commencing on 

ti, e fir- a January, the first Monday in May, 

Monday in October, in each year. There 
are six < ircuits, as follows, viz.: The Astern .-Perth, 



i 



Hanagers, who withheld the necessary information. 



[108J 



1856.] 



JUDICIARY. 



81 



Cornwall, By town, L Orignal. Brockville. Home : Niagara, 
Whitby, Hamilton, Cayuga, Barrie, Sydenham. Western: 
St. Thomas, Sandwich, Sarnia, Chatham, London, Gode- 
rich. Midland : Peterborough, Cobourg, Belleville, Picton, 
Kingston. Oxford: Simcoe, Brantford, Guelph, Berlin, 
Stratford, Woodstock. Toronto: Toronto. 

Heir and Devisee Court. Commissioners, the Judges of 
the Superior Courts, and such other persons as may be 
appointed by commission under the Great Seal. Their 
duties are to determine claims to lands in Upper Canada, 
for which no patent has issued from the Crown in favour 
of the proper claimants, whether as heirs, devisees or as 
signees. Sittings at Toronto, first Monday in January and 
J uly in each year. Clerk of Commissioners, W. B. Heward. 

Court of Probate. Official Principal, S. Brough, Toronto ; 
Registrar, C. Fitzgibbon, Toronto. 

Surrogate Court. Judge, S. B. Harrison; Registrar, 
Win. J. FitzGerald, Toronto. 

County Courts. Presided over by resident Judge in 
each countv; these Courts possess equity powers. 

Sessions. Chairman, the County Judge in each 



county, who, with one or more Justices of the Peace, holds 
a Court of Quarter Sessions in his county four times a 
year for trials by jury in cases of larceny, misdemeanor and 
other offences. Sittings, first Tuesday in January, April, 
and July, and the third Tuesday in November, with power 
of adjournment. 

Recorders Courts. In the Cities of Toronto, Hamilton, 
and Kingston, the Recorders Court takes the place of the 
County Sessions, the Justices for Counties having no juris 
diction in the Cities the care of which is confided to the 
Recorder, Mayor, Aldermen and Police Magistrate of each. 
The City Sessions are held on the first Monday in January. 
April, July and November. 

Division Courts. For the summary disposal of cases by 
the County Judges. Courts are held once in two months 
in each division, or oftener, at the discretion of the Judge. 
The divisions are established by the Courts of Quarter 
Sessions. The jurisdiction of these Courts has been en 
larged by the Act of last Session (See page 43.) 

Insolvent Debtor s Court. The County Judge in each 
county presides. 



JUDICIARY LOWER CANADA. 



Oiurt of Queen s Bench Chief Justice, Hon. Sir L. H. 
Lafontaine, Bart.; Puisne Judges, Hons. T. C. Aylwin, 
J. II. Duval, R. E. Caron. Appeal Side, Terms Quebec, 
7th to 18th January, and 1st to 12th July. Montreal, 1st 
to 12th March, and 1st to 12th October. Crown Side, 
Terms Quebec, 20th January and 14th July. Montreal 
llth March and 14th October. Three Rivers, 2nd Feb 
ruary and llth September. Sherbrooke, 12th February 
and 20th September. Kamouraska, 5th April and 5th 
November. Aylmer, 10th June and 10th Dec. Gaspe: 
The Circuit Judges exercise criminal jurisdiction in Term. 

Superior Court Chief Justice, Hon. F. Bowen; Puisne 
Judges, Hons. William C. Meredith, A. N. Morin, and J. T. 
Badgley, Quebec ; Hons. C. D. Day, James Smith, C. Mon- 
delet. and George Vanfellon, Montreal ; Hon. D. Mondelet, 
Three Kivers ; Hon. E. Short, Sherbrooke. Terms Mon 
treal, from 17th to 27th February, March, April, May, 
June, September, October, November and December. Que 
bec, from 1st to 5th February, March, April, May, Sep 
tember, October and December, and 20th to 25th June 
and November. Three Rivers, 12th to 25th February, 1st 
to llth June, and 1st to 14th November. Sherbrooke, 20th 
to 27th January, 1st March, and October 8th to 15th of 
June. Kamouraska, 26th March to 24th April, and 26th 
October to 4th November. Aylmer, 1st to 10th February, 



and 1st to 10th July. Perce, 21st to 30th August. Kew 
Carlisle, 4th to 13th September. The sittings at Perce 
and New Carlisle, in the District of Gaspe, form only one 
Term. The Governor may authorize the holding of another 
Term annually, in this District. 

Circuit Courts. Judges Wm. Power, Esq., Quebec ; H. 
Guy, J. S. McCord, and J. C. Bruneau, Esqrs., Montreal : 
J. G. Thompson, and J. F. DeBlois, Esqrs., Gaspe: J. A. 
Taschereau, Esq., Kamouraska; and W. K. McCord, Esq., 
Aylmer. 

Quarter Sessions. Quebec, Montreal, Three Rivers 
commence severally, 8th January, 4th April, 4th July, 
and 4th October. Sherbrooke commence 8th January, 
8th April, 8th July, and 8th October. Kamouraska, from 
7th to 15th January, and loth to 24th July. Aylmer, 5th 
April and 5th October. Gaspa At Perce and at the Basin, 
and at New Carlisle and Carleton, the three days succeed 
ing the sittings of the Circuit Court at these places res 
pectively. 

Vice Admiralty Court. Judge, Hon. H. Black, Quebec; 
Registrar, Charles Drolet; Marshal, J. B. Parkin. 

Commissioners Courts held monthly in the country 
Parishes, for determining cases in a summary, way not 
exceeding 6 cun ency each in amount. 

Clerk of Appeals J. U. Beaudry, Quebec. 



AN INDEX TO THE STATUTES, 

Passed in the First Session of the Fifth Parliament of the Province of Canada (18 rf- 19 Vic.}, alphabetically arranged 
according to the initial letter of the word most distinctive of the subject-matter treated of in each, and otlierwisefurUicr 
classified, so as to facilitate the acquisition of any particular Act required. 

Imperial Acts. 

CXX. MERCHANT SHIPPING To repeal certain Acts re- 



XCIX. EVIDENCE To amend the Law of. 

CXVIII. LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL To empower Legisla 
ture of Canada to alter Constitution of. 

CIV. MERCHANT SHIPPING. To amend and consolidate 
Acts relating thereto. 



lating to, and to continue certain Provisions in said 
Act. 

III. TREATY To carry into Effect, between her Majesty 
and the United States of America. 



Public Acts. 



GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS. 



LXXVIII. Accounts, PublicTo secure the more effect 
tual Auditing of. 
LXXXV. Acts To continue the following : 

Bankrupts For Relief of 7 Vic. c. 10, 9 Vic. c. 30, 12 
Vic. c. 18, 14 & 15 Vic. c. 20 in part only. 

Sills of Exchange To ascertain Damages on pro 
tested 3 Wm. IV. c. 14. 

Bidter For Inspection of in Quebec and Montreal 
11 Vic. c. 7. 

Debtors To attach Effects of in Cases under 10. 
14 & 15 Vic. c. 18. 

Debtors To facilitate Proceedings against 9 Geo. 
IV. c. 28. 

Debtors, Fraudulent To prevent Evasion of Credi 
tors. 9 Geo. IV. c. 27. 

Debtors, Insolvent To relieve 8 Vic. c. 48. 

Piff Grosbois To place common of, under Control 
of the Inhabitants 9 Geo. IV. c. 32- 

Fisheries To regulate in District of Gaspe. 4 & 5 
Vic. c. 36. 



[169] 



Fisheries, Salmon To preserve in Counties ofCorn- 
wallis and Northumberland 9 Geo. IV. c. 51. 

Hastings, County Registration of Titles in 9 Vic. 
c. 12, 10 & 11 Vic. c. 38, 12 Vic. c. 97. 

Insane Persons For Relief of in Home District 
11 Geo. IV. c. 20. and Extension of Act 3 W. IV. c. 45 . 

Justices of Peace To regulate Fees of Persons em 
ployed by 6 Wm. IV. c. 19. 

Mariners To provide medical treatment for sick 
6 Wm. IV. c. 35, as amended by 8 Vic. c. 12. 

Militia For regulation of 9 Vic. c. 28, 12 Vic. c. 88 . 

Provincial Penitentiary For the better Managemeu t 
of 14 & 15 Vic. c. 2. 

Public Business Empowering Commissioners to en 
quire into Matters connected with, &c. 9 Vic. c. 38. 

Real Property in L. C . Relative to Registration of 
Titles to and Incumbrances upon 8 Vic. c. 27. 

Real Property in L. C. To enable Proprietors to 
acquire where illegally detained from them 14 & 
15 Vic. e. 92, as amended by 16 Vic. c. 205. 

Registration of Titles For County of Hastings 
9 Vic. c. 12, 10 & 11 Vic. c. 38, 12 Vic. c. 97. 

Rivers and Rivulets, U. C. To prevent Obstructions 



82 



INDEX TO THE STATUTES. 



[1856. 



in 7 Vic. c. 36. as amended by 10 & 11 Vic. c. 20, 14 i, 
15 Vic. c. 123. 

Road Laws Amendment of 2 Vic. c 7. (See c. 100 
sec. 5, of past Session.) 

Secret Incumbrances For Extinction of on Lands in 
L. C. 9 Geo. IV. c. 20. 

Seigneurie ofLaprairie For Regulation of Common 
of 2 Geo. IV. c. 8. 

Seigneurie of Labaie St. Antoine For Regulation o 
Common of 2 Geo. IV. c. 10, 4 Geo. IV. c. 26. 

Trinity House, Montreal To enlarge Powers of 
where Health of City endangered 10 & 11 Vic. c. 1. 

TrWm To encourage Destruction of, L. C. 1 Win 
IV. c 6. 

Wolves To encourage Destruction of U. C. 6 Wm 
IV. c. 29. 

XI. Ashes, Pot and Pearl To regulate Inspection of. 
XCV. Ashes, Pot and Pearl. To amend Act 18 Vic. c 
11 regulating Inspection of. 

X. BiUs and Promissory Notes To regulate Tunes of 
Payment. 

LXXXIX. Civil List To amend the. 

II. Clergy Reserves To make better Provision for Moneys 

arising from, by rendering them available for Municipal 

Purposes. 

XCII. Criminal Law To amend the. 
XCIII. Crown Lands Department To Connect Office OJ 
Supervisor of Cullers with. 

V. Customs To amend Acts 12 Vic. c. 1, and 16 Vic. c. 
85 imposing Duties of. 

LXVIII. Customs To explain the Act 18 Vic. c. 5 
amending Acts imposing Duties of. 

LXXX. Debentures, MunicipalrTo facilitate the Nego 
tiation of. 

VIII. Elections To provide for the Freedom of. 
LXXXVII. Elective Franchise To extend, and repeal 

former Acts 7 Vic. c. 65 and 16 Vie. c 154. 

LXXXVI. Legislative Assembly For better securing the 
Independence of. 

XCI. Military Reserves and Ordnance. Lands To trans 
fer to the Province. 

LXXVII. Militia To regulate, and repealing Acts 9 
Vic. c. 28, 13 & 14 Vic. c. 11, 4 & 5 Vic. c. 2, 12 Vic. c. 88, 12 
Vic. c. 89 now in Force for that Purpose. 

VT. Naturalization Laws To amend the 12 Vic. c. 197 . 

LXXIX. Newspapers To abolish Postage on, and for 
other Purposes connected with Post Office Department. 

LXXXII. Patriotic Fund To legalize certain Grants 
from Municipalities to. 

LXXXI. Reciprocity Treaty To ratify certain Things 
done under Act 18 Vic. c. I to confirm, and for other 
Purposes. 

LXXVI. Representation To amend the Parliamentary 
Representation Act 16 Vic. c. 152. 

IV. Revenue For raising Loan on Credit of Consolidated. 

LXXXVI1I. Statutes To alter Mode of drawing up the 
Provincial Statutes. 

CI. Substitutions To abolish the Publication of Docu 
ments containing, and to provide for their Registration in 
the Registry Office. 

IV. SupplifSYor defraying Expences of Civil Govern 
ment for 1854, and raising Money on Credit of Consolidated 
Revenue. 

I. Treaty To give Effect to, on the Part of this Pro 
vince, a Treaty between Her Majesty and the United 
States of America. 

VII. Voters To amend Act 16 Vic. c. 153 extending 
Elective Franchise, and defining Qualifications of. 

CXXXV. Weights and Measures To amend Laws 12 
Vic. c. 85 concerning Inspestors of. 

IX. Witnesses To enable Civil Courts to Summon Wit 
nesses from any Part of the Province. 

UPPER CANADA. 

XX. Courts County To provide for holding of, in Cases 
of Illness of Judge. 

CXX11I. Cnurts, Error and Appeal To explain and 
amend Act 12 Vic. c. 63 establishing. 

CXXII. Courts, Superior To amend Act 9 Vic. c. 33 
for Accommodation of. 

CXXV. Division Courts To extend Jurisdiction of. 

CXXIV. Dormant Equities To amend the Law of. 

CCXXII. Drainage To incorporate General Drainage 
and Land Improvement Company. 

CXXI. Educational To provide for the Sale of Lands 
tor Educational Purposes. 

CXXXIV. Excise To amend Act Ifl Vic. c. 184 re 
lative to certain Duties of. 



CXXXVII. Fences and Water Courses To amend Act 
8 Vic. c. 20 relating to. 

CXXXVIII. HighwaysTo repeal 16 Vic. c. 189, and to 
regulate Travelling on Public. 

CXX VI. Infants To amend Laws relating to Custody of. 

CXX. Insurance To Amend Act 6 Wm. IV. c. 18 
establishing Mutual Insurance Companies. 

CXXX. Jurors To provide for the Payment of. 

CXIX. Lands To authorise the Sale or Lease of Lands 
held in Trust for Religious Bodies. 

CXXXIII. Loans By-Laws for raising Loans to be 
approved of by Majority of Electors of Municipality re 
quiring them. 

CXXIX. Marriages To remove Doubts respecting cer 
tain. 

CXXXVI. Master and Servant To amend Act 10 & 11 
Vic. c. 23 regulating Duties between. 

CXXVII. Registry Lows To amend the. 

CXVIII. Replevin To explain Act 14 & 15 Vic. c. 64 
amending and extending the Law relating to. 

CXXVIII. Reporters to Courts of Law and Equity To 
amend and consolidate the Acts 4 Geo. IV. c. 3, 3 Vic. c. 
2, Acts of U. C., and 8 Vic. c. 39, and 12 Vic. c. 65, and 13 
and 14 Vic. c. 51 relating to the Appointment of. 

CXXXIX. Road To amend the Road, Bridge, Pier or 
Wharf Joint Stock Companies Act 16 Vic. c. 190 of 1853. 

CXXXI. Schools To amend the Laws 13 <fc 14 Vic. c. 48, 
14 & 15 Vic. c. Ill relating to Separate Schools. 

CXXXII. Schools To make further Provision for Gram 
mar and Common Schools. 

XXI. Taxes To extend Time allowed for Assessments 
and Collection of Taxes in Upper Canada for 1855. 

CXL. Taxes, dx.To explain Act 16 Vic. c. 183 for 
Recovery of Taxes imposed by late District and County 
Councils. 

LOWER CANADA. 

CIX. Bailiff? To amend Laws respecting Qualification 
and appointment. 

CLX11I. Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials To autho 
rize the Keeping of separate Registers in sundry Churches. 

XIX. Building Societies To amend Act 12 Vic. c. 57 
encouraging. 

CXVI. Building Societies To amend Act 12 Vic. c. 57 
encouraging. 

XCVII. Convictions To regulate Proceedings in Appeal 
from Decisions of Justices of the Peace, in Summary. 

XVI. Debt, Imprisonment for To explain 12 Vic. c. 42. 
CV1I. Debtors To enable Creditors to attach Effects of 

before Judgment in Cases under 10. 

CXIII. Driving Furiously To restrain on certain nigh- 
ways. 

III. Fkudtd Rights and Duties For Abolition of. 

CXIV. Fisheries For the Protection of. 

XV. Grain, Pulse, Seeds, <c. Act 16 Vic., c. 193 es 
tablishing Standard Weight of, extended to L. C. 

CVI. Hypothecs To facilitate Sale of Immoveablos 
charged with, where Proprietor is unknown, &c. 

CIV. Judicature To amend the Judicature Acts. 

XCVIII. Jurors, Petty To provide for payment of, and 
to make better Provision for other Judicial Officers. 

CVIII. Lessors and Lessees To consolidate the Laws 
relating to. 

CX. Licitations, Forced To regulate Proceedings on, 
and to give them the Effect of Sheriffs Sales. 

XIII. Loan To amend and extend Consolidated Muni 
cipal Loan Fund Act 16 Vic. c. 22 to L. C. 

C. Municipal and Road Act For the Reform of the 
Municipal and Road System of Lower Canada. 

XVIII. Municipal Authorities To amend Act 10 & 
11 Vic. c. 7 establishing. 

XVII. Notaries To empower Notaries to hold Meetings 
of Relations, &c., in certain Cases without Authority of 
Judge. 

CXI. Notaries To amend Act^-Acts of 1847 and 1849 
organizing. 

XIV. PartnersJn ps, Limited To extend Act 12 Vic, c. 
75 to Lower Canada. 

CV. Recusatifm of Judges To restrict in certain Cases. 

XCIX. Registry Laws To establish in and for each Eloo 
ral County. 

CII. Retrait Lignager To abolish the Right of. 

LXXXIV. Rivers Improvement Act 10 Vic. c. 191 To 
amend and extend to L. C. 

C. Road Act For the Reform of the present Municipal 
and Road System. 

CIII. Seigniorial Act 0/1854 18 Vie. c. 3 To amend the. 

CXVII. Sunday Saks To repeal any Law authorizing. 



[170] 



1856.] 



INDEX TO THE STATUTES. 



83 



Local and Personal Acts* 



BANKS. 

XLI. City Bank To amend Act 4 & 5 Tie. c. 97 and 
increase Capital. 

XL1I. Commercial Bank, M.D. To facilitate Transfer of 
Shares, &c., and increase Capital. 

CCVI. Eastern Townships Bank To incorporate. 

XLIII. La Banque du Peuple To increase Capital. 

CCII. Motion s Bank To incorporate. 

XXXVIII. Montreal, Bank of To amend Charter and 
increase Capital. 

CC1V. Niagara District Bank To incorporate. 

XL. Quebec Bank To amend Act 4 & 5 Vic. c. 91 and 
increase Capital. 

XII. Savings Banks To amend Act 4 & 5 Vic. e. 32 
relating to. 

XCVi. Savings Banks To regulate and repeal Act 
4 & 5 Vic. c. 32 now in force for that purpose. 

CCI. St. Francis Bank To incorporate. 

CCV. Toronto, Bank of To incorporate. 

XXXIX. Upper Canada, Bank of To facilitate Transfer 
of shares and increase Capital. 

CCHI. Zimmerman s Bank To incorporate. 

EDUCATIONAL AND LITERARY. 

CCXLII. Abbotsford Academy To incorporate. 

CCXXXVI. Athenceum To amend Act^ll Vie. c. 16 
incorporating the Toronto Athenaeum. 

CCXLI. Aylmer Academy To incorporate. 

LXX1II. College de Monnoir To incorporate. 

CCXL. College in Hamilton To incorporate. 

LVI. College Masson To incorporate. 

LVII. Huntingdon Academy i o incorporate. 

CCXXXVUI. Sherbrooke Literary Institute To incorpo 
rate. 

CCXXXIX. Sceurs de la Presentation To incorporate. 

LV. St. bands College To incorporate. 

CCXXXVII. St. Michael s College To incorporate. 

CCXLIII. St. Koch? Institute To amend Act 16 Vic. 
c. 265 incorporating. 

GAS AND WATER COMPANIES. 

CCXV. Consumers Gas Company, Toronto To extend 
the powers of. 

XCIV. Gas and Water Companies To amend Act 16 
Vic. c. 173 for Incorporation of. 

CCXVII. Kingston Water Works To increase Capital. 

CCXV1II. Metropolitan Gas and Water Company, To 
ronto To amend Act 16 Vic. c. 250 incorporating. 

XXX Quebec To enable Corporation of, to borrow a 
further sum for Water Works. 

OCX VI. Quebec Gas Company To increase Capital. 

INDIVIDUAL. 

CCI. Fraser, William and EdouardTo authorize the 
Selling of certain Lots in the Seigniory of Riviere du Loup. 

CCLI. Galvin, Bartholomew To admit to Practice as an 
Attorney in Upper Canada. 

CCXLiVIlI. Macaulay, John Jermy To admit to Prac 
tice as an Attorney, &c., in Upper Canada. 

CCXLV. Me Waitie, lieu. Alexander To confirm certain 
Marriages solemnized by. 

LXV1I. Powell, William Dummer, and his Wife To 
empower Trustees to Sell certain Lands held in trust for. 

CCXLIX. Powell, William Dummer, and his Wife To 
amend Act 18 Vic. c. 67 Empowering Trustees to Sell, &c. 

LXVI. Ritchie, Rev. WiUiam. Empowered to Sell cer 
tain Lands held ia trust. 

LXX1V. Shortis, Edward To vest Road Allowance be 
tween Lots 15 and 16, sixth Con. Thora, in. 

INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

CCX. Imperial Fire, Marine and Life nsurance Com 
pany To incorporate. 

LX. Mutual Assurance Association of the Fabriques, <c 
To amend Act 16 Vic. c. 149 incorporating 

CCXI. Provident Life Assurance and Investment Com 
pany To incorporate. 

CCX111. Provincial Insurance Company To amend Act 
12 Vic. c. 167, amended by 16 Vic. c. 69 incorporating. 

CCXII. Quebec Fire Assurance Company To amend Act 
9 Oeo. IV. c. 58 of L. C. incorporating and to facilitate 
management of Business. 

CCX1V. St. Lawrence Assurance Co. To incorporate. 
MANUFACTURING AND MINING. 

LI. Canada Copper Company To incorporate. 

CCXIX. Canada Ore Dressing Company To incorporate. 

XLVI1I. International Mining and Manufacturing Com 
panyTo incorporate. 



[171] 



LII. Kingsey Slate Works To incorporate. 

CCXX. Lyn Manufacturing Company To incorporate. 

XLIX. Megantic Mining Company To incorporate. 

CCXXI. Montreal Locomotive and Steam Forge Manufac 
turing Company To incorporate. 

CCXXI1I. Canada Powder Company To incorporate. 

XLVII. Quebec and St. Francis Mining and Exploring 
Company To incorporate. 

LIII. Shipton Slate Works To incorporate. 

L. St. Lawrence. Mining Company To incorporate. 

XLVI. Upper Canada Mining Company To amend Act 
10 & 11 Vic. c. 73 incorporating. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

CLVTT. Accidents by Fire, Quebec and Montreal To au 
thorize Investigation in cases of. 

CLI. Ameliasburg Township To confirm Survey of, de 
claring the inclusion of Hillier. 

XXV. Bedford, Township To confirm certain Surveys of. 
CLXXIII. Beverly, Township To revive, continue and 

amend Provisions of Act 16 Vic. c. 230 establishing 
Boundaries of certain Lots. 

CXLI. Burial Grounds, Quebec To prohibit Interments 
in certain. 

CXLVI. Burial Ground, General, nf Toronto To enable 
Trustees to Close the same and Sell a portion thereof, and 
for other purposes. 

XXVII. Chatham, Town To empower School Trustees 
to Dispose of a certain Land. 

CLXVIII. Circuit, ArthabaskaTo alter Limits of, and 
for other purposes. 

CLVIII. Circuit, Quebec To alter and extend Limits of. 

XXIX. Cornwall, Town To declare certain Survey valid. 

CLXIV. Court- Houses, Montreal and Aylmer To make 
provisions for Defraying Cost of, at. 

CL. Dundas, Town To amend Act 16 Vic. c. 54 au 
thorizing the Town of, becoming security to a certain 
amount for the Desjardins Canal Company to the Great 
Western Railway Company. 

CLXVII. Durham, Township To alter the tenure of 
Indian Lands in. 

LXIV. Friendly Society To incorporate the British 
American Friendly Society of Canada. 

LXIX. Halton < Wentworth, Counties of To make cer 
tain provisions rendered necessary by the Separation of. 

CXLVII. Hamilton, City To authorize the negotiation 
of a Loan of 50,000. 

CLXXII. Hamilton, Township To confirm a certain 
Survey in. 

LXI. Hospital, Montreal To incorporate the University 
Lying-in. 

CLXX. Huntingdon, County To remedy the Defects in 
certain Deeds. 

CXLII. Industry, House of, Montreal To transfer all 
Property, rights and privileges, &c., to the City. 

CCXXVI. L Hospice St. Joseph de la Maternite, Quebec 
To incorporate. 

CCXLVII. Masonic Hall, Quebec To incorporate. 

CCXLIV. Medicine and Surgery for relief of certain 
Practitioners in, L. C. 

CLIV. Monaghan, Township To repeal Act 16 Vic. c. 
228 confirming Road Allowance in. 

CLXII. Montreal, City To amend the seveial Acts 
14 & 15 Vic. c. 128, 7. Vic. c. 44, and 16 Vic. c. 127 of in 
corporation. 

LXII. Montreal Dispensary To incorporate. 

XXXVII. Niagara Falls Suspension Bridge To increase 
Capital Stock of. 

CLVI. Niagara, Township To confirm a certain por 
tion of the original Survey. 

CLXXI. Norwich, Township To divide into two sepa 
rate Municipalities. 

CLXV. Notaries of St. Francis To suspend parts of the 
Acts 10 & 11 Vic. c. 21, and 13 & 14 Vic. c. 39 regulating 
the Profession as far as it relates to this District. 

XXVI. Otonabee, Township To authorize the Exchange 
of Concession Road Allowance. 

XXIII. Ottawa, City To erect the town of Bytown into. 

CXLVIII. Paris, Town To incorporate and define the 
Limits thereof. 

XXXI. Quebec, City To enable Corporation of to raise 
Loan to consolidate City Debt. 

CLIX. Quebec, City To amend and consolidate provi 
sions of Ordinances of Incorporation, and to vest more 
ample powers in Corporation. 

CCXXXII. Quebec Benevolent Society To amend Act- 
Act of L. C., 47 Geo. III. c. 17 incorporating. 



84 



COLLEGES. 



[1856. 



LXIII. Quebec Friend!;/ Society To amend Act Act of 
L. C. 10 & 11 Qeo. IV. c. 49 incorporating. 

CLX. Quebec Turnpike Road To increase Tolls on. 

I., XXV. Seed To enable farmers of Lower Canada to 
more easily obtain Seed during present year. 

CLIII. Smith, Township To determine the courses of 
Side Lines of certain Lots in. 

CLX1X. St. David, Parish of To legalize a certain 
Assessment and School rate in. 

CLXVI. St. Francis, District To increase the number 
of sittings of Courts of Justice within, &c. 

CXV. Students-at-Law, L. C.To amend Act 16 Vic. c. 
130 relative to the Enregistration of the Articles, &c., of. 

XC. Supplies For defraying Expenses of Civil Govern 
ment for 1855. 

LXXXTII. Surveyors To amend Acts 12 Vic. c. 35, 
14 & 15 Vic. e. 4 Relating to Land Surveyors. 

CCXXX1. Temperance, Sons of To incorporate in L. C. 

CXLV. Toronto, City To confirm the City in possession 
of Peninsula and Marsh, now held by it under license. 

LI V. Toronto Exchange To incorporate. 

CLXI. Trinity House, Quebec To increase Salaries of 
Superintendents of Pilots, and of the Bailiff of. 

CXL1V. Trout To prevent the taking of, with nets in 
Lakes of the county of Saguenay. 

CCXX1V. Victoria Hospital. Quebec To incorporate. 

CXLIX. Welland, County To authorize the raising of 
Means to liquidate certain Debts and Claims against, and 
for other purposes. 

XXVIII. Whitby, Town To incorporate and define 
Limits of. 

CLV. Winchester, Township To confirm present Boun 
daries of certain Lots in. 

CLII. Wolfe Island, Township To determine Manner 
ia which the Side Lines of Lots of, shall be drawn. 

XXXII. Yamaska Seigniory To amend Act 14 & 15 
Vic. c. 135 reviving Act of L. C., 3 Get. IV. e. 18 regu 
lating the Common of. 

NAVIGATION, DOCKS AND HARBOURS. 

XLV. Canada Ocean Steam Navigation Company To 
incorporate. 

CCXLVI. Dam or Breakwater on Grand River To 
authorize the Construction of, at or near the Village of 
1 rpston. 

XXII. Harbour Companies To amend the Joint Stock, 
Pier, Wharf, Dry Dock, and Ilarbour Company s Act 16 
Vic. c. 124. 

CXCVII. Humber Harbour Co. To renew Charter of. 

LXXI. Louth Harbour To extend time for completing. 

CXLIII. Montreal Harboui To provide for the Manage 
ment and Improvement of. 

XLIV. Montreal Ocean Steam Ship Co To incorporate. 

CC. Ontario and Bay of Quinte Canal Co. To incorporate. 

CXC VIII. Otter CreeJc Navigation Co. To incorporate. 

CXCIX. Port Bunvell Harbour Cv.To amend Act -12 
Vic. c. 160, amended by 14 & 15 Vic. c. 157 of incorporation. 

XXIV. Port Hope Harbour To amend Act 16 Vic. c. 
incorporating Commissioners. 

CLXXIX. Woodstock and Lake Erie Railway < Harbour 
Company To amend Charter 11 Vic. c. 117 of. 

RAILWAYS. 

CLXXXII. Amherstburg <t St. Thomas To incorporate. 

CLXXXI. Brockvi le <C- Ottawa To amend Act 16 Vic. 
c. 106 incorporating. 

CLXXXVIII. Bytown and Prescott To change the name 
of, and to amend Act 13 & 14 Vic. c. 132 incorporating. 

CLXXV1I. Champlain and St. Lawrence To amend and 
extend Act 16 Vic. c. 78 incorporating. 

CLXXXVI. Oobourg and Peterboro To amend Act 
16 Vic. c. 242 and to authorize the Construction of a 
Branch to Marmora. 

LXX. Gait and Guelph To amend Act 16 Vic. c. 42 I 
authorizing Construction. 



XXXIII. Grand Trunk To amend Acts 16 Vic. c. 37, 
16 Vic. c. 38, 16 Vic. c. 43, 14 & 15 Vic. c. 148, 16 Vic. c. 41. 
13 & 14 Vic. c. 116, 8 Vic. c. 25, 10 & 11 Vic. c. 65, 16 Vic. 
c. 39, and 16 Vic. c. 76 relating to. 

CLXXIV. Grand Trunk Granting additional aid to, lay 
Loan. 

CLXXV. Grand Trunk To authorize a change of loca 
tion in the City of Toronto. 

CLXXVI. Great Western Authorizing the Construction 
of a Branch to Brantford. 

CXCIII. Hamilton and South Western To incorporate. 

CLXXX. Hamilton and Toronto To amend Act 16 Vic. 
c. 44 incorporating. 

CXCI. L Assomption Rirer Railway To incorporate. 

CLXXXIX. Montreal and Bytown To amend Act in 
corporating, and for other purposes. 

CLXXXVII. Montreal and I ~ermon( Junction To amend 
Act 12 Vic. c. 178, amended by 14 & 15 Vic. c. 145 in 
corporating. 

XXXIV. North Shore Railway To amend Act 16 Vic. 
c. 100 incorporating. 

CXCII. OakviUe and Arthur To incorporate. 

CLXXVI1I. Ontario, Simcoe and Huron To remove 
doubt as to their power of Constructing Branch into Barrio. 

CXCIV. Peterboro 1 and Chemong Lake Railway To in 
corporate. 

XXXVI. Peterboro and Port Hope To change the name 
of, and amend Act 9 Vic. c. 109 incorporating. 

CXCV. Port Perry and WhitchurchTo incorporate. 

CXCVI. Quebec, C/ucudiere, Maine and Portland Coin- 
pany To incorporate. 

XXXV. Quebec and Saguenay Company To incorporate. 
CLXXXI1I. Sm-el, Drummondville and Richmond Tc 

incorporate. 

CXC. St. Olair, Chatham and Rondeau To incorporate. 

CLXXXV. Stanstead, Shefford and ChamblyTo amend 
Act 16 Vic., c. 107 incorporating. 

CLXXXIV. Stratford and Huron To incorporate. 

CLXXIX. Woodstock and Lake Erie Railway and Har 
bour Company To amend Charter 11 Vic. c. 117 of. 

RELIGIOUS INCORPORATIONS. 

CCXXXIII. Asylum of the Good Shepherd, Quebec To 
incorporate. 

CCXXX1V. Benevolent Society of Notre Dame de B-UK- 
cours. Montreal To incorporate. 

CCXXIX. Bible Society of Upper Canada To incorporate. 

CCXXVIII. Catholics of Quebec, speaking EiujU$ltTo 
incorporate. 

CCXXVII. Colonial Church Corresponding Committee of, 
at Montreal To incorporate. 

LVIII. Evangelical Lutherans To enable their Ministers 
to solemnize Matrimony, &c. 

LXXII. Evangelical Society at La Grande Lignc To in 
corporate. 

LIX. German Evangelical Church To relieve. 

CXII. Parishes, Churches, Parsonage Houses < Church 
yards To amend Acts 13 & 14 Vic. c. 44. and 14 & 15 
Vic. c. 103 and Ordinance 2 Vic. c. 29 concerning the 
civil Erection of. 

CCXXX. Religious Tract and Book Society of I , 
Canada To incorporate. 

CCXXV. Sisters of Si,. Joseph, Toronto To incorporate. 

CCXXXV. St. Patrick s Orphan Avylutn, Munl/-KulTo 
incorporate. 

LXV. Zion Church, Montreal To empower Trustees to 
alienate certain Property. 

TELEGRAPHS. 

CCVITI. British North American Telegraph Company 
To amend Act 16 Vic. c. Ill incorporating. 

CCV1I. Montreal Telegraph Company To amend Act 
10 A 11 Vic. c. 83 incorporating. 

CCIX. New York, Newfoundland, and London Telegraph 
Company To grant certain Privileges to. 



COLLEGES. 



University of Toronto. Visitor, Sir E. W. Head, Bart., 
M.A., Governor-General of British North America, Chan 
cellor, Hon. William Hume Blake. A ice-Chancellor, Rev. 
John McCaul, LL.D. Members of the Senate, Hon. Win. 
Hume Blake, Chancellor, Rev. John McCaul, LL.D, Vice- 
Chancellor; lion. William Henry Draper; Hon. Adam 
Fergusson; Joseph Curran Morrison, M.I . P.; John Lang- 
ton, M.A., M.P.P.; David Christie, Esq.; Willwm A. Logan, 
Esq., F.R.S. , Fred. W. Cumberland. Esq.; James J. Hayes, 
Esq., M.D.; Rev. John Taylor, M.D.; Rev. Adam Lillie, 
D.D.; Hon. C. Widmer; Hon. Robert Baldwin; Rev. E. 



Ryerson, D.D. ; The Principal of Queen s College for the 
time being, Rev. S. S. Nelles, M.A. ; Very Rev. A. McDon 
nell; Rev. M. Willis, D.D.; F. W. Barron, M.A.; Rev. S. 
A. Gaudet; M. Barratt. B.A.; P. Freeland, Esq., Registrar. 
University College President, Rev. John McCaul, LL.D. 
Vice-President, - . Professors: Classics, 



Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Rev. J. McCaul, LL.D.; Meta 
physics and Ethics, Kev. James Beaven, D.D. ; Chemistry 
and Experimental Philosophy, H. II. Croft, D.C.L. ; Agri 
culture, George Buckland; Natural Philosophy, J. B. 
Cherriman, M.A.; History and English Literature, Daniel 



[172] 



1856.] 



COLLEGES. 



85 



Wilson, LL.D. ; Natural History, Rev. Win. Hincks, F.L.S. ; 
Mineralogy and Geology, E. J. Chapman: Modern Lan 
guages, J. Forneri, LL.D.; Meteorology and Director of Mag- 
netical Observatory, C.T.Kingston, M.A.; Lecturer on Orien 
tal Literature, J. M. Hirschfelder; Libr njRev.A : Lorimer. 

Upper Canada CoUege. PrmcipaJr*^vrrT&rro5,~lO.. ; 
First Classical Master, Rev. H. Scadding, D.D. ; Mathema 
tical Master, vacant; Second Classical Master, Rev. W. 
Stennett, M.A. ; Third Classical Master, W. Wedd, M.A. ; 
French Master, J. P. De la Haye; First English Master, 
M. liarrett, M.A. ; Second English Master, 0. Thompson; 
Commercial Master, J. Dodd ; Geometrical Drawing Mas 
ter, J. G. Howard; Ornamental Drawing Master, J. Bull; 
Instrumental Music Master, A Maul. The Resident School 
House is in full and successful operation ; Three College 
Masters reside in the Building, one of whom is always on 
duty. Each boy has a separate dormitory. Baths have 
been fitted up for their comfort. Terms Autumn, from 
end of Summer Vacation to November 30 ; Winter, from 
1st December to end of February (including Christmas 
Vacation ;) Spring, from 1st of March to May 15th, or 
Wednesday nearest thereto; Summer, from 15th May to 
July 21st, or Wednesday nearest thereto. 

Bursar s Department of the University and Colleges at 
Toronto. Bursar, David Buchan, Cashier or Chief Clerk, 
Alan Cameron; Book-keeper, M. Drummond; Assistant 
Clerk, James Nation ; Messenger, William Morrow, Offi.ce, 
St. George s Square. 

University of Queen s College, Kingston. Opens on the 
First Wednesday in October, and closes on the last Thurs 
day of April. Trustees: lion. J. Hamilton, Chairman; 
Andrew Drummond, Esq., Treasurer ; James McLennan, 

Esq., Secretary Professors : Rev. , Principal and 

Primarius Professor of Theology ; Rev. James George, Vice- 
Principal and Interim Lecturer on Systematic Theology ; 
Rev. John M. Smith, A.M., Professor of Hebrew, Biblical 
Criticism, and Church History; Rev. J.Williamson, LL.D., 
Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy; Rev. 
Jas. George, Protessor of Logic, and Mental and Moral Philo 
sophy; Rev. George Weir, A.M., Professor of Classical 
Literature. Medical Faculty : President, James Sampson, 
M.D. Professors: James Sampson, M.D., Clinical Medi 
cine and Surgery ; John Stewart, L.R.C.S., Edin., Anatomy, 
Physiology, and Practical Anatomy; John R. Dickson, 
M.T>., Principles and Practice of Surgery; Horatio Yates. 
M.D., Principles and Practice of Medicine; J. P. Litchfield, 
M.D., and Alexander Campbell, Esq., Barrister at Law, 
Forensic and State Medicine; Fief Fowler, M.D., L.R.C.S., 
Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Pharmacy ; J. P. Litch- 
Seld, M D., Midwifery. Secretary, Dr. Stewart. 

McGUl College Visitor, His Excellency The Governor 
General; The Honorable Charles Dewey Day, President 
of Board of Governors; Principal, J. W. Dawson, Esq.; 
Secretary, Registrar and Bursar, \V. S. Barrage, Esq. 
Facility of Law. Dean of Faculty, The Hon. William 
Badgley, D.C.L.; Lecturers, J. J. C. Abbott, Esq., B.C.L., 
and F. W. Torrance, Esq., M.A. Faculty of Medicine. 
Dean of Faculty. A. F. Holmes, Esq., M.D. ; Professor of 
the Theory and Practice of Medicine, A. F. Holmes, Esq., 
M.D.; Professor of Surgery, G. W. Campbell, Esq.. A.M., 
M.D. ; Professor of Midwifery and the Diseases of Women 
and Children, A. Hall, Esq., M.D. ; Professor of Anatomy, 
0. T. Bruneau, Esq., M.D. ; Professor of Clinical Medicine, 
James Crawford, Esq., M.D. ; Professor of the Institutes of 
Medicine, William Eraser, Esq., M.D; Professor of Che 
mistry, William Sutherland, Esq., M.D. ; Professor of 
Clinical Surgery, W. E. Scott, Esq., M.D. ; Professor of 
Materia Mertica, William Wright, Esq., M.D.; Professor of 
Medical Jurisprudence, R. P. Howard, Esq., M.D. ; Demon 
strator of Anatomy and Curator of Museum, D. C. McCal- 
lum, Esq., M.D. Faculty of Arts. Vice-Principal and 
Dean of Faculty, Rev. Canon Leach, D.C.L. ; Professor of 
Classical Literature, Rev. Benjamin Davies, Ph. Dr.; Pro 
fessor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, William 
Andrew. Esq., M.A.; Professor of Moral Philosophy and 
Logic, Rev. Canon Leach, D. C. L.; Professor of History, 
Ancient and Modern, Henry Aspinwall Howe. Esq., M.A.; 
Professor of Hebrew and Oriental Literature, Rev. A. 
De Sola; Lecturer on French and German Literature, 
Charles F. A. Markgraf, Esq. High School Department. 
Rector, Professor II. A. Howe, M.A.; First Assistant Master, 
T. A. Gibson, Esq., M.A.: Second Assistant Master, David 
Rodger, lOsq.; Third Assistant Master. W. Bowman, Esq.; 
Founh Assistant Master, J. D. Borthwick, Esq.; Fifth 
Assistant Master, Alexander Grant, Esq.; French and 
German Master, C. F. A. Markgraf, Esq. ; Drawing Master, 
James Duncan, Esq.; Music Master, John Follenus, Esq. 
University of Victoria College Cobourg. Rev. S. S. Nellus, 



M.A., President; Rev. S. D. Rice, Governor and Chaplain 
Faculty of Arts: Rev. S. S. Nelles, M.A., Professor cf 
Mental and Moral Philosophy ; William Kingston, M.A., 
Professor of Mathematics ; John Beatty, Jun., M.D., Pro 
fessor of Natural Science ; John Wilson, B.A., T.C.D. ; Pro 
fessor of Classical Literature ; John Campbell, Classical 
Tutor ; William Kerr, B.A., Rector of Hi^h School ; E. B. 
Ryckman, B.A., Mathematical Tutor; John W. Kerr, As 
sistant Teacher. Faculty of Medicine : Hon. John Rolph, 
M.D., M.R.C.S., Eng.. Professor of Principles and Practice 
of Surgery ; Joseph Workman, M.D.. Emeritus Professor of 
Midwifery and Diseases of Children ; W. T. Aikins, M.D., 
Professor of Descriptive and Surgical Anatomy, and Dean 
of Medical Faculty ; Henry H. Wright, M. D., Professor of 
Principles and Practice of Medicine ; Michael Barrett, A.M., 
M.D., Professor of Institutes of Medicine, Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics ; J. Kowell, M.D., Demonstrator of Ana 
tomy. The Medical Department is conducted at Toronto. 

University of Trinity College, Toronto : Incorporated by 
Royal Charter, 1852. Council The Honorable and Right 
Reverend the Lord Bishop of Toronto, The Honorable 
Sir J. B. Robinson, Bart., Chancellor of the University, 
The Rev. the Provost of Trinity College, Professor Hod- 
der, Professor Vankoughnet, Rev. Professor Parry, Rev. 
Professor Irving, The Rev. George O Kill Stewart, D.D., 
LL.D., Archdeacon of Kingston, The Veu. A. N. Bethune, 
D.D., LL.D., Archdeacon of York, The Rev. H. J. Grasett, 
B.D., G. W. Allan, Esq., John Arnold, Esq., Lewis Mofiatt, 
Esq., The Hon. James Gordon, The Hon. Mr. Vice-Chan 
cellor Spragge, James M. Strachan, Esq., Sir Allan McXab, 
M.P.P; Secretary, Charles Magrath, Esq. Officers of the 
College Provost, George Whitaker, M.A. ; Professor of 
Divinity, the Provost; Professor of Classics, E. St. John 
Parry, M.A. ; Professor of Mathematics, G. C. Irving, M.A. 
Professors of the Faculty of Law The Hon. J. H. Cameron, 
Q.C., J. H. Hagarty, Q.C., P. M. Vankoughnet, Q.C. Pro 
fessors of the Faculty of Medicine Obstetrics, E. M. Hod- 
der, M.D., M.R.C.S., Eng.; Institutes of Medicine, James 
Bovell, M.D., M.R.C.P., Eng.; Principles and Practice of 
Surgery, Cornelius J. Philbrick. F.R.C.S., Eng. ; Anatomy 
and Physiology, N. Bethune, M.D., M.R.C.S., Eng. ; Prac 
tice of Medicine, F. Badgley, M.D., M.R.C.S., Edin.; Materia 
Medica and Therapeutics, W. Hallowell, M.D., M.R.C.S., 
Edin. ; Medical Jurisprudence, F. M. Russell, M.D., M.R.C.S., 
Eng. ; Chemistry, Henry Youle Hind, M.A. Professor of 
Music, G. W. Strathy, Mus. Bac. 

Bishop s College, Lennoxville: Incorporated by Royal 
Charter, 1853. President of the Corporation, and Visitor, 
The Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Quebec. Vice-President 
of the Corporation, and Visitor, The Right Rev. the Lord 
Bishop of Montreal. Chancellor, Hon. W. Walker. Vic*}- 
Chancellor, Hon. J. S. McCord. Trustees, H. Smith, Esq., 
Chairman, Hon. E. Hale, Hon. J. S. McCord, G. F. Bowfn, 
Esq., W. Baker, Esq., B. Morris, Esq., Rev. C. P. Reid, 
Rev. R. Doolittle, Rev. R. Lindsay, Rev. W. Bond. College 
Council, Rev. J. H. Nicols, H. Miles, Esq., E. Chapman, 
Esq., Rev. J. II. Thompson. Officers of the Corporation, 
E. Chapman, Esq., Secretary; E. L. Montizambert, E:-<I,! 
Honorary Counsel ; E. Chapman, Esq., Auditor ; Rev. L. 
Doolittle, and B. T. Morris, Esq., Attorneys. Officers of 
the College, Rev. J. H. Nicolls, M.A., Principal and Pro 
fessor of Classics ; H. Miles, Esq., M.A., Vice-Principal and 
Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy; Rev. 

J. Henry Thompson, M.A., Professor of Divinity ; , 

Professor of Chemistry and Minerology ; Rev. L. Doolittle, 
M.A., Bursar; Rev. J. II. Thompson, M.A., Librarian. 

College nf Regiopolis, Kingston. (See Clergy, p. TO, col. 1.) 

CnUege of By town. (See Clergy, page 70, col. 1.) 

St. Michael s College, Church Street, Toronto. Incorpo 
rated by Act of the Legislature, 1855. In Charge of the 
Fathers of the Order of St. Basil. (See Clergy, p. 70, col. 2.) 

Knox s College. Rev. M. Willis, D.D., Professor of Systiv 
matic Theology, Ac. ; Rev. J. P. Young, Professor of Evi 
dences of Reliaion, Moral Philosophy, and Logic; J. .\. 
Smith, Classical Tutor ; Rev. W. Reid, A.M., Secretary. 

Canadian Congregational Ideological Institute, Adelaide 

Street, Toronto. Treasurer, Patrick Freeland, Esq. ; Secre- 

I tary, Rev. F. II. Marling. Committee : Revs J. Roaf; A. 

\ Lillie, D.D. ; A. Wicksou, A.M. ; E. Ebbs ; J. T. Bj-ri i 

J. B. Robinson ; Messrs. A. Christie, Peter Freeland, W. F. 

Meudell; John Nasmith, John Snarr, and E. Childs. Rev. 

A. Lilllie, D.D.. Professor of Theology, &c. ; Rev. A. Wickson. 

A.M., Classical and Hebrew Tutor. Course, Four Sessions 

of eight months each, from middle of Oct. to middle of June. 

Divinity Hall of the United Presbyterian Synod. The 
Divinity Hall meets in Toronto on the 3rd Tuesday in 
October and continues in session till 2nd Thursday of 
April. Professor, Rev. John Taylor. 



[173] 



86 



MEDICAL. 



[1856. 



Universite Laval Faculte de Medecine, J. Blanchet, M.D., 
Professeur de Physiologie et des Institutes de la Medecine ; 
J. A. Sewell, M.D., Professeur de la Therrie et de la Prac- 
tique de la Medecine, et de Clinique Medicale; J. Z. Nault, 
M.D., Professeur de Matiere Medicale et de Therapeutique, 
et de Clinique Medicale; J. C. Fremont, M.D., Professeur 
des Principes et de la Practique de la Chirurgie, et de Cli- 
nique Chirurgicale; A. A. Jackson, M.D., Professeur de 
1 Obstetrique et des Maladies des Femmes et des Enfants ; 
J. Landry, M.D., Professeur d Anatomie et de Clinique 
Chirurgicale; E. Lemieux, M. D., Professeur de Juris 
prudence Medicale, et Demonstrateur en Anatomie; S. S. 
Hunt, Ecuyer, Prof, de Chimie; T. Z. Nault, Secretaire. 

Oouncil of Public Instruction for Upper Canada. Hon. 
Samuel Bealy Harrison, Q. C., Chairman; Rev. Egerton 
Ryerson, D.D., Chief Superintendent of Schools; Eight 
Rev. A. F. M. de Charbonnel, D.D., Roman Catholic Bishop 
of Toronto; Kev. H. J. Grasett, B.D. ; Joseph Curran Mor 
rison, Q.C., M.P.P.; James Scott Howard; Rev. John 
Jennings, and the Rev. Adam Lillie, D.B. Members fer 
the purpose of the Grammar School Act, Rev. John McCaul, 
LL.D., President of University College, and the Presidents 
of the Colleges affiliated with the University of Toronto; 
John George Hedging, Recording Clerk. 

Provincial Normal and Model Schools. For the instruc 
tion and training of Teachers. Normal School : Thomas 
Jaffray Robertson, Head Master ; Rev. William Ormiston, 
A.B., Second Master; Archibald McCallum, Teacher of 
Book- Keeping; William Hind, Teacher of Drawing; 
Henry Goodwin, Teacher of Gymnastics and Calisthenics. 
Model Schools: in which the Normal School Students 
practice the art of Teaching. Archibald McCallum, 
Master of Boy s School ; Warren Rock, First Assist 
ant; David Ormiston, Second Assistant; Dorcas Clark. 



Mistress of Girl s School ; Henrietta Shenick, First Assist 
ant; Helen Clark, Second Assistant; and the Teachers 
of Music Drawing, and Gymnastics and Calisthenics in the 
Normal School The Sessions of the Normal School com 
mence on the 15th May and loth of November of each 
year, and continue for five months each. 

Grammar Sc>iools. Each of these Schools is managed 
by a Board of Trustees, appointed by the County Council. 
There is one Grammar School in each County Town, which 
receives at least 100 per annum ; and where the funds will 
admit of it, others may be established in different parts of 
the County. Pupils attending these Schools are prepared 
for matriculation in the University and Colleges. There 
were 64 Grammar Schools, with 4,287 pupils, in Upper 
Canada, in 1854. 

Common Schools. Each township is divided luto School 
Sections of a suitable extent for one School ; and in each 
of these sections three Trustees are elected to manage its 
school affairs. In cities, towns and villages they are 
managed by a board of School Trustees elected for each 
ward or municipality. There were 3244 Common Schools 
with 204,168 pupils, in Upper Canada, in 1854. 

Public School Libraries Each School and Municipal 
Corporation desirous of establishing Free Public Libraries, 
is aided by the Educational Department granting 100 per 
cent, on local appropriations, and supplying books from the 
Depository in connection with the Department. During 
the last year and a half (October, 1855) about 250 Libraries 
have been established, containing 115,508 volumes. 

The Total number of educational institutions reported 
by the Department of Public Instruction in operation 
in Upper Canada during 1854, wiis 3,512, attended by 
214,734 pupils, and expending 239,128 11s. 3d. in thoir 
support. 



MEDICAL. 



Medical Board Vpper Canadft, Toronto. President, The 
Hon. C. Widmer, M.D., and F.R.C.S., Eng.; Secretary, E. 
Clarke, F.R.C.S.E.; W. C. Gwynne, M.B.; W. Telfer, 
L.R.C.S.K. ; W. Durie, K.H.; J. King, M.D.; W. Beau 
mont, M.R.C.S., Eng.; G. Herrick, M.D.; W. B. Nicol,M.D.; 
John Rolph, M.R.C.S.; James Bovell, M.D.; Joseph Work 
man, M.D. ; Edward M. Ilodder, M.C. and F.R.C.S.E. ; Jas. 
Sampson, Kingston; Harmanus Smith, Ancaster; James 
Wilson, Perth; Basil R. Church, Merrickville ; W. II. 
Itrouse, Prescott ; Robert Edmondson, Brockville ; W. H. 
Howard, Farmersville ; Henry H. Wright, Toronto; W. 
Allison, Markham; Roderick McDonald, Corn wall; George 
II. Park, Hamilton; James Mitchell, Dundas; JohnFraser, 
Pelham; Thomas T. Macklem, Chippawa; Ephraim Cook, 
Norwich; John B. Grouse, Simcoe; George Southwich, St. 
Thomas; W. Aikins, Toronto, and T. D. Morrison, Toronto. 

Toronto General Hospital. In corpora ted 1847 Trustees: 
Appointed by Government, Hon. C. Widmer, M.D.James 
Boaty, and John Doel ; by Corporation, G. W. Allan ; by 
P.oard of Trade, Thos. Clarkson. Consulting Phys. & Surg., 
Hon. C. Widmer, M.D. Attending Phys. and Surg. s, W. 
Telfer, M.R.C.S., Edin. ; G. Herrick, M.D. ; W. R. Beaumont, 
M.IX, F.U.C.S., En;/.; E. M. Ilodder, M.D., F.R.C.S., Eng.; 
James Bovell, M.D., L.R.C.P., London; J. Scott, M.D., 
M.R.C.S., En-r.; James H. Richardson, M.D., M.R.C.S., 
Eng.; Resident Surgeon, Edward Clarke, F.K.C.S., Eng.; 
Sretary and Treasurer, J. W. Brent. Hours of attend 



ance, 12 o clock, noon, daily. Visitors are permitted to see 
their friends every day from 3 to 5 p.m., except Saturday 
and Sunday. 

Provincial Lunatic Asylum, Toronto. Two-and-a-half 
miles West from the City Hall, on Queen Street. Property 
vested in the Crown. Government appoint Medical Super 
intendent and Bursar, and four visiting commissioners 
quarterly, two of whom are residents of the city, who 
frame by-laws for its government, thoroughly examine the 
Asylum, and report to the Governor General. The build 
ing was designed to accommodate, when the wings are 
erected, 250 patients ; there are at present 370 in it. The 
Institution is open to the public between the hours of 12 
noon and 3 p.m., every day, Saturdays and Sundays ex- 
cepted, by application to the Medical Superintendent at 
the Asylum. The admission of patients is J egulated by 
the Act, 16 Vic. chap. 188, which requires that the patient 
be examined by three licensed medical practitioners, 
verified by Reeve or Mayor collectively, who certii y to the 
insanity. From the overcrowded state of the house, ad 
missions are at present made as vacancies occur, according 
to priority of applicants. Idiots and persons afflicted with 
paralysis are inadrnissaWe. Visiting Commissioners, G. S. 
Tiffany. Chairman, E. F. Whittemore, W. L. I ei rin, and 
John Simpson, Esquires. Officers of the Institution : 
Medical Superintendent, Joseph Workman, M.D. ; Bursar, 
J. McKirdy ; Steward, G. McCullough ; Matron, M.A. Parkes. 



PaVindar and Celestial Phenomena 2to32 

Mathematical Problems and Solutions - - - - 4 to 32 
Abstract of Meteorological Observations - - - - 30, 31 

Provincial Observatory 31 

The Future of Western Canada 33 

The Royal Family 37 

Province of Canada ------- 

Government Officers, &c. - - - 37, 38 

I, Jslative Council and Assembly 38 

Post Office Dupartment Newspaper, Money Orders, 
posture to Europe, to the Seat of War, Book Post 

with Eniiland 39 to 42 

Financial Cost of Chief Provincial Works, State 
ment of Debentures issued; Public Debt 1855 . - 42 



CONTENTS. 

Act to Extend Jurisdiction of Division Courts - - 40 

Canadian Patents granted to 30th June, 1855 - - 44 to 48 
Municipalities, C- W. County Officials, Clerks of 
Division Courts, County Towns, Municipalities, 

Magistrates 49 to 66 

Clergy of Canada - - - C6 to 75 

Collectors of Customs 75 

Tariff of Customs 75 to 79 

Hanks in Canada, with their Agencies 79 

Kailways 80 

Judiciary Upper Canada, Lower Oanada - - - 80, 81 

Index to the Statutes of 18 & 19 Vic. 81 to 84 

Colleges 84 to 86 

Medical 86 



E. The Compiler, on the conclusion of his labors, regrets that want of space forbids the insertion of an Addenda 
correcting many typographical errors, and in particular, the List of Magistrates, as published under the head Munici 
palities. He regrets, also, to announce, that 1 :i compelled to exclude from the present Almanac, valuable 
Governmental Returns relating to the Provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick. Prince Edward s Island and New 
foundland, kindly furnished him by officf-rs in their respective governments. To them, however, and the very many 
gentlemen who afforded him information respecting the Government of Canada, the Municipalities, and other depart 
ments of the Almanac, he would tender his most sincere thanks for their valuable assistance. 

[174] 



1856.] 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



87 



CANADA PERMANENT 

BUILDING AND SAVINGS SOCIETY, 



ESTABLISHED IN 1855. 
TO SUCCEED THE TORONTO, AND FARMERS & MECHANICS BUILDING SOCIETIES. 

ON AN IMPROVED SYSTEM. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

JOSEPH D. RIDOUT, ESQ., President. 

PETER PATERSON, ESQ., Vice President. 

J. G. CHEWETT, Esq. E. F. WHITTEMORE, Esq. 

T. D. HARRIS, " J. G. BEARD, 

A. NORDHEIMER, " TflOS. MACLEAR, 

Solicitor E. C. JONES, Esq. Surveyor W. B. CREW, Esq. 

Secretary and Treasurer Mr. J. HERBERT MASON. 

Bankers THE BANK OF UPPER CANADA. 

Office The Office lately occupied by the FARMERS AND MECHANICS BUILDING SOCIETT, 

Toronto Street, Toronto. 

Shares, 100; Half Shares, 50; quarter Shares, 25. 

TO INVESTING MEMBERS. 

rpHE certain and highly profitable return secured to Investors of either 
J_ large or small amounts by institutions of this nature, -when properly conducted, as 
exemplified in the successful termination of the two societies above named, is now well 
understood ; and in this Society the Investing Member has the additional advantage of 
being able to withdraw the amount paid in on his stock, with compound interest, whenever 
he desires, on giving a limited notice. New members will be received at any time, and 
will share in the profits from the time of their subscriptions commencing. Shares are 
paid up by monthly instalments of 1 Is. each, extending over six years, on which a dis 
count will be allowed when paid in advance. A payment at the time of entering, of 64, 
entitles a Member to the full amount of his share, at the expiration of the time specified, 
and half or quarter shares in proportion. 

TO DEPOSITORS. 

To persons not members, the Society offers all the advantages of a SAVINGS BANK, to 
gether with a higher rate of interest and more accommodating terms than those institu 
tions are able to afford. The whole capital of the Society is pledged for the security of 
money received on deposit, and being all loaned on real estate, no safer guarantee can be 
given or required. Money will be received, for which interest will be paid at the rate of 
six per cent, per annum, on sums of ten pounds and upwards, and five per cent, under 
that amount, withdrawable at any time, on notice being given. 

TO BORROWERS. 

The Society will make advances, repayable by monthly contributions covering principal 
and interest, according to the following 

LOAN TABLE: 



be repaid 

i. a 
it u 


in 1 year a monthlv p&vment of 


One Share of 
100 


Half Share of 
50 


Qr. Share of 
25 


8 18 4 
4 15 
373 
2 13 2 
250 


492 
276 
1 13 7 
1 6 7 
126 


247 
139 
16 10 
13 4, 
11 3. 


2 " " " 


3 " 


4 " " 


5 " <i 





Applications for loans will be received by the Secretary, from whom copies of the Rules 
and Prospectus, and any further information may be obtained on application if by letter, 
post-paid. 

[175] 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



[1855. 



READY-MADE CLOTHING 



IMPORTER OP 

CLOTHS, CASSIMERES, TESTINGS, 



DHY aOODS, A 




AT THE 



TORONTO YORKSHIRE HOUSE, 

105, YONGE STREET, SIGN OF THE 






rPHE Subscribers, in returning thanks to their numerous customers and the public at large for 
past favours, beg respectfully to announce, that their Stock is now complete with a large 

and select assortment of 



Comprising in part of Silks, Plain and Embossed Satins all colours, Velvets, French Flowers, 
Ribbons, Laces, Black and coloured Grenadine Falls, Gloves, Scotch and Shetland Wool Hosiery, 
Ladies Woolleu Under-Dresses,^Polkas, Furs, the latest styles in Paisley and German Wool Long 
Shawls, Fancy Dress Goods, Alpacas, Orleans, Cobourgs, French Merinos, Lama and Henrietta 
Cloths, Poplins. The Staple Department is, as usual, well stocked with English and Canadian 
BLANKETS ; Horse Blankets of superior quality and extra size ; Home-made English and Welsh 
Flannels, Yarns, Worsted, L. Wools, Shirtings, Sheetings, Tickings, Factory cottons very cheap, 
with every other article suitable for the season. fi~ Goods marked in plain figures, the ONE 
PRICE as usual, strictly adhered to. N.B. Just received, a splendid assortment of Children s 
Knitted German Wool Over Dresses. Also, Fifty Dozen Knitted Wool Socks. 

Toronto, November, 1855. BUTTON & BLAKE LY. 

[176] 



1856.] 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



89 



CITY STEAM PRESS, 

63 YONflB STREET, 





TORONTO. 



BETWEEN KINO AND ADELAIDE STREETS. 



# 1 *^f_ara.j_^ -caj a-^-^_x-ir^fci t_j JKT-J-^I 7 

0ak, |0l) art rimittfutfll printer, 



Be<*s most respectfully to draw the attention of the Canadian Public to his NEW AND UNRIVALLED STEAM 
PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT. Possessing every advantage to be derived from the use of STEAM MACHINERY and 
the LAROEST, BEST, and MOST VARIED ASSORTMENT OF TYPE and other PRINTING MATERIALS in Canada, he is prepared 

to execute a very large amount of 

PRINTING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES! 

No Job, in Printing, however small or common, or however extensive or fine, but can be executed at the CITY STEAM 
PRE. This Establishment possesses one of Buggies Card Machines, capable of working off 1500 to 

2000 Cards per hour. #9- BUSINESS CARDS ONLY $4 per 1000 ! ! 
J$y SHOW CAKDS of every description printed in Gold and Colours, equal to any on this Continent -ft 

At the late PROVINCIAL EXHIBITION, held at COBOURS, in October last, TWO PRIZES WERE AWARDED 
TO THIS ESTABLISHMENT FOR THE BEST SPECIMENS OF PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL PRINTING. 
JtSf Country Merchants will save at least 25 per cent. Ty having their Printing done 
at this Office. ORDERS BY POST promptly attended to and punctually executed. 

MAKE A NOTE OF THE ADDRESS: 

Blackburn s City Steam Press, No, 63 Yonge Street, Toronto, 



THOMAS WHEELER, 




[ENVELOPE SEALS AND EMBOSSING PRESSES. 



\VATCHMAKER, <fcc., 

Begs to inform his friends and the public, that he has 
REMOVED his Office to No. 18, KING STREET EAST, 
five doors East of his old stand (over the store of G. 
B. Wy Hie, Esq., first floor) where he will have increased 
facilities for executing the orders of his customers. 



CLOTHING, DRY GOODS, OR MILLINERY 



CAN BE HAD AS CHEAP AT 





NEW STORE, 

80, KING STREET EAST, TORONTO, 

As any other retail store in the City. Also, 

TAILORING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 

CALL AND PROVE IT ! 

PLAIN FIGURES ONLY ARE USED, AND NO SECOND PRICE. 

GEORGE LONGMAN. 



90 ADVERTISEMENTS. [1856. 

"THE LEADER." 

T ITTLE more than three years ago, the Proprietor of the Leader without having canvassed for party support, 
J-J without having established any intermediate agencies for the enlistment of public patronage, without having 
covenanted beforehand for the co-operation of a single individual either in public or in private life announced his in 
tention of publishing a first-class Political Journal. The bitterness, the personal as well as the political animosity 
which characterized party journalism throughout the Province, led him to anticipate that a Newspaper which should 
introduce a new era in the Periodical Literature of the Province, by discussing public questions solely on their merits 
by discarding personalities, unless when these were indispensable by assuming to storm the citadel of public opi 
nion by argument, rather than by appeals to passion and to prejudice could not fail to win its way into favor and 
influence with an intelligent community. Taking a retrospect from the present stand-point, the Proprietor feels that 
he can congratulate himself on the realization of his highest anticipations. Only a few months after this Journal 
was first published, the readiness with which the public supported it justified an enlargement. A few months more, 
and he found himself warranted in increasing the issues of the Journal from a Semi-Weekly to a Daily Edition. An 
enlargement in the Daily, the Semi-Weekly, and the Weekly, had to be made at a later date ; and more than twelve 
months ago, by the incorporation of the Daily Patriot with the Leader, another important step in advance was taken 
by the issue of an Evening as well as a Morning Edition, along with the two Semi-Weekly and two Weekly Editions, 
Eighteen separate issues each week were thus given forth from the same Press, and under the same Proprietorship as 
that which first sent forth the Semi-Weekly bantling of 1852, to win its way to public favor. A few months subse 
quently, and before the Leader had completed the third year of its existence, a step still more important in newspaper 
Improvement was made by the Proprietor. At a sacrifice which every other Journal in this Province, and every other 
Journal on this Continent the New York Tribune, Herald, and Times alone excepted has shrunk from, he deter 
mined on discarding the handbill system of advertising by the use of large type displayed over a great surface, and not 
only occupying space which might be devoted to reading matter, but destroying that harmony in the mechanical ap 
pearance of the Paper, which forms so marked a feature in Knglish Journals, as compared with those of the United 
States, France, and Germany. Along with this plan of condensation, the Proprietor made, simultaneously, another 
change, which probably aggravated the sacrifice, without being correspondingly satisfactory iu the shape of an im 
provement. _ This change, it is needless to say, was the adoption of the quarto form of publication. All these changes, 
however, it is proper to state, exemplified a progress in the history of Journalism which the Province bad never before 
witnessed. And how sensible the reading public were of the improvement, may be gathered from the fact, that b^bra 
the completion of the third year of the Journal s existence, our Paper was in the hands of FIFTEEN THOUSAND 
Families I and could count between Ninety and a Hundred Thousand Readers ! This patronage altogether unprece 
dented in the Province was procured by no agency, save that of the voluntary co-operation of an appreciative public. 
The readers of the various Editions of our Journal have not been indifferent to the fact, that we had sacrificed, in 
some measure, the patronage of the advertising community solely for their benefit in order, in the first place, that 
there might be more reading matter in the Paper, and in order that the taste of an intelligent people might be gratified 
by the introduction of important mechanical improvements. 

In the Fourth year of the Journal s existence, we sit down to chronicle yet another step in its progress. We have 
already alluded to the sacrifies which we have made of advertising patronage, purely for the benefit of the 
reading community. The time has come when, we think, the interest both of our readers and our advertisers may be 
advanced, by an improvement altogether new in the progress of Canadian Journalism. To give proper facilities to ad 
vertisers for display, at the same time that we jealously protect the interests of our readers, by an ample record of the 
news of the day, is a problem which has cost us some labour to solve. Whether we have succeeded, the future must, 
in part, be left to determine. Our present conviction is, that we have succeeded. Our plan is to discard the Quarto 
form, and throw open our columns for advertising display. We introduce, also, the fine broad column of the English 
Daily Journals so well suited to show off Advertisements, and yet so well adapted to purposes of condensation, when 
space is valuable, as it always must be, in a leading Political and General Newspaper. With the introduction of tha 
broa 1 ! columns, the Proprietor has determined, also, on improving the quality of the printing paper; and along with 
these changes, we add a large space, equal to four broad columns, to the size of the Journal. The tendency of our im 
provement, however, is more towards mechanical excellence and perfect workmanship, than towards indefinite enlarge 
ment. We purpose showing those who follow our Leadership, what can be done in the way of newspaper progress and 
improvement , and we have confidence in the intelligence, the refinement, and the good taste of a Canadian commu 
nity, that we shall not labour in vain. 

In regard to the Literary department of the Journal, the Public are the fittest judges whether there is a correspond 
ing improvement. On this point, it is out of place for us to say anything. Our Journal professes to s<,eak in behalf 
of the intelligence of the Province. We claim for it the character of calmly discussing questions of political interest; 
of working with and for the body of the people, rather than slavishly serving a party; and of furnishing intelligence 
of the most valuable kind in advance of any other Journal in Canada, 

THE MORNING EDITION 

Of the Leader is published at the rate of Five Dollars a-year, every penny of which isexpended inprocuiing the naked 
Bheet on which we print : payable in advance, otherwise Six Dollars. 

THE EVENING EDITION 

s published at the same rate, and contains all the News of each day, up to Four o clock P.M. 

THE SEMI-WEEKLY EDITION 

Is published on Tuesdays and Fridays, at Three Dollars a-year, paid in advance, and Three-and-a-half Dollars credit. 

THE WEEKLY " LEADER/ 

One of the best Journals for Country Circulation in Canada, is published every Wednesday Morning, at One Dollar a- 
year, strictly in advance. When not paid in advance, the charge is Two Dollars. 

THE WEEKLY "PATRIOT" 

Is also published every Wednesday, and is a First-class Weekly Paper, circulating more largely than any other Jouma 1 
in Canada. It will be furnished on the same terms as the Weekly Leader. 

Advertisements for the Daily Editions are iu<rtfd in the Semi-Weekly and Weekly Issues, without u\ir;i:-ii:iriri>. 
at rates as low as those of Journals of th sm-vlli^t circulation, notwithstanding that *ach Advertisement vrl 
appears in our Columns is seen by at least ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND PERSONS I 

JAMES BEATY, 

PUBLISHER, 
Toronto, Novemter 1st, 1855. No. 120 King Street East, Toronto. 

[178] 



1856.] ADVERTISEMENTS. 

PROFESsIONALTlFE ASSURANCE COMPANY, 

Chief VfficeslQ, CHEAPSIDE, LONDON. 

All Policies ^indisputable. No charge for Policy Stamps. 
Safe, cheap, and offering advantages beyond those of any former Company. 

JOHN C. GEIKIE, Agent, 
70, YONGE STREET, TORONTO. 

J6@r COPY YOUR LETTERS. THE COPYING PRESS SUPERSEDED. 

THE CHINESE TRANSCRIPT FLUID, 

Three Shillings and Nine-pence a Bottle. 

By Royal Letters Patent, offers invaluable benefit to all for business or private correspondence, copying all letters 
or documents perfectly and at once, by the mere pressure of the hands. 

" A writer with this fluid is enabled to produce a copy of his letter or writing without trouble and in a moment. - 
(Lrnidon) Times. 

JOHN C. GEIKIE, Bookseller and Stationer, Wholssale and Retail Agent for Canada. 70, YONGE ST., TORONTO. 

TT ~JOHN RITCHEY, Jun., 

ST. LAWRENCE BUILDINGS, TORONTO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS, 

READY-MADE CLOTHING, &c. 

Has constantly on hand a large Assortment of Plain and Fancy Dry Goods, 

Ready-made Clothing, &c. 7 

WHICH FOR VARIETY AND LOWNESS OF PRICE CANNOT BE 

SURPASSED. 



WORTHY^ OF NOTICE. 

REV. DK. LYMAN BEECHER. to Messrs. Reed, Cutler & Co., Boston. 

Gentlemen, I have used the Vegetable Pulmonary Balsam myself with benefit in Catansial 
Coughs and Colds, and have known it to be used with good effects in the early stages of Pulmo 
nary Affections, in families around me. 

(Signed) LYMAN BEECHER. 

Boston, October 20, 1855. 

Rev. Dr. Leonard Woods, (late Abbott Professor in Andover Theological Seminary,) writes to 
Messrs. Reed, Cutler & Co., as follows: " From a long use of the Vegetable Pulmonary Balsam 
in my family circle, and in some instances among Theological Students, I have been led to regard 
it as a safe and efficacious medicine." 

How ESTEEMED BY PHYSICIANS. JOHN". A. BERRY, M.D., Saco, Me., says, " During a prac 
tice of twenty years, I have seen used all the popular remedies for Coughs, and am well satisfied 
that your VEGETABLE PULMONARY BALSAM is best, and I hope it will be better known and more 
generally used." 

