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Library 



Ontario College 

OF 

Pharmacy 






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J 



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ONTARIO 

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

GEF?PARD ^.-r c- 



TORON-' • J 

ruggist 



the Advancement of Pharmacy. 



\\n.. \1I. 



TORONTO, JAXUARV, iSijs. 



No. I 



Canadian Druggist 



WILLIAM J. DYAS, PUBLISHER. 



Subscription, $1 per year in advance. 

.\ilvci tisini; r.ilcs on applicilion. 

The Canadian DRiKiciisr Ls issued on the 15th of each 
month, and all matter for insertion should reach us by the 
5th of the month. 

New advertisements or climiges to be addressed 

Canadian Druggist, 

20 Bay St. TORONTO, ONT. 

EUROPEAN AGENCY : 

BROCK A H.\LIK.\\. .-XLIermary House, W.illing St. , 
LONDON, a.C, ENCiLANU. 

CONTENXS. 

Review of tlie Year 1894. 

Tradk Notes. 

Pharmacy in Enj^land. 

Drug Clkkks' Column. — Felicitatem Ailversiis 
Gradus. 

Examination Questions, Onlario College of Phar- 
macy. 

Ontario College of Pharmacy — Results of Exam- 
ination. 

Observation Sheets of the -American Pharmaceuti- 
cal .A..ssociaiion. 

Eau de Colo.i];ne Tipplers. 

.\ New .Saccharine Patent. 

Ei)lTORi,\t..— Volume .Seven. The New Year. 
I)ru(,'gists and Physicians. Cash Discount. 

Perfumes and Formul.L' for their Manufacture. 

The Disinfection of (he Dust of Rooms. 

Three Creosote Preparations. 

The Origin of Pharmacy. 

Pyrogallate of Bismuth. 

Demonstration of Wood Fibre in \'apor. 

Ph.vkmacv Abroad. 

.\ .Scientific Discovery from Japan. 

Test for Wintergreen Oil. 

Camphor 

.Vntidotes for Poisons. 

Thermometers and Thermometer Testing. 

Explosive Mixtures. 

Salulirine. 

Formulary. 

Elecampane as an Antiseptic. 

To Distinguish between Lemon and Orange Peel. 

Punier. R Aril ic NoTKs. 

Pharmaceutical Analysis. 

BusiNKss Notices. 

Rooks and Magazines. 

Drug Iv'eports. 



Europe has 383,290 blind, 230,200 
deaf intites. 

In Holland more women than men die 
of ajioplexy. 

Of 10,000 deaths in England, 1 84 are 
from measles. 

Hright's disease is most prevalent in 
Shanghai, China. 



Review of the Year 1894. 

I )tiring the i)ast year considerable 
activity has prevailed on the chemical 
side of phannacology, and in the more 
purely medical and bacteriological fields, 
first opened up by Pasteur, Brown-Se- 
quard, and Koch. Pharm.acy depends 
to a large extent upon the progress of 
therapeutics, and it is of keen interest, 
on the threshold of the new year, to 
take notice in what direction the progress 
i.s tending. For some years the ten- 
dency was strongly in favor of the organic 
derivatives which modern chemistry has 
so wonderfully developed, and to which 
we owe the existence of antipyrin, anti- 
febrin, [jhenacetin, etc. But more re- 
cently the development has taken place 
upon the lines suggested by the late Dr. 
Brown-Sequard, and animal extracts have 
been prominently introduced and boom- 
ed. The past year will be historically 
remarkable for the rise and development 
of what is already known as serum 
therapeutics. 

.SERUM THER.\PEUTICS. 

After the discovery of the bacillus of 
diphtheria by Loeffler, cultures were made 
which were found to produce diphtheria 
in animals inoculated with it. The ba- 
cillus is accompanied by to.xins which 
probably assist in producing the disease, 
and from these cultures to.xalbumin tnay 
also be obtained. Roux further ad- 
vanced the subject by showing that the 
introduction of these substances into the 
tissues conferred immunity. Behring 
and Kitasato ne.xt discovered, in 1890, 
that the serum of the blood of animals 
previously rendered immune by gradu- 
ated doses of the toxin was itself anti- 
toxic, hence the name of antitoxin. The 
treatment of diphtheria and tetanus by 
antitoxin is now on its trial, but it is im- 
portant to note that most of the leading 
authorities insist thai all the ordinary 
measures should be employed at the 
same time that antitoxin is used. The 
accounts, on the whole, are very favor- 
able, but one or two notes of warning 
have been uttered in Europe against tot) 
high an expectation being formed. In 
handling antitoxin, care should be taken 
not to expose it to light more than can 
be helped, and all vessels, hypodermic 
syringes, etc., shpuld be carefully ster- 
ilized by heat, carbolic acid, or absolute 
alcohol. 



Professor Klebs, of Berlin, has re- 
cently patented unfiphthisin for use in 
tuljerculosis. It is prepared from the 
tubercle bacillus culture fluid by the ad- 
dition of cresol, filtering and adding 
sodio bismuth iodide in excess, then 
caustic soda, again filtering, and finally 
precipitating antiphthisin from the liquid 
by the addition of alcohol. 

It is of interest to record here that 
Koch's tuderaeh'n, the unforttmate fore- 
runner of antitoxin, has been found of 
great utility as a diagnostic agent in 
bovine tuberculosis. Dr. Schvveinitz, of 
the Washington Bureau of Animal In- 
dustry, says that by its use it will be pos- 
sible, eventually, if not to entirely eradi- 
cate, at any rate to control and limit the 
disease among cattle. Another diagnos- 
tic agent is iiialkin, which is being ex- 
tensively employed for the detection of 
glanders, and of which veterinarians 
speak in highest praise In each case 
the liquid is injected subcutaneously, in 
doses of about i c.c, with the usual an- 
tiseptic precautions, and the temperature 
carefully taken, at intervals, to note if 
any decided increase has occurred. 

NEW REMEDIES. 

The year has been by no means un- 
productive of new remedies, althotigh 
there is some sign of a diminution in the 
number emanating front flerman sources. 
Increased attention is being directed to 
the development of those previously in- 
troduced which appear to have most 
claitn upon medical recognition. Thus, 
thioform, one of the innumerable substi- 
tutes for iodoform, has been strongly re- 
commended ill veterinary practice, and 
employed with success. 

Amongst those which have been 
brought more or less into prominence 
during the year are the following : Ferra- 
tiii, first introduced by Schmiedeberg, 
and isolated by him from the liver of the 
pig, has been produced artificially as an 
albuminate of iron. It contains 7 per 
cent, in an easily assimilable form, and 
has been employed with the most satis- 
factory results in the treatment of annsmia. 
The dose is from 3 to 20 grains. Cal- 
cium glyaro-phosphah\ the calcium salt 
of glycero-phosphoric acid, is a white 
crystalline powder, soluble i in 15 of 
cold water, but less soluble in hot. 
Glycero-phosphoric acid is one of the 
products of the splitting up of lecithin, 
and is supposed to present the phosphoric 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



acid in a specially assimilable form. It 
has been administered /i^r os, and by sub- 
cutaneous injection in ataxia, sciatica, and 
neurasthenia. The potassium, ammonium, 
and sodium salts are also prepared, and 
the dose for injection is about five grains 
three times a day. If taken per os, the 
dose must be larger. Tussa/, a saline 
combination of mandelic acid and anti- 
pyrin, which is stated to be more effective 
than antipyrin, and, as the name sug- 
gests, is introduced as a cough remedy. 
The dose, for adults, is lo to 15 grains ; 
children, less in proportion to age. Der- 
mol is a compound of chrysophanic acid 
and bismuth, stated to have the formula 
Bi(Ci„ - H.j O,)o Bi O3. It is an am- 
orphous yellow powder, and recom- 
mended in skin affections as a substitute 
for dermatol — the basic gallate of bis- 
muth — either in the form of dusting pow- 
der or ointment. Formalin, the name 
given to formaldehyde, is a powerful an- 
tiseptic, preservative, and disinfectant. 
It is supplied in a concentrated state, 
containing at least 40 per cent, of formal- 
dehyde, lodo-cresol, or, more correctly, 
tri-iodo-cresol, is a crystalline substance, 
soluble in chloroform, fats, and oils, but 
only sparingly soluble in alcohol. It is 
characterized by its freedom from color 
and smell. Therapeutic data are yet 
wanting. Aluminium has been a fruitful 
source of new remedies of recent years, 
and aluminium boro-formaie is the latest. 
It is readily soluble in water, and recom- 
mended in place of alumnol, being milder 
in its effect, whilst equally antiseptic, 
and, therefore, particularly adapted for 
application to the throat. Amongst 
those which have also appeared in our 
columns are antitetraizine, ingestol, ligno- 
sulfine, etc. 

PHARMACY. 

The most important event of general 
interest to pharmacists has been the an- 
nouncement of an Imperial Pharmaco- 
poeia, specially designed to meet the 
wants of the British colonies. The work 
of revision will be taken in hand towards 
the end of this year, and already several 
suggestions have been tendered from 
India and Australia. It is of great 
importance that Canada should formu- 
late recommendations, so as to bring 
the British Pharmacopoeia more into 
line with everyday requirements. To 
this end early co-operation of Canadian 
physicians and pharmacists is very desir- 
able, and we have already urged the pro- 
vincial associations to take prompt action 
in the matter. 

New editions of the Swiss and Bul- 
garian Pharmacopeias have appeared 
during 1894, and comments and criti- 
cisms have freely flowed in the pharma- 
ceutical press respecting the new United 
States Pharmacopeia. 

The International Congress of Hygiene 
took place at Buda-Pesth, Hungary, in 
September. 'I'he usual resolutions in 
favor of an international pharmacopceia 
were passed by the pharmacy section, 
but little of importance transpired. 



Among the numerous papers dealing 
with improvements in pharmacy published 
during the year, we can only select a few 
for special notice. Granular effervescent 
preparations have been ably dealt with by 
Bradley. Tinctures have received further 
attention from Farr and Wright, whilist 
Dodsley has recommended some im- 
proved methods for their manufacture, 
and Parker has made several good sug- 
gestions to recover the spirit left in the 
marc. White considers that infusions 
may be kept any reasonable length of 
time if sterilization is effected and a mi- 
nute quantity of chloroform added, as a 
preservative. Infusions prepared from 
concentrated preparations rarely agree 
with recently-prepared specimens, says 
Barclay. Spirit of nitrous ether can be 
kept nearly two years without suffering 
much depreciation, according to Jones, if 
the bottles containing it are stoppered, 
luted, and stored in a cool cellar. Mc- 
Donnell suggested the more rapid prepar- 
ation of iodine ointment by merely heat- 
ing the iodine and lard together, stirring 
well till dissolved. Henry recommended 
a tincture of iodine of the strength i in 
16, which should replace the present lini- 
ment and tincture of the British Pharma- 
copceia. Simple resin and eucalyptus oint- 
ments are best prepared without any 
stirring during the cooling, as recom- 
mended in the case of ceratum resins. 
United States Pharmacopreia advocates 
Boa. .Miss. Cretce, which has been the sub- 
ject of a paper by Professor Scoville, who 
hints that precipitated chalk is frequently 
used instead of prepared chalk, as the 
product is whiter. This practice is, 
of course, reprehended. Glucose is a 
perennial recommendation as a substitute 
for syrup in preparations, like syrup of 
iodide of iron, prone to change. The 
original formula for Bland's pills is pub- 
lished by Ince : Dried sulphate of iron, 
30 ; dried carbonate of potassium, 30 ; 
powdered gum acacia, 5 ; water, 30 ; syrup, 
15. This quantity in grammes to pro- 
duce 120 pills. Note that a medical 
committee has announced that the phar- 
macopceial dose for antifebrin, 4 to lo 
grains, is excessive ; the proper dosage is 
from I to 4 grains. 

PHARMACOGNOSY. 

A good deal of solid work has been 
done in clearing up the pharmacognosy of 
some of the lesser known drugs. Hooper 
finds an alkaloid in Ahrus precatorius'tooX. 
with glycyrrhizin and an acid resin. The 
aconite investigation of Professor Dunstan 
and his pupils has not advanced much, 
whilst an amusing controversy as to 
priority in discovery has taken place be- 
tween Dunstan and Freund. There is no 
doubt that aconitine splits up, when heat- 
ed, into acetic acid and another alkaloid. 
Keller obtained .87 to 1.23 per cent, of 
aconitine from aconite root. Dr. .A.itchi- 
son reported that asafa'tida is certainly 
not the product of Ferula Narthex, nor 
is it collected in Kashmir, but comes 
■ from Afghanistan proper. Greenish dis- 
covered asphodel root as an adulterant of 



white hellebore. Balsam of Peru has been 
examined by Trog, who finds that the 
fluid part is benzyl-benzoate with cinnamic 
acid and vanillin. Cactus grandiflorus, 
recommended very highly some few years 
back as a heart-tonic, is reported by Gor- 
don Sharp to be inert, and certainly pro- 
duces no effects, pharmacologically, com- 
parable to digitalis. Cayenne pepper adul- 
terated with rice has been detected in 
Washington. Cinnamon and cassia barks 
have been carefully compared by Pfister. 
Schmidt criticizes the description of 
clirysarohin and chrysophanic acid given 
in various pharmacopoeias. The former 
gives a yellow color with sulphuric acid 
and brown with caustic potash, whilst the 
chrysophanic acid gives a red color with 
the acid and blue with potash. Schorm 
purifies conime and nicotine from their hy- 
drochlorates by means of peroxide of hy- 
drogen. Dorstenia contrayeroa is reported 
iiy Mussi to yield an amorphous alkaloid, 
contrayeroine, which forms a white tart- 
rate. The plant is used in Brazil as an 
antidote to snake bites. Ergot\\&'s, yielded 
to Bohringer yet another active constitu- 
ent, spasmotin or sphacelotoxin, which is 
stated to be very active in doses of 4 to 8 
centigrammes. Escrine crystallizes from- 
benzene in large flat prisms, and melts at 
105-106° C, according to Petit. Guaiacol 
is best applied by painting doses of 4 
grammes upon the skin, when 50 per cent. 
is absorbed and may be obtained from the 
urine, state Linnessier and Lannois, Gin- 
ger is being considerably adulterated with 
exhausted ginger, and may be detected by 
the ash. Pohl has given a concise botani- 
cal description of hydrastis and localized 
berberine. Ipecacuanha is being thorough- 
ly examined by Paul and Cownley, who re- 
port that emetine is a mixture of at least 
two alkaloids. The ash of kamala con- 
tains a considerable proportion of manga- 
nese, and so-called kamaline is rottlerin, 
C,,H„03, says Bartolotti. Kola is the 
subject of almost the last monograph 
written by Professor Fliickiger. In his 
usual masterly fashion, he traced the his- 
tory of the drug and its chemical constitu- 
ents. The paper was published in our 
October issue. Konsso yields a highly 
active substance, kosotoxin, according to 
Leichsenring ; but commercial kosin is not 
a natural constituent, and isf ormed during 
isolation. Jaborandi leaves are scarce, 
and another pilocarpus plant has been 
sulistituted, called ceara jaborandi, which 
is practically devoid of pilocarpine. Oils 
have been examined by .Schimmel during 
the year, and much interesting information 
supplied. Oil of eucalyptus is the subject 
of a recent note by Holmes, in which he 
gives valuable results obtained by Payne. 
The average yield of eucalyptol is about 
fifty per cent, from four or five different 
species. Pa'reira bark has yielded vello- 
sine to Freund, which has a similar action 
to brucine. Sugar of milk sometimes 
contains as much as 1.5 per cent, of ash, 
chiefly MgO, so Braithwaite recommends 
a limit of 0.25 per cent. Sajfron %\\ov\A 
not lose more than 12 per cent, of mois- 
ture at 202° F., and 7 per cent, of ash on 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(2A) 



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(2B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



J. STEVENS & SON 



78 LONG LANE, . LONDON, E.G., 

ENGLAND 



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IF YOU USE THE 

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for beauty. 

Scant 2 oz. (looks like a 3 oz.) com- 
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net per gross. Sample sent on re- 
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Steam's Kola Compound 
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Perfumes 

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CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



llie dried suljstance, is the recomniciida- 
lion of Uarciay. 

CHEMISTRY. 

Tiio discovery of the year, if true, is 
iitKloiibtedly that made by Lord Rayleigh 
and I'rofessor Ramsay. I'hey allege the 
existence o( a fifth constituent in the at- 
mosphere, obtained by abstracting; water, 
carbon dio.\ide, oxygen and nitrogen from 
air. It occurs with nitrogen, but differs 
from that body by its greater density. 

A useful recommendation of Dott is 
that specific gravities be taken at 20° C. 
instead of 15' C. A suggestive paper by 
Kdel on " I'harmaceutical Testing," pub- 
Hshetl in our September issue, siu>uld be of 
great value, as the subject is very impor- 
tant. The purity of chloroform has long 
engaged attention, and Squibb, Schacht, 
Blitz, and Broivn admit that absolute 
purity can be obtained, no matter what 
the source may be — acetone, ketone, or 
alcohol. The new U.S.P. tests are spoken 
highly of. Arsenic in glycerin has been 
reiiorted now and again during the past 
few years, and should be guarded against. 
Furfuraldehyde is an excellent test for 
veratrine, according to Wender. Papers 
on analytical alkaloidal chemistry have 
been published by Kebler, an<l also by 
Wright and Farr. The tendency is to 
assist accurate determinations of alkaloidal 
galenical preparations. Guasti has shown 
that the isonitrite test for acetanilide in 
phenacetin is valueless. The following 
test will detect 0.5 per cent, of acetani- 
lide. One gramme is boiled with 15 c.c. 
of water, cool and filter. Add bromine 
water to the filtrate, when if acetanilide be 
present a turbidity will result. lodate 
can be easily detected in iodide of potas- 
sium, according to Spica, by precipitation 
with barium chloride. If the precipitation 
be barium iodate, it will dissolve in hot 
concentrated hydrochloric acid, and sep- 
arate on diluting with water. Mabery 
reports the examination of Canadian 
sulphur petroleum, which he found to 
contain 0.98 per cent, of sulphur. 
Estimation of HCN in ai/ua Laurocerasi 
may be improved, reports Denig^s, by 
using potassium iodide as indicator in 
solutions made strongly alkaline with soda 
or ammonia. Creosote from beech and 
oak is identical, and contains phenol, cre- 
sols, guaiacol, etc. They also contain a 
sulphur derivative. Becchi's silver reac- 
tion for the detection of cotton-seed oil in 
lard is not trustworthy. Bevan found that 
exposure of the lard to the air was suffi- 
cient to ensure the silver reaction. The 
iodine absorption remains the best test. 

BOT.\NY. 

Useful contributions to botany have 
been made by Green, who has examined 
several ferments. Jamieson has discovered 
apertures at the tip of root hairs. Berthe- 
lot and Andre have traced the formation 
of CO, and absorption of O by leaves after 
their removal from plants. Dyer has made 
exhaustive study of the available mineral 
plant food in soils. Purjewicz showed 
that decomposition of organic acids is 
always taking place in plants, but is favor- 



ed by light and heat. Malic acid is most 
easily decomposed, then oxalic, and next 
tartaric. 

Bacteriology and microscopy deserve 
special recognition, as their importance 
grows daily. In the histology of drugs 
and examination of bacteria, the micro- 
scope is becoming an indispensable in- 
strument of research to the pharmacist. 
We must content ourselves with drawing 
attention to the numerous notes we have 
published on the subject during the year, 
[)articularly by Dr. Kccles, Dr. Whelpley, 
and others, i'hotography is growing in 
favor every year, and the space devoted to 
it monthly is sufficient evidence of its im- 
portance. 

The depression in trade which has exist- 
ed throughout this continent has, as a 
matter of course, had its effect upon the 
drug market. 

The volume of business done during 
1894 is reported by wholesalers to be, as 
near as can be ascertained at the time 
of writing, about the same as in 1893. 
Although stock has been taken, it yet 
remains for the books to be balanced to 
show the proportion of profits. Prices, on 
the whole, have not varied much, and have, 
as a rule, favored the buyer. 



Prinee Edward Island. 

Mr. Fred. C. Davies is advertising all 
his stock, etc., for sale, and contemplates 
removing to Florida. 

Mr. W. W. Macdonald, druggist, of 
O'Leary, P.E.I., was married on the 25th 
December, 1894, to Miss Annie E. Ellis, 
of Alberton, in St. Peter's Church. 

Summerside has another — its fourth — 
drug store, the proprietors of which are 
respectively Air. Manson (lately with Dr. 
Dodd, of Charlottetown, formerly with 
Mr. Gourlie, of Summerside), and Mr. 
MacNeill, who, for some years past, has 
had charge of the Kensington Drug 
Store. The firm's name is Manson & 
MacNeill. The business is being carried 
on in the eastern half of the store lately 
occupied by Mr. A. C. Rogers. 

The Maritime Grocer oi December 25, 
1894, says: Mr. Charles Silver, of Sim- 
son Bros. & Co., who lias just returned 
from Charlottetown, tells us that the win- 
dow display of W. R. Watson's drug store, 
of that city, is one of the finest he has 
ever seen. The arrangement of the dif- 
ferent Christmas novelties and perfumes 
is unique, the background of the same 
being artistically adorned with limbs of 
young spruce, forming a contrast which is 
very pleasing to the eye. 



A druggist at Cypress, Man., has been 
fined $50 and costs on a charge of selling 
liquor as a beverage. 

There is said to be a good opening for 
a physician at Cartwright, Man. Forty- 
five families have signed their names to 
an agreement to pay a doctor $10 each 
for the first year. The nearest doctor is 
now from 16 to 20 miles. 



Trade Notes. 

Ross & Co. have opened a drug store 
in Vancouver, B.C. 

William Geary has opened a drug store 
in Vancouver, B.C. 

J. D. Warren, druggist, Pembroke, Ont., 
has made an assignment. 

The Sugden Pill & Drug Co., Winni- 
peg, Man., has been incorporated. 

Chas. Nelson, druggist, Vancouver, has 
opened a branch at Chilliwack, B.C. 

Harry P. Hyams, Montreal, has regis- 
tered as the Crescent Chemical Works. 

Grant Jessop, druggist, Chillisvack, B.C., 
has been burned out. Insurance $2,500. 

H. E. Calkin has purchased the drug 
business of R. O. Christie at Springhill, 
N.S. 

Harbottle has opened a new drug store 
in the Rossin House block, Toronto, 
Ont. 

N. C. Poison & Co., druggists, Kingston, 
Ont., have sold their business to W^ H. 
Medley. 

R. G. McPherson, druggist, New West- 
minster, B.C., has sold his business to 
H. Ryal & Co. 

W. S. Robinson has sold his drug busi- 
ness on Avenue Road, Toronto, Ont., to 
R. C. Hueston. 

It is reported that McCartney & Co., 
druggists, Nanainio, B.C., are about sell- 
ing their business. 

Thomas Johnston, Avenue Road, 
Toronto, Ont., has sold his drug business 
to B. D. Turquand. 

H. W. Bleasdale, druggist, Fort Mac- 
leod, N.W.T, is arranging a settlement 
at 50 cents on the dollar. 

J. W. Colcleugh, druggist, of Mount 
Forest, Otit., has been elected mayor of 
that town by acclamation. 

The drug stock of George E. Clark, 
Gravenhurst, Ont., was completely de- 
stroyed by fire on Jan. 4th. 

G. E. Gibbard has opened a branch 
drug store on College street, near Clinton 
street, Toronto. It will be under the 
management of F. Nichaus. 

H. W. Mitchell, who passed his exam- 
ination at the O.C.P. last month, goes 
to Winnipeg, Man., to take a position in 
his father's drug store in that city. 

R. Tuthill has disposed of his drug 
business on Lake street, Chicago, and has 
purchased the Market Drug Store, Toron- 
to, owned by R. O. Snider & Co. 

A. B. Petrie, jr., is a partner in his 

father's businesses, Guelph, Ont., dating 

from January ist. We can only wish him 

the success that has always attended the 

' old firm. 

A. B. Petrie, of Guelph, Ont., the genial 
president of the Ontario College of 
Pharmacy, and Miss Petrie, left on Wed- 
nesday, January 9th, for a pleasure trip to 
Australia, to be gone three months. We 
wish them a pleasant voyage and safe 
return. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Pharmacy in England. 

The Widow's Clause in the Pharmacy Act— 
Itroysl, for the Preparation of Spts. Ether 
Nit — Sanmetto— Chlorobrom in Seasicl^ness 
—Pure Chloroform— The Chemical Market. 

(By Our Own Correspondent.) 

The president of the Pharmaceutical 
Society is always springing new surprises 
upon his supporters. Some few years 
ago he went for the curriculum scheme 
with all his heart and soul, and actually 
induced the council to embody it in a 
bill before parliament, but its career was 
short. Next, be evolved some improved 
method of conducting the examinations 
with the assistance of outside professors, 
which the Council adopted, and now 
seems sorry for it. For one of the first pro- 
fessors appointed was Professor Green, 
who holds the chair of Botany in the 
society's school of pharmacy. This un- 
fortunate selection has raised a small 
hornet's nest, as it is thought that the 
unimpeachable fairness of the examina- 
tions cannot be maintained if a professor 
of one school of pharmacy is on the 
board of examiners, whilst all the rest of 
the schools throughout the country are 
unrepresented. Now, Mr. Carteighs has 
started a crusade against the widow's 
clause in the Pharmacy Act. By this 
clause, a chemist's widow is permitted to 
continue the business if she engages a 
qualified assistant as manager. For some 
unexplained reason, except that this 
beneficent provision for the widow and 
fatherless is an anomaly, we are called 
upon to sacrifice this clause, and for 
what ? Apparently to assist in closing a 
few businesses in the country, where com- 
petition is getting so keen. But in this 
absurd outcry against an institution which 
has certainly never proved a grievance — 
rather the reverse — the president forgets 
that, as the law stands, even if the widow 
clause were repealed, all that she has to 
do is to turn the business into a limited 
liability company, and she can carry on 
the business just as before. From this it 
will be seen that any agitation on the 
subject is farcical, and that no surrender of 
the widow's privilege would effect any 
alteration in pharmacy unless the com- 
panies' immunity is also broken down. 

Itrosyl. — Under this cabalistic word, 
Messrs. Fletcher, Fletcher & Co. have 
introduced a concentrated spirit of nitrous 
ether. Indeed, it is so highly concen- 
trated that they claim i part mixed with 
19 parts of rectified spirit will instantly 
produce the pharmacopceial spirit of sweet 
nitre. From an examination of it, I am 
inclined to believe that it is a solution of 
ethyl nitrite in absolute alcohol, with a 
small quantity of aldehyde. The solution 
is probably prepared by the double de- 
composition method from sodium nitrite 
in a freezing mixture, as recommended 
some few years ago by Professor Uunstan. 
It is supplied only in sealed glass cap- 
sules holding one fluid ounce, with the 
idea of preserving the fluid without any 
loss of gas, one of which is to be broken 
and mixed with the rectified spirit as re- 



quired. As one of the bugbears of phar- 
macy is the preservation of spirit of 
nitrous ether at its full strength, this 
method may be of some advantage. The 
price of the capsules is twenty-four cents 
each, which makes the preparation some- 
what dearer than the ordinary article. 

Saiimetto. — This is the latest American 
candidate for medical favor which has 
reached this side. It is apparently a 
fluid extract flavored so as to be rather 
agreeable, and of a reddish color. It has 
been suggested that it is an extract of the 
saw palmetto. Some considerable ex- 
pense has already been incurred by the 
proprietors, the Od Chemical Manufac- 
turing Company, by mailing all our regis- 
tered physicians a free sample, with 
literature. From the latter I gather it is 
recommended particularly for cytitis, 
pyelitis, prostatitis, and pre-senility — 
whatever that may mean. Apropos of 
new remedies of this class, I may mention 
that I had an opportunity of seeing it 
prescribed the other day by one of our 
leading West-end physicians. It was for 
a young woman who, I learned afterwards, 
was suffering from tuberculosis of the 
kidney. The prescription was followed 
in a few days with another calling for 
Dusart's syrup of the hypophosphites, 
next a course of Steam's wine of cod- 
liver oil, and, finally, Scott's emulsion. 
Then I lost sight of the patient, but I 
could not help reflecting on the apparent 
advantages possessed by our enterprising 
cousins, who had so effectually captured 
this physician that nothing in the phar- 
macopoeia, or even manufactured in Eng- 
land, was good enough for him. 

Chlorohrom. — This preparation, first 
suggested by Dr. Charteris, Professor of 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics at 
Glasgow University, is being boomed by 
the proprietors, Messrs. Burgoyne & Co. 
It is a pleasant mixture of an elixir na- 
ture, containing chloralamide and bromide 
of potassium. Dr. Charteris specially 
recommended it as a remedy for seasick- 
ness, and some remarkable evidence of 
its success in preventing or abating at- 
tacks of this distressing malady has been 
produced. Messrs. Burgoyne are now 
pushing the remedy as an ideal sedative 
and hypnotic. They claim that it can be 
safely administered even to children, 
whilst the combination with choralamide 
prevents the depressing action of the 
bromide from being asserted. In con- 
nection with its success as a remedy for 
seasickness, it should be borne in mind 
that Dr. Charteris insists on the passen- 
ger taking an anti-bilious pill, or three- 
grains tabloids of calomel, for two nights 
previous to embarking. When on board, 
a dose of chlorobrom, either 4 or 6 
drachms, should be taken, and the pas- 
senger should retire to his berth and as- 
sume the recumbent attitude. In over 
one hundred cases only one unsuccessful 
result was obtained, and this was explain- 
ed as being due to an excessive dose. 

Pure Chloroform. — For some time past 
the purity of chloroform has been a sub- 



ject of speculation and experiment. 
Whatever the cause may be, it is an un- 
doubted fact that more deaths from chlo- 
roform have occurred in recent years 
than formerly. Physiologists are inclined 
to put the onus upon the chloroform 
manufacturers, and suggest that as chlo-' 
roforni is now prepared from acetone, 
methylated spirits, etc., impurities are 
much more probably present than when 
it was only prepared from pure alcohol. 
Some such opinion is also held by 
Squibb, although he admits that pure 
chloroform is the same thing, no matter 
what it is made from. Messrs. Macfarlan, 
of Edinburgh, who are very large makers 
of this article, have from time to time 
Communicated to the pharmaceutical 
press their experience in the matter. 
Whilst advocating more stringent tests to 
be applied for the detection of impuri- 
ties, they are perfectly convinced that, 
with ordinary care, there need be no im- 
purities, but state that the bleaching 
powder employed is- a more prolific 
source of impurity than acetone, methy- 
lated spirits, etc. They have placed upon 
the market an absolutely pure chloroform 
for anesthetic purposes, which extended 
experience has shown can be safely kept 
for a year or more without decomposition. 
Makers of chloroform are naturally rather 
inclined to saddle anesthetists with the 
responsibility of most of the accidents 
that have happened. They state, with 
some show of reason, that many a hun- 
dred minor operations are now performed 
under chloroform which used to be per- 
formed without aViffisthetics, and that this 
has rendered surgeons careless of the, 
idiosyncrasies and cardiac weakness of 
patients who are not suitable subjects for 
chloroform inhalation. 

The market at the close of the year is 
always more quiet, very Itttle business 
being transacted. Chemicals remain, for 
the most part, unaltered, and there have 
been no drug sales since the 15th. Some 
excitement has been caused among the 
export drug houses by the county council 
threatening to summon all who have 
metric weights and measures on their 
premises for purpc^es of trade. As many 
of the South American indentors require 
their goods to be supplied by the kilo- 
gramme or litre, this is very awkward ; 
and it appears that, as the law stands, it is 
illegal for chemists here to dispense 
foreign prescriptions with metric weights. 
This matter appears all the more ridicu- 
lous, inasmuch as the new British Phar- 
macopceia is to recognize the metric sys- 
tem more fully. Some conjoint action 
of the Pharmaceutical Society and Cham- 
bers of Commerce is spoken about. 



December is the most fatal month in 
the year for asthma. 

The number of persons born blind is 
sixty-five to the million. 

Mrs. Shaw, the whistler, says that one 
of the best cures for indigestion is whist- 
ling for about half an hour after eating. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. (^a) 



Have You Ever • . 



Sold Taylor's Marking Ink with stretcher? 

If not, send us $1.75, and we will forward 

I dozen at once, postage or express paid. 

Taylop's Marking Ink 

Has been on the market for several years, and has given unqualified 
satisfaction wherever sold. Although not advertised, its sale has 
gradually increased, and we propose now to place it more prom- 
inently before the trade 



Taylor's Ink 



Is put up in handsome Easel Boxes, 13 inches high by n inches 
broad, making a most attractive ornament for the counter or 
glass case 

Increase Your Sales 

Of Marking Ink by displaying a dozen of Taylor's Ink. 

THE NEW 

RAT POISON AND MOUSE KILLER 

- SURE DEATH - 

Is meeting with a very large sale 



Large Boxes. Neatly Put Up. Retails 15 Cents. 

Costs $9.00 per gross. 

SURE D£A.TH ^-'^i" be confidently recommended as a reliable poison. 



ARCHDALE WILSON & CO. 

Wholesale Druggists and Chemists 

HAMILTON ONTARIO 



(4B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



- EXCELSIOR - 



Dru£i[ Mixer and Sifter 



IMPROVED AND PERFECTED 



For Dru^^ists, Manufacturing^ Chemists, Perfumers, Etc. 

Suitable for the manufacture of Baking Powder, Tooth Powder, Face Powder, Condition Powder, and for the Compound 

Powders of the Pharmacopceia. 

These are made in Three Sizes—SUITABLE TO MIX 5 lbs., 10 lbs., and 25 lbs.— at $6, $12, and $18 each. 



Easily Cleaned 

and 
No Wood 

To Scent. 




Dust Proof 
and 

Changeable 

Sieves 



RUBBER BRUSH RUBS ALL LUMPS OUT OF POWDER BEFORE IT IS SIFTED. 

These Machines mix the powders thoroughly, land then force them through sieves of the proper fineness for the intended powders. Two .Sieves, 
40 and 60 mesh, with each Mixer. 

This Mixer and Sifter is handled by the prominent wholesale druggists of the United States, and gives general satisfaction. Amongst those 
handling them are: Morrison & Phummer, Chicago; Bullock & Crenshaw, and Smith, Kline & Co., Philadelphia; W. H. Seheffelin & Co., and 
McKesson & Robbins, New York, and others. 

The 10 lb. Mixer is specially adapted for the general requirements of the Retail Druggist. 

WM. J. DVAS, Strathroy, Ont., Sole A^ent for Canada. 



RADLAUER'S 

ANTISEPTIC PERLES 

Of Pleasant Taste and Fragrance. 

Non-Poisonous and strongly Antiseptic. 



These Perles closely resemble the sublim.ates and carbolic acid in 
their antiseptic action. A preventive of diphtheric infection. 

For the rational cleansing and disinfection of the mouth, teeth, 
pharynx, and es]iecially of the tonsils, and for immediately removing 
disagreeable odors emanating from the mouth and nose. 

A perfect substitute for mouth and teeth washes and gargles. 
Radlauer's Antiseptic Perles take special effect where swallowing is 
difficult in inflammation of the throat and tonsils, catarrh of the gums, 
periostitis dentalis, stomatitis mercurialis, salivation, angina, and thrush. 

A few of the "Perles" placed in the mouth dissolve into a strongly 
antiseptic fluid of agreeable taste, cleanse the mouth and mucous mem- 
brane of the pharynx, and immediately remove the fungi, germs, and 
putrid substance accumulating about the tonsils, ihere'.iy preventing any 
further injury to the teeth. 

METHOD OF APPLICATION : 

Take 2 — 4 Perles, let them dissolve slowly in the mouth, and then 
swallow. Being packed in small and handy tins, Radlauer's Antiseptic 
Perles can alway.s be carried in the pocket. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



S. RADLAUER 



Pharmaceutical Chemist 



BERLIN W., GERMANY 

W. J. DYAS. Strathroy. Ont., Wholesale Agent for Canada. 



Sovereign . . 
Lime Fruit Juice 



Is the Strongest, Purest, and of Finest Flavor 



We are the largest refiners of LIME JUICE 

in America, and solicit enquiries. 

For Sale in Barrels, Demijohns, and twenty-four ounce Bottles 
by wholesale in 

TORONTO, HAMILTON, KINGSTON, AND WINNIPEG 

SIMSON BROS. & CO., Wholesale Druggists 

HALIFAX, N.S. 

TO THE DRUG TRADE 

PHENYO-CAFFEIN 

Is an acknowledged Leader among HEADACHE 
and NEURALGIA Remedies. 

Its special advantages are safety, etficiency, convenience of form for 
carrying and taking. 

Our policy is to serve the regular <lrug trade exclusively by 
thorough, persistent, and judicious advertising. 

We believe we can benefit ourselves by benefiting you. 

Correspondence solicited regarding the goods, method of adver- 
tising, etc., etc. 

Home Office, Worcester, Mass. Dominion Office, Toronto, Ont 

Direct all Dominion correspondence to ' 

JOHN C. GERRY, Dominion Agent. Toronto. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Drug Clerks' Column. 



Felicltatem Adversus Gradus. 



(;kim Ks loK iiiK Drug Ci.krks of On i arid. 



My D. J. AsnuuKV, Ontario College of Pharmicy, Junior 
Class of i8()4- 

I daresay that the majority of the drug 
clerks of the province are at this |)reseiu 
time in an ahnost similar predicament to 
my own about six months or a year ago. 
I was just about then eagerly anticipating 
the time when I should be liberated from 
the /kiitdiis^f of apprenticeship and could 
enter u|)on a more lucrative and enjoy- 
able course of existence, and in the not 
very distant future become what is the 
aspiration of all in any way ambitious 
youths, my own boss (although I am 
forced to admit the prospects of having 
such an employer were not at all of an 
enviable character). Green fields are 
pleasant far away, and of the pastures of 
bliss my too vivid imagination had an 
exceeding abundance. But there are a 
few things we mortals are in a position to 
learn as we advance upon life's pathway. 
.■\nd my turn was yet to come, and that 
at no far distant season. 

I had never for a moment thought of 
associating my apprenticeship life with 
the interests of our province's College of 
Pharmacy, because I was content to 
leave bad enough alone, and to take my 
medicine of school life as a druggist only 
can (in capsules) when it should become 
incumbent upon me to attend the delib- 
erations of the institution of learning 
which was to attempt to fit me out in the 
garb of pharmacy. But my apprentice 
days coming to a fulfilment, and the next 
consequent step for me being the attend- 
ing school, I attended this last fall's 
junior session of our own Ontario college, 
and I there learned a few lessons which 
have been of profit to myself, and which 
T feel may be worth a little to my fellow- 
rug clerks. .-\nd so I beg indulgence of 
<Jheni whilst I'bring to their notice the 
'product of my observations. 

I feel strongly convinced of the cir- 
cumstance that most of our drug clerks 
never cast a thought about their connec- 
tion with our college at Toronto until 
they are brought into direct contact with 
it by an attendance upon its course of 
tuition and training. The clerks never 
get to feel that they are prospectively as 
intimately connected with the school as 
are those who are from year to year 
attendant upon its sessions. It is abso- 
lutely certain that no man can enter the 
drug business as a business in this 
Ontario of ours until he has been gradu- 
ated from the college supposed to train 
him up in the way he should go in his 
pharmaceutical life in the province. And 
so the boy going into the business ought 
to appreciate fully what is before him and 
govern himself accordingly. Far too 
many young fellows squander their time 
in the store, do nothing toward getting 

•Step^ towards succes?. 



ready lor school work, fail to avail them- 
selves of the facilities anta influences for 
study extended them, and go down to 
Toronto perfect ignoramuses, sufficiently 
wrapped up in their own powers to harp 
.^^oliaii music to that providence their 
ignorance describes as " luck " as that 
they hope, and even expect, they will pass 
through examinations and come out as 
full-fledged druggists, and be able to take 
their places among the business men oi 
the province as fit representatives of a 
business into which they have gained 
access by the skin of their teeth, and very 
little skin at that. Well, there may be 
something so striking about these young 
men as to commend them extraordinarily 
favorably to their examiners, but I don't 
believe their hash will prove half so 
digestible when they come to eat it. It 
is generally found each May that those 
who fail on the council examinations are 
the men who did not think it worth their 
while to get a little bit prepared for the 
work of the course before entering upon 
it. These are the ones who usually get 
left. Now, the work at school will not be 
such an extreme burden to him who has 
prepared himself before and during the 
course in sonie measure for it. There is 
certainly lots of work to get up, but honest 
ap[)lication and perseverance can sur- 
mount all barriers, and he who earnestly 
does his best to get up the work will not 
find the getting of it up such an onerous 
task after all. 

But there are a few things it will not 
be amiss lor each of us to get an insight 
into ere we attempt to try our skill at the 
storing our minds with the knowledge of 
pharmaceutical hook lore. And these 
we might just for a few minutes take a 
glance at : — 

I. A clerk before attending school 
should train his mind to a system of study. 

At the Ontario College of Pharmacy, 
as at all others, they do not profess to be 
able or to attempt to karn any man the 
theories of [iharmacy ; they only teach. 
No person can regulate the mind ol 
another, none can influence his fellow's 
powers of thought and mental grasp. To 
assert and exert themselves, each man 
must look after his own mental character. 
And I noticed this circumstance very 
markedly displayed in my recent experi- 
ence at school. Some fellows could not 
apply themselves at all to study, could 
not get their minds into working trim, 
could not bring their talents to bear upon 
their required exercises, and, of course, 
these men could not but lose through 
this deficiency of power. It is a very 
pleasant way of looking at matters, I fully 
realize, this of considering that while in 
the store as an apprentice a fellow can 
afford to let studies run and can allow 
himself to neglect attention to his books 
altogether ; but I also now from experi- 
ence realize every bit as fully that this 
way of looking at the situation is a hood- 
wink and a dangerous snare. .A. man's 
mind needs to be prepared for thinking, 
and, unless it he prepared, all the knowl- 



edge of all the sages the world has ever 
known will never sprout forth into useful- 
ness from this mind, because the soil is 
no go(>d, has never been cultivated. I 
believe that if the clerks of Ontario would 
only get to realize what they are losing 
by not paying a little attention to study 
while in tlie store, they would stir them- 
selves a little bit in this matter. There are 
lots of little things each clerk can learn 
before entering school which he would 
find would save him a lot of trouble on 
going to school, and which I know would 
be of great service to those who are to 
tutor him. .Almost any fellow while in 
the store can get up the doses of drugs 
and preparations of the Pharmacopoeia, 
can study up the ways of preparing official 
medicaments, can get up the process of 
determining specific gravity of substances, 
and can know a little bit about the 
metric system of weights and measures, 
and that table in the front of " Maisch's 
Materia Medica." This is very little to 
have to study for four years, but if prop- 
erly gone at will be of profit to him who 
attempts it. And then in the college 
announcement will be found a course of 
study for apprentices, drawn out by the 
council of the college, which may well 
be given the serious consideration ol the 
clerks of our province. This table was 
not made out just for amusement ; it was 
fixed up for your profiting, brother clerk. 

II. A clerk needs to form proper hab- 
its of going about his work. 

There is nothing so disgusting and 
distasteful to any person of refinement 
than a man who is slovenly, and who 
does not know how to correctly and 
expeditiously go about his business, and 
the Professor of Pharmacy at the O.C.P. is 
not a man of vulgar inclinations, not by 
any means, as many neglectful clerks 
have found and will yet find out. Any 
man who is clean and particular himself 
likes to see the same qualiiies in others. 
But there are lots of peoi)le in this world 
of ours who are exceedingly dirty in their 
methods of work, and who, bi sides this-, 
never use their common si. nse to direct 
them how to go about their business. 

Some clerks in their works show this 
lack of skill to a very, very marked extent. 
In making pills thev too often make more 
pill messlhAn pill mass, a terrible slabber 
all over the whole of their utensils; in mak- 
ing powders, the powders are more often 
spread upon the dispensing counter than 
upon the necessary papers. These clerks 
more often dispense with the powders 
than they dispense them. And in their 
other operations they are equally un- 
skilled. They never think for a minute 
what ought to be done under a given cir- 
cumstance, and how this ought to be 
done. They never use their thinking 
caps at all. 

Now, no school professes to be able to 
make a man of any fellow. They don't, 
at school, supply a man with character, 
only with aids to the framing of this. 

These two thoughts came forcibly to 
me during my connection with our school 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



at Toronto during this past fall, and I 
have jotted them down rather hurriedly 
and uninterestingly for the enlighten- 
ment and guidance of those with whom 
my life is closely knit in the fellowship 
of occupation. 



Examination Questions Ontario College 
of Pharmacy. 

junior examinations, uf.cf;mbp,r, 1894. 

Pharmacy. 
Examiner: — Chas. F. Heeisner, Ph.G., 
Phm.B, (Tor.). 

Time allowed, three hours. . 

1. Hydkargyri Iodidum Rubrum. 
Give {a) chemical name and formula ; {l>) 
method of preparation in detail, stating 
reasons in full for each step from begin- 
ning to end ; [c) equation showing chemi- 
cal change which takes place ; (</) means 
of determining the quantities of the neces- 
sary ingredients to furnish the greatest 
possible yield of salt. 

2. What volume of Aither Piiriis will 
be required to counterpoise four fluid 
ounces of Aciaiiin Nitricum 1 What will 
0.5 liter of Rectified Spirit \it\^\ and (c) 
what weight of absolute alchohol will it 
represent ? , 

3. {a) Differentiate between Water of 
Crystallization and Water of Decrepita- 
tion, {h) Ex|jlain why granulation is a 
more efficient means of purifying certain 
chemical salts than re-crystallization. 

4. How many Avoirdupois pounds are 
represented by the sum of 425 dekagrams, 
ZYz kilo's, 33^ myriagiams, 825 deci- 
grams, 460 milligrams, and 18 grams. 

5. {a) Describe and illustrate a method 
of upward-filtration, stating its advantages 
over the usual method, and the objects 
gained. What medium may be used in 
the filtration of {b) Phosphoric Acid, {c) 
Solution of Soda ? 

6. Having in stock 50 grams of pow- 
dered opium containing 8 p.c. of mor- 
phine, in what proportions can I most 
economically mix with it powders assay- 
ing 9, 12, and 15 p.c, to yield a product 
that will assay 10 per cent, morphine. 

7. (a) Mention the initial unit of the 
Metric System ; (b) explain the derivation 
of the unit of weight from the lineal unit ; 
(<r) show the relation existing between the 
units of capacity and length. Give the 
equivalents of the following in the cus- 
tomary weights and measures : {c) Meter, 
{d) Gram, [e) Liter. Give approximate 
metrical equivalents for : (/) grain, ("-) 
drachm, {It) fluid ounce, (/) inch. 

8. {a) Define and give examples of 
Solution by Intervenlion ; {b) Define 
Supersaturated Solution ; (c) a solution of 
Potassic Chlorate, saturated at 15° C, 
weighs 411^ ozs.; what amount of salt is 
there in solution ; {d) and what is the per- 
centage strength of the solution ? 

Q. (n) Define specific gravity ; (b) what 
is the unit for solids and liquids ; {c) state 
method of using the loaded cylinder in 
specific gravity determinations. Give sp. 
gr. and percentage strength of {a) Spiritus 



Tenuior, (1^) JEihex, (c) Chloroformum, 
(d) Liquor Ammonite, (c) Liquor Amnio- 
niae Fortior. 

10. A piece of wax weighs 14.25 grams ; 
a block of brass (sufificiently large to im- 
merse the wax in water) weighs in distilled 
water, 15° C. — 30 grams ; wax and brass 
together weigh in distilled water, 15° C. — 
29 25 grams ; what is the specific gravity 
of the wax? 

1 1. State how each of the following are 
affected by exposure' in uncorked bottles : 
(a) Plumlii Acetus, {/>) Zinci Sulphas, (c) 
Calcii Chloridi, (d) Liquor Plunibi Subace 
talis. 

12. Give test to distinguish between a 
solution of plumbic acetate and Goulard's 
extract. 



Chemistry and Physics. 
Examiner: — A. Y. Scott, B.A., M D., 
CM. 

Time allowed, two hours. 

1. State the Law of Definite Proportion 
and illustrate your answer. 

2. Give the history, occurrences, pre- 
paration, and properties of Ammonia. 

3. How much oxygen can be obtained 
from 200 grammes of Potassium Chlorate 
(rt) at normal temperature and pressure, 
(l>) at 15" C. and 740 mm. pressure? 

4. What are the impurities in ordinary 
coiiiniercial Hydrochloric and Sulphuric 
Acids ? What are the sources of these 
impurities ? How would the Acids be 
purified ? 

5. Give an account of the occurrence, 
preparation, chemical and physical pro- 
perties of Sulphur Dioxide. How much 
Sulphur would it require to unite with the 
Oxygen in 1,000 liters of air at o" and 760 
mm. ? 

6. Write equati(jns illustrating action 
of: 

{a) Potassium Hydrate on Ammonium 

Chloride. 
(/') Chlorine on Hydrogen Sulphide. 
(c) Barium Chloride on a Sulphate. 
{d) Sulphur Dioxide, Oxygen, Hydrogen 

Nitrate and Water. 

7. State Boyle's Law. How would it 
be proved ? 



Pharmacal Laboratory. 
Examitier: — Chas. F. Heebner, Ph.Ci., 
Phm.B. (Tor.). 

Time allowed, two and a half hours. 

1. Determine the extractive matter in 
the liquid preparation handed you, and 
report according to the following forms : 

{a) Quantity of liquid taken. 

{b) Amount (actual) of extractive matter 
found. 

((•) Percentage of extractive matter 
found. 

((/) NVrite out process used in determin- 
ing extractive in detail, and exhibit 
all figures used. 

2. Determine the specific gravity of the 
solid substance, and submit a report of 
your results in accordance with the sub- 
joined form : 

(a) Substance marked. 



(/') Weight of substance taken, 
(f) Weight of an equal volume of water. 
{d) Specific gravity of substance. 
Exhibit all figures used in the above deter- 
mination. 

N.B. — Neatness of work, order in ar- 
rangement, and cleanliness of working 
desk and outfit, will enter as important 
factors in your ratings. 



Latin, etc.. Therapeutics and Posol- 

OGY. 

Examiner : — J. T. Fotheringham, 
B..'\., M.B. 

Time allowed, two hours. 

1. Decline the nouns : — Bromidum, 
Congius, Liquor, Filula, and Spiritus, 
naming the cases. 

2. Give case and syntax of the italicized 
words : — Recipe Lincturce Asafa'tidce 
drachmam unam quarta quaque hora. 

3. Analyze this classical prescription 
into its component parts, giving each part 
its name. 'I'ranslate directions : 

R. Pulv. Jalapa;, gr. xx. 
Pot. Tart. Ac, 7,j. 
Syr. Zingib., 3ij. 
Aq. Menth. Pip., 3j ss. 
Ft. haust. Stat, sumend. 

4. Apply Young's rule to the above 
prescription to reduce it to suit a child of 
four years of age. 

5. Give niaximum doses of the follow- 
ing preparations : — Pulv. Cretan Aromat. 
c. Opio ; Pil. Hydrarg.; Extr. Stramonii ; 
Extr. Case. Sagr. Fl.; Extr. Bellad. Alco- 
hol; Extr. Aloes Barb.; Vin. Antimon.; 
Tr. Cannab. Ind.; Tr. Capsici ; Tr. Valer. 
Ammon. 

6. Enumerate the ordinary methods of 
administration of drugs, and distinguish 
lietween terms Local Effect and Systemic 
Effect, giving exain[)le of each. 

7. Define the following terms : Absorp- 
t'on. Digestion, Ventricular Systole, 
Plnsma, and Metabolism. 

8. Describe, very shortly, the Blood. 

9. Define the following terms, with 
examples : Tonics, An8est<hetics, Hypnot- 
ics, Stimulants, Narcotics. 



Botany. 
E.xaminer : — A. Y. Scott, B.A., M.D., 
CM. 

Time allowed, two hours. 

I. Describe fully specimens marked A 
and B. Under what would each be class- 
ed, and why? 

What is meant by Phyllotaxy ? Name 
the different kinds of buds found on the 
branch shown, and what is their arrange- 
ment ? 

3. Describe the various forms of Inflor- 
escence. Under which would you class 
the flower shown, and why ? Give as 
minute a description as possible of the 
parts of the same flbwer seen without dis- 
section. 

4. Trace the formation of the fruit and 
seed from the flovver. Describe the speci- 
men of fruit as to class, loculi, placenta- 
tion, epicarp, etc., also the seed it con- 
tains. 

5. Describe Parenchymatous Tissue. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(6a) 



3 



GOOD SELLERS 



VELROSE 



SHAVING CREAM 
SHAVING STICK 
BARBER'S BAR 



,/;i\\ic^;^5i^' SHAVING ^^^ 
!& •^'^^^si^, ,. CREAM '^* 





'SH/WINGj 

¥ stick| 

i'ONTFIEAL. - Ni:W VOB,l< 



PAY YOU WELL. PLEASE YOUR CUSTOMERS 
ATTRACTIVE COUNTER ARTICLES 

Oriler Sample k dozen from your wholesale house to come with next order. 
We supply Samples for free distribution with first orders. 

THOS. L^BKMING&CO. 

MONTREAL 



Toilet # 



Papers 



$7 to $i6 per case 

Put tip ill 

Flat Packages 

Plain and PcrforaferJ 

liolls 

At Mill Prices 

-- FIXTURES 



™= E. B. EDDY CO. 

BRANCHES : 

MLONTRKAL and TORONTO 



LITTLE'S 

PATENT FLU I D 



SHEEP DIP 

AND CATTLE WASH. 



For the Destruction of Ticks, Lice, Mange, and 

all insects upon Sheep, Horses, Cattle, 

Pigs, Dogs, etc. 

Superior to Carbolie Acid for Ulcers, Wounds, Sores, etc. 



Removes Scurf, Roughness and Irritation of the Skin, 
making the coat soft, glossy, and healthy. 



Removes the unpleasant smell from Dogs and other animals. 



" Little's Sheep Dip and Cattle Wash " is used at the Dominion 
Kxperimental Farms at Ottawa and Brandon, at the Ontario Industrial 
Farm, Guelph, and by all the principal Breeders in the Dominion ; and 
is pronounced to be the cheapest and most effective remedy on the market. 

SS" 17 Gold, Silver, and other I'lize Medals have been awarded to 
" Little's Sheep and Cattle Wash " in all parts of the world. 

Sold in large Tins at $1.00. Is wanted by every Farmer and Breeder 
in the Dominion. 

ROBERT WIGHTMAN, Druggist, OWEN SOUND, ONT. 

Sole Agent for the Dominion. 

To be had from all wholesale drugijists in Turnnto, I lamilton, and London. 



(^^ 



^^ 



;'Little*s Soluble Phenyji 



;;>^DE0DQRiSER8.ANTiSEPTIGI? 



-^"■, 



.NEW DISINFEGTANB 



CHEAP, HARMLESS, and EFFECTIVE 

A Highly Concentrated Fluid for Checking and Preventing 
Contagion from Infectious Diseases. 



NON-POISONOUS AND NON-CORROSIVE. 



In a test of Disinfectants, undertaken on behalf of the .American Gov- 
ernment, "Little's Soluble Phenyle " was proved to be the best Disin- 
fectant, being successfully active at 2 percent., whilst that which ranked 
second required 7 per cent., and many Disinfectants, at 50 per cent., 
proved worthless. 

" Little's Soluble Phenyle " will destroy the infection of. all Fevers 
and all Contagious and Infectious Diseases, and will neutralize any bad 
smell whatever, not by disguising it, but by destroying it. 

Used in the London and Provincial Hospitals and approved of by the 
Highest .Sanitary .Authorities of the d.ay. 

The Phenyle has been awarded Gold .Medals and Diplomas in all 
parts of the world. 

Sold by all Druggists in 25c. and 50c Bottles, and $1.00 Tins. 

.-\ 25c. bottle will make four gallons strongest Disinfectant. Is wanted 
liy every Physician, Householder, and Public Institution in the Dominion. 



ROBERT WIGHTMAN, Druggist, OWEN SOUND, ONT. 

Sole Agent for the Dominion. 

To be had from all Wholesale Druggists in Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 
and London, Ont., and Winnipeg, Man, 



(6b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 




MAN LEYS 



"MANLEY'S" 

^Celery Nerve Compound 



Beef, Iron, and Wine. 



A scieiitilic ComWuation of Celery. Beef, Iron, 

and Wine, TonloH, and Pur^ Glycenoe, 

ilKtead of alcoliol. 

UNEQUALLED 

AS A HEALTH flUlLDERMd HEALTH RESTORER 

Has given the FULLEST SATISFACTION lo person* 

who have taken it. 

It is put up in a i6-oz. bottle, contained in an attractive 

Blue and White carton 

PRICE TO THE TRADE :-$6 (net) per 1I07. 5 P=r 
cent, off on three dozen orders, and 5 per cent, off for spot 
cash. 

SELLS FOR »1 A BOTTLK. 

Orders respectfully solicited. . 

For testimonials, etc., write to the makers. 

The LION MEDICtNE CO. 

87 King St. East, TORONTO. 



Gibbons' 

Toothache 

Gum 

Per doz. $i.oo 

yi gross 2.75 



For Sale by all Wholesale Druggists 



J. A. GIBBONS & CO. 

Toranto 



MINARD'S 



LiNlMEHt 



Sold from HaliT'ur to t htoiia 

BY 



u*t ICAY I Brown S: Webb. 
HALIFAX 1 Forsvtl 



. .. Simson Bros. & Co. 

Forsyth, Sutdiffe & Co. 
ST. JOHN— T. B. Barker & Sons. D. McDiarmid & Co. 
YARMOUTH-C. C. Richards & Co. 

OlIFBEC 

r...,....>T... I Kerry, Watson & Co. Lyman Sons & Co. 
MONTREAL 1 Evans Sons & Co. Lyman, Knox Jt Co. 

KINGSTON— Henry Skinner & Co. 

(' Lyman Bros. & Co. Evans Sons & Co. 

TORONTO Northrop & Lyman. 

\ Elliot & Co. T. Milburn & Co. 

HAMILTON— Archdale Wilson & Co. J. Winer & Co. 
LONDON -London Drug Co. Jas. A. Kennedy & Co. 

WINNIPEG— Martin, Bole & Wynne Co. 
NEW WESTMINSTER-D. S.Curtis & Co. 
VICTORIA -Langley & Co. 




Co/v^PLEXlON ,: 

TOILET 'I 

Soap 

||jL|AllerlB^VriJley. 

CHiCACO- 




-^ Allen B. Wrisley's 

CUCUMBER 
fa^^"^ % COMPLEXION 
TOILET 
SOAP 

IS " PURE GOLD " 

The virtues of Cucumber Juice for the Skin 
and Complexion have become famoui. We 
challenge comparison with any fine milled, 
delicately perfumed, high grade soap in the 

market. It's The Complexion Toilet Soap 

of the world. Made on honor, full value, par 
excellence. Matchless for a clear, soft, skin 
beautifier. It is well worth 50 cents a cake, but 
can be sold at Retail for (X) one-quarter of that 
price. Try it, try it, and be convinced. 

Sold by the Wholesale Druggists in 
Canada. 



Bole, Wynnes Co. 

Wholesale Druggists and 

Manufacturing Chemists 



We wo'jld be glad to correspond with 
Druggist in Western Provinces when in 
the market. 



MADE ONl.V 1!V 

ALLEN B. WRISLEY 

479 to 485 5th Avenue, 
CHICAGO. 

Manufacturer of High Grade Toilet Soaps, Per- 
fumes, and Glycerine. 

N.B.— Prices and Samples to JOBBERS on application 



Gray's 



CASTOR-FLUID 

For the hair. 

DENTAL PEARLINE 

An excellent antiseptic tooth wash. 

SULPHUR PASTILLES 

For burning in diphtheritic cases. 

SAPONACEOUS DENTIFRICE 

An excellent antiseptic dentifrice. 



These Specialties 



All of which have been well advertised, 
more particularly the " Castor- Fluid," 
may be obtained at all the wholesale 
houses at Manufacturer's price. 



HENRY R. GRAY 



ESTABLISHED 1859. 



Pharmaceutical Chemist 

22 St. Lawrence Main Street 

(Cor. of Lagauchetiere) 

MONTREAL 



OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE ; 



WINNIPEG, 



MANITOBA 



ONTARIO 
VACCINE 
FARM 



Pure and Reliable Vaccine Matter always on hand 
Orders by mail or otherwise promptly filled. 

10 Ivory Points, $1 ; 5 Ivory Points, 65 cents; single 
Points, 20 cents. Discount to the trade. 

Address all orders— VACCINE FARM, 
A. STEWART, M.D. Palmerston, <»nt. 



W.A.Gill &. Co. CoLUMBUS.OHio.U.S.A 




P'or sale at Manufacturers' Prices by the leading whole 

sale druggists and druggists' sundrymen 

throuehout Canada. 



JOSEPH E. SEAGRAM 



Waterloo, Ontario. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



ALCOHOL 

Pure Siiirits 
Rye and 3lalt Whiskies 

OLD TIMES" AND "WHITE WHEAT' 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Practical Chemistry. 
.C.xviw/V/-.-— Graham Chambers, H.A., 
M.B. 

7>'W(" allotvfti^ hoo and a half hours. 

1. Detect .And in substance marked 
'•A " 

2. Detect Meial in Substance marked 
"Ji." 

3. Detect Acid in substance marked 
" C." 

4. I )etect .Acid in substance marked 
"IV" 

5. Blow a bulb on end of straight glass 
tube. 

6. Write equations illustrating the 
action of heat upon : 

{a) Ammonium Nitrate. 
(1*) Hydrogen Peroxide. 

7. What compounds are formed by the 
action of hot concentrated Sulphuric .\cid 
upon the following subtances : 

(a) Sulphur. 
{h) Hydriodic .Acid, 
(c) O.xalic Acid. 
{d) Hydrogen. 

8. Write equations, showing the action 
of Chlorine on : 

(a) Hydrogen Sulphide. 
{h) Hot Potassium Hydrate. 
{c) Potassium Bromide. 

9. How would you detect the presence 
of a Bromide in an Iodide ? 



senior examinations, december, 1894. 

Dispensing. 
Examiner : — O. F. Botsfokd. 

Time allowed, threi hours. 

Miss Gracie Copland. 

1. R.— 

Magnesii Sulph 5'ss. 

.Sndii Bicarb 3iii. 

Tinct. Card. Co 3ii. 

Aquae ad. ^\\, 

Misce et flat mistura. 

Sit;. : Cochleare mag : ex cyalhn aq. ter in die 
ante cilios. 

J. II. IlEwm, Esq. 

2. R.— 

.Sodii flyposulphitis .jiv. 

Acid . Sulph Dil 51. 

Aq. Destillat;^ ad. giv. 

Misce, fiat Lotio. 

Sig. : Adhibendiini caputi et carpo semel die. 

Mrs. P'ratherstonhai'gh. 
3 B.- 

Plumbi .\cetati'; . . gr- x. 

.\cidi Tannic! gr. v. 

Ext. Belladonna gr. iii. 

Olei Theobromas q.s. 5''' 

Fiat .Suppositorium, mitte tales. . . . iii. 
Sig. : Uno utare quaque nocte more dicto. 

Svr.NEY D. Durham. 

4. R.- 

Sulphuris Sublimati gr. xxxvi. 

Sodii Bicarb gr. xxiv. 

Misce et fiat massa et div. in pil. xii. 

Sig. : Duo ante jentaculun! omne mane. 

R. JoLi.iFFE, Esq. 

5. R.- 

Acetanilidi gr. xxiv. 

Quinina^ Sulph gr. xvi. . 

Misce et fiat massa et in capsulas octi) divide. 
Sig. : Unam quaque hora donee dolar in capute 
mitescat. 



Prescriptions. 

E.xaminer : — W. MURCHISON. 

Time allmued, two hours. 

1. Name the three cases, and give a 
list of ten imperative verbs most fre- 
quently used in prescription writing. 

2. Give the equivalent, expressed in 
grains, scruples, haU'drachins, and 
drachms (using symbols), of the Metric 
weights from one to ten grams. 

3. Give two or three simple rules for 
expressing quantity by weight of the 
Apothecaries system in .Metric terms. _ 

4. Give full Latin word and meaning 
of the following abbreviations : Ad 2 
vie. : De d. in d. : Ejusd. : F.L.A., : Gr. 
vj. pond. : 0.0.0. : P.C. : P.M.: P. rat. 
ast. : Sesunc. : St. : Temp. dext. : Tra. : 
Pocul. : Feb. dur. : Decub. : T.O C. : 
S.V. : M.P. 

4. Give the maximum doses of the 
following substances : Amyl Nitris, Co- 
caina, Cantharis, Cerii Oxalas, Codeina, 
Cupri Sulphas, Elaterinum, Ferri .Arse- 
niaSjHvdrargyri Perchloridum and Oleum 
Crotonis. 

6. Convert fully into English : 
R.— 

Scilte Radicis recens exsiccatse et 

contritae, drachmam, 
Zingiberis Radicis contritK, 
Saponis duri, singulorum, drachmas 

tres, 

Ammoniaci coniriti, drachmas duas ; 

Misce inter se pulveres ; deinde cum 

Sapone contunde, et adjice syrupi simpli- 

cis quantum satis sit, ut idonea fiat eras- 

situdo. 

7 to 10. Oral. 



Botany. 
Examiner : — Chas. R. Sneath. 

Time alloweiiy two hours. 

1. What do you understand by the fol- 
lowing terms, viz. : Cambium layer, pri- 
mordial utricle, primary meristem, leaf 
cycle, adventitious roots, plumule, parie- 
tal placentation. 

2. (a) What are the Pteridophyta ? 
{b) What classes are included in the 

series? 

{c) Describe the general plan of repro- 
duction. 

3. Explain the various forms of Vena- 
tion, referring them to classes of plants in 
which found. Explain the example 
given. 

4. {a) Name and describe the parts of 
a typical flower. 

{b) Describe fully the functions of the 
gynoecium. 

{c) Name and explain its modifica- 
tions. 

5. Chlorophyll — 

Explain fully its uses and properties. 

6. What are the functions of the leaf? 
Explain its minute structure. 

7. 8, 9, and lo. Oral. 



Starch and an alkaloid. I extract it with 
the following solvents successively : — ist, 
Ether; 2nd, Rectified Spirits ; 3rd, Cold 
Water ; 4th, Hot Water. In which of the 
solvents would you expect to find the vari- 
ous constituents ? 

2. What is an Infusion ? Why is cold 
water used in preparing infusions of Cal- 
umba and (Quassia, and why is Sulphuric 
.Acid used m -Acid Infusion of Cinchona ? 
State strength of each of the above 
named infusions. 

3. What is a Crystal, and what qualities 
of crystals are expressed by the following 
teriTis : — Anhydrous, Efflorescent, Deli- 
quescent ? 

4. What ingredients arc used in prepar- 
ing Yellow Mercurial Lotion and Black 
Mercurial Lotion, and what Salts do the 
finished preparations contain ? 

5. Give practical notes on the prepara- 
tion and preservation of three of the fol- 
lowing : — Lead Plaster, Ointment of Ni- 
trate of Mercurj', Solution of Subacetateof 
Lead, Compound .Mixture of Iron, Strong 
Solution of Acetate of Ammonium. 

6. Name the ingredients in the follow- 
ing : — Simple Ointment, Compound Tinc- 
ture of Camphor, Wine of Ipecacuanha, 
Linmient of Belladonna, Compound Pill 
of Soap, Compound Powder of Kino. 

7. .Add together 14 Millegrammes, 300 
Kilogrammes, So Grammes, 1240 Centi- 
grammes, and give the equivalent of the 
total in grains. 

8. {a) How is Spirit of Nitrous Ether 
prepared, and (b) Ho'v is its strength esti- 
mated ? 

9 and 10. Oral, and recognition of speci- 
mens. 



Pharmacy. 
Examiner: — F. T. Harrison. 

Time allowed, two hours. 
I. .A drug contains:— Chlorophyll, Fi.x- 
ed Oil, Gum, Sugar, Tannin Albuminoids, 



Materia Medica. 
Examiner : — J. Tolbert Pepper. 

Time allowed, two hours. 

1. Point out the difference in the physi- 
cal characteristics of the following : — 

Conium Fruit and Caraway Seeds. 
Short Buchu and Uva Ursi Leaves. 
.Aconite Root and American Hellebore 
Root. 

2. Castor Oil — 

(a) Give Latin name of the plant from 
which it is obtained. 

lyb) In what country does the plant 
grow ? 

{c) From what part of the plant is the 
oil obtained, and how ? 

(//) What is the dose, and how may it 
be best administered ? 

(c) What are its medicinal properties ? 

(/) Name some other purposes for 
which it is used. 

3. Rubber — 

(fl) Give English and Latin names of 
plants from which this is obtained. 

(/') From what country does the largest 
supply come ? 

(<r) How is it collected ? 

{d) In what condition is it when col- 
lected? 

(i') In what condition is it ivhen sent to 
the manufacturer ? 

{f) How is this change eilected ? 

{g) In your estimation, do goods manu- 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



factured from rubber form an important 
part of a druggist's stock ? 

{/i) Give a list of goods, manufactured 
from rubber, which are usually kept in a 
modern pharmacy. 

4. What part or parts of the following 
plants are used in medicine : — 

Myrislica Officinalis. 
Convolvulus Scammonia. 
HKmato.xyluin Campeachianum. 
Quercus Infectoria. 
Caryophyllus Aromaticus. 

5. Licorice — 

(a) Give Latin name of plant from 
which it is obtained. 

(/;) From what country is it obtained? 

(c) What part of the plant is used ? 

(i/) Give medicinal properties. 

(6') Give names of several brands or 
makes that are usually kept in a drug 
store. 

(/) Give common names for a very 
popular and much used preparation of 
Powdered Licorice. 

6. What is the most common adulterant 
of Pulvis Rhei, and how would you detect 
it with the microscope? 

7. Wild Cherry Bark — 
(a) Give the Latin name. 

(/') To what country is it indigenous ? 
(c) What preparations of it are most fre- 
quently used ? 

((/) VVhat acid does it contiin ? 

(e) Docs this acid pre-exist in the bark ? 

8. 9 lo. Oral examination, and recog- 
nition of specimens. 



CHEMISTRY. 

Examiner : — B. Jackes. 

Time allowed, two hours. 

1. Draw a diagram and illustrate by 
equations the manufacture of Sulphurous 
Acid by two different methods. 

2. Explain the manufacture of Hydro- 
cyanic Acid and show how it is reduced to 
Scheeles' and B.P. strength. 

3. Give an account of the chemistry of 
HNO3, considered {a) as an acid ; (/') as 
an oxidizing agent ; (<") give proof that it 
contains H. 

4. Write the formula and names of the 
compounds containing the elements {a) 
(H and O), {/') (H and CL), (<•) (O and C). 

5. Give briefly a method of preparing 
small quantities of {a) Metallic Arsenic, 
{b) Alumina (AL, OjS {c) Sulphide of 
Iron. 

6. How may [ei) Zinc be distinguished 
from Alumina, (/') Lead from Silver, {c) 
Cadmium from Arsenic. 

7. Trace the different changes which 
take place in the manufacture of Alcohol, 
and show what relation it bears to Acetic 
Acid. 

8. Give the original source, preparation, 
and purification of Potassium Carbonate. 

9 and 10. Oral, and recognition of sam- 
ples. 

Ontario Colleg-e of Pharmacy. 

The following are the results of the 
junior examinations at the Ontario Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, arranged in order of 
merit : 



FIRST-CLASS HONORS. 

W. McDowell, H. Eagleson, J. C. Mor- 
rison, D. J. McF. A^hbury, J. M. Fisher, 
J. P. Hennessey, John Woodward, R. 
Henderson, John Murray and G. E. 
Thatcher, equal ; J. C. Grosch, Winfield 
F'aulds, N. H. Brown, }. S. Brown, |. G. 
Blain, F. W. Day. 

SECOND CLASS HONORS. 

E. Bryson, O. Dowler, J. R. Y. Brough- 
ton, J. A. Anderson and A. W. Urqu- 
harr, equal ; Wilson Mitchell, A. F. Gled- 
hill, J3. P. St. John, Geo. A. lonson, C. H. 
Amys, .-\. C. Rorabeck, k. E. Marett, F. 
W. Sills F. T. Mc Master and Johnson 
Lucas, ecjual ; Harry Taylor, W. E. Bauer, 
H. A. Rowland, S. J. Mackey and G. F. 
Campbell, equal ; E. T. Jones, Norval 
Smith and F. Studholme, equal ; N. 
Samuelson, J. \. Clraham and S. C. 
Lamb, equal ; W. J. Bauld, A. E. Cox, 
J. Watson, Charles T. Laird, E. A. Wal- 
ters, W. J. Kirkland and Colin Camp- 
bell, equal ; W. M. Wright, A. T. Brown, 
Geo. J. Hunt and W. W. Turner, equal. 

PASS LIST. 

Alphabetical — W. H. Andrews, W. 
Appelbe, D. Ballingal, A. W. Butchlen, 
H. R. Carter, J. M. Cavanagh, A. Cham- 
bers, H. W. Chambers, Harry Cowan, 

A. Cundle, J. S. Fraleigh, Paul M. Gor- 
don, Tim. Hatton, Chas. A. Hillis, Major 
Kelly, Will H. Lee, J. W. Little, E. E. 
Miller, R. H. McNally, O. A. McNichol, 
W. B. Nethery, W. H. Pearson, G. A. 
Ramsden, H. A.. Raney, H. G. Rad- 
cliffe, Leonidas Rattey, A. W. Roberts, 

B. J. Rolston, G. A. Rowe, H. N. Roy, 

C. E. Swaisland, J. F. Taylor, Lawson 
Wynn. 

Granted Kgrotat with pass standing — 
Alex. McDougall, George Timline. 

STARRED IN PASS SUBJECTS ONLY. 

Materia medica and pharmacy. — John 
J. Doherty. 

Pharmacy and chemistry — E. B. Mil- 
ler. 

Chemistry — A. A. Morrow. 

Materia medica, pharmacy, chemistry 
— W. H. Snyder. 

Materia medica — J. G. Keogh. 

Materia medica, botany, chemistry — 
Harry U. Tobey. 

HIGHEST IN SUBJECTS. 

Pharmacy, including practical — H. 
Eagleson, W. McDowell and John Mur- 
ray, equal ; R. Henderson, John Wood- 
ward and J. N. Fisher, equal. 

Latin, posology, etc. — W. McDowell, 
Winfield Faulds, H. Eagleson, R. Hen- 
derson and Wilson Mitchell, equal. 

Botany — H. Eagleson, W. McDowell, 
and J. C. Morrison. 

Chemistry — J. C. Morrison, W. Mc- 
Dowell, J. P. Hennessey, J. N. Fisher, 
and D. J. McF. Ashbury. 

Practical chemistry — N. E. Brown, F. 
W. Day, O. Dowler, H. Eagleson, J. P. 
Hennessey, Wilson Mitchell, W. McDow- 
ell and George F. Thatcher, equal. 

The senior session begins on January 
8, 1895. 



COUNCIL EXAM. — DEC, 94. 

Pass List— Allen, T. S., Barnes, T. T.. 
Harnhart, F. C, Barrie H. G., Booth, J. 
H., Cruttenden, Thomas, Davis, Geo. H., 
Dunn, S. L., Hill, Reuben, Mitchell, H. 
W., Ross, .A. H., Srigley, J., Jackson, 
Sydney, Johnston, John J., McKinnon, 
D., Shurie, Jas., Ward, R. C, Waugh, J,. 
C, and Johnston, A. R. 

Passed in subjects — Four subjects. 
Brown, T. A., and Carter, W. C. Five 
subjects, Johnston, J. A. One subject, 
Thompson, J. C., and Bunting, G. B. 



" Observation Sheets " of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

The following has been sent out by 
Mr. .Alfred R. L. Dohme, chairman ot 
the section on scientific papers of the 
.\merican Pharmaceutical Association : — 

To Every Pharmacist in this Great 
Land. — Greeting: In accordance with 
the resolution adopted by the American 
Pharmaceutical Association at its forty- 
second annual meeting at .Asheville, in 
September, 1894, it becomes my pleasant 
duty to place before the pharmacists of 
this country the "observation sheet" 
given below. The purpose of this paper 
(as was ably pointed out in his address 
by the ex-president of the association, 
Mr. E. L. Patch, who formulated it) is to 
collect and tabulate a series of data upon 
iiicompatibilitiej, difficult problems, and 
experiences of all kinds in compounding 
and dispensing drugs, and how they were 
solved ; upon the relative salability and 
therapeutic value of the various new 
remedies ; upon the condition of the 
various products purchased by the phar- 
macist, his experience with formulas of 
the Pharmacopceia, National Formulary, 
etc., as well as errors or difficulties of any 
kind found in the Pharmacopceia, dis- 
pensatories, or elsewhere. 

Wnen you consider that as many as 
5,000 able and conscientious pharmacists 
will receive a copy of this observation 
sheet, and that the committee will thus 
secure the experience, reports, etc., of that 
number of men, you will readily recognize 
the great value that will accrue to every 
pharmacist. These reports will be tabu- 
lated, and in all probability published, 
and the experiences, suggestions, ideas, 
and much of the knowledge of this large 
number of men will thus be made public, 
and all will derive benefit. 

The number of suggestions for experi- 
ment, reflection, and original research 
that will thus be brought to light, and 
the number of knotty problems to phar- 
macists solved, will be very great. The 
report upon the salability of preparations 
and new remedies all over the land, and 
upon the quality of many U.S. Pharma- 
copceia and other preparations, will be of 
gr'fat service and interest to every pharma- 
cist. The whole idea of the sheet is so 
n;\v and so rich in valuable possibilities 
and usefulness that no just estimate of it 
can be given yet, save to say that it will 
prove of immense value to us all. One 



CAXADIAX DRL'dGlST. 



(8a) 



Why Not Put Up your Own 

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Condition Powders, 

Folding Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Bird Seed, 

Foldint: Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Chloride of Lime, 

Impervious Bo.ves and Wraps. 

Baking Powder, 

Ko-xes and W'r.aps. 

Compound Licorice Powder, 

bo.x>;s and Wiaps. 
Powdered Borax, 

Folding Cartons. 



Cream Tartar, 

Folding Canons. 
Soap Bark, 

P'olding Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Epsom Salts, 

Folding Cartons, or Cartons and 
\\'raps. 

Senna Leaves, 

Folding Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Cough Drops, 

Folding Cartons— 2 ounce and 4 



Or if there are any other lines you wish to put up, 
write Its about them. 

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LONDON. Canada. 



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Canada, we will mail to any druggist of the Dominion, postage prepaid, 
one only, " Alpha " Atomizer No. 3, with one hard rubber screw tip, on 
receipt of 63c. in cash, stamps, or by post office order. 

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Effect Of the Frencli Treaty 

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Vr. J, DYAS 



»AX r^ r^ 



MANUFACTURERS" AGENT 

Chemicals, Druggists' Specialties, 
Proprietary Medicines 

WAREROOMS and LABORATORY: 

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(8b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



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CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



thing is essential to make it thus valuable 
and useful, and that is that you, with 
every pharmacist who receives a copy, 
should take it up in the spirit in which it 
was conceived. Fill it up, and more, if 
possible, with your own personal experi- 
ences anti ideas, and be convinced that 
you arc one of a large number who are 
working for the common good, and the 
advancement of our calling — the science 
of pharmacy. 

l)o not cast it aside, but begin at once 
to jot down such information as it seeks, 
and continue to do this until any time 
convenient l)efore the end of June, 1895. 
Then send it to the undersigned, who 
will place the information and data which 
it embodies in the |)roper columns of his 
tabulated report, and, when completed, 
report it to the association, which will, no 
doubt, so dispose of it that all who have 
helped to produce it will receive a copy. 
The undersigned will gladly send a supply 
of " observation sheets ' to all those who 
desire to join in this grand piece of work, 
if they will be kind enough to inform him 
to that effect in writing. 

Hoping that you will join us heartily in 
this good work, and that I will heai from 
you in due season, I remain, dear sir. 
Yours very respectfully, 

Alfred R. L. Dohme, 

Chairman .Section on .Scientitic Papers. 
303 Pkatt St., Baltimore, Md. 

Below will be found a transcript of the 
points in which observations are to be 
made and jotted down on these " obser- 
vation sheets " : — 

The Prescription. — (t) A prescrip- 
tion received calling for therapeutic in- 
compatibles (medicaments opposed to 
each other in action). (2) A prescription 
received calling for chemical incompat- 
ibles. (A precipitate, (J/ change of color, 
b ; effervescence, c ; caused by chemical 
action.) (3) Physical incompatibles. (A 
precipitate due to change in character of 
solvent, a : due to a separation, /'.) (4) A 
ditificult pill mass. (5) An unsatisfactory 
ointment. (6) An excessive dose. (7) 
Dangerous abbreviation. (8) Peculiar 
composition. Copy of R attached. How 
the trouble was treated, and result. 

The Store. — (i) New remedies called 
for and times employed. (2) Obsolete, 
unmarketable, or peculiar products called 
for. 

The Labor.\torv. — Experienced diffi- 
culty in securing satisfactory products in 
using U.S.P. (a), Nat. Form, (b), publish- 
ed in (name of drug journal or other work 
of reference) (c), formula for the follow- 
ing : — (i) Fluid extract of (2) 

Tincture of (3) Syrup of 

(4) Elixir of (5) Plaster 

of (6) Ointment of 

(7) Extract of (8) Chemical 

product. (9) Character of trouble and 
how remedied. (10) Noticed the follow- 
ing errors in the U. S. P. {a). Dispensa- 
tory (fi), description of (name of article or 
product). (11) Had the following diffi- 
culty in applying the U. S. P. test for 
(name of article or product). (12) Found 



the following product had become unsal- 
able from having changed as stated (name 
article or product). Had been in stock 
for (time), and was stored (place or situa- 
tion as concerns tem[)erature, moisture, 
etc.). 

Eau de Cologne Tipplers. 

Whether eau de Cologne is, or is not, 
used to any great extent in this country 
as a cordial, or as an intoxicant, is prob- 
ably known only to ladies' maids. If a 
few thousands of these could be inter- 
viewed, some approach to the truth might 
be made ; more probably not. But accord- 
ing to the St. Janus' Budget, which gleans 
its knowledge from some articles which 
have been recently published in the Kol- 
nische Zeitung, the consumption of the 
perfume in some foreign countries as a 
drink is considerable. It is stated that 
lax Moslems affect to regard it as some- 
thing which does not rank as wine or 
spirit. No strict Mohammedan would 
admit hair-splitting of this kind; but 
there are Mohammedans who are not 
strict, and these not only drink it them- 
selves, but allow large quantities of it to 
be introduced into the harem. This ac- 
counts for its enormous consumption in 
North Africa and Asia. It is said to pro- 
duce a stateof intoxication, morecomplete 
than can be caused by an equal quantity of 
any other spirit, for, besides being strong, 
it is loaded with various ethers. King 
Juru, of Rio Nunez, excused himself for 
stealing and drinking Consul Vohsen's 
eau de Cologne in 1S79 by saying, " He 
very good for drunk," and the Hottentots 
to this day declare with regard to it that 
nothing else makes a man really and 
truly intoxicated. The writer in the 
Cologne Gazette states that the best Col- 
ogne water has the worst taste, and that 
the cheaper varieties — and there are 
some very cheap sorts made in Germany 
for export to the East, etc. — are the least 
unpleasant to drink. The great Cologne 
makers, upon being appealed to, have ex- 
pressed doubts whether their wares can 
be much used in this way. " Jiilich 
platz. No. 4," writes that the strength of 
his eau de Cologne, containing qo per 
cent, of alcohol, would prevent it from 
being drunk " neat," and that the admix- 
ture of water renders it so milky and oily 
on the surface that he does not believe it 
would be palatable to any one. But this 
manufacturer forgets that people do drink 
absinthe and mastic, which, mixed with 
water, develop similar phenomena. As 
for the little eau de Cologne makers, 
some of them certainly study to produce 
potable rather than merely pleasant- 
smelling distillations, and few of them 
can be ignorant that their wares are ex- 
tensively used for drinking. 

Dr. Stuhlmann, in his account ofEmin 
Pasha's country, mentions that many a 
Central African Mohammedan drinks his 
eau de Cologne and water as regularly as 
the Englishman drinks his whiskey, and 
describes as a particularly favorite bever- 
age a mixture of eau de Cologne with 



sugar and water. Dr. Baumann, the dis- 
coverer of the sources of the Nile, says 
that the Arabs not only mix eau de Col- 
ogne with their drinking water, but also 
use it in their cooking ; and that it is 
largely drunk by the Soudanese soldiers 
in the German service. Consul Siemsen, 
writing from Macassar, tells of a native 
rajah who greatly appreciated a cocktail 
composed of eau de Cologne and 
orange bitters. One of the numerous 
Farinas admits that, to his knowledge, 
the Indian Mohammedans and their 
ladies drink enormous quantities of Col- 
ogne water, and points out as a signifi- 
cant fact that native dealers, when de- 
sirous of forming an opinion of a sample, 
invariably taste and do not smell. And 
it is notorious that another Cologne firm 
some years ago flooded the Bombay mar- 
ket with a professedly potable eau de 
Cologne flavored with sugar and Kiim- 
mel. The stuff failed to sell, partly be- 
cause it was too expensive, but chiefly 
because, owing to the admixture, it was 
too weak. The native dealer has no faith 
in an eau de Cologne a mouthful of 
which does not cause the taster actual 
pain. In Paraguay it is loved by the 
women. In the Moluccas it will pur- 
chase almost anything, though it does 
not seem to be established that the 
women there drink it. It is only certain 
that their favorite drinking vessel is an 
eau de Cologne bottle. In the Kilima- 
Njaro district of Africa both the king, 
Mandara, and his priine minister. Mar 
eale, drink it habitually. Count Joachim 
Pfeil noticed the prevalence of the habit 
in Griqualand East as early as the seven- 
ties ; and in Southwest Africa, at this 
day, cheap sorts of eau de Cologne are 
drunk by the natives in preference to all 
else. In Zanzibar native doctors pre- 
scribe eau de Cologne as a medicine, and 
have thus introduced it as a dissipation. 
It is now taxed there as spirits, and its 
sale is proportionately restricted ; but 
it used, until recently, to enter duty 
free, and was actually cheaper than gin 
or brandy. It is drank in Greenland. — 
Chemist and Druggist. 



A New Saccharine Patent. 

A new method of preparing saccharine 
has just been patented by the Easier 
Chemische Fabrick. The process con- 
sists in the transformation of thiosalicylic 
acid into thiosalicylic chloride, and this 
into the corresponding acid amide. This 
latter body is then oxidized by means of 
potassium permanganate, or other oxid- 
izing agents. The details are as follows : 
21 kilos of PCI; and 15.3 kilos of thio- 
salicylic acid are mixed quite dry. The 
resulting body is a fluid, and HCl is 
given off. After getting rid of the HCl 
and POCI3, the thiosalicylic chloride is 
crystallized and suspended in water, 
heated, and treated with potassium per- 
manganate. The saccharine is separated 
with great ease. — {Moniteur Scientifique') 
— British and Colonial Druggist. 



10 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Canadian Druggist 

WILLIAM J. DYAS, Editor and Publisher. 
JANUARY 15TH, 1895. 

Volume Seven. 

With this issue the Canadian Drug- 
gist enters on its seventh volume, and, 
at the same time, makes an important 
step in the removal of the office to 
Toronto. In i88g the publisher issued 
the initial number, launching out into 
the sea of journalism without experience 
in the inner working of the printer's 
"sanctum," or in the many difficulties 
which a combined editorship and general 
management entailed, but with the deter- 
mination to leave nothing undone to 
make the undertaking a success, and en- 
deavoring to steer clear of the shoals and 
quicksands upon which many a venture 
has been wrecked, and so to guide the 
ways of the vessel, and to properly equip 
her, as to make her not only the pride of 
the owner, but a source of gratification 
and profit to the ports of entry into 
which she would steer — and these, we 
might mention, are in the whole length 
and breadth of this vast Dominion. 

Our patrons, the druggists of this 
" Canada of ours," have nobly and liber- 
ally aided us in our efforts, have applaud- 
ed our steady progress, and in many ways 
have given token of the appreciation felt 
in having a representative journal, akin 
to their feelings, and imbued with the 
desire, above all things, to assist in every 
legitimate and honorable way the interests 
of the retail drug trade. 

While not making any rash promises 
for the future, it is our intention not only 
to maintain the enviable character given 
this publication as a Trade Paper, but, 
from time to time, to enhance its value 
not only as a reliable medium of infor- 
mation on matters of pharmaceutical 
happenings within our own borders, but 
giving the pith of pharmaceutical litera- 
ture, culled from the columns of many of 
our able confreres, together with con- 
tributed articles from the pens of prac- 
tical and skilled pharmacists in this and 
other countries. 

To our readers we return thanks for 
their liberal support and encouragement, 
and also to our advertisers, who have con- 
tributed so largely towards our success. 

To one and all we wish 
A Happy and Prosperous New Year. 



The New Year. 



With the opening of the new year, we 
extend to each of our readers, our con- 
tributors, and our supporters, our best 
wishes for a happy and prosijerous new 
year. The advent of the new always 
marks the limit of the old, and, while 
opening to us the hopes and opportuni- 
ties of a new period, it closes behind us a 
time in which former hopes were realized 
or frustrated, and opportunities lost or 
made good use of. We all naturally long 



for prosperity. In our varied ways we 
strive for it, and use to the fullest the 
natural gifts we possess and the advan- 
tages we can secure. The limit of our 
field is, in many cases, the limit of the 
results we can attain. The character of 
the pursuit in which we are engaged does 
not alTord us very great scope for com- 
mercial enterprise ; yet for the amount of 
capital we require to invest, it is certain 
to yield us a greater return than could be 
derived from an equal amount invested 
in any other way. It is true that but few 
can ever hope to become wealthy, if their 
wealth is to be derived from the retail 
trade ; yet it is equally true that to its dili- 
gent and pamstakmg votaries the drug 
business affords a happy medium, if the 
word happy is appropriate. Its pursuit is 
eminently respectable, and all that is re- 
quired to make it satisfactory and endur- 
able is contentment with what we have, 
and frugality deserving of better reward, 
with a determination to do still belter, if 
possible. The year which has just ended 
has been as trying in many respects as 
could well be thought possible ; and as we 
have all survived it, and are yet hopeful 
of the future developing to our advantage, 
it cannot be amiss for us to express hopes 
which we all feel an interest in, and 
which, if fulfilled, will make the new 
year to us, at least, a much better one 
than the old. 



Druggists and Physicians. 

In an editorial in a late number of the 
Ontario Medica/ Journal an onslaught is 
made on druggists under the supposition 
that they are responsible for the sale of 
proprietary medicines. The statement of 
the case and the arguments used are so 
weak that it might be allowed to pass 
without criticism, but the frequency with 
which articles of a similar kind, with the 
same end in view, appear in medical jour- 
nals of late makes it advisable that some 
notice should be taken of them in the 
pharmaceutical press. The fact that the 
country is being flooded with physicians, 
many of whom barely eke out a living, is 
no doubt the reason for much of the out- 
burst of feeling which is exhibited. Pin- 
ing for a professional life, young men, en- 
couraged by the fact that in former days 
practitioners made, in many cases, hand- 
some competences out of their profession, 
and trusting in the " close combine " 
which exists to realize all their expecta- 
tions, they enter on a life calling for which 
many of them are unfitted, and, as the 
article referred to says, " settle down and 
be ready for any emergency," trusting to 
the people to support them, and, in fact, 
demanding a support, and resisting any 
supposed invasion of their rights. 

The article says, " When druggists will 
undertake to manufacture and compound 
medicines to cure diseases, and make a 
trade of them to everybody, we think they 
are going beyond their duty, and invading 
the rights of every physician now devoting 
his time to the practice of medicine." 



Who, we ask, is the proper person to 
" manufacture and compound medicines " 
if not the druggist ? The law says he is, 
and licenses him to do so ; then by what 
right or on what grounds can the physi- 
cian object ? How are they " invading the 
rights of every physician " ? What law, 
either of custom or on the statute books 
of the country, consigns to the physician 
" the right " to " nianufacture and com- 
pound medicines " ? True, there are many 
physicians throughout the country who do 
prepare proprietary remedies and push 
their sale ; still this does not say they are 
the only persons who should do so, neither, 
we think, will our contemporary attempt 
to justify them. 

Our contention is, if proprietary medi- 
cines are to be manufactured, the druggist 
is the one who should make them, and 
" make a trade of them to everybody." 

Another complaint made by physicians 
is in respect to the refilling of prescrip- 
tions by druggists. This matter we spoke 
of at length in a recent issue. We would 
merely notice a threat made in the Domin- 
ion Medical Monthly, where its says, " A 
physician can now keep his supply of tab- 
lets, triturates, pills, dressings, etc., in 
such a convenient form that he can give 
his own medicines to his patients at very 
little waste of time. If the druggists are 
not careful, they may force medical men 
to keep their own supplies." All of which 
is quite true, and, referring to the first 
clause, we krow of instances — and who 
does not ? — of physicians now dispensing 
their own medicines, sometimes charging 
for them and sometimes not, in some 
cases giving advice and medicine as low 
as twenty-five cents, and ranging upwards 
to five dollars and sometimes more. The 
threat to " keep their own supplies," there- 
fore, does not alarm many ; but how would 
it do for every druggist to have his own 
physician, who could prescribe free ? If 
doctors will go at us with " daggers 
drawn," surely we must, as pharmacists, 
prepare to meet them, and "where there's 
a will there's a way." Let us rather, there- 
fore, work harmoniously together, as we 
should do, each keeping as much as pos- 
sible within his own limit, and be ro-la- 
borers in the main aim and end of both 
professions — the relief of the suffering and 
cure of the diseased. 



Cash Discount. 



The wholesale drug houses of Mon- 
treal have issued a joint circular in refer- 
ence to discounts, etc., which reads as 
follows : 

On and after January ist, 1895, our 
terms will be as under : 

Monthly accounts (four months' goods) 
paid on or before the fifteenth day of the 
month following that of purchase will be 
subject to 5 per cent, discount. 

If paid after that date, and on or before 
the last day of the same month, 3 per 
cent, discount will be allowed. 

Settlements after above indicated peri- 
ods, and prior to maturity (four months 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(ioa) 



Business for 1895 



SHOULD start off with a boom, and we are fully prepared to aid you in making it a profitable 
year, if you will but invest a portion of your business capital in the best line of Non-secret 
Preparations that are manufactured. We are pioneers in the trade, having been the origi- 
nators ot tne Non-secret Idea; and thoui^'h our prices are, in some instances, a trifle higher than 
those of competing houses, the quality of our products will well warrant the slight advance. We 
strive to manufacture the best preparations that can be made, our motto being 

"NOT THE CHEAPEST, BUT THE BEST." 



Our lines of Sarsaparill.\s, Cough Syrups, Worm Medicines, Liniments, Salves, and other 
popular household remedies are very attractive and saleable. They are made of pure materials, are 
of excellent formul;E, are finished with handsome and artistic wrappers, and yield a liberal profit 
of from 100 per cent, to 400 percent. The great points in their favor are that they are true to the 
formulae printed on the labels. The goods bear your address (you know what you are selling), 
and your trade on them, once established, will prove permanent and profitable. 

Our Non-secret Catalogue for 1895 is carefully 
compiled and handsomely illustrated. A careful 
perusal will repay you well, for we show you our 
formulae, what the goods cost, what they sell for, 
and the exact margin of profit to be made on each 
preparation. 



Send for a copy of our Catalogue for 
1895, or fill out the attached coupon, and 
mail to 



CUT THIS OUT AND MAIL TO 



FREDERICK STEARNS & CO., 

WINDSOR, ONT. 

Kindly mail me a copy of your new Catalogue for 
1895, as advertised in the Canadian Druggist. 



FREDERICK STEARNS & CO., 



MANUFACTURING PHARMACISTS, 



LONDON, ENG NEW YORK CITY. DETROIT, MICH. 



(iob) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



B u ttormill^ 

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Over 2,000,000 
Cakes Sold in 1892. 



The Best Selling 

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the World. 



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OUR LINE OF 

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the name "BUTTERMILK" is printed as above "in 
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COSMO BUTTERMILK SOAP CO, 

I«3 Wabasli .4 %'«'., t"HI«'.4<iO. 

F.W.HUDSON & CO , TORONTO 

Sole Agents for Canada. 

KENNEDY'S 

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(REGISTERED) 



A POSITIVE CURE FOR 

CATARRH 

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HEADACHE, Etc 



It is reliable, safe, and sure, giving instant relief in the 
most distressing cases. 

PRICE, 25 CENTS. 

Wholesale of Kerry, Watt^on & Co,, Montreal. 

Lyinan, Kii<>x & Co., IVIoutreal and 
Toronto. 

And all leading Druggists. 



OLD DOMINION CRESCENT BRAND 

CINNAMON PILLS 

THE ONLY GKNUINE 

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ASK your Druggist for " Burland's Old Dominion Cres- 
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Upon receipt oi six cents in stamps we will reply by return 
mail, gi^-ing full particulars in plain envelope. Address 

BURLAND MEDICAL. CO., 

Morse Building, NEW YORK CITY. 

please mention this paper. 



SURE SELLING SPECIALTIES: 

CARSON'S BITTERS 

PECTORIA 

SILVER CREAM 

ALLAN'S COUGH CANDIES 

\ j;ro8s Boxes at S»l per Box. 

SOAP BARK 

In 5c. Packages, \ grosa Box, SI 
per Box. 

Full lines of Sundries. 

Mail orders promptly executed. 



ALLAN & CO. 

53 FRONT ST. EAST, TORONTO 

Wm. Radam's 

MICROBE 
KILLER . . 



WILLIAM ELLIS 

Sole Manufacturer for the Pro- 
vinces of Ontario and Quebec. 

(The factory having been removed from Toronto.) 



SOLD BY ALL WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS. 



HEAD OFFICE AND FACTORY : 

98 DUNDAS ST., 

LONDON, ONT. 

DICKS 

UNIVERSAL 
MEDICINES 



FOR HORSES 
AND CATTLE 



They always give entire >alisfaction, and there axe no 
medicines in the market that can compare with them. 

Thrifty farmers, stockowners and carters all over the 
country are, by actual results, realizing that they cannot 
afford to be without a supply of 
Dick'rt Blood Purifier Price 50e. 
Dick's Blister, for Curbs, Spavins, Swellings, 

etc. Price 50c. 
D!ck*s Liniment for Cuts, Sprains, Bruises, etc. 

Price 35c. 
Dick's Ointment. Price 25c. 

Circulars and advertising cards furnished. 

DICK & CO., P.O.BOX 482, MONTREAL. 



PER DOZ, 

No. 1. Hozzle and Shield, with Outlet Tubinff . 

No. 3. " " Complete 2 -qt. Fountain, 48 

DISCOUNT TO TRADE ON APPLICATION. 
BEST SYRINGE ON THE MARKET. SOLO BY ALL JOBBER'- 

LYMAN, KNOX & CO. 

Montreal and Toronto 

Agents for Canada. 




HOW 18 THIS ? 



.Something unique even in these days of mam- 
molh preniiurn offers is the latest effort of 
Stafford's Magazine, a New York monthly of 
home and general reading. 

The proposition is to send the Magazine one 
year for one dollar, the regular subscription 
price, and in addition to send to each subscriber 
lifty-two complete novels during the twelve 
months ; one each week. 

Think of it. You receive a new and complete 
novel, by mail, postpaid, every week for fifty- 
two weeks, and in addition you get the Maga- 
zine once a month for twelve months, all for one 
dollar. It is an offer which the pul)lishers can 
only afford to make in the confident expectation 
of getting a hundred thousand new subscribers. 
Among the authors in the coming series .are 
Wilkie Collins, Walter Besant, Mrs. Oliphanl, 
Mary Cecil Hay, Florence Matryat, Anthony 
TroUope, A. Conan Doyle, Miss Braddon, Cap- 
tain Marryat, Miss Thackeray, and Jules Verne. 
If you wish to take advantage of this unusual 
opportunity, send one dollar for Stafford's Maga- 
zine, one year. Your first copy of the Magazine, 
and your first number of the fifty-two novels 
(one each week) which you are to receive during 
the year, will be sent you by return mail. Remit 
by P.O. Order, registered letter, or express. 

Address — 

STAFFORD PUBLISHING CO., 

Publishers of 
STAFFORD'S MAGAZINE, 



P.O. Box a»64. 



NEW YORK, N.Y 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



II 



from fifteenth day of month of purchase), 
will be subject to allowance at the rate of 
7 per cent, per annum for the unc\pired 
time. 

Passbooks will not be issued after 
above date, as it is found that the system 
interferes with settlements. 

Monthly statements will be rendered 
promptly. 

Montreal, Dec. loth, 1894. 



Perfumes and Formulae for Their 
Manufacture. 

Bv Jacoh Jesson, Muskhgon, Mich. 

The query, " How far is it expedient 
for pharmacists to manufacture their own 
perfumes, and what formulas can be pro- 
posed for their manufacture?" may be 
answered with the statement that it is 
expedient so far as the pharmacist may 
desire pleasure and profit from his busi- 
ness. The art of manufacturing perfumes 
by right belongs to the pharmacist, but it 
ha-i drifted into the hands of specialists, 
owing to the general impression that 
it is something mysterious and dififi- 
cult. I assuie you, however, that it is 
not difficult, and every pharmacist of 
ordinary intelligence should be able to 
supply his trade with goods equal to 
those produced by domestic or foreign 
specialists. The outlay required is small 
compared with the profits derivable from 
the investment. The essential oils and 
pomades required can be obtained from 
wholesale druggists, and in the desired 
quantities. The formulas herewith pre- 
sented have been in use by me for the 
past seven years, and may be accepted as 
reliable. ... I have divided the 
subject into three parts, (i) a short 
description of each article, and the mode 
of preparing the tincture, spirit, or 
essence ; and as these formulas have 
proven to be good and practical, we here- 
with publish them. The materials enter- 
ing into the manufacture of perfumes are 
obtained in different parts of the world, 
and from the vegetable and animal king- 
doms. 

ALMOND (amygdala AMARA). 

Is a native of Persia, Syria, and Bar- 
bary, and is cultivated in Southern 
France and Italy. 

Almond Spirit. 

Oil of bitter almonds drops 80 

Deodorized alcohol. ... oz. 16 

Procure the best Cologne spirits or 
deodorized alcohol obtainable. Do not 
use common alcohol, as its odor is too 
strong and pungent for perfumers' use. 

AMBERflRIS. 

This substance, which is found floating 
in the sea, or is thrown up by the waves 
upon the shores of various countries, is 
now generally believed to be produced in 
the intestines of the sperm whale. The 
best gray ambergris is quite expensive, 
but is the only one worth buying. 



Tincture of Ambergris. 

Ambergris drams 2 

Powd. orris root drams 2 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 16 

Grind the ambergris and orris in a 
mortar until reduced to a fine powder; 
transfer to a bottle, and add the alcohol. 
Macerate for thirty days, and filter 
through paper. 

HENZOIN (bENZOINUM). 

Benzoin is imported from Borneo, 
Java, and Siani. The tincture of benzoin 
has the property of adding permanence 
to some of the more fleeting odors. 

Tincture of Benzoin. 

Gum benzoin, in fine powder oz. 2 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 16 

Macerate for thirty days and filter. 

BERGAMOT (ciTRUS BERGAMIA). 

The oil is obtained m Italy by expres- 
sion from the peel of the fruit. It should 
be kept in a dark place and in a tightly 
corked bottle. If not well taken care of, 
it soon loses its green color, becomes 
cloudy from a deposit of resin, and 
acquires a turpentine smell. Care should 
be taken to preserve all oils as above 
directed. 

cassie (acacia farnesl\na). 

Cassje is cultivated in Southern France 
and Italy, and produces a very valuable 
perfume, resembling violets, but stronger. 

Essence of Cassie. 

Cassie pomade oz. 16 

Deodorized alcohol q.s. or oz. 16 

Introduce the pomade and alcohol into 
a Mason fruit jar of half gallon capacity. 
Digest by means of a water bath until the 
pomade is barely melted : shake well to- 
gether, and repeat the shaking frequently 
until cold. Allow this to stand forty 
days; then drain off the essence. If this 
falls short of one pint, repeat with a suf- 
ficient quantity of alcohol to make up 
that measure. The washing can be con- 
tinued and a second pint of essence 
obtained, which, although much weaker, 
may be found useful in a cheaper grade 
of perfumes. 

CLOVE (carvophvllu.s). 

The clove tree is one of the most ele- 
gant trees found in the Moluccas and 
other islands of the Chinese seas. Clove 
is a leading feature in some of the fine 
bouquets. 

Spirit Cloves. 

Oil of cloves drams 4 

Deodorized alcohol oz. i6 

citronella (andropogon mardus). 

Oil of citronella is obtained by distilla- 
tion from citronella grass, a native of 
Ceylon and India. 

civiT (from viverre civetta). 

The substance is secreted by the civit 
cat. It is found in a large double glandu- 
lar receptacle, between the anus and 
pudendum. The cat abounds in portions 



of Asia. Civit has a most disagreeable 
odor, but as a fixing substance, for giving 
permanence to the more fleeting odors, it 
is very valuable. 

Tincture of Civit. 

Civit dram I 

Powd. orris root dram I 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 16 

Proceed as with tincture of ambergris. 
geranium (pelargoneum capitatum). 

Geranium oil is obtained in Southern 
France and Turkey, from rose leaf geran- 
ium. 

Spirits of Geranium. 

Oil of geranium oz. i 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 15 

JASMINE (jA.S.MINU.M ODORATISSIMUM). 

Jasmine is cultivated in SoL'thern 
France and Italy. Its odor is so peculiar 
and fine that it cannot, itself, be imitated, 
but it is used for imitating odors of other 
flowers. 

Essence of Jasmine. 

Jasmine pomade oz. 16 

Deodorized alcohol q.s. or oz. 16 

Proceed as with cassie. 

LAVENDER (lAVENDULA VERa). 

The best of oil of lavender comes from 
Mitcham, in England, where the plant is 
grown extensively. 

LEMON (citrus LIMONUM). 

The lemon tree is a member of the 
great citrus family. Sicily produces a 
large amount of the oil of lemon. The 
raising and extracting of oils of lemon, 
orange, and bergamot form one of the 
chief industries in the vicinity of Palermo. 
A good essence of lemon for dispensing, or 
for soda water syrups, may be prepared 
as follows : 

Oil of lemon drams 4 

Catb. magnesia >' ^ 

Sugar. " 4 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 8 

Water qz. 8 

Dissolve the oil iti two ounces of alco- 
hol ; triturate in a mortar with the mag- 
nesia and sugar. Gradually add the 
remainder of the alcohol and water, and 
filter. 

LEMON grass (andropogar citratus). 

Is a species of grass growing in India. 
On account of its odor resembling ver- 
bena, the oil is used for preparing the 
extract of verbena. 

MUSK (from moschus, mosch.atus). 

Musk is obtained from the musk deer, 
a small animal inhabiting the mountain- 
ous regions of Central Asia. Grain musk 
is the best form in which to purchase the 
article. Musk is used extensively in per- 
fumes, both as a simple extract and for 
giving permanence to more fleeting odors. 

Tincture of Musk. 

Grain musk drams 2 

Hot water oz. I 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 15 

Rub the musk to a fine paste with the 
hot water. Digest in a covered mortar 



12 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



for two hours, add the alcohol, and trans- 
fer to a tightly-corked bottle. Digest for 
thirty days and filter. 

ORANGE (citrus AURANTUM. CITRUS 

bigarade). 

From the orange tree is obtained five 
distinct and valuable perfumes : (i) The 
true flower odor, obtained by digesting 
the flowers with lard ; {2) oil neroli pet- 
ale or oil neroli bigarade, by distilling the 
flowers of the sweet and bitter orange 
respectively ; (3) oil of neroli petit grain, 
by distilling the leaves and unripe fruit ; 
(4) oil of orange Portugal, obtained by 
rolling the fruit in a metal cup covered 
with spikes, known as an ecuelle, which 
wounds the fruit and causes the oil to 
flow from the oil glands ; (5) commercial 
oil of orange, obtained by expressing or 
distilling the orange peel. The orange 
tree is cultivated extensively in Southern 
France, Italy, and Sicily. 

Essence of Orange Flowers. 

Orange flower pomade oz. 16 

Deodorized alcohol q. s. or oz. 16 

Proceed as with cassie. 

Neroli Spirit. 

Oil neroli petale drams 4 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 16 

ORRIS (oris florentina). 

Is largely cultivated near Florence, 
Italy. 

Tincture Orris. 

Orris root pulverized oz. 8 

Deodorized alcohol, enough to make oz. 16 

Prepare by percolation. 

PATCHOULV (POGOSTEMON PATCHOULL 
LINDLEV). 

Patchouly is a native of Selhet, a dis- 
trict of Bengal. It is also found in Java, 
Ceylon, and portions of China. The oil 
is distilled from the fresh herb. It has a 
very peculiar musty, mossy odor ; but, 
when properly blended, forms a very fash- 
ionable perfume. 

PIMENTO. 

The allspice tree- is a native of the 
West Indies, Mexico, and South America. 
The oil is obtained by distilling the ber- 
ries. 

ROSE (rose centifolia). 

This is truly the Queen of Flowers, 
and, although roses are found growing 
wild in nearly every part of the world, it 
is only in France, Turkey, and India that 
they are cultivated for their perfume. 
The Turkish oil is the one commonly 
found in the market. Oil of rose should 
congeal at 80 deg. F. When slowly 
cooled to 50 deg. F. the oil becomes a 
transparent solid, interspersed with nu- 
merous slender, shining, irridescent scale- 
like crystals (U.S.P.). The oil is obtained 
by distilling the flowers with water. 

Essence of Rose. 

Rose pomade. oz. 16 

Deodorized alcohol q. s. or oz. 16 

Proceed as with cassie essence. 



spirit of Rose. 

Oil of rose drams 2 

Oil of rose geranium ** i 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 16 

The oil of rose geranium is added to 
give permanence to the spirit. 

ROSEMARY (ROSMARINUS OFFICINALIS). 

The rosemary plant is a native of the 
borders of the Mediterranean Sea. It is 
also cultivated in this country. The oil 
is one of the leading ingredients in 
Cologne. 

santal (santalum album). 

The oil is distilled from the wood, 
which is a native of Australia and the 
South Sea Islands. 

Spirit of Santal. 

Oil of santal wood drams 2 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 16 

TONKA (dIPTERIX ODORATA). 

The Tonka bean is the fruit of a large 
South American tree. When fresh they 
are very fragrant, having a strong odor of 
new-mown hay. They are exported from 
Para and Angustura. Tonka beans are 
used for scenting snuff, and by unscrupu- 
lous dealers for adulterating vanilla. And 
in perfumery in the form of tincture they 
enter into many of the leading bouquets. 

Tincture of Tonka. 

Tonka beans oz. 6 

Deodorized alcohol, a sufficient quantity. 

Reduce the beans to a coarse powder ; 
macerate in a corked bottle with 16 
ounces of alcohol four days. Then filter 
and add enough alcohol through the 
filter to make the product measure 16 
ounces. 

tuberose (paleanthes tuberosa). 

The tuberose is a native of the East 
Indies. It is cultivated for its perfume 
in Southern France. Its odor is very 
fine and is a general favorite. 

Essence of Tuberose. 

Tuberose pomade oz. 16 

Deodorized alcohol q. s. or oz. 16 

Proceed as with cassie. 

VANILLA (vanilla PLAINFOLIA). 

The best vanilla beans come from 
Mexico. Tincture of vanilla is used as a 
fixing ingredient to some perfumes. 

Tincture of Vanilla. 

Vanilla beans oz. i 

White sugar oz. i 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 16 

Cut the beans in small pieces. Beat 

with the sugar in a mortar until they are 

reduced to a coarse powder. Macerate 

with the alcohol for thirty days and filler. 

violets (viola odorata). 

A very delicate odor, but very fleeting ; 
by the addition of some of the stronger 
properties a very fine and popular per- 
fume is obtained. Violets are cultivated 
in Southern France. 

Essence of Violets. 

Violet pomade oz. 16 

Deodorized alcohol q. s. or oz. 16 

Proceed as with cassie essence. 



VITIVERT, OR KUS KUS (ANDROPOGAN 

muricaxus). 
Is the rhizome of an Indian grass. 
Spirits of Vitiveri. 

Oil of vitivert drops 30 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 4 

ylang or ihlang (cananga odorata). 
This plant is found in the Phillippines 
and the islands of the Indian Archipelago. 
The oil is obtained by distilling the flow- 
ers. The perfume is very characteristic 
and lasting. 

Spirit of Ylang. 

Ylang oil drams 3 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 4 

In the following formulae, if the per- 
fumes are too expensive, the ambergris 
can be omitted and civit substituted, 
except in extract of ambergris. The musk 
can also be reduced in strength one-half 
and still yield satisfactory results. In ail 
cases secure the best goods, regardless of 
price. In perfumes as well as in medi- 
cines quality is of the first importance. 
When the perfumes are mixed they should 
be frequently agitated, and allowed to 
stand for two or three weeks before filter- 
ing. Age improves all perfumes if kept 
in a moderate atmosphere and in a dark 
place. 

(1) AMBERGRIS EXTRACT. 

.Spirit of rose oz. 3 

Tincture of ambergris "8 

" musk " 4 

'* vanilla '* i 

Where permanence is desired this can 
be recommended. 

(2) ESS. BOUQUET. 

.Spirit of rose oz. 8 

Tincture of ambergris " i 

" orris " i 

Essence of cassie " i 

Oil of bergamot drops 30 

" lemon " 60 

" neroli petale " 15 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 5 

(3) frangipanni. 

Tincture of musk oz. 5 

" civit drams 4 

" orris root oz. 3 

Essence of orange flowers " 3 

' ' tuberose " 3 

Spirit of vitivert " i 

Oil of santal drops 60 

' ' neroli petale " 60 

" rose " 120 

" rose geranium " 60 

Where there is a demand for some- 
thing lasting regardless of price, this will 
prove satisfactory. 

(4) rose geranium extract. 

Oil of rose geranium oz. i 

Deodorized alcohol " 15 

(5) HELIOTROPE. 

Tincture of vanilla oz. 8 

" ambergris " i 



Spirit of rose " 3 

Essence of rose " 3 

Oil of bitter almond drops 5 

(6) HONEYSUCKLE. 

Essence of rose oz. 4 



" violet 








Tincture of vanilla 

" tolu 


" I 

*' I 




.. " I 


Oil of neroli petale 

" " bitter almond 

Deodorized alcohol 


drops 3 

oz. I 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



13 



(7) JOCKEY CLUB. 

Spirit of rose 02. 4 

Essence of rose " ' 

" " tuberose "4 

" " cassie "2 

" " jasmine " > 

" " orange flowers " > 

Tincture of civit "2 

" " musk " I 

(8) LAVENDER EXTRACT. 

Oil of lavender (Mitcham) drams 4 

Essence of rose oz. 2 

Deodorized alcohol " '4 

(9) LILY OF THE VALLEY OR WHITE POND 

LILY. 

Essence of tuberose oz. 8 

" "jasmine " I 

" " orange flowers " I 

" " cassie "2 

" " rose " 2 

Spirit of rose " ' 

Tincture of vanilla "I 

Oil of bitter almonds drops 2 

(10) MILLEFl.EURS (THOUSAND FIOVVERS). 

Spirit of rose oz. 2 

Essence of rose " ' 

" " jasmine "4 

" " orange flowers " I 

" " cassie " 2 

Tincture of orris " 2 

" " tonka drams 4 

" " ambergris "4 

" musk " 4 

Oil of bitter almonds drops 3 

" " neroli petale " 3 

" " cloves " 3 

" " bergamot "120 

(11) MUSK. 

Tincture of musk oz. II 

.Spirit of rose " 4 

Tincture of civit " I 

This is rather a high-priced article, but 
the tincture of musk can be reduced one- 
half with alcohol, and still yield a satis- 
factory result. 

(12) NEW-MOWN HAY. 

Tincture of tonka oz. 6 

Spirit of rose "2 

Essence of rose " 2 

" " ja.mine " 2 

Oil of neroli petale drops 10 

** *' rose geranium " 60 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 4 

(13) NIGHT- BLOOM I NO CEREUS. 

.Spirit of rose oz. 4 

Essence of jasmine "4 

Tincture of tonka " 2 

" " civit " 2 

" " benzoin '' 4 

(14) ORANGE FLOWER EXTRACT. 
Essence of orange flowers oz. 12 

" " cassie " 2 

Tincture of musk " 2 

(15) PATCHOOLY. 

Oil of patclio.dy dr.i|w . . . drop.; 75 

" " rose ■' 15 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 16 

SWEET PEA. 

Essence of tuberose oz. 5 

" " orange flowers " 5 

" " rose " 5 

Tincture of tonka " i 

(16) CLOVER PINK. 

Essence of rose oz 6 

" " cassie " 4 

.Spirit of orange flowers " 4 

Tincture of vanilla .. " 2 

Oil of cloves drops 10 

(17) RONDOLETIA. 

Tincture of musk . . drams 4 

" " ambergris " 4 

" " vanilla " 4 

Oil of bergamot " i 

" " lavender (Mitcham) drams 2 

" "cloves " I 

" " rose drops 30 

Deodorized alcohol , oz. 14 



(18) 



ROSB. 
IVhite Rose (No. i ). 

Spirit of rose oz. 8 

Essence of rose " 3 

" " jasmine " 4 

Extract of patchouly " ' 

(19) White Rose (No. 2). 

Oil of rose drams 2 

" " " geranium drops 30 

Essence of rose oz. 4 

Deodorized alcohol " 16 

Essence of jasmine " 2 

Tincture of musk " ' 

" " ambergris " i 

Extract of white rose is a general favor- 
ite and cannot be recommended too 
highly. 

(20) MOSS ROSE. 

.Spirit of rose oz. 9 

Essence of orange flowers " 8 

" " rose "2 

Tincture of civit " l 

" " musk " I 

(21) TEA ROSE. 

Essence of rose oz. 4 

Spirit " " "8 

" santal " 2 

Essence of orange flowers " i 

Tincture of orris " i 

Oil of rose geranium . .drops 20 

(22) SPRING FLOWERS. 

Essence of rose oz. 7 

" " violet " 6 

Oil of bergamot ... drams I 

Spirit of rqse oz. I 

Tincture of ambergris " I 

Essence of cassie " I 

(23) TUBEROSE EXTRACT. 

Essence of tuberose. ... oz. 15 

Tincture of ambergris " I 

(24) UPPER TEN. 

Tincture of vanilla oz. 4 

" ambergris "3 

" orris " 3 

Spirit of rose " 3 

Essence of orange flowers ** 3 

Oil of bergamot drops 90 

" lemon " 15 

(25) VI'KBENA. 

Oil of lemon grass drops 50 

" lemon , " 320 

" neroli petale " 20 

" orange " 160 

Essence of orange flowers oz. 3 

" tuberose "3 

Spirit of rose "3 

Deodorized alcohol " 6 

(26) VERBENA (NO. 2). 

Oil of lemon grass drams 3 

*' lemon ** 3 

' ' orange . drops 30 

Deodorized alcohol oz. 15 

(27) VIOLET. 

Eoience of violets oz. 1 1 

" cassie " 2 

Tincture of musk " 1 

" orris " 2 

(28) VIOLET (NO. 2). 

Essence of cassie oz. 6 

' ' rose "3 

' ' tuberose " 3 

Tincture of orris " 3 

Spirit of bitter almonds " i 

(29) WOOD VIOLET. 

Extract of violets (No. 2) oz. 16 

Oil of bitter almonds " 15 

(30) YLANG YLANG. 

Spirit of ylang oz. 8 

' ' rose "4 

Essence of jasmine '. " 2 

Tincture of civit " 2 

This is my favorite ; it combines fra- 
grance and lasting qualities at a moderate 
price. 



(31) WHITE LILAC. 

Essence of tuberose oz. 1 2 

" orange flowers . " 3 

Tincture of civit drams 4 

.Spirit of ylang " 4 

Oil of bitter almonds " 3 

[This article was read before the Michi- 
gan Pharmaceutical Association, and has 
been republished in the Registered Phar- 
macist. — Eu.] 



The Disinfection of the Oust of Rooms. 

Dr. P. Miguel has recently made a 
comparative study of the disinfectants 
available for the disinfection of living 
rooms. He condemns, first of all, the 
system by which the public can procure 
the most dangerous antiseptics, notably 
corrosive sublimate. 

The experiments of the author have 
been chiefly made upon the dry dust of 
rooms, and have tried the effect of va- 
pors of various volatile substances on 
microbes. 

The classification of acid vapors in the 
order of their destructive activity with re- 
gard to microbes is as follows : 

Osmic acid. 

Hydrochloric acid. 

Nitro-hydrochloric acid. 

Formic acid. 

Hydrocyanic acid. 

Sulphurous acid. 

Acetic acid. 

Ammoniacal vapors are not capable of 
destroying the germs of all bacteria, and 
are, moreover, inactive against the spores 
of the anthrax bacillus ; they act injuri- 
ously upon objects exposed to their 
action. 

Methylic alcohol., though possessing an 
energetic disinfecting power, belongs to 
the class of antiseptics whose action is 
incomplete. 

Ethylic alcohol, in some cases, is an 
unreliable bactericide, but in many cases 
gives satisfactory results. 

The hutylic and amylic alcohol zre slow 
and inactive bactericides. 

Formaldehyde seems to be a bacteri- 
cide of altogether remarkable power, and 
the author thinks it is destined to sup- 
plant all the other antiseptics as soon as 
its cost is sufficiently reduced to make its 
general application practicable. The 
vapors of a i per cent, solution of for 
maldehyde will destroy all microbes and 
all germs of the typhus micro-organisms. 
They have no action upon other ob- 
jects. 

Having obtained this important result. 
Dr. Miguel commenced a series of ex- 
periments on " typhus bacillus," using 
gradually diluted solutions of formalde- 
hyde. He found that with a 2 J/2 per 
cent, solution the bacteria were killed in 
forty-eight hours. It was only when the 
dilution reached 1 in 800 that the bac- 
teria commenced to resist the action for 
a longer period — it was only killed, in 
fact, at the end of ninety-six hours — and 
with I part in 1,000 the time required to 
effect the same object was 168 hours. 



_t4 

As is the case with sulphur dioxide, 
the vapor of the aldehyde has great pene- 
trating powers, and destroys the microbes 
even when the dust has accumulated to a 
great depth. 

In the direct experiments made upon 
cultures in bouillon^ i part of formalde- 
hyde in 2,000 stopped all growth, whilst 
to produce the same effect with corrosive 
sublimate twice this proportion was 
necessary. 

The author bas also satisfied himself 
that no risk is run through breathing the 
vapor, and states that a person can 
breathe freely for several minutes in a 
closed room in which a 10 per cent, solu- 
tion was left to evaporate, without suffer- 
ing any inconvenience. 

Briefly summarizing the results, formal- 
dehyde combines all the qualities of an 
excellent disinfectant : promptness of 
action, considerable penetrative power, 
energetic action at low temperatures, in- 
nocuousness towards metals and other 
objects exposed to the vapor, and to in- 
halation at the strength used for bacteri- 
cidal purposes. 

The author, continuing the study of 
aldehydes in this connection, arrives at 
the conclusion that formaldehyde, trioxy- 
inethelene (polymerized formaldehyde), 
and benzoyl chloride may be classed in 
the order named as absolute disinfect- 
ants ; two others, viz., benzylic aldehyde 
and chloral as relative disinfectants. 

The author has also determined the 
relative disinfecting value of various 
essential oils, and classes them in the 
following order, the temperature during 
the experiments being constant (is°C.), 
and the duration forty-eight hours : 

Percentage 
of bacteria 
destroyed. 

Essential oil of almonds (bitter) 99 

** '* thyme 99 

" " cumin 95 

" " peppermint.., 93 

" " girafle 92 

" " neroli 90 

" " lemon 88 

" " lavender 81 

" " canella 75 

" " aspic 74 

" " eucalyptus 74 

" " rosemary 73 

" " terebenthine 66 

Camphor 65 

The essences are agreeable disinfect- 
ants, not affecting either materials or 
colors, but of limited value on account of 
the incompleteness of their action. — 
Ann. de Micrographie, 1 894 ; Manufac- 
turing Chemist. 



CANADIAN DRUGGiSt. 



Three Creosote Preparations. 

Bv H. L. Grimes. 

Urged by the growing importance of 
creosote as a therapeutic agent, and by 
the frequent inquiries by physicians for a 
palatable form of administering the same, 
I made a series of experiments to attain 
that end. 

Owing to the peculiar and persistently 
pungent taste of creosote, there is nothing, 
in my opinion, short of the gelatin 



capsule, that will completely mask it. 
However, as this form of administration 
is not always eligible, I confined my 
efforts to combining the drug with other 
agents calculated to modify the pungency 
of the drug to a greater or smaller extent, 
and make the medicament more accept- 
able to the palate and to the stomach. 

In all pharmaceutical preparations of 
creosote, intended for internal use, none 
but the purest beech-wood creosote should 
be used. That of Merck & Co.'s im- 
portation takes preference with me. 

The three appended formulas have 
been deduced from my experiments, and 
the products have received the approval 
of many very prominent physicians : 

WINE OF CREOSOTE. 

Creosote ( Beech-wood) 96 min. 

Alcohol I fl. oz. 

Oil Cinnamon 24 drops 

Oil Cloves 12 drops 

Oil Anise .... 12 drops 

Syrup Orange-Peel 4 fl. oz. 

Sherry Wine 8 fl. oz. 

Simple Elixir, enough to make. . . 16 fl. oz. 

Dissolve the creosote and oils in the 
alcohol, add the wine, syrup, and elixir, 
and filter through purified talcum. Each 
tabespoonful represents 3 minims of creo- 
sote. The dose is a tea- to a tablespoon- 
ful three or four times a day, after meals. 

EMULSION OF CREOSOTE. 

Creosote (Beech-wood) 768 min. 

Powdered Acacia 1080 grs. 

Water, enough to make 32 fl. oz. 

Triturate the creosote with the acacia 
in a dry mortar, and add, all at once, 27 
fluid drams of water ; stir briskly with the 
pestle until the nucleus of the emulsion 
is formed, and add enough water to make 
2 pints ; finally, strain through a cloth. 
This is a convenient preparation for ad- 
mixture with other medicaments. Each 
tablespoonful contains 3 minims of creo- 
sote. 

Perhaps'the most admirable combina- 
tion is a creosoted emulsion of cod-liver 
oil with hypophosphites, of which the fol- 
lowing is the formula : 

CREOSOTED EMULSION OF COD-LIVER OIL WITH 
HYPOPHOSPHITES. 

Cod-Liver Oil 32 fl. oz. 

Creosote (Beech-wood) (>}i fl. drs. 

Powdered Acacia 8 oz. 

Glycerin 4 fl. oz. 

.Syrup Orange-Peel 2 fl. oz. 

Calcium Hypophosphite 555 grs. 

