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KITORIAL INDEX— PAGE 169 

BUYERS' DIRECTORY— PACK I4S 

ADVERTISING INDEX— PAIiE 170 




,^^ MANUFACTURING NEW5 

A weekly newspaper covering in a practical manner the mechanical power, foundry and allied fields 
Published by the MacLean Publishing Co iipany, Limited. Toronto, Gaijada. 



Vol. XXI. No. 14. 



Publication Office: Toronto, April 3rd, 1919 



V/^ 




r©05[D) 








The Ford-^ith Machine 
Limited 

Hain|non, Ontario, Canada 
Mak^s of Milling Machines 
era and Special Machinery 



( A N A D 1 A ^■ M A C H I N E K V 



SMALL TOOLS 



PROMPT 
SERVICE 

is assured 'at our present 
store where P. W. Small 
Tools are carried in stock. 
Place your order there 
lo-dav. 



P. & W. Combination 
Lathe Knurling Tool 





Combines Three Distinct 
Knurling Tools in One 

^ ()u uill save time by using this three- 
in-one Lathe Knurling Tool. 
It ca r r i e s 
three pitches 
of knurls 

fine, medium ^'ne Medium coarse 

and coarse, as shown in sample. This 
does away with necessity of having 
three holders or of changing knurls 
where but one holder is available. Same 
knurls can be used in this holder as are 
used in our regular Lathe Knurling 
Tool. 




Regular Lathe Knurling Tool 

Precision Machine Tool- -Standards & Gauges 

PRATT & WHITNEY CO 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 

Works: DUNDAS, ONTARIO 



MONTREAL 

723 Drummond Bldg. 



TORONTO 
1002 C.P.R. Bldg. 



WINNIPEG 
1205 McArthur Bldg. 



VANCOUVER 
B.C. Equipment Co. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 






m> 



M ACH I N E 





Double Back Geared Gap Lathe 

26-inch x 42-inch Swing 



Bertram Machine Tools are built for safety and service, 
and are backed by a concern with sixty years' experience 
and the larg^est of its kind in Canada. 



The John Bertram & Sons, Co., Limited 

MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENT 
DUNDAS, ONTARIO, CANADA 

MONTREAL TORONTO VANCOUVER 

723 Drummond BIdg. 1002 C.P.R. Bldg. 609 Bank of Ottawa BIdg. 

WINNIPEG 
1205 McArthur BIdg. 





CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



Ih 




QiuDiisnGr 



TORONTO 



APRILS, 1919 




Living in a World of Advertising 

THINK of a good product to-day and you think of an adver- 
tised product. You can't get away from it. 
Advertising enters into your daily life far more than you realize and 
"there's a reason." 

You awake in the morning to the tune of an advertised alarm 
clock. You lather your face with an advertised soap and brush. 
You shave with an advertised razor. You dress in advertised 
clothes and advertised underwear, socks and shoes. 
You eat an advertised orange, an advertised cereal served with ad- 
vertised milk. You finish off your breakfast with advertised bacon 
and eggs or marmalade and a cu'^ of advertised tea or coffee. 
You put on your advertised hat and make a rush for an advertised 
street car. You read the advertisements in an advertised news- 
paper. 

Your work throughout the day brings you in contact with adver- 
tised lines. You are probably engaged in the manufacture of an 
advertised product. 

If you go to the theatre or movies it is to see an advertised show. 
You smoke advertised tobacco and cigars. You listen to the music 
of an advertised piano in your home or to the advertised records " 
played by an advertised phonogranh. 

Finally you lay your tired head oi an advertised pillow and your 
body on an advertised mattress, \'our wife meantime reading the 
bargain day advertisements in the evening paper when she should 
be turning out the (advertised) light. 

About the only thing that enters into your life that is not advertised 
is sleep and it will never need advertising because the supply will 
never equal the demand. 

There is, as we said before, a reason why >ou eat and use and wear 
and buy advertised products. It is because they are good. And 
it shows you have good judgment when you buy advertised lines. 

A poor product cannot be contin lously advertised. A good pro- 
duct can. 



at the Post Office at Buffalo, under the Act of March 3rd, 1879. 



scription price in Canada sroo""in'' Tll"f j^l.""!' '^J"''' ^'"^' '''*• '^°'- ^l- No. 14. Published weekly at 143-1.53 Univei-sity Ave.. Toronto, Canada. Sub- 
second-clasa matter July i. 1912 ' at ti," p^^t i?fl^U .; "•..^?"'^'^'^. *' .?«^°?'^:''''l^!.™^"^^ ^"=4 Office Department, OtUwa, Canada'. Enter5d as 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




©ualttu 



REASON IT OUT 

Demand full value for every dollar by 
spending it where you earn it 

PURCHASE THE PRODUCTS 

OF 

CANADIAN MILLS 



A Canadian Dollar is Worth 

One Hundred Cents in Canada 



THE 

STEEL COMPANY 

OF 

CANADA 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON MONTREAL 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXT. 



I 



WALCOTT 

The Lathe for Continuous 
Duty 

Hundreds of Canadian shops were working night and daj' to keep up with 
the demands of war. This continuous service put a heavy sti-ain upon the 
machines used. These machines were of quality construction and modern 
design that stood the strain and gave economical and efficient service. Such 
is the WALCOTT LATHE. Here is a tool not just built for war purposes; it 
is a tool that will give you the best of service in peace time as well as war 
time. And in the WALCOTT you see a lathe with a price as low as pos- 
sible, compatible with the cost of production. 

WALCOTT LATHES are in demand, but our increased 
facilities put us in a position to supply all Canadian 
requirements. 

WALCOTT LATHE COMPANY 

Engine Lathes 
140 Calhoun Street - JACKSON, MICHIGAN 

AGENTS :— Hill. Clarke & Co.. Chicago. 111. Frevert Machinery Co.. New York City. N.Y. W. E. Shipley Machy. 
Co., Philadelphia. Pa. National Supply Co.. Toledo, Ohio. Motch & .Merry weather Machinery Co., Pittsburgh. 
H. A. Smith Machinery Co.. Syracuse. N.Y. Wm. E. DulT. York. Pa. Wm. E. Duff. Jacksonville. Fla. Brown- 
McDonald Machy. Co.. St. Louis, Mo. Smith-Booth-Usher Co.. Los Angeles. Calif. Hendrie-Bolthoft Mfg. & Sup. 
Co., Denver, Col. Gordon & Finkbeiner, Portland, Ore. Northern Machinery Co.. Minneapolis. Minn. Brownell 
Machinery Co.. Providence, R.L Chas. A. Strelinger Co.. Detroit. Mich. Marshall & Huschart Machinery Co.. 
Indianapolis. Ind. Fenwiclt. Freres & Co.. Paris, France. Buck & Hickman. Ltd.. London. Engla'nd. Parke & 
Lacey Co.. Sydney. N.S.W. Standard Machy. & Supplies. Ltd.. Montreal, Que. Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. 
Ltd.. Toronto. Ont. 




April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




Heavy Duty Lathes 




Rough turning pins on cranksliafts of 
nickel ?teel was the duty a-ssigned to this 
42-in. Rridgeford Heavy Lathe in tlie shop 
of the Erie Forge Company, Erie, Pa. The 
ii;)ugh size is apiiroximutely H in. in- diameter 
and the finished size 5 in. in diameter. Eight 
pins is an average day's output on this ef- 
ficient lathe. 

]?ridgeford Heavy Duty Lathes are in 
operation in all parts of the world on all 
kinds of dutv. Tliat their work is iniiforni- 



ly satisfactory is evidenced l)y the numhor 
of rejieat orders from shops that started with 
one Brigdeford a'; a "tryout." One well- 
known plant lia-s '200 Rridgefords and there 
are many othei's entirely "Bridgefordized." 

Bridgeford Heavy Duty Lathes range in 
size from ■24-in, to 72-in. swing. 



Facts speak louder than mere words. Let us prove 
by facts and figures why Bridgeford Lathes are 
standard equipment in the leading industrial plants. 




BRIDGEFORD MACHINE TOOL WORKS 

151 Winton Road, Rochester, N.Y. 
Manufacturers of Heavy Duty Lathes for more than 20 years 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



The Short Belt Drive For Compressors Saves Space 

Have you been wondering how you can fit 
that compressor into your power house? 
Here is the solution — the short-belt drive. 

We build both single-stage and two-stage 
machines — straight-line and duplex with 
this type of drive. 

Less floor space 
Less belt expense 
No belt stretching 
Capacities up to 2,000 ft. per 
min. with short-belt drive. 

Send for our booklet on how to apply the 
short-belt drive to the best advantage. 




CinainliigEj-soIl-Rand'Corapi 

Limited 

SYDNEY, SHERBROOKE, MONTREAL, TORONTO 
COBALT, WINNIPEG, NELSON, VANCOUVER 



L 



Doubly Efficient — Does Both 
Bar and Chuck Work 

This Cincinnati Acme Flat Turret Lathe is a double-production, geared 
head machine of the sliding gear type. It operates on minimum power 
because the only gears running are those doing the actual work. 

This machine saves remarkable time and labor machining either bar 

work or chuck work up to 16 in. diameter. 

Head is cast solid with the bed. 
You know what that means: ac- 
curacy, rigidity, constant and per- 
fect alignment of spindle with vees, 
upon which the turret carriage 
travels. 

We also make a full line of Screw 
Machines and Turret Lathes. 

Write for Valuable Bulletin 

The Acme' 
MachineTool Co. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Canadian Agents: Rudel-Belnap Machinery 
Co., of Montreal and Toronto 




in. x36 in. Flat Turret I at In F.ciuipped for Bar Work. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




HIGH SPEED yIND OIRBON TWIST DRILLS, 
RE/3MERS AfiD MILLING CUTTERS 

Manufactured by the 

WILT TWIST DRILL CO. 

Walkerville ^^ Canada limited - 1. g^^ Ontario 

London Office: Wilt Twist Drill Agency, Moorgate Hall, Finsbury Pavement, LONDON, E.C. 2 ENG. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXr. 



THE CAHLYLE JOHNSON MACHINE CO. 



MANCHESTER CONN. 




Courtesy National Acme Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 



WATCH 



is subject to exceptional hard usage, but it 
gives unfailing service. 

YOUR MACHINE 

should be equipped with clutches that will 
give just such satisfaction. 

What are your requirements? Let us know. 
We maintain an engineering force to work 
out all clutch installations. They will co- 
ODerate with vou. 



Write for our Yellow Data Sheets and Booklet, 

"Clutches as Applied in Machine Building" 

AGENTS: CANADA— Williams & Wilson. 320 St. James St., Montreal: The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. 
Ltd., Montreal and Bra'nches. ENGLAND— The Efandem Co., Ltd.. 22 New-man St . Oxford St.. London, 
W. 1, Sole Agents for British Isles. AUSTRALIA— Edwin Wood Pty., Hdwe. Chambers, 231 Elizabeth 
Street, Melbourne, Victoria. JAPAN — Andi*ews & Geoi-ge Co., 10 Takegawacho. Kiobashiku, Tokyo. 
SOUTH AFRICA--D. Drury & Co.. Main Street. Johannesburg. FRANCE-Anciens Elab. Glaenzer & 
Perreaud. IS Fauborg du Temple. PaVis. 




Double Clutch in Nest 
of Gears. 



THE JOHNSON FRICTION CLUTCH 



Coal 
Coke 
Iron Ore 



' " ""^iCtOti^ FOUNDRY & MALLEABLE 




Made by The Canadian Furnace Co. 
Port Colborne, Ontario, Canada 

M.A.HANNA&.CO. 

Sales Agents, CLEVELAND 

Canadian Office : 

)04 C.P.R. BIdg., Toronto 




edicui 



HrGH 
SPEED 



Steel 



Insures Maximum Production 



FIRTH'S CARBON TOOL STEELS 

"' m^. . Standard Brands Highest Quality 

HOS. FIRTH & SONS, Limited, Sheffield, England 



CANADIAN WARFHniicP"! ' '^^ St. Paul St. West, MONTREAL 
tANAUlAN WAREHOUSES , „ West Adelaide St., TORONTO 



J. A. SHERWOOD 

Canadian Manager 



'tt^i'-^aN;^.--- Vg.'Wl 



>^-ikfifif.-x\i-.i 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Frogs, S\«ritclies 
Mates, Crosses 
Diamonds, Etc. 




TRA 



foryteam 
&£lectric[ 



Built-up, Hard- 
Centre or Solid 
Manganese-Steel 



COMPLE" 



ORK 



ECTIONS 



CANADIAN STEEL FOUNDRIES. LIMITED 

Transportation Building, Montreal 







Forging Billets and Bars 

Electric Furnace, Alloy Steels 

Die Blocks 

Annealed — Heat Treated 

Piston Rods 

Rough Turned— Annealed — Heat 
Treated 

High Speed Steel 



General Steel Company 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

DETROIT- 823 Dime Bank Building 



Swedish Steel Sclmportino 
Co., Limited * 



Montreal 
New \brK 



Direct representa- 
tives of foremost 
Swedish mills : 
makers of 



Toronto 
Denver 



Tool Steels 




ALLOY STEELS 

BARS, 

HIGH 

DRILL 

BARS. 



BILLETS, 

DISCS, SHEETS, 

SPEED STEELS, 

RODS. DRAWN 

SEAMLESS TUB- 




ING, COLD ROLLED STRIP 
STEEL. WELDING WIRE, 
WROUGHT AND ROLLED 
IRON, PIG IRON. STEEL 
AND IRON ENDS, HOL- 
LOW AND SOLID MINING 
DRILL STEEL. 



PROMPT SHIPMENTS \ 

from Jar^e stock ^'^^^^ ^^^ 



10 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXT. 




MILLER 

Breaking Production 
Records 

Forcing the feed on the 

"BRIGGS" to an extent 

impossible on any other 

machine. 



THE photograph shows 
twelve belt lacer jaws 
clamped together on the 
table of a Briggs Milling Ma- 
chine, where two straddle- 
mounted cutters mill the channels 
at one setting, though the stock is 
cold rolled steel, one inch thick. 
15 minutes completes the opera- 
tion, this speed being attained by 
forcing the feed to an extent im- 
possible with any other milling 
machine. There is no chatter — 
the surface is "finished" when it 
comes from the machine. 

Rigid, powerful and easy to oper- 
ate. Takes wide, deep cuts with- 
out showing least signs of dis- 
tress, and will produce accurate 
work when ronning at a high rate 
of speed. 

Gooley & Edlund^ Inc. 

Cortland, N.Y., U.S-A. 

Williams & Wilson, Ltd., Montreal 

FOREIGN AGENTS:— Allied Maehinen.' Company of 
America, France. Belgium. Italy. Switzerland. 
Russia. Scandinavia and Barc**lona; C. W. Burton 
Griffiths & Co.. London, Manchester and Glasgow ; 
Andrews & George Co., Tokyo, Japan. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



11 




Stood The Test 



No. 20% Power Press 



No. 404 Shear 




No. 960 Power Shear 





"B.B." Tools during the last 
four years have proven their 
superiority under the most 
trying conditions. 

Inexperienced help and 24 
hours' daily service will test 
the best machines. 

Quality that is "built in" on a 
machine is bound to assert it- 
self under such circumstances. 

Our line comprises shears of 
all kinds, power presses for 
punching, forming, embos- 
ing, blanking, etc. Tin- 
smith's tools and sheet metal 
working machines of every 
description, also canners' and 
evaporators' machinery. 






No. 100 Power Punch 



The Brown-Boggs Co., Limited 

Hamilton, Canada 




12 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 




lil 



ALLOYsTOOL STEEIS 



In Billets, Bars, Sheets, Hot and 
Cold Rolled Strips, Cold Drawn 
Cast Steel, Wire and Drill Rods 

HIGH GRADE STEEL l^l PURPOSES 



imf?} m^m 



Principal Trade Marks 



KAVSER ELLISON 



SHEFFIELD, ENG. 
Montreal Warehouse 



ESTABLISHED 1825 
Complete Stock 

RALPH B. NORTON 

Agent 

126 Craig St. West Montreal, Que. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



13 




LeBLOND 

Heavy Duty Milling 
Machines 

Plain or Universal Types — Cone or 
Gear Drive. All commercial sizes 
No. to No. 5. 

Adapted for the Heaviest Manufac- 
turing or the most exacting tool room 
service. A suitable Range and Capa- 
city for every class of milling. 

Patent Self-Aligning Arbor Sup- 
ports — 

Hardened Steel Spindle Bearings — 

Double-Friction Back Gears — and 
the simplest type of right-hand con- 
trol, contribute to an increased pro- 
duction and longer life as a precision 
machine. 

The R. K. LeBlond Machine 
Tool Company 

CINCINNATI, OHIO, U.S.A. 

Canadian Agents: 
THE A. R. WILLIAMS MACHINERY CO., LIMITED 
St. John, N.B. Montreal, P.Q. Toronto, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. Vancouver, B.C. 



m 



ELECTRIC 

Steel Castings 

High Grade STEEL Castings 

Of Every Description 

Prompt Deliveries 

Send us your drawings 
for estimates. 

THE ELECTRIC STEEL AND METALS 
COMPANY, LIMITED 

WELLAND ONTARIO 



Jardine Universal Ratchet 
Drill 

Time is expensive when a machine is stand- 
ina idle, waiting for repairs. 





On the average repair job, this machine completes 
the drilling m less than the time required to set 
an ordinary ratchet to begin. 

Weight, 40 lbs. Price, $26.50 net 

Sold by all Machinery and Supply 

Houses 

A. B. JARDINE & CO., Limited 

HESPELER, ONTARIO 



14 



CANADIAN M A C H I N E R Y 



Volume XXI. 



Our New 2" Single Head 
Rapid Nipple and Pipe 
Threading Machine- 
Motor Drive 




Constant Speed Motor 
All Gear Drive - Change 
LeOer 
6 Changes of Speed 
Large Reservoir 
' Special Oil Trough 
Cutting Box 

Many Other 
Features 



t 



FRONT VIEW 
2-In. Single Head Nipple Macliine — Motor Drive 



JOHN H. HALL & SONS, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Pipe Threading Machinery 



We 
Manufacture 
All Sizes 

Roller 
Cutters 




Pipe Machines 
Nipple Machines 
Special Machinery 

WRITE FOR NEW 

DESCRIPTIVE BULLETINS 

JUST ISSUED 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



IB 




Hioh 
Sp^ed 

Steel 



CEVERAL factors combine to make this high- 
speed steel a triumph of the steel-maker's art; 
Electric Furnaces— entirely infallible, automatically 
regulated, delivering the same result time after 
time. 

Uranium—This rare element, cousin to Radium, 
effects a profound change in the texture and quality 
of the steel. 

Added to these, the constant care and skill of years 
of steel-making experience make the result of each 
melt a foregone conclusion. 

Latrobe Electric Steel Co. 

LATROBE, PENN. 




16 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI 



WAR is destructive. Peace is constructive. War has taught 
us many things, chief of which is the great value of Time. 
Time is the ess*^nce of yovir life and mine. Whatever saves Time, saves Life. 

Superior 

The Nationally Known FIRST QUALITY 

HIGH SPEED STEEL 

Is the Avowed Enemy of Waste and Inefficiency, and is Allied with Life 

Save Time, Save Life. Are your 
Tools made of Rg^eul? 

Vanadium-Alloys 
Steel Co. 

Genera] Sales Offices, PITTSBURGH, Pa. 
Works, Latrobe, Pa. 



f.-* ' I 



•K '"^""^S 



^~: 



iaWi^ 



y>» 



*2*?r* 



.Jtt-r. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



17 



W^OLFRAM 

HIGH SPEED STEEL 



VULCAN 

TOOL STEELS 

for Every Purpose 

Vulcan Special Vanadium For Punches 
and Dies. Has wonderful wearing 
qualities. 

Vulcan Non-Shrinkable For Intricate 
Dies. Does not warp. Does not shrink. 

Vulcan Regal No. 2 -For Fine Finishing 
Tools. The highest grade tungsten 
finishing steel. 

Vulcan Hecla -For work requiring great 
strength. The first high grade Chrome 
Vanadium steel produced in America. 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 




Vulcan Crucible Steel Co. 



ALIQUIPPA Established 1900 

'^ Makers of Wolfram High Speed Steel 



PA., U. S. A. 



BRANCH RS : 

. ,.• 102 Purchase Street MnotrcBl ; 

t6-}S So. Clinlon Sircet • Kewrarlt, N- 
31^ \\-.v relet', aph Bt^is.- JSi. i^\.j> 



. . Herald Bids. 

52 No, Uih Stroei 
i2^ Inicrnalioual l/ifc BIdg. 



!'.■.:■: 





18 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 




HIGH SPEED STEEL 
INTRA S TEEL GIBRAL TAR S TEEL 

Tool Steel for Every Purpose 

Twist Drills, Taps, Hack Saw Blades, Milling Cutters, Files, Etc., 

Music Wire for Springs, Steel Balls. 

Cold Rolled Mild Steel for Shafting, Etc. 

We call to your particular attention that we make a specialty of 
and solicit your inquiries for 

Circular Saws — for wood and for hot or cold metal cutting 
Machine Knives — for cutting wood, paper, tobacco, agricultural. 

H. BOKER & CO., INC., 332 St. James St., Montreal, P.Q. 



IMPERIAL GENUINE BABBITT MET Al.'^''^iZi''faL'::f' 




rr/-^^ 







Made specially for all HIGH SPEED. HEAVY ENGINES and EXTRAORDINARY HARD WORK 



Manufactured and euaranteed to give eiceilent service by 



THE CANADA METAL COMPANY, Limited, ^"^vlfuE TORONTO, ^i^,'^' v'f r."', 



HOYT METALS 



"Frost King" 
"Trojan" 

Nickle Genuine 
BABBITTS 



Hoyt Metals have been used with great success for 
many years. 

Put them to the test and you'll soon see a difference in 
your babbitt cost- 
All elements entering into our mixtures are carefully 
refined and put together in such proportions and in such 
relation to each other that the best possible alloy is 
secured for the work for which it is designed. 
.\nnaal sales over $5,000,000. 

Hoyt Metal, Co. Toronto 

New York, N.Y. London, Eng. St. Louis, Mo. 




April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



19 




Why Worry? Bring It To Us If It Is a Forging. 

Canadian Billing & Spencer Plant 

Welland 



















ALL SIZES FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 



HAMMOND STEEL CO., SYRACUSE, N.Y. 

Detroit Office :— 1257 DAVID WHITNEY BLDG. 
Buffalo Office :.-792 ELLICOTT SQUARE 
New York Office :-312 HUDSON TERMINAL 



20 



CANADIAN MAC H I N E R Y 



Volume XXI. 




New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, Canada 




FINISHED COUPLING SHAFT, 18 IN. DIAMETER BY 21 FT. LONG 

Heavy Marine Engine Forgings in 
the Rough or Finish Machined 

Our Steel Plant at Sydney Mines, N.S., together with our Steam Hydraulic Forge Shop 
and modernly equipped Machine Shop at New Glasgow, N.S., place us in position to 
supply promptly Marine Engine Crank and Propeller Shafting, Piston and Connect- f 
ing Rods; also Marine and Stationary Steam Turbine Shafting of all diameters and 
lengths, either as forgings or complete ready for installation, and equal to the best on 

the American Continent. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



21 




Crucible 

AND 

Open Hearth Steel 
Tool Steel 



^^ADrn^' BRAND cTrn 

AlVuU HIGH-SPEED O 1 EiLL 



The John Illingworth Steel Co. 

1856 



Frankford, 
New York Office 



Phila. 
217 Broadway 



RALPH B. NORTON, AGENT 
Montreal, Canada 



Philadelphia GEAR Works 

VINE STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Spur, Bevel, Spiral, Herringbone and Intermittent 

GEARS and PINIONS 

Made in all kinds of metals, rawhide and fibre 



SOCKET WHEELS 

MADE TO ORDER 
DISTRIBUTORS OF 

DIAMOND CHAINS 

For Power Transmission, Machinery 

and Motor Trucks, Motor-Cycles and 

Bicycles. 

We ship gears to all parts of Canada. 

Write us when you want pood grears. 

t'ood service, good prices. 

(Jet our Catalogue: "All About Ciears." 




BEVEL 
BEVELS 



CANADIAN M A C II I N E R Y 



Volume XXI. 



Chapman 

Double Ball Bearings 

CONSERVE POWER! There is too much power going 
to waste the world over. This fact has been noted by 
the British Government and sweeping reforms are con- 
templated in Great Britain. 

Canada also wastes much power. A reform is necessary here, too. 
Babbitt bearings are being used too often where Chapman Double Ball 
Bearings should prevail. The adoption of Chapman Double Ball Bear- 
ings, wherever an axle or shafting needs support in the transmission of 
power, results in a saving of 75% of friction loss. 

Now in use in over 2,000 Canadian factories. Fit any adjustable 
hanger. Adopted by Canadian and United States Governments. 

Write for full story of their efficiency. 

Chapman Double Ball Bearing Company of Canada, Ltd. 

Room 408 Shaughnessy Bldg., Montreal. 339-351 Sorauren Ave., TORONTO, Canada. 
Transmission Ball Bearing Co., Inc., 1050 Military Road, Buffalo, N.Y. 




A ''Strikingly Different'* 

WALL RADIAL 
DRILL . 

This is a real machine tool. Care- 
ful design and high-grade materials 
contribute to its great success and 
economy. Much wider range is 
possible on this drill than the or- 
dinary radial. The head is excep- 
tionally rigid, yet moves with ex- 
treme ease from end to end of 
arm. For the crowded shop this 
drill is ideal, as when not in use 
it can be pushed back out of the 
way. 

MADE IN FOUR STANDARD 
SIZES 

Rated Drills to Wall to 

size center of end of arm 

7 ft. 14 ft. circle 10 ft. 

9 ft. 18 ft. circle 12 ft. 

11 ft. 22 ft. circle 14 ft. 

13 ft. 26 ft. circle 16 ft. 

F.O.B. Boston, Mass. 



/?£fitEWAaL£ BftOrfZE Bu.'j". 




Af^o Cou/vre/ts/fi/Jf/MG 



Ball. Tnjfusr Sea/^z/vg --■'" 

lAftfaE. Sf>MOL£ AcCUftATCLY Gkol/vo 



OA*9S£ P/rcH R^C/< 

'Afo ^ MoKse Zaf>£/f 



LYND-FARQUHAR COMPANY 



419-425 Atlantic Avenue 



BOSTON, MASS 






April 3, 1919 CANADIAN MACHINERY 



23 




"Not Steel but its Master" 



PROPER PROCEDURE + STELLITE ^ PRODUCTION AND ECONOMY 



One of Toronto's new industries was 
presented by us with a Tool-Holder Bit of 
No. 3 STELLITE to try out on Cast Iron. 

They made tests with the best brands of 
High Speed Steel as against STELLITE, 
and found that they were able to ran at 
double the speed and feed by using 
STELLITE. 

"AS A MATTER OF FACT A TOOL 
BIT OF %-inch square STELLITE HAS 
TURNED OFF 35,000 TIMES ITS OWN 
WEIGHT OF CAST IRON IN TEN DAYS." 

As a consequence of their own tests they 
laid out their transmission to accommodate 
STELLITE and are now getting a much 
larger production than they had estimated. 

We visited them recently and warned 
the Superintendent to save his shop-ends of 
STELLITE. as they were worth $2.00 per 
pound to his firm. 

This was like getting money from home, 
as he had already decided to use STELLITE 
without this added incentive. 

ASK FOR DEMONSTRATION, 



Deloro Smelting & Refining Company, Limited 

TORONTO H.O. and WORKS: DELORO, ONT. MONTREAL 

200 King Street West 315 Craig Street West 



24 



CANADIAN M A C H I N E R Y 



Volume XXI, 




Silent Chain Drives Help Pre- 
vent Tools From * Shattering'' 

ON horizontal boring mills, where the columns must 
often be located far apart, the tools are likely to 
"chatter" if the power application is not uniform and 
steady. 

Link-Belt Silent Chain Drives transmit the power from motor 
to machine in a steady, uniform, positive "stream". There is no 
slippage. And yet, the chain cushions the machine against shock 
when heavy loads are suddenly applied. 

Link-Belt Silent Chain Drives lengthen the life of the driven 
machine, improve the product, save power, save floor space, and in- 
crease production. 

They are "flexible as a belt, positive as a gear, more efficient 
than either." Our Machine Tool Drive Book No. 312 gives details. 
Send for a copy. 

CANADIAN LINK-BELT CO., LTD. 
WELLINGTON and PETER STS., TORONTO 








SILENT CHAIN DRIVES 



We Also Make 

n Elevators and Conveyors 

a Link-Belt and Sprockets 

DSilent Chain Drives 

n Truck and TractorChains 

D Electric Hoists 

D Locomotive Cranes 

DWagfon Loaders 

DCoal and Ashes Systems 

Write for Catalogs 
Place X in Square 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



25 




INTERNAL AND SURFACE 

GRINDING 

If you do surface or internal grinding one of these three will handle your 
work to best advantage. 

The CYLINDER GRINDER will take care of all work that.cannot be rotated 
to advantage, such as two, four or six cylinders en bloc, and awkward large size 
castings of any material. 

The INTERNAL GRINDER produces absolutely accurate holes, either 
straight or taper, in hardened steel, iron or bronze. It is ideal on bushings, 
gears, collars, ball bearing races and a thousand other parts, where accuracy 
and production are essential. 

The SURFACE GRINDER delivers at a commercial rate a mirror finish on 
keys, rings, cutters, dies, discs, collars; in fact any shaped part whose size l.'^ 
within the capacity of the chuck. 

Send for a Complete Folder Catalog 

The Heald Machine Company 

WORCESTER, MASS., U.S.A. 



26 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



Standard the 
World Over 



'""^^^^^r^^ 



THE "RACINE" 




Use "Racine" HS Tungsten 
Power Blades 



The Machine 
for High Speed 
Metal Cutting 

To successfully meet 
competition in the fu- 
ture you must adopt 
modern machines; ma- 
chines that mean qual- 
ity as well as quantity 
production. The RA- 
CINE is the tool you 
need. It increases 
speed, minimizes waste, 
reduces cost and is ab- 
solutely accurate. 
Equipped with patented auto- 
matic lifting device which raises 
the blade of the non-cutting 
stroke and eliminates all drag- 
ging and strain on the blades. 
This means a saving in material, 
increased speed, long life for 
blades and greater production. 
Let us explain the machine 
fullv. Write. 

RACINE TOOL 
& MACHINE CO. 

Melbourne Avenue 

RACINE, WIS., U.S.A. 



SIMONDS 

HACK SAW BLADES 

U NEaUALED IN QUALITY ANY SIZE OR LENGTH 

Simbnds Canada Saw Co. LimitecL 

ST, JOHN MONTREAL VANCOUVER. 



rrTTTTT 



h'EAVV F-iACHIiHiM SAW BLADE 



mm^ 



IS C. I7C &^Hl6 C THICK' 
10 TEETH ^^TO INCH 



Vt'TOZ WIDE ACCORDING TO ^H TYPE K SPEED OF MACHINE 



^^^^l^^^^^l^^T^^^^^^^l' 



AGENTS IN CANADIAN TOWNS WANTED 



ENOX 

Hacksaw Blades 

ARE THE BEST 



Sole Makers : 



Liberal Terms offered to firms willing to carry 
stocks and act as sole agents for the district. 



ENOX 



LfCHT ^MACHINE BLADE 

21 THICK Uvii,V> WIDE 
14 TEEThHtOINCM * 



FRY'S (LONDON) LIMITED 




SAW BLADCS 




AN ENTIRELY BRITISH COMPANY 
46 Upper Th.me. St, London. E.C. 4, England. Wort. : Greenwich. S.E. 10 

Agerjts for Canada, East of Fort William: - .,.... — ... - 

"^"^ ^ wm^l'^'^B v't'i",'''!'''' ^ SUPPLIES, LIMITED. 261 Notre Dame St. West. MONTREAL. QUE. 

^^"^"'^ to- B"tu.h Columb.a-The A. R. Williams Machinery Co.. Limited. 495 Railway St.. Vancouver. B.C. 



pril 3, 1019 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



27 




28 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



90-inches 

in diameter 



Cut on right shows 
Tooth Saw used by 
ting gun forgings. 
tooth saw blade we 
made in the United 
—1" plate, 1 5/16" 
speed steel teeth, 
3,000 lbs. 



a Hunter Duplex Inserted 
the Erie Forge Co. for cut- 
It is the largest inserted 
know of ever having been 
States or any other country 
kerf, and contains 56 high- 
and weighs approximately 




No matter what your sawing re- 
quirements may be, there is a Hun- 
ter "Duplex" Saw that is just right 
for the work. The discs are made 
of Chrome-Vanadium Steel, oil 
treated. 

Hot Saws, Friction Discs, Solid 
Blades made of Vanadium, Tung- 
sten and Chrome Alloy Steels. Saw 
Sharpening Machines. Inserted 
Tooth Grinders. Hardened Steel 
Specialties. Write for prices. 





^^4^ 



Hunter Saw & Machine Co. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A. 



STERLING 

HACK SAWS 

Are known the woi-ld over for their 
efficient cutting quality which 
insures economy and satis- 
faction. 




YdU will make oo 
mistake in h u y i n g 
"Sterling" Blades for the 
f:illowing reasons. 
1st — They are made of the very 
liest quality of steel mllt'd liy any mill 
in the world. 
■Jnd — The best mechanical construction which 
UH been acquired by many years of experience. 
•]rd — Sijccial heat treatment which goes to make the 
ciiifiency lioth for maximum quality and uniformity. 

A trial inill convince you. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works 

BUFFALO, N.Y., U.S.A. 



pri! 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



29 




S\lt 




YOUR 



GETTING 




^mnn 




The high cost of tools should emphasize more than evier the impor- 
tance of quality. 

The high cost of hack saw blades ought to drive every hand blade 
user over to thte saw that does not break in ordinary hand work. 

VICTOR FLEXIBLE HACK SAW BLADES have exacUy the same 
cutting power as the finest All-Hard on the market, and that they 
cannot be broken in use except by intentional abuse is an undispu- 
table fact — which will represent a saving from twenty-five percent 
to thirty-three and one-third percent in breakage alone. 

Seventy-five percent of the All-Hard blades used in hand frames 
break before they are worn out. Watch the All-Hard blades in 
your own shop and see the enormous amount of breakage — then 
use VICTOR FLEXIBLES and note the economy. 



Victor Saw^ Works lib-Hamilton,Canada 



VICTOR 




30 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 




Perfect Wire Straightening Quickly and Profitably Done on Our 

Automatic Wire Straightening and Cutting Machine 

Just put your coil of wire on the reel, adjust the rolls and dies, and set the gauge for 
the length you want. The machine does the rest — thousands of feet per day, perfectly 
straight and cut to accurate lengths. 
Catalogue tells more about them, and we'll be glad to send you a copy. 

THE F. B. SHUSTER CO., New Haven, Conn. 

FORMERLY JOHN ADT & SON ESTABLISHED 1866 

ALSO MAKERS OF STRAIGHTENERS FOR SQUARES, HEXAGONS, FLATS, ETC. 



^ tt fl 



■ iU'l.U'(J 







The 





Universal Grinder 

For General Tool Room Work 

This Grinder is furnished with attachments for 
grinding all sorts of milling cutters, reamers, 
2ounterbores, and other machine shop tools. 

It is also suitable for cylindrical, internal and 
flat work which frequently turns up in the mak- 
ing of tools and jigs. 

These attachments are all very simple in design 
and easily adjusted upon the machine, being 
graduated so that any desired angles can be at 
once obtained. 

The whole machine is thoroughly well built, 
well finished, and will be found a dependable, 
convenient grinder. 

Greenfield Machine Company, 

GREENFIELD, MASS., U.S.A. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



31 



RICKERT-SHAFER 



The smooth drive reduces the strain on 
the taps — they wear longer — and there 
are fewer delays from taps breaking in 
the work. 

R-S Tappers ensure faster tapping and 

quicker assemblins. 

Friction drive, absorbing all the 

shock, allows a chuck speed of 

140 r.p.m. on ^-in. work — 50 

per cent, faster than the usual 

tapping speed for that size. Uses 

but I h.p. 

Write for specifications 

The Rickert-Shafer Co. 

ERIE, PA., U.S.A. 

'RED HERBERT. Foreign Agent, Coventry. England 



Save Tap Breakage 




Silve 




D 



r s ur\ 



Fast, Strong, Accurate and Dependable 
Drills with an experience of 65 years 
behind them — they can be depended on 
to finish the work and do it right. 

The 20 is made in four distinct 
styles with round or square base, 
and can be furnished singly or in 
gangs of 2, 3, or 4 spindles. 

The 25" has eight spindle speeds 
and six positive geared ^^eeds. 

Send for full description 
and quotations. 

The Silver Mfg. Co. 

290 Broadway 
SALEM - - OHIO 




32 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI, 




HENRY & WRIGHT 

Drilling Machines 




The Henry & Wright Mfg. Co. 

Hartford, Conn. 

CaDadlso Fairt>anks-More« Co.. Montre*:, Torooto, Winnipeg: 
A. R. Williams Machinery Co., Toronto. St. John. N.B. ; 
H. W. Petrie, Ltd.. Toronto; WlUSams & Wllaon. Montreal ; 
Rudel-Belnap Machinery Co., Montreal; Canada Machinery Corp.. 
Oalt. Ont- ; Geo. F. Foss Machinery 4 Supply Co.. Montreal 
Gf-neraJ Supply Co.. Montreal. 



WE BUILD 
THEM BY 
HUNDREDS 

Standardized Pro- 
duction enables us to 
offer this powerful 
Waterbury Grinder at such a low price. 
It grinds rapidly and accurately, all 
flat surfaces, dies, punches, planer, 
lathe, and other tools. Has adjustable 
table and tool rest with large radius of 
travel. Rigid, 3-point table supports 
giving great steadiness. A reliable, 
practical grinding outfit. 



Klake A Johnaon Ca^ Waterbnrr, Conn. 



April 3; 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



33 



i'S0t 






Beaver Brand 
Metals 

Copper, Brass, Bronze, Canada Silver, and Gilding Metal 
in sheets, rolls, plates and rods. Naval Bronze, Yellow 
Metal and Muntz Metal in sheets and rods for shipbuilding 
requirements. Specify Beaver Brass Rod for drilling and 
free cutting. Extruded shapes. 



■ ■«^'sp-««- ""^^-^ tKiSlf-VliM 



r*''»^!w^ 






■N««l%^ 



N»»#! 



I.ti 



ii- * 



'*>»»», 



*»*■•. 



'**», 






Seamless rirass and Copper Tubes. 

Guaranteed Ingot Metals— Yellow, Red and Composition Ingots. 

We are Purchasers of Copper Bearing Material. 

Link DP with Beaver Brand Products — you'll like the quality, price and •erric*. 

Brown's Copper & Brass Rolling 
Mills, Limited 

New Toronto, Ont.,SCan. 



-Tl^ ?1 



IBROWN'SI 



34 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 






IV^ADE IN CANADA 



Malleable 



Cast Iron 



PIPE FITTINGS 

Both Screwed or Flanged, 
Black or Galvanized— All Sizes 



litii I!I!T¥7FIIM 



MALLEABLE AND 
GREY IRON 

CASTINGS 



For General Machine Shop 
Work, for Manufacturers 
of Automobiles and Speci- 
alty Manufacturers. 



Quality 
Products 



We have the facilities for filling your orders 

with exceptional promptness. Annual 

capacity 6,000 tons. 




International Malleable Iron Co., Limited 

Guelph, Ontario 



April 3. 1919 



C A N A D I A N MACHINERY 



as 




Knight Heart Brand 
Belt in the plant of the 
Model Mill Company, 
Johnston City, Tenn. It 
is 24 inches ' wide, 
double-thick. It trans- 
mits 241 Horse Power. 
H has been in continu- 
ous hard service for five 
years. Its cost per 
week has been $1.35, o-r 
five mills per horse 
power, per week. 



Power and the Right Material 



I^eather is the right material 
for belting. It is firm. It is 
strong. It ha.s permanent pow- 
er of expansion and contrac- 
tion. It is tough, but it yields 
in the right degree, at the right 
time. It is easily and repeated- 
ly spliced or repaired. It 
stands mauling by shifters. 
Side-slai)ping won't fray it. 
Even after long use it can be 
cut into narrow belts and goes 
on with its good work. 

Leather stands alone as to 
these characteristics. It is Na- 
ture's contribution to power 
transmission needs. No other 
known substance is like it in 
wearing qualities. And no 
other belting material success- 
fully replaces it. 

There is no mystery aliont 
the quality of the leather in 
riraton & Knight Standardized 
-Series Belts. It's in the tan- 



nlny — an operation based on 
the work to he done. The 
yearly output of our tannery 
is nearly 300,000 hides. That 
makes you sure of uniform 
quality for any given specifica- 
tion. For there is a wide scope 
of selection from such a moun- 
tain of leather. 

Graton & Knight Standard- 
ized Series Belts are made to 
give the longest possible service 
at the smallest pos,sible cost. 
Tho.se who \ise them say that 
they do. 

Many of the best-belted 
plants ask us to specify the belt- 
ing for every drive. Try the 
plan yourself. Then, when 
buying, call for "Graton & 
Knight Brand — or equal." 
This won't commit you to buy- 
ing our beltv«. It will put your 
buying on the one basic con- 
.sideration - — the work to be 
done. 




Write for new hook ahoui SlanJarJheJ Leather Belting 

THE.GRATON & KNIGHT MFG. COMPANY, Worcester Mass., U.S.A. 

Oak Leather Tanners. Maliars of Leather Belting, Lace Leather. Packings, and Specialties 

, BRANCHES AND DISTRIBUTORS IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES 

Canadian Graton & Knight, Ltd. .'Montreal. Canadian Representatives: Tlie 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Ltd., St. John. Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
Hamilton. Ouebec. Calgary, Saskatoon, Vancouver. Windsor. Winnipeg, Victoria 



36 



C A N A D I A N M A C H I N E R Y 



Volume X 



"We tried Goodyear Extra Power on 

our hardest pull before ordering in large 

lots" 

"Now we have decided to replace with 

Goodyear Extra Power all other types 

of belt as they wear out" 



The experience of the Pease 
Foundry Co., of Brampton, is 
the experience of hundreds of 
other users of belting in Canada. 
Read what Mr. J. G. McKin- 
non. Manager of the Brampton 
plant, says in his recent letter 
to us: 

"Your Extra Power Belting is 
giving us splendid satisfaction. We 
were averse to trying Extra Power. 
Imt now we are .sorry we did not use 
it when we installed onr latest 
equipment. 

"We now have about $1 .r>00 worth 
in use in our plant. 

"We tried Extra Power on our 
hardest jiiill hefove ordering in large 
lots. 

■'Now we have decided to replace 
with E.xtra Power all other types of 
lelt a- ihey wear out." 

Such tests as this are the basis of 
the astonishing success of Goodyear 
Extra Power Belting. Where unusual 
service was needed — Goodyear Extra 
Power made good. The result has 
been a vast sale of Extra Power for 
ordinar)' drives — the "day-in-and- 
daA'-out" drives that factory men 
want to equip with good belts and 
forget. 



Improved service and lower belt- 
ing costs have come wherever Good- 
year Extra Power Belting has been 
installed. 

Often it has overcome conditions 
under which other belts failed com- 
pletely. 

In many plants it has speeded 
production amazingly. 

Always it has cut belting costs a-nd 
power cost. 

The particular construction of 
Goodyear Extra Power makes it 
tremendously strong, yet flexible and 
pulley-hugging. A friction surfacr 
assures efficient delivery of power to 
the pulleys. 

We train men to solve belting 
problems. The Goodyear Belting 
man has a big story to tell you. Per- 
haps he may help you. His servace 
involves no obligation. 

The Goodyear Tire & 
Rubber Co. of Canada 

Limited 

UrattrJirs: Halifax, St. John, Montreal, 
Oftaira. Toronto, Hamilton, London, 
Winnipeg. Rrrjina, Calgary, Edmonton,, 
['flncoinv'c. Sfrrirr .^torkx in .'^nailer 
cities. 







I 



April :i, 191!) 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



37, 



ALGOMA STEEL C0RP0R\TION.OD. 

SAULT STE. MARIE. ONTARIO 




BLOOMS, 
BILLETS, 
SLABS. 

STRUCTURAL 

STEEL 

ME,RCHANT 



CONCRETE 

REINFORCING 

BARS 

IRON. BRASS 
AND BRONZE 

CASTINGS 




Charging and Withdrawing Crane 

Sulphuric Acid. Nitre Cake 



snrE:.E:L 

RAILS 

Open Hearth Quality 

(All Sections from IZibs 

to 100 lbs per yard) 

SPLICE, 

BARS 

STEEL 

TIE PLATES 

PIG IRON 

BASIC. FOUNDRY- 
BESSEMER 

SULPHATE OF 

AMMONIA 




CENEKA), VlhVV Ol IHK t-I-ANi' Ul- rHE AI.GU.MA SI EEL ruKl'UKA'l" ION 1 HUM THE WATERI'RONl' 



38 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



imvt 



T i V 



^#>-. 



W 



I 



IW-' 



"W^'r 



In these days of gigantic demand Nortons 
everywhere keep production up 

Here's a grinding job up in Vermont at the Jones & Lamson plant. 
It's a Drum Drive Shaft for a J & L TuiTet Machine. The material 
is machine steel and its rough size is 1 9 '32 in. x 1 17/32 in. x 
1 25/32 in. x 1 13 32 in. The finished size is I14 in. x II/2 in- x 1% 
in. X 1% in. 

A limit is set of .0005 in. — and maintained at the rate of 28 com- 
plete shafts per day. 

Isn't an installation— in a plant so thoroughly well known in the 
quality field as Jones & Lamson — an endorsement for Nortons that 
you can't afford to overlook when you are ready for grinding 
machines? 

Norton Grinding Company, Worcester, Mass. 

Chicago Store : 11 North Jefferson Street 

Canadian Agents: 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Company, Limited 



St. John 
Windsor 



Quebec 
Winnipeg 



Montreal 
Saskatoon 



Ottawa 
Calgary 



Toronto 
Vancouver 



Hamilton 
Victoria 



April 3, 1!)19 



(J A i\ A D 1 A N M A C H I N E R Y 



39 




SPECIAL 
SERVICE 

To Concerns Who Make 
Their Own Tools 

We supply Davidson- 
ized High-speed Steel 
Blanks in the semi- 
finished state, harden- 
ed and finished within 
grinding size (about 
.015 to .020 stock to be 
removed from working 
surfaces). This en- 
ables the user to ob- 
tain these tools of un- 
equalled quality at a 
cost which compares 
most favorably with 
that of tools made 
from the solid bar. 




Faster ! 

Faster ! Faster ! 



Lower production costs! Every day they are be- 
coming more important. Facing a period of re- 
adjustment and rapid changes, with increasingly 
keen competition in home m^'rkets and the un- 
precedented opportunity to compete favorably 
abroad, right now is the time to reduce your pro- 
duction costs by speeding up! 

Increase Production With 

DAVIDSONIZED 

HIGH-SPEED STEEL TOOLS 

As evidence that these tools tvill enable you to increase your pro- 
duction radically, we quote from one of our great American gun 



plants: — 



30% Increase in Cutting Speed 



"Please be advised that we placed into production the Formed 
Milling Cutters received from you for milling the sectors on 
breech blocks made of 3H% nickel steel, and obtained an increase 
of 30% in cutting speed to secure the same number of pieces in 
production before it became necessary to re-grind, using same 
feed and depth of cut." 

Think What This Would Mean in Your Plant 

Any equipment that will increase production is worth considering, even 
if it involves added investment. But using Davidsonized tools does net 
require that; you need tools anyway. And your increased output through 
the use of Davidsonized tools will cut down the percentage cost of all 
the important items that make up your overhead — space, depreciation 
of costly machines, labor, etc. The cost of every milling operation in vour 
plant will be reduced in two ways through the use of Davidsonized High 
Speed Steel Cutters — first, by the increased output per machine per 
hour; second, if Davidsonized cutters are run under only same conditions 
as others, by the greater mimber of pieces per grinding obtainable. The 
latter feature will lower tool costs to an extent which makes these tools 
far more economical than any others. 

DAVIDSONIZED HIGH-SPEED STEEL TOOLS are revolutionizing pro- 
duction standards. We guarantee them to out-perform any others you 
ire using, whether of your own Or outside make, and to outlast them. 
If they do not make good this guarantee, it is your privilege to return 
them and we will cancel all charges. 

Besides its convenience, saving of time and elimination of your loss by 
tracking in hardening, Davidson "Special Service" gives you better tools 
which increase production and last longer. Send us a trial order; our 
iruarantee prevents risk. Correspondence invited. 

THE DAVIDSON TOOL MFG. CORPORATION 

Main Office: 118-122'Maiden Lane, New York 
Works : 56-62 North 6th Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. 




40 



( • A N A T A .\ M A C H I N E R Y 



Volume XXI. 



McDougall Shapers 

These are up-to-date Shapers, 
designed for modern shop 
production. 

They are plain in design., yet 
embody all essential features 
necessary for efficient work. 

Every adjustment is conveni- 
ent for the operator and fine 
for the most accurate work. 

Let us have your enquiry. 

The R. McDougall Company 
Limited 

Manufacturers 
GALT, ONTARIO, CANADA 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Company, Limited 
Sales Agents 




U. S. Electric 
Drills and Grinders 

Save Time, Labor and Money 

They can be at- 
tached to any lamp 
socket. 

For drilling in 
metal they are su- 
perior to any other 
kind of portable 
drill. Cost 50% less 
to run than air 
drills. 




3 SIZES 

3-16 in., W.G.T.. e lbs. 

Vt in., W.G.T. 9 lbs 

%in.. W.G.T. 12 lbs. 

All motors wound for 
110 or 220 TDlts. 

Direct or alternating 
current. 

Try a few of our 
Electric Drills and 
Grinders and you'll 
send us an order for 
more. Our gniaran- 
tee protects you. 




%" and 114 

Universal Motor 

DRILL. 



For Sale By 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Limited 



Montreal, St. John, N.B., Toronto, 
Vancouver 



Winnipeg, Calgary. 



THE UNITED STATES ELECTRICAL TOOL CO. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 



I 



PXH 

TRAOe MARK 

SERVICE 

Our new factory is now completed. 
Ninety Thousand Square Feet of floor 
space are equipped with the most efficient 
appliances and machinery, devoted exclu- 
sively to the production of 

QUALITY FILES 

The same meticulous care will be ob- 
served as in the past in every stage of 
manufacture, and we shall continue to use 
Best Clay Crucible Cast Steel for all shapes 
and sizes of Files. 

May we serve YOU? 

Ingersoll File Company, Limited 



INGERSOLL 



ONTARIO 



John Morrow Screw & Nut Co., Ltd. 

INGERSOLL, ... ONT 

Sole Selling Agents 






THAOe MARK 



April 3, 1919 



r A N A D I A N MACHINERY 



41 




EED-DRENSCE POMPANY 

WORCESTER ^0^ MASS. U.S.A. 



THE FIRST CHANCE YOU HAVE 

TO WATCH ONE OF THESE MACHINES AT WORK, STOP FOR JUST A FEW MINUTES 
AND STUDY IT. 

THE CONVENIENT LOCATION OF ALL OPERATING LEVERS, THE MANY SPEEDS AND 
FEEDS, AND THE IMPOSING SOLIDNESS OF DESIGN WILL SUGGEST TO YOU THE 
WORTHINESS OF A "REED-PRENTICE" FOR YOUR WORK. 

WE WILL GLADLY SEND YOU A CATALOGUE OF OUR LIGHT AND HEAVY DUTY 
RADIALS. 



CANADIAN FAIRBANKS-MORSE CO.. LIMITED. CANADA 

MANNING. MAXWELL & MOORE. INC.. NEW YORK 

FENWICK FRERES. PARIS 




42 



C A N A D I A N :M' A C H I N E R Y 



Volume XXI. 





NORTON COMR.VN\', 

-»VOItCESTER,MASS. 



No. 39A 



The Right Abrasive 
for Grinding Glass 

It is well known that Alundum, an aluminous 
abrasive, grinds better on materials of high tensile 
strength, and Crystolon, a carbide of silicon abra- 
sive, is more satisfactory on materials of low 
tensile strength. In the case of glass we have a 
material that is, so to speak, on the border line. 
There are several instances where Crystolon is be- 
ing used in one shop and Alundum in another on 
very similar work. Obscure differences in the 
grinding conditions or in the operations may make 
one of the two abrasives slightly superior to the 
other. The following examples, therefore, are only 
a guide as to the wheels and grain more commonly 
used on different kinds of glass cutting or grinding. 

For deep, medium and fine mitres in rich cut 
glass "Alundum stones" have long proved to be 
without a rival. This same wheel is also remarkably 
successful in work on light ware or when used as 
an engraving tool. 

Both Alundum and Crystolon grain are used for 
general glass roughing and for roughing mitres in 
cut glass with an iron wheel or "mill." Here, owing 
to their purity, the artificial abrasives proved their 
great superiority. There are no impurities in any 
quantity or large sized grains which are so apt to 
cause chipping and other troubles. Grain size 90 
is commonly recommended for this work. 

Crystolon is used extensively for beveling mir- 
rors and plate glass and for many surfacing and 
sdging operations. It is also used on many little 
known operations such as surfacing glass laps and 
jgrinding the seats of glass valve sockets. 

In the case of surfacing lenses or in squaring their 
edges Alundum is largely employed and some very 
remarkable tests have only recently been reported 
on this work. One lense manufacturer emphatical- 
ly says "There will never be anv more emery in 
our shop if we can get Alundum." 

The use of Alundum and Crystolon on glass was 
chosen for the subject of this week's "Notes on 
Grinding," because this class of work is out of the 
ordinary and because we wished to emphasize that 
no matter how unusual your grinding or polishing 
operations are there is a correct kind and size of 
Norton abrasive to fit your requirements. Our Sales 
Engineering Department is able, by years of ex- 
perience, to recommend what should be sent you on 
trial. Whv should you not take advantage of this 
service? It has been responsible for cutting down 
the production costs in hundreds of shops. Why 
not yours ? 

NORTON COM P J NY 

Canadian Agents:— The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Ltd.. Montreal 
Toronto, Ottawa, St. John, N.B., Winnipeg, Calgary, Saskatoon, 
Vancouver, Victoria. F. H. Andrews & Son, Quebec, Que. 
Grinlinj Wiisil PJaitj, Wjrcistar, Mass. 



tLECTHIC FURNaCE PLANTS 
HIAGAfrA FALLS. H. V. CMIPPAWA. ONT, 



E 




NEW YORK STORE CHICAGO STORE 

IS1 CHAMBERS ST. 1 I NO JEFFERSON ST 



. ."Ti-B^ 



MARK YOUR PRODUCTS 
THE "MATTHEWS" WAY 




"Matthews-made" steel stamps 
and lettering dies make easily 
read and durable marks on all 
classes of products. Matthews 
Champion Type Holders — for 
flat and convex surfaces — with 
interchangeable Steel Type, 
save time and lower marking 
costs. Matthews Inspection 
Hammers of best Pittsburgh 
Steel, are fashioned with the 
"know how" of over 50 years' 
experience. 

Booklet "For Light and Heavy 

Marking" sent on request. 

Write for a copy of it. 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Limited 

Montreal, Toronto. St. John, Quebec, Ottawa, Hamilton, 

WincUor, Winnipeg, Saskatoon. Calvary. Vanconver. 

Victoria. 

Jas, H. Matthews & Co. - Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Steel Lettering Dies and Stamps 



A 

Ker. U.S. Pat, Offlca. 

"METALWOOD" 

Hydraulic and Hydro-Pneu- 
matic Quick Operating 
Presses for Straightening, 
Forcing and Broaching oper- 
ations. 

Hydraulic Accumulator Sys- 
tems complete; Pumps, 
Valves, Forged Steel High 
Pressure Fittings, etc. 

Metalwood Manufacturing Co. 

Detroit, Michigan 

Sate* ReprmsentativKB 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Ltd., Montreal and Toronto 
R. E. Ellis Engineering Co,, 621 Washington Blvd., Chisago 
Fairbanks-Morse & Co.. Inc., 30 Church St., New York CItj 
Sherritt & Stoer Co.. Inc., Finatice Bldg.. Philadelphia. Pa 



April 3, 1919 



C A N A D IAN MACHINERY 



43 




Steel Economy 



These machines 

fully described 

in Machine Tool 

Catalog 

No. 39 



Got 



yours .' 




The use of Nutter & Barnes Automatic 
Metal Cutting- Off Saw Machines in the steel 
shed effect a real economy in steel. 

These high-powered machines drive cm 
exceptionally small, narrow saw, considering 
their capacity. Consequently the wastage of 
steel is reduced to a minimum. 

On the other hand, they are big pro- 
ducers. Nutter & Barnes Cold Saws are 
used by some of the largest shops in the 
world. They can help you ! 



r MACHINE tool"] 
L DIVISION J 



Products 

Taps and Dies 

Screw Plates 

Reamers 

Ga^es 

Pipe Tools 

Opening Die Heads 

Machine Tools 

Threading Madunes 

Lathes £Screw Machines 

Grinding Machines 

Cutting Off Machines 

Saw Sharpeners 



Greenfield Tap and Die Corporation 

GREENFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 
Canadian Agents: 

WELLS BROS CO. OF CANADA, LTD. 



GALT 



ONTARIO 



44 



CANADIAN M A C H I N E R Y 



Volume XXI. 





Service 



Regarding this 
point there can 
be no question. 

Gisholt Service, 
in the matter of 
company organi- 
zation, sat isfies 
b y offering t o 
users a n d pros- 
pective users of 
Gisholt Tools the attention of Spe- 
cialists trained to give every aid 
toward the solution of shop prob- 
lems. 

Gisholt Turret Lathes 

Let this point sink in. Gisholt Turret Lathes are dependable to 
the "highest" degree. The good impression they make is lasting. 
rather than fleeting. They are machines one never tires of — 
machines one likes to give work to beca'use of the assured pro- 
duction. 

Will you let us tell you more about them? 

GISHOLT MAC 

Builders of Standard and Automatic Turret Lai • 

Small T 

E. Washington A^ 

Eastern Sales Office: 30 Church Street, New '^ 

Canadian Agents : The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Ltd! 

Winnipeg. Saskatoon. CaV^ 



pril :!, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



45 




satisfies 



Gisholt Service, in the matter of 
machines, satisfies by offering to 
users tools and machines design- 
ed to accomplish certain definite 
production objects. 

Gisholt machines are only a 
means to an end, that end being 
maximum production at lowest 
cost. 



Gisholt Tool Grinders 

Designed to encourage production and dis- 
courage idleness amonK workmen who are 
now forced to waste their time, and yours, 
waiting for a turn at the emery stand. 

A boy and a' Gisholt Tool Grinder will turn 
wasted time into productive time and keep 
your lathe operators busy at their machines. 
The money you put into a Gisholt Tool 
Grinder will prove a most profitable in- 
vestment. 

Write for Catalog. 

fE COMPANY 

ical and ^Horizontal Boring Mills, Tool Grinders 
iai Machinery, etc. 

idison, Wis., U.S.A. 



ks: Madison, Wis.; Warren, Pa. 

Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton 
ouver, Victoria. 





46 



C A N A D I A N MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



J 



ac 



klift 



— your way to lower labor 
costs and bigger profits 

It can be done— that's why so many- in the United States are using the 
Jacklift and the platform system for handling heavy loads. And now the 
Jacklift is being made in Canada for Canadian manufacturers who wish to 
reduce their inside tracking costs. 

The Jacklift and platform system in your plant means the easier handling 
of loads, the quicker movement of materials, less labor, greater economy and 
less possibility of accidents or damaged materials. 

Four Vital Points of the 

JACKLIFT 



High Lift 

A clear lift of 2V2 inches by 
four easy strokes of the handle 
operating an ordinary jack. 

Easy Lift 

Four times the handle move- 
ment means a lifting ratio of 1 
to 35. A girl or boy can easily 
handle one of these machines 
with heavy loads. 

Angle Lift 

The handle will operate at 
any angle up to 90 degrees 
either side as easily as straight 



away. This is impossible with 
any other truck. 

Straight Lift 

The Jacklift raises and low- 
ers the load in a straight line — 
a great convenience, as every 
other truck operator will tell 
you. 

These four vital points, not 
contained in any other truck, 
place the Jacklift in a class 
away above all competition, 
and yet the price is practically 
the same as the other machine. 



-I 





MADE IN CANADA 



The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Company 

Limited 
Sole Canadian Sales Agents 

St. John, Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, Windsor, Winnipeg, 
Saskatoon, Calgary, Vancouver, Victoria. 



(AnadianMachinery 



AN D 



Manufacturing News 



Volume XXI. No. 14 



April 3, 1919 



, - ,«.-. ^^\J*^. t.,v»5 



The New Home of Pratt & Whitney Co., Ltd. 

A Description of the New, Modern Plant at Dundas, Ont., Which 
is Specially Designed, and Arranged to Manufacture on a Greater 
Scale Than Ever Before, This Already Well-known Line of Small 

Tools, Etc. 

By J. H. MOORE, Associate Editor CANADIAN MACHINERY 



THE following article will be 
strictly a plant article, devoleJ u 
a general description of the con- 
struction of the building, its various 
features of more than ordinary interest, 
which show the care and amount of 
thought that has been spent on the lay- 
out of this new modem plant. Of course 
as can be surmised, the need of a new 
plant arose from greatly increased busi- 
ness, in fact the demand for the tools, 
gauges, etc., as turned out by this firm 
has become so pronounced that the pre- 
sent building now in operation has 
proved inadequate for 
the needs of the small 
tool industry, so this 
new modern building 
was the only solu- 
tion. 

The building itself 
is of flat slab re- 
inforced concrete, to- 
gether with brick 
construction through- 
out, and as the pro- 
per place to start a 
description of this 
nature is at the 
ground level, let us 
look at Fig. 1 and see 
the commencement of 
operations. From this 
view we glean a 
general idea of the 
style of base used 
for the pillars in the 
basement, the molds 
and their construc- 
tion being clearly 
seen in the photo- 
irraph. Fig'. 2 takes us still a 

little further, and illustrates the base- 
ment in course of construction. The 
massive pillars are particularly notice- 
able, these being of hexagon design, and 
measuring 36 inches across the flats. 
The construction of the molds foi the 
bays are also clearly shown, the distance 
between these bays being 25 feet. The 



plant complete measures 175 feet by 75 
feet, with two added towers for ele- 
vators, each 15 feet wide, making the 
building at these points 90 ft. wide over 
all. In addition to the basement there 
are three stories, each having a height 
of 15 feet from floor to ceiling. These 
floors will be described in due course. 

At Fig. 3 we seen a decided change 
from photo No. 2, for things have no>.v 
assumed a definite shape. It is hax'dly 
necessary to comment on this photo, foi 
it is self-explanatory, and illustrates 
more clearly than written description 




FIG. 



-THE BUILDING AS IT APPEARS FROM THE STREET. 



could ever accomplish, the general ap- 
pearance of the building at this stage. 

At Fig. 4 is shown an interesting view 
of the reinforcement bars, and the style 
of placing in position. This view was 
taken after the second storey was com- 
pleted. The old building at present in 
use can be seen in the background of the 
picture. 



At Fig. 5 we see how the building locks 
after completion, as viewed from street. 
Attention is called in this view to two 
entrances shown in the foreground, one 
with steps leading up to the door, the 
other simply a large door with concrete 
sill. The first door spoken of is used 
to serve a double purpose, namely, as an 
entrance to the plant office, also as an 
entrance to the wicket of the parcel re- 
ceiving and parcel shipping portion of 
the stock room. The door with concrete 
sill is utilized for purposes where express 
waggons or light shipping is done. Com- 
pletely around the 
shipping portion of 
the building is laid a 
brick roadway, and 
for shipping heavier 
material there is a 
door at the ground 
level of freight ele- 
vator shaft, which 
can be opened when 
desired and truck 
backed in, when ele- 
vator can be stopped 
at same height as the 
truck and work is 
then easily passed 
from the elevator to 
truck, or vice versa 
as the case may be. 

The Basement 

Perhaps the best 
method of giving 
readers a detailed de- 
scription of the in- 
terior of this plant 
would be to start at 
the basement, gradually working up to 
the roof, so, commencing at the base- 
ment, let us see what we find. 

The first thing particularly noticeable 
is the pair.ting scheme adopted. The roof 
is painted a cream color, the walls to 
within about 3 ft. from the floor a light 
buff; the remaining portion to the floor 
is painted dark green, and the general 



322 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XX r. 



eflfect is very pleasing. The cream- 
colored roof and buff walls present a 
g-ood lig-ht appearaijee, while the green 
below harmonizes splendidly, yet will 
not get dirty as easily as the lighter 
color would. 

Another paintina; scheme which is 



ton frejght elevator, the other a,2-toii 
passenger type. At all openings on each 
floor are installed safety gates. 

Stock Rack Systems 

The method of handling the stock in 
the basement is well worthy of attention. 




FIG. 1— THE START OF BUILDING OPERATIONS 



used to splendid advantage is that of 
painting the various type of pipes dif- 
ferent colors. Wherever a pipe is paint- 
ed red it denotes that such ^ pipe is ;i 
part of the sprinkler system which is 
installed throughout the entire building. 
White painted pipe illustrates that all 
such pipe contains electric wiring, and 
so on, each color having a particular 
meaning, which is illustrated clearly on 
blueiirint in ide for this purpobe. This 
scheme safeguards the possibility of 
tapping into a pipe expecting to find 
electric wiring, but suddenly finding that 
you have unfortunately tapped the 
sprinkler system, or perjiau^. the^team 
system. '"" ^ _ - 

Another point of interest in this por- 
tion of the building is the floor construc- 
tion. This floor has a cement foundation 
with wood blocks bedded in tar for u 
walking surface. Such a floor as this 
is much easier on the feet=*han the usual 
cement floor generally found in a base- 
ment. 

At one end of the basement is a rooi.' 
set apart for the millwright's use, wheru 
all supplies as required by him can be 
kept. There is also a large wash room 
with individual basins, each containin-.: 
hot and cold water taps. In this room 
are also installed steel lockers for the 
workmen. This wash room feature is 
duplicated on every floor. The fittings 
in these wash rooms are away above the 
average usually found in such a plant 
as this. 

There is also a slop sink on every floor 
where same can be used for the many 
ourposes a fixture like this comes iv 
handy for. 

Another interesting duplication on 
each floor is the toilet installation. On 
each floor are two separate toilets, one 
for ladies, the other for gentlemen. The 
fixtures in these toilets are simply splen- 
did, and each toilet is divided by a slat; 
partition. 

Elevatflrs 
Two elevators are installed, one a 3- 



First the stock is brought in from the 
back of the building so that it will not 
interfere with any other shipping, when 
it is placed in racks of special construt- 
tion, in fact racks made specially for the 
purpose. These racks are made from 
channels and angle irons, held together 
by tie bolts. The construction is arrang- 
ed so as to form passages about 9 inches 
square clear through the rack. Attached 
to each space is a raised stamp stating 
what size stock goes in that particular 
place. These stamps are placed on both 
.sides of the i-ack so that stock can be 
withdrawn from either side. Another 
feature of these racks is that all ma- 
terial is classified and separated in a 
rather easy but effective manner. Wher- 
ever muterial is separated in sections 
the particular post or channel of the rack 
if painted white. This white post shows 
up very clearly, and fl it machine ste i, 



- ment. for it will be but the matter of 
a moment to transfer the stock from the 
racks to the machines. On the otiie.- 
side 01 these cut-off machines will be 
placed steel bins, in which will be stored 
the various lengths of short ends. These 
bins %wli also have raised stamps on 
each bin designating the type of stock, 
and all particulars pertaining to the 
same. In this basement will be per- 
formed the cutting off, boring, and tap- 
ping operations. Butt welding wll also 
be carried on in this department. 

First Floor 

Fig. 6 allows reader to form some 
opinion of the interior appearance of 
this floor, in fact the first and second 
floors are very similar in design, the 
only difference being that the factory 
offices are on the first floor, while the 
second floor is devoted entirely to manu- 
facturing purposes. 

Starting at the factory office. Here 
the offices are divided in the usual way 
by glass partitions into a private office 
for C. A. Fisher, factory superintendent, 
then into a general office, with enquiry 
wicket of unusual design. At this wicket 
visitors state their business, when, witii- 
out rising, the girl in charge can control 
electrically the door leading into the 
aisle of the office. Such a feature is 
well worth while, for it prevents any 
Tom, Dick, or Harry getting into the 
office without proper permission. In 
conjunction with these offices is built a 
iaborat'>ry, where scleroscope, gauges, 
etc., will be kept to illustrate the actual 
tests made on the work as it goe.* 
through the plant without the necessity 
of going into the shop. 

The Store Room 

The store room on this floor is a de- 
partment in itself. Here are placed irt 
long rows steel drawers on one side and 
steel bins on the other. These drawer-, 
and bins are all numbered, and each sec- 
tion is given a letter of the alphabet, ther. 




ITG. 2— AT WORK ON THE BASEMENT. 



round machine steel, and so on are easily 
kept apart. This applies of course to 
the tool steel, etc., as vcell. 

Directly alongside of the racks will be 
the cut-off machines. Such an advantage 
is easily understood and needs no com- 



again each line of drawers or bins has 
a number. The whole system will be 
controlled by a card system with which 
you will be able at a moment's notice 
to ascertain the location of the piece, or 
pieces you desire. For example, suppose 



April 3, 1919 



C A N A 1) 1 A X M A CHIN E R Y 



323. 



we want a tap hob of some particular 
size and we find the card says section 
C, line 15, drawer No. .591. It is then an 
easy matter to locate section C, when 
line 15 will be seen plainly marked. Of 
course to find drawer 591 then becomes 
a mere detail. The same idea applies 
of course to the bins. All various tools 
or parts are classified under the proper 
head, and tlie system, when completely 
in operation, will be something to be 
rather proud of. 

It will be noticed by readers that steel 
bins, etc., are mentioned, in fact the 
sheet steel idea is followed out ex- 
clusively, for all the index cabinets, 
desks, etc., in the office, are made from 
the same material. On this floor will 
also be placed the smaller automatic 
machinery. 

In the photo No. 6 it will be noticed 
that there is an ice-cooled drinking 
fountain in the foreground. The f o\in ■ 
tains are duplicated on each floor. An- 
other feature which applies to every 
floor is the manner of controlling the 
lights. On each post is inserted a switch 
receptacle which controls the lights for 
each bay. Four 250 candle power lights, 
hung 2 ft. from the ceiling, provide the 
artificial light for each bay, so as can 
be surmised, at night the place presents 
a very well-lighted appearance. On each 
floor is also built a foreman's office as 
shown at the right of Fig. 6, and in this 
clfice is also contained a wash basin. 
There is also a dumb-waiter system in- 
stalled connecting to the tool room, but 
this will be explained further along in 
the article. Reader's attention, however, 
is called to the shaft for this dumb 
waiter, which has the door open for il- 
iustrativ3 purpose. This shaft is clearly 
seen at the extreme ri'.iht of Fig. 6. It 
will be also noticed from this photograph 
that these floors are all hardwood, care- 
fully laid. 



its first operation, going through its 
various operations in sequence until fin- 
ally it lands at the other end of the floor. 
From there it will be sent upstairs with 
out any lost motion whatever. The oper- 
ations conducted on this, the central and 



trouble is eliminated, always of course 
excepting the cutting off of the power 
itself, for which there is hardly any 
remedy. 

The Third Floor 
The third floor is divided into various 




FIG. 3-THE BUILDING PARTIALLY COMPLETED 



main floor will be as follows: Turning, 
milling, threading and filing; 90 ft. of 
filing bench will be installed at the 
finishing portion of this floor. 

It might be well to mention that all 
hangers used in the power installation 
are 61 ball-bearing design and are paint- 
ed ii battleship grey on every floor. The 
novel method of motor installation on 
this floor is well worth a detailed de- 
scriptior. The shafting on this floor is 
divided into two sections, each driven 
by a 20 h.p. motor. Hydro power is 
used. Should cither of the motors give 




FIG. 4— A GENERAL VVEW OF REINFORCEMENT BARS TO FLOOR. 



Second F'loor 

On the second floor the general build- 
ing features are exactly similar, but the 
system of arranging operations is worthy 
of note. Tile stock will be brought up 
direct from the basement by elevator to 
this flooi, when it will then commence 



out the line shafts are so arranged that 
couplings, which are on the extreme ends 
of these shafts, can be connected in a 
few minutes, when the one motor can 
then drive the entire floor shafting until 
such time as the other motor is repaired. 
By this method all danger of power 



departments in the following mannei : 
Grinding, hardening, polishing-, sand 
blasting, inspection and tool depart- 
ments. 

The grinding department will be 
equipped with dust exhaust pipe system, 
as also will the polishing department. 
The hardening department will be 
equipped with gas fume removing- 
hoods. This hardening room measures 
60 by 40 feet, and the floor is 
of wood block construction where the 
workmen will walk and brick construc- 
tion where the furnaces will be installe<l 
All the walls and ceiling of this depart- 
ment are painted dark green, and dark 
colored blinds will be installed, so that 
these can be regulated to suit the work-' 
men in order that they can readily tell' ' 
the true color of the steel being heated, 
thereby ensuring correct temper. 
Hardening furnaces will be all oil operat- 
ed while the tempering furnaces will 
be the electric oil bath type. 

Polishing Room 

The polishing room is totally enclosed 
in glass and stands to the right of the 
inspection department, in fact the sand 
blast, department, inspection and polish- 
ing follow in sequence. The idea of hav- 
ing the inspection department in f^e 
middle is easily surmised, for in such 
position it can pass the work to either 
the sand blast or polishing department 
as required. Sliding wickets are pro- 
vided for this purpose. These wickels 
are also dust-pi-oof, for each of these 
three depirtments are totallv enclosed 
in glass, and dust-proof as far as it is 
possible to be. 

Before going on to the tool room, let us 
follow uv) the routine of the work which, 
after being completed on the second floor, 
started to come up to this, the last floor 
lonmediately on arrival it is taken to the 



324 



C A N A 1) I A N M AC H 1 NERY 



Volume XXI. 




FIG. 5— GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW. 



carriage can be brought to each particu- 
lar floor by a button designating the 
floor number, but the carriage cannot 
be sent up to the tool room. In order 
to have this done, the operator in the 
tool room must be called up on the 
speaking-tube, when he can then press 
the correct button to bring the carriage 
to his floor. Such a system entirely 
eliminates the possibility of accidents. 

The Roof 

Going up on the roof we see the usual 
type of flat design roof, but here also are 
the exhaust ventilators for the gas fumes 
from the hardening room, together with 
the dust extractor which was made by 
Pratt & Whitney's staff themselves. A 
description of this extractor would not 
be amiss. It measures 18 feet x 6 feet 
and is made entirely of sheet steel. It 
is divided mto four sections, each sec- 
tion containing two long stop plates and 
two short top plates. Each section is 
also provided with dust-proof doors. Of 
course the action of the dust-laden air is 



inspection department before hardening. 
It then goes aci-oss the floor a distance 
of aDout 20 feet and is hardened, coming- 
back again directly to the inspection. 
From here it goes to the grinding depart- 
ment and back to the inspection. From 
the inspection it goes to the sand blast 
or polishing department as necessary 
through the sliding wickets already 
spoken of, coming back once more for 
the final inspection. In other words, 
there is not a lost movement throughout 
the entire proceeding. 

The Tool Room 

In this department is placed a com- 
plete Bowser system of oil tanks, carry- 
ing the various oils used throughout the 
plant. Here also is the controlling board 
of the dumb waiter, and we had better 
go into this in detail to explain its safety 
features. At each floor is provided a 
steel door, which cannot be opened until 
the dumb waiter is at that particular 
floor, nor can the apparatus be started 
from any floor before the door is closed. 
These safety features can be easily ap- 
preciated. The whole system is first of 
all controlled from the tool room, but the 





..liimiiii! 




FIG. SPLAYING THE FLOOR OF THE FIRST AID ROOM. 



FIG. 7 VIEW SHOWING METHOD OF PLACING INSERTS. 



self-apparent. Coming through this ex- 
tractor it continually meets these various 
stop plates where the dust is discouraged 
to go further, hits these plates, and drops 
to the bottom of the extractor. By the 
time the air reaches the end of its 
journey all the dust has left it, so prac- 
tically free air leaves the ventilator on 
top. This extractor will only need clean- 
ing about twice a year. 

Up on the roof is also the elevator 
house where a platform is arranged, 
with railing, to facilitate oiling, yet 
making such operation perfectly safe. 
The blower for exhaust system \s also 
installed in this elevator house. In re- 
gard to the heating system as installed 
in this plant, it is known as the Webster 
vacuum system and the blower used for 
the oil furnaces is that of the Spencer 
turbine type. 

Other Special Features 

We have purposely kept to the last 
two important features. First let us 
look at Fi?. 7; this photo illustrates 
Continued on page 327 



April 3, 1919 



325 



A New Method for the Smelting of Iron Ores 

Many Ores Are Not Suitable For the Blast Furnace, and the 
Following Article Describes a Duplex Process For the Making of 

Steel From Any Ore 

By J. W. MOFFAT 



CANADIAN iron ores in many 
cases do not admit of economical 
reduction in the blast furnace, and 
the physical state in which many of 
them are found is such that they would 
have to be briquetted before being intro- 
duced into the blast furnace at all. 

A new method has recently been de- 
vised for the reduction of metals from 
their oxide or sulphide ores, which does 
not necessitate the use of the blast 
furnace, and which at the same time 
enables ores of any degree of fineness 
to be used. In principle it employs two 
present known furnace processes in com- 
bination. The first step is the reducing- 
of the ore and its conversion into the 
metallic state, but in the form of sponge, 
as it is called. The next step is the 
transferrence of this sponge, either hot 
or cold, into the electric furnace, where 
it is melted down and finished. This 
process is particularly adapted to the 
manufacture of iron and steel and fei-ro- 
alloys. 

The iron sponge is iron in a porous 
form, and a definition by Raymond 
states that is obtained by reduction 
without fusion. Its weight is about one- 
third that of cast iron. 

The reduction of iron ores into this 
form has been attempted by the use of 
gas, but the success obtained has never 
been very great, as complete reduction 
was very seldom accomplished unless by 
the lengthening out of the operation. 
Not only was this the case, but accurate 
control of the heat was difficult and 
the sponge was liable to re-oxidize it 
when cooled or remelted if an oxidizing 
atmosphere is present. 

These difficulties have been overcome 
by the aid of pyrometers for tempera- 
ture control, CO.. recorders for gas an- 
alysis and by the use of the electric 
furnace in which a reducing atmosphere 
is readily maintained. 

The reduction of hematite iron ore 
(Fe.O ) is accomplished in stages, the 
first to maenetite (FeO.) w-hich takes 
place from .300 to 450° C, and then to 
porou? oxide (FeO) and finally to me- 
tallic iron, which takes place from 700 
to 800° C, the iron then being in a 
spongy metallic state. The spongy iron 
thus formed is finally melted at a still 
higher temperature of from 1100° to 
1300° C. 

Previous Efforts 

A number of attempts have been made 
to use sponge iron in various ways, a 
few of which may be noted. In Clay's 
process the reduction was effected in 
retorts made from fire clay, the ore hav- 
ing been mixed with carbonaceous ma- 
terial, the heat being applied externally 



and the sponge iron product was then 
further heated and balled. 

Newton also used a closed container 
in a somewhat similar way, heating it 
externally to a white heat for about 48 
hours and taking the product while hot 
to a puddling furnace, or, when cold, to 
a crucible furnace. 

Harvey devised a process in which 
coarsely ground ore mixed with charcoal 
was placed on inclined shelves within a 
puddling furnace in such a position that 
it was heated by gas entering the fur- 
nace. When reduced, the iron was 
worked up into puddled balls with the 
aul of further heat. 

Roger mixed ore with coal and ef- 
fected reduction in a rotating cylinder, 
heated externally; this he located above 
his puddling furnace into which the 
sponge was dropped, further heated and 
then balled. 

A number of attempts have been made 
to use iron sponge in the crucible fur- 
nace. For instance, Beeford put a mix- 
ture of iron ore and carbonaceous ma- 
terial into a suitable container, heated 
it externally, and then transferred the 
sponge while hot into crucibles, thus 
melting it down. Later on he trans- 
ferred it through a closed runner to a 
decarburizing chamber, where it was 
acted upon by decarburizing gases or 
steam. This was probably done to elim- 
inate some of the carbon in the sponge. 
The utilization of the sponge has also 
been tried out in the open hearth fur- 
nace. 

A number of other processes have 
been tried out for the using of iron 
sponge in the puddling crucible and open 
hearth furnaces, but all of them could 
only be considered as furnishing part of 
the metal used and all would certainly 
introduce more or less oxide into the 
bath of molten metal, thus increasing 
the finishing costs, for carbon dioxide in 
the furnace gases will oxidize iron 
sponges at as lov. a temperature as 
300°C. 

While the blast furnace at first glance 
might offer a means of working up the 
sponge, it has the serious disadvantage 
of oxidizing the already reduced sponge 
in the top part of the shaft. This action 
is due to the carbon dioxide, which is 
present in the blast furnace gases along 
with the carbon monoxide. This action 
would waste all the work previously done 
on the ore and the material would have 
to be aeain reduced in the reducing 
zone of the furnace. 

In the author's process for which 
patents have been granted (Canadian 
patent No. 186,994, Oct. 15th, 1918, and 
U. S. patent issued Feb. 18th, 1919) for 



the duplexing of a reducing furnace with 
an electric melting furnace it is imma- 
terial how the sponge is made. The re- 
ducing furnace must suit the materials 
used for supplying the heat and the 
means of reduction for the most conven- 
ient and economical means in one local- 
ity may not be so in another. 

With modern scientific apparatus re- 
duction and the making of iron sponge 
:s an easy operation to carry out suc- 
cessfully. Such furnaces should be me- 
chanically charged, rabbed and dis- 
charged, and means should be provided 
for making small additions of carbon to 
the charge when necessary. Preferably 
the gases of combustion supplying the 
heat should not be passed over or 
through the ore being reduced. Station- 
ary pyrometers should be provided which 
will indicate by colored flash lamps any 
variation up or down from the proper 
temperature. 

With a properly designed furnace an 
intelligent laborer should be able to 
operate a number with resulting low 
labor costs. 

Any electric furnace can be success- 
fully used in the final melting down of 
the scrap. 

Canadian Ores 

Ores of high metallic iron content, say 
65 per cent, and over in the crude state, 
are becoming increasingly difficult to 
get in Canada and the United States 
within a reasonable transportation dis- 
tance of any market. One of the largest 
concerns in the United States catalogues 
the product of thirty odd mines, without 
showing one such ore, seven, however, 
range between 60 and 62 per cent. Out- 
side of the Helen and Magnie mines of 
the Algoma Steel Corporation, the Ati- 
kokan Iron Co. and the Moose Mountain 
mine of the Moose Mountain, Ltd., the 
ore bodies in the older and more popu- 
lous parts of Canada are not large, and 
are of low grade as a rule. 

In Ontario, except the ones mentioned, 
no really large property has been thor- 
oughly proved to contain one million 
tons of marketable ore, though there are 
a few of undoubted promise, such as 
the Canada Iron Mines' properties in 
Hastings County and the Belmont mine 
in Peterborough. There are, however, 
in Ontario many small bodies of ore 
situated conveniently to the market. 

In the 48 years between 1869 and 1916 
the Dominion Government reports show 
a total production of about 4,350,000 tons 
of ore in Ontario, an average of 90,- 
625 tons annually, or a little IBS'? than 
250 tons daily, an amount insufficient 



326 



CANADIAN x\l A C II 1 N E R Y 



to alone supply one very small blast 
furnace. 

In the Province of Quebec from 1886 
to 1916, a period of 30 years, there was 
a total production of 379,953 tons, mak- 
ing the yearly average 12,665 tons, or 
a daily average of 35 tons. 

New Brunswick, in 68 years, 1848 to 
1916, produced 272,850 tons, a yearly 
average of 4,013 tons, or a daily average 
of 11 tons. 

Nova Scotia, in 30 years, 1886 to 1916, 
produced 1,279,637 tons, or a yearly 
average of 42,655 tons, or a daily aver- 
age of 117 tons. 

British Columbia, in 30 years, 1886 to 
1916, produced 65,078 tons and exported 
practically all of it to the neighboring 
State of "Washington. This tonnage is 
a yearly average of 2,170 tons, or a daily 
average of 6 tons. 

The other provinces have done little or 
nothing in the mining of iron ore. 

Dominion Government reports also 
supply other statistics of the total out- 
put of all Canada. For a period of 30 
years the total production was 5,759,540 
tons (2,000 lbs.), a yearly product of 
191,985 tons, or a daily average of about 
526' short tons, or 470 long tons, the 
latter being the ton used in the pig iron 
market. This 470 long tons of ore would 
have to carry about 55 per cent, of me- 
tallic iron to meet the supply required 
for only one small blast furnace, mak- 
ing 250' tons of pig iron daily, which is 
one-half the size of what is considered 
a good furnace to-day, when they are 
being built to produce up to 600 .and 
700 tons of pig per day. 

In 1916 the United States produced 
about 75,500,000 tons of ore, the popula- 
tion being about 100,000,000; this is 
equivalent to 75.5 tons per 100 of popula- 
tion. The same year Canada produced 
from her mines 340,000 tons, or 4.25 tons 
per 100 of population, or about one- 
seventeenth of what the United States 
did. 

This is a poor showing, particularly 
when it is remembered that the great 
producing iron ranges found in the 
States of Minnesota, Michigan, and New 
York are also found in Canada, and that 
the last twenty years include what is 
called "Canada's growing time." There 
are undoubtedly many reasons why such 
a state of affairs exists, some can be 
removed by legislation, but the great 
cause of this poor showing is that few 
of our mines with convenient shipping 
facilities can produce even 100 tons per 
day, and the great majority of all Can- 
adian ores unfortunately require crush- 
ing, grinding and concentration with 
subsequent briquetting to render them 
acceptable to blast furnace operators, 
and it is this cost of briquetting which 
finally proves to be the last straw. 

The Canadian blast furnace operator 
is able to deal with one American sell- 
ing agent for his entire requirements 
for a year's run, feeling absolutely sure 
of its delivery to him and of its being, 
according to the analysis, guaranteed at 
the time of its selection. Another factor 



which enters into the ease with which 
American ores can be used is the almost 
negligible duty of eight cents per ton 
and no war tax. English ores can be 
imported still more cheaply as regards 
duty as the amount in this case is only 
six cents. 

The best solution tending towards the 
utilization of Canada's resources would 
seem to be the operation in some pro- 
fitable manner of the many small iron 
mines, such as are to be found between 
the Lake of the Woods on the west, all 
the way down the north shore of the 
Great Lakes water system to the Straits 
of Belle Isle on the east. As there are 
very many large water powers available 
forthe generation of electricity at points 
sufficiently convenient for the transmis- 
sion of power to suitable smelting loca- 
tions, the past difficulties can be largely 
overcome by a reversion to the use of 
the iron sponge of the ancients, melt- 
ing it in the very modern electric fur- 
nace with its ideal conditions for that 
work, and without removal, finishing the 
metal into any desired iron or steel. 

Marketing the Product 

It is hardly to be expected that the 
electric furnace can market ordinary 
pig iron in opposition to that made in 
the blast furnace, except under most 
unusual conditions, such as a very long 
'naul from the blast furnace to that mar- 
ket which may be adjacent to the electric 
furnace. Low phosphorous high silicon 
nig iron, however, could be made for sale 
to the open hearth steel furnaces and 
some washed metal (metal with the 
phosphorous sulphur and silicon practi- 
cally eliminated) and other special irons 
would have some market. 

The natural product of the electric 
furnace is steel, however, and to that 
metal is its work advantageously con- 
fined from a financial point of view. It 
is particularly well suited to the furnish- 
ing of the molten metal in a steel foun- 
dry, but this class of work is only pros- 
perous in the centres of large popula- 
tion, and most of our smaller iron mines 
are situated at some distance from the 
cities. 

During the war there was a ready 
market found in casting ingots for the 
forging of shells. The war taught us 
new possibilities, and if existing forging 
and rolling mills are not disposed to con- 
tinue that practice, the electric furnace 
plants could cast ingots, crop them (re- 
melting the cropped ends with the iron 
sponge of the next heat) and ship the in- 
gots to a distant forging works or roll- 
ing mill which they themselves had com- 
bined to build and operate. A plate roll- 
ing mill would find a ready market for 
its entire output in Ontario, for instance. 
Rolling billets, too, would probably be 
satisfactory. Electric furnace steel, 
owing to its superior quality, will always 
find a sale in competition with other 
steels and at a higher price even when 
steel of high quality is desired. 

Under the new process the ore should 
be crushed fine enough to effect the best 
magnetic separation of the iron oxide 



Volume X. 

from its associated gangue, usuallv 
silica. It is rather expensive to get rid 
of rock material by means of slags 
made in the electric furnace, and an 
ore should be concentrated up until it 
carries as high a metallic iron content 
'as possible, over 63 per cent, say, though 
no hard and fast rule can be laid down, 
as it all depends on the analysis of each 

ore. 

For reduction purposes, the carbon- 
aceous material should be ground to the 
same size of grain as the ore and should 
be very thoroughly mixed with it. Its 
analysis should show the weight of fixed 
carbon and volatile matter, moisture, and 
ash. Theoretically the metallic iron 
should have one-quarter of its weight of 
fixed carbon present for its complete 
reduction, but in practice a further small 
percentage is added. For example, 1,000 
lbs. of 65 per cent, iron ore (Fe.O,) has 
650 lbs. of metallic iron and theoreticalh- 
requires 162 V2 lbs. of fixed carbon for 
complete reduction which would be found 
in 275 lbs. of charcoal showing 60 per 
cent, of fixed carbon in analysis. 

Limestone, also finely ground like the 
concentrates, may be mixed in 
the charge and will be calcined in the 
process, or it may be added as lime in 
the electric furnace. There should be 
enough lime present to make a very 
basic slag in the electric furnace. 

The iron sponge may be handled hot 
or cold. When transferred hot, the re- 
ducing furnace should be provided with 
means for discharging its contents into 
containers having air-tight valves, tak- 
ing every care that air is not allowed 
access to it during the discharge. The 
containers must be discharged into the 
electric furnace with like care and pre- 
ferably through the roof, the furnace 
having been previously rendered air- 
tight. The current can then be put on 
and it will be noticed that the charge 
will carry the current steadily at once 
without the very objectionable surging 
found in melting cold scrap. Indeed, if 
the sponge is only reasonably warm this 
will occur and the running will be 
smooth. 

The reducing furnace may be provided 
with a large air-tight cooling chamber 
underneath, into the top of which the 
iron sponge may be dropped when re- 
duction is complete. When this cham- 
ber is constructed to hold the product of 
several runs, it becomes a storage bin 
as well, with the lowest charge cooled 
below the oxidizing temperature, but 
still being warm it can be transferred 
without care and be charged into the 
electric furnace through its regular 
doors. 

In the case of a low grade hematite 
or a mixed hematite and magnei,ite ore, 
which ores do not answer well to mag- 
netic concentration, a partial reduction 
to Fe 0^ will render it well suited as a 
rule.' 

The heat required for the chemical re- 
actions can be either secured by burning 
coal or coke on a grate or by using these 
in powdered form, blown in with air to 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



327 



a combustion chamber or by using liquid 
fuel, such as fuel oil. The burning gases 
from any of these fuels should heat ex- 
ternally the container in which the work 
of reduction is being carried on, but pre- 
ferably should not be allowed to enter 
it. If electric heat is used it can be ap- 
plied in the same chamber as that in 
which reduction is being carried on. 

The operation of the electric furnace 
in the melting down of the sponge is 
practically the same as in the melting 
and i-efining of scrap. 

In the Swedish electric furnace (El- 
ectro-Metals Co.) it requires about 1.1 
k.w. hours of power to produce 1 lb. of 
metal and the metai is a white iron only. 
This is equivalent to 2,200 k.w. hours for 
a net ton. It is transferred while liquid 
to an electric furnace, where about 300 
k.w. hours of additional energy are re- 
quired to finish the metal into steel, 
making the total energy used about 2,- 
500 k.w. hours from ore to steel. 

Properly reduced iron sponge melts 
as readily as scrap, which can be melted 
and finished in good practice with 700 
or 750 k.w. hours per ton, but as the 
rock material remaining in the iron con- 
centrates will frequently necessitate a 
larger amount of lime to secure a very 
basic slag, the amount of slag used in 
the iron sponge process will be some- 
what greater than in the scrap melting 
process. A fair average will be 800 k.w. 
hour with the sponge process, or about 
one-third the amount required by the 
electric process used in Sweden. 

In this new process no high tempera- 
ture heat is lost in waste gases leaving 
the electric furnace, as there \vill be 
practically no gases generated there, and 
compared with other processes using 
1,700 k.w. hr. of energy more than the 
iron sponge process, which employs heat 
obtained for reduction from fuel, the 
economy in the process is readily seen. 
A six-ton electric furnace will require 
the iron sponge made from about 10 
tons of 63 per cent. Fe concentrate per 
heat. Four heats can be easily made in 
24 hours and a skilled operator could get 
five if the plant were suitable. Taking 
the number of heats at four a six-ton 
furnace would then readily produce 24 
tons of linuid steel in 24 hours, and 
would require 60 tons of 63 per cent. 
Fe concentrates. If the ore mined would 
need concentration of 1% into 1 to pro- 
duce 63 per cent. Fe concentrate, one 
six-ton furnace would use 90 tons per 
day of such crude ore. 

Owing to the existing instability of 
prices of materials and to the labor un- 
rest, it appears to be quite inadvisable 
to make any attempt to quote an aver- 
age cost for either plant or product — a 
cost quoted to-day will probably be use- 
less a few months hence. Iron sponge, 
however, will cost less than scrap as 
soon as the war scrap is all used up. 

The following are the main claims 
granted in the patents issued to the 
author : 

1. A discontinuous process of treating 
metallic oxide ores which consists in re- 
ducing a charge of ore without fusion in 



a suitable furnace, and, after reducing, 
excluding oxidizing gases from contact 
with the charge, while its temperature is 
above the lower limit at which re-oxida- 
tion can take place, placing the reduced 
charge in a separate electric furnace and 
fusing it there in an inert or reducing 
atmosphere. 

2. A discontinuous process of treating 
metallic oxide ores, which consists in re- 
ducing the charge of granular ore with- 
out fusion in a suitable furnace, and at 
as low a temperature as possible to 
maintain the granular form of the re- 
duced ore, and after reducing excluding 
oxidizing gases from contact with the 
charge while its temperature is above 
the lower limit at which reoxidation can 
take place, placing the reduced charge 
in a separate electric furnace and fusing 
it therein in an inert or /educing atmo- 
sphere. 

3. A discontinuous process of treating 
metallic oxide ores which consists in re- 
ducing a charge of ere without a flux, 
without fusion in a suitable furnace and 
after reducing, excluding oxidizing gases 
from contact with the charge while its 
temperature is above the lower limit at 
which reoxidation can take place, plac- 
ing the reduced charge in a separate 
electric furnace and fusing' it therein 
with a flux in an inert or reducing atmo- 
sphere 4, 5 and 6, cover the cooling of 
the charge after reduction and before 
fusion to a temperature below that at 
which reoxidation can take place as al- 
ready set out in 1, 2 and 3. 



NEW HOUSE OF PRATT & 
WHITNEY 

Continued from page 324 
clearly the system of inserts as provided 
in the Ceiling of each floor every 3 feet 
apart. By means of these inserts, which 
take the form of fastening bolts, to- 
gether witii 3 in. channels placed length- 
wise and crosswise, hangers for the 
various countershafts can be placed to 
within a square inch of the desired posi- 
tion without any trouble or hole-boring 
in the ceiling. This idea is a decided 
improvement over the old-time method. 

First-Aid Room 

Last, bat not least, let us refer to 
Fig. 8, which illustrates the laying of 
the tiled floor in this very necessary 
department. This room is part of the 
second or main floor and is placed in this 
central position for convenience. The 
complete room is painted white, and of 
course, as can be seen, the floor is tiled. 
Foot bath, wash basin, in fact all neces- 
sary equipment will be installed in this 
room, v;here good medical attention will 
be secured. 

Taken in all, this plant is modern in 
every respect, for cement stairway with 
railing, fu-e doors on every floor, sprink- 
ler system throughout, and all other up- 
to-the-minute fixtures are installed. In 
a later article we hope to show readeri 
of CANADIAN MACHINERY the plac- 
ing of the new machine equipment, to- 
gether with some of the most interesting 
operations throughout this plaiit. 



FLUE TEMPERATURES 

The temperature of the gases in the 
uptake or smoke flue affords a useful in- 
dication of the economical performanc 
of the boiler, although it sometimes re- 
quires skill and experience to interpret 
the temperature readings correctly An 
unnecessarily high temperature in the 
flue usually indicates poor economy be- 
cause it shows that a considerable'quan- 
tity of heat that should be absorbed b\- 
the boiler and utilized in the production 
of steam is being poured into the stack 
vvastefully; but a low temperature doe^ 
not always indicate good economy, be- 
cause It may be due to leakage "of air 
through the setting or through some of 
Its connections, or to imperfect combus- 
tion in the furnace, accompanied by ex- 
tensive distillation of combustible gase.^ 
in the unconsumed form. 

At the moment of their emergence 
from the boiler, the flue gases must 
necessarily be somewhat hotter than the 
boiler or its contents, and in the best 
boiler-room practice the flue tempera- 
ture is usually from 500° to 600° Fahr. 
When a materially higher value than 
600° is observed, the conditions that lead 
to it should be investigated and reme- 
died, because neglect to do so is liken- 
to result in a large and probably continu- 
ous waste of heat. When the combus- 
tion is effected by means of an ordinary 
chimney or stack, a certain tempe'-atare 
in the escaping gases is essential to the 
realization of a proper draft. If the 
chimney and the other parts of the in- 
stallation are correctly designed, the 
draft should be good with a flue temper- 
ature of 500° Fahr., as indicated above, 
unless the boilers are heavily overload- 
ed; but good natural draft can rarely 
be had with a flue temperature materi- 
ally lower than this. A high flue tem- 
perature may be due to any one of a 
number of causes. The boilers are per- 
haps being forced beyond their norr>:al 
capacity, so that the flow of gas is too 
rapid to permit a proper absorption of 
the heat; or they may have become 
thickly coated with sediment and scale 
internallv. so that their heating surfaces 
are not in good contact with the water; 
or they may have become covered, ex- 
ternally, with a coating of non-conducr- 
ing soot and dirt. 



Closing the Plant. — The Canadian 
Steel Foundries, Welland's largest in- 
dustry, has closed and when it will open 
again no man can prophesy. "Every 
order we have on hand will be completed 
by Saturday," said R. S. Hart, manager, 
"and We have no other course open to 
us. We have done everything within 
our power to keep the plant in opera- 
tion, but we have not succeeded. What 
foundry work is available will be done at 
our plant at Longuc Pointe." The Wel- 
laiid plant normally employs between six 
and seven hundred men, though that 
number has been much reduced in the 
past three months. 



328 



Volume XXI. 



Types of Electric Furnaces— 1: the Rennerfelt 

The First of a Number of Articles Dealing With Various Types of 
Electrical Furnaces in Successful Use in Metallurgical Industry— 
The Electrical Characteristics of This Furnace Are of Interest 



Bv W. F. SUTHERLAND. 



THE Rennerfelt electric arc furnace 
was developed by Rennerfelt in 
1912 and is now in successful use 
for meltina: steel, cast iron ferro-nian- 
ganese, nickel, copper, bronze, brass and 
aluminum, etc. It is of Swedish origm, 
the inventor, Ivan Rennerfelt, having 
conducted the experiments which led to 
its successful development in Sweden. 
The earlier Rennerfelt furnaces were 
tuilt of the square or rectangular type, 
while others were of the later round 
type with domed roof. Standard prac- 
tice with the manufacturers now is to 
use the round shell with a removable 
dome-shaped roof. This improved design 
results in a better heat distribution and 
a more accessible hearth. Relining is 
also greatly simplified. 

Originally, all furnaces, even the larg- 
est types, were tiltable about central 
trunnions, and the tilting was accomp- 
lished by rack and pinion and worm gear- 
ing. This construction is now only 
adopted in the smaller sizes, the three 
ton and larger sizes now being tilted by 
means of a cradle and rack. This con- 
struction permits of a much smaller 
movement of the pouring lip and where 
even this amount of movement is in- 
advisable it is possible to support the 
fui-nace by means of trunnions immedi- 
ately under the pouring lip. In the lat- 
ter construction as well as in the other 
arrangement the actual tilting of the 
furnace is accomplished by means of 
motors suitably controlled. 

Operating Characteristics 

The Rennerfelt furnace, while draw- 
ing a three-phase current from the 




l.OOO-LB. FURNACE. FRONT VIEW 



trodes. The now well known connection 
t'.evised by F. C. Scott for transforming 
three phase current to two-phase is 
used for this purpose and reference to 
the accompanying diagram will make 
the connections employed understood. 

The vertical electrode is the common 
return for both phases and carries 1.41 
times the current carried by either of 
the side electrodes. The voltage em- 
ployed between the centre and the side 
electrodes is about 100, and for steel the 
makers have arranged, on the trans- 
former, for a reduced capacity voltage 
tap to give approximately 65 volts on 
the low tension side. This arrangement 
is of the utmost importance during re- 
fining, as the furnace will work more 
efficiently as an arc resistance type fur- 
najG at the lower voltage. At the same 




l.uuu-LB. FURNACE IN UNITED STATES MINT 



mains, differs from other makes of fur- 
naces used in the metallurgical indus- 
tries through the arrangement of and 
method of supplying current to the elec- 



time it is evident that the same power 
input will not be required during the re- 
fining period as in the melting down 
period and excessive power would only 



burn out the lining. It is therefore of 
importance to reduce the power input 
from the transformer bank to the fur- 
nace, and, as mentioned, this is now done 
by means of taps on the transformers 
and not by introducing extra reactance. 
The reactors, which are now usually in- 
serted on the high tension side of the 
transformers, are used to facilitate 
starting, but, due to the fact that an in- 
crease in reactance is liable to lower the 
power factor, it is not good operating 
practice to run the reactance in the cir- 
cuit for any length of time. Reactance 
is occasionally employed in the low ten- 
sion side in the larger installations, 
where the incoming line voltage is com- 
paratively low. 

The arc is formed between the tips of 
the three electrodes and on account of 
the two-phase current employed and the 
arrangement of the electrodes is thrown 
in a downward direction, thus creating 
a very intense heat where most needed, 
on the top of the bath itself. Thus 
while the arc is free burning the heat is 
directed where needed and a powerful 
heating effect secured. The character of 
the arc, by means of which it needs no 
conducting path through the metal, en- 
ables the bottom to be sintered in with 
little or no trouble. 

It has been found that the highest 
efficiency and best working conditions 
in the Rennerfelt furnace are obtained 
at a certain and constant distance be- 
tween the electrode tips and the top of 
the charge. For this reason the elec- 
trodes have been made tiltable in a ver- 
tical plane. Problems of design in con- 
nection with the maintaining of an air- 
tight furnace have been satisfactorily 
overcome and specially designed stuff- 
ing boxes, external to the shell, allow the 
electrodes to be tilted at their maximum 
angle without leakage. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



329 




TILTING MECHANISM AND CONTROL 



The tilting of the electrodes has in- 
troduced an important advantage. When 
in their lowest position arcing to the 
slag can take place. By this means the 
furnace can work as an arc resistance 
furnace with the slag and metal as part 
of the circuit. 

The free burning arc for melting cold 
scrap will assure an even and steady 
operation with a current in the high ten- 
sion leads perfectly balanced and of hiah 
power factor. Automatic electrode con- 
trol can be used at the beginning of the 
melt. 

If any amount of refining is to be car- 
ried out in the furnace the electrodes are 
tilted at the necessary angle and the 
furnace worked as an arc resistance 
furnace. The makers state that this fea- 
ture is of importance in the desulphuriz- 
ing period in basic operation, especially 
where a heavy white slag is used as in 
tool steel. The use of a carbide slag is 
made possible instead of a ferro-silicon 
slag at a considerable saving. 

Linings 

For use in the steel industry, either 
acid or basic linings can be used to suit 
conditions encountered. For basic op- 
eration the bottom consists of magnes- 
ite brick, on the top of which is the 
usual fused or sintered lining of dead- 
burned magnesite. The side walls are 
made of magnesite brick up to or a little 
above the slag line. From there up 
silica brick is used. It is economy to 
use cheaper brick of neutral charac- 
teristics for the outer layers on the bot- 
tom and sides where the heat is not so 
inttnse and the basic characteristics of 
the magnesite are not needed. 

For acid operation the bottom is made 
of silica brick with a rammed-in lining 
of gannister on top. The walls are made 
of silica brick. The roof is always made 
of 9 in. special silica brick. Since there 
is only one small hole in the roof and 
since it is of comparatively short radius, 
the maintenance costs are low and the 
inevitable expansion of silica brick is 



taken care of. A spare roof frame is 
furnished and a new roof may always 
be kept in reserve, making the replace- 
ment time less than one hour. 

The life of the refractories is usually 
in the neighborhood of 250 heats for the 
roof and slightly more for the walls. No 
trouble is experienced with the bottom, 
which only requires an occasional patch- 
ing and will last indefinitely if properly 
cared for. 

The linings used for non-ferrous 
metals are in some cases different from 
those usually met with in steel practice. 
For copper, red brass, cupro nickel. 



cent, tin, and 7 per cent, zinc, a bottom 
constructed of carborundum sand, mixed 
with fire clay and molasses for a binder 
was used with Chicago fire brick for the 
side walls and roof. This lining has 
lasted for 300 heats and it is claimed 
will be good for many heats more. 

For the melting of aluminum a basic 
bottom has to be employed, made up of 
magnesite bricks with a fused=in mag- 
nesite lining. From the slag line up 
the furnace should be lined with fire- 
brick. It is essential in melting this 
metal to avoid any contamination with 
jsilica and for this reason no silica brick 
is used in the furnace. 

Power Consumption 

The makers of this furnace, Hamilton 
and Hansell, Inc., New York, have kindly 
furnished the following figures relative 
to the power consumption on various 
classes of work, which must, however, be 
read with the knowledge that variation 
is to be expected in this respect accord- 
ing to the class of work being done., 

Power consumption and length of heat 
for four heats on steel castings, acid lin- 
ing used and furnace operating only in 
the davtime: 



Heat No. 
1 



Charge 
1900 lbs. 
1800 lbs. 
1825 lbs. 
1800 lbs. 

7325 lbs. 



Time 
4.00 hrs, 
3.40 hrs. 
3.26 hrs. 
3.06 hrs. 

14,11 hrs. 



Kw. hi->- 
800 
520 
520 
490 



2330 
Per ton 
Aver. 1831 lbs, SVi hrs, 637 

The electrode consumption using 
Acheson graphite electrodes varied from 
9 to 11 pounds per ton. 

Another installation averaged 700 k.w. 
hr. per ton where no refining was re- 



, High Tension Bus 

[i T b] Oil Owirch 

j-O O o-j 




AAAAAAAA 



Fu p N A. c e 

WIRING DIAGRAM OF FURNACE 

bronze and silver, a gannister bottom is quired and about an additional 100 k.w. 

used, with silica brick sides arid roof, hr. for each slag taken off. These last 

while for bearing metal composed of 82 results were obtained by continuous op- 

per cent. Cu., 5 per cent, lead, 6 per eration. 



330 



C A N A D I A X M A C HI N E R Y 




KL'RNACE AND CONTROL PANELS 



For the non-ferrous metals the fol- 
lowing data are of interest: 

Cupro-nickel (75% Cu. 25', Nil in lOOO-'.b. 
Furnace 

No. of pounds per heat 1,001) 

Kw. hr. used per ton -^'00 

Time per heat 90 min. 

Approximate loss 32^, 

Bronze (95% Cu, 47, Zn, I't Sn.) in lOOO-lb. 
Furnace 

No. of pounds per heat 1.000 

Kw. hr. used per ton 300 

Time per hea't 65 min. 

Approximate loss - 32V, 

MeltinE Silver Dollars in IO00-!b. Furnace 

No. of pounds per heat 1,000 

Kw. hr. used per ton 200 

rime per heat 65 min. 

Approximate loss 05% 

Bearing Metal (2000-lb. Furnace) 

Total meUl charjted S.OIS lbs. 

Total metal recovered 7.980 lbs. 

Los3 68 lbs. (.845% I 

Kw hr. used per ton (a'verage of 116 heats) 

360 kw. hr. 



This includes pre-heating, testing and 
melting. Average time for making one 
•omplete 2,000 lb. heat from charge to 
pour, 90 minutes; in other words, 12 min- 
utes for charging, 70 minutes for melt- 
ing and 8 minutes for pouring. Elec- 
trode consumption, based on 104 tons of 
charge, using Acheson graphite elec- 
trodes, 5V4 lbs. per ton. 

Rating and Transformer Capacity 

The Rennerfelt furnace is manufac- 
tured in the following sizes and the 
transformer capacities given are advised 
for the various sizes. 

Transformer rating. 
Capacity. 40° C, rise norma'I 

rating 

100-200 lbs 40-60 Kva. 

300-500 lbs SO-100 Kva. 



Volume XXI. 

, nnn Ibs 150-200 Kva. 

1,000 ibs ^ 300-400 Kva. 

gross ton .SOO-IOOO Kva. 

1-t Bross ton ^ , 

6-6 gross ton ' -"" 

The makers give a comprehensive 
statement of the characteristics and sal- 
ient features of the Rennerfelt arc fur- 
nace as follows: 

The heat is generated with an arc 
with the absence of excessive strain on 
the power supply. 

The high tension current may be of 
any cycle and voltage, either two or 
three phase, and is perfectly balanced on 
all three phases, if three phase current 

is used. 

The arc is independent of any metal in 
the furnace and therefore can be regu- 
lated more easily with better control of 
the temperature. 

The arc is thrown violently down- 
wards, and being a radiating arc of 
large volume, favors a high efficiency 
and the roof has a long and satisfactory 

life. . ' ^ 

Due to the arc being free burning, the 
automatic side electrode control can be 
used during the melting down period 
without violent fluctuations in the 
power output. 

The power factor is high— about !H1 
per cent, with 60 cycle current. 

There is only one small hole in the 
short radius roof, the short radius roof 
and the single hole both making for 
strength and low maintenance cost. 

A very important feature of this fur- 
nace has to do with the possibility of 
preheating the furnace with the free- 
burning arc and the bottom can be 
sintered in by this means without the 
use of coke, oil or other material. No 
trouble is experienced in getting con- 
tact as the arc is drawn between the 
tips of the three electrodes and cold 
scrap is never used as part of the circuit. 




CROSS AND LONGITUDINAL SECTIONS OF 3-TON FURNACE, SHOWINGELECTRODE ARRANGEMENT 



April 3, 1919 



331 



Canadian Machinery Drafting Course — Part I 

This Series Will be Issued Every Two Weeks — In Each Section 
Will be Shown Some Problem, or Plate, For the Reader to Work 
Out— A Prize Will be Given to the Three Best Plates Sent in Each 
Issue, so Here's an Opportunity — Get Busy and Send Your Plate 

Along to Our Editor 

By J. H. MOORE, Associate Editor CANADIAN MACHINERY 



BEFORE entering upon this series 
of talks or lessons, on the art of 
mechanical drafting-, the reader 
must not imagine that here commences 
a slow, painstaking, thorough course on 
the subject already mentioned. While 
such a course would be a boon to many, 
yet the averag-e reader would not fol- 
low such a detailed course, which, to 
cover the subject properly, would span 
over a space of from three to four years. 
Not only would the avera2:e reader drop 
out of line before this time, but to the 
machinist apprentice especially, such a 
detailed course would not appeal, for in- 
cluded in a complete study of the draft- 
ing business would be many things not 
of especial appeal to him. 

We will try, therefore, to only touch 
on the most essential points as we go 
along, keeping in mind that this is a 
course specially arranged to meet the 
requirements of the machinist appren- 
tice, in order to illustrate to him the 
basic principles of mechanical drawing, 
and its application to the working draw- 
ing. 

We will work up gradually from the 
straight line problem into the actual 
assembly drawing, but will go to such 
a stage by easy steps. We want the 
apprentice to feel that here is a course 
specially arranged for him, and should 
he get puzicled at any time that we will 
be only too willing to answer him, and 
lift him over the difficulty. Close study 
to this course .'should increase the earn- 
ing power of the student, and besides. 



Mechanical Drawing 

To put it as briefly as possible, mech- 
anical drawing is the method of showing 
graphically the intricate details of 
machinery. It is, so to speak, the lan- 
guage by which the draftsman speaks 
to the workman. A brief study of a 
well-executed drawing gives a much 
better idea of the machine portrayed, 
than a long-winded verbal, or even a 
detailed written, description would ever 
do. In fact the better and clearer the 
drawing is made, the easier the work- 
nnn can comprenend the ideas of the 
draftsman. 

A neat drawing for instance was 
never made by a careless worker, nor 
even by a good draftsman with poor 
instruments, but as you seldom see a 
good designer with poor instruments 
one can usually tell the character of the 
draftsman, by his style of drawing. 

To the beginner, however, a cheap 
grade of instruments would suffice, but 
as he becomes more expert, he would do 
well to secure a better grade of tools. 
In fact if one can afford it, the best 
plan is to purchase the better grade 
right at the start, but this is simply a 
matter which rests with the student 
himself. 

Instruments and Materials 

First comes the question of paper. In 
selecting drawing paper, the first thing 
to be considered is the kind of paper 
most suitable for the proposed work. As 
>ve are principally mterested in the needs 




To keep the expense item down to the 
lowest possible figure, we will call for 
sheets 9% x 131/3 in. in size. This al- 
lows students to purchase their paper in 
what is called the Demy size of sheet, 
this being a sheet 15 in. x 20 in. By 
careful cutting you have two sheets from 
each large one, 10 in. x 15 in., sufficient 
size to cover the work. Whatman's paper 
is considered by many the best grade of 
paper, and either the cold pressed, or 
hot pressed, will answer the purpose. 
The hot pressed paper has a smoother 
surface, but does not stand erasures as 
well as the cold pressed sheets, so it 
might be well for readers to get the 
tougher material, for no doubt there 
will be considerable erasure made at 
the beginning. 

Drawing Board 

The drawing board, Fig. 1, is usually 
made of well seasoned, and straight 
grained soft pine. Each end is protected 
by a side strip, usually about 2 in. wide. 
This strip is trued accurately to suit 
the T-square, but as students will more 
than likely purchase their drawing 
boards, we will leave this matter for the 
reader to study at his leisure. 

Thumb tacks are used to fasten the 
paper to the board. There are all kinds 
on the market, but a grade about 10c to 
20c a dozen, will suit the student's pur- 
pose admirably. 

In regard to the pencils required. Lead 
pencils are graded according to their 
hardness, the degree of which is indicat- 
ed by the letter H. For example H. 
means simply one degree of hardness, 
6H, six degrees, and so on. A pencil of 
4H grade is ideal for general working 
conditions. Some authorities claim 2H, 
or 3 H are better suited for lettering 
purposes, while for intricate det-iil work 




/7* 2. 







SKETCH OK DRAWING BOARD 



SHARPENING THE PENCIL 



the objective of each student should be 
to land at least one prize. So now that 
we have introduced the object and aim 
of this series, let us proceed at the very 
beginning, and see what mechanical 
drawing really ^s. 



of this course, we will consider only 
the paper most suitable for our purpose, 
for practically every drawing office 
throughout the country have their ovsTi 
particular pet paper, which they claim 
is the best ever. 



a 6H pencil will be found best suited to 
this class of work. 

The hard pencils should be sharpened 
as shown at Fig. 2, so that in pencil- 
ling a drawing the lines may be made 
very fine and light. The wood is cut 



332 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



away so that about % in. to % in of 
lead projects. Lead can now be sharp- 
ened to a chisel edge as shown on the 
sketch. In the drawing of the lines the 
student should place the chisel edge 
against his T-square, or triangle, enab- 
ling him to draw a clean cut fine line, 
through points as desired. Should no 
inking be necessary, a softer grade of 
pencil is used, than if it is intended to 
ink in over the pencil work. 

T-Square , 

The T-squaie gets its name from its 



with your rule, and draw your vertical 
lines 6 in. apart with a triangle, which 
we will now describe, both as to its uses 
and material. 

Usually triangles are made in two 
styles, 45 degrees and 60 — 30 degrees as 
shown at Fig. 5. A represents the 45 deg. 
triangle, while B illustrates the 60 deg. 
— 30 deg. These instruments are made 




/y^.^. 



SKETCH 01-' T-SQUARE 



general appearance, and consists of a 
thin straight edje called the blade, with 
a short piece called the head, and fast- 
ened at right ingles to it, see Fig. o. 
T-squares are jsually made entirely of 
wood, pear and maple, in the cheaper 
grades; mahogany, with protection edges 
of ebony, in the middle class, while cel- 
luloid edges are placed on the more ex- 
pensive ones, lieaders need not go to 
much expense on this end, except they 
really wish to, for a T-square of good 
quality can be secured for very little 
cost. Some T-squares are also provided 
with swivel heads, but for the purpose 
of this series, we will not discuss this 
point, as it is not a necessity. 

To show clearly the use of the T- 
square lefer to Fig-. 4. .-Always keep 
the head A up against the left hand 
edge of board, otherwise the various 
lines drawn will not be parallel. Lines 
A, B, C, D, and E. are drawn % in. 
apart, and 6 in. in lenu-th. 

Take a piece of paper, and practise 



of wood, steel, celluloid, or rubber, de- 
pending on the price. The student's 
pocket book capacity can be his guide, 
as to the kind he purchases. 

A 6 in. or 8 in., a side size, will be 
found convenient for most work, and will 
be ideal for this course. By purchasing 
a triangle of each style as already des- 
cribed, the student is well equipped for 
such work as the course will present, 
at the start. 

Taking it for granted that the student 
has now a drawing board. T-square, pen- 
cils, rubber, and triangles, we can go 
ahead with the exercise at Fig. 4. 

First practise making the lines A and 
B 6 in. apart. Draw these vertically 
by means of the T-square and triangle, 
either one, as shown. Next use the T- 
square only, and draw your horizontal 
lines, meeting the vertical lines, yet not 
going- over them. This is most import- 
ant, for the exercise is simply one to 
teach control of the hand. .\11 lines must 
touch, but not go over, yet be sure of 




PRACTISE LESSON ON HAND CONTROL 



this exercise. You will be surprised ho-^v 
the pencil will want to go still further, 
until you learn to control your hand 
properly. Mark your M in. distances 



the point, that they must touch. Draw 
these horizontal lines % in. apart, mark- 
oflf the spaces A'ith your ruler, or scale 
as it is usually called. 



After you believe yourself proficient 
enough, study Plate No. 1. To the best 
of your ability follow the instructions 
closely, draw up the plate, and send us 
in vour work. 





60- 30 



r/6i.^ 



SKETCH OF TRIANGLE 

To the three neatest plates received, 
we will award a prize, in the shape of a 
special 6 in. steel scale, with drill sizes, 
decimal equivalents, etc., stamped on its 
face, and in all future issues on this 
series, will carry out the same plan, for- 
warding a scale to the three best and 
neatest plates received on each part or 
plate. 

Instructions 

First tack a piece of paper 10 in. x 
15 in. on the drawing board, using T- 
square to see that it is placed on fairly 
square. Now draw the trimming lines 
9% x 13 '2 in. Ne.xt draw border lines 
as shown at Plate No. 1, 9 in. x 13 in., 
and join. Divide the sheet up into 5 sec- 
tions .A., B, C, D, and E. In portion 
E print in the lettering as showm, and 
while we do not expect this lettering 
will be of splendid standard, still it will 
help you to get ready for the separate 
lesson to come later in the course. In 
section K, complete the horizontal lines, 
each % in. apart as illustrated, stopping 
14 inch away from the border, and 
dividin'j- lines. In section B, draw \x\> 
the vertical lines, following out the di- 
mensions given. At section C, draw 45 
degree lines as shown, using your T- 
square and sloping edge of 45 deg. 
triangle, .-^t section D draw up the 60 
deg. and 30 deg. lines as illustrated, 
using your 60 deg. — 30 deg. triangle, 
together with your T-square. In all cases 
study the plate carefully, and work to 
the dimensions shown. 

Remember that neatness counts. For 
the drawing of this plate use a 3 or 
4H pencil, and make your lines decided, 
and plain. Send us in your work as soon 
as you can. We will judge each plate 
two weeks after its issue, giving you 
lots of time to send your work aloncr 
steadily, so get busy with a capital B, 
and watch for Part 2, which will fur- 
ther explain the various instruments, and 
their iises. When sending: in your plate 
use the coupon, and fill the same in 
carefully. At the same time if you 
feel so inclined, write us your ideas on 
this course, and if it appeals to you.^We 
are mighty anxious to make this course 



April 3, 1919 



C A N A D I A N M A C II I N E R Y 



333 



of great benefit, so let us hear from 
you when your work comes in. 

In studying- the plate, do not pay any 
attention to the scale, shown on the 
sketch. Work to the dimensions givei., 
and the result will be what we want. 
We purposely do not give you an exact 
copy to work from, but rather let you 
prove that you have followed instruc- 
tions closely. It is not necessary to 
ink in this first plate, so as stated be- 
fore use a 3 or 4H pencil, and make your 
lines plain and decided. 

Mail your plate flat, do not fold, or 
if desired you can roll it up, and place 
it in a regular mailing tube. Be sure 
you have sufficient postage placed on 
the same. We will not return plates 



unless specially requested to. In such 
cases return postage must always ac- 
company the request. Address all cor- 
respondence on this course to CANA- 
DIAN MACHINERY Drafting Course, 
McLean Publishing Co., 143 University 
Ave., Toronto, Canada. . 



KEEP THINGS FREE FROM SOOT 

All tubes, passages, and surfaces about 
the boiler should be kept free from 
soot, because this is an exceedingly poor 
conductor of heat, and if it is allowed to 
accumulate in quantity it will cut down 
the efficiency of the boiler to a serious 
extent by diminishing the absorption of 
heat. The various tubes, passages, and 
surfaces should be cleaned as often as 



may be necessary in order to avoid such 
accumulation, and the man in charge 
of the plant can best tell, from experi- 
ence, at what intervals this must be 
done. It is not at all uncommon for 
water-tube boilers, in particular, to be 
neglected until the soot in some of the 
passageways accumulates to an almost 
incredible extent. The existence of large 
quantities of soot indicates that the com- 
bustion in the boiler is not what it 
should be, and when there are heavy de- 
posits of soot, attention should be given 
to the furnace, the draft, the method of 
handling the fires, and such other points 
as may suggest themselves, in order to 
see if the combustion cannot be im- 
proved. 



V 



V 



^ 



o 



6i 



^T 



-^ 



.4 



'-'>K 



> 



4' 



*^N 




&i' 



-•r 




"•M-^ 



C/^/y/^p//i/y Pl/^cH/r/^/^r P/r/jri/m-^^Cou/r^^:'-^ -. 



/i/i/^£. 



' '^••^/fPA'^-JJ.^^ 



n/)r£:/y^l 



-^ 



HERE IS THE FIRST PLATE- SO GET BUSY 

Tear off and send with drawing 



Name 

Address 

Position 

Firm's name. 



COAL AT END OF RUN 

In ending any run of service of the 
boiler preparatory to laying it up for 
cleaning or repairs, the fire should be 
allowed to die out toward the end of the 
run, — just enough coal being fired, dur- 
ing the last hour, to keep up steam as 
long as it is needed. In this way it will 
be possible to avoid the waste involved 
in having a large mass of comparatively 
fresh coal on the grates at the time the 
boiler is put out of commission. While 
this point is a minor one, it is worthy of 
attention. 



334 



Volume XXI. 




WELDING 
AND CUTTING 




Oxy-Acetylene Welding in the Railroad Shops 

Interesting Facts Regarding the Use of the Oxy-Acetylene 

Welding and Cutting Torch in the Railroad Shop — Paper Read 

Before the Institution of Mechanical Engineers 



IT is only about fourteen or fifteen 
years ago that the oxy-acetylene 
process of cutting and welding metal 
was in its infancy, oi- experimental^ 
>t:ige. Its widespread and ever increas- 
ing popularity is no doubt due to the 
fact that the process offv-rs general 
advantages over all other systems of 
blow-pipe welding, by reason of its ex- 
treme portability, wide scope, and the 
liigh efficiency of the autogenous weld 
])ro(luced. 

Oxygen. — Oxygen is obtained for 
commercial use by the commonly 
adopted methods of, first, splitting 
water into its elements — oxygen and 
hydrogen, by passing an electric current 
through it, and secondly, liquefying air, 
and splitting it into its elements — oxygen 
and nitrogen. The oxyc;en so obtained is 
stored in large gasometers, and then 
compressed into steel cylinders at a 
pressure of 120 atmospheres. It is then 
in a fairly pure state; the British Oxy- 
gen Co. guaranteeing their product to 
be from 98.5 per cent, to 99.5 per cent, 
pure. 

As a result of storing the oxygen in 
contact with water in the gasometers, a 
certain quantity of moisture is carried 
by the gas into the steel cylinders; the 
moisture condenses, and to expel it from 
the cylinder, which it is advisable to do 
in order to prevent the valve freezing 
in cold weather, it is only necessary to 
invert the cylinder, and allow the pres- 
.sure of the gas to blow the water out 
as the valve is opened and closed two 
or three times. 

Acetylene. — Acetylene is a gas com 
posed of 92.3 per cent, carbon and 
7.7 per cent, hydrogen. It contains the 
highest percentage of carbon of all the 
hydrocarbon series, and is produced by 
dissolving an equal volume of carbide of 
calcium and water. Carbide of calcium 
is made by fusing a mixture of lime 
and coke in the proportion of fifty-six 
parts by weight of lime to thirty-six 
parts by weight of coke in an electric 
furnace, the temperature of which is 
about 7,000 deg. F. 



By F. HAZLEDINE 

Several types of acetylene gas gen- 
erators are in general use, and they may 
be classified as follows: 

(1) .\pparatus in which a quantity of 
gas sufficient for several days' use is 
manufactured and drawn off as required. 

(2) Automatic generators in which the 
quantity of gas produced depends upon 
the quantity of gas consumed. 

These are mostly of the moving-bell 
type, but they vary to the extent that 
in some the water is added to the car- 
bide, and in others the carbide is added 
to the water. 

The following is an analysis of "gen- 
erator gas: Acetylene, 98.05 per cent.; 
oxygen, 0.08 per cent; sulphuretted hy- 
drogen, 1.7 per cent.; ammonia, 0.1 per 
cent.; phosphoretted hydrogen, 0.04 per 
cent.; silicon hydrate, 0.03 per cent. 

Since the presence of sulphur and 
phosphorus in more than very small 
quantities is injurious to iron and steel, 
it is necessary to remove these impurities 
from the acetylene if reliable welds are 
to be made. This is done by a combin- 
ation of mechanical filters and chemical 
actions, with a material which consists of 
iron-oxy-chlorides, the effect being the 
oxidation of the impurities. In cases 
where portability is of first importance, 
use is made of dissolved acetylene, which 
is supplied compressed to ten atmos- 
pheres in steel cylinders that are first 
filled with a porous material saturated 
with acetone — a liquid which readily dis- 
.«olves acetylene. This gas, the use of 
which is known as the high-pressure sys- 
tem, is safe, clean, and pure; a point 
which has direct bearing on the quality 
of the weld produced. 

The oxy-acetylene flame (the hottest 
flame known to science) consists of 
equal volumes of oxygen gas and acety- 
lene gas, previously mixed in a chamber 
of the blow-pipe before issuing from 
the nozzle, where it combines with one 
and a half volumes of oxygen obtained 
from the atmosphere to complete com- 
bustion. The flame takes the formation 
of two cones — an inner cone of intense 
heat (about 6,300 deg. F. at the tip). 



composed of about equal parts of hydro- 
gen, carbon, and oxygen, enveloped in a 
relatively cool flame of hydrogen and 
carbon-dioxide. However, much de- 
pends upon the regulation of the flame, 
as an excess of oxygen will cause the 
metal to be oxidized, and an excess of 
acetylene will cause the metal to be car- 
bonized. The welder is guided by the 
appearance of the flame; that is, the 
relative size and shape of the two cones, 
and by the nature of the sparks thrown 
off from the metal, white star-shaped 
sparks indicating excess of oxygen. The 
blow-pipes in use are of two general 
types, namely: 

(1) One for use with high-pressure 
gas (dissolved acetylene). 

(2) One for use with low-pressure 
systems (that is, generator gas). 

The latter type of blow-pipe is con- 
structed on the "injector" principle, the 
velocity of the oxygen causing the acety- 
lene gas to be drawn fronj the gener- 
ator into the blow-pipe, where it is in- 
timately mixed with the oxygen. It has 
been found necessary to insert, in all 
cases, a hydraulic safety-valve between 
the generator and the blow-pipe in order 
to eliminate any chance of the gas back- 
firing into the generator. The high- 
pressure blow-pipe is simpler in design. 
As the oxygen and acetylene are both 
under pressure, the "injector" construc- 
tion is unnecessary, therefore the only 
arrangements required are: a suitable 
valve for the control of the oxygen gas, 
and a roll of wire-gauze to prevent back- 
firing of an explosive mixture. The best 
blow-pipes for general use are those 
which are supplied with different size 
tips ranging in capacity from 50 to 2,000 
litres per hour. This obviates the neces- 
sity of having to purchase a number of 
complete blow-pipes, and is also the 
means of saving time when changing 
from one class of work to another, as it 
is easier to change a nipple than to 
disconnect and recouple the gas supply 
to a blow-pipe. 

It is impossible to overestimate the 
importance of adequately preparing the 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



335 



work before the weld is actually at- 
tempted, as any time spent in this way 
is amply repaid afterwards, in the easier 
execution made possible by it, and also 
by the honiogeneous nature of the weld. 
It is a matter, however, in which it is 
impossible to lay down any hard and 
fast rules; the varying nature of the 
work accomplished making it impossible 
to dc so. The general principles ob- 
tained in the best practice point out that 
the line of the weld must be opened out, 
that is, the two sides bevelled to form 
an angle of 90 deg. The reasons for 
this are: 

1. To make certain that the weld will 

be penetrated, not merely sealed 
over; and 

2. To strengthen the weld by increas- 

ing the surface in contact. 

It is essential that the line of the weld 
should be thoroughly cleaned either by 
hand tools or some chemical agent. The 
most important part of the preparation 
is that of arranging the pieces to be 
welded in such a position that there will 
be no deformation, breaks, cracks, or 
integral strains, and that they will be 
linable at the conclusion of the operation. 
This is the point in which the experience 
and skill of the operator is revealed as 
there are no rules to guide him; and 
upon any work but that of the very 
simplest character, failure to grasp and 
apply the laws of expansion and contrac- 
tion means the pirtial or total ruin of 
the work. It is impossible to control 
expansion and conti-action by physical 
force, so that the only way to prevent 
disastrous results is to foresee the prob- 
able direction and extent of the phano- 
mena, and nullify the effect by preheat- 
ing certain parts of the work, either by 
the blow-pipe, or by the welder's fur- 
nace. It is rood i^rictice when the article 
is not too cumbersome, to raise the tem- 
perature of the whole piece of work 
nearly to red heat in the furnace, make 
the weld whilst the temperature is still 
rising, and then allow it to cool slowly 
and uniformly in sand or asbestos, or by 
allowing the furnace to cool off, but in 
this case care should be taken to shield 
it from all currents of air. In large 
pieces of work, pans of charcoal and coke 
are placed in the immediate neighbor- 
hood of the place which it is desired to 
heat. In the case of castinas it is ad- 
visable to preheat them bodily, not 
locally, as there is always the chance of 
discovering the presence of an internal 
strain due to the irregular cooling of the 
metal when it was cast. It is advan- 
tao-eous to preheat work in all cases in 
order to save oxyt,en and acetylene for 
although the heat of the oxy-acetvlene 
flame is intense, the total amount of heal 
contained is not very great, and much 
would be lost by conduction to colder 
parts of the work. 

The actual execution of the weld, after 
it has been properly prepared, is a fairly 
simple matter to an experienced opera- 
tor, providing the welding-rod and flux 
of the correct composition are at hand. 
For wrought-iron and mild steel, the 
welding-rod used to replace the metal re- 
moved in forming the V should be of 
soft pure iron, known as Swedish iron. 



For cast-iron, the welding-rod should 
be made of the best grey cast-iron, con- 
taining about 5 per cent, of silicon, and 
be free from manganese, as the silicon 
destroys the oxide of iron formed, and 
results in a weld of grey iron which is 
not too hard to work with ordinary cut- 
ting tools; but manganese would tend 
to combine the carbon and iron, and make 
a white iron weld which would be un- 
workable. It is also necessary to use 
a flux to slag the oxide. A well-known 
and excellent flux in powder form is 
made of equal quantities of carbonate 
and bi-carbonate of soda, to which is 
added from 10 to 15 per cent, of borax 
and 5 per cent, of precipitated silica. 
The flux is applied by heating the end 
of the welding-rod and dipping into the 
flux. 

For copper, the welding-rod used 
should be of phosphor-copper with just 
a trace of aluminum. It is found that 
the introduction of a small amount of 
phosphorus prevents the absorption of 
hydrogen and carbon-monoxide, which 
would escape as the weld was cooling 
and form blow-holes and also prevent 
oxidation. The flux used is in the form 
of a powder consisting of sodium borate, 
chloride of sodium, and boracic acid, al- 
though it is not absolutely necessary if 
the edges of the weld and the metal to 
be added are clean. 



SAVING LIFE BY OXY-ACETYLENE 

An extraordinary story of the salvage 
of a British submarine which went down 
near the Clyde was recently cabled by 
the Associated Press. The submarine 
liad seventy-three persons on board in- 
cluding naval contractors and men from 
the yard where she had been built. The 
order was given to submerge, and she 
was just beneath the suface when water 
began to pour into her aft and she de- 
scended stern down to a depth of fifteen 
fathoms. 

A few hours passed before divers were 
sent down on what they thought was a 
forlorn hope so far as bringing anyone 
up alive was concerned. Reaching the 
bottom they discovered that the stern 
of the vessel was embedded in many feet 
of mud. Knocking at the hull they were 
amazed to hear a responsive tapping. 

Strong wires were put round the ves- 
sel and the air cylinders were utilized to 
blow out the oil fuel stored forward, 
which enabled the vessel to drive upward 
until her bow was well above water in a 
nerpendicular position. Immediately a 
big hole was cut in her with oxy- 
■icetylene cutting blow-pipes and forty- 
two men were brought out. They 
had been below fifty-seven hours before 
being saved. — From the "Acetylene and 
Welding Journal." 



WELDING FORE.MEN 

One of the real troubles in the welding 
industry is to find foremen who appre- 
ciate the problems involved; that is, men 
who can be made to feel that welding is 
more than a mechanical job. All kinds 
of men have been selected for this posi- 
tion, and for all kinds of reasons. One 
superintendent may pi'efer a blacksmith 



because a blacksmith is familiar with 
steel and iron, but he ignores the fact 
that the blacksmith knows nothing about 
cast iron, brass, aluminum, etc. Each 
trade finds its special knowledge useful 
in welding, and a first-class welder 
should know something about all metal 
trades. A welder who does only one 
thing can be trained quite easily in a 
short time, and he need not know much 
more than how to do his special work 
correctly, but the .man in charge must 
know more than this. A person ignorant 
of the clemenlgry practices of metal- 
lurgy and mechanics cannot be safely 
entrusted with welding work that in- 
volves possible damage to person and 
property. When those in authority fully 
realize their responsibility in this mat- 
ter, proper methods of instruction such 
as welding schools and trade journals 
will come into their own. — From the 
"Acetylene and "Welding Journal." 



.SAFETY VALVES AND BOILER 
HEATING SURFACE 

The now accepted rule that the size 
of the safety valves of the ordinary 
type required on each boiler shall be 
determined as follows: 

Area of safety valve in square inches 
equals total heating surface of boilers 
in sq. ft.) multiplied by 1.25 



p + 15 
where p is the working pressure in 
pounds per square inch. A set of ex- 
periments made by Isherwood showed 
that increase of efficiency was associated 
with a reduction in the tube surface, 
so it is pertinent to ask how the safety 
valves referred to would answer in this 
case. In the first series, the boiler 
heating surface was 792 square feet, and 
the pressure 80 lbs. gauge, so that the 
area of safety valves 

1.25 

7^ 792 X = 10'*2 sq. in. or 3.64 

80+15 
in. diameter. 

In the second case with half the tube 
surface then this formula would give tne 
safetv valve area 
(1.25) 
__ 424 X rr= 5.580; or 2.66 m. 

80 + 15 
diamotei. 

A rule which gives results of this 
charcter is one that can hardly be deem- 
ed entirely satisfactory, and points to 
the desirability of returning to the no- 
tion that the maximum rate of evapor- 
ation depends upon the maximum cap- 
acity of the furnace to liberate heat 
energy. The area of the fire grate is 
surely the measure of the safety v.^lve 
area. — M.M. 



Can Export Now. — The Canadia 
Trade Commission announces a new 
ruling under which it will be possible to 
resume exportation of wood pulp to 
Mexico. Owing to conditions arising out 
of the war both Canada and the United 
States were obliged to exercise extreme 
caution as to permitting the exportation 
of any paper-making material. 



336 



Volume XXr. 




WHAT OUR READERS 
THINK AND DO 




Views and Opinions Regardin-g Industrial Developments, Factory Administra- 
tion and Allied Topics Relating to Engineering Activity 



INTERESTING MILLING FIXTURE. 

By J. H. MOORE. 

There are many methods employed of 
bobbing screws, but one of perhaps the 
most interesting- fixtures for milling 
screws, used for jacks, came to the writ- 
er' attention the other day. The photo 
illustrates its construction clearly, and 



joint shaft on feed gear box. By this 
method a direct gear drive from the gear 
box is obtained. The operation time on 
this work has been cut down more than 
half, and a much better class of work 
has been obtained, than by the former 
method, A bobbing cutter is, of course, 
placed on the miller arbor when the 
work, by means of the gearing', feeds 




GENERAL VIEW OF THE FIXTURE 



the simplicity of the idea is its chief as- 
set. 

The mechanism is mounted on a flat 
plate, and consists of gears so arranged 
that, from the time they are driven from 
shaft A, until they reach the master 
screw B, the proportion is correct. This 
screw has a similar pitch to the one de- 
sired to hob or cut, and has a hole in its 
end into which the work is placed. 

The complete fixture is mounted on the 
miller table, and end of shaft is connect- 
ed! by a special length bar to universal 



crosswise at the proper speed, cutting 
a good thread of correct pitch. No 
doubt this scheme will bring to many 
readers' minds its possibility of adoption 
to other classes of work. 



RELIEVING TURNING TOOL. 

By F. SCRIBER. 

When turning some classes of work 

it is very desirable that there be 

no maiks on the parts being 

A turret lathe usually comes 



turned. 



forward, makes a cut and returns 
to its original starting point and then 
indexes. This makes it necesary to drag 
the tool back over the work, and as there 
is always some spring to the tool when 
cutting, as a general thing, when the 
tool is going back without cutting it will 
scratch the work, sometimes very deeply. 

To eliminate this scratch on the fin- 
ishing operation on particular work, a 
tool similar to that shown in Fig. 1 was 
designed. This is held in a holder A to 
the turret. In this holder is mounted a 
sleeve B. This sleeve is revolvable in 
the holder so as to give the proper clear- 
ance and cutting rake for the tool, and 
when located in the proper position is 
rigidly clamped by the two bolts C, with 
nuts and washers on same. 

A lengthwise adjustment is also pro- 
vided on this sleeve by means of adjust- 
able nuts D and E. At the end of this 
sleeve B two lugs F and G are arranged. 
The purpose of these lugs will be de- 
scribed later. The cutting tool itself, 
H, is held in a shank J by means of 
screws K. This shank is free to revolve 
in the sleeve B, two hardened steel bush- 
ings, L and M, providing bearings for the 
same, while the adjustable nuts N keep 
it back in place against the shoulder O. 

When turning work the thrust of the 
cut is taken in the direction of the arrow, 
which pivoting about the centre P causes 
the face K on the shank to come against 
the lug F on the sleeve, thus making a 
rigid and fixed place for taking the 
thrust of the cut. When through cutting 
the work the spring Q contained in this 
lug' forces the tool holder around until 
the other side of the lug on the shank of 
the tool comes against the screw R, thus 
the cutting edge of the tool is held clear 
of the work while the tool returns to its 




DETAIL OF BELIEVING TURNING TOOL 



April 3, 1919 

original starting point. This simple op- 
•eration of throwing the tool forward pre- 
vents scratches or tool marks appearing 
lengrthwise of the worli. 

The spring is kept in place by the 
plate S, which is in turn held onto the 
sleeve of the tool by four small screws. 
When starting in on a new piece the ac- 
tion of cutting the material forces the 
cutter around the centre P, compressing 
the spring and bringing the shank of tht 
tool up against the lug K, thereby re- 
turning the cutter to the correct position 
for turning. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



337 



Atherley, Ont.— Tenders are asked for 
a 20 h.p. engine to run the stone crusher 
for Rama Township. The township will 
supply wood and water. Work will com- 
mence in May. Tenders must be in the 
hands of the clerk or reeve by noon on 
Saturday, April 12, 1919. Henry 
Hea-.'ener, reeve, R.R. No. 2, Atherlev. 
W. M. Shields, cleerk, OConnell P.O. 




CENTRE PUNCH FIXTURE 



CENTRE-PUNCH FOR ACCURATE 
LOCATING 

npIlE view offers a suggestion for a centre- 
punch, the idea being to provide means 
f(ir holding it perfectly upright and steady, 
while the point is brought accurately to a 
line, or an intersection where it is desired 
to place a pop as near as possible true. A 
little stand is built of two pegs and a trian- 
gular plate, the latter having a bush forced 
into it, to hold the punch, which is secured 
by a set-screw. This tool also enables the 
tool-maker to get a better view of the surface, 
.since it is only necessary to place a finger, 
or two upon the plate or hold the pegs to 
keep the tool steady. — Fred Hokner. 




SAFETY FLANGE FOR SENSITIVE DRILL 
lABLE 

'T*HE drawing shows a safety buffer flange that was 
fitted to the stem of a sensitive drilling machine 
table, the object being to prevent breakage through 
youngsters allowing the table to bang down violently 
through neglecting to hold it firmly when loosening 
the grip handle. The machine was in a small shop, 
for general service. The buffer consisted of a thin 
nng like a pipe flange templet, with four holes into 
which were pushed rubber plug. The h9le in the 
ring was a loose fit on the table stem.— Fred Horner. 



SAFETY' FLANGE PREVENTS BREAKAGES 




A^^^^^^'^^k^^^^^^^^^^v.■,v.; 



PACKING FOR THIN WORK IN TOOL 
MAKERS' CLAMPS 



PACKINGS FOR THIN WORK IN TOOL- 
MAKERS' CLAMPS 



VTERY thin plates or pieces that have to be 
held in toolmakers' clamps for operating 

on by hand or machine must usually be packed 
6 up firmly to prevent them from slipping down 

under the pressure of the tools. Three kinds 

of packing are shown in the view, A being one 
for repetition pieces, simply plate bent round. At B strips 
are bent, one round each jaw, this being suitable for any 
width of opening of the jaws, but giving no support under 
the central areas of the work. A compromise between the 
two is seen at C ; here piec«s are bent into U shape, if neces- 
.sary being wedged apart firmly with a wooden block or 
wedge, seen dotted.— Fred Horner. 



k 



338 



Volume XXI. 




DEVELOPMENTS IN 
SHOP EQUIPMENT 




UNIVERSAL AND CHUCKING HOL- 
LOW SPINDLE THREAD MILLER 

THE Smallev-Gencral Co., Bay 
City, Mich., have developed a new 
universal and chucking hollow 
spindle thread miller similar to the No. 
1 size, but of larger range and for work 
of smaller diameter than the former 
size. 

General Description 

The salient features of the thread 
miller are sturdy construction, turning 
attachment, small floor space occupied, 
quick change of speeds and pitches for 
various threads, absence of loose gears. 



the shift from neutral to milling speed 
or turning speed are obtained by shift- 
ing the levers on the front. The turn- 
ing speed beai-s a constant relation to 
the milling feed so that it is fast for 
small work, and slow for large. This 
feature enables faces to be turned 
true with the thread giving perfect 
alignment when screwed together. The 
only loose gears are those required for 
the lead screw to change the pitch of 
thread milled; Thus it is seen that 
quick shifts from one job to another 
are possible. The chuck carrying the 
work is mounted on a flange on the 
outside of the main head spindle and 



to which face plate or chuck of any type 
can be attached. The bearings are 8x6 
inches and split. The main spindle is 
driven by means of a three step cone 
pulley and a gear train. Just beneath 
the main spindle is a combination of 
gears actuated through clutches which 
controls either the high or low speeds. 
The low speed is for milling, and the 
high is for lathe or turning speed. In 
order to govern the peripheral speed of 
the surface to be milled, there is located 
in the bottom section a system of slid- 
ing gears which in combination with the 
three step cone gives a total of 18 
speeds. The lead screw is driven and 




■ I ■ 

i 





^ •^\i« 




i/\ 



V > 



DIRECT FRONT VIEW 

simplicity of operation and cleanliness. 
When the multiple tooth hob is used, the 
thread is completed at one revolution of 
the work, but when a single cutter is 
used as many revolutions are necessary 
as there are threads. If the threads are 
near the end of the work, the chucking 
type of machine as shown herein js 
recommended. For lead screws, jack 
screws, worms and work where the 
milled surface is 4 in. or more from the 
end, a centering type of milling head is 
supplied and the work is held between 
centres. The bed, which is of lathe 
type, has the main head cast solid with 
it, thus insuring rigidity and perfect 
alignment. Under the maip head are the 
gears driving the main spindle. They 
are mounted on shafts in the cabinet 
leg, and so arranged that with the three 
step cone eighteen speeds can be ob- 
tained. The changes of speed and also 



GENERAL VIEW 



is driven by means of a train of gears 
giving the required speed and con- 
nected to the main spindle by means of 
a change gear train is the lead screw. 
On the shears of the bed is located the 
milling head, and the milling hob is 
held on the spindle by a tapered arbor 
and draw-in bolt. 

This machine will swing 20 inches 
diameter. The maximum distance from 
the face of main spindle to the face of 
milling spindle with popular sized bed 
is 20 inches. Any length of bed can be 
provided. It will mill either internal or 
external, right or left hand, straight or 
tapered threads. It is not adapted to 
the milling of absolutely square threads. 

The spindle in the main head is 38 
inches in length with an opening 
through the centre 6 inches in diameter. 
It carries a flange 15 inches in diameter 



changes of pitch are obtained as in a 
lathel 

Located on the ways of the machine 
is the bottom slide which in turn carries 
the top or cross slide. This cross slide 
is controlled in its relation to the bot- 
tom slide by means of a micrometer 
screw, by which the diameter of the 
thread is controlled. The top slide car- 
ries the milling spindle which is either 
direct driven for light threads, or back 
geared for the usual run of work. The 
spindle bearings are 2% inches in diame- 
ter by 6 inches in length. The milling 
hob is held on this spindle by means of 
a tapered arbor and a draw-in bolt. .lust 
back of the spindle is placed a tool 
holder. In front of the spindle is a 
socket for boring bar. Either may be 
used in connection with high speed for 
finishing or facing, and it is usually 
unnecessarv to remove the turning 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



339 



tools when milling. When milling, the 
bottom carriage is clamped to a feed 
tube located between the ways of ^he 
machine. All the slides are provided 
with tapered gibs. The bearings of the 
bottom slide on the ways are 24 in. x 24 
in., while the guiding or gibbing ways 
are 24 in. x 8 in. 

The cutting lubricant falls into the 
steel pan below the shears, and then 
drains into a settling basin on the bot- 
tom of pan. From there it is taken by 
reversible oil pump wnth flexible metal- 
lie connections back to the work. The 
machine is fully equipped with grease 
cups and self closing oil cups. The 
milling spindle and back gears are lubri- 
cated by plural oiler located within easy 
access and sight of operator. 

Slides are provided with wipers to 
keep them clear of chips. 

Most of the gears in gear box revolve 
on hollow shafts which are packed with 
an absorbent. These shafts are filled 
with oil, which slowly drains out through 
holes in the tube, thus oiling the bear- 
ing. The lower shaft turns, but is im- 
mersed in oil. 

The unique feature of the Smalley 
General Thread Miller is the feed-tube 
and lead-screw device which controls 
the lead on the thread to be milled. 
Some of its important advantages in 
brief are: 

(a) The dragging backward action 
against the thread of the lead-screw pre- 
vents any backlash. 

(b) The 12 inches of thread on the 
lead screw, as against the 4 to 5 inches 
on ordinary machines, gives longer life, 
greater accuracy and larger production. 

(c) The thread can be picked up at 
any time or place. It is not necessary 







GENER.\L VIEW OF .MACHINE AND WORK 



to wait for the split nut to come around 
as on a lathe. 

(d) It does not use up the lead-screw 
when in high or turning speeds. 



I^ISCHER OIL GROOVING MACHINE 

The Fischer Machine Company of Phil- 
adelphia, Pa., have recently placed on 
the maiket what is known as their oil 
grooving machine. This machine, with 
some of the classes of work as accom- 
plished by it, is shown in the accompany- 
ing photograph. 

The machine has been designed to au- 
tomatically cut oil grooves in bearings, 
and by means of certain gear changes, 
will cut straight groves as well as 




spirals, as shown in illustration. It 
will do both internal and external work. 

Machine is convenient and easy to 
operate, has few parts, there being no 
complicated mechanism to cause trouble, 
all operating parts being thoroughly en- 
closed and dirt proof. The machine may 
be locked by means of a binder screw, 
and the clutch disengaged, in this way 
adapting machine for cutting keyways. 

The tool slide has a reciprocating mo- 
tion, and is linked to an adjustable con- 
necting rod, and will cut any length 
,<iroove within the capacity of the ma- 
chine, which is 10 inches over the car- 
riage, and a stroke from zero to 8 inches. 
This machine effects a great savinq: of 
labor, does better and more uniform 
work than can be done by hand. General 
specifications fellow: 

Net weight of machine, 815 lbs. 

Net weight of countershaft, 130 lbs. 
Gross weight, 1,000 lbs. 

Size, boxed for export, 60 ' x .54" x .v 
30". 

Gross weight, 1,000 lbs. 
lbs. 



CLOSE UP VIEW OF MACHINE 



NEW PUBLICATIONS 

The Landis Machine Company, 
Waynesboro, Penn., have published a 50- 
page booklet on the Landis Pipe Thread- 
ing Machinery. This publication, cata- 
log No. 25, illustrates and describes in 
detail the Landis stationary pipe drive 
heads, pipe threading, cutting machines-, 
rotary pipe and nipple threading heads, 
etc. The excellent illustrations combin- 
ed with the text make the publication 
of considerable value to those interested 
in the pipe threading and cutting m^i- 
chinery. 

The Independent Pneumatic Tool Com- 
pany, Chicago, has recently sent out a 
new folder descriptive of the Thor Line 
of pneumatic tools. The various tools art- 
displayed and described in such a man- 
ner that a ready comparison may bt 
made of the various classes. 



340 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



The MacLean Publishing Company 

LIMITED 

(ESTABLISHED 1888) 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, President H. T. HUNTER. Vice-President 

H. V. TYRRELL. General Manager 

PUBLISHERS OF 

GnadianMachinery 

^Manufacturing News-^ 

A weekly journal devoted to the machinery and manufacturing interests. 
B. G. NEWTON. Manager. A. R. KENNEDY, Mana'ging Editor. 

Associate Editors : 

W. F. SUTHERLAND T. H. FENNER J. H. RODGERS (Montreal) 

J. H. MOORE 



Office of Publication. 143-153 University Avenue. Toronto. Ontario 



Vol XXI, 



APRIL 3, 1919 



No, 14 



A Changed Russia? 

CELLING goods to Russia has been regarded as a risky 
'-^ proposition for a long time. There are many Cana- 
dian firms that were hard hit by having merchandise in 
Russia on the outbreak of the war and to them the idea 
of once more putting merchandise in that market was 
of secondary rating to the paramount question, "Who is 
going to pay for them?" Even Canadian firms which 
have had a very large connection in Russian and Siberia 
make certain now that any shipment they might be con- 
templating is well covered in advance. 

Now comes word from New York that L, C. A. K. 
Martens, who has been a resident there for some time, 
is prepared to act on behalf of the Soviet Government 
with the idea of spending. about $200,000,000 in gold. 

The purchases he requires to make include railroad 
supplies, agriculture implements, machinery, tools, min- 
ing machinery and supplies, electrical supplies, printing 
machinery, textile manufactures, shoes and clothing, fats 
and canned meats, rubber goods, typewriters and office 
supplies, automobiles and trucks, etc. Russia, on the 
other hand, is prepared to sell flax, hemp, hides, bristles, 
furs, lumber, grain, platinum, metals and minerals. 

Mr, Martens further makes the assertion that Ger- 
man domination of trade and political conditions has been 
broken and that "Russia is starting all over again." The 
Russian agent also goes on to state that many of the 
reports that have appeared in print regarding the murder 
carried on by the Government has been grossly untrue. 
Martens hopes to get recognized at Washington, and 
open up trade between the two countries. 



and transportation enter very largely into the base cost 
of steel products. . 

This advance in wages and transportation will apply 
to ore, coal, coke, limestone and all other supplies. 

As to the possibilities of wage reduction, one well- 
kno%vn New York man, in speaking on this subject the 
other day, expressed the belief that wages will not be 
materially reduced until 1920. He went on to say that 
undoubtedly Europe will be unable to han-est anything 
like a full crop in 1919, and that it will be 1920 before 
the food supply of the world is sufficient to reduce the 
cost of living. 

He then urged that the business men stop talking 
about price reductions and saying that prices will shortly 
be reduced, for in doing so they destroy their own market 
and kill the business enthusiasm by keeping consumers 
out of the market. 

In addition to the above, there is a constructive side, 
for in Europe there is an almost inconceivable shortage 
of iron and steel, representing an accumulated _ demand 
of more than four years' standing. This applies with 
equal force to South America, Australia, New Zealand, 
.lapan, China, India, for the lack of transportation facili- 
ties have made it impossible to transport supplies to 
these countries. 

We know that in the United States, a period of six 
months' depression in the steel business has inevitably 
been followed by a prolonged period of unusual demand, 
and we know that there has been a check on the peace 
consumption of steel in this country for approximately 
two years. 

We have a strong conviction that this is a time when 
every business man should make a correct analysis of 
present world conditions and lend his assistance in a 
constructive solving of the present problems. 



Stop 



Tallcing Prices 

CANADIAN MACHINERY has received a letter, written 
to a well-known manufacturer, and some of the views 
on price and wage matters are well worth reading: — 

An interesting fact has been brought to our attention. 
It relates to the manufacturing costs of steel products. 
The statement is to the effect that the Steel Corporation 
have paid in salaries and wages during 1918 considerably 
more than four hundred million dollars. 

With their estimated production of finished steel the 
cost of wages and salaries alone, will, therefore, approxi- 
mate $25.00 per ton, from which it will be seen that before 
there can be a material reduction in the cost of steel 
products, it must be brought about through a reduction 
in wages and in transportation costs, for, as you know, 
transportation costs have advanced from 50 to 75 per cent, 
during the past several years, and you know that wages 



What That Drop Amounts To 

TTAVE you ever seen oil dripping? Didn't seem to be 
^ -*^ wasting much, did it? 

But these drops amount to a lot if there are enough of 
them. Here is something worth remembering: — 

Oil just dropping wastes: 15 gallons per day, 105 gal- 
lons per week, 5,460 gallons per year. 

Oil wasting through an opening the size of the eye 
of an needle, one thirty-second inch in diameter, under 
3 pounds pressure waste: 2G4 gallons per day, 1,848 gal- 
lons per week, 96.096 gallons ner year. 

Oil leaking through one-eighth of an inch aperture 
wastes: 2,788 gallons per day, 19,516 gallons per week, 
1,014,832 gallons per year. 



Steel Then and Now 

SHIP plate has been reduced in Canada to 4.50 cents 
ner pound. Market quotations from United States 
makers make this figure possible. 

During the war the prevailing price was from 10 to 
12 cents per pound. The firms selling in Canada were 
not making anv more than they are now. 

It is a significant fact that there have been no wage 
reductions to make possible the cuts that have been made 
in the selling price of steel. For all intents and purposes 
wages are just rs high now as they were when plate 
was bringing the long price. 

The situation, looked at in an ordinary way, would 
mean one of two things: (1) The steel mills were making 
big money during the period of the war, or (21 they must 
be losing a lot of money selling at present quotations. 
Steel mills are not in business for their health, so that 
inference No. 2 can be disniissed. 

During the war the great cry was for plate. Ship- 
building could not nroceod without the supnly. The fact 
that there was such a call is no good reason why the 
price should have been allowed to go crazy. It is plain 
evidence that there was war time profiteering. 



April 3, 1919 



341 



Making a Serious Mistake Here 



By AN INSPECTOR 



IN July, 1913, i.he Ontario Goveiument put into fores 
an act concerning the design, construction and inspec- 
tion of steam boilers, which was a long step in ad- 
vance of any previous regulation. 

Being framed on the line of the British Columbia 
laws, it was also a step to,v ards the much needed uni- 
formity of laws in the different Provinces, the absence of 
which maktis a boiler safe in one Province and dangerous 
in another. 

A Good Act 

As we have said this act was a good one, and met with 
the unqualified approval of boiler builders, insurance 
companies and boiler purchasers, all of whom stood to 
benefit by it. The boiler builder had only to show that 
his boiler was built under the Ontario Act, to establish 
the quality of the article he was selling, the purchaser 
had the same guarantee as to the article he was buying, 
and the insurance companies had a certain amount of 
guarantee as to the risk they were taking. It gave the 
operating engineers or firemen a sense of security against 
accident, by reason of the boiler and fittings being of 
standard designs, and subject to the approval of the 
Government inspectors. 

Hopes of a Better Era 

This action of the Government led those interested 
in steam engineering to hope that other much needed re- 
forms would ensue, particularly the granting of graded 
certificates. However, the Government was content to 
rest on its laurels, probably feeling that having done one 
good work, they were entitled to a period of recuperation. 
This, in itself, might not have been so bad, but that re- 
cently they awoke from their long hibernation with a 
feeling that something should be done. What malign 
force prompted this feeling deponent knoweth not, but in 
their anxiety to take some action the Government has 
passed an order-in-council which goes a long way to 
wipe out all the benefits of the Act of 1913. 

The Order-in-Council 

This order-in-council follows an amendment to the On- 
tario Factories Act, making it compulsory that all boil- 
ers (except those in private dwellings, or used for farm 
or agricultural purposes) be either insured with a Boiler 
Insurance Company, registered in the Department of In- 
surance, or inspected once annually by an inspector, duly 
authorized in writing by the superintendent of the Trades 
and Labor Branch. 

The order-in-council provides that any engineer hold- 
ing a 1919 license shall be considered duly authorized to 
make such inspection. An inspection of a boiler by the 
engineer in charge of that boiler will not be accepted, 
but an inspection by any other engineer will be. That 
is, an engineer can inspect his next door neighbor's boiler, 
and vice versa. 

What an idealistic condition is opened up by this 
order-in-council. No more bumptious and critical in- 
spectors poking their noses into all kinds of hidden re- 
cesses, and making foolish suggestions entailing more 
work for the poor engineer. Instead of that, Bill Smith 
gets his good friend and fellow lodge member. Jack Jones, 
to come around and just give his boiler a look over. 

"Now Jack," murmurs Bill, "I guess there's no need 
of knocking that back hand hole out. It's always an 
awkward job to get it tight again with a new gasket." 

"Sure Bill, that'll be alright," says the obliging Jack. 

"I didn't knock the manhole door in, Jack. You can 
see everything from the front hand hole with this torch 



of mine. Anyhow, you know you don't need to be afraid 
of any boiler I have charge of." 

"That's true, me boy," agrees Jack. "We will just open 
the smoke box door and look at the end of the tubes." 

This being done, and Jack assuring himself that the 
end of the tubes are still there, the inspection is com- 
pleted. After a little desultory conversation Jack goes 
off with a feeling of a job well done. Before leaving he 
has arranged for Bill to reciprocate his kind offices the 
following week. 

In the course of a few days Bill's employer gets a 
report from Jack Jones informing him everything is 
in excellent shape, which cannot fail to give the boiler 
owner the utmost satisfaction. 

How About This Case? 

Take another instance of what might happen. Sup- 
posing a plant of, say, 300 H.P., containing 3 boilers of 
100 H.P. each. The company does not carry insurance. 
There is a certain weakness about one of the boilers, 
which the engineer knows of and has informed his em- 
ployer. He knows it may run indefinitely, or may give 
out at any moment. An insurance inspector would insist 
on a repair. The plant is busy and a shut-down is un- 
desirable. There is a little plant close to with one boiler, 
and an engineer holding a 1919 license, who can probably 
write his own name. He is called over and asked to 
make the inspection. Everybody is satisfied. It may 
be said that employers or owners would not permit such 
things. I will give instances of my personal experience 
on these lines which will dispose of that argument, a 
little later on in this article. 

What An Inspector Should Know 

Before going any further it would be well to discuss 
the duties and qualifications of a competent boiler in- 
spector. 

In England, where boiler inspecting has been brought 
to a perfection not known on this continent, the insurance 
companies demand a high grade class of men for their 
boiler inspectors. These men have to be qualified as 
engine inspectors also, and are almost invariably recruited 
from the ranks of the sea-going engineers. They hold 
either an extra first class or first class Board of Trade 
certificate, which guarantees them to be men of special 
training and experience. Having obtained a man of 
this calibre, these companies subject their recruits to a 
rigid course of instruction extending over some months, 
before they are allowed to go out and inspect on their 
own responsibility. 

Evidently from the care expended in selecting and 
training inspectors, the heads of these comuanies do not 
believe that any Tom, Dick or Harry is qualified to in- 
spect boilers. The chief men on the staffs of these or- 
ganizations are men of world-wide reputation, such a? 
Michael Longridge, Stromeyer, Brian Donkin, etc. 

What then should the qualifications be to make a 
successful inspector? 

First ot all he should be a mechanic. Not necessarily 
a boiler maker, in fact, very few boiler makers are 
qualified as mspectors. He should have a thorough know- 
ledge of the principles of design and construction of all 
types of boilers, fire tube and water tube. He should 
know the principles of combustion and of heat. He 
should have had considerable experience in operating, 
and combine with these abilities the faculty of being 
able to make a good working sketch. He should be able 
to make a clear and intelligent report on what he finds. 



342 



C.\ X A DIAX -M acuixek y 



Volume XXI. 



In his actual inspecting- work his knowledge of boilers 
should enable him to detect incipient flaws and weak- 
nesses, and suggest remedies to prevent their spread. 
The ability to state his opinions in clear-cut language, 
and a large amount of tact, are also qualifications to be 

■desired. , 

Some of the insurance companies in Canada attempted 
to obtain these kind of inspectors, and in some cases 
succeeded. However, what militates against them is 
the fact that these men can command much higher salaries 
than the insurance companies can afford to pay, from 
the incomes thev receive. They do get the best men 
possible, and under the direction of their chief engineers 
they do good work. 

One thing is certain. A company that stands to lose 
real money by an accident will, in the nature of things, 
be more particular in their inspection than any other 

agency. 

Not a Sinecure 

The work of a boiler inspector carried out conscien- 
tiously is arduous, dirty and uncomfortable. It is more 
so in" Canada than need be, owing to the disinclination 
of the average engineer to properly prepare his boiler 
for inspection. The inspector is hampered in his work 
by having to dig his way through hot ashes and soot, 
which should be cleared out long before he comes. He 
frequently has to argue and persuade in order to have 
the handholes and manholes opened up. It is not to be 
understood that this is always the case, for there are 
many engineers who take a pride in having things ready 
for the inspector. There are too many who do not, either 
from ignorance or unwillingness to make the effort. 

Too much of this attitude has been engendered in the 
past by inspectors themselves. In too many cases the 
inspector did not carry out his duties in a thoroughly 
conscientious manner, but when conditions were against 
him simply let it slide. This made the engineers imagine 
that there was no need to bother. The result was that 
when the careless and incompetent inspector was rele- 
,aated to the limbo of forgotten things and a new man 
more aware of his duties came along, trouble ensued. 

To make a proper inspection of a boiler it should be 
cooled off thoroughly. The interior of the boiler should 
be perfectly clean. The exterior surfaces should be the 
same, and every part of the boiler that is possible of 
access in any way should be properly prepared. The 
inspector should then make a thorough inspection of 
every part, and be able to make a report of conditions 
that will be almost an exact index of that boiler's fitness 
for its work. 

The characteristics of a steam boiler, its liability to 
sudden accident, or gradual failure through corrosion, are 
the same whether the boiler is located in Chowbent, Lan- 
cashire or Kalamazoo, Mich. Therefore, one would be 
led to imagine that the same or nearly the same ability 
would be necessary to inspect them. Evidently this is 
not so. 

The Province of Ontario takes the view that any man 
who can throw coal into a boiler is qualified to inspect it. 
It takes this view in issuing its certificates by granting 
the same certificate to a man in charge of .5,000 H.P.. 
as to the man in charge of 50 H.P. It further gives the 
man who has charge of one boiler and engine, and knows 
but little about either, the power to inspect a .500 or 
1.000 H.P. water tube boiler and pronounce on its con- 
dition. Ye gods, was ever such a nonsensical and dan- 
gerous principle propagated by any responsible body? 
There are good men in charge of stationary plants 
in Ontario as elsewhei'e, but the majority are no more 
fit to carry out an inspection of a steam boiler than thev 
are to diagnose a case of sickness and prescribe for it. 
This is not meant as disparaging their abilities for the 
position they hold, but rather to point out that their 
trainina- and education has not "been along lines such 
as would fit them for the task. Many engineers (?) 
holding Ontario licenses are practically illiterate, and a 
special clause is inserted in the examination regulations 



to allow these men to have a person *» ^f ^„/°;;„",.''\t" 
verbal answer to the examination question oi allow tne 

xamlner To perform this duty Yet these men a 
qualified bv an order-in-council to assume the lespon 
^.bUtv of "declaring on the safety of a steam boiler. 
Th extent ^f their 'experience consists in a large number 
of cases in having fired a boiler for some years coup ed 
with starting and stopping a steam engine and making 
minor repairs, such as packing glands, etc. 

\s to the argument that boiler owners would see foi 
their own sake the necessity of having as thorough an 
inspection as possible. Some boiler owners will, but 
niany more will, from a false sense of economy, avoid 
it as far as possible. , .^ „* „ 

The writer was asked to make an inspection of a 
boiler which had been giving trouble by leaking round 
the .earns. The owner said he had a good engineer 
but would like an outside opinion. On being asked if 
the boiler had been inspected regularly, he said not 
for some years; he didn't think it needed it. A visit 
was made "to the boiler room while the boiler was under 
steam to get a general idea of conditions. There was 
.ome leakage over the fire seam and round the front 
head The gauge glass showed signs of being plugged 
•in and looking in the fire door to observe the girth seam 
the back end of the combustion chamber was observed 
to be pretty near filled up. -Arrangements were made 
to let the boiler down and to make an internal inspection 
the next day. It took an hour's hard work the following 
day to get "the back handhole door knocked in, the scale 
was piled up so thick and hard against it. The dirt and 
a=hes had so much accumulated in the combustion cham- 
ber and up to the bridge wall that it was almost impos- 
sible to get any kind of a fire in the furnace, and that 
fact alone had saved the back plate from bulging. The 
small amount of heat that could be obtained kept the 
water circulating over the fire, and the solid matter was 
deposited on the back plate. After the inspection had 
been comoleted, the owner was asked how the boiler 
had got into that state and how often was anv cleaning 
done. He stated that he had stopped the cleaning, as 
his man used to spend four or five hours every Sunday 
on the job, and it cost too much. 

Another case was where a locomotive boiler had been 
installed by the owner and his engineer. This boiler 
had been set up in such a manner that the fire was 
under the fire box altogether, and the solid mud ring 
was exposed to the full heat of the flame. The result 
was, as might be expected, innumerable cracks and a 
fractured ring. This owner prided himself on knowing 
all about boilers. 

The writer lemembers well a case of a hospital in 
a large city in Ontario where dangerous conditions pre- 
vailed, and" it was only after several strong reports had 
been made, and pressure put upon the authorities that 
these conditions were remedied. -And the boilers were 
in the basement of the hospital. 

In large plants or medium-sized plants owned by 
responsible manufacturing concerns, every care is taken 
to safeguard the boiler and maintain its efficiency, and 
every recommendation of an inspector is carried out. 
These clients will not be affected by the new order. 

It is the hundreds of small, one-boiler concerns which 
stand most in need of efficient inspection that will be 
the ones to take advantage of this new order of things. 
The owner who hates to spend a cent on his boiler up- 
keep will be the one to pick out a man he knows will 
be easy to make the inspection. Was it for this ciass 
of owner the order was made? What is the object of 
it; through whose influence was it promulgated? What 
are the arguments in its favor? .\nd what do the en- 
gineers themselves think of it? 

Prob?blv some of them will be of the oninion of a 
certain Government inspector now deceased, but well 
known in his day. To all arguments of a technical nature 
he had one renly, "A kettle is a kettle, and a b'iler is a 
b'iler." In all the years this man inspected he wa"- 
never known to go inside a boiler, and there are otiiers. 



April 3, 1919 



34S 




MARKET 
DEVELOPMENTS 




Consumers Get Benefit of All Reductions 

Dealers Have Passed Along the Latest Cuts— Planes Are Showing 

a Tendency to Come to Lower Levels— Big Deal Put Through 

For Disposal of Shell Steel 



NOT much time has been lost in passing the reduc- 
tions made in the price of steel and iron on to 
the Canadian consumers. The price lists issued 
this week pass on the average cut of seven dollars per ton. 
Plate is now quoted at 4.50e per pound. In this connection 
it IS worth noticing that there has been no wage reduction 
yet in the steel trade, and yet during the war plate sold 
locally at from 10 to 12 cents per pound, against the 
lowly 4.50 now. The inference is that either much money 
wa.s made by the mills during the war or they must be 
losing quite a tidy sum now, and it is hardly likely that 
the latter will be generally accepted. It is perhaps a 
little too early yet to state whether the new prices are 
going to result in much vigorous buying, although the 
trade generally is very hopeful that such will be the case. 
There is already talk of further reductions, but it will be 
some months before anything in this line can be done. 
Some machine tools are showing a tendency to drop 



in price, but not to any very great degree. Planers are a 
little down, and they can afford to be. At the outbreak 
of the war and the beginning of munition making there 
was no demand for planers, and firms stopped making 
them. When war shops came into the market and when 
the shipbuilding programme was started there was a big 
call for planers, one U.S. Government order calling for 
as many as 400 at a time. The result was that prices 
simply ran wild, and they are still over twice the old 
price. 

Some 40,000 tons of shell steel, the property of the 
I.M.B., was sold to Toronto scrap dealers during the week, 
and it is likely that the remainder of this material in 
the country will be shipped to England. No disposition 
has yet been made of the steel here that belongs to the 
United States Ordnance Department, although negotiations 
pending ought to bring something definite. 



LOWER PRICES FAIL TO BRLNG 

MONTREAL BUYERS OUT STRONG 



Special to CANADIAN MACHINERY 



\/fONTREAL, April 3.— Reconstruc- 
-'•''Ation is still in the making, appar- 
ently, and business operations, on a 
sound basis, are delayed or postponed 
to a large extent by the unsettled con- 
ditions contingent on the readjustment 
that has been taking place since the first 
of the year. The extended delay that 
has taken place in the settlement of 
American shell contracts has prevented 
a speedy clearing of these plants, and 
the taking up of new enterprise. Con- 
siderable capital is tied up in this way, 
thus delaying expansion in other direc- 
tions. 

Price adjustments in steel are lower- 
ing the mill and warehouse quotations, 
but buying is still of a light character. 
Metals are devoid of interest. Machin- 
ery trade is quiet and old material has 
shown slight improvement. 

Lower Prices, But Light Demand 

Whether the decision of the American 
mills to meet the reduction in steel 
prices, announced by the Commission, 
and the appai-ent willingness of the Can- 
adian mills to meet the changed condi- 
tions will stimulate buying is yet to be 



seen. As yet, the movement has not 
been pronounced, but from past inquiries 
it would not be surprising to see a re- 
vival of heavy buying, not of an abnor- 
mal character, but of sufficient volume 
to create renewed confidence to the 
trade. One of the difficulties at the 
pi'esent time is in the operaiion of the 
mills, it being necessary in some in- 
stances to I'un for intervals, periodically, 
in order to meet trade requirements. 
5teel production on an economic basis 
requires continuous operation, so that 
'ight, but steady, de'iiand necessitates 
'he shut down of the furnaces <iurin,a; 
operating periods. Should lower prices 
'■reate a better domestic demand it may 
^nable the mills to operate closer to 
capacity and avoid expensive shut 
■ 'owns. Considerable war material is 
still stocked and producers are expect- 
ing to dispose of this at a loss. Local 
dealers have revised prices on some com- 
modities to meet the lower quotations at 
the mills, but inquiry as yet has not 
been sufficient to indicate that heavy 
buying will immediately follow the cut- 
ting of the price. The base price on 
both iron and steel is now fixed at $3.75 



per hundred, and price revisions are ex- 
pected on other lines. Dealers here have 
made a further adjustment in respect to 
plates, the new scale being $4.50 on '4 
inch, and $4.90 on the smaller sizes. 
Black sheets have also been revised, Xo. 
28 gauge being c|Uoted at $6.55 and No. 
10 at $5.15 per hundred. 

Copper I'ndertone Better 

The week's devpioirnt.nts in the metal 
situation has added little interest to t' 
market and the trade is still hovering 
on the brink of expectancy. In com- 
menting on the better tone of the Ameri- 
can copper situation, dealers here say 
that the optimistic tone is naturally re- 
flected in local circles, but do not an- 
ticipate any immediate activity in this 
connection. It is reasonable to expect 
a revival of interest now and then, but 
a general return to norma! activity will 
only take place when readjustment has 
reached the point where reconstruction 
can be carried on f^n a staMe and reliable 
'i=is. Demand at present is of a "■ 
character, but the volume is relatively 
light. Price quotations are unchanged 
and firm at 19 and 20 cents per lb. The 
tin situation is still devoid of mention- 
able interest, the demand continuing to 
be largely for small lots. Operations 
are more or less obscured, and dealers 
report little future buying. All the 



344 

metals are inactive with price quotations 
unchanged. 

Used Tools Still Prominent 

Machine tool activity throughout the 
district continues to be of a transient 
character, the supply equal, at all times, 
to the present demand. Dealers are 
making- occasional sales of new tools, but 
the bulk of the trading; is in the transfer 
of used equipment from a previous 
buyer to new purchaser. In many in- 
stances these sales are made on a direct 
basis, hut in others the dealers are act- 
ing the part of rebuilders, in overhaul- 
ing and refitting the machines for more 
general nurposes than for which thev 
were originallv designed or previously 
used The ouestion of price continues to 
be an influencing factor in the sale of 
new enuipment. and it is this phase of 
the situation that places second-hand 
ti-ading in the primary position. How- 
ever, used machinery of a serviceable 
character is becoming scarcer, and event- 
ually the demand will revert to new 
tools. With Government action in re- 
spect to lower prices on primary com- 
modities the way may be opened for 
better rino*-itions on finished products 
and machinery. 

Scrap Improvement Anticipated 

The outlook in old material and scrap 
circles has taken on a more encouraging 
tone during the past week, and while 
sales have increased but little, there Is 
a feelipT throughout the trade that a 
gradual revival will shortly develop. 
This is o-enerallv surmised from the be- 
lief that the lowering of steel prices will 
stimulate heavier buvinf, with the con- 
sequent increased demand for scran. 
Dealers are less reluctant to take on ad- 
ditional material nt prevailing prices, as 
manv think that the trade is on the turn 
and that the market will become more 
active before the month is out. It would 
apnear that shell earnings are pretty 
well absorbed, but heavy melting steel 
is still plentiful. Dealers buving prices 
here are well maintained, with the ex- 
ception of two items, boiler plate and 
machine shon tnrninjrs, these having 
fallen off $'^ and $1 per ton, the respec- 
tive quotations being .$10 and $5 per 
ton. 



CANADIAN MACTIINERY 



POINTS IN WEEK'S 
MARKETING NOTES 



Production at U. S. steel mills is 
about 75 per cent, of capacity, 
which is equal to 105 per cent, of 
the 1914 capacity. 

Further declines are looked for 
in steel, but for the present it is re- 
garded as certain that prices will 
stand, and buying is proceeding on 
that assumption. 

U. S. Railroad Administration or- 
dered 100,000 cars, but the railroad 
officials refuse to take deliveries, 
and only 20,000 of the lot have 
been accepted. 

Experts who have gone through 
the U. S. Steel Corporation report 
for the year claim that figures 
there show that consumers are pay- 
ing too much for steel. 

Some machine tools are showing 
a tendency to move toward a lower 
market price. In other cases de- 
liveries are very indefinite and 
prices strong. 

Some 40.C00 tons of shell steel 
have been sold to Toronto scrap deal- 
ers, and great quantities of what 
remains will be sent back to Eng- 
land. 

Plate is sold in Toronto and Mon- 
treal now at $4.50 base. 

New lists are out on lapwelded 
boiler tube, the discounts being 
rrised from 37 to 40 ii. 

The slowness of making adjust- 
ments with war contractors is 
causing some inconvenience in shops 
where the amount involved is need- 
ed as working capital. 



NO GENERAL REDUCTION LIKELY 

FOR PRICES OF MACHINE TOOLS YET 



'TpORONTO. — Warehouses announce 
■*• that all stock on hand has now been 
brought to the level of the recent cuts. It 
is anticipated that this will stimulate 
buying to a very considerable extent. 

Machine-tool dealers notice a tendency 
to bring down prices from war levels. In 
fact this is quite marked in some cases, 
and equally absent in others, especially 
where makers have orders on the books 
and no stock on hand. 

Some Movement in Scrap 

Anything that looks like a deal helps 
to relieve the stagnation that has envelop- 



ed the scrap market during the past three 
or four months. There are signs now 
of business coming to life, and also of a 
stronger feeling in some of the metal 
lines. There has been some little specu- 
lation regarding the disposal of much of 
the shell billets that are stored in this 
country, the property of the Imperial 
Munitions Board and of the U. S. Ord- 
nance department. We understand that 
a great deal of the Imperial Munitions 
Board steel will be shipped out of the 
country, probably to England, although 
CANADIAN MACHINERY learned to- 
day that a deal had been put through 



Volume XXI. 

whereby some 40,000 tons had been sold 
to . Canadian firm of metal merchants. 
A l?rge melter has been in touch with 
the lot. but it has not been disposed of 
yet. No prices have been let out on the 
sale of this material, but it is under- 
stood that something in the neighbor- 
hood of $11 was secured. 

Although the tendency has not found 
expression in higher figures yet the mar- 
ket for red and yellow metals — copper, 
machine composition, red and yellow- 
brass— is stronger. The copper market 
is showing more strength than at any 
time since the decline took place. The 
best evidence of this is the refusal of 
dealers to promise fourth-quarter de- 
liveries. Otherwise the market is not 
improved. Dealers are not anxious to 
have offerings coming into the market, 
as it means stocking the stuff, and they 
are not at all anxious to do this. 

More Cuts are Made 

The cuts that vcere made in American 
steel prices were effective on March 21, 
the day of their announcement, and they 
have been passed on to Canadian dealers. 
It is correct to state no-w that Canadian 
purchasers can secure the advantage of 
all these reductions, as there has been a 
cut of an average of $7 per ton on all 
warehouse lines. Some of the Canadian 
firms will be pinched a little by reason of 
having higher priced materia! on hand, 
but for the most part the Canadian ware- 
house interests will get out very well. 
They were not heavily stocked for the 
very good reason that they could not se- 
cure the material. The chances are that 
many of them would have taken on much 
larger tonnage had thev been able to se- 
cure deliveries. Although they used to 
make wry faces at such things as licenses, 
preferences, etc., the chances are that in 
some cases at least the dealers will now 
be inclined to rise up and call these trade 
impediments blessings in disguise. 

Plates and sheets have been brought 
down, the mark aimed at being a $7 per 
ton reduction. The new price on plate 
is $4.50 per pound ( ''4 -inch up) and $4.90 
for 3/16. 

Business is improving, and there seems 
to be no good reason whv it should not 
continue to do so There has been a ten- 
dency to hold back, or else to make pur- 
chases in very small amounts. 

Boiler tubes did not stay verv long with 
their pronounced intention of -emaining 
at old figures. The cut on these amounts 
to the same as $7 per ton on other lines, 
although it is worked out differently. T'he 
discount has been increased SV2 points 
from 37 to 40 V2. This conce=sion is made 
only on lapweld steel tubes, but this 
covers the great part of the trade, as 
fully 90 per cent, of the tubes used in this 
district are of this sort. Seamless tubes 
are not yet cut. The mills making them 
have orders on hand that will run for 
some time, but the prospects are that 
sooner or later they will have to meet 
the reductions on the other varieties of 
tubes. 

The Price of Machinery 
If one imagines that all, or nearly all. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



71 



GOULD & EBERHARDT 

SHAPERS 

in Stock 




20", 24" and 28" 
Sizes 



Write for literature describing 
the Double Triple Quick Stroke 
and other original features. 

IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT. 



The A. R. Williams Machinery Company, Limited 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER 



"If It's Machinery, Write Williams' 



64 Front Street West, 
TORONTO 



Acid Electric 

STEEL CASTINGS 

Acid Electric Steel Castings show 
superior ability to resist wear and 
crystallization. They are smooth in 
texture, free from Blow Holes, and 
machine perfectly. We specialize in 

Railroad and Other High Grade 
Castings 

up to 15 tons, any specification. Elec- 
tric Steel Castings COST NO MORE 
than ordinary Steel Castings. 

Prices on Application— Prompt Deliveries 

The Thos. Davidson Mfg. 
Co., Limited 

Steel Foundry Division, Lachinc Canal 

Head Office : 187 Delisle St. MONTREAL 

Phone Victoria 1492 



ST. LAWRENCE WELDING CO. 

LTD. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 

A. M. BARRY, Managing Director 

Office and Works : 
138-140 Inspector Street Maritime Branch : 

Telephone Service : HALIFAX, N.S. 

(Long Distance) Main 5779 and at Night, Westmount 3483 



CONSULTING ENGINEERS on all kinds of welding. 

BREAKDOWN REPAIRS handled at once; just 
'phone us and we will be on the job by next train. 

OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING of heavy cast iron 
frames, cylinders, gears, water wheels, etc. 

STEEL, any kind of welding on parts of large or 
small machines, tanks, digesters, boilers, shafts, 
brackets, etc. 

Can be welded in place when necessary. 

ELECTRIC WELDING on boilers, digesters, leak- 
ing tanks, Ltc. 

MARINE REPAIRS undertaken by our Marine 
Welding Tug which is equipped with Electric and 
Oxy-Aeetylene Welding Apparatus with Compressed 
Air Plant complete. 

OXY-ACETYLENE CUTTING of any kind of steel 
construction. 

PORTABLE WELDING APPARTUS of all kinds 
with skilled operators always available to repair 
your breakdown at once. 

THERMIT WELDING on all classes of work is a 
special feature of present activities. 



Manufacturers of Steel Tanks, Air Receivers, 
Welded Tanks, etc.; Electric Welders, Oxy- 
Acetylene Welders, Boiler Repairs, Lead Burning 
and Thermit Welding. 



C A ^' A D I A N -M A C 11 1 2v K K A 



Volume XXI. 



the war-shop machinery has been ab- 
sorbed, all that is necessary is to take a 
look through some of the shell shops that 
have been partially dismantled. Of 
course much of the stuff will bring only 
scrap bids, but there is enough outside 
of this to be a factor in the market. 

It is hard to see where there is going 
to be much reduction in the price of 
machinery. Planers are showing symp- 
toms of coming down, probably because 
the trip down is a long one, and they 
can afford to take it in large steps. Some 
of these machines are still a good 200 per 
cent, above old levels. At the first of the 
war no planers were called for, and as 
a result they were built in small numbers. 
When the rush of shipbuilding came there 



was a big call for planers. In fact the 
U. S. Government at one time called for 
400 at once. A tremendous demand and 
an empty market meant only one thing, 
viz.: greatly increased prices. Now that 
work calling for these machines is com- 
petitive and noi'mal the prices begin to 
shrink. Some firms announce cuts of 1.5 
and 20 per cent., but the best deliveries 
they can quote are two or three months 
ahead. Another well-known maker of 
gear bobbers promised between two and 
three months' delivery, whereas two or 
three weeks used to be the usual thing. 
One firm having three 60-inch boring mills 
in stock sold the lot in two weeks. There 
is a belief in Canadian trade that admits 
that the sale of new material is better. 



PRICES MAY BE CUT AGAIN, BUT 

FOR PRESENT THEY HELP BUSINESS 



Special to CANADIAN MACHINERY 



PITTSBURGH, Pa., Apr. 3.— The pass- 
ing of another week has not brought 
iron and steel buyers to a more favorable 
appraisal of the price I'eductions that be- 
came effective March 21, nor do producers 
e.x press more confidence that the reduc- 
tions will bring about a general trade re- 
vival. There are a few who do, but the 
majority frankly admit that they expect 
som- time to elapse, nerhans maiiv 
months, to elapse before there is a really 
active market. This admission virtually 
carries with it an admission that prices 
will decline further before there is really 
heavy buying. 

Fairly Active Market 

All the business that was held back 
during the thre.? or four weeks prior to 
the nrice reduction, and after Secret'try 
Redfield had announced his intention of 
seeking deflation of war time prices, is 
likely now to come out, and in the past 
ten days it has been coming out in very 
good volume, making the market at least 
as active as it has been at any time since 
the signing of the armistice. It is ob- 
served, however, that the buying is from 
just the same sources as formerly, no new 
demand having been created, so that the 
volume on a long range average is not 
likely to be altered. Business is merely 
being placed now that would otherwise 
have been placed some time ago. 

While the market can hardly be de- 
scribed as better than quiet, or moderate- 
ly active, and while production is only 
at about 75 per cent, of capacity, sight 
must not be lost of the very important 
fact that such activity really represents 
an enormous tonnage of iron and steel. 
The viewpoint must be that of the large 
increase that has occurred in capacity. 
During ten years before the war the steel 
industry operated at its full capacity for 
only about three years out of every five, 
on an average, and the capacity was much 
smaller than that now existing. As there 
has been an increase of capacity during 
the war of 40 per cent., from 35,000,000 
tons of annual ingot capacity in 1914 to 
fully 49,000,000 tons, a 75 per cent, oper- 
ation now means a greater tonnage than 



could have been produced before the war, 
as it would be 105 per cent, of the 1914 
capacity. The capacity in that year, in 
lurn. was much greater thnn the caoacity 
in 1906, which will long be remembered as 
one of the very best years, if not the very 
best, the steel industry ever had before 
the war. It is surprising that the steel 
industry is not operating at capacity now. 
The wonderful thing is that such a large 
tonnage of steel is being taken by buyei's 
and is consumed, for nothing is more cer- 
tain than that no one is buying steel, or 
accepting delivery of steel, that is not ur- 
gently needed. Practically everyone be- 
lieves that prices will decline rather than 
advance, and as they are not at all likely 
to decline in the very near future it is 
better to order at once if the material 
is needed soon. 

Room for Declines 
While iron and steel producers have 
much of their "costs" in their public ut- 
terances and in the arguments with the 
Industrial Board at Washington, the con- 
sumers are convinced that there is a large 
and unusual margin of profit from which 
price reductions could be made, and it is 
pointed out by some buyers and by a few 
particulaWy broad-mindecl producers that 
after all it does not do much good to con- 
vince people in Washington that costs are 
high and reductions cannot be made, be- 
cause it is from their customers that the 
producers must secure their orders. It is 
the customer, not Washington, that must 
be convinced. It is true that the Rail- 
road Administration is located in Wash- 
ington, and railroad orders usually 
account for a considerable part of 
the steel business, but appearances now 
are that the Industrial Board does not 
control the Railroad Administration. It 
certainly is true that the railroad officials 
have a great deal to say in the matter of 
railroad purchases. The Railroad Ad- 
ministration cannot force purchases upon 
the railroads, as was proved by the case 
of the 100,000 freight cars ordered a year 
ago. Even before the war ended some of 
the raih'oads began refusing to accept de- 
liveries of cars under that transaction, 



and with '.var's end the position of thes-.' 
railroad officials is made stronger. Only 
about 20,000 of the 100.000 cars have been 
made and delivered. 

With this question of costs and profits 
so prominent, the current report of the 
United States Steel Corporation is being 
studied with particular interest. The re- 
port states that deliveries during liUS 
were at substantially "Government 
prices," from which there have since been 
reductions averaging about $11 per net 
ton. Now while the corporation reported 
earnings in the year of $208,000,000. or 
only say 25 per cent, more than in the 
best year before the war, the total pro- 
fits were very much larger, there having 
been large deductions on account of 
special conditions that would not obtain 
in future. It is understood that bonuses 
to employees, on account of exceptionally 
large profits, amounted to something like 
$10,000,000 more than would usually be 
expected. Then there was an adjust- 
ment of $20,000,000 to inventory that will 
not have to be made again, while $40,- 
000,000 was charged off by reason of var- 
ious facilities installed for filling war 
orders having become worthless. Finally 
there was about $275,000,000 allowed for 
Federal taxes. The total profits there- 
fore were in excess of $550,000,000. While 
some producers assert that prices cannot 
be reduced unless wages are reduced, it is 
noted, by comparison with the total pro- 
fits just mentioned, that the total, vt:^?s 
and salaries paid by the Steel Corpor- 
ation in 1918, exclusive of payments made 
by its four railroads now under control 
of the Raih'oad Administration, amounted 
to $426,299,290. As the Federal tax is 
levied upon profits in excess of certain 
fairly liberal allowances, money that is 
earned to pay that tax can hardly be con- 
sidered a necessary part of the expense of 
production. 

It is not surprising, therefore, that 
many ouyers expect additional irice re- 
ductions. The common view is that such 
reductions are more likely to occur in 
June than at any other time. A quarter- 
ly readjustment of prices seems to be the 
natural thing, particularly as the War 
Industries Board set such a period. 

Pig Iron 

The foregoing applies particularly to 
stee'. Pig iron may experience declines 
at almost any time, as the pig iron mar- 
ket, on account of the multiplicitv f f dis- 
tricts, each with its own individual mar- 
ket level before the period of Government 
control, is a much more complicated af- 
fair than the steel market, with its single 
Pittsbui'gh basis. The present effort is 
to hold all pig iron price cuts at $7.25 
per ton ($3 reduction last December and 
$4.25 in March) under the Government 
prices that ruled at the close of the war. 
That price schedule, however, presented 
some unusual features, the Eastern 
Pennsylvania furnaces being on a Pitts- 
burgh basis, charging freight from Pitts- 
burgh to destination rather than from 
furnace, while the Birmingham furnaces 
got as high prices at furnace as the 
Northern furnaces, when under competi- 
tive conditions they must sell at less, on 



Aiwif =5:^19 



C A N A D I A N M A C 11 I N E K V 




Canadian Agents': 

Williams & Wilson, Ltd., Montreal ; The A. R. Williams 
Machinery Co., Ltd., Toronto, Winnipeg and St. John, N.B. 



74 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



account of the heavy freights North.. As 
there is not enough demand to go round 
consumers will buy at the lowest delivered 
prices available, and that would shut 
some furnaces out of much of their trade. 
For instance, the basis price of No.2 foun- 
dry iron, silicon 1.75 to 2.25 per cent, is 
$26.75. The valley furnaces will sell at 
that price, and so will the Buffalo fur- 
naces, f.o.b. furnace in each case, but the 
Eastern Pennsylvania furnaces would 
quote that price, f.o.b. Pittsburgh. New 
England buyers would not take such iron, 
as Buffalo iron would be cheaper, yet in 
the past Eastern Pennsylvania furnaces 
depended on New England for consider- 
able business. 

At a meeting of the Associated Manu- 
facturers of Merchant Pig Iron held in 
Pittsburgh late last week an assutance 
v.-as secured from the Industrial Board 
that the board does not consider itself 
in any sense a Government price fixmg 
body, hence the furnaces decided they had 
no occasion to adjust pig iron contracts 
to the reduced basis. Pickands, Brown & 
Company, Chicago, however, have issued 
formal notice that they will voluntarily 
make the concession to all customer"^ on 
shipments beginning March 21. 



IMPROVEMENT IN 

NEW YORK MARKET 

Special to CANADIAN MACHINERY 

I^TilW YORK, April 3.— The past week 
-'■^ has produced a somewhat better 
volume of inquiry for machine tools than 
the preceding week. In fact, March bus- 
iness, on the whole, has been fairly good, 
comparing favorably with normal pre- 
war months. Some machine-tool build- 
ers are complaining, while others have a 
fairly good budget of orders. Certain 
types of tools are naturally in greater 
demand than others. 

As has been noted in previous letters, 
the farm tractor industry has been mak- 
ing great strides since the end of the 
war, and manufacturers of tractors have 
come into the markets for quite a large 
number of machine tools. In this con- 
nection, the report of the Department of 
Agriculture that the 1919 output of trac- 
tors will be 315.000 is of interest, as this 
is more than double the number that were 
turned out last year. 

A Big Field 

J. N. Willys, president of the Willys- 
Overland Co., Toledo, Ohio, in making his 
annual report, says that the outlook for 
the farm tractor and automobile indus- 
tries was never brighter. Mr. Willys 
says that the output of cars from his own 
plants will be 175,000, or more than twice 
the depleted 1918 production and exceed- 
ing by 25 per cent, the company's best 
year. Mr. Willys reports a steadily in- 
creasing demand for cars. As other 
automobile manufacturers are also ex- 
panding to a similar extent it is obvious 
that the automobile manufacturing in- 
dustry will continue throughout the year 
as one of the best customers of the 
machine-tool builders. 



.Slow Move Here 

One thing that is holding back buying 
of machine tools to some extent is the 
slowness of the United States Govern- 
ment in making settlements with war 
contractors. The British Government is 
also somewhat slow in this respect. How- 
ever, the work is proceeding gradually, 
and with much of the preiimiiiiiry details 
out of the way the actual cash remuner- 
ations should soon come. 

N'3W inquiries before the New York 
trade include one from the Submarine 
Boat Corporation, which has a large ship- 
yard at Port Newark, N. J., for 100 16-in. 
engine lathes, 100 20-in. upright drills 
and 100 emery grinders, all motor driven. 
These tools are to be installed on mer- 
chant ships being built at the Submarine 
plant. Another good-sized inquiry 
comes from the Standard Oil Co. of New 
Jersey, which requires about 50 machines 
for a ship repair plant at Bayway, N. J. 
The list includes about a dozen punches 
and shears, a plate planer and miscellan- 
eous machine tools. 

One of the largest machinery orders 
placed in this country for export since 
the war ended has been closed by F. E. 
Robert & Co., Philadelphia, engineers, 
for the steel plant of Sota & Aznar in 
Spain. The machinery purchased in- 
cludes rolling mil's, large cranes, machine 
tools, etc. The French High Commis- 
sion, New York, has practically com- 
pleted purchases of about 150 machine 
tools for reconstruction work in France. 

Still Buying Heavily 

The Navy Department has been a con- 
sistent and steady buyer of machine tools 
for several months, the ending of the war 
having made no appreciable change in 
its program. One of the largest of the 
navy projects is the armor plate and na- 
val ordance plant at Charleston, W. Va., 
for which $3,500,000 to $4,000,000 worth 
of very large machine tools were pur- 
chased a few months ago. Recent pur- 
chases have covered equipment for a new 
torpedo station at Alexandria, Va., and 
tools for various shipyards. Extensions 
are being made at practically all of the 
navy yards, but particularly at Norfolk, 
Va.; Boston, Brooklyn and Mare Island, 
Cal. 

The machine-tool trade is expecting 
that the railroads will soon come into the 
market. The first railroad list of im- 
portance in months has been issued at 
Chicago by the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy for about 50 tools. Several of the 
roads in the East are known to have buy- 
ing programs in contemplation but these 
have been held up awaiting funds. Now 
that railroad financing plans are under 
way it is expected that money may soon 
be provided for necessary betterments. 

Many Used Tools 

A great many second-hand tools fi'om 
war plants are now being offered. The 
International Arms & Fuse Co., Bloom- 
field, N. J., which recently issued a list 
of about 1,000 used tools, which it offered 
for sale, has had fair success in disposing 
of them. It is expected that the entire 



equipment of the plant of the Wright- 
Martin Aircraft Corporation, Long Is- 
land City, N.Y., will soon be placed on 
the market. At a recent sale of the 
equipment of the Stenotype Co., Indian- 
apolis, Ind., users of tools made bids for 
a great deal of the equipment which were 
higher than dealers were willing to pay. 
Milling machines in particular were in 
demand. 



FAIRBANKS-MORSE 

HAD RECORD YEAR 

Earnings on Common After All Deduc- 
tions Total $710,097 

Montreal. — A record year, both from 
the standpoint of the volume of business 
handled and that of profit, is disclosed 
in the annual report of the Canadian 
Fairbanks-Morse Company, Limited, for 
1918, now being sent to the shareholders. 
After providing for depreciation, war 
taxes and allowing a full year's dividends 
on the preference shares of the company, 
the balance earned for the common share- 
holders was $710,097, as compared with 
$691,973 in 1917, $546 629 in 1916, and 
$619,048 in 1915. The earnings shown 
in 1918 represented 44.38 per cent, on the 
$1,600,000 common stock, asainst 43.2 
per cent, in 1917 and 34.2 per cent, in 
1916. Dividends of 18 per cent, were 
paid on the junior issue of the company 
in 1918, as compai-ed with 26 1-8 per cent, 
in 1917, and 10 per cent, in 1916. 
Present Surplus $1,762,537 

After all dividend requirements were 
liquidated there remained a balance of 
$422,097 to add to the amount brought 
forward from 1917, bringing the total 
surplus up to the substantial fisure of 
$1,762,537. The surplus of $1,762,537 
represents the equivalent of nearly 57 
per cent, on the combined issues of 
$1 .500.000 preference shares and $1,600,- 
000 common. A survey of the balance 
sheet to be submitted to the shareholders 
indicates a comfortable financial position 
and shows several interesting changes 
from last year. The company ended the 
year 1918 with $519,861 cish on hand, 
with no bank loans and with an excess 
of current assets over liabilities of more 
than $4,300,000. 

The balance sheet shows an increase 
of over $630,000 in inventories and near- 
ly $1,000,000 in accounts receivable. An- 
other feature of the ba'ance s'leet is the 
disappearance in the 1918 exhibit of any 
allowance for deferred char<res, as 
an-ainst an item of $472,982 carried in the 
1917 statement. 

The president's report further states: 

"With the signino- of the armistice, 
work at the Toronto factorv on munitions 
ceased. During the war neriod the effort 
of this department was concentrated en- 
tirely on the production of shells, thus 
contirbuting in a measure to the success 
of our armies in the field We hive put 
aside the sum of $150,000 for the pur- 
pose of plant rehabilitation and are al- 
ready producing some of 0"r established 
lines at Toronto. The outlook for the 
future is promising and we exneet that 
the results for the coming year will -be 
satisfactory," 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN M A C II I N E R Y 



75 




— will increase your hand-tapping 
speed TENFOLD 

This Automatic Walilstrom, attachable to every type of 
drill press, will tap holes as squarely as they could be 
drilled. Controlled by the average operator, it will tap 
10 times as many holes as an expert hand-tapper. Its 
mechanically obtained oscillating movement imitates 
hand-tapping at 10 times hand-tapping speed — and it 
actually reduces tap breakage. 




Wahlstrom Attachment 



This attachment is far beyond the experimental stage. In hundreds of plants it has 
made the slow and costly hand-tapping a thing of the past. Wherever it has been 
given a tryout it has become indispensable. 

Nothing about this Attachment can get out of order. Parts are hardened and 
ground steel. It takes taps of all sizes up to 14 inch. We guarantee that you will 
be satisfied or money refunded. 
Send for Bulletin to-day. 

AIKENHEAD HARDWARE LIMITED 



17, 19, 21 Temperance Street 



Toronto, Canada 



"Beaver" Dies for Easy Cutting 



^ 


^ 




No. 41 


^2> "5> 


3^, 4 in., R.H. 


ONE SET OF DIES- 
NO CHANGING 



A Strictly One- Man Device 



Beaver Threaders are Easy 
Workers. Narrow, receding dies 
are used which automatically 
move outward as the thread ad- 
vances, so that less metal is re- 
moved and the work grows con- 
tinually easier. With Beaver 
Die Stocks 2-inch steel pipe 
may be threaded easily with one 
hand; and 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12- 
inch pipe may be threaded by 
one man. 

No Changing Dies. Because of 
the narrow, lathe-like chasers, 
Beaver Die Shocks will thread 
several sizes of pipe — not pos- 
sible with old style die con- 
struction. The dies are instant- 
ly adjusted to any size of pipe. 



This eliminates the nuisance of 
having to fumble around in a 
dark comer with greasy hands, 
looking for the proper set of 
dies. 

No Bushings. Beaver Die Stocks, 
2-inch and smaller, use a self- 
centering chuck — thus eliminat- 
ing troublesome bushings. 

Adjustable. With Beaver you 
"move the handle — that's all." 
No dies to change up to four- 
inch; no bushin2:s up to two- 
inch. Your men can cut a thre»4 
with Beavers, while changing 
dies and bushings in other tools. 
Beavers are the most economical 
tools to use. 



Beaver Guarantee. Every Beaver tool is 
guaranteed to satisfy in every respect. "The 
user must be pleased" — that's our policy. 
Write for full particulars. 



AIKENHEAD HARDWARE LIMITED 

17, 19, 21 Temperance St., TORONTO, Ont. 



76 



C A N A D I A N MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



SELECTED MARKET QUOTATIONS 

Being a record of prices current on raw and finished material entering 
into the manufacture of mechanical and general engmeermg products. 



PIG IRON 

Grey forge, Pittsburgh $^'7 13 

Lake Superior, charcoal, Chicago 34 60 

Standard low phos., Philadelphia . 

Bessemer, Pittsburgh 29 35 

Basic, Valley furnace 25 75 

Toronto price: — .„ , „„ 

Silicon. .2.25^f to 2.75% $32.75 to $35.75 

Government prices 

IRON AND STEEL 

Per -lb. to Large Buyers Cents 

Iron bars, base, Toronto $ 4 40 

Steel bars, base, Toronto 4 40 

Steel bars, 2 in. to 4 in. base 5 50 

Steel bars, 4 in. and larger base 6 00 

Iron bars, base, Montreal 4 5-5 

Steel bars, base, Montreal 5 05 

Reinforcing bars, base 4 .^0 

Steel hoops ^ ^" 

Norway iron 11 2n 

Tire steel » 50 

Spring steel 8 00 

Brand steel. No. 10 gauge, base 4 40 

Chequered floor plate, 3-16 in 9 25 

Chequered floor plate, ^4 in 9 00 

Staybolt iron ; 8 50 

Bessemer rails, heavy, at mill 

Steel bars, Pittsburgh 2 35 

Tank plates, Pittsburgh 2 65 

Structural shapes, Pittsburgh 2 45 

Steel hoops, Pittsburgh 3 30 

F.O.B., Toronto Warehouse 

Steel bars 4 40 

Small shapes 4 50 

P.O.B. Chicago Warehouse 

Steel bars 4 10 

Structural shapes 4 20 

Plates 4 45 

FREIGHT RATES 

Per 100 lbs. 
C.L. L.C.L. 

Pittsburgh to Following Points 

Montreal 29 39V2 

St. John, N.B 47% 63 

Halifax 49 64^^ 

Toronto 23% 27y2 

Gueplh 23% 27% 

London 23% 27% 

Windsor 23% 27% 

Winnipeg 81 106% 

METALS 

Lake copper $19 00 $20 00 

Electro copper 18 50 19 00 

Castings, copper 17 25 19 00 

Tin 60 00 58 00 

Spelter 9 00 8 50 

Lead 6 75 7 50 

Antimony 8 00 8 50 

Aluminum 35 00 40 00 

Prices per 100 lbs. 

PLATES 

Montr**!! I Toronto 

Plates, Vi up $ 5 50 $ 4 50 

Plates. 3-16 in 5 75 4 90 

Price List No. 38 

Standmrd Buttweld 

Per 100 feet 

Vfe in $ 6 00 $ 8 00 

% in 4 68 6 81 

% in 4 68 6 81 

% in 6 21 7 78 

% in 7 82 9 95 

1 in 11 56 14 71 

1% in 15 64 19 90 

1% in 18 70 23 7« 

a in 25 16 32 01 

2% in 40 37 51 19 

3 in 52 79 66 94 



3ii> in 67 16 84 18 

4 ' in 79 57 99 74 

Standard Lapweld 

•-> in 38 81 35 34 

2% in 42 12 52 36 

3 ' in 55 08 68 47 

3% in 69 00 86 94 

4 in 81 75 103 00 

4% in 93 1 18 

5 in 1 08 1 37 

6 in 1 40 1 78 

1 83 2 32 

1 93 2 44 

2 22 2 81 

2 66 3 36 

2 46 3 12 

3 17 4 02 



Pounds 
'I oroni" 

$10 00 
12 75 
12 75 
12 75 

12 00 
9 00 
8 50 



m 

7 in 

8L in 

8 in 

9 in 

lOL in 

10 in 

Terms 2</'(! 30 days, approved credit. 

Freight equalized on Chatham, Guelph, 

Hamilton, London, Montreal, Toronto, 

Welland. 

Prices — Ontario, Quebec and Maritime 

Provinces. 

WROUGHT NIPPLES 

4 and under, 457c. 

4%" and larger, 40%. 

4" and under, running thread, 25%. 

Standard couplings, 4" and under, 35%. 

4I2" and larger, 15%. 

OLD MATERIAL 

Dealers' Buying Prices. 

Per 100 

Miinireal 

Copper, light $10 50 

Copper, crucible 13 00 

Copper, heavy 13 00 

Copper wire 13 00 

-Vo. 1 machine composi- 
tion 10 00 

New brass cuttings .... 8 00 
Red brass turnings .... 8 00 
Yellow brass turnings.. 6 00 

Light brass 5 00 

Medium brass 8 00 

Scrap zinc 4 00 

Heavy lead 3-4 

Tea lead 2-3 

Aluminum 15 00 

Pel 

Heavy melting steel .... 10 00 

Shell turnings 6 00 

Boiler plate 12 00 

Axles (wrought iron) . . 20 00 

Rails 15 00 

Malleable scrap 15 00 

No. 1 machine cast iron 18 00 

Pipe wrought 9 00 

Car wheels 20-22 

Steel axles 22 00 

Mach. shop turnings. ... 6 00 

Stove plate 14 00 

Cast boring 8 00 

BOLTS, NUTS AND SCREWS 

Per Cent. 

Carriage bolts, %" and less .... 10 

Carriage bolts, 7-16 and up net 

Coach and lag screws 25 

Stove bolts 55 

Plate washers List plus 20 

Elevator bolts 5 

Machine bolts, 7-16 and over .... net 

Machine bolts, % and less 10 

Blank bolts net 

Bolt ends net 

Machine screws, fl. and rd. hd., 

steel 27% 

Machine screws, o. and fil. hd., steel 10 



6 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 


4 


00 


3 


00 


12 


00 


Ton 




9 


00 


6 


no 


8 


00 


15 


00 


11 


00 


12 


00 


14 


00 


5 


00 


18 


00 


20 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


8 


00 



Machine screws, fl. and rd. hd., 

brass add 20 

Machine screws, o. and fil. ho 

brass ^^^ ^6 

Nuts, square blank add $1 66 

Nuts, square, tapped add 1 76 

Nuts, hex., blank add 1 75 

Nuts, hex., tapped add 2 00 

Copper rivets and burrs, list plus 30 

Burrs only, list plus 50 

Iron rivets and burrs 25 

Boiler rivets, base %" and larger $8 50 

Structural rivets, as above 8 40 

Wood screws, flat, bright 72% 

Wood screv^s, 0. & R., bright 67% 

Wood screws, flat, brass 37% 

Wood screws, 0. & R., brass 32% 

Wood screws, flat, bronze 27% 

Wood screws, 0. & R.. bronze 25 

MILLED PRODUCTS 

Per ""-ni 

Set screws ^o 

Sq. and Hex. Head Cap Screws.. 20 

Rd and Fil. Head Cap Screws net 

Flat But. Hd. Cap Screws plue net 

Fin. and Semi-fin. nuts up to 1 in. 25 
Fin. and Semi-fin. nuts, over 1 in., 

up to 1 % in • 20 

Fin. and Semi-fin. nuts over 1% 

in., up to 2 in plus W 

Studs net 

Taper pins '*0 

Coupling bolts, plus 10 

Planer head bolts, without fillet, 

list plus 10 

Planer head bolts, with fillet, list 

plus 10 and 10 

Planer head bolt nuts, same as 

finished nuts. 

Planer bolt washers net 

Hollow set screws list plus 20 

Collar screws list plus 30, 10 

Thumb screws 20 

Thumb nuts 65 

Patch bolts add 40. 10 

Cold pressed nuts to 1% in., .add $4 .50 
Cold pressed nuts over 1% in.. add 7 On 

BILLETS 

Per 1?-' .•• ►"- 

Bessemer billets $38 5(i 

Open-hearth billets 38 50 

O.H. sheet bars 42 00 

Forging billets 51 00 

Wire rods • 52 00 

Government prices. 

F.O.B. Pittsburgh. 

NAILS AND SPIKES 

Wire nails $5 50 $5 30 

Cut nails • 5 85 5 65 

Miscellaneous wire nails 60% 

Spikes, % in. and larger $7 50 

Spikes, % and 5-16 in 8 00 

ROPE AND PACKINGS 

Drilling cables, Manila 30 

Plumbers' oakum, per lb 10 

Packing, square braided 38 

Packing, No. 1 Italian 44 

Packing, No. 2 Italian 36 

Pure Manila rope 37 

British Manila rope 31 

.New Zealand hemp 31 

Transmission rope, Manila 43 

Cotton rope, U-lb. and up 74 

POLISHED DRILL ROD 

Discount off list, Montreal and 

Toronto ne* 



\ 



April :;. 1019 



C A N A D I A N M A C li I N E R Y 




GRINDING HARDENED 
BEARINGS IN PLACE 

STARTING and finishing this job with one 
set-up — from machining the casting to 
grinding the hardened bearing in place — 
is a good illustration of the DUMORE grin- 
der on production. This method positively 
aligns each bearing with the rest of the ma- 
chining, by tempering. And the danger of 
chatter-marks, taper or bell-mouth is elimina- 
ted because the DUMORE grinder is perfect- 
ly balanced throughout and gives correct cut- 
ting speeds to even small emery wheels. 
Limits of .0001" are easily maintained. 

There are any number of jobs in your shop 
for the DUMORE grinder which this illus- 
tration will suggest. Give your workmen 
the use of a tool that will speed their work, 
turn out better tools and improve the quality 
of your product. The DUMORE grinder is 
light and portable — may be carried anywhere 
in the shop and quickly set up. 

Ask your dealer for a demonstration. If 
he is not able to supply your needs, write us 
for further information and prices. 

WISCONSIN ELECTRIC COMPANY 
2910 Sixteenth Street Racine, Wis. 




CfettiKte g 




KOlftPMENT A 

For KTOcraJ tool room u 
Include* Hitjh SEWf" In- 
tom.ll SpfndkAwith rpach 
Of 3 inches 30.000 R- P.M. 
Come:, folly equipped, 
Weigha 17i ' oouDds. 



EODIPMRNT B 
For deep huetriat 
work. Eitensuio 
arm bos UHtKh 
reach. 10.000 R.P 
M. Arra iator- 
ctianaeatile "with ia- 
tem.il spindle 'OP 
Equipment A. 



EOUITMENT C 
For button diEi 
Will grind 70 an 
hour Interchange 
able iidth A and B 



DunoRE^GRiMDERS 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Solder, strictly 34 

Solder, guaranteed 39 

Babbitt metals 18 to 70 

Soldering coppers, lb 58 

Lead wool, per lb 14 

Putty, 100-lb. drums 6 75 

White lead, pure, cwt 17 80 

Red dry lead, 100-lb. kegs, per 

cwt 15 50 

Glue, English 35 

Tarred slater's paper, roll .... 1 30 

Gasoline, per gal., bulk 33 

Benzine, per gal., bulk 32 

Pure turpentine, single bbls.,gal. 1 10 
Linseed oil, raw, single bbls. . . 1 70 
Linseed oil, boiled, single bbls. . 1 73 

Plaster of Paris, per bbl 4 50 

Sandpaper, B. & A List plus 43 

Emery cloth list plus 37 Vz 

Sal Soda 03% 

Sulphur, rolls 05 

Sulphur, commercial 04% 

Rosin "D," per lb 07 

Rosin "G." per lb 08 

Borax crystal and granular .... 014 

Wood alcohol, per gallon 2 00 

Whiting, plain, per 100 lbs 2 50 

CARBON DRILLS AND REAMERS 

Per Cent. 

S.S. drills, wire sizes up to 52 ... 35 
S.S. drills, wire sizes. No. 53 to 80 40 

Standard drills to 1 % in 40 

Standard drills, over 1% in 40 

3-fluted drills, plus 10 

Jobbers' and letter sizes 40 

Bit stock 40 

Ratchet drills 15 

S.S. drills for wood 40 

Wood boring brace drills 26 

Electricians' bits 30 

Sockets 40 

Sleeves 40 

Taper pin reamers net 

Drills and countersinks. . .list plus 40 

Bridge reamers 50 

Centre reamers 10 

Chucking reamers net 

Hand reamers 10 

High speed drills, list plus 75 

High speed cutters, list plus .... 40 
COLD ROLLED SHAFTING 

At mill list pins 40* 

At warehouse list plus 60% 

Discounts off new list. Warehouse price 

at Montreal and Toronto 

IRON PIPE FirriNGS 

Malleable fittings, class A, 20% on list; 

class B and C, net list. Cast iron fittings, 

15* off list. Malleable bushings, 25 and 

7%%; cast bushings, 25%; unions, 45%; 

plugs, 20% off list. Net prices malleable 

fittings; class B black, 24%c lb.; class C 

black, 15%c lb.; galvanized, class B, 34c 

l).; class C, 24 %e lb. F.O.B. Toronto. 

SHEETS 

Mnntreal Toronto 

Sheets, black. No. 28. $ 6 25 $ 6 25 
Sheets, black. No. 10. 5 25 5 25 

Canada plates, dull, 52 

sheets 8 50 8 00 

Can. plates, all bright 8 50 9 00 

Apollo brand, 10% oz. 

galvanized 

Queen's Head.28 B.W.G 

Fleur-de-Lis. 28 B.W.G 

Gorbal's Best. No. 28 

Colbome Crown, No. 28 

Premier, No. 28 U.S 7 85 

Premier, 10% oz 8 50 

Zinc sheets 20 00 20 00 

PROOF COIL CHAIN 
B 

M in., $14.35; 5-16 in.. $13.85; % in., 
$13.50; 7-16 in., $12.90; % in., $13.20; 



$13.00; % in., $12.90; 1 inch, $12.65; 
Extra for B.B. Chain, $1.20; Extra for 
B.B.B. Chain, $1.80. 

ELECTRIC WELD COIL CHAIN B.B. 
% in., $13.00; 3-16 in., $12.50; V* in., 
$11.75; 5-16 in., $11.40; % in., $11.00; 
7-16 in., $10.60; % in., $10.40; % in., 
$10.00; % in., $9.90. 

Prices per 100 lbs. 

FILES AND RASPS. 

Per cent. 

Globe 50 

V'ulcan 50 

P.M. and Imperial 50 

Nicholson 32% 

Black Diamond 32% 

J. Barton Smith, Eagle 50 

McClelland, Globe 50 

Delta Files 20 

Disston 40 

Whitman & Barnes 50 

BOILER TUBES. 

Size Seamless LapweUied 

1 in $28 00 $ 

1 1/4 in. 32 00 

1% in 35 00 28 00 

1% in 35 00 28 00 

2 in 40 00 28 00 

2% in 43 00 30 00 

2% in 45 00 35 00 

3 in 52 00 40 00 

3% in 47 00 

3% in 62 00 48 00 

4 in 70 00 60 00 

Prices per 100 ft., Montreal and Toronto 
les 10. 

OILS AND COMPOUNDS. 

Castor oil, per lb 

Rovalite, per gal., bulk 19 V^ 

Palacine 22% 

Machine oil, per gal 27% 

Black oil, per gal 16 

Cylinder oil. Capital 52 

Cylinder oil, Acme 39% 

Standard cutting compound, per lb. 06 

Lard oil, per ?al $2 60 

Union thread cutting oil antiseptic 88 

Acme cutting oil, antiseptic 37% 

Imperial quenching oil 39% 

Petroleum fuel oil, bbls. net 10% 

BEL-nNG— NO. 1 OAK TANNED. 
Extra heavy, single and double.. 30% 

Standard 30,10% 

Cut leather lacing. No. 1 2 20 

Leather in sides 1 75 

TAPES. 

Chesterman Metallic, 50 ft $2 00 

Lufkin Metallic, 603, 50 ft 2 00 

Admiral Steel Tape, 50 ft 2 75 

Admiral Steel Tape, 100 ft 4 45 

Major Jun. Steel Tape, 50 ft 3 50 

Rival Steel Tape, 50 ft 2 75 

Rival Steel Tape, 100 ft 4 45 

Reliable Jun. Steel Tape, 50 ft 3 50 

PLATING SUPPLIES. 

Polishing wheels, felt 3 25 

Polishing wheels, bull -neck. . 2 00 

Emery in kegs, American .... 07 

Pumice, ground 3% to 05 

Emery glue 28 to 30 

Tripoli composition 06 to 09 

Crocus composition 08 to 10 

Emery composition 08 to 09 

Rouge, silver 85 to 60 

Rouge, powder 30 to 45 

Prices Per Lb. 

ARTIFICIAL CORUNDUM 

Grits, 6 to 70 inclusive 08% 

Grits, 80 and finer 06 

BRASS 
Brass rods, base % in. to 1 in. rod 38 
Brass sheets, 24 gauge and heavier, 
base 43 



Brass tubing, seamless 46 

Copper tubing, seamless 48 

WASTE 
White Cts. per lb. 

XXX Extra.. 19% .\tlas 17 

Peerless 19 X Empire ....15^'- 

Grand 18 Idea! 16 

Superior 18 X press 14 

X L C R ....17 

Colored. 

Lion 15 Popular 12 

Standard ... 13% Keen lOH 

No. 1 13% 

Wool Packing. 

Arrow 25 Anvil 15 

Axle 20 Anchor 11 

Washed Wipers. 
Select White. 11 Dark eolor«d. 09 
Mixed colored 10 
This list subject to trade discount for 
quantity. 

RUBBER BELTING. 
Standard . . . 10% Best grades . . 1»* 



ANODES. 



Nickel 
Copper 
Tin .. 
Zinc .. 



.68 to .66 

.38 to .46 

.70 to .70 

.18 to .18 



Prices Per Lb. 



COPPER PRODUCTS. 

Bars, % to 2 in $42 50 $43 00 

Copper wire, list plus 10. . 
Plain sheets, 14 oz., 14x60 

in 46 00 44 00 

Copper sheet, tinned, 14x60, 

14 oz 48 00 48 00 

Copper sheet, planished, 16 

oz. base 46 00 45 00 

Braziers', in sheets, 6x4 

base 45 00 44 00 

LEAD SHEETS. 

Montr*»l Torout/' 

Sheets, 3 lbs. sq. ft.... -.$10 25 $11 50 
Sheets, 3V2 lbs. sq. ft... 10 00 11 00 
Sheets. 4 to 6 lbs. sq. ft. 9 75 10 50 
Cut sheets, %c per lb. extra. 
Cut sheets to size, Ic per lb. extra. 
PLATING CHEMICALS. 

Acid, boracic $ .25 

Acid, hydrochloric 06 

Acid, nitric 14 

.\cid, sulphuric 06 

Ammonia, aqua 23 

Ammonium carbonate 

Ammonium, chloride 55 

Ammonium hydrosulphuret 30 

.\mmonium sulphate 15 

.\rsenic, white 27 

Copper, carbonate, annhy 50 

Copper, sulphate 22 

Cobalt, sulphate 20 

Iron perchloride 40 

Lead acetate 35 

Nickel ammonium sulphate 25 

Nickel carbonate 32 

Nickel sulphate 35 

Potassium carbonate 1.80 

Potassium sulphide (substitute) 2 25 

Silver chloride (per oz.) 1.45 

Silver nitrate (per oz.) 1.20 

Sodium bisulphite 15 

Sodium carbonate crystals 05 

Sodium cyanide, 127-130% 40 

Sodium hydrate 22 

Sodium hyposulphite, per 100 lbs. 6 . 00 

Sodium phosphate 18 

Tin chloride 1 .75 

Zinc chloride, C.P 80 

Zinc sulphate 15 

Prices per lb. unless otherwise stated. 



April 3. 19!') 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



79 




ILLINOIS TOOL WORKS, CHICAGO. 




Detroit Store 997 Woodward Avenue. Represented by A. C. Towne & Co., BuEFalo. Louis G. Henes, 75 Tremont 
St., San Francisco and Title Insurance Building, Los Angeles. 



Volume XXI. 



How to Locate Export Trade for Canada 

Things That the Canadian Manufacturer Would Do Well to Bear 
in Mind^Ask Specific Questions and Make Use of the Trade 

Commissioner's Service 



HHERE are (.-ertain things that the 
Canadian manufacturer should 
bear in mind whtn completing his 
preparations for foreign trade. Atten- 
tion to these will have much to do with 
the success or failure of any selling plans 
that may he contemplated. CANADIAN 
M.ACHINERY, in conversation with an 
authority on this matter, secured con- 
siderable information that should be 
helpful. 

In the first place the Canadian firm 
that is desirous of securing export busi- 
ness should make use of existing service 
provided for that purpose. Following is 
the correct list of representatives of the 
Canadian Trade Commission: 

Argentine Republic— B. S. Webb, Re- 
conquista No. 46, Buenos Aires. Cable 
address: Canadian. 

.Australia— D. H. Ross, Box 140, G.P.O. 
Melbourne office. Stock Exchange Bldg., 
Melbourne. Cable address: Canadian. 

British West India Islands and British 
Guiana — E. H. S. Flood, Bridgetown, 
Barbadoes. Cable address: Canadian. 

China — J. W. Ross, 1.3 Nanking Road. 
Shanghai. Cable address: Cancoma. 

Cuba — J. C. Manzer, 501 and 502 
Antigua Casa de Correos, Teriente Rey 
11, Havana. Cable address: Cantracom. 

France^Phillippe Roy, Commissioner- 
General, 17 and 19 Boulevard des Capu- 
cines, Paris. Cable address Stadacona. 

Holland — Ph. Geleerd, Acting Trade 
Commissioner, Zuidblaak 26, Rotterdam. 
Cable address: Watermill. 

Italy— W. McL. Clarke, via Carlo 
Cataneo 2, Milan. Cable address: Cana- 
dian. 

Japan -A. E. Bryan, 53 Main Street, 
Yokohama. Cable address: Canadian. 

Newfoundland — W. B. Nicholson, Bank 
of Montreal, Water Street. St. John's, 
Newfoundland. Cable address: Cana- 
dian. 

New Zealand — W. A. Beddoe, Union 
Bld-j-s . Customs Street, .Auckland. Cable 
address: Canadian. 

Siberia — L. D. Wilgress. Suifunskava 
Street 10, Vladivostok. Cable address: 
Canadian. 

South Africa — W. J. Egan, Norwich 
Union Bldgs., Cape Town. Cable ad- 
dress: Cantracom. 

Unit'd Kinp-dom — Hanison Watson, 73 
Basin<h"ll Street. London, E.C.2, Eng- 
land. C'bles: Sleisrhino-, London: J. 
Forsyth Smith. Acting Canadian Trade 
Co^imissicner. 87 Union Street. Glasgow. 
Cab'e address: Cantracom; J. E. Rny. 4 
St. Ann's Snufire. Man'-hester. Cable 
address: Cantracom; J. Fovsvth Smith, 
Century Bldo-s.. 31 North John Street, 
T ivernoo'. Cible addr»=s: Cantracom; 
N. D. Johnston, Sun Bldg.. Clare St., 
Biistol. Cib'e address: Canadian 

Canadian Commercial Agents: 

Austrfllii — B. Millin, Roval Exchange 
Bldg.. Sydney, N.S.W., .\ustralia. 



British West Indies — Edgar Tripp, 
Port of Spain, Trinidad Cable address: 
Canadian; R. H. Curry, Nassau, Ba- 
hamas. 

Nor\\ay and Denmark — C. E. Sontuni, 
Grubbcgd, No. 4, Christiania, Norway. 
Cable address: Sontums. 

Have other Help 

Recently the British Trade Commission 
lias made arrangements so that the ser- 
vices of its representatives can be made 
to serve any part of the British Empire 
where a trade commission is not already 
located. The list of British Trade Com- 
missioners follows: 

At Headquarters 

C. Hamilton Wickes, 73 Basinghall 
Street, London, E.C.2. 
Canada 

Montreal— G. T. Milne, 367 Beaver 
Hall Square, Montreal. Telegraphic ad- 
dress: Britcom. 

Toronto— F W. Field, 257-260 Con- 
federation Life Bldg., Toronto. Tele- 
graphic address: Toroncom. 

Newfoundland— G. T. Milne. 
Australia 

Melbourne— S. W. B. McGregor, Com- 
merce House, Flinders Street. Melbourne. 

Sydney— The Officer in Charge, H.M. 
Trade Commissioner's Office, Royal Ex- 
change, Sydney. 

New Zealand 

Wellington— R. W. Dalton, P.O. Box 
369, Wellington. 

South Africa 

Johannesburg — W. G. Wickham (at 
present c o Trade Commissioner's Office, 
Cape Town). 

Cane Town— J. L. Wilson-Goode, P.O. 
Box 1346 Norwich Union Bldgs., Cape 
Towr. 

India and Ceylon 

Calcutta— T. M. Ainscough, O.B.E.. 
McLcod Buildings, 28 Dalhousie Square, 
Calcutta. 

Straits Settlements 

Singapore — P. J. McKellen (at present 
stationed at headquarters). 
British West Indies and British Honduras 

Trinidad — A. J. Pavitt, Port of Spain, 
Trinidad. 

Must Be Specific 

Above all e'se inquiries sent to any of 
these men should be specific and very 
much to the point. There are letters and 
catalogues sent out that might just" as 
well be dropped in the waste paper 
basket here as elsewhere. British firms 
make a practice of working their trade 
commissioners for all they are worth. 
As an instance of this, one firm commu- 
nicated to tho Canadi'in office and pre- 
sented a direct list of forty-two ques- 
tions, each of which renuired a creat deal 
of research work. The digging up of 
this material took up almost two weeks, 



and p.oved to be a valuable document 
for the enquirer and also for the office, 
as it was thus enabled to be in possession 
of a large amount of information that 
had not previously been available. 

Point to Remember 

When writing to the Trade Commis- 
sioner.-; remember that they may know 
nothin'; of your business; they may be 
strangers to your best lines. Do not 
trust to a catalogue and a rubber stamp 
letter turning the trick. Ask for these: 

Prices that are paid for similar liner 
in the country you wish to enter. 

Competitive lines that are now on the 
market. 

Change in the markets and marketing 
conditions owing to the war. 

Progress made by local firms making 
these lines. It is important to keep this 
information up to date as in nearly every 
country an effort is being made to pro- 
duce at home the lines that have been 
extensively imported. 

Value of the market. By this we mean 
an estimate of the possible amount of 
goods likely to be purchased in the dis- 
trict. 

Merits of the competing lines. It is 
very necessary to know this in detail. 

Differences in the selling methods em- 
ployed. This includes the important 
matter of credit, terms, collections, etc. 

What sort of representation a firm 
should have. Get "a list of suitable firms 
or im potters. 

Changes in tariffs. In fact get all in- 
formation about this matter and keep it 
up-to-date as frequent changes are made. 

Ask for the best way to ship and pack. 

Use the trade papers of the lines you 
want to reach if such publications are 
available. 

The British Commission 

.\lth.jugh Canadian firms are more 
vitally interested in the Canadian Trade 
Commissioners, it is interesting to note 
the scope of the work carried on by His 
Majesty's Trade Commissioneers. 

The primary duty of His Majesty's 
Trade Commissioners appointed in var- 
ious parts of the British Empire, com- 
prises the collection of information in 
regard to opportunities that may arise 
for securing and developing the trade 
of the United Kina-dom and such other 
parts of the British Empire as may ex- 
r;ress a d'^.^ire to avail themselves of thv 
facilitie-, afforded by the Trade Commis- 
sioner Service, but it is also a part oT 
their e'eneral duty to endeavor to p."o- 
mote the trade or the British Emnire as 
a whole, within the area to which they 
appointed. 

In.s;truction are also given to Trade 
Commissioners to report from time to 
time to the Board of Trade and to the 
Governments of such parts of the British 
Empire as may invite them to do so, all 



April %i ii)lS 



C A N A D I A N M A C U\ N E R Y 



81 



Holding 
a 16 X z 
cut in 
Cast Iron 
on 

Simmons' 
Magnetic 
Chuck 



Here is an example of the "grip" of a 
Simmons Chuck used 011 a No. 5 Brown 
& Sharpe Vertical Milling Machine. 



On a piece of cast iron 16 by 2 by i>^ 
held by an 8' x 18 chuck, a cut 5-16 deep 
was made across the entire piece. The feed 




was I2y2 per minute; the cutter was a 5 
diameter inserted tooth face mill, running 
at a speed of 100 R.P.M. Current used by 
the chuck, .4 amp. at no volt. The 
strongest "grip," with the least current — 
and no leakage of magnetism into frame 
of chuck or machine. It is powerful and 
vet it conserves electricitv. 