OPINIONS OF THE TRADE. August 1st, 1854 "We know of no medicine -which has deservedly sustained so high a 
reputation for so long a term of years, or which more rarely disappoints the reasonable expectations of those who 
use it." [Signed,] 

Allen & Co., Cincinnati, Oh. Wm. H. Harrison, Cincinnati, Oh.-- J. B. Wilder & Co., Louisville, Ky. Barnard, 
Adams & Co., St. Louis, Mo. F. Scammon & Co., Chicago, 111. E. E. Gay, Burlington, Iowa, J. Musson, Quebec, C. E. 
Win. T. Baird, Woodstock, N. B. Brewers, Stevens & Gushing. Boston, Mass. B. A. Fahnestock & Co., New York, N.Y. 
B. Hollister & Co., Buffalo, N. Y. Carleton & Ilovey, Lowell, Mass. J. L. Thompson Co., Troy, N. Y. Isaac Tost, 
Kochester, N. Y. A. McClure & Co., Albany, N. Y.. and many others of the oldest and most respectable Druggists in 
the United States. 

The above requires no* comment, and must commend itself to all. The VEGETABLE PULMONARY BALSAM, so 
favorably known lor the past THIRTY YEARS, for COUGHS, COLDS, CONSUMPTION, AND ALL DISEASES OJ? 
THE LUNGS, THROAT AND CHEST, is prepared ONLY by REED, CUTLER & CO., Druggists, Boston. 

Price Small bottles, 50 cents; large, $1. Sold in Montreal by Lyman, Savage & Co., W. E. Bowman and R. Blrks 
Quebec, J. Musson & Co., J. Bowles and G. G. Ardouin Toronto, by Lyman & Bros. Hamilton, by Winer, Moore & Co., 
and Hamilton & Kreshaw Bytown, R. A. Boal and J. Roberts Richmond, by Foster & Macleay Woodstock, by 
T. & II. H. Scott, D. McLaren & Co. Three Rivers, L. A, Dubord St. Catharines, C. A. Brouse & E. Pafford Sher- 
brooke, Wm. Brooks & Co. Niagara, H. Pafford Cobourg, T. B. Howells Kingston, E. W. Palmer Belleville, R. 
Hoiden & Co. Port Hope, Chas. Brent Dundas, J. M. Thornton London, C. M. Sims and B. A. Mitchell Melbourne, 
Thos. Tait Brantford, A. II. Cook and 0. C. Mills Brockville, H. S. Humphrey and A. Turner. 

[179] 



92 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



[1856. 



ISUH. 



RICHMOND HILL POST-OFFICE, 




FOU THE UNITED COUNTIES OF YORK AND PEEL. 



& POTTER, 

(FROM DOLLOND S) 




nstrument 




54, KING STREET, TORONTO, 



~\,rANUFACTURERS and Importers of THEODOLITES, LEVELS, TELESCOPES, MICRO- 
1V1 SCOPES, and all descriptions of SURVEYING, OPTICAL, AND PHILOSOPHICAL 
INSTRUMENTS. HYDROMETERS and SACHROMETERS, as used by the Imperial Government. 

SPECTACLES to suit all sights. 

ROYAL ADMIRALTY CHARTS of the St. Lawrence and the Lakes. 

1$^* Repairing and Adjusting on the Premises. 




OCULIST AND AURBST, 

OPERATOR ON THE EYE AND EAR. 



H 



AVING concluded a protracted professional engagement abroad, has returned, and resumed 
his business at Toronto, and may be consulted as usual for all diseases appertaining to the 



Dr. C., having during his absence availed himself of many useful and important discoveries in 
the treatment of DEAFNESS, and many diseases of the EYE, can Avith confidence be consulted 
by those afflicted, as NO CHARGE will be made in any case for examination and opinion. 

Dr. CadwelPs Treatise on the Eye and Ear, will be forwarded to any part of the country free 
of charge, by sending the address POST PAID. Communications must also be PRE-PAIU, and 
those requiring an answer, ENCLOSE A FEE. 

jBSf Artificial Eye inserted free of pain. . i 

OFFICE-NO, so, KINQ STREET EAST. 

[180] 



1856.] 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



93 






THOM.AS 

anfc amwmm 

FRONT STREET, TORONTO. 



GASH advanced on Wheat. Flour and othe\- Produce for sale here or elsewhere at the owner s 
option. Agent for the sale of Small Bills on England, Ireland, and Scotland, in sums of 1 

and upwards. Milners & Son s, of London and Liverpool, 
PATENT FIRST-CLASS SAFES AND DEED CASES. 
The strongest wrought iron safe-guard against robbery and fire extant. 
Also, "Wilder s American SAFES, all warranted. 



PROVINCIAL SALAMANDER SAFES! 



U. 

O 
O 



n 

9 





UJ 



.{ 




u 

x 



Manufacturers of the Improved Double Bevel Fire and Burglar Proof Salamander Safes. 
A large assortment of Salamander Safes, at prices from $30 and upwards, always on hand. 



. H. CHENEY & Co., 

MANUFACTURERS, IMPORTERS, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IX 



COIL GRATES, HALL 





WOOD ANO COAL STOVES 



|UUUl\U1U| uc uua nuuu flllU UUHL U I U I LU I 

PLANISHED AND JAPANNED GOODS AND TIN WARE. 

PARTICULAR ATTENTION PAID to JOBBING. 

STORE No. 5 St. James s Buildings, King Street, Toronto, 

FOUNDRY-CORNER OF QUEEN & VICTORIA STREETS 

[181] 



94 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



[1856. 



WORKS PUBLISHED BY ROBERT DICK. 



The Gospel Tribune. Published monthly for the 
promotion of Alliance and Intercommunion throughout 
Evangelical Christendom. Price, when paid in advance, 
5s. per annum ; to Ministers, 2s. 6d. Wo Outage charged. 

The Clip of the Lord," NOT " The Cup of 
Devils." 13y John Mair, M.D., of Kingston, C.W. 
100 copies sent for 15s., Postage, free. 

Gospel Tribime Pamphlets, No. 1. A LETTER 
addressed to the non-established Preslrj terian Commu 
nions of Scotland, by Sir Geo. Sinclair, Bart, of Ulster. 
20 copies sent for 5s.,/ree of Postage. 

Simmons Laconic Manual. A book which aims 
at furnishing the richest variety of good and wholesome 
sentiments, in the smallest possible number of words. 
Price, 5s., and sent free of Postage. 

Simmons Scripture Manual. A NEW WORK : 
possessing it, the teacher or student of the Bible never 



need remain one minute at a loss for all the Scripture 

texts required on any subject. Price, 5s.; and sent free. 
Rev.H.Mulklns Report on the Prohibitory 

Liquor Laws of New England. Sent Post 

free. 100 copies for $5. 

Communications of every kindintended for the Publisher, 
to be addressed as shown in the form below. 

All Remittances forwarded by mail, in letters thus ad 
dressed and duly registered are at the risk of the Publisher. 



Paid. 

ROBERT DICK, 

(Tribune Office:) 

TORONTO, C.W. 



Sole Agent for the Sale of the Crystal Palace LEVER PRESS. 

JOHN ELLIS, 



LITHOGRAPHER 

AND DRAUGHTSMAN, r - 

8 KIKG STREET WEST,^ 

TORONTO. \ 



jd&^ 5^3%i 



HERALDRY OFFICE. 

SVrm0, Crests, 

Notary, Municipal & City 
Seals and Presses. 

Shares, Bills of Exchange, 

Mercantile, Visiting and 
k Wedding Cards. 



MAPS, PLANS OF ESTATES, VIEWS, &c. (in superior style, and for the Trade.) 



18, King Street East, 

LINEN AND WOOLEN DRAPER, 

SILK MERCER, HABERDASHER, 

DAMASK AND 

CARPET WAREHOUSEMAN, &c. &c. 

41 KING STREET, Corner of TORONTO STREET, 

OPPOSITE THE NEW POST OFFICE. 

HOUSE FURNISHING HARDWARE, 

OF ALL KINDS, 

Rodgers and other celebrated Table Cutlery, Silver Plated Forks and Spoons, Cruets, 

Candlesticks, &c. &c., Best Britannia Metal Tea and Coflfee Pots, 

Papier Machie and Japanned Trays, 

IRON BEDSTEADS, FIRE-IRONS AND FENDERS, &C. 

Enamelled and Tinned Kitchen Ware, Bar, Hoop and Sheet Iron, Glass Pails, 

And all other Goods in the Hardware Line for gale at moderate Prices. 

R LEWIS & SON. 
[182] 



1856.] 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



95 



4 t 



THE GLOBE." 



per annum. 



THE DAILY GLOBE, $6 

THE TRI-WEEKLY GLOBE, ; 4 per 

THE WEEKLY GLOBE, 2 p er 



E PRESENT CIRCULATION of the Globe (1st Nov., 1855) is 16,176, and 
i- it is constantly increasing. Its subscription list is larger than those of the other 
thiee City daily papers united, and larger than that of any single business Journal 
published west of New York. 

The Sheet on which it is printed is, with one exception, the largest used by any 
business paper in America. 

GEORQE BROWN, 

Proprietor and Publisher. 

OFFIOE-22 KING STREET WEST, TORONTO. 

ill KIPS OF EOBK ME JOE riHTIK 

EXECUTED CHEAPLY AND WITH DESPATCH. 



WHITEFIELD S 



VIEWS. 



are the largest, most elaborate, and reliable Views that have BVM- IM 

3^ yio > ^^^^^^ the 

Price per single copy (plain) ........................................ 

Do. do. (fully colored) .................. ... .................................... *1 5 

Do. for the set, complete (plain) ............... ................................... 2 

Do. do. (colored) 



for 



*?\jij .................. 

These Views are got up in the First Style of the Art, and printed on thefinp sf miVi- t " "r 15 

them and they are well adapted for the parlor, or as present s to Wends ^n the Old^un^rv ***** *"* 6XpreSSly 

Orders sent to MACLEAU & Co, 1C King Street East, Toronto, will be promptly attended to 

NOTICES FROM THE PRESS. 

VIEW OF MONTREAL. We are sure all will admit that it View of Hamilton 

would be impossible to have completed a picture more SS^ASK^^L^^L delineation, style, and 
foithtully correct than Mr. Whitefield s View of Montreal. 
Montreal Pilot. 

M e are satisfied, from this specimen of his handicraft 

l.i.*^T_ It L,:*. ,e . i j .. i * 



, 

that Mr. Whitefield is no pretender, but an accomplished 
Artist, with the minute fidelity of Portraiture, and much 
skill in perspective and coloring, and that his picture is 
infinitely superior to anything of the kind that has ever 
been attempted. Montreal Transcript. 

Mr. Whitefield has completed the most faithful view of 
our city that we have ever seen. Montreal Gazette. 

Mr. Whitefield s view is a remarkably faithful one the 
perspective very correct, and well worthy the talents of 
the artist ; and we are glad to have it in our power to add 
our decided testimony to that of our cotemporaries, res 
pecting the merits of this picture. Montreal Courier. 

We have no hesitation in saying, that a more beautiful 
and elaborately correct view of Montreal could not possibly 
be executed. Montreal Herald. 

VIEW OP QUEBEC. Mr. Whitefield has completed his view 
of Quebec, and we have no hesitation in saying, that it is 
the best, the most correct, and the most judiciously sketch 
ed view of Quebec yet taken. Quebec Morning Chronicle. 

VIEW OF 11 YMILTON. We have been shown by Mr. White- 

ild, an engraved copy of his View of Hamilton, which is 
really beautiful, and in our opinion, as correct as it well 
could be. Hamilton Spectator. 

We have been favored with a glimpse of Mr. Whitefield s 



We consider it admirably well executed. It is a faith- 
engraving of a beautiful city, and well deserves the 
patronage ot our citizens. Daily Evening Journal 

THE Viw OF TORONTO which Mr. Whitefield has shown 
us is the only one which we have yet seen which does 
anything like justice to this city. -Old Omntryman 

, am f la to say that Mr. Whitefield has achieved a 

great feat he has drawn a good view of Toronto; a thimr 

^ r arc ely deemed possible. Anglo American Magazine. 

Mr. Whitefield has, from the point he has selected, been 

b to introduce all the striking buildings that adorn 

avery pretty 



Mr. Whitefield s productions far surpass in size and artis- 
Adwxate ^^ ^ W h * T6 yet seen> ~ c " narfa Christian 

Mr. Whitefield s views of Ottawa (late Bytown.) are per 
fect gems * * * He has a happy knack of 

always hitting on the best point from which to make hia 

[etch, added to the masterly manner in which they aro 
executed is sure to please.- Anglo-American Magazine. 

Mr. WhitefieJd s view of Port Hope is an admirable, and 
at the same time a truthful picture. Port Hope Pilot and 





A vast number of notices similar to these could be 
added were there room sufficient for the purpose. 



[183] 



96 ADVERTISEMENTS. [1856. 



H J 



MACLEAR & Co., 

16, KINQ STREET EAST, TORONTO, 

rAVE great pleasure in embracing this opportunity of laying before their friends and the public 
generally, a few remarks on the facilities which they possess for supplying every demand con 
nected with their business. 

Booksellers. As Booksellers, they keep constantly on hand a full supply of valuable works, in every department 
Sacred Litera- of Literature, Science and Art. The Clerical Profession will find a large stock of Standard Works in 
Divinity, Theology, Sacred Criticism and Practical Christianity, the production of the most celebrated 
Bibles, &e. English and American Divines. Their stock of BIBLES is extensive and complete, comprising in size, 
every edition, from the elegant miniature for the pocket to the magnificent Quarto Illustrated, Im 
perial and Comprehensive Bibles, for family use, of Messrs. Elackie & Son, of Glasgow, Scotland, and in 
price, from the strong, useful sheep cover at a few pence, to the most costly productions of the binder s 
and gilder s art. In Hymn Books, they have the various collections used by different denominations 
of Christians, either bound up with the Bible, or separately, viz.: Psalms and Uymns for the Church 
of Scotland, Wesley s Hymns, Watts , and the Supplement to Watts , or Congregational Hymn Book. 
Church Services in great variety. Prayer Books, roan, gilt edges, from 25 cents each. Catechisms, &c. 
MedicaL i n jjedical Books, they need only say that they are the agents for Messrs. Blanchard & Lea, of Phila 

delphia, and keep a stock of their valuable medical and Surgical works on hand; also, the best publi- 
lications in this department of other houses, Home and Foreign. The London Lancet (monthly) sup 
plied at $5 per annum. The Medico-Chirurgical Eeview (quarterly) for $3 , and Braithwaite s Retro- 
Legal, spect (half-yearly) for $2. To the Legal Profession 31. & Co. beg to intimate that they are the publish 
ers of several valuable legal works, and keep also every publication of importance on the subject 
Scientific and necessary for the study or reference of gentlemen connected with the law. Under the head of Mechan 
ism and the Useful Sciences, they have works on Engineering, Railway and Farm Machinery, Archi. 
tecture, Ornamental Designs, Electricity, Chemistry, &c., in addition to the very useful series of Ele- 
General Head- nientary Works published by Weale, of London, England. To the general reader they can offer an 
immense variety, suited to every age and taste, in History, Biography, Travels, Poetry, Essays, Fio- 
tion, Ac. &c. All works of importance in this department can be procured of M. & Co. as soon as pub 
Educational, lished. Educational Works, including Common School, College and other Text Books, wholesale 
and retail ; Grammai s, Dictionaries, Beading and Composition Books, in Greek, Latin, Hebrew, French, 
Periodical. German, Spanish and Italian. In Periodicals, they receive and supply regularly all the principal pub. 
lications, English and American. They will spare neither trouble nor expense to procure for their 
subscribers early copies. Under this head they may mention that they are agents in Canada for the 
Blackwood and Re-publication of Blackwood s Magazine and the four great English Reviews The Edinburgh, the 
the Reviews. Q uar t e rly, the Westminster and the Xorth British, the whole of which are supplied for $10 per annum. 
These Keviews, it is knowu to many, are among the greatest efforts of English literature ; their con. 
tributors are men of the highest standing; the topics they discuss are always of the utmost importance, 
Their Contri- and the manner as befits the most powerful intellects of this or any other age. Among the host of 
butors. great names, living or dead, who have contributed to their pages, they may mention Lords Jeffrey, 
Brougham and Campbell, Bev. Sydney Smith, T. B. Macaulay, Sir Walter Scott, J. G. Lockhart, Dr. 
Chalmers, H. Rogers (author of the Eclipse of Faith), Carlyle, Mazziui, Sir David Brewster, Sir W. 
Hamilton and many others; and it is not too much to say, that no man can be conversant with the full 
development of English literature, who is not a reader of these Keviews, while the amount for which 
they are supplied is less than a third the published price. The Illustrated London News, Punch, and 
other English papers, immediately upon the receipt of the mail every week. 31. & Co. will be happy 
to procure, either from England or the States, any works to order which they have not in stock. 

Stationery Maclear & Co. have imported direct from the manufacturers in Great Britain an immense stock of 

Imported Di- PAPER, of every make, size, weight and quality. They believe that they will thus effect to their cus- 

rect - tomers a considerable saving over those houses who, not importing themselves, have to pay an extra 

per centage for the agency on this side. The stock consists of Book and Writing Papers, Foolscap, 

Pott, Letter and Note Paper, Copying, Blotting, Cartridge and Wrapping Paper, Drawing, Tissue and 

Music Paper, Tracing Cloth and Paper, &c.; Ledgers, Journals, Day, Cash, Bill and other Blank Books of 

Blank Books all sizes; while, with their facilities for ruling, paging, binding, Ac., they are enabled to execute upon 

madetoorder. ^be B h or te S t, notice every description of book to order for Counties, Municipalities, Railroad Companies, 

Bankers, Shippers, Merchants, &c. &c. Clerks of the Peace and Clerks of the Council of the different 

Inkfl. Counties are respectfully requested to inspect the Pattern Books for use in their offices. Stephens Blue" 

Black. Writing Fluid, Waters Black and Carmine do, Perth Office, Copy ing, Printing, Red and Blue Inks of 

[184] 



1856.] ADVERTISEMENTS. 97 

superior quality, wholesale and retail ; Gold, Steel and Quill Pens and Holders, Envelopes, Wax, 
Wafers, Vestas, and every article required for the desk or counting room. In Law Stationery, they Lafl 
have Deeds on Paper and Parchment, Full Covenants do. under the statute. Mortgages with power of 
sale, do. with insurance clause and power of sale, Chattel Mortgages, Leases, Quit Claim Deeds. All 
forms of Division Court and Magistrates Blanks. LAW FORMS, viz : Subpoenas, Cognovits, Writs ot 
Summons, Notices to Admit, Affidavits of Service, Chancery Blanks, &c. &c. Skins of Writing Parch 
ment in great variety and of superior quality. Their stock of Miscellaneous Stationery it would of Miscellaneous, 
course be quite impossible to particularize. They have everything that is required and usually found 
in such establishments, suitable for the Surveyor, the Artist, the Tradesman, the Teacher, and the 
Private Individual; also many useful and ornamental novelties in Copying Presses, Writing Cases, 
Papier Mache Portfolios and Inkstands, Envelope Cases, Date Boxes, Newspaper and Letter Files, Taper 
Stands, Rogers Sheffield Desk and Pocket Knives, c. &c. 

Their facilities for Book and Job PRINTING are all of the very first order, both in extent and com- The Printing 
pleteness. They have some powerful Presses by Adams and Hoe, the. most celebrated American Office, 
makers, worked by a Model Steam Engine, together with a large and varied stock of new type, which 
is being constantly augmented by the addition of every novelty, as produced, for Ornamental Printing. 
But of their capabilities in this matter they are fortunately not required to say much. As samples of gp t ;,.j lllH | ls 
the work performed by them, they may point to the Canadian Journal, the nionthlv organ of the Work. 
Canadian Institute, the execution of which has been affirmed to be of a character that would do credit 
to the oldest Printing Houses in Europe; or if the reader has not seen that publication, they need only 
refer to this present work THE CANADIAN ALMANAC. They do not hesitate to say that it will Th e Ahnanar. 
liear a favorable comparison with any similar production published in any part of the world. Those who 
are conversant with the getting up of an Almanac who know the double necessity resting upon the 
compilers, of embodying the latest information, and yet publishing early in the fall, and the consequent 
baste with which it is printed, will look upon it as a marvel of elegance and correctness. They are 
prepared to execute in an equal manner, 

Xewspapers, Posting Bill?, Invitations, 

Books, Hand Bills. Funeral Cards, 

Pamphlets, Railroad Bills. Prospectuses, 

Magazines, Steamboat Bills, Druggists and other Labels. 

Programmes, Show Bills, Business Cards, 

Catalogues, Circulars, &c. Ac. 

Printing hi Gold, Bronze and Colors executed hi first rate style. 

In the LITHOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT, Maclear & Co., to meet the growing demand for work in Lithography 
this line, have added considerably to their previous resources, by employing several of the best artists 
to be found, the purchase of new presses and all necessary materials, and are now in a position to exe 
cute orders to any extent in 

Maps, Diagrams, Bill Heads, 

Charts, Debentures. Architectural Designs. 

Plans, Cheques, ( irculars, 

Surveys. Bank Notes, Portraits, Ac. 

in the highest style of art, at a price lar below that of Engraving on Copper or Steel, and in many in- To 1-aud Own- 
stances not perceptibly inferior in execution. They would call the especial attention of Land Owners, ers and others. 
Surveyors, and all others who may require plans of property, to this department. M. & Co. believe 
that during the past season, the majority published have been issued from their office, some of them 
of so elaborate and finished a character as to take the position of works of art, and those who are inte 
rested in such matters should remember that a well-executed plan is an essential element in the suc w 
essful disposal of all kinds of real estate. Parties requiring such work will do well to visit their 
establishment, as from the experience and constant practice of their workmen, they are often enabled 
to make valuable suggestions for its effective execution. Lithographic Printing in Colors with accu 
racy and elegance. Business and Private Cards, Bill Heads, &c., engraved on Copper Plate and printed. 
Envelope Dies cut, and Envelopes stamped, either plain or in colors. 

The Bindery is complete in all its details, including facilities for binding in every style, from the rv - Jjinderr 
cheapest to the most elegant, in any quantity, at reasonable prices and on the shortest notice. By 
their Ruling Machine they cun execute any desired pattern in Blank Books, and having recently added Ruling and 
a Paging Machine, they are prepared to furnish Account Books paged throughout ; also to page books Pagi: 
(old or new,) at a very small charge. They believe that the resources at their command in every de 
partment of their establishment are unsurpassed in any part of the Province. The very flattering 
amount of patronage bestowed upon them since entering upon the business of the late Hugh Scobie, 
has encouraged them to spare no expense in perfecting their working plant, and in adopting every im 
provement to facilitate the execution of orders entrusted to them ; and they are determined by the 
employment of first-rate workmen, by attention, punctuality and economy, to merit a continuance and 
increase of the same favors. 



*#* Th e Publishers of the Canadian Almanac regret that hi consequence of the pressure of Advertise 
ments, they have been obliged to refuse several applications for space, also to leave out a list of their 
own publications, which they had prepared. 

G [185] 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



[1856. 



THE ORIGINAL AND 




ONLY GENUINE 



SIR ASTLEY COOPER S 

MILD APERIENT ANTI-BILIOUS PILLS 

TOR THE CURB OF 

Bilious Disorders, Liver Complaint, Indigestion or Dyspepsia, Habitual Costiveness, 

Sick: Headache, Giddiness, Heartburn, Flatulency, Loss of Appetite, Irritability, 

Nervousness, Languor, LetHargy, Low Spirits, General Debility. 

THE distinguished patronage with which^these sterling Pills have long been honored, the beneficial effects whirh 
have constantly resulted from their use, the purity of the ingredients which enter into their composition their 
careful and peculiar mode of preparation, and the great and increasing demand for them from everv a 
globe, prove at once their superiority over all similar preparations in Europe or America. Prepared from the oricinnl 
recipe of the distinguished Physician and Surgeon, the late SIR ASTLEY COOPER. 

IMPORTANT CAUTION. 

In consequence of the great demand for these most excellent Pills, they have been extensively counterfeited bv 
several unprincipled persons both in Canada and the United States, and in order to secure the public for the future 
from all danger or risk of counterfeits, the proprietors have caused to be engraved, at great expense, a hforhlv-finished 
label, which is placed on the outside of the wrapper, and also on the top of each box, and ou which is engraved the 
likeness of the late Sir Astley Cooper, from the celebrated painting by Lawrence, with the words, " SIR \STJ BY COOPFK X 
APERIENT ANTI-BILIOUS PILLS." 

And in order to afford the public a still further protection, the proprietors have placed the fac-similie of their 
signature on the outside wrapper, and also on the directions which accompany each b?x; without these mirks of 
authenticity, they are spurious and an imposition. MACPHAIL & Co., Sole Proprietors, 

London and New Yoi k . 

Sold at 25 cents, 50 cents, and SI 00 per Box, with full directions for use, by A. B. & D. Sand* 100 Fulton ffi-opl 
N. Y.; Schiffelin, Brothers, & Co., 170 William Street; Boyd & Paul, 149 Chambers Street; C. V. Clickener & Co s] 
Barclay Street; Olcott, McKesson & Robbins, 127 Maideu Lane; Rushton, Clark & Co., 165 Broadway; C. H 
Broadway, and by all respectable Drugsists and Dealers in Medicine throughout the civilized world - and 
and retail at the depots, 150 Oxford Street, London, and 141 William Street, New York. 

~~* For Sale by all respectable Druggists and Dealers in Medicine in Upper and Lower Canada. 




VIS 




STILL TRIUMPHANT. 

And after a thorough trial, by innumerable living witnesses, has proved itself 

THE MEDICINE OF THE AGE. 

A LTHOUGH there have been many Medicinal Preparations brought before the public since the first introduction of 
XX PERRY DAVIS VEGETABLE PAIN KILLER, and large amounts expended in their introduction, the Pain Killer 
has continued to steadily advance in the estimation of the world, as the best Family Medicine ever introduced. 
As an Internal and External Remedy it is truly a source of 

JOY TO THE WORLD!! 

One positive proof of its efficacy is, that the sales have constantly increased, and wholly upon its own merits, as 
the Proprietors have not resorted to Advertising to gain for it the rank it now holds among the great number of 
preparations of the present time. The effect of the Pain Killer upon the patient, when taken internally in cases of 
Cold. Cough, Bowel Complaints, Cholera, Dysenterry, and other affections of the system, has been truly wonderful. 
and has won for it a name among medical preparations that can never be forgotten. Its success in removing Pain, ;IK 
an external remedy, in cases of Burns, Bruises, Sores, Sprains, Cuts, Sting of Insects and other causes of suffering, 
has secured for it such a host of testimony, as an almost infallible remedy, that it will be handed down to posterity 
as one of the greatest medical discoveries of the nineteenth century. The magical effects of the Pain Killer, when 
taken or used according to directions, are certain. You have only to be sure that you buy the genuine article and 
adhere to the directions in its use, and you will admit its wonderful medicinal properties. 

The genuine Perry Davis Pain Killer is now put up in panel bottles, with the words, "Davis" Vegetable Pain 
Killer " blown in the glass, and with two Steel Engraved Labels on each bottle one an excellent likeness of Perry 
Davis, the Original Inventor of the Medicine, the other a steel engraved not* of hand none others can be relied upon 
as genuine. 

Price of Bottles 12% cents, 25 cents, 50 cents, and $1, respectively. 

Perry Davis & Son, Proprietors, 

No. 7, High Street, Providence. R. I. 
[186] 



1856.] 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



99 



THOMPSON & CO., 

BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS AND PRINTERS, 
52, KING STREET EAST, TORONTO, 

PUBLISHERS OP THE * 

"DAILY COLONIST/ "BRITISH COLONIST" &"NEWS OP THE WEEK," 

/"I RATEFCIi for the encouragement and support hitherto bestowed on them, would respectfully solicit a continuance 
VJ" of public favour. Their Stock has been carefully selected with a view to meet the wants of their friends, and 
no effort will be spared to afford them satisfaction. 

BLANK BOOKS MADE TO ORDER. 

BOOK & JOB PRINTING NEATLY EXECUTED. 

"THE DAILY COLONIST" 

Is printed and published every morning (Sundays excepted) by THOMPSON & CO., King Street, Toronto. 
Price One Pound Ten Shillings per Annum, or 1 5s. paid at the Office in advance. 



< t 



THE BRITISH COLONIST ; 



Is printed and published every Tuesday and Friday Morning, by THOMPSON & CO., King Street, Toronto. 
Price One Pound per Annum, or fifteen Shillings, paid at the Office lu advance; 

"THE NEWS OF THE WEEK" 

OR 

WEEKLY COLONIST," 

Is printed and Published every Saturday morning, by THOMPSON & CO., King Street, Toronto. 
Price Two Dollars per Annum, or Seven Shillings and Sixpence, paid in advance. 

THOMPSON { CO. have recently issued the follmving Publicatiom : 

MUNICIPAL MANUAL for Upper Canada, 8vo., 10s. MUNICIPAL OFFICERS READY RECKONER, 12mo., 5s 
DIVISION COURT ACTS, Svo. sewed, Is. 10%d. CANADIAN TARIFF, 12mo., 7%d 

JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURE, Monthly, 5s. per Annum. 
In the Press: THE EDUCATIONAL MANUAL FOR UPPER CANADA. 

%3~ Municipal, Magisterial, Legal, and other Blanks always on hand. ~ft 

Nov. 1855. 52, King Street East, Toronto. 






>a 



BILLS OP EXCHANGE, Drafts on New York, American Bank Notes, and 
Uncurrent Money bought and sold. 

Collections made in the Cities and Towns of the United States. 

Toronto Street, next to the Post Office, \ E. F. WHITTEMORE & CO. 

Toronto, November 1, 1855. j 

MARINE FlicE AND LilFE INSURANCE. 

The Subscribers are Agents for the following highly respectable Companies : 
^Etna Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. one of the oldest established Agencies in Canada. 
Home Insurance Company of New York. 

Risks taken at fair Rates, and Losses adjusted fairly and honourably. 

E. F. WHITTEMORE & CO. 







if HE TORONTO HOUSE 




THE TORONTO HOUSE, 

NO. 6O, KING STREET EAST, 

TORONTO. 

TTCHARLESWORTH, 

C^ [Would respectfully call the attention of the Public generally to his large Stock of 



# 



; 



u.-*t^z-?--; 



J.CHARLESWORTH. 




STAPLE AND FANCY 



All of which are offered at the lowest remunerating Prices, and no second price. 
An inspection of Stock is solicited. 

Remember John Charlesworth, and observe the Wood-cut 

[187] 



100 ADVERTISEMENTS. [1856. 

NEW PRINCIPLE! NEW REMEDY!! NO POISON!!! 
RHODES S EE VEH & A,GRJE CURE ; 



OR ANTIDOTE TO MALARIA ; 

/ </; the Prevention and Cure of Fever and Ayuc, or Chill Fever ; Dumb Ague, and other Intermittent 

and Remittent Fevers ; also of Bilious Fever, accompanied by Typhoid Symptoms ; Ty/>/!< 

Fever, Yellow Fever, Ship and Jail Fever, General Debility, Night Sweats, an<l 

all other forms of Disease which have a common origin in 

MALARIA OR MIASMA. 

fJMIE diseasas are common to many localities of the United States; but -wherever they prevail, North, South, East 
JL or West, they all equally spring from tho same miasmal cause. The great variety of symptoms and forms of dis 
ease is owing principally to difference in age, sex, constitution and habits of the sufferers; but as the cause is the 
same, they will all equally yield to a remedy that is competent to overcome or remove that cause. 

By the laws of Nature, every principle has its opposite, and for every disease, or cause or disease, there is a re-agent, 
<>r in other words a specific remedy. All Malaria, whether arising from Marshes, Stagnant Water, decomposition o: 
animal and vegetable matter, or even newly cleared lands, is the same in character and effect; is a poison floating in 
(he atmosphere, causing disease to all who breathe it. In accordance with those unalterable laws governing tl.i- 
unerring affinity subsisting between, opposites, there is in the preparation before us, offered to tho public, 

THE NATURAL ANTIDOTE TO MALARIA. 

which neutralizes the poison wherever it comes in contact with it, even in the open air, and when taken internally 
completely purifies the system affected by it of its baneful influence, and thus restores and preserves health. 

The remedy is believed to be entirely new, and unknown to any but the proprietor, who distinctly claims the fol 
lowing extraordinary results from its use : 

ft will instantly check the ague in persons who have suffered for any length of time; from on? <iay in twenty yearn, 
and by continuing its use, according to the directions, a radical cure will be effected; the patient continuing free" from 
the complaint for years. 

In its operation upon the poison in the system, it will immediately relieve all the distressing symptoms of biliouH or 
ague diseases, and when the disease is cured, it will entirely prevent the accession of 

GENERAL DEBILITY AND NIGHT SWEATS, 

which so often follow the administration of other medicines. The patient at once begins to recover appetite and strength, 
and continues to improve until restored to perfect health. 

Ky its use Fever and Ague may be banished from every family and class in the community ; farmers, mechanics, and 
al! labouring people may be using this article as a 

PREVENTIVE, 

and pursue their respective avocations in perfect safety from ague or bilious attacks during the sickly season, which Is 
often to them the most valuable part of the year. 

Since the introduction of the CURE in every part of the United States, its success has been so complete and unvary 
ing as to have fully proved these assertions in favor of its extraordinary merit. 

When these declarations were made, at the date of its introduction, they seemed incredible to many, even of the 
most candid minds, because all the resources of science had been taxed in vain to subdue Ague or Bilious diseases; 
and what was still worse for Ague sufferers, all their remedies or treatment, whether scientific or empirical, have been 
limited to the use of poisonous and destructive drugs, such as Arsenic, Quinine, Mercury, Salicine, &c. The effects of 
these are sometimes worse than the disease they subdue, and when such remedies fail, or give only temporary relief, 
their poisonous effects are superadded to the poor sufferer s first complaint. 

On this account Ague sufferers should be particularly careful about using any secret Fever and Ague remedies, not 
withstanding the makers of them uniformly assert they may be taken with perfect safety, even when it is notoriously 
well known that their potency depends solely upon destructive poisons. 

Now, as a proof that the Remedy is not only valuable on account of its power to cure disease, but that it is also 
WORTHY OF PUBLIC CONFIDENCE BECAUSE OF ITS SINGULAR AND ENTIRE HARMLESSNESS. 
The following certificate from one of the most celebrated chemists in the United States, has been obtained, and a copy 
of it is attached to every bottle : 

" NEW YORK, Monday June 11, 1855. 

1 have made a chemical examination of Rhode s Fever and Ague Cure, or Antidote to Malaria, and have tested it 
for Arsenic, Mercury, Quinine and Strychnine, but have not found a particle of either in it, nor have I found ;uu 
unbalance in its composition that would prove injurious to the constitution. 

" JAMES R. CHILTON, M.D., Chemist." 

It is a stubborn fact, therefore, that this Remedy is destined not only to relieve the human family from malarious 
diseases, but to do an equally good work by preventing the taking of other medicines which do harm. 

The entire absence of auy baneful ingredient makes this Remedy not more valuable as a Cure than it is a preventive. 

No class of disease is so easily managed as the one under consideration, if the medicine be taken in advance. Thin 
is owing to the diseases being produced by one and the same cause, and therefore all, both residents and travellers, 
hliould protect themselves by the timely use of this preventive, and not wait for the poison already lurking in their 
v.-ins to develop itself in a violent attack. Take the Cure as a preventive, and so destroy the poison before it does harm. 

UI KT. Directions for Diet are highly important, and must be closely observed. The Diet should be simple, plainly 
prepared, and in other respects such as tho patieut has found to agree best with him. If, however, he is naturally 
bilious, much meat while in a hot climate, will be found to be decidedly injurious, and a vegetable and highly nutri 
tious diet far preferable. Those differently constituted may use a more generous diet. Meat, when eaten, should be 
t.-ncli-r, juicy, and not overdone. The food should be thoroughly masticated, and regular hours for meals observed. 
Since costiveness or unhealthy looseness of the bowels is very pernicious during the sickly seasons the state of the 
lx>wels should be closely watched, and, if possible, regulated by diet. The patient can in most cases easily accomplish 
this most desirable end, by refraining from things which constipate, and taking such diet as loosens the bowels if 
costive, and so on the contrary if too loose, avoid everything of a relaxing nature. 

Among other articles of diet, the following possess constipating qualities : common fine wheat bread, more especially 
that made by "the baker," because it too often contains alum in its composition; boiled milk; cheese; pepper in any 
form; salted and smoked meats and fish, and refined sugars; but coars whoat bread of domestic make, corn bread, 
i-orn and rye bread, fresh butter, raw milk, rarely cooked fresh meats, especially venison and pork, raw sugars and 
molasses ara laxative. 

HABITS OF LIFE. Avoid outdoor air from the time of sunset until an hour or two after sunrise, for the malaria 
or inlasma of infected districts is most abundant and active during the night ; a bright sun soon causes it to disappear. 
Vlso avoid exposure to damp, chilly winds, over exertion, irregularity of habits, anxwty of mind, or other like predispou- 
ing causes. Sleeping apartments located in the upper stories are much more healthy than those of the first or lower 
one, because the poisonous air is the heaviest. The system should have all necessary reppsu. 

[188] 



1856.] ADVERTISEMENTS. 101 

Some constitutions are able to resist all influences for months or years, while others are prostrited by an ague attack 
after only a few days exposure. And it generally happens that those cases most speedily produced are the most 
npeedily cured, while those whose constitutions have been gradually undermined by the subtle poison lurking in the 
system for a length of time, require a greater period in which to regain their health. 

In most instances there are several days warning given by premonitory symptoms before the disease breaks out. B 
sure to heed these, and by commencing the use of this medicine according to directions, you are assured of arresting it 
in advance, and of being entirely free, f mm, any Ague attack during the whole season. Just compare the trifling cost of 
this article with the immense loss of time consumed by sickness, and observe what an argument the great difference is 
in favour of using this certain preventive. 

The following directions for using this medicine must be strictly observed : 

If the patient is suffering from any form of Intermittent Fever or Ague, it should be taken three times a day, half 
an hour before each meal, and so continued until the patient feels that a permanent and radical cure is effected. 
Merely "breaking the chill" is not curing the disease; it is only the commencement. If the patient has been diseased 
a long time, or for a long time exposed to Malaria, the greater the period required for an effectual cure. Such may 
require several bottles of this remedy. One or two bottles will suffice for ordinary cases ; one bottle will occasional^ 7 
answer, but cannot be always relied upon for a permanent cure. It will also be prudent to take it once or twice a day, 
according to the unhealthiness of th* locality, until a heavy frost appears, if in a cold or temperate climate; if where 
frosts do not occur, then it should be taken till some little time after every vestige of the complaint has disappeared. 

It will generally be found necessary to precede this medicine by a mild cathartic or antibilious purgative. The very 
best thing for general use is a moderate dose of Castor Oil, the object of which is to cleanse the stomach and free the 
biliary passages. REMEMBER that where this is necessary, or there is costiveness it JirsT BE TAKEN or the operation of 
the antidote will be seriously obstructed. 

THE DOSE. The bottle must first be shaken until all the ingredients are thoroughly mixed. The quantity for an 
adult is a table spoonful. It will be best, however, for ladies or feeble patients to commence with two-thirds the 
quantity. Any sensation of nausea, or unpleasant feeling at the stomach, is a signal for the dose to be lessened. Most 
people could take three times the amount without any uncomfortable feelings. 

For children above six years of age, about one-half of a table spoonful; and from three to six years, one-third of a 
table spoonful. From one to three years, thirty drops ; and under one year, ten to fifteen drops taken clear or in a 
little water. Much larger quantities, however, than are necessary to expel disease, may be taken, without any injury. 

ONLY CAUTION. In certain specified cases, poxir the contents of one or more bottles of the Cure into shallow 
vessels, (dining plates.) and place them in sleeping-rooms; for the vapour rising from the medicine, and also the air 
wafted across, or circulated over the dregs of it, after the liquid is evaporated, will counteract and destroy, to a degree 
commensurate with its exposure, the miasmata or poison contained in the apartment. This mode of exhibiting the 
Cure should likewise be resorted to when very young infants are exposed to malarious situations, 

The bottles in which the medicine is put up have the words "RHODES S FEVER AND AGUE CURE" blown in the glass, 
and on the outside wrapper is the name of the medicine, (the copyright of which is secured.) and the signature of the 
proprietor. These precautions are adopted to prevent counterfeits and imitations. 

The reliance for its success is entirely upon ita axtv.il merits wherever introduced and \ised. These will be considered 
sufficient. 

Prepared and sold by the proprietor. JAMES A. RHODES, Providence, R. I. 



Extract of a Letter from Professor Fletcher, who was cured while engaged at Brown University, 

Prov., R. I. 

INDIANAPOLIS, Lm, March 1, 1855. 

JAMES A. RHODES, Esq. Dear Sir : Yours of loth ult., has been received, and I am glad to hear that a medicine so 
efficacious is to be introduced into this AGUISII country. I have the greatest confidence in its success, and can reassure 
you of its happy effect upon me in entirely breaking up the chills and leaving me strong and healthy. 

1 like the statement on your wrappers that you will let the medicine stand on its own merits, and standing thus, I 
am most sanguine of its success. 

I expect to travel over a large portion of our State this Spring, and I shall have abundant opportunity to recommend 
it verbally. Wherever I go I shall take great pleasure in thus testifying to its merits; and if you will instruct your 
agent to let me have a few bottles, I will carry them with me to distribute for your benefit. 

In haste, I remain, truly yours, 

MILES J. FLETCHER. 
HAD THE AGUE FOR TWELVE YEARS ! ! ! 

PROVIDENCE, June 29, 18f>5. 

Having been informed of the illness of a poor but worthy woman, who has not been free from Fever and Ague a 
month at a time, for the last twelve years, I supplied her gratuitously with Rhodes s Fever and Ague Cure. She took 
in all four bottles, which completely restored her to health and strength, and as tour months have now elapsed, there 
is no reason to doubt the permanency of the cure. I am also aware of many other cases in which it has been used, and 
have never known it to fail. C. A. P. MASON, Apothecary. 

LETTER FROM A POSTMASTER. 

MAXWELL, Delaware County, Ohio, Angust 19, 1855. 

MR. J. A. RHODES. Dear Sir, Your medicina has met with the, most favorable success in this neighbourhood. I 
have about live bottles left. \ gave it to them at lirst. " if no cure no pay, although I was not authorized by you to 
<lo so ; but I took the responsibility on myself. I5ut not a bottle has come back, and as I am almost out of the article. 
! wish you would forward me one gross of the bottles, if you see proper to do so. ami I will be punctual in payment. 1 
enclose fifteen dollars on the medicine I have received, for which please send me a receipt. Ship tne Cure to me as soon 
UK vou din ; there never has been as much Chills and Fever, since I lived in the .State, (is at present. 

Yours, ic., KSCHAUD MARTIN. It.st master. 

FEVKR AND AGUE MEDICI NK. 

In another col umn of to-day s paper will be found an advertisement for "RHODES FK\~EJ! and Afil K < ( ]{ K. 
We are not iu the habit of puffing medicines, but desire to say, for the benefit of the afllirtfd. that Wm. \. Rowe, 
Merchant, Sharpsburgh, who has it for sale, informs ns that he has sold several dozen bottles, and in every rase it lias 
effected a cure. This proves the medicine to be good, and we tal;e pleasure in bringinc it before the notice of the 
public. Odtf Fellow, Bovnsborif, Ma., Kept. 4. 

At this season, when there is so much danger to be apprehended from the malaria jn thy atmosphere, we are con 
stantly breathing, no person phould be without the great preventive and sure cure for Fever and Ague, and all biliow.-; 
complaints. 

This is RHODES FEVHH and AfrfJE Cl EE. n With a bottle of it in bis possession, any one is safe, though ho 
may be in the most sickly locality. And at the same time, he may feel assured he is taking no remedy worse than the 
disease. Tho certificate of its entire innocence, of tha celebrated Dr. Chilton, is attached to each bottle. 

J. D. VerHngton, Wholesale Agent, GO, Clark Street, and for sale by 13ay and Baldwin, V. Scammou ,t Co., aud dm/ 
gists everywhere. Chicago Pat/finder. 

AGENTS. Montreal S. J. LYMAN & Co., nud JOHN GARDNER. Quebec G. U. AKDOUIN. Hamilton T 
BICKLB & SON. Pictou A. ELLIOTT, and J. D. B. FRAZEK, and by Dealers generally. 



102 ADVERTISEMENTS. [1856. 

CANADA LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY, 

HEAD OFFICE, HAMILTON, C. W. 

AGENCY, KING STREFT, TORONTO; 

WITH AGENCIES THROUGHOUT CANADA, AT ST. JOHN S, N. B., 
AND ST. JOHN S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 

Capital 250,000 

Accumulated Fund 65,000 

Annual Income 22,500 

TITANAGEMENT local and economical; Premiums lower than those of the majority of offices, yet safer, because 
*" carrying a larger margin for contingencies ; Funds invested in the Province at high rates of interest. 

The growth of business has been steady and continuous. The increase of the accumulated assurance fund a good 
criterion of prosperity in life assurance has been, and is, in a ratio fully equal to the advance of income and liabilities. 
A comparison of the proportion of this fund to the duration of the institution and the extent of its assurances, with 
the proportion exhibited by other and older offices doing business in the Province, will result largely to the credit of 
the Canada Company. 

At the date of the last-published balance-sheet, the total liabilities were 172,186, and the total assets 244.029, 
Knowing a balance in the Company s favor of 71,843. The last year s dividend of profit awarded to assured in the 
Mutual Branch, of seven years standing, was equivalent to fifteen per cent, upon the gross premiums received in the 
twelve months. 

Assurances are granted of ordinary or special kinds : for life, with or without Profit, Endowments, Half-Credit, on 
Joint Lives and Survivorship. Annuities, immediate and deferred. Assurance and Annuity combined on a new and 
r imple plan. 

Money received at interest or for accumulation at higher rates than are allowed by banks or savings banks, and on 
terms of withdrawal not less advantageous. 

Detailed information and all requisite papers may be obtained on application to THOS. M. SIMONS, Secretary, 
Hamilton, or to any of the Company s agents. 



I> R . HOOFLANO S 

CELEBRATED GERMAN BITTERS. 

Prepared by Dr. C. M. JACKSON, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WILL effectually cure LIVER COMPLAINT, DYSPEPSIA, JAUNDICE, Chronic or 
Nervous Debility, Diseases of the Kidneys, and all diseases arising from a disordered Liver or Stomach. 

Such as Constipation, Inward Files, Fulness 
or Blood to the Head, Acidity of the Stomach, Nausea, Heart 
burn, Disgust for Food, Fulness or Weight in the Stomach, Sour Eructations, 
Sinking or Fluttering at the Pit of the Stomach, Swimming of the Head, Hurried and Difficult 
Breathing, Fluttering at the Heart, Choking or Suffocating Sensations when in a lying posture, Dimness of 
Vision, Dots of Webs before the Sight, Fever and Dull Pain in the Head, Deficiency of Perspira 
tion, Yellowness of the Skin and Eyes, Pain in the Side, Back, Chest, Limbs, &(,., 
Sudden Flushes of Heat, Burning in the Flesh, Constant Imagin 
ings of Evil, and Great Depression of Spirits. 

The proprietor, in calling the attention of the public to this preparation, does so with a feeling of the utmost con 
fidence in its virtues and adaptation to the diseases for which it is recommended. 

It is no new and untried article, but one that has stood the test of a ten years trial before the American people, 
and its reputation and sale is unrivalled by any similar preparations extant. The testimony in its favor given by tho 
most prominent and well-known physicians and individuals in all parts of the country, is immense. 

1/ie general want of success in treating diseases of the lirer and stomach, has not been a deficiency of pathological 
knowledge of their functions, but of a suitable compound that would act upon the disease and all the sympathetic af 
fections. That has been gained in these Bitters ; and they can be used by persons with the most delicate stomach with 
perfect safety as they at no time debilitate the patient, but give strength and increase the nervous energy. They 
can be taken at all times, and under all circumstances. No ordinary exposure will prevent them having a salutary 
effect, and no bad effect can result from an over dose. 

If patients will persevere in the use of this remedy, and use it strictly according to directions, it will cure the fore 
going diseases in every instance, if not beyond the power of medicine. It has caused many to enjoy the blessing of 
renewed health, and in many desperate and abandoned cases, a perfect and radical cure. 

THEY ARE ENTIRELY VEGETABLE, 

And frufrom Alcoholic Stimulant, and all injuriou. ingredients; are pleasant in taste and smell, mild in their opera" 
tlon, will expel all morbid secretions from the body, give bloom to the pallid cheek, and health and vigor to the framci 

Price 75 cents per bottle. 

Principal Office, No. 96 AECH STREET, Philadelphia. Pa. Sold by Druggists and Storekeepers in every town and 
village in the United States and Canadas. 

1190] 



1856.] ADVERTISEMENTS. 103 




SIGN OF THE ^Jfflffi 26 > KING ST EAST 

GOLDEN TORONTO, C.W. 

And Commercial Buildings, Dundas Street, London, C.W. 

THE Subscriber, as every body knows, is one of the largest, best, and most successful 
manufacturers of 
READY-MADE CLOTHING, HATS, CAPS, SHIRTS, &c. t 

In Canada West, and will supply the Trade Wholesale Cheap. 

He is now receiving au immense assortment of British and Foreign DRY GOODS, Staple and 
Fancy, purchased by himself in the best markets, which will be sold cheap to the Trade. 

Terms liberal. Call and examine before purchasing. ROBERT WALKER, 



LYMA.N, BROTHERS & Co., 

KING STREET, TORONTO, 

"WHOLESA.LE DRUGGISTS 

IMPORTERS OF 

Drugs, Chemicals, Medicines, Perfumery, &c., 

T7"EEP constantly on hand a large Stock of Goods in their line of business for the supply ot 
Druggists, Doctors, Merchants, and Pedlars. They deal largely in all kinds of 



OILS, PAINTS, BRUSHES, SEEDS, &c., &c., 

Which they offer on the most liberal terms for Cash, or approved paper. 



GEORGE HARCOURT S 




3NTo. ll, Tailing; Street, 

OPPOSITE NORDHEIMER S MUSIC STORE, 

TORONTO. 



GH. keeps constantly on hand a large Stock of READY-MADE CLOTHING, 
, of the best material and workmanship, and of the latest fashion ; also, a 

superior Selection of 

BROAD CLOTHS, CASSIMERES, DOESKINS, 

TWEEDS, VESTINGS, &c., &c. 

S^ Gentlemen leaving their Measure may depend upon having a Good Garment, 

Well made and Cheap. 
[191] 






A 
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C 

T 
I 

O 
N. 
F 




O 



W. R. BROWN, 

WOODEN WARE AND HOUSE FURNISHINGS. 

""" """ANGUS " 5 ALLAS^ 



DOOR MATS, 
FLOOR, MATTING, 



No. 20, KING STREET WEST, TORONTO. 
BASKETS, 

UltUSIU S, K1500MS, 
1,8, Tl. ?;S,SJi-:VKi?, 

MEASURES; m BIL WOOLMOI S, 

T1J5, i .ATHS. iS? HOI KS A\0 TWIXK. 

JAi ANXK!) WARE, CHAMOIS SKINS, ( OM . S A"-:i> TOYS. 




PR I NTERS 



LITHOGRAPHERS 



MA CLEAR 
&. Co. 



BOOKSELLERS 



S TAT1ONERS 



;EN GRAVERS ^ 16 KING S T A S T PUB LIS H E R S 



BOOKBINDERS TOR ON T . 



8cC. 8cC. 



^ 
eagjo -z 



IN UUA.B.T BOTTLES, 

^ 01 iiddv ^irtfi/ui j 11 ic lilmd, and fur the Curt of Scrofula, JKlifitmatifm, Stubborn Ulcers, . 

|T* Kilt -ft" m, Pixer Sores, Erysipelas, Pimples, Biles, Mercurial Diseases, Cutaneous JKrup- 
AoAi, ** .-er Complaint, Bronchitis, Consumption, female Complaintt, Logs of Appetite, 
. .ti&aerc. Debility, <fr. 

This " f ic preparation combines, in a highly concentrated form, all the medicinal virtues 
of Sar compounded with other rare vegetable extracts, potent hi the ctfrd of disease, 

and ; ii <51e of injui iously affecting the most delicate constitution. It acta simu tane- 
oush ..po^ 0l -6 stomach, bowels^ kidneys, liver and the circulation. It ifeterrnines and rarries 
off tj,tv irpductsfof unhealthy sfretionE, and gently stimulates, while it Disinfects and expels 
fr.>* i the st<im:icli and bower ^11 that 1s irritating, until thej are oleanc- J, and restored to a 
gourjd and healthy condition. 

Another Cufc or Scrofula. 

Troy, N. Y., September 1st, 1854. 

Messrs. A. B. i D. SANDS : Gentlemen, I have for nearly three years been troubled with that 
dreadful disease, Scrofula; so much so, as to be offensive to my husband and to myself; and to 
obtain relief have tried every kind of medicine that came under my notice^ without effect. One 
of my neighbours who had been cured of a similar complaint by your Sarsaparilla, advised me 
to make a trial of it. and I can truly say that it has done mo a world of good, having completely 
cured me. Hoping that my evidence may induce others similarly afflicted to adopt the same 
remedy, with the same satisfiictory results, 

I remain, gratefully yours, SAUAH A. J. P01ILMAN. 

Prepared and sold, wholesale and retail, by A. B. & D. SANDS, Druggists and Chemists, 100 
Fulton Street, corner of "William, New York. Sold by druggists generally throughout the 
United States and Canadas. Price $1 per bottle ; six bottles for $5. 

For sale by J Musson & Co., and J. Bowles, Quebec ; W. Lymau & Co., Montreal ; S. If. 
Urquhart, Toronto ; T.- Bickle & Son, Hamilton ; G. Baker <t Co., Kingston ; B. A. Mitchell, 
London; O.C. Mills & Co., Brentford; Canada; Morton & Co., Halifax, N. S.: and T. "Walker & 
Son, St. John, N. B. 



TORONTO. 



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PRINTED Al IHE STEAM PRESS EBTABLISHMBHT Ot MACLEAB, THOMAS t COMPANY, TOBOKTO. 







TENTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. 



THE 



CANADIAN ALMANAC, 



In 

AND 



of Useful 
f//y 

FOR THE YEAR . 

*fl A C. *$ 

JL o 

BEING THE FIRST AFTER LEAP YEAR, 

CONTAINING FULL AND AUTHENTIC COMMERCIAL, STATISTICAL, ASTRONOMICAL 
DEPARTMENTAL, ECCLESIASTICAL, EDUCATIONAL, FINANCIAL, AND 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 



THE ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS HAVE BEEN MADE EXPRESSLY FOll THIS 
PUBLICATION, AT THE PROVINCIAL OBSERVATORY IN TORONTO. 



TORONTO: 

* 

MACLEAR AND CO., 16, KING STREET EASTt 

SOLD BY BOOKSELLERS AND STOREKEEPERS GENERALLY THROUGHOUT 
THE BRITISH AMERICAN PROVINCES. 



THE CANADIAN ALMANAC, 

FOR THE YEAR 1857. 



CHRONOLOGICAE CYCLES. 



Golden Number 
Epact 



Solar Cycli- ......................................................... 



Dominical Letter 

Roman Indie tion 

Julian Period 



The year ~ml8 of the Jewish Era com. Sept. 19th ., 
The year l J74 of theMahom. Era com. Aug. 22nd. 



EPOCHS. 

1857 
1857 



The 21st of Queen Victoria s Reign beg June 20th... 185T 
The 82nd of the Indep. of the U. S. begins July 4th... 1S57 



FIXED AND HOVEABLE FESTIVALS AND ANNIVERSARIES. 



Ash Wednesday reb v 25 

St. David ?i arch ,i 

St. Patrick Mar - J, 

Lady Day M^- 25 

EASTER SUNDAY A P n 

St. George A P nl 

Holy Thursday Ma y n 



Birth of Queen Victoria May i 

Accession of Queen Victoria June 20 

Midsummer Day June 24 

Birth of Prince Albert Aug. 26 

Michaelmas Day Sept. 29 

Birth of Prince of Wales Nov. 

St. Andrews Nov. 30 



Explanation of the Articles in tlie Calendar. 

These pages are calculated for Toronto and Quebec, and for ordinary purposes will serve with sufficient accuracy for 
every city ia Canada. 

MOON S PIIWSS This Table gives the times for the two meridians when the moon passes the geocentric longitude? 
of 0, 90, 180 and 270 east of the sun. It gives also the times of her greatest and least distance 

TWILIGHT. In this table are given the times at which twilight begins in the morning and end.-, in the evening, i. e.. 
the times when the sun s centre is 18 below the horizon. 

GREATEST ELONGATION OF THE POLE STAR.-This column gives the greatest azimuth of the Pole Star east or west from 
the meridian as observed at a place in latitude 45. When the greatest elongation rorrespondmg to any other latitude 
is required, the number given in the column should be corrected by means of the following table. a 








o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 




Degrees of Latitude 


42 


43 


44 


45 


46 


47 


48 


49 


50 


1st Correction for degrees 


5 58 


4 5 


2 5 





4-2 12 


4-4 32 


4-6 59 

f f 


+9 34 


4-12 18 


2nd Correction for each 


// 


ft 





*: 












minute of latitude 


4- 1.9 


4- 2.0 


4- 2.1 


4- 2.2 


4- 2.3 


4- 2.5 


4- 2.6 


4- 2.7| 



The 1st correction for tue degrees of latitude is to be subtracted from the greatest elongation given in the calendar. 
or added to it according as the degrees of latitude are less or greater than 40. 

The 2nd correction, which is always addative, is found by multiplying the number given in the third line of the 
table by the number of minutes in the latitude. 



Thus for latitude 4320 / ...lst correction= 4 5" 
" " 4740 / ... " " 4- 4 / 32 // 

" 4510 / ... " " 4- 0" 



2nd cor. + 2.0X20=4-40" 

4- 2.5X40= I 40 " 
" 4- 2.2X10= 22" 



THE Pi ANETS The times of rising and setting of the five chief planets are calculated for Toronto, and are corrected 
for refraction. The times of culmination, although computed for the meridian of Toronto, will serve approximately for 
the whole of Canada. Tae meridian zenith distances, being designed merely to aid in finding the planets, have I 
Iven only to the nearest tenth of a degree, as seen from the latitude of Toronto. 

When the planetary day is shorter than the mean solar day, and commences soon after the midnight of the 
preceding day P t he planet will sometimes arrive a second time on the meridian before the expiration .of tli MtUttfl 
day. From analogous causes a planet will sometimes rise twice or set twice m the s ime civil day. V, hen two culmina- 
ions occur in the same day, or two risings or settings, the times of both are registered. 

The times of the SUN S KISINO AND SETTING are given for the upper limb, and are corrected for refraction both tor 
Toronto and Quebec. 

The MOON S RISING is given from full to change, and her setting from chance to full. 

The MOON S MERIDIAN ZENITH DISTANCES are given to the nearest tenth of a degree for Toronto. They are not 
corrected for parallax .>r refraction. 

The column SUN ON MERIDIAN gives the time that a watch should shew when the shadow of a sun dial is on thp 
noon mark. 

DECLINATION OP THE SUN AT APPARENT NOON. This column gives the sun s declination at the instant he passes tb# 
meridUn df Toronto. 

MOON S AGE. -This column shews to the nearest tenth of a day the Moon s age at Toronto Noon. 
The column, MOON ON THE MERIDIAN, gives the mean time at which the moon s centre passes the meridian of Toronto. 
The column. UPPER TRANSIT OF POLE STAR shews for every day the mean time at which the Polo Star makes its upper 
transit across the meridian of Toronto. It passes in the morning from April 9th to October 8th, and m the evening for 
. the rest of the year. 

[194] 










Cloche Mountain* 

2 00 Get above tf* Sea 




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ttrfffi^ff r 

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B^5^^^T 3Pu)i O 

I lmrunyij---^---^^ \i \ 

i I ^?<^t5^V i K 1 - V-^ 
.iil&P^Y * flW ^ 

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ofQ- ^\^-<^ vfr> . . > v 



^^V^^^>\ T JM/ P -^Win^ 



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ur XVv^l 

.ffe^ 




jl^riiV f ^.^---- 

0v ***,Se<v - -jdoMhom* < k<1 

~" 




Boundaries 

J>o. of Townships 




.Railroads 

Canals. 

Pltuikand Gravelled Roads 

Offurlloadt^ 
Proposed/ 



Scale of Mttes 

so ao *p 



Published by Ma clear \" ( " 

XOKOSTXO, 



1857.] 



THE CANADIAN ALMANAC. 



3 



The five last columns, although computed for Toronto, will serve with sufficient accuracy for the whole of Canada. 

The time at which the lower transit of the Pole Star occurs may be found by adding 11 h. 58 m. 2 s. to the time of it* 
preceding upper transit. 

From the time of the upper transit of the pole star may be found the time of Us greatest western or eastern elonga 
tion, by adding or substracting the constants given in the annexed Table. 





o 
42 


o 
43 


o 
44 


O 

45 


o 
46 


o 
47 


o 
48 


o 
49 


o 
50 


rvmsfant 


h m s 
5 53 49 


h 111 E 
5 53 38 


h m s 

5 53 26 


h m s 
5 63 14 


h m s 
5 53 2 


h m s 

5 52 49 


h m s 

5 52 36 


h m B 

5 52 22 


h m t 
5 52 8 



From the times of the upper transit of the Pole Star may be derived, with the aid of the following table, the times of 
<-nlmination, and of the rising and setting of the principal fixed stars that appear above the horizon of Toronto. 

Star Table* 

To ascertain when any star found in the following table will be on the meridian, add the number in the left-hand 
"umn of figures to the preceding meridian transit of the pole star given in the calendar. To find the time of rising 

a star, subtract the number opposite to it in the right-hand column of figures from the time of its meridian passage, 
lor the setting of a Star, add the same number to the time of its meridian passage. Those stars marked ( ) revolve 

a circle of perpetual apparition, and do not rise or set at Toronto, or at places to the north of Toronto. 



NAME OF STAR. 



On 

Meridi n 



Rises 
and Sets 



I h m 

Andromedae 22 50 

Pegasi (Algenib) ............... 2o 55 

Cassiopese 23 21 

Ceti 23 25 

Ursa Minoris (Polaris) 

Arietis 40 



Arietis. 



Persei 

Tauri 

Aurigse (Capella) 



52 

1 47 

2 7 

3 20 
3 58 



Tauri , 
Orionis 

Orionis 4 

Columbae 4 

Orionis I 4 




9 

17 
21 
27 
40 



Canis Majoris (Sirius) 

Canis Majoris 

Geminor (Castor) 

Canis Minoris (Procyon) 

Geminor (Pollux) , 

Hydrae 

Leonis (Regulus) I 8 52 



5 31 

5 45 

6 17 
6 24 
6 28 
8 12 



h m 
8 3 

6 56 

4"4s 

7 21 

7 33 
6 12 

7* "S 

11 15 
5 27 

8 4 
5 57 

5 54 

3 18 

6 26 

4 53 
3 53 
8 27 
6 20 
8 3 

5 28 

6 49 



NAME or STAB, 



On 

Meridi n 



y Leonis 

a Ursae Majoris 

/3 Leonis 

j3 Corvi 

a Virginis (Spica) 

r) Urse Majoris 

a Bootis (Arcturus) 

j3 Ursse Minoris 

/3 Librse 

a Coronas Borealis 

a Serpentis 

/3 Scorpii 

o Scorpii (Antares) 

a Herculis 

j3 Draconis 

y Draconis 

a Lyrae (Vega) 

a Aquilae (Altair) 

a Cygni 

a Cephei 

B Aquarii 

a Aquarii 

a Pis. Aus. (Fomalhaut) 
a Pegasi (Markab) 



Rises 
ind Sets 



h m 
9 3 
9 46 

10 33 

11 18 

12 9 

12 33 

13 

13 42 

14 
14 19 
14 28 

14 48 

15 11 

15 58 

16 17 
43 

17 22 

18 27 
18 34 
20 5 
20 14 

20 48 

21 39 
21 47 



h m 

1 22 



26 
19 



7 20 



25 
67 
24 
40 
7 



6 56 



9 17 

6 32 

10 43 

5 35 

5 55 
3 43 

6 55 



TABLE, 

Shelving the Illuminated Portion of the Discs of Tenus and Mars. 

The numbers given in this table represent the width of the illuminated portion of the Disc measured along the 
diameter that divides the illuminated portion symmetrically the apparent diameters being considered as unity. 



1857. 


Venus. 


Mars. 


1857. 


Venus. 


Mars. 


January 15. 
February 14. 
March 15. 
April 15. 
May 15. 
June 15. 


-700 
-582 
-421 
-165 
-010 
263 


-956 
-972 
-984 
-994 
-999 
1 -000 


July 15. 
August 15. 
September 15. 
October 15. 
November 15. 
December 15. 


-474 
-628 
-746 
-836 
-906 
-964 


-996 
-998 
-975 
-959 
-939 
-920 



Eclipses. 

In the year 1857 there will be two eclipses, both of the sun. 

I. A total eclipse of the sun, on March 25, partially visible in Canada West, a little before sunset. 

This eclipse will be first feen at sunrise, at a point about 250 miles E.N.E. from Sydney, New South Wales, and will 
be subsequently seen to commence at sunrise, at a series of points extending along the eastern coast of Australia, 
northward to New Guinea, and southward to the parallel of 68 south latitude. 

[195] 



THE CANADIAN ALMANAC. 



[1857. 



The total eclipse is first seen at sunrise, a little to the east of Adelaide in South Australia : from thence the line of 
total eclipse, crossing the equator in long. 150 W , and touching the extremity of the Californlan peninsula, extends 
to the centre of the Gulf of Mexico, which is the point whence at sunset the total eclipse is last seen. 

The eclipse Is seen to end at sunset, from a series of points extending from the south of Peru, through Mexico, across 
the Kocky Mountains, to Hudson s Bay : the place at which the eclipse is last seen, being a point about 5 west from 
the Gulf of Mexico. 

The geographical boundaries within which the eclipse is wholly or partially visible areas follows : 

On the West A line from the north of New Guinea, extending south along the western limits of South Australia to 
a point in lat. 68 nearly due South from Melbourne. 

From this point the Southern boundary stretches across the South Pacific to the coast of Peru near Lima. 

The Eastern boundary extends from this point northward through Peru, Cuba, the United States and Canada Wes< 
to Hudson s Bay. 

Finally, the Northern boundary is a line passing from Hudson s Bay through Nootka Sound across the North Pacific 
to New Guinea. 

At places on the Western boundary, the moon is seen only to touch tlie Eastern limb of the sun at sunrtee. 

On the South boundary, the moon is seen to touch the sun on the northern limb. 

At places on the North boundary, the moon is seen to touch the sun on his southern limb. 

And finally, at places on the Eastern boundary, th moon is seen to touch the western limb of the sun st sunset. 

The following table exhibits the times at which the eclipse begins at certain places in Canada. 



Cobourg. 

h m 

6 14 P. M. 



Toronto, 
h m s 
6 8 39 P. M. 



Hamilton. 

h m 

6 6 P. M. 



London. 

fc n> 

6 P. M. 



A point near Detroti. 
h m 
5 52 P. M. 



The eclipse will be invisible at Kingston and in Lower Canada. 

The exact time at which the eclipse begins at any point in Canada, may be calculated to the nearest niinute froift th* 
following elements, with the aid of a table of logarithms. 

h. h m s h s 

<! R. A. at 11 Gr. M. tfane 20 30.96 change tn 1 = 132.17 



Declin. 



921.6 



. 10 = 180.34 



h m s ha 

R. A. at Gr. M.Noon ... 17 37.22 I = 9.087 

o r IT h " 

1 54 32.9 1 = 



Q Declin.... 
S. A. of Mean 



h m 8 h 
01133.94 1 = 



= 58.87 
= 9.8565 



Semid. of 



Semid. of section of himkious cone = 1961.65 



C red. Hor. Par. Sun s Hor.Par. 
Reduction of hit. for figure of the earth 



3640.3 

/ IT 

10 48 



II. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun on Sept. 17th, invisible in Canada. This eclipse begins at a point a little to the- 
south of the Caspian sea, and ends in the interior of Australia. 

The line of central eclipse exterds from a point near Constantinople across the Caspian Sea, the north of India, an<2 
tha Burmese Empire to a point on the N. E. of Australia. 

The eclipse is visible in Sweden, Russia, South Eastern Europe, tl> Levant, Egypt, Australia, the Eastern Archi 
pelago, and the whole of Asia, with the exception cf a portion of its nortb, eastern extremity. 



Meteorological* 

Tlit following is a table giving the normal and mean vaJues nf certain meteorological elements for each month during the 
year. The numbers in the tattle are derived from the experience of past years at Toronto, and serve as standards 
with which to compare the observed values of the several dements. 



MOXTHS. 


MEAN NORMAL TEMPERATURE. 


MEAN HEIGHT or BAROMETER 

I! IN8HES. 


RAIN. 


S.vow. 


Oa.m 


8a.m 


2p.m. 


4pm. 


10pm 


Mdnt 


Mean 


6 a.m. 


2 p.m. 


10p.m. 


Mean. 


Naof 
Days. 


Depth in 
Inches. 


Naof 

Days. 


Depth in 
Inches. 




o 
22 80 
19 79 
25 55 
35 79 
46 10 
55 77 
60 11 
59 21 
51 34 
40 52 
33 53 
24 72 




22 99 
20 70 
28 30 
40 26 
51 21 
60 97 
66 30 
65 45 
56 60 
4:1 5i 
34 63 
25 03 




28 19 
28 81 
-35 84 
47 51 
58 57 
68 18 
74 74 
73 60 
64 41 
50 94 
40 06 
30 41 


o 

27 64 
28 13 
35 20 
47 19 
58 65 
68 81 
74 99 
73 76 
64 17 
50 02 
39 07 
29 43 


o 
24 21 
22 63 
28 58 
38 66 
48 23 
57 23 
61 99 
61 98 
54 52 
43 OS 
35 29 
26 62 




23 27 
21 9S 
27 93 
37 91 
46 5d 
55 67 
59 83 
r,n 86 
53 47 
41 84 
3-1 3:j 
26 07 




24 80 
23 67 
30 38 
40 99 
51 48 
61 03 
66 25 
65 76 
57 49 
45 04 
.36 15 
27 09 


29 627 
29 615 
J .i C,2I 
29 659 
29 582 
29 595 
29 604 
29 645 
29 664 
29 6G6 
29 C27 
29 650 


29 602 
29 596 
29 600 
29 639 
29 555 
29 572 
29 583 
29 629 
29 636 
29 645 
29 608 
29 621 


29 631 
29 613 
29 623 
29 640 
29 565 
29 572 
29 586 
29 62?) 
29 643 
29 Clio 
29 621 
_".* <;n 


29 628 
29 611 
29 618 
29 644 
29 564 
29 576 
29 589 
29 632 
29 646 
29 664 
29 626 
29 643 


4 6 
3 9 
5 7 
8 7 
10 3 
10 7 
8 9 
9 3 
10 6 
11 2 
9 2 
5 1 


1 701 
1 088 
1 613 
2 571 
2 975 
3 042 
3 720 
2 719 
4 458 
2 929 
3 026 
1 622 


10 4 
11 
7 9 
2 4 
4 

1 9 
4 6 

11 2 


134 
18 3 
9 9 
2 
01 

1 

2 5 

11 -. 




March 


April 


May ... 




Julj 










December 


[196] 



Second Winter Month. 



JANUARY, 1857, 



>f This is the first month of the year ; its Zodiacal sign is CAPKICORNCS, or the Goat ; it 
derives its name from Janus, a deity represented by the Romans -with two faces. 



MOON S PHASES. 


D. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


-/ 
| 

1 
11 
21 


Twilight leg. or ends, 


Semidiam. 


Pole Star. 


) First Quarter 
Full Moon 


3 
10 

17 
25 
5 
17 
31 


h m 
6 57am 
3 60am 
11 32pm 
6 08pm 
noon 
10 Opm 
5 am 


h m 
7 29am 
4 22am 
05* 
6 41pm 
noon 
10 Opm 
5 am. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Sun 


Moon 


Polar 
distance 


G. Elon. 
Lat. 45 


Beg. 

A.M. 


End. 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End. 
P. M. 


9 Last Quarter 
New Moon 


h m 
5 51 
5 50 
5 46 


h m 
8 18 
6 26 
6 37 


A m 
5 55 
5 54 
5 46 


h m 
6 13 

8 22 
6 34 


/ // 
16 18 
16 16 
16 17 


/ // / // 

16 021 26 49 

15 361 26 48 
15 061 26 48 


/ // 

2 02 47 
2 02 46 
2 02 46 


^ Perigee 


CAt)os?ee .. 