Sodium Hypophosphite 555 grs. 

Oil Wintergreen 2 fl. dr. 

Oil Sassafras 2 fl. dr. 

Oil Cinnamon 2 fl. dr. 

Distilled Water, enough to make 4 pints. 

Mix the cod-liver oil, creosote, and 
essential oils with the acacia, in a dry 
mortar ; dissolve the hypophosphites in 
1 2 fluid ounces of warm water, pour the 
solution, all at once, into the mixture of 
oils, creosote, and acacia, and stir briskly 
in one direction with the pestle until 
emulsification takes place ; then add the 
glycerin, syrup, and enough water to 
make 4 pints, and strain through a cloth. 
Recently-distilled water should preferably 
be used in these emulsions : but, if none 



is at hand, water that has been freshly 
boiled and filtered will serve the pur- 
pose. In cold weather the water should 
be slightly, warmed, else the emulsion will 
be very slow in forming. The creosote 
in the latter emulsion temporarily obtunds 
the sense of taste to a considerable de- 
gree while the preparation is being swal- 
lowed, and helps 'to conceal, in a measure, 
the unpleasant taste of the cod-liver oil. — 
Merck's Market Report. 



The Origin of Pharmacy. 

The historian of the St. Louis Globe- 
Democrat has been occupying himself 
with the origin and development of phar- 
macy, and as a result we have an interest- 
ing study of the subject. 

3300 YEARS B.C. 

The identity of the druggist and the 
medicine man, he remarks, are, in the 
early ages, after as well as before Christ, 
necessarily almost inseparable. As early 
as 3300 years B.C., in the reign of Sent, 
we find directions as to the preparation 
of prescriptions. The giving of these 
was accompanied by incantations, so that 
the faith-cure advocates of to-day may 
almost claim this great antiquity. That 
the school of pharmacy was known among 
the Assyrians is abundantly attested. In 
the Ebers papyri, 1600 B.C., we have 
prescriptions of famous physicians. There 
were blisters and powders and ointments 
and the general use of drugs, both min- 
eral and vegetable. The Hebrews early 
absorbed a curiosity as to the pharmaceu- 
tical art, so great that they had a medical 
school of their own at Sora, as late as 200 
A.D. There was also development in 
pharmacy in China at a very early day, 
Ching Nong, a contemporary of Menca 
I., being learned in the art. Hippocrates, 
460-370 B C., is authority for many facts 
going to show that in the temples of 
^"Esculapius the art of medicine became 
somewhat systematized. The pharma- 
cists dwelt within the walls, whilst the 
physician went out among the people. 
With Hippocrates, however, the physician 
and the pharmacist became one. His re- 
lations are of his predecessors. He car- 
ried his drugs with him. In consequence 
of an epidemic, about 187 B.C., temples 
were erected to ^-Esculapius and Hygeia, 
introducing pharmacy and therapeutics 
into Rome. About ninety years later, or 
about iQo B.C., the people of Rome pur- 
chased a " shop of surgery " for Area- 
gathus, who had left Greece for Rome. 
There he practised both medicine and 
pharmacy. He had a fancy for opera- 
tions, and was therefore driven out. 

IN THE YEAR I. 

After this the extensive use of drugs 
showed the tendency towards pharmacy. 
Monecrates, i A.D., was one of the 
earliest of these disciples. He invented 
diachylon plaster, which is much the same 
as that used to-day. So also was Archi- 
genes. He employed opium in dysen- 
tery. Another pioneer in pharmacy was 



CAN'ADIAX DRUGGIST. 



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(Wholesale De|>artnieiu) 

And Jewry House, Old Jeivry. E.G. 



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CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 




DOMINION SHOW CASE WORKS ~1":=L?' 

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MANUFACTURERS OF 

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CANADIAN DRUCr.IST. 



Dioscorides, a sludent in botany and pliar- 
niacology, whose work was recognized as 
an aiilliorily as late as tlie sevenleenth 
cenlury. Dioscorides described 400 dif- 
ferent (ilants. (ialen was the first to 
secure the aronia of plants l)y distillation. 
His supremacy was maintained for 1,400 
years. It is on record of him that he 
kept a drug store in Rome. He added 
half as many to the plants described by 
! )ios(:orides. Then came a period of de- 
cline. There were, however, three great 
men — Buffus, who discovered the function 
of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, and Au- 
relianns and Leonidas, who proposed iso- 
lation in contagious diseases, and who 
were denounced as brutes for this action. 
Oribasius, in the fourth century, was very 
active in pharmacy. Pope (iregory the 
tireat, in the sixth century, proclaimed the 
school of hom<eopathy, which, however, 
had prevailed in China several centuries 
before. 

rH.\RMAtV AMONC THl'; .\R.\BI.\NS. 

The Arabians did miH;h to extend the 
practice of pharmacy, together with the 
separation of medicine and pharmacy, 
which was recognized as early as the 
eighth century. The Arabians held the 
practitioners of medicine in very high 
esteem. Mahomet himself had a fancy 
for the healing art, and thsre is reason 
for believing that numerous medical 
works were preserved by the Arabian 
physicians out of the destruction of the 
Alexandrian library. There were two 
great schools among the Arabians. Many 
drugs were imported from the East, and 
this gave birth to an army of dealers, 
physicians, who also practised pharmacy, 
and who were thus distinguished from 
the regular apothecaries. They existed 
in Italy as early as the eleventh century. 
It is also important to know that the sep- 
aration of medicine and pharmacy was 
established by law among the Arabians as 
early as the eleventh century. The school 
at Salerno compelled itS' graduates to 
sw^ear not to give or accept percentages on 
prescriptions. This school was founded 
in the seventh century, but subsequently 
fell under the control of the Arabs, after 
which their ideas as to the separation of 
medicine and pharmacy prevailed. 

PHARMACV UNDER THE SARACENS. 

It is beyond doubt that, prior to the 
twelfth century, there were drug stores in 
Cordova, Toledo, and other large towns, 
and that these establishments were under 
very severe restrictions. The material 
for the law passed in 1233, and which 
remained in force a long time, was drawn 
from these laws by Emperor Frederick II., 
of the two Sicilies. Under this law^ every 
physician was required to give informa- 
tion against any pharmacist who should 
sell bad drugs. Pharmacies were divided 
into two classes: — (i) The stalionarii, who 
sold simple medicines and non-magistral 
preparations according to a tariff deter- 
mined by competent authority : and (2) 
the confectionarii, whose business con- 
sisted in scrupulously dispensing the pre- 
scriptions of the medical men. All such 



establishi\ients were placed under the 
surveillance of the College of Medicine. 
Pharmacy was, to a great extent, under 
the control of the Arabian physicians 
during the Middle Ages. The religious 
orders, the Benedictines particularly, 
largely devoted themselves to pharn>acy, 
pharmacology, and therapeutics. These 
monks were forbidden to shed blood, so 
surgery largely fell into the hands of the 
barbers. With the rise of alchemy, 
medicine, [)harmacy, chemistry, toxicol- 
ogy, the grocery business, the confection- 
ery business, and barbering became one 
combined trade. In Spain, under the 
auspices of the Saracens, pharmacy at- 
tained a status it never lost. So, also, in 
Italy. The develo[nnent of i)harnncy in 
Germany and En^^land, however, took 
place somewhat later, so that the begin- 
ning of their pharmacal history is com- 
paratively recent. 

EARI,V GERMAN DRUGGISTS. 

The history in Germany begins in the 
thirteenth century. A drug store is found 
to have existed at Muenster in 1267, and 
one in Augsburg in 1285, and a third in 
Hildsheim in 1318. So the growth was 
very slow. The establishment at Hilds- 
heim was originally the property of the 
church, but after 1385 was controlled by 
the city. That the boundary line of 
pharmacy and medicine was clearly de- 
fined at this period is shown by the ex- 
istence of a parchment ordinance of the 
city of Nuremburg, 1350. This decree 
ordains that the druggist shall conscien- 
tiously fill all written and verbal orders 
on him according to his best ability ; 
that he shall use none but pure drugs ; 
that he shall treat rich and poor w'nh 
equal courtesy ; th it he shall be modest 
in his charges, and not demand more than 
he needs to feed and clothe himself and 
those dependent upon him, allowing a 
reasonable advance in the cost of the 
drug as a compensation for his service. 

THE GXOCER APOTHECARIES OF FRANCE 
AND ENGLAND. 

In Fiance and England grocers and 
spicers were early united with apothe- 
caries. In 1345 King Edward of England 
gave a pension of six pence a day to an 
apothecaiy of London who took care of 
his majesty during his illness in Scotland. 
The separation of the apothecary and the 
physician must have been pretty com- 
plete about that time, and it is also pretty 
certain that the populace suspected both 
of giving and taking percentages on pre- 
scripti' ns. This is shown in the "Can- 
terbury Tales," in which Chaucer says of 
his physician : — 

Full ready had he apolhec.iries 
To send him drugs and lectuaiies, 
For each of ihem made other to winne, 
Their friendship was not new to liegin. 

The pictures of the old apothecaries 
still in existence are of considerable inter- 
est. One of them of a drug store of 1 548 
is vividly described by Shakespeare, fifty 
years later, in Romeo and Juliet : — 

I do rememher an apothecary — 

And hereabouts he dwells— which have I noted 

In talter'd weeds, with overwhelming brows 



(nlling of sinipio, nuagre wire hi^ looks. 

Sharp misery had worn him 10 the l>ones ; 

.\nd in his needy shop a tortoise liiing, 

.•\n allignlor sluHed, and other skins 

Of ill-shaped fishes ; and about his shelves 

.\ beggarly account of empty lx)xes, 

(irecn earthen pots, blad<lers and musty seeds, 

Remnants of packthread and old cakes of roses, 

Were thinly scattered to make up a show. 

THE OLDEST PICTURE OF A DRUG STORE. 

The oldest picture of a drug store is 
cne of 1450. It looks like the warehouse 
of a creamery, with buckets full of butter 
piled shelf upon shelf, and might easily 
be taken for such a place were it not for 
the presence of the druggist preparing 
his drugs in a three-legged mortar. 
Another of 1505 shows the pharmacist, in 
all his official robes, designating to his 
assistant with his sword the drugs to be 
used. Ano her, of 1536, is still more 
pretentious. It is shown while it is 
undergoing the very rigid inspection pro- 
vided by law. 

The first trace of a pharmacal corporate 
body is found in Bruges, in Belgium, in 
I2Q7. It had a large hall, seals, statues, 
and a chapel. Divine servii es were held 
every day, and members sworn in. Its 
members were of distinguished families. 
It had the exclusive right to sell medi- 
cines, and soon became rich and powei- 
ful. — American Dn/gf;ist. 



Pyrogallate of Bismuth. 

This compound has recently been in- 
troduced as an antiseptic medicine, and 
the striking feature of the body is that 
whilst pyrogallic acid is a virulent poison, 
the pyrogallate of bismuth appears to be 
non-toxic. 

Voswinkel prepares the compound by 
dissolving separately 150 grammes of 
pyrogallol in 630 grammes of a 25 per 
cent, solution of common salt, and 316 
grammes of bismuth trichloride in 1,000 
grammes of the same solution. The two 
solutions so obtained are filtered, mixed, 
and warmed together for half an hour on 
the water bath. The product is then 
poured into twenty parts of water, where- 
by the basic salt is precipitated. After 
allowing to settle the liquor is filtered off, 
and the precipitate washed until the wash- 
ings are free from chloride. According 
to Voswinkel, the product so obtained 
has the formula — 



'OH 

C„H,C— OVn.- 



'"^^"Q/Bi— OH 

Vittorio prepares the salt by triturating 
ill a porcelain capsule two parts of car- 
bonate of bismuth and one part of pyro- 
gallol with sufficient water to make a thin 
cream. The whole is then heated on 
the water bath, replacing the water, which 
evaporates as long as carbonic acid gas is 
evolved. The mass gradually becomes 
ye!low\ When the reaction is completed, 
the whole is thrown on to a filter and 
washed with warm water until the wash 
water is no longer colored violet on ad- 
dition of lime water, after which the pro- 
duct is dried at a temperature not exceed- 



i6 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



ing 50'. The pyrogallate so oblained 
possesses a sulphur-yellow color, and con- 
tains 60.1 per cent, of bismuth. The 
amount of pyrogallol in the compound 
may be determined volumetrically by 
means of a solution of iodine, using 
starch paste as an indicator. The blue 
color of the iodide of starch is only 
formed when all the pyrogallate is decom- 
posed. It is necessary to work with very 
dilute solutions, and 762 parts of iodine 
correspond to 126 parts of pyrogallol. 
The bismuth is removed by passing sul- 
phuretted hydrogen through water con- 
taining a weighed quantity of the pyro- 
gallate in suspension, and the excess of 
the gas removed by warming the liquid. 
By this means Vittorio finds that his pre- 
paration corresponds with the formula — 
C; H,, O4 Bi. 

The author concludes as follows from 
his researches : 

(1) Pyrogallate of bismuth, even in 
■consideral)le doses, is not toxic. 
■ (2) When introduced into the system, 
it suffers but little decomposition in the 
intestines. The bismuth passes through 
the system, whilst the pyrogallol is only 
found in the form of the products of its 
o.xidation. 

(3) By reason of its slight solubility, its 
application is advantageous in all cases 
where the use of pyrogallol is desired 
without, the risk attendant on the simple 
acid. In p.articular, therefore, it is recom- 
mended in infectious maladies of the 
intestines. — Jouiual de Pharin. et de 
C/iiin.: Manufaittiring Chemist. 



Demonstpation of Wood Fibre in Paper. 

Wolesky states in the Papierzeitun^ 
that if paper, either sized or unsized, be 
wet with a solution of diphenyianiin in 
alcohol, to which sulphuric acid has been 
added, if wood fibre be present it will 
show itself by an orange reaction that is 
very characteristic. The intensity of the 
color is in direct proportion to the 
amount of the fibre present. In colored 
papers, which yield to sulphuric anilln 
very feeble or no results at all, and even 
phloroglucin gives a very faint reaction, 
the diphenyianiin test gives most satis- 
factory results, the orange coloration be- 
coming very marked as the paper dries. 
Yellow or orange colored jiaper some- 
times makes the detection of wood fibre 
by this means somewhat difficult, but the 
difficulty is removed at once by bleaching 
the papei with a mineral acid, hydro- 
chloric preferably. 



Koch, the great bacteriologist, has 
placed himself under the care of Father 
Kneipp, the clerical water-cure practi- 
•tioner. 

In the Trench budget for 1895 is an 
appropriation of $15,000 to provide for 
the organization of chairs of dental sur- 
gery in several of the medical schools of 
that country. 



Pharmacy Abroad. 

Municipal Pharmacy. — It is not 
often that pharmacy is even remotely 
connected with such a hot debate in 
supreme legislative bodies as took place 
lately in the French Chamber. The Mu- 
nicipal Council of Roubaix is Socialist, 
and in carrying its opinions into practice 
established a pharmacy, managed by a 
duly qualified pharmacist, at which drugs 
were sold and prescriptions dispensed at 
cost price. The local pharmacists natur- 
ally objected to this, and agitated for the 
suppression of the municipal pharmacy. 
In virtue of a law prohibiting corpora- 
tions from engaging in commercial trans- 
actions, this was done by the Prefect of 
the Nord. M. Guesde, a prominent .So- 
cialistic revolutionist leader and a deputy 
in the Chamber, seized the opportunity 
for a general debate on Socialistic doc- 
trines. M. Diipuy, the Premier, showed 
how the establishment of a pharmacy 
would lead to other shops being opened, 
and to Collectivism. After violent 
speeches, a vote of confidence in the 
government was passed, and so the Rou- 
bai.x pharmacists have got their way. — 



The Chinese Pharmacopceia. — The 
Chinese Pharmacopoeia contains many 
peculiar remedies. Snow-water is sup- 
posed to be good for worms, while hail- 
water IS poisonous. For eye troubles the 
excrescence of bats is recommended. 
Amber is nervine. Ink is a diuretic, 
and gunpowder is a vermifuge. Benzoin 
is good for stomach ache. It is much 
adulterated, but there is a sure test. If 
real, its fumes will charm rats out of 
their holes. Wheat bread is prescribed 
for a variety of complaints, and bread 
pills are an old remedy with celestial 
doctors. Verdigris is good for skin 
troubles. Ambergris is a substance 
coughed up by dragons, and is excellent 
for healing. Plasters of elephant hide 
are useful for wounds that heal slowly. 
Dried scorpions and seed pears cure a 
number of diseases. Ashes of paper 
are an astringent. — New England Driig- 
eist. 



Pharmacy in Wicstern .•\ustralia. — 
The Western Australian Pharmaceutical 
Society have succeeded in getting an Act 
passed through the legislature last month 
to control the practice of jiharmacy in 
the colony. The Pharmaceutical Society 
of Western Australia is the official body, 
and will have the power of enforcing the 
subscriptions payable yearly for the right 
to keep open shop. All sellers of poisons 
are to hold a license from the society. 
The council will be elected by the chem- 
ists, but tlie Governor may remove any 
member of the council, and on the advice 
of the council he may direct the removal 
of any name from the register, and may 
add fresh items to the poison schedule. 
The Act comes into force on March ist, 
1895. Their rights are secured to per- 



sons already in practice, and the society 
are empowered to recognize certificates 
from other countries. Four years' 
apprenticeship is enjoined before passing 
the qualifying examination. The poisons 
regulations include directions for their 
safe keeping, and for sales by post. 
Medicines dispensed by medical men or 
by pharmaceutical chemists from prescrip- 
tions by medical men, as well as patent or 
proprietary medicines, are outside the 
poisons regulations. — Britishaud Colonial 
Druggist. 



Italy now requires that all compounded 
medicines sold within her borders shall 
bear outside the package a recipe show- 
ing the ingredients of which they are 
composed. 

A Seientlfie Discovery from Japan. 

A Japanese sathint, Jokichi Takamine, 
who has studied at Glasgow and Tokio 
Universities, has discovered sa)s The 
Times, a novel method of preparing dias- 
tase and some other substances, of which 
we recently received specimens. He has 
been cultivating Eurotiian oryza', a my- 
celial plant of the As/ergillns family, on 
wheat-bran, and has found that, at an 
early stage of its growth, it bears upon its 
roots minute crystals of diastase, while 
the unripe spores contain a very powerful 
ferment. By washing the bran in per- 
colators and crystallizing the solution, he 
claims to be able to obtain diastase of 
considerable [lurity as a commercial pro- 
duct. Takamine claims that a mixture of 
equal parts of this diastase (or " Taka- 
koji," as he calls it) and crude wheat- 
bran, when added in the i)roportion of 
10 per cent, to the qu.nntily of grain 
mashed, will effect a more per'ect con- 
version than the use of to percent, of 
the best malt. The ferment rs a very 
remarkable substance. It is said to be 
three times as powerful as yeast— that is, 
it will continue to produce fermentation 
in a sugar solution till there is 20 ])er 
cent, of alcohol present, whereas the 
action of ordinary yeast stops when the 
percentage of alcohol reaches 7. 'I'his 
one fungus, therefore, appears to prcduce 
in itself the converting agents required in 
two of the most important processes in 
the manufacture of beer and spirits. Be- 
sides this, the wheat-bran, after two or 
three cultivations have been grown upon 
it, is said to form a good food for cattle, 
containing some 20 per cent, of protein, 
or fiesh-formlng substance. — British and 
Colonial Druggist. 



Test for Wintergreen Oil. 

The following is an excellent test for 
oil of wintergreen, or birch, that is sus- 
pected of being mixed with the synthetic 
oil: 

The theory is that, while synthetic oil 
wintergreen is almost the same, chemically, 
as true oil, yet, it being an alcoholic 
product, it is impossible to entirely 
remove traces of alcohol ; hence, if a 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(i6a) 



«!!>^iaSi^i«7S«<gi9HB»iaS!HS9i:^^ 



» 
^ 



I 



^^sa; 




Ships 
That 




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■\/f AY be a long time returning. Opportunities 
neglected m;iy never recur. MENTHOL 
COUGH DROPS are a new thing just put on 
the market, and there will never be a better time 
to introduce them to your customers than the 
present. Put up in 5-lb. glass jars. No stick- 
ing. No breakage. Good margin to Jobber 
and Retailer. 



Toronto Biscuit and Confectionery Co. 



7 FRONT ST. EAST, TORONTO 



ONE OF THE BEST SOOTHING AGENTS OR DEMULCENTS KNOWN 



Pure Unadulterated Liquorice 

FOR 

Coughs, Colds, Etc. 



The SOLAZZI BRAND is certified 
Analysis to be an AbSOluteljf Pure 
Extract, without any 
admixture. 




>SSSSSSSBS3SBSSSSS3SBSSSSSBSSSSSei 

"SOLAZZI." 



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" By Far the B est and Purest," 

THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST "->- 

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To be Obtained of all Wholesale Houses 



This is the purest LigUOUICKfl 

JUK'K obtainable; it ii a guaranteed j 
specific— in fact Q 

NATURE'S OWN REMEDY \ 

for Winter Coughs, Colds, and all Chest f 
Affections. 

Chemists should stock and push this 
article, as a safe and effective remedy, - 
provided by kindly nature, in preference j 
to Patent Medicines, which, in these jn 
days, yield only the barest profit. To be ^ 
had, with Show Cards and Handbills, of g 



(i6b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Vol. VII. 



No. L 



The first issue from our office at 
Toronto, Ontario. 

yA/ E would direct the attention of Manufacturers and 
Dealers in all lines connected with, or sold by, the 
drug '.rade that we reach the 

ENTIRE DRUG TR.-YDE OF CANADA, 

and present a medium unequalled by any for Advertisinc, 
to this trade. 

For advertising rates, address 

CANADIAN DRUGGIST, 

20 Bay Street, Toronto. 




Edited by ALBERT SHAW 



'""Review-Reviews 



-rbnrhiy • [tiVsCd 





NEW YORrvAjfor". 

Lcndon. Nor** tL %rvii 



T WAS in April, 1891, that the first number 
of the American Review of Reviews was 

printed The new ide?. of giving the best that was in 
the other magazines in addition to its own brilliant, orig- 
inal articles, took America by storm, as it had talcer 
England — lliough the n^;gazine itself was not at all a 
reprint of the English edition. It deals most largely wiUi 
Amencan affairs, and is edited with perfect independence, in its own ofrke 
The Review of Reviews is a monthly, timely in illustration and text 
and instantly alive to the newest movements of the day, to a degree nevei 
before dreamed of Thousands of readers who offer their commendations, 
r.mong them the gi'eatest names in the world, say that the Review o 
Icevisws gives them exactly what they should know about politics, litera- 
ture, economics and social progress The most influential men and womer 
of all creeds and all parties have agreed that no family can afford to lose its 
educational value, while for profes- 
sional and business men, it is simply 
indispensable The departments are 
conducted by careful specialists, in- 
stead of mere scissors-wielders, and 
scores of immediately interesting por- 
.traits and pictures are in each number. 
All this explains why the Review 
of Reviews has come to a probably 
unprecedented success in the first three 
years of its existence. For 1895 it 
will be more invaluable than ever. 



Agents are reaping luncisome profits. We 
give liberal commissions. Send for terms. 



Annual Subscrlpllon, $3.50 

Sample Cop>, 10 Cents, l.n stamps 

3bREV1EW'^P£VIEWS 

13 A£tor Place. New York 



^'?^^^'^»^j9C^;^j^^m:}mmW 



THE REGULAR DEPARTMCNTS 

Besides the special articles and ch:ir- 
acter sketches of thrilling intere^.i ar.-1 
timeliness, the Review of Reviews 
has these regular departments: 

The Progress of the World. — An lUustra- 

lerieditorul review of Ihe momh's events 
which thinking, alert men and women 
should understand in their proper signili- 
cance and proportions. 

Leading Articles of the Month.— This de- 
partment, and the succeeding one. The 
PerJOdlcuIa Reviewed, embody the idea 
on which tlie magazine was founded and 
named. All that is best in the other 
mat'i^incs. American and foreign, is 
here brightly summarized, reviewed and 
quoted from. 

Current History In Carlcatura chronicles 
the month's history through the pictur- 
esque means ol [he successful cartoons 
that are appearing throughout the world. 
Other departments review carefully new 

books, give lists and Indexes of all articles 

m the world's magazines, and lurnisba lerse 

daily record of current events. 



The Detroit 



THE ONLY GENUINE. 



Pennyroyal 
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treatment of 

PAINFUL AND IRREGULAR MENSTRUATION 

That Physicians prescribe them liberally. 

The Druggist can safely recommend them for their 
value to the sick. 



At $8.00 per dozen delivered, you get a good profit of 50 per 
cent. No need to try to work off an imitation of them. 

If you want local advertising, or terms, or special remedies, write to 
the manufActurers. 



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MONTREAL 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



17 



small particle of red aniline, soluble in 
alcohol, be drop[)ed into a vial of the syn- 
thetic oil, it will imniediateiy show a dis- 
position to dissolve, which is not the case 
with true wintergreen. I'ractically, this is 
found to be the case. In three to five 
minutes' time, by agitating vials of both 
oils with aniline in them, it will be 
noticed that the artificial product readily 
dissolves the aniline, whereas the other 
will hardly have any perceptible effect on 
it. .'\fter (he lapse of fifteen minutes to 
half an liour both will be discolored, but 
the artificial will have a purplish tint, 
while the natural oil will be more of a 
cherry color, and, in proportion as the 
two are mi.xed, so will be the time and 
extent of coloration. 

This is a delicate test, fit only for use 
by experts, for which reason we have not 
hitherto published it, as by it a careless 
user would probably reject all the oil he 
purchased, whether pure or otherwise. Be- 
fore adopting it for use it will be well to 
make several experiments, in order to get 
a correct idea of the length of time requred 
for the action of pure oil wintergreen on the 
aniline, in comparison with the artificial 
or known mixtures of the two. — Aiiienaitt 
Soap Journal. 



Camphor. 

A great variety of plants contain cam- 
phor, but the article of commerce known 
as camphor is chiefly obtained from the 
Lauras iatnphora, a tree which grows in 
Japan and the islands of the Eastern seas. 
The chief habitat of the tree, however, is 
the island of Formosa, where it reaches to 
its greatest size, and where most of the 
camphor of the Western commerce is 
produced. 

In addition to these supplies, a large 
quantity is shipped from Japan, but there 
is considerable difference between the 
produce of the two localities, the latter 
being of a lighter color, and of a pinkish 
hue, and also a coarser grain than that 
obtained from Formosa, and it also com- 
mands a higher price in the market — 
almost twice the amount as that from the 
island. Although the camphor tree, or 
shrub, is found in China, especially 
abounding in the eastern and central 
provinces, Chekiang and Kiangsi, very 
little is manufactured in that country, 
although very large trees are ijiet with, 
some of them being nine feet in girth, 
and the wood is an important item in the 
timber trade of Hankow. But in the 
island of Formosa the forest covers the 
line of mountains from north to south in 
those districts where the virgin vegeta- 
tion has not given place to cultivation. 
The island of Formosa lies partly within 
the tropics. It is 210 miles in length, 
and 70 miles in width, and separated 
from China by the Formosa Strait, and 
the position is such as to render it a pos- 
session of importance for the Eastern 
trade. It has a fertile soil, and is ex- 
tremely rich in minerals. 

I'he island is inhabited partly by Chin- 



ese, and partly by the aboriginal savage 
tribes. These are natives, sprung from 
the Malayan stock, and are confined to 
the mountain country of the eastern and 
southern districts, while the Chinese are 
limited to the western and a small por- 
tion of the north. Year by year the lat- 
ter slowly advance in their search for 
camphor, but at great risk to themselves, 
as there is no friendly feeling between 
them and the natives. The trade has of 
late years been gradually flecreasing 
owing to the great risk entailed in collect- 
ing, and from the fact that the extraction 
of camphor causes the destruction of the 
tree, and this has never been made good 
by replanting, so the forest becomes less 
and less, the Chinese advancing, while 
the aboriginies retreat. The mutual jeal- 
ousy and encroachments between the two 
parties are considerable. 

The siglit of a virgin forest, such as 
these in Formosa, when once seen will 
not easily be forgotten. The trees grow 
to a height of about fifty feet, the leaves 
are of a bright shining green color, and 
when bruised give out the odor of cam- 
phor. The wood is much prized and 
sought after for carpentry and cabinet 
work, as it is white and very fragrant, 
which latter quality is considered to act 
as a deterrent to all kinds of insects. 
The tree has of late years been intro- 
duced into other countries, and may be 
found in the Parisian nurseries, and is 
occasionally met with in Great Britain. 

The method of collecting and prepar- 
ing this substance differs considerably in 
the various countries in which it is found, 
and it is exceedingly pleasant and inter- 
esting to accompany the camphor mer- 
chants, although the expedition is attend- 
ed by numerous risks in Formosa, as the 
work must be done in an enemy's coun- 
try. 

A careful selection of the trees is first 
made ; those chosen are such as possess 
an abundance of sap, for those which are 
dry are useless except for the wood, which 
in every case is secured, as it is in great 
demand. The camphor is prepared from 
such portions as the branches, roots, and 
refuse ; these are taken freshly cut, and 
reduced to small pieces, so as to be suit- 
able for distillation. This process is done 
by means of stills fixed under temporary 
erections on the ground ; they are exceed- 
ingly rough and crude. A number of 
fires are then made, and over them is 
placed a long wooden trough or hollow-ed 
tree, coated with clay, and half filled with 
water. Boards pierced with holes are 
then fitted on to the trough, and above 
these are placed rough jars containing the 
camphor wood. The mouths of these 
jars are then covered with inverted pots, 
and the joints made airtight by various 
methods, mostly by hemp packing. 

The fires being lit, in course of time 
the generated steam passes from the 
water through the pierced boards, and so 
saturates the wood contained within the 
jars, causing the sublimated camphor to 
settle in crystals on the inside of the pots. 



It is then scraped off, and undergoes 
other processes of distillation for the pur- 
pose of purifying the substance. Within 
a copper vessel a layer of earth containing 
lime is placed, and on this layer is depos- 
ited the crude camphor. This again is 
covered by a layer of earth, and so alter- 
nately, until the vessel is full, the last 
layer being, of course, the e.irth. The 
whole is then covered with green mint. 

k vessel formed of straw, covered on 
the outside with wet clay, is then put over 
the still and fixed. This combined ap- 
paratus is then placed over a fire and al- 
lowed to heat, and, after a considerable 
lime, left to cool. 

The vessels are then opened and the 
camphor is found to have sublimed, at- 
taching itself to ihe upper vessels. From 
these it is scraped every few days, and is 
then very pure and clean. Camphor, 
when pure, is a white brittle substance, 
forming octagonal crystals or square 
plates. 

For purposes of transport, camphor is 
placed in large vats or tubs with holes at 
the bottom ; through these holes passes 
an oily liquid, known as camphor oil, to 
the extent of three to four per cent. This 
possesses a very strong odor, and holds 
in solution a quantity of common cam- 
phor, which it deposits in crystals when 
exposed to a low temperature. This oil 
is much used by the Chinese as an em- 
brocation for all rheumatic complaints, 
and bids fair to become a very valuable 
import. In Japan this oil is used for 
lighting purposes by the very poor, who 
burn it in open lamps, notwithstanding its 
odor and dense smoke. 

Nearly all the camphor produced in 
Formosa is shipped from Tamsui, at the 
northern extremity of the island. This 
is, indeed, an interesting place, and the 
old .Spanish fort on the eastern side of 
the harbor, built more than a thousand 
years ago, as well as the Consular prison, 
adds to its charms. Were it not for tie 
trade in camphor the exports would be 
small indeed. From here, it is conveyed 
in native vessels to the various ports of 
China. Owing to its being badly packed, 
and the large quantity of water absorbed 
during its sublimation, the loss by evap- 
oration during the sea journey is consider 
able. 

This has been somewhat remedied of 
late years by means of an hydraulic press. 
But it is becoming more and more evi- 
dent that the supply from this locality is 
gradually decreasing. The seaboard has 
no longer its camphor trees, and the col- 
lertors are compelled to go further inland 
for their supply. On the mountains in 
the interior there are still large tracts, but 
some care is necessary, so that the supply 
should not cease altogether. 

The Japanese are, however, alive to the 
importance of this trade, and, as the tree 
is fairly distributed throughout that coun- 
try, it will doubtless receive the attention 
of that enterprising nation, especially in 
the province of Tosa, in Sikok, for it is in 
this locality that the preparation of cam- 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



phor is carried on throughout the year, 
the best results being obtained in the 
winter. There are at the present time, 
under the care of the Japanese Forestry 
Department, large plantations of young 
trees, so that it is estimated that the sup- 
ply of camphor is assured for the next 
twenty-five years. The distilling process 
is simple, but very much in advance of 
that used in Formosa. The article pro- 
duced is never quite pure ; it generally 
needs purifying after its arrival in Europe. 
A few years ago the annual imports into 
the United kingdom were— unrefined, 
12,368 cwt.; refined, 2,361 cwt. 

This refining was for some time almost 
exclusively carried on in Venice, but it is 
now done in Great Britain, Holland,Ham- 
burg, and Paris, the process being a most 
interesting one. The methods used vary 
in the several countries. Besides what is 
known as camphor, there are many varie- 
ties of the drug, differing somewhat from 
this article of Eastern commerce, such as 
Borneo and Malayan camphor, Borneole, 
Camphyl alcohol or Kapur Barus, Blumea 
or Ngai camphor, and others more or less 
known in perfumery and pharmacy, ob- 
tained from the leaves, flowers, fruit, and 
roots of various trees and shrubs, such as 
the bergamot tree, the bitter orange, orris 
root, thyme, tobacco leaves, and many 
other sources.— tP. D., in British and 
Colonial Druggist. 



Antidotes for Poisons. 

In cases where other articles to be 
used as antidotes are not in the house, 
give two tablespoonfuls made mustard in 
a pint of warm water. Also give large 
draughts of warm milk or water mixed 
with oil, butter, or lard. If possible, give 
as follows : 

For Bed-bug poi'ion, 

Corrosive sublimale. 
Blue vitriol, 
Lead water, 
Saltpetre. 
.Sugar of lead. 
Sulphate of zinc. 
Red precipitate, 
Vermilion. 



Give milk or white of eggs, 
large quantities. 



For Fowler's solution, 
White precipitate, 
Arsenic. 



For Antimonal wine, 
Tartar emetic. 

For Oil of vitriol. 
Aqua fortis. 
Bicarbonate potassa. 
Muriatic acid. 
Oxalic acid. 

For Caustic soda, 
Caustic potash, 
Volatile alkali. 

For Carbolic acid. 



\ Give prompt emetic of mustard 
( and salt, tablespoonful of 
r each ; follow with sweet oil, 
I butter, or milk. 

^ Drink warm water to encourage 
I vomiting. If vomiting does 
r not stop, fiii'e a grain of 
I oi>iiiiii in water. 



Magnesia or soap dissolved in 
" water, every two minutes. 



Thermometers and Thermometer 
Testing. 

The Zeitschrift fiir Instrumentenkunde 
takes from a bulletin of the Physilkalisch- 
technischen Reichsanstalt, at Charlotten- 
burg, the following interesting points con- 
cerning thermometers and their testing : — 
After a thermometer has been " prov- 
ed," a stamp is placed on it. This con- 
sists of the figure of an eagle, a number, 
and the cJrrent year. The stamp is filled 
with metallic bismuth, which many tests 
have demonstrated to be the most 
durable, even with the most severe 
handling. 

All thermometers destined for scientific 
and technical use are marked with double 
lines, to avoid any incompetent tampering 
with the scale. Since recently a concern 
in Thuringen has been testing thermo- 
meters and giving certificates of accuracy 
which resemble in form and general ap- 
pearance those of the institute, in future 
all of the latter will be headed and mark- 
ed Aintliche (official). 

The liquid amalgam of sodium and 
potassium (introduced, some five years 
ago, by Hempel, of Berlin) would seem 
to be applicable for high-grade thermo- 
meters without the use of compressed 
gases, as its boiling point is very high 
(between 680° and 700° €. = 1264'' — 
1292° F.). Experiments, however, have 
demonstrated that even at 300° C. the 
glass begins to be attacked by it, and the 
effect is rapidly progressive with tempera- 
tuie rising above this point, until at 480° 
the entire filling becomes black (probably 
through the separation of silicon). 

For filling thermometers for the meas- 
urement of very low teiuperatures (like 
Six's) cresote is used. The blue-colored 
liquids used in ordinary thermometers, 
cuproammonium acetate and cupropyri- 
din acetate, are used. 

The borosilicate glass recently recom 
mended for thermometer tubes has proven 
Itself very effective up to 300' C, and is 
therefore much used in the manufacture 
of high-grade instruments. The blue 
striped glass, the so-called resistance glass, 
introduced by Grenier & Friedricks,*of 
Stuetzerbach, is also much used in high- 
class instruments. 

In proving thermometers for ordinary 
temperatures, olive oil is used for the 
highest point, and a solution of a mixture 
of potassium and sodium salts are used 
as baths. — National Druggist. 



For Chloral hydrate. 
Chloroform. 

For Carbonate of soda, 
Copperas, 
Cobalt. 

For Laudanum, 
Morphine, 
Opium. 

For Nitrate of silver. /Give common salt in water. 

For Strychnine, 

Tincture iiu.x vomica. 



gredients and the containing bottle is not 
absolutely dry, to burst the bottle and 
violently scatter the contents. It should 
should never be mixed dry with tannin. 
Occasionally a gargle is ordered contain- 
ing these ingredients ; they should always 
be dissolved separately. Hypophosites 
and chlorate similarly explode when mixed 
in the dry state. Chlorate of potassium 
and glycerine alone should never be dis- 
pensed, nor should it be combined with 
sulphur or the metallic sulphides. 

Permanganate of Potassium is an- 
other source of danger, for the same rea 
son as chlorate, it so readily gives up its 
oxygen ; consequently, it should not be 
mixed with any organic bodies, such as 
sugar or glycerine, nor with spirit of wine 
or spirituous preparations. When ordered 
in the form of pills, it should be massed 
with kaolin and petrolatum. 

Glycerine, in addition to the cases 
above mentioned, should not be combined 
with chromic acid ; nor with Imra.x to- 
gether with alkaline carbonates. 

Turpentines and Vol.\tile Oils 
Containing Terpenes should not he 
combined with strong mineral acids, nor 
with iodine or bromine. 

Iodine should never be mixed in the 
free state with any preparations contain- 
ing free ammonia, especially when com- 
bined with fatty matter. 

Oxide of Silver, sometimes ordered 
in the pilular form, should be massed 
with kaolin and petrolatum, and no 
chloride combined with it. 

Spirit of Nitrous Ether frequently 
becomes very acid in keeping ; in this 
state, when mixed with carbonates or bi- 
carbonates, it liberates carbonic anhy- 
dride, and, if tightly corked, the bottle is 
frequently burst. Such a mixture should 
not be corked immediately after mixing. 
Excess of acid in the nitre may be re- 
moved by keeping a large crystal of 
sodium bicarbonate in the stock bottle, 
occasionally easing the stopper.— j9/-///i/2 
and Colonial Druggist. 



\ Drink freely of water with 
i vinegar or lemon juice in it. 

1 Give (lour and water or gl-utin- 
i ous drinks. 

"V Pour cold water over the head 
V and face, with artificial res- 
) piration, gali'anic battery. 

^ Prompt emetics ; soap, or mu- 
(■ cilaginous drinks. 

1 Strong coffee followed by 
I ground mustard or grease 
r in warm water to produce 
J vomiting. Keep in motion. 



Salubrine. 



Emetic of nnistard or sulphate 
of zinc, aided by war II water. 

— Medical and Surgical Reporter. 



Explosive Mixtures. 

We are so freijuently in receipt of com- 
plaints from our readers relating to explo- 
sions of mixtures that we think a few notes 
on some of the more fretjuently prescribed 
dangerous compounds may be of service. 

Potassium Chlor.^te. — This is prob- 
ably more often the cause of explosion 
than any other chemical which is handled 
by pharmacists. It should never be mixed 
in the powdered state with organic sub- 
stances ; even in very small traces in " sal- 
ine," it is apt, after a time, if all the in- 



Under this name a remedy has been 
patented in France, and the proprietors 
claim for it marvellous properties. It is 
composffd of two parts of acetic acid, 
twenty five parts of acetic ether, fifty 
parts of alcohol, and twenty-three parts of 
water. 

This mixture, diluted with varymg 
quantities of water (from two to six parts 
water to one part of salubrine), possesses 
antiseptic and hsmostaiic properties ; it 
is used for contusions, certain skin dis- 
eases, corns, dental disease, insect 
stings, rheumatism, etc., and, in fact, the 
extraordinary virtues must be accepted 
with a very large grain of salt. — Manufac- 
turing Chemist. 



Only 906 persons in 1,000,000 die of 
old age. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



ClSa) 



NEW BOOKS 



for 



Pharmacists 

and 

Students of Pharmacy. 



A New Series of Itooks preparecl especially to meet the wants 
of the Student and IMiamtacist ot to-day, aud in accordance with 
the latest methods of teaching. 



Handbook of Pharmacy : 

A Text-book for students. By ViPgil CoblentZ., Ph.G-, A.M.. 
Phil.D., I'rofessor of Theory ami I'ractico of I'harinacy, Director of 
riiarmaceuticalLaboratory, College of Pharmacy ofihe City of NewVork. 
Octavo. 39.1 illostratlons. 500 pages. Cloth, !$!. 

Organic Materia Medica and Pliartnacof/iios}/ : 

By L. E. Saype, Ph.G., Professor of Pharmacy and Materia Medica 
in the School of Pharmacy of the University of Kansas, etc., etc. An 
introduction to the Study of the \'egetable Kingdom and the \"egetable 
and .\nimal drugs, comprising the Botanical and Physical characteristics, 
source, constituents, and Pharmacopreia Preparations, with chapters on 
Synthetic Organic Remedies, Insects injurious to Drugs, and Pharmacal 
Botany. 
Octavo. 555 pages. 543 handsome illustrations. Cloth. !$4.50. 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry : 

\ Text-book for Medical and Pharmaceutical Students. By E. H. 
BaPtley. M. D., Dean and Professor of Organic Chemistry, Brooklyn 
College of Pharmacy ; Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology at the 
Long Island College Hospital ; Chief Chemist, Board of Health of 
Brooklyn, N. v., etc. Third Edition, Revised and Enlarged. 
With Illustrations. Glos<iarv and Complete Index. 12mo. 6S4 pages. 
Cloth, S3 ; Leather, $3.50. 

Materia Medica, Pharmacy, Pharmacology, and 
Therapeutics. 

A Handbook for Students. By Wm. Hale White, M.D., F.R.C.P., 
etc., Physician to and Lecturer on Materia .Medica, Guy's Hospital : 
Examiner in Materia Medica, Royal College of Physici.ans, London, 
etc. Second .A.merican Edition. Revised by Reynold W. WilCOX, 
M.A.,M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Therapeutics at the 
N.V. Post-Graduate Medical School ; .Assistant Physician Bellevue 
Hospital. 

13ma. tiGl pages. Cloth, $3 : Leather, «i3.50. 

For Extended Dascription, send for Circular and Sample Pages. 



These Books may be ordered through any Bookseller or 
Wholesale Druggist, or upon receipt of price they will be 
sent, postpaid, to your address. 



PUBLISHED AND FOR SALE BY 

P.BLAKISTON,SON&CO., 

Pblishers of the U.S. Pharmacopeia, 

1012 Walnut Street, - - Philadelpliia. 



THE 



Montreal 
Optical Go. 

The only firm of Manufacturing Opticians 
in the Dominion. 



PRESCRIPTION WORK A SPECIALTY 

C'Cuntry Or</ers flllc-O wltti care 
and %>romj>titude. 



If you are dealing in OPTICAL GOODS, it will PAY YOU to do 
business with US. and, if you are not doing so already, write and j^et our 
Catalojjue and Price List. 



LePAGE'S 



"Syrup Hypophos. Comp." 



IMPROVED 



( Per Winchester 
TRADE PRICE -I Per Dozen-Small 



$2.25 

-- — --.. .....".. - 3-5° 

yPer Dozen — Large • 7.00 



Also LePAGE'S "BEEF, IRON AND WINE." 



Oiijillty Guaranteed. 



Price Reasonable. 



Trade Solicited. 



C. W. LePAGE & CO., 



59 BAY STREET, TORONTO. 



IS 



O THB TRADE. 



In all localities from which we have secured and published testimonials 
for our OODD'S KIDNEY PILLS, the sale has been greatly 
increased, which resulted to the benefit of the druggist as well as ourselves. 

We would, therefore, respectfully request all druggists to forward us the 
names oF any of thsir customers who have been cured or benefited by our 
DODD'S KIDNEY PILLS, and secure us the testimony for pub- 
lication if possible, in return fur which we shall be pleased to give them the 
benefit of any advertising connected therewith, if desired. 

Thanking the Drug Trade for their assistance towards the success of our 
Remedies, and respectfully soliciting a continuance of the same, 
Respectfully, 

THE DODDS MEDICINE CO. (LTD). 

Toronto, January ist, 1895. 



Every Druggist 
Should Handle Our 

DRUGGIST FAVORITE, 5c. 
^^° PATTI, IOC. 



Send for Sample Order. 



Fraser &, Stirton, 

LONDON, Ont. 



(i8b) CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Druggists' Confectionery. 

ROBERT GIBSON & SONS, 

Medicated Lozenge Manufacturers, 

CARLXON WORKS, 

ERSKINE STREET, HULME, MANCHESTER, 

1, GLASSHOUSE YARD, ALDERSGATE ST, LONDON, ENGLAND. 

Superior Boiled Sugars 

HAVE GAINED A HIGH REPUTATION EVERYWHERE 

F^OR BXPORT TRA.UB, 

They are put up in i-lb., 2-lb., and 5-lb. Bottles. Packed in Casks or in i doz. Cases as required, 

and delivered F. O. B. at any port in England. These Sweets are absolutely pure. 



SARSAPARILLA AHD SULPHUR TABLETS. 

As it is extremely probable these Tablets will have a very large sale, we beg to advise Chemists that we 
guarantee every pound of Tablets to contain equal to 24 ozs. of Compound Decoction of Sarsaparilla, besides the 
usual quantity of Sulphur, thus securing a really valuable blood purifier. 

HIGH-CLASS LOZENGES 

CHLORODYNE COUGH LOZENGES, CHLORODYNE JUJUBES, 

PEPPERMINT LOZENGES, 

In every variety of size and strength. Curiously Strong, and Multum in Parvo Mints give the utmost satisfaction. 

Medicated Lozenges of Pharmacopoeia Strength. 

DIGESTIVE TABLETS. 
VOICE ANO THROAT LOZENGES 

FOR SINGERS AND PUBLIC SPEAKERS. 



ORIGINAL SUGAR WORM CAKES 

Have an immense sale, both at home and abroad ; will keep in any climate, and give entire 
satisfaction. Put up in tins containing 3 doz., 6 doz., and 12 doz. cakes. 

THROAT HOSPITAL LOZENGES 

(As per T. H. Pharmacopceia.) 

All Lozenges are sent out in 2-lb. and 4-lb. Bottles (bottles free), but allowed for if returned. 
Proprietary Lozenges Carefully Prepared, Stamped, and Cut to any Size or Shape. 

PRICE LISTS SENT ON APPLICATION. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Formulary. 



CLOTH CLEANSKRS. 

Parts. 

(1) Alcoholic spirit of .imnionia lo 

Oil of turpentine, reclitied lo 

Sulphuric ether lo 

Oil of lavender I 

Alcohol, 90 per cent 169 

Mix, dissolve, and filter. 

Parts. 

(2) Spirit of ammonia 4 

Father 10 

Benzine 30 

Oil of lavender i 

Tincture of soap bark 45 

Alcohol, 90 per cent 100 

Mix and filter. 

Parts. 

(3) Rectified turpentine 10 

Kenzine 10 

.\niinonia water 10 

Alcohol, 90 per cent 70 

Parts. 

(4) Benzine 999 

Oil of turpentine Yz 

Oil of myrbane ^ 

Before applying any of the cleansers 
recommended to colored goods, an 
experiment should be made either with a 
sample of t'le goods, or on some portion 
which will not be seen, to determine 
whether directions given for treating the 
spot will affect the color. — Dieteruii s 
Manual. 

GLYCERINE ANO ROSEMARY HAIR-WASH. 

01. amygdal. dulc 51. 

Liq ammonii^ 5iij* 

01. rosmarini lU x. 

Glycerini 5'j. 

Spt. vini rect 5'v. 

Aq. rosce S^iij. 

Mix the oils with the solution of am- 
monia and 2 oz. rose water, shake well, 
and add the glycerine, spirit,, and the 
rest of the rose water. 

ALMOND TOILET PASTE. 

Blanched sweet almonds oz. 1 2 

Rice starch oz. 3 

Powderd orris root oz. i 

Zinc oxide oz. Y^ 

White soft soap oz. I 

Spermaceti drams 2 

Oil of almonds fl. oz. 7 

Oil of bitter almonds minims 30 

Otto " 15 

Rose water " q.s. 

Beat the almonds to a paste with the 
rice powder, orris, and zinc oxide, and 
add the soap. .Melt the spermaceti in 
the oil of almonds, and then beat all to- 
gether, adding enough rose water to make 
a soft paste. — British and Colonial Drug- 
gist. 

IIEKTOGRAPH, OR COPYING PADS. 

Parts. 

Gelatine, by weight I 

Glycerine 4 

Water 2 

INKS. 

Parts. 

(l) ^^ethyl violet I 

Water 7 

.\lcohol ... I 



I'.irts. 

(2) Rosaniline 2 

Water 10 

.\lcohol • t 

The patent for hektograph having ex- 
pired, any one can make or sell it. — 
Scientific American. 

BEDBUG EXTERMINATOR. 

Soft soap 20 parts. 

Water 65 parts. 

Turpentine 5 parts. 

Coal oil 10 parts. 

Dissolve the soap in the water, with 
the aid of heat, add the turpentine, stir 
until the latter is thoroughly mixed, and 
finally add the coal oil, continuing the 
heat and stirring uritil a homogeneous 
mixture is obtained. 

Directions to go with the above : \Vash 
the parts of the bedstead, let dry, and 
apply the mixture with a brush to all 
parts frequented by the bugs. The pre- 
paration may also be painted on walls, 
etc. — National Druggist. 

GLYCERINE OF IODIDE OF IRON (eD. 
ROYAL INF.). 

Fine iron wire i oz. 

Iodine 2 oz. 

Distilled water 3 oz. 

Glycerine 27 oz. 

Mix two ounces of glycerine and two 
ounces of water in a flask, and digest the 
iodine and iron in the tnixture, at first 
cooling and afterwards heating until the 
froth becomes white. Then filter into 
twenty ounces of glycerine, wash the 
flask, and filter with the remaining water, 
and m.ike the final volume up to thirty- 
one fluid ounces with glycerine. — British 
and Colonial Druggist. 

HARNESSMAKERS' AND SADDLERS' WAXE.S. 

The yellow wax consists of equal parls 
of balsam of fir and yellow beeswax. The 
black consists of 50 parts of balsam of fir 
and 46 parts of beeswax (yellow) melted 
together. While melting, stir in 3 parts 
of linseed oil and i part of bone or lamp 
black. 

DRY BRONZE POWDER, FOR USE WITH 
WATER. 

The Pharmaceutische Centralhalle gives 
the following : Rub to a fine powder i 
part of potassium dichromate, and add 
65 parts of bronze powder and 40 parts 
ot dextrin. Rub until perfectly smooth, 
and then put up in water-tight paper, 
either parchment, waxed, or paraffined. 
About two drams will make a convenient 
package. .A.s " directions " for the pack- 
age, use the following : " Mix only when 
you are going to use. For use, add an 
equal amount of water, and rub smooth, 
-^pply with a camel'shair pencil or soft 
brush. " — National Druggist. 

CREME CELESTE. 

The Revista di Clinica Medica gives 
the following formula : 

White cerate So parts. 

Spermaceti So parts. 



^9 

oil of sweet almond 600 parts. 

Glycerin 120 parts. 

Distilled water 1 20 parts. 

Borax 5 parts. 

Cumarin 0.03 part. 

Attar of rose i part. 

Oil of bergamot 0.50 part. 

Essence of orange flower. . . .0. 50 part. 

.\ttar of ylang-ylang 0.30 part. 

.\ltar of iris o. 10 part. 

Tincture of amber 0.30 part. 

Mix. If desired, color with alkanin 
dissolved in a part of the oil of almond. — 
National Druggist. 



Elecampane as an Antiseptic. 

According to the Medical Age, elecam- 
pane is one of the most valuable of 
modern antiseptic remedies, one that, 
aside from its powerful effect, has the 
great advantage of being free from odor. 
It is aromatic, stimulant, expectorant, 
emmenagogue, diaphoretic, and tonic to 
mucous membrane. It has been found 
of especial use in malaria, tuberculosis, 
catarrhal diseases, wliooping-cough, and 
chronic bronchitis. One grain of the 
inulin added to 10,000 of urine will pre- 
vent the latter from decomposition. 
With this evidence it would seem as if it 
would prove a true bactericide in wasting 
diseases. Elecampane in the early forties 
enjoyed much reputation in phthisis, but 
fell into disuse until the revival of the old 
contagious views of that disease. 



To Distinguish Between Lemon and 
Orange Peel. 

When orange peel is moistened with 
strong hydrochloric acid, its color changes 
from yellowish to a rich dark green ; 
lemon rind, similarly treated, retains its 
hue, or, at most, assumes a dingy, yellow- 
ish-brown tint. A convenient and simple 
chemical test, therefore, which will dis- 
tinguish between small fragments of lemon 
and orange peel is to touch them with a 
glass rod previously dipped in hydro- 
chloric acid. The diluted acid will answer 
the purpose, but the reaction is slower. 
A few minutes' exposure, says Mr. E. G. 
Clayton {Science Sif tings), to hydro- 
chloric acid gas will eR"ect this change in 
the pigment of orange peel. The color of 
lemon rind is unaffected. 

Long established, profitable, and successful 
proprietary articles for sale. .An excellent 
opportunity for live man to secure good business, 
capable of great extension, at a very low figure. 
.\pply to Box 20, Office of Canadian Druggist. 

WANT ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Adxyertise7iu>nU under the head o/Buffiness Wanted, 
Situations Wanted, Situations Vacant, Business for 
Sale etc.. will be iiverted once free of charge. An- 
swers must not he set>t in care of this o^ce unless 
postage staitips are forwarded to re-mail replief, 

SITUATIONS WANTED. 

SITUATION WANTED .AS DRUG CLERK ; 

three and a half years' experience ; attended one term 
at Ontario College of Pharmacy; good references from 
present employer. Address, B. M. Copeland, 136 
Catharine St., Hamilton. 



20 

Photographic Notes 

Electric Photography. 

Following up the Henrich Hertz theory 
of the similarity of the other waves of 
light to those of electro-magnetism, ex- 
cept that the latter are larger, Professor 
Dolbear has shown that electro-magnetic 
waves can act the part of light in taking 
photographs, which may thus be pt-o- 
duced even when the subject whose pic- 
ture is desired remains in absolute dark- 
ness. 

An Intensifler for Negatives Reproduc- 
ing Lines. 

Water i,ooo parts 

Iodine 14 parts 

Iodide of potassium 27 parts 

The negative is allowed to remain in 
this until entirely yellow. It is thorough- 
ly washed, so that the water running from 
it is colorless. Afterward the negative is 
placed in a one per, cent, solution of 
Schlippe's salt rendered alkaline by a lit- 
tle caustic soda.— /"^Jm Photo. 



CA NADIAN DRUGGIST. 

Sensitizing Solution. 

Tartrate of iron and potash. ... 15 grams. 

Red prussiate of potash 12 grams. 

Rain water 250 grains. 

Solution to Fade the Print. 

Ammonia 10° grams. 

Rain water 9°° grams. 

Solution to give the Brown Tint. 

Tannic acid 1° grams. 

Rain water 5°° grams. 

— American Journul of Photography. 



Photographic Reproduction of Chalk 
Drawings. 

The observation made in this column, 
says The Graphic, with regard to the 
closeness with which chalk drawings 
could be copied in photography, received 
ample illustration in a case that I only 
heard of the other day. It seems a draw- 
ing made by a notable artist was obtained, 
and carefully copied on exactly the right 
kind of paper by means of photography. 
The imitation was said to be so complete 
as to almost deceive the artist himself. 
A good many copies of the print were 
then obtained; they were all carefully 
mounted in imitation of the original 
drawing, and these were all pledged at 
pawnbrokers in different parts of London 
for various sums. The majority of them 
were sold, and the affair was only found 
out by the artist discovering it in the 

' ig it to 



house of a friend, and pronouncing 
be a photograph.— 5«V«/{/i'V American. 

Brown Ferro-Prussiate Prints. 

Ferro-prussiate blue prints can be easily 
transformed to brown by the following 
process : The blue print, well washed and 
dried, is plunged in dilute ammonia for 
two to four minutes, until it is almost col- 
orless ; then rinse and immerse it in a 
bath of tannic acid, where it is left until 
it is clear and toned. This operation re- 
quires about twelve hours. If, at the end 
of this time, the color is not sufficiently 
deep, add to the bath several drops of 
ammonia, and let the print remain in it a 
minute or two longer, then rinse it in 
plenty of water. The prints thus obtained 
are very pretty, and resemble in color 
sepia drawings. Here are the formula 
for the different baths employed : 



Professional Models. 

The Photographic News proposes to in- 
duce a number of people, both male and 
female, big and little, to form an associa- 
tion of models, and after sufficient train- 
ing to frequent the picturesque and other 
localities to which photographers are 
mostly attracted. On a stick, over his 
shoulder, the male would carry a bundle, 
and the female a basket on her arm, each 
containing a number of inexpensive but 
suitable costumes, and, to prevent mis- 
understanding, a scale of lit^s,.— Scientific 
American. 

Exhibition of Photography. 

The Executive Council of the Imperial 
Institute have announced that a special 
exhibition of photography in its applica- 
tions to the arts, sciences, and industries 
will be held at the Imperial Institute, in 
connection with the United Kingdom 
section, during the summer season of 
1 895. An influential committee of advice 
has been formed, composed of governors 
of the Imperial Institute and scientific 
men of well-known standing who are 
interested in photography ; and sub com- 
mittees have been appointed in connec- 
tion with the seven sections of the exhi- 
bition, viz. : 

Division i.— The history of photog- 
raphy, including illustrations of early pro- 
cesses, the progressive development of 
processes, the early processes of photo- 
mechanical work, and modern photo- 
graphic literature. 

Division 2.— Artistic photography, com- 
prising a thoroughly representative exhi- 
bition of all schools, embracing known as 
well as new works, and illuftrations of the 
present condition of photographic art in 
the various colonies and in India. 

Division 3.— Photography as an indus- 
try, demonstrating the apparatus used in 
photography and the special processes 
connected with the preparation of lenses, 
the production of brass fittings, cameras, 
etc., shown in actual operation ; the 
preparation of dry plates, coating of sensi- 
tive media, printing processes, also shown 
in actual operation ; reproduction of pic- 
tures, and the production of portraits by 
daylight and artificial light. 

Division 4.— Photography in its appli- 
cations to industries, such as reproduc- 
tions having photography as their basis, 
as applied to illustrated journalism, litera- 



ture, etc., and industrial applications of 
photography to ornamentation. 

Division 5.— Applications of photog- 
raphy to the sciences, including ortho- 
chromatics, optics, stereoscopy, photo- 
micrography, spectroscopy, meteorology, 
and magnetism, astronomy, automatic 
recording apparatus, etc. 

Division 6.— Applications of photog- 
raphy to educational purposes. 

Division 7. — Miscellaneous applica- 
tions of photography, including applica- 
tions of photography to architecture and 
archeology, to engineering, to military 
and naval purposes, to legal purposes 
(such as the detection of forgeries), to 
surveying, cartography, chronography, etc. 

Notification of the exhibition will 
shortly be transmitted to the principal 
firms engaged in the manufacture of 
apparatus connected with pTiotography in 
the United Kingdom. The Governor- 
General of India, the Governor-General 
of the Dominion of Canada, and the 
governors of the various colonies have, 
by a recent mail, been requested to invite 
Indian and colonial manufacturers to 
ty^\\^\'i.— British and Colonial Druggist. 



Pharmaceutical Analysis. 

SOME SPECIAL TESTS FOR DRUGS AND 
CHEMICALS. 

It is highly essential for every pharma- 
cist to know how to test the articles he 
deals in as to their putity and freedom 
from adulterants. It is, further, important 
that he should not only have the knowl- 
edge, but also put it into actual and 
regular practice. The public now look 
to the skill and training of the educated 
chemist for protection from fraud, and 
e.xpect to find the drugs they purchase 
from him pure and good. The medical 
practitioner also entrusts him with the pre- 
paration of the means by which he has to 
combat disease— a position of no slight 
responsibility. The duty, therefore, lies 
with every pharmacist to satisfy himself 
that the drugs and chemicals he uses are 
free from impurity, and justify the trust 
reposed in him. The processes included 
in the following tests have been rendered 
as simple as possible, so that they may be 
conducted at any dispensing counter. 

AciiTUM. — For e.vcess of sulphuric acid, 
add one grain of chloride of barium to 
one fluid ounce of vinegar, and filter. 
The filtrate should not give any further 
precipitate with chloride of barium. If 
copper, iron, or lead are present, a black 
coloration will be found if the vinegar 
be first neutralized with ammonia, and 
sulphydrate of ammonium then added. 
Good malt vinegar should dissolve exactly 
18 grains of carbonate of magnesium, and 
no more. 

Arsenic. — To test for the presence of 
antimony, add dilute hydrochloric acid 
and pass H„S through the solution. If 
present, an orange precipitate will be 
thrown out. Heavy mineral bodies, such 
as baryta or lead, may be detected by 



CANADIAN I)KU(;c;iST. 



(2CA) 




$,„ „^ 1 Sizeof Cameras'-ix s^x 5!^ In. 
lO.OtP , size of Picture 4 X s in- 

The . . 

Folding 

KODET 

Junior. . 



A practical camera with which the merest novice 
can readily learn to make ihe bef.t phoir eranhs 
Aa illustrated instruction book, free with every 
instrument explains each step clearly. 

The Folding: Kodet Jr. la a fully eqnlppr'd caraftra 
for hand ortripi'd work. NutesoiiiL' of itr. points: 

Adapted to roll film and glass plates; 

Reversible finder with focusing plate ; 

Ground glass for fine focusing; 

Improved shutter for time and Instantaneous 

exposures ; 
Tripod Sockets for vertical or horizontal views; 

Self contained when closed, handaouiely dnished 
and covered with leather. 

Price, with double plate holder. - $io.oo 
Developing and Printing outfit. - 1.50 

Roll Hohler for film (not loaded), 10.00 



S Sctui for 

5 Caiaic 



logiic. 



EASTHAN KODAK CO. 
* Rochester, N. Y. 



Major's Cement 

ESTABLISHED 187G, 

Universally acknowledged to be the 

Best and Strongest preparation 

ever offered to the public- 

For repairing China, Glassware, Furniture, Meerschaum, 
Vases, Books, Leather Belting, Tipping Billiard 
Cues, etc. 

Price Wl.OO and S1.50 per duz. 

15 and 35 cents per bottle. 



MAJOR'S LEATHER CEMENT. 

For repairing all kinds of Leather Goods. 

Price 80c.. i^LOOai'd :#1.50 per doz. 
10. 1 > an<l 35 ceuts per bottle. 



MAJOR'S RUBBER CEMENT. 

For repairing Eoots and Shoes and all kinds of Rubber 
Goods. 

Price !#1.00 per c1«iz. 
15 centrt per botllf. 

The Leather and Rubber Cements are superior to any in 
the market, and can be u«ed by any one, as tht^ directions 
are pi\en so explicitly. It is put up in two-ounce bolllcs, 
one quart and one gallon cans. 



MAJOR'S BEST LIQUID GLUE. 

For repairinL^ Wood, Tipping Milliard Cues, etc , alwayys 
ready for use. 

Pric« SO ceitta aiHl $1.00 per doz. 
10 and 15 cents per bottle. 



A. MAJOR CEMENT CO. 

232 WILLIAM ST., NEW YORK CITY. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 
WJLPOLE hypo" 



Laading Professional 
and Amateurs 



SULPHITE 

OF 



SODA 



Kv-ry lilt lr,iti(l rlMiiili'nllv (inil photofrrnpliicnlly he- 
fort' HhipiiinK. If yourHUpply iimii (loca nol kocp the 
Walpole Uypowo wil Viipplv vour wontf.l /h. w toTW. 

WALPQLE CHEMICAL WORKS. Walpole. Mass. 



DRUG STORE FITTINGS 



A SPECIALTY. 



DRUGGISTS about to remodel their stores, 
or fit up new buildings, will find it to their 
advantage to write us for designs and estimates. 
We have something new and original for each 
customer. 



THE 



CANADIAN OFFICE AND SCHOOL 
FURNITURE CO,, Ltd. 

PRESTON, - ONTARIO. 

BRAYLEY, SONS & GO. 

Wholesale Patent Medicines 

43 and 45 William Street, - MONTREAL. 



OUK SPECIALTIES: 

TURKISH DYES. 

DR. WILSON'S HERBINE BITTERS. 



Sole Proprietors of the following: 

Dow's Sturgeon Oil Liniment 

Gray's Anodyne Liniment 

Dr. Wilson's Antibilious Pills 

Dr. Wilson's Persian Salve 
Dr. Wilson's Itch Ointment 

Dr. Wilson's SarsaparilHan Elixir 
French Magnetic Oil 

Dr. Wilson's Worm Lozenges 
Dr.Wilson's Pulmonary Cherry Balsam 

Dr. Wilson's Cramp and Pain Reliever 

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Manual of Pharmacy and 

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CANADIAN DKUCiGIST. 



21 



i^jiiiting a portion in a capsule. Arscnious 
acid, being volatile, leaves the impurities 
behind. 

Ai.UM.^Alum is sometimes contami- 
nated with iron. To determine this, add 
excess of caustic potash to a boiling solu- 
tion. If a reddish-brown precipitate is 
formed, iron is present. As a confirma- 
tory test, add to a solution a little nitric 
acid, and boil until the excess of acid is 
driven off. To a portion of the liquid 
add siilphocyanide of potassium, and to 
another portion ferrocyanide of potas- 
sium. The former will turn red in color, 
and in the latter a blue precipitate will be 
found if iron be present. Commercial 
sulphate of alum may be tested for sul- 
phate of potash by adding carbonate of 
ammonia in e.xcess, filtering, concentrat- 
ing the filtrate, evaporating to dryness, 
and heating to redness in a platinum 
crucible. If alkali be present in the 
sample, a residue will be left in the 
crucible. 

Am.\ioni.\cum. — Gum ammoniacum 
turns a blood-red color on the addition of 
hypochlorite of lime or soda, and may 
thus be distinguished from any other 
resin or gum resin. 

Citric Acid. — Add lime water to a 
cold dilute solution, sutficient to render it 
slightly alkaline. If a white precipitate 
at once falls, o.\alic acid is present. The 
presence of tartaric acid may be proved 
by adding a solution of sulphate of potash. 
If present, a white crystalline precipitate 
will be formed. 

Chlor.\te of Pot.xsh. — To a solution 
add nitrate of silver. .-V white precipitate 
will be thrown down if any alkaline chlo- 
ride be present. 

C.-\RBON.\TE OF M.\GNESi.\. — Should be 
entirely soluble in hydrochloric acid. 
Shake up a small quantity with water, 
filter, and concentrate the filtrate. Add 
a few drops of hydrochloric acid and 
chloride of barium solution. If a white 
precipitate is formed, alkaline sulphates 
are present. 

Carmine. — Shake up for some time a 
weighed quantity with ammonia, wash the 
precipitate, and dry over a water bath. 
The impurities will remain. 

Cre.\m of T.ART.\R.^-Cream of tartar 
is sometimes contaminated with lime. To 
test for this, dissolve a small quantity in 
dilute hydrochloric acid ; if effervescence 
is caused, add ammonia till the solution 
becomes slightly alkaline ; next add oxa- 
late of ammonia, allow to stand for eight 
hours, filter, wash the precipitate (if any), 
and dry, then ignite, and when cool weigh 
the residue as lime. A ready test is to 
dissolve 84 grains of bicarbonate of soda 
in 2 ounces of water, and add 204 grains 
of the cream of tartar ; the mixture, after 
heating, should be neutral to litmus 
paper. If the sample is of superior 
quality, the mixture will be acid. For 
adulteration with barium, dissolve 20 
grains of cream of tartar in i ounce of 
distilled water, with heat ; if any remains 
undissolved, or a precipitate is thrown 



down on adding a little sulphuric acid, 
the presence of barium is indicated. 

CHLOROFORM.-Chloroform should have 
a specific gravity of 1.49. It should not 
bleach nor redden litmus paper. On the 
addition of nitrate of silver, it should not 
become turbid or give a white precipitate. 
Solution of caustic potash should not 
turn it brown on heating, and it should 
mix with ether or alcohol. It should not 
be colored after shaking up with sulphuric 
acid, and should leave no residue or un- 
pleasant odor after evaporation. 

Ether. — The specific gravity of ether 
should not exceed 0.720. It should be 
neutral to litmus paper. If it forms an 
opaijue emulsion on shaking up with oil 
of copaiba, it indicates the presence of 
water and alcohol. Pure ether should 
remain clear. 

CrUMS. — Acacia and Senegal, with solu- 
tion of sulphate of iron, give a yellow 
precipitate. Dextrine gives no precipi- 
tate. The former gums give, with sub- 
acetate of lead, a white curdy mass, and 
with tincture of guaiacum a blue color. 
'iVagacanth does not change color on the 
addition of tincture of guaiacum, and 
forms a transparent jelly with subacetate 
of lead. 

Glycerine should have a specific 
gravity about 1.25, should be quite neu- 
tral to litmus paper, and its solution 
should not be affected by nitrate of silver, 
oxalate of ammonia, or chloride of 
barium. On the addition of sulphydrate 
of ammonium, if a black or brown color 
be formed, the presence of lead, copper, 
or iron is indicated. Shaken with an 
equal volume of sulphuric acid, it should 
be unaffected, or only a very pale straw 
coloration result, which proves the ab- 
sence of sugar or dextrine. On heating a 
small quantity in a platinum dish till the 
glycerine is driven off, a charred residue 
will remain if sugar be present, but only 
a black stain if the glycerine be pure, 
which burns away without leaving ash 
when heated to redness. 

Gu.-\I.\CUM. — Perch loride of mercury 
solution poured on guaiacum wood and 
slightly warmed should produce a bluish 
green color. Guaiacum resin turns green- 
ish blue on the addition of chloride of 
lime or chloride of soda, and a solution in 
rectified spirit strikes a clear blue when 
applied to the inner surface of a raw 
potato. 

Hops. — Exhaust a weighed quantity of 
hops by repeated macerations with alco- 
hol ; wash the residue with alcohol, and 
finally carefully dry at a low temperature, 
and weigh. The loss should not be less 
than from 9 to 12 per cent. ; if less, they 
are deficient in lupulin. To detect if 
hops have been sulphured, introduce a 
portion of the sample into a hydrogen 
apparatus, and pass the gas into a solution 
of nitro-prusside of sodium. If sulphur 
is present a purple color will be formed, 
which, however, quickly fades away. 

HvDROCv.-iXic Acid. — (Dufla's test). — 
To determine the amount of actual hydro- 



cyanic acid in a sample, mix some nitrate 
of silver with a little ammonia, so that 
the clear liquid may be slightly acid, then 
pour it into a weighed portion of the 
sample of hydrocyanic acid as long as any 
precipitate is found. Collect the precipi- 
tate of cyanide of silver on a small filter, 
j)reviously dried and weighed at 212' F., 
and wash the precipitate and filter, and 
dry again at 212' F., and weigh. 133.9 
parts of cyanide of silver represent 27 
parts of anhydrous hydrocyanic acid. 

Honev. — Honey is often adulterated 
with glucose and artificial fiavorings. Mix 
the sample with an equal quantity of 
water, and add strong spirit, stirring con- 
stantly till a permanent turbidity is pro- 
duced. In honey adulterated with glu- 
cose, syrup, or dextrine, a heavy gummy 
deposit will soon form ; with genuine 
honey but a slight milkiness is produced. 
Starch and flour are readily detected, as 
they remain insoluble when the sample is 
dissolved in cold water or spirit. 

Iodide of Pot.assium. — The chief im- 
purities found in commercial iodide of 
potassium are iodate, carbonate, and sul- 
phate of potass, chloride of potassium 
and sodium, sulphide of potassium, and 
organic matter containing sulphur. Iodate 
of potass may be detected by adding a 
small quantity of tartaric or hydrochloric 
acid, when a deposit of iodine takes 
place. For determining the presence of 
carbonate and sulphate of potash, and the 
alkaline chloride, if in large amount, shake 
up well with pure alcohol, and these salts 
will be left undissolved. The chloride 
may be estimated by precipitating the 
solution of the sample with excess of 
nitrate of silver, and adding ammonia to 
excess. The iodide of silver remains in- 
soluble, while the chloride is dissolved, 
and can again be precipitated from the 
filtered liquid by the addition of an excess 
of nitric acid. Sulphur impurities may 
be detected by adding to the solution a 
little sulphuric acid and a small quantity 
of granulated zinc. Allow the gas evolved 
to pass over some moist carbonate of 
lead, which will be blackened if sulphur- 
etted impurities are present. 

Lard. — Pure lard should be quite free 
from taste and smell, and form a perfectly 
clear liquid when melted by immersing a 
tube containing it in hot water. If either 
lime, carbonate of soda, or water has 
been added, the melted fat will be more 
or less opaque. By keeping the sample 
in a molten condition, the water gradually 
settles out. 

Myrrh. — Genuine myrrh, on the addi- 
tion of nitric acid, forms a transparent, 
dirty-yellow liquid. Bdellium indicum 
will not dissolve in nitric acid, but be- 
comes soft, and turns whitish and opaque. 
Filter paper moistened with an alcoholic 
tincture of myrrh, and then touched with 
nitric acid, turns a blood-red color, while 
a strip of paper soaked in a tincture made 
from bdellium or myrrha indica, and treat- 
ed in the same manner, remains yellow 
or brown. On igniting, good myrrh 
should not leave more than from 3.:; to 
3.8 per cent, of ash. 



22 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Menthol. — Is occasionally adulterated 
when moulded into cones, with wax or 
paraffin, in order to make it hard. To 
detect this, slowly evaporate a portion of 
the suspected cone at a low water bath 
temperature. If either adulterant be 
present, a fusible residue will be left, 
which has very little smell. 

Musk.. — Genuine musk grains should 
dissolve in boiling water, not leaving 
more than 25 per cent, of residue. On 
incineration it should not leave more than 
6 per cent, of ash. It should be soluble 
in ether, and should be precipitated from 
a hot solution by acids and acetate of 
lead, but not by chloride of mercury. 

Nitrate of Potassium. — For the de- 
tection of nitrite in nitrate of potash, to a 
solution of the salt add one or two drops 
of yellow prussiate of potash, not sufficient 
to communicate a perceptible yellow tint. 
A few drops of acetic acid should then be 
added, and almost immediately, accord- 
ing to the quantity of nitrite present, the 
liquid will turn a bright golden color. 
When testing for minute quantities it is 
best to use two similar flasks, one con- 
taining pure water and the other the 
solution of salt to be examined, and add 
the reagent to each in exactly the same 
quantity, placing a sheet of white paper 
behind each vessel. This may also be 
used as a test for nitrates by boiling the 
sample for a short time witii clean shav- 
ings of lead, and proceeding as above, 
the absence of nitrites in the substance 
having been first determined. Lead re- 
duces even the nitrate of potash to nitrite. 
— (Schc-effer's test.) 

Nitrate of Silver. — Make a solution 
in water and add hydrochloric acid, filter, 
and treat the precipitate with excess 
of ammonia. If it does not entirely dis- 
solve the ammonia, chloride of lead is 
indicated. Treat the filtrate with H„S ; 
a brown or black precipitate proves cop- 
per or lead present. Filter the liquid, 
evaporate to dryness, and ignite. A 
white saline residue indicates the presence 
of nitrate of potash. 

Olive Oil. — Its specific gravity should 
be between .913 and .918 at 60°. For 
the detection of cotton-seed oil, make a i 
per cent, test solution of nitrate of silver 
in absolute alcohol. Place 5 c.c. of the 
suspected oil in a glass flask, add to it 25 
c.c. ofabsolute alcohol and 5 c.c. of the test 
solution. The flask is then heated in a 
water hath at 84" C. If there be any cot- 
ton-seed oil present the mixture will begin 
to darken, the most minute quantity serv- 
ing to discolor, and the tint assumed will 
depend on the amount of cotton-seed oil 
present.— (Bechi's test.) 

Castor Oil.— Should be entirely solu- 
ble in one volume of absolute alcohol and 
in two volumes of rectified spiiit. (B.P. 
tests.) For adulteration with rosin oil, 
add a few drops of stannic bromide in 
carbon bisulphide to the suspected sample 
of oil in the same solvent. If a red or 
violet color is developed, rosin oil is pres- 
ent in proportion to the rapidity and color 
produced. As low as 3 or 4 per cent, of 



rosin oil may thus be detected. — (Renard's 
test.) 

Ox.^Lic Acid. — Organic impurities may 
be detected by heating a small quantity 
with sulphuric acid ; if pure it will not turn 
brown or bluish. Pure oxalic acid should 
leave no residue after heating to redness 
in a platinum crucible. 

Phosphoric Acid. — A white precipitate 
on the addition of chloride of mercury 
indicates the presence of phosphorous 
acid. Ar^enic may be detected by passing 
a current of ILS through it ; and sulphuric 
and nitric acids by applying the usual 
tests. Sulphocyanide of potassium gives 
a red coloration if iron be present. 

Soft Paraffin (Vaseline). — Good 
soft paraffin should be completely volatile 
when heated on fire, and should not give 
off any smell of burning fat. When agi- 
tated with twice its volume of strong spirit, 
it should remain practically undissolved. 
The spirit on testing afterwards should 
be neither acid nor alkaline. 

PoDOPHYLLiN. — According to Podwys- 
sotzki, the active constituent of podophyl- 
lin is podophyllotoxin, which is present in 
commercial samples of podophyllin to the 
extent of from 20 to 30 per cent. This 
may be estimated by treating about a 
grain of resin with chloroform in the cold 
as long as anything is dissolved ; the 
greater part of the chloroform is then 
driven off by heat, and the remainder of 
the chloroformic solution is poured into 
20 times its volume of light [)etroleum 
spirit. The podophyllotoxin separates 
out, and can be removed, dried, and 
weighed. 

Potassium Bromide. — In solution, on 
being mixed with chlorine (chlorinated 
lime and HCl will do), then agitated with 
chloroform, the latter, on falling to the 
bottom, exhibits a red coloration. A fur- 
ther portion of the solution mixed with 
mucilage of starch and a drop of an aque- 
ous solution of bromine or chlorine 
should not give a blue color. The addi- 
tion of diluted sulphuric acid should not 
immediately cause a yellow coloration, 
which indicates the absence of bromate. 

Quinine.— Should be entirely soluble 
in water acidulated with sulphuric acid. 
It dissolves in pure sulphuric acid with a 
feeble yellowish tint, and undergoes no 
further change of color when gently 
warmed. Twenty-five grains of the freshly- 
prepared salt should lose 3.8 grains of 
water by drying at 212° F. Ignited, with 
free access of air, it should leave no 
residue. 

Rhubarb.- An old test for the quality 
of rhubarb root is to place two or three 
drops of oil of aniseed or fennel on a 
piece of the root and rub on it for a few 
minutes a little magnesia. If the root be 
of inferior quality, the spot rubbed will 
gradually turn salmon color or pink; 
while if genuine and of good quality, it 
will remain the usual yellow color. 

Salicin. For contamination with 

lead, dissolve a small quantity in water, 
and add a few drops of sulphydrate of 



ammonium ; if a dark coloration or 
black precipitate be produced, the pres- 
ence of lead is indicated. Ten grains of 
salicin, shakenup with two ouncesof ether, 
and filtered, allowed to evaporate, should 
leave no residue. On igniting, no ash 
should be left. 

Sulphate of Iron.— Test for copper : 
Boil a small quantity in water with nitric 
acid, and add ammonia to excess. If 
copper is present, the liquid will be tinted 
blue after the precipitate has settled. 
Alumina is also a frequent impurity. To 
determine this, add to a solution which 
has been treated in a like manner with 
nitric acid an excess of caustic potash, 
boil and filter ; then add ammonium 
chloride ; if alumina be present, a white 
precipitate will be thrown down on stand- 
ing. 

Sulphate of Magnesia.— To a solu- 
tion of the salt add baryta water, then 
excess of ammonia carbonate. Filter, 
evaporate the filtrate to dryness and 
ignite. If sulphate of soda be present, 
carbonate of soda will remain. If con- 
taminated with iron, sulphydrate of 
ammonia will give a black precipitate. 
To test for copper add excess of am- 
monia, and the liquid will assume a blue 
color if copper be present. 



Of every 10,000 deaths in England, 
270 are from apoplexy. 

In 1857 the Russian hospitals had 
62,000 typhus patients. 



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Corrected to January 10th, 1895. 



The quotations given represent average prices for 
quantities usually purchased by Retail Dealers. 
Larger parcels may be obtained at lower figures, 
but quantities smaller than those named will 
command an advance. 

Alcohol, gal $4 05 $425 

Methyl i 90 2 00 

Allspice, lb 13 15 

Powdered, lb 15 17 

Aloin, oz 40 45 

Anoiiyne, Hoffman's bot., lbs. . . 50 55 

Akrowroot, Bermuda, lb 45 50 

St. Vmcent, lb 15 iS 

B.^ls.am, Fir, lb 40 45 

Copaiba, lb 65 75 

Peru, lb 2 50 2 75 

Tolu, can or less, lb 65 75 

Bark, Barberry, lb 22 25 

Bayberry, lb 15 18 

Buckthorn, lb. . . 15 17 

Canella, lb 15 

Cascara, .Sagrada 25 

Cascarilla, select, lb iS 

Cassia, in mats, 11) iS 

Cinchona, red, ll) 6c 

Powdered, lb 65 

Yellow, lb 35 

Pale, lb 4C 

Elm, selected, lb 2C 

Ground, lb 17 

Powdered, lb 2C 

Hemlock, crushed, lb iS 

Oak, white, crushed lb 15 

Orange peel, bitter, lb. . . 15 

Prickly ash, lb 35 

Sassafras, lb 15 

Soap (quillaya), lb I J 

Wild cherry, lb 11 

Beans, Calabar, lb 4: 

Tonka, lb.... ,1 5c 

Vanilla, lb 8 oc 

Berriks, Cubeb, sifted, lb 5c 

powdered, lb. .. 5 = 

Juniper, lb ; 

Ground, lb 12 

Prickly ash, lb •. , 4c 

Buns, Balm of Gilead, lb... .... . 55 

Cassia, lb 25 

Butter, Cacao, lb . . . 75 

CAMi'ltOR, lb 65 



Powdered, lb. 
Capsicum, lb. . . 



I 50 

2."! 



17 
30 
20 
20 
65 
70 
40 

45 
21 
20 

28 

20 

17 
16 
40 
16 
■5 
15 
50 
2 75 
10 00 

55 
60 
10 
14 
45 
60 

30 
80 
68 
I 50 
I 60 
30 



Powdered, lb $ 30 $ 

Carbon, Bisulphide, lb 17 

Carmine, Xo. 40, oz 40 

Castor, Fibre, lb 20 00 2 



Chalk, French, powdered, lb.. 

Precip. , see Calcium, lb. . . . 

Prepared, lb 

Charcoal, Animal, powd. , lb 

Willow, powdered, lb 

Clove, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Cochineal, S.G., lb 

Collodion, lb 

Cantharidal, lb 2 50 

CoNFEcnoN, Senna, lb 40 

Creosote, Wood, lb 2 00 

Cuttlefish Bone, lb 25 

DeXI RINE, lb . 10 

Dover's Powder, lb i 50 

Ergot, Spanish, lb. 
Powdered, lb. 



ID 

10 
5 
4 

20 

25 
30 

40 

75 



75 
90 



Ergotin, Keith's, oz 2 00 2 



ExiRACT, Logwood, bulk, lb. . . 

Pounds, lb 

Flowers, .Arnica, lb 

Calendula, lb 

Chamomile, Roman, lb. 
German, lb 

Elder, lb 

Lavender, lb 

Rose, red, French, lb. . . 

Rosemary, lb 

Saffron, .American, lb. 



13 
14 
15 
55 
30 
40 
20 
12 
60 
25 
75 

Spanish, \ al a, oz i 00 

Gf.latine, Cooper's, lb 75 

French, white, lb 35 

Glycerine, lb 14 

Guarana 3 00 

Powdered, lb 3 25 

Gum .-Vloes, Cape, lb iS 

Barbadoes, lb 30 

Socotrine, lb 65 

Asafretida, lb 40 

.Arabic, 1st, lb 65 

Powdered, lb 75 

Sifted sorts, lb 40 

Sorts, lb 25 

Benzoin, lb 50 

Catechu, Black, lb 9 

Gamboge, powdered, lb i 20 

Guaiac, lb 50 

Powdered, lb 70 

Kino, true, lb I 2S 



35 
iS 

50 

00 
12 
12 

6 
5 
25 
30 
35 
45 
So 

2 75 

45 

2 50 

30 
12 

1 60 
80 

1 00 
10 
14 
17 
20 
60 
35 
45 
22 

15 

2 00 
30 
So 

I 25 
So 
40 
16 

3 25 
3 50 

20 

50 
70 

45 
70 
S5 
45 

30 

I 00 
20 

I 25 

I 00 

75 



Myrrh, lb $ 

Powdered, lb 

Opium, lb 4 

Posvdered, lb 6 

.Scammony, pure Resin, lb 12 

Shellac, lb 

Bleached, lb 

Spruce, true, lb 

Trag,icanth, flake, 1st, lb 

Powdered, lb i 

Sorts, lb 

Thus, lb 

Here, .\lthea, lb 

Bitlerwort, lb 

Burdock, lb 

Boneset, ozs, lb 

Catnip, ozs, lb 

Chiretta, lb 

Coltsfoot, lb 

Feverfew, ozs, lb 

Grindelia robusta, lb 

Hoarhound, ozs., lb 

Jaborandi, lb 

Lemon Balm, lb 

Liverwort, German, lb 

Lobelia, ozs, lb 

Motherwort, ozs, lb 

Mullein, German, lb 

Pennyroyal, ozs, lb 

Peppermint, oz.s., lb 

Rue, ozs. , lb 

Sage, ozs., lb 

Spearmint, lb 

Thyme, ozs., lb 

Tansy, ozs. , lb 

Wormwood, oz 

Verba Santa, lb 

Honey, lb 

Hors, fresh, lb 

Indigo, Madras, lb 

Insect Powder, lb 

Isinglass, Brazil, lb 2 

Russian, true, lb 6 

Leaf, Aconite, lb 

Bay, lb 

Belladonna, lb 

Buchu, long, lb 

Short, lb 

Coca, lb 

Digitalis, lb 

F'ucalyptus, lb 

Hyoscyamus 

Matico, lb 



45 
55 
25 
00 
So 
45 
45 
30 
75 
10 

45 
8 

27 
27 
16 

'5 

17 
25 
20 

53 
45 
"7 

45 

38 

38 

'5 
20 

17 
iS 
21 
30 
18 



/3 
25 
GO 
CO 

25 
18 

25 
50 
20 

35 
15 
iS 
20 
70 



i 48 
60 

4 5° 
6 50 
13 00 
48 
50 
35 
80 

1 >S 

75 
10 

30 
30 
18 

17 
20 
30 
38 
55 
50 
20 

50 
40 
40 
20 
22 

20 
20 
25 

35 
20 

25 
20 
18 

22 

44 

15 
25 

So 
28 

2 10 
6 50 

30 
20 
30 
55 

22 

40 
20 
20 
25 

75 



(22B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Senna, Alexandria, lb $ 25 

Tinnevelly, lb 15 

Stramonium, lb 20 

Uva Ursi, lb 15 

Leeches, Swedish, doz i 00 

Licorice, Solazzi 45 

Pignatelli 35 

Grasso 30 

Y & S— Sticks, 6 to I lb., per lb. 27 

" Purity, 100 sticks in box 75 

" Purity, 200 sticks in box I 50 

" Acme Pellets, 5 lb. tins 2 00 

" Lozenges, 5 lb. tins.. . i 50 
" Tar, Licorice, and Tolu, 

5 lb. tins 2 00 

LUPULIN, oz 30 

Lycoi'odium, lb 70 

Mace, lb i 20 

Manna, lb i 60 

Moss, Iceland, lb 9 

Irish, lb 9 

Musk, Tonquin, oz 4600 

NuTc.ALi.s, lb 21 

Powdered, lb 25 

Nutmegs, lb i 00 

Nux Vomica, lb 10 

Powdered, lb 25 

Oakum, lb. .... . 12 

Ointment, Merc, lb. '/i and j<. 70 

Citrine, lb 45 

Paramiehyde, oz 15 

PepI'Ek, black, lb 22 

Powdered, lb 25 

Pitch, black, lb 3 

Bergundy, true, lb . 10 

Plaster, Calcined, bbl. cash. ... 2 25 

Adhesive, yd 12 

Belladonna, lb 65 

Galbanum Comp. ,1b So 

Lead, lb 25 

Poppy Heads, per 100 i 00 

Rosin, Common, lb 2i 

White, lb 3i 

Resorcin, white, oz 25 

RocHELLE Salt, lb 25 

Root, Aconite, lb 22 

Althea, cut, lb 3° 

Belladonna, lb 25 

Blood, lb 15 

Bitter, lb 27 

Blackberry, lb 15 

Burdock, crushed, lb 18 

Calamus, sliced, white, lb 20 

Canada .Snake, lb 3° 

Cohosh, black, lb 15 

Colchicum, lb 40 

Columbo, lb 20 

Powdered, lb 25 

Coltsfoot, lb 38 

Comfrey, crushed, lb .. 20 

Curcuma, powdered, lb 13 

Dandelion, lb 15 

Elecampane, 11) 15 

Galangal, lb 15 

Gelsemium, lb 22 

Gentian or Genitan, lb 9 

Ground, lb 10 

Powdered, lb 13 

Ginger, African, lb 18 

Po.,lb 20 

Jamaica, blchd., lb 27 

Po.,lb 30 

Ginseng, lb 3 00 

Golden Seal, lli 75 

Gold Thread, lb 90 

Hellebore, white, powd., lb... 12 

Indian Hemp iS 

Ipecac, lb i 30 

Powdered, lb i 60 

Jalap, lb 55 

Powdered, lb 60 

Kava Kava, lb 40 

Licorice, lb 12 

Powdered, lb 13 

Mandrake, lb 13 

Masterwort, lb 16 

Orris, Florentine, lb 30 

Powdered, lb 40 

Pareira Brava, true, lb. ...... , 40 

Pink, lb , . 75 

Parsley, lb 30 

Pleurisy, lb 20 

Poke, lb 15 



5 30 (Jueen of the Meadow, lb $ iS 3 

25 Khalany, 11) 20 

25 Rhubarb, lb 75 

iS Sarsaparilla, Hond, lb 40 

I 10 Cut, lb 50 

50 Senega, lb 55 

40 Squill, lb 13 

35 Stillingia, lb 22 

30 Powdered, lb 25 

75 Unicorn, lb 38 

1 50 Valerian, English, lb. true 20 

2 00 Virginia, Snake, lb 40 

1 75 Yellow Dock, lb 15 

Rum, Bay, gal 2 25 

2 00 Essence, II) , . . . 3 00 

35 Saccharin, oz i 25 

80 Seed, Anise, Italian, sifted, lb. . . 13 

I 25 Star, lb 35 

I 75 Burdock, 11) 30 

10 Canary, bag or less, lb 5 

10 Caraway, lb 10 

50 00 Cardamom, lb I 25 

25 Celery 30 

30 Colchicum 50 

I 10 Coriander, lb 10 

12 Cumin, lb 15 

27 Fennel, lb 15 

15 t'enugreek, powdered, lb.. . 7 

75 Flax, cleaned, lb 3i 

50 Ground, lb 4 

18 Hemp, lb 5 

25 Mustard, white, lb II 

30 Powdered, lb 15 

4 Pumpkin 25 

12 (Quince, lb 65 

3 25 Rape, lb 8 

1 3 .Strophanthus, oz 50 

70 Worm, lb 22 

85 Seidlit?, Mixture, lb 25 

30 Soap, Castile, Mottled, pure, lb. . 10 

I 10 White, Conti's, lb 15 

3 Powdered, lb 25 

4 Green (Sapo Viridis), lb 15 

30 Spermaceti, lb 55 

28 Turpentine, Chian, oz 75 

25 Venice, lb 10 

35 Wax, White, lb 50 

30 Yellow 40 

16 Wood, Guaiar, rasped 5 

30 Quassia chips, lb 10 

18 Red Saunders, ground, lb 5 

20 Santal, ground, lb 5 

^ chemicals. 

20 Acid, Acetic, lb 12 

45 Glacial, lb 45 

22 Benzoic, English, oz 20 

30 German, oz 10 

40 Boracic, lb 15 

25 Carbolic Crystals, lb 18 

14 Calvert's No. I, lb 210 

1 8 No. 2, lb I 35 

20 Citric, 11) 50 

18 G.allic, oz 10 

25 Hydrobromic, diluted, 11) 30 

10 Hydrocyanic, diluted, oz. bottles 

12 doz I 50 

15 Lactic, concentrated, oz 22 

20 Muriatic, lb 3 

22 Chem, pure, lb 18 

30 Nitric, lb loj 

35 Chem. pure, lb 25 

325 Oleic, purified, lb 75 

80 Oxalic, lb 12 

95 Phosphoric, glacial, lb I 00 

15 Dilute, lb 13 

20 Pyrogallie, oz 35 

I 50 Salicylic, while, lb I 60 

I 70 .Sulphuric, carboy, lb 2^ 

60 Bottles, lb 5 

65 Chem. pure, lb 18 

90 Tannic, lb 90 

15 Tartaiic, powdered, lb 30 

15 Acetanii.id, lb 90 

18 AcONiTiNE, grain 4 

40 Alum, cryst., lb i| 

35 Powdered, lb 3 

45 A.MMONIA, Liquor, lb., .880 10 

45 Ammonium, Bromide, lb ,. 65 

80 Carbonate, lb 14 

35 Iodide, oz 35 

25 Nitrate, crystals, lb 40 

18 Muriate, lb 12 



20 
30 
50 
45 
55 
65 
15 
25 
27 
40 

25 
45 
iS 

50 
25 
50 
15 
40 

35 
6 

13 

50 

35 

60 

12 

20 

17 

9 

4 

5 

6 

12 

20 

30 

70 

9 

55 

25 

30 

12 

16 

35 

25 

60 

80 

12 

75 

45 

6 

12 

6 

6 



13 
50 
25 
12 
16 

25 
2 15 
I 40 

55 
12 

35 

I 60 

25 

5 

20 

•3 

30 
80 

13 
I 10 

17 

3S 
I 80 

2? 

6 

20 

I 10 

32 
I 00 

5 



75 
15 
40 

45 
16 



Valerianate, oz $ 55 

Amyl, Nitrite, oz 16 

Antinervin, oz 85 

Antikamnia I 25 

Antipyrin, oz , I 00 

Aristol, oz I 85 

Arsenic, Donovan's sol., lb 25 

P'owler's sol., lb ' 15 

Iodide, oz 50 

White, lb 6 

Atropine, Sulp. in 4 ozs. 80c., 

oz 5 00 

Bismuth, .-Vnimonia-cilrate, oz . 35 

Iodide, oz 50 

Salicylate, oz 30 

.Subcarbonate, lb 2 25 

Subnitrate, lb 2 00 

Borax, lb 9 

Powdered, lb 10 

Bromine, oz s 

Cadmium, Bromide, oz 20 

Iodide, oz 45 

Cafeeine, oz 50 

Citrate, oz 50 

Calcium, Hypophosphite, lb. .. . i 50 

Iodide, oz 95 

Phosphate, precip., lb 35 

Sulphide, oz g 

Cerium, Oxalate, oz 10 

Chinoidine, oz 15 

Chloral, Hydrate, lb i 00 

Croton, oz 75 

Chloroform, lb 60 

Cinchonine, sulphate, oz 25 

CiNCHONIDINE, Sulph., OZ 15 

Cocaine, Mur., oz 575 

CODEIA, J oz I 00 

Collodion, lb 65 

Copper, Sulph., {Blue Vitrol) lb. 6 

Iodide, oz 65 

Copperas, lb i 

DlURETIN, oz I 60 

Ether, Acetic, lb. . . - 75 

Sulphuric, lb 40 

EXALOIXE, oz I 00 

Hyoscyamine, Sulp., crystals, gr. 25 

Iodine, lb 4 75 

Iodoform, lb 6 00 

lODOL, oz I 40 

Iron, by Hydrogen So 

Carbonate, Precip., lb 15 

Sacch., lb 30 

Chloride, lb 45 

Sal., lb 13 

Citrate, U.S. P., lb 90 

.\nd Amnion, ,1b 70 

And Quinine, lb i 50 

(Juin. and Stry., Oz . . iS 

And Strychnine, oz 13 

Dialyzed, Solution, lb 50 

Ferrocyonide, lb 55 

Hypophosphites, oz 25 

Iodide, oz 40 

.Syrup, lb 40 

Lactate, oz 5 

Pernitrate, solution, lb. ...... . 15 

Phosphate scales, lb i 25 

Sulphate, pure, lb 7 

Exsiccated, lb 8 

And Potass.. Tartrate, lb. .. . 80 

And Amnion Tartrate, lb. .. 80 

Lead, Acetate, white, lb 13 

Carbonate, lb 7 

Iodide, oz 35 

Red, lb 7 

Lime, Chlorinated, bulk, lb 4 

In packages, lb 6 

LiTiIIU.M, Bromide, oz 30 

Carbonate, oz 30 

Citrate, oz 25 

Iodide, oz 5° 

.Salicylate, oz 35 

Mai'.nesium, Calc, lb 55 

Carbonate, lb 18 

Citrate, gran., lb 35 

Sulph. (Epsom salt), lb ij 

Manganese, Black Oxide, lb. . . 5 

Menthol, oz 55 

Mercury, lb 75 

.\mmon (White Precip.).... i 25 

• Chloride, Corrosive, lb i 00 

Calomel, lb I 00 

With Chalk, lb 60 



60 

iS 

00 

I 30 

1 10 

2 00 
30 
15 
55 

7 

5 00 

40 

55 

35 

2 40 

2 10 

10 

1 1 

13 

25 

50 

55 

55 

I 60 

I 00 

3S 
6 

12 

18 
I 10 

So 
I 90 

30 

20 
7 00 
I 10 

70 
7 

70 

3 

I 65 

So 

50 
I 10 



5 50 
7 00 

I 50 
S5 
16 

35 
55 
16 

I 00 
75 

3 00 
30 
15 
55 
60 
30 
45 
45 
6 
16 

I 30 

9 

10 

S5 

85 

15 

S 

40 

9 

5 

7 

35 

35 

30 

55 
40. 
60 
20 
40 



7 
66 
80 

I 30 
I 10 
I 10 

65 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



2^ 



Business Notices. 



As ihe (IcsiRii of the Canaiman Oruggist is to l>enetit 
mulu.-illy iill interested in llic business, we would re«|uest 
all parlies ordering good* or making purchases of :iny de- 
scription from houses advertising with us to nicntiun in 
their letter tliat su.:h ad%-erttsenient was noticed in the 
Canadian Uku<,<;ist. 

The attention of Druggists and others who may be in- 
terested in the articles advertised in this journal is called 
to the s/'tiial considtrittion of the Husiness Notices. 

Read tlie list of text-books advertised 
by P. HIakiston, Sons & Co., of Phila- 
delphia, ill this issue. 

\\'e call attention to the advertisement 
of E. J. Hiissey & Co. in this issue of the 
new ladies' syringe for which Lyman, 
Knox & Co., Montreal and Tororto, are 
agents for Canada. 

Mr. G. Elmendorf, of ICImira, N.V., 
when in Toronto a short time ago, ap- 
pointed the Canadian Specialty Co. 
Dominion agents for his Tar (lum, which 
has already made a good re[)utation for 
itself in the States, and, in fact, they have 
been working day and night to supply 
the demand. The Tar Gum is put up in 
attractive five-cent packages, containing 
five pieces each, and twenty packages in 
a paper box, with advertising matter. 
See advertisement. 

A very handsomely gotten up catalogue 
giving a list of the non-secret preparations 
manufactured by the house of Frederick 
Stearns & Co. has just been received by 
us. It is a copy of their very recent issue, 
and when our readers send for one, as we 
would advise them to do, ask for " Cata- 
logue '94." Before turning to the inside 
pages one is attracted by the artistic de- 
sign of the outside cover, which is litho- 
graphed in blue and white, and bears a 
fine cut of their extensive laboratory in 
Detroit. The first thing that catches the 
eye on the inside is their introductory 
page. Here Messrs. Stearns & Co. briefly 
but clearly express their views on the non- 
secret question, which idea they intro- 
duced in 1876 to meet a demand that 
existed, and always will exist. They claim 
for their non-secret preparations a distinct 
and unique position, that of household 
remedies of open composition, carefully 
and accurately compounded from the best 
materials, sold on their own merits, and 
not intended to replace or substitute any 
remedies made by others for similar pur- 
poses. The arrangement adopted through- 
out the catalogue itself is a model one, and 
exceedingly convenient for reference. 
Each preparation is to be found under 
its proper heading, and in regular order 
are given a list of the diseases or ailments 
for which it is intended to be used, its 
formula in full, the dosage, and a descrip- 
tion of each package, including the size, 
style of wrapper, etc. The price to the 
druggist, as well as the retail price, with 
the percentage of [irofit to be made on 
the sale of each article, follows, the whole 
concluding with a few explanatory notes, 
giving further particulars regarding the 
preparation. As the description of almost 
every preparation is accompanied by an 
illustrative cut, showing the style of the 
finished package, the druggist is enabled 



to get an extremely clear idea of each 
remedy listed. 

A Great Canadian Wine Firm. 
Canada has made great strides in wine- 
making since 1866. At that date little 
tliought was given to the manufacture of 
wines in Canada. Its climate was consid- 
ered too cold and unfit for vine-growing. 
In that year a company of gentlemen 
from Kentucky, who had been engaged in 
vine-growing in that state, feeling sore 
over the results of the war, learned of the 
mild and salubrious climate of Pelee 
island, in Canadian territory, only six 
miles north of Kelly's island, then consid- 
ered the home of the Catawba grape, 
removed to that island and established the 
first grape vineyard in Canada. Five years 
afterward Captain J. S. Hamilton, of 
Brantford, took an interest in the com- 
pany, and through his tact and push, com- 
bined with the high class of wines manu- 
factured, made Pelee island wines a 
household name throughout the Dominion 
of Canada. They are to be found on the 
wine list of every first class hotel from 
Halifax in the east to \'ancouver in the 
west. In 1889 the Pelee Island Wine and 
\'iiieyards Co., Limited, was established, 
and Captain Hamilton was elected presi- 
dent. He still holds that position, prac- 
tically controlling the stock, and the com- 
pany's brands of dry and sweet Catawba, 
St. Augustine, Isabella, and claret, are 
creditable alike to the company and Can- 
ada. The company's special claret, now 
on the market, is a wine of 1891 vintage, 
known as " Chateau Pelee Medoc," has a 
large sale in Canada, and can be obtained 
from leading wine merchants everywhere 
in Ontario at $3.75 a case. In the lower 
provinces, where E. G. Scovil, of St. John, 
N.B., has the agency, $1 a case is added, 
to pay freight charges. In 1891 a brandy 
distillery was established on the island, 
and is now being put on the market under 
the brand "J- S- Hamilton & Co., Cog- 
nac." The purity and high quality of the 
brandy already commands an extensive 
sale, and connoisseurs state that few 
French brandies equal it in quality. — To- 
ronto Empire. 



Books and Magazines. 

Frank Leslie's Popular Munfhly 
for January, just out, is really a holiday 
number, with regard both to the character 
of its reading matter and its richness in 
illustration. The leading article, " St. 
Andrews and Andrew Lang,'' by Mrs. 
Leicester Addis, is a charming account of 
the university career and literary life of 
this versatile author, also of the quaint 
little Scotch city of his alma mater, where 
the now faddish game of golf has been 
played on its native links ever since the 
middle ages. "Chiming Bells," a full- 
page engraving of Boutigny's picture of 
the death of Marshal Lannes at the battle 
of Essling, furnishes the motive for 
some interesting historical pages about 
Napoleon and Alexander I. of Russia. 

Girls who like to read about marriage — 
and what girl does not? — should buy a 



ciipy of the January Ladies' Home Journal 
and read the excellent marriage article 
which Mrs. Burton Harrison has written 
under the title of " Heigh Ho ! for a 
Husband." Edward Bellamy sketciies, in 
his own way, what he believes a "Christ- 
mas in the Year 2000 " will be like. Other 
articles there are — some twenty odd of 
them — all good and wise, making ihis 
issue of the Journal one of the most 
evenly interesting which the editors have 
made. No magazine is certainly bttter 
worth its price of ten cents. The Curtis 
Publishing Company, of Philadelphia, 
issue it. 

The relation which price bears to 
quality in literature is made obscure by 
the Christmas Cosmopolitan. Stories 
by Rudyard Kipling, Wm. Dean Howell?, 
Mrs. Spencer Trask, Mrs. Burton Harri- 
son, and Albion W. Tourgee, are inter- 
spersed with poetry by Sir Edwin Arnold, 
Edmund Clarence Steadman, and James 
Whitcomb Riley, while through the 
number are scattered illustrations Ly such 
famous artists as Remington, Toche, 
Reinhart, Turner, Van Schaick, Gibson, 
and Stevens. A series of portraits of 
beautiful women of society illustrate an 
article on "The Relations of Photography 
to Art"; a travel article by Napoleon Ney, 
grandson of the famous Field Marshal ; 
one of the series of " Great Passions of 
History," to which Froude and Gosse 
have already contributed, and half a dozen 
others equally interesting, go to make up 
the attractions of the number. The 
Cosmopolitan people say : " We might 
charge you more for this number, but, in 
all frankness, could we give you better 
material, better illustrated, if we charged 
you a dollar a copy ? '' 

It has been generally understood for 
some time past that some change was be- 
ing made in the control of the Empire, 
and in a recent issue announcement was 
made that a syndicate of wealthy and in- 
fluential men had secured a controlling in- 
terest, with the intention of taking an active 
pirt in its publication and management. 
The syndicate is composed of: — W. R. 
Brock', Esq., of W. R. Brock & Co., Pres. 
Canada General Electric Co : Hon. Sena- 
tor Sanford, Pres. Sanford Manufacturing 
Co.; Hon. Sir Frank Smith, Vice-Pres. 
Dominion Bank : Thos. Long, Esq , Pres. 
Great Northern Transit Co.; Col. John I. 
Davidson, of Davidson & Hay, \'ice-Pres. 
Bank of Commerce ; Warring Kennedy, 
Esq., of Samson, Kennedy & Co., Mayor 
of Toronto ; H. Cargill, M.P., of Cargill ; 
A. F. Gault, of Gault Bros., Montreal, 
Pres. Dominion Cotton Mills Co.; D. 
Morrice, of D. Morrice, Sons & Co., Mon- 
treal ; R. A. Lucas, of Lucas, Steele ,!t 
Bristol, Hamilton ; F'rank J. Phillips, Pres. 
Cobban Manuf;\cturing Co. and Consoli- 
dated Plate C;iass Co.: James Murray, 
Esq., St. Catharines : Frank Turner, C.E., 
Toronto ; H. J. Scott, Q.C., Toronto ; D. 
Creighton, Publisher, Toronto. This is 
undoubtedly the strongest syndicate ever 
formed in connection with a paper ia 
Canada. 



_^4 

Iodide, Proto, oz $ 35 

Bin., oz 25 

Oxide, Red, lb I 15 

Pill (Blue Mass), lb 70 

Milk Sugar, powdered, lb ... . 30 

Morphi-N'p:, Acetate, oz 2 00 

Muriate, oz 2 oo 

Sulphate, oz 2 00 

PetsiN', Saccharated, oz 35 

Phenacetine, oz 35 

PiLOCARI'INE, Muriate, grain. .. . 20 

Pi PERI N, oz I 00 

Phosphorus, lb 90 

PoTASSA, Caustic, white, lb 55 

Potassium, Acetate, lb 35 

Bicarbonate, lb 15 

Bichromate, lb 14 

Biirat (Cream Tart.), lb 22 

Bromide, lb 55 

Carbonate, 11) - 12 

Chlorate, Eng., lb iS 

Powdered, lb 20 

Citrate, lb 70 

Cyanide, lb 40 

Hypophosphites, oz 10 

Iodide, lb 4 00 

Nitrate, gran, lb S 

Permanganate, lb 40 

Prussiate, Red, lb 50 

Yellow, lb 32 

And Sod. Tartrate, lb 25 

Sulphuret, lb 25 

Proi'I.ylamixe, oz 35 

(,)UIN1NE, Sulph, bulk 30 

Ozs., oz 35 

QuiNiDlNE, Sulphate, ozs., oz... 16 

Sai.icin, lb 3 75 

Santo.min, oz 20 

Silver, Nitrate, cryst, oz 90 

Fused, oz I 00 

Sodium, Acetate, lb 30 

Bicarbonate, kgs. , lb 2 75 

Bromide, lb 63 

Carbonate, lb 3 

Ilypophosphitc, oz 10 

Hyposulphite, lb 3 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



S 40 Iodide, oz $ 40 $ 43 

30 Salicylate, lb I 75 I 80 

1 20 Sulphate, lb 2 5 

75 Sulphite, lb S 10 

35 SOMNAL, oz 85 00 

2 10 Spirit Nitre, lb . 35 65 

2 10 STRONTlirw, Nitrate, lb 18 20 

2 10 Strychnine, crystals, oz i 00 i 10 

40 Sultonal, oz 34 35 

38 Sulphur, Flowers of, lb 2J 4 

22 Pure precipitated, lb 13 20 

I 10 Tartar Emetic, lb 50 55 

I 10 Thymol (Thymic acid), oz 55 60 

60 Veratrine, oz , 200 2 10 

40 Zinc, Acetate, Hi 70 75 

17 Carbonate lb 25 30 

15 Chloride, granular, oz 13 15 

25 Iodide, oz 60 65 

60 O.xide, 11) 13 60 

13 Sulphate, lb 9 II 

20 Valerianate, oz 25 30 

22 

_j. essential OILS. 

50 Oil, Almond, bitter, oz 75 So 

12 Sweet, lb 50 60 

4 10 Amber, crude, lb 40 45 

10 Rec't, lb 60 65 

45 Anise, lb 3 00 325 

55 Bay, oz 50 60 

35 Eergamot, lb ■■.... 3 75 4 00 

30 Cade, lb 90 I 00 

30 Cajuput, lb I 60 I 70 

46 Capsicum, oz 60 65 

32 Caraway, lb 2 75 3 00 

38 Cassia, lb i 75 i 80 

20 Cedar 55 85 

4 00 Cinnamon, Ceylon, oz 2 75 3 00 

22 Citronelle, lb 80 85 

I oo Clove, lb I 00 I 10 

I 10 Copaiba, lb i 75 2 00 

35 Croton, lb i 50 I 75 

3 00 Cubeb, lb 3 00 325 

65 Cumin, lb.' . 5 50 6 00 

6 Erigeron, oz 20 25 

12 Eucalyptus, lb I 50 I 75 

6 Fennel, lb i 60 i 75 



Geranium, oz $1 75 

Rose, lb. 3 20 

Juniper berries (English), lb... 4 50 

Wood, lb 70 

Lavender, Chiris. Fleur, lb.... 3 00 

(iarden, lb i 50 

Lemon, lb 2 00 

Lemongrass, lb i 50 

Mustard, Essential, oz 60 

Neroli, oz 4 25 

Orange, lb 2 75 

Sweet, lb 2 75 

Origanum, lb 65 

Patchouli, oz , . So 

Pennyroyal, lb 2 50 

Peppermint, lb 4 25 

Pimento, lb 2 fao 

Rhodium, oz 80 

Rose, oz 7 50 

Rosemary, lb 70 

Rue, oz 25 

Sandalwood, lb 5 50 

Sassafras, lb 75 

Savin, lb I 60 

Spearmint, lb 3 75 

.Spruce, lb 65 

Tansy, lb . . 425 

Thyme, white, lb i 80 

Wintergreen, lb 2 75 

VVormseed, lb . 3 5° 

Wormwood, lb 4 25 

pt.xed oils. 

Castor, lb 9 

Cod Liver, N.F., gal i 15 

Norwegian, gal 150 

Cottonseed, gal i 10 

Lard, gal 90 

Linseed, boiled, gal . .' 60 

Raw, gal 58 

Neatsfoot, gal I 00 

Olive, gal i 30 

Salad, gal 2 25 

Palm, lb 12 

Sperm, gal i 75 

Turpentine, gal 60 



I 


So 


3 


50 


5 


00 




75 


J 


50 


I 


75 


2 


10 


I 


60 




65 


4 


50 


3 


00 


3 


00 




70 
S5 


2 


75 


4 


50 


2 


75 
S5 


I 


00 




75 




30 


7 


50 
So 


I 


75 


4 


00 




70 


4 


50 


I 


90 


3 


00 


3 


75 


4 


50 




1 1 


I 

I 


25 
60 


I 


20 


I 


00 




63 
61 


I 


10 


I 


35 


2 


40 


I 


13 
80 




65 



The Standard Brands. 



.,tu.,,.; E..; um\ 'Cable Extra' 'El Padre' 'Mm' and 'Madre e'Hiio' ^ "^'^ & sons 

Sold Annually. O J MflNTRFil . P.O . 



'DERBY PLUG," 5 and 10 ets., "THE SMOKERS' IDEAL,' -'DERBY, 

ARE THE BEST. 



D. RITCHIE & CO., 



MONTREAL, P.Q. 
ATHLETE" CIGARETTES, 



Montreal. 



Drug Reports. 



Canada. 

The report of trade during holiday 
times from retail druggists has been very 
good, many doing much better than ex- 
pected. The demand for expensive goods 
has been light, but perfumery and general 
sundries have sold well. In these hard 
times people get intensely practical in 
Christmas gifts, as one druggist reports 
sales of p.itent medicines for that purpose. 

There are no important changes in 
prices to note, gum arabics tending higher. 

Sulfonal has advanced ; no particulars 
of it yet. 

Caffeine still high on account of scar- 
city. 

Tartaric acid easier. 

Norway cod-liver oil has agiin advanc- 
ed. 

The new duty will advance price of 
salad oils. 

Opium continues firm. The demand 



is small and stocks reported very large, 
but the reports of a proposed combination 
keep the price up. 



Linseed Oil. 



The situation in linseed oil seems a 
little stronger. Some of the American 
crushers who, a couple of weeks ago, were 
anxious to sell in one or two carload lots 
at S3 to 54c. have declined bids at those 
figures for much larger quantities during 
the past few days. It is claimed that the 
only reason oil does not advance as a 
result of the strong statistical position is 
that the import prices at present will not 
admit of it. On the other hand, English 
crushers, having disposed of their surplus 
stock of seed, have no oil to spare for this 
market, and, if they had, American con- 
sumers woi'ld not give it the preference, 
even at i to 2C. below the cost of the do- 
mestic product, because of its generally 
inferior quality and the unsatisfactory 
methods of packing followed by the Eng- 
lish crushers. — -Journal of Coininerce. 



A New Supgieal Dressing. 

Kikusi, a surgeon of Tokio, Japan, has 
called attention to a novel and what pro- 
mises to be a very important article of 
surgical dressing. It is a form of char- 
coal derived from burning straw in a 
smouldering fire, or so arranged that the 
supply of air is insufficient for complete 
combustion. The little stalks of charcoal 
thus prepared are said to be highly hy- 
groscopic, and to make a wonderfully 
cheap and efficient dressing for wounds. 
It may be applied directly, or enclosed in 
little linen or cotton bags. — National 



Japanese camphor can now be had in 
compressed cakes of two-ounce weight. 

Quinine and uranium chloride is a 
yellow, crystalline powder, soluble in 
water. 

Caffeine oxalate is a true salt, occur- 
ring as a white crystalline powder, soluble 
i 



n water and alcohol. 



Canadian Druggist 

Devoted to the interests of the General Drug Trade and to the Advancement of Pharmacy. 



\\n.. Nil. 



TORONTO. I-lIliRLAKV, iSy = 



.\i 



Canadian Druggist 



WILLIAM J. DYAS, PUBLISHER. 



Subscription, $1 per year in advance. 

.\ilvcrtising rates on application. 

Tlie Ca.nadiav Dkuiigist is issu<:d on the 15th of each 
month, and all matter for in.sertion should reach us hy the 
Sth of the month. 

New advertisements or dianses to he addressed 

Canadian Druggist, 

20 Bay St. TORONTO, ONT. 

EUROPEAN AGENCY : 

HKOCK .\: HAI.Il'.VX, .\ldermary House, Watling .Si., 
LO^^DOISI, E.C, ENGLAND. 

CONTKNXS. 

Counsel the Council. 

Iinportrint .-\riicles. 

Uruc Ci.krk.s" COLI'MN.— Drug Clerks' Regis- 
ter. 

CoRRBsi'ONDEN'CE. — Answers to Correspond- 
ents. 

British Columbia Notes. 

TRADf; Notes. 

I'harmaceutical Assoei.ition of the Province of 
Quebec. 

An Elegant and Brilliant French Polish. 

Pharmacy in Kngland. 

Practical Hints on Pharmacy. 

Pharmaceutical Analysis. 

Local Remedy for Diphtheria. 

Oil Emulsions. 

The E.xamination of Urine. 

l-'.iiiTORiAi.. — Publisher's Notices. E.schange of 
Ideas. The Result of Co-operation. 

.Montreal Notes. 

Ontario College of Pharmacy Council .Meeting. 

Kormula Wanted. 

To Meet Cutting in Prices. 

Little Things. 

.Medical Practitioners in Austria. 

Let Us Reason Together. 

A Warning Cork for a Poison Bottle. 

Tablet Triturates. 

The Passing of the Tablet Fad. 

Origin of the Term .\n. esthetic. 

Doctor Ridden. 

FORMl'LARY. 

Frigotherapy. 
Tal)lets of Wine. 

PitOlOCRAI'HIC NOt'ES. 

An Enterprising Japanese Pharmacist. 

Pharmackutical NOIES. 

Reactions of Phenacetine. 

Nitropentaerythrite and a .Smokeless Explosive. 

The Spanish Cork Industry. 

Details That Will Take Care of Themselves. 

Business Notices. 

Books and Magazines. 

Drit, Reports. 



Sewing up wounds by an electrical 
machine is one of the latest advances in 
surgical technique. 



Counsel the Council. 

If those who sometimes cavil because 
they imagine the Council of the Ontario 
College does not perform reasonably 
effective work had a clearer insight into 
the difficulties constantly standing or 
being put in the way of those acting on 
their behalf, they would he more willing 
to offer counsel than criticism. 

The council is composed of druggists 
whose interests are identical with the 
interests of their confreres. They are 
assuredly anxious to protect themselves, 
and must protect all other druggists in 
doing so. They do not receive any 
recompense for their services, yet fr„m 
the lessons of the past they naturally ex- 
pect considerable adverse criticism and 
condemnation. They feel that when out- 
side tradesmen become their commercial 
enemies, those inside should be their 
friends. They know well that the critic 
who is not in the council would be in a 
reverse position were he in it, and they 
must often feel that their efforts on behalf 
of their fellows are so ill-requited as to 
make them wish they never had anything 
to do with it. 

Those who have the general interests 
of the trade at heart must have realized 
during the past two or three years that 
conditions of trade are rapidly changing, 
and that the change, so far, has not been 
in their interests. The sentiment of the 
country is being acted upon in such a 
manner as to lessen the position of bodies 
possessing incorporate legislative powers, 
and under such circumstances we are 
obliged to submit. While doing so, how- 
ever, we would fall far short of our duty 
to ourselves and to one another if we 
failed to strive unitedly to bring about a 
betterment of conditions over which we 
can exercise some influence. Any large 
body of individuals, united together with 
a common, definite object in view, can 
accomplish much if they will e.xercise 
their influence persistently and judiciously. 
The tendency of the day is to combina- 



tions ; and the druggist of to-day is 
threatened from just such a source, and 
will ultimately have to meet the difficulty 
upon equal terins. The council of our 
college is the executive body through 
which we can act, if we only advise the 
course to pursue. Legislation is tempor- 
arily in abeyance, and of necessity must 
remain so. The only hope lies in com- 
mercial action — the buying and selling of 
goods which can be profitably handled 
and fairly well controlled ; tlie pushing of 
lines of trade which our location and cir- 
cumstances will enable us to handle to 
advantage ; the cutting off from our busi- 
ness connection those houses which sup- 
ply us and betray us at the same time ; 
the circulation amongst ourselves of such 
information as will enable us to act 
unitedly and decisively when occasion re- 
quires it, and the protection of our own 
trade as far as possible against the liceri- 
sing of drug businesses improperly run 
under the name of a practising physician. 
All these matters might be regulated 
under control of council by the appoint- 
ment of a commercial committee whose 
duty would be determined by the extent 
and scope of the work which would 
devolve upon it. 

This is a sul)ject in which we are all in- 
terested. We may not all see alike as to 
a solution of the question, and, if there 
are others who desire to present their 
views, we shall be glad, indeed, to heai 
from them in another issue. 



Impoptant Articles. 

Analytical chemistry is playing a most 
important part in the world of science, 
and the practical pharmacist who would 
aspire to keep in the front of his profes- 
sion must devote himself to a study of it 
in all its bearings. 

This month we give our readers the 
conclusion of an article taken from the 
British and Colonial Druggist entitled 
'■ Pharmaceutical Analysis," and also from 
the same source one on " The Exami- 
nation of UrineJ' Next month will be 
given a paper on " The Bacteriological 
Examination of Water." 



26 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Drug. Clerks' Column. 

We have received a very interesting set 
of rules for the guidance of the dispensing 
clerk from T. W. Richardson, in the em- 
ploy of Mr. D'Avignon, of Windsor. They 
will appear in our next issue, and those 
intending to compete will require to have 
copy forward for pulilication at the same 
time. 

iVe are confident that there are many 
young men who could furnish a set of 
rules which would be of very great inter- 
est and use to our readers, and we shall be 
most happy to publish such if sent, and to 
give credit, as fairly as possible, to whom 
it is due. 



Dpug Clerks' Register. 

Name. Employee. .\ddress. 

John P. Hennessey Hamilton, Ont. 

W. S. Scheak H. S. Case... " 

A. G. Cornyn H. S. Case... 

Correspondence. 

Editor of the Canadian Druggist. 

De.\r Sir, — I have had some trouble 
of late when buying liquids by finding 
what seems to me to be a shortage in the 
measure. As liquids are supposed to be 
sold by- the imperial measure, I contend 
that the \nnt or gallon is one-quarter 
larger than the old or wine measure, thusly, 
old pint, 1 6 ounces. One-quarter of that 
— 4 ounces — added to i6 ounces, makes 
one imperial pint, or 20 ounces. Then a 
pair — 8 wine pints — make a wine gallon. 
Add one quarter gallon, or 2 pints, to 
make the imperial gallon — 160 ounces. 

I also contend that to reduce an im- 
perial pint to a wine pint deduct one-fifth 
— 20 ounces imperial pint, 4 ounces would 
be one-fifth of 20, therefore one-fifth of 
20 being 4, and that one-fifth, or 4 ounces, 
being taken from 20 will surely leave 16 
ounces. 

About five weeks ago I sent two tins 
away to be filled. Both came back 
full. 

I keep on hand a //msf accurately 
measured Winchester. It was measured 
by one of Whitall, Tatum & Co.'s 8-ounce 
glass measures up to the 8-ounce mark 
10 times, so I- measured the contents of 
one tin. It held only 720 ounces. 

If 20 ounces make a pint (B.l*., page 
xxi.), 80 ounces ought to make one-half 
gallon, and 10 one-half gallons ought to 
make 800 ounces ; but I only got 720 
ounces from each tin, and was charged 
with ten gallons, although according to 
B.P. measurement I only got ^///t- gallons. 
I reported it to the party 1 got it from, 
and, although I explained it, they insisted 
that the tins \\&\^ five gallons each im- 
perial measure. 

I would be much obliged if you would 
kindly let me know through your Drug- 
gist if the stand I have taken is right or 
wrong, and you will greatly oblige me. 

I. How many ounces should there be 
in an imperial pint ? 



2. How many imperial pints should 
there be in an imperial gallon ? 

3. How many ounces should there be 
in an imperial gallon ? 

5. When changing a wine pint into an 
imperial pint, is not one-quarter (or 4 
ounces) added ? 

4. U'hen changing an imperial pint 
into a wine measure, is not one-fifth (or 4 
ounces) deducted from 20 ounces, thus 
leaving 16 ounces ? 

Vours truly, Drugs. 



.\NSWEk. 

The writer, while correct in some re- 
spects, is entirely at fault in respect to 
measurement by the process he adopted. 

He apparently took for granted that a 
fluid ounce was the same, whether indi- 
cated oh a graduate manufactured in the 
United States or in Great Britain, while, 
in fad, they are not. 

The grain by weight doesn't vary, but 
the minim does. See below : 

I minim B.P. is equal to 0.91 
grain. 

1 minim U.S.?. is equal to 0.94 
grain. 

I minim B.P. is equal to 0.96 minim 
U.S.P. 

I minim U.S.P. is equal to 1.04 minims 
B.P. 

So it will clearly !)e seen that while 
there are 60 minims in 3i- in both cases, 
and 480 minims in .ji., that the quantity 
of fluid in the respective ounce measures 
of the different countries must vary, and, 
if in ounces, so in pints and gallons. 

The variation in the ten-gallon quantity 
spoken of will, therefore, be about 64 
ounces, or within 4 ounces of the quantity 
he claims to have lost. 



Answers to Correspondents. 

J. A. A. asks for formukt for Pil Cochia 
and Blackberry Brandy. 

PIL COCHIA. 

R. Est. Colocynth Comp 

Aloes aa gr. .K. 

I'otass. .Sulph 

P. Caniliogia 

P. .Scamition aa gr. v. 

M. ft. Massa et div. in pil No. .\. 

BLACKBERRY BRANDY. 

R. Cassia }^ oz. 

Cloves ^4 07.. 

Mace '4 rjz. 

Cardamom seeds i dr. 

Add this to 1 5 lbs. of blackberries 
mashed and 5 gallons of 95 per cent, 
alcohol. Macerate for two weeks. Press 
it and then add 10 lbs. of sugar, dis- 
solved in 3)/ gallons of water, and filter 
the product. 



British Columbia Notes. 

