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Full text of "The Canadian nurse"

Canadian 




VOLUME 60 



MONTKEAl 



MAY 1 964 



Nurse 



NUMBER 5 




Let's Look at the Teacher 

Gynecology and Obstetrics 
— A Nursing Challenge 

Hip Arthroplasty 



OWNED AND PUBUSHED BY 



THE CANADIAN NURSES' ASSOCIATION 



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MAY 1964 - VOU 80. No. 5 



425 



^etwecK OuMeiM4^ 



Each biennium. in ihe spring months 
preceding the general meeting, it has long 
been our custom to invite the officers of 
our Association or the chairmen of the 
major committees to share with you their 
thinking, as our guest editors, on matters 
affecting our profession. This month we 
are proud to welcome our first vice-pres- 
ident, Ann Isobel (Black) MacLeod to 
uur pages. Before you read Mrs. MacLeod's 
editorial, take a quick look at the Ticket 
of Nominations on page 474 and you will 
note that she is president-elect by acclama- 
tion. Now, as you read "A Health Assess- 
ment" you will realize how thoroughly fa- 
miliar with all of the activities, develop- 
ments our president-to-be already is. 

A graduate of the University of Alberta 
Hospital, with her M.A. from Teachers 
College. Columbia University. Mrs. Mac 
I.eod is the wife of a prominent psychiatrist 
in Montreal. Her early professional career 
concentrated, broadly speaking, on the field 
of public health nursing. Since 1953 she 
has been the director of nursing of Tlie 
Montreal General Hospital. During this 
past biennium she has been chairman of 
the CNA Fiaance Committee and also of 
the special committee that studied the in- 
terrelationships of the National Office of 
our association and the Canadian Nurse 
journal office. 



Have you ever thought of the fact that 
"obstetrics" and "gynecology" are twin fac- 
ets of medical care that are distinctly and 
completely feminine in character? As Dr. 
J. Edwin Coffey points out in his discus- 
sion of "Newer CofKcpls in Gynecology," 
the two fields are so closely allied there is 
a definite trend today toward melding them 
into one specially. 

Agenesis or aplasia is the partial or 
complete failure of a part of Ihe body to 
develop: in the current article, a part of the 
female reproductive system. While the sur- 
geon couM assist nature, the comprehensive 
nursing care that was required and provided 
was of the utmost importance to the ul- 
timate recovery of the patient. 



Every nurse is ver>' familiar with Ihe 
care of patients afflicted with the chronic 
condition of the joints — arthritis. A 
youthful nurse who has never seen an 
arthritic patient recover to a point even 
approaching normal use of those affected 
joints is apt to be extremely pessimistic. 
She needs to be reminded constantly that a 
considerable degree of recovery is not only 
possible but probable with adequate, intel- 
ligent care. In particular, those patients 
who can benefit from arthroplasty will be 
able to resume their normal pattern of life, 
free from endless, nagging pain. Following 
surgery, which is clearly outlined by Dr. 
Igor Bitenc, there is a long, slow period of 
rehabilitation during which good nursing 
care is so essential. Physiotherapy and oc- 
cupational therapy have important roles 
in promoting recovery but it is the nurse, 
through her more frequent contacts with 
the patient, who can supply the psycho- 
therapy that is never more vital than when 
emotional upsets, worry and discouragement 
torment the sufferer. 



Next month, many nurses will be travel- 
ling to St. John's, Newfoundland for their 
first visit to that friendly Atlantic province. 
Accommodations have been arranged for a 
thousand visitors. We hope your application 
has gone in long since. 

Those of you who are lucky enough to 
be going will receive Ihe warmest welcome 
you have ever been accorded anywhere 
in Ihe world. You can become familiar 
with many of the "different" expressions 
that may be recognized from the items in 
World of Nursing this month. 

While your welcome will b« heart warm- 
ing, Ihe weather does not always match 
the graciousness of our hostesses. It may 
be cold; it may be damp: there may be 
icebergs off shore; there might even be a 
middle of June snow storm. .So bring plenty 
of warm clothes, your most comfortable 
walking shoes and. just in case, a leak- 
proof hot water bottle. 

BE SBEFNG YOU IN ST. JOHN'S! 



i 



# 



426 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 




THE 

CANADIAN 

May 1964, Vol. 60, No. 5 NURSE 



453 A Health Assessment A. I. MacLeod 

455 Gynecology and Obstetrics: A Nursing Challenge /. E. Coffey 

459 Agenesis of the Female Reproductive Tract 

5. M. Miall and D. E. MUligan 

463 Hip Arthroplasty /. Bitenc 

466 The Long Road Home j. McKay 

471 Let's Look at the Teacher 5. Jourard 

479 CNA Executive Meets in Ottawa J. Ferguson 

480 Many Irons in the Fire 



The views expressed in the various articles are the view's of the authors and 

do not necessarily represent the policy or views of 

The Canadian Nurse nor of the Canadian Nurses' Association. 



426 Between Ourselves 475 The World of Nursing 

430 Pharmaceuticals and Other -«- ,- 

Products ^" Employment Opk)rtunities 

432 Random Comments 522 Educational Opportunities 
474 CNA Ticket of Nominations. 

Biennium 1964-1966 527 Index to Advertisers 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60. No 5 



427 



Journal Board: Miss Alice Girard, Chainnan; Misses M. Cameron, M. Lewis, G. Char- 
bonneau, H. McArthur, M. Richmond, S. Alcoe, Mrs. I. MacLeod, Sr. D. Lefebvre. Miss 
E. A. E. MacLennan. president CNA; Misses H. Mussallem, M. E. Kerr. 



EdHerial Advisor*: Ailwrla, Miss Jeon Cummins, 1305 Mootreol Ave., Calgory; British Columbia, Miss 
Marion Mocdonell, 1807 West 36th Ave., Voncoover 13; Manitoba, Miss Sheila L. Nixon, 31-105 Ros- 
lyn Road, Winnipeg 13; Now Brunswick, Miss Anna Christie, 231 Saunders St., Fredericton; Now- 
feundtand. Miss Ruby Harnett, 59 Bennett Ave., St. John's; Nova Scotio, Mrs Hope Mack, Nova 
Scotia Sanotorium, Kenfville; Ontario, RNAO, 33 Price St., Toronto; Princo Edward Island, Miss Ido 
MocKoy, Dept. of Health, Dominion BIdg., Charlottetown; Quoboc, Sr. M. Elaine, St. Mory's Hospilol, 
Montreol (English); Sr. Sointe-Borbe, Hotel Dieu Hospital, Quebec City (French); Saskatchewan, Miss 
Victoria Antonini, SRNA, 2066 Retollack St., Regino. 



Executive Director and Editor: Margaret E. Kerr, M.A., R.N. 

Associate Editor: Jean E. MacGregor, B.N.. R.N. 

Assistant Editor (English): Virginia A. Lindabury. B.Sc.N., R.N. 

Assistant Editor (French): Claire Bigue. B.Sc., Ed. Inf.. I.L. 

Circulation Mcnoger Winnifred MocLeon 

Subscription Rales: Canada and Bermuda: 6 months. $2.25; one year. $4.00; two years, $7. 

Student nurses: one year. $3.00: three years, $7.00. 

U.S.A. and Foreign: one year, $4.50; two years. $«.0(). 

Single copies: 50 cents each. 

For the subscribers in Canada, in combination with the 
American Journal of Nursing or Nursing Outlook: I year. $10.00. 

Make cheques and money orders payable to The Canadian Nurse. 

Change of address: Four weeks' notice and the old address as well as ihe new are necessary. 
Not responsible for journals lost in mail due to errors in address. 

Authorized as Second-Class Mail by the Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment 
of postage in cash. Postpaid at Montreal. 

RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED 

1522 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal 25, Quebec 
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MAY 1964 - VOL. flO, No. 5 



429 



iharmaceuticals 

ana older products 



BETADINE SHAMPOO (BRITISH DRUG HOUSES) 

IndkatiotM — For the sofe, effective treotment of seborrheic condition* of the icalp chorocter- 
ijed by erythemo, scaling ond exfoliation of the scalp with excessive dandruff or>d occomponied 
by prurifis; as a gerwral germicidol skin cleanser in ihe prevention of ocute inflomrtKjtory skin 
diseases and recurrent furunculosis. 

Description — An antiseptic shampoo containing 7.5% povidone-iodine as an active ingredient. 
It forms a rich, golden lather, free from ony objectiortable medicirxil odor. Available in plastic 
squeeze bottle of 4 fluid ourKes. 

COMPIAMIN (EUlOn-AAARION) 

Indicotions — For the treatment of peripheral vascular artd cerebral vascular disease. 

Description — Complomin is o xantfiir)e derivative of 3-pyridine carbonic acid. It acts by in- 
creasing the blood supply to the skin and musculoture by opening the reserve copillaries. 

Administration — In ocirte coses, Complomin should be used in large doses porenterally, 
orolly or both. Suggested dosage is 1.8-5.4 Gm. doily. Ttte suggested dosoge for mointenonce 
therapy is 0.9-1.8 Gm. daily. 

Side Effect* — The toxicity of Complomin is low. No deleterious side effects have been noted. 
A sensation of warmth in the skin may appear in the upper half of the body, then subside in 
10-20 minutes. This usually disappears after the drug has been used 3 or 4 days. 

Contra indications — Should r>ot be given with ganglionic blocking ogents, phenothiazines or 
piperozirw derivatives. Should be used with caution on potients with peptic ulcer. 

DISPOSABLE WASH CLOTH (LOWNDES) 
Description — A nor)-woven, obsorbent wash cloth that lasts "one per patient per day." Sur- 
veys hove shown that its use is SO per cent less expensive than use of the horsher-surfoced 
conventionol woven fabric. Further savings ore reolized because counting, sorting and "penalty" 
charges for shortoges ore eliminated. Available in 11" x 12" size or lorger. 

FOOT aEVATOR (J. T. POSEY) 

Uses— Forms a soft, light collar oround the ankle, elevating the foot to give tfte patient 
moximum tomfort and protection without ony irritation from contoct whh the sheet. 

Description — Composed of polyether foam covered by a slick plastic shield The soft cotton 
liner is lounderobie. 

HEMA-COMBISTIX (AMES) 

Uses — A four-woy "dip-ond-read" strip test for simultat>eous edorimetrlc determination of 
urinary pH, glucose, protein and occult blood. 

Deicriptioii— Hemo-Combistix is ideal for rapid routine testing in the physician's office, and 
for routine urinalysis in the hospitol ond loborotory. Folse positives due to turbidity interference, 
nor>-glucose reducing substances, etc., ore eliminated. The test requires only drops of urine ar>d 
is time-saving ortd economical. Avoiloble in glass bottles of 100 strips. A color chart oppeors 
on eoch bottle label. 

SANSKT (SANDOZ) 

Indication* — For tfie prevention of severe, recurring votculor headaches. 

Description — Sonsert has three moin actions: It inhibits serotonin (o vasoconstrictor compound); 
it reduces fluctuotions of blood vessels; it affects vorious porn factors, otw of which appears to be 
serotonin. Each sugar-coated tablet contains 2 mg. methysergide ntoleote. 

Administratiefi — Average maintenorKe dosage: 2-4 tab. doily with meals. 

Contra indicolien* — Not to be used by patients with peripheral vosculor disease, cororwry artery 
disease, severe arteriosclerosis, pregmncy. 

SINOOKATIM (SQUIBB) 

Use* — A contrast medium to give radiogrophic evidence of physiologic ond pothologic corv 
ditions of the fecrxjle genital tract. Specifically intended for hysterosolplrtgogrophy. 

De tcf iprtew A sterile aqueous solution of 40% Renografin, 20% Cholografin methylglu- 
comine solts, and opproximotely 38% firmly bound iodine. Sodium citrote is added as o buffer. 

Administiulion The medium is administered to patient in lithotomy position. To visualize 
the uterus, 3 to 4 cc. usually suffice. An additional 2 to 4 cc. will demonstrate tfte lube*. 

r*e iMmal pnmmlt phaemmcn tl cals for imfotmalhm. Manes «ii<i» m «rf Uttl mh • «*|nfe<M mmt $n»ttlk: 
430 THE CANADIAN NURSE 



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MAY 1964 - VOL 60. No 5 



«1 



T 




Test Pool Examinations 

FOR 

Registration of Nurses 

IN 

Nova Scotia 



To take place on Augutt 19, 20 and 21, 
1964 at Halifax, Sydney, New Glatgow, 
Antigonith and Yarmouth. Requests for 
application forms should be mode at 
once and forms must be returned to the 
Registrar not later tiion June 19th, IM4 
togetfier with: 

I. Diplofna of School of Nursing; 

7. Fee of Twenty Dollars ($20 00). 
Applications received after this date wHI 
not be accepted. No undergraduate moy 
write unless he or she has passed success- 
fully oil final school of nursing exomino- 
tions and is within nine (9) weeks of com- 
pletion of the course in nursing. 

NANCY H. WATSON, R.N., 
REGISTRAR, 

THE REOISTfREO NURSES' ASSOCIATION 

OF NOVA SCOTIA. 
«024 QUINPOOl ROAD, HAIIFAX, N.S. 



/^mJm C<^mmenis 



Only tagacd letters submitted to the editor 
will be considered for publication here. 
Name will be withheld from the published 
letter at the writer's request. 

Dear Editor: 

Attention Hamilton General Hospital 
Graduates! Your School of Nursing cele- 
brates its 75th Anniversary in June 1965. 
Have we your correct address, maiden and 
married names and year of graduation? If 
not. please notify the Alumnae Office. Se- 
nior Residence. Hamilton General Hospital. 
B. McMullen. Chairman, 
Publicity Committee. 

D;ar Editor: 

Mrs. McDonald is to be commended for 
her letter (July '63). At a time when the 
press is assailing medicine in general, we 
should welcome constructive criticism from 
our members: I personally find many ar- 
ticles a ponderous mass of verbiage. 

The student nursing care studies are good. 
although they tend to emphasize routine 
nursing details. (We assume the patient has 
been turned, and his back rubbed). Theae 
studies neglect the broader issues, e.g. sta- 
tistics re prognosis, etc. 

There is little in the magazine of world 
interest. Our diseases nowadays are mainly 
from over-indulgence of some sort, while 
61% of the peoples of the globe are hun- 
gry! This should be of vital concern to each 
of us. M. Motley, Ont. 

Dear Editor: 

In the Jan. '64 issue ("In a Capsule") the 
matter of Florence Nightingale seemed, 
even as a capsule, hard to take. I have had 
a special interest in this lady, lately: Having 
had $100 given to me for my favorite 
charity. I chose to see what a nurse in 
Indonesia needed. Her request for second- 
hand text books has already been looked 
after. She also asked for a skeleton, (too 
costly), and a picture of Florence Nightin- 
gale — also very hard to come by. Now I 
have, by the kindness of our library here, 
found a clipping from an old London Il- 
lustrated ot her holding her lamp while 
wounded are being brought into a low-vault- 
ed room. This is now being mounted and 



432 



THX CANADIAN NtmSE 



will be forwarded. If anyone has a skeleton 
available I would very much like to know! 

The question of lamp-carrying is still im- 
portant. Now we use a flashlight to awaken 
patients. No doubt the last qestion is face- 
tious and hardly needs a comment. We 
know Miss Nightingale gave much of her 
life for the benefit of nursing, day and 
night and even from her bed. 

Now to R.N. in B.C. in "Random Com- 
ments." Is it not too bad to want to discard 
tradition which gives us background and 
continuity? Tradition alone is worthless, but 
capping denotes advance — as do chevrons 
used in some hospitals. It does help in know- 
ing what to expect from a nurse. Today, 
some nurses expect to start at the top 
instead of the bottom. I'm quite sure the 
public are aware that all arc not graduate 
nurses. 

All white uniforms probably save laundry 
expenses, at least that was the reason that 
brought them into being. It is nice now to 
see a return of some colored uniforms for 
students. With a few exceptions, such as 
dietitians and therapists, our caps are ours 
alone. However, the few very old-fashioned 
caps and uniforms of another age, are the 
ones that really stand out. So much for that 
kind of tradition. 

Something so much more important is a 
return to the tradition of good bed-side 
nursing. 

F. J. Miller. Ont. 

Dear Editor 

Please extend my appreciation to Mar- 
garet J. Moncrieff for her article "Prob- 
lems, Principles and Practices in the Care 
of Patients in Plasters" (Nov. '63). In my 
opinion, this is one of those rare articles 
about nursing care that has succeeded in 
demonstrating that nursing care can be ad- 
ministered by applying knowledge of basic 
scientific principles. 

I would like to purchase three reprints 
of the article if they are available. 

Sandra S. Shumway, Ohio 

Dear Editor: 

I found it disquieting to read a well- 
known nurse's remarks to the Trustee Sec- 
tion of the O.H.A. last Oct. This nurse de- 
scribed her training as "a patchwork busi- 
ness, packed with horrors and wounds from 
which I have not recovered." Since I 
trained around the same time, I believe, 
(the hungry 30's) and also assumed charge 
as a student nurse, I feel quite free to de- 
hate the issue. 



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DIRECrOI OF NURSING 

THE STAMFORD HOSMTAl, 

STAMFORD, CONNKTICUT 



Fatigue is the one and only descriptive 
word I can use. Twelve or 14 hrs. a day 
could not be ended otherwise. Horrors, may- 
be, but not to me. as a student, as much 
as to the patient to whom they happened: 
A slit throat; a suicide who lived 5 long 
days; missing limbs after train accident; a 
cancerous growth eating away the tongue 
and throat of an old Colonel, etc. Yes. they 
have their impact on a student But you 
cannot turn away from this nor lessen the 
degree of shiKk to a student upon witness- 
ing her first contacts with human tragedy 
if nursing is the profession she has chosen. 
Let us not discard the past too hastily 
but. rather, let us carry forward the best 
of it. One of the "bests" of yesterday's 
nurse's training, perhaps more so in the 
smaller training school, was the greater 
sense of responsibility developed hy heina 
fiiven more responsihitily in the senior year. 
This was especially so in obstetrics and 
surgery. I was appalled, recently, in having 
a graduate of two years tell me she was in 
a panic because I had booked her on ob- 
stetrics. She had been allowed to perform 
one and only one. rectal exam during her 
entire training. Now. some nurse educators 
are advocating that we shorten the course 
to two years! As head nurse on obstetrics for 
12 years and director of nursing for five 
years. I strongly protest. I am truly thankful 
that I spent almost nine months of my 
(raining on obstetrics. 

instead of removing a year from the 
curriculum, why don't we give the student 
nurse six months in the case riNim with 
delegated responsibility and divide the re- 
maining six months between pediatrics and 
surgery 

A tribute to today's training schools: 
They have removed that overwhelming fa- 
tigue from nursing, given generous "time 
off." comfortable and shining surroundings 
to work and play in. I'm honestly glad for 
them. But. let us not remove the sense of 
responsibility that the student should feel 
towards the sick, injured, or disturbed pa- 
tient who is with us always. How well pre- 
pared is she to assume responsibility after a 
panicky whisper over an "intercom.** a 
hurried summons from a nursing aide, an 
urgent report from an orderly, a snappy 
order from a doctor? 

Book learning is excellent I am an ar- 
dent reader myself, but it can not replace 
the actual contact with the patient from 
whom we really learn about human bciiigl 
Is that not why we are in the nursing 



434 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



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PARKE-DAVIS 



fession? We are caught today in a web 
of rules and regulations. It is excellent for 
the ink companies and statistics, but does 
it save the man hemorrhaging to death in 
the ambulance entrance? There is both 
pathos and humor in nursing. It can be 
exhausting and it is not glamorous; but it 
has excitement and a tremendous satisfac- 
tion. It dispels lonehness and gives you a 
feeling of belonging, but do not divorce 
it from tragedy or attempt to find Utopia. 
Remember the healthy don't need us, but 
the sick do. Florence Nightingale never lost 
sight of this for a moment. 

Dorothy M. Gelz. Alta. 




Dear Editor: 

The article "The Psychoses of Child- 
hood" by Lisctte Perron (Jan. '64) was very 
well written. However. I would like to 
clarify a statement made in the subheading 
for the benefit of readers, concerning "the 
mode of treatment which suits each psy- 
chosis." 

Treatment and nursing care of those with 
psychiatric disturbances is based on the 
behavior which they exhibit rather than 
according to a diagnosis — which often is 
difficult to specifically determine. Thus, if 
someone displays a certain kind of behavior, 
an attempt is made to meet the need which 
this behavior indicates, regardless of the 
diagnosis. 

I find Thr Canadian Nurse is becoming 
more and more interesting and educational 
for both students and graduates. I am 
looking forward to the next issue. 

Loretta Norman. N.B. 



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ICN Congress 

Nurses from 58 countries will take part 
in the ICN Grand Council and the 13th 
Quadrennial Congress of the International 
Council of Nurses, June 16 to 23. 1965. to 
be held in Frankfurt am Main. Federal 
Republic of Germany, by invitation of the 
German Nurses Federation. 

Congress Theme: Communication or con- 
flict — roads to better understanding be- 
tween nurse, patient, health team and pub- 
lic. Under this theme, eight suh-topics cov- 
ering all fields of nursing interest will be 
d t scuM cd . Dr. Magda Kelber. a social eco- 
nomist, writer and teacher, will be Congress 
Consultant and Keynote Speaker 



438 



THE CANADIAN NURSF. 



In the Good Old Days 

(The Canadian Nurse — may 1924) 

The Congress of The International Coun- 
cil of Nurses is to be held July, 1925, in 
Helsingfors. Finland. It is hoped that 2,000 
nurses from all parts of the world will 
attend. 

According to present steamer rates, the 
trip from New York to Copenhagen will 
be $130.00, all inclusive, with best accom- 
modation. 



How TO Make a Useful 
Probationer 

Their first lesson, to study and recite, 
should be in hospital ethics and etiquette. 
This should be given on their first day of 
residence. They should be taken to the 
hospital and should be given surgical dress- 
ings to make. They may be allowed to 
enter the wards to carry trays at meal time 
and to feed a few helpless patients. 

On the second day. begin lessons in the 
principles of bacteriology. Six or eight les- 
sons, given during the first two weeks, will 
be enough to teach the most important facts 
about this subject. Explain to them, in this 
first lesson, why a servant's cleaning is 
drudgery, while a nurse's is a scientific 
procedure founded on bacteriology. 

On the third day. add bed-making to their 
list of accomplishments. On the fourth day 
demonstrate the changing of an occupied 
bed and allow them to practise it on pa- 
tients who are not very ill. On the fifth 
day, show them how to fill hot water bags 
and ice-caps, how to give a urinal, etc. Go 
slowly. It makes even brilliant people a 
definite length of time to adjust them^lves 
to a new environment and to grow ac- 
customed to new work. 



O.R. Nurses Meef 

First Ontario Conference of 

Operating Room Nurses to be 

held June 29 and .30, 1964 

Royal York Hotel, Toronto. 

Enquiries should be directed to: 
Miss Kathleen Burton. R.N.. Convenor of 
Commiuee on Publicity. 109 Jamieson 
Ave., Ape. 15, Toronto 3. Ont. 




MONEY SAVER 

Because HEMA-COMBISTIX* 

tells the story of urinary blood, 
protein, glucose, and pH in one 
minute, it has to save time. 
P.S. Time is money. [I 
Ames Company of Canada 
Ltd., Toronto, Ontario. 




i>ii«4 AKAEf 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60, No. 5 



or 




THK CANADIAN NURSE 



precision from BAXTER 
the FLO'TROL clamp 




—one of many taken -for- granted exclusives 
on PLEXITRON sets 

In giving parenteral fluids, you can be confident that yourFLO-TROL clamp settings 
will be maintained. The wheel of the clamp can be rolled on the tubing from wide-open 
to shut-off position ... yet it will remain precisely fixed on the tubing at any desired 
point in between. And the FLO-TROL clamp permits you to stop, change bottles, and 
start administration again . . . without disturbing the original setting or flow rate. We 
hope you continue to take it for granted! 

Manufacturing Etblcal Pharn-iacautlcals In Canada Since 1S38 

BAXTER LABORATORIES OF CANADA LTD. auistom Ontario 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60. No. 5 



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You know you're well 
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If you write, we will send 
a catalogue 



440 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



Consider 
this Selection 




ol New 
and Recent Texts 



designed for the modern nursing cnrricttlum 

A New Book! Kempf and Useem's 

PSYCHOLOGY: DYNAMICS of BEHAVIOR in NURSING 



This unusual book offers a clear, understand- 
able picture of the concepts underlying hu- 
man behavior. Designed as a basic introduc- 
tion to psychology for the nursing student, 
this text relates basic psychological principles 
directly to actual nursing situations. Vital so- 
ciological concepts are also integrated into 
the discussions. You'll find material on: feel- 



ings, attitudes and emotions, learning patterns, 
culture and personality, family and environ- 
mentnl influences, etc. 

By FLORENCE C. KEMPF, R.N., B.S., A.M., Chairman. 
School of Nursing, Michigan State University, Eost 
Lonsing; ond RUTH USEEM, Ph.D., Department of So- 
ciology and Anthropology, Michigan State University, 
East Lansing. About 20S pages, 6-1/1" x 9-1/4". 
Abcut S4.3S. New— Just Keady! 



New (2nd) Edition! 

WORKBOOK for PRACTICAL NURSES 



Sutton's 



Here is a practical workbook packed with 
useful questions and problems covering every 
commonly-encountered nursing situation — 
from simple housekeeping to nursing care in 
emergencies. The practical nurse, student or 
graduate, will find up-to-date exercises and 
review material on: duties and functions of 
the practical nurse — basic needs of the aged 



— emergency nursing — anatomy and phy- 
siology — diagnostic procedures — medical 
and surgical treatment — general nursing care 

— drug therapy. 

By AUDREY LATSHAW SUTTON, R.N., Director of 
Nursing Service, Edgewood General Hospital, Berlin, 
N.J. About 400 pogcs, 7-1/4" i 10-1 4", illustrated. 
Abcut S4.3S New (2nd) Edition— Juit ffeotfyf 



Ninth Edition! Bogert's 

FUNDAMENTALS of CHEMISTRY 



Designed with the nursing student in mind, 
this text presents an excellent survey of inor- 
ganic, organic and physiologic chemistry — 
with emphasis on medical and biological ap- 
plications. Scores of new discussions in this 
revised edition describe: atoms and atomic 
weights — chemotherapy and modern drugs 
— bleaching and disinfecting — chemical 



changes arut equations — covalence — cor- 
tical hormones. 



By L. JEAN BOGERT, Pk. D.. formerly lastrvctor in 
Medicine. University of Chicogo; Instructor in Experi- 
mental Medicine, Yolo Medical Sciiool, ond Lecturer 
in Chemistry, Connecticut Training School for Nurses. 
New Haven. 626 pages, 6" x 9-1 4", with 20S 
illmtrotioas. %».*0. Njnt* tditio»—eiMitlmd Jam*. 19*1 



Sixth Edition! Bogert's 

LABORATORY MANUAL of CHEMISTRY 



In this practical laboratory manual. Dr. Bo- 
gert provides simple experiments to clearly 
illustrate the subject matter in her text 
(above), or to correlate with other textbooks 
of general chemistry. These experiments util- 
ize common, inexpensive materials and ap- 
paratus, as well as time-saving manipulations. 



Following each experiment you'll find ques- 
tions designed to bring out main points in 
observation. Timely experiments are included 
on: nitrogen, ammonia, air. ionization, sterols, 
solutions, etc. 



By L. JEAN BOGERT. Pk.D. ZH 
iliastrated. S2.7S. 



$-j/4- I r', 

S<it* UHitml 



Gladly sent to teachers on approval 



W. B. SAUNDERS COMPANY 

Canadian Representative 

McAinth i Co. Ltd., 1»3Z Yonge St.. Toronto 7 



West Washington Square 
Philadelphia 5 



MAY 1964 - VOL. flO. No. 5 



441 



"■**" ^: ', ^T~i ' "^ : 




On every ward, when you turn out the lights, some one wakes up . . . and 
wakefulness thrives on minor irritations. Skin discomfort, particularly, can 
disturb your patients during the nighttime hours. But as nurses in thousands 
of hospitals know, a body rub with Dermassage may add that one welcome 
touch of relaxation which tips the balance in favor of rest and sleep. 

Dermassage comforts, cools and soothes tender, sheet-burned skin. It relieves 
dryness, cracking and itching and helps prevent painful bed sores. 

You will like Dermassage for other reasons, too. A body rub with it saves 
your time and energy. Massage is gentle, smooth and fast. You needn't follow- 
up with talcum and there is no greasiness to clean away. It won't stain or 
soil linens or bed-clothes. You can easily make friends with Dermassage— 
send for a sample ! 

"SEE IF YOUR HANDS DON'T TELL YOU THE DIFFERENCE" 
M'ow distributed in Canada by Lakeside Laboratories (Canada) Ltd. 

1675 Lcalla Str««t, Don Mills, Ontario 
'trademark 



443 



THE CANAtMAN VHRSF. 



DULjCOLAX 

the laxative to replace enemas 




The ability of Dulcolax to replace the traditional enema, not only in simple 
constipation but also in preparation for surgery and diagnostic procedures, 
has been well documented in the professional literature. 

Dulcolax saves valuable time 

The time required for Dulcolax administration is minimal compared 
to the enema administration and preparation and cleaning of enema 
equipment. 

Dulcolax eliminates a distasteful task 

Dulcolax tablets or suppositories are equal and often superior in 
cleansing action to enemas. With Dulcolax all but bedriddsn patients 
are able to use the toilet rather than bedpan and cleansing of soiled 
clothing, bed linen or dressings is rarely necessary. 

Dulcolax spares your patients discomfort 

Your patients will be extremely grateful to be spared the discomfort, 
embarrassment and inconvenience of an enema. Dulcolax results 
generally in one or two evacuations of soft, formed stool without 
violent purgation or exhausting straining. 

Dulcolax tablets (enteric coated) 5 mg. 
Dulcolax suppositories 10 mg. 
Dulcolax suppositories for children 5 mg. 



/S^ 




JjLj Boehiinger Ingelheim Products 

Diviuon of Gcify (Canada) Limited, Montreal 



BS06644 



MAY 1964 - VOL W. No 5 



OPPORTUNITIES 
for 



REGISTEREP NURSES 

in 

THE CANADIAN FORCES 
MEDICAL SERVICE 



It 



I 



I 



Applications are now being accepted from Registered Nurses for 
enrolment as officers in the Royal Canadian Navy, the Canadian 
Army or the Royal Canadian Air Force for duty in the Canadian 
forces Medical Service. 

Interesting and challenging careers with opportunity for advance- 
ment are offered to those who meet the requirements. 



I 



YOU MAY QUALIFY IF YOU ARE 



A registered nurse and a current member of a Provincial Registered 

Nurses' Association. 

A woman under 35 years of age, single. 

A Canadian citizen, or other British subject with the status of 

"landed immigrant" 

For further informatioiv— 

Visit, write or call your nearest Canadian Armed Forces Recruiting Centre 

or write to: THE SURGEON GENERAL 

DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE 
OTTAWA, Ontario 



i44 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 




:f< 



>?: 



look 

\ voith 

^ confidence 

to 

these 

new 

Moshy texts to see how effectively 

they meet your current course requirements 



New 3rd Edition ! 
Shafer-Sawyer-McCluskey-Beck 
MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING 



Ready Next Month ! 



Here is ihe up-io-ihe-minute new edition of 
the only medical-surgical nursing text that has 
been tried, tested and pei^ccted in classroom 
use, with revisions and changes based on sug- 
gestions of instructors who used previous edi- 
tions. You will find it a comprehensive, yet 
compact presentation, avoiding duplication of 
material. Thoroughly revised and improved to 



reflect rapidly changing theories and proce- 
dures, this revision has been redesigned and 
printed in two colors throughout. It has been 
altered substantially to meet all of your cur- 
rent course requirements. Of the nearly 200 
illustrations. 50 of them are new to this edi- 
tion, many of them clinical photographs of 
actual nursing procedures. 



■y MTNLEEN NEWTON $H»FER. formerly tstociatc Prvftnsr in Out-Patient Nsrtint. TDe Cornell UnhrenitT-New York 
Hospital School el Nursin(: JANET R. SAWYER. R.N.. A.M.. Instructor, School ol Education. Department of Nurse Educa- 
tion. New York University: AUDREY M. McClUSKEY. R.N.. M.A.. Sc.M. Hit . Supervisor. Hamden Public Health and 
Visitini Nurse Association. Inc.. Hamden. Conn.; and EDNA LIFCREN BECK. R.N.. M.A., Associate Director of Nursinf 
Education. Muhlenberg Hospital School af Nursiof, Plaiafleld, N.i. Ready in May. 3rt edition, approi. 97S paces, 
SW'i9^4", 192 fitures. About itli- 

A New Book! Matheney-Nolan-Ehrhart-Griffin-Griffin 

FUNDAMENTALS OF PATIENT-CENTERED NURSING 



In keeping with the modem trend in nursing, 
this new textbook provides your beginning 
students with the basic concepts on which to 
build a patient.orientcd knowledge of all ma- 
jor clinical areas of nursing. Written by 5 in- 
structors teaching in associate group programs. 



this presentation stresses the interrelationship 
of sysjcms, the physical-emotional-cultural re- 
lationship within the individual and Ihe unity 
of man. This is the only text available in thb 
subject area to effectively correlate biological, 
physical and social sciences. 



By RUTH V. MATHENEY, R.N., Ed.D.. Prtfetsor and Chairman. Department of Harslnf. Nassau Community Collet<. Ne« 
Yorti. N.Y.; BREDA T. NOLAN, R.N., M.A.. Assistant Professor. Department ol Nursinf. Nassau Community CollefO: ALICE 
M. EHRHART. R.N.. M.A.. Assistant Professor. Department of Nursing. Broni Community Collefe. New York. NY.: 
SERAIO J. CRIFFIN R N.. MA.. Associate Professor and Head. Department of Nursini. Broni Community Collefe; lOANNE 
KINS CRIFFIN. R.N.. M.A.. lecturer in Nursinf Science, Department ol Nursini Science. Department af Nursiag, Broai 
Cammanity CaltefO. Patlliliad Martk, 1M4. }4S MCa>, CWiBV^, 4« ittastratiam. Prica, »S.M. 



THE C. V. 



MOSBY COMPANY 

3207 Washington Boulevaid 



M 



Publishers 

St. Louis, Mo. 63103 



McAINSH and Co., Ud. - 1835 Yonge Street - Toronto, Ontario 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60. No. 5 



445 




.• 



Just Published! 



New 4th Edition 



INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN ANATOMY 



Francis 



With a new page size, new format, new illus- 
trations and a new 13-plate, full.color Trans- 
Vision® Insert of the Human Analomv illus- 
trated by Ernest W. Beck, the new 4th edition 
of this popular text promises to be more stim- 
ulating and interesting than ever. Concise but 
complete descriptions of tissues, organs and 
systems, augmented by carefully executed il- 
lustrations, lead your students from an under- 



standing of simple structures to the identifica- 
tion and location of more detailed and intri. 
cate parts of the human body. The author has 
used the English equivalent of the Paris revi- 
sion of the anatomic nomenclature throughout, 
and has rewritten a number of sectioas to in* 
crease the emphasis on function, and to make 
the material mere easily understood. 



■y cm I 



cut C FtMCIS. A.I., M.O., Ai««ciatt fntmm f JkaatMir, BtMrtMM tf taatwqr, Wttttni tttvtm IMnnOi, 
Oki*. PuftllskX JMoary, 1M4. «lk t«tiM, 47t MC*>. •*»"< Ivy, attk »S t«it ilkntritlMt m* n catar 
I TrMt-Vltinfc Insert d Hmum HiiIibi ill»trat*« kr Enwtt «. teck. Prtct. Un. 