(T Periaree .. 



* Should read 18 05 a. m. Printed as above for want of space. 
The Planets. 



JANUARY Isr. 


JANUARY Ilia. 


JANUARY 216T. 


^?AME OF - ~ 

T>T 4 VT"T 




On Mer 


g 




On 


Mer. 






On 


Mer. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Meridi n * 


3 Rises. 


Sets. 


Meridi c 


Zen h 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Vleridi n 


/en-h 

dist. 


(A m 


A 771 


Am 


A 771 


A f?i 


A m 


o 


k m 


h m 


h m 


o 


Venus 9 52f 


7 511 


2 52} 59 


1 9 40f 


8 16} 


2 581 


55 3 


9 27- 


8 37} 


3 01} 


50 9 


Mars 9 45+ 


4 

7 45} 


2 45} 59 


3 9 25f 


7 471 


* vvy 4 

2 361 


56 9 


9 03- 


7 49t 


2 26} 


54 


Jup 


iter 13 


i 

L 22f 


11 23} 


5 22} 44 


1 10 46J L 


1 4- 

50} 


* y**4 

4 48} 


13 6 


10 10- 


*^ 4- 

10 19} 


4 14} 


42 9 




Sat 


urn < 


t 24} 


7 39f 


3| 21 
11 59J 4 " 


2 3 41} 


6 56f 


11 16} 


21 1 


, 2 58 t 


6 13f 


10 34} 


21 




JJra 


nus 1 


I 15 1 


3 48f 


8 29} 25 ! 


3 36} 


3 07f 


7 49} 


25 8 


11 576 


2 27f 


7 10} 


25 9 




NOTE. In the above Table t signifies A. M^andJ P. 


M. 






~ 
| 


Day of 


i 

^- 


TORONTO. 


QUEBEC. 


UPPER 


AND LOWER CANADA. 


C 


Week. 


- 




Sun 






Sun s 


Mn s 


Moon 


Upper 


o 
h. 




b> 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


d M. 


riun 


Sun 


Moon 


on 




JeclinatioE 


Age 


on 


Transit of 


a 




L 


Uses. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Z. D. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Meridian. 


Noon, S. 


Noon. 


\Ierid. 


Pole Star. 








k 


in 


h m. 


h m 


o 


^ TO 


A 771 


A m 


h 771 


i 


o 


/ // 


days 


h 


we 


A 


m t 


1 


Thursday. . 


} 


7 35 


4 33 


10 40 


48 8 


T 464 22 


10 38 


12 4 


i 


22 


58 33 


5.3 


4 


43 


6 20 3<5 


2 


Friday . . . 


! 


7 35 


4 34 


11 55 


42 


r 46 4 24 


11 56 


12 4 32 


22 


53 7 


6.3 


5 


30 


6 16 39 


3 


Saturday. . 


:: 


7 84 


4 36 


Morn 


35 2 


r 45 4 25 


Morn 


12 6 


( 


22 


47 15 


7.3 


6 


18 


6 12 43 


4 


SUNDAY. 


i 


7 34 


4 37 


1 10 


28 7 


J 44 


4 26 


1 15 


12 5 27 


1-1 


40 55 


8.3 


7 


7 


6 


8 46 


6 


Monday . . 


6 


7 34 


4 38 


2 2823 1 


r 44 


4 27 


2 37 


12 5 54 


22 


34 9 


9.3 


8 


1 


6 


4 49 





Tues lay . . 


e 


7 34 


4 39 


3 4918 7 


7 44 


4 28 


4 1 


12 6 21 


23 


26 55 


10.3 


8 


58 


6 


52 


7 


AVednesday 





7 34 


4 40 


5 8 


16 


1 44 


4 29 


5 23 


12 6 46 


22 


19 13 


11.3 


9 


59 


5 56 56 


8 


Thursday . 


8 


7 34 


4 41 


6 22 


15 3 


r 44 


4 30 


6 38 


12 7 12 


22 


11 7 


12.3 


11 


1 


5 52 59 


9 


Friday . . . 


.i 


7 34 


4 42 


7 25 




7 44 


4 32 


7 42 


12 7 36 


22 


2 34 


13.8 


Morn 


5 49 2 


10 


Saturday. . 


i< 


7 34 


4 42 


Rises 


16 6 


7 43 


4 33 


Rises 


12 8 


1 


2] 


53 36 


14.3 




2 


5 45 5 


11 


SUNDAY. . 


! i 


7 33 


4 43 


6 8 


19 4 


7 43 


4 34 


5 56 


12 8 24 


21 


44 12 


15.3 




59 


5 41 9 


12 


Monday. . . 


12 


7 33 


4 45 


7 21 23 7 


7 43 


4 35 


7 12 


12 8 47 


21 


34 23 


16.3 


1 


51 


5 37 12 


13 


Tuesday . . 


]: 


7 32 


4 46 


8 29 ] 28 8 


7 42 


4 36 


8 24 


12 9 10 


21 


24 8 


17.3 


2 


39 


5 33 15 


14 


Wednesday 


i ! 


7 32 


4 48 


9 34 


34 5 


7 42 


4 38 


9 32 


12 9 31 


21 


13 30 


18.3 


3 


22 


5 29 18 


15 


Thursday. . 


15 


7 31 


4 49 


10 38 


40 4 


7 41 


4 39 


10 38 


12 9 53 


21 


2 27 


19.3 


4 


3 


5 25 22 


16 


Friday . . . 


! 


7 3C 


4 50 


11 40 


46 3 


7 40 


4 40 


11 43 


12 10 13 


20 


51 


20.3 


4 


43 


5 21 25 


17 


Saturday. . 


17 


7 30 


4 51 


Morn 


52 


7 40 


4 42 


Morn 


12 10 33 


20 


39 8 


21.3 


5 


22 


5 17 28 


18 


SUNDAY. . 


is 


7 30 


4 52 


44 


57 4 


7 39 


4 43 


60 


12 10 52 


20 


26 53 


22. 3 


6 


3 


5 13 31 


19 


Monday . . 


I . 


7 29 


4 53 


1 4962 3 


7 38 


4 44 


1 58 


12 11 10 


20 


14 15 


23.3 


6 


46 


5 


9 35 


20 


Tuesday . . 


21 


7 29 


4 54 


2 5566 5 


7 37 


4 46 


3 7 


12 11 28 


20 


1 14 


24.3 


7 


32 


5 


5 38 


21 


Wednesday 


21 


7 28 


4 56 


4 069 7 


7 36 


4 48 


4 15 


12 11 44 


i . 


47 50 


25.3 


8 


20 


5 


1 41 


22 


Thursday . 


>: 


7 27 


4 67 


5 6 


71 7 


7 35 


4 49 


5 23 


12 12 


1 


19 


34 5 


26.3 


9 


14 


4 57 44 


28 


Fri lay . . . 


2i 


7 26 


4 69 


6 6 


72 1 


7 35 


4 49 


6 24 


12 12 J6 


i .i 


19 58 


27.3 


10 


10 


4 53 48 


24 


Saturdry. . 


j 


7 25 


5 


Sets 


70 7 


7 34 


4 50 


Sets. 


12 12 30 


19 


5 29 


28.3 


11 


7 


4 49 51 


25 


SUNDAY. . 


i 


7 


24 


5 2 


4 36 


67 7 


7 33 


4 52 


4 24 


12 12 44 


18 50 40 


29.3 


Ev. 4 


4 45 54 


26 


Monday . . 


21 


7 


21 


5 3 


5 54 


63 2 


7 32 


4 54 


5 45 


12 12 57 


18 


35 29 


0.7 




59 


4 41 57 


27 


Tuesday . 


- 


7 


22 


5 4 


7 12 


57 4 


7 31 


4 55 


7 5 


12 13 


j 


18 19 59 


1.7 


1 


50 


4 38 1 


28 


Wednesday 


28 


7 


21 


5 5 


8 2950 9 


7 29 


4 57 


8 26 


12 13 20 


18 4 9 


2.7 


2 


40 


4 34 4 


2U 


Thursday. 


: 


7 


_ < 


5 7 


9 4543 9 


7 28 


4 5? 


9 45 


12 13 31 


17 47 58 


3.7 


3 


28 


4 30 7 


30 


Friday . . 


81 


7 


11 


5 9 


11 236 9 


7 28 


5 OC 


11 6 


12 13 


(1 


17 31 30 


4.7 


4 


16 


4 26 10 


31 


Saturday . 


8 


7 


is 


5 If 


Morn 30 3 


7 27 


5 01 


Morn 


12 13 


41 


17 


14 42 


5.7 


5 


5 4 22 14 



197] 



FEBRUARY, 1857. 



Third Winter Month. 



Z% This Month has AQUARIUS, or the Water-bearer for its Zodiacal sign ; its name is from the 
Februa, or sacrifices offered to the manes of the gods at this season. 



MOON S PHASES. 


1). 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


/ 

% 

5 


Twilight beg. or ends, 


Semidiam. 


Pole Star. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


) First Quarter ... 
O Full Moon 


1 
8 

ie 

24 

i 
26 


h, m 
3 3pm 
6 35pm 
9 2pm 
6 40 am 
7 Opm 
1 Opm 


h m 
3; 35 pm 
7 8pm 
9 34pm 
7 13am 
7 Opm 
1 Opm 


Sun 


Moon 


Polar 
distance 


G. Elon. 
Lat. 45 


Beg. 

A. M. 


bind 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


O Last Quarter 


i 

11 

21 


h, m 
5 38 
5 28 
5 13 


h m 
6 50 
7 2 
7 14 


h m 
5 40 
5 28 
5 12 


h m 
6 48 
7 1 
7 15 


/ // 
16 16 
16 14 
16 12 


/ // 
16 9 
15 
15 45 


f ff 

1 26 49 
1 26 50 
1 26 52 


/ // 

2 2 47 

2 2 49 
2 2 52 


New Moon 


CAposree 


C Perigee 





Tlie Planets. 



NAME OF 
PLANET. 


FEBRUARY IST. 


FEBRUARY HTH. 


FEBRUARY 21sr. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 

Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 

dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


:Mer. 
Zen. 
dist. 


Venus 


h m 
9 2f 
8 39- 
9 30- 
2 11" 
11 13f 


A in 
9 6} 
7 51} 
9 47} 
5 28f 
1 43f 


A m 
3 4} 
2 15} 
3 38} 
9 47} 
6 26} 


o 

44 7 
50 7 
42 1 
21 
25 9 


A m 
8 45f 
8 16f 
8 55f 
1 29} 
10 34f 


A m 
9 23} 
7 62} 
9 17} 
4 46f 
1 4f 


A m 
3 04} 
2 04} 
3 06+ 
9 06} 
5 47} 


o 

*9 6 
47 5 
ft 3 
20 9 
25 8 


A m 
8 25f 
7 53- 
8 20- 


A m 
9 41} 
7 53} 
8 49+ 
4 6f 
27f 


A m 
3 3} 
1 53} 
2 34} 
8 25} 
5 9} 


o 

34 6 
44 4 
40 5 
20 9 

25 8 


Mars 


Jupiter 
Saturn 


Uranus 


4 
9 54- 





NOTE. lu the above Table ( signifies A. M., and % P. M. 



| Day of Month;; 


Day of 
Week. 


c 

-. 
. 

8 

> 


TORONTO. 


QUEBEC. 


UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


Sun 
on 
Meridian. 


Sun s 
Declination 
Noon S. 


Aln s Moon 
Age | on 
Noon.; Merid, 


Upper 
Transit of 
Pole Star. 


Sun 

Rises. 


Sun 

Sets. 


Moon 
Sets. 


d M. 
Z.D. 


Sun 
Rises. 


Sun 

Sets. 


Moon 
Sets. 








h m 


A m 


A m 


\h m 


A m 


A m 


h m s 


o / // 


days h m 


h m s 


1 


SUNDAY. . 


82 


1 17 


5 11 


19 


24 47 25 


5 3 


2612 13 57 


16 57 37 


6. 7 5 57 


4 18 17 


2 


Monday. . . 


33 


7 16 


5 12 


1 38 


19 77 24 


5 4 


1 4912 14 04 


16 40 14 


7. 7: 6 52 


4 14 20 


3 


Tuesday . . 


34 


7 15 


5 13 


2 57 


16 57 22 


5 6 


a 1012 14 10J6 22 34 


8. 7 7 50 


4 10 24 


4 


Wednesday 


35 


7 13 


5 15 


4 10 


15 27 21 


5 7 


4 27 12 14 16 


16 4 36 


9. 7j 8 50 


4 6 27 


5 


Thursday . 


86 


7 12 


5 16 


5 15 


15 7 


7 195 9 


5 32 


12 14 21 


15 46 22 


10. 7 9 5J 


4 2 30 


6 


Friday . . . 


87 


7 11 


5 17 


6 9 


18 07 185 10 


6 2512 14 24 


15 27 53 


11.710 48 


3 68 34 


rr 


Saturday . . 


:;- 


7 10 


5 18 


Rises 


21 87 16 


5 12 


Rises 


12 14 27 


15 9 8 


12.711 42 


3 54 37 


8 


SUNDAY. . 


\- 


7 8 


5 20 


5 1 




7 15 


5 13 


4 52 12 14 29 


14 50 7 


13. 7 Morn 


3 50 40 


9 


Monday . . 


! 


7 7 


5 22 


6 11 


26 67 14 


5 15 


6 04 


12 14 31 


14 30 51 


14.7 SO 


3 46 44 


10 


Tuesday . . 


1! 


7 5 


5 24 


7 20 


32 17 13 


5 17 


7 17 12 14 31 


14 11 21 


15.7 1 15 


3 42 47 


11 


Wednesday 


12 


7 4 


5 25 


8 24 


38 


7 11 


5 19 


8 23 ! 12 14 31 


13 51 37 


16. 7i 1 58 


3 38 50 


12 


Thursday . 


IS 


7 3 


5 26 


9 28 


43 9 


7 9 


5 20 


9 3012 14 30 


13 31 39 


17. 7; 2 38 


3 34 54 


13 


Friday . . . 


i; 


7 1 


5 27 


10 30 


49 8 


7 7 


5 21 


10 35 12 14 28 


13 11 28 18. 7 3 18 


3 30 57 


14 


Saturday. . 


15 


6 59 


5 29 


11 36 


55 4 


7 6 


5 23 


11 43jl2 14 26 


12 51 4 


19.7 3 58 


3 27 1 


15 


SUNDAY . 


H 


6 58 


5 30 


Morn 


60 6 


7 4 


5 24 


Morn 


12 14 23 


12 30 2820. 7| 4 40 


3 23 4 


16 


Monday. . . 


17 


6 57 


5 31 


38 


65 


7 2 


5 26 


50 12 14 19 


12 9 3921.7 5 23 


3 19 7 


17 


Tuesday . . 


K 


6 55 


5 33 


1 4C 


08 7 


7 1 


5 27 1 59-12 14 14 


11 48 4022.7 6 11 


3 15 11 


18 


Wednesday 


r. 


6 54 


5 34 


2 52 


71 1 


6 59 


5 29 


3 7 


12 14 9 


11 27 27 


23. 7 7 2 


3 11 14 


19 


Thursday . 


51 


6 52 


5 36 


3 62 


72 2 


6 57 


5 31 


4 10 


12 14 Sill 6 5 


24. 7 7 56 


3 7 18 


20 


Friday . . . 


5] 


G 51 


5 37 


4 48 


71 7 


6 56 


5 32 


5 4 


12 13 67ilO 44 3325.7 8 53 


3 3 21 


21 


Saturday. . 


52 


6 49 


5 39 


5 31 


69 5 


6 64 


5 34 


5 47 


12 13 49 lO 22 5026.7 9 48 


2 59 25 


22 


SUNDAY . 


5! 


6 48 


5 40 


6 09 


65 6 


6 52J5 36 


6 20 


12 13 42 


10 5627.710 44 


2 65 28 


23 


Monday . . 


Vi 


6 47 


5 41 


Sets 


60 36 50 


5 37 


Sets 


12 13 33 


9 38 5528.711 37 


2 51 32 


24 


Tuesday . . 


V 


6 45 


5 42 


6 6 


53 9i6 48,5 39 


6 212 13 24 


9 16 45 


0. 2 ev. 2!) 


2 47 35 


25 


Wednesday 


51 


6 43 


5 43 


7 25 


46 9 6 46,5 40 


7 2512 13 15 


8 54 26 


1.2 1 19 


2 43 39 


26 


Thursday . 


57 


6 41 


5 45 


8 44 


39 56 45 


5 41 


8 4612 13 4 


8 31 59 


2.2 2 9 


2 39 42 


27 


Friday . . . 


,> 


6 40 


5 40 


10 5 


32 56 43 


5 43 


10 1012 12 53 


8 9 26 


3. 2 2 59 


2 35 46 


28 


Saturday. . 


58 


6 38 


5 48 


11 26 


26 1 


6 41 5 45 


11 36J12 12 42 


7 46 44 


4. 2 3 52 


2 31 49> 



[198] 



First Spring Month. 



MARCH, 1857. 



3 March is the third month of the year; with the ancients it was the first. The name is said 
to be derived from that of Mars, the God of War ; its Zodiacal sign is PISCES, the Fishes. 



MOON S PHASES. 


D. 


Toronto 


Quebec. 


"f". 

~: 

- 


Twilight beg. or ends, 


Semidiam. 


Pole Star. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


) First Quarter ... 
OPiill Monn 


2 
10 

18 
25 

11 

v, 


h m 
11 13pm 
11 00am 
3 46pm 
511 pm 
noon 
7 Onm 


h m 
11 45pm 
11 32am 
4 18pm 
5 43pm 
noon 
7 Ot>m 


Beg. 

A.M. 


bind 

P. M 


Dug. 
A. M. 


tuU 

P. M. 


Sun 


Moon 


Polar JG. Elon. 
distance Lat. 45 


(JJ Last Quarter 


l 

11 

21 


h m 
5 1 
4 43 
4 24 


h m 
1 25 
7 37 
7 50 


h m 
4 59 
t 39 

^ IF 


h m 
7 27 
7 41 
7 57 


/ // 
16 10 
16 8 
16 5 


/ // 
16 15 
14 54 
15 46 


/ // / // 

1 26 54 2 2 55 
1 26 562 2 57 
1 26 592 3 2 


New Moon 


C Apogee .. 


ff~ Perisee 



The Planets. 







MARCH 


[ 1ST. 






MARCH 


llTH. 






MARCH 


21tT. 




PLANKT. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 
dist. 




h m 
8 8f 


h m 
9 54} 


A m 
3 It 


o 
30 8 


h m 

7 45f 


h m 
10 8} 


A TO 

2 571 




6 6 


A m 

7 22t 


h m 
10 17+ 


/( in 
-) 49+ 


o 
>3 


Mars 


7 35f 


7 53} 


W J..J. 

1 44t 


41 9 


7 lit 


7 53} 


+ 

1 321 


38 8 


i ,& | 
6 49f 


7 53+ 


- -"4 
1 1 + 


35 8 


Jupiter 


7 52+ 


8 27} 


J. ^-14. 

2 9+ 


39 8 


i ii | 

7 18f 


7 591 


j. t>^ + 
1 38+ 


38 9 


6 43f 


7 32+ 


1 8+ 


37 9 


Saturn 


f- 1 
16} 


3 33f 


7 53t 


8 


11 37f 


" 4- 

2 54t 


7 13t 


?0 8 


10 58f 


2 lof 


1 ~4 

6 35+ 


>0 8 


Uranus 


9 24t 


U 521 


1 U-J 

4 381 


25 7 


8 46f 


11 141 


i *"4 

4 01 


25 7 


8 8t 


10 36+ 


3 22t 


>5 6 



NOTE. In the above Table f signifies A. M. and J JP. M. 



Day of Month) 


Day of 
Week. 


ij 

- 
H 

8 

:_ 



TORONTO. 


QUEBEC. 


UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


Sun 
on 
Meridian. 


Sun s 
Declination 
Noon, S. 


Mn s 
Age 
Noon. 


Moon 
on 
Meiid 


Upper 
Transit of 
Pole Star. 


Sun 
Rises. 


Sun 

Sets. 


Moon 
Sets. 


G M. 
Z. D. 


Sun 
Kises. 


Sun 

Sets. 


Moon 

Sets. 








h m 


h m 


h m 


o 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m s 


/ // 


days 


h m 


h m t 


1 


SUNDAY . 


M 


6 37 


5 48 


Morn 


20 9 


6 39 


3 46 


Morn 


12 12 30 


7 23 57 


5.2 


4 47 


2 27 53 


2 


Monday . . 


61 


6 35 


5 49 


46 


17 1 


6 37 


3 47 


59 


12 12 18 


713 


6.2 


5 45 


2 23 56 


3 


Tuesday . . 


82 


6 34 


3 50 


2 3 


15 26 35 


3 49 


2 18 


12 12 5 


6 38 4 


7.2, 


6 45 


2 20 


4 


Wednesday 


88 


6 32 


5 52 


3 11 


15 2 


6 34 


5 50 


3 28 


12 11 52 


6 It 58 


8.2 


7 45 


2 16 4 


5 


Thursday . 


HI 


6 30 


5 53 


4 6 


17 06 32 


5 52 


4 23 


12 11 38 


5 51 48 


9.2 


8 43 


2 12 7 


6 


Friday . . . ! 65 


6 28 


5 54 


4 51 


20 36 30 


5 53 


5 


12 11 24 


5 28 33 


10.2 


9 36 


2 8 11 


7 


Saturday. . ! 66 


6 27 


5 55 


5 23 


24 7 


6 28 


5 54 


5 34 


12 11 9 


5 5 14 


11.2 


10 26 2 4 15 


8 


SUNDAY. . 67 


6 26 


5 56 


Rises 


30 


6 26 


5 56 Rises 


12 10 54 


4 41 51 


12.3 


11 12 


2 18 


9 


Monday . . G8 


6 24 


5 58 


5 5 


35 7 


6 24 


5 57 


5 1 


12 10 39 


4 18 26 


13.2 


11 54 


1 56 22 


10 


Tuesday . .69 


6 22 


5 59 


6 11 




6 22 


5 58 


6 10 


12 10 23 


3 54 56 


14.2 


Morn 


1 52 26 


11 


Wednesday 


7<> 


6 20 


6 


7 15 


41 7 


6 20 


6 


7 10 


12 10 7 


3 31 24 


15.2 


35 


1 48 29 


12 


Thursday . 


71 


6 18 


6 2 


8 18 


47 6 


6 18 


6 2 


8 21 


12 9 50 


3 7 49 


16.2 


1 15 


1 44 33 


13 


Friday . . . 


72 


6 17 


6 3 


9 23 


53 4 


6 16 


6 3 


9 29 


12 9 34 


2 44 12 


17.2 


1 54 


1 40 37 


14 


Saturday. . 


7;; 


6 14 


6 4 


10 27 


58 7 


6 14 


6 4 


10 36 


12 9 16 


2 20 33 


18.2 


2 35 


1 36 41 


15 


SUNDAY. . 


71 


6 12 


6 6 


11 33 


63 6 


6 12 


6 6 


11 45 


12 8 59 


1 56 52 


19.2 


3 18 


1 32 44 


16 


Monday. . . 


7. , 


6 11 


6 7 


Morn 


67 5 


6 10 


6 8 Morn 


12 8 42 


1 33 11 


20.2 


4 4 


1 28 48 


17 


Tuesday . . 


76 


6 9 


6 8 


38 


70 4 


6 8 


6 9 


53 


12 8 24 


1 9 29 


21.2 


4 53 


1 24 52 


18 


Wednesday 


77 


6 7 


6 9 


1 41 


72 16 6 


6 10 1 57 


12 8 7 


45 46 


22.2 


5 45j 1 20 56 


19 


Thursday . 


786 5 


6 11 


2 36 


72 36 4 


6 12 


2 54 


12 7 40 


S 22 4 


23.2 


6 39 


1 17 


20 


Friday . . . 


79 


6 4 


6 12 


3 25 


70 86 2 


6 13 


3 41 


12 7 31 


N 1 39 


24.2 


7 34 


1 13 3 


21 


Saturday. .80 


6 2 


6 12 


4 4 


67 86 


6 14 


4 18 


12 7 12 


25 20 


25.2 


8 29 


197 


22 


SUNDAY .81 


6 ] 


6 13 


4 36 


63 25 59 


6 15 


4 46 


12 6 64 


49 026.2 


9 22 


1 5 11 


23 


Monday . . 82 


5 59 


6 15 


5 2 


57 45 57 


6 17 


5 1 


12 6 3b 


1 12 38 


27.2 


10 14 


1 1 15 


24 


Tuesday . . 83 5 57 


6 16 


5 27 


50 65 55 


6 181 5 30 


12 6 17 


1 36 15 


28.2 


11 5 


57 19 


25 


Wednesday 845 55 


6 17 


Sets 


43 35 53 


6 19 Sets 


12 5 59 


1 69 50 


29.2 


tl 55 


53 23 


26 


Thursday . 


855 54 


6 18 


7 38 


35 85 51 


6 20 


7 43 


12 5 41 


2 23 22 


0.8 


ev. 46 


49 27 


27 


Friday . . . 


86 


5 51 


6 19 


9 2 


28 8|5 49 


6 21 


9 11 


12 6 2 . 


2 46 52 


1.8 


1 40 45 31 


28 


Saturday. . : 87 


5 49 


6 21 


10 26 


22 9:5 47 


6 23 10 39 


12 5 4 


3 10 17 


2.8 


2 36 41*35 


29 


SUNDAY. . 


88 


5 47 


6 22 


11 49 


18 35 45 


6 25 


Morn 


12 4 43 


3 33 39 


3.8 


3 3fi 


37 39 


30 


Monday . . 


89 


5 45 


6 23 


Morn 


15 65 43 


6 26 


t 


12 4 27 


3 56 57 


4.8 


4 37 


33 43 


31 


Tuesday . . 


90;5 44 


6 24 


1 2 


15 05 41 


6 27 


1 20 


12 4 9 


4 20 10 


5.8 


5 38 29 47 



[199J 



8 



APRIL, 1857. 



Second Spring Month. 



<Y> This is the fourth month of the year, having for its sign ARIES, the Ram. Its Latin name 
Aprilis, is from Aperio, to open or set forth. 



MOON S PHASES. 


!). 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


j. 

1 


Twilight beg. or ends, 


Semidiam. 


Pole Star. 


f) First Quarter ... 
O Full Moon 
O Last Quarter.. 


1 
o 

i; 

2^ 
31 
11 

J 


h 771 

8 16am 
4 11 am 
6 43 am 
1 57am 
7 Opm 
9 Opm 
5 Oam 


h m 
8 49am 
4 43am 
7 15am 
2 29am 
7 33pm 
9 Opm 
5 Oam 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Sun 


Moon 


Polar 
distance 


G. Elon. 
Lat. 45 


.beg. End 

A. tt. P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


New Moon 
O First Quarter ... 
CApoaree 


1 

n 
2] 


h mh m 
4 28 6 
3 4l 8 21 
3 20:8 38 


h m 
3 53 
3 29 
3 5 


h m 
8 15 
8 33 
8 53 


/ // 

16 2 
15 59 
15 56 


/ // 

15 46 
14 45 
16 27 


/ // 

1 27 2 
I 27 6 
1 27 9 


o / // 

236 
2 3 12 
2 3 16 







The Planet . 



NAME OP 




APRII 


1ST. 






APRIL 


LlTH. 






APRIL 


21ST. 




PLANET. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Heridi n 


Mer. 
Zen b 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 

aieridi n 


Mer 
Zen h 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 

Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zetrh 
di.t. 


Venus 


h m 
6 54+ 


h m 
10 16+ 


h in 
*> 35+ 


o 
20 1 


h m 
6 2h4 


h m 
10 2t 


h Til 
*> 13+ 


o 

18 4 


h m 
<i 4P>4- 


h m 
iq 07 + 


h m 
1 37 + 


o 

181 


Mars 


6 22i 


7 54J 


1 8t 


32-7 


6 11 


7 5;>j 


57+ 


30 


4Uf 

5 39f 


7 63+ 


46+ 


J o 1 
97 R 


Jupiter 
Saturn 


Y "" \ 

6 7f 
10 17f 


7 2+. 
1 33f 


4 
34J 

5 53+ 


36 9 
20 8 


V J. | 

5 32f 
9 39f 


6 35J 
56f 


4t 
5 16t 


36 
9 8 


4 59f 
9 3+ 


6 8| 
IQt 


11 33-j- 
4 ! r )t 


35 1 
on 8 


Uranus 


7 26f 


9 56J 


2 41t 


25 4 


6 47f 


9 20+ 


2 3t 


25 3 


6 10+ 


8 43 + 


* - t l 

1 9Pi+ 


oc o 
























1 ^DJ 





NOTE. In the above Table t signifies A. M., and J P. M. 



Day of Month 


Davof 
Week. 


1 

"8 

1 


TORONTO. 


QUEBEC. 


UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


Sun 
on 
Meridian. 


Sun s 
Declination 
Noon, N. 


Mn s 
Age 
Noon 


Moon 
on 
Merid. 


tipper 
Transit of 
Pole Star. 


Sun 
Rises 


Sun 

Sets. 


Moon 

Sets. 


(" M 
X.D. 


SUM 

Rises 


Sun 
Sets. 


Moon 

Sets. 








h m 


h n 


h m 


o 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m s 


/ // 


days 


h m 


h in s 


1 


Wednesday 


91 


5 41 


6 27 


2 3 


16 2 


5 39 


6 29 


2 20 


12 3 51 


4 43 19 


6.8 


6 37 


25 51 


2 


Thursday. 


92 


5 40 


6 28 


2 51 


19 1 


5 37 


6 31 


3 5 


12 3 33 


5 6 22 


7.8 


7 33 


21 65 


3 


Friday. . . 


93 


5 37 


6 29 


3 27 


23 2 


5 35 


6 32 


3 39 


12 3 15 


5 29 19 


8.8 


8 23 


17 59 


4 


Saturday . 


94 


5 36 


6 30 


3 55 


28 2 


5 33 


6 33 


4 4 


12 2 57 


5 52 12 


9.8 


9 11 


14 3 


5 


SUNDAY. 


95 


5 35 


6 31 


4 19 


33 8 


5 32 


6 34 


4 25 


12 2 B( 


6 14 58 


10.8 


9 53 


10 7 


6 


Monday. . 


96 


5 32 


6 32 


4 35 


39 7 


5 29 


6 35 


4 39 


12 2 22 


6 37 87 


11.8 


10 34 


6 11 


7 


Tuesday . 


97 


5 30 


6 34 


Rises 


45 6 


5 27 


6 37 


Rises. 


12 2 4 


709 


12.8 


11 14 


2 16 


8 


Wednesd y 


98 


5 29 


6 35 


6 9 


51 4 


5 25 


6 38 


6 12 


12 1 47 


7 22 34 


13.8 


11 53 


11 58 20 


9 


Thursday. 


99 


5 27 


6 36 


7 12 




5 23 


6 40 


7 18 


12 1 29 


7 44 52 


14.8 


Morn 


11 54 24 


10 


Friday. . . 


100 


5 25 


6 37 


8 16 


56 9 


5 21 


6 41 


8 26 


12 1 14 


872 


15.8 


33 


11 50 28 


11 


Saturday . 


101 


5 24 


6 38 


9 22 


61 9 


5 20 


6 42 


9 33 


12 57 


8 29 4 


16.8 


1 16 


11 46 32 


12 


SUNDAY. 


102 


5 23 


6 3[ 


10 28 


66 2 


5 19 


6 43 


10 42 


12 41 


8 50 57 


17.8 


2 


11 42 37 


13 


Monday. . 


103 


5 20 


6 40 


11 30 


69 5 


5 16 


6 44 


11 46 


12 26 


9 12 42 


18.8 


2 48 


11 38 41 


14 


Tuesday . 


IOJ 


5 18 


6 42 


Morn 


71 6 


5 14 


6 46 


Morn 


12 10 


9 34 16 


19.8 


3 38 


11 34 45 


15 


Wednesd y 


105 


5 17 


6 43 


29 


72 3 


5 13 


6 47 


47 


11 59 55 


9 55 43 


20.8 


4 32 


11 30 50 


16 


Thursday. 


106 


o 16 


6 44 


1 19 


71 5 


5 11 


6 49 


1 36 


11 59 41 


10 16 59 


21.8 


5 25 


11 26 54 


17 


Friday. . . 


107 


5 13 


6 45 


2 1 


69 2 


5 8 


6 50 


2 16 


11 59 27 


10 38 6 


22.8 


6 19 


11 22 58 


18 


Saturday . 


108 


5 12 


6 46 


2 34 


65 3 


5 6 


6 52 


2 46 


11 59 13 


10 59 3 


23.8 


7 11 


11 19 8 


19 


SUNDAY . 


109 


5 11 


6 47 


3 360 2 


5 5 


6 53 


3 12 


11 59 


11 19 4824.8 


8 2 


11 15 7 


20 


Monday. . 


110 


5 9 


6 49 


3 27 


54 


5 3 


6 65 


3 34 


11 68 46 


11 40 2325.8 


8 52 


11 11 17 


21 


Tuesday. . 


111 


5 7 


6 50 


3 49 


47 1 


5 2 


6 56 


3 52 


11 58 34 


12 46 


26.8 


9 41 


11 7 15 


22 


Wednesd y 


112 


5 5 


6 51 


4 10 


39 8 


5 


6 67 


4 10 


11 68 22 


12 20 57 


27.8 


10 31 


11 3 20 


23 


Thursday . 


113 


5 4 


6 52 


Sets 


32 4 


4 58 


6 58 


Sets 


11 58 10 


12 40 56 


28.8 


11 23 


10 59 24 


24 


Friday . . 


114 


5 2 


6 54 


7 55 


25 8 


4 57 


6 59 


8 6 


11 57 59 


13 43 


0.4 


Ev.18 


10 55 29 


25 


Saturday 


115 


5 1 


6 55 


9 22 


20 4 


4 55 


7 1 


9 36 


11 67 49 


13 20 17 


1.4 


1 18 


10 51 33 


26 


SUNDAY. 


116 


5 


6 56 


10 43 


16 7 


4 53 


7 3 


10 69 


11 57 38 


13 39 38 


2.4 


2 21 


10 47 38 


27 


Monday. . 


117 


4 57 


6 57 


11 52 


15 1 


4 51 


7 4 


Morn 


11 57 2P 


13 58 45 


3.4 


3 25 


10 43 42 


28 


Tuesday . 


118 


4 56 


6 58 


Morn 


15 6 


4 49 


7 5 


9 


11 57 20 


14 17 38 


4.4 


4 27 


10 39 47 


29 


Wednesd y 


119 


4 54 


7 


46 


18 


4 48 


7 6 


1 3 


11 67 11 


14 36 17 


5.4 


5 26 


10 35 51 


30 


Thursday . 


120 


4 53 


7 1 


1 27 


21 8 


4 47 


7 7 


1 41 


11 67 3 


14 54 42 


6.4 


6 20 


10 31 56 



[200] 



Third Spring Month. 



MAY, 1857. 



y May, the fifth month of our year, was the second in the old Alban Calendar ; our Saxon 
ancestors, after the Romans, called it Mains Month. Zodiacal sigi TAURUS the Bull. 



MOON S PHASES. 


:, 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


/ 
| 


Twilight beg. or ends, 


Semidiam. 


Pole Star. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


O Full Moon 


8 
16 
28 
!0 

^ 


A^ m 
8* 53pm 
8 52pm 
9 30am 
7 54 am 
11 Opm 
3 pm 


h m 
9 26pm 
6 25pm 
10 3am 
8 27am 
11 Opm 
3 Opm 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 
p. Ji. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Sun 


Moon 


Polar 

distance 


G. Elon. 
Lat. 45 


($ Last Quarter ... 
New Moon 


J 
11 
21 


h m 
2 59 
2 39 
2 21 


h m 
8 55 
9 14 

9 32 


h m 
2 40 
2 15 
1 52 


h m 
9 14 
9 37 
10 OC 


/ // 
15 54 
15 52 
15 50 


/ // 
15 22 
14 53 

16 40 


/ // 

I 27 11 
1 27 14 
1 27 16 


/ // 

2 3 11) 
2 3 23 
2 3 26 


) First Quarter ... 
CAnoo ee 


( Perigee 




Tile Planets. 



NAME OF 

PlANET. 


MAY IST. 


MAY HTH. 


MAY 21ST. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Aler. 
Zen h 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen. 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


M-r. 
Zen h 

dist, 


Venus 


h m 
5 3f 
5 19f 

4 25J 
8 27f 
5 32f 


h m 

8 28+ 
7 51 + 
5 42+ 
H 41 + 
8 7J 


h m 
45+ 
35+ 
11 3f 
4 4+ 
49+ 




19 6 
25 5 
34 3 
20 8 
25 


h. m 
4 17f 
5 Of 
3 51j 
7 52f 
4 55f 


h m 
7 10+. 
7 49+ 
5 15 % 
11 5+ 
7 30+ 


h m 
11 44f 
25+ 
10 33f 
3 28+ 
13+ 


o 

22 9 
23 7 
33 4 
20 9 
24 9 


h m 
3 36-j- 
4 43f 
3 17f 
7 17f 
4 17f 


h m 
5 55+ 
7 46+ 
4 47+ 
10 30+ 
6 54+ 


h m 
10 46f 
15+ 
10 2f 
2 54+ 
11 36f 


o 

26 7 
22 1 
32 6 
21 
24 7 


Mars 


Jupiter 
Saturn 


Uranus 




NOTE. In the above Table -f signifies A. M., and J P. M. 



1 


Day of 


1 


TORONTO. 


QUEBEC. 


UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


<s 


Week. 


o 






Sun 


Sun s | Mil s 


Moon 


Upper 








SUu 


,Suu Moon 


(i M- 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


on 


Declination Ape 


on 


Transit of 


jS 




p 


Kises. 


Sets. Sets. 


Z.D. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Meridian. 


Noon, N. 


Neon. 


Met id 


Vole Star. 








h in, 


i in h m 


o 


k m 


h m 


h m 


h m s 


/ // 


days 


h m 


h rn S 


1 


Friday. . . 


121 


4 52 


7 2 1 58 


26 6 


4 44 


7 9 


2 10 


11 56 55 


15 12 51 


7.4 


7 8 


10 28 


2 


Saturday . 


122 


4 50 


7 3 


2 24 


52 1 


4 437 11 


2 32 


11 56 4 


15 80 47 


8.4 


7 52 


10 24 5 


g 


SUNDAY. 


123 


4 40 


7 5 


2 43 


37 8 


4 427 12 


2 48 11 56 41 


15 48 25 


9.4 


8 34 


10 20 9 


4 


Monday. . 


124 


4 48 


7 6 


3 1 


43 7 


4 40 


7 14 


3 3 


11 56 35 


16 5 49 


10.4 


9 14 


10 16 14 


5 


Tuesday. . 


125 


4 40 


7 7 


3 IS 


49 6 


4 39 


7 15 


3 1811 56 30 


16 22 57 


11.4 


9 53 


10 12 18 


6 


Wednesd y 


120 4 45 


7 8 


3 34 


55 2 


4 37 


7 16 


3 32111 56 25 


16 39 48 


12 4 


10 32 


10 8 23 


7 


Thursday . 


1274 43 


7 9 


Rises 


60 3 


4 35 


7 17 


Rises 111 56 21 16 56 22 


13.4 


11 15 


10 4 28 


8 


Friday. . . 


128 


4 42 


7 10 


7 13 


64 8 


4 34 


7 18 


7 2311 56 17 


17 12 40 


14.4 


11 58 


10 32 


9 


Saturday . 


121>4 41 


7 11 


8 19 




4 337 19 


8 32 


11 56 13 


17 28 40 


15.4 


Morn 


9 56 37 


10 


SUNDAY. 


1304 40 


7 12 


9 22 


68 5 


4 31 


7 21 


9 37 


11 56 11 


17 44 24 


16.4 


45 


9 52 4] 


11 


Monday. . 


131 


4 397 13 


10 22 


70 9 


4 30 


7 22 


10 39 


11 56 9 


17 59 49 


17.4 


1 34 


9 48 4f, 


12 


Tuesday. . 


1324 387 14 


11 16 


72 1 


4 29 


7 23 


11 32 


1.1 56 7 


18 14 57 


18.4 


2 27 


9 44 51 


13 


Wednesd v 


1334 37 


7 15 


11 59 


71 8 


4 28 


7 24 


Morn 


11 56 6 


18 29 46 


19.4 


3 21 


9 40 55 


14 


Thursday . 


1344 3(1 


7 1(1 


Morn 


70 


4 26 


7 26 


15 


11 56 6 


18 44 15 


20.4 


4 13 


9 37 


15 


Friday. . . 


!::.-> 4 35 


7 17 


35 


66 7 


4 25 


7 27 


48 


11 56 6 


18 58 27 


21.4 


5 5 


9 33 6 


16 


Saturday . 


l:;i;4 34 


7 18 


1 5 


62 1 


4 24 


7 28 


1 16 


11 56 7 


19 12 20 


22.4 


5 56 


9 29 9 


17 


SUNDAY. 


1374 33 


7 1!) 


1 30 


56 5 


4 23 


7 29 


1 36 


11 56 8 


19 25 54 


23.4 


6 44 


9 25 14 


18 


Monday. . 


1384 81 1 21 


1 51 


50 14 22 


7 30 


1 55 


11 56 10 


19 39 8 


24.4 7 32 


9 21 18 


19 


Tuesday. . 


Nil i 307 22 


2 11 


43 14 20 


7 32 


2 12 


11 56 13 


19 52 1 


25.4 


8 19 


9 17 23 


20 


Wednesd y 


[40 t 29 


7 23 


2 33 


35 y 


4 18 


7 34 


2 28 


11 56 16 


20 4 34 


2(1.4 9 8 


9 13 28 


21 


Thursday . 


141 4 28 


7 24 


2 5(1 


29 1 


4 17 


7 35 


2 51 


11 56 20 


20 16 48 


27.410 1 


9 9 33 


22 


Friday . . 


1424 28 


7 24 


3 24 


23 1 


4 16 


7 36 


3 14 


11 56 24 


20 28 39 


28.4 


10 57 


9 5 38 


23 


Saturday . 


1434 27 


7 2.-, 


Sets 


18 4 


4 15 


7 37 


Sets 


11 56 2!! 


20 40 10 


29.4 


11 59 


9 1 43 


24 


SUNDAY . 


1114 26 


7 27 


9 30 


15 7 


4 15 


7 39 


9 47 


11 56 84 


20 51 21 


1.1 


o.l 4 


8 57 47 


25 


Monday. . 


1454 2-j 


7 28 


10 34 


15 2 


4 14 


7 40 


10 52 


11 56 40 


21 2 9 


2.1 


2 10 


8 53 62 


26 


Tuesday . 


14(14 2: , 


7 J .i 


11 23 


1C) 11 


4 13 


7 41 11 87 


11 56 46 


21 12 35 


3.1 


3 12 


8 49 57 


27 


Wednesd y i !7 t 21 


7 3d 


11 59 


20 3 


4 13 


7 42 


Morn 


11 66 53 


21 22 40 


4.1 


4 10 


8 46 2 


28 


Thursday . 


1484 23 


7 31 


Morn 


24 8 


4 12 


7 43 


11 


11 57 


21 32 22 


5.1 


5 2 


8 42 7 


29 


Friday. . . 


14 .) 4 23 


7 31 


27 


30 2 


4 11 


7 43 


86 


11 57 8 


21 41 42 


6.1 


5 49 


8 38 11 


80 


Saturday . 


1.-.04 22 


7 32 


48 


15 . 


4 10 


7 43 


55 


11 57 16 


21 60 39 


7.1 


6 32 


8 34 16 


81 


SUNDAY. 


LSI 


4 22 


7 33 


1 7 


41 9 


4 9 


7 44 


1 10 


11 57 24 


21 59 14 


8.1 


7 10 


8 30 21 



[201]- 



10 



JUNE, 185T. 



First Summer Month. 



>r is ll l e 8ix S month of tllc year> and ha3 for its si s n GEMINI > the Twins ; mo 

lenvation ot its name is from Juno, in honour of whom a festival was celebrated at the 
beginning of the month. 



MOON S 
PHASES. 


D. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 



p>~. 

t 

- 


Twilight beg. or ends, 


Semidiam. 


Pole Star. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


O Full Moon 


7 
L6 

2] 
28 

-! 
19 


h m 
5 pm 
1 52am 
4 46pm 
11 2pm 
7 Oam 
9 Opm 


h m 
38pm 
2 24am 
5 18pm 
11 34pm 
7 am 
9 Opm 


Sun 


Moon 


Polar 
distance 


G. Elon. 
Lat. 45 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End. 

P. M 


O Last Quarter... 
New Moon 


\ 

1 1 
1\ 


h m 
2 6 
1 57 
1 55 


h m 
9 50 
10 2 
10 8 


h m 
1 30 
1 15 
1 11 


h m 
10 26 
10 43 
10 52 


// / 
15 48 
15 47 
15 46 


// / 
14 54 
15 22 
16 27 


o / // 

1 27 17 
1 27 18 
1 27 19 


o / // 

2 3 27 
2 3 29 
2 3 30 


First Quarter... 
(T Apogee . 


C Perigee . 





The Plane Is. 



NAME or 




JUNE 


1ST. 






JUNE 


lllK. 






JUNE 


21 ST. 




PLAM.CT. 


Rises. 


Bets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 

Metidi n 


ilt.r. 
Zeu b 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 
dist. 


Venus 


h m 

2 59i 


h m 
4 55+ 


h m 
(i .-.74. 




oq f. 


h m 

O QOJ. 


h m 
A 9.4 + 


h m 

9OC4. 




on o 


h m 


h m 


h m 





Mars 


" " J \ 
4 26-!- 


7 49t 


J OIJ 

4+ 


!-)A Q 


A 1 OJ. 


7 Qft + 


Zoj 

aKAA. 


oU 2 
,-tf\ f\ 


lOf 


8 t 


9 9f 


29 5 


Jupiter 
Saturn 


~U| 

2 40f 
6 40f 


i ^-.j. 
4 16t 
9 5 9 + 


v t + 

928f 

9 Ifit 


31 8 
>1 1 


* i "l 

2 5f 

A f\ 


OUJ 

3 48+ 

91 7 + 


O4j 

8 57f 

1 A1 + 


20 
31 1 

no 


Oj- 
1 3l{ 


7 29J 
3 19+ 


11 44f 
8 25f 


19 6 
30 5 


Uranus 


3 36f 


6 14J 


- -KJJ. 

10 55f 


24 6 


2 58f 


5 38+. 


1 41 J 

10 18f 


J 
24 5 


coy 
2 20| 


42t 
5 It 


1 7J 
9 41f 


21 3 
94 a 



NOTE. In the above Table f signifies A. M. and J P. M. 



Day of Mont h[] 


D.iy of 
Week. 



TORONTO. 

<M 




QUEBEC. 


UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


bun 

on 
Meridian. 


bun s 
Declinuu-i, 
Noon, N. 


Mil s 
Age 
Noon. 


Moon 
on 
Merid. 


Upper 
Transit of 
Pole Star. 


>> Sun 
f| iRises. 


Sun Moon 

Sets. Sets. 


a M 

Z. D. 


Sun 
Rises. 


Sun 

Sets. 


Moon 

Sets. 






h mh mh m 





h m 


h m 


h m 


h m s 


/ // 


days 


h m 


h m t 


1 


Monday . . 


1524 227 34 1 23 


17 8 


4 09 


7 47 


1 22 


11 57 33 


22 7 25 


9.1 


7 52 


8 26 26 


2 


Tuesday . 


1534 21 


7 35 1 40 


53 4 


4 09 


7 47 


1 38 


11 57 42 


22 15 14 


10.1 


8 31 


8 22 31 


8 


Wednesd y 


1544 21 


7 35 1 57 


58 8 


4 09 


7 47 


1 51 


11 57 52 


22 22 39 


11.1 


9 13 


8 18 36 


4 


Thursday . 


1554 20 


7 36 2 17 


63 4 


4 08 


7 48 


2 9 


11 58 3 


22 29 40 


12.1 


9 55 


8 14 40 


6 


Friday . . 


15H4 20 


7 36 2 39 


67 4 


4 07 


7 49 


2 28 


11 58 1222 36 1813.1 


10 42 


8 10 45 


6 


Saturday . 


1574 19 


737 Rises 


70 3 


4 07 


7 49 


Rises 


11 58 23 


22 42 3314.1 


11 30 


8 6 50 


7 


SUNDAY. 


158 4 19 


7 38 8 16 




4 07 


7 50 


8 33 


11 58 33 


22 48 -l -\ 


15.1 


Morn 


8 2 55 


8 


Monday. . 


1594 19 


7 39 9 11 


71 8 


4 07 


7 51 


9 29 


11 58 45 


2-2 53 6016. 1 


23 


7 59 


9 


Tuesday. . 


1604 19 


7 39 9 56 


72 


4 06 


7 52 10 13 


11 58 56 


22 58 5317.1 


1 16 


7 55 5 


10 


Wednesd y 


1614 197 3910 30 


70 6 


4 05 


7 63J10 50 


11 59 8 


23 3 31 


18.1 


2 7 


7 51 10 


11 


Thursday. 


1624 187 4011 8 


67 7 


4 05 


7 5311 19 


11 59 20 


23 7 4C. 19.1 


3 2 


7 47 15 


12 


Friday. . . 


1634 187 4111 33 


63 5 


4 05 


7 54 11 40 


11 59 32 


23 11 3520.1 


3 53 


7 43 19 


13 


Saturday . 


1644 187 4111 55 


58 2 


4 05 


7 55 Morn 


11 59 44 


23 15 1 


21.1 


4 40 


7 39 24 


14 


SUNDAY . 


1654 187 42 Morn 


52 1 


4 05 


7 55 





11 59 57 


23 18 022.1 


5 27 


7 35 29 


15 


Monday. . 


1664 18 


7 42 1545 5 


4 05 


7 55 


17 


12 ! 


23 20 3M23. } 


6 13 


7 31 34 


16 


Tuesday . 


1674 18 


7 42; 37 


38 6 


4 05 


7 56 


35 


12 22 


23 22 50 i t. 1 


7 1 


7 27 39 


17 


Wednesd y 


1684 18:7 43 56 


31 8 


4 05 


7 57 


52 


12 35 


23 24 37 


25.1 


7 49 


7 23 44 


18 


Thursday. 


1694 18 7 44 1 24 


25 6 


4 05 


7 57 


1 14 


12 48 


i:\ 25 5S 


26.1 


8 43 


7 19 49 


19 


Friday. . . 


1704 187 44 1 52 


20 4 


4 05 


7 57 


1 41 


12 1 1 


23 2(5 55 27. 1 


9 40 


7 15 54 


20 


Saturday . 


1714 187 44 2 33 


16 8 


4 05 


7 57 


2 17 


12 1 14 


23 27 20 28. 1 


10 43 


7 11 59 


21 


SUNDAY. 


1724 187 44 Sets 


15 2 


4 05 


7 57 


Sets 


12 1 27 


23 27 35i". . ] 


11 48 


784 


22 


Monday . . 


1734 197 45 9 13 


15 9 


4 06 


7 58 


9 28 


12 1 40 


23 27 17 


0.8 


Ev.54 


749 


23 


Tuesday. . 


1744 107 45 9 55 


18 6 


4 06 


7 58 


10 8 


12 1 54 


23 26 ::i 


1.8 


1 55 


7 14 


24 


Wednesd y 


1754 2i 7 4510 28 


22 8 


4 06 


7 5810 38 


12 2 6 


23 25 28 2.8 


2 52 


6 56 19 


25 


Thursday. 


17U4 20 


7 4410 5028 


4 07 


7 58 10 57 


12 2 19 


23 23 5< , 


3 40 


6 52 24 


26 


Friday. . . 


1774 21 


7 4411 9 


33 7 


i 07 


7 5V) 


11 6 


12 2 82 


23 21 69 


4.8 


4 20 


6 48 29 


27 


Saturday . 


I7S4 21 7 4111 2839 8 


4 08 


7 58 


11 29 


12 2 44 


23 19 38 5.8 


5 8 


6 44 34 


28 


SUNDAY. 


17 . 4 22i7 4411 45 


15 8 


4 08 


7 5811 44 


12 2 57 


23 16 63 6. H 


5 49 


6 40 38 


29 


Monday. . 


1804 2-1 1 4-1 .Morn 


51 C, 


4 09 


7 57 


11 58 


12 3 9 


23 13 42 7.8 


6 29 


6 36 43 


80 Tuesday .|181 4 227 44J 2 


57 1 


i 09 


7 57 


Morn 


12 3 21 


23 10 8 8. 8 


7 9 


6 32 48 



[202] 



Second Summer Month. 



JULY, 185T. 



11 



05 July is the seventh month of the year according to ancient reckoning it was the fifth ; 
Mark Anthony denominated it July, in compliment to Julius Cassar, who was born in it. CANCEB 
the Crab, is its Zodiacal sign. 



MOON S 
PHASES. 


1). 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


i. 

?; 
P 


Twilight beg. or ends, 


Semidiam. 


Pole Star. 


O Full Moon 


7 
14 
2] 

l^S 

1 

17 
9y 


A m 
I 26am 
7 39am 
55 am 
3 56pm 
9 Opm 
2 Opm 
2 Opm 


A m 
1 59am 
8 11am 
1 27am 
4 28pm 
9 Opm 
2 Opm 
2 Opm 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Sun 


Moon 


Polar 

distance 


G. Elon. 
Lat. 45 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


O Last Quarter... 


First Quarter... 
CArtocree . 


1 
11 
21 


h m 
2 1 
2 13 

2 29 


h m 
10 6 
9 57 
9 43 


h m 
1 19 
1 88 
2 


h m 
10 47 
10 33 
10 12 


/ // 

15 46 
15 46 
15 47 


/ // 
14 48 
15 4 C J 
15 58 


/ // 

I 27 18 
1 27 18 
1 27 16 


/ // 

2 3 28 
2 3 28 
2 3 26 


( Perigee 


CAcoo ee . 





The Planets. 







JULY 


1ST. 






JULY] 


ITH. 






JULY 


21si. 




PLAXET. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 

Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 
(list. 


Bises. 


Sets. 


On 

Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 

dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer 
Zen h 
dist 


Venus 


h m 
1 53f 


A m 
4 3t 


h m 

8 58f 


o 

9 8 


h m 
1 40+ 


A m 
4 fit 


A m 

KO-J- 




9A Q 


A l 
1 31 + 


A 7?l 
4. 1 1 + 


A m 

Q K.-I 




94 ft 


Mars 


3 49+ 


o + 

7 291 


11 34f 


19 5 


3 40f 


i- 

7 8t 


11 24+ 


19 7 


Q QQJ. 


* A -I 4- 
fi ^4+ 


U1 3+ 


90 3 


Jupiter 


57f 


i u.j. 
2 49J 


7 53f 


30 


22f 


1 * 

2 18t 


7 *>0i 


9Q A 


1 1 43 + 


D Ot.}. 
1 4fi + 


64f!-^ 


.iU o 
9O i 


Saturn 


5 Of 


8 8J 


34J 


21 4 


4 36f 


7 24+ 




*>1 fi 


q KOJ. 


6^OT 


n9A4- 


zy 1 

91 T 


Uranus 


1 43+ 


4 24t 


9 3f 


94 9 


1 6t 


< ^-+ 
3 47t 


8 ^6 


94. i 


9fi+ 


" J J 

310+ 


"T 

7 48+ 


1 7 

9/1 /\ 












* "i 














^4 Q 



NOTE, In the above Table f signifies A. M., and J V. M. 



3 




J3 









S3 


Day of 


8 

r* 


TORONTO. 


QUEBEC. 


UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


1 


Week. 


*W 

O 






Sun 


Sun s 


Mirs 


ilooii 


Upper 


> 




>> 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


C M 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


on 


Declination 


Age 


on 


Transit of 


i 




a 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Z.D. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Meridian. 


Noon, N. 


Noon. 


Morid. 


Pole Star 








h m 


h m 


A m 


o 


A m 


A m 


A m 


A m S 


/ // 


days 


A m 


A m s 


i 


Wednesd y 


182 


4 23 


7 44 


20 


62 


4 10 


1 58 


13 


12 3 32 


23 6 9 


9.8 


7 52 


6 28 53 


2 


Thursday. 183 


4 24 


7 44 


42 


66 2 


4 10 


7 58 


33 


12 3 44 


23 2 45 


10.8 


8 86 


6 24 58 


8 


Friday . . 


184 


4 24 


7 -\\ 


1 7 


69 5 


4 10 


7 58 


55 


12 3 55 


23 56 58 


11.8 


9 25 


6 21 3 


4 


Saturday . 


185 


4 25 


7 43 


i 4: 


71 5 


4 11 


7 57 


1 26 


12 4 5 


22 51 47 


12.8 


10 16 


6 17 8 


5 


SUNDAY. 186 


4 25 


7 43 


2 22 


72 1 


4 12 


7 56 


2 6 


12 4 16 


22 46 11 


13.8 


11 9 


6 13 13 


6 


Monday. . 


187 


4 26 


7 43 


Rises 




4 13 


7 55 


Rises 


12 4 26 


22 40 13 


14.8 


Morn 


6 9 18 


7 


Tuesday . 


188 


4 27 


7 43 


8 37 


71 2 


4 14 


7 55 


8 52 


12 4 36 


92 33 50 


15.8 


4 


6 5 23 


8 


Wednesd y 


189 


4 27 


7 43 


9 10 


68 7 


4 15 


7 55 


9 22 


12 4 45 


22 27 5 


16.8 


57 


6 1 28 


9 


Thursday . 


190 


4 28 


7 42 


9 38 


64 8 


4 15 


7 55 


9 46 


12 4 54 


22 19 56 


17.8 


1 49 


5 57 33 


10 


Friday . . 


191 


4 29 


7 41 


10 1 


59 7 


4 16 


7 54 


10 6 


12 5 2 


22 12 24 


18.8 


2 39 


5 53 38 


11 


Saturday . 


192 


4 29 


7 41 


10 21 


53 8 


4 17 


7 53 


10 23 


12 5 10 


22 4 29 


19.8 


3 26 


5 49 43 


12 


SUNDAY. 


193 


4 30 


7 40 


10 41 


47 3 


4 17 


7 53 


10 40 


12 5 18 


21 56 10 


20.8 


4 12 


5 45 48 


13 


Monday. . 


194 


4 31 


7 40 


11 4 


40 5 


4 18 


7 52 


10 59 


12 5 25 


21 47 2f 


21.8 


4 58 


5 41 53 


14 


Tuesday. . 


195 


4 32 


7 40 


11 24 


33 8 


4 20 


7 51 


11 18 


12 5 32 


21 38 26 


22.8 


5 46 


5 37 58 


15 


Wednesd y 


196 


4 33 


7 39 


LI 52 


27 5 


4 21 


7 51 


11 41 


12 5 38 


21 29 2 


23.8 


6 36 


5 34 3 


16 


Thursday . 


197 


4 34 


7 38 


Morn 


22 1 


4 22 


7 50 


Morn 


12 5 44 


21 19 15 


24.8 


7 30 


5 30 8 


17 


Friday. . . 


198 


4 35 


7 37 


26 


17 9 


4 23 


7 49 


13 


12 5 50 


21 9 7 


25.8 


8 29 


5 26 12 


18 


Saturday . 


199 


4 35 


7 37 


1 15 


15 5 


4 24 


7 48 


56 


12 5 54 


20 58 36 


26.8 


9 32 


5 22 17 


19 


SUNDAY. 


200 


4 36 


7 36 


2 9 


15 3 


4 25 


7 47 


1 52 


12 5 59 


20 47 45 


27. 8 10 35 


5 18 22 


20 


Monday. . 


201 


4 37 


7 35 


Sets 


17 1 


4 26 


7 46 


Sets 


12 6 2 


20 36 32 


28.8 


11 38 


5 14 27 


21 


Tuesday . 


202 


4 38 


7 34 


8 23 


20 7 


4 27 


7 45 


8 35 


12 6 6 


20 24 69 


0.4 


Ev.36 


5 10 32 


22 


Wednesd y 


203 


4 39 


7 33 


8 51 


25 6 


4 28 


7 44 


8 59 


12 6 8 


20 13 4 


1.4 


1 29 


5 6 37 


23 


Thursday. 204 


4 40 


7 32 


9 13 


31 2 


4 29 


7 43 


9 18 


12 6 10 


20 48 


2.4 


2 17 


5 2 42 


24 


Friday. . . 205 


4 41 


7 31 


9 31 


37 3 


4 31 


7 41 


9 34 


12 6 12 


19 48 14 


3.4 


3 4 


4 58 47 


25 


Saturday .206 


4 42 


7 30 


9 49 


43 5 


4 32 


7 40 


9 48 


12 6 12 


19 35 20 


4.4 


3 44 


4 54 52 


26 


SUN DAY. 207 


4 43 


7 29 


10 6 


49 5 


4 33 


7 39 


10 10 


12 6 13 


19 22 6 


5.4 


4 24 


4 50 57 


27 


Monday. .208 


4 44 


7 28 


10 24 


55 ] 


4 34 


7 38 


10 17 


12 6 12 


19 8 33 


6.4 


5 5 


4 47 2 


28 


Tuesday .209 


4 45 


7 27 


10 44 


60 3 


4 36 


7 36 


10 35 


12 6 11 


18 54 41 


7.4 


5 47 


4 43 7 


29 


Wednesd y 2 10 


4 46 


7 26 


11 8 


64 8 


4 37 


7 35 


10 57 


12 6 10 


18 40 31 


8.4 


6 30 


4 39 11 


80 


Thursday. 211 


4 47 


7 25 


11 39 


68 5 


4 38 


7 34 


11 25 


12 6 4 


18 26 2 


9.4 


7 18 


4 35 U6 


81 


Friday . . 


2124 48 


7 24 


Morn 


70 9 


4 39 


7 33 


12 


12 6 5 


18 11 15 


10.4 


8 8 


4 31 21 


[203] 



12 



AUGUST, 185T. 



Third Summer Month. 



St This Month was named by the Romans August, in compliment to the Emperor Augusts 
It is the eighth month in the year. Its Zodiacal sign is LEO, the Lion. 



MOON S PHASES. 


D. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


W 

| 

P 


Twilight beg, or ends, 


Semidiam. 


Tole Star. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


O Full Moon 



12 
19 
27 
12 
2G 


h m 
1 llpm 
24pm 
11 Sam 
9 47 am 
10 Oam 
9 Oam 


h m 
1 43pm 
56 pm 
11 41am 
10 19am 
10 Oam 
9 Oam 


Sun 

/ // 
15 48 
15 49 
15 51 


Moon 


Polar 
distance 


G. Elon. 
Lat. 45 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


Eud 

P. M. 


($ Last Quarter...... 
9 New Moon 
> First Quarter ... 


1 

i i 
21 


h m 
2 49 
3 7 
3 24 


h m 
9 23 
9 3 
8 42 


A m 
2 26 
2 48 
3 9 


h m 
9 57 
9 21 
8 57 


/ // 
15 
16 11 
15 16 


o / // 

1 27 14 

1 27 12 
1 27 9 


/ // 

2 3 23 
2 3 20 
2 3 16 


C Apogee... 





Tlie Planets. 



NAME OF 




AUGUS 


risi. 






AUGUST 


llTH. 






AUGUST 


21ST. 




PLACET. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zea h 

dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
7-enTi 
dist. 


Venus ... 


h m 
1 28t 


h m 
4 21J 


h m 
8 54t 


o 
93 o 


h m 

1 30+ 


h m 
4 20+ 


h m 

Q 0+ 




99 fi 


h m 

1 OQi 


h m 

4QR + 


A Wl 

974. 


o 

99 Q 


Mars 


3 25f 


6 37t 


11 1+ 


>1 3 


3 11+ 


fi 19+ 


10 4Q+ 


)O F. 


o i qj. 


P; RQ+ 


t 

1 n o4. 


ZZ O 
OQ ft 


Jupiter 


11 3J 


1 9t 


ii ay 

6 8f 


8 7 


10 27 + 


35+ 


5 33+ 


OQ K. 


Q 4Q + 


o oyj. 
UrQj- 


lu ooy 

4^f ,4- 


zo y 

OQ Q 


Saturn 


3 17f 


X 

6 211 


10 49f 


_!1 9 


2 44+ 


& 4fi+ 


10 1 ^* 


99 1 


y 4, J 

21 AJ. 


C 1 A + 


OUJ 
9/1AJ. 


o o 

99 O 


Uranus 


11 40 1 


2 28J 


7 6i 


24 


11 2+ 


1 50+ 


f> 28+ 


93 Q 


10 9i + 


O **}. 

Oe;o+ 


t\JJ 
f. OQ4- 


.i-i O 
93 Q 








"1 




LA *+ 












o zyy 


-j . 



NOTE. In the above Table, f signifies A. M., and J P. M. 



1 

1 


Day of 
Week. 


2 
>> 

s 

| 


TORONTO. 


QUEBEC. 


UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


Sun 
on 
Meridian. 


Sun s 
Declinatioi, 
Noon, N. 


Mu s 
Age, 
.Nooii. 


Moon 

on 
Mcrid. 


Upper 
Transit of 
Pole Star. 


Sun 
Rises. 


,Suu 
Sets. 


Moon 

Sets. 


C M 
Z D. 


Sun 

Rises. 


Sun 
Sets. 


Moon 
Se*s. 








A m 


A m 


A m 





h m 


A TO 


A m 


Awe 


o / // 


days 


h m\ h m s 


1 


Saturday . 


213 


1 49 


7 23 


16 


72 2 


4 41 


7 31 





12 6 1 


17 56 9 


11.4 


9 00 


4 27 26 


2 


SUNDAY. 


214 


4 50 


7 22 


1 4 


71 8 


4 42 


7 30 


46 


12 5 57 


17 40 47 


12.4 


9 62 


4 23 31 


8 


Monday. . 


215 


4 51 


7 21 


1 59 


69 9 


4 43 


7 29 


1 42 


12 6 52 


17 25 7 


13.4 


10 49 


4 19 36 


4 


Tuesday . 


216 


4 52 


7 20 


3 9 


66 4 


4 44 


7 28 


2 64 


12 6 47 


17 9 11 


14.4 


11 42 


4 15 41 


5 


Wednesd y 


217 


4 53 


7 19 


Rises 




4 46 


7 26 


Rises 


12 5 41 


16 62 58 


15.4 


Morn 


4 11 46 


6 


Thursday . 


218 


4 55 


7 17 


8 3 


61 7 


4 47 


7 25 


8 10 


12 5 35 


16 36 29 


16.4 


33 


4 7 50 


r 


Friday . . 


219 


4 56 


7 16 


8 26 


55 9 


4 48 


7 23 


8 29 


12 6 28 


16 19 43 


17.4 


1 21 


4 3 55 


8 


Saturday . 


220 


4 57 


7 14 


8 46 


49 3 


4 49 


7 21 


8 47 


12 5 20 


16 2 42 


18.4 


2 9 


400 


9 


SUNDAY. 


221 


1 587 12 


9 7 


42 5 


4 60 


7 20 


9 4 


12 5 12 


16 45 25 


19.4 


2 55 


3 66 5 


10 


Monday. . 


222 


i 59 


7 11 


9 28 


35 6 


4 52 


7 18 


9 23 


12 5 3 


15 27 53 


20.4 


3 44 


3 62 10 


11 


Tuesday . 


223 


5 


7 10 


9 54 


29 1 


4 53 


7 17 


9 45 


12 4 54 


15 10 6 


21.4 


4 32 


3 48 16 


12 


Wednesd y 


224 


5 2 


7 8 


10 24 


23 4 


4 54 


7 16 


10 12 


12 4 44 


14 62 4 


22.4 


5 25 


3 44 19 


13 


Thursday . 


225 


5 3 


7 7 


11 6 


18 9 


4 55 


7 14 


10 50 


12 4 33 


14 33 48 


23.4 


6 20 


3 40 24 


14 


Friday . . 


226 


5 4 


7 6 


11 59 


16 


4 56 


7 12 


11 41 


12 4 22 


14 15 18 


24.4 


7 21 


3 36 29 


15 


Saturday . 


227 


5 5 


7 4 


Morn 


15 


4 58 


7 10 


Morn 


12 4 11 


13 56 34 


25.4 


8 25 


3 32 34 


16 


SUNDAY. 


228 


5 


7 2 


1 3 


16 1 


4 59 


7 9 


45 


12 3 59 


13 37 37 


26.4 


9 26 


3 28 38 


17 


Monday. . 


229 


3 7 


7 1 


2 21 


19 


5 1 


7 7 


2 6 


12 3 47 


13 18 27 


27.4 


10 29 


3 24 43 


18 


Tuesday . 


230 


5 8 


7 


Sets. 


23 3 


5 2 


7 5 


Sets. 


12 3 34 


12 69 4 


28.4 


11 19 


3 20 48 


19 


Wednesd y 


231 


5 9 


6 58 


7 21 


28 7 


5 3 


7 3 


7 21 


12 3 20 


12 39 27 


29.4 


Ev. 8 


3 16 53 


20 


Thursday . 


232 


5 10 


6 56 


7 35 


34 7 


5 4 


7 2 


7 38 


12 3 6 


12 19 40 


1.0 


55 


3 12 58 


21 


Friday. . . 


233 


5 11 


6 55 


7 52 


40 9 


5 6 


7 


7 53 


12 2 62 


11 69 41 


2.0 


1 37 


392 


22 


Saturday . 


234 


5 13 


6 53 


8 10 


47 


5 7 


6 69 


8 9 


12 2 37 


11 39 30 


3.0 


2 19 


357 


23 


SUNDAY. 


235 


5 14 


6 51 


8 27 


52 9 


5 8 


6 56 


8 22 


12 2 22 


11 19 8 


4.0 


2 59 


3 1 12 


24 


Monday. . 


236 


5 15 


6 49 


8 47 


58 4 


5 10 


6 54 


8 40 


12 2 6 


10 58 35 


5.0 


3 41 


2 57 16 


25 


Tuesday. . 


237 


o 1C 


6 48 


9 


63 2 


5 11 


6 53 


8 58 


12 1 50 


10 37 62 


6.0 


4 24 


2 63 21 


26 


Wednesd y 


238 


5 17 


6 47 


9 37 


67 3 


5 12 


6 61 


9 24 


12 1 33 


10 16 59 


7.0 


5 10 


2 49 26 


27 


Thursday 


239 


5 18 


6 45 


10 10 


70 2 


5 13 


6 49 


9 54 


12 1 16 


9 55 57 


8.0 


5 58 


2 45 30 


28 


Friday . . 


240 


3 1 ,) 


6 43 


10 53 


72 


5 15 


6 47 


10 37 


12 59 


9 34 45 


9.0 


6 50 


2 41 36 


29 


Saturday . 


241 


5 20 


i l-j 


11 47 


72 3 


5 16 


6 46 


11 30 


12 41 


9 13 23 


10.0 


7 43 


2 37 40 


SO 


SUNDAY. 


242 


5 21 


6 99 


Morn 


71 


5 17 


6 43 


Morn 


12 23 


8 51 54 


11.0 


8 37 


2 33 44 


31 


Monday. . 


243 


4 23 


6 37 


50 


68 2 


5 19 


6 41 


34 


12 4 


8 30 15 


12.0 


9 30 


2 29 49 



[204] 



First Fall Month. 



SEPTEMBER, 185T. 



13 



TTJJ This is the ninth month of the year, though anciently the seventh : hence its name, Septem, 
wnd ember, from the rainy season usually commencing at this period. Zodiacal sign VIRGO, the 
Virgin. 



MOON S PHASES. 


D. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


00 

>. 
e. 
P 


Twilight beg. or ends, 


Semidiam. 


Pole Star. 


Toronto 


Quebec. 


Sun 


Moon 


Polar 
distance 


G. Elon. 
Lat. 45 

/ // 

2 3 12 
236 
232 


O Full Moon 


3 
10 

18 

!<> 
1 
28 


h m 
11 50pm 
5 33pm 
16am 
3 42am 
8 Oam 
4 am 


h m 
22* 
6 5pm 
48am 
4 14am 
8 Oam 
4 am 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 
P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 




A New Moon 


1 

1] 

2] 


h m 
2 42 
3 56 
4 9 


h m 
9 18 
7 57 
7 36 


h m 
3 30 
3 47 
4 3 


h m 
8 30 
8 6 

7 43 


/ // 
15 54 
15 56 

15 59 


// / 
15 35 
16 02 
14 50 


/ // 

1 27 6 
1 27 2 
1 26 59 


O First Quarter ... 
C Perigee . 


ff" Anosree . 



* Should read 4 22 a. m. Printed as above for want of space. 
The Planets. 



NAME OF 
PLAXET. 


SEPTEMBER IST. 


SEPTEMBER HTH. 


SEPTEMBER 21sr. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen b 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 

Meridi n 


Mer. 
/en h 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen b 
dist. 


Venus 


h m 
1 53f 
3 6f 
9 7} 
1 33f 
9 40+. 


k m 
4 50+ 
5 37} 
11 17f 
4 33} 
29} 


h m 
9 16f 
10 22+ 
4 14| 
9 2f 
5 6t 


o 

24.0 
25.7 

28.3 
22.5 
23.9 


h m 
2 10f 
3 OJ 

8 28} 
59t 

9 i} 


h m 
4 39} 
5 15+ 
10 36t 
3 56+ 
11 49f 


h m 
9 25f 
10 08t 
3 34f 
8 28f 
4 27f 


o 

26 

27 6 
28 3 
22 7 
23 9 


h m 

2 31f 
2 55f 
7 47+ 
20f 
8 21} 


A m 
4 34} 
4 51} 
9 56f 
3 15} 
11 10t 


h m 
9 33t 
9 63t 
2 54-j- 
7 48t 
3 47t 


o 

28 9 
29 6 
28 5 
22 8 
23 9 


Mars 


Jupiter 


Saturn 


Uranus 



N OTE. In the above Table f signifies A. M., and J P. 51. 



DayofMonth|| 


Day of 
Week. 


Day of Year. 


TORONTO. 


QUEBEC. 


UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


Sun 
on 
Meridian. 


Sun s 
)eclinatioc 

Noon, N. 


Mil s 
Age 
Noon. 


Moon 
on 
Merid. 


Upper 
Transit or 
Pole Star. 


Sun 
Rises. 


Sun 

Sets. 


Moon . 
Sets. 


d M. 
Z. D. 


Sun 

Rises. 


Sun 

Sets. 


Moon 

Sets. 








h m 


h m 


h m 





h m 


h m 


h m 


h m s 


/ // 


days 


h m 


h m i 


1 


Tuesday . 


244 


5 24 


6 35 


2 064 


5 20 


6 40 


1 46 


11 59 46 


8 8 30 


13.010 22 


2 25 53 


2 


Wednesd y 


245 


> 25 


6 34 


3 1*58 5 


5 21 


6 38 


3 4 


11 59 26 


7 46 35 


14.0 


11 13 


2 21 58 


3 


Thursday . 


246 


5 27 


6 32 


4 29 




5 23 


6 36 


4 22 


11 59 7 


7 24 33 


15.0 


Morn 


2 18 3 


4 


Friday . . 


247 


5 27 


6 30 


iises 


52 1 


5 24 


6 34 


3ises 


11 58 47 


7 2 25 


16.0 


2 


2 14 7 


5 


Saturday . 


248 


5 28 


6 29 


7 11 


45 2 


5 24 


6 32 


7 9 


11 58 28 


6 40 9 


17.0 


50 


2 10 12 


6 


SUNDAY. 


249 


3 30 


6 27 


7 32 


38 1 


5 26 


6 30 


7 27 


11 58 8 


6 17 57 


18.0 


1 38 


2 6 17 


7 


Monday. . 


250 


5 30 


6 25 


7 5731 3 


5 27 


5 29 


7 48 


11 57 47 


5 55 17 


19.0 


2 27 


2 2 21 


8 


Tuesday . 


251 


5 32 


6 23 


8 28 


25 


5 28 


6 27 


8 15 


11 57 27 


5 32 43 


20.0 


3 20 


1 58 26 


9 


Wednesd y 


252 


5 33 


6 21 


9 6 


20 


5 30 


6 24 


8 52 


11 57 6 


5 10 3 


21.0 


4 17 


1 54 31 


10 


Thursday 


253 


5 34 


6 19 


9 55 


16 6 


5 32 


6 22 


9 38 


11 56 46 


4 47 17 


22.0 


5 17 


1 50 35 


11 


Friday . . 


254 


5 35 


6 18 


10 55 


15 


5 32 


6 20 


10 38 


11 56 25 


4 24 26 


23.0 


6 19 


1 46 40 


12 


Saturday . 


255 


5 37 


6 16 


Morn 


15 5 


5 34 


6 18 


11 48 


11 56 4 


4 1 31 


24.0 


7 20 


1 42 45 


13 


SUNDAY. 


256 


5 37 


6 14 


3 


17 6 


5 36 


6 16 


Morn 


11 55 43 


3 38 30 


25.0 


8 18 


1 38 49 


14 


Monday. . 


257 


5 39 


6 12 


1 18 


21 6 


5 36 


14 


1 6 


11 55 22 


3 15 26 


26.0 


9 13 


1 34 54 


15 


Tuesday. . 


258 


5 40 


5 10 


2 32 


26 6 


5 38 


6 12 


2 23 


11 55 1 


2 52 19 


27.0 


10 3 


1 30 58 


16 


Wednesd y 


259 


5 41 


6 8 


3 45 


32 3 


5 38 


6 10 


3 42 


11 54 40 


2 29 7 


28.0 


10 50 


1 27 3 


17 


Thursday . 


260 


5 42 


6 7 


Sets 


38 


5 40 


6 8 


Sets 


11 54 19 


2 4 53 


29.0 


11 33 


1 23 7 


18 


Friday. . . 


261 


5 43 


6 5 


6 15 


44 6 


5 42 


6 6 


6 13 


11 53 58 


1 42 36 


0. 5 Ev. 14 


1 19 11 


19 


Saturday . 


262 


5 44 


6 3 


6 32 


50 7 


5 44 


6 4 


6 28 


11 53 37 


1 19 15 


1.5 55 


1 15 16 


20 


SUNDAY. 


263 


5 46 


6 1 


6 50 


56 3 


5 44 


6 2 


6 44 


11 53 16 


55 55 


2.5 


1 36 


1 11 20 


21 


Monday. . 


264 


5 47 


5 59 


7 13 


61 4 


5 46 


6 


7 4 


11 52 55 


32 32 


3.5 


2 19 


1 7 25 


22 


Tuesday. . 


265 


5 48 


5 57 


7 38 


65 85 48 


5 58 


7 25 


11 52 34 


099 


4. 5 3 4 


1 3 29 


23 


Wednesd y 


266 


5 49 


5 56 


8 8 


69 3 


5 48 


5 56 


7 54 


11 52 13 


S. 14 16 


5.5 3 51 


59 33 


24 


Thursday .| 267 


5 50 


5 54 


8 47 


71 5 


5 50 


5 54 


8 30 


11 51 53 


37 41 


6. 5 4 40 


55 36 


25 


Friday. . .1268 


5 51 


5 52 


9 36 


72 4 


5 51 


5 53 


9 18 


11 51 32 


116 


7.5 5 83 


51 40 


26 


Saturday . 


269 


5 52 


5 51 


10 34 


71 85 52 


5 50 


10 17 


11 51 12 


1 24 32 


8. 5 6 26 


47 45 


27 


SUNDAY . 


270 


5 53 


5 48 


11 39 


69 7 


5 53 


5 48 


11 24 


11 50 52 


1 47 57 


9.5 


7 18 


43 49 


28 


Monday. . 


271 


5 54 


5 47 


Morn 


66 1 


5 54 


5 47 


Morn 


11 50 32 


2 11 20 


10.5 


8 10 


39 53 


29 


Tuesda . . 


272 


5 56 


5 45 


51 


61 3 


5 56 


5 44 


39 


11 50 12 


2 34 42 


11.5 9 1 


35 58 


80 


Wednesd y 


273 


5 57 


5 43 


2 5 


55 4 


5 58 


5 42 


1 56 


11 49 53 


2 58 3 


12.5 9 50 


32 2 



|205] 



14 



OCTOBER, 1857. 



Second Fall Month. 



^ October in the year of Romulus, was strictly what its name implies, the eighth month 
With us it is the tenth ; sign in the Zodiac, LIBRA, the Balance. 



MOON S PHASES. 


!-. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


00 



a 


Twilight beg. or ends 


Semidiam. 


Pole Star. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


O Full Moon 
O Last Quarter ... 
New Moon 


3 
10 
17 
26 
6 
20 


h m 
9 51am 
36am 
4 21pm 
8 48pm 
3 Oam 
8 Opm 


h m 
10 23am 
1 Sam 
4 53pm 
9 20pm 
3 Oam 
8 Opm 


Sun 


Moon 


Polar 
distance 


G. Elon. 
Lat. 45 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


1 

11 

21 


h m 
4 32 
4 34 
4 46 


A 772 

7 17 

6 59 
6 43 


h m 
4 18 
4 32 
4 45 


h m 
7 22 
7 2 
6 44 


/ // 
16 2 
16 4 
16 7 


/ // 
16 8 
15 41 
14 45 


o / // 

1 26 55 
1 26 51 
1 26 47 


/ // 

2 2 56 
2 2 50 
2 2 45 


) First Quarter ... 
(T Perigee .. 


(T -Apogee ., 





The Plauctg. 



NAME OF 
tutat. 


OCTOBER IST. 


OCTOBER HTH. 


OCTOBER 21sT. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 

Meridi n 


Aler. 
Zen h 
(list. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 

Meiidi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 

dist 
o 

41 2 
36 3 
29 3 
23 1 
94 1 


Venus 


h m 
2 54+ 
2 48f 
7 07J 
11 45J 
7 41j 


h m 
4 26J 
4 26J 
9 12f 
2 42J 
10 29f 


h m 
9 40f 
9 37+ 
2 llf 
7 15f 
3 7f 


o 

32 5 
31 7 
28 7 
22 9 
23 9 


h m 
3 17f 
2 42f 
6 24t 
11 8J 
7 OJ 


h m 
4 16+ 
4 1+ 
8 28f 
2 6+ 
9 49f 


h m 
9 47f 
9 2l| 
1 28+ 
6 38f 
2 27+ 


o 

36 8 
34 
29 
23 
24 


h m 

3 40f 
2 34+ 
5 42+ 
10 31 + 
6 21 + 


h m 
4 6} 
3 36+. 
7 32f 
1 28+ 
9 8+ 


h m 
9 53+ 
9 5+ 
44+ 
6 If 
1 4CI 


Mars 


Jupiter 


Saturn 


Uranus 




NOTE. In the above Table f signifies A. M., and J P. M. 



[ Day of Month 


Day of 
Week. 


Day of Year. 


TORONTO. 


QUEBEC. 


UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


bun 
on 
Meridian. 


Sun s 
Declination 
Noon, S. 


Mn s 
Age 
Noon 


Moon 
on 
Merid. 


Upper 
Transit of 
Pole Star. 


Sun 
Rises 


Sun 

Sets. 


Moon 

Sets. 


C M. 
Z.D. 


Sun 

Rises 


Sun 

Sets. 


Moon 

Sets. 








h m 


h m 


h m 


o 


h m 


h 7? 


A m 


h m S 


o / / 


days 


h m 


h m s 


1 


Thursday . 


274 


5 58 


5 41 


3 22 


48 65 59 


5 40 


3 16 


11 49 33 


3 21 21 


13.5 


10 38 


28 7 


2 


Friday. . . 


275 


5 59 


5 40 


4 36 


41 5 


6 


5 38 


4 34 


11 49 15 


3 44 37 


14.5 


11 27 


24 12 


3 


Saturday . 


276 


6 


5 37 


5 55 




6 2 


5 3t 


5 57 


11 48 56 


4 7 62 


15.5 


Morn 


20 16 


4 


SUNDAY 


277 


6 1 


5 36 


Rises 


34 3 


6 3 


5 34 


Rises 


11 48 38 


4 31 3 


16.5 


16 


16 20 


5 


Monday . . 


278 


6 3 


5 34 


6 27 


27 6 


6 5 


o 31 


6 16 


11 48 20 


4 54 1C 


17.6 


1 9 


12 25 


6 


Tuesday. . 


279 


6 4 


5 33 


7 3 


21 8 


6f- 
t 


5 29 


6 48 


11 48 3 


5 17 14 


18.5 


2 6 


8 29 


7 


Wedncsd } 


280 


6 5 


5 30 


7 49 


17 5 


6 8 


5 28 


7 31 


11 47 45 


5 40 14 


19.6 


3 7 


4 33 


8 


Thursday. 


281 


6 6 


5 29 


8 45 


15 3 


6 9 


5 2L 


8 27 


11 47 29 


6 3 10 


20.5 


4 10 


Ev. 58 


9 


Friday . . 


282 


6 8 


5 27 


9 55 


15 1 


6 1C 


5 24 


9 38 


11 47 13 


6 26 3 


21.6 5 12 


11 62 46 


10 


Saturday . 


283 


6 8 


5 25 


11 8 


15 2 


6 11 


5 23 


10 54 


11 46 57 


6 48 8 


22.6! 6 14 


11 48 60 


11 


SUNDAY. 


284 


6 9 


5 24 


Morn 


20 4 


6 13 


o 21 


Morn 


11 46 42 


7 11 3C 


23.5 


7 9 


11 44 54 


12 


Monday. . 


285 


6 11 


5 22 


22 


25 


6 14 


5 19 


11 


11 46 27 


7 34 6 


24.5 


8 


11 40 68 


13 


Tuesday . 


286 


6 13 


5 20 


1 36 


30 4 


6 15 


5 17 


1 31 


11 46 13 


7 56 34 


25.5 


8 48 


11 37 2 


14 


Wednesd y 


287 


6 13 


5 19 


2 45 


36 3 


6 17 


5 15 


2 41 


11 45 59 


8 18 67 


26.5 


9 31 


11 33 6 


15 


Thursday. 


288 


6 14 


5 17 


3 62 


42 4 


6 19 


5 13 


3 50 


11 45 46 


8 41 13 


27.5 


10 13 


11 29 10 


16 


Friday. . . 


289 


6 16 


5 15 


4 56 


48 5 


6 20 


5 11 


4 58 


11 45 34 


9 3 22 


28.5 


10 63 


11 25 14 


17 


Saturday . 


290 


6 18 


5 13 


Sets. 


54 3 


6 21 


5 9 


Sets 


11 45 22 


9 25 22 


29.5 


11 34 


11 21 19 


18 


SUNDAY. 


291 


6 19 


5 12 


5 16 


59 6 


6 23 


5 7 


5 8 


11 45 10 


9 47 15 


0.8 


Ev.16 


11 17 23 


19 


Monday. . 


292 


6 20 


5 11 


5 41 


64 3 


6 24 


5 6 


6 34 


11 45 


10 8 60 


1.8 


1 


11 13 27 


20 


Tuesday . 


$3 


6 21 


5 9 


6 9 


68 1 


6 26 


5 4 


6 55 


11 44 50 


10 30 34 


2.8 


1 46 


11 9 31 


21 


Wednesd j 


294 


6 22 


5 7 


6 44 


70 7 


6 27 


5 3 


6 29 


11 44 40 


10 62 


3.8 


2 35 


11 5 35 


22 


Thursday . 


295 


6 24 


5 5 


7 29 


72 1 


6 29 


5 1 


7 12 


11 44 32 


11 13 15 


4. 8 3 25 


11 1 39 


23 


Friday . . 


296 


6 25 


5 4 


8 22 


72 1 


6 30 


1 58 


8 6 


11 44 23 


11 34 21 


5.8 


4 17 


10 57 43 


24 


Saturday . 


297 


6 27 


5 2 


9 24 


70 6 


6 31 


4 67 


9 8 


11 44 16 


11 65 16 


6.8 


5 9 


10 63 47 


25 


SUNDAY. 


298 


6 27 


5 1 


10 31 


67 7 


6 32 


4 5C 


10 18 


11 44 9 


12 16 


7.8 


6 


10 49 61 


2G 


Monday . 


299 


6 28 


5 


11 42 


63 66 34 


4 54 


11 33 


11 44 3 


12 36 32 


8.8 


6 60 


10 45 65 


27 


Tuesday . 


300 


6 30 


4 58 


Morn 


58 36 35 


4 53 


Mo /n 


11 43 58 


12 67 52 


9.8 


7 38 


10 41 59 


28 


Weduesd j 


501 


6 31 


4 57 


55 


52 


6 37 


4 51 


49 


11 43 53 


13 17 


10.8 


8 25 


10 38 3 


29 


Thursday. 


302 


6 33 


4 55 


2 9 


45 2 


6 39 


4 4r 


2 6 


11 43 50 


3 36 56 


11.8 9 13 


10 34 7 


80 


Friday . . 


303 


6 34 


4 54 


3 26 


38 1 


6 41 


4 47 


3 26 


11 43 47 


3 56 30 


12.8 


10 1 


10 30 11 


81 


Saturday . 


304 


6 36 


4 52 


4 42 


31 


6 42 


4 46 


4 46 


11 43 44 


4 16 9 


3.810 63 


10 26 16 



[206] 



Third Fall Month. 



NOVEMBER. 1857. 



15 



n\. This month, whose Zodiacal sign is SCOKPIO, the Scorpion, is, in common with some of 
tie other months, indebted for its name to Romulus, with whom it was the ninth month it is 
now the eleventh. 



MOON S PHASES. 


D. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


t 

00 

1 


Twilight beg. or ends, 


Semidiam. 


Pole Star. 


O Full Moon 


1 
8 
16 
M 
2 

17 
;0 


k m 
1 40 pin 
10 57 am 
10 37am 
15 pm 
noon. 
2 am 
midnight 


k m 
8 12pm 
11 29am 
11 09am 
48pm 
noon. 
2 an; 
midnight 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 


Sun 


Moon 


Polar 
distance 


G. Elon. 
Lat. 45 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


O Last Quarter 
New Moon 
) First Quarter ... 
f Perigee ...4 


] 
n 

21 


k m 
I 59 
j 11 
) 22 


h m 
6 28 
6 18 

6 01 


h m 
5 C 
5 IS 
5 2f 


k m 
8 27 
5 16 
3 7 


/ // 
16 10 
16 12 
16 14 


/ // 

16 43 

15 6 
15 


o / // 

1 26 43 
1 26 39 
1 26 36 


/ // 

2 2 39 
2 2 33 
2 2 29 


CAT>osree 


( Perigee 



The Planets. 



NAME OF 
PLANET. 


NOVEMBER 1ST. 


NOVEMBER HTH. 


NOVEMBER 21sT. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 

Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 

Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 
dist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 
dist. 


Venus 


h m 
4 6f 
2 26f 
4*54:5; 
9 49J 
5 36t 


h m 

3 52J 
3 7} 
6 52f 
45+ 
8 23+ 


h m 
9 59f 
8 46f 
11 511 
5 19f 
1 ]t 


o 

46 4 

38 8 
29 8 
23 2 
24 1 


h m 
4 31f 
2 17f 
4 11 + 
9 9 
4 56t 


h m 
3 40J 
2 411 
6 5f 
6j 
7 42+ 


h m 
10 06f 
8 29f 
11 061 
4 40f 
20+ 


o 

51 1 
41 2 
30 2 
23 1 
24 2 


A TO 
4 57f 
2 8f 
3 29+ 
8 301 
4 151 


TO h 
3 30J 

2 151 
5 29f 
11 27f 
7 Of 


m h 
10 18+ 
8 12f 
10 22J 
4 00+ 
11 35t 


o 

55 6 
43 8 
30 6 
23 1 

24 3 


Mars 


Jupiter 
Saturn 


Uranus.., 



NOTE. In tna above Table f signifies A, M., and J P. M. 



1 


Day of 


TORONTO. 


QUEBEC. 


UPPER AND LOWER 


CANADA. 





"Week. 


o 












Sun | Suns \ Mil s 


-Moou 


tipper 


o 




h, 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


M. 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


on Declination 


Age 


on 


Transit of 







(3 


ilises. 


Sets. 




Sets. 


Z. D. 


iises. 


Sets. 


Sets. 


Meridian. ! Noon, S. 


S oon. 


Merid. 


Pole Star. 








h m I 


r~w 




h m 


l 


I m 


h m 


h m 


h m s I " 


iays 


h m h m s 


1 


SUNDAY. 


3056 37 


I 51 j 


6 6 


4 6 


3 44 


4 44 


6 13ill 43 44 ; 14 35 2414.8 


11 4910 22 1 J 


2 


Monday . . 


3066 38 


1 50 


Rises 




3 454 43 


Rises 11 43 4314 54 2616.8 ,Mora 10 18 22 


3 


Tuesday . 307 


S 3914 49 




5 40 


9 5 


3 464 42 


6 25 


11 43 4315 13 1316.8 


49 10 14 26 


4 


Vednesd y 


308 


6 404 48 




6 32 


6 26 484 41 


6 15 


11 43 4315 31 4417.8 


1 55J10 10 30 


5 


Thursday . 309 


6 42 


4 46 




7 39 


5 1 


5 49 


4 39 


7 22 


11 43 4515 50 1|18.8 


2 59 10 6 34 


6 


Friday . . 


310 


6 44 


4 44 




8 54 


6 2 


6 51 


4 37 


8 4011 43 4816 8 319.8 


4 3 10 2 38 


7 


Saturday . 


311 


6 45 


4 43 10 9 


9 2 


6 53 


4 35 


10 Oil 43 5116 25 47120.8 


5 ? 


9 58 41 


8 


SUNDAY. 


3126 46 


4 4211 25 


3 6 


6 54 


4 34 


11 1811 43 6616 43 1521.8 


5 57 9 54 45 


9 


Vlonday. . 


3136 47 


4 41 


Morn 


28 8 


6 55 


4 33 


Morn 


11 44 i;i7 2722.8 


6 46 


9 50 49 


10 


Tuesday . 


314 


6 48 


4 40! 


36 


34 6 


6 564 32 


31 


11 44 717 17 21 


J3. 8 


7 30 


9 46 53 


11 


Wednesd y 


315 


6 49 4 39, 


1 44 


39 7 


6 584 31 


1 4211 44 1417 33 58 


24.8 


8 12 


9 42 57 


12 


Thursday. 


316 


6 51 


4 371 


2 50 


45 7 


6 59 


4 30 


2 50 


11 44 2217 50 17 


25.8 


8 53 


9 39 0- 


13 


Friday. . . 


317 


6 52 


4 36 ; 


3 53 


52 5 


7 


4 29 


3 5711 44 3018 6 1726.8 


9 33 


9 35 4 


14 


Saturday . 


3186 54 


4 361 


4 57 


57 9 


7 2 


4 27 


5 311 44 4018 21 57|27.8 


10 14 


9 31 8 


15 


SUNDAY. 


319 


G 55 


4 35| 


6 2 


62 8 


7 3 


4 26 


6 1111 44 5018 87 1828.8 


10 67 


9 27 11 


16 


Monday. . 


320 


6 56 


4 34;Sets. 


66 8 


7 5 


4 25 


Sets. 11 45 218 52 2029.8 


11 42 


9 23 15 


17 


Tuesday. . 


321 


6 57 


4 33 


4 45 


69 9 


7 614 25 


4 3011 45 1419 7 1 


l.OEv.31 


9 19 19 


18 


Wednesd y 322 6 59 


4 82) 


5 2" 


71 7 


7 8!4 23 


5 1011 45 27:19 21 22 2.0 


1 21 


9 15 22 


19 


Thursday. 


3237 1 


4 31 


6 r 


72 1 


7 94 22 


6 Oil 45 4019 35 22 


3.0 


2 12 


9 11 26 


20 


Friday. . . 


324 


7 2 


4 30 


1 16 


72 1 


7 104 21 


6 59 


11 45 6519 49 


4.0 3 4 


9 7 30 


2 


Saturday 


825|7 2 


4 30 


8 2 


68 7 


7 124 21 


8 7 


11 46 1020 2 18 


5.0 


3 55 


9 3 34 


22 


SUNDAY 


32f 


7 3 


4 30 


9 2 


65 


7 IS 


4 20 


9 1 


11 46 2620 15 11 


6.0 


4 44 


8 59 37 


23 


Monday . 


32-i 


7 6 


4 29 


10 40 


60 2 


7 IE 


>4 1810 31 


11 46 4320 27 43 


7.0 


5 31 


8 65 41 


2 


Tuesday. 


32* 


17 6 


4 28 


11 4 


54 6 


7 16!4 18111 4 


11 47 120 39 52 


8.0 6 17 


8 51 44 


2 


Wednesd j 


r82J 


)7 


4 27 


Morn 


48 2 


7 184 17 


Morn 


11 47 1920 61 38 


9.0 7 2 


8 47 48 


2 


Thursday 


88( 


)7 8 


4 27 


1 


41 e 


7 19,4 1C 


1 ( 


HI 47 3821 3 110.C 


7 49 


8 43 51 


27 


Friday . 


331 


7 K 


)4 26 


2 1 


34 I 


7 20:4 1C 


2 1< 


111 47 5821 13 59J11.0 


8 37 


8 39 55 


2 


Saturday 


33; 


>7 11 


4 25 


3 3 


28 I 


7 224 1 


3 3J 


)11 48 19,21 25 3312.0! 9 29 


8 35 59 


2 


SUNDAY 


.3337 11 


!4 25 


4 5 


22 1 


7 234 14 


t 5 511 48 40i21 34 4513.010 27 


8 82 2 


8 


Monday. . 334J7 144 24 


6 2 


17 * 


7 24,4 14 


[ 6 3511 49 2;21 44 3114.011 30 


8 28 6 



[207] 



DECEMBER, 1851. 



First Winter Month. 



/ SAGITTARIUS, the Archer, is the Zodiacal sign of this, the Twelfth and la t month of our 
year, and the tenth of the Romans. 



MOON S PHASES. 


D. 


Toronto. 


Quebec. 




- 

Q 


Twilight leg. or ends, 


Semidiam. 


Pole Star. 


O Full Moon 


1 
8 
Ll 
24 

30 
1 i 
2? 


h m 
5 40am 
1 20am 
5 4 4 am 
1 19am 
4 16pm 
3 Oam 
noon. 


h m 
6 12am 
1 53am 
6 16am 
1 51 am 
4 48pm 
3 Oam 
noon 


Toronto. | Quebec. 


Sun . Moon 

i 


Polar 
distance 


G. Elon. 
Lat. 45 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 
P. M. 


Beg. 

A. M. 


End 

P. M. 


O Last Quarter ... 
Q New Moon ... . 


f) First Quarter ... 
O Full Moon 
(T Apogee . 


1 
il 
21 


h m 
5 32 
5 40 
5 47 


h m 
6 7 
6 7 
6 11 


h m 
5 36 
5 45 
5 52 


h m 
6 3 
6 2 
6 6 


/ //: / // 

16 1616 47 
16 1714 50 
16 1815 21 


/ // 

1 26 33 
1 26 31 
1 26 29 


o / // 

2 2 25 
2 2 21 
2 2 19 


( Perigee 





The Planets. 



NAME OF 
PLAXET. 


DECEMBER IST. 


DECEMBER HTH. 


DECEMBER 21si. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 

clist. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


MerTdi n 


Mer. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


On 
Meridi n 


Mer. 
Zen h 
dist. 


Venus 


h m 
5 23f 
1 59f 
2 46} 
7 49} 
3 35} 


h m 
3 22} 
1 68} 
4 35f 
10 46f 
6 18f 


h m 
10 23f 
7 54f 
9 38} 
3 19f 
10 54} 


o 

59 6 
45 8 
30 9 
23 
24 4 


h m 
5 48f 
1 50f 
2 5} 
7 7} 
2 54} 


h m 
3 20} 
1 21} 
3 51f 
10 06f 
5 37f 


h m 
10 34f63 
7 36f 48 
8 56} 31 ] 
2 38f22 9 
10 13} 24 5 


h m 
6 13f 
1 40f 
1 21} 
6 25} 
2 13} 


/* m 
3 21} 
55} 
3 5f 
9 24f 
4 56f 


h m 
10 47f 
7 17f 
8 11} 
1 56f 
9 33} 




65 4 
50 2 
31 2 
22 8 
44 6 


Mars 


Jupiter 


Saturn 


Uranus 





NOTE. In the above Table f signifies A. M. and J P. M. 



3 

g 

^ 


Day of 


fH 


TORONTO. 


QUEBEC. 


UPPER AND LOWER CANADA. 


(*_ 
o 


Week. 









Sun 


Sun s 


Mn s 


Moon 


Upper 


5 1 




, 


Sun i Sun 


Mooii 


(I M. 


uu Sun 


Moon 


on 


Declination 


Age 


on 


Transit of 


| 




Q 


Rises. S.-ts. 


Kises. 


Z.D 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Meridian. 


Noon, S. 


Noon 


Merid. 


Pole Star. 








h mh m 


h m 


o 


h m 


h m 


h m 


h m s 


/ // 


days, 


h rr 


h m s 


1 


Tuesday . 


335 


1 15 4 24 


4 14 




7 25 


4 14 


3 57 


11 49 24 


21 53 50 


15.0 


Morn 


8 24 9 


2 


Wednesd v 


336 


7 16 ! 4 24 


5 17 


15 57 26 


4 13 


4 56 


11 49 47 


22 2 4616.0 


3t 


8 20 13 


3 


Thursday. 


337 


7 17 4 23 


6 31 


15 5 


7 27 


4 13 


6 15 


11 60 11 


22 11 16 17. ( 


1 44 


8 16 16 


4 


Friday. . . 


338 


7 184 23 


7 52 


17 87 29 


4 12 


7 40 


11 50 35 


22 19 21 18. ( 


2 4e 


8 12 19 


5 


Saturday . 


339 


7 194 23 


9 10 


21 87 304 12 


9 1 


11 51 


22 26 59 19. 


3 47 


8 8 23 


6 


SUNDAY. 


340 


7 204 22 


10 24 


2G 9731412 


10 18 


11 51 26 


22 34 11 20. f 


4 4( 


8 4 26 


7 


Monday. . 


341 


7 214 22 


11 34 


32 7 


7 31 


4 1311 31 


11 51 52 


22 40 6621.C 


5 27 


8 29 


8 


Tuesday . 


342 


7 224 22 


Morn 


38 87 32 


4 12 


Morn 


11 52 18 


22 47 1522.0 


6 1C 


7 56 33 


9 


Wednesd y 343 


7 234 23 


41 


44 97 34 


4 12 


41 


11 52 45 


22 53 623. C 


6 52 


7 62 36 


10 


Thursday. 344 


7 244 23 


1 45 


50 8 


7 35 


4 12 


1 46 


11 53 13 


22 58 32 24. C 


7 32 


7 48 40 


11 


Friday . . 


345 


7 24 : 4 23 


2 50 


56 4 


7 36 


4 12 


2 56 


11 53 40 


23 3 3025.0 


8 13 


7 44 44 


12 


Saturday . 


340 7 254 23 


3 54 


61 47 36 


4 12 


4 2 


11 64 9 


23 8 1 26. 


8 56 


7 40 47 


13 


SUNDAY. 


347 7 26 4 23 


4 59 


65 7 


7 38 


4 12 


5 9 


11 54 37 


23 12 427.1 


9 40 


7 36 51 


14 


Monday. . 


348i7 274 23 


6 4 


69 07 38 


4 12 


6 17 


11 55 6 


23 15 3728.0 


10 27 


7 32 54 


15 


Tuesday. . 


349 


7 274 24 


Sets. 


71 2 


7 39 


4 12 


Sets. 


11 65 35 


23 18 44129.0 


11 17 


7 28 58 


16 


Wednesd y 


350 


7 284 24 


4 13 


72 1 


7 39 


4 13 


3 55 


11 66 5 


23 21 23 


0.2 


Ev. 8 


7 25 1 


17 


Thursday. 


351 


7 284 25 


5 10 


71 47 40 


4 13 


4 63 


11 56 34 


23 23 34 


1.2 


1 


7 21 3 


18 


Friday. . . 


352 


7 294 25 


6 14 


69 4 


7 41 


4 13 


5 59 


11 57 4 


23 25 17 


2.2 


1 52 


7 17 7 


19 


Saturday . 


353 


7 304 20 


7 21 


66 1 


7 42 


4 13 


7 9 


11 57 34 


23 26 31 


3.2 


2 41 


7 13 10 


20 


SUNDAY. 


354 


7314 25 


8 30 


ni 6 


7 42 


4 14 


8 22 


11 68 4 


23 27 16 


4.2 


3 29 


7 9 13 


21 


Monday. . 


355 


7 31 4 26 


9 30 


56 37 42 


4 14 


9 34 


11 58 34 


23 27 37 5.2 


4 14 


7 5 17 


22 


Tuesday . 


356 


7 324 26 


10 49 


50 2 


7 43 


4 15 


10 47 


11 59 4 


23 27 23 6.2 


4 59 


7 1 21 


23 


Wednesd y 


357 


7 324 27 


Morn 


43 8 


7 44 


4 15 


Morn 


11 69 34 


23 26 45 7. 2 


5 43 


6 57 24 


24 


Thursday . 


168 


7 324 28 





36 9 


7 44 


4 16 





12 4 


23 25 37i 8.2 


6 29 


6 53 27 


25 


Friday . .869 


7 324 29 


1 13 


307 


7 44 


4 17 


1 17 


12 34 


23 24 2 9.2 


7 17 


6 49 30 


26 


Saturday . 360 


7 334 29 


2 30 


Jl 07 44 


4 18 


2 38 


12 1 4 


23 21 5710.2 


8 10 


6 45 34 


27 


SUNDAY. ,361 


7 334 30 3 51 


lit 6 


7 45 


4 18 


4 3 


12 1 33 


23 19 2611.2 


9 8 


6 41 37 


28 Monday . 3<;u 


7 334 31 5 15 


16 4 


7 45 


4 19 


5 29 


12 2 3 


23 16 26 12.2 


14 


6 37 40 


29 


Tuesday. . 363 


7 334 32; 6 37 


15 27 45 


4 20 


6 64 


12 2 32 


23 12 57 


13.2 


I 18 


6 33 44 


80 


Wednesd y 361 


7 344 32 Rises 


6 47 45 


4 21 


Xises 


12 3 1 


23 9 2 


14.2 


Morn 


6 29 47 


21 


Thursday. 3ii.-, 7 344 33) 5 21 


19 67 46 


4 21 


6 8 


12 3 29 


23 4 37 


15.2 


26 


6 25 50 



1857.] 



REMARKABLE OCCURRENCES. 



17 



REMARKABLE OCCURRENCES IN 1855. 



January, 1855. 

1. The town of Bytown named Ottawa City. More than 
half Hamburg inundated by the Elbe. 

2. Th.< George Canning, New York and Hamburg packet 
ship, lent at the mouth of the Elba, with all on board. 
Omer Pasha embarked at Varna for Eupatoria. 

5. Death of Lord Robertson. Advance of the Russian 
troops in Asia to Topak Kuleli. 

6. Omer Pasha left the Crimea for Varna.- Albany Jm/rnal 
(N. Y ) printed on basswood paper. Opening of the Vienna 
conferences. 

7. Navigation on Lake Erie still open. 

8. Great meeting held in Toronto on behalf of the 
Patriotic Fund. 

9. The Russians re-crossed the Danube, the Turks having 
left for the Crimea. 

10. Miss Mary Russell Mitford died, aged C9. Sardinia 
adheres to the Western Powers, and undertakes to send 
15,OuO men to the Crimea. 

12. Sortie by the Russians from Sebastopol, repulsed by 
the French. Trial of Gleason and McGrath for the murder 
of Sheppard. Murder of Miss Charlotte Todd, at St. Tho 
mas. Address presented to Lord Elgin by the Liverpool 
Chamber of Commerce. Death of the Queen Dowager of 
Sardinia. 

13. Eighteen hundred men of the French Imperial 
Guard embarked at Marseilles for the Crimea. Fierce 
cannonade on the Allies by the Sebastopol garrison. 

14. Death of Judge Panel, at Quebec. The subscription 
to the French loan of 500.000,000 of francs closes, and 
amounts to 2,175,000,000 of francs. 

15. Great Fire in Belleville; loss $2-4,000. Russian sortie 
from Sebastopol ; fourteen English and nine French officers 
taken prisoners. 

16. Murder of Mrs. Curtis, at Simcoe. 

19. Ice bridge formed between Quebec and Point Levi. 

2 ). Riot on Buffalo and Brantford Railroad. 5.500 sick 
and wounded at Scutari and in the hospital. Spiller von 
Hauenschild, German poet and novellist, under the name of 
Mix Walde.n, died, aged 30. Paulin Guerin, French 
painter, died. Death of the Queen of Sardinia. 

22. St r Queen City burned at Queen s Wharf, Toronto. 

23. Mutiny among the Zouaves ; 400 of them sent in 
chains to Constantinople. Mr. Morin retires from the 
Oil >i net and is appointed a Judge. Archdeacon Hare died. 
aged 59. 

24. Irving tried for manslaughter of Samuel Reid, and 
acquitted. Arrest of John Thompson, one of the Townsend 
gang. 

25. The Canadian grant of 20,000 ster g to the Patriotic 
Fund, acknowledged in the House of Commons. 

26. Post-office money-order system introduced into Cana 
da. Great ftre in Kingston. Trial of the Quel-<- Gav:t//i 
Rioters. Rev. Richard Jones, political economist, died 
aged C4. 

27. Steamer Pearl exploded at Sacramento ; 50 lives lost. 

28. Prince Napoleon Buonaparte returned to Paris fnun 
the Crimea. The Turkish trooks embarked fn.iii Varna for 
the Crimea. Broussa nearly destroyed by an earthquake ; 

:> Inhabitants killed or maimed. First train of cars 
d over the Panama railroad, connecting the Atlantic 
and Pacific oceans. 

2^t. Great. Fire at Fort Erie, loss $60,000. The C7.ar, by 
ti imperial manifesto, calls the entire population of I. 



and biographer, died, 



liable to serve, to arms. English Ministry resigned. 

30. Duke of Cambridge arrived in England from the Cri 
mea. The Turks defeated at Tcholok bridge, in Asia. The 
Island of Aves taken possession of by the Americans. 

31. Russian Sortie from Sr-bastopol ; 300 French soldiers 
put hors ilecnmbut Turkish army attacked at Lairhva. in 
Asia: Russians repulsed. cities of Ceaenza and P otenza 
(Naples) visited by severe shocks of Earthquake. 

February, 1*55. 

1. Severe earthquake in Mexico. Rome connected bv 

sgrapb with the rest of Europe. The I araguagans fired 

upon a United States steamer exploring the river Paraguay. 

B ^ [209] 



2. Fire in Quebec Lunatic Asylum. Thanks of the 
House of Commons presented to Sir De Lacy Evans. Grand 
Dukes Michael and Nicholas of Russia joined the army in 
Sebastopol. 

3. Treaty of Alliance between Sardinia and the Western 
Powers adopted by the Sardinian parliament. 

5. English missionaries to Polish Jews banished from 
Ru.-siau Poland by royal order. 

6. Thermometer 254 Fah. in Toronto, 3S in 
Barrie, and 16 in New York. Railway trains in the 
Prairies buried for days in the snow, and passengers nearly 
starved with cold and hunger. 

7. Lord Palmerston formed the new Ministry. 

8. Earthquake in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. 
Gen. Alvarez established a provisional government in 
Acapulco, adverse to Santa Anna. Count Abel Hugo died. 
The Palmerston Ministry sworn into office, at a Privy 
Council held at Windsor Castle. 

9. Augustus Cassar Dodge appointed United States Minis 
ter to Spain. M. Augeuot, Belgian poet, died, aged Si. 

10. Death of the Duke of Genoa, brother to the King of 
Sardinia. 

11. Thompson, of the Townsend gang, with seven others 
escaped from the Hamilton gaol. Earthquake in New 
Zealand. 

12. An imperial ukase orders the organization and 
arming of all the militia of the Russian empire, for the 
defence of the "orthodox faith." 

13. James Denistoun, historian 

aged 52. 

15. Thompson, the burglar, recaptured. French frigate 
miUante lost in the Straits of Bonifacio ; 600 drowned. 
Count Tekeli, Hungarian historian, died. 

10. Exhibition in Toronto of articles to be sent to the 
Paris Exhibition. 

17. Euparoria attacked by the Russians ; the Russians 
repulsed, with a loss of 500, by the Turks, under Omer 
Pasha. Russia declared war against Sardinia. 

18. The Allied fleets raised the blockade at the mouths 
of the Danube. 

19. Earthquake in Maine, U. S. 

20. Joseph Hume, M.P., died, aged 78. The Tiber over 
flowed its banks at Rome. Lord John Riussell leaves Lon 
don for the Vienna Conference. 

21. American Treaty with Japan concluded at Simoda. 
The Thames and Litli-y frozen over. Charles R. Dod, 
compiler of Biography, Peerage, &c., died, aged 02. 

22. Bread riots in London. 

2o. Provincial Parliament re-assemble at Quebec. Elec 
tion riot at Montreal. Two Russian redoubts at Sebasto 
pol stormed by the French. Prof. Karl F. Gauss, German 
astronomer, &c., died, aged 78. 

24. The French attacked the Malakhoff; great loss on 
both sides. 

26. Santa Anna left the city of Mexico suddenly with a 
large body of troops. 

28. Chev. de Meyer, German naturalist, died, aged 60. 
The Cltyof Bronssa, in Asia Minor, destroyed by an earth 
quake. 

March, 1855. 

1. Allied fire re-opened on Sebastopol. Peruvian war 

T Jtinujr. from Cullao, wrecked on St. John s rock ; 
400 natives and soldi* rs perished. 

2. The Emperor Nicholas of Russia died. The Act giving 
effect to the Reciprocity Treaty approved by the President 
of the United states. 

3. Copley Fielding, landscape painter, died, aged 68. 

4. The Czar. Alexander II., accepted resignation of 
Prince Menschikofl as Commander io Chief in the Crimea. 

Another Russian sortie trom Sebastopol repulsed. Lord 
John Russell arrived at Vienna. 

5. Engagement botw n Russians and Turks at Eupatoria. 
(V Conspiracy of burglar Thompson and other prisoners, 

to bivak tin Toronto jail, defeated. Dinner in Montreal to 
renm < leneral. The ( !,i m >se rebels defeated by the 
Imperialists at Canton, and shanghai re-taken from the 
insurgents. 



18 



REMARKABLE OCCURRENCES. 



[1857. 



7. The Czar announced his intention of pursuing the 
war policy of his late father. J. Hoilius, Portrait painter. 
died, aged 37. 

8. The Holy Synod of Russia called upon the people to 
arm. 

10. Santa Anna returned to the city of Mexico. Death 
of Don Curias, Jnfaute of Spain, at Tri.ste,agcd 07. 

11. The Austrian troops driven from Krajova by the 
natives. 

12. Marseilles visited by a dreadful storm. 

13. Russian fire opened on the Allies from the heights of 
Balaclava. 

14. Ek. nder Bey advanced from Eupatoria, and repulsed 
by the Russians. Earl St. Uerniaius, Lord Lieutenaut of 
Irelaud, succeeded by the Earl of Carlisle. G. Passworth. 
architect and engineer, died, aged 54. 

15. The French advanced their lines. Russian sortie re 
pulsed. Whilst the people were swearing allegiance to 
Alexander, in Warsaw, the great bell of the Cathedral fell, 
killing 100 men. 

1C. Prussia refused to join the treaty of the Allies. 

17. Russian rifle pits taken by the French. 

18. The garrison in Sebastopol re-inforced by 15,000 men. 

20. Laying foundation-stone of the Toronto Exchange. 
Prince Gortsehakoff, the new Russian Commander-in- 
Chief, arrived in Sebastopol. 

21. The Japanese governor of Hakodadi ordered all 
Americans to quit that port. 

22. General attack by the Russians on the Allied lines 
repulsed. Loss : Russians, -Odd men ; British, 000 ; i rench, 
360. 

25. Chinese rebels, to the number of 3,500, decapitated 
iji one day, near Canton. 

27. R. C. Carpenter, architect, died, aged 43. 

2S. Santa Anna s army defeated by insurgents under 
General Moreno. 

30. Cholera raging in St. Petersburgh. 

31. Miss Bronte, (Mrs. Nichol) novelist, died, aged 48. 
Rafael Furstenthal, Hebraist, died, aged 74. 

April, 1855. 

1. The Russians establish themselves in Baidar. 

2. Geo. B. Greenough, geologist and geographer, died, 
aged 77. 

3. New Tork Prohibitory Liquor Law passed Senate. 

4. The British fleet sailed from Spithead, for the Baltici 
under the command of Rear-Admiral Dundas. 

5. Mr. Layard installed Rector of Marischal College, 
Aberdeen. 

9. Bombardment of Sebastopol, from 350 guns of largest 
calibre commenced. General Corral elected President of 
Nicaragua. 

10. City of Broussa visited by a second earthquake ; 150 
shocks in 24 hours. 

12. The French silenced the Flagstaff Battery. 

13. Severe engagement between the Allied and Russian 
armies before Sebastopol. Sir Henry de la Bache, jr. .< ilo- 
gist, diod, aged 55. 1 elegrapluc communication with the 
Crimea completed. 

17. The Emperor and Empress of the French visited 
England. Cholera in the French Crimean camp. 

IS. Tremendous Hurricane; great damage at Whitby> 
Niagira, &c. I. T. Isakey, French minature painter, died) 
ged bS, 

19. Rifle pits carried by the English ; Col. Egerton, of the 
77th, killed. Alfred B. Clayton, architect, died, aged 60. 

.;ii--cui garrison at I etropaulowski escapes to the 
Amoor in two ships of war, accompanied by three American 
whalers, which conveyed their stores, and part of their 

< The Baltic coast of Russia blockaded by the British 

20. Kingston Bay clear of ice. 

21. The Emperor and Empress of the French return to 
Dover en rvutr. for Paris. 

23. Lord John Russell leaves Vienna for London. 
25. The Municipal Debentures and Newspaper Pi 



Abolition Bills read a third time, and passed. Lord Strat 
ford de Rcdcliffe left Constantinople for the Crimea. 

26. Review of French troops before Sebastopol, by Gen. 

Canrobert. 

28. The Emperor Napoleon III. attacked by the as 
Pianori, who fired two .-hots at his Majesty without effect. 
The bombardment of Sebastopol suspended. 

30. Sir Henry R. Bishop, musical composer, died, aged GS. 

May, 1855. 

1. The French stormed the Batterie Centrale, taking 8 
mortars and 200 prisoners ; loss o:i ki.led and 210 wounded. 
Mount VeMivius in a violent state of eruption for three 
weeks from this day. 

2. The Allies took some important works of counter ap 
proach before Sebastopol. Sir George Head, author of 
Travels and Statistics, died, aged 74. 

3. Petropaulowski taken by allied pacific fleet. Rus.-ians 
at Sebastopol attempt the re-capture of works lost on pre 
vious day. and are defeated. 

4. The John, bound from Plymouth to Quebec, wrecked 
in a gale off the coast of Cornwall ; 200 lives lost.. 

5. Sir Robert H. Inglis died, aged 70. 

6. Captain Collinson returns in the Enterprise from the 
Artie regions. 

7. Navigation open at Quebec. 

8. Sleighing in Hamilton. Sir Humphrey Davy s widow 
died. 

9. Mount Vesuvius in an active state of eruption. Gen. 
Delia Marmora arrived in the Crimea with 400U Sardinians. 

10. Mr. Smiley, of the Hamilton Spectator, died. Uu 
sortie repulsed by the British. Loss on both sides 4UO 
killed. 

11. Another Russian attack repulsed with a loss of 110 
killed and wouuded. 

12. The Russians attack the British trenches ; British 
1 i-s IIKJ killed and wounded. Prussia and Austria agree to 
maintain an armed neutrality during the war. 

14. Pianori guillotined at Paris. 

15. Paris Exhibition opened. Cholera re-appeared in 
Allied camp. Santa Anna besieged Zainora with 0,000 men. 

16. Gen. Canrobert resigned French command at Sebas 
topol ; succeeded by Gen Pelissier. 

17. Destructive floods in Jamaica. 

18. Blowes and King executed for Murder of Mr. Nelles. 
Distribution of Crimean medal to returned wounded and 
invalided soldiers by her Majesty. 

19. Allied army completed its fourth parallel towards 
Sebastopol. 

20. The Annie Maclean, with cargo for army from Lord 
Blantyre, went down in the Black sea, with all hands. 

21. Spanish Revolution in Saragossa commenced. 

1. The Kertch expedition sailed from Sebastopol. Tho 
French Baltic fleet sailed from Kiel to join the British 
squadron. A British force, sent from Sierra Leone to en 
force payment of some 1000 dollars indemnity from the 
King of Mallaghae, is repulsed with great ti 

23. The French attacked the Russian ambuscades at the 
head of Quarantine Bay, with brilliant success; Ri: 
loss about 2,500 killed. . 

24. Kertch and Yenikali captured without 

The enemy, in evacuating Kertch, destroyed 4.100,000 Ibs. 
of corn, arid 508,000 Ibs. of flour. The French carried the 
remainder of the Russian place d armee attacked the previ 
ous day. Russian loss 2,500 ; French, -J., MO. 

25. A portion of the allied armies advanced to the 
Tchernaya. Five vessels laden with (urn came into 
Kertch, and fell into the hands of the Allies. 

26. Thomas Faulkner, topographer, died, aged 79. 

27. Four barges captured in Biuka Bay, by Afagicitnnt 
and Merlin, of the Baltic fleet. The sea of A/oll squadron 
appeared before Rerdiansk, and the enemy destroyed four 
war steamers and a considerable depot of corn, to prevent 
tlu-ir capture by the Alies. Monterey city (Mexico) cap- 

, by revolutionary troops. 

28. The Allied squadron arrived off Arabat, and after an 

ment of one hour and a half, blew up the enemy s 



[210] 



1857.] 



REMARKABLE OCCURRENCES. 



19 



magazine. Soudjack Kaleh evacuated by Russians. Car- 
liat insurgents at Valanquiza (Spain) defeated. 

29. Santa Anna defeated at Morelia (Mexico) by Gen. 
Comonibrt. Viscount Strangford, Portuguese translator 
died, aged 75. 

30. The Provincial Parliament prorogued by Governor 
General. 

31. Carlist insurrection in Spain quelled The Allied 
fleets within fifteen miles of Cronstadt. Genitschi, near 
Putrid Sea, bombarded by the Allies, and Russian stores 
destroyed. 

June, 1855. 

2. Liquor Riot in Portland, Maine. Horace Greely ar 
rested iu Paris. 

3. Ports of the White Sea blockaded. 

4. Vienna conference dissolved. New comet discovered 
by Levenier. 

5. Anapa evacuated by the Russians. Gheisk, Mariopoul 
and Taganrog surrendered to Captain Lyons. 

6. Bombardment of Sebastopol resumed. The Ilango 
maaeacre. 

7. 1 he French carried the white works and the Mame- 
lon, taking 73 guns and 500 prisoners. Kussian loss, 4,3UO ; 
.trench, i, u oO ; British, 165 killed and missing, 5UO wounded. 

8. Failure of Strachan, Paul, & Bates. 

9. Russians abandon right shore of Careening Bay 

A young man shot by his lather in Chatham, C. VV . 

10. Barnum s Baby Show in New York. Cagliari (Italy) 
visited by an earthquake. Old Suiithlield market, London, 
closed. 

14. Remains of Kertch accidentally destroyed by fire. 

15. The " Know Nothing " Council issue their Platform 
of Principles." 

17. Bombardment of Sebastopol again resumed. 

18. Allies attacked the Malakholl and Redan ; repulsed 
with great slaughter. 

1 .). New York City Guards entertained in Montreal. 

20. Austria reduces her army. 

21. Kara (Asia) invested by a Russian army, under Gen 
Mouravieff. 

23. Captain Lyons died off Therapia from a wound A 
man went over Niagara Falls. Sault Ste Marie Canal 
opened ; the steamer Mlinviss made the first trip through it. 

21. Great rain storm in Niagara District. Nystadt at 
tacked by English frigate tiamer. 

25. Utah territory ravaged by grasshoppers. J, Black 
political writer, &c., died aged 72. 

H. Lord Raglan died before Sebastopol; succeeded in 
command by Gen. Simpson. Baltimore visited by an 
earthquake. Geuitchi bombarded by Sea of Azoff squadron 

29. Fire in Toronto, and disgraceful riot amon" the fire 
men. Admiral Nachimoff killed. Col. Walker fought the 
battle of Riva-i, and was defeated by Government troops 
Yellow fever broke out in French Guiana. Madame de 
Girardin (Delphiue Gay) died, aged 46. 

30. Baron de Rottenburg appointed Adjutant-General of 
Canadian militia. James Silk Buckingham, author and 
traveller, died, aged 69. 

July, 1855. 

I. Insurrection by the Santals in India. Abbe de 

Rosmmi, Italian metaphysician, died, aged f,x. 

3. Yfiikcni occupied by the Russians. The Turkish army 
partially blockaded at Kars. 

5, LMVHII, in Fiulaud, bombarded and destroyed by the 
English. 

7. Sir W. E. Parry, Artie discoverer died, aged 65. 

8. The Russians made a sortie on the Mamelon. 

1 i. Briti-h Consul at Cincinnati arivsted by the United 
- authorities, on the charge of recruiting fjr the 
Foreign Legion. British opened tire on the Redan. 

II. Bombardment of Sweabourg by the Allied fleets. 

1-2. DiMrnircfiil Circus riot in Toronto. Lord John Rus 
sell resigned his seat in KngiNh Cabinet. Revolt of the 
Arabs of Tripoli, who, under Gourmah. repulsed a Turkish 
force sent against them, with a loss of 2,000 men and thtir 
guns. 



13. Commandant de Belveze arrived at Quebec in French 
frigate Oipricieuse. General Mouravieff attacked the 
lurkish camp at Kars and repulsed. Lord J. Russell re 
signs the office of Colonial Secretary. 

14 Severe Russian Sortie from Sebastopol. 

16. Lord Canning appointed Governor-General of India 
Russian sortie on French works in front of the Mamelon 
Petrouskoi destroyed by Sea of Azoff squadron The 
King of Portugal visits the City of Turin. The Mandigoe* 
of Sabbagee, in Gambia, repulsed with great loss a small 
British force sent to arrest a slave-dealer in that town, who 
had sold a British subject. 

17. Governor O Connor, aided by a French force from 
Goree, attacks Sabbagee, which is taken, razed to the 
ground, and 1,500 Mandigoes slain. 

18. Project of Georgian Bay ship canal anproved of hr 
Toronto Board of Trade. 

19. Thermometer in Toronto 100 Fahr. in the shade nt 
noon. 

20 Sir W. Molesworth appointed Colonial Secretary. 

23. Sir W. Molesworth succeeded Lord John Russell <i 
Colonial Secretary. 

24. The Carradoc arrived at Bristol with the remains of 
Lord Raglan. 

25. A smart earthquake felt about 1 p. m., all along tht- 
east of France, from Valence to Metz ; and also in ftaiy, 
Switzerland, and Germany. 

26. The Broom inquest in Toronto. Renewed and more- 
violent s"hocks of earthquake in the Valais in Switzerland : 
the villages of St. Nicholas, Viege, and Stalden destroyed. 
Lord Raglan s remains deposited in the family vault in 
in Badminton Park. 

30. Several Hotel robberies in Toronto. M. Flugel, lex 
icologist; Charles Spindler, German novelist; and Joseph 
Max, German sculptor, died. 

31. Russian army in the Crimea largely reinforced during 
the past month. 

August^ 1855. 

1. Mr. Logan, the Canadian geologist, awarded the great 
gold medal at the Paris Exhibition, for his collection of 
minerals and geological map. 

2. Russian sortie by the Woronzoff road repulsed bv the 
British. 

3. Kirwin in Toronto. Santa Anna denied the rumonr 
of his abdication in a proclamation to the Mexican people. 

4. Yellow fever in the Barbadoes. 

5. A Royal Proclamation issued in Hanover, reinstating 
the aristocracy in the rights which they possessed before 
1848, in obedience to a decree of the Frankfort Diet o 
April 12, 1855. 

6. The King of Portugal visits Q n Victoria at Osborne. 

7. Riot between Irish and Dutch labourers at Port 
Credit ; two of the latter killed. Yellow Fever at Norfolk. 
Virginia. The garrison at Kars repulsed an attack of the 
Russians. Rev. Richard Sheepshanks died, aged 61. 

8. Commandant de Belveze arrived in Toronto The 
Blackie inquest. 

9. Santa Anna abdicates the dictatorship of Mexico. 

10. Riga bombarded by Allied fleet. Santa Anna fiecl 
from Mexico; General Carrera chosen president in his stead 
Col Walker sailed for San Juan. 

12. Electric telegraph completed between Panama and 
Aspinwall. Santa Anna arrived at Peroto and sjo-ued his 
abdication. 



14. British war steamer Wolvemnr, lost in a hurricmc- 
off the Mosquito coast. British Parliament prorogued. 

15. Hon. Abbott Lawrence died at Boston Satita Anna 
arrived at Vora Cruz. Col. Walker, at San Jnan del Sur 
recruits his band of fillibusters. 

16. Battle of the Tchernaya or Traktir Bridso. Russian 
loss 2,oOO killed, 5,000 wounded; Allies, about 1000- 
Patrick Park, sculptor, died. 

17. The Allies recommenced the bombardment of Scbai 
topol. 

18. Queen Victoria and Prince Albert arrived in Pari* on 
a visit to the Emperor of the French. Concordat between 
Austria and the Holy See signed at Vienna 



:2nj 



20 



REMARKABLE OCCURRENCES. 



[1857. 



21. Santa Anna arrived in Ilaranna with his family. 

37. Queen Victoria embarks at Boulogne for England. 

30. A magazine, containing 140,000 Ihs of gunpowder, 
exploded in the French camp, near the Mamelon. 

31. A Russian sortie repulsed by the 23rd and 07th regi 
ments The cholera iu Florence carried off 11,000 persons 
during the past month. 

September, 1855. 

2 Col. Walker, with his force, crossed from San Juan 
to Virgin Bay. 

3. Hachaul in New York. Walker fought, and gained 
Niu battle of Virgin Bay. 

5. Final bombardment of Sebastopol commenced. 

6. Fergus O Connor died. 

7. Hon. Francis Ilincks appointed Governor of the 
Windward Islands. 

8. Fall of Sebastopol, after a siege of 349 days. Rus-i;m 
taw, killed. 2,t>25; wounded, 6,964 ; missing, 1,739. French 
loss, killed, 1,634; wounded, 4,513 ; missing. 1410. English 
tods, killed, 385; wounded. 1886; missing, 176. In all no 
ftiwer than 21,322. Attempt by Bellemarre to assassinate 
Xajioloon. 

10. The smoking ruins of Sebastopol taken possession of 
by the Allies. 

11 . Terrific storm of wind, rain, and lightning, at Sebas- 
tapol. 

13. Meeting in Toronto of delegates from Chicago, Mil- 
lyaukie, Oswego, &c., to advance project of Georgian Bay 
Canal. Gen. Carrera resigned Presidency of Mexico; suc 
ceeded by General Vega. 

16. Russians erecting new batteries on north side of 
#ebastop. l. Santa Anna arrived at St Thomas from Ila- 
wanna. Inauguration of the reign of Don Pedro V., Kiug 
wf Portugal. 

17. Increased mortality from yellow fever, at Norfolk 
ftnd Portsmouth, Virginia. 

18. Prof J. W. F. Johnston, chemist, Ac , died, aged 59- 
Camille Roqueplan, French painter, died. 

20. Distribution of medals, clasps, and ribbands to the 
British army in the Crimea. The Czar Alexander II. 
visits Moscow en nrute for Southern Russia. 

22. The Czar arrived at Odessa. 

23. The Czar left Odessa for Nicholaieff. 

24. The Allies take possession of Taman and Fanagoria, 
at the entrance of the Sea of Azoff. 

>. The Czar arrives at Nicolaieff. 

26. Severe shocks of an earthquake felt at Truxillo, Hon 
duras. 

27. Riga bombarded for several hours by 6 English ves 
sels. The Russians before Kars capture a Turkish convoy 
of provisions, destined for the garrison, together withl,0(X) 
horses and 300 men. 

38. Publishers banquet at New York. 

29. The Russians attacked Kars and were defeated, with 

a loss of 12.UOO men, killed and wounded The Russians 

-also defeated near Kupatoria, by a body of French cavalry. 

Lieut.-Gen. Markham Bailed for England, in bad health. 

October, 1855. 

1. Trial of fire engines in Paris ; the Canadian engine 
arried the day. The King and Queen of Prussia vi-it 

Aix-la-Chapelle. 

2. Sebastopol left by the Russians. 

3. The King of Prussia lays the foundation stone of the 
great railway bridge across the Rhino, between Cologne 
jwid Deutz. 

4. The ship City nf Trrrnttn, built in Toronto, arrived at 
Liverpool, after a run of twenty-four days from Quel. <. 
The new constitution of Denmark promulgated at Copen 
hagen. 

5. Great rejoicings In Toronto over the fall of Sebastopol ; 
She city brilliant y illuminated. 

7. Alvarez elected President of Mexico. 

8. The Kinburn expedition anchored off Odessa, menacing 
that town, in order to draw off the Russian troops from 
Kinbnrn. Francis Majendi. French Anatomist, died, aged 
72. M. Maulzel, automaton condtuctor, died. 



[212] 



9. The Tenth IT. C. Prov. Exhibition held at Cobourg. 

10. Colonel Mason appointed to mike a survey of a route 
for Georgian Bay Ship Canal. A band of Montenegrin* 
make an incursion into Herzegovina. 

11. Dr. Kane s Artie Expedition returned. 

12 Great Crimean Banquet in Glasgow, in honour of 
the Sebastopol Victory. 

13. Hamilton illuminated in honor of the Governor- 
General s visit, anu the fall of Seba-itopol. Col. Walker 
took the City of Granada, in Central America. 

14. Yellow fever nt Norfolk and Portsmouth, U S. 
almost subsided. The Allied Squadron lei t Odessa and 
anchored off Kinburn. 

15. Troops landed south of Kinburn. 

17. The Allied fleet bombarded Kinburn for two hours- 
Robert Corrigan murdered at St. Sylvester. L. C. 

18. A number of "Free Lovers" arrested in New York. 
Givat Fire in St. John s Nwfoundland : Jin; honors des 
troyed. The Russians blew up the Oc/.akoif batteries, 
opposite Kinburn. 

20. Omer Pasha advanced with 22 batt. to relieve Kars. 

21. Reinforcement of Sardinian army at Balaclava. 

22. Sir William Molesworth died, nged 4">. General 
Corral, commander of the forces of the lute n -vTument in 
Nicaragua, surrendered to Walker at Granada. 

24. Frederick Lucas, polemical writer, died, aged 43. 

25. Prov. Temperance Convention assembled in Toronto. 

27. Martin Rudolph sentenced to pay .lu fine, for H::-;- 
phemy, at Berlin, Canada West. Me-~si-<. Sir.-ichan. I anl, 
and Bates tried at Old Bailey for swindling, and sentenced 
to fourteen years transportation. 

31. Marianopol, on Sea of Azoff, bombarded by Allies. 

November, 1855. 

1. flener.il Sir W. J. Codrington appointed Cnmnuinder- 
in-Chief in the Crimea, in place of General Simpson. 

2. The Governor-General made his public entry into 
Toronto ; streets handsomely decorated. 

5. Omar Pasha crossed the Ingour, defeating 2 >.iv 
Russians. Russians, 400 killed and wounded; Turks. . 100. 

8. Gen. Carral, Ex-President of Nicaragua, tried by 
court martial, and shot by the tillibusti-r Walker. Slavery 
abolished in Egypt by decree of the Divun. 

9. The Czar, accompanied by Grand Dukes Michael and 
Nicholas, arrived in the Crimea. 

10. The Czar surveyed the ruins of Sebastopol, and in 
spected the Russian troops on north side. 

12. The Czar left the Crimea for St. Petersburg. 

1.3. Foundation-stone laid of Canadian Institute Build 
ing, Toronto. 

15. The Emperor Napoleon clo-vd the Paris Exhibition. 
Messina, Italy, visited by a dreadful storm. 

17. Montreal and Brockville section of Grand Trunk 
Railway opened. 

19. The Czar arrived In St. Petersburg. 

20. Gen Canrobort concludes a Treaty with Sweden, on 
behalf of the Allied powers. 

21 Major-Gen. Markham died in England. 
22. The King of Sardinia arrived in Franco. 

26. Gait and Preston Railroad opened. 

28. Rebellion of convicts at Sing Sing Prison, N. Y. 

30. King of Sardinia arrived in England. Bl>ckade of 
the White Sea raised. 

December, 1855. 

3. Hamilton and Toronto Railroad opened for traffic. 

5. Another conspiracy discovered in Mexico, the object 
being to make Gen. Uraga 1 rcM dent. 

7. The Ftp.nnship Crwtnt City, of New York, lust on 
Bahama reefs. 

11. Hudson Bay Company s Expedition, under Mr. J. (1. 
?tuirt. arrived at St. I aiil s Minnesota, bringing other 
r. lies of Sir .F. Fr.tnklin and his party from the spot where 
they perished in lisOO. 

20. Great Railway Celebration in Toronto : Festival and 
Ball. Five thousand present at the Ball. 



1857.] 



MATHEMATICAL DEPARTMENT. 21 



MATHEMATICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Mathematical Acknowledgements* 

It is with great pleasure that we give the following notices of our mathematical friends, most of whom have 
exhibited a rare and profound acquaintance with mathematics. Much taste and labour have been Hhown by Me- srs. 
Dunne, Ralph, Cowan, Oliver, Sheehan McLoghlin, Soinerville, Dupuis, and Mary Anne Dunne; and much renown is 
due them for beautifully prepared MSS., intricate diagrams, and still more intricate and extensive solutions. Although 
a few persons have fallen below the number of solutions required, we have concluded to notice all. Full credit 1ms 
been given, although in some cases the Author has obtained a part, but not all the answers to a problem, when th<.-ra 
were several. We have adhered strictly to the principles of the operations, and disregarded many slips of the p<jii. 

We have received correct solutions of problems as indicated below: 

Mr. WILLIAM COWAN. Common School Teacher, of No. 6, Guelph, all the Problems of our last issue. Noli. We are 
indebted to Mr. Cowan for many corrections of the formulae of last year. 

Mr. WILLIAM RALPH, London, C. W., all except Prob. 53. 

Dr. NOHLE R. OLIVER, London, C. W., all except Prob. 53. 

Mr. WILLIAM DUNNE, of St. James, Sherrington, L. C.. and late of No. 4, Onondaga, U. C., all e.xwpt Prolw. 0. 7, 16. 18., 

28, 44, 53. Note. By mistake no credit was given to Mr. Dunne last year for solving Ex. 14, which he did correctly. 

Mr. JOHN SHEEHAN, C. S. T., Onondaga, County Brant, all exc pt Probs. 6, 16, 28, 37, 53, 54, 66. Credit is also due t 
Mr. S., fur solving correctly Probs. 4, 9, and Ex. 27, of 1855, which were overlooked. 

MR. P. B. MCL.OCHLIN, Teacher, Commercial and Mathematical Academy, Toronto, C. W., all excrpl Probs. C, 37, 42, 
45, 53, 62, 64, 66, 70, 71, 75, 77, 83. 

MART A. DUNNE. Sherrington, C. E., answered. Probs. 2, 3, 4. 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 17, 19. 21. 24, 25. 20. 27. 31, 32, S3, 
34, 36, 33, 39, 40, 41, 43, 46, 48, 49, 50, 51, 55, 56. 57 58. 61, 62, 63, 65, 69, 70, 71, 72, 74, 70 78, 79. 81, 84, 85. 87, 89. 

Mr. JOFIN MILLS. C. S. T., near Kingst-n, C. W.. Probs. 1. 2, 3, 4. 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. 12, 13, 14. 17. 18, 21, 22. 24. 25. 26, 
27, 31, 32. 33. 38, 39, 40, 41, 46. 48, 49. 50. 51, 52, 55, 58, 59, 60, 62, 63, 65, 69, 72, 74, 75, 76, 78, 81, 84, 85, 87, 88. Si) ; and 
formula? for Ex. 33, 35, 41, and 51, of 1855. 

MR. ROBERT SOMERVILLE, Teacher, Claremont. Probs. 3, 4. 5. 8, 9, 10. 11, 13, 17. 20, 24, 20, 27, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 38. 40, 
41, 42, 43, 47, 48, 49, 51, 56, 57, 63, 65, 69, 74, 75, 76, 78. 79, 81, 84, 87, 89. 

Mr. MATTHEW LONG. C. S. T., Van;han, County of York. Probs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 20, 21. 24, 25, 
26, 27, 30, 31. 32. 33. 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 55, 56, 57, 53, 59, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 67, 69, 70, 
71, 72, 76, 78, 79, 81, 84, 85, 87, 89. 

Mr. NATHAN F. DUPCIS, Colebrook, C.W., Probs. 1, 2, 3, 4. 5. 7, 8. 9, 10. 11, 12, 13. 15, 17, 18, 20, 22. 24. 25, 27. 31, 32. 38, 
36, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 46, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 59, 60, 61, G3, 65, 68, 69,75, 76, 78, 79, 84, 85, 87, 89; none others being 
attempted. 

Mr. WILLIAM MOWBRAY. Township of Moore. C. W.. Probs. 2. 3, 4. 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. 13, 14, 17, 18. 20. 24 25. 27, 30 31 

32, 33, 34, 40, 41, 43, 46, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 55, 60, 62, 63, 65, 68. 69, 72, 75, 76, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 84, 85, 87, 88, 89. 

Mr. JOHN MC-CLARY, Teacher, Port Robinson, Probs. 1. 2. 3, 4. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. 11, 12, 13, 14. 17. 18, 20. 23. 24. 25, 26 2T 
9, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 36, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 46, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 63, 65, 66, 72. 74, 75, 78, 84. S5, 89. 

Mr. THOMAS RAMAC.E, Etobicoke, Probs. 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 17, 18, 20, 24, 26, 27, 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 41, 42, 4:1 4t, 4.% 

46, -IS, 4,1, OJ, 03, 60, 61, 65, 78, 84, 85, 87, 83. 

Mr. D. . I. WALTACB. Tona, Elgin County, C. W., Probs. 3, 4,5. 8, 9,10,11, 13, 14, 18, 22,23. 24. 27. 31, 32 33 31 40 4L 
4o, 4S, 53. 52. 55. 59, 65, 69, 72, 76, 78, 79, 80, 81, 84, 85, 87, 88, 89. The diagrams in Mr. Wallace s MS. were neatlj 
drawn aul coloured. 

Mr. JVMKS T. McCLELiAND. Teacher, No. 10, Scarborough, Probs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11. 13, 19, 27. 31, 32, 33 40 46, 
51, 02, 54, 63, 05, 69, 74, 75, 76, 78, 84, 89. 

Mr. JAMES GAHAN, Colchester, Essex Co., C. W., Probs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, 13, 15, 22, 24, 26, 27, 31, 32, 33, 34, 3S, 

3S, 4 .1, 4,5, 4S, 43, 50, 51, 52, 55, 53, 61, 63, 65, 63, 75, 76, 79, 85. 

Mr. SvMua RABB, of Newboro, Probs. 3, 4, 5, 7, S, 9, 10, 13, 17, 31, 32, 33, 34, 33, 43, 41, 4S, 43, 51, 59, 63, 74. 75, 78, 
78, 84, 85. 87, 89. 

Mr. (i. T. IOv\N3. of Dundas Grammar School, Probs. 1, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 19, 24, 20, 20, 27, 33, 31, 32, 33, 31 38 41 4i 

48, 49, 50. 54, 55, 58, 61, 62, 72, 74, 78, 79, 81, 84, 87, 89. 

Mr. JOH.V CAMPBELL. Teacher of S. S. No. 12, Caradoc, Probs. 1, 5, 8, 9, 10. 11, 12, 13, It, 15. 17, 19, 20 21 21 V, "6 <r 

29, 30. 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 45, 40, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 54, 55, 50, 57, 59, 60, 65, 68, 69, 74, 75, 7~8, SU 
8-i* Sj , 80. 

Mr. Jo;i v J ifl >US3, S-urborougb., Probs. 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 17, 24, 27, 31, 32, 33, 38, 41, 42, 43, 47, 49, 53, 56, 57, 58, 

61, 74.-81. 84, 89. 

Mr. ARCHIBALD McCLELLAN, Jun.. farmer, of Dumfries, C. W., Probs. 4, 5, 8, 9, 10,11, 13, 18, 21, 22 21, 25 20 31 3- 

33, 39, 40, 48, 49, 51, 52, 63, 65, 69, 74, 76. 

Mr. PKTKR OURRIE. C. S. T., Osgoode, C. W., Probs. 2. 4, 5. 8. 11. 13, 17, 20, 24. 27, 31, 32, 33, 46. 84, 89. 

Mr. J \MEsOatLviE, Carradv,. Probs 3, 5.8, 10. 11, 13, 14 21. 20, 27. . U. .",2, 39. 40/40. 40. 01. 52. 63. 65, 6 J,7S SI 87 89 

Mr J^MF.S J. SUTHERLAND, Caradoc, Probs. 3. 4. 5. 8. 9. 10. 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 21, 25, 27, 31, 32, 33, 35, 36, 40, 41, 42 43 

49, 50. 51. 52, 54. 55, 56, 57, 60, 65, 66, 69, 74, 78, 81, 84, 87, 89. 