It is rather late in the day to refer to 
the matter, but seldom has there been 
such an evidence of enterprise as was here 
this last Christmas on the part of the 
druggists. The displays were excellent. 
A new idea, and a triumph of the elec- 
trician's skill, was introduced in placing a 



number of artificial budding flowers among 
the displayed fancy goods, the buds being 
prettily colored electric lights. Business 
here during Chrisimas was very good ; 
with some stores the cash sales of Christ- 
mas eve exceeded those of Christmas eve, 
1893, by 25 percent, and 50 per cent; 

January has been enlivened by the de 
parture of the majority of the sealing 
schooners, and the druggists have been 
helped by the stocking up of the mcdi 
cine chests, etc. Now the quietness may 
be felt by almost livery one for a month 
or so. The weather continues open, and 
no snow since January 4th, 1895. 

The Provincial Legislature is now in 
session. Among other bills is a bill to 
amend the Pharmacy Act, 1891. Up to 
time of writing, this bill has had its sec- 
ond reading. It provides for a third class 
of persons, to be known as "certified 
clerks": stipulates that only certificates 
of examination equal in standing to the 
British Columbia Pharmaceutical .Asso- 
ciation Licentiate Examination shall be 
accepted in lieu of examination here ; 
exempts the members of the association 
from jury service. It is not going to be- 
come law, however, without a very severe 
fight, for the members of the legislature 
seem opposed generally to legislation of 
this character. Messrs. Cochrane, Hen- 
derson, and Shotbolt are a committee to 
get the amendments through, and, be it 
known, Henderson and Cxichrane are 
rustlers, sure. Mr. Cochrane has been 
over at the House talking wiih the mem- 
bers almost daily, and would, doubtless, 
have continued had not his clerk, Mr. 
Price, decided to seek other pastures. 
.Mr. Shotbolt, owir.g to a badly sprained 
ankle, cannot canvass the members to 
any extent, being confined to his store. 

Unfortunately, a young gentleman who 
has a grievance with the British Columbia 
Pharmaceutical Association is working 
hard to stop the passage of the bill re- 
ferred to. It seems that this young man 
left this ciiy after having served his ap- 
prenticeship, and went to Chicago, where 
he attended a course of lectures at the 
Illinois College of Pharmacy, receiving a 
diploma. He omitted to take the Siate 
Board Examination of Illinois, and on his 
return here the local association informed 
him that he must take the examination of 
this province. He declined, and on the 
advice of his lawyer has taken the above 
course. Lengthy letters pro and con his 
case generally, but particularly on the 
relative merits of state board examiners, 
college diplomas, and " practical experi- 
ence," have appeared this last week in the 
Colonist newspaper. This paper, in an 
editorial, spoke out plainly against some 
remarks made in the House during the 
discussion on the second reading, and the 
almost ridiculous bill introduced by one 
Sword to repeal the Pharmacy Act of i8gi. 
That this latter bill will be knocked out 
goes without saying, but just what will be 
the outcome of this unfortunate disagree- 
ment between the young man and the 
British Columbia Association is more 
than your correspondent can say. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(Zfyh) 




s 



Fluid Extracts . 
Elixirs .... 
Medicinal Syrups 
Liquors .... 
Tinctures . . . 
Green Soap . . 
Chlorodyne. . . 



Standard in strength and quality, 
price. Satisfactory in use. 



Reasonable in 




Apply for Price List and Special Discounts to 

T. MILBURN dz CO. 

Toronto, - - Ontario 

qjinmjijxrmjTJVJxr\uuTjiJxrumrurLrLp _^igo j^ stock . . 

^ -^--v 5 THE ROYAL REMEDY 

& EXTRACT CO.'S 

Celery and Pepsin Chew- 
ing Gums 
Sweet Wheat 
After Dinner 
Banana 

Mountain Teab'y Tolu 
Pine-apple 
Blood Orange 
Merry Bells 
Royal Tablet Tolu 
Royal Pencil Tolu 
Kissimee 
Tolu Sugar Plums 

6 Plums in sliding Box, 
retailing at 5 cents. 

Japanese Handkerchief Boxes 
Japanese Glove Boxes 

Containing each, 
100 SWEET WHEAT 

and 
100 AFTER DINNER 

HANDSOME, finely 

polished Oak Frame 

Show Cases. 

3 sides glass, 3 glass shelves, 24 
in. high, 8 in. wide, 7 in. deep. 

LEE'S Poison Bottles 
CHAPIREAU'S Cache- 
teuses and Cachets 

Send for Price List. 

38 Front Street East, 
TORONTO. 



ELMENDORF'S 



TUB m 

A Sure Cure for La Grippe. 



pi f4i?altt?ful C^fjeu/it)'? Qum, 

Curing Coughs, Colds and Sore Throat, 
Inflammation of the Lungs, Con- 
sumption. Catarrh, Rose Cold 

or Haj- Fever, Asthma, Dys- 

pepsi,">. Nervous Affection and 

all Germ Diseases, Cankered Mouth 

aud Cleansing to the Blood. 



P"RieE 5 CE/NTS 

Sample by Mail Two 3c. Stamps. 

por Sale by Drui}(Ji8ts. 
THE CANADIAN SPECIALTY CO., 



38 Front St., East, 



j^ u„ , ,„„. o.., t«>i, TORONTO, Ont. ^ 

L Dominion Agents. J 

LTiJTJTJTTinjTj uxru\rinjTJTj nnuirum 

THE CANADIAN SPECIALTY CO. - 



Paris Green... 



Cask = about 400 lbs. 

100 lb. Case^Four 251b. parcels, each enclosed in two 
bags of heavy paper. 

Box of 1 2 lbs. Twenty-four cartons, each 1 2 lb. net. 

Box of 1 lb. = Twenty-four cartons, each 1 lb. net. 

PACKAGES FRKK. 

This article is promised close scrutiny by the Inspectors 
this season. Buyers are therefore advised to select stock care- 
fully. Our purchases will be thoroughly tested, and all goods 
sold by us we will guarantee. 

All the packages mentioned above contain full net weights 
of Absolutely Pure Paris Green ; and to the consideration 
of wei,L;hts wc would call special attention, remarking that it 
has become a widespread custom to weigh in packages with 
the goods, so that the gross weight only equals the presumed 
NET weight — a custom that renders the retailer liable at any 
time to fine. 



Sponges.., 



We HAVE a large stock of Sponges, " forms '' and "cut," 
packed in convenient boxes of light wood, containing twenty- 
five to fifty pieces each. We hope for the liberal patronage of 
the trade. 



Camphor... 



For future shipment we are quoting Howard's at 
extremely low figures. We have also to offer Japanese Cam- 
phor, of prime quality, in compressed cakes (clear crystal) of 
one pound each. Each cake wrapped and sealed. 

The probabilities of the market would suggest the booking 
of orders as a wise course to pursue. 



Cerol Leather Dressings. Flint's Emulsion. 

Elliot's Syrup of Figs, 12 oz., ^3.60. 

Fountain Syringes. Hot Water Bottles. 

" Highland " Chest Protectors. 

McLauchlan's Candies. Bouquet Pearls. 

Havana Fruit Gum { ^iSl; ^iX" stamp. 

Adams' Gums, in Glass Packages. 



Your orders and enquiries are respectfully solicited. 

ELLIOT & CO. 

MANrFACTUKBRS OF 

FLUID EXTRACTS, PILLS, TINCTURES, Etc. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



(26b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



TAYLOR'S 



■LfTTEST, ODORS': 

: Fp THE 




JOHN rnvLOQ •^ cov. 

TORONTO. 



J. STEVENS & SON 



78 LONG LANE, - LONDON, E.G., 

ENGLAND 

Do You Sell 

Anything used in tlie Sick-room, 
the Hospital, the Dispensary, by 
Medical Practitioner, or Patient 
in anyway connected with Surgery 
or the Practice of Medicine ? 
WRITE FOR OUR LIST 

145 Wellinirton Street West, 

TOIiOIfTO 




The 

Best 

Brushes 

Hair, Tooth, Nail, 
Shaving, Bath, 
Cloth, Infants' 

MANUFACTURED BY 

A.Dupont<SCo. 

PARIS 



Agents for Canada- 



J. PALMER & SON, 

'"' si"?!,""" MONTREAL 



Full Stocks of New Crop 

Field and Garden Seeds. 



SPECIAL ATTENTION TO 

Red and Alsike Clovers, 
Timothy Seed, Etc. 



ENSILAGE CORN IN CAR LOTS. 



Catalogues on Application. 
Correspondence Invited. 



All enquiries by wire or mail will 



I'll! receive prompt attention. 



The Steele, Brings, Marcon Seed Co. 

• limited ) 

TORONTO, ONT. 

^i^PartieH having any of the above Seeds, or 
Choice Seed Grains to ofi'eo', please send 
samples. 



The.. 



Lyman Bros. (5 Go, 



(LIMITED) 



TORONTO, 



ONT. 



s 



p 




o 



N 



$ 



G 
E 



S 



Our Representatives are on 
the road with one of the most 
varied assortments of Sponges, 
for deHvery later on (or from 
stock now) ever offered in Can- 
ada. 

See our Samples before plac- 
ing orders. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



27 



Trade Notes. 

G. E. Huitler, druggist, Toronio, has 
made an assignment. 

Mr. Cowie is starting a new drug busi- 
ness at Edmonton, N.VV.T. 

.•\ new drug store is being opened at 
Portage la Prairie, Man., by lohn Hill. 

A. J. Hunter has sold his drug busi- 
ness at Everett, Ont., to C. M. Kingston. 

("i. H. Williams, formerly of Revelstoke. 
B.C., has opened a drug store at Three 
Forks, Oregon. 

W. J. Flemniing & Co. have purchased 
the drug business of White & Co., Pruice 
Albert, Saskatchewan. 

The Dominion Glass Company, Jos. 
Rarsalon, President, has registered in the 
Tutelle office, Montreal. 

Henry Procter has sold his fourth in- 
terest in the Crescent Pharmacy, Nanaimo, 
B.C., to F. C. Stearman. 

N. I. McDermid has moved his drug 
business from his old stand to the corner 
of Dundas and Wellington streets, Lon- 
don, Ont. 

John W. Hunting, who for some time 
had a drug busuiess on Wellesley Street, 
Toronto, Ont., died at Pickering, Ont., 
February 7th. 

H. Proctor, formerly in business in 
Nanaimo, B.C., has purchased the drug 
store at the corner of Queen andBathurst 
streets, Toronto, Ont. 



Nova Scotia. 

During the week which marked the 
funeral obsequies of our late Premier, the 
influx of strangers to Halifa.x was very 
large, the drug fraternity being well repre- 
sented by members from all parts of Nova 
Scotia and the neighboring provinces of 
New Brunswick andPrmce Edward Island. 
On the return of the island contingent, 
the S.S. Stanley, by which they intended 
taking passage, was detained at Pictou by 
stress of weather, and in the words of one 
of their number, " There are twenty-three 
of us islanders, all told, detained at Pictou 
by a furious snowstorm, some of us rather 
jolly, under adverse circumstances, a la 
Mark Tapley." 

Among the representatives we noticed 
Mr. I). Reddin, of Reddin Bros., of Char- 
lottetown, who was his usual self, and 
amusing his friends with flashes of wit. 
With his characteristic energy, Mr. Red- 
din secured tickets for all the functions of 
the week. We rather think Denny was 
glad he came to Halifa.\. 

Dr. A. 1). McGiUvary, of Sydney, C.B., 
was also among the visitors to the city 
last week. The doctor's visits to the 
metropolis are not of very frequent occur- 
rence. 

Mr. R. D. Stiles, of Pictou, was another 
in the list of visiting druggists, as was Mr. 
Wm. Crowe, of Crowe Bros., Truro. 

Mr. George V. Rand, the well known 
druggist of Wolfville, who, we regret to 



say, met with a serious accident at his 
home some few weeks ago, by falling 
down stairs, is somewhat improved, but 
still not by any means completely re- 
covered. 

Mr. Hugh E. Calkin, formerly in the 
employ of Simson Bros. & Co., Halifax, 
has purchased the business of R. O. 
Christie, of Springhill, and will carry on 
same at that place. Mr. Christie intends 
opening a drug store at IJttle (Jlace Bay, 
C.B. We trust both the gentlemen will 
meet with success in their undertakings. 

Mr. W. A. Canfield, formerly in the 
employ of W. H. Hills, Acadia Mines, 
has secured a position with Simson Bros. 
& Co. 

Mr. E. J. Phelan, who was for some 
years with C. A. Sterns, of Apothecaries' 
Hall, Halifax, has gone to Glace Bay to 
fill a vacancy in the store of Senator Wm. 
McDonald at tl-at place. 

Mr. Alfred A. Patterson, for some time 
buver for Simson Bros. & Co., at present 
seeking health in South Africa, is writing 
very entertainingly of his adventures in 
that country, and his letters are appearing 
in the Halifax Herald. This Halifax boy 
is now located within fifteen miles of 
Compasberg, the highest point of the 
cape, lying in the Sneeuwberg mountain 
range, and where the atmosphere is so 
clear that the formation of the boulders 
on the mountain side can be distinctly 
discerned at a distance of from fifteen to 
twenty miles. Mr. Patterson reports his 
health improved, and weight increased. 



Prince Edward Island. 

Hitherto agents of the wholesale drug 
houses of Montreal have usually paid 
their first annual visit to Prince Edward 
Island not earlier than the months of 
May or .\pril. 1895 initiates a new de- 
parture. Mr. David \\'atson, jr., of 
Messrs. Kerry, Watson & Co., arrived in 
the last week of January, and some of his 
fellow-travellers from Montreal are so 
near, upon the mainland, that their ad- 
vent is daily expected. If an experiment 
is being made, one can scarcely refrain 
from predicting a failure, for the island 
druggists have to buy in the autumn a 
full stock in case of complete isolation in 
winter, and, as a result, their wants are 
small in midwinter, and these wants are 
immediate ones. The uncertainty of 
freight rates, as well as the date of arrival 
of goods ordered, cannot but militate 
against the success of the venture, which 
even the Halifax wholesale houses have 
not been brave enough to essay, although 
they have the advantage over their Mon- 
treal competitors of closer communication. 



Montreal College of Pharmacy. 

At the College of Pharmacy recently, 
instead of the regular lecture on materia 
medica. Prof T. D. Reed gave a lecture 
on the use of the microscope by pharma- 
cists and chemists. A large number of 
instructive and beautiful objects were 



shown under a series of microscopes, the 
|)urpose being to bear out the recom- 
mendation of the microscope as an instru- 
ment of recreation, instruction, and prac- 
tical utility ; also for the purpose of ex- 
hibiting specimens to the audience, 
objects which had been photographed 
were shown by the projection lantern and 
limelight. Among those present were 
I). Watson, J. E. Morrison, E. Muir, and 
a large number of students. Mr. Watson, 
the president, on moving a vote of thanks 
to Dr. Reed for the entertaining and in- 
structive lecture and demonstration, which 
all had enjoyed, stated that the college 
was adding to its appliances the instru- 
ments necessary for the teaching of phar- 
macy according to advanced modern 
science. The present session is one of 
the best in the history of the college, 
ninety-three students having been en- 
rolled. 



Pharmaceutical Association of the 
Province of Quebec 

PRELIMIN.'VRV EXAMINATIONS. 

The preliminary Board of E.xaminers 
held their quarterly examinations in Mont- 
real and Quebec on Thursday, Jan. 3rd, 
when thirty-five candidates presented 
themselves in Montreal, and four in 
Quebec, and of these the following, 
named in order of merit, passed, and are 
entitled to be registered as certified ap- 
prentices, namely : A. G. Lapointe, E. 
W. Jacobs, B. Rogalsky, J. E. Dagneau, 
F. J. Lemaistre, R. O. Dumont, J. A. 
Langlois, H. Genereau, W. E. McKee, 
C. F. Covernton, and Raoul Grignon. 
The following candidates passed in all 
subjects but one, namely : James A. Gil- 
lespie and G. A. Ricard, Latin ; W. J. 
Shea, Geography. The remainder of the 
candidates are referred back for furtlitr 
study. 

The examiners were Professors A. Le- 
blonde de Brumatt and Isaac Gammell, 
with Mr. A. Lakin acting as supervisor 
in Quebec. The next examination will 
take place on the 4th of April, and candi- 
dates are required to give the Registrar, 
Mr. E. Muir, ten days' previous notice of 
their intention to present themselves. 



An Elegant and Brilliant French Polish. 

De la Rogfere gives the following as the 
formula for a polish for woods, which has 
a magnificent and unrivalled brilliancy : 
In 1,500 parts of alcohol of 94° dissolve 
30 parts sulphuric ether, 25 parts lavender 
oil, 25 parts spike oil, 30 parts boric acid, 
7 parts camphor, 30 parts hard copal, 
100 parts sandarac, 365 parts shellac, 30 
parts benzoin, 30 parts balsam copaiba, 
and 5 parts tincture of cinnamon. This 
polish may be applied with the pencil, or 
with the polisher's " daub " (a ball of 
cotton covered with silk or linen). No 
oil is used on the latter when thus ap- 
plied. — National Druggist. 



28 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Pharmacy in England. 

German Competition in Surgical Instruments— 
A Physician dispenses a fatal dose of Strych 
nine for Himself-A Monopoly of the word 
" Medical " Sought for— New Examiners of 
the Pharmaceutical Society— Tea Tablets. 

(From Our Own Correspondent.) 

There is just now something like a flood 
of German instruments and sundries being 
introduced to the drug trade in England. 
Clinical thermometers are being offered 
in nickel cases at $40 per dozen, which is 
surely " rock bottom." Besides this there 
are binaural stethoscopes selling at prices 
fully 50 per cent, lower than only a few 
years ago. The patent of a well-known 
firm of manufacturers of seamless ene- 
mas having expired, there are any num- 
ber of imitations on the market. Most 
of these it is quite incorrect to describe as 
" seamless." They certainly appear so on 
a cursory inspection, but closer examina- 
tion shows that it is only the heavy enam- 
elling on the surface that hides the seams. 
In addition to these, the antiseptic era of 
surgery has proved a fine opening to the 
German instrument manufacturers, and 
these goods are being largely manufac- 
tured in one solid piece of steel, or in 
such a manner that they can easily be 
taken to pieces and sterilized. All the 
leading hospitals are adopting sterilizers 
or autoclaves, by means of which instru- 
ments, bandages, etc., can be effectually 
sterilized by heat. Some of these pieces 
of apparatus are very elaborate and very 
expensive. The large-sized sterilizers are 
fitted with safety valves, tubalures for 
thermometers, etc., and frequently cost as 
much as $50 to $100. Simple copper 
cases for scalpels, small aseptic knives, 
etc., are made so that they can be placed 
over a Bunsen burner and heated to red- 
ness. As the scalpels and knives are 
made of solid steel, very effective sterili- 
zation can thus be assured, whilst no de- 
terioration takes place. One of the great- 
est drawbacks to the use of antiseptic and 
germicidal solutions, such as corrosive 
sublimate and sal-alembroth, was the cor- 
rosion of the instruments. Sterilization 
by heat is quite as effective, and without 
this serious drawback. With regard to 
the cheap clinical thermometers alluded 
to above, it should be noted that t'lese 
catch lines are frequently of very inijrior 
qualit)'. The inaccuracy of clinical ther- 
mometers is notorious, and an e.xamina- 
tion of a number a few years ago indi- 
cated that the graduation was so incorrect 
that readings were frequently more than 
a degree or two out. The Lawet recently 
raised a protest against "half-minute" 
clinical thermometers. These quick read- 
ing thermometers are misleading, accord- 
ing to TAe Lancet, as the mere opening of 
the mouth to introduce the instrument 
reduces the temperature so much that, at 
the expiration of half a minute, the full 
temperature is not restored. 

The accidental death of a doctor in 
London is reported as being due to his 
inadvertently taking an overdose of a 
strychnine mixture for neuralgia. He 



was a particularly handsome man and al- 
ways immaculately dressed, and yet it was 
not his first mistake in dispensing. It is 
related that some time ago he was 
observed rushing hatless from his surgery 
in order to overtake a patient. It tran- 
spired that he had doubled the quantity 
of medicine, but forgotten to alter the 
dose. With regard to his last fatal error, 
by which he lost his life, it is exceedingly 
probable that he had the whole of the 
strychnine dissolved in a glass measure 
ready to put into the mixture bottle. He 
was called away from the dispensing 
counter for a moment and on his return 
raised the measure to his lips and drank 
the contents, thinking it was a measured 
dose from the medicine bottle. He lin- 
gered for nearly an hour, and his death 
was most painful, owing to the continued 
tetanic spasms, which, in spite of medical 
assistance, were uncontrollable. It is 
surely the ircny of fate that the deceased 
doctor was the author of an article, pub- 
lished in a medical journal only a year or 
two ago, advocating the advantages of a 
special and distinctive bottle always to be 
employed for poisons. 

A precious bill has just been introduced 
by the British Medical Association, in 
order to secure the monopoly of the word 
"medical." Thus it is laid down as a 
penal offence for any one, not a legally 
qualified medical man, to assume, use, or 
take the title medical practitioner, medical 
specialist, medical dispenser, medico- 
herbalist, medico-electrician, and so on. 
The penalty, therefore, which a pharma- 
cist would incur if he should dare to call 
himself a medical dispenser (which is just 
what he is), or his pharmacy a medical 
hall, is the liability to imprisonment for 
twelve months. It need hardly be said 
that there is not the remotest chance of 
the bill ever being passed by Parliament, 
but it is a fine specimen of the cool 
assumption of some of our notoriety- 
hunting medicos. It must be admitted 
that the medical profession suffer con- 
siderably from the illegitimate practise of 
medicine by persons totally unacquainted 
with the subject. But a body that cannot 
agree to let nurses be properly examined 
and registered without showing a degree 
of jealousy, which has made it a laughing- 
stock, is hardly to be encouraged in the 
endeavor to secure anything further in the 
way of a monopoly. 

The introduction of professional ex- 
aminers on the Examining Board of the 
Pharmaceutical Society has had no ap- 
preciable effect on the number of passes 
and failures. It is rumored that Professor 
Green is particularly severe, although it is 
not stated whether his own students at 
Bioomsbury Square, with whom he is im- 
mensely popular, experience the same 
severity. The character of the examina- 
tions cannot fail to be improved by the 
addition of these professors to the Board, 
and they are naturally more in touch with 
students, and understand the requirements 
which a student should be able to satisfy 
better than pharmacists who have left 



their schooldays long behind. The new 
examiners include Professor Percy Frank- 
land, F.R.S., of Mason's College, I5irming- 
ham, and Professor McLeod, of Cooper's 
Hill College, who will take chemistry at 
the London examinations, and Professor 
J. Gibson, of the Heriot Watt College, at 
Edinburgh. Professor Green, D.Sc, 
M.A., of the society's school, and Mr. 
A. C. Seward, M.A., Lecturer and Ex 
aminer at Cambridge University, will take 
botany in London, and Professor Patrick 
Geddes, of University College, Dundee, 
will examine in the same subject in Edin- 
burgh. The Pharmaceutical Society is 
certainly fortunate in obtaining the ser- 
vices of such eminent men, as the emolu- 
ment is not large. Travelling expenses 
are, of course, allowed, but the fees are 
only $16 per diem, and the examinations 
now only run into some twenty days in 
the year. 

Some time ago I mentioned the intro- 
duction of compressed tablets of tea by 
Messrs. Burroughs, Welcome & Co., and 
there is no doubt that they have " caught 
on " with the public, and particularly 
with the travelling section. Special care 
is taken to select the tea leaves and re- 
move the mid-rib, after which it is crushed 
and compressed. When infused in a cup 
of boiling water, preferably by means of a 
patent straining-spoon, a capital cup of tea 
is produced in a few moments. I under- 
stand that Messrs. Burroughs, Welcome 
& Co. have had to have special tabloid 
machines erected for the purpose, and the 
demand for the tablets is sufficient to keep 
four or five constantly going. The latest 
idea, introduced by the Terrabona Com- 
pany, is decidedly novel, and a step in 
advance. They have introduced packets 
of tea, milk, and sugar combined, and the 
ingredients, sufficient for at least three 
cups of tea, are enclosed in a gelatine 
wrapper. The use of the gelatine cover- 
ing is still furtlier claimed as a novel im- 
provement, as it is stated to precipitate 
the tanning from the tea. This latest 
novelty is put up in packets, to retail at 
two cents each, and supplied to druggists 
at $2.16 per gross, and it is claimed that 
it will prove a boon to tourists and travel- 
lers. The invention is duly protected by 
patent, and as an attractive novelty will 
doubtless command a ready sale. 



Salubrin, a specialty prepared in 
Switzerland and recommended as a 
strong antiseptic and hajmostatic, is said 
to consist of about 2 parts of acetic acid, 
25 parts of acetic ether, 50 parts of alco- 
hol, and 23 parts of water. It is used as 
a dressing for wounds. 

SuBLiMOPHENOL. — By bringing togeth- 
er equal molecules of mercuric chloride 
and potassium carbolate, and gently heat- 
ing the solution, a brick-red precipitate, 
which passes through yellow to white, 
forms, consisting of a mixed chloride and 
carbolate of mercury. This has been 
termed sublimophenol. Washed, dried, 
and dissolved in boiling alcohol, it forms, 
on cooling, colorless crystals. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



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Stamped on Each Drop 



Lansing's 
Glasscine 
Labels 



FOR 



Druggists' Shelfware 



These Labels are made from thin transparent 
sheets of Celluloid, and are exactly like the Glass 
Labels in finish and appearance, but are more 
durable and cheaper. 

The only Label Factory in Canada. 

Samples, Catalogue, etc , sent on application. 

ADDRESS- 
LANSING & WOOD, 

LOCK BOX 362, 

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Mention (his joiirna/. 



(28b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST 



Business for 1895 



SHOULD start off with a boom, and we are fully prepared to aid you in making it a profitable 
year, if you will but invest a portion of your business capital in the best line of Non-secret 
Preparations that are manufactured. We are pioneers in the trade, having been the origi- 
nators ot the Non-secret Idea ; and though our prices are, in some instances, a trifle higher than 
those of comjieting houses, the quality of our products will well warrant the slight advance. We 
strive to manufacture the best preparations that can be made, our motto being 

"NOT THE CHEAPEST, BUT THE BEST." 



Our lines of Sarsaparillas, Cough Syrups, Worm Medicines, Liniments, Salves, and other 
popular household remedies are very attractive and saleable. They are made of pure materials, are 
of excellent formulas, are finished with handsome and artistic wrappers, and yield a liberal profit 
of from 100 per cent, to 400 percent. The great points in their favor are that they are true to the 
formulae printed on the labels. The goods bear your address (you know what you are selling), 
and your trade on them, once established, will prove permanent and profitable. 

Our Non-secret Catalogue for 1895 is carefully 
compiled and handsomely illustrated. A careful 
perusal will repay you well, for we show you our 
formulae, what the goods cost, what they sell for, 
and the exact margin of profit to be made on each 
preparation. 



Send for a copy of our Catalogue for 
1895, or fill out the attached coupon, and 
mail to 



CUT THIS OUT AND MAIL TO 



FREDERICK STEARNS & CO., 

WINDSOR, ONT. 

Kindly mail me a copy of your new Catalogue for 
1895, 3^ advertised in the Canadian Druggist. 



FREDERICK STEARNS & CO., 

MANUFACTURING PHARMACISTS, 



LONDON, ENG. NEW YORK CITY. DETROIT, MICH. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



20 



Practical Hints on Piiarmaey.* 

Hv CiiAs. L. Weidi.kr, Ph.G. 

• 'I'his paper is made up of ideas, snmc 
original and some not. Tiie object is to 
give a few practical hints which the writer 
has found hy experience to be thoroughly 
practical and ui) to date. In these days 
of progression and sharii competition, it 
is necessary for one to be fully .iwake and 
lake advantage of every little thing. Peo- 
ple like to see a druggist who is progres- 
sive, and it is the best kind of an adver- 
tisement for people to say, " Well, I like 
to deal at Mr. /.'s store ; he always has 
something new to show or tell, and he is 
thoroughly up to date." This paper deal.s, 
liowever, with subjects behind the pre- 
scription counter rather than with those 
in tlie front. 

l'",very druggist has, of course, his prac- 
tical ideas worked out in some form, 
but perhaps there are some hints in this 
paper that will be of service to him. 
What may be of use in one store is not 
necessarily true of others, but it is hoped 
that all wil! be of some value to every 
one. 

.A-hvays send a repeated prescription 
out in a new dress. A repeated prescrip- 
tion with soiled label shows carelessness 
and lack of attention to details Pre- 
scriptions, above other things, should be 
faultlessly put up. 

All prescriptions, when finished, should 
be checked off by another prescription 
clerk. The ingredients, quantities, 
weights, measures, and labels, should all 
be "called off by the compounder, each 
little point being noted. This is the only 
way of insuring absolute accuracy. This 
has been the means on innumerable occa- 
sions of saving the druggist's reputation. 
A case that recently happened will bear 
repeating. It was a murder trial in New- 
York, and the prescription called for 
(luinine sulphate and morphine sulphate, 
the latter in doses of i ,'5 grain each, in 
capsule form. Fhe patient died, and, as 
there were peculiar circumstances attend- 
ing the death, a chemical examination of 
the contents of the stomach of the dead 
body was made. Morphine was found in 
such quantities as to leave not the slight- 
est doubt but that she had died from 
morphine poisoning. The druggist was 
brought to trial, charged with criminal 
negligence in compounding prescriptions. 
On the witness stand it was proven that 
all prescriptions in that store were check- 
ed off by another prescription clerk, who 
had examined the bottles, weights, etc., 
and found them correct. It is needless 
to state that the druggist was fully exon- 
erated, and in the end the affair was of 
decided lienefit to him. All the proceed- 
ings were known to every one, and when 
the true facts of the matter became public 
property customers showed their confi- 
dence in his ability and carefulness in a 
substantial manner. It was subsequently 
proven that the morphine that caused the 
death of the patient was administered by 

•Read before the O.S.P..^., 1894. 



the prescriber, who later paid the |)enalty 
for the crime. 

Mucilage of Acacia when allowed to 
stand for some time changes in composi- 
tion, due to a fermentation that sets up. 
The preparation may be kept indefinitely 
by using chloroform water. I do not 
think any physit'ian could oliject to chloro- 
form being there, as it is present to the 
extent of only one-half of one per cent. 

In making infusion of digitalis, it has 
been shown that cold water is preferable 
to hot water, in that less coloring matter 
and more colorless active principles are 
dissolved. In the following formula it 
has been found that the product keeps a 
month longer, while with the official pro- 
duct a decomposition sets in in three or 
four days. Dr. H. C. Wood, Professor in 
the University of Pennsylvania, states that 
there is no therapeutic objection to the 
use of ammonia water in the quantity and 
manner used. The formula is as follows : 

Digitalis leaves, bruised. ..120 grains. 

Water i^'/i fluid ozs. 

.\mnionia water 90 minims. 

Alcohol I fluid oz. 

Macerate for one hour, agitating occa- 
sionallv, express, wash residue with water 
filter. To the i4^'2 fluid ounces add 90 
minims ammonia water, i fluid ounce al- 
cohol, and sufficient water to make the 
product measure a pint. 

In making the Tincture of Catechu or 
the Compound Tincture of the Pharma- 
copceia, gelatinization always results after 
a time. This is overcome by the use of 
logwood to the extent of ten per cent. 
There can be no therapeutic objection to 
its use. 

This time in the year there are frequent 
calls for a good gargle. One largely used 
in the East and a most excellent prepara- 
tion is composed of the Compound Infu- 
sion ol Rose Leaves, with Tannui and 
Chlorate of Potash. 

Ammonia Carbonate, as it is generally 
kept in the drug store, quickly loses its 
carbonic acid gas and ammonia, resulting 
in a white opaque mass or powder. In 
making the aromatic spirits of ammonia 
it is necessary to use the white translucent 
masses; hence the importance of keeping 
.\mmonia Carbonate in its proper condi- 
tion. An excellent plan to adopt is to 
keep it in a stone jar provided with per- 
forated false bottom. A small quantity 
of concentrated ammonia being kept in 
the bottom all the time will insure a first- 
class chemical, the liberation of the am- 
monia gas from the water supplying that 
lost by the carbonate. 

Prescriptions calling for soft elastic 
capsules containing liquids are received 
frequently, and every druggist, when it is 
practical, should put up his own capsules. 
There is a firm now who get up an appar- 
atus for filling capsules, they supplying 
the capsules with the apparatus. The 
capsules are so shaped that an end can be 
cut off, the liquid dropped in from the 
apparatus, and the open top can be easily 
covered. It is an ingenious idea, and so 
simple that expertness comes with the 



first few trials. A prescription calling for 
two dozen capsules could easily l)e made 
in twenty minutes, affording a profit pro- 
portionately much greater than when cap- 
sules already put up are dispensed. 

.■\de[)s l.anae Hydrosus is the ofificial 
I.anoline and contains 30 per cent, of 
water. It is far cheaper to buy the anhy- 
drous Lanoline and mix the water with it 
yourself. 

Chloroform is now made so pure and 
so cheaply that the Pharmacopa-ia, re- 
cognizing this fact, has discarded the for- 
mer official chloroformum venale. Not- 
withstanding this fact, there are still two 
kinds in commerce so-called, pure and 
impure. The modern process for its 
manufacture yieldsthe remarkable amount 
of 167 per cent, of pure chloroform from 
100 per cent, of original material, or, in 
other words, one hundred parts of acetone 
will yield one hundred and sixty seven 
parts of pure chloroform ; thus making 
it entirely unnecessary to purchase so- 
called commercial chloroform at the price 
of the pure and pay a higher price for 
that labelled pure, when they all come 
from the same original container. 

Regarding excipients, there should al- 
ways be a little jar of glucose syrup, and 
one each of glycerite of starch and traga- 
canth : also a variety of one ounce bottles 
with pipette in cork, containing, variously, 
water, mucilage of acacia, glycerine, and 
syrup. P^or dusting powders, there should 
be a number, all in two ounce wide mouth 
bottles with sprinkler top, containing, re- 
spectively, powdered licorice root, starch, 
lycopodium, powdered acacia, and pow- 
dered carbonate of magnesia. These 
could be arranged conveniently on one 
shelf on the prescription counter, and will 
be the means of saving much time, 
trouble, and many steps. 

Every prescription counter should be 
supplied with a powder board for folding 
powders on, one, say, seventeen by twenty 
inches would be sufliciently large. Have 
the surface smooth and well varnished. 
The average prescription counter is al- 
ways a little soiled, and rarely presents a 
perfectly smooth surface. This little de- 
vice, if kept within easy reach, will be 
found a necessity. 

.\n ingenious device recently put on 
the market by a Boston house is an oint- 
ment slab or block composed of several 
layers of parchment paper. The idea is 
that after the ointment is mixed on the 
top sheet this can simply be torn off and 
thrown away, saving much time, as it 
does away with the usual porcelain slab 
and its frequent cleaning. Some oint- 
ments may be too stiff to work with ad- 
vantage, but they can be easily softened. 
In the way of a spatula for use with oint- 
ments that act on metal there is quite an 
ingenious one gotten out by another Bos- 
ton firm. It consists of a steel blade 
thoroughly coated with gutta percha, 
forming altogether a very useful utensil, 
combining all the advantages of the ordi- 
nary spatula with none of its disadvan- 
tages. 



30 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



For poisonous drugs, there is the poisoii 
closet, a very safe necessity. An excel- 
lent plan is to have on the door a table 
of doses, maximum and minimum, with 
antidotes, For weighing poisonous drugs 
or chemicals, we have the specially deli- 
cate balance. This should never rest on 
the prescription counter, but so supported 
as to be entirely free from all jarring, 
which is almost as detrimental to the life 
of a good balance as careless handling. 

There is always a certain place in the 
drug store reserved for drugs, chemicals, 
and odds and ends that are only occa- 
sionally called for. An excellent plan to 
adopt when the number is large is to have 
a book properly indexed, and have all 
alphabetically arranged. This saves 
much time and annoyance, as we all 
know how exasperating it is to have a call 
for something and know you have it, but 
can't just remember where it is. You 
don't like to keep the customer waiting, 
or he won't wait, so a sale is lost. 

A good scheme for keeping track of 
the cost of and date of purchase of cer- 
tain goods generally kept in drawers is to 
have a tin slot frame made suitable to 
receive an ordinary stiff card, which can 
be slipped in properly marked-when the 
drawer is refilled. 

Last, but not least— a place for every- 
thing and everything ahvays in its place. 
There is nothing so annoying as to be in 
a hurry and going to look for something, 
to find the place where it always has been 
kept occupied with something entirely 
different. — Pacific Drug Review. 



Pharmaceutieal Analysis. 

(Continued from page 22, Jaiiu.-iry 1895.) 

SOME SPECIAL TESTS FOR ))kUGS .VND 
CHEMICALS. 

Sulphate of Zinc. — Boiled with ex- 
cess of caustic potash it should entirely 
dissolve. A blue coloration on the addi- 
tion of ammonia indicates copper. Add 
sulphydrate of anunonia ; if white preci- 
pitate, the sample is free from iron. 
Should the precipitate be gray or dark in 
color, it indicates the presence of iron. 

ScAMMONV. — Starch may be detected 
by adding tincture of iodine to a little of 
the powdered scammony shaken up with 
boiling water, and allowed to cool. If it 
turns blue, it indicates the presence of 
starch. If adulterated with common resin 
or guaiacum, the addition of sulphuric 
acid will turn it red ; if the latter alone, 
it will change to green on mixing with 
water. It should not change on the ad- 
dition of chloride of soda or perchloride 
of iron. The presence of jalap resin may 
be detected by shaking up scammony 
with ether. Jalap resin remains undis- 
solved. 

Spirit of Nitrous Ether. — Should 
have a specific gravity of 0.840 to 0.845 S 
should not effervesce, or but feebly, when 
shaken up with bicarbonate of soda. The 
presence of aldehyde is indicated by a 
brown coloration on heating with caustic 



potash. It should yield not much less 
than five times its volume of the gas on 
keeping. The spirit may be tested with 
accuracy by the nitrometer, or the follow- 
ing simple method. Prepare two solu- 
tions as follows : 

No. I. 

R.— Sodii hyposulph gr. iv. 

Sotlii chloridi gr. xl. 

Potass, iodid gr. xx. 

Aq. ad 5 ii- 

.Solve. 

No. 2. 

R. — Spt. Kther. nitros ,5 i'- 

Acid, sulph. dil 5 '. 

Misce. 

Place No. i solution in a small por- 
celain dish — a two-ounce ointment pot 
will answer the purpose. Pour into this 
3iss of No. 2 solution, and stir till effer- 
vescence ceases. The mixture should 
be free from iodine color; if not so, the 
spirit of nitre is stronger than should be 
used ; if no iodine has remained free 
after the effervescence has passed off, add 
another 5ss of the No. 2 solution. This 
should now produce a permanent brown 
color, if the spirit of nitre is up to its nor- 
mal strength. If a second addition of 7jss 
(total 3iiss) is required, it is below its 
normal, but not unfit for use ; but if this 
second 3ss fails to produce a permanent 
brown color, the spirit of nitre is too weak 
to be sanctioned. 

Volatile Oils. — Volatile or essential 
oils are sometimes adulterated with fatty 
oils, resins, balsams, and alcohol, etc. A 
spot of the sample placed on paper and 
allowed to evaporate should leave no 
grease behind if pure. If diluted with 
alcohol, on shaking up with a few small 
pieces of chloride of calcium the chemi- 
cal will become partly dissolved. 

Wax. — Boil a small quantity of bees- 
wax with water, any mineral impurities 
present will settle to the bottom. Add a 
few drops of tincture of iodine to the 
water in which the sample has been 
boiled, and, if it turns blue, it proves the 
presence of starch. Resin and fats may 
be dissolved out, if present, by shaking a 
portion of the wax up with chloroform. If 
more than 25 per cent, be dissolved, it 
indicates adulteration. — British and Col- 
onial Driig^isfs Diary. 



A Local Remedy for Diphtheria. 

Professor Loeffler, of Greifswald, the 
discoverer of the diphtheria bacillus, has 
suggested a new remedy for the disease. 
The mixture recommended is said to 
consist of alcohol, 60 parts ; toluol, 36 ; 
and solution of ferric chloride, 4. Men- 
thol is added to deaden the pain caused 
by the application, which is effected by 
means of pieces of wadding, the affected 
parts being at first treated every three or 
four hours. Of seventy-one patients 
treated by this method from the outset, 
all have been saved, while only one death 
occurred out of twenty six cases treated 
after the second day of the attack. 



Oil Emulsions.* 

By Stei'Hen J. Clark. 

In making a good oil emulsion, it has 
always been considered by pharmacists 
in general as an operation requiring a 
skillful manipulation, and to manage the 
operation so as to be successful in pro- 
ducing a perfect emulsion in every case 
was considered a high accomplishment by 
the ordinary pharmacist. 'Phe pharma 
cists of this country have paid too little 
attention to making first-class emulsions. 
Physicians, as we all know, very seldom 
prescribe oil, gum, and water in their 
proper proportions. Consequently, the 
pharmacist is compelled to use his own 
judgment in dispensing a perfect emul- 
sion. Emulsions are deserving of a great 
deal of attention. In fact, the physician, 
as well as the pharmacist, should be 
more familiar with this class of prepara- 
tions. 

Two methods are employed in the 
manufacture of such emulsions. One 
consists in making a thick mucilage, to 
which the oil is added gradually in small 
proportions until it is all thoroughly in 
corporated, and lastly, the other ingre- 
dients. The second method, which is, 
no doubt, universally employed in the 
leading pharmacies of this country, and 
its process, most all druggists are well 
versed in. Nevertheless, to accomplish 
a perfect success, I wish to suggest and 
impress a few very important points on 
this subject. 

First of all, cleanliness, like in all 
other manipulations, is one of the agents 
which should never be lost sight of, and 
especially so in this case. A most con- 
venient and advisable shape of a mortar 
employed during this process is one of a 
shallow form with a flat pestle properly 
adjusted to its shape. The powder, 
should be of absolute purity, should be 
placed into the mortar, its dust covering 
the sides of the vessel, keeping the oil 
from greasing them. Now, the oil should 
be added in the proportion of one to 
two of the gum, and, after being well 
mixed, add a certain amount of water. 
Most any apprentice, after following these 
rules, should be able to turn out a first- 
class preparation. As it is in these days 
of progress, druggists should provide 
themselves with an emulsifier, which 
would be a very useful machine to them 
if they are in a community where emul- 
sions are very frequently prescribed. A 
perfect emulsion should be as white as 
milk and its fat globules too small to be 
visible to the naked eye. In fact, it 
should be a homogeneous compound. — 
Pacific Drug Review. 



Iodophenochloral. — This is a mix- 
ture of equal parts of tincture of iodine, 
carbolic acid, and chloral hydrate, and 
has been recommended as an application 
in certain skin diseases. The brown 
liquid must be carefully preserved. 

'Read before the O.S.P.A., 1894. 



CANADIAX DRUfiGIST. 



•')'-■ A) 



3 



GOOD SELLERS 



VELROSE 



SHAVING CREAM 
SHAVING STICK 
BARBER'S BAR 





SHAVING,, 

I ii ^'^^ 

THOS LEEMINC &C° 

lti'i!i;ti • ' -u 

IJ'ONTREAl., - Nl'W VOR|* 



ii»i»?^ 



PAY YOU WELL. PLEASE YOUR CUSTOMERS 
ATTRACTIVE COUNTER ARTICLES 

Order Sample h dozen from your wholesale house to come with next order. 
We supply Samples for free distriliution with first orders. 

XHOS.UEEMING&CO. 

MONTREAL 



A Druggist 



taking proper interest in his 
establishment will provide his 
customers with first-class goods 
only. 



E.B. Eddy's 



Toilet Papers and Fixtures 
form part of the Stock of a 
well-equipped drug-store. 




LITTLE'S 

PATENT FLU I D 



SHEEP DIP 

AND CATTLE WASH. 



For the Destruction of Ticks, Lice, Mange, and 

all Insects upon Sheep, Horses, Cattle, 

Pigs, Dogs, etc. 

Superior to Carbolic Acid for Ulcers, Wounds, Sores, etc 



Removes Scurf, Roughness, and Irritation of the Skin, 
making- the coat soft, glossy, and healthy 



Removes the unpleasani smell from Dogs and other animals. 



" Little's Sheep Dip and Cattle Wash " is used at the Dominion 
Experimental Farms at Ottawa and Brandon, at the Ontario Industrial 
Farm, Giielph, and by all the principal Breeders in the Dominion ; and 
is pronounced to be the cheapest and most effective remedy on the market. 

43" 17 Gold, Silver, and other Prize Medals have been awarded to 
" Little's Sheep and Cattle Wash " in all parts of the world. 

Sold in large Tins at $1.00. Is wanted by every Farmer and Breeder 
in the Dominion. 

ROBERT WIGHTMAN, Druggist, OWEN SOUND, ONT. 

Sole Agent for the Dominion. 

To be had from all wholesale druggists in Tnronio. 1 lamiltnn, and London. 



..^ 



i 



Little's Soluble Phenyle] 



X 



f:iDEDDDRISER&ANTISEP7ICl^ 



NEW DISINFECTANT. 



^V WJ IMVERStL use (//^ 

CHEAP, HARMLESS, AND eVfECTIVE 



A Highly Concentrated Fluid for Checking and Preventing 
Contagion from Infectious Diseases. 



NON-POISONOUS AND NON-CORROSIVE. 



In a test of Disinfectants, undertaken on behalf of the American Gov- 
ernment, "Little's Soluble Phenyle "was proved to be the best Disin- 
fectant, being successfully active at 2 per cent., whilst that which ranked 
second required 7 per cent., and many Disinfectants, at 50 per cent., 
proved worthless. 

" Little's Soluble Phenyle" will destroy the infection of all Fevers 
and all Contagious and Infectious Diseases, and will neutralize any bad 
smell whatever, not by disguising it, but by destroying it. 

Used in the London and Provincial Hospitals and approved of by the 
Highest Sanitary Authorities of the day. 

The Phenyle has been awarded Gold Medals and Diplomas in all 
parts of the world. 

Sold by all Druggists in 25c. and 50c. Bottles, and Si. 00 Tins. 

.\ 23c. bottle will make four gallons strongest Disinfectant. Is wanted 
by every Physician, Householder, and Public Institution in the Dominion. 



ROBERT WIGHTMAN, Druggist, OWEN SOUND, ONT. 



Sole Agent for the Dominion. 

To be had from all Wholesale Druggists in Montreal, Totontr 
and London. Ont., and Winnipeg, .Man. 



Hamilton, 



(30B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 




MAN LEYS 



"MANLEY'S" 

^Celery Nerve Compound 



Beef, Iron, And Wine 



A Bcleiitiflc Combination of Celery, Beef, Iron, 

and Wine, Tonics, and Pure Glycerine. 

instead of alcoliol. 

UNEQUALLED 

AS A HEALTH BUILDERand HEALTH RESTORER 

Has giv=n the FULLEST SATISFACTION to person. 

who have taken it. 

It is put up in a i6-oz. bottle, contained in an attractive 

Blue and White carton. 

PRICE TO THE TRADE :-$6 (net) per do7 5 P=;' 
cent, off on three do/en orders, and 5 per cent, off for spot 
cash. 

SELI'S FOB «1 A BOTTLE. 

Orders respectfully solicited. 

For testimonials, etc., write to the makers. 

The LION MEDICINE CO. 

87 King St. East, TORONTO. 



Gibbons' 
Toothache 

Gum 

Per doz. $i.oo 

X gross 2.75 



For Sale by all Wholesale Druggists 



J. A. GIBBONS S- CO 



Toronto 



MINARD'S 



LINIMENT 



Sold from Ualifnjc to Firtoria 



HALIFAX 



Krown it Webb. 



Simson Bros. & Co. 



■ i Forsyth, Sutcliffe & Co. 

ST. JOHN -T. B. Barker & Sons. D. McDiarmid & Co. 
YARMOUTH-C. C. Richards & Co. 

»,TDi7«i I Kerry, Watson & Co. Lyman Sons & C.l. 
MONTREAL j £vans Sons & Co. Lyman, Knox & Co. 
KINGSTON— Henry Skinner & Co. 

( Lyman Bros. & Co. Evans Sons & Co. 

TORONTO Northrop & Lyman 

\ Elliot & Co. T. Milburn & Co. 

HAMILTON— Archdale Wilson & Co. J. Winer & Co. 
LONDON-London Drug Co. Jas. A. Kennedy & Co. 

WINNIPEG— Martin, Bole & Wynne Co. 
NEW WESTMINSTER-D.S. Curtis & Co. 

VICTORIA I.angley ,><; Co. 



Allen B. Wrisley's 

CUCUMBER 




The virtues of Cucumber Juice for the .Skin 
and Comple.tion have liecome famous. We 
challenge comparison with any fine milled, 
delicately perfumed, high grade .soap in the 

market. It's The CoiTiplexion Toilet Soap 

of the world. Made on honor, full value, par 
e.xcellence. M.itchless for a clear, soft, skin 
beautifier. It is well worth 50 cents a cake, but 
can be sold at Retail for {'4) one-quarter of that 
price. Try it, try it, and be convinced. 

Sold by the Wholesale Druggists in 
Canada. 



MADE ONLY BY 

ALLEN B. WRISLEY 

479 to 485 5th Avenue, 
CHICAGO. 

Manufacturer of High Grade Toilet Soaps, Per- 
fumes, and Glycerine. 

N.H.— Prices .ind Samples to JOBBERS on application. 



Gray's 



CASTOR-FLUID 

!•. .1 the- hair 

DENTAL PEARLINE 

An excellent antiseptic tooth wash. 

SULPHUR PASTILLES 

For burning in diphtheritic cases. 

SAPONACEOUS DENTIFRICE 

.'^n excellent antiseptic dentifrice. 



These Speeialties 



All of which have been well advertised, 
more particularly the " Castor- Fluid," 
may be obtained at all the wholesale 
houses at Manufacturer's price. 



HENRY R. GRAY 

ESTABLISHED 1859. 

Pharmaceutical Chemist 

22 St. Lawrence Main Street 

(Cor. of Lagauchetiere) 

MONTREAL 



Bole, Wynne & Co. 

Wholesale Druggists and 

Manufacturing Chemists 



We wo-ld be glad to correspond with 
Druggist in Western Provinces when in 
the market. 



OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE : 
WINNIPEG, - MANITOBA 



ONTIIRIO 
VACCINE 
FARM 



Pure and Reliable Vaccine Matter always, on hand. 
Orders by mail or otherwise promptly filled. 

10 Ivory Points, $1 ; 5 Ivory Points, 65 cents ; single 
Points, 20 cents. Discount to the trade. 

Addressall orders- VACCINE FARM, 
,\. .STEWART, M.D. Palmerston, Ont. 



W.A.Gill a Co. CoLUMBUS,OHio.U.S.A 




•IN-THE' MARKET' 



For sale at Manufacturers' Prices by the leading whole- 
sale drug.sistsand druggists' sundrymen 
throughout Canada. 



JOSEPH E. SEAGRAM 



Waterloo, Ontario. 



MANUKACTURER OF 



ALCOHOL 

Pure Sxtirits 
line ffitff Malt Wliinhies 

OLD TIMES" AND "WHITE WHEAT" 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



y 



The Examination of Urine 

The imiiortance to [>hurinacists of a 
general knowledge of urinary analysis is 
now universally admitted, whilst increased 
attention is being paid to the subject by 
the medical profession. The tendency, 
therefore, siiould be, and in a measure is, 
towards the busy practitioner and consult 
ing physician depending more and more 
upon the chemical training of the phar- 
ma(-ist to relieve them of detail work, for 
whu:h they have neither time nor inclina- 
tion. A recent edition of a standard 
work on the subject contains the follow- 
ing : " No account of the method of 
making standard solutions will be given, 
as this preparation re(iuires a greater 
knowledge of chemistry than is usually 
possessed by the clinical (medical) 
student. For the same reason, no de- 
tails have been introduced which require 
the use of a i)alance." This absence of 
chemical training in the average medical 
man is surely the pharmacist's opportunity. 
Moreover, the cultivation of tliis branch 
of analytical chemistry cannot fail to 
improve the status of pharmacists, as well 
as prove an e.xtra source of remunera- 
tion. 

It is the object of the present article to 
give, in a concise manner, an outline of 
some of the methods which have been 
proved in practice to be most useful and 
convenient, .\lthough the matter will be 
largely selective, the opportunity will be 
taken to draw attention to some of the 
latest tests, and also to recent develop- 
ments in physiological chemistry. 

A caution may well be given here 
against the employment of single tests — 
a method of analysis much employed by 
medical men, but which is often unreliable. 
The pharmacists should always employ 
two or three controlling tests, and so 
make sure of his results. 

It will t)e more convenient, perhaps, to 
divide the subject into "General Quali- 
tative Examination,'' and " Quantitative 
Determination of Constituents." 

GENER.^L QUALITATIVE EXAMINATION. 

This is best conducted, according to a 
definite plan, as follows : i . Note the 
color, opacity, and translucency of the 
sample. 2. Ascertain the specific gravity 
and volume. 3. Reaction to test papers. 
4. Test for albumin. 5. Test for sugar. 
6. Test for biliary salts and pigments. 7. 
Examine the sediment, both chemically 
and microscopically. 

Color. — The normal color of urine 
may be affected by disease, or by the in- 
gestion of drugs. In diabetes, hysterical 
affections, anemia, etc., the urine is usually 
very pale. Dark-colored urine may be 
due to fever, biliary pigments, blood, etc. 
If due to fever, the specific gravity will be 
high, the volume excreted small, and the 
presence of urobilin highly probable. 
Urine containini,'' blood from the kidneys 
has a smoky-brown appearance, and de- 
posits a sediment of pigments and blood 
corpuscles. Santonin, rhubarb, and senna 



give orange-colored urine, rendered red 
by the addition of alkali. Logwood in 
ternally communicates a reddish tinge, 
and carbolic acid and creosote turn the 
urine blackish. Healthy urine is quite 
clear when voided, but on standing a 
small quantity of mucus and urates are 
frequently deposited. 

VoLU.Mt. — If the whole of the excretion 
of twenty-four hours has been sent, it 
should be measured and recorded. The 
average amount passed daily in health is 
about 1,500 c.c, or 52 fl. ozs., but it 
varies widely. The amount is consider- 
ably increased in diabetes, where the ex- 
cessive thirst is one of the distressing 
features of the disease. In fevers the 
volume is very much reduced. 

Specific Gravity. — This is ascertained 
by the form of glass hydrometer known as 
urinometer. It is as well to check the 
accuracy of this little instrument by 
means of the ordinary specific gravity 
bottle. Frequent errors are made in 
taking specific gravities. The temperature 
of the liquid should be 6o~-' F. (15.5" C), 
and the eye on a level with the surface of 
the urine. The degree should then be 
taken which coincides with the lower edge 
of the capillary elevation. Normal urine 
varies from about 1.015 to 1.025. Lower 
gravity than i.oio occurs after drinking 
fluids freely, or as the result of cold 
diuretics, etc. High gravity may be due 
to excess of urea or sugar. Note that a 
low specific gravity may sometimes occur 
even in diabetes, as shown last year by Sir 
Edward Sieveking. 

Reaction. — Urine is usually acid from 
the presence of acid sodium phosphate ; 
rarely from free acids. After a full meal 
it is frequently alkaline. In acute diseases 
it is often highly acid. Excessive alkalinity 
may be due to the administration of alka- 
lies or to decomposition, when urea has 
been converted into ammonia. To de- 
termine which of these two may be the 
cause, red litmus paper should be immersed 
in the sample, and gently warmed until 
dry. If fixed alkalies are present, the test 
paper remains permanently blue. 

Albumin. — A large number of tests for 
the detection of albumin in urine have 
been proposed. Many of these are ex- 
cessively delicate, perhaps too much so, as 
they generally precipitate other substances 
as well. In acvte fevers albumin is often 
present, but disappears after the fever has 
subsided. The most serious form of 
albuminuria is known as Bright's disease. 

Heat and Acid Test. — Filter a small 
quantity of the urine, if not bright and 
clear. Fill a test tube two-thirds full with 
the sample, and heat the upper t^zxI of the 
urine until it boils, and then add two drops 
of strong acetic acid. Any coagulation or 
cloudiness, which is permanent, is due to 
albumin, whilst a turbidity, which might 
be due to precipitated phosphates, will be 
dissolved by the acid. The only [lossiblc 
error is the precipitation of mucin in 
neutral or alkaline urine. If the sample is 
acid, and has stood some time, all the 
mucin will be separated by filtration. If 



neutral, or alkaline, it should first be care- 
fully acidified and filtered, or tests for 
mucin may be tried. 

Cold Nitric Acid Test.— A delicate 
method is that suggested by Sir William 
Roberts. One volume of concentrated 
nitric acid is mixed with three volumes of 
a saturatedsolution of magnesium sulphate. 
Place a small quantity of this solution in 
a test tube, and add the urine very care- 
fully from a pipette, inclining the tube so 
that the urine flows gently on to the surface 
of the denser liquid. If albumin be pres- 
ent in considerable amount, a white zone 
is formed at the junction of the liquids, 
whilst, if only traces are present, it may 
require to stand some time before a haze 
appears. The test is not so satisfactory 
as the heat and acid, as uric acid and urea 
nitrate in concentrated urine may react, 
whilst copaiba, balsam of tolu, etc., taken 
internally, give a similar appearance to 
albumin, but redissolve on shaking with 
more acid or some alcohol. The test of 
acidulating with strong nitric acid, and 
boiling, although in very common use, 
must be condemned. It is almost certain 
to convert a large proportion of the 
albumin into soluble acid-albumin, which 
is not precipitated on boiling. 

Picric Acid Test. — A saturated solution 
is employed. Coagulation takes place at 
the pointof junction if the contact-method 
as above described is used. This is in- 
creased by rotation of the test-tube. It 
should be carefully noted that picric acid 
precipitates peptones and alkaloids as well 
as albumin. On heating, however, the 
former bodies redissolve. 

Trichloracetic Acid Test. — A very sen- 
sitive reagent, detecting i part of albumin 
in 100,000 parts of urine. It precipi- 
tates alkaloids, but they dissolve again on 
adding excess of the reagent. True pep- 
tone is not precipitated, but proteoses or 
albumoses (intermediate bodies between 
albumin and peptone) are coagulated, 
but redissolve on warming. 

Sugar. — When testing for sugar, it is 
very advisable to remove any albumin that 
may be present by boiling and acidulat- 
ing with acetic acid and subsequently fil- 
tering. Urates should also be filtered 
out if in considerable amount, or the urine 
decanted. 

Felilings Test. — This test is so well 
known as to require but little description. 
The pharmacopceial solutions may be em- 
ployed, and it should be remembered that 
if kept ready mixed it is liable to reduc- 
tion in time, and so prove unreliable. 
This is easily ascertainable, as it should 
undergo no change when boiled. Fill a 
test-tube about one fourth full with the 
test solution, and boil. If no change 
occurs the test is reliable, and a few drops 
of urine should be added and the con- 
tents boiled again. If there is still no 
alteration, continue addmg a little more 
urine and boiling until an equal volume 
of urine has been added to the test. If 
no precipitation has taken place, sugar is 
absent. In many instances, however, a 
change takes place giving a greenish-color 



32 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



and a deposit occurs. Uric acid, creati- 
nine, and other constituents, may occa- 
sion this. But this is very different, and 
cannot be mistaken for the orange or red 
suboxide or copper which is quickly pre- 
cipitated when diabetic urine is tested. 

Phenylhydraziii Test. — Since the elab- 
orate researches upon the sugars by Eniil 
Fischer, this test has come into promi- 
nence. It is considered reliable for the 
purpose of distinguishing urine containing 
traces of sugar from those containing ex- 
cessive amounts of other reducing bodies, 
such as uric acid, etc. As modified by 
Richter, this test is as follows : Phenyl- 
hydrazin hydrochlorate, 2 parts ; sodium 
acetate, 3 parts ; water, 20 parts. Mix 
equal volumes of the urine, and test and 
digest for i hour on a water-bath, replac- 
ing water lost by evaporation. After fif- 
teen to twenty minutes there is a separa- 
tion of slender yellow needles, and at the 
expiration of an hour about 80 per cent, 
of the glucose has been converted into 
the phenylhydrazin compound. The 
needles may be filtered off, washed, dried, 
and dissolved in boiling alcohol and re- 
precipitated by water. They melt at about 
204-205°C., and their feathery appearance 
under the microscope is very character- 
istic. 

Biliary S.'\lt.s .\nd Pigments. — The 
presence of bile in urine usually com- 
municates a dark-brownish color to the 
excretion, which is made deeper brown 
by the addition of alkali. Commercial 
peptone, consisting largely of albumoses, 
is a delicate test for bile salts. 

Tlesh peptone should be dissolved in 
distilled water, in about the proportion 
of 2 grammes in 250 cc, with a trace of 
salicylic acid to preserve it. If filtered 
bright, it is permanent. Dr. Oliver, who 
recommended the test, suggests the dilu- 
tion of the urine before applying the test, 
but this is only necessary where a slight 
haze would be obscured by the depth of 
color in the sample. Bile pigment may 
.be detected by the reaction with iodine. 
A drop or two of the B.P. solution of 
iodine should be poured down the side of 
a test-tube half-filled with urine. If bile 
pigment be present, a fine green color ap- 
pears, whilst, if absent, only a pale yellow 
coloration is seen. 

Urinary Sediments. — Besides mucus 
and urates, which are commonly deposited 
in healthy urine, phosphates may appear 
in ammoniacal or stale urine, or after the 
ingestion of alkaline salts. Pus, uric acid, 
and oxalate of calcium may occur in mor- 
bid urine, and when albumin is present 
diligent search must be made for renal 
casts. The sediment should be collected 
in a conical vessel and a small quantity 
withdrawn, by means of a pipette, with as 
little of the supernatant liquid as possible. 
A drop may thus be placed upon a slide, 
the cover slip gently pressed over it, su- 
perfluous liquid oozing out removed by 
clean blotting paper. A ^4^ or '/^ inch 
objective will be found a very useful size 
for the microscopical examination. 
Urates. — Readily detected by their 



dissolving when gently warmed. They 
are frequently pink-colored from the uri- 
nary pigment, uroerythrin. They have 
no special significance, as they occur 
whenever there is diminished secretion 
from any cause. Urates in urine are acid 
urates of sodium, potassium, or ammo- 
nium. 

Uric Acid, often accompanied with 
urates, is recognizable to the naked eye 
from its similarity to cayenne pepper. It 
is insoluble when heated, hut dissolves in 
a few drops of solution of potash, repre- 
cipitated by acids. Its appearance under 
the microscope varies, the common forms 
being lozenge-shape, rosettes, or dumb- 
bells. 

Phosphates appear as a white deposit, 
and may be recognized by their solubility 
in acetic acid. The acid solution can 
then be tested for phosphates in the ordi- 
nary way, either by molybdic acid or mag- 
nesium mixture. 

O.XALATE OF calcium is insoluble in 
acetic acid or in alkalies, but dissolves in 
hydrochloric acid. It generally occurs as 
octahedra, or dumb-bell crystals, with 
mucus. 

Mucb> is thin in acid urine, ropy in 
alkaline. Mucin is precipitated by acids, 
alcohol, or alum, but dissolved by alka- 
lies, and not affected by mercuric chloride. 
Microscopically examined, mucous cor- 
puscles resemble leucocytes. 

Pus always renders urine turbid, but in 
acid urine it separates as a white deposit 
somewhat similar to phosphates. The 
addition of alkali turns it into a gelatinous 
mass, and if the urine is alkaline the de- 
posit will have this appearance. It is 
|)recipitated by mercuric chloride. A 
drop of acetic acid renders the nuclei of 
pus cells much more distinct under the 
microscope, and the granular corpuscles 
are colored mahogany-brown by iodine 
solution, whilst epithelial cells are only 
tinged yellow. 

Renal Casts are cylinders which have 
received their shape from the renal tu- 
bules. They are absolutely confirmative 
of the presence and significance of albu- 
min, and indicate disease of the kidneys. 
There are several varieties, the principal 
being blood-casts, granular, and hyaline 
casts. Blood-casts are recognizable from 
the number of red-blood corpuscles. 
Granular casts are opaque, with shar]) 
outline and irregular granules. These 
consist of degenerated epithelial cells or 
blood corpuscles. Hyaline casts are more 
easily overlooked as they are colorless, 
long and narrow, with crystals and phos- 
phates frequently embedded in them. 
They are frequently described as of 
" ground-glass " appearance, and are con- 
stantly present in chronic Bright's disease. 
Blood. — In highly-colored urine blood 
may be detected from the presence of 
corpuscles under the microscope. If a 
large quantity be present, the urine will be 
alkaline and albuminous. The haemin 
reaction is useful for the detection of 
blood in the sediment. It is applied as 
follows : A little of the sediment is placed 



on a slide with a. drop of glacial acetic 
acid, and a few crystals of chloride of so- 
dium. Heat is cautiously applied until 
all the liquid has evaporated, and oblong 
red-brown crystals of hasmin will be easily 
recognized under the microscope if blood 
be present. 

Report. — It may be useful to give here 
a form of report which is often employed 
by analysts after the qualitative examina- 
tion of urine according to the above 
scheme. It should be modified or ampli- 
fied as the case may require, and some- 
times it is as well to give a full account 
of the microscopical appearance of the 
deposit, and adding a few remarks at the 
end of the report upon any of the abnor- 
mal features. A sample of diabetic urine 
will, perhaps, be best taken as an illustra- 
tion. It would run somewhat as follows : 
" I beg to report the result of my exami- 
nation of a sample of urine received 
from on the inst. The 

urine was of a light yellow color and 
measured 1,800 cc. or 64 fluid ounces. 

Specific gravity, at 60"' F., 1.030 

Reaction, faintly acid. 

Alhnmin, absent. 

Sugar, present in large amount. 

Biliary salis and pigments, absent. 

Deposit, mucus. 

Microscopical examination revealed 
nothing abnormal. 

(Signed) ." 

quantitative determinations. 

.\ciditv. — Certain gout specialists, in 
particular, lay great stress upon the deter- 
mination of the acidity. This is because, 
under the administration of salicylate of 
sodium, the uric acid which has accumu- 
lated in the blood and tissues is excreted, 
and the rise in acidity considerable. As 
the acidity is diminished after meals, it is 
advisable to be supplied with the whole 
excretion of twenty-four hours, i.e., from 
9 a.m. to 9 a.m. Acidity should be deter- 
mined volumetrically in too cc. of urine 
by means of standard caustic soda solu- 
tion, using a few drops of a proof-spirit 
solution of phenol-phtalein as indicator. 
Each cc. of the solution should be equal 
to o.oio gramme of oxalic acid, and it 
should be reported in terms as equivalent 
to parts per thousand. Normal urine has 
an acidity equivalent to 2.5 to 3.0 grammes 
of oxalic acid (C2HoOj.2H.jO) per litre. 
In gout, under the influences mentioned, 
and in acute febrile diseases, it rises to 6 
grammes, or even more. Many medical 
men prefer statements of acidity, uric acid, 
and urea in the number of grains excreted 
per twenty-four hours. 

Albumin. — The most satisfactory me- 
thod of determining the amount of al- 
bumin in urine is by means of Esbach's 
albuminometer. The instrument con- 
sists of a test-tube with special graduations 
to mark the proportions of albumin. 
The urine is poured into the mark U, 
and a saturated solution of picric acid 
added to the mark R, the tube well 
shaken, and allowed to stand at rest for 
24 hours. At the end of that time the 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(32A) 



Why Not Put Up your Own 

WHEN YOU CAN BUY 

Complete ## 

Containers 



AT REASONABLE PRICES ? 

You Can Save the Manufacturers' Profit ! 



For Samples of Containers ivith Prices, for putting up or 
packaging any of the folhnving goods, drop us a card : 



Condition Powders, 

Folding Canons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Bird Seed, 

Folding Cartons, or Cartons anil 
Wraps. 

Chloride of Lime, 

Impervious Boxe^ and Wraps. 
Baking Powder, 

Hoxes and Wraps. 

Compound Licorice Powder, 

Hox.'s anti Wr.ips. 

Powdered Borax, 

Folding Cartons. 



Cream Tartar, 

Folding Cartons. 

Soap Bark, 

Folding Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps, 

Epsom Salts, 

Fiilding Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Senna Leaves, 

Folding Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Cough Drops, 

Folding Cartons — 2 ounce and 4 



Or if tliere are any other lines you jvish to put up, 
'write us about them. 

LAWSON & JONES, 

LONDON, Canada. 



FINE RUBBER GOODS 



Bulb Enemas 

Water Bottles 

Fountain Syringes 
Atomizers 

Ice Bags 

Invalid Rings 
Tubing 
Combination Fountains and Water Bottles 
Stoppers 

Nipples 

Air Pillows 

Bands 



Finger Cots 



Operating Pads 

Nasal Douches 
Bed Pans 

Teething Rings 

Medicine Droppers 

Hospital Sheeting, etc 



ALPHA RUBBER COMPANY 

(LlMITEDi 
MONTREAL, - - QUE. 



?~f\ 



SjPLE, BUT SDRE ! 

Somerville's 
M. F. Cough 
Chewing Gum 



FIVE CENTS PER BAR 

TWENTY BARS ON A HANDSOME 

STANDING CARD 



THE WHOLESALE TRADE HAVE IT 
PRICE 65c. PER CARD 



C. R. SOMERVILLE, 



LONDON, Onl. 



Wampole's 

BEEF, WINE, AND IRON. 



In Pint Bottles $5 00 per doz. 

Winchester (', Imp. Gal.) 2 00 each. 

Imp Gallon, in 5 gal. lots, and over 3 50 per gal. 

With handsome lithographed labels. Buyer's name prominently 
printed on same, at the lollowing prices : 

V Gross lots, and over $60 00 per gross. 

(Packed in One-Dozen Cases. I 

We use a Pure Sherry Wine in the manufacture of this article, 
assuring a delicate flavor, and we guarantee the quality to be 
equal to any in the market. 

We invite comparison with other manufacturers, and will cheer- 
fully furnish samples for that purpose. 

Your early orders and enquiries solicited through Wholesale 
Jobbers or direct from us. 



Henry K. Wampole & Co., 

Manufacturing Pharmacists, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Canadian Branch : 



36 and 38 Lombard Street, TORONTO. 



(32B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Wino of the ^^traot of Cod Liver 



Sold by all first-cl-*ss 
Chemists and Druggists 



CHEVRIE 



General Depot :— PARIS, 
I, Faubourg Montmarte, 2i 



This Wine of the Extract of Cod Liver, prepared by M. CHEVRIER, a first-cla^s Chemist of Paris, possesses at the same time the active 
principles of Cod Liver Oil and the therapeutic properties of alcoholic preparations. It is valuable to persons whose stomach cannot retain latty 
substances. Its effect, like that of Cod Liver Oil, is invaluable in Scrofula, Rickets, Anaemia, Chlorosis, Bronchitis, and all diseases of the Chest. 



Wine of the Extract of Cod Liver with Creosote 



General Depot : — PARIS, 
21, Faubourg Montmarte, 21 



CHEVRIER 



Sold by all first-class 
Chemists and Druggists 



The beech-tree Creosote checks the destructive work of Pulmonary Consumption, as it diminishes expectoration, strengthens the appetite, 
reduces the fever, and suppresses perspiration. Its effect, combined with Cod Liver Oil, makes the Wine of the Extract of Cod Liver with Creosote 
an excellent remedy against pronounced or threatened Consumption. 



Rndla^iior*^ Souinal 

AETHYLCHLORALURETHAN 

(registered) 

the newest and most efficient soporific remedy 

Taken in doses of 32 grains, or half a teaspoonful, in milk, ale, or 
cognac, produces in half an hour a quiet refreshing sleep, lasting from six 
to eight hours, with no unpleasant after effects. The effects of .Somnai. 
are more pleasant than those of Chloral Hydrate and Morphia. Experi- 
ments made in the Town Hospitals, Moabit and Friedrichshain, Konigliche 
Charite and Konigliche Universitats Poliklinik, Berlin, have shown that 
SoMNAL does not accelerate the pulse and does not upset the stomach. 
SOMNAL is especially recommended for Nervous Insomnia, Neurasthenia, 
Spinal Complaints, Infectious Disea.ses, Paralysis, Melancholia, Hysteria, 
Morphinismus, and Diabete.s. The low price of .Somnal enables its use 
in the poor and workmen's practice and in hospitals. 



Radlauer's Antinervin 

(SALICYLE BROMANILIDE) 

In the form of Powder, the most efficacious Antipyretic, 
Antineuralgic, and Antinervine 



Antinervin replaces and surpasses Antipyrin, has no hurtful second 
ary effects, and is cheaper. Taken in doses of 8 grains four times a day, 
it is an excellent remedy for Feverish, Catarrhal, and Rheumatic Pains. 

Antinervin is of especial service in cases of Influenza, Neuralgia, 
Asthma, Tuberculose, Yellow Fever, Malaria, Migraine, Gout, Rheuma- 
tism in the Joints, Diptheritis, and other typical Fevers 

MANY GOLD MEDALS HAVE BEEN AWARDED 



S. RADLAUER, Kronen Apotheke, FRIEDRICHSTRASSE, i6o BERLIN, W. 



VJ. J. DYAS, Toronto, Ontario 



Wholesale Agent for Canada 



Buy 



ADAMS' ROOT BEER 

► Pays Well, Sells Well, and Gives Satisfaction 



RETAIL, 10 AND 25 CTS.; WHOLESALE, 90C. and $1.75 PER DOZ., $10.00 and $20.00 PER GROSS 



Place it on your list and order from your next wholesale representative. 



THE CANADIAN SPECIALTY COMPANY 



DOMINION AGENTS 



TORONTO, ONTARIO 



"THE TWIN" 

HALF-MINUTE 

Clinical Thermometer 



FOR QUICK REGISTRATION OF TEMPERATURE 

INDELIBLE BLACK 



The most Substantial 
Sensitive 

^Li^l^r^f Mrn^i-l^j^l^ni^^— ^ N Tliermometer ever 
■^mt±M±Jdi±:'Z'^d ±±f^y ::^J offered to the 



PATENTED MARCH 25, 1890 



Medical Profession. 



With the atmospheric register at 60°, if "THP'. TWIN" be immersed in warm water of 105°, the merciny will reach that degree in less than 

2o Seconds. 

The welding the two bulbs into one without any intervening space renders " THE TWIN " much stronger and less liable to break than any other 
heretofore offered. 

It will also be found much more convenient to carry, requiring less room in a case or in the vest pocket. For these reasons, as well .as for its 
Quaranteed Accuracy, "THE TWIN" is universally recommended by the medical profession. 

FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS. $2.00 EACH 

25 per cent, discount to all doctors who mention the "Canadian Druggist"; if in gold with chain and pin, $2 net. 

Sole Agents : s. B. CHANDLER & SON, Toroiito, Canada 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



33 



coagulated albuminous precipitate will 
have settled, and the number correspond- 
ing to the upper level of the deposit is 
noted. This figure represents parts per 
thousand or grammes of albumin per 
litre of urine. Care nuist be taken that 
alkaloids or peptones are not present 
or the result will be vitiated. Coagula- 
tion by means of the heat and acid test 
may also be employed, but it is very 
tedious. The precipitate must be collect- 
ed on a tarred filter paper, dried and 
weighed. 

Sur..^R. — There are two well-recognized 
methods of determining sugar — Fehl- 
ing's and Pavy's. The objection to Fehl- 
ing's method is the uncertainty of the 
end reaction. Pavy's method is not open 
to this objection, but it is really too 
delicate, and affected by uric acid and 
creatinine, whilst the ammoniacal fumes 
are unpleasant. The cupric-cyanide pro- 
cess of Mr. A. W. Gerrard is a modifica- 
tion of Fehling, which has all the advan- 
tages of Pavy's method without the ex- 
cessive delicacy to other bodies. As 
recently improved, it consists of the fol- 
lowing : ( I ) Copper sulphate, re-crystal- 
lized, 69.3 grammes, distilled water to 500 
cc; (2) tartarated soda, crystallized, 175 
grammes ; caustic soda, pure, 76.56 
grammes ; distilled water to 500 cc. 
Take 5 cc. of each of these solutions, and 
dilute with distilled water to 50 cc; 25 
cc. of this mixture is heated, and a solu- 
tion of cyanide of potassium run in until 
the blue color is just discharged. (The 
cyanide solution may be made of any 
strength, but about 35 grammes in 500 
cc. will be best.) Add the remaining 25 
cc. of the mixture, boil again, and run in 




the urine from a burette, stopping the 
flow of the urine directly the blue color 
is again discharged. With diabetic 
urine, it will be necessary to dilute one 
volume to ten volumes with water, and 
use this diluted liquid. As 5 cc. of the 
copper solution is equal to 0.05 gramme 
of glucose, the volume of urine employed 
to discharge the color will contain 0.05 
gramme of sugar. To obtain the per- 



centage a simple proportion sum is 
necessary. Thus suppose 12.8 cc. of 
urine were used, then 12.8: 0.05: 100: 
0.39, and if the urine was diluted ten 
times that would give 3.9 as the per- 
centage. Multiplication of the percentage 
by 4.37s will give, of course, the number 
of grains per fluid ounce. 

Gerrard's glycosometer (patented) con- 
sists of a burette graduated to read the 




percentage of sugar or grains per ounce, 
without the need of calculation. 

Ure.a. — The best method of determin- 
ing urea is that depending upon the 
liberation of nitrogen by means of hypo- 
bromide of sodium. Several forms of 
ureometer or ureameter have been de- 
vised, but that of Mr. A. W. Gerrard is 
one of the best and simplest. It is much 
more accurate than the modified 
form known as Cruise's, or Doremus' 
ureometer, which invariably gives results 
considerably below the truth. Solution 
of hypobromide is made by dissolving 
100 grammes caustic soda in 250 cc. 
distilled water, and adding 25 cc. of 
bromine. It is much more satisfactory, 
owing to the unstable nature of the 
solution, to keep the caustic solution 
alone. Then, as required, the bromine 
can be added for each determination by 
means of the capsules of bromine. 
These glass capsules contain 2.2 cc. of 
bromine, and it is only necessary to drop 
one with sufficient force into 25 cc. of 
the caustic solution to liberate the brom- 
ine without any smell or danger. 

Directions for Using the Uremet- 
ER. — Fill the large arm of the uremeter 
with water, and adjust the small arm so 
that the level is at O in the large arm, 
and just covers the bottom of the small. 
See that the clip at the top is quite tight. 
Place 25 cc. of the hypobromite solution 
ii^ the bottle, and lower the tube contain- 
ing 5 cc. of urine into the same vessel, 
without spilling any of its contents. 
Having inserted the india-rubber cork 
firmly, and adjusted the level of the 



the liquid again, by means of the clip, 
gradually upset the urine into the hypo- 
bromite by inclining the bottle. Nitrogen 
is immediately evolved, and the increased 
pressure lowers the level of the water. 
At the expiration ofa few minutes, when 
no more gas is being evolved, immerse 
the bottle in cold water to reduce the 
temperature, and again adjust the arm 
so that the water in both lubes is level. 
The level of the liquid is read off from 
the graduations on the arm in terms of 
percentage. The average amount of urea 
in normal urine is about 2 per cent. 

Uric Acid. — The tendency of uric 
acid to form concretions, and its import- 
ance as a factor in gout, have led many 
physicians to desire a quantitative deter- 
mination. Several methods, based upon 
the reduction action of uric acid upon 
alkaline cupric solution, have been found, 
in practice, very misleading. Denigfes 
{Bull. Soc. Chitn., 11, 226-230) recom- 
mends the following : A. Dissolve 150 
grammes of ammonium chloride and 
100 grammes magnesium chloride in 
strong ammonia to 500 cc, and add 
an equal volume of ^^ silver nitrate 
solution. B. Dissolve 10 grammes pure 
potassic cyanide and 10 cc. strong 
ammonia in 500 cc. water. Take 100 cc. 
of urine, and add 25 cc. of A filter, and 
20 cc. of B, and a few drops of 20 per 
cent, solution of potassic iodide with 2 
per cent, of ammonia added to 100 cc. of 
the filtrate. This liquid is then treated 
with I'i silver nitrate solution, until a 
persistent turbidity is obtained. The 
number of cc. employed, with one-fourth 
added (as an aliquot part was taken), 
multiplied by 0.00168, gives the percent- 
age of uric acid. 

Albumin is stated not to interfere with 
the result, but iodides must be removed 
by adding nitric acid and excess of silver 
nitrate. This is in turn removed by 
sodium chloride and the titration con- 
ducted as above. The percentage of uric 
acid varies from 0.04 to 0.175 PC cent. 

Phosphates. — The uranic acetate 
method of determining phosphates is 
most suitable. The solutions required 
are made as follows : 35 grammes uranic 
acetate, 25 cc. glacial acetic acid, distilled 
water to i litre. This should be titrated 
upon a solution of ammonio-sodic phos- 
phate, 5.886 grammes in a litre, so that 
each cc. represents 9 005 grammes each 
of sodic acetate and acetic acid in a litre. 
Also a 5 per cent, solution of potassic 
ferro-cyanide freshly prepared. Mix 50 
cc. of the filtered urine with 5 cc. of the 
sodic acetate solution and warm the mix- 
ture. Run in standard uranic solution 
until precipitation does not any longer 
appear. A drop is then removed by 
means of a glass rod. and allowed to drop 
into a drop of the ferro-cyanide solution 
placed on a white plate. So long as no 
brown color appears, the uranic solution 
can be added. When this occurs, note 
the number of cc. of uranic solution used, 
and thisnumbermultiplied by 0.005 andby 
2 gives the percentage of phosphoric acid. 
— British and Colonial Druggisfs Diary 



34 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Canadian Druggist 

WILLIAM J. DYAS, Editor and Publisher. 
FEBRUARY 15TH, 1895. 

Publisher's Notices. 

We desire to emphasize the following ; 

The Canadian Druggist is published 
on \\\& fifteenth of each month. 

Communications or articles for ipser- 
tion should reach this office by the 
seventh. 

Changes of advertisements, or copy for 
new advertisements, should reach us by 
the fifth of the month to ensure proper 
position. 

Any irregularity in receipt of this jour- 
nal should be at once reported. 

Advertisements under the headings of 
Business for Sale, Business Wanted, Situa- 
tions Vacant, Situations Wanted, or 
Goods for Exchange, will receive one 
insertion free. 

Communications are invited on all 
matters pertaining to the drug and 
chemical trades. 

All communications must be accom- 
panied by the name of the writer, not 
necessarily for publication. 

A careful perusal of all the advertise- 
ments is requested, and, when ordering 
special lines mentioned there, state that 
you "saw it in the Canadian Drugglst." 

Advertisements of Business for Sale 
and Wanted, Situations Wanted, etc., are 
on page 40 of this issue. 

Remember, — the address of the Can- 
adian Druggist is now 20 Bay Street, 
Toronto, Canada. 



Exchange of Ideas. 



It seems somewhat surprising that out 
of the large number of druggists in busi- 
ness in this country, there are so few who 
realize the benefit that must ensue from a 
liberal exchange of ideas in reference to 
matters connected with the trade. From 
time to time we have asked our readers 
to send for publication anything tending 
to the advancement of Pharmacy, the 
solving of perplexing business questions, 
the unravelling of difficulties in the labor- 
atory or at the dispensing counter, or the 
everyday happenings which, if minor 
importance to one, may be of still greater 
importance to others. Human nature is 
naturally selfish, especially if not allowed 
free intercourse with its neighbor, and no- 
thing tends to make us as selfish as this 
keeping everything to oneself — our ex- 



periences, our wants, and our acquired 
knowledge. Our desire to know more, to 
find out something which has not revealed 
itself to us, or not been revealed by 
others, should encourage us to come out 
of ourselves, to impart, as well as to ask 
for, information, to endeavor to guide 
others as well as to be guided by others, 
and thus to acquire many things which, 
in the ordinary routine of business or 
even in text-books, has not heretofore 
been presented. To take even a selfish 
view of the subject, just imagine what we 
would gain if one of us with an enquiring 
turn gives to his confreres the benefit of 
one fact coming under his notice which 
he believes to be of material help, when 
he may have the benefit of the experi- 
ences of hundreds which may be induced 
to follow his example in this respect. We 
are all too prone to lock up within our- 
selves that which might be of great help 
to others, and which to impart would 
leave us none the poorer. We would 
urge upon druggists the expediency of 
giving this subject serious consideration 
and making a commencement by sending 
us something which they themselves have 
found to be valuable, and of which others 
may have no knowledge. This invest- 
ment of one thought will, in all probabil- 
ity, be the means of bringing in a har- 
vest of other people's thoughts, some of 
which may be more profitable to us than 
years of study or experimental work 
The columns of drug journals are always 
open, and only too glad to receive any 
such contributions, and in doing this the 
journalist endeavors to do his share to- 
wards a subject so evidently beneficial as 
an exchange of ideas. 



The Result of Co-operation. 

At the annual meeting of the directors 
and shareholders of this company, held in 
Hamilton recently, a most satisfactory 
showing of the year's work was presented. 
The retiring directors were reelected 
unanimously, and a consulting board was 
selected from Toronto shareholders to 
assist their representative director in 
maturing plans to meet their needs. 

The first issue of twenty thousand dol- 
lars worth of stock having been taken up 
over a year ago, another issue has been 
made at a premium, and already, we 
understand, a considerable amount of this 
has been taken. ♦ 

This is purely a druggists' company, as 
only they can buy or hold stock ; and as 
the venture is entirely a new method of 



meeting a difficulty, its successful issue 
will doubtless be watched with consider- 
able interest, and, not alone by those 
in whose interests it is, but by those 
against whose interests it is. 

The trade difficulties with which On- 
tario druggists have had recently to con- 
tend seem only to h.ave cemented them 
more closely together. The initiative 
work of this company affords a fair indica- 
tion of what the future may be if co- 
operation in business lines exists. 



Montreal Notes. 



Business is dull in Montreal, and not 
only the pharmacists say so, but all re- 
tail business men as well. As a dry goods 
man said a few days ago, " There could 
not be a better time for a Federal election 
than now." 

The students' incipient rebellion at the 
College of Pharmacy has subsided. If 
the number offering for the botany class 
next year will warrant it, the board will 
appoint a French lecturer. It must not, 
however, be forgotten that the college is 
self-supporting, and ways and means must 
betaken into consideration. Meanwhile, 
Professor Bemrose is giving as good a 
course of botany as can be obtained in 
Montreal, either French or English. 

Commercial travellers are beginning to 
appear quite frequently in Montreal from 
Toronto houses, and they hold out 
temptations, and show up-to-date goods, 
especially in sundries. American travel- 
lers are more frequent now than formerly. 

Messrs. Lyman, Sons & Co. now repre 
sent the Pasteur Institute of New York, 
and have brought in large quantities of 
"serum" made by Dr. Roux's formula, 
so there is no excuse for not giving the 
new remedy a trial wherever an epidemic 
of this terrible disease exists. 

The prescription business becomes 
more difficult every day, and the pharma- 
cist who scrupulously desires to obey the 
instructions of the physician has an anxious 
time of it. In Montreal the products of 
no less than six different pill and tablet 
manufacturers are constantly being pre- 
scribed, and woe betide the unlucky 
pharmacist who happens to supply an 
Upjohn's quinine pill for a Warner's, or 
I'ice versa, especially if the prescrilier 
happens to be a physician who has 
absorbed all the enterprising drummer 
has told him. A little discretion should 
be left to the dispenser, as it is impossible 
for one house to keep a full line of pills 
by six or seven different makers. 

The committee appointed to enquire 
into the charge that the questions at the 
last Quebec examinations had got into the 
hands of certain students has reported 
that, after a full and exhaustive enquiry, 
there is no ground whatever for the 
charge. 



CANADIAN DRIK.GIST. 



(,',^.\) 



pletcher fQanufaetuping Co-. 

440 TONGE STREET, TORONTO. 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

Soda Fountains - Generators - Cylinders - Freezers 

And every other article necessary for carrying on the Soda Water Business. 

THE accompanying fount 
shows an entirely new 
idea for counter apparatus. 

The Canopy is made from 

natural hardwood, highly fin- 
ished. 

The Fount is heavily silver- 
plated on pure white metal ; 
all connections and attach- 
ments are made from pure 
block tin, thereby insuring 
Soda Water absolutely free 
from the metal poison so often 
found in old apparatus. 

The Body of Fount is 
double, having a dead air 
space between inside and 
outside linings. Inside of 
this is a coil of block tin 
pipe, reaching to w^here our 
name-plate appears. This 
plate is hinged so that it may 
be raised when filling body 
with broken ice, for which we 
supply a special funnel free. 

Fount has Eight Patent 
Pneumatic Syrup Jars and 
Two Patent Drip Plates 
fitted into slab under Soda 
Taps. These plates can be 
lifted out for purpose of pack- 
ing ice around coolers and 
syrup jars. 

Cooler box is fitted under 
counter, is easy of access, 
and no trouble to fill with 
ice. 

We supply with the Fount : 
Canopy, Marble Slab, Eight 
Patent Syrup Jars, Cooler 
Box, Six Silver- Plated Tum- 
bler Holders, T'iVelve Tumblers, 
and all connections and pipes 
ready for attachingto cylinder. 
The FRIGID B FOUNT. 

W^ make this Fount in Style .■\, without Canopy, and a smaller slab, but with all other attachments the same as Style B. 
F.O.B. Toronto. Counter e.xtra in all cases. .Any style made to order. 




Dealers in Fruit Oils, Fruit Extracts, Flavorings, Etc. 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



(34B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



B u ttermill^ 



• Toilet Soap. 




Over 2,000,000 
Cakes Sold in 1892. 



The Best Selling 

Toilet $o»p in 

the World. 



Excels any 25- 

cent Soap on the 

Market. Nets the 

a«' Retailer a good 

profit. 



Wlieii 8oI<l at a very popular price it wilt 
>iot remain on your counters. Try a sample 
lot. 



The quality of this soap is GUARANTEED. See that 
the name " BUTTERMILK"' is printed as above "in 
green bronze,'" and the name " Cosmo Buttermilk Soap 
Company, Chicago," in diamond on end of package. Be- 
ware of imitations. 

COSMO BUTTERMILK SOAP CO., 

1U5 Wabash Ave., CHICAOO. 

F.W.HUDSON &. CO , TORONTO 

Sole Agents for Canada. 

KENNEDY'S 

MAGIC CATARRH SNUFF 

(REGISTERED) 



A POSITIVE CURE FOR 

CATARRH 

COLD IN THE HEAD 
CATARRHAL DEAFNESS 

HEADACHE, Etc 



It is reliable, safe, and sure, giving instant relief in the 
most distressing cases. 

PRICE, 25 CENTS. 

Wholesale of Kerry, Watson & Co., Montreal. 

Lyman, Knox & Co., Montreal and 
Toronto. 

And all leading Druggists. 



OLD DOMINION CRESCENT BRAND 

CINNAMON PILLS 

THE ONLY GENUINE 

KEHEF FOR LARIES. 

ASK your Druggist for " Rutland's Old Dominion Cres- 
cent Brand Cinnamon Fills." Shallow rectangu- 
lar metallic boxes, sealed with crescent. Absolutely sate 
and reliable. Refuse all spurious and harmful imitations. 
Upon receipt ot six cents in stamps we will reply by return 
mail, giving full particulars in plain envelope. Address 

BVRLAND MEDICAL €0., 

Morse Building, NEW YORK CITY. 

Please mention this paper. 



NOTICE. 

We have just been appointed 
Wholesale Agents for the Do- 
minion of Canada for the sale of 

Payson's 
Indelible 
Ink. 

All Orders will have our prompt 
attention. 

The London Drug Co. 

LONDON, ONT. 



KERRY, WATSON & CO., - MONTREAL. 

Wm. Radam's 

MICROBE 
KILLER . . 



WILLIAM ELLIS 

Sole Manufacturer for the Pro- 
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(The factory ha\'ing been removed from Toronto.) 



SOLD BY ALL WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS. 



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98 DUNDAS ST., 

LONDON, ONT. 

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Montreal and Toronto 

Ag-^nt-^ for Canada. 




Our Latest Importations. 



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ALUM POWDERED, In bWs. 
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CHLORIDE LIME, in casks. 
SALTPETRE CRYSTALS, in kegs. 
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Jas. A. Kennedy & Co. 

IMPORTKRS, 



LONDON, 



ONTARIO. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



35 



Ontario College of Pharmacy Council 
Meeting. 

The regular semiannual mectnii; of 
the Council of the Ontario College of 
Pharmacy opened in tlie Board room of 
the college building, Gerrard street east, 
Toronto, at 3 o'clock p.m., Tuesday, 
Feb. 5th, 1895. The members present 
were: Messrs. J. H. Mackenzie, J. A. 
Clark, C. K. McGreijor, C. D. Daniel, 
D. H. MacLaren, J. (}. Shuff, Henry 
VVatters, J. M. Hargreaves, and W. A. 
Karn. 

In the absence of the president, Mr. 
A. B. Petrie, the vice-president, Mr. J. 
H. Mackenzie, took the chair, and, in 
doing so, expressed his regret at the ab- 
sence of the president, who was then on 
his way to the antipodes on a trip com- 
bining business and pleasure. Speaking 
for himself, and for every member of the 
council, Mr. Mackenzie continued, he 
wished Mr. Petrie a pleasant, prosperous, 
and beneficial voyage, and a safe leturn. 
(Hear, hear.) 

The minutes of the last council meet- 
ing, having been published and placed in 
the hands of every member, were accepted 
as read, and adopted as printed. 

Letters were read from Messrs. D' Avig- 
non and Poison, members of council, an- 
nouncing their inability to be present at 
the council meeting. 

A large numb;r of other communica- 
tions were read, and referred to the vari- 
ous committees for attention. Three or 
four were dealt with directly by council, 
among them being one from Dr. J. W. 
Campbell, of Kingston, requesting to be 
registered for a drug store at 94 .\venue 
road, Toronto. It being reported, how- 
ever, that this store was owned by a 
student of the college who has, so far, 
failed to secure his diploma, the council 
resolved, on motion of Messrs. Watters 
and McGregor : That the application of 
Dr. J. W. Campbell, Kingston, re regis- 
tration of drug store at 94 Avenue road, 
be not granted, as it does not appear that 
he is proprietor of that store, and that 
the four dollars received from him be re- 
turned. 

J. H. Walker, St. Catharines, wrote 
protesting against the action of the Regis- 
trar in charging him with three years' 
arrears on a drug store on College street, 
Toronto, which he claimed never to have 
owned, but only operated for a while for 
another. Inasmuch as the Registrar had 
never received notification of Mr. Walker's 
retirement from business, the council 
unanimously, and without discussion, en- 
dorsed the action of the Registrar. 

In response to requests from the West- 
ern Fair and Toronto Industrial Exhibi- 
tion boards, the council appointed Messrs. 
Shuff and Karn to represent them at 
London, and Messrs. Mackenzie and 
Daniel to act on the Toronto board. 
The council then adjourned. 

Second D.w. 

Upon resuming business on Wednesday 
morning, with Vice-President Mackenzie 



again in the chair, all the members present 
the previous day were in their places, and, 
inadditioi, .Mr. John McKee was present. 

No committees were ready to report, 
and an adjournment was accordingly 
made until after lunch, when the Infringe- 
ment Committee reported as follows 
through its chairman, Mr. Watters : 

Report of the Infringement Com- 
mittee : 

Toronto, February 6, 1895. 

Your committee beg to report that, 
since last meeting of council, a vigorous 
attack has been made on druggists m ar- 
rears, resulting in the removal from the 
Registrar's books of the names of nearly 
all those in arrears. 

An attempt has also been made to put 
a stop to every case of infringement 
brought to the notice of the committee 
that offered reasonable prospect of con- 
viction. This attempt has been attended 
with less success than we could have 
desired, owing to the difficulty of obtain- 
ing the services of a competent and reli- 
able detective. Your committee would ask 
for the approval of the council to secure 
the best possibledetective talent obtainable 
to undertake a thorough and determined 
prosecution of all cases of infringement. 

In reference to the case of Dr. R. B. 
Wells, Durham, your committee would 
ask the council to confirm the action 
already taken in refusing to register Dr. 
Wells. 

In the case of the Oakville Pharmacy, 
your committee would recommend that 
the matter be left in the hands of the 
Registrar, to be dealt with by him. 

Your committee would ask that the sum 
of $200 be placed at the disposal of the 
chairman. 

(Signed) Henry W.\tters, 

Chairman. 

Upon motion of Messrs. Watters and 
Daniel, the report was received. 

Upon a second motion from the same 
gentlemen that the report be adopted, 
some discussion arose upon the proposal 
to enter upon an active campaign against 
suspected law-breakers, and every speaker 
warmly supported the position taken by 
the committee, urging that no expense be 
spared to bring offenders to justice. 

Mr. Clark asked if the simple adoption 
of the report would be considered sufficient 
authority for the committee to take action, 
and, upon the chairman's affirmative reply, 
the report was adopted with unanimity, 
and the council adjourned until Thursday 
morning. 

Third D.^v. 

The council resumed on Thursday 
morning at 10.30 o'clock, with Vice- 
President J. H. Mackenzie in the chair, 
and all members previously in attend- 
ance present. Three or four communi- 
cations were referred to the proper com- 
mittees, and an adjournment made until 
11.30 o'clock, when the Executive Com- 
mittee presented the following report. 

Report No. i of the Executive and 
Finance Committee : 



To the President and Members of the 
Council. 
Gentlemen, — Your committee have 
examined carefully the following accounts, 
and recommend their payment, subject 
to adjustment, by the Registrar Treasurer, 
of two small accounts, viz.: 

Lyman Bros $ 86 51 

Lyman, Knox ii: Co 57 93 

Vannevar & Co '5° 

Elliot &*Co 33 70 

James Bain & Co 20 85 

Empire Printing Co 15 75 

Globe Printing Co 17 10 

Mail Printing Co 18 19 

Monetary Times 26 25 

Map and School Supply Co.... 202 14 

Toronto Rubber Co 422 

P. Freysing & Co 5 13 

J. A. Carveth & Co 3 38 

J. H. Dunlop I 20 

Simcoe Ice Co i 20 

John Wright 75 

Jas. R. Mills 47 06 

Whitall, Tatum & Co 5 04 

Edgar & Malone 20 00 

Brown Bros 225 

Rolph, Smith & Co LS 45 

A. P. Watts II 25 

Bell Telephone Co 23 50 

W. Lloyd Wood 9 24 

Mrs. Parsons (scrubbing) 5 50 

Expenses re committee meeting, Decem- 
ber, 1894 : 

W. A. Karn $ 7 5° 

H. Watters 29 08 

C. K. McGregor 7 00 

J. A. Clark 4 75 

Total $683 42 

Y'our committee would again recom- 
mend that in all cases the Registrar- 
Treasurer only shall issue orders for 
supplies and repairs to the building, and 
in cases where any additions are required 
on the building or the furniture, such 
shall only be undertaken by the authority 
of the chairman of the Executive and 
Finance Committee. 

Y'our committee have examined the 
reports of the Registrar-Treasurer and 
auditors, and recommend their adoption. 

Your committee would further recom- 
mend that the Registrar-Treasurer de- 
posit one thousand dollars ($1,000), from 
the current account of the college, in the 
savings bank department of the bank, 
and that the President and Registrar- 
Treasurer pay this amount to the holders 
of the mortgage on the college on May 
30th, 1895. Upon payment of the said 
amount the mortgage indebtedness on 
the college building will be reduced to 
thirteen thousand dollars ($13,000). 

Regarding the covering of the remain- 
der of the steam pipes with mineral 
wool, your committee would recommend 
that this matter be laid over until the 
.-Xugust meeting, 1895. 

Your committee would recommend that 
the minutes of this council meeting be 
printed in pamphlet form, similar to the 
report of the last semi-annual meeting of 
the council, and a copy be mailed to each 



36 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



member of the college, and the Registrar- 
Treasurer is hereby authorized to carry 
out this recommendation, and that any 
other notice requiring announcement by 
the college be incorporated in this pam- 
phlet, and that special prominence be 
given to the resolutions, passed last coun- 
cil meeing, that all members of the col- 
lege who shall pay their annual renewal 
fees on or before the first day of May 
receive a rebate of two dollars ($2), com- 
mencing with the year 1895-6. The fee 
not being paid on or before the ist day 
of May in each year, no rebate shall be 
allowed. 

And your committee would further 
recommend that the Registrar-Treasurer 
send printed post-card notices to each 
member of the college on or about April 
1st, relating to the payment of the annual 
fee and the rebate permitted upon prompt 
payment on or before the first day of 
May. 

Your committee would recommend that 
the Registrar-Treasurer be authorized to 
issue printed notices to the members of 
the college regarding the elections to be 
held of members of the council of the 
college, under By-law X, subsection 4. 
Respectfully submitted, 

D. H. MacLaren, 

Chairman pro lent. 
Upon motion for the adoption of the 
report, the chairman called attention to 
the satisfactory condition of the college 
finances, and congratulated the council 
upon the fact that the mortgage debt was 
now practically reduced to $13,000. This 
was the amount of the debt upon the old 
building, so that the new building, with 
its magnificent equipment, which was 
alone worth $10,000, had been paid for. 
They were paying off the debt as fast as 
the terms of the mortgage would permit, 
or the mortgagors accept the money ; in 
fact, it could be paid off still more rapidly 
if the holders of the mortgage would per- 
mit it. 

Mr. J. A. Clark endorsed the Presi- 
dent's remarks, and called attention to 
the fact that, in addition to reducing the 
debt on the college, the council had been 
enabled to reduce the members' fees fifty 
per centum, when paid promptly. 

Mr. H. Walters expressed his pleasure 
and satisfaction at the report before them, 
and also at the small cost to which the 
council had been put for law expenses. 

The report was then adopted, and the 
council adjourned. 

After devoting some hours further to 
committee work, the council again con- 
vened at 3.45 o'clock Thursday after- 
noon, when Mr. C. U. Daniel presented 
the following report of the Committee on 
Education : 

EDUCATIONAL REPORT. 

(i) Your committee beg to report that 
very careful attention has been given to 
the many questions referred. With refer- 
ence to the internal working of the col- 
lege, your committee are pleased with the 
results of the past year. The dean and 
members of the faculty have been faithful 



in the discharge of their duty, and every 
effort has been made to perfect the stu- 
dents and thoroughly fit them for a suc- 
cessful business life. The high standard 
has been maintained and reports are con- 
stantly being received of the high posi- 
tions the graduates of the Ontario College 
of Pharmacy hold in different parts of 
Canada and the United States. 

The junior course recently finished was 
very successful. A larger number of stu- 
dents passed through the course than at 
any previous time, and the popularity of 
the college is attested by the fact that a 
number of students are in attendance who 
were three-year men, and consequently 
not obliged to take the course, and your 
committee desire to draw attention to the 
letter from Robert Brydon, Esq., a mem- 
ber of the Board of Pharmacy of Virginia, 
and it is a matter of congratulation that 
our high standard is being recoghized, 
and that the graduates of our college in 
distant parts sustain the reputation of the 
college, and we recommend that Mr. 
Brydon's letter be incorporated in this 
report. 

Board of Pharmacy of Virginia, 

Danville, Va., Jan. 20, 1895. 
Isaac T. Leivis, Esq., Toronto : 

Dear Sir,— Our Board of Pharmacy 
is anxious to obtain from other Boards 
and Colleges of Pharmacy as much infor- 
mation as possible in regard to educa- 
tional requirements for apprentices, and 
knowing your college to be in the lead in 
such kind of legislation I would be greatly 
obliged by your sending me a copy of 
your laws on the subject. Our people 
are not educated up to the idea of look- 
ing upon druggists as professional men, 
and only by action as embraced in your 
law can we hope to obtain that desired 
position. Two of your graduates are liv- 
ing here, and have made for themselves 
enviable names as competent pharmacists, 
thus sustaining the reputation of your 
college. As a former citizen of Toronto, 
and apprentice of the old firm of Lyman, 
Elliot & Co., as well as my late brother, 
Mr. William Brydon, having been one of 
your examiners, I take a great interest in 
your college, and am glad to know of the 
high character to which it has attained, as 
well as its continued success. 
Yours truly, 

Robert Brydon. 
(2) Your committee recommend that 
the following amounts be appropriated to 
the different departinents for the |)urchase 
of apparatus that is absolutely necessary 
to the proper working of the college : 
Department of botany and chemistry : 

Botanical models of plants $ 75 

Chemical and physical apparatus, 
including spectroscope 150 

$225 

Department of Practical and .Ana- 
lytical Chemistry 75 

Department of Materia Medica and 
Microscopy 142 

Department of Pharmacy 75 

In the Department of Pharmacy there 

is an unexpended amount of previous 



appropriations ($132), and your commit- 
tee recommend that authority to expend 
this amount be given. 

(3) With reference to the John Roberts 
scholarship, your committee would suggest 
that steps be taken to give practical shape 
to the bequest by carrying out the pro- 
visions embodied therein, with the follow- 
ing limitations, as approved by Mr. J. 
Roberts Allen, the executor of the estate, 
viz., that the scholarship and medal be 
restricted to candidates at the May quali- 
fying examination who present themselves 
the first time for examination, and show 
qualifications at that examination entitling 
them to the award of merit specified, and 
who have served apprenticeship in the 
Province of Ontario, and have taken two 
courses of lectures in the Ontario College 
of Pharmacy. 

(4) Your committee, in view of the 
expiration of the contracts of the faculty, 
recommend that the Executive and 
Finance Committee renew the same at 
this meeting. 

(5) Your committee recommend that, in 
view of the heavy work to be performed 
by the janitor during the severe winter 
months, an assistant to look after 
fires be engaged during the months of 
February and March ; salary $4 per week. 
.\lso, that the boy now employed in look- 
ing after the cloak-room and other matters 
be retained during the balance of the 
season. 

(6) Your committee are of the opinion 
that the floor of the upper laboratory 
should be covered to prevent liquids going 
through the cracks, and seriously incon- 
veniencing the occupants of the lower 
laboratory, and recommend this matter 
to the attention of the Committee on 
Finance. 

(7) It is strongly urged that, as the 
dean's and e,xaminers' reports form part of 
this report, they all be entered upon the 
minutes of this council. 

[(8) This clause was referred back, and 
appears in amended form in Report No. 

(g) Your committee have examined 
the report of the Examining Board, and 
recommend that diplomas be granted to 
the candidates named in the report here- 
to attached. 

(10) Respecting the recommendation 
of discontinuing the granting of medals 
for any purpose other than general pro- 
ficiency, we would recommend that no 
change be made in the regulations at the 
present time. 

(11) Respecting the recommendation 
regarding the withholding of rating from 
candidates who have not completed full 
apprenticeships, your committee concur. 

(12) Your conimittee also recommend 
that the Executive and Finance Com- 
mittees provide, if possible, the necessary 
dispensing scales as requested. 

(13) Your committee recommend that 
the general proficiency medal be granted 
to the candidate at the December exami- 
nation who conforms to the regulation 
standard, provided that the candidate has 
not failed at any previous examination. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



37 



This regiilalion to apply to the last 
December examination. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. D. U.\NlliL, 

Chairman. 
.\ppcnded to this report, and forming 
a part thereof, were the reports of the 
Dean and Hoard of K.xaminers. 

Tlie Hoard of I'.xaminers reported as 
follows : .'\t the last meeting of the Board 
of Examiners considerable discussion took 
place ns to the eligibility of any of the 
candidates for proticiency medals. The 
standing taken was sufficiently high to 
warrant them being given, but owing to 
a regulation adopted by the council in 
February, 1893, the board felt that a 
decision by the council would be neces- 
^ sary. Awaiting such decision, I remain, 
on behalf of the board. 

Very respectfully yours, 

VV. MuKCHisoN, Chairman. 

Following this were given the details of 

the examinations as have been already 

published, and then the report made the 

following recommendations : 

That the council consider the desira- 
bility of discontinuing the granting of 
medals for any purpose other than gen- 
eral proficiency ; 

That in case any candidate be hereafter 
permitted to write for diploma whose time 
has not been completed at the time of 
writing, his rating be withheld until the 
council has been furnished with evidence 
of the completion of his full apprentice- 
ship period ; and. 

That a sufficient number of dispensing 
scales be procured to complete the equip- 
ment of each dispensing desk. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 
W. MuRCHisON, Chairman. 
The Dean reported as follows : 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to 
herewith present my report for the session 
of 1894-95 to date : 

The junior term began on September 
nth, 1894, with the matriculation exam- 
ination. Three candidates only were re- 
quired to take the examination, and these 
were all successful. 

Lectures commenced on September 
13th, and continued without intermission 
(excepting the usual Thanksgiving holi- 
day and the 'Varsity sports half holiday) 
until December 12th ; 104 students were 
in attendance during the term. The 
records of this college show the largest 
junior class to be that of 1891, which 
numbered 109 members, and of this num- 
ber some nine or more dropped out dur- 
ing the term owing to attacks of diph- 
theria and typhoid ; hence at the recent 
junior term a larger number of students 
were carried through the entire term than 
at any previous session. 

In addition to the number of exercises 
called for by the college time table, the 
writer gave an extra exercise by way of 
experiment of one hour each in what he 
chooses to term " Pharmaceutical Arith- 
metic." The popularity of these grinds, 
and the success attained in developing 
the aptness of the class to grasp and re- 
tain the principles involved under the 



above title, was such as to warrant a con- 
tinuance of similar exercises in the future. 

The junior written examinations began 
on December 12th, and continued for 
four consecutive days ; practical examina- 
tions were held on December 4th. Sev- 
eral members of the class received over 
go per cent, of the total. 

First class honors were granted to all 
students receiving 80 per cent., or more, 
of the total marks attainable ; second- 
class honors to those attaining from 66 to 
80 per cent. ; and a pass to all taking 50 
per cent, or more. 

A hundred and two candidates, in all, 
entered for the examination, of which 
number 86 were successful in all subjects 
and 6 in part subjects. Two were granted 
Eegrotats on account of illness. 

Students' names are arranged in order 
of merit in the accompanying honor list 
(Exhibit B), and alphabetically in the 
pass list. 

The supplementary examination was 
held on January 3rd and 4th, 1895, the 
results of which are submitted herewith. 
The lectures of the present senior term 
began on January 8th, with 100 students 
in attendance, the largest senior class 
during the record of this college. The 
gentlemanly conduct of the class is worthy 
of remark, their relations with the Dean 
and stafT being most courteous and re- 
sponsive. As students they are veritable 
plodders, and give us every reason to pre- 
dict that they will reflect credit upon 
themselves, and the college as well, at the 
May examinations. 

The question is often asked. What be- 
comes of our graduates ? and, with a view 
to answering this query, the writer has 
devoted considerable time, during the 
past eighteen months, in tracing the loca- 
tion of the graduates of 1892-94 inclu- 
sively, representing three classes. It has 
been ascertained that, within twelve 
months of the date of graduation, 65 per 
cent, of them are found engaged in busi- 
ness on their own account, or occupying 
responsible positions as managers of phar- 
macies in the neighboring provinces or in 
the United States, or pursuing a course 
of study in medicine, while the remaining 
35 per cent, find positions as managers, 
or become proprietors of pharmacies in 
Ontario. 

To indicate how readily many obtain 
positions as head dispensers in certain 
localities, the writer would mention that 
during the last three months of 1894 he 
aided twelve graduates in securing employ- 
ment in New York city suburbs, where a 
diploma of this college receives spon- 
taneous recognition, and where the knowl- 
edge and skill of its possessors as practi- 
cal dispensing chemists are so well known. 
It is also gratifying to be able to sub- 
mit that the Manitoba Board admits the 
thoroughness and efficiency of our course 
of instruction by registering those now 
receiving either the college diploma or 
the certificate, whereas in 1890 requests 
to recognize holders of the Ontario Col- 
lege of Pharmacy diploma were respect- 
fully declined. 



At the last semiannual meeting of the 
council, the faculty was requested to sub- 
mit a plan for an extension of the college 
course. Much as a two years' course is 
needed, and, in fact, should be inaugur- 
ated at the earliest possible date, yet it 
has been found, after a careful considera- 
tion of the matter, that the college build- 
ing as it now stands, though suited to the 
accommodation of two classes of students 
for didactic work, cannot be adapted for 
instruction in the all-important practical 
work. Duplicates of the two laboratories 
would be required, or the present labora- 
tories nearly doubled in size. The faculty 
desires the council to look over the build- 
ing with them, with a view to offering 
suggestions that may not have occurred to 
the former. 

i?f matriculation, the staff again urges 
that an increased standard be adopted, 
namely, a Third Class Non-Professional 
Departmental Certificate. 

In my last report I called attention to 
the fact that the Senate of the University 
of Toronto were discussing the proposed 
recognition of graduates of the degree 
Phm.B. (Tor.) as matriculants in medicine, 
and the courses of instruction in our col- 
lege as an equivalent for the same subjects 
as taught by the Medical Faculty. Acting 
in accordance with the advice of members 
of the Senate, our representative (Dr. 
Scott) on that body has withdrawn the 
proposed statute until such a time as our 
matriculation shall have been increased. 
It might be mentioned here that the 
medical departments of Queen's and Mc- 
Gill Universities, also Trinity School of 
Medicine, have voluntary recognized the 
degree mentioned in lieu of matriculation, 
and some have granted a dispensation on 
the subjects taken up in our college 
courses. 

It is requested that the council modify 
the regulation passed at the August, 1893, 
meeting, making it incumbent upon the 
members of the staff to take annual in- 
ventories of their respective departments. 
The task is indeed a lengthy and laborious 
one in certain departments, and, as there 
is very little material change in a single 
year, would not a biennial inventory, then, 
meet the objects to be attained quite as 
well as the e.xecution of the regulation as 
it now stands ? 

It having been deemed prudent to en- 
gage a boy to take charge of the students' 
cloak room, while the classes are in ses- 
sion, all complaints of sneak-thieving 
(which has proved to be a constant an- 
noyance in the past) have been avoided. 
It is suggestedthat the Registrar-Treasurer 
be empowered to secure the services of a 
boy for this purpose during future college 
sessions. 

It is imperative that the floor of the 
chemical laboratory should have asphal- 
tum, sheet lead, or some other suitable 
covering placed over it at once, to prevent 
the constant unavoidable dripping of 
water, acids, etc., upon the students, their 
work tables, apparatus, etc., in the phar- 
macal laboratory, which has been a source 
of constant annoyance ever since the 



38 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



seams of the floor have opened, owing to 
the shrinkage of the wood. 

It IS also requested that each labora- 
tory be provided with a wall clock. 

The staff respectfully suggest that the 
next session shall begin on September 
I2th ; the junior term to continue until 
December i8th, fourteen consecutive 
weeks ; the senior term to extend from 
January 3rd, 1896, to May 3rd — seven- 
teen and a half consecutive weeks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chas. F. Heebnkr, 
Toronto, February 5th, 1895. Dean. 

Appended as exhibits to the Dean's 
report were copies of the examination 
papers, and lists of candidates passing, 
i'hese have already been published. 

Messrs. Daniel and Waters moved that 
the report be received. Carried. 

Messrs. Daniel and Waters moved that 
the report be adopted. 

Moved, in amendment, by Messrs. Clark 
and Hargreaves, that the council go into 
committee of the whole to consider the 
report. 

This was carried, and Mr. Shufif took 
the chair. 

Clause I was adopted. 

Clause 2 was referred to the Executive 
and Finance Committee. 

Clauses 3 to 7 inclusive were adopted. 

Clause 8 was referred back. 

The balance of the report was approved, 
and, on being reported back to the coun- 
cil, the report as amended was adopted. 

The council then adjourned until ten 
o'clock, Friday morning. 

Fourth Day. 

On reassembling on Friday morning, 
the vice-president again in the chair, a 
communication was read from the stu- 
dents, petitioning for permission to hold 
an " At Home " in the college building, 
and this was granted. 

Moved by J. M. Hargreaves, seconded 
by J. A. Clark : Tliat owing to the 
absence of the president, who is in Aus- 
tralia, the vice president be authorized to 
sign diplomas granted to graduates by 
this council February 7, 1895, and also 
fulfil all other duties of the president 
until his return. Carried. 

A communication having been received 
in reference to the case of Dr. W. A. 
Ross, of Barne, who had applied for 
registration, it was resolved, upon motion 
of Henry Watters, seconded by John 
McKee : That the matter of Dr. W. A. 
Ross, Barrie, be referred to the college 
solicitors to ascertain if this college is 
obliged to register him as a chemist and 
druggist, and should their opinion be that 
the college is not obliged to register him 
that his registration fee be returned and 
his name removed from the register ; 
also the name of the apprentice registered 
under him. 

Report No. 2 of the Executive and 
Finance Committee was as follows : 

GENTI.EMEN, — Your committee deem 
that the following will be sufficient 
appropriations for the various departments 
for the present term, and that the question 



can be fully considered after the taking of 
stock of apparatus and chemicals at the 
end of the senior course, and will be 
dealt with by the council in August, which 
will be in sufficient time for procuring any 
appliances required next term : 
Dep irtment of botany and chem- 
istry $125 00 

Department of practical and 

analytical chemistry 75 00 

Department of materia medica 

and microscopy 100 00 

Department of pharmacy 132 00 

Your committee would recommend 
that estimates be procured as to the cost 
of covering the floor of the upper labora- 
tory, and submitted to the council at the 
August meeting. 

Clause No. 4 of the Report of the 
Committee on Education referred to us, 
relating to renewal of contracts of the 
professors of the college, your committee 
recommend that the President and Regis- 
trar-Treasurer be authorized by this coun- 
cil to sign a renewal of the contract with 
each of the professors for a further term 
of two years from the expiration of the 
present contract, and upon the terms and 
conditions of the present contracts. 

Your committee recommend that at the 
request of the Board of Examiners re pur- 
chase of dispensing scales be left over 
until the August meeting. 
Respectfully submitted, 

D. H. MacLaren, 

Chairman pro tern. 

Mr. Daniel then presented Report No. 
2 of the Committee on Education, which 
was as follows : 

Clause 8 of Report No. i of the Com- 
mittee on Education was sent back to 
your committee, and it is recommended 
that the following be substituted : All 
apprentices desirous of writing at the 
qualifying examination in Mayor Decem- 
ber may do so if the term of their 
apprenticeship terminates by the time of 
the meeting of the council in the follow- 
ing August or February of each year, pro- 
vided always that satisfactory evidence is 
presented to the council that the term of 
apprenticeship is completed between the 
qualifying examination and the next 
meeting of the council. Students are 
requested particularly to note that 
they are required to attend the senior 
course, and that no part of the time spent 
at the senior course is allowed to count 
in the term of apprenticeship, and that all 
former regulations concerning this matter 
be hereby rescinded. 

With reference to the application of 
Hanley G. Chant, your committee recom- 
mend that he be permitted to write at 
the qualifying examination in December 
next. Your committee recommend that 
the following students at present attend- 
ing the senior course be permitted to 
write at the qualifying examination to be 
held in May next, viz., A. Cundle, J. R. Y. 
Broughton, Mr. Bauld, and O. .A. 
McNichol. -With reference to the com- 
munication from Mr. E. B. Shutileworth 
re some books belonging to Rev. Dr. 
Avison, of Seoul, Corea, your committee, 



in view of the fact that the books have 
not been in use for some time, and that it 
is not deemed desirable at present to ex- 
pend any further sum on library account, 
recommend that they be returned as re- 
quested. Attached to and formmg part 
of this report is the report of the Dean, 
which speaks for itself. The work of the 
session has been thoroughly rehearsed, 
and the report contains much useful and 
veryinterestinginformation. The exercises 
in Pharmaceutical Arithmetic are highly 
commended. The reference therein to 
a two years' course and higher matricula- 
tion your committee strongly approves, 
but owing to extreme difficulty in procur- 
ing the necessary legislation the question 
cannot be dealt with at present. Your 
committee recommend that announce- 
ments to the number of 1,800 be pub- 
lished, and sent out in the usual manner. 
Respectfully submitted, 

C. D. Daniel, 

Chairman. 

Upon the motion of Messrs. Daniel 
and McKee the report was received, and 
the council went into committee of the 
whole thereon. 

Mr. Clark objected to the adoption of 
the first clause of this report, on the 
ground that it was an amendment to the 
by-laws which required a six months' 
notice of motion. This view of the mat- 
ter was sustained by the board, and Mr. 
Daniel was permitted to withdraw the 
clause and give notice of motion for its 
adoption at the next meeting of the coun- 
cil. 

The report as thus amended was re- 
ported back to council and adopted. 

By-Laws. 

Report of the By-laws and Legislation 
Committee. 

Your Committee on By-laws and Legis- 
lation beg leave to submit the following 
report : 

1. That John Lavelle be not appren- 
ticed in connection with the Durham 
Pharmacy, and that the Registrar return 
him the one dollar, together with his 
papers. 

2. That the request of Mr. Fred Fox 
be not granted, and that his apprentice- 
ship date twenty-seven months prior to 
Deceinber i, 1894. 

3. That the request of Charles W. F. 
Howard, of Hagersville, be granted. 

4. Regarding ttie application of Daniel 
J. McBride, of Orangeville, we would re- 
commend that his apprenticeship date 
from December i, 1889. 

5. We would recommend, on payment 
by W. J. Atkins of his fee for 1894, that 
John A. Robertson's registration date 
from August 14, 1893. 

6. We would recommend that the re- 
quest of C. O. B. Tweedale be granted. 

7. That the request of W. A. Coleman 
be granted on receipt of an affidavit from 
Cairncross & Lawrence to the Registrar 
of the college, to the effect that said W. 
A. Coleman commenced liisapprenticeship 
with them on July nth, 1894. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(3Ra) 




A 




Jar 
Free 




WITH Adams' Pepsin Tutti Frutti 

ASK YOUR WHOLESALER FOR IT. 
Advertising matter to decorate your store window sent free on application. 

ADAMS & SONS CO., 



11 and 13 JA.RVIS STMBBT, 



TORONTO, OAT. 



LEATH & ROSS'S 

WELL-KNOWN BRAND OF 

HomiBopatliic Medicines 

IN GREAT DEMAND EVERYWHERE NO CHEMIST SHOULD BE WITHOUT THEM 

PARCELS ENCLOSED DAILY to any of the London Wholesale Houses to 

Save Carriage. 



-<^\. 



'!=T >^_ -^ " 



OUR 



THIS HANDSOME AND IMPROVED BENT-GLASS 



£5 CHEMIST'S COUNTER SHOW CASE 



HANDSOME AND 
ATTRACTIVE 

CASE 

FITTED COMPLETE 

NO CHARGE 

WHATEVER 
FOR 

THE CASE 



Stands unrivalle<l for style, convenience, and beamy ; occupies 
but a small space on the counter, and is made tO Open back 
or front, to suit the convenience of the purchaser. 
DIMENSIONS Length, 19?^ in.; width (from bickto front), liji in.; height, 3;}^ in. 

Nearly 3000 Chemists stock our Medicines and find a Ready 
Sale for Them. 

Tinctures, Pilules, and Camphor 



foioia 



Q0:0 Q'OiO,JiO.Q| 



.QiO>0*r/ ) O 0< QQiO'O DO 
^ '^u-O' G: O: Of' Q O; 0)0 Q O 
Q. Q-liQ> 1' Q. Q* Q Qi 00'0a> 
QOQQ QCaO S)iQ OOOO' 
0.0.00 Q O' Q; QsQ' GiQO'Q' 
QlQ-QOQQ'O QQi'QOO'Oi 



Oa)0 0: 



I ClQi 






/rM«'^ 



1 L Size 



ill great demand everywhere, 
and can be had in any strength 
from the mother, ix ; i, and 
upwards. 



3/6 



Per 

doz. 

Cash 



•-glih 
l.4l 



%] 



LEftTH i ROSS, Wholesale Export Homeopathic Chemists Ai^ !~i! 



LEAJH&ROSS 



LONDON 



9 Vere St., Oxford St.. W. 

(\\bo\&^\e Department) 

And Jewry House, Old Jewry, E.C. 



L 



,ENG. 



(38b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



DOMINION SHOW CASE WORKS ~:=!i!'- 

HIGHEST AWARDS RECEIVED WHEREVER EXHIBITED 







MANUFACTURERS OF 



..SHOWCASES.. 

Of every Description in Nickel, Silver, Walnut, Ebonized, etc. 
HARDWOOD STORE FITTINGS, METAL SASH BARS, Etc. 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST 



SH.wR.M^HEMFMJi^gL- - infE3j JORONTO JUNCTION. ONI 



J. S. HAMILTON 

PURE GRAPE BRANDY DISTILLER 

Pelee Island 



Distilled under Excise supervision. 



" J. S. HAMILTON & CO." 

COGNAC 

In Quarter-Casks, Octanes, Half-Octanes, and Casks. 



J. S. HAMILTON & CO. 

BRANTFORD 

SOLE GENERAL AND EXPORT AGENTS 



A PERFECT TEA 



MONSOON TEA 

FINEST IN THE WORLD. 
From Tea Plant to Tea Cup in its Native Purity. 

PACKED BYTHE GROWERS 

Andsold in the original packages, ;i lb., lib. and 

5 lb. caddies. 

If your grocer has none, tell him to ordpr from 

STEEL, HAVTER &. CO. 

11 and 13 Front Street East, Toronto 



THE OLDEST 



THE BEST 




hat betn hneiun to fhe trade slnc*^ 



itMaThm4lineT>,SilH.if Cotton 
>irttA. COMMON "PBS^ 

Trade supplied by all leading Drug Houses in the 
Dominion. 





JOHN LABATT'S 

Ale AND Stout 



Ten Gold, Silver, and Bronze 
Medals, and Twelve Diplomas 

Awarded at the World's Exhibition of France, 

Australia, United .States, Canada, and 

Jamaica, West Indies. 

Highest points on this Continent, and Meda! 
at Chicago, 1893. 

Gold Medal at San Francisco, 1894. 



THEY REFRESH, STIMULATE, AND NOURISH 

. . . RECOMMENDED BY PHYSICIANS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINI 




Bpeivery at London, Ontario, Canada 



A DRUGGIST'S SPECIALTY. 

Curtis & Son's 
Yankee Brand 
Pure Spruce Gum 

Is meeting with tlie success 
its liigh qualities uierit. 



A TRIAL ORDER SOLICITED. 



CURTIS & SON 

PORTLAND, ME., U.S.A. 



■ Piso^s Remedy for Catarrh is the 
Best, Easiest to Use, and Cheapest. 



CATARRH 



■ Sold by druggists or sent by mail. 
BOc. E. T. Hazeltine, Warren, Pa. 



WEBSTER'S ■ 

INTERNA TIONAL 

Abreetst of the Tiines. ^-*- (^ 1 1 C/iVA JV X 

A Grand Educator. ^^^^—~~^-^^^^~^~^*~^^^~ 

Successor of the 
'* Unabridged." 

Standard of the 

U. S. Gov't Vrint- 
ing Office, the U.S. 
Supreme Court and 
<»f nearly all the 
School books. 

AVarnily com- 
mended by every 
State Superinten- 
tlent of Schools, 
and other Educa- 
tors almost with- 
out number. 

A College President writes: "For 
' ease with which the eye finds the 
' ^vord sought, for accuracy of defini- 
*tion, for effective methods in indi- 

* eating pronunciation, for terse yet 
' comprehensive statements of facts, 

* and for practical use as a "working 

* dictionary, ' AVebster's Internatioual' 
' excels any other single volume." 

The One Great Standard Authority, 

Si) writes ilon. I>. J. Brewer, Justice V- S. 
Supreme Court. 

G. * C. MERRXAM CO,, rublishers, 

Spring£eld, Mass., U.S.A. . 

. istf~Spnd to the publishers for free pamphlet. 
i iScS" I>o iKtt buy cheap reprints of ancient editions. — 




CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



39 



S. That the request of (). \V. Hondur 
son be granted. 

9. Tiiat Clark H. W. Newton's registra- 
tion date from November ujtli, 1S94. 
The council iiave no power to register ap- 
prentices prior to the date of certificate of 
(]uahrication. 

10. That when Mr. H. F. Clordon pays 
his fees and forwards an affidavit confirm- 
ing date of apprenticeship agreement that 
the request of James Dawson be granted. 

11. We would recommend that on 
payment of the sum of $4 by Dr.' Mc- 
Laughlin for the year 1892, when he was 
a partner with Dr. W. J. Anderson, that 
Frank McKechnie be registered from 
February loth, 1892, that being the date 
of his qualification papers. 

12. That the application of J. I,. Mc- 
Phee be granted, registration to date from 
May 1st, 1894, on receipt by the Registrar 
of an affidavit from W. McDonald to the 
effect that J. L. McPhee was apprenticed 
with him on Ajiril 2Sth, 1894, the dates 
apparently having been erased on the ap- 
prenticeship papers. 

13. That George J- Mitchell be regis- 
tered from date of educational qualifica- 
tions, September 6th, 1894. Your com- 
mittee regret that druggists should take as 
apprentices yoting men without the neces- 
sary education to qualify. 

14. That Elmer J. Bellman be allowed 
to register from November 24th, 1893, 
that being date of certificate of qualifica- 
tion. 

15. That Herbert N. Ray be allowed 
to register from March 12th, 1S88, that 
being date of the certificateof qualification. 

16. Regarding the letter of B. F. Cass- 
well, the committee would authorize the 
Registrar to reply that such a position 
would be contrary to the spirit and inten- 
tion of the Act. 

17. That the application of Tames 
Brown be granted. 

18. That the application of C. J. Wynn 
be granted. 

19. That H. G. G Craig's application 
for registration be granted by Dr. J. W. 
Shillington paying his fees for 1892, and 
proof that he has been with a qualified 
druggist since. 

20. That the application of J. J. Speight 
be granted. 

21. We find that William Granville 
does not produce the necessary educa- 
tional qualifications to register under the 
Pharmacy Act. 

22. That the Registrar forward to R. 
Currie and G. White the qualification 
blank forms required by this college. 

23. That the application of Mr. G. H. 
Cameron cannot be granted, and that the 
letter of J. K. Strachan, Registrar of the 
Pharmaceutical .Association of the Pro- 
vince of Manitoba, be referred back to the 
council for consideration and action. 

24. That Chas. McDonald, of Ren- 
frew, be granted his diploma upon pass- 
ing his examination as required by the 
Pharmacy law of Ontario, he having com- 
pleted his term of apprcnticeshi]) in full 
according to the Pharmacy .Act in force 
in 1885. 



25. Regarding the letter of H. !•'. Mc- 
Carthy, of Ottawa, re apprentice, we 
would recommend that the Registrar for- 
ward to Mr. McCarthy a blank form of 
educational qualitication which the ap- 
prentice might pass at once, if capable, 
and instruct him that we have no power 
to register an apprentice until we are in 
possession of said qualification. 

26. Regarding the application of W. 
E. Bauer, we would recommend that he 
be allowed the time served in Ontario 
under a duly registered chemist, viz., from 
the 1 6th July, 1888, to September 8th, 
1890. 

27. That the council has no pow'er to 
grant the request of Raymond Fisher. 

28. Regarding the application of W. 
Applebee, we would recommend that his 
request be granted on furnishing to the 
Registrar of the college the necessary 
affidavit of C. R. Sneath. 

29. That the application of John B. 
Sawdon be granted on his sending to the 
Registrar proof of his necessary educa- 
tional qualifications at that date. 

30. That the application of J. T. 
Curts be granted on forwarding to the 
Registrar an affidavit of firm from his em- 
ployers. 

31. That the application of J. H. 
Bennett be not granted. 

32. That George J. Hunt be allowed 
to go up for examination, providing he 
can produce evidence to the Registrar 
showing that his full time of appren- 
ticeship has been served with a duly 
qualified pharmaceutical chemist. 

2,2,- That the application of Morley 
Prust be aranted. 

34. Regarding the request of John A. 
Traynor, of Lanark, the evidence pre- 
sented is so conflicting and unsatisfactory 
that your committee cannot grant it. 

35. Regarding the application of Clay- 
ton Copeland, we would recommend that 
his registration " date from time of his 
educational qualifications 

36. Your committee have had before 
them the application of Mr. J. R. Watson 
to be allowed the term of fifteen months, 
which he alleges he served under articles 
of apprenticeship with Mr. A. B. Petrie, 
of Guelph, as well as the aflidavits of 
George Williams, grocer ; Thos. M. Till, 
deputy collector of revenue ; Alex. Stew- 
art, druggist ; W. O. Stewart, physician : 
and W. J. Graham, decorator, in support 
of same. .We beg to report that we do 
not feel justified in entertaining the same. 

37. Regarding the request of J. W. 
Campbell, of Kingston, your committee 
recommend that it be granted. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

C. K. McGregor (Chairman). ^ 

W. A. K.4RN. 

J. M. Hargre.aves. 

J. G. Shuff. 
Mr. McGregor moved the adoption of 
the report, but an amendment to go into 
committee of the whole for its considera- 
tion was carried, and the report was taken 
up clause by clause. The only clause 
which created any discussion was the last 
but one, and, after debating it at some 



length, it was moved in amendment by 
Messrs. Watters and Mackenzie that the 
clause be struck out and the following 
substituted : " That the a[)plication of J. 
R. Watson be granted." This was car- 
ried, and the report, as amended, was 
adopted. 

Moved by C. D. Daniel, seconded by 
C. K. McGregor, and resolved : That in 
view of the fact that a .satisfactory letter 
has been received from the secretary of 
the Pharmaceutical Society of the Prov- 
ince of Manitoba with reference to the 
recognition of our graduates that we agree 
to accept graduates from Manitoba col- 
lege, provided they have complied with 
the regulations of a standard equal to our 
own. 

Moved by Henry Watters, seconded by 
C. K. M*cGregor, and resolved : That the 
vice-president he requested to watch pro- 
ceedings in the Ontario Legislature, and 
in the event of any bill or bills going 
before the House affecting druggists that 
he be empowered to call a meeting of 
council, should he deem such necessary. 

Moved by C. D. Daniel, seconded by 
J. Vl. Hargreaves, and resolved : That 
$3,000 additional insurance be placed 
upon the contents of our college building. 

Moved by Henry Watters, seconded 
by John McKee, and resolved. That the 
council do now adjourn to meet in Aug- 
ust, or at the call of the president. 



Formula Wanted. 



R.R.S. asks for a formula for a tooth- 
ache gum, also mode of manufacture. 



To Meet Cutting in Ppiees. 

The cutter in patent medicines is 
springing up in various towns, and, while 
it may be made a little difficult for small 
dealers to get stocks at first, it is impos- 
sible to prevent it in the long run, and it 
is somewhat hard, such being the case, to 
ask drug jobbers to go outside of their 
usual methods in reference toselling direct; 

It prevents the handling of these goods 
in other channels, and cannot in any 
way prevent cutters from procuring them. 
The cutter has come to stay, this has 
been clearly proven both in this and 
other countries, and you cannot prevent 
a man with money from getting what he 
wants. We are not in sympathy in any 
way with any one demoralizing prices, 
and would do anything to assist maintain- 
ing prices of patent medicines, but " facts 
are stubborn things," and if wholesale 
grocers carry stocks of patent medicines 
it will only tend to increase the trouble. 
There is no doubt from past experience 
that at the first sign of a cutter starting 
the only way to meet him is by the retail 
druggist putting down prices so that no 
capital can be made out of it, and when 
these men find they are doing business 
for nothing it will die out much quicker 
than by opposition of any other^kind. 



40 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Little Things. 

Little things are the secrets of success 
in business, in science, in art, in morals, 
in knowledge — in every pursuit in life. 
Careful attention to little things brings to 
a successful performance of big things. 
In the universe there are no trifles. As 
Angeto said: "Trifles make perfection, 
and perfection is no trifle." Most of the 
great discoveries of the world have re- 
sulted from attention to little things. 
Study the history of bankruptcies and 
failures in business and in life, and you 
find them largely men who had no talent 
for looking after details. Moments are 
the golden sands of time. An hour every 
day withdrawn from frivolous pursuits 
would n.ake an ignorant man a well in- 
formed man in ten years. > 

The happiness of life is made up of 
little things, little courtesies, little kind- 
nesses, little deeds, pleasant words, genial 
smiles, a friendly letter and good wishes. 
It is so in character. — Exchangi:. 



a small part in bad condition, don't say 
the whole lot is spoiled. Be fair. This 
you are entitled to be as a man, and as a 
merchant. — Mercantile Journal. 



become popular, and must congratulate 
the manufacturers on producing an article 
which is a credit to Canadian manufac- 
turers. 



Medical Practitioners in Austria. 

Statistics recently published by the 
Superior Sanitary Council of Austria 
show that in the various kingdoms and 
countries represented in Reichsrath 
there were, at the end of 1893, 8,149 
medical practitioners. Of these, 6,728 
were doctors of medicine, and 1,421 
wero grade practitioners. 



Let Us Reason Together. 

When goods don't turn out exactly as 
ordered, don't forget the Golden Rule — 
treat the shipper as you would wish him 
to treat you. Consider that he is anxious 
to fill your order right — that he wants to 
give you just what you ordered, and that 
he has ust-d all possible diligence to have 
this done, but that mistakes are liable to 
occur. The wrong brand may have been 
shipped ; a case may have been shipped 
instead of a dozen ; you may have ordered 
a box, thinking- of one size, and he may 
have sent you what he considers two half 
boxes to fill the order. Many things may 
happen, and if you suspect the shipper of 
evil intentions and a desire to get the best 
of you, instead oif giving him credit for 
having done the best he could, you will 
not act genteelly. You will ship back 
without notice. You will put him to per- 
haps unnecessary expense ; the goods 
may be perishaljle, and by the time they 
get back be utterly worthless. Therefore, 
do what is right and fair. Take the 
goods, care for them, write the shipper at 
once fully what is wrong. Don't wait for 
a salesman, that may be several days. 
Write at once, and explain clearly. Don't 
simply say to him. " The goods are not as 
ordered, and are here subject to your 
order." How can he tell what is not as 
ordered? Explain, then he can under- 
stand and write you intelligently. If the 
goods are perishable, assort them at once 
and save the good; and if there should be 



A Manual of Organic Materia Medica 
and Pharmacognosy. An introduction to 
the study of the vegetable kingdom and 
the vegetable and animal drugs, etc., etc. 
By Lucius E. Sayre, Dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, Professor of Materia Medica 
and Pharmacy in the University of Kan- 
sas, member of the Committee of Revision 
of the United States Pharmacopoeia. 
Philadelphia : P. Blakiston, Son & Co. 
.\ volume of 550 pages with over 500 
illustrations, the majority of which latter 
are from original drawings. An extended 
review of this work will appear in our next 
issue. 



Kola is both a necessity and a luxury 
to the inhabitants of a large portion of 
P>quatorial Africa, where the fresh seed is 
employed as a masticatory with a view to 
overcome fatigue, hunger, and thirst. The 
main reason why it has not obtained the 
position it deserves in this country as a 
tonic siimulant is that it has usually here- 
tofore been imported in a dried condition. 
F. Stearns & Co., of Detroit, Mich., are 
the first to prepare a preparation made 
from the fresh (undried) Kola nuts, and 
offer " Kolavin," a delicious tonic wine 
and powerful cerebrospinal stimulant. 
This retains undiminished the same 
peculiar properties possessed by the fresh 
Kola nuts, and physicians desiring to test 
this new product can easily obtain 
samples forclmical experiments by making 
application for same. 



Soda Water Apparatus. — We would 
call the attention of our subscribers to 
a new style of soda water apparatus, de- 
signed and manufactured by the Fletcher 
Manufacturing Company of this city, 
whose advertisement appears on another 
page. This fountain has been especially 
designed for druggists' use, offering many 
advantages over the old style marble 
fount, not the least of which is the small 
cost compared with the marble fountain. 
The pneumatic patent syrup jar has 
many points to recommend it. Among 
others we may mention its great superior- 
ity for rapid serving, and for keeping the 
syrups cool. The jars are made from 
pure block tin, silver-plated ifiside and 
out. The jars are sunk through the 
marble into the cooling box, which fits 
directly under the counter, where main 
coolers for fountain are placed. Thus 
the soda water and syrups are kept cool 
by same ice. The Frigid Fount (new 
this season) has, besides the main coolers, 
a series. of coil coolers placed inside the 
body of the fount. The body of fount is 
filled with ice, which must of necessity 
ensure cool soda water. We understand 
that Messrs. Hooper & Co., of King 
street west, in this city, have ordered one 
of these fountains. We predict a large 
sale for this apparatus, which is bound to 



Amvlocarbol. — A mixture composed 
of 9 parts of carbolic acid, 150 parts of 
soap, 160 parts of amylic alcohol, and 
water enough to make 1,000 parts, is 
designated amylocarbol. 

Chloral-caffeine is a soluble com- 
pound of chloral and caffeine {Phar. 
Ceniralb.), obtained by uniting in an 
alcoholic or aqueous solution by process 
claimed to be patented. 

WANTS, FOR SALE, ETC. 



AdveriisfmcniR inuJcr t)te head of Buf<i7iess Wanted, 
Situations Wanted. Sitnxtioiis Tacant, liusiness for 
Sale, etc . tvill lie lusrrted once free of charge. An- 
swers must not be sent in care of this office imless 
postage stamps are forwarded to re-mail replief. 



BUSINESS WANTED. 



DRUG BUSINESS WANTED. MANITOBA OR 

British Columbia preferred. Can pay spot cash. All 

coinmunicalions confidential. Give full particulars. Ad- 
dress Box 205, Omemee, Ont. 



BUSINESS FOR SALE. 



DRUG BUSINESS FOR SALE IN A THRIVING 
town, N.W.T. Stock consists of drugs and station- 
ary, amounting u- $i,8oo. For information write to the 
Canadian Druggist. 



FIRST-CLASS DRUG BUSINESS FOR SALE, 
east of Toronto. Stock ahout $6,000. Good reasons 
for selling. Apply to R., care of Canadian Druggist. 



T ONG-ESTABLISHED, PROFITABLE, AND 
Lj successful proprietary articles for sale. An excellent 
opportunity for a live man to secure good business, cap- 
able of great extension at very low figure. Apply to Box 
20, office of Canadian Druggist. 



SITUATIONS WANTED. 

SITUATION HY DRUG CLERK, 4*2 NEARS' EX- 
pe ience ; can furnish qood references. Am ready to 
fill position by the i5tli inst. Address, D. W. H., care of 
thi^ journal. 

SITUATION WANTED BY DRUG CLERK, 
with about four years" experience ; can furnish refer- 
ences from present employer ; good dispenser. Address, 
H.S. Pannell, 248 Alired Street, Kingston. 



SITUATION WANTED AS MANAGER OR As- 
sistant, by graduate of O.C.P. and Phm.B. Five 
years' experience, ciiy and town. Good refereuices. Mod- 
erate .salary. Address, " Pharmacist," Angus, Ont. 



w 



ANTED POSITION IN DRUG STORE BY A 
young man with four years' e.\perience. Best of 
references ; strictly temperate. Address, W. O. Helan, 
Walkerton, Ont. 



SITUATION WANTED AS DRUG CLERK; 
O three and a half years" experience ; attended one term 
at Ontario College of Pharmacy; good referL-nces from 
present employer. Address, B. M. Copeland, 136 
Catharine St., Hamilton. 



Geo. H. Chandlek. H, C Chandlee. 

Trade-Marks, Caveats, etc, 

CHANDLEE S CHANDLEE, 

Patents and Patent Causes. 
Electrical and Mechanical Experts. 

I'OI.ACK BUILIIINU. Al I.ANTll- BUILDINO. 

YORK. Pa. WASHINGTON. D.C. 

Correspondence Solicited. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



{40A) 



e!>/ra^l^'/i>Sf^<^S(i^NISSSiSbSi!^!)iSSi 2S9KNttiS?KS KsaawsjssiWiassssffica 




When 



others 



...I ^IJ. 



You will come back again 
to the genuine 



:St^iJ^j;sS'S(Z^;gS;:s^A'iZJJiS/j;S^. S^.S^Ji^JS:^S^£>iS/S<!SSSi!.^?lfZf^< 



MENTHOL COUGH DROPS 

Like every other successful article they have 
been imitated, but the imitation only helps 
to show what the genuine really is. 



Toronto Biscuit and Confectionery Co. 



7 FRONT ST. EAST, TORONTO 



ONE OF THE BEST SOOTHING AGENTS OR DEMULCENTS KNOWN 



Pure Unadulterated Liquorice 



FOR 




Coughs, Colds, Etc. 

The SOlAZZI brand is certified by 
Analysis to be an AbSOlutely PUfe 
Extract, without any 
admixture. 



•• HEALTH " says: 

"By Far the Best and Purest." 



SOLAZZI." 



This is the purest LIQUORICE | 
JITIC£ obtainable ; it is a guaranteed » 
specific — in fact j| 

I NATURE'S OWN REMEDY " 

for Winter Coughs, Colds, and all Chest \ 
Affections. 



"THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST" ->- 

"The Most Esteemed of All' 



Chemists should stock and push thisS 
article, as a safe and effective remedy, 'l 
provided by kindly nature, in preference ^ 
to Patent Medicines, which, in these jj 
days, yield only the barest profit. To be S 
bad, with Show Cards and Handbills, of g 
ALL WHOLESALE HOUSES. | 



a bad. 



To be Obtained of all TVholesale Houses 



(40b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Fortier's 
Lafayette 

THE FINEST Set. Cigar 

EVER OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC. 

JUST TRY IT 



R I TANS 



One Gives Relief. 



i 



'm. ■%. '^..jm^is^^s^m^mmmmmmmm^smmmm^mmmKr^. 



IF YOU USE THE 

Red Star Toothwash Bottle 

You will beat your neighbor, as 

no other approaches it 

for beauty. 

Scant 2 oz. (looks like a 3 oz.) com- 
plete open crown sprinkler at $7.83 
net per gross. Sample sent on re- 
ceipt of scents to pay postage. 

T. C. Wheaton & Co., Millville, 
N.J., manufacturers of Flint, Green 
and Amber ware, and the largest 
factors of Homeo. Vials in the 
world. 

Baylis Manufacturing Co. 

16 to 30 Nazareth Street, 
MONTREAL 



IMPORTERS OF 

Linseed Oil 
Turpentine 
Castor Oil 
Paris Green 
Glues 



WRITE 

FOR 

QUOTATIONS 



pOH BODY aN^ Bf^RUSi 

SINCE 30 VE.\RS .\LL EjMINENT PHYSICI.^NS RECOMMEND 



YIN MARIAN I 



The original French Cocoa Wine ; most popularly used tonic-stimulant 
in Hospitals, Public and Religious Iiistilutions everywhere. 
Nourishes, Fortifies, Refreshes 
Streiiphens the entire system ; most Agreeable, Effective and Lasting 
Renoi'ator of the Vital Forces. 

Every test, strictly on its own merits, proves exceptional reputation. 
Palatable as Choicest Old Wines 

LAWRENCE A WILSON & CO., Sole Agents. MONTREAL 
Effect of the French TTreaty 

CLARETS AT HALF PRICE 

The Bordeaux Claret Company, established at Montreal in view of the French 
treaty, are now offering the Canadian connoisseur beautiful wines at $3.00 and $4.00 
per case of 12 large quart bottles. These are equal to any $6.00 and $8.00 wines sold on 
their label. Every swell hotel and club are now handling ihem, and they are recom- 
mended l)y the be-it physicians as being perfectly pure and highly adapted for invalids 
use. Address : BORDEAUX CLARET COMPANY, 30 Hospital Street, Montreal. 



W. J. DYAS 



r4,y 



MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 

Chemicals, Druggists' Specialties, 
Proprietary Medicines 

WAREROOMS and LABORATORY : 

Strathroy, Canada 



The Detroit 



THE ONLY GENUINE. 



Pennyroyal 
Wafers 



Have been so successful with Women in the 
treatment of 

PAINFUL AND IRREGULAR MENSTRUATION 

That Physicians prescribe them liberally. 

The Druggist can safely recommend them for their 
value to the sick. 



At $8.00 per dozen delivered, you get a good profit of 50 per 
cent. No need to try to work off an Imitation of tliem. 

If you want local advertising, or terms, or special remedies, write to 
the manufacturers. 



EUREKA CHEMICAL CO., 



Canadian Laboratory 

WINDSOR, ONT. 



DETROIT, MICH. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



41 



A Warning Cork for a Poison Bottle. 

R. Watson Couiicell {Monthly Aliiga 
ziiie itf Pharmacy), proposes that the cork 
for a poison l)ottle be cut in two, hori- 
zontally, near the small end, and the en- 
lire cork threaded on a string, witli a 
knot below the lower segment of the cork. 

The free end of the string is to be attached 
t ) an additional label bearing the word 
poison. Tiio cork being fitted to the 
l)oitie containing poison tiiere are several 
things which attract attention, even in the 
dark. First, the string ; second, the label 
(bearing the word poison); if these are 
not noticed, then if the cork is seized and 
IHiUed, only the upper segment comes 
away, sliding on the string, and the con- 
tents of the bottle cannot be poured out. 
It is necessary to pull on the string itself 
in order to remove the cork entire. 

This appliance can be made by any one, 
costs nothing, and suits any bottle. On 
the bottle itself the poison label should 
always be stuck above the directions, so 
as to be seen first, as, when the poison 
label is placed at the bottom of the bottle 
it is often covered by the hand grasping 
the bottle and is not seen. 



Tablet Triturates. 



Bv C S. Hallberg. 

None of the various novelties in phar- 
niacal science has leaped into favor as 
quickly as have the tablet triturates. Al- 
though brought into notice by Ur. Fuller, 
of New York, some ten years ago, it is 
only during the past three years that they 
have been exploited by manufacturers. 
The success that they have met with is 
tremendous, and if their employment 
should continue in the same ratio it will 
seriously threaten dispensing pharmacy. 
Of the various forms in which medicines 
have been presented, from the eli.xir to 
the coated and compressed pills and 
lozenges, the tablet triturate is by far the 
most insidious. There is no fear, how- 
ever, that the triturates have come to stay, 
but, on the other hand, a probability that 
they will disappear as quickly as they 
came. They owe their popularity to the 
fact that dry medication is favored by 
many physicians ; to the claims set forth 
as to their ready solubility ; and, above all, 
to the fact that the triturates have enabled 
the physicians to supply small doses in an 
elegant and convenient form at a very 
small cost to his patients, thus aftbrding 
him an advantage homceopathists have 
so long enjoyed. 

These apparent advantages will not 
stand the searchlight of investigation. 
Dry medication, except for specific pur- 
poses or local effect, or in the case of a 
few exceptional remedies, is the most un- 
satisfactory method of administration of 
medicine. 

Therapeutic effect is largely a question 
of solubility in the system. As a general 
rule the more dilute the drug the quicker 
and more certain the effect The effect 
is quicker for the same quantity of drug 



from an infusion than from a tincture; 
and in the same ratio more prompt is the 
effect from a tincture than a fluid extract, 
just as the effect is greater from a fluid 
extract than from an extract, and from an 
extract than from a resin such as podo- 
()liyllin. 

Hut this is not the only advantage that 
lifjuid medicants have over dry or pow- 
dered forms. Many substances do not 
act when taken internally because reac- 
tion of the fluids of the body is not favor- 
able to their solution and consetjuent ab- 
sorption. Thus oxides, carbonates, alka- 
lies, etc., are not active if the fluids be 
alkaline, while the effects of other sub- 
stances, such as chloroform, are impaired 
through the effect of an acid condition of 
the fluids. The liquid form of medicine 
permits addition of acids and alkalies to 
correct tlie respective conditions and to 
insure the prompt effect of the remedy. 
Addition of acids to tonic bitters is a 
familiar practice. In this way an effect 
far more prompt is obtained than in neu- 
tral media. 

The so-called idiosyncrasies, t0v,ard or 
untoward effects, of many drugs are prob- 
ably due to the fact that they are not 
properly dissolved or absorbed by the sys- 
tem, and aside from the reaction of the 
liquids, may also be due to the inactivity 
of excretory organs, such as the kidneys. 
The cumulative effects of drugs, as in the 
case of strychnine, are undoubtedly due 
to the comparative insolubility of the al- 
kaloid or its salts in the alkaline fluids; 
when the reaction changes to acid, then 
the strychnine which may have accumu- 
lated in the system is quickly dissolved, 
with not infrequently the most dangerous 
consequences. As an illustration in one 
instance, a person for whom strychnine 
tablet triturates (1.50 grain) had been pre- 
scribed, obtained a bottle of 500 and 
afterwards a second bottle, of which he 
complained after due use that it had no 
effect. These triturates in all probability 
contained strychnine ; hence it is likely 
that it remained insoluble in the system. 

Another reason why organic drugs are 
not adapted to dry medication, especially 
in tablet triturate form, is that these latter 
are made from alkaloids, and not from 
preparations of the drug. If the prompt 
certain effects of a drug be required, in 
solution, is of much greater importance 
that when the full effect is desired the 
drug (in most instances) be used and not 
an alkaloid nor other active principle. 
Notwithstanding claims made, for com- 
mercial reasons, the opinion that alka- 
loidal drugs are valuable only because of 
the amount of alkaloids they may be 
shown to contain, has not been suffi- 
ciently demonstrated to be incorporated 
in the United States Pharinacopceia of 
1S90 to any greater extent than in the 
United Stales Fharmacopceia of 1880, 
except as to one drug, nux vomica. The 
dose of extract of nux vomica is given by 
a standard authority (National Dispensa- 
tory) at one-half grain, "which may be 
gradually increased to gram o.i or 0.2, 



when the specific effect of the drug is 
sought." 

Based upon these doses of the extract 
the equivalent quantities of the other pre- 
parations are presented (in tabular form;, 
and also the amount of alkaloids and 
strychnine in each. 









2. 


*o 












tn 




■* 


1^ 




72 






" 


" 




'^ 


z 


J3 













o 








1 


H 


X 


tL 






10 


8 


a ' 
















d 








■* 


Ov 


I? 1 


< 














cu 














a 






u^ 










-0 


ta 




-X 


^ 


^ 


< 






















u 


J£ 












S 


<; 


t£ 


























CI 


^ 














X 














D 




C 


LTl 











Z 


^ 


B 






X 





u* 
















g 












en 

w 


^ 



-J 


10 



•^ 


u^ 



d 


X 










































a 




c 


\J^ 





vO 


M 


> 


^ 






































T3 


(J 


fo 


VO 








< 


^ 










^ 


(S 




fc 


u 










^ 

















,_ 















!;l 




■ :? 


VO 






















N 




















tti 















This table demonstrates that the weak- 
est preparation (the tincture) is relatively 
the strongest compared with the drug 
strength of the fluid extract, the extract, 
or the alkaloids. That the full effect of 
nux vomica is represented by the alka- 
loids is no more true than that the effects 
of opium are represented by morphine, or 
that cinchona is completely represented 
by the alkaloids. Medical men should 
begin to realize more generally these con- 
clusions : 

(i) That when full, prompt effects of 
any drug is desired it must be prescribed 
in the form of a tincture made from the 
crude drug of the best quality, and not 
from the fluid extract. (2) That alka- 
loids cannot replace their respective drugs 
any more than synthetic products have dis- 
placed the alkaloids. (3) That by using 
tablet triturates they are simply poular- 
izing the form of self-medication, the 
triturates now being put up and numl)ered 
according to the disorder for which thev 
are recommended. (4) That old-time 
patent medicine, herb women, and Indian 
and Chinese travelling fakirs are preferred 
by mar>y persons to modern physicians 
because the former give them "'good, old 
reliable medkine-s," that " work promptly 
and effectively," instead of dimethyl- 
phenyl-isopyrazolon, acetphenetidin, and 
the hosts that have come and gone. 

The quicker physicians appreciate that 
the materia medica and pharmacy of their 



42 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



fathers is their best friend the better for 
the best interests of the medical profes- 
sion. — Retail Druggist. 



The Passing of the Tablet Fad. 

Unquestionably one of the greatest 
evils from which legitimate pharmacy and 
medicine suffer is the indiscriminate use 
of compressed tablets. Beginning, in a 
small way, they have gradually increased 
in use until now they threaten to over- 
throw all other form of preparations. 
Their convenience, portability, and cheap- 
ness are elements that appeal to many, 
and in the case of inorganic chemicals 
and well-defined organic compounds, like 
strychnine, morphine, atropine, etc., they 
afford, in many cases, a valuable means 
of drug-administration, but the danger to 
legitimate pharmacy and medicine lies 
not in the use of the tablet, but in its 
abuse ; and it is upon this matter that we 
wish to speak. 

In the evolution of drug administration 
different forms of preparations have suc- 
cessively arisen. Crude drugs have been 
followed by infusions, and these by tinc- 
tures, extracts, fluid extracts, and active 
principles. None of these, however, has 
wholly replaced the others. Each class 
has shown especial value, and met special 
indications in disease treatment. Hence, 
as a result, medicine has had her imple- 
ments of treatment largely increased, and 
pharmacy has broadened in work. 

But in the use of tablets a different 
result is sought. The tablet faddists 
claim that all medicinal preparations 
should be given in the form of tablets, 
and, like all extremists, they are wrong. 
After the fad is over, it will be found that 
tablets afford a valuable means of drug 
administration in certain cases, and may 
be used at times with advantage. That 
they will permanently replace all the older 
forms of preparation, we do not believe 
possible, especially in the case of prepara- 
tions of drugs of organic origin, for the 
reason that tablets cannot be made to 
contain the same proximate principles, in 
the same soluble form, and in the same 
proportion, as found in various galenical 
preparations. Even if it were possible to 
do this, the tablet does not afford the 
readiness of assimilation and resulting 
promptness in action given by other 
forms of preparations, notably the liquid 
ones. 

Now, when physicians learn that they 
cannot get as good therapeutical results 
with tablets as with other forms of medi- 
caments, they will use tablets for special 
cases only — after the present fad subsides, 
for like all other men, including the phar- 
macist, the modern physician must have 
his fad. 

The abuse of the tablet lies in the en- 
deavor made to have it replace all other 
forms of drug preparations. Notably is 
this so in the case of tablets alleged to 
represent tinctures and fluid extracts. 
Granting that the liquid preparations be 
rightly made, we believe that the heat 



used in concentrating and drying them 
with the diluent to make the powder for 
the tablet must result in an alteration of 
the proximate principles of the drug, both 
in proportion and kind. 

Heat is a most important factor in 
altering the character and amount of 
active principles in a drug preparation. 
Take, for example, digitalis infusion. M. 
Roger has shown {Amer. Jour. Pharm., 
1889, 174) that the toxicity of digitalis 
infusion is very notably diminished when 
the product of maceration is simply con- 
centrated on a water bath ; from go to 150 
times the amount of the heated product 
being required to cause death, as com- 
pared with the cold water product. What 
is true of infusion of digitalis when heated 
is very probably true of other drug pre- 
parations 

How the commercial tablets alleged to 
represent galenical preparations are made 
is known only in a general way ; each 
manufacturer following his own working 
details. We have been informed, how- 
ever, on good authority, of a practice pur- 
sued by one manufacturer in the making 
of tablets of the so-called narcotic tinc- 
tures (i.e., aconite, belladonna, digitalis, 
etc.), which, if true, is open to the severest 
censure. This manufacturer, finding that 
his tablets of these tinctures stuck to- 
gether on keeping in stock, adopted a new 
procedure. Instead of making the tab- 
lets contain the tincture in minims, as 
represented, he makes a fluid extract of 
the drug, evaporates to a thick consist- 
ency, washes with petroleum benzin to 
remove resin, coloring matter, and ben- 
zin soluble extractive, spreads on plates, 
dries with heat, and makes up into tablets. 
Now, apart from the question as to 
whether this benzin treatment removes or 
alters any active principles or not, the 
fact remains that such tablets are not what 
they are represented to be. Instead of 
being made of tinctures, as claimed, they 
are made of fluid extracts, concentrated 
by heat, washed with a solvent that re- 
moves certain proximate prmciples, and 
then heated to eliminate the persistently 
remaining traces of benzin, which heat 
probably modifies, if it does not destroy, 
the remaining proximate constituents. 
The most enthusiastic tablet faddist can 
hardly claim that tablets made in this way 
are fit to replace properly-made tinctures. 
Whether this practice is followed by 
other manufacturers or not we do not 
know, but we believe that the surest way 
for physicians to get the best therapeutical 
results with drugs of organic origin is to 
use properly-made tinctures and other 
galenical preparations made by pharma- 
cists. These preparations may vary some- 
what, from natural causes, in their pro- 
portion of active principles, but they vary 
no more than the varying personalities of 
sick patients, and as they are usually given 
until physiological effects are had the 
danger in the use of non-standardized 
preparations of potent drugs is more ap- 
parent than real, and has been greatly 
exaggerated. 



We believe that tablets have had their 
day, or rather have reached their zenith 
of popularity, and like every form of drug 
preparation that has pieceded them will 
pass away, in part at least, to make room 
for something else ; and when this takes 
place physicians will then be found to 
cry to the newcomer, as they do now with 
the older galenical preparations and the 
compressed tablet : " Le roi est mort. 
Vive k roi!" It should be the aim of 
physicians and pharmacists everywhere 
to work together to discourage the abuse 
of the tablet form of drug administration. 
— Alumni Report in Journal of Pharmacy. 



Origin of the Term Anaesthetic. 

Edgar Willet, in a communication to 
the British Medical Journal, records a 
conversation he had wiih Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, when the latter was in England 
in 1886. The discussion liad turned on 
the subject of anaesthetics, when he said ; 
" Do you know the origin of the term? " 
On receiving a negative answer he replied, 
" Then I will tell you. I believe it was 
I who invented it, and this is how it 
occurred. Many years ago, when ether 
and chloroform were only just coming 
into use, Morton, the dentist at Boston, 
who was largely responsible for the intro- 
duction of ether, came to me and asked 
me if I could suggest for him a word 
which could be used for both drugs, and 
also a word which would describe the 
effect produced by their inhalation. After 
trying two or three words, esthetic 
occurred to me as meaning sensitive, and 
in consequence ansesthetic as being in- 
sensitive easily followed, with anresthesia 
for the condition produced. That," he 
concluded, " was, I believe, the origin of 
the term." 



DoetoF-Ridden. 



History is full of proofs of the degrada- 
tion of the calibre of nations which be- 
come subject to the tyranny of a priest- 
hood. VVe in this country have a fair ex- 
perience of the effect of the predomi- 
nance of lawyers in our legislature, and in 
our public affairs generally, though, per- 
haps, from this calamity we get off with 
no worse result than a depletion of our 
purses. We have not yet had the spec- 
tacle of a doctor-ridden nation, though we 
owe no thanks to the doctors themselves 
for this exemption. They have done 
their utmost to establish a reign of terror 
over us, and to dictate laws which, if car- 
ried, would place us all in their power, 
and we are not sure that they are not in- 
creasing their influence to an almost 
dangerous degree, through their parlia- 
mentary coinmittees, associations, and 
journals. There is, however, we are glad 
to believe, a healthy prejudice against the 
assumptions which at present provide an 
atmosphere of suspicion around their pro- 
posals, which will always, we hope, pre- 
serve us from absolute submission to their 
pretensions. — Chemist and Druggist. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(42A) 



NEW BOOKS 

for 

Pharmacists 

and 

Students of Pharmacy. 



A N«\v Series of Books prepared etipeclally to meet the wautA 
of the Student and PhariiiaciHt of to-day, and lu accordance witli 
tlie latest iiinthodi) of teaching. 



Iftiiulltoo/t of I'lutrniacji : 

A Text-lx>ok for students. By ViPgil CoblentZ., Ph.G-, A.M., 
Phll.D., Professor of Theory and I'r.iclice of rharm.icy, Director of 
I'l^ariiiaceulicalI.aboratury,Ct)Ilege of Pharmacy of the City of N'ewYork. 
Octavo. 395 Illustrations. 500 pages. Cloth, $4. 

Oiyanic Materia Medica and Phavinacognosy : 

Hy L. E. Sayre. Ph.G., ['rofessor of Pharmacy and Materia Medica 
in the School of Pharmacy of the University of Kansas, etc., etc. An 
introliiction to the Study of the Vegetable Kingdom and the Vegetable 
and .\nimal drugs, comprising the Botanical and Physical characteristics, 
source, constituents, and Pharmacopreia Preparations, with chapters on 
.Synthetic Organic Remedies, Insects injurious to Drugs, and Pharm.acal 
fiotany. 
Octavo. 55.5 page4. 543 haudsoine Illustrations. Cloth, !iS4.50. 

t'hdritiac.euHcal Chetnistrt/ : 

A Text-book for Medical and Pharmaceutical Students. By E. H. 
BaPtley, M.D., Dean and Professor of Organic Chemistry, Brooklyn 
College of Pharmacy; Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology at the 
Long Island College Hospital ; Chief Chemist, Board of Health of 
Brooklyn, X.V., etc. Third Edition, Revised and Enlarged. 

Wi'h Illustrations. Glossarv anil Complete Index. 12nio. 684 pages. 
Cloth, .«:{ : Leather, l$:!.0O, 

Materia Merlica, P/iarnmri/, Pharniacolotjih and 
Therapeutics. 

A Handbook for Students. By Wm. Hale White, M.D., F.R.C.P.. 
etc., Physician to and Lecturer on Materia Medica, Guy's Hospital ; 
Examiner in Materia Medica, Royal College of Physicians, London, 
etc. Second American Edition. Revised by Reynold W. WllcOX, 
M.A.,M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Therapeutics at the 
N.V. Post-CFraduate Medical School ; .-Vssistant Physician Bellevue 
Hospital. 

13mo. 661 pages. Cloth, S3 ; Leather, S3. 50. 

For Extended Description, send for Circular and Sample Pages. 



These Books may be ordered through any Bookseller or 
Wholesale Drug-gist, or upon receipt of price they will be 
sent, postpaid, to your address. 



PUBLISHED AND FOR SALE BY 

P. BLAKISTON, SON & CO., 

Pnhlisherfi of the U.S. Pharmacopreia, 

1012 Walnut Street, - - Pliiladelphia. 



THE 



Montreal 
Optical Co, 

The only firm of Manufacturing- Opticians 
in the Dominion. 

PRESCRIPTION WORK A SPECIALTY 

Coiinfri' Orf/or.»4 f///e</ with oar& 
and jtronijtt ItiKte-. 

If you are dealing in OPTICAL GOODS, it will PAY YOU to do 
business with US, and, if you are not doing so already, write and get our 

Catalogue and Price List. 



liCPAGES 



"Syrup Hypophos. Comp. 



jj 



IMPROVED 



f Per Winchester 
TRADE PRICE - Per Dozen-Small 



$2.25 

3-5° 

7.00 



I Per Dozen — Large 

Also LePAGE'S "BEEF, IRON AND WINE." 

Quality Guaranteed. Price Keasonable. Trade .Solicited. 



C. W. LePAGE ft CO., 



59 BAY STREET, TORONTO. 



t2 



O THE TRADE. 



In all localities from which we lia\^ secured and published testimonials 
for our OODD'S KIDNEY PILLS, the sale has been greatly 
increased, which resulted to the benefit of the druggist as well as ourselves. 

We would, therefore, respectfully request all druggists to forward us the 
names of any of their customers who have been cured or benefited by our 
DODD'S KIDNEY PILLS, and secure us the testimony for pub- 
lication if possible, in return fur which we shall be pleased to give them the 
benefit of any advertising connected therewith, if desired. 

Thanking the Drug Trade for their assistance towards the success of our 
Remedies, and respectfully soliciting a continuance of the same, 
Respectfully. 

THE DODDS MEDICINE CO. (LTD). 

Toronto, January- ist, iSqs- 



Every Druggist 
Should Handle Our 

DRUGGIST FAVORITE, 5c. 
-^"^ PATTI, lOc. 



Send for Sample Order. 



Fraser & Stirton, 

LONDON, Ont. 



(42B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



BOOKS FOR DRUGGISTS 



WRITTEN BY EXPERTS 



Manual of Formulae. 



SI. no I'OST FREE. 

A/tORE than i,ooo relialile formula; connected with 

every department of modern pharmacy, carefully 

arranged for ready reference. Imlispensahle te chemists. 



^ Minor Ailments. 

^ . 91. rM POST FREE. 

^ Directions for treatment of the slight aftections, 

^^ ^ accidents, etc., daily lirought under the notice of 

wv the "counter prescriher. " The must modern and effect- 

XX ive methods are described, and the most recent of 

^^ proved remedies pointed out. Produced under the 

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Practical Dispensing. 

IKf^USTHATEU, r,Oc. i'OST EtCEE. 

CONCISE hut lucid treatise on the subject specially de- 
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emulsions, suppositories, also plaster spreading and pill 
coating, etc. , carefully described and illustrated. Detailed 
directions for preparation of poultices, and of nutritive 
diet for invalids. 



A Synopsis of the British 

Pharmacopoeia Preparations. 

By Chas. F. Hkebner, Ph.G., Ph.M.B. 

Sl.on IISTBRLE.WED. 

The object of this work is to furnish, in a most con- 
■^ venient manner, a method for the study of the official 
preparations as to their Latin and English titles and 
synonyms, their composition, methods of preparation, 
strength, doses, etc., arranged in classes. 

This book will be found an invaluable aid to appren- 
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Practical Dentistry. 

.'JOe. t'OST FREE. 

THE main features of the surgical and mechanical 
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Diseases of Dogs and Cats. 



75c. FOST FREE. 

THIS work has been specially written for Chemists by 
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most modern methods. 



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50o. POST FREE. 

Directions for the preparation of perfumes and 
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Manual of Pharmacy and 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

ByChas. F. Heebner, Ph.G., Ph.M.B., 

Dean of ttie Ontario College of Pharmacy, and formerly Instructor 

in Theory and Practice of Pliarmacy in the New 

York College of Phai-macy. 

Cloth-Bound, 13010., SS2 pp., SS.OO 

THE study of Pharmacy simplified by a systeinatic and 
^ pr.actical arrangement of topics, and the elimination 
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The first edition has been thoroughly revised and freed 
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microscopical (fully illustrated) and a full index. 



Any of these books will be furnished post free, on receipt of price, by the CANADIAN DRUGGIST. Toronto, Ontario. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



43 



Formulary. 



t 



BOROSAr.lCVt.AT. 

I'liis is ihc name j^ivon to a compound 
made by hringing togeUiei two molecules 
(676 parts) ot' sodium salicyhte antl four 
molecules ( I 24 parts) of horic acid. They 
are rubbed together, and the damp mass 
then dried. It is an antiseptic, and in 
the following combination is an excellent 
application for chilblains : 

liorosalicylat ."Jv. 

Arnica glycerine 5j' 

I.anolinc or lard 3'vss. 

\'aseline jvss. 

Mix. 

The arnica glycerme is made by macer- 
ating I oz. of arnica flowers in 9 oz. (by 
weight) of glycerine for eight days. — C/ieni- 
ist (uui Dniggisl. 



EMOLLIENT CRK.\.\1 FOR CH.\PPF.D 1L\ND.S 

(Quince seed 3'ss. 

Boric acid i) j. 

(Ilycerine 3'j. 

S.V.R ,^iij. 

Carbolic acid gr. x. 

Eau de Cologne 3'j- 

Oil of lavender "t xx. 

(Ilycerile of starch 5'j- 

Water to .5xvj. 

Dissolve the boric acid in S ozs. of 
water, macerate the quince seed in the 
solution for three hours, strain, add the 
glycerine, carbolic acid, and glycerite, 
and mix well. Mix the S.^^R., eau de 
Cologne, and lavender oil, add the mix- 
ture to the mucilage, and mix the whole 
thoroughly. — Chemist and Druggist. 



CEMENT FOR PORCEL.AIN LETTERS. 

Solution sodium silicate 30.0 

Slaked lime 45-0 

Mix and add. 

Litharge 30.0 

Glycerin enough. 

Make a paste and use immediately. 



PASTE FOR BOTTLE LABELS. 

Zweiffler {Suddeiitsche Apotluker /fit- 
ting), after many experiments, prefers a 
paste of dextrin, to which thymol, in the 
percentage of i part to 2000, has been 
added. He maintains that the thymol, 
while not interfering in the slightest with 
the great adhesive properties of dextrin, 
makes it proof against the action of mois- 
ture, which has hitherto been the great 
objection to it. — National Druggist. 



TAN AND FRECKLES. 

R. Potassii carbonatis jiij. 

Sodii chloridi, 5']. 

Aq. aurantii flor. , 5\j. 

Aq. roFa-, 5viij. 
M. Kt. lotio. Sig. Face wash - 
tow E.y. 



Bartlio- 



A Universal Polish. — That is what 
the Corps gras indiistrielles calls tlie fol- 
lowing, which it claims acts equally well 
upon unvarnished, or unpolished, wood 
and old (varnished or polished) furniture : 
Dissolve in 1,000 [larts of alcohol of 94, 



15 parts lavender oil, 50 parts gum copal, 
365 parts shellac, 45 parts gum acroid 
(black-boy gum, New Holland resin), 30 
parts gum eleuii, and 30 parts benzoin. 
The solution is nearly colorless. It is 
used as other polished and lacs are. 

l)EPII.ATOR^• SOAP. 

(jlycerine 453 

Tallow 907 

Cocoanut oil 907 

Castor oil 1844 

Soda lye, 33 p. c 1814 

Starch 113 

Sodium sulphate 907 

— Corps Gras Indttslr, 

.DEPILATORY PIGMENT. 

Iodine Rr. 24 

Oil turpentine m. 40 

Castor oil fl.dr. I 

.Mcohol " 5 

Collodion, .enough to make fl. oz. 2 
Directions : -^pply daily for three days 

— Practitiotier. 



Cements to f'lx Metals to Glass. — 
(i) Make a saturated solution of alum, 
and use this to make a paste of plaster 
of paris. {2) Plaster of paris made into 
a paste with boiled linseed oil. (3) Smear 
the surface of the glass with india rubber 
solution, and do the same with the sur- 
face of the metal. Allow both to stand 
till the smell is gone — perhaps 24 hours 
— in a warm room. Then slide the one 
upon the other, and they will stick to- 
gether. If the space between the two is 
appreciable — that is, more than paper 
thickness — interpose a collar of pure rub- 
ber of the proper thickness ; cut a strip 
of the right width, and of a length that 
will wrap round without overlapping. 
Smear the ends that abut and the glass 
with rubber solution, and let the solvent 
evaporate, then wrap the collar round the 
glass, and the ends will unite. — Phar. 
Era. 



NEW PROCESS FOR SYRUP OF RHUBARB. 

The present process for this syrup is 
wasteful. If the spirit is recovered by 
distillation, most of the aroma of the 
rhubarb and coriander pass over, and, of 
course, is absent from the syrup. I would 
suggest the following formula : 

Rhubarb root S oz. 

Coriander fruit 8 oz. 

Rectified spirit 5 oz. 

Distilled water q.s. 

Refined sugar 6 lbs. 

Powder the rhubarb and coriander, 
using No. 20 sieve. Place the portion 
which, after several times powdering, 
refuses to pass the sieve at the bottom 
of the percolator, then add that which 
passes the sieve, using but little pressure. 
Mix the 5 ounces of spirit with 16 of dis- 
tilled water, and pour on the powders. 
Macerate thus for twenty- four hours, then 
continue to add distilled water until 52 
ounces have passed. In this dissolve the 
sugar with a gentle heat. Percolation 
may be continued until about 3 pints 
more have passed, this evaporated by 



water bath to 4 ounces, and strained into 
a syrup. I enclose a sample prepared 
thus, also one made strictly P. B. (except 
that I recovered 6 ounces of spiritus rhei 
c. roriand. of S.G. .897 by distillation). 
Should like your opinion as to aroma, 
etc. The P.P>. is the brighter, because 
the liquid was filtered through paper. 

Commenting on the above, the editor 
of they<wr«rt/ says : "The aroma of the 
sample of syrup of rhubarb prepared by 
the .'•uggested process is decicedly finer 
than that of the accompanying P.B. speci- 
men. Besides being less clear, however, 
it also appears more liable to fermenta- 
tion than the latter, the cork having been 
forcibly ejected from the bottle contain- 
ing it, and the fermentative action con- 
tinuing for some days, whereas in the P.B. 
syrup no such action was apparent under 
identical conditions." — J. Clower, in 
Pharmaceutical Journal and Transac- 
tions. 

Cough Drops Formulas. 

Though somewhat obscured by unusual 
technical directions, the following will no 
doubt prove intelligible, and may offer 
valuable suggestions : 

MONTPELIER COUGH DROPS. 

Brown sugar. 10 pounds 

Tartaric acid 2 ounces 

Creani of tartar i^ ounce 

Water i\ quarts 

Aniseed flavoring. . . .a sufficient quantity 

Melt the sugar in the water, and when 
at a sharp boil add the cream of tartar. 
Cover the pan for five minutes. Remove 
the lid, and let the sugar boil up to crack 
degree. Turn out the batch on an oiled 
slab, and when cool enough to handle 
mould in the acid and flavoring. Pass it 
through the acid drop rollers, and when 
the drops are chipped up, and before sift- 
ing, rub some icing with them. 

MEDICATED COUGH DROPS. 

Light brown sugar 14 pounds 

Tartaric acid i J ounces 

Cream of tartar J ounce 

Water 2 quarts 

.\niseed, cayenne, clove, and 

peppermint flavorings.. a few drops of each 

Proceed as before described, but when 
sufficiently cool pass the batch through 
the acid tablet rollers, and dust with 
sugar. 

HOREHOUND CANDY. 

Dutch crushed sugar 10 pounds. 

Dried horehound leaves 2 ounces. 

Cream of tartar 3^ ounce. 

Water 2 quarts. 

Aniseed flavoring sufficient. 

Pour the water on the leaves and let it 
gently siinmer till reduced to three pints ; 
then strain the infusion through muslin, 
and add the liquid to the sugar. Put the 
pan containing the syrup on the fire, and, 
when at a sharp boil, add the cream of 
tartar. Put the lid on the pan for five 
minutes, then remove it and let the sugar 
boil to stiff" boil degree. Take the pan 
off" the fire and rub portions of the sugar 



44 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



against the side until it produces a creamy 
appearance ; then add the flavoring. Stir 
all well and pour into square tin frames, 
previously well oiled. — Cnnfectianers 
Union. 



CHEAP COUUH STICKS. 

Brown sugar 12 pounds 

(llucose 8 pounds 

Tartaric acid . I ounce 

AVater 2 quarts 

.\niseed flavoring and jetoline 

coloring sufficient 

Turn the sugar and glucose into the 
water, and, when dissolved, boil up to 
weak crack degree. Pour on an oiled 
slab, and add the flavoring and coloring. 
Work these well in, and run the baich 
through the fiat stick rollers, cutting the 
sticks to weigh i '-i ounces each. Wrap 
separately in waxed paper. 

P.\REGORfC COUCH f)ROP.S. 

Brown sugar 14 p<jiin(ls 

Cream of tartar \ ounce 

Tartaric acid I A ounces 

Ground ginger I ounce 

Water 2 quarts 

Aniseed flavoring and pare- 
goric sufficient 

W'ork the ingredients together in the 
same way as directed in the preceding 
recipe, adding the cream of tartar to the 
sugar directly the latter boils. When 
poured, incorporate all the flavorings, and 
run the batch through the cough drop 
rollers. Care should be exercised in the 
quantity of paregoric used. 



Friffotherapy. 



According to the British Medical 
Journal, M. Raoul Pictet has extended 
his application of low temperatures to 
the treatment of dyspepsia, under the 
name of " Frigotherapy," and, being a 
sufferer from indigestion, has ascertained, 
by experiments upon himself, that ex- 
posure to a very low temperature for 
several minutes relieves indigestion and 
excites hunger. By repetition of the 
treatment his stomach affection was 
entirely cured. — Pharinaccutiial Journal. 



Tablets of Wine. 



According to Indnsfries and Iron, 
London, November 10, trials are being 
made in France with a view to concen- 
trate wine in tablets for transport. The 
ripe grapes are pres.sed as in the manu- 
facture of white wine. By means of a 
pump the juice is transferred into an 
apparatus where it is evaporated in 
vacuo ; the boiling plant is between 30 
and 45 degrees C. The vapor is drawn 
off by a pump and condensed. As soon 
as the mass- has the consistency of a 
syrup, it is mixed with the pulp. Thus a 
sort of marmalade is produced containing 
80 per cent, of grape sugar. In order to 
make wine this is dissolved in water to a 
strength of 8 to 9 degrees, and then 
flavored. 



Photographic Notes 

Porous Gla.ss for Windows. — The 
latest hygienic craze in Paris is the use of 
porous glass for windows. This is de- 
clared to possess all the advantages of the 
ordinary window-framing, and, while light 
is as freely admitted as through the medi- 
um of common glass, the " porous " fur- 
ther admits air too, the minute holes with 
which this is intersected being too fine to 
permit of any draught, while they provide 
a healthy continuous ventilation through 
the apartment. 

A New Devei.oper. — The following 
was communicated to the French Photo- 
graphic Society : . 

Water 1000 c.c. 

.Sulphite 100 grams. 

Dissolve in warm water, and add — 

Metol 5 grains. 

Hydroquinone 7 grams. 

.■\fter solution — 

Carbonate of potash 40 grams. 

— American Fhotographic Journal. 

H.ARiJENiNG Solution. — In the Lon- 
don letter of the Photographic Journal of 
India, the following frequently recom- 
mended solution for hardening gelatine 
negatives is given, and strongly en- 
dorsed : 

Tannin 60 grains 

.VI um I ounce 

Water 10 ounces 

Immerse the fixed and washed negative 
in the above solution for fifteen minutes ; 
wash well and dry. 



just before usmg 50 c.c. of a i per cent, 
of gold chloride solution is added, Nou- 
veaux Reniedes. 



Mr. B.\s.sett recommends the follow- 
ing combination of metol and hydro- 
quinone for those who find metol with 
sodium bicarbonate too slow : 

Metol \ ounce 

I iydroquinone \ ounce 

Sodium sulphite 4 ounces 

Carbonate of soda 2 J ounces 

Water So ounces 

He showed us fourteen prints from dif- 
ferent negatives that were developed with 
five ounces of this developer, all of which 
were excellent. He said that it would 
easily have developed many more, but 
fourteen was the entire batch. — Photo- 
Beacon. 



New Photoi;r.-\phic Reducer. — A 
correspondent of the Amateur Photo- 
grapher recommends a new combination 
for reducing over-exposed prints. A cold 
saturated solution of sodium hyposulphite 
(about 20 per cent.) is diluted with four 
times its volume of water. To too c.c. 
of this is added i c.c. of a 10 per cent, 
solution of uranium nitrate. The prints 
are immersed in the solution for a few 
minutes until sufficiently reduced, .then 
washed, and fixed with the following solu- 
tion : Lead nitrate, 10 parts (? grammes), 
and sodium hyposulphite, 200 parts, are 
dissolved in distilled water,. 1000, whilst 



To Check DI'-.velopment. — Various 
suggestions have been made as to meth- 
ods of completely stopping the develop- 
ment of a gelatino-bromide negative plate, 
and one of the most convenient methods 
is to use an alcoholic solution of bromide 
of cadmium, as by this means one at the 
same time charges the film with bromide 
and eliminates the water. The Revue 
Suisse recommends the following bath : 



Bromide of cailmium . 
Alcohol 



I ounce 
1 8 fluid ounces 

After five minutes' immersion in the bath 
the negative may be exposed even to direct 
sunlight, and can be preserved any length 
of time before being fixed. — American 
fournal of Photography. 



Protection of the H.\nds of Those 
WHO Work in W.atkr. — Apprentices, 
bottle-washers, etc., whose hands are al- 
most constantly wet, are liable to an 
eczematous affection, the seat of which 
is usually around the edges of the nails. 
It is sometimes so severe that the hands 
are practically disabled. It may be 
avoided by keeping convenient a mixture 
of olive oil, lanolin, vaselin, and glycerin, 
in equal parts, melted together, and about 
5 per cent, of camplio-phenique, mixed 
with it while hot. This should be rubbed 
on the fingers at night when retiring. In 
the morning wash the hands with good 
Castile soap, dry them, and again apply 
the mixture. In a very shoit time the 
eczema disappears, and it \\\\\ not reap- 
pear as long as the preparation is used. — 
National Drui'gist. 



Mending Cr.\cked Negatives. — To 
make a cracked negative fit for use. Dr. 
Miethe recommends the following pro- 
cess : Place the broken negative, the film 
of whicti must be intact, film side down, 
upon a metal plate which has been heated 
so that it can hardly be touched by the 
hand. The break is then covered with 
Canada balsam, which readily melts and 
fills up the cracks. To give the negative 
more stability, a large piece of the Canada 
balsam is put upon the centre of the back 
of the negative, and a clean glass plate, 
the same size as the negative, is laid over 
all. The melted balsam spreads out 
evenly, the excess being squeezed out. 
.\fter cooling, the plates are still further 
fastened around the edges with strips of 
Sheplie gum paper. — .-Inierican Journal 
of Photography. 



To Protect Photographic Prints. 
— The most injurious effects upon all 
photographic prints are caused by mois- 
ture, and for that reason the most accept- 
able carrier of light-sensitive substances is 
collodion. A collodion pellicle hardens 
very much in course of time, and if, ac- 
cording to a writer in \}at Photographic 
Times, the picture is afterwards protecied 
by a stratum of varnish, impervious to 



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Gray's Anodyne Liniment 

Dr. Wilson's Antibiliou^ Pills 

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French Magnetic Oil 

Dr. Wilson's Worm Lo.:cnges 
1 n, Wilson's Pulmonary Cherry Balsam 

Dr. Wilson's Cramp and Pain Reliever 

Dr. Wilsons Dead Shot Worm Sticks 

Nurse Wilson's Soothing Syrup 
Lla.rk Derby's Condition Powders 
W'right's Vermifnqe 

Robert's Eye Water 

Kurd's Hair Vitalizer 
Dr. Howard's Quinine Wine 

Dr. How.^rd'^ Beef, Iron and Wine 
Strong's Summer Cure 

Dr. Howard's Cod Liver Oil Emulsion 



(44B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



- EXCEIiSIOR - 



DruG[ Blixer and Sifter 



IMPROVED AND PERFECTED 



For Drug>gists, Manufacturing Chemists, Perfumers, Etc. 

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Powders of the Pharmacopoeia. 

These are made in Three Sizes-SUITABLE TO MIX 5 lbs., 10 lbs., and 25 lbs. -at $6, $12, and $18 each. 



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Sieves 



RUBBER BRUSH RUBS ALL LUMPS OUT OF POWDER BEFORE IT IS SIFTED. 

These Machines mix ihe powders thoroughly, ami then force them through sieves of the proper liiieness for the intended powders. Two Sieves, 
40 and 60 mesh, with each .Mixer. 

This Mixer and Sifter is handled by the prominent wholesale druggists of the United States, and gives general satisfaction. Amongst those 
handling them are: Morrison & Phummer, Chicago; Bullock & Crenshaw, and Smith, Kline & Co., Philadelphia; W. H. Scheffelin & Co., and 
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The ID lb. Mixer is specially adapted for the general requirements of the Retail Druggist. 

WM. J. DYAS, Strathpoy, Ont., Sole Ag^ent for Canada. 



RADLAUER'S 

ANTISEPTIC PERLES 

Of Pleasant Taste and Fragrance. 

Non-Poisonous and strongly Antiseptic. 



These Perles closely resemble the sublimates and carbolic acid in 
their antiseptic action. A preventive of diphtheric infection. 

For the rational cleansing and disinfection of the mouth, teeth, 
pharynx, and especially of the tonsils, and for immediately removing 
disagreeable odors emanating from the mouth and nose. 

A perfect substitute for mouth and teeth washes and gargles. 
Radlauer's Antiseptic Perles take special effect where swallowing is 
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periostitis dentalis, stomatitis mercurialis, salivation, angina, and thrush. 

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putrid substance .accumulating aljout the tonsils, thereby preventing any 
further injury to the teeth. 

METHOD OF APPLICATION: 

Take 2 — 4 Perles, let them dissolve slowly in the mouth, and then 
swallow. Being packeil in small and handy tins, Radlauer's Antiseptic 
Perles can always be carried in the pocket. 



MANUFACTURED BY 

S. RADLAUER - Pharmaceutical Chemist 

BERLIN W., GERMANY 
W. J. DYAS, Strathroy, Ont., Wholesale Agent for Canada. 



Sovereign . . 
Lime Fruit Juice 



Is the Strongest, Purest, and of Finest Flavor 



We air the largest refiners of LIME JUICE 

/« America, and solicit cuqiiincs. 

For Sale in Barrels, Demijohns, and twenty-four ounce Bottles 
by wholesale in 

TORONTO, HAMILTON, KINGSTON, AND WINNIPEG 

SIMSON BROS. & CO., Wholesale Druggists 

HALIFAX, N.S. 

TO THE DRUG TRADE 

PHENYO-CAFFEIN 

Is an acknowledged Leader among HEADACHE 
and NEURALGIA Remedies. 

Its special advantages are safely, efficiency, convenience of form for 
carrying and taking. 

Our policy is to serve the regular drug trade e.xclusively by 
thorough, persistent, and judicious advertising. 

We believe we can benefit ourselves by benefiting you. 

Correspondence solicited regarding the goods, method of adver- 
tising, etc., etc. 

Home Office, Worcester, Mass. Dominion Office. Toronto, Ont. 

Direct all Dominion correspondence In 

JOHN C. GERRY, Dominion Agent, Toronto. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



45 



moisture, absolute fluraljility of the [iriiit 
is attained. Such a varnish is composed 
ot saturated solution of amber in : 



(,'hloruform 

Coal tar benzole, pure 
Damar 



... " 45-0 
..." 7-5 

The varnish flows as freely as collodioni 
.md covers the film with a hard, i^lassy 
substratum. To prevent moisture from 
acting U|ion the reverse side of the picture, 
an apijropriate mountant should he resort- 
ed to. Ordinary starch, flour, or gelatin 
paste will not do, but instead of it he 
recommends a rather thickish solution of 
shellac in alcohol. 



One Oper.\tion Toninc and Fixing 
Solution. — Mesol, according to P. Mer- 
cier (Photo. Times), is a toning-fixing bath 
prepared to obtain a toning bath which 
preserves its activity, and, at the same 
time, a fixing bath yielding proofs having 
good keeping qualities. The first object 
is attained by communicating to the bath 
the mo.-,t complete neutrality by the pres- 
ence of talc, which is a silicate of alumia 
and of magnesia. As to i he second de- 
sideratum, this is also attained by the neu- 
trality of this bath, as also by the presence 
of a good proportion of sodium chloride 
and of lead acetate. In mesol, the black 
plumbic compound formed in the light is 
entirely fixed by the talc, in such a way 
that the bath always remains clear. Here 
is a mesol formute : 

Sodium hyposulphite 150 

Sodium chloride 5° 

Sodium acetate 10 

Lead acetate 15 

Talc, powdered 15 

Water 10,00 

After dissolving, add the talc, and after 
agitating. 

Gold chloride 0.5 

When not in use the bath must contain 
talc in excess. 



An Enterprising Japanese Pharmacist. 

Mr. Motoyosi Saizau, a Japanese, 
writes an interesting article in the Revue 
i/es Revues of Paris on " Journalism in 
Japan." The founder of Japanese jour- 
nalism, he says, was a pharmaceutical 
chemist named Kishida-Chinkau, who 
issued some twenty five years ago a peri 
odical sheet to spread the praise of his 
medicines. It came out twice or three 
times a month. Politics he was forbid- 
den by law from touching : but in order 
to make his circular more interesting, he 
introduced into it society paragraphs and 
sensational police cases, and even serial 
stories from national legends. Still, 
journalism languished in Japan till the 
introduction of modern [irinting presses, 
when It fast became prosperous. Kishida- 
Chinkau was, however, ruined by com- 
petition. The Japanese have now up- 
wards of 400 dailies, costing a half-penny 
or a penny, and something like 300 
reviews or magazines. — Chemist and 
Druggist. 



Pharmaceutical Notes. 

A DkI.ICAII, RkACIIO.N ImK M(jKl'mNk,. 

— Lama gives the following reaction as 
detecting .000005 gramme of morphine : 
A few drops of the solution are placed in 
a porcelain ca|)sule, with an equal quan- 
tity of uranimii acetate solution (.03 gr. 
uranium acetate and .02 grain sodium 
acetate in 10 c.c). A brilliant red color 
results at once. Oxymorphine gives the 
reaction as well as morphine. — Apotheker 
Zeitung. 



Phosphoglycer.\te of Lime. — A new 
process of Messrs. Portes and Prunier 
enables this now somewhat popular reme- 
dy to be obtained at a cheaper rate. 
Briefly, the operations are as follows : 
Equal parts of glycerine and phosphoric 
acid are allowed to stand for six hours at 
110° C. The acid is then saturated with 
carbonate of calcium. After repeated 
purifications the product is obtained as a 
whit£ crystalline powder, more soluble in 
cold than in hot water. — Bulletin de la 
Soc. de Pharmaeie. — {British and Col. 
Druggist.) 



The Crystallization of Syrups. — 
M. Carles, in the current number of the 
Repertoire de Pharmaeie, deals with this 
question in an interesting paper, of which 
the chief pomts are the following : Syrups 
will either keep intact as is the case with 
syrups of chloral, cherry-laurel, etc., or 
they ferment as in the case of syrups of 
ipecac, opium, violets, fruit syrups, etc. ; 
or they will crystallize, and then, as they 
have, so to speak, lost part of their sugar, 
are considered easily liable to alteration. 
This last idea is, however, found to be 
incorrect. The author's experience is 
that syrup can easily be supersaturated 
with sugar, and that when left at rest, and 
in a cooler place than that in which they 
were prepared, they deposit the e.xcess of 
sugar and return to their nonnal state, 
and leave properly saturated syrup. In 
the author's experience this is the sole 
cause of the phenomenon. — Repertoire. 



Maltol — An inodorous substance, 
soluble in all proportions in hot water, 
chloroform, and acetic acid ; but slightly 
soluble in cold water and benzine ; freely 
soluble in alcohol, ether, etc. It melts 
at 159° C, and has the formula C„ H.-.Oa. 
It is a constituent of malt caramel, from 
which it is obtained by condensation of 
the empyrheumatic vapors produced in 
the torrefication of malt (in the prepara- 
tion of the so-called malt coffee), k hun- 
dred kilograms of malt (200 lbs.) produce 
between i.So and 4.20 gm. of maltol. 
The latter presents the characteristics of 
a phenol, being soluble in sodium hy- 
drate, from which solution it is precipi- 
tated by carbonic acid. . The discovery 
and separation of maltol removes a very 
grave source of error in the analysis of 
beer, it having previously been confound- 
ed with salicylic acid in the latter. — Na 
tional Druggist. 



SoLUBILIIN In (JOCAINE HvDRO- 

chi.orate in \a.iei.in. — In answer to a 
dispensing query \T\The Chemist and Drug- 
gist, several correspondents recommend 
to rub up or dissolve the hydrochlorate 
of cocaine in a minimum quantity of water, 
and then thoroughly incorporate with the 
vaselin. Such an ointment is probably 
more efficacious than a solution of the 
alkaloid itself in a fatty excipient, but in 
either case the addition of oleic acid 
would be undesirable, remarks one corre- 
spondent. Another suggests that a better 
preparation would be made by dissolving 
the alkaloid itself in oleic acid, and mix- 
ing this with the vaselin, though this 
course would not be justifiable when the 
hydrochlorate of the alkaloid is prescribed. 
It may be pointed out, however, that the 
evidentdesireof the inquiry was to ascertain 
how the salt might be incorporated in the 
ointment in a state of solution. It is slightly 
soluble in melted vaselin, but only to the 
extent of about half what is ordered in the 
prescription. The alkaloid itself is more 
soluble, but its use would not be justified, 
and whether the hydrochlorate would be 
partially dissolved or not would depend 
to some extent on what was known re- 
garding the prescriber's intentions. — 
Chemist and Druggist. 



"Stock Calomel," according to the 
Meyer Brothers' Druggist, is the name 
applied to a commercial commodity of 
questionable composition. Its sale seems 
to be confined principally to Te.xas, where 
the article is employed in the treatment 
of wounds on cattle. The article is evi- 
dently the outgrowth of the demand for a 
large quantity, in return for a little amount 
of money, without regard to quality. 
While pure calomel is required for human 
beings, there is a feeling that almost any- 
thing will do for dumb animals. An in- 
vestigation reveals the fact that under the 
name of stock calomel the following mix- 
tures are sold at prices in accordance with 
the composition : (i) Calomel, one part ; 
white lead, three parts. (2) Calomel, one 
part ; white lead, seven parts, (3) Calo- 
mel, one part ; flaxseed meal, one part. 
(4) Calomel, three parts ; white lead, two 
parts. (5) Calomel, one part ; sugar, one 
part. 



Obtaining Pure Chlorine. — Gooch 
and Kreider state that chlorine evolved 
by action of hydrochloric or sulphuric 
acids, diluted with twice their volume of 
water, upon potassium chlorate, consists 
of about equal parts of chlorine and 
chlorine dioxide. With concentrated 
hydrochloric acid, cooled to 0° C, the 
yield of chlorine is about 85 per cent, of 
the mixed gases evolved, and with hot 
concentrated hydrochloric acid the yield 
is 75 per cent, pure chlorine, but, when 
heated, the acid itself is volatilized and 
reduces this per cent. They recommend 
for laboratory purposes the use of hydro- 
chloric acid diluted with an equal weight 
of water and heated to 60° or 70° C., 
when it reacts upon the chlorate to give 



46 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



chlorine as pure as is required (80 to 85 
per cent. pure). Chlorine, as evolved 
from the generator, is never pure, but can 
be purified by passing the dry gas through 
a tube containing asbestos fibre, heated 
by a bunsen flame. The heat decom- 
poses the chlorine dio.xide, and pure 
chlorine can thus be collected. — Chemi- 
cal News. 



The Gaseous Products Evolved 
FROM Wood Charcoal when Submit- 
ted TO A High Temperature with the 
Exclusion of Air. — The mean com- 
position of the gaseous products of dis- 
tillation are : 

Carbonic acid 9. 14 

O.xygen o. 26 

Carlion monoxide 18.08 

Hydrogen 49.11 

Marsh-gas 16.04 

Nitrogen 7.37 

100.00 

Hence the reaction C -f CO^ = 2CO hith- 
erto admitted as the expression of the 
truth is much more complicated than the 
above formula indicates. The wood 
charcoal which has undergone the opera- 
tion burns without odor or smoke, and is, 
in some cases, preferable to ordinary 
charcoal. The antiseptic properties of 
the gaseous mixture are superior to those 
of carbon monoxide. — Chemiail A'eivs. 



Reactions of Phenaeetin. 

Bayer (Journ. de Pharm. d'Anvers) 
gives the following tests for phenaeetin : 
(i) When heated with a small proportion 
of hydrochloric acid and the mixture dis- 
solved in water, the resulting solution 
becomes of a rubyred color on the addi- 
tion of chromic acid. (2) Chlorine 
water or chlorinated lime in solution 
gives a violet color, passing to ruby-red in 
the presence of phenaeetin. (3) Dis- 
solved in concentrated sulphuric acid it 
is colored red by the addition of a few 
drops of nitric acid. This reaction dis- 
tingui-shes it from acctanilid. (4) Heated 
with a few drops of sulphuric acid and a 
trace of phenol it produces a purplish red 
color, and gives off an odor of acetic acid. 
(5) A solution of o.oi gram of phenaee- 
tin in 10 c.c. of boiling water after cool- 
ing is not rendered turbid by the addi- 
tion of sufficient bromide water to pro- 
duce a yellow coloration. 



Nitropentaerythpite and a Smokeless 
Explosive. 

An application for a patent under the 
above name has been made. The process 
of manufacture is as follows : The product 
known under the name of pentaerythite 
resulting from the condensation of acet- 
aldehyde and formaldehyde in presence 
of lime, and having its fusing point be- 
tween 190° and 260"^ C, is reduced to a 
very fine powder, and is then dissolved in 
nitric acid, and precipitated by concen- 
trated sulphuric acid, or may be brought 



into a mixture of nitric acid and sulphuric 
acid. 

The crystalline solid thereby produced 
is separated from the liquid, washed with 
water, and any acid that is left in contact 
with it is neutralized by a diluted solution 
of soda. The substance is then pul- 
verized while in a moist condition. 

The substance thus produced may be 
pressed or brought into a granular form 
as a smokeless explosive, or it may be 
mixed with nitrocellulose. 

The claims for a patent are : 

(i) The method of production as de- 
scribed. 

(2) The production of a smokeless ex- 
plosive. 

(3) An enumeration of various sub- 
stances with which it may be combined. 
— Manufacturing Chemist. 



The Spanish Cork Industry. 

K'Ci official in the French Forestry De- 
partment, who was recently sent out by 
the French Government to inspect the 
cork forests of Spain, has just presented 
his report to the government. He esti- 
mates that about 1,550,000 acres of land 
are planted with cork trees in Spain. 
The province which is richest in cork 
trees is Gerona, with 395,000 acres of 
forest ; then follows Huelva, 335,000 ; 
Caceres, 200,000; Seville,i8i,ooo; Cadiz, 
137,500 ; Ciudad Real, 70,000 ; and 
Cordova, 57,000 acres. The ten prov- 
inces of Badajoz, Jaen, Malaga, and 
Toledo (in the south), and Burgos, San- 
tander, Zamora, Salamanca, Avile, and 
Saragossa (in the north) have cork plan- 
tations ; but the trees do not flourish in 
any of them. Thirty-two provinces con- 
tain no cork plantations at all. It is just 
& hundred years since a cork factory was 
started in Gerona, since then the manu- 
facture of cork has blossomed into one of 
the chief industries of Spain. The largest 
factories are at Gerona, Avenys de Mar 
(Barcelona), San Celoni, and Tordera.- 
Over one thousand four hundred million 
corks for bottles, representing a value of 
seventeen million pesetas (^5_|o,ooo) are 
turned out of the factories every year. 
About 12,000 men are employed in the 
work. It is difficult to calculate the 
income which cork brings in, as statistics 
in Spain are very faulty, and no account 
is kept of the cork that is used in the 
country itself. It is estimated, however, 
that during the past year ^1,073,800 was 
paid for the cork that was exported. The 
chief markets for raw and manufactured 
cork are London, Paris, Reims, Epernay, 
Mainz, Dresden, New York, Calcutta, 
Melbourne, Sydney, and Yedda. — Foreign 
and Colonial Importer. 



Salifebrin or Salicylanilid is the 
latest " coal-tar derivative " marketed by 
Radlauer. According to the Pharma- 
ceutische Wochensfhrifl, it is a mechanical 
mixture of salicylic acid and acetarjilid, 
with corresponding properties. 



Details That Will Take Care of Them- 
selves. 

If there ever was an occupation requir- 
ing watchful care, it is that of the |>harma- 
cist. There are so many new remedies 
announced each year that get farther than 
the manufacturers' advertisements in the 
trade journals — yes, even so far as the 
druggists' prescription shelf. One by one 
these things accumulate, and, as time goes 
by, it becomes difficult in some cases to 
get reliable data referring to the dose, 
properties, solubilities of these once new 
remedies. 

If the druggist will trim a neat blank 
label and gum it on the back of each bot- 
tle, he will find that he will need all of its 
space in which to write a few things down 
— details that will take care of themselves. 
The first thing to note down is the cost 
price per ounce. Then follows the selling 
price per grain or drachm. If the phar- 
macist will continue his statistics further, 
he should add the dose, usual and maxi- 
mum, then the effects on the system, in 
one or two words — and we have plenty in 
the vocabulary to describe each therapeu- 
tic effect, by the way — giving also the in- 
compatibles and solubility, concluding 
with an advisable vehicle. 

It may be a yeai or two — yes, even 
longer — when these sanie facts, gleaned 
at the time from the books and journals, 
will be of great service to the one dis- 
pensing. Maybe it will be a new clerk, 
or assistant, or the proprietor, who will be 
asked by a physician or patient the dose, 
effect, compatibility or solvent for this 
identical, yet out-of-the-way remedy. By 
embodying all this in a few words, and writ- 
ing it on a small label on the bottle, the 
answer will always be at hand, and where 
it is most needed. 

It is just these peculiar remedies that 
your physician may ask you about, and 
it is your business to furnish the informa- 
tion. He may, doubtless, know the ther- 
apeutic value and dose, yet inquire for 
its solubility and a pleasant method of 
administration. If every out-ofthe-way 
chemical or preparation is thus labelled, 
the compounding of a prescription calling 
for it would be more of a pleasure than a 
task, and still serve to relieve the drug- 
gist's memory of details which will then 
take care of themselves. — Frank T. 
Green, in Pacific Druggist. 



Paraform. — According to Aronsohn 
{Jour. d. Phar. v. Elsass-Loth.), when 
formaldehyde is heated for a sufficient 
length of time in a watery solution, it 
passes into a solid, white, crystalline 
polymer, insoluble in water. This is 
paraform. It is a very strong intestinal 
antiseptic. For this purpose it is said to 
be superior to B-naphthol, iodoform, 
salol, dermatol, and benzo-naphthol. It 
has a strong inhibitory action on the pro- 
pagation of bacilli. One grain of para- 
form will completely sterilize 200 grams 
of urine. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(46A} 




NEW PERFUMES 



TOILET WATER ASSORTMENT. | sweet mignonette, 

LILLIAN RUSSELL, 

MAGNOLIA BLOSSOM. 



VIOLET, 
ROSE, 
HELIOTROPE, 
LAVENDER, 
ORANGE, 
LILAC. 
MAGNOLIA. 



% 



THESE NEW PRODUCTS OF OUR LABORATORY ARE 
VERY LASTING AND FRAGRANT. 



4 iiod 8 oz. Toilet Water. 



Seel J" JMannfncturin^ Oompanyf 



HBTROIT, MICHIGAN. 



liSTAHLlSHEIi lA ISr,'^ 



W^/A'OSO/^, OXTARIO. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST PRICES CURRENT 



Corrected to February 10th, 1895. 



The quotations given represent average prices for 

quantities usually purchased by Retail Dealers. 
Larger parcels may be obtained at lower figures, 
but quantities smaller than those named will 
command an atlvance. 

Alcohol, gal $405 $425 

Methyl I 90 2 00 

ALLsriCE, lb 13 15 

Powdered, lb 15 17 

Aloin, oz 40 45 

.ANonvNE, Hoffman's hot., lbs. . . 50 55 

An ROWROOT, Bermuda, lb 45 50 

St. Vincent, lb 15 iS 

Balsa.m, Fir, lb 40 45 

Copailia. lli 65 75 

Peru, lb 2 50 2 75 

Tolu, can or less, lb 65 75 

Bark, Barberry, lb 22 25 

Bayberry, lb 15 18 

Buckthorn, lb 15 17 

Canella, lb 15 17 

Cascara, .Sagrada 25 30 

Cascarilla, select, lb 18 20 

, Cassia, in mats, lb 18 to 

Cinchona, red, lb 60 65 

Powdered, lb 65 70 

Yellow, lb 35 40 

Pale, lb 40 45 

Elm, selected, II) 20 21 

(iround, lb 17 20 

Powdered, lb 20 28 

Hemlock, crushed, lb 18 20 

Oak, white, crushed lb 15 17 

Orange peel, bitter, lb.. . 15 16 

Prickly ash, lb 35 40 

.Sassafras, lb 15 16 

Soap (quill.iya), lb 13 15 

Wild cherry, lb 13 15 

Bea.ns, Calabar, lb 45 50 

Tonka, lb. . . . 1 50 2 75 

Vanilla, lb 800 1000 

Berrii£.s, Cubeb, sifted, lb 50 55 

powdered, lb... 55 60 

Juniper, lb 7 10 

Ground, lb 12 14 

Prickly ash, lb , . 40 45 

Buds, Balm of Gilead, lb. 55 60 

Ca.ssia, lb 25 30 

Butter, Cacao, lb 75 80 

CA.Mi'itoR, lb 65 68 

Cantharidks, RiLssian, lb i 40 i 50 

Powdered, lb I 50 I 60 

Capsicum, lb 25 30 



Powdered, lb $ 30 $ 

Carbon, Bisulphide, lb 17 

Carmine, No. 40, oz 40 

Castor, Fibre, lb 20 00 

Chalk, French, powdered, lb... 10 

Precip. , see Calcium, lb 10 

Prepared, lb 5 

Charcoal, Animal, powd. , lb. . . 4 

Willow, powdered, lb 20 

Clove, lb 25 

Powdered, lb 30 

Cochineal, S.G., lb 40 

Collodion, lb ... 75 



Cantharidal, lb 2 So 



Confection, Senna, lb. 



40 
Creosote, Wood, lb 2 00 



Cuttlefish Bone, lb . 
Dextrine, lb. 



25 
10 

Dover's Powder, lb i 50 

Ergot, Spanish, lb 75 

Powdered, lb 90 

Ergotin, Keith's, oz 2 00 

13 
14 
15 
55 
30 
40 
20 
12 
60 
25 
75 



Extract, Logwood, bulk, lb. 

Pounds, lb 

Flowers, Arnica, lb 

Calendula, lb 

Chamomile, Roman, lb. 
German, lb 

Elder, lb 

Lavender, lb 

Rose, red, French, lb. . . 

Rosemary, lb 

Saffron, .\merican, lb. 



Spanish, Val'a, oz i 00 



35 

18 

50 

20 00 

12 

12 

6 

5 

25 

30 

35 

45 

80 

2 75 

45 

2 50 

30 

12 

I 60 

So 

1 00 

2 10 
14 
17 
20 
60 
35 
45 
22 

15 
2 00 

30 
80 
I 25 
80 
40 
16 



Gelatine, Cooper's, lb 75 

French, white, lb 35 

Glycerine, lb 14 

Gu.^rana 3 00 3 25 

Powdered, lb 3 25 3 So 

Gum Aloes, Cape, lb 18 20 

Barbadoes, lb 30 50 

Socotrine, lb 65 70 

Asaftetida, lb 40 45 

Arabic, 1st, lb 65 70 

Powdered, lb 75 85 

Sifted sorts, lb 40 45 

Sorts, lb 2S 30 

Benzoin, lb 50 i 00 

Catechu, Black, lb 9 20 

Gamboge, powdered, lb t 20 I 25 

Ciuaiac, lb 50 i 00 

Powdered, lb 70 75 

Kino, true, lb 12; 



Myrrh, lb $ 



Powdered, lb. 



45 

Opium, lb 4 2S 

Powdered, lb 6 00 

Scammony, pure Resin, lb 12 So 

Shellac, lb 4c 

Bleached, lb 45 

30 



Spruce, true, lb. 



Tragacanth, flake, ist, lb 90 

Powdered, lb. . . . 

Sorts, lb 

Thus, lb :... 

Herb, .Althea, lb 

Bitterwort, lb 

Burdock, lb . . 

Boneset, ozs, lb. . . . 

Catnip, ozs, lb 

Chiretta, lb 

Coltsfoot, lb 

Feverfew, ozs, lb. . . . 
Grindelia robusta, lb 
Hoarhound, ozs., lb. 
Jaborandi, lb 



10 

45 

S 

27 
27 
16 
15 
17 
25 
20 

53 
45 
"7 
45 



Lemon Balm, lb 38 

Liverwort, German, lb 38 

Lobelia, ozs, lb 15 

Motherwort, ozs, lb 20 

Mullein, German, lb 17 

Pennyroyal, ozs, lb iS 

Peppermint, ozs., lb 21 

Rue, ozs. ,1b 30 

Sage, ozs., lb 18 

Spearmint, lb 21 

Thyme, ozs., lb 18 

Tansy, ozs. ,1b 15 

W'ormwood, oz 20 

Verba Santa, lb 38 

HONEV, lb 13 

Hops, fresh, lb 20 

Lndigo, Madras, lb 75 

Insect Powder, lb 25 

Isinglass, Brazil, lb 2 00 

Russian, true, lb 6 00 

Leaf, .\conite, lb 

Bay, lb 

Belladonna, lb 

Buchu, long, lb 

Short, lb 

Coca, lb 

Digitalis, lb 

Eucalyptus, lb 

Hyoscyanius 

Matico, lb 



25 
18 

25 

5° 
20 

35 
15 
18 
20 
70 



$ 48 
60 

4 SO 

6 50 

13 00 

48 

50 

35 

I 00 

I 15 

75 
10 

30 
30 
18 

17 
20 
30 
3S 
55 
50 
20 
50 
40 
40 
20 
22 
20 
20 
25 
35 
20 

25 
20 
18 
22 
44 
15 
25 
80 
28 
2 10 
6 50 

30 
20 

30 
55 
22 
40 
20 
20 

2S 

75 



146b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Senna, Alexandria, lb 

Tinnevelly, lb 

Stramonium, lb 

Uva Ursi, lb 

Leeches, Swedish, doz 

Licorice, Solazzi 

Pignatelli 

Grasso 

Y & S— Sticks, 6 to I lb., per lb. 
" Purity, loo sticks in box 
" Purity, 200 sticks in box 
" Acme Pellets, 5 lb. tins 
" Lozenges, 5 lb. tins.. , 
" Tar, Licorice, and Tolu, 

5 lb. tins 

LUPULIN, oz 

Lycopodium, lb 

Mace, lb 

Manna, lb 

Mo.ss, Iceland, lb 

Irish, lb 

Musk, Tonquin, oz. . 

NUTGALLS, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Nutmegs, lb 

Nux Vomica, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Oakum, lb. . . 

Ointment, Merc, lb. Yi and Y^. 

Citrine, lb 

Paraldehyde, oz 

Pepper, black, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Pitch, black, lb 

Bergundy, true, lb . 

LASTER, Calcined, bbl. cash. . . . 

Adhesive, yd 

Belladonna, lb 

Galbanum Comp. , lb 

Lead, lb 

Poppy Heads, per 100 

Rosin, Common, lb 

White, lb 

Resorcin, white, oz 

Rochelle Salt, lb 

Root, Aconite, lb 

Althea, cut, lb 

Belladonna, lb 

Blood, lb 

Bitter, lb 

Blackberry, lb *t . . . 

Burdock, crushed, lb 

Calamus, sliced, white, lb .... 

Canada Snake, lb .... 

Cohosh, black, lb 

Colchicum, lb 

Columbo, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Coltsfoot, lb 

Comfrey, crushed, lb 

Curcuma, p owdered, lb 

Dandelion, lb 

Elecampane, lb 

Galangal, lb 

Gelseinium, lb 

Gentian or Genitan, lb 

Ground, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Ginger, African, lb 

. Po., lb 

Jamaica, blchd., lb 

Po., lb 

Ginseng, lb 

Golden Seal, lb 

Gold Thread, lb . . 

Hellebore, white, powd., lb. . . 

Indian Hemp 

Ipecac, lb .... 

Powdered, lb 

Jalap, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Kava Kava, lb 

Licorice, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Mandrake, lb 

Masterwort, lb 

Orris, Florentine, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Pareira Brava, true, lb 

Pink, lb 

Parsley, lb 

Pleurisy, lb 

Poke, lb 



25 
15 
20 

15 
00 

45 
35 
30 
27 

75 
50 
00 

50 



I 



00 

30 

70 

20 

I 60 

9 

9 

46 00 

21 

25 

1 00 
10 

25 
12 

70 
45 
'5 
22 

25 

3 

10 

2 25 
12 

65 
80 

25 
I 00 

2i 

34 

25 
25 

22 
30 
25 

'5 

27 
15 
18 

20 

30 

15 
40 

20 

25 
38 

20 
13 
15 

15 
15 
22 

9 
10 

13 
iS 
20 
27 
io 

3 00 

75 
90 
12 
18 

> 30 
I 60 

55 
60 
40 

12 
13 
13 
16 

40 
40 
75 
o 
20 



5 30 
25 

25 

18 

I 10 

50 
40 

35 
30 
75 

1 50 

2 00 

1 75 

2 00 

35 
80 

' 25 

' 75 

ID 
!0 
50 00 
25 
30 
I 10 
12 
27 
15 

75 
50 
18 

25 

30 

4 

12 

3 25 
13 
70 
85 
30 

I 10 

3 

4 

30 

28 

25 
35 
30 
16 

30 
18 
20 
25 
35 
20 

45 
22 

30 
40 

25 
14 
18 
20 
18 

25 
10 
12 

'5 

20 

22 

30 

35 

3 25 

80 

95 

15 

20 

I 50 

I 70 

60 

65 
90 

15 
15 
18 
40 
35 
45 
45 
80 

35 
25 
iS 



Queen of the Meadow, lb $ 18 : 

Rhatany, lb 20 

Rhubarb, lb 75 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, lb 40 

Cut, lb 50 

Senega, lb 55 

Squill, lb 13 

.Stillingia, lb 22 

Powdered, lb 25 

Unicorn, lb 38 

Valerian, English, lb. true 20 

Virginia, Snake, lb 40 

Yellow Dock, lb 15 

Ru M, Bay, gal 2 25 

Essence, lb 3 00 

Saccharin, oz i 25 

Seed, Anise, Italian, sifted, lb... 13 

Star, lb 35 

Burdock, lb 30 

Canary, bag or less, lb 5 

Caraway, lb 10 

Cardamom, lb i 25 

Celery 30 

Colchicum 50 

Coriander, lb 10 

Cumin, lb 15 

Fennel, lb 15 

Fenugreek, powdered, lb.. . 7 

Flax, cleaned, lb 3^ 

Ground, lb 4 

Hemp, lb 5 

Mustard, white, lb 11 

Powdered, lb 15 

Pumpkin 25 

(Ouince, lb 65 

Rape, lb 8 

Strophanthus, oz 50 

Worm, lb 22 

.Seidlitz Mixture, lb 25 

Soap, Castile, Mottled, pure, lb. . 10 

White, Conti's, lb 15 

Powdered, lb 25 

Green (Sapo Viridis), lb 15 

Spermaceti, lb 55 

Turpentine, Chian, oz 75 

Venice, lb 10 

Wax, White, lb 50 

Yellow. . . .' - 40 

Wood, Guaian, rasped 5 

Quassia chips, lb 10 

Ked Saunders, ground, lb 5 

Santal, ground, lb 5 

chemicals. 

Acid, Acetic, lb 12 

Glacial, lb 45 

Benzoic, English, oz 20 

German, oz 10 

Boracic, lb _ 15 

Carbolic Crystals, lb 18 

Calvert's No. I , lb 2 10 

No- 2, lb I 35 

Citric, lb 50 

Gallic, oz 10 

Hydrobromic, diluted, lb 30 

Hydrocyanic, diluted, oz. bottles 

doz I 50 

Lactic, concentrated, oz. ! 22 

Muriatic, lb 3 

Chem, pure, lb i8 

Nitric, lb \o\ 

Chem. pure, lb 25 

Oleic, purified, lb 75 

Oxalic, lb 12 

Phosphoric, glacial, lb i 00 

Dilute, lb 13 

Pyrogallic, oz 35 

Salicylic, white, lb i 00 

.Sulphuric, carboy, lb 2J 

Bottles, lb 5 

Chem. pure, lb 18 

Tannic, lb 90 

Tartaric, powdered, lb 30 

Acetanilid, lb 90 

Aconitine, grain 4 

Alum, cryst., lb , i j 

Powdered, lb ... 3 

Ammonia, Liquor, lb., .8S0 10 

Ammonium, Bromide, Jb 80 

Carbonate, lb 14 

Iodide, oz 35 

Nitrate, crystals, lb 40 

Muriate, lb 12 



20 

30 
2 50 

45 
55 
65 
15 
25 
27 
40 

25 
45 
18 

2 5° 

3 25 
I 50 

IS 

40 

'\ 

13 
I 50 

35 

60 

12 

20 

17 

9 

4 

5 

6 

12 

20 

30 
70 

9 

55 
25 
30 
12 
16 
35 

25 

60 

80 

12 

75 

45 

6 

12 

6 

6 



13 

50 
25 

12 

16 

25 
2 15 
I 40 

55 
12 

35 

I 60 

25 

5 

20 

13 

30 
So 

13 
I 10 

17 

3S 

I 10 

5* 



20 
I 10 

32 
I 00 

5 

3 

4 

12 

85 
15 
40 

45 
16 



Valerianate, oz $ 55 

Amyl, Nitritejcnz., 16 

Aniinervin, oz 85 

Antikamnia I 25 

Antipyrin, oz 100 

Aristol, oz I 85 

Arsenic, Donovan's sol., lb 25 

Fowler's sol., lb 13 

Iodide, oz co 

White, lb 6 

Atropine, Sulp. in \ ozs. 80c., 

oz . ". . .: 5 00 

Bismuth, Ammonia-citrate, oz . 35 

Iodide, oz 50 

Salicylate, oz 30 

Subcarbonate, lb 2 25 

Subnitr.ate, lb 2 00 

Borax, lb 9 

Powdered, lb 10 

Bromine, oz 8 

Cadmium, Bromide, oz 20 

Iodide, oz 45 

Cafi-eine, oz 50 

Citrate, oz 50 

Calcium, Hypophosphite, lb i 50 

Iodide, oz 95 

Phosphate, precip. , lb 35 

.Sulphide, oz - 5 

Cerium, Oxalate, oz 10 

Ciiinoidine, oz 15 

Chloral, Hydrate, lb i 00 

Croton, oz 75 

Chlorofok.m, lb 60 

Cinchonine, sulphate, oz 25 

Cinchonidine, Sulph., oz 15 

Cocaine, Mur., oz 575 

CoDEi A, 4 oz I 00 

Collodion, lb 65 

Copper, Sulph., (Blue Vitrol) lb. 6 

Iodide, oz 65 

Copperas, lb i 

Diuretin, oz I 60 

Ether, Acetic, lb. . .- 75 

.Sulphuric, lb 40 

Ex algine, oz I 00 

Hyoscyamine, Sulp., crystals, gr. 25 

Iodine, lb 4 75 

Iodoform, lb 6 00 

lODOL, oz I 40 

Iron, by Hydrogen 80 

Carbonate, Precip., lb . 15 

Sacch., lb 30 

Chloride, lb 45 

Sol., lb 13 

Citrate, U.S.P., lb 90 

And Ammon. , lb 70 

Arid Ijuinine, lb i 50 

Quin. and Stry., oz iS 

And Strychnine, oz 13 

Dialyzed, Solution, lb 50 

Ferrocyonide, lb 55 

Hypophosphites, oz 25 

Iodide, oz 40 

.Syrup, lb 40 

Lactate, oz. 5 

Pernitrate, solution, lb 15 

Phosphate scales, lb i 25 

Sulphate, pure, lb 7 

Exsiccated, lb 8 

And Potass. Tartrate, lb 80 

And Ammon Tartrate, lb . . . So 

Lead, Acetate, white, lb 13 

Carbonate, lb 7 

Iodide, oz 35 

Red, lb... 7 

Lime, Chlorinated, bulk, lb 4 

In packages, lb 6 

Lithium, Bromide, oz 30 

Carbonate, oz 30 

Citrate, oz 25 

Iodide, oz 50 

Salic ate, oz 35 

Magnesium, Calc, lb 55 

Carbonate, lb iS 

Citrate, gran., lb 35 

Sulph. (Epsom salt), lb 1} 

Manganese, Black Oxide, lb. . . 5 

Menthol, oz 55 

Mercury, lb 75 

Ammon (White Precip.).... I 25 

Chloride, Corrosive, lb I 00 

Calomel, Ih I 00 

With Chalk, lb 60 



$ 60 

18 

00 

I 30 

1 10 

2 00 
30 
'5 
55 

7 

5 00 

40 

55 

35 

2 40 

2 10 



13 

25 
50 
55 
55 

I 60 

I 00 

38 

6 

12 

18 

I 10 
80 

I 90 

30 

20 
7 00 
I 10 

70 
7 

70 

3 

I 65 

So 

50 
I 10 

30 
5 50 
7 00 
I 50 

85 
16 

35 
55 
16 

I 00 
75 

3 00 
30 
15 
55 
60 

30 
45 
45 

6 

16 

I 30 

9 
10 

85 

85 

15 

8 

40 

9 

5 

7 

35 

35 

30 

55 

40 

60 

20 

40 

3 

7 

66 

80 

I 30 

I 10 

I lo 

65 



C AN A n IAN DKLt.OlSl 



47 



Business Notices. _Book^and_ Magazines. 



A-. the .If^un ..r till- t.AS M-IAS 1>RUGGIST is t.j ,. ntrlit 
niulualty .k'l iiilcre^ie^i \n ihc btt«iiness, we would r<-,|ucsl 
all parlies ordeiiiiR jjood- or mnkiiit; purchases of any de- 
scription fr-.ni houses nd\erlisine with us to mention in 
their letter that such advertisement was noticed in ihe 
Canadian I)Kt-i;<iisT. 

The atienlion of DriiKuists and others who may be in- 
terested in ihe articles advertised in this journal is called 
to the -t/.-. Kii' ,,'inu/i-ruri\>n of the Husiiiess Notice-. 



Mc^ssrs. Biintin, Gillies & Co., the 
wholesale stationers in Hamihon, are 
advertising prompt and careful attention 
to mail orders. Their close proximity to 
the wholesale drug houses of Ha-nillon 
should make them a handy source of 
supply for goods such as they handle. 
The firm is an old-established one, and 
has a high reputation for fair dealing and 
good values. 

Sekds. — Attention is called to the 
advertisement of The Steele, Briggs, 
Marcon Co., Ltd., on page 26B of this 
issue. This firm is one of the largest 
dealers in field, garden, and flower seeds 
in the Dominion, and a hasty visit 
through their premises revealed the extent 
of the business transacted. The very 
large stock carried, the great attention 
paid to even the smallest details connected 
with the putting up and sale of their goods, 
and the means taken to ensure the sale of 
only reliable and first-class seeds, show 
plainly wherein the success of their 
business lies. The catalogue issued by 
this firm for 1895 is one of the hand- 
somest on the continent, and only in- 
tensifies the fact that they do nothing by 
halves. 

J.\MES W. Tufts' Rkpre.sent.vtives. — 
J. \V. 'I'ufts, manufacturer of soda water 
apparatus, Boston, Mass., has just issued 
a new catalogue, showing the latest de- 
signs in sotia water fountains. One 
hundred and ten thousand copies of the 
January circular were mailed to the trade. 
-Several changes in the staff, of representa- 
tives have been made, Mr. W. L. 
Harkness being no longer with this house. 
Copies of the new illustrated catalogue 
and price list will be mailed on appli- 
cation. 

Prices of Tanglefoot for 1895. — 
The O. & \V. Thum Co. are pleased to 
announce that, thatiks to the increased 
output for 1894, they are able to make a 
reduction in the price of twenty cents per 
case. The new prices will be : 

In lots of less than one case, 50 cents 
per box. 

In lots of one to five sases, $4.75 per 
case. 

In lots of five cases and over, .$4.50 
per case. 

Notwithstanding the reduction in price, 
the quality of tanglefoot is generally 
improved. Retailers should anticipate 
their season's wants and order the largest 
(juantity they can use, thus securing the 
best possible price. In any quantity, 
however, Tanglefoot is nearly all profit. 



T/ie lUdletin of F/uiriuacy comes U> 
hand much im()roved typographically and 
in general appearance. Under the editor- 
ship of I'rol. Oldberg, TJie BuUclin loses 
none of its aforetime excellence, and 
promises to be one of the "lights" of 
pharmacy. 

We are in receipt to-day of a copy of a 
special edition of Copp, Clark 1.S; Co.'s 
Canadian Almanac for 1S95, printed for 
the enterprising corporation of H. H. 
Warner & Co. (Ltd.), of London, England, 
who are now sole proprietors of " War- 
ner's Safe Cure." It is full of valuable 
information, and reflects credit on the 
publishers, as well as on the enterprise of 
the English company. 

CoN.\N Dovi.E ON America. — Conan 
Doyle's impressions of the literary phases 
of American life are to be contained in an 
article to appear in the next issue of The 
Ladies' Home Journal. The article was 
originally intended to be the novelist's 
impressions of American women, but this 
plan was altered, and the article to be 
printed in The Journal will give Dr. 
Doyle's ideas of " Literary Aspects of 
America." 

We are in receipt of the first number of 
The Photogram de Luxe, a beautiful 
edition, printed on heavy art paper, with 
a special supplement, and which is one of 
the choicest magazines published in con- 
nection with photography. 'I'he subscrip- 
tion price is 9s. per annum, post free. 
This work, or The Photogram, or Photogram 
Folio, may be had from all newsdealers. 
Publishers Messrs. Dawbarn & Ward 
(Ltd.), 6 Farringdon .\\e., London, E.C., 
London. 

Dr. Parkhlr.st to Women. — Dr. 
Parkhurst starts out as a writer for women 
in the February Ladies' Home Journal m 
a way which promises to be most inter- 
esting. His vigorous style is in his work 
and his direct way of putting truths leave 
no room for misinterpreting his ideas 
about women. For his first article he 
coins a new word, " Andromaniacs," by 
which he designates the type of woman 
who wants to be mannish, and apes the 
ways of men. That he is not in sympathy 
with them is evident, and his proniise of 
discussing the women who want to vote, 
who want to preach, and who desire to be 
in business, in his (ulure Journal articles, 
gives further evidence of his deep interest 
in humanity. 

Late Literary News. — Ceneral Lord 
Wolseley makes a most important contri- 
bution to the literature of the China- 
Japan war. In an article for the February 
Cosmopolitan he discusses the situation, 
and does not mince matters in saying 
what China must do in this emergency. 
Two other noted foreign authors contri- 
bute interesting articles to this number. 
Rosita Mauri, the famous Parisian dan- 
seuse, gives the history of the ballet, and 
Emile Ollivier tells the story of the fall of 
Louis Philippe. From every part of the 
world drawings and photographs have been 
obtained of the instruments used to tor- 



ture poor humanity, and appear as illustra 
lions for a clever article by Julian Haw- 
thorne, entitled "Salvation via the Rack.'' 
Mrs. Reginald de Koven, .Anatole France, 
W. Clark Russtll, Albion W. Tourgee, 
and William Dean Howellsare among the 
story-tellers for the February number of 
The Cosmopolitan. 

In the February number of Prank 
Leslie's Popular Monthly the momentous 
conditions and prospects confronting 
Nicholas J I., the young Czar of Russia, 
" On the Threshold of a Reign,'' are the 
subject of a peculiarly well-informed 
article by Valerien Cribaytrdoff. This is 
richly illustrated with pen drawings by the 
author, and a large number of rare por- 
traits. Closely associated with the great 
FLastern Question, also, as well as possess- 
ing a highly picturesque interest of its 
own, is M. de P.lowitzs account of "A 
Trip to Bosnia-Herzegovina." 'I'heo 
Tracy tells the fascinating ".Story of the 
Silkworm,'' charmingly illustrated with 
photographs specially taken for the pur- 
pose in the famous silk-raising districts of 
Friuli, in Northern Italy. 'I he breezy log 
of " A Yachting Cruise in Scotch Waters,'' 
with numerous sketches of the same, is 
contributed by Commodore John McRae, 
of the Brooklyn Yacht Club. 

The Delineator for March is the great 
spring number, and, in our opinion, is the 
finest issue of this popular inagnzine that 
has yet been published. All the depart- 
ments are unusually well filled, and the 
fashions have an increased value through 
lieing the first authoritative pronounce- 
ment of the spring modes. The chief 
feature of the literary matter is a most 
comprehensive chapter on "Cards: Their 
Uses and Etiquette," by Mrs. Roger A. 
Pryor, this being the first of a series en- 
titled "The Social Code." There is also 
a very interesting first article on " The 
Experiences of Life at a Training School 
for Nurses,'' with an introduction, by Mrs. 
F'rederic Rhinelander Jones. "Woman 
as a Musician " is the subject of a "Con- 
versation '■ between Edith M. Thomas 
and Dr. S. R. Elliott, to which is append- 
ed a delightful bit of verse by Miss 
Thomas. Mrs. Carrie M. Dearborn, ex- 
principal of the Boston Cooking School, 
writes of "The Teaching of Cookery as 
an Employment for Women," and 
Josephine Adams Rathbone of " A Girl's 
Life and Work at the L^niversity of ^lichi- 
gan." Mrs. Longstreet has an instructive 
paper on " The Care of the Hands and 
Feet.'" Mrs. Maude C. Murray contributes 
another chapter to her interesting serit^s 
on " The Relations of Mother and Son," 
and Mrs. Witherspoon continues her 
entertaining gossip in "Around the Tea 
Table." Pleasurable and profitable em- 
ployment is found in " Burnt Work," H. 
K. Forbes ; " Venetian Iron Work," J. 
Harrv .^dams ; and " Crepe and Tissue 
Papers," Tillie Roome Liitell. The 
housewife will find much of value in the 
care of silver, cookery for the month, 
and hints on serving lemons, and the 
fancy worker will appreciate the new de- 
signs in Knitting, Netting, Tatting, etc. 



_£ 

Iodide, Piolo, 0/ ? 35 

Bin., oz 25 

Oxide, Red, lb 1 15 

Pill (Blue Mass), lb 70 

Mii.K Sugar, powdered, lb ... . 30 

MORPHI.NK, Acetalt, oz 2 00 

Muriate, oz 2 00 

Sulphale, oz 2 00 

PEP.SIN, Saccharated, oz 35 

Phenacetine, oz 35 

Pilocarpine, Muriate, grain. .. . 20 

PiPERIN, oz I 00 

Phosphorus, lb ... 90 

PoTASSA, Caustic, white, lb 55 

Potassium, Acetate, lb 35 

Bicarbonate, lb 15 

Bichromate, lb 14 

Bitrat (Cream fart.), lb 22 

Bromide, lb 55 

Carbonate, Ih 12 

Chlorate, Eng. , lb iS 

Powdered, lb 20 

Citrate, lb 70 

Cyanide, lb 40 

Hypophosphites, oz 10 

Iodide, lb 4 00 

Nitrate, gran, II) S 

Permanganate, lb 40 

Prussiate, Red, lli 50 

Yellow, lb 32 

And .Sod. Tartrate, lb 25 

Sulphuret, lb 25 

Propi.ylamine, oz 35 

Quinine, Sulph, bulk 30 

Ozs. , oz 35 

QuiNiDiNE, Sulphate, ozs., oz... 16 

Sai.icin, lb 3 75 

Santonin, oz 20 

Silver, Nitrate, cryst, oz 90 

Fused, oz I 00 

Sodium, Acetate, lb 30 

Bicarbonate, kgs. , lb 2 75 

Bromide, lb (33 

Carbonate, lb 3 

llypophosphite, oz 10 

Hyposulphite, lb .... 3 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



* 40 

30 

1 20 

75 
35 

2 10 
2 10 

2 10 
40 
3S 
22 

I ID 
I 10 
60 
40 
17 
15 
25 
60 

>3 

20 
22 
75 
50 
12 

4 10 
10 
45 
55 
35 
io 
30 
46 
32 
3S 
20 

4 00 
22 

I 00 

I 10 
35 

3 00 
65 

6 
12 
6 



Iodide, 0/ ^ 40 

Salicylate, lb i 75 

Sulphate, lb 2 

Sulphite, lb S 

Somnal, oz S5 

Spirit Niire, lb . . 35 

Strontium, Nitrate, lb iS 

Strychnine, crystals, oz. . . . .,. i 00 

SuLi'ONAL, oz ' 34 

StiLPHUR, Flowers of, lb 2j 

Pure precipitated, lb 13 

Tari AR Emeiic, lb. . 50 

Thymol (Thymic acid), oz 55 

Veratrin'k, oz 2 00 

Zinc, Acetate, lb 70 

Carbonate lb 25 

Chloride, granular, oz 13 

Iodide, oz 60 

O.xide, lb 13 

Sulphate, lb 9 

Valerianate, oz 25 

ESSENTIAL OILS. 

Oil, .Almond, bitter, oz 75 

Sweet, lb 50 

Amber, crude, lb 40 

Rec't, lb 60 

Anise, lb 3 00 

Bay, oz 50 

Bergamot, lb '*"'.... 3 75 

Cade, lb 90 

Cajuput, lb ... I 60 

Capsicum, oz 60 

Caraway, lb 2 75 

Cassia, lb i 75 

Cedar 55 

Cinnamon, Ceylon, oz 2 75 

Citronelle, lb 80 

Clove, lb I 00 

Copaiba, lb i 75 

Croton, lb I 50 

Cubeb, lb 3 00 

Cumin, lb 5 5° 

F.rigeron, oz 20 

Eucalyptus, lb I 50 

Fennel, lb i 60 



, so 

5 

10 
00 

65 
20 

1 10 
35 

4 
20 

55 
60 

2 10 
75 
30 
'5 
<''5 
60 
II 
30 



So 
60 
45 
65 

3 25 
60 

4 00 

I 00 

I 70 

65 
3 00 
I So 

«5 

3 00 

85 



1 10 

2 00 
1 75 

3 25 
6 00 

25 
I 75 
I 75 



Geranium, oz fti 75 

Rose, lb 3 20 

Juniper berries (English), lb. . . 4 50 

Wood, lb 70 

Lavender, Chiris. Fleiir, lb.... 3 00 

(Jarden, lb i 50 

Lemon, lb 2 00 

Lemongiass, lb i 50 

Mustard, Essential, oz 60 

Neroli, oz 4 25 

Orange, lb 2 75 

Sweet, lb 2 75 

Origanum, lb 65 

Patchouli, oz . 80 

Pennyroyal, lb 2 50 

Peppermint, lb 4 25 

Pimento, lb 2 Oo 

Rhodium, oz 80 

Rose, oz 7 50 

Rosemary, lb 70 

Rue, oz 25 

Sandalwood, lb 5 50 

.Sassafras, lb . . . 75 

Savin, lb i 60 

Spearmint, lb 3 75 

.Spruce, lb 65 

Tansy, lb 4 25 

Thyme, white, lb i 80 

Wintergreen, lb 2 75 

Wormseed, lb 3 50 

Wormwood, lb 4 25 

ITXED OILS. 

Castor, lb 9 

Cod Liver, N.F., gal i 15 

Norwegian, gal ■ 50 

Cottonseed, gal i 10 

Lard, gal 90 

Linseed, boiled, gal 60 

Raw, gal 58 

Neaisfoot, gal I 00 

Olive, gal i 30 

.Salad, gal 2 25 

Pal.m, lb 12 

Sperm, gal i 75 

Turpentine, gal 60 



Si So 

3 50 
5 00 

75 

3 50 

1 75 

2 10 

1 60 
65 

4 50 

3 00 

3 00 
70 
«5 

2 75 

4 50 

2 75 
S5 

1 1 00 

75 

30 

7 50 

80 

1 75 
4 00 
70 
4 50 
I 90 

3 00 

3 75 

4 50 



I 25 
I 60 
I 20 
I 00 

63 
61 

1 10 

' 35 

2 40 

13 
I 80 

65 



..l;,;;™, ...;.[ 'Cable Extra' 'El Padre' 'Mango' and 'Madre e'Hijo' {«• "^'^ '^ ^""^ 

Sold Annually. | O J | MONTREAL, P.Q. 

"DERBY PLUG," 5 and 10 ets., "THE SMOKERS' IDEAL," -DERBY," "ATHLETE" CIGARETTES, 

ARE THE BEST. 



D. RITCHIE & CO, 



Montreal. 



Drug Reports. 

Canada. 

As is usual at this season of the year 
all heavy goods stiffen in price, and will 
be firm until summer freight rates come 
into force. Business keeps fairly active, 
and is, if anything, ahead of last year. 
The signs of the times indicate we are on 
the eve of better times. 

Norway cod liver oil has advanced in 
price in Europe almost double, and will 
likely lie much higher. It is worth to- 
day $2 per gallon, and, as the prices are 
based on the catch made from January to 
March, it will be no lower for a year. The 
catch of fish is small, and the livers of 
those caught contain little oil. 

Cocaine is 10 per cent, higher, and the 
outlook indicates a further advance. 

Gum tragacanths are all 25 per cent, 
higher. Gum acacias may sympathize 
with them. 



Salicylic acid and salicylate soda 
easier in price. 

Sulphonal is 25 per cent, higher ; very 
little in stock in this market at present. 
It is reported, in the future, sulfonal and 
p-henacetine can only be had in ounces. 

Bromides are all higher, principally 
ammon bromide, soda bromide, etc. 

Aloes, all kinds, are dearer on account 
of small production. 

Antito.xine, a new antipyretic, is worth 
$1.50 per ounce, in one ounce boxes. 

Laviolette's Syrup of Turpentine has 
been reduced to $1.60 per dozen, or $18 
per gross. 

England. 

Ixindon, Jan. ?6th, 1895. 
The drug and chemical markets have 
been very dull, and transactions for the 
most part have been of a jobbing charac- 
ter. A concerted attempt has been made 
to abolish the old London terms, which 
included a draft or trell of one or two 



pounds extra allowed by the seller to the 
buyer on each cwt. 

Sulphonal has advanced, owing to the 
amalgamation of the two principal manu- 
facturers. Salicine is also dearer, the 
reason being a short crop of the willow 
bark. Gum Kino is gradually reaching 
famine price, as no more appears coming 
forward. The e.xport season is respon- 
sible for the rise in value of copper sul- 
phate. 

Quinine and opium are quiet, and 
there are no alterations to note. Camphor 
is lower, and ergot easier. Jalap, senega, 
and ipecacuanha, steady, witii a firmer 
tendency. Cascarilla bark realized ex- 
treme prices at the auctions this week, 
but other drugs were, for the most part, 
unaltered in value. 



Antitetraizin is the name given in 
Italy to an alleged quinine derivative, 
and recommended by Zambeletti, of 
Milan, as an effective analgesic in rheu- 
matism and kindred ailments. The dose 
is 0.75 to 1.5 per day. 



ONTARIO 

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

4.4 GERRARD ST. E. 
TORONT' 



Canadian Druggist 

Devoted to the interests of the General Drug Trade and to the Aduancement of Pharmacy. 



Vol. VII. 



TORONTO, .\I.\KCH, 1895. 



No. 3 



Canadian Druggist 



WILLIAM J. DYAS, PUBLISHER. 



Subscription, $1 per year in advance. 

.■VdvcrtUing ratei on application. 

> The Canadian Druggist is issued on the 15th of each 
month, and all matter for insertion should reach us by the 
Sth of the month. 

New ad\'ertisements or changes to be addressed 

Canadian Druggist, 

20 Bay St. TORONTO, ONT. 

EUROPEAN AGENCY : 

BROCK A H.-\L1F..\X, .-Mdermary House, Walling St., 
LONDON, S.C, ENGLAND. 

CONTENTS. 

Uniform Legi^'ation. 

The Ph.trniacopoeia. 

To Coi respondents. 

Manual of Organic Materia Medica and Pharma- 
cognosy. 

Tr.M)F. Notes. 

British Columbia Notes. 

Pharmaceutical .Association of the Province of 
Quebec. 

British Columbia Pharm.ocy Legislation. 

Pharmacy in England. 

Rules f.ir the Guidance of Dispensing Clerks. 

The Future City Druggist. 

Crystallization of .Syrups, and the Remedy. 

Phosphorus Pills. 

Perfumed .Moth Camphor. 

An Autom.itic Proce.ss for .Aqua Chloroformi. 

Acetylene as an lUuminant. 

Red, Yellow, and Black. 

The Opium Trade of Asia Minor. 

.Sodium Carbonate. 

Test for .Acetajiilid in Phenacetine. 

An Act to further .Amend the B. C. Pharmacy 
Act. 

El>iroRi..\L.— Death of Mr. S. M. Burroughs. 
Justice to a .Manufacturing House. — The 
Ownership of the Prescription. 

The Bacteriological Examination of Water. 

Points on the making of Pills. 

Estimation of .Spirit of Nitroglycerin. 

Simple Te.sts for Common Drugs. 

The Stability of Sublimate Solutions. 

Wintergreen Oil. 

Bismuth O.xysalicylate. 

Peyotline, a new .Alkaloid. 

Formulary. 

A New Ointment B.ase. 

Purification of Ether. 

PHoroGR.\pnic Notes 

Safeguards .against Deterioration of Stock. 

Business Notices. 

Books and Mag.^zines. 

The American Pharmaceutical .Association. 

Reaction of Pure Ether. 

Drug Reports 



The highest niortality in European 
cities per 1,000 for .\ugust is St. Peters- 
burg, 62 ; and the lowest, Swansea, 10. 



Uniform Legislation. 

Is it not high time that steps were being 
taken by our governing pharmaceutical 
bodies to form an association whose 
power shall not be confined to the limits 
of a single province ? Here we have in 
Canada seven distinct pharmaceutical 
associations, each with powers conferred 
on them by the legislatures of their respec- 
tive provinces, still as distinct from each 
other as though they were not part and 
parcel of one country. Each legislates for 
itself, has its own poison schedule for 
guidance of pharmacists, its own regula- 
tions as to who inay or may not asstime 
to themselves the title of "chemist" or 
" druggist," and each one determines what 
qualification is necessary to earn such a 
title. .\nd all this in provinces where, we 
might say, an imaginary boundary line 
marks the only distinction between several 
of them. Such a thing should not be, 
and there is no reason for the present 
state of affairs, which is, we contend, 
detrimental to the interests of pharmacy 
in this Dominion. If we want to conserve 
any rights that we at present possess, or 
to obtain any legislation which recom- 
mends itself as desirable for the well-being 
of the profession, it must all be done by 
united action. There are too many influ- 
ences at work in some of our local legis- 
latures to make it desirable that matters 
so important to the pharmacist, and of 
such vital interest to the public, should 
be confined to these local limits, and it 
is through combined action on the part 
of pharmacists of the Dominion, legislating 
in the House of Commons, that interests 
such as we represent can be legislated upon 
for the benefit of the whole of Canada. 

This is a matter that cannot be acted 
on too quickly. The course of events 
shows most unmistakably that unless we, 
as pharmacists of the Dominion, act 
promptly, and secure Dominion legisla- 
tion, forming an association, to which 
powers may be granted to regulate phar- 
macy throughout all Canada, what rights 



we even now may have are in danger of 
being tampered with, and, once lost, when 
may we hope to regain them ? We would 
urge promptness in taking steps towards 
the formation of a Dominion Pharma- 
ceutical Association, and in combining 
the interest of pharmacists in all the pro- 
vinces for the general good. 



The Pliarmaeopoeia. 

Suggestions as to alterations and addi- 
tions to be made to the proposed Imperial 
Pharmacopoeia are being made through 
the English medical and pharmaceutical 
press; and although the interest taken 
seems to be rather of a lukewarm charac- 
ter, yet it appears to be taken for granted 
that the work will partake somewhat of 
the '• Imperial " character suggested. 

The various pharmaceutical bodies of 
this country, not having been officially 
asked to formulate any suggestions, nor, 
in fact, to take any part, have very wisely 
concluded not to interfere in any way, 
having no desire evidently to push them- 
selves in where not asked, no doubt feel- 
ing the discourtesy shown them by the 
committee in England who have the mat- 
ter in charge. Under any circumstances, 
we believe the better way would be to 
accept wiiatever may be the outcome of 
the deliberations of the committee, and 
recognize as the official pharmacopoeia 
of the DoiTiinion the volume so prepared ; 
then, if deemed advisable in the interests 
of Canadian pharmacy, publish an adden- 
dum, comprising such things as are con- 
sidered desirable to incorporate in a work 
which will be the official te.xt-book for our 
schools and our guidance in the labora- 
tory. 

A FELLOWSHIP, to be known as the 
" Stearns Fellowship of Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry and Pharmacology," has been 
established at the University of Ann 
.Arbor, Michigan, through the liberality 
of Frederick Stearns & Co., of Detroit. 
During the coming year the work of the 



50 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



fortunate candidate will be under the 
immediate supervision of the dean of the 
department, Dr. A. B. Prescott. Only a 
short time ago the Stearns art collection, 
comprising hundreds of beautiful water- 
color reproductions of Japanese fishes, 
executed at great expense by a famous 
Japanese artist, was given to the univer- 
sity to be placed in the general museum. 

To Coppespondents. 

We have received several anonymous 
comunications asking for formula, etc. 
To these and all correspondents we would 
repeat : The name must in all cases accom- 
pany the communication, although it will 
not be published if so desired. 

Manual of Opganie Materia Medica and 
Phapmaeognosy. 

An introduction to the study of the vege- 
table kingdom and the vegetable and ani 
mal drugs ; comprising the botanical and 
physical characteristics, source, constitu- 
ents, and pharmacopoeial preparations, 
with chapters on synthetic organic reme- 
dies, insects injurious to drugs, and phar- 
macal botany. By Lucius E. Sayre, 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy, Pro- 
fessor of Materia Medica and Pharmacy 
in the University of Kansas. 555 pages. 
543 illustrations. Cloth, $4.50. Phila- 
delphia : P. Blakiston & Co. 

The absence of a good text book in the 
English language treating of the subjects 
Materia Medica and Pharmacognosy to- 
gether has been increasingly felt each 
year during the past decade, and of late 
many teachers of these branches have 
viewed the idea of combining the subjects 
in a single text-book as being impracti- 
cable, yet Prof. Sayre has in the work 
before us solved the secret of combina- 
tion in a very ingenious and satisfactory 
manner, and pharmaceutical educators 
have reason to congratulate him upon the 
successful conclusion of his efforts, in 
having furnished a new and prominent 
American text-book, and one which will 
be consulted for reference by both the 
pharmaceutical and medical professions. 
The present edition, like all first edi- 
tions, presents many glaring defects, 
which will undoubtedly be dealt with in 
subsequent editions, yet the scope, 
arrangement, and the judicious selection 
of subject-matter is indeed above com- 
ment. The author has divided the work 
into two parts, and included therewith 
three appendices. 

Part I. treats on Pharmaceutical 
Botany, and Part II. on Materia and 
Pharmacognosy. 

We cannot refrain from making the 
statement that in the 82 pages devoted to 
Part I. the author has scarcely grasped 
the needs of the pharmaceutical student 
in this direction, nor has he adjusted his 
instruction to the accomplishment of the 
object desired. Though the application 
of botanical knowledge to the practice of 
pharmacy is limited, it does not follow 



that writers are justified in permitting 
their teachings to be superficial and 
indefinite. The curtailment of botanical 
instruction to the pharmaceutical student 
should be only as to the amount of the 
field covered, but the needed portions 
should be taught and illustrated fully, 
clearly, and with a simplicity of style all 
the more marked because the student is 
deprived of the more enlightening effect 
of those portions which are here neces- 
sarily omitted. 

The portion of the book referred to is 
a mere series of definitions, many of them 
greatly abbreviated and vague; hence 
Part I. is mainly synoptical, and can 
therefore only serve as a guide to the 
teacher or student previously instructed 
in structural botany. A little more care 
should have been observed in the arrange- 
ment and naming of the illustrations ; 
thus. Fig. 20 (see Page 28) is not the 
Pitcher of Nepenthes distillaoria, as 
stated ; it is Sarracenia purpurea. 

In Part II. we meet the ingenious and 
practicable treatment of Materia Medica 
and Pharmacognosy. 

The drugs are arranged, first, according 
to their most prominent physical charac- 
ters, but we doubt if the method adopted 
will prove as efficient as that used in 
Maisch's work, owing to indefinite 
characterization by reference to taste only 
in the headings. 

The second method of arrangement of 
this portion of the work is according to 
botanical relationship, the only satisfactory 
method of teaching the subject scientific- 
ally and practicably to the pharmaceutical 
or medical student. Here the drugs are 
taken up separately, after a brief descrip- 
tion of the characteristics of the natural 
order, and a synopsis of the drugs belong- 
ing to the particular order. In treating 
of the drugs separately the official name 
(according to the U.S.P.) is presented 
with synonyms in English and German, 
then follow, in order, the definition 
botanical characteristics, source, related 
and similar articles, description of drug, 
important constituents, action and uses, 
and a summary of official preparations, 
with strength and doses. There is gener- 
ally included a cut of the plant and of the 
drug, gross and structural, thereby aiding 
the student greatly in familiarizing him- 
self with the pharmacogostical character- 
istics. The animal drugs are similarly 
treated under their several zoological 
orders. 

The careful student should note the 
following misleading statements, errors, 
and omissions which have met the writer's 
eye in a hasty examination of this part of 
the book : 

Page 138 — Omission, Habit of Podo- 
phyllum, United States. 

Page 149 — The statement is made that 
sinalbin is, by the action of the ferment 
myrosin and water, converted into volatile 
oil, glucose, etc., which can scarcely be 
considered correct, as the volatile oil of 
mustard cannot be prepared from the con- 
stituents of white mustard. 



By the above mentioned reaction the 
ghicoside sinalbin, Q.^f^Wi^J^.^'&.^O^^, 
of white mustard, yields acrinyl sulpho- 
cyanate, C7H7CNSO (which is not the 
volatile oil of mustard) ; also sinapin 
bisulphate, CieHjsCNOjHjSOi, and 
glucose, CgHjjOg. Volatile oil of mus- 
tard is obtainable only from Sinapis nigra, 
which contains sinigrin (a potassium glu- 
cosidal salt, KCjoHieNSoOio), and 
which, under the influence of the ferment 
myrosin and water, becomes allyl sulpho- 
cyanide ox volatile oil of mustard, C3H5 
CNS, glucose, CeHjoOfi, and potassium 
acid sulphate, KHSO^. 

Page 182 —Strength of spir. aurantii 
compositus should be 5 p.c. ; under oil of 
Bergamot, 8th line, read potassium hy- 
drate for potassium. 

Page 1 94 — Read anacardiese for anacar- 
diaces. 

Page 210 — Last line read 20 p.c. for 30 
p.c. 

Page 214 — Dose of copaiba should be 
i^ to I drachm, not 5 to logrs. 

Page 221 — Strength of aq. amygdalae 
aniaree should be y^jj p.c, not i p.c. 

Page 231 — Read hamamelaceae for ham- 
amelidese. 

Page 250 — Strength and doses of pre- 
parations of oil of anise omitted. 

Page 254 — The statement that oil cori- 
ander " is one of the most stable of the 
volatile oils," etc., is incorrect ; it develops 
a terebinthinate odor. 

Page 266 — Dose of ipecac omitted ; 
expectorant, 3 to 8 grs. ; emetic, i 5 to 60 
grs. 

Page 267 — Read 2.5 p.c. quinine for 
25 p.c, 5th line. 