Ready in Mayl 



New 8th Edition 



Smith 



MICROBIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY 

Through 7 editions, this ouutanding textbook 
has been one of the leading texts in its field. It 
stresses the relationship of microbiology to 
nursing, medicine, dentistry, ever>day living, 
food and water supply, sanitation, the pro- 
cesses of nature, manufacturing and com- 
merce. TTie new 8th edition incorporates new 
information on virology, immunology, allergy 
and asepsis Microbiology and pathology are 



tt ALICE LORRAINE SMITH, A.!., U.t., F.C A.P., F.A.C.P. 
SMtkwiitkm Mt<ical SckMl, Dkilat, Tiut. titti M 

lllkttratlMit. AkMt $7.M. 



treated as distiiKt entities, so you can effec- 
tively use this text whether you teach a com- 
bined course or a separate course in "Micro- 
biology". Each part provides your student with 
an initial over-all survey, followed by an anal- 
ysis of the details of the subject at closer ranfe. 
ClassifKution has been revised according to 
the latest edition of Bergey's Manual of Dt' 
terminative Bacirriology. 

, AttMlktt PraMiMr ct f l Wi l ip, n* UahPtrtlti tf TtiM 
Mar. ttk taitiaa, iMrai. U» pafai, T'l IV. vttb m 



Jtist Published! 



New 6th Edition 



Benz 



PEDIATRIC NURSING 

Examine the new edition of this well-known 
text and you will find it presents the most com- 
prehensive information available on child 
care. Compare it with the text you are now 
using for completenevi. content, scholarly ap- 
proach and effective illustrations. You will 
find it unquestionably the most thorough text 

f "if!".*^ "E: ■" • "'^- *»»^»«» rnHtu,. fm- 
lawa Cmr, lava. Pikli>at4 rtknunr. IW4. sit Kitiaa. M7 



available on the subject. Although easy to use, 
PEDIATRIC NURSING b wiitten from the 
scholarly approach to give your students an 
understanding in depth of pediatrics. fMM just 
a surface knowledge of the subject. The n««- 
terial is flexible throughout so that you may 
recombinc it to suit your needs. 



mnim. tMi aatianl* 



>•■•*.• 



at lavt CaHn* a« 
^rtta, 17 M. 



THX CANADIAN NURSE 



look with confidence 

to these new Mosby texts 
for the most effective presentations 



Ready in July ! 



A New Book 



Havener-Saunders-Bergersen 



NURSING CARE IN EYE, EAR, NOSE 
AND THROAT DISORDERS 



TTiis well-illustrated new book represents the 
combined efforts of an eminent ophthalmolo. 
gist, a distinguished otorhinolaryngologist, and 
a medical-surgical nurse. Clinically oriented, 
it correlates the nurse's responsibilities with 
pertinent descriptions of diagnosis, treatment 
and care. You will find discussions of such im- 



portant areas as: conducting visual screening 
tests by means of the Snellen chart; preoper- 
ative and postoperative care of eye, ear, nose 
and throat patients: medical and surgical 
management of eye defects. A chapter written 
by a competent audiologist on "Hearing Im- 
pairment" adds to the book's value. 



By WILLIAM H. HAVENER. B.A.. M D , M.S. (Ophth.), Prsfessor. Department of OphttiJimolao. The Ohi* State UniVtrtitf, 
Columbus. Ohio; WILLIAM H. SAUNDERS. M.O.. Professor and Chairman of the Department of Otolaryngolon. Tilt Mi* 
State University Colleie of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio: and BETTY S. BERSERSEN, R.N., B.S.. M.S., Instructor, ffirX- 
ment of Nartinf Edacation, Teachers Collete, Colymkia Uniirersitl, New Ttrk, N.T. Rcatff la Jaly, 19S4. Awnx. 42S 
pafts, 6V<>"i iW, mm 227 flfurei. 



Ready This Month i 



A New Book ! 



Brooks 



LABORATORY MANUAL AND WORKBOOK 
FOR INTEGRATED BASIC SCIENCE 



Now, for the first time, a comprehensive lab- 
oratory manual presents the essence of chem. 
Lstry, microbiology and human biology as an 
integrated and interrelated body of knowledge. 
Here your students can find all lab<iratory ex- 
periments for physics, chemistry, microbiology 
and human biology in one adequate labora- 
tory manual, making it easier to assimilate 



principles and relate the various sciences to 
one another. You will find more than 80 short, 
simple and highly instructive exercises ( includ- 
ing several dealing with drug action) which 
can also be used as class demonstrations. The 
more than 150 illustrations range from osmos- 
is through electrophoresis, and include cross 
sections of artery, vein and capillary. 



By STEWART M. BROOKS, M.S., loitractar hi ScKiic*. Laull loaiw CoHefe. Aakara<al«. MauaclniMtts (tftiHatod wrai 
Ptter Beat Briiham HospiUI, Battaa) RaMy later this manth. U1 Rafos, IWi lOW, IBt illattratiaat. Akaat S4.96. 



Ready in June i 



New 7th Edition 



Anderson 



WORKBOOK OF SOLUTIONS AND DOSAGE OF 
DRUGS (Including Arithmetic) 



Here is a new edition of the workbook in- 
structors have called the most "teachable" in 
this area. Through 6 editions, this simplified, 
logical presentation has made this workbook 
the most widely used one for courses in "Solu- 
tions and Dosage" and "Arithmetic and/or 
Mathematics for Nurses". Concisely written 
to facilitate understanding and retention of 
basic principles, the book is divided into 4 
parts: I, a review of fundamental arithmetic 
as it applies to the mathematics of dnigs and 



solutions: II and III, principles and problems 
in computation and preparation of solutions 
and dosages of drugs: IV. drug definitions, 
origin, and application, plus laboratory exer- 
cises in their usage. You will find many help- 
ful new review and drill exercises in this revi. 
sion. The Answer Guide provided instructors 
includes a survey test to aid you in evaluat- 
ing student achievement at the beginning of 
the course. 



■y ELLEN M. ANDERSON, R.N.. B.S., M.A., Biractar, Sckaal af Itartlac, Calaaifela HasRiUI, Mitwaakoa, WItcaada. R*a# 
la iww, IBM. Ttk a41tia«, ITS R^tt, TVt'i ISVV. 



THE C. V. MOSBY COMPANY 

3207 Washington Boulevard 




Publishers 

St. Louis, Mo. 63103 



McAINSH and Co. Ltd. - 1835 Yonge Street - Toronto, Ontario 

MAY 19M - VOL. flO. No. 5 447 





'-^, 

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Start In a small way If you like, 

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dimes you find in your pocl^et every night. 
That's right! You can mal<e that change 
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THE CANADIAN NURSE 




BUFFALO NEEDLE 



Indwelling Intravenous Plastic Polypropylene Cannula 

STERILE— Ready to Use . 



Disposable 









C*nnuta it l«tt tntfw«4ltnx for intr*- 
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■ Can be dinsinntiliiil and reassem- 
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• Eliminates need for repeated veni- 
puncture during prolonged IV th era py 
and caudal anesthesia. Cannula camot 
be dislodged. 

"Archives of Surgery 86:177 (Feb. 
1963) "Accidental Loaa o( a Plastic 
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Tavlor. M.U. & C. A. K-itherford. 
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26 ga. Naedle 20 (a. camwla i 1* tang 
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MAY 1964 - VOL. 60. No. 5 



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b- 




...and you 
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HEADACHE 



"217' 

TABLETS 

the wonder 

combination 

for 

RELIEF 

IN HALF 

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Acetylsalicylfc acid 3V4 gr. 

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Caffeine Citrate V4 gr. 

Available in Handy TuIms of 12 
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1^ 



Ctuvde6&3koMt6cCo 

MONTREAU CANADA 



430 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



Report Available 

Blueprint for Progess in Hospital Nurs- 
ing, a report of the first history-making 
series of national conferences, sponsored by 
the National League for Nursing's Dept. of 
Hospital Nursing and the Regional Council 
of State Leagues for Nursing, is now avail- 
able at $3.75 a copy. 

Eighteen outstanding speakers discuss how 
organized nursing services and care of pa- 
tients can be improved in the face of social 
forces now at work, rapid technological ad- 
vances, and new scientific discoveries. Or- 
ganizational barriers that impede progress in 
providing better care are identified through 
group discussion. Also included are many 
practical suggestions for counteracting those 
barriers and for promoting and implement- 
ing progressive planning for the future. 

To order this publication, write to: De- 
partment of Hospital Nursing, National 
League for Nursing, 10 Columbus Circle, 
New York 19. N.Y. 




NARISEPT 



DISPOSETTEi 



I 



I 



Medical Film Listings 

The following are descriptions of films 
in the Heredity Series, produced by Indiana 
University. Films are 30 minutes in length, 
black and white, and the service charge is 
SS.OO each. 

// Runs in the Family 

This initial film in the series discusses the 
general aspects of heredity. Chances of in- 
heriting mental illness or transmitting con- 
genital defects are discussed along with the 
chemistry of the hereditary nucleo-protein 
material. 

Reproduction and Heredity 

A discussion of common aspects of re- 
production and heredity dealing with prin- 
ciples of biogenesis, then mitosis. 

Sexuality and Variations 

Discusses why sexual method of repro- 
duction is so widely spread in nature: out- 
lines typical life history of an organism; 
considers parthenogenesis, characteristics of 
ovum and sperm; compares mitosis and 
meiosis. 

These films may be rented from: Cana- 
dian Fihn Institute. 1762 Carting Ave.. 
Ottawa 13, Ont. 



SINGLE DOSE GENERAL PURPOSE 
ANTIBACTERIAL OINTMENT 



A major break-throuRh in the physicians 
effort to maintain .sterile conditions and pre- 
vent undesirable sequelae in topical lesions 
has lieen made in the development of the 
new NARISKPT antibacterial ointment in 
handy "Disposettes" that eliminate the 
danger of re-infection from contaminated 
multiple dose containers. 

Kich "DispoBetle" single-dose container) 
provides 900 mg. of ointment as- 

Neomycin :?.5 mg. ' 

Bacitracin VS.P. .^00 units 

Anhydrous Petrolatum ointment base q.s. 
I 'equiL'aU'nl to Neomycin Sulfali' U.S. P. 5 mg.) 

DIRECTIONS: Cut off soft, narrow spout-likt 
lip ami squeeze "Disposette" to direct oint- 
nu'iil to :itTocted area. 

INDICAIIONS: Vse as a neneral purpose ant' 
bacterial ointment to prevent or treat inf- 
tion such as may he eni-ountered in abrasio; 
cuts, or minor burns or for nipple ! i 

during breast fiHHlinK |xriod. .M ■•<* 

for application on and around , ..i i^.,, .u 
and pimples. 

HOSPITAL AfnJCATtOMS: Intranasally used 
as .intLseptic. liolli m existing infei'tion in the 
nose or in the de.stru;-tion of organisms, as '" 
asymptomatic nasal carriers. 

PRESENTAnON: 10 •Disposettes" in a uniqu. 
skfve lyi)e blister pack for one-nt-u-lime use. 



INTRA MEDICAL PROOUCTJ 




Positive identification Never Sleeps 

Young or old, asleep or awake, all your patients have full-time 
protection with Ident-A-Band. Soft, comfortable, always right, 
Ident-A-Band lets your patients rest-while It stays on the Job. 

fcfenf-A-Band' 



THE CANADIAN NURSK 



THE mmm mm 



A MONTHLY JOURNAL FOR THE NURSES OF CANADA 

PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH AND FRENCH 

BY THE CANADIAN NURSES' ASSOCIATION 



VOLUME M 



MONTREAL. MAY 1964 



NUMBER i 



fl Health flssessment 



"Health is a State of Complete Physical. 
Mental and Social Well-being." 

These words from the World Health 
Organization definition of health can 
apply to a professional organization as 
well as to an individual. What is the 
state of health of the Canadian Nurses' 
Association? This question does not 
imply a suspicion that it is sick — for 
it is not — but we have gone far be- 
yond considering "the absence of dis- 
ease or infirmity" as implying health. 
We look now. in individuals and insti- 
tutions, for abundant well-being. On 
the eve of a new biennium, let us look 
at the health of our profession 

We. as nurses, advise a yearly 
health assessment for individuals. Per- 
haps a biennial examination for the 
CNA is more in keeping with our 
method of operation. Is the Canadian 
Nurses' Association in the best pos- 
sible state of health to play its part in 
the promotion of the welfare of the 
Canadian people during the next two 
years? As with an individual, if we 
look carefully we will be able to find 



aspects of functioning that can be im- 
proved. Is our professional body func- 
tioning well physically? During the 
past two years, it has been evaluated 




(Gcbf. 

I SOB EL MacLeod 



Atoofrcalj 



MAY 1964 - VOL flO. No. 5 



453 



by ourselves with the help of experts 
in managemetit consultation. The or- 
ganization within which our employed 
staff is required to function has been 
studied, as well as some of the aspects 
of committee structure and the rela- 
tionship of such structure to the work 
of the office staff. Remedial changes 
are planned. Some will give greater 
scope to our employees to carry out 
policies by aligning necessary author- 
ity with responsibility for creative ac- 
tion. Our physical environment will 
be improved by the building of CNA 
House in Ottawa. The architects have 
drawn up plans for a beautiful and 
functional building for the use of staff 
and membership. We anticipate that 
it will be completed well before the 
end of the next biennium. 

What of our mental and social 
health? The way in which we meet 
one another's needs will have an effect 
on our total health as a profession. 
The promotion of mutual trust and 
respect among our members in the 
various positions and fields of nursing 
is essential if we are to have the 
strength as a profession to meet the 
needs of our society. Such harmony 
within is enhanced as we work together 
to promote the economic and social 
welfare of our members. Consideration 
of this aspect of welfare is particularly 
meaningful today among workers in aU 
professions. The provincial and na- 
tional committees concerned with this 
part of work satisfaction will have a 
heavy responsibility. They will func- 
tion successfully only with the thought- 
ful support of the membership. 

The health of a profession, as of an 



individual, requires that it be a con- 
tributing part of its society. Canadian 
society needs the contribution of the 
nursing profession as it plans and car- 
ries out health programs in the future. 
Are we ready to make this contribu- 
tion? It is essential that the CNA fore- 
sec and understand changes in the 
broad field of welfare service in our 
country'. If we are to take our place, 
there is no time for confusion. We 
must be clear ourselves as to what the 
role of nursing will be. We must as- 
sume responsibility for ensuring that it 
is clearly communicated to other pro- 
fessional and lay groups with whom 
we will be called upon to work. We 
cannot always wait until we are asked 
what nursing can do. It is a function 
of a profession to initiate such com- 
munication. The Canadian Nurses' As- 
sociation is aware of this responsibility 
and has taken action. It promises to 
be an increasingly significant profes- 
sional function during the years of 
change ahead. 

Essentially, the Canadian Nurses' 
Association seems to be healthy and 
vigorous but health is never static. 
The profession's continued well-being 
will depend on its ability to be timely 
in meeting the needs of its members 
while adapting constantly to the needs 
of society. It will be required, in the 
future, to make prompt and appro- 
priate adaptations within to facilitate 
equally prompt and appropriate adap- 
tations without. 

A. IsoBEi. MacLeod, m.a 

1st Vice-President, 

Canadian Nurses' AssiKiation 



HUMAN RELATIONS INSTITUTE 



The 16th Annual Institute on Hu- 
man Relations will be held June 15-25, 
1964. at Fort Qu'Appelle. Saskatche- 
wan. TTie purpose is to examine the 
interaction of forces within groups and 
to study their influence upon: group 
structure and development; communi- 
cation; leadership; personal growth. 



Financial assistance in the form of 
grants equivalent to tuition is available 
to a limited number of delegates. Re- 
quests for tuition grants received prior 
to May 31 will receive first considera- 
tion. Address enquiries to: Human Re- 
lations Council. Saskatchewan House, 
Dewdney Avenue West. Regina. 



454 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



GYNECOLOGY AND OBSTETRICS 
A Nursing Challenge 

J. Edwin Coffey, m.d., f.r.c.s.(c.) 



Gynecology and obstetrics is on the move. No other discipline has undergone 

such self -reappraisal, reorganization and rededication to excellence in 

the areas of research, teaching and clinical practice. That these 

changes were overdue is readily admitted. 



This specialty has been outpaced 
by a resurgence in other fields during 
and following World War II. Instru- 
mentation available since that time has 
provided our investigators with the 
means to measure, record and evaluate 
human data hitherto uncharted. This 
includes work on amniotic fluid and 
intervillous space pressures, uterine 
blood flows, myometrial physiology 
and biochemistry, physiology of labor, 
transfer and metabolic studies of the 
placenta, and exfoliative cytology of 
the reproductive tract. The impetus in 
laboratory and clinical research has 
supplied the balance necessary for a 
healthy discipline which, until recently, 
has been weighted in the direction of 
pure clinical and pathologic work. 

Present day gynecology and obstet- 
rics is taught with greater correlation 
to the basic sciences than was pos- 
sible even a decade ago. This attitude 
permeates the teaching curriculum of 
the medical student, intern, resident 
and postgraduate student. How has 
the emphasis on basic research affect- 
ted the third member of the triad, i.e. 
clinical practice? Some of the older 
men complain that we are now turning 
out laboratory gynecologists without 
operative ability nor knowledge of 
pathology. This, of course, is an ex- 
treme view but nevertheless founded 
on sofne fact. Anv revival is bound to 



Dr. Coffey. Hosmer Fellow. McGill 
University, practises in the Department of 
Gynecology and Obstetrics at the Montreal 
General Hospital 



swing too far and therefore we must 
be careful to maintain proper balance 
in training programs so that clinical 
excellence is complemented by rather 
than subverted to the laboratory. 

Political reorganization has also 
taken place within the specialty in re- 
cent years. One must recall that from 
midwifery developed the art of ob- 
stetrics and from general surgery the 
art of gynecology. One is predomin- 
antly medical, the other surgical in 
nature. Gynecologic endocrinology 
and female urology are intimately in- 
volved and in many centres are an 
integral part of the service. You can 
easily see the pressures which must 
come from sister specialties as they in 
turn feel encroached upon. Because 
the human organism is not divided 
along the lines of man-made special- 
ties we encounter border areas where 
overlap is bound to occur and for the 
sake of consistent patient care must 
be tolerated. Historically, obstetrics 
was practised separately from gyneco- 
logy but over the years the two have 
been combined and now. with few 
exceptions, form one discipline devot- 
ed to the study and treatment of dis- 
eases peculiar to women. Now that 
this marriage has been successful it 
would seem wise to follow accepted 
matrimonial standards and take on a 
single family name. "Gynecology" or 
"Gyniatrics" would best seem to suit 
the purpose. This struggle for identity 
culminated in the founding of exclusive 
Colleges such as the Royal College of 
Obstetricians and Gynaecologists in 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60. No. 5 



455 



Britain and the American College of 
Obstetricians and Gynecologists in the 
U.S.A. In Canada, the specialty is a 
division within the Royal College of 
Physicians and Surgeons. It is not un- 
likely that in time this Division will 
form the nucleus for a Canadian Col- 
lege of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Because of this growing maturity the 
discipline no longer assumes the role of 
a medical or surgical subspecialty and 
thus assumes full responsibility for the 
training of appropriate medical person- 
nel. 

Not only in political structure have 
changes occurred but also in the aca- 
demic structure. Traditional obstetrics 
had emphasized the mechanics of labor 
and delivery with the obstetrician high- 
ly skilled in manual and forceps man- 
oeuvers designed to accomplish deliv- 
ery at any cost. No longer is simply 
a "live" baby the principal aim but 
also one having full mental and phy- 
sical capabilities, undamaged by diffi- 
cult mechanical manipulations at birth. 
Cesarean section has generally re- 
placed the very difficult forceps deliv- 
ery. Similarly, the traditional gyneco- 
logist was a general surgeon who re- 
stricted his surgery to the female re- 
productive tract and his laboratory 
interests to gross and microscopic 
study of the involved tissue. Many of 
the great names in gynecology were 
such people. The founder of abdominal 
surgery, Ephriam McDowell, attained 
this honor in 1809 by performing a 
gynecologic procedure — removal of 
a large ovarian cyst. John Marion 
Sims, the "Father of American Gyne- 
cology," was famous for his vesico- 
vaginal fistulae repairs. Howard Kelly, 
a familiar name to the instrument 
nurse, pioneered the use of radium in 
gynecologic cancer and made a signifi- 
cant contribution to gynecologic urolo- 
gy. Cullen. a former Canadian and 
student of Kelly's, was a great teacher 
and pathologist. Emil Novak, a self- 
made man, left his mark as a master 
gynecologic pathologist and teacher. 
The philosophy of the last three men 
is still felt at the Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital where they once worked. 

Canadians may take pride in the 
fact that their ancestors were among 
the first to recognize gynecology as a 
specialty. The first gynecologic depart- 



ment in Canada and among the earli- 
est in America was formed in 1883 
at the Montreal General Hospital as 
part of the McGill Medical School. 
This preceded the Sloane Maternity 
Hospital by four years and Johns Hop- 
kins by six years. 

To this historical beginning has been 
added a broad base of research activity 
that has resulted in a new approach — 
one with emphasis on physiology and 
biochemistry of reproduction. In ob- 
stetrics, maternal, placental and fetal 
physiology have become popular areas 
of study. Much of this is done on hu- 
man subjects as a result of advanced 
instrumentation. It is not unusual to 
see a woman in labor with tiny elec- 
trodes recording fetal heart beats and 
plastic catheters recording intra-amni- 
otic fluid pressures while infusion of 
oxytocin is given by constant infusion 
pump. Abnormal types of labor are 
thus detected early and treated under 
finer control than gross clinical evalu- 
ation permits. Placental physiology, as- 
sisted by newer tissue culture tech- 
niques, is being studied from all angles, 
i.e. placental transfer of nutrients, 
oxygen, and drugs to and from the 
fetus: the endocrine and metabolic 
activity of the placenta. Amniotic fluid 
obtained by amniocentesis is being 
studied in isoimmunized Rh negative 
mothers in an effort to predict the af- 
fected fetus and thus achieve early 
delivery thereby avoiding severe ery- 
throblastosis. A massive research pro- 
gram is now underway in the United 
States gathering precise data on all 
aspects of the reproductive process 
from conception through delivery and 
childhood. Much of the data is being 
gathered by obstetrical nurses. It is 
hoped that analysis of this material 
will point to the areas in fetal or new- 
born development where brain dam- 
age occurs resulting in cerebral palsy 
or mental retardation. 

In the gynecologic field major ad- 
vances have been made as well. Cyto- 
logic screening for cancer is readily ap- 
plied to cervix and endometrium and 
has been shown to reduce the relative 
numbers of invasive cervical cancer 
Here is an area where public education 
should spread the word that every wo- 
man, certainly after age 30, should an- 
nually avail herself of a Papanicolaou 



4M 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



Smear. In the treatment of gynecologic 
cancer there is much work being done 
with chemotherapy, especially for cho- 
riocarcinoma and ovarian tumors. Ra- 
dium therapy is still the mainstay for 
cervical cancer but improved opera- 
tive techniques, blood transfusion and 
antibiotics have made radical pelvic 
surgery, with or without urinary and 
intestinal diversion, a common ap- 
proach in some centres. This is one 
reason why gynecologic surgery must 
be taught in its widest and historical 
sense to enable its graduates to inves- 
tigate and treat those complications in 
the pelvis arising from gynecologic dis- 
ease. This demands a knowledge of 
cystoscopy, female urologic surgery, 
sigmoidoscopy and bowel surgery. 

Endocrine aspects of gynecology, 
including metaboUc pathways and cli- 
nical effects of ovarian steroids, are 
currently under much study. The Stein 
Leventhal Syndroirte with polycystic 
ovaries is still unexplained as to etio- 
logy but may well be an enzyme de- 
ficiency similar in some respects to 
the adreno-genital syndrome. Since 
menstrual disorders may be related to 
any disturbance in the hypothalamic- 
pituitary-ovarian axis the modern gyn- 
ecologist must look far afield to ex- 
plain many of these complaints. The 
higher centres which control ovulation 
contain many secrets waiting to be 
discovered. Infertility study has be- 
come so specialized that exclusive cli- 
nics operate for that purpose alone. 
Evaluation of the patient should be 
done in an organized manner to save 
time and money. Tubal occlusion, 
which is the most common cause of 
infertility, is often treated by tubo- 
plastic procedures giving a 10-20 per 
cent pregnancy rate. 

Ovulation suppression is currently 
a popular therapeutic procedure made 
simple by the new and powerful pro- 
gestational drugs. These have been 
useful in the treatment of endometri- 
osis, dysfunctional bleeding and prima- 
ry dysmenorrhea. Jbejn widest ap^li- 
cation jp date ha s been m conception 
'"control but it i$jgilijoo garl y lo fg lly 
Assess ^e_lo ng-term effec ts^ j f anv. 
JPg 3^ ovary or fetus , C ongenital 
anom alies of the reproductive trac t 
ctj^^l^aae in for further study i n con- 
nection with female hermaphroditism 



of ad renal and dr ug-induced variety . 
Theiiew progestational drugs were first 
used in treating threatened abortions 
resulting in an epidemic of newborns 
with ambiguous external genitalia. 
These were due to the androgenic 
drug effect on the female fetus in 
utero. The modem gynecologist must 
know how to differentiate these inter- 
sex problems and do the proper repar- 
ative surgery. 

ed all w hr> rarp fnr pregn a nt woman 

to the poten tial^ dangers of dr ugs. Simi- 
larly. irradiation of females should be\ 
regnt ared^ gaFefully and ideally should] 
"be Ri ven only on the first 10 dav sK 
following the mense s. The importance 1 ff)yM 
"ot noting the L.MTP. on x-r ay requisi-j I 
tions isjobv ious vet scldom ~done; J 
— Wtrefe~3oes the professional nurse 
fit into this pattern of changing con- 
cepts and new dimensions? If the tra- 
ditional nurse-doctor team is to con- 
tinue she too must become a specialist 
of sorts. In the teaching centres where 
research should be high in priority 
she must be well trained in the basic 
sciences and clinical research tech- 
niques used in obstetrics and gynecol- 
ogy. She should have a desire for ac- 
curate observation and a fascination 
for the unusual. Every pregnant wo- 
man whether in the antepartum clinic, 
the labor and dehvery suite, or post- 
partum recovery room should be a 
study unto herself. With this attitude 
there is no such thing as the "routine" 
patient. The latter becomes an indi- 
vidual with individual problems and 
individual solutions. With few excep- 
tions in medicine the "best routine" 
is "no routine." These become neces- 
sary when either member of the nurse- 
doctor team becomes lax in his ob- 
servation of the patient and "for the 
sake of a few, subjects the many." 

The delivery room nurse, whether 
in the large centre or cottage hospital, 
is often the object of dispute by the 
expectant father desirous of holding 
his wife's hand in labor and observing 
the drama in the delivery room. This 
attitude has been promoted in the lay 
and certain medical press over the 
past decade to such an extent that we 
are led to believe that being born is 
"as simple as falling off a log." It is 
just that and so arc the consequences 



MAY 1fl«4 - vol, no. No 5 



457 



{ 



^ 



should the newly bom be narcotized 
previously by heavy analgesia or gen- 
eral anesthesia, hypoxic from proloiig- 
ed cord compression or obstructed air- 
way or too premature to swim on its 
own. What sort of rescue team is 
available? Woefully inadequate in 
most cases! This very situation has 
led Professor Allan Barnes of Johns 
Hopkins to make the following com- 
parison. 

The removal of a brain tumor calls 

far a su rg eo n with twoa^s taiiis. k SCTu b 

nurse and t wo circ ulating nursej^.an, anes- 

thetlst and assistant. The pati ent's progno sis 

is about figjltrfn jg nnlh^ a nd X'^^ hf.^pf «ai 

^ IUVSHneiTt is tremendous. The birth of a 

' newborn at 4:uu a.m. orten 'is anended 

~fty" one physician, no scrub nurse, one 

circulating nurse and ina dequate nr ^"•p- 

hazard anesthesia coverag e. The combined 

prognosis of the two patie nts is over a. 

hun dred years, but the hosp ital investment 

is min imal . . . We do not den y that l>'^h 

■ c !. c^nliiTM-ntal^ tijyiHp wh«T» all fnfK Wfll- 

we canno T forget, however, that no oth er 
birthday ~is surround gl by the mortality 
whicti surrounds the day 



This is food for thought. There 
should be no further doubt as to the 
necessity of highly trained obstetrical 
nurses. 

Another object of concern is the 
expected surge in birth rate once the 
postwar "babies" start reproducing. 
Trained obstetricians have not kept 
pace with the rising birth rate and 
there is likely to be an acute shortage 
in the future. How, then, can the 
specialist be most effectively utilized? 
By training qualified nurses as obstet- 
rical assistants they might undertake 
such time-consuming duties now per- 
formed by the doctor, i.e.. prenatal 
visits after the initial assessment, ob- 
servation during labor and postpartum 
visits in hospital. Abnormal findings 
could be brought to the attention of 



the obstetrician. Thus, the talents of 
the obstetrician would be reserved for 
the time of greatest hazard. This does 
not mean a return to midwifery as we 
knew it but instead the promotion of 
special nurses through extensive train- 
ing to take more responsibility with- 
out lowering the standards of obstetric 
care in this country. 

Likewise, the gynecologic nurse, if 
she has a flair for the operating room, 
must be well skilled in pelvic proce- 
dures including urologic, bowel and 
vascular techniques. She should be 
adept at ptisitioning patients in dorsal 
lithotomy or knee chest. In the office 
or clinic she must instil confidence in 
the young girl about to have a pelvic 
examination or the elderly woman 
still clinging to Victorian traditions. 
She should understand menstrual phys- 
iology and concepts of infertility 
investigation in order to assist the 
gynecologist in his task. On the gyne- 
cologic ward she must know general 
principles of postoperative care and 
every detail of gynecologic care. Be- 
cause of the proximity of bladder and 
bowel to the reproductive tract, the 
potential for undoing ail the good in 
a gynecologic procedure by haphazard 
postoperative care is very great. 

Finally, to those who say that gyne- 
cologic and obstetric nursing consists 
only of enemas, bedpans, catheters 
and screaming parturients. I say they 
have missed the greatest opportunity 
of their career. What other field has 
so much uncharted territory — so 
many opportunities for the nurse, fired 
with enthusiasm, to march side by 
side with the gynecologist-obstetrician 
searching for answers to disordered 
reproductive physiology or for means 
of improving obstetric care, thereby 
relieving future generations of the 
ominous prospect that "no other haz- 
ard in one's lifetime is attended by 
such risk as that of being bom"? 



A good mind possesses a Kingdom. The world belongs to the Enthusiast who 

— Spneca keep^ cool. — Wn.ii*M MrFrr 



last year I had one fault 
ceited: this year I'm perfect! 



I was con- Outtide ^how is a poor sut>stitute for inner 

worth AFSor 



45S 



THE CANADIAN NURSF 



Agenesis of the 
Female Reproductive Tract 

Susan M. Miall and Diane E. Milligan 



Two students' account of the care given to a patient with congenital absence of 

the vagina and uterus — a condition first described in 1593 and of 

which only 750 known cases have been reported. 



The first thing that Janet did when 
admitted to her room in the gyneco- 
logy unit was to become acquainted 
with her room-mate — being very 
careful not to mention her own con- 
dition in her conversation. Janet was 
a tali, attractive young lady who was 
not in any apparent physical pain or 
distress. She seemed tense, however, 
and concerned about her hospitaliza- 
tion. 

Reason for Admission 

Five years ago, at the age of 13, 
Janet had accompanied her mother 
to the family physician regarding her 
delayed menarche. He had assured 
them that there was no cause for alarm 
— that many girls do not begin to 
menstruate until they are 14 or IS 
years of age. 

During the next few years, Janet 
completed a commercial course and 
then worked as a typist in a large 
business establishment. She met many 
young people at work and, eventually, 
the gentleman who wished to marry 
her. Since her menstrual periods had 
still not begun, she again consulted her 
physician. He advised immediate hos- 
pitalisation for investigation. 

Examinotion Under Anesthetic 

On the day prior to the vaginal ex- 
amination, the area from the umbilicus 
to and including the pubic area and 
the perineum was shaved. Janet ap- 
peared embarrassed when this proce- 

Miss Miall and Miss Milligan were sec- 
ond year students at Ottawa Civic Hospital 
when they prepared this study. 



dure was started, but made no protest. 
The nurse assumed a "matter-of-fact" 
attitude which seemed to ease the 
strain. 

An enema was given in the evening 
to evacuate the bowel. Janet felt naus- 
eated during the procedure and vomit- 
ed afterwards. Her obvious tension 
and apprehension appeared to be re- 
sponsible for this malaise. It was diffi- 
cult for her to talk about her fears, 
but when she finally did verbalize 
them, she seemed more at case. Nem- 
butal gr. 11/4 was given to ensure a 
good night's sleep. 

Early the next morning, a specimen 
of urine was collected and sent to the 
laboratory for routine urinalysis. The 
preoperative sedative of morphine gr. 
'6 and hyoscine gr. I '150 was ad- 
ministered subcutaneously at 7:15 a.m. 
and the patient was taken by stretcher 
to the operating room three-quarters of 
an hour later. 

The doctor discovered a congenitnt ab- 
sence of vagina and uterus and marked 
hypoplasia of the ovaries. Ihe external 
genitalia appeared normal except for the ab- 
sence of the vaginal orifice. Rectal exam- 
ination revealed a semi-circular band — the 
ovarian ligament — extending from one 
side of the pelvis to the other with a small, 
bean-like knob of tissue on the right side, 
which appeared to be an ovary. This con- 
dition — agenesis of the reproductive tract 
— is rare. Normally, these organs appear 
ab«Mit the fifth week of intrauterine life. 

Although the ovary was only a nubbin 
of tissue, estrogen and progesterone were 
being produced normally as evidenced by 
the presence of secondary sex characteris- 
tics. The hormones produced in the anterior 
pituitary gland must, therefore, have been 
acting on this small ovary. 



MAY 1<V!4 VO' 



4S9 



The Patient's Reaction 

Janet reacted to the doctor's ex- 
planations by withdrawing. She refused 
to discuss her condition with anyone, 
except to say that she agreed that cor- 
rective surgery should be done. She 
was undoubtedly concerned about her 
fiance's reaction to it and how it 
would affect their marriage; in spite 
of this, she kept silent and maintained 
a stoic front. Efforts, on the part of the 
nurse, to encourage her to confide only 
led to her further withdrawal 

Corrective Surgery 

The skin area from the nipple 
line to the midline of the thighs was 
cleansed and shaved the day before sur- 
gery. The next morning, Janet was 
given a soap suds enema; preoperative 
sedative consisted of morphine gr. i^fi 
and hyoscine gr. 1/150 s.c. 

The surgeons opened the dimple within 
the hymeneal ring and, with blunt dissec- 
tion, separated the plane of cleavage be- 
tween the bladder and rectum. There was 
no evidence of any vaginal cul-de-sac 

The dissection was carried up to the 
perineum to a depth of 4-1/2 inches. A 
mold 1-1/4" in diameter and 4-1/2" deep 
was then securely sutured to the vulva. An 
indwelling catheter was inserted into the 
bladder before the patient was returned to 
the recovery room. 

In the pencil-thin fold of tissue between 
the bladder and rectum lay cells which con 
tained the potential for a mature vagina 
By dissecting this fold and placing a mold 
between these tissues, the surgeon hoped to 
stimulate growth through nature's patterns 
and thereby form a vault of vaginal li«.<ue • 

Postoperative Period 

Janet was returned to the recovery 
room unconscious with a Foley cath- 
eter draining and an I.V. of 5% glu- 
cose and distilled water containing one 
ampoule of Solu-B and 500 mg. of 
Redoxon. The latter are vitamin com- 
pounds necessary for body metabolism 

Half an hour later, the patient was 
conscious and in severe pain. Demerol 
100 rog. was given. Blood pressure 



• Amer. J. Obstet Gynec . 12:310. Sept 
1958 



was 98/65, pulse 76, respirations 18. 
There was no bleeding or discharge 
per vagina. Janet was returned to her 
own room at 3:30 p.m. 

A further injection of 100 mg. of 
Demerol was given at 8:30 p.m. At 
this time the nurse noted that the peri- 
neal dressing was partially covered 
with a serosanguinous discharge. She 
gave perineal care and changed the 
dressing. B.P., pulse and respirations 
remained stable. Intake and output 
were recorded. Nembutal 200 mg. was 
given at 10:00 p.m.. but the patient 
slept little because of discomfort. The 
analgesic was repeated at 1:30 a.m. 

Objectives of Care at this Stage: 

1. To relieve the patient's pain and to 
keep her as comfortable as possible. 

2. To provide support and encourage- 
ment. 

y. To maintain nutrition and fluid and 
electrolyte balance. 

4. To prevent complications. 

Meeting the Objectives 

1. Janet experienced constant pain 
due to spasms of the perineal muscle. 
She received injections of Demerol 100 
mg. q.4 h. but these did not com- 
pletely control her discomfort. The 
slightest leg movement increased the 
pressure on the perineal sutures and 
caused her to cry out with pain. 

As the severity of the pain increas- 
ed, the patient's tolerance of it de- 
creased and her fear heightened. She 
frequently screamed and cried for her 
mother as the effects of the analgesic 
lessened. At this point, the doctor or- 
dered Stelazine 5 mg. t.i.d. This drug, 
a synthetic dihydrochloride, is an atar- 
axic in that it helps to relieve anxiety, 
thus providing emotional equilibrium. 
The effectiveness of the medication 
was demonstrated by Janet's restless- 
ness one night when the drug was 
withheld. 

2 Janet required considerable sup- 
port and understanding. Despite con- 
stant reassurance, she continued to 
worry about the outcome of the sur- 
gery. She acted thoughtlessly with her 
fiance when he came to visit her; she 
exploded angrily when nursing proce- 
dures caused her discomfort; she was 
frightened by the appearance of new 
personnel 



M 



II 



4« 



THK CANADIAN I^UR.SE 



F* 




It was necessary for the nurse to 
realize that the hostility and anger de- 
monstrated by Janet was her way of 
releasing frustration and axiety; it was 
not an attack against the nurse her- 
self. By understanding this, the nurse 
was able to accept the patient and her 
behavior. 

3. For two days postoperatively. 
Janet received intravenous therapy 
supplemented by a clear fluid diet. 
Approximately 1.000 cc. of 5% glu- 
cose was given intravenously each 
eight-hour shift. A regular diet was 
then provided with instructions to en- 
courage a high fluid intake. The pa- 
tient ate only tea and toast at first, but 
her appetite increased as her pain sub- 
sided. An accurate account of intake 
and output was kept. 

4. Special precautions were taken 
to avoid possible complications. Peri- 
neal care was given each time the 
dressing was changed to prevent in- 
fection. The perineum was washed 
with warm water and soap using 
downard strokes. This procedure was 
very painful and had to be done gently. 
Chloromycetin 250 mg. was given 
b.i.d. intramuscularly for five days. 

Two days after the operation, a 
foul-smelling, yellowish vaginal dis- 
charge was noted. Prior to this, the 
discharge had been red or pink with no 
obvious odor. Later, the discharge be- 
came brownish and continued to have 
a foul odor for several days. Ordin- 
arily, this might have been taken as a 
sign of infection; in Janet's case it was 
a result of the type of surgery per- 
formed. The odor necessitated fre- 
quent change of dressings with peri- 
nea! care, and good ventilation in the 
room. Perfumed soaps and cologne 
were helpful in eliminating it. 

The Foley catheter was left in the 
bladder during the postoperative peri- 
od to protect the suture line from con- 
tamination of urine. Six days after 
surgery, an order was written to clamp 
the catheter and release on desire to 
void. That night the catheter was re- 
leased and 300 cc. of clear amber 
urine was obtained. TTiis clamping and 
releasing procedure was continued un- 
til the mold was removed. 

Prevention of circulator) complica- 
tion was an essential part of care. 
Preopcrativcly Janet had been taught 



various leg exercises to carry out post- 
operatively to prevent venous stasis 
without straining the suture line. These 
she did. but only with considerable 
persuasion because of the severe pain 
in the perineal region. Due to the type 
of surgery performed and the pain ex- 
perienced with movement, the patient's 
exercise was all taken in bed. Her 
most comfortable position was a low, 
semi-Fowler's which seemed to relieve 
pressure on the perineum. Skin care 
was an essential part of the nursing 
care. Frequent massages were given 
with particular attention to bony prom- 
inences. 

Postoperatively, return of bowel 
function is an important consideration. 
Four days after the surgery, Janet was 
given an enema consisting of one 
ounce of magnesium sulphate, two 
ounces of glycerine, and three ounces 
of water. The return flow contained 
small amounts of fecal matter. This 
procedure also helped to relieve the 
patient of pains due to flatus accu- 
mulated in the bowel. A rectal tube 
was inserted following this and 150 
cc. of liquid stool was released. Two 
days later, a soap suds enema was 
given with good results. 

Removal of Mold 

Approximately two weeks following 
the insertion of the mold, the surgeon 
was notified that it was protruding 
about one inch from the vaginal ori- 
fice. He immediately booked the oper- 
ating rcxim for removal of the mold 
the following day. 

Following this relatively minor pro- 
cedure, Janet was returned to the re- 
covery room. She was extremely ap- 
prehensive when she regained con- 
sciousness, and was afraid to move 
her legs or turn because of pain she ex- 
pected to experience. When told that 
the Foley catheter had been removed, 
she was ecstatic and seemed uncon- 
cerned about the outcome of the sur- 
gery. She was returned to the ward 
shortly after this and slept soundly for 
an hour or so. When she awoke she 
required an injection of Demerol 100 
mp. for pain. 

PostoperoHve Core 

The doctor's orders were as follows; 



M.AY 1964 VOL flO. No 5 



461 



IM 



Diet: 1. Full diet as tolerated. 

2. Encourage fluids. 

Prophylactic treatment: I. Dettol douches. 

2. Instillation of Triple-Sulpha Cream 
b.i.d. 

3. Dicrysticin 2 cc. I.M. o.d. Sigmamycin 
250 mg. q.i.d. 

Healing measures: 1. Heat to perineum 
provided by electric light baker b.i.d. 

2. Vitamin therapy. 

Analgesics and sedatives: I. Demerol 100 
mg. q.6 h., p.m. 

2. Analgesic tablets q.4 h. p.h.n. 

3. Stelazine S mg. t.i.d., p.r.n. 

4. Nembutal gr. iii h.s. 

Measures for bowel function: 1. Agarol 1 
tbsp. and 

2. Soap suds enema two days postoper- 
atively. 

Normal bladder function was fost- 
ered by having the patient sit erect 
when voiding. Catheterization for res- 
idual urine yielded 7 cc, signifying 
that the bladder was emptying itseff 
adequately. 

A few hours following her return 
to the ward, the patient was given a 
sterile dettol douche; she experienced 
little discomfort. The return flow was 
pink and cloudy. One full tube of 
Triple-Sulpha Cream was instilled into 
the vagina. The electric light baker 
was then applied to the perineum for 
20 minutes thus increasing the blood 
volume to the area. This helps the 



healing process as well as having a 
soothing effect. The entire procedure 

— douche, application of cream and 
heat — was carried out b.i.d. 

Janet was taught to use a plastic 
mold equipped with a handle to dilate 
the vagina. At first she was hesitant 
and required much encouragement. As 
the vagina became more flexible, how- 
ever, she was soon able to insert the 
dilator with competence, using aseptic 
technique. The doctor impressed upon 
her the importance of carrying out 
this procedure t.i.d. at home in order 
to maintain the vaginal vault. 

Discussions arose between patient 
and nurse concerning general home- 
care. A diet high in protein and vita- 
mins was essential; a careful balance 
between rest and exercise was em- 
phasized to ensure maximum progress 
to health; the importance of personal 
hygiene, including daily douches, was 
stressed. 

The remaining supportive sutures 
were removed four days after surgery. 
The physician found the graft to be 
satisfactorily established and permitted 
Janet to be ambulatory. Two days later 
she was discharged from hospital. 

Her future plans include marriage 

— about six months after the surgery. 
She and her fiancd will adopt children 
after their marriage so that they will 
have every chance of sharing a happy 
family life. 



Excuse pleas* — but Memorial University 
at St. John's, Newfoundland asked that 
nurses attending the CNA convention there. 
June 14-19, do not wear high heels in the 
university. So bring along a pair of flat 
shoes — the CNA will provide a shoe bag 
for your spikes. 
P.S. — It will also provide a star-studded 

convention where there's much to 

team and much to enjoy. 




M2 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



HIP ARTHROPLASTY 



Igor Bitenc, m.d., f.r.c.s.(c.) 



Arthroplasty is a reconstructive procedure in a joint, particularly to the joint 
surfaces, to enable this articulation to resume the function of motion 

under stress. 



For successful arthroplasty, it is 
important that re-education of the sur- 
rounding muscles be achieved and that 
their proper action be secured by elim- 
inating all periarticular scar tissue and 
fibrosis. 

INDICATIONS 

Indications for arthroplastic proce- 
dures are numerous, as are the contra- 
indications to it. Where joint surfaces 
arc destroyed and ankylosis has taken 
place, either by fibrous tissue or by 
bone, arthroplasty can be considered 
if the patient is in an age group where 
re-education of muscles can be achiev- 
ed and if he is willing to undergo a 
lengthy rehabilitation. The patient's so- 
cial status and occupation will help 
to determine the feasibility of such a 
procedure and the type to be em- 
ployed. 

Following arthritic changes due to 
pyogenic infection, surgery must be 
postponed until the infection has been 
quiescent for a long time — preferably 
for over a year. No signs of infection 
anywhere else in the body should be 
present. 

If arthroplasty is to be perfofmed 
because of joint changes due to rheu- 
matoid arthritis, it is preferable that 
the disease be well controlled by medi- 
cation; otherwise the procedure should 
be carried out during a period 
of remission. Following traumatic 
changes in a joint, where incongruity 
has led or is expected to lead to anky- 
losis, arthroplasty should be carried 
out as soon as possible. Since there 
will still be good muscles surrounding 
the joint, re-education and rehabilita- 



Dr. Bitenc is an orthopedic surgeon on 
the staff of the Royal Victoria Hospital, 
Montreal. 



tion win require a much shorter period. 
EXegenerative arthritic changes, either 
of unknown etiology or. as more com- 
monly seen, as a result of changes of 
the mechanics of the joint due to pre- 
vious joint disorders (e.g. Legg-Per- 
thes' disease or slipped capital epiphy- 
sis) are also frequently treated by 
arthroplasty. 

The selection and evaluation of pa- 
tients for this procedure should be 
made very carefully. If the indications 
are correct, more successful results 
will be obtained if there is full infor- 
mation in regard to the patient's ori- 
ginal disability. Other procedures, such 
as arthrodesis or osteotomies of the 
McMurray, Pauwels or Blount type, 
have stood the test of time and have 
had. on many occasions, longer-lasting 
results. The decision rests, therefore, 
not only on the ability of the surgeon 
but on his evaluation of the local con- 
dition of the joint to be treated, the 
patient's age. sex, occupation, desire 
of rehabilitation and the time available 
to him for treatment. 

TYPES OF ARTHROPLASTY 

The interposition arthroplasty is 
well-known. After readjustment of the 
soft tissues and remodeling of the bony 
surfaces of the joint, fascia (from the 
patient himselO or Vitallium is inter- 
posed between the raw bone ends to 
function as a gliding surface. The best 
is the metallic cup made from Vital- 
lium. 

One part of the joint surface can 
be removed and replaced. The aceta- 
bulum can be replaced using steel or 
Vitallium of different shapes. Replace- 
ment of the femoral head is usually 
carried out using a prosthesis in the 
form of a head and stem (e.g. Austin 
Moore, Thompson types, etc.). The 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60. No. 3 



463 



Vitallium cup arthroplasty and the re- 
placement arthroplasty with an Austin 
Moore prosthesis are the two types 
used most frequently. 

The indications for these procedures 
are quite different as is the postoper- 
ative treatment. Replacement arthro- 
plasty is frequently carried out in eld- 
erly people who have had a subca- 
pital fracture of the neck of the femur; 
after replacement of the removed head, 
the patients are able to begin walking 
much earlier than if they had waited 
until the fracture had united following 
reduction and internal fixation. The 
possibility of complications such as 
non-union and avascular necrosis is 
eliminated. The drawback is that re- 
placement arthroplasty may not func- 
tion well over an extended period. At 
present, we just do not know how 
long it will stand up. It varies from 
individual to individual. 

OPERATIVE PROCEDURES 

Vitallium Cup Arthroplasiy 

The surgical approach to ihe hip 
joint for this procedure is from the 
front or, in some cases, from the lat- 
eral aspect. During the exposure of 
the hip joint, it is essential that the 
entire joint and acetabular cavity be 
well-visualized following dislocation of 
the head of the femur from the acetab- 
ulum so that readjustment of the sur- 
rounding muscles can be carried out. 
such as transfer of the iliopsoas, etc. 
The incision, therefore, is made most 
frequently in the anterior aspect, start- 
ing at the crest of the ilium and curving 
downward over the hip joint, ending in 
the lateral aspect of the thigh. The 
muscle layers are separated in such a 
way that they arc not severed but. ra- 
ther, are detached from the point of 
origin — such as the tenor fascia lata 
and glutei sub-pcriostally from the outer 
surface of the crest and ilium, the 
sartorius from the anterior superior 
iliac SDine, and the rectus fcmoris 
from the inferior anterior iliac spine. 
The main trunks of vessels and nerves 
arc preserved, but some vascular bran- 
ches crossing the exposure cleft arc 
ligated. The capsule of the joint is 
excised along with all scar formation. 

The hip is dislocated anteriorly and 



the joint surfaces are then remodeled 
so that there will be no impingement 
of the margin of the interpositioned 
Vitallium cup. This will usually require 
additional removal of the margins of 
the acetabulum. If this has been car- 
ried out frequently, it will be necessary 
to transfer the greater trochanter with 
insertion of the gluteal muscles further 
down the shaft of the femur to allow 
better leverage for these muscles and 
to clear the neck of the femur for bel- 
ter abduction. It is also frequently ne- 
cessary to transfer the iliopsoas more 
anteriorly to the trochanteric area. 

Throughout this procedure, force is 
avoided, particularly when the hip is 
to be dislocated. Attention has to be 
paid, at all times, to the proper fit of 
the cup and it is necessary to develop 
an acetabulum that is deep enough for 
the proper fit. When closure is com- 
menced, the muscles that were detach- 
ed are sutured to their original pos- 
itions. 

When the patient is moved to his 
bed. a Thomas splint with a Pearson 
attachment is used to suspend the leg 
with an additional five to seven pounds 
of traction to overcome the postoper- 
ative muscle spasms. The leg will be 
placed with the hip in slight flexion 
and abduction, yet neutral position in 
regard to rotation. The knee joint is 
slightly flexed at about 20 degrees. 
This position is the most comfortable 
for the patient's postoperative care 
and will enable him to start gentle mo- 
tions, partially passive and partially 
active. At all times it will be necessary 
to re-educate and strengthen muscles 
that have not been used for many 
years. 

The cup acts as an interposed struc- 
ture, moving in the acetabulum and 
allowing motion of the head of the 
femur in such a way that double mo- 
tion takes place — one inside and one 
outside the cun. This diminishes the 
total friction. The surfaces against the 
cup surface will reorganize the original 
blood clots to fibrous tissue that event- 
ually will undergo metaplasia to fibro- 
cartilage and become completely 
smooth, depending on the surface of 
the cup. 

The lime to start mobilizing a pa- 
tient will vary for each individual: a% 
a rule, ambulation can be started after 




464 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



five tc» six weeks in the suspension 
apparatus. During the following two 
to four weeks, the patient begins to 



of the hip joint area. The only struc- 
ture sectioned longitudinally is the ilio- 
tibial tract and the fascia lata with 




VitalUun Cup 
for Hip Arthroplasty 

use a walker, graduates to crutch walk- 
ing and then to sitting and climbing 
stairs. Walking on crutches is desir- 
able for at least six months postoper- 
atively. During this time, the patient 
will probably have a Trendelenburg 
gait, which means the dipping of the 
pelvis to the opposite side due to the 
inability of the weakened gluteal mus- 
cles to support the pelvis and the body 
weight over the head of the femur. 
Other than muscular discomfort, such 
as muscle ache due to overwork or 
tiredness, it is expected that the patient 
will be pain-frcc. 

Replacement Arthroplasty 

The approach most commonly used 
is the modified Gibson (entering the 
thigh and hip joint area from the post- 
cro-latcral aspect) or the so-called 
"southern approach." (entering the hip 
joint from the posterior aspect). Both 
of these approaches arc preferred for 
the simple reason that the gluteal mus- 
cles, especially the gluteus mcdius and 
minimus arc not detached and the only 
muscles sectioned during this approach 
arc the short external rotators of the 
hip joint. As a result, after the pros- 
thesis is introduced and the wound 
healed, complete activity of the patient 
can be resumed. 

For this procedure, as opposed to 
the first one where the patient is lying 
on his back with a sandbag under the 
affected hip. the patient is lying on the 
opposite side, and the hip to be opcr- 
•itcd upon is uppermost. An incision 
is made into the postero-lateral aspect 



Moore Type 
Hip Prosthesis 




a split along the fibers of the gluteus 
maximus muscles. The short external 
rotators are detached in the greater 
trochanteric area with special care to 
protect and avoid injury to the sciatic 
nerve. 

The hip joint is entered from behind 
and. after excision of most of the 
capsule and scar tissue, the hip is dis- 
located, by internal rotation. The head 
and the neck of the femur are removed 
with an osteotome after the dense 
portion of the neck has been drilled. 
The latter procedure has to be carried 
out in such a way that the drill will be 
at the correct angle to allow proper 
placement of the prosthesis where the 
neck of the prosthesis rests on the re- 
maining portion of the neck of the 
femur, especially on the strongest por- 
tion, the calcar fcmoralc. The bed for 
the stem of the prosthesis is prepared 
and. after measurement has been taken 
of the removed head of the fenr.'r. the 
size of the prosthesis is chosen. If the 
acetabulum is incongrucnt and adjust- 
ments arc necessary this will be car- 
ried out; then, according to the size 
of the newly-formed acetabulum, the 
size of the head will be determined. 

The prosthesis is driven into the 
shaft through the neck of the femur. 
It should Iv sitting firmly and should 



MAY I9«4 - VOL «n Nn 



4ro 



prove immobile when tested. The re- 
duction of the hip is carried out; the 
short rotators are reattached at the 
posterior aspect of the trochanteric 
area of the femur; the fascia is closed 
as well as the skin. 

After such a procedure, it is unne- 
cessary to place the patient in balanced 
suspension or traction. He may be 
nursed without specific care and is 
able to turn from side to side. Follow- 
ing removal of the sutures, exercises 
are started and these can be of an ac- 
tive nature from the beginning. To 
provide suspension of the leg, slings 
can be added or a pre-formed plaster 
mould used to allow lateral abduction. 
Motion can be increased to the resis- 



tance point by use of weights. 

The exercises of primary interest are 
abduction for gluteal muscle strength- 
ening and extension to strengthen the 
gluteus maximus. Hip flexion exercises 
are not desirable at this stage. After 
the patient is able to abduct the leg 
against the resistance of a certain 
amount of weight, ambulation, begin- 
ning with a walker and gradually pro- 
gressing to crutches, can be started. 
Theoretically, and sometimes in prac- 
tice, patients following a procedure of 
this type can ambulate in a matter of 
days without ill effects. This is parti- 
cularly true of patients who have had 
the arthroplasty as a result of acute 
fracture. 




THE LONG ROAD HOME 



Judith McKay 

The patient who has a hip arthroplasty must be prepared to face a rigid rehabili- 
tation schedule. 



Mrs. Allen was a 55-year-old wo- 
man who had suffered almost constant 
pain in her right hip for five years. 
The pain had become increasingly 
severe over the years and, added to 
this, she noticed stiffness in her hip. 
a tendency to limp, and shortness of 
the affected leg. The physician told 
her that she had a condition called 
osteoarthritis — a strange term which 
she did not understand and which he 
explained to her. 

OSTEOARTHRITIS 

This is a degenerative disease of the 
joints characterized by thickening and 
scarring of the synovial membrane and 
capsule, and by hypertrophy of the 
cartilage and bone at the joint mar- 
gins, with thinning of the cartilage of 
the articular surfaces. It is a disease 
that occurs more often in middle or 
later life, and is associated with joint 
wear and tear. It is also more common 



Miss McKay is head nurse of an ortho- 
pedic unit at Toronto General Hospital. 
Toronto. Ont. 



in people who are overweight. Signs 
and symptoms of the disea.se are usual- 
ly mild, although persistent and pro- 
gressive. Injury, strain, and damp 
weather aggravate the condition; symp- 
toms tend to be more severe if the 
individual remains too long in one 
position. Overactivity results in more 
discomfort, but this can be partially 
relieved by rest. 

The pain of osteoarthritis is usually 
mild, often described as an ache or a 
feeling of stiffness. When the lower 
extremities are involved, a limp ap- 
pears, probably due to a natural ten- 
dency to protect the affected limb. 
The patient will notice some limitation 
of movement in the hip joint, especial- 
ly when trying to abduct and extern- 
ally rotate the leg. Muscular weakness 
of the leg develops due. in most cases, 
to the limited use of the extremity. 
As the disease progresses, the pain be- 
comes more unbearable and severe. 

ANATOMY OF AFFECTED AREA 

The hip is the junction between the 
pelvis and the lower extremity con- 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



sisting of the hip joint and surround- 
ing muscles. The hip is flat in front, 
slightly rounded laterally, and quite 
rounded posteriorly by the muscles of 
the buttock. The innominate bone, 
formed by the fusion of the ischium, 
ilium, and pubis, forms the inner 
boundary of the hip, and outer bound- 
ary of the pelvis. Near its centre a 
rounded cavity, the acetabulum, 
shaped like the inside of a hemisphere 
or hollow ball, presents a socket for 
articulation with the femur. 

The hip joint is formed by the 
movement of the bail-shaped head of 
the femur with the acetabulum, with 
the femoral head loosely attached to 
the acetabulum by ligaments. This is a 
ball and socket joint which can move 
to any position within the approximate 
range of half a sphere. It is a strong 
joint as well as a very moveable one, 
since it must carry the weight of the 
trunk and upper extremities, as well 
as bear the brunt of the various activi- 
ties of the lower extremity. The hip 
joint and its muscles are used actively 
in the process of walking, running, 
jumping, dancing, swimming, etc. Ad- 
duction and external rotation of the hip 
permit crossing of the legs. 

ARTHROPLASTY 

The physician told Mrs. Allen that 
it would be necessary for her to have 
a hip arthroplasty — a revision of her 
hip joint. 

Arthroplasty is the reconstruction, not 
merely of the bony structures, but of all 
the component parts of an articulation or 
joint, for the purpose of restoring motion 
to the joint and function to the muscles, 
ligaments, tendons, and other soft tissues. 
Arthroplasty is designed to restore and to 
produce a more functional and stable joint, 
with maximum freedom from pain. It is 
most commonly done at the hip joint. The 
procedure is divided into four parts: 
the plastic adjustment of the soft 
structure; the reconstniction of the 
bone; the interposition of material be- 
tween the articular surfaces; the after 
treatment. 
There are three different operations which 
come under the heading of hip arthroplast\ 
t. fasdal 

2. cup 

3. replacement 



Basically, the treatment and post- 
operative care of these three are the 
same, with a few specific exceptions 
which will not be discussed. The oper- 
ation itself is only the first step in the 
re-establishment of function. Carefully 
planned after-treatment to re-educate 
the atrophic muscles is essential to 
success. 

Preopekative Care 

An understanding of and strict ad- 
herence to the rehabilitation program 
are necessary. The patient is given a 
detailed explanation of events to be 
encountered subsequent to surgery. 
This explanation includes the treat- 
ment program and the estimated period 
of total or partial incapacity. The pa- 
tient must recognize and understand: 

that a normal joint cannot be created by 
any surgical procedure; what may be ex- 
pected from the procedure in her particular 
case; the probable length of hospitalization 
and convalescence; what the postoperative 
rehabilitation program involves, and the 
role she will play in it. 

This was explained to Mrs. Allen by 
her physician well in advance of the 
proposed surgery. She had an oppor- 
tunity to think about it and to discuss 
it with her family. Since orthopedic 
surgery is a very long, drawn out pro- 
cess, it is important that the family 
be able to look after themselves, or 
that arrangements be made for some- 
one to look after them during the pa- 
tient's hospitalization. Mrs. Allen un- 
derstood that the operation might or 
might not be successful. In either case 
she was prepared to face an extremely 
long convalescent p)eriod. 

When Mrs. Allen was first admitted, 
the nurse assigned to care for her 
showed her to her room, introduced 
her to other patients, asked her to put 
on a hospital gown, and then put her 
clothes away. She explained how to 
contact the nursing staff with the signal 
light, how to use the radio, and where 
the washroom was located. .After this 
Mrs. Allen was told about the general 
hospital routine. Her admission tem- 
perature, pulse and respirations were 
taken and recorded, and. finally, a 
urine sample was obtained and sent 
to the laboratory for routine analysis. 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60. No. 5 



407 



After she was in bed, the intern carried 
out a final preoperative physical exam- 
ination, and took a sample of blood 
to determine the hemoglobin content 
as well as the patient's blood group. 
The laboratory was asked to have 
2,000 cc. of blood available, since 
blood loss during hip surgery if often 
quite extensive. After he had examined 
the patient, he asked her to sign a 
written consent for surgery. An enema 
was given and the operative site was 
prepared. 

In orthopedic surgery, it is essential 
to minimize the danger of infection 
since an infected bone is extremely 
difficult to cure. If infection sets in, 
the bone becomes very weak and rarely 
regains its original strength. The nurse 
washes the operative site carefully, 
shaves it without breaking the skin, 
and prepares the skin with an anti- 
septic agent such as Phisohcx. The 
area extends from the waist to the knee 
on the affected side, and from midline 
in the back to midline in the front, 
including the public area. The area is 
then wrapped in sterile towels. To 
assure the patient of a restful night a 
hypnotic, such as secobarbital sodium 
is administered orally. 

In the morning, the patient is put 
in an anesthetic traction bed. Her 
valuables are locked away, nail polish 
and/or dentures are removed. One 
hour prior to surgery, she is given pre- 
operative sedation to relax her, and to 
reduce bronchial secretions in the 
lungs in preparation for anesthesia. 

POSTOPERATWF. CaRE 

Following surgery, an elastoplast 
gauze dressing is "laid on" the oper- 
ative site in such a way that tension 
is avoided. The patient is kept anes- 
thetized until she is moved to her 
traction bed with the limb immobilized 
in a splint and traction applied to it 
A Hodgen or Thomas splint with a 
Pearson knee attachment is used with 
five to seven pounds of traction ap- 
plied to overcome muscle spasm in the 
leg. The hip is placed in a position 
of slight flexion, moderate abduction 
and slight internal rotation. The knee 
is slightly flexed. This position is 
sometimes altered, depending upon the 
operative technique employed. 



A folded towel or trochanteric roll 
is placed under the buttock behind the 
greater trochanter and in line with the 
gluteal cleft to maintain internal rota- 
tion of the extremity. The patient's 
position is changed by adjusting the 
apparatus. The extremity must at all 
times be kept in proper relation to the 
trunk, regardless of the position in bed. 

Mrs. Allen was transferred to the 
recovery room, where she was kept 
until conscious. During the surgery it 
had been necessary to give her 2,000 
cc. of blood. The transfusion was com- 
pleted in the recovery room and an 
r.V. of 5% G/DW started. The sur- 
geon wrote the following postoperative 
orders: 

I. Give a total of 2,000 cc. of blood and 
follow it with 2,500 cc. of intravenous fluid 
in 24 hours: 5% G/DW alternated with 
5% G/NS. 

2. Each 1,000 cc. of intravenous fluid 
should contain I Gm. Frythromycin. 

3. Intravenous to run until the patient is 
able to tolerate 2.000 cc. of clear fluids 
orally in a 24-hour period. 

4. Clear fluids only to be increased in 
24 hours to diet as tolerated. 

5. Morphine gr. I '4 q.4 h. p.r.n. s.c. for 
•18 hours for pain lo be followed by 

6. Morphine gr. 1/6 q.4 h, p.r.n. for 48 
hours to be followed by 

7. Codeine gr. I s.c. q.4 h. p.r.n. 

8. Gravol 50 mg. I.M. q.4 h. p.r.n. for 
nausea and vomiting. 

9. Chest routine q.l h. for 24 hours and 
then p.r.n. 

10. Do not turn patient for 24 hours; 
after this period, turn on unaffected side 
q.2 h. 

1 1 . Catheterize in 1 2 hours if the patient 
has not voided. 

12. Blood pressure to be taken q 1/2 h 
until stable and then q.4 h. 

The nurse mentally reviewed the 
reasons for these orders: the intra- 
venous fluid is given to replace the loss 
of body fluid and to compensate for 
a reduced oral intake: Erythromycin, 
an antibiotic, is given to reduce the 
possibility of postoperative infection: 
since bone surgery is one of the most 
painful types of surgery, it is. there- 
fore, necessary to give the patient a 
strong analgesic such as morphine: 
since the gastrointestinal tract move- 
ment is greatly decreased for approxi- 
mately 48 hours after surgery, a limit- 



I 



46R 



TKK CANADTAN ?«.rRSF 



ed oral intake is essential to decrease 
nausea and vomiting; regular, deep 
breathing and coughing exercises wiL 
clear the chest of stagnant secretions 
caused by the immobility of the pa- 
tient, thus reducing the possibility of 
pneumonia; the patient must remain 
in one position for 24 hours to allow 
the operative site to become stable; 
to decrease the possibility of pressure 
areas, the patient must later be turned 
from back to unaffected side q.2 h.; 
blood pressure is taken at regular in- 
tervals for early detection of shock. 
Mrs. Allen recovered from her sur- 
gery extremely well. In 24 hours the 
intravenous was discontinued since she 
was able to tolerate clear fluids orally. 
In 48 hours she began to eat solid 
foods. She voiifed without catheter- 
ization. 

REHABitrrATioN Program 

This includes: 

A well balanced diet which allows the 
patient to maintain her usual weight; enough 
milk to encourage the formation of new 
bone; sufficient rest to give body and mus- 
cles time to regain strength: change of body 
position and frequent massage to prevent 
the development of decubitus ulcers: ad- 
ministration of a laxative daily to counter- 
act the problem of constipation and to en- 
sure regularity: adequate sedation to relieve 
pain. 

Physio- and Occupational Therapy 

Since the length of time required for 
the patient to remain in traction is 
usually three to four weeks (sometimes 
five to six weeks), it is necessary to 
find an outlet for her energies end 
thoughts. If she is not occupied in 
some way, she may become quite de- 
pressed. Since depression only serves 
to hinder the physical progress of the 
patient, it is essential that the occupa- 
tional and physical therapy be com- 
bined in a well-balanced program. 

Mrs. Allen was interested in paint- 
ing and in leathercraft; during her 
period of rehabilitation she was able 
to complete several oil paintings and 
to make a wallet, a belt and book 
cover. This she enjoyed thoroughly. 
When not working on her crafts, she 
spent her time doing exercises. 

Early muscle activity is limited by 

MAY 19e4 • VOL. 60. No. S 



the painful reaction, secondary to sur- 
gical interference; muscles fatigue 
quickly and require a great deal of 
rest. It is only with a consistent exer- 
cise program, carried out within the 
limits of comfort, that fatigue lessens 
and tolerance for activity increases. 
Muscle strength may develop early, 
but endurance is regained slowly. The 
tissues that have been disturbed must 
readjust physiologically to the demands 
of increased function. Thus, the first 
exercises taught to the patient are: 

1. Anterior tibial pull with toe curling, 
alternated with plantar flexion of the foot. 
This simply means pulling the whole foot 
up towards the unbent knee and then push- 
ing it away from the knee as far as possible. 

2. Quadriceps setting and knee extension. 
This exercise is designed to strengthen the 
quadriceps muscle in the thigh by tighten- 
ing and relaxing the knee joint. 

3. Internal rotation of the Itip. This is 
accomplished by trying to pull the hip 
inwards towards the pubis. 

These exercises are done daily at 
regular intervals, and are continued 
throughout the entire postoperative 
period. A week to ten days following 
surgery, the physiotherapist increases 
the exercise program, and starts the 
patient on passive and active assisted 
flexion and extension of the hip and 
knee by manipulation, the use of 
suspension ropes, and a knee sling. 
She also teaches passive and active 
leg abduction exercises. The passive 
exercises consist of gently swinging the 
leg from side to side of the traction 
suspension apparatus; riie active exer- 
cises consist of stretching the leg to 
make it as "long" as possible. This 
program is continued until the traction 
is removed. While the patient continues 
the above exercises, the physiotherapist 
follows the surgeon's orders for more 
advanced exercises. Medical practice 
differs respecting this pattern. 

The patient progresses according to 
her work tolerance, her age. and her 
recuperative powers. Mrs. Allen was 
a very willing worker and made good 
progress; within 10 days after removal 
of the traction, she was ready to sit 
in a chair and to begin ambulation in 
a walker. This step is usually taken 
when the patient can actively assist in 
moving from the bed to the chair. The 



I 



physiotherapist taught Mrs. Allen to 
"mark time" in the walker and then 
to walk by bearing just enough weight 
on the affected lunb so that she felt 
the floor firmly underneath her foot, 
while supporting the remainder of 
her body weight with her arms on the 
framework of the walker. There is a 
natural tendency to bend over in order 
to protect the affected side. Mrs. Allen 
had to remember to maintain an erect 
position. 

Eight weeks after surgery, and after 
the patient had mastered the walker, 
the surgeon told the physiotherapist 
that Mrs. Allen could be started on 
crutch walking with partial weight- 
bearing on the affected limb. Until 
the time of discharge, Mrs. Allen con- 
tinued to use crutches and to gradu- 
ally increase the amount of weight that 
she put on the affected leg. 

Most patient are discharged to con- 
valescent homes. Mrs. Allen had a 
very willing, capable family who were 
able to arrange for help in the home 
so that she could rest, continue her 
physiotherapy, and readjust gradually 
to the problems of managing her home. 

Conclusion 

Perhaps one of the most important 
but one of the most difficult parts of 
Mrs. Allen's postoperative care was the 
maintenance of a good mental attitude. 
She needed constant encouragement 
and reminders that progress is slow, 
and must be assessed on a weekly 
basis rather than a daily one. She 



had to understand that she could nol 
speed up the healing process by work- 
ing too hard and tiring herself. Most 
orQiopedic patients do not feel sick 
and it is difficult for them to under- 
stand why healing takes so long. 

Upon discharge, Mrs. Allen was 
given a list of instructions: 

Avoid sitting for more than one hour at 
a time. 

Complete relaxation in a recumbent po- 
sition — one hour a day. 

A definite exercise program. '^ 

Avoid physical fatigue. ^^ 

Muscle soreness and stiffness not relieved 
by rest or Aspirin is due to overactivity. 

Do not increase the number of times, or 
length of time of any one exercise until it 
can be performed asymptomatically several 
times in succession. 

Exercise only to the discomfort point. 

Leaving hospital, almost fully re- 
covered from her surgery, Mrs. Allen 
was pleased that her pain had gone, 
and that her hip joint moved easily. 
The weeks of bed rest, exercise, and 
patience were worth the effort — even 
if it was "a long road home." 



REFERENCES 

Howarth. M. B. Textbook of Orthopedics. 
Philadelphia. W. B. Saunders Co. 

Larson. C. and M. Gould. Calderwood's 
Orthopedic Nursing. St. Louis, C. V. Mosby 
Co.. 1961. 

Speed. J. S. and R. A. Knight, ed. 
CampbelFs Operative Orthopedic. St. Louis, 
C. V. Mosby Co., 1956. 



P 



II 



^.omincjl 



I 



IN 





June 1964 




Gray 


— Law and Nursing Brookbank 


— The Nurse as SuperviKW 


Jourard 


— PerMnal Contact in Jameson and 






Teaching Mackie 


— Reorganization of a De 
partment of Nursing 



plids additional material 



470 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



LErS LOOK AT THE TEACHER 



Sidney Jourard, ph.d. 



Many nurses go into 



'nursing education" because they can't stand nursing 
patients! 



We learn, not only from the efforts 
of a teacher to inform and correct us, 
but also through identification with the 
example set for us by our teacher. 
This learning from example is a very 
subtle thing, because much of it goes 
on without a word ever being spoken. 
The kinds of things which students 
learn by emulation of exemplars in- 
clude: attitudes, values, likes, dislikes, 
prejudices, and kindred matters. 

Involve MENT is Essentul 

Let us look at the typical role-model 
encountered by a student of nursing. 
Her class instructors are commonly 
women who have not been responsible 
for patient care in ages. They haven't 
liked patient care for a variety of reas- 
ons — it does not pay enough, they 
are afraid of close contacts with peo- 
ple, or they failed to find challenge or 
satisfaction in the process of patient 
care. And so. they went to a teacher's 
college, took a master's degree heavily 
loaded with such courses as curriculum 
construction, methods of evaluation — 
the kind of thing that appears in the 
syllabus of a college of education — 
and they may. as well, have taken a 
graduate seminar where they read and 
talked about some pha.se of nursing, 
e.g.. nursing administration, or super- 
vision etc. Then, they have gone back 
to a school of nursing, and have set 
out to teach students something about 
which they themselves may know very 
little. I realize that this is a caricature 
of the state of affairs, but I wager 
that it's not wholly inaccurate. 

While it is untrue that all expert 
practitioners can teach the art to 
others, it is also true that one cannot 



Dr. Jourard is with the Department of 
Psychology, University of Florida. Gaines- 
ville. Fla. 



teach the spirit of a profession unless 
one is continually involved in it. I do 
not believe nurses can teach nursing 
to students unless, at some regular 
interval, they hurl themselves into ac- 
tive care of patients in order to learn 
more, test out ideas, discover areas of 
inadequacy and the like, then share 
this with students. 

I am a clinical psychologist by pro- 
fession. By hook and by crook. I have 
maintained a small case-load of private 
patients whom I see in psychotherapy. 
I have done this continually, though 
my main salaried positions have been 
either teaching or research. One of the 
things I teach, do research in. and 
write papers about, is psychotherapy. 
How could I teach a meaningful sem- 
inar in personal counselling and psy- 
chotherapy, unless I kept a lively par- 
ticipation in my practice? I might read 
much about the field, and become an 
expert on others' opinions about the 
practice of psychotherapy, but my only 
basis for criticism of the work of others 
would be the grammar and logic of 
the books and articles I read. I would 
have no personal experience to serve 
as a basis for agreeing or disagreeing 
with the views of others. 

If a nurse who teaches students does 
not practise her p mK'«'''i"n what rtnpT 

the Stud fn' l'^^"' f'-"'" *'<•'•'? r'artijnlv 

she mav le.im the factual material that 
Tr"f5uri3~in the books that havg he^n 
assigned! She may learn soineth ing 
frot n th(^ leetUffcs. But the signiTicance 
Of What is learned in the library rtr 
lecture hall for the practice of patient 
cdTc may not be clear. 

A Contagious Enthususm 

What kind of nAe-model are you 
as an educator? One of the most im- 
portant characteristics of an effective 
role-model is the degree to which she 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 00. No 5 



471 



is actively and creatively committed 
and involved in her work. To be com- 
mitted and involved means to be con- 
cerned about some branch of learning 
and practice, struggling to understand 
it, contributing to it, studying it, ap- 
plying it, and perhaps teaching it. A 
committed person is one who is en- 
"thu^ed abQuLherlsub |ectnnatter . No- 
thing is so contagious as eiun u^fem, 
""uHles s'ms lack of enthusiasm. When 
was The last time that you had an 
idea that excited you, or read some 
literature in your field that fascinated 
you? When was the last time that you 
wrote a paper for presentation to your 
colleagues or students, for their cri- 
ticism or reactions? When was the last 
time you submitted something for pub- 
lication? When did you willingly take 
on an "impossible" patient, to see 
what you could do or learn? 

This is the kind ol enth usiasm that 
carrjes^oyeiLtD ^ludcnlsin _ spite o j^ the 
imm ense boredom of some^of the~ma- 
lenal 



thaL_nc eds^ to be read, or "of 

lectu res diatlnust be anenaea. txate- 
me nt, in v olvement, and enthusiasm 
^th oneVpro fession cannot be fake d. 
The bored educator, the one who~is 
bored With he r subj^ci-maner'ough t 
tcTtalce a haig lllof'k at h>F-aetf- — 
should jhe be teaching? 



~~~So far, I have discussed two aspects 
of teachers of nursing as role-models 
— their closeness to the practice of 
the art they profess, and the nature 
and quality of their involvement and 
committment to it. 

Statement of Pun pose 

Let us look at something that might 
make it difficult to become an enthu- 
siastic professor of nursing — the 
lack of clarity of definition of the field 
itself. Is nursing nothing more than 
a conglomeration of skills? If this is 
true, then nursing assistants who often 
can make a bed or rub a back as well 
as a registered nurse should be called 
nurses. What is nursing for, anyway? 
Is it a profession devoted to being an 
extension of the physician's eyes, ears, 
and hands? Is it dedicated to paper- 
shuffling? 

There has been lacking a conception 
of the purpose of the profession as a 
whole that has troubled many thought- 



ful people. It may seem academic, but 
a profession must have some kind of 
over-all statement of purpose, a pur- 
pose that can never be fully achieved, 
in order to provide scope for the con- 
tinuous growth and development of 
practitioners. 

Have any of you improved as nurses 
over the years? If so, in what respects 
have you improved? Have you become 
more expert with the hypodermic? I 
venture to say that one can reach a 
plateau in proficiency at injections in 
about an hour of expertly supervised 
practice. Have you become more ex- 
pert at making medication rounds, get- 
ting the medicine to the patient with a 
minimum of effort, fuss, or bother? 
In principle, a machine could do this 
better. 

What does growth in nursing prow- 
ess mean? An answer to this question is 
gradually being made by a few of the 
leaders in the field. Nurses in widely 
scattered areas quite independently 
have arrived at a conception of nurs- 
ing which ensures it will have an un- 
limited ceiling. They see nursing as a 
profession concerned with the promo- 
tion of comfort, or well-being, or 
equilibrium in sick people. Nurses ad- 
dress themselves to the residuals of 
health in patients, seeking to identify 
these, and foster their enlargement. 
Physicians arc the bloodhounds of 
patholog\'. quite properly so. Nurses, 
like mothers, nurture growth, then let 
the grown person go free. This con- 
ception has exciting implications. It 
implies that there is much to be learn- 
ed through practice in contact with 
patients: through research about the 
conditions of comfort, about the means 
of fostering morale, growth, and a 
fighting spirit in patients. 

If a nursing educator has wrestled 
seriously with the problem of defining 
ultimate goals for her profession, she 
need never feci that her training is fin- 
ished. She will realize that there always 
will remain much to learn in order to 
improve the quality of the care she 
practises or teaches. If a nurse gen- 
uinely is groping ceajselessly for mefh- • 
ods of increasing her competence, she 
will not convey, by her example, the 
idea that once one has finished one's 
training, one need Icam nothing more 

I rather like one leader's statement 



in 



THX CANADIAN NtmSE 



that she doesn't train nurses, but ra- 
ther seeks to develop good people, 
who in the process, learn the technical 
skills and knowledge that will make 
them useful not only in a sickroom 
but also in the community. 

I would like to invite some heated 
discussion about this theme of becom- 
ing a more effective role-model, be- 
cause I believe it to be a crucial factor 
in student-learning. Teacher colleges 
may load their students with tech- 
niques of teaching this, that or the 
other thing, but the importance of the 
role-model is generally overlooked. All 
too often, teachers have sought to be 
something they are not in the presence 
of students in the hope of being a 
proper example. This is not desirable. 
It is better to be what you are, as a 
teacher. If you are bored, or mediocre, 
then you can seek to find what is 
wrong with your setting, with you, or 
with your profession. If you find out 
and correct matters, you will again 
achieve high morale and be the more 
desirable sort of role-model. 

I^^TCRPFRSONAL COMPETENCE 

Nursing educators have high hopes 
of fostering interpersonal competence 
in their students. What exactly does in- 
terpersonal competence mean? Taken 
literally, the term means facility or 
skill at producing desired outcomes to 
one's transactions with others. One 
who displays interpersonal competence 
is able, through his relations with 
others, to prixluce such desired out- 
comes as: being liked by the other; 
being known and understood by the 
other; being obeyed by the other, if 
that is desired, and so on. Further 
implicit to the term "interpersonal 
competence" is the idea that the one so 
gifted is able to accomplish his pur- 
poses in interpersonal dealings without 
jeopardy to values other than those 
being sought in the transactions. For 
example, an individual may be able to 
get others to like him, which is. after 
all, an eagerly pursued aim in dealings 
with others. But if, in doing this, the 
individual is obliged to suppress his 
true self, he may be paying for his 
popularity with neurosis, or recurrent 
physical ills, which arc common out- 
comes to the supprcssi<tn of self. 



Interpersonal competence is a tricky 
kind of skill or capacity to teach. It is 
difficult to teach it in the same way, 
for example, that one teaches students 
how to dismantle an oxygen tent, or 
how to change a bed. It seems to be 
best learned through experience. Here 
is where the role-model becomes of 
the utmost importance. Perhaps the 
best way for students to learn inter- 
personal competence is through expo- 
sure to persons who already have 
achieved some measure of this skill; 
that is, through involvement in rela- 
tionships with persons more compe- 
tent interpersonally than they are at 
present. 

What is the most crucial factor in 
interpersonal competence? Empathy 
certainly is important, but I would say 
that security is equally important. By 
security, I mean the freedom and 
courage to be one's real self. This im- 
plies that the person who would be- 
come competent at interpersonal rela- 
tionships must place real-self-being 
high on the ladder of values. It means 
she must basically like and trust her 
own, spontaneous reactions to situ^ 
ations and people, and be willing to 
reveal these in a face-to-face situa- 
tion. In the long run, such openness 
will produce the outcomes that are 
most desired. 

What fosters such security and 
openness? Among other things, nu- 
merous experiences at being open with 
others, and being confirmed or sup- 
ported or taken seriously when one 
has been thus open. Students can be 
helped to become more sure of their 
own identity and more courageous in 
expressing their true feelings and opin- 
ions, when faculty members have taken 
the pains to listen seriously to them, 
and have rewarded them for such 
openness, even when they disagree 
with what they say or do. The teacher 
can set an example for this sort of 
openness by being that open herself 
and letting students see her that open. 
For example, one need only look at 
the conferences between a nurse and 
a doctor, and compare these with the 
conversations between that same nurse 
and a student, or an assistant, to see 
where courage to be open, enters the 
picture jQftCQ. in the relati on with the 
physici an, the nurse will stifle h er gen- 




MAY ig64 - VOL 60. No 5 



473 



uine opin ions and suggestions ou t_pf 

dteaa ^ being cntic ized or_j3lait€d . 
— Gran^d^hi^LJhg^^-^-^ diff e ren c e in 

power and jtatus_betwppn a nurse and 
— phystdanryet stud ents w ould be aided 

rnimcasuraBry if they could watch truly 



ences in being known. _This means 
thaT teachers should seelc to Icnow their 
studerits TnoT hecessanlv the tacts-"df 
tfielFTamily backgrounds, and the 
fffoHeifis Ihey are having With TheTF 
boy friends, fiathei^iwneans seeking 
_to know them as they^areHunng every 






open diaiopue be tween their teachers 
^ofTHrfSJng^anH^ ph yiifiant aQ fhpy rffi - ;^ tji i l l/il t wi t h l l i e iii .S i i ili knowl rrl g r 

laborate in the care of a patient. 



We in n ursing education claim that 
we wanr our students to come to know 
thepatients torwhom they ca re. The 
best way ot tostering this desire in 
students is to give them living experi- 



not only helps the teacher know what 
Tslo'be taught, but it also reinforc es 
tTi^^udent's sense of identity as a^r- 
"son. If the teacher is equally free in 
letting "the student know he r as she 
IS, then sne is proviamg mvaiuable 
role-model expenences to the siudcni. 



Canadian Nurses' Association 

Ticket of Nominations 



BIENNIUM 1964-66 



Presidtnt Mrs. A. Isobel MacLeod 

acclamation 

First Vice-Prtiident 

Miss Katherine MacLaggan 
acclamation 

Second Vice-President Sister M. Felicitas 



Third Vice-President 



Miss Ruth E. McClure 

Mrs. Blanche Duncanson 
Miss Vema Huffman 
Sister Denise Lefebvre 
Miss Louise Miner 
Miss Betty Sellers 



Director of Nursing, Montreal General Hos- 
pital. Montreal. Que. 

Director, School of Nursing, University of 
New Brunswick. Fredericton. N.B. 

Director, School of Nursing, St. Mary's 
Hospital. Montreal, Que. 
Director, School of Nursing. University of 
Alberta School of Nursing. Edmonton, Alta. 

Director, Nightingale School of Nursing. 
Toronto. Ont. 

Consultant in Public Health Nursing. Dcpt. 
of National Health & Welfare. Ottawa. Ont. 
Director. Institut Marguerite d*Youville. 
Montreal. Que. 

Director. Nursing Service Division, Sask. 
Dept. of Public Health. Rcgina. Smk. 
Director of Nursing. Queen Elizabeth Hos- 
pital. Toronto. Ont. 



flepresentathres of Nursing Sisterhoods 



Sister T. Castonguay 

Sister Mance Decary 
Sister M. Elaine 

Sister Agnes Fleury 

Sister Catherine Gerard 
Sister B. Knopic 
Sister Cecile Leclerc 

Sister Clare Marie 

Sister Margaret Mooney 

Sister Joseph -Ovide 
Sister Saint Albert 
Sister S(. Joseph 



Director, School of Nursing, Regina Grey Nun's Hospital. 

Rcgina. Sask. 

Director of Nursing. Hopital Notre-Damc, Montreal. Que. 

Director of Nursing Service, St. Mary's Hospital. Montreal. 

Que. 

Director. St. Boniface General Hospital School of Nursing, 

St. Boniface, Man. 

Administrator. Halifax Infirmary, Halifax, N.S. 

Administrator. Our Lady's Hospital. Vilna. Alta. 

Presently enrolled in Master's program. Catholic University 

of America. Washington. DC. 

Director. Degree Program, St. Martha's Hospital. Anli- 

gonish, N.S. 

Assistant Director, School of Nursing, University of Ottawa. 

OtUwa. Ont. 

Assistant Administrator. Hopital du Sacri-Coeur. Hull. Que. 

Director. OtUwa General Hospiul. Ottawa. Ont. 

Administrative As.siitant. HAlel Dieu. Carapbellton. N.B. 



474 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



THE WORLD 




OF NURSING 



PREPARED IN YOUR NATIONAL OFFICE, CANADIAN NURSES' ASSOCIATION. 
74 STANLEY AVENUE. OTTAWA 



Are You Ready? 



The stage is set, the welcome mat 
is out, St. John's awaits you. But be- 
fore you board your flight for the 
32nd Biennial Meeting, we thought 
you should become familiar with some 
of Newfoundlands folklore. For when 
you step off that flight you will be 
charmed by the islanders' picturesque 



speech and customs. For instance, 
when you hear, "Long may your big 
jib draw," you are being given a good 
wish for the future. 

Here is a selection of unusual words 
and their meanings, Newfoundland 
sayings and some festal customs. We 
think you will enjoy them. 



Words 


Meanings 




angishore 


a weak, miserable person 




am 


any 




ballyrag 


to abuse 




binicky 


ill-tempered 




bogie 


a small stove 




chucklehead 


a stupid penon 




colched 


caught 




crannicks 


dried roots of trees 




douse 


to give a quick blow 




duff 


pudding of flour, fat pork and mcrfasses 




flinders 


small pieces 




gamogue 


a silly trick 




gandy 


a paiKake 




linker 


otie who brings bad luck 




lashins 


plenty 




lourd 


dark, gloomy 




nam 


none 




oonshick 


a person of low intelligence 




plaumaush 


soft talk. ftaUery 




pn)t 


food 




rames 


a skeleton 




rompse 


to wrestle 




slinge 


to stay away from school or work 




sloo 


to get out of the way 




switcfael 


cold tea 




twack 


to examine goods and buy nothing 




vang 


fried salt pork 




ytnry 


rising eariy, alert 




yw 


here 




m 


in this place 




y«p 


to retort angrily 




MAY lOM - VOL. flO. No •> 


47} 





Newfoundland Sayings 
All mops and brooms 

A noggin to scrape 

Don't cut tails 

Give her the long main sheet 

Good morrow to you 

In a hobble about it 

Out dogs and in dieters 

Tom Long's account 

Tis not every day that Morris kills a cow 

The old dog for a hard road 

When the snipe bawls, the lobster crawls 

You can't tell the mind of a squid 

71ie older the crab, the tougher his claws 



This refers to an untidy condition of the 

hair 
A very difficult task 
Don't be too particular 
To go afar with no intention to return 
You are mistaken 
Not worrying about the matter 
Prepare for the summer fishery 
To pay what you owe and have nothing left 
Favorable ofiportunity comes but seldom 

Experience easily overcomes difficulty 

After sunset 

This refers to an unreliable person. A squid 

can move backwards or forward 
It is not easy to fool a sophisticated person 



Figures of Speech 

Busy as a nailer 
Cross as the cats 
Deaf as a haddock 
Far as ever a puffin flew 
Leaky as the basket 
Old as Buckley's goat 
Round as the bung of a cask 
Slow as cold molasses 
Smooth as a mill pond 
Soggy as lead 
Stunned as an owl 
Smoky as a Labrador tilt 
Wide as the devil's boots 
Yellow as beaten gold 

OMENS 
Good Luck 

Seeing the new moon first over the left 
shoulder — picking up a horseshoe on the 
road — picking a four leaf clover — seeing 
two black crows flying overhead — putting 
on a garment inside out by mistake — pick- 
ing up a coin — picking up a pin or a 
white button — a rooster crowing on the 
doorstep — to see a baby smiling in its 
sleep — to dream of one's father — a bee 
coming into the room. 
Bad Luck 

Breaking a mirror — having thirteen per- 
sons at table — coiling a rope against the 
sun — walking under a ladder — pur- 
chasing a broom in May — meeting a red 
haired woman — coming in by one door 
and going out by another — meeting a 
cross-eyed person — to spill salt — to 
leave a knife turned blade upwards — to 
have a lone black crow fly over your head 



— to be called back just as you have be- 
gun a journey — to whistle on the water 

— to drop the ring at a marriage ceremony. 

FOLK MEDICINES 

Slopping Blood 

The application of cobwebs, also turpen- 
tine of fir. Nose bleed could be stopped by 
certain persons who recited a secret prayer 
or rife to secure the desired effect. 
Curing Wans 

Cut notches in a stick and hide the latter. 
Rub a piece of fresh meat to the warts, 
then bury the meat and as it decayed the 
warts disappeared. Count the warts and 
make a like number of chalk marks on the 
back of a stove: as these burned off the 
warts went also. 
Toothache 

Vinegar left in the mouth gave relief. 
Pebbles from the grave of a pious person 
provided a faith cure. Tlie magician charm- 
ed away the toothache. One way to do this 
was to write some words on a scrap of 
paper and have the afflicted one carry the 
script on his person. He was forbidden to 
read it as the pain returned in punishment 
of such curiosity. 

Pain in the side 

Put a pebble under the tongue 
Headache 

Walk backwards, aroiind in a circle pre- 
ferably. 

Fatal Customs 

Celebrated with gusto is the night of 
November 3th. Huge bonfires are lit in 



476 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



every village to perpetuate the Guy Fawkes 
attempt to blow up the Parliament Buildings 
in the time of James I. Green boughs and 
tar barrels are used to create a thick smoke 
screen, and through this dense pall of 
smoke young people dance and collide with 
shouts of laughter. Should a novice come 
in good clothes, he or she is marked for a 
lavish smearing of burnt embers. 

Other times of much merriment are 
Pancake Night, the eve of Lent, and the 
feast of St. Patrick. Old time dances are 
all in order on these occasions, and the 
music of the fiddle or the inevitable ac- 
cordian gives the gay throng the necessary 
accompaniment. 

Advanced Nursing School to Open 
in Autumn 

Dr. Helen K. Mussallem was 
one of eight nursing leaders in Edin- 
burgh recently to discuss curricula for 
the International School of Advanced 
Nursing Education which will open in 
October. 

The school, which will form a sec- 
tion of the established Nursing Studies 
Unit at Edinburgh University, is being 
established in association with the 
World Health Organization. Teaching 
and research facilities for the school, 
the first of its type in any British 
university, will be provided by the 
university itself, but the WHO will 
provide fellowships for both staffs and 
students, and also travel grants. 

The school is being set up in Edin- 
burgh because a nursing studies unit 
already exists there, and because the 
university has shown interest in offer- 
ing opportunities to nurses. 

The new course, which will lead to 
a diploma for graduate nurses and 
certificates for non-graduates, will last 
a year. Admission requirements will 
be the same as those demanded by the 
university academically, but nurses 
will have to have qualified in their 
country of origin. 

The program will prepare nurses for 
the administration of nursing services 
or of nursing education, and students 
will be full members of the university. 
They will be learning principles that 
can be applied in any setting so that 
they can go back to their own countries 
and make a specific contribution. 

Others, attending the meetings, who 



were also concerned with the setting 
up of an advisory body to be con- 
cerned in the implementation of the 
program, included Miss Lyle Creel- 
man, chief nursing officer of WHO, 
Geneva; Miss Fernanda Alves-Diniz, 
Regional Nursing Officer, WHO; Mile 
M. Duvillard, director of the school 
of nursing, Le Bon Secours, Geneva; 
Mile G. Frere, director of the school 
of nursing. Free University of Brus- 
sels; Miss M. Scott-Wright, deputy 
matron, St. George's Hospital, Lon- 
don; Miss I. Hamelin, director of the 
nursing education division. Interna- 
tional Council of Nurses, London; and 
Miss Marion Murphy, professor of 
public health nursing, University of 
Minnesota. 

Nurses Enter University of Ghana 

The University of Ghana has ad- 
mitted 20 students in its new 2-year 
program for graduate nurses. The 
students — ten women and ten men 
— will be prepared to teach in schools 
of nursing, public health schools and 
midwifery schools. 

Both general education and profes- 
sional subjects are included in the 
program, including psychology, soci- 
ology, and English, which are taken 
with non-nursing students. In time, 
the university plans to lengthen the 
course to provide a degree in nursing. 

Nurses and the Social Insurance 
Number Project 

Last month a mammoth project, in- 
volving approximately 6.5()0,dOO Ca- 
nadians, began with the issuance of 
Social Insurance Numbers to employed 
persons whether covered by unem- 
ployment insurance or not. All em- 
ployed nurses, including those in hos- 
pitals now considered charitable in- 
stitutions, must make application for 
a Social Insurance Number, if they 
have not already done so. 

You are a.sked to obtain an applica- 
tion form from your employer. The 
completed form will be sent to the 
nearest office of the Unemployment 
Insurance Commission and your So- 
cial Insurance Number Card will then 
be issued to you. Those nurses who 
are self-employed on private duty must 



MAY 1964 - VOL. », No 5 



47T 



go to the nearest office of the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Commission to 
make application. 

Nuns employed as nurses are also 
to be registered unless they are mem- 
bers of religious orders which have 
taken vows of perpetual poverty and 
whose wages and salaries are paid ei- 
ther directly or by them to the Order. 

Young Women to be Encouraged 
into Nursing 

Forty-three delegates from all parts 
of Alberta attended the 4th Annual 
Presidents' Institute of the Alberta 
Association of Registered Nurses, held 
recently in Edmonton. Among the 
topics discussed were ways and means 
to encourage more young women to 
enter the nursing profession. 

One Chapter of AARN is organ- 
izing a Career Club for high school 
girls. The aim of this club is to give 
more insight into nursing and the al- 
lied health professions. It will also help 
them to explore their own aptitude 
for such professional pursuits. 

It is not designed to be a club of 
nurses, but a career opportunity course 
to show what fields are open to 
women; how to get into the various 
courses; what they need to know about 
the job they will undertake; the future 
that is open to them; and to help them 



decide on a definite course. The Chap- 
ter members will act in a counselling 
capacity and will give short talks dur- 
ing the year on what nurses do in 
specialized fields such as operating 
room, case room, public heaJth and 
general duty. 

A Couple of Firsts 

A new school of nursing, designed 
for women in the 30-50 age group, 
will be started at Toronto's St. Joseph 
Hospital this year. The two-year day 
school for nursing will be the first of 
its type in Canada. It will use adult 
education methods, provide special 
counselling services and turn out 
graduate nurses. The new course for 
older women has already attracted 100 
applicants, although only 35 will be 
enrolled. 

Ryerson Polytechnical Institute may 
add a three-year diploma course in 
nursing to its curriculum in 1964. If 
Ryerson approves and is able to se- 
cure the necessary staff and clinical 
facilities, the first 30 student nurses 
are expected to enroll in the fall of 
1964. The projected course is the 
first experiment outside a university 
to try nursing as a course in a generd 
educational institution. Its success will 
determine the establishment of similar 
courses elsewhere. 



An Unusual Custom 

The Haida people of Queen Charlotte 
Islands have a custom of complimenting 
the cook when they attend a party. 

The guest leaves a morsel of food on his 
plate to compliment the hostess on her 
generosity in giving him more than he can 
eat. The hostess provides a paper bag for 
each guest. At large weddings, etc.. crack- 
ers, fruit or favors may be saved to lake 
home in the bag. 

Recently, one nurse held a party to intro- 
duce a new nurse to the area. In recognition 
of the custom, she provided the small paper 
bag. The people used them in the customary 
way — after they were assured that thi.s 
was expected. 

— Excerpts. Feb.. 1964. Medical Service*. 



Dept. of National Health and Welfare. 
Canada. 



Student Exam Bonert 

The appendix was taken immediately to 
the laboratory with the patient's name and 
her doctor attached to the container. 

Pregnancy is an illness that lasts nine 
months and usually cures itself. 

Religious care should be given to a pa- 
tient's back to prevent bedsores. 

• • • 

We may be personally defeated, but our 
principles never. — Wm. Llod Garrison 

• • • 

The man who leu himself be bored it 
even more contemptible than the bore. 

— Samuel Butxer 



478 



THK CANADIAN NURSE 




CNA Executive Meets in Ottawa 



June Ferguson 



Thirty-three nursing leaders from 
across Canada were faced with prob- 
ably the most difficult decisions that 
an executive committee has been con- 
fronted with in many years, when they 
met in Ottawa last February. Thirty- 
six reports, some of which called for 
great changes within the association, 
were presented for action. 

One such report was that of the 
Nursing Affairs Committee, in which 
chairman Katherine MacLaggan 
asked for a re-examination of the 
objects of CNA. She stated that a 
change in the structure of CNA is 
now warranted. "The work can no 
longer be handled exclusively by vol- 
untary committees." she said. "In- 
creasing authority and responsibility 
within the policy laid down by the 
executive committee should be del- 
egated to the employed personnel of 
the association." She also said that 
authoritv for the total enterprise of the 
CNA should be brought under one 
administration. 

The report of the executive director 
also pointed up the need for a study 
of the organization. Dr. Helen Mus- 
SALLEM said that during the past year 
the activities of the association and its 
national office had increased in an 
attempt to meet specific demands, but 
"many activities met in this way do 
not necessarily result in a move toward 
reaching desired goals." She felt that 
a study of the functions of the as.so- 
ciation and a restructuring of its head- 
quarters could provide a guide where- 
by the energies expended might be 
organized and channeled to more ef- 
fectively meet the objectives of the 
association. She pointed out that this 
was no small task, but one with which 
the executive committee is now con- 
cerned. 

Her report revealed the scope of 
activities carried out in the past year. 
There were approximately 30 commit- 
tee meetings held in Ottawa. 22 addi- 
tional meetings attended by CNA 
secretariat, and 15 major speeches 



given by the executive director, in 
addition to field assignments in Can- 
ada and Europe. The association was 
involved in three submissions to go- 
vernment groups — the National Cen- 
tennial Administration, the Senate 
Special Conmiittee on Aging and the 
Royal Commission on Bilinguaiism 
and Bicuituralism. She also pointed out 
that the three special studies — the 
study of nursing education, the pro- 
ject for the evaluation of the quality 
of nursing service, and the school im- 
provement program — had all devel- 
oped as projected at the last executive 
meeting. These activities, together with 
the 8.0 per cent increase in member- 
ship in the past year, underlined the 
need to study and expand the pro- 
grams of national office to serve the 
association's membership. 

The recommendations in these re- 
ports were basically the same as those 
presented by Stevenson & Kellogg, 
the firm of consultants hired during 
the year to study the organization and 
administrative procedures of both the 
Canadian Nurses" Association and the 
Canadian Nurse Journal. 

Their recommendations included 
change in the composition of commit- 
tees and the division of responsibilities 
and activities between committees and 
permanent staff. "To be effective," 
Stevenson-Kellogg said, "organization 
and procedures must have clear ob- 
jectives as their genesis." Their first 
recommendation called for the pro- 
duction of a revised set of objectives 
for the Canadian Nurses* Association. 

They explained that the activities 
required to accomplish the associa- 
tion's objectives fall into two general 
areas — those at the corporate level 
and those at the operating level — 
and recommended that authority for 
performing these activities be com- 
pletely delegated to permanent salaried 
employees. The executive committee 
would then operate as a policy-making 
body and discharge its ultimate re- 
sponsibility by ensuring that the 



MAY 1984 - VOL 90. No. 5 



47» 



actions of the permanent staff con- 
form to promulgated policy. They also 
recommended that the process of del- 
egation be projected through succes- 
sive echelons of the permanent staff 
so that '"the power of decision is at 
the lowest practical level." 

The executive committee agreed 
that authority for the total enterprise 
of the CNA should be brought under 
one administration but that a task 
committee should be set up to study 
the Stevenson-Kellogg report and de- 
velop and plan for step-by-step re- 
organization based on the implementa- 
tion or adaptation of those recom- 
mendations that seem feasible. It was 
further agreed that the task committee 
should present a progress report to the 
executive committee as soon as pos- 
sible. 

Other decisions made at the four- 
day meeting were: 

Tliat a research project in a Canadian 



hospital be initiated by the Canadian 
Nurses' Association to explore the nursing 
needs of patients as a basis for estimating 
staff requirements. 

That the extension course in nursing 
unit administration be endorsed for the 
year 1964-65 and that further continuance 
be considered on a year-to-year basis. 

That the CNA enter into an agreement 
with the CHA to assume, on a 50-50 basis, 
such financial subsidy as may be necessary 
for the support of the extension course 
in nursing unit administration. 

That the Canadian Nurses' Association 
report from time to time to the Prime 
Minister of Canada and his cabinet on 
nursing and related matters of human wel- 
fare as they pertain to Canada and to the 
international scene. 

Though Dr. Kaspar Naegele pre- 
sented a report of his study on nursing 
education in Canada, it was only an 
interim one. His full report will be 
given at the biennial meeting in June. 



Many Irons in the Fire 

"Legal adviser suggests thai CNA approach Minister of National Defence con- 
cerning status of male nurse in the Armed Services." "A Special Com- 
mittee is investigating the possibility of making psychiatric experience 
a requirement for all students in the province." "Personnel policies 
revised to up-grade the basic minimum salary of R.N." 



These were three of the many issues 
reported by individual provinces at 
the annual CNA Executive Commit- 
tee meeting held in February. The 
latter, concerning changes in financial 
remuneration, was mentioned in sev- 
eral of the reports, indicating a general 
movement toward improvement of the 
economic welfare of the R.N. 

Studies, workshops and institutes 
concerning staffing patterns and qual- 
ity and quantity of nursing care, have 
been held in abundance in most pro- 
vinces. The emphasis, at present, 
seems to be concentrated on nursing 
service, which, for a time, seemed al- 
most overshadowed by nursing educa- 
tion. The latter, however, has not been 
neglected: Schools of nursing have con- 
tinued to show enthusiastic support 
for the CNA School Improvement 
program: institutes for nurse educators 



are being held with large attendance; 
certain schools of nursing are being 
set up within the framework of general 
education; at least one school is re- 
commending a basic nursing course of 
less than the traditional 36 months. 

Many provinces reported an in- 
crease in the number and acceptance 
of loans available for postgraduate stu- 
dy. There seems to be a growing 
awareness, by all nurses, of the neces- 
sity for continued education — both 
in the university and work settings. ^ 
This is a healthy sign. It is a must if W" 
we are to realize our potential — in- 
dividually and collectively. 



ALBERTA 

t. Bylaw passed to allow graduate* from 
outside the province, inactive in nursing but 
wishing to participate in Chapter activities. 



II 



480 



THE CANADIAN NiniSE 



I 



to become registered with associate mem- 
bership. 

2. Provision made for new standing com- 
mittee, "The Student Nurses' Association 
of Alberta Advisory Committee." This acts 
as an advisory and consultant body to 
S.N.A.A. and provides a liaison between 
the two associations. 

3. Criteria for registration of Canadian 
and U.S. graduates approved: Applicant 
required to provide evidence of registration 
in province or state in which she graduated, 
successful completion of NLN Test Pool 
Examinations in Nursing with passing score 
of at least 350. and competence in nursing. 
Applicants who have not written NLN ex- 
aminations are required to submit school 
of nursing and academic credentials. 

4. Basic minimum salary for R.N. in full 
emplo>'ment will be S3 IS per month, ef- 
fective April 1. 1964. 

5. Loans amounting to $10,000 have 
been issued to 18 nurses during past two 
years. 

6. Survey team, appointed by the Uni- 
versity of Alberta, visited all schools of 
nursing in the province and published report 
last fall. 

7. The report of the Nursing Education 
Survey Committee, chaired by Dr. Scarlett 
of Calgary, recommended, among other 
things, that a Provincial Nursing Council be 
established "to provide for cooperative and 
coordinated planning and organization, and 
for licensure of all nursing personnel . . ." 

As.sociation members were asked to study 
this report, and a task committee was set 
up to prepare a Brief for presentation to 
the provincial government. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

1. Two-year contracts have been success- 
fully negotiated with 50 hospitals, providing 
for a basic minimum salary of $332 for 
1964 and S340 for 1965 with four annual 
increments of 5%. 

2. Institutes held for various groups in- 
cluding nursing service and nursing educa- 
tion. 

3. Under the direction of the Depanment 
of Continuing Medical Education of UBC, 
an imervice correspondence course for 
public health nurses is being offered as 
well as a course for R.N.'t in obstetric* and 
a course for doctors and nurses in care of 
prematurely bom infants. 

4. A special committee is investigating 
th« pooibility of making psychiatric experi- 



ence a requirement for all students in B.C. 
schools of nursing. 

5. A Brochure for High School Counsel- 
lors, which the counsellors helped to pre- 
pare, describing nursing education programs, 
entrance requirements, etc.. has been dis- 
tributed to all high schools in the province. 

6. The Joint Committee of the RNABC 
and the B.C. Hospitals' Association hope 
to obtain financial assistance to support 
an NLN study of the staffing patterns in 
B.C. general hospitals. 

7. No indication that the government in- 
tends to implement the Practical Nurses' 
Act. Now an additional problem has arisen: 
Three new schools for training practical 
nurses have recently been established in small 
centres. These schools are not providing 
clinical instructors: there seems to be little 
concern as to the adequacy of clinical 
teaching facilities. 

MANITOBA 

1 . Conferences for directors of schools of 
nursing held to discuss problems affecting 
administration of schools of nursing. 

2. The emergence of post-surgical and 
intensive care units in hospitals has greatly 
reduced the call for private nurses. 

3. Institute on Evaluation in Nursing 
held for instructors and supervisors. 

4. The Manitoba Government Nurses 
Loan Fund loaned $8,050 to 57 student 
nurses. 

5. Basic minimum gross salary recom- 
mended by the Association is $4,200 a year. 

6. The Manitoba Hospital Survey Board 
has published the second part of its report. 
Part I concerns "Hospital Facilities;" Part 
II concerns "Hospital Personnel." 

7. In memory of Dr. Isabel M. Stewart, 
the Association donated $1,000 to the Cana- 
dian Nurses' Foundation. 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

1. New personnel policies adopted pro- 
viding for an increase of $50 per month 
in the basic salary for the general duty 
nurse, and proportionate increases for other 
categories of staff, proiected over a three- 
year period. 

2. Two scholarships established by As- 
sociation (SI. 000 each) to be awarded an- 
nually to basic students or to nurses re- 
gistered in N.B. who are wotting toward 
a B.Sc. in nursing. 

3. A brochure. "Concepts of Nursing 



MAY 19M - VOL. W, No 5 



461 



Care as They Affect Staffing," available 
without charge from NBARN. 

4. Under the Continuing Education Pro- 
gram for Graduate Nurses at the U.N.B. 
School of Nursing, a one-week institute was 
held for nursing service personnel on "Qua- 
lity Nursing Care;" six-week summer school 
courses in psychiatric nursing and public 
health nursing also held. 

5. Major concerns are the unequal dis- 
tribution of nursing personnel throughout 
Ihe province, and difficulty in staffing 
schools of nursing with qualified faculty. 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

1. Workshop on "In-service Hducation" 
held, with Miss Mary Richmond, as con- 
sultant. A "Let's Understand Each Other" 
workshop had a psychologist as consultant. 

2. A Brief pointing out the need for a 
school of nursing at the Memorial Univer- 
sity of Newfoundland was presented to the 
president of the University. 

3. Recommended that the NLN Test Pool 
Examinations be continued with a minimum 
acceptable score of 350. 

4. Study to be started to make recom- 
mendations for providing the best possible 
nursing care throughout the province. 

NOVA SCOTIA 

1. The requirement of psychiatric nurs- 
ing as a compulsory subject for registration 
is being studied. 

2. Association has approved a four-year 
program leading to a B.Sc. degree in nurs- 
ing, at St. Frands Xavier University, Anti- 
gonish. in place of the present 5-year 
program. 

3. Consideration is being given to a 
proposed new program in nursing educa- 
tion of less than 36 months at Ihe Halifax 
Infirmary. 

4. The Nursing Service Committee pro- 
poses to conduct a study day or workshop 
to help answer the question: "Is less than 
3.4 hours per patient adequate or how does 
one decide what is desirable or adequate?" 

5. TTie Board of Registration of Nursing 
Assistanu has approved Ihe establishment 
of an additional school for nursing assist- 
ants at New Walerford. 



ONTARIO 

I. A five-year experimental program, 
designed to prepare a nurse at the diploma 



level, will be initiated September 1964 at 
the Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, Toron- 
to, providing the College of Nurses of 
Ontario approves the course. This project 
is an application of the concept of bringing 
basic nursing education diploma programs 
within the general framework of education. 

2. Dr. J. Crispo's study concerning the 
feasibility and advisability of the Associa- 
tion seeking special legislation leading to 
the implementation of collective bargaining 
is now being considered by the Committee 
on Socio-Economic Welfare. 

3. A provide-wide study on nursing has 
met with enthusiastic response. It is antici- 
pated that a conference of representatives 
from all parts of the province will be held 
in 1964. 

4. The RNAO legal adviser has suggested 
(hat the CNA make representation lo the 
Minister of National Defence concerning 
the question of discrimination against re- 
gistered male nurses in the Armed Services. 

5. Arrangements have been made with 
the College of Nurses of Ontario to pur- 
chase testing service from the RNAO for 
the purpose of registration. 

6. Project underway to develop standard- 
ized objective-type machine-scored examin- 
ations for the nursing assistant applying 
for registration. 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 

1. The prerequisite for admission lo 
schools of nursing is now Grade XIl with 
an over-all average of 60 per cent. 

2. The recommendation Ihat the 40-hour 
week be implemented for all nursing per- 
sonnel in hospitals and health agencies has 
been accepted in principle. 

3. A study of medical procedures being 
performed by nurses resulted in recom- 
mendations which were discussed with the 
Joint Committee on Health Services and 
sent to all hospitals and agencies. 

4. A study of nursing education is being 
conducted by personnel from CNA. 

5. A Nursing Activity Study is being 
made by Health Insurance Consultants 
from Dept. of National Health and Wel- 
fare. 

6. A new categorization of all hospital 
Fwrsonnel by Ihe Civil Service Commission 
and the Hospital Services Commission is 
having repercussions in hospitals which are 
struggling to maintain autonomy. 

1. Major problems include: the lack of 
qualified personf>el to staff hospitals and 



4H2 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 




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2727 E. Foothill Blvd. 

Dept. CN 
Pasadeno, California 



SEND YOUR ORDER TODAY 




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nylon. Cot. No. NWR-I, SS.SSeodi. 




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roil of spring. 
Posey Dispos- 
able Wrist or 
Ankle Restraint, 
Cot. No. 4155, 
S7,50 dozen. 



schcwis of nursing; the difficulty in provid- 
ing adequate nursing care for patients under 
present budgetary allocations. 

QUEBEC 

1. The Association has a bill before the 
legislature to amend the Nurses' Act. One 
of the important amendments concerns the 
inclusion of male nurses in the Act. 

2. Various institutes and conferences were 
held in both the French and English lan- 
guages. 

3. Fifty instructors from French-language 
schools of nursing attended the course or- 
ganized by the Canadian Defence College. 
This was the first such course to be con- 
ducted entirely in the French language. 

4. A two-day bilingual institute on labor 
relations will be held in the Spring. 1964. 

5. Four refresher courses for nurses held, 
two in French languafe. two in English 
language. 

6. Nurse consultant appointed to Hospital 
Insurance Service. 

7. Translated Virginia Henderson's book- 
let Bajif Principles of Nursing Care into 
French 

SASKATCHEWAN 

I . The revised "Requirements for Ap- 
proval of schools of nursing and admission 
to the S-RNA" permits schools to plan 
a basic nursing education program of less 
than three yean with a minimum of two 
yean. 



2. By the end of 1964 facilities should be 
available for all nursing students to receive 
psychiatric affiliation. 

3. A booklet "Criteria on Nursing Service 
Department" prepared by Committee on 
Nursing Service. 

4. The Nursing Division. Dept. of Public 
Health, continues to study home care pro- 
grams. A guide for planning pilot projects 
for organized home care programs in Sas- 
katchewan Health Regions has been de- 
veloped. 

5. The Joint Committee on Nursing, 
Medical and Hospital Services met four 
times, recommending action on various 
problems submitted by the nurse members- 
Presently under discussion is the problem 
of admission of mentally ill and alcoholic 
patients to general hospitals. 

6. Twenty-four R.N.'s received Dominion- 
ProviiKial bursaries for postgraduate study. 
F.leven R.N.'s received financial assistance 
for study through the S.R.N.A. Loan Fund. 

Saminar for Senior 
Nursing Executives 

The School of Nursing of the University 
of Western Ontario has encountered no 
more rewarding experience than the re- 
sponse to its first seminar for senior nursing 
executives, June 1963. Particularly heart- 
warming has been the sustained enthusiasm 
expressed by the expert nursing consultants 
who worked with the faculty in its imple- 
mentation and by the participants who ex- 



MAY 1B64 - VOL. 90. No. 5 



483 



I 



THE NATIONAL 
HOSPITAL, 

QUEEN SQUARE, 

LONDON, W.C.I., 

ENGLAND 



(NEUROLOGY AND NEUROSUHGEKY; 
POSTGRADUATE NURSING EDUCATION 

One y*ar couraat or* op«n to graduates 

of occredited Schools of Nurtirtg with good 

•ducotionol bockground. 

Thr«« months acod»mic t«ochirtg in th« 
School of Nurs ir>g ur>d*r gu kiunc* of 
Sittvf Tutor auisted by leaching Stoff 
of Stnior Neurologists ond Neurosurgeons 

Eight months Oinicol experierK*. 

Five weeks vocation 

Certificate and bodge of the Hospiiul 
owarded to successful Students. 

Full graduate salary paid throughout the 
far. 

This work has o special oppeal to nurses 

Inferested in reseorcn oixi the humonitorion 

ospect of Nursif>g. 

Fof prospectus apply to the Matron 



CLUB 501 

"WHERE THE ELITE MEET" 

An exclusive club for unattcKhed 
people 

WA. 4 1302 

Of write 

501 YONGE STREET. TORONTO 
ONTARIO 



perienced it. Moreover, foUow-up bu 
revealed the many specific and creative 
ways in which participants have used to 
advantage, in their employing agencies, the 
benefits derived. 

The program this year, scheduled for 
June 22 — July 4, incorporates a new ap- 
proach, but retains much of last year's 
format. It is designed to appeal both to 
those who attended last year and who 
may wish to return and to those attending 
for the first time. The germinating idea 



for the program is found in these words 
of Norman Cousins: 

Like a broken record, the theme that 
keeps recurring every time I write about 
education is that we may be educating 
ourselves for the wrong century. The 
twentieth century is at least a thousand 
years beyond the nineteenth in the issues 
confronting the individual .... Challenges 
which formerly belonged to a society 
as a whole now press in upon the indi- 
vidual. Education did not create these 
problems, but it certainly has to deal 
with them.* 

The program committee is proud to an- 
nounce the planned participation of the 
following experts in the various fields of 
thought to be explored: R. B. Willis, Vice- 
President; Dr. O. H. Warwick. Dean of 
Medicine: Miss R. C. Aikin, Dean of Nurs- 
ing: Dr. G. H. Turner, Professor of Psy- 
chology; J. A. Mclntyre, Director of Ex- 
tension and Summer School; K. J. Duncan, 
Assistant Professor of Economics and So- 
ciology; C. C. Lundbcrg. Assistant Professor 
of Business Administration (all from the 
University of Western Ontario); Dr. Oswald 
Hall. Professor of Sociology. University of 
Toronto: Dr. Beatrix Tuchweber, Research 
Associate of Dr. Hans Selye, University of 
Montreal: a representative from the Interna- 
tional Council of Nurses. 

This specific program gives recognition 
lo the crucial role played by the anticipated 
seminar participants, the almost inestimable 
value that can be placed on their contribu- 
tion to society and their almost limitless 
sphere of influence. In announcing this 
Seminar, the Dean and the Faculty of the 
School of Nursing acknowledge their deep 
debt of gratitude to the W. K. Kellogg 
Foundation for again providing the finan- 
cial support which makes possible this 
stimulating venture in contirviing education 
for some of Canada's nursing leaders. 



•Norman Cousins. "The World, The 
Individual and Education." Sational Edu- 
cation Association Journal, 49:10, April 
I9W 



No man, for any considerable period, can 
wear one face lo himself, and another to 
the multitude, without finally getting be- 
wildered as to which may be the true. 

— Nathaniel HAwmoitNE 



484 



THE CANADIAN NURSB 



EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 



r 

I 

I 



ADVERTISING RATES 

Canada and Bermuda: 
$7.50 for 3 lines or less; $1.50 for each additional line 



I U.S.A. and Foreign: | 

. $10.00 for 3 lines or less; $3.00 for each additional line 

Rates for display advertisements on request 

I I 

All advertisements published in both English and French issues. Closing 

I date for insertion or cancellation orders, TWO MONTHS prior to date of | 

I publication. . 

. The Canadian Nurses' Association has not yet reviewed the personnel poli- 

I cies of the hospitals and agencies advertising in the Journal. For authentic I 

information, prospective applicants should apply to the Registered Nur.^ef' 
I Association of the Province in which they are interested in working I 

I Address correspondence to: . 

THE CANADIAN NURSE JOURNAL, ' 

I ISn SHERBROOKE STREET WEST. MONTREAL 7S. QUEBEC I 



AlBERT* 

OirMfw •! Nl>niii9 (I). O roJu rt l NwM [1} (or imoll hotpital. Solory for Oirvctor of Nuning: S3SS to V400/n< 
Solary for Nutm: S315 wiifi 3 ormuol irKremcnti of $1S/m. 40-fir. wk., 3.wk. annual vocoiton and 9 stotu- 
tory holidavt o yr. Charg* for room, board and foundry: iXi'm Apply lo: L F. Krowctiuk, Administrator. 
G:«tdon Municipof Hopilal. Glcndon, Albwto. I-4M 

Siwior N«r««. P.K1 N or B.S<-, preferred. Solory bosed on L H.S. 5 Kale depcrxiing on troining ond experience 
Staff Nones (2) immediotely for duttei m the Vermition-Lloydminster-De^ent lectort, P.H.N, or B.Sc., prt 
ferred, but R.N.'s considered. Solory boted on L.H.S. 5 scole deperyJing on training ond experierKe. Furtficr 
•nformotion and eftquiries from; Or. R. B. Murroy, Medicol Officer of ffeolth, Minburn-Vermilion Healtfi Unit, 
VERMILION. Albarto. )-9a3 

Re9 U »er«d Neisei (Immediotely) for lOO-bcd hospital. For full porticulors please apply to: The Olrecter of 

N.irsing Service. St. Mary's ffospitol, Comroie, Alberto. I-IS'S 



Reahtend Nurse for 3(Maed hospital in central Alberta. Solary S300-t345 with onnuol itKrements. Separate 
modern residence. Apply to: Director of Nursing, Municipal Hospital, Eckville, Alberta. 1-32-1 

Retistered Nwsee for a busy Sl-bed active treatment tiospitol. situoied in east central Alberta. Salary range 
from t3l&S3SS commeruvrote with esperierKe. Full maintenoiKe in new nurses' resideiKe for S30/m, skfi 
leave ond pension bertefits available. 40.hr. work wk., 21 days onnuol vacotion plus natutory twlidoys. For 
further mfornxstion apply to: Mist Morgoret Moclntosh. Director of Nursing, Municipol Hospitol, Elk Point. 
Alberto 1341 

Rseis l eie d Niwses. Salwy: $3M/m. storting to $375 moaimum. For further informotion contact: Mrs. P. Londry, 
Administrator, Bon 520, Municipal Hospital, Foirview, Alberto. 1-37.1 

Registered Nerses (3) for 3l'bed active treatment liospilol. Salary SSIO'm with bi-yeorly iiKremcnts. Re i ideiKe 
available Prefer three recent grodt interested in moving togelfier to west centrol Alberto. Write Adminislro- 
tor. Generol Hospitol. Rimbey. Alberto 1-77) 

Regi st er id Nei s es for Oies u l IMy. Staff vocorKles in SO-bed Generol Hospital. Situated on moin highway 
between Colgory and EJ iii uwl eit. ■otic sotory t3IS/m with increments ei p erience recognued. Apply 
Locombe Gerwrol Hospitol. Locombe. Alberta. 1-54-1 



Duty Weises for modern AO-bed fully occredised hospital situated 70 mi. northwe s t of Edmonton 
Good personnel polKWS. ResiderKe u cc ewmiodation. For furtfier particulars apply to: Administrator, St. Joseph's 
Hospital, Bartheod. Alberta t-3-l 



Oeeeral (Wty Norses fo> well equipped '6bed hospital « octn* town o< 3.000 Solory S3IS-I3M for 
Alberto regi s tered; i3M-t3S0 for norvAlberta regi e tand New s e pu rose r esidence. escelteM personnel 
policies 4 worfcmo conditiorw. Apply to: OMVCtor of Nureing, Brooks Gerterol Hospital, Brooks, Alberta. I-I)) 

O f— I OMy NatsM (2) for modem 2S-b«l hospitol en Highway No. 12. Solory range S340 to $315. New 
<talf residertce Full mointenarKe $35. periorwtel policies iftcli.de Blue Cross. MSI. and pension plans 21 
*iy«' vocation per veor pint ttatutory holidoyt Apply to the Director of Nurses, Municipol Hospitol, 
Cerenwt^n AlberSn l-2S'l 



MAV imu vol. (« No s **'• 



Otnirul Duty NvtsM (2) for 34-iMd Getwrol Hotpital. Solary 0)543M/in commancing at $330 with 1 y«ar 

practical Mparitnc*. Full malntananc* ot J35/m. Train for* from ony point in Canada will b» f fundod 

oft»f 1 yar •mploymwif. Apply to: Municipal Hospital, Two Hillt, Albarto. Phon* 335. I-«8-1 

^ — , i 

OiihidI 0«ly Nan«< for 54bad active treatment hospilol. Basic salary $325 with onnual $15 increments to 
$370 maximum. Post experience recognized. Perquisites $35/m in new residence. Good recreotional focilities 
in town situolied I20-mi. from Edmonton on daily tronsportation routes. Apply: Administrator, Woinwright 
Municipal Hospitol, Wainwright, Alberto. 1-94-1 

General Duty Nurses for new 90-bed hospital in baoutiful small city just outside Edmonton. Excellent work- 
ing conditions, rriodern residence and top solories. Apply: Director of Nursif>g, Wetoskiwin Municipal Hos- 
pitol, P.O. Box 340, Wetoskiwin, Alberta. 1-96-1 

Oiinleule Nurses. Salary: $315 to $360/m. 5 day, 40-hr. wk., 31 days paid vocotion oftvr 12 mo. continuous 
en^loyment, also gerwrous sick time ond pension benefits. For furtt>er particutors please apply to: AA. 
Howkes, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Municipal Hospitol, Drumheller, Alberto. 1-31-2 

Graduate Noraee (4) for Provost Municipal Hospital, PROVOST, Alberta. (34 beds, 6 bassinettes) for Gerteral 
Duty, starting bosic solory $335/m. 3 yearly increments of $15 — first increment added for one yeor or 
more previous experience. Rotating shifts — good residence available. Apply: Mrs. E. lindsoy, AAatron, P.O. 
Box 270, PROVOST, Alberto. 1-73-1 

Publk HeoMi Hm»m for tfw City of Edmonton, commencing July or August 1964. Salary $4,140 - $4,980 over 
five yeors. Goneralized progrom, 5-doy-wk., vocation, sick leove and retirement plan. Forms of application 
may be obtained from Mr. G. B. Lawrence, Secretary, locol Board of Heollh, 770 City Hell, Eamonlon, 
Alberto. I-33-I4 

NURSES fully qualified for 30-bed active treatment hospital. New hospital building and recently rerwvoted 
nurses' residence. Unless definitely interested in coming, please do not apply. Periotwiel policies sent upon 
request. Apply toi iWn. tA. Hislop, Superinter>dent, Municipal Hospital, Boseono, Alberto. 1-5- 1 

■amsH coiuMaiA 

Director of Nursing i ervke e required in the Foil for o very modern, very octive 32-bed hoepital wHh on 
exponsion project under way; ttie hospital is in a smoll town within 1-3/4 hours drive on the Trans-Canoda 
Highway from Victoria, B.C. Applicants with previous supervisory experience given prefererKe, solory oocn- 
mensurote with qualifications ond experience; oil opplicatiorM will be held in the strictest confidence. 
Pleose oddress a(x>lications or requests for further information, uttder personnel heeding, to: )ilr. Ion Peddie, 
Administrator, Loaysmith & District Hospitol, ladysmith, British Coluntbio. 2-37-1 

CGaical lastiecters for f iJe h l u , U re l ity mmi Ow eta l Seigety in 4S0^ed hospital cortducting a school of 
nursing with 190 students. Postgraduate preparation essential. Degree preferr e d. Current RNABC personnel 
policies in practice. Apply: Director of Sdwol of Nursing, St. Joseph's Hoepital, Vidorio, British Columbio. 

2-76^ 

Operating Room Heed Neree (Experierxed, June 1st) with postgroduote course for modem u cci e di led 
82-bed hospitol. Salary: $381-$460 according to experience plus RNABC allowance for postgroduote course. 
Accommodation ovoiloble, 10 sttitutory holioays, 4-wk. vocation, superonnuotion ond medical plan co veroge. 
Apply: Director of Nursing, Gerterol Hospitol, Kitimot. British Columbia. 2-36-IA 

HCAO NUtSC for small, active psychiotric unit in o Generol Hospital, associated with district Mental Health 
Clinic. University preparation desiroble. Position open August first. For furttier informotion opply to: Director 
of Nursing, Kelowno Generol Hospital, Keiowno, British Columbio. 2-34-1 

Heed W ei sew mole or female, for active Operating Reatn Unit. Po*S0radua«* I f o li iinB tequired. Good per. 
sonnel policies; residence occommodation available (female). Apply to: Director ot Nursing, Trail-Todenoc 
Hoepital, Trait, BrirWt Columbia. 2-72-1 



O iitel IMy Nana* for active 2S-bed heipiwi. Salary B.C. r*gi*t*r*d $330 •» Mart. 

Uieegi tl eted $308. INAiC p eraonnel policie* in effect, nurses' residence ovoiloble. Apply: Administratar, 
Lady Mime HaepHol, Athmh, Britirii Columbia. 2-4-II 

»HTlli 1 1 Nen** er Oredeete W ws ee for 75-bed hospitol opened In September 1962. Salary B.C reglsterarf* 
nurea $332-$404; salary non-registered nurse $317, RNABC policies in effect. Very octive town in Catboo 
Roitdting country. Apply: Director of Nursing, Cariboo Memorial Hospitol. Willioni* lake, British Cotumbio. 

2-ao-i 

O w i fl Oely Mmtm (2) for 304Md active howilol (Acoadtlid) BCRNA peliciM In aMecl. A«plyi Oincler of 
Nursing. Creston Valley Ho*piMl, Oeeion, Bntlsh Columbia. 3-l*-1 

fl u i n l Detr Nan** for active 3 bed he*piiol. RNAK pelicie* end sdiedule* In effect alee Nortfiern oilew 
ane*L Aceommodalien* vroilaMe in fB*id*nce. Apply: Director of Nursing, General Hoepisol, Fort Nelson, 
British Columbia. 3-X3-1 

OBURAl DUTY NURStS wi* B.C. registration for acth« 200-bed General Hesyital wHti Sdwol of NurtH^lB 
large expansion progrom under way. Personrwl pclicie*. ifKludino salary, in ut cerd u n ce with RNABC ^ 
contract for 1964. Apply loi Dir*ctor of Nursing, Royal Inland Hospital, Komloep*. iritirfi Cotumbia 2J3-I 

Osesrel Defy Norse* for fully occredited 82.bed hospital in n ottl i we s twn B.C 19*4 tolorie*! Bw C Regietwed 
$347-$4l9, Non-Registered $332. Room ond board $50, m, 10 statutory holidays. 1% days sick leave, 4-wfc. 
vocotion. Superannuation and Medicol Plon coveroge. Apply tsi Direciar of Nwslno. Oenerol Hoepiloi, Kiti- 
mot, British Columbio. 2-36-1 

O—srel Defy None* for summer vocation relief ond for full Hna, In OH diyartn«Mi of wuiiwn tuiilliil 
locotcd in a very active community. Storting basic soloryi $332 for B.C. RegisMred ond $917 for non-B.C. 
Regltterad. RNABC pertonnel policiei m effect. Plonned rotation. Room* ovoiloble in nurse*' residence ol 
$24/m. Apply toi Director of Nursing, Prince George Regienol HetpNol, Prince Oeoroo, BrItWi Colurtibia. 

2.1M 

488 THE CANADIAN NURSE 



1 



NURSING WITH 

Medical Services Directorate 




REGISTERED HOSPITAL NURSES 
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES 

AND 

CERTIFIED AUXILIARY NURSES 

For service to Indians across Canada, Eskimos and the 
population of the Yukon and Northwest Territories. 

Those interested in positions of the following locations should write fo: 
Fisher River Hospital, HODGSON, AAAN.; Miller Boy Hospital, PRINCE 
RUPERT, B.C.; AAoose Factory Hospital, MOOSE FACTORY, ONT.; Norway 
House Hospital, NORWAY HOUSE, AAAN.; Sioux Lookout Indian Hospital, 
SIOUX LOOKOUT, ONT.; Nonaimo Indion Hospital, NANAIMO, B.C. 

iMtormotion oa tlMM ond etk«r pMitioMt n avoilpMi freni M«4ical SvrrkM 
Oirtctorolc, Deportment ot Notioiiol Health and Wilfort, in Vonco<i**i, 
Cdaieatoa, Rogino. Wwaipof, Ottowo ond Qaebtc, or fro* t<M 

Oirtctor, H i iu mtl Smrkm, 

DEPillMENT OF MTIOIll HUITH MD WElFAtE, Oll/tWt 



^*" 



Y 1964 ■ VOL. 60. No. S 



487 



6«n«ral Owty Nun«s (or I 1 0- bed hospilol in norihweitern fi.C. SolOfy-ft.C. '•gisterad t347-j4l9, non-regit- 
i«red S332. Newly furnished residence v»ith T.V. Good social octivllies, including bowling, cv.rl.ng, lenms and 
year-round swimming. Full personnel benefits irKluding travel ollowonce. Apply to: Director o* Nursing, Gen- 
erol Hospital, PrirKe Rupert, British Columbio. 2-S6-2 

Generol Duty Nurses for well-equipped 80-bcd Getteral Hospital in beautiful miond valley odjocent Loka 
Kathlyn and Hudson Boy Glocier. Initial salary (335, momTenonce $50, 40hr. 5-doy wk., 4-wk vocation. 
Booting, fishirtg, swimming, golfing, curling, skating, skiing. Comfortable nurses' residetKe, roil fore od- 
vonced if necessary. Apply: Sacred Heart Hospitol, Smithers, British Columbio. 2'73-l3 

G e n er o l Duty Nurses for octive 40-bed hospitol. Soiory in occordonce with RNABC controct for 1964. Nurses' 
residence available. Also Loboratory Technicion. Apply to: Administrator, St. John Hospital, Vanderhoof, 
British Columbio. 2-74-1 

Generol Duty and O.R. Nufsee with postgroduote course or equivalent experience required for 146-bed 
Gerierol Hospitol. Personnel policies in occordonce with RNABC. Apply: Director of Nursiitg, Gerwrol Hospital, 
Chilliwock, British Columbio. 2-13-1 

Generol Duty, Operating Roetn ft Capeneeced Obstetricol Nurses for 434-bed hospital with school of nurstr>g. 
Salary: S332-S404. Credit for past experience & postgroduote training, 40-hr wk. Storutory holidoys. Annuel 
incremenis; cumulotive sick leave; pension plon^ 28-days annual vocation,- B.C. registration required. Apply: 
Director of Nursing, Royal Columbio Hospital, New Westminster, British Columbio. 2-73-13 

Generol Duty Groditate Nurses (2J for June or July. 31-bed General Hospitol in the surtny interior of B.C. 
Soiory; S350/m with 28 doys annual vocation ond 10 statutory holidoys. Full board or>d room in TV 
equipped residence: SSO-m with free uniform laundry. Apply: Director of Nursirtg, PrIrKeton Gervrol ffos- 
pitol, Princeton, British Columbia- 2-59-1 

Graduate Nurses for 60-bed modern hospitol in retort oreo on Voncouver Itlood. R.N. bosic rofe $332/m with 
yearly increments occordirtg to RNABC personnel policieft. EttquirieSi Director of Nursing, Coftiobelt River & 
District General Hospital, Campbell River, British Columbia. 2-9-1 

If you're o Groduote Nitrse we would like to hove you join our nursing stoff either os a permonent staff 
membef of for swrrtmer vocotion relief. We hove o SO-bed ftospilol, with stoff restdetKe, 35-mi. from Von 
couver - good bus service Appty: Director of Nursirig. longley Memoriol Hospital, Murroyville. BritisF 
Columbio. 2-44-1 

GRADUATE NURSES for 31-bed hospital. Salary S335 for B.C. registered, $10 lew for Non.Reg. lodging close 
<n -- $12.S0/m. Travel from Vortcouver refurtded after 6 nto. Interesting social odvontoges. Applications to- 
Secretary-Treasurer, General Hospitol, Bok 640, Oceon Foils, British Columbia. 2-49 1 

Graduate Nana for opening in 19-bed hospitol located ot Port Alice, B.C. This attroctive openirtg is m o 
modern community with full recreational focilities. Top soiory offered. NO DEDUCTION for room ond board 
for interview ond information pleose write: RAYONIER CANADA (B.C.) LIMITED, 1111 W. GEORGIA STREET, 
VANCOUVER 5, B.C. 2-73 24 

Otoduote Nurses oad C erti f ied Nuning Assisloan for 70-bed ocute Generol Hospital on Pocific Coast Salary 
for Groduotes in occordotKe with RNABC tcole with credit for eaperietKa; Nursirtg Aasiiionis $2l4-$246 Board 
6nd room $25/m,- 4-wk. vocation after I-yr. Superonniiotion or>d medical plons. Apply: Director ol Norsirtg. 
St George's Hospital, Alert Bov. British Columb'o 2-2-1 

Operating Reoa, Obt. and O enerol Defy N w iii for modern 4S0-bed hospital with a school of nursing 
RNABC policies in effect. Salary $332,'m. Credit for post experience and postgroduote troinirtg, 40-hr wk, 
10 statutory holidays. Annual irKrentents, cumulotive sick leove, pension plan, 7B-doy onnuol vocot.on B C 
registration required. For particulars write to: Director of Nursing Service, St Joseph's Hospitol. Victorio. 
Vancouver Island, British Columbia. 2-76-5 

Nenea hwo for 30-bed hospitol. Sotorlea ot per B.C. Regitleted Nurtei' ogreewtent. Comfortable nurtet' home 
Apply to: Mitt H. Compbell, R.N . Director of Nurting Conununlty Hospital. Grand ForVt. Britith Columbio 
_^ 2J7-1 

CNOIAND 

Staff Nurses required full time m oil words ond deparimenti m a busy Generol Hospitol Pleose opply to 
IIOCMESTER'''l(HJr*HSo°**''*****'* **°^"'^*' •»****0««*»*T COMMinit, IT •ARTHOIOMEW'S HOtflTAl, 

Theatre Pupil Courtet commencing Morcft, Mov, July, Se p te m ber. November. 4 or 6 mo court* giving rr 
perienc* m Moior ond Minor surgery ond accident work. Applications lo: Molron. MIDWAY AND ORAVESENO 
MOSPITAl MANAGEMENT COMMimf. CT tARTHOlOMWS HOSWTAl, ROCHESTER. KENT. ENGIAND 

1 4-3- 1 A 



MANITOSA 



INSTRUCTORS m Fu«Kfam<rntalt m Nursing, Medicol-Surgicol Nurting, ond Obt. Nursing. ISfrbed hospitot 
o^nmg erpomion ID ?S0 beds Apply «o: Director. Scftool of Nurting. Victorio Gwienil ffetpilol, Winnipeg. 
'*°"''°°°- 3-72-11 

^^^^^fT^'JH*^ r ' '»••«>" G«*rol Hotpltol Soiory ronge $340-$3W, occontmodotien ovoiloble ot MS 
good personnel policies Contoct: Administrotor, Benito Hotpltol. Benito. Moniiobo J-4 I 

f2S*T3i 'SH^ rL""*^ Itoepilol- Sotory: l3«0/m. plut SIB incrMtntI after « me. tervic*. plut free 

^, ^ P^SS^r^£gJ!?*g^ "T*"^ hoytitd and pentlon plant ovoOobte. For further panleulan -, 

opply to: Pertonnel Monoger, Sttertitt Go rdon Minn lanilwl. lynn UU, ManHobe. S-^I«B ill 

5S.*If"il!*^J*iII' xyj^!"^ "'^i^Z Vi VS*"^ '*"''" o* Director of Nurting, of o 25-bed hotpitol. 
iir'_ ^ ^^"'Sl^^'T' ""*»• W^MIS Ouortert ovoilobt. For more detailed informntlon write: 
Administrator. DeSolnberrv District Hospital. St Pierre, Mianitnho J.S3-IB 

**" THF CANADIAN NTIRSF 



ONTARIO SOCIETY 

for 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN 



(^ 



presents a challenge 
to Public Health Nurses 



Applicants must have at least 
two years exfjerience in o 
generalized public health pro- 
gram, prefprobly in Ontario 



INTERESTING 

AND CHALLENGING 

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 

INCLUDE: 

* rehobilitatioii of crippled 
children 

* counselling of children 
and parents 

* working with official 
health agencies 



New attrcKtive salary 
schedule with excelieni 
benefits. Cor provided 
Pre-service training with 
soiory. 



Apply in writing to 

MISS MARGARET MacMllLAN. 
Reg.N.. 

Supervisor, Nursing Service. 

350 Rumsey Road, 

Toronfo 17, Ontario. 




f m iwy'i 
Hwi TOU. M • OisMci Nwm 



MAY 1064 - VOL. 60. No 5 



489 



lUgntand NviMi (2 )for 25-b«d hoipitol, 30-mi. from Winnipeg. Commencing (olory $325, 4(M>r. wk.. voco- 
tion pay. peniion plon, 10 tlafutorv holidayi, »ick leove with poy. $5.00 increment every 6-mo. Apply to: 
Administrator, DeSoloberry Oistrici Hotpitol, St. Pierre, Manitoba. 3-53-1C 

Registered Nunei (4), Practical NwrMt (8) for Aug. 1964 for new 50-bed hospilol. Solory: R.N.'t, $320-$365, 
L.P.N.'s, $220-$250. 40-hr. wk., S-wk vocotion. 9 «tal. hoiidoyi. Room or)d boord, t4S/m. Atodem ruidence. 
Apply: Motron, Pine Follf Generol Hoipitol, Pine Foils, Monitobo. 3-44-1 

Registered Nurses (3) licenced Practical Ngraes (2) for 32.bed fully modern hospital, salary }320 ar>d $225 
respectively, 50/m for full mainienonce in residence, 40-hr. wk., 3-wk. vocotion after one yeor. Fringe bene- 
fits include life insurance, pension plon and medical services. Personnel policies supplied on request. For 
furttier information write or phone 180 collect to: Mrs. E. Sims, Superintendent, Roblin District Hospital, 
RoblJn, Monitobo. 3-48-1 

■•■islerad aad Practical Nonee (immediotelY) for 18-bed hospitol at Vito, Aton., TtVmL from Wirmlpaa. 
Starting salary, R.N. $330 • UP.N. $225, wllti ollowanc* for experionce. Doily bus servlco. 40*f. wk.. Ml 
maintenance available for $50/m. Apply to: Matron, Dbtrlct Hospital, Vita, Monltaba. S-M-l 

Reginered Oeoeral Dnty Nones (3). Immediately, for fully modern 20-bed hospital. Solory: $330/m. 40 hr. 
wk. Increments of $5.00 every 6 mo. for 6 increments. Full mointenonce ovoilable of ttie hospital for $45/m. 
For further informotion ond opplicolion form oppiy to; Mrs. Olive Compbell, Matron, Hunter Memorial 
Hospitol, Teulon, Monitobo. 3-63-1 

General Ovty Nvrses (3j for new 8S-bed hospital. Good salary artd generous personnel policies. Apply: 
Director of Nursing, Portage Hospitol District No. 18, Portoge lo Prairie, Monitobo. 3-45-I 

Oeoeral Duty Nurses (i) and L.P.N. (1) immediately for 17-bed hospilol. Storting solory for R.N.'s $320-$360; 
L.P.N. $220-$260/m. Increments every 6-mo. Jon. af>d July. Board ond room $50 single, $45 double room. 
40-hr. wk., pension plon in effect ond M.M.S. ber>efits. Apply: Matron, Grar>dview District Hospital, Grorid- 
view, /Monitobo. 3.29-1 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Registered Nurses for General Duty and Operoting Reeoi for 100-bed hospitol. Newfld. Gov't, salary plue 
$150 bonus end of 6-mo. service. One way transportation poid, 2-wk. vocotion offer completion of 1-yr. 
8 statutory holidoys. Apply: Nurse- ir>-Charge, Notre Dome Boy AAemoriol Hospital, Twillingate, Newfouiid- 
lond. 5-13-1 

NOVA sconA 

Registered Nerse* for 3t-bed hospitol in pleosont community — [oe lnw Shora of Nova Sootio. Apply: 
Superintendent, Eastern Shore Memorial Hospitol, Sheet Horbour, Nova Scotia. 6-32-1 

Oeoeral Defy Neteee for mooem 35-bao hoepitol sttuoted on beautiful 9owln Sno^. Good porsonnal pollciae. 
Excellent living quarter* Apply Superintendent, Fishormen's Memorial Heipltal, Umanburv, Nova Scotio. 4-2I-I 

ONTARIO 

MHCTOt Of NMSINO EDUCAnON for 21S-bed accredited hoepitol — 100 students — Unh>«rsitv preparation 
and expericnca required, degree preferred. Good persormel policies, paeition available June, 1965. Apply to: 
Administrotor, Royal Victoria Hospital, Barrie, Ontario. 7-4-2 

Seperviser, PeMic H eel * Norsioa. Generolizcd program in rural-urban oounly of S3,000 people. Direct in- 
quiries, including qualification, experienee artd salary expected toi Dr. R. M. Aldli. Huron County Heoltfi 
Unit, Goderich. Ontario. 7-SI-2 

lo s ervice I de ctl ie C i iid i olei for in-service oitd orientation pro«rom. Boccolauraat* Oegm pre f erred. 
Experienced Operoting Room Head Nurse for S-lheotre operating room sulfa. Modern 230-bed General 
Hospital with a sdwol of nursing. Excellent personnel policie*. Solory will be c o mmeneurofe wUh quolifico- 
tiora and experience. Apply to: Director of Nursing Servio, St. Joseph's General Hospital, Port Arthur, Ont. 

7-106-2 

Regls«ersd Norses for new 65-bed hospitol. Retort ana. Salary range: t3IS/in. Up-«»date penoMiel policips. 
Apply: Director of Nurses. South Muskoko Memorlol Hospitol, Broeebridge, Ontario. 7-1SI 

R oR to ered Nones for Surgicol, Medicol, Pediatric, Obdefrkol, De yu fl i iom and OpgroMna loeni, required 
by lOO-bed General Hospitol, situated in Northern Ontario. Storting salary S3M, annual inoownte, good 
personnel policies, including 40 hours per sneek. O.H>. pension plan and group life IneutoMi^ OMS.C 
and P.S.I. plant in effect. Accommodation ovoHaWa in reeldenc e if deeired. Per futlher porttaulan apply lo: 
Director of Nurses, Ixidy Minto Hoepitol, Cochrane. Ontario. 7.30-1 

R ti l sleisd Mor t ee for 34-bed hospitol. min. salary »3S0/m. — mn. of 1490 In f»»» yoort. *e>*. vocotlen wHh 
pay tick leave after 6ht<o. service. All Staff — S^ioy 40.hr. wk., 9 statutory holkiays, pentkM plan ft other 
benefits Apphr to; Superintendent. Englehort ft District Hospital. En g l ehort, Ontario. 7-40-1 

RiBliMisd Nonee for modern S5-bed General Hospitol, 4Wir. wk., 8 tlolutery holidays, excellent personnel 
ST"***.*^ opportunity for odvoncetnant. Retort town on lake Huron. Applyi Director of Nursing, General 
Hospitol, Kirtcordme, Ontorio. 7.d5-1 

''"'r i" * ^ " !!■ ' ' ' ! * "' "■■ " fa' w»IU«»wlpped 424ied Oenarol Hey H al lecoMd k« mo knptm for to 

^5!!^ *^. "S!^ leeourtet. The tpertimlnded parton hot unllmilid acthrMa to enipy. ttartino tolory: 
J^'^'"-,J?*^'?* personnel pollciet. Ac c o o onedofien avoilolile h seeH-fumiilwd nuriM' (widinc*. M 
hxther infermatkm pleoeephOTP or wriM i The Director of Nursing, Sieue lookMt Owol Hoyital, P.O. 
Box Wr, dKHra loouHft« OvMorio. 7-1 19*1 

^••***^ ."T!!? *" li'l,^ ""SP?^ Minimum lolary, t340, *^$A. vwaMm. pmmion. IMe and modlcal 
«euror)ce. t Watyt ory hoUdayt, 4Shr. wk. Apply to< DifKlor of NuraM. tmnufkm Oeswrol HeM^* »«>^ 
rorcupms, Onfono. 7*12^1 

*«> THE CANADIAN NURSE 



:-v»»:-:«*K-:' 






THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN 



i 




m YOU RECEIVE THE ADVANTAGES OF 



ir FIVE-WEEK ORIENTATION PROGRAM FOR NEW STAFF 



if ONGOING INSERVICE EDUCATION FOR NURSES 



if EXTENSIVE STUDENT EDUCATION PROGRAM 



• RESEARCH INSTITUTE 



APfilCATION FOR GENERAL DUTY POSITIONS INVITED 

FOR INFORMATION CONTACT; 

THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING 

5S8 UNIVERSITY AVKNUK, TORONTO, CANADA 



:-S::: 



MAY 1M4 - VOL. W. No. 6 



401 



Ii*9»l«fed NurMS tor 25b«d hoipilol. Mmimom salory; 1350 *ith ollowonce lor «Apc'icnce Keu»>«red 
NLrsing AMijIonIs, minimum jolory: $250 <«ifh allowance for xpcrience Excellent fringe benefit. Board 
ond room ovoiloble in reiidence: U5/m, Apply to: Mr.. G. Gordon. Superintendent, Nipigon Dnlncl 
Mcinoriol Hospital. 98 Churchill St., Nipigon, Ontorio. 7.871 



Registered Nurses and Registered Nvrsing Assistants for well equipped 75-bed hospilol m progressive town of 
6 500 situated midwov between Winnipeg ond the Conodion Lokeheod. Bosic woge Reg N , $330 and Reg 
N.Ass'ls $230/m with single room occommodotion availoble in modern nurses' residence Excellent personnel 
policies. For further informolion. pleose phone or write; The Director of Nursing. Dryden District Generol 
Hospital, Dryden, Ontorio. 7-36-1 



Registered Nurses, Certified Nursing Assbtanls (lAAMEDIATELY) for 40-bed hospitol in pleasant town of 5,000 
42-hr. wk. with good tototion shifts, providing long nveekerids every 4 wks. Good salaries and personnel 
policies For further detoils ond opplication, opply: Administrator, General Hospital, Esponola. Ontorio. 

Regisiered Nurses oad Certified Nwwiig AseietaM* for 160-bed occreditMl hotpitol. Starting tolory t3S0 ond 
$240 respectively with regular annual increments for both. Excellent pereonnel policies. ResidetKe occom- 
modotion available. Assisionce with tronsportotion can be arranged. Apply to: Director of Nursing. Kirklond 
i District Hospitol, Kirklond loke, Ontario. 767-1 

Registered Nurses and Certified Nursing Assistants for immediote and future vacancies in this 42-bed hospital. 
Starting salaries S335 and $225. respectively. Accommodotion in new residence available. Ueuol ''inoe bene- 
fits. For full informotion, apply to: Director of Nursing, New llikeard and Oietrict Ho«pita4, New liikeord, 
Ontario. 7-83-1 

Registered Nurses for Oenerol Duty in well-equipped 28-bed fiospital, locoted in growir>g gold mining and 
tourist area, north of Kerwro, Ontario. Modem residence with irtdividual rooms; room, boord artd uniform 
loundry only $45. 40-hr. wk., no split shift, cumulative sick time, 6 stotulory holidays and 28 day poid 
vocation offer one year. Salary range $350 - $375. Apply to: Matron, Atorgoret Cochenour Memoriol Has 
pitol, Cocf»erK>ur, Ontorio. 7-29-1 

Reaisteted Nurses far Oiesrol Duty in all deportinanls irKluding pramoture and new-bom nursery. Isolation. 
EmCrgarKy. Recovery Room, and Interaive Care Unit. Good salary and parsonnel pollcias. Applyt Oiiactor 
of Nursing. Victoria Hospital, lortdon, Ontorio. 7-73-10 

Registered Nurses for O enerol Duty for well-equipped 42-bed General Hospitol located in orea known for its 
weolth of ftoturol resources. The sportsminded person has unlimited activities to enjoy Salory rort)^ $325 
to $365 with irKrement for experience. Excellent personnel policies. Accommodarian available in well 
furnished nurses' residence, for further inforrrKiiion please phone or write: The Director of Nursing, General 
Hospital. P.O Boa 909, Sioux lookout. Ontorio 7-: 19-1 

Registered Nurses for Oenerol Duty A Operating Roeoi in modem hoepitol (opened in 19S6). Situoted in the 
Nickel Capitol of the world, pop. 80.000 people. Salaiy: tXIS par ai*., with otMHiol merit incratnanit. plus 
en a uol heoes ploo, 40-hr. wk. Recognition for eaperierKe. Good personnel policies. AssistorKe with irons- 
Dortotion con be arranged. Apply: Director of Nursing, Memoriol Hoepitol, tadbory, Ontorio. 7-127-4 

Registered or Oroduote Nirrses for modem 100-bed hoepitol loc a ted in summer resort district, 40-mi. from 
Ottowo. Apply: Oiractor of Nursing, Public Hospital, Smiths Falls, Ontario. 7-120-2 

Registered Norses for Opeioti a g Roeoi, Medical, Sot^kol ond Obs. Oeo t .'s. Excallant personnel policies- Solory 
commensurote with education ond experierKO. Apply to; Dire c tor of Nursing, Strofftroy Mid d le s ex General 
Hospitol, Strothroy, Ontario. 7-125-1 

Oenerol Doty Regislered Narses for 90-bed hospital situoted in Itie Ottowo Valley. Good tolary, rmny 
benefits Apply to: Director of Nursing Service, St. FrorKis Gonerol Hotpitol, Smiths Foils, Ontario. 7-120-1 

O eescal Doty Norsas for 66-bed Ganerol Hospital. Starting solaryi t33S/m. Excallent parsonnti policies, 
pension plan, life irauronce, etc. residerKe occormnodation. Only 10 min. from downtown Buffisla. Apply 
Director of Nursing. Douglas AAemoriol Hospital, Fort Erie, Onlorio. 7-45-1 

Generol Duty Nurses for modern 100-bed hospital Registered Nurses $32S-$3SS/m, Graduates $2SS-$32Vm. 
40-hr wk . berwfits include accident, sickness and life insuratKa, hoepitol and medical insurance plans, 
t OHA Pension Plan. Apply: Miss Tillett. Dfredor of Nursing, laomingten District Memorial Hospitol. 
leomlngton, Ontario 7-69-1 

General Doty Nurses for 100-bed modem hospital, southwestern Ontario. 32 mi. from London. Salary eom- 
mansurota with experierKO t ability: $32S/m bosic tolory. Pension plan. Apply giving full particulars lo: 
The Director of Nurses. District Memoriol Hoepitol. Tillsenburg. Ontario. 7-I3M 

0— '«< 0¥tr Norses for 32S-bed fully accredited Generol Hospitol locoSad in dow n lewri orao of city. Plan- 
ned orientation program. Progressn>« personnel policies Apply lo: The Director of Nursing, The Doctors 
Hospital. 45 Brunswick Avenue, Toronto 4. Ontorio 7-133-9 

Oenerol Duly Nurses A Certified Norstaf Aiililaots for now Jfrbed ho«>ilal with modern equipmont. 40*r 
wk , 8 ttotutory holidays, excallant parsennal pollcias A opportunity for odvancomant. Teuriil town on 
Georgian Boy. Good but connections to Toronto Apply fo: Director of Nurses. General Hotpitol. Meolord, 
Ontario. 7.7».| 



«a«j st a t ad Worses for floor duty. Haod Nursa wHb Unh AdminiMraHaii iraMni, (Nmlg) tof 70*ed 
octiva and Oironic Hospitol in rasort oreo Stoning satariw on rggional boii*, oaciltont pwionnal policJos. 
Apply: Director of Nurtno. Huntsvllle District Mamorlol Hoipllal. Hunltvah, On««to. 7-99^1 

Ops»Hta| Raaa Narses for general operating room work which irsdudes cardiovascular, nourosurgary. 
ganilD-ixinory, eor, eye, nose ond throot and orthopedic surgery Good salary and p arsennal policias. 
Apply: Oiractor of Nursitig, Victorlo Hospital. London. Orttorio 7-73-10A 

*1« THE CANADIAN NURSE 





; YOU FEEL THE IMPORTANCE 
OF NL'RSING . . . AT . . . 

COOK COUNTY 

HOSPITAL 

It emphasizes the vital part the nurse plays 
in the modern world of medicine... and 

420t 



in addition offers A 
you extremely liber- ^ 
al employment ben- 
efits. Our staff 
nurses start at. . . . 



MAIL THIS COUPON for INFORMATION 



Personnel Manager Box 426 

Cook County School of Nursing 

1900 West Potk str*«t, Chicaso 12. Illinois 
NAME 




ST. ADDRESS- 
CITY 



.STATE. 



lAv im4 . vol. on No « 



4fl? 



Public H«aMi Nvnci iQ>.>olif>ed) for on urban-rural Heallli Unit. Salory rong*: $4,000 lo W.9S0, onnuol 
increment; $200 with oHowonce for experivnce. Apply: Director of Public Heolth Nursing, Simcoe County 
Health Unit, Court House, Borrie, Ontorio. 7-8-3 

Public Haohfa NwtM> (quoiifiad) for general program. Salary ronge (3,900 to $4,800. 5-day-wk., I -mo. voco- 
lion, cor alloworKe, pension plan, 50% hoipltolizotion, P.S.I. Apply to: Or. E.A. Dunton, Director, Brant 
County Health Unit, Aberdeen Avenue, Brantford, Ontario. 7-17-4 

Public Heolth Nurses for generalized program. Minimum salary: $4,000 witfi alloworKe for previous experi- 
ence and annual increments. Cumulative sick leave plon. Hospitalization, P.S.I. or»d Pension Plon available- 
Liberal transportation allowance and holidays. Apply to: A. E. Thorns, M.D., Director, Leeds nd Grenville 
Heolth Unit, Brockville, Ontorio. 7-18-4 

Public Heolth Nvnes (Qualified) for generalized program, by Stormont, Dundos af>d Glengarry Health Unit 
located in the Seaway Valley area. Minimum salory $4,000. Annual increment. AlloworKe for experietKe. 
S-day wk. Employer-shored (50-50) group insurorKe, portable OMERS pension plan, Ontario Hospital Insu- 
rance ond P.S.I. coveroge (medicol, surgical and obstetricol plan). 3-wk. vocation, cumulotive sick leave 
credits, one-half paid as bonus upon leavir>g after 3-yr. service. Generous cor alloworKe. Reply in writing 
to: Or. John A. Thomson, Medical Officer of Health, Box 1058, Cornwall, Ontario. 7-34-5 

Public Health N«rse{s) (Qualified) for o generalized program in Etobicoke Township. Minimum salary: 
S4,355. Cor ollowonce: $670 p9T onnum, 4-wk. vocation ofter 1 vr. Usual employee benefits. Apply: Director 
of Public Health Nursing, Township of Etobicoke, 550 Burnhomtnorpe Rood, Etobicoke, Ontorio. 7-41-3 

Public Heohh Nurses (qualified). Salary ronge $4,00O-$5,2O0. Cor alloworKe, employer shared pension plon 
and other benefits. Apply to: Mr. Allan F, Stewort, Secretory-Treosurer, Wentworth County Heolth Unit, 
Court House, Hamilton, Ontario. 7-55-14 

Public H e a lth Nurse (bilir>gual) for health unit in rural Ontario. Minimum solory $3,800. Cor allowance, pen 
sion plan, group irtsuronce. For further information, pleose write: Or. ft. G. Grenon, Unit4 Sanitoire, Prescott 
& Russell, rOrignol, Ontario. 7-73-14 

PuMic Heahfa Nurses (Qualified) for generolixad program in a highly urbcaiited and rurol ana. fa rpanonnel 
policies ond further informotion apply to: Or. A. F. Bull, Medical OfTicar of Health, Holton County Health 
Unit, Milton. Ontorio. 7-81-2 



PuMk t l i uhh Nurses (Quolified)- Salory ronge $3,650 ■ $4,M0, required in a ganaroliied program in rurol 
and semi-urban oreo odjocent to Metropolitan Toronto. Excellent workino conditlont Including pension plan, 
group insurorKe, ovtd troraportotion arrangements. Write: Or. R. M. King« York County Heolth Unit, 64 
Boyview Avenue, Newmorket, Ontario. 7-84-2 

Public Health Nurse (Quolified) for generalized program in small city health deportment. Solory: $4,000 to 
$5.(XX}, P.S.I.. 5-day wk., generous cor allowance, 1-mo. vocation, occumulative sick leove. Apply to: Or 
A. S. Middlebro', Owen Sourxl Department of Health, 100 • 8th Street, East Owen Sound, Ontorio. 7-94-2 

PubNc Heohh Nurses for t i m r»l pw g r— . Solory ronge $4 200 to $4,900. Personnel policies include car ex- 
pense ollowonce, OMERS pension plon, group ittsuroiKe, 50% of P.S.I. mn6 hospital inaurotKa, liberal ollow- 
once for experience. Apply to: Dr. G. I. Anderson, Director, The Lombton Health Unit, 3^ George Street. 
Sornia, Ontorio. 7-1 14-3 

Public Heohh Nur s e s (2) for generalized public heolth program. Minimum salary $4,100 plus cHlowonce for 
experience. 4.wk. vocotion. Cor allowance, pension plan, hospitalization, P.S.I., and Group ImurorK* ovail- 
oble. Apply stating quolificotions to: Dr. W. K. G. Allcm. Director and AHedicol Officer of Health, Norfolk 
County Health Unit, Box 247, Simcoe. Ontario. 7-118-2 

Pub l i c Heo hh Nuna (Qualified - Catholic )JWinimum solory: $4,236. Arwuol increments. S-doy wk.; 4-wk. 
vocation; $100 uniform allowance; peruion; P.S.I. Apply: Director, St. Elixobalh Vititina Nursat Aiaociation. 
99 Gloucester Street, Toronto 5, Ontario. Telephone: 9354907. 7-13)40 

PVHIC HEAITH NUtSC for ganarolizad program with the Bruca County Heolth Unit. Minimum salary $3,900 
with odiusimonts for experieiKa, pension, surgical medical, oreup itHuronca and cumulative sick leove plans 
ovoiloble Cor provided, or optionol choice of mileaga plant. Apply to: T. H. Alton, Sac-Traa«., Btuca County 
Heolth Unit, P.O. Box 70, Wolkanon, Ontorio. . 7.J38.2 

PuMic Hsehh NOTta (quoiifiad) for generalized progrom in City of Wotarloo. Amuol incrwMnIt, fringe 
benefits and ollowonca for experience. Apply to: Or. P A. Voelker. MO.H.. 39 Albert $1., Wolarloo, Ontario. 

7-150-1 

Pi*lk HiiM Nweas for on expanding ganarolizad program. Salary tdiadula, $4,00O-$4,900, with storting 
solory being baaed on experience. Personnel policiat include cor milaeye ollowanca, OM.tR.S pansiort 
plan, group insuronce. family coveroge under Windsor Medicol Services, hospitalization, o 3-wk. vocotion 