Mr. ir-:\iiv IK -ioY, Ckrradoc, Probs. 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 2i, 25, 27, 23, 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 48, 40. 

50, ylj > , _)*. 55, 5b, 57, 60. 

Mr. .Io a I II.-D3. C, 3. Teacher, Huwkesbury E*st, C. W., Probs. 3, 10, 11, 13, 22, 21, 28, 27, 31, 32, 33, 33, 43 45 52 
74, 78, 84. 87, 89. 

Mr. JAMSS BURGESS, Etobicoke, Probs. 11, 13. 31, 46, 52. 

Mr. T I > ,iv< TIIORPB, S. T., Byward. City of Ottawa. Probs. 3, 9. 10, 18, 24, 27, 33. CO, 78, 87, 89. 

Mr. MVRSIIVLL MV;I,IN. Jun.. Scarborough, Probs. 13, 31. 4 ). 46, 52, 65, 78,84, 89. 

Mr. Til )\i\s CIMS.S, Teacher. South Zorra. Oxford Co.. Probs. 5. 10, 11, 13, 31, 60, 65, 76, 84, 89. 

Mr. Was IN S. WILLIAMS, Cayuga, Probs. 11. 20. 31. 32, 41, 50. 55. 56, 57, 78. 

Mr. !K i. M :lj. J .iiv.cox. ilrafton, Ilaldhnand, Probs. 3, 10, 11,20, 24, 25, 27. 31, 32. 33. 48. 49 

Mr. THOM is P. SrowcLL, 0*ego Tijga, County N. Y., Probs. 1, 2, 5, 7, 13, 15, 16, 19, 22, 31, 37, 59 ; these bein" all that 
were tried. 

NOTE. Solutions were received too late fur notice last year, from Mr. J. L. P. O H.OLKY. P. L. Survevor. Ottawa City 
from Mr. JAMKS BKATTIE. Teacher, Drurabo, Blenheim; from Mr. W. R. BIOG. St. Catherines; fiom Mr. PLTER CURRUL 
of Hull; fr m Mr. JAMES SIMPSON, Farmer, Naagaweya; from Mr. HENUT JuTV,cf Saltlieet; and from Mr. I,;:NDER D 
TAYLOR, S. T., Markham. SAMUEL U. WRIGHT 

[213] 



22 MATHEMATICAL DEPARTMENT. [1857. 

Answers to the Problems for 1856. 

PROB. 1. 1-H121; 4-=-121; 16^-121; and lOO-j-121. Ans. The number of answers are 
infinite. 

PROB. 2. 273 and G19 Ans. The number of answers are infinite. 

PROB. 3. In 22+(17831-=-41109) hours. A cuts 4-f (3242-5-41 109) ; B, 3-f(17S30i-^41109) 

and C, 2+(13185-f-41109) acres. Ans. 
PROB. 4. Let R=Earth s radius, and A=the required height. Then h^-2 (R-f-/<)|- and h=R, 

or the radius. Ans. Had A-5-2(R-f-A)=J, then would A=2R. 
PROB. 5. Let 5=2a, 6=6, 4=2c, and y(a i -{-b i }=d. Then the overflow=J(2c 6+crf a) 

(c-j-6 crf-Mi) 2 7r=26.2721536 solid inches. 
PROB. G. Solid inches=1770.435693734966238. Ans. 

The cheese consists of a cylinder, two segments of a sphere, and a body similar to 

the ring of Prob. 27th of 1855 The ring is part of a circle of 18| inches in diam. 
PROB. 7. Let a=l, 6=/6. Then the triangle being isosceles, those sides are each 

and the base=/{86 2 2a-f-2a 1 /(8&H- 



PROB. 8. Let 2=a. Then x=}^|/(8d=2|/(4a-fl))=2 l or 1. Ans. 

13 
PROB. 9. The sides are 15, (15/14)-=-7, (7 /14), and 142/14. Ans. 

The answer above supposes, that the area cut off from above 24. If the lower 
section=24, then the sides are 15, (15/35)-5-7, =12.677313; 13(7 /35)-=-7= 
2.012995, and 14 2/35, =2.1678404. Ans. 

/4 \ 
PROB. 10. Let 400=4a, then a 2 ( -- 1 U-160 17.077 acres. Ans. 

\7T / 

PROB. 11. 28 cents. Ans. 

PROB. 12. Log. of square miles=5.5272018, or 336668 sq. miles, or 215467520 acres, 7912 
miles being the diam. Mr. Hendricks, of Newville, Indiana, gets 337311.0164 
miles, regarding the earth as a spheroid, and the polar diameter=41707620 ft. 
the equatorial=4 1847426 feet. It is a laborious solution. 

PROB. 13. Let 12=a, then a(a 2 -f-3a+2;=364 Ans. 

PROB. 14. Let a =9, and x the thickness, then z=Ja(2 v /3)=l. 2057714 Ans. 

PROB. 15. Let a=4, then Ja^/3, and <zj/6, are the dimensions, or 2.3094, and 3.2659864 feet. 

PROB. 16. 53 27 / 22". Ans. Or cos. \ angle=[a v /( a 2+26 2 )|H-26, where <z=100, 6=300. 

PROB. 17. Let 48 2a, 6=26 ; then 2a6-j-(a4-6)=5i from the ground. Ans. Angles are 
38 57 and 141 03 . 

PROB. 18. Let2=2a; then surface=2a 2 J t(2 v 2 1) 11.49 feet. Convex surface 2a 2 7 r(2 v / 2 
2)=5.20516. Entire surface=2a 2 7 r(2 1 /2l) -11.49. Solidity=Ja 3 ^-(5 1 /2 
4)=3. 2264232. Ans. The hole wants 4 equal segments of being a globe. 

PROB. 19. Let 5=a, Then 4aXl= 2 for the 10 revolutions, and J of a revolution=2. 928937 
.-. 202.928937 feet Ans. Space=| a 2 7r=58.905 feet. The 1st 3rd of a revolution 
would=5 feet, or half of the Semi-arc. A CYCLOID is generated. 

PROB. 20. Let 2=2a ; then the solidity- 27r 2 a 3 =l 9. 7393. Surface=47r 2 a 2 =39.4786. A RING. 

PROB. 21. Let a1\, 6=10, then a ] /(64&)=57.06902 tons. Ans. 

PROB. 22. Sides are 1st, (58, 40, 42); 2nd (72, 24,70); 3rd (113,15,112). Again 232, 160, 
168; 296, 96, 280; and 452, 60, 448. Ans. Answers infinite. 

PROB. 23. Let ll=a, 16=26, 20=c ; then the perpendicular =(ae-5-/)=8.8==p; in which e 
=z{cT/(c 2 4& 2 )}=4, and/=^||/( 4 c+a 2 ) a}=5. The smaller segment 
of the base, BC = 6>/(6 2 a f) = 5 = g. Then the sides AD, or BD, are 

* =8.8/5 or 4/5 Ans. 



Formulae for a similar problem may be found on page 22 of the Almanac for 1856, 
for Ex. 21 of 1855 ; which see, with the corrections for the same in the Errata of 
this year. 

PROB. 24. Let a= 4, 6=6, c 8; then the perpendicular=fi/15 jo, and the square fcet=-^7r 
(a+6)=91. 25515476. Solidity=457r-^-2=70.686=J/Vc. Ans. A DOUBLE 
CONE, whose bases are united. 

[214] 



1857.] MATHEMATICAL DEPARTMENT. 28 

PBOB. 25. Let a=4, 6 6, c 8, perp. Jj/15^, greater seg. of base=m=5J ; =2f the 
other seg. Then surface in the one case=7r(c 2 4-m6+2am-(-an)=466.5276, in the 
other it=rt(c 2 -f-ara+26w-fwi6)=448.2532. 

Solidity in the 1st case=^7r(c4-m)=322.4349744, and in the other case, solidity 
== jcp B .(c+n)=261. 59833305144. A CIRCULAR PRISM. Ditto in Prob. 49. 

PROB. 26. Let 6=a, 8=6, 10=c, then solidity, 6 being the axis=f6 2 7r=804.2496. Surface 
:=67r(2a+c+6) 753.984. If a be the axis, the solidity=-ta 2 6;r=603.1872, and 
surface=W(a+26+c) 603.1872. AN INNER SECTIOiN OF A CIRCULAR 
PRISM. 

PROB. 27. Let a=6, 6=8, c=10 (the 10=c being implied), then solidity =Ja6 2 7r 402.1248, 
and surface=67r(6+c) =452. 3904. A CONE is generated. 

PROB. 28. Let 100 lbs=w, 60=t, 1501bs.=\V., 100 feet I, and 40 feet=rrf. Then the thrust 
=T=/(sine 2 H-(a 2 cos. 2 )H-6 2 )x( w + M ) 257.794 Ibs. 

P=pressure against the wall=a(W+w)-:-(7 tan S- O^ 63 - 51 lbs - In these formulae 
a($lw-\-d W)H-(W-fw>)=44 feet centre of gravity of ladder and man. 

PROB. 29. Let 2a=20, then side of circumscribed triangle=Ja^/(30+6 1 /5)-|-a(l-{- 1 /5)= 
54.32434. Side of inscribed triangle=2a sine 108-r-sine 48=25.5 J5. Ans. 

PROB. 30. Letl2=2a; thenmax. diam =a 1 /(5-|-2 1 /5)=18.46608 ; min. diam. =2(5-j-j/5) 
=17.3664; max. radius ^ay^SO+KV 5) 10.2078 min.radius=la 1 /(25+10 v / 5) 
=8.25816; max. chord=a(l+|/5)=19,416408 ; min. chord=2a. Area=<V 
(25+10,/ 5) 247.7448. Ans. 

PROB. 31. Let a 20 ; then Ja(a+l) (2a+l)=2870 balls. Ans. 

PROB. 32. Let 4=a, then surf.=4a 2 ,r=201.0624; solidity a 3 7r=201. 0624. A CYLINDER. 

PROB. 33. Let a=l ; then surface=4a 2 ^=12. 5664. Solidity=J4 a 3 ff== 4.1888. A SPHERE. 

PROB. 34. Let 2a=4, h=l, arc=4. 63581=?. Surface of segment=2.7947625=?<. Then the 
surface of the spindle^-ir(2a(a 2 +A 2 ) p(a 2 2 ))--/i=19. 140417912. 
Solidity=7r(j4a 3 w(a 2 /i 2 )-5-A)=7.1701784. Centre of gravity= -[ (f a 3 -i-w) 
( a 2_; i 2) H _ 2A J = o.4084 from the base. A CIRCULAR SPINDLE. 

PKOB. 35. Let a=l ; then surface=2aV=19.7393. Solidity=Ja 2 7r(37r 4)=5.68085. 

Centre of Gravity=4a-r-3 rt( from the base, and a(3rt 4)-=-3rt from the vertex. 
Centre of gravity of the arc=2a-Hrt, measured from the base, and fa 2)-=-^ 
from the vertex. An axile section of a CIRCULAR RING. 

PROB. 36. Let a=10, 5=13, C=19, then side a falls upon=2a6 2 c 2 -H- 1 / J4a 5 6 2 c* (aV a 2 6 2 + 
6 2 C 2)2 J^25.0306. That upon which b falls=26a 2 c 2 -=- 1 / {4a 2 6 2 c* (a 2 c 2 a 2 fi 2 +6 2 
c 2 ) 2 } =19.2547, and that upon which c falls=2ca 2 6 2 -f- 1 / j 4a 2 6 2 c t (a 2 c 2 a 2 6 J +6 2 

c 2 ) 2 } =13. 1743. 
PROB. 37. Sides are 114 ; 136.17 ; and 92.01137. COWAN. 

136.1192, 113.957, and 91.9763. W. DUNNE. Mr. RALPH gets 113.857, 91.8106, 

and 136. 

PROB. 38. Let o=44, 6=55, and c=60 ; then the required distance=RADIUS OF CIRCUM 
SCRIBED CIRCLE ; 

= abc^ { 0+6+c) (5+c a) (a+cb) (a+b c)} =31. 2614. Ans. 

PROB. 39. Let o=5, 6=1241. Thenx,ory=j{a or =F v /( l /(86+8a) 3a 2 ) } =5.93439204, 

and 0.93439204. Ans. 
PROB. 40. Let a 50, and 20=6, then the length=a-f-6 1=69, and i<+ 1 ) (2a+36 2)= 

67,150. Ans. 
PROB. 41. Let 2=4, and 1 h. Solidity=^(3a 2 +^)=6.8068. Surface= rt (2a 2 +A 2 )= 

28.2744. Convex surface= rt (a 2 +A*)=15.708. A SEGMENT OF A SPHERE. 

PROB 42. Let 2a=4, arc=4. 63581 p, area=2. 7947625=*. The surface of revolution 2</ rt 
( ? .|-2a) 108.521. Soli tity=2flw 35.130303. Ans. CIRCULAR SLAB. 

PROB. 43. Let 2=2a. Surface=6(4a s rtv /3)=130.59>39. Solidity=6(2a 3 rt X3)=l 13.0976. 
Area of hexagon=6a V3. Perimeter=12a. AN HEXAGONAL RING. 

PROB. 44. Every day is known by its distinctive name for 24 hours, at every place on the 
earth; and hence it exists on the world by that name for 48 hours. Greenwich 
being regarded as the prime meridian ; then Monday began on the earth, on the 
lower meridian 24 hours before the man left London, and Tuesday begun at that 

[215] 



24 MATHEMATICAL DEPARTMENT. 



[1857. 



instant on the lower meridian. Hence, he would be first told it was Tuesdiv 
noon, at the lower meridian or 180 E. or W. of London. 

THOU. 45. Let 800Q=2a ; then the linear side of inscribed ICOSAEDRON, whose surface 
consists of 20 equilateral triangles, five of which compose the surface "of the 
pyramidal mountain, with a pentagonal base = 4a -+- / (10+2i/5) = side of 
FENTAGON=24. Radius of the circle enclosing the PENTAGOl4=i2o 1 /6 B 
^/(SO+lO/S^c. .-. 4a/5=2c. .-. a=J C j/5, and b= 1 C] /(10 2V/5) 
Surface of icoaafrwi=40aV3 ^-(5+ v/5)=206V3=50cV 3^(5+^/5). Solidity 



Radius of largest globe inscribed within the icosaedron=a v / (7 +S,/ &)--, 
(3(5+v/5))=V(i(7+3/5))=/( ffl -J4i)=J c / (35+15/5) -^(3(5+^5 )). 
Height of the mountain above the globe inscribed in the icosaedron=a 



{ | /5- v /(35+15 1 /5)-- 1 /(15+3 1 /5)} =821.382131 miles. Ans. Height of 
mountain above its pentagonal base=4a-f-(. f >+ 1 /5)=6 1 /(50 10 1 /5)=2211.1456 
miles.=2c i /5--(5+ 1 /5). Maximum perimeter of icosaedron,=8a(V3 + l W-, 
1025=4i3 l=4 C -- 



- 

)=4 C ( 1 /8+l) v /6-- 1 /(10+2 l /5). Minimum perimeter of 
ditto=20a- v /(10+2 1 /5)=106:=10c,/5-H 1 /(10+2 v /5). Perpendicular of each 



triangular facc=2 l /3-f- 1 / (10+2 1 /5)=6 1 /3=c v /!5-- v /(10+2 v /5). Radius of 
the circle inscribed within the PENTAGON=r.l2fl l /(25-|-10i/5)-^ v /nO+ V5) 
p v /(25+10 1 /5)=^ 1 /(125+50 v /5)-- 1 /(10+2 > /5). Maximum diameter of 
Pantagon = 2a v /(5+2 v /5)-- 1 /(10-f-2 1 /5) = b tf (5+2 > /6)=c 1 /(254-10 l /5)-- 1 / 
6). Maximum chord of PENTAGON==2( l /5+l)-- t /(10-(-2,/5)==6 
)=V( -* J )=(6+|/6)-t-J/(ieH>2 l /5> Area of PENTAGON^ V 





. 40. The least com. mult, 2520. Hence 2521, 5041, 75G1, and 10081. Ans. 
PROB. 47. Let 6 a, 4=6. Surface flrtV(K a2 + 62 ))= 301 -95335. Solidity=^|o 2 rt 26 
355.30742. Area of elipse=}a^. Contour=r rt] /n( a 2_^i2j\ AN ELIPTICAL 
RING. 
The figure of this Prob. was intended to be that of Prob. 43, instead of Prob. 55. 

In that case, surface=6(Sa 2 rt)=150.7%8. Solidity=6(4a : Vti/3)=:130.5939 

where 2=2a. In this case an HEXAGONAL RING is generated. 
PROB. 48. Let 2=2a. Alt a/3. Cent, of Grav.^ay/3 from base. Area a 2 i/3. Then 

surface generated=4a 2 rti/3=21. 765633. Solidity=2a s rt=6.2832. A DOUBLE 

CONE, with bases united. 

PROB. 49. Let 2a=2. Solidity=2a 3 7 t/3=10.8828. Surface 12a 2 rt =37. 6992. 
PROB. 50. Let a=6, 6=4. Solidity=^a& 2 rt=50.2G56. Surface i&rfj/(0a 2 36*)=68.0598224. 
PROB. 51. Multiply by x, and (z 2 4x^-\-3(x^4x} 0. .-. Z 2 _4z= 3, hence x=\, 3, 4 Ans 

In Prob. 50 che.-e is generated a PROLATE SPHEROID. 

PROB. 52. The least com. mult.=2520. Hence 2519, 5039, 7559, and 10079. Ans. 
PROB. 53. Let a=4, 6=5, c 6, /<=12, perp. of base=(5 l /7)-=-4,=rf, then side of cube 

-~(dh-\-ch-i r dc)=1.8lOQ. Radius of globe=0.975, according to Mr. COWAN. 

PROB. 54. Let a=10, 6=12, c=16. Side=/ 
+64-fc4)) |=21.391322542. 

PKOB. 55. Let a=6, 6=4, Solidity=^a 2 6rt=75.3984. Surface </rf/(65 2 -f-3a 2 )=89. 74046 

In this Prob. the figure is an OBLATE SPHEROID. 
PROB. 56. This is the same as Prob 47, which see, and its solution. 

PROB. 57. Let a=6, 6=4. Surface= rt 2 6/(^(a 2 +6 2 ))=201. 3003616. SoliJity=}a6 2 rt 2 = 
236.8716134. AN ELIPTICAL RING, not like that of Prob. 47. 

PROB. 58. Leta=6, 6=4, /(=!. Solidity=aF rt (36 2/0^-66=7.854. SEG. PROL. SPHEROID. 

PROB. 59. Let 324=a, 6 4 =81. .-.6=3. Wine drawn 1st time=| (ai 6)=94.8973968 ; 
2nd time=6 l /fl(ai 6)=G7. 1025978; 3rd time=6 2 ai( i 6)=47.4486984 ; 4th 
time=4 3 (ai6)=33. 5513016. The amount of wine left after each drawings 
1st (6r})i-$-a ; 2nd=(6a*) 2 --ai ; 3rd=(6aS) 3 -^-a 2 : 4th=(6al)*-t-fl, and nth time 
=(ba* / )"-=-- 1 . 

PROB. 60. Let 16=a, 9=6. .-. 2 1 /a6=diam. of middle circle=24. Perp. of trianglc=2a 

[216] 






1857.] MATHEMATICAL DEPARTMENT. 25 



)-=-(a 6)=128. 

36.950417. Sides=|244v/3=129.3264. 
PROS. 61. Let 6=a, 6=4, A=2. Solidity= rt /i 2 i 2 (3rt 2A)-=-Ca 2 =13.03182. SEG. PROLATE 

SPHEROID. 
PROB. 62. LetG=, 6=4, A=2. Solid! ty= rt /i 2 6 2 (3a 2A)H-Ga 2 =l 3.03182. SEG. PROLATE 

SPHEROID. 

Q 

Surface=32. 7640542. Convex surface=21. 593921. Base of seg.=3.7712= ---/2. 

o 

PROB. G3. Let 2/ 2 =l H-(l+i-)> tlieny=/2z-^-12, and.?/ 2 =x^-72=l---(l-f-x). Hence z=8, or 9. 
PROB. 64. Let a=6, 6=4, A=l. Solidity=rf/r a 2 (36 2A)-r-66 2 =l 1.781. SEG. OBLATE 
SPHEROID. 

2 
PROB. 65. Let nG, a=33, 6=199, rf=com. dif. z-j-rf=lst term. Then <7= |/( 8*6 8a) 

H- >/( 2 1)=1, and z= - ^(w-|-l)=2, andz-j-cZ=3, and 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, Ans. 

PROB. 66. Side of the county. 31.14915 miles=z. Let a=21, 6=13, c 27 ; then 2z 2 ( 2 +c 2 
Z 2) =a *+c 4 26-(6 2 -fa*+e !! .) 

PROB. 67. Let 3956.2=3, and (32-=-5280)=6. Then 1 /(26)=6.9429 miles per second. Ans. 
PROB. 68. Let 100 a, sine (360-=-15)=12 =s. Then SH-(a+*)=17.212512. Ans. 
PROB. 69. Let 132=a. Then ar=i T /(lv / (a+i))=4, or 3, or J(l-t- v /43). 

PROB. 70. Area of seg.=5.5. Distance of cent. grav.=:0. 77942. Solidity=26.93488. ELIPTIC 
SPINDLE. 

PROB. 71. Areaof seg.=3.G85104. Dist. of cent. grav. 0.384. Solidity=8.890799. ELIPTIC 
SPINDLE. 

PROB. 72. Let 6=2, 6=8. Then solidity=J 2 6rt=113.0976=half of the cylinder circum 
scribing the PARABOLOID. Convex surface of the same = (ffrt-5-66 2 )-/ 
((46 2 +a 2 ) 3 as)=105.212184. Area of base=a 2 rf=28.2744. Total=133.486584. 
Surface of PARABOLA=J4a6, or of the rectangle enclosing it. Centre of 
gravity of the surface of the semi-parabola=J3a from the axis of abscissa, and 
36, from the ordinate. The parameter (a 2 -=-6). Focal distance=(a 2 ~r-46). 

Arc of the PARABOLA=2 v /( - ! +J 4 ^)- This last formula applies only when the 
abscissa is half, or less than half the ordinate, and hence does not apply in this 
case. 

PROB. 73. This problem, by some mistake, has not sufficient data for its solution. 
PROB. 74. Let 160=, 6=120, 100=e. One side=J l /(26 2 +2c 2 a 1 ) 50.771821 ; another^ 
i | /(2a 2 +2c 2 6 2 )=79.442502 ; the last=v/(2a 2 -|-26 2 c 2 )=88.19171. 

PROB. 75. Let a 7, 6=10, c=-5X10=50. Then c(a 2 +6 2 )-=-(6 2 a 2 )=146.07843. Ans. 

The other sails 2a6c-r-(6 2 a 2 )=137.2549 miles. Course of the first, N. 200 / 54 // 
W. Hourssailedafterthetack=c( 2 +6 2 )-=-6(6 2 a 2 )=14.607843. Total=19. 607843. 

PROB. 76. z=19, 14, 9, 4; ?/=9,20,31,42. These are all the values in positive integers. 

PROB. 77. Let5=cr; then surface=A16a 2 7t=418.88, or 64 thirds of the generating circle. 

Solidity=(5a 3 rt 2 -H8)=77l.06641, or 5 eighths of the circumscribing cylinder. 

Cent. grav. of arc=|a from the base up. A solid produced by a CYCLOID. 
PROB. 78. Let 5=a, 1=6, 2h, 3e; then solidity=6A(2a+c)-r-6=4J. A WEDGE. 

Surface=a6+i(a+e) 1 /(4A 2 +6 2 )+J/(a 2 2ae+e 2 +4A 2 ) 23.7284904. 

PROB. 79. Let 2a=2. 46=12, and .-. 6=26. Convex surface of ruler=8cr6,t=75.3984. 
Entire surface=2a rt (46-f-a)=81.6816. Solidity of ruler=46 2 rt =37 6992. Con 
vex surface of lesser part=2fif6rt=18.8496 ; of the greater part=Ga6rt=56.5488. 
Solidity of former=a 2 67t=9.4248 ; of the latter=3ai^=28. 2744. Axes of the 
elipse are 2a, and 2 v /(a*+6 2 )=6.3245554. Its area= rt <V0 2 +6*)=9.9346 ; its 

circumference=rt(+i/( 2 +^ 2 )) =13.07621 13. Entire surface of greater part- a^. 
((66-|-ff)-|- 1 /( 2 +6 2 ))=69.G250113; and of the other=ffrt((26+a)-|- l /(a 2 +6 2 )) 
=31.9258. A CYLINDRICAL UNGULA. 

PROB. 80. Let 2a=2, 46=12; then solidity of lesser part=a 2 6Q3 ] /3 j?*)=1.5108; its 
convex surf ace=:4<?6( 1 / 3 ^rt)=8.2176; its entire surface=16.2267 ; solidity of 
greater part= 2 6(^14rt J3 > /3)=36.1884; its convex surface=4ai(7rt 1/3)= 

[217] 



26 MATHEMATICAL DEPARTMENT. [1857. 

67.1808 ; its entire area=80.2448. The area of the base of lesser part=a (4rf 
3 1 /3)H-12=0.6141, and of the greater part=a 2 (8rf-|-3,/3)H-12 2.5274. Sawed 
surface=7.895. A FRUSTRUM OF CYLINDRICAL UNGULA. 

PROB. 81. In this Prob. use 80z* for 30x 4 , and the 5th root 2r 1. 

PROB. 82. Solidity of the water=90.0521 ; of the empty space=73.3111 ; convex surface of 
water==54.562765 ; and of the other=56.403285. FRUSTRUMS OF CONICAL 
UNGULAS. 

PROB. 83. Filled ?pace=74.503034 ; its entire. surface=131. 208266; its convex surface= 
49.345303. Empty space=88.860166; its entire surface=l 35. 173853. Convex 
surface 63.61009; surface of the water= 5X4/6 32.659863. Arc of parabola 
around the water=14.64378214. Base of same, or double ordinate=4 t /6= 
9.797959. Surface of bottom of watcr=49.2031. FRUST. CONICAL UNGULA. 

PROB. 84.-Lct6 a. Sar.=oV3=62. 8688288. Sol.=(a 3 / 2 )- ; - 12 = 2 5.4558448. TETRAEDRON- 

PROB. 85. Let 2=2a, 12=46. Of the lesser part, convex surface 8a5rt=25. 1328. Flat 
surface=4a6/3=20.784; the ends= a*(4* 8/8) =1.2282. Entire surfacc= 
J-a(4 rt (46+a) +3/3(86 )) 47.1452. Solidity=a 2 6(4rt-3/3)=7.3C92. 0. 
the greater part, convex surface= 1606^=50.2656. Fl;:t sur.=4a6/3=20.784. 
Ends=a 2 (8rt+3/3)=5.0548. Total = ^(4* (2+86) + (3+246) /3)) = 
76.1044. Solidity=^a 2 6(8rf+3/3)=30.33. SEG. OF CYLINDER. 

PHOB. 86. Let 2er=2, 12=46. Upon the smaller section erect an ungula, so as to make that 
section a complete cylindrical ungula. The convex surface of the first=i!66 
(/3 rt )=10.9568. Its solidity=2a6(9/8 4rf)-s-9=2.0144. Solidity of the 
other=17.94304. Its convex surface=|26(6a+4) (2a 1 /15+3.647)Wloa = 
45.5588. Hence, solidity of smaller section 15.92864. Its couvex=34.602. Of 
the larger section, convex surface=40.784. Solidity=21. 77069. Arc whose versed 
sine is J5a is=3.647, and it contains 208 bT 20 " Sine of A arc=ia 1 /15= 
9682458. FRUSTRUM OF CYLINDRICAL UNGULA. 

PROB. 87. Let 2a 6, 26=8, A=5. The slant height=/(A 2 -j-a*-|-6* 26) T /26=5. 09901 95 
Convex surface=x(a+6) ( v /26)=112.155. Flat surface= rt (a 2 +5 2 )=78.54. 
Entire surface= rt ((a 2 +6 2 ) + (a+6) v /(a 2 +6 2 +^2a6))=190.695. Solidity=JA 
^(a-J-64.o5)=198.782. A FRUSTRUM OF A CONE. 

PROB. 88. Let a=4, 10=6, A=4. Slant height==J/(4A 2 +a 2 -f-6 2 2al}==g solidity of 
the water=|(6 2 a/at)-H(6 )}(6A 7 tH-12)=130.3795. Solidity of empty space 
= |(6 v /6a a 2 )^_(6 a) J (a/^^-12)=32.9837 ; convex surface of water= rt / 
(4^ 2 +(6 a) 2 ) (i_j(6+a) l /ai) H -4(6 a)=72.948099. Convex surface of mea. 
sure=^rt^(a+6)=109.956; convex surface of empty space=37. 007901. Entire 
solidityr= T i z / ;rt (a 2 +6 2 +a6)=163.3632. CONICAL UNGULAS. 

PROB. 89. Let a=8. Sur.=2a 2 1 /3=221. 7025024. Sol.=Ja s 1 /2=241.35911936. OCTAEDRON. 

NOTE. Some of the formulae for frobs. 80, 85. 86, are not general, except for such cases as have the 
sines, and versed sines, the same fractional part of a. 

SOLUTIONS FOR THE YEAR 1854. 

PROB. 14 of 1854. Let 417=J-a. . . a=834 the furrows across the field, which are even. Then 
(a 2 +2a 2)-t-2a*=A. s part, and (a 2 2a-j-2)-=-2a 2 =B s part. If a is odd, then 
(a 2 -|-2a l)-f-2a 2 = greater part, and (a 2 2a-f-l)-j-2a 2 =the lesser. 

PROB. 22. Let 30=a ; then a(/2 l)=the diameter. 

PROB. 33. Let 10=a, and 6=the base, then ^ a=required altitude ; and p=required base. 

PROB. 35. Let 3=2a, 16=6, then 2a6-^{ /(36 2 +a 2 )+a|=radius. 

PROB. 37. Let 400=2a, then a=200 Ans. (Sine of 30= radius). 

PROB. 19. By a former pupil of the Laval University zV+:rV=40320, and zV z 12 =9728. 
... (315-^76)=(V(y 3 +wiy))-:-(y(y 3 mV))=(l+wi 3 )H-(m 2 m 5 ). Hence 
315w 5 7Gm 3 -f315m 2 -t-76 \ .-. 3m+2=0, and m=|=(z 2 -f-y). Now 40320 

=zV+zV 2 =y 6 + 16y6 = y 6 - Hence y=46656, and y=d=6, andz 2 =3X 6 

81 81 
=4 . . z=2 Ans. 

GJGOM. PROB. 5. Let 2=a ; side of cube=rJa]/3. 

GEOJI. PROB. 6. Let 6=2a ; then side of cube=2a( v / 2 1). If the altitude be=.1, and base 
=6, then the side of oabe==&A-*-(i4-A|/2)i 

[218] 



1857.] MATHEMATICAL DEPARTMENT. 27 

Problems. 

The following Problems have been selected from the Examination Papers in the Universities 
ofToronto and J rinity College (Toronto), and have been furnished by the Professors of Mathe 
matics in those Institutions, who have kindly undertaken the charge of this department of the 
Canadian Almanac. Persons sending in solutions will please address their communications (post 
paid) to the Publishers, Messrs. MACLEAR & Co., 16, King Street East, Toronto. 

S PROS. 1. If a strairht lino be drawn from one corner of a square cutting off the nth part of the diagonal, it will cut 
off the (n-l)th part of a side : and iflines be drawn similarly from each of the other three corners, a square will ba 
formed whose area is to that of the original square as (-l; a to w 2 +l. 

v/ PROB. 2. A vertical palinc is composed of equidistant rectangular boards of the same breadth and of the same 
thickness, the faces of all th > l. i.-n-J-i being; in the sime planf, and an eye N placed exactly opposite the centre of one of 
the boards, and at a distance from it equal to p times its thickness : shew th it no li jht will be visible bevond the nth 
board from that to which th eye is opposite, provided that the ratio of the distance between the boards to the 1 readth 

2/iJ-l 

be not greater than -- - --. 
2(p-w-l) 

PROB. 3. A point C is taken in AB the diameter of a circle, and a poiat D in AB produced, such that 

AC: CB :: AD-.DB; 

any point P in the circumference is .joined with tho points A, C, B, D; shew that PA, PB bisect thj exterior and 
interior angles at, P of the triangle PCD. 

/ paoB. 4 Tha value of ---- is always intermediate between those of and for all real values of x 
cAi^-t 22 x y 



2-2 +a 2 
and y : and no real value of x can make o~~ ^ between -\-\ and -1. 

PROB. 5. Tho sum of the cubes of any odd number (n) of consecutive integers is divisible by n times the 
integer. 

" PROB. 6. There are n points in space of which no four lie in the sumj plane, with the exception of p of them which 
all lie in one plane; find how many tetrahedrons can be formed having these points for vertices. 



v" PROB. 7. Tf j/l^^=6j/f^"-)-cv/l-t 2 , then will v l-t/ 3 =c/l-a 2 +a^l-c2, aa d a i so y\-&=ay\- 

y^ PROB. 8. Find tho geometric series in which any term is the arithmetic meau between the terms next but one and 

next bat three preceding, 

7 PROB. 9. Tn any geometric series, show that if the 5th term be a harmonic mean between the 3rd and 7th, the 9th 
will be an arithmetic mean between the 7th and llth. 
y^Psoa. 10. If the successive terms of the binomial expansion of v l -)-!} ba respectively multiplied by the successive 

2 

torms of an arithmetic series whose sum is s, the sum of the resulting series will be - s. 

n+1 

t*- PROD. 11. Shew that 



/ I \l + x X 3 ~4 ~5 

1 r _l_ I 

ll+J + 2 3 + 12 



\i+x/ 

and ifx be very nearly equal to 1, shew that the quantities 1, 2-x, jfo-x) (1-z 2 ), are nearer and nearerapproximations 

/1\" 

to the value of - . 
\xl 

S PROB. 12. An underwriter has insured three ships : the first, an iron steamer, for 20,000 ; the second, another 
steamer, not of iron, for 15,000 : and the last, a sailing vessel, for 10,000: one of them is known to have been burned ,, 
at sea. and three persons A, B. C, whose respective veracities are 3-4th<:. 4-oths, and 5-6ths report thus A, that the 
lost ship was an iron steanv-r : IJ, tint it was not a sailing vessel ; C, that it was a sailing vessel : find the expectation 
of loss to the underwriter, the a priori probability of destruction by fire being twice as great in the case of a steamer as 
in that of a sailing vessel. 

< PROB. 13. Solve the equations 

1 1 1 

2x 2 x 1 6z 2 +z 2 " 3z 2 x 2 ~~ 
2*. 



, PROB. 14. Find x from the equation (a+6)y tt*-|-(^-)-^j;4-(a-6)^a! -r^-/)z=n(a* + 1-}: and shew that it will be 

7 2 1 

rational if n be of the form 2. - where r is any rational quantity. 

/ PROB. 15. A person goes on tossing a common die till he throws an ace, and at whatever throw (tho nth) this occurs 
he is to receive 1-rath of a pound. Shew that the value of his expectation is 7s. 2d. nearly. 

. 16. If a sin 9b sin 0, a cos 9-\-b cos <j>c, and a bc tan \p, then will 

<b B 
tan -cot-^t 



PROB. 17. If cos (0 ^>-L/3)==sec a cos (0_0_) =c , then will 



sin*? 

*j 


**| 


sin 2 




2 
[219] 


cos 2 



28 MATHEMATICAL DEPARTMENT. [1857. 

PROB. 18. Two equal circles (of radius r) touch externally, a n d another circle (radius R) is drawn touching and 
Including both : of the three chords of this latter which are common tangents to the former, one is equal to the 
diameter, and tha squares of the semi-lengths of the other two are expressed by the quantity 



PROB. 19. Tf r he the radius, the centre, of the circumscribed circle of a triangle ABC, whose sides are a, b, c ; and 
a 



& c k 9 ^ e r:lj " of tlle c rcumscri bad circles of the triangles BOG, COA, AOB ; prove that 



a b c abc 



a b c 



PROB. 20. If d be the angle contained between similarly situated common tangents to two 
circles, the distauce between who.-?e centres is c, prove that 



tan e= 



c 2 Zr 

vrherc s is the sum or difference of the radii, according to the pair of tangents selected. 

v - PRO:;. 21. A person standing on a horizontal plane observes that the top of a telegraph post standing on the same 
plane is in a line with the topof a building which stands on a hill at a greater distance th m th/ post : the distance of 
liis staiin from th f >ot of the post is b, and the angle subtended by the height of the building is ft. " c then moves 
to a station further off from the foot of the post by a distauce a, and in the same line with the former station and the 
foot of the post: and he there observes that thy angle subtended by the building is the same as b.-t ore, and that the 
top of the post is in a line with the foot of the building. Shew that the height of the post . and the height 

of the building 

(a+2i) tan ft 

a 2/ai-f-iMan ft. 

/ PROB. 22. ,Tc in the angular points of a triangle with the centre of the circle escribed on the sid- <i. and about the 
three tri.-m.l s ;. ruu-i by th* joining lin^s .nd the sides of the triangle, let, circles bo described, the product of whose 
radii is denoted by I . Let I , P denote similar quantities with reference to the sides 6, c ; and P, a similar quantity 

a Ac 

for the inscribed circle. Prove that 

1 L+1,,1 

p P P ~ P 

abc 

y/ PKOB. 23. If two points on the surface of a sphere (radius=l) be joined by two arcs of 
small circles whose angular radii are r, r f , the area of the included lune will be 

29 <>> cot r+$ cot r , 

where 0, $ are the lengths of these arcs, the angle at which they intersect. Shew also that 
by a proper convention, this expression will give the areas of the eight lunes formed by two 
intersecting small circles. 

PROB. 24. A circle being described on a diameter the rectangular co-ordinates of whose end 
are (x, y\, (x, y\. the equation to the circle will be 
v i v v 2 v 



and if this diameter be a chord of the parabola y 2 = 7 ^, and y, y be the ordiuates of the two other 

3 ^4 

points of intersection of the p inbola by the circle, then will y^-y-{-y-{-y=ft. 

1 " 2 3 4 

PROB. 25. A smooth sphere is supported on an inclined plane by a straight heavy rod whi -h has one end hi.i^. d at a 
point in the inclined phu.- and cm urn-n fn-nly al> nit it. If th ivntiv of gravity of t!i-> rud In; th. 1 point in -untact 
v.ith the sphere, shew that it is necessary for equilibrium that the ratio of the weight of the sph re to that of the rod 
be not greater than (cosec ct 1) ; 2, where a is the angle of inclination of the plane to the hori .on. 

PROB. 20. If a uniform rigid arc ia the form of a semi-circle b- 1 freely from one end. thu verticil line 

through the point of suspension will divide the arc into segments, wbose chords are in the ratio of TC - 

PROD. 27. A uniform chain is laid over two snvxith fixed p lints in tlr- sain.- lio;i/,ontal plane, tin di reen 

th-m b.-iug a; it" I, ba the whole length of tin; chain. D the excess of the length of thi vertical jiortioa above th it of the 
cateuary, then will 



I a >ii. 2S. Tho greatest triangle that am be inscribed in a s,-_ ini>nt of a circle is ultimat-ly h-i!f th-- n the 

same b l-se with its sid-s toir-l. .mcut, when the height ..f th, segiiieiit is indefinitely diniini-li !. 



I. A ri^bt . pri-.!ii, whose transv i i-. a u ivisi regular poly gon, ia terminated 

pyramids c liistrucU-d on its ends as b, nj will include a given v<>;u;n< wiilMhc least 

possible surface when the inc .inivUon of the faces of the pyramids tu II. ., 

[220] 



1857.] MATHEMATICAL DEPARTMENT. 29 

? PBOB. 30. In an ellipse described under a force in the centre C (;t being its value at the 
unit of distance), if T be the time through an arc PQ, prove that 

Area of triangle PCQ=Ja6 sin (y yuT), 
a, b being the semi-axes. 

* PROB. 31. A particle is describing an ellipse about the centre: and when it is at the end of the axis minor the centre 
of force is suddenly transf-rred to the focus, the intensity remaining the same, but the law being changed to that of 
the inverse square of the distance. Determine the change of the particle s velocity ia order that it may continue to 
describe! the same ellipse. 

PROB. 3-. An elastic ring without weight will in its natural state just go round a given smooth sphere: it is now 
made to pass rouad two such spheres, each equal to the f >rmer, in conticr ; and afterwards round three such in mutual 
conta-t: prove that tin matii.il pressure between, the spheres is greater iu the former case than in the latter in the 
ratio of 4 to 3 

PROB. 33. The receiver of a condenser is capable of bearing a pressure of 200 Ibs on the square inch. The piston 
when pushed to its lowest point has. owing to imperfect construction, a portion of the cylinder below it equal to l-12th 
of the whole. The pressure of the atmosphere is lolbs to the square inch. Will it be possible with this instrument to 
burst the receiver ? 

PROB. 34. A siphon of very small bore is drawing water from a vessel which is placed under the receiver of an air- 
pump. After three ascents of the piston the water ce.ises to flow. The volume of the cylinder of the air-pump is 
one-third oi that of the receiver, and the water barometer is standing at 32 feet. Find the height of the top of the 
siphon above the surface of the water, which, owing to the smallness of the bore of the siphon, may be supposed to stand 
at the .same level during the experiment. 

\s PROB. 35. If a Lemniscate touch a series of circles which all pass through its node, their centres will lie on an 
equilateral hyperbola. 

yS PROB. 36. Plane central sections of an ellipsoid, drawn parallel to tangent planes that are equidistant from tha /tf 
centre, have all the same area. - 

i^- PROB. 37. If a sphere sliding with a given velocity on a smooth horizontal plane impinge ona vertical plane iuclined ft "/ 
at 60 to iis direction of motion, arid sufficiently rough to compel the sphere ^supposed inelastic) to roll in contact with - 
it. .shew that, the pphe.-e loses J-l-Uhs of its velocity. 

PROB. 38. A circular disk of radius r, placed vertically on a rough horizontal plane, has a horizontal velocity u 
communicated to it. an j oNo an angular velocity w about its centre, tending to make it roll in a direction opposite to 
that of u; the friction not being sufficient to prevent sliding, shew if nv=ii. the disk will have returned to its original 
position just at the instant when perfect rolling commences. Also determine the subsequent motion. 

PROB. 39. A thin circular tube of radius a and mass M stands vertically on a horizontal plane which is sufficiently 
rough to secure perfect rolling; if a smooth particle of mass in be placed within the tube near its lowest point, the 

2Ma 

particle will oscillate isochronously with a simple pendulum whose length is - . 
. 2M-j-m. 

PROB. 40. If an elas ic fluid, in which the ratio of the pressure to the density is supposed constant (A-). be issuing 
from a small orifice with a given velocity in the farm of a right cone, and V, v be the velocities in two transverse 
sections whose radii are j!, r, th-ju will 

V II V_a 

log. _ + 2 log _ = -<. 

PROBLEMS CONTRIBUTED BY CORRESPONDENTS. 

S PROB. 41, bv JUSTITII. Whit will $100 amount to in ten years, at G par cent interest, which is to be compounded 
every indent? 

/ PROB. 42. by MART Ax\E DCXXE, aged 16 years. Three nvtn and their wive= purchased cloth. Each person paid as 
v much per yard as he or she bought yards: John paid as much as Peter and William paid, and bought as many yards 
M lXtk their wives bought IVrcr paid us much as his wife and .John s wife paid. Had Hannah purchased 5 yards 
more, she would have had as many as Sarah and Elizabeth b >th : had Sarah purchased 13 more, she would have had 
aa many as Hannah and Eli/.abeth : and had Elizabeth purchased 19 more, she would have had as many as Hannah and 
Sarah. William and his wife paid less than either couple. Whi h were man and wife? 

/^ PROII. 43, by WILT.IAM Duxyr.. Find a number consisting of two digits, whose sum is a square, whoso product is a 
double square, and whose quotient is a Phonic number. 7y<*6+4 *- t&fo ffn^jt. m,t,e> 



s PROB. 44. by the same. Suppose Guelph and Duudas to be connected with Toronto by straight railroads, meeting in 
Toronto, and let the distan.-.. I.e. from Guelph to Toronto, 50 miles: from Toronto to Dundas. 42 miles : and from 
Dunda.s to Guelph. 2i> miles. Suppose then t lattwo trains Set out at the same instant of time the one from Guelph to 
Toronto, at the rate of 35 miles per hour : and the other, from Toronto to Dundas. at the rate of :;o miles per h.mr : 
at what parts of the roads will these trains come nearest to one another, and how far will they be then asunder? 

Piion. 4o, by C>T ,r.i/:s Ci. \riK.-A horse s tether, of 3 i yards in length, is fixed in the circumference of a circular field 
whose diameter is 400 yards, how much will it allow him to graze? And supposing that the end of the tether is 
removed to the circumference of the secondary circle, and in a line with the centre of the field, what additional space. 
would he be enabled - 



V~ PROH. 46. by J\MF,S Mi. ( f.r.i.i.\M\ Four men, A, B, C, and D, owe to E 1 U. so that if to A s share you add 5, it 
equal B s diminished by ; C s multiplied by 5, and D s divid -d by .Cn. Find each man s share. 
. PROB. 47, by the same. A offers .",20; fine, and 200 yearly rent, "for alei-^ of a farm for twenty-one vears : B offers 

"500, fine, and 180 yearly rent; and C offers 2211 yearly rent. Which is the best olfer, ruckouing compound interest 
at 4 per cent ? 

^ PKOH. 48. by . A stone was dropped into an empty pit, and during the time that elapsed from the 

instant it was dropped till that at which the sound from the bottom was heard at the top, a pendulum IS inches in 
length ma It: ^ vibrations. What was the depth of the pit? 

^ PROB. 49, by the same. A tree rises to the height of 119 feet above the plain on which it grows. At the distance of 

t is an eminence of _ :> feet higher than the top of ihe. tree. An arrow shot exactly in a h iri.vmtal direction from 

the eminent, just n razes the top of the tree, without being obstructed in its flight, and thrn fixes itselt in a turf lying 

on the- same level plain on which the tree stands. Calculate the distance of the turf from the tree, the whole length of 

the curve traversed by th,j arrow, and the length traversed after passim: the tree. 

^ PHOD. 50. by the same. Tf a irlass tube, "<> inches Ion , , close :it to;i. b" sunk perpendicularly into water, till its lower 
or open end bo ">o inches below the surface of the water, hfWhk h will the water rise within the tube, the quicksilver 
in the common barometer at the same time standing at 2 J 1 .; iiu-hes ? 

[221] 



30 



OUR RAILWAY POLICY. 



[185T. 



OUR RAILWAY POLICY ITS INFLUENCE AND PROSPECTS. 

this question by examining our present relations with the 
neighbouring States of tho Union, in connection with the 
facilities we oiler for direct and rapid communication with 
the Atlantic se.iboard ; and to this we may add a review of 
our improved domestic condition and prospects as resulting 
from cheap and rapid travel between districts before inac 
cessible for extensive commercial or industrial purp - 

It has often and correctly been asserted, that the geo 
graphical position of Canada, and particularly of the 
n Peninsula, is of the utmost value to her future 
progress and prosperity. Her fertile territory is thrust like 
a wedge iuto the heart of a foreign country of vast extent 

! and unequalled capabilities. The growth of the Western 
ft.ites. coupled with their dependanco upon the casern 

! markets for the consumption of their surplus productions, 
invests all means of communication with an interest pro 
portional to the facilities they afford for rapid and cheap 
transit. No wonder then, that the West, seeking thu 
Kasu-rn seaboard, should anxiously endeavour to secure a. 

! short route across the territory of Canada. Hence it is 
that the through traffic forms so important an item in the 
business of Canadian railways, , and is always an object^ of 
the highest interest in the projection of our new lines. The 
main lines, it will be observed on inspection of the map, 
run from frontier to frontier, or from the port of an upper 
to the port of a lower lake. Detroit to Hamilton and 
Niagara river; Goderich to Buffalo; Sarnia to Toronto; 
Coliingwood to Toronto: and how fully do the returns of 
the great links of communication, which have had a fair 
trial, indicate the source of the support they already re 
and to whi h they look forward with increasing confidnre. 
The capabilities of the Great Western Railway are already 
strained in the endeavour to conduct the business which 
is upon it from tho West. The compai at ive growth 
of traffic since the opening of the line has been very 
kalile. A ghiir-e at the following tables will show 
the rapidity and stability of this pro;. 



The Map which accompanies the present issue of the 
Cautdiau Almanac, exhibits the lines of railway in actual 
; ion, iu process of construction, and projected. 

Compare this map with its predecessor, issued in 1852, 
and it will be seen that our railways then embraced those 
only which belonged to the future; which were, in other 
words, in process of construction, or projected. During 
the five years which have elapsed since tint period, what 
ha- b.vii accomplished, and what results obtained? in 
actual operation we have 1st The Great Western Kail- 
wav. from the Niagara river to the Detroit river, 22 J miles 
long, traversing the most fertile part of Western Canada. 
2nd The Toronto and Hamilton Railway, a branch of the 
Great Western, 3S miles long, skirting the shores of Lake 
Ontario. 3rd. The Grand Trunk Railway, comprehending 
the following sections : Toronto to St. Mary s, 102 miles; 
Toronto to Montreal, 333 miles ; the Montreal and Portland 
Branch, 2i2 miles; Quebec and Richmond. 9o miles; and 
the .St. Thomas Branch. 49 miles. 4th. The Ontario, Sim- 
coe and Huron Railway; Uo miles. 5th. The Ottawa and 
Pre-icott Kailway, 53 miles. 6th. Montreal and Plattaburg 
Kailwav, 02 mi les. 7th Cobourg and Peterborough Rail 
way, 2,iV miles. 8th Krie and Ontario Railway, 17 miles. 
Jth. Buffalo and Lake Huron Railway, (Fort Erie to Strat 
ford) 111 miles. 10th. Champlain and St. Lawrence Rail 
way. 44 miles, llth. Port DaLhousie and Thorold Railway, 
5 miles. 12th. London and Port Stanley Railway. 2S miles. 

Hut before this review meets the eye of the reader, it is 
very probable that several additional lines and branches 
will" have been completed, and also have come iuto actual 
operation: r-ueh as the Grand Trunk, from at. Mary s to 
Portland : the Port Hope and Lindsay Railway, 42 miles; 
Stratford to Goderich, (part of Buffalo and L:tke Huron 
Railway; 44 miles; Brockville and Pembroke Kailway, 

But what results have been obtained by this liberal, this 
seemingly extravagant railway policy t We may answer 



Comparative Growth of Traffic on the Great Western Raihcay since the Opening of the Line : 



HALF YEARS ENDING 


Talne of 
Local Passen 
ger Traffic. 


Value of 

.1 1 as- 
r I r.-iffie 


Value of 
Local 
Freight. 


Value of 
Foreign 
Freight. 


Value of 
Local 
Live I 


VaUle of 
Foreign 
Live Stork. 






50.9(52 



68,721 




1S.9C6 




11.227 




777 



449 




, ci;. .-2s 


76,468 


,349 


12.4U1 


1,332 


1,250 




( 8.8 J 


104 


40,) 


L t.841 


1,011 






93.12S 


109y221 


61,872 


:ii. 


3,040 


18,438 


31st July. 1S50 


100,018 


110,112 


05,707 


51.i 


4,016 


20,641 



Both locil and foreign passenger traffic have very nearly 
double,! themselves in five half years : lo -&l freight has more 
than trebled itself; while foreign freight has become nearly 
nuadrupled The traffic in local stock has risen from 75 i 
to 4.016. and in foreign from 449 to the very imposing 
sum of 20.~>il; thus shewing in a remarkable manner 
the value of direct connection with the Western States. 
The average traffic receipts per week, during the half-years 
before stated, progressed in the following rapid ratio : 
from 5,773 in 1S51, to 7,1S9, to 9,584, to 12,688 to 
13,033, in 1S5G. 

The value of through traffic on the Great Western can 
not f^il to be appreciated upon comparison with the returns 
of local traffic. During the six mouths ending Julj 
l.u J4 from local passengers, and ,s 
.sengers fed this line; $10,0(13 from local live 
stock, and SV2,105 from foreign live stock; the ratio <> 
tho traffic value of foreign live stock to local live 
being as 5 to 1. Still more striking are the proportional 
earnings at the different stations. Suspension Bridge, the 
it frontier terminus, earns in the half-year ending 
: )u Y 31st. 1856, $502,571 ; Windsor, the other, or Detroit 
River frontier terminus, earns $303.625. Then follow in 
order the principal station* ami hrst the port stations <.t 
Hamilton. ^115,017, and Toronto, $81,780; the inland 
11, $75.081, and Paris, $30.500; all other 
stations earning individually less than $30,000. 

The difference in the numbers of p u oing east 

ward and westward, shows in a remarkable manner the 



"rowlh and importance of the great West: 1^5.059 pussen- 
geri went eastward, and 2 1 , w.-ini. A like propor 

tion holds good with regard to tons of freight : 50.042 tons 

; to ih eastward, agiin.- t 07.7 .c to the westward; 

an 1 of this the foreign eastward freight amounted to 
S.2.")2 tons, against 21,321 tons pissing to the we>t. 

It is not difficult to discover the most active influence^ 
which may operate (other things being equal) beneficially 
or the contrary upon our railroads both during present 
and future time. Certainly the scarcity or abundance of 
money is the first consideration. Let money be abundant, 
ami all our railways will prosper under good management; 
let money be scarce and dear, and the l,.-st constructed 

through lines, those from frontier to frontier, willal Im 

able to make headway. In dull tim - loeal traffic will 
scarcely remunerate railways from port to port, our long 
winters catting off alar, - sli-ire of through traffic. The 
early closing or late opening of navigation, together with 
the contingencies of a stormy or calif must influ 

ence the returns of railways from port to port. Finally, 
short crops will affect b >th classes of railways, which the 
strongest will be able to bear the best. 

Starting wilh the proposition that the great lines of 
through traffic from frontier to IVonti-r n-t up .n the most 
-. we may contemplate with all Confidence the 
Construction nf tie- -fat Southern Line, from Buffalo to 
\inh-r-ttiurg, and ano lier Northern Line from Quelph 
to the mouth of the Saugeen. We maj 
further, and in pursuance of a bold railway p iiey, looking 



[222] 



1857.] 



OUR RAILWAY POLICY. 



31 



to the future rather than to the immediate present, hint 
at the construction of a Sault Ste Mario aud Ottawa trunk 
line, to bring the boundless mineral region 01 the Lake 
Superior busin within the limits of our industry, and to 
pay tribute to our enterprise. No one, however sanguine, 
ventures to predict the political importance of the northern 
valley of the Mississippi, and east of the valley of the 
-Missouri, twenty years hence. AVe vainly endeavour to 
picture its gigantic future, in contemplating its wonderful 
rivers, life arteries of communication, traversing valleys of 
wide extent and endless fertility; its huge coal beds, easily 
accessible, and offering, even at the surface, the simplest 
means of making available the inexhaustible treasures of 
iron, copper, and lead, which spread themselves out south 
west and west of the Lake Superior Basin, and oppose, by 
their bountiful distribution, many of the disadvantages of 
climate and isolation. The Missouri river, from latitude -44, 
flows for hundreds of miles in a northerly and north 
westerly direction, through the longitudinal centre, of 
North America, and now marks the extreme limits of 
settlement and civilization. In ten years hence, the 
Mi-souri, north of Council Bluffs, will be thickly settled as 
far as the great westward bend; and Minnesota, lying 
between that mighty stream and Lake Superior, will 
account its If an old State. But here the westward progress 
ends. Let it be remembered that the region west of the 
Missouri is doomed to endless sterility south of the 46th 
parallel. Dry and arid winds render agriculture impos 
sible. An atmosphere totally deprived of moisture by the 
rocky mountain chain, fur many months in the year, 
creates a sterile belt some three or four hundred miles 
across, where rain seldom, ami dew never falls. The 
progress of settlement must be to the north, in the direc 
tion of the valley of the Red River (Lord Selkirk s Settle 
ment) aud on towards the Sascatchawan. Mature has 
placed a limit impassible and enduring to the advance of 
civilization west of the Missouri, except immediately along 
the borders of the rivers which have their unfailing sources 
in the llocky Mountains and the Black Hills ; and there 
only it will be tolerable in that region of drought. With 
what we have witnessed during the p ist ten years, and 
what we see growing whilst we read, who will set a limit to 
the growth of the great .North Western States. But what 
is to become of their winter isolation t is asked. The reply, 
railways, is patent to all. Railways have grown upon us 
so suddenly and vigorously, that few persons are familiar 
with the magnitude of the interests they represent, or the 
part they play, when taken as a whole, in the active 
industry of the world. A few words and figures will suffice 
to point out their influence and extent. In 1828, there 
were but three miles of railway in the United States ; in 
1856, there were 23,000 miles in actual operation, and 
another 5,000 miles will be added before the close of the 
present year. The capital invested in this interest exceeds 
170,000,000 currency ; and that of Canada alone does not 
fall short of 20,000,000. In order to comprehend these 
millions fully, compare the amount of capital invested in 
means of communication, with other sources of national 
income. Great Britain furnishes us with sufficiently accu 
rate statistics : 

St g. 
Value of means of communication of all lands 500,000,000 

Agricultural produce and implements 230,000,000 

Live .stuck 242,0< i; 0)i !i I 

Railways alone 290,000,000 

Manufactured goods 2 JO^OOOJOOO 

BtQe shipping 40,000,000 

I ui. ign merchandize 50,000,000 

FlsheriM 5,000,000 

It is thus seen that the value of railways alone exceeds 
either the value of agricultural produce, live stock or 
manufacture*. 

C y. 
In the United States of America the value of 

railways i.s 170.000,000 

Hvertock : 

fanning implements and machinery 6.>.000,000 

Agricultural productions 400,000,000 

The extent to which a great agricultural country may be 
dependent upon railways is well shown in the following 
enumeration.* The receipts of railways in Great Britain 
and Ireland in 1854 amounted to 20,215.000 sterling. 
Twenty thousand tons of iron are required to be replaced 



* See Sir Robert Stephenson s Address on the Railways 
of Great Britain. 



annually ; 26,000,000 sleepers perish every year ; 300.000 
trees are felled to supply the annual loss of sleepers; 
130,000 men are employed airectly or indirectly, which 
represent a population of 520.000 souls, at four persona 
to a family; so that one in fifty of the population of the 
United Kingdom is dependent upon railways. In a young 
country like Canada, at the beginning only of her railway 
career, it is impossible to procure statistics showing the 
extent of her railway industry; sufficient, however, may 
be gleaned from the foregoing statements to show what 
that industry will become when her great lines of traffic 
are in full working order. To be convinced that we live 
amidst the most productive elements of railway progress 
aud enterprise, we have only to consider the present posi 
tion of the commerce of the lake region; of our own 
country, and the shores by which we are on three sides 
invested. Beginning with Lake Superior, we find that in 
the fall of 1854 the Sault Ste Marie Canal was completed, 
and duriug the season of 1855, copper and iron to the 
value of $2.700,000 passed through it. Seven States of the 
Union border the Lakes on our shore. Western Canada 
embraces them on the other. The population of the seven 
Lake States, according to the census of 1850. was 9,784,550, 
or 16,062 inhabitants more than the aggregate of the 
twenty-four remaining States of the Ui.ion. The total 
value of the Lake commerce was $608,310.320 in 1855. This 
commerce was conducted by 9,007 vessels. American and 
Canadian, having an aggregate tonnage of 3.561,249 tons, 
and in point of national importance, it stands third on the 
list of United States commerce with foreign countries in 
actual value and in point of tonnage, first on the list The 
trade with Canada alone is valued at $30,902,058 for the 
year 1S55. 

To descend from countries to cities, and taking the one 
m whuh Upper Canada is especially interested, let us 
compare the commerce of Chicago with the increase of 
her railways. In 1852, 40 miles of railway centered in 
Chicago ; in 1856, 2,933 miles. Their earnings in 1851 were 
-11,000 currency; in 1855, 3,324,000 currency. Popula 
tion m 1852, 38,783; in 1855, 83,509. Receipts of grain in 
18o4, 15,800,000 bushels, in 1855, 20,400,000 bushels- and 
so on m all other items of importance to a great com- 
mercial exporting city, freely connected by railways -with 
its sources of supply. 

This vast commerce was carried on through the following 
means of communication : 



IMPORTS. EXPORTS. 

$95,724,797 $34,783,726 
................................ 7,417,769 809i:il.i7 

By Railroads .............................. 88,381,597 98,421,32- 

The imports and exports of Toronto have increased in 
the lollowing ratio : 



IMPORTS. EXPORTS. 

639,317 134.211 

1,165 056 221,490 

- 1 - 7 1049 



The population of Toronto* in 1834 was 9,254- in 1844 
showing an average increase of 916 per annum 
during tie H of ten years. In 1852, the population 
was .M,, ,.,, being an increase of 1,544 per annum during 
eight years. In 1856, the population was 41.760 thus 
giving an annual average increase of 2,721 durini f unr 
years, in the year 1S50, the number of dwellings was 
4,264, with a population of 25,166, or very nearly six 
persons to each house. In 1856 the number of houses was 
6,124 with a population of 41,760, or nearly 7 persons to 
each house In 18al, the assessed value of real property 
amounted to 143,442, representing an actual value of 

was 366,139, representing an actual value of i> 10i3ld 
or an increase in the ratio of nearly 200 per cent, in" five 
years. In 18o6, more than one-eighth of the whole p< pu- 

1?, OG he Clt ? were m "tti-naanco at school, and of 
these 2,962 were boys, and 2,607 girls. 

That the population, commerce and wealth of the twn 
cities whose progress has just been traced, are dependent 



[223] 



* The Report of the Commissioners for takin<* thr. 
r,nsusof the City of Toronto in 1856, not havin^ been 
-;-.u ,1 at the time of our going to press, we are unfble t 
give more than a general abstract. 



32 



OUR RAILWAY POLICY. 



[1857. 



upon railways for their future growth and eontinuince. fow 
will be disposed to doubt. They are but types of many 
other cities in the region of the trreaf hikes, and do but 
r<".le::t the expanding industry of the country surrounding 
them. Kuihvays. however, are perishable construe! ions, 
au I their duration is short in proportion to the wealth 
they create. The more tratlic the more wear and tear, and 
-ity for renewal of the so culled permanent way. Six 
and twenty thousand miles of railway in the United States 
and Canada, wasting away at the rate of eight percent. 
per annum, involve a tremendous outlay for repairs, and 
a v.ist >mm ive to enable those repairs to be ell c t -d. 
Iron must be sought for and found. The statistics of the 
iron trada are eminently suggestive in relation to our 
railroad policy. Canada produces as yet very little iron, 
all our railroad iron has to be imported. The United 
States produced about 1 000,000 tons last year, but they 
require a much larger quantity for numerous purposes. 
The r.itio of consumption and production in the United 
flap s is about 81 Ibs to each inhabitant of production, and 
UTibsof consumption. The iron required during the la-t 
live jears for renewal of tracks, amounted to 489,000 tons. 
while the quantity necessary for the construction of 
11,000 miles during the same period was not quite three 
times as much. or. 1,150,000 tons. The estimated pro 
duction of rails in the United States for the last five years, 
does not exceed f>00,000 tons, and the actual quantity im 
ported amounted to 1.143.U2U tons. Every effort is being 
mule by the Americans to produce their own railway 
iron. The importations of rails during the year ending 
Juno 1S.)5, amounted to 127.000 tons, and the American 
mills produced 135.0UO tons during the same year up to 
December 31st; thus giving on an average of five years a 
decrease of importations of 101 000 tous, and an increase in 
the home production of 35,000 tons. But does not the 
demand for railroad iron far exceed the capabilities of the 
home supply? Carefully prepared statistics show, that 
dutin- the List live years the whole quantity of rails pro- 
duced at home or imported, were consumed in the ratio of 
30 per cent, for renewal of rails on lines in active opi ra 
tion, and 70 per cent, for new tracks. It is probable that 
this ratio will continue for some years; but if the annual 
wear and tear be assumed equal to 8 per cent, per annum. 
on20.iu.io miles, the quantity of iron required for renewal 
of rails dining the next five years will be 770.000 tons. It 
may be further assumed, that in view of the extensive 
system of railways in process of construction and pro 
jected, the annual increase of new lines in the United 
States during the next five years, will be at least 3000 
miles. To supply these new lines. l,4">. r >.000 tons of iron 
will be required, thus creating a total demand for 2.231,000 
tons. In 1855. the American mills produced 135. . .mo (MIS. 
Let us assume that their powers of production inereas ;it 
the rate of 10 per cent, per annum: in 1K60 tlun will 
yield 217.001 tons, and duniiig the five vears from 1^">i tu 
I860 their production will amount tu .I ls.r.-jn tons against 
^ -j:;l.ti ii) ion.- required for consumption, leaving 1^322,380 
tons to be imported, a.ainst 1.143,029 during the years 
1850-56; thus involving an increase of 17S.751 tons, or 
35 500 tons per annum. The item under consideration has 
been simply railroad iron; but it must be remembered 
that numerous other branches of industry increase with 
railroad-, and involve a similar or even greater Increase 
iii the demuid for the raw material : nor is it to be sup- 
po-ed that the new d.scoverics in the manufacture of iron 
will cheapen rails to any consideta le extent. Iron 
wrought by Hessenier s new method, will serve to reduce 
the price of many minor articles of manufacture, but at the 
same time it will greatly increase the demand for the ran 
mait rial, wilh a view to meet the more general demam: 
for iron ware of all descriptions, in conse^ueie-e of 
its cheapness and durability. So striking is tbi- fad 
that while the exports of Great Britain show an an 
mud diminution of upwards of 140.000 tons, the home 
consumption is increasing in a greater ratio than the pro 
ducti"ii. Hence if America looks for an increased rappl] 
of iron from England, for the purposes of the projr.-tc. 
railroads, she must anticipate an increase in pri e. i r 
adopt the other and most natural alternative foster her 
own iron industry, and work her own mines. The lattei 
course, no one can doubt, is now bting carried out, am 
promi-es in two or three, years to tell with marked effect 
upon the L ike Superior Hasin. and the iron treasures o 
Canada We may confidently anticipate the time when tin 
railroad* now creeping up the Ottawa will span the low 
barrier between the valley of that river and the Lake 
Superior Hasin. (living ns one more iron link l>et\veei 
frontier and frontier, nd awakening a desolate region 



rich in mineral wealth, to industry and life. Few are 
iccnst imed to associate any other ideas than those of 
sterility of soil and rigour of climate with the Lake 
Superior Basin, or the northern shores of Lake Huron. 
And yet what is in reaiily the case. An air line drawn 
Vom Three Rivers, on the St. Lawrence, to the Sault fcte 
Marie, on Lake .Superior, runs half a degree north of the 
46th parallel of latitude. The same parallel prolonged in 
in easterly direct! m intersects France anil Central CJer- 
nany; and in a westerly direction skirts the southern 
shores of Lake Superior, and enters the Pacific at the 
mouth of the Columbia river. Deviating a few miles to 
the south of this line, we pass from the valley of the St. 
Lawrence into that of the Ottawa, where railways are in 
>p ration as far as the city of Ottawa, and projected to 
1 einbioke. From L em broke we follow the valley of the 
Ottawa until the parallel from which We started is touched 
on the north shore of Lake Nipissinji. From this pi.int an 
air lino to Sault Ste. Marie pas-es through the fertile 
valleys which have recently been discover.-d on the North 
shore of Lake Huron, touches the Bruce Mines, and finally 
reaches the .Sault. The direct distance from Three Livers 
to the Sault. in an air line, is about the samv as to IVtroif, 
or nearly 050 miles. From Pembroke to the Sault, it is 
not quite 400 miles ; so that in fact the construction of 
450 miles of Itailway would bring the vast mineral 
treasures of the Lake Superior Basin within thirty hours 
journey of Montreal, ami establish by far the shortest 
possible communication between the K.-istern Stales of the 
Union, and the network of railways which are in process 
of construction in Wisconsin, Northern Michigan and 
Minnesota, through the great iron and copper region of 
the Basin of Lake Snpeiior. Ample practical proof has 
been afforded during late years, that the northern shores 
of Lake Huron are well adapted for agricultural purples, 
and that inland valleys, some tew miles firm the l.iike, 
suppoit a magnificent growth of hardwood timber, a sure 
sign of the adaptation of climate and soil to the most 
important operations of hus-1 andry. A great mining 
population is rapidly pouring into the Lake Superior 
Uasiu, and the country of the ancient miners resounds 
ouce anain with the clamour of human industry, assisted 
bv all the energy, enterprise, and ingenuity of the An^lo- 
Saxon race. How little is generally known i-f I embina, 
and the settlements on the Ked Kiver, between the 4M1> 
and the 50th parallel of latitude; and yet in the valley of 
that remote river, a population of il.OUO find abundant and 
well-recompensed employment in the cultivation of wheat, 
potatoes and other agricultural productions, Kven at 
Fort, (iarry. eiirhty miles north 01 Hembina, and on the 
b irderfl of Lake \Viuuipeg. forty bushels of wheat to the 
acre are raised; and like the valley of our own Thames, 
the yield is still 15 to 20 bushels, after twenty years of 
cropping;* and this fertility and luxuriance obtain* :iOO 
mil.-s no tu of the latitude of the south shore of Lake 
Superior. 

We now proceed to glance at the local benefits which 
have (.ri"inatvd from the construction of railways iu 
(unda TbeOremt Western Kailway speiks volumes for 
the stimulus given to every Kind of industry through the 
extensive and fertile country it serves. The Midden and 
unparalleled increase in population and wealth of the 
t AMIS throivh or near which it passes: the Bpringlng up 
of villa-es a few miles apart, throughout its length: and 
the doubling and even trebling in value of forming land 
within five or ten miles of its course, are evidences ample 
and uucontrovertible. Yet it may be urged that the Great 
Western is an exceptional case ; that the same advii. 
are not likely to accrue to other tracks of country through 
which railways pass less favourably iltuuted than that 
fortunate line of traflic- That the local benefits c. n 
by our railways are ^enenil throughout the country it is 
rot difficult to show; and for the sake of impartial illus 
tration, let the Great West-m be for the time being 
ignored and another line s^Ux-ted, for a short survey ot 
the advantages it has conferr-d upon the country tri- 
but irv to it It may be well to divide the several elements 
ol ir.iWrv andweulih ulonir a line of railway into the, 
following beads: 1st. Lumber; 2nd, Labgor; 8rd, Kami 

Produce- 4th. Value of Land. The Ontario. Bimcoe, and 
Huron I .iiilway may be t.-.k. ti us au illustration. Ibis 
line is U miles long, and has two outlets : OMat Toronto, 
on Lake Ontario;" the other at Collingwood, on Lake 
Huron With re-ard to the first item. Lumber, i 1 
established fact, that in ordinary years, lumber conveyed 



* Governor Simpson. 



[224] 



1857.] 



OUR RAILWAY POLICY, 



33 



a greater distance than 40 miles over country roads, will 
not pay expenses. Now any lumber made within twenty 
to thirty miles of the line of the Ontario, Simcoe, and 
Huron Railroad can be brought to either an eastern or a 
western market at a considerable profit. Hence a vast 
tract of country extending over sixty miles in length, and 
forty to sixty in breadth, suddenly acquires value for the 
lumber it is capable of yielding, in virtue of the accessible 
markets which have baen created by the construction of a 
line of Railway. 2nd, Labour. Time is an element of the 
utmost importance to the farming industry of the country. 
The time consumed in coHveying produce to market 
before a railway existed formed a serious item in the 
expenses of husbandry, twenty to thirty miles north of 
Toronto, in the days of mud or even macadamized roads. 
The whole line of railway is now in effect a market; 
and as time and labour are almost synonymous in the 
agricultural season of Canada, the gain in a year to far 
mers within a few miles of the track may be estimated at 
the lowest average equal to twelve days wages, besides the 
wear and tear of conveyances and other contingencies. 
This gain is established along sixty miles of the line, and 
from ten to fifteen miles on each side of it. 3rd. Farm 
Produce. Before a railway existed north of Toronto, all 
minor articles of farming industry were neglected as 
articles of trade, over one-half of the region through which 
the line now passes. Now, however, at every station, 
fruit, butter, eggs and vegetables command a ready cash 
sale. The price of fire- wood has ri?en considerably, so that 
in many localities where wood was an incumbrance, it 
has now become a source of profit, quite independent of 
ulterior farming operations on the land it occupies. 
4th, Value of Land. Few persons could have foretold the 
extraordinary increase which has taken place in the value 
of land, in the remote townships through which the North 
ern railway passes. Leaving out of view altogether the 
*ites of villages or new-formed towns, and giving attention 
solely to farm-land within five to ten miles of the track, the 
following curious results, derived from unexceptionable 
sources, furnish an unexpected and startling proof of the 
local trade created by the Northern Railway. 

Present average value ofland per acre, in nine 
townships through which the northern half 

of the Northern Railway passes 900 

Average value before the construction of the 

railway . 1 10 

Increase of value . 7 10 

Increase due to the construction of tho railway 600 
Increase due to other causes 1 10 

The results are even more striking, when the calcula 
tions are made upon reliable data for the fertile and long- 
settled townships which border on the centre of the line, 
some thirty and forty miles from Toronto. 

The present average value of farms per acre, within 
five miles of the railway, and on either side, is 16. 
Between five and fifteen miles from the railway it varies 
from 16 to 14 per acre. The average value before tho 
construction of the railway was from 8 to 6 per acre, 
giving an average increase in value of 8 per acre, since 
the construction of this great artery of communication. 
The increase solely due to the construction of the railway 
may be estimated at one-half of the actual increase, or 
about 4 pji acre within fifteen miles on either side of the 
track. To other causes, such as immigration, increase of 
population, and the sudden increase in the general value 
of land throughout Canada, the other remaining half of 
the total increase in value may reasonably be attributed. 
We arrive at a true conception of the amount of positive 
wealth which the construction of the Northern Railway 
has created in the counties through which it passes, if we 
confine ourselves merely to the average increase in the 
value of land, without touching upon the vast wealth of 
industry in its multitudinous forms of husbandry, lumber 
ing, milling. Ac., tc. Assume tho railway to be 70 miles 
l"iu . instead of 95, and the land lying within ten miles 
on both sides of .he track will embrace 896,000 acres, which 



at 4 an acre of increased value will give the gross sum of 
3,584,000, springing from the mere construction of the 
railroad alone. This sum amounts to more than thrice 
the cost of the whole line; and it is not an imaginary or 
even an unproductive capital, for it is continually helping 
to settle the more distant townships, aod introduce by 
purchase into the older townships through which the road 
passes, men of larger capital and of higher education than 
the original settlers. It is felt too in municipal aftiiirs,; in 
taxation, for instance, with a view to the improvement of 
roads and bridges, and building of school houses. Finally, 
it is felt in the growth of general prospoi ity and advance 
ment; in the conversion of luxuries into wants, which 
increasing wealth always induces; in tho rapid increase 
of the consumption of foreign importations, in place of 
ruder homespun; and in a universal assumption of many 
of the desirable accompaniments of civilization and refine 
ment, with a dash, perhaps, of their follies and griefs. The 
instances which have been cited of the remarkable advan 
tages which have resulted from tho construction of a rail 
way through a country of not more than average fertility, 
apply with equal force to every section of Canada. If. 
however, with similar advantages of termini, whether 
from lake port to lake port, or from frontier to frontier, 
the additional acquisitions of soil of higher fertility and 
climate of greater moderation, can be secured, the more 
encouraging will be the results obtained. It cannot l.<? 
doubted by any one, who in the full strength of five 
years experience considers the questions involved in our 
railway policy, that most remunerative and unoccupied 
fields for railway operation are still easily to be found in 
Canada. Without any invidious selection, let us glance at 
one which has many recommendations. 

The only practicable harbour on Lake Huron north of 
Goderich is near the mouth of the Saugei-ii. Here there 
exist no connections beyond those offered by country mud 
roads in the fertile townships of the valley of tho river 01 
tho same name, with either western or eastern markets. 
A railway from Quelph to Saugeen, would at once connect 
Lake Huron with Lake Ontario at Toronto, and ultimately 
with Lake Erie at Buffalo. It would pass through a region 
now only partially settled, but containing a soil of unsur 
passed excellence, and a climate far less subject to exces 
sive alternations of heat and cold than the country 
bordering the Northern Railway. The increase in the 
value ofland due to the construction of such a line, would 
pay all cost in a year from its completion ; and. judging 
from late experience, there can no longer be any question. 
that the wisest conceivable policy for the Municipalities of 
the Townships between Guelph and Saugoen would be to 
hasten on by liberal guarantees, the projection, progress 
and completion of a work which would suddenly bring to 
them an industrious population, political influence, and 
enduring wealth. 

Whatever may be the future value of Canadian Railways 
considered as property only, there can be no room for con 
jecture as to the extent and nature of tho advantages ther 
impart to tho sections of country they serve: neither can 
there be any doubt that the municipalities of fertile town 
ships gain tenfold more by increase of property along a 
line of railway, than they involve themselves by its con 
struction, even when they become responsible for the 
whole of the cost of the work serving their townships. . 
Our railway policy offers none but (he simplest of prob 
lems. Our great through lines will be fed to excess by 
the continued growth of the great West. Our local lines 
will create relief for themselves by peopling the forests 
through which they pass, and giving that value to the 
timber and soil which tho mere fai-.t of their having be 
come accessible instantly imparts to them. A bold and 
comprehensive railway policy for Canada is in fa it synony 
mous with rich harvests, abundant immigration, and 
boundless inert wealth quickened into life. A timid and 
penurious policy implies a severe and dreary struggle with 
the stern progress of our age, which few woxild be willing 
to encounter, and none but the weak and shortsighted 
hope to sustain. 



British and American Express Co. Head Office, King- 



EXPRESS COMPANIES. 



n. This Company undertakes to forward merchandize 
and money, collect bills, with goods, notes, and drafts, 
throughout the Canadas, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, 
and over the line of the Grand Trunk Railroad, and connects 
with all the United States and European Express Cos. 
American Express Co. Head Offices, Buffalo and New 

c 



York Connects with the British and American Express 



Co. at Toronto, and forward goods, &c., West, over the line 
of the Great Western Railroad. 

Vicker g Express O . Head Office, Toronto. Conveys 
goods over the line of tho Ontario, Simcoe, and Huron 
Railroad to Collingwood, Owen Sound, Bruce Mines, Saul 4 . 
Ste. Mai ie, Green Bay and Chicago. 

[225] 



34 



PROVINCE OF CANADA. 



[1857. 



HER MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY (ALEXAXDRINA ) VICTORIA, 
By the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great 
Britain and Ireland Queen, Defender of the Faith. Her 
Majesty, the only child of His Royal Highness Edward 
Duke of Kent, fourth son of King George III., was born 
on the 24th of May, 1819 ; succeeded to the Crown on the 
demise of her uncle, his late Majesty William IV., on the 
20th June, 1837, and married Feb. 10, 1840, Francis- Albcrt- 
Augustus-Charles-Emmanuel, Duke of Saxe, Prince of Co- 



THE ROYAL FAMILY. 



burg and Gotha. who was born August 20, 1319. 1 
Victoria-Addaidc-Mary-Louisa, Princess Royal, b, Nov 2) 
1840; Albert-Edward, Prince of Wales, b. Nov. 9, mi : 
AUee-Maud-Mary. b, April 25, 1S43; Alfr^l-i:,-,,,.-/- ,\lh?rt, 
b. Aug. G, 1844; Helena- Augusta-Victoria, b, Mav -">. 184 
Louisa-Caroline-Alberta, b. March 1S.1S48: Arthur-n iltium- 
Palrick-Albert. b. May 1, 1850; Ltopnld-Gforat-Dun - in- 
Albert, b. April 7, 1853. 



GOVERNOR GENERAL His Excellency Sir Edmund Walker 
Head, Bart., Governor General of British North America, 
and Captain General and Governor-in-Chief of the Provin 
ces of Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and the Island 
of Prince Edward, &c. 4c. Ac. R. T. Pennefather, Governor 
General s Secretary. Capt. Retallack, 16th Regt., A. D. C., 
Military Secretary, and Principal Aide de-Camp. Colonel 
Irvine, Provincial Aide-de-Camp. Lieut. Col. Duchesnay, 
extra Provincial Aide do-Camp. 

CIVIL SECRETARY S OFFICE. R. T. Pennefather, Secretary ; 
Henry Cotton. Chief Clerk ; W. R. Bartlett, 2nd Clerk ; 
Philip Hill, Office Keeper: John Boxall, Messenger. 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 

Speaker of Me Legislative Council Hon. E. P. Tache. 
Attorney General for Upper Canada lion. John A. Mac- 

donald. 

Inspector General Hon. William Cayley. 
Postmaster General Hon. Robert Spence. 
Cbmmissitmer f Crown Lands Hon. Joseph Cauchon. 
Chief Commissioner Public Works Hon. Francois Lemieux. 
Atorney General for Lower Canada Hon. Geo. E. Cartier. 
Receiver General Hon. Joseph C. Morrison. 
Provincial Secretary Hon. Timothy Lee Terrill. 
Presidtnt of the Council and Minister of Agriculture Hon 

Philip M. Vankoughnet. 

OFFICERS. William H. Lee, Clerk of Executive Council ; 
William A. Himsworth, Confidential Clerk; Moore A. Hig- 
gins, F. Valleraud, and Oliver Cote, Clerks ; Michael Jsaugh- 
.ton, Doorkeeper ; James Ryan, Messenger. 

PROVINCIAL SECRETARY S OFFICE. Hon. T. Lee Terrill, 
Provincial Secretary ; Etienne Parent, Assistant Secretary 
East; Edmund A. Meredith, Assistant Secretary West; 
T. D. Harington, Chief Clerk; G. Powell, first do., West; 
H. E. Steele, second do.; C. J. Birch, third do.; Thomas 
Ross, first do. East; Henry Jarmy, second do.; William 
H. Jones, third do. ; Alfred R. Roche, fourth do. ; S. Tetu, 
fifth do. ; George S. Bertrand and H. R. Glackmeyer, extra 
do.; John Gow, Office Keeper ; James Dorr. J. N. Fradet, 
Messengers. 

PROVINCIAL REGISTRAR S OFFICE. Provincial Registrar. 
-the Provincial Secretary for the time being; Thomas 

Amiot, Esq., Deputy do. ; William Kent, Chief Clerk ; G. 

H. Lane, second do. ; Amable Belanger, Assistant do. ; and 

.J. A. Belanger, extra do.; Maxime Valiquette, Messenger. 

RECEIVER GENERAL S OFFICE. Hon. Jos. Curran Morrison, 

Receiver General ; Charles E. Anderson, Deputy do. ; Theo. 
Dufort, 1st Clerk and Book-keeper; J. B. Stan ton, 2nd, or 

Warrant Clerk; G. C. Reiffenstein, 3rd, or Debenture Clerk: 

William Hedge. 4th, and Bank Account Clerk; J. F. Pel- 

lant, 5th. General Clerk ; L. F. Dufresne, Clerk in charee 
f Municipal Loan Fund of Upper Canada; Charles W. 

Shay, As-l-taut Book-keeper and General Clerk ; Frederick 
Braun, Clerk in charge of Municipal Loan Fund of Lower 

Canada and of Seigniorial Act of 1854; F. L. Casault. Mcs- 
-s-3nger; J. Irwin, Assistant do. 

INSPECTOR GENERAL S OFFICE. William Cayley, Inspector 
General ; William Dickinson, Acting Deputy Inspector Ge 
neral: David A. Ross, Chief Clerk; Morrii G.xlard, 1st 
Book-keeper; John Drysdale, 2nd do.; Archibald Carv 
Clerk: F. (!. Scott, Clerk; J. J. Hackett, Clerk; David 
Ryau, House-keeper and Messenger. 

Auditors Branch. John Langton, Auditor r,f Public 
Accounts; Thomas Cruse, Book-keeper: C. Cambie. Cl. rk 
Christopher Green, do.; James Patterson, do.; Edward C 
Barber, do. ; J. A. Kavanagh, do. 

f,,ftmnf Department. 1{ . S. M. Bouchctte. Commissioner ; 
Thomas \\orthinzton. Inspector of I ortsfor I ].),,-!- Canada: 
Hathew Ryan. do. fur Lower Ornate; J A. Green, Stati*- 
, Ical Clerk; J. W. Peachy, Corresponding Clerk; J R 



PROVINCE OF CANADA. 

SEAT OF GOVERNMENT TORONTO. 

Audy. Clerk of Seizures and Forms: II. H. Duffil. Stati 
cal and Canal Office Clerk ; J. M. Muckle, Check Cl >rk P 
E. Sheppard, extra do. do. 



COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS. 

Those marked thus* are Warehousing Ports. 



AmJierst,* J. J. Fox. 
Amherstburg* E. Anderson. 
Bath, W. J. Fairfield. 
Bayfield, Wm. Keith. 
Beauce, T. J. Taschercau. 
BeUemVe* S. S. Finden. 
Branlford* D. Curtis, Jr. 
Brighton,!). Y. Leslie. 
Brocuvi/le,* W. B. Simpson. 
Bruce Mines. J. Pcnnetather. 
Burwell. G. J. Reid. 
Bytown,* D. Graham. 
Chatham,* Win. Co-grove. 
Chippcwa,* F. II. Haycock. 
ClarencevXle. Clias. Sti-wart. 
Cvaticook,* J. Thompson. 
Cobourg* W. II. Kitsou. 
CoUwrne,* J. Parke. 
tb&nfftoood,* J. Me Watt. 
Cornwall*. Q. C. AVood. 
Coteau du Lac, P. E. Waiter. 
Oramahe,* J. M. Merriman 

Credit,* 

Dalhoiifie* J. Clark. 
Darlington,* D. Fisher. 
Dickenson s Landing, R. K. 

Bullock. 

Dover,* E. Webster. 
Dundas* W. B. Gwyn. 
Dundee,* J. Cameron. 
DtmnviUe, W. B. Sheehan. 
Elgin, A. McMillan. 
P,rt Erie* R. Graham. 
Prdiglisburgh, A. Kemp. 
Gananoque, Wm. Brough. 
Gaspe* J. C. Belleau. 
Genrgeville. C. Bullock. 
Goderic/i.* D. Lawaon. 
Grafton* S. S. Walsh. 
Hamilton* J. Davidson. 
Bemminaford, C N Johnson. 
Hope* M. Whit-la-ad. 
Huntingdon, J sanes Botham. 
Vlslc Verte. J. W. Heath. 
Kingston,* James Hopkirk. 
Kingsville, J. King. 



LacoUe, T. Gordon. 

London * J. B. Strathy. 

JfaitJand.* I). Jones. 

Milford, F. W. Smith. 

Moii/real,* T. ISoutliillvr. 

Morrisliurg. A. McUonell. 

Niipanee. E. Dunham. 

New Carlisle* Joan Fras.-r. 

Ni:wcasUe,,(B. Head) Smith 

Niagara,* T. McCormick. 

OakviOt* K. K. Ohisholm. 

Oshaiva.* - C. Walsh. 

Owen Sound, W. Stephens. 

f \irif * J. Murphy. 

Penrtanguixhrne. W Simpson. 

PhMtptlwy, p. t>. Russell. 

Picton,* J. Koblin. 

Potion, J. II. McVey. 

Prescott.* A. Jones. 

Quebec.* J. W. Dunsromb 

Vlieenfton.* I . ]>,. Clcnient. 

Bnitomki* .s. (xunivau. 

Rivlfre. aux- Raisins, W. Ro 
binson. 

Rondeau, George Duck. 

A "( wn. H. Acton. 

RutsrUmun, K. I topers. 

Sarnia* T. Forsyth. 

Saugesn. J. B. O Connor. 

Sautt fite.. Marie* .1. Wilson. 

Stamford* G. Mc-ML-ken. 

Stanley* M. Child. 

Stanslead. S. A. Dickerson. 

. Johns,* W. McCrae. 

St. Regis. G. R. Audy. 

Stratford, James Orr. 

SutUm, B. Seaton. 

Three Hirers,* C. II. Godby. 

Toronto* \V. F. Meudell. 

Trenton* A. Macaulay. 

Trout River, J. II. Smith. 

Wallace./mrg/i, John IV11. 

Wrllinytan. J. R. Yeilding. 

WJtitlty* W. Wan-en. 

Windsor* J. F. KJliot. 

Woodstock,* Jordan Charles, 
STATISTICS. lion. P. M. 



[226] 



BUREAU OF AGRICULTURE AND .:*. n..n. i . .u. 
Vankoughnet. Head of Bureau ; William Hntt >n. Secretary : 
E. Campbell. 1st Clerk ; N. F. Laurent, 2nd do. ; P. Peguine- 
3rd do. ; D. McLeod, 4th do. 

DEPARTMENT op PUBLIC WORKS. Office. Wellington Street- 
Hon. F. Lemieux, Chief Commissioner; Hon. H. II. Kil- 
laly, Assistant do. ; T. A. Begly, Secretary. 

Engineering Branch. John Page. Chirf Kn^ inei-r : F. P. 
Rabldga, Kn-inn-r and Dnuightsman ; P. Gauvreau, Clerk 
of Works. 

Corre.spnmlinf/ Brnnr7i.T,. P. Shanly, Chief Cl.Tk ; J. 
Guy, Clerk; .J. W. Harper. Clerk. 

Financial Branch. J. Turnbull, Book-keeper and Ac 
countant; F. Hamel, Assistant do. 

Board of Railway Ommisxionerf. The Hon. tho Inspec 
tor General. Ch simian: The Hon. the I ostmr^ nr General; 
The lion, the Chief Commissioner of Public Works; The 
Hon. the Receiver General; Tho Hon. the Assistant Com- 



1857.] 



PROVINCE OF CANADA. 



35 



missioner of Public Works. Secretary The Secretary of 
Public Worka. 

CROWN LAND DEPARTMENT. Hon. Joseph Cauchon, Com 
missioner; E. A. Genereux. Secretary; J. Morphy, Regis 
trar. 

Accountant s Department. W . Ford, Accountant ; J. 
Alley, Assistant do. ; C. J. Walcot, do. do. ; F. T. Roche, 
Clerk; J Tolmie, do.; D. A. Grant, Temporary do.; C. 
Pope, do. dn. ; John Gale, do. do. 

Currespondence West. J.C. Tarbutt, Corresponding Clerk 
West; A Kirkwood, Clerk ; A. J.Taylor, do.; C. Gamon, 
Temporary do. 

Cirretpinden.r.e E laf. W. F. Collins, Coi-responding Clerk 
East; T. Hammond, Clerk; V. E. Tessier, do. ; T. Cherrier, 
do. ; F. D. Diuial. Temporary do. 

Late Surveyor General s Office. W. Spra<rge, Chief Clerk 
late S. G. 0.: T. Hector, Clerk; F. A. Hall, do. 

Surveys \Ve.<t. A. Russell, Senr. Survey or and Draughts 
man West. T. Devine, Assistant Surveyor and Draughts 
man: II. J.Jones, Clerk; J. H.Bridgland. Temporary do,: 
J. Prendergast, do. do. ; F. Banister, do. do. 

Surveys E<ixt. J. Bouchette, Senior Surveyor and 
Draughtsman East ; C. T. Fletcher, Assistant do. ; G. G. 
Dunlevie, Assistant do.; J. F. Bouchette, Temporary do.; 
E. Caizac, Temporary do.; F. Chasse, Tempoiary Clerk. 

Jesuiti Eitutr* and Queen s Domain F. T. Judah 1st 
Clerk Jesuits Estates and Queen s Domain; L. R. Fortier, 
Temporary Clerk. 

Wmds and Forests. Vf . McD. Dawson. Clerk of Woods 
and Fon-sts; I . 31. Partridge, Temporary Clerk; S. B. 
Bauset, do. ; L. A. Robititille, do. 

nyers. J. Bradshaw, G. Fisher, J. Innis, E. Du- 
montier. 

BOARDS FOP. THE EXAMINATION OF PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYORS 

Vpper Canada Board. The Hon. the Commissioner of 
Crown Lands, ex officio ; Joseph Bouehette and A. Russell. 
Senior Surveyors and Draftsmen, Crown Lands Depart 
ment: John Booth. Elizabethtown ; Sandford F. Fleming. 
Toronto: David Gibson, Township of York : William Haw 
kins, Toronto, John Stoughton Dennis. Weston; and 
John Knatchbull Roche, Port Hope, Provincial Land Sur 
veyors ; Secretary. t\ F. Passmore, Toronto. 

L iwr Cnoit/.a Board. The Hon. The Commissioner of 
Crown Lands, cz nfficio ; Joseph Bouchette and Andrew 
Russell, Senior Surveyors and Draftsmen. Crown Lands 
Department: Adolphus Larne Quebec; Charles Francois. 
Fornie. St. Jean Port Joli; Joseph Hamel. Quebec; and 



John Ostell. Montreal, Provincial Land Surveyors; Secre 
tary, E. T. Fletcher, Quebec. 

CROWN TIMBER OFFICE. McLean Stewart, Collector; D. 
Bonacina, Assistant Collector. 

CROWN LAW DEPARTMENT. 

Canada West. Hon. John A. Macdonald, Attorney 
General; Henry Smith, Solicitor General; Robert A. 
Harrison, Clerk ; David Alexander, Jr., Assistant Clerk; 
Patrick Lynch, Messenger. Canada East. Hon. Geo. Et. 
Cartier, Attorney General; Dunbar Ross, Solicitor General; 
George Baby, Clerk; John Gow. Jr., Messenger. Clerk of 
Crown Law Department, George Futvoye. 

ADJUTANT GENERAL S OFFICE Colonel the Baron de Rot- 
teuburg, Adjutant General; Lieut. Col. Donald Macdonald, 
Deputy Adjutant General, U. C. ; Lieut. Col. the Hon. A. 
M. de Salaberry, Deputy Adjt. Genl.. L. C. ; Robert Berry, 
1st Clerk ; Charles Petitclair, 2nd Clerk : W. R. Wright, 
3rd Clerk; J. Bte. Raymond, 4th Clerk; Edward Bartlett, 
Temporary Clerk ; Mr James Hamilton Hay, Bt., Tempo 
rary Clerk ; Henry Smeaton, Office Messenger. 

INDIAN DEPARTMENT. R.T. Pennefather, Superintendent 
General of Indian Affairs; S. Y. Chesley, Assistant do.; 
Michael Turnor. Chief Clerk; Thomas G. Anderson, Visit- 
in. Superintendent; David Thorburn, do.; Duncan C. 
Napier, do.; George Ironside, do.; Froom Talfourd, do.; 
Francis Assickenack, Interpreter. 

GENERAL POST OFFICE. Hon. Robert Spence. Posmaster 
General; William II. Griffin, Secretary; E. F. King. Chief 
Clerk; J. Ashworth, E. J. King, Accountants; P. Lesuenr, 
Superintendent Money Order Branch; J. T. McCuaig, 
Inspector Dead Letters; Edward S. Freer, Inspector Mont 
real Division: If. A. Wicksteed. Inspector Kingston Divi 
sion ; John Dewe, Inspector Toronto Division ; G. E. Grif 
fin, Inspector London Division. 

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT, C. W. For the general admi 
nistration of the Grammar and Common School Laws. 
Rev. Kgerton Ryerson, D.D., Chief Superintendent of 
Education ; J. George Hodgins, M.A., Deputy Superinten 
dent of Education; Thomas Hodgins, Second Clerk ; A. J. 
Williamson, Cl>-rk of Correspondence; Alexander Marling, 
Clerk of Accounts; Samuel P. May, Clerk of Libraries; 
Messrs. Taylor, Lestor and Churchill, Assistant Clerks. 
Offices in the Normal School Buildings, Toronto. 

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT, C.E. Hon. P. J. 0. Chauveau, 
Chief Superintendent of Education; LouU Giard, Secretary ; 
Joseph Lenoir. Clerk. 



LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF CANADA. 



NAMES & RESIDENCES. 

Hon. P. B. DeBIaquier, Toronto. 

" Peter McfHIl. Montreal. 

" Rene E. Caron, Quebec. 

W. Morris. Montreal. 

J. Crooks. Flamhorn Wi -st. 

" A. Fergusson, Flarnhr,ro East. 

" J. Macaulay, Kingstsm. 

J. Hamilton. Kingston. 

" A. Ferrie, Doon. 

" P. H. Knowrlton. Brom>. 

" 1 . II. Moore. Fhillipsburyfi. 

" J. Dionn. .%. Pierre les Becquet. 

" G. J (J Hidhue. London. 

W. Wilker. Quebec. 

C. \Vi lin.T. Toronto. 

" P. Boucher DeBoucherville. Bmi- 

illf. 

" J. Morris. BrocJ.-vilJe. 

" J Gordon, Toronto. 

" II. Pinhey. M<u-<:li. 

" J. Fe-riier. Mo,i/r, t> . 

" R. MMtlic-inn. Perth. 

" G. S. Boulton, Cibouro. 

" D. B. Yi-.-r. Montreal. 

" Jnmes Lt-slin. Montreal. 

" Frederick A. Quesnel, Montreal. 

J. Bourivt. Montreal. 

" G. S DelJi-aujftu, Coteau du, Lac. 

" John Ross, Toronto. 



Hon. E. P. T.ACHE Toronto, Speaker. 

NAMES AND RESIDENCES. 

Hon. Le Methot, St. Croix. 
" J. 0. Turpreon, Ttrrd)onne. 
" S. Crane, Preset)/ 1. 
S. Mills. Hamilton. 
" Louis Panet. Quebec. 

Narcisse F. Belleau. Quebec. 

Charles Wilson. Montreal. 

Benjamin Seymour, Ba/fi. 

David M. Armstrong, Br.rthier. 

Ebenezer Perry, Colifiurg. 

Eusnbe Cartier. St. Hyacintlie, 

Walter II. Diokson, \inyara. 

ELECTIVE LEGISLATIVE COUNCILLORS. 
UPPER CANADA. 

II. Smith. r,nr1hi()tnn. 

J. Simpson. Queen s. 

Col J. Prince, Wi:stern. 

Hon. P. Vankoutrhnet, Ridrau. 

James Patton, Saugcen. 

K. Murney, Trent. 

LOWER CANADA. 
IIollN Smith. Wellington. 
A. J. OncliKsnay. Lnu:nn 
L II. Renaud. / < s,i!nl;-rry. 
L. DePsaulle*. Hoii temnnt. 
E. ^I:l -ion. Milli fylf.t. 
M. P. De S. LaterrWe, Lauretitides. 



PERMANENT OFFICERS. ,1. F. Taylor 
Clerk of the House and Master in Chan 
cery ; Robert LeMoine, Deputy and 
Assistant Clerk, Master in Chancery, 
and French Translator; Fennings Tay 
lor. Deputy and Assistant Clerk. Mas 
ter in Chancerv, and Chief Office Clerk; 
K.L. Montizambert Law Clerk, English 
Translator, and Clerk of Committee^; 
J. E. Doucet, Additional Assistant 
Clerk, and Assistant French Transla 
tor; W. A. Maingy, Additional Assis 
tant and 2nd Office Clerk; James 
Adamson. Clerk of the English Jour 
nals; J G. Couillard, Clerk of the 
French Journals ; George de Blaquiere, 
Junior Clerk: Rene Kimber, Gentle 
man Usher of the Black Rod : Olivier 
Yallerand, Serjoant-at-Arms ; Rev. W. 
A. Adamson, D.C.L.. Chaplain and Li- 
braritn; 31ichael Keating. Chief Mes- 
sfnger, and House-keeper ; Samuel 
Skinner, Messenger and Assist.-iiit 
House-keeper: Edward Botterell Door 
keeper; Antoine Lachance. MemengBr; 
Timothy Neiiry, do.; James Doherty, 
do. ; John Hanley, do. ; John Young, 
do : F. Bo;ilet. do. ; Peter Dunn, do.: 
Jo jih Casault, do. 



ADDRESS. To the Honourable the Legislative Council of th<< Province of Canada, in Parliament assembled. The 

Petition of 

Humbly fihcweth, That, ic. 

[Place and date.] 

[227] 



36 



PROVINCE OF CANADA. 



[1857. 



LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF CANADA. 



CONSTITUENCIES. NAMES. 

Argentfuil ......... Sydney Bellingham 

Bagut ............... Timothe Brodeur. 

Bcauce ............. Dunbar Koss. 

Btauharnois ...... Charles Daoust. 

Bdlcchasse ......... 0. C. Fortier. 

Bertldi-r ........... Pierre Eust. Dostaler. 

Bmarenture ...... John Meagher. 

Brant (E. R.).. ..David Christie. 

Brant ( W. JR.).... Herbert Bigsar. 

Bnx3cviUe( Town)Qeorge Crawford. 
Brome ............... Jas. Moir Ferres. 

Carleton ........... Wm. F. Powell. 

Chambly .......... Noel Darche. 

Champlain ....... Thomas Marchildon. 

Charlevais ......... Pierre G. Huot. 

Cliateauf/uyy ------ Jacob DeWitt. 

Chicoittimi 



John Sewall Sanborn. 
Cornwall (TwMTO)Uoderick McDonald. 
Dorchester ......... Barthelemi Pouliot. 

Drummond < 



Dundas ............ John Pliny Crysler. 

J)urham (/:. 7. .)Francis II. Burton. 
Durham ( W. .fi.)Henry Munro. 
Elgin (E. R.).. ..George Southvrick. 

Klijin ( IF. R.)... George Macbeth. 
}--xix ............... Arthur Rankin. 

Frontenac ........ Henry Smith. 

Gaxpe ............... John LeBoutiller. 

Glengary .......... Hon. J. S. Macdonald. 

Orenvilk (S. J?.)\Vm. Patrick. 
Grey ................ George Jackson. 

Jl ditimand ....... Wm. Lyon Mackenzie. 

Jfalton ............. Geo. K. Cbisholm. 

Hamilton (Crty)Hot?.Sir A N McXab,Bt 
1 faffing! (>Y. .R.)0eo. Benjamin. 
J fastings (S. Je.)Billa Flint. 
JJoclielaga ......... Joseph Laporte. 

Huntingdon ...... R. Brown Somerville. 

Huron < Bruce..Hon. W. Cayley. 
Ibervitte ............ Chas. Joseph Laberge. 

Jacques Cartier..Michel P. Talois. 
Jolielte ............. Joseph H. Jobin. 

Kamouraska ..... Jean Chas. Chapais. 

Kent ................ Edwin Larwill. 

Kingston (City)llon.J. A. Macdonald. 
Lamiiton .......... George Brown. 

J. jna.rlc (N. #.)..Robert Bell. 
Lanark (S. It.).. .James Shaw. 
Lnprairie ......... T. J. J. Loranger. 

L Attomptim ..... Joseph Papin. 

Laval ............... Pierre Labelle. 

Lenox and Ad- ] ~ ., , ,. 
,i;,, g ton ....... { David Roblm 

Grm-] 



Leeds (S. Ji.) ...... Jessie Delong. 

/;"i,-/x ................ HonFrangoisLemienx 

Lincoln ............ Hon. W. II. Merritt. 

L liiet ............... Chas. F. Fournier. 

London (City). ..John Wilson. 
Lotltinitre ......... John O Farrell. 



Louis VICTOR SICOTTE, Speaker. 

COXSTITUENCIES. NAMES. 

Maskinonge ....... Joseph E. Turcotte. 

Mfgrnitic .......... \Vm. lihodes. 

Middltsex(E. JJ.Wm. Miles. 
Middlesex (W.R.)3o\m Scatcherd. 
Missisquni ......... H. II. Whitney. 

Mnntcalm ......... Joseph Dufresne. 

Altnimagny ...... Napoleon Casault. 

Mnntmorency ..... Hon. Joseph Cauchon. 

(Antoinc A. Dorion. 
Montreal(City)l Luther H. Holton. 

(Hon. John Young. 
Montreal (I 



Napierville, ....... Jacques 0. Bureau. 

Niagara (7fru;n)Hon. Jos. C Morrison. 
yicol*t .............. Thomas Fortier. 

X<jrfol/c ............ Hon. John Kolph. 

NorthumberlunA 



No 



Ontario (N. l{.).-Joseph Gould. 
Ontario (S. R.)...J. McV. Lumsden. 
Ottawa (City).... A gar Yeilding. 

Ottawa ............ Alanson Cooke. 

Oxford (N. 7e.)...Donald Matheson. 
Oxford (S. 7i.)...Ephraim Cook. 
Fed .................. James C. Aikins. 

Perth ............... Thos. Mayne Daly. 

Pcterlx/rouah ..... Wilson Conger. 

Pontiac ............ John Egan. 

Purtn M/. .......... Jos. Elie Thibaudeau. 

Prescott ............ Henry W. McCann. 

Prince Edward.D&iitl B. Stevenso.i. 

( Jean Blanchet. 
Quebec (C ity).-< Charles Alleyn. 

(George II. Simard. 
Queh C (County )Tmncms Evanturel. 
Renfrew ........... John Supple. 

Richelieu .......... Jean B. Guevremont. 

Richmond and \ , T ,, ,, 

Wolfe ............ I Wm. L. Felton. 

Rimouski ......... Joseph C. Tache. 

Rouville ............ W. H. Chaffers. 

Rusftll ............. G. B. Lyrn Fellowes. 

Saint Hyacinlhe.Ilon. L.Victor Sicotte. 
Saint John s ...... Francois Bovirassa. 

Saint Maurice.. L. L. L. Desaulniers. 
Shefford ............ Hon. L.T. Drummond. 

Sherbrooke (2")Alex. T. Gait. 
Sh rbrooke <6\ , r T ,, 

Wjj- e .......... ] Wm. L- Felton. 

Simcoe (iV. JZ.)...Angtis Morrison. 
Simcoe (S. R) ..... Hon. W. B. Robinson. 

So Hanges ......... Luc H. Masson. 

SLansttad .......... Hon. Tim. L. Terrill. 

Stormont .......... William Mattice. 

Temiscouata ...... Benjamin Dionne. 

Tf.rrebonnr. ........ G. M. Prerost. 

Three. Rivers 
(Town) 



livers } 
) I 



Antoine Polette. 



Tivo Mountains...}. B. Daoust. 



CONSTITUENCIES. NAMES. 

Vaudrtuil J. B. Mongeuais. 

Verclteres Hon. Geo. E. Cartier. 

Victtiria James Smith. 

Waterloo (If. _R.)M. II. Foley. 
Waterloo (S. .)Bobert Ferrie. 

Wrlland John Frazer. 

miingtonW.SWrn. Clai kc. 
Wellwgton(S.R.)A. J. Fergusson. 
Hn<wort//(iV..K)Hon R. Spence. 
Wentwarth(S.R.). B. Freeman. 

Yamaska Ignace Gill. 

York (N. R.) Joseph Hartman. 

York (E. If.) Amos Wriiiht. 

Yark(W. R.) John W. Gamble. 

PERMANENT OFFICERS. 

Chief Department. W. B. Lindsay, 
Clerk : W. B. Lindsay, Jun., Clerk As 
sistant; W. Ross, Deputy do.; T. 
Vaux, Accountant; C. Laugevin, As 
sistant do. 

Law Department. G. W. Wicksteed, 
Law Clerk. 

General Department. W. P. Patrick, 
Chief Office Clerk; II Hartney, A.-.-ist . 
do. ; William Spink, Routine and Re 
cord Clerk, H. B. Stuart, English 
Writing do.; E. Denechaud, French 
do. ; W. B. Ross, Junior Clerk ; Her 
mann Poetter, do. ; A. Laperriere, do. ; 
P. Rivet, do. ; A D. G. Taylor, do. ; H. 
McCarthy, do. ; J. F. Gingras, do. 

General Committee Department. 
Alfred Patrick, Chief Clerk of Com 
mittees and of Controverted Elections ; 
J. P. Leprohon, First Assistant Clerk of 
Committees; F. X. Blanchet, 2nd do. 

Private Bill Department. A.. Todd, 
Clerk of Private Bills; T.Patrick, As 
sistant do. and Clerk of Railway Com- 
mittea. 

Translators. T). P. Myrand, Chief 
French Translator; W. Fanning, As 
sistant do. ; E. P. Dorion, do.; A. De- 
silcts, do. ; F. Badgley. English Trans 
lator; W. Wilson, Assistant do.; W. 
P. Power, do. 

Journals. G. M. Muir, Clerk of Eng 
lish Journals ; P. E. Ganion, Clerk of 
French do. ; W. C. Burrage, Assistant 
Clerk of English Journals ; W. H. Le- 
Moine, Assistant Clerk of French do. 

Library. Alpheus Todd, Librarian : 
A. G. Lajoie, Assistant do; J. Curran, 
Library Keeper. 

Serjeant-at-arms Department. D. W. 
MacDonell, Serjeant-at-Arms ; A. L. 
Cardinal, Chief Messenger and House 
KC-.-JPI.T: M. McCarthy, Assistant M- - 
senger : 0. Vincent, do. ; J. O Connor, 
Door-keeper ; R. Bailie, Assistant do. 

Post, Office. Department. V.. Defrics, 
Post Master; Joseph Blais, Assistant 
do. ; P. Lalibcrte, Messenger. 



ADDRESS. To the Honourable the Legislative Assembly of Canada, in. Provincial Parliament assembled. 

The Petition of 

Humbly sheweth. That, Ac. 

Wherefore your Petitioners humbly pray, &c. 
[Place and date.] 



No Petition to the Legislative Assembly -will be received unless there be three genuine signatures on the sheet 
)f paper or parchment on which the conclusion of the Petition is written or printed. The usage has been, in the 
niv. Assembly, to receive only written Petitions, but at a late session (1853), the Assembly adopted a resolution 
to receive printed Petitions in that House. All Petitions must be dated. 



PROVINCIAL OBSERVATORY, TORONTO. 

Latitude, 43. 39 .4 North. Longitude, 79. 21 .5. West, or 5 hours, 17 minutes, 26 seconds Slow of Greenwich Time. 

Elevation above Lake Ontario, 108 feet. Approx imate Elevation above the Sea, 342 feet. 
The Provincial Observatory is now attached to the University of Toronto, and is in the charge of Prof. KINGSTON, and 



three Assistants. 



[228] 



1857.] 



INDEX TO THE STATUTES. 



37 



AN INDEX TO THE STATUTES, 

Pissed in the Sxond Session of the Fifth Parliament of the Province of Canada (19 <20 Vic.), a&phabeticatty arranged 
according to the initial letter of the word most distinctive of the siibject-matter treated of in each, and otherwise further 
classified, so as to facilitate the acquisition of any particular Act required. 

Reserved Act. 

CXL. LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL To render Elective. (Assented to by Her Majesty in Council, 24th June, 1856.) 

Provincial Acts. 



GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS. 
LXXXV. Acts To continue the following : 

Bankrupts For Relief of 7 Vic. c. 10, 9 Vic. c. 30, 
12 Vic. c. 18, and 13 & 14 Vic. c. 20. 

Bills of Exchange To ascertain Damages on pro 
tested 3 Win. IV. c. 14. 

Butter For Inspection of in Quebec and Montreal 
11 Vic. c. 7. 

Debtors To facilitate Proceedings against 9 Geo. 
IV. c. 28. 

Debtors, Insolvent, U. C. To relieve 8 Vic. c. 48, 
except sec. 44. 

F^f Grosbois To place Common of, under Control of 
Inhabitants 9 Geo. IV. c. 32. 

fisheries To regulate in District of Gaspe 4 & 5 
Vic c. 36. 

fisheries On the Labrador and N. Shore of Gulf of 
St. Lawrence 16 Vic. c. 92. , 

fisheries, Salmon To preserve in Counties of Corn- 
wallis and Northumberland 9 Geo. IV. c. 51. 

Hastings, County Registration of Titles in 9 Vic. 
c. 12, 10 & 11 Vic. c. 38., and 12 Vic. c. 97. 

Insane Persons For Relief of in Home District 
11 Geo. IV. c. 20 and Extension of 3 Will. IV. c. 45. 

Mariners To provide Medical Treatment for Sick 
6 Wm. IV. c. 35, as amended by 8. Vic. c. 12. 

Peace For the Preservation of at and near Public 
Works, while in the Progress of Construction 8 Vic. 
c. 6, as amended by 14 & 15 Vic. c. 76. 

Peace, Justices of To regulate Fees of Persons em 
ployed by 6 Wm. IV. c. 19. 

Provincial Penitentiary For the better Manage 
ment of 14 & 15 Vic. c. 2. 

Public Business Empowering Commissioners to 
enquire into Matters connected with, &c. 9 Vic. c. 38. 

Real Property in L C. Relative to Registration of 
Titles to and Incumbrances upon 8 Vic. c. 27. 

Real Property in L. C. To enable Proprietors to 
acquire, when illegally detained from them 14 and 
15 Vie. c. 92, as amended by 16 A T ic. c. 205. 

Rivers and Rivulets, U. C.To prevent Obstructions 
in 7 Vic., c. 36, as amended by 10 & 11 Vic. c. 20, and 
14 & 15 Vic. c. 123. 

Secret Incumbrances For Extinction of on Lands in 
L. C. 9 Geo. IV. c. 20. 

Seigneurie of La Baie St. Antm ne For Regulation of 
Common of 2. Geo. IV. c. 10. and 4 Geo. IV. c. 26. 

Seigneurie ofLaprairie For Regulation of Common 
Of 2 Geo. IV. c. 8. 

Irinity House, Montreal To enlarge Powers of, 
where Health of City is endangered 10 & 11 Vic. c. 1. 

Waives, L. C.To encourage Destruction 1 Win. 
IV. c. 6. 

Wuh-es, U. C.To encourage Destruction 6 Wm IV. 
c. 29. 

XVI. Clergy Reserves To Amend Act 18 Vic. c. 2 
Appropriating Moneys arising from. 

X. Customs To amend Acts, inconsistent with this Act 
imposing Duties of. 

XL1I. Excise To impose additional E. Duty on Spirits. 
LXXXVII. flour, Meal, ax. To consolidate Acts 4 & 
5 Vic. c. 89, 11. Vic. c. 6, and 13 & 14 Vic. 29 For Inspec 
tion of. 

XIII. Geological Survey To make further Provisions 
for, in this Province. 



XLIX. Lotteries For the Suppression of. 

XL1V. Militia Law To amend 18 Vic. c. 77. 

XLV. Ordnance Estates To transfer in Part to Secretary 
of War, and in part to the Provincial Government. 

II. Ordnance Lands To authorize Commutation of 
Claims, upon, on their transfer to the Province. 

XLVI. Peace, Justice of To amend Act 6 Vic. c. 3 
for the Qualification of. 

L. Ship-building For the Encouragement of. 

XLI. Speaker To Provide for the Execution of the 
Office of, in Legislative Assembly, in certain cases. 

LXXXVI. Supplies For Defraying Expenses of Civil 
Government, 1856, and raising 250,000 on Consolidated 
Revenue. 

UPPER CANADA. 

XLIII. Common Law Procedure Act, ISoG To amend, 
repeal, and consolidate certain Acts, and to simplify and 
expedite proceedings in Courts of Queen s Bench and 
Common Pleas. 

XCI. County Courts To amend Act altering and 
amending Act regulating Practice of, Ac. 

XC. County Court Procedure Act, 1856 To simplify 
and expedite proceedings in County Courts. 

XC11I. Debtors, Insolvent To extend 8 Vic. c. 48 
for the relief of. 

XC1V. Game Laws To alter and amend 7 Vic. c. 12, 
8 Vic. c. 46, 14 & 15 Vic. c. 61, and 16 Vic. c. 171, &c. re 
lating to. 

XCII. Jurors To amend 16 Vic. c. 120 as regards 
Fees payable to Sheriffs and Clerks of the Peace. 

LOWER CANADA. 

LII. Actions To extend 12 Vic. c. 45 facilitating 
actions against certain Persons and Unincorporated Com 
panies. 

LXXXVIII. Affidavits To authorize Judges of Supe 
rior Courts to appoint Commissioners for taking, in U.C. 

XLV1I. Agriculture To amend 16 Vic. c. 18 provi 
ding for the better organisation of Agricult. Societies. 

LVII. Disinterments To amend 16 Vic. c. 174 au 
thorising in certain cases. 

XV. Enregistration To facilitate Enregistrations and 
Searches in Registry Offices. 

LV1II. fire Insurarce, Mutual. To amend 4 Wm. 
IV. c. 33, Act of L.C establishing. 

LV. Judicature Amendment Act, 1856 To amend 12 
Vic. c. 35 relating to Courts of Civil Jurisdiction. L.C. 

CI. Municipal and Road Act, 1856 To amend and 
explain 18 Vic. c. 100. 

LVI. Notarial Profession To facilitate Examination 
of Candidates for Admission to. 

I. Queen s Bench To provide for holding additional 
Term of, in appeal. 

CII. Registrars To regulate amount of Security to be 
given by. 

CIII. Religious Societies To amend 2 Vic. c. 26, Act 
of L. C providing for relief of certain. 

LIX Ments and Life Rents To provide more effectual 
means for securing Payment of. 

LIII. Seigniorial Amendment Act, 1S56 To amend 
Seigniorial Act, 1854, and S. Amendment Act, 1855. 

XX. St. Jerome Village To authorize organisation of 
Municipal Council in. 

CIV. Watercourses To authorize improvement of. 



Local and Personal Acts. 



BANKS. 

III. Banking To amend 13 &. 14 Vic. c. 21 estab 
lishing Freedom of. 

XXVII. Banque du PcuplcTo amend 18 Vic. c. 43 
relating to. 

XLVIII. Chartered Banks To retain a per centage in 
certain cases. 

VII. City Bank To explain and amend Charter of. 

CXX. Commercv-d Ban?c To amend and consolidate 
Acts relating to, and to change its corporate name to 
" Commercial .Bank of Canada." 



CXXIII. Colonial Bank of Canada To incorporate. 

LXXVI. Montreal Bank To amend and consolidate 
Acts relating to. 

XXIX. Savings Banks To amend 1 & 5 Vic. c. 32 
relating to. 

CXX1I. Union Bank of Canada To incorporate. 

CXXI. fpfier Canada Bank To amend and consoli 
date Acts forming Charter of. 

EDUCATIONAL AND LITERARY. 
XIV. Common Schools, L. C. To amend L. C. School Law- 
Acts of 1S46, 1849, and 1853. 



[2291 



38 



INDEX TO THE STATUTES. 



[1857. 



CXXXII. Lachute College To incorporate. 

LI. Library Associations and Mechanic.? Institutes To 
amend 14 and 15 Vie. c. 86 incorporating. 

LIV. Formal Schools, L. C. For establishment and sup 
port of, and for other purposes. 

LXXII. St. C/iristophed Arthabaska To legalize a School 
Assessment in Parish of. 



GAS AND WATER COMPANIES. 

XXVIII. BrockvuU Gas Light Co. To amend 16 Tic. c. 
108 incorporating. 

LXIV. Hamilton Water Worl-s For Construction of 
LXX. Montreal Water Worls To authorizing the bor 
rowing of 50,000 for completion of. 

INDIVIDUAL. 

CXXXVII. Bernard. Hewitt to admit to Practice as an 
Attorney. &c., in Upper Canada. 

X i? X ^ Burriu < Daniel To vest in, a certain Allowance 
for Kod, Township of Marlboroujrh. 

LXXXI. Capron, Horace, and Mt/ron Ames To vest in, 
a certain Allowance for Koad, Township of South Dumfries. 

XXX VI. DooliUle, Samuel and Robert Johnson To vest 
in, a certain Allowance for Road. Township of Haldimand 

XXXIX. Falkenbercr, Alfred To naturalize. 

XXXVIII. Furley, Jr. John To vest in, a certain Al 
lowance for Road, Township of Darlington. 

CXXXIV. Hawkins, GeoffryTo admit to Practice as 
an Attorney, Ac., in Upper Canada. 

XL. Killam, HcneyTo naturalize. 

CXXXVI. Laivford, Thomas Wright To admit to Prac 
tice as an Attorney, Ac., in Upper Canada. 

XXXIII. Lyon, George Byron To change the Name of 
and his Family, by adding that of" Fellows." 

LXXX1V. Me Lead, Henry Augustus Fitzgerald To ad 
mit to Practice as a Provincial Land Surveyor. 

XXXIV. Papps, Henry Spencer To admit to Practice as 
an Attorney, Ac., in Upper Canada. 

CXXVII. Patfon, Rev. Henry To authorize his Con 
veyance of a portion of a certain Glebe. 

LXXXII. PmveU. Anne To confirm the Partition made 
by Trustees of the Will, &c.. of the late. 

CXXXVIII. Smart, William Lynn To admit to Prac 
tice as an Attorney, Ac., in Upper Canada. 

XXXVII. Tauntmi. James To vest in, a certain Allow 
ance for Road, Township of South wold. 

XXXV. Wade, John and Benjamin Seymour To vest in 
a certain Allowance for Road, Township of Hamilton. 

CXXXV. Walker, Benjamin To admit to Practice as an 
Attorney, &c., in Upper Canada. 

LXXXIII. Weller, WilliamTo authorize the Holding 
and Conveyance of the Canada Grand Trunk Telegraph 
Line. 

LXXX. WiNces, Ge.orge Samuel To vest in, certain Al 
lowances for Road, Township of Brantford. 

INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

LXXXIX. Dividends To provide for the payment of bv 
Insurance Go s. 

CXXV. Farmers Union Ins. Co. To incorporate. 

LVIII. fire Insurance Cos., (Mutual) L.C.To amend 
4 Win. IV. c. 33, Act of L. C. establishing. 

CXXIV. Marine Ins. Co., Canada To incorporate. 

MANUFACTURING AND MINING. 
LXXVIII. Canada and Liverpool Mining and Exploring 
Co. To incorporate. 

XII. Joint Stock Go s. To amend 13 & 14 Vic. c. 28, and 
1C Vic. c. 172 providing for the formation of, for Manufac 
turing and Mining purposes. 

1, XX VII. Quebec and St. Francis Mining and ErjAitring 

iny To incorporate. 
LXXIX. Victoria Mining Company To incorporate. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

CX. Agricultural Societies To vest in, of Middlesex and 
Elgin, certain lands in City of London. 

LX1. Chatham.. Jvwn, U.C. To authorize Council of, to 
dispose of Land set apart for a Cemetery in said Town. 

CV. Challiam Township, L.C.To erect part of, into a 
separate Municipality. 

LXXI. Chic iutimi County. To set off part of. as a sepa 
rate Municipality. 

LXIII. Clifton. Tim-nTo incorporate. 

LX. Cornwall, Town ToenableCoiinnlof.toappropriate 
the >urplus Moneys raised for making certain Macadami 
zed Iload. 



C. Cornwall, Township To legalize certain By-law of 
Council of. 

LXV1I. Darlington. TomishipTo authorize Survey of 
Broken Front Concession of. 

IV. Durham, Township To change Tenure of Indian 
Lands in. 

XVII. Gait, Town To incorporate and define limits of. 

XXX. Hamilton Hotel Co. To increase their Capital 
Stock. &c. 

XIX. Huron, County To separate Co. Bruce from. 

XCIX. Kemptville, Village To incorporate. 

CVII. Kingston, Hospital To amend and Consolidate 
Laws relative to the incorporation of. 

VI. Lincoln and Welland CVs.To facilitate the disuni 
ting of. 

CXXVI. Loan and Investment Oo., Canadian To incor 
porate. &e. 

XCVII. London. City To authorize the negotiation of 
63,000. 

CIX. "Martin s Bend," Onondaga Township To alter 
Survey of. &c. 

CXXVIII. Mount Royal Cemetery To amend and con 
solidate Acts incorporating. 

CXIX. Newcastle. Village. To incorporate. 

XXXI. Ontario Hotel Co. To incorporate. 
XVIII Owen Snund, Town To incorporate. 

XCV. Peterborough, County To separate Co. Victoria 
from. Ac. 

LXIX. Quebec To render the Mayor of elective, by elec 
tors of. 

CVI. Quebec To establish a Recorders Court in City of. 

V. Quebec To repeal in part 16 Vic. c. 233 providing 
a remedy against City of, in case of Kiots. 

LXVIII. Sarnia, Town To Incorporate. 

CXXXIII. Sons of Temperance, (J. W.To Amend 14 
& IS Vic. c. 159 Incorporating. 

LXII. Stamford, Township To rest in Council of, a 
certain Road Allowance. 

LXV. St. Catherines To enable Church-Wardens of St. 
George s Church in Town of, to sell certain Land pur 
chased as " A Site for a Parsonage." 

CVIII. St. Catherines To enable Council of. to sell cer 
tain Land purchased for the purpose of a Public Cemetery. 

XXX1T. St. Moniijue Brittge Company To Incorporate 
| Henry Wolfe Trigge and others under the name of. A:c. 

XCVI. Toronto To settle Northern Boundary Line of 
I City of. 

CXXXI. I n ion of St. Jo.vph of Montreal To Incorporate. 

XCVIII. Woodstock TmvnTo Incorporate, and to divide 
into Wards, Ac. 

LXVI. York County To provide for Separation of County 
Peel from. 

NAVIGATION, DOCKS AND HARBOURS. 

CXIX. Bond Head Harl>our Company To Amend 1 
Vic. c. 31, Act of U. C. Incorporating and to increase 
Capital Stock. 

IX. Part Darlington Harbour Company To increase 
Capital Stock of. 

CXVIII. Toronto < Georgian Bay Canal Company To 
Incorporate. 

LXXIV. Woodstock < Lal-e Erie Railway <C Harbour 
Company To Amend 18 Vic. c. 179 Incorporating. 

RAILWAYS. 

CXT1I. AmJieratbvrg it St. Thomas To Amend and ex 
tend 18 Vic. c. 182 Chartering. 

XXI. Buffalo (CLal.-e Huron To Incorporate, with power 
to purchase the Buffalo, Brantford & fioderich R.Il. 

XXV. Canada fforth-West Iinili-natt To Incorporate. 
VIII. Champlain < St. Lawrence To remedy defect in 
18 Vic. c. 17$ and to Amend, Ac., Acts Incorporating. 
CXI. Grand Trunk Ruilway To grant additional aid to. 

XXII. Hamilton and Port Dover To revive, continue, 
and amend Act incorporating. 

CXVII. Kingston and Nnuburrjh To incorporate. 

XXIV. L Assomption Hirer and Railway Company To 
amend 18 Vic. c. 191 incorporating. 

CXII. Lal;e Huron to Qm-i.n- To provide for and en 
courage (he construction of ;v Railway. 

LXXV. London and G.T.R. Junction Railway To in 
corporate. 

CXVI. Montreal and RyfownTo render operative the 
Carillon and Gr.jnville section of. 

LXX1II. Ontari", Stmcot it- Huron To amend Charter. 

XXIII. Port Dalhousie, and Thorold To extend the 
line of. 



[230] 



1857.] 



TARIFF OF CUSTOMS. 



39 



CXIV. Queenston and St. Catherines To incorporate. 

XI. Railway Officers and Sen-ants For Punishment of, 
iu certain eases. 

XXVI. Stratford and Huron To amend 18 Tic. c. 184 
i ncorporating. 

CXV. WjJ^rloo and Smgeenlo incorporate. 

LXXIV. Woodstock and Lake Erne To amend IS Vie. 
c. 179 incorporating. 

RELIGIOUS BODIES. 

CXXX. Evangelical -Lutherans To amend IS Vic. c. 



58 enabling their Ministers to solemnize Matrimony. <tc. 

CXXIX. Rectory To cancel Letters Patent for endow 
ment of in Warwick Township. 

CIII. Religious Societies, i.e. To am end 2 Vic. c. 26 
for the relief of certain. 

TELEGRAPHS. 

LXXXIII. Canada Orartd Trunk Telegraph Line 
To authorize William Well*r to hold and convey the 
same. 



TARIFF OF CUSTOMS. 

AU Articles marled thus (*) arc admitted FREE under the Reciprocity Treaty, wlten the growth or produce of tlie V. S. 

Specific. AdVal. 

Brandy in Wood, cases covering Free 

Brass and Copper Tubes, when imported for 

the Manufacture of Locomotives 2% 

Brass or Yellow Metal, &c., Brass or Yellow 

Metal, in Bars and Sheets Free 

Brick, Fire 2^ 

Brick, other than Fire Brick 

Brimstone 

Bristles Free 

British North American Provinces, Recipro 
cal Free Trade with, (see end of Tariff.) 

Brooms, per dozen 2s. Cd. 

*Broom Corn Free 

*Buckwheat Freo 

*Buckwheat Meal Free 

*Bulbs and Roots Free 

Bullion Free 

Bunting Free 

Burning Fluid 

*Burr Stones, unwrought Free 

*Burr Stones, wrought Free 

Busts and Casts of Alabaster, Bronze, Mar 
ble, or Plaster of Paris Free 

*Butter Free 



Specific. AdVal. 

Acids, Strong fluid, including Muriatic, 

Nitric, Oxalic, Sulphuric 2}.^ 

Agricultural Societies, Seeds of all kinds, 
^ arming utensils, and Implements of 
Husbandry, when specially imported by, 
for the encouragement of Agriculture Free 

Alabaster Busts Free 

All Goods, Wares and Merchandize, not 
otherwise charged with duty, and not de 
clared to be exempt from Duty 15 

Allspice, (See Pimento and Pepper.) 

Allum 3H 

Ammunition, Arms, and Utensils of War, 
(except from G. B. or B. A. P.) Prohibited. 

Anchors Free 

Anatomical Preparations Free 

* Animals of all kinds Free 

Antiquities, Collections of. Free 

Apparatus, Philosophical, when specially 

imported for use of Philosophical So 
cieties, Universities, &c Free 

Apparel, Wearing, and other Personaleffects, 
and Implements of Husbandry, not mer 
chandize, in actual use of persons coming 
to settle in the Province Free 

Apparel, Wearing, of British Subjects dying 
abroad Free 

Arms for Army or Navy and Indian Nations, 
provided the Duty otherwise payable 
thereon, would be defrayed or borne by 
the Treasury of the United Kingdom, or 
of this Province Free 

Artificial Slate and Metallic Paints, being 
the produce and manufacture of N. S. 
when imported direct from G.B. or B.N.A. 
Provinces Free 

* Ashes, Pot, Pearl, and Soda Free 

Bar Iron 2% 

*Bark 15 

*Bark, used solely in dyeing Free 

* Barley, except Pot and Pearl Free 

* Barley Meal Free 

Burley, Pot and Pearl 15 

liars. Railroad 2% 

Base or Counterfeit Coin Prohibited. 

Battit.g, Cotton Batts, and Wadding 15 

* Beans Free 

*Bean Meal Free 

5 !!ear and Bigg Free 

*I!i-;irand Big Meal Free 

*! terries, used solely in dyeing Free 

Binnacle Lamps, (see Ships.) 

Blasting Powder 15 

Bleaching Powder 2% 

* Block Marble, unpolished Free 

Blocks, (see Ships.) 

Blue, Ultra Marine and Paste 

Boiler Plate and Boiler Plate punched 

Book-binder s Tools, Presses and Imple 
ments of all kinds Free 

Books, Printed, not foreign reprints of 
British dpvviirht Works! Free 

Books of immoral or indecent character Prohibited. 

Boots, Fishermen s 2% 

Borax 2% 

Botany, Specimens of Free 

Bottled Wine and Spirits, cases covering... Free 

Bottles, (see Packages.) 

*l!ran and Shorts Free 

Brandy 4s. per. gal. 

Brandy imported for any Officers Mess free 



Cabinets of Coins Free 

Canada Plates 5 

Candy, Sugar, (see Sugar.) 

Caoutchouc Free 

Carriages of Travellers, and those employed 
in carrying Merchandize, (Hawkers or 

Circus Troupes excepted) Free 

Casks, Ship s Water, in use Free 

Cassia and Cinnamon 3d. per Ib. 

Casts, (see Busts.) 

Cases covering Casks of Wine or Brandy in 
wood, Dry Goods, Hardware, Cutlery, or 

Bottled Wine or Bottled Spirits Freo 

Cement, Marine Free 

Chains, Iron, of all sorta, except Chain 

Cables 5 

Chain Cables Free 

Charcoal, made or refined 

Charitable Societies, donations of clothing 

for gratuitous distribution by Free 

*Cheese Free 

Chocolate and Cocoa Paste, the produce or 
manufacture of G.B. or B.N.A. Provinces. Free 

Chocolate from other Countries 15 

Cigars 3s per Ib 

Cinnamon 3>1. 

Clay, Fire Free 

Clay, Pipe Free 

Cloves 3d. per Ib. 

Clothing, for Army or Navy or Indian Na 
tions, or for gratuitous distribution by 

any Charitable Society Free 

*Coal Free 

Cocoa Nuts 15 

Cocoa Nut Oil..i Free 

*Cochineal Free 

Coffee, Green %d per Ib. 

Coffee, other than Green 2d 

Coins, base or counterfeit Prohibited. 

Coins, Cabinets of Free 

Coin or Bullion Free 

Coke Free 

Collections of Antiquities Free 

Commissariat Stores Free 

Compasses, (see " Ships ") 

Connection Rods 5 



[231] 



40 



TARIFF OF CUSTOMS. 



[185T. 



Specific. AdVal 

Contractor s Stores for Army, Navy or In 
dians Free 

Copper, in Bars. Rods, or in Sheets Free 

Copper Tubes, (see Brass.) 

Copperas 2 

Copyright Works, Foreign reprints of British 15 

Cordage of all kinds Free 

Cordials. Liqueurs, and Spirits, sweetened 

or mixed with any other Article 5s. per gal. 

*Corn, Indian Free 

Cotton and Flax Waste Free 

Cotton Batts, Batting, and Wadding 15 

Cotton Warp?. 2 : 

*Cotton Wool Free 

Cotton Wick 2 

Cottoa Yarn 2 

Counterfeit or base Coin Prohibited. 

Cranks wrought Iron 5 

Crates containing Glassware or Earthen 
ware Free 

Crushed Sugar, (see Sugar.) 

Dead Lights, (see Ships.") 

Dead Eyes, (sea " Ships.") 

Deck Plugs, (see " Ships.") 

Donations of Clothing for gratuitous distri- 

tribution by Charitable Societies Free 

Draining Tiles iy 

Drawings Free 

Drawings of immoral or indecent character Prohibited. 

*Dried Fruits l^dperlb. 

*Drugs used solely in Dyeing Free 

*Dye Stuffs, viz. Bark, Berries, Drugs, Nuts, 

Vegetables and Woods Free 

Earths, produce of B.N.A. Provinces Free 

*ggs 15 

Engravings Free 

Etchings Free 

Farming Utensils (see Agricult. Societies.) 

Felts . * 2 

Felt Sheeting Free. 

Fire Bricks 214 

*Firewood from G. B. and B. N. A. Colonies Free. 

Fire Clay Free. 

*Fish Fresh, from G. B. and B. N. A. Col. Free. 

*Do. Salt, from do. do Free. 

*Do. Oil, from do. do Free. 

*Do. Products of do. do :. Free. 

Fishing Nets and Seines 

Fishing Hooks 

Fishermen s Boots 

*Flax, Hemp, and Tow, undressed Free. 

*FIour Free. 

Frames and Pedestals, rough from the forge, 
when imp ted for manufac. of Locomotives 5 

*Fruits (dried), per Ib l^d. 

*Fruits (green) Free. 

Fruits of all kinds from B. N. A. Provinces Free. 
Fruits preserved in sugar, candy, or molas- 

Hes. and other Confectionery 15 

*Furs or Skins, the produce of fish or crea 
tures living in the sea, when imported 
direct from the U. K, or B.N.A. Provinces Free. 
*Furn, Skins, or Tails, undressed do. do. Free. 

Gems Free. 

Geneva or Gin, per gallon 3s. 6d. 

Ginger, per Ib 2d. 

Goods unenumerated 15 

*Graius Barley and Rye Free. 

*Beans and Peas Free. 

*Ie:irand Bigg Free. 

*Bran and Shorts Free. 

*Buckwheat Free. 

*Flour Free. 

*Hops Free. 

Indian Corn Free. 

*Oats Free. 

*Wheat Free> 

*Mealof the above grains Free. 

*Grease and Scraps Free! 

Green Coffee, per Ib "... a/^. 

*Grindstones, wrought or unwrought, the 

produce of B.N.A. Provinces Free. 

Gunpowder, except from G.B. or B. Possess. Proh ibt. 

Guns (fowling) and Pistols 15 

Gum Copal 2J 

*Gypsnm. ground or miground, the produce 
of G. B. and B. N. A. Provinces Free. 



Specific. AdVal 

*Gypsum as Manure Free. 

Hams (see Meats.) 

*Hay Free. 

Hat Plu?h Free. 

*Hemp, undressed Free. 

Hemp Yarn (Russian) Free 

*Hides Free. 

History (Natural), Specimens of Free. 

Hoop Iron 2JZ 

Hoop or Tire (for driving-wheels, bent or 
welded, wheii imported for the manufac 
ture of Locomotive Engines) 5, 

*IIops Free. 

*Horns (produce of G.B. and B.N.A. Prov.) Free. 
Household effects, personal and not mer 
chandize, of inhabitants of this Province, 
being subjects of H. M., and dying abroad Free. 
Husbandry, Implements of, when imported 

by incorporated Agricultural Societies... Free. 
Immoral or indecent Books or Drawings ... Prohibt. 
Implements and Tools of Trade of handi 
craftsmen, not being merchandize, &c... Free. 
Implements of Husbandry, not being mer 
chandize, but in actual use, and belonging 
to persons about to settle in the Province Free. 
Implements of Husbandry, imported by in 
corporated Agricultural Societies Free. 

*Indigo Free. 

India-rubber Manufactures 20 

*Indian Corn Free. 

Ink, Printer s Free. 

Inventions and Improvements in the Arts, 

Models of Free. 

Iron Bar, Rod, and Hoop 

Hoop or Tire (for driving-wheels of 

Locomotives) bent and welded 5 

Wheels and Axles for do 5 

Boiler-plate and Boiler-plate punched iy, 

Chains, all sorts other than cables ... 5 

Chain Cables Free. 

Connection Rods, in pieces, when im 
ported for manufact. of Locomotives 5 
Frames and Pedestals, rough from 

forge, for manufact. of Locomo tvs 5 
Scraps, bars or sheets, and not other 
wise manufactured 2V^ 

Galvanized 5 

Plough Moulds or Shares 5 

Railroad Bars 2*4 

Rolled Plate, from >^ inch to IJ^inch 

in thickness 

Round and Square, from 4 inches and 
upwards, suitable for shafts and 

other parts of machinery 2 

Straps for Walking Beams 5 

Wrought Cranks 5 

Canada Plates 5 

Spike Rods 2 

Pig Free 

Jib Hanks (sec Ships.) 

Joiners Tools, Wood for Free 

Junk and Oakum Free 

*Lard Free 

Lead Pig and Sheet Free 

Leather Manufactures H . 

Lime, the produce of B.N.A. Provinces only Free 

Lines, Fishing Free 

Liqueurs (see Cordials.) 

Uthographs Free 

Maccaroni, per Ib l^d- 

Mace and Nutmegs, per Ib 9d. 

Machinery, Models of. Free 

Machinery for the manufacture of doors, 

windowsashes, and blinds 5 

Machines, to be worked by steam, for the 

making Bricks by pressure from dry clay 2 1 , 

Manufactured Tobacco, other than cigars 

or snnff, per Ib 

*Manures of all sorts Free 

Maps Free 

*Marble, in blocks, unpolished Free 

Harble Busts Free 

Marine Cement Free 

Meal of Barley, Buckwheat, Bear or Bigs, 

Oats, Rye. Beans, Peas, and Wheat Free 

*MeataofU kinds Free 

Medals or Gems Free 






[232] 



1857.] 



TARIFF OF CUSTOMS. 



41 



Specific. AdVal. 

Menageries, Horses, Cattle, Carriages or 

Farness of Free 

erchaudise unenumerated 15 

*Mess Pork Free 

*Metal Ores of all kinds of. Free 

Yellow or Brass, in bars or sheets... Free 
Type, in blocks or pigs Free 

Metallic "Paints and Artificial Slate, being 
the produce and manufacture of Xova 
Scotia, when imported direct from G.B. 
or the B.X.A. Provinces Free 

Military Clothing Free 

Military Stores and Accoutrements, inclu 
ding military buttons, imported for the 
use of the Provincial Militia Free 

Mineralogy, Specimens of Free 

Models of Machinery, and other inventions 
and improvements in the Arts Frerf 

Molasses, per gallon 2^d. 

Muriatic Acid 2% 

Musical Initruments for Military Bands ... Free 

Mustard, per Ib 3d. 

Natural History, Specimens of. Free 

Naval Arms Clothing, Cattle; Provisions, 

and Stores of. Free 

Nitre 

Nitric Acid 

North American B. P. (See end of Tariff.) 

Nuts, Cocoa 

*Nuts used solely for dyeing Free 

Nutmegs, per Ib 9d. 

Oakum Free 

*0ats Free 

*0atmeal Free 

Ochres, the produce of B.X.A. Prov cc-s only Free 

Oil Cocoanut Free 

Palm. Free 

Piue Free 

Cake 

Old Irou 

Old Nets Free 

Ordnance Stores Fixv 

*0res of all kinds of metals Free 

Ore Dressing Machines 

Oxalic Acid 

Packages containing goods paying ad val 
orem duties to pay the same od valm-em 
duty as the goods contained in them. 
*Packages, when of the ordinary description, 

containing free goods. 
Packages containing goods paying Specific 

duties 

Packages, viz . Bales, Trusses. Cases covering 
casks of Wines or Brandy in Wood, cases 
and casks containing Dry Goods, or Cutle 
ry crates and casks containing Glassware 
or Earthenware, cases containing Bottled 
Wine or Bottled Spirits, and all other 
packages in which the goods are not usu 
ally exposed for sale, or which do not ne 
cessarily or generally accompany the 

goods when sold ~ Free 

Paintings in Oil or Water-colours, being 

works of art Free 

Palm Oil Free 

Paste Blue 

*Pearl Ashes Free 

*Peas Free 

* do Meal ^ Free 

*Pelts, the produce of G. B. and B. X. A. 

Provinces Free 

Pepper and Pimento 2d per Ib. 

Personal effects Free 

Philosophical Instruments and apparatus, 

(see apparatus Philosophical) Free 

Phosphorus 

Pig Iron Free 

Pig Lead Free 

Pimento and Pepper -d. per Ib. 

Pine Oil.- Free 

Pipe Clay Free 

*Pitch and Tar Free 

*Plants, Shrubs, and Trees Free 

Piaster of Paris, Busts and Casts of Free 



Specific. AdVal. 

Plaster of Paris for manure Free 

Plate, Boiler 2% 

Pork (see .Meats.) 

*Pork, Mess Free 

*Pot:is-h Free 

Prepared Rigging 2J^ 

Preparations, Anatomical Free 

Printed Books, (not Foreign reprints of 

British Copyright Works) Free 

Printers Ink Free 

Printing Implements of all kinds Free 

Paper, Printing 5 

Printing Presses Free 

Printing Types Free 

L rovinces, British North American, (see end 

of Tariff.) 
Provisions for Army or Navy or Indian 

Nations Fre 

Prussiate of Potash 2% 

*Rao;s Free 

Railroaa Bars -}> 

Raw Coffee %d per Ib. 

Raw Sugar, (see Sugar.) 
Refined Sugar, (see Sugar.) 

Kesin and Rosin Free 

*Rice Free 

Rod Iron 2}4 

Rods. Spike 

Roll Sulphur or Brimstone 

* Hoot a and Bulbs Free 

Rope Free 

Rum 2s. 3d. per gal. 

Russia Hemp Yarn Free 

*Rye Free 

*Rye Meal Free 



Sail Cloth 

Sal Ammoniac . 
Salt 



Free 
Free 

Free 
Free 



Scrap Iron 

*Scraps and Grease 

*Seedsof all kinds 

Settler s Wearing Apparel and other per 
sonal effects, Implements of Husbandry, 

not merchandize, in actual use of persons 

coming to settle in the Province Free 

Shackles, (see " Ships.") 
Sheaves, (see " Ships ") 

Sheet Iron 

Sheet Lead Free 

Shellac - 

Ship s Blocks 

do Binnacle Lamps 

do Compasses 

do Dead Eyes 

do Dead Lights 

do Deck Plugs 

do Jib II*nks 2% 

do Sails 

do Shackles 

do Sheaves 2J4 

do Signal Lamps 

do. Travelling Trucks 

do. Water Casks, in use Free 

*.Shortsor Bran Free 

*Shrubs and Trees Free 

Signal Lamps, ("see Ships") 

*Slate 25/> 

Snuff 6d. perlb. 

Societies, Charitable, donat. of Clothing to . Free 

*S<>da Ash Free 

Specimens of Natural History, Mineralogy 

or Botany Free 

Spices, unenumerated 4d. per Ib. 

Spike Rods ?/, 

Spirits and Strong Waters of all sorts, for 

every gallon of any strength not exceeding 

the strength of proof by Sykes s Hydro 
meter, ami so in proportion for any greater 

strength than the strength of proof, and 

for any greater or less quantity than :i 

gallon, vi/ ; 

Brandy 4s. pergall. 

Geneva or Gin, and other spirits or strong 
waters not being Whiskey, Rum, or 
Brandy 3s.6d.per gal. 



[233] 



42 



TARIFF OF CUSTOMS. 



[1857. 



tfjxriftc. A lVal. 

Hum .................................................... 2s. ;5d. pergal. 

AVhi.-.key ................................................ 714,1. per gal. 

Spirits, Cordials, and Liqueurs, sweetened 
or mixed with any other article ............ 5s. per frail. 

Starch, ................................................... 2d. perlb. 



2U 



Specific. AdYal. 

per gal. 



Stone, unwrought, from B. N. A. Provinces 
and U, S ........................................... Free 

Stores of Army. Navy, and Indian Nations Free 

Straps fur Walking Beams ........................ 

Sugar, refined, whether in loaves or lumps, 
candied, crushed, powdered or granulated. 
or in any other form, or other Sugar equal 
to Refined Sugar in quality .................. 14s. per cwt. 

Sugars. White and Brown Clayed, and Yel 
low Bastard Sugars, or Sugar of any kind 
equal in quality to any of the said kinds 
of sugar, but not equal in quality to re 
fined sugars ....................................... 10s. per cwt. 

Sugars, Haw and other kinds not equal in 
quality to any of those above-mentioned. 7s. 6d. per cwt. 

Sulphuric Acid ........ . .............................. 2V4 

Sweetmeats, or Fruits preserved in Susrflr, 
Candy or Molasses, and other Confec 
tionery .............................................. 15 



Tallow 
*Tar 

Tea 



Teasels 

Telegraph and Bridge Wire, when bona_fide 
imported to be used as such in Canada... 

Telegrapb Insulators, Uelay Magnets. Re 
gisters and Batteries 

Tiles, Draining 

Timber, viz: Boards, Planks, Staves and 
Firewood, the produce of G. B. and B. N. 
A. Provinces, when imported directly 
therefrom 

Timber and Lumber of all kinds, Round, 
Hewed, Sawed, unmanufactured, in whole 
or in part 

Tin and Zinc 

Tobacco, manufactured, other than Cigars 
and Snuff 

Tobacco Unmanufactured 

Do. Cigars 

Do. Snuff 

Tools and Implements of Trade of Handi 
craftsmen (see Implements and Tools) ... 

Tow undressed 

Traveller s Horses and Carriages 

Travelling Trucks, (sec "Ships.") 

Trees and Shrub s 

Treenails 

Turpentine, other than Sp. of Turpentine. 

Turpentine, Spirits of. 

Twine and Lines 

Type Metal, in block or pigs 

Types, Printing 

Ultra Marine and Paste Blue 

*Unmanufacturtd Tobacco 

*Unpolished Marble, in blocks or slabs 

*Unwrought Burr Stones, (see Burr Stones) 
Utensils, Farming, when imported by Agri 
cultural Societies 

Varnish, bright and black 

Varnish, Copal, Mastic and other kinds ex 
cept Bright and Black 

"Vegetables from O. B., and B. N. A. Prov. 

* Vegetables, ustd solely in dyeing 

Vehicles of Travellers, except Hawkers and 
Pedlers 

Veneers 

Vermicelli 

Vinegar 

Vitriol 

Wares, nnenuuierated 

Warp, Cotton 

Water Lime 

Wearing Apparel and other personal effects. 
in actual use, not merchandize, of JUTS .]- 
coming to settle in the Province 

"Wheat 



Free 

Free 

2y, per Ib. 

Free 



Free 



Free 



2Jd. per Ib. 

-M. per Ib. 
3s. per Ib. 
Cd. per Ib. 

Free 
Free 
Free 



Free 
Free 



Free 
Free 
Free 



15 
15 



2d. per Ib. 

Free 

Free 

Free 

Free 



Free 

Free 



15 



Fl-ee 
Free 

1>4 per Ib. 
per gal. 

V 

15 



Free 



Free 
Free 



-Wheat Meal 

Whiskey 

Wine of all kinds, in wood or other vessels 
not being bottles, not exceeding in value 

10 the pipe of 12G gallons Is per gal. 

do do, not exceeding in value 15 the 

pipe of 126 gallons Is Cd per gal. 

do do, exceeding 15 the pipe of 126 do. 2s per gaK 
do in quart bottles not exceeding 20s in 

value per dozen, the dozen bottles 7s Gd 

do in pint do do in proportion, do 3s 9d 

do in quartdo do -10s in value per doz. do 10s 

do in pint do do in proportion, do 5s 

do in quartdo exceeding 40s in value per 

dozen, do 12s 6d 

do in pint do do in proportion do Cs 3d 

Wine of all kinds imported for any Officers 

Mess Free 

Wire. Telegraph and Bridge 2J< 

W 7 ood used in making Carpenter s and 

Joiner s Tools Free 

*Wood used solely for dyeing Free 

*Wool Free 

*Wool, Cotton 1 roe 

Wheels and axles for Locomotives 5 

Yarn, Cotton 2\( 

Yarn, Russian Hemp Free 

Yellow Metal, in bars or sheets Free 



Zinc. 



[X 



Reciprocal Free Trade, with British IV. A. Provinces. By 
Proclamation, dated loth August, 1S50. under the Act 13 
and 14 Vic. chap. 3. the following articles of the growth, 
produce or manufacture of .New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, 
or Prince Edward s Island, and when imported directly 
from any of the said Provinces, are exempt from duty, that 
is to say : 

Animals, salted and fresh Meats, Bark, Butter, Cheese, 
Clio-olate and other preparations of Cocoa, Copper, Earths, 
Fruits, Firewood, Fish, Fish Oil. Firs and Skins, the pro 
duce of Fish or creatures living in the sea, Grain and 
Breadstuffs of all kinds, Grindstones and stones of all 
kinds, Gypsum, ground or unground, Hay and Straw, 
Hops, Hides. Horns, Head, Matter and Blubber of crea 
tures livi ,g in the sea, Iron in pigs and blooms, Lard, 
Lead in Pigs, Lime. Ores of all kinds, Orehes, Rock-Salt, 
Seeds, Spermaceti Oil, Tallow, Timber and Lumber of all 
kinds. Train Oil, Undressed Skills and Furs of all kinds, 
Vegetables, Wool, Wood. 

Xntf.. As to the importation of Fish and Oil via the 
United States, See below. 

Goods in tmnsilu through another Country. In virtue of 
the authority of the third Section of an Act of the. Provin 
cial Parliament, passed in the sixteenth year of Her Maje.*- 
ty s Keign, and chaptered eighty-five, it is ordered that 
goods, btmafi dr. exported to this Province from any country, 
but passing in transitu through another country and 
under Bonds, shall be, until it shall be otherwise ordered, 
valued for duty, as if such goods were imported directly 
from such first mentioned country into this Province. 

Discount for Cash in Jn voices. By Circular of 29th of 
April, 1853, Importers of Goods in every case are allowed to 
deduct the discount actually allowed for cash, or that ac- 
curding to the cn.-U./m of Trade which is allowed for cash. 

/>> ii;n E.rport Duty. By Circular of 20th May, 1853, 
it is directed that in nil cases in which an Kxport duty is 
charged on the face of the Invoi"c. the >ame shall he do- 
ducted from the amount upon which the duty is to be 
levied. 

Importation nf Visit nn>1 Oil ria 1 nitnl Stnlrs. In virtue 
of the authority of the .Nineteenth Section of an Act i.f the 
Provincial Parliament, passed in the eighth year of Her 
Majesty s Keign. and chaptered four, His Kxeellenev the 
Administrator of Hi" Government in Council, has been 
pleased to order that Fish and Oil, being bnna fi lf the 
growth, produce, or manufacture of any of the British 
North American I r VincPS, may be imported into this 
Province vifi the Tinted States, between the First day of 
November and the First, day nf May in each year, and be 
exempt from the payment of Duties of Customs, upon being 
::ecoinpanicd by proper Certificates of growth, produce or 
manufacture, as required by law to entitle them to exemp 
tion. 



1857.] 



BANKS. 



43 



BANKS IN CANADA WITH THEIR AGENCIES, &c. 



PLACED. NAMES OP BANKS. OFFICERS. 

Barric Upper Canada E. Lally. Agent. 

" Toronto W. D. Ardaih. Agent, 

Commercial ... S. M. Sanford, Agent. 

Bdleville Upper Canada E. HoMen, Agent. 

Commercial... Andrew Thomson. Manager. 

" Montreal Q. McNider. Manager. 

Berlin Upper Canada George Davidson, Agent. 

Bowmani ille ...Upper Canada George M earns, Agent. 

...Montreal John Simpson, Manager. 

" ...City Bank ... Robert Armour, Agent. 

Bradford City Bank ... A. McMaster, Agent. 

Brantford B. N. America ,T. C. Geddes, Manager. 

Upper Canada T. S. Short t, Agent. 

Montreal A. Greer, Manager. 

BrocKviUe Upper Canada R. F. Church. Agent. 

Commercial ... Robert Findlay. Manager. 

" Montreal F. M. Holmea, Manager. 

CJuitham. Upper Canada George Thomas, Cashier. 

Commercial... Thomas McCrae, Agent. 

Gore A. Chart eriss, Agent. 

Chippaioa Upper Canada James Macklem. Agent. 

Cobourg Montreal C. II. Morgan, Manager 

" Toronto J. S. Wallace. Agent. 

Cornwall Upper Canada J. F. Pringle. Agent. 

Montreal W. Mattice, Agent. 

Dundas B. N. America William Lash, Agent. 

Elgin Zimmerman s. G. McMicking, Cashier. 

&M Gore John Davidson, Agent. 

" Commercial... William Cooke, Manager. 

Gode.rich Upper Canada John McDonald, Agent. 

Montreal T. M. Jones. Agent. 

Gw&ph Gore T. San dilands, Agent. 

" Montreal J. McLean, Agent. 

Hamilton Gore A. Steven, Cashier. 

Upper Canada Alfred Stow, Cashier. 

B. X. America R. C. Fergusson. Manacer. 

Montreal Andrew Milroy, Manager. 

Commercial ... W. H. Park, Manager. 

Ingersoll Commercial... W. A. Rumsey. Agent. 

J\i /ston Commercial ... C. S. Ross, Cashier. 

Upper Canada W. G. Hind, Cashier. 

B. N. America S.Taylor, Manager. 

Montreal A. Drummond. Manager. 

LtwJsay Upper Canada J. McKibbon, Agent. 

London Upper Canada James Hamilton. Cashier. 

" B. N. America George Taylor. Manager. 

" Commercial ... J. G. Harper, Manager. 

" Montreal H. C. Barwick, Manager. 

" Gore W.W. Street. Agent. 

M /nfreal Montreal D. Davidson, Cashier. 

" City Bank ... F. McCulloch, Cashier. 

Du Peuple ... B. H. Lemoine, Cashier. 

" Molson s W. Sache, Cashier. 

Upper Canada E. T. Taylor, Manager. 

" B. N. America R. Cas?els. Manager. 

" Commercial ... Thomas Kirby, Manager. 

Newcastle Toronto Samuel Wilmot, Agent. 

Niagara Upper Canada T. McCormick, Agent. 

Nicrilet Quebec L. M. Cresse, Agent. 

Osltawa Commercial ... James Laing, Agent. 

Ottawa Upper Canada R. S. Cassels, Agent. 

" B. N. America A. C. Kelty. Agent. 

" Montreal P. P. Harris, Manager. 

" Quebec H. V. Noel, Agent. 

Puris Gore James Nimmo, Agent. 

Perth Commercial ... A. Leslie, Agent. 

" Montreal J. McTntyre^ Agent. 

Peterborough... Commercial ... Wm. Cluxton. Agent. 

...Toronto James Hall, Agent. 

...Montreal R. Nicholls, Agent. 

Picton Montreal James Gray, Agent. 

l^ort Hope Upper Canada E. P. Smith. Agent. 

Toronto J. E. Walsh, Agent. 

Commercial... W. F. Harper, Manager. 

Montreal A. Macdonald, Agent. 

Port Stanley ...Montreal E. E. Warren, Agent. 

Commercial ... E. E. Warren, Agent. 

PrescoU Commercial ... John Patton. Agent. 

Quebec Quebec C. Gethings, Cashier. 

" Upper Canada J. F. Bradshaw, Manager. 

B. N. America F. W. Wood, Manager. 

" Montreal W. Gunn, Manager. 

" Commercial... Joseph Wtmham, A "cut. 

" City Bank ... Daniel McGie, Agent. 



PLACES. NAMES OF BANKS OFFICERS. 

Upper Canada Alexander Vidal, Agent. 

Commercial ... G. W. Thotnas, Acent. 

Savlt Ste Marie B. N. America .I.Ballenden, Agent. 

Sherbrookt City Bank ... W. Ritchie. Agent. 

Simcoe Gore D. Campbell. Agent. 

" Montreal Samuel Head, Agent. 

Swffuxmftm . Upper Canada Alexander McNabb, Agent. 
St. Catherines. Niagara Dist. . John Smart. Cashier. 

. Upper Canada T. L. Helliwell, Cashier. 
. Commercial ... George Rykert, Agent. 

,%. Thomas ...Montreal E. M. Yarwood. Manager. 

" ...Co. Elgin B k. Colin Munro, Cashier. 

Stratford Upper "Canada J. C. W. Daly, Agent. 

Commercial ... U. C. Lee, Agent. 

Three Rirers... Upper Canada DeMoulin, Agent. 
...B. N. America W. Scougall. Agent. 

...Montreal Geo. B. Ilauliston, Agent. 

...City Bank ... James Dickson. Agent. 

...Quebec John McDougall. Agent. 

Toronto Upper Canada T. O. Ridout. Cashier. 

" Toronto A. Garner n, Cashier. 

" B. X. America W.G. Cassels. Manager. 

" Commercial ... C. J. Campbell. Manager. 

" Montreal J. Stevenson, Manager. 

" City Bank Thomas Woodside. Manager. 

" Quebec W. W. Ransom, Manager. 

Du Peuple ... E. F. Whittemore. Agent. 

" Molson s John Glass. Agent. 

Trenton Montreal J. Gumming, Agent. 

Whitliy Montreal Thomas Dow. Agent. 

Woodstock Gore James Tngersol. Agent. 

" Montreal W. P. Street. Agent. 

Windsor Upper Canada Thomas E. Truw, Agent. 

BANK INSPECTOR. 

Sank of Montreal George Dyctt. 

FOREIGN AGENTS. 
London (Eng.) B. N. America Head Office. 

Upper Canada Glyn. Mills & Co. 

Toronto City Bank of London. 

Commercial ... London Joint Stock Bank. 

Montreal Glyn, Mills & Co. 

Quebec Glyn, Mills & Co. 

City Bank Glyn, Mills & Co. 

Gore Glyn, Mills & Co. 

Bank of Liverpool. 
Edinburgh (Sc) Upper Canada British Linen Company. 

" Montreal British Linen Company. 

" " Commercial ... Commercial Bank of Scotl d. 

" " Gore Union Bank. 

Glasgow (Scot.) Montreal British Linen Company, and 

Union Bank of Scotland^ 

" " . Commercial ... Western Bank of Scotland, 
and Clydodale Banking Co. 

Du tlin (Ire.) Commercial ... Boyle, Low, Pirn <feCo. 
" " City Bank ... National Bank of Ireland. 

New York Upper Canada .T.G King and Sons. 

" Toronto Bank of Commerce. 

" B. X. America Richard Bell. K. H. Grain, 

and C. F. Smith, Agents. 

Commercial... Merchant s Bank. 

" Montreal Bank of Commerce. 

Quebec Maitland. Phelps. & Co. 

City Bank ... Bank of the Republic. 

Gore Ward & Co., and Merch.B k. 

Boston Montreal 9. Henshaw & Sons. 

Upper Canada Blake, Hoarc, & Co. 

" Commercial... Merchant s Bank. 

Albany Upper Canada New York State Bank. 

" Commercial ... New York State Bank. 

" Gore New York State Bank. 

Oswego Upper Canada Luther Wright s Bank. 

Commercial ... Luther Wright s Bank. 

Rochester Upper Canada Rochester City Bank. 

St. John (MB.) B. N. America Bank of B. N. America. C. F. 

Smithers, Manager. 

Quebec Commercial Bank, N. B. 

Halifax (2V./ST.) B. N. Ame: ica Bank of B. N. America. S. N. 

Binney. Manager. 

" Montreal Bank of Nova Scotia. 

St.John(N.R) B. N. America Bank of B. N. America. 

" Montreal Union Bank. 

Fi-edericton(N.B.) Quebec ... Central Bank. 



[2351 



44 



PATENT LAWS. 



[1857. 



PATENT LAWS. 

-1 &/nnpisi.i of the Acts relating to Patents for useful Inventions in Canada. 



12 VIC. CAP. XXIV. 



An Act to Consolidate and Amend the Laws of Patents fur 
Inventions in this Provini:- . 



[Assented to 30M May, 1S49J 

Sec. I. Sets forth, the expediency of amending and modi 
fying the Acts severally in force in Upper Canada (7 Geo. 
IV. c. 5), and in Lower Canada (0 Win. IV. c. 34) for the 
Encouragement of Useful Arts, inasmuch as they differ iu 
i-. veral particulars; and to extend the advantages and 
privilege if Patent Rights hereafter to be granted, and to 
make the same co-extensive with the Province of Canada: 
And enacts tint any person, a subject of Her Majesty, 
and resident ia this I roviuce, having discovered ir in 
vented any new and useful art, machine, manufacture, or 
composition of matter, or any new and useful improve 
ment on any art, machine, manufacture, or composition of 
matter, or the principle thereof, tha same not being known 
or used in this Province by others before his or their dis 
covery or invention thereof, aud not, at the time of the 
application for a Patent, in public use or on sale in this 
Province with his consent or allowance, as the inventor or 
discoverer thereof, and desiring to obtain an exclusive 
property therein, may make application by petition, in the 
manner provided in and by the above-mentioned Acts, to 
the Governor or Administrator of the Government of this 
Province, expressing such desire, and the said Governor or 
Administrator shall, on the due proceedings being had, as 
by the said Acts directed to be done, grant such Patent, 
which shall bo good and available to the said grantee, his 
heirs, lawful representatives or assigns, for the period of 
fourteen years from the granting of the same, after the 
said Letters Patent shall have been recorded in the man 
ner directed by the said Acts, and upon the assignment of 
the same previous to the grant aforesaid, for the same 
period, after such assignment shall have been recorded in 
the office of the Secretary of the Province. 

Sec. II. Enacts that in actions for damages for infringe 
ment of rights granted by Patent, the court may grant 
treble costs: But a Defendant in any such action may 
specially plead the matter of defence to the said action. 
And further, that whenever it shall satisfactorily appear 
that the Patentee, at the time of making his application 
for the Patent, believed himself to be the first inventor or 
discoverer of the thing patented, the same shall not be 
held to be void on account of the invention or discovery or 
part thereof, having been before known or used in a 
foreign country, it not appearing that the same or any 
material or substantial part thereof, had been before pa 
tented or described in any printed publication : Also, that 
whenever the Plaintiff shall fail to sustain his action, on 
the ground that in his specification of claim is embraced 
more than that of which he was the first inventor or dis 
coverer, or if it shall appear that the Defendant had used 
or violated any part of the invention, justly and truly 
specified and claimed as new, it shall be in the power of 
the court to adjudge and award as to costs, as may appear 
to be just and equitable. 

Sec. HI. Enacts that the right of obtaining a Patent 
1-volves on the legal representative, in case of the inven 
tor s decease before a Patent is granted ; and when the 
application shall ba made by such legal representative, 
tli-i ! (duration required to ba made and taken shall ba so 
raried as to be applicable to him. 

SBC. IV. Enacts that in case of interfering applications 
for Patents, the decision of tha sani3 shall be made by ar 
bitrators, iu the manner and ancording to the directions 
in the above-mentioned Acts: Provided always, that no 
thing in the said Acts nor in this Act shall be construed 

deprive an original and true inventor of the right to a 
Patent for his invention by reason of his having previously 
taken out Letters Patent tnerefor in a foreign country. Ac. 

Sec. V. Enacts that every Patent shall be assignable in 
Law as to the whole or undivided part of the interest 
therein, nd provides that every such assignment shall be 
recorded in the office of the Provincial Sacretary within 
two months from the execution thereof. 

Sec. VI. Enacts that Patents may b issued to assignees 
of inventors : And in all cases the applicant for a Patent 
:t.-r to be granted shall furnish duplicate drawings. 
whenever the case admits of drawings, one of which shall 
Vie deposited In the office of the Provincial Secretary, and 
the other shall be annexed to the Patent, and considered 



a part of the specification thereof, and a copy of the spe 
cincation shall be in all cases annexed to such Patent. 

Sec. VII. Enacts that a new Patent may be obtained 
whenever any Patent shall be inoperative or invalid by 
reason of a defective or insufficient description or specifics/- 
tion, if the error have or shall have arisen from inadver 
tency, accident, or mistake, and without any fraudulent 
or deceptive intention: An 1 in case of death, or assign 
ment of the original Patent, a similar right shall vest in 
the legal representative of the Patentee: And the Patent 
so re-issued, together with the corrected description and 
specification thereof, shall have the same effect and opera 
tion in law on the trial of all actions thereafter comr 
tnenced for causes subsequently accruing, as if the same 
had been originally filed in such corrected form before 
the issuing of the original Patent. 

Sec. VIII. Enacts that whenever, by mistake or inadver 
tence, any Patentee shall have made his specification of 
claim too broad, the said Patentee or legal representative 
may make disclaimer of such parts as he shall not claim 
to hold by virtue of the Patent, stating in the said dis 
claimer the extent of his interest in such Patent; and 
such disclaimer shall be in writing, attested by one wit 
ness, and recorded in the office of the Provincial Secretary, 
and shall be considered as part of the original specifica 
tion, to the extent of the interest possessed in the patent 
or right secured thereby by the disclaimant : But such 
disclaimer shall not affect any actions pending at the time 
of its entry, except so far as may relate to the question 
of unreasonable neglect or delay in filing the same : And 
the Patent shall ba deemed good aud valid for so much of 
the invention as shall be truly and bona fide his own, or 
not disclaimed, provided it shall bo a material and substan 
tial part of the thing patented : and such Patentee or his 
legal representative shall be entitled to maintain a suit at 
law or in equity on such Patent for any infringement of 
the invention or discovery as shall be bona fide his own. 

Sea. IX Enacts that whenever any application shall be 
made for any addition to an existing Patent the specifica 
tion of claim shall be subject to revision and restriction 
in the same manner as orignal applications aud such im 
provement shall not be granted, uor the re-issue allowed 
until the applicant shall have entered a disclaimer, or al 
tered his specification of claim in accordance with the 
revision or restriction thereon. 

Sec. X. Enacts that whenever a Patent shall be returned 
for correction and re-issue, and the Patentee shall claim 
several Patents to be issued for distinct and separate parts 
of the thing patented, the same shall be granted in tha 
same manner as original Patents; Provided always, that 
no addition shall be made to any Patent heretofore grant 
ed, nor new Patent issued for an improvement made in 
any machine, &c., until a duplicate model and drawing 
of the thing originally intended, shall have been deposited 
in the proper office therefor. 

Sec. XI. Enacts that whenever any Patentee shall desire 
an extension of his Patent, he may apply therefor in writ 
ing, setting forth the grounds thereof, and causing notice 
of such application to be published three limes each in the 
Oinaila Gazette, and in two other Newspapers (English 
and French) issued inthatsectionof the Province in which 
he shall reside, and such application shall be decided upon 
by a board who shall sit for that purpose at the office of 
the Registrar of the Province. And if upon a hearing of 
the matter it shall appear to the Board that the s tid term 
should be extended for the term of seven years, and tha 
said Patent shall thereupon have the same effect in law 
as if it had been originally granted for the term of twenty- 
one years; Provided always, that no extension of a Patent 
shall be granted after the expiration of the term sought to 
be extended, nor unless the petition or application therrfor 
shall be presented six calendar mouths at the least before 
the expiration of such term. 

Sac. XII. Enacts that every p"rson or corporation who 
has or shall have purchased or invented any new machine 
&c., prior to the application for a Patent therefor, by a 
person claiming to be the inventor, shall pos-css the ri, tit 
to use and vend to others tha specific machine, man 
ture or composition of matter, so made or pur< h ise 1. with 
out liability therefor to the Patentee or any other p >rsnn 
interested in such invention; and no Patent shall be hold 
to bi- invalid by reason of such purrliase A:.-., prior to the 
application for such Patent, except on proof of abandon- 



[236] 



1857.] 



PATENT LAWS. 



45 



ment, or that such purchase Ac., has been or existed for 
more than one year prior to such application for a Patent. 

Sec. XIII. Enacts that any sxibject as aforesaid, who 
may have invented or produced any new or original design 
for works of art, not known or used by others before his 
invention or production thereof, and prior to the time of 
his application for a Patent therefor, may obtain an exclu 
sive property or right therein, by Letters Patent for a 
period of seven years. 

Sec. XIV. Enacts that a solemn declaration ia to be 
taken in matters of Patents instead of an oath, except in 
suits, actions or proceedings in Courts of Justice in rela 
tion to Patents. 

Sec. XV. Enacts that any person counterfeiting the name 
of a Patentee, or infringing in any manner the patent 
rights of any person, or of stamping any unpatented arti 
cle, for the purpose of deceiving the public, he shall be 
deemed to have cominmitted a misdemeanor, be punished 
by fine or imprisonment or by both, at the discretion of 
the Court trying the same ; Provided the fine do not ex 
ceed Fifty Pounds currency in amount, and the imprison 
ment three months in duration. 

Sec. XVI. Enacts that all Patentees and Assignees of 
Patents shall stamp or engrave on each article ottered for 
sale, the date of the Patent thereof; and any persons pa 
tented or assigned neglecting so to do shall be deemed to 
have committed a misdemeanor, and shall be liable there 
for to the same penalties as are provided in the next pre 
ceding section. 

Sec. XVII. Enacts that when Letters Patent have been 
fraudulently or surreptitiously obtained, i.-suc-d improvi- 
dently, or upon false succession; that it shall and may 
be lawful for any person to impeach such Letters Patent. 

Sec. XVIII. Enacts that all Patents granted under this 
Act, shall extend and be privileged throughout the Pro- 
vine of Canada; Provided always, that nothing herein 
contained shall be construed to prevent the free importa 
tion of inventions or discoveries used in the United States 
of America, or in any part of Her Majesty s Dominions in 
America, into this Province for sale, or for use, or otherwise. 

Sec. XIX. Enacts that all provisions of the above men 
tioned Acts, inconsistent with the provisions of this Act, 
shflll be repealed, &o. 

Sec. XXI. Provides for the interpretation of certain 
words &c., contained in this Act. 



14 & 15 VIC. CAP. LXXIX. 

An Act to enalJle parties InlrJinrj Patents for Inventions con 
fined to one section of this Province., to obtain the extension 
of the same to the other section thereof, and for other i>ur- 
poses therein mentioned. 

[Assented to 3(M7i August, 1S51.] 

Sec. I. Sets forth the expediency of parties holding Pa 
tents for inventions, issued under the Acts of Parliament 
of the respective Provinces of Upper or Lover Canada pre 
vious to the Union, obtaining the extension of the exclu 
sive privileges granted by such Patents, to that section of 
the United Province not embraced within such Patents ; 
And enacts. That whenever any party holding a Patent 
issued under the authority of either of the Acts above 
mentioned, shall be desirous of obtaining the extension of 
the privileges thereby granted to the other section of this 
Province, it shall be lawful for the Governor of this 
Province, upon application made to him to that effect, to 
issue Letters Patent to such grantee, which shall be availa 
ble in that section of the Province not embraced by the 
Patent already issued. 

Sec. II. Repeals Act of L.C. G Will. IV. c. 34, and of U.C. 
7 Geo. IV. c. 5. 

Sec. III. Enacts that Letters Patent granted under 12 
Vj<;. c. 24. shall recite briefly the substance of the Petition 
upon which they aro granted, and shall contain a short 
description of the invention or discovery referring for a 
fuller description thereof, and for more ample details, to 
the specification. 

Sec IV. Provides and enacts, That any person who shall 
have discovered an improvement in any machine or com 
position of matter which shall have been been patented, 
and shall have obtained a Patent for such improvement, 
shall not be at liberty to make, use or vend the original 
invention, but the improvement only ; nor shall the Jirst 
inventor be at liberty to use the improvement. Simply 
changing the form or the proportion of any machine or 
composition in any degree, shall not be deemed a discovery. 

Sec. V. Enacts, that every Inventor, before he can re 
ceive a Patent, shall make a solemn declaration that he 



believes that he is the true inventor or discoverer of the 
Art, Machine or Improvement for which he solicits a Patent, 
and shall deliver a written description or specification in 
duplicate of his Invention or Improvement, &c. ; which 
description or specification, signed by him? elf. and attested 
by two witnesses, shall be filed in the office of the Secretary 
of the Province, and certified copies thereof shall be com 
petent evidence in all Courts where any matter or thing 
touching Patent Right shall come in question; and such 
inventor shall moreover deliver a model of the Machine 
by him invented, provided the Provincial Secretary shall 
deem it necessary. 

Sec. VI. Provides, that all Patents shall be assignable at 
Law. 

Sec. VII. Enacts, that if any person infringe Patent 
Eights, every person so infringing shall be liable to an 
action for the same, in which, besides such damages as shall 
be awarded by the Jury, the party injured shall also reco 
ver treble costs. 

Sec. VIII. Provides and enacts, that if at the trial in any 
such action, it shall be made apparent, to the satisfaction 
of the Court, that the Patent Rights had been obtained 
through fraud or wilful misdescription in tho specifica 
tion or for the invention or discovery of another person, 
judgment shall be rendered for the defendant, with costs, 
and the Patent declared void. 

Sec. IX. Enacts, that in cases of interfering applications 
for any Patent, the same shall be submitted to the arbitra 
tion of three skilled persons, one of whom shall be chosen 
by each of the applicants, and the third by the Secretary 
of the Province, or his Deputy; and the decision or award 
of such arbitrators, or any two of them, delivered to the 
Secretary in writing, and subscribed by them, shall be 
final, and if either of the applicants shall refuse or fail to 
choose an Arbitrator, when required so to do by the Secre 
tary of the Province, the Patent shall issue to the opposite 
party ; and when there shall be more than two interfering 
applicants, and the parties applying shall not all unite in 
appointing three arbitrators, it shall be in the power of the 
said Secretary of the Province, or Deputy, to appoint the 
three Arbitrators for the purposes aforesaid. 

Sec. X. Enacts, that every applicant signifying bis desire 
to obtain a Patent, shall pay into the hands of the Secretary 
of the Province, or Deputy, a fee of Five Pounds Currency : 
Provided always, that for every copy or exemplification 
which may be required at the office of the said Secretory, 
of the enrolment of any such Patent, or of the specification 
or other document relating thereto, the person obtaining 
such copy shall pay at the rate of One Shilling for every 
folio of seventy-two words, and a further sum of Ten Shil 
lings for affixing the Great Seal to the exemplification of 
any such Patent; and for every copy of any drawing re 
lating to such Patent, the party entitled to and obtaining 
the same, shall pay such sum as the Provincial Secretary, 
or Deputy, shall consider a reasonable compensation for 
the time and labor expended thereon. 

Sec. XI. Provides and enacts, that the privileges, &c.. 
mentioned by this Act, slml! extfrd to and include any 
subject of Her Majesty, being an inhabitant of this Pro 
vince, who shall in his or her travels in any foreign country 
have discovered or obtained a knowledge of, any new and 
useful art, machine, &c., not known or not in use in this 
Province, before his or her application for the same : Pro- 
1 vided nevertheless, that nothing herein contained shall 
j extend to inventions or discoveries of any new and useful 
art. machine, &c., made, discovered or used in the United 
I States of America, or in any part of Her Majesty s Domi 
nions, in Europe or America, or be construed to prevent 
the free importation thereof into this Province, for sale, 
by any person or for their use or otherwise, from the 
United States or Her Majesty s said Dominions. 

Sec. XII. Provides and enacts, that such person so de 
sirous of introducing into this Province any invention. Ac., 
shall make a solemn declaration, that he believes himself 
to be the first introducer or publisher of such invention, 
&c., in this Province, and that he discovered or obtained a 
knowledge thereof while on his travels in some foreign 
country, not being one of the United States of America, or 
any of Her Majesty s Dominions in Europe or America. 

Sec. XIII. Enacts, that all theprovisionsandenactments 
of 12 Vic. c. 24, shall apply to Patents issued under tbis 
Act, arid the provisions of this Act relative to matters sul>- 
sequent to the issuing of any Letters Patent, shall apply 
to Letters Patent issued under either of the Acts hereby 
repealed, as fully as to Letters Patent issuing after the 
passing hereof : Provided always, that the words "or the 
principle thereof, 1 in the first section of Act 12 Vic. c. 24, 
shall be and are hereby repealed. 



[237] 



46 



PATENTS. 



[1857. 



CANADIAN PATENTS, 

Issued ly the Bureau of Agriculture and Statistics, from 1st July, 1855, to 30th June, 1856. 



James Fell A seed machine for the purpose of judiciously 
sowing clover, grass, or other small seeds. July 7, 1855. 

William Driseoll A new an<l useful butter churn. July 
7, 1865. 

Peter How Higley An improved carriage spring. July 7, 
1855. 

Robert Might A portable, vibrating and self-acting cir 
cular sawing machine. July 25, 1855. 

Peter Murdoch An improvement in axles and springs for 
carriages. August 21, 1855. 

Peter Murdock An improvement in the construction of 
double and single trees. August 21, 1855. 

Daily Selleck A new and useful improvement in. the con 
struction of churns. August 23, 1855. 

Isaac Win. Forbes A self-acting and self-adjusting rail 
road switch, and alarm and register. Sept. 1, 1S55. 

James Jackson Miller An improved rudder. Sep. 4, 1855. 

William Delany An improved method of constructing the 
gearing of buggies and other spring vehicles. September 
4, 1855. 

Alexander Anderson An improved washing machine. 
September 5. 1855. 

John Donaghue A new and useful improvement in the 
slab plate, pillar and column, usually placed at graves, 
in memory of the dead. September 5, 1855. 

Richard Hawkins An instantaneous reefer. Sep. 5, 1855. 

Jerome Oill Improvements in the machinery of reaping 
and mowing machines. September 6, 1855. 

John Dunn A new and improved method of constructing 
alarms or signal?, to be called " Dunn s Air Whistle." 
September 12, 1855. 

James Paton Clarke A new keyed musical instrument 
named the Hyaliena," or glass organ. Sep. 18, 1*;V>. 

Thomas Jay Fuller An improved plough. Sep. 18, 1855. 

John Taylor A new method of manufacturing printing 
paper from the straw of wheat, oats and rye, or Irom any 
other kind of straw. September 19. 1855. 

George Codding Briggs A improved washing machine. 
September 19, 1856. 

Charles W. Coe A machine for drilling holes and other 
operations in me*als. September 19, 1.866. 

Kelson Horatio Goslin & Daily Selleck An improvement 
in the construction of washing machines. Sep. 20, 1855. 

Francis Gore Willson An improved hot-air furnace, safety 
Register and system of ventilatk n. Sep. 21, 1855. 

James Smart An improvement iu the construction of 
platform scales. September 22, 1855. 

John Stainthorp An improvement in machinery for the 
manufacture of candles. Sept. 24, 1855. 

Josiah Fay Marsh Certain improvements in the construc 
tion of ploughs. Sep. 25, 1855. 

James Miller A machine for accelerating the process of 
tanning hides. September 27, 1S.V,. 

James Hamilton An improved cloth mangle. September 
27, 1855 

D. Arey Porter An improved washing machine. Novem 
ber 20, Is.V.. 

Thmas Wiggins A cheese press, November 21, 1855. 

James Dennis Improvements in the construction of 
churns November 21, 1S55. 

Jerome Oill New and useful improvements in the con 
struction ofmowingandrenpintrnmchines. Nov. 21, 1855. 

John Condell A new plan or principle for the construction 
of an artificial limb. November 21, 1855. 

David Matthew Improvements in the construction of 
locomotive engines. November 21, 1855. 

Daniel Freeman A new and useful improvement in the 
manufacture of carriages. November 21, 1 -.;~if>. 

Thomas Jay Fuller A knitting machine. Nov. 30, 1855. 

Samuel Ilullx-rt An Agricultural Plough. Dec. 3. 1855. 

Cyrus Dean A new and useful machine for making use 
of the waste heat from any furnace. Dec. 3. 1 

Adoniram Kendall A new machine for making shingles. 
Dec. 3, 1855. 

James Bear An improvement in the manu&cture of 
chums. December 3, 1 V>.">. 

Abiether Ashley IHblwrd A new and useful mode of con 
veying water into steam boilers. December 4. 

Jacob Binghain A new and useful improvement iu the 
manufacture of ploughs. Decembers, U 

Hosea !Mm Willard A new and improved method of 
scouring and polishing stone, marble and iron. Dec. 
10, 1855. 



Charles Lewis Aime de Bergue An apparatus for acting 
on water and other liquids, so as to force, displace or 
propel the same, or a body floating thereon. Dec 10, 1855. 

Wilsie Manning A new and improved wash-tub for 
clothes, denominated " The Montreal Wash-tub." Dec. 
10, 1855. 

Joel Babcock Hayden A metallic improved box and fas 
tening for carriage wheel?. December 13, 1855. 

James McLellan A new machine for the repairing of iron 
rails used for cars and carriages to run upuu, or railways. 
December 15, 1855. 

Lewis Bright, Junr. Certain improvements in a washing 
machine. December 15, 1855. 

John Ross An improved leverage power fire-engine. Dec. 
15, 1866. 

Peter Bowen A triple action vertical scourer and separator 
for cleansing wheat and other grain. Dec. 24. 1S55. 

Charles Haratio Waterous Useful improvements in the 
construction of steam and water circular saw-mills. Dec. 
24, 1855. 

Piere Ktiene Picault A medical preparation called by him 
the " Nurses and Mother s Treasure." Jan. 17, 1 

Henry Wandy A new centre force and suction pump. 
January 17, 1856. 

Toussaint Trudeau An improvement in the construction 
and mode of connecting railway carriages. .Ian. 17, 1850. 

William Burnliacu Choate An improvement iu the manu 
facture of lanterns. January 17, 1856. 

Robert Ord New and useful improvement in a machine 
for screwing bolts. January 23, 1856. 

Angus Mclntosh New improvements in the composition 
of cement for roofing houses. Feb. 5. ls;>ii. 

Samuel MrLaughlin A self-acting railway collision pre 
venter. February 5, 1856. 

Wilber F. Adams A semi-revolving cyliuder steam-engine. 
Feb. 11, 1X56. 

Joseph Westman A new method of raising fruit trees 
from the parent tree, without grafting or budding. 
February 11, 1856. 

John Ross New improvement in the construction of 
pumps or fire-engines. February 11, 1850 . 

Charles Maitland Tate A new improved method of con 
structing links or couplings for railway carriages, called 
by him Tate s Safety Link." February 15, 1 

D. Arcy Porter A self-acting railroad or entrance gate. 
February 15, 1856. 

Alexander Moffatt A spring for closing doors outside and 
inside. February 15, 1850. 

William Tanner Improvements in the construction of 
steam-engine boilers. February 19, 1856. 

Charles Hubbard Gould An improved planing machine. 
February 19, 1856. 

Charles Lemon A new and useful method of casting the 
mould boards of Ploughs. February 23, 1856. 

Francis Roberts Hawkins Improvements upon, find In, 
the construction of" Ide s Grain Drill. Feb. 23, l.s.v;. 

D. Arcy Porter A moving and self-acting cattle guard, 
for railway purposes. February 23. IVni. 

John Brown A new oven for baking purposes. February 
23, 1856. 

Marquis Laffayette Goodenow A new art for manufac 
turing paints from a vegetable deposit of hog-iron ore, 
and from hydraulic cement rock. Feb. 23, 1 * 

John Angell Cull An improvement in the preparation of 
Indian corn for the purposes of distillation. Feb. 2n. 

John Angell Cull An improvement in the manufacture 
of starch from Indian corn. February 29, 1856. 

Edward Hedley A new and improved method of con 
structing shingle machines. March 5, Is.. . 

Joseph Westriiun A double action washing-machine. 
March 6, 1856. 

John Hugill A diagonal water-wheel. March 12. 1856. 

Samuel S. IHckok Certain improvements in the construc 
tion of clothes-horses. March 12, is.y;. 

Selim Pettit A circular shaving straw-cutter. March 
12, 1856. 

James Flanigan A new and improved method of Muti 
lating railroad ctirs, Rt< ;im-)io:its. and other Homely 
covered and rapidly moving vehicles, and of expelling at 
the same time, cinders, smoke, dust and other disa 
greeables. March 12, 1856. 

Daniel Gould A new and improved pressed brick for 
building purposes. March 12, 1856. 



[238] 



1857.] 



JUDICIARY. 



47 



Alfred Elisha Munson Certain improvements in the con 
struction of carriages and other four-wheeled vehicles 
March 18, 1856. 

Thomas Ritchie An improvement in the draft applied to 
reaping, mowing or other machines. March 20, 1856. 

Henry Huff A new and useful machine for dove-tailing in 
cabinet-making. March 27, 1856. 

Harvey Fowler, Junr. A reciprocating engine. March 
27, 1856. 

James H. Headley A new method of manufacturing 
marbleized granite. March 27, 1856. 

Willis Phelps A new and improved method of con 
structing bee hives, called " the Union Bee-hive." April 
5, 1856. 

George Sidey A new and useful machinery, known as 
" a Horizoi.tal Revolving Wind-power." April 5, 1856. 

James Davis A slabbing and rolling g.-ing of circular saws 
for sawing lumber or round logs into boards or planks. 
April 5, 1856. 

Thomas G. Morse An improved atmospheric churn. 
April 9, 1S56. 

James A. Oliver A corn-planter, or machine for sowing 
corn. April 14, 1856. 

Selim Pettit A horizontal rotary shingle-machine. April 
14, 1856. 

Sandford S. Blodgett An improved oven for baking and 
cooking meats or other articles. April 16, 1856. 

Ebenezer E. Gilbert A new and improved machine for 
sawing, called by him, " Gilbert s Steam-sawyer." April 
22, 1856. 

Charles H. Gould A new torsion spring for carriages. 
April 24, 1856. 



Isaac Horning A corn-planter, or machine for sowing 

corn. April 28, 1856. 
William Gill An improvement on steam-engines, by 

variable cut-off and expansion geer for stationary or 

marine engines. April 30, 1856. 
John Lent, Junr. A machine for digging and picking 

potatoes. April 30, 1856. 
Thomas Millichamp Au improved tap for water and 

other liquids. May 12, 1856. 
Thomas McMurchy A hot or cold cylinder mangle. May 

14, 1856. 
Alexander Anderson An improved revolving hay-rake 

and pea-puller. May 14, 1850. 
William Graeme Tomkins A process for withdrawing the 

sap from trees recently felled, and rendering the same 

both seasoned and dry in a very brief time, and in case 

of need, imbuing the body of the tree with colouring 

matter, or inserting therein chemical substances in 

liquid form to prevent dry-rot, decay, or render the tree 

incombustible. May 16, 1856. 
James Munroe Thompson A new and improved method 

of hanging a mully-saw. May 23, 1856. 
Peter Ban man An improved portable cider-mill and press. 

May 30, 1856. 
Robert Currie McFadden Certain improvements upon a 

boot-cramping machine. June 19, 1856. 
Rodolphus Lounsbury New and useful improvements in 

corn-planters. June 19, 1856. 
William Howard Certain improvements on the concave 

horse-shoe. June 27, 1856. 

Andrew C. Bruce A new cultivator. June 27, 1856. 
Luther Otway Rice New and useful improvements in the 

manufacture of springs for carriages. June 27, 1856. 



JUDICIARY UPPER CANADA. 



Court of Error and Appeal. Judges, the Judges of the 
Superior Courts of Law and Equity. Clerk, the Registrar 
of the Court of Chancery, Toronto. 

Court of Queen s Bench. Chief Justice, Hon. Sir J. B. 
Robinson, Bart. Puisne Judges, Hon. Arch. McLean and 
U. E. Burns. Clerk of the Crown and Pleas, C. C. Small. 
Reporter, J. Lukin Robinson, Toronto. 

Court of Chancery. Chancellor, Hon. W. H. Blake. 
Tice-Chancellors, Hou. J. C. P. Esttn and J. G. Spragge. 
Master, A. N. Buell. Registrar and Reporter, A. Grant. 
Long vacation commences 1st July, and ends 21st August. 

Court of Common Pleas. Chief Justice, Hon. W. H. 
Draper, C. B. Puisne Judges, lions. W. B. Richards and 
J. H. Ilagarty. Clerk of the Crown and Pleas. L. Heyden. 
Reporter, E. S. Jones, Toronto. Clerk in Chambers, W. 
B. Reward, Toronto. 

Clerl;s of Assize. W. A. Campbell, Toronto; the Deputy 
Clerks of the Crown are ex-officio Clerks of Assize and 
Marshals in their respective counties. 

Deputy Clerks of tfie Crown. The Clerks of the County 
Courts will be ex-officio Deputy Clerks of the Crown and 
Pleas of their several counties as the present incumbents 
vacate by death or otherwise. 

Law Terms. Hilary begins first Mondny in February. 
and ends Saturday of the ensuing week; Easter begins 1st 
Monday in June, and ends Saturday of the ensuing week; 
Trinity begins last Monday in August, and ends on the 
Saturday of the ensuing week; Michaelmas begins third 
Monday in November and ends Saturday of the ensuing 
_week. Long vacation from 1st July to 21st August. 

Circuits. The Circuits are held twice a year in each 
County, between Hilary and Easter Terms, and between 
Trinity and Michaelmas Terms, except in the County of 
York, where there aro three in each year, commencing on 
the first Thursday in January, the first Monday in May. 
and the second Monday in October, in each year. There 
are six Circuits, as follows, viz: The Ktnteni : Perth. 
Cornwall. Itytown, L Original. Brockville. Ihine: Niagara. 
Whitby, Hamilton. Cayuga, Barrie. Sydenham. f\~:<t<:rit . 
St. Thomas, Sandwich, Sarnia, Chatham, London, Goderich. 



Midland: Peterborough. Cobourg, Belleville, Picton. King 
ston. Oxford: Simcoe, Brantfnrd, Guelph, Berlin, Strat 
ford, Woodstock. Toronto: Toronto. 

Ildr and Devisee Court. Commissioners, the Judges of 
the Superior Courts, ani such other persons as may be 
appointed by commission under the Great Seal. Their 
duties are to determine claims to lands in Upper Canada, 
for which no patent has issued from the Crown in favour 
of the proper claimants, whether as heirs, devisees or as- 
siirnci s. Sittings a; Toronto, first Monday in January and 
July in each year. Clerk of Commissioners, W. B. Heward. 

Gwrt of Prolate Official Principal, S. Brough, Toronto ; 
Registrar, C. Fitzgibbon, Toronto. 

Surrogate Court. Judge, S. B. Harrison; Registrar, 
Win. J. FitaOerald, Toronto. 

County Courts. Presided over by resident Judge in each 
county ; these Courts possess equity powers. 

Qt urttr Sessions. Chairman, the County Judge in each 
county, who, with one or more Justices of the Peace, holds 
a Court of Quarter Sessions in his county four times a year 
for trials by jury in cases of larceny, misdemeanor and 
other offences. Sittings, first Tuesday in January. April, 
and July, and the third Tuesday in November, with power 
of adjournment. 

Recorders Courts. In the Cities of Toron o, Hamilton, 
and Kingston, the Recorders Court takes the place of the 
County Sessions, the Justices for Counties having no juris 
diction in the Cities the care of which is confided to the 
Recorder, Mayor, Aldermen and Police Magistrate of each. 
The City Sessions are held on the first Monday in January, 
April, July and November. 

Division Courts. For the summary disposal of cases by 
the County Judges. Courts are held once in two months 
in each division, or oftener, at the discretion of the Judge. 
The Divisions are established by the Courts of Qiuu t.T 
Sessions. The Jurisdiction of these Courts has been en 
larged by the Act 18 & 19 Vic. chap. 125. 

InxoJrent Debitor s Court. The County Judge in each 
county presides. 



MEDICAL. 



Medical Board I pper Canada. Toronto. President, The 
Hon. C. Widiner, M.D.. and F.R.C.S., Eng. ; Secretarv. E. 
Clarke, F.R.C.S.R. ; W. C. Gwynne, M.I?.; W. T.-lter. 
L.R.C.S.E.; W. Durie. K.H.; J. King. M.D.; W. Beau 
mont, M.R.C.S., Eng. ; G. Uerrick. M.D. ; W. B. Nitol, M.D. : 



John Rolph, M.R.C.S.; Joseph Workman, M.D.t Edward 
M. Hodder, M.C. and F.R.CS.E. ; James Sampson, King 
ston ; Harrnanus Smith, Ancaster; ./amcs AVilson, Perth; 
Basil R. Church, Mcrrickville; W. II. Brouse, Prescott; 
Robert Edmondson, Brockville; W. H. Howard, Farmers- 



[239] 



48 



POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT. 



[1857. 



villc; Henry II. Wright, Toronto; W. Allison, Markham; 
Roderick McDonald, Corn-wall; George H. Park, Hamilton; 
John I raster, 1 elham ; Thomas T. Macklem. Chippawa; 
Ephraim Cook, Norwich; George Southwiok, St. Thomas; 
W. Aikins, Toronto; William II. Dalton, Dundas. 

Toronto General Hospital. Incorporated 1847 Trustees : 
Appointed by Government. Hon. C. Widmer, M.D. .Tamos 
Beaty, andJohii Doel; by Corporation, O. W. Allan; by 
Board of Trade, William Henderson. Consulting Phys. 
and Surg. s, Hon. C .Widmer, M.D., George Herrick, M.D. 
Attending Ph.vs. and Surgt. s, W. Telfer, M.R.C.S., Edin.; 
W. 11. Beaumont, M.D., F.R.C.S., Eng. ; 12. M. Hodder, 
M.C., F.R.C.S., Eng.; J. Scott, M.D., M.U.C.S., Eng.; James 
II. Richardson, M.D., M.R.C.S., Kng. ; J. Ralph, M.1X, 
M.I! C S, Eng. Resident Surgeon, Edward Clarke., F.R.C.S., 
Kng. ; Secretary and Treasurer, J. W. lircnt. Hours < f 
attendance, 12 o clock, noon, daily. Visitors are permitted 
to see their friends eyery day from 3 to 5 p.m., except 
Saturday and Sunday. 

Provincial Lunatic Asylum, Toronto. Two-and a-half 
miles West from theCity Hall, on Queen Street. Property 
vested in the Crown. Government appoint Medical Super 
intendent and Bursar, and four visiting commissioners 



quarterly, two of whom are residents of the city, who 
frame by-laws for its government, thoroughly examine the 
Asylum, and report to the Governor General. The build 
ing was designed to accommodate, when the wings are 
| erected, 2oO patients ; there are present 370 in it. Th<> 
i Institution is open to the public between the hours of 12 
. noon, and 3 p. m., every day, Saturdays and Sundays 
| exoepted, by application to the Medical Superintendent at 
the Asylum. Tie admission of patients & regulated b\- 
j tlie Act, 16 Vic. chap. 188, which requires that the pa lent 
j be examined by three licensed medical practitioners, 
verified by Reeve or Mayor co.lectively, who certify to the 
insanity. From the overcrowded state of the house, ad- 
; missions are at present made as vacancies occur, according 
to priority of applicants. Idiutsarid persons afflicted witii 
paralysis are Inadmissable. Vi-itinirOommissioners, Hon. 
S. Mills. Chairman, Win. Cawthra, James Beatty, Robt. 
Armour, Esquires. Officers of the Institution: Medical 
Superintendent, Joseph Workham, M.D.; Bursar, J. 
McKirdy; Steward. G. McCullough; Matron, Mary Mc- 
Culloiigh. 

Nnle,. A Branch of this Asylum was la ely opened in 
the University Buildings under the same management. 



POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT. 



POSTAGE RATES ON LETTERS. 

Between any two places in Canada, 3d. per ],4 oz. Pre 
payment optional. 

From Canada to United States, fid. Prepayment optional. 
California 9x1. do. 



Oregon 9d. 



do. 





Via 


Via 


Via 


LOWER PROVINCES. 


Queb cand 


Por ld and 


Bost n A lla x. 




Halifax. 


St. John. 


Cunard Str s. 


New Brunswick 


3d. 


3d. 


7Vd. 


\ova Scotia 


OJ 


3d 


r\/(\ 


Prince Edwd. Is and 
Newfoundland 


3d. 


WL 


{1^ 



Prepayment optional. Letters to be forwarded by Bri 
tish Steamer from Boston, must be specially so addressed. 

GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND. 

By British (Canard) Mail Steamers, from New York or 

Boston, lOd. cy. (Sd. stg.) 
By Canadian Mail Steamers, from Quebec (in Summer), 

-,y z A. cy. (6d. stg.) 

BRITISH COLONIES. 



. 

*.\ew Zealand. 

Penang. 

.-t. Helena. 
-Singapore. 

Sierra Leono. 
Surinam. 



Aden. Ceylon. 

*Australia(embra- *Cli ina. 
cing all Colonies *East Indi.v- 
known thereby.) *Gold Coast. 
Brit.W. Indies(in- Gibraltar. 
eluding Bar does Malta. 
and Bermuda. Mauritius. 
Upon Letters for those places marked (*) 1 repayment is 

compulsory. 

Letters for the above British Colonies are subject to a 
rate of Is. od. per ~% oz. cy. (Is. 2d. stg.), when sent by 
British (Canard) Mail" Packet, via Boston or New York: 
and to a rate of Is. 3d. cy. (Is. stg.) when sent by Cana 
dian Mail Steamers. 

FRANCE. 

Is. ?d. cy. per ^oz. by British (Cunard Line), and Is. 5d. 
cy. by Canadian Steamers. Prepayment optional. 

Rates on Letters to countries in Europe, see last Cana 
dian Almanac, p. 41. 

BOOK POST BETWEEN CANADA AND FRANCE. 

Printed Papers, Books, Pamphlets, <tc., mny be forwarded 
b." the Canadian Line of Steamers, at th" following rates, 
being the British and French charges combined : 

For a packet of printed matter, or single News- Oy. S/g. 
paper, Book, Pamphlet, &c. not over 2ozs. 2Ud=Os 2d 
Do. exceeding 2 ozs. and not exceeding 4 ozs. 5d=0s 4d 
5 4 " 7S - " 8 ozs. 10d=0s8d 

- *> * " lib. Is8d=ls4d 

Jo- I 1 - I /ilb. 2s 01=28 Od 

Do " iy,\\,. 2lbs. 3s 4d=2s 8d 

And so on increasing lOd cy. (equal to 8d. stg.) for 
additional half pound in weight. Prepayment Optional 
_ The Book Postal Regulations between Canada and 
Britain (as given in lust year s Canadian Almanac), 
apply also to matter between Canada and France 



NEWSPAPERS. 

Newspapers published within the Province of Canada, pass 
by Mail free of Postage within the Province, whether 
posted from the office of publication or otherwise. 

Between Canada and other British North American Pro 
vinces, free of charge. 

To the United States, free to the Frontier. 

To Foreign Countries, at rates of charge prescribed by 
Imperial Post Oflice. 

Canada to England (Cunard Line), Id. on delivery. 
Do. do. (Canadian Line), Id. on delivery. 

England to Canada (Cunard Line), Id. on delivery ; Id. also 
to be prepaid in England. 

England to Canada (Canadian Line), Id., to be prepaid in 
England. 

Newspapers for the British Colonies, sent via England, 
are liable to a British charge which must be prepaid of 
Id. when forwarded by Canadian Lino of Steamers, and of 
2d. when forwarded by Cunard line. 

MAGAZINES, PERIODICALS, &c. 
Between any P.O. in Canada and ray place in British N. 

America or the United States he Canadian rate is 
If not exceeding 3 ozs. in weight, J^d. 
If over 3 ozs. in weight, 2d. 

The quarterly prepayment of Postage on Periodicals, 
reduces postage one-half. 

Printed Circulars, Price Currents, Hand Bills, &c., aro 
charged at the rate of i^d. per oz. (For further regula 
tions respecting Magazines, Circulars, &c., see last y< ur s 
Oinadian Almanac, p. 39. 

REGISTRATION OF LETTERS. 

Persons transmitting letters which they desire should 
pass through tin- Post as Rcgisten-il Letters," must ob 
serve that no record is taken of any letter unless .-pceially 
handed in for registration at the time of posting. Upon 
all such letters, with the exception of those addressed to 
the United States, Id. must be prepaid, as a Registration 
charge. If addressed to the United States, the Ordinary 
Postage rate on the letter to that country must be pre 
paid, and in addition a Registration charge \ >f :M. per letter. 
The registry thus effected in Canada wili be carried on by 
the United States Post Office, until the letter arrives at it* 
destination. 

In like manner, letters addressed to Canada may be 
Registered at the place of Posting in the United States, 
and the registry made there will accompany the letter to 
the place of delivery in Canada. 

A Certificate of Registration will by given by a Post 
master, if required. 

It must be distinctly understood by parties who avail 
themselves of the privilege of registration, that such re 
gistration, with the certificate and receipt, are merely In 
tended to afTurd the means of tracing the course of .-ucb 
letters through the Post, and of asr-ertairiing their delivery 
! at destination, and will not be held to imply any liability 
on the part of the Postal department to make good any 
loss, nr alleged loss, arising upon the miscarriage of any 
such letter or its contents. 



[240] 



1857.] 



POST OFFICES IN CANADA. 



49 



POST OFFICES IN CANADA. 

A List of the Post Offices in Canada, with the Names of the Postmasters. Also the Township, and Electoral Division or 
Oxtnty, in which each is situated. Corrected to the 1st of September, 1850. 

NOTE. The Offices printed in Italics are authorized to grant and pay Money Orders. 



NAME OP TOWNSHIP OR ,.._ NAME OF 

POST OFFICE. SEIGNIOR?. POSTMASTER. 

Abbott s Cor s Missisquoi...!!. II. Smith. 

Abbottsf. >rd Rouville Ebenezer Fisk. 

Abercorn Button Brome Benjamin Seaton. 

Aberfnyle Puslioch ....Wellington. .8. Falconbridge. 

Acton Esquesing ...Halton L. McDonald. 

Acton Vale ....Acton Bagot C. Beauregard. 

Adamsville ....Farnham ....Brome George Adams. 

Adtlisnn Klizabetht n Broekville ...Coleman Lewis. 

Adelaide Adelaide Middlesex ...John S. Hoare. 

Adumston Adamston ...Renfrew Arch. Patterson. 

Adolphustown Adolphust n Lenox J. J. Watson. 

Albion Albion Peel Samuel Walford. 

Aldboro Aldboro Elgin, W. 11. John McDougall. 

Alexandria ...Lochiel Glengary ....Alex. McDonell. 

Alfred Alfred Prescott John Hill. 

AlUnburg Thorold Welland John Kannie. 

Allan Park ....Bentinck ....Grey G.B.Allan. 

Allan s CornersDurham Chateaug ay. William Allan 

AUansville Peel Wellington .George Allan 

Allisouville ...AmeliasburgPrince Ed.. ..Royal C. Hicks. 

Alluinettels d Alluuibttels.Pontiac John Lynch. 

Alma Peel Wellington ..Thomas Graham. 

Alnwick Alnwick Northum. ...R. Mulholland. 

Alton Caledon Peel John S. Meek. 

Altona Pickering ...Ontario Jos. Monkhouse. 

Alvinston Brooke Lambton ....John Brannan. 

Ameliasburg...AmeliasburgPrmce Ed Owen Roblin. 

Amhe.rstbu.ryh, . Maiden Essex James Kevill. 

Amherst Is d..AmherstIs dAddington... William Scott. 

Amiens Lobo Middlesex ...II. B. Fuller. 

Ancaster Ancaster ....Wentworth .G. B. Rousseaux. 

Anc. Lorette ..Quebec Quebec Michael Gauvin. 

Angus Essa Simcoe, S. R.J. B. Curtis. 

Arlington Adjala Simcoe, S.R.Thomas Kidd. 

Arnprior McNab Renfrew Andrew Russell. 

Arran Arran Bruce John Morton. 

Arteinesia Artemesia ...Grey John Sproul. 

Arthabaska ...Arthabask.* .Arthabaska .Philip N. Pacaud. 

Arthur Arthur Wellington ..Andrew Mitchell. 

Arva London Middlesex ...Joseph Sifton. 

Asbburn Whitby Ontario, S. R.James La wder. 

Ashtield Ashfield ......Huron Joseph Cline. 

Ashgrove Esquefiing ...Halton John Hunter. 

Ashton Goulbourn...Carleton John Sumner. 

Aj-phodel Asphodel ...Peterboro ...J. S. Fowlds. 

Athelstan llornbrooke. Huntingdon .J. Anderson. 

Alherly Mara Ontario, N.R.W. C. McMullan. 

Athlone Adjala Siincoe, S. R.Joseph Kidd. 

Athol In. Reserve. Glengary ....James McDonell. 

Auburn Colborne ....Huron W. B. Garratt. 

Au:zhrim Euphemia ...Lambton ....J. McKennie. 

Aultsville Ozuabruck ..Stormont ....J. R. Ault. 

Aurora. Whitchurch.York, N. R. .Charles Doan. 

Avon Dorchester. ..Middlesex ..Simon Whaley. 

Avonbank Downie Perth James Muir. 

Aylmcr (East) .Hull Ottawa J. R. Woods. 

Aylmer (West)Malahide ....Elgin, E. R. .Ph. Hodgkineon. 

Aylwiu Aylwin Ottawa J. Little. 

Ayr Dumfries, N.Waterloo ....Robert Wyllie. 

Baby s Point. ..Srmibra Larnbton ....James Menton. 

j nbyville ShHrrington.Napierville .Hump. Nesbitt. 

Baden Wilinot Waterloo ....Jacob Beck. 

Bagot Bagot Renfrew Gerrard MeCrea. 

Ba^otville Chicoutimi ..L. Z. Rousseau. 

Ballinafa l Hrin Wellington ..James Campbell. 

Ballycruy Adjala Simcoe, S. R.Peter Small. 

Balmoral Walpole Haldimand.. Lewis Anguish. 

Baltimore Hamilton ...Northum. ...Robert Harstoue. 

liandon Hullett Huron John Warwick. 

Barnett Nii hol Wellington ..James Elmslie. 

Barnston Barnston ....Stanstead ...John Humphrey. 

Barrie Vespra Simcoe, N. R.Jonathan Lane. 

Buth Krnestown ..Addington...W. J. Fairfield. 

B.itis-an Batiscan Champlain ,.J. B. F. Filteau. 

Batis-an B dge Batiscan Champlain. ..J. Fusrere. 

Battersea ?torrington .Frontenac ...Cor. Vanluven. 

liiiyfald Stanley Huron James Gairdner. 

Bay ham Bayham Elgin, E. R. .Thos. Springall 



NAME OP TOWNSHIP OR coc> .j r NAME OF 

POST OFFICE SEIGNIOR V. P0.3TMASTBR. 

Bcachrille Oxford, W. ..Oxford, S. R. W. Hnok. 

Beamsville Clinton Lincoln J. B. 0* borne. 

Bear Brook ....Cumberland Russell John Walsh. 

Beauharnois ...Beauharnois Beauhariiois Henry Bogue. 

Beaumont Beaumont ...Bellechasse ..Z. Turgoou. 

Beauport Beauport ....Quebec Alex, dellougelle. 

Beaverton Thorah Ontario,N.R.Donald Canierwi- 

Becancour Becancour ...Nicolet B. Rivard. 

Bedford Stanbridge ..Missisquoi... Nelson Adams. 

Belfast Ashfield Huron Alex. McDonagh. 

Belford Markham ...York, E. K. .William Harper. 

Belfountain ...Caledon Peel Thos. J. Bush. 

Bellamy s Mill.Ramsay Lanark, N.R.Thomas Coulter. 

Belle Riviere Two Mount. Wm. Snowdon. 

Belleville Thurlow Hastings ....J. H. -Meat-ham, 

Bell Ewart Innisfil Simcoe, S.R.Edwd. Drake. 

Bell s Corners .Nepean Carleton George Arnold. 

Belmont Dorchester. ..Elgin, E. R.J. F. Waterberrr 

Belmore Turnberry... Huron T. W. Irvin. 

Beloeil Beloeil Vercheres ...J. R. Brillon. 

Benmiller Colborne ....Huron Thomas Logan. 

Bennie s Cor s.Rampay Lanark, N.R.Alex. Loishman. 

Bentinck Bentinck ....Grey A. B. McNab. 

Berlin Waterloo, N.Waterloo ....Wm. Davidson 

Berthier, en B.Berthier Montmagny.David Blouin. 

Berthier, en .H.Berthier Berthier J. F. G. Coutu. 

Bervie Kincardine ..Bruce Nichol Mclntyre. 

Beverly Bastard Leeds, S. R..J. A. Russell. 

Bic Bic Rimouski ...George Sylvain. 

Biddulph Biddulph ...Huron J. Cooncy. 

Binbrook Binbrook ....Wentworth .Henry Hall. 

Birmingham. ..Pittsburg ...Frontenac ...Jas Birmingham. 

Bishop s Mills .Oxford Grenville, N.S. L. liishop. 

Black Creek ...Willoughby .Welland A. McMurray. 

Blandford Blandford ...Arthabaska..l ierre Trepannier 

Bloomfield Hallowell ....Prince Ed.. ..Jonathan Strikw. 

Bloomsburg ...Townsend ...Norfolk M. M. Kitchen. 

Blythe Huron John Templeton. 

Bobcaygeon ...Verulam ....Victoria Mossom Byd. 

Bodmin Morris Huron Wm. Harris. 

Bond Head ....Tecumseth ..Simcoe, S. R.Mrs. A. St. CLui< 
Bongard s Cor.Marysburg ..Prince Ed.. ..John Bougar-li 
Bosanquet...,.Bosanquet... Lambton ....Levi Schooley, 

Boscobel Ely Shefford Wm. HackwalL. 

Boston Townsend ...Norfolk David Morgan. 

Bothwell Zone Kent II. D. Muara. 

Boucherville...BouchervilleChambly Louis Noi mandii 

Bourg Louis ..^Bourg Louis.Portneuf James B>:. r. 

Bowmanville... Darlington ..Durham, W.Robert i surbaim. 

Bradford [ W. Gwillim.Simcoe, S. R.George Douglas. 

Bramitton Chinguac sy.Peel K. Cbisholiu. 

Branchton Dumfries, S.Braut, E. R..Joseph. Burrows. 

Brant Brant Bruce Malcolm Maclean 

Branfford Brantford ...Brant, W. R.J. D. Clement 

Breslaw Waterloo ....Waterloo ....Cyras.Erb. 

Brewer s Mills.Pittsburg ...Frontenac ...R. Augliu. 

Brewster Hay Huron 

Bridgenorth ...Smith Peterboro . ...Marcus S. Dean. 

Bridgeport Waterloo, N.Waterloo, N.P. N. Tagge. 

Hriylitun Murray Northum. ...Jos. Lock wood. 

Bristol Bristol Poatiac William King. 

Brock Brock Ontario. N.K.Thomas Hill. 

Brock s Creek-.Aldboro Elgin. W. R.Donald McKiHop 

Bi-ocltville Elizabethan T. of Brockv.John Kilborn. 

Brome Bromo Brome 1L R. Williams. . 

Brompton Bronipton ...Richmond ...S. A. Stevens. 

Brompton F. ...Brompton ...Richmond ...James Dean. 

Bronte Trafalgar ....Halton Jlyah Williams. 

Brooke Brooke Lambtou ..,.Seorge Shirley. 

Brooldin Whitby Ontario, S.R.Robt. Darlington 

Brougham Pickering ....Ontario, S.R,Richard Tauo. 

Broughton ....Broughton ..Megantic ....C. II. J. Hall. 
Brownsburg ...Chatham ....Argentewil ..Alex. McGibbon. 
Brown s Cor rs.Pickering ...Ontario, S.R.Thomas Palmer. 
Brownesville...Dereham ...Oxfjrd, S. R.E. F. Brown. 

Bruce Bruce Bruce Peter Sinclair. 

Brucefield Stanley Huron R. H. Gairdner. 

Bruce Mines ...On L. Huron ..,J..l ennettitber. . 



[241] 



50 



POST OFFICES IN CANADA. 



[1857. 



-V. .ME OF TOWNSHIP OB f , nu ,. TT NAME OF 

POST OFFICE. HEIUNIORY. POSTMAsTEB. 

Bui-kinj:Li;im...BuckinghainOttawa James Wilson. 

gurfurd Burford Brant, W. R.Henry Kirkland. 

Burgessville.... Norwich Oxford, S. R John Tennant. 

Burn-bran Seymour ....Northum. ...Alex. Donald. 

Burnsiowu ...MuNab Renfrew A. II. Don-swell. 

Burritt s ll ds.MarlboroughCarleton John Meilile,, Jr. 

Bute Somerset ....Megantic J. McKinnon. 

UuUouville ...Markham ...York, E. R. ..Wm. Morrison. 

Button Raleigh Kent Arch. McSween. 

Cacouua Cacouna Temiscouata J. J!. Beaulieu. 

Cws.irea Cartwright ..Durham, W. James C sesar. 

Cainsville Hrantford.E.Braut, E. H..J. D. Dresser. 

Caintown Youge Leeds Myles Younjr. 

Caist .ir Caistor Lincoln lames Tisdale. 

Caistorvilla ...Cuistor, Lincoln David Tice. 

Caledon Cledon Peel George Bell. 

Caledon, East .Caledon Peel Tos. McDougall. 

Caledonia FUtsCaledonia ...Prescott William Bradley. 

Caledonia Sp. .Caledonia ...Prescott James Brock. 

Calumet Is. ...Calumet Pontiac Louis Brissurd. 

Cfttnbray Fenelon Victoria Jos. Wilkinson. 

Ciundt-u. I .nst .Camden, K. .Addington ..Samuel Clarke. 
Campbell! , rd .Seymour ....Northum. E.James Boland. 

Campbell s C ssChinguac sy. Peel F. M. Penny. 

Campbellvillo .Nnssagawe a Halton lames McLean. 

Canboro Cauboro Ilaldimand ..Win. i itch. 

Cttnestoga Woolwich ...Waterloo, X.Charles Ilendry. 

Canfield Cayuga IIaldimaud..A. Willson. 

Canniftou Thurlow Hastings. S...Iohvi Camiiff. 

Canning Blenheim ...Oxford, N. R.Thos. Allchin. 

Gannlagton ...Brock Ontario, N.R.Charles Gibbs. 

Caurobert Rouville James Malarkey. 

Cap Chat(.S.O) Gaspe K.G. Lamontagne 

Canton Hope Durham Win. Carr. 

Cape Cove Perce Gaspe William Tilly. 

Cape Kich St. Vincent .Grey Douald McLaren. 

Cap St. Ignace Mootmairny.P. A. Larue. 

Cap Saute I ortneuf ....Portneuf ....G. A. Allsop. 

Carillon Chatham ....Argenteuil ..G. W. Schneider. 

Carleton (K.C.)Carleton BonaventureJoseph Meagher. 

Oj.rle.ton race .Becttwitli ...Lanark, S. R.Dunc. Campbell. 

Carlisle Flamboro E.Wentworth .W. Lottridga. 

Carlow Colborne Huron Jas. McDonagh. 

Carluke Ancaster Wentworth..James Calder. 

Carp Huutley Carleton. ...Wm Law. 

Carronbrook ...Logan Perth U. C. Lee. 

Carthage Mornington.Pei th Alex. McDonald. 

Cartwright ...Cartwright ..Durham, W.Win. Vance. 

Castiefurd Horton Renfrew 

Castlemoro ....G. ol TorontoPeel John Murphy. 

Castleton Cramahe Northum. ...John C. Pennock. 

Cathcart Burford Brant Isaac Lawrence. 

Caughnawaga .Sit. St. LouisLaprairie Robert McNabb. 

Cavagnol Vaudreuil....Vaudreuil ...R. B. Mathison. 

Cavan Cavan Durham, E..John Knowlson. 

Oaytiga Cayuga Ilaldimand .Dune. Campbell. 

Cedar Grove ...Markham. ...York, N. R. .Sam. Harrington. 

Oedars Soulanges ...Soulanges ...Ben. Joassim. 

Cent. Augusta. Augusta Grenville, S. Horace McLean. 

Centreville . ...Camden EastAddington... James N. Lapum. 

ChanMy W. Chambly.Chambly Thomas Ilickey. 

Champlain Champlain ..Champlain...J. E. Lanouette. 

- Charlesbourg ..Quebec Quebec Joseph Lecourt. 

Charleston Escott Leeds. 8. R. .P. . Green. 

Charleville ....Augusta Grenville, S.Charles Lane. 

Chateauguay ..Chateaug ay Chateaug ay .George Burrell. 
Chateau Richer Montm eucy.Montm ency.L. 0. Rousseau. 

Chatham, EastChatham Argenteuil ..George Bradford. 

Chat/tarn WW.Raleigh Kent B. F. Barfoot. 

Chelsea Hull Ottawa Nicholas Link. 

Cheltenham ...Chinguac sy.Peel William Allan. 

Cherry Creek ..Innisfil Siincoe, S. R.Wm. Main. 

Cherry Valley .Athol Prince Ed....Isaiah T. Insley. 

Chertsey Chertsey Montcalm ...MagloireGranger. 

Chesterfield ...Blenheim ...Oxford, N. R.George Baird. 

Chichester Chichester ..Poutiac John Poupore. 

Chicoutimi Cbicoutimi ..Chicoutimi ..John Quay. 

Olnppawa Stamford ...Welland Mrs. Hepburn. 

Churchville ...Toronto Peel William Lu 

Claremont Pickering ...Ontario, S.R.WUlium Mc.Nnb. 

Clarence Clarence Russell Richard Wood ley. 

Clarenceville...Noyan Ibervilie Charles Kevrart. 

Clarendon Cen Clarendon ...Pontiac /sine.- Hi::w. 

. Clareview Sheffield Addington. ..Ar. h. McDonnell. 

Clarke Clarke Durham, W.John IVavis. 

dear Creek ....Uoughton ...Norfolk Jona. llridguian. 



NAME OP TOWXSniPOB rr)I - V TV SAM SOP 

POST OFFICE. SK1GMOKY. PObTMAS l LV.. 

I Clearville Orfurd Kent .7. R. ),ury. 

I Clifford Minto Wellington W. Jiiown. 

Clifton II., Sub.Stamford ....Welland J. Shears. 

Clinton Tuckersniitbllurou Ihomtis Fair. 

Clover Hill Essa Si niece. S. R.Robert Sproule. 

Clunas Dorchester...Llgin, E. R..A.Clunas. 

Cmitiaiok Bart ord StaijStead ...Horace Cutting. 

Cobden Ross Renfrew Jason Gould. 

C oiourg Hamilton ... Northum. W.Thomas Seott. 

Codringtou ....Brighton Northum. E. Patrick O Neill. 

Colborne Cramahe Northum. E.Joseph A. Keeler. 

Colchester Colchester. ..Essex James Bell. 

CVldsprings ...Hamilton ... Northum. W.D. Mclntesh. 

Coldstream Lobo Middlesex ...Elias Cutler. 

Coldwater Medoute Simcoe, N. R.Jauies Shaw. 

Colebrook Camden, E. .Addington. ..Charles Warner. 

Coleraine Toronto GorePeel Thomas St. John. 

Coliuville Moore Lambton lohn Butler. 

Collingwriod ...NottawasagaSimcoe, N.R.Peter Fenrusson. 

Cullin s Hay ...Kingston ...Froutenac ...Law. Herihm, r 

Columbus Wh.tby Ontario, S. R.Robert Ashk.n. 

Coiner s Mills ..Etnestown ..Addington ..Daniel W. Perry. 
ii-n.tan Compton Compton ....A. M . Keudrich. 

Concord Vaughan York, W. R.John Duncan. 

Ctnry Downie 1 ertli \Vm.CVni-). 

! Cousecon Hillier Prince Ed.. ..Win. Kii ki.-r. , .. 

| Contrecoeur ....Contrecoeur .Vercheres ...0. L:\mouieux. 

Coukshire Eaton Compton ...R. W ilford. 

Cookstown Tecumseth ..Simcoe, S. R.James Harper. 

Cooksville Toronto Peel F. 1!. Mor!e.\ . 

Copetown Iteverley Went worth Thomas Milne. 

Cornwall Cornwall T. of Corn allG. C. Wood. 

Corunna Moore Lambton ....II. J. Miller. 

Coteau du Lac.Soulanges ...Soulanges ...Louis Adams. 

Coteau Land. .Soulanges ...Soulanges ...J. Birmingham, 

Cote des NeigesMontrtal ...Hochelaga ...R. Hoberison. 

Covey Hill He mingford Huntingdon Wm. Barrett. 

Cowansville ...Durham Missisquoi... Peter Cowan. 

Cranbourne ...Cranbourne .Dorchester. ..John Keegaa. 

Credit Toronto Peel James Magrath. 

Creek Bank Woolwich ...Waterloo, N.John Fisher. 

Creemore Mills NottawasagaSimeoe, N.R.E. Webster. 

Crosby s Cor s..Markham ...York, E. R. .Arth. Alexander. 

Crossbill Wellesley ...Waterloo, N.Jas. McCutcheon. 

Crosspoint Restigouche.BonaventureJohn Fraser. 

Croton Dawn Lambton ....J II. Johnston. 

Crowland Crowland ...Welland G. W. Cook. 

Croydon Camden, E. ..Addington ..Carlos Mendell. 

Culloden Dereham ....Oxford. S. R.Wm. Smith. 

Cumberland ...Cumberland Russell G. G. Dunning. 

Cuniminsville. Nelson Halton Wm. Panton. 

Cumnock Nichol We lington .Janifs Samson. 

Daillebout De Ramsay .Joliett* Robert Turner. 

Dalesville R. of Chat mArgenteuil ..Peter McArtbur. 

DalhousieMillsLochiel Glengary ...D. W. McPhail. 

Danville Shipton Richmond ...J. W r . Stockwell. 

Darttord Percy Northum. E.Philip S. Dorland. 

Dawn Mills ...G. ofCamdenKent James Smith.. 

Dealtown Raleigh Kent Joseph Smith. 

De Cewsville... Cayuga Ilaldimand (.William DeCew. 

Delaware Delaware ...MiddlesexW.S. M. Towle. 

Delhi Middleton... Norfolk Wm. McClellao. 

Demorestville .Sophiasburg.Prince Ed. ...John Unveil. 

Deniston Hinchi rookeFrontenac ...Wm. Denuison. 

De Ramsay .. .De Ramsay ..Joliette James Read. 

Dereham Dereham Oxford, S. R.L. McLean. 

Derry West ...Toronto Peel William McCl.iiv. 

Deschambault.Deschamb lt.Vortnevif K. Ilauielin. 

Devon Usborne Huron Joseph Quirk. 

Dewittville Huntingdon. Joseph Oliver. 

Dickenson s L.Oznabruck.-.Stormont ...Win. Cdl iuhcun. 

Dingle Grey Hurt n. Wm. Grant. 

Dixou s Cur rs.Matilda Dundas William Wood. 

Doon Waterloo, N.Waterlfjo, N.Hobert. Strung. 

Dorchester Dorchester... Middlesex l ..Th(.inas I ulnran. 

Dorchester Stii.Dorchester... Middlesex ...I/. M. Croby. 

Doughertv N. E. Hope ..Perth las. Dounlierly. 

Douglas .". liromley Renfrew Charles Coulter. 

Douglas t<"Tn ..Douglas ;as|i,- Cliarlt-s Veil. 

I)..wnev\ille ...Emilj \ ictciria Mirb.-ifl l.i-hane. 

lirayto n I eel Welliuglou .J. Hartncy. 

Drrsdei! <I.i.! CaindenKent ( < M. Webster. 

Mills .j.Ihirford ^fwn.-ti-ad ...A. T. lian^es. 

Drumbn Blenheim ...Oxford, N. R.F. Blancier. 

Urum ondvilleCrantbam ...Drummond James Millar. 

Druin ondville .Stamford ...Wtlland S. FulcoiibriJge. 



[242] 



1857.] 



POST OFFICES IN CANADA. 



51 



NAME OF TOWNSHIP OR. rorvTY NAVE OP 

POST OFFICE. SEIGNIORY. POSTMASTER. 

Du<Iswell Dudswell ...Wolfe Zenth Evans. 

Dunany Wentworth .Argenfceuil ..J-amuel Smith. 

Dutihar Wiliianisb rgUuudas \Vui. Beckstedt. 

Duubarton ....Pickering ...Ontario, S. R .lohu Parker. 

Dumblane Saugeen Bruce W Wallace. 

JJaiidas Fliimlioro W. \\entwoith Pat. Thoi uton. 

Dundee Guduiam h erHuuiiugdon David Baker. 

Dungmnon ...Wawannsb .Huron John Kaine. 

Du-iham Dunham ....Missisquol... Edward Baker. 

Dunkeld Brant Bruce Ilu-h Bell. 

fJ:iunviUe Moulion Haldimand .John Atinour. 

Durham .v Durham Drumniond .Robert Mure. 

Eardley Eardley Ottawa Wyman Davis. 

Ktat Ctiftnn ...t lit ton Compton ....Davi-i Stone. 

East F.trnhatn Farnnam ...Urouie Rod. Hutchins. 

Ka-t FiamptoiiKrampton ...Dorchester... James Kennedy. 

East Gl.-UHlg...Glenelg Giey Klin.il, Atkinson. 

E. Ha.wke.si,uryHa-kesburyPivscott James Gamble. 

East lliii-eluril Hereford Compton . ...0. W Prouty. 

East Holland .Holland Grey Henry Cardwtll. 

Eastou s Cor rsVVol ford Grenville, N Heuian McCrae. 

Iv-.st Oro Oro Simeoe. N.R.Win s-impsnn. 

E. Williamsb t: \\"illiamsb rgDuudas Linds<y Pillar. 

Eastwood Oxford, S. ...Oxford. S. 11. Uy. Vansittart. 

Eaton Baton Campion loshua K<>ss. 

Eden Bay Ham Elgin, E. K.Juhn Mabee. 

Eden Mill.s Kramo.sa Wellington .. Samuel Meadows. 

Elmonton Chingu-dc/sy.l etl 1. Collingbutirne. 

EdwarJ.-.burg .Edwardsb rgGrenville, S.William S. Akin. 

r.^unville Gratton .P.eDi rew 51. J. Ilickey. 

Ejiliiiiton York York, W. R..Jos. Margrave. 

E.rinondvUl&...TuckersmithIIurou . ...T. J. Matks. 

EiMnont Kgremout ...Grey David Cocbrnno. 

Ekt rid Ektrid MiddlesexW.Jonatban Miller. 

Elderslie Srarb >ro ....York. E. K. .J. Malcolm. 

Eldon Kldon Victoria Angus Kay. 

Elgin S. Crosby ...l^eerls. S. It. ,1 hil. Pennock. 

l.l-inliurg Kingston ...Frontenae ...Peter Bates. 

Klgiuiieid London Middlesex E. Win. Frank. 

Lli/.abethville .Hope Durham. E. ..I, McMurtry. 

El le.* mere Scarl>oro ....York. E. K. .A. Ulendinuing. 

Elusa Kluia I erib G. Code. 

Klni. ivve Essa Simc"e. S. R.Georae Latimer. 

Klnra. Piikiiigton.. Wellington .Koi-t-rr llaiu . 

Euihro / ,ri-a, W. ...Oxford. N. K.G. Math^pon. 

i;aiily Emily Victoria Knbrrt Gr^ndy. 

Eiini.-* Enniskillen .Lnuihtou ....Chirles Litlle. 

Knniskilleu ...Darliu^ton .Durham. W.Thomas Ferris. 

Enterprise Caindeu EastA(idingt"n ...las. Sherman. 

Epsom Keacb Ontariu. N.K.Anson T. Button. 

Eramosa Erauiosa Wellington ..Knliert Dr.yden. 

l.rin Erin Wt-llnuton ,.V\ illiam Cornock. 

Erinsviilj ....sbc-fTield Addingtop...Piifrt k Githey. 

Eroll Plyuipton ...Lambton George Whiting. 

JO-cutt Yunge Leeils. S. R. .Tliouias Vanstou. 

Ksriue^ing . ... Esquesing ... llalton Mrs. Rk h. Tracy. 

i M<ic".V0 Etcilncoke ...York. VY. l..\\ itli.im (iambic. 

Euphn^ia Euphr.tsia ...(irry Th tuias J. Rorke. 

EvurtiiU Erauiosa Weliiugtou .llul us Everts. 

Exett-r .Stephen Huron W. Zander*. 

Fail-view 7* >TT& Oxford. N. H.John Armstrong. 

Falkirk Williams ...Middlesex ...John II. IMestly. 

Farm-rsville...Yonge L"e<ls. S. R. .Ana Parish. 

Farnliaui (Vn..Farnham lirnniH Jnhn Johnston. 

Fiiel >n Falls .Fenelon Victoria T. S Stajner. 

Fenwkk I elham W^llatid L. Hanry. 

Nich il Wellington .James McQueen. 

P...Iruuirnond .1/inark. 8. R William Duran. 

Hedt ovd Froulenac ...IMward liottin*. 

Fin. h Finch Storuiont ...J. A. Cockburn. 

Finjial Southwol I...Kljin, W. KLevi Fowler. 

Ft*b Creek Blanshard ...Perth lohn Hell. 

Fitch Hav Stanstead ...Stnst*-ad ...John IM1. 

Fitzroy IlarborFit/.roy (!ai-lrton W. I). 1 i^ott. 

Flint Kaladar Adiiington...John I^insirg. 

Florence Kuphemia ...Lambton ....GK>. V. Kirby. 

Flos Flos Sim.-oe. N . K.John Crui^. 

Fonthill I elham Wrlland 1. S I rire. 

Fot-K>ter s t ullsUoss KentVi-\v Oliver Ko vster. 

Foivstville Ol.arldfville.Noriolk G. W. Griffin. 

Foifar Bastard I .fed-. S. R. .W. II. Young. 

Fort Coulonge.. Mansfield ...I on iac G^nrirn lirvson. 

Fo.-t Kti ......Bertie W,,|land Win. Karn dford. 

Fort \\illiam ..IC.-Ler I ontiac 11. McKetixie. 

Fox l .iver,Sub G.ts| J. D. St. (. mix. 

Franipton Frampton ...Donhester...John Hoss. 



NAME OF TOWNSHIP OB rnt ., TY NAME OP 

POST OFFICE. SEIGMORY. POilMAtltR. 

Frauklbtd Sidney Il-istiugs. S.. William licwen. 

Fr uktown ....Beckith ...L;tu<iik, S. K.E. Mi.-i.wen. 

Fraukville Kit ley LeedsiGreu. William Smith. 

FreilericksVrgFredericksb. Lenox ILIO. Oliphant. 

Freelton W.Flamlioro \VeijtrtortliW : ui. N. Douglas. 

Freiburg Waterloo, i\.Wa erloo, N.Ferd. KouiLack. 

FrelighMmrg . ..St. ArmaudsMi.-sisqUoi...Levi Kemp. 

French Villagelvitigsey l>i ummond .Fram-nis I othie:-. 

Frost Village.. .Shetlord Sheltord 11. S. Foster. 

Fullarton Fullarton ...Perth James Woodley. 

Fulton Caislor Lincoln S. 0. Greeuman. 

Gall- Uuml rits, N.WaU-r oo, S..J nn Davidson. 

Ginanoyue Leeds Leeds, S. 11. .U. F. lirittun. 

Garal raxa Gara raxa ... Wellington.. G. Skene. 

Garthby Garthby \\olfe L. T. LeBel. 

Gaspe Basiu ...Uaspe Guspe lohn Kden. 

Gentiily Gentilly Mcoltt Felix Hruuello. 

Gt.<rrg<t(fusn Escjuesing ...llalton John Sunipter. 

Georgeville ....Staustead ...Stanstead ...C. S. Cbauuel. 

Utor^ina Gt-or^ina ....York, M. R. .J.O. B. ll urchicr. 

Gilbt-rt s Mills Sopbiasburg Piince l.d ...Daniel Gilbeit. 

Giant ord G anford Wentworth .John Atkinson. 

Uleneig Gleuelg Grey Mark Appleby. 

tilwnloyd Inverness ...Megiuilic lames tj.t\ir.^>-on. 

GlenJyon Carrick Bruce J. tbaniioii. 

Glen Morris ...Dumfries ....Biant Hob- rt blieil. 

Glen William .Esquesing ...llulton Cliatles U iiliama. 

Uoble s Cor rs.. Blenheim ...Oxtbrd, N. Il.Wui. L. Goble. 

GI dr.rich Godeiicli Huion James WatM>n. 

Golden Creek. 15o.sanquet...Liuib ; on Allen Kennedy. 

Goodwood Uxbridge ....Ontario, N.R.Mich. Chapman. 

(iore s l^indingllauiiliou ...Northum.W. William Brown. 
Gormley s C rs.Markham ...York, E. R. ..lames Goimlejr. 

Gosfield Go.-field Essex Jos C oiitswoi ;b. 

Gnsport Adolphust u Lenox Nich. Bo^art. 

(j(juid Lin^wick ...Coni[itou James Ko>s. 

Gower Point. Westnieat^.Kenhew Gill*-rt Cannon. 

(irahauisville ..Cbinguac sy.l erl George Grabauu 

(Ji anby Granby SLelTyrd Horace Lyiuaii. 

Grande Baie ...Ba.;ot Chk outimi .Julieu Siilliaut, 

Grande Greve Gaspe Cuarles hsuouf. 

Grande Ligne St Johns ....las S. Guiiiii.ig. 

Graud Kiver Gaspe Henry Dalf.u. 

Givenbank ....Reach Ontario. N.H.L. VauAllen. 

Greenbush ....Elizabelht n T. ot Br< ckv.II. W. lilam-baid. 

Greeuock GrerDOCk ....Bruce J. B. llitchie. 

Green Point ...S"pliia.sliurg Prince Ed. ...Philip Roblin. 

Greensville Vi". Flam boro Weut worth .James .lojce. 

Greeuwi-.od ....Piekering ...Ontario, S.It. W. Mc-Cufloujth. 

Grenville Grenville ....Argenteuil ..Edwin Piidbaui. 

Grey (irey Huron Wm. Tamer. 

Gri-rsville St. Vincent .Givy Andrew Grier. 

Grimshy Grimsby Lincoln R. F. Xelks. 

Grondiues Gro.ndines ...Portneui lean Cote, 

Groveseud Malahide ...Elgin, E. It. .W. B. Lyon. 

Qutlpk Gueiph Wellington .Robert v ojlvit. 

liiiysboro Iloughton ...Noiti.lk S. K. Garnham. 

Ilaixeri-ville ...Onei la Haldimand .James G. HasKett. 

Haldimand ....Halaim-tnd .Northum. W.John T -a lor. 

Halifax llalit.ix Me^aiitic ...Andre Eexeau. 

Hill s Mills ...WestrninsterMidJIesex E.Chailes Hall. 

Ham Ham Wolfe Israel I 

Hamburg Fivderickhb .Lenox Richard Ham. 

J f-.t mi, till Barton C. of Haniilt.Kdmund J.iichie. 

Hampton Darlington ..Durham, W.H. hlliott. 

Hannon Giant ord Wentworth .Joseph Harmon. 

Hanover Bentinik ...Grey A. Z. Gottalls. 

Harlem Bastard Leeds. S. R. .A. ( h anbeilaiu. 

liarpurhny McKillop ...Hun^n M. MacDeruud. 

1 Lin iets\ ille. ..Dorchester... Mi JdU-Sr-x ...Jno. McMillan. 
Harrington. K.Harrington .Argt-ntenil... A. f ampbell 
IlHH-injiton, W.W. JV>na. Oxtoid, N.H.D. L. Uemoiest. 

Harrisliurg ...DnmlVies ...Ur-nt S i-tauton. 

Hairiston Minlo Wellington ..J. Ilaniscn. 

Harlf.ird Towns. jd ...N-rf >lk S. Dean. 

Harwich Harwich Kent John McK inlay. 

HiirwiiO l Hauiilton ...Northnm lames Barber. 

Hastings Asphodel IVterU>ro < ....Hi-nr\ Fowlds. 

Hatley Hati.-y Staustead ....W. G. Coi.k. 

llaw.i>flinry ...Hawkeslmn I rescott Charles licrsey. 

Ilawksville ...Wel!enley ...Wnti-rloo, N (.labri.-l Hawk. 

lliwks <jue ....Oro Siuicoe C. Y. i : eil, 

Hay Hay Ilumn lanu-sMunay. 

Ilaysville \\innot Waterloo. S. John HJINR. 

Headtord Markham ...York. E. R. .Mdwnrd T>lor. 

Headville Grauthaui ...Drummond .Henry Menut. 



[243] 



POST OFFICES IN CAXADA. 



[1857. 



K AMR Or TOWNSHIP OR rorvT T NAME OF 

POST OFFICE. SEIGNIORY. POSTMASTER. 

Heck s CornersSouth GowerGrenville, N.J. S. Archibald. 
Heidelburg ....Woolwich ...Waterloo, N.John Krassler. 
Ifemmingfbrd .Hemniingf dlluntingdonJohn Seriver. 

Henderson s C.limily Victoria II. Morton. 

Ilenryville Sabrevi is ...Il*rville E. S. Goodenbw. 

Herchnnu gC rKlIiuchinb ke flu HingdonM. S. McCoy. 

Hertford Hereford Compton Aaron Workman. 

Highland Cr k.Scarboro ....York.E.R.... 

Hilli-a- Ilillier Prinee Ed.... Philip Flagler. 

Hillsboro Plympton ...Lambton ....Thomas L. Hill. 

Hillshurg Erin Wellington .Win. Gooderham. 

Hilton Brighton ....Northum.,E.Syl. Kiihmoud. 

Holland Holland Grey Wm. Lyons. 

Ho land /.u7i (?.(Jwilluiii , E York. N. ]!. .W. .T. Sloane. 



Hollen T.Maryboro 

Holmesville ...Goderirh .. 

Holyrood Kinloss ... 

Hopctown Lanark , 



Wellington .S. Robertson. 

.Huron Wm. Holmes. 

.Bruce Wm. Mclvenzie. 

.Lanark, N.K.R. Cannan. 

Hornby Ksquesing ...llalton John Mi-Millen. 

Horniiip sMil pMelarn-thon .Grey .Tames Mc.Ghee. 

Houghton Houghton... Norfolk Jos. A. Ellis. 

Tlriwk-k S.Georgeto nChiiteaug ay .Thomas Gebbie. 

Hubbell s FullsFitzroy Carleton James Riddell. 

Hull Hull Ottawa G. J. Marston. 

HuINviile Walpole ILHdimand .John Hull. 

Humber Etobicoke ...York. W. R.. Robert Bowman. 

Humberstone .Hunibersto eWeIlnrt John Thompson. 

IIun*erstown .Huntersto n Maskinongc. William Parker. 
Huntingdon ...Godmanc ter Huntingdon John Holiinson. 

Huntingville ..Ascot Richmond ...C. Mullory. 

Iluntley Hunt ley Carleton John Graham. 

Huston Maryboro ...Wellington .Wm. Robinson. 

Intlian L Seneca IIaldimand....lohn Craigie. 

Industry loliette L. T. Groulx. 

Infffrs ill Oxford, N.. .. Oxford, S. R.Ch. E. Chadwidc. 

Jnkermann Mountain ....Dundas John Renwick. 

Jnnerkip E. Zorra Oxford, N.R.Robert Lindsay. 

Innislil Innisfil Simcoe, S. li. Benjamin Ross. 

Innisville .Drummond ..Lanark, S R.Michael Murphy. 

Inverhuron ...Bruce Bruce William Gunn. 

Inverness Inverness Megantic Robert Layfleld. 

lonft Dunwich Elgin, W. R.William Harris. 

Iron Hill Brome Brome Isaac Cutting. 

Inlay Fenelon Victoria D. Gilchrist. 

Isle aux Coudres Saguenay ... 

Isle aux Grues L Islet G. L. dit Jolicccur. 

Isle aux Noix Iberville James Phillips. 

Islo Perrot Isle Perrot...Vaudreuil ...Marie S. Jobin. 

,1*16 Verte Isle Verte ...Temiscouata.Louis Bertrand. 

Jarratt s Cor s.Oro Simcoe, N.R.Chas. Jarratt. 

Jarvis Walpolo Haldimand...C. W. Shannon. 

Jorsay, Riv.C Beauce 

Jerseyvilk Ancaster Wentw thSRII. F. Young. 

Johnson Sydenham ...Grey Wm. Johnstone. 

Johnson s Cor.HemmingPdriiintingdon.Oliver Lyttle. 

Johnson s MillsIIay Huron Moses Johnson. 

JohnviHe Eaton Compton Charles Smith. 

Jordan Louth Lincoln lacob Snure. 

Kanvmrasl a, ...KamonraskaKanio\ii"askaAlexis Gagne. 

Kftrs N. Gower ...Cnrlton James Lindsay. 

Katesville Adelaide Mid sex.W RW. McClatchey. 

Keenansvillo...Adjala Simcoe. S. R.P. D. Kelly. 

Kelvin Burford Brant. W. R.John Kelly. 

Xenj im llf. Oxford Oreiiville NRW. H. Bottom. 

Kennebec Line Dorchester. ..David Fortin. 

Kenyon Keryon Glen.eary Donald Cattannch 

Kertch Plympton ...Lambton. ...James Oxenham. 

Keswick N. Owillimb.York, X.R... David Sprague. 

Kettleby MillsKing York, N. K... Jacob Walton. 

loliette Jules Bourgeois. 

....Montcalm ...N. dit Desrochca. 
ofUike HuronR. Johnston. 
Kilmaruock.... Montague ...Lanark, S. R..las. Maitland. 

Kilsyth Derby Grey Alex Fleming. 

Kilworrti Delaware ...Middlesex ...John Brown. 

Kinburn Fit/.roy Carleton .lamos Mills. 

Kiwwnline Kincardine ..Bruce D. McKendrick. 

King King York, N. R...H..T. Davis. 

Kingsey Kingsey Drummond ...I. W. Wilson. 

Kingsey Falls. .Kingsey Drr.mniond ..Hayes Gilman. 

Kinijstnn Kingston ....City of K st n Robert Deacon. 

Kingston MillsKincston ....Frontenac ...W. II. Deane. 

Kingsville Gostield Kssex Alex McDonald. 

KfnUM Kinloss Bnice Thomas II<xlgins. 

Kinsalc Pickering Ontario, S R..Tohn Fairies. 

Kintail Ashfield Huron D. McKao. 



Kildare Kildare 

Kilkenny Kilkenny 

Killu-ney N. Shore 



NAME OF TOWNSHIP OB rfm XTT HAMK OF 

POST OFFICE. SE1GNIORT. POSTMASTER. 

Kippin Tuck ersmith Huron Robert Annan. 

Kirkton Usborne Huron lames Eaton. 

Kirkwall Beverley Went h. N R.M. Campbell. 

Klineburg Yauglian ....York, W. 11..H. S. Ilowland. 

Knowlton Brome Brome Albert Kimball. 

KnowltonFallsBrome Brome S. Richardson. 

Komoka Lobo M sex, W.R. 0. D. Mabec. 

La Baio La Bale Yamaska ...Joseph Rousseau 

La Beauce Ste. Marie ...Beauce George Louis. 

L Acadie L Acadie ...St. Johns ...L. Archambcault 

Lac/ane Montreal ...Jiicq. CartierJas. McJ .lbeaino. 

Lac/iute Argenteuil...Argenteuil...John Meikle. 

Lacolle Lacolle St. Johns ...T. Yan Yliet. 

Lafontaine Tiny Pimcoe, N.R.Toussaint Morean 

La Giicrre Godmanc t r.Iluntingdon.John McDonald. 

Lakelield Gore Argenteuil...G. I ogeis. 

Ijvkeside E. Missouri. ..Oxford, N.R.H. McKenzio. 

L. Temi. couata Temiscouata.George Call. 

L Amaroux ...York York lames Tnylor. 

Lambton Lambton ...Beauce Dr. L. Labrecque. 

Lanark Lanark Lanark, N.B.A. G. Hall. 

Lancaster Lancaster ...Glengary ...K. Mcl herson. 

Lauurai Lanoraie Berthier J. B. Galien. 

Lansdown Lunsdown ...Leeds, S.R... George McKelvey 

Lal etite Riv. .Frangois. 

La PigeonniereLaSa lle Napierville .Moise Roy. 

Laprairit Laprarie Laprairie ...John Charlton. 

Largie Dunwich ...Elgin, W. R.Neil McKachran. 

L Assomption ..St. Sulpicc...L Assompt n Jos. Guilbault. 

Latta s Mills ...Thurlow Ila8tings,SR.George Ross. 

Laval Laval Montm r iicy 

Laval trio Laval trie ...Berthier N. L. Dnplessis. 

L Avenir Durham Drummond .II. S. Grilling. 

Lawreneevillo..South Ely ...Shefford E. Lawrcnco. 

I>eaniington ...Mersea Essex Warren Kimbal). 

Leavens St.Yincent...Grey S. Cunningham. 

L?eds Leeds Megantic ...M. Jiggins. 

Lefroy Innisfil Simcoe, S. R.D. Davidson. 

Leith Sydenham. ..Grey William Wylie 

Lemonville ...Whitchurch .York, N R...J. Hill. 

Lenox Fred ksburg.Lenox P.J Forshce. 

Lennnxrille ...Ascot T.ofSh rb ke.I. P. Cushing. 

LesEboulemensEboulemens.Charlevoix... Charles DuBergor 

Les Ecureuils...d Auteuil ...Portneuf. P. Bedard. 

LesKscoumains Saguenay ...Felix Tetu. 

Leskard Clarke Durham lohn McNeil. 

Lifford Manvcrs Durham, E RGeorge E. Shaw. 

Linds iy Ops Victoria E. Culbert. 

Lippincott York York, W R... Thomas Larkin. 

Liwadel Ilowick Huron Arthur Mitchell. 

Lisbon N. E. Hope. ..Perth John /inkfuin. 

L Islet L Islet L Islet D. S. Eallantyne. 

Listowell Elma Perth W. H Hacking. 

Litchfield Litchfield ...Pontiac I. W. B. Ford. 

Little Britain .Maraposa ...Victoria Obadiah Rogers. 

Little Rideau .HawkesburyPrescott Thomas Ross. 

Lloydtown King York, N R...Anth Kastwood. 

Ijobo Lobo Mid sex, WKH. Macklin. 

I>ochaber Lochal>er ...Ottawa Richard Jones. 

Ix>chicl Lochiel Glengary ...Owen Quigley. 

Limilim I^nndon C. of London. L. La v. 

Long Isl. LocksNepean Carleton George Picker. 

Long Point T. of Montr l.Hochelaga...J. B. Morin. 

Lnngvi uil Longucuil ...Clmmbly ...P. Ix"sperance. 

I^onsdalo Tycndinaga .Hastings, SKR. Wildnmn. 

Lorette Lorette Quebec D. Le Francois. 

L Oriflnal Alfred Prescott C. Johnson. 

Lorraine Mono Simcoe, K It ..las. Morrison. 

Loskey Ki"S York. N R... James Bowman. 

Lotbiniere Lotbiniere ...Ix>tbiniero ...Joseph Filteau. 

I^oughboro ...Loughl>oro .Frontenac ...Hugh Madden. 

Louisville Chatham ...Kent Calvin Stephens, 

Low Low Ottawa Caleb Brooks. 

Lower IrelandTreland Megantic ... 

Lowville Nelson llalton John McLaren. 

Lvn Eliz bthtownT.of Brockv.N. Baxter. 

Lynden Beverley Went th NR-John Howard. 

Lyndhurst Ijvnsdowne .Leeds, N R... William P. Lee. 

Lyndoch CharlottVlleNorfolk George Grey. 

Lyons S.DorchesterElgin, E R...W. Si-cord. 

M Don. s Cor s.Dalhousie ...I>anark, N RHugh McLean. 

McGUIivrpy ...McGillivray .Huron D. ShofF. 

Macville Albion Peel Robert H. Booth. 

Madoc Madoc Hastings NRA. F. Wood. 

Mad Riv. MillsOsprey Grey Andrew Yuill. 

Magdalen Is Gaspe J. J. Fox. 



[244] 



1857.] 



POST OFFICES IN CANADA. 



53 



NAME OP TOWNSHIP OR PorNTT NAME OF 

POST OFFICE. SEIGNIORT. POSTMASTER. 

Magog ^lagog Stanstcad ...Calvin Abbott. 

Maidstone Maidstone ...Essex I. L. McGee. 

Maitland Augusta Grenville SRGeo. C. Longley. 

Malakofif Marlboro ...Carlton W. J Tierce. 

Mallorytown.-.Yonge Leeds, S R... Charles Kenyon. 

Malta Bruce Bruce W. Cbisholm. 

Manchester ...Reach Ontario, N R William Powson. 

Manitowauing.... On Lake Huron George Ironside. 

Manningvillo Huntingdon. Fisher Ames. 

Manvers Manvers Durham, EKIIenry Stapes. 

Maple Vaughan ...York kniph Noble. 

Maple Grove. ..Ireland Megantic ...Thomas Barwis. 

Mapleton Yarmouth. ..Elgin B. Wilson. 

Mara Mara Ontario, NR. William Ritchie. 

Marbleton Dudswcll ...Wolfe I. B. Bishop. 

March March Carleton Thomas Head. 

Mariposa Mariposa ...Victoria Mary Douglas. 

M WlMin Markham ...York, E U...Ai^ji. Barker. 

Marlow Beauce las. Armstrong. 

Marmora Marmora ...HftrthtgB.NIU). Q. Bowen 

Marshvillo Wain fleet ...Welland Edward Lee. 

Martintown ...Char l t nb g Glengary ...R. Blackwood. 

Martinville Clifton Compton ...A. Martin. 

Marysvilla Tyendinaga .Hastings, SRD. M. Uafoe. 

Mascoucha Ma.scouche...L Assompt n Phillip Mount. 

Maskinongo ...Maskinonge.Maskinonge.A. T. Lafreiiii-re. 
Massawippi ...West UatleyStanstead ...Luther Abbott. 

Matane Matane Rimouski ...L. N. Blais. 

Matilda Matilda Dundas George Brouse. 

Mayticld Ching cousy .Peel William Spiers. 

Mayne Wallace Perth James Bolton. 

Medunte Medonte Sinicoe, N R.Edmund Moon. 

Melancthon ...Melanc-thon .Grey lames Brown. 

Melbourne Melbourne. ..Richmond ...Thomas Tait. 

Melrose Tyrtidinag*. .Hastings, SRGeorge Duncan. 

Melville ffillier Prince Edw..lohn Wilson. 

UerriiAviUf. ...Wolfbrd GrenvilleNRE. II. Whitmarsh. 

Merrittsville ...Crowland ...Welland Thomas Burgar. 

Mersea Mersea Essex I. Wigfield. 

Merton Nelson Halton Henry Harrison. 

Metis Aletis Rimouski ...W. K." Page. 

Meyersbnrg ...Seymour ...Norfhumbl dCharles Lavis. 

Middleville ...Lanark Lanark, N R.Iames Guthrie. 

Milford Marysburgh.Prince Edw.Thomas Cook. 

Millbank Mornington .Perth W. Rutherford. 

Mill Brook Cavan Durham, E RMrs. M Knowlson 

Mille Vaches faguenay ....lohn Peverley. 

Mill Grove W. Hambro Went th, NRA. B. Palmer. 

Mill Haven ...Ernestown .Addington... Jeremiah Amey. 

Mill Point Richmond ...Lenox James Bowen. 

Milnesville Markham ...York, E R... Peter Milne. 

Milton, East ...Milton Shefford Charles Gillespie. 

if.lbin,. ttktf ...Trafalgar ...Halton William D. Lyon. 

M tclirll Logan Perth John Hicks. 

Mohawk Brantford WBrant. WR... William L. Jones. 

Moira Huntingdon. Hastings, NRHenry Ostrom. 

Holesworth ...Grey Huron John Mitchell. 

Mono Centre. ..Mono Simcoe, SR... 

Mono Mills ...Mono Simcoe, SR... John McLaughlin 

Montcalm Rawdon Montcalm ...J. B LeBlanc. 

Monte-Bello ...Pet. Nation .Ottawa Chas. Major, jun. 

M lutrml Montreal ...C. of Montr IDr. J. B. Meilleur 

Montrose Stamford ...Welland A.Thompson. 

Mt. St. HilaireSt. Hilaire.,.Rouville H. W. Hitchcock. 

Moore Moore Lambton ... W.McPhrson. 

Morgantown...Erin WYngt n SRWm M. Crews m. 

Morningdale... Mornington .Perth I. Nicklin. 

Morpeth Howard Kent D. Warren. 

Morrisfiank ...Morris Huron C. B. Hamilton. 

Morrisbur^ ...Matilda Dundas fames Holjen. 

Morri^d ale Grey Huron Donald Scott. 

Morriston Pulinch ...Wellington .11. B. Morrison. 

Morton S Crosby ...Leeds, S. U. .George Morton. 

Murvcn Erne- town... Addington .J. P. Lake. 

M is.-ow Camden E ...Addington . L. Yanluven. 

Moulin-tte ...Cornwall ...Glenrary ...S. II. Moss. 

Mountain Mountain ...Dundas Tames Cleland. 

Mnuiit Albion .Burton Wentworth .W. Cook. 

Mount Hrvd^esOarni loc ...Middlesex ...K. Mihfll, .Tun. 
Mount l- .l.-in...Dcrpham ...Oxford, S. R J. S. Woodward. 

Mount Forest .Arthur Welliniton .K. McDonald. 

Mount .TobnjmnMonnir Rouville lohn McQuillen, 

MnuntPVttknantCavan Durham S. G, Re-t. 

M t St Patrick Brougham. ..Reu Vow Thomas Brady. 

Mount Vernonllr.intf rd W. Brant, W. R. i houvis IVrrin. 
Mulrnur Mulmur Simcoe, S. R.John Little. 



NAME OP TOWNSHIP OR couvrT NAME OP 

POST OFFICE. SEIGNIORY. POSTMASTER. 

Mun -el WoltbrJ Grenvilla ...James Br\ ant. 

Murray Murray North iimberlKeoben Young. 

Murray Bay ...M ntmurray.Charlevoix...Cleophe Cimon. 

Murvale Portland Frontenac ...Michael Davy. 

Xanticoko Walpole Ilaldimand .Samuel HaskeL 

Nap-mee Kichmond ...Lennux Alex. Campbell. 

Napier Metcalfe Middlesex ...John Munroc. 

NapierviUe ...De Lery .Napierville .Loop Odell. 

Nassagaweya .Nassag-aweyallalton Thos.Easterbrook. 

Nelson Nelson Halton A. G. MacCay. 

New Aberdeen. Waterloo, S. .Waterloo ...George Davidson. 

Newark Norwich Oxford, S. R.Atig. Gary. 

Newboro 1 N. Crosby ...Leeds, S. R. .J. B. Stevens. 

Neivhurg Ciimden EastAddington ...A. F. G. Hooper. 

Newbury Mosa Middlesex ...Rob. Thompson. 

New Carlisle... Cox BonaventureMatt. Caldwell. 

Newcastle. Clarke Durham Hiram Hodges. 

New Dundee ...Wilmot Waterloo ...F G. Miller. 

New Durham. ..Burford Brant, W. R.K. F. Schooley. 

NewGlasgow.-.Lacorne Terrebonne .William Furse. 

New Hamburg. Waterloo ...Waterloo ...William Scott, 

New Hope Waterloo ...Waterloo ...Conrad Nahrgang 

New Ireland ...Ireland Megantic ...R. C. Porter. 

Newland E. Gwillimb. York, N.R.... Robert Hunter. 

New LiverpooLLauxon Levi lohn McKenzie. 

A ewmarAet ...Whitchurch .York, N. R. .William Roe. 

Newport Brantford ...Brant, W. R.Thaddeus Smith. 

New KichmondN.RichmondBonnventure Richard Brash. 
New Sarum ...Yarmouth ...Elgin, E. R. -lob Gibson. 
N. Robinson ...Tecumseth... Simcoe, S. R.Wm. Chantler. 

^fuiynra Niagara T. of Niagara Rob. Connor. 

Nicottt Nicolet Xicolet II. A. Chillr.s. 

Kilestown Dorchester. ..Middlesex ...Joshua Putnam. 

Nissouri Nissouri, \V..Middlesex ...N. P. Allen. 

Nithburg N. Easthope .Perth lames Brown. 

Nobleton King York, N Thomas Noble. 

Norman by Norman by ...Grey Thomas Cadwell. 

Normondale ...Charlottev leNorfolk J. W. Sbeppard. 

Normanton ...Saugeen Bruce lohn J. Lchnan. 

North Adjala.-.Adjala Simcoe, S. R.Wm. Donehey. 

North Arthur .Arthur Wellington. 

North AugustaAugusta Grenville ...S. .T. Bellamy. 

North Douro...Douro 1 eterboro ...Robert Casemenl 

North Eldon...Eldon Victoria Wm. MacCreadic 

North Ely Ely Shefford G. Bartlett. 

N. Georgetown Beauharnois.Chateuguay .Basile Yannier. 
North GlanfordGlandford ...Wentworth .Jacob Terrybcrrj 

North Gower .N. Gower ...Carleton Horatio Holden. 

N th LancasterLancaster ...Glengary ...Charles Locltu r. 

North Pelham.l elham Welland Adam McGlasha 

North Port ...Sophiasburg.P. Edward. ..Samuel Solmcs. 
N. Stanbridge .Stanbridge...Missist)oi ...William Clarke. 

N. Stukeley -Stukeley ...Shefford M. A. Bessette.} 

North Sutton.-.Sutton Broine II. P. Sweet. 

N. WalsinghamWalsingham Norfolk lohn Newlove. 

N. Williamsb gWilliamsb rgDundas Walter Bell. 

Norton Creek .Beauhaniois.ChatoauguayThos. Cantwcll. 

Noival Esquesing ...Halton William Clay. 

NurwicJi Norwich Oxford, S. R.. Gilbert Moore. 

Norwood Asphodel ...Peterboro .... amesFoley. 

Nottawa (sub.)NottawasagaSimcoe, N. K. William Uowlai 
Xottawasiiga...Nottawasaga Simcoe, N.R. Francis llewaon 
Do. Station. .Nottawasaga Simcoe, N.R. D. Baine. 

Notredamedu P Temiscouata B. Michaud. 

Oakland Oakland Brant, W. K.John Toyne. 

Oak Ridges ...Whitchurch .York, N. R. .\. McKechanie. 

Oiii-.rille Trafalgar ...Halton R. Balmer. 

Oakwood Mariposa Victoria A. A. McLauchl 

Oban Plympton ...Lambton ...P. McGregor. 

Odessa Ernesto\vn...Addington...P. S. Timerman 

Omagh Trafalgar ...Halton W. C. Beaty. 

Oneida Oneida Ilaldimand. ..). T. Mutchmor 

Onondaga Tuscarora ...Brant, \V.R..W. S. Buck wo U 

Onslow Onslow Pontiac Walton Smith. 

Ontario Salttlcct Wentworth ..I. W. \Villson. 

Ornnrifville ...Garafraxa ...Wellington ..Orange Lawrcnc 

Orchill Morris Huron J. B. Taylor. 

Orilh a Orillia Simcoe, N. R.K. G. Sloe. 

Ormstown Beauharnois .Chateaugnay William Cross. 

Oro Oro Simcoe, N.R.Donald Grant. 

Orono Clarke Durham Joseph L Tuck 

Orwell Yarmouth ...Elgin D. Sutherland. 

Osgoode 0>no<xle Cark-ton Adam J. Baker 

0*>inwa Whitby Ontario, S. R.Gavin Burns. 

Osprey Osprey Grey Tames Gibson. 

O-pringe Kriii Wellington .Francis Clark. 



[245] 



POST OFFICES IN CANADA. 



[1857. 



NAME OF TOWNSHIP OR NAME OF 

POST OFFICE. SKIGNIORT. POSTMASTER. 

O jtHHhee Otanabee ...Petcrboro ...Thomas Short. 

O tuiva, dtly ...Gloucester ...City of uttawaG. \V. Baker. 
Ottawa Q.W ksVaudrsuil ...Yaudreuil ....lohn Hodgson. 

Otterville Norwich Oxford, S. ILJohn II. Cornell. 

Ouijeau Sheen Pontiac John Andrews. 

Oungali Chatham ...Kent Stephen Kiuny. 

OtUf.ii. &inn<l .Sydenham ...Grey George Browu. 

Oxford Centre .Oxford Oxford. S. K. .1. F Chapman. 

Oxford Mills ...Oxford Greuville ...Richey Waugh. 

Oznabruck C. .0/nabruck ...Stormont ...Jacob I oaps. 

Paisley Elderslie ...Bruce Thomas Orchard. 

P:ii-i:nltain Pakenham ...Lanark, N.K. William Dickson. 

Pal rnin Trafalgar ...Halton 11. M. Swif/.er. 

Papineauville .Petite Nation Htawa Stephen Tucker. 

p,trix Dumfries, S. Brant. K. 11 ..GeorgeMacartney. 

Pasbebiac Bonaventnre Daniel Bisson. 

Pefterlaw Georgina ...York, N. li. ..I. Johnson. 

Pelham Union. I olham Welland J. C. Buckbce. 

]\tn,iiroi>f, IVmbroke ...Renfrew Alex. Moffat. 

PntetanguitlienrTiny Simcoe, N.R.D. J. Mitchell. 

Pen villa Tecumseth...Simcoe, S. K.llenry Stone. 

Perce 1 erce Gaspe J. K. Tuzo. 

Percy Percy Northumberl.Dr. B Demorcst. 

Perrytown Hope Durham A. Choate. 

P,:rt!i Drummond .Lanark, S.U..J. P. Grant. 

Pet rlmrif N.Monaghan Peterboro ...S. J. Carver. 

Petersburg Wilmot Waterloo ...John Ernst. 

Phili i^ un-ii. A .St. Armand .Missisquoi ...D. T. I!. Nye. 

Philipsburg, IV. Wilmot Waterloo ...G. C. Doering. 

Philipsville ...Bastard Leeds, S. K. .Sidney A Taplin. 

Piekrring Pickering ...Ontario. S. ...P. F. Whitney. 

1 ictim Marysburg.-.P. Kd ward. ..David Barker. 

Pi;)iTcvilln Pierreville....Yamaska ...Henry Vassal. 

Pigeon Hill ...St. Arnaud .Missisijuoi ...S. W.Stono. 
Pikr, llir- r ...Stftnbridge...Mi8siquoi...A. L. Taylor. 
1 ino Orchard .Wliitchurcli.Yoi-k, N. II. ..Moses Wilson. 

Pine Kiver Huron Bruce r. W. Gamble. 

I ittsferry Pittsburg ...Frontenac ...Daniel Root. 

Plant ig.-net ...Plantagenet.Prescott Peter McMartin. 

I lattsville Blenheim ...Oxford, N.R.Samuel Platt. 

Point Abino ...Bertie Wellaml lialph Disher. 

Vt. Alexander .Ksher Pontiac Bcnj. McConnell. 

Pte. aux CheneGrenville ...Argentcnil...Arch. Cameron. 
Pt.auxAngliiis Two .M tains.Two M tains.B. Charlebois. 
Pte. aux Trem Isl of Montr. Hochelaga ...P. Dubreuil. 

PCS. aux Trem. P. aux Trem. Portneuf Franco. X. Larue. 

Pte Claire Montreal. ...Jacn.Cartier.P. C. Valois. 

Pte. du Lac ...Pte du Lac. ..St. Maurice .Leon Decoteau. 

Pt. Fortune ...Rigaud Yaudreuil ...A. St. Denis. 

Pt. Levi Lauzon Levi Robert Buchanan 

Pt. Levi. East .Lnuzon I.evi H. Montminy. 

Pt. Platon St Croix Lotbiniero ...Stanislas Ilarael. 

PC. St. Peter ...Malbuie Gaspe Geo. Packwood. 

Pontiac Mills. ..Onslow Pontiac D. Rattray. 

Ptagedu FortLitchfield ...Pontiac D. F. McLaren. 

Pt. Albert Ashfield Huron 

Port an Persil .Mt. Murray .Charlcvoix....Tohn McLaren. 

Pt. Bruce Malahida ...Klgin, E.H...C liarles Fruser. 

Pt. Burwell ...Bayham Klgin, K.K... Thomas Pilchur. 

J l. C Jhm-ne ...Humb stone .Welland T. Manly. 

Pr. Credit Ktobicoko ...York. W.K... James Cotton. 

J t. Hd/tmisie .Grantliam ...Lincoln J. II. Martindalc. 

P . Daniel Pt. Daniel ...Bonaventnrc P. Swoetman. 

Pt. Duvf.r Woodhouse .Norfolk Walker Powell. 

Pt. Klmsley ...N. Klmslcy ...Lanark, S.R.feobert Garry. 

P . Ho<^ver Ortrtwright .Durham. WRThomas Hoover. 

J /!. Ittpf. Hope Durliiirn. Kil. David Smart. 

Portland Bastard Lt-d-i, SJI...S. S. Scovil. 

P... Maitland...Sherbrooke .Haldimand .William Benson. 
1 . Milford ...Marysbiirgh.Prince Edw.. Henry Yandusen. 

Pt. Nelson Nelson Halton Hugh Cotter. 

P.irtn"uf Portncuf Portii"iif Sini -on Lame. 

Y . Perry Keach Ontario. \. H.Joseph Kigelnw. 

J L. yi n i.w)i...Thorold Welland Andrew Murray. 

J /. Ifntcnn WaNinghaniNorfolk And. McLenuun. 

I t. P.oyal WalsinjrlKimNorfolk K. Hingham. 

} . Pvri-- Woinlh .use .Norfolk AY. H. HyiT-e. 

) . Stl Francis. Nicolist Nico!r>t 1. C Simmons. 

I . Sarni t Sarnia I.ambton ...Da\id MrCall. 

] ( rtsmoutli ...Kingston ...Frontenac ...(ieor.-e MrLeod. 

J f.fittinlri/ Yarmouth ...l-.l-in, ! . 1!...J. llenile]>.in. 

J t TalJjot Dunwlch ...Klgin. W.I{...Iohn Clark, 

} :. -:-. i t Augusta Grenvill .SKAlpheus .!<>< 

] ;. i in Waterloo. S..Wloo, S.P....Ianil> Hespi ler. 

> rir>?ville Artemisia ...Grey AV. Ferguson. 

J rinottt-.m Blenheim ...Oxford, N.H.Alex. Milmine. 



NAME OP TOWNSHIP OH rm ... T _ K \MEOF 

POST OFFICE. SEIGNIORY. POSTMASTER. 

Prospect Beckwith ...Lanark, S. ll.Wm. \\ illiani-.. 

Proton Proton Grey Geo. Armstiong. 

Puidluoh Pu..linch Wel gton, SRWiliiam Leslie. 

Quelj>c Quebec Quebec city .John .-exvell. 

Queeusboro ...tlzevir Hastings, NHSimon McKenzie. 

Queenston Niagaia Wellaiul Jasoph W\nn. 

Queeusvillo ...K.Gwilliamh.York. N.K... .lames Ayiward. 

Raglan Whitby Ontario, S.H.Philip Kunoiid. 

Itailton Loughboro .Frontenac ...John WaWi. 

liainham liainham ...Haldimaud .Charles Williams. 

Kainham Cent.Kainham ...Haldimaud .William Jone>. 

Jt.imfiii/ Hiiiusay Lanark, N.K.James \\ yiii..juu. 

Hap. desJoach Aberdeen ...Pontiac 1 iberius Colton. 

Katho Blandford ...Oxford, N.ll.W. S. J-Jliott. 

Havenswood ...Bosanquet ...Lambton ...John Hawiing.s. 

Hawdon Hawdon Montcalm ...Luke La.y. 

Keach Keach Ontario, N.H.Abner llurd. 

Heading .Jjaralraxa ...Wel ton, NH.James Donaldson 

Hednersville .ffAmeliasb gh.J rince Jidw. James Keilner. 

Rcn/ma llorton Henfrew (ieorge Kos<. 

Kepentigny ...L Assompt n.L Assomp t nBenjamin Morean 

1 viceville Plantageuet.Prescott Peter .McLaiiicn. 

Richmond, Ea.Shipton Richmond ...G. K. Foster. 

Richmond, We.Goulburn ...Carloti^u Mrs. W U.U.Lyon 

ItinliMimuL 7/iHYaughan ...York, W.K... Matthew Teefy. 

Hichview Toronto Gore Peel John Davis. 

Hichwood Blenheim ...Oxford, Is. H.John I ine. 

Ridgetown Howard Kent T. Hushton. 

Jii(/aud lligaud A audrenil ...A. \V. C. har Ic-bois. 

Bimoiaki lUuiou-ski ...Himouski ...V. (.l.iuvreau. 

Kiver David Yumaska ...Benj. 1 hci-ion. 

Hiver Desert Ottawa J. G. Williams. 

KiverSt. Louis. St. Louis ...Beauharnois.P. St. Denis. 

Kiversdale Greenock ...Bruce George Iromcr. 

Kiv auxCanards Charfcivoix...J. Kadford. 

Kiv.desl rairiesMontreal ...Hochelaga ... 

A. Loup. e,nbtisH\\. du LoupTemiscouta .Chas, II Gar.Jry. 

en haut.Hiv. du Loup.Maskinonge .Louis Baribeaii. 
Riv. Ouelle ...Kiv.Ouelle...Ka!ii aslca ...Cli. H. Tetn. sun. 
R. Tr. Pistoles.Trois Pistole.sTeniisconata.Na/.aire Tetu. 

Hohinson Uury Compton ...Lemuel Pope. 

Koblin Richmond ...Lenox E. A. Spencer. 

Rochester Rochester ...Essex M. Ouellette. 

Rockford Townsend ...Norfolk J. Fessender. 

Kockton Beverley Wen th, N R.\V. W. liarlow. 

Rockwood Eramosa WTgt n, SH.Kobert Passmoro. 

Rolph Middleton ...Norfolk E. D. Buchui r. 

Komney P.omney Kent Thomas Jienv.ick. 

Rond eau Harwich... Kent 

Rosebank Brantford ...Brant, K.H...John.Tlioii] 

Rosetta Lanark Laiuu k, N K.Jolin I)ods. 

Roscville Dumfries, N.Wat loo, S.R.J. R. Detwiler. 

Roslin Thurlow Hastings,SR.George Mowatt. 

Rosa Iloss Renfrew lames Mcljiren. 

Hothsay Maryboro ...Wellington .William West. 

Rouge Hill Pickering ...Ontario, S R.Einanuel Playtor. 

Uougemont ...St. Cesaire ...Kouville D. Batchelder. 

Rowan Mills. ..WalsinghamNorfolk H. Delilaquiere. 

Hoxborough ...Hoxborough.Stormont ...D. MeCallv.m. 

Roxton Falls. ..Koxton Sliefford Benj. l-av;u< . 

Russell Russell Russell Richard IKlmer. 

Husselltown ChateaugiiaylAiren/o ll(.uli>. 

Ryckman s Co.Glanford Wenfth, SK.G. M. liycknmn. 

Ste. Adele AhercrombieTerrebonne .J. B. Yillemnre. 

St. Agatha ...Wilmot W loo, S. R... Anthony Kaiser. 

St. Aime Richelieu ...P. Gelinas. 

St. Alexandra Kam aska ...Edmund Leveque. 

St. Alexandro Ilwrvillo P. II. Dnlcide. 

St. Alexis St. Sulpice... Montcalm ...J. I). Racette. 

St.Alphonse Joliette Luke Corcoran. 

St. Andre St. Andre ... Knm aska ...P. C. Manjuis. 

St. And. AvelinPet. Nation .Ottawa A. T. Gibeau. 

St. Anilri-ws. KArgenteuil...Argenteuil... Thomas Meiklo. 
St Andrews. WCornwall ...T.of C" wall... Allan Grant. 

St. Angelique .Pet. Nation .Ottawa J, B. N. Papiii -nu 

St. Anicet Godmanches. Huntingdon. V. S. Bonrireault. 

Sle Anne, B PI. Montreal ...Jacq. (. artier.Ed. Mc.Nau^hton. 
Ste Anne. d l PSte. Anne ...Champlain...T. Methot. 

Ste Anne d. M Gaspe J. Pen. . 

Ste Anne d. Pl.Ste. Anne ...Tcrrchonne .Hector Gnu 
Ste. Anne la P.Ste. Anne ...Knm aska ...Joseph Dionno. 

St Anns, LJnco.Gainsi-oro" ... Lincoln Jacob l j>j,, i-. 

St Anselme ...St. An- -iiue .I)oreh,-ster...F. F. Bulcan. 
St Antoine. Lot.St. Antoine .Lotbinieiv ... Kdnnnid l.arno. 

St Ant. It. Rich Yercheres ...> ; :ii : r. 

SI Armand, C e.St. Arin. iiul .Mi-sisqnoi ...Mrs. J. Potter. 



[246] 



18 V7.] 



POST OFFICES IN CANADA. 



NAME OF TOWX8IUP OS. r ,, rv - r NAME OP 

POST OFFICE. SEWNIOUY. POSTMASTER. 

- f . Ar.-eue Cacouna Temiiconata.Elzear Pelletier. 

St. Aihanase...Ste AthanasL.>iberville V. Vincelettc. 

t Au-.ru -tiuPn 1 ortneuf 0. East. 

St. Angus, -MI Two M teins.J. N. Mignault. 

St. Bar., St. M.rit. Barnabe .St. Maurice .L. Bellemare. 
,St.Bar.,ll.Ya.m.St. Barnabe .St.HyaciiitheE. Mathieu. 

StBart,sub-offi.StBarthermiBerthier J. Fauteux. 

St. Bazile, do. ..St. Bazile ... I ormeuf 

St. Benoit Two M tains. iVo M tains.A. L. Brion. 

St. Bernard ...St. Bernard .Dorchester ...Pierre plant. 

Ste. Brigida ...Monoir Ibervillcs William Murray. 

St. Bruno Moutarville .Chambly ...A. P. Pare. 

St.Casiiuir St. Casimir...Portneuf Nar. Parre. 

St Oath s, East.Fossambault.l ortneuf. Joseph Maloney. 

.St Gith s.We.st.Grantham ...Lincoln J. P. Merritt. 

St. Cele-itin Nicolet C. E. Iloude. 

St. Ccsaire Uouville C. Dorval. 

StChas.il Kich.St. Charles. ..St.HyacintUeJ E. LeBlanc. 
StChas.KBoy.Bellechas.se .Bellechasse .J Montniiny. 
St. Cristopho .Arthabaska .Arthabaska .A. Stein. 

Ste. Claire Ste. Claire ...Dorchester ...L. V. Royer. 

St. Clements ...Wellesley ...Wloo, N.B...John Stroh. 

St. Clet Vaudreuil ...Vaudreuil ... J. II. Thisdale. 

St. Columbin Two M tains.M. J. Phelan. 

St. Constant ...Laprarie Laprarie Norliert. 

Ste. Croix Ste. Croix ...Lotbiuicre ...Moise Couture. 

St. Cuthbert Bertliior 3. Chenevert. 

.Ste.Cyrillo L Islet J. 1). Cloutier. 

St. Damast ...St. Damase...St.HyacintheF. Brin. 

St. David s Niagara Lincoln C. Fisher. 

St. Denis, Rich.St. Denis St.llyacintheF. X. Laforce. 

. t. D_ nis, Bou Kani aska ...J. I). Lavoie. 

St. Didace Lanaudicrc ..Maskinonge .C. k\ Turgeon. 

St. Dominique Bagot Francois l)upont. 

St. EdoaarJ Napierville...J. Blain. 

Ste. Elizabeth Joliette P.Hud.d-BeauHcu 

St. i;h)i Temi.scouta .B. Langlois. 

St. Kl/.ear Beauce Joseph Keny. 

St. INorit, Montcalm ...B. Yezina. 

St. Etienne ...St. Maurice .St. Maurice .0. Desilets. 

St. J-lu-iaclie Two M tains.David Mitchell. 

;<t, 1 tbien Kimonski ...V.Roy d-Lauzon. 

Ste. Famille ...I. of Orleans.Montmorenc.J. Letourneau. 

St Fel.de Valois Joliette Max. Crepeau. 

St Fercol,sub-o Montmoreuc 

Ste. Flavie Hiniouski ...J. B. Lamontagne 

St. Foy Quebec Quebec Joseph Hoy. 

St. Francis Yamaska ...0. II. Coutiu. 

St. Krancoi3,.M Montmagny .J. B. IjaBglois. 

St. Francois, B.Beauco Beauce F. X. Ponsant. 

St, Franc., d O.I. of Orleans. Moutmorenc.C.Dagn.d-Laprisc. 

St Gabriel, d B.Brando. i Berthier 0. Chahit. 

Ste Genevieve .Montreal ...Jacq. CartierJ. M. Pacjuin, 

St. Georc.-c.Bca.St. George ...Beauee Win. Webb. 

,V Qtorgt, Bra.VHmfrioa, S..Brant, E.R... George Stanton. 
Bt.Geo^e, llas.TItmtingdon.Hasfgs, N.R.John Francis. 

Bertrule .Ste. GertrudeNicolet Leon Chanipoui-. 

l- t. Gervais St. G"rvais...BcllechasHe ..Io.-> [rlj Jolivet. 

OUes.. St. Giles lx)tbiniero ...George C ote. 

Si. (ire-joii-e ...St. Gregoire .Nic->li-t >iai;islas Doucet. 

Ste. 1Ileiie Kani aska ...N. 1 eltier. 

St. Ilel. Bagot P>agot Ulrie Vaillant. 

St. Helens Wawanosh... Huron John Mackay. 

St. Ik-nedine Dorchester ...Marcel Fortier. 

St. Il mri Lauzon Levi K. II. Marceau. 

;-!. H-]-:n-.i Two M taius.T). Marsil. 

St. Hilaire St. Hilaire ...Rouville Thomas Valiquet. 

St. Ilu -ines Bagot Charl-s Blain. 

St*. /// c-iVii/ic.St.IIyacintheSt.HyacintheE.L.i;. C. Despres. 

St. Trenno Ckarlevoix... Joseph Gossclin. 

Pt T-i 1 iiv, Dor Dorehester ...B. Morin. 

St Isi.Lai>rark- Laprarie F. L. Langovin. 

St. Jacobs W r oolwich ...Wloo, N.R... Joseph Eby. 

St.Ja -(| i.>s St. Sulpice ...L Assompt n.J. E. Ecrement. 

>t. Jac.nvs,Mi Laprarie Joseph 0. Poirer. 

St. Janvier OcBlaiuvill .T -i ivh..nne .Dr. John Fisher. 

St. Je. IJaptistellouvillo Ttouville L. I). Goureau. 

81 .! ChrySO.Oh Chateauguav.T. A. Leriche. 

L I/-. Lauzon Lcvi J. G mmx. 

St J des Chaill Lotbiniere ...P. (\ Le, Yasseur. 

, .. .f. iV h-I ^HisT. of Orleans. Montmoreno V. X. Tur> 
.(. I ort Joli.St. J. 1 t. Jolil/Islet F. Fournicr. 

p.,-. j..,- im Terrebonno .L. G. Loranger. 

fif. J l inn, 7vrt St. Johns ...W. A. Osnood. 

St. .To .iin, Wc.-iM e.lhann Wellanl John Wilkorson. 

t. Joseph St. Joseph ...Beanco Jos. 0. C. Arcand 



NAME OF TOWNSHIP OK CO n\TT NAME OP 

POST OFFICE. SEIGNIORT. POSTMASTKB. 

St Joseph duL.Two M tains.Two M tains. John McCaul. 

Ste. Jude St.UyacintheN. Gauthier. 

Ste. Julie Belosil Vercheres ...E. Cliagnon. 

Ste. Julienne ....*. Montcalm ...T. J errault. 

St. Lambert ...Lauzon Levi M. Lrochu. 

StLaurent d Orl. of Orleans. Moiitmorenc Joseph Chabot. 
St. Laurent, M. Montreal ...Hochelaga ...D. McDonald, Jan. 

St. La/are Bellechasse .M. L Horty. 

St. I/con Dumontier...Maskinongc .D. Lassis^ernj.v 

St. Ligoui-i Montcalm ...C. F. P. Kenaud. 

St. Lin L Assompt n.Thomas GarauU. 

St. Louis de Gr Beauharnois . Jno. Symonds. jr. 

St. Luc Lougueuil ...St. Johns ... Samuel Hamilton. 

Ste. Luce Lessard Eimoiiski ...A. E. Gauvre.iu. 

St. Marc St. Marc Vercheres ...John Fra/er. 

St. Marcel Richelieu ...G. Ouellct. 

St(i Marguerite Dorchester. ..Louis Koy. 

St? Mario de MMonoir Rouville F. II. Gatien. 

Ste. Marthe ...Rigaud Vaudreuil ...E. Lalonde. 

St. Martin Isie Jesus ...Laval Chas. Sj 

Ste. Martine ...Beauharnois.ChateauguayM. A. Primean. 

St Mary s .Bfan.Blanshard ...Perth Thomas Christie. 

St. Mathias ...E. Cliambly..Rouville Paul Bertrand. 

St. Maurice Chuamplain...T. II. Pacaud. 

St: Michel St. Michel ...Bellechasse .E. S. Belleau. 

St. Modiste ...Wentworth .Temiscouata.N. Meville. 

St. Monique ...Nicolet Nicolet P. ?\ourie. 

St. Narcisse ...Champlain...Champlain...D. Hanielin. 

St. Nicholas Levi Morris Scott. 

St. Norbert ...Berthier Berthier E. Granilpre. 

St. Ours St. Ours Richelieu ...L. Chapdelaino. 

St. Pacome Kam aska ...Alex. Hudon. 

St. Paschal Kam aska ...Kam aska ...A. Blondean. 

St. Paul d Ind Joliette J. W. Renaud. 

St. -Paul s Bay.St.PauVsBayCharlevoix...T. Fortin. 

St. Phillippe Laprarie George F. Singer. 

Ste. Pliilomene ChateauguayJ. B. D Amour. 

Ste. Pie Bagot J. C. Bat-hand. 

St. Pierre d Or.I. of Orleans.Montraorenc.F. Fortin. 

St. Pierre, Mo Montmagny .Charles Bacon. 

St. P. les Becq Nicolet 0. Tonsignant. 

St. Placide Two M tains. J. E. Cochran*. 

St. Polyearpe...New Long l .Soulanges ...John Taylor. 
. Prosper Champlain... Philippe Gerard. 

St Raphael. W.Charl tt n b gGlengary ...D. F. McDonnell. 

St. Raphael. E Bellechasse .F. Goulet. 

^t. Raymond...Bourg Louis.Portneuf Ed. Plamondon. 

St. Remi La Salic Napicrvillc... Henry Duncan. 

StP>ocdes Ann L Islet A. Morin. 

St. Roc 1 Achi L Assompt n.B. lioch-r. 

St. Rosalie St.HyacintheBagot 0. Seneeai. 

Ste. Rose Isle Jesus ...Laval W. Miller. 

St. Sauveur ...AbercrombieTerrebonne...W. II. Scott. 

St Scolastique Two M tains.H. Delesderniei*. 

Simon, YamDe Ramsay .Bagot 

St Simon, Rim Rimouski ...A. Pelletier. 

^te. Sophie Halifax Megantic ...Olivier Hcbcrt. 

w t. Stanislas Champlain. ..Basilide Roy. 

St. Sulpice L Assompt n.L Assompt n. 

St. Sylvester Lotbiniere ...John Machell. 

Sylvester. E Lotbiniero ....George McCrea. 

St. ftifrcsf, ^to.Blainville ...Tcrrebonne John Morris. 

St ThomaSjBcr.Lanoraie Berthier Louis Voligny. 

St. Thomas, Mn.?t.T}\omnt. ..Montmagny ..1. S Yal ]!. 

W. J-!ir>mas, TKY T armouth ...Elgin, E.R...E. Ermatinger. 

Sto. Timotheo Beauharnois ..I. B. Scott. 

St. Urbain CliateaugmtyC. McOiU. 

Ste. Ursule Maskinonge .L. Lup>>n. 

Sto. Valentine St. Johns ...F. B. Laperle. 

St. Vnllier St. Vallier ...Belleeliasse .F. Kclangc-r. 

Ste. Victoire Richelieu ...Henry I . Par?. 

St. Vincent ...St. Vincent. ..Grey W. Stephensou. 

StA inc.d. Paullsle Jesus ...Laval C. Germain. 

St. Zephirin ...Couiiral Yamaska ...l!. Crepeau. 

St. Zotique Soulanges ...0. F. I rieur. 

Salem Mnlnhide ...Elgin, E. K.Ge i. Srtvitfps 

Salford Dereham ...Oxford, 8. R.A S. Harris 

Saii lhill Albion Peel Robt. Dwyer, jr. 

Sand Point McNab Renfrew Alexr. McDonell 

Sundioich Sandwich ...Essex P. II. Morin 

Kuwttn Saugeen Bruce Kobt. I!e:d 

Sanlt au Recnl. Montreal ...Iloehelaga ...Edounrd Cauy>hii> 
Salt. Ste.MarieEntrance toL Superior.. .Jos. Wilson 

Sawyerville ...Newport Compton ...Wm. Sawyer 

Searboro Scarboro ...York, E. I!. A. MacLcan 

Scotch Block... Esquesing...IIalton Tha. Iluma 



[247] 



56 



POST OFFICES IN CANADA. 



[185T. 



NAME OF TOWNSHIP OE ro ,- VTT NAME OF 

POST OFFICE. SEIUMOKY. POSTMASTER. 

Scotland Oakland Brant, W. K.II. Lyman 

Scott Scott Ontario,N.R.John Weighill 

Sebringville ...Downie Perth S. K. Hesson 

Seeley s Bay. ..Leeds Leeds, S. It. T. H.Russell 

Selby Richmond ...Lenox David Wartman 

Selkirk Walpole Haldimand Henry Kent 

Seneca Seneca Haldimand James Little 

Seymour EastScymour ...Nthbrld. ERDavid Allan 

Shakespeare ...S. KasthopePerth Wm. Cossey 

Shannonville Tyendinaga Hastings, Sit Hiram Holden 

Sharon Gwillim ryE.York, N. R. J. C. Hogaboom 

fihawenegan ...Shawenegan St. Maurice J. Q. Rousseau 

Sheffield Bevcrley ... Wntwth, NRS. Holcomb 

Shffd. Mourit nShefford Shefford D. R. Savage 

Sffierbronlce Ascot Tof S brnokeWm. Brooks 

Sherrington ... Napierville Geo. Busby 

Sillsville Fredricksbg .Lenox Donovan Sills 

Silver CrVri...l,sii\iesing ...Halton A. P. Goodenow 

Silver Hill Charlot ville Norfolk Elizabeth Cole 

Simcoe Woodhouse Norfolk Ileiiry Mulkius 

Sinclairville ...Seneca Haldimand A.A.Davis 

Sligo Caledon Peel Isaac Hunter 

Snritbfleld Brighton ...Nthbrld, ERRobert Smith 

Smith sCorn r.sMurray Nthbrld, ERWilmot Gerow 

Smith s tldls...y. Elmsley Lanark, S. R.James Shaw, jr. 

Smithville Thurlow ...Hastings, SRWm. Ashley 

Smiilivilie Grimsby ...Lincoln Abishai Morse 

Sombra Sonibra Lambton ...P. Catanach 

Somerset Somerset ...Megantic ...H. Jutras 

Soraba Upton Bagot S. B. Warner 

SouthBolton...l>oUon Brome Amos Austin 

South CayugaS. Cayuga...Ilaldimand Isaac Fry 

South Douro...Douro Peterboro ...Daniel Sullivan 

South DurhamDurham Drummond Asa Leighton 

South ElmslcyS. Elmsley. ..Leeds, S. R. Elisha Landon 

South Ely Kly Shefford F. R. Blanchard 

South Finch. ..Finch Stormont ...Nelson Grey 

S thGloucesterGloucester... Carleton John O Doherty 

South Gower...S. Gower ...Grenvi leNRD. P. Pelton 

South GranbyGranby Shefford Elias Clow 

S.HinchinbrokllinchinbroklluntingdonJ. Holbrook 

South March. ..March Carleton Win. Boucher 

S th Monagh nS. MonaghanNtbbrld,W RJohn Clemisha 

S th MountaiuMountain ...Dundas John Morrow 

South Potti.n Potton Brome Joseph Manson 

South Roxton Roxton Shefford A. Sanborn 

SthWestmeathWestmeath Renfrew Geo. Smith 

South Zorra...7,orra Oxford, N. R.Thos. Cross 

Spart*. Yarmouth. ..Elgin, E. R.John A. Eakins 

Spencer Cove... Quebec Denis Maguire 

Sponoerville ...Edw rdsburgGrnvile, 8.R.W. B. Imrie 

Spike s CornersPortland Frontenac ...Barnbs. Wartman 

Spring ArbourWalsingham Norfolk Alex. Mcliae 

Springf rd Norwich Oxford, S. R. Chauncy Wikox 

Springville .