Page 297 — 01. gaultherias, composition, 
dose, and preparations omitted. 

Page 316— Read bydrophyllaceae for 
hydrophyllese. 

Page 339 — Doses of all drugs on this 
page omitted. 

Page 347 — Read polygonaceae for poly- 
goneae. 

Page 349— Dose of rheum omitted. 
Tonic i/^-i gr., cathartic 20 to 30 grs. 
Page 359 — Acetum opii oinitted. 
Page 363 — Oleum cinnamomi, prepar- 
ations : Acid, sulph. aromat. omitted. 
Page 385 — Extract juglandis omitted. 
Page 395 — Preparations of ol. juniperi 
omitted. 

Page 441 — Read acid for alkaline. 
In " Appendix A," the author gives an 
important contribution on " Insects in- 
jurious to drugs," while " B " treats on 
organic remedies formed by synthesis. 
The latter is decidedly out of place, and 
might have been omitted entirely without 
detracting in the least from the merits of 
the book. 

" Appendix C," " Pharmacal Botany," 
is treated of in too superficial a manner to 
be found of much value. An exhaustive 
index concludes the work. 

C. F. H. 



Carefulness, experience, and $1,000 
will beat carelessness, inexperience, and 
$10,000 any day. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(50A) 



Qj\n uv\njTJTJTJTj njn u uTJTJTJxruTJT/ run f 




ELMENDORFS 



me iiuin 

A Sure Cur© for La Grippe. 



f\ ^^(5alt^7ful (^e\u\o<i Cum, 

f'uring Coughs, Colds and r>ore Tliroat, 
Iiitlammation of the Luni,'B. Con- 
sumption. Catarrh, Rose Cold 

or Hay Fever. Asthma. Dys- 
pepsia, Nervous Affection and 
all Germ Diseases, Cankered Mouth 
and Cleansing to the Blood. 



P-RICE 5 CE/NTS 

Sample b^' .^lail Two 3c. Staiups. 

por SaD by Drui}<}ist8. 

THE CANADIAN SPECIALTY CO,, 9 

5 38 Front St.. East. TORONTO, Ont 5 

L Dominion Agents. p 

injTjTjrnjinj iTLTinj^njTJTj nnuTJTrB 

THE CANADIAN SPECIALTY CO. - 



Also in Stock . . 

THE ROYAL REMEDY 
& EXTRACT CO.'S 

Celery and Pepsin Chew- 
ing Gums 
Sweet Wheat 
After Dinner 
Banana 

Mountain Teab'y Tolu 
Pine-apple 
Blood Orange 
Merry Bells 
Royal Tablet Tolu 
Royal Pencil Tolu 
Kissimee 
Tolu Sugar Plums 

6 Plums in sliding Box, 
retailing at 5 cents. 

Japanese Handkerchief Boxes 
Japanese Glove Boxes 

Containing each, 
100 SWEET WHEA T 

and 
100 AFTER DIN NEK 

HANDSOME, finely 

polished Oak Frame 

Show Cases. 

3 sides glass, 3 glass shelves, 24 
in. high, 8 in. wide, 7 in. deep. 

LEE'S Poison Bottles 
CHAPIREAU'S Cache- 
teuses and Cachets 

Send for Price List. 

38 Front Street East, 
TORONTO. 




s 



Fluid Extracts . 
Elixirs .... 
Medicinal Syrups 
Liquors , . . . 
Tinctures . . , 
Green Soap . . 
Chlorodyne. . . 



Standard in strength and quality Reasonable in 
price. Satisfactory in use. 



Apply for Price List and Special Discounts to 

T. MILBURN & CO. 

Toronto, - - Ontario 



Seasonable 



and 



Interesting 



Cod Liver Oil 
Insect Powder 
Paris Green 
Moth Camphor 
Gum Camphor 
Quinine 
Phenacetine 
Sulphonal 
Spirits Turpentine 
Linseed Oil 



Look at your list and 
enquire of 

ELLIOT & CO, 

TORONTO. 



(50B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



rii: 



j^^^ife) ?'C'S4^-*£^ li ^S-i?^®^^^ ^ 



ths Handkerchis^^ 




i if 



■ - - - -* 

JOMN Taylors Coy. 

N^ TORONTO.^- 




J. STEVENS & SON 



78 LONG LANE, - LONDON, E.G., 

ENGLAND 



Do You Sell 

Anything used in the Sick-room, 
the Hospital, the Dispensary, by 
Medical Practitioner, or Patient 
in anyway connected with Surgery 
or the Practice of Medicine? 

WRITE FOR OUR LIST 

li't WelUiiiftoit Street West, 

TOItONTO 

ESTABLTSHBD 1850 . 

Our stocl;s of Seeds are now complete for the Spring 
Trade, and we shall be pleased to nuote pricee to dealers, 
and fnrnish samples when recjuired. 

CLOVER SEEDS. 

Medium Red, Mammoth Red, Alsike, Lucerne, 
White, Scarlet, aiid YelloA'. 

GRASS SEEDS, 

Timulhy, Orchard, Blue, Red Top, Lawn, 
Hungarian, and Millet. 

SEED CORN. 

Red and White Cob, Compton's and Longfel- 
low, and all the leading varieties far fodder and 
ensilage. 

ONION SETTS, 

Dutch, Potato, and Shallots. 
Full assortments of agriciiltural and garden seeds for the 
trade. Write for catalogue. 

John A. Bruce 8z Co. 

Wholesale Seed Merchants, 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



The 

Best 

Brushes 



Hair, Tooth, Nail, 
Shaving, Bath, 
Cloth, Infants' 



MANUFACTURED BV 



A. 




t&Co. 



PARIS 



Agents for Canada— 

J. PALMER & SON, 

'"' s.°i" °'°* MONTREAL 



Full Stocks of New Crop 

Field and Garden Seeds. 



SPECIAL ATTENTION TO 

Red and Alsike Clovers, 
Timothy Seed, Etc. 



ENSILAGE CORN IN CAR LOTS. 



Catalogues on Application. 
Correspondence Invited. 

All enquiries Ijy wire or mail will receive prompt attenti 



The Steele, Brings, Marcon Seed Co. 

(LIMITED ) 

TORONTO, ONT. 

^^I'arriea having any nt Uip above Seeds, or 
Clioi4!u Seed Graiue* to olt'ea-. please Heud 
Htiinpleu. 



The.. 



Lyman Bros. & Co. 



(LIMITED) 



TORONTO, 



ONT. 



ANTITOXIN (Serum) 

ANTITOXIN (Neuralgia) 

ANTIKAMNIA, QUININE 

and SALOL TABLE IS. 



As-Ker-Shaw Ointment 
As-Ker-Shaw Balsam 
As-Ker-Shaw Blood Remedy 
Bazin's Depilatory 
Fehr's Compound Talcum Powder 
Humphrey's No. 77 
Karl's Clover Root Tea 
Kern's Rheumatic Cure 
Lyon's Tooth Paste 

Lyon's Tooth Powder 

Mellin's Food 

WE HAVE IN STOCK 

SAUNDER'S 6d. FACE POWDtR 

WHITE. 



ARNOLD'S No. 6 

Water Oil Atomizer 

AT $12 50 PER DOZEN 

Is one nf the best values in the market. E\'ERV 
ONE UUAK.ANTEED. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Trade Notes. 

\'. V. Maddoc'k is opening a new drug 
store in (luelph, Ont. 

There is said to be a Rood opening for 
a doctor at Hilton, Man. 

Dr. Arthur will shortly o|)en a new 
drug store at Rossland, B.C 

\V. r. Junkin, druguist, Fenelon I'ails, 
Ont, has made an assignment. 

I.. Bentley has purchased the drug 
stock of the estate of F. Butler, IDionto, 
Ont. 

Charles E. Hooper, the oldest druggist 
in Toionto, Ont., died last month, aged 
63 years. 

S. A. Drake, of the Kasl 1 Drug Co., is 
about opening a branch stoie at Three 
Forks, B.C. 

The drug store of C. W. McLaren, 
Morden, Man., was destroyed by fire last 
month. 

The drug stock of the insolvent estate 
of James & Co., St. Thomas, Ont., was 
sold on the 4th inst. 

Cochrane & .\Iunn, druggists, Victoria, 
B.C., are dissolving partnership. John 
Cochrane will continue alon-j. 

The Hearle Manufacturing Company, 
toiltt soap makers, Montreal, Que., have 
assigned, with liabilities of $35,000. 

A. S. Hopkins, Yonge street, Toronto 
(H. A. Knowles' old stand), has assigned. 
We understand the business is in the 
market. 

F. H. Vai'p, Hamilton, Ont., has sold 
his James street north store to Mr. 
.Arthur Ross, who has been assistant with 
J. \V. Spackman for some time. 

P. I). Whyte, formerly with \\\ E. 
Saunders & Co, of London, Ont., was 
amongst the successful candidates at the 
recent pharmacy examinations at Chicago. 

Private advices from Prince Edward 
Island report business very dull — in fact, 
more so than for many years past, owing 
principally to the very heavy fall of snow, 
which completely blocked traffic. 

The Sydenham Glass Company (Ltd.), 
with factory at Wallaceburg, Ont., will be- 
gin o[)erations in the course of a week or 
ten days. They intend manufacturing a 
full line of green prescription ware, fruit 
jars, etc. 

Mr. T. J. Mclntyre, of The Lyman 
Bros. & Co. (Ltd.), Toronto, has been 
laid up for the past two weeks with an 
abscess in his head. We are glad to say 
latest reports are that he is now slowly 
recovering. 

Robt. T. Kyle, a graduate and gold 
medalist of the OC. P., has ju'^t passed 
the examination held by the Minnesota 
Board of Pharmacy, at Minneapolis, 
where he obtained the highest number of 
marks secured by any candidate, and cap- 
tured as high a standing as was ever taken 
before the board in that state. 

Mr. John Henderson, general manager 
of The Lyman Bros. & Co. (Ltd.), To- 



ronto, met with a nasty accident on .Mon- 
day evening, February 25th. In stepping 
(rom a street car he burst a blood vessel 
in the calf of his leg. He has been con- 
fined to the house for a week, hut hopes 
to be about in a few days. 

Robert R. Martin, at one time in the 
retail drug business in Toronto, Ont., and 
subsequently manager of the New York 
house of Sharpe & Dohme, and who was 
appointed a little over a year ago to man- 
age the London (Eng.) house of Oppen- 
heimer & Co., manufacturing chemists, 
has been obliged, on account of his health, 
to seek a warmer climate. He will, in 
future, represent his firm in South .Africa, 
making his headquarters at Cape Town. 

Dr. Frank Langiliere. of the National 
Pharmacy, .Montreal, Que., has just re- 
turned from a trip to Baltimore. He 
came back?'/a Boston, and left with Jaines 
W. Tufts an order for soda fountains, one 
for cold soda and one for hot. The for- 
mer is a magnifit ent apparatus, composed 
of white and gold tiles, which were made 
especially for Mr. Tults in Bavaria, and 
is the only one of its kind on this side of 
the ocean. The latter is also in white and 
gold, and the tile in this, too, was made in 
Cerminy on Mr. Tufts' special order, and 
is an exclusive design. 



place of .Mr. 'I'eporten, and .Mr. .Martin, 
late of Winnipeg, v^ill take the position in 
the laboratory vacated by .Mr. \Vhite. 



British Columbia Notes. 

Sufficient interest is probably taken in 
the doings of druggists in this province to 
warrant the printing of the amendments 
to the Pharmacy Act, which passed the 
Local House, Feb.-uary i ith. There can 
be no doubt now that the B.C.P.A. mean 
business, and that they intend to elevate 
pharmacy. It was claimed, and with 
truth, that the old Act was practically 
unworkable, and hence all energy was 
strained to remedy the defect. Much 
credit is due the M. PP. (H. D. Helmcken, 
Q.C.) who kindly took charge of the bill, 
and also to the committee, Messrs. Hen- 
derson, Cochrane, and Schotbolt, who 
laid the question very clearly Lefore each 
individual member. 

The School of Mines referred to will 
be opened up early in June of the present 
year. 

The council of the B.C. P. .A., will meet, 
as far as is known at present, on Thurs- 
day, March 14th. This will be a very 
important meeting, as the by-laws of the 
association will need some alteration in 
order to reconcile them with the Act as 
now amended. 

It is reported that the firm of Cochrane 
iS: Munn, of Victoria, will likely dissolve, 
the business being cotiducted in future by 
Mr. John Cochrane, an O.C.P. graduate. 

Langley & Co., of Victoria, have de- 
cided to extend their wholesale business 
to the mainland, and have entrusted their 
.Mr. J. A. Teporten with the management 
of the branch to be established on Carrall 
street, Vancouver. Mr. White has been 
promoted to drummer for the firm in 



Pharmaceutical Association of the 
Province of Quebec. 

Notice to Students. 

The semi-annual examinations for 
major and minor candidates will com- 
mence on Tuesday, April 16th, 1895, at 
9 a.m., and will be held in the College 
of Pharmacy, 595 Lagauchetiere Street, 
Montreal. Candidates must file their 
applications, duly certified, with the 
Registrar, on or before .April 6th. Print- 
ed regulations and form of application 
must be obtained from the Registrar, and 
must be duly signed by the applicant. 

Candidates who have failed more than 
once in their examinations will be required 
to pay the full examination fee. 

No applications for examination will be 
received after April 6th. 

E. MuiK, 
Secretary-Registrar. 
595 Lagauchetiere Street, 

Montreal, March 5th, 1895. 



At a meeting of the council of the Phar- 
maceutical .Association of the Province of 
Quebec, held on March 5, the following 
resolution was unanimously passed, namely: 

"That this council having heard with 
deep regret of the death of Mrs. Paul 
Mathie, Quebec, wife of our esteemed and 
honored ex-vice-president, ex-examiner 
and member of the council, desire to place 
on record our sympathy and condolence, 
in this the great bereavement of our con- 
frere, and that the secretary be requested 
to send a copy of this resolution 10 Mr. 
Mathie and the press." 



British Columbia Pharmacy Legislation. 

In another portion of this month's 
issue we give the amendments to the 
British Columbia Pharmacy .Act as they 
passed their final readingintheLegislature. 
Some of these clauses are very important, 
and have a distinctive bearing on the 
needs of the pharmacists in that province. 
One of the clauses provides that any per- 
sons approved of by the examiners, who 
have obtained diplomas from the Pharma- 
ceutical Society of Great Britain, or certi- 
ficates from any pharmaceutical society in 
Canada, whose standards and require- 
ments are equal to those of the British 
Columbia Association, may be registered 
in British Columbia without further 
examination. 

Further regulation has also I een made 
as to the sale of poisons, and the right is 
granted to medical men to associate 
themselves in business with druggists. 



If you neglect your business, you will 
soon have no business to neglect. 

When you get a good thing hang to it 
like a nigger preacher to a striped water- 
melon. 



52 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Pharmacy in England. 



A Hitch in the Matter of the "Imperial" Phar- 
macopceia— The Epidemic of Influenza— Pro- 
prietary Remedies and their Names Expos- 
ure of a Nostrum— Trouble in the Research 
Laboratory of the Pharmaceutical Society- 
Death of S. M. Burroughs. 



(From Our Own Correspondent.) 

Already there are indications of a re- 
volt amongst pharmacists against the 
methods adopted by the General Medical 
Council to secure a revision of the phar- 
macopoeia. The appointment of Pro- 
fessor Attfield as editor is postponed, and 
every one anticipates that the upshot will 
be the association of one or two thera- 
peutists with Professor Attfield. At the 
Edinburgh meeting of the Pharmaceutical 
Society, the qualification of Professor Att- 
field to judge botanical questions was 
openly challenged, and it was plainly 
stated that pharmacists do all the work, 
whilst others reap the reward. So far, the 
only attempt to make a start has been 
the usual complimentary letter from Sir 
Richard Quain to the President of the 
Pharmaceutical Society, inviting the as- 
sistance of the Council and members, 
and pharmacists generally, in the produc- 
tion of anew pharmacopoeia. The coun- 
cil evidently did not regard the matter 
very seriously, as they merely nominated 
the same committee again as assisted in 
the production of the Addendum, 1890. 
It is true they actually invited one new 
pharmacist, Mr. P. W. Squire, to join 
them, but, of course, Mr. Squire would not 
consent. I have repeatedly pointed out 
in these columns that if the work of 
revision is to be undertaken in earnest, a 
far larger committee than the half-dozen 
men above mentioned will be absolutely 
necessary. As it is, most of the members 
of this committee do little or no actual 
work, but relegate it to their assistants or 
the managers of their laboratories. In 
the production of the miserably deficient 
addendum, this committee took nearly 
eighteen months, and groaned over the 
work. There is some tendency in medi- 
cal ranks at a concerted attempt to 
introduce concise therapeutic notes about 
each drug, or its preparation, although 
Dr. Lauder Brunton's scheme to make it 
a prescriber's companion has been gener- 
ally derided. Incompatible and solubili- 
ties inight well be stated, but hints upon 
the proper combinations for a prescription 
are surely out of place. 

Influenza, or la grippe, has begun to 
pay us its annual visit, somewhat delayed, 
but undoubtedly rendered more severe 
by the prolonged frost. Already the 
death rate has doubled, jumping in three 
weeks from seventeen to thirty-five per 
thousand. There has been a steady rush 
for ammoiiiated tincture of quinine and 
other recognized remedies, hut eucalyptus 
oil appears to have lost its value in the 
eyes of the majority of the publie. As a 
general disinfectant and prophylactic, it 
was unquestionably overrated during the 
1890 scare, but in the first stages of the 
epidemic, when the coryza is severe and 
the fauces swollen and painful, inhala- 



tions of eucalyptus oil v.'ith steam are 
very useful, and afford rapid relief. Doc- 
tors and chemists have been very busy 
ever since the frost broke up, and the de- 
velopment of coughs and colds by the 
public has been wonderful. Soon we 
shall have the convalescent period with 
its cod liver oil emulsion, syrup of the 
hypophosphites, and other recognized 
remedies. 

Why do manufacturers of proprietary 
preparations so often saddle their special- 
ties with uncouth and unpronounceable 
names? It was bad business for the pro- 
prietors -to cling to the title, "Gerandel's 
Pastilles," as it is not a pastille at all, but 
a compiessed pellet or tablet. The way 
the public, in obedience to the e.^tensive 
advertising, have tried to grasp M. Geran- 
del's name is most amusing. Now a new 
soap has been launched, with the highly 
euphonious title of "Myrospermum." One 
can easily imagine Mary Jane coming into 
the shop for acake of Myra's-journal soap! 
If proprietors would only grasp the ele- 
mentary fact, which would be forced on 
their notice a dozen times a day if they 
were behind the retail counter, that they 
often suffer from the absolute inability of 
the public to grasp and remember their 
extraordinary titles, they would be more 
careful in future. Be distinctive, by all 
means, but do not let the word be long, 
or capable of about two dozen different 
methods of pronunciation. 

Writing about proprietary preparations 
reminds me very forcibly that they have 
their Nemesis. Occasionally it is a trade 
journal that offers a formula which is 
stated to produce exactly the same article as 
that on which a proprietor may have spent 
much money and time before completion. 
Against that form of Nemesis, I have not 
much to say except that it is hardly an 
honorable proceeding. But we have in 
London a journal, called Science Si/tings, 
that has thrown down its gauntlet against 
quackery. It assisted in the expose 
which took place a couple of years ago of 
Harness and his confreres, who were 
selling so-called electric belts ingeniously 
contrived so that even the smallest quan- 
tity of electricity could not pass to the 
wearer. This journal has turned its atten- 
tion to proprietary preparations, and this 
week announcesan exposure of "Koko" lor 
the hair. This is a comparatively young 
proprietary, but has been extensively 
boomed, and, during a discussion at the 
Chemical Society on the subject of analy- 
tical reports, it came in for some criti- 
cism. On that occasion the report of a 
well-known analyst was quoted, and from 
the carefully-guarded language in which 
the report was framed it was stated that 
the preparation might consist of distilled 
water. Now we understand the reason 
for this, as Science Siftings finds the 
composition to be, glycerine 60.6 grains, 
borax 15.35 grains, in each six ounces. 
A small quantity of rose water is present 
to give a little odor, but the bulk of the 
preparation is water. There was an im- 
pression abroad that it contained pilocar- 
pine, but, as Science Siftings points out. 



this alkaloid is exceedingly dear just now, 
so perhaps this accounts for its absence. 
There was the usual highfalutin reference 
to a tribe of Indians, the Coco-Maricopas, 
who had discovered this extraordinary 
remedy, and who were never known to go 
hald, etc. It will be interesting to learn 
the sequel. Harness attempted to put 
the law in motion on the question of libel, 
but was unsuccessful. We might almost 
safely presume that Koko is doomed, and 
those who have large advertisement con- 
tracts running had better gather in the 
shekels. 

What looks like a concerted attack by 
the trade journals here upon the Research 
Laboratory of the Pharmaceutical So- 
ciety has taken place this week. Both 
journals attack the director, Professor 
Dunstan, rather viciously, and directly 
charge him with committing the unpar- 
donable sin of suppressio veri. There is 
also an artful alliteration concerning 
priority prigging. But Professor Dunstan 
is perfectly capable of taking care of him- 
self, and if he condescends to notice the 
attacks, and it is to be hoped he will, as 
they call for answers, will probably hit out 
straight. His reply to a criticism of Mr. 
P. W. Squire on the melting point of 
aconitine was a masterpiece, and his sweet 
suggestion that, as Mr. Squire had no 
acquaintance with elementary research 
work, his blunders were therefore pardon- 
able, was specially delightful to those who 
know the pompous manner of Mr. 
Squire. Someway or other, however, 
there appears a hitch in the work of the 
laboratory, as since March of last year we 
have had no communication on the aco- 
nite investigation. 

The death of S. M. Burroughs, of the 
enterprising firm of Burroughs, Well- 
come & Co., is a severe loss for pharmacy 
in this country. His eneigetic support 
and aid was ever ready for all schemes 
intended to benefit druggists and their 
assistants. His philanthropy was also well 
known, and it it is only a short lime ago 
that he gave $5,000 to found a cottage 
hospital in the litde town of Darlford, 
where the firm's works are established. 
The progress of the firm is a remarkable 
illustration af the value of persistent and 
large advertising. So much success have 
they achieved that nine medical men out 
of ten use the registered trade mark of 
the firm, " tabloid," in preference to the 
English word, tablet, when they want to 
describe compressed goods. The firm 
setm to have been perpetually hankering 
after something new, and it is well known 
that they will go to any expense and 
trouble in perfecting the ideas of medical 
men. But as to their exact value to 
pharmacists as a class, there is no mistak- 
ing the fact that they have done more 
mischief than a dozen ordinary proprie- 
tary manufacturers. They calmly suggest 
to doctors that they should prescribe their 
compressed tabloids, and the chemist will 
only have to soak off the ordinary label 
and fix on one with the proper dose and 
the thing is done. This is reducing the 
art of dispensing to its lowest depths. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(52A) 



We think we can 



Save you Money 



when you want any of the following staples : 



NORWAY COD LIVER OIL. 

CARBOLIC ACID OPT. 

GUM ACACIA. 

CAMPHOR. 

EPSOM SALTS. 

SAL SODA. 

FLOUR SULPHUR. 



Please get our quotations before ordering. 



ARCHDALE WILSON & CO. 

Wholesale Chemists and Druggists, 

HAMILTON, ... - ONTARIO. 



FREDERICK STEARNS & CO.'S 



PREPARATIONS OF 



Preparations of the Fresh (Undried) Nut. 

Kolavin ^ delicious wine, each tablespoonful rep- 
resenting 30 grains of the fresh (undried) 

Kola nuts- In full pints, $8.00 per dozen. 
J^qJ^];^qj^ Elegant confections or bonbons, each rep- 
resenting 10 grains of fresh (undried) Kola. 

$4.00 per dozen boxes. 

Fluid Kola ■'^ concentrated liquid extract, each 

- minim representing one grain of fresh 

(undried) Kola. Per pint, $3.50. 



Preparations of the Dried Nut. 

Steam's Kola Cordial (orSn%i.) 

A delicious cordial, each teaspoonful representing 
15 grains of dried Kola. In 12 oz. bottles at $8.00 
per dozen. 

Compressed Tablets of Kola 

Compressed Tablets of dried Kola, 10 grains each. 
Per too, 25 cents. 

Fluid Extra ct of Kola 

Each minim representing one grain ol dried Kola, 
Per pint, $3.50, 



KOLA 




Our Claims on Kola. 



1, We introduced Kola commercially in .\merica in 
iSSi (see New Idea, April, 1881). 

2, We introduced the first palatable preparation of Kola 
in the form of Stearns' Kola Cordial in 1893. 

3, We originated the first and only preparation of fresh 
(undried) Kola in 1894, when Kolavin was introduced, 

4, We to day are the only importers of fresh (undried) 
Kola from Africa, 

5, We have done more scientific work on Kola than any 
other American house, (See our 80-page monograph 
issued l.ast year, 1S94, ) 

6, We have done more by liberal advertising in the 
pharmaceutical and medical press to call Kola to the 
attention of these professions than all other houses com- 
bined, 

THF.IvEFORE we consider ourselves headquarters for 
Kola and its preparations, and believe the professions will 
endorse our position. 



Frederick Stearns 8c Co., Manufacturing Pharmacists, 

s of Kola in America) 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN. 



Windsor, Ont, 



London, Eng. 



(The introducers of Kola in America) 

New York. 



(52B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Butter milli: 

-Toilet Soap. 




Over 2,000,000 
Cakes Sold in 1892 



The Best Selling 

Toilet Soap in 

the World. 



; Excels any 25- 

"" cent Soap on the 

Market. Nets the 

^* Retailer a good 

profit. 



When sold at a very popular price it will 
not remain on your counters. Try a sample 
lot. 



The quality of this soap is GUARANTEED, See that 
the name "BUTTERMILK" is printed as above .n 
green bronze," .ind the name "Cosmo Buttermilk boap 
Company, Chicago," in diamond on end of package. Be- 
ware of imitations. 



NOTICE. 

We have just been appointed 
Wholesale Agents for the Do- 
minion of Canada for the sale of 

Payson's 
Indelible 
Ink. 

All Orders will have our prompt 
attention. 

The London Drug Co. 

LONDON, ONT. 



IM-? Wabasli Ave.. «:ill<'AOO. 

F.W.HUDSON & CO, TORONTO 

Sole Agents for Canada. 



KENNEDY'S 

MAGIC CATARRH 8NDFF 

(REGISTERED) 
A POSITIVE CUBE FOB 

CATARRH 

COLD IN THE HEAD 
CATARRHAL DEAFNESS 

HEADACHE, Etc 



COSMO BUTTERMILK SOAP CO., KERRY, WATSON & CO., - MONTREAL. 



f</^Q 






iTlMD Without bed pan. 

PERFECTLY ASEPTIC. 
AHHOraCAUY CORRECT 
HOT A WEDGE. 



, PHWPHLtT 

THM WILL 

INTEREST 



YOU. 



It is reliable, safe, and sure, giving instant relief in the 
most distressing cases. 

PRICE, 25 CENTS. 

Wholesale of Kerry, Watson & Co., Montreal. 

Lymau, Knol * Co., Montreal and 
Toronto. 

And all leading Druggists. 









48 



BlIKLA^DVS 

OLD DOMINION CRESCENT BRAND 

CINNAMON PILLS 

THE ONLY GENUINE 

RELIEF FOR LADIES. 

ASK your Druggist for " Burland's Old Dominion Cres- 
cent Brand Cinnamon Pills." Shallow rectangu- 
lar metallic boxes, sealed with crescent. Absolutely sale 
and reliable. Refuse all spurious and harmful imitations. 
Upon receipt of six cents in stamps we will reply by return 
mail, giving full particulars in plain envelope. Address 

BVRLAND UIEDICAL, CO., 

Morse Building, NEW YORK CITY. 

Please mention this paper. 



""fi-rits Of '^^^ 



No. 1. Nozzle and Shield, with Outlet Tubing . . 
So.i. " " Complete 2 -qt. Fountain 

OISCOUNT TO TRADE ON APPLICATION. 
BEST STRINGE ON THE MARKET. SOLD BY ALL JOBBEB"' 

LYMAN, KNOX & CO. 

Montreal and Toronto 

Agents for Canada. 



DICKS 

UNIVERSAL 
MEDICINES 



Royal Oil Co 



TORONTO 



Offer the following special 
lines to the Drug Trade : 

XX Peltolatimi, in 50 lb. tubs. . . 7c. per lb. 

"25 "... tVzC- " 
" in I lb. lacquered 

tins (24 tins to case) $3.00 per case. 

White " in 25 or 50 lb. tubs. l8c. per lb. 

Benzine, 5 gallon tins 20c. per gal. 

Extra Gasoline, s gallon tins 25c. per gal. 

Sewing Machine Oil, in 5 gallon 

tins 80c. per gal. 

.Sewing Machine Oil, in 2 oz. 

bottles $6 00 per gross. 

Cycle Oil, in 2 oz. bottles $6.00 " 

Royal Iloof Ointment, in 1 lb. 

tins (24 tins to case) $3-5° V^" '==>s«- 

Raw Linseed Oil, by the barrel . 54c. per gal. 

" " in 5 gal. tins. 57c. " 

Boiled " " by the barrel. 57c. " 

" " " in 5 gal. tins. 60c. " 

Pure Neatsfoot Oil in 5 gal. tins. 90c. " 

Pure Sperm Oil, in 5 gal. tins. . $2.00 " 

Castor Oil, in case lots 6c. per lb. 

" " in 5 gal. tins 6>^c. " 

Sperm Candles, 36 lbs. to case. . lo>^c. " 
Paraffine Candles " il>^c. " 

Pure Spirits Turpentine, by the 

barrel 45c- per ga' 

Pure Spirits Turpentine, in 5 gal. 

tins 50c. " 

Wood Jackets, 5 gal. cans 35^- each. 



FOR HORSES 
AND CATTLE 



Terms : 



30 Days. No Discount. 



They always give entire .satisfaction, and there are no 
medicines in the market that can compare with them. 

Thrifty farmers, stockowners and carters all over the 
country are, by .actu,al results, realizing that they cannot 
afford to be without a supply of 
Dick's Blood Purifier Price 60c. 
Dick's Blister, for Curbs, Spavins, Swellmgs, 

etc. Price 50c. 
Dick's Liniment for Cuts, Sprains, Bruises, etc. 

Price 35c. 
Dick's Ointment. Price 35o. 

Circulars and .-idvertising cards furnished. 

DICK &, CO., P.O.Box 482, MONTREAL. 



To buyers of large quanti- 
ties we shall be pleased to quote 
special prices. 

Trusting to receive your 
esteemed orders, 

Yours very truly, 



ROYAL OIL COMPANY 



TORONTO. 

GEO. ANDERSON, Manager. 

We are the largest manufacturers of Cana- 
dian Coal Oil, and the largest importers of 
American Coal Oil in Canada. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



53 



Burroughs would have lived for many 
more years but for his restless nature. 
You could never take up a trade journal 
without learning he was in South Europe, 
or in Africa, or .Vsia, or anywhere— l)ut at 
home. Always on business, with a keen 
eye to business, he lived mainly for busi- 
ness, and has paid the penalty. Still he 
was much respected, and many to-day 
lament the early decease of a large- 
hearted man. 



Rules for the Guidance of the Dispens- 
ing: Clerlt. 

By T. W. Richardson. 

Be clean and neat about your person 
and dress. A patient will not care to 
take medicine put up by a slovenly per- 
son, nor to be waited on by one. Do 
not be afraid of putting yourself about for 
the sake of obliging a customer. Have a 
smile and pleasant word for every one ; a 
little kindness done may not mean much 
to you, but it may do much for you by 
securing you the good will of your cus- 
tomer. 

In receiving a prescription, tell the cus- 
tomer the length of time it will take to 
prepare it. Enquire if they will wait or 
call again. If they will wait, politely re- 
quest them to be seated, or, if they wish 
it delivered, have it delivered promptly, 
for although half an hour may not make 
much difference, yet the suffering patient 
may be inclined to complain at any delay. 

Before commencing to dispense read 
the prescription carefully, and, if any ex- 
planation regarding it is needed, consult 
with the doctor, but without the patient's 
knowledge. 

Scrupulousness, accuracy, neatness, and 
dispatch, as well as a,thorough knowledge 
of his business, constitute the necessary 
requisites of a good dispenser. 

There must be no substitution. Use 
only the best quality of drugs. You get 
a best-quality price, and you have a per- 
fect right to furnish best quality goods to 
your customer. Be accurate, fi.x your 
mind on what you are doing, and give it 
your full attention. Be careful of your 
fraction of a grain — carelessness cannot 
be tolerated at all. Remember that the 
patient's health, and even life, is placed 
frequently in your care, and that careless- 
ness, therefore, in dispensing amounts 
almost to criminality. Neatness is a great 
factor towards success. The majority of 
people dread taking medicine, and should 
they receive a bottle with the label on 
askew, and perhaps smeared with a dirty 
finger, the neck of the bottle sticky, and 
the cork in crooked, they would be apt to 
be disgusted. Despatch is very impor- 
tant, and in order that dispensing may be 
done quickly it is necessary to have 
everything handy. Have only on your 
dispensing shelves such things as are fre- 
quently used, and so arranged that the 
least movement will enable you to reach 
them. 

A good arrangement is to have a deep 
dispensary, and along the back of the 
counter, and midway from either end, a 



compartment for ihe scales, with mortars 
and graduates on either hand. 

Underneath the counter have drawers 
for paper for wrapping prescriptions, 
already cut, pill boxes, powder papers, 
pill tiles, pill machines, corks, etc., also 
com[)artments for bottles and ointment 
pots. Have your gas jet and sealing wax 
at one ejid of the dispensary, and your 
water supply as convenient as possible, 
for we all know what a necessary commo- 
dity "aqua pura " is, and how frequently 
it is brought into requisition in our 
" noble and beloved " profession. 

In dispensing poisonous lotions or lini- 
ments, use a poison bottle, and make it a 
point of honor to affix a shake, lotion, or 
linmient label, whenever necessary. 

Keep your counter clear and clean, and 
replace everything when through with it. 
Having prepared the medicine, take the 
prescri[)tion to the desk and date, num- 
ber, price, and place any note which you 
may need for reference upon it. Having 
neatly wrapped and sealed your package, 
you are ready to hand it to your customer 
if waiting. If he is not waiting, write on 
wrapper the name of patient, designation 
of prescription, number of price, as follows: 
John Thomson, 

Lotion, 139540— 35c. 



The Future City Druggist. 

De.\r Mr. Editor,- -Under the above 
heading I desire to send you my idea of 
what the city druggist of the future should 
be. 

The city druggist of the future must be 
aspiring as to professional reputation. 
He must be well educated, and possess 
the Ph.M.B. degree in pharmacy. His 
professional abilities should be supported 
by sufficient means to sustain the emi- 
nence he should naturally enjoy. His 
assistants should, if not graduates, be at 
least matriculants of the university. His 
slock should be as varied as the wants of 
his customers, regardless of the profits 
wasted in maintaining it. He should 
never give any thjught to such low-born 
institutions as departmental stores, which 
thrive on commercial rather than pro- 
fessional lines. In his dealings with the 
public he must impress them with the 
importance of his profession as a branch 
of the healing art, and discountenance, 
publicly at least, collusion with medical 
men for mutual benefit. 

He will, of course, not from necessity, 
but as art evidence of his obliging nature, 
continue to afford the public the free use 
of his telephone, directory, and other 
mere adjuncts of his calling. Away from 
the public eye, he will obey patiently any 
demands made upon him by the medical 
profession. Being a professional man 
himself, he must feel it beneath his dig- 
nity to charge the doctor for such things 
as sponges, surgical dressings, etc., which 
his superior may require, and, even should 
members of the doctor's family see fit to 
make trifling demands in the drug sundry 
line, his sense of professional propriety 
will deter him from asking or seeking 



recompense. Above all thing.s, he must 
never, in the slightest degree, encroach 
on the rights of the medical fraternity by 
compounding remedies for the minor ail- 
ments of humanity, and, should his cus- 
tomers seek a refilling of prescriptions 
without the authority of their medical 
adviser, it will be his duty firmly, but 
kindly, to refuse the same. Under no cir- 
cumstances will he return the original 
prescription or give a copy, as it might in- 
advertently be dispensed as a new prescrip- 
tion by a confrere, and thus rob the author 
of the fee which is properly his due. His 
duty,atall times, will be to protect the medi- 
cal profession, as far as lies in his power, 
from the many forms of plagiaristic em- 
piricism which have proven a bane to it 
in the past, and, although his pocket may 
suffer somewhat in doing so, the high 
sense of dignified justice which should 
pervade him will be ample reward for his 
disinterested efforts. 

OVERTHELEFT. 



Crystallization of Syrups, and the 
Remedy. 

Carles [Repertoire de Fhariihuie), in an 
article on the crystallisation of syrups, 
states that it is his habit, as soon as he 
notes a tendency of a syrup to crystallize, 
to put it on the water-bath and heat it. 
The separated sugar is at once taken up, 
and remains in solution. Occasionally, 
he says, the crystallization will occur only 
on the bottom of the vessel, and is due to 
the fact that the latter is standing on some 
object colder than the surrounding atmos- 
phere. This is especially the case in 
winter. All that is necessary in such 
cases is to reverse the jar or vessel, which, 
by equalizing the temperature, causes the 
crystals to be again taken up. — National 
Druggist. 



Phosphorus Pills. 



Yet another method for dispensing 
phosphorus in pills is suggested by M. 
Ledoux, of Liege, who heats anhydrous 
wool-fat, 4 gm., and phosphorus 6 eg., in 
a capsule, on a water-bath at a temperature 
about 45^, until the phosphorus is melted. 
The mixture is then stirred with a slightly 
warmed pestle until cool, after which 
powdered marsh-mallow, q.s. for 120 pills, 
is added. The finished pills should be 
rolled in powdered talc and preserved in 
the same, sheltered from the light. — 
/ourns. de pharm. de Liege, et d'Anvers. 
— Pharmaceutical Journal. 



Perfumed Moth Camphor. 

Naphthalin-camphor, says x\\e. Drogisten 
Zeituny, now so popular as a moth-pre- 
venter, is prepared by melting together, 
on the water-bach, 2400 parts of naphtha- 
lin and 780 parts of camphor. The un- 
pleasant, penetrating odor of the product 
may be masked and rendered even pleas- 
ant by adding to the product, while still 
fluid, 2 parts cumarin, i part, nerolin, and 
53/^ parts of mirbane oil. 



54 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



An Automatic Process for Aqua Chloro- 
fopmi. 

By William Elborne, B.A., 

Pharmacist at University College Hospital, Demonstrator 
of Materia Medica at University College. 

The B.P. process for preparing aqua 
chloroformi is to put the chloroform and 
water into a two-pint stoppered bottle and 
shake them together until the chloroform 
is entirely dissolved in the water. 

The U.S. P. process is to "add enough 
chloroform to a convenient quantity of 
distilled water, contained in a dark amber- 
colored bottle, to maintain a slight excess 
of the former, after the contents have 
been repeatedly and thoroughly agitated. 
When chloroform water is required for 
use, pour ofif the needed quantity of the 
solution, refill the bottle with distilled 
water and saturate it by thorough agita- 
tion, taking care that there be always an 
excess of chloroform present." 

Now, the B.P. process for aqua cam- 
phorce is one of automatic diffusion of a 
solid volatile substance into distilled 
water : " Enclose the camphor in a mus- 
lin bag, and attach this to a piece of glass, 
by means of which it may be kept at the 
bottom of the bottle containing the dis- 
tilled water. Close the mouth of the 
bottle, macerate for at least two days, and 
then pour off the solution when it is 
required." In practice it is customary to 
keep a large excess of camphor in the 
bag, pouring off and replenishing with 
water until the whole of the camphor has 
disappeared — the operation extending 
possiljly over months ; this process, sub- 
stituting stout parchment paper for the 
muslin bag, may be regarded as having 
suggested the following process : 

In the sense of filtration, parchment 
paper is impervious to water, alcohol, 
chloroform, ether, and essential oils, but 
if such be enclosed in the parchment 
paper, and the latter suspended in a 
vessel of water, the enclosed liquids will, 
by osmosis, diffuse through the membrane 
• into the water until, in the case of liquids 
freely miscible with each other, equili- 
brium within and without the membrane 
is established, or, if they be only sparingly 
soluble in water, until the latter becomes 
saturated : thus, if a fluid drachm of 
chloroform be enclosed in parchment 
paper and suspended in 25 ozs. of dis- 
tilled water, in a closed vessel secluded 
from light, it is found to have quitted the 
membrane and saturated the water in 
eight days, and if a large excess of chloro- 
form be used (say, two fluid ounces), 
retaining the same volume of water, satura- 
tion is effected in twenty-four hours. 

The process, having been in use for 
some months, has given every satisfac- 
tion. In the accompanying diagrammatic 
representation of the method adopted, B 
is an earthenware 4 gallon barrel contain- 
ing distilled water ; P, a pint of chloro- 
form tied up in a bag of stout parchment 
paper ; S, the string passing round 
through the bung and spile-holes and 
supporting the bag ; VV, a dark amber- 
colored Winchester quart filled with water, 



inverted and standing in the bung-hole, 
acting as a replenisher and gauge. The 
whole being placed in position is allowed 
to remain intact for seven days, after 
which period it may be drawn from the 
tap as required for use. The Winchester, 
when empty, is to be refilled with distilled 
water and again placed in position, and 
the chloroform bag replenished at much 
longer intervals. A saturated aqueous 
solution of chloroform is stronger than 
the B.P. aqua chloroformi, three parts of 
the former being equivalent to four parts 
of the latter. 

For other medicated waters in consider- 
able requisition, such as aq. menth. pip., 
the process might prove of general appli- 
cation ; but where the specific gravity of 
the essential oil is less than unity it would 
be requisite to load the flaps of the parch- 
ment with spare glass stoppers, in such a 
manner as to keep the bag at the bottom 



natural ice yield a product, alter melting, 
filtering, and boiling, that will stand all 
the Pharmacopoeia tests for impurity ; 
indeed, water, in the act of freezing, 
becomes completely separated from every- 
thing which is previously held in solution, 
a familiar physical fact of mere theoreti- 
cal interest to the pharmacist. — The Phar- 
maceutical Jdurnal. 




of the vessel, as represented in the lower 
part of the diagram. 

With oil of peppermint thus arranged, 
the superincumbent water certainly be- 
comes highly impregnated after a week's 
immersion, but whether it be preferable 
to enclose the oil pure and simple, or 
previously rubbed down with calcium 
phosphate and water, remains a subject 
for future enquiry ; the automatic replen- 
isher in this instance would probably have 
to be abandoned on account of a possibly 
unequal rate of dififusion of the several 
constituents of the oil. 

Substituting i lb. of slaked lime for the 
chloroform, and following the same direc- 
tions, most satisfactory lime water is 
obtained — uie slaked lime to be previously 
washed with water, after subsidence the 
supernatant liquid to be thrown away, 
and the sediment transferred to the bag. 
It may be worthy of notice that, in the 
absence of distilled water, clear blocks of 



Acetylene as an lUuminant. 

We are all interested in new illuminants, 
and any proposal which has for its object 
the cheapening and simplifying of exist- 
ing means of lighting is always deserving 
of attention. That there is great need 
for a new illuminating agent is evidenced 
by the increasing demand in many places, 
for numerous purposes, of a self-contained 
source of gas of high illuminating power. 
It would seem that we are within measur- 
able distance of obtaining this advantage. 
Professor Vivian B. Lewes has iieen dis- 
cussing the synthetic production of acety- 
lene by means of the electric arc. In an 
exceedingly interesting paper on the sub- 
ject, he points out that from that simple 
hydro-carbon can be produced al' those 
bodies which are amongst the most im- 
portant in our coal gas, and which so far 
have only been obtained by destructive 
distillation of coal, hydro-carbon oils, or 
other organic substances. Recent re- 
search, however, has shown that by fusing 
a mixture of powdered chalk and carbon 
in an electric furnace a compound called 
calcic carbide is formed, which is decom- 
posed by water into lime and acetylene. 
Professor Lewes is of opinion that this 
process is commercially practicable. Data 
received by him from America shows that 
the calcic carbide can be produced at a 
little under ^4 a ton, while the beauti- 
fully pure lime obtained by the decom- 
position would be worth to the gas mana- 
ger about los. a ton. The illuminating 
power of acetylene is about fifteen times 
as great as that of London gas, so that 
the light of 1,000 feet of the latter should 
be obtained for less than 6d. by the use 
of acetylene. Professor Lewes points out 
that acetylene obtained in this way may 
be used either to give a very high illu- 
minating effect by itself, or to enrich low- 
grade coal gas. It may be compressed 
and distributed in steel cylinders, or the 
calcic carbide may be fused into sticks, 
which can be decomposed by water, in 
suitable apparatus, at the place where the 
gas is required for consumption. Pro- 
fessor Lewes has certainly made out a 
very clear case for the future success of 
the new illuminating agent, and should it 
prove as practicable as he suggests there 
would seem to be a special field for it 
abroad, seeing that it can be fused into 
sticks, and afterwards decomposed by 
water. — Foreigu and Colonial Importer. 

A sluggish merchant and a wide-awake 
trade don't go well together. 

Don't try to run a hundred-thousand- 
dollar-business in a fifty-thousand-dollar 
town. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(54A) 



3 



GOOD SELLERS 



VELROSE 



SHAVING CREAM 
SHAVING STICK 
BARBER'S BAR 



v> 



'■( ''W>^ SHAVING . \ 



'-iSj;:,^ CREAM' :i, 





SHAVING; 

l: stick! 

JHOS LEEMINC &C° 

[JiiONTREAL. - NCW VOBK 




PAY YOU WELL. PLEASE YOUR CUSTOMERS 
ATTRACTIVE COUNTER ARTICLES 

Order Sample \ dozen from your wholesale house to come with next order. 
We supply Samples for free disirilmtion with first orders. 

THos. i.ee:ming&co. 

MONTREAL 



Druggists 



taking proper interest in his 
establishment will provide his 
customers with first-class goods 
only. 



E. B. Eddy's 



Toilet Papers and Fixtures 
form part of the Stock of a 
well-equipped drug-store. 



HULL, 



MONTREAL, 



TORONTO. 



LITTLZ*S 

PATENT FLU I D 



SHEEP DIP 

AND CATTLE WASH. 



For the Destruction of Ticks, Lice, Mange, and 
all Insects upon Sheep, Horses, Cattle, 
Pigs, Dogs, etc. 

Superior to Carbolic Acid for Uleeps, Wounds, Sores, etc 



Removes Scurf, Roughness, and Irritation of the Skin, 
maliing the coat soft, glossy, and healthy. 



Removes the unpleasant smell from Dogs and other animals. 



" Little's Sheep Dip and Cattle Wash " is used at the Dominion 
Experimental Farms at Ottawa and Brandon, at the Ontario Industrial 
Farm, Guelph, and by all the principal Breeders in the Dominion ; and 
is pronounced to he the cheapest and most effective remedy on the market. 

liS" 17 Gold, Silver, and other Prize Medals have been awarded to 
" Little's Sheep and Cattle Wash " in all parts of the world. 

Sold in large Tins at $1.00. Is wanted by every Farmer and Breeder 
in the Dominion. 

ROBERT WI6HTMAN, Druggist, OWEN SOUND, ONI. 

Sole Agent for the Dominion. 

To be had from all wholesale druggists in Toronto, Hamilton, and London. 



^^ 



^ 



Little's Soluble Phenylej 



]DEOOORISERg.ANTlSEPTIC[^ 



NEW DISINFECTANI^ 



>RW UMVERSAL USE if/' 

CHEAP, HARMLESS, AND EFFECTIVE 



A Highly Concentrated Fluid for Checking and Preventing 
Contagion from Infectious Diseases. 



NON-POISONOUS AND NON-CORROSIVE. 



In a test of Disinfectants, undertaken on behalf of the American Gov- 
ernment, " Little's Soluble Phenyle " was proved to be the best Disin- 
fectant, being successfully active at 2 per cent., whilst that which ranked 
second required 7 per cent., and many Disinfectants, at 50 per cent., 
proved worthless. 

" Little's Soluble Phenyle " will destroy the infection of all Fevers 
and all Contagious ami Infectious Diseases, and will neutralize any bad 
smell whatever, not by ilisguising it, but by destroying it. 

Used in the London and Provincial Hospitals and approved of by the 
Highest Sanitary Authorities of the day. 

The Phenyle has been awarded Gold Medals and Diplomas in all 
parts of the world. 

Sold by all Druggists in 25c. and 50c. Bottles, and $1.00 Tins. 

A 25c. bottle will make four gallons strongest Disinfectant, Is wanted 
by every Physician, Householder, and Public Institution in the Dominion. 



ROBERT WIGHTMAN, Druggist, OWEN SOUND, ONT. 

Sole Agent for the Dominion. 

To be had from all Wholesale Druggists in Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 
and London, Ont., and Winnipeg, Man. 



(54B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



SODA WATER APPARATUS 



NEW 



DESIGNS IN Onyx, Marble, and Tile, W*th Wood Canopies. 



Se>id for Catalogue. Free to prospective buyers. 




Most Liberal 

Allowance for Old 

Apparatus 

in Exchange. 

▼ ▼ ▼ 

Fruit Juices. 



Send for samples of 
the Finest Juices made. 



T ▼ T 

SECOND-HAND 
APPARATUS 

Of every make, cheap. 

Send for price list. 



-i^jr 



Exceptionally Low Prices. - - Very Easy Terms. 

FACTORIES— 33 to 51 Bowker St., 49 to 51 Chardon St , 96 to 100 Portland St., Boston. 

WAREROOMS-New York : 10 Warren St., near Broadway and City Hall. Chicago: 268 to 270 Fifth Ave. St. Louis: 1211 
Pine St. Baltimore : Cor. Lombard and Concord streets. San Francisco : 212 Eddy St. Dallas : Cor. Com- 
merce and Field streets. Boston: 96, 98, and 100 Portland St., near Union Station. 

SALESROOMS— New Orleans : 37 Chartres St. Detroit: 254 Woodward Ave. Minneapolis: 136 Seventeenth St. South. 
Denver : Cor. Seventeenth and Curtis streets. Philadelphia: 1416 Chestnut St., Room 23 Hazeltine Building. 

Address all communications to 

JAMES W. TUFTS, 33 Bowker St. Boston, Mass. 

Agent for Canada.- W. S. WOODS, 58 First Avenue, Toronto, Ont. 

In sending for catalogues customers will confer a favor by mentioning The Canadian Druggist. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



55 



Red, Yellow, and Black. 

ONTARIO COLLEGE OF PHARMACV DINNER. 

On the evening of the first of M.irch 
was held the graduating class dinner, the 
most important social event in the 
academic year at the Ontario College of 
Pharmacy. Over a hundred sat down to 
the sumptuous repast provided liv the 
Rossin House, and their appreciaiiijii of 
the effort of the chef was apparent by the 
way the victuals disappeared. After the 
menu the gathering was called to order 
by the chairman, Mr. Newton H. Brown, 
who, in behalf of the class, briefly wel- 
comed the guests. The president of the 
Montreal College of Pharmacy sent greet- 
ings and best wishes, and expressed sor- 
row that they were unable to send a 
representative. Mr. W. A. Karn, of 
Woodstock, member of the council, had 
come down for the dinner, but had been 
taken ill with grippe, and so was unable 
to attend. 

The chairman then proposed the toast 
to " The Queen," which was received by 
the National Anthem, sung by all present. 
The toast to Canada was followed by the 
" Maple Leaf" Mr. Geo. F. Campbell, 
in one of the best speeches of the even- 
ing, referred to the character, climate, and 
resources of Canada, to her educational 
system, of which Toronto University was 
the head in Ontario, and to the position 
of the College of Pharmacy in affiliation 
with the University, and ably showed rea- 
sons why every Canadian should be 
proud of his native land. This speech 
was followed by singing " Rule, Britannia." 
Mr. Lucas was next called upon to pro- 
pose the toast of the evening — " The Col- 
lege and Faculty." This toast was greeted 
by the college yell — 

" Who are we ? 
Phar-ma-cy — 
We are from 
The O— C— P." 

Mr. C. D. Daniel, the only member of 
the council present, replied on behalf of 
the college. After a few humorous re- 
marks, he spoke of the standing of the 
college, and said that it stood in abso- 
lutely the first place in the colleges of 
pharmacy in America, and ranked well 
with those of the old world- Other col- 
leges may have finer buildings than ours, 
others may have finer equipments, but 
none turn out students with a better phar- 
maceutical education. Our diploma is 
accepted by boards of pharmacy all over 
the United States, while few of theirs are 
accepted outside of their own district. 
This has not been won by reciprocity; 
for our council would accept no diploma 
from a college of inferior standing to our 
own. He added that the council were 
far from satisfied with the present equip- 
ment, and hoped to still improve on the 
training and education that the college 
affords the students. The present high 
examination standard of 66 per cent, for 
a pass and 75 per cent, for honors was 
not set to lessen the number of druggists, 
or to prevent students from entering the 



business, but solely with the object of 
maintaining the standard of the college, 
for it was that very thing that made our 
diploma so desirable and so valuable to 
the holder. 

Dean Heebner and Dr. Fotheringham 
then followed on behalf of the Faculty. 
The Dean evidently thought the boys had 
enough of his seriousness through the 
term without having any that evening, for 
his speech was humorous throughout, 
kee[)ing the boys in constant laughter till 
he had finished. He took as his text the 
quotation which he found on the menu 
card : 

'• Think not of our approaching ills. 
Nor talk of powders, plasters, pills, 
To-motrow will he time enough 
To hear such mortifying stuff." 

He enlarged on the first two lines, and, 
at the request of the class, declared the 
lecture for the next morning off, although 
he thought the last two lines sounded 
like a request to leave it on. 

Dr. Fotheringham jokingly referred to 
an " ad." on the programme, which read, 
" Use Dr. Fotheringhara's Anti-fat," and 
said that the remedy was not for sale. 
He complimented the class on the success 
of the evening's entertainment, and said 
that although they had shown themselves 
to be fond of recreation and pleasure, yet 
he did not think a professor in the city 
could boast of a harder working or more 
studious lot of students than he could in 
the College of Pharmacy. Moreover, he 
did not know of any class of students 
who were, as a whole, more neat and care- 
ful of their personal appearance than the 
boys of theO.C.P. 

The boys then sang " Vive la Phar- 
macie," a version of " Vive la Compag- 
nie," written for the occasion. 

VIVE I.A PHARMACIE. 

Bring hither a beaker and fill it with wine, 

Vive la Pharniacie, 
And pledge Alma .Mater with ninety times nine, 

Vive la Pharmacie. 

Cho. — Vive le, vive le, vive le roi, 
Vive le, vive le, vive le roi, 
Vive le roi, vive la reine, 
Vive la Pharmacie. 

Here's to the Council who meet twice a year, 
To deal out the parchment we're working for here. 

The Professors come next, and they're not a bad 

lot. 
There's Heebner and Fotheringham, Chambers 

and Scott. 

Here's to old Isaac, the muscular man, 

When he braces himself, shove him over who can. 

And now to the Grads. this health we will sing, 
For we hope to be Graduates, too, in the spring. 

And here's to the Students of Ninety-five — 
May they pass the exams, and come out alive. 

Mr. E. A. Walters, in proposing the 
toast to " Sister Institutions," referred to 
the noble family of colleges which form 
the University of Toronto, of which the 
College of Pharmacy is probably the 
youngest member. If our college is ever 
moved from its present site we will hope 
that it may be moved closer to the head 
of the University — University College — 



so that our students may imbibe more of 
the true college spirit from closer rela- 
tionship with the other students. He 
also expres.sed the good will of the class 
toward the Trinity medical department, 
and closed by asking the students to 
drink brotherly love and fraternal affec- 
tion to the toast of " Sister Institutions." 

This toast was responded to by repre- 
sentatives from University College, To- 
ronto and Trinity Medical Schools,School 
of Practical Science, and the Dental Col- 
lege. 

Mr.T. J.Gledhill made a rather humor- 
ous speech in asking the boys who were 
working for the sheepskin of the college 
to drink to all owners of sheepskins as 
being the fortunate members of the drug 
fraternity. In response to this toast to 
the graduates Mr. T. Allen made a very 
happy speech, and wished the boys all 
possible success at their examinations. 
Mr. Elliot, jr., of the firm of Elliot & Co., 
spoke of the coiiimercial outlook of the 
drug trade, and said that the money to 
he made in pharmacy of the future lay in 
the druggists making all their own prepara- 
tions and in putting into use the higher 
pharmaceutical processes they were taught 
at the college. 

Mr. Wright, with a burst of eloquence, 
asked the boys to drink " princely pros- 
perity, perpetual progress, and protracted 
popularity to the public press," which 
toast was responded to in one of the best 
speeches of the evening by Mr. Mont- 
gomery, of the ' Varsity, the student organ 
of the University. 

The toast to the ladies was proposed 
by Mr. H. A. Rowland, and ably responded 
to by Mr. Leonidas Rattey, whose love 
for the fair was manifest. " Ourselves " 
was proposed by Mr. Urquhart, and an- 
swered by Mr. McNichol. After the final 
toasts to the chairman and the commit- 
tee, this most enjoyable evening was 
brought to a close with " Auld Lang 
Syne." During the speeches numerous 
songs and solos were rendered, among 
which was a new version of " Litoria," 
written for the occasion : 

LITORIA. 
Ye Pharmacy man goes out to dine — 

Swe-de-le-we-dum bum. 
But never touches any wine — 

Swe-de-ie-we-dum bum ; 
He makes the stock of victuals fly — 

Swe-de-le-wetchu-hi-ra-si, 
And tackles all from soup to pie — 

Swe-dele-wedum bum. 

Cho. — Litoria, Litoria — 

Swe-delewe-tchu-hi-ra-sa, 
Litoria, Litoria — 
Swe-de-Ie-we-dum bum. 

He sits him down and tries to smoke ; 
He laughs when e'er he sees a joke ; 
He drinks the merry toast with glee. 
And hollers loud for Pharmacy. 

He tries to dance a stag-dance reel. 
But in his head he feels a wheel ; 
He mixes up surrounding scenes. 
And isn't worth a hill of beans. 

Ye night is past. He wanders home. 
No more to dinners will he roam. 
He climbs up to his attic den 
And rests his loaded abdomen. 



56 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Messrs. C. VV. McPherson, VV. S. Mc- 
Kay, and J. S. Martin took solo parts. 
The menu card was exceedingly neat and 
tastefully gotten up, and should prove a 
fitting souvenir for such an enjoyable 
event. 

Mr. Newton H. Brown occupied the 
chair, and his committee was as follows : 
Mr. J. A. Graham, secretary ; Mr. W. J. 
Bauld, treasurer ; Messrs. Geo. F. Camp- 
bell, E. A. Walters, Frank Ross. 



The Opium Trade of Asia Minor. 

Opium is perhaps the most interesting, 
the most valuable, and the most famous 
product of Asia Minor. This substance, 
which resembles a resinous gum, is e.x- 
tracted from the capsules of poppy-heads. 
Incisions are made in the capsules after 
the fall of the flowers, and the juice which 
runs from them is then dried and made 
up into blocks of various sizes. These 
are covered with leaves and sent in special 
^ales to the market at Smyrna. 

The poppy is usually cultivated in the 
central regions of Asia Minor on firm 
soil of sandy or chalky clay, richly man- 
ured. Several sowings are made through- 
out the course of the year, but the crops 
are grouped under two general denomi- 
nations, the autumn and the spring crops. 
The autumn sowings are begun towards 
the end of the month of September, and 
produce the greater part of the harvest. 
The seed is sown in fields which have 
been plowed or dug up, and when the 
plants have appeared a great many are 
destroyed in order to assure to each plant 
a clear space of about 75 centimetres. 
The earth ought to be stirred and hoed 
three times over before the time for pick- 
ing the poppy-heads has come. 

After the month of November the 
snow almost always covers up the young 
plant, which is thus preserved from frost 
and the severity of the winter until the 
snow melts, that is to say, until March. 
It then grows vigorously until it becomes 
from I to I'A metres in height. Each 
plant produces from 5 to 30 globular 
capsules, which are generally oval in 
form. The flowers are large, solitary at 
the top of the ramifications, and com- 
posed of four or five petals set in the form 
of a cross, and crumpled until they ex- 
pand. They are of all shades from white 
to red. When the capsule is ripe it takes 
a pale yellow tint. This is the moment 
for making the incisions. They are 
always made at sunset ; the juice which 
oozes from them in the form of tears is 
collected next morning, at dawn, in 
shells. It is then dried and moulded 
into the form of blocks, which are wrap- 
ped in leaves of the same plant. From 
its first appearance until the time of 
harvest, the plant is exposed to all the 
intemperance of the weather, excess of 
rain or drought, of cold or heat, violent 
winds, etc., and it is thus peculiarly liable 
to be injured on the nights which precede 
the incision of the capsule. 

* From a report of the French Chamber of Commerce 
at Smyrna. 



The seed is sown two or three times in 
spring, between the beginning of Febru- 
ary and the end of April. This crop 
requires greater uniformity of weather, 
especially frequent rains. The conse- 
quence is that the spring sowings are more 
delicate, and their product is sensibly 
inferior to that of the autumn crop. 

The blocks are left to dry, and are 
then arranged in high baskets contaming 
about 75 kilogs., with certain leaves 
which have the property of keeping the 
opium in good condition, and of prevent- 
ing the blocks from sticking to one 
another. The bales are then forwarded 
to Smyrna and Constantinople to be sold 
there to exporters. Turkish opium has 
produced during the last fifteen years an 
average of 6,000 bales. One single year, 
which was absolutely exceptional, pro- 
duced 11,000 bales. But this year we 
have only 3,000, a figure just as abnormal 
as the preceding. 

These are the various varieties of 
opium and their respective values : 

(i) Malatia, Tokat, Zileh. Quality 
extremely fine, and the paste much appre- 
ciated by Chinese smokers for its delicate 
flavor. Amount of morphine very small, 
varying from 8 to 1 1 per cent., which is 
only obtained by means of a special 
selection. 

(2) Boghadich. The best quality of 
Turkish opium, paste delicate and fine, 
greatly appreciated, especially by the 
smokers of Central America. 

(3) Yerli. All opium which is grown 
in the neighborhood of Smyrna is called 
Yerli. It is less valued than that of 
Boghadich, but is as rich in morphine. 
This is the quality which is used for 
drugs and in medicine. 

(4) Chaiie. This kind is so like that 
of Yerli that it may be included in the 
same category. 

(5) Salonica. The cultivation of opium 
at Salonica is of relatively recent date. It 
has greatly extended, and produces about 
800 bales per annum, half of which, of 
very fine quality, is more appreciated than 
even the Boghadich. 

(6) Karatrissar. This is the district 
which produces the most opium, and 
supplies, on a large scale, the trade of 
England, America, and Holland. The 
quality of this variety is very good ; the 
morphine varies from 9 to 12 percent. 

(7) Adeth. Average quality brought 
from all parts of the interior. The Turk- 
ish word "adeth" means "usual." It 
represents the ordinary type, which is 
easily sold for China and America, and 
the amount of morphine is almost uni- 
formly 9.5 per cent. 

(8) Chinquiti. This name is given to 
a quality of opium from various parts of 
the interior. It is opium mixed with 
foreign matter ; it contains morphine 
sometimes to the extent of 9 per cent. 

(9) So so. Under this name are de- 
signated those opiums which are bought 
in the condition in which they arrive from 
the interior. There is a mixture of five 
kinds and of Chinquiti. The morphine 
is from 9 ' ^ 1 1 per cent. It should be 



noted that mouldy opiums of bad appear- 
ance, which are rejected, are often found 
figuring afterwards in the category of the 
"So so's." 

These are, approximately, the quantities 
exported each year : 

Bales. 

For England i ,000 

" North America 2,000 

" Central and South America 600 

" Spain and her Colonies 500 

" Holland 500 

" France 300 

" Germany 300 

" Italy 100 

" Other countries 100 

Total, about 5,400 

or cases representmg at the average price 
of 48 francs the kilogramme, eleven million 
of francs. 

The permanent stock, at the end of 
the season, which closes on the 15th of 
June; is valued approximately at 1,000 
bales between Smyrna, Constantinople, 
and the producing districts. The maxi- 
nmm price of opium of late years has 
been 40 francs the kilogramme, and the 
minimum price to which it has fallen 
has been 18 francs; but this fall only 
occurred once, and lasted but a very short 
time. In any case we are very far from 
that period when this article, which used 
to play a preponderating part in the 
export trade of Smyrna, sometimes reach- 
ed very high prices indeed. The price 
used to go up and down, producing 
great profits and serious losses. But the 
speculative spirit which used to mark the 
opium trade has entirely disappeared, the 
variations of price are slight, and only 
follow the normal law of supply and de- 
mand, in consequence of the extent of 
the crops and the requirements of the 
consumer. — Board of Trade Journal. — 
Pliarmaceutical Journal and Transac- 
tions. 



Sodium Carbonate. 



Chemically pure sodium carbonate for 
analytical purposes is prepared by Reint- 
zer {Chem. Centralbl.') by taking 250 cc. 
of water of 8o°C., and dissolving in it as 
much sodium bicarbonate as it will take 
up. After filtering and cooling to io°C. 
a double salt crystallizes out, to which 
the formula NaXO.., + NaHCO^ -f- 2H.,0 
is assigned. These he separates, washes 
with a little cold water, and then con- 
verts the substance into Na.^COg by 
heating in a platinum crucible at just 
below perceptible red heat. 



Test for Aeetanilid in Phenacetin. 

Guasti gives {L'Orosi) the following 
method for detecting aeetanilid in phena- 
cetin, when present to the extent of 4 per 
cent, or more : Boil 0.5 gram of the 
sample with 10 cc. of water; cool, filter 
off the deposited phenacetin, concentrate 
the filtrate, boil with i cc. of hydrochloric 
acid, and treat with phenol and calcium 
hypochlorite solution. On adding an 
excess of ammonia, the liquid assumes an 
indigo blue color if aeetanilid is present. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(56A) 



Why Not Put Up your Own 

WHEN YOU CAN BUY 

Complete #k 

^^ Containers 

AT REASONABLE PRICES? 

You Can Save the Manufacturers' Profit ! 



For Samples of Containers with Prices, for putting up or 
packaging any of the foUotving goods, drop us a card : 



Condition Powders, 

Folding Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Bird Seed, 

Folding Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Chloride of Lime, 

Impervious Boxes and Wraps. 
Baking Powder, 

lioxes and Wraps. 
Compound Licorice Powder, 

Boxes and Wiaps. 

Powdered Borax, 

Folding Cartons. 



Cream Tartar, 

F'olding Cartons. 

Soap Bark, 

Folding Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Epsom Salts, 

Folding Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Senna Leaves, 

Folding Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Cough Drops, 

Folding Cartons — 2 ounce and 4 
ounce. 



Or if there are any other lines you wish to put up, 
write us about them. 

LAWSON 8z: JONES, 

LONDON. Canada. 



SIMPLE, BUT SURE ! 

Somerville's 
M. F. Cough 
Chewing Gum 



FIVE CENTS PER BAR 

TWENTY BARS ON A HANDSOME 

STANDING CARD 



THE WHOLESALE TRADE HAVE IT 
PRICE 65c. PER CARD 



G. R. SOMERVILLE, 



LONDON, OnL 



Artistic Novelties - - 

F^OU URUGaiSTS' TRA^UB, 

^1 HE remarkable satisfaction given to customers in handling our line of Celluloid 
-*- Specialties in Toilet Cases, Odor Cases, Manicures, and Sundries, has 
encouraged us to put on the road this year a still more complete assortment than 
ever before. 






Druggists are respectfully requested to reserve their orders till our line is shown. 

HARRIS H. BUDGBR, 

Wholesale F^ancy Goods, Notions, and 
Druggists* Sundries, 

60 Yon^o Stroetf - - - - Toronto. 



(56b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



FINE RUBBER GOODS 



Bulb Enemas 

Water Bottles 

Fountain Syringes 
Atomizers 

Ice Bags 

Invalid Rings 
Tubing 
Combination Fountains and Water Bottles 
Stoppers 

Nipples 

Air Pillows 

Bands 
Operating Pads Finger Cots 

Nasal Douches 
Bed Pans 

Teething Rings 

Medicine Droppers 

Hospital Sheeting, etc. 



ALPHA RUBBER COMPANY 

(LIMITED) 
MONTREAL, - - QUE. 

THE 

Montreal 
Optical Co. 

The only firm of Manufacturing Opticians 
in the Dominion. 



PRESCRIPTION WORK A SPECIALTY 

Country Orders filled xfith care 
'and promptitude. 



If you are dealing in OPTICAL GOODS, it will PAY YOU to do 
business with US, and, if you are not doing so already, write and get our 
Catalogue and Price List. 



$ KOFF NO MORE t 



-»-^«!H^-» 



Watson's Cough Drops 



Will give positive and instant relief 
to all those suffering from 

Colds, Hoarseness, Sore Throat, etc., 
. . . and are . . . 
Invaluable to Orators and Vocalists 



R. & T. W. 



Stamped on Each Drop 



I^ePAGE'S 



"Syrup Hypophos. Comp." 



IMPKOVKU 



rPer Winchester 
TRADE PRICE \ Per Dozen— Small 
[Per Dozen — Large 



$2.25 
3-50 
7.00 



Also LePAGE'S "BEEF, IRON AND WINE." 

Quality Guarauteed. Price Reasouable. Trade Solicited. 



C. W. LePAGE ft CO., 



59 BAY STREET, TORONTO. 



"THE TWIN" 

HALF-MINUTE 

Clinical Thermometer 



FOR QUICK REGISTRATION OF TEMPERATURE 

INDELIBLE BLACK 



PATENTED MARCH 25) 1890 



The most Substantial 
Sensitive 

Medical Profession. 



With the atmospheric register at 60° , if " THE TWIN " be immersed in warm water of 105 ^ , the mercury will reach that degree in less than 
2o Seconds. 

The welding the two bulbs into one without any intervening space renders " THE TWIN " much stronger and less lial)le to break than any other 
heretofore offered. 

It will also be found much more convenient to carry, requiring less room in a case or in the vest pocket. For these reasons, as well as for its 
Guaranteed Accuracy, "THE TWIN" is universally recommended by the medical profession. 

FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS. $2.00 EACH 

25 per cent, discount to all doctors who mention the "Canadian Druggist"; if in gold with chain and pin, $2 net. 

Sole Agents : s. B. CHANDLER & SON, Toronto, Canada 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



57 



An Act to Further Amend the B.C. 
" Pharmacy Act, 1891." 

The following is the full text of the 
amendiiieiits as certified correct and 
passed third reading on February iith, 
1895: 

Her Majesty, by and with the advice 
and consent of the Legislative Asseiiil)ly 
of the Province of British CoUnnhia, 
enacts as follows : 

(i) This Act may be cited as the 
"Pharmacy Act Amendment Act, 1S95." 

(2) Section 10 of the '.'Pharmacy .-\ct, 
1891," is herel.iy repealed, and the follow- 
ing inserted in place thereof : 

" lo. The Board of Examiners shall 
examine the candidates and grant such 
certificates or diplomas as they may think 
proper to those whom they deem qualified 
to be 'licentiates of pharmacy, certified 
clerks, or certified apprentices. The said 
Board of Examiners shall consist of three 
members of the Association, who shall be 
appointed annually by the Lieutenant- 
Governor in Council. In case of any 
vacancy occurring in such Board, such 
vacancy shall be filled by the Lieutenant- 
Governor in Council." 

(3) Section 1 1 of the said Act is hereby 
repealed, and the following substituted in 
place thereof : 

"11. All persons approved of by the 
Board of Examiners who by examination 
have obtained diplomas from the Pharma- 
ceutical Society of Great Britain, or cer- 
tificates from any Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion, or in the Dominion of Canada or 
elsewhere, whose standing and require- 
ments are equal to those of the Pharma- 
ceutical .'\ssociation of British Columbia, 
may be registered as members of the 
Pharmaceutical Association of British 
Columbia without the examination pre- 
scribed by the said Act. Such diplomas 
or certificates must be accompanied by 
certificates of good moral character, and 
shall be subject to such other regulations 
as may be provided for in the by-laws of 
the Association : Provided, also, that 
such persons must have attended two 
courses of lectures in chemistry, two in 
materia medica and pharmacy, and one 
course in botany, in the British Columbia 
School of Mines, or such other school or 
college whose standing and requirements 
are equal to those of said British Colum- 
bia School of Mines. Such courses each 
to consist of not less than fifty lectures : 
Provided that the by-laws of the Associa- 
tion shall not require on the part of the 
applicant any previous residential qualifi- 
cations." 

{4) Section 12 of the said Act is here- 
by amended by adding thereto the follow- 
ing sub sections : 

"((j) It shall be unlawful for a certified 
apprentice to compound prescriptions or 
sell poisonous drugs or chemicals unless 
under the direct supervision of a licentiate 
of pharmacy or certified clerk : 

" {fi) Whenever any city or town in 
British Columbia is incorporated at'ter the 
passing of this Act, all persons who have 



been practising as chemists or druggists 
on their own account in any such city or 
town before its incorporation for the 
period of six months shall be entitled to 
be registered under this Act without 
examination, provided application is made 
therefor within the period of six months 
after such incorporation." 

(5) Section 16 of the said Act is here- 
by repealed, and the following substi- 
tuted in lieu thereof ; 

•' 16. No person shall, within the limits 
of any incorporated city or town in this 
province, keep open shop for the retailing, 
dispensing, or compoimding poisons, or 
sell, or attempt to sell, any of the articles 
mentioned in Schedule ' A ' or Schedule 
' B ' to this .-Kct, unless such person is 
registered as a licentiate of pharmacy 
under this .\ct, under the penalty set 
forth in section 20 in this Act. A 
certified clerk may, under the provi- 
sions of this Act, compound prescriptions 
or sell poisonous drugs or chemicals while 
acting m that capacity." 

(6) Section 17 of said Act is hereby 
repealed, and the following substituted in 
lieu thereof : 

"17. Articles named or described in 
Schedule ' A ' or Schedule ' B ' shall be 
deemed to be poisonous within the mean- 
ing of this Act ; and the said Council 
hereinbefore mentioned may from time to 
time by resolution declare that any article 
in such resolution named ought to be 
deemed a poison within the meaning of 
this Act, and thereupon the said Council 
shall submit the same for the approval of 
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council ; and 
if such approval is given, then such reso- 
lution and approval shall be advertised in 
the British Columbia Gazette, and on the 
expiration of one month from such adver- 
tisement the article named in such resolu- 
tion shall be deemed to be a poison with- 
in the meaning of this -A.ct, and the same 
shall be subject to the provisions of this 
Act, or such of them as may be directed 
by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council." 

(7) Section 18 of said .\ct is hereby 
repealed, and the following substituted in 
lieu thereof: 

" 18. No person shall sell any poison 
named in Schedule ' A ' either by whole- 
sale or retail unless the box, bottle, ves- 
sel, wrapper, or cover in which such 
poison is contained is distinctly labelled 
with the name of the article and the word 
' poison,' and, if sold by retail, then also 
with the name and address of the pro- 
prietor of the establishment in which 
such poison is sold ; and no person shall 
sell any poison mentioned in Schedule 
' A ' to any person unknown to the seller 
unless introduced by some person known 
to the seller, and on every sale of any 
such article the person actually selling the 
same shall, before delivery, make an entry 
in a book to be kept for that purpose in 
the form set forth in Schedule ' C ' to this 
Act, stating the date of the sale, the name 
and address of the purchaser, the name 
and quantity of the article sold, the pur- 
pose for which it is stated by the purchas 
er to be required, and the name of the 



person, if any, who introduced him, to 
which entry the signature of the pur- 
chaser shall be affixed, under the penalty 
set forth in section 20 of this Act : Pro- 
vided the person actually selling the 
poison shall be liable to the penalty men- 
tioned in this Act." 

(8) Section 19 of said Act is hereby 
repealed, and the following substituted in 
lieu thereof : 

" 19. .A.ny article enumerated in Sched- 
ule ' B ' to this Act shall not be sold un- 
less the container of such be distinctly 
labelled with the name of the article, 
name and address of the seller, and the 
word ' poison ' affixed thereto, under the 
penalty set forth in section 20 of this 
Act." 

(9) Section 27 of said Act is hereby 
repealed, and the following substituted in 
lieu thereof : 

" 27. It shall be lawful for the Lieuten- 
ant-Governor in Council to appoint a fit 
and proper person to be known as ' Pub- 
lic Analyst,' who must be a member of 
the Pharmaceutical Association, and who 
may be allowed to charge such fees in 
respect of analyses to be made by him as 
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may 
approve. And in any prosecution under 
the said Act a certificate of such Public 
.Analyst as to the identity of any drug, 
chemical, or compound shall be deemed 
good and sufificient evidence of the same." 

(10) Section 28 of said Act, and sec- 
tion I of the " Pharmacy Act Amend- 
ment Act, 1892," are hereby repealed, 
and the following substituted therefor : 

" 28. Nothing in this Act contained 
shall prevent any duly qualified member 
of the medical profession or surgeon from 
engaging in or carrying on the business 
of an apothecary, chemist, or druggist, 
provided that when any such duly quali- 
fied member of the medical profession or 
surgeon desires to carry on the business 
of a chemist or druggist, as defined by 
the said Act, he shall not be required to 
pass the examination, but shall register as 
a chemist or druggist and otherwise com- 
ply with all the requirements of the said 
Act. And it shall also be incumbent 
upon any medical practitioner or surgeon 
now carrying on the business of a chemist 
or druggist within the incorporated cities 
and towns of the province to register an- 
nually and otherwise conform to all the 
requirements of the said Act." 

(11) The said Act is further amended 
by adding thereto the following section : 

" 29. In any conviction under this .\ct 
the penalty may be enforced by distress 
and sale of the goods of the offender, and 
in case of there being no sutTicient distress 
found out of which the same can be 
levied, such offender shall be liable to be 
imprisoned for any period not exceeding 
one month. Every such penalty when 
collected shall be paid to the Treasurer 
of the Pharmaceutical .Association of 
British Columbia for the general purposes 
of the said Association." 

(12) Section 7 of the "Pharmacy Act, 
1891," is hereby amended by striking out 
sub-section (/). 



58 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Canadian Druggist 

WILLIAM J. DYAS, Editor and Publisher. 
MARCH 15TH, 1895. 

The /fid!i7 Rubber and GuttaPercha 
Journal is authority for the statement 
that a member of the firm of Messrs. 
A. & F. Pears, together with an associate 
inventor, have been successful in manu- 
facturing a perfectly fireproof celluloid 
from spent fibres from paper mills, which 
they are pro[)osing to manufacture on a 
large scale. 



a liberal contributor to the Pharmaceuti- 
cal Society's Benevolent Fund, donated 
^1,000 to the Dartford Cottage Hospi- 
tal, and helped to support a number of 
charitable and religious institutes in his 
native town. Mr. Burroughs leaves a 
widow and three small children. 



The manufacturers of the new antipy- 
retic and analgesic called "Antitoxin" 
have announced their determination to 
take proceedings to prevent the use of 
this word, except as applied to their pro- 
duct. They claim that the name, as used 
to designate the diphtheria serum, is an 
infringement of their trade mark, which 
was registered some years ago. 



The graduating class of the Ontario 
College of Pharmacy are to be congratu- 
lated on the unqualified success which 
attended their dinner, held on the evening 
of March ist. The menu was good, the 
speeches witty and enjoyable, and the 
management excellent. Chairman Brown 
and the other members of the committee 
who had the affair in charge showed 
what the " red, yellow, and black '' can 
do in providing an enjoyable evening. 
The O.C.P. is always ahead. 



Death of Mr. S. M. Burroughs. 

Silas Mainville Burroughs, of the firm 
of Burroughs, Wellcome &: Co., Snow 
Hill, London, England, died at Monte 
Carlo, whence he had gone but a short 
time previously for his health, on Febru- 
ary 6th. 

Mr. Burroughs was an American by 
birth, having been born in Medina, N.Y., 
December 24th, 1846, and began his 
pharmaceutical career in Lockport, N.Y., 
afterwards entering the house of John 
Wyeth & Brothet, Philadelphia. In t88o 
the firm of Burroughs, Wellcome & Co. 
was formed, and the success of the busi- 
ness then established has been almost 
phenomenal. 

In social, business, and religious circles 
Mr. Burroughs was a prominent figure, 
and made hosts of friends by his urbanity 
of manner, generous disposition, and a 
distinct personality, which impressed all 
who came in contact with him. He was 



Justice to a Manufacturing House. 

There appeared in the Toronto World 
of February 22nd a statement that Parke, 
Davis & Co., of Walkerville, Ontario, were 
seeking to introduce low-grade alcohol 
into their Canadian laboratory for the 
manufacture of patent medicines, and in 
the issue of the same paper of February 
26th an anonymous letter appeared, al- 
leging that the low-grade alcohol was 
desired " for the manufacture of pharma- 
ceutical preparations intended to be used 
for the making up of prescriptions." That 
a very great wrong had been done this 
firm in th<; publication of such false state- 
ments every one will admit, and the com- 
plete retraction of the charges and insinu- 
ations by the World in its issue of March 
2nd was but an act of justice towards 
the firm. 

Parke, Davis & Co. indignantly deny 
that their petition to the excise authori- 
ties had any bearing whatever on low- 
grade alcohol. What they wanted was 
simply permission to introduce pure, 
standard, rectified spirit in bond for the 
manufacture of pharmaceuticals designed 
for export on a large scale to foreign coun- 
tries. Such standard spirit can be im- 
ported in bond at the price of 25 cents 
per imperial gallon. At present Parke, 
Davis & Co. are greatly hampered by the 
high market price of alcohol in the Do- 
minion— $1.17 per imperial gallon in 
bond, and to this must be added the ex- 
cise duty of $1.50 proof gallon ! Their 
proposition to the excise authorities WSis 
cheerfully complied with ; will reduce 
substantially the cost of producing goods 
for export ; will enable them to compete 
with European manufacturers in the mar- 
kets of the world outside the Dominion ; 
and will not involve the slightest sacrifice 
of quality or potency in the finished pre- 
parations. 

They also strenuously aver that no low- 
grade alcohol has ever entered into any 
preparation of their manufacture, and their 
petition had no bearing on any save the 
pure, standard, rectified spirit. 

Practically, there is no such thing on 
the market as " low-grade alcohol," unless 



this term be applied to dilute alcohol. 
Inasmuch as every manufacturer is per- 
fectly free to purchase pure spirit (94 per 
cent.) and dilute it in accordance with 
the needs of the product manufactured 
(some preparations require strong alcohol 
as a solvent, and others require dilute 
spirit), it would be absurd to talk of low- 
grade alcohol in this connection. The 
only other form of " low-grade alcohol " 
is a certain crude product supplied exclu- 
sively to establishments manufacturing 
vinegar under bond. The well-known 
" wood alcohol " could not possibly be 
used in the manufacture of pharmaceuti- 
cals, owing to its obnoxious odor. 

The charge made that Parke, Davis & 
Co. desire to employ a low-grade spirit 
for the manufacture of patent medicines 
was another gratuitous misstatement. This 
house has, we understand, no proprietary 
interest in any patent medicine, nor does 
it advertise or sell any of its products to 
the public. It confines its operations en- 
tirely to the medical profession, which it 
reaches through the usual channels of the 
wholesale drug trade and retail pharma- 
cists. 

The reputation of this house throughout 
Canada is such that no druggist, we be- 
lieve, would give credence to any such 
charges; and we feel it a duty towards 
one of our most enterprising and reliable 
manufacturing concerns to give the facts 
as they actually are. 



Tlie Ownersliip of tlie Prescription. 

The question as to whom a prescrip- 
tion really belongs, when it has been 
made up by a pharmacist, has frequently 
been raised in connection with French 
pharmacy. No special rule has been laid 
down with regard to it, and, consequently, 
pharmacists have been in the habit of 
keeping the recipes or not, as they think 
fit. M. Bogelet, the lawyer of the Gen- 
eral Association of French Pharmacists, 
has expressed the opinion that a general 
system should be adopted for pharma- 
cists to retain, for the purpose of personal 
guarantee, all prescriptions containg either 
active poisons or those that are danger- 
ous. They should, however, undertake 
to deliver proper copies, bearing the ad- 
dress of the pharmacy, to patients. Article 
15 of the proposed new law touches the 
question slightly by saying : " If pharma- 
cists retain a medical prescription, they 
ought to deliver an exact copy, if this is 
asked for." — Chemist and Druggist. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(58A) 



Onyx and Marble Soda Water Apparatus 



THERE IS NONE BETTER THAN 



PUFFER'S "FRIGID" 



IT LEADS THEM ALL. 



'T'AKE advantage of the 
opportunity and estab- 
lish a successful Soda- 
Water Trade It is a cash 
business, and yields large 
returns. 






QONSTRUCTED of 
Beautiful Onyx or Fan- 
cy Marbles. Every part 
made from the best ma- 
terials, and in the latest 
manner. 




'pO establish a good trade 
you need a practical 
and attractive apparatus. 
There is none better than 
Puffer's " Frigid." 












gXTRACTS and Fruit 
Juices of the highest 
grade at prices lower than 
ever. 

A large number of second 
hand apparatus at low 
prices. 



PRICES REASONABLE. TERMS EASY. 

Liberal allowance for old goods taken in trade. Illustrated Catalogue mailed free on reqyest. 

A. D. PUFFER & SONS, 



BRANCHES: 

39 and 41 Centre St., New York. 

264 Fifth Ave., Chicago. 

538 Magazine St., New Orleans. 



38 to 48 PORTLAND STREET, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



(58b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



plctcher nianafactaring Co., 

" 440 YON6E STREET, TORONTO. 



Manufacturers of and Dealers in 



Soda rountains - Generators - Cylinders - Freezers 

And every other article necessary for carrying on the Soda Water Business. 

THE accompanying fount 
shows an entirely new 
idea for counter apparatus. 

The Canopy is made from 
natural hardwood, highly fin- 
ished. 

The Fount is heavily silver- 
plated on pure white metal ; 
all connections and attach- 
ments are made from pure 
block tin, thereby insuring 
Soda Water absolutely free 
from the metal poison so often 
found in old apparatus. 

The Body of Fount is 
double, having a dead air 
space between inside and 
outside linings. Inside of 
this is a coil of block tin 
pipe, reaching to where our 
name-plate appears. This 
plate is hinged so that it may 
be raised when filling body 
with broken ice, for which we 
supply a special funnel free. 
Fount has Eight P.atent 
Pneumatic Syrup Jars and 
Two P-^TENT Drip Plates 
fitted into slab under Soda 
Taps. These plates can be 
lifted out for purpose of pack- 
ing ice around coolers and 
syrup jars. 

Cooler box is fitted under 
counter, is easy of access, 
and no trouble to fill with 
ice. 
, We supply with the Fount : 
Cajiopy, Marble Slab, Eight 
Patent Syrup Jars, Cooler 
Box, Six Silver Plated Tum- 
bler Holders, Tivelve Tumblers, 
and all connections and pipes 
ready for attaching to cylinder. 

The FRIGID B FOUNT. 

We make this Fount in Style A, without Canopy, and a smaller slab, but with all other attachments the same as Style B. 
F.O.B. Toronto. Counter e.vtra in all cases. Any style made to order. 




Dealers in Fmit nil^, Fruit Extracts. Flavorings, Etc. 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



59 



The Bacteriological Examination of 
Water. ' 

By R. a. Cmi'is, F.I.C. 

During tlie last few years the literature 
of the subject of Hacteriology has liecome 
so extensive that anything like a general 
epitome of the subject is quite beyond 
the scope of a paper for a single evening. 
I shall, therefore, restrict my remarks 
to that de|)artment of the subject which 
has a practical application in the examina- 
tion of water for drinking purposes. 

Before proceeding to the subject 
proper, it may, however, be well to give 
a general idea of the characters of the 
micro-organisms under consideration, so 
that those who are not already familiar 
with them may be able to understand 
more clearly the facts referred to. Those 
organisms commonly grouped together 
under the term "bacteria" are unicellu- 
lar bodies of extremely minute propor- 
tions ; some idea of their size may Ije 
given by the statements that if 10,000 
of some of the smaller forms were placed 
end to end the thread would be only one 
inch long, and a cubic inch of the 
organisms in mass would contain ten 
millions of millions of individuals. These 
organisms are not all of the same form, 
and, in consequence, may be arranged 
into various classes ; perhaps Cohn's sys- 
tem is the most convenient for general 
use : 

(i) Coccacea;, Ball bacteria. Cells 
spherical or shortly elliptical. 

(2) Bacteriacea;. Rod-bacteria. Cells 
distinctly longer than broad, straight rods, 
varying in length, 

(3) Spiro-bacteria, Vibrionaceffi. Cork- 
screw bacteria. Cells curved, often twisted 
into long or short spirals. 

(4) Desmo-bacteria. Thread bacteria. 
Cells united to form long threads, some 
being enclosed in sheaths. 

The bacterium consists of protoplasm 
enclosed in a membrane, usually of an 
albuminous nature. Some species pos- 
sess fiagella, by means of which they have 
the power of motion, and which may be 
situated on certain parts of the cell only, 
or distributed over the whole surface. In 
some species no flagella have been ob- 
served. Of the motile forms some species 
may be seen to dart rapidly across the 
field of vision, others move hut sluggishly. 

Some forms develop distinctive colors, 
but I he majority are colorless or yel- 
lowish. 

A fact of the utmost importance is that 
bacteria are unable to rise in air, unless 
carried upward by a draught, and in 
water, at rest, most species subside to the 
bottom. 

Many kinds of bacteria produce spores, 
which are far more resistant to the 
effects of temperature, etc., than the 
parent bacteria ; these spores often remain 
as such for a considerable period of time, 
and then develop when favorable condi- 
tions obtain. 

'Read at a meeting of the Brighton .■\ssociation of 
Pharmacy. 



The application of bacteriology to the 
subject of water supply may conveniently 
be considered under three sections : 

(i) The determination of the efficiency 
of filters. 

(2) The general examination of water 
as to suitability for drinking purposes. 

(.^) The special examination of polluted 
water for individual species of bacilli. 

I. THE DETERMINATION OF THE EFFI- 
CIENCY OF FILTERS. 

The value of bacteriological examina- 
tion for this purpose has for several years 
past been recognized, and the system is 
now in full operation in connection with 
the water supply of many towns. 

For this purpose samples of water must 
be taken before and after filtration — in 
such a position that the samples- shall 
fairly represent the water actually run- 
ning at the time — and the number of 
bacilli in each sample determined. The 
bottles in which the samples are taken 
must be previously sterilized, either by 
heating for three hours to a temperature 
of 130° — 160" C, or by filling with a 
solution of bichloride of mercury 
(i — 1,000), allowing to stand one hour, 
and then rinsing six or eight times with 
water previously rendered sterile by boil- 
ing for an hour in a flask plugged with 
cotton-wool, and covered with a small, 
sterilized beaker. Water may also be ster- 
ilized by passing through a Chamberland- 
Pasteur or a Berkefeld filter. The stop- 
pers of the sterilized bottles are tied over 
with sterilized gutta-percha tissue, and 
transported in tins or other suitable con- 
tainers. 

When taking the samples, every care 
must be exercised to avoid the possibility 
of infection from any external source ; 
the stopper must be removed by grasping 
between finger and thumb, together with 
the gutta-percha capping, and not laid 
down upon the ground, but held until the 
sample has been taken ; the bottle is held 
in the other hand in such a position that 
no bacteria from the skin can enter the 
bottle ; this is easily arranged when the 
supply is a flowing stream, but if a pool or 
reservoir the bottle should be held by a 
sterile clamp. The neck of the bottle 
must be completely immersed, so as to 
avoid the entrance of any dust which 
may have settled upon the surface of the 
water. When full, the stopper is re- 
placed, and tied over as before. If the 
supply is carried by a pipe, the tap should 
be turned on for several minutes before 
taking the sample. 

when the test has to be carried out at 
a distance, it is needful to pack the tins 
in ice, so that the temperature may not 
rise above 4° or 5° C. by the time the test 
is made. The case shown is one in con- 
stant use, the temperature twenty-four 
hours after packing is 0° C. The reason 
why it is so important to keep down the 
temperature is that the organisms multi- 
ply extremely rapidly at ordinary tempera- 
tures, but very slowly, or not at all, when 
kept at or near 0° C. Unfortunately, 



however, some species of bacteria are 
killed at the freezing point, consequently 
the results obtained may be lower than 
the truth. Moreover, the development of 
those which are not killed is much re- 
tarded by long continued low temperature. 
The bacteria in pure water obtained from 
deep springs usually multiply far more 
rapidly than those from streams ; this is 
no doubt owing to the fact that the former 
waters do not contain any of those pro- 
ducts of bacterial life which inhibit their 
further growth, whereas the latter usually 
do contain such products, and living bac- 
teria in far larger numbers in addition. 
As an instance of rapid multiplication, 
Frankiand gives the following figures : 

Kent Well. On day of collection 7 bacteria. 

" After I day at 20° C 21 " 

" After 3 days at 20' C. 495,000 " 

The multiplication usually attains a 
maximum by about the seventh day, in 
the case of spring waters, but not until 
the fifteenth to twenty-fifth day in impure 
water of streams, after which the numbers 
rapidly decline. 

The number of bacteria is ascertained 
by introducing small portions of the water 
into a suitable nutrient, and counting the 
colonies developed. This is commonly 
carried out in small flat-bottomed glass 
dishes known as Petri's dishes, which are 
furnished with covers of the same form. 
The most convenient medium for cultiva- 
tion is gelatine-peptone, because this is 
solid at the ordinary temperature, yet may 
be liquefied by a very gentle heat, and 
thus easily and uniformly mixed with the 
water under examination. For its pre- 
paration a pound of lean minced beef is 
infused with a litre of cold water, and 
allowed to stand for twenty four hours in 
a cold place, then strained and pressed, 
adding water to the strained liquor to 
produce one litre, if needed. To this 
liquid are added 100 grammes of fine 
white gelatine, 10 grammes of dry pep- 
tone, and 5 grammes of salt, and the 
whole placed in a steam sterilizer for an 
hour, after which it must be carefully 
neutralized, or rather rendered faintly 
alkaline. As the degree of alkalinity has 
a most important influence upon the 
growth of bacteria, the best plan is to 
remove a small portion of the medium 
and titrate by means of j-^ sodium hy- 
drate, using phenol-phthalein as an indi- 
cator ; having in this way ascertained the 
amount required for exact neutralization 
the correct quantity of normal sodium 
hydrate is added together with i gramme 
(per litre) of crystalline sodium carbon- 
ate ; this being the degree of alkalinity 
which gives the best results. To this 
liquor, when cool, the whites of two eggs 
are added, and after admixture the whole 
is placed in the steamer for twenty min- 
utes, when the coagulated albumen is re- 
moved by straining through linen, and 
finally cleared by filtration through white 
filter paper at a temperature of about 
45° C. The filtrate is collected in a flask 
which is plugged with cotton-wool, pre- 
viously sterilized at 130' to 140° C- trans- 



6o 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



ferred to steam sterilizer, and heated on 
four successive days during ten to fifteen 
minutes. Sterilized test tubes, also 
plugged with cotton-wool, may be partly 
filled and sterilized in the same way. 
Thus prepared, the medium may be pre- 
served in the dark for months. 

For the actual tests, at least four dishes 
are required for each sample, and these 
t igether with all other glass apparatus 
should be sterilized as usual in the air 
oven, several pipettes divided into ,5- cc. 
will be needed, also glass flasks of 100 cc. 
capacity for diluting tlie water. 

The dishes having been placed on a 
level table and the nutrient melted at 
about 40° C , about 10 cc. is carefully 
introduced into each dish, removing the 
cover only so far as to allow of the liquid 
being poured in, and taking care to avoid 
infecting the nutrient, by using sterilized 
forceps for removing the cotton-wool 
from neck of flask, the lip of which must 
also be gently heated ui Bunsen flame. 
Before the medium has solidified varying 
quantities of the water samples are intro- 
duced by means of the sterilized pipettes. 
Convenient amounts are i cc, i cc, 
^ cc, ]'jj cc, and yc^„ cc, but with very 
bad water y^Vij ^'^- (o"" 6^'en less) will be 
sufficient. These smaller quantities are 
measured by first preparing dilutions of 
the original water with 99 or 999 times 
its volume of sterilized water. The water 
and medium have now to be thoroughly 
mixed by tilting the dishes backwards and 
forwards several times, and then set at 
rest in a cold place (refrigerated during 
hot weather) until thoroughly set, when 
they are transferred to an inculiator and 
maintained at about 20° C. In those 
dishes which contain a sufficiently small 
portion of the water, each individual or- 
ganism is separated from the others by 
mixing with so large a proportion of 
medium, and when this solidifies each one 
is kept in its place, consequently when it 
multiplies it in time produces a "colony" 
sufficiently large to be .seen by the naked 
eye or a pocket lens. The dishes are 
therefore examined from time to time 
during several days. By the end of the 
second day, but frequently much earlier 
than this, some colonies will be seen, and 
these will increase in number until all are 
developed, when they must be counted. 
If few in number this may easily be done, 
but, if many, a special counting apparatus 
will be required. That usually em|)loyed 
is Wolfhugel's, which consists of a black- 
ened plate, upon which the dish is placed, 
and covered with a glass plate divided 
into squares. The dish is viewed through 
this divided plate, and the number of col- 
onies in five of the squares (diagonally) is 
counted. From this the number in the 
whole dish may be easily calculated. 
The following figures are given as an 
instance of results actually obtained : 
S cc. contained 230 col's = 460 bact. per cc. 

tScc. " 45 " = 450 " " 

j^cc. " 47 " = 470 

rjijcc. " 5 " = 500 " " 

nArirCc. " i " =1,000 " " 

In such a case, where the number of 



organisms is comparatively small, it is 
evident that the figures obtained from 
the smaller quantities are less reliable 
than those from the larger, and in calcu- 
lating results it is well to omit them, the 
actual number to be certified in the above 
example would be 460, the mean of the 
first three plates. On the other hand, 
when the number is very large, the results 
from smaller quantities are more reliable 
than from larger ones, where the difficulty 
of accurate counting is a very real one. 

Having thus ascertained the number of 
bacteria in the water before and after 
filtration, a simple calculation gives the 
percentage removed. When working 
well, sand-filters, as used by most water 
companies, will remove from 95 to 99.9 
per cent, of the bacteria. This remark- 
able result is explained by the fact that 
the bacteria at first arrested by the upper 
surface of sand there multiply, forming a 
slimy coating, which serves as a very 
efficient filtering medium for the water. 
It follows, therefore, that a newly-con- 
structed filter does not purify the water 
well, but requires a few days to attain its 
maximum of efficiency- It also follows 
that the rate of filtration becomes slower 
as the slimy coating increases in thick- 
ness — so much so that from time to time 
the upper surface of fine sand must be 
scraped off to the depth of about }i to }( 
inch. 

The vast majority of bacteria present 
in natural waters are of a harmless charac- 
ter, but there is no reason to believe that 
pathogenic organisms, such as cholera 
and typhoid germs, will behave in any 
way differently from the ordinary " water 
bacteria," in fact, the experience of Ham- 
burg during the cholera epidemic of 1892 
shows that they behave similarly. The 
towns of Hamburg and Altona both drew 
their supply from the river Elbe. The 
former received the water from a point 
above the outfall of the town sewers, and 
did not filter it before supplying, whilst 
the latter took its supply below the out- 
fall of sewers ^of both Hamburg and Al- 
tona. The neighboring town of Wands- 
beck received water from an inland lake 
after filtration. The deaths from cholera 
in the three towns were as follows : 

Hamburg 12.28 per thousand. 

Altona 2.34 " 

Wandslieck 2. 15 " 

2. THE OENER.-M- EXAMIN.^TION OF WATER 
AS TO SUITABILITY FOR DRINK- 
ING PURPOSES. 

The first step in this examination is 
the same as already described, but it is 
evident that the bare determination of 
the total number of organisms present is 
of practically little value, because the 
great majority will usually be harmless 
forms, and the purest natural waters are 
capable of sustaining the life of vast num- 
ber of bacteria ; moreover, as has been 
before observed, a water naturally very 
pure bacteriologically becomes teeming 
with bacterial life a few days after collec- 
tion, by multiplication. There are, how- 



ever, other considerations of much greater 
value, viz., the number of bacteria which 
cause liquefaction of the gelatine, and the 
number of different species present. 
When examining the dishes for the num- 
ber of colonies it will be apparent that 
great differences exist between them, some 
appear within thirty-six hours or even 
earlier, whilst others do not become visible 
for several days ; moreover, some are 
found only upon the surface of the gela- 
tine, others are entirely embedded beneath 
the surface ; the color may vary, the 
commonest being yellowish or white, red- 
dish, brown, or gray. One very impor- 
tant difference is that while some forms 
cause rapid liquefaction of the gelatine, 
others liquefy it but slowly ; others, again, 
do not possess this power at all. This 
liquefaction may extend far beyond the 
visible circumference of the visible 
colony, or may be confined to a small 
radius ; the liquid gelatine may be thin or 
viscid, transparent or turbid. The form 
of the non-liquefying colonies is also im- 
portant — round, oval, or irregular, or of 
characteristic form. 

These liquefying bacteria are very fre- 
quently the cause of putrefaction, and 
produce unpleasant odors consequent 
upon the decomposition of the gelatine ; 
moreover, they are not able to live and 
multiply in pure waters to anything 
like the extent that the non-liquefying 
species do, hence their presence in large 
numbers is a very bad feature. 

A water which becomes polluted by 
sewage and other household filth is 
thereby contaminated not only by 
great numbers of bacteria, but by many 
species, whereas a water drawn from a 
deep spring or other source remote from 
polluting influences contains compara- 
tively few, and very few, perhaps only 
three or four, species of bacteria. The 
gelatines cultures having been made as 
'usual, they are carefully examined, and a 
• minute portion of each form of colony is 
removed by means of a needle (pre- 
viously sterilized by heating in the Bun- 
sen flame, and cooled), and transferred to 
test-tubes of gelatine or other culture 
media. The inoculation of test tubes is 
carried out either by " stroke " or " punc- 
ture " as follows : 

For stroke culture test tubes are used, 
containing gelatine, agar-agar, or sterilized 
potatoes. Agar-agar culture medium is 
prepared in the same way as gelatine- 
peptone, substituting for the gelatine 
20 grams of agar-agar, which, however, 
requires prolonged heating to ensure solu- 
tion. Potatoes are difficult to sterilize ; 
they are first washed, soaked in solution 
of bichloride of mercury (i-iooo) for an 
hour or two, and then peeled ; again 
placed in bichloride solution for five 
minutes, washed with sterilized water, and 
cut into slices about one-third of an inch 
thick, with a sterilized knife. The slices 
are then put into sterile cultivation plates 
or test-tubes (plugged with sterilized 
wool), and placed in the steam sterilizer 
for an hour longer. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



6t 



The wire having been heated in a flame 
and allowed to cool, without l)eing 
touched or laid down, a minute portion 
of a single colony is taken up on its 
point ; the test-tube, containing nutrient 
soliilified in a slanting direction, is held 
in the left hand, the plug removed be- 
tween the backs of the third and fourth 
fingers of the right hand, taking great care 
that the part of the plug which enters the 
tube shall not come into contact with any 
other object, the wire is then passed into 
the tube without touching the sides, and 
gently drawn across the medium without 
injuring the surface. It is now again 
plugged, and [ilaced in the incubator — if 
gelatine, a temperature of 20" C.; if agar- 
agar, or potatoes that of 37° C. — is usu- 
ally employed. These cultivations show 
certain peculiarities of growth whereby 
further differentiation of species may be 
obtained. 

For puncture, the nutrient should be 
solidified horizontally, and the lube being 
held mouth downwards the infected wire 
is pushed upwards through the medium, 
right to the bottom of the tube. Here, 
again, differences soon become apparent : 
the bacteria may grow along the whole 
track of the needle, or only at or near sur- 
face, or at bottom only ; the growtli ftiay 
be a fine cord or a thick column, with or 
without radiating processes ; the colony 
may spread over surface or be confined 
near the puncture ; the gelatine may be 
liquefied in a funnel-shaped or other 
depression from surface, or equally over 
whole surface, etc., etc. Some species 
produce bubbles of gas, whereas others 
do not. 

Having in this way ascertained that 
several species are present, small portions 
of each culture may be e.xamined micro- 
scopically, when it is possible that further 
differences may be observed, e.g., two 
colonies, otherwise very similar, may be 
found to be a bacillus or micrococcus 
respectively. The growth of a colony 
may be observed by cultivation in the 
hanging drop ; that is, by inoculating with 
a very minute speck of a colony, a small 
drop 01 gelatine or agar-agar on a cover- 
glass, inverted over a glass slide having a 
depression in centre, the cover-glass being 
kept in position by a minute portion of 
vaseline at one corner. 

By these means and other special cul- 
tures, when necessary, the number of 
species may be ascertained. Migula 
states that no good drinking water con- 
tains more than 10 different species. 

3. THE SPECIAL EX.AMIN.ATIOX OF POL- 
LUTED W..\TER FOR INDIVIDU.^L 
SPECIES OF BACILLI. 

Pathogenic bacteria frequently find 
access to water used for drinking pur- 
poses, inainly through sewage pollution, 
and, unfortunately, some of these species 
are capable of living in water for consid- 
erable periods of time, thus giving every 
opportunity for spreading the disease. 

It has been demonstrated that Bacillus 
typhosus is capable of existing in a living 



condition in sterilized water for some 
months, but in ordinary water its duration 
is more restricted ; this is probably due 
to ■' crowding out '' by other and more 
numerous water bacilli. 

The cholera spirillum is rapidly 
destroyed when introduced into sterilized 
distilled water, but the addition of small 
quantities of nitrates or chlorides greatly 
increases its vitality. Most shallow wells 
or streams of a polluted character contain 
these salts in considerable traces, hence 
the conditions are favorable for the con- 
servation of this bacillus, should it obtain 
access. The experiments hitherto made 
upon the vitality of cholera spirillum in 
ordinary potable water are not very satis- 
factory, but there is no doubt that it is 
capable of living for a considerable time. 
Moreover, the experience of Hamburg and 
Altona, already quoted, would seem to 
show this. 

The particular bacteria which have 
usually to be sought are those of typhoid 
fever and cholera, although others, such 
as those of anthrax, septicKmia, or tetanus, 
have occasionally been found. I shall 
confine my remarks to the detection of the 
bacilli of typhoid fever and cholera. 

The Typhoid Bacillus. 

The difficulties surrounding the detec- 
tion of this bacillus are very great, partly 
because it is commonly accompanied by 
far greater numbers of other bacilli derived 
from sewage, and partly because it is a 
disease not adapted for physiological test 
upon the lower animals. 

On this account, an ordinary plate cul- 
tivation can scarcely ever be successful in 
giving a culture of the specific organism 
unaccompanied by other species, partic- 
ularly the Bacillus coli coiumuiiis, con- 
stantly present in human fieces. Under 
these circumstances, special methods 
must be adopted to destroy the other 
species, after which tests are applied to 
distinguish between the B tyyhosus and 
B coli. communis, or any other species 
which may occasionally be met with. 
The water is first introduced into phenol- 
broth, or the sediment obtained by filter- 
ing a large quantity of the water through 
a Berkefeld or Chamberland-Pasteur filter, 
and is cultivated in the same medium. 
This medium is prepared as follows : — 

Some beef-broth is prepared exactly as 
described for gelatine-peptone, hut omit- 
ting the gelatine, and making neutral 
instead of slightly alkaline. A number of 
test-tubes each receive 10 cc. of the liquid, 
and in addition three, six, or nine drops 
of the following solution: — 

Pure phenol 5 grnis. 

" hydrochloric acid 4 " ■ 

Distilled water too " 

These tubes are kept in the incubator 
at 37° C. for twenty four hours, whereby 
any microbes will be destroyed. To 
these sterile tubes one to ten drops of the 
water are added, and, after admixture, 
replaced in the incubator. If the sedi- 
ment be used, a larger quantity nf phenol- 
broth should be employed. At tiie 



expiration of twenty-four hours, and 
agam at forty-eight and seventy-two hours, 
any of the tubes which appear turbid are 
to be submitted to plate cultivation, and 
the resulting colonies carefully examined 
for resemblance to those of the typhoid 
bacillus, and if any be present these are 
tested by {a) cultivation on potatoes, {b) 
inoculation into gelatine tubes, {c) cultiva- 
tion in milk, (d) indol test, and {e) general 
microscopical characters. 

The plate-cultures of typhoid bacillus 
develop colonies of two forms. Some 
spread themselves out upon the surface, 
forming a translucent, almost transparent, 
film with uneven edges ; radiating lines 
may be seen like medullary rays, and in 
addition are lines similar to the annular 
zones of wood. These colonies may 
become as large as one-third inch in 
diameter. Other colonies do not grow 
upon the surface, and are quite small, 
opaque and yellowish-gray in color, and 
somewhat lemon-shaped in form. 

{a) Cultivated upon potatoes at 37° C. 
these interior colonies produce an almost 
invisible grayish-white growth after two 
days, but on touching the surface with a 
needle, it is found to be covered with a 
felt-like pellicle. This remarkable appear- 
ance is not always shown, depending upon 
the acidity, or otherwise, of the potatoes. 

{d) Introduced into gelatine tubes by 
puncture, it grows chiefly on the surface, 
producing a thin, grayish-white surface 
colony. If, however, the gelatine be 
melted and the bacilli then added, care- 
fully mixed, and allowed to solidify, then 
cultivated at 20° C. no air-bubbles appear 
in the mass ; this is a very important test, 
because B. coli communis always produces 
gas-bubbles. 

(c) Milk is sterilized by heating to 58°- 
65° C. for an hour or two on five to eight 
successive days ; into this medium some 
of the bacilli are introduced, and placed 
in incubator at blood heat ; after twenty- 
four to forty-eight hours the milk is 
faintly acid and not coagulated, whereas 
the B. coli communis renders it strongly 
acid with coagulation. 

(d) The indol test is made, as sug- 
gested, by Kitasato. To 10 cc. of the 
culture in ordinary peptone broth, grown 
for twenty-four hours, i cc. of a solution 
of sodium or potassium nitrite (.02 grm. 
in 100 cc.) is added, and then a little 
strong sulphuric acid ; the B. coli com- 
munis produces indol, yielding a rose or 
deep red coloration, a reaction not 
obtained from cultures of the typhoid 
bacillus. 

(t?) Microscopical Characters. — The ty- 
phoid bacillus is about three times as 
long as broad, with rounded ends, and 
mostly occurs singly. It is very motile, 
and has numerous long flagella. The B. 
coli communis is broader in proportion, 
and is provided with one to six flagella. 
For examination, it is necessary to stain 
the bacilli, which is carried out in the 
following way. A small quantity of one 
of the colonies having been mixed with a 
little water on a glass side, a minute drop 



62 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



of this mixture is placed upon a sterile 
cover-glass, and allowed to become ilry, 
after which it is fixed by holding over a 
Bunsen flame between the fins^cr and 
thumb, until unpleasantly warm ; the 
cover is then placed with the bacilli 
downwards upon a little aqueous solution 
nf gentian violet for ten minutes, alter 
which It is removed, washed with water, 
and examined by a high power. 

The fl.igella are not stained in this wav, 
but they may be stained when obtained 
from a young agar-agar culture by employ- 
ing a mordant consisting of 

Tannin solution (l to 4 parts of water). 10 cc 
Saturated solution of ferrous ...ulphate.. 5 ^'^ 
Saturated aqueous solution of fuchsine. 1 cc 
Caustic soda solution i cc 

.^fter fixing, the cover-glass is covered 
with a large drop of this mordant, and 
gently heated until it begins to steam, for 
about a minute ; then rinsed thoroughly, 
if necessary, using a little absolute alco- 
hol to remove mordant. After again 
allowing to dry, the following slain is used 
(after filteration) : 

Fuchsuie 5 grnis. 

Saturated aniline water,. * 100 cc. 

Let stand twenty-four hours with frequent 
agitation, and filter. By this means the 
llagella are stained pink, whilst the proto- 
plasm of the bacilli is a very deep red. 
T/ie Spirillum of Cholt.ra. 
Koch recommends the following meth- 
od for identification of cholera spirilla in 
water : To 100 cc. of the water add i 
grm. of peptone and i grm. of salt, and 
place in incubator at 37° C. Aga' agar 
plates are poured after ten, fifteen, and 
twenty hours, and the mixture is also 
examined microscopically. Any suspi- 
cious colonies, i.e., those which are white 
and semi-transparent with well-defined 
m.irgin, are examined by microscope, and 
also inoculated into fresh tubes for the 
indol reaction, the physiological test, and 
general microscopical appearances. 

Indol Reaction. — This reaction has 
been described when referring to the 
detection of tv[)hoid bacteria, iiut in the 
case of the cholera spirillum it is unneces- 
sary to add sodium nitrite, because the 
nitrite has already been formed by reduc- 
tion" of nitrate present in the peptone, 
the addition of pure sulphuric acid (free 
from nitrous acid) is alone necessary. It 
IS important, however, that the test should 
ue applied only to a pure culture in order 
to eliminate the action of other bacteria. 
The reaction succeeds best in peptone 
-, ilution (one per cent, peptone, one-half 
|)er cent. salt). 

Physiological Test. — For this one and 
one-half m.g of the surface growth of an 
agar culture is mixed with i cc. of sterile 
broth, and injected into the peritoneal 
cavity of a guinea pig. This (piantity 
should be a fatal dose for an animal 
weighing 300-350 grammes. Rapid re- 
ductinii of temperature ensues, resulting 
in death. 

Gelatine Tube Culture. — At 20^ C. in 
puncture cultivations a thin, white thread 
appears along the needle-track ; this 



thread suddenly widens out just below the 
surface, causing liquefiiction, whilst a 
bright, glistening bubble of air appears in 
the lunnel-shaped liquefied portion. The 
liiiuelaction gradually proceeds until the 
whole contents of the tube becomes fluid. 

Microscopic Examination. —The chol- 
era spirillum is a short, bent, rodlet, with 
rounded ends, frequently actively motile, 
and when stained may be seen to possess 
fiagella, either singly, or in pairs at both 
ends. 

In conclusion, great as has been the 
advance of this young but vigorous 
science, there is no doubt that we are at 
present but opening the clasp of a casket 
filled with some of the choicest gems of 
knowledge, each of which is enclosed in 
its own case, the secret spring of which 
can only be found by patient search, and 
which will be passed over untouched by 
the careless experimenter. Much remains 
to be done in the description ofunde- 
scribed forms, or the more ready identi- 
fication of those already known ; and I 
venture to think the chemical side of the 
subject will be fruitful of much. I mean 
the study of the products obtained by 
cultivation of various bacteria in media 
containing traces of chemical substances 
of definite composition, more particularly 
of oxidizing and reducing agents. 

To any who wish to commence the 
study of bacteriology, I would recornmend 
Migula's " Introduction to the Study of 
Practical Bacteriology," which may be 
followed by Frankland's "Micro-organisms 
in Water," and Crookshank's " Manual of 
Bacteriology." — British and Coloniiil 
Druggist. 



Points on the Making- of Pills. 

Mr. A. H. Miles writes to the BulUtiii 
of Pharmacy : 

" I have found it profitable, in my re- 
tail experience, to make a good many of 
the pills called for, and some of the 
methods followed may be of practical 
help to any druggist minded to make a 
trial. Large pills are better left to the 
manufacturing pharmacist. Many of the 
small ones, however, may be readily and 
Quickly made, and, with but little experi- 
ence, well enough made to satisfy the 
most fastidious. 

" I am provided with a copper pill 
machine with three sets of double plates, 
from one quarter grain to six grains. My 
mass diluent is pure cut-loaf sugar pow- 
dered in the store, and my excipient is 
Remington's for all pills which are to be 
white. I make just enough at a time to 
fill a single prescription, if the prescription 
calls for a size or kind not likely to be 
again wanted. Of the staple pills, how- 
ever, I make from 500 to 2,000 ; usually 
selecting a number which is some multiple 
of the number my plate will cut, of the 
size of pills to be -lade. With but little 
experience and calculation the weight of 
each pipe-cut may be ascertained, and the 
whole mass divided by weighing or cut on 



the six-grain plate. I have found it very 
conducive to perfect uniformity to roll all 
my pill pipes at once, where I am making 
one thousand pills or less of one kind at 
a time. I do this by rolling between 
pieces of plate glass about the size of a 
small pill tile. Of course it might be 
accomplished as well by wood rollers if 
the surfaces were as true. These pipes 
will vary in length a little, even if weighed. 
It is not difficult, however, to get them to 
average the desired length with a little 
care. The number of pills will not vary 
more than two or three from this calcula- 
tion. With pipes thus rolled, it is possible 
to cut six or even seven at once on the 
machine. 

" My young men can make and finish 
a thousand pills an hour, and so perfect 
and uniform as to leave nothing to be 
desired. This is true of morphia in all 
sizes, strychnia sulphate and nitrate in the 
many sizes required, atropia and other 
pills where the medicament is much less 
in bulk than the diluent, and in some 
cases, as in quarter and half-grain mor- 
phia, where there is but little sugar re- 
quired. 

"The pharmaceutical manufacturers' 
products are cheap, and some of them are 
getting cheaper, but at present prices for 
most of the small alkaloidal pills any 
pharmacist who wishes to fill his leisure 
hours usefully can pay for his outfit, with 
a good margin beside, if he will undertake 
pill-making to a limited extent." 



Estimation of Spirit of Nitroglycerin. 

J. B. Nagelvoort {AmeriMii Journal of 
Pharmacy) gives the following method : 
Cool a proper quantity of a 10 per cent, 
alcoholic solution of nitroglycerin to 
iS'C. Take 50 cubic centimetres of it; 
pour this quantity into two litres of 
water,; agitate the mixture, and set it 
aside in a cool place over night. (In 
cold weather take care that the water 
cannot freeze and break the bottle so as 
to endanger your life.) The next morn- 
ing siphon off the water, only leaving 
enough in the bottle to transfer the nitro- 
glycerin — which has separated and lies as 
a syrupy fluid on the bottom — into a 50 
cubic centimetre graduate, which is gradu- 
ated in 0.5 cubic centimetres. Use a fun- 
nel — this insures against loss ; let the 
funnel drain. If the 10 per cent, alco- 
holic solution of nitroglycerin is of the 
required (U.S.P.) strength, there should 
be about 2.5 cubic centimetres of nitro- 
glycerin in the graduate. Since we 
measure, instead of weighing, our nitro- 
glycerin, its volume has to be multiplied 
by its specific gravity, which is 1.600, in 
order to obtain its weight : 2.5 x 1.6 = 4. 
Applying a correction for the .'■olubility of 
nitroglycerin in a large quantity of water 
(.'Mien says it is i gram in 800 cubic 
centimeters), it is a simple calculation to 
verily the fluid under examination. Dilute, 
according to the figures found, to phar- 
macopceial strength. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST 



(C)ZA) 



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tleir 




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:\'s&ljm 



WathL ADAMS' PEPSIN TUTTI KRIJTTI 

ASK YOUR WHOLESALER FOR IT. 
Send for new advertising matter to decorate your window. 

ADAMS & SONS CO., 

11 and IS JA.RVIS STI-iBBT, ... TORONTO. ONT. 

HEATH & ROSS'S 

WE L-KNOWN BRAND OF 




IN GREM DEMAND EVERYWHERE 



ic meaicines 

NO CHEMIST SHOULD BE WITHOUT THEM 



PARCELb ENCLOSED DAILY to any of the London Wcolesa'.e Houses to 

Save Carriage. 



OUR 



THIS HANDSOME AND IMPROVED BENT-GLASS 



£5 CHEMIST'S COUNTER SHOW CASE 



iiniiropiir nijn [ Stands unrivalled for style, convenience, and beauty : occupies 

I but a small space on the counter, and is matle tO Open back 

ATTRACTIVE or front, to suit the convenience of the purchaser. 

DIMENSIONS I.tngtii, 19^^ in.; widch (fioni b icti 10 tronc), 11-?^ in.; height, 3: 



CASE 



FITTED COMPLETE 



NO CHARGE 



WHATEVER 



THE CiSE 



Nearly 3000 Chemists stock our Medicines and find a Ready 
Sale for Them. 



Tinctures, Pilules, and Caniphor 



1/ 



L Size 



in great demand everywhere, 
ind can be had in any strength 
from the mother, ix : i, and 
upwards. 



{Jl\J Cash 



LEftTH S ROSS, wholesale Export Homeopathic chemists 



9 Vere St., Oxford St.. W. 

(Wholesale Deparniient) 

And Jewry House, Old Jewry, E.C. 



LONDON. ENG. 




(62B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 




"MANLEfS" 

Celery Nerve Compound 

WITH 

B ef, Iron, And Wine 

A scientific Combination of Celery, Beef. Iron, 

and Wine, Tonics, and Pure Glycerine, 

instead of alcohol, 

UNEQUALLED 

ASAHEALTHBUlLDERan AL RESTORER 

Has given the FULLEST SATISFACTION to persons 

who have taken it. 

It is put up ill a 16-oz. bottle, contained in an attractive 

Blue and White carton. 

PRICE TO THE TRADE :— $6 (net) per doz. 5 psr 
cent, off on three dozen orders, and 5 per cent, off for spot 
cash. 

SELI.S FOR »1 A BOTTLE. 

Orders respectfully solicited. 

For testimonials, etc., write to the makers. 

The LION MEDICINE GO. 

87 King St. East, TORONTO. 



Gibbons' 

Toothache 

Gum 

Per doz. $1.00 
X gross 2.75 



For Sale by all Wholesale Druggists 



J. A. aiBBONS &■ CO 

Toranta 



MINARD'S 



LINImeNT 



Sold from Halifax to Victoria 

BY 

■,.iir....r( Brown & Webb. Simson Bros. & Co. 

HALIFAX I Forsyth, Sutcliffe & Co. 

ST. JOHN— T. B. Barker & Sons. D. McDiarmid & Co. 
yARMOlITH-C. C. Richards & Co. 

QUEBEC— „^ , o s-r- 

MOMTDCAI J Kerry, Watson & Co. Lyman Sons & Co. 
MONTREAL \ ^^^^^ gons & Co. Lyman, Knox & Co. 

KINGSTON-Henry Skinner & Co. 

( Lyman Bros. & Co. Evans Sons & Co. 

TORONTO { Northrop & Lyma";. „ » ^ 

I. Elliot & Co. T. Milburn & Co. 

HAMILTON— Archdale Wilson & Co. J. Winer & Co. 
LONDON— London Drug Co. Jas. A. Kennedy & Co. 

WINNIPEG— Martin, Bole cS: Wynne Co. 
NEW WESTMINSTER-D. S. Curtis & Co 
VICTORIA— Langley & Co. 
QUEBEC— W. Brunet et Cie. 




A- Complexion 

TOILET 

Soap ' 




Allen B. Wrisley's 

CUCUMBER 
COMPLEXION 
TOILET 
SOAP 

IS "PURE GOLD" 



The virtues of Cucumber Juice for the Skin 
and Comple.\ion have become famous. We 
challenge comparison with any fine milled, 
delicately perfumed, high grade soap in the 

market. It's The Complexion Toilet Soap 

of the world. Made un honor, full value, par 
excellence. Matchless for a clear, soft, skin 
beautifier. It is well worth 50 cents a cake, but 
can be sold at Retail for (^) one quarter of that 
price. Try it, try it, and be convinced. 

Sold by the Wholesale Druggists in 
Canada. 



MAuE ONLY BY 

ALLEN B. WRISLEY 

479 to 485 5th Avenue, 
CHICAGO. 

Manufacturer of High Grade Toilet Soaps, Per- 
fumes, and Glycerine. 

N.B.— Prices and Samples to JOBBERS on application. 



Gray's 



CASTOR-FLUID 

For the hair. 

DENTAL PEARLINE 

An excellent antiseptic tooth wash. 

SULPHUR PASTILLES 

For burning; in diphtheritic cases. 

SAPONACEOUS DENTIFRICE 

An excellent antiseptic dentifrice. 



These Speeialties 

All of which have been well advertised, 
more particularly the " Castor-Fluid," 
may be obtained at all the wholesale 
houses at Manufacturer's price. 



HENRY R. GRAY 



ESTABLISHED 1859. 



Pharmaceutical Chemist 

22 St. Lawrence Main Street 

(Cor. of Lagauchetiere) 

MONTREAL 



Bole, Wynne & Co. 

Wholesale Druggists and 

Manufacturing Chennists 



We wo'ild be glad to correspond with 
Druggist in Western Provinces when in 
the market. 



OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE : 
WINNIPEG, - MANITOBA 

ONTARIO 
VACCINE 
FARM 



Pure and Reliable Vaccine Matter always on hand. 
Orders by mail or otherwise promptly filled. 

10 Ivory Points, $1 ; 5 Ivory Points, 65 cents ; single 
Points, 20 cents. Discount to the trade. 

Address all orders-^VACCINE FARM, 
A. STEWART, M.D. Palmerston, Ont. 



W.A.Gill & Co. Columbus.ohio.U.S.A' 




IN -TH E • MARKET* - 



For sale at Manufacturers' Prices by the leading whole- 
sale druggists and druggists' sundiymen 
throughout Canada. 



JOSEPH E. SEAGRAM 



Waterloo, Ontario. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



ALCOHOL 

Pure Sjtivits 
Bye and Malt Whiskies 

"OLD TIMES" AND "WHITE WHEAT" 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



63 



Simple Tests for Common Dpujfs. 

The increased activity of public ana- 
lysts, and the, to say the least, unsatisfac- 
tory condition in whicti the retailer is, in 
respect to responsibility for the sale of 
defective drugs, render it imperative that 
he should be able to test for himself the 
drugs ni(^st commonly " found wanting." 
The majority of chemists and druggists 
have been content to leave the care of the 
purity and strength of their drugs in the 
hands of the wholesale houses if bought 
from them or, if made by themselves, have 
trusted to accurate manufacturers to en- 
sure permanent stability. Both of these 
practices ignore the deteriorating influence 
of time upon the stock articles, and the 
consequence is that in so many cases in 
which chemists are prosecuted we hear 
the plea of " had a long time in stock.'' 
We feel sure that under these circum- 
stances a description of simple tests, suffi- 
ciently severe to keep the drugs within 
safe bounds, yet devoid of too fine opera- 
tions, will be welcome to the average 
chemist and druggist. The following is 
such a description, comprehensible and 
able to be practically made use of by even 
those who have never performed a chemi- 
cal test in their lives. Our selection will 
be seen to comprise the favorite targets of 
the public analyst. First, however, we 
must describe the apparatus and reagents 
(test solutions) required. 

There will be no difficulty in utilizing a 
small space in the pharmacy for these re- 
quirements. Either the chemist will use 
his dispensing counter when not other- 
wise engaged, or, if space permits, will 
erect a screen to protect himself from ex- 
ternal observation, and keep a small space 
clear for use as his " laboratory.' Three 
or four feet of counter, with three rows of 
shelves fastened to the hack of the screen, 
similar to the ordinary dispensing shelves, 
with a cupboard below, will be all that is 
requisite in this direction. If there be a 
small sink fitted into the counter, he will, 
of course, locate his " laboratory '' in close 
proximity to this. Having chosen a site 
for the work, the remaining considerations 
are small. .\ few bottles holding about 
a pint (stoppered), the same number of 
4-ounce stoppered, and of small wide- 
mouthed bottles, together with a small 
quantity of apparatus, will be all that is 
necessary. The bottles will hold such 
reagents as the user may determine upon 
as being in most common use for his 
work. The few standard solutions he 
may use, prepared according to the direc- 
tions of the Pharmacopceia, must be kept 
in the larger bottles. With regard to 
these, the following remarks may be made. 
Do not make too much of any standard 
solution, as in certain cases deteriorialion 
occurs with a certain amount of rapidity. 
This is especially the case in hyposulphite 
of sodium (thiosulphate), and also, to a 
certain extent, in other cases. Alkali so- 
lution should be kept in a corked bottle, 
and should be kept as nearly full as pos- 
sible. If a stopper be used, this will stick 
in the neck and occasion much annoy- 



ance. For general reagents, such as 
barium chloride, silver nitrate, etc., 5 or 
10 per cent, solutions may be used. 

The actual apparatus used will not be 
very expensive. It may be either pur- 
chased direct from one of the chemical 
apparatus makers, or part of it may be 
made by the ingenious pharmacist, and 
the glass vessels bought from the makers. 

Three pieces of wooden apparatus will 
be necessary — a test-tube rack, a burette 
stand, and a filtering stand. None of 
these are beyond the pocket of any phar- 
macist or the tools of the ingenious ama- 
teur carpenter. The simplest form of 
test-tube rack is an oblong l)lock of wood 
about 8 inches long, 3 inches high, and 3 
inches broad. A double row of holes, 
sufficiently large to just take the tubes, are 
then cut in the block by a bit of the 
proper size, and the rack is made. A 
little cutch and varnish will vastly improve 
it. The burette and filter stand may take 
any form, so long as they will hold the 
burette and filter and allow the vessels to 
stand below them. The most useful filter 
stand consists of two blocks of wood, 
about 6 inches high, with a thin piece 
screwed on to them about 10 inches in 
length, in the form of a bridge. The top 
of the bridge, i.e., the thin piece, which 
should be about three inches wide, is 
bored with holes varying from one to two 
and a half inches in diameter, and thus 
serves as a support for funnels of various 
sizes, the vessels into which the liquid is 
to be received being easily arranged below. 
A good burette stand is not so easy to 
make, but a couple of shillings will pur- 
chase one if wished for. 

Next come the water-bath and the dry- 
ing oven. The water-bath is of great im- 
portance, and may be of very varied forms. 
A copper water-bath is rather expensive, 
but, of course, very useful. An easily 
extemporized bath is a beaker, on which 
rests the dish to be heated ; but the most 
suitable of homemade baths is an ordi- 
nary iron pot. Circles of tin are cut out 
to cover the top of the pot, and holes of 
various sizes cut in these according to the 
size of the dishes each is intended to sup- 
port. This is supported on an iron tripod 
stand, and a Bunsen burner campletes a 
water-bath which will be as effectual as 
the most expensive copper bath. 

The drying oven is even less expensive. 
A tin biscuit box or quinine tin is all that 
is needed. If the ordinary lift-ofif lid is 
exchanged for a door, which can easily be 
run in a pair of grooves, and the box 
placed on its side on the tripod, the tem- 
perature can be easily regulated by the 
height and distance of the flame and the 
distance to which the which the door is 
opened. A small hole may be bored in 
the top, in which a cork with a thermo- 
meter is inserted, and the temperature 
watched. So much for the metal appa- 
ratus, which can present no difficulty to 
the versatile pharmacist. 

Glass apparatus must, of course, be 
bought, for but few are able to manipulate 
glass themselves. Of ordinary ungradu- 
ated glass and porcelain but little is ne- 



cessary. A dozen test tubes, a couple of 
nests of beakers, a few flasks and evapor- 
ating dishes are all that are requisite. For 
work, where the minutest accuracy is not 
necessary, a very thin porcelain dish or 
crucible may be substituted for the more 
expensive platinum. If, however, the 
funds will allow, a platinum crucible will 
be found very useful. A small retort will 
be required— for distillation of spirits 
from tinctures — and also a condenser. 
Supports for the retort and condenser 
(Liebig's condenser is the best form) will 
be needed, and may take any form de- 
sired, or may be obtained from the tnaker 
for a very small sum. A specific gravity 
bottle is also absolutely necessary. This 
can be obtained for a very small sum, or 
a very thin flask with as narrow a neck as 
possible may be used. It should hold 
1,000 grs. at least, and the point in the 
neck to which 1,000 grs. of water fill it at 
60' F. is carefully scratched on to the 
glass. The number of grains which it 
weighs when filled with the liquid to be 
examined, minus the weight of the flask 
itself, will then be the specific gravity of 
the liquid (with a decimal in the proper 
place, of course). In the examination of 
ginger and mustard an exhausting appa- 
ratus is necessary. A Soxhlet tube, an 
apparatus which allows the percolation 
and recovery of the solvent to go auto- 
matically, is obtained for about half a 
crown, and is well worth purchasing. One 
or two flasks graduated to hold r,ooo 
grains, together with ordinary graduated 
glass measures, and one or two pipettes 
and burettes, will practically complete the 
whole of the apparatus required. There 
will, of course, be a few little things found 
requisite from time to time, but most of 
these will be, in all probability, found in 
the ordinary stock of the pharmacist. 
To go back to the reagents, the following 
will be found to come in useful for almost 
everyday use : 

ST.4NDARD SOLUTIONS. 

Soda (NaOH). 
O.xalicacid (C^H.^O^). 
Hyposulphiteo"fsoda(NaoSo03.5H„0). 
Silver nitrate (AgNOg). 

ORDIN.\RY RE.-\GENTS. 

Phenolphthalein (in proof spirit). 

Barium chloride (for sulphuric acid and 
sulphates). 

Silver nitrate (for hydrochloric acid and 
chlorides). 

Starch water (for iodine). 

Sulphuretted hydrogen (for lead). 

Chromate of potassium (indicator for 
hydrochloric acid). 

Sodium phosphate (for magnesium). 

Magnesium sulphate (for phosphoric 
acid). 

Dilute ammonia. 

Dilute hydrochloric acid. 

Strong hydrochloric acid. 

Dilute sulphuric acid. 

Strong sulphuric acid. 

Nitric acid. 

Oxalate of ammonia (for lime). 

Ferric chloride. 

Ether. 



64 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Alcohol. 

Distilled water. 

Other solutions may be found neces- 
sary, and may be either kept in stock or 
prepared as required. The elementary 
apparatus above described will enable 
the pharmacist to examine the greater 
proportion of his drugs which are liable 
to adulteration. Of course, if the phar- 
macist be a good analyst he will enlarge 
this in all probability, and will submit his 
drugs to a more exhaustive examination ; 
but if not, the description of the more 
simple tests will afford the pharmacist 
wiio is not so skilled in analysis sufficient 
information to attain the end we have in 
view, namely, the protection of himself 
agamst prosecution under the Food and 
Drugs Act. 

There is a mention several times in 
this article of the specific gravity of 
liquids. In the enumeration of the ap- 
paratus required we have also mentioned 
the specific gravity bottle. Although it 
is a simple operation, we may, neverthe- 
less, explain briefly the taking of the spe- 
cific gravity of a liquid. This is got by 
taking the net weight of the distilled 
water in the specific gravity bottle when 
full, and the net weight of the liquid to 
be tested filling the same bottle. Then 
divide the weight of the liquid by the 
weight of the water. We now pass on to 
our list of drugs. 

OLIVE OIL. 

For a complete analysis of olive oil, it 
would be necessary to apply a number of 
tests of great delicacy, as the adulteration 
in this article is very judiciously managed 
in some cases, especially when the oil is 
intended for medicinal use. However, 
there are several easily-applied tests 
which will at least give the chemist a 
very fair idea of its purity. The specific 
gravity is of the highest importance, and 
can easily be taken in the specific gravity 
bottle above mentioned. 

It should never be less than .914, nor 
more than .918. Any higher gravity 
than this latter should at once condemn 
the oil as being adulterated, in all prob- 
ability with cotton seed, sesame, or 
arachis oil. In addition to this, the fol- 
lowing test, known as Conroy's, should 
be applied. About 6 fluid drams of the 
oil are mixed with ^^ dram of strong 
nitric acid in a large porcelain dish, and 
heated gradually until chemical action 
sets up, the source of heat taken away, 
and the mixture is then stirred until the 
action ceases. If the oil is pure, a pale, 
straw-colored mass results, which sets 
solid in two hours. The other seed oils 
commonly used for adulterating olive oil 
give a deep orange red mass, which does 
not set like olive oil. About 2 fluid 
drams of the oil may be heated on the 
water-bath with the same quantity of 
alcohol, in which i grain of nitrate of sil- 
ver has been dissolved. If so little as 5 
per cent, of cotton seed oil be present, 
the mixture, which should be sh.iken 
from time to time, will become black in a 
quarter of an hour. 



VINEG.\R AND ACETIC ACID. 

To determine whether a given sample 
is vinegar or not is a task which involves 
great dilificulties, and skilled analysts 
often disagree on a given sample ; so 
that the pharmacist must, of necessity, in 
most cases, confine himself to determin- 
ing the actual quantity of real acetic acid 
present. The specific gravity of the 
vinegar should be taken — it is usually 
about 1.0x8. Then a given quantity, 
say 4 fluid drams, should be diluted with 
water until the odor is very light, a few 
drops of solution of phenol-phthalein 
added, and the liquid titrated in the 
usual way with standard solution of soda. 
The 4 drams should require 220 minims 
of the soda solution. It is possible, 
however, that the free acid may partially 
consist of a mineral acid — for example, 
sulphuric acid. In order to satisfy one- 
self that this is not the case, a few fluid 
drams should be evaporated to dryness, 
when '.he resulting residue should not re- 
fuse to dry, nor begin to char. Further, 
when dry, the residue should be ignited 
and a little hot water (distilled, of course) 
be added, with a drop of phenol-phtha- 
lein solution, and if the ash is alkaline, 
as shown by the red color, no free sul- 
phuric acid can have been present. In 
the case of ordinary acetic acid, the only 
difference to be observed is that no ap- 
preciable ash will be obtained. In the 
case of vinegar, barium chloride will 
often give a slight precipitate, but this 
may be due to the presence of sulphates, 
not necessarily sulphuric acid itself. A 
precipitate in acetic acid, however, is in- 
dicative of free sulphuric acid, since no 
bases to combine with the acid and foim 
sulphates should be present. 

ALMOND OIL. 

Not only is almond oil often adulter- 
ated, but it is very frequently entirely 
substituted by peach or apricot kernel 
oil, sometimes sold under the name of 
ol. amygdala; (exot.). The specific 
gravity of almond oil should never be 
less than .914, nor more than .919, and is 
usually about .917. The two oils above 
named have gravities of .920 to .923, or 
even a little higher. With regard to a 
careful examination of this oil, the same 
remarks apply as- in the case of olive oil. 
There are one or two simple tests, how- 
ever, that are easily applied, and which 
yield useful results. A solution of zinc 
chloride is prepared by saturating strong 
hydrochloric acid with zinc oxide. Five 
drops of this and 10 of the oil are stirred 
together on a glass plate with a glass rod, 
and the color resulting is noted. Almond 
oil gives no color, peach kernel oil gives 
a purple brown, and apricot kernel oil 
gives a very similar, but a rather more 
muddy, brown color. This is a very use- 
ful and reliable reaction. 

GINGER. 

Now that a conviction has been ob- 
tained for the sale of partially exhausted 
whole ginger, pharmacists must be care- 
ful in their purchases of this drug. The 
best method for testing this article is a 



little tedious, but presents no difficulty 
and requires but little apparatus. A 
weighed quantity is dried at the water 
bath temperature for six hours, and the 
loss in weight is taken. Nearly all this 
is due to moisture, and it should never 
exceed 15 per cent. In good ground 
ginger it is seldom so much. One hun- 
dred grains or any convenient quantity 
are then placed in the Soxhlet's exhaust- 
ing tube and extracted with ether — 
which, of course, should be kept boiling 
with hot water, and not by a naked 
flame. This is allowed to exhaust for the 
whole day, and the ether is then allowed 

pOR SALE— A "JORDAN" NO. 2 TABLET 
^ Machine, with extra sets of dies ; also Mass Mixer. 
Cost laid down, $150. Will be sold at a great reduction. 
" W.," Office of Canadian Druggist. 

WANTS, FOR SALE, ETC. 



AdvertisffUfnt^ under the head of Bu»ivesH Wanted, 
Situations Wanted, Sitnationn Vacant, liuswt-ss for 
Sale, etc . will be interted once free of charge. An- 
sitrers must not he 3e»t in care of this o;Qice unless 
po'tage staniits are forwarded to re-mail replies, 

SITUATIONS WANTED. 

SITUATION WANTED AS DRUG APPRENTICE. 
Have one year's experience ; good references from 
present emplover. Address, N. BALL, Elmwood, Ont. 

SITUATION WANTED BY DRUG CLERK, WITH 
four years' experience ; good dispenser and stock- 
keeper. Strictly temperate, andean furnish best of refer- 
ences. Address, JOHN L. BRODIE. Forest, Ont. 

SITUATION WANTED BY DRUGGIST, WITH 
twelve years' experience. Graduate O.C.P. Refer- 
ences fully competent ; moderate salary ; country town 
preierred. Address, " CHEMIST," 68 James St. North, 
Hamilton. 

SITUATION WANTED BY DRUG CLERK, WITH 
eight years' experience in dispensing ; registered in 
Nova Scotia. Good references. Address, Box 104, 
Springhill, Nova Scotia. 

FOR SALE. 

TUFT'S SODA FOUNTAIN AND ICE SHAyER, 
in first-class order, for sale, at a bargain. Will sell 
separately if required. Address, W. G. SMITH, Guelph, 
Ont. 



Geo. H, Chandlee. H, C. Chandlee. 

Trade-Marks, Caveats, etc, 

CHANDLEE S CHANDLEE, 

Patents and Patent Causes. 
Electrical and Mechanical Experts. 

PoLACK Building, Atlantic Building, 

YORK, Pa. WASHINGTON. D.C 

Correct; ondence Solicited. 




CAIV I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 

prompt answer and an honest opiDion, write to 
WUIvN & CO., who have had nearly fifty years' 
experience in the patent businees. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. A Handbook of In- 
formation concerning Patents and bow to ob- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue Of mecban* 
ical and scientttlc books sent free. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
Bpecial notice in the Scientific American, and 
thus are broueht widely before the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has by far the 
laruest circulation of anv scientiflc work in the 
world. 53 a vear. Sample copies sent free. 

Buildine Edition.monthly, $2.50 -^ year. Single 
copies, 'Zii cents. Every number contains beao- 
tiful plates, in colors, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabline builders to show tbO 
latest desiKTis and secure contracts. Address 

ilVNN & CO., IJEW Yoke, 361 Bboadwat* 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(64A) 



!>iSi!^g^f^i:m^&XS(ff!S!fiSiiXS)l 2Ste2>S!aS9aS! HSSSW9«MMSigSS KS?ag 



KS?as 




When 



others 



. . . Fail 



^ 



zsms^^iiif^.^f^sm'is^if^ss^^^^si^jii^iimi'simmm^^^i^ 



You will come back again 

i to the genuine 

MENTHOL COUGH DROPS 

Like every other successful article they have 
been imitated, but the imitation only helps 
to show what the genuine really is. 



Toronto Biscuit and Confectionery Co. 



7 FRONT ST. EAST, TORONTO 



ONE OF THE BEST SOOTHING AGENTS OR DEMULCENTS KNOWN 



Pure Unadulterated Liquorice 

FOR 

Coughs, Colds, Etc. 




The SOLAZZI BRAND is certified by 
Analysis to be an AbSOlutely Pure 
Extract, without any 



admixture 



SOLAZZI." 



This is the purest LIQUORICE 5 
JUICE obtainable ; it is a guaranteed { 
specific — in (act li 

NATURE'S OWN REMEDY ' 

for Winter Coughs, Colds, and all Chest Q 
Affections. 



Chemists should stock and push this 
article, as a safe and effective remedy, 
provided by kindly nature, in preference 
to Patent Medicines, which,_ in these 
days, yield only the barest profit. To be 
* ad, with Show Cards and Handbills, of 
ALL WHOLESALE HOUSES. 

3BSSS3SSSSSBEa3ZSfSSS 



To be Obtained of all ^Wholesale Houses 



(64B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Fortier's 
La Fayette 

THE FINEST 5ct. Cigar 

EVER OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC. 

JUST TRY IT 




R I PANS 



One Gives Relief. 




Radlauer^^ Somtistl 

aethyl-chloralurethan 

(registered) 

the newest and most efficient soporific remedy 

Taken in doses of 32 grains, or half a teaspoonful, in milk, ale, or 
cognac, prodvices in half an hour a quiet refreshing sleep, lasting from six 
to eight hours, with no unpleasant after effects. The effects of Somnai. 
are more pleasant than those of Chloral Hydrate and Morphia. Experi- 
ments made in the Town Hospitals, Moabit and Friedrichshain, Konigliche 
Charite and Konigliche Universitats Poliklinik, Berlin, have shown that 
SoMNAL does not accelerate the pulse and does not upset the stomach. 
SoMNAL is especially recommended for Nervous Insonmia, Neurasthenia, 
Spinal Complaints, Infectious Diseases, Paralysis, Melancholia, Hysteria, 
Morphinismus, and Diabetes. The low price of Somnai, enables its use 
in the poor and workmen's practice and in hospitals. 



Radlauer's Antinervin 

(SALICYLE BROMANILIDE) 

In the form of Powder, the most efficacious Antipyretic, 
Antineuralgic, and Antinervine 



Antinbrvin replaces and surpasses Antipyrin, has no hurtful second 
ary effects, and is cheaper. Taken in doses of 8 grains four times a day, 
it is an excellent remedy for Feverish, Catarrhal, and Rheumatic Pains. 

Antinervin is of especial service in cases of Influenza, Neuralgia, 
Asthma, Tuberculose, Yellow Fever, Malaria, Migraine, Gout, Rheuma- 
tism in the Joints, Diptheritis, and other typical Fevers 

MANY GOLD MEDALS HAVE BEEN AWARDED 



S. RADLAUER, Kronen Apotheke, FRIEDRICHSTRASSE, i6o BERLIN, W. 



V\!. J. DYAS, Toronto, Ontario 



Wholesale Agent for Canada 



W. J. DYAS 



MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 

Chemicals, Druggists' Specialties, 
Proprietary Medicines 

WAREROOMS and LABORATORY : 

Strathroy, Canada 



Every Dru^^ist 
Should Handle Our 

DRUGGIST FAVORITE, 5c. 
*«" PATTI, IOC. 



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Fraser & Stirton, 

LONDON, Ont. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



65 



to condense in the Soxhlet tube, and the 
flask taken away before it syphons over 
again, 'i'his saves the trouble of recover- 
ing the ether afterwards. The flask is 
now dried at 212°!"'. till of constant 
weight. The amount of what is ex- 
tracted from the ginger thus should not 
he less than 3.5 per cent. (3.5 grains to 
the above quantity). It is generally 
much higher, and rarely goes down to 3 
per cent. The same process should now 
be repeated on the same quantity of 
ginger, substituting alcohol for ether in 
the Soxhlet tube, and the alcoholic ex- 
tract (which takes nearly two days to 
come out) should be from 2 — 4 per cent. 
(2 — 4 grains). A convenient quantity is 
then burnt (100 grains), and the ash 
weighed. It should lie between 3 and 4 
per cent. (3 — 4 grains), and should never 
e.xceed 4.5 per cent. It is then treated 
with hydrochloric acid (i part acid and i 
water), and raised to boiling point. The 
insoluble portion is filtered off, the filter 
paper washed, dried, and burnt, and the 
residue weighed. This sandy, or sili- 
ceous, matter should never exceed 1.8 
cent. (100 grains = 1.8 grains), and even 
when it is as high as this, it is probably 
due to extraneous matter. 

BEESWAX. 

The almost daily convictions obtained 
for this article render it of the highest 
importance to be on one's guard in offer- 
ing it for sale. The complete analysis of 
beeswax is a thoroughly scientific investi- 
gation, as very complex adulterations are 
now practised. There are two simple 
tests (both of which, however, can mis- 
lead one, when the wax is skilfully adul- 
terated), which will, at least, give some 
aid to the pharmacist, e^p'ecially in the 
case of wax adulterated with paraffin and 
cerasin. These, it will be remembered, 
are the adulterations on whiqh practically 
all the convictions have be«n obtained, 
although by no means the only ones in 
common use. These tests are the melt- 
ing point and the specific gravity. The 
melting point is taken in the usual 
method, and should be from 62° — 63° C. 
The specific gravity is best determined by 
making up mixtures of spirit and water 
until a smalt pellet of the wax, evenly cut 
and free from air bubbles, just remains in 
position in the liquid without either 
sinking or floating. The specific gravity 
of the mixture of spirit and water is then 
taken in the specific gravity bottle as 
usual. 

TINCTURE OF IODINE. 

The chief requirement in this is the 
proper amount of free iodine, which 
should be 1 1 grains in the fluid ounce 
Consequently, not less than 21 nor more 
than 22 grains of pure crystallized hypo- 
sulphite of soda should be required for 
decolorization of the blue color produced 
on adding a little starch water to the 
ounce of tincture. 

COMPOUND TINCTURE OF C.\MPHOR. 

" Paregoric without opium " is best de- 
tected thus : Dilute i fluid dram with 



proof spirit to i fluid ounce, add a few 
drops of perchloride of iron solution (10 
grains in 100 minims). If opium is 
present a red color is produced. Some 
idea of the strength of the opium can be 
got by taking a known strength of opium 
and diluting till it gives the saine tint 
with the chloride as the solution tested. 

The presence of the anise oil in this 
tincture is shown by the turbidity on 
diluting with water. Of course, other 
essential oils will do this as well, but it is 
unlikely that the oil of anise will be left 
out and another oil put in. 

The benzoic acid is found as follows : 
Render the tincture alkaline ; shake with 
ether, which dissolves out the camphor 
and essential oil, and separate this solu- 
tion. Now acidify to set free the benzoic 
acid ; shake out this with ether, and sep- 
arate as before. Dry the second ethereal 
solution, and the benzoic acid will be 
left. 

IODIDE OF POTASSIUM. 

The presence of iodate of potassium in 
the iodide is detected by dissolving the 
sample in water, adding a little of a solu- 
tion of tartaric acid, when iodine will be 
set free and color starch blue, if iodate is 
present. Ten grains of iodide of potas- 
sium should give 14 grains of iodide of 
silver when the precipitate of the latter, 
obtained by adding silver nitrate to a 
solution of the potassium iodide, is dried 
and weighed. 

LARD. 

In analyzing this the specific gravity 
ought to be taken, but as this is a difti- 
cult operation for the chemist and drug- 
gist with limited apparatus we will omit it. 

The chief adulterant is water, and this 
is sought for thus : Heat the sample for 
two or three hours on a water-bath. If 
an ounce is taken it should not lose more 
than 12 or 13 grains. Mineral sub- 
stances are sometimes added to aid the 
incorporation of water. These will be 
shown by sinking when the lard is 
melted. 

Cotton-seed stearin is detected in the 
lard by applying the following test : To 
one dram of the fat add 10 fluid drams 
of petroleum ether and one drop of 
strong sulphuric acid. Pure lard will 
give a straw or faint reddish color, which, 
after some time, clears and almost disap- 
pears altogether, while dark red drops 
separate. If the cotton-seed stearin is 
present there is at once blackening, or a 
dark brown color is produced, and this 
so remains for a long time. 

CREAM OF TARTAR. 

The common adulterants of this are 
starch and phosphate of calcium. The 
starch is easily detected by boiling with 
water and adding solution of iodine, with 
which starch gives a blue color. The 
phosphate is delected by boiling with 
very dilute hydrochloric acid and adding 
solutions of sulphate of magnesia and 
ammonia, when a white precipitate is 
given with the phosphate. Some samples 
have even had bicarbonate of soda added. 



The effervescence on dropping in water 
shows this. 

PRECIPITATED SULPHUR. 

From the old milk of sulphur the pre- 
cipitated is distinguished by a simple 
test. Heat a little on the end of a knife 
in a flame. A residue is left with the old 
variety, the pure precipitated volatilizes 
completely. 

ALCOHOL IN TINCTURES. 

The amount of alcohol in tinctures is 
important. For most, this is shown thus : 
Take a certain number of fluid ounces, 
distil off the alcohol, and make the dis- 
tillate up to the original volume, take its 
specific gravity, and compare with a table 
of alcohol and water specific gravities. 

If essential oils or very volatile sub- 
stances are present in the tincture, a little 
modification must be adopted ; for in- 
stance, where benzoic acid is present, 
alkali can be added and then distillation 
effected. If essential oils are present in 
respectable quantities, add calcium chlor- 
ide in strong solution and a little sodium 
phosphate. The precipitate thrown down 
brings the oil with it. After this distil as 
before. 

PEPPER. 

The great test for this is the total 
amount of ash got by burning, and the 
amounts soluble in water and hydrochloric 
acid. 

Black pepper should yield total ash 4 — 5 p c. 

White pepper should yield total ash. . . 1.2 " 
Black pepper should yield ash soluble 



White pepper should yield ash soluble 

in water 5 — .6" 

Black pepper should yield insoluble ash .3 — .5 " 
Whitepepper should yield insolubleash .1 — .3 " 

The solvents are first water, then hydro- 
chloric acid. The amount soluble in 
hydrochloric acid is got by difference be- 
tween the total ash and the sum of the 
other two items given above. 

METHYLATED SPIRIT IN TINCTUI '.S. 

Distil off the alcohol from the tii ;ture, 
add to it a little bichromate of po...jsium 
and sulphuric acid, and digest for two 
hours in the cold. Dilute to ten times 
its volume. Distil off half ; make slightly 
alkaline with sodium carbonate ; boil 
down to half ; acidify with acetic acid, 
and add silver nitrate solution. Heat 
just to boiling. Pure spirit gives a light 
brown color, methylated spirit gives a 
very dark brown color and silver mirror 
on the sides of the tube. 

SPIRIT OF NITROUS ETHER. 

The following is reprinted from the 
Diary, which will be found to contain 
other useful tests : Spt. eth. nit. should 
have a specific gravity of 0.840 to 0.845 ! 
should not effervesce, or but feebly, when 
shaken up with bicarbonate of soda. The 
presence of aldehyde is indicated by a 
brown coloration on heating with caustic 
potash. It should yield not much less 
than five times its volume of the gas on 
keeping. The spirit may be tested with 
accuracy by the niirometer, or the follow- 
ing simple method. Prepare two solu- 
tions as follows : 



66 

No. I. 

R Sodii hyposulph gr. iv. 

Sodii chloridi gf- "'• 

Potass, iodid gr. xx. 

Aq. ad .^ . . . 3 ii. 

Solve. 

No. 2. 

R. Spt. Ecther. nittos 5 ii- 

Acid, sulph. dil 5 i- 

Misce. 

Place No. i solution in a small por- 
celain dish ; a two-ounce ointment pot 
will answer the purpose. Pour into this 
5iss. of No. 2 solution, and stir till effer- 
vescence ceases. The mixture should be 
free from iodine color ; if not so, the 
spirit of nitre is stronger than should be 
used; if no iodine has remained free 
after the effervescence has passed off, add 
another oss. of the No. 2 solution. This 
should now produce a permanent brown 
color if the spirit of nitre is up to its nor- 
mal strength. If a second addition of 
3ss. (total oiiss.) is required, it is below 
its normal, but not unfit for use ; but if 
this second 3ss. fails to produce a per- 
manent brown color, the spirit of nitre is 
too weak to be sanctioned. 

LIME WATER. 

This should contain 10 grains of lime 
in the pint. Two fluid ounces, tinged 
blue with litmus, should require the whole 
of one ounce aqueous solution, contain- 
ing 2}( grains of pure crystallized oxalic 
acid to change the color to a red. 

TINCTURE Of OPIUM. 

Distil off the spirit from an ounce of 
the tincture, and dilute the remainder to 
double its volume with distilled water. 
Add freshly slaked lime (15 grains), shake 
well, and stand for half-an-hour, stirring 
occasionally. Filter and add 36 grain 
measures (40 minims) of S.V.R., and 166 
grain measures (180 minims) of ether, 
and shake. Next add 13 grains of chlor- 
ide of ammonium, shake well and fre- 
quently during an hour, and set aside for 
12 hours ; now follow the B. P. directions 
under " opium," beginning with the 
counterbalancing of the filters, taking, 
however, 66 grain measures (72 minims) 
of ether instead of 200 ; 33 grain meas- 
ures (36 minims) instead of 100 ; and 66 
grain measures of water (72 minims) as 
maximum limit, with which to wash the 
bottle, instead of 200. The crystals ob- 
tained should weigh 3.3 (roughly, 3,13 
grains). — British and Colonial Druggist. 

The Stability of Sublimate Solutions. 

Vignon pointed out some time ago that 
1 per mille solutions of mercuric chloride 
rapidly decreased in strength, and lost, 
therefore, their antiseptic power in con- 
tact with the air. Tanret now urges that 
pure air has nothing to do with the mat- 
ter, and does not cause any precipitation 
of the mercury. Vignon has taken up the 
subject again, and now demonstrates that 
Tanret's conclusions are correct, and that 
the decomposition is due to traces of al- 
kali, derived either from the water or the 
glass in which the solutions were kept, 
and to dust and organic impurities from 
the air. — Bulletin. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Wintepgreen Oil. 



The artificial methyl-salicylate is con- 
stantly gaining ground, although its oppo- 
nents in America are doing all that lies in 
their power to bring it into discredit. As 
an instance of this, we may mention that 
an attempt was recently made to create a 
panic among the manufacturers of chew- 
ing gum, who use a considerable quantity 
of the oil, by spreading about a report 
that the use of the artificial product 
caused inflanimition of the eyes. It was 
stated that the "chemicals" contained in 
the synthetical oil were the source of the 
mischief Any one who has the least idea 
what so-called natural and artificial winter- 
green oil are will at once agree with us 
that such statements are the outcome of 
cross ignorance. 

According to the new U.S.P., both the 
genuine wintergreen oil — which is hardly 
to be met with any longer in commerce 
— and the oil prepared from sweet birch, 
consist almost entirely of methyl-salicylate, 
presupposing always that both are pure, 
and not, as is frequently the case, adul- 
terated. Now, can there be any doubt 
that methyl-salicylate is the only active 
constituent of both oils? If, then, 
in view of the fact that the two natural 
oils are scarcely to be met with in com- 
merce in a state of reliable purity, a pure 
methyl-salicylate, prepared from pure 
salicylate acid as used daily in medicine 
— that is to say, a product of definite 
chemical composition, CH3C7H5O3 — 
is recommended, the question arises : 
How is it possible that any one with the 
least inkling of chemistry can talk of 
" noxious chemicals " which are said to 
be present in wintergreen oil. It is im- 
possible to argue against such foolish 
assertions as are palmed off upon the 
American consumer. — Schimmel's Report. 



the oxide becomes reduced to metal by 
the ignition, it must, of course, be 
oxidized by nitric acid or otherwise. The 
salt must be free from chloride and 
nitrate, which it is very liable to contain 
when prepared by the method of double 
decomposition usually recommended. I 
have tried the most approved processes 
of this kind, but with quite unsatisfactory 
results. Addition of glycerm, of sodium 
chloride, and of ammonium chloride has 
been recommended to prevent precipi- 
tation of basic salt of the stronger acid. 
Causse has given detailed instructions for 
the preparation of the salicylate, using a 
large proportion of sodium chloride to 
prevent formation of oxychloride of bis- 
muth. If the figures as given in the 
"Year Book " are correct, the amount of 
hydrochloric acid is insufficient to dis- 
solve the oxide (40 c.c. acid to 35 gram- 
mes oxide of bismuth). However, I 
have followed the process exactly, and 
also tried some obvious modifications of 
the same, with the result that oxychloride 
was invariably present in very considerable 
quantity, salicylate being correspondingly 
deficient. 

In one experiment a large amount of 
uncombined salicylic acid was found in 
the product. In the experiment, whicli 
was conducted exactly as described in the 
abstract so far as that could be under- 
stood, the resulting compound contained 
0.2 per cent, free salicylic acid, and left 
94.5 percent, on ignition, an amount which 
is far in excess of the proper quantity. 
These experiments tend to explain the 
defects of some of the preparations found 
in the market, and shows the necessity 
for testing this salt, which will probably 
take a permanent place in the " materia 
medica." The tests above described will 
be found sufficient to practically indicate 
the purity of the preparation. — Phar- 
mnceuiical Jnirnal and Transactions. 



Bismuth Oxysalieylate. 

By D. B. DoTT. 

This salt is usually simply described as 
bismuth salicylate, and there is probably 
no objection to the practice, as the normal 
salt (if it exists) is immediately decom- 
posed by water into the basic salt and 
free acid, so that there is little likelihood 
of it obtaining a place in medicine. The 
formula of the basic salt is BiC7H503 
(0H„, or BiO.C^H^Oa.HoO). This sali- 
cylate has within recent years come con- 
siderably into demand for the treatment 
of gastric catarrh and some intestinal 
disorders. Like most of the basic salts 
of bismuth, it is not perfectly white, but 
possesses a perceptibly grayish hue. It 
should yield mere traces to ether. This 
is a most important test. 

I have examined a sample commended 
on account of its whiteness, which gave 
47.23 per cent, to ether. Such a salt is 
irritating and objectionable. When dis- 
solved in two or three parts of boiling 
hydri!chloric acid, it should yield plenty 
of crystals on cooling. On complete 
ignition there should remain 61.31 per 
cent, of oxide, or very near it. If any of 



Peyotline, a New Alkaloid. 

At a recent meeting of the Berlin Physi- 
ological Society Professor L. Lewis gave 
an account of some experiments made 
with an alkaloid obtained from a North 
Mexican cactus called " Peyotl," which 
Nature briefly reports. This plant has 
an intoxicating action, and in large doses 
produces sleep and a state of nervous 
excitation accompanied by a so-called 
" power of prophesying," similarly attri- 
buted to the sulphurous exhalations of the 
temple at Delphi. Small doses of the al- 
kaloid when given to frogs produced 
tetanic cramps and a greatly increased 
reflex irritability, analogous to strychnine, 
but with this difference — that by carefully 
apportioning the dose the effects were 
permanent for several days. Professor 
Lewin regarded the new alkaloid as spe- 
cially adapted to further the study of the 
nature of tetanus. He further stated that 
he has found alkaloids with powerful ac- 
tions in many species of Cactus hitherto 
regarded as harmless by botanists, notably 
one closely resembling curare. — Chemist 
and Druggist. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



f66A) 



THIS PACKAGE C0HTAIN8 FOURTELTS 
EsasasasesasasBa 




Spvuiiil ^Votice to Orug-g-ists of Camidtt. 



FItY POISOfl FEItTS 



NEVER FlILS 

INSECTS. 




SUPERSEDES 

POISONS, 

EFFECTIVE 



Reduced Price 

DAVIS' FLY FELTS 



Throe Bojc JLots, 



only ^ 0.7S 



DIRECTIONS. 

FUO0 one ot ths P>in apon a dUh or pUto; lu«p vet with I 

< w»tar. Um ooly eooiiith wftler toaoftk Uie FxLT. Flioa will drink I 
j (b« [witooMl wktur oS tlio Fu.Tuidtljeimmadi»t«)y, 
I PUcai QD do M>a FtnTOXM ka-deosusd'an pUt oniAsiotUii tfines- ' 
' I02 haoudM ktoodu t'«Aa. Dtezaeulemont ftuozd'e*a poor temper 

la FiiTTmB I'M moa^be« boiroat I'eftQ empoisooDao, aortirool da 1 
PiCTkK t>t morroat toimadiatcmdQt. 
CAtmoll.— Shoold th«li({Tiid bo analloved by oooidcct &\ odod I 

< kdmiQistAr m Urge dooea. LimoWaUr. Fl&xeood Tea, or Iron Bast, I 
foUovad by *d wnetio and drinks o( Milk or Floor uul W&ler. 



PRICE 6 CENTS. 



Order through regular suppher. If they do not handle, send order direct 
to manufacturers. 

Davis' Fly Felts are immensely popular and have a large and greatly in- 
creasing sale. 

4 Felts in each package, retail at 5 cents per package, 100 packages in box. 
Each package guaranteed full strength. Dealer's profit, nearly 125%. 

Order in 3 box lots, $6.75. 

Sold by all the largest and popular Wholesale Druggists and Patent Medicine dealers in Canada. 

Manufactured only by 

The POWELL & DAVIS Co., Chatliam, Ont. 



MANUFACTURCO BY 

POWELL & DAVIS CO., CHATHAM, ONT. 



Wine of the Ejl tract ot Cod Liver 



Sold by all first-cUss 
Chemists and Druggists 



ch:evrie:r 



General Depot : — PARIS, 
21, Faubourg Montmarte, 21 



This Wine of the Extract of Cod Liver, prepared by M. CHEVRIER, a first-class Chemist of Paris, possesses at the same time the active 
(irinciples of Cod Liver Oil and the therapeutic properties of alcoholic preparations. It is valuable to persons whose stomach cannot retain fatty 
-ubsiances. Its effect, like that of Cod Liver Oil, is invaluable in Scrofula, Rickets, Anaemia, Chlorosis, Bronchitis, and all diseases of the Chest. 

Wine of the Extract of Cod Liver with Creosote 



General Depot : — PARIS, 
21, Faubourg Montmarte, 21 



CHEVRIER 



Sold by all first-class 
Chemists and Druggists 



The beech-tree Creosote checks the destructive work of Pulmonary Consumption, as it diminishes expectoration, strengthens the appetite, 
reduces the fever, and suppresses perspiration. Its effect, combined with Cod Liver Oil, makes the Wine of the Extract of Cod Liver with Creosote 
in excellent remedy against pronounced or threatened Consumption. 



Buy 



ADAMS' ROOT BEER 

► Pays Well, Sells Well, and Gives Satisfaction 



RETAIL, I0AND25CTS.; WHOLESALE, 90C. and $1.75 PER DOZ., $10.00 and $20.00 PER GROSS 



Place it on your list and order from your ne.xt wholesale representative. 

THE CAHADIAH SPECIALTY GOMPAHY 



DOMINION AGENTS 



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CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



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FORMERLY 

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WEST TORONTO JUNCTION, ONT. 



J. S. HAMILTON 

PUR GRAPE BRANDY DISTILLER 

Pelee Island 



Distilled under Excise supervision. 



" J. S. HAMILTON St. C." 

COGNAC 

In Quarter-Casks, Octanes, Half-Octanes, and Casks. 



J. S. HAMILTON & CO. 

BRANTFORD 

SOLE GENERAL AND EXPORT AGENTS 



A PERFECT TEA 



MONSOON TEA 

FINEST IN THE WORLD. 
From Tea Plant to Tea Cup in its Native Purity. 

PACKED BY THE GROWERS 

Andsold in the original packages, \i lb., lib. and 

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II your grocer has none, tell him to order from 

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11 and 13 Front Street East, Toronto 



THE OLDEST 



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cMarhiniI^eii,SilKJ?Gbtton^ , 
fVYiaA" COMMON T?X:V^^ 



Trade supplied by all leading Drug Houses in the 
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JOHN LABATT'S 

Ale AND Stout 



Ten Gold, Silver, and Bronze 
Medals, and Twelve Diplomas 

Awarded at the World's Exhibition of France. 

Au;>ualia, United Stales. Canada, ?nd 

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Highest points on this Coiilinenl. and Meda 
at Chicago, 1S93. 

Gold Medal at San Francisco, 1894. 



THEY REFRESH, STIMULATE, AND NOURISH 

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A DRUGGIST'S SPECIALTY. 

Curtis & Son's 
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Pure Spruce Gum 

Is meeting with the wuccess 
its high qualities merit. 



A TRIAL ORDER SOLICiTED. 



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■ Sold by druggists or seat by mail. 
60c. E. T. Hazeltine. Warren, Pa. 



I W EBSTER'S 

I NTERNA TIONAL 

DICTIONARY 

Successor of th c 
** Unabridged.*' 

Standard of the 
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ease -with ■n-hich the eye finds the 
wor«l sought, for accuracy of deiini- 
tinn, fi>r effective methods in indi- 
cating pronunciation, for torse yet 
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CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



67 



Formulary! 



ANTISEPTIC DRESSING FOR WOUNDS. 

IJ; llamamelis Extract. ,'^,iv 

Glycerine ,'^ii 

Aciil Carbolic gtlxii. 

GU.\I.\COL WINE. 

Gu.iiacol, crystallized 1 50 grains. 

Sherry wine 2 pints. 

Mix and dissolve. 



water and pour into the boiling glue. 
I'"inally add the acetic acid and oil of 
cloves. 



OINTMENT FOR CHAPPED HANDS. 

Menthol gr. .w. 

Salol gr .\xx. 

01. oliva; ,5ss. 

Lanolini ,^iss. 

Apply night and morning, rubhing in 
well. 



BUTTER OF PHOSPHORUS. 

The Bulletin de Pharmacie suggests the 
following as a substitute for cod-liver oil 
in hot weather : 

Fresh butter ^lYz ounces. 

Potassium iodide 4 grains. 

Potassium bromide 15 grains. 

Sodium chloride 2 drams. 

Phosphorus i^ grain. 

About one-third of an ounce is to be 
taken daily, spread on oread. — National 
Druggist. 



AROMATIZED COD-LIVER OIL. 

Dietrich gives the following formula for 
aromated cod-liver oil : 

Essence of lemon 50 parts. 

Essence of neroli 20 parts. 

Essence of English peppermint. 10 parts. 

Vanilline i part. 

Conmarin i-io part. 

Cod-liver oil 10,000 parts. 

Dissolve the conmarin and vanilline in 
the essential oils, with the aid of a very 
gentle heat, and mix the solution with 
the cod-liver oil. 



TOOTH PASTE. 

Powdered pumice 5j- 

" cuttle-fish bone giss. 

" myrrh giij. 

" orris root 5'i'ss. 

" precipitated chalk gvj. 

" alum .... .5j. 

Curd soap o^iij- 

Glycerine gxij. 

Rose water gx. 

Otto of rose 3j- 

Oil of cloves 5'j- 

Shred the soap, mix it with the glycer- 
ine, and heat on a water-bath till uniform ; 
then add the water, and mix with the 
powders, finally adding the perfume. 



PASTE FOR VARNISHED SURFACES. 

The British and Colonial Druggist 
recommends the folllowing : 

Rice starch : . . . 2 ounces. 

White glue I ounce. 

Acetic acid 4 drams. 

Oil of cloves 20 minims. 

Dissolve the glue in cold water, then 
boil. Mix the starch with a little cold 



VARNISH FOR COPPER. 

To protect objects made of copper, and 
to guard them against oxidation, the 
Revue de Chiinie industrielle recommends 
varnishing them with the following : 

Carbon disulphide I part. 

Benzine (benzol) I parf. 

Oil of turpentine I part. 

Hard copal 1 part. 

Methylic alcohol 2 parts. 

The journal quoted declares this var- 
nish to be very resisting, and to protect 
the metal perfectly, especially if two or 
three coats of the varnish or lacquer have 
been given. — National Druggist. 



SOLUBLE ESSENCE OF TOLU. 

Balsam Tolu 3 fl. oz. 

Alcohol 6 " " 

Glycerine 12 " " 

Water, 

Alcohol of each enough to 

make 32 " " 

Dissolve the tolu in the mixture of the 
alcohol and glycerine with the aid of 
heat ; then add 12 fi. oz. of water, and 
set aside to cool. Pour off the milky 
liquid from the resinous precipitate, rub 
it with a little powdered pumice, and fil- 
ter, washing the filter with enough of a 
mixture of i part alcohol and z parts 
water to make two pints. 

This is said to make an excellent syrup 
of tolu when mixed with simple syrup. 



LIQUID PATENT LEATHER DRESSINGS. 

(l) — Aniline black. . . i part. 

Camphor 2 parts. 

Shell.ic 24 " 

Wood alcohol 73 " 

(2) — Glue 16 parts. 

Logwood (in chips) 32 " 

Indigo I " 

Tragacanth 2 " 

Glycerin 16 " 

Vinegar 12S ** 

Water 64 " 

Boil, Strain, and bottle. 

(3) — ShelKic 2 parts. 

Ammonia water i " 

Water 6 " 

Aniline black to color. 

Water to make 16 parts. 

Boil the first three ingredients together, 
until the shellac is dissolved ; then add 
the aniline dye and sufficient water to 
make a pint. 

Hager gives the following formula : 

Gallic acid 2 parts. 

Borax 2 " 

Extract logwood i " 

Aniline black 4 " 

.■\mmonia water 4 " 

Hot water 20 " 

Shellac varnish 800 " 

The shellac varnish is prepared as fol- 
lows : 

Borax 2 parts. 

Rain water 4c *' 

Powdered shellac 6 " 

Heat the borax and water to boiling, 
and add the shellac in divided portions, 
stirring well all the while ; when cold, 
strain. — Merck's Market Report. 



A New Ointment Base. 

Eggert and Haeckel, of Berlin, are intro- 
ducing a new basis for ointments into the 
trade, under the name of myronin, which 
is claimed to possess many advantages. 
Eggert gives the following account of its 
composition : All fats that contain fatly 
acids and glycerine combined are liable to 
rancidity. Fajty or waxy bodies, in which 
the fatty acids are combined with higher 
alcohols, keep far better, and are not liable 
to rancidity to any extent. Such alcohols 
are cholestcrin, ceryl, myricyl, and dode- 
catyl alcohols. Cholesterin is found to a 
certain extent in wool-fat, but the relatively 
difficult purification, etc., render it some- 
what expensive. The vegetable wax of 
Copernicia cerifera contains myricyl alco- 
hol, and certain whale oils, such as doeg- 
ling oil, contains dodecatyl alcohol. He 
claims that doegling oil is a very suitable 
body for an ointment basis on two grounds: 
(i) That it is not liable to quick rancidity; 
(2) It is easily absorbed into the tissues, 
without provoking any irritability. The 
necessity of finding a suitable method for 
combining this oil with vegetable wax is 
obvious, and the following method is that 
adopted : If the free fatty acids which 
the wax always contains are neutralized by 
alkalies, the wax is in such a condition 
that it will easily mix with considerable 
quantities of other fats or water. In fact, 
a preparation in which the wax and water 
are in proportions of i to 5 is of the con- 
sistency of soft paraffin. After the wax 
and the doegling oil have been freed from 
all albuminoids, and have been purified 
by filtering and washing, the free acids of 
the wax are neutralized with weak, hot 
alkaline carbonate solution in the calcu- 
lated quantity. Doegling oil is then added 
in sufficient quantity to give the required 
consistency, as found by experience, and 
the whole is mixed to a homogeneous 
mass by mechanical means. The normal 
product contains 12.5 per cent, of water, 
but this can be raised or lowered at will. 
— British and Colonial Druggist. 



Purification of Ether. 

M. Eckenberg states that approximately 
pure ether for analytical purposes can be 
obtained from commercial ether by add- 
ing to the latter 5-10 per cent, of a liquid 
paraffin, that boils above 300° C, and 
distilling at 40° to 50°. The alcohol and 
oxidation products are retained in the re- 
tort by the paraffin, whilst the water, if 
much be present, will form a layer beneath 
the latter. Acids and other objectionable 
impurities may be removed by this method 
which is also applicable for purifying 
chloroform, acetone, etc. Subsequent 
heating to 120° expels the impurities from 
the paraffin, and renders it fit for further 
use. — Chem. Zeit. 



A Strike of Doctors.— Five hun- 
dred medical men in Hungary have 
threatened to go on "strike." Ti ey 
want better State control and higher fees. 



68 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Photograph ic Notes 

Mounting Difficulties. — A few days 
ago I stepped into an amateur's work- 
room, and found him sweating over 
mounting difificulties. The iiiount laid on 
the table, carefully pencil-marked to indi- 
cate where the print should come, and 
my friend was busy at work- applying glue 
to the edges of the print, " so that it would 
stay where it was placed." Now, there 
are several reasons why this is a bad pro- 
cedure. Glue is hard to spread, and sets 
very quickly, but it also often contains 
substances injurious to the print, to say 
nothing of the fact that it soon decom- 
poses and degrades the print. As a 
mountant, nothing that I know of is bet- 
ter than thick starch for albumen prints, 
and starch and fine flour for aristos. In 
making it up I use an aluminium cup, 
which does not rust, however long the 
starch may be left in it. A few drops of 
oil of cloves will preserve it for a week. 
I always strain the starch through a salt 
bag, and it should be thick enough to re- 
quire considerable pressure to force it 
through. Now the prints are drawn out 
of the last wash water on to a large pane 
of glass, and allowed to drain for a few 
moments. I then take a towel and roll it 
up compactly, and roll it over my prints, 
forcing the moisture out, which is ab- 
sorbed by the towel. This provides a 
squeegee which is so flexible that it enters 
every indenture of the uneven pile of 
prints. It also dries the prints so that 
they readily take the paste. My paste 
brush has the bristles set in hard rubber, 
which holds them securely. The mount- 
ant must be thoroughly rubbed into the 
pores of the paper. Now comes the rub 
of placing them on the mount. If it is 
cabinets, you soon accustom yourself to 
place them just so far from the sides and 
top, and vou mount so near the edge that 
little difficulty is experienced. In case of 
plain mounts, lo by 12, or larger, greater 
care is needed, as, for the best effects, 
you must have plenty of margin around 
your prints. I will mention two methods. 
Instead of a glass plate place your prints 
on oilcloth to receive the paste. This 
can be readily washed off" and rolled up, 
and laid away when not in use. Now cut 
a piece of stiff brown paper the size of the 
mounts to be used, and draw on it in pen- 
cil mark an outline the exact size of the 
print, and just where you will want it on 
the mount. Now lay the print, facedown, 
on the brown paper inside this outline. 
The pasted side is up. Stand the mount 
exactly on the upper edge of the paper, 
and gradually lower it, and gently press 
over the print. Now lift up your mount, 
and then the print is in its place. But 
the better way is to train the eye to the 
exact measurement of distance. Take up 
your pasted print and hold it in both 
hands, being careful not to touch the cor- 
ners nor the edges. Hold it before you 
over the mount, about an inch from its 
surface, note carefully; is it the proper 
distance from the upper edge, is it paral- 



lel with the upper edge, is it equal dis-5 
tance from the two outer edges ? If so,| 
gently lower. Should you find a slight| 
mistake, slip the print into place without] 
delay. In the final rubbing down I use 
a brown, bibulous paper, which can be| 
used over and over again, and does not* 
wrinkle nor curl up. That's all there is ' 
of it. Above all, let me say to the ama- 
teur, train the eye fight clear of make- 
shifts'. Photography should become more 
and more a thing of yourself. A trained 
eye, a trained hand, and brain and soul, 
even, for I believe that is where the feel- 
ing of art resides. Your photography will 
bless you in proportion as it makes you 
more perfect.—/! H. Bates, in Photo- 
graphy. 

Something New in Photogr.\phv. — 
It has been observed that when formic 
aldehyde is added to the gelatine in solu- 
tion a compound is formed which is inso- 
luble in water, but which can be melted 
by heat and made into films. This pecu- 
liarity has been taken advantage of by 
Schering's works, and two patents have 
been obtained in England by Mr. August 
Zimmerman to cover the manufacture of 
a new photographic film. The consists 
of a layer of the formalated gelatine, upon 
which is spread the ordinary color-sensi- 
tive gelatine-emulsion, or the hardened 
gelatine may itself be sensitized or dipped 
in emulsion. It either case it is obvious 
that the invention is one of great utility, 
as the gelatine film can be used for all the 
purposes for which paper films are now 
used. — Chemist and Druggist. 



Photo-engraving with Silver Salts. 
— At the last meeting af the Royal Photo- 
graphic Society, Mr. Leon Warnerke gave 
a demonstration of a process for photo- 
etching, partly dependent on sensitive 
silver salts instead of bichromated gela- 
tine. A negative of the original is taken 
in the usual way through a screen. After 
the negative is developed and dried, it is 
given a safe edge. The next step in the 
process is to place the negative in contact 
with a sheet of paper coated with gelatine 
pigmented with a sensitive silver salt, such 
as the bromide, and making an exposure, 
the image being developed with pyro- 
ammonia. After development, the image 
is pressed or squeegeed in contact with a 
copper plate previously polished with 
snakestone and charcoal, the paper back- 
ing and the soluble gelatine, together with 
the unaltered silver salt, being removed 
by hot water in the same manner as a 
carbon image is developed. After wash- 
ing and treatment with alcohol, the plate, 
when dried, is ready for etching with per- 
chloride of iron in the ordinary way. The 
process, Mr. Warnerke pointed out, might 
be adapted to photogravure purposes by 
commencing with a transparency instead 
of a negative, and transferring the devel- 
oped negative in the plate grained with 
asphaltum, the subsequent operations 
being as usual. The process is an out- 
come of the negative paper process brought 
out by Mr. Warnerkein 1 880, and described 



(by him in the paper he read before the 
? society in 1886. — Journal of the Society of 
\Arts. — Phar. Journal. 

Photographic Contrivances. — J. A. 
\ White says he once chanced to place a 
common eye-glass lens in front of the 
diaphragm of a single combination lens, 
and expected to be surprised at the dis- 
tortion of the picture. The resulting 
image was, of course, less in size, but he 
could discover no other difference in the 
two images. An interior made with that 
combination of an achromatic landscape 
lens of eleven-inch focus and an eye-glass 
lens of seventeen-inch focus showed no 
curved lines, and the title on a sheet of 
music taken at a distance of fifteen feet 
showed up clear and distinct ; nor could 
he distinguish any diffraction of colors. 
It is best, he states, to have a set of 
multiple foci lenses, but with the aid of a 
pasteboard tube (made by rolling up a 
sheet of paper), his original achromatic 
lens, a positive spectacle lens of sixteen 
inches and a negative lens (for near-sight- 
ness), he has lenses of seven, eleven, 
fourteen, and twenty inches. Usually 
the original lens is preferable, but there 
is many a time when trying to compose a 
view on a small plate that the seven-inch 
lens, covering a half-size plate, comes in 
handily, or when a distant view loses all 
detail with the usual lens the " twenty- 
inch " is very convenient. A front exten- 
sion is needed for the camera with the 
" twenty-inch," but is easily made of paste- 
board. The achromatic piece is used in 
front of the lens with the others behind, 
and the mounting is easily done. Another 
contrivance is for taking stereoscopic 
views with one lens. A front board is 
fitted with one hole for a lens, the centre 
of the hole to be ifs inch to one side of 
the centre of the board and equidistant 
from top to bottom. In use the lens is 
in position to command one of the halves. 
After exposing that half of the plate the 
slide is replaced in the holder, and the 
front board is reversed in order to expose 
the other part of the plate. The camera 
must be clamped rigid that the plate may 
not be displaced between exposures. — 
Photographic Times. 



Sensitive Coating for Half-tone 
Etching. — In a late number of the Photo- 
Beacon Mr. Le Page gives a formula 
which has stood the test of three years, 
and which he recommends very highly : 

Glue clarified (Le Page's) oz. 2 

Water fl. oz. 2 

Ammonium bichromate (Merck's) gr. 120 

Water fl. oz. 2 

Albumen, dried gr. 120 

Water fl. Oz. 4 

Chromic acid, c. p gr. 10 

According to the author this prints 
quickly, develops easily, and gives every 
detail there is in the negative ; the gen- 
eral results being of a high average. 



Some men never learn that they are 
fools until they have passed the age of 
activity and usefulness. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(68a) 



4iiOI.I> illi:i>AI. T«» AiTIATKIK PIIOT<KiK *I*IIKKS. (Opkn TO THE WoRi.i.) 



DARLINGTON'S 



" Nothing better could be wished for." 

—British Weekly. 

" Far superior to ordinary guides." 

— London Daily Ch. 



"Sir Henry I'onsonby is eomniandeil by the 
Queen to th.ink Mr. Darlington for a copy of 
his Handbook." 

lOdited by KALPII D.ARLI W4iiTOi\, F.K.G.»). 



HANDBOOKS 

IS. each. Illustrated. Maps by John Rartholomew, F.R.G.S 

The Isle of Wight. 



The Channel Islands. 

The North Wales Coast. 



Bournemouth and the New Forest. 

Aberystwith, Barmouth and Cardigan Bay. The Vale of Llangollen. 

Crown 8vo., cloth, 2s. • • - - The Birds, Wild Flowers, Ferns, Mosses, and Grasses of North Wales. 

Llangollen— Darlington & Co. London— \V. J. Adams & Sons. 



IF YOU USE THE 

Red Star Toothwash Bottle 

You will beat your neighbor, as 
no other approaches it 
for beauty. 
Scant 2 oz. (looks like a 3 oz.) com- 
plete open crown sprinkler at $7.83 
net per gross. Sample sent on re- 
ceipt of 5 cents to pay postage. 

T. C. Wheaton & Co., Millville, 
N. J., manufacturers of Flint, Green 
and Amber ware, and the largest 
factors of Homeo. Vials in the 
world. 

Baylis Manufacturing Co. 

16 to 30 Nazareth Street, 
MONTREAL 



IMPORTERS OF 

Linseed Oil 
Turpentine 
Castor Oil 
Paris Green 
Glues 



WRITE 

FOR 

QUOTATIONS 



DRUG STORE FITTINGS 



A SPECIALTY. 



DRUGGISTS about to remodel their stores, 
or fit up new buildings, will find it to their 
advantage to write us for designs and estimates. 
We have something new and original for each 
customer. 



THE 



CANADIAN OFFICE AND SCHOOL 
FURNITURE CO., Ltd. 

PRESTON, ONTARIO. 



RUBBER 
GOODS 



AT RIGHT PRICES 



OUR LINE OF 

ENEMAS, TUBING, FOUNTAINS, 

ATOMIZERS, is very complete and 
prices righl. Buyers can effect great 
saving by placing orders with us. 



SURE SELLING SPECIftLTlES; 

CARSON'S BITTERS 

PECTORIA 

SILVER CREAM 

ALLAN'S COUGH CANDIES 

\ gross lioxes at SI per Box. 

SOAP BARK 

In 5c. Packages, } gross Box, SI 
per Box. 

Full lines of Sundries. 

Mail orders promptly executed. 



ALLAN & CO. 

53 FRONT ST. £ AT, TORONTO 

Wm. Radam's 

MICROBE 
KIL LER , , 

WILLIAM ELLIS 

Sole Manufacturer for the Pro- 
vinces of Ontario and Quebec. 

(The factory having been removed from Toronto.) 



SOLD BY ALL WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS. 



HEAD OFFICE AND FACTOKT : 

98 DUNDAS ST., 

LONDON, ONT. 



IT PAYS TO HANDLE OUR SPEGIJLTIES 



Le Vido 

Water of Beauty. 



A true specific for all 
Skin Diseases. 

BECAUSE 

li gives satisfaction to your 
customers. 

It is a reliable, safe, and sure 
preparation. 

It has b«en on the market 
for 25 years. 

It is handsomely put up and 
extensively advertised. 

It gives you a fair profit. 

Order now through 
your Jobber. 



Boulanger's Cream 
Emulsion. 



Do/en 
$4.00 



Sold at 
50c. 



"Le Vido" Water 
of Beauty. 

Dozen Sold at 

$7.00 $1.00 

Dr. Scott's Pile 

Cure. 

Dozen Sold at 

$1.50 25c. 

Injection Wattan. 
Dozen Sold at 

$5.00 75c. 

Dermatonic Com- 
plexion Powder. 

Dozen Sold at 

5i-75 25C' 



THE MONTREAL CHEMICAL CO., 
MONTREAL 

Laboratory, 
St. Johns, Quebec. 

IS%S^4SK5SS5 S32Si«S«K5XoS!' SfAxa^VSaiSM *i»553! 



BRAYLEY, SONS & CO. 

Wholesale Patent Medicines 

43 and 45 William Street, - MONTREAL. 



OUB SPECIAXTIES: 

TURKISH DYES, 

DR. WILSON'S HERBINE BITTERS. 



Sole Proprietors of the foUowinsr: 

Dow's Sturgeon Oi! Liniment 

Gray's Anodyne Liniment 

Dr. Wilson's Antibilious Pills 

Dr. Wilson's Persian Salve 
Dr. Wilson's Itch Ointment 

Dr. Wilson's Sarsaparillian Elixir 
French Magnetic Oil 

Dr. Wilson's Worm Lozenges 
Dr. Wilson's Pulmonary Cherr>* Balsam 

Dr. Wilson's Cramp and Pain Reliever 

Dr. Wilson's Dead Shot Worm Sticks 

Nurse Wilson's Soothing Sjrrup 
Clark Derby's Condition Powders 
Wright's Vermifuge 

Robert's Eye Water 

Kurd's Hair Vitalizer 
Dr. Howard's Quinine Wine 

Dr, Howard's Beef, Iron and Wine 
Strong's Summer Cure 

Dr. Howard's Cod Liver Oil Emolsioo 



(68b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



FOR BODY flN° Bt^fllfl 

SINCE 30 yp:ars all eminent physicians recommend 



VIN MARlAMl 



The original French Cocoa Wine ; most popularly used tonic-stimulant 
in Hospitals^ Public and Jveligioits Institutions everywhere. 

Nourishes, Fortifies, Refreshes 

Strengthens the entire system ; most Agreeable^ Effective and Lasting 
Renovator of the Vital Forces. 

Every test, strictly on its own merits, proves exceptional reputation. 

Palatable as Choicest Old Wines 

LAWRENCE A. WILSON & CO., Sole Agents, MONTREAL 
Effect Otthe Frenchi ^Treaty 

CLARETS AT HALF PRICE 

The Bordeaux Claret Company, established at Montreal in view of the French 
treaty, are now offering the Canadian connoisseur beautiful wines at $3.00 and $4.00 
per case of 12 large quart bottles. These are equal to any $6.00 and $8.00 wines sold on 
their label. Every swell hotel and club are now handling them, and they are recom- 
mended by the be'it physicians as being perfectly pure and highly adapted for invalids' 
use. Address : BORDEAUX CLARET COMPANY, 30 Hospital Street, Montreal. 



The Detroit 



THE ONLY GENUINE. 



Pennyroyal 
Wafers 



Have been so successful with Women in the 
treatment of 

PAINFUL AND IRREGULAR MENSTRUATION 

That Physicians prescribe them liberally. 

The Druggist can safely recommend them for their 
value to the sick. 



At $8.00 per dozen delivered, you get a good profit of 50 per 
cent. No need to try to work off an imitation of them. 

If you want local advertising, or terms, or special remedies, write to 
the manufacturers. 



EUREKA CHEMICAL CO., 



Canadian Laboratory 

WINDSOR, ONT. 



DETROIT, MICH. 



RADLAUER'S 

ANTISEPTIC PERLES 

Of Pleasant Taste and Fragrance. 

Non-Poisonous and strong-ly Antiseptic. 



These Perles closely resemble the sublimates and carbolic acid in 
their antiseptic action. A preventive of diphtheric infection. 

For the rational cle.insing and disinfection of the mouth, teeth, 
pharynx, and especially of the tonsils, and for immediately removing 
disagreeable odors emanating from the mouth and nose. 

A perfect substitute for mouth and teeth waslies and gargles. 
Radlauer's Antiseptic Perles take special effect where swallowing is 
difficult in inflammation of the throat and tonsils, catarrh of the gums, 
periostitis dentalis, stomatitis mercurialis, salivation, angina, and thrush. 

A few of the "Perles" placed in the mouth dissolve into a strongly 
antiseptic fluid of agreeable taste, cleanse the mouth and mucous mem- 
brane of the pharynx, and immediately remove the fungi, germs, and 
putrid substance accumulating about the tonsils, thereby preventing any 
further injury to the teetli. 

METHOD OF APPLICATION: 

Take 2 — 4 Perles, let them dissolve slowly in the mouth, and then 
swallow. Being packed in small and h.andy tins, Radlauer's Antiseptic 
Perles can always be carried in the pocket. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



S. RADLAUER 



Pharmaceutical Chemist 



BERLIN W., GTRMANY 
W. J. DYAS, Toronto, Ont.. Wholesale Ag-ent for Canada. 

Sovereign . . 
Lime FFuit Juice 

Is th3 strongest, Purest, and of Finest Flavor 



We are the largest refiners of LIME JUICE 

m America, and solicit enquiries. 

For Sale in Barrels, Demijohns, and twenty-four ounce Bottles 
by wholesale in 

TORONTO, HAMILTON, KINGSTON, AND WINNIPEG 

SIIVJSON BROS. & CO., Wholesale Druggists 

HALIFAX, N.S. 



TS! 



o the: trade. 



In all localiiie'; from which we have secured and published testimonials 
for our DODD'S KIDNEY PILLS, the sale has been greatly 
increased, which resulted to the benefit of the druggist as well as our'^elves. 

We would, therefore, respectfully request nil druggists to forward us the 
names of any of their customers who have been cured or benefited by our 
DODD'S KIDNEY PILLS, an*^ secure us the testimony for pub- 
lication if possible, in return for which we shall be pleased to give them the 
benefit of any advertising connected therewith, if desired. 

Thanking the Drug Trade for their assistance towards the success of our 
Remedies, and respectfully soliciting a continuance of the same, 
Respectfully, 

THE DODDS MEDICINE CO. (LTD). 

Toronto, January ist, 1S95. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



6q 



Safeguards Against Delerioratlon of 
Stock. 



liy I.KON C. Fink. 

.V large proportion of ihe materials 
which constitute the stock of an average 
drug store are particularly prone to de- 
terioration, and painstaking pharmacists 
are required to exercise more than ordi- 
nary circumspection to prevent exposure 
of sensitive pharmaceuticals to pernicious 
influences. In fact, the art of affording 
such protection is quite as important as 
the ability to select drugs and prepare 
medicines properly. 

A complete tabulation of all the chemi- 
cal and physical changes which can modify 
and injure pharmaceutical preparations is 
not within the scope of this article, but it 
is deemed apposite to mention a few 
exemplary forms of deterioration which 
will serve to suggest to the minds of in- 
telligent pharmacists others which can 
occur from similar causes. 

The importance of maintaining a uni- 
form temperature, through day and night, 
in a [iharmacy, is apt to be overlooked. 
Remember that your stock is largely 
made up of fluid preparations holding 
chemical substances in solution. These 
are reasonably permanent at a normal 
temperature, but as the temperature 
lowers the solvent power of the men- 
struum is reduced and precipitation of 
the less soluble ingredients occurs. Re- 
sults grow gradually worse as the tempera- 
ture goes down, until disaster comes in 
the freezing of aqueous solutions and 
consequent bursting of bottles. 

Change of temperature may also cause 
loss and annoyance from breakage of 
demijohns through expansion or con 
traction of liquid contents. If a demi- 
john is filled with cold liquid, tightly 
corked, and subsequently transferred to a 
warm room or climate, the liquid will 
expand with rise of temperature and blow 
out the cork or burst the vessel. Tightly 
corked demijohns filled with hot liquids 
frequently collapse under atmospheric 
pressure as the contents cool and con- 
tract. It is, therefore, a safe rule never 
to fill such large glass containers com- 
pletely, but rather leave an ample cushion 
of air to allow for expansion and contrac- 
tion. 

.Sunlight can do incalculable damage 
to chemicals, pharmaceuticals, plush goods 
and toilet articles in general, unless spe- 
cial precautions are taken to prevent its 
injurious action. Calomel is not altered 
by the atmosphere if kept in the dark, 
but, when exposed to sunlight, it gradu- 
ally turns gray or black, indicating de- 
composition. Santonin acquires a yellow 
color by exposure to sunlight. Silver 
nitrate becomes gray or black on exposure 
to sunlight in the presence of organic 
matter. Sunlight darkens yellow mer- 
curous iodide and yellow mercuric oxide 
in consequence of their partial reduction. 
Bright green scales of soluble ferric phos- 
phate and soluble ferric pyrophosphate 
turn dark on exposure to sunlight. Red 
mercuric iodide is permanent in the air if 



kept in the dark, but acquires a brownish 
tint by exposure to sunlight. Quinine 
bisulphate readily acquires a deep brown- 
red color on exposure to direct rays of 
sunlight. Quinine sulphate and quinine 
hydrochloraie are gradually colored yel- 
low by similar exposure. Ferric salts in 
solution with sugar are reduced to ferrous 
salts by action of sunlight. Many vola- 
tile oils are injured by prolonged exposure 
to atmospheric oxygen and sunlight, 
while some are eventually rendered worth 
less and entirely unfit for use. Perfumes 
exposed to direct rays of sunlight rajiidly 
degenerate and soon acquire a rank odor ; 
it is apparent, therefore, that they should 
not be habitually presented in show- 
windows. 

Drugs and chemicals are frequently 
injured by absorbing moisture or carbonic 
acid, or both, from the atmosphere. 
Solids that absorb moisture from the air 
are called hygroscopic. Solids which ab- 
sorb moisture from the air, and become 
liquid, or dissolve therein, are called 
deliquescent. Crystalline substances which 
part with their water of crystallization on 
exposure to air, thereby losing their crys- 
talline form, are called efflorescent. 

On exposure to atmosphere, caustic 
soda absorbs water and is liquefied, sub- 
sequently solidifying and becoming efflor- 
escent. This change is caused by the 
absorption of carbonic acid and the crys- 
tallization and efflorescence of the sodium 
carbonate thus formed. Potassa also 
deliquesces and absorbs carbonic acid 
under similar exposure. Chlorinated lime 
absorbs moisture and carbonic acid from 
damp atmosphere, with loss of valued 
properties and formation of a plastic mass ; 
it should, therefore, be kept in a closely 
covered jar and stored in a cool, dry 
place. 

Lime becomes " air slacked " by ex- 
posure to ordinary atmosphere, absorbing 
water and carbonic acid, and being con- 
verted into hydrate and carbonate of cal- 
cium. Carbonate of f)otassium is ex- 
tremely deliquescent in humid air, form- 
ing a colorless or yellowish alkaline liquid 
of an oily appearance. Chloride of zinc, 
acetate of potassium, and chloride of cal- 
cium are also very deliquescent salts 
which require special protection. 

Powdered extracts should be carefully 
protected from exposure to moist air, in 
small bottles with mouths wide enough to 
admit the blade of a spatula. Selected 
corks should be used, and the bottles 
should be kept in a cool place — never in 
a current of hot air from a stove or fur- 
nace. 

It is particularly essential that granular 
effervescent salts be kept in securely 
corked bottles, for, if access of air be per- 
mitted, sufficient moisture will soon be 
absorbed to cause the acid to act upon 
the carbonated base and gradually liber- 
ate carbonic acid. The valued efferves- 
cent properties of the preparations will 
thus be irretrievably lost. 

If clear lime water be exposed to the 
influence of air, a pellicle of calcium car- 
bonate is formed upon the surface ; this 



fihn sinks to make room for another, un 
til, finally, nearly all the lime is rendered 
insoluble and the supernatant liquid is 
comparatively valueless. It is essential, 
therefore, that a goodly excess of lime be 
kept in the bottom of the lime-water bottle 
to maintain the strength of the solution. 
The container should be kept in a cool 
place, as cold water dissolves more lime 
than hot water. 

Solution of lead subacetate is decom- 
posed on exposure to air, or on being 
mixed with water containing air in solu- 
tion, a white precipitate of insoluble car- 
bonate of lead being formed. When 
freshly made, it should be divided into 
two- or four-ounce bottles, kept full and 
tightly sealed until required for use. 
Liquor potassa and liquor soda also pos- 
sess marked affinity for carbonic acid, 
and should be preserved in securely- 
stoppered bottles. 

Quinine sulphate, like some other 
alkaloidal salts, does not " lose strength " 
by exposure to ordinarily dry atmosphere, 
but rather loses water of crystallization by 
evaporation and becomes correspondingly 
richer in quinine. It should be borne in 
mind also that effloresced carbonate of 
sodium is stronger than the normal crys- 
tallized salt in proportion to the amount of 
water it has lost. Sulphate of soda, com- 
monly called Glauber salt, contains more 
than half its weight of water of crystalliza- 
tion, nearly all of which is dissipated on ex- 
posure to dry atmosphere, leaving a dry, 
white powder which is correspondingly 
richer salt. Sulphate of zinc also efflor- 
esces slowly in dry air. 

Atmospheric oxygen causes many un- 
desirable changes in chemicals and phar- 
maceuticals. On exposure to air the 
color of syrup iodide of iron slowly 
changes to yellow and subsequently to 
brown, the change of color proceeding 
from the exposed surface downward. 
This color can sometimes be bleached 
and the syrup restored to its original ap- 
pearance, but here is a case where an 
ounce of prevention is worth a pound of 
cure. Keep the syrup in small bottles, 
full, and well corked. Syrup bromide of 
iron is, of course, similarly affected. 

Certain fixed oils will remain unchanged 
for a great length of time in air-tight ves- 
sels, but, when exposed to the atmos- 
phere, they attract oxygen and ultimately 
become concrete. The tendency of lin- 
seed oil to dry or harden on exposure to 
air IS typical in the extreme. Exposed to 
the air, lard absorbs oxygen and becomes 
rancid ; it should, therefore, be kept in 
well-closed vessels, or procured fresh when 
lequired for use ; in the rancid state it 
irritates the skin, and sometimes exer- 
cises an injurious reaction upon sub- 
stances mixed with it. 

Phosphorus absorbs oxygen from the 
atmosphere with sufficient avidity to 
cause rapid combustion and necessitate 
its preservation under water. Prolonged 
exposure to air gradually transforms light 
green ferrous carbonate into the familiar 
red-brown "sub-carbonate of iron," which 
is ultimately little more than ferric oxide, 



CANADIAN DRUGCxIST. 



and can undergo no further change from 
similar influences. 

Not content with ravaging tlie phar- 
macist's stock, this belligerent element 
exhibits a remarkable propensity, in the 
presence of moisture, for rusting his 
spatulas and other metallic utensils. 

Serious pecuniary loss by evaporation 
of volatile solids like camphor results from 
exposure of these substances in ordinary 
open wooden drawers. Menthol is ex- 
tremely volatile, and should, therefore, 
be kept in securely corked bottles to pre- 
vent loss. Exposed to the air, carbonate 
of ammonium partially volatilizes, be- 
comes opaque, and crumbles into a white 
powder. Iodine is most advantageously 
kept in securely closed glass receptacles ; 
most ordinary wares are liable to be 
attacked or permeated by it. Chloral 
evaporates slowly when exposed to dry 
atmosphere. Povvdered drugs which de- 
pend upon volatile constituents for medi- 
cinal virtue, like cinnamon, cloves, orris 
root, and valerian, should, so far as prac- 
ticable, be kept in bottles, or some other 
comparatively air-tight contamer. 

Stronger water of ammonia should be 
kept in strong, glass-stoppered bottles, 
which should be stored in a cool place 
and opened with extreme care. When 
warm, the liberated gas frequently forces 
the stopper out with considerable vio- 
lence, and many accidents resulting in in- 
juryto the sight of operators are onrecord. 

Pressed roots and herbs are more con- 
venient to handle, occupy less space, and 
are better preserved than crude drugs in 
bulk form. Furthermore, the danger of 
error is materially reduced by handling 
neatly pressed, wrapped, and labelled 
packages. 

Examine your stock of dandelion and 
rhubarb roots occasionally to be sure that 
purchasers do not find worms in them 
and form unfavorable impressions of you 
and your business methods. 

Cantharides should be thoroughly dried 
and kept in securely closed containers. 
The vapor of chloroform quickly kills 
insects which infest cantharides, and their 
destruction can be accomplished by plac- 
ng a small quantity of chloroform in a 
wide-mouth bottle, or other open vessel, 
upon the surface of the infested drug and 
securely closing the container. The heavy 
chloroform vapor will then gradually sink 
through the drug and destroy the insects. 

The modern method of marketing 
chlorinated lime in hermetically sealed 
parcels is not only a source of conveni- 
ence, but affords protection which serves 
to prevent loss of the loosely combined 
chlorine upon which the value of the 
preparation as a disinfectant is almost 
entirely dependent. The disagreeable 
odor of chlorine which clings to the hands 
of the operator is also avoided. 

Charcoal is used in medicine chiefly for 
its Absorbent and disinfectant properties. 
Owing to its absorbent powers, it should 
not be unnecessarily exposed to the at- 
mosphere of a laboratory or pharmacy, 
lest it be thus rendered unfit for medic 
inal purposes. 



Fine sponges should be kept in a 
closed show-case or drawer. Carriage 
and slate sponges, which are frequently 
allowed to become soiled and lend an 
untidy appearance to the store by rolling 
about in a window or on the floor, can be 
conveniently kept assorted and cimspic- 
uously displayed in the wire basket with 
separate compartments for different sizes. 

Oxalic acid should not be kept in paper 
parcels, since it soon renders the paper 
fragile, and in being thus scattered about 
may, by admixture with other drugs, 
cause loss of lile. Owing to its external 
resemblance to Epsom salt, and its very 
poisonous nature, the substances should 
not be kept in similar drawers. The 
practice of keeping them in containers of 
different style and safely remote from 
each other is less likely to lead to 
accidental confusion. 

Remember that heated atmosphere 
usually accumulates near the ceiling, and 
preparations subject to injury by expos- 
ure to elevated temperature should not 
be kept on upper shelves. Several cases 
are on record wherein chlorinated lime, 
which is known to greedily absorb water 
and carbonic acid from a humid atmo- 
sphere, was put up in securely corked and 
sealed bottles, which were then placed 
upon an upper shelf until the heat of 
summer, or a very warm apartment, had 
liberated sufficient gas to cause a startHng 
explosion, sometimes followed rapidly by 
a succession of similar ones and a cloud 
of dust. 

Lard ointments, cerates, and in fact 
nearly all animal fats, are liable to grow 
rancid by prolonged exposure to air, this 
change in many cases being accelerated 
by heat and light. Every precaution 
should, of course, be taken to avoid such 
decomposition ; but when rancidity is 
apparent, preparations should never be 
dispensed, for, instead of having the mild 
demulcent properties which constitute 
their chief value, they become irritant and 
entirely unfit to serve as vehicles for 
medicinal substances to be applied to the 
skin. Ointment jars should invariably be 
thoroughly cleaned and freed from ran- 
cidity before refilling with fresh stock. 

With ordinary drug-store arrangement 
it is scarcely [MMCticable to entirely protect 
tinctures and fluid extracts from injurious 
effects of air, light, and changes of tem- 
perature, but any provision which tends to 
prevent precipitation from these causes is 
commendable. The stock of tinctures 
should be placed in charge of one capable 
employe who should be held responsible 
for its condition. Haste is apt to make 
serious inroads upon accuracy in prepar- 
ing pharmaceuticals. 

The danger from leaving bottles inse- 
curely corked is apparent when we con- 
sider that, if a fluid extract prepared from 
a menstruum composed of diluted alco- 
hol be exposed to the air in an open 
vessel, the alcohol will evaporate much 
more rapidly than the water. By this 
change of character in the menstruum, 
certain resinous constituents of the drug 
frequently become insoluble and are 



deposited, rendering the fluid more or less 
turbid, and materially lessening its medic- 
inal value. Collodion loses ether by 
evaporation, and becomes comparatively 
worthless. 

The deterioration which can occur in a 
singledrug store from causes indicatedhere 
command the constant attention of the 
manager, and much greater is the prob- 
lem which confronts the wholesale manu- 
facturer, who must prepare a great 
variety of products in large quantities, to 
be distributed in the market in all direc- 
tions, where they are expected to remain 
unchanged through the extreme variations 
in temperature which characterize the 
severe winters in the north, and the torrid 
summers in the south ; and no less injur- 
ious is the improper exposure to which 
pharmaceuticals are frequently subjected 
in temperate climates. — Bulletin of Phar- 
macy. 



To Hide the Taste of Chloral. 

Dr. E. Holland calls attention to the 
fact that the taste of chloral hydrate is 
effectively masked by lemonade. Two 
or three drachms of the syrup should be 
placed in a tumbler with about 2 ounces 
of water. If to this is added about 2 
ounces or so of gaseous (bottled) lemon- 
ade, the mixture may be drunk at leisure, 
and the soporific action of the drug is in 
no way impaired. — Medical Bulletin. 



Our Latest Importations. 



ALUM, in bbls, 
ALUM POWDERED, in bbls, 
FINEST EPSOM SALTS, in bbls. 
FINEST SUBLIMED SULPHUR, in bbls. 
ROLL SULPHUR, in bbls. 
CHLORIDE LIME, in casks. 
SALTPETRE CRYSTALS, in kegs. 
SALTPETRE POWDERED, in casks. 
POWDERED HELLEBORE, in bbls. 
GLYCERINE, in tins. 
WHITE CASTILE SOAP. bars. 
WHITE CASTILE SOAP, cakes. 
PARIS GREEN, in casks and drums. 
GIBSON'S CANDIES, full assortment. 

Your orders Solicited. 

Jas. A. Kennedy & Co. 

IMPORTKRS, 
LONDON, - ONTARIO. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(70A) 




NEW PERFUMES 



TOILET WATER ASSORIMENT | sweet mignonette, 

VIOLET LILLIAN RUSSELL, 

ROSE, I MARIPOSA LILY, 

HELIOTROPE. | MAGNOLIA BLOSSOM. 

LAVENDER, |j) 

ORANGE, «' '•^.fe* 

LILAC, 
MAGNOLIA. 



THESE NEW PRODUCTS OF OUR LABORATORY ARE 
'I VERY LASTING AND FRAGRANT. 



^ooly JManiifncturing^ Conipniiy^ 



niiviioi r, MICH Id AS. 



/;S'r.\K/,js//ii/j i.\ isn-j. 



IV/AT n S f > ff , OA' V.A KIO. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST PRICES CURRENT 



CoFrected to March 10th, 1895. 



The quotations given represent average prices for 
<|uantilies usually purchased by Retail Dealers. 

Larger parcels may be obtained at lower figures, 
but quantities smaller than those named will 
c^mimand an advance. 

Al.coiioi., gal $4 05 $4 25 

Methyl i 90 2 00 

Allsi'Ice, lb 13 15 

Powdered, lb 15 17 

Al.oIN, oz 40 45 

.Anodvne, Hoffman's bot., lbs. . . 50 55 

•Arrowroot, Bermuda, lb 45 50 

St. \'incent, lb 15 iS 

Balsa.m, Fir, lb 40 45 

Copaiba, lb 65 75 

Peru, 11) 3 75 4 00 

Tolu, can or less, lb 65 75 

H.\RK, Barberry, lb 22 25 

Bayberry, lb 15 18 

Buckthorn, lb 15 17 

Canella, lb 15 17 

Cascara, Sagrada 25 30 

CascariUa, select, lb iS 20 

Cassia, in mats, lb 18 20 

Cinchona, red, lb 60 65 

F^owdered, lb 65 70 

Vellow, lb 35 40 

Pale, lb 40 45 

Kim, selected, lb 20 21 

(iround, lb 17 20 

Powdered, lb. ... 20 28 

Hemlock, crushed, lb 18 20 

Oak, white, crushed lb 15 17 

Orange peel, bitter, lb. . . . 15 16 

Prickly ash, lb 35 40 

S.issafras, lb 15 16 

.Soap (quillaya), lb 13 15 

Wild cherry, lb 13 15 

Beans, Calabar, lb 45 50 

Tonka, lb I 50 2 75 

Vanilla, lb 6 00 7 50 

Bf.rriks, Cubeb, sifted, lb 30 35 

powdered, !b. .. 35 40 

Juniper, lb 7 10 

Ground, lb 12 14 

Prickly ash, lb 40 45 

Buds, Balm of Gilead, lb 55 60 

I a.ssia, lb 25 30 

BtiTiKR, Cacao, lb 75 80 

Ca.mi'HOR, lb 60 68 

Cantiiaridks, Russian, lb i 40 i 50 

Powdered, II) i 50 i 60 

Capsicum, lb 25 30 



Powdered, lb $ 30 

Carbon, Bisulphide, II) 17 

Carmink, No. 40, oz 40 

Castor, Fibre, lb 20 00 



CHAI.K, French, powdered, lb.. 

I'recip. , see Calcium, lb 

Prepared, lb 

Charcoal, ."Animal, powd., lb. . . 

Willow, powdered, lb 

Cl.ovE, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Cochineal, ,S.G. , lb 

Collodion, lb 

Cantharidal, lb 2 

Confection, Senna, lb 

Creosote, Wood, lb 2 

Cuttlefish Bone, lb 

Dextrine, lb 

Dover's Powder, lb i 

Ergot, Spanish, lb 

Powdered , lb 

Ergotin, Keith's, oz 2 

Extract, Logwood, bulk, lb. . . . 

Pounds, lb 

Flowers, Arnica, lb 

Calendula, lb 

Chamomile, Roman, lb. .... . 

German, lb 

Elder, lb 

Lavender, lb 

Rose, red, French, lb i 

Rosemary, lb 

Saffron, American, lb 

Spanish, Val'a, oz I 

Gki.aitne, Cooper's, lb 

French, white, lb 

Glycerine, lb 

Guarana 3 

Powdered, lb 3 

CJUM .\LORs, Cape, lb 

Barbadoes, lb 

Socotrine, lb 

Asafietida, lb 

.Arabic, 1st, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Sifted sorts, lb 

.Sorts, lb 

Benzoin, lb 

Catechu, Black, lb. . . . 
Gamboge, powdered, 11 

Guaiac, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Kino, true, lb 



10 
10 

5 

4 

20 

16 

'7 
40 

75 
50 
40 
00 

25 
10 

50 
75 
90 
00 
13 
14 
15 
55 
30 
40 
20 
12 
60 
25 
75 
00 

75 
35 
•4 
00 

25 
18 
.io 

65 
40 

65 
75 
40 

25 

50 

9 

20 

SO 
70 

25 



35 
18 

SO 

20 00 

12 

12 

6 

5 

25 

■7 

18 

45 
80 

2 75 
45 

2 50 
30 
12 

I 60 
80 

1 00 

2 10 
14 
'7 
20 
60 
35 
45 
22 

15 

2 00 

30 
So 
I 25 
80 
40 
16 

3 25 

3 50 
20 

SO 
70 
45 
70 
85 
45 

30 

I 00 

20 

I 25 

I 00 
75 



Myrrh, II) $ 

Powdered, lb 

Opium, lb .... ^ 

Powdered, lb ( 

.Scammony, pure Resin, lb 12 

Shellac, lb 

Bleached, lb 

Spruce, true, lb 

Tragacanth, flake, 1st, lb 

Powdered, lb i 

Sons, lb 

Thus, lb 

Herb, .Althea, lb 

Bitterwort, lb 

Burdock, lb 

Boneset, 02s, lb 

Catnip, ozs, lb 

Chiretta, lb 

Coltsfoot, lb 

Feverfew, ozs, lb 

Grindelia robusta, lb 

Hoarhound, ozs., lb 

Jaborandi, lb . 

Lemon Balm, lb 

Liverwort, German, lb 

Lobelia, ozs, lb 

Motherwort, ozs, lb 

.Mullein, German, lb 

Pennyroyal, ozs, lb 

Peppermint, ozs., lb 

Rue, ozs., lb 

Sage, ozs. ,1b 

.Spearmint, lb 

Thyme, ozs., lb 

Tansy, ozs., lb 

Wormwood, oz . . 

Verba Santa, lb 

Honey, lb 

Hoi's, fresh, lb 

Indic.o, Madras, lb 

Insect Powder, lb 

Isinglass, Brazil, lb 2 

Russian, true, lb 6 

Leaf, .Aconite, lb 

Bay, lb 

Belladonna, lb 

Buchu, long, lb 

Short, lb 

Coca, lb 

Digitalis, lb 

Eucalyptus, lb 

Hyoscyanius 

Matico, lb 



45 

55 

I 25 

) 00 

> So 

45 

45 

30 

90 

10 

45 
8 

27 
27 
16 

15 
17 
25 
20 

53 
45 
17 
45 
38 
38 
■S 
20 

17 
18 
21 
30 
iS 

21 

iS 

'5 
20 

38 

'3 

20 

75 
25 
00 
00 

25 

18 

25 
50 
20 

35 
15 
18 
30 
70 



$ 48 
60 



4 50 

6 50 

13 00 

48 

SO 

3S 
I 00 

' '5 
75 
10 

30 
30 
18 

17 
20 

30 
3S 
55 
SO 
20 
50 
40 
40 
20 
22 
20 
20 
25 
35 
20 

25 
20 
iS 
22 

44 
15 
25 
80 

28 
2 10 
5 50 

30 

20 

30 

55 
22 
40 
20 
20 
25 
75 



170BJ 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Scuiia, Alexandria, lb 

Tinnevelly, lb 

Stramonium, lb 

Uva Ursi, lb 

Lkeches, Swedish, doz 

Licorice, Solazzi 

I'ignatelli 

Grasso 

Y & S— Sticks, 6 to i lb., per lb. 
" Purity, lOO sticks in box 

'* Purity, 200 sticks in box 

"• Acme Pellets, 5 lb. tins 
" Lozenges, 5 lb. tins.. . 
" Tar, Licorice, and T0U1, 

5 lb. tins 

Lurui.iN, oz 

LVCOPODIUM, lb .... 

Mace, lb 

Manna, lb 

Moss, Iceland, lb 

Irish, lb 

Mu.SK, Tonquin, oz . . ... 

NUTGALl.S, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Nutmegs, lb 

Nu.\ Vomica, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Oakum, lb 

Ointment, Merc, lb. J^ and Yz. 

Citrine, lb 

Paraldehyde, oz 

Pepper, black, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Pitch, black, lb 

Bergundy, true, lb 

LASIER, Calcined, bbl. cash. . . . 

Adhesive, yd 

Belladonna, lb 

Galbanum Comp. , lb 

Lead, lb 

Poppy Heads, per 100 

Rosin, Common, lb 

White, lb 

Resorcin, white, oz 

RocHEi.LE Salt, lb 

Root, Aconite, lb 

Althea, cut, lb 

Belladonna, lb 

Blood, lb 

Bitter, lb 

Blackberry, lb 

Burdock, crushed, lb 

Calamus, sbced, white, lb .... 

Canada .Snake, lb 

Cohosh, black, lb 

Colchicum, lb 

Columbo, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Coltsfoot, lb 

Comfrey, crushed, lb 

Curcuma, p owdered, lb 

Dandelion, lb 

Elecampane, lb 

Galangal, lb , 

Gelsemium, lb 

Gentian or Genitan, lb 

Ground, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Ginger, African, lb 

Po.,lb 

Jamaica, blchd., lb 

Po., lb 

Ginseng, lb 

Golden .Seal, lb 

Gold Thread, lb 

Hellebore, white, powd., lb. . . 

Indian Hemp 

Ipecac, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Jalap, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Kava Kava, lb 

Licorice, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Mandrake, lb 

Masterworl, lb 

Orris, Florentine, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Pareira Brava, true, lb 

Pink, lb . 

Parsley, lb 

Pleurisy, lb 

Poke, lb 



$ 25 


$ 30 


'5 


25 


20 


25 


'5 


IS 


I 00 


I 10 


45 


50 


35 


40 


30 


35 


27 


30 


75 


75 


I 50 


I 50 


2 00 


2 00 


I 50 


1 75 


2 00 


2 00 


30 


35 


70 


80 


I 20 


I 25 


I 60 


I 75 


9 


10 


9 


10 


46 00 


50 00 


21 


25 


25 


30 


I 00 


I 10 


10 


12 


25 


27 


12 


15 


70 


75 


45 


50 


15 


18 


22 


25 


25 


30 


J 


4 


10 


12 


2 25 


3 25 


12 


'3 


bS 


70 


So 


«5 


25 


30 


I 00 


I lO 


2i 


3 


34 


4 


25 


30 


25 


28 


22 


25 


30 


35 


25 


30 


15 


16 


27 


30 


15 


18 


18 


20 


20 


25 


30 


35 


15 


20 


40 


45 


20 


22 


25 


30 


38 


40 


20 


25 


13 


14 


15 


18 


15 


20 


15 


18 


22 


25 


9 


10 


10 


12 


13 


15 


:8 


20 


20 


22 


27 


30 


30 


35 


3 00 


3 2S 


75 


80 


90 


95 


12 


15 


18 


20 


1 30 


I so 


I 60 


I 70 


55 


60 


60 


65 


40 


90 


12 


15 


13 


15 


13 


18 


16 


40 


30 


35 


40 


45 


40 


45 


75 


80 





35 


20 


25 


15 


18 



Queen of the Meadow, lb $ iS $ 

Rhatany, lb 20 

Rhubarb, lb 7^ 2 

Sarsaparilla, Ilond, lb 40 

Cut, lb 50 

Senega, lb 53 

Squill, lb I J 

Stillingia, lb 22 

Powdered, lb 25 

Unicorn, lb 38 

Valerian, English, lb. true 20 

Virginia, Snake, lb 40 

Yellow Dock, lb 15 

Rum, Bay, gal 2 25 2 

Essence, lb 300 3 

Saccharin, oz i 25 i 

Seed, Anise, Italian, sifted, lb... 13 

Star, lb 35 

Burdock, lb 30 

Canary, bag or less, lb 5 

Caraway, lb 10 

Cardamom, lb I 25 i 

Celery 30 

Colchicum 50 

Coriander, lb 10 

Cumin, lb 15 

Fennel, lb 15 

Fenugreek, powdered, lb.. ,. 7 

Flax, cleaned, lb 3! 

Ground, lb 4 

Hemp, lb ^ 

Mustard, white, lb u 

Powdered, lb i c 

Pumpkin 25 

Quince, lb 65 

Rape, lb s 

.Strophanthus, oz 50 

Worm, lb 22 

Seidlitz Mixture, lb 25 

Soap, Castile, Mottled, pure, lb. . 10 

White, Conti's, lb 15 

Powdered, lb 25 

Green (Sapo Viridis), lb 15 

Spermaceti, lb 55 

Turpentine, Chian, oz 75 

Venice, lb 10 

Wax, White, lb 50 

Yellow 40 

Wood, Guaiac, rasped 5 

Quassia chips, lb 10 

Ked Saunders, ground, lb 5 

Sanlal, ground, lb 5 

chemicals. 

Acid, Acetic, lb. ... , 12 

Glacial, lb 45 

Benzoic, English, oz 20 

German, oz . 10 

Boracic, lb .... 15 

Carbolic Crystals, lb iS 

Calvert's No. I, lb 2 10 

No. 2, lb I 35 

Citric, lb 50 

Gallic, oz 10 

Hydrobromic, diluted, lb 30 

Hydrocyanic, diluted, oz. bottles 

doz I 50 

Lactic, concentrated, oz , 22 

Muriatic, lb 3 

Chem, pure, lb 18 

Nitric, lb loj 

Chem. pure, lb 25 

Oleic, purified, lb 75 

Oxalic, lb 12 

Phosphoric, glacial, lb i 00 

Dilute, lb 13 

Pyrogallic, oz 35 

Salicylic, white, lb i 00 

Sulphuric, carboy, lb 2A 

Bottles, lb 5" 

Chem. pure, lb iS 

Tannic, lb 90 

Tartaric, powdered, lb 30 

Acrtanilid, lb 90 

AcoNiTlNE, grain .. 4 

Alum, cryst., lb ij 

Powdered, lb 3 

Ammonia, Liquor, lb., .8S0 10 

Ammonium, Bromide, lb So 

Carbonate, lb 14 

Iodide, oz - 35 

Nitrate, crystals, lb 40 

Muriate, lb 12 



20 
30 
50 
45 
55 
65 
15 
25 
27 
40 

25 
45 
18 

50 
25 
5° 
15 
40 

35 
6 

13 

50 

35 

60 

12 

20 

17 

9 

4 

5 

6 

12 

20 

30 
70 

9 
55 
25 
30 
12 
16 
35 
25 
60 
So 
12 
75 
45 

6 
12 

6 

6 



13 
50 
25 
12 
16 
25 
2 15 
I 40 

55 
12 

35 

I 60 

25 

5 

20 

13 
30 

So 

13 
I 10 

17 

3S 

I 10 

2j 

6 
20 

1 10 
32 

I 00 

5 

3 

4 

12 

85 
15 
40 

45 
16 



Valerianate, oz $ 55 

Amvl, Nitrite, oz 16 

Antinervin, oz 85 

Antikamnia I 25 

ANTII'YRIN, oz I 00 

Akistol, oz I 85 

Arsenic, Donovan's .sol., lb 25 

Fowler's sol., lb 13 

Iodide, oz 50 

White, lb 6 

Atropine, Sulp. in J ozs. Soc, 

oz 5 00 

Bismuth, Ammnnia-citrate, oz . 35 

Iodide, oz 50 

Salicylate, oz 30 

.Subcarbonate, lb 2 25 

Subnitrate, lb 2 00 

Borax, lb. g 

Powdered, lb 10 

Bromine, oz S 

Cadmiu.m, Bromide, oz 20 

Iodide, oz 45 

Caffeine, oz 50 

Citrate, oz 50 

Calcium, Hypophosphite, lb.... i 50 

Iodide, oz 95 

Phosphate, precip., lb 35 

Sulphide, oz 1; 

Ceriu.m, Oxalate, oz 10 

Chinoidine, oz 15 

Chloral, Hydrate, lb i 00 

Croton, oz 75 

Chloroform, lb 60 

Cinchonine, sulphate, oz 25 

CiNCHONIDINE, Sulph. , OZ I5 

Cocaine, Mur., oz 575 

CODEIA, \ai - So 

Collodion, lb 65 

Copper, Sulph., (Blue Vitrol) lb. 6 

Iodide, oz 65 

Copperas, lb , i 

DiURETIN, oz I 60 

Ether, Acetic, lb. . . - 75 

Sulphuric, lb 40 

Ex ALGINE, oz I 00 

Hyoscyamine, Sulp., crystals, gr. 25 

Iodine, lb 4 75 

Iodoform, lb 6 00 

lOtJOL, oz I 40 

Iron, by Hydrogen 80 

Carbonate, Precip., lb . 15 

.Sacch , lb 30 

Chloride, lb 45 

Sol., lb 13 

Citrate, U.S.I'., lb 90 

And Amnion, ,1b 70 

And Quinine, lb i 50 

CJuin. and Stry., oz . . 18 

And Strychnine, oz 13 

Dialyzed, Solution, lb 50 

Ferrocyonide, lb 55 

Hypophosphites, oz 25 

Iodide, oz 40 

Syrup, lb 40 

Lactate, oz. 5 

I'ernitrate, solution, lb 15 

Phosphate scales, lb i 25 

Sulphate, pure, lb 7 

Exsiccated, lb 8 

And Potass. Tartrate, lb.... 80 

And Ammon Tartrate, lb. .. 80 

Lead, Acetate, white, lb 13 

Carbonate, lb 7 

Iodide, oz 35 

Red, lb 7 

Lime, Chlorinated, bulk, lb 4 

In pakagcs, lb , 6 

Lithium, Bromide, oz 30 

Carbonate, oz ; 30 

Citrate, oz 25 

Iodide, oz 50 

Salic ate, oz 35 

Magnesium, Calc, lb 55 

Carbonate, lb 18 

Citrate, gran., lb 35 

Sulph. (Epsom salt), lb ij 

Manganese, Black Oxide, lb. . . 5 

Menthol, oz 55 

Mercury, lb 75 

Ammon (White Precip.).... i 25 

Chloride, Corrosive, lb i 00 

Calomel, lb I 00 

With Chalk, lb 60 



% 60 
18 
00 

I 30 

1 10 

2 00 
30 
15 
55 

7 

5 00 

40 

55 

35 

2 40 

2 10 

10 

II 

13 

25 

50 

55 

55 

I 60 

I 00 

38 
6 

12 

18 
I 10 

80 
I 90 

30 
20 
7 00 
90 
70 

7 
70 

3 

I 65 

80 

5° 
I 10 

30 
5 50 
7 00 
I 50 

85 
16 

35 

55 

16 

I 00 

75 
3 00 
30 
15 
55 
60 

30 
45 
45 

6 

16 

1 30 

9 
10 

85 

85 

15 

8 

40 

9 

5 

7 

35 

35 

30 

55 

40 

60 

20 

40 

3 

7 

66 

80 

' 1,0 

I 10 

I 10 

65 



CANADIAN DRLC.fllST. 



71 



Business Notices. 



A* the design of tht: Canaiuan Druggist is to bene5t 
mutually nil interested in the business, we would retiuest 
All parties ordering good* or making purchases of any de- 
scription from houses advertising with us to mention in 
their letter that such advertisement was noticed in the 
Canadian IJriiggist. 

The attention of Druggists and others who may be in- 
terested in the articles advertised in this journal is called 
to the s^ciai consitleratioH of the Business Notices, 



We have pleasure in callinij attention 
to the advertisement of the Royal Oil 
Company of 'roronto, who are offering 
special lines at close prices. If in immedi- 
ate need of any of the goods quoted, or 
will want them shortly, we would advise 
placing an order at these prices. 

Our readers will again recognize the 
advertisement of the Powell & Davis Co. 
on another (lage. Davis' Fly Felts have 
become a household word throughout the 
Dominion. The hundreds of bales of 
Davis' Felts shipped annually to this city 
alone is sufficient lo satisfy any one as to 
the popularity of Davis' Fly Felts. Powell 
& Davies are making a reduction in price. 
See their adv. 

We have been using Piso's remedy for 
catarrh on two cases of long standing, 
and find it even more efiTective than it is 
claimed to be. Each of us have suffered 
much from catarrh, and had given up a 
cure after spending large amounts of 
money for doctors' bills, but now we feel 
safe to say we expect a permanent cure in 
a short time ; in fact, my catarrh only 
troubles me a little, and then only when 
1 take a fresh cold. My brother had the 
worst kind of a case, and the change in 
him is so great that his friends speak 
about it, and he tells them that Piso's 
remedy for catarrh did it. 

A. M. Alley & Co., 
Wm. T. Alley, Mgr. 
1133 Market St., St. Louis, Mo. 



Books and Magazines. 



In the March number of Frank Leslie's 
Popular Monthly the wonderful story of 
the life and inventions of Thomas Alva 
Edison is set forth, in an article by Henry 
Tyrrell, with the apparent purpose of con- 
trasting an actual living hero, a modern 
conqueror of science, with the dark and 
sinister shadow of Napoleon, as projected 
anew by the curious contemporary revival 
of his sanguinary legend. The paper is 
accompaniei with some interestingillustra- 
tions, including new portraits of Edison, 
of his parents, wife, children, and scientific 
collaborators. 

2'he Delineator for April is called the 
spring announcement number, and is an 
excellent specimen of this most popular 
woman's magazine. Supplementary to 
the regular issue of patterns there is a 
timely article on "Bicycling," with illustra- 
tions of costumes, which will interest all 
lovers of the wheel. The papers on "The 



Voice," which were inlerru[)led by the 
illness of the author, are resumed ; and 
tliere is begun a most practical series on 
" Preservation and Renovation," the first 
instalment treating of "The Putting Away 
and Care of Furs." Mrs. Roger A. Pryor 
writes very entertainingly on " The Eti- 
quette of First Calls and Introductions," 
giving the accepted usages and formulas ; 
and the second paper on " The Experi- 
ences of a Training School Life" increases 
the interest already felt in the subject. 



The American Pharmaceutical 
Association. 

The best reason that can be given for 
becoming a member of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association is because it 

There is no initiation /ee. The annual 
dues are $5, payable after the election of 
a member, or preferably when application 
is made. There is no other expense con- 
nected with becoming and continuing a 
member than this $5 per annum. 

The American Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion was founded forty-three years ago, 
the first meeting being held in the city of 
Philadelphia on October 6th, 1852. 

Its aim was to unite the educated and 
reputable pharmacists and druggists of 
America in securing such objects as 
would elevate pharmacy. By united ac- 
tion it has fully justified the designs of 
its founders ; its roll contains the names 
of over 1,700 members, drawn from all 
pans of North America, some of the most 
distinguished exponents of the art and 
science having been enrolled. 

Its objects a/tpeal to no clique, section, 
or faction, but it is in the broadest sense 
a national body. It has from the first en- 
couraged and fostered State Pharma- 
ceutical Associations, receiving delegates 
from these bodies and extending to them 
aid, whenever such was sought. 

Among the many benefits received in 
return for annual dues the first to be men- 
tioned is the handsomely bound volume 
of about 1,000 pages, issued annually 
gratis to members. It is called "The 
Proceedings," but this term but remotely 
expresses the character and value of the 
work. True, it contains the proceedings 
of the annual meeting, which are of much 
interest to members, but it contains, what 
is of greater value, the interesting discus- 
sions and extemporaneous remarks as 
they drop from the lips of America's most 
eminent pharmacists and authors, besides 
all papers read during the meeting, em- 
bracing every class of subjects with which 
the pharmacist is concerned. 

Of great practical value to every retail 
pharmacist is the report on Progress of 
Pharmacy, which is published in the vol- 
ume of proceedings. This feature alone 
will give as great returns as can be de- 
rived from five dollars invested in works 
of reference. The formulas are well 
worth the price. 

With the continued growth of pharmacy 
in this country it has become of the ut- 



most importance for all organized bodies 
to work in harmony, and it is earnestly 
hoped that the members of State Associa- 
tions will strengthen the parent body, and, 
in turn, receive the benefits which this 
powerful organization can bestow, by be- 
coming members of the national associa- 
tion. This may be done by filling out an 
application, which can be obtained from 
Dr. H. M. Whepley, 2342 Albion place, 
St. Louis, M 3., chairman committee on 
membership. Return the application 
with $5 to Mr. Geo. W. Kennedy, Pt^tts- 
ville, Pennsylvania, secretary committee. 
The 189s meeting will be held in that 
world-renowned health resort, prosperous 
city, and hospitable convention place, 
Denver, Colorado, August 14 to 21. 



Reaction of Pure Ether. 

H. Thomas {Berichte d. phil. Gesel.) 
finds it impossible to obtain ether that will 
not restore the color to fuchsin de- 
colorized by sulphurous acid, and show 
an alkaline reaction with moistened red 
litmus paper. He comes to the conclu- 
sion that these are properties of chemi- 
cally pure ether, and his opinion is con- 
firmed by the fact that ether obtained in 
Pictet's laboratory by freezing behaves in 
a similar manner. The production of 
bodies thus formed by the action of air on 
pure ether, such as acetic acid, acetalde- 
hyde, peroxide of hydrogen, etc., is not 
prevented by the addition of two per cent, 
of alcohol. 



HOW 18 THIS ? 



Something unique even in these days of mam- 
moth premium offers is the latest effort of 
StaffoitCs Magazine, a New York monihly of 
home and general reading. 

The proposition is to send the Magazine one 
year for one dollar, the regular subscripiion 
price, and in addition to send to each subscriber 
fifty-two complete novels during the twelve 
months ; one each week. 

Think of it ! Yo* receive a new and complete 
novel, by mail, postpaid, every week for fifty- 
two weeks, and in addition you get the Maga- 
zine once a luonth for twelve months, all for one 
dollar. It is an offer which the publishers can 
only afford to make in the confident expectation 
of getting a hundred thousand new suliscribers. 
Among the authors in the coming series are 
Wilkie Collins, Walter Besant, Mrs. Oliphant, 
Mary Cecil Hay, Florence Marryat, Anthony 
Trollope, A. >_onan Doyle, Miss Braddon, Cap- 
tain Marryat, Miss Thackeray, and Jules Yerne, 
If you wish to take advantage of this unusual 
opportunity, send one dollar for Stafford's Maga- 
zine, one year. Your first copy of the Magazine, 
and your first number of the fifty-two novels 
(one each week) which you are to receive during 
the year, will be sent you by return mail. Remit 
by P.O. Order, registered letter, or express. 

Address — 

STAFFORD PUBLISHING CO.. 

Publishers or 
STAFFORD'S IVIAGAZINE. 



P.O. Box 2364. 



NKW YORK, N.Y 



72 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Iodide, Proto, oz (f 35 

Bin., oz 25 

Oxide, Red, lb I 15 

Pill (Blue Mass), lb 70 

Milk Sugar, powdered, lb ... . 30 

Morphine, Acetate, oz 2 00 

Muriate, oz 2 00 

Sulphate, oz 2 00 

Pei'SI.v, Saccharated, oz 35 

Phenacetine, oz 35 

Pilocarpine, Muriate, grain. .. . 20 

PiPERiN, oz I 00 

Phosphorus, lb go 

Potassa, Caustic, white, lb 55 

Potassium, Acetate, lb 35 

Bicarbonate, lb 15 

Bichromate, lb . 14 

Biirat (Cream Tart.), lb 22 

Bromide, lb 55 

Carbonate, lb 12 

Chlorate, Eng., lb 18 

Powdered, lb 20 

Citrate, lb 70 

Cyanide, lb 40 - 

Hypophosphites, oz 10 

Iodide, lb 4 00 

Nitrate, gran, lb 8 

Permanganate, lb 40 

Prussiate, Red, lb 50 

Yellow, lb 32 

And Sod. Tartrate, lb 25 

Sulphuret, lb 25 

Propi.ylamine, oz 35 

Quinine, Sulph, bulk 30 

Ozs. , oz 35 

QuiNlDlNE, Sulphate, ozs., oz. .. 16 

Salicin, lb 3 75 

Santonin, oz 20 

Silver, Nitrate, cryst, oz 90 

Fused, oz I 00 

Sodium, Acetate, lb 30 

Bicarbonate, kgs., lb 2 75 

Bromide, lb 63 

Carbonate, lb 3 

Ilypophospbite, oz 10 

Hyposulphite, lb 3 



40 

30 
20 

75 
35 
10 
10 
10 
40 



22 
I 10 
I 10 
60 
40 
17 
IS 
25 
60 

13 
20 
22 

75 
50 
12 

4 ID 
10 

45 
55 
35 
30 
30 
46 

32 

38 

20 

4 00 

22 

I 00 

I 10 

35 
3 00 

65 
6 

12 
6 



Iodide, oz 8 40 

Salicylate, lb I 75 

Sulphate, lb 2 

Sulphite, lb 8 

SOMNAL, oz 85 

Spirit Nn RE, lb 35 

Strontium, Nitrate, lb 18 

Strychnine, crystals, oz i 00 

SULFONAL, oz 34 

Sulphur, Flowers of, lb 2 J 

Pure precipitated, lb 13 

Tartar Emetic, lb 50 

Thymol (Thymic acid), oz 55 

Veratrine, oz 2 00 

Zinc, Acetate, lb 70 

Carbonate lb 25 

Chloride, granular, oz 13 

Iodide, oz 60 

0.\ide, lb 13 

Sulphate, lb 9 

Valerianate, oz .... 25 

ESSENTIAL OILS. 

Oil, Almond, bitter, oz 75 

Sweet, 111 50 

Amljer, crude, lb 40 

Rec't, lb 60 

Anise, lb 3 00 

Bay, oz 50 

Berganiot, lb ■■'■.... 3 75 

Cade, lb 90 

Cajuput, lb I 60 

Capsicum, oz 60 

Caraway, lb 2 75 

Cassia, lb I 75 

Cedar 55 

Cinnamon, Ceylon, oz 275 

Citronelle, lb 80 

Clove, lb I 00 

Copaiba, lb I 75 

Croton, lb I 50 

Cubeb, lb 2 50 

Cumin, lb 5 50 

Erigeron, oz 20 

Eucalyptus, lb I 5° 

Fennel, lb i 60 



* 


43 

So 




5 




10 




00 




65 




20 


I 


10 




35 




4 




20 




55 
60 


2 


lO 




75 




30 




65^ 
60 




II 




30 




80 




60 




45 
65 


3 


25 
60 


4 


00 


I 


00 


I 


70 
65 


3 
I 


00 
80 




«5 


3 


00 
85 


I 


10 


2 


00 


1 


75 


3 


00 


6 


00 




25 


I 


75 


I 


75 



Geranium, oz li-i 75 

Rose, lb ... . 3 20 

Juniper berries (English), lb. . , 4 50 

Wood, lb 70 

Lavender, Chiris. Fleur, lb.... 3 00 

(iarden, lb I 50 

Lemon, lb 2 00 

Lemongrass, lb i 50 

Mustard, Essential, oz 60 

Neroli, oz 4 25 

Orange, lb. . . 2 75 

Sweet, lb 2 75 

Origanum, lb 65 

Patchouli, oz 80 

Pennyroyal, lb 2 50 

Peppermint, lb 4 25 

Pimento, lb 2 fao 

Rhodium, oz 80 

Rose, oz 7 50 

Rosemary, lb 70 

Rue, oz 25 

Sandalwood, lb 5 50 

Sassafras, lb 75 

Savin, lb I 60 

Spearmint, lb 375 

Spruce, lb 65 

Tansy, lb. 4 25 

Thyme, white, lb I 80 

VVintergreen, lb 2 75 

Wormseed, lb 3 50 

Wormwood, lb 4 25 

FIXED OILS. 

Castor, lb 9 

Cod Liver, N.F. , gal . . i 25 

Norwegian, gal 2 00 

Cottonseed, gal i 10 

Lard, gal 90 

Linseed, boiled, gal 60 

Raw, gal 58 

Neatsfoot, gal I 00 

Olive, gal i 30 

Salad, gal 2 25 

Palm, lb 12 

Sperm, gal i 75 

Tu rpenti NE, gal 60 



»i 80 

3 50 
5 00 

75 
50 
75 
10 
60 
65 
50 
00 
00 
70 
85 
75 
50 
75 
85 



75 
30 
50 
80 

75 
00 
70 
50 
90 
00 
75 
50 



II 

1 30 

2 10 
I 20 
I 00 

63 

61 

I 10 

1 35 

2 40 

13 
I 80 

65 



.,Iu.:r.T«7.:.| xable Extra' 'El Padre' 'Mnngo' and 'Madre e'Hijo' f ''ZM"'' 

Sold Annually. J U " I MONTREiL, P.Q. 

"DERBY PLUG," 5 and 10 ets., "THE SMOKERS' IDEAL," "DERBY," "ATHLETE" CIGARETTES, 

ARE THE BEST. 



D. RITCHIE & CO, 



Montreal. 



Drug Reports. 



Canada. 

Providence, in the shape of plenty of 
snow and cold weather, has somewhat 
interfered with business during the past 
month, but there is no reason of com- 
plaint for this season of the year. The 
report from those lines of business, in 
which March 4th is a settling day, has 
been very favorable this year, and all along 
the line prospects are bright. These 
indications will, no doubt, have a set back, 
pending the elections; therefore it is to be 
hoped these will come on and be got 
over speedily, for they have a very un- 
settling effect on trade. 

Bals. Peru is scarce, consequently has 
advanced fully $1 per pound. 

Camphor has made a triple advance 
lately, and, as the season of large con- 
sumption is near at hand, higher prices 
are looked for. 

Cod liver oil (Norway) maintains its 
high price. It will not likely be lower for 



a season, with a good prospect of being 
still higher. 

Cocaine iTiuriate higher. 

Salicylic acid and salicylate of soda are 
lower in price. 

Green acacias are all tending higher. 

Cubeb berries easier. 

Castor oil still very low. 

Croton oil dearer. 

Nitrate silver, another decline. 

Acid citric lower ; tartaric firmer. 

Boschees' German Syrup, and Green's 
August Flower samples have been with- 
drawn from the market. 

Gibbon's toothache gum has been 
reduced to 65c. per dozen. 

England. 

London, February 27, 1895. 
There has been some improvement in 
the drug market during the month, and 
an extraordinary rise in the price of cod 
liver oil. Old 1894 oil has doubled in 
value within a few weeks, and the new 
season's oil is quoted at a phenomenal 
figure. 



Citric acid is firmer on the spot, as 
lemon juice is dearer. 

Camphor is in a similar position, owuig 
to advance of raw material. 

Saffron is moving upward, and cascarilla 
bark is advancing. 

Sulphate of ammonia is lower. 

Chlorate of potash continues on the 
down grade. 

Oil of aniseed is also easier. 

During the iTionth there has been a 
complete drop in salicylic acid and sali- 
cylates. 

Ordinary drugs have been very quiet, 
and chetTTicals remain, for the most part, 
unchanged in value. 



Kind Words from Cape Breton. 

"I think the druggists of Canada are 
deeply indebted to you for the trouble you 
take in supplying the trade with such an 
excellent periodical." 

A. D. MacGillvarv. 

Sydney, C.B. 



Canadian Druggist 

Devoted to the interests of the General Drug Trade and to the Advancement of Pharmacy. 



Vol. VII. 



TORONTO, APRIL. 1895. 



X< 



4 



Canadian Druggist 



WILLIAM J. DYAS, PUBLISHER. 



Subscription. $1 per year in advance. 

.\dvertistng rates on application. 

The Canadian Druggist is issued on the 15th of each 
month, and all matter for insertion should reach us by the 
5th of the month. 

New advertisements or changes to be addressed 

Canadian Druggist, 

20 Bay St. TORONTO, ONT. 

EUROPEAN AGENCY : 

BROCK A H.^LIF.W, .^Idermary House, Watling St., 
LONDON, K.C, ENGLAND. 



CONTBNXS. 

AmentJments to the Pharmacy Act. 

Acknowledgments. 

Drug Ci.kuks' Column. — Do the one thing 
well —The Valued Apprentice 

Patent Medicines in Japan. 

Boric Acid in the solubility of certain Phenols. 

Trade Notes. 

Montreal Notes. 

Manitoba Notes. 

Prince Edward Island. 

College of Pharmacy Examinations. 

Should Doctors Dispense ? 

Pharmacy in England. 

.\irol. 

Improved Syrup of Iodide of Iron. 

Correspondence— The Qualifications of Ap- 
prentices. 

Sealing Wax. 

A Short History of Scales and Weights. 

Chances for Enterprising Druggists. 

How to join the .\merican Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation. 

The Pri-nio Syringe. 

Wake up ! 

Resemblance between the Reaction of the Alka- 
loids and Acetanilid. 

Editorial. — Mutually Interested — A Good 
Line. 

What Next ? 

New Remedies and Chemicals. 

How to make the Business Pay. 

Borax in Pharmacy. 

The Liquefaction of Hydrogen. 

Physicians' Supply Houses. 

An Important Decision. 

Cinchona Gathering in Peru. 

Compound Syrup of Hypophosphiles. 

FORMILARY. 

Antidiphiherilic P.astilles. 

Phoiockai'Iuc Notes. 

The Amateur Photographer. 

Show-Bottle Colors. 

The Conceited Student. 

Proposed Regulation of Patents. 

Determination of the Purity of Liquids. ' 

Alkaloids and Alkaloidal Salts. 

Business Notices. 

Books .\nd Magazines. 

Drug Reports. 



Amendment of the Pharmacy Act. 

The council of the college, headed by 
Mr. Mackenzie, acting president in the 
absence of Mr. Petrie, has achieved a 
signal victory in regard to the bill intro- 
duced by the Hon. G. \V. Ross at the 
present session of the Local Legislature 
to make permanent the clause exempting 
the manufacturers and dealers in patent 
or proprietary medicines from the restric- 
tions of the Pharmacy Act. 

This clause, as proposed to be made 
permanent, and which has been in force 
as a renewal and experimental legislative 
clause during the past two years, reads as 
follows : " Nothing in this Act contained 
shall extend to, interfere with, or affect 
the making, vending, or dealing in any 
patent or proprietary medicine, and the 
said Act shall be read as if this section 
had always formed part of the said Act." 

To the portion of the clause exempting 
the vendor from the restrictions of the 
Act the council offered no opposition, as 
general dealers have always been exempt 
in so far as the sale of non-poisonous 
proprietary compounds is concerned ; 
but to the part freeing the manufacturer 
of any patent or proprietary compound, 
whether it contained any scheduled 
poison or not, from the restrictions of the 
Act, they most strenuously objected ; as 
they argued, and rightly so, we believe, 
that such an exemption would wipe out 
in actual practice the schedule to the Act, 
as it would permit the sale of every article 
there mentioned, provided it was put up 
under the guise of a proprietary medi- 
cine. They claimed that if it was improper 
for a qualified druggist to sell these things, 
which they were competent to handle, it 
was assuredly improper that incompetent 
persons should be specially privileged by 
legislative enactment to do so ; that if the 
welfare of the community was sought, 
the consumer should be safeguarded 
somewhat, as otherwise he would be 
entirely at the mercy of every designing 
quack-medicine vendor ; that under such 



legislation the class of remedies designed 
for the treatment of private diseases and 
those which were suggestively advertised 
for immoral and criminal purposes would 
be sure to increase ; that other countries, 
instead of granting unrestrained license, 
as this bill proposed to do, passed 
restrictiveor prohibitive legislation regard- 
ing them ; and that,'while our Pharmacy 
Act had always left the question an open 
one, it had never been designed by its 
framers that any one other than whole- 
sale druggists, doctors, and veterinary 
surgeons should be specially exempt 
from the provisions of the Act. These 
and many other reasons were urged upon 
Sir Oliver and thejnembers of his cabinet 
by Messrs. Mackenzie and Clark, who, 
with Messrs. Karn and Hargreaves, waited 
upon the government by special appoint- 
ment to consider the proposed bill and 
give their views upon it. As indicating 
what the council would be willing to have 
passed as an amendment to the Act, the 
committee presented a typewritten copy 
of the following to Sir Oliver : 

"ThePharmacy Act is amended by add- 
ing thereto the following sections : 

"ThePharmacy Act is amended by add- 
ing thereto the following section : 

" Nothing in this Act contained shall 
extend to, interfere with, or affect the 
making or dealing in any patent or pro- 
prietary medicines. Provided always 
that on the petition of three licensed 
medical practitioners (or the Council of 
the Ontario College of Pharmacy) the 
Provincial Board of Health shall cause to 
be made a full and sufficient analysis 
of such patent or proprietary medicine by 
an analyst or other competent person 
appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in 
Council, and if on such analysis it appears 
that such patent or proprietary medicine 
contains any of the poisons mentioned in 
any of the schedules to this Act to an 
extent that renders their use in the doses 
prescribed dangerous to health or life 
the said Board of Health shall give notice 
to the manufacturer or proprietor of such 



74 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



patent or proprietary medicine, or to his 
agent or representative in the Province of 
Ontario, of the result of such analysis, and 
of a time and place at which such manu- 
facturer or proprietor may be heard before 
said board in opposition thereto. 

"The Board of Health shall forthwith, 
after the date so appointed for such hear- 
ing of said manufacturer or proprietor, 
submit the report of said analyst, the ob- 
jections (if any) made to same by said 
manufacturer or proprietor, together with 
their report thereon, to the Lieutenant- 
Governor in Council, and on the receipt 
of such report, if same approves of the 
report of said analyst, notice thereof 
shall be given in the Ontario Gazette, and 
thereafter the provisions of this Act with 
regard to poisons shall apply to such 
patent or proprietary medicine." 

The bill had received its second read- 
ing before the conference was held with 
the Ministers, yet to show the confidence 
which the government had in the wisdom 
of the limitations proposed by the drug- 
gists, they introduced the measure for its 
third reading, word for word, as proposed 
to be amended. 

We most heartily congratulate the 
council upon this result, as the position 
now secured definitely gives power to 
interfere with any nnproper proprietary 
remedy, and at the same time precludes 
any unfairness to the maker. The strict 
intention of our Act, the protection of the 
consumer of medicine, is the essence of it, 
and we are much mistaken if the protect- 
ive tenor of it will not strengthen our 
Act with the public, and enable us in 
future to secure desired amendments 
without having to contest organized op- 
position. 

Acknowledgments. 

Our thanks are due to Frederick Stearns 
& Co., Detroit, Mich., for a neat and sub- 
stantial blotter pad for desk use, a very 
necessary addition to our editor's sanctum. 



Drug Clerks' Column. 



We are in receipt of a very useful and 
handsome leather-bound memorandum 
and price book from Messrs. Wm. A. Gill 
& Co., Columbus, Ohio, manufacturers of 
seamless tin boxes, specially adapted for 
druggists' use. 



Do the One Thing Well. 

Digression is just as dangerous as stag- 
nation in the career of a young man in 
business. There is absolutely no posi- 
tion worth the having in business life to- 
day to which a care of other interests can 
be added. Let a man attempt to serve 
the interests of one master, and if he 
serves him well he has his hands and his 
head full. There is a class of ambitious 
young men who have what they choose 
to call " an anchor to the windward " in 
their business. That is, they maintain 
something outside of their regular posi- 
tion. They do this from necessity, they 
claim. One position does not offer suffi- 
cient scope for their powers or talents ; 
does not bring them sufficient income, and 
they are "forced,'' they explain, to take 
on something in addition. I have known 
such young men But so far as I have 
been able to discern, the trouble does not 
lie so much with the position they occupy 
as with themselves. When a man turns 
away from the position he holds to out- 
side affairs, he turns just so far away from 
the sure path of success. To do one 
thing perfectly is better than to do two 
things only fairly well. It was told me 
once, of one of our best known aciors, 
that outside of his stage knowledge he 
knew absolutely nothing. But he acted 
well— so well that he stands to-day at the 
head of his profession, and has an income 
of five figures several times over. All- 
around geniuses are rare— so rare that 
we can hardly find them. It is a 
pleasant thing to be able to talk well on 
many topics ; but, after all, that is but a 
social accomplishment. To know one 
thing absolutely means material success 
andcommercial and mental superiority. 
I dare say that if some of our young men 
understood the needs of the positions 
they occupy more fully than they do, the 
necessity for outside work would not 
txKt.— Edward W. Bok, in the Cosmo- 
politan. 



when he is certain of his ground. He 
takes no risks by assuming what he is not 
sure of, preferring rather to be honest 
than to be considered smart. His busi- 
ness conduct is above reproach, and his 
habits such as bring credit to the institu- 
tion with which he is connected. In 
short, he thoroughly earns the recom- 
mendation he receives. 



A prospectus of " Monograph of Fluid 
Extracts, Solid Extracts, and Oleoresins," 
by Joseph Harrop, Ph.G., has been 
received from the publishers. The work 
will contain 200 pages, bound in cloth, 
interleaved, and sold at $2.00. The 
author will be remembered by our readers 
as having written a " Monograph on 
Flavoring Extracts," which has been very 
favorably received, and highly commended 
by pharmacists and the trade press. 



Some people are busy only when they 
are busy talking. 

When Push and Caution go into part- 
nership Success is finally going to get into 
that firm. 



The Valued Apprentice. 

The apprentice whose value is truly 
esteemed is he who realizes that he is a 
factor in the business in which he is en- 
gaged, and who strives to become impor- 
tant in his minor sphere. His aim is to 
perform the duties assigned him as well 
as his abilities will allow. He slights 
nothing, does nothing as a matter of form, 
or as something which he must get through 
with. His honesty is unimpeachable, his 
willingness to work commendable, and 
his zeal in the service of his employer 
noticeable. He may only be getting two 
dollars a week, but never shows that he 
is merely giving value for the pay he gets. 
He is strictly methodical, obedient, and 
receptive of the instruction imparted. 
His carefulness is a prominent feature in 
the performance of his duties, and he 
inspires confidence by exhibiting it only 



Patent Medicines in Japan. 