occumulotive tick leave and other benefiH. Nurses olreody quolified in public heolth or those qualifying 
i!LK^ "?• *^"*^ 'S —^ opplicotions to: Or. J. Howie, Director. Melropoliton Windsor Haollh Unit. 
3090 Wyondotw Siraat East, Windaor, Ontario. 7-1454 

PaMk Haahh Nona fw i M sra l staff daMaa. Basic salory: $4,300 with odiustmant for experience. Paraonnal 
<"'f.T '"«'>«• amployer shared Ontario Hospital Sarvicat, Wksdww Madkol and OiWEIS plan. Apply stating 
quoUKOtiont and axpar«nca to: Or. W. H. Johnston, IMadicDl Officer of Haolth. Daportmant of Haoliti. 
Chothom, Ontario. 7-34-3 

CTAPP NUISIS FOR 220.8eO ACCRroiTEO HOSPITAl with School of Hunl^ Soiory t31S. Prafaranca for on» ^ 

pcwticulor servKu g~en evary ,»n»deration. Poe^aoaic CartHlolai tacaanlad. Uk^I panewwl tMnafhi. fin* jt^ 
S^lZl'i^JL? °T°' *»»?,"•?''>«» Northern New York Sloto. Apply: Xniitant DiractaTof Huntxg {Sarvleali '^ 
^^eoeroi plospitoi, Cornwall, Ontario. 7-34-1 

lERMUOA 

S3"l!2jJI!"Tlj!r °r''**^ "^ r.* o^oj*^ ««>" poi s ped u i i lo couTM and/or aaaarMnca. (or ISO- 
bad^hoapital Travel ollowonca pa«< For portlcuion, wrhat Matron. nn« Hawri VII Memoriol Hoyital. 



TO: Registered Nurses 
FROM: Director of Nursing 



Ours is a progressive Psychiatric Ward in a Pediatric Hospital 
setting, with 14 patienis ages 4 to 16 — blending a variety of 
Psychiatric conditions. 



The nurse, in a warm homelike setting 
"lives" with the child through doily 
activities, participating with him 
in seasonal sports and community 
events. Close association with the So- 
cial Worker, Occupational Therapist, 
Psychiatrists, Teachers and Nursing co- 
workers, provides learning opportuni- 
ties and guidance for the creative 
nurse to develop skill in helping the 
child establish meaningful relation- 
ships. 

Are you interested? 

Send your application to: 

THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

MONTREAL CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL, 

2300 Tupper Street. Montreal 25, Que. 



MAY l«M Vot «. v.. «5 



OUESEC 

NURSING INSTRUCTORS for lorge Nurting Auislont progrom. Apply, giving full porticulori of Irolning ale 
to- Th« Director of Nunina Education. V«rdun Proteitont Hcnpitoi, 6875 LoSali* Blvd.. V«dun. Quabac 

9-47-M 

ftnialwii Haod Nana* and Carttfiad Nai l ia g Aisiatanli for AO-bad diMdran't orthopadic hospital. Excallani 
panonnal policia*. Apply: Mi*s Floro M. lanwnt, Rag.N.. Adminittroior. Shrinari Hotpitol fof CrippM Chll- 
drrnx, 1S29 Cador Avanua, IMontrcol 25, Quabac 9-0-43 

SAIKATCHEWAN 

Raststarad Nunat witli dutiet to cocnmanca ot toon o> pouibla. Solory ronga S3I5 - S375/m, 40-hr. wk., naw 
modam fully air-cof>ditionad hoipilal to ba opanad in Juna 1964. Accommedotioni ovailobia in naw nurtai' 
residance. Apply stating quotificotioni to: Mim E. Sporks, Diractor of Nuning, Union Hospitol, Rosatown. 
Soskatchewon. 10-1 1 l-l 

Ragntarad Nunas for tha Rrvardala Mamoriol Union Hospital at Turtlafe'd, Soik. Solofy a> racommandad by 
SRNA. Eiccellant panonnal polkiat in affact, nunat' ratidanca locotad n»ar Ifw hospital, board of>d room 
avoilobte. Tha R. Memorial Union Hospital is o 20-bad hospitol. modern throughout, good e<^ipmanf of>d 
facilities, a further oddition ond a large renovation program has bee n approved. The hospital hos two 
Doctors on staff, a clinic is situoted rwar the hospital providing services such os Dentist, Physiotharapy, Op- 
Tomotrist etc. Turtleford is a modern Village situated 50-mi. from North Bottleford with daily bus sarvica to 
N.B. and Saskatoon. Surrounded by a number of resorts. Please apply to; Sec.-AAaiyjger, R.M. Union Heapital, 
Turtleford, Soskotehewon. IO-125-t 

Regittared Nunat for modem 24-bad hospital. Estobliahad parsonnal policia*. Paraion plan. Salary ronga $310 
- S387 with yearly irKrements. Adjustment to stortirtg salary mode for previous experience. Apply: Mist M. 
Stang, Director of Nursing, Union Hospital, Wokow, Soskotehewon. 10-131-1 

Orodaala Nana* for oil deportments. AAodcm 160^ad fully accredited hospitol in ottroctiva city, populotion 
13,000. Nurses' residence built in 1958 in open landscaped orao with Iannis court ond skating rink. Good 
solory scola orsd personrsel policias. Applications to ba forwarded to; Tha Diractor of Ntxsing, Union Hos- 
pitol, Swift C\jrrt\i, Soskotcnewon. 10-122-1 

U.SA. 

Registered Nwrte (Scenic Oregon vocation playground, skiing, swimming, booting ond cultural events) for 
29S-bed teaching unit on campus of Univertiiy of Oregon madicol school. Salary tlorts ot $387. Pay differ- 
ential for nights and evenirigs. liberal policy for odvoncafKant, vocotiona, tick laowi. helidayt. Apply: /Mult- 
nomah Hospitol, Portiar>d, 97201, Oregon. 15-38-1 

Ragittarad Narsas for modem 374-bad Genarol Hotpitol on Iha baoutlful, worm Panirauio y«t ctily lO^nin 
from ttia haort of cosmopolitan Son FrorKitco. Opaningt in oil nuting fr M ic » t induditig oparatina room, 
tmargatKy room, oisd I.CU. Excellent parsonnal policias, many autre benefits and oppotunitia* for ad»onc»- 
mant. Telephone collect, Oxford 7-4061 or orrite: Diractor of Personnel, Penitwulo Hotpit o l. 1783 El Camino 
Real, Burliisgama, Colifomio. 15-5-20 

»t|ltltit< Nanai. Coreer satisfoction, interast ortd p ro f anionol growth unlimllad in modem, JCAH u cci ad i tad 
25 4 bad hospital, locoted in one of California's finott oraot, ra ciwitto i u l. aducotionol and culturol advantages 
ore yours as well as wonderful year-round climoW. If iMi corabinarlan li whot you're looking lor. conloct 
u* nowl Sloff Nurse entronc* salary $395 with outacnetic incnoM lo t49S par no., tuparvltory peaMont 
at Inc r ao t a d rote. Special area and liberal shift diffarantiolt paid, bcillant bw fltt Including Blue Croea hot- 
pHallzatien and surgicol covaroga ond liberal partotmal pellcto. Piu>«mIuiiuI ilaff apeeinlmantt ovaUoMo in 
all dinknl oraot to theae oltgifala for Collfensia IkwiturB. Wrtia tBdoyi Diractor ofNuning, Eden HeaBMol, 
20103 lake Oiobot Rood, Coilre Volley, ColMomlo. )?5-l2 

Rtai it eitd Nwtat for SO-faad County Hospital in Imperial Vollay. toutham Colif. Solory ronga $37S-$440 
Effective July 1. 1964. $39S-$4a9. Liberal benafitt include 3-wfc. vocation Itt year. Ideal diiaata — No 
smog or fog. Wrila: Panonnal Dtportmant. County of Imparlol, B Cantra, Colifemie. I5-5-J1 

REOISTRIO NMMS Positions avoiloble at Oliva View Hotpitol, locottd in Seulham Califomio. neor 
Los Angelet. A 800-bad specioliied medicol focility offcn eaperianca In madicol. turgicol ond tuberculosis 
^^!^; '"<'"'•*«' orientoiion program plonned ot needed. Beginning tolory $450/m. Bonus opproximaiely 
MO/m for evening or night duty. The los Anoela* County Civil Sarvica Commission Invilt* you lo wrhe lo: 
Morgorei Drmnon. R.N., Director of Nuning. lo> 501. Oliva View. Colifornio 913M. IS-5-SS 

f^iV^ •••*»" ♦?' P''voia 27S4iad hotpitol lor man. woman and chHdran. Staff Nurse solaria* from $400 
$465, diffarentmls for evenings and nighH. Opportunities in oil clinical oraot. Holidayt. vocolion*, tick laova, 
life insuronca and haolth insuronce. California registrotion required. Appllcotiem and details furnished on 
reqi^t Conloct: Personnel Director. Children's Hotprtol. 3700 Colrforrio SiifWt. Son Froncisco 18, Colifomio 

15^5 4 



V''.? .;"* y*"** ^ 233-bad modwn Jhmp<M. PoaiNant mw W ablt - oil larvicat. no thift retelien liberoi 
benafHt. odwincameniopporninll^ "n orao, aouol ooportunity emptoyw Apply: 

Director of Nuning Sarvica. Ko lwr Foundation Haap l lolt. •«> honcitce iTcolRomlo 1*5-7 

^S^ fc^to^B^JbtU cSlfTi "^--"^ »— • "••!«— *«-» »-«*' •♦ '*>^^. C^ 



M^^ft^ttt^ Notm^ Staff NwrvM far ptnttmmutti ^mMhil vvriouv tfspoflnMvMK. tUnt •«•*. nJ^iffi CmhHm* 
STi? JS'^t'TrXTi'i 'T!^ ^lljt^iSJ;:^?^ •" one «f #• loi«aM i^nd fbUttTintrol hctpi 
S:-:X M'collJoJlr" """^ '^"^ 0.0-r.m.n.. 0«tan .« An„H Hot^. »0. U^Ta^^ 



26, Colifomio • ^^ --' - ■ **" "^-'^ iJmC 

*•* TH?; CANADIAN NURSf 



DIREaOR OF NURSING EDUCATION 

AT THE 

STRATFORD GENERAL HOSPITAL, STRATFORD, ONT. 



The present Director of Nursing is retiring about the middle 
of the yeor after being with the hospital for 20 years. We 
would like to appoint a successor before the end of June. 

The Director of Nursing is fully responsible for the Nursing 
Service, and the School of Nursing through the Director of 
Nursing Education. 

We have just completed an expansion and renovations pro- 
gramme which gives us 209 active treatment beds. All service 
departments have been modernized and enlarged to take care 
of another 60 beds when these are required. 

The old hospital, connected by a tunnel to the new hospital, 
was completely renovated in 1955, and accommodates 105 
chronic and convalescent patients. 

There is no need to extol the beauties of Stratford, which 
has achieved world renown through its annual Shakespearean 
Festival. 

The hospital offers excellent personnel policies including 
membership In the Hospitals of Ontario Pension Plan, Group 
Life Insurance, and P.S.I. Blue Plan. The hospital is fully ac- 
credited. 

Applicants who should have their B.Sc. (Nursing) and a 
wide experience in hospital administration, should address 
their applications, together with biographical details to: 

MR. J. L. BATEMAN. SUPERINTENDENT, 
GENERAL HOSPITAL, STRATFORD, ONTARIO. 



MAY 1N4 VOL « No. » 



iV7 



ATTENTIONI GENERAL DUTY NURSES 297-bed fully accredited County Hoipitol located 2-hf. drive from San 
Froncijco, ocean beaches & mountoinj resorts in modern & progressive city of 35,000. 40-hr, 5-day wk., pd. 
vacation, pd. holicioys, pd. sick leave, retirement plan, social security & insuror>ce plon. Accommodations in 
nurses' home, meals at reasonable rates, uniforms laundered without charge. Stortir^ salary $395 per mo., 
plus shift and service differentials. Merit increoses to $481/m. Must be eligible for California registrotion. 
Write: Director of Nursing, Stanilous County Hospital, 830 Scenic Drive, AAodesto, Colifornio. 15-5-42 

General Duly Staff Nurses for 450-bed, fully approved hospital. Solory range per mo.: Day Duty, S438-458. 

P.M. and night duty, S 448-468. 40-hr. wk. Poid vacation. 7 poid holidays per yr. Accumulative sick time 
based on length of service. Liberal hospitalization plan. Nurses' residence. Rooms ot reasonable rotes 
Registration or permit to work in Colifornio required. Address applications to: Chief Nurse, Southern Pocific 
Railroad Hospital, Son Francisco, Coltfornio. 15-5^ 

GENERAL DUTY STAFF NUISES — Central California loroa GwMrat Hoapitol. Start $4I3/in. Excallent in- 
service educotion programs; liberal personnel policies, shift dtfferentiol. Apply: Pertonr>el Director, Son 
Joaquin County, Room 530, Courthouse, Stockton, Colifornio. I5-S-36 

Staff Nurse* for 300-bed County Hotpitol. AttrcKtiv* personnel policies plus differential for specialtiee, ofter- 
noon and night duty. Opportunities for odvonced educotion. Apply to; Director of Nursing Service, Kaiser 
Four>dation Hospital, Oakland 11, Colifornio. 15-5-3C 

Staff Nurses for 100-bed County Hospital located in the progreniv* Son Jooquin Valley. Solory: S39S- 
S458/m. Storting salary depends on experierK*. $10 shift differential for evenings and nightt. Oooeionol 
promotions to Heod and Supervisir^g poettions. Liberal fringe benefit*. AAodern nureee' reeiderxa of nominol 
cost. Call or write: Director of Nurses, Tulore County Generot Hoepital, Tulare, California. 1^5-44-A 



Staff Owty pe s ifsesis (Nsprses) in private 403-bed hospitol. Liberal personnel policies and solory. Substontial 
differential for evenir>g and nignt duty. Write: Personnel Director, Hospitol of The Good Somoriton, 12)2 
Shotto Street, Los Angeles 17, California. )5-5-3B 

I n tere s ted Neiiei (must be fluent in Er>glish ortd be willir>g to apply for Colifomio registrotion). Southern 
California, Ventura County — 350.bed hospitol. Solory rar>ge S384-S466 compeneotion for extra experience. 
Nurses' residence $20/m. Ventura, city of 36,000, is near the beaches, has a mlM yeor-reurtd climate and is 
a one-hour drive from a lorge metropolis. Write: Personrtel Department, Courltious*, Ventura, California. 

15*53 

PROFESSIONAL NURSES For immediate openings in 274-bed General Hospital, liberal fringe benefits. Enjoy 
interesting, challenging position in the ideol climate of Sonta Monico Boy. Apply: Directar of Nursing, Sonto 
Monica Hospital, 1250— 16th Street, Santo AAonico, Colifornio. 15-5-40 

NURSES — ALL SHIHS, ALL DEPTS. NEW ACCREDITED 99-bed hospital. Slortirig saloiy $40S/m plus dtfferen 
rial, liberal benefits. Contoct Director of Nurses, Viewpork Community Hospital, 5035 Coliseum Stroet, Los 
Angeles, California. 90016 )S-5-3M 

Nersee for new 75-bed General Hospitol. Resort oreo. Ideal dimate. On beoutlful Pocffk oceon. Apphr >o: 
Director of Nurses, South Coast Community Hospitol, South Loguiw, Colifornio 15^550 

O e n erol Duty Nurses for vorious deportments ifKluding surgery for 73-bed hospital. Storting solory S375 
per mo. with periodic increaaes and fringe benefits. Collage town, tourist area, ideal climate. Contoct: 
Superintet>dent, Luttiem Hospitol Association, Alomoso, Coloroda. 15-6.1 

Execethre Director generalized public health nursirig oger«cy. Potentiol for progrom exporttion in rapidly 
growing community 45 minutes from NYC. Stoff t full timo, 5 relief nurses. Master's degree, odminislfativ* 
ability; experience required, salary open. Send r6sum6 to Mr. Chorleas H. Ulridi, Choirmon. Personrtcl Staff 
Committee, Visitir>g Nurse Association, 60 Guernsey Street, Stamford, Connecticut. 157-4 

REGISTERED NURSES: for 75bed, air conditioned hospitol, growing conununlty. Storting solory $330-$36S/m, 
fringe benefits, vocotion, sick leave, holidoys, life insurance, riospiloliiation. I meol furnished. Write: 
Administrator, Hendry General Hospital, Clewiston, Florido. 1510-1 

Help Wontedl Registered Nwse in sunny Florido near West Polm Beoch. 40-hr. wk. Good working conditions. 
New SO-bed hospital under construction. Living quorters available. S.E. end of loke Okeecf>ob«e. Write or 
coll: J. C. Simonds, Administrotor, EVIROlAOfS MEMORIAl HOSPITAL 1749 E. Main Street, Pohokee, Florida, 
33476. Phone; 924-5502. 1510-4 

fl» "wl Dvly Nurses for 54-faed howHol, minimum stortina salary $330 per mo., located naor Miami and 
West Palm Beoch. Apply: Director of Nurses, Belle Gtode Mwnoriol Hospital, Bell* Glodt. Florida 1510^3 

OEMERAl HAFF NURSES for 425bed private. General Hospitol with comaleiely modem focilities. locoted 
in pleosont residential oreo neor tt>e Northwestern University compos ond tronsportotion to Chicago Loop. 
Hiring ronge $5,040 to $5,400 for permanent personnel. Progmsive personnel policies. Apply: Directar of 
Nursing Sorvice, Evonston Hospital, 2650 Ridge Av«we, Evonston, Illinois. 1514-2 



Steff Nurses (All Areas) Orientation mnd staff i l s»e l ea«ienl ptagreis, 
werfcifig enviroameat, indivldvalisad living acisanseJefleas ia 



lagraaM, awrsa-savlaa e^aipateat, ciialleagia^ .k. 

• aaw air > e»< H le»e e l etlaess. Opportunity to ■ 
porticipoie in nursing proctice of the finest quality in our 200-bed Generol Hospital, lecaM olortg lok* W 
Michigon shoreline, 30 min. from Chicogo. Starting solorias $390-$410 plus $30 differeMial for Ml ond 11-7. I 
Write: Director of Nursing, Highland Pork Hospitol, Highlond Pork, Illinois for detolM brochure. 1514-J 



NURSfS for 200-bed modern prooressiv* Gwtcrol HcepHol. Solory $300/m, living ouortsrs fumitfied free, plus 
on* meol while on duty, liberal personnel policies. Write: DIrKtor of Nursing, Jackson P<w* Hospitol, 7531 
S. Stony Islond Avenue, Chicago 49, Illinois. 1514-lE 

«•• THE CANADIAN NURSE 



JEWISH 










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GENERAL 


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HOSPITAL 


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MONTREAL 
QUE. 


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NURSING OPPORTUNITIES 






In this modern 400-bed non lectarion hotpitol in Administration, Teaching, StoH Nursing, 
Certified Nursing Assistants also required. Openings in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Obstetrics and 
Medicine and Sargery. Excellent personnel policies. Bursaries for pott-basic courses in 

Teaching and Administration. 




For further intormation, please write 




Omcler of Nursing, 


JEWISH GENERAL HOSPITAl, 3755 Cot* St. Catherine Rd., Montreal, Que 




THE WINNIPEG GENERAL HOSPITAL 

!• R«cruitins Q«n«ral Duty Nursss for all Sarvices 

SBM> AmiCATlONS DIRECTIY TO 

THE PERSONNEL DIRECTOR, WINNIPEG GENERAL HOSPITAL. 
WINNIPEG 3, MANITOBA 



MAY 1904 • VOL. ». No 5 



REQI8TCRCD NURSES REQUIRED 

For G«n«ral Duty in modam IB-bed privets Hospilol in Iron mining town, 

140 milfls north of Soult Ste. Mari«, Ontorio. 

SALARY RANGE t320 MINIMUM TO $360 AAAXIMUAA. 

AIloworK* for •xpariMio*. Bocvd and room ovailobl* ot $20 par month 

Transportation ollowarK* up to $50 oftvr 6 monthi. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF NURSES, LADY DUNN HOSPITAl, WAWA, ONTARIO. 



ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF NURSING SERVICE 

Wonted for /WcKellar General Hospital. An octiva trsotmant hospitol of 380 bads, wHh o prograuiv 
school of nunif>g. Pottgroduote preparation eeaential; Boccoloureota Degree preferred 

Afnt TO: 

Oiractor of Naniafl, 

McKELLAR GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

Fort WillioM, Ontario. 



NURSES WANTED 

GBiEKAl DUTY NUUU 

wonted for a modem 75-bed occredited hos 

pitol situated in the beautiful Porklond 

District of Soskotchewon. 

Salary $320 to $380 per month. A five day 
40 hour week with no split shifts. Accom- 
modation with rtteols ore ovoiloble at o very 
reosonobte rote on }h9 hospital grounds 

Appfy t» t*e: 

Director of Nursing Services, 

CANORA UNION HOSPITAL. 

Canoro, Soskotckewan. 



MATRON 

nquind for 

12.bed hospitol in Lynn Loke. Monilobo. 
Salary: $375 per month plus room and board. 
Group iruuronce, medical, hospitol and pen- 
sion ptons available. Applicants should be 
nurses eligible for registration in Uonitobo 
Previous supervisory experience would be 
desiroble, but not essentiol. 

for further partieutars apptf to: 

Personnel Manager, 

SHERRITT GORDON MINES LIMITED, 

Lynn Lake, Manitoba. 



Nwsa for 425-bcd Gefterol Hospital with school of nursing, 45 interru ond residents 
Orientation and refresher course ovoilable. Opportunity for odvofKement. Area offers excellent educotionai. 
racraotional and housing focilities. Liberal personnel policies. Apply: Personnel Deportment, Spririgfield 
Hiwpital, 759 Chestnut Street, Springfield, Mossochosuetts. 15-22-5 

SlaM Net i e e and Licensed Fraetkal Na me (Openines in several areas, all shifts). Minimum stortittg pay $77! 
R.N.'s; LP.N.'s $61 per wk, experience considered differentials poid for raliefs, nights. Every olrier w eel i ' 
and off in smell community hospitol 2 miles from Boston. Living quortors ovoiioble. Contoch Miss Bixobelli 
A. Byrne, R.N., Director of Nuging, Chelseo Memoriol Hospitol. Chelsao, Atoas. 1 5-22-1 

Staff Nanaa 380-bad hoep. new 120 mad-autg. unit. Trona. pd. 1st doss olr to Albuq. ar<d return within U.S 
in ajuhonga for l-yr. amp. controcf. Coma to Naw Atoxico "Lar>d of Enchontment." Career opportunities 
I orgeat pvt. JCAH oocradHad hoep. in sta«ai near U. of Naw Mexico. R.N. 1 B.S. pgm. Procfical Nurse pgm 
ocoadMad txm & NAPNE. Vocondas, Mact4ucg. ft occoaionolly O.B., Pads., t O.R., soloriea $390 per mo 
even., night or O.R. with coll; annual increoees up to $410; ooys $340 per mo. with irKreoses up to $400 
■ototien from day duty I* raquirad only wtsan no panon desiring permanent PJA. or night tour is ovoilable. 
Ubarol penonnal poikias irKlude: opHoral Blue Cross. Discouftt Hasp. Services, pd. sick leave cumulative 
to 5 wfc*., annual physical exom.. vocation I yr. — 2 wks.. 5 yrs. — 3 wks., 10 yrs. — 4 wks. Active in-service 
progrom. Occosiorsol vocofKy hosp. owned oppts. New Mexico liceraure as professional nurse and U.S. citi- 
zenship (or Immigration Visa) required. Write or coll collect: Mrs. Emily J. Tuttle, Dir. of Nursing, Presby 
terion Hospital Center. 1012 Gold. 5.E., Albuquerque, New Mexico. Phone 243-5611. 15-32-3 



grieia 



Narses for 450-bed nop sa ct orlon ocuta Generol Hospital with NLN fully accredited school o< 
nuning. Liberal personnel policlee iiKlwda tuition aid for study oi Western Reserve University. Opening ol 
naw moin building has created ottroctiva poaitiens for Stoff Nurses in medicol, surgical, obstetric ortd pedio- 
tric dhrlsiom. Apartments ovoiioble in Immediate neighborhood. Apply: Miss Louise Horrieon, Director of 
Nursing Satvica, Mount Sinoi Hospital, 1800 East 105th Street, Clavelond 6. Ohio. 1M6-1D 

flaff Maiiaa for modem 400-bed tuberculoaia hoapital, suburbon Clevelotyt. Ohio. Monthly solories stort ot 
$410 with semi-onnuol increments. Extra for nigM and raliaf duty, 5-day work wk . 3-wk. paid vocotion, 
6 poid holidays, liberal sick leave, co mf ortobla oc to mrtiodotiena in nurses residence at low rate. Laora and 
earn at o prograsshre occradited hospital in a growing community. Write: Oiractor of Nursing. Sunny Acres 
Hospitol, Ctovaland 22, Ohio. lV36-I E 

CTAIT NUIStS All Clinlcol Sarvlcas. Storting sdory $382 for day shift; $419 for evening ond night shifts, 
opportunMaa for odvottcanierit. Penonnal policiaa, sick leave, retirement plan, 3-wk. vocation and laundry 
of unifonna. Orientation and In-sarvica pragroma. Housing available on Compus. Apply: Director, Nursing 
Servica, Unhrarsity of Texas Medical Bfonch Hoapltoto, ColvaeSon, lexoa. 15-44-5 



Outstortding opportunitias for earaar davalop m a nt l (xpondktg 320-bad medical center in 
surnmer ond winter resort area. Opportunities include spaciol core, psychiatric ond clinical research nursing 
Active inservice progrom; scholorship oid ovoilable for coniinuir>g educotion itirough University of Vermont 
Deportnjant of Nursing. Attractive New England community. Apply: Gilbert R. Lubbers, Assistont Adminis- 
trotor. The <*ary Fletcher Hospital, Burlington. Vermont. 1 5-46-3 

ITAIf NU*«I University of Washington SaO-faad, modem, axpanding Teochlrsg ond Reeear^rHoapitol located 
on CGRipus offers you on opportunity to ioin the stoff in one of Itia followirig specioltiee: Clinlcol R eseorc h . 
Pramotura Canter Open Heort Surgery, Physical Medicine, Onhooadica. Naureaufoary, Adult and Child 
Psf^Molry m odd.tion to the Generol Service*. Solory $380 - »4&. Untqua banaflt pragram offer* free 
UnKonity caursa* ofler s>x months fulltima employment. For in f armatlon on apportunMa* svrMa •»• Mrs 
Ruth nna. Owactor of Nursing Sarvlcas, Univarsitv Hospitol. 1999 Padfk Avwwa. Saottfa, WosMngton 

1S.4B-20 



500 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



I 



PROVINCE OF 
ALBERTA 

Provincial Mental Hospital, 
Ponoka, Alberto 



GtAOUATE NURSES— for General Duty 
Differentiol for odvonced preparotion or 
experience in Psychiofric Nursing. 
Solory — $300 to $360 per montfi. 
INSnUCTORS — to feoch Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing (Clinical ar«d Clossroofn) 
(o) Affiliate Progrom in Psycfiiotric Nurs- 
ing, 
(b) Basic combined General and Piychi- 

otric Nursing Course 
Salary — (Qualified Instructor with Psy- 
chiatric Nursing experience) $395 to $495 

per month. 
This is on active treatment mental hospi- 
tal conducting an approved School of 
Nursing. 40-hour work week. Civil Service 
holiday, sick leove and pension benefits. 
Good personnel policies. 60 miles from 
Edmonton. 

Apply to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

Provincial Mental Hospital, 

Ponoka, Alberta, giving full 

particulars. 



LONDON, ONTARIO 

ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL 

Teochirtg Hospital, 600 beds, new focili- 
ties, requires: 

TIACHERS — ObtletrKal and Sorpieal UniH 

HEAD NURSES 

OfNEtAl STAFT NURSES 

REGISTERED NURSING ASSISTANTS 

for fmrthtt iMotmaiioti opply 

THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

St. Joseph's Hospital, 

London, Ontario. 



DIREaOR OF 

NURSING 

EDUCATION 

at the 

STRATFORD GENERAL 
HOSPITAL, 

Stratford, Ontario. 

In this same issue appears no- 
tice of a vacancy for a Director 
of Nursing in June, the present 
Director retiring after 20 years 
with the hospital. We also re- 
quire a Director of Nursing Edu- 
cation for this three year Dip- 
loma School. 

Enrolment at present is sev- 
enty students. With our newly 
completed addition and renova- 
tions, this can be increased to 
ninety students when the new 
school and additional residence 
accommodation is built. 

Salary will be commensurate 
with qualifications and experi- 
ence. Applicants, who should 
have their B.Sc. (Nursing) with 
a good background of experi- 
ence in Schools of Nursing, 
should address their opplica- 
tions, together with biographical 
details to: 

MR. J. L. BATEMAN, 

SUPERINTENDENT, 

GENERAL HOSPITAL, 

STRATFORD, ONTARIO. 



MAY 1964 • VOL. «. No. 5 



Ml 



SUPERVISOR, OUTPOST HOSPITAL 

Northern Health District 

KBQUIKED BY 

SASKATCHEWAN DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

SALARY RANGE: $377 - $459 monthly 

REQUIREMENTS: Registered Nurse with a certificate in midwifery and 
professional experience. 

This is an opportunity for interesting and challenging public health nurs- 
ing service. The appointee will act as nurse midwife in an outpost hos- 
pital. Free living occommodation and sustenance provided. 

BENEHTS: Three weeks holiday, three weeks accumulative sick leave al- 
lowance annually with pay, excellent pension and group life insurance 
plans and other benefits. 

APPLICATIONS: Forms and further information available at Public Service 
Commission, Legislative Building, Regina, Saskatchewan. Quote file no. 
c/c 8177. 



THE DUFFERIN AREA HOSPITAL 

A WW oddHion to be Oftetttd in July, imHes applkotioits fnm: 

REGISTERED NURSES 
REGISTERED NURSING ASSISTANTS 

For all Nursing Units including an Intensive Care Unit. Solories — Re- 
gistered Nurses: $320-$360; Registered Nursing Assistants: $210-$250. 
Progressive Personnel Policies, Pension Plan, Group Insurance. 



for furthtr informction write to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 
Dufferin Area Hospital, Orangeviile, Ontario. 



SOS 



THE CANADIAN NlHtSE 



TORONTO GENERAL HOSPITAL 




NURSING OPPORTUNITIES 

for 
REGISTERED NURSES AND CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTS 

planned Orwntotion Programme — Iniervke Educational Programmes 

Opportunity to gain additionol knowledge in specialized fields of nursing 

Excellent personnel policies 

Salaries commensurate with prevailing current salaries in Metropolitan Toronto 

for information or application write to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, TORONTO GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
101 College Street, Toronto 2, Ontario. 



MALE NURSES 

(REGISTERED) 

REQUIRED JULY 1 TO OCTOBER 31 
FOR CANADIAN GOVERNMENT CARGO SHIPS 
TRAYEUING TO THE EASTERN ARCTIC 



EXPENSES PAID 

SALARY UP TO $380 

MONTHLY DEPENDING 

ON EXPERIENCE 



APPLY TO DIRECTOR. PERSONNEL SERVICES 
DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE 

OTTAWA 

U.S>. 
•tow Teili Pehrclliac Me«c«l tchMi aad Miipl n l in twort of Monhotton. Si> month coursM for qualified 
regltiered nurses in Ojieroting Room Nursing, ortd Mediod SurgicolOut Patient Deportment Nursing. Classes 
begin in Moftti and September, include 230 hours of instruction ond superviwd clinicol enperierxe. Room, 
meolt, medicsl core, and monthly cosh stipend. For informotion write: Oirertor of Nursing Education, 345 
West SOfh Street. New rotk. New York 10019 15^3324 



MAY 1984 - VOL 60, No 5 



503 



GENERAL DUTY NURSES 
FOR ALL DEPARTMENTS 



Gross salary for nurses registered in the Province of Ontario $335 
monthly with annual increment $10 monthly to $385, 

Salary until registration is established — $305 monthly. 

Rotating periods of duty — 40 hour week, 8 statutory holidays annually 
— Annual vacation 21 days. 

Annual sick time 12 days after one year, unused fxartion cumulative to 
36 days. 

Hospitals of Ontario Pension Plan. 

Ontario Hospital Insurance and Physicians' Services Incorporated, 50% 
payment by hospital. 

DIREaOR OF NURSING, GENERAL HOSPITAL. OSHAWA. ONTARIO 



THE SARNIA GENERAL HOSPITAL 

OHers excellent opportunities hr 

REGISTERED NURSES AND 
REGISTERED NURSING ASSISTANTS 

Sarnia is an industrial city located midway on the seaway, 60 miles 
north of Detroit and Windsor and 60 miles west of London. It is a resort 
area noter for swimming and boating as well as being located a reason- 
able distance from the skiing resorts in Northern Michigan. 

The hospital is modern, fully approved (JCAH), and has recently been 
expended to 350 beds. 

Positions are available in oil services. 

Salary scale with annual increments to the maximum. Additional salary 
allowance for two years or more acceptable experience or postgraduate 
certificate. Benefits include pension plan, 40-hour week, regular rotation 
of shifts with premium pay for evenings and nights. 

Apply 

PERSONNEL DIRECTOR, 
SARNIA GENERAL HOSPITAL, SARNIA, ONTARIO. 



504 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 




Then take a look at us: Charles T. Miller Hospital 

... a stimulating environment that encourages professional growth 
in your choice of work areas. 

. . . excellant personnel policies including team leader salary. Credit 
allowed for previous experience. Tuition paid by hospital for satis- 
factory completion of post-grad credits in nursing field. 

. . . exciting metropolitan atmosphere of the Twin Cities of St. Paul- 
Minneapolis. Surrounded by lakes and ski areas. Convenient to 
theatres, shopping, world-famous symphony orchestra, art 
galleries. 



To receive 

our informative 

tMoklet, mail 

this coupon to: 




I Miss Joan Johnson, R. N., Personnel Office 

I Charles T. Miller Hospital • Dept.C-5 

I 125 West College Ave. • St. Paul 2, Minn. 



i Name_ 
Street- 



City. 



-State. 



STRATFORD GENERAL HOSPITAL 

STRATFORD, ONTARIO 

There are vacancies for the following positions: 
Surgical Clinical Instructor 
Medical Clinical Instructor 

A newly renovated and enlarged hospital of 209 octive treatment beds, 
with completely modernized services and service departments, together 
with o three year diploma course in nursing comprise the working back- 
ground for these positions: 
The hospital offers excellent personnel policies. 

Applicants must hold preferably a B.Sc. (Nursing) or a certificate in 
t«oching. 
Salary commensurate with preparation and experience. 

Applications, together with biographical details to: 

MINERVA H. SNIDER, REG.N., DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

General Hospital, Stratford, Ontario. 



MAY 1904 • VOL. 00, No S 



SOS 



READ ME 



Nursing is nursing is nursing, wherever you are — therefore what attracts 

nurses to different areas? Well I don't know but this is what Shelburne 

has to offer for all duty hours. 

A. Outdoor life — In summer, camping, fishing, swimming, golf, 
boating, water skiing. 

In winter — Skating, fishing through ice. 

B. Indoor life — make your own, no Night Clubs ,one movie house, 3 
good eating places. Adult education classes of all types — old 
time dancing, leather work, pottery, language, painting, drama. 
Nearest Concerts, ploys etc. in Yarmouth. 

C. Good shopping area, salaries as recommended by RNANS. Navy 
Base 5 miles away. 

Air force base 30 miles away — both expanding. Are you in- 
terested? 

PItase hare applKOtions addresied to: 

THE ADMINISTRATOR, 

ROSEWAY HOSPITAL, 

Shelburne, Nova Scotia. 



NURSING ADMINISTRATOR 

OHAWA CIVIC HOSPITAL 

This position carries full authority in status as on Assistant Director of 
the Hospital and responsibility for Nursing Education and Nursing Ser- 
vice in on 1,100 bed University Teaching institution. The position will be- 
come vacant during the summer of 1964 due to the retirement of the 
present encumbent who has completed eighteen years of progressive 
service in the position. 

Applicants must have at least a Bachelor's degree in Nursing and pre- 
ference will be given to applicants with a Master's degree. The appoint- 
ment offers a very excellent opportunity as well as a challenge in taking 
over an administrative responsibility within a Hospital which is recog- 
nized OS having a good Nursing Education Program and o highly respect- 
ed Nursing Service. The position provides responsibility to be a part of 
an active administrative team with not only an opportunity to develop 
and plan Nursing Programs but also hospital activities in general. Excel- 
lent salary, pension plan, group insurarKe, sick leave, vocation and ap- 
pealing personnel policies. 

Our staff is aware of this advertisement and the confidence of appli- 
cants will be maintained. 

Please address applications or requests for additional information fo: 

DOUGLAS R. PEART, B.Com., D.H.A., 
Executive Director, Ottawa Civic Hospital, Ottawa 3, Ontario, Canada. 



SOS 



THE CANADIAN NXmSE 



NUMBER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 




HOSPITAL — 

Newly expanded 350-bed hospital. 
Progressive patient care corKept. 

SALARY — 

General Staff Nurses registered in Oiv 
forio $335 - $400 per month. Registered 
Nursing Assistants $235 - $271 per 
month. 



HOUSING — 

Furnished apartments available at sub- 
sidized rotes. 



JOB SATISFACTION — 

High quality patient core and friendly 
working environment, personal recog- 
nition and professiofKil development. 



You ore itn'rted to enquire concerning 
employment opportunities to: 



DIRECTOR OF NURSING, NUMBER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, 
200 Church Street, Weston, Ontario - Telephone 249-8111 (Toronto) 



JAMES PATON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

Applications are imiited for the following positions at the above 1S3-bed General Hospital at 

Gander, Newfoundland. 

DIRECTOR OF NURSES 

Applkanti should hove several years' experience in o nursing odminlstrotive copadty. The 

successful opplicant will be responsible for tfw organization of nursing services in the hospital. 

Preference will be given car)didates with university training. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF NURSES 

Applicants should hov* experience in nursing administration. The piosition carries responsibility 

for coordirxition of nursing core activities ai>d for assuming tiie duties of the Director of 

NuiMt in her obMnce. Preferenc* will be given condidotes with university training. 

SUPERVISORS, HEAD NURSES, ASSISTANT HEAD 
NURSES AND STAFF NURSES 

Required for units and deportments of Itte hospitol. 

Apflicmtiom stating oga, education, eip«rie»ce, qaalifkotioits, etc.. shomU ba addrtssad to: 

THE ADMINISTRATOR, 

Jamos Paton Memorial Hospital, 

Gander, Newfoundland. 



MAY 1M4 • VOL. ao. No. 9 



807 



REGISTERED NURSES 

For General Duty required for 100-bed general hospital. Forty-hour week. Three weeki aniwol 
vocation for first three yeors of service then four weeks onmiolly. Nine (9) statutory holidays 
annually, l-'/^ days sick leave per month accumulative to five months. Shift differential 
of 40 cents for eoch evening shift and 50 cents for eoch night shift. Solory ronge: $315-$390 
with special consideration given for postgraduate training and previous experierKe. Residence 
accommodation with meals available at the rote of $35 per month if desired. 

Apply to: 

Director of Nurses, 

WEYBURN UNION HOSPITAL, 

Weyburn, Saskatchewan. 



NOTRE DAME HOSPITAL 

North Battleford, Saskatchewan 

UBQUIReS 

General Staff Nurses and Certified Nursing Assistants for Medical, Surgical, Obstetricol and 
Pediotric Services. Forty hour week. Solory range: R.N. $315 to $390, C.N.A. $205 to $235 
gross per month. Differentiol for evening and night duty for R.N.'i. Accommodation close to 

hospital if desired. 

Apply to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING SERVICE, 
Notre Dame Hospital, North Battleford, Sask. 



VICTORIAN ORDER OF NURSES 
FOR CANADA 

OFFERS 

Interesting and Challenging Careers. Positiont ore ovoiloble in various ports of Cono^ of 
prevailing salary rates. Good personnel policies. Pension plan. Transportotlon on duty. 

Uniform ollowartce. 

Buls«ries ore offered to ossist students in the finol year of the basic degree course or 

graduate nurses taking preparation in public heolth iMirslng. 

for furthtr information writo: 

MISS JEAN LEASK, DIRECTOR IN CHIEF, 

5 Blackburn Avenue, Ottawa 2, Ontario. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF NURSES 

Re<)uired by IB-b«d PrivoU Ho*f)*tot. Ort1ai*o re^titrotton r«qu<r*d. 
Regiiiered Nurtc with lupcrvtory •iperienc* or cjiperierH:* o« Superintendent of smoll hospilol 
wouW fill reouiremeoit. Two rootti opanmenti with both ond oil meoU supplied for $20 per month, 
four weeks onnuol vocation per yeor, eight itoiutory holidays, hospitolnotion, medical-surgicol ond 
Grouo InsuroTK*. Moving aipenses up to $50 refunded following tin monihi employment Solory 
Kol* will be forworded following opplicotion 
Apph t9- 

MRS. V. M SWITZER, SECRETARY, 
•OARD OF DIRECTORS, LADY DUNN HOSPITAL, WAWA, OtfTARIO 



SOS THE CANADIAN NURSE 



» 




NEW HOSPITAL 

AJAX, ONTARIO 

110 BEDS 

Nursing the patient as an 

individual 
Opening — October 1964 



VACANCIES for Head Nurjej, Assistant Head Norses, General Doty R.N.'s and Registered 
Norsing Assistants (Union Agreement fof Registered Norsing Assistants) in AAedicine ond Sur- 
gery. O.R.. OBS., Pediatrics. Salaries comnwnsurate with prevailing salaries in Metro Toronto. 
Consideration for experience ond education. Overseas nurses welcome. Personnel recognition 
ond excellent fringe benefits. Professionol cJevelopment fostered. 

A|as i( 7 miles from Metre Toronto, hourly bus service 

Apply to 

NURSING OFFICE PERSONNEL, 

AJAX AND PICKERING GENERAL HOSPITAL, 

Ajax, Ontario. 







YORK COUN 


TY HOSPITAL 




i 


,. BARRIE 


ONE HOUR FROM DOWNTOWN TORONTO 






\ SUMMER 


260 bed Hospital with new focilities ir^ 




WINTER \ VACATION 


eluding: 




SKIING \ AREAS . 


INTENSIVE CARE UNIT 






\ 


SELF CARE UNIT 




N 


d^ 


PSYCHIATRIC UNIT 




a 


W WwiARKET 


CLINICAL INSTRUCTRESSES: 




■ " 


$385-$460 per month 








REGISTERED NURSES: S335S400 per month 








REGISTERED NURSING ASSISTANTS: 
$230-S26S per month 

LIBERAL PERSONNEL BENEFITS INCLUDE 






r^^iTto y^ 


Pension Plon, Group Life Insuronce. 
Medical ond Hospital Insuronce. 






\ .^^ 








Heot* »ritt tor turthtr details cor 


cttning employment oppo/1uniti*s to.' 




DIRECTOR OF NURSING, YORK COUNTY HOSPITAL, 




Newmarket, Ontario. 



LY 1964 - VOL. 60. No. S 



9M 



DIRECTOR OF NURSING 

Modern progressive 70-bed hospital located in picturesque valley north of Edmonton. 
Accreditation application being mode. 

Highly qualified nnedical staff provides stimulating work environment. 
New suite ovoilable in residence. 

Send particulars io: 

Administrator, 
PEACE RIVER MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL, PEACE RIVER, ALBERTA. 



ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF NURSING 

REQUIRED FOR 
ALBERTA CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL, CALGARY, ALBERTA 

Apply to: 

Director of Nursing, 
ALBERTA CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL, CALGARY, ALBERTA. 



PSYCHIATRIC NURSING INSTRUQRESS 

Required to organize and participate in progrom in Psychiatric Nursing in a r>ew Community 
Mental Hospital under auspices of ROYAL OHAWA SANATORIUM. 

Apply: 

Director of Nursing, 

ROYAL OTTAWA SANATORIUM, 

Ottawa, Ontario. 



INSTRUCTORS 

Required for School of Nursing with 75 students in 250-bed hospital 
SCIENCE INSTRUCTOR TO TEACH BASIC SCIENCES 
CLINICAL INSTRUCTOR FOR MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING 
INSTRUCTOR FOR FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING 
University preparation required. Good personnel policies. Solary commensurate with qualifi- 
cations and experience. 

For further information apply to: 

Assistant Director of Nursing (Education), 

CORNWALL GENERAL HOSPITAL, 

Cornwall, Ontario. 



510 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



THE VANCOUVER GENERAL HOSPITAL 

ENQUIRIES INVITED FOR 

CURRENT REGULAR FULL TIME STAFF PLACEMENT 

FROM 

GENERAL STAFF NURSES 

SALARY COMMENCES UP TO $366 PER MONTH 
WITH APPROVED EXPERIENCE. 



All enquiries addressed to: 
PERSONNEL DIRECTOR, WILL BE ANSWERED. 



MONTREAL CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

DID YOU KNOW THAT 

1. We have 354 beds for children from the Premature to the Adolescent age group. 

2. Our nurses moy be bilingual or Ertglish-speaking. 

3. We are affiliated with McGill University. 

4. We hove on excellent Orientation ond In-Service Program. 

5. Solary is commensurote with experience and preparation. 

6. We hove vacancies for Registered Nurses. 

For information please write: 

THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

Montreal Children's Hospital, 2300 Tupper Street, 

Montreal, Que. 



MEDICAL SUPERVISOR REQUIRED: 

Position available for Medical Supervisor on a 62-bed unit with two nursing stations. 
Preference given to applicants with one yeor University in Word Administration and 

experience. 

Well defined personnel policies, including pension plan, 4-week vacation, sick time. 

Direct inquiries to: 

Director of Nursing, 

STRATFORD GENERAL HOSPITAL, 

Stratford, Ontario. 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60, No. 5 511 



ONTARIO PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH REQUIRES 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES 

FOR 

NORTHERN ONTARIO PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE 

Storting salary — S4,400 (with •xparience) 

— To develop ond organize on expending public health nursing service in outlying areas 
— Challenging opportunity for person with initiative in developing and co-ordinating progroms 
— Bilinguolism an asset but not essential 
— -Excellent promotional opportunity 
— Full range of employee benefits 

— Services established in North Boy and Timmins. Plans for additional offices in Sault Ste. AAorie, 
Si_dbury, Lokehead. 

Apply to: 

Personnel Director, 

Room 5527 East Block, Parliament Buildings, Toronto. 



DIRECTOR, SCHOOL OF NURSING 

SOUTHWESTERN ONTARIO RESORT AREA 

Excellent position available in Spring of 1964. Modern classrooms and facilities in main wing 
of 351-bed hospital. Student enrollment of 95. Modern students' residence adjacent to hospitol. 
Minimum quolifications include a bachelor's degree in Nursing Educotion, as well as suc- 
cessful experience in Nursing Administration and Educotion. Registration in Ontario is required. 
The person appointed to this position will hove the opportunity of using progressive techniques 
in teaching. 

Write to: 

Administration, 

SARNIA GENERAL HOSPITAL, 

Sarnia, Ontario. 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTORS 

ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL, SCHOOL OF NURSING, HAMILTON, ONTARIO 
MEDICAL — SURGICAI and OBSTETRICAL UNITS 

Weil-equipped modern school of nursing — Expanded January, 1963. 
800-Bed Hospital fully accredited. Salary commensurate with preparation and experience. 

for further information please apply to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL, 

School of Nursing, Hamilton, Ontario. 



OAKYILLE-TRAFALGAR 
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

OAKVIllE, ONTARIO 

General Duty Nurses for all departments, also Operating Room Nurses required in modern 
340-bed fully accredited hospital. 

Ookville is a progressive community situated on Lake Ontorio just twenty miles from the 
cities of Toronto and Hamilton. Excellent salaries and personnel policies. Further details will 
be furnished on request. 

Apply to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, 

Oakville, Ontario. 



312 



THE CANADIAN NXJRSE 



DIRECTOR OF NURSING 

REQUIRED BY JUNE 1st, 1964 

For modern 18 bed, 8 bossinel hospital, serving o progressive ,fost growing farming and 

industrial area in Northern Alberta. Salary open for discussion, depending on experience. 

Employees porticipote in Pension Plan, M.S.I, and Blue Cross. 

Motron's suite in NEW Nurses' Residence available at $35 per month, including board ond 

laundry. Fare will be paid from any point in Canada, on condition of at least one year 

employment. 

Please state in application, date available, salary expected and experience. 

For further information write, phone or wire collect to: 

MANNING MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL, 
Box 250, Manning, Alberta, Ph. 173, after hours 189 or 236. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

MHROPOLITAN GENERAL HOSPITAL, WINDSOR, ONTARIO 

REQUIRES 

INSTRUCTOR IN BASIC SCIENCES and SURGICAL NURSING 

This is an opportunity to participate in the development of a progressive program v^/hich 

emphasizes educational nursing experiences for the stucJent. The program consists of 2 basic, 

preparatory years followed by one yeor of Nursing Internship. One class of 32 students is 

admitted annually. 

DUTIES INCLUDE: Instruction in Anatomy and Physiology, Chemistry and Physics. Clinical and 

Classroom instruction in an integrated program of Medical-Surgical Nursing. 

REQUIREMENTS: University preparation in Nursing Education — Salary differential for Degree. 

Duties to commence August 1st, 1964. 

For further information, contact: 

Director, School of Nursing, 2240 Kildare Road, Windsor, Ontario. 




COUNTY OF RENFREW HEALTH UNIT 

This new Health Unit will begin operation July 1st, 1964. Applications and enquiries are 

invited regarding the positions of the following: 
DIRECTOR and MEDICAL OFFICER of HEALTH 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING SUPERVISOR and PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES 
CHIEF SANITARY INSPECTOR and INSPECTORS 

Solaries will be based on experience, pension plans, group insurorKe, vocations and sick 

leave in varying scoles. 

Apply to: 

E. M. FRASER, 

County Clerk-Treasurer, 

County Administration Building, Pembroke, Ontario. 



YORK CENTRAL HOSPITAL 

RICHMOND HILL, ONTARIO 

Applications are invited for: 

1) GENERAL STAFF NURSING POSITIONS 

2) REGISTERED NURSING ASSISTANT POSITIONS 
ALL IN CLINICAL AREAS 

This is o new 126-bed active treatment hospital, lying outside Metropolitan Toronto. Progres- 
sive personnel policies, salary based on education and experience. 

Apply to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

York Central Hospital, Richmond Hill, Ontario. 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60, No. 5 



513 



WOODSTOCK 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 

WOODSTOCK, ONTARIO 



Applications are invited for the position 
of Clinical Teacfier in Medical-Surgical 
Unit for August 1964. 
QUALIFICATIONS: 
Prefer degree in Nursing Education and 
experience or diploma in Nursing Educa- 
tion and minimum of 2 years teaching 
experience. 



Apply to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING 

Woodstock General Hospital 

Woodstock, Ontario. 



aiNICAL INSTRUaORS 



Required for School of Nursing in this 
350-bed General Hospital. Modern class- 
rooms and facilities. Student enrollment 
95. 

Minimum qualifications — Diploma in 

Nursing Education. Good starting solory 

with special consideration for experience 

or degree. 

Excellent working conditions with oppor- 
tunities to use progressive techniques in 
teaching. 



Apply: 

Personnel Director, 

SARNIA GENERAL HOSPITAL, 

Sarnia, Ontario. 



SOUTH PEEL HOSPITAL 

COOKSVOU 

A naw 450-b«d Gancrol Hotpltat, located 
12 miles from the City of Toronto, has 
openings for: 

(1) Supervisor for Nursing Office with 
Nuning Service Administration Diplo- 
ma. 

(2) Supervisor for Unit Administration on 
Medical Word. 

(3) Head Nurses and Assistant Head 
Nurses for AAedical and Surgical units. 

(4) General Staff Nurses In all depart- 
ments. 

Good personnel policies. Salary commen- 
surote with experieiKe and preparation. 

For information or application, 
write to; 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING 
South Pool Hospital, 
Cooksvillo, Ontario 



NURSES 

KENORA, ONTARIO 



This r*sort town of 14,000 p«opt« hot |ust 
opened o section of it» new 100-b*d hospital 
ond In the not too distant futur* will be 
opening the second section for which nurses 
are needed. The hospital is wonderfully loc- 
ated on the shores of beautiful Lake of the 
Woods in Ontario. In the sumn-ver we have 
activities in swimming, boatirtg, fishing ond 
golfing and in the winter there is skating, 
curling, toboggoning, skiing and Ice fishlr>g. 

A nurse's retklence is available at a reas- 
onable rate of $20 per month for privat* 
room or $15 per month for a double room. 
Cofeteria services are available at cost as 
well as a kitchen in the nurses' residence. 
Separate personnel policies for nurses ore 
available and will be mailed on request. 
The starting salary is $330 per month. Eight 
statutory hoi idoys, sick leave, three weeks 
vocation with pay are some of the benefits 
of thase policies. 

All opplications will be treated with cour- 
tesy and privacy 



P/eoM afkply to: 

Director of Nursing, 

KENORA GENERAL HOSPITAL, 

Kenora, Ontario. 



514 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



^ 



OSHAWA GENERAL HOSPITAL 

Oshawa, Ontario 

Requires for School of Nursing 

CLINICAL INSTRUCTOR IN SURGICAL NURSING 

with Certificate in Nursing Educotion 
For further inforrttation, apply to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 
Oshawa General Hospital, Oshawa, Ontario. 



GENERAL DUTY NURSES 

SALARY RANGE $327 - $363 

Required by Metropolitan Toronto for the new Riverdole Hospital, an 800-bed hospital for 

chronic ond convalescent patients. Shift allowances for afternoon and night shifts. Cumulative 

tick pav and pension plans ore in effect. Permorvent positions, 40 hour week 

Apply: 

PERSONNEL OFFICE, 
387 Bloor Street East, Toronto 5, Ontario. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan 

APPtlCATIONS ARE INVITO) FOR: 

General Staff positions. 
OPPORTUNITIES FOR EMPLOYMENT ARE AVAILABLE IN: 

Medical, Surgical, Obstetrical, Pediatric, Psychiatric and Rehabilitation Services 

SALARY RANGE: 

S300-$360 — Differential for evening and night duty — 40-hour week 

RESIDENCE: 

Temporary accommodation if desired 

Apply to: 

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL, UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, 
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. 



GENERAL DUTY NURSES 

Two General Duty Nurses, starting salary $332 ■ with two years' experierKe $349 ■ wilti 
four years' experience $366. Travelling expenses paid on completion of one yeor's service. 
Personnel policies as in accordance with provincial agreement. Health plon and retirement 
plan in operation. Comfortable nurses' residence. Situated 80 miles upcoast from VarKOuver 
with daily bus and plane connections. 

Apply to: 

Director of Nursing, 

POWELL RIVER GENERAL HOSPITAL, 

Powell River, British Columbia. 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60, No. 5 



515 



CLASSROOM & CLINICAL 
NURSE INSTRUaOR 

(Male or Female) 
Required for the 

HOSPITAL FOR MENTAL DISEASES.- 
BRANDON, MANITOBA 

Salary Schedule — $350-$440 per month 
Regular Annual Increments 
Pension Privileges 
Liberal Sick Leave v/ith Pay 
Annuol Vacation vtrith Pay, os set out by 
Civil Service Commission 

QUALIFICATIONS: 

Registered Nurse with postgraduate 
training in Nursing Education and 
preferably a Licensed Psychiatric 
Nurse. 

Write to: 

THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 
HOSPITAL FOR MENTAL 

DISEASES, 
BRANDON. MANITOBA. 



ST. JOSEPH'S 
HOSPITAL 

Hamilton, Ontario 



A modern, progressive, 850-bed hospital, 
located in the centre of Ontorio's Golden 
Horseshoe, has openings for: 

1) Head Nurses for Medical or Surgical 
units. 

Postgraduate study preferred. 

2) General Staff Nurses in all clinical 
areas. 

3) Registered Nursing Assistants in all 
clinical areas. 



for further information write to: 

THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

St. Joseph's Hospital, 

Hamilton, Ontario. 



REGISTERED NURSES 



and 

CERTIFIED 
NURSING ASSISTANTS 

tor 

360-bed accredited Generol Hospital Re- 
gistered Nurses salary range $325 - $377 
per month vi/ith consideration for con- 
temporary experience or special preporo- 
tion. 

Certified Nursing Assistants $230 - $260 
per month. 

For further information write: 

Director of Nursing Service, 

METROPOLITAN GENERAL 

HOSPITAL, 

Windsor, Ontario. 



YiaORIA HOSPITAL 

LONDON, ONTARIO 

Modern 1,000-bed hospital 
Requires 

Registered Nurses for 
all services 

and 

Registered 
Nursing Assistants 

40 hour week — Pension plan — Good 
salaries and Personnel Policies. 

Apply: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

Victoria Hospital, London, Ont. 



516 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

METROPOLITAN GENERAL HOSPITAL 

requires 

INSTRUCTOR IN PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

This is on opportunity to participate in the development of o progressive program which em- 
phasizes educational nursing experience for the student. The program consists of 2 basic, 
preparatory years followed by one year of Nursing Internship. One class of 32 students is 
odmitted annually. Duties include: Instruction in Introductory Psychology and Mentol Hygiene. 
Clinical and Classroom Instruction in Psychiatric Nursing. Requirements: University preparation 
in Nursing Education. — Salary differential for Degree. — Duties to commence August, 1964. 

For further information, contact: 

Director, School of Nursing, 2240 Kildare Road, Windsor, Ontario. 



DIRECTOR OF NURSING 

FOR MODERN, 163-BED, FULLY ACCREDITED GENERAL HOSPITAL 
SALARY COMMENSURATE WITH QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE 

Please address enquiries to: 

Administrator, 

KIRKLAND AND DISTRICT HOSPITAL, 
Kirkland Lake, Ontario. 



Opportunities for Employment Are Available in: 

SCHOOL OF NURSING: 

CLASSROOM INSTRUCTOR — CLINICAL INSTRUCTORS FOR: 
Operating Room, Medicine, Neurosurgery, Pediatrics, Psychiatry. 

NURSING SERVICE: 

SUPERVISOR, DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS — STAFF NURSES, MEDICINE AND SURGERY. 

University teaching hospital. Applicants should be eligible for Ontario Registration. 

Personnel policies and further information may be obtained from: 

Director of Nursing, 

KINGSTON GENERAL HOSPITAL, 

Kingston, Ontario. 



GRADUATE STAFF NURSES 

Opportunities for men and women on all services including metabolism, rehabilitation, psy- 
chiatry, recovery room, medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics, operating room and emer- 
gency room. Well planned orientation and in-service programs, tuition free courses ot Western 
Reserve University after 3 months employment, tow cost housing in nurses' residence. Liberal 
personnel policies with premiums for evening and night tours. Staff Nurse salaries range 
$400-$440, based on experience and education. For more information ask for our new 
booklet describing nursing opportunities at University Hospitals. 

Write to: 

THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING, UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF CLEVELAND, 

University Circle, Cleveland, Ohio, 44106. 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60. No. 5 



517 






GENERAL STAFF 
NURSE POSITIONS 

AVAILABLE 

In the General Operating Rooms (includes 
general surgery, cardiac, neurosurgery, 
plastic, eor, nose and throat and urol- 
ogy). Gynecological and Ophthalmologicol 
operating rooms. Solory commensurate 
with experience. Opportunities for pro- 
motion. Excellent fringe benefits including 
refund of tuition up to six points per 
semester. 

for furiher information write: 

Director, Nursing Service, 

THE JOHNS HOPKINS HOSPITAL 

Baltimore 5, Maryland. 



THE ROSS 
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

LINDSAY, ONTARIO 
InYites applications for tite position of 

HEAD NURSE 

For a 35-bed Surgical Unit with duties to 
commence June, 1964. 

Previous experience necessory, preference 

given to applicants with o B.Sc.N. or 

University preparation. 

This Is an active treatment general hos- 
pital of 140 beds, located in the "Ka- 
wartha Lokes" region. Personnel policies 
available on request. 

for furtlier information, please write to: 

PERSONNEL DIRECTOR, 

The Ross Memorial Hospital, 

Lindsay, Ontario. 



ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL 




APPIICATIONS ARE INVITED FOR 
THE POSITION OF 


Toronto, Ontario 

REGISTERED NURSES 




DIREaOR OF 


and 




NURSING SERVICE 


CERTIFIED 




AT 


NURSING ASSISTANTS 

600-bed fully accredited hospilol provides 




THE METROPOLITAN 


experience in Operating Room, Recovery 
Room, Intensive Core Unit, Pediatrics, Or- 




GENERAL HOSPITAL 


thopedics, Obstetrics, General Surgery and 
Medicine. 




WINDSOR, ONTARIO. 


Orientation and Active In-service program 




The Metropolitan General Hospital is a 


for oil staff. 




fully accredited 362 bed facility, and ap- 


Salary is commensurote with preparation and 




plicants with experience and holding o 


experience. 




Bachelor Degree, or with University pre- 


Benefits include Pension Plan, Group Life 




paration, will be given preferable con- 


Insurance, Sick Leave - 12 days after one 




sideration. Associated with the Hospital 


year, Onfono Hospital Insurance — 50% 




is the Metropolitan Hospital School of 


paynnent by hospital. 




Nursing which has teaching standards 


Rototing Periods of duty — 40 hour week. 




well recognized in Ontario. 


8 stotutory holidays — annual vacation 3 




Salary will be commensurate with quali- 






fications and experience, and otf>er em- 


Apply: 




ployee benefits are generous. 


ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF NURSING 




Address all applications and enquiries to: 


SERVICE 




THE ADMINISTRATOR, 


ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL 




METROPOLITAN GENERAL 
HOSPITAL, 


30 The Qtfoontway, Toronto 3, Ontorio 








1995 Lent Ave., Windsor, Ont. 



518 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



TORONTO BRANCH 

VICTORIAN ORDER OF 
NURSES 

invites applications for positions of 
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES 

This branch offers experience in a diversified 
program includir>g bedside nursing, indivi- 
dual teaching, child health centre octivities, 
participation in experimental f>rogrami, stu- 
dent program, inservice education. 

For details apply: 

DIRECTOR, 

Victorian Order of Nurses, 

(Toronto Branch), 

281 Sherbonrne Street, Toronto 2. 



OPERATING ROOM 
SUPERVISOR 

With postgraduate course in 

OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE 
AND MANAGEMENT 

Required for 
lOO-bed hospital. 

for salary rates and policies apply to: 

Director of Nursing, 

THE CHARLOTTE COUNTY HOSPITAL, 

St. Stephen, New Brunswick. 



REGISTERED NURSES 

HOSPITAL FOR CHILDREN 

Solory occording to quolfficotions and ex- 
perience. Differential for evening and night 
duty. 40 hour week. Statutory holidays. 

Pension plan. Sicknees insurance. 

Apply to: 

THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

Hopital Marie Enfant, 

5200 Belanger Street E., 

Montrcol 36, Tel. 727-2844. 



INSTRUCTORS NEEDED 

As the number of Students Increoses, so must 
the number of Instructors! Our Junior Stu- 
dents ottend Lakeheod College for 5 subjects 
during the academic year. 

The School is progressive ond the program 
is dynomici 

Apply to: 

Director of Nursing, 

McKELLAR GENERAL HOSPITAL, 

Fort Willion), Ontario. 



INSTRUCTORS 

1. Clinical Co-orcJinator (New Position) 

2. Clinical Instructors: 

1. Pediatric Nursing 

2. Operating Room Nursing 

3. Surgical Nursing 

3. Science Instructors (2): 

University preparation required 
Salary differential for degree 

For further Mormatioit apply to: 

Director of Nursing, 
BRANDON GENERAL 

HOSPITAL, 
Brandon, Manitoba. 



THE QRENFELL 
MISSION 

Has excellent opportunities for interesting 
and challenging work in northern New- 
foundland and the Labrodor coost. 

For details, phast write: 

Miss Dorothy A. Plant, Secretary, 
GRENFELL LABRADOR MEDICAL 

MISSION, 

Room 701 A, 88 Metcalfe Street, 

Ottawa 4, Ontario. 



SUPERVISORS 

KM 

Inservice Education 
Department 

AND 

Operating Room 

Reautred by an active 250-bed hospital. 

Apply to: 

Director of Nursing, 
NORTHWESTERN GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
2175 Keele Street, Toronto 15, Ontario. 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60, No. 5 



519 



DIRECTOR OF NURSING 

50-BED HOSPITAL 

Reference necessary. Thriving Industrial Com- 
munity. Winter and Summer resort. New 
liv'ng quarters on grounds of hospital. 
This is a challenging position for a suitable 
person. Salary open. 

Apply tc: 

Secretory-Trcosurer, 

PONTIAC COMMUNITY HOSPITAL, 

Box 280, SHAWVILLE, Quebec. 

Phone 647-2214, COtLECT. 



EMPLOYMENT 
OPPORTUNITY 

The Moncton Hospitol School of Nursing re- 
quires a Faculty member to lecture in the 
Physical Science subjects. The three-year 
course is carried on in a modern General 
Hospital, a class of 60 students commences 
annuolly. 
Good personnel policies available. 

For further information regardiryg this position, 
write: 

The Director of Nursing, 

THE MONCTON HOSPITAL, 

Moticton, New Brunswick. 



OPERATING ROOM 
NURSES 

Applications for experienced Operating Room 
Nurses ore invited for the General Hospital, 
St. John's, Newfoundland. 

Appty to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 
General Hospital, 
St. John's, Nfld. 



Head Nurse Operating 

Room and Head Nurse 

Maternity 

Registration and Postgraduate certificote re- 
quired for this responsible position in UO- 
bed hospital in Northwestern British Columbia. 
Solory $381-$460 plus $10 for certificate or 
$25 for university. Newly furnished residence 
with T.V. Good social activities including 
bowling, curling, tennis and year round 
swimming. Full personnel benefits including 
travel allowance. 

Apply to: 

Director of Nursing, 

GENERAL HOSPITAL, 

Prince Rupert, B.C. 



REGISTERED NURSES 
REQUIRED 

For the Operating Room and other Services. 
Good personnel policies. Residence accom- 
modation available — $30 per month. 'A 
Friendly Hospital in a Friendly Community'. 

For further information, write to: 

Director of Nursing, 

McKELLAR GENERAL HOSPITAL, 

Fort Williom, Ontario. 



SCIENCE INSTRUCTOR 

Applications are invited for the position of 
Science Instructor for a School of Nursing 
situated in the Interior of British Columbia. 
New Residence and teaching facilities opening 
soon. Expected student enrolment — 100. 
Position available after July Ist, 1964. 

Please address enquiries to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

Royal Inland Hospitol, 
Komloops, British Columbia. 



ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 
OF NURSING SERVICE 

For occredited 200-bed hospital 

QUALIFICATIONS: Baccalaureate Degree pre- 
ferred. Supervisory experience. Salary ac- 
cording to quolificotions. Position open July 
Ist, 1964. 

Apply to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 
General Hospital, 
Guelph, Ontario. 



REGISTERED NURSE 

for 

no-bed "HOME FOR THE AGED" with 50- 
bed bed-care wing. Located on Grand River, 
Niogora Peninsula within 1 hour's travel 
to Hamilton, Niogara Falls and Buffalo, N.Y. 
Modern staff quarters optional. 

For full particulars apply: 

SUPERINTENDENT, 

stating qualifications, experience and 
remuneration: 

GRANDVIEW LODGE, 
Dunnville, Ontario. 



520 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



CITY OF HAMILTON 

requires a 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE 

Must be o Registered Nurse with a public 

health certificote. 

5 day • 36-V^ hour week 

Minimum salary: $4,066 

Maximum salary: $4,901 

Starting salary commensurate with previous 

experience. 

Top fringe benefits including pension, sick 

pay, group insuronce, vacotions, statutory 

holidays, hospital and medical plan. 

Apply to: 

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL, 
City Hall, Hamilton, Ontario. 



GENERAL STAFF 
NURSES 

SALARY $415 tc $480 
(Commflnsurot* w/axp*rt*nc«) 
$3.00 per doy differentiol for evenings. $1.50 
differentiol for nights. Positions ovoiloble in 
Birthroom, Post Portum, ' Newborn Nursery 
and Medical - Surgical areas. Time and a 
half for overtime. Quorters available on 
hospital grounds. Other liberal fringe bene- 
fits. 

For more information write: 

Personnel Director, 

WOMAN'S HOSPITAL, 

432 E. Hancock, Detroit 1, Michigan. 

TEmple 3-2000 



TWO GRADUATE 
NURSES 

For girl's private camp (campers 6 to 16); 
June 24 — August 24 

for further particulars, write to: 

MRS. JOHN GILCHRIST, 

6-A Wychwood Park, 

Toronto 4, Ontorio. 



REGISTERED NURSES 

required for 

82-bed hospital. Situated in the Niagara 
Peninsula. Transportotion assistance. 

For salary rates and personnel policies, 
apply to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

Holdimand War Memorial Hojpilvl, 

Dunnville, Ontario. 



OTTAWA CIVIC 
HOSPITAL 

requires 

GENERAL STAFF NURSES 

for 
OPERATING ROOM 
MEDICAL 
SURGICAL 
OBSTETRICAL AND 
PSYCHIATRIC 



DEPARTMENTS 



Apply: 

EDITH G. YOUNG, REG. N., 

Assistant Director and Administrator 

of the Department of Nursing. 



INSTRUCTORS 

for 

MEDICAL and SURGICAL 
NURSING 

University preparation required. The School 
conducts a three-yeor program and a two- 
year program. A challenge awaits you. 

Appfy to; 

Director, School of Nursing, 

GREY NUNS' HOSPITAL, 

Regina, Saskatchewan. 



WANTED IMMEDIATELY 

Registered Nurses 

and 

Certified Nursing Assistants 

For a new 40-bed Hospital with Nurses' 
Residence. Nurses — Salary: $340-$390 accord- 
ing to experience. 3 semi-onnuol increments 
of $10 eoch. C.N.A.'s— Salary: S225-$2SS oc- 
cording to experience. 3 annual increments 
of $10 each. 

Reply to: 

The Director of Nursing, 

GERALDTON DISTRICT HOSPITAL, 

Geraldton, Ontario. 



THE ROSS MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 

requires 

GENERAL DUTY NURSES 

Positions ore now available on our Medical, 
Surgical, Obstetrical and Pediatric Services. 
All inquiries are welcome. The hospital offers 
excel lent personnel benefits along with on 
active in-service education and on organized 
orientation program. 

for complete details please direct your 
reply to: 

PERSONNEL DIRECTOR, 

Tke Ross Memorial Hospital, 

Lindsay, Ontario. 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60, No. 5 



521 



EDUCATIONAL 



« 



ORTUNITIES 



DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY 

School of Nursing 

Degree Course in Basic Professional Nursing 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Nursing ar-e required to complete 
2 years of university work before entering the clinical field, and one year 
of university work following the basic clinical period of 30 months. On 
comf>letion of the course the student receives the Degree of Bachelor of 
Nursing and the Professional Diploma in either Teaching In Schoo^s of Nursing 
or Public Heafth Nursing. 

Degree Course for Graduate Nurses 

Graduate nurses who wish to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Nursing are 
required to complete the three years of university work. 

Diploma Courses for Graduate Nurses 

(a) Public Health Nursing 

(b) Teaching In Schoots of Nursing 

(c) Nursing Service Administration 

for t w i k tr intormatioit apply to: 

DIRECTOR, SCHOOL OF NURSING 
DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, HALIFAX, N.S. 



O.R. POSTGRADUATE COURSES 

THE VANCOUVER GENERAL HOSPITAL 



Applications for Postgraduate Courses in Operating Techniques are in- 
vited by The Vancouver General Hospital. Three classes a year ore nov\/ 
being held and interested applicants will be advised of class dates. 



Further particulars, on ertquiry to the 

PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT, 

The Vancouver General Hospital, 

will be forwarded. 



522 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 




SCHOOL FOR GRADUATE NURSES 
McGILL UNIVERSITY 



PROGRAMS FOR GRADUATE NURSES 

DIPLOMA 

Students are granted a diploma at the completion of the first year of the program 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Nursing. All first-year students elect to study in 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

or 

TEACHING AND iSUPERVISION IN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING: 

* Medical-Surgical Nursing 

* Psychiatric Nursing 

* Maternal and Child Health Nursing 

DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF NURSING 

A two-year program for nurses with McGill Senior /Matriculation or its equivalent. 

A three-year program for nurses with McGill Junior AAotricufotion or its equivalent. 
In the first year students elect a field os indicated above, in the final year students 
elect to moior In one of the following: 

* Nursing Education 

* Administration and Supervision in Hospitals or In Public Health Agencies 



DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE (APPLIED) 

A program of approximately two years for nurses with 
Students elect to major in 



boccolaureate degree. 



* Development and Administration of Educatiorxil Programs in Nursing 

* Nursing Service Administration in HospHoU and Publk Flealth Agencies 

PROGRAM IN BASIC NURSING 

leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

A fhre-year program for student* with McGill Junior Matriculation or its equivalent. 
This program combines academic and professionol courses with supervised nursing 
experience in the AAcGill teaching hospitals and selected health agencies. This broad 
background of education, followed by graduate professional experience, prepares 
nurses for advanced levels of service in hospitals and community. 

For ftntftar (ofemNitioa wrH» to: 
DIRECTOR, McGILL SCHOOL FOR GRADUATE NURSES 

SSM UNIVBaiTY STKKT, MONTIfAl 2, QUE. 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60, No. 5 



323 



ST. JOSEPH'S 
HOSPITAL 

TORONTO, ONTARIO 

Offers a 6 month Postgraduate Course 
in Operating Room Management and 
Technique. 

Classes March and September 

Reaspnabl* monthly stipend 



For information and details of the Course, 
apply to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING 

SERVICE, 

St. Joseph's Hospital, 

30 The Queensway, 

Toronto 3, Ontario. 



UNIVERSITY OF 
BRITISH COLUMBIA 

School of Nursing 

DEGREE COURSE IN BASIC 
NURSING 

DEGREE COURSE FOR 
GRADUATE NURSES 

Both of these courses lead to the 
B.S.N. degree. Graduates are pre- 
pored for public health as well as 
hospital nursing positions. 

DIPLOMA COURSES FOR 
GRADUATE NURSES 

1. Public Health Nursing. 

2. Administration of Hospital 
Nursing Units, 

For information Write to: 

The Director, 

SCHOOL OF NURSING, 

UNIVERSITY OF B.C., 

VANCOUVER 8, B.C. 



CLINICAL COURSE IN 
PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

offered by 

Th* D*partfn*nt of Veterans AKairs, 

W»stminst«r Hospital, London, Ontario. 

Open to all Registered Nurses. Enrollment 
Limited. Four months duration commencing 
12 January 1965. Room and meols at nominal 
rotes. 

for further information please write: 

Director of Nursing, 

WESTMINSTER HOSPITAL, 

London, Ontario. 



COURSE 

for 

GRADUATE NURSES 

In operating room techniques, six months. 

Terms isegin June 21, and December 6, 1964. 

Room, meals, laundering of uniforms and 

monthly stipend provided. 

itpp/y to: 

Director of Nursing Education, 

COOK COUNTY SCHOOL OF NURSING, 

Dept. C, 1900 West Polk Street, 

Chicago, Illinois, 60612. 



NOVA SCOTIA 
SANATORIUM 

KENTVILLE, N.S. 

Offers to Graduate Nurses a Three- 
Month Course in Tuberculosis Nursing, 
including Immunology, Prevention, Medi- 
cal and Surgical Treatment. 

1. Full series of lectures by Medical and 
Surgical staff. 

2. Demonstrations ond Clinics. 

3. Full maintenance, salary and all staff 
privileges. 

For information apply to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

NOVA SCOTIA SANATORIUM, 

Kentvlile, N.S. 



524 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



A COURSE 

in Advanced Operoting Room 
Technique and Monogenient 

is offered by 

THE MONTREAL GENERAL HOSPITAL 

to 
Qualified Registered Nurses 

Classes of 6 months' duration ore admit- 
ted March and September ond ore limited 
to 6 students. 

For further information write to: 

THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

The Montreal General Hospital, 

Montreal 25, Quebec. 



THE WINNIPEG 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 

Offers the following opportunity for ad- 

vonced preparation to qualified Registered 

Graduote Nurses: 

A six month Clinical Course 

In 

Operating Room 

Principles and Advanced 

Practice. 

The course commences in September of 
each year. Maintenance is provided, ond 
a reasonable stipend Is given each month. 
Enrolment is limited to o maximum of 
ten students. 

For further information please write to: 

THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

700 William Ave., Winnipeg 2. 



ROYAL 
VICTORIA 
HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

MONTREAL, QUEBEC 

Postgraduate Courses 

I. (a) Six month clinical course in Obs- 
tetrical Nursing. 

Classes — September and Februory. 

(b) Two month clinical course in Gyne- 
cological Nursing. 

Classes following the six month 
coime in Obstetrical Norsing. 

(c) Eight week course in Core of the 
Premature Infant. 



2. Six month course in Operating Room 
Technique and Management. 

Classes — September and March. 



3. Six month course in Theory and Prac- 
tice in Psychiatric Nursing. 

Classes — September and March. 



For information ond details of the 
courses, apply to: — 

Director of Nursing, 

Royal Victoria Hospital, 

Montreal, P.Q. 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60. No. 5 



525 



MONTREAL CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Offers a 6 month poitgraduate course in Nursing of Children. 

ENTRANCE DATES SEPTEMBER AND MARCH 

This course is designed for. Registered Nurses with a minimum of 1 year's experience In 

Pediotric Nursing. 

Applf to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

Montreal Children's Hospital, 

2300 Tupper Street, Montreal 25, Quebec. 



Assistant Head Nurses 

General Duty Registered 

Nurses 

AND 

Registered Nursing 
Assistants 

RtQUIKCD fOR 
Medical - Surgical - Pediatric Departments 

In o 70-bed modern hospital. Excellent em- 
ployee benefits. Good personnel policies. Lo- 
cated in pleasant community of 11,000 close 
to Toronto, Hamilton and other torge centres. 
Address replies to: 
Director of Nursing, 
GEORGETOWN and DISTRICT 
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, 
Georgetown, Ontario. 



CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
OF WASHINGTON, D.C. 

OFFERS 

Registered Nurses a 16-wk. supplementary 
program in pediatric nursing. Classes ore ad- 
mitted January, May and September. 

For complete information write to: 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING, 

2125-13HI Street, N.W., 

Washington, 9, D.C. 



DONT FOPGETYOUPCMANGf OF ADDRESS- 




REGISTRATION No. 

PROVINCE 



NAME 

OLD ADDRESS 



(Maiden name, if recently marrierf) 



NEW ADDRESS 



DATE EFFECTIVE 



Mail this to: 

THE CANADIAN NURSE JOURNAL, 

1522 SHERBROOKE STREET WEST, MONTREAL 25, P.Q. 



526 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



4i^ 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

MAY 1964 

COMMERCIAL 

Ames Co. of Canada Ltd. 436, 437 Lakeside Laboratories (Can.) Ltd. 442 

Baxter Laboratories of Canada Lewis-Howe (Turns) 434 

Ltd 431, 439 J. B. Lippincott Co. of Canada 

Bland & Co. 440 Ltd. Cover IV 

Boehringer Ingelheim Products, c. V. Mosby Co. 445. 446, 447 

Div. of Geigy (Canada) Ltd. 443 parke Davis & Co. Ltd. 435 

Brown Shoe Co. of Can. Ltd. 429, 528 j j Posev Co 483 

S^^'"fVr'S*rPr "^^^ W. B. Saunders Co. 441 

Dept. of National Defense, „ o. w .j a-^o 

Reg'd. Nurses 444 Savage Shoes Ltd. 438 

Investors Syndicate of Can. Ltd. 448 Stenlon of Canada Ltd. 449 

Hollister Ltd. 452 Uniforms Reg'd. Cover 111 

Intra Medical Products Ltd. 451 Warner-Chilcott 425,432.433 

June Adams "Club 501" 484 White Sister Uniform Inc. Cover II 

PROFESSIONAL 

Alberta 485 New York Polyclinic Medical 

Ajax & Pickering Gen. Hospital 509 School and Hospital 503 

Bermuda 494 Nova Scotia 490 

British Columbia 486 Nova Scotia Sanatorium 524 

Charles T. Miller Hospital, Ontario 490 

St. Paul, Minn. 505 Ontario Soc. for Crippled Children 489 

Children's Hospital of Oshawa General Hospital 504 

Washington, D.C 526 Ottawa Civic Hospital 506 

Cook County School of Nursing, Quebec 496 

Chicago 493, 524 Roseway General Hospital, 

Dalhousie University 522 Shelbume, N.S. 506 

Dept. of National Health and Royal Victoria Hospital 525 

Welfare, Ottawa 487 St. Joseph's Hospital, Toronto 524 

Dufferin Area Hospital, Sarnia General Hospital 504 

Orangeville, Ont. 502 Saskatchewan 496 

England 488 Saskatchewan Dept. of Public 

Hosp. for Sick Children, Toronto 491 Health 502 

Humber Memorial Hospital 507 Stratford General Hospital 497, 501 

James PatonMemonal Hospital, Toronto General Hospital 503 

Gander, Newfoundland 507 u S A 496 

Jewish General Hospital 499 University of British Columbia 524 

Manitoba 488 ^ * i ci i ct> 

McGiU University 523 Vancouver General Hospital 511, 522 

Montreal Children's Hosp. 495, 526 Westnunster Hospital, London, 
Montreal General Hospital 525 Ontano 524 

The National Hospital, London, Winmpeg General Hospital 499, 525 

England 484 York County Hospital, 

Newfoundland 490 Newmarket, Ontario 509 

Classified advertisements are listed alphabetically 

• * * 

Advertising Representatives: Vanco Publications, 183 St. Clair Ave., W.. 

Toronto 7, Ont. 

Richard P. Wilson, 1 West Lancaster Avenue, Ardmore, Penna. 

Address advertising enquiries to: 

Advertising Manager, Ruth H. Baumel. The Canadian Nurse Journal 

1522 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal 25, Quebec 

Member of Canadian Circulation Audit Board Inc. 



MAY 1964 - VOL. 60, No. 5 



527 




WONDER 

$14.99* 



Three smart styles by Naturalizer- 

and the smartest thing about them is their amazing Wonder sole! 



1 Wondersole is shaped to match 
the contour of the foot. Supports 
body weight evenly, over all parts 
of the foot. Lets you stand and 
walk longer without strain. 



2 Ordinary insoles are flat. The 
ball and heel of your foot are 
forced to support the entire body 
weight. Feet tire easily. 



i\a7iu^i£^t 



THE SHOE WITH THE BEAUTIFUL FIT 

with 

Wondersole XM 

■Prices quoted are Suggested Retail Prices 




For name of your nearest dealer, write: 

NATURALIZER DIVISION. BROWN SHBE 

COMPANY OF CANADA, LTD.. PERTH. ONTARIO 



528 



THE CANADIAN NURSE 



•^^ 



in this exciting new 
DACRON 
PUCKER 



7/ 



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::t 



.V %1 



"-^'N 

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Finest quality imported 100% 

Docron Pucker 

Convertible collor 

Sixes 8 to 24 

about $14.98 



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778 KING STREET WEST • TORONTO 2B, ONTARIO 
AT BETTER STORES EVERYWHERE • WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 




Nursing Education 
Monographs 



I 



Out of the graduate preparation of nurses for leadership roles come new studies, new 
ideas which contribute to the development and refinement of philosophy, goals and 
methods in nursing. The objective of this monograph series, sponsored by the Department 
of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, is to communicate these 
contributions in the interest of improvement of nursing education and nursing service. 
Based on dissertations at the doctoral level, the following monographs have been pub- 
lished by the Bureau of Publications. Teachers College, and are distributed arouncf the 
world by J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY. 

NURSING OF ADUn: A Plan for Teaching Care of Adults (Number 1) 

By DOROTHY W SMITH, R.N., U.D.. Chairman, Dtpartmtnt of Mtdical-Sutgical Nursing. College of Nursing, 
Rutgers University. 

Instructors in clinical nursing programs can obtain from this monograph specific 
ideas for general problems. It offers suggestions for making the curriculum more 
unified, realistic and useful. 

63 PAGES IM2 PAPERBOUND S2.00 

DEVaOPMENT OF GENHlAl EDUUTKW IN C0UE6IATE NUKING PROGBANS: 

Role of ttie Administrator (Number 2) 

8r MARY KOHL PIUCPICH. R.N.. Ed.D., Dean, School of Nursiog, Keuka College. 

Casts light on the conflict between G«neral Education's insistence on the indivisibi- 
lity of its parts and Nursing's belief in its own uniqueness. The author examines the 
hypothesis that baccalaureate nursing programs place primary emphasis on purely 
professional objectives and give secondary consideration to General Education's 
objectives 

U PAGES IMS PAPERBOUND S}.00 

INTROOUGHM TO AS9SIS: A Programed Unit in Fundamentals of Nursing (Number 3| 

Sr MARIE M. SUDOR, RN , fdD, Instructor, Department of Nursing Education, Teachers College. Columbia 
University. 

You'll find this fully programed (branching) text to be an excellent self-teaching 
tool for students taking the Fundamentals of Nursing course and for in-service 
education. The unit was adapted from a teaching machine program and has been 
tested extensively in nursing school classrooms. 
274 PAGES 1M3 PAPERBOUND STUDENT EDITION S}.7S TEACHER'S EDITION S4.25 

PROGRAHH) mSTRUaiON FOR NURSING IN THE (OMMWHTV COUEGE (Number 4) 

e, MARIE M SEEDOR. RN . Ed.D 

This monograph's purjxtse is to introduce nursing instructors to the entire subject 
of programed instruction. The author describes how programing is done, emphasizes 
that sufficient time is essential in developing programing skill and discusses the 
testing that is neces.sary before accepting a unit for general use by studentf 
117 PAGES 1963 PAPERBOUND S3 00 

EVALUATING STUDENT PROGRESS IN LEARNWG THE PRAHKE OF NURSWG Number 5) 

St ALICE R RINES. R N . EdD 

A timely treatise that underscores the urgent need for improved methods of meas- 
uring student achievement in the clinical area. The "why" and "how" of evaluation 
IS clearly detailed to provide nursing educators with a better yardstick for gauging 
student performance on the floors 
76 PAGES 1963 PAPERBOUND S2.7S 



J. I. IPPHKOn COMPANY Of CANADA LTD.. 4865 Western Ave.. Montreal 6. P.O 

Please send the books indicated by the circled number below: 
No. 1 No. 2 No. 3 No. 4 No. 5 



Lippincott 



NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY 



PROV.