Bulletin 103E describes Simmons' Magnetic Chucks. 




New York Office, Woolworth Building 



Detroit Office, Majestic Building 



82 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 




INDUSTRIAL NEWS 



NEW SHOPS, TENDERS AND CONTRACTS 
PERSONAL AND TRADE NOTES 




CONTRACTS 

Brantford.— Schultz Bros. Co., Ltd., 
has secured contracts for the supply of 
interior hardwood finish for the Union 
station, Toronto, and for the erection of 
a new three-storey mill building for the 
Riverside Silk Mills, Gait. 



ENGINEERING 

Welland. — Crowland township council 
at a meeting let the contract for instal- 
ling 16,470 feet of water mains in the 
Crowland industrial section. Six tenders 
in all were received, ranging from 60 
cents to 95 cents a foot. The contract 
was let to the lowest tenderer, Mitchell 
& Mohan, of London, at 60 cents. Work 
will begin at once. The council some 
time ago made the purchase of the 
necessary pipe. 

Ottawa. — As the result of a conference 
it was decided to at once call for ten- 
ders for 250,000 ties to be used in con- 
nection with the further construction of 
the Hudson Bay railway. It is practi- 
cally certain that, as the result of repre- 
sensations made by Western members, 
that in addition to the securing of ties, 
some construction work on the line on 
the bay will be done this season, and the 
line completed in all probability before 
the end of the summer of 1920. 



MARINE 

Toronto. — Announcements are posted 
that the S. S. Dalhousie City opens the 
season's trips on March 31, taking pas- 
sengers and freight. She leaves To- 
ronto at 5 p.m., and Port Dalhousie at 
8..30 a.m. 

Dunnville.— The T., H. & B. car ferry 
Maitland has been laid up for a few 
weeks for repairs. The boat has made 
a record in lake navigation, having be\n 
on the run between Ashtabula, Ohio, and 
Fort Maitland on the Grand River, con- 
tinuously since April 1 of last year, ex- 
cepting when delayed by freight short- 
age. A return trip has been made 
across the lake every fifteen hours in 
every sort of weather for practically one 
year. 

Midland. — The second steel vessel be- 
ing constructed by the Midland Ship- 
yard Co. to the order of the Imperial 
Munition Board is now rapidly nearing 
completion. The steel structural work 
has been finished and the machinery is 
being placed in the vessel so that she 
will be ready for launching as soon as 
the ice begins to move. Carpenters are 
now at work placing the deck houses 
and fitting out the officers' quarters. 
The vessel is a duplicate of the "War 
Fiend" which sailed last fall and re- 
cently sailed from St. John for Gibraltar. 



matters affecting, or likely to affect, the 
trade, industry, and commerce of their 
area that may come under their notice. 

The Trade Commissioners are also di- 
rected to furnish information in regard 
to tariffs subsidies, bounties, contracts, 
open, or likely to be open, for tender, the 
opening of new industries, the extension 
of public works, financial and trade 
conditions, and other matters of commer- 
cial interest, whilst they are to report, 
as occasion required, on the nature and 
extent o^ foreign competition in local 
markets so far as it affects British trade. 

An imnort^nt part of the work of the 
Trade Com^^i'sioners is to compile and 
furnish pe'iodica'lv the names of princi- 
pal impo"ters "nd buvors of British goods 
in the different localities of the area in 
which thev act. with an indication of the 
classes of "oods in which they deal, and 
also to co^ioi'e an a^encv record in re- 
spect of firms or nersons holding agencies 
for fim^s d"mic"'°d in the various parts 
of the British Emiire and in foreign 
countries, supplemented by lists of firms 



or persons desirous of acting as agents 
for firms domiciled in the various parts 
of the British Empire. They also are tu 
acquaint the Department of Overseas 
Trade with information in regard to im- 
portant trade exhibitions or agricultural 
shows, etc., open to British exhibitors 
which it maye be proposed to hold in their 
area. Special importance is attached to 
their obtaining and forwarding to the 
Board of Trade from time to time 
samples of: 

1. Articles of foreign manufacture 
which may appear to be displaying Bri- 
tish goods of a similar kind in the local 
markets. 

2. Any new or little known natural or 
manufactured products of their area 
(such as minerals, fibre, earth, etc.) 
which appear likely to be of use for in 
dustrial purposes. 

Canada has an extensive system of 
trade commissioners. It is up to the 
manufacturers to make use of them. The 
effort is well worth the making. 



Port Dover. — This community is dis- 
satisfied with the amount which has 
been put in the estimates for the im- 
provement of Port Dover Harbor. Reeve 
R. M. Taylor has been invited to attend 
the meeting which is to be held in Brant- 
ford, at which representatives of all the 
municipalities along the Lake Erie & 
Northern and Grand Valley Electric 
Railways will be present to discuss the 
matter. It is understood that an indig- 
nation meeting will be held in the Tele- 
phone City to be followed by the sending 
of a strong deputation to Ottawa to im- 
press forcibly on the minds of those in 
authority that something worth while 
must be done, and soon, in regard to 
Port Dover harbor. 

Toronto. — George S. McKellar, operat- 
ing manager of the Dominion Shipbuild- 
mg Company, denies a report that fifty 
men a day ai'e discharged at the com- 
pany's plant because of lack of work. 
"We are building six shins at the pres- 
ent time," he said. "About two weeks 
ago we laid off 150 men on account of 
the non-arrival of a big shipment of 
steel. We are expecting this material 
any day now, and as soon as it comes 
the men will all be taken on again. 
There are about 1,000 men on our pay- 
roll now." Asked as to the prospects 
for further contracts for shins. Mr. Mc- 
Kellar said: "We are waiting to see 
what the Government is goinT to do in 
the way of shipbuilding. Hcvever, I 
think the prospects are all right." 

New York. — Edward N. Hurlev, chair- 
man of the United States Shipping 
Board, addressing the National Marine 
League here to-night, presented for con- 
sideration an American shin-oneratinir 
program. He reviewed his plan in part 
as follows: The Government-owned ships 
should be sold to and operated bv Ameri- 
can citizens at a price which fairly re- 
flects the current world rmrk^t for sim- 
ilar tonnage. Twentv-five per cent, of 
the purchase price of each si^'n should 
be paid down, the remainder falling due 
and payable in graded annual instal- 
ments over a period not e-«^ceeding ten 
years. It is under'^tood that no transfer 
of a vessel to foreign retristrv shonld be 
permitted without express permission of 
the Government. 

London. — J. W. Isherwood, inventor of 
the Isherwood longitudinal svstem of 
ship construction, who recentlv paid a 
visit to America, and has returned to 
England, predicts a world shipyiing boom 
for the next three or four years, and 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



83 



makes the statement that the United 
States will inevitably advance and will 
become England's greatest competitor. 
He said that it is not probable that Am- 
erica will produce such a plentiful sup- 
ply of ships as to revolutionize sea 
carrying, nevertheless that country is 
bound to become England's greatest 



LOOK AFTER BOTH 

IMPORT AND EXPORT 

MONTREAL.— At the present time 
reconstruction" is more of a byword than 
a password and yet there are none of us 
can afford to lose the opportunity of do- 
ing our fair share toward the problem of 
readjusting the abnormal business and in- 
dustrial conditions subsequei.t to the 
ending of the world war. The market 
situation to-day is not as we would wish 
it and, as a matter of fact, is due to cir- 
cumstances over which we have no con- 
trol, but the sooner we attack the pro- 
blem, and also, the more "horse-sense" 
-ve use, the better we can assist in bring- 
ing prices, market conditions, supply and 
demand, to a level where we can all do 
business, and at a profit. Pre-war prices, 
present day prices, and the prices we 
would all desire to make, are of totally 
different proportions, and the sooner we 
quit "shopping" and get firm prices, firm 
delivery, and buy and sell, instead of 
using paper and ink, and "hot air," the 
sooner will the meaning of the word "re- 
construction" be made clear to us. As a 
matter of fact, we have had innumerable 
inquiries for commodities, domestic and 
export, we have had our mills and cor- 
respondents give us best prices and de- 
livery, rock bottom prices, and that is 
the end. or rather the beginning of the 
end; markets are disturbed, everyone is 
out to get what he can and proper trad- 
ing is impossible. 

To endeavor to secure a fair share of 
legitimate business, the International 
Metal and Trading Co., have opened of- 
fices at 406 McGill building, Montreal, 
P.Q., with an organization competent to 
handle both import and export business. 
They have completed business relations 
with important houses in South America, 
the far East, India and South Africa, 
and are ready to handle any commodities 
suitable for these countries. 

Negotiations are under way for the 
purchase of considerable new material for 
South America, and the plans laid out for 
the expansion of trade between Canada 
and there are well under way. The In- 
ternational Metal and Trading Co. ex- 
tend their services to anyone in the mar- 
ket for staple products, also for second- 
hand material. Their scrap department 
is efficiently organized and in close touch 
with market developments. 




To Manufacturers Seeking Locations 

The Success of Your Industry Depends Upon Your Choice of Location 

Complete, up-to-date information on shipping 
facilities, power rates, labor conditions, raw 
materials, factory sites, municipal inducements, etc., 
for every commercial centre in Ontario. 

Complete details, plans and photographs of over 60 
available vacant factories in Ontario, 1,000 to 
100,000 square feet floor space. 

Our whole organization is free to bona- 
fide parties seeking industrial locations. 

We can save you time, travel and correspondence. 
Consult us. It will pay you. 

INDUSTRIAL DEPT. HEATON'S AGENCY 

Publishers of Heaton's Annual (The Boards of Trade Register). Etc. 
32 CHURCH STREET, TORONTO 

Established 1905 



PATENT 
ATTORNEYS 



PLEWES Limited 

WINNIPEG 
For AH 

Machinists' Supplies 



RESEARCH BUREAU 

REPORTS BYEXPERTS ON SCIENTIFIC, "ECH- 

NICAL AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT. 

SPECIAL RESEARCHES ARRANGED. 

PATENTS. TRADE MARKS. ETC. 



HANBURY A. BUDDEN 
fl2 DHUMMOND Bt-C3<5.. MONTREAL 



Cable Addrcsi 
"BREVET" 



CASTINGS 

Medium Weight Grey Iron, Brat; Etc. 
JOBBING 

GREENLEAFS,LIMITED 

Belleville, Ontario 



ATENT 



Fetherstonhauffh & Co., 

The old established firm. Pat- 
ents eTcrywhere. Head office, 
Royal Bank Bld«. , Toronto. 
OtUwa office. 5 Elein SL 
Offices throughout Canada. 
Booklet Free. 



^IXVi 



YOUR INVENTIONS 



Send direct to Ottaw.i for free r it-niability re- 
port and booklet Patfiil Pruiec Lion ' Clienis 
gatenit) advcrtiBcd m tiie "Paieut Kuview." 

Harold C. Shipman & Co.:^l.\^r\ 



Dickow's Index Centers Knocks 
Out Worry 



Because they have 
superior accuracy, 
simplicity and 
durability. 




Patents Pending 

PROMPT DELIVERY 
For Accuracy Get Dickow's 
5oW hy d*aUrs, Writ* u» t»-day 

Pred. G. Dlckow. 37 So. DeapliioesSt.. Ckici^oJIl. 




/ii 



TTI 



^ "^RAWCUTSMAKRS ^ 
^'^PtCIAlORAWaiTRRSnAPtwT' 
-nriNISHCO MACHINC KCYS^ 
I JTAllON«RTS. P0RT4BU KlY WATCUTTlRSl 
IsPaiAL LflMHOTIVt CYUNPa ftMIERSi 



gFriCC-WgRHS;MUSKtCUN riUCMTiUSA. 



OVENS 

JftpAxmlsc «id V»mi«hiiic OfeaM 
m bMt«d ta Ou. ElMtridtr. 

n Bt««m or Co«l. „ ,. _. 

jj Eem<<i«n Slphoiuce VeBtU»tot», B»»«i« 

5 Otoii. truckB. oMt«™. etc. 

" Writ* for Bo(>U«- 

n Brantford Oven A Raek C*.. Ltd. 

■ Brantford. Canada. 

■DBaBDanaQaaiaKnHnsnHDHDBT 



I 



84 



C A N A J) I A .\ M A C II I N '^ R V 



Volume XXI. 



Silt 




You 
Know How 
Greatly it Increased 

Production 

You know how it proved to be 
without equal for both first and 
second operation punches — how, 
in both Canadian and American 
shell plants, this heat-treated 
ready-for-use steel enabled each 
punch to turn out over 2,000 
shells. 

Hawkridge Brothers' steel for 
every commercial requirement 
is just such production-increas- 
ing steel as proved this "Hawk" 
D. Chrome Vanadium. We make 

Steel of Every 
Description 

Hawkridge Brothers 
Company 

303 Cong:ress St., BOSTON, MASS. 

U. S. A. 



PATENTS FOR SALE 

Two Canadian Patented 
Steam Specialties for 
sale ; one Steam Trap, 
Patent Number 187215, 
and one Steam Separator, 
Patent Number 183340. 

Allentown Experimental Works 

Allenlown, Pa., U.S.A. 



competitor. It is '^f\j^^ ^Jj^t workers ar^ 

paid higher ^'ftg^s hi American ship- 
yards than in British shipyards, but they 
will produce ships quicker and cheaper, 
and if England does not wake up she 
will be left as a shipbuilding nation. 

St Catharines. — Capt. James P. De- 
'.aney died early Friday morning. Those 
simple words will carry a message that 
will be heard with deep regret in every 
port of Canada's waterways. Boy and 
man, "-Jim" Delaney had sailed the in- 
land seas. He rose from cabin boy at ten 
years of arje to master on hi? first ship, 
the "Lake Michigan. When the old canal 
was the great connecting link between 
Ontario and Erie, Captain Delaney was 
a well-known sailor; in later life he com- 
manded some of the finest steamships 
afloat, and then assumed the importan-t 
duties of a St. Lawrence River pilot. For 
years he was a master mariner in the 
employ of the Matthews Transportation 
Company, and brou.ght up many of their 
finest steamers on their initial trips to 
the Great Lakes, the "Haddington," 
"Beaverton," "Eastern," "Wacondah." 
and others. He appeared to be a natural- 
born navigator. During his long period 
of service, through all kinds of weather, 
he never lost a ship; in fact, it may be 
said that he never had a serious mishap. 
.\bout five years ago he became a pilot 
for the American Government, and 
handled many naval gunboats on their 
trips to the seaboard. 



PERSONAL 

John A. Greig, of Ross and Greig, ha.s 
been elected president of the Caledonian 
Society of Montreal. 

The death occurred, on Monday, Marc ii 
24, of R. A. Hogge. purchasing agent 
for the past few years for the Steel 
Company of Canada in Montreal. Mr. 
Hogge was born in Dumfries, Scotland 
in 1886, coming to Canada in 1910. After 
a period of service with Messrs. Hugii 
Russell and Sons, iron and steel mer- 
chants, he entered the employ of the 
Steel Co. of Canada in 1912 as clerk in 
the works office, subsequently being pro- 
moted to purchasing agent. 



TRADE GOSSIP 

To Stimulate Thrift. — .\mong their em- 
ployees the Canada Car and Foundry Co. 
has organized a War Saving Society, 
through the co-operation of which it is 
e.\pect;jd to work up an enthusiastic 
spirit among the men. The company 
will present a shield to the factory ob- 
taining the largest percentage of sub- 
scribers, and it will become the property 
of the plant having the greatest enrol- 
ment at the end of six months. 

Wants Information. — Lieut. -Colonel 
W. H. Price, who roused the Ontario 
House by his slashing attach upon war 
profiteering in Canada, will follow up 
his opening assault by putting the mem- 
bers of the Legislature on record on 
the matter. The Parkdale member, if 
occasion offers, will introduce a resolu- 
tion asking the Dominion Government to 



request from the Imperial Munitions 
Board a statement of the moneys spent 
on munitions in Canada during the war 
and the profits made upon munition con- 
tracts. 

Contemplated Expansion. — Peacock 
Bros., of Montreal, who for many years 
have been Canadian agents for G. and J. 
Weir, Limited, of Glasgow, are now 
manufacturing the Weir feed pumps in 
their own factory recently established 
in Montreal. Considerable new equip- 
ment has been obtained from the States 
and England, and the new plant is amply 
equipped to handle efficiently this nev.- 
branch of their operations. It is an- 
nounced by officials of Peacock Bros, that 
the Clyde Engineering Works are con- 
templating increased expansion of their 
business in Canada. 

Jobs For Them. — One thousand jobs 
are awaiting Detroit's returned crippled 
soldiers at Ford Motor Company's plant 
in Highland Park. This announcement 
was made by Edsel B. Ford, president of 
the company. The men will be paid the 
minimum wage of six dollars a day of 
eight hours now in effect in the plant. 
"The thousand soldiers are wanted for 
our new self-starter department," .said 
Mr. Ford. "The only requirements neces- 
sary are that they are crippled soldiers. 
Detroit men, and have use of their hands. 
Men who have lost both legs and an arm 
will find work with us that they can do. 
We can use the^e men whether they have 
to stand up or lie down at their work.'* 

At the Poison Yards. — It is rumored 
that difficulties are being met with in 
reference to the continued operation of 
the Poison Iron Works, Toronto, and 
that if for any cause the works are 
closed down the completion of four boats 
in process of construction for the Im- 
perial Munitions Board will be sus- 
pended. If the works are closed down 
1,200 men will be thrown out of work, 
which, at this time, is highly undesir- 
able. G. T. Clarkson refused to make 
any statement whatsoever. It is under- 
stood that the trouble became acute 
when the creditors failed to get to- 
gether to decide upon a policy to be 
followed so that all concerned could co- 
operate in the continued operation of 
the plant. 

Briquetting of Coal. — At a recent 
meeting of the Montreal branch of the 
Engineering Institute of Canada, a papti 
was read by Paul A. Seurot, M.E.I.C. on 
"Coal Briquetting," in which he empha- 
sized the importance of developing this 
industry for the purpose of materially 
assisting in the solution of the ever- 
present fuel problem, and at the same 
time aid in making Canada more inde- 
pendent in this regard. He stated that 
of the total coal brought out of the 
mines, from 10 to 3S per cent, was prac- 
tically wasted, and if proper facilities 
were provided the bulk of this could be 
economically utilized. Some little atten- 
tion was given to this matter out West 
where some 1,100 tons of coal was 
briquetted per day, but when compared 
to other countries, Canada was far be- 
hind in the development of this indusr,i.> .. 



April 



1919 



CA X A DI A X M AC II I XERY 



85 



TRADE IN SIBERIA 

The Canadian Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion is sending to its members an an- 
nouncement of some importance dealing 
with steps that have been taken to develop 
trade with Siberia. The circular states 
in part: 

"Careful investigation shows clearly 
thi't wonderful opportunities await Can- 
adian manufacturers in the markets of 
Siberia, provided they are taken advan- 
tage of without delay. 

"The lack of financial stability in Si- 
beria is the chief difficulty. To overcome 
this, the British Government has organ- 
ized the Siberian Supply Co., with head- 
quarters at Vladivostok. Honorable R. 
E. Hubbard, representing the British 
Governm-ent, spent some time in Ottawa 
and at the head office of the pssociation, 
for the purpose of giving information re- 
garding the possibilities of Siberian trade, 
and how to go about securing it. 

"Through negotiations shared in by the 
Canadian Manufacturers' Association, the 
Dapartment of Trade and Commerce, the 
Canadian Trade Commission and the Si- 
berian Supply Co., the services of the 
latter have been placed at the disposal of 
Canadian manufacturers who desire to 
enter the Siberian export field. This or- 
ganization endeavors to keep itself con- 
stantly informed as to what goods are 
required and in what quantities. When 
it finds a possible market for Canadian 
goods, the Canadian Trade Commission 
at Ottawa will act as Purchasing Agent, 
the Canadian manufacturers to be paid 
before the goods leave Canada, out of a 
credit to be established by the Canadian 
Government. We have been provided 
with a list compiled by responsible mer- 
cantile and Government representatives 
at present in Siberia, showing the classes 
of goods in demand and a schedule of 
these appended hereto. 

"Members of this association who are 
organized into groups should consider the 
advisability of sending group representa- 
tives immediately to Vladivostok. 

"Individual manufacturers who are in 
a position to make prompt deliveries are 
urged to send catalogues (illustrated 
where possible), and price lists (in Can- 
adian currency and f.o.b. shipping point), 
giving weight and cubic space of goods 
when packed for ocean shipment, as well 
as samples where practicable, to Honor- 
able R. E. Hubbard, the Siberian Supply 
Co., Vladivostok. 

"Please advise us when you forward 
catalogues and samples, in order that we 
may check their delivery, and furnish 
you with information in regard to trai s- 
[lortation of goods. 

"If you are interested, communicate 
with the Commercial Intelligence Depart- 
ment of this association, 1404 Bank of 
Hamilton building, Toronto, reporting 
any action taken hereon. The associa- 
tion will arrange for conferences with the 
Canadian Trade Commission at Ottawa, 
for any group of manufacturers in kin- 
dred lines when advice is received that 
such conferences are desired. 



^UFK/N 





SCALES 



AH standard 
patterns, also 
Comb i n a tion 
Steel Scales 
and Reference 
Tables. car'>- 
init DECIMAL 
E Q U I V A- 
LENTS O F 
FRAC TIONS 
AND WIRE 
GAUGES, 
TAP AND 
DRILL SIZES 
OF ALL 
STANDARDS. 

Handy 

and 

Durable 




TH E /uFH/N Pule /7o. o/^(^A/vAOAjrj>. 

W/ND30K. o/vr. 



WOODLAND 

Fire Bricks 

And Other Grades 

CUPOLA BLOCKS 

FIRE CLAY 



Prompt Shipment 

From our Stock at 

MONTREAL 

We Solicit Your Inquiries 



HARBISON-WALKER 
REFRACTORIES CO. 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 

Office and Warehouse : 

301 ATWATER AVENUE 
MONTREAL, QUE., CANADA 



'Barnes- Made' 

Springs 

are unusual in 
service and wear. 




They are the re- 
sult of sixty years* 
experience, unsur- 
passed equipment and highly skilled 
workmanship. 

A trial will convince you that 
"Barnes-Made" Springs are the 
best buy. 

Catdbhshed 1837. 

THE WALLACE BARNES COMPANY 

218 South St.. Bristol. Ct., U.S. A. 
ManTrs of "Barnes -made* Product* 

Sprin4s.ScrewMacKin* Products. Cold Rollad Sled and Wire 



No. 4aPross 
10 to 12 
i tons. 




Write for complete information on 
Atlas Arbor Presses. All sizes for all 
purposes. 

ATLAS PRESS CO. 

330 N. Park St. 
Kalamazoo, Mich., U.S.A. 



Clear 

Wired and Frosted 

Portlights 



.v^sse4•^ 



X ft AO C 

PORTLIGHT 



JLENS. 



^H^ YO^ 



PROMPT DELIVERIES 

Canadian Representative: 

John Lindsay 

34 Victoria Street, Toronto 



LASSIFTED ADVERTISiNC 



Rates (payable in advance) : Two cents per word first insertion; one cent per word sub* 

sequent insertions. Connt five words when box namber is required. Each figmre counts 

as one word. Minimum order $1.00. Display rates on application. 



SECTION 



POSITIONS WANTED 

TF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A SUPERIN- 
tendent or general foreman, a Cana'dian citizen 
with twenty years varied shop experience in 
Canada and United States, a thorouKhly live man 
with executive abUity, one that ca'n lower the cost 
and raise the quality of your product, just get in 
touch with tht advertiser. Box 566. Canadian 
Machinery. (cl4m) 

CUPERINTENDENT OR WORKS MANAGER 

now open for position. Sound, practical man, 
with good initiative and executive aTjility. Thirty 
years' experience on marine and Corliss valve 
engines, machine tools, mining and sawmill ma- 
chinery ; also general repairs. Well versed in the 
design of tooling required to get the maximum 
efficiency atid production. Best references. Box 
568, Canadian Machinery. (cl4m) 



MACHINE WORK WANTED 



HELP WANTED 



MACHINERY WANTED 



MACHINE WORK WANTED FOR LATHES, 
shapers, milling machine and planer, etc. 
Hourly or contract basis. Prompt delivery. W. H. 
Sumbling Machinery Co.. Toronto. (ctfm) 



PATTERNS 



qiORONTO PATTERN WORKS. 66 JARVIS 
-^ Street. Toronto. Patterns in wood and metal 
for »" kinds of TOachinery. (cfm) 

BKANTFORD PATTERN WORKS ARE PRE- 
pared to make up patterns of any kind — in- 
clndinB marine works — to sketches, blue prints or 
sam-le castings. Prompt, efficient service. Bell 
'Phone 631 : Machine 'Phone 733. Brantford Pat- 
tern Works. 49 George St., Brantford. Ont. (ctfm) 



Used Machinery 

For Sale 

1 — No. 40 Bliss Press. 
1 — No. 74i/> Bliss Press. 
1 — No. 751/2 Bliss Press. 
1 — 42" Boring Mill, two 

heads. 
1 — 30 X 30 X 10 Planer. 
1— 16' Smith Mills Shaper. 
1 — 18 X 6' C.M.C. Lathe. 
1—26 X 10' Whitcomb- 

Blaisdell Lathe. 
5 — Racine Power Hack 

Saws. 

Charles P. Archibald & Co. 

Machinery and Supplies 

164 St. James St. - Montreal 



\YANTE1>— A CAPABLE MACHINE TOOL 

salesman. State experience. Box 553, Cana- 

dia'n Machinery. (cl4m) 

Vy ANTED- -DRAUGHTSMAN FAMILIAR WITH 

mining and crushing machinery. State salal-y 
expected. Box 565. Canadian Machinery. (cl4m) 

CALESMAN— MACHINERY AND SUPPLIES— 

City of Montreal. Man familiar with machine 
tools and with fx-^erience and connection in Citv 
of Montreal preferred. Good opportunity for i..i 
ambitious and capable young man. Write in 
deta'il in first instance, stating salary wanted to 
start. Box 569. Canadian Machinery. Montreal. 

(cl5m) 

DRAFTSMAN WANTED 

^EXPERIENCED ON MACHINE TOOL DESIGN. 
^ Apply in confidence to Box 570. Canadian 
Machinery. (cl8m) 



FOR SALE 



pLANER FOR SALE. 46 INCHES WIDE. 36 
'^^ inches hdgh. 17 feet bed. has single head and 
screw feed, in first-class condition. Will be sold 
cheap. Apply The John Whitfield Co.. 33 Sher- 
boume St.. Toronto. (cl3m) 



o 



NE SECOND-HAND JENCKES CORLISS EN- 
gine — 12" x 30". Cut. description and price 
on application to Canadian Ingersoll-Rand Co.. 
Limited. Toronto. Ont. (ctfm) 

pANADIAN WESTTNGHOUSE MOTOR. 100 
*" h.p. Serial No. 113842. full load sne«d. 580 
r.p.m.. 225 amps, per terminal, 220 volts. Con- 
stant speed. 7200 alts. Armour & Co.. Hamilton. 
Ont. (cl4m) 

/^NE SPINDLE, GRIDLEY, AUTOMATIC. %- 
^ inch capacity, aecond-hand. perfect condition, 
slightly psed. Ontario Metal Products Company. 
Limited. (cl5m) 



MANUFACTURER'S OPPORTUNITY 

100 Vz arid 1 Vi h.p.. air cooled gas engines, 
in semi-finished condition, with patterns, 
jigs, gatiges, etc. Attractive bargain to 
eerious party. Apply to 
THE A. BERNARD INDUSTRIAL CO,, 
Fortierrille, Que. 

(cl4m) 



FOR SALE 

Shepard Electric Hoists. 3 
with Motor Driven Trolleys. 


Tons Capacity 
Floor or Pulpit 


Control 


440 


Volts. 3 ph 


ise, 25 cycles. 


Used one 


year. 


Al condition 




N. B. PAYNE & CO.. 
Electric Traveling Cranes and Hoists 

Telephone. 25 Church St.. 
Cortland 1800. New York 

(cl6ml 



PATENT 


FOR SALE 


Canadian Patent No. 180024. Rail Bonds. | 


Manufactured and 


used extensively in 


mines in U.S.A. 




G. H. BURGE, 1 


Huntsville 


Mo.. U.S.A. 




1 ,■ 1 4ni 1 



VU ANTED— ONE TWO H.P. MOTOR, 3 PHASE. 

' 60. 220. One 10-inch lathe chuck. 4 jaw. 

One 16. 18 or 20 inch. 4 jaw. Northwestern Iron 

Works. 1419 Scarth St.. Regina, Sask., Canada. 

(cl3m> 



AGENTS WANTED 



AGENT WANTED 

By a well known Shef- 
field firm for tool steeb 
and alloy steels. 

Must have technical 
knowledge and good 
connection. State quali- 
fications fully to 

Box Number 567, 

Canadian Machinery, 

128 Bleury St, 

Montreal. 

(cl5m) 



Good Used Equipment 

Shaw 71/2 Ton 3 Motor 
Crane, D.C. 220. 
36' X 16 C.M.C. Triple-gear- 
ed Q.C. Lathe. 
27"xl6' LeBlond D. B. G., 
Q. C. Lathe. 

Pels Type Beam Shear, 
Bertsch Plate Shear. 
23 X 26 W. & W. Bulldozers. 
2,000 cu. ft. Can. Ing. Rand 
Air Compressor. 
96" Fifield Hor. Boring Mill. 
88" X 20 Bertram D. B. G. 
Lathe. 

The A. R. Williams Machinery 
Company, Limited 

HALIFAX N.S. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



87 



IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT 



14" X 6' 
14" X 8' 
14" X T 
6—16' X 

chan 
18" X 6' 
19" X 10 
22" X 10' 
12—26" 

quick 
28" X 10' 
36" X 14 
24"— 10" 
28" — «4" 
20" X 36" 

gear, 



LATHES. 
Mckenzie, standard. 
LEBLOND Toolroom Equipment. 
HENDEY Toolroom Equipment. 

6' C.M.C. double back g:ear, quick 
jge gear. 
CISCO, double back gear. 

LEBLOND heavy duty. 

REED PRENTICE, geared head. 
X 12' C.M.C. double back gear, 
change. 

CONRADSON geared head. 

NEW HAVEN triple geared. 
X 20' McCABE. double spindle. 
X 14' BERTRAM gap lathe. 

X 14' CMC gap lathe, double back 

quick change gear. 



SHAPERS. 



\^- McKENZIE B.C. crank. 
16" RAE B.C. crank. 
16" STEPTOE crank. 

2»" GOULD & EBERHARDT high duty. 
24" and 28" GOULD & EBERHARDT high 
duty. 

MILLERS. 
No. IVi and 2M; LEBLOND Universal. 
No. 3H and 4 LEBLOND Universal. 
No. 3 FORD-SMITH Universal. 
BECKER vertical single pulley drive. 
BECKER No. 7H SLincoln type. 

GRINDERS. 
No. 3 LANDIS Universal. 
No. 1 LEBLOND Universal Tool, power 
feed and wet attachment. 



GISHOLT Tool Grinder. 
BAY STATE vertical surface. 

DRILLS. 
10" MYERS bench sensitive. 
10" McKENZIE sensitive. 
14 " MYERS column sensitive. 
14" PFPFECT column sensitive. 
15" BARNES lever feed. 
20' BARNES back geared. 
22" BARNES s'iding head. 
26", 28" and 34" BARNES sliding head. 
26" and 28" BARNES with tapper. 

RADIALS. 
2' FOSDICK National pattern. 
3' NILES box table. 
4' CINCINNATI-BICKFORD, speed box 

drive. 
5' LONDON box table. 
5' FOSDICK heavy duty speed box and 

tapping attachment (new). 

PLANERS. 
24" X 24" X 7' LONDON heavy pattern. 
30" X 30" X 8' BERTRAM, one head. 
36" X 36" X 12' BERTRAM, one head. 

42" X 42" X 10' McGregor gourlay, 

heavy pattern. 2 heads. 
26" X 26" X 8" new WHITCOMB-BLAIS- 

DELL. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
8" JARECKI pipe threading machine. 
4" MERRILL pipe threading machine. 

ivy McGregor gourlay. 



The above list merely gives part of our stock, which is ready for immediate shipment 
from Toronto. 

Write our Service Department and put your proposition up to them. 

THE A. R. WILLIAMS MACHINERY CO., LIMITED 



64 FRONT ST. W. 



TORONTO 



USED 

MACHINERY 

In stock at New Glasgow and 

offered for sale: 

1 "Bullard" lathe 20xl2'-0" 

1 "Curtis" air hoist 8"x4'-0" 

1 "Matheson" hydraulic press 
14-x24" 

1 "Sturtevant" volume blow- 
er, No. 7 

1 "Grant" riveting hammer, 
belt driven (NEW) 

1 "Berlin" hardwood flooring 
planer and matcher, No. 
88. 

Write for particular.* and 
prices. 

I. MATHESON & CO., LTD. 

Buildera of Machinery 

New Glasgow, Nova Scotia 

tf 



FOR SALE 

Large Quantity of 

USED MACHINERY 

In excellent condition. 

Automatic and Hand 

Screw Machines 
Drill Presses, Grinders 
Milling Machines 
Punch Presses 
Electric Motors 
Air Compressor 
Automatic Slotting 

Machine 
Twist Drills 
Miscellaneous Equipment 

P. W. Ellis & Co., Ltd. 

St. Clair Ave. and Prescott St., Toronto 



Used Machinery 
and Motors For Sale 



2--24" Colburn Drill Presses. $.o00.00 eacfi. 
1—24" Balcer Heavy Duty Drill Press, 

$450.00. 
3— Newton Cold Saws. Cheap. 
2- Davis Cut Off Machines. $100.00 eav-h, 
2 H-m'Uon Gejr Cut Off Machines. 

$100.00 each. 
Raciro No. 1 Power Hack Saws. $6.5.00 

each. 
Peer ess Heavy Duty Power Hack SaVs. 

$100.00 each. 
; 200 Gallon Dean Pump. 1,800-lb. Pres- 
sure. Cheap. 
1— Le Blond 24" x 10' 0" Lathe with Taper 

attachment. $.500.00. 
1- Bawden 6" Shell Lathe. 5150.00. 
1— McGregor-Gourley 18" x S" Lathe. 

$200.00. 
1 — 18" X 8' 0" Putnam Engine Lathe. 

$150.00. 

MOTORS 



1 -Canadian General Electric Co.. type 1. 

class 6, 25 cycle. 200 H.P.. 550 volts, 

lSi> amp., 500 R.P.M., wound rotor at 

$2,300.00. 
1 -Canadian Westinghouse Co., type C.C.L. 

induction motor, squirrel cage rotor, 

300 H.P.. 2 200 volts, 70 amp.. 3 phase. 

25 cycle, 480 R.P.M. at $3,200.00. 
1- Canadian General Electric Co., 200 

H.P.. type I. class C. 25 cycle, 2.200 

vo'ts. 46 amp., 500 R.P.M., squirrel 

cage rotor at $2,800.00. 
1 -Canadian Westinghouse Co., type C.C.L. . 

200 H.P., 550 volts, 189 amp., 3 phase. 

480 R.P.M., 25 cycle, squirrel cage 

rotor at $2.4.^0.00. 
I Canadian Genera'l Electric Co., type l. 

class 4, 25 cycle. 150 H.P., 550 volts. 

146 amp., 750 R.P.M., squirrel cage 

rotor at $1,850.00. 
1 — Canadian Westinghouse Co.'s type 

C.C.L.. 150 H.P.. 2,200 volts. 36 amp.. 

3 phase, 25 cycle, 480 R.P.M. at 

$2,800.00. 



All the above in good condition. Call or 
write 

The Canada Metal Co. , Ltd. 

35 Fraser Ave. Toronto 



We Want a 
Mechanical Engineer 
With Sales Experience 

— a man who can give his entire 
time to selling a widely advertised 
power house device. An intelligent, 
convincing talker, a man not afraid 
of work, a man who expects good 
pay for good work, is the man we 
want. We will respect your con- 
fidence. In the first instance, write 
fully to Box 160, Power House. 



YOU'LL FIND WHAT YOU WANT 

In the Classified Advertising Section of Canadian Machinery. Watch it each week 

for all liinds of new and used machinery. 
YOU MAY WANT WHAT YOU FIND. 



88 



t' A N A 1) I A X M A r III XKR Y 



Volume XXI. 




A light type drill, having hand 
wheel, hand lever and auto- 
matic feed. 



IF YOU WANT 

Machine Tools 

NEW OR USED 

Complete equipment for 
Boiler Shops, Structural 
Steel Works, Railroad 
Spring Shops, Flue Shops, 
o r Machinery for any 
other purpose, or Wood- 
working Machinery o f 
any kind 




A I'niversal Machine for cutting and cleaning 
from IH" to 6'/4" flues. 



GET OUR QUOTATIONS 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Company, Limited 

32 Front Street West, Toronto, Canada 
TORONTO MONTREAL WINNIPEG 



GAUGE MAKERS TO THE TRADE 

You need special tools — we need your 
ork. Send us your blue prints for 
estimates on following: 



w 



Gauges, Tools, Dies 

Special and 
Rolling Mill Machinery 

High-grade workmanship and accuracy 
on all work guaranteed. 



RELIANCE MOTOR & TOOL CO. 

LIMITED 
427 Queen St. W. - Toronto, Canada 



IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

MONTREAL STOCK 
Motors 3-Phase 60-Cycle 

75 H.P., 550 VOLTS, 450 R.P.M. 2 
60 H.P., 550 VOLTS, 450 R.P.M. 1 

TRANSFORMERS.... 3 
200 K.V.A., 2200/2300-14000/15000, 60 Cycles. 

TRANSFOR.MERS, POLE TYPE— 550-^- VOLTS 

.n K.W 2 10 K.W 1 

D.C. LIGHTING GENERATOR 

10 K.W., 110 VOLTS. 450 R.P.M 1 

RAND AIR COMPRESSOR, 800 F T 1 

Prompt Delivery and Subject to Inspection. 

Low Phosphorus Pig Iron, Electric 

Furnace Products, Steel Products 

of all descriptions 

Zenith Coal & Steel Products, Limited 

402 McGill Building Montreal 

1410 Roval Bank Bide.. Toronto. Ont. 



April 



1919 



CANADIAN M A C H I N E R Y 



89 



FOR SALE 

Machinery and Entire Plants Equipment of 
O'Brien Munitions, Limited, and Energite Explosives 



PIPE AND FITTINGS— 

Sta'ndard pipe ^4" to S", Boiler tubes. 
Standard fittings and vaive;, whistle, 
steam tra'ps. Hydraulic Fittings {50'/, 
brass ». cast iron pipe, radiation wall and 
floor, etc.. etc. 

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT— 

Motors, Transformers. Switchboard and 
endless instruments. Northern Elect rii.- 
magneto telephone system. Fire Alarm 
system. Line material, poles and pole tit- 
tings, copper wire, lea'd cable, Wheeler 
street lights, etc., etc. 

AUXILIARY STEAM PLANT— 

Cross-compound. GouldieMcCullough Cor- 
lis Engine. 275 K.W. Generator with 
complete equipment, including instru- 
ments. 

BOILERS AND TANKS— 

100 H.P. Gouldie-McCuIlough. 150 H.P. 
Jencks Machine Co. 200 H.P. Heiner 
Safety Water Tube, steaks, guys, valves 
and fittings : water heaters, steam super- 
heaters. 

PUMPS AND COMPRESSORS— 

Pumps — C.F.M. duplex. Gould and 
W'house centrifugal and fittin'gs. Com- 
pressors — Steam w'house. Ingersoll-Rand. 
Underwriters crowell pressure and vac. 



All In First Class Condition 

FANS AND COILS— 

Canadian Buffalo Forge ventilating and 
pressure fans, healing coils, exhausters, 
blowers, etc. 

HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT— 

Accumulators, Pumps, Pres>es, all com- 
plete with fittings, etc. 

CONVEYORS (horizontal and return) 

Complete with belting, rollers, pulleys, 
driving gears, motors. Am. Steel & Wire 
Co.'s aerial cableway. cars, shields, driv- 
ing mechanism and cable*!. 

ETHER-ALCOHOL APPARATUS— 

Badger's latest improved Ether and Al- 
cohol units complete. 

MIXERS— 

Werner Pfliderer, self -dumping. 
REFRIGERATING EQUIPMENT— 

By Kroeshell Bros., steam or electricity 
complete, condensers, coils. headere, 
valves and fittings. 

INDUSTRIAL RAILWAY— 

Rails, frogs, switches, fish plates, turn 
tables, gasoline and oil locomotives, steel 
box cars, flat cars, work, coal, cinder, 
wooden powder and rat cars, and all- 
steel snow plough. 



FIRE APPARATUS— 

100- lb. pressure 1,000 gal. Underwriters 
Centrifugal Fii*e Pump, with direct con- 
nected 100 H.P. G.E. motors ; capa., six 
streams. 

PLUMBING— 

Hot water tanks, bib taps, wash basins, 
toilets, showers, latrains, syphon traps, 
wash basins, etc. 

SCALES— 

Howe and C.F.M p]atfor*n- Renfrew- 
Truck, C.F.M. Tank and Truck, auto- 
matic weighing machine. 

PIPE COVERING— 

85*^.^ 2-ply Magnesia, Cork Covering 4" 
125'. 

TRANSMISSION EQUIPMENT— 

Belts, shafting, pulleys, hangers, gears, 
conveyors, elevators, etc. 

SHOP EQIUPMENT— 

Consisting of fully-e<iuipped machine, 
carpenter, tinsmith and blacksmith shops. 
Also a quantity of miscellaneous ma- 
chinery, tools, etc.. etc. 



M. J. O'BRIEN, LIMITED 



Renfrew, Ontario 



PARTIAL LIST OF 
TOOLS 

2—60" BuUard Vertical Boring Mills 

1 — 60" Niles Vertical Boring Mill 

No. 4— B. & S. Plain Miller 

1 — 36" X 36" X 8' Gray Planer, two head? 

No. 3 — Cincinnati Universal Miller 

5 — No. Steptoe Hand Millers 

13" X 5' 6" New Carroll-Jamieson Quick-Change Lathe 

14" X 6' New Carroll-Jamieson Quick-Change Lathe 

15" X 6' New Sidney D.B.G. Quick-Change Lathe, swing 

17" ■• 
15" X 8' New Sidney D.B.G. Quick-Change Lathe, swing 

17" ~ 
17" X 8' New National Quick-Ghange Lathe 
3'— 17" X 8' New Sidney D.B.G. Quick-Change Lathe, 

swing 19" 
17" X 10' New Sidney D.B.G. Quick-Change Lathe, swing 

19" 
18" X 24" 
19" X 10' 

21" 
9 — 19" X 8' New Sidney 

swing 21" 
25" X 14' New Sidney D.B.G. Quick-Change Lathe, swing 

27" 
33" X 14' Putnam, arranged for Motor Drive 
6' Western Radial Drill 
5' Bickford Single Pulley Drive Radial 
100-lb. New Little Giant Hammer 
50-lb. New Little Giant Belt Hammer 
25-lb. New Little Giant BeU Hammer 
30-ton Watson & Stillman Hydraulic Press 

FRANK TOOMEY INC. 



New Rahn Larmon Lathe, D.B.G. Quick-Change 
New Sidney D.B.G. Quick-CHange Lathe, swing 



D.B.G. Quick-Change Lathe, 



127 North Third Street 



PHILADELPHIA, 



We are looking for a Canadian 
concern to manufacture our line. 

We would like to correspond 
with a prominent concern in 
Canada with a view to having 
our line of machinery manufac- 
tured and sold in Canada for 
the Canadian market. Our line 
consists of excavating machin- 
ery, trenching machines, con- 
crete mixers and concrete 
road-making machinery, mul- 
tipedal farm tractors, etc. 

Please write us as to your 
facilities. 

F. C. AUSTIN COMPANY, INC. 

Office 609 Railway Exchange 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



so 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI 



3EC/(£R BBLT-DIIIVEN miLBRS - 

Vie Machine thdit give the Smooth Fini^ri 



III" 



Where there's a 
Becker there's Speed 

Convenience, rigidity and accuracy are 
outstanding features of this small size 
Becker Milling Machine. Use it for high 
speed demanding the utmost accuracy. 

QUICK 
DELIVERIES 

Becker small size Millers are carried in 
stock ready to ship. They include Nos. 
2, 2A, 3, 4B, 2H, 3H. These machines 
are finely adapted for light engraving, 
die sinking, profiling and milling small 
and medium size parts. 
Remember, the full Becker line includes 
machines for practically every milling 
purpose. 

Send for Monthly Stock List. 

Becker Milling 
Machine Company 

Hyde Park, Boston, Mass. 

Canadian Agents : 
Rudel-Belnap Machinery Company, Ltd., 137 McGill St., Montreal 
A. K. Williams Machinery Company, Ltd., 64 Front St. West, Toronto 



^ 



April 3. 1919 



C A N A TH A N MACHINERY 



91 



Special Machinery, Jigs, Fixtures, Punches and Dies, Small 
Tools, Screw Machine Products, Gauges, Forgings, Etc. 



li^ommms'^'TUSTirr^ 











ELLIOTT & WHITEHALL 
MACHINE & TOOL CO. 

GALT, ONT. 






SPECIAL MACHINERY 

JIGS AND FIXTURES PUMPS 

GAUGES GASOLINE ENGINES 

GEAR CUTTING 

\LL EQUIPMENT REQUIRED FOR RAPID AND ECONOMICAL 

PRODUCTION OF INTERCHANGEABLE PARTS. PROMPT 

ATTENTION TO ALL WORK. 





FITCHBURG 



Plain Cylindrical 
Grinders 

Built by 

Fitchburg Grinding Machine Co. 

FITCHBURG, MASS., U.S.A. 



IN STOCK HERE 



National High Speed Side Milling Cutters 



ti Only 



■>8 X 1" 

1.. X I" 

% X I" 

% X m" 



National High Speed Slitting Saws 



9 Only 2'; 
10 
■20 

12 
6 



X 3, 64 

X 1/8 

X 1/8 

X 1 16 

X 3/16 

X .5/32 

X 3 32 



4 Only 
1 
4 •• 

12 " 
6 



3,32 

1/8 

3/32 

3/16 

3/16 

1/S 



Hi" 

1" 

W 



1 
I 
1 
1 

m 

I 



J. A. M. Taylor 

M. 786 318 Stair BIdg., Toronto 



MACHINE SHOP 
SUPPLIES 



TOOLS, DIES and GAUGES 

Manufacturers of UNIVERSAL CYLINDER 
RE-BORING TOOLS. 

Windsor Machine & Tool Works 

Windsor, Ont. 



WELDING 



APPARATUS 



AND 



SUPPLIES 



The REGO 100% Efficient Welding Torch 

fti Saves Oxygen Eliminates Flash-Back Better Welding »^ 

- S£^^ ^^^ 4MM . ^fite to us for anything and eCeryUiing you need. *■"% .^ j 

WELDING & SUPPLIES COMPANY » 



C. ROYER, Manager 



IZ27 Ontario Str<!«t East, MONTREAL 



BA TH Universal 
Manufacturing Grinders 

built by 

Universal Grinding Machine 
Company 



Fitchburg, Mass. 



U. S. A. 




Built to Order 



Also gauges, punches, jigs, dies, small 

tools, etc. 
Prompt Service. 
Moderate cost. 
Send Blueprints for estimate. 

Brown Engi nee ring Corporation 

LIMITED, TORONTO 
415-419 Kia« St., W. 



Tel. Adel.42S 




r A -N' A'DT'A'N'' ZVPA C-H I'N'E R\7 -, 



Vtflnhie KXI..^ 






MACHINES, EQUIPMENT 
APPLIANCES and TOOLS 

for 

SPECIAL PURPOSES 

DESIGNED AND BUILT 

We will make what YOU want 
as you want it. 

Write us about it. 



WOOD METAL PATTERNS 
PATTERNS Hand and Machine 



OUR REGULAR PRODUCTS: 

THREAD GAUGES 

SNAP GAUGES 

CYLINDRICAL GAUGES 

WE ARE GENERAL AND 
SPECIAL TOOL MAKERS 

Let us quote you on your require- 
ments, and have your tools made 
as you want them made. 

WOOD METAL PATTERNS 
PATTERNS Hand and Machine 






Special p 
Equipment 

Built to 
Specification 

Steel Plate 

and Structural 

Steel Work 




CastfflSs 







High Quality 

and 

Prompt Service 

Double-Sure 



Write for 
Full Particulars 



S:i'r--¥JX-:£: i-J~ia>ppii:^Si,iiii 



WILLIAM HAMILTON CO., Limited 



TORONTO 



ONTARIO 



April 



1913 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



KELLY 

Tools for Bigger 

PRODUCTION 



Use These Cost Cutting 
Combinations 



TAPER SHANK 



NOSE DRIVE 



FLOATING 
FINISHING 
REAMER 



SEMI-FINISHING „ 
TOOL C 



ROUGHING TOOL 



This photograph was taken in the plant of 
the Youmans Machine Company, Cleve- 
land. The drill press is a standard type ; 
work is performed at two settings. hardened strip pilot 

For the larger hole, the Kelly Tool is fitted with a pilot 
that enters the fixture guide hole. Two adjustable and 
replaceable high-speed steel tools are set ahead of the 
floating reamer; the first rough bores the hole, the 
second semi-finishes and the reamer (set far enough 
back to allow the boring tools to clear) finishes it, all 
in one pass of the spindle. 




TAPER SHANK - 



NOSE DRIVE- 



FLOATING 
FINISHING 
REAMER^ 



ROUGH BORING '' 

TOOL 

ALSO ONE 

ON OPPOSITE 

SIDE 




At the second setting, the fixture i.- 
provided with a locating plug that 
fits the larger hole. The tool is 
similar to the larger one and per- 
forms practically the same work, 
except that the hole is longer and 
the boring tools do not clear before 
the reamer enters. Both holes are 
held to a limit of .001"; center dis- 
tance to .002'. Holes must be paral- 
lel to each other and square to the 
face. This work is performed on 
steel castings and is of such uni- 
formly high standard that it passes 
the most careful inspection. Kelly 
Tools for drill press work are pro- 
vided with pilots and bodies of any 
specified diameter and length, with 
shanks to fit taper hole in spindle or 
adapted to use special chucks. 

Catcdog J-i shows Kflly Tools in 
action. Get it? 

THE KELLY 
REAMER CO. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 

AGENTS: 
London: Burton, Griffiths & Co., Ltd. 
Paris: Burton Fils. 
Latin America: Fox Bros. & Co., New York 

City. 
40 Domestic Agencies. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 




Investment in labor-saving devices is not 
an expense. The real expense is the 
constant daily leak through the pay roll. 
The Smalley General Thread Miller is 

the great economizer of human effort. 
Its accuracy, its convenience and speed 



justify the investment of capital neces- 
sary to its installation wherever quantity 
thread milling is done. This modern 
machine tool has two speeds and will 
mill in one minute 2 to 12 inches, or 
turn 15 to 30 feet. Pay you to write 
for full description of this cost-cutter. 



Smalley-General Company, Inc., Bay City, Mich. 

Canadian Agents: Rudel-Belnap Co., Linxited, Montreal and Toronto 



'ii^iim^^. 



^^^^)im^/^M A\^yJM///^^^^^^^\^m^^\::^A^Mi 



ACCURACY 




When you want 
Cap and Set 
Screws and Semi- 
finished or Finish- 
ed Hexagon Nuts 
for your rush jobs 
send your order to 
us. Prompt ser- 
vice with accurate 
goods. 

THE 



THE IMPROVED 

TAVLOR-NEWBOLD 



GALT MACHINE SCREW CO., 

GALT, ONTARIO 



LIMITED 



Eaat«r«i R»pr..«nt*ti¥*a ; Tk» CaaadiaB B. K. Morton Comv.Bv 
LiBitod. 49 Common St., Montroal. Quo. 




INSERTED TOOTH COLD SAW 

WRITE FOR BUI-LKTIN T-S 

Tabor Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, U.S.A. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Automatic Machinery 

for all purposes 

Punch Press Work 

Screw Machine Products 

Consult us on your machine problems 

Toronto Tool Company 



516 Richmond St. West 



Phone Adel 1181 



r 








i^tv"^ 




J 



Automatic Screw Machine 



ACCURACY 



Products 



QUALITY 



Our Mechanical Engineers are 
at the service of our Clients. 

United Brass & Lead, Limited 

St. Helen's Avenue, - Toronto 

W. L. TOBIAS, Superintendent 
Formerly Superintendent National Cash RegUter Co. 



Don't Wear Out Men 
Wear Out Tools 

It's cheaper to scrap dull 
files than to pay men to 
work with them. 

That's why you should 
instruct all men to turn 
in files the moment they 
reach their "inefficient 
point". 

" Famous Five " Files, however, 
stay sharp for a long time because 
the steel is high grade, accurately 
cut and properly hardened. 

Specify them when ordering. 

They are : 

KEARNEY & FOOT 

GREAT WESTERN 

AMERICAN 

ARCADE 

GLOBE 




86 



r A N A D I A X M A C 1 1 I X E R Y 



Volume XXI. 



PNEUMATIC 

Piston Air Drills 
and Reamers 





Four cylinder type, two on each side. Semi- 
Corliss valve close to each pair of cylin- 
ders gives greater efficiency and power, 
saves clearance Josses and allows air to 
enter cylinders at full prt-^siire of the 
pipe line. 



TOOLS 



Chipping. Calking and 
Flue Beading Hammers 



SPEED UP YOUR PRODUC- 
TION AND BE PREPARED 
FOR THE COMING BOOM 



One Piece Lons: Stroke Riveting 
Hammers. No Coupling. 





One Piece Construction — No leaky joints. 
Solid Bala'nce Valve — No holes .to plug with 
dirt. Direct Exhaustion — No grit returned 
throueh valve. 



Four sizes, t" to 
4" stroke. The 
barrel and all 
wearing part.^ are 
hardened and 
.ijround, making- 
the Thor Chipper 
practically free 
from vibration. 



INDEPENDENT PNEUMATIC TOOL COMPANY 

General Office: 600 West Jackson Blvd., CHICAGO 

CANADIAN OFFICES: 334 St. James St., MONTREAL; 32 Front St., TORONTO: 123 Bannatyne Ave. E., WINNIPEG; 1M2 Homer St., VANCOUVER 



W. D. Anderson's 

Engineering 
Efficiency Service 



Manufacturers often spend thousands 
of dollars on additional buildings and 
equipment in order to get greater out- 
put and profits long before their pro- 
duct reaches 80 per cent., or their pro- 
fits 50 per cent, of what may be easily 
secured from the facilities they already 
have. 

Are you satisfied with your output? We 
can and will increase your production. 



Ring up Anderson s Efficiency Service 

PHONE 221 ADELAIDE 
380 Queen West Toronto, Canada 



M.COLLIER SIVIITH 

"CJU I CK-WORK^' 

.^''^ Regisliral U.S. Paltnl Ogrcc ' ^\ 

ROTARY SHEARS 

Made in 6 Sizes 

Cut all gauges of sheet and plate metal up to 1 inch thick in 
straight or irregular shapes and openings without cutting in 
from side of sheet. Leaves square, true edge that requires nn 
finishing. Used in building shipes. boilers, tanks, ca'rs jnd 
general plate and sheet metal work. 




r^.trntf.l Am.,- ;ir.i. 19i;i 

SAVES 50 , TO 90% 

Eliminates Oxyacetylene Cutting and Plate Planing 

iVrilc tor Catalogue 

THE QUICKWORK COMPANY, o^mo'^'b'*^s^ a' 



April 



1919 



C A X A t) I A iV M A C H I N E R Y 



97 




jium 111^ 



^ Tl« -^ 



ma 





'■■"•MHlEa'avSaaiiaaHBi ■■■■•■»■■■ ■■•taH**^ 

:::ts»n;!::::;:i;::»::::::K:::B::siBS\ 
|::;;:::ih::::::!::::::::::::!:::]K;:SHa 

■■■■■■■■■■■■•■■■■■•■■■■■■■■■■•■■■■■■■S£S5#k3K' 

l!!:::3;:::::::;::::::;st::::h;l!)3!S3iHii3^ 
^:::::::::::::;;;::3:;::::::::!:!!!!!M!! 

'■>>■>■■>■•■ ■■■■■■■•■••■»■■■■■ ■■■! 

iHiK!!!!9ii:i:::::;i::::::::::;! 




.1 

»;.!lii!i''r I 



nil In 'iJii 



hit 



5'x 18" Plain Grindor 



A TOOL of large production capa- 
-^^ city for the grinding of dupli- 
cate parts at low unit costs. 

It is of simple balanced design, 
permittinju: rapid and eas}' operation. 
It is absolutely rig-id and wonderfully 
accurate. 




T 




HE new 5 x 18 Plain Ott 
Grinder is equipped with 
either automatic or hand feeds. 
Bearings throughout are Non-Gran 
metal, insuring long life and the 
maximum of bearing service. The 
wheel spindle is of special steel, 
carefully hardened and accurately 
ground. It runs in bearings that 
can be easily and quickly adjusted 
for the slight wear that takes place. 
Spindle and bearings are constant- 
ly lubricated from two large sight- 
feeding oilers which enables the 
operator to tell at all times that the 
spindle is being properly lubri- 
cated. The head and footstocks 
clamp to the table with T bolts and 
align themselves from a true sur- 
face on the front edge of the 
swivel table. The countershaft 
bearings are all Hyatt Rollers. 

Investigate. Send blueprints 
and samples of work and we 
will submit production and 
cost estimates for your consid- 
eration. 



OTT GRINDER qOMPANY 

Main Office and Works: 217 West Tenth St., INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



98 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



Economical in first cost, 
operation, maintenance 
and floor space. 




The ideal 
equipment for Accur- 
ate Production, Manufacturing, 
Repair Shops, Garages, Training 
Schools, and all classes of accurate 
high-class work. 



THE Do Your Castings Cost Too Much? 



K-T 



MARK 




FOUNDRY 



GALT - ONT. 

Fifteen Tons per Day 



A rearrangemeni of your patterns might cut their cost 25'^/c ; a different 
method of molding- them . might double your production at no increase in 
molding cost. We can advise you and we have expert metal and wood pattern- 
makers who are able to make any changes that may commend themselves 

to you. 

If you need some new Patterns 

send us a sample, blueprint or sketch, and ask for our advice. It won't cost 
you anything. If our advice is good and commends itself to you, it is only 
fair to assume that our work will be equally satisfactory, and we need the 
work as badly a:: you need the patterns. 

We are in a position to do turning, boring, drilling qf other semi-finishing 
operations on castings supplied by us. 

— ASK US 



MAKE NAILS! NOT NOISE! 

We offer the trade new types of 

WIRE NAIL MACHINES 

QUIET IN OPERATION: WITH VERY HIGH OUTPUT: ALL PARTS ACCES- 
SIBLE: DECREASED MAINTENANCE COSTS; GREAT CAPACITY; OCCUPYING 
SMALL FLOOR SPACE. 

Smoothly running machines, with balanced mechanical motiona and no rotating 
cam*. Built in 5 sizes, handling wire <*«ni No. 17 to %" diam. 

PRACTICALLY NOISELESS IN OPERATION 

Sleeper & Hartley, Inc., Worcester, Mass. 

CANADIAN BRANCH, COATICOOK, P.Q. 

L«ndoD, Eniland, P. A. Perir, C3 Queen Victoria Street, E.C. 4. Paris, France. Edgar Blozham, 12 Rue du Delta 
ustralia : Edwin Wood Ptr. Ltd., Melbourne. 




April 3, 19.19 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



99 




THE ESPEN-LUCAS MACHINE WORKS, 



FRONT & GIRARD AVENUE 
PHILADELPHA, PENNA., U^.A. 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 





» 



El^E SAFE 



CEIOGLUS 



SHATTER-PROOF LENS 




ANY glass goggle lens will break under a sufficiently hard blow. 
The wearer and his employer are primarily interested in what happens 
- when the lens breaks — whether the splinters are driven into the eyes of 
the wearer or stay in the frame. 

That's where the ^rccO) Celoglas shatter-proof lens saves the day. Even though 
it may be fractured by a flying missile, the lens will remain intact in the frame 
and no particles of glass can fly in the eyes. 

}Safety goggle frames with Celoglas lenses are the ideal eye protection. The 
)frame is the strongest ever made for eye protection purposes. It protects 
around and between the eyes, and is so sturdily constructed that 
it will ward off any ordinary missile without inconvenience to the 
wearer. Light in weight and extremely comfortable in use. Lenses 
may be changed without the aid of special tools. 
Made with easy cable ear-bows, as illustrated, or elastic head- 
bands, at the same price. 

Price with CELOGLAS shatter-proof lenses. 

SI 15.00 per hundred pairs 
Price with regular heavyweight glass lenses, 

$90.00 per hundred pairs 

^^p"^ Celoglas lenses are earnestly recommended for 
all extra hazardous occupations. 




Any safety engineer, pur- 
chasing agent or superin- 
tendent will be sent a ^s^ 
Safety Goggle with Celoglas lenses for 
trial purposes, free, upon request. 




STANDARD OPTICAL CO. 

, N.Y. 



April 3, 1919 



C A N A D IAN MACHINERY 



101 



C astings - Forgings 



^ FEW days lost in striving to ascertain where certain steel products can 
can be obtained means money and prestige sacrificed— and a set-back 
to your policy of prompt delivery. 

^UT delays to the minimum, and assure yourself of systematic co- 
operation by placing your orders for FORGINGS AND CASTINGS with 
us. 

QUR equipment is as complete as a Foundries Equipment could be, our 
service organization Dominion-wide in scope, ever on the alert to give 
you practical, efficient service. 

^0 matter what your requirements be, we can supply you promptly. 
If service and quality count with you — we will eventually receive your 
enquiries. 



DOMINION Foundries & Steel, Limited 

HAMILTON, CANADA 



WELDING and CUTTING 

THE CARTER WELDING COMPANY OF TORONTO, LIMITED, announce 
that in addition to their OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING and CUTTING 
DEPARTMENT they have added ELECTRICAL WELDING MACHINES, 
and THERMIT WELDING EQUIPMENT. 

They are now equipped to handle everything in Oxy-Acetylene, Electrical 
and Thermit work. No job too small, and none too large. 

— [dAVIs] 



Ig OURNQKVaU i?-' 

THE CARTER WELDING COMPANY OF TORONTO, LIMITED, are the sole Canadian 
agents for the DAVIS-BOURNONVILLE Welding and Cutting Apparatus, and handle- 



Portable Generators 
Stationary Generators 
Welding Torches 
Cutting Torches 
Regulators 
Hose 



Carbide 
Welding Rods 
Flux 

Carbonite Rods 
Goggles 



Carbon Removers 
Portable Trucks 
Compressed Acetylene 
Electrolytic Oxygen 
99.80% pure 



There is no connection with any other firm in Canada under a similar name. 
All correspondence to be sent to Toronto office. 

The CARTER WELDING CO. of TORONTO 

LIMITED 

9 Sheppard Street - Toronto, Canada 



102 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 







POWERFUL, WELL-BALANCED MACHINES THAT ARE 
LIGHT-RUNNING AND ADAPTED TO ALL CLASSES OF 
RAPID MANUFACTURING. 

Every feature of the W-B Lathe of to-day has been considered from 
the viewpoint of greatest utility. Materials used embody toughness 
and durability. Our tests must prove great wearing quality and 
strength before any material is selected. 

The product of an organization that has for sixty years been distin- 
guished for the superior design, workmanship and material of its 
product. 

WRITE FOR OUR LATEST CATALOG DESCRIBING ALL OF 
THE GOOD FEATURES OF WHITCOMB-BLAISDELL LATHES. 




Lathes 



WHITCOMB-BLAISDELL 
MACHINE TOOL CO. 

WORCESTER, MASS. 




Planers 






April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



103 



WICKES Heavy Duty Engine Lathes 



BUILT FOR REAL SERVICE 




We also manufacture High grade Horizontal and Vertical Rolls, Angle Rolls, Punches, Shears, 
Sprue Cutters, Radial Wall Drills, or Countersinking Machines and Flanking Clamps. 

Ask for Our Catalogue 

WICKES BROS., SAGINAW, MICH., U.S.A. 



NOW 

The Time to Make Normal Money is Now. 

HOW 

By Installing Modern, Time-Saving- Machinery 

WHERE 

Buy a Cisco, The Best Lathe Made. 

The Lathe with the Pull. The Lathe of Simplified Accuracy. 

24" X 12" (equal to most 30") 18" x 8" (equal to most;22") 

24" X 16" 18" X 18" 

Immediate Delivery 

THE CISCO MACHINE TOOL COMPANY 



Makers of 

14"-16"-18"-24" 

Engine and Tool Room Lathes 



Made in 
CINCINNATI, U.S.A. Cone Driven Motor Driven 

Geared Head 
Motor Driven Geared Head 



104 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXL 



Becoming a Bi^^er Man 

WHAT is the difference between some men you know and others known to you? 
Why are some men earning $3,000 a year and some $30,000? You can't put it 
down to heredity or better early opportunities, or even better education. What, 
then, is the explanation of the stagnation of some men and the elevation and progress of 
others? 



We are reminded of a story. A railroad man, bom in Canada, 
was revisiting his home town on the St. Lawrence River. He 
wandered up to a group of old-timers who sat in the sun 
basking in blissful idleness. "Charlie," said one of the old 
men, "they tell me you are getting $20,000 a year," "Some- 
thing like that," said Charlie. "Well, all I've got to say, 
Charlie, is that you're not worth it." 

A salary of $20,000 a year to these do-nothing men was in- 
credible. Not one of the group had ever made as much as 
$2,000 a year, and each man in the company felt that he was 
a mighty good man. 

Charlie had left the old home town when he was a lad. He 
had got into the mill of bigger things. He developed to be a 
good man, a better man, the best man for certain work. His 
specialized education, joined to his own energy and labor sent 
him up, up, up. To put it in another way: Charlie had always 
more to sell, and the world wanted his merchandise — brain, 
skill and ability. Having more to sell all the time, he got 
more pay all the time. 

Charlie could have stayed in the old home town; could have 
stagnated like others; could have been content with common 
wages. In short, Charlie could have stayed with the common 
crowd at the foot of the ladder. But Charlie improved him- 
self and pushed himself, and this type of man the Goddess of 
Fortune likes to take by the hand and lead onward and upward. 
Almost any man can climb higher if he really wants to try. 
None but himself will hold him back. As a matter of fact, 



the world applauds and helps those who try to climb the lad- 
der that reaches towards the stars. 

The bank manager in an obscure branch in a village can get 
out of that bank surely and swiftly, if he makes it clear to 
his superiors that he is ready for larger service and a larger 
sphere. The humble retailer can burst the walls of his small 
store, just as Timothy Eaton did, if he gets the right idea and 
follows it. It is not a matter of brain or education so much 
as of purpose joined to energy and labor. The salesman or 
manager or bookkeeper or secretary can lift himself to a 
higher plane of service and rewards if he prepares himself 
diligently for larger work and pay. The small manufacturer, 
the company director, the broker — all can become enlarged in 
the nature of their enterprise and in the amount of their in- 
come^by resolutely setting themselves about the task of grow- 
ing to be bigger-minded men. 

specialized information is the great idea. This is what th« 
world pays handsomely for. And to acquire specialized in- 
formation is really a simple matter, calling for the purposeful 
and faithful use of time. This chiefly. 

One does not have to stop his ordinary work, or go to a 
university, or to any school. One can acquire the specialized 
information in the margin of time which is his own — in the 
after-hours of business. Which means: If a man will read the 
right kind of books or publications, and make himself a serious 
student at home, in his hours — the evening hours or the early 
morning hours — he can climb to heights of position and pay 
that will dazzle the inert comrades of his youth or day's work. 



IF business — BUSINESS — is your chosen field of work, we counsel you to read each week 
THE FINANCIAL POST. It will stimulate you mentally. It will challenge you to further 
studious effort. It will give you glimpses into the world of endeavor occupied by the captains 
of industiy and finance. With the guidance of the POST, and with its wealth of specialized 
Information, you, a purposeful man, aiming to go higher in life and pay, will find yourself becom- 
ing enlarged in knowledge and ambition, and will be acquiring the bases and facts of knowledge 
which become the lungs of the ladder you climb by. 

It is the first step which costs. But this cost is trivial — a single dollar. We offer 
you the POST for four months for a dollar. Surely it is worth a dollar to discover 
how riorht we are in our argument. If you have the will to go higher in position 
and pay, sign the coupon below. 



THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED, 
. — 143-153 University Avenue, Toronto. 

Send "' THE FINANCIAL POST for four months for one dollar. 



Money to be ">cio»ti 

remitted 



Signed 



C. M. 



April :!, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



106 




"Forbes Facts" 

1. One man can do the work of 
six against the old stock and 
die method of cutting. 

2. It is the only machine on the 
market with receding gear. 

3. It is self-contained and motor- 
driven. 

4. It is portable. 

These are convincing argu- 
ments for the construction 
and utility of this machine. 
Thread cutting can be per- 
formed fast, clean and true. 
Equipped with self-centering 
vise. 

The Curtis & Curtis Co. 



115 Garden Street 



Bridgeport, Conn. 



The Only Grand Prize for 
TOOL HOLDERS 

Awarded separately and independent of other 
lines exhibited at the 

PANAMA-PACIFIC EXPOSITION 
WAS WON BY 

ARMSTRONG 
TOOL HOLDERS 

HIGHEST AWARD 

at4 World's Expositioas 

Paris - - - 1901 

St. Louis - - 1904 

Liege - - - 1905 

San Francisco - 1905 




THEY ALWAYS 
MAKE GOOD 



OFFICIAL 

AWAR D 
Rl BBON 








PANAMA PACIFIC 

INTEriNATIONAL 

EXPOSITION 

SAN FRANCISCO 

1915 

PRESiDtNT 



OlStCTCHOfEXHiailS 



GRAND 
PRIZE 

OEPARTMENTOF 

MACHINERY 



They Are Saving Millions of 
Dollars in High Speed Steel 

CATALOG FREE 

^^^1 Armstrong Bros. Tool Co. 

"The Tool Holder People" 

306 N. Francisco Ave., CHICAGO. U.S.A. 

The Panama -Pacific MEDAL OF HONOR was also won by 

ARMSTRONG Drop Forged Wrenches, Ratchets, 

Clamps, Lathe Dogs, Etc. 



106 



C A N A D I A N MACHINERY 



Volume XXI 




r 



No. 2 Turret Screw Machine 

The No. 2 Turret Screw Machine is particularly fitted to 
small parts manufacturing. Many fuse parts and adapter 
contractors have used large batteries with marked success. 
Now you will find them just as profitable and reliable for 
your peace work. 

The machine is built with both plain head and geared friction head 
construction. The geared friction head adapts it particularly to 
threaded work up to the capacity of i in. x 6-in. for alloy steels and 
other tough metals requiring the power obtainable through this 
construction. 

With our increased output we can quickly equip you, and, as with 
all W. & S. machines your production can be speeded by equipping 
from our immense stock of standard tools. 

Turret Lathes and Screw Machines from % in. x 4 in. to 4V2 in. x 44 in. bar 
capacity. Maximum swing 21 V2 •", 

THE WARNER & SWASEY COMPANY 

CLEVELAND, OHIO, U.S.A. 

New York Office- Singer Building. Boston Office — Oliver Buildinj?- Buffalo Office Irociuois Building. 

Detroit Office — Ford Building. Chicago Office and Show Rooms— 618-622 Washington Blvd. 

FOREIGN AGENTS: Chas. Churchill & Co., Ltd.. London, Birmingham. Manchester. Ne\vcastle-on-Tyne a'nd Glasgow. Allied 
Machinery Company, Paris and Turin. Van Rietschoten & Houwens. Rottei-dam. Yamatake & Co., Tokio. Benson Brothers, 
Sydney and Melbourne. A. Asher Smith, Sydney. A. R. Williams Machinery Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. St. John. Winnipeg and 
Vancouver. Williams & Wilson, Ltd., Montreal. 



m 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



107 






Williams^jSuperior Drop-Forged Clamps 

"THEY STAND THE STRAIN" 

JUST "because they're cheap" is no reason why you should buy cast Clamps. 
They're dear at any price if not dependable and a moment's thought will 
show that a cast product cannot be depenable for such service. 

Williams' Lines of "C," Machinists' and Strap Clamps provide a wide 
range of sizes for all clamping service — "There's a Williams' Clamp for every 
purpose." And they're 'all fully guaranteed. 

Machinists' Tools Booklet on request. 

J. H. Williams & Co. 



w 



Western Office and Warehouse: 
45 So. Clinton St., Chicago, III. 



The Drop-Forging People" 

THE A. G. LOW CO., LTD. 

4S Pacific Ave., Saskastoon, Sask. 
Agents forlManitoba, Saskatchewan, British Colunnbia and Alberta 



General Offices: 
45 Richards St., Brooklyn, N.Y. 




HURLBUT^S 

Patent Cutting-off and 
Centering Machines 



TO say that the Hurlbut, 
Rogers Cutting-Off and 
Centering Machine will 
double your production and 
cut your costs in half may 
seem like a broad claim. 
But this IS just what this 
machine will do compared 
with any ordinary machine 
of its kind. 

Hurlbut, Rogers speed and efficiency is 
easily explained. Instead of only one, 
it is equipped with two cutting-off tools 
—one cutting up and the other down. 
In this way they hold the work against 
each other and finish a job in just half 
the time and do twice the work. 

You can't afford to be without this ma- 
chine. It saves real money. Let us 
tell you more about it. Write! 

The Hurlbut, Rogers Machinery Company 

South Sudbury, Mass., U.S.A. 

Poreifn Aeents-England : Chas. Churchill & Co. Limited, 

London Manchester. Glasgow and Newcastle-on-Tyne. 




108 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XX. 




Will Solve Your Lifting Problem 

In mines, mills, foundries and industrial plants, on sugar plantations, in 
office and commercial buildings, on board ships, in fact, wherever there is 
lifting of any kind (up to 30 tons) to be done, Wright Hoists serve with 
that inimitable service which has made the name a synonym for satisfaction. 

Let us tcli you cost of a 
Wright Hoist for your 
work and show you how 
it wifl save that cost 
rrtany times over. 




April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



109 



STEFANSSON'S 

OWN STORY of his 

FIVE YEARS in the ARCTIC 

Over five years ago Vilhjalmur Stefansson, the famou:; Arctic' explorer, was commissioned by the Can- 
adian Government to lead a party into the uncharted space that extended from the north-westerly bound- 
aries of Canada on to the North Pole. Shortly after the party got away the news came back to civili- 
zation that Stefansson and some of his party had drifted out into the Arctic seas on an island of ice and 
they were given up as lost. But Stefansson came back, safe and sound after four years of amazing 
adventures, during the course of which he made many discoveries of scientific and geographical value. 
Mr. Stefansson has written his story of this wonderful journey and exclusive Canadian rights have 
l^een purchased by MACLEAN'S MAGAZINE. It starts in the April issue and will continue for six 
months. It is a thrilling narrative — unquestionably the most important Canadian story of the year. 

'W Stefansson's story will be published exclusively in Canada in MACLEAN'S. The series of articles by him, now 
appearing in American and Canadian newspapers, refer entirely to his experiences on previous explorations and do 
not deal with the journey that he undertook for the Dominion of Canada and completed last year. 

Other Outstanding Features of April MacLean's 



"Imperial Relations Must be Worked Out," by Viscount 
Bryce. An important announcement on the future 
construction of the British Empire. 

"Reconstruction in Turkey," by Stephen Leacock. A 
humorous article on the present condition of things 
in Turkey as seen by Canada's great humorist, and 
applied to Canadian conditions. 

"Bulldog Carney," by W. A. Eraser. A splendid novel- 
ette of the Canadian West, complete in this issue. 
Illustrated by Charles L. Wrenn. 

"Opening the New Book," by J. K. Munro. An article 
on the situation at Ottawa created by the new Lib- 
eral leadership — smashing, impartial, fearless. 

"The Sun Gazer," by Charles G. D. Roberts. A remark- 
able animal story. Illustrated by Artheur Heming. 



"Canada's Fishmonger General," by Thomas M. Eraser. 
An article on a young Canadian who put Canadian 
fish on the diet of the British armies by a series of 
Barnum and Bailey advertising stunts. 

"Bombing the Boche," by Lieut. J. Vernon Mackenzie. 
The second of the two articles that Mr. Mackenzie has 
written on the whirlwind campaign of raid reprisals 
which so frightened all Germany. 

"The Transformation," by Erederic S. Isham. Illustrated 
by Hanson Booth. The second instalment of this 
sparkling new serial. 

"Man and Wife." by C. W. Stephens. Illustrated by R. 
M. Brinkerhoff. The first instalment of a three part 
story of Canadian life by a new Canadian writer — a 
delightful love story with a background of business 
intrigue. 



The Review of Reviews 



The best articles from all publications the world over ara selected and condensed for this department. Some of 
the articles in the April number are: 

Is the ex-Kaiser Haunted? 

Next Government Will be Labor. 

New Life of Deposed Princess. 

A New Kind of Socialism. 



The Man Behind Bolshevism. 
Could German Fleet have been 

Destroyed. 
The Secret Plans of the Allied 

Command. 

Too Much Wilson. 



Are We Communicating With 
Mars? 



The Cohort of the Damned. 
Has War Wiped Out Disease? 
The Red Terror in Russia 
The Sultan Takes Hold. 
Some Tricks of the Mediums. 



Over 65,000 Canadian Families Buy 



MACLEAN'S 

"CANADA'S NATIONAL MAGAZINE" 



APRIL ISSUE 



Now On Sale 

At All News Dealers 



on nm /"'/^DV CO nn PfP PFAR Dealers who have not been handling IVIACLEAN'S .should 

^UC rt,K K^KJrl. $^.UU riLIS. rn^/^is. secure copies at once from their nearest wholesaler. 

If there are no newsdealers in your town, or if your newsdealers cannot =ir niv voii. send 20 cents for a sample copy 
or $2.rO lor a whole year's subscription to MACLEAN'S MAGAZINE, 143-153 University Avenue, Toronto, Canada. 



no 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI 



Heat Under Accurate 
Control 

Here is an important factor in the heat treatment of 
metals. An intense heat, rapidly developed, and always 
under accurate control of the operator, are features that 
distinguish 

BELLEVUE FURNACES 

These tool forges are particularly adapted for the require- 
ments of the small machine shop for annealing and tempering 
dies, cutters, reamers, etc. 

Combustion is perfect and no flames come in contact with 
material. Built to stand the highest temperature. Doors are 
properly counterbalanced. In every way BELLEVUE FUR- 
NACES meet with the demand for duraliility, efficiency and 
convenience. 

Let us advise you about your heat-treating 
problems. 

Bellevue Industrial Furnace Company 

Julius C. Hinz, President 

703 Bellevue Ave. - Detroit, Mich. 

Representatives in Canada: H. W. PETRIE, LIMITED, Toronto, Canada 




IMPERIAL 
CARBIDE 




For 
Welding 
Cutting 

and 
Lighting 



^1 



Manufactured by 

Union Carbide Co. of Canada, Ltd. 



Head Office: 

Dominion BankBldg. 

TORONTO, ONT. 



Works : 

WELLAND 
ONT. 



Large Stocks maintained at convenient distributing 
centres throughout Canada 




WE 

Manufacture Brass Automatic Screw 
Machine products. Capacity of ma- 
chines Vg in. to 2 in. 

Send us your samples or blue prints, 
and we will quote prices. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. 



WkmM^VWM^i 




April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



111 



K empsmith H 
milling machines 




K empsmit H No. 2 Universal Milling Machine 

Equipment — Double friction countershaft, 10y2 inch Universal Dividing Head complete with tailstock, center- 
ing rest, Hill patent dog and driver, two index dials, set of change gears for spiral milling and index charts 
for operatmg; 6 inch Universal Chuck, 1 inch arbor, two arbor supports, brace. No. 3 Swivel Vise, outside 
tool shelf and all necessary crank handles, wrenches and accessories as shown. 



THE KEMPSMITH MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

MILWAUKEE, WIS., U. S. A. 

FOREIGN AGENTS: Barandiara'n & Co.. 3 Alameda. San Sebastian, Spain. Edgar Bloxham. 12 Rue du Delta, Paris. France. D. Drury 
& Co., 1-2 Central House. Main St.. Johannesburg. S. Africa. Nielsen & Winther. Copenhagen. Denmark. PaVkc & Lacy Co., Ltd., 60 
Clarence St.. Sydney. N.S.W.. Australia. Selson Engineering Co.. 85 Queen Victoria St.. London, E.G., England, and 19 Via Botero. 
Tnrin, Italy. Spliethoff Beeuwkes & Co.. l.euvehaven, W.Z. 159, Rotterdam. Holland. American Trading Co.. Tokio. JaVan. 



\ 



112 



CANADIAN M A C H I N E R Y 



Volume XXI. 




I^IS Ait Hoists 




Economical — Safe — Dependable 

The Curtis Air Hoist has been so perfected in 
its speed regulation, design and mechanical 
construction that it is the simplest, safest, most 
economical hoist for light and medium capa- 
cities. It effects a decided saving in man power. 

Hoist to Meet Your Needs 

CURTIS AIR HOISTS have been 

successfully adapted to meet a 

^ide variety of needs in hundreds 

the leading industrial plants 

roughout America. 

r Engineering Department is at 
our service, ready to study any 
ipecial conditions you have to 
meet and recommend suitable 
equipment. Illustrated descsiptive 
literature and full information on 
request. 

Curtis Pneumatic Machinery Co. 

1585 Kienlen Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

BTanchOBic»—i32-AHtidwnTern\inat,t^.Y.C. 



The Rhodes Combined Shaper & Slotter 



Designed especi- 
ally for making 
tools, dies, models 
— and shaping 
and slotting all 
classes o f light 
work. 

Rigid, well made, 
accurate in pro- 
duction and dur- 
able in service. 




Can be quickly 
and conveniently 
changed from 
horizontal to ver- 
tical operation. 

This feature exists 
in NO other ma- 
chine on the mar- 
ket. 

Write for full description 



PATENTED JUNE 23. 1914 



THE RHODES MANUFACTURING COMPANY, SRfFVrcoNSru.'s.A 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN M A C lU N K R Y 



113 



CANADIAN MADE 



CANADIAN MADE 



Electric and Hand Traveling Cranes 





Northern Type E Crane Trolley, Rigid, Enclosed 
Construction. Patented in Canada. 



Single Girder Electric 
Hoist Crane, Type D-1S8. 
1 Ton to 10 Tons. 
Made also double girder 
design. 




We make a wide range 
of CRANE and HOIST 
designs. All sizes'and 
capacities, 1 ton to 
100 tons. 



Get our prices and 
specifications before 
you buy. 

In asking prices, 
staU SERVICE. 
CAPACITY, SIZE 
OR SPAN POWER, 
and, if electric, 
KIND O F CUR- 
RENT. 

Catalogs free. 




6 a 



Northern Crane Works, Limited 

Walkerville, Ontario, Canada 



Type D Electric Hoists 
— % to 10 Tons. 

Air Hoists, Trolleys 
and Tracks. 



Type No. 20 
Air Hoist. 



ELECTRIC CRANES & CAPSTANS 




CATALOGS 
POST FREE 



THOMAS BROADBENT & SONS LIMITED 

HUDDERSFIELD 

ENGLAND 



CODES 
A. B. C. LIEBER A. 1. 



J 



114 



CANADIAN M A C H I N E R Y 



Volume XXI. 




The " MODERN " Die Chaser Grinder 



Let Your Die Troubles 
End Right Here 

Why let Die Trouble stand between you and maximum production? 
In the 

Modern Die Chaser Grinder 

you will have a machine that does away with die trouble — because its output 
is marvellously eccentric. 

Made for belt drive or a complete motor-driven unit. Special attachments for 
grinding Spring Dies, Pipe Dies, Reamers, Taps, Hobs, Spiral and End Mills, 
Milling Cutters, etc. ; can be furnished with the regular equipment. 

For Fast Accurate Work 

Bulletin C. G. will give you full details. We would also be pleased to send you 
full particulars re "Modem" Self-Contained Grinding Machines. Tools splen- 
didly adapted to meet the present demand for large production. 

Modern Tool Company 

Main Office and Works: State and Peach Streets, Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 

Canadian Agents: Rudel Machinery Co., Toronto and Montreal 

New York Office : - 50 Church Street 

Chicago Office : - 32 N. Clinton Street 

F. Wesley Parker, Resident Engineer and Export Agent, 2 Rector Street 



April 3, 1919 C A N A D I A N M A C H I N E R Y us 



Electric Furnaces 

and 

Equipment 



THURY REGULATORS, NEW TYPE 
ELECTRODE WINCHES ELECTRODE HOLDERS 

MAGNETIC BREAKS ROOF COOLER RINGS 

HAND CONTROLS BUSS BARS SYSTEMS 

ELECTRIC FURNACES 
FOR SMELTING FERRO ALLOYS AND REFINING STEEL 
PORTABLE ELECTRIC HOISTS, MONO RAIL HOISTS, 

GENERAL CONSULTING 



VOLTA MANUFACTURING CO. 

WELLAND, ONTARIO 



116 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



COPYING by PHOTOGRAPHY 

The PHOTOSTAT 



(Trade Mark Registered) 



Clear 



The Photographic Copying Machine produces 

Clean Perfect Permanent Facsimiles 



Why spend time and money with old methods when the PHOTOSTAT does better 
work in a fraction of the time at less cost? 

The Westinghouse Lamp Company say : "Photographic copying, as we discovered two 
years ago, is a wonderfully efficient process, not only for all sorts of work that form- 
erly required detailed tracing, but for important documents where identical copies 
are needed, and in fact, wherever quick reproduction is necessaiy. 

"Our analysis shows that where it foraierly required a skilled draftsman approximately 
five to six days to trace from a blue print in order to make more blue prints, our photo- 
graphic copying machine — the Photostat — can reproduce the same work in 15 minutes, 
and with absolute accuracy, as this device catches every item, whereas a draftsman is 
liable to omit a line. 

"Reduction of large drawings to letter size or enlargement of small ones is an import- 
ant advantage. The machine, as is indicated by the figures above, soon pays for itself 
in time and salary saved — but what is more important is its ability to speed up our 
production." 



Copy Your Own 



^ jOb^ 




^bT^^^^^^^H ^^^^H^^^B 




H^^'^^^ifI*" ^i^Rb 




ME~ . . JhL.^ ^ '^^^m 






This cut shows a- PHOTOSTAT in 


operation 



I'encil Drawings 
Ink Drawings 
Tracings 
RpDOrts 
Shipping Lists 
Specificatioi>s 
Blue Prints 
Sketches 



Maps 

Letters 

Telegrams 

Documents 

Data Sheets 

Contracts 

Records 

Graphs 



Illustrations for Salesmen 
Drawings for Advertising 

Copies made direct upon paper. 

and developed and fixed right in the machine itself. 
No expert knowledge required. 



The PHOTOSTAT is manufactured by the Eastman Kodak Company exclusively for the 

COMMERCIAL CAMERA COMPANY 

343 State Street, Rochester, N.Y. 
Chicago, 111. Philadelphia, Pa. New York, N.Y. Providence, R.l. Washington, D.C. 

AGENCIES: 

ALFRED HERBERT, LTD., COVENTRY, ENGLAND 

SOCIETE ANONYME ALFRED HERBERT, PARIS, FRANCE 

SOCIETA ANONIMA ITALIANA ALFRED HERBERT, MILANO, ITALY 

GRAHAM BROTHERS, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



ii: 



LANDIS 



Self-contained 

Plain Grinding Machine 




No matter how excessive 
the tool-load may be, there 
can be no variation of the 
degree of accuracy because 
the work is held stationary 
— and "the wheel travels." 

In addition the Landis is 
compactly and rigidly built 
to avoid any chatter. 

A study of the machine 
will convince you of its many 
advantages and its fool- 
proofness. The built - in, 
labor-saving features insure 
big production. 



log. 



Let us send you our cata- 



LANDIS TOOL CO., Waynesboro, Penn. 

50 Church Street, New York City 




"The Marshalltown 
Throatless Shears" 

guarantees perfect work at less than half the ordin- 
ary expense. 

Rotary, self-feeding shears designed for cutting in 
and out curves, straight or irregular shearing, circles, 
also beveling and splitting of plates. Built in various 
sizes having capacities from tin up to i/o" thick. No 
limit to the size of sheet being cut. Hand, belt or 
motor drives. The last word in metal cutting shears. 
We also manufacture Rotary Bevel Shears, Splitting 
Shears and Plate Milling Machines. 

Let us know your requirements. 

Marshalltown Mfg. Co. 

Marshalltown, Iowa 
U. S. A. 



118 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXT. 



Save Taps, Trouble and Money 

The "B-T" Reverse Tapping Attachment fits any make drill press 
and is equally efficient on all of them. 

Eliminates necessity of reversing the machine spindle. Simply 
raising spindle reverses tap — the machine, meanwhile, goes ahead 
at full forward speed. 

A reverse speed twice that of tapping speed is given by an internal 
gear drive. It is friction driven — automatic- 
ally adjusted by the amount of pressure the 
operator puts on the drill spindle. 

Can also be had with positive drive. Both 
plain and friction chucks are fitted with jaws 
to grip round and square end of tap. 

Get the details — In our Bulletin. 
Write to-day. 

BIcknell Thomas Co. 

Greenfield, Mass., U. S. A. 

"B-T"' Reverse Tapping Attachment 



c 




Diamond Tools 

For Trueinc Grinding Wheels 



NDJJSTRIAL qtMf 



THE GENERAL SUPPLY COMPANY 
of CANADA, LIMITED 

OTTAWA TORONTO MONTREAL WINNIPEG 

356 Spark Si. 38 Toronto Si. 408 McGill Bldg. 85 Waler Si. 

VANCOUVER 

906 Vancouver Block 
Sole Canadian Agents for 

THE JOYCE-KOEBEL COMPANY, INC. 

Formerly Geo. A. Joyce Co. Lfd. 
NEW YORK LONDON 



We wanted 
something original — 
this is what we got 

"T3OTH in these operations and 
Jj half another — I'll show you 
later — completed in the time 
our old taps took to do one; that, 1 
guess, is why we continue to use your 
Victor Collapsible Taps." 

It was the often-heard story of time saved, of 
costs lowered, of all threads clean and smooth. 
And it was pleasant to hear. 



Victor Tool Company 

Waynesboro, Pa, 

U.S..V. 



Send 

For 

Estimates 




April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



119 




MURCHEY 

COLLAPSING TAPS 
and SELF-OPENING DIES 




Wonderfully Fast and Durable 

Two Murchey Taps on your lathe completely 
finish these so that when they come off the 
machine there is no more handling or re- 
sizing- to do. No need of taking out of 
one lathe and putting it in another. No 



Flawlessly Accurate 



reversing, no stripping. No chance of work 
getting off centre. Do work more accur- 
ately and 50% faster than solid tools. 
Murchey Chasers are quickly adjusted to 
compensate for wear, and Murchey Adjust- 
able Taps serve as long as ten solid taps. 
Write at once for full particulars. 



Murchey Machine & Tool Company, Detroit, Mich. 

THE COATS MACHINE TOOL CO., Caxton House, Westminster. London, England, Glasgow, Newcastle-on-Tyne. 
FENWICK FRERES AND CO., 15 Rue Fenelon, Paris France. 




H&G 




Die Head Cuts 

Perfect Threads 

The H. & G. Die Head illustrated is only 3%" outside 
diameter, yet it will cut from the smallest up to 1" 
standard thread and up to 1%" fine threads. For 
absolute proof of its ability to stand up and give 
good results, see the perfect threads it cuts on 
nickel steel. You can see these many places, but in 
almost any automobile or 
aeroplane plant for cer- 
tainty. 
on Made in 9/16", 1"^ 1%" 

and 2" sizes. 

No stronger, more dur- 
able, more accurate Die 
Head was ever made. 

Ask for Catalog 

Eastern Machine 
Screw Corp. 





Wherever there is the 
whir of drills — there, too, 
you find Jacobs Chucks. 

Their success, never ques- 
tioned, has been firmly 
established by their 
acknowledged superiority. 



120 



C A N A D I A N MACHINERY 



Volume XXT 



ALMOND 

CHUCKS xMICROMETERS 



Give them 
a try out. 
Universal 
Geared 
Scroll 
Chuck — 
Sizes 5", 
6-, 71/2", 9" 
and 12 \ 



Geared 
Nut Drill 
Chucks, in 
various 
capacities, 
0" to 1". 



Micro- 
meter 
Calipers — 

English 
Readings, 
1", 2" and 
3". 

Metric 
Readings, 
25, 50 and 
75 m/m. 




CEA^TttTH cur 
ON nAROCNU 
'OOL STftl. 
SPUT HUX 



"ARDCNEO 
BUSHIHC IN lACN 



Sept. 




Request our 
Catalog for 
your files. 



T. R. ALMOND MFG. CO. 

6 Maple Avenue, Ashburnham, Mass. 



Look at this again 
— closely 



and read what we 
have to say 
below 




WHEN a tap breaks off close or below 
the surface, you'll find this Walton 
Tap Extractor will save a j^reat deal 
of time and trouble. The crucible fingers 
prasp the flutes of the tap, a twist of the 
wrench and the piece is out. 
Don't you think it would pay to have a few 
lying around on your benches? 

The Walton Company 

Hartford, Conn. 




The "Cushman" Chuck of to-day 
is the fruit of nearly sixty years 
of Chuck building 

And right from the start in 1862, they have been 
known throughout the industry for their high 
quality Material and Workmanship. 
The CUSHMAN Chuck of to-day embodies every 
up-to-date improvement of a long line of FA- 
MOUS CHUCKS. 

Send for our Catalosrue showing complete line 
of Lathe Chucks, Drill Chucks and Portable Face 
Plate Jaws. 

Cushman Chuck Co., Hartford, Conn. 




April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



121 






1^ 



b 



d 



BUnERFIELD 

TWIST DRILLS 

GEAR AND 

MILLING CUTTERS 

(Carbon and High Speed Steel) 



It will pay every manufacturer, who 
is not acquainted with Butterfield 
Tools, to measure their quality by the 
test of long, hard SERVICE. 

You'll find the Butterfield durability 
the key to tool economy. 

Drop us a line for catalogue. 

Butterfield & Company, Inc. 

Rock Island, Quebec 

Toronto Office : ^^ 

220 King Street West 




m 








31 



122 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



L A N D I S — The Reconstruction Threading Tool 

Threads will play a mighty big part in reconstruction here and abroad. Economy in producing 
these threads will be more important now than ever, and it is vitally necessary that the most 
efficient and most economical machines be employed. 

Landis Die Heads and Machines will meet all demands, whether for quality, production or 
low threading cost. The chaser is fundamentally different in design from any other thread- 
cutting tool, and this design insures clean-cut, well-formed threads on iron, steel, brass, monel 
metal or any material. 

Production is doubled due to the chaser having a strictly tangential disposition to the cutting 
edge, thereby eliminating all unnecessary friction. 

Threading costs are reduced from 50 to 75% since the 
chaser is merely given a slight grinding at the cutting 
edge, when dull. The chaser has three inches of avail- 
able cutting material, which permits of 90 to 120 grind- 
ings, and no annealing, hobbing or retempering is neces- 
sary. 

Familiarize yourself with the other big features; they 
are worth knowing. 

Ask for Catalogue No. 24 

LANDIS MACHINE COMPANY 

Waynesboro, Pa. 





Battleships steamed for the harbor when enemy sub- 
marines were about. That's where they belonged. The 
work of fighting the deep sea pests was left to smaller 
craft — they were quicker, more 
easily handled and more capable 
for the work. The same prin- 
ciple should apply in your shop 
practice. 




U.S. 

MILLER 



should be used for milling: 
small parts. They too are 
quicker, more easily handled 
and more capable for this 
work than big tools. You 
can actually reduce your mill- 
ing costs one-third to one-half 
on each part by the use of 
the U. S. Hand and Weight 
Miller. Finely built to com- 
bine speed, accuracy and dur- 
ability. 

United States 
Machine Tool Co. 



Chi 



CINCINNATI 
> U.S.A. 



Every Emery Wheel With 
Its Own Dresser 

Desirable, isn't it, now that cost is 
no objection? For with an inex- 
pensive Desmond-Stephan Dresser 
for every wheel, every wheel will 
be touched up frequently 
and so kept true and 
equal to its original cut- 
ting efficiency. 



I 




For all ordinary shop grinding 
wheels specify "Dlamo-Carbo" 
—the perfect diamond substi- 
tute. 

For large, coarse, hard wheels 
ask for the "Desmond-Hunt- 
ingdon." 

Shenran Corrugated, 2 sizes 
Norton Zig-Zag, 2 sizes 
Magazine 
Diamonds 

The Desmond-Stephan complete line of Economical 
Grinding Wheel Dressers is catalogued. Write for 
copy. 

The Canadian Desmond-Stephan Mfg. Company 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO 

Alfred Herbert, Limited, Coventry, A^rent for Great Britain 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN M A C II I N K K ^• 



123 



Mechanical Engineering Books 

If you are desirous of improving yourself in your trade and so 
putting yourself in the position of making more money, these 
Mechanical Engineering Books will be found helpful. 




MACHINE -SHOP WORK. By 
Frederick W, Turner, Instructor 
in Machine-Shop Work, Mechanics 
Arts High School. Boston. 208 
pp., 241 illus. Cloth binding. 
The use of various hand tools is 
explained, followed by a compre- 
hensive discussion of the lathe 
and lathe tools, with the methods 
of screw cutting, taper and ec- 
centric turning, et«. The way to 
figure compound gears for screw 
cutting : drilling ; boring ; plan- 
ers : shapers ; slotters ; milling 
machines and cutters ; how to cut 
spirals, gears, cams, etc. ; grind- 
ing ; the operation of automatic 
machines. Price $1.50 



FOUNDRY WORK, Revised by 
Burt*n L. Gray, instructor in 
Foundry Practice, Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute. 224 pp., 
191 illus. Cloth binding. A 
practical handbook on stan- 
dard foundry practice, includ- 
ing hand and machine mold- 
ing, cast iron, malleable iron, 
steel and brass casting, foun- 
dry management, etc. In- 
cludes use of various types of 
molding machines. Price. $1.00 





MECHANICAL DRAWING. By 
Ervin Kenison, S.B., Assistant 
Professor of Mechanical Draw- 
ing, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 176 pp.. 120 illus. 
Cloth binding. Gives a course 
of practical instruction in the 
art of Mechanical Drawing, based 
on methods that have stood the 
test of years of experience. In- 
cludes orthographic, isometric 
and oblique projections, shade 
lines, intersections and develop- 
ments, lettering, etc., with abun- 
dant exercises and plates. Price 
$1.00 




MACHINE DESIGN. 
By Charles L. Griffin, 
S.B., Assistant Engin- 
eer, the Solvay-Process 
Co., American Society 
of Mechanical Engin- 
eers. 208 pp., 82 de- 
signs. Cloth binding. 
Explains in detail how 
to make the entire de- 
sign of all kinds of 
machinery, how to lay 
out gears, etc., with 
complete specimen de- 
signs of numerous ma- 
chines. Price . . .$1.50 



FORGING. By John Lord Bacon, Eng. and 
Supt. of Construction, with R. P. Shields & 
Son, San Diego. Cal.. American Society Me- 
chanical Engineers. Author of "Forge Prac- 
tice" 128 pp.. ISO illus. Cloth bmding. A 
working handbook of practical instruction _ m 
hammering, working, forming, and tempenn^ 
of wrought iron, machine steel, and tool steel, 
including the important modern development of 
electric welding. Price »!■"" 



PATTERN MAKING. By JaniM 

Ritchey, Instructor in Wood Work- 
ing, Armour Institute of Tech- 
nology. 160 pp.. 250 illus. Cloth 
binding. Shows the reader how to 
take the blueprint and from it make 
the pattern for any kind of casting 
under any condition. The allowancea 
for shrinkage, draft, and finish are 
explained. Simple and built-up pat- 
terns of all kinds are clearly treated. 
Various special cases are taken up, 
such as pulleys, cranks, pipe connec- 
tions, valves, etc. Price $1.50 



TOOL MAKING. By Edward R. Markham, Consulting 
Mechanical Engineer, formerly Superintendent of the 
Waltham Watch Tool Co., American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers. Author of "The American 
Steel Worker." 224 pp., 325 
illus. Cloth binding. Takes 
up the methods of treating 
tool steels — annealing, tem- 
pering, spring tempering, 
hardening, case - hardening, 
etc. ; how to make drills and 
reamers of all kinds ; the mak- 
ing of arbors and mandrels, 
taps, hobs, reamer and tap- 
holders, jigs, gauges, dies and 
die-holders of all kinds, coun- 
terbores, facing tools, milling 
cutters, hollow mills. and 
forming tools. Gives all neces- 
sary information for tool mak- 
ing in all its branches. Price 
$1.75 






Sent postpaid on receipt of price. We can also furnish you with other standard works 
on Engineering in all its branches, including books for Civil Engineers, Contractors, 
Electricians Foundrymen, Steam Engineers, Mechanical Engineers, Municipal Engin- 
eers, Railroad Engineers, Sanitary Engineers, Gas Engineers, Hydraulic Engineers, 
Technical Men. 

Technical Book Department 



MacLean Publishing Company 



143 University Ave., Toronto 



124 



C A N A D I A N M A C II T N H K V 



Volume XXr. 





Sidney-for-Service Lathes are noted for their power and 
rigidity. Take deep cuts through toughest metal with- 
out pause or chatter. 




Specifications include 3- 
step cone, double back 
sear, semi-quick change 
sear lathe, built on 10 ft. 
bed. This lathe also fur- 
nished with quick-change 
gears. Bed lengths avail- 
able: 10, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 
20 feet. 

The Sidney Line comprises 
1.5-inch, 17-inch, 19-inch, 
25-inch, 27-inch, 30-inch 
and 36-inch lathes, which 
are adaptable to the finest 
tool room work or the 
heaviest duty shipyard or 
factory rapid production 
work. 



The Sidney Tool Company, Sidney, Ohio 

Canadian .-Vgents: The Geo. F. Foss iVIachinery & Supply Co., 
Montreal. Quebec. H. W. Petrie, Limited, Toronto, Ontario. 



WSuSSa 




STEEL CO.. LTD 



Engineers, Manufacturers 

and Erectors of Steel 

Structures 

Industrial Bridges, Buildings, 
Towers, Penstocks, Columns, 
Smoke Flues and Stacks, Chutes, 
Coal Bins, Ore Bins, Tanks, 
Towers, Cranes. 

Structural Steel and Steel Plate 
Work, and a combination of the 
two lines. 

Prompt Deliveries Assured. 
Write for Catalog. 

MacKINNON STEEL CO., LIMITED 

Sherbrooke, Quebec 
Montreal Office: 404 New Birks Building 



i///////////////////////////////////* 



'-J 






SPRINGS 

are dependable springs 

We've been making springs since 
1845. We've evidently made good. 
The demand for Dunbar Springs 
has forced us to put up a big new 
plant. With better equipment than 
ever before, we are ready to handle 
your orders. You might be inter- 
ested in spiral or flat Vanadium 
Steel springs — we've done some 
good work in this line. If there's 
anything in small springs or oil 
tempered Steel Springs of any 
sizes that you need, it might 
be well to get in touch with us. 



k-* 



"N^ 



The Dnnbar Brothers Co. 



BRISTOI, 

CONN. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



125 



Miiy flS ®^^ 



No. 121 
Die Adapter 





Scroll Chuck 




No. 142 

Center Drilling: 

Tool 




No. 141 

Flanged Tool 

Holder 




No. 14J 
Rear Tool Holder 



^Ki^^P 



No. Hi 
Knurlini; Tool 



No. 148 
Facinff Head 



Increased Capacity Draw 

Back Collet with 

Bothinffs 





roPtlATION 
lOUOH TURN. BOirr DHILLitrACC 



THE FOSTER LINE 



Bar Cap. 2* 



UNI\ERSAL TURRET LATHE 

Swing over CarrUgc. 14* 

over Croat Slide, 8~ 

No. r-B UNIVERSAL TURRET LATHE 

Bar Cap. tVi' Swing over Carriage. 20- 

over CroM Slide, 13'i" 



No. PLAIN HEAD SCREW MACHINE 
Bar Cap. ft" IC Swing 

No. 1 PLAIN HEAD SCREW MACHINi 
Bar Cap. j}' 11' Swing 

No^ 2 PLAIN AND TRICTrON HEAD SCREW MACHINES 
Bar Cap. 1A' la* Swing 

No. 3 PLAIN, FRICTION AND ALL QEAREO HEAD 
SCREW MACHINES 
Bar Cap. 1^" U'/j' Swing 

No. 4 FRICTION HEAD SCREW MACHINE 
Bar Cap. t^" I'Vi" Swing 

No. 5 FRICTION AND ALL QEAREO HEAD SCREW 
MACHINES 
Bar Cap. 1i|" ^7\' Swing 

Nm. 6, 7. 8, 9, 10 FRICTION HEAD SCREW MACHINES 
Bar Cap. 2,V"; 2A"; 2iTi*; Zfi"; ^I't' resp. 20' Swing 



No. 2 FRICTION HEAD UNIVERSAL TURRET LATHE 
Bar Cap. t,^" U' Swing 

No. 2 FRICTION SET-OVER TURRET LATHE 
Oar Cap, 1^" 14" Swing 

No. 3 FRICTION HEAD UNIVERSAL TURRET LATHE 
Bar Cap. 1^' '6' Swing 

No. a FRICTION HEAD SET-OVER TURRET LATHE 
Bar Cap. 1^' 10' Swing 



THREAD MILLERS 
Manufactured under the Holden A Morgan Patents 




No. 147 
Multiple Tnmin< Head 



What Would it Mean 

To You in Dollars 

and Cents 

to have five cutters working 
simultaneously on your work? 

That is what is taking place in 
the first operation on this pulley. 

But other things are required 
also to obtain maximum produc- 
tion and lowest cost. The com- 
bination of cutters, speeds and 
feeds must be correct for the 
material worked upon ; the lip 
and clearance angles of the cut- 
ters must be ground right and the 
tools must work in the proper 
sequence. 

These are problems for the 
trained production engineer to 
solve. 

The Foster Engineering staff is 
at your service. Avail yourself 
of their skill and knowledge- 



No. 138 
Sinsle Cutter Turner 




Push-Out CoMet 
with Bushings 



No. ltt7C 




Draw-Back Collet 
with Bushing! 



No. 103 A 
Flat Cutter Bushing 



Taper Attachment 




No. Hi 
Recessing and 
Boring Tool 



No. 140 
Pointing Tool 

No. 149 
Rear Forming 
Tool Bolder 




No. 103 B 
Split Bushing 




No. 139 
Multiple Cutter 
Turner 



I 



No. 102 A 

Adapter for 

Forged Cottere 



Foster Machine Co., Elkhart, Ind., U.S.A. 



12b 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XX 1. 



GARVIN No. 11 Plain Milling Machine 

Adapted to the lightest kinds of small milling and light manufactur- 
ing and suitable for jewelers, makers of electrical goods, brass workers, 
sewing-machine manufacturers and others. 
The Features of the Machine Are: 
, ^^^ Telescope Arm. 

tti*i3 ^^V Hardened and ground Tool-steel Bearing for arbor in arm. 

Spindle Bearing Taper, with adjustment. 

Power Feed driven by vertical worm shaft inside of column, which 
drives a worm gear clutched to the pinion shaft in the knee. 

Feed Works located and protected inside of column. 

Quick and sensitive movement of Table by Adjustable Lever and Rack 
Pinion. 

^^^^^^^^^ _ Micrometer adjustments of Knee and Saddle. 

mi^^^^^^^ Vsl^ Oil Pan around table. 

Elevating Screw does not pass through the floor. 

Power Feed of Table 12% in. 

In and Out Adjustment 4V4 in. 

Vertical Adjustment 10 in. 

Net Weight. Skidded 600 lbs. 

For Further Information f „f'^.R^,?^\°^„^'i^#eT 
IMMEDIATE DELIVERIES 

No. 11 Plain Milling Machine Sc nd foT C O mp Ic tc C Ot ol O g 

Use Code .... Abode 

MANUFACTURED BY 

THE GARVIN MACHINE COMPANY 

Spring and Varick Streets (Visitors Welcome) 50 Years New York City 




Wherever Pipe is Cut or Threaded 
Economically 

The probability is two to one that it's a 



Will 



lams 



Pipe 
Machine 



that's on the job. 
For in approximately two-thirds 
of all the larger plants in this 
country Williams' Pipe Machines 
are used. 

It was the Williams Pipe Machine 
that brought highest honors home 
from the Panama Exposition. 
The Machine illustrated has a 
capacity of 21 1/2" to 12". Also 
nine other sizes to meet your re- 
quirements. 

Write 

Williams Tool Company 




Erie 



Penn. 



U.S. A. 



Canadian Agents: 
The A. R. Willianns Machinery 
Co.( Ltd. Toronto Canada 



European Agents: 
Universal Machinery Corp. 
London - England 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



127 



Keep This List For Future Reference 

Classified Index of Oil Handling Equipment 



Circulating Systems for Lubricating Oil; 

Curb Pump for Oil and Gasoline; 

Cutting- Oil Reclaiming Systems; 

Dry Cleaning Naphtha Storage and Distributing 

Systems; 
Filling Station Equipment; 
Filtering and Circulating Systems for Lubricating 

Oil; 
Fuel Oil Systems; 
Gasoline Meters; 
Gasoline Pumps, Self-Measuring; 
Gasoline Tanks; 

Hand Pumps for Oil and Gasoline; 
Kerosene Pumps, Self -Measuring; 
Kerosene Tanks; 

Lubricating Oil Filtering and Circulating Systems; 
Lubricating Oil Storage Systems; 
Lubricating Oil Storage Tanks and Pumps; 
Meters for Oil, Kerosene, Gasoline, etc.; 



Naphtha Storage and Handling Systems for Dry 

Cleaners; 
Oil Meters; 

Oil Pumps; » 

Oil Storage and Distributing SysteiriS"; 
Oil Tanks; 

Paint Oil Storage and Handling Systems; 
Pipe Line Registering Measures (Meters); 
Power Pumps for Oil, Gasoline, etc.; 
Railway Oil Storage and Handling Systems; 
Reclaiming Systems for Oil; 
Registering Measures; 

Remote Control Systems for Oil and Gasoline; 
Rubber Cement Tanks and Pumps; 
Self-Measuring Pumps for Oil and Gasoline; 
Tanks for Oil, Gasoline, Kerosene, etc.; 
Tanks for Underground Storage; 
Underground Tanks; 
Wheel Tanks for Lubricating Oil and Gasoline. 



THERE IS A BOWSER SYSTEM FOR EVERY REQUIREMENT. 

Write BOWSER To-day. 

Tell us what kinds of oils and how much you use. 
Detailed information will be mailed on any particular outfit in which you would be interested. We also offer to you 
the services of our special engineers in making a survey of your plant and planning a complete gasoline and oil 
storage system suited to your needs. 

S. F. BOWSER AND COMPANY, Inc., Ft. Wayne, Ind., U.S.A. 



LONDON 
32 Victoria Street S.W. 1 



Canadian Office and Factory, Toronto, Ont. 

PARIS HAVANA 

5 Rue Denis-Poissons Lonja del Comercio 427 



SYDNEY 
6 Castlereagh Street 



CATARACT BENCH LATHES 
AND ATTACHMENTS 



Are Doing Remarkable Work 




Cataract Bench Lathes Have Made Good Everywhere 

Write for our Catalog 

Hardinge Bros., 1770 Bertau Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

ALFRED HERBERT CO., Limited, Coventry, England, are our representatives for United Kingdom, 
France, Belgium, Russia, Japan, Manchuria, Korea, Formosa, Chma, Italy. 



Here's an example of what was 
accomplished with a Cataract 
Bench Lathe: In the American 
Bronze Corporation they are 
used for finishing Non-Gran 
products (largely bushings). It 
is conceded that 
Non-Gran Bronze 
with its distinc- 
tive, dense, tough 
quality, is more 
difficult to ma- 
chine than many 
grades of steel. 
Limits are .00.5" 
on length, .002" 
for flanges and 
.0005" for dia- 
meters and con- 
centricity — 
.00025" not infre- 
quently required: 
but no matter 
how exacting re- 
quirements, four 
"Cataracts" 
handle the work 
to complete sat- 
isfaction of all 
concerned. 



128 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI 




FRAN KLI N 



DiE-CASTlNGb 



"Die-Cast It" 

Die-castings have solved many a manufacturing pro- 
blem. 

Good die-castings are durable, accurate parts. Where 
applicable they differ from machined parts only in 
lower cost and more consistent uniformity. They 
represent years of intensive study by metallurgists, 
engineers and designers. 

The Franklin Manufacturing Company 

originated the die-casting process in America 27 
years ago. It has always led the way in perfecting 
it. Difficult problems have always come to Franklin. 

To Canadian manufacturers wishing to speed up 
production and cut costs with absolutely no loss in 
the efficiency of their product, the Franklin Manufac- 
turing Company offers the services of its expert 
metallurgists, designers and engineers. 

Send samples of blue prints to-day for 
a report on the practicality of using 
die-cast parts. Write, too, for Booklet 
"C" containing interesting facts about 
die-casting. 

Franklin Mfg. Company 

746 Gifford St., SYRACUSE, N.Y., U.S.A. 



tT>El%" Tool Room Drill 



The ALBANY 



This light service drill has 
unique features which put 
it in a class by itself. 
The machine starts rapidly, 
has quick speed change and 
unusual facility for chang- 
ing driljs. Accuracy of 
drilling depth is assured 
without measuring and all 
other features of the "Al- 
bany" are similarly de- 
signed to increase its ca- 
pacity for quick, accurate 
drilling up to % incn. 

Details in Circular 

FOREIGN AGENTS : F. W. Home 
& Co., Tokyo. Japan, Cliina. Korea. 
R. L. Scrutton Co.. Ltd., Sydney. 
Australia a'nd New Zealand. Lit- 
ton's Machine Tool Co.. London. 
England. A. Berthoin, Grenoble, 
France. V. Lowner. Copenhagen 
Denmark. Aktiebolaget. Rylander. 
Asplund. Stockholm, Sweden. Gil- 
lespie Bros. & Co.. South Africa 
(New York City). Monti & Os- 
curo. Milan. Italy. , 

Albany Hardware 
Specialty Mfg. Co. 




ALBANY 



WISCONSIN 



"WHITNEY" 

MACHINE KEYS 

For the 

Woodruff System of Keying 




If you are not already using the "Woodruff System" 
write us at once. Remember that the operations of 
cutting the Keyseats and inserting the Keys require 
no skilled labor. Used by all manufacturers to 
whom economy, rapidity, and interchangeability are 
essential. 

^^' ^ Furnished in our Special 

v,^ ^' Carbon Steel 

Furnished in Nickel 
Steel Heat Treated 

The Whitney Mfg. Co. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

Cliains Keys and Cutters Hand Milling Machines 



\.pril 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



129 



POTTER & 
JOHNSTON 



AUTOMATIC 
MILLING MACHINES 



HORIZONTAL 



VERTICAL 



EVERY working- 
part o f this ma- 
chine is built with a 
view to increased pro- 
duction. 

CONTINUOUS MILLING 

No lost time due to ma- 
chine idleness because the 
operator is load- 
ing one fixture 
while the cutter 
operates on the 
other. 

16 Table Feeds, 
7/a in. to 12 5-16 
in. 

Length of Table 
Feed, 28 inches. 

12 Spindle 
Speeds, 20 to 
180 R.P.M. 

Send us your 
Blueprints and 
we'll gladly give 
you production 
figures. 

Bulletin 36 on 
application. 




I Canadian Offices: POTTER & JOHNSTON MACHINE CO., Pawtucket, R.I. 

ROELOFSON MACHINE & TOOL CO., LTD. 

Head Office: 1501 Royal Bank Building, Toronto, Canada 
Works and Warehouse: Gait, Ont., Canada 



130 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXL 




The Tribloc is the kind of "helper" that will 
handle any sort of a load quickly, surely and 
safely. It doesn't lag or slip, doesn't get in 
the operator's way, doesn't break down on the 
job. It can do more than a gang could, with- 
out the confusion, and in far less time. For 
shifting massive pieces or placing heavy 
moulds, it saves time, effort and men. 
The planetary gearing, all steel working parts 
and the patented loop hand-chain guide insure 
strength, durability and safety in operation at 
any angle or speed. A Tribloc is so efficient 
and so well made, we guarantee it for five 
years. You're as safe in buying it as the work- 
men are in using it. 

A Tribloc is the extra "help" 
you've been needing. Ask for 
our catalog, which gives details 
and prices. 

FORD CHAIN BLOCK & MFG. CO. 

Second & Diamond Sts. PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



Production of Rare Quality at 

Lowest Labor 
Costs 



■ STtO. 

I BEVEL IflCMI STEZL 
4bA«« GEARS 




There is unusual 
strength, accuracy, 
speed, convenience and 
range in 



AURORA 

Drilling Machines 



You can use them 
to great advantage 
on any work in your 
shop that's suitable 
for a machine tool 
of this kind. The 
operating is easy 
and the labor cost 
comparatively low. 



Drop a line for full particulars and specifications. 

Stationary Head Sizes 20"— 21" 
Sliding Head Sizes 22^—44" 

The Aurora Tool Works 

AURORA, INDIANA, U.S.A. 



CALMACl)<>> *'.t.lED MACHINEOYCOMPANYOF AMEBIC* 

—S^ "^^r tap BBOADW/KV. NEWYORK.V&A. ""■" < 



The 




B 
A 
R 
N 

E 
S 




:i50-D 



Complete line. 8-inch to 50-incb swing 

Gang Drills. — Horizontal Drills. 

SEND FOR CATALOG. 

W. F. & JOHN BARNES CO. 

104 Ruby Street ROCKFORD, ILL. 

Canadian Agent.— A. R. WILUAMS MACHINERY CO. 
Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver, and St. John, N.B. 
WILLIAMS & WILSON, Montreal 



April 3, 1919 



C A N A I) I A N M A CHIN K R Y 



k;i 



^mm^f^Wf.W^:^lS^:^f:?;'7!SS^^rJ^. 



Here's Information You Need! 



In view of the modeni trend toward welding as a means of labor, time 
and money saving, and the positive superiority of ARMCO IRON 
filling material, every well posted welding engineer should have this 
book of valuable information at hand for quick reference. 

" Armco Iron Welding Rods and Wire " is not merely a catalog, but 
treats in a helpful way of the following subjects : 



Requisites of a desirable filling itiaterial. 

Welding of mild steel and wrought iron. 

How and why the new American product ARMCO 
IRON surpasses the now unobtainable genuine 
Nonvay and Swedish irons as a welding ina- 
terial. 

Hoiv a single composition of ARMCO IRON sup- 
plants a large number of compositions of other 
welding materials. 

Analysis and physical testx of .ARMCO IRON. 

Typical examples and illustrations of welding 
done with ARMCO IRON. 

Emergency Fleet Corporation specificatio7is for 
ivelding wire. 

Microscopic study of steel and iron with refer- 
ence to welding. 

Cost cards for keeping tab on welding jobs. 

Metallurgy of iron and steel, including color chart 
for heat treatment. 

Miscellaneous useful data including tables of wire 
gauges, conversion of temperatures from 
• Fahrenheit to Centigrade, properties of ele- 
ments and metal compositions, decimal equi- 
valents, metric conversion tables, definitions 
of electrical units, mensuration factors. 

If you are a consulting, desip^ning or managing en- 
gineer, shop superintendent or foreman, your free copy 
is ready for mailing on request, and the engineering ad- 
vice of our welding specialists is also free for the asking. 



Send for 
your copy 





PAGE STEEL & WIRE CO. 

Establtshcd ISS3 as Page Woven fVire Fence Co. 

Makers of "Copperweld" Copper Clad Steel Wire; ARMCO Iron Welding Rods and Electrical Wire; 
Wire Mill Products, Plain and Galvanized; Wire of Special Analysis; Wire Fencing for all Purposes; 
Factory Gates; Ornamental Iron Fence; Machine Guards; Tool and Stockroom Partitions; 
Architectural Iron. 



f* la tils: , A/ ones sen . Pa. and .4 u 



.Muh. 



Sales Offices: 30 Church Street, New York 

Western Representatives: Steel Sale& Corporation, Chicago 




132 



C A X A D T A N M A C H I N K R Y 



Volume XXl 



STEINLE 




One of the reasons why the Steinle 24" Full Swing Side Carriage Turret Lathe is 
ahead of all others in the economical and accurate production of many classes of work. 

The Constant Power Single Pulley Drive 

This feature insures the same amount of power being delivered to the machine at all 
times. It does away with power losses due to variation in the amount of belt contact 
always in evidence when cone pulleys are used. 

One belt furnishes power for all functions of the machine. As long as this one belt 
is kept in proper condition the operator never has trouble with the power traverse 
of the carriages or pump, as the power for operating these features is derived from 
the main drive through geared connections and not through belts. 

No countershaft to oil or get out of kelter. 

Consider the advantages: ONE BELT direct from line shaft or motor, Thirty Revers- 
ible Spindle Speeds, Power Traverse for Both Carriages, Independent Feed for Both 
Carriages, Cutter Lubricant Pump, ONE BELT. 

The operator can give all his attention to the cutting tools, feeds and speeds, result- 
ing in more and better work. 

There are more good reasons why the Steinle 24 Full Swing Side Carriage Turret 
Lathe is ahead of all others in the economical and accurate production of many classes 
of work. We will give these reasons in future advertisements in this Journal. Watch 
for them. They will be interesting to you. 

STEINLE TURRET MACHINE CO. 



MADISON 



WISCONSIN, U.S.A. 



April 3, 1919 



C A N A I) I A N M A C 11 1 N E R Y 



133 



TRADE 




MARK 



REGISTERED 



Specifications No. 2 
A Miller. 

Spindle speeds . . . .VI 
From 21 to 423 r.p.m. 

Table feeds 6 

From .317' to 2.79" 
per min. 

Table 814 .\ 27" 

Long, feed (power) 

26". 

Vertical feed (hand) 

13". 

Trans, feed (handi 

8V4". 

Drive . . . Single pulle.v 
10 X 3" running 250 
r.p.m. 

Gears — Hardened 
Weight 1.500 lbs. 



MILLING MACHINES 

FOR 

Rapid Production of Motor Parts 

The demand for increased production requires tools of 
great strength and durability; the Fox 2- A Universal Milling 
Machine illustrated has met this demand, and is being used 
wherever extreme accuracy and quantity production are 
required. 

The machine has a universal table, spiral cutting attach- 
ment, 10 Dividing Head with 6' Universal Chuck, making it 
a machine especially adapted for Tool Room Work. 

The United States Govern- 
ment used this machine in its 
various repair shops for Aero- 
plane Motors. 

You should be using this 
tool to help the production of 
parts necessary for reconstiiic- 
tion. 





We build this same machine with a plain table, 
omitting the spiral cutting attachment and Dividing 
Head. 

Our No. 1 type machine has a four-step cone 
drive, and while being a lighter machine is a "bear" 
for work. This was proven by the hundreds of them 
in the largest munitions plants. 

We also build the Fox Multiple Spindle Drilling 
Machines. 

FOX MACHINE COMPANY 

1047 W. Ganson St., Jackson, Michigan, U.S.A. 




134 



C A N A D 1 A N M A C II I N E R Y 



Volume XXI. 



Today every production minute is vital. If pro- 
duction is to reach its maximum, the waste 
minutes must be saved. Lacing a belt only 
twice a year at an average of ten minutes time 
—some methods take half an hour— multiplies 
into a huge production loss, throughout in- 
dustrial America. Old-fashioned, obsolete belt 
lacing methods must go. 



OieeUf)p^rB£ttCacer 

Laces a Belt in Three Minutes 



Any machine workman can 
lace a belt instantly with 
the Clipper. The low cost of 
the Clipper lacing tool makes 
possible immediate lacing — 
no running around the plant 
or calling for an expert. 

The Clipper makes a dur- 
able and perfect joint — 
one that pulls better and is 
safer — is flush with the belt 
on both sides and is more 
flexible than the belt itself. 



Clipper belt lacing predominates in every 
manufacturing center in the world 



Some millsuppUi dealer in 

Gverti ciln sells the 

Clipper 




The Clipper goes to you for 
free trial. 

It is perpetually guaranteed 
where Clipper hooks are 
used. 

The American Museum- of 
Safety gave the Clipper the 
only gold medal ever award- 
ed for metal lacing. 
The use of the Clipper ni 
your plant will solve effec- 
tively your belt lacing 
problems. 







Clipiaer 

SjetljCdcerCompami 




GR'AND RAPIDS- 
■MICHIGAN-U-S-A- 



April 3. 1919 



C A N A D I A N M A C 1 1 1 N I<: R Y 



135 



A Time Saver — 
Can You Beat It? 

TTAVE you noticed the Consolidated 
^ ^ Clamp Connection on all Consoli- 
dated Presses? Grips like a vise and 
stays put, one of the bull-dog kind, 
which, when properly tightened, will 
not break away, or slip. 

If you break it we will furnish a new 
one free of charge. 

Consolidated Press Company 

HASTINGS LARGEST EXCLUSIVE MANUFACTURERS OF POWER PRESSES IN U.S.A. MICHIGAN 

Canadian Representatives: A. R. WILLIAMS MACHINERY CO., Limited, Toronto, St. John, Winnipeg, Vancouver 




Cool Shop This Summer 

If You Use 

EONOMIZER FORGE 

I T is economical in 
power ; protects 
workmen from 
flames and hot 
gases and the heat- 
ed material from 
oxidation or scale; 
increases the quan- 
tity and improves 
the quality of heat- 
ed products ; pre- 
vents smoke, flame 
and heat escaping- 
into forge shop. 

Write to-day for catalog 34-T 

W. S. ROCKWELL COMPANY 

Furnace Engineers and Contractors 

50 Church Street New York 

(Hudson Terminal BIdg.) 

Canadian Representative; R. J. McLean 

128 Bleury St., Montreal, Canada. 




STANDARD o,l 
FURNACES ols 



Prompt delivery on 
all tool room types. 




Rivet Heater 



Toronto Office; 

STANDARD FUEL 
ENGINEERING CO. 

W. H. KIRK, Manager 

909 Excelsior Life Building 

Phone: Main 385 



For 

Annealing 

Carbonizing 

Hardening 

High Speed Steel 

Lead and Salt 

Oil Tempering 

Forging 

Riveting 




136 



(AX A 1) I A N M A C II I N E R Y 



Volume XXI. 




TYPE K HIGH SPEED 
STEEL FURNACE 



The 

Right Furnace for 

High Speed Steel 

Too much— too little or an uneven heat treatment of High 
Speed Steel renders it practically worthless for the purpose in- 
tended. 

This Gilbert & Barker furnace has been designed especially 
for the correct heat treatment of High Speed Steel. A temper- 
ature of 2400°F. is quickly obtained and easily maintained, ihe 
heat is uniform on all sides of the work and loss by radiation is 
reduced to the minimum by special insulation. 

More than 50 years' experience in designing and building 
furnaces, especially for the accurate and economical heat treat- 
ment of metals is your guarantee of satisfaction. 

PROMPT DELIVERY ON G. & B. FURNACES 
Recent additions to our plant, already one of the largest in 
this field, makes it possible to offer immediate shipment of your 
order. 

Tell us your problem and we will tell you the type 
of furnace you require, but first send for Bulletin 
24. To-day is a better day than to-morrow--write. 

Gilbert & Barker Mfg. Co. 

West Springfield, Mass., U.S.A. 



Canadian Agent.*: Williams & Wi'son. 

Montreal. Que. New York Office. 

26 Broadway. 



K 



Do These Advantages Appeal 

To Your Sense of Economy and Efficiency ? 

It's economy — re- OIL FURNACE 

quires one - half the versus 

space; costs less than ^^^^ FURNACE 

halt; no chimneys or 

flues required; instantaneous and perfect control 
of temperature; higher temperature obtained; 
no coal ash handlers required; no coal or ash 
piles; less waste of fuel, because it is shut off 
instantly: requires much less time to get the 
required heat. Can you afford to lose the 
Advantages of this oil Furnace? 

TVrite To-day for Full Particulars. 

Mechanical Engineering Company, 

Limited 
Three Rivers, Que., Can. 

Cable Address: "Mecol" 




April .S. 191<1 



A X A 1) 1 A N M A I' 



X {■: H Y 



137 





Ytor the Fire 



"OAKITE saved these brass parts 
from the scrap pile. 

"When the shop burned down, these parts were in 
the hottest part of the fire. The oil was baked on to 
them so hard that we could not remove it by scrubbing 
or soaking in all kinds of acids. 

'And just when we were ready to scrap them, one of 
those Oakite men came in here, and said he could 
clean them with Oakite. 

"And he did. ^ 

"Just look at those parts now— good as new!" 



CV A wL I ■ K OAKLEY CHEMICAL CO. 

^yOP^LKmJL H MiA 44 THAMES STREET • NEW^ YORK 



138 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



ANGULAR 




ANGULAR GRIT 
offers you the 
most advanced 
and economical 
method of clean- 
ing castings, etc. 
Its angular and 
irregular cutting 
points clean raw 
castings and f org- 
ings more thor- 
oughly and with 
greater speed 
than either sand 
or shot. 

ANGULAR GRIT 
dispenses with sand 
bins and sand dry- 
ers, and there is no 
dust nuisance where 
it is used. 

If you are using 
sand, think of the 
labor you can save 
bv adopting ANGU- 
LAR GRIT in its 
place. 

Used for all kinds of 
cleaning operations 
— best materials for 
cleaning shells. 
Prove its superiority 
by giving it a trial. 



Pittsburgh Crushed Steel Co. 



Established 1888 

Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A. 

Canadian RepresentativcM : 

Williams and Wilson Ltd., Montreal, P.Q. 



■'■■'»■■■ 






Cloth 

every description ' 





LANCASHIRE MOTORS 



t&f 



HAVE WORLD WIDE REPUTATION 
FOR 

"RELIABILITY" 




MOTOR DRIVING MINE HOIST 



Specialists m Motor 
Manufacture and Application 



SEND YOUR ENQUIRIES TO 



The Lancashire Dynamo & Motor Co., 
of Canada, Limited 



Head Office and Works 

45 NIAGARA ST. 

TORONTO 



Branch Office 
602 NEW BIRKS BLDG. 
MONTREAL 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



139 



At Your Service 

Let Us Quote on Your Contract Work 

Our Staff is always available for Consultation. 

PATTERNS 

CASTINGS 

FORCINGS 

And Machine Work of all Kinds 



VICTORIA FOUNDRY CO., LIMITED 

OTTAWA CANADA 



V-" . 



What Can You Save? 

By Using Parts Made in the 
Punch Press 

Look over your standard parts, Mr. Manufacturer, and see what parts 
can be made (or could be made by slight change in design) by this process. 

You will be surprised at the saving you can effect. 

We make Blanking, Perforating, Drawing, Forming and all classes of 
dies and tools for plain or difficult stamping to suit the production 
required. 

A Battery of presses is also available at our plant to manufacture parts 
for you with the understanding that you pay only for good parts made. 
Our facilities ensure prompt deliveries at right prices. 



370-586 PAPE: AVE,T0R0K'' 



it-Sij 



I 



140 



C A N A D I A N M A C H I N E R Y 



Volume XXI. 




CINCINNATI 
VERTICALS 



UNUSUAL SPINDLE POWER. 
HEAT TREATED ALLOY STEEL 
HARDENED GEARING. 

MASSIVE SPINDLE HEAD CON- 
STRUCTION. 

HANDY-CAN MILL AROUND A 
RECTANGLE WITHOUT STOPPING 
FEED OR SPEED. 

These are some reasons why you 
should use CINCINNATI VERTI- 
CALS. 

The Cincinnati Milling Machine Co. 
CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



Canadian Agents : 

H. W. Petric, Ltd Toronto. Out. 

H. W. Petrie, of Monircal Ltd. Montreal, Que. 
Genera! Supply Co . of Canada Winnipeg, Man. 



J 





NO PULSATION 








T^RAHERN lubricating pumps are Rotary Geared. 
This type of construction insures a stea'dy even 
pumping movement, in either direction, which forces 
a copious stream of lubricating coolant into the 
deepest cuts. The stream is forced from the pump in 
an even flow, absolutely free from pulsation. 

This steady flood of coolant increases the efficiency 
and prolongs the life of your equipment and insures 
s hig-her gra'de of work turned out at lower cost. 

Trahern Pump Co. 

^^.an^^ Rockford, 111., 








Reversible ^^K 

Type with ^^S' ' -» 

ReJief Valve ^^|^.„^^^|| 

















Hepburn Pumping 
Machinery 

Our line embraces standard duplex pumps for boiler 
feeding and for fire and general service; tank or 
low service duplex pumps; duplex hydraulic pumps 
for service in connection with hydraulic lifts and 
presses, accumulators and oil presses; pressure or 
mine pumps; horizontal power pumps and air and 
circulating pumps, etc. 

Hepburn Pumps are 
"Martin" Pumps im- 
proved wherever im- 
provement could be 
made. 




JOHN T. HEPBURN, LIMITED 



18-60 Van Home Street 



Toronto, Ontario 



April 3, 191£ 



CANADIAN M A C 1 1 1 N i; li Y 



141 



2 Minutes or 20? 




This Is The Vital Question 

Do you drill ten holes in the time it 
takes for one? The Hoefer Auxiliary 
Head equips any driller so as to accom- 
plish this big saving in time. It speeds 
up production in drilling tremendously. 
Not only do you save the drilling time, 
but also the time now lost in shifting the 
.iigs and raising and lowering the spindle 
for the extra holes. 

Hoefer Auxiliary Heads are made in any 
multiple, arranged in any manner, from 
2 up. They are made by expert tool 
makers and unqualifiedly guaranteed 
to handle accurately the work for which 
they are designed. 

Investigate now — every day you use a 
single drill where the multiple may be 
used you are paying for an auxiliary 
head through increased costs, but not 
securing its benefits. 

Write for catalog. Send a blueprint of 
some of your work for estimate of time 
and cost. 




THE 



CEfER 

Mfg. Co., Freeport, 111. 



621 WashmKton Blvd., Phone Haymarket 2408, Chicago, Illinois; 1113 Citizens' Bids.. 
Phone Main 795, Cleveland. Ohio; 70S Empire Building, Phone Court 1911 or 1912. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. ; 602 Kerr Building, Phone Cherry 2884. Detroit, Mich. ; 30 Chiirc.n 
Street, Phone Cortland 1616. New York City; Badger-Packard Mchy. Co.. MilwauKes. 
Wisconsin ; National Supply Co., Toledo, Ohio. 



WATER POWER 
DEVELOPMENT 




Over forty years' experience in design- 
ing and installing special turbines, both 
on vertical and horizontal shafts. 

Can supply complete equipment, in- 
cluding flume, turbine and power trans- 
mission. 

Stock of standard vertical shaft Little 
Giant Turbines on hand for prompt 
shipment. 

We solicit your inquiries. 

J. C. WILSON & CO. 

BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO 



RIVET SPEED 




One every second is a 
speed which this Grant 
Rivet machine will keep 
up indefinitely, in any de- 
gree of tightness or loose- 
ness desired. Each rivet 
is finished with perfectly 
shaped head, polished and 
with no hammer marks 
showing. 

We claim this the only 
machine manufactured 
that will accomplish this 
feat. Our claims are un- 
challenged. By writing 
for our catalogues you 
may obtain full informa- 
tion regarding the ability 
of this machine. 
We are rivet machine 
specialists. Get in touch 
with us. 

GRANT 

Mfg. & Machine Co. 

Holland Avenue 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN., 
U.S.A. 



i 



142 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 




TRANSVEYORS 

Congestion and lost motion in factory 
internal transfer do not exist where the 
Transveyor is operated. 

Assembled on platforms, material is 
off the floor and ready for instant re- 
moval. 

To put the load on wheels, slip the 
Transveyor under the platform, pull the 
handle forward — unload by pressing the 
foot pedal ; both operations consume less 
than one minute. Are you losing time? 

Make your floor walk — eliminate 
handling, speed up production, save 
time and labor by storing and transfer- 
ing material the Transveyor Way. 

Our booklet on Transveyor Economy 
is yours for the asking. 

Cowan Truck Company 

(5 Water Street Holyoke, Mass. 

Canadian Agent 

Mr. R. B. SMILEY 

78 Ellsworth Ave. Hillcrest. Toronto, Ontario. Canada 




The "TOLEDO 



9f 



Double 
Crank 
Presses 



Powerful fac- 
tors of the sheet 
metal world in 
restoring t li e 
wa-stage of war. 
Go where you 
will — to that al- 
most leading in- 
dustry of tlie 
world — auto- 
mobiles and 
trucks — to the 
electrical manu- 
facturers — t 
the makers of 
tinware — to the 
birthplace o f 
stoves and 
ranges - — to the 
metal furniture 
factory — to the producer of metal caskets and 
vaults— to the forging plant — Everywhere you 
will find these presses the dominant factor of pro- 
duction. 

The Toledo Machine & Tool Co. 

Toledo, Ohio 

Representatives — Allied Machinery Co. of America, 19 Rue de 
Rocroy. Paris. France; Via XX Settembre 12. Turin, Italy: 

16 Seidengasae. Zurich. Switzerland. 





m^M^j<v''¥ 



"STILES" No. 2-B 

For reaching into the center of large sheets of 
metal, this model of the "Stiles" type of Press 
is provided. The massiveness of the frame and 
its special design make it rigid, even under the 
most .severe punching strains. 



E. W. BLISS CO. 

Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S.A. 



1857 CHICAGO OFFICE DETROIT OFFICE 191B 

Peoples Gat BIdg. Dime Bank Bide 

CLEVELAND OFFICE ■ Union Bank Bids. 

LONDON. S. E. ENGLAND PARIS. FRANCE 

Pocock St., Blackfriars Rd. 1 00 Blvd. Victor-Hugo St. Ouen 





April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



143 



'''''''''''''''''i^i^i'i'i'i^i'iii^iii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiM 



Illllllllllllllilll1lllllllllilll1l!lll1!llll|l|llill|{|ll!lllll!l!ll|l|||l|!lll1llhlililllllil!lll!lll1|lll|{|^ 




How Dominion Rubber System 
Belting Service Helps Belt Users 

For more than fifty years we have speciaHzed in the making of belting and the solv 
ing of problems in transmitting power and conveying materials economically. 

We maintain a staff of belting experts for the sole purpose of helping Canadian Manufac- 
turers to"speed up" production by cutting belting costs and eliminating power wastage. 

These experts will, without charge, analyze your transmission and conveying equip- 
ment in its entirety and will recommend changes only where they are necessary to 
increase the efficiency of that equipment. 

You are under no obligation to us in availing yourself of this service — the only return 
that we request is that you purchase Dominion Rubber System Belting when you have 
been convinced that the changes recommended by our engineer will be beneficial. 

This special service is available through any of our branches. 

Phone, wire or write the one nearest to you and let us prove to you that the kind 
of service we have given to Canada's largest industries and the kind we want to 
give to you, means more then just selling better belts. 



Dominion 

*'- RUBBER ^'^ 



Makers of 
Dominion Hose, Packing and Industrial 
Rubber Goods and Dominion Tires, the 
GOOD Tires for every Purpose. 



Service Branches: 

Halifax St. John Quebec Montreal 

Ottawa Toronto Hamilton London 

Kitchener North Bay Winnipeg Fort William 



Brandon Regina 



Saskatoon Edmonton 



Calgary 



Lethbridge Vancouver Victoria 



144 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 




CRANES 

All Kinds 

GEO. ANDERSON & CO. of CANADA, Ltd. 

157 Craig St. W., MONTREAL, Que. 



The Greater Strength 
of K\\ p M Hexagon Socket 




A broken set screw 
means time wasted. 
trouble and ex- 
pense. When you 
force the Allen 
something hag to 
go. This time it 
was the block. 

THE ALLEN 
MFG. COMPANY 

Hartford, 
Conn» U.S.A. 



Independent Skinner Chucks 

FOR HIGH SPEED 

WORK 

IRON OR STEEL 

BODY 

The last word in 
chuck construction. 
Wide jaws ; hard- 
ened steel thrust 
bearings ; adjust- 
ing s c r t sv s of 
large diameter, 
threaded full 
length: jaws 
ground after hard- 
ening, etc. 
Write as to-day for 
prices. 

THE SKINNER CHUCK COMPANY, New Britain, Conn. 

New York Office: Factory and Main Oftice : 

94 Reade St., N.Y. New Britain. Conn. 

London Office: 149 Queen Victoria Street 
San Francisco Office: Rialto Building 




<i:iii!i i:ri:i 1 1 nil i iiiirimii uiinuinii.n m:i;i:Hii;i:i:i!i:i:i 1 1 i;ui| 

Fairbanks 
Hammers 

25 to 300 lbs. 

Belt or Motor Drive ^ 

Thee Hammers Embody a I 

Desijin : ml Workmanship that 1 

ae UiibU p.issed. 1 

Send for Catalog E 

UNITED HAMMER CO. | 

Oliver Building Boston. Mass 1 

siiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiininiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimii'iiiiiiiii!,! 




PRESSES and SHEARS 

Sheet Metal Working Machinery 

THE D. H. STOLL CO., INC. 

BUFFALO, N.Y. 




Write for Your Copy 
of the New Catalog 

Learn how you can secure and ma'in- 
tain uniform operating conditions in 
your power plant. Learn how to fur- 
nish positive proof instead of mere as- 
sertions by reading our new CataloK 
No. I-IOOL 

BRISTOL'S 

RECORDING GUAGES 

are unique in their extreme simplicity of construction. The 
continuous night a'nd day records obtained with these recorders 
show the actual pressure maintained throughout the twenty-four 
hciiirs. 

THE BRISTOL CO., WATERBURY, CONN. 

Branch Offices: Boston New York Pittsburgh Chicago San Francisco 



Canadian Steel Foundries Need 
Frost Improved Sand Mills 



WINNING FEATURES : 

Heavy Mullers 

Unloading Devire 

Motor or Belt Drive 




The Frost Mfg. Co. 

112 W. Adams St., Chicago 



STEEL CASiTlNGS 



pLECTRIC Steel Castings of 
■^^all kinds from 5 pounds to 
5,000 pounds. 

PROMPT DELIVERY 



Manitoba Steel Foundries^ Ltd. 

1204 McArthur Building 

Winnipeg _ _ _ Manitoba 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



145 



DIAMOND POINTED TOOLS 




Our line comprises Diamond Pointed Tools for every 
industrial purpose. We are also equipped to furnish 
promptly special Diamond Pointed Tools of every variety. 
Qaality proflacts. 



ORDER FROM ST. CATHARINES if more 
convenient. Complete stock — quick service. 
Goods submitted on memorandum to respon- 
sible firms. 



Wheel Trueingr Tool Company, 88 West Pitt Street, Windsor, Ontario 



John W. Gordon, Manager, 5 Jame« St., St. Catharines. 



^^^^^ Send for our New 


Cataloe of 1 


^^^^ SAFETY AND FIRST AID EQUIPMENT 1 


^HSfl^^H He Manufacture 


Masks and Helmets 


^HlnH^H Adiustoflrlas C^oe-crlea 


Leather 


^HlHj^p KesDiratora 


and Asbestos 


HS^^V smetv and llane^er 


Leeeinss and 


A^^B HiirnA 


Clothing 


^^^^^^^^^ 


And EverythinK for 


.^^^^^^^^^^^■1 losDital kauiDment 


Safety 


^^^^■^^^^ HK STkON<; KKNN!ARI» * NIITT 1 


i044 K. 9th Street 


Cleveland, Ohio. 1 



SENT ON TRIAL 



Hand or Breast 
Drills, 12 'iizcs, 
sizes fitted with 
04 to 2'*: in. 
cap. Ball bear- 
ing through- 
out. Larger 
screw feed. 



We make complete line 
of Portable Electric 
Drills and Grinders for 
all purposes. Especially 
built to withstand hard 
usage. For all currents 
and voltages. 

Catalog? 

Cincinnati Electrical Tool Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 

New York Office : 50 Church Street 




SEND US YOUR INQUIRIES AND PRINTS FOR QUOTATIONS 

ON SPRING SHACKLE BOLTS or 

PRESSED STEEL AND BRASS GREASE CUPS- OILERS OIL CUPS 





"PLAIN" 



Samples and Catalogues 
Sent on Request 

Canadian Winkley Co. 

Limited 
Windsor, Ont. 



•SECTIONAL" 



IT IS IMPORTANT 

when advertising that as many 
prospective buyers as possible read 
what you are selhng. We advise 
you to use Canadian Machinery. 



CLUTCHES 

Combined Jaw and Friction. Friction only. 
Gas Engine Clutches. Jaw Clutches. 

Write for interesting printed matter. 

,The Positive Clutch & Pulley Works, Ltd., Canada 

Factory : Aurora. Ont. 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



STEEL CASTINGS 



DELIVERY 



QUALITY 



JOLIETTE STEEL CO. 



LIMITED 



Sales Office: 

MONTREAL, Que. 



Works: 

JOLIETTE, Que. 




Castings 



L 



Brass, Gunmetal. Manganese Bronze, Delta Metal, 
Nickel Alloys, Aluminum, etc. 

MARINE AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINE BEAR- 
INGS. MACHINE WORK AND ELECTRO 
PLATING. METAL PATTERN MAKING. 

United Brass & Lead, Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 




manii 



!]HAMILTON 



(luuiieEiG 



AND 



IRON 

HEAVY HARDWARE 

Mill Supplies Automobile Accessories 

WE SHIP PROMPTLY 



140 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



Helical Gears 

Accurately Hobbed 



tf^ CUT 




HAMILTON GEAR & MACHINE COMPANY 

VAN HORNE STREET, TORONTO 



SHAFTING 



Cold Drawn, Turned and Polished Steel, 

Rounds, Squares, Hexagons and Flats, 

Steel Piston Rods, Pump Rods. 

Special facilities for Keyseating up to 6 in- diameter. 

THE 

Canadian Drawn Steel Co. 

^^^"^——^^^^ LIMITED 



HAMILTON 



CANADA 




A BALATA 
BELTING 



Which WeCuarantee 

Second To None 

And Entirely 

Satisfactofy 

Try One And Be Convinced 

J.CMcLAREN BELTING CO. 

, - Limited ' 

ffRADE MARK Montreal Toronto Winnipeg 

"°n!EiC.M«UBEN BEUINC C? UUUEO ^^^^^^m^mmm^^^l^^ 




Rochester Thrust 
Bearings 

Are made in large sizes 
for heavy duty 



ROCHESTER, BALL BEARING CO., INC. 

ROCHESTER, N.Y. 



SMELTERS CdCdl FK 
&WELDERS UVUULLkJ 

Tie Aave a style to meet every req/uirement 




Write _for Catalogue 

Consolidated Optical CompaTiy 

TrUnvtrpal Toronto WtnmpccJ^ Var»couv<>t- 



DARLING BROTHERS, LIMITED 

Engineers, Manufacturers and Founder* 

120 Prince Street, MONTREAL, P.Q. 

Pumps for any ServiceSteam Appliances- 
Freight Elevators—Webster Vacuum Heating 
System. 



PRESSES— ALL TYPES 

Press Attachments, Automatic. 
Metal and Wire Forming Machines. 
Tumblers — Large Line. 
Burnishing Machines. Grinders. 
Special Machines. 

Baird Machine Co., Bridgreport, Coniu, U.S.A. 





leoBsy^st^'nsrSnto . 

Tests of Metals, Fuels, OiIs,'jWater, Etc. 
INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH 




GEARS AND GEAR CUTTING 
SPROCKETS AND CHAINS 

In stock and to order, any size from one- 
quarter inch to six-foot in diameter, any 
material. Estimates and gear advice cheer- 
fully furnished. 

Grant Gear Works, Inc., iVJrr\l\: 

G. B. GRANT U.S.A. 





NORTON JACKS 

FOR ALL KINDS OF HEAVY LIFTING 

Send for compUte catalogue showing 
50 styles 10 to 100 tons capacity. 

^„tly^: O. NORTON, Limited 

Coaticook, Prov. Quebec, Canada 



WE MANUFACTURE RIVETS of every 
description, H inch. dia. and smaller 



PARMENTER & BULLOCH CO., LTD. 

GANANOQUE. ONT. 



April 



1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



147 



WOOD 

and 

METAL. 



>/[YTER/\/S ' ^^™^"^ Wheels^ 



Dominion Pitte rn Works 

Rear 109 Adelaide St. W. 
Ph. Add. 1740 Toronto, Ont. 



Aluminum 

Maich 

Plates 



>Sa>\r Guminers 



V 



WE SELL METALS OF ALL KINDS 



SCRAP 
Copper, Brass 
Lead. Babbit. Etc. 
INGOT 

Copper. Lead 
Spelter. Etc. 



S TEEL 

RAILROAD CAP AXLES. 

BARS 

BILLETS 

ETC. 



B. ENUSHEVSKY & SON, Toronto, Can. 



Sold Direct to the User— 
This means Economy 

to jrou 
Brantford EmeryWheel Co 
Brantford,Ont 



«» THE ^ DAVIS 

Milling Attachment 

and Compound Table 

For the Die Maker, Repair Shop, Pattern Maker or 
Garafi«; wil] perfonn more than 90% of the jobs that 
■come up. 

Tor any DrOl Press 

14" to 42" swine. 

Big Economy — Big 
•CotoveBience— SmaJl 

Price. It relieves 

your large millers. 

iomes in handy 

s p o tt.ing castings. 

milling ends of bosses, and many 

orher odd jobs. Cuts all kinds of 

K(?yseats perfectly ; mills deep 

grooTes. slots and cams. We also 

make cylinder reamers for reboring 

Ford car. and a reliable air com- 
pressor—all at special factory prices. 

Write for circulars to-day. 

Hinckley Machine Works, TunoiV 




Oxy- Acetylene Welding and Cutting Apparatus 
Carter Welding Co., ^l"j::l Toronto 

For Davis- Boumonville Oxy- Acetylene 

Apparatus 

General Office and Factory, Jersey City, NJ. 

Canadian Factory, Niagara Falls, Ont. 

Sales Offices : New York, Boston, Philadelphia, 
Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago, 
Detroit, St. Louis, San Francisco, Seattle. 



^AYlS 



INDUSTRIAL 

MILITARY 

AND MARINE 




;?/ai?E¥^ ©©©©ILii: 



ONE PAIR 
OR 20,000 
PER DAY 



WRITE FOR DETAILS 

A. Willson & Co., Inc. Canadian Office. 23 Scott St., Toronto 



BERNARD 



Why waste power that costs 
money? 

This can be effectively pre- 




WOOD 
SPLIT 



PULLEY 



vented by using "Bernard" 
Wood Split Pulleys. 

Let us quote on your require- 
ments. 
The A. Bernard Industrial Company, Fortierville, Quebec 



Manufacturers of High Grade Power and Transmission Appliances 



■ ■ 







A C L EAR, TRAC H. FOR THE STOCK 

*-- INVESTIGATE! 

SEND FOR 

CATALOG "C" 

OR 

ASK THE USER 



WOOD Tur? REIT MAC Ml ME CO 

BRAZIL INDIANA USA 



148 



C A N A D I A N M A r TT T N E R Y 



Volume XXI. 



L< 



rower Losses 

Belt slip, air fanning, too heavy 
pulleys — account j'or losses of 
hundreds to thousands of dol- 
lars in many plants throughout 
the countr3\ 

Check these power and fuel los- 
ses. Reduce belt slip and win- 
dage (air fanning) to a mini- 
mum. Make every ton of coal 
do full duty by installing 





AMERICAN -^^ 

^^^ STEEL SPLIT ^1^ ^OfS, 

^ PULLEYS ^ ^ 



There are no "ifs" about these pulleys. They are guaranteed 
to minimize belt slip and wind resistance. They are guar- 
anteed for double belt duty. They are recommended for rim 
speeds up to 6,000 feet per minute. There are over 4,000,000 
in use because they transmit more power with less waste 



than any other pulley in the market. 

National distribution through supply houses from parent 

stocks in larger cities. 

Write for 37-page book "Getting Maximum Pulley Efficiency." 

It will tell you how to eliminate pulley waste. 



The American Pulley Company, - Philadelphia, Pa. 



MacKittei*ti 

::::i::i::: Cable ^ Addres^ 



Works 
Founde i 
1858 



^■•■•(■■■■■■■■■■■'■■(■■■•■llllllllk 



^■■■•■■•■■iaaatat 



laiaiiaaai. 



"Cook" 

Hartford, 

U.S.A. 



1^* "Ij; — tuivvtuw' 



mii^ 



vuiaaiiiai 



Send for •!!!!!■.•.■■!!!!! 

Catalogue 
Series B6 



[■tiBtaiiHiiitiigiMiijiitiiil 

'X!t 

'ui ■»■■■•••■■■! 



■■■•■■■■■r 



Codes : 

Liebers 

Western Union 



Complete plant equipment for making- 
screws of types shown above. All ma- 
chinery automatic. The almost universal 
use of our machinery proves its worth. 

A.sa, S. CooTc Co. 

Hart foTdL , Con-Tt . 



TQ0IL'& 



UJT 




/ 



/ 



iiniiiiriiiiiiii 



/ 



/ 



We have the equip 
ment to make the 
tools and produce 
the stamping. Let 
us quote on your 
requirements. 



/ 



HOMER & WILSON 



Stamping and Tool Wjrks 

is Lancaster St. HAMILTON 




Do you want someone to 

handle your small 

stamping work? 

An advertisement in the contest section will put you 
in touch with firms who have the facilities for 
^landling small stampings, small tools, jigs, fixtures, 
itc. If you need their help, tell^hem so here. 

CANADIAN MACHINERY 

Contract Wor^ Section 
143 UNIVERSITY AVENUE :-: TORONTO 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



149 




Cane^dian 





IREC 




II what you want is not here, write ua, and we will tell you where to get it. Let us suggest that you consult also 

the advertisers' index facing the inside back cover, after having secured advertisers' names from this directory. The 

information you desire may be found in the advertising pages. This department U maintained for the benefit and 

convenience of our readers. The insertion of our advertisers' names under proper headings is gladly undertaken, but does 
not become part of an advertising contract. 



ABRASIVE MATERIALS 

.\ihenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto, Out 

Brantford Emeiy Wheel Co., Brautfoi-d, Canada. 

Canadian Fairbanks.'Morae Co., Momreal. 

The Geo F. Foss Uehj. & Supply Co.. .Montreal 

Ford-Smith Mach. Co.. Hamilton. Got 

Norton Co.. Worcester, Mass. 

Plewes Ltd., Winnipeg. Man. 

Pittsburgh Crushed Steel Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rice I/ewi.s St Hon, Toronto. Out. 

Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 

ACETYLENE 

Carter Welding Co., Toronno, OnL 

Canadian Welding Works. Montreal, Que. 

Prest-0-LJte Co.. Inc., Toronto. Ont. 
ACETYLENE GENERATORS 

PrestOJJte Co., Inc., Toronto, OnL 
ACORN DIE AND HOLDERS 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp., Greenfield. Mass. 

WeUii Hros. of Can.. Gait. Ont. 
ACCUMULATORS, HYDRAULIC 

Canadian Fairbanka^Morse Co., Mootreal. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto. Onl. 

Hydraulic Machy. Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

.Metalwood Mfg. Co., Detroit. Mich. 

Nile^-Bcment-I'nnd Co., New York. 

Willrams & Wil-son, Limited, Montreal. Que. 
AIR COMPRESSORS 

EliirlinK I'ros.. Ltd.. Montreal. Quebec. 
Limited. MrjntreaJ 



Que. 



Inc. Bay City, Mich. 



WUliams & Wilson, 
AIR CYLINDERS 

Sin.'Uley-General Co., 
AIR RECEIVERS 

Can. IngersoU-Rand Co.. Sberbrooke, Que. 

Canadian Welding Works. Montreal. Que. 

Dominion Bridge Co., Montreal. Que. 

MacKinnon Steel Co.. Sberbrooke, Que. 

a*t. Lawrence Weldinp Co.. Montreal. Que 

Williams & WUson. Limited. .Montreal. Que. 
AIR WASHERS 

Can. Blower & Forge Co.. Kitchener, Ont. 

Sbeldona. Ltd., Gait. Ont 
ALUMINUM 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

United Brass & Lead. Ltd.. Toronto. 

TnllTYi.Tn Bra^s S; Metal Co.. Hamilton 

WUliams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 
ALLOY, STEEL 

.■.;-awlrong Whitworth, of Canada, Montreal, Que. 

Roker & Co.. Inc.. H., Montreal Que. 

Mrth & .Sons. Thos.. Montreal. Que. 

Oenera! Steel Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

H«wkridge Bros Co., Boston, Mass. 

Kavaer-BIlison & Co.. Ltd.. .Montreal. 

Norton. Ralph B,. Agent. Montreal. 

Standard AUoys Company Plttsbuigb, Pa. 

Swedish Steel & Importing Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

'Vanadiiun Alloys Sletl Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Vulcan Onicible Steel Co.. Aliquippa. Pa 
A6TERNATING CURRENT, ELECTRIC 
•WIELDING EQUIPMENT 

Arcwell Corporation of Can., Toronto, Ont. 
ARBORS 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Monltreal. 

Cleveland TwiS! Drill Co., Cleveland. 

Poitl-Smlth Machine Co. Hamilton. Ont. 

J. C. Wilson & Co., Belleville, Ont. 

Garlock-Walker .Machinery Co.. Toronto Ont. 

M«r<» Twirt Drill & Mach. Co.. New Bedford. Mass 

Prmtt * Whitney Co., Dnndas Ont. 

Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 
ARCHITKCTURAL IRON 

Page Steel & Wire Co., Adrian, Mich. 
ARRESTERS. DIIST 

Northern Crane Co., WalkerviUe. Ont. 

Sheldons Ld., Gait, Ont. 

Pangbom Corpora tion . Hageistown. Md. 
AUTOGENOUS WELDING AND CUTTING 
PLANTS 

Carter Welding Co.. Toronito. Ont 

Prest-0-Llte Co., Inc.. Toronto. Ont 

S(t Tyawrenep WeldinB Co.. Montreal. Que. 
AUTOMATIC MACHINERY 

Balrd Machine Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 

Garloek-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Oanlner, Robt, & Son, Montreal. 

Natonal Acme. Co.. Cleveland. O.. and Win.1=..i 

Pratt & Whitney Co., Dundas, Ont 

Koelofaon .Machine & Tool Co.. Toronto. Oan. 
Williams Machy. Co.. A. R.. Toronto. 

William.. * Wil»nn. Ltd.. Montreal. Oiie. 
AUTOMATIC METAL CUTTING-OFF 

MACHINES „ „ , ,., »,.„ 

Qieenfleld Tap & Die Corp. Greenfield, -Mass. 
WeJls Bros, of Can.. Gait, Ont 
Alkenhesd Hardware Co.. X°™"w-j2! i 
Canadian Falrhanks^Morse Co.. Mol«Teal. 
Canada Metal Co.. Toronto. ,,„,„.i 

Tk" rs.r. n- fr... M-hv * annmlv Co Montreal 
AIITrt SHPPT MPTAI, MACHINERY 
OMiekwnrk Co.. St. Mar>a, Ohio 



UAUBITT METAL 

Hoyt .Metal Co.. Toronto. 
Magnolia Metal Co., .Vlontreal. 
Uiut. Lewi:, & Sou. Toiuuto. Ont. 
Tallmau HDma & Meul Co.. Hamilton. 
\\ llklll^on it Kompas:^. Hamilton. Ont 
Williams & Wilson. Limited, .Montreal, Que. 
BALL BEARINGS 
^.tinaoiao V'airbanKs.<Moise Co., Montteal. 
v..an. a K F tJo., Toronto, Ont. 
ohapman Double Ball Bearine Company. Toronto 
Rncbe'^ter Ball Bearing Co.. Rochester. N.Y. 
Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montieal, Quo. 
BALLS, STEEL 
rtnKer & Co.. Inc, Montreal. Que. 
Williams & Wilson. Limited, Montreal, Que. 
BAROMETERS 

Taylor In.^tniment Co., Rochester, N.Y. 
BARRELS. SAND-BLAST 

rnncrhni-n Corporation. Hagerstown, Md. 
BARRELS, STEEL SHOP 
Haini .Machine Co., Bridgeport. Conn, 
Cleveland Wire Spring Co,, Cleveland. 
BARRELS, TUMBLING 
naiid Machine Co.. Bridgeport, Conn, 
Katie Foundry. Gait, Ont 
Noithem Crane U oiks. Walkerville, Ont 
Wilson & Co.. J. C. Belleville, Ont 
VVhtring Foundry Equipment Co.. Harvey. 111. 
Williams & Wilson. Limited. MontTeai. Que. 
BASE FACING MACHINES 

Victoria Foundry Co., Oitawa, Ont, 
BARS, BORING 
Gitiholt .Machine Co., Madison, Wis. 
Nites-Bement-l'ond Co.. New York. 
Wilson & Co, J. C, Belleville. Ont 
Williams & Co., J. H., Brooklyn. N.Y. 
Williams & Wilson, Limited, MonbreaJ, Que. 
BARS, MERCHANT 

.Algoma Steel Corp., Sault Ste. Marie. Ont, 
BARS, CONCRETE REINFORCING 

AlKoma Steel Corp., Sault Ste. Marie, Ont, 
BEADING MACHINES 

Quickivork Co.. St Marys, Ohio. 
BLLT CONVEYORS 
Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont. 
Williams & Wilson. Limited, Montreal, Que. 
BtAKlM;S. BRONZE 
Wilson & Co., J. C Belleville, Ont 
Wentwnrtb Mfg. Co.. Hamilton. Ont 
BEARINGS. DIE CAST 

Franklin Mfg. Co.. Syracuse. N.Y. 
BEARINGS, HIGH SPEED, OR HEAVY 
DUTY BRONZE 

Wentworth .Mfg. Co., Hamilton. Ont 
BELT LACERS 

Clipper Belt Lacer Co., Grand Rapids. Mich. 
BELi LACINU LEATHEK 
Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont 
Foss Mchy & Supply Co., The Geo. F., Montreal 
Graton & Knight Mfg. Co.. Worcester. Mass. 
Kice. I.ewii* i Son. Toronto, Ont 
BELTING. BALATA 
Baxter & Co., Ltd.. J. R., Montreal, Que. 
Federal Emrtneering Co., Toronto, Ont 
BELTING, RUBBER 
Can. Consolidated Rubber Co., Ltd.. Montreal- 
Outta Peicha & Rubber. Ltd.. Toronto. Can, 
BELTING, CHAIN 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 
Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 
Jones & Glassco. Montreal. Que. 
Moise Chain Co.. Ithaca. NY. 
MTittnev Mfg Co.. Hartford. Conn. 
Williams & Wilson. Limited, Montreal, Que. 
BELTING. CONVEYOR 
Can Consolidated Rubber Co.. Ltd.. Montreal. 
Bajter 4 Co.. Ltd.. J. R.. Montreal. Que. 
Canadian Falrbanka-.MorBe Co.. Montreal. 
Federal Englneerinit Co.. Ltd., Toronito. Ont 
Graton &• Knight Mfg. Co., Worcester. Mass. 
Jones & Glassco. Montreal. Que. 
M<iT,aren. J C. Belting Co.. Montreal, Que. 
.Morse Chain Co.. Ithaca. NY. 
Plewes. Ltd.. Winnipeg. Man. 
Rice. Lewis & Son. Toronto. Ont 
S>o-.d»M Vschv * Sui.nHes r.f'.. Mon'real. Que 
Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 
BELTING, FRICTION ANP SURFACE 

Can Consolidated Rubber Co.. Ltd., Montreal. 
BELTING, LEATHER „ ^ , n 

Can Graton * Kniirht Mfg Co.. Montreal. Que. 
Gntta Perchn ^- Rubber. Ltd.. Toronto. Can. 
BELTING. STITCHED COTTON DUCK 
Dominion BelHne Co.. Hamilton Ont 
Outta Percha * Rr'bber. Ltd.. Toronto, Can. 
BFI TING. WOVEN 
Baiter ft Co.. Ltd.. J. R.. Montreal. Que 
Federal ETWtnepritip Co.. Ltd.. Toronto, Onit. 
BFNCH LEGS. STEEL 
New T>-ltaln Mach. Co.. New Britain. Conn. 



BENCH DRAWERS, FRICTIONLESS 

.\ew Brium Mach. Co., New Britain, Conn. 
BENDING ROLLS (PLUTE & AUGHl 

Wickes Bros., Saginaw, Mich. 
BENDING MACHINERY 
Bertram & Sons Co.. John, Dundas. 
Bertrams, Limited, Edinburgh. 8i.t>tland. 
Brown-Boggs Co., Ltd., Uamllton. Can. 
Can. Blower & Forge Co., Kitchener. Canada. 
Garloek-Walker .Machinery <^.. Ti>ronto. Ont 
Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Qufc 
BLASTING MACHINES. SAND 
Ferracute Mach. Co.. Bridgeton, N.J. 
Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto. Ont 
Jardine, A. B., & Co., Hespeler. Ont 
National Machinery Co.. Titfin. Ohio. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York, 
Tnl--1„ Machine & Tool Co. Tol-lo. Ohio 
Wmian.s & Wilson. Limited, .Montreal, Que. 
BILLt.T MARKERS 

Matthews & Co.. Jaa. H.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 
BILLETS 

Swedish Steel & Importing Co. Ltd., Montreal. 
Aleoma '^teel Corp.. Sault Ste Marie. Out. 
Kayser-EIlison & Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
Norton, Ralph B. . Agent, Montreal. 
BILLETS. FORGING 
Coneral ^teel Co.. Milwaukee. Wis 
Ka>'ser-ElIison & Co.. Litd.. Montreal. 
Norton. Ralph B., Agent, Montreal. 
BINS, STEEL 
Dennis Wire & Iron Works. London. Ont 
Dominion Bridge Co.. Montreal. Que. 
^lacKinnon Steel Co.. Sberbrooke. Que. 
Toronto Iron Works. Ltd.. Toron'o. Ont. 
BLASTING MACHINES, SHOT AND 
STEEL GRIT 

Pittsburgh Crushed Steel Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
BLOOMS AND SLABS 

Algoma Steel Corp.. SauJt Ste. Marie, Out. 
B1.UWERS 
Can. iilower & Foige Co.. Kitoheuer. OnL 
BtielduQB. L/td.. UaJl, Out 
tiariucK-Wai&er .Uachmery Co., Toronto, Ont 
.\liio(iovein & Co.. Munlreal, Que. 
Williams & Wilson. Limited, Montreal. Que. 
BLOW flPES AND KLUULAIORS 
Carter Welding Co., Torontio, OnL 
Prest-0-Lite Co.. Inc., Toronto, Ont 
BLUE PRINTING MACHINERY 
Commercial Camera Co.. Province, B.I. 
Mulliner-Edlund Tool Co.. Syrcause. N.Y. 
Wickes Bros., Saginaw, Mich. 
BOARDS, GLASS CUTTING 

Lufkin Rule Co. of Can., Windsor, Ont. 
BOARTZ 
Anderson & Co. of Canada. Geo-. Montreal. Que, 
Joyce. Koebel & Co.. Inc., New York. 
BOLT CUTTERS 
Greenfield Tap & Die Corp., Greenfield, Mass. 
Wells Bios, of Can.. Gait. Onl. 
Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 
BOOKS, TECHNICAL 

MadLean Publishing Co.. Toromio. 
BOILERS 
Dominion Bridge Co.. Montreal. Quebec. 
MaoGovem & Co., Montreal, Que. 
MacKiimon Steel Co.. Sberbrooke. Que. 
Riverside Machinery Eiepot. Detroit. Mich. 
BOLT CUTTERS AND NITT TAPERS 
Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, tint 
Canadian Machinery Corp., Gait. Ont 
Garlock-Walker Machinery Co. . Toronto. Ont 
A. B. Jardine & Co., Ltd.. Hesjteler. OnL 
Landis Machine Co., Waynesboro, Pa. 
Rice. Lewis & Son, Toronto. Ont 
\v«no Brothers Co. of Canada Gait Ont 
Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 
BOLTS 
Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont 
London Bolt ft Hinge Works. London, OnlL 
Rice. I.#wla & Son. Toronto. Ont 
Manitoba Bridge & Iron Wks.. Ltd.. Wpg., Can. 
Steel Co, of Canada. Ltd., Hamilton. Ont 
United Bra-ss ft Irfad. Ltd.. Toronto. 
Wilkinson ft Kompass. Hamilton. Ont. 
Willinms ft Co. T H,, Brooklyn. N.Y. 
BOLTS. SPRING SHAKI W 

Can. Winkley Co.. Ltd., Windsor, Ont. 
BOLT AND NUT MACHINFRY 
Bertram ft Sons Co.. John. Dnndaa. 
Canada Maetilnerv Corp.. Gait f^nt. 
Garlock-Walker Machinery Co, Toronto. OnL 
Gardner ft Son. R<*t.. Montreal. 
Landis Machine Co.. Wavneshoro Pa. 
National Acme Cft, Cleveland Ohio. 
National Machinery Co.. Tiffin Ohio. 
RIvenrtde Machinery Depot. Detroll, Mich. 
Williams ft Wilson, Ltd.. Montreal One. 
Williams Machinery Co., A. R., Toronto. 



160 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



BOLT THREADING MACHINERY 
Judbw * Uo., LUL, A. a., Ueqwlet, Oat. 
LmoaiB Macniue (Jo., Wajneabero, Pa. 
NattoD«i Acme Co., Cler«iAnd. Utila 
Victor Tool Co., Wayu«Hbon>, t*. 
Wiaiaina & Wilaon, Limited, Montreal, Que. 
BUKl>u MACUUit.'S, fMEUMATlC 
CYiaNDKK 
Cltraland Pneum»Uc Tool Co. of Canada, Toronto 
Caiia<UaD KairuanKn-vMuise Co.. MoalreaL 
CaB. iDgemuU-Koud Co., Sberbroo&e, gue. 
Uarloca-W aiaer Alaciunery Ca. Torooto, Ont 
UUKINC MACHINES. UPRIGHT AND 
HORIZONTAL 
Bertram de ctoos Co., John, Duodaa. 
Betl8 .Vlactune Co., Bocllester, N.Y. 
Canada ilacmnery Corp., Oalt, ODt. 
Oarlock -W aifcer Machinery t^, TowmU), OBt 
Gwaunjs & Lewia -Uig- Co.. Fond du Lao. Wla 
Oisbolt Machine Co., Madison, WU. 
Lanais Tool Co., Wajnesbcro. Pa. 
NUes-Bement-Pond Co., New Sort 
RoololBon AlaeOme ft Tool Co.. Toronto, Out. 
Wffliama & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que, 
BOKliNU ANU TURNING MILLS 
Bertram & Sona Co.. John, Dondas. 
Belts Machine Co., Rochester. N^. 
Canada Machinerj Corp., Salt. Ont 
Hiaholt Machine Co.. Ma<UK.n, Wla. ^_,_^ 
Fobs Mchy. S 8uppU Co., The Q«o. F., Mo«»treaL 
Nile»-B«Dent-l"ond Co.. ,^New iorlL 
WfflianiB & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 
BOAt-o, slLtL BUOP AND TUTK 
Clereland Wire Spring Ca, Clweland, ^o. 
New Bruin Mach. Co.. Nrw Bnta», Com. 
BRAKEBAND LINING CUTTERS 

Peok. Stow & WUcoi Co., Southington, Conn. 
BKAivtS 
Brown. Boggs & Ca, Hanrilton^ Can 
Electrio Steel 4 Metals, Ltd.. W^and. Out 
BRASS AND COPPER BARS, RODS 
BRAKES, CORNICE , . ^ 

Peck, Stow & Wilcox Co., Southington, Conn. 

AKJII O 1 1 ■ t |t"l *^ 

Browns Copper & Brass Eollln* Milla. Kew 

T2taiSi%rass & Metal Co., HamntoB. Ont. 
BRASS FOUNDERS 

Canada .Metal Co., Toronta 

Greenleafs, Ltd.. BeUerille, ,««-__, -_ 

St. Lawrence Welding Co., MomraaJ, Qoi. 

Tahman Bra* ft Metal Ca. HamUK*, Ont 

United Brass « Lead Ltd-. '?"»«?•, 

Wilson & Co., J. C, BelleTillo, Ont. 
BRASS WORKING MACHINERY 

Foster Machine Co.. Blkhart, Ind. 

Oarlook-Walker MachineiT Co. , Toronto, OnL 

Warner 4 Swaaey Ca, Cleteland. 

Mile«-Bement-Pond Co., New YorJ. 

Prest-O-Lite Co. lie-- ToHmto, Oot. 

Wood Turret Machine Co. , BrajO. todL 

Williams Machy. Co., A. R-. Totwito. 

Willi. "15 H, WUson, Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

"nlS-VValker Befactories Ca of Canada, Mont- 

real, Que. 
BRIDGES, RAILWAY AND HIGHWAY 

Dominion Bridge Ca, Montreal, Qne. 

MacKinnon Sleel Co.. Sherbrooke Que. 

Manitoba Bridge 4 Iron Wks. Ltd. Wpg-. Can. 
BRONZE RODS AND SHEETS, PLATES 

Brown's Copper A Brass Rolling MiUs. New 
Toronta 
BRONZE, NAVAL „, „ 

Brown's Copper & Brass BoUing Milla, New 
Toronta 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Tallman Braiw and Metal Co.. HamUton. Ont 

Cnited Brass & Lead Ltd.. Tonmta 
BRONZE. COPPER 

BU^InG "^D^POLMHrnO MACHINERY 
Ford-Smith Mach. Ca. Himntco. <5>»-.,^,„ . 
Fa- Mch7. 4 StopIt Ca. The Oea F.. M«>'«»1- 
Oarlock-Walker Mschlneir Co.. Toronto Ont 
N.« Rritsin \I«.-hlne Co.. New Brt-aln. Coin, 
•wmiams * Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 

BUCKETS. DUMP 
MacKinnon Steel Co.. Shenhrooke. Que. 
Morris Orsne 4 Hoist Co.. Hei-bert, Niagara 
Falls. Ont 

BUCKETS. ELEVATOR 
Can Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 
MacKinnon ateel Co.. Sherbrooke Qua. 

BUCKETS. CLAM SHELL. CRAB. DUMP 
Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto, Ont vi-~r. 

Morris Crmne * Hoist Co., HertKrt. Niagara 

Northern rnne Works, Ltd. .WalkerrOle, Ont, 
BULLDOZERS 

Bertram ft Sons Ca. John. Dundaa. 

Canada Mschinerr Corp., Oalt Ont 

n.,"~-k W.lkB' Msehinerr Co Tnrtmto. t>nt 

wniiama ft Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Qn«. 
BURNERS. OIL AND NATURAL GAS 

Northern Crane Works. Ltd.. WalkerriHe, Ont 
BURRS. IRON AND COPPER 

Pnrmenfer ft B'lllneh Co.. Gananogue. Ont 
BUSHINGS. BRONZE 

Oher^rtt^or Brass Co.. M. L.. Syracuse. N.T. 
CALIPERS 

Peck. Stow ft Wilcoi Co., Southington, Conn. 
CABINETS. SAND BLAST 

Pan«4>nra Comoratloo. Hagerstown, Md. 
CALKS. BOOT 

Lnfkin Rule Co. of Can.. Wtadaor, Ont 
CANADA SILVER SHEETS. ROLLS 

BTt>wn's CopiJer ft Brass Roilllng Mflla, New 
Toronto, 
CANNERS' MACHINERY 

Bliss. E. W. Co.. Brooklyn. NY. 

FerrsCTlte Msrh. Co.. Bridffeton. N.J 

Brown Bnav« ifr Cn. HsTnOton. Can. 
CANNrRS' CONVEYORS 

Can, Link-BeH Ca. Toronto. Ont 

Wflaon ft Ga. J. G., BenerlBe. Ont 



CARBONIZING BOXES 

Katie Fmmdry. Gait, Ont 

Morris Oiane & Hoist Co., Ltd., Herbert, Niagara 

Falls, OnL 
Swedish Crucible Steel Co.. Windsor, Ont 
CARRIERS, PNEUMATIC TUBE 

Jones 4 Glaseco, MontreaL 
CARS. INDUSTRIAL 

Can. Blower 4 Forge Co.. Kitchener. Can. 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Ltd., Montreal 

Morris Crane 4 Hoist Co.. Ltd., Herbert, Niagara 
Falls. Ont 

Sheldons, Limited, Oalt, Ont 

Whiting Foundry Equipment Co., Harrey, 111. 
CASTINGS, MACHINERY 

Winnipeg Iron Foundry Co., Winnipeg. 

Wilson ft Co., J. C, BelleTille. Ont. 
CASTINGS. ALUMINUM. BRASS. 
BRONZE. COPPER AND GUN METAL 

Algoma Steel Corp.. Ssult Ste. Marie. Ont. 

Franklin Mfg. Co., Syracuse, N.T. 
CAS'nNGS. DIE CAST 

Franklin Mtg. Co., Syracuse, N.Y. 

■Wentworth Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont 
CARRIERS 

Aleiander Fleck, Ltd.. OtUwa. 

Greenleafs. Ltd.. R«no»in» n-> 

ObenJorfer Brass Co.. .\1. L.. Syracuse. N.Y. 

St Lawrence Welding Co.. Montreal, Qne. 

Tallman Brass 4 Metal Co.. Hamilton. 

United Brass ft Lead Ltd., Totonto. 
CASTINGS. BRASS AND IRON 

Aleoma Steel Corp.. Sault Ste. Marie, OnU 
CASTINGS. BUILDING 

Katie Foundry, Gait Ont 
CASTINGS, GRAY IRON 

Bemanl Indnstrial Ca, The A., Fortlerrille. Que. 

Brown. Boggs Co.. Ltd.. Hamilton. Can. 

Alexander Fleck, Ltd.. Ottawa. 

Gardner 4 Son, Rol«.. Montreal. 

Greenleafs. Ltd.. Belleville. Ont 

Hnll Iron 4 Steel Foundries, Ltd., Hull, Que. 

International Malleable Iron Co., Qnelph. Ont 

Kennedy 4 Sons. Ltd.. Wm.. Owen Sound. 

Katie Foundry. Ltd.. Gait. Ont 

PlessisTille Foundry Co., Pleasisrflle, Qne. 

Sheldons. Limited. Oalt, Ont 

Fittinira. Ltd., Oshawa. Ont 

Hamilton Co.. Wm.. PeterhMO. 

Wtl-mn 4 Co. I. C. Bellefrae. Ont 
CASTINGS. PLUMBERS* 

Katie Foundry, Gait. Ont 
CASTINGS. NICHROME 

Can ririver-Harris Co.. Walkenrille. Can. 
CASTINHS. HARDWARE 

Katie Ponndty. Gait. Ont 
CASTINGS. STEEL CHROME AND 
MANGANESE STEEL 

Thoa. Daridson Mfg. Co., Montreal. On*. 

Dominion Foundries ft Steel. Ltd.. HamU'on, Ont 

Hun Iron ft Steel Foundries. Ltd.. Hnll. Que. 

KpnnedT 4 Sons. Ltd.. Owen Soond. 
CASTINGS. MALLEABLE 

Flttlnra. Ltd.. Oshawa. Ont 

International Malleable Irtm Co. Onelph. Ont 
CASTINGS. NnCKEL STEEL 

Hnn Iron ft .''teel Foundries, Ltd.. Hnll. Que. 
CEMENT MACHTNFRY 

Canadian FalrbanksAIoiw Co.. Ltd.. Montreal. 

Osrdn**r. Roht.. ft Son Montreal 
CEMENT HANDLING MACHINERY 

Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 
CPNTFRtNG MACHINES 

Vto-oria Fonndry Co.. Ottawa, Ont 
CENTRE REAMERS 

Bertram ft Rons Co.. John. Dundaa. 

Oarrtner. Rn^t. ft Son. MontreaL 

F"rthnrt. Rorem 'Mach. Co.. South Sndhurr. Maaa 

Nfles-Bement-Pmid Co.. New York. 

Pratt A WTiltoey Co.. DnndaB. Ont 

Welts Bros. Co. of Canada, Oalt, Ont 
CHAIN. ■WELDED COIL 

'Jfnrris Crane 4 Hoist Ca, Hertjert, Niagara 
Falli. Ont. 
CHAIN BLOCKS 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Canadian Falrtianks-Morse Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 

Ford Chain Block A Mfg. Co.. PhOadelphla. Pa. 

Garloek-Wallrer Maehy. Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Moms Crane 4 Hoist Co.. Herbert. Niagara 
Falls. Ont. 

P'™ T.ewi-i 4 Son Toronto. Ont 

Wniijna ft Wilson, Limited, jiooitreal, Qne. 

■Wrtirht Mfg. Co . Lisbon. Ohia 
CHAIN LINKS. DETACHABLE 

FitTinss. Ltd.. Oshawa. Ont 
CHAINS. FOR ELEVATORS AND 
CONVEYORS 

Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 

>ln™. Chain ''n.. Ithaca. N.Y. 

Williams 4 Wilson. Limited. Montreal, Que. 
CHAIN. MALLEABLE, DETACHABLE AND 
RIVETED 

Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 

,M„,,. fhain ''".- Ithaca. NY. 

Wmiams 4 Wilson, Limited. Montreal, Qne. 
CHAIN DRIVES 

Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Corentry Chain Co.. CoTentry, 'England. 

Jones ft Olasseo, Montreal. Que. 

Mor«e rTialn Co.. TCuaca, N.T. 
CHASERS 

National Acme Ca. Cleveland. Oblo. 

Taylo r. J. A. M.. SIS Stair BMg.. Toronto. Ont 
CHEMISTS 

■roroiKo Testing Ltfboratory. Ltd., Tortmto. 
CHROME VANADIUM STEEL 

J. V. A. Comstedt. New York Hty. N.Y. 

Oeneral **teel Co.. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Kayser-Ellison 4 Co.. Ltd.. Montreal. 

Norton. Ralph B.. Agent. Montreal. 
CHROME NICKEL STEEL 

J. P. A. Comstedt. New York Cltr, N.T. 

General Steel Co.. MHwankee, Wh. 

Kayser-Ellison ft Co., Ltd.. Mon'treal. 

Norton. Ralph B.. Agent. Montreal. 



CHUCKS. AERO, AUTOMATIC 

Oarrm Machine lo., Mew York. 
CHUCKS, COLLET, AIR 

Elliott & Whitehall Ma<^ & Tool Co., Gale, out 
Smaiiev-Generai Co., Inc., Bay CiU. Mich 
WQllams & Wilson, Limitoa, Montreal, Que. 

CHUCKS, DRILL, LATHE AND 
UNIVERSAL 

Aikenhead Haidwara Co,, Toroot*. Ont 

Almond Mfg. Co., T. R., Ashbumham, Maia 

Bertram & Sons Co., John. Dundaa. 

Can. Blower ft Forge Co.. Kitchener, Canada 

Canadian Fairbanks^oree Co., LLd.. Montreal 

Cushman Chuck Co.. Hartford, Conn. 

Foas Mchy. ft Supply Ca, The Oea P., Montrval 

Gardner, Robt, ft Son, Montreal. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Ca, Toronto. Onl 

Gisholt Machine Co., Madison. Wis, 

Hardinge Bros., Chicago, lU. 

Jacobs ilfg. Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Ker 4 Goodwin, Brantlord 

Knight Melal Products, Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 

Modem Tool Co., Erie, Pa. 

Rice, Lewis 4 Son, Tortmta, Ont 

Skinner Chuck Co., J^ew Britain. Conn. 

Whifon Machine Co., D E.. New London, ri-iin. 

Wflllains 4 Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 
CHUCKS. DRILL, AUTOMATIC AND 
KEYLESS 

Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Can. Blower 4 Forge Co., Kitchener. Canada 

Whitney Mfg. Co., Hartford, Conn. 
CHUCKS, FRICTION AND TAP 

Victor Tool Co., Waynesboro, Pa. 

Wells Bros. Co. of Canada, Gait, Ont 
CHUCKS. MAGNETIC 

Feald .Machine Co., Worcester. Masa. 

Williams & Wilson, Limited, Mciitr«al, Que- 
CHUCKS, RING WHEEL 

Ford-Smith Mach. Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 

Gardner Machine Co.. Beloit Wis. 
CHUCKS, WRENCH 

Thomas Elevator Co.. Chicago, 111. 
CHUCKING MACHINES 

Garvin Machine Co., New York. 

Gisholt Machine Cc, Madison, Wis. 

New Britain Machine Co.. New Britain, Conn. 

National Aome Co.. Windsor, Vt 

Niles-BementPond Co., New York. 

Roelofson Machine & Tool Co,. Toronto. <*in 

Warner 4 Swasey Co., Cleveland, O. 

W~vl Turret Mach Co.. Brazil. Ind.. U.S. A 

Wmiuns 4 Wilson, Llmiied. Montreal, Que. 
CIRCULATING SYSTEMS FOR LUBRICAT- 
ING OIL 

Bowser & Co., S, F.. Inc.. Fort Wa^e. Imi 

Williams 4 Co., J. H., Brooklyn, NY. 
CLEANING COMPOUND 

Oakley Chemical Co., New York. 
CLOCKS, WATCHMAN, PORTABLE 

Gisholt Machine Co., .Madison, Wis. 

Hardinge Bros., Inc., Chicago, 111, 
CLUTCHES. CHAIN 

Jones & Glassoo, Montreal, Que. 
CLUTCHES. FRICTION AND PULLEY 

Bernard Industrial Co., A.. Fortlerrille, Qne 

Can. Link-Belt Co., Toronto. Oi»t. 

Carlyle Johnson Mach. Co., Manchester, Conn 

Jones 4 Glassco., Montreal. Que. 

Pnoitive Clutch ft Pulley Work^, Ltd.. Toronto 

wmiams ft Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que, 
COAL HANDLING MACHINERY 

Can. Link-Belt Ca, Toronto. On:, 

Dominion Bridge Ca. Montreal, Que. 

Marsh Engineering Works. Ltd., Belleville, ''nl 

W.ictlovfm 4 Co., Montreal, Que. 

MacKinnon Steel Co., Sherbrooke. Que 

Morris Crane & Hoist Co., Heitert, Niagara 
Falls, Ont 

Northern Crane Works. L'd,. Walkerville. Ont 

Wbitine Foundry Eoui-ptnent Co., Harvey I!' 

wmiams ft Wilson. Limited, Montreal, Que 
COILING MACHINERY. WIRE AND 
SPRING 

Oarlook-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Oni 

Sleeper ft Hartley. Inc., Worcester, Mass 
COKE AND COAL 

Banna 4 Co.. M. A., Cleveland. O. 

Nova Scotia Steel ft Coal Co.. New Glascnw .\ ■- 
COKE AND COAL HANDLING EQUIPMENT 

Manitoba Bridge 4 Iron Wks., Ltd.. Wpg.. Tan 

COLLARS. SHAFTING 

Wilson & Co.. J. C, Belleville. Ont 

William.^ 4 Co,. J. H.. Rrooklvn, NY. 

Wnliams ft Wilson, ^.mited, Montraal, Que. 
COLLECTORS. PNEUMATIC 

Can. Blower 4 Foree Co.. Kitchener. Ont 

Sheldons. Limited. Gait. Ont 

J. C. Wilson 4 Co., Belleville. Ont 
COLLETS 

Becker Milling Machine Co., Boston. Ma.« 

Hardinge Bros., Inc., Chicago. 111. 

Wil'xin * Co.. J. C. Belleville. Ont 
COMPOSITION INGOT 

Brown's Copper ft Brass Rolling Mills. Now 
Toronto. 

Canada Metal Co., Torontc, Ont 

United Brass 4 I/ead Ltd.. Toronto, 
COMBINED OPEN SIDE PLANER-SHAPER 

LvTvl-Faronhar Co.. Boston, Mass. 
COMPRESSORS. AIR 

Can. IngersoU-Rand Co.. Shert>rooke. Qne, 

Cleveland Pneirmatic Ttiol Ca of Canada, Toronte 

Cnrtis Pneumatic ^fachv. Co.. St Louis, Mo 

Gartock-Walker Machiinepv Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Hinckley Machine Co.. Hinckley. III. 

i>fo/.Oovern 4 Co.. Montreal. One. 

wnitanM ft Wilson. Limited, Montreal. Qne. 
CONDENSERS 

MacOovem 4 Co.. Montreal, Qne. 

Smalley-General Co.. Inc.. Bay City. Mlek. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



151 



Only a Drawing-in 
Bolt Required to Hold 
Arbors and Collets 

Clutch on arbor or collet fits recess in spindle and drawing- 
in bolt securely holds arbor or collet in place. This con- 
struction does away with plates, screws and loose parts; 
and as illustration shows 

No Drive Could be More Positive 



The spindles of Brown & 
Sharpe Milling Ma'chines are 
but one of the many features 
of these easy-to-operate, pro- 
ductive machines. Let us 
tell you about them in detail. 
See for yourself why they 
are so well equipped to stand 
the steady drive of your busy 
shop. 



All Brown & Sharpe 
arbors have a shank 
as large in diameter 
as the largest stand- 
ard arbor of the same 
taper. 



Nose of 
Spindle 
Free 
From 
Project- 
ing 
Parts 





Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co. 

PROVIDENCE, R.L, U.S.A. 

Canadian Representatives ; 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Ltd., Toronto. Montreal. 

Winnipeg. Calgary, Vancouver, St. John, Saskatoon. 



BROWN & SHARPE MILLING MACHINES 




Mild Steel, High Carbon Steel, Manganese Steel, Chrome Steel 

We are manufacturers of Steel Castings running from yi lb. to 5,000 lbs. 
each and are in good position to furnish prompt deliveries at moderate 
prices. Try us with your next order. 

The Wm. Kennedy & Sons, Limited, Owen Sound 

ESTABLISHED ISSO 



152 



C A N A D I A N MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



CONNECTING KODS 
Canada Pound's & For^nga. Ltd.. Welland, Ont 

CONSULTING. CONTRACTING AND GEN- 
ERAL ENGINEERING & MACHINE WORK 

.Manitoba Bridge & Iron Wks., Ltd., Wpg.. Can. 
CONTRACT WORK 

Banfield. W. H.. & Sons. Toron o. 

Brown Engineering Corp.. Toronto. 

Ford-Smith Machine Co.. Hamilton. Ont. 

Homer & WUson. Hamilton. Ont. 

Katie Poundrj, Ltd., Oalt. Ont. 

Marten .Machme Co.. Hamilton. Cat. 

St. La^n-ence Weltiing Co.. Montreal. 

Victoria Foundry Co., Ottawa- 
Wilson & Co., J. C, Belleville. Ont 

Welland -Motor & Machine Co.. Welland. Onl. 

Windsor Mach. Tool Co.. Windsor, Ont. 
CONTROLLERS. MAGNETIC BRAKES. 
ELEC. WINCHES. MONO RAIL HOISTS 

Volta MIS. Co.. Welland. Ont. 
CONTROLLERS AND STARTERS 

waiiams aiachy. Co., A. R., Toronto. 
CONTROLLING INSTRUMENTS 

Tasior Instrament Co.. Rochester. X.'i. 
CONVERTERS. ROTARY 

MacOnvom & Co.. .Montreal. Que. 
CONVEYORS. BELT AND CHAIN 

Can. Link Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont. 

Jones .t Glassco. Montreal. 
COPING MACHINES 

Bertram & Sons Co.. John. Dundas. Ont 

Garlork -Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Can Blower & Forge Co., Kichener. Ont 
COPPER. BUS BAR. SHEET. PLATES. RODS 

Brown's Copper & Brass RoUing Mills. New 
Toronto, Ont 
COUNTERBORES AND COUNTERSINKS 

Aikenbead Hardware Co., Toronto. Ont 

ClevelaJid Twi.'rt Drill Co.. Cleveland. 

Morse Twist Drill & Mch. Co., New Bedford. Mut 

Pratt & WhitjjeT Co., Dundaa. Ont 

Rice. Lewis & Son, Toronto. Ont 
COUNTERSHAFTS 

Almond Mfg. Co.. T. R., Ashburoham. M«««. 

Bainl Machine Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

F«id-Smith Machine Co.. Hamilton, Ont 

Fo-ster .Marhinp f^o.. Elkhart. Tnd. 

wmiams & Wilson, Limited, Mon.trcal, Que. 
COUPLINGS, FRICTION 

BemaiKl lndus:Tial Co., The A., Fortierrille, Que. 

r„n Link-Belt (^o.. Toronto. Ont 

Williams & WUson, Limited. Monto-eal. Que 
COUPLINGS. PLAIN. FLEXIBLE AND CUT 

OFF 

Clevelmd Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto 
Ganincr. Robt. & Son. Montreal. 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co.. Chicago, in 
Wilson & Co,, J. C. Belleyflle, Ont 
CRANES. LOCOMOTIVE 
Can. Link- Belt Co.. Toronto. Out 
Sorthem Crane Works. Walkemlle. 

CUPS. OIL 

Can. Winkley Co.. Ltd., Windsor, Ont. 

COVERS. OIL HOLE 

Can. Winkley Co.. Ltd., Windsor, Ont. 
CRANES. GANTRY 
Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Morris Crane ft Hoist Co., Hertert. Niagara 

Falls. Ont. ,^ .„ 

Northern Crane Works, \^ alBemlle. 

CRANE RUNWAYS 

.MacKinnon Steel Co.. Sherbrooke. Quebec. 

CRANES. GOLIATH. PNEUMATIC AND 
PORTABLE 

.Morrli Crane * Hoist Co., Heitiert, Niagara 
Falls. Out. 

Vo..*bern r^-tne Work^. Wnlkerville. 

Wil«An & Co. J. C. Belleville. Out 

WflBams & WDson, Limited. -Montreal, Que. 
CRANES. TRAVELLING. ELECTRIC AND 
HAND POWER 

Anderson A- r^. of Canada. Geo.. Montreal, Que. 

Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto, Out 

Curtis Pneumatic Machy, Co.. S:. Louis, Wo, 

Dominion Bridge Co.. Montreal. 

Hepburn. .lohn T.. Ltd.. Toronto. Ont 

.MacKinnon Steel Co.. Sherbrooke. Quebec. 

Mnuitnbs Bridge & Iron Wks., Ltd,, Wpg,, Can 

Morris Crane ft Hoist Co,, Herbert, Niagara 
Falls. Ont 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York 

Northern rmne Works. Walkerrille. 

CRANK SHAFTS 

Canada Found's & Forgines, Ltd,, Welland, Ont. 
Williams & Co.. J H., Brooklyn. N.T. 

CRANES. PORTABLE 

Aikenbead Hard-war* Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Can Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont, 

Morris Crane ft Hotst Co., Heitert. Niagara 
Falls. Ont. 

Northern Cpnne Works. Walkprville. 

Rice. T.ewi« gf Sf>n. Tor<into Ont- 

.1. r wn»on .<- Co.. BeTlerlTle. Ont. 

Williama ft wn.<5ofl. Limited, Montreal, Que. 
CRIMPS. LFATHER 

Graton & Kiiirht Mfg. Co., Worcester. Maaa. 
CRUSHED STEEL 

Pifsbiircb Cnished Steel Co,, Pittsburgh, Pa 

CUPOLAS 

Can. Blower ft Forge Co.. Kitchener. Ont 

Northern Crane Work5. Walkerrille. 

Sheldons, Ltd.. Gait. Ont 
CUPOLA BLAST GAUGES AND BLOWERS 

Sheldon^ T.'d , Gait. Ont 
CCBB PUMPS FOR OIL AND GASOLINE 

BowBer ft Oo., S. F.. Inc.. Fort Wayne, Ind. 



Cl'RRENT TRANSFORMERS 

Electric Steel & Metals, Ltd,, Welland, Ont 

CUT-OFF COUPLINGS. FRICTION 

J. r Wilson & Co.. Belleville. Ont 
Williams & v. Json, Limited. Montn-eal, Que. 

CUTTERS. BOLT 
Greenfield Tap ft Die Corp., Greenfield, Mass. 
Wells Bros, of Can., GaJt Ont 
Williams & WUson, Limited, .Monfci-eal. Que. 

CUTTERS, FLUE 

Cleveland Pneuma ic Tool Oo. of Canada. Torooli- 

CUTTERS, PIPE (SEE PIPE CUTTERS) 
CUTTERS. MILLING 

Becker .MUling Machine Co.. Boston. Mass 

Boker & Co.. Inc.. H.. Montreal, Que. 

P,utterfleld & Co., Bock Island. Que. 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Ltd.. .Montreal. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland. 

Davidson Tool Mfg. Co., New York, NY. 

Elliott & Whitehall .Mach. ft Tool Co., Gait. Ont. 

Fosa .Mchy. ft Supply Co.. The Geo. F., .Mimtre*!. 

(JaiTin .Machine Co., New York. 

Illinois Tool Works. Chicago. III. 

.Morse Twist Drill ft Machine Co. New Bedford. 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dundas, Ont 

Rice, Lewis & Son, Toronto Ont 

Tabor .Mfg. Co. Philadelphia. Pa. 

Whitney (Mfg. Co., Hartford. Conn. 
CUTTING-OFF MACHINES 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago. 

Bertram ft Sons Co.. John, Dundas. 

Canadian Falrbanks^Moiae Co.. Ltd., Montreal. 

Cnitis & Curtis Co., Bridgeport. Conn. 

Foss .Mchy. ft Supply Co.. The Geo. F., Montreal. 

Oarlock-Walkei ilachinery Co., Toronto, Ont 

Garvin Machine Co., New York. 

Greenfield Tap ft Die Corp., Greenfield, Mass. 

Hurlburt. Rogers .Machy t-o.. South Sudbury, .Mass 

Hall ft Sons. John H.. Brantford. Ont 

Kennedy ft Sons. Wm. , Owen Sound, Ont. 

NUes-Bement-Pond Co., New York, N.T. 

Peerless Machine Co.. Racine, Wis. 

Prest-O-T^lte Co.. Inc.. Toron'-o. Ont 

Racine Tool ft .Machine Co.. Racine. WLs. 

Standard Mchy & Suryplles. Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

Tabor Mfg. Co. Philadelphia. Pa. 

Wc'Is Bnvs. of Can.. Gait. Ont 

Williams ft Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 
CUTTING COMPOUND AND CUTTING OIL 

Cataract Refining Co., Ltd.. Toronto. 

Elm Cutting Oil Co.. Toronto. 

On'ario Lubricating Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

CITTTINC, OIL. RECLAIMING SYSTEM 

Bowser ft Co.. S. F.. Inc.. Fort Wa\-ne. Ind. 
CUTTING AND WELDING PLANTS 

Prest-O-Lite Co.. Inc.. Toronto. Ont. 
CYANIDE AND LEAD BATH POTS 

Swedish Crucible Steel Co., Windsor, Ont 
CYLINDERS. AIR 
Ford-Smith Machine Co,, Hamilton, Ont. 
Smaller General Co.. Inc. Bay City, Mich. 

CYLINDERS. AUTOMATIC REBORING JIGS 
AND REAMERS 

Hincklev Mschine Co Hinckley. 111. 
Kelley Reamer Co.. Cleveland. O. 
DEEP DRAWING DIE STEEL 

J. F. A. Comstedt, New York City, NY. 
DERRICKS 
.Aikenbead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont 
Dominion Bridge Co. Montreal. 
Morris Crane ft Hoist Co.. Herbert. Niagara 
Falls, On^ 

DIAMOND TOOLS 

.\nderson ft Co. of Can., Geo.. Montreal. Que. 

rnrd-Smith Machine Co.. Hamilton, Out. 

Jovce-Koebel Co.. Inc. New York City. 

Wheel Tnifing Tool Co.. Win*lsor, Onl. 

Wbeol Tnieine Tool Co. Oetroit, 

WUliaJns ft Wil.<aon. Limited, Montreal. Que- 
DIAMONDS, CARBON & BORTZ 

Wheel Tnieing Tool Co.. Detroit 
DIAMONDS. BLACK AND ROl'GH 

Jnvce. Koe1>el ft Co.. Inc. New York. 

Wheel Tnieing Tool Ca, Windsor. Ont 

DIE BLOCKS 

General Steel Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
DIE HEADS. AUTOMATIC 

Greenfield Tap ft Die Corp.. Greenfield, Mass, 

Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont. 

Williams & WU.«on. Limited. Montreal. Oue. 
DTFS, BRASS PRINTING, EMBOSSING 
AND LETTERING 

Matthews. Jns. H, ft Co.. Pltfshurrb. Pa. 

ptttshurrh Steel Staitm Co.. PittAurgh. Pa. 
DIES FOR BIT BRACE I'SE 

Biitterfield ft Co.. Roek Island. Que. 

A. B. Jardine A Co.. Ltd. HeopHer. Ont 

Wells Brothers Co. of Canada. Gatt. Ont. 
DIES AND DTE STOCKS 

Aikenhead Hanlware Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Banfleld. W. H.. ft Son Toronto 

Boker ft Co.. Inc.. H . Montreal. Qne. 

Biitterfield ft Co.. Rock Island. Que. 

Brown. BoGgs Co.. TTamllton. Ont. 

Canadian Faii^anks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

The Geo. F Frvw Mcbv ft tJiirmlv Co., .Montreal. 

Gardner. ROht. ft Ron. Montreal. 

A. B. Jardine ft Co.. TTpfltieleT. Ont 

Landis Marfelne Co.. WftyTw*«boTo. Pa. 

Modem Tool Co.. F.rte, Pa- 
Morse Twint Drill ft Mch- Co.. New Bedford, Mass. 

\.!itionnl Ae-TTip Co., Cleveland. Ohio. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont. 

Fire T,ewl« ft Son. Toronto, Ont. 

RicVerf.Shflfer Co., Krie. Pa. 

Rtundard MnchT. ft- SiTTmHeo. Ltd.. Montreal 

BI0II Co.. loc. P H , B-ffalo. N,Y, 

Tr-iic T>T.o*here nr ri,«.».l» OrI* Ont. 

Wnilams ft Wilson, Limited, Montreal. Que. 



DIES. PIPE THREADING 

A. B. Jardine ft Co., Ltd.. Heapeler. Ont 

Butterfleld & Co., Bock Island, Que. 

Landis Machine Co.. Waynesboro. Pa. 

WUliams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal. Que. 
DIES. THREADING 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp,, Gi-eenfield, Mass. 

Wells Bros, of Can., Gait, Ont. 
DIE SINKERS 

Becker Milling Machine Co., Boston. Mass. 

Ganrtr. Machine Co., New York. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Dundaa. Ont 
DIES. BOLT. PIPE 

Greenlield Tap ft Die Corp., Gr&enfield, Mass. 

Wells Bros, of Can., Gait, Ont 
DIES FOR MACHINES 

Aikenhead Hardware CX).. Toronto. Ont. 

Buttertield & Co., Rock Island, Que. 

Firth ft Sons, Thos., Montreal, Que. 

Landis iiachine Co.. Waynesboro, Pa. 

Wells Brothera Co. of Canada. Gait, Ont. 

DIE HE.\DS 

Greenfield Tap ft Die Coi-p., Greenfield. Mass. 

Wells Bros, of Can., Gait. Ont 
DIES, SELF-OPENING 

tJeometric Tool C^., New Haven. 

Landis .Machine Co., Waynearboro, Pa. 

.Modem Tool Co., Erie. Pa. 

.Murchey Machine ft: Tool Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Veils Brothers Co. of Canada, Gait. Ont 

Williams & Wilson. Limited, Mantre.ll. Que. 
OIE JL0CK3. HEAVY FORGED 

Hammon.l St»el Co., Inc., Syracuse, N.Y. 
DIE FORCINGS 

Hammond Steel Co., Inc., Syracuse, N.Y. 
DIE STEEL. HOT AND COLD WORK 

Armstrong. Whitworth of Canada, Montreal, Que. 

Firth ft .'Sons, Thofi. , Montreal. Que. 

Kayser- Ellison ft Co., Ltd., Mootieal. 

Norton, itilph B. , Agent, Montreal. 
DIES FOR SCREW PLATES 

Wells Brothers Co. of Canada, Oalt, Onl. 
DIES, SHEET METAL WORKING 

E. W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Brown, Boggs ft Co.. Hamilton. Canada. 

Illinois Tool Works, Chicago, 111. 

Marten Machine Co.. HamUlon. Ont 

Nonnac Machine Co., St Cathailnea, Ont 

Stoll Co., U. U., Buffalo, N.V. 

Windsor Mach. ft Tool Co.. W.udsor, Ont 

Worth Engineering Co.. Toronto, Ont 
DIES. SCREW AND THREAD 

Butterfleld ft Co., Rock Island, Que. 

A. B. Jardine & Co., Ltd., Hesiieler, Ont 

Landis Machine Co.. Waynesboro. Pa. 

Modem Tool Co., Erie, Pa. 

Murchey Machine & Tool Co., Detroit. Midi. 

National-Acme Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

I'ratt ft Whitney Co.. Dundas, Ont, 

Wells Brothers Co. of Canada, Oalt, Ont 
DISCS. LEATHER. STEEL 

Graton ft Knight Mfg. Co., Worcester, Maaa, 

Swedish Steel ft Importing Co,, Ltd., Montreal. 
DIRECT CONNECTED UNITS 

.MacGovern ft Co.. .Montreal. Que. 
DRAFT. MECHANICAL 

W. H. Banfield ft Sons, Toronto. 

Butterfleld ft Co.. Rock Island. Que. 

Can. Blower & Forge Co., Kitchener, Ont 

A. B. Jardine ft Co.. Hespeler, Ont 

Piatt ft VSTiitney Co., Dundas, Ont 

Sheliions. Ltd.. Oalt Ont 
DRESSERS. GRINDING AND EMERY 
WHEEL 

Baiter ft Co., Ltd., J. R . Montreal, Que. 

Can. Deemond-Sleuhao Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Ford-Smith Mach Co.. Hamilton, Ont 

Wheel Tnreing Tool Co.. Windsor, Ont 

WUliams ft Wilson. Lrmited. Montreal. Que- 
DRILL PRESStS 

Aurora Tool Works, Aurora. Ind. 

W F. ft John Bamee Co., Rockfoid. 

Can. Blower ft Fonje Co., Kitchener, Ont 

Canada Machinery Corp, Gait, Ont 

The Gee F Foss Mchy, ft Supply Co., Montreal 

Oarlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont 

Oarrin Machine Co., New York 

A B. Jardine ft Co., Ltd.. Heopeler, Ont 

Nlles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

United Slates Mach. Tool Co., Cincinnati. 0. 

A R Williams Machinery Co., Torontoi. 

Williams ft Wilson. Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
DRILL RODS 

Kayser-Ellison ft Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 

Norton. Ralph B., Agent, Montreal, 

Sweiiish Steel ft- ImiKutine '•• Ltd., Montreal. 
DRILLING MACHINES. GANG 

Fames, W. F, ft John, Co.. Rockford, 111. 

Bilton Mach. Tool Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait Ont 

qoror Mfg. Co.. Salem. Ohio. 

Williamn ft >i ilst>n. Limited. Mcmtreal. Que. 
DRILLING MACHINES. LOCOMOTIVE AND 
MULTIPLE SPINDLE 

John Bertram ft Sons Co.. Oimdas. 

Bilton Mach. Tool Ca. Bridgenort, Conn. 

Can. Blower ft Forge Co., Kitchener, Ont 

Canada Machii-ery Corp.. Oalt Ont 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreu. 

The Geo. F. Fwn Mchv. ft Snr>nly Co., Montreal 

For Machine Co.. Jackoon. Mich. 

Gariock-Walker Machinery Co. Toronto. Ont 

Garvin Machine Co.. New York. 

Hrnrv ft Wright Mfg. Co.. Hartford, Conn. 

\ Tl Jsivline ft Co.. He«oeler. Ont 

T,andis Tool Co., Wavneftboro. Pa. 

Vstionsl-Acme r*o.. neveland Ohio. 

Niles-Bnnent-Pond Co.. New York. 

Rockfoid Drilling Mach Co., Bockford, IB. 
DRIIMNG MACHTNFR 
RADIAL AND TURRFTT 

John Bertram 4 Sons Co.. Dimda*. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



153 



That's Just ]ike 

THE 




1 WlO I JJIvIIjIj V_vA NEWVORKCHICA.GO 



'f^'.' 



Ag^nta for Europe 
CLEVELAND TWIST DRILL CO.. ; GREAT BRITAIN) Ud 
3a- a: Upper Thames St.. London E.C. 4. 




154 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



Canadian Fairbanks-Mone Co., Montreal. 
Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, Onl, 
Garlook-Walber Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont 
Henry & Wright Mfg. Co., Hartford, Conn. 
I.andis Tool Co., Waynesboro, Pa. 
.Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New Yort. 
Reed-Prentice Co., Worcester. Mass. 
Williams & Wilson, Limited, .Montreal, Que. 

DRILLING MACHINES, SENSITIVE 

Bilton Mach. Tool Co., Bride«?port, Conn. 

W. F. & John Bame» Co., RocWord, 111. 

Canadian FairbanisHMorse Co., Montreal. 

Canada Machinery Corp., Qalt, Ont. 

The Geo. F. Foas Mchy. & Supply Co., Montreal. 

Oarlock- Walter Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Henry & Wnght Mfg. Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Landls Tool Co., Waynesboro, Pa. 

LI McKenzie .Machinery Co., Quelph, OnL 

.SUes-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dundaa, OnU 

United States Mach. Tool Co., ClncinnaU, Ohio 

Waiiams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 
DRILLING MACHINES, UPRIGHT AND 
HORIZONTAL 

Aurora Tool Works, Aurora, Ind. 

John Bertram & Sons Co., Dundas. 

Garlock-Walker Machmeiy '^r-^""^^'}:? 

can. Blower & Foree Co., Kitchener Ont. 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont. 

Koixl-Smith Machine Co., Hamilton, Ont, 

Olddings & Lewis Mfg. Co., Fond du Lac, Wla. 

tnS (London), Ltd., London, England. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Ont. 

i B. Jardine & Co., Hespeler, Ont. 

Landis Tool Co., Waynesboro, Pa. 

R. MoDoiigall Co., Gait. 

Reed-Prenuoe Co., Worcrater, Mass. 

Niles-Banent-Pond Co New |ork. 

Rockford Drilling Mach. Co., Bockford, lU. 

Silver Mfg. Co., Salem, Ohio. 

t R Williams Machinery Co., Toronto. 

Williams & Wilson. Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
DRILLING MACHINES. VERTICAL 

GiddingB & Lewis Mfg, Co.. Fond du Lac. Wu 
DRILLING MACHINES. WALL RADIAL 
Lvud-FarQuhar Co.. Boston, Mass. 
Wickes Bros., Saginaw. Mich. 
DRILLING POSTS „ „ , . , 

Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto. Ont. 

Keystone Mfg. Co.. Buffalo. N.X. 

Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto^ Onl. 

surer Mfg. Co.. Salem, OMo. 
DRILLS. BENCH „ ^ , n^, 

Aikenhead Hardware Co ToronU) Ont. 

W F & John Barnes Co., Rockfoid, lU. 

Can. Blower & Forge Co. , Kitchener, Ont. 

Canadian Faii<bank»-Morse Co., Montreal 

The Geo. F. Foss Mchy. & Supply Co.. Montreal 

Fry's (London). Ltd., London, England. 

Garlock-Walker Machines Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont. 

Rice Lewis & Son. Toronto, Ont. . 

rnited States Electrical Tool Co.. Cincinnati. 

WiiSns & Wilson, Limited. Montreal, Que. 

DRILLS, CENTRE 

Aikenhead Hardware Co, Toronto, Ont. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland. 

Mor^^ist Drill & Mch. Co., New Bedford. Mass 

Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto, Ont. 

Wilt Twist DriU Co. of Canada. Walkervllle. Onl 

wmiams & Wilson. Ltd.. Montreal, Que. 
EARTH HANDLING EQUIPMENT 

Maoitoba Bridge & Iron Wks., Ltd., Wpg., Can 
EFFICIENCY ENGINEERING SERVICE 

Anderson's Efficiency Service. Toronto. Ont. 
ELECTRIC FURNACES 

Electric Steel & Metals, Ltd., Welland, Ont. 

General Steel Co.. Milwaukee. Wis. 
ELEVATOR ENCLOSURES 

Volta Mfg. Co., Welland, Out. 

Canada Wire & Iron Goods Co., HamUton, Ont. 
DRILLS. BLACKSMITH AND BIT STOCK 

Aikenhead Haidware Co.. 'Toronto. Ont 

Can. Blower & Forge Co.. Kitchener Ont 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co.. Cleveland. 

The Geo. F. Foss Mchy. & Supply Co.. Montreal 

A. B. Jardine & Co.. Hespeler. Ont. 

Morse Twist Drill & Mch. Co.. New Bedford. Mass 

Rice Lewis & Son. Toronto, Ont 

Wilkinson & Kompass, JS"»9'°'\iT ,S _iii. n„, 

Wilt Twist DrUl Co. of Canada. Walkerville. Ont 

DRILLS. ELECTRIC AND PORTABLE 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont. 
Can. Blower & Forge Co.. Kitchener. Ont 
Boker & Co.. Inc. H.. Montreal. Que. 
Cincinnati Electrical Tool Co.. Clnclnnatt. Ohio 
The Geo. P. Foss Mchy. & Supply Co.. Montreal 
Garlook-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 
Independent [hiemnatlc Tool Co.. Chicago. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 
Preet-O-Lite Co.. Inc.. Toronto. Ont _ 
nnited States Electrical Tool Co.. Cincinnati. 
A R. Williams Madiinery Co.. Toronto. 
Wilkinson & Konvpass. Hamilton. Ont 
wnUams & Wil.son. Limited. Montreal, Que. 

DRILLS. EMERT ^. 

Gariock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 

DRILLS. HIGH SPEED TOOL ROOM 

.Mbanv Harxiware Spec. Co.. Albany. Wis. 
nRILLS, HIGH SPEED T'WIST 
Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto. Ont 
Armstrong. Whitworth of Canada. Montreal, Que 
Atkins & Co.. Wm.. Sheffield. Eng. 
Butterfleld & Co.. Rock Island. Que. 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co.. Cleveland. 
Canadian Fairbanks-Moise Co.. Montreal. 
H. A. Drury Co.. Montreal. 

The CJeo. F. Foss Mchy. & Supply Co., Montreal 
MoKenna Brothers. Plttdbunth, Pa. 
Marshall & Co.. Geo.. Toronto. Ont. 
Mnrse Twist Drill * Mch. Co., New Bedford. Mam 
W. P. & J#»hn Barnes Co.. Rockford. HI. 
V-rtKt Machine Co.. Qllt, Ont 



Plewes. Ltd.. Winniipeg. Man. 
Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont 
Rice Lewis & Son. Toronto, Ont 
StandajTl Machy. & Supplies. Ltd.. Montreal. Que. 
Tavlor, J. A. .\I., Stair Bldg.. Toronto. 
Whitman & Barnes .Mfg. Co., St, Catharines, Ont. 
Wilt Tivist Drill Co of Canada, Walkervllle, Ont 
Wi1l<in^on & Kompass, Hamilton, Ont 
Williams & WUson. Limited, Montreal, Que. 

DRILLS. OIL TUBE 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co.. Cleveland. 
Mnise Twist Drill & Mch. Co.. New Bedford. Mass. 
Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto. Ont. 

DRILLS. PNEUMATIC 
Can. Ingersoll-Rand Co.. Montreal. Que. 
Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co.. Chicago, 111. 
Viioa-RpitiPntPnnd Co- New York. 
Williams & Wil.son, Limited. Montreal, Que. 

DRILLS. PNEUMATIC CORNER 
Can. IngersolI-Rand Co.. Montreal. Que. 
Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto 
Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co.. Chicago. HI. 

DRILLS. RATCHET AND HAND 
.\ikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont 
.Vi-mstrong Bros. Tool Co.. Chicago. 111. 
Can. Blower & Foige Co.. Kitchener. Ont 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 
Cincinnati Electrical Tool Co., Cincinnati, OMo. 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland. 
Gariock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 
A. B. Jardine & Co.. Hespeler. Ont 
Morse Twist Drill & Mch. Co.. New Bedford. Mass. 
Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dimdas. Ont 
Rice Lewis & Son. Toronto. Ont 
Wilt Twist Drill Co. of Canada, Walkervllle, Ont 

DRILLS, ROCK 

Can. Ingersoll-Rand Co., Montreal, Que. 
Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada, Toronto. 
The Geo. F. Foes Mchy. & Supply Co.. Montreal. 
A. R. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 
DRILLS. TRACK 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co.. Cleveland. 
The Geo. F. Foss Mchy. & Supply Co.. Montreal. 
Morse Twist Drill * Mch. Co., New Bedford. Mass. 
wnt Twist Drill Co. of Canada. Walkervllle. Ont. 
rnited Brass & Lead, Ltd., Toronto. 

DRIVES. CHAIN 

Can. Link-Belt O.. Toronto, Ont 
Coventry Chain Co. 
Jones & Glaseco. Montreal. 
Morse Chain Co.. Ithaca. N.T. 
DRY CLEANING SYSTEM 
Bowser & Co.. 8. F.. Inc. Fort Waj-ne, Ind. 
' ORYFRS. SAND 

Pan^bora Corporation. Hageratown. Md. 

■ DRYING APPLIANCES 

Baird Machine Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 
I Sheldons. Ltd.. Oalt. Ont 

DRUM CONTROLS 

Electric Steel & MeUIs, Ltd., Welland, Ont 
DUMP CARS 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 

MnrKlnnon Steel Co., Shertjrooke, Que. 
DUST EXHAUSTFR. ARR^-STfR 'SYSTEM 

Psnebom Corporation. Haeerstown. Md. 
DUST HANDIING EQUIPMENT 

Psne-bom Corporation. Hagerstown. Md. 
DUST SEPARATORS 

Can Blower & Forge Co., Kitchener, Ont 

<:>,«l*m« Ltd. Oalt. Ont. 
DYNAMOS ANT) ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

Cansdlan Falrhanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Lancashire I>vnamo & Motor Co.. lAA.. Toronto. 

Pratt & Whitoev Co.. Dundas. Ont 

M«c<5oTem ft Co.. Montreal. Que. 

atsndanl Mar^v. ft Supplies. Ltd.. Montreal. Que. 
\ R wnilBvnn Martiv. Co.. Toronto. 
EI EVATOR M »rnrvFPY 

>T.>T,I»M*» tt rl^<r.. /Ir Tr«n Wks.. Ltd., Wpg., Can. 
EI EVATOR WETCHTS 

Katie Potmdry, Gait, Ont- 
EI FVATORS AND BUCKETS 

Can Wnk-Belt Co.. Toronto, Ont 

p..-*Ib PT>oiiTnoH(» Msohv Co.. St. Louis. Mo. 

Williunfl ft wn«rm. Llmit*^. Mmifrreal. Que. 
EiEVaTTvr; AND CONVEYING 
MArHINEWT 

Can Tylnk-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 

r^on Ma»Hii»w^ Grarltv Carrier Co.. Toronto. Ont. 

\fAi-ri« rv«Tip ft Hoist Co., Herbert, Niagara 
F.n. Ont 

WnH«m« ft Wtl^arm. LiTnit*-1. Mont-o^l. Que. 
KWVvy OPrVWEUa fPNEITMATIO 

npr.>l«n/1 PtionmsHe Tool f^n of Cannda. Toronto 

17„...» o-^\th ^f«r^^"* rn vrvmtUrtTi Ont. 
EMERY AND FMERY WHEET.a 

p.,.rfB* fr fn.. Ltd .T. R.. Montreal. One. 

BrantfoH BmeiT Wheel Co.. Brantford. Canada. 

Fnso MriiT * <1itpt%1v Co.. The Geo. P., Montreal. 

Onrvin M«**lTie Oo New York. 

Cnnndlaii Falrhnntr^Mor«e Co.. Montreal. 

Cnnadfl Finiprv Wheel* Co.. TTamllton. Ont 

FnM-SniO^ Mneh Co TTflTnilton. Ont 

RVe T,ewlp A- Son, Toronto. Ont. 

StflndaH Mafhv. ft Supnlle*. Ltd., Montj-eal. Que. 

T»-:'i-!„crtn * iTnmnflws VTnTnltton Ont 

Williams & WiLioo. Limited. Montreal. Que. 

EPWfRY WWEEI DRESSINGS 

wn>«el TrupHie Tool <V. . Wlnd«oT. Ont 
ENC.rWES. STEAM. GAS. GASOLINE 

Cnnadinn FaiT^anW-Morse Co.. Montreal. 
Gnttn Perrba ft RubWr. T,td.. Tornnto. Can. 
Tnhrtcon Mac'h. Co.. Carlvle. Manchester. Conn. 

>f««n,^.-^-n H- fn \fft«troal 0>'e 

ENGINES. HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL 

,T«>i">.'xTi Mfx^b Co Cartvle, Manchester. Conn. 
SheVons Ltd.. Oalt. O-t. 
\ R WltHfltia Martiv. t'n. . Tnrnmto. 
TI-.1.U-,, j(. iT-!i,„„ r.td.. Montreal. Que. 
ENf^lV"^. M 4 WINE 
Can. Ingersoll-Rand Co., Ijtd., Sherbrooke, Que. 



ENGINE SHAFTS 

Hammond Steel Co.. Inc.. Syracuse. N.T. 
ENGRAVERS 

Pritchard-Andrews Co.. Ottawa. 
ESCUTCHEON PINS 

Paimenter & Bulloch Co.. Gananoque. Ont 
ETCHING MACHINES 

Brewster Co. .Wm.. New York. N.Y. 
EXHAUST HEADS AND HOODS 

Can. Blower & Forge Co., Kitchener, Ont 

Canadian Fairbanks-tMorse Co., iMontreol. 

Sheldons, Ltd., Gait, Ont 
EXHAUSTERS 

Can, Blower & Forge Co., Kitchener, Ont 

Pangbom Corporation, Hagerstown, Md. 

Sheldons. Ltd.. Gait, Ont. 

WOliams & W^ilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 

EXTRUSION DIE STEEL 

J. F. A. Comstedt, New York City, N.T. 
EXTRACTORS, TAP 

Walton Co., The. Hartford, Conn. 
EXTRA TOOL STEEL 

J. F. A. Comstedt, New York City, N.T. 
EYE BOLTS AND NUTS 
Can. Foundries & Forgings. Ltd., Welland, Ont 
United Brass & Lead, Ltd., Toronto. 

FACTORY GATES 

Page Steel ft Wire Co., Adrian, Mich. 
FANS 

Balrd .Machine Co.. Bridgeport, Conn. 

Can. Blower ft Forge Co.. Kitchener,. Ont 

Sheldons. Ltd.. Gait. Ont 
FENCING. WIRE 

Page Steel & Wire Co.. New York. N.I. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited!, MontJreal, Que. 

FENCE. IRON AND FACTORY 

Canada W'ire & Iron Goods Co., Hamilton. Ont 
Page Steel & Wire Co., Adrian. Mich. 
FRRRO-TUNGSTEN 
Vanadium-Alloys Steel Co.. Pittaburgh. Pa. 

FILES 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Atkdna & Co.. Wm.. Sheffield. Eng. 

Delta FUe Works. Philadelphia. Pa. 

IngersoU File Co.. Ltd.. Ingersoll. Ont 

Marshall & Co.. Geo.. Toronto. Ont 

-Vicholson File Co.. Port Hope. Ont 

Rice Lewis & Son. Toronto. Ont 

Simonds Mfg. Co.. Fitohburg, Mass. 

Standard -Machy. & Supplies. Ltd.. Montreal, Que. 

WHkinson & Kompass. Hamilton, Ont 

FILLING STATION EQUIPMENT 
Bowser & Co., S. F.. Inc.. Fort Waj-ne, Ind. 

FILTERING AND CIRCULATING SYSTEMS 

FOR LUBRICATING OIL 
Bowser & Co., S, F.. Inc., Fort Waj-ne. Ind 
Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Co., Hamilton, Ont 

FIRST AID CABINETS 
Strong, Kennard & Nutt Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

FIRE BP.ICKS 
Harbison-Walker Retactories Co. of Gaaada, Mont- 
real, Que. 
FITTINGS. MALLEABLE AND CAST IRON 

Fittings. Ltd.. Oshawa. Oat 

FIXTURES ^ 

Brown Engineering Corp.. Toronto. Ont 
Crescent Machine Co., Ltd.. .MontreiL 
Elliott & Whitehall Mach. & Tool Co.. Oalt. Ont. 
niinois Tool Works. Chicago. Ul. 
Marten Machine Co.. HamUton. Ontario, 
Toronto Tool Co.. Toronto. Ont 

FLEXIBLE SHAFT COILING MACHINERY 
Sleeper ft Hartley. Inc.. Woreeeter. Utm. 

FLANGING CLAMPS 
Wickes Bros.. Saginaw, Mich. 

FORGES. HAND PORTABLE 

Aikenhead Hardware C«.. Toronto. Ont 
Can. Blower & Forge Co.. Kltohener. Out 
A. B. JaixUne ft Co.. Ltd.. Heapcler. Ont 
Rice Lewis & Son. Toronto. Ont 
Sheldons. Ltd.. Gait. Ont. 

FORGINGS. STEEL AND IRON 
Can. Foundries A Forginga. Ltd.. WeUand, Ont. 
Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co.. New Glasgow, N.8 

FORGINGS, DROP. AUTOMOBILE 

AND LOCOMOTIVE , 

FORGING AND WELDING 
Victoria Foundry Co., Ottawa. 
Can, Billings & Spencer, Ltd., Welland, Ont 
Dominion Bridge Co,, Montreal. Que. 
Dom. Forge ft Stampdng Co., Walkervllle, Ont 
Manitoba Bridge & Iron Wks.. Ltd.. Wpg., Can. 
Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd., Hamilton. Ont 
Whitman ft Bam« Mfg. Co.. St Oatharinee. Ont 
Williams ft Co.. J, H.. Brooklyn, N.T. 

FORGING MACHINERY 
John Bertram & Sons Co., Dundas. 
BIlM, E. W., Co., Brooklyn. NT. 
Brown. Roggs Co.. Ltd., Hamlltmi. Ont 
Canada Machinery Corp.. Gait, Ont 
Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. To'-onto, Ont 
Natinnal Machinery Co.. Tiffin. Ohio. 
Williams ft Wilson. Limited, Montreal, Que. 

FORGINGS. SPBX:iAL 

ArULStrong. Whitworth of Canada. Montreal. Qua 
Canada Foundries & Forgings, Ltd., Welland, Ont, 
Williams ft Co.. J. H.. BroOklTn. N.T. 

FRICTION LEATHERS 

Graton & Knight Mtg. Co.. HoottelL 

FRICTION SURFACE BELTING 
Can. Consolidated Rubber Co.. Ltd.. Montseal 

FUFL OIL SYSTEMS 

Bon-ser ft Co,. S. F.. Inc.. Fort Wavne. Ind. 
GllVrt ft Barker M*g. Co.. Springfield. Mass. 



April 3, 1019 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



155 



No.l&li , 
'. ; Style D" 

FOSDICK "^ 
DESIGN J 




No.l&li 
Style A 





Si/.t of Mafhine No. 1 No. IV2 

tHameter of spindlt 3^" 4" 

Moree taper No 5 6 

Traverse of spindle 28" 30' 

Vertical adjustment of head 3G" 54' 

Horizontal adjustm't of column... 36" 62" 
Maximum, work bed to center 

of spindle (Style D) 44" 62" 

.Size of work bed 12" x 72" 42" x 120" 

Size of Machine No. 1 No. 1^ 



Speeds (4 to 266 R.P.M. geo- 
metrical progression) 12 11 

Feeds, in all directions (.007 in. 

to H in. per revolution) 8 8 

Motor horse power 7^ 10 

Floor space 9' x 15' ll'xl9' 

Total height of machine 8' y 10' 3" 

Net weight (Style A machine).. 16.000 lbs 21,000 lbs 
Net weight (Style D machine).. 15.000 lbs 19.50!) lbs 



ii^ltli li i iii i'ii i u i iiii'iiiiiiiinillliM 









Milling 



'" 



{lii'iiillillilKUIiInT I'll IJIil 



""""'» .ii.Bii.iicggiM 



1 



Machines 



Built to handle those awkward, un- 
wieldy pieces that are so trouble- 
some to handle on other machines. 

Their convenience, simplicity, easy 
control and great accuracy will 
prove invaluable to your plant. 

Let us put some interesting facts be- 
fore you. Write for full particulars 
now. 





NO. ••4" FOR BIG WORK 

Diameter of spindle 5 

Size of hole in spindle No. 6 Moise 

Size of floor plate 8' x 12* 

Floor space re<juired 16' x 24' 6" 

Weight 50,000 lbs. 

NO. "0" FOR PRECISION WORK 

Diameter of spindle bar 3% in. 

Spindle bored to fit Morse Taper No. 5 

Longitudinal travel of spindle 26 in. 

Vertical a .justment of head on column 25^^ in. 

Size of table 24 in. x 60 in. 

Traverse travel of table 30 in. 

Longitudinal travel of table 32 in. 

Approximate net weight 9.500 lbs. 

Drop us a line for detailed information and 
catalogue. 



Giddings & Lewis Manufacturing Company, Fond Du Lac, Wis. 

Foreign Agents: Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Toronto. Montreal, Winnipeg. Vancouver; Fenwick, Freres & Co., Paris. Lyons, Liege, 
Zurich: Burton-Griffiths & Co., England: Wynmalen & Hausmann, Rotterdam ; R. L. Scrutton & Co., Limited, Sydney, Australia; 
K.\ lander & Asplung. Stockholm ; Wilh. Sonesson & Co., Malmo ; Gustav Nielsen, Christiania. 



156 



C A M A D 1 A i\ M A (J H ] N E R Y 



FURNACES. ANNEALING. CASE HARDEN- 
ING AND TEMPERING 

Bellevue Furnace Co.. Detroit. Mich. 
CWcago FlHdbie Shaft Co., Cliicago, 111. 
Gilbert & Barker Mfg. Co., Spnngfleld, 3JM». 
Mechanicid Engineering Co., Three Bl»ei», Que. 
SUndaid Fuel Engr. Co.. Detroit, ^i^ 
Williams & Wilson, Liinile<i, Montreal. Que. 

i URNACES, BLAST 

Belleview Industrial Furnace Co.. Detroit 

Toronto Iron WorlB. Ltd.. Toronto. 
FURNACES. FORGING 

Gil'bert & Barker Mfg. Co., Spi-ingfleld, Mass. 

Standard Pud Engineering Co., Detroit, Mich. 
FURNACES, HIGH SPEED STEEL, SHELL 

Standard Fuel Engineering Co., Detroit, .Vlich. 
FURNACES, LEAD AND SALT 

Standard Fuel Engineering Co.. Detroit. Mich. 
FURNACES, RIVETING 

Standard Fuel Engiineering Co.. Detroit, Mich. 
FUSE BOXES, STEEL 

Dom. Forge & Stamping Co.. Walkemlle, Ont 
GAUGES. MANUFACTURERS, LIMIT, 
THREAD „ ,^ ,, 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfleld, -Mass, 

Wells Bros, of Can., Gait, Ont. 
GALVANIZING PLANT 

Manitoba Bridge & Iron Wte., Ltd., Wpg.. Can. 
GANG PLANER TOOLS 

Ai-mstrong Bros. Tool Co.. Chicago. 
tiASKETS. LEATHER, ETC. 

Qraton & Knight Mfg. Co.. Montreal. 
GASOLINE METERS „ ,„ ... 

Boneer & Co., S. F., Inc., Fort Wayne, Ind. 
GASOLINE TANKS ^ ^ „ , ., 

Bowser & Co., S. F., Inc.. F<"* Wayne Ind. 
GASOLINE PUMPS, SELF-MEASURING 

Boivser & Co., S, F., Inc., Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Elliott & Whitehall Mach. & Tool Co., Gait, Ont. 
GAUGES, CALIPERS 

WiUiamo & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.T. 
GAUGES, MERCURY COLUMN, DRAFT 

Taylor Instrument Co., Rochester, N.Y. 
GAUGES, FUSE HOLE 

Windsor Mach. & Tool Co., Wmdsor, Ont 
GAUGES, HYDRAULIC 

Taylor Instrument Co,. Rochester, H.l. 
GAUGES, STANDARD 

Brown Engineering Corp,, Toronto, Ont 

Canadinn Fairbanks-iMorse Co., ilontreal. 

Clevaland Tvrist Drill Co.. CleTeland. 

OalTin Machine Co.. New York. 

Illinois Tool Works, Chicago, lU. 

Morse Twist Drill & Machine Co., New Bedford. 

Nonnac Machine Co.. 8t Catharines. Ont 

Peck, Stow & Wilcox Co., Southington, Conn. 

Pratt & Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn. 

SwedUh Gage Co., Inc., Montreal. 

Taylor J. A. M., m Stair BIdg., Toronto. Ont 

Toronto Tool Works, Toronto, Ont. 

United Brass & Lead, Ltd., Toronto. 

Wells Brothers Co. of Canada, Gait, Vnt 

Worth Engineering Co., Toronto, Ont 
GAUGES, VACUUM AND PRESSURE 

Bristol Co., Waterbury, Conn. 

Taylor Instrument Co.. Rochester, n.x. 
GEAR BLANKS , „ 

Can. Steel Foundries, Ltd.. Montreal. Que. 

Dom, Foundries & Steel. Ltd.. Hamilton, Ont 

Kayser-Ellison & Co., Ltd., Montreal. 

Norton, Ralph B., Agent, Montreal. 

Wilson & Co.. J. C. Belleville. Ont. 

Williams & Co., J. H., Brooklyn, N.i. 
GEAR BLANKS. CAST 

Katie Foundry. Gait, Ont 
GEAR-CUTTING MACHINERY 

Bilton Mach. Tool Co.. Bridgeport, Conn. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, ont 

D E Whiton Machine Co., New London, txinn. 

A U. Williams Machy, Co., Toronto. 

Williams & WOson, Ltd., Montreal, Que. 
GEAR-TESTING MACHINE 

Gisholt Machine Co., Madison, WK 
GEAR-TURNING MACHINES, BEVEL 

Bridgeford Mach, Tool Works. Rochester, N.Y 
GEAR BOXES, REDUCTION 

Corentry Chain Co.. CoTcntry. Eng. 

GEARS. CUT, MORTISE, ANGLE, WORM 

Baiter & Co.. Ltd.. J R.. Montreal, Que. 

Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Dominion Bridge Co,, Montreal. Que. 

Dom. Foundries & Steel, Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

Gardner. Robt, & Son, Montreal. 

Grant G'^ar Works, Boston, Mass. « 

Hamilton Gear & .Machine Co.. Toronto. 

Victoria Foundry Co., Ottawa. „ „ „ 

Hull Iron & Steel Foundries, Ltd., Hull, Que 

Illinois Tool Works. Chicago, 111. 

Jones & Glassco. Montreal. 

Wm. Kennedy & Sons. Ltd., Owen Sound, Ont. 

Philadelphia Gear Works, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wilson & Co.. J. C, Belleville. Ont 
GEARS, RAWBIDE 

GaiTlner. Robt., & Son. Montreal 

Grant Gear Works, Boston, Mass. 

Hamilton Gear & .Machine Co., Toronto, 

Jones & Glassco, Montreal. 

Philadelphia Gear Works, Philadelphia. Pa. 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co., Toronto. 
GENERATORS. ELECTRIC 

Canadian Falrbanlls.aiorse Co.. Montreal. 

Lancashire Dynamo & Motor Co.. Toronto. 

MaoGovem & Co.. Montreal, Que. 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 

Williams & Wilson. T.td., Montreal, Que. 
GENERATORS. MOTOR 

MacOviTem & Co.. Montreal, Que. 
GERMAN SILVER 

Brown's Copper & Brass Rolling Mills, New 
Toronto. fVnr 

GLASSES. SAFETY 

Strone. Kennard & Nutt Co., Cleveland. Ohio 
Willson & Co.. Inc.. T. A.. Reading. Pa 



GOVERNOR. WATER WHEEL 

Wilson & Co., J. C, Belleville, Ont. 

GRAPHITE „ . 

Aikenhead Haixiware, Ltd., Toronto. Ont 
Bice Lewis & Son, Toronto, Ont. 

GOGGLES 

Consolidated Optical Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Standard Optical Co., Geneva. N.Y. 

Strong. Keuaid & Nutt Co., Cleveland. Ohio. 

Willson & Co.. Inc.. T. A.. Readmg. Pa. 
GRAVITY CARRIERS 

Can. Link-Belt Co., Toronto, Ont 

Jones & Glassco, Montreal. , „ ^ . ... 

Morris Crane & Hoist Co., Ltd.. Herbert. Niagara 
Falls. Ont 
GREASE CUPS, PRESSED STEEL. BRASS 

Can. Winkley Co., Ltd., Windsor. Ont, 
GREASES (SEE LUBRICANTS) 
GRINDERS, AUTOMATIC KNIFE 

W. H. Banfleld & Son, Toronto. 

Canada .MachineD' Corp., Gait, Ont 

fS Mchy. & Supply Co., The Geo. F Montreal. 

Gailock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Ont 
GRINDERS, CENTRE COLUMN, PEDESTAL 
AND BENCH 

Blake & Johnson Co,, Watei^ury, Conn. 

Can. .Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont 

Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto 

Ford-Smith Mach. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

FOS.S Mchy. & Supply Co., The Geo, F., ilontreal. 

Oarlock-Walker Machinery Co,, Toronto, Ont 

Katie Foundry, Gait. Ont 

.Modem Tool Co.. Erie., Pa. 

Morse Twist DriU & Machine Co .New Bedford. 

NUes-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. N.Y. 

New Britain Machine Co., New Britain, Conn. 

Perfect .Machine Co.. Gait, Ont 

I'ttited States EHectrical Tool Co.. CincannaU, O. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Monti-eal, Que. 
GRINDERS. CUTTER 

Brown & Sharpc Mfg. Co. Providence, R-l- 

Cincinnati -Milling Mach. Co., Cincjnnat , Ohio. 

The Geo. P. Foes Mchy, & Supply Co., .Montreal 

Garvin .Machine Co.. New York. 

Greenfield .Machine Co., Greenfield. -Mass. 

Grand Rapids Grinding -Mach. Co,, Grand Rapids. 

Greenfl'eld Tap & Die Corp., Greenfield, Mass, 

Heald .Machine Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Landis Tool Co.. Waynesboro. P»- „ , ,, _ 

LeBlond Mach. Tool Co.. R, K.. qnrlnnatl. 0. 

Norton Grinding Co., Worcmter, Mass. 

Perfect Machine Co., Gait, Ont. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont 

Wells Br»s. of Can . Gait. Ont. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. .Vlonbreal, Que. 
GRINDERS, DIE AND CHASER 

Landis Alachine Co., Waynesboro. P«. 

Modem Tool Co.. Erie. Pa. 

National-Acme Co., Cleveland. Ohio. 
GRINDERS. DISK 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago, 111. 

Foitl-Smdth Mach. Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Gardner Machine Co.. Beloit, Wis. 

Heald .Machine Co.. Worcester, Mass. 
GRINDERS. DRILL 

Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto. Ont. 

The Geo. r. Foes Mchy. & Supply Co., Montreal. 

Garvin LMa-chlne Co.. New York. , „ .. 

Grand Rapids Grinding Mach. Co., Grand Rapids. 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp., Greenfleld, .Mass, 

t'nited States ESectrical Tool Co., Clndnati, O. 

Wcll^ Brw. of Can.. Gait. Ont 

Wmiams & WiLson, Limited. M.mtreal, Que. 
GRINDERS. CYLINDER. INTERNAL 

Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co. Providence, B.I. 

The Geo. F. Foss Mchy. & Supply Co.. .Montreal. 

Greenfleld .Machine Co.. Greenfield. Mass. 

Heald .Machine Co.. Worcester. -Mass. 

Landis Tool Co.. Waynesboro, Pa. 

Modem Tool Co., Erie, Pa- 
Norton Grinding Co.. Worcester. Mass. 

Perfect Madiine Co., Gait, Ont 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 
GRINDERS, PORTABLE. ELECTRIC. 
HAND. TOOL POST, FLOOR AND BENCH 

daird Machine Co.. Bridgejiort, Conn. 

Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co., Providence, R.I. 

Cincinnati Electrical Tool Co.. Clncnnati. Ohio. 

Ford-Smith Mach. l>.. Hamilton, Ont 

The Geo. F. Foss .Mchy. & Supply Co.. Montreal. 

Grant .Mfg. & ^Machine Co.. Bridgeport, Conn. 

Oarlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Oot 

Greenfleld .Machine Co.. Greenfleld, Mass. 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., Chicago. 111. 

Fnited States Electrical Tool Co.. Clndnati. O. 

A. R. Willi.ams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 

Williams & Wil>ion. Ltd.. ilontreal. Que. 

Wilkinson ft Komnasa. Hamilton, Oot 
GRINDERS. PNEUMATIC 

Can. Ineersoll-Rand Co.. Montreal. Que. 

Cleveland Pnenmatic Tool Co. of Canada, Toronto. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont 

lTi.leT>pTTleTit PneiiTnatic Tool (->o.. Chicago, m. 
GRINDERS. ROTARY SURFACE 

Bristol Machine Tool Co.. Bristol. Conn. 
GRINDERS. TOOL AND HOLDER 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co.. Chicago. 

W. F. & John Barnes Co.. Rockford. 111. 

Blake & Johnson Co.. Watert>ury. Conn. 

Blount. J. G.. ft Co.. Everett. Ma-ss. 

Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.. Providence. R. I. 

Ford-Smith Machine Co.. Hamilton, Ont 

Grand Rapids Grinding Mach, Co., Orand Baplde. 
Mich. , „ 

Greenfleld .Matfhlne Co., Greenfleld. Mass. 

Greenfield Tap * Die Corp.. Grefufleld. Mass, 

National-Acme Co,, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Tahor Mfc Co.. Philadelphia. Pa. 

Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont. 

Wine ft Son. J. 15.. Hamilton. Ont. 
GRINnERS. UNIVERSAL. PLAIN 

Grand Rapids Grinding Mach. Co.. Orand Rapids. 
Mtch. 



Volume XXT. 



.Modem Tool Co.. Erie. Pa. 

Norton Grinding Co.. Worcester, Mass. 

Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Qut. 
GRINDERS, VERTICAL SURFACE 

Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.. Providence, R.I. 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Cs., Montreal. 

Heald Machine Co., Worcester, Maas. 

Pratt £c Whitney Co.. Dundas, Ont 

Reed-Prentice Co.. Worcester. Mass. 

Wing & Son, J. E., Hamilton, Ont 

Gisholt Machine Co.. Madison, Wis. 

Norton GTinding Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Williams & Wilson, Limited, Momtnaal. Que. 
GRINDING AND POLISHING 
MACHINES, PORTABLE, PNEUMATIC 
AND SPRING FRAME 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 

Cincinnati Electrical Tool Co., Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Ford-Smith Mach. Co., Hamilton. Ont 

Gardner, Robt, & Son, Montreal, 

Garviu Machine Co., New York, 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Greenfield Machine Co., Greenfleld, Maas. 

Hall & Sons, John H., Brantford. 

LeBlond Mach. Tool Co., K. K., Cincinnati. 

Niles-liement-Pond Co.. New York. N.Y. 

Norton Grinding Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Wisct.usin Electric Co.. Racine, Wis. 

Williams & Wilson, Limited, .Montreal. Qti.- 
GRINDING MACHINES, CAR WHEEL. 
CUTTER, CYLINDRICAL. CRANKSHAFT 

Norton Grinding Co., Worcester. Mass. 

GRINDING WHEELS 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto, Ont 
Baiter Co., Ltd., J. B.. Montreal, Que. 
Brantford Emery Wheel Co.. Brantford, canaiU. 
Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 
Ford-Smith Mahcise Co., Hamilton, Out 
The Geo. F, Foss Mchy. & Supply Co., Montreal 
Norton Co., Worcester, Mass. 

GRIT, ANGULAR 

Pittsburgh Crushed Steel Co.. Pittsburgh. I'a. 

GUARDS, WINDOW AND MACHINE 

Canada Machinery Corp., Qalt, Ont 

Canada Wire & Iron Goods Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 

Dennis Wire & Iron Works, London, Ontario. 

New Britain Mach. Co., New Briuin, Conn. 

Page Steel & Wire Co., Adrian. Mich. 
GUN TAPS ^ „ ,.. „ 

Gi-eenfleld Tap & Die Corp., Greenfleld. ilaas. 

Wells Bros, of Can., Gait, Ont 
HANDLES, BALANCE, CRANK AND 
MACHINE 

Williams ft Co.. J. H., Brooklyn, N.\. 
HACK SAW BLADES 

Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Baiter ft Co., Ltd., J. K., .Montreal. Que. 

Boker & Co.. Inc., H,, Montreal, Que. 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Diamond Saw & stamping Works. Buffalo, N.T. 

Ford-Smith Machine Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Kayser-Ellison & Co., Ltd., .Montreal. 

Norton, Ralph B., .4gent, Montreal. 

The Geo. F. Foss Mchy, ft Supply Co., Montreal, 

Fry's (London), Ltd., London, England. 

Racine Tool & Machine Co., Racme, Wis. 

Plewes, Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 

Rice Lewis ft Son, Toronto, Ont 

Simonds Mfg. Co., Fitchburg, Maaa. 

L, 8. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 

Standard .Machy. ft Supplies, Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

Victor Saw Works, Ltd., Hamilton, Canada. 

Wilkinson ft Kompasd. Hamilton, Ont 

Williams ft Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 
HACK SAW FRAMES 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Can. FairbankS'-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Fonl-Smitli .Machine Co.. Hamillou. Ont. 

Garvin .Machine Co.. New York City. 

Victor Saw Works. Hamilton. Ont 

Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto. Ont. 

Wilkinson & Kompass, Hamilton. Ont 

Williams ft Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 
HACK SAWS, POWER 

Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works, Buffalo, N.Y. 

The Geo. F. Foss Mohy. & Supply Oj.. .Montreal. 

Foni-Smith .Machine Co.. Hamilton. Ont. 

McKcnzie .Machy. Co.. D., Guelph. Ont 

Peeriess Machine Co., Racine, Wis. 

Perfect Machine Co., Gait. Ont 

Racine Tool & .Mach. Co., Racine, Wis, 

L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, Mass. 

Victor Saw Works, Hamilton, Ont 

Williams .Machy. Co., A. R., Toronto. Ont- 

\i-iilt,Tms & WiliDTi. Ltd.. Montreal. Que. 

WQliams & Wilson, Limited. Montreal. Que. 
HAMMERS. AIR 

Erie Foundry Co.. Brie, Pa. 
HAMMERS (DROP), MOTOR AND 
BELT DRIVEN 

Beaudry & Co., Boston, Mass. 

Bliss. E. W., Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Brown, Boggs Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Canada. 

Canadian Billings ft Spencer Ltd., Welland. 

Onada Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont. 

High Speed Hammer Co.. Rochester. N.Y. 

A, B. Jardine ft Co.. Hespeler, Oot 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. N.Y. 

Plessisville Foundry Co., Plessisville, Que 

Toledo Machine ft Tool (3o.. Toledo. 

United Hammer Co., Boffton, Mass. 

Williams ft WOson, Limitcil. Montreai. Qu<- 
HAMMERS, HELVE POWER 

Canada Machinery Corp.. Gait, Ont 

Weqt Tire Setter Co,. Rochester, N.Y. 

Williams ft Wilson, Limited MontrertJ, Que 
HAMMERS. CHIPPING, CAULKING, 
PNEUMA'nC 

C^n. Ingeisoll-Band Co., Montreal, Que.^ 

Gorlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co.. Chloagc, 111. 
HAMMERS. MARKING 

Matthews, Jas. H. ft Co., Pitlsburgh. Pa. 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 







PIPpIS)IU€Tr, 



STANDARD 

OR 

SPECIAL 




READY 

FOR 
DELIVERY 

NUTS— Plain— S.A.E. 

Castellated — S.A.E. 
Semi-finished — V — U.S.S. 

SCREWS— Cap V— U.S.S.— 

Set— U.S.S.— V. 





THE NATIONAL ACME 
• COMPANY • 

0ECOURCELLES&C.T.R. MONTREAL P.Q. 



158 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



HAMMERS, NAIL MACHINE 
Rioe Lewis & Son, Toronto, Ont. 
United HanuBier Co., Boston Mass. 

HAMMERS. STEAM 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont. 
Erie Foundry Co., Erie, Pa. 
NUes-Bement-Pond Co., New Torlt. 

HAMMERS, SHELL NOSING 

Beaudry & Company, Inc., Boston, Maw. 
BAND LEATHERS OR PADS 

Graton & Knight Mfg. Co., .Montreal. 

HANGERS, SHAFT 

Algoma Steel Corp., Sault Ste. Mane, Ont. 

Baird Machine Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Can. S K F Co., Toronto, OnL 

Gardner, Robt.. & Son, Montreal. 

Jcnes & Glaasco, Montreal. 

Standard Pressed Steel Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. .Monti-eaJ. Que. 
HARDNESS TESTING INSTRUMENTS 

Shore Instmment & Mfg. Co., New Tort 
BEATING AND VENTILATING ENGINEERS 

Can. Blower & Forge Co., Kitchener. Ont. 

Sheldons, Ltd.. Gait, Ont. 
BEAT GAUGES, HARDENING 
AND ANNEALING 

Shore Instrument & Mfg, Co., New York. 

HIGH SPEED STEEL 

J. F. A. Comstedt, New York City, N.Y. 

General Steel Co.. M'teaukee, Wis. 

Kayser- Ellison & Co., Ltd.. -Montreal. 

NoHon. Ralph B.. Agent. Montreal. 
HIGH SPEED TOOL ROOM DRILLS 

Albany Hard-ware Spec. Co., Albany, Wis. 
HIGH SPEED TOOL METAL 

Deloro Smelting & Refining Co.. Toronto, Ont. 

J. F. A. Comstedt, New York City, N.T. 
SnNGE MACHINERY 

Baird Machine Co.. Bridgeport, Conn. 

Illinois Tool Works, Chicago. Ul. 

HINGES „ ^ , ., n^ 

London Bolt & Hinge Works. London, Ont 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp., Greenfield. Maaa. 

Illinois Tool Works, Chicago, UL 

Pt«tt & Whitney Co., Dundas, Ont 

Taylor, J. A. M,. 318 Stair Bldg., Toronto. Ont. 

WeJls Bros, of Can., Gait. Ont. 
HOBS. MILLING 

HOISTS. AIR ^ „ 

Can. IngenioU-Rand Co., Ltd., Sherbrooke, Que. 

Morris Crane & Hoist Co.. Herbert. Niagara 
Falls, Ont. 
HOISTING AND CONVEYING 
MACHINERY AND ENGINES 

Can. Link-Belt Co., Toronto. Ont. 

Can. Matthews Gravity Carrier Co.. Toronto. Ont. 

^. Ingersoll-Rand Co., Ltd.. Sherbrooke, Que. 

Dominion Bridge Co., Montreal. Quebec 

Jones & Olassco. MontreaL 

MacQoTem & Co., Montreal, Qne. „,.__ 

Morris Crane & Hoist Co.. Herbert, Niagara 

Northern Crane Works. Walkenllle, OnL 
WflUama & Wilson. Limited. Montre.TJ. Que. 
HOISTS, CHAIN AND PNEUMATIC 
Can. Ingersoll-Rand Co., Montreal, Que. 
Garlock-Walker -Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont 
Ford Chain Block & Mfg., PhiladellAla, Pa. 
Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., Chicago, Ul. 
Morris Crane & Hoist Co.. Herbert. Niagara 

Falls. Ont ,^ _,„ ^.. 

Northern Crane Works, Walkerrllle, Ont 

Wricht .Mfg. Co.. Lisbon. Ohio. 

Williams & WUson, Limited, Mmti-eal, Que. 

HOISTS, ELECTRIC 

Can. Link-Belt Co., Toronto, Ont 

Dominion Bridge Co., Montreal, Quebec. 

Electric Steels & Metals, Ltd., Welland, Ont 

Kennedy & Sons, Owen Sound, Ont 

Morris Crane & Hoist Co., Herbert, Niagara 
Falls. Ont _^ 

Northern Crane Works, Walksrrille, Ont 

Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 
HOLDERS, STEEL DIE FOR MARKING 

Matthews, Jas. H.. & Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
HOLDERS, ELECTRIC 

Electric Steels & Metals. Ltd.. Welland, Ont 
HOPPERS 

MacKinnon Steel Co., Ltd., Sherbrooke, Que. 

Dominion Bridge Co., Montreal, Quebec 

Toronto Iron Works. Ltd., Toronto, Ont 
HOSE, PNEUMATIC 

Baxter & Co., Ltd., J. R., Montreal, Que. 

Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co, of Canada, Toronto. 

Garlfick-Wnlker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont 

Gvtta Percha & Rubber, Ltd., Toronto, Can. 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co., Chicago, m. 

Wejls Bros. Co. of Canada, Gait. Ont 
HOSE, SAND BLAST 

Outta Percha & Rubber. Ltd.. Toronto, Can. 

Paiigbom Corporation. Hagerstown, Md, 
HOSE. STEAM 

Ontta Percha & Rubber, Ltd., Toronto, Ont 
HYDRAULIC MACHINERY 

Gnrlcck-WalKer Machii,t'y Co. Toronto, Ont, 

Hydraulic JIachv. Co.. Ltd.. Montreal, Que. 

Metalwood Mfg. Co., Detroit. -Mich. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

William It. Pf-rrin. Ltd.. Toronto. 

West Tire Setter Co., Rochester. N.Y. 

Victoria Foundrv Co.. Ottawa. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 
HYDROMETERS 

Tavlor lustnjnient Co.. Rochester. N.Y. 
HYGROMETERS 

Tavlnr Tn-^tmrnent Co.. Rochester, N.Y. 
HYGRODEIKS 

Ta*Ior Instmment Co., Rocheater. N.Y. 



INDICATORS, SPEED 

.likeuhead Hardware Co,, Toronto, Ont 
Brown & Sherpe Mfg, Co., Providence, R. I. 
L. a. Stiiiett Co., Athol, Mass. 

INDEX CENTRES 

Fred C. Liictcw, Chicago, 111. 

Ford-Smith -Machine Co.. Hamilton. Ont. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York. 

Williams & Wilson, Limited. -MtyntreaJ. Que. 

INDICATING INSTRUMENTS 

Taylor Instrument Co.. Rochester. N.Y. 

INGOT METAL 

Brown's Copper & Brass Rolling Mills. New 

Toronto. (Jui. 
United Brass & Irfad Ltd.. Toronto. 

INGOTS, STEEL 

Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co.. New Glasgow, N.S. 
INSTRUMENTS, ENGINEERING 
Consolidated Optical Co., Toronto, Ont. 

IRON ORE 

Hanna & Co., M. A., Cleveland, O. 

IRON SAND 

Pittsburgh Crushed Steel Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
IRON, WROUGHT. ROLLED AND PIG 

Swedisih Steel & Importing Co.. Ltd.. Montreal. 
IRREGULAR CUTTING SHEARS 

Quicbwork Co.. St Marys, Ohio. 
JACKS 

Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto, Ont 

Can. Fairbanks- .Morse Co., Montreal. 

Morris Crane & Hoist Co., Herbert, Niagara 
Falls, Ont 

Northern Crane Works, WalkervUle. 

Norton, A. O., Coaticook, Que. 

Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto, Ont, 

WUltems & Wilson, Limited, Montreal. Que. 
JACKS, PNEUMATIC 

Nortiem Crane Works. Walkervllle. 
JACKS, PIT AND TRACK 

Canadian Falrbanks-.VIorse Co.. -Montreal. 

Northern Crane Works. Walkervllle. 
JAWS, FACE PLATE 

Cnshman Chuck Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Skinner Chujk Co., New Britain. Conn. 
JIGS. TOOLS. ETC. 

Brown Engineering Corp., Toronto. Ont 

Elliott & Whitehall Mach. & Tool Co.. Gait 

Glsholt Machine Co., Madison, Wis. 

Homer & Wilson. Hamilton. Ont 

Illinois Tool Works. Chicago. HI. 

Marten -Machine Co.. Hamilton. Ont 

Toronto Tool Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Normac JIachine Co.. St. Catharines. Ont 

JOURNAL WEDGES 

Canada Foundries & Forglngs. Ltd.. Welland, Ont 
KEY SEATERS 

Garlock-'Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Garvin Machine Co.. New York. 

Morton Mfg. Co., Mtiskegon Heighta, Mich. 

A. R. Williams MaShy. Co., Toronto, 

Williams & Wilson. Ltd.. Montreal. Que. 
KEYS. MACHINE 

Whitney Mig. Co.. Hartford. Conn. 

Williams & Co., J. H.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 

KILNS 

Can. Blower & Forge Co., Kitchener, Ont 

Kennedy Sc Sons. Wm. . Owen Sound. Ont. 

-MacKinnon Steel Co.. Shert>rooke. Que. 

Sheldons. Limited. Gait. Ont 
LABELS AND TAGS 

Matthews. Jas. H. & Co.. Pittsburgh. Pt 
LABORATORIES. INSPECTION 
AND TESTING (SEE CHEMISTS) 
LADLES. FOUNDRY 

Northern Crane Works, Walkervllle. 
LAG SCREW GIMLET POINTERS 

National Machy. Co., Tiffin, Ohio. 
LAMPS. INCANDESCENT AND NITROGEN 

Can. Laco-Phllijis Co.. Toronto, Ont 
LAMPS. TUNGSTEN 

Can. Laco-Phillps Co.. Toronto, Ont 
LATHES. CHUCKING 

Acme .Machine Tool Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Wood Turret Marhine Co.. Bra/il. Ind. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montresil. Que. 

LATHE CHUCKS (SEE CHUCKS) 
LATHE DOGS AND ATTACHMENTS 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago. 

Curtis & Curtis Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Hendey Machine Co.. Torrington. Conn. 

Wflliams & Co.. J. H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
LATHES. AUTOMATIC AND SEMI- 
AUTOMATIC 

GiShoIt Machine Co., Madison. Wi«. 

Wood Turret Machine Co.. Brazil, Ind. 
LATHES. AXLE 

Bridgeford Mach. Tool Works, Rodieater. N.Y. 

LATHES. BORING 

BrideefOTd :Mach. Tool Wks.. Rochester. N.Y. 
Williams & Wilson, Limited. .MomtreaJ, Que 
LATHES. PRECISION. BENCH 
W. F. & John Barnes Co.. Rockford. 
Blount, J. G., A Co.. Everett. Mass. 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 
The Geo. F. Foss Mchy. & Supply Co.. Montreal. 
Garlock-Walker Machinery (3o., Toronto. Out 
Hardinge Bros.. Chicago. HI. 
New Britain Mach. Co.. New Britain, Conn. 
Pralt & Whitnev Co., Diindas, Ont 
Wnilnms A Wilson, Limited. Montreal, Que. 

LATHES. BAND TURNING 

Roelofson Machine & Tool Co.. Toronto. Ont 
LATHES. BRASS 

Acme Machine Tool Co.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Hardinge Bros.. Inc., Chicago. 111. 

Wnnd Turret Machine Co., Brazil, Ind. 

Williams & WDson, Limited. Moobreal. Que. 



LATHES, ENGINE 

Acme Machine Tool Co.', Cincinnati. Ohio. 

John Bertram & Soaa Co., Dundas. 

Bridgeford Mach. Tool Works, Rochester, N. V. 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont 

Canadian Fairbanks-^orse Co., Montreal. 

Cincinnati Lathe & Tool Co., Cincinnati, O. 

Cisco Machine Tool Co., Cinciimati. Ohio. 

Wickes Bros., Saginaw, Mich, 

The Geo. F. Foes Mchy. & Supply Co., .MontreaJ 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York. 

Gislholt Machine Co., Madison, Wis. 

Kennedy & Sons, Wm., Owen Sound, Ont 

R. McDougall Co., Gait 

.Miles-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Reed-Prentice Co.. Worcester, Mass. 

Smalley-General Co., Inc., Bay City, .Mich. 

Sidney Tool Co., Sidney, Ohio. 

Standard Machy. & Supplies. Ltd., Montreal. Qiir 

Walcott Lathe Co., Jackson, Mich. 

Whilcomb-Blaadell Mach. Tool Ck>., Worcester. 

'Mass. 
A. R. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 
WOllams & Wilson. Limited, .Montreal, Que. 

LATHES. HORIZONTAL 

Wood Turret Machine Co., Brazil, Intl 

LATHES. METAL TURNING 

Cisco -Machine Tool O).. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Fittings. Ltd.. Oshawa, Ont 

Wniiams & Wilson. Limited, MontretU, Que. 
LATHES. JOURNAL TRUEING 

Bridgeford Mach. Tool Works. Rochester. N.T. 
LATHES, PATTERNMAKERS' 

J. G^ Bloimt Co., Everett. Mass. 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont 

Wood Turret .Machine Co.. Brazil. Ind. 

Geo. F. Foes Mchy. & Supply Co., Montreal. 

Garlock-Walker Machy. Co., Toronto, Ont 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. .Montreal, Que 
LATHES, POLISHING 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp., Greenfield. Ma.«. 

WeU.s Bros, of Can.. Oalt. Ont. 

wmiams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal. Que. 
LATHES. SINGLE PURPOSE 

Baiter & Co., Ltd., J. R., Montreal, Que. 

Bertiara Jnhn. & Sons Co., Di.nda< Ont 

Bridgeiord Mach. Tool Works, Rochester. N.T. 

Canada .Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont 

Can. Fairbanks-.Mome Co., MontreaL 

Garlock- Walker Machy Co., Toronto. Ont 

Hepburn. Jchn T., Ltd . Toronto. 

Plessisville Foundry. PleselBville, Que, 

Roelofson Marh. & Tool Co., Toronto, Can. 

W, T. WTiitehead, Son & Co., Montreal. Qua 

Won,1 Turret Machine Co.. Brai;Il. . Ind. 

Williams & WUson. Limited, Montreal. Que. 
LATHES. SCREW CUTTING 

Bertram, John. & Sons Co., Dundaa, Ont 

Bridgeford Mach. Tool Worta, Rochester. N.T. 

Canada Machinery Onp., Oalt, Ont. 

CI.sco Machine Tool Co.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

The (3eo. F. Foss Mchy. A Supply Co., Montreal 

Foster -Machine Co.. BHkbart. InA 

Garlock-Walker Machy. Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Hardinge Bros., Inc., CHllcago, 111. 

Wickes Bros., Saginaw, Mich. 

Hepburn. John T. . Ltd.. Toronto. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Riverside Machinery Depot, Detroit. .Mich. 

Wbitcomb-Blaisdell Mach. Tool Co.. Worcester 
M«<s 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 

Woml Turret Machine Co.. Brazil. Ind. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 
LATHES. SPEED 

Greenfield Tap & Die (3orp.. Greenfield. Mass. 

Well.: Bros, of Can.. Gait. On*. 

wnilnms & Wilson, Limited, Montreal. Que. 

LATHES. SPINNING 

Bliss, B. W.. Co., Brooklyn, NT. 
Ferrarute Mach. Co, Bridgeton. N.J. 
Williams & WDson, Limited. .Montreal. Que. 

LATHES. TOOL ROOM 

Pioco Machine Too] Oi.. CIncinn.Tfl. Ohio. 
Williams & Wilson, Limited. Montreal. Que. 
LATHES, TURRET, HAND, HORIZONTAL 

Acme Machine Tool Co.. Ciacinnati. Ohio. 
Bertiam, John. & Son.^J Co. Dundas Ont 
Blount. J. G.. & Co.. Everett. Mass. 
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.. Providence. R.I. 
Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. MontreaL 
Canada Machinery Corp.. Oalt. Ont. 
H. C. Dodge. Inc., Boston, Mass. 
The Geo. F. Foes Mchy. & Supply (3o.. Montreal 
Ford-vSmith Machine Co. Hamilton. OnL 
Poster Machine Co. Elkhart. Ind. 
(Jartock- Walker Machy Co.. Toronto, Oat 
Gisholt Machine Co.. Madison. Wis. 
Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. M»a«. 
Hardinge Bros.. Inc.. Chicago, HI. 
Hepburn. John T.. Ltd.. Tot-nto. 
R. K. LeBlond Mach. Tool Co.. Cincinnati. Obla 
Mullmer-Enlund Tool (3o.. Syracuse, N,T. 
National-Acme Co.. CHeveland. Ohio. 
New Britain Machine Co.. New Britain. Ooaa. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New Tork. 
Pratt & Whitney (Jo., Dundas. Ont 
Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait, (Tnt 
Warner * Swasey O.. Cleveland. O. 
A. B. Williams Macihy. Co, Toronto. 
William'! .t Wil^inn. Ltd.. Mnntreal. Qne 
Wood Turret Mach. Co.. Brazil. Ind.. U.S.A. 
Williams & Wilson. Limited, Montreal, Que. 

LEAD BURNING 

St Lawrence Welding Co., MmitKal. Qua. 

LEATHER STRAPPING 

Graton & Knight Mfg. Co., Worcester. Ma«. 
LENSES FOR GOGGLES 

Standard Optical Co.. Geneva. N.T. 
LIDS, SCREW TOP AND HINGE 

(Jan. Winkley Co.. Ltd., Windsor. Ont. 



I 



I 



April 3, 19ie 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



159 



Stampings 



w 



E are specializing in Large 
Metal Stamping and Deep 
Drawing. Our plant is fully 
equipped to handle any order. 
Prompt delivery guaranteed. 
Let us quote on your next re- 
quirements. 



Canadian Cartridge Company 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON - CANADA 



The Hammer With The 
Human Stroke 




HEADS RIVETS COLD 

Heads 'em tight or loose, flush, countersunk, or flnishe* 
heads any shape desired, and at the rate of: — 

A rivet a second, sizes up to 3/16". 

A rivet in two seconds, size Vi" to %". 

A rivet in three seconds, size 7/16" to %". 

And on special order we build machines to handle rivet* 
np to 1 1-^" with proportionate rapidity. 

Built in eight sizes. 

Besides riveting, the High Speed Riveting Hammer does 
all kinds of peining. swaging, upsetting, etc. 

Send OS sample assembly parts with rivets or sketch of 
r«ur work, 

and 

Let us shoulder your riveting problems. 

Send for the High Speed Hammer Book. 

THE HIGH SPEED HAMMER COMPANY, INC. 

ROCHESTER. N.Y. 




The' Rochester Helve Hammer 
Quick-change Stroke 

Long or short, fast or slow, heavy or light — any 
length, weight and force of blow instantly secured 
on the Rochester "Helve" while the machine is run- 
ning. This feature alone saves so much time where 
there is a variety of small work to be forged, swaged 
or welded, that it recommends the tool without re- 
ference to its distinctive features. 

Complete Description in Catalog 
8 SIZES-2 STYLES OF FRAMES 

THE WEST TIRE SETTER CO. 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

WEST HYDRAULIC TIRE SETTER. 



160 



C A ^" A D I A N MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



LIFTS, PNEUMATIC 

Morris Crane & Hoist Co.. Ltd.. Herbert. -Niagari 
Falls. Ont 
LINK BELTING 

Can. Fairbaiiks-.Moroe Co.. Montreal. 

Can. Link-Belt Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Jones & Glassco, .Montreal, Que. 

.Morse Chain Co.. Ithaca, N.Y. 

Williams & vi'ilson, Limited. Slootreal. Que. 
LINOLEUM MILL MACHINERY 

Bertrams, Ltd., Edinburgh, Scotland. 

LIQUID AIR 

Carter Welding Co,, Toronto, Ont. 

Prest-OLite Co.. Inc., Toronto, Ont 
LOADERS. WAGON AND TRUCK 

Can. Liuli-Belt Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Monis Crane & Hoist Co., Herbert, >ia«ari 
Falls. Ont. , .. ^ ^ n 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Monti-eal. Que. 
LOCKLKS. STEEL WARDROBE 
AND STEEL MATERIAL 

Canada Wire & Iron Goods Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Dennis Wire & Iron Worlts, London, Ontario. 
1 UBRICANTS 

Cataract Ueflning & -Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Elm Cutting Oil Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Ontario Lubricating Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
LUBRICATING, OIL FILTERING AND 
CIRCULATING SYSTEMS 

BowTser & Co.. S. F, . Inc. Fort Wajne, Ind. 
LUBRICATORS 

Trahero Pump Co., Rockford, 111. 
.MACHINE COUNTER WEIGHTS 

Katie Foundry, Gait. Ont. „„»,„..,^ 

MACHINERY, CORNER AND BENDING 

Peck Stow & Wilcox Co.. Southington, Conn. 
MILLING ARBORS 

Kearney & Trecker Co.. .Milwaukee, Wis. 
MACHINERY DEALERS 

Archibald & Co.. Chas. P., Montreal, Que. 

Baiter & Co.. Ltd.. J. R.. Montreal, Que. 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Garlock-Walkei .Maciiv. Co., Toronto, Ont. 

The Geo. N. Foss Mchy. & Supply Co., Montreal 

Standard Machy. & Supplies, Ltd., Montreal, Que. 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 

■Williams & Wilson, Ltd.. Montreal, Que. 
MACHINERY. HAMMER AND NAIL 

Girlock-Walker .Machinery Co,. Toronto, Ont. 
MACHINERr GUARDS (SEE GUARDS) 
MACHINERY REPAIRS 

Marten Mach. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Prest-O-Llte Co., Inc.. Toronto, Ont. 

A. &. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 

Williams & Wilson. Ltd.. Montreal. Que. 
MACHINES, RUNNING. BALANCING 

Norton Grinding Co., Worcester, Mass. 
MACHINISTS' SCALES. SMALL 
TOOLS AND SUPPLIES 

Can. Fairbanks- Morae Co., Montreal. 

.Marten Mach. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto, Ont 

MacGovem & Co.. Montreal, Que. 

Starrett Co., L, S.. Athol, Mass. 

J. H Williams & Co.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 
MACHINE TOOLS 

Cincinnati L.-ithe & Tool Co., Cincinnati. O. 

Williome & Wilson, Limited, Montreal. Que. 
MACHINE & REPETITION WORK 

Katie FoundiT. Ltd., 'Gait. Ont 
MANDRELS 

Can, Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co., CleTeland. 

A. B. Janiine & Co., Hespeler, Ont. 

Morse Twist Drill & ilach. Co.. New Bedford 
tMass. 

Pratt & Whitney Co., Dundas, Ont. 
MARKING DEVICES 

Pritchard-.\ndrew5 Co. of Canada. Ottawa. Ont. 

Matthews. Jas. H., & Co.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 
MARKING MACHINERY 

Brown. Boegs Co.. Hamiltoo, Ont. 

The Geo. F. Foes Mchy. & Supply Co.. Montreal 

Perrin. Wm. R.. Toronto. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 
MEASURING MACHINES 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont 
MEASURES. REGISTERING 

Bowser & Co.. S. F.. Inc., Fort Wayne, Ind- 
MEASURING TAPES AND RULES 

James Chesterman & Co.. Ltd.. She.. eld. Bng. 
METALLURGISTS 

Toronto Testing Laboratory. Ltd.. Toronto. 
METAL SAWS 

Simonds Mfg. Co.. Pitchburg. Mass. 
METALS 

Brown's Copper & Brass Rolling Mills. New 
Toronto. Ont. 

Canada Metal Co.. Toronto. Ont. 

Dom. Iron & Wrecking Co.. Ltd.. 'Montreal. Que. 

Fnnshevckr .V Son. B . Toronto. Ont, 

International Metal & Trading Co.. Montreal. Que. 

Rice Tyewi*) Si Son. Toronto, Ont 

Standard Mach v. & Supplies, Ltd.. Montreal. Que 

United Br»*w * T>ead Ltd.. Toronto. 
METAL STAMPINGS. SMALL 

Cun Winkley Co.. Ltd.. Windsor. Ont. 
METERS 

Can. Cartridge Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 
MFTHnCS. WATT=:R 

Can. Cartridge Co.. Hamilton. Ont. 
METERS. OIL. GASOLINE. KEROSENE. ETC. 

Bowser & Co.. Inc., 3. F.. Toronto, Ont 
MICROMETERS 

Almond Mfg. Co., T. R., Ashbumham, Maas. 

Taylor. J. A M.. SIS Statr Bldg.. Toronto. Ont. 

Wflltains & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Qtie. 
MILLS. SAND 

Frost Mfg. Co.. Chicago. Ill 
MILL MACHINERY 

Alexander Fleck. TAA.. Ottawa. 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfleld, .Mass. 



Wells Bro. of Can.. Gall, Out. 
MILLING ATTACUMliMo 

Becaci MiUms ilaoiine Co.. Boston. Mass. 
Hecuam. .lolin. 6i avuo Co.. UiUiUttJ, Uut 
bruwu &. diiarpe Ml«. Co.. I'loviUcuce. U.l. 
Canada Jlacumcry Corp.. Gait. out. 
Cmcumati iliUmg Mdcflme Co.. cmcmnati. 
Fora-dmiUi -Uatn. Co.. tiamillon. uuu 
Fox Mactiine Co.. Jackiun, Mich. 
Hanlinge Uros.. Inc.. Chicago. HI. 
Hcnde> Macn. Co.. TorimgLuu. Conn. 
Hiucklej -Uaulime Works. Hmckley, Wis- 
Kearney As Trecker Co., Milwaukee, His. 
Kcinpauutn MIg. Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
^Ues-±Stment-l'ond Co., *New ioik. 
Pratt & wmtuey Co., 1 'imdaa, Ont. 
Tali-l'eirce Mtg. Co.. Woonsocket. R.I. 
Williams & Wilson, Limited, ilontieal. Que. 
MILLING MACHINES, AUTOMATIC 
liilton Mach. Tool Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 
Belts Machine Co.. Rochester. N.Y. 
WUliams & WiLson, Limited. Mooti-eal, Que. 

MILLING CUTTtRS ^ ^ 

Clevclaud .Milling Machine Co., Cleyeland. O. 

Kearney & Trecker Co., Milwaukee. \Ms. 

Williams & Wilson, Limited. .Montreal. Que. 
MILLING MACHINES. HAND 

Brisi,^, Machine Tool Co.. Bristol. Conn. 
Mli.i,lNu u.ACilliVtS, TUKLAD 

Gisbolt Machine Co.. Madison, Wis. 

uaiouige l,.!.-.. In;.. Chicago. 111. 

United States Mach. Tool t;o.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

I'ratt & Whitney Co.. Uundaa. Out 

Steptoe Co.. The. John. Cincinnati. Ohia 

.lilliams & Wilson, Limited. ilontieiU, Que. 
MILLING MACUINtS, HORIZONTAL 
AND VERTICAL 

Becker .Milling Machine Co.. Boston. Mass. 

Bristol .Machine Tool Co.. Bristol. Conn. 

Blown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.. Providence. 

Bertram. John. & Sons Co., Dundaa Ont 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont. 

Ford-Smith Mach. Co.. Hamilton. Ont 

The Geo. F. Foss Mchy. & Supply Co.. MoutreaL 

Fox Machine Co.. Jackson. Mich. 

Gariock-W alker Machmery Co.. Toronto. Ont, 

Gooley & Edlund. Cortland. N.Y. 

Hardinge Brort.. Inc.. Chicago, Ul. 

Kearney « Trecker Co., MUwaukee. Wis. 

Kempamilh M(g. Co.. Milwaukee. Wis. 

R. K. LeBlond Mach. Tool Co., Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Uundas. Ont 

Steptoe. The John Co., Cincinnati. Ohia 

United States Mach. Tool Co.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Whitney Mfg. Co.. Hartford, Conn. 

A R. Williams .Machy. Co.. Toronto. 

W'iUiams & Wilson. „jmted. .MantreSil, Que. 
MILLING MACHINES. PLAIN. 
BENCH AND UNIVERSAL 

Becker Milling Machine Co. Boeton, Maaa. 

Billon Mach Tool Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 

Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co., Providence. 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait. Ont 

Cincinnati Milling Machine Co.. CincinnalL 

Ford-Smith JIach. Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Foss. The Geo. F.. Mchy. & Supply Co.. Montreal. 

Fox Machine Co.. Jackson. Mich. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Tortmto. Ont 

Garrin .Machine Co.. New York. 

Gooley & Ekilund. Inc., Cortland. N.T. 

Hardinge Bros., Inc.. Chicago, 111. 

Hendev Machine Co.. Torrington. Conn. 

Kearney & Trecker Co.. .Milwaukee. Wis. 

Kempsmith Mtg Co.. .Milwaukee. Wis. 

R. K, LeBlond Mach. Tool Co.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co. New York. 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dundas, Ont 

Stontoe. The John Co.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Williams & Wilson, Limited, .MontTeaJ. Que. 
MILLING MACHINES. PROFILE 

Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.. Provldenoe. 

Can. Fairbanks- .Mor'e Co.. Montreal. 

Foss. The Geo. F.. Mchy. & Supply Co.. Montreal. 

Gail«x*k-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont, 

Garvin .Machine Co.. New York. 

PTin A- miilney Co.. Dundaa. Ont 

William* & Wilson. Limited, Montreal, Que. 
MILLING TOOLS 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.. Providence, B.I. 

Forel-Smith Mach. Co.. Hamilton. Ont 

Geometric Tool Co.. New Raven. Conn. 

Kempsmith Mfg. Co.. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Rice Lewis & Son. Tomnto. Ont. 

T-'>">'- Mfg Cn Philadelphia. Pa. 

WDlIams & Wilson, Limited, J.ontreal, Que 
MINE CARS 

Can. Fairbank.sJMorse Co., Montreal. 

Dominion Bridge Co.. Montreal. Que. 

MacKinnon Steel Co... Sherbrooke. Que. 

Modem Tool Co.. Erie. Pa 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dundas, Ont 

ShelHons. Ltd.. Oalt. Ont, 
MINING MACHINERY 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Manitoba Bridge & Iron Wks. Ltd.. Wpg,. Can 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 

Williams S.- Wilson. Ltd.. Montreal. Que. 
MIXERS. SAND 

Frost Mfs. Co.. Chicago, HI. 
MODEL WORK 

Windsor Mach. & Tool Co.. Windsor. Ont 
MORTISING MACHINES 

Canada Mnchinerv Corp. Oalt. Ont 

G-arlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 

New Britain Mafb Co.. New Britain. Conn. 
MOTORS. ELECTRIC 

Can. Fairtronks-MoTse Co.. Montreal. 

Gflrlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Lancashire Dynamo A- Motor Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. 

MaoOovem & Co.. Montreal. Que. 

A R. Williams Machv. Co., Toronto. 

t\ ilHo™« & wiy^rm T tl . Montreal, Que 
MOTORS, PNEXTMATTC 

f^eveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto. 

G«rlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 



MOULDS. RI BBER 

Elliott « Wh.,ehall .Mach. & T.x)l Co.. Gait. Ont. 
MULTIPLE INDEX CENTRES 

Garvin .Madhire Co.. New York. 
MUNTZ METAL 

Brown Copper & Brass Roller Mills. New Toronto. 
Ont 
NAILS 

Page steel & Wire Co.. Adrian. Mich. 
NAIL .MACHINERy 

Sletper & Hartley, Inc. Worcester. .Mass. 
NAME PLATES, BRONZE. LTCUED 
AMJ STAMPED 

Matthews, Jas. H.. & Co.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Pntcliard- Andrews Co.. Ottawa, ont 
NlCKtL 

Boker & Co.. Inc. H.. Montreal. Que, 
NICKEl- SILVER 

Brown's Copper 6: Braas Rolling Mills. New 
Toronto, Ont 
NICKEL STEEL 

J. F. A Comstedt. New York City. N.Y. 

Kayser-EUison & Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 

Norton. Ralph B.. Agent. Montreal. 

NIPPLE HOLDERS 

Curtis & Curtis Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 
NIPPLE THREADING MACHINES 

John H. Hall & Sons. Ltd.. Brantford. Ont 

Landis Machine Co., Waynesboro, Pa. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal, Que. 
NITROGEN 

Carter Welding Co,, Toronto, Ont 

NUTS 

Manitoba Bridge & Iron Wks.. Ltd.. Wpg., Can. 

Williams & Co.. J. H.. Brooklyn. N.Y. 
NUTS. SEMI-FINISH AND FINISHED 

Gait Machine Screw Co.. Gait Ont. 

National-Acme Co.. Cleveland. Ohio. 

United Brass & Lead Ltd.. "Toronto. 

Wilkinson & Kompass. Hamilton. Ont 
NUT BURRING MACHINES 

National Machy. Co.. Tiffin. Ohio. 
NUT MACHINES (HOT) 

NatioiU Macay. Co.. Tiffin. Ohio. 
NUT FACING AND BOLT SHAVING 
MACHINhS 

Garvin Machine Co.. New York. 

Natioual .Machineiy Co.. Ti..n. Ohia 

Victor Tool Co., Wajnesboro, Pa- 
Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 

NUT lAPPERS 
Bertram, John, & Sons Co.. Dimdaa Oat ' 

Canada .Machinery Corp.. Qalt Ont 
Garvin Machme Co.. New York. 
Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. Maao. 
Hall, J. H.. & Son, Brantford. Unt 
A. B. Jardine & Co., Hespeler. 
Landis .Machine Co.. Waynesboro. Pa- 
National Machmery Co.. 'Titfin. Ohio. 
Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 

OILS. MOTOR 

Elm Cutting Oil Co.. Toronto. Ont 
OILS. DRAWING 

Elm Cuttmg Oil Co.. Toronto. Ont 
OIL Stl-A/tATORS 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse. Co.. Montreal. 

Sheldon's, Ltd.. Gait. Ont 
OIL STONES 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Cai^omndum Co.. Niagara Falls. N.Y. 

Norton Co., Worcester. Mass. 

Rice Lewis & Son. Toronto. Ont 
OIL STORAGE SYSTEMS 

Bowser & Co.. Ina. S. F.. Toronto. Ont 
OPENING DIE HEADS 

Greenfleld Tap & Die Corp.. Greenield. Mask 

Wells Bros, of Can., Gait. Ont 
OP'lICAL SUPPLIES 

Consolidated Optical Co.. Toronto, Ont 
OSCILLATING VALVE GRI.NDERS 
(PNEU.MATIC) 

Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of CaiL. Toronto. 
OVENS FOR BAKING, BLUING, DRYING. 
ENAMELING. JAPANNING AND 
LACQUERING 

Brantford Oven & Rack Co.. Brantfopd. Ont 
OVEN TRUCKS. STEEL 

Brantford Oven & Rack Co.. Brantford. Ont 

MacKinnon Steel Co.. Sherbrooke. Que. 
OVENS FOR DRYING. TEMPER AND 
UNDER TRUCKS 

Brantford Oven & Rack C!o.. Brantfori. Out 
OXV-ACKTYLENE WELDING AND 
CUTTING 

Carter Welding Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Prest-0-Ltte Co.. Inc.. Toronto. Ont 

St. Lawrence Welding Co.. Montreal. Que. 
OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING AND 
CUTTING PLANT 

Carter Welding Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Prest-O-Lite Co.. Inc.. Toronto. Ont 

Orvweld Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. Ont 
PACKINGS. ASBFSTOS 

Cleveland Wire Spring Co.. Cleveland. 

New Britain Mach. Co.. New Britain. Oonn. 
PACKINGS. LEATHER. H'YDRAULICS. 
ETC. 

Baxter & Co.. Ltd.. J. R.. Montreal. Que, 

Oiaton & Knight Mfg. Co.. Worcester. Man. 

Oiitta Pereha & Rubber. Ltd.. Toronto. Can. 

William R. Perrin. Ltd.. Toronto. 
PANS, WET AND DRY 

Frost Mfe Co.. Chicago. Til. 
PAPER MILL CONVPYORS AND DRIVES 

Can. Link-Belt Co. Toronto. Ont 

Bertrams. Ltd.. Edintrinrh. "Votland. 

MacKinnon Steel Co.. Sherbrooke. Qua. 
PAPER MILL MACHINERY 



April 3, 1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



161 



We are 
Growing 

When our plans are 
2omi>I«ted. "HISCO* 
will be the largest 
plant of its kind in 
Canada. 

Two biff new electric 
furnaces are beinp 
added to our present 
large equipment. And 
cleaning and anneal- 
ing depaVtment mea- 
suring 300' X 100' is 
about to be com- 
pleted. 

This will place us in 
a position to handle 
orders big and small 
with unequalled fa- 
cility. 




Specify "HISCO" Products 

Quality and Service Guaranteed 
Steel, Chrome, Manganese and Nickel Steel Castings 

Annealed and Unannealed 

Cement Mill and Mining Machinery Castings, Stamp ^'i"s. Cri's'-'ng Plants. Excavating Outfits, Steel 
Car Wheels, Locomotive Driving Wheels and Frames, etc. 

GEARS Machine Moulded, any size up to 18 feet, without Patterns 

HULL IRON & STEEL FOUNDRIES, LTD., HULL, QUE. 




SPEED 

THE NEW STANDARD 

Increases Production 50 to 100"^^ 




It increases production 50 to 100 per cent, with the same nunit.t/ 
of machines, at a greatly reduced cost. 

Or it gives the same production with two-thirds to one-haif as 
many machines, saving in investment, in attendance and in floor 
space. And in all cases it saves in expensive material and sa\\ 
blades. 

Proof can be furnished in the record the Peerless High Speed has 
made with many large concerns of international reputation. Fur- 
ther proof and the best proof will be to try it in your own shop : 
and if you think you can afford to do without it after 30 days' use. 
we will pay freight both ways. 

Write for description, names of users and trial plan. 

PEERLESS MACHINE CO. 

1607 RACINE STREET RACINE, WISCONSIN 



PRESSES 

* Made 

f Canada 

I 




Hydraulic I'resses, Pumps and Accumula- 
tors for all purposes 

WRITE FOR PRICES AND DELIVERIES 

WILLIAM R. PERRIN, Limited 

TORONTO, CANADA 



162 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



PATTERN SHOP EQUIPMENT 

Canada Machinery Corp., Qalt, Out, 
Fox ilachine Co., JacJcson, Mich. 
Gartock-Walkcr Machmery Co., Toroato, Out 
Wflliams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 

PATENT SOLICITORS 

Budden, Banbuiy A., MontreaL 
Fetheretonhaugh & Co., Ottawa. 
Marion & Marion, Montreal. 
Ridout & .\iaybee, Toronto. 
E»omJnmn fattena Works, Toronto, OnU 
J, C. Wilson & Co.. BeUerille, OnU 
Oreenleah Ltd., PelleTillc. Ont. 
Marten Machine Co.. HamUton. Ont. 

PECK CARRIERS FOR POWER PLANTS 

Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto, Ont, 
PERFORATED METALS AND 
ORNAMENTAL IRON GOODS 

Canada Wire & Iron Ooods Co., Hamilton. 

PIG IRON 

Hanna & Co., M. A., Cleveland, O. 
Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 
PIPE FITTINGS, MALLEABLE AND 

CAST IRON „ „ , u r. , 

IiitemaUonal Malleable Iron Co.. Ouelph. Ont, 

PIPE CUTTING AND THREADING 

MACHINES ^ „ 

ButterSeld & Co.. Rock Wand. Que. 

Can. Falrbanks^Morse Co.. Montreal 

Curtis & Curtis Co., Bridgeport. Conn. 

Foi Machine Co.. Jackson, Mich. 

Garlock -Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont, 

Garvin Machine Co., New York. 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield, .Mass. 

John H. Hall & Sons. Brautfont 

A. B. Janline & Co., He»pd«T, Ont 
Landis Machine Co.. Waynesboro, Pa. 

B. MoEtougall Co.. Gait 

Wells Bros. Co. of Canada. Qalt. Ont 
Williams Tool Co.. BJrie, Pa. 
A R Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 
WUllams & Wilson, Limited. Montreal. Que. 

PHOTOSTATS 

Commercial CaJnera Co.. Providence. B-I. 

PIPE RIVETED STEEL 

Toronto Iron Works. Ltd., Toronto. 
PIPE CUTTERS. ROLLING 
Curtis & Curtis Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 
Qreeufleld Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. JIase. 
John H. Hall & Sons. Ltd.. Braatford. Ont 
\ Wells Bros. Co. of Canada, Gait, Ont 

PIPE TOOLS 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. Mass. 
Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait, Ont 

PIPE DIES 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp., Greenfield. Mass. 

WeUs Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont 
PIPE CUTTERS 
I Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. Mass. 

Wells Bros, of Can., Gait. On<- 
PIPE REAMERS 

Gremfteld Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. Mass. 

Well-s Bros, of Can.. Gait. Out 
PIPE STOCKS 

Greenfteld Tap & Die Corp., Greenfield, Mass. 

Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont 
PIPE THREADERS 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Grsenfleld. Maas. 

Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont 
PIPE TAPS ^ „ „ 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. Maas. 

WeUs Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont 
PIPE VISES „ ^ ,, „ 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. Mass. 

Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont 
PIPE WRENCHES „ . „ ., 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Oreenfleld, Maaa. 

Wells Bros, of C«n.. Gait Ont 
PISTON RODS. ROUGH TURNED 

General Steel Co., MUwaukee. Wis. 
PISTON AND PISTON RING MACHINES 

National Acme Co., Windsor, Vt 
PLANER JACKS 

Armstrong Broa. Tool Co., Chloago. 
PLANERS. STANDARD AND ROTARY 

Betts Machine Co.. Rochester. N.Y. 

John Bertram & Sons Co.. Dundaa. 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait Ont 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreat 

The G«o. F. Foss MChy. & Supply Co.. Montreal. 

Gardner, Robt, & Son, Montreal. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont 

Garvin Machine Co,, New York. 

Hamilton Machine Tool Co., Hamilton, Ohio 

Morton Mfg. Co.. Muskegon Heigbta, Mich. 

Xiles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

WhitcombBlalsdell Mach. Tool Co.. Worcester. 
Ma.as. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 

PLANING AND SHAPING MACHINERY 

Canada Machinery Corp.. Gait Ont 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

The Geo. F. Foss Mchy. & Supply Co.. Montreal. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 

r.arvln Machine Co.. New York. 

Hamnton itachlne Tool Co.. Hamilton. Ohio 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Steptoe. The John Co.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 

WiU?aTns fr ^vilson. Ltd., Montrf.;!!. One. 

Wnilama & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 
PLANF.R-SHAPER, COMBINED OPEN SIDE 

Lvni-Farquhar Co.. Boston. 

WflllaBtt & Wilson. Limited, Montreal. Que. 
POWER HAMMERS 

Qulclcwork Co.. St Marys. Ohio. 
POWER TRANSMISSION MACHINERY 
Ms^itnba BriHep & Trmi Wk.'i. Ltd.. Wt>b.. Can 

Williams & WHson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 



PLANING MILL EXHAUSTERS 

Can. Blower & Forge Co.. Kitchener. Ont 

Sheldons. Ltd.. Gait Ont 

MacGovem & Ca. Montreal. Que. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 
POLE SAW FRAMES 

Manitoba Bridge & Iron Wks., Ltd.. Wpg.. Can. 
PLIERS 

Aikenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. 

Canadian Billings & Spencer. Ltd.. Welland. 

Peck. Stow & Wilcox Co.. Southington, Conn. 

Rice Lewis & Son. Toronto. Ont 
POLE LINE HARDWARE 

Manitoba Bridge & Iron Wks.. Ltd.. Wpg.. Can. 

POWER CRANES, HAND 

.MacKinnon .Steel Co.. Sherbrooke. Quebec. 
PLATE AND TANK CONSTRUCTION 

.Maniioba Bridge & Iron Wks., Ltd., Wpg.. Can 
POLISHING MACHINES 

Fo. 1 «Tnitb Minliine To.. Hamilton. Ont. 
Williams & Wilson. Limned. Montreal. Que. 

POLISHING PLATES 

Grt^nfleld Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. Mass. 

W»'Ii Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 

POWER HOUSE CONVEYORS 

Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 
Morris Crane & Hoist Co.. Herljert. Niagara 
Falls. Ont 
PRESSERS. ARBOR 
Atlas Press Co.. Kalamazoo. Mich. 
Mot«!wood Mfe Co.. Detroit Mich. 
Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 

PRESSES. BROACHING. FORGING 
AND FLANGING 

Atlas Press Co.. Kalamazoo, Mich. 
E. W. Bliss Co.. Brooklyn. NT. 
Ferracute Machine Co., Bridgeton. N.J. 
Metalwood Mfg. Co.. Detroit Mich. 
Toledo Machine & Tool Co.. Toled©. 
St"il Co., D. H.. Buffalo. N.Y. 
Williams & Wilson. Limited, Montreal. Que. 
PRESSES. CAM. TOGGLE. EYELET 
Baird Machine Co.. Brirleeport. Conn. 
BIi<» Co.. E. W.. Brooklvn. NY. 
Cnn'olidated Press Co.. Hastinffs, Mich. 
Toledo Machine & Tool Co.. Toledo. 
Sin" Co. D, H.. Buffalo. N.Y. 
Williams & Wilson. Limited. Tklontreal, Que. 

PRESSES FOR SHELLS 

Atlas Press Co.. Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Bli.ss Co.. E. W . Brooklyn. N.Y. 

Forracute Machine Co.. Bridgeton, N.J. 

The Gw). F. Foss Mchv. & Suppiv Co.. Montreal. 

Oarlock-Walker Machinerr Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Hvdmulic Mar-hy. Co.. Ltd.. Montreal. Que, 

.Metalwood Mfg. Co.. Detroit. Mich. 

William R. Pen-in. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Stoll Co.. D. H.. Buffalo. N.Y. 

We«f Tire Setter Co.. Rochester. N.Y. 

PRFSSES. FILTER 

Willism R. Perrin. Ltd.. Toronto. 
Smallev-General Co.. Inc.. Bay City, Mich. 

PRESSES. PNEUMATIC 

Metalwood Mfg. Co.. Detroit. MIA. 
Toledo Machine & Tool Co.. Toledo. 

PRESSES. DROP AND FORGING 

W. H Banfleld & Son. Toronto. 

E. W. Bliss Co.. Brooklyn. N.T. 

Brown, Bncir" Co.. Ltd.. HsTnllton. Canada. 

Can. Falrtjanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

William R. Perrln. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Sfoll Co. D. H.. Buffalo. N.T. 

T"i~1o Machtn» * Tool Co.. Toledo. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 
PRESSES. HYDRAULIC 

John Bertram & Sons Co.. Dundas. 

Metalwood Mfg. Co.. Detroit. Mich. 

Ni1es-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

William R. Perrin. Ltd.. Toronto. 

Toledo Machine & Tool Co.. Toledo. 

Ston Co.. Inc.. D. H.. Buffalo. NY. 

West Tire Setter Co.. Rochester. N.T. 

A. R. Williams Machv. Co.. Toronto. 

Wflliams & Wilson. Ltd.. Montreal. Que. 
PRFSSES. BALING 

wmiam R. Perrin. Ltd.. Toronto. 

PRESSES. POWER 

Balrd Machine Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

F.. W. Bliss Co.. Brookl.vn. NY. 

Brown. BocGS Co,. Ltd., Hamilton. Canada. 

Canada Machlnerv Corp., Gait. Ont 

Can. Palrtiantas-Morse Co. . Montreal. 

Consolidated Presis Co., Hastings. Mich. 

Ferracute Machine Co., Bridgeton. N.J. 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Oat 

Hvdraulic Machv. Co.. Ltd.. Montreal, Que 

William R. Perrin. Ltd., Toronto. 

RIverelde Machlnerv Depot. Detroit. Mich. 

Stoll Co.. D. H.. Buffalo. NT. 

Toledo Machine & Tool Co., Toledo. 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co<, Toronto. 

Williams & Wilson. Ltd.. Montreal. Que 
PRESSES. SPRING FOOT 

Bliss Co. E. W.. Brooklyn. N.Y. 

Brown, Boegs & Co.. Hamilton. Ont 

(Consolidated Press Co.. Hastings, Mich. 

Tnlwlo Machine & Tool Co.. Toledo. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Monfcreal, Que 
PRESSES. SCREW 

Barnes. W. F., & John Co.. Rockford, 111. 

Bliss Co., E. W., Brooklyn, N,Y. 

Ferracute Mach. Co. . Bridgeton, N.J. 

William R. Perrin. Ltd., Toronto. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreel. Que, 
PRESSES. TRIMMING 

Bliss Co.. E. W.. Brooklyn. NT. 

r^anada Machinery Corp.. Gait. On*. 

Consolidated Press Co.. Hastings. Mich, 



Erie FouudiT Co.. Erie, Pa. 
Ferracute Mach. Co.. Bridgeton, N.J. 
Stoll Co.. D. H.. Buffalo. N.Y. 
Williams & Wilson. - miied, Montreal. Que. 
PRODUCTION WORK 

Windsor Mach. & Tool Co., Windsor, Oat 
PROPELLERS 

Kennedy & Sons, Wm., Owen Sound, Ont 
PSYCKOMETERS, SLLNG 

Taylor Instrument Co., Rochester, N.Y. 
PULLEYS 
Algoma Steel Corp.. Sault Ste. Marie, Ont 
American Pulley Co., Philadelphia. 
Baird -Machine Co.. Bridgeport Conn. 
Bemani Industrial Co.. Fortierville. Que. 
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co., Providence, B.I. 
Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co., .Montre&L 
FoKl^Sniith .Machine Co.. Hamilton. Ont 
Wm. Kennedy & Sons. Ltd.. Owen Sound. Oat 
Positive Clutch & Pulley Works.. Ltd., Toronto 
J. C. Wilson & Co.. Belleville. Ont 
Standard Machy. & Supplies. Ltd.. Montreal. Qua. 
A. It. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 
tVilliams & Wilson, Ltd.. .Montreal. Que 
PULLEYS, STEEL SASH, STEEL BELT 

American Pulley Co.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
PULLEYS, FRICTION CLUTCH 
American Pulley Co., Philadelphia, 
Baird .Machine Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Bernard Industrial Co.. A.. Fortierville. Que. 
Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 
Carlyle Johnson Mach. Co.. Manchester, Conn. 
Positive Clutch & Pulley Works. Ltd,. Toront* 
Jones & Glassco. Montreal. 
Johnson. Carlyle. Mach. Co., Manchester, Oooa. 

Williams & Wilson, Limited, MootresJ, Oue. 
PULLEYS. BELT 

American Pulley Co.. Philadelphia. Pa. 
PULP .MILL MACHINERY 
Hydraulic Machy. Co.. Ltd., Montreal. Qua. 
MacKinnon Steel Co.. Sherbrooke. One 
PUMPS. CENTRIFUGAL 
Oolcjie & .McCulloeh Co.. G«lt. Ont 
Bowser & Co.. Inc.. S. F.. Toronto, Ont 
Can. Blower & Forge Co.. Kitchener, Ont 
Can. Ingereoll-Rand Co.. Montreal, Que 

Darling Bros.. Ltd., Montreal, QnetM-c. 

M. L. Oberdorfer Brass Co., Syracuse, N T 

Pratt & Whitney Co., Duadas. Out 

Sheldons, Ltd.. Gait. Ont 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que 
PUMPS. FUEL OIL 

Bowser & Cc. Inc., S. F., Toronto, Ont 

Darting Bros., Ltd.. Montreal. Quebec, 
Trahem Pump Co., Rockfoid, HI. 
PUMPS. GEARED 

Darling Bros.. Ltd.. Montreal. Quebec, 

M I., Oberdorfer Bra.ss Co.. Syracuse, N.T 
PUMPS, HIGH PRESSURE 

William R. Perrin, Ltd,, Toronto. 
PUMPS. ALL KINDS 

Darling Bros., Ltd,. Montreal. Quebec. 

M. L. Oberdorfer Brass Co.. Syracuse, N.T. 

William R. Perrin. Ltd.. Toronto. 

A. R. Williams Machv. Co.. T.utnto. 

Williams Sc Wilson. Ltd,, Montreal. Que 
PUMPS. HYDRAULIC 

Gariock-Walker .\Iachinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Darling Bros.. Ltd.. Montreal. Quebec. 

Metalwood Mfg. Co.. Detroit. Mich. 

William R. Pcrrui Ltd.. Toronto. . 

WDliams & Wilson. ,.<imited. Montreal. Que 
PUMPS. LUBRICATING. OIL STORAGE 

Bowser & Co.. S. F.. Inc.. Fort Wayne. Ind. 
PUMPS. HAND. FOR OIL AND GASOLINE 

Bowser & Co.. S. F.. Inc.. Fort Wayne. Ind, 
PUMPS. RUBBER CEMENT 

Bowser St Co,. S. F. . Inc. Fort WaTOe. Ind. 
PUMPS. POWER FOR OIL AND GASOLINE 

Bowser & Co.. S. F.. Inc.. Fort Wayae. Ind. 
PUMPS. KEROSENE, OIL. SELF-MEASUR- 
ING 

Bowser 4 Co.. S. F., Inc., Port Waynt Ind, 
PUMPS, ROTARY. POWER DRIVEN 

Bowser & Co.. Inc. 6. F.. Toronto. Oat 

Darling Bros.. Ltd., Montreal, Quebec. 

M. L. Oberdorfer Brass Co.. Syracuse, N.Y. 

Trahern Pump Co.. Rockford. HI 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 
PUMPS. LUBRICANT. OIL. WATER 

Darling Bros.. Ltd. Montreal. Ouf-bec, 

Fry's (London!, Ltd.. Lon<3on. Bnsland. 

.M. L. Oberdorfer Brass Co.. Syraouae. NT, 

Trahem Pump Co.. Rockford. HI. 
PUMPS. MOTOR AND BELT DRIVEN 

Darlinc Bros.. Ltd.. Montreal. Quebec, 

MacGovei-n & Co.. Montreal. Que. 

M, L, Obirdorfer Bra,sa C^, Svrncuse. N.T. 
PUMPS. STEAM AND CENTRIFUGAL 

Can. Ingersoll-Rand Co.. I>td., vSherbroeke. Que. 
PUMPS. SUD 

Frv's (London). Ltd., Tyondon, Enf^and, 
PUMP LEATHERS 

Graton & Knight Mfg. Co,, Woreester, Htm. 
PUNCHES AND DIES 

W. H. Banfleld & Sons. Toronto. 

R W. Bliss Co. Brooklyn. N.T. 

Bbker & Co.. Inc., H., Montreal, Que. 

Brown. Hoggs Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Canada, 

Oan. Blower & Poi^ Co.. Kitchener, Ont. 

Fen^cu.e Mach. Co., Bridgeton. N.J, 

Can Pall^auks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Gardner. Robt 4 "t, Montreal. 

A. B. JanJlne & Co.. Hespeler. Ont. 

Mulliner-Enlnnd Tool Co.. Syracuse. N.T. 

Marten Machine Co.. Hamilton. Ont 

Peck. Stow & Wilcox Co., Southlngton, Conn, 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dimdas. Ont 

atoll Co.. D. H.. Buffalo, N.T. 

Toledo Machine & Tool Co.. Toledo. 0. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 
PUNCHES. HAND 

Peck, Stow & Wilcox Co.. Southlngton. Conn, 
PUNCHES, POWER 

John Bertram & Sons Co.. Duadaa. Oat 

E. W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn, N.T. 

Brown. Bnggs Co.. Ltd.. Hamilton. Oat 



April 3, 1919 



C A N A D I A N M A C H 1 N E R Y 



163 



"PANGBORN" 

Type "LB" 
Rotary Table Sand-Blast 




This table handles pieces in all sizes or 
shapes within its capacity. 
It is self-contained, hygienic and continuous 
operating and for medium-sized work not 
adaptable to barrel cleaning it is indispen- 
sable. 



Metals "work" faster and cheaper as well as 
paint, plate or galvanize, with a better and more 
lasting finish when thoroughly cleaned, whether 

Castings, Forgings, Stampings, 
Sheet or Structural 

The most effective and economical method of 
thorough cleaning is with a 

"PANGBORN" SAND-BLAST 

of the type, size and arrangement adapted to indi- 
vidual requirements. 

Our line embraces Hose Machine, Barrel, Table 
and Cabinet Sand-Blasts, and provides the econo- 
mical way of cleaning your product. 

If your problem is unusual, let our Engineers 
work it out for you. 



1 

^O R PO P» AT 
HAGERSTOVyN. MD. 

• SAND-BLAST SPECIALISTS 
P. O. BOX 8503 





Jones & Glassco (Regd) 

ENGINEERS 

MONTREAL AND TORONTO 

Specialiits in 

POWER TRANSMISSION CHAINS 

CANADIAN AGENTS FOR 

"RENOLD" 

Patent Silent and Buh R«ll«r Chain* 

"MORSE" 

Rocker Joint Silent Chains 

Chain Drives from >4 H.P. to SOOO H.F. in socceasfai 

operation 

Write for particniars to 

Head Office: Branch Office; 

St. Nicholas Baildinr 1204 Traders Banit BaiUia« 

MONTREAL TORONTO 



SteelXinks 



THE 



TORONTO IRON WORKS 



HEAD OFFICE 



LIMITED 



ROYAL BANK BLD6. T O R O N TO 



WOR.KS: 
CHERRY STREET 






Oil Storage, Gasoline 
Tanks, Air Receivers, 
Pneumatic Water 
Supply Tanks, Smoke 
Stacks, Boiler Breech- 
ing, Riveted Steel 
Pipe, Bins and Hop- 
pers. Heavy and light 
steel plate construc- 
tion erected any- 
where. 



164 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



OaiudL Macbinery Corp., GaJt, Ont 

OKUOlldited Press Co., Hastings, Mich. 

Ferracute Mach. Co., Bridgeton, N.J. 

Oarlock-Walker Madiinery Co., Toronto, Ont. 

A. B. Jarctine & Co., Limited. Heapeler, Ont. 

Niles-Bemeni-Pond Co., New York. 

Stoll Co., D. H., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Wiekes & Co.. Saginaw, Mich. 

Wniiams & Wilson, Limited. MontreaJ, Que. 
PUNCHES. CHROME. VANADIUM SHELL 

Hammond Steel Co., Inc.. Syracuse, N,T. 
PUNCHING MACHINES, HORIZONTAL 

Bertrams, Ltd., Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Bertram & Sons Ca, John, Dundas, OnU 

Canada Machinery Corp., Gait, Ont 

Wiekes & Co.. Saginaw. Mich. 

E. W. BUss Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Brown. Boggs Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 

Garlock-Walber Alachinery C«., Toronto, Ont. 

Nile^i-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

Williams & Wilson, Limited, Xlontreal, Que. 
PYROMETERS 

Bristol Co.. Waterbury, Conn.. U.S.A. 

Shore lastniment & Alfg. Co.. New York City 

Taylor Instrument Co.. Rochester. N.Y. 

Thwing lustmment Co.. Philadelphia. Pa. 
QUARTERING MACHINES 

Bertram & Sons Co.. John. Dundas. Ont. 

Nilea-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 
RAILING. IRON AND BRASS 

United Brass & Lead, Ltd., Toronto, Ont 
RAIL BENDERS 

Algoma Steel Corp., Sault Ste. Marie, Ont 

NiJes-Bement'Pond Co., New York. 
RADIAL DRILLING MACHINE, WALL 

Lvnd-Farquhar Co., Boston. 

Wlckes & Co.. Saginaw, Mich. 
RAILROAD TOOLS 

Can. Fairbanks-Moree Co., Montreal. 

Garlock- Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto Ont 

Niles-P.ement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Williams ft Wilson, Limited, Montreal. Que 
RAIL OVERHEAD 

Mocris Crane & Hoist Co.. Herbert. Nlaxara 
Falls. Ont 
RAILWAY EQUIPMENT 

Manitoba Bridge & Iron Wks.. Ltd., Wee. Can 
RATCHETS 

Keystone Mfg. Co.. Buffalo. N.Y. 
RAW HIDE PINIONS (SEE GEARS) 
REAMERS. ADJUSTABLE 

Can. Fairbanks-.Uotse Co., MontreaL 

Cleyeland Twist Drill Co., CTe»eland. 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp., Greenfield, Mass. 

Moree Twist Drill & Mch. Co.. New Bedford Maw. 

Plewes, Ltd., Wiimipeg, Man. 

Pratt & Whitney Co., Dundas. Ont 

Standard .Vlaciy. & Supplies. Ltd., Montreal Que. 

The .McCrosky Reamer Co., MeadriUe Pa. 

The Kelly Reamer Co.. Cleveland, O. 

Taylor, J. A. M., 318 StAir Bldg., Toronto. Ont 

Wells- Bros, of Can., Gait. Ont 

J?ii"^. f J?'.n'^ *''«• ^- St- Catharine.. Ont 

WUt Twist Drill Co.. Walkerville, Ont 
REAMERS. PIPE. CYLINDER 
AND LOCO.MOnVE 

ButterfieM & Co.. Book Island, Que. 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleveland. 

Kelly Reamer Co., Cleveland, O. 

Moree Twist Drill & Mch. Co., New Bedford. Maat. 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont 
REAMERS. BRIDGE. EXPANDING 
AND HIGH SPEED 

Alkenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. 

Baiter & Co.. Ltd.. J. R.. Montreal Que 

Boker & Co.. Inc.. H.. Montreal Que. 

Butterteld & Co.. Rock Island Que 

Can. Fairbanks Jlorse Co.. Montreal. 

The MoCrosky Reamer Co.. iMeadville Pa. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co.. Cleveland 

Gisholt Machine Co.. Madison. Wis. 

Illinois Tool Works. Chicago. IIL 

Morse Twist Drill & Mch. Co.. New Bedford Maaa 

Pratt & Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont, ' 

REAMERS. STEEL TAPER 
AND SELF-FEEDING 

Butterfleld ft Co., Rock Island. Que 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

«eveland Twist Drill Co.. aeveland. 
■ Illinois Too! VS'orks. Chicago, 111 

A. B. Jardine ft Co., Hespeler. Ont 

Morse Twist DriU ft Moh. Co., New Bedford, Mass 

Pratt ft Whitney Co., Dtmdas, Ont 
REAMERS. BOILER 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield, Msm. 

'Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait, Ont 
REAMERS. CHUCKING 

Greenfldd Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. Mass. 

Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont 
REAMERS. HAND 

Greenfield Tap ft Die Corp., Greenfldd. iUx. 

Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont ^^ 

REAMERS. EXPANDING 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield, Mass. 

Wells Bros, of Can., Gait. Ont 
REAMERS. PIN 

Greenfield Tap i- Die Corp., Greenfield, ■Mass. 

Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait, .Ont 
REAMER FLUTING MACHINES 

G«rTin .Machine Co.. New York. 
REAMERS. TAPER. BRIDGE 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. Ma». 

Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont 
REAMERS. PIPE, SHELL 

Greenfield Tap ft Die Corp.. Greenfield MasB. 

"^rils Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont 
KEA.MING MACHINES, PNEUMATIC 

Cleveland Pneumatic Co. of Canad*. Toronto. 

Garlock-Walker Machinerv Co.. Toronto Ont 
RECORDING INSTRUMENTS 

Bristol Co.. Waterburr. Conn. 

Gisholt Machine Co.. Madison. Wto. 

Taylor Instrument Co.. Rochester. N.T. 



REELS. WIRE AND TEXTILE MFG. 

American Pulley Co.. Philadelphia. Pa. 
REGULATORS. AUTOMATIC 
Electric Steels & Metals. Ltd.. Welland. Ont. 

REGULATORS, PRESSURE 
TEMPERATURE 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 
Taylor Instrument Co.. Rochester. N.Y. 

RESPIRATORS 
Strong. Kennard ft Nutt Co.. Cleveland. Ohio. 

RIVETS. TUBULAR, BIFURCATED 
Parmenter & Bulloch Co.. Gananoque. 
Rice Lewis & Son. Toronto. Ont 
Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd.. Hamilton. Ont 

RIVETS. IRON. COPPER AND BRASS 
Aikenliead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont 
Manitoba Bridge & Iron Wks.. Ltd., Wpg.. Cati- 
Parmenter ft Bulloch Co.. GananoQue. 
Rice. Lewis & Son. Toronto. Ont 
Steel Co. of Canada Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 

RIVETERS, PNEUMATIC. HYDRAULIC, 

HAMMER. COMPRESSION 
Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. ilontreal. 
Can. Ingersoll-Rand Co.. Montreal. 
Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada. Toronto 
Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 
Independent E^neumatic Too! Co.. Chicago. 111. 
Nil^-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

RIVETING MACHINES. ELASTIC 
ROTARY BLOW 

Grant Mfg. & Machine Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 
Hich-Speed Hammer Co.. Rochester. N.Y. 
Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 
F. B Shnster Co., New Haven, Conn. 
ROAD BUILDING EQUIPMENT 
Can. Ingei^soll-Rand Co., Ltd.. Sherbrooke. Que. 
Manitoba Bridge & Iron Wks.. Ltd.. Wpg.. Can 

RODS 

General Steel Co.. Milwaukee. 

Pag^ Steel ft Wire Co.. Adrian. Mich. 
ROLLER CHAINS 

Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Jones ft Glassco. Moutresl. 
ROLLS. BENDING AND STRAIGHTENING 

John Bertram ft Sons Co., Dundas. 

Prrvwn. BoCTTs Co.. Ltd.. Hamilton. Canada. 

Cnnada Machinery Corp.. Gait. Ont 

Garlock-Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

T"!'^-'" Mflf^hinp ,^ Tool Co.. Toledo. O. 

wniiams ft Wilson. Limited, Montreal. Que. 
ROOF COOLERS 

Electric Steels & Metals. Ltd.. Welland. Ont 
ROLLS. CRUSHING 

Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. 
RUBBER MILL DRIVES 

Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 
RUBBER MILL MACHINERY 

Bertrams. Ltd.. Edinburgh. Scotland. 
RULES 

Brown ft Sharpe Mfg. Co.. Providence. 

James Chesterman & Co.. Ltd.. Sheffield, Eng. 

Rice Lewis ft Son. Toronto. Ont 

L. S. Starrett Co.. Athol. Mass. 
RULES. STEEL, STRAIGHT AND FOLDING 

Lufkin Rule Co. of Can.. Windsor. Ont 
RULES. BOXWOOD. FOLDING 

Lnfkin Rule Co. of Can.. Windsor. Ont 
RULES. BOARD AND LONG 

Lufkin Rule Co. of Can.. Windsor. Ont 
SAW MILL CONVEYORS 

Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Williams & W^ilsoo. Limited, Mocita^E^. Que 
SAND .MILLS 

Frost .Mfg. Co.. Chicago. 111. 
SAND-BLAST EQUIPMENT 

Pangbom Corporation. Hager^town. Md. 
SAND BLAST MACHINES 

Pangbom Corporation. Hagerstown. Md. 
SAND BLAST SUPPLIES AND ACCES- 
SORIES 

I'angbom Corporation, nagerstown. Md- 
SAFETY APPLIANCES 

Strong. Kennard & Nutt Co.. Cleveland. Ohio. 
SjVFETY APPLIANCE GOGGLES 

Willson Co.. Inc. T. A.. Reading. Pa. 
SAND BLAST ABRASIVES 

Pangbom Corporation. Hager-sto\*"n, Md, 

Pittsburgh Crushed Steel Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
SAND MIXING MACHINERY 

Frost Mfg. Co.. Chicago. 111. 
SANDING MACHINES 

Canada Machinery Corp.. G^t. Ont 
SAW MILL MACHINERY 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Canada -Machinery Corp.. Gait. Ont 

Gardner. Robt. ft Son. Montreal. 

Curtis Pneumatic Machy. Co.. St Louis. Mo. 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 

Williams & Wilson. Ltd.. Montreal. Que. 
SASH WEIGHTS AND WRENCHES 

Fittings. Ltd.. Oshawa. Ont 
SAWS, CIRCULAR METAL 

Plewes. Ltd.. Winnipeg. Man. 

Simonds Mfg. Co. . Fitchburg, Alaas. 

Tabor Mfg. Co.. Philadelphia. Pa. 
SAWS. HACK (SEE HACK SAW3) 

Hunter Saw ft Mach. Co.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 

I^bor SIfg. (30.. PhUadelphia. Pa. 
SAW SHARPENERS 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. Mass. 

Wells Bros, nf Can.. Gait. Ont 
SAWS. SLITTING 

Taylor. J. A. M.. Stair Bldg., Toronto. Out 
SCALES. MECHANICS' 

Lufkin Rule Co. of Can.. Windsor. Oat 
SCLEROSCOPES 

Shore Instrument ft Utg. C!o.. New York Cit; 



SCREENING MACHINERY 

C^n. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 
SCREW EXTRACTORS 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co., CneveUnd. O. 
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS 

Gait Machine Screw O.. Gait. Ont 
Knight Metal Products. Ltd.. Toronto. Ont 
United Brass ft Lead. Ltd.. Toronto. 
Wentworth Mfg. Co., Hamilton. Ont 

SCREW MACHINES, HAND. AUTOMATIC 

Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co., Providence, R.I. 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. MontreaL 

H. C. Dodge. Inc.. Boston, Mass. 

Foster Machine Co.. Elkhart. Ind. 

Garlock-Walker Maohy. Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. OnU 

Garvin Machine Co.. New York. 

Greeuflrfd Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. Cilass. 

A. B. Jardine ft Co.. Hespeler. 

National Acme Co.. Cleveland. Ohio. 

New Britain Machine C^.. New Britain. Ck>nn. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont 

Wells Bros, of Can.. Oalt. Ont. 

Warner ft Swasey Co.. Cleveland. O. 

A. R. Williams Machy Co.. Toronto. 

Wood Turret Mach. Co.. BraaU. Ind.. U.S.A 

Williams & Wilson. Ltd.. Montreal. Que. 

SCREW MACHINES. AUTOMATIC 
MULTIPLE SPINDLE 

H. C. tkxlge. Inc.. Boston. Mass. 

National Acme Co.. Cleveland. Ohio. 

New Britain Machine Co. New Britain. Conn. 

SCREWS 

Can. B. K. .Morton. Toronto. Montreal. 
Oalt Machine Screw Co.. Gait. Ont 
National Acme Co.. Montreal. Que. 
Rioe Lewi3 & Son. Toronto. Ont 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd.. Hamilton. Ont. 
Dnited Brass ft Lead Ltd.. Toronto. 
Wilkinson ft Kompass. Hamilton. Ont 

SCREW PLATES 

Butterfield & Co.. Rock Island. Que. 

GreenfleU Tap ft Die Corp.. Greenfield. Ma-ss. 

A. B. Jardine ft Co.. Hespeler. 

Moise Twist Drill ft Mch. Co.. New Bedford, Mass 

Rice Lewis ft Son. Toronto. Ont 

Taylor. J. A. M.. 318 Stair Bldg.. Toronto. Ont. 

Wells Bros. Co. of Canada, Gait, Ont 

Wilkinson & Kompass. Hamilton. Ont 
SCREW SLOTTERS 

Garvin Machine <3o.. New York. 

National Acme Co.. Cleveland. Ohio. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont 
SECOND-HAND MACHINERY 

The Geo F. Foss Mohy. ft Supply Co.. Montreal. 

Williams & Wilson. Limit*^- Jlonbreal. Que. 
SEPARATORS. MOISTENERS AND OIL FOR 
COMPRESSED AIR 

Pangbom Cori^oration. Hagerstown. Md. 
SELF-OPENING DIES 

Grwnfirl.l T.\p ft Die Corp.. Greenfldd. Maae. 

Wells Iir,«. of Can.. Gait. Ont. 

Williams ft Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Que. 
SEPARATORS. SAND 

Pangbom Corporation. Hagerstown. Md. 
SET SCREWS. SAFETY 

Alkenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont 

Allen .Mfg. Co.. Hartford. Conn. 

Bristol Co.. Waterbury, Conn.. U.S.A. 

Wilkinson ft Kompass. Hamilton. Ont 
SHANKS. STRAIGHT AND TAPER 

Jacobs .Mfg. Co.. Hartford. Conn. 
SHAPERS 

John Bertram & Sons Co.. Dimdas. 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Canada Machinery Corp.. Gait, Ont 

The Geo. F. Foss Mchy. ft Supply Co.. Montreal 

Gardner. Robt., ft Son, Montreal. 

GarlockWalker Machinery O.. Toronto. Ont 

Hendey Machine Co.. Torrington. Conn. 

Hamilton .Mach. Tool Co.. Hamilton. Ohle. 

Rhodes Mtg. Co.. Hartford. Conn. 

Stentoe Co., John. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

wniiams ft Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Qoe. 
SHAFTING 

Algoma Steel Corp.. Sault Ste. Marie. 0»t 

Can. Fairbanks-.Morse Co.. Montreal. 

Garlock-Walker Machy. Co.. Ltd.. Toronto. Ont 

Jones & Glassco. Montreal. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.. New York. 

Can. Drawn Steel Co., Hamilton. Ont 

Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont 

Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto. Ont, 

A. R. Williams Machy. Co.. Toronto. 

Wilkinson ft Kompass. Hamilton. Ont 

wn»nn ft Co.. J. C Belleville. Ont 

wniiams ft Wilson. Limited, Montreal, Que. 
SHARPENING STONES 

Norton Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Rice. I/ewis & Son. Toronto. Ont. 
SHFARINC. MACHINES. ANGLE IRON. 
BAR AND GATE 

John Bertram ft 8on« Co.. Dnndaa 

Bertrama. Ltd.. Edlnbnrgh. Reotland 

fantia Machinerv Corp.. Oalt f>nt 

Garlock-Wnlker Machinerv Cn.. Toronto. Ont 

A B Jardine ft Co.. H»«tie!er. Ont. 

Vfle^-Pement.Pond Co.. New Yott 

Toledo M.-hlne A Tool 0>.. ToIe«» 
SHEARS. POWER 

Jfthn Bertram A Bona Co.. DnndaJ 

RllM. E. W.. Co.. nrookjTi*. HT 

Rrnwn Boers Cn T.t^ TTnT^fl^rtn, Canada. 

r«n. Blower ft Fone Co. Kltdieiier, Ont 

r'anada Machlrtery Con). Oalt, Ont 

Ferranite >fach1ne To.. Brldeeton v j, 

Csrlnrk-Wfllker Machinery Co.. Toronto, Ont 

Wickps ft Co.. Saginaw. Mich, 

*. B. JatHine * Co.. Mtnlted, TTntpeler. Ont 

Vitlnnal Marhv f)o T1<"« fnito. 

VI1,«.n>mrTit PoTi-l Cn . V-w T"-t 

^fnV Co. Inc. P. TT.. Riiff»'A NT. 

T"i».»n M.»rbin» ft T"oI Co. Toledo. 

Wimama ft Wilson. Limited. Montreal, Que. 
SHVARS. ROTARY 

Quickwork Co.. St. Marys. Ohio. 



April 3, 1919 



CA N A I) I .\ N M A C II 1 N K R Y 



165 






"COMPETITOR" FRICTION CLUTCHES 

No! Don't Misunderstand Us 

This is not a Competitor of other Makes of Friction 

Clutches. "It has no rivals." It is a competitor of 

the Troublesome loose Pulley. 

Friction Clutches give far better 
results than tight and loose pulleys 
and are more readily operated, also 
more economical, as the saving in 
time and belting, the protection of 
machinery and the prevention of 
accidents v^^ill pay many times over 
—^ during a year their original cost. 

By the use of friction Clutch Cut-off 
Couplings, sections of the line shaft or 
various departments can be shut down 
without interfering with any other 
portion of the plant. This is especially 
advantageous when it is necessary to 
make repairs during working hours, or 
to run one department when the re- 
mainder of the plant is closed. 

When friction Clutches are used for 
driving direct to machines, the load is 
picked up gradually while the line 
shaft is running full speed. Each 
machine is operated independently. 





Competitor 
Pulley Clutch 

Be Up -To -Date. Don't 
Install a Tight and Loose 
Pulley. Install a "Com- 
petitor." This will do 
away with tight and loose 
Pulley troubles and the 
First Cost is very little 



more. 



Cut-off Coupling 
Worrall Type 

For your large, 
heavy Drives. The 
"WORRALL" 
Clutch has No 
Equal. 



We carry a full line of these Clutches in Stock. 
In all sizes and Bores. 

WILLIAMS & WILSON, Limited, Montreal, P. Q. 



106 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 



SHEARS, PNEUMATIC 

Toiedo iliohlne tt Tool C«.. Toicdo. Ohl<w 
SHEET METAL ROLLING MACHINES 

onS'x'^f,"'^ * ^^""^ Co.. SouUUnglon. Conn. 
SHEARS. SPLITTING ^^ 

cK^^' ^'°" * WUcoi Co.. Southington. Conn. 
SHEET METAL MACHINERTf 

Pecb. Stow & WUcox Co., Southington. Conn 
aui^AKS. UUUAKING 

Br.w». Bom «. Co.. HuBlltoB, Ouuda 

Stoll Co.. D. H.. Buffalo. N.rT ^^^ 
StHLKT METAL WORKING TOOLS 

Bsird Macbme Co., lirtdgeport. Conn. 

BllM. e. W.. Co., Brooklyn. S.Y. 

Brown. Boggi A Co.. Hamilton. Cuuin 

Peck, stow it Wilcox. Southinnton. Conn. 

Peck. Stow & Wilcox Co.. Souttiagton, Conn 

mn'. '"••, L" H.. ButfaJo. N.I. 

WlUiains & Wilson. Limited. .Montreal Que. 
SHEETS. CRUCIBLE, CAST 

Kajser-Ellison & Co.. Ltd., Montreal. 

STAMPiNG"* ""■■ ^"^'' ''°°^ 

a£"J;'^i'"i.™'"''s* *^' I''''- Hamilton. Ont 
SHEET METAL STAMPINGS 

c^^Sf^"^ ^°^' * ^'P*- C«- WalkerrlU.. Cat 

SHELL BANDING MACHINES 

HYDRAULIC 
Oarlock-Walker Maohr. Co., Ltd.. TorooU. Out 
Metalwood Mfg. Co.. Detroit. Mich. 
Sf"?°-,„ ''"•■ "■• "■■ Toronto. Ont 

^.n^r-^'^T'^^ WORKING MACHINERY 

Stoll Co.. Inc.. D. H., BulTalo NY 
SHELVING, STEEL 

aSSVi' ^"' * '">" ^<^^- London. OnUri* 
SHELL PAINTING MACHINES ""'*™- 

Can Blower A Foi», Co.. KltchcB.r. Oat. 

Sheldons. Ltd.. Salt. Oot 
SHELL RIVETERS 

Orant Mff A Uadilaa Co.. BrldsaDort. aa»^ 
=5^? .''■^"' H.mm« Co.. B«*2Sk T 
SHIPBUILDING ' "•'• 

snAp'I'URNmjRB™" ^"^'^ '-^ ■ ^'*- ^"• 

Dennis Wire A Iron Work.. Loodoa Oatait^ 
Anubnu Brna. Tool 0«.. Chleam. 

Oan. LInk.Relt Co.. Twnt*. OmL 
AjlTMihead HaMwar, <V. TMvst.. Oat 
^'.^." *;,''S.Tr "''sT* „"• """•rt—. •« 

SLPncFs. OAs^reoN^"""*"''' °"'- 
sl'^ings'^hIin'^- '*"'- 

•LOTTFRB 

Betl» Maehlne Co. . Rodieater N T 

Natlnnal-Aenr 0«.. Clttratad. Okte. 
■Jr!'"T2;'E?'"' <'* "•• Tort 

CaniKllaii Wrtdlm WoHb. Umbwl (fc,- 
^I^JIrkERS^^^"^ *'"" ^"^^'^ "^■'AI' 

aocKvrn*' '''^^^ ''°- "*''~"'««. Wis. 

■iwy * nanx Mfg. 0»., rrarMMw 

SS^iLi; J^o"'^^ ''"• ""•'•XL 

■mtme Ufk. O... KnVala. N.Y. 
^M«ni Tool «v. art,, p^ 

^I^IT^. ""*"* <^*'' SCREWS 

®K.«.'^r''7''n?^<^'» CAST IRON 

Katie Foundry. Gait Ont. 
8ULOEBING IRONS 

nIIS!"*i H«'<lw.r. Co.. Totnnto, OM. 

P™«tO-LIIe Co.. lac Tmate, OuL^ 

S'^1.^''" * "o"- ToTOBta. Oat 
soJSSr"™ * ''^ ^"' '^""^ 

Alkwliead Bardwu* Co.. TenaH*. Ont 

Ktoe. Lewja & Son. Toroat*. Out 

«oSUt? "'»" * '-wxl. I'M- TorSto^ 
SPEED REDUCING GEARS 
Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto, Oat. 

SPIKES "*"■ *"""~'- 

Manitoba Bridee & Iron Wks., Ltd Wne 
SPLICING CLAMPS ' 

Peck, Stow & WUcoi Co., Southington Conn 
"PIUNGS. MACHINERY "'^'™' ^<"^- 

Barnes. Wallace Co.. Briatol. Gona. 

Oaa. Steel Ponadrlea. Ltd., UsatnaL Oaa. 

CT^.Iand wire Rprinr Co., Cleialiad. 

Dunbar Bto6. Co.. Brbtol, Conn. 

GarlockWalker .Machinery Co.. Toronto. Oat. 

Jaa. flt«e]e. Ltd.. Ou^i^. Oat 
SPECIAL MACHINERY 

Baird UaahliM Co.. Brtdaeport, Ooa. 

Baafleld. W. H., A Bona. Toronto. 

Bearer Engineering Co. Montreal. One 

Bartrua. Jolin, A Bona Co., Ouadaa. 

BUa., ■. w. C«.. BrooUya. N.I. 

BrawB, Boaa A Oou, Hunllton, Caaad* 

Brown Engineering Corp., Toronto Cat. 

Pwraaato Uaeh. Co.. kridcetoB. HJ 

1 nrd-Smith Machine Co.. Hamilton. Ont 

'■sriock- Walker Machinery Co.. Toronto Oat. 



Can. 



EUiffit A WhItehaU Mach. A Tool Co., Oalt. Oal 
(ianria Maclllbe Co., New lork. 
Oooiey A iCdiund, loa, Coortland, N.T. 
John a. Uaii A Soaa, BranUocd. 
Hydmulle MwAy. Ca, LuL, Uontnal, Qna. 
A. B. Jardma A C*., Uetpeler. Unt 
Katie Foundry Gait, Cut- 
is atiuoai- Acme c«., CleTeland. Ohio. 
Uullmer A ifnlund Tool Co., SyraenM, N.I. 
Marten Mactune Co.. Hamilton. Oat, 
Reed-Prentice Co. Woioester, Uaaa. 
Sleeper A Butlej, Inc. Wsroeaudt, Uaaa. 
S'.oU Co.. D. H., Buffalo, N.I. 
Viotarla Foundry C<l.. utuwa, Oat 
Welland Motor & .Machine Co.. Wetland, Oat 
Wilson & Co., J. C, Bellerille, Ont 
William R. Pcrria, Ltd.. Toraata. 
Windsor .Mach. & Tool r<i.. Windsor. Oat 
SPRING COILING AND WINDING 
MACHINERY 
Baird Machine Co.. Bridgeport. Coaa. 
Garrio Machine Co.. New York. 
Sleeper A Hartley. Inc.. Woroester. MaM. 
SPRING MAKING MACHINERY 
(AUTOMATIC) 
BaIrd Machine Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 
Sleeper A Hartley. Inc.. Worcester. Uam. 
SPROCKETS. CHAIN 
Can Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 
Orant Gear Works. Boston. Mass. 
Jones & Glassco. Montreal. 
Morse Chain Co.. Ithaca. N.T. 
Philadelphia Gear Work>. Philadelphia. Pa. 
Wilson & Co.. J. C. Bellerille. Ont 
SPROCKET WHEELS. CAST 
Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont 
?errin. ^m. R. . Toronto. 
""".nn * Co.. .1. C Bellerille. Ont 
SPROCKET WHFELS. CHILLED THREAD 

Katie Poundty. Gait. Ont. 
SQUARES 

Peck. ,atow & -Wilcox Co.. Soulliington. Conn. 
STAYBOLT TOPS 
fWnfleld Tap & Die Corp.. Grecnfleld. Mass. 
WelK Bros, of Can., Oalt. Ont 
STAIRS. IRON 
Can Wetdlne Works. Montreal. Que 
ratiaila Wire A Imti Gondii Oo . Hamilton. Ont 
STAMPINGS. SHEET BRASS. COPPER. 
ALUMlNtnH and STEEL 
D<wa FoT«f A atamrlna Oo.. WalkerrlUe Oat 
Womer A WHaon. HamlltnB. Oat 
»T-_,Hr~rti. >ff<, p„ Hamilton. Ont 
STAMPINCS. MPTAL 
STAMPmr.s. METAL AND STEEL 

Can. Cartridge Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
STAMPING MACRINFRY 
Wlw no. u. w.. Brookim N T 
BfvwB. Boov A Co.. Hamilton. Canada 
Canada Machinery Corp.. Oalt. Ont 
rmmU Maeh Co.. Rrldgtnn. N.J 
STAMPS. 8TEET. ALPHABET. FIGURES 
MatttiMn. Jaa. H. A Co.. Hartford, Ona. 
PHtMiaM-Awdi>wi Co,. Ottawa Can 
STAPLE MArHmF,8 

■n..n^ A Har«.T tne. W»reest«r. Uam. 
STEAM APPLIANCES 

Durllng Bm«.. Ltd. VmitreaV On*ec 
8TFAM RPPARATORS ANT) TRAPS 
Can Faltltanks-MArw Co.. UsBtratl. 
nkM^nu 1,M.. Oalt, Oat. 
STFFL BALLS 

Bochestrr Ban Bearing Co.. Ro<*e9rter N.T 
STFFL. CHITTRLE TOOL 
H.mmem<l «»•»! On.. Tne . Srraciiu NT 

r..l„„,.^V ,,„,, p„ y„^„ ^,„ y^^ jj J 

KsTwr-Elllxwi ft Co.. Ltd.. Montreal. 

Norton. Ralph B.. Agent Montrwil. 

ViiIcKB rmrthle Steel Co.. Allqnltipa. Pa. 
8TFEL. CARBON. PERRO-TUNG8TEN 

Arraatrong Whltworth of Canada. Montreal Que 

Bftker A rry Tne , H , Mnntr«,l Qne 

Oan B K. MnT»oB. Toronto. Montml. 

I~rf4i » an„,. t^n. . Montreal Qne. 

Kayaer-ElHuon A Co.. Ltd.. Montreal. 

Norton. Ralph B.. Agent, Montreal. 

Latre*>e Electric Bteel Co.. I.atrobe. Pa 

Tanadlum-AIloTa S»ee1 Co.. Plttilmrgh Pa. 

Tnloaa OmrtWe Kteel Co., AUanlnna. Pa. 
STFFL CASTTWRS 

JoHrtle Steel Co.. Montreal. Que. 

Kenne^T * Qn»i« Wni Owen Sound. Ont. 

Can. Br^keehoe Co.. flher1>rooke. Que. 

Nora SeoHa Steel A Coal Co.. New aiaanow N B 

Swedish Omrfhle Steel Co.. Windsor. Oat 
8TFFI. COT.n ROLLED 

r,n r>-.WT. steel O^.. H.iallton Ont 

Kayser. Ellison & Co.. Ltd.. Mr>n.tr¥«]. 

Norton. Ralph B.. Asent. Montreal. 

Rice r.ewie A Son. Toronto. Ont 

Swedish "toel * Tmnortine On.. Ltd.. Montreal. 

nnioB Drawn Steel Co.. Hamlltna, Ont 
STFEL PRESSURE BI.OWPRS 

Can. Blower A Foi»e Co., Kitchener. 0»t 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal, 

nietdons Ltd.. Oalt, Oat 
STEEL, NICKEL 

Ffrth A Sons. Thos. . Montreal. Que. 

Kayser-Ellison & Co.. Ltd.. Montreal. 

Norton. Ralph B.. Agent, Montreal. 

Vulcan Crucible Steel Co.. Alloulppa, Pa. 
STEEL. HIGH SPEED 

Amatroog Whitwortb of Canada. Lt6i. Uoatraal 

AtWna A Co.. Wm., ShefTield. Eng. 

Boker & Co.. Inc.. H-. Montreal. Que. 

Gan. Falrhanks-Morae Co.. Montreal. 

Can. B. K. Morton. Toronto. Montreal. 

H. A. Drury Co.. Ltd.. Montreal. 

.Marshall A Co., Geo.. Toronto. Ont 

Firth A Sana. Thoa., Montreal. Qa«. 

Hawkridge Bros. Co., Boston. Maaa. 

Illlncworth Steel Co.. John. New York. N.I. 

LatrObe E/Iectrle Steel Co.. Latrobe. Pa. 

Plewes. Ltd.. Winnipeg, Man. 

Rloe Lewis A Son. Toronto. Ont 

Standard Alloys Company. Pittaburgfa, Pa. 



Swedish Steel A ImTwrting Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
V anadium- Aiioya Steel Co., Plllstxirgta, Pa. 
Vuic&n Orucibie Steel Co., AliQuippa, Pa-; rapro- 
seatad In Canada by Norton, caliard A Co., 
Montreal, Que. 
4TEKL, URIl 

PitutHirgh Crushed Steel Co.. nttabunk, Pa. 
STEEL, CUUUME AND MANl^ANESE 

Joliette St«el Col, Aionireal. ija^ 
STEEL, OPEN HEARTH 

Illingworth Steel Co., John. New Xork. N.I. 
STEEL, CRUSHED 

Pittaburgh Cruahed Sted Co., Pittsbuirh, Pa. 
STEEL, ROCK DRILL 

Annstrong, Whitworth ol Canada. Montreal, Qua 

Kayser Ellison & <k>., Ltd., Montreal. 

Norton. Ralph B., Agent, Montreal. 
STEEL. SPECIAL ELJiCTitlC ALLOY 

Hammond Steel Co., Inc.. Syraouae, N.I. 
8TELLITE, HIGH-SPEED TOOL METAL 

Deloro Smelting A Heflning Co.. Toronto. Ont 
STEEL, STRUCTURAL 

Algoma Steel Corp., Sault Ste. Marie, Ont 
STEEL. VANADIUM 

Annitrong. Whitworth ot Canada, Montreal, Que. 

Drury. H. A., Co., Montreal. Que, 

Kayser-Ellison & Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 

Norton, Ralph B.. .\gent. Montreal. 

staauard Alloys Co., Pittabuiih, Pa. 

Vanadtum-Alloya Steel Co-, Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Vuloan Crucible Steel Co., AUtulppa. Pa. 
STOCK RACKS FOR BARS. PIPING. ETC. 

Morris Crane & Hoist Co.. Herljert. Niagara 
Falls. Ont 

New Britain Machine Co.. New Britain. Cooa. 
STOCKS AND DIES 

Oi>eenlield Tap & Die Corp., Greenfield. Maaa. 

r\'elk llros. of Can.. Gait. Ont 
riTOCKS. PIPE 

Butterfleld A O^.. Rock laland. Que. 

A. B. Jardine A Co., Limited. Hespeler. Ont 

Rice. Lewis & Son. Toronto. Ont 

w.lls Bros. Co. of Canada. Gait Ont 
STOOLS. STEEL, SHOP 

New Britain Machine Co.. New Britain, Owa. 
STRAIGHTENING MACHINERY 

Baird Machinery Co.. Bridgeport. Coon. 

Bertrams, Ltd., Bdlnburgb, Seotiand. 
STRAND 

Page Steel & Wire Co.. Adrian. Mich. 
SUPPLIES. CONTRACTORS' 

Manitoba I^n<lge & Iron Wfcs.. Ltd.. Wpg.. Can 
STRUCTURES. STEEL BUILDINGS 

Manitoba Biiilge A Iron Wks.. Ltd.. Wpg.. Can. 
SYSTEMS. REMOTE CONTROL FOR OIL 
AND GASOLINE 

Bowser & Co., S. F.. Inc.. Fort Wayne. Ind. 
STORAGE AND HANDLING SYSTEMS FOR 
DRY CLEANERS. AND NAPHTHA 

Bowser & Co.. S. F., Inc.. Fort Wayne. Ind. 
SYSTEMS, RECLAIMING. FOR OIL 

Bowser & Co.. S. F.. Inc.. Fort Wayne. Ind. 
SYSTEMS, RAILWAY OIL, STORAGE AND 
HANDLING 

Bowser A Co.. S. F.. Ina, Fort Wayne. Ind. 
SYSTEMS. PAINT, OIL STORAGE AND 
HANDLING 

Bowser A Co.. S. F.. Inc.. Fort Wayne. Ind. 
SYSTEMS, OIL STORAGE AND DISTRIBUT- 
ING 

Bowser A Co.. S. F.. Inc., Fort Wayne. Ind. 
SWITCHES. RAILWAY 

Can. Steel Foundries. Ltd., Uoatiaal. 
TABLES. SAND-BLAST 

Pangbora Corporation. Hageistown. Md. 
TACK (DOUBLE POINTi MACHINES 

Sleeper A Hartley. Inc.. Woreeater, Maaa. 
TAPPING MACHINES (PENUMATIC) 

CleTeland Pneumatic Tool r^. of Pan.. Toront*- 
TANKS. GASOLINE, KEROSENE AND OIL 

Bowser A Co.. Inc.. S. F.. Toronto. Ont 

Dommlon bridge Co.. Montreal. Quebec 

Dominion Forge A Stamping Co.. Walkcrellla. 

MacKinnon Steel Co.. flherbrooke. Que. 

St Lawrence Wpldlnff Co.. Montreal. Qua. 
TANKS. LUBRICATING OIL STORAGE 

Bowser & Co. 8. F.. Inc.. Fort Wayne, Ind. 
TANKS. RUBBER CEMENT 

Bowser A Co.. 9. F.. Inc. Fort Wayne. Ind. 
TANKS, STEEL. WATER PRESSURE 

Bowser A Co.. Inc. S. F.. Toronto. Oat 

Can, Welding Workl, Moatreal. Qoa. 

Dominion Bridge Co.. Montreal. Quebec 

MacGorem A Co.. Montreal. Que. 

MacEllmon Steel Co., Sheibrooke. Que. 

St Lawrence Welding Co.. Montreal, Qua. 

Toronto Iron Works. Ltd.. Toronto. 
TANKS, UNDERGROUND STORAGE 

Bowser & Co. . S. F., Inc, Fort Wayne. Ind. 
TANK WAGONS 

Canadian Welding Works. Montreal. Que. 

MacKinnon Steel Co.. Sherbrooke. Que. 

St Lawrence Welding Co.. Montreal. Qua. 

Toronto Iron Works, Ltd.. Toronto. 
TANKS, WHEEL, FOR LUBRICATING OIL 
AND GASOLINE 

Bowser & Co.. S, P., Inc.. Fort Wayne. Ind. 
TANKS 

Can. Ingersoll-Rand Co.. Ltd., Sherbrooke. Que. 
TAPES, MEASURING 

Jamee Chesterman A Co.. Ltd., Sheffield. Eng. 

Rice. Ijewis A Son. Toronto. Ont. 
TAPPING MACHINES AND ATTACHMENTS 

Bertram, .^ohn. A Sons Co.. Dundaa. 

Canada Machinery Corp.. Gait. Ont 

Oarrin Machine Co., New York. 

The Geoonetrlc Tool Co.. New Havea. 

J. H. Hall A Sons, Brantford. Ont 

A. B. Jardine A Co., Hespeler, Ont 

Landls Machine Co., Waynesboro, Pa. 

Modem Tool Co., Ene, Pa. 

Murohey Machine A Tool Co., Detroit 

NUea-Bement-Pond Co.. New York 

Rickert Chafer Co.. Erie, Pa. 



April 



1919 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



167 



National-Acme Co.. Gleveland. Ohl*. 

L. S. SUrrett Co.. Attiol. Man. 

rt'hiriiey Mfg, Co.. Hartford. C^nn 

WOliams & Wilson. I/iinit<>ci. Montreal. Que. 
TAPES— MEASURING, STEEL AND WOVEN 

Lufkin Rule Co. of Can.. Windsor. Ont 
TAPES, POCKET 

Lufkin Rule Co. of Can.. Windsor, Ont 
TAPS, ADJUSTABLE 

Barter Co.. Ltd.. J. R., Montreal. Qua. 

Boker & Co., Tnc. H-. .Montreal. Que. 

Butterfleld & Co.. Rock Island. Que. 

Qeometric Tool Co., New Haren. 

Modem Tool Co.. Erie, Pa. 

Murchey Machine ft Tool Co., Detroit 

Victor Tool Co.. Wamesboro. Pa. 
TAPS, BOILER 

Greenfleld Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield, Mass. 

Wells Bros, of Can., Gait, Ont 
TAPS, GUN 

Gieenfleld Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield, Max. 

Walls Bros, nt Can., Gait, Ont. 
TAPS. HAND 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield, JMaas. 

Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait. Out. 
TAPS. MACHINE RELIEVED 

Greenfield Tap & Die Coi-p. . Greenfield. Mass. 

Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont. 

TAPS. MACHINE SCREW 

Greenfield Tap &- Die Corp., Greenfield, Mass. 
Wells Broj. of Can.. Gait. Ont 
TAPS. PIPE 

Greenfield Tap & Die Corp., Greenfield. 'Mass. 
Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont 

TAPS, STAYBOLT. "MAX" TAP 

OreenfleM Tap & Die Corp.. Greenfield. Mass. 
Wells Bro3. of Can., Gait, Ont 
TAPS. TAPPER 
Greenfield Tap & Die Corp., Greenfield, Mass. 
Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont 
TAPS. DIES AND WRENCHES 
Butteifield ft Co.. Rock Iiland. Qna. 
Can. Fa)i^ank»-l(on« C«.. ICootmL 
Olereland Twiat Drill Co.. Claralms*. 
n>e Geo. F. Foas Mchr, ft flunily Co.. MoatnftL 
OeoiBetrie Tool Co.. New Hareo. 
Greenfield Tap ft Die Corp.. Greenfldd, Una. 
A. B. Jardine ft Co., Heapeler, Out 
Landls Machine C«.. Warne«lmro, Pa. 
Morse Twi.t nnil ft Mch. Co.. New Bedford, llaM. 
tlaiAtj Machine ft Tool Co.. Dttralt 
Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Dundaa, Ont 
Blee, Lewis ft Son. Toraoto. Ont 
L. 8. Starrett Co., Atbol, Maaa. 
Taylor. J. A. M.. 31S Stair Bldg., Toroaio, 0>t. 
Well* Bros. To of Ciinada. Gait. 0»1 
WnU«ms & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Qu«w 
TAP EXTENSIONS 

Allen Mtg. Co.. Hartford, Conn. 
TAP EXTRACTORS 

Walton Co.. The. Hartford. Co«n. 
THERMOMETERS. INDUSTRIAL 

Taylor Instmmen* Co.. Rochester, M.T. 
THERMOMETERS. ENGRAVED 

Taylor Instmmer.t Co.. RoAester. N.T. 
THERMOMETERS. TEMPERATURE AND 
PRESSURE 

Taylor Instrument Co.. Rochester, N.T. 
THERMOMETERS, RECORDING AND 
INDEX 

Bristol Co.. Wat^rt>ury, Conn., U.S.A. 
Tayior iDstrument Co.. Rocheflt«r. N.T. 
TESTING INSTRUMENTS 
METALLURGICAL 

Shore Instrument A Mfa. Ofl.. New T»Tt dty. 
TESTING LABORATORIES 

Tormit/» Te<»Hnr TAhoratnrr. Toronto. 
THREAD-rt'TTTVG MACHINES 
Ga2i. FatTtitnlm-tfnrs* flo.. IfOQtreaL 
OoTtl« ft Curtis Cn. Brldaevort. Conm. 
OarVtrk-Walker MiehT. Co. Ltd., Toraato, Oat. 
< m n»trir Tool Co.. New TTaTen. 
A. B .Tsnliiie * Co., T.lwiUM. H<m>el«r, 0*1 
Laadlfl Machine Oo., WameMbora. Pa. 
NaUoBal-Aemr Co., OloTeland. Ohio. 
NaUmal MnchT. Co.. Tiffin. Ohio. 
Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Dmidaa. Ont 
We11« Tiro* Cn of Canida. 0«lt. Out. 
wmtans ft WQsoQ. Limited. Monfereol. Qoa. 
THREADING TOOLS 
Greenfield Tap ft Die Corp., GreenSeld, Maaa. 
Landls Machine Co.. Waynertvoro. Pa. 
Pratt ft Wliitntw Co.. Dnnds*. Ont 
WeDs Bros, of Can.. Oalt. Ont 
wmiame * Co.. .1 H Brooklyn. NT. 
THREADING MACHINES FOR BOLTS, NUTS 
AND PIPES 
OTWiifletd Tap ft Die Corp.. (Jreenildd. Maaa. 
Well' Brtw. «f Can.. Oalt. Ont 
WBIiain* ft WOaon. Limited. Montreal, Qoo. 
THRF«n MIMING IMACHTNES 
Taft-Plerce Mfi. Co.. New York. N.T. 
*na]leT.Geneni1 Co.. Inc.. B ay C ity. Mteh. 
THUMB SCREWS AND VDT8 

Osnad. F™md> ft Forrlnaa. Ltd.. WeBaml, On«. 
tJtitted BrasK ft T.»«d Ltd.. Toronlo 
wmisme ft Co .1 TT. . Brooklyn, N.T. 
TINSMITHS' TOOt,8 
^^^^^r^ !*.>.«.• j^ Co WiwiW'w. Oan. 
WntuH ft Wffaon. Limited. Montreal. Qa& 
TIRE BENDERS 

A. n T«-^..» ft ro. \.im\*»A. |y«*f\eleT. o»«. 
T IBW SFTTTNG MACHTNTIS. HTDRAUUC 
Wmiafn R. Petil B . Ltd. Twwnto. 
WMt Tire nettsr On.. Roekeatar. N.T. 
TOOL CASES 
ItlM. I.«wl> * Kflft, Tanato. Ont 

TOOL ROT.neps 

AlkaakMd nardwarv O*.. Toraato. Oni. 
CUrckKl Twbt DriD Oa, aaraUnl. 



Armstrong Bros. Tool Co.. Chicago. 

Deloro SmeltinK ft Refining Co.. Toronto, Oat 

Gisfaolt .Machine Co.. Madison. Wis, 

.Modem Tool Co.. Brie. Pa. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co.. Dundas. Ont 

Rice. Lewis & Son. Toronto. Ont 

Williams ft Co.. J H., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

TOOL POSTS, LATHE 

Armstrong Bros, Tool Co.. Chicago 
Williams & Co.. J. H.. Brooklyn, N.T. 

TOOL ROOM PARTITIONS 

Canada Wire & Iron Goods Ca, Bamiltoe. 
TOOL STEEL 

ArmsiTong. wliiiworth. Ltd. of Canada, Montreal. 

Atkins ft Co.. Wm., SlieffieM. Eng. 

Boker & Co.. Inc.. H.. Montreal. Que. 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Montreal. 

rielnro SoielriuB ft Reflnine Co. Toronto. Oat 

General Steel Co., Milwaukee. Wla. 

H. A. Dniry C^.. Montreal. 

Firth ft Sons. Thoa., Montreal. Que. 

Hammond Steel Co.. Inc.. Syracuse. N.T. 

Harrev ft Co.. Arthur C. Boston. Mass. 

rrnwkri'^t"' Bro" Co.. Bo«ton. M««* 

Kayser- Ellison & Co.. Ltd.. Montreal. 

Norton. Ralph B. . Agent. Montreal. 

Latrobe Electric Steel Co.. Latroho. Pa. 

Marshall ft Co.. Geo.. Toronto. Ont 

Rice. Irfiwis ft Son. Toronto Oi^t 

Yanadium-AIIoTS Stee) Co., Pittsburjh, Pa. 

v..ir.on r".-:».'. o'eel Co., AliQuippa. Pa. 
TOOLS. BENDING 

Peck. Stow & Wilcox Co.. Southington, Conn. 

TOOLS. BLACKSMITHS' 

A. B. .Tardine ft Co.. Limited. Hnpeler, Ont 
Rice. lyewis ft Son. Toronto. Ont. 

TOOLS. ADJUSTABLE BORING 

T^o Kellr Reamer Co., CleTelsnd. O. 
Williams ft Wilson, i^imdted, Montreal, Que, 

TOOLS. ELECTRIC 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co.. Chlea«o. ID. 

A R. WilHsms Machinery C«.. Toronto. 

Fnrd-5*mith Machine Co.. KamiUon. Ont. 

Tutted State" IPIee Tool Co.. Otoelnnatl. O. 
TOOIS. PORMTNG 

D«»)dson Tool -vtrir Co.. New York, NY. 
TOOI,S. PNPttMATIC 

Curt TneeT^ftll-Rsad Co.. M o w t ienl. One. 

neTeHTi.1 Pnenwatie Tool C«. of Canada. Toronto. 

f%.r+l« |».ienw»stie \f«<.bineTT Co.. St, TjOiiis Mo. 

0».fn».fc-W«llreT Mse»itner» Ho.. Towwito. Owt. 

T".*«.*i.3e..* r>fl«rMt.«M.. T.w.t On OVI-.wn T|l. 

TOOTH, t.atttf;. t>t.*wp» st.otTKK 

A .^n»t»nnr W-na TnnI On OMeare 
n^elintt V«nH1ne Co. \fs^l«nn. Wis. 
nTni,ni» » o,, T TT w...nMTn. NY. 

Tnnrn «rwww M*rinv« 

r~^.. >€•.*•.. »..n1 Co.. Wkltart. lad. 
TOwwwq BTmrT, 

I.«n«**nn« trVlfwnrtI* nf OswihIr T.M., IfoBtraal 

«*.M«n-yi*. r^ ▼"• *— — .»n. Out 

Twarir t>owt»t»t» stfut. 

V — .»• r»— n» * TTM«t rVx. HnT*»ert. Niaesr* 

TRACK SYSTEMS 

^Arr4« Cmne ft Holat Oa., Hartiert, Nla<ai. 
FSiTlw. Ont 

ifn.^*.*.^ re«nn Woctl. Walfeerrffle. 
TRANSFORMERS 

MsrO.>Tem ft Co.. Mo ntre al. One. 
TRANSMISSION MArTTTMFItY 

Anie.4ean »»..neT On PWledelnhU. Pa, 

A. R, WnWama MajoWnerr Co.. Taronta. 
Can. T.lnV-net* On.. TnenntA Owt 

Can. FalrltanW-lkforao Co.. Montranl. 

Can. Drawn Stee? Oo. . TTamfltew Ont 

OnrenHFT OH«in Oo Onventrr. T3n«lsnd. 

Hamilton Oear ft Wae^ifne Co., Tfltnnto. 

.Tmi*« ft Glsssro. Mnntreal. 

Tr*nned» ft Snns. Wm.. Ow*ii Hound, Ont. 

1t(n.ne 0>i,ln Vf,. Tth«e« f T 

.1 O tyn«nn * Oo. . T?ene.TtTle- Ont 

Winisnw ft Wilson. T/^Tn^♦ed. Montreal. Qne. 
TT>»vawTa<aTfiv potps 

\fsnl».*« V'tAiM^ ft Tmn Wks,, Ltd., Wpg., Can. 
TRANSMISSION ROPK 

T™« * nU*^« \fnn*..^T At.» 
Mt'^ITinnon Steel Oo. . T.M S^nrtvmoke. Que. 
tr05r.n *• Oft T. o. T»o11»T^T^e. Ont 
TP a vawTssTfiv rnwTnts 

Onr^« Pnet.n.*tte \f«e4t1nerv €Ni.. St T.Onla. Mo 

rt»n.<n<nn W.<.*ne On.. Mnne*«iV ©n^fce.. 

XfwnTrtnnon s»eel On . S>»»T*rtw>Ve. Qrf^^r. 

MsnItOhs Bridre ft Iron WV... T,td.. Wpg., Can. 

Vnv*Sam 0»«ne 1Vn*¥« 1T«lkn**iyie 

.yi.n...- »•-..- a \feta1 Oo.. TTanitlt«n. 
TT»»NSV1TORS 

On^rttn T-"ck Co.. Holvoke. Mass. 
Tlfni ivnt 

Hfne-i, o~ne & Hoist Co.. L»I.. Hortiert. Niagara 
PsHa. Ont, 

•pT»Troirq. FAOTOT^T PTfPTOTIT. FTC, 

Ovnsdi VttrMnerr Onm.. Oalt Ont 

n»#mnsn TVnnMe P«« W«sHn- On.. Toronto. 

Onwun Tmt^ Co.. TTolrnk*. Maaa. 

\t«c!T'nnnn Steel Oo. qheT^rmnVe. QnebeC. 

P«n» T^wl* ft 0"n Tnmntn f^ 
TPrrOTTS. TITMBTeR AND KTI.If 

to,»14nnB T.fil Ostt Ont 

qwe.1i«h steel ft Tmrmrtlnr On.. T>tl!. , Montreal. 

V«-*'.«*n 0.«n* IV...** ^•tV*..»1Tte 
TlflVG S'AMTirSS. Bit ASS * COPPPR 

Sf.ndani T.i»»e ft F-nne r*^ Wn*4«*nnlr Ant. 
.r.nw^n nr*«« •".• M.>»s1 0« TT*n.n*nn Ont. 

TT'PING rOTI.PHS. PTETIPT.F WPTAI. 
slmnn.1 M'? rn T R AsMwiTnliaM. Uaaa 
•*.«n*. ft TT.-*t-» Tnn w«— — »^ Maaa. 

TItT»PPT MACHIN"^. I.ATHFS 
Hmww * sl»»n» Vfa Co. Pmvldenoa 

rt«*1nn*-Tr«1Ver Ms'^lnerr Co. Tnenn»n Ont, 

Greenfield Tap ft Die Corp . Greenfield. Mass. 



New Britain Machine Co.. New BriUia. Conn. 

Pratt ft Whitney. Uartlord. Conn. 

Wells Bros, of Can.. Gait. Ont 

Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Que. 
TUNUSIEN FILAMblMT CUlLlNb 
MACHINERY 

Sleeper ti Uartliy, Inc., Worcester, Uaaa. 
TURBINES, HORIZONTAL 

Wilson & Co., J. C. Belleville, Ont. 
TURBO GENERATOR UNITS 

MacGovem & Co., ilontreal. Que. 

Warner ft Swasey. Cletelanu. O. 

Qarrin Machine Co.. New York. 
TURNBUCKLES 

Canada Foundries ft Forgings. Ltd.. Wslland. Ont 

Rice, Lewis & Son, Toronto, Ont 
TURNTABLES 

Can. Link-Belt Co., Toronto, Ont, 

Morris Crane & Hoist Co.. Herbert. Niagara 
Palls. Ont 
UPSETTING AND BENDING 
MACHINERY 

l*ha Bertram ft Bona Co.. Dundaa 

Brown. Boggi Co.. Ltd.. Hamilton, Canada. 

Fooi-Smith .Macliine Co.. Hamilton. Ont 

Oarlock-Walker Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont 

A. B. Jardine ft Co.. Heapeler. Ont 

Manitoba Bridge & Iron Wks., Ltd., Wpg.. Can. 

National Machy. Co.. Tiffin. O. 

Canada Machinery Corp.. Gait. Ont 

Nlloa-Bement-Pond Co., New York. 

A. E. Willlama Machy. Co.. Toronto. 

Williams & Wilson. Ltd.. Montreal. Que. 

Waltaiiv & "^Uson. Limited, Montireal. Que. 
VALVE LEATHERS 

Oraton ft Knight Mfg Co.. Montreal 
VALVE GRINDERS (PNEUMATIC) 

dereland Pneumatic Tool Co. of Canada. ToronU 
VALVES. HYDRAULIC 

Matalwood Mfg. Co . Deaalt. Mioh. 
VANADIUM STEEL 

J P. A. Comstedt. New York City. N.Y. 
VENTILATING APPARATUS 

BTmntford Oren ft Back Co.. Brantford. Ont 

Can. B'ower ft Forge Co.. Kitihener. Ont 

Bheldoni. Lbnited. Gait. Ont. 

A H William- Machy Co Tnmntn 

wnilams & wnson, Limited. Montreal. Quo. 
VISE STANDS. PORTABLE 

New BriUin Machine Co.. New BriUin. Oonn. 

wmlama ft Co.. J. H.. Brooklyn. NY. 
VISES. BENCH 

Alkenhead Hardware Co.. Toronto. Ont. 
BeekoT Milling Machine Co.. Boston. Masa. 

The Geo. F. Fnaa MchT. A Supply C«.. MontiaaL 
N-w BHfoin M.rhine Co. New Rrlt.ln Conn. 

Williams & Wilson, Limited, Montreal, Quo. 

VISES. PIPE 

Atkanhend Hardware Co.. Toronto, Ont 
Bntt«t«eld ft Co., Roek Island. Qne. 
Wens Bros. Co. of Canada OsIt nnt 

J W Wmiam" ft Cn Tt.-ooklrn V T. 

Williams & Wilson. Limited. Montrenl, Qno. 
VISES. PLANER AND 9HAPER 

Alkenhead Hardware Co.. Tomnto. Ont, 

qwnner Chock C«.. N— Bril.<- c™,b 

Wffltams ft Wilson. Limited. Moiitrenl, Quo. 
WASHER MACHINES 

Nstionsl Machy. Co., Tiffin. Ohio. 
WASHERS , ^ 

Bamv, Wallace, Co.. BrisU*. Conn. 

Oraton ft Knight Mfg. Co. Worc...ter. Maaa. 

Kajser-Ellison & Co., Ltd., MontreaL 

Norton, Ralph B.. Agent, Mcoti^aL 

London Bolt ft Hinge Woriu. i-uodoo. Ont 

Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd.. HamUlon. Ont 
WASTE 

CnSted Brass & Lead Ltd.. Toronto. 

Wilkinson & Kompaas. Hamilton. Ont 

Wood Turret Machine Co.. BraiO. Ind 
WATER-INTAKE SCREENS 

Can. Link-Belt Co.. Toronto. Ont. 
WATER TOWERS 

Toronto Iron Works. Ltd.. Toiftn. ^^ 

WELDING. ELECTRIC. SPOT. BUTT. KTC 

St Lawrence Welding Co.. Montreal. Qua. 
WELDING MASKS „ , > ^, 

Strong. Kennard ft Nutt Co.. Clerdand. Ohlfc 
WELDERS. ELECTRIC, SPOT. 
BUTT. ETC. 

Tabor Mfg. Co.. Phfladelphla Pa. 
WELDING RODS AND WIRE 

Page Steel & Wire Co.. Adrian. Mieh. 
WELDING. WORK AND SUPPLIES 
(Aotocenoua and Oxy-Acetylene i aeo OXT- 
ACETYLENE 
WHEELS. SPROCKET AND TRACTION 

C«n Link-Belt CjI. To.nnto "nt 

wnilams & Wilson. Limited. Montreal. Quo. 
WHEELS. PRESSED STEFL 

American Pulley Co.. Philadelphia. Pa. 
WHEEL TRUEING TOOLS , _ , „ 

Anderson ft Co.. of Canada. Geo . Montreal, Qua. 

WT.»et Trieine Tool Co Wln^.n. <1nt 

wmiama ft Wllaon. Limited. Montreal. Que. 
W'NCHFS . 

Can. IngersoU-Rand Co., Sherbrooke, Que. 

John H. Hall * Sons. Br.nHor.1 

Kennedy ft Son. Wm.. Ow-n S~.n^ <*"^, 

Morris Crane ft Hoist Co.. Hertert, Niagara 
Falls. Ont _ ^ „ .^ _,., 

Northern Crane Wnrka. w.ikerwti. 
WIRE. CAST STEEL AND MT'SIC 

Kayser-EllLson ft Co.. Ltd.. MontreaL 

Norton. Ralph B.. Agent. Montreal. 
WIRE COILING AND POINTING 
MACHINERY 

Baird Machine Co.. Brldgetmrt. Oonn. 

F. B. Shuster Co.. New Haran. Oaan. 

Sleener ft Hirtley TnO . WoroaotOt. UaM. 

WIRING MACHINES 

Quictwor* Co., i*t Marys, OMa 
WRENCHES. PIPE, POWER 

Peck, Stow ft Wilcox Co., Southington. Oonn. 



168 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 



Volume XXI. 

Miiiyi 



"THE COVENTRY" CHAIN DRIVES 



^! 1 



THE ideal drive for all kinds 
of power transmission. In 
the case of the rolling mill illus- 
trated, considerable power, large 
reduction of speed ratio, even 
flexible torque, silence and short 
centres are required. Note short 
distance between centres in front 
chain drive. 

THE 



COVENTRY 

REGISTERED TRADE MARK 



THE "COVENTRY" CHAIN Co.. Ltd. 

COVENTRY, ENGLAND 

Cables: Chains, Coventry. Codes A. B.C., 4th and 5th Editions, 
and Western Union 




Rolling Mill for producing stream line wire 
for aeroplanes. Diameter of rolls 9", rolling 
speed 20.0 per minute. 



HlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllilllillllllHIIllllllllilililililiM 



Jlfl^lli^ 



SraC TUBINGi 



pOR Agricultural Implements, Trolley Arms, Fence 
Posts, Bedsteads — and all kinds of manufacturing 
purposes. Reliable quality, uniform in size, 14 to 20 
gauge, size 3/g" to 2" outside diameter. 






Co. 



Sklnej Tool Co. 

-Silver Mfg. Co 

•Simouda Canada Saw Co. 

Skinner Cbuck .Co 

Sleeper & Hartley. Inc. . 
i$m.nlk*y-General Co., Inc. 
St-indaixi Fuel Engineering 

Stimdard Optical Co 

Standard Pressed Steel Co. 
■siandaixl Tifte & Pence Co. 
Slarrett Co., L. S. 

Steel Co. of Canada ."..' 

S-teinle T>irret ilachine Co. 
St. Lawrence Welding Co. 
stoll Co., D. H....... 

Strong. Kennard & Nutt Co 
.Swedish .Steel & Importing Co 



124 
31 
26 

144 
. 93 
, W 
. 135 
. 100 
. 129 
. 168 
, 27 
. -3 
. 132 
. 71 
. 144 
. 145 
. 9 



Continued from page 170. 



Tabor .Mfg. Co 

Taft-Pierce Mf<r. Co 

Tallman Brass & .\Ietal Co. 

Tayloi-, .1. A. .M. 

Toledo Machine & Tool Co. 

Toomey. Franlt ■ 89 

Toronto Iron Works 163 

Toronto Testing Lahoratory, Ltd. ... 14fi 

Toronto Tool Co » 95 

Trahcm Pump Co 140 

D 

Union- Carbide Co ,.,. 

United Brass & l.ead. Ltd. 

United Hammer Co. 

United States Elec. Tool Co. .. 
United States Machine Tool Co. 
Universal Grinding Machine Co. 



W 
81 
110 

91 
142 



110 



»1, 145 
... 144 



Vanadium-Allo.vs Steel Co. 

Victor Saw Works 

Victor Tool Co 

Victoria Foundry Co 

Volta Mfg. Co 

Vulcan Crucible Steel Co. 



W 

Walcott Lathe Co 

Walton Co., The 

Warner & Swa-sey Co: ... 
Welding & Supplies Co. ... 
Wells Bros. Co. of Canada 

Wentworth Mfig. Ca 

West Tire Setter Co 

Wheel Tnieing Tool Co. 



. IG 
. 29 
. IIS 
, 139 
115 
, 17 



4 
m) 
106 
91 
43 
92 
169 
143 



Whitcomb-BLiLsdell -Macli. Tool C' 

WTlituey .V.g. Ci 

Wickes Brothel's 

Wilkinson & Kompjts.-* 

Williams llaclU'. Co.. A. R ' 

William."; & Co.. J. H 

William.s & Wilson. Lt.1 

Williams Tool Co. , 
Willson & Co., T. A 
Wil-son & Co.. J. C. 

Wilt Twist Diill Co 

Windsor Machine A Tool Works. 

Wisconsin Elec. Co 

Wood Turret Machine C4> 

Wright ilfg. Co. .. 



7^-n\\\\ Coal & Steel PlxIucw 



I(.-J 
lis 
103 
115 
, 81 
107 
165 
12" 
147 



117 
108 



March, 1919 169 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 

AND MANUFACTURING NEWS 

A weekly newspaper devoted to the machinery and manufacturing interests. 



Vol. XXI. TORONTO, APRIL B, 1919 . '-■ No. 14 



EDITORIAL CONTENIS 

THE NEW HOME OF PRATT & WHITNEY CO., LTD .321 

A NEW METHOD FOR THE SMELTING OF IRON ORES 32.5 

CANADIAN MACHINERY DRAFTING COURSE— PART 1 332 

WELDING AND CUTTING 33.5 

WHAT OUR READERS THINK AND DO 336 

PROGRESS IN NEW EQUIPMENT 338 

EDITORIAL 340 

MARKET DEVELOPMENTS 342 

Summary. . . .Toronto Letter. . . .Montreal Letter. . . .Pittsburgh Letter. . . .New York 
Letter. 

SELECTED MARKET QUOTATIONS 76 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENTS 80 



THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, Pres. H. T. HUNTER, Vice-pres. H. V. TYRRELL, Gen. Man. 

Publishers of Hardware and Metal. The Financial Post. MacLean's Magazine. Farmers' Mafeazine. 

Canadian Grocer. Dry Goods Review. Men's Wear Review. Printer atid Publisher, Bookseller and 

Stationer. Canadian Machinery and Manufacturing News. Power House. Sanitary Engineer. 

Cana'dian Foundryman, Marine Engineering of Canada. 

Cable Address : Macpubco, Toronto : Atabek, London. Eng. 

ESTABLISHED 1887. 



(ANADiAN Machinery 

"^ Manufactur ng News 



A. R. KENNEDY, Managing Editor. B. G. NEWTON, Manager. 

Associate Editors: J. H. RODGERS, W. F. SUTHERLAND. T. H. FENNER. 
Eastern Canada Representative: D. W. Towne ; Ontario Representative: S. S. 
Moore: Toronto and Ha'milton Representative: W. E. G. MacDonald. 
CHIEF OFFICES : 
CANADA— Montreal, Southam Building, 128 Bleury Street. Telephone 1004; Toronto, 143-163 University Ave., Tele- 
phone Main 7324: Winnipeg, 1207 Union Trust Building, Telephone Main 3449. 
GREAT BRITAIN— LONDON, The MacLean Company of Great Britain, Limited, 88 Fleet Street, E.G., E. J. Dodd, 

Director. Telephone Central 12960. Cable address : Atabek, London, Engla'nd. 
UNITED STATES—New York. A. R. Lowe, Room 620, 111 Broadway, N.Y.. Telephone Rector 8971; Boston, C. L. 
Morton, Room 734, Old South Building, Telephone Main 1204. A. H. Byrne, Room 900, Lytton BIdg., 14 E. 
Jackson Street, Chicago, Telephone Harrison 1147. 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE— Canada, Great Britain, South Africa and the West Indies. $3.00 a yeat ; United States 
$3.50 a year: other countries, $4. CO a year; Single Copies, 15 cents. Invariably in advance. 



170 



C A N A D I A N M A C H I N E R Y 



Volume XXI. 



Anybody Can Operate This Miller 

and Turn Out a Pile of Work 
so Simple to Operate is the 




U 



HENDEY 



yj 



Skilled mechanics are scarce these days — but 
anyone can run a machine of its simplicity and 
turn out work accurately and fast without 
trouble. 

All Feeds positive driven through gearings giv- 
ing 18 changes. 

This is the universal type — designed to handle 
all milling operations performed on machines of 
this character, either with regular equipment or 
by aid of attachments, which can be supplied 
for increasing efficiency and scope of machine. 

Write for full description 

The Hendey Machine Co. 

Torrington, Conn., U.S.A. 

Canadian Arcnta: A. R. Willianu Machinery Co.. Toronto, Ont. 
A. K. Williams Mnchinery Co., 260 Princess St., Winnipeg; A. K 
Williams Macliinery Co., Vancouver; A. R. Williams Machinerr Co.. 
St. John. N.B. : William* & Wilaon, Montreal. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



A 

Acme -Vlachine Tool Co 6 

Aibenhead Hanlware Co 75 

Albany Hardware Spec. Co 128 

AJgoma Steel Corp 37 

Allentown B-Tperimental Works M 

Allen Mfg. Co. 144 

Almond Mfg. Co 120 

American Pulley Co 14S 

Anderson. G*o. A 141 

Anderson's Efficiency Service 96 

Archibald & Co.. C. P 86 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co. 105 

Atlas Press Co 85 

Aurora Tool Works ..;; 130 

.\n<itin Co., Inc.. F. C 89 

B 

Baird Machine Co 146 

Banfleld, W. H UH 

Barnes Co., W. F., & John 130 

Barnes, Wallace, Co. 85 

Becker .Milling Machine Co 93 

Bellevue Industrial Furnace Co. ... lljO 

Beraard Industrial Co., A 147 

Bertram & .Sons Co.. John 1 

Bertrams, l,td 83 

Betts Machine Co. 5 

Bicknell-Thomas Co. US 

Blake & Johnson Co 32 

BIlss Co;. E. W 142 

Boker & Co., Inc., H 18 

Bowser & Co.. Inc., S. F 137 

Brantfonl Emery Wheel Co. 147 

Brantford Oven & Rack Co 83 

Bridgcford ilachme & Tool Works.. 5 

Bristol Company 144 

Broadbent & Sons, Thos. 113 

Brown, Boggs Co 11 

Brown Kng. Corp 51 

Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co. 151 

Brown's Copper & Brass Rolling 

Mnis 33 

Budden. Hanbury A- 83 

Butterfleld & Co., Inc 121 

C 
Canada Pounilries & Forgings. Ltd.. 19 

Canada Machinery Corporation 

Outside back cover 

Canada .Metal Co 18, 87 

Can.ida Wire & Iron Goods Co. ... 138 

Cm. Blower & -Forge Co 32 

Can. Cartridse Co )59 

C^n. »'ons<>lidate<i Rubber Co. 81 

Can. Des-monl-Stephan Co 122 

Can. llraini .Steel Co 146 

Can. F.iirlwnlci-Morse Co 46 

-Can. Ingersoll-Rand Co 6 

Can. Linls- Belt Co "4 

Can. Steel Foundries. Ltd 9 

Can. Winkley Co 143 



I'ailyle Johnson .Machine Co 

Carter Welding Co 

Chapman Double Ball Bearing Co. 

Cincinnati Electrical Tool Co. 

("isco Machine Tool Co. 

Cleyeland Twist Drill Co. 

Cincinnati Millinjg .Madi. Co 

Classified Advertising 

Clipper Belt Laccr Co 

Commercial Camera Co 

Consolidated Optical Co. 

Consolidated Press Co. 

Cook. A. 8 

Coventry Chain Co. 

t^owan Truck Co 

Curtis & Curtis 

Curtis Pneumatic Mach. Co. 

Cushman Chuck Co 

D 

Darling Bros.. Ltd 

Davidson .Mfg. Co.. Ltd., The Thos. 

Davidson Tool Mfg. Corp 

Davis-Boumonville Co 

Deloro Smelting & RetiuiDg Co 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works.. 

Dickow. F. C 

Dom. Foundries & Steel 

Dominion Pattern Works 

Drury Co., H. A 

Dunbar Bros. Co.. The 

E 



8 

1«1 
22 
US 
103 
153 
140 

1.A 
IW 
14l> 
135 
14S 
16S 
142 
15 
112 
120 

146 
71 
i9 

147 
23 
\2< 
Si 

101 

147 
21 

IL! 



Eastern Machine Screw Corp. 
Electric .Steel & Metals Co. . 

Elliott & Whitehall 

Ellis & Co., P. W 

Enushevsky & Son. B 

Bspen-Lucas Machine Works . 



, U9 
13 
91 
SS 
155 
99 



Fetheistonhaugh & Co 83 

Financial Post of C.anada 85 

Urth & Sons. Thos 8 

Fitchburg Grinding .Mach. Ca .... 91 

Ford Chain Block & .Mfg. Co. 130 

Ford-Smith 'Machine Co. ...Front cover 
Foss Mach. & Supply Co.. Geo. F. 

Inside back cover 

Foster Machme Co. LiS 

Vox -Mach. Co 133 

Franklin Mfg. Co 128 

Frost Mfg. Co 144 

Fry's (London). Ltd 26 

O 

Gait Machine Screw Co 94 

Garlock-Walker Machy. Co 88 

Garvin Machine Co 126 

General .Steel Co 9 

Geometric Tool Co 71 

Giddings & Lewis Mfg. Co 155 

GUbcrt & Barker .Mfg. Col 136 



fiisholt Machine Co .44-45 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co 36 

Gooley A E<llun I. Inc. 10 

Grant Gear Works I4fi 

Grant Mfg. & Machine Co. 141 

Gralon & Kniglit .Mfg. Co X 

Greenfield Machine Co. 31 

Greenfield Tap & Die Coi-p. 43 

Greenleafs Ltd 83 

H 

Hal! &. Sons. Ltd.. John H 14 

Hammond Steel Co ig 

Hamilton Gear & Machine Co. ...'. 14C 

Hamilton Co.. William. l,td 92 

Hanna & Co.. M. .V 8 

Haitiinge Bros. '.'". 127 

Harbison- Walker Refactories ....'..'.'. 85 

Hawkridge Bros S4 

Heald .Vlachine Co !..!. 26 

Heaton's .\gency 83 

Hendey Machine Co " 170 

Henry & Wrifht .Mfg. Co. 32 

Hepburn. John T 140 

High Speed Hammer Co.. Inc. .'...'. 159 

Hinckley ^I.ich. Works 147 

Hoefer Mfg. Co 141 

Homer & Wilson .'us 

Hoyt Metal Co ig 

Hull Iron & Steel Foundries 161 

Hunter Saw & Machine Co 28 

Hurlburt-Rogers Machinery Co. 107 

I 
niingwoith .Steel Co.. The John... 21 

Illinois Trxil Works 79 

Independent Pneumatic Tool Co 96 

IngersoU File Co 40 

International -Malleable Iron Wks. . 34 

J 

Jacobs -Mfg Co U9 

Janline & Co.. A. B 13 

Johnson Machine Co.. Carlyle 8 

Joliette Steel Co 145 

Jones & Glassco 163 

Joyce-Koebel Co 118 

K 

Katie Foini.lrj- Co 93 

Kayser. Ellison & Co. ]2 

Kelly Re.amer Co 93 

Kempsmith Mfg. Co ill 

Kennedy & Sons. Wm 151 



Lancashire D>-namo & Motor Co... 138 

iLandis Machine Co 152 

Landis Tool Co 117 

Latrobe Electric Steel Co 15 

LeBlond .Mach. Tool Co. 13 

Lindsay. .John 65 

Lufkin Ride Co 83 

LjTid-Faiquhar Co 22 



M 

.M.icKinuon Steel Co 1*4 

.MacLeaii's .Magazine 109 

.Manitoba Steel Foundries. Ltd. 144 

Marion & .Marion 83 

Marshalltown Mfg. Co Hi 

.Marten Mach. Co 92 

.Matheson & Co.. 1 8? 

Matthews .^ Co., Jas. H. 12 

-MelMUEall Co.. Ltd.. B. 40 

McLaren, J. C, Belting Co 146 

Mechanical Engineering Co. 136 

Metalwood Mfg. Co « 

Modem Tool Co. 114 

.Morton Mfg. Co. «S 

.Murchcy .Machme & Tool Oo. 119 

N 

National .-icme Co. . ... 157 

Nicholson FMle 95 

Nil&i-Bement-Pond .. Inside froikt cover 

Northern Crane Works 113 

Norton. -\. O MS 

Norton Co. 42 

Norton Grinding Co 33 

.Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co 20 ' 

O 

Oaklev Chemical Co 137 

O'Brien. M. J . 89 

Ott Grinder Co. .. .97 

P 

Page Steel i Wire Co. 131 

Pangbom Cori>oiution 1G3 

P.aimenter & Bulloch Co 146 

Peerle.ss -Machine Co 161 

Penrn. Wm. R 161 

Philadelphia Gear Works 21 

Pittsburgh Crushed Steel Co 138 

Plewes. Ltd 83 

Positive Clutch & Pulley Works... 145 

Pmtt & Whitney Inside front cover 

Publishers Page 2 

Q 

Qiiick^voi'k Co 96 

R 

Racine Tool & Machine Co 26 

Reed-Prentice Co. 41 

Reliance Motor & Tool Ce. S8 

Rhodes .Mfg. Co 112 

Kickert-Shafer Co. '.' 31 

Rochester Ball Bearing Co 146 

Rockwell Co.. W. S 135 

Roelofson Machme & Tool Co. .... 1'.3 

-S 

Seneca Falls Mfg. Ca 54 

.Shipman & Co.. H. C 83 

.Shore Instrument Co 145 

Shoster Co.. F. B JO 



Continued on page 168 



C A X A D I A N M A T II [ N E R Y 



J 



L 




Splendid 
Values 



In New and 
Second-hand 



Machinery 



LATHES SECOND-HAND AND NEW 

2 — 19^' X 10' Sidney Quick Change Gear Engine Lathes. 

1 — 17" X 10' Sidney Quick Chance Gear Engine Lathe. 

5 — 18" X 10' Mueller Standard Heavy Duty Engine Lathes. 

1 — 16" X 8' Monarch Quick Change Gear Engine Lathe. 

1 — 28" X 14' Boye & Emmes Instantaneous Quick Change Gear Engine Lathe. 

dition. 
1 — 18" X 8' McDougall Quick Change Gear Engine Lathe. In good condition. 



In first class con- 



= MILLERS NEW AND SECOND-HAND = 

^S 2 — No. 1 Kempsmith Universal Milling Machines. ZZ 

SS 2 — No. 2 Kempsmith Universal Milling Machines. ^ZZ 

^^ 1 — No. 1 Kempsmith Universal Milling Machine. In first class condition. ^;; 

^2 1 — No. 3 Kempsmith Universal Milling Machine. In first class condition. ^^ 

^^ 2 — No. 21 Garvin Plain Milling Machines. In first class condition. ^— ■ 

g SHAPERS NEW AND SECOND-HAND = 

SS 1—28" Smith & Mills Actual Stroke 32" Single Pulley Gear Box Drive Shaper. — 

— 1—26" X 30" C.M.C. Back Geared Crank Shaper. j^ 
— ■ 1—20" Smith & Mills Back Geared Crank Shaper. ^— 

— 2—16" Smith & Mills Back Geared Crank Shapers. ^S 
^™ 1 — 20" Ohio Back Geared Crank Shaper. In first class condition. — 
^S 1 — 16" Ohio Back Geared Crank Shaper. In first class condition. S^ 

1 DRILLS NEW AND SECOND-HAND s 

^— 2— Class "B" 8" Henry & Wright Sensitive Drills. , ^^ 

— 2— Class "B" 12 Henrv & Wright Sensitive Drills. — 

— 1—20" Silver Plain Drill. SS 
^— 1 — 76" C.M.C. Portable Radial Drill. Complete with motor attached. In first class condition. SS 

^S The abovf is a partial list of new and second-hand machines we have in ^^ 

^SI stock for immediate shipment. For further particulars write, wire or ^^ 

SSS phone us. Get our monthly stock book. j;^ 

SS Inspection Invited — 

s The Geo. F. Foss Machinery & Supply Co., Limited ^ 



Machine Tools and Supplies 
PHONE MAIN 8500 305 St. James Street 



MONTREAL ^ 



n 



/ 



CANADIAN MACHINERY 




SLOTTERS 



Sizes 11", 15", 18" and 24" 



The C.M.C. Slotter is designed to com- 
bine strength and rigidity with con- 
venience of operation, and has all 
modern improvements. 

It is built with that thoroughness and 
embodies all the mechanical excellence 
that so distinguishes the entire line of 
C.M.C. machine tools. 

A special descriptive bulletin is cheer- 
fully furnished to parties interested- 

Send us your enquiries. 

CANADy^MACHINERY CORPORATION 

LIMITED 

GALT - ONTARIO 

Toronto Office and Warerooms: 

BROCK AVENUE SUBWAY