Japan, which has so adapted itself to 
European manners, and with so much 
advantage, as may readily be noted in the 
successes in its struggle with the Chinese, 
has a very prominent patent medicine, 
out of which, we learn, the proprietor has 
made the usual fortune which seems to 
be the reward of any one who can get a 
patent medicine to go. The medicine is 
called "The Thousand Gold Medicine," 
at least that is the English translation of 
the Japanese title. Ttie method . of ad- 
vertising it is unique. He employs hun- 
dreds of young men, whom he dresses in 
a uniform consisting of a handsome coat, 
an oiled paper cloak, leggings, high clogs, 
and an umbrella bearing the trade mark 
of the manufacturer, two circles inter- 
laced. These pedlars carry the medicine 
in portmanteaus especially decorated. 
The composition of the medicine is stated 
to be starch, catechu, thuja, liquorice, 
elecampane, camphor, peppermint, and 
cloves. It is made in little cakes, covered 
with tinfoil, each cake being divided into 
twenty portions. The pedlars travel on 
foot throughout Japan, and chant, as they 
go along, the following agreeable little 
testimony to the virtues of the medicine 
they hare to sell • " Ah, Patent Thousand 
Gold Medicine, the secret of which No- 
buyamia ok Adzuchi St. Osaka has inher- 
ited. Ah ! these are the properties of 
this medicine : Ah ! it makes the stomach 
and spleen strong ; Ah ! it is excellent for 
hoarseness and colds, pyrosis, and the re- 
sult of eating decayed food ; Ah ! it cures 
headache, giddiness, and dizziness on 
awakening, and is valuable for children's 
diseases." There is a familiar ring about 
this advertisement which shows that No- 
buyamia has had his eye on our methods. 
— Missouri Magazine of Pliarniacy. 



Boric Acid in the Solubility of Certain 
Phenols. 

M. Bernin (Bui. de Pharm. de Lyon) 
has found that boric acid increases the 
solubility of thymol, phenol, and salicylic 
acid to a considerable extent. The solu- 
bility of thymol in distilled water, which 
is about I in 800, is more than doubled 
in the presence of boric acid, 3 grammes 
dissolving easily in a litre of boric solu- 
tion. For phenol its solubility is doubled ; 
but it is particularly on salicylic acid that 
the solvent power is most marked. While 
distilled water does not entirely dissolve i 
gramme per litre, with boric solution 875 
grammes can be dissolved. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



('74A) 



njTn uxnjxruTJxru njiu uxr^ruxn-TLTLf ruTf 




ELMENDORF'S 



Tim m 

A Sure Cure for La Grippe. 



Curing CougliB, Colds and Sore Throat. 

IiiHammation of the Lunge, Coii- 

Hinuption. Catarrh, Kose Cold 

or Hay Fever. Asthma, Dys- 
pepsia. Nervous Ajlection and 
all Germ Diseases, Cankered Mouth 
and Cleansini:! to the Blood. 



PRICE 5 CE/NTS^ 

z. Sample by Mail Two 3c. Stamps, 

por Sale by Dru(}i5ists. 



THE CANADIAN SPECIALTY CO., ^ 

5 38 Front St., East. TORONTO, Ont. ? 

L Dominion Agents. p 

UTXinjTJTJTJTJ IJTJTJTJlJTnjTJ JTJTlJXnjD 

THE CANADIAN SPECIALTY CO. - 



Also in Stock . . 

THE ROYAL REMEDY 
& EXTRACT CO.'S 

Celery and Pepsin Chew- 
ing Gums 
Sweet Wheat 
After Dinner 
Banana 

Mountain Teab'y Tolu 
Pine-apple 
Blood Orange 
Merry Bells 
Royal Tablet Tolu 
Royal Pencil Tolu 
Kissimee 
Tolu Sugar Plums 

6 Plums in sliding Box, 
retailing at 5 cents. 

Japanese Handkerchief Boxes 
Japanese Glove Boxes 

Containing each, 
100 SWEET WHEAT 

and 
700 AFTER DINNER 

HANDSOME, finely 

polished Oak Frame 

Show Cases. 

3 sides glass, 3 glass shelve.*;, 24 
in. hij^h, 8 in. wide, 7 in. deep. 

LEE'S Poison Bottles 
CHAPIREAU'S Cache- 
teuses and Cachets 

Send for Price List. 

38 Front Street East, 
TORONTO. 




s 



Fluid Extracts . 
Elixirs .... 
Medicinal Syrups 
Liquors 
Tinctures 
Green Soap 
Chlorodyne. 



* • • 



• • 



• • 



• • 



Standard in strength and quality. Reasonable in 
price. Satisfactory in use. 



Apply for Price List and Special Discounts to 

T. MILBURN 8z: CO. 

Toronto, - - Ontario 



Seasonable 

and 

Interesting 

Cod Liver Oil 
Insect Powder 
Paris Green 
Moth Camphor 
Gum Camphor 
Quinine 
Phenacetine 
Sulphonal 
Spirits Turpentine 
Linseed Oil 



Look at your list and 
enquire of 

ELLIOT & CO. 

TORONTO. 



(74B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



r 



^itfe£^ 



P Palest: Ocfor^ ' 
the HsndkerchisE 




John Jrylor^ Coy. 



-DRONTO 



^ 



J. STEVENS & SON, 

78 LONG LANE, - LONDON, E.G., 

ENGLAND 



Red Cross English Dressings, 

Druggists* Specialties, 
Glass and Earthen^vare, 

Hospital Supplies and Instruments. 



1S05 L,ist and Ulscounts jiow ready'. 



CANADIAN AGENCY : 

145 Wellington Street West, 

TOROKTO 

ESTA«l.ISHKH 1850. 

Our stocl;^ of Seeds are now complete for the Spring 
Trade, and we shall be pleased to quote prices to dealers, 
and furnish samples when required. 

CLOVER SEEDS, 

Medium Red, Mammoth Red, Alsike, Lucerne, 
White, Scarlet, and Yello*. 

GRASS SEEDS, 

Timothy, Orchard, Blue, Red Top, Lawn, 
Hungarian, and Millet. 

SEED CORTSr, 

Red and White Cob, Compton's and Longfel- 
low, and all the leading varieties for fodder and 
ensilage. 

ONION SETTS, 

Dutch, Potato, and Shallots. 
Full assortments of agricultural and garden seeds for the 
trade. Write for catalogue. 



John 



A. Bruce 8z: Co. 

Wholesale Seed Merchants, 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



The 

Best 

Brushes 

Hair, Tooth, Nail, 
Shaving, Bath, 
Cloth, Infants' 

MANUFACTURED BY 

A.Dupont&Co. 

PARIS 



Agents for Canada— 

J. PALMER & SON, 

'"'s.°S,°'"° MONTREAL 



Full Stocks of New Crop 

Field and Garden Seeds. 



SPECIAL ATTENTION TO 

Red and Alsike Clovers, 
Timotliy Seed, Etc. 



ENSILAGE CORN IN CAR LOTS. 



Catalogues on Application. 
Correspondence Invited. 

AH enquiries by wire or mail will receive prompt attention. 



The Steele, Brings, Marcon Seed Co. 

(LIMITED) 

TORONTO, ONT. 



^^^PartieM having any of the above Seeds, or 
Choice Seed Grains to offer, please send 
samples. 



The.. 

Lyman Bros. & Co. 

(LIMITED) 

TORONTO, - ONT. 



GREASE PAINTS 



We are Canadian Agents for the celebrated 
Grease Paints manufactured by Chas. 
Meyer, New York, and have in stock 
the following, which we shall be glad to 
quote : 

No. I — Very Pale Flesh Color. 

2 — Light Flesh, Deeper Tint. 

3 — Natural Flesh Color, for Juvenile Heroes. 

4 — Rose Tint " " " 

5 — Deeper Shade " *' " 

6 — Healthy Sunburn " " 

7 — " " Deeper Shade. 

8 — .Sa'low. for Voung ^Ian. 

9 — Ilcalihy C ilor, for Middle Ages. 

10 — Sallow, for Old .^ge. 

II — Ruddy " 

12 — Olive, Healthy. 

13 — " Lighter Shade. 

i4-(;ipsy, Flesh Color. 

15 — (Jthello. 

16 — Chinese. 

17 — Indian. 

18 — East Indian. 
Japanese and all other colors made to order 
Done up in sticks of eight inches in length, 
and two sticks in a box, per doz. boxes 

Lining Colors 

Black, Brown, Lake, Crimson, White, and 
a color for shading wrinkles. Done up in 
six sticks in a box, per doz. boxes. 

Carmine Crease Paints 

.Small sticks, per doz. boxes. 

Assorted Grease Paints 

Box containing two shades of Flesh, one 
Black, one Brown, one Lake, one Crim- 
son, one White, one Carmine, and a color 
for shading wrinkles ; per doz. boxes. 

Powder Exora 

The finest powder in use, Meyer's. Guar- 
anteed perfectly harmless. In all colors ; 
per doz. boxes. 

Cream Exora 

In china pots. .A very fine preparation 
for beautifying the complexion. In dififer- 
ent shades, as follows : White, Pink, and 
Brunette ; also Creole, Gipsy, Indian, arsl 
all other colors made to order ; per doz. 

Rouge Exora 

In china pots, extra fine quality ; per 

doz. 

For the lips ; per doz. 

Spirit Gum 

For pasting on Beards, Moustaches, Whis- 
kers, etc. No. I, very strong : No. 2, 
medium ; No. 3, mild. Small bottles, 
per doz. Large bottles, per doz. 

Eyebrow Paint 

Meyer's. Black, Brown, or Blue ; per doz. 
sticks. 

Nose Putty 

Per doz. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



75 



Trade Notes. 

H. Carter, Sundridge, Ont., has made 
an assigmnent. 

The drug stock of the late Dr. Cameron, 
Lanark, Out., is uffcred for sale. 

\V. K. Teetzel, of Nelson, is opening a 
branch drug store at Rossland, B.C. 

E. S. Kinsman, Digby, N.S., has sold 
his drug business to L. R. McLaren. 

V. A. Clarke & Co., druggists, Mea- 
ford, Ont., have made an assignment. 

C. K. McGregor is opening a new drug 
store on Dalhousie street, Brantford, Ont. 

B. M. Canniff, Portage la Prairie, Man., 
has sold his east-end drug store to ). K. 
Hill. 

The drug stock of J. W. McLaren, 
Chatham, Ont., was destroyed by fire, 
March 31st. 

The drug store of T- A. Gourlie, .Sum- 
mersiiie, P. L.I., was destroyed by fire, 
March 30th. 

C. A. Dilworth, druggist. King street 
east, Toronto, has sold his business to 
W. J. Nicoll. 

J. Mclntyre has purchased the branch 
drug business of (]. D. Daniel on Carlton 
street, Toronto, Ont. 

W'e regret to learn of the very serious 
illness of Mr. Charles Thompson, drug- 
gist, of Tilsonburg, Ont. 

The Kickapoo Indian Medicine Co. 
has filed letters of incorporation in the 
Tutelle Office, Montreal. 

Cochrane & Munn, druggists, Victoria, 
B.C., have dissolved partnership. Mr. J. 
Cochrane continues the business. 

Young has purchased the drug busi- 
ness known as the Gladstone Pharmacy, 
Queen street west, Toronto, Ont. 

The Davis & Lawrence Co., Ltd., Mon- 
treal, (Jue., have now the sole right to 
manufacture and sell Perry Davis' Pain 
Killer in the United States. 

A number of carload shipments of 
acids manufactured by the Victoria 
Chemical Company, of Victoria, B.C., 
have been made to various points in the 
United States. 

Dr. Higinbotham, Brantford, Ont., has 
moved his drug business from the old 
stand, corner of King and Colborne 
streets, to a store on the east side of the 
Market square. 

The many friends of Mr. George Birks, 
druggist, of Prescott, Ont., will regret to 
hear of the death of his son William, who 
was a first-year student of the Toronto 
Medical School. 

"By Appointment, Chemist to His 
Excellency the Governor-General of Can- 
ada," such is the designation which has 
been conferred upon Mr. J. A. Harte, 
druggist, corner of Metcalfe and St. 
Catherine streets, Montreal. 

Amonsst those who are placing new 
soda water fountains in their dru^ stores 
this season are Henrv Wade, Kingston, 
Ont.; D. C. .Mguire. Cornwall. Ont. ; and 
A. E. Brethour, Ottawa, Ont. These 



fountains have all been purchased from 
James W. Tuft, Boston, Mass. 

.Arthur J. Sequin, the popular traveller 
lately with John Taylor & Co., perfumers, 
Toronto, has been appointed agent for 
Canada for Messrs. Gelle Frl-res, of Paris, 
France, with headquarters at Montreal. 
Mr. Sequin was presented by his fellow- 
employees with a gold-headed cane on 
the occasion of his leaving. 

At the recent weading of Mr. James 
A. Kennedy, wholesale druggist of Lon- 
don, Ont., he was made the recipient of a 
handsome secretaire-bookcase, presented 
by his employees, who also extended 
their congratulations, and expressed their 
apijreciation of the mutually pleasant 
relationship which existed between them 
as employer and employees. 



Montreal Notes. 

Mr. Brault, who was lately in the em- 
ployment of Messrs. Laviolette & Nelson, 
has opened the long-closed store at the 
corner of St. Denis and Dorchester streets 
as a retail drug store. The supply is get- 
ting greater than the demand, and the 
idea that the public can support as many 
drug stores as groceries will receive a sud- 
den shock one of these days. Even now 
it is doubtful whether any of them are 
making more than a very meagre living. 

A neat box containing a glass tube and 
swab has been sent by the Provincial 
Board of Health to about a dozen phar- 
macies in different parts of the city, so 
that physicians can obtain one readily on 
application when they desire to have a 
bacteriological examination madeof throat 
exudation to establish diagnosis in sus- 
pected cases of diphtheria. This will be 
done without charge by Dr Wyatt John- 
son, bacteriologist to the department, and 
the result sent to the physician, all free of 
charge. 

It is reported that two or three more 
drug stores are to be opened in the ex- 
treme east end this spring. There ap- 
pears to be some subtle spirit in a 
pharmaceutical license which forces the 
holder thereof to forthwith begin business 
on his own account. It is not every man 
that can run a drug store successfully, 
and colleges, as a rule, do not turn out 
men of business. Experience in other 
cities than the one a man has served his 
apprenticeship in tends to enlarge the 
views, and is a powerful factor in success 
in life. 

Mr. B. E. McGale, of Notre Dame 
street, has moved into his elegant new 
premises after the turmoil and annoyance 
of street widening. Mr. McGale is one 
of the most successful pharmacists in 
Montreal, and evidently knows how to run 
a drug store in the right way. 

Mr. John Nault, who was also expro- 
priated in the widening of Notre Dame 
street, will shortly move into his new- 
quarters. It is to be hoped that the 
street widening craze has about spent 
itself in Montreal. 



Mr. VValiace Dawson, of St. Lawrence 
Main street, recently opened a branch in 
the ea>t end of St. Catherine street for the 
convenience of his many customers in that 
locality. 

A singular action has been taken in the 
Superior Court by two students against 
the College of Pharmacy arising out of 
the troubles in the Botany class during 
the session just closed. The authorities 
properly refused to permit certain students 
to continue their attendance at the lec- 
tures unless they sent in a suitable apology 
for their conduct. This they did not do. 
///fit: illiC lacriiitce. 

Mr. Albert Nelson, chemist, Notre 
Dame street, recently met with a severe 
loss by the death of his respected father, 
Mr. John Nelson, late of H.M. Customs. 
He was for a number of years collector at 
St. Hyacinthe, and was from there trans- 
ferred to a more important post in the 
Montreal Custom House. He died full 
of years, beloved by all who knew him. 
His funeral service was held in the Church 
of the Gesu on the 25th ultimo. 

Business looks very much like improv- 
ing this spring. Already the streets are 
crowded with people, and the average 
daily sales in the retail stores are increas- 
ing. The cleaning of the streets of snow 
through which the electric cars run inter- 
feres a little with country trade, as the 
the farmers can come in their sleighs over 
the snow roads to the entrance of the 
city, and then have some difficulty in get- 
ting further. 

Dr. Langelier, a member of the firm of 
the " Pharmacie Nationale," has pur- 
chased a magnificent soda fountain in the 
States which is said to eclipse anything 
ever brought to Canada. It is to be 
hoped he will have a good hot, dry sum- 
mer to repay, to some extent, his enter- 
prise. 

A workman in a factory in Montreal 
on the 17th ult. drank some methylated 
spirits which had been given him to use 
in the course of his business. The well- 
known and delightful odor of the spirits 
tempted him and he drank it. Needless 
to say he died, and a "crowner's quest " 
sat on him. 

An overdose of morphine and chloral 
was the cause of another death. The 
verdict rendered stated that " the deceased 
came to his death through an overdose 
accidentally taken by himself," and with 
the usual rider attached that no such poi- 
son should be sold, etc., etc. 



Manitoba Notes. 

The regular spring examinations for the 
Pharmaceutical Association of Manitoba 
began on the morning of the 3rd of 
April in the Manitoba Medical College, 
Winnipeg. Messrs. John F. Howard, C. 
Flexor, and Dr. W. A. B. Hutton were 
the examiners. 

This is an anxious time for pharmacy 
students. Thirteen appear before the 
examiners at this sitting, three for the 
major and ten for the minor examination. 



76 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



The annual general meeting of the 
Pharmaceutical Association of Manitoba 
will convene on Friday, the 5th of April, 
to receive the report of examiners and to 
transact such other business as may come 
before the meeting. A large attendance 
of members is anticipated, and, as there 
are matters of paramount importance to 
the association to be considered, an inter- 
esting and successful meeting is also an- 
ticipated. An account of the proceedings 
will appear in the next issue of this jour- 
nal. 

Mr. George Graham, formerly with Mr. 
G. W. McLaren, Morden, has lately pur- 
chased the business of Mr. S. L. Taylor at 
Treherne, and will continue the business 
at the same place. Mr. Taylor has re- 
moved to Minnedosa to take charge of 
his business at that place. 

Mr. J. K. Hill, for some time with the 
late firm of E. D. Martin & Co., has pur- 
chased the branch store of Mr. B. M. 
Cannifif, Portage la Prairie, and will con- 
tinue the business in the same premises. 
Portage la Prairie is Mr. Hill's native 
tovvn, and his many friends will look for- 
ward with interest for his success in the 
present venture. 

Mr. George McLaren, Morden, whose 
entire store was consumed by fire recently, 
has again opened out with a fresh and 
complete stock of drugs and druggist sun- 
dries. 

Mr. Watson, who has for some time 
been in charge of Messrs. Morrison & 
Jordans' store at Carman, has removed to 
Portage la Prairie to take a lucrative posi- 
tion with Mr. Joseph Taylor. 

Messrs. A. Young & Co., formerly of 
Miami, has recently purchased the busi- 
ness of Messrs. Harrison & Co., Neepa- 
wa, and also their branch at Arden. Both 
will be carried on as before by Messrs. 
Young & Co. 

Mr. J. K. Patton, of Minnedosa, paid 
a flying visit to Winnipeg last week. 



Prince Edward Island. 

The druggists of Charlottetown have 
every reason to be very grateful to Mr. 
Carmichael, traveller for Messrs. Lyman 
Sons & Co. 

They had begun gradually to driit into 
cut prices and a certain degree of mutual 
mistrust had begun to exist, which pre- 
vented any one of them from initiating a 
remedial agreement. Recognizing this, 
Mr. Carmichael came to the rescue, and 
found no difficulty in securing the signa- 
tures of all the druggists in Charlottetown 
to the following agreement : 

AGREEMENT. 

VVe, the undersigned pharmacists of the 
city of Charlottetown, Prince Edward Is- 
land, recognizing the [iresent unbusiness- 
like position into which the [)atent medi- 
cine trade has fallen and drifted, and for 
the remedying of this and other grievances. 

We, the undersigned subscribers, on our 
honor as gentlemen and pharmacists, 
hereby agree, each with the other, to the 
following : 



On and after Monday, March i8th, 
1895, all patent medicines and other 
goods usually kept in a drug store shall 
be sold singly at the marked retail price 
on the package or advertised by the 
manufacturer. 

When sold in half-dozen quantities, the 
price shall be the single price of five. 

When sold in quarter-dozen quantities, 
the price shall be one-half the price of the 
half-dozen quantity. 

All articles sold in quantities for cash 
may or may not be delivered at the time 
of sale, but the total amount of sales 
must be deposited. 

All articles sold in quantities, on credit, 
must be delivered at time of sale. 

The following list of articles is e.xclu- 
sive of the foregoing. To the selling 
price of these we further agree, viz. : 

Allen's Hair Restorer $1 25 

Ayer's Hair Vigor i 00 

Beecham's Pills (English) 35 

Butler Leeming's Essence 75 

Burnett's Cocaine, small 60 

CuUen Brown's Chlorozone, small... 40 
" " " large... i 00 

Cuticura Resolvent i 50 

" Ointment 65 

" Plaster 30 

" Soap 25 

Cockle's Pills 35 

Condy's Fluid 35 

Dunn's Fruit Saline 75 

Eno's Fruit Salt . . 90 

Ellenian's Embrocation, small 50 

" " large i 00 

Florida Water, M. & L 60 

Fellows' Syrup i 25 

HoUoway's Pills, small 35 

" " large 90 

" Ointment, small 35 

large 90 

Horsford's Acid Phosphate 75 

Hall's Hair Renewer 75 

Kennedy's Medical Discovery i 75 

Lamplough's Saline 90 

Murray's Fluid Magnesia 35 

MelHn's Food, small 50 

" " large i 00 

Medicamentum 10 

McKenzies Dead Shot 10 

Parker's Tar Soap 25 

Mexican Mustang Liniment 35 

Sozodont 75 

Steedman's Soothing Powders 35 

Stedman's Teething " .... 31; 
Tinctures Iodine or Opium, i oz. . 10 

4 oz. 

lots and over 08 

Tinctures, ordinary 08 

" " 4 oz. lots and 

over, per lb i 00 

All articles costing from $7.50 to 

$8.50, no price marked thereon, 

sell for - I 00 

Dated the i6thday of March, 1895. 

The druggists sent a joint letter of 
thanks to Mr. Carmichael for his interest 
and kindness. 

So far the system is working satisfactor- 
ily, and the agreement has restored the 
proper mutual feeling of confidence 
among the druggists. 



CoUeg'e of Pharmacy Examinations. 

The Montreal College of Pharmacy 
closed a very successful lecture session 
on Friday, March 29th, 1895, ^^^ usual 
sessional examinations having taken place 
during the week. The students were ex- 
amined in chemistry, materia medica, 
and botany, and the results given below 
are those of the combined sessional ex- 
aminations of December and March, the 
names of the successful students being 
given in order of merit. The student 
obtaining the highest points in each sub- 
ject gains the prize given by the college 
for these subjects. 

The names of the successful candidates 
are as follows : Botany — Osborne T. 
Pinck, W. F. Horner; Chemistry — ist 
year — Louis Rogalsky, W. Frothingham 
Roach, Oscar Turgeon, O. Mowatt, 
James Franckum, W. F. Horner ; 2nd 
year — James A. Gillespie, F. L. Woolley, 
O. T. Pinck, James H. Goulden. Materia 
medica — ist year — R. J. Lunny, Louis 
Rogalsky, Norman Holden,D. R. O'Neill, 
D. S. Baxter ; 2nd year — James A. Gil- 
lespie, Osborne T. Pinck, and Oscar 
Turgeon. 

In addition to the above, the following 
students passed in materia medica at the 
closing sessional examination, namely : 
A. Germain, E. Thiverge, J. A. Goyer, 
M. Langlois. 

The major and minor examinations of 
the Quebec Pharmaceutical Association 
will be held April i6th and following 
days. 

Should Doctors Dispense? 

A correspondent of Til-Bils remarks 
that pharmacy is a trade or profession 
which is really little understood by out- 
siders. A chemist's real business is dis- 
pensing the prescriptions of medical men, 
and a doctor's real business is attending 
and prescribing for the sick. A patient is 
really better off to pay his doctor for his 
advice and prescription and take it to a 
reliable chemist, who, the chances are 
1000 to I, will charge according to the 
quality of the drug supplied. There is 
absolutely nothing that varies so much in 
price as drugs. Glycerin, citrate of mag- 
nesia, salicylates, essential oils, the ma- 
jority of drugs can be bought at any 
price, and it stands to reason that a 
chemist supplying a good, sterling quality 
cannot charge the same as, say, the stores, 
where the proprietor is not a chemist at 
all, and really does not, in many cases, 
understand the true manipulation of the 
drugs any more than his errand boy or 
porter, and often has no scruples as to 
quality. — Pharmaceutical Journal and 
Transactions. 



Benzacetin, or acetamido-methyl-sali- 
cylic acid, is a white, crystalline body, 
melting at 205''C. It is soluble in alco- 
hol, slightly so in water. It forms very 
active salts with bases. It is said to be 
an excellent remedy for neuralgia, and to 
give great relief in half an hour. 



r.WADIAN DKUGCIST. 



(7(>.\) 



^^-■^i 



^^^ijV'S'? *^ Wv '.^Z H'» 







READ THIS 

Dear Sirs, St Marys, rtugust 3rd. 1891. 

The following may be of use to you: "A customer of 
tDJne, who keeps a butcher shop in this tou-n, bought a 10 cent 
'[nckaec uf your Fly Pads from me and in ten ^iiy s killed over 
A Buuuu, Measurs of Fues." Vour» truly, 

F. G Sanderson. 

IT WOULD TAKe 0V6R 
dOOSH65T50F6TICKYPAP£R 
TO HOLD THIS B05N6LOFFL1&5 

^WILSON'S^ 

FLY PADS 

50LDBYALLDRUGGI6T6 



There is an 
- INCREASED DEMAND - 

for 

WILSON'S FLY PADS 

Annually. 

Wilson's Fly Pads kill 150 times as many Flies for 
the money as Sticky Fly Paper, and the public recognizes the 
treniendous difference in value. Sticky Paper kills a compara- 
tive few ; Fly Pads kill them all. 



Have you ordered Fly Pads for the season ? 

All Wholesale Druggists keep them. 



Archdale Wilson & Co., 

Hamilton, Ont. 



FREDERICK STEARNS & CO.'S 



PREPARATIONS OF 



Preparations of the Fresh (Undried) Nut. 

Kolavin ■^ delicious wine, each tablespoonful rep- 
resenting 30 grains of the fresh (undried) 

Kola nuts. In full pints, $8.00 per dozen. 
J^qJ^^jqj^ Elegant confections or bonbons, each rep- 
resenting 10 gr.<iins of fresh (undried) Kola. 

$4.00 per dozen boxes. 

Fluid Kola -^ concentrated liquid extract, e.ach 

. minim representing one grain of fresh 

(undried) Kola. Per pint, $3.50. 



Preparations of the Dried Nut. 

Stearns' Kola Cordial (o Jg'Jnai.) 

A delicious cordial, each teaspoonful representing 
15 grains of dried Kola. In 12 oz. bottles at $8.00 
per dozen. 

Compressed Tablets of Kola 

Compressed Tablets of dried Kola, 10 grains each. 
Per 100, 25 cents. 

Fluid Extract of Kola 



Each minim representing one grain ot dried Kola. 
Per pint, $3.50. 

Frederick Stearns & Co. 



KOLA 




Windsor, Ont, 



London, Eng. 



(The introducers 

New York. 



Our Claims on Kola. 



1. We introduced Kola commercially in America in 
18S1 (see New Idea, .\pril, i8Sl). 

2. We introduced the first palatable preparation of Kola 
in the form of .'^teams' Kola Cordial in 1893. 

3. We originated the first and only preparation of fresh 
(undried) Kola in 1894, when Kolavin was introduced. 

4. We to day are the only importers of fresh (undried) 
Kola from Africa. 

5. We have done more scientific work on Kola than any 
other American house. (See our 8o-page monograph 
issued last year, 1894.) 

6. We have done more by liberal advertising in the 
pharmaceutical and medical press to call Kola to the 
atleniion of these professions than all other houses com- 
bined. 

THEREFORE we con.sider ourselves headquarters for 
Kola and its preparations, and believe the profession.^: will 
endorse our position. 



Manufacturing Pharmacists, 

of Kola in America) 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN. 



■ I 



(76b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



B utter mill^ 

-Toilet Soap. 




Over 2,000,000 
Cakes Sold in 1892 



The Best Selling 

Toilet Soap in 

the World. 



5 Excels any 25- 

•^ cent Soap on the 

Market. Nets the 

•a^^"- Retailer a good 

profit. 



When Bold at a very p^-piilar price it will 
•lot remain on your counters. Try a sample 
lot. 



The quality of this soap is GUARANTEED. See that 
the name "BUTTERMILK" is printed as above in 
green bronze," .ind the name "Cosmo Buttermilk boap 
Company, Chicago," in diamond on end of package. Be- 
ware of imitations. 

COSMO BUTTERMILK SOAP CO., 

1(;5 Wabash Ave. <'III€AGO. 

F.W.HUDSON &. CO , TORONTO 

Sole Agents for Canada. 

KENNEDY'S 

MAGIC CATARRH SNUFF 

(REGISTERED) 



A POSITIVE CUKE FOR 

CATARRH 

COLD IN THE HEAD 
CATARRHAL DEAFNESS 

HEADACHE, Etc 



It is reliable, safe, and sure, giving instant relief in the 

most distressing cases. 

PRICE, 25 CENTS. 

Wholesale of Kerry, Watson & Co., Montreal. 

I.yman, Knox & Co., Montreal and 
Toronto. 

And all leading Druggists. 



OLD DOMINION CRESCENT BRAND 

CINNAMON PILLS 

TIIK ONLY GKNUINE 

RELIEF FOR LADIES. 

ASK your Druggist for " Burland's Old Dominion Cres- 
cent Brand Ciunamoil Pill»." Shallow rectangu- 
lar metallic boxes, sealed with crescent. Absolutely sate 
and reliable. Refuse all spurious and harmful imitations. 
Upon receipt of si.\ cents in stamps w*; will reply by return 
mail, giving full particulars in plain envelope. Address 

BlIKLAND ITJEDIC AL fO., 

Morne Building. NEW YORK CITY. 

Please mention iliis paper. 



WOTIGI':. 

We have just been appointed 
Wholesale Agents for the Do- 
minion of Canada for the sale of 

Payson's 
Indelible 
Ink. 

All Orders will have our prompt 
attention. 

The London Dmg Co. 



LONDON, ONT. 



KERRY, WATSON & CO., 



MONTREAL. 



i'J¥> 






IllSEDWlTllOUTBtDPiN. 

PERFECTLY ASEPTIC. 
*N)no™aU.Y CORRECT 
WOT k WEDGE. 



Wt lilUE 
i PAMPHLET 
THAT WILL 
, INTERtST 
YOU. 



i^yii 









PER 002. 

No. 1. Nozzle and Shield, with Outlet Tubing . . $80 
No. S. " " Complete 2-qt. Fountain, 48 

DISCOUNT TO TRADE ON APPLICATION. 
BEST S»RINGE ON THE MARKET. SOLD BY ALL JOBBLfl''' 

LYMAN. liNOX & CO. 

Montreal anil Toronto 

Agents fur Canada. 

DICKS 

UNIVERSAL 
MEDICINES 



FOR HORSES 
AND CATTLE 



They always give entire .-satisfaction, and there are no 
medicines in the market that can compare with them. 

Thrifty farmers, stockowners and carters all over the 
country are, by actual results, realizing that they cannot 
afford to be without a supply of 
Dick'tt Blood Purifier Price 50c. 
Dlck'H BltNter, for Curbs, Spavins, Swellings, 

etc Price 60c. 
DickV Liniment for Cuts, Sprains, Brui-ses, etc. 

Price 25c. 
Dick's Ointment. Price 35c. 

Circulars and advertising cards furnished. 

DICK & CO., P.O.Box 482, MONTREAL 



A PERFECT TOILET GEM. 



ARECA NUT 
TOOTH SOAP. . . 

The drug trade of Canada will 
find this one of the most satisfac- 
tory articles on the market. The 
package is convenient and attract- 
ive. 

Kindly make sure the Areca 
Nut Tooth So.^p offered you is 
made in Winnipeg. The genuine 
is for sale by 

Lyman Btcs. Co., Toronto, 

Elliot & Co., Toronto, 

Evans & Sons, Montreal, 

Lyman, Kno.\ & Co., Montreal, 

Lyman Sons & Co. , Montreal, 

Kerry, Watson & Co., Montreal, 

]. Winer & Co., Hamilton, 

J. A. Kennedy & Co , London, and by 

TIIK 

MARTIN, BOLE & WYNNE CO, 



HOW 18 THIS ? 



Something uni<|ue even in these days of mam- 
moth premium offers is the latest effort of 
Stafford's Magazine, a New York monthly of 
home and general reading. 

The proposition is to send the Magazine one 
year for one dollar, the regular subscription 
price, and in addition to send to each .subscriber 
fifty-two complete novels during the twelve 
months ; one each week. 

Think of it ! You receive a new and complete 
novel, by mail, postpaid, every week for fifty- 
two weeks, and in addition you get the Maga- 
zine once a month for twelve months, all for one 
dollar. It is an offer which the puljlishers can 
only afford to make in the confident expectation 
of getting a hundred thousand new subscribeis. 
Among the authors in the coming series are 
Wilkie Collins, Walter Besant, Mrs. Oliphant, 
Mary Cecil Hay, Florence Marryat, Anthony 
Trollope, A. i^onan Doyle, Miss Braddon, Cap- 
tain Marryat, Miss Thackeray, and Jules Verne, 
If you wish to take advantage of this unusual 
■ipporttuiity, send one dollar for Staftbrd's Maga- 
zine, one year. Your first copy of the Magazine, 
and your first number of the fifty-two novels 
(one eachweek) which you are to receive during 
the year, will be sent you by return mail. Remit 
by P.O. Order, registered letter, or express. 

Address — 

STAFFORD PUBLISHING CO., 

Publishers ot 
STAFFORD'S MAGAZINE, 



r,0. Pox 8864. 



NEW TOKK, N.Y 



CANADIAN UkUGGIST. 



11 



Pharmacy In England. 



The Research Liiborntory Squabble Freund and 
Dunstan on Aeonitlne Ur. Williams' Pliik 
Pills Allen & Hanburys' Antl-cutUng 
Scheme DruK Stores Amalgamate Coca 
Wine and Petroleum Emulsion. 



(From Our Own Coircsponilenl.) 

Reference was made last minuh to the 
uiifortunatL' squahdlc wliich is now going 
on over the aconite research conducied 
by the Research laboratory ol the Pharma- 
ceutical Society. iNlatters since then have 
assumed an acute stage, and no one can 
forecast what the upshot will be. 15riefly 
stated, the afifair arose througli a coin 
ment in the official review ol the year, 
published in the PliiXrmaceutici.il Journal, 
although Professor Dunstan regards the 
action ol that journal as having been 
antagonistic for some time. The editor 
warmly repudiated the insinuation, and 
demanded an apology, which the Research 
committee at one stage of its proceedings 
was quite prepared to accord him. Now 
they are reported to have unanimously 
passed a report in favor of Professor 
Dunstan's claims, and the apologizing is 
expected from the other side. The whole 
affair is unquestionably lamentable, and 
it hardly appears possil)le, from the acri- 
mony imported into the discussion, that 
any mutually satisfactory understanding 
can result. The resignation of either Dr. 
Paul, the editor of the Pharmaceutical 
Journal, or Professor Dunstan, would be 
a most unfortunate close to an incident 
that should never have occurred, and 
which a little reasonable action of the 
committee would have prevented. 

Quite apart from this regretful disagree- 
ment, Professor Dunstan has to meet 
some severe criticisms from Dr. Martin 
Freund, who, having repeated some of 
Dunstan's work on aconitine, has arrived 
at different results. Freund has obtained 
totally different numbers in the combus- 
tion of aconitine, and has identified 
Dunstan's isaconitine with a product of 
the hydrolysis of aconitine. Freund's 
work on hydrastine is well known, and 
his determination to continue the aconi- 
tine research will be productive of inter- 
esting results to all who desire to see the 
answer to a complex question. The abili- 
ties of the two investigators are unques- 
tioned, and the duel will be intently 
watched by chemists and pharmacists. 
The constitution of alkaloids is a subject 
of deepest interest, and allows room for 
any amount of speculative imagination. 
For over four years the Research labora- 
tory of the Pharmaceutical Society have 
devoted their best energies to clearing 
up the uncertainty which surrounded 
the aconite alkaloids. It will, indeed, be 
disappointing if the greater part of the 
evidence produced during the investiga- 
tion should be called in question and 
proved to be incorrect. At any rate, as 
Professor Brauner, the eminent chemist 
of Prague University, remarked to the 
London Chemical Society this week, " It 
is better to acknowledge one's error than 
have it proved by some one else." Hold- 



ing this view, we are bearing with e^iuani- 
mity the corrections in hi*; own work that 
Professor Dunstan has since made. 

The proprietor of Dr. Williams' Pink 
Pills is pushing the sale by very extensive 
advertising in England just now. Some 
marvellous testimonials are reproduced, 
and the pills are claimed to cure loco- 
motor ataxy, scrofula, and other almost 
incurable diseases. The claim that these 
pills are not a patent medicine is hardly 
fair, for, although literally true, it has been 
the custom for many years to class all 
these proprietaries as patent medicines, 
and the public still regard them so. In- 
deed, one of the points upon which most 
reliance was laid, when the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society commenced its crusade 
against the unqualified sellers of these 
so-called patent medicines, was that by 
long custom they had become regarded 
as patents, and were therefore entitled to 
the exemption made in favor of patent 
medicines in the Act. As the readers of 
the C.\N.\i)i.\N Drucoist are aware, this 
argument was not successful in the law 
courts when proprietaries containing poi- 
sons were concerned. 

Messrs. Allen & Hanburys, Limited, of 
Plough Court, have joined the anti-cut- 
ting league by demanding a signed guar- 
antee that their preparations shall not be 
sold below the minimum prices which 
they have specified. This only applies 
to their well-known specialties, such as 
their infants' food, bynin (extract of malt), 
bynol (extract with cod liver oil), etc. 
VVhilst giving Messrs. .■Vllen & Hanburys 
credit for the best intentions, there is 
nothing very striking about the scheme. 
Chemists can hardly be supposed to wax 
enthusiastic over a scheme that practi- 
cally sanctions the selling of a 42-cent 
bottle of bynin at a minimum retail price 
of 35 cents, of which the wholesale price 
is 32 cents ; or even their popular food, 
which is supposed to retail at 24 cents, 
and for which they have settled a mini- 
mum cutting price of 19 cents, the whole- 
sale price being 18 cents. There is no 
doubt that the adhesion of such an old- 
established nrm to the principle that it is 
wise to do something to prevent unrea- 
sonable and ruinous competition amongst 
traders will have more beneficial effect 
than the mere value of their scheme. All 
these methods of protecting the trade 
have the serious drawback of inflicting 
extra clerical work and hampering Inma 
fide business transactions amongst all 
concerned. Were it not for this there 
would be far more wholesalers joining in 
the movement, and something like suc- 
cess, in the objects desired, would be 
attained. 

It is a significant fact that four of the 
large drug-store proprietors in London 
have joined hands and invited the co-op- 
eration of the public in running their 
businesses. These four vendors are the 
proprietors of some eleven stores, five of 
which have been opened during the last 
four years. The price for the whole has 
been fixed at ^65,900, of which ^33,900 
is to be in cash and the remainder in 



sha/es. This amount includes the leases 
of the various shops, fixtures, and stock. 
The |)rofit during the past three years 
average about ,,^7,000 on a turnover of 
about ;^ 49,000. If this rate of profit 
should be maintained, and the directors 
confidently anticipate an increase, it will 
be sufficient to pay 6 per cent, on the 
preference and 10 per cent, on the ordi- 
nary shares. It is rumored that some of 
the shares have already been dealt with 
at one-quarter premium, but there is a 
clause in the prospectus which financiers 
regard as ugly. It is stipulated that 100 
deferred shares of ^^i each (taken wholly 
by the vendors) are to be entitled to half 
the profits after 10 per cent, has been 
paid on the ordinary shares. This means 
that if the profit, after 10 per cent, has 
been paid, should be ^2,000, _;^i,ooo 
would be divided among the ordinary 
shareholders, and would give them an 
extra x]/-, per cent. The remaining 
;^i,ooo would go to the deferred, giving 
them 1,000 per cent, interest ! This is 
truly an equitable piece of drug-store 
subtlety. 

After the influenza is the harvest time 
for tonic wines and general pick-me ups. 
Coca wine is daily growing in popularity 
in this country, although care has to be 
exercised that the wine contains a suffi- 
ciency of the drug or the revenue authori- 
ties object. The method of mixing the 
fluid extract of coca with an ordinary red 
wine is frequently productive of an almost 
inert and alkaloid-free product. The 
tannin in the wine precipitates the alka- 
loid and filtration removes the precipitate, 
and also a good deal of the color of the 
wine. This may be partly prevented by 
detannating the wine first with gelatine, 
in the proportion of half a drachm of 
gelatine to a pint of wine. The wine, 
after clarification, usually precipitates 
resinous matter on the addition of the 
coca, owing to the acid present, but there 
is no fear of precipitating alkaloid. Cod 
liver oil emulsion, syrup of the hypophos- 
phites, etc., all have their advocates, and 
each chemist should be prepared with a 
nice staple article. Petroleum emulsion, 
made with the odorless and tasteless 
petroleum oil, with hypophosphites, has 
been more popular this winter, and if it 
has any efficacy is certainly much less 
nauseous than cod liver oil. Clinical 
opinions so far appear divided, but per- 
haps not much more than they usually 
are. 

The cod liver oil scare, coming as it 
did at nearly the end of the season, 
caused a good deal of commotion. Many 
firms had run their stocks low, and as 
each week the livers were reported from 
Noiway to be leaner than ever, and prices 
went up, things began to look black. 
Many chemists all over the country have 
contracts to supply drugs, etc., to the local 
hospitals or unions, and those who had 
no stocks left were in a tight corner. 
But already the scare is over and prices 
are falling rapidly. Apart from the fact 
that considerable stocks of 1894 oil 
existed in London and Hamburg, the 



78 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



demand is appreciably getting smaUer 
as the spring advances. Probably three 
months hence, or even earher, we shall 
see cod liver oil back to its old figure be- 
fore the scare, and the trade will feel 
easier. 



Correspondence. 



Airol. 

Airol is the trade name given bismuth 
0X0 iodo-gallate, which is the latest addi- 
tion to the long list of substitutes for iodo- 
form. The new combination is, as usual, 
patented in Germany, and the name, 
airol, trade-marked. Airol is described 
( Woch. fur Chem. und Pliarm.) as a gray- 
green, fine, voluminous, tasteless, and 
odorless powder, permanent in the light. 
When exposed to moist air, it is gradually 
converted into a red powder, which is a 
still more basic bismuth compound with 
relatively smaller percentage of iodine. 
It is insoluble in the ordinary solvents, 
but dissolves in soda solution, and in 
diluted mineral acids. \Vith small quan- 
tities of water and glycerine, it forms an 
emulsion which is fairly permanent. 
When heated with concentrated sulphuric 
or nitric acids, iodine is relaxed. When 
dissolved in very dilute hydrochloric acid 
and shaken with chloroform, the chloro- 
form assumes a violet color. Another 
portion of the hydrochloric acid solution 
when treated with iron chloride gives the 
intense dark-green reaction of gallic acid. 
If hydrogen sulphide be passed through a 
hydrochloric acid solution of airol, black 
bismuth sulphide is precipitated. 



Improved Syrup of Iodide of Iron. 

In the Bulletin Commercial, M. Oswald 
Girard, after speaking of the variations 
found in commercial syrups of iron 
iodide, involving especially color and 
taste (due to the changes which take 
place when the ordinary syrup is used), 
and also of the various methods used to 
obviate the changes or mask the taste, 
suggests the following formula, which he 
declares is free from the objectionable 
features of the process of the Codex and 
pharmacopoeias : 

Iodine 41 parts. 

Iron 20 p.-irts. 

Distilled wafer 100 parts. 

Proceed as directed in the Codez or 
Pharmacopcfiia, and, after the solution of 
iron iodide is obtained, mix it with the 
following syrup : 

Citric acid 5 gm. 

Distilled water 10 gm. 

Alcoholic essence oforangepeel. 10 gm. 

Simple syrup sufficient to make 
(with the addition of the iron 
solution) I kilo. 

Twenty grams of this syrup contain ten 
centigrams of iodide of iron. — National 
Druggist. 



The man who can't laugh can't suc- 
ceed. 

A mistake openly acknowledged is a 
fault remedied. 



The Qualification of Apprentices. 

Editor of the Canadian Druggist : 

Dear Sir, — Your invitation, in the 
last issue of the Canadl-^n Druggist, 
to your readers to "air their opinions " 
on matters pharmaceutical has induced 
me to speak of a matter which has been 
repeatedly brought to my notice during 
the past year or two. 

I believe the members of the council 
are always ready to receive suggestions 
that may be for the good of the profession 
and lift it out of its present anomalous 
condition to a position of strength, secur- 
ity, and respect. 

Matters are gradually — nay, rapidly — 
growing worse. What with the depart- 
mental store, the manufacturing pharma- 
cist, the dispensing physician, and our 
colleges crowded with fledgling druggists, 
pharmacy is " between the devil and the 
deep sea." Are we going to give up what 
we have already won, and place ourselves 
on the line of the grocery and dry-goods 
man, or shall we hold our ground, lop off 
dead and decaying branches, and, by 
raising ourselves above mediocrity, gain 
the respect, not only of the public gener- 
ally, but also of our sister professions, 
which, at present, are inclined to look 
down upon us 1 

This leads me to speak of the great 
weakness in our educational system, the 
qualification of apprentices, and I have 
no doubt a great many of your readers 
have had experiences similar to my own. 
The qualification is supposed to be a 
third-class non-professional with Latin, or 
its equivalent, as certified by headmaster 
of a High school. This alternative, would- 
be apprentices have found, is a good deal 
easier than the third-class certificate, and 
is. in fact, a wide-open back door into the 
fold of pharmacy. For instance, a boy 
fails in his third-class examination, in 
whole or in part, and, instead of going 
at it again, he gets a tutor — perhaps a 
senior pupil of the High school — to 
" coach " him for two or three months ; 
said tutor sets a series of papers on which 
his pupil passes, the headmaster certifies 
O.K., for he knows little, and cares less, 
of the qualification required. I have 
known young men to become registered 
on this plan who dare not attempt the 
open examination, and who were wofully 
ignorant of a common English education. 
The question with him is not, " How 
much can I learn?" but, "How easiest 
can I get registered ? " His penmanship 
is vile, his spelling no better, grammar an 
unknown subject. He may know a few 
Latin nouns, but he could not put a sen- 
tence together grammatically to save his 
neck. 

If every pharmacist practising to-day 
had been obliged to pass, at least, a uni- 
versity matriculation before commencing 
his apprenticeship, would he not be a 
more successful man ? He would have 
more respect for himself, as would also 



his neighbors ; our profession would stand 
second to none ; then only those who 
loved pharmacy for its own sake would 
have entered its portals, and those who 
saw only the fine clothes, fancy fittings, 
and reputed profits would have been com- 
pelled to stay out. 

There is no longer any need to keep 
the standard so, low as at present. Let 
us accept only university matriculation as 
sufficient for registration. Not even the 
Ph.B. degree has done so much to raise 
the status of our profession as this would 
do. 

I hope, Mr. Editor, to hear from others 
on this subject, through the columns of 
your really excellent journal. 
Yours truly, 

Medicamentarius. 



Sealing Wax. 



It is singular enough that the oldest- 
known printed recipe for making common 
sealing wax, published at Augsberg in 
1579, describes the use of almost the 
same ingredients as those at present em- 
ployed Rosin, the whitest that can be 
obtained, Venice turpentine, and vermil- 
ion are the components. For black wax 
lampblack is to be added, for blue wax 
smalt, and for yellow orpiment. When 
sealing wax was more widely used than is 
the case at present, scented wax was an 
article frequently on sale at fancy station- 
ers ; but in this epoch of feverish impa- 
tience and hurry, although our Gallic 
neighbors may have their sealing wax 
code with a different signification for each 
color, we rarely go beyond the employ- 
ment of black wax for announcements of 
a funereal and mortuary kind and of red 
wax for business letters. On the whole, 
it may be said of sealing wax as of quill 
pens — nine out often prefer a steel pen 
to a quill one, and about the same pro- 
portion prefer using a gummed envelope 
to the trouble of sealing a letter with 
wax. 

Before the introduction of the penny 
post envelopes were rarely used, because 
extra postage was charged for every paper 
enclosed in another, and for years after- 
wards a four-paged quarto letter was 
folded so as to be self contained. When 
envelopes were first sold they were not 
gummed, so sealing wax was used. When 
such letters went across the equator, 
mostly in sailing vessels, the wax used to 
run and stick all the letters together, espe- 
cially when the ship "got into the dol- 
drums," and frizzled becalmed near the 
equator for days at a stretch. It is quite 
within modern memory when postage 
stamps were first perforated. Before that 
they had to be cut apart with scissors or a 
knife, or to be torn from the sheet, to the 
disadvantage of a clumsy operator. The 
little discs called "wafers" seem to have 
gone right out of fashion. — Stationer and 
Printer. 



A clear conscience and a dirty store 
never go together. 



CANADIAN DKU(iGIST. 



3 



GOOD SELLERS 



YELROSE 



SHAVING CREAM 
SHAVING STICK 
BARBER'S BAR 




%ir(M 



'^ 



y 

"-"^HAVING CrEAM 
Ti-IOSLEi:MINC8,COi.:!||, 





'lIBl 



PAY YOU WELL. PLEASE YOUR CUSTOMERS 
ATTRACTIVE COUNTER ARTICLES 

Orilcr Sample .J dozen from yuur wholesale house to come with next order. 
We supply Samples for free distribution with first orders. 

THOS.I^KEMING&CO. 

MONTREAL 



A Druggist 



taking proper interest in his 
establishment will provide his 
customers with first-class goods 
only. 



E. B. Eddy's 



Toilet Papers and Fixtures 
form part of the Stock of a 
well-equipped drug-store. 



HULL, 



MONTREAL, 



TORONTO 



LITTLE'S 

PATENT FLU I D 



SHEEP DIP 

AND CATTLE WASH. 



For the Destruction of Ticks, Lice, Mange, and 
all Insects upon Sheep, Horses, Cattle, 
Pigs, Dogs, etc. 

Superior to Carbolic Acid for Ulcers, Wounds, Sores, etc. 



Removes Scurf, Roughness, and Irritation of the Skin, 
making: the coat soft, glossy, and healthy. 



Removes the unpleasani smell from Dogs and other animals. 



" Little's Sheep Dip and Cittle Wash " i.s used at the Dominion 
Experiment.il Karms at Ottawa and Brandon, at the Ontario Industrial 
Farm, Guelph, and by all the princi|>al Breeders in the Dominion ; and 
is pronounced to be the cheapest and most effective remedy on the market. 

tS" 17 Gold, Silver, and other I'rize Medals have been awarded to 
" Little's Sheep and Cattle Wash " in all parts of the world. 

Sold in large Tins at $1.00. Is wanted by every Farmer and Breeder 
in the Dominion. 

ROBERT WIGHTMAN, Druggist, OWEN SOUND, ONT. 

Sole Agent for the Dominion. 

To be had from all wholesale druggists in Toronto, Hamilton, and London. 



.^ 



§>^ 



WIe'sSolublePhenyle 



.^ 



;^DEODDRISEfl&ANTISEPTIC[^ 



NEW DISINFECTANTS 



,TW UAllVEfiSAL USE {fj 

CHEAP, HARMLESS, AND EFFECTIVE 



A Highly Concentrated Fluid for Cheeking and Preventing 
Contagion from Infectious Diseases. 



NON-POISONOUS AND NON-CORROSIVE. 



In a test of Disinfectants, undertaken on behalf of the American Gov- 
ernment, "Little's Soluble Phenyle " w.is proved to be the best Di.sin- 
feclant, being successfully active at 2 percent., whilst that which ranked 
second required 7 per cent., and many Disinfectants, at 50 jier cent., 
proved worthless. 

"Little's Soluble I'henyle " will destroy the infection of all Fevers 
and all Contagious and Infectious Diseases, and will neutralize any bad 
smell whatever, not by disguising it, but by destroying it. 

Used in the London and Provincial Hospitals and approved of by the 
Highest Sanitary Authorities of the day. 

The Phenyle has been awarded Gold .Medals and Diplomas in all 
parts of the world. 

Sold by all Druggists in 25c. and 50c. Bottles, and Si. 00 Tins. 

A 25c. bottle will make four gallons strongest Disinfectant. Is wanted 
by every Physician, Householder, and Public Institutiorl in the Dominion. 



ROBERT WIGHTMAN, Druggist, OWEN SOUND, ONT. 

Sole Agent for the Dominion. 

To be had from all Wholesale Druggists in .Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 
and London, Ont., and Winnipeg, Man. 



(78b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Onyx and Marble Soda Water Apparatus 



THERE IS NONE BETTER THAN 



PUFFER'S "FRIGID" 

IT LEADS THEM ALL. 



'T'AKE advantage of the 
opportunity and estab- 
lish a successful Soda- 
Water Trade It is a cash 
business, and yields large 
returns. 



S^-5 
'<^- 



0= 



c<^= 



'^= 



QONSTRUCTED of 
Beautiful Onyx or Fan- 
cy Marbles. Every part 
made from the best ma- 
terials, and in the latest 
manner. 




:-.y .T 1:^-' T 




THE JEWEL. 



'T'O establish a good trade 
you need a practical 
and attractive apparatus. 
There is none better than 
Puffer's " Frigid." 



_!>, 
-©?"' 



_®3 



i2. 



___!>, 
-^P^"' 



=1^ 



gXTRACTS and Fruit 
Juices of the highest 
grade at prices lower than 
ever. 

A large number of second 
hand apparatus at low 
prices. 



PRICES REASONABLE. TERMS EASY. 

Liberal allowance for old goods taken in trade. Illustrated Catalogue mailed free on request. 

A. D. PUFFER & SONS, 



BRANCHES: 

39 and 41 Centre St., New York. 

264 Fifth Ave., Chicago. 

538 Magazine St., New Orleans. 



38 to 48 PORTLAND STREET, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIvST 



79 



A Short History of Scales and Weights. 

Read bcfoic ihc Wisconsin I'harmaccutical Association, 
by A. C. Mt»RKisoN. 

In recording the development of 
weights and measures, which necessarily 
includes the means of ascertaining the 
force of specific gravity upon any object, 
and the apparatus by which weight is 
estimated, if full justice is done to the 
subject, volumes in folio would he needed. 
It will, therefore, be necessary to cover 
the subject as regards early history in a 
more cursory manner than would be 
wished by the conscientious compiler. 

'I'he word weight and the word gravity 
are nearly synonymous. Gravity is the 
force which attracts everything within the 
radius of this planet toward the centre of 
the earth, which is commonly called the 
centre of gravity, at which point the force 
of the gravity of the world is at equili- 
brium, balanced by equal attraction in 
every direction. As is well known, this 
common acceptance of the word gravity 
is in error, as every planet, every sun, 
every constellation, and the universe it- 
self, has its own centre of gravity, towards 
which objects are drawn by an almost in- 
comprehensible attractive force in direct 
ratio to the bulk, density, and distance of 
the object from this centre, and these 
objects are restrained from falling to this 
centre and into a fiery chaos by the cen- 
trifugal force of their own motions above 
it. 

The absolute weight of any object, 
then, is its attraction without other influ- 
ences toward the centre of gravity ; and 
the pressure exerted by this object, if re- 
strained from approaching the centre of 
gravity, is weight. There are innumer- 
able means of ascertaining weight. Among 
them is the astronomical method of 
weighing a world or a sun by arithmetical 
deductions from its known motions, den- 
sity, and bulk ; but as in this article we 
have to do more especially with the as- 
certainment of terrestrial weights and 
their use in commerce, we are obliged, on 
the score of brevity, to confine ourselves 
to weights and measures as established 
by usage, legislative enactment, or the 
customs of a locality, and the establish- 
ment of the specific gravity exerted upon 
a given object by comparison with these 
standards ; and this brings us directly to 
that simplest of all means — the balance. 
If a horizontal bar be attached by means 
of a flexible support to a given point, 
exactly in the centre, it will remain hori- 
zontal, owing to the neutralization of the 
force of gravity exerted on either end by 
the other. It is then said that it is a per- 
fect balance. Attach to this a standard 
of weight established by either of the 
means above described and the influence 
exerted will draw the bar into a horizon- 
tal position. Attach to the other end of 
the bar a weight exactly equivalent to the 
standard previously fixed, and if, for in- 
stance, that standard be what is common- 
ly designated as one pound, the balance 
is again established ; and as it will not be 
established until the weight at either end 



is exactly the same, we know that the 
article attached in the second instance is 
one pound. 'I'he scale is, therefore, 
called a balance, and offers us the sim- 
plest solution of the difficulty of ascer- 
taining relative weights. The balance is 
unquestionably the earliest means of as- 
certaining weight, and almost all com- 
mercial and practical mcthoils of ascer- 
taining weight are based upon this prin- 
ciple. Even the hydrometer simply finds 
its equilibrium and the lifjuid establishes 
its balance and thus tells with certainty 
the specific gravity of a liquid, from which 
the weight of a given quantity of liquid 
can, by comparison with the known 
weight of water, be ascertained. 

The Bible gives us many instances of 
the use of the balance, and it is extremely 
difficult to fix its earliest beginnings, 
which seem to be lost in the mists of an- 
tiquity; and it is strange also to be 
obliged to assert that modern civilization, 
while it has immeasurably improved in 
accuracy the meansof ascertaining weight, 
relies still chiefly upjn the early principle 
of the balance. 

The steelyard, as it is commonly called, 
came into use as an improvement on the 
ordinary balance, as far as history knows, 
with the Romans, although it probably 
did not originate with them. This ap- 
paratus differed from the ordinary bal- 
ance in the fact that one end of the hori- 
zontal bar was much thinner than the 
other, which enabled its makers to place 
means of suspension nearer to the large 
end before equilibrium was established. 
By using a single weight it therefore be- 
came possible, by means of a scale 
marked on the long end, to ascertain 
several weights, basing the calculation 
upon the distance as marked on the 
scale from the centre of gravity. Thus, 
tie weight which two inches from the 
centre of gravity would weigh a certain 
amount would, ten inches from this 
centre, balance a very much larger weight, 
owing to the principle of the lever which 
is brought into play. This made pos- 
sible the ascertainment of the weight of 
any commodity to a nicety, without the 
constant change of weights which was 
necessary to establish the equilibrium of 
the common balance. Modern scales 
are, in a large measure, based upon the 
principle of this Roman steelyard, al- 
though many modifications have been 
introduced. 

There is a balance called the Danish 
balance, and used in commercial matters 
in countries near the Baltic, which differs 
from the steelyard in this— that the coun- 
terpoise is fixed and the pivot movable, 
whereas in the steelyard the pivot is fixed 
and the counterpoise, or balance in 
weight, is movable. The beam is gradu- 
ated in a contrary direction to that of the 
steelyard in order to adapt it to this 
change, and the beam has to be slid for- 
wards or backwards, according to the 
weight to be counterpoised. In the com- 
mon balance, the steelyard, and the Da- 
nish balance, the beam is straight, but 
there are others called the bent-lever bal- 



ances, in which the weight is suspended 
from a bent arm and counterpoised by a 
heavy knob at the other end, and the 
heavy knob is made to indicate the 
weight of the article attached to the bent 
arm. 

There are a large number of important 
contrivances called spring-balances, weigh- 
ing-machines, and dynamo-meters, whose 
object is to indicate pressure, weight, or 
force in various ways, but it would be im- 
possible to describe them within the 
limits of the present paper, as many of 
them are very intricate. It is curious to 
recollect that the modern steam gauge, 
which indicates the pressure of steam, is 
simply a weighing-machine ; and so on, 
in innumerable fields, the weighing-ma- 
chine presents itself to us most unex- 
pectedly. 

At this point, it is well to digress to 
the subject of acknowledged standards of 
weights and measures. Throughout the 
world, in every nation, and it might 
almost be said in every community, dif- 
ferent standards and weights are used to 
express a given quantity, length, or weight 
of commodities, but we have more to do 
with avoirdupois, troy, and the metric 
system, and, for the purposes of this 
article, it will be necessary to confine 
ourselves to these three. King Edgar, of 
England, in order to establish uniformity 
throughout his realm, where the utmost 
confusion prevailed, enacted certain de- 
crees in the year 975, a work more com- 
pletely done by William the Conqueror, 
who ordered that all weights and measures 
in the kingdom should be stamped. 
Richard the First, in the year 1197, 
established the yard, which was a measure 
exactly equalling the length of the arm of 
the preceding monarch, Henry the First. 
King John confirmed the legality of the 
then weights and measures in the Magna 
Charta. We gain our first knowledge of 
what the exact standard of English 
weights was from the statute of Henry 
the Third, in 1266, which declares " that 
an English penny shall weigh thirty-two 
wheat corns in the midst of the ear ; that 
twenty pence shall make one ounce, 
twelve ounces, one pound ; that eight 
pounds do make a gallon of wine ; that 
eight gallons of wine do make a London 
bushel, which is the eighth part of a 
quarter." It appears that the wheat corn 
was the first standard of weight in Eng- 
land, and it is supposed that the metallic 
weight called a grain was used as the re- 
presentative of a wheat corn, and that the 
modern troy grain is nearly the same. 
After a time the pennyweight was reduced 
from thirty-two to twenty-four grains, 
twenty pennyweights made an ounce, and 
twelve ounces, one pound. This was 
called the troy pound, and became the 
standard of English weight, consisting of 
5,760 grains ; but still legislation could 
not insure uniformity in weights, for there 
was the moneyer's pound, consisting of 
5,400 grains, the avoirdupois pound of 
7,000 grains, and the old commercial 
pound of 7,600 grains. In the time of 
Elizabeth, a standard of the avoirdupois 



8o 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



pound was placed in the exchequer, and 
a standard of the troy pound was placed 
in the exchequer, Goldsmith's Hall, and 
the Mint. Nothing seems to have oc- 
curred in regard to the standard of weight 
till 1758, when a committee of the House 
of Commons was appointed to investigate 
the subject of weights and measures. On 
comparing the troy pound in the mint 
with that in the exchequer, it was found 
that the former was lys grains heavier 
than the latter. As the exchequer pound 
had been in use 170 years, the commit- 
tee concluded that it had become some- 
what worn. 

It was then considered whether the 
English standard should be troy or avoir- 
dupois in the future, and they resolved 
upon the former for the reason that that 
weight was best known to the English 
law ; it was that which had been the 
longest in use, and that by which coins 
were measured ; it was best known to the 
world ; it was that to which their country- 
men had referred and compared ancient 
and modern weights ; and it was the 
weight which had been subdivided into 
the smallest parts. The committeee then 
proceeded to obtain, with the utmost pos- 
sible exactness, the standard weights of 
the several parts of the troy pound, in 
which they were assisted by a balance 
constructed by a Mr. Bird, which would 
turn with the two-thousandth part of a 
grain. One copy of the standard troy 
pounds was delivered to the House of 
Commons, and another to the king's 
assay master of the mint, in whose pos- 
session there was, and we believe still is, 
Mr. Bird's weighing app.iratus. The troy 
pound consists of 5,760 grains, and should 
it be destroyed can be re-established from 
the fact that according to its standard a 
cubic inch of distilled water, at a tempera- 
ture of 62 degrees Fahr., and 30 degrees 
bar., weighs 252.458 iroy grains. 

In the year 1816, it was decided that 
the avoirdupois pound should be 7,000 
grains troy. Thus we have two standards 
in England. It is useless here to go into 
the details of these differences, wliich are 
both technical and practical, and which 
may be illustrated by the assertion that in 
some places 112 lbs. of potatoes are one 
cwt., in others 120, in others again 132 ; 
and at no point on record is 100 lbs. of 
potatoes a hundredweight of potatoes. 
This divergence runs through commerce 
in every direction, and would form an 
interesting subject for further research, 
but must be omitted. 

We next come to the establishment of 
the metric system, for which we are in- 
debted to France. The distance from 
either pole to the equator is mathemati- 
cally equal to one-fourth of the circumfer- 
ence passing through both poles, and is 
therefore called a quadrant. It was de- 
termined to make the ten-millionth part 
of this quadrant the standard of measure 
from which a standard of weight might be 
deduced. The next point, therefore, was 
to determine the exact number of units of 
measure of any given system which this 
quadrant contained. This required the 



researches of the astronomers and mathe- 
maticians. It was found that the dis- 
tance from the North Pole to the Equator 
was 10,936,578 English yards, or, to put 
it in a less scientific and rather more 
amusing form, it would take exactly this 
number of arms exactly the same length 
as that of Henry the First to cover the 
distance. We are, therefore, obliged to 
admit that although Henry has for over 
six hundred years slumbered, this remark- 
able arm of his is still as useful a stand- 
ard of measurement as heretofore. But 
the French did not follow in the footsteps 
of the English, except in so far as to as- 
certain an expressible distance, for they 
divided these 10,936,578 English yards 
by 10,000,000, which added something 
over three inches to the arm of Henry ; 
and should the metric system, which 
looks probable, ever conquer the world, 
the disciples of Henry will be proved 
guilty of giving short measure. From 
this measure of length were deduced 
measures of weight. The one-hundredth 
part of a metre is called a centimetre. 
Suppose, then, that we have a centimetre 
cube of distilled water at its point of 
greatest condensation, about 39.36 Fahr. 
The weight of this cube is the unit or 
standard weight, and is called a gram. 
The silver coinage of France rests on this 
basis, a franc being five grams of silver 
nine-tenths pure. 

The weights and measures used for the 
simple traffic of original or primitive na- 
tions are always simple, and are usually 
of early origin. We find that the metric 
system, however, is based upon scientific 
and easily ascertained facts, and has the 
advantage of being estimated by a deci- 
mal system, which is an extraordmary 
simplification. The earliest standards of 
measure were the length of the foot or of 
the palm, a pace, a span, or the distance 
from point to point of the extended arms, 
all of which were subject to radical and 
irreconciliable differences in the individ- 
ual. The standardizing of weights and 
measures by government is usually the 
first indication of the advancement of civ- 
ilization, and a history of the enactments 
of the various governments would be 
interesting in the extreme, but we must 
leave this subject, after mentioning the 
fact that, among other means of ascertain- 
ing a fixed standard, it has been attempt- 
ed to establish a unit of length of a pendu- 
lum vibrating seconds in the mean lati- 
tude of 45 degrees. In the last hundred 
years there seems to have been rapid im- 
provement in the methods of ascertaining 
weights by means of balances, not that 
the highest possible attainment in the 
simple balance much exceeds the marvel 
of Bird, whose balance turned with the 
two-thousandth part of a grain, but that 
the balances and scales used for ordinary 
commercial transactions are so much 
nearer the high standard of perfection. 
Tliis is due to the modern inventive 
genius of the times, which has manifested 
itself in this and many other directions. 
It is not that new principles have been 
introduced, but that greater progress in 



mechanical operations has been made 
possible by the greater perfection in ma- 
chinery. Even in the working and fin- 
ishing of metals many advantageous 
points of advancement have been seized 
upon by the manufacturer of balances 
and scales and applied successfully, so 
that the standard of perfection in scales 
to-day is inconceivably in advance of the 
crude efforts of the early world. — Omaha 



Chances for Enterprising Druggists. 

Because the druggist must surrender a 
part of what was formerly his, it by no 
means follows that the loss is irretrievable, 
or that he is without means of effective 
retaliation against his despoilers. The 
process of merchandise distribution is 
undergoing incessant change and read- 
justment. Every branch of retail trade 
must expect some losses, but to the en- 
terprising and alert there are usually cor- 
responding gains. If perfumes must go, 
why not replace them with school books 
and school supplies generally ? If toilet 
articles, why not introduce a select line 
of artists' materials, engravings, etchings, 
frames, and related supplies ? • Anything 
of cleanly and ornamental character, if 
adapted to the space limitations of a drug 
store, and particularly if its advantageous 
sale be largely dependent upon the infor- 
mation and personal judgment and relia- 
bility of the merchant, will find an espe- 
cially appropriate place in the druggist's 
stock. To this class belong also lamps, 
glassware, fine wall paper, watches, clocks, 
the better class of jewelry, fine cutlery, 
and a variety of other articles quite as 
germane to the drug business as soda 
water and cigars, and quite as dignified 
and profitable. Optical supplies are pe- 
culiarly appropriate, provided the drug- 
gist be familiar with the art of fitting 
glasses ; the same is true of trusses and 
similar goods. In short, anything that 
will not detract from the dignity of the 
store and that is associated with educa- 
tion, home decoration, popular sanitation, 
and physical comfort, and that can be 
made to se//, merits the consideration of 
every druggist to the limit of his facilities. 
Insurance agencies, carefully chosen 
agencies for bicycles (with one or more 
samples to keep the soda fountain com- 
pany), agencies for society engraving com- 
prising specimens of styles and facilities 
for prompt estimates and execution of 
orders — all these can be made to con- 
tribute generously to the store revenues, 
and to fill in most agreeably and profit- 
ably many a leisure moment of the pro- 
prietor or cleik. We mention these ad- 
ditions not as desirable accessions to the 
" practice of pharmacy," but as proper 
extensions of the retail drug business in 
localities where an exclusively prescription 
or medicine trade would fail of adequate 
returns for all of the druggist's time and 
his incidental expenses. — IVcs/ern Drug- 
gist. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(8oA) 



Why Not Put Up your Own 

WHEN YOU CAN BUY 

Complete ^# 

« Containers 

AT REASONABLE PRICES ? 

You Can Save the Manufacturers' Profit ! 



For Samples of Containers 'with Prices, for putting up or 
packaging any of the follo7ving goods, drop us a card : 



Condition Powders, 

Folding Canons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Bird Seed, 

FoUiing Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Chloride of Lime, 

Impervious Hoxes and Wraps. 

Baking Powder, 

Boxes and Wraps. 

Compound Licorice Powder, 

Lioxcs and Wiaps. 

Powdered Borax, 

Folding Cartons. 



Cream Tartar, 

Folding Cartons. 
Soap Bark, 

Folding Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Epsom Salts, 

Folding Canons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Senna Leaves, 

Folding Cartons, or Cartons and 
Wraps. 

Cough Drops, 

Foliiing Cartons — 2 ounce and 4 
ounce. 



Or if there are any other lines you wish to put up, 
write us about them. 

LAWSON & JONES, 

LONDON, Canada. 



SIMPLE, BUT SURE ! 

Somerville's 
M. F. Cough 
Chewing Gum 



FIVE CENTS PER BAR 

TWENTY BARS ON A HANDSOME 

STANDING CARD 



THE WHOLESALE TRADE HAVE IT 
PRICE 65c. PER CARD 



G. R. SOMERVILLE, 



LONDON. OnL 




You Haven't Wings 
but— 

You can fly (almost) if you ride a Victor 
Bicycle weighing 19 pounds, IJ ounces. 

The lightest weight high-grade bicycia 
on the market. Try it. 

Weight reduced by accurate tests made 
by (he wonderful Victor Dynamometer. 



Artistic Descriptive Catalogue Free. 

HARRIS H. FUDGER, 

Wholesale Canadian Agent. 



i 



Harris H. Fudger 

TORONTO. 

Games and Field Sports 

Hammocks 

Baby Carriages and 

Wheeled Goods 



Pocket Edition " Games and Sporting Goods Annual " Free on Application. 



MY import samples are now ready for inspection. 
A few customers who saw the hne in pre- 
^ paration for April opening have pronounced 
it ahead of anything shown in Canada. You will be 
welcome to look through whether you buy or not. It 
will pay you to take a run into Toronto this month. 

HARRIS H. FUDGER, 

50 YONGZ STREET, TORONTO. 



(8oB) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Alpha t^ubber Co., utd, 



The "ALPHA' 



and 



"OMEGA" Continuous 
Flow Syringes prevent 
the painful injection of 



If you want an ATOMIZER 
that will produce an absolutely 
continuous Bpray> without 
tiring the hand, you wilt find it in 

The "ALPHA" Atomizer. 




CONTI NUOUS_FLOW . 

OMEGA No. 3. 




We manufacture in 
Canada a full line of 
reliable rubber goods 
and a guarantee goes 
with each article. 

If you have not re- 
ceived our new price 
list this month, write for 
it. It is handy and 
neat. 



Factory and Office: 



50 Nazareth St., Montreal. 

THE 

Montreal 
Optical Co. 

The only flrm of Manufacturing Opticians 
in the Dominion. 



PRESCRIPTION WORK A SPECIALTY 

Country' Orders fill&tj n^ith care 
and pronit>tltudG, 



If you are dealing in OPTICAL GOODS, it will PAY YOU to do 
business with US. and, if you are not doing so already, write and get our 
Catalogue and Price List. 



i KOFF NO MORE 1 



►>.A^^ 



Watson's Cough Drops 



Will give positive and instant relief 
to all those suffering from 

Colds, Hoarseness, Sore Throat, etc., 
. . . and are . . . 
Invaluable to Orators and Vocalists 



R. & T. W. 



Stamped on Each Drop 



LePAGE'S 



"Syrup Hypophos-Comp." 







IMPBOVKD 






TRADE PRICE 


rPer Winchester 
i Per Dozen— Small 
(^Per Dozen — Large 


- $2.25 

3-5° 
7.0'j 


Also 


LePAGE'S ' 


BEEF, IRON 


AND WINE." 


Quality Guaranteed. 


Price Heasouable. 


Trade Solicited 



C. W. LePAGE & CO., 

59 BAY STREET, TORONTO. 



"THE TWIN" 

MALF-MINUTE 

Clinical Tlierinometer 



FOR QUICK REGISTRATION OF TEMPERATURE 

INDELIBLE BLACK 



The most Substantial 
Sensitive 

-— ■— — ■ |j^i,,,,i;,,^ |,,M|j iT3ggn 3m: n :n,M^ ^ Thermometer ever 

, - --,,_ -.<^tebh!fey=Brl?.g:!dzt:iy->g^J?J offered to the 

Medical Profession. 



PATENTED MARCH 25. 1890 



With the atmospheric register at 60° , if " THE TWIN " be immersed in warm water of 105 ° , the mercury will reach that degree in less than 
2o Seconds. 

The welding the two bulbs into one without any intervening space renders " THE TWIN" much stronger and less liable to break than any other 
heretofore offered. 

It will also be found much more convenient to carry, requiring less room in a case or in the vest pocket. For these reasons, as well as for its 
Guaranteed Accuracy, "THE TWIN" is universally recommended by the medical profession. 

FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS. $2.00 EACH 

25 per cent, discount to all doctors who mention the "Canadian Druggist"; if in gold with chain and pin, $2 net. 

Sole Agents : s. B. CHANDLER & SON, Toronto, Canada 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST 



8i 



American Pharmaceutical Association. 

I'he council has by vote named 
Wednesday, August 14th, 1895, for ihe 
next meeting of the American Pharma 
reutical Association, which is to lie held 
in the city of Denver. 

I'he arrangements for hotel accommo- 
daiions and transportation have not yet 
lieen effected. As soon as completed 
tliey will l)c announced. 

W. S. Thompson, 
Chairman of the Council, American Phar- 
maceutical Association. 
Washin.nton, D.C, .March i8th, 1895. 



How to Join the American Pharmaceu- 
tical Association. 

President Simpson has announced the 
meml)ers of the "Special Au.\iliary on 
.Membership." Each member has charge 
of the work of obtaining applications in 
his own state or province. If you desire 
to join the association, apply to your re- 
presentative on the committee. The 
following are theCanadian representatives: 
Province of Ontario, John Lowden, To- 
ronto ; Province of Quebec, G. Lachatice, 
Montreal ; Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, 
and Prince Edward Island, F. C. Sinison, 
Halifax. 

The Council Committee consists of 
Dr. H. M. VVhelpley (chairman), St. 
Louis, Missouri ; Chas. M. Ford, Denver, 
Colorado ; Geo. VV. Voss, Cleveland, 
Ohio ; \Vm. C. Alpers, Bayonne, New 
Jersey ; S. P. Walton, .\tlanta, Georgia ; 
and Geo, W. Kennedy (secretary), Potts- 
ville, Pennsylvania. 



The Ppi-mo Ssrringe. 




.\ sanitary article of value is quickly 
understood and as quickly appreciated 
by physicians, immediately they are given 
an opportunity to examnie it. 

.^ striking instance of this fact is well 
illustrated in the case of the new ladies' 
syringe, "The Pri-mo," which is being 
placed on the market by E. J. Hussey & 
Co., 80 John street, New York. 

This high-grade instrument has im- 
provements which are at once apparent, 
and a trial is sufficient to firove its great 
advantages over the regular syringe. 

Its merit lies in the peculiar construc- 
tion of the nozzle and shield. The nozzle 
is anatomically correct in design, superior 
in finish, comfortable and efficient. 



The shield is provided with a soft rub- 
ber cushion, which makes it fit snugly 
about the parts which it closes com- 
pletely. 

With the Pri-mo Syringe much hotter 
water may be used than m the old way. 

It is used without bed-pan or rubber 
sheeting, thus allowing the patient to take 
the douche in a recumbent position. 

The nozzle and shield may be used 
with any fountain or bulb syringe. 

Physicians throughout the country 
who have tried " The Pri-mo" recom- 
mend it. The testimony of a few are 
appended : 

In reply to your inquiry will say that 
the Pri-mo Ladies' Syringe arrived safely, 
and it gives perfect satisfaction. I con- 
sider it indispensable, especially in such 
institutions as this, and a great comfort to 
any one using it. 
Yours truly, 

GEO. S. WALKER, M.D., 

Female Dept., Western State Hospital, 
Staunton, Va. 

The two Pri-mo Ladies' Syringes pur- 
chased of you have given entire satisfac- 
tion, rhey fully come up to what you 
claim for them. Please send me another 
No. 2 outfit at an early date. 
Very truly yours, 

AMOS H. ELLIOT, M.D., 

480 Munro St., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

They are furnished in two outfits, viz. : 
No. I, containing nozzle and shield, 
packed with 4 feet (}■( inch) outlet tub- 
ing, and No. 2 containing nozzle and 
shield, packed with a two-quart fountain 
bag, tubing, infant and lecital pipes, com- 
plete. 

Each outfit is packed in a polished 
cherry wood box, which is lined with 
enamelled waterproof paper. Send for 
an illustrated pamphlet telling all about 
the " Pri-mo " Ladies' Syringe. 



Wake Up ! 



When will the pharmacists of the 
world thoroughly realize that " the old 
times,'' when the apothecary did every- 
thing in the pharmaceutical line, have 
passed away, never to return, and that 
this generation must keep up with the 
procession or be run over ? The apothe- 
cary of to-day does not powder roots, boil 
lead plaster, make his own chemicals, etc. 
Many of the old style of preparations, 
such as potions, poultices, decoctions, 
boluses, plasters, etc., have either gone 
out of fashion or are made by others. 
Modern prescriptions do not call for pills 
and powders by hundreds. Modern pre 
scriptions are not confined to the official 
drugs and preparations of over-conserva- 
tive pharmacopceias. They do call for 
modern and improved forms of medica- 
tion. Modern physicians demand im- 
proved methods and preparations and 
greater exactness. They cannot stop to 
inquire why it is that the average retail 
druggist is not specially educated. They 
need the aid of thoroughly educated phar- 
macists capable of promptly responding 



to the new requirements of scientific pro 
gress. They not only need that aid — 
they will have it. 

But the pharmacists as a body do not 
seem to respond promptly to these calls 
upon them, or to take an active and pro- 
minent part in the general progress of 
medicine and pharmacy. In our country 
it will require determined and continued 
effort to rehabilitate the profession of 
pharmacy. Yet some of our pharmacists, 
judging by their utterances, are on the 
point of becoming whining pessimists. 
Others have apparently plunged into un- 
mixed commercialism. 

There are very many progressive and 
able men practising pharmacy in America 
who are ambitious to protect, preserve, 
and advance their profession. If they 
will take united action they can unload 
the incubus of the patent-medicine traffic, 
and scrape off the other barnacles that 
impede pharmaceutical progress. 

What is really being donefor the future 
of American pharmacy ? Much is done 
by the schools ; but what are the pharma- 
cists as a body doing to elevate their pro- 
fession and establish a proper distinction 
between the mere merchant-druggist and 
the real pharmacist ? — Bulletin of Phar- 
macy. 



Resemblance Between the Reactions of 
the Alkaloids and Aeetanilid. 



E. Schaer {Archives de Pharniacie, The 
Analyst) recalls that Tofel has pointed 
out that anilids, such as aeetanilid, give a 
reaction with sulphuric acid and an oxi- 
dizing agent which resembles the strych- 
nine reaction. Fluckiger has drawn at- 
tention to a similarity between the reac- 
tion of morphine with sulphuric acid con- 
taining nitric acid and that of aeetanilid 
with the same reagent. Schar has tested 
both these statements. He finds, with 
respect to the strychnine reaction, that 
this differs in two main points from that 
yielded by aeetanilid. (i) The play of 
color shown by strychnme is from blue to 
methyl violet, whereas that exhibited by 
aeetanilid is rather a blue-purple-red col- 
oration. (2) The introduction of the oxi- 
dizing agent into the solution of strych- 
nine in sulphuric acid induces a deep 
violet color, which gradually changes — 
through cherry-red, purule-red, and blood- 
red — to yellow-red, whilst in the case of 
aeetanilid there is a rapid change from 
purple-red, through violet-red, into a 
dirty blue-green, olive-green, or brown- 
green. The reaction of sulphuric acid, 
containing nitric acid, on morphine and 
on aeetanilid is certainly very similar ; 
but aeetanilid gives no reaction with sul- 
phuric acid which contains selenic acid, 
titanic acid, molybdic acid, or tungstic 
acid, and thus should not be mistaken for 
morphine. Furthermore, morphine gives 
a deep red-brown color with sulphuric 
acid and bismuth subnitrate, whilst aeet- 
anilid gives a dark-yellow color, becoming 
carmine-red at the edges of the mass. — 
National Druggist. 



82 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Canadian Druggist 

WILLIAM J. DYAS, Editor and Publisher. 
APRIL 15TH, 1895. 

Mutually Interested. 

The Western District Medical Associa- 
tion of Toronto lias again attempted to 
induce the members of the Toronto Re- 
tail Druggists' Association to stop renew- 
ing prescriptions without the order of the 
prescriber. A conference was held recent- 
ly between representatives selected from 
both bodies, and the subject was freely dis- 
cussed. On the part of the medical men 
no definite reason was urged why the 
practice, so universally adopted elsewhere, 
should be changed here, other than that 
occasionally prescriptions were renewed 
which were of a specific character, and 
only intended for temporary use, and 
which, if the prescriber had been con- 
sulted, would not have been repeated with 
their sanction. 

On the part of the druggists, it was 
claimed that no desire existed on their 
part to renew prescriptions of such a char- 
acter, or which might reasonably be con- 
sidered dangerous or harmful if repeated- 
ly taken. At the same time, they showed 
that it would be difficult, practically, to 
carry out the wishes of the Medical Asso- 
ciation unless the members of that body 
were willing to share with them the re- 
sponsibility for refusing renewals. It was 
urged that if any physician saw fit to 
write upon his prescription to the effect 
that it should not be renewed, the instruc- 
tions would be rigidly adhered to. This, 
and this alone, the druggists claimed, was 
the first step needed to produce the result 
desired by the medical men, and, unless 
this was done, no very great diminution of 
the general practice of repeating at the 
demand of customers could be expected. 

We have not yet learned what course 
the members of the Medical Association 
purpose pursuing, but, if they are deter- 
mined to stop the custom of renewing, the 
remedy is entirely in their own hands,and 
it is purely a matter of judgment as to 
the wisdom of applying it. The druggists 
will follow instructions to refuse renewals 
if so given, and both they and the pre- 
scriber will have to assume the responsi- 
bility for curtailing a general privilege to 
the patient to renew as their judgment 
dictates. 

It is very unlikely that druggists will 
antagonize their customers on their own 
responsibility by refusing renewals, and,if 
the physician is unwilling to share it, he 



must permit a continuance of the general 
custom. There is little doubt but that 
many prescriptions are renewed which 
would be better unfilled, and that in writ- 
ing such prescriptions the physician should 
guard against renewal by writing upon it 
" not to be repeated." If this were care- 
fully done, the welfare of the patient 
would be safeguarded, and the renewal 
could be as consistently refused by the 
druggist as by the doctor. On the other 
hand, the refusal to renew any and every 
prescription presented would place both 
doctor and drug^^'ist in a peculiar combina- 
tion light before the community, and 
arouse a feeling detrimental to both. 

Under the free-trade wave of popular 
opinion now prevailing, moderate and 
cautious action is very necessary. The 
patent medicine forces seem to be exre- 
cising a powerful influence, and doctors 
and druggists should not take steps which 
might be apt to give them the dominant 
position. 

The question of repeating is one of very 
considerable importance,and the handling 
of it should be done solely with a view to 
the welfare of the community, and not 
from any motives of gain. The doctor 
should not interdict renewals for such a 
purpose, and the druggist should exercise 
the utmost care and discretion in refilling, 
so that the cultivation of habits for se- 
ductive or harmful drugs may be avoided. 

Our suggestion to both physician and 
pharmacist is to keep principle to the 
front and profit to the rear, and the solu- 
tion of the question will resolve itself. 



A Good Line. 



Since the introduction in our columns 
of a department devoted to Photographic 
Notes, a number of druggists, who had 
not previously handled a line of photo- 
graphic supplies, have acted on our sug- 
gestion and added this branch to their 
business, and, we are pleased to say, with 
satisfactory results. It is a line peculi- 
arly adapted to druggists' trade, and one 
which, if properly looked after, will prove 
profitable and interesting. 

As we pointed out in a former issue, the 
outlay for stock need not be large, and it 
would be injudicious, at least in the 
commencement, to purchase anything 
beyond what would be an experimental 
order, especially of those things which 
could not be sold to any but a photo- 
grapher. 

The experience of a few months will 
show just what chemicals are required. 



and the matter of the stock of appliances, 
such as cameras, lenses, etc., can be best 
judged after a little experience in other 
branches of the requirements necessary. 
The fact that many druggists are them- 
selves amateur, and in a few cases pro- 
fessional, photographers shows a com- 
mendable artistic taste, and at the same 
time provides an agreeable diversion 
from the stereotyped labors of the aver- 
age retail druggist. To those who have 
not yet handled these goods, we would 
suggest that they look into the matter, 
and see if there is not an opening in their 
locality for a line of this kind. As a mat- 
ter of pure business, we should always be 
on the lookout for any additional lines 
which will add to our sales, and the one 
here presented is one which must com- 
mend itself to many of our readers as 
being particularly adapted to a place in 
the stock of the progressive druggist ; 
and, combined with this, we would recom- 
mend the art of photography as a pastime 
which would prove not only very interest- 
ing, but tend to divert the mind from the 
everyday worry and cares of business. 



What Next ? 



" Vaccination " against diphtheria, as 
we suppose the process must be called 
until a name for it is invented, is now 
an accomplished fact, and the horse, it 
seems, is to be, like the cow in relation 
to smallpox, the intermediary and modi- 
fier. See the wonderful wisdom of Pro- 
vidence ; nothing is lost, nothing wasted ! 
When tallow began to get scarce and 
dear, coal oil was discovered. As timber 
in the older states thinned out and rails 
were rails, the barbed wire solved the 
fence problem. When the electric motor 
emancipated the horse and the patient 
mule from the street-car service, what to 
do with the horse became a problem, 
which the French solved by eating him. 
Behold ! science has dedicated the eman- 
cipated animal to nobler uses, and he 
is not yet ^wrs de combat ; he is to be 
used to knock out diphtheria — a kind of 
c^«/«(?-knocks, eh ? — Al.R.R., in Ex- 
change. 

An Irish chemist, anxious to display 
the qualities of certain vegetable dyes, has 
created no small sensation by trapping a 
number of sparrows which the intense 
cold has tamed, and dyeing their feathers, 
so as to make the rich blues and greens 
of the parrot, the sapphire tints of birds 
of paradise, and the prismatic hues of the 
humming bird. Bird-fanciers wereamazed 
at the phenomenon, but a close examina- 
tion revealed the imposture, to the great 
amusement of the onlookers. Needless 
to say the enterprising trader has secured 
a huge advertisement bv the transaction. 
—Ex. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



i^Z.M 



tltt^!l!ilrflirlf :l* *tT!l!:lr^f!f:!; :::!l!!tf11f1ll1t HI I III II I III III t1 lirtltllHItlttinitltlltlir 



TANGLEFOOT 




SEALED 



STICKY FLY PAPER 



m 
m 
m 





- - 1895 - - 



ALL TANGLEFOOT is now made with the new 
Corrugated Border. This Border is an improvement on 
any of its predecessors — it restrains the sticky composition 
more securely, it opens more readily, and remains on the 
sheet. Always acts the same under all conditions. It is 
the perfection of Borders. (Patemed Feb. 19th, .393) 

Each case contains five of the New TANGLEFOOT 
Holders, with slides to raise the center of the paper. A 
sheet presenting a convex surface catches flies much faster 
than one lying flat. These Holders are nicely wrapped 
ready to hand out to a good customer for a present. 

Notwithstanding the reduction in price the quality is 
improved in general. The paper is a little stronger, a little 
stickier, and will remain sticky a little longer. 



Prices for the Regular Size, 1895. 

LESS THAN ONE CASE, - 50 CENTS PER BOX. 
ONE TO FIVE CASES, - - $4.75 PER CASE. 
FIVE CASES AND OVER, - $4.50 

Each Box contains 25 double sheets. 
Each Case contains 10 boxes. 



*tt 



^^m^^^^^^^^^^^^^ei 




(82B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



pletehep fQanufaeturing Co., 

440 YONGE STREET, TORONTO. 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

Soda Fountains - Generators - Cylinders - Freezers 

And every other article necessary for carrying on the Soda Water Business. 

THE accompanying fount 
shows an entirely new 
idea for counter apparatus. 

The Canopy is made from 
natural hardwood, highly fin- 
ished. 



The Fount is heavily silver- 
plated on pure white metal ; 
all connections and attach- 
ments are made from pure 
block tin, thereby insuring 
Soda Water absolutely free 
from the metal poison so often 
found in old apparatus. 

The Body of Fount is 
double, having a dead air 
space between inside and 
outside linings. Inside of 
this is a coil of block tin 
pipe, reaching to where our 
name-plate appears. This 
plate is hinged so that it may 
be raised when filling body 
with broken ice, for which we 
supply a special funnel free. 

Fount has Eight P.\tent 
Pneumatic Syrup Jars and 
Two Patent Drip Plates 
fitted into slab under Soda 
Taps. These plates can be 
lifted out for purpose of pack- 
ing ice around coolers and 
syrup jars. 

Cooler box is fitted under 
counter, is easy of access, 
and no trouble to fill with 
ice. 

We supply with the Fount : 
Canopy, Marble Slab, Eight 
Palcnt Syrup Jars, Cooler 
Box, Six SilverPlated Tum- 
bler Holders, Twelve Tumblers, 
and all connections and pipes 
ready for attaching to cylinder. 




Tlie KRIQID 



FOUNT. 



We make this Fount in Style A, without Canopy, and a smaller slab, but with all other attachments the same as Style B. 
F.O.B. Toronto. Counter extra in all cases. Any style made to order. 



Dealers in Fruit Oils, Fruit Extracts, Flavorings, Etc. 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



CAXADTAN DRrCGIST. 



83 



New Remedies and Chemicals. 

The following list of new remedies and 
chemicals has been carefully compiled liy 
the editor of the National Dni^'^^ist from 
the pages of current chemical, medical, 
and pharmaceutical periodicals, mostly 
(lerman and French, and is brought down 
to the middle of December, 1894. Some 
of the articles therein scheduled have 
been known for some time, but have not 
become familiar to the great majority of 
pharmacists, and we may add that, in the 
very nature of things, they will probably 
never become so. In almost every in- 
stance the name first given is that by 
which the substance is registered or 
patented, or both, and is therefore its 
trade mime, in contradistinction to the 
name under which the substance is known 
in chemical nomenclature. 

In all cases where the therapeutical, 
physiological, or pathological actions are 
given, it is well to remember tliat the 
statements are made almost solely upon 
the literature issued by the patentees, and 
therefore subject to revision when (if 
ever) the substance shall be tested by 
disinterested practitioners. 

Ahrastol. — Synonym for Cerebrin. 

/Icetono-Resorcin. — A combination of 
two molecules of resorcin and one mole- 
cule of acetone, obtained by heatmg to- 
gether 15 gm. resorcin ; 100 gm. acetone, 
and 50 gm. concentrated hydrochloric 
acid. It appears as small anhydrous, 
prismatic crystals, insoluble in water, 
alcohol, ether, or chloroform, but readily 
soluble in alkalies. 

Acid Isocampholic. — Friedel has given 
this name to a compound with the for- 
mula CioSigOo, or the same as cam- 
pholic acid. It is a portion of the residue 
in preparing the latter, and appears as a 
colorless oily fluid with an unpleasant, 
irritating odor, which boils at i8o°-i8i°C., 
has a density of 0.9941. It is soluble in 
alcohol and ether, but nearly insoluble in 
water. 

Agathin. — Synonym for Chelene. 

Agopyrin. — Mixture of salicin ammo- 
nium carbonate and cinchonine sulphate. 

Alphol. — A salicylic ether of alpha- 
naphthol, an isomer of betol (the similar 
ether of beta-naphthol). It is obtained 
by heating to 120 -130' C. a mixture of 
sodium-salicylate, sodium alphanaphtho- 
late, sodium phosphate, and sodium 
chloride. Regarded therapeutically,alphol 
approaches salol. It is decomposed by 
the gastric and intestinal juices into sali- 
cylic acid and alpha-naphthol. It has 
been given with good results in cystites 
of gonorrhoeal origin, and acute articular 
rheumatisms. The dose of the |)owder is 
from 50 cgm. to i and even 2 gm. (8 to 
30 grains). 

Aluminum Boroformate. — A new salt, 
intended as a succedaneum of alumnol, 
aluminum acetotartrate, etc., for which 
the hospitals of St. Petersburg have been 
using it. It appears as brilliant nacreous 
tablets, readily soluble in water, hot or 
cold. 



and 



eye- 
has 



Aluminol. — .Muminate of disulphonic 
^f/a-naphthol. 

Amidol. — Dramidophenol hydrochlor- 
ate. 

Amylokarhol. — Name given by I'. 
Kocks, Dppenheim, to a mixture of 9 
parts of carbolic acid, 150 parts of green 
soap, 160 parts amylic alcohol, and suffi- 
cient water to make 1,000 parts. 

Analgine. — Synonym for Creolin. 

Anaspaliii. — Mixture of lanolin 
vaselin. 

Angine. — Non-epurated wool-fat. 

Anodine. — An antiseptic used in 
surgery, the exact nature of which 
not yet been established. 

Antacidin. — Saccharate of lime. 

Anti-hacterin. — Mixture of crude alumi- 
num sulphate and lamp-black. 

Antilieiiziiipyrin. — Constitution un- 
known (a patented substance which, 
it is claimed, prevents benzin, etc., from 
being struck by lightning). 

Antidysenterin. — Mixture of pelletier- 
ine, extract of pomegranate, myrobaline, 
and excipient, made into pills. 

Antifitngin. — Magnesium borate. 

Antinonnine. — This is a trade name for 
ortho-dinitrocresol. It is used as an in- 
secticide for destroying insects on plants 
and trees. It is also coming into use as 
a wood preservative, and is employed as 
other substances of this description, either 
by planting it on the surface or imbiba- 
tion. It seems to be a good all-round 
household disinfectant, which can be 
mixed with almost anything. Its most 
recent application is as an ingredient of 
preservative paints, for household and 
architectural uses. 

Antiparasitin. — A proprietary for de- 
stroying parasites, vegetable and animal, 
infesting human beings and domestic 
animals. It is said to be efficient. The 
formula has not yet been made public. 

Antiphthisin. — Klebsch's tuberculosis 
cure. It is also called sozalbumose, and 
is one of the "antitoxines." 

Antipyonine. — Trade name of a poly- 
borate of sodium. It is white, unctuous 
to the touch, insipid, and appears to be 
devoid of toxicity and causticity. In ad- 
dition, it is extremely soluble in water. It 
is used in diseases of the eye, ear, etc., 
where it acts as a harmless but energetic 
antiseptic. 

Antirheumatin. — According to Kamm, 
this is a combination of sodium salicylate 
and methylene blue. It comes into trade 
in the shape of blue prismatic crystals, 
easily soluble in water and alcohol, and 
tasting very much like sodium salicylate. 
After taking rheumatin the urine becomes 
blue or green. 

Antisepdn. — Two substances have ap- 
peared under this name, viz., monobrom- 
acetanilid, and the serum of animals 
which have been treated with iodine 
terchloride. 

Antispasmin. — Mixture of sodic nar- 
ceine and sodium salicylate. 

Aiititetraiziti. — .A proprietary, put upon 
the market by Zambeletti, of Milan, as an 
antirheumatic and antineuralgic. It is 
claimed to be superior to phenacetin. 



Antitoxins. — K name applied to a 
series of serum preparations, derived, by 
bacteriological processes, from the blood 
of animals rendered immune from certain 
infectious zymotic diseases, the specific 
causative (so-called pat/iogenttic)\m\cro- 
organisms of which have been (or are 
supposed to have been) discovered, iso- 
lated, and propagated by means of pure 
cultures. The result of this cultivation 
is inoculated upon animals, and by suc- 
cessive inoculations the immunity above 
referred to is at length attained. The 
product of the blood of these animals, 
the serum preparations above alluded to, 
is called the antitoxin of the particular 
disease that was inoculated upon the 
animal. We thus have (or will have, if 
the " fad " continues) a series of anti- 
toxins, such as diphtheria antitoxin, 
phthisis antitoxin, typhus antitoxin, etc. 

Anytins and Anytoh. — Whtn gum or 
resin oils, mineral oils, etc., are acted 
upon by sulphuric acid, we obtain a series 
of substances which are either soluble in 
water or produce salts which are thus sol- 
uble. Helmers has given the name any- 
tins to those of these substances which 
are soluble in alcohol. These anytins 
serve as solvents for a large number of 
substances (among them carbolic acid, 
the kresols, guaiacol, kreosol, thymols, 
the higher phenols, benzol and its homo- 
logues, terpenes, mineral and etheric oils, 
all the camphors, etc.). The substances 
thus rendered soluble in water are called 
anytols. Roth names are patented. 

Apyonine. — A succedaneum of yellow 
pyoktanin. 

Aquozone. — A 2 per cent, aqueous 
solution of ozone, with hypophosphites. 

Aromatine. — Coarsely powdered gen- 
tian root, used as a succedaneum of hops 
in brewing. 

Asbolin. — Synonym for Fossilin. 

Atherin. — .-^n alcoholic solution of am- 
monium pyrogallate, employed m Aus- 
tralia, according to the Chemist and 
Druggist, as a brown hair-dye. 

Benzacetin. — Acetamidomethyl salicy- 
late. New antineuralgic. 

Benzoparacresol. — Benzoylparacresol. 

Bergamol. — Inolyl acetate (used in per- 
fumery only). 

Beta-Resalgin. — Trade name for Phe- 
nyldimethyl-pyrazolon beta-resorcylate, 
also called Resorcylalgin. It consists of 
2 molecules of antipyrin and i molecule 
of beta-resorcylic acid. 

Boral. — Aluminum boro-tartrate. In- 
soluble in water, but becomes soluble on 
the addition of tartaric acid. Used as a 
disinfecting astringent. 

Borocarbide. — Borocarbide, a new ma- 
terial recently prepared in the electric fur- 
nace by the French chemist, Henri Mois- 
san, is a compound of borax and carbon, 
and is excessively hard, cutting diamonds 
without difficulty. 

Boroformate of Aluminum. — See Alumi- 
num boroformate. 

Borol. — Synonym for Gluside. 

Brassicon. — A new headache remedy, a 
green-colored mixture, consisting, accord- 
ing to the Suddeutsche Apotheker Zeitung, 



84 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



of 2 gm. oil of peppermint ; 6 gm. cam- 
phor ; 4 gm. etiier ; 12 gm. alcohol ; and 
6 drops of mustard oil. 

Bromamide. — Bromanilin hydrobro- 
mate. 

Butyromel. — A mixture of 2 parts fresh 
butter and i part of honey, rubbed to- 
gether until a clear yellow mixture is ob- 
tained. It is used in preparing palatable 
preparations of cod-liver oil, and other 
rank-tasting oleaginous substances. Name 
proprietary. 

Calcium Phosphoglycerinate. — A pro- 
posed succedaneum for calcium phos- 
phate, made by heating together, under 
certain conditions, anhydrous glycerin 
and commercial phosphoric acid. Vol. 
xxiv., p. 175- , 

Camphar. — Fifty per cent, alcoholic so- 
lution of camphor, with the latterinexcess. 

Camplioide. — Solution in absolute alco- 
hol of camphor and collodionated wool. 

Cancroine. — Solution of neurine in car- 
bolized water, with the addition of a slight 
amount of citric acid. Also applied to an 
extract obtained from cancerous tumors. 

Cannahindo>i. — Derivative and sup- 
posed active principle of Cannabis indica. 
Vol xxiv., p. 251. 

Capittine (also spelled Kaputin). — Ac- 
cording to the British Alcdical Journal is 
simply acetanilid colored with sortie harm- 
less color. 

Cardi?ie (also written Kardin). — One 
of the so-called "animal extracts,' <? la 
Hammond, obtained from beef hearts. 

Cerberin.—- A glucoside of the seed of 
a plant of the species Cerbera (Apocy- 
nacere), indigenous to Mexico. Its for- 
mula is C.^-.H^sOi o. It appears as a 
yellowish-white, amorphous powder, easily 
soluble in water and in alcohol. It seems 
to have the physiological action of the 
digitalis group, especially the heart action 
of the same. It is said to act as an anti- 
dote to digitoxin. 

Cerebrine. — Another "animal extract," 
derived from brain substance. 

Chelene (also written Kelene). — Ethyl 
chloride. 

Chloralamidc. — Chloroformamide. 

Chloralose. — Condensation product of 
chloral and glucose. 

Chloroiodolipol. — Another product of 
the laboratory of Zambeletti, prepared (by 
the substitution of various polyvalent 
phenols) from creosote and guaiacol. It 
is crystalline and well defined. Used in 
chronic affections of the larynx and 
respiratory vife. 

Chlorol. — Solution of sublimate and 
copper sulphate. 

Chloryle. — Mixture of methyl and ethyl 
chlorides. 

Chroatol. — New remedy in skin dis- 
eases, whose formula is not yet made 
known. It presents itself in the shape of 
crystals of greenish-yellow appearance, 
having a pronounced aromatic odor, in- 
soluble in water, slightly soluble in ether 
and chloroform, but more so in alcohol 
and glycerin. Vol. xxiv., p. 205. 

Chromogen. — Acid sodium salt of chro- 
motropic acid (dioxanaphthalsulfonic 
acid). 



Cinnamol. — Highly rectified oil of cin- 
namon. 

Cocaine Phenaie. — According to Viot 
and Oefele, a mechanical mixture of 
cocaine and phenol. Poinsot states that 
it also contains paraffin oil and peanut 
oil. 

Cocillana. — A remedy derived from a 
plant of the family Meliacere. The part 
employed is the thick bark of the trunk 
and large branches. It has been found 
superior to apomorphine in affections of 
the respiratory organs, and those who 
have tried it give it preference over ipeca- 
cuanha. It is prepared in the form of a 
tincture, syrup, and fluid extract. 

Coffearine. — Alleged new alkaloid of 
coffe, having the formula Ci4HigN._,04. 

Collasin. — A varnish used in dermat- 
ology, consisting of traumaticin and col- 
lodion. 

Copraol. — A solid fat, derived by spe- 
cial treatment, from the cocoanut. Used 
as a substitute for cacao-butter in mak- 
ing suppositories, etc. It has a much 
higher melting-point than the butter, and 
seems to be an article of real merit. 

Crelium. — Cresolated soap. Also writ- 
ten Krelium. 

C^-jv/fl////;.— Collodion cotton dissolved 
in methylic alcohol. 

Curcin. — The name given by Siegel to 
the toxical principle derived by him from 
Jatropha curcas, one of the family of 
Euphorbiacete. It is an analogue of 
ricin, and is classed, along with the lat 
ter, among the toxalbumins. 

Cutal. — A preparation similar to Boral, 
and is a borotannate of aluminium. It is 
soluble in water, and contains 76 parts of 
tannin, 13.23 parts of kaolin, and 10.71 
parts of boric acid. It has the same uses 
as Boral. 

Dextrococaine. — Iso-cocaine. 

Diabeiine. — Lcevulose. 

Diodofortn. — Ethylene tetriodide ; a 
definite carbon diiodide containing 4.62 
parts of carbon, and 95.28 parts of iodine, 
and nearly answering to the theoretical 
C2I4 {i.e., carbon 4.51, iodine 95.49). 
Odorless, insoluble in water, slightly 
soluble in ether and chloroform, etc. 
Carbon disulphide is a good solvent for 
it. Vol. xxiv., p. 19. 

Diurctin, Diuretin Benzoate. — Mixture 
of sodic theobromine and sodium ben- 
zoate. 

Dulcine. — (See Sucrol). 

Eitnerin. — The name given by Gehe 
& Co. to a substitute for yolk of egg, put 
upon the market by them. It is claimed 
to have many uses, but the chief one, so 
far, is in tanning and finishing fine 
leathers. 

Emol. — Lardite. 

Emulsin. — This substance, according 
to iht Journal der Pharinacie von Elsass- 
Lothringen, is a form of paraffin oil, oxi- 
dized under pressure. It appears as a 
neutral, odorless, oily liquid, which forms 
a stable milky solution in water, and is, 
therefore, recommended as a material for 
emulsions. The Pharmaceutische Central- 
halle, commenting on the above, says 
that, as far as can be judged from these 



claims, enmlsin seems to be identical with 
or very similar 10 vasogen, described in 
this journal two or three months ago. 
We would also call attention to the fact 
that the name emulsin has already been 
given to the fermentive principle of sweet 
almonds. 

Entomfobo. — A preparation for " de- 
struction of insects by the evolution 
of ozone " (!), put on the market by 
Leonardi, of Venice. Examination shows 
it to be simply a tincture of pyrelhrum 
flowers. It is used as a spray. 

Ergotine Gallate. — Mixture of extract 
of ergot and gallic acid. 

Ethylendianiine Tricresol. — A mixture 
of 19 parts each of ethylendiamin and 
tricresol, dissolved in 500 parts of dis- 
tilled water. It appears as a clear, color- 
less liquid, becoming slightly yellow on 
exposure to the air. It has an alkaline 
reaction, and metallic instruments are not 
attacked by it when in dilute solution. 

Euchlorin. — K new diphtheria remedy. 
It is prepared by placing in a dry glass 
1.50 gm. potassium chloride and adding 
10 drops of hydrochloric acid. As soon 
as the gaseous reaction ceases, add suf- 
ficient water to make 200 gm,, and stir 
well. Used as a gargle, etc., and also 
givjen internally, a few drops every hour. 

Eulyptol.--K name proposed by Dr. 
Schmelz, of Nice, for a mixture of car- 
bolic acid, salicylic acid, and eucalyptus 
oil, in equal parts. 

Ferratine. — A name given to an iron 
albuminate which carries 7 per cent of 
metallic iron. 

Formaline. — Forty per cent, aqueous 
solution of formaldehyde. 

Forinalith. — Diatomaceous earth satu- 
rated with formaline. 

Gallal. — Aluminum gallate. 

Gallannl. — Gallic acid anilid. Also 
written Gallinol. 

Gallobroinol. — Dibromogallic acid. 

Gelaiol. — Name given a new ointment 
basis, consisting of oil, glycerin, gelatin, 
and water. 

Glycine. — A photographic developer 
whose formula is yet unknown. 

HcEmaiogen. — An iron albuminate de- 
rivative, very similar in composition to 
ferratin. An alkaline solution of iron al- 
buminate is decomposed by the addition 
of iron citrate and acetic acid, the hsema- 
togen falling as a precipitate. It is a 
soft, yellow powder, containing about 7 
per cent, of iron, easily soluble in alkaline 
fluids. It is recommended in rachitis, 
anremia, scrophuloses, etc. 

HiEinol. — A black, or dark-brown pow- 
der, obtained by the action of zinc upon 
defibrinated blood, and said to contain i 
per cent, of soluble iron. 

Hicmostatine. — An extract obtained 
from the thymus of veal, containing sodi- 
um hydrate, with the addition of calcium 
chloride. 

Headine. — Mixture of acetanilid and 
sodium dicarbonate. 

latrol. — O.xyiodethylanilide. 

Ilicen. — Drs. Schneegensand Bronnert, 
of Strassburg, communicated the follow- 
ing information concerning this hew glu- 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



85' 



coside to the Deutsche Sammlung A'aliir- 
forscher und Aerzte,M. Vienna : When the 
bark of the Ilex aquifolius is exhausted 
with ether, and the residue of evaporation 
is saponified with alcohohc potash sohi- 
tion, a new carbohydrate is obtained, 
liken, which exists \n the bark in com- 
bination with the fatty acids. liicen 
crystalhzes out of alcohol, forming needles 
which melt at 182°- 183 C. It is but 
sparingly soluble in alcohol, and insolu- 
ble in water. 

Iiigestol. — A citron yellow liquid, slightly 
opalescent, said by the exploiters (Richter 
& Co., Berlin) to consist of magnesium 
sulphate, sodium sulphate, potassium sul- 
phate, sodium chloride, spirit of ether, 
and iron. Said to be an excellent reme- 
dy in chronic stomach and bowel trou- 
bles, especially of children. 

lodcaffeine. — Mixture of caffeine and 
sodium iodide. 

lodocasein. — A new antiseptic prepara- 
tion, appearing under the form of a yellow 
powder, having a very feeble odor of 
iodine, which, it is stated, can be got rid 
of by greater care in preparation. It is 
used in powder form, and also for impreg- 
nating gauzes. 

lodethylum Camphoratum. — - A new 
cholera cure, very highly recommended 
by Vielgluth. It is used in subcutaneous 
injections. No hint is given as to the 
method of preparation, hut it is probably 
a solution in camphor in iodethyl. 

lodolin. — Chloriodate of methylchloro- 
quinolin (?). 

lodotheine. — The same as iodocaffeine. 

Iodotheobromine.—'^V\yX\Me. of theobro- 
muie and sodium iodide. 

loitone. — Odoriferous principle of the 
orris-root. 

lodphenochloral. — A mixture of equal 
parts of tincture of iodine, carbolic acid, 
and chloral hydrate. It appears as a 
brown liquid, which must be preserved 
with great care. It is recommended as a 
parasiticide in certain skin diseases. 

Izal. — A new, non-toxic antiseptic, 
from English sources. It appears as a 
dark-brown liquid, which becomes milky 
on the addition of water. It is a by- 
product of the coal-tar industry, and is 
claimed to contain no phenol, but does 
hold analogous terpenes. It is probably 
a cresol preparation. 

Kamalin. — Substances identical with 
Mallotoxin and Rottlerin. 

Kaputin. — See caputin. 

Kardin. — See cardine. 

Katharine. — Trivial name given to 
teirachlormethane or carbon tetrachloride, 
CCl,. 

Kelene. — See Chelene. 

Kreplinum. — Trade name for a solution 
of quillaya bark in dilute alcohol (con- 
taining 25 percent, of alcohol), to which 
IS added oii of rosemary, lavender, or 
other perfuming oils. 

Lactol. — This is also known as lacto- 
naphthol, and is lactic ester of beta-naph- 
thol, a body resembling in its composition 
benzonaphthol. In the intestines it is 
decomposed into lactic acid and naph- 
thol, and may be safely used in all cases 



where the disinfection of the intestines by 
means of naphthol is desired. Lactol is 
entirely tasteless. 

Lactophenine. — Phenacetine in which 
the acetyl group is replaced by the lactyl 
group. 

Lanaine. — Purified wool-fat. 

Lii^nosulfin. — A product occurring in 
the manufacture of sulfi-cellulose, con- 
taining free sulphurous acid, and the 
same combined with the volatile products 
of wood. Used in the disinfection of 
dwellings. 

Lititine. — Cotton lint, deprived of its 
oil and fats. 

IJthiumDiuretin. — Mixture of lithiated 
theobromine and lithium salicylate. 

Llareta. — This is a preparation of Hap- 
lopapHS llareta, a plant indigenous to 
Chili. The fluid extract is recommended 
by Dr. Infante in the treatment of blen- 
norrhagia, causing, according to the doc- 
tor, cure in from ten to fifteen days. 

Lore/in. — lodoxyquinolino-sulphonic 
acid. It appears as a yellow, crystalline, 
inodorous powder, but slightly soluble in 
water, alcohol, ether, and the oils. In its 
quality as an acid, it forms with metallic 
oxides, some of which are soluble and 
some insoluble. Sodic loretin dissolves 
easily in water, giving an orange-colored 
solution which, in a strength of from 2 to 
5 per cent., may be employed as a wash, 
or as a humid dressing, to supplant solu- 
tions of phenol. For further notice of 
this interesting substance and its com- 
pounds, see Vol. xxiv., p. 40. 

Lysidin. — Also called methylglycoxali- 
din, a light red crystalline, very hygro- 
scopic body, having the formula C^H^ 
No- It is easily soluble in water, and is 
recommended in aqueous solution as a 
succedaneum of the carbonate of lithium 
in the treatment of diseases arising from 
uric acid diathesis (gout, rheumatism, 
etc.). 

Malacine. — Trivial name of a salicyl 
derivative of phenacetine. It appears as 
little crystals of a pale yellow color and of 
a feeble and not unpleasant taste ; soluble 
in hot alcohol, but insoluble in water. 
All the mineral acids, even in high solu- 
tion, decompose it into salicylic aldehyde 
and phenacetin. It is said to have a 
remarkably gentle and yet powerful effect 
in rheumatism. 

Maltol. — An inodorous substance, sol- 
uble in all proportions in hot water, 
chloroform, and acetic acid ; but slightly 
soluble in cold water and benzin ; freely 
soluble in alcohol, ether, etc. It melts at 
150° C, and has the formula CcH^Og. 
It is a constituent of malt caramel, from 
which it is obtained by condensation of 
the empyrheumatic vapors produced in 
the torrefication of malt (in the prepara- 
tion of the so-called malt-coffee). 

Methylene. — Mixture of 4 volumes of 
chloroform and i volume of methylic 
alcohol. 

Aletol. — Synonym for Sozal. 

Aligrainin. — According to Hoffman's 
analysis, a mechanical mixture of 89.40 
parts antipyrin, 8.20 parts caffeine, 0.56 
parts citric of acid, moisture 1.84 part. 



Nasrol. — Sodium caffeinosulphonate. 

Neurodine. — This is a congener of ther- 
modine, being acetyl/-oxyphenylurethane. 
It presents itself as inodorous, colorless 
crystals, slightly soluble in cold, and more 
freely soluble in hot water. Recom- 
mended by the regular " touts " for cer- 
tain foreign chemical and color works as a 
wonderful analgesic and nervine. 

Nico. — Nickel carbonyl oxide. Syn- 
onym for Sym()horal. 

Niitrin. — Strohschein, of Berlin, has 
put an artificial food on the market under 
this name, which the label assures us is 
" the pure nutrimental part of meat." 
Analysis shows it to contain albumen, 
83.5 per cent. ; fat, 6.1 per cent. ; nutri- 
mental meat salts, 4.9 per cent. ; and 
water, 5.5 per cent., an apparently valu- 
able nutriment. 

Odontodol. — Proprietary name for a 
toothache remedy, consisting of i part of 
cocaine, 1 part essence of cherry-laurel, 
and 10 parts of tincture of arnica. 

Oenoglucose. — New form of grape sugar 
of great purity. 

Oltocreosote. — Mixture of etheric creo- 
sote and oleic acid. 

Oleoguaiacol. — Mixture of etheric guaia- 
col and oleic acid. 

Orchidin. — A name given to the steri- 
lized aqueous extract of testicular matter, 
having the advantage over the Brown- 
Sequard liquor of being free from albu- 
mins. It, however, possesses the same 
quantity of leucomaines. 

Orthin. — Synonym for Thermodin. 

Ozalin. — A disinfecting mixture, of 
which the proprietors are silent as to com- 
position. Analysis shows it to consist 
principally of the sulphates of calcium, 
magnesium, and iron, mixed with mag- 
nesia and quicklime. 

Faraform. — According to Aronsohn, a 
polymerid of formaldehyde, obtained by 
heating the aqueous solution of the latter 
(formalin, formol), which is transformed 
into paraform. It is a white, crystalline 
substance, insoluble in water, acting as 
an intestinal antiseptic, said to be superior 
to iodoform, i^^/«-naphthol, dermatol, 
benzonaphthol, etc. It is given in doses 
of from 3 to 5 gm., and is also employed 
as an external antiseptic dressing. 

Pheduratin. — A phenol derivative of 
unknown constitution. 

Phenosalyl. — A mixture of phenol and 
salicylic, benzoic, and lactic acids. When 
first introduced menthol was used in the 
compound in place of benzoic acid. 

Pheno.xin. — Trade name for carhon 
tetrachloride. 

Phenylon. — Synonym for i\ntipyrin. 

Phosphorine. — Name given to a mix- 
ture of iron chloride and phosphoric acid, 
to which Lilycerin is added. 

Picein, Piceol, and Levoglucosane. — The 
first is a glucoside of Pinus picea, having 
the formula C^H.gOj, H^O. Piceol is a 
derivative of picein, the latter decompos- 
ing under the influence of emulsin into 
glucose and piceol. Levoglucosane is 
another derivative of picein, which is ob- 
tained by treating the latter with baryta. 
Picein is but slightly soluble in cold 



86 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



water and cold alcoliol, but dissolves with 
ease in both substances when boiling. It 
is soluble in all parts iti acetic ether, but 
insoluble in chloroform and sulphuric 
ether. Its physiological action has not 
yet been fully determined. 

Pixol. — Mixture of caustic soda, wood 
tar, and soap. 

Polysulfin. — Claimed by its manufac- 
turer to be a sodium pentasulphide, but 
shown by analysis of R. Rau {Pharmaceu- 
tische Centralhalle) to consist of traces of 
free sulphur and sodium thiosulphate, S 
per cent, of sodium chloride, and 60 per 
cent, of sodium carbonate, the balance 
being water. In other words, this is im- 
pure sodium carbonate, or commercial 
soda with a little sulphur dusted in. 

Rednchie. — A photographic developer 
of unknown constitution. 

Resol. — Wood tar saponified with pot- 
ash lye, with the addition of methylic 
alcohol. 

Resorbine. — Unguent base, containing 
oil of sweet almond, wax, gelatin, soap, 
and water ; or, in other words, a very 
thick emulsion of oil of sweet almond. 

Resorcylalgine. — Condensation product 
of antipyrin and resorcin. 

Resorcinol. — Equal parts of iodoform 
and resorcin heated together. 

Retinol. — Essential oil derived from 
resin. 

Reuniol. — A substitute for attar of rose, 
recently patented in Germany. It is said 
to be derived from Algerine, French, and 
Reunion geranium oil. It belongs to the 
alcohol series, closely allied to geraniol, 
and, like it, forms one of the principal 
constituents of attar of rose. Unlike 
geraniol, it is said to be economical in 
use, to resist o.xidation, and to resemble 
the aroma of the tea rose. Pure Reuniol 
is colorless, but in the course of manufac- 
turing it often acquires a slightly bluish 
tinge. It is soluble in alcohol, fats, and 
fixed oils. 

Rhinosderine. — A name given by Paw- 
lowsky to an animal extract similar to 
tuberculine, made from cultures of the 
bacilli found in the nose in rhino-scler- 
oma. 

Rhodalin. — Thiosinamin. 

Rixolin. — Mixture of petroleum and 
light nil of camphor. 

Rosinol. — The same as retinol. 

Salacetol. — Condensation product of 
aceton and salicylic acid. 

Saladol. — A combination of sodium 
salicylate and sodium lactate, dissolved in 
1 per cent, hydrogen peroxide solution. 
Recommended in diphtheria. 

Salantol. — According to Bourget, this is 
a compound of salicylic acid and aceton, 
possessing about the same properties of 
salol. It is not attacked by the gastric 
juice, and is decomposed only in the 
intestines, separating into its component 
pans of salicylic acid and aceton. It is 
recommended in the treatment of diar- 
rhoea. 

Saligenin. —The active principle of 
salicin, obtained by decomposition of 
salicin, by means of ferments, glucose 
being the remaining product. Saligenin, 



by the action of oxygen, is converted into 
salicylic acid. 

Salocol. — Salicylate of phenocol. 
Saluhrine. — A composition hailing from 
Sweden, and containing, according to 
Hager, 2 per cent, of anhydrous acetic 
acid, 25 per cent, of acetic ether, 50 per 
cent, of alcohol, and the balance of dis- 
tilled water. It is antiseptic, astringent, 
and hjemostatic, and is used, diluted with 
water, as a gargle, and on compresses. 

Saluinin. — According to the Pliarma- 
ceutische Post, this is an aluminum sali- 
cylate, insoluble in water or alcohol. 
With ammonia it forms a neutral double 
salt, soluble in water and in glycerin. 
This salt, according to Dr. Heymann, of 
the Berlin faculty, exercises an astringent 
and irritating effect on the mucous mem- 
branes, and therefore it may be employed 
with advantage in insufflations and appli- 
cations to the air passages in the treat- 
ment of ozoena and dry pharyngitis. 

Sanatol. — Crude cresol-sulphuric acid. 
Also written sanatol. 

Suiguinol. — A preparation from beef 
blood of unknown constitution. [Later 
information states that it contains iron, 
manganese, and the normal blood salts. 
Ed. National Druggist.^ 

Saprol. — Also known as ahrastol, a sul- 
phon derivative of beta-naphthol. 

Scdatine. — Formerly used as a synonym 
of antipyrin ; more recently it has been 
adopted as the trade name of para-valery- 
lamidophenetol. 

Sequardiiie. — Sterilized testicular ex- 
tract. 

Septeintrionalin. — Alkaloid of Aconitum 
septemtrionale. Its physiological action 
resembles that of curare, for which reason 
it is employed in vivisections. It is also 
recommended as an antidote to strych- 
nine. 

Sodium Chloroborate. — Effloresced bo- 
rax treated with chlorine. 

Soltinol. — Constitution unknown as yet. 
Soriatose. — Preparation of albumose. 
Steresol. — Alcohol solution of gum lac, 
benzoin, tolu balsam, phenol, oil of gin- 
ger, and saccharin. 

Sterilisateur. — Aromatic vinegar, con- 
taining free hydrochloric, citric, and tar- 
taric acids, and saccharin. 

Sublimo-phenol. — Name given to a 
phenolated mercuric chloride, or rather a 
chloro-phenolate of mercury, obtained by 
Desesquelle in slightly warming together 
an aqueous solution, including one mole- 
cule of potassium phenolate, and a similar 
solution containinu' a molecule of bichlor- 
ide of mercury. When the two solution? 
are brought together under a gentle heat, 
a precipitate is thrown down which, on 
first forming, is of a brick-red color, which 
soon passes to yellow, and ultimately 
becomes white. The product assembled 
and washed is treated with boiling alcohol 
of 95", and on cooling of the liquor the 
sublimo-phenol is deposited in colorless 
crystals. These crystals melt and decom- 
pose at about 2io°C. They are exceed- 
ingly soluble in fused phenol, and also in 
boiling aqueous or alcoholic solutions of 
phenol. Used in antiseptic surgery. 



Sucrol. — Synonym for dulcin ; chemi- 
cally, paraphenetol carbamide. 

Sulphinol. — A white powder, consisting 
of boric acid, borax, and sodium sulphide. 
It is soluble in 10 parts of water, or in 20 
parts of glycerin. 

Siilphophon. — A mixture of zinc sul- 
phide and calcium sulphate. 

Symphorols. — A generic name for the 
caffeine sulphates or sulpho-caffeinates. 
Thus, sodium sulpho caffeinate is called 
sodium symphorol. Similar compounds 
are lithium symphorol, potassium sym- 
phorol, etc. These new remedies, espe- 
cially sodium symphorol (formerly called 
nasrol), are employed as valuable diuretics 
in dropsy, and affections of the heart and 
kidneys. Lithium symphorol has been 
used with good effect in rheumatism, cal- 
culous affections, and the uric acid dia- 
thesis, etc. The strontium salt seems 
useful in inflammatory conditions of kid- 
neys. 

Tannal. — A tannate of aluminum, which 
is of itself insoluble in any of the ordinary 
solvents, but when combined with tartaric 
acid it makes a double salt that is exceed- 
ingly soluble. It is an energetic astrin- 
gent, from which Heymann has obtained 
excellent results in the treatment of rhin- 
itis, pharyngitis, and catarrhal laryngitis. 
He employs tannal in the form of insuf- 
flations, and the tanno-tartrate, dissolved 
in water or glycerin, as a gargle or as a 
spray, in these diseases. 

Tannigen. — A name given by Beyer & 
Co., of Elberfeld, to acetyl-tannin, new 
astringent for internal use, discovered by 
H. Meyer. It is an ethereal compound 
of tannin, insoluble in the stomach, but 
readily soluble in the duodenum as soon 
as it comes into contact with the pancre- 
atic juice. It appears as a yellowish-gray 
powder, free from taste and smell, very 
slightly hygroscopic, and which, dry, can 
be heated to 108° C. without alteration. 
When this degree of heat is passed it 
becomes brown and melts. In water at 
50° C. it is converted into a honey-like 
mass, which easily draws out into threads. 
It is scarcely affected by cold water, or by 
dilute acids. It promises to be of value 
in dysenteries and relaxed conditions of 
the lower bowels. 

Tetanusantitoxi)i. — A preparation made 
by Tizzoni and Cattani of the blood of 
horses and dogs that have been inoculated 
with tetanic virus. It comes from the 
laboratory of Merck, and is, in all proba- 
bility, another of the Koch series of 
" fads." 

Thermodin. — Acetyl-oxyphenylurethane. 
It appears as an inodorous, colorless, and 
crystalline sL'bstance, almost insoluble in 
cold, and but slightly soluble in hot water. 
Recommended as an antineuralgic. 
Thioform. — Bismuth dithiosalicylate. 
Thiosapol. — Soap containing sulphur, 
chemically combined. 

Tliiuret. — Product of oxidation of 
dithiodiurate of phenyl. 

Thymacitin. — Ethoxy-aceto-amido- 
thymol. 

Tolilantipyrin. — Tolypyrin (below). 
Tolyp)rin. — Paratolydimethyl-parazo- 



CANADIAN DKUr.GIST. 



(86a) 



WITH ADAMS' PEPSIN 

TUTTI FRUTTI 

ASK YOUR WHOLESALER FOR IT. 



Send for new advertising matter to decorate your window. 



ADAMS & SONS CO., 

11 and 13 JA.RVIS ST., 




TORONTO. 



Some Men 

Get Ahead in the World 



Faster than others. They are usually the men 
who keep their eyes open and are ready to take 
hold of a good thing when it comes along. 

Those who saw " a good thing " in 




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" a good thing" on them ever since. 

Are you ready for another case ? 



Toronto Biscuit and Confectionery Co. 



7 FRONT ST. EAST, TORONTO 



(86b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 




"MANLEY'S" 

Celery Nerve Compound 



Beef, Iron, and Wine 

A acieiitUic Combinatlou of Celery, Beef, Iron, 

and Wine, Tonics, and Pnrfc Glycerine, 

instead of alcohol. 

UNEQUALLED 

AS A HEALTH BUILDER^d HEALTH RESTORER 

Has given the FULLEST SATISFACTION to persons 

who have taken it. 

It is put up in a i6-oz. bottle, contained in an attractive 

Blue and White carton, 

PRICE TO THE TRADE :— $6 (net) per doz. s per 
cent, off on three dozen orders, and s per cent, off for spot 
cash. 

SELLS FOB !*1 A BOTTLK. 

Orders respectfully solicited. 

For testimonials, etc., write to the makers. 

The LION MEDICINE GO. 

87 King St. East, TORONTO. 



A Reduction 
In the Price 

Of 



Toothache 
Gum 

To 65c. per doz. 

To be had of all Wholesale Druggists. 



J. A. GIBBONS & CO., 

TORONTO. - - BUFFALO. 



Lll4lMEMi 



Sold from Ualifax to Victoria 

BY 

( Brown & Webb. Simson Bros. & Co. 

HALIFAX I Forsyth, Sutcliffe & Co. 

ST. JOHN— T. B. Barker & Sons. D. McDiarmid & Co. 
VARMOUTH-C. C. Richards & Co. 

° ~ I Kerry Watson & Co. Lyman Sons & Co. 

MONTREAL | Evaiis Sons & Co. Lyman, Knox & Co. 
KINGSTON-Henry Skinner & Co 



f Lyman Bros. & Co. I 

TORONTO; Northrop &Ly^ 

I, Elliot & Co. 



Evans Sons & Co. 



.man. 

T. Milburn & Co. 

HAMILTON— Archdale Wilson & Co. J. Winer & Co. 

LONDON— London Drug Co. Jas. A. Kennedy & Co. 

WINNIPEG— Martin, Bole & Wynne Co. 

NEW WESTMINSTER-D. S. Curtis & Co 

VICTORIA— Langley & Co. 

QUEBEC— W. Brunet et Cie 




Allen B. Wrlsley's 

CUCUMBER 
COMPLEXION 
TOILET 
SOAP 

IS "PURE GOLD" 



The virtues of Cucumber Juice for the Skin 
.ind Complexion have become famous. We 
ch.illenge comparison with any fine milled, 
delicately perfumed, high grade soap in the 

market. It's The Complexion Toilet Soap 

of the world. Made on honor, full value, jjar 
excellence. Matchless for a clear, soft, skin 
beaulifier. It is well worth 50 cents a cake, but 
can be sold at Retail for ('/) one-quarter of that 
price. Try it, try il, and be convinced. 

Sold by the Wholesale Druggists in 
Canada. 



MAuE ONLY IIV 

ALLEN B. WRISLEY 

479 to 485 5th Avenue, 
CHICAGO. 

Manufacturer of High Grade Toilet Soaps, Per- 
fumes, and Glycerine. 

N.Ii —Prices and Samples to JOBBERS on application- 



Gray's 



CASTOR-FLUID 

For the hair. 

DENTAL PEARLINE 

An excellent antiseptic tooth wash. 

SULPHUR PASTILLES 

For burning in diphtheritic cases. 

SAPONACEOUS DENTIFRICE 

An excellent antiseptic dentifrice. 



These Specialties 

All of which have been well advertised, 
more particularly the " Castor-Fluid," 
may be obtained at all the wholesale 
houses at Manufacturer's price. 



HENRY R. GRAY 



ESTABLISHED 1859. 



Pharmaceutical Chemist 

22 St. Lawrence Main Street 

(Cor. of Lagauchetiere) 

MONTREAL 



Bole, Wynnes Co. 

Wholesale Druggists and 

Manufacturing Chemists 



We wo'jid be glad to correspond with 
Druggist in Western Provinces when in 
the market. 



OFFICE AUB WAREHOUSE : 
WINNIPEG, - MANITOBA 

ONTARIO 
VACCINE 
FARM 



Pure and Reliable Vaccine Matter always on hand. 
Orders by mail or othei-ivise promptly filled. 

10 Ivory Points, $1 ; 5 Ivory Points, 65 cents ; single 
Points, 20 cents. Discount to the trade. 

Address all orders— VACCINE FARM, 
A. STEWART, M.D. Palmerston, Ont. 



GlLLaCo.COLUMBUS,0HIO.U.S.A 




• IN 'THE • MARKET* '^ 



For sale at Manufacturers' Prices by the leading whole- 
sale druggists and druggists' sundrymen 
throughout Canada. 



JOSEPH E. SEAGRAM 



Waterloo, Ontario. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



ALCOHOL 

Pure Spirits 
Rye and Malt Whiskies 

"OLD TIMES" AND "WHITE WHEfiT" 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



87 



one. (See National Druggist, October, 
1. 1893, page 121.) 

Trefusia, — Natural iron-alhuminate. 

Tricresol. — Sometimes written trikresol. 
Mixture of the three cresols of coal and 
wood tars, purified to the highest degree. 
So says Schering, its ()atentee. 

Triformol. — Identical with paraformal- 
dehytJe. 

Tumenol. — Sulphonated preparation of 
bituminous oil 

Tussol. — Name given by Ur. Rehn, of 
Frankfort-am-Main, to a benzoic com- 
pound of antipyrin, manufactured by the 
Hoechst Color Works. It is declared to 
be valuable in treating the coughs of 
childhood. 

f/7y//y/.— See Eulyptol. 

Urethylane. — ^Ethyl-urethane. 

Urecidin. — Mi.xture of sodium sulphate, 
chloride, and citrate, and lithium citrate 
in the form of a granular salt. 

Ureplurin. — Mixture of lithiated theo- 
bromine and lithium salicylate. See 
Lithium Diuretin. 

Ursone. — Proximate principle of uva 
ursi. 

Valzine. — Synonym for sucrol. 

Vaselin, Oxygenated. — See Vasogen. 

Vaselone. — -A product analogous to 
vaselin having recently appeared in com- 
merce, and whose composition, etc., was 
kept secret. M. Villon undertook its 
analysis, and now writes to Le Monde 
pharmaceutiqui to say that vaselone is a 
mixture of stearone and margarone, dis- 
solved in neutral mineral oil. The pro- 
duct resembles vaselin in most of its 
characteristics, being white, odorless, neu 
tral, and not attackable by mineral acids 
or other chemical reagents. It is, how- 
ever, not so translucent as vaselin. Its 
chief use seems to be in perfumery, 
though it is recommended as a substitute 
for vaselin in pharmacy. 

Vasogen. — This is the trade name for 
Vasolinum oxydatuni. It is described by 
Dr. Max Dahmen, of Krefeld, in the 
Pharmaceutische Zeitung. The new pro- 
duct makes an emulsion with water with- 
out any addition, and the product seems 
to be a permanent one. It is also a sol- 
vent for many otherwise ditficult soluble 
medicaments, among them iodoform, 
creosote, ichthyol, menthol, chrysarobin, 
pyrogallol, chloroform, camphor, pyok- 
tannin, etc. By means of vasogen these 
remedies may be employed in dressing 
wounds, ulcers, etc., on the mucosa, as 
well as the skin. 

Vasogenin — Vasogen ointment base. 

Vitalin. — A solution of borax in gly- 
cerin. —National Dru^srist. 



How to Make the Business Pay. 



Don't keep a bank account at the ex- 
pense of your creditors. 

Never trust the man who says he don't 
care to make money. 

Your best friend is sometimes the dead- 
beat who hales you. 

The way to find luck is to work for it, 
not talk about it. 



This is a ([uestion that we have all of 
us asked ourselves most frequently and 
persistently during the last two years. It 
is one that has kept many of us awake, 
cudgelling our brains, many and many a 
night, or has let us go to sleep with its 
echo still whispering in our ears. In try- 
ing to formulate a plan, certain things 
have occurred to me which may be of 
service to my fellow-tradesmen, especially 
those in towns and villages outside of the 
great cities. The first proposition is, and 
I will elevate it to the dignity of 

MAXIM NO. I. 

Keep up your stock. Carry, if you 
please or can, a full line of everything, 
but at any rate never get out of those 
things best adapted to your section of 
country, and most frequently demanded 
by your customers. As to what might be 
considered a full line, opinions will vary 
according to the different localities. It 
is, unfortunately, true that a large portion 
of articles, formerly staple in the drug 
trade, and belonging to it alone, are now 
carried by the " stores." Some of these 
articles we can well afford to relinquish, 
and be better prepared to turn our atten- 
tion, our practical and scientific knowl- 
edge, to more reliable sources of trade 
and profit. 

If the pharmacists would concentrate 
their efforts and their capital ; would 
cease to attempt to carry those articles 
that have become the common property 
of the " calico-butter-eggs and quinine 
pills pharmacies," and would leave the 
handling and sale of all such articles to 
the "stores," the reputable manufacturers 
would regard us as worthy of more con- 
sideration than mere shopkeepers. 

The retailer can so regulate his busi- 
ness, if the proper care is taken, and need 
never, except in some miraculous and 
unprecedented rush of custom (which may 
the Lord send at once, and frequently 
thereafter !), be forced to confess himself 
"just out" of something that he ought 
to have plenty of. 

M.^.XIM NO. 2. 

The groceryman and the stores have 
invaded your business— ^-y^ must invadt 
theirs. 

This may seem contrary to what I have 
just said, but it is not so. There are a 
number of things of which in former 
times the apothecary had absolute con- 
trol and monopoly, not only by custom, 
but by law ; but the grocer stole them 
from us so long ago that he has acquired 
a title thereto by lapse of time. If my 
readers will go back over the files of the 
National Druggist for 1892 and 1893, 
and read the entertaining and instructive 
articles on " Pharmacy in the time of 
Moise Charas," and other articles on the 
history of pharmacy, he will see that then 
the apothecary alone could sell spices, fine 
table oils, pure wines and liquors for medi- 
cinal and even family use. 

Take away from the grocer and the 
"store" their trade in />«/-if spices, pure 



table 6\\, pure wines and liquors, /ar< tea, 
pure and fine confectionery, etc. Do this 
by providing for your custom X.ht best that 
money can buy. Guarantee their quality 
with YOUR OWN I.ABEL attached to each 
and every package, in addition to those of 
the manufacturer, the wholesaler, or the 
importer. Make (and keep) a reputation 
for your goods on quality, remembering 
that reputation makes repetition of custom 
an assured fact. 

How would such a sign as the following 
look to the passer-by ? 



JOHN SMITH, ; 

PHARMACIST ON .MODERN PRINCIPLES. 

Headquarters for '. 

Accuracy in Dispensing, : 

Honesty in Dealing. - ; 

Purity of Materials. 

Substitution in No Form Tolerated. 



Now, if you were hunting for an apothe- 
cary to fill a prescription, or wanted to 
buy the best of anything, would you not 
walk right in and give John Smith your 
order ? I would. 

MAXI.M NO. 3. 

Maintain your dignity, but do not let 
superciliousness and false pride pass for 
dignity. If your trade demands that you 
should keep in stock (and in villages and 
small towns it will demand it) hair-pins, 
toothpicks, spectacles, jewelry, keep them, 
and sell them, but do it as a merchant. 
Remember that pharmacy has two sides, 
the professional and the mercantile, and 
that in the latter, when we go outside of 
true pharmacy, as we are forced to do by 
custom and the existing order of things, 
we do it simply as merchants, and not as 
pharmacists. Display your wares, adver- 
tise them in whatever manner may seem 
best, but remember : Don't make a 
" Racket shop " of your pharmacy. 

MAXIM NO. 4. 

Don't be greedy. Demand and receive 
a fair profit for all you sell, but do not try 
to get rich all at once. This needs no 
explanation. Every reader knows jus: 
what I mean, but I will add to this rule 
one more — Do not expect to do all the 
business ; don't be worried if you happen 
to see a customer going into Jones' shop. 
Jones must live as well as yourself. To 
conclude, in answer to the query. How is 
money to be made in the retail drug busi- 
ness ? I will sum up : 

(i) Conduct your pharmacy on purely 
business principles. 

(2) Carry a full and genuine stock of 
things demanded by your trade. 

(3) Carry a side line of articles such as 
I have suggested, and such as your own 
good sense and judgment will dictate, and 
make a reputation upon the quality and 
purity of all that you carry. To do this, 
avoid substitution. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Do these things, and you will not only 
be successful in business, but you will be 
so with a clear conscience, which is more 
than gold and rubies.— J! A. Moseley, in 
the National Druggist. 



Borax in Pharmacy. 

THE ADDITION OF GLYCERIN TO BORAX 
PREPARATIONS. 

The fact that glycerin, when added to 
aqueous solutions of borax, decomposes 
the latter with formation of free boric 
acid is well known. 

The frequently asked query : What is 
the cause of the effervescence in prepar- 
ing Dobell's solution? f^nds its explana- 
tion in this manner, also the pharmaco- 
poeial identity test for glycerin. 

The same reaction may take place in 
other instances, perhaps less frequently, 
yet being at times of importance at the 
dispensing counter, occasionally requiring 
some reflection before unlooked-for phe- 
nomena are satisfactorily explained. 

Some weeks ago a mixture consisting 
of aqueous tincture of rhubarb and gly- 
cerin was found to explode when dis- 
pensed in a well-filled bottle. 

When this mixture was prepared in an 
open vessel, distinct effervescence could 
be observed on standing. 

Tindura rhei aquosa, a preparation 
frequently prescribed by German practi- 
tioners, contains, besides the active vege- 
table ingredients, borax and potassium 
carbonate. 

The glycerin decomposes the sodium 
borate, with liberation of free boric acid, 
and the latter is again neutralized by the 
potassium carbonate present with evolu- 
tion of COs- 

'I'he expansion of this gas renders the 
bottle holding this mixture liable to frac- 
ture. 

BORAX IN UNGUENTUM AQUvE ROS/E. 

Several objections have been made 
against the addition of borax to the cold 
cream of the new Pharmacopceia. 

The action of the borax upon salts of 
mercury and the alkaloids appears to be 
the chief objection. 

The addition of glycerin to cold cream, 
as sometimes ordered extemporaneously 
in prescriptions, will also decompose the 
borax in the manner mentioned. 

Borax appears to possess some saponi- 
fying action upon the fatty ingredients, 
and if glycerin is subsequently added 
boric acid is liberated, changing the reac- 
tion of the ointment from alkaline to 
acid. 

It would be interesting to know 
whether this would produce an impair- 
ment of the preijaration as to its medici- 
nal value. 

GLYCERIN AND SOME BAY RUM SAMPLES. 

The pharmacopceial bay rum formula 
is not satisfactory to many pharmacists 
on account of the almost colorless ap- 
pearance of the product. 

In their efforts to cater to the popular 
taste, they prefer to have the preparation 



of a bright yellow, or even yellowish-brown 
color. 

To effect this, some follow the practice 
of macerating bay leaves or tumeric, or 
both, in the solution of the oils, while 
others add solution of potassa to the oils 
of bay and allspice before dissolving them 
in alcohol. 

Some also dissolve a certain amount of 
borax in the water before it is added to 
the alcoholic oil solution. 

Still others use the potash solution and 
make the borax addition besides. 

When the last method is employed, the 
bay rum will possess a handsome yellow 
color. 

But if the preparation, thus prepared, 
is mixed with glycerin, the effect repeat- 
edly mentioned takes place, namely, the 
borax is decomposed and the acid liber- 
ated. 

This effect may readily be observed 
after the glycerin addition. 

The mixture will decolorize, the yellow 
color almost entirely disappears, and the 
previously alkaline bay rum will turn dis- 
tinctly acid to test paper. 

Other illustrations may be mentioned, 
where chemical incompatibility may arise 
between borax and glycerin, but a little 
reflection will readily indicate the liability 
of Its occurrence. 

In the preparation of toilet washes, in 
which it is desirable to keep the borax 
unchanged, this fact must be considered 
with care. 

One point we may, perhaps, call atten- 
tion to, namely, the chemical incompati- 
bihty of borax with fluid extracts and 
tinctures containing glycerin. 

Astringent fluid extracts, such as those 
of sumach berries, rose, etc., as a rule, 
contain glycerin, and it is well known that 
these preparations enter frequently into 
mouth washes containing borax.—/: IV. 
Haussmann, in American Journal oj 
Pharmacy. 



grees below zero. In his subsequent ex- 
periments, Professor Olszewski still fur- 
ther lowered the temperature of hydrogen, 
but it was not until a few days ago that 
this lightest of all gases passed from the 
gaseous to the liquid state at the remark- 
ably low temperature of 404 degrees below 
zero, Fahrenheit. 



The suit against the Ash Soda Fount- 
ain Company, for infringement on the 
drawer syrup can patents, has ended, and 
Judge Crosscup, of the United States Cir- 
cuit Court, has handed down his decree, 
in which a perpetual injunction is issued 
restraining and enjoining the defendant 
from directly or indirectly manufacturing, 
using, or selling the inventions or improve- 
ments claimed in said patents. 



Glycerine is said to have a decided 
power in preventing fermentation in the 
stomach. 

WANTS, FOR SALE, ETC. 



Adverlisf-mmt-' under the head of Business Wanted., 
Situaticms Wanted, Situationi Tacant, husiness far 
Sale, etc., will ie invrted once free of charge. An- 
suersimist not be sent in care of this office unless 
potage .ttatnps are forwarded to re-mail repUef, 

SITU ATIONS WANTED. 

DRUGGIST-TEN YEARS' EXPERIENCE. 
Graduate O. C. P. ; references ; salary moderate ; 
good dispenser. Address, "PHARMACIST," 362 Cannon 
.Street East, Hamilton. 

FOR SALE. 



RUG BUSINESS AND STAND. MODERN 
stone, finished in hardwood ; house all modern 
conveniences ; city ; about $6000.00 ; good trade. Address, 
CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



D 



« DRUG BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER, B.C. 
f\ In one of the best stands in the city. Stock about 
$6000, well selected and fresh. Terms : 'yi cash, balance 
secured. Rent reasonable. A Jive years, lease is held by 
present owner. Address, 



'DRUGS," care of Langley 
& Co., Druggists, Vancouver, B.C. 



Geo. H. Chandlee. H. C. Chandlee. 

Trade-Marks, Caveats, etc. 



The Liquefaction Of Hydrogen. CHANDLEE & CHANDLEE, 



Science has at last triumphed over 
matter. Hydrogen, which has previously 
resisted all attempts to change its physi- 
cal characteristics, now succumbs to the 
will of the noted scientist. Professor 
Olszewski, of Cracow. As early as 1883, 
Professor Olszewski began the experi- 
ments in the liquefaction and solidifica- 
tion of gases, which has resulted in the 
conversion of the last of the constituents 
of the atmosphere into liquid form. Oxy- 
gen, nitrogen, and many other gases, 
when submitted to low teinperatures in 
tubes by means of liquid ethylene, boiling 
in vacuo, at a temperature of 218 degrees 
below zero Fahrenheit, were severally 
liquefied, but hydrogen refused to become 
liquid even when submitted to a pressure 
of 180 atmospheres, and cooled down to 
364 degrees below zero, by means of 
liquid ethylene and liquid air boiling in 
vacuo. What the critical temperature o^ 
the gas was could only be conjectured 
although recognized to be below 364 de^ 



Patents and Patent Causes. 
Electrical and Mechanical Experts. 

I'OLACK Bru.wsG. Atlantic Building, 

YORK, Pa. WASHINGTON, D.C 

Correti ondence Solicited 




CAM I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 
prompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
nUINN ifc (;<».. who have had nearly fifty years 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly cnnlldentlal. A Handbook o£ In. 
lormation concernins Patents and now to CO. 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue 01 mecuan- 
leal and scientlflc books sent free. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special noticeiuthe Scienfilic Ainericnn. atiO 
thus are brounht widely before the public witD- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper. 
Issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has by far the 
largest circulation of any scientlflc work In tne 
world. SSavear. Sample copies sent free. 

Building Edition, monthly, $2.50 J year. SinclC 
copies 'i.* cents. Every number containp beai> 
tlful plates, in colors, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders to show toe 
latest designs and secure contracts. Address 

MUNN & CO.. NEW YOKE, 361 BrOADWAT- 



CANADIAN DRUr.niST 



fSSA) 



FOR BODY bn° BRRIH 

SINCIC 30 YKAKS ALL EMINENT PHYSICIANS RECOMMEND 



YIN MARIAN] 



The oriijinal French Cocoa Wine ; most poimlaily used tonics.imulant 
in Hospitals^ i^ublU and Keli^ioits htsttlutions everywhere. 

Nourishes, Fortifies, Refreshes 

Strenphens the entire system ; most Agreeali/e, Effective an J /.astiiig 
Renovator of the Vital Forces. 

Every test, strictly on its own merits, proves exceptional reputation. 

Palatable as Choicest Old Wines 

LAWRENCE A. WILSON & CO, Sole Agents, MONTREAL 
Effect Of the Frencli "Treaty 

CLARETS AT HALF PRICE 

The Bordeaux Claret Company, establi,shed at Montreal m view of the French 
treaty, are now offering the Canadian connoisseur beautiful wines at $3.00 and $4.00 
percase of 12 Iari;e quart lioltles. These are equal to any $6.00 and $8.00 wines sold on 
their label. Every swell hotel and club are now handling them, and they are recom- 
mended by tlie be-t physicians as bein^ perfectly pure and highly adapted for invalids' 
use. Address : BORDEAUX CLARET COMPANY, 30 Hospital Street, Montreal. 



The Detroit 



THE ONLY GENUINE. 



Pennyroyal 
Wafers 



Have been so successful with Women in the 
treatment of 

PAINFUL AHD IRREGULAR MENSTRUATION 

That Physicians prescribe them liberally. 

The Druggist can safely recommend them for their 
value to the sick. 



At $8.00 per dozen delivered, you get a good profit of 50 per 
cent. No need to try to work off an imitation of them. 

If you want local advertising, or terms, or special remedies, write to 
the manufacturers. 



EUREKA CHEMICAL CO., 



Canadian Laboratory 

WINDSOR, ONT. 



DETROIT, MICH. 



Room 11, Janes Building, - King and Yonge Sts., 

TORONTO. 

Two classes in Optics and Refraction will be formed during 
May one commencing on Wednesday, May 1st, and the 
otheron Thursday, May 16Lh, 

The tcachinK embraces everything necessary for an Optician to know tn intelligently 
and salisfacluriiy detect errors of vision and properly fit spectacles. The cour'ie i so 
arranged and conducted that a beginner is piloted along step by step, covering ihe 
\vh»lc j^ruund in such a manner that with rcgu'ar attendance and moderate reading the 
student will almost cerl;iinly secure the necessary in ormation to successfully pas* the 
e.vatninations held ai the end of the course, and ihus become possessor of a Diploma of 
iiiuch value to an Optician. After an exprriencc of between two and three years in the 
schools i>f opbtholmology and eye hospiial- of both Enuland and An.t rica. i fnake no 
iip'jlogy for saying this is the most efficient course in Canada. To those pa-ssing the 
examination two sul>scqueni lectures are given, one on RETINOSCOPY, or the 
Shadow Test, a method withal ea-sier to learn and more accunite in results ihan those 
usually employed by Optlciar-s. The second one on the USES OF THE 
OPHTHALMOSCOPE* a moderate acquaintance with which enables one to 
determine where the -ervices of the Oculist should supplant those of the Optician. 

The fee for this course is $50 in advance. 

For further information apply as above. 

RADLAUER'S 

ANTISEPTIC PERLES 

Of Pleasant Taste and Fragrance. 

Non-Poisonous and strongly Antiseptic. 



These Perles closely resemble the sublimates and carbolic acid in 
their antiseptic action. A preventive of diphtheric infection. 

For the rational cleansing and disinfecti' n of the mouth, teeth, 
pharynx, and especially of the tonsils, and for immediately removing 
disagreeable odors emanating from the mouth and nose. 

A perfect substitute for mouth and teeth washes and gargles. 
Radlauer's Antiseptic Perles take special effect where swallowing is 
difficult in inflammation of the throat and tonsils, catarrh of the gums, 
periostitis dentalis, stomatitis mercurialis, salivation, angina, and thrush. 

A few of the " Perles" placed in the mouth dissolve into a strongly 
antiseptic fluid of agreeable taste, cleanse the mouth and mucous mem- 
brane of the pharynx, and immediately remove the fungi, germs, and 
putrid substance accumulating about the tonsils, thereby preventing any 
further injury to the teeth. 

METHOD OF APPLICATION: 

Take 2—4 lories, let them dissolve slowly in the mouth, and then 
swallow. Being packed in small and handy tins, Radlauer's Antiseptic 
Perles can always be carried in the pocket. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



S. RADLAUER 



Pharmaceutical Chemist 



BERLIN W., GE RMANY 
W. J. DYAS, Toronto, Ont., Wholesale Agent for Canada. 

Sovereign . . 
Lime Fruit Juice 

is the Strongest, Purest, and of Finest Flavor 



We are the largest refiners of LIME JUICE 

in America, and solicit enquiries. 

For Sale in Barrels, Demijohns, and twenty-four ounce Bottles 
by wholesale in 

TORONTO, HAMILTON, KINGSTON, AND WINNIPEG 

SIMSON BROS. & CO., Wholesale Druggists 

HALIFAX, N.S. 



(88b) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



SUCCESSORS TO 

WAGNER, Z IDLER & CO. 



DOMINION ART WOODWORK MFG. CO., 

HIGHEST AWARDS RECEIVED WHEREVER EXHIBITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

>^*m^.( \ a . . SHOW CASES . . 

Of every Description in Nickel, Silver, Walnut, Ebonized, etc. 

HARDWOOD STORE FITTINGS, METAL SASH BARS, EtO. 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST 

SH.W ROOMS, HE.. OFHCE. „■ F»CmY, ■ - |£gj joRQNTO JUNCTION, ONT. 




Fortier's 

<^ Shakespeare 



THE FINEST 5ct. Cigar 

EVER OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC. 

JUST TRY IT 



99 



R I TANS 



One Gives Relief, 





Radlauor^^ Somiial 

AETHYL-CHLORALURETHAN 

(registered) 
the newest and most efficient soporific remedy 

Taken in doses of 32 grains, or half a teaspoonful, in milk, ale, or 
cognac, produces in half an hour a quiet refreshine sleep, lasting from six 
to eight hours, with no unpleasant after effects. The effects of SOMNAI, 
are more pleasant than those of Chloral Hydrate and Morphia. Experi- 
ments made in the Town Hospitals, Moahit and Friedrichshain, Konigliche 
Charite and Konigliche Universitats Poliklinik, Berlin, have shown that 
SOMNAL does not accelerate the pulse and does not upset the stomach. 
SoMNAL is especially recommended for Nervous Insonmia, Neurasthenia, 
Spinal Complaints, Infectious Diseases, Paralysis, Mel.ancholia, Hysteria, 
Morphinismus, and Diabetes. The low price of Somnal enables its use 
in the poor and workmen's practice and in hospitals. 



Radlauer's Antinervin 

(SALICYLE BROMANILIDE) 

In the form of Powder, the most efificacious Antipyretic, 
Antineuralgic, and Antinervine 



Antinervin replaces and surpasses Antipyrin, has no hurtful second 
ary effects, and is cheaper. Taken in doses of 8 grains four times a day, 
it is an excellent remedy for Feverish, Catarrhal, and Rheumatic Pains. 

Antinervin is of especial service in cases of Influenza, Neuralgia, 
Asthma, Tuberculose, Yellow Fever, Malaria, Migraine, Gout, Rheuma- 
tism in the Joints, Diptheritis, and other typical Fevers 

MANY GOLD MEDALS HAVE BEEN AWARDED 



S. RADLAUER, Kronen Apotheke, FRIEDRICHSTRASSE, i6o BERLIN, W. 



W. J. DYAS, Toronto, Ontario 



Wholesale Agent for Canada 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



89 



Physicians' Supply Houses. 

The remarks on subslilution which 
have been presented recently in these 
pages, and another instalment of which 
is given in this issue, bring very forcibly 
to attention the fact that the present 
condition of the retail drug trade calls for 
the most careful investigation of its 
causes, with the view to such reformatory 
measures as shall bring it to a state 
where it shall be more satisfactory in 
both a financial and professional sense. 
It cannot be denied that the drug trade 
is in a |)recarious condition, suffering 
from evils which threaten its very exist- 
ence as a separate calling. Acrimonious 
discussions between doctors and drug- 
gists, the diversion of trade to the depart- 
mental stores, the charges of illegitimate 
substituiion, and the general accusations 
in the newspapers of unprofessional and 
unbusinesslike practices are destined to 
destroy the occupation of the pharmacist 
sooner or later, if a remedy be not found 
and promptly applied. 

This condition of affairs cannot be at- 
tributed to any one cause, but is the 
effect of many influences which have 
been to greater or less degree operative 
for a number of years. It may, however, 
be asserted that one of the most powerful 
of these influences has been the physi- 
cians' supply houses, and the drug trade 
have not recognized soon enough the 
great influence for evil which these houses 
exert, and now it is necessary to employ 
drastic measures to counteract this in- 
fluence, which threatens the very exist- 
ence of retail druggists. The patent 
medicine evil is a minor one in compari- 
son, and the substitution claim of manu^ 
facturers is of still less importance. 

All will admit the injury done the re- 
tail drug trade by these supply houses, 
but all are not agreed upon the causes 
for the existence of these concerns. We 
believe, however, that the druggist him- 
self is largely responsible for the success 
of this new competitor. The local drug- 
gist is the natural purveyor of medicines 
to and for the physicians in his locality, 
but he has frequently been slow to recog- 
nize the opportunities at his command 
for serving the physician, for holding his 
patronage and good will, and for extend- 
ing his own business. The time has now 
come for every druggist to bestir himself 
and to ask. What shall I do, and how 
shall I meet this competition? Shall I 
permit these outside concerns to supply 
the medicines and instruments to the 
physicians in my territory merely because 
I am so poor a business man that I can- 
not control this trade, or shall I do my 
part as an active business man, and try 
to regain and hold this trade, which is 
rightly mine ? 

Instead of getting out of his store, 
going around and calling upon the physi- 
cians, the same as representatives of the 
supply houses do, the druggist in many 
cases has been too content to sit in his 
store and growl, because the physicians 
do business with these energetic sales- 



men. We do not believe that doctf)rs, as 
a rule, have had any just cause for com- 
plaining of the prices charged them by 
druggists, and we sympathize with the 
druggist, who has often been imposed 
upon by the doctor, who helped himself 
to cigars and knickknacks about the 
store, as if the goods were his. Hut these 
latter are comparatively trivial matters 
which the druggist must expect to put up 
with if he wants the good will, patronage, 
and influence of the doctors. We are 
convinced that the average doctor prefers 
not to buy his goods in such large quan- 
tities as he is compelled to from out-of- 
town dealers. Instead of buying one bill 
of fifty dollars worth of drugs, he would 
rather get these as he wants them from 
the local druggist ; but so long as the 
druggist sits with his arms folded and 
makes no earnest attempt to secure this 
trade, he must expect the business will 
switch off into other channels. 

If the druggist will take it upon him- 
self to keep in touch with his physicians, 
cater to their wants, and call their atten- 
tion to the injustice of their buying their 
goods abroad, he will find every sensible 
doctor ready to admit the justice of his 
claims. The doctor realizes that the drug 
store is a necessity in every locality, and 
he is broad-minded enough to recognize 
that the more trade a druggist enjoys, the 
better variety of goods he can keep, the 
fresher will be his supplies, and the 
cheaper he can afford to sell them. 
Physicians are entitled to buy their medi- 
cines at physicians' prices, and while 
some manufacturers will sell as cheaply 
to a physician as they will to a druggist, 
the larger and more reputable makers 
allow the druggist an extra discount, and 
we have a positive assurance that it is 
the preference of the better class of 
manufacturers not to sell direct to physi- 
cians. The curse of the business is these 
little manufacturing houses who make a 
few pharmaceutical products, but buy 
more, issue a price list, and send out 
agents to charm the doctors with a dis- 
count song about 25 per cent. This is 
the worst competition the druggist must 
meet, and, if he isn't business man enough 
to meet it, then he nmst expect to lose 
the trade. When you find that a manu- 
facturer is selling as cheaply to physicians 
as he is to you, then you should most 
emphatically protest, and, if it is not 
stopped, refuse to handle his goods, and 
send your orders to the manufacturer 
who will protect you. There is plenty of 
competition among the manufacturers, 
and no druggist need feel compelled to 
handle any line of goods which he can- 
not sell to his physicians at a reasonable 
profit. These small manufacturers of 
medicines who work up their business by 
selling direct to physicians are on a par 
with the manufacturer of soap who 
peddles his product from house to house 
instead of selling it through the retail 
grocers. The physicians' supply house is 
an outgrowth of an example set by a 
sharp Yankee peddler, who worked up a 
large business in his own county and 



state by selling surgical instruments. He 
soon found that the word " discount " 
was a charm to the average doctor, and 
he reasoned that if he could sell instru- 
ments, why couldn't he sell medicines, 
and soon he extended his line. This ex- 
ample has been followed until these con- 
cerns have sprung up like mushrooms in 
all large trade centres. Their tendency 
is to destroy rather thati to support estab- 
lished trade channels, but nevertheless 
their influence should not be underesti- 
mated by the druggists, and if the latter 
wish to control this trade, which justly 
belongs to them, they must make a des- 
perate effort or it will soon be beyond 
their reach. 

Among many of the larger and more 
reputable manufacturers there is a strong 
feeling against these physicians' supply 
houses. Some of them [xjsitively refuse 
to sell goods at better than retail drug- 
gists' prices, but the volume of business 
which some of these houses do, and, in 
consequence, the large orders they are 
able to place, have forced the manufac- 
turers in many cases to recognize them 
as jobbers. The legitimate wholesale 
druggists are unanimously opposed to 
these supply houses. These jobbers do 
their business through the retail druggist, 
and dare not openly sell to physicians. 
In consequence, the supply house takes a 
large volume of business away from the 
jobbing drug trade. If the retail drug- 
gists would only arouse themselves and 
assert their position, they would find the 
jobbers ready to work with them, and the 
combination ought to seriously impede 
the progress of this outside influence. 
But so long as the physician believes 
that he can buy his goods cheaper of the 
physicians' supply house, just so long 
will it be impossible to break that con- 
nection. The local druggist must give 
the physician to understand distinctly 
that he can and will supply his wants in 
a satisfactory manner, and at as low a 
price as the doctor can buy from the 
outsider. — Pharmaceutical Era. 



An Important Decision. 

The following, taken from the Detroit 
Free Press of ApxW 2nd, is of considerable 
interest to the drug trade, involving, as it 
does, the rights of the manufacturer to an 
exclusive trade mark : 

Judge Swan yesterday dismissed the 
bill of the California Fig Syrup Co. 
against Frederick Stearns &: Co., by 
which it was sought to restrain the de- 
fendant from the use of the words " fig 
syrup " on one of its preparations. The 
complainant is engaged in the manufac- 
ture and sale of a preparation which it 
denominates "Syrup of Figs, California 
Liquid Fruit Remedy, Gentle and Effect- 
ive." The words " Syrup of Figs '' are 
blown in the bottle, inscribed on the 
labels and on the pasteboard wrapper. 
The company is organized under the laws 
of Nevada, and has its principal offices 
in New York, Louisville, San Francisco, 
and Reno. 



go 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



The bill states that the complainant 
has for many years been engaged in the 
manufacture of the liquid laxative medi- 
cal preparation designated as "Syrup of 
Figs," and that it was the first to com- 
pound the same. It is alleged that the 
words " Syrup of Figs " have- come to be 
known as a trade mark of complainant's 
preparation, and that, by reason of a large 
investment in advertising this product, 
the complainant has the exclusive right to 
the name "Syrup of Figs" in connection 
with the liquid laxative preparation 
which, it is alleged in the bill, is called 
by the public, indifferently, " Syrup of 
Figs " and " Fig Syrup.'' The charge 
against the defendants is that they are sell- 
ing their own laxative preparation, promi- 
nently marked " Fig Syrup," by taking 
advantage of the reputation of the com- 
plainant's article. 

The answer of the defendants is that 
they were led to believe, from the name 
of complainant's preparation, that it is a 
syrup of the fig, and contend that the 
complainant was not the first to manu- 
facture a syrtip of figs or to call a syrup 
by that name, or to discover or name the 
fig. It is further denied that there can 
beany exclusive right to the name "Syrup 
of Figs," which, if the article is a syrup 
made from figs, is a descriptive name, 
and, if not so made, is a deceptive name. 
The answer declares that the defendants 
put on the market a laxative fig syrup, 
actually made from figs, and, therefore, 
properly named " Fig Syrup," and that 
their packages are wholly unlike those of 
the complainant. 

The testimony in the case showed that 
the complainant considered the use of fig 
juice in the compound as superfluous 
because of no laxative quality; that its 
preparation contained a very small per- 
centage of fig syrup, and that its principal 
base was senna. It was shown that the 
defendants' fig syrup contains 9 2oths of 
syrup of figs, io-2oths fluid extract of 
senna, and that the other i-2oth is made 
up R.ochelle salts, aromatics, and water. 

In his exhaustive opinion. Judge Swan 
says there are but two questions to be 
answered, which briefly are : 

(i) Are the words "Syrup of Figs" or 
" Fig Syrup " a descriptive name ? and 

(2) Are they, under the proofs, de- 
ceptive? 

In the answer to the first, he says it is 
well settled that words " which are merely 
descriptive of the character, qualities, or 
composition of an article" cannot be 
monopolized as a trade mark, citing a 
number of decisions, and then continues : 

" In Canal v. Clark the court lay down 
two negative essentials of a valid trade 
mark, and it is then stated : ' No one can 
claim protection for the exclusive use of 
a trade mark or trade name which would 
practically give him a monopoly in the 
sale of any goods other than those pro- 
duced or made by himself. If he could, 
the public would be injured rather than 
protected, for competition would be de- 
stroyed.'" 

After giving Webster's and Standard 



dictionaries' definition of syrup, the opin- 
ion shows that the word " syrup " is neces- 
sarily qualified by that of the ingredient 
which is predominant in the preparation. 
More authorities are quoted to show that 
the names " fig syrup " and " syrup of 
figs " are not designed to indicate per se 
the owner or producer of the preparation 
and distinguish it from like articles made 
by others, but to indicate quality and 
composition. By their failure to dis- 
tinguish them from like articles made by 
others, they cannot be sustained as valid 
trade names. 

Replying to the second question, the 
court says that if the equities of the par- 
ties are dependent upon the quantity of 
fig juice which enters into their respective 
preparations, they largely preponderate in 
favor of the defendants, as shown by the 
testimony quoted. " It is a condition, 
however,'' continues the opinion, "of 
equitable relief to one who apples for the 
protection of his trade mark that the com- 
plainant should come into court with 
clean hands." 

" There can be no doubt," says the 
court, " either that the complainant's 
preparation is not, in fact, compounded 
of the juice of the fig, but its principle is 
senna, or that its name was adopted and 
is used for the purpose of trading upon 
the popular fallacy that the juice of the 
fig in medicinal doses is an effectual 
remedy for constipation, or that the ordi- 
nary purchaser buys the compound as 
and for the fruit remedy which it is ad- 
vertised and asserted to be. The law 
applicable to this state of facts is as clear 
as their purpose and effect. It will not 
lend its aid to foster the delusion of the 
public, or countenance the deceit." 



Cinchona Gathering in Peru. 

The mountains of Peru form the nat- 
ural home of the cinchona tree, which is 
easily distinguishable from surrounding 
foliage by its beautiful leaves and magni- 
ficent proportions. The trees them- 
selves frequently attain a height of eighty 
feet, are straight as a lance, and covered 
with foliage. The leaves are large and 
of a deep glossy green, relieved by deli- 
cate pink lines. The life of a bark-hunt- 
er is one of constant toil and incessant 
hardship, and his main reliance on his 
long and solitary journeys in search of 
the bark is the coca leaf, which he masti- 
cates for the strengthening and stimulat- 
ing qualities it possesses. Since the days 
of the Incas this coca has been in com- 
mon u.se locally, and it is said that 
among the mountains of Bolivia and 
Peru Indians using coca freely when 
driving pack mules over the roughest 
roads along the Sierras outstrip well- 
mounted horsemen. From thirty to fifty 
grammes are consumed daily, serving 
both as food and stimulant. The cas- 
carillero, constantly using coca, finally 
loses the senses of taste and smell. 
There are many varieties of cinchona, 
which the hunter learns to distinguish 



through the texture and appearance of 
the bark. They are red, white, orange, 
yellow, blue, and gray ; the yellow being 
the finest. Although the pay of the 
quinine-hunter is very small, it suffices to 
meet the simple requirements of himself 
and family, and as a class they are happy 
and contented with their lot. It is a vo- 
cation that is handed down from father 
to son, but despite long years of experi- 
ence, coupled with an intimate knowledge 
of the intricate trails leading to the cin- 
chona tree, the Indian hunters frequently 
lose their lives in the jungles of the wil- 
derness. Occasionally, a number of hunt- 
ers start together as a greater protection 
against disaster. Upon reaching a de- 
sirable spot where the signs of paying 
trees are considered good, preparations 
for camping are at once made, and from 
the tops of the loftiest trees the hunters 
scan the forest, quickly recognizing the 
cinchonas. The task of gathering cin- 
chona bark occupies all the working 
hours between sunrise and sunset. Armed 
with knives and keen-edged hatchets, the 
tree is (juickly felled and the trunk is 
stripped and cleared from all foreign 
growth. This is a task of considerable 
magnitude, frequently requiring days of 
constant labor, the sharp edges of lance- 
like leaves, mingled with thorns and 
briars, lacerating and wounding the hunt- 
er's flesh. The bark, when removed, is 
cut into small curling slips and piled 
up in a convenient spot, where they are 
subjected to a drying process. The thin 
portions of the bark curl up, drying rap- 
idly, while the larger and thicker strips 
retain their shape, and are easily packed 
for transportation. When all is pro- 
nounced ready by the torlego, or head 
hunter of the party, the bark is neatly 
lashed together with plaited grass and 
bound round with broad tough leaves, as 
a protection to the cured bark. The In- 
dians and peons then shoulder their bur- 
dens, often weighing as much as one 
hundred and fifty or two hundred pounds 
— these are kept in position by plaits of 
grass passing round the foreheads of the 
bearers, and are thus carried to market. — ■ 
Journ. Soc. Arts, through Pharmaceutical 
Journal and Transactions. 



Compound Sypup of Hypophosphites. 

The following formula is said by a 
writer in the Western Druggist to yield a 
non-precipitating syrup of fine appear- 
ance: Calcium hypophoshhite, 256 grs.; 
sodium hypophosphite, 128 grs.; potas- 
sium hypophosphite, 128 grs.; manganese 
hypophosphite, t6 grs.; tinct. citro-chlor- 
ide of iron N.F., i oz. ; tinct. nux vomica, 
160 m.; quinine hydrochlorate, 8 grs.; 
sugar, 12 oz.; water to make 16 fl. oz. 
Dissolve the hypophosphites by tritura- 
tion in 6 oz. previously boiled water, dis- 
solve the quinine salts in J^ oz. of warm 
water, mix the two solutions and pour 
over the sugar. Shake well, add the tinc- 
tures and enough water to make 16 fl. oz. 
Again shake, until the sugar is dissolved, 
stand for 24 hours and filter. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



(r/j:\) 



THIS PACKAGE CONTAlN^J^^^^^^^j^ S/>ce/.j/ Notlcc tu nrugirlHts a! Canada. 



I DAVIS 

FLY POISOH FEIiTS 



NEVER FAILS 
Fr*iBs 

INSECTS. 




SUPERSEDES 

POISONS, 

EFFECTIVE 



Reduced Price 

DAVIS' FLY FELTS 



Throa Box Lots, 



only ^ 6.75 



DIRECTIONS. 

riac» OQU of the Kstn opoo ft dmb or jA*^ i kt-cp vti wilb I 

wftU>r. LwtoDly onuntih wfttar k>«oaktb« Fklt. Flieu will dnok I 

tbe po.Runcd wklor off Uiu Fill had dio iDunediktoly, 

j rinooi un <ln oon FBcrmu «a-dc«nB d'an pUt on ftMi««tt« ; tenu- 

' loz huiiiijMfi««odurMLa. OaojiaoulniiientMaozd'aftapoar temiwr | 

! U FiiTus. Loa ii)i:iat;h(M botronl I'efta ompoiBOmoo, nrtlxool da i 

Pectiui ct thoitodL inimodiAtcoioiit. 

CAimOli-— Should tho lii]md bo ^wftllnwod by oooidcDl fti Oiic« I 
kdfninutAr in Iftrncdoara, Liino WaU>r K]ttjr.Mvl Tea.or Iron Bmt, | 
! tcAk>««d by ftD omeUc uid dxiiAa of M ilk or Floor utd Wtttor. 




PRICE 6 CENTS. 



Order through regular supplier. If they do not handle, send order direct 
to manufacturers. 

Davis' Fly Felts are immensely popular and have a large and greatly in- 
creasing sale. 

4 Felts in each package, retail at 5 cents per package, 100 packages in box. 
Each package guaranteed full strength. Dealer's profit, nearly 125%. 



MANUFACTURCD BV 

POWELL & DAVIS CO., CHATHAM, 



Order in 3 box lots, $6.75. 
Sold by all the largest and popular Wholesale Druggists and Patent Medicine dealers in Canada. 

Manufactured only by 

The POW^ELIL & DAVIS Co., Chatbam, Ont. 



Wine of the E:s:tract of Cod Liver 



Sold by all first-class 
Chemists and Druggists 



CHEVRIEI 



General Depot :— PARIS, 
21, Faubourg Montmarte, 21 



This Wine of the Extract of Cod Liver, prepared by M. CHEVRIER, a 6rst-class Chemist of Paris, possesses at the same time the active 
principles of Cod Liver Oil and the therapeutic properties of alcoholic preparations. It is valuable to persons whose stomach cannot retain fatty 
substances. Its eflect, Uke that of Cod Liver Oil, is invaluable in Scrofula, Rickets, Anasmia, Chlorosis, Bronchitis, and all diseases of the Chest. 

Wine of the Extract of Cod Liver witli Creosote 



General Depot :— PARIS. 
21, Faubourg Montmarte, ai 



CHEVRIER 



Sold by all first-claiis 
Chemists and Druggists 



The beech-tree Creosote checks the destructive work of Pulmonary Consumption, as it diminishes expectoration, strengthens the appetite, 
reduces the fever, and suppresses perspiration. Its effect, combined with Cod Liver Oil, makes the Wine of the Extract of Cod Liver with Creosote 
in excellent remedy against pronounced or threatened Consumption. 



Buy 



ADAMS' ROOT BEER 

► Pays Well, Sells Well, and Gives Satisfaction 



RETAIL, I0AND25CTS.; WHOLESALE, 90C. and $1.75 PER DOZ., $10.00 and $20.00 PER GROSS 



Place it on your list and order from your next wholesale representative. 

THE GANADIAH SPECIALTY GOMPAHY 



DOMINION AGENTS 



TORONTO, ONTARIO 



(goB) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



J. S. HAMILTON 

PURE GRAPE BRANDY DISTILLER 

Pelee Island 



Distilled under Excise supervision. 



" J. S. HAMILTON & CO." 

COGNAC 

[n Quarter-Cabks, Octanes, Half-Octanes, and Casks. 



J. S. HAMILTON Sc CO. 

BRANTFORD 

SOLE GENERAL AND EXPORT AGENTS 




JOHN LABATT'S 

Ale AND Stout 



Ten Gold, Silver, and Bronze 
Medals, and Twelve Diplomas 

Awarded at the World's Exhibition of France, 

Australia, United States, Canada, and 

Jamaica, West Indies. 

Highest points on this Continent, and Meda' 
at Chicago, 1893. 

Gold Medal at San Francisco, 1894. 



THEY REFRESH, STIMULATE, AND NOURISH 

. . , RECOMMENDED BY PHYSICIANS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINI 




Bre-wery at London, Ontario, Canada 



W. J. DYAS 



MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 

Chemicals, Druggists' Specialties, 



'*i '♦"< '*x 



Proprietary Medicines 

WAREROOMS and LABORATORY : 

Strathroy, Canada 



Every Drug'gist 
Should Handle Our 

DRUGGIST FAVORITE, 5c. 
^^^ PATTI, IOC. 



Send for Sample Order. 



Fraser & Stirton, 

LONDON, Ont. 



A PERFECT TEA 



MONSOON TEA 

FINEST IN THE WORLD. 
From Tea Plant to Tea Cup in its Native Purity. 

PACKED B-TthFoROWERS 

And sold in the original packages, J4 lb.. 1 lb. and 

5 lb. caddies. 

It your grocer has none, tell him to order from 
STEEL., HAYTER & CO- 

11 and 13 Front Street East, Toronto 



THE OLDEST 



THE BEST 



H.has been Hnawnto ^ the frodf ifingg- iflSya 

"ocMaThm^LmcniSvUt-JfCottDtv 

Trade supplied by all leading Drug Houses in the 
Dominion. 



A DRUGGIST'S SPECIALTY. 

Curtis & Son's 
Yankee Brand 
Pure Spruce Gum 

Is nie«t.iiig with the hucc«sb 
its high quHlities merit. 



A TRIAL ORDER SOLICITED. 



CURTIS & SON 

PORTLAND, ME., U.S.A. 



Piso's Remedy for Catarrh is the 
Best, Easiest to Use, and Cheapest. 



CATARRH 



■ Sold by druggists or sent Ijy mail. M 
60o. E. T. Hazeltine. Warren, l>a. B 



WEBSTER'S 

INTERNA TIONAL 



' Abreast of the Titnes.'' 
A Grand Educator. 



Successor of the 
'* Unabridged.** 

Standard of the 
U. S. Gov't Print- 
ing; Office, the U.S. 
Supreme Court and 
of nearly all the 
Schoolbooks. 

Warmly com- 
mended by every 
State Sujierinten- 
dent of Schools, 
and otlier Educa- 
tors almost ■with- 
out number. 



A College President writes: "For 
ease with which the eye finds the 
^vord sought, for accuracy of deHni- 
'tion, for effective methods in indi- 
' eating pronunciation, for terse yet 
* 4-omprehensive statements of facts, 
' and for practical use as a working 
' dictionary, * Webster's International' 
' excels any other single volume." 




The One Great Standard Authority ^ 

So writes ilon. U. J. Brewer, Justice U. S. 
Supreme Court. 



G, & C. MBRRTAM CO,, Pablisbers, 
SpringGeld, Mass., U.S.A. 

' i&^Senrt to the publishers for free pamphlet. 
_, 0*- Do nut buy cheap reprints of ancient editions. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



01 



Formulary. 



LAVENDER SACHET POWDER. 

Lavemlcr flowers, ground R> j. 

I'owilercil gum benzoin R' /4^- 

Otto of lavender 5 !i- 



KALODANT. 

Dahman's analysis of this po|)ular Par- 
isian dentifrice is considered authoritative, 
and is as follows : 

R. Precipitated carlxinate of lime . grm. 250. 

Calcined magnesia " So. 

Glycerine " 500. 

Medicinal soap " 150. 

Essence of canella " ij. 

Essence of peppermint ** ij. 

It is colored with carmine in a solution 
of carbonate of potash. — [/niversa/ Maga- 
zine. 



CAMPHOR ICE WITH GLYCERINE. 

Spermaceti 5iv. 

Cerce albx ^W. 

Camphor pulv 5iv. 

Sofiii boralis 5ij. 

Stearin S'^^j- 

Glycerin gxxxiij. 

01. lavandulaa lUxxv. 

" limonis nixxv. 

" coryophylli lUxxv. 

*' bergamot "Ixxv. 

Melt the wa.\, spermaceti, and stearin, 
then dissolve the camphor in the warm 
mixture ; mix the borax with the glycer- 
ine, and stir into the hot mixture gradu- 
ally, constantly agitating. Pour into suit- 
able moulds. — American Druggist. 



SMELLING SALTS. 

The Seifensieder Zeitung gives the fol- 
lowing directions for preparing a superior 
article of smellmg salt : 

Ammonium carbonate 120 gni. 

Spirit of ammonia 60 gm. 

Bergamot oil 12 drops. 

Lavender oil 8 drops. 

Oil of cloves 4 drops. 

Neroli oil 4 drops. 

Cinnamon oil 4 drops. 

The ammonium carbonate, which 
should be quite fresh, and in lumps 
about the size of a hazel nut, is put into 
a wide-moutlied jar. The oils and am- 
monii are then mixed and poured into 
the jar, and the stopper at once applied. 
Set aside for two days, at the end of 
which time the ingredients will be found 
to have united in a solid mass. 

If it is desired to prevent this occur- 
rence and have the substance in the shape 
of a dry salt, instead of letting the con- 
tainer reinain quiet, shake it frequently 
and violently every day for a week. The 
salt thus obtained can be easily removed 
from the container, coarsely pulverized, 
and put into little smelling bottles, should 
it be desirable so to do — National Drug- 
gist. 



SOLUTION OF PHOSPHOGLVCERATE. 

Calcium phosphoglycerate to grammes 

Distilled water sufficient to make 1,000 cc. 

Dissolve and filter. 

The solution is not entirely clear, but 
may be made so by the addition of a 
trace of citric acid. 



SVRUP OK CALCIUM PHOSPHOGLYCERATE. 

Calcium phosphoglycerate 10 grammes 

Citric acid I gramme 

( jranulated sugar .610 grammes 

Water 340 grammes 

'l"he salt and acid are dissolved in 
the water, the sugar is added and dis- 
solved without heat ; the product weighs 
about 950 grammes, wliich may be 
brought to the weight of 1,000 grammes 
by the addition of syrup of orange. 



LAUNDRY POWDER. 

The Bayer.-Ind. u. Gew. Bt. recom- 
mends the following : 

Borax 45 parts 

Sodium hyposulphite 5 parts 

Sodium hydroxide 50 part? 

Mix and put up in pound packages. 



SVRUP OF IODIDE OF IRON AND ORANGE. 

The following formula for syrup of fer- 
rous iodide is suggested by O. Girard 
{Bull, com.): Iodine, 4.10 gm. ; iron fil- 
ings, 2 gm. ; distilled water, 10 gm. 
The solution having been prepared as 
directed in the Codex — by placing the 
iron filings and water in a flask, and 
adding the iodine in small quantities at a 
time, and agitating after each addition 
until tlie solution finally acquires a green 
color— it is then mixed with one kilo, of 
the following : Citric acid, 5 gin. ; dis- 
tilled water, 10 gm. ; tincture of orange 
peel, 10 gm. ; simple syrup, q.s., to make 
I kilo. Twenty grammes of the fin- 
ished syrup will contain o. 10 cgm. of 
ferrous iodide. 



COLORLESS SOLUTION OF SHELLAC — AN 
ELEGANT LABEL VARNISH. 

Dissolve 150 gm. of shellac in a litre of 
alcohol by the aid of gentle heat, in a 
water-bath. Stir in about 150 gm. freshly 
burned charcoal and bring the mixture to 
a boil, maintaining it at this temperature 
about ten minutes. Filter a small por- 
tion, and, if not absolutely colorless, add 
a little more charcoal and again boil. 
After again testing, if found to he quite 
free from color, first strain through silk 
(an old pocket handkerchief will answer), 
and subsequently filter through paper. 
The resultant solution, with the addition 
of a little castor oil, to ensure elasticity, 
makes the best varnish for prints, paint- 
ings, etc., that we have ever tried. — 
National Druggist. 



TO WHITEN THE NAILS. 

K Dil. sulphuric acid, 5 ij. 
Tinct. myrrh, 5 j. 
Spring aq. 3 iv. 

Mix well. Wash the nails with soap 
and water, then dip the fingers into the 
wash. — Universal Maeazine. 



media (Starkungs und Er/rischungsmittel), 
suggests the following : 

I'epton 15 parts 

Milk sugar 40 parts 

Cacao-mass 30 parts 

Kola, in powder 25 parts 

Sugar, powdered white 40 parts 

Aromatics 10 parts 

Mix and make into tablets. — National 
Druggist. 



TINCTURE OF LITMUS. 

W. Schaefer, of Alzey, has an article of 
this subject in the Apotheker Zeitung, 
from which we translate as follows : 

Pack the coarsely cut litmus in a per- 
colator and exhaust with cold distilled 
water ; evaporate the extract down ac- 
cording to the weight of the litmus used, 
and to the residue add thrice its weight 
of alcohol of 90°. Acidify strongly with 
hydrochloric acid and set aside for two 
days. Nitrolitmin (azolitmin) falls in the 
shape of a brown fiocky precipitate, while 
the muddy violet coloring matter of the 
litmus remains in solution in the alco- 
holic fluid. Collect the precipitate on a 
smooth filter, wash in acidified hot water 
two or three times, or until the waste 
water, on treatment with ammonia, strikes 
a pure blue, without a trace of violet. 
Let the azolitmin remain upon the filter, 
and dissolve it with distilled w\ater carry- 
ing a small percentage of ammonia. Add 
distilled water to the filtrate suflScient to 
make a total solution equal to 3}^ times 
the weight of litmus originally used. 
Neutralize very exactly, and add, to in 
sure its preservation, 10 percent, of alco- 
hol of 90*'. Such a tincture leaves abso- 
lutely nothing to be desired, either by 
apothecary or chemist. — National Drug- 
gist. 



Antidiphthepitie Pastilles. 

Dr. A. Rose {Med. Record, Am. Medico- 
Surg. Bull.). As our control of the 
course of diphtheria is still very limited, 
we should welcome every suggestion of 
means of guarding against diphtheritic 
infection. We all know that a healthy 
pharynx is of importance, and that this 
organ, like the mouth, should be kept in 
an aseptic condition. For this purpose 
the author suggests either the pastilles 
used by himself, or those recommended 
by Dr. J. Bergmann (under the name of 
" Diphthericide "), and urges that they be 
" given to the little ones going to school 
in place of candy or chewing gum." For- 
mula; for the two kinds of pastilles are as 
follows ; 

Rose: Resin Guaiac, 0.75 gm.: Sac- 
charin, o.oi gm.; Sugar and Extr. Licor- 
ice, 0.75 gm. 

Bergmann: Thymol, o.oo2gm.; Sodium 
Benzoate, 0.020 gm.; Saccharin, 0.015 
gm ; Mucilage, q.s. 



KOLAPEPTON" TABLETS. 

Ludwig Bernegau, in a series of for- 
mula; for strengthening and refreshing 



Hoffman's anodyne. Dr. Hare says, is 
the best drug known for the relief of de- 
pression from smoking. 



92 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Photograph ic Notes 

The Prophecy of Photography. — 
A correspondent of the American Journal 
of Photography has unearthed the follow- 
ing anticipatory view of photography from 
a fable published in Amsterdam, in 1690: 
" There was no painter in all the country, 
but when they wished the portrait of a 
friend or a picture representing some 
lovely landscape, or other object, they 
put water into large basins of gold and 
silver, and made this water face the ob- 
ject they wished to paint. Very soon 
this water would congeal, and become as 
the face of a mirror, where the image 
dwelt ineffaceably. This could be car- 
ried wherever one pleased, and gave as 
faithful a picture as any mirror." 

Developers for Bromide Papers. — 
Hesekiel & Co. recommend the following 
developer for their "grain" bromide 

paper : 

Solution I. Potassium oxalate, 3 oz ; water, 
10 oz. 

" II. Iron sulphate, 30Z. ; water, 10 oz. 

" III. Potassium bromide, i oz. ; water, 
10 oz. 
For use mix six parts (?oz.) of I. with 
one part of II., add a few drops of III. 
to obtain extra brilliancy, and then water, 
5 oz. After developing, put the prints 
in a clearing solution (acetic acid, i dr.; 
water, 32 oz.), rinse and fix (hypo., 4 oz., 
water, 20 oz.). Another good developer 
is a I per cent, solution of rodinal, with a 
few drops of potassium bromide solution 
as required. After developing, rinse and 
fix in hypo, solution as above, treating for 
ten minutes. — Pharmaceutical Journal 
and Transactions. 



Intensifying Formul,-e — Mercury 
AND Ammonia. 

Mercuric chloride, pulv. . . . "'i ounce. 

Hydrochloric acid (slrong) . 60 minims. 

Water (hot) 20 ounces. 

Use when cold. This solution keeps 
indefinitely. 

The negative must be perfectly fixed 
and washed, and allowed to remain in 
the above solution until bleached. Wash 
for ten minutes in running water, and 
then blacken by immersion for two min- 
utes in 

Ammonia 4 drams. 

Water 10 ounces. 

Afterwards wash for ten minutes in 
running water. 

Brown stain indicates imperfect wash- 
ing. Semi-opaque patches, which show 
white or grayish white on examining glass 
side of negative by reflected light, are due 
to imperfect fixation. 

If the opacity is found to be too great 
after the intensification, the negative may 
be reduced by an immersion in a solution 
of sodium thiosulphite (hypo.), i ounce 
to water 20 ounces. The reduction takes 
place quickly ; when sufficiently done, 
wash well in running water. Local reduc- 
tion may be effected by applying the 
hypo, solution by cotton-wool to the too 
opaque portion. — Photography. 



after thi.s treatment, may be easily strength- 
ened. — M. Goislin, in Archiv. 



Printed Lantern Slides. — Prof. W. 
J. Waggener, of the State University of 
Colorado, makes a valuable suggestion 
in regard to the production of lantern 
slides. He finds that with an ordinary 
printing press and engraved blocks, all 
kinds of pictures and diagrams may be 
printed upon sheets of transparent gela- 
tin in the same way that they are now 
impressed upon paper. The prints thus 
made are ready for use as lantern slides 
without any further preparation, and in 
the majority of cases these gelatin prints, 
which can be produced for a few cents, 
will be found quite as useful as the expen- 
sive photographs on glass now in general 
use. 

Photographing Glass Vessels. — 
For the photographing of engraved glass 
vessels, the following method is recom- 
mended in Die Photographic. In order 
to reduce the vigor of the impression of 
the back surface, the front side of the 
glass should be rubbed with powdered 
talc and lightly dusted with a soft cloth, 
so as to leave the talc only on the etched 
or engraved portion. The vessel should 
then be filled with a very dilute solution 
of permanganate of potash. After such 
treatment, a photograph showing a clear 
impresssion of the etching or engraving 
may readily be oh\.?i\x\^A.— Photography. 



Mounting Gelatin Prints. — It is 
pointed out that paraffined paper is good 
for rubbing down the prints when mount- 
ing, or gutta percha tissue inay be used 
for the same purpose. The film wants 
hardening ; if this is secured by the use 
of alum the mounting may be more easily 
conducted. Some persons advise that 
the mountant should be spread on the 
card, and not on the print. When washed 
place the print face downwards on a sheet 
of glass, one on top of the other ; then 
drain. The top print is then brushed 
over the back with strong starch paste, 
not quite cold. The print is then lifted 
and placed loosely in its proper place on 
the mount. Another print is similarly 
treated, and when that is in position the 
first print is finally smoothed down on 
the mount with a fine soft sponge, well 
damped with water. This washes the 
superfluous paste off the edges at the 
same time. The sponge is then squeezed 
dry, and the print is wiped dry with it. 
Blotting paper should never be used. 
Prints so mounted look clean, and never 
come off if the paste is of the right con- 
sistency. — I holography. 



Reduction of Negative. — The nega- 
tive is plunged into water for thirty min- 
utes, and then carried to a bath com- 
posed of 

Water loo c. c. 

Sulphuric acid 4 c. c. 

Solutionof bichromate of potash, 3pc. 6 c. c. 

This solution being very energetic, it is 
important to watch carefully its action on 
the negatives ; the reduction takes plate 
in uniform manner, and the plate is not 
spotted, as sometimes happens with the 
other known reducers. The negatives. 



The Amateur Photographer. 

The Spatula, in speaking of the hand- 
ling of photographic supplies, says : How 
many there are belonging to this restless 
army of amateur photographers, it is im- 
possible to discover ; but it is known that 
more than half a million cameras have 
been sold in the United States alone dur- 
ing the last few years, and the demand is 
anticipated to be, during the coming sea- 
son, greater than ever. 

The money spent by this host during 
a year must amount to many millions of 
dollars, for its members, as a rule, belong 
to that inuch-to-be envied class of families 
the heads of which are at present reluc- 
tantly figuring up their income tax. The 
druggist, as we have before suggested, is 
the proper medium through which a large 
proportion of this vast amount of money 
should reach the manufacturer. His 
knowledge of chemistry, and his knowl- 
edge of photography, the latter of which 
he should possess if he doesn't, make him 
especially well adapted for dealing in the 
supplies of which the amateur is con- 
stantly in want. Why should a person 
have to go to a hardware, stationery, or 
grocery store for " soda acid sulphite," if 
he happens to want it for photographic 
purposes ? Suppose he should want to 
know something about the chemical, what 
could the grocery clerk tell him ? 

Not only are the chemicals proper 
stock for a druggist, but so also are the 
films, plates, papers, glasses, and all the 
other paraphernalia used by the photogra- 
pher. In case he chose to do so, it might, 
perhaps, in some cases be well to draw 
the line at cameras, tripods, and expen- 
sive lenses, and yet, even in these, if sold 
by order or on cominission, there will be 
found in most cases a profit large enough 
to more than pay for the extra trouble. 

The department stores and the grocery 
emporiums have stolen so much of the 
proprietary trade that by divine right be- 
longs to the pharmacist, it is only fair and 
good business policy for him to keep on 
the lookout for something to take its 
place. At present there is nothing else 
on the horizon which so legitimately be- 
longs to him as does the line of goods we 
have mentioned. They are in great part 
chemicals, are neat and clean to handle, 
are in gooddemand,and offeragood profit. 
Where there is possibly sufficient trade 
to warrant it, it would be a good idea to 
fit up a part of the store especially for the 
display and sale of these goods. The 
method of doing this would depend upon, 
the judgment and taste of the druggist. 
We would, however, advise that he be as 
generous as possible, and, if practicable, 
have a small room which might be used 
as a sort of headquarters for the amateurs, 
and in which they could do some of their 
work. A small space could easily be par- 
titioned off and made into a dark room. 
This would win the eternal gratitude of 
all the amateurs for miles around. 



CANADIAN l)RU(j{iIST. 



(r)2.\) 



<;«l,l> Ifli:i»\l. TO AiTIA'I'I'.riC l'IIOT<M;iHI'lirKS. (Oi'KN to thk Woki.u) 



DARLINGTON'S 



" Nothing better could be wished for." 

—British Weekly. 

" Far superior to ordinary guides." 

— London Daily Ck. 



"Sir Henry I'onsonliy is commanded l>y the 
(,)ueen to thank Mr. Darlington for a copy of 
his Handbook." 



HANDBOOKS 



Kililt'tl by KAI.PII l>AIEI.I.\<JTON, T.K.iii.^. is. e.-ich. Illustrated. Maps by John Bartholo.mew, K.k.G.S. 

Bournemouth and the New Forest. The Isle of Wight. The Channel Islands. 

Aberystwith, Barmouth and Cardigan Bay. The Vale of Llangollen. The North Wales Coast. 

Crown Svo., cloth, 2s. - - . - . The Birds, Wild Flowers, Ferns, Mosses, and Grasses of North Wales. 

Llanhollen — Darlington & Co. London—W. J. Adams & Sons. 



IF YOU USE THE 

Red Star Toothwasli Bottle 

You will beat your neighbor, as 
no other approaches it 
for beauty. 
Scant 2 oz. (looks like a 3 oz) com- 
plete open crown sprinkler at $7.83 
net per gross. Sample sent on re- 
ceipt of 5 cents to pay postage. 

T. C. Wheaton & Co., Millville, 
N.J., manufacturers of Flint, Green 
and Amber ware, and the largest 
factors of Homeo. Vials in the 
world. 

Baylis Manufacturing Co. 

16 to 30 Nazareth Street, 
MONTREAL 



IMPORTERS OF 

Linseed Oil 
Turpentine 
Castor Oil 
Paris Green 
Glues 



WRITE 

FOR 

QUOTATIONS 



DRUG STORE FITTINGS 



A SPECIALTY. 



DRUGGISTS about to remodel their stores, 
or fit up new buildings, will find it to their 
advantage to write us for designs and estimates. 
We have something new and original for each 
customer. 



THE 



CANADIAN OFFICE AND SCHOOL 
FURNITURE CO., Ltd. 

PRESTON, - ONTARIO. 



RUBBER 
GOODS 

AT RIGHT PRICES 

OUR LINE OF 

ENEMAS, TUBING, FOUNTAINS. 

ATOMIZERS, is Vfry ccMii|)lL-le and 
prices light. Buyers can eilcct great 
saving by placing orders with us. 



SURE SELLING SPECIALTIES: 

CARSON'S BITTERS 

PECTORIA 

SILVER CREAM 

ALLAN'S COUGH CANDIES 

i j;ross ISoxes at .'S'l per Hnx. 

SOAP BARK 

In .'>c. Packages, \ gross Box, !Sl 
per Box. 

Full lines of Sundries. 

Mail orders promptly executed. 



ALLAN &, GO. 

53 FRONT ST.EAST, TORONTO 

Wm. Radam's 

MICROBE 
KILLER . . 



WILLIAM ELLIS 

Sole Manufacturer for the Pro- 
vinces of Ontario and Quebec. 

(The factory having been removed from Toronto.) 



SOLD BY ALL WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS. 



HEAU OFFICE AND FACTOKT : 

98 DUNDAS ST., 

LONDON, ONT. 



OUR SPECIALTIES 



IT PAYS TO HANDLE 

Le Vido 

Water of Beauty. 

A true specific for all 
Skin I>isea»eH, 

BECAUSE 

It gives satisfaction to your 
customers. 

It is a reliable, safe, and sure 
preparation. 

It has been on the market 
for 25 years. 

It is handsomely put up and 
extensively advertised. 

It gives you a fair profit. 

Order now through 
your jobber. 



Boulanger's Cream 

Emulsion. 
Dozen Sold at 

S4.OO 50c. 

"Le Vide'" Water 

of Beauty. 
Dozen Sold at 

$7.00 Si. 00 

Dr. Scott's Pile 

Cure. 

Dozen Sold at 

£1 50 25c. 

Injection Wattan. 
Dozen Sold at 

$5.00 75c. 

Dermatonic Com- 
plexion Powder. 
Dozen Sold at 

Si. 75 25c. 



THE MONTREAL CHEMICAL CO., 
MONTREAL 

Laboratory, 
St. Johns, Quebec. 



BRAYLEY, SONS & GO. 

Wholesale Patent Medicines 

43 and 45 William Street, - MONTREAL. 



OUR SPECIALTIES: 

TURKISH DYES. 

DR. WILSON'S HERBINE BITTERS. 



Sole Ppoppietops of the following ; 

Dow's Sturgeon Oil Liniment 

Gray's Anodyne Liniment 

Dr. Wilson's Antibilious Pills 

Dr. Wilson's Persian Salve 
Dr. Wilson's Itch Ointment 

Dr. Wilson's Sarsaparillian Elixir 
French Magnetic Oil 

Dr. Wilson's Worm Lozenges 
Dr. Wilson's Pulmonary Cherry Balsam 

Dr. Wilson's Cramp and Pain Reliever 

Dr. Wilson's Dead Shot Worm Sticks 

Nurse Wilson's Soothing Syrup 
Clark Derby's Condition Powders 
Wright's Vermifuge 

Robert's Eye Water 

Hurd's Hair Vitaliier 
Dr. Howard's Quinine Wine 

Dr. Howard's Beef, Iron and Wine 
Strong's Summer Cure 

Dr. Howard's Cod Liver Oil Emulsion 



W2B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



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WRITTEN BY EXPERTS 




Manual of Formulas. 



&1.50 J-'OST FREE. 

More than i,ooo reliable formula connected with 
i'l every department of modern pharmacy, carefully 
arranged for ready reference. Indispensable to chemists. 



Minor Ailments. 

9i.no I^aST FREE. 

]")lRECTION.S for treatment of the slight afiections, 
^ accidents, etc., daily brought under the notice of 
the "counter prescriber." The most modern and eflect- 
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proved remedies pointed out. Produced under the 
direction of an experienced medical practitioner. 



Practical Dispensing. 

ILLUSTRATED, 50c. F'OST FREE. 

CONCISE but lucid treatise on the subject specially de- 
signed for students. Preparation of mixtures, pills, 
emulsions, suppositories, also plaster spreading and pill 
coating, etc. , carefully described and illustrated. Detailed 
directions for preparation of poultices, and of nutritive 
diet for invalids. 




A Synopsis of the British 

Pharmacopoeia Preparations. 

Bv Chas. F. Heebner, Ph G., Ph.M.B. 
91.00 1XTERLEA.VED. 

1'IIE object of this work is to furnish, in a most con- 
venient manner, a method for the study of the official 
preparations as to their Latin and English titles and 
synonyms, their composition, methods of preparation, 
strength, doses, etc., arranged in classes. 

This book will be found an invaluable aid to appren- 
tices and students in pharmacy or medicine. 



Practical Dentistry. 

50c. POST FREE. 

'The main features of the surgical and mechanical 
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Manual of Pharmacy and 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

By Chas. F. IIeebnek, Ph.G., Ph.M.B., 

Dean of the Ontario College of Pharmacy, and formerly Instructor 

in Theory and Practice of Pharmacy in the New 

York College of Pharmacy. 

Cloth-Bound, ISmo., U32 p/)., SS.OO 

The study of Pharmacy simplified by a systematic and 
■^ practical arrangement of topics, and the elimination 
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CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



93 



Show-Bottle Colors. 

The following formuUi;, many of which 
are new, are reprinted from the IVesUrn 
Dnii^gist : 

Crimson. — Iodine, 120 gr. ; potassium 
iodide, 120 gr. ; hydrochloric acid, 2 fl. 
oz. ; water, i gal. To the iodine and 
iodide of potassium contained in a mortar 
add 8 ozs. of water and make a solution. 
Acidulate the remainder of the water with 
the liydrochloric acid and mi.\ both solu- 
tions. In the event of the bottles bemg 
ex[)osed to extreme cold it is advisable to 
add 10 per cent, of alcohol, leavin;; out 
an equivalent amount of water. 

Scarlet. — .\mmonia water, 16 fl. oz. ; 
acetic acid, 32 fl. oz. ; alcohol, 16 fl. oz. ; 
tincture of ferric chloride, 4 fl. oz. ; dis- 
tilled water, enough to make i gallon. 
.Add the acetic acid to the ammonia 
water, shake thoroughly, and add the 
alcohc)!. Mix the tincture of chloride of 
iron with the water, and to the solution 
so formed add the ■ first solution of am- 
monia, water, alcohol, and acetic acid. 

Crimson, No. 2. — .Alkanet root, 16 av. 
oz. ; oil of turpentine, i gal. 

Dark Red. — Potassium iodide, 640 gr. ; 
alum, 64 gr. ; water, i gal. 

Red. — Cobalt carbonate, 30 gr. ; hydro- 
chloric acid and ammonium carbonate, of 
each sufficient ; water, i gal. Dissolve 
the cobalt in hydrochloric acid, dilute 
with the water, then add of concentrated 
solution of ammonium carbonate enough 
to produce the proper tint. 

Fink. — Cobalt oxide, 2 av. oz. ; nitric 
acid, c. p., I av. oz. ; hydrochloric acid, 
c. p., I av. oz. Dissolve and add : Strong- 
er water of ammonia, 6 fl. oz. ; water, 3 
gals. ; sulphuric acid, c. p., i av. oz. Set 
aside for one month. Properly prepared, 
this is claimed to furnish a splendid pink 
liquid. 

Pink, No. 2. — Cobalt oxide, 60 gr. ; 
nitric acid, 6 fl. oz. ; water, i gal. 

Garnet. — Potassium bichromate, 10 
dr. ; sulphuric acid, 10 fl. dr. ; water, 20 
fl. oz. Dissolve the bichromate in the 
water, and then add slowly and with con- 
stant stirring the whole of the sulphuric 
acid. Then add : .Alcohol, Y^ fl. oz. ; 
water, enough to make one i gallon. By 
lamplight this fluid shines garnet, while 
in daylight it appears a deep mauve green. 
Vi'det. — Cudbear, 60 gr. to 2 av. oz. ; 
ammonia water, 4 fl. oz. to 8 fl. oz. ; 
water, i gal. Macerate for 24 hours. 

Furfile. — Verdigris, 640 gr. ; water of 
ammonia, av. oz. ; water, i gal. 

Brilliant Purple. — Copper sulphate, 7 
parts ; water, 52 parts ; French gelatin, 4 
parts; boiling water, 52 parts; solution 
of potassa, 985 parts. (Taking grains 
this makes approximately 2 fluid ounces.) 
Dissolve the copper sulphate in the water 
and the gelatin in the hot water, mix the 
two solutions, and add the solution of 
potassa ; shake the mixture occasionally 
during 10 hours, then decant and dilute 
with enough water to make the desired 
tint. 

Orange. — Potassium bichromate, 4 av. 
oz. ; nitric acid, i av, oz. ; water, i gal. 



(Or dissolve 64 grains of chromic acid in 
I gallon of water.) 

Amber. — Dragon's blood, i part ; sul- 
phuric acid, 4 parts ; water, 3,629 parts. 
Macerate the powdered dragon's blood 
in the acid for 20 to 30 minutes, then 
add the water. 

Straw or Lemon Yellow. — Potassium 
bichromate, 6 av. oz. ; sodium bicarbon- 
ate, 6 dr. ; water, i gal. 

Pea Green. — Nickel, 120 gr. ; nitric 
acid, I fl. oz. ; potassium bichromate, 120 
gr. ; water, 1 gal. 

Olive Green. — Ferric oxide, i av. oz. ; 
hydrochloric acid, 4 fl. oz. ; copper sul- 
phate, 8 av. oz. 

Dark Green. — Copper sulphate, i av. 
oz. ; ammonia water, 4 fl. oz. ; potassium 
bichromate, enougii to produce the de- 
sired tint ; water, i gal. 

Emerald Green. — Nickel, 85 parts ; 
hydrochloric acid, 132 parts ; nxKxous 
acid, J5 parts ; water, enough to make 
4,000 parts (all by weight). Dissolve the 
nickel in the hydrochloric acid, then add 
the water, and finally the nitrous acid. 

Grass Green. — Copper sulphate, 35 
parts ; ammonium chloride, 35 parts ; 
water, 930 parts. Add the salammoniac 
to the copper solution. 

Sea Green. — Copper acetate, 4 parts ; 
acetic acid, 36 parts ; water, 960 parts. 
Triturate the copper acetate with the 
acetic acid, gradually adding the water. 

Pale Blue. — Copper sulphate, 16 av. 
oz. ; sulphuric acid, 2 av. oz. ; water, i 
gal. Dissolve the copper sulphate in the 
water containing the acid. 

Blue. — Copper sulphate, 28 parts ; 
alum, 28 parts ; sulphuric acid, 26 parts ; 
water, 946 parts. Gradually add the acid 
to the water containing the salts. 

Purple Blue. — Copper sulphate, i av. 
oz. ; ammonia water, 4 fl. oz. ; water, 3 
gals. 

Any of the water-so'.uble aniline dyes 
may be employed, but they fade rapidly 
in the light. 

To prevent freezing about 20 per cent, 
of glycerin or alcohol must be added to 
the solutions, excepting those containing 
free chromic acid. 



The Conceited Student. 

The conceited student is a misguided 
youth with a head several sizes too large 
for him. He comes up to his pharmacy 
college flushed and important from his 
school successes, and swollen with the 
flattery of his sisters and provincial aunts. 
Provincial aunts exude adulation in di- 
rect ratio to their absorption of afternoon 
tea. They tell him that he is destined 
to be a great man, and he believes them 
with all the force of his inexperience. 
He proceeds to show his superiority by 
saying something disrespectful about the 
atomic theory. His emphatic statement 
that it is all rot stamps him among his 
fellow-students as a daring and original 
genius. Their silence encourages him to 
take a rise out of the periodic law. They 
do not comment on this either. His easy 



faifliliarity with every department of 
knowledge seems to form a mystic aureole 
around him, through which the ignorant 
cannot, and the wise do not trouble to, 
penetrate. He is cocksure of everything. 
He never condescends to learn anything; 
as he can always teach, this seems un- 
necessary to him. 

He is most at home in the rostrum of 
the lecturer, whence he distributes nug- 
gets of information with the condescension 
of those who know little that is not super- 
ficial. His opinion is deemed so valuable 
that it is often sought by those who know 
more about their subject than he. His 
belief in his own omniscience is so sincere 
that his sincerity passes for omniscience. 
Nothing is too insignificant a target for 
his learning to make flying shots at. If 
he misses his mark, the bombast of his 
manner forms a smoke-cloud that screens 
his failure from inquiring eyes. He 
speaks much, and is not prevented from 
astonishing the world by the restraining 
knowledge of his own incompetence. 
When demonstrators detect the base ring 
in his coinage, he argues familiarly with 
them, and puts them right when they have 
not strayed from the straight path. When 
they grow sick. of his impertinences and 
leave him to himself, he forthwith informs 
his neighbors that he has taught those 
conceited gentlemen to respect his 
opinion. They, the demonstrators, are 
mere figureheads, who can only hold their 
own by not contesting points with men, 
like himself, who are up to most moves 
on the chemical board. He then lounges 
across the laboratory to tell the quiet 
young man who is going to sweep the 
medals of his session how to make sul- 
phuretted hydrogen in a test tube by 
adding diluted sulphuric to crystals of 
ferrous sulphate. When, partly by over- 
looking the notes of his neighbor in the 
chemistry class, he manages to write the 
equation of the purification of chloride of 
zinc from impurities of iron and lead, he 
rejoices like a hen that has laid her 
first egg, and is a most distressing 
nuisance while his cackling enthusiasm 
lasts. 

Very, very rarely will he confess that 
facts have slipped his memory, but he 
never forgets anything. If, when he can- 
not call something to mind, you tell him 
what it is, he remembers it at once. Al- 
though he is so very clever, the examin- 
ers soon discover his incompetence, and 
politely remind him that three months' 
further reading would not be without 
benefit to him. Then he goes off in a 
huff" to his acquaintances and his provin- 
cial aunts, and tells them of the gross 
ignorance of one of the e.xaminers, and 
how he was really compelled to set that 
worthy right. This so annoyed the ex- 
aminer that that gentleman ploughed 
him, just out of spite, you know. His 
provincial aunts believe him, and after he 
has told the tale a few times he believes 
it himself, and feels that he has been 
grievously wronged. Should he manage 
to qualify later on, he is short-sighted 
enough to attempt a puny revenge by 



94 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



refusing to join the corporation ttiat looks 
after his interests. This need not he a 
matter for surprise. Even men of his 
calibre can soar to the dizziest heights of 
consistency. — Studeii* Series in Chemist 
and Drui'i'ist. 



Proposed Regulation of Patents. 

A bill has been introduced in the 
United States House of Representatives 
in which it is proposed to create a board 
of chemical and meilical experts, who 
shall have power to fix the standards of 
all drugs and medicines. It also pro- 
vides that this board shall have power to 
grant licenses to manufacture any patent 
or proprietary medicine, and all such 
licensees shall pay ninety-six dollars per 
annum for such license. 

Each box, package, bottle, or vial 
used for putting up a patent medicine 
will be required to bear a revenue stamp 
equal to 5 per cent, of the retail price of 
the article, and failure to attach such 
stamp is punishable by a fine of $100. 
All proprietary articles shall be submitted 
to the Board for Fixing the Standard of 
Drugs and Medicines, and if pronounced 
healthful shall be permitted to he sold. 
No formula of any medicine shall be 
made public by the board unless it is 
found by chemical analysis that the 
article is not made in accordance with 
the formula submitted, but, if the stand- 
ard is not as represented, "the formula 
shall be published and the fraud ex- 
posed." Any officer improperly divulg- 
ing his official knowledge shall be pun- 
ished by a fine of from $500 to $2,500, 
and imprisonment of from one to ten 
years. 

It is also provided that no prescription 
by a physician shall be considered a pro- 
prietary drug or medicine unless sold 
under a proprietary brand ; and that no 
retail or wholesale druggist putting up 
physicians' prescriptions shall be consid- 
ered as subject to the license provided 
for, unless they shall also put up proprie- 
tary articles, by which is meant " all ar- 
ticles of drug and medicine manufactured 
and exposed for sale with the name of 
any individual firm or corporation at- 
tached thereto or printed thereon, or 
any article of drug, medicine, cosmetic, 
perfumery, or any article prepared there- 
from and sold under a patent or proprie- 
tary brand." 

The promoter of the bill states that 
the object of his proposed measure is for 
revenue purposes, and not for the pur- 
pose of aiming at the patent medicine 
manufacturers. 



Determination of the Purity of 
Liquids. 

Having been engaged in purifying a 
number of pharmaceutical products, R. 
Pictet has sought for some definite means 
of ascertaining their purity, and finds that 
in the case of liquids the direct observa- 
tion of the temperature of their critical 
points affords a very sensitive test {Comp. 



rend., cxx., 43). This temperature varies 
from ten to sixty times more than that of 
the boiling point in the case of a given 
liquid under similar conditions. The 
method adopted was to take a series of 
very pure liquids and determine their 
boiling points, noting the height of the 
barometer, and then to determine the 
critical points by means of a sensitive 
thermometer. A few drops of alcohol, 
aldehyde, water, etc., were then added to 
the pure liquids, and the boiling and 
critical points again observed. A tube of 
5 mm. external diameter, 3 mm. internal 
diameter, and 45 to 50 mm. long, 
was filled with the liquid under examina- 
tion. A portion of the contents was 
then evaporated, and the tube sealed by 
means of the Dlow-pipe, so that it was 
one-third full of liquid, and the remain- 
ing space occupied by saturated vapors. 
The tube was next placed obliquely in a 
small rack, side by side with a very sensi- 
tive thermometer, in the centre of a thin 
sheet-iron cylinder having two openings 
fitted with mica. A similar, larger cylin- 
der surrounded this, and was warmed 
from below by a multiple gas flame, the 
current of heated air passing through a 
siries of wire gauze partitions which 
divided the enveloping space. The whole 
apparatus was finally enclosed in a third 
sheet-iron cylinder, covered with asbestos, 
and arranged so that the tubes could be 
readily observed through the three pairs 
of windows. The stem of the thermome- 
ter passed through openings in the three 
cylinders, and it was possible to note dis- 
tinctly the tenth of a degree. Chloro- 
form, chlorethyl, and pental were the 
liquids exaniined. The temperature was 
first allowed to rise slowly to the criti- 
cal point, when the meniscus suddenly 
disappeared, and very characteristic gyra- 
tory movements were visible throughout 
the length of the tube. The temperature 
was then gradually lowered until the 
transparent interior of the tube became 
suddenly opaque, the minute particles of 
liquid collecting at the bottom, and the 
meniscus reappearing. On warming 
again, and after several trials, a tempera- 
ture was found at which within one tenth 
of a degree the meniscus was observed to 
disappear and the mist become visible. 
This mean temperature is that given as 
the critical point in the following table : 

Critical Differ- DiHerence 
point. ence. in b. p. 

Chloroform, pure . . . 258°. S"! 

Chloroform mixed ,„ „ „o , , „o , 

... r 1 --S-0 -0.1 too. 2 

with a few drops -> 

of .nlcohol 255°. oj 

Chlorethyl, pure... 181° o^ 

Chlorethyl mixed I , a- „ , „■= a 

wuh a few drops 

of alcohol i87°.oj 

Pental, pure 2oi°.2S 

I'ental mixed with a I _ ,' 7 ^-'o" 

few drops of aide- | '' ^ " 

hyde I99°-5J 

In taking the boiling point it was found 
necessary always to immerse the ther- 
mometer to a uniform depth at the same 
place, the same vessel being employed 
and heated by a flame of uniform power. 
The addition to a liquid of others more 



volatile and readily soluble lowered the 
temperature, as when aldehyde was added 
to pental. On the other hand, the addi- 
tion to chloroform, boiling at 61°, of the 
less volatile alcohol equally lowered the 
temperature of the critical point. Chlor- 
ethyl, which boils at -f u", had its criti- 
cal point raised 6'^ by the addition of 
alcohol, which boils at 78°. 8. It is dif- 
ficult, therefore, to deduce a natural law. — 
Pharmaceutical Journal and Transactions. 



Alkaloids and Alkaloidal Salts. 

We are in receipt of a chart compiled 
by Albert N. Doershuk, Ph.G., Kansas 
City, Mo., which is of undoubted value 
for druggists and drug clerks. It is a 
compilation of "The Alkaloids, Alka- 
loidal Salts, and Neutral Principles of the 
United States Pharmacopoeia, 1890." 
The official Latin and Enghsh titles and 
English synonym are given, together with 
the origin, physical description, chemical 
composition, degrees of solubility, doses, 
etc. Anv of our subscribers who desire a 
copy may obtain one, postpaid, by writing 
to the National Druggist, St. Louis, Mo., 
who publish it as a supplement. 



He who gargles with guaiac will pre- 
vent or abort a tonsillitis. 

Remember that physiological rest is 
the first principle in the cure of all 
diseases. 



Our Latest Importations. 



ALUM, in bbls. 
ALUM POWDERED, in libls. 
FINEST EPSOM SALTS, in bbls. 
FINEST SUBLIMED SULPHUR, in bbls. 
ROLL SULPHUR, in bbls. 
CHLORIDE LIME, in casks. 
SALTPETRE CRYSTALS, in kegs. 
SALTPETRE POWDERED, in casks. 
POWDERED HELLEBORE, in bbls. 
GLYCERINE, in tins. 
WHITE CASTILE SOAP, bars. 
WHITE CASTILE SOAP, cakes. 
PARIS GREEN, in casks and drums. 
GIBSON'S CANDIES, full assortment. 

Your orders Solicited. 

Jas. A. Kennedy & Co. 

INIPORTKRS, 
LONDON, - ONTARIO. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



frj4A) 




NEAV PERFUMES 



TOILET WATER ASSORTMENT. 



VIOLET. 
ROSE, 
HELIOTROPE, 
LAVENDER, 
ORANGE, 
LILAC, 
MAGNOLIA. 



i 



SWEET MIGNONETTE, 

LILLIAN RUSSELL, 

MARIPOSA LILY, 

MAGNOLIA BLOSSOM. 

THESE NEW PRODUCTS OF OUR LABORATORY ARE 
VERY LASTING AND FRAGRANT. 



and S oi. fullct Wjfor. 



Seely Manufnctiirin^ CompanY^ 



nBTROIT, MICHIGAS. 



ESTABLISHED lA' 1862. 



WIXDSOR, ONTARIO. 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST PRICES CURRENT 

Corrected to April 10th, 1895. 



The quotations given represent average prices for 
quantities usually pui chased by Retail Dealers. 
Larger parcels may be obtained at lower figures, 
but quantities smaller than those named will 
command an advance. 

Alcohol, gal $4 05 $4 25 

Methyl 190 200 

Allsi'Ice, lb 13 15 

Powdered, lb 15 17 

Aloin, oz 40 45 

Anodyne, Hoffman's bot., lbs. . . 50 55 

.Vrrowroot, Bermuda, lb 45 50 

St. \incent, lb 15 18 

B.^LSAM, Fir, 11) 40 45 

Copaiba, lb 65 75 

Peru, lb 375 400 

Tolu, can or less, lb 65 75 

Bark, Barberry, lb 22 25 

Kayberry, lb 15 iS 

Buckthorn, lb 15 17 

Canella, lb 15 17 

Cascara, Sagrada 25 ^o 

Cascarilla, select, lb 18 20 

Cassia, in mats, lb 18 20 

Cinchona, red, lb 60 65 

Powdered, lb 65 70 

Yellow, lb 35 40 

Pale, lb 40 45 

Elm, selected, lb 20 21 

Ground, lb 17 20 

Powdered, lb 20 28 

Hemlock, crushed, lb iS 20 

Oak, white, crushed lb 15 17 

Orange peel, bitter, lb. . . . 15 16 

Prickly ash, lb 35 40 

Sassafras, lb 15 16 

Soap (quillaya), lb 13 15 

Wild cherry, lb 13 15 

Beans, Calabar, lb 45 50 

Tonka, lb I 50 2 75 

Vanilla, lb 600 750 

Bf.rriks, Cubeb, sifted, lb 30 35 

powdered, lb. .. 35 40 

Juniper, lb 7 10 

Ground, lb 12 14 

Prickly ash, lb 40 45 

Buds, Balm o( Gilead, lb 55 60 

Cassia, lb 25 30 

Butter, Cacao, lb 75 80 

Camphor, lb 60 68 

Canthariues, Russian, lb i 40 i 50 

Powdered, lb '5° I 60 

Capsicum, lb 25 30 



Powdered, lb $ 

Carbon, Bisulphide, lb 

Carmine, No. 40, oz 

Castor, Fibre, lb 20 

Chalk, French, powdered, lb... 

Precip., See Calcium, lb 

Prepared, lb 

Charcoal, Animal, powd. , lb. . . 

Willow, powdered, lb 

Clove, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Cochineal, S.G., lb 

Collodion, lb 

Cantharidal, lb 2 

Confection, Senna, lb 

Creosote, Wood, lb 2 

Cuttlefish BonI?, lb , 

Dextrine, lb 

Dover's Powder, lb i 

Ergot, Spanish, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Ergotin, Keith's, oz 2 

Extract, Logwood, bulk, lb. . . . 

Pounds, lb 

Flowers, Arnica, lb 

Calendula, lb 

Chamomile, Roman, lb 

German, lb 

Elder, lb 

Lavender, lb 

Rose, red, French, lb i 

Rosemary, lb 

Saffron, American, lb 

Spanish, Val'a, oz i 

Gelatine, Cooper's, lb 

French, white, lb 

Glycerine, lb 

GUARANA 3 

Powdered, lb 3 

Gum Aloes, Cape, lb 

Barbadoes, lb 

Socotrine, lb 

Asafcetida, lb 

Ar.ibic, 1st, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Sifted sorts, lb 

Sorts, lb 

Benzoin, lb 

Catechu, Black, lb 

Gamb'ige, powdered, lb I 

Guaiac, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Kino, true, lb i 



30 
17 
40 
00 
10 
10 
5 
4 
20 
16 

17 
40 

75 
50 
40 
00 

25 
10 

50 
75 
90 
00 
13 
14 
'5 
55 
30 
40 
20 
12 
60 
25 
75 
00 

75 
35 
14 
00 

25 

18 

30 
65 
40 

65 

75 
40 

25 

50 

9 

20 

SO 
70 
25 



35 
iS 

50 

20 00 

1 2 

12 

6 

5 

25 

17 

18 

45 
So 

2 75 
45 

2 50 
30 
12 

! 60 
80 

1 00 

2 10 
14 
17 
20 
60 

35 
45 
22 

15 

2 00 

30 

80 

1 25 

80 

40 
16 

3 25 
3 50 

20 
50 
70 
45 
70 
85 
45 

30 

I 00 
20 

I 25 

I 00 

75 



Myrrh, lb $ 

Powd"ered, lb 

Opium, lb 4 25 



Powdered, lb 

Scammony, pure Resin, lb. 

Shellac, lb 

Bleached, lb 

Spruce, true, lb 

Tragacanth, flake, 1st, lli. . 

Powdered, lb 

Sorts, lb 

Thus, lb 

Herb, Althea, lb 

Bitterwort, lb 

Burdock, !b 

Boneset, ozs, lb 

Catnip, ozs, lb 

Chiretta, lb 

Coltsfoot, lb 

Feverfew, ozs, lb . . - 

Grindelia robusta, lb 

Hoarhound, ozs., lb 

Jaborandi, lb 

Lemon Balm, lb 

Liverwort, German, lb. . . . 

Lobelia, ozs, lb 

Motherwort, ozs, lb 

Mullein, German, lb 

Pennyroyal, ozs, lb 

Peppermint, ozs., lb 

Rue, ozs. , lb 

Sage, ozs., lb 

Spearmint, lb 

Thyme, ozs., lb 

Tansy, ozs. , lb 

\\'ormwood, oz 

Verba Santa, lb 

Honey, lb 

Hops, fresh, lb. . . 

Indigo, Madras, lb 

Lnsect Powder, lb 

Isinglass, Brazil, lb 

Russian, true, lb 

Leaf, Aconite, lb 

Bay, lb 

Belladonna, lb 

Buchu, long, lb 

Short, lb 

Coca, lb 

Digitalis, lb 

Eucalyptus, lb 

Hyoscyamus 

Matico, lb 



45 


$ 4S 


55 


60 


4 25 


4 5° 


6 00 


6 50 


2 So 


13 00 


45 


48 


45 


SO 


30 


35 


90 


I 00 


I 10 


I «S 


45 


75 


8 


10 


27 


30 


27 


30 


16 


18 


15 


17 


17 


20 


25 


30 


20 


38 


S3 


55 


45 


SO 


17 


20 


45 


50 


38 


40 


38 


40 


15 


20 


20 


22 


«7 


20 


18 


20 


21 


25 


30 


3S 


18 


20 


21 


25 


iS 


20 


15 


18 


20 


22 


38 


44 



/3 

25 

2 00 

6 oo 

25 

18 
25 
50 

20 
35 
15 
18 
20 
70 



15 
25 
80 
28 
I 10 
■ 50 
30 
20 
30 

55 
22 
40 
20 
20 
25 
75 



194B) 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Senna, Alexandria, lb ... . 

Tinnevelly, lb 

Stramonium, lb 

Uva Ursi, lb 

Leeches, Swedish, doz 

Licorice, Solazzi 

Pignatelli 

Grasso 

Y & S— Sticks, 6 to i lb., per lb. 
" Purity, 100 sticks in box 

'* Purity, 200 sticks in box 

" Acme Pellets, 5 lb. tins 
" Lozenges, 5 lb. tins.. . 
" Tar, Licorice, and Tolu, 

5 lb. tins 

LUPULIN, oz 

Lycopodium, lb 

iVlACE, lb 

Manna, lb 

Moss, Iceland, lb 

Irish, lb 

Musk, Tonquin, oz , 

NUTG ALLS, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Nutmegs, lb 

Nux Vomica, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Oakum, lb 

Ointment, Merc, lb. J^ and yi. 

Citrine, lb 

Paraldehyde, oz 

Pepper, black, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Pitch, black, lb 

Bergundy, true, lb 

LASTER, C^alcined, bbl. cash. . . . 

Adhesive, yd 

Belladonna, lb 

Galbanum Conip. , lb 

Lead, lb 

Poppy IIead.s, per 100 

Rosin, Common, lb 

White, lb 

Resorcin, white, oz 

Rochelle Salt, lb '. 

Root, Aconite, lb 

Althea, cut, lb 

Belladonna, lb 

Blood, lb 

Bitter, lb 

Blackberry, lb 

Burdock, crushed, lb 

Calamus, sliced, white, lb 

Canada .Snake, lb 

Cohosh, black, lb 

Colchicum, lb 

Columbo, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Coltsfoot, lb 

Comfrey, crushed, lb , .. 

Curcuma, p owdered, lb. 

Dandelion, lb 

Elecampane, lb 

Galangal, lb 

Gelsemium, lb 

Gentian or Genitan, lb 

Ground, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Ginger, African, lb 

Po.,lb 

Jamaica, blchd., lb 

Po., lb 

Ginseng, lb 

Golden .Seal, lb 

Gold Thread, lb 

Hellebore, white, powd., lb... 

Indian Hemp 

Ipecac, lb ... 

Powdered, lb 

Jalap, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Kava Kava, lb 

Licorice, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Mandrake, lb 

Masterwort, lb 

Orris, Florentine, lb 

Powdered, lb 

Pareira Brava, true, lb 

Pink, lb 

Parsley, lb 

Pleurisy, lb 

Poke, lb 



$ 25 $ 30 



IS 


25 


20 


25 


15 


iS 


I 00 


I 10 


45 


50 


35 


40 


30 


35 


27 


30 


75 


75 


I 50 


I 50 


2 00 


2 00 


I 50 


I 75 


2 00 


2 00 


30 


35 


70 


80 


I 20 


I 2S 


I 60 


I 75 


9 


10 


9 


10 


4b 00 


50 00 


21 


25 


25 


30 


I 00 


I 10 


10 


12 


25 


27 


12 


15 


70 


75 


45 


50 


>5 


18 


22 


25 


25 


30 


3 


4 


10 


12 


2 25 


3 25 


12 


'3 


65 


70 


80 


«5 


25 


30 


I 00 


I 10 


2* 


3 


3i 


4 


25 


30 


25 


28 


22 


25 


30 


35 


25 


.30 


15 


16 


27 


30 


15 


18 


18 


20 


20 


25 


30 


35 


15 


20 


40 


45 


20 


22 


25 


30 


38 


40 


20 


25 


'3 


14 


15 


18 


15 


20 


15 


18 


22 


25 


9 


10 


10 


12 


13 


15 


18 


20 


20 


22 


27 


30 


30 


35 


3 00 


3 2S 


75 


80 


90 


95 


12 


IS 


18 


20 


I 30 


I 50 


I 60 


I 70 


55 


60 


60 


65 


40 


90 


12 


15 


13 


15 


13 


18 


16 


40 


30 


35 


40 


45 


40 


45 


75 


80 


■s 


35 


20 


25 


IS 


18 



Queen of the Meadow, lb $ 18$ 

Rhatany, lb 20 

Rhubarb, lb 75 

Sarsaparilla, Hond, lb 40 

Cut, lb 50 

Senega, lb 55 

Squill, lb 13 

Stillingia, lb 22 

Powdered, lb 25 

Unicorn, lb 38 

Valerian, English, lb. true 20 

Virginia, Snake, lb 40 

Yellow Dock, lb 15 

Rum, Bay, gal 2 25 

Essence, lb 3 00 

Saccharin, oz i 25 

Seed, Anise, Italian, sifted, lb... 13 

Star, lb 35 

Burdock, lb 30 

Canary, bag or less, lb 5 

Caraway, lb 10 

Cardamom, lb i 25 

Celery 30 

Colchicum 50 

Coriander, lb 10 

Cumin, lb 15 

Fennel, lb 15 

Fenugreek, powdered, lb.. . . 7 

Flax, cleaned, lb 3I 

Grou[id, lb 4 

Hemp, lb 5 

Mustard, white, lb u 

Powdered, lb 15 

Pumpkin 25 

Quince, lb 65 

Rape, lb 8 

Strophanthus, oz 50 

Worm, lb 22 

Seidlitz Mixture, lb 25 

Soap, Castile, Mottled, pure, lb. . 10 

White, Conti's, lb 15 

Powdered, lb 25 

Green (Sapo Viridis), lb 15 

Spermaceti, lb 55 

Turpentine, Chian, oz 75 

Venice, lb 10 

Wax, White, lb 50 

Yellow 40 

Wood, Guaian, rasped 5 

Quassia chips, lb . 10 

Red Saunders, ground, lb 5 

.Santal, ground, lb 5 

CHEMICALS. 

Acid, Acetic, lb 12 

Glacial, lb 45 

Benzoic, English, oz 20 

German, oz. 10 

Boracic, lb 15 

Carbolic Crystals, lb 25 

Calvert's No. i, lb 2 10 

No. 2, lb I 35 

Citric, lb 50 

Gallic, oz 10 

Hydrobromic, diluted, lb 30 

Hydrocyanic, diluted, oz. bottles 

doz I 50 

Lactic, concentrated, oz 22 

Muriatic, lb 3 

Chem, pure, lb 18 

Nitric, lb loj 

Chem. pure, lb 25 

Oleic, purified, lb 75 

Oxalic, lb 12 

Phosphoric, glacial, lb i 00 

Dilute, lb 13 

Pyrogallic, oz 35 

Salicylic, white, lb i 00 

Sulphuric, carboy, lb 2i 

Bottles, lb 5" 

Chem. pure, lb 18 

Tannic, lb 90 

Tartaric, powdered, lb 30 

ACETANILID, lb 90 

AcoNiTiNE, grain .. 4 

Alum, cryst., lb i| 

Powdered, lb 3 

Ammonia, Liquor, lb., .880 10 

Am.monium, Bromide, lb 80 

Carbonate, lb 14 

Iodide, oz 35 

Nitrate, crystals, lb 40 

Muriate, lb 12 



20 

30 
2 50 

45 
55 
65 
15 

25 
27 
40 

25 

45 
18 

2 50 

3 25 
I 50 

15 
40 

35 
6 

13 

I 50 

35 

60 

12 

20 

17 

9 

4 

5 

6 

12 

20 

30 
70 

9 
55 
25 
30 
12 
16 
35 
25 
60 
So 
12 
75 
45 

6 
12 

6 

6 



13 
5° 
25 
12 
16 
30 
2 15 
I 40 

55 
12 

35 

I 60 

25 

5 

20 

13 
30 

80 

13 
I 10 

17 

38 

I 10 

2j 

6 

20 

I 10 

32 
I 00 

5 

3 

4 

12 

85 
15 
40 

45 
16 



Valerianate, oz $ 55 $ 

Amyl, Nitrite, oz 16 

Antinervin, oz 85 

Antikamnia I 25 

Antipyrin, oz I 00 

Aristol, oz .... I 85 

Arsenic, Donovan's sol., lb 25 

Fowler's sol., lb 13 

Iodide, oz 50 

White, lb 6 

Atropine, Sulp. in J ozs. 80c., 

oz 5 00 

Bismuth, Ammonia-citrate, oz . 35 

Iodide, oz 50 

Salicylate, oz 30 

Subcarbonate, lb 2 25 

Subnitrate, lb 2 00 

Borax, lb g 

Powdered, lb 10 

Bromine, oz 8 

Cadmium, Bromide, oz 20 

Iodide, oz 45 

Caffeine, oz 50 

Citrate, oz 50 

Calcium, Hypophosphite, lb.... i 50 

Iodide, oz 95 

Phosphate, precip. , lb 35 

Sulphide, oz 5 

Cerium, Oxalate, oz 10 

Chinoidine, oz 15 

Chloral, Hydrate, lb i 00 

Croton, oz 75 

Chloroform, lb 60 

Cinchonine, sulphate, oz 25 

ClNCHONIDINE, Sulph.,OZ I5 

Cocaine, Mur., oz 750 

Codeia, j oz 80 

Collodion, lb 65 

Copper, Sulph., (Blue Vitrol) lb. 6 

Iodide, oz 65 

Copperas, lb i 

DiURETIN, oz I 60 

Ether, Acetic, lb. . .- 75 

Sulphuric, lb 40 

Exalgine, oz I 00 

Hyoscyamine, Sulp., crystals, gr. 25 

Iodine, lb 4 75 

Iodoform, lb 6 00 

lODOL, oz I 40 

Iron, by Hydrogen 80 

Carbonate, Precip., lb 15 

.Sacch., lb 30 

Chloride, lb 45 

Sal., lb 13 

Citrate, U.S.P., lb 90 

And Ammon. ,1b 70 

And Quinine, lb I 50 

Quin. and Stry. , oz iS 

And Strychnine, oz i ; 

Dialyzed, Solution, lb 50 

Ferrocyonide, lb 55 

Hypophosphites, oz 25 

Iodide, oz 40 

Syrup, lb 40 

Lactate, oz. . 5 

Pernitrate, solution, lb 15 

Phosphate scales, lb i 25 

Sulphate, pure, lb 7 

Exsiccated, lb 8 

And Potass. Tartrate, lb 80 

And Ammon Tartrate, lb . . . 80 

Lead, Acetate, white, lb 13 

Carbonate, lb 7 

Iodide, oz 35 

Red, lb 7 

Lime, Chlorinated, bulk, lb 4 

In pakages, lb 6 

Lithium, Bromide, oz 30 

Carbonate, oz 30 

Citrate, oz 25 

Iodide, oz 5° 

Salic ate, oz 35 

Magnesium, Calc, lb 55 

Carbonate, lb 18 

Citrate, gran., lb 35 

Sulph. (Epsom salt), lb ij 

Manganese, Black Oxide, lb. . . 5 

Menthol, oz 55 

Mercury, lb 75 

Ammon (White Precip.).... I 25 

Chloride, Corrosive, lb i 00 

Calomel, lb I 00 

With Chalk, lb 60 



60 
18 
00 

I 30 

1 10 

2 00 
30 
15 
55 

7 

5 00 
40 

55 
35 
2 40 
2 10 
10 
II 



25 
50 
55 
55 

I 60 

I 00 

38 

6 

12 

iS 

I 10 
80 

I 90 

30 
20 
8 50 
90 
70 
7 
70 

3 

I 65 

80 

50 

I 10 

30 

5 50 

7 00 

I 50 
85 
16 

35 

55 
16 

I 00 
75 

3 00 
30 
15 
55 
60 

30 
45 
45 

6 

16 

I 30 

9 
10 

85 

85 

15 

8 

40 

9 

5 

7 

35 

35 

30 

55 
40 
60 
20 
40 
3 
7 
66 
80 

I 30 
I 10 

I ID 
65 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



95 



Business Notices. 

/Vs ihc design of ihc Canaiuas Druggist is to benefit 
millually :iU interesleil in the business, we would request 
all parties ordering goodv or making purchases of any de- 
scription from houses ad\ertising with us to mention in 
their letter that such advertisement was noticed in the 
Canadian L'Kur.cisT. 

The attention of Druggists and others who may be in- 
terested in the articles advertised in this journal is called 
<o the social coniideration of the business Notices, 

BoxKS. — Boxes, boxes, boxes, all kinds, 
makes, and sizes, for druggists' use, are 
supplied by the Hemming Bros. Co., 
Limited, Toronto, Ont. 

F.ANCY Goods. — Attention is directed 
til the advertisement of H. H. Fudger, 
who offers to the drug trade special lines 
in fancy goods and novelties particularly 
adai)ted to the trade. 

P.wson'.s Ink. — By reference to our 
advertising columns it will be noticed 
that the London Drug Co., London, Ont., 
are, together with the parent house in 
Montreal, general agents for Canada for 
Payson's Indelible Ink. 

.\rkca Nut Tooth So.\p. — This de- 
lightful toilet article, manufactured by the 
Martin, Bole & Wynne Co., of Winnipeg, 
Man., is advertised in this issue. If you 
have none in stock, include it in your 
next order to your jobber, 

Rkduction IX Prick. — Read the ad- 
vertisement of the Powell & Davis Co. in 
this issue, who announce a reduction m 
price of their well known Fly Felts. 
These gojds command a ready sale, are 
true fly destroyers, and afford a good 
margin of profit. 

The close proximity of the establish- 
ment of Buntin, Gillies & Co., Hamilton, 
to the different drug houses of that city 
make it a convenient source of supply for 
stationery, school supplies, etc. Parcels 
can come as enclosures, thus saving 
charges for carriage. 

Speci.\l Lines Offered. — Elliot & 
Co., Front street west, Toronto, offer this 
month a number of special lines in their 
advertisement on page 74a. The popular- 
ity of some of their special package goods, 
which are put in handsome cartons, 
makes them a particularly attractive form 
of goods for the retail druggists. We 
hope in an early issue to make an ex- 
tended mention of this, one of the pioneer 

wholesale drug houses of the country. 
• 

As will be seen by our advertising col- 
umns. Dr. W. E. Hamill announces the 
formation of classes in Optics and Re- 
fraction, specially adapted for druggists 
who wish to obtain the knowledge where- 
by they may properly fit their patrons 
with spectacles, .^.s the doctor is a well- 
known specialist in diseases of the eye, 
and has recently returned from a two 
ye.irs' visit to the eye hospitals of Ameri- 
ca and England, we can cordially recom- 
mend this course to our readers. 

G.\RFiELD Te.\. — .Amongst the large 
number of remedies which have been 
placed before the public in the form of 
Teas for medicinal use none, we believe. 



holds a higher place in public estimation 
than the celebrated Garfield Tea, Drug- 
gists who are anxious and willing to in- 
crease their sales and enhance the pro- 
fits of their business can obtain a quan- 
tity of free sample packages and advertis- 
ing matter, charges prepaid, on ap[)lication 
to the manufacturers, D, Dunsmore & 
Co., 271 Oueen street east, Toronto, Ont, 

Fly Se.^son. — As the season is ap- 
proaching when the demand for fly 
papers will be one of the most frequent 
of calls on the druggist, we would just re- 
mind our readers, and we are sure a re- 
minder is all that is necessary, of the 
necessity for having on hand a good sup- 
ply of Wilson's Fly Pads. These pads 
are so universally known throughout 
Canada that any druggist's stock would 
be very incomplete, and his sales materi- 
ally lessened, if he were compelled to say, 
" We are just out of them." Place your 
order early. See advertisement. 

A M.^NUF.'iCTURINGCo.MP.ANV ASSIGNS. 

— The J. S. Carroll Manufacturing Com- 
pany, makers of soda water apparatus, 
have made an assignment for the benefit 
of their creditors to Charles K. Duffield 
and Daniel Kornhau. The company was 
incorporated in 1894. The deed of as- 
signment is dated the 4th inst., and is 
signed by J, S. Carroll, president, and 
George W. Bean, secretary. It is said 
the cause of the failure is numerous suits 
brought by big soda water apparatus cor- 
porations for alleged infringement of pa- 
tents. The liabilities will be less than 
$10,000. 

Major's Cement. — A. Major, who 
started the manufacture of Major's Ce- 
ment in 1876, has moved from 232 Wil- 
liam street, New York, to 461 Pearl 
street, near Park Row, as the building he 
formerly occupied is to be taken down. 
It is one of the old landmarks of New 
York city, owned by the Rhinelander 
estate. This is the first time Mr. Major 
has been compelled to move in fifteen 
years. He is well recompensed, however, 
for his trouble, as he has moved into a 
more spacious building, located on a 
wide street with good sidewalk facilities, 
and has a store front where he can ex- 
hibit his goods to advantage, also the 
different inducements which he offers to 
the trade, such as thermometers of differ- 
ent sizes, signs, folding chairs, etc. 

The Princess of Wales and the 
Empress of Russia— Russia's Empress 
GAIN'S Strength. —The producers of 
" Mariani Wine " (Vin Mariani) should, 
according to report, soon have a splendid 
market in Russia for their nerve and 
brain tonic, as the Dowager Empress has, 
at the suggestion of the Princess of Wales, 
drunk it since the death of her Consort, 
with the most remarkable and beneficial 
results. It seems that Her Majesty is 
one of the many delicate persons with 
whom stimulating drugs like quinine, iron, 
and Peruvian bark disagree, but such is 
not the case with the wine tonic referred 
to. It is w^ell known that the Princess of 



Wales also derived increased strength of 
brain and nerves from it during her last 
great trials. Moreover, in consequence 
of the benefits obtained by the Empress, 
a great demand for this tonic has sprung 
up among the ladies of Russian aristoc- 
racy suffering from " nerves." — The Court 
Journal, London, Jan. 12, 1895. 



Books and Magazines. 

The substantial value of " Current 
History " as the most convenient and 
concise record published of the world's 
doings, is becoming more and more recog- 
nized. In breadth of scope, reliability of 
information, clearness of statement, free- 
dom from bias, judiciousness of treat- 
ment, and systematic arrangement for 
reference purposes, this publication has 
no competitor. Its place as a standard 
work of reference has long been assured, 
and it receives the strong endorsement of 
eminent men in all walks of life, and of 
all shades of political and religious belief. 
Buffalo, N.Y. : Garretson, Cox & Co., 
publishers. Paper, $1.50 a year ; bound 
in cloth, gilt stamped, $2.00 ; half moroc- 
co, $2 50. Sample copies, 10 cents. 
Sample pages and circulars, free. 

The April number of Frank Leslie's 
Popular Monthly contains a beautifully 
illustrated article, entitled " How to Be- 
come a Prima Donna," written by W. de 
Wagstaffe. Other pictorial and literary 
features of this number are : A biographi- 
cal sketch of Count Yamagata, the con- 
temporary Japanese Von Moltke, written 
expressly for Frank Leslie's Popular 
Monthly by Teiichi Yamagata, a near 
relative of the great Field .Marshal ; " The 
World Awheel," being a chapter on the 
evolution of the bicycle and la Peine 
Bicychtte, by Henry I'yrrell ; " Homes in 
Japan," by George Donaldson ; and 
"Taxidermy as an .\rt," with illustrations 
by W. H. Drake, written by Frank A. 
Chapman, of the American Museum of 
Natural History. There are also a num- 
ber of good short stories and poems by 
distinctively popular writers. 



An Easter Magazine. 

Probably no two words in the English 
language are more misused and abused 
than " lady " and "woman," and there is 
much wisdom, therefore, in a popular dis- 
cussion of the proper usage of the words, 
such as is given in the April Ladies' 
Home Journal, by Margaret Deland, Mrs. 
Burton Harrison, and Sarah Orne Jewett. 
" The Burning Question of Domestic 
Service " is treated intelligently and in- 
terestingly by the Cot.ntess of Aberdeen. 
The cover of this April Journal is a re- 
production of two of C. D. Gibson's most 
stylish and charming girls, and all 
through the issue is the freshness and 
daintiness of springtime and Easter days. 
This ideal magazine is sold for ten cents 
a number and one dollar a year by The 
Curtis Publishing Company,' of Philadel- 
phia. 



96 



CANADIAN DRUGGIST. 



Iodide, Proto, oz I 35 

Bin., oz 25 

Oxide, Red, lb i 15 

Pill (Blue Mass), lb 70 

Milk Sugar, powdered, lb ... . 30 

Morphine, Acetate, oz 2 00 

Muriate, oz 2 00 

Sulphate, oz 2 00 

Pepsin, Saccharated, oz 35 

Phenacetine, oz 35 

Pilocarpine, Muriate, grain. .. . 20 

PiPERiN, oz I 00 

Phosphorus, lb 90 

Pot ASS a. Caustic, white, lb 55 

Potassium, Acetate, lb 35 

Bicarbonate, lb 15 

Bichromate, lb 14 

Bitrat (Cream Tart.), lb 22 

Bromide, lb 55 

Carbonate, lb 12 

Chlorate, Eng., lb 18 

Powdered, lb 20 

Citrate, lb 70 

Cyanide, lb 40 

Hypophosphites, oz 10 

Iodide, lb 4 00 

Nitrate, gran, lb 8 

Permanganate, lb 40 

Prussiate, Red, lb 50 

Yellow, lb 32 

And Sod . Tartrate, lb 25 

Sulphuret, lb 25 

Proplylamine, oz 35 

Quinine, Sulph, hulk 30 

Ozs. , oz 35 

Quinidine, Sulphate, ozs., oz. .. 16 

Salicin, lb 375 

Santonin, oz 20 

Silver, Nitrate, cryst, oz 90 

Fused, oz I 00 

Sodium, Acetate, lb 30 

Bicarbonate, kgs. , lb 2 75 

Bromide, lb 63 

Carbonate, lb 3 

Ilypophosphite, oz 10 

Hyposulphite, lb 3 



$ 40 Iodide, oz I 40 

30 Salicylate, lb I 75 

1 20 Sulphate, lb 2 

75 Sulphite, lb 8 

35 Somnal, oz 85 

2 10 Spirit Nn re, lb 35 

2 10 Strontium, Nitrate, lb 18 

2 10 Strychnine, crystals, oz I 00 

40 Sulkonal, oz 34 

38 Sulphur, Flowers of, lb 2J 

22 Pure precipitated, lb 13 

I 10 Tartar Emeiic, 11) 50 

I 10 Thymol (Thymic acid), oz 55 

60 Veratrine, oz 200 

40 Zinc, Acetate, lb 70 

17 Carbonate lb 25 

15 Chloride, granular, oz 13 

25 Iodide, oz 60 

60 Oxide, lb 13 

13 Sulphate, lb. 9 

20 Valerianate, oz 25 

essential oils. 

50 Oil, Almond, bitter, oz 75 

1 2 Sweet, lb 50 

410 Amber, crude, lb .......... . 40 

10 Rec't, lb 60 

45 .\nise, lb 3 00 

55 Bay, oz 50 

35 Bergamot, lb ■■••.... 3 75 

30 Cade, lb 90 

30 Cajuput, lb I 60 

46 Capsicum, oz 60 

32 Caraway, lb 2 75 

38 Cassia, lb i 75 

20 Cedar 55 

4 00 Cinnamon, Ceylon, oz 2 75 

22 Citronelle, lb 80 

I 00 Clove, lb I 00 

I 10 Copaiba, lb I 75 

35 Croton, lb I 50 

3 00 Cubeb, lb 2 50 

65 Cumin, lb 5 50 

6 Erigeron, oz 20 

12 Eucalyptus, lb I 50 

6 Fennel, lb i 60 



> 43 
I So 

5 

10 
00 

65 

20 

1 10 
35 

4 
20 

55 
60 

2 10 
75 
30 
15 
65 
60 
II 
30 



80 
60 
45 
65 

3 25 
60 

4 00 
I 00 
I 70 

65 
3 00 
I 80 

85 
3 00 

S5 

1 10 

2 00 

I 75 

3 00 
6 00 

25 
I 75 
I 75 



Geranium, oz ^i 75 

Rose, lb 3 20 

Juniper berries (English), lb. . . 4 50 

Wood, lb . 70 

Lavender, Chiris. Fleur, lb.... 3 00 

Garden, lb i 50 

Lemon, lb 2 00 

Lemongrass, lb i 50 

Mustard, Essential, oz 60 

Neroli, oz 4 25 

Orange, II). . . 2 75 

Sweet, lb 2 75 

Origanum, lb 65 

Patchouli, oz 80 

Pennyroyal, lb 2 50 

Peppermint, lb 4 25 

Pimento, lb 2 fao 

Rhodium, oz 80 

Rose, oz 7 50 

Rosemary, lb 70 

Rue, oz 25 

Sandalwood, lb 5 5° 

Sassafras, lb 75 

Savin, lb i 5o 

Spearmint, lb 3 75 

Spruce, lb 65 

Tansy, lb 4 25 

Thyme, white, lb i 80 

Wintergreen, lb 2 75 

Wormseed, lb 3 5° 

Wormwood, lb 4 25 

pi.xed oils. 

Castor, lb 9 

Cod Liver, N.F., gal i 25 

Norwegian, gal 2 00 

Cottonseed, gal i 10 

Lard, gal 90 

Linseed, boiled, gal 60 

Raw, gal 58 

Neatsfoot, gal i 00 

Olive, gal i 30 

Salad, gal 225 

Palm, lb 12 

Sperm, gal. i 75 

Turpentine, gal 60 



81 80 

3 50 
5 00 

75 

3 50 

1 75 

2 10 

1 60 

65 

4 50 

3 00 

3 00 
70 
85 

2 75 

4 50 
2 75 

85 



75 

30 

7 50 

80 

I 75 
4 00 
70 
4 50 
I 90 
3 00 

3 75 

4 50 



II 

1 30 

2 10 
I 20 
I 00 

63 

61 

I 10 

1 35 

2 40 

13 
I 80 

65 



.,:t;.T.T;;r:::;.| table Extra' 'E1 Padre' 'Mnngo' and 'Madre e'Hijo' {'■ 'ft\f*^ 

Sold Annually. J O J [ MONTREAL, P.Q. 

"DERBY PLUG," 5 and 10 ets., "THE SMOKERS' IDEAL," "DERBY," "ATHLETE" CIGARETTES, 

ARE THE BEST. 



D. RITCHIE & CO.. 



Montreal. 



Drug Reports. 



Canada. 

Business remains quiet, purchases being 
small, and there is a general disposition 
to hold back, awaiting the opening of 
spring trade. There have been but few 
failures in the drug trade during the last 
month, the worst feature being the in- 
crease in " cutting " which has developed 
in several additional places. 

In prices there is not much of change 
to note. 

Quinine is steady at former prices. 

Opium remains as before; the tendency 
in foreign markets is downward. 

Citric acid is advancing ; tartaric acid, 
easy. 

Camphor is firm. 

All preparations of bromine are higher, 
that article having advanced very much 
in price. 

Linseed oils remained unchanged. 

Spirits of turpentine again advanced. 



England. 

London, March 27, 1895. 

There has been further improvement 
in the chemical and drug markets during 
the month, and a fair export demand. 

Carbolic acid is easy, but held firmly 
for the summer months. 

Chlorate of potash is weak, and borax 
lower. Mercurials remain unchanged. 

Cochineal is dearer, and coriander has 
advanced. 

Cocaine is very firm at a recent ad- 
vance. Cod-liver oil has been tending 
downwards during the last fortnight. 

Camphor was advanced slightly by Eng- 
lish manufacturers early in the month, 
and almond oil was also raised a point. 

Opium is dull. Quinine steady, and 
prices well maintained. 

Saffron is dearer, but jalap, senega, and 
ipecacuanha are easier. Turpentine has 
shown an increased value during the 
whole month. 



An Expensive Substance. 

One article which does not yet appear 
in our Price Current is the new element 
Argon. We might state, however, for 
intending purchasers, that at present quo- 
tations it is worth $20,000 per cubic inch. 



Pure insect powder has commenced to 
be in demand. Prices are about the same 
as last yeai. We would warn our friends 
not to be induced by a few cents a pound 
to buy any powder on which they cannot 
entirely rely. Its a " penny wise and 
pound foolish " policy. Paris green will 
bring about same money as last year. 
Canadian samples offered are much ahead 
of last year ; it is a nice color and runs 
freely. We would advise supporting home 
manufacture, everything being equal. Co- 
caine has made a decided advance in price. 
Disinfectants will likely stiffen in price as 
the season opens. 



Valerianate of ether is claimed to be a 
specific in persistent hiccough. 



Canadian Druggist 

Devoted to the interests of the General Drug Trade and to the Advancement of Pharmacy. 



V(U.. \1I. 



TORONTO, .MAY, i.S,,5. 



X< 



Canadian Druggist 



WILLIAM J. DYAS, PUBLISHER. 



Subscription, $1 per year in advance. 

AilvertisinLi rates on application. 

The Canadian Druggist is issued on the i5lh of each 
month, and all matter for insertion should reach us by the 
5th of the month. 

New advertisements or changes to be addressed 

Canadian Druggist, 

20 Bay St. TORONTO, ONT. 

EUROPEAN AGENCY : 

BROCK A H/M.IF.W. .Aiaermary House, Watling St., 
LONDON, E.C., ENGLAND. 

CONTENTS. 

Ontario College of Pharmacy. 

Trade Notes. 

Prince Ethvard Island Notes. 

Manitoba Notes. 

Nova Scotia Notes. 

CoRRESi'ONDENXE— DispensiniJ Difficulties. 

College of Pharmacy. 

Suggested B. P. Emulsions. 

Creoso'.e Syrup. 

Pharmacy in England. 

Enlarged Faculty of the School of Pharmacy of 
Northwestern University, Chicago. 

Pharmaceutical E.saminations. 

-■V Polyglot .Apothecary.