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Full text of "Cap and Gown, 1929"

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Copyright 



1929 



William Byrom Dickens 
Editor 

Earl A. R. Lemmon 
Manager 




















19 2 9 

Volume XXXIII 



UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 





Alma Mater 

Alma Mater, Sewanee, 

Our glorious Mother ever be, 
I will give my all to thee — 

Cod bless thee to eternity. 
Thou canst malfe me worth the 
while, 
O guide and shelter me. 
And all my life, through storm 
and strife. 
My star thou It be. 

Newton Middleton. 





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n 







Bishop Gailor 
Chancellor 



Board of Regents 



Rt. Rev. Thomas F. Gailor, S.T.D., Chancellor, Chairman Memphis, Tenn. 

Rt. Rev. Frederick F. Reese, D.D Savannah, Ga. 

Rt. Rev. T. D. Bratton, D.D Jackson, Miss. 

Rt. Rev. Edwin A. Penick, D.D Charleston, S. C. 

Rev. Charles T. Wright ... Memphis, Tenn. 

Rev. Carroll M. Davis, LL.D New York, N. Y. 

Rev. Walter Whitaker, D.D Knoxville, Tenn. 

B. F. Finney, LL.D Sewanee, Tenn. 

John L. Doggett, Esq Jacksonville, Fla. 

William B. Hall, M.D Selma, Ala. 

G. W. Duvall Cheraw, S. C. 

Georce R. Parker Lexington, Ky. 

Robert Jemison, Jr Birmingham, Ala. 



The University 




[ANY are larger, many are older, yet none has a more striking history. The 
history of Sewanee, founded on faith and kept alive by the grim determi- 
nation of many brave souls whose whole existence has been Sewanee — and 
Sewanee is the University — has been called a "high romance of education." 

The University owes its inception to the vision and faith of Bishop Leonidas Polk 
of Louisiana, who in 1835 proposed to Bishop Otey of Tennessee the establishment of 
an Episcopal College. Immediate action was prevented by the financial panic of 1837; 
but the vision, strengthened during the lapse of time, assumed definite form in 1856. 
At this time, these two churchmen and a third, Bishop Elliot of Georgia, held a con- 
ference; and definite plans for the "establishment of a Protestant Episcopal College" 
were adopted. Their task seemed hopeless, but they set to work as only God-inspired 
men can. An historian has said of them, "A noteworthy group, Otey, Polk and El- 
liott — a saint, a soldier, and a scholar." 

The name, "The University of the South," was decided upon because the school 
was not to be the University of any State nor was it to be the gift of any one man. The 
site for the school was purchased, and on September 10, i860, a large crowd witnessed 
the laying of the cornerstone of this "university of the wilderness." 

Six months later, however, the country was plunged into the "worst catastrophe of 
its history;" and Sewanee, along with the rest of the South, was swallowed up in the 
struggle. All the buildings were destroyed, and even the cornerstone — noble emblem 
of the founders — was blown to pieces. The endowment was lost, and it seemed as if 
all the hopes and ideals of those three bishops were blasted into one great conflagration. 

Yet, to quote a lover of Sewanee, "Sewanee is of the spirit and can never die." 
This spirit was resurrected in the person of Bishop Quintard, who in 1886, rekindled 
the dying embers of faith engendered by Bishops Polk, Otey and Elliott, all of whom 
had died during the war. 

Undaunted by the fact that the South was impoverished and demoralized by the 
war, Bishop Quintard went to England and raised five hundred thousand dollars on 
which to rebuild Sewanee. Therefore, mainly through his efforts, the University of 
the South opened with nine students on September 18, 1868. 

From this humble beginning, a great, though still small, university has grown. Its 
very existence has been a struggle — chiefly against financial ruin. With no endow- 
ment, a small enrollment, and no help to be hoped for from the "exhausted South," 
the University seemed each day to be nearer the brink of failure. But, that undying 
spirit, Sewanee, has grown and endured through grinding poverty by sacrifice and self- 
denial, by a reverent tenacity of purpose, and by an unquenchable faith in the spirit in 
which it was founded and later reborn. 



13 




Dr. B. F. Finney 

Vice-Chancellor 

Dr. B. F. Finney attended the University as a student, and his life has been 
closely associated with it ever since. After leaving Sevvanee, he was graduated from 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute at Blacksburg, Va. Even as a student Dr. Finney had 
displayed an unusual interest in the welfare of the University, and in 1913 he was 
placed on the Board of Regents. He served in this capacity until 1922, at which 
time he was made Vice-Chancellor. 

In 1924 he was given the honorary degree of LL.D. from Hobart College, Ge- 
neva, N. Y. Dr. Finney is also a member of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew and is a 
trustee of St. Katherine's, a girls' school, at Bolivar, Tenn. In addition, he is the 
Executive Head of the Board of Trustees at Columbia Institute, a girls' school at Co- 
lumbia, Tenn. 

In the years that Dr. Finney has served as Vice-Chancellor, he has done much for 
the good of the University. He has put Sevvanee on a much sounder financial basis, 
and his accomplishments in the endowment campaign have been very exceptional. 

Though his interests in the campaign have kept him away from Sewanee much 
of the time, "Uncle Ben," as he is affectionately called, has won a place in the heart 
of every student; he is indeed a loyal son of whom his Alma Mater may well be proud. 



1+ 




Dean George M. Baker 

Dr. George Merrick Baker has very ably served as Dean of the College of Arts 
and Sciences at Sewanee since 1920. During that time, he has greatly improved the 
educational program in the University, and he has gained friends among the profes- 
sors and students alike. 

Dr. Baker was graduated from Yale University in 1900, and in 1905 he received 
his Ph.D. from that university. He served as Instructor in German at Yale from 
1901-1910, with the exception of 1906, which he spent studying in the Universities of 
Berlin and Munich. From 19 10-19 14, he was head of the German Department at 
William Penn Charter School in Philadelphia. In 191 7, he came to Sewanee as Pro- 
fessor of the Germanic Languages, which position he held until he was made Dean. 

At the outbreak of the World War, Dr. Baker enlisted in the Foreign Service 
Department of the A. E. F. He was a member of the General Staff College in 1918, 
and after the close of the war, he served on the General Staff with the Army of Oc- 
cupation in Germany. 

Dr. Baker is also well known for his commentaries on Germanic philology. He is 
the editor of German Stories and also Kleist's Prinz von Homnurg. Moreover, he 
has been a frequent contributor to the Sewanee Review, the Journal of Germanic 
Philology , and the Modern Language Notes. 



15 




Faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences 



Henry Marki.ey Gass, B.A. 

(Oxon); M.A., University of the South. 

Professor of Greek 

William Howard MacKellar, B.A., M.A. 

University ot the South. 
Professor of Public Speaking 

William Boone Nauts, B.A., M A. 

University of the South. 
Professor of Latin 

William Skinkle Knickerbocker, 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Columbia. 

Professor of English Literature 

John Mark Scott, B.A. 

Southwestern College; M.S., Iowa State College. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
William Waters Lewis, C.E. 

University of the South. 
Professor of Spanish 



Brigadier-General James Postell Jervey 

(United States Army, Retired). 

Professor of Mathematics 

Tudor Seymour Long, B.A. 

Cornell 
Associate Professor of English 

*The Rev. Raimundo de Ovies 

University of the South. 

Chaplain of the University and Professor of 
English Bible 

Eugene Mark Kayden, B.A. 

University of Colorado: M.A.. Harvard Univer- 
versity. 

Professor of Economics 
Roy Benton Davis, B A. 

Barlham College; M.A., Missouri. 
F. 11. Williams Professor of Chemistry 

Georce Merrick Baker, B.A., Ph.D. 

Yale. 

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and 
Professor of Germanic Languages 



•Called to serve as Dean of St. Phillips Cathedral in Atlanta. 



16 




Faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences 



Moultrie Guerry, B.A. 

Sewanee. 

Chaplain of the University and Professor of 
Englisli Bible 

Michael Smith Bennett, B.S., D.D.S. 

Pennsylvania. 
Professor of Physical Education 

Charles Carroll Montgomery, A.B. 

Leland Stanford. 
Instructor in Spanish 

Georce Francis Rupp, B.S. 

Penn State College; M.F., Yale. 
Acting Professor of Forestry 

John Maxwell Stowell McDonald, A.B. 

Harvard; M.A., Columbia. 
Acting Professor of Philosophy 



Gaston Swindell Bruton, B.A., M.A. 

University of North Carolina. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Albert Gaylord Willey, B.A. 

Dartmouth. 
Associate Professor of Biology 

Abbott Martin, B.A., M.A. 

University of Mississippi. 

Instructor in English 

Sedley Lynch Ware, B.A. 

(Oxon); I.L.B., Columbia; Ph.D.. Johns Hop- 
kins. 

Professor of History 
John James Davis, B.A. 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Professor of French 

James Fenton Daugherty, B.A. 

Dickinson; M.A., North Carolina. 
Acting Professor of Physics 



17 




'Oh, /wiu I lontj to travel back 
And tread again that ancient track. 










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Senior Class Officers 

William C. Schoolfield President 

James F. Griswold Vice-President 

Leslie J. Williams Secretary-Treasurer 











SENIORS 



Jack S. Autin, B.S Ponchatoula, Louisiana 

2 A E 

Freshman Football, Basketball. Track; Varsity Football, '26, '27, '2S; Varsity Track, "26, '27; 

'28; Captain Track, '29; Fraternity Basketball, Track, and Baseball; Winner S. I. C. Hurdles, 

'27; High point man in S. T. C. Track, '-2S; Order of Gownsmen; Junior and Senior German; 

Prowlers; Blue Key; Union; "S" Club; Fire Department; Pi Omega; Louisiana Club. 



m 



Ruben Crawford Bean, B.S Winchester, Tennessee 

^ r A 

Freshman Football, Basketball, Track; "Varsity Football, Basketball, Track; Intel-fraternity 
Basketball, Baseball, Track; Tennessee Club; Junior and Senior German Club; Rat Leader; 

"S" Club; Order of Gownsmen. 



Charles Edward Berry, B.A Columbus, Georgia 

ATA 

Freshman Basketball, Track; Interfraternity Baseball, Basketball, Handball; Order of Gowns- 
men; Sacristan, '2S; Choir; Prowlers; Senior German; Georgia Club; Committee on Student 

Activities. 










&- 






















SENIORS 



James Newell Blair, B.A. 



N 



. Joplin, Missouri 



Fraternity Baseball; Order of Gownsmen; Pi Omega President. '2!>; "Purple;" "Cap and 
Gown" Humor Editor, '29; Union; Senior German Club; Missouri Club. 

Charles M. Boyd, B.S Abilene, Texas 

<i>r a 

Interfraternity Track and Baseball; Varsity Track, '2S, '29; Varsity Football, '2S, '29; Fresh- 
man Football, "25; Blue Key; Texas Club; Senior German; Prowlers; Pan-Hellenic. 







Edward DuBose Brailsford, B.A Summerton, South Carolina 

2 N 

Order of Gownsmen; Junior and Senior German; Union; South Carolina Club; Prowlers, "'is. 
'29; Choir; Director '27, '2S; Waiters' Union; Glee Club, '20, '27, '28, '29. 






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SENIORS 



John Calvin Bruton, Jr., B.S. 



Columbia, South Carolina 



2 A E 



Freshman Football, Basketball; Varsity Football, '26, '27, '2S; Captain Varsity Football, "2S ; 
Varsity Basketball, "27, '2S, '29; Fraternity Track; "S" Club President, '29; Honor Council, 
'28, '29 ; President of Sophomore and Junior Classes; Sewanee Union, '27, '2S, "29; Proctor, 
'28, Head Proctor, '29 ; Blue Key; Chief Fire Department; Ratting Commission; South Caro- 
lina Club; Alpha Phi Epsilon; A. B. C. ; Student Vestry; Senior German; Prowlers; Order of 
Gownsmen; Pan-Hellenic ; Omicron Delta Kappa. 



W. Chauncy Bryant, B.S Savannah, Georgia 

ATA 

Freshman Basketball, '27 ; Fraternity Basketball and Baseball ; Secretary Sophomore Class, 
'27; Prowlers; Senior and Junior German Clubs; Pan-Hellenic, "29; Varsity Basketball, '29; Or- 
der of Gownsmen; Georgia Club; Cirele Club Secretary and Treasurer, '29. 



Frank G. Burroughs, B.S Conway, South Carolina 

ATA 



Assistant Manager of Track, '27; Varsity Track Man 
of Gownsmen; Scholarship Society; "Mountain Goat,' 



anager, '2S, *29; Fraternity Track; Older 
" '2S ; Prowlers; Senior German ; Pan- 
Hellenic; Blue Key; Proctor; Chairman Grievance and Discipline Committee; South Car- 
olina Club. 









SENIORS 

Stanyarne Burrows. Jr., 13. S Oswego, South Carolina 

2 A E 



Assistant Manager of Football. '2fi. '27; Manager of Football. '2S; Clerk of Course Track 
Meets. '2S; Fraternity Baseball; Order of Gownsmen Secretary and Treasurer. '2S; Purple 
Masque Vice-President. '2?; Prowlers President. '20: Ratting Commission: Member of Gri 
ance and Discipline Committee; Senior German 

'29; "S' 



i. -■'. r\aLiins i_"niiuibsiuii , ivieinuei 01 unev- 
n; Union; Blue Key Secretary and Treasurer ' 
" Club. 



Harry Pulliam Cain, B.A. 






Tacoma, Washington 




Freshman Football. Basketball, Baseball; Fraternity Basketball, Baseball; Captain 
Handball; Iuterfraternity Sports Director; Order of Gownsmen ; Chairman of Activities Com 
mittce. '2S, '29; Scholarship Society; Varsity Debater, "26, '27. '2S, '29; Alpha Phi Epsi 
President, '2S, '2!t ; Sopherim ; Purple Masque; Blue Key; Junior and Senior German ; Pan 
Hellenic; Sports Editor "Cap and Gown." '27; Sports Editor "Purple," '27. '2S; Edttor-in' 
fireS^S^afpS^ ^SS, '29; Union; Debate Council; Sigma Epsilon Vice-President, '2S, President; 
'29; Omicron Delta Kappa Vice-President. 






ter C. Chattix, 



Winchester, Tennes 






a, r A 



Freshman Football: Varsity, '26, '27. 
Vestry; Union; Senior German 



»S; Interfratcrnity Basketball, Baseball. Track; Student 
Tennessee Club; Order of Gownsmen; Prowlers. 















SENIORS 

John H. Cleghorn, B.A Demopolis, Alabama 

K 2 

Freshman Basketball; Varsity Basketball; Interfraternity Basketball, Track. Baseball, Hand- 
ball; Choir; Order of Gownsmen; Pi Omega; Glee Club Vice-President; Pan-Hellenic President, 
'29; "Cap and Gown;'' Alabama Club; Junior and Senior German; Prowlers. 

William M. Cravens Sewanee, Tennessee 

K A 

Blue Key; Prowlers; "S" Club: Freshman Football, '25; Varsity Football. '26, '27, '28; Cap- 
tain-elect. '29; Varsity Track, '27, '2S; Fraternity Basketball, '20. '27; Fraternity Baseball, 
'27, '2S; S. M. A. Club; Tennessee Club; Junior and Senior German Club; Order of Gownsmen. 

William Haywood Daggett, B.A Marianna, Arkansas 

* a e 

Senior. German; Fraternity Baseball, '28, '29; Fraternity Basketball, '28; Freshman Football, 

'26; Order of Gownsmen, 






SENIORS 



Frank Patterson Dearing, B.S Jacksonville, Florida 



A T 

Freshman Football; Neograph: Sopherim; Sispna Epsilon; Glee Clu 
Waiters' Union; Junior and Senior German; Order of Gownsmen; 

Club; Freshman "Purple." 



■ '2S, '29; Choir; Crucifer; 
'Purple Sparks;" S. M. A. 



Julian Roberto deOvis, B.S Atlanta, Georgia 

ATS 

Freshman Football and Basketball; Varsity Football; Fraternity Basketball; Order of Gowns- 
men; Junior and Senior German; Choir; Purple Masciue; Glee Club; S. M. A. club; Georgia 
Club; Pan-Hellenic; Prowlers; Sigma Epsilon. 



William Byrom Dickens., B.A Estill Springs, Tennessee 

K * 

Varsity Track. '2S; Interfraternity Handball, '2S. '29; Order of Gownsmen; Chairman of Com- 
mittee on Publicity and Publications. '29; Student Assistant in Biology. '27, '2S, '29; Alpha 
Phi Epsilon; National Committeeman, '28. '29; Blue Key; Chairman of Reception Committee; 
Sopherim Secretary, '28, '29; Varsity Debate Team; Debate Council, '26, '27, '2S, '29; Scholar- 
ship Society President, '28, '29; Phi Beta Kappa; "Cap and Gown" Editor-in-Chief. '29, Man- 
aging Editor, '2S; Sigma Epsilon Vice-President, '27, President, '2S, Critic, '29; Union; Com- 
mittee on Club Room; French Medal, '27; Fitzpatrick Scholarship, '2S, '29; "V" Club; Editor 
Students' Hand-Book, '29; Senior German Club; Omicron Delta Kappa President; Tennessee 

Club. 







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I 








SENIORS 




John Fredson, B.S . . . . Fort Yukon, Alaska 

Varsity Debater; Sigma Epsilon; Alpha Phi Epsilon; Order of Gownsmen. 

Frederick Reese Frever, B.S Savannah, Georgia 

ATA 

Order of Gownsmen ; Senior German Club ; "S" Club; Prowlers; Neograph; Vice-President 
Scholarship Society; Choir; Freshman Football and Track, '25; Varsity Track. '2S; "Purple" 
Staff, '2">; Georgia Club; Member of Championship Handball Team. '28; Fraternity Basketball, 

Track, and Baseball. 



Sam W- Frizzelle. B.S Nacogdoches, Texas 

<i> r a 

Freshman Football, Basketball, Interfraternity Baseball, Track, Basketball; Varsity Football; 
Varsity Basketball ; Texas Club; Prowers; "S" Club; Vice-President of Junior Class; Senior 

German; Order of Gownsmen. 













s 






SENIORS 







IS 



Pi Omepa; Choir; Photographic Editor "Cap and Gown," '29; Glee Club Manager. 
Secretary to Dean; Scholarship Societ; 



James Francis Griswold, B.S. . 




■ 
. Kenosha, Wisconsin 



Freshman Football and Basketball; Varsity Football. '20. '27, '28; "S" Club; Alternate Cap 
tain-eleeN Football. "29; Fraternity Basketball and Baseball; Order of Gownsmen President, 
'28, '21'; Secretary-Treasurer Junior Class; "Vice-President Senior Class; Blue Key; Prowlers 
Union; "V" Club; Pan-Hellenic. '28, '29; Fire Commission; Assistant Fire Chief. '2,8; Honor 
Council, '27, '28; Scholarship Society; Senior German; Ratting Commission, '27, President, '28; 

Omicron Delta Kappa. 






/ 






Omicron 



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r 



Leith McRoy Hartsfield, B.S Ft. Myers, Florida 

ATA 

Fraternity Basketball and Track; Assistant Football Manager, '25: Freshman Track; Proctor 



Jmmer School, "28; Student Assistant, Ciyil Engineering, ' 

man; Order of Gownsmen 






'2S. '29; Junior and Senior Ger- 



\ 



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SENIORS 



Johx Julian Hope, Jr., B.S Columbia, South Carolina 

K A 

Freshman Football, '25; Freshman Basketball, '26: Freshman Track. '20: Varsity Basketball, 
■27 '29; Varsity Track. '27, '29; "S" Club, '27, '2S, '29; Junior and Senior German Clubs; Pan- 
Hellenic Council; Prowlers. 



Harry W. Hoppen, B.A. 



. Bogalusa, Louisiana 



A E 



Freshman Football and Baseball; Varsity Football Squad. '26, *27, '2S; Int erf rater nity Basket- 
ball and Baseball ; Ordi r of Gownsmen ; Louisiana Club; Junior and Senior German Clubs; 
Prowlers; Blue Key; Ratting Commission; Golf Team, '2& 



Edwin McClellan Johnston, B.A Atlanta, Georgia 

2 N 

Fraternity Basketball and Baseball; Order of Gownsmen; Student Union: Scholarship Society; 

Pan-Hellenic, '2S ; Sigma Epsilon Secretary-Treasurer. '2S. Vice-President, *2!t ; Georgia Club; 

Prowlers; Junior and Senior German Clubs; "Sewanee Purple" Local Editor. '29. 
















^tofcJw 









SENIORS 



Earl A. R. Lemmon, B.A. 



. Patterson, Loui 



K 2 



Freshman Football. '2 5; Varsity Football, '26 ; Order of Gownsmen; Pi Omega President, '28; 
Pan -Hell en ic President, '28 ; "Mountain Goat," '2S ; "Cap and Gown," "2S, Business Manager. 
'29; Junior and Senior German Clubs; Louisiana Club, Vice-President, '29; "V" Club; Student 
Assistant in Biology; Fraternity Baseball. 

. Birmingham, Alabama 




Langston W. McCalley, B.S. . 

A 

Freshman Football; Fraternity Baseball and Basketball; Order of Gownsmen; Junior and 

















'ill' 






SENIORS 



William Cardwell McGehee, B.A. . 



Paris, Tennessee 




Freshman Track ; Interfraternity Baseball, '29 ; Order of Gownsmen ; Publications Committee, 
'29 ; Sigma Epsilon Vice-President, '2S, President, '29 ; Sopherim ; Alpha Phi Epsilon ; Union ; 
Chairman of Club Committee, '29; Waiters* Union, Head Waiter, '29; Varsity Debater, '2S, '29; 
"Mountain Goat." "20, '27, *2S, '29; '-Purple," '2S, '29; "Cap and Gown" '2!»; Purple Masque 
Business Manager and Treasurer '29; Student Assistant in English; Tennessee Club; Scholar- 
ship Society; Senior German; Omicron Delia Kappa. 

Daniel F. H. Murphey, B.A Daphney, Alabama 

2 N 

Sigma Epsilon; Freshman Basketball; Fraternity Basketball; Alabama Club; Scholarship So- 
ciety. 



B.A Chattanooga, Tennessee 

A T £2 

Order of Gownsmen; Tennessee Club; Noogrnph, 2(>. '27; Choir. '26, '27; Sopherim. '2S. '29; 
"V" Club: Waiters' Union; Purple Sparks; Glee Club; "Winner of Knight Medal for Declama- 
tion; 'SB; Sigma Epsilon, '25, '26; "Mountain Goat" Staff. '26. '27, '28. '29; Poetry Editor of 
"Mountain Goat," '28; S. M. A. Club; Junior and Senior German Clubs. 









K 











SENIORS 



Hill Pearce, Jr., B.S Birmingham, Alabf 

<I> A e 

Varsity Football Squad, '27, '2S: Varsity Track Squad, '28; Alabama Club; Vice-Preside 
Junior German, '2S; Senior German, '29; Order of Gownsmen; Pan-Hellenic. 






Arch Peteet, Jr., B.A. 




. Greenwood, Mississippi 



Freshman Football Squad; Varsity Football Squad. '27, '28 ; Fraternity Handball and Base 
ball; Glee Club, '27, '28, '2&, President, '2!>; Sewanee Syncopaters, '27, '28, '29; Order | 
Gownsmou; Junior and Senior German Clubs; Mississippi Club; Blue Key; Honor Council, '2 

Prowlers. 



aeon, ^icor 







SENIORS 



Albert Evans Sanderson, B.A Baxley, Georgia 

K <i> 

Interfraternity Baseball, '2T; '2S. '2D; Sigma Epsilon, Secretary-Treasurer, '29; Varsity Debate 
Team, '27, '28, "2'J; Debate Council; Commencement Debates] "2N; Commencement Declaimer, 
'27, '2S; Order of Gownsmen; Checker Team, '2S, *29 (Champion); Alpha Phi Epsilon; North 

Carolina Club. 



William Cleveland Schoolfield, B.A. 

<i> a e 



Mullins; South Carolina 



Freshman Football, '25; Varsity Football, '26, '27, '2S; Freshman Track", '26; Varsity Track, 
'27, '28; Fraternity Basketball; President Senior Class; Phi Beta Kappa; "S" Club Vice-Presi- 
dent, '28; Student Vestry, '26, "2S. '29; Senior Warden. "29; Order of Gownsmen. Secretary, '2!*; 
Vice-President Freshman Class, '26; Athletic Board of Control, '28, '29; Vice-President; Schol- 
arship Society; Prowlers; Union ; Neograph ; "Purple." '27 ; Freshman "Purple" Editor, '26 ; 
Blue Key President, '29 ; Junior German Vice-President. "27 ; Senior German; Ratting Com- 
mission; Fan-Hellenic; Proctor, '28, '29; South Carolina Club; "Winner of "Cap and Gown" 
Contest for most valuable football player, '28; Omicron Delta Kappa. 



II 

George Dillingham Schuessler, 13. S. 



Columbus, Georgia 



b e r r a a 



Fraternity Basketball and Handball; Scholarship Society; Phi Beta Kappa; Order of Gowns- 
men, Waiters' Union. 



\\ 




^^>v 







SENIORS 



Curtis Holt Sory, B.S Cedar Hill, Tennessee 

K A 



Freshman Basketball, '27; Varsity Basketball, '27. '2X; Fraternity Basketball; Order of 

Gownsmen; Student Vestry, '26, '27; Prowlers; Tennessee Club; Junior and Senior German; 

Pi Omega; "Cap and Gown," '27, '2S; Post Master; Union, '2S. 



Edgar Allex Stewart, Jr. . R.A. 



Alabama 



<I> A 



Order of Gownsmen; Scholarship Society; Xe'i-rnjili ; .Junior German Secretary and Troasur 
'2S; Senior German; Alabama Club; "Cap and Gown" Literary Editor. "2TI; ('lass Editor, '2S; 
Freshman "Purple" Editor, '27; Spanisb Assistant; Phi Beta Kappa. 



Mark McClellax Tolley, B.S Columbia, Tennessee 

K A 

Freshman Football Squad. '20; Freshman Track Team. '26; Varsity Football Squad, 'Mj^vaT 
'28; Junior German Club, '25, '26, President '27;, Senior German Club. '2S, Secretary-Treasurer 
'29; Blue Key; Prowlers; Circle Club; Tennessee Club; "S" Club; Order of Gownsmen; Ratting 

Commission. 





I*--Y- i'^n 















SENIORS 



Hartsville, South Carolina 




* r a 



Interfraternity Basketball and Baseball; Order of Gownsmen: Junior and Senior German; Pi 
Omega; Union; South Carolina Club. 



Warren Wade Way, Jr. B.A Raleigh, North Carolina 

2 N 



Manager of Varsity Basketball; Manager of Freshman Basketball, '2S; Order of Gownsmen; 
Blue Key; "S" Club; Prowlers; Union; "Purple," '25, '26, Local Editor, '27, '2S; Ratting Corn- 
Commission, '27, '28; Scholarship Society; North Carolina Club. 



ILLIAMS, B.A. 



Fort Worth, Texas 



K A 



Senior and Junior German; Interfraternity Baseball, Basketball and Track; Texas Club; Order 

of Gowusmen. 



' 




( 





«3jj^ 




46 



L_ 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 




JUNIOR 

The Ha.ro knocks \\\<l Villam for 

A goul Yi'fik. &.W his NugWt. 



47 




=J 




JUNIORS 



Joseph Lee Allen, Jr. 

ATA 

SIGNAL MOUNTAIN, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Track; Varsity Track Squad, '27 and '28; 
Tennis Team. '2S and '29; Fraternity Track and Base- 
ball; Manager of Tennis. '29; Order of Gownsmen; 
Glee Club; Junior German Club; Senior German Club; 
Tennessee Club. 



William J. Ball 

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Varsity Track, '2S, '29; Order of Gownsmen; Sewanee 

Union; Waiters' Union; Choir; Sigma Epsilon; Soph- 

erim; South Carolina Club. 



Walter Ernest Boyd 

at a 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Order of Gownsmen; Fraternity Baseball; Proctor; 
Honor Council; Pan-Hellenic Council; Blue Key; A. 
B. C. ; Prowlers. '2S, Secretary and Treasurer, '29; 
Glee Club Secretary and Treasurer, '29; Choir; Se- 
wanee Union; Junior and Senior German Clubs; Fire 
Department; Sphinx Club; "V" Club; Texas Club. 



Clint Brown 

ATA 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

Order of Gownsmen; Fraternity Basketball and Base- 
ball; Assistant Football Manager, '27; Freshman 
Football Manager, '2S: Blue Key; Prowlers; Senior 
German; Debate, '26; Texas Club. 



Frank G. Brunner, Jr. 

•!■ r a 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 

Ord' r of Gownsmen; Fraternity Baseball; "Moun- 
tain Goat," '27. '28, Advertising Manager. '29; Schol- 
arship Society; Junior German; Tennessee Club. 



Nash Burger 

K * 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 
Order of Gownsmen: Millsaps College, '26, 



.Man- 
aging Editor of "Mountain Goat:" "Cap and Gown;" 
"Purple;" Sopherim; Sigma Epsilon; Sewanee Union; 
Senior German; Texas Club. 



48 



JUNIORS 



Jack Pryor Buzard 

ATA 

MOBILE, ALABAMA 

Order of Gownsmen; Freshman Track. '27; Fiater- 
nity Baseball ami Basketball; Junior and Senior Ger- 
man Clubs; Glee Club; Alabama Club. 



Robert C. Cann 

2 A E 

MONROE, LOUISIANA 

Order of Gownsmen; Freshman Tennis Team. '27; 
Varsity Tennis Team. '28; Fraternity Baseball. Bas- 
ketball, and Track; Junior and Senior German Clubs; 
Sewanee Union; Assistant Football Manager; "V" 
Club; Louisiana Club. 



Robert B. Chadwick 

2 A E 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Order of Gownsmen; Sewanee LTnion; Senior German; 

Circulation Manager of "Mountain Goat;" Biology 

Laboratory Assistant; Alabama Club. 



B. Melvin Craig 

ATA 

SELMA, ALABAMA 

Order of Gownsmen; Sewanee Syncopators, '27, *2S. 

'29, Director, '29; Glee Club; Purple Masque; Choir; 

Senior German Club; Scholarship Society; Alabama 

Club. 



William B. Craig 

ATA 

SELMA, ALABAMA 

Order of Gownsmen; Manager of Freshman Track, 
'2S; Assistant Manager Varsity Track, '29; "Moun- 
tain Goat" '28, Business Manager. '29; Freshman 
"Purple," '27; Neograph : Prowlers; Junior and Senior 
German Clubs; Alabama Club. 



Jackson Cross 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 



Order of Gownsmen; Sewanee LTnion; Art Staff 

"Mountain Goat;" Literary Staff "Mountain Goat;" 

Senior German. 




49 




Caft and Gown, 1929 





JUNIORS 



John Sumner Davidson 

2 N 
KENSINGTON, MARYLAND 

Order of Gownsmen; Business Manager of "Purple;" 

Sopherim; Student Librarian, '2S, '29; Sewanee Union; 

Senior German; "Mountain Goat." 



William Dixox Dossett 

K A 

BEULAH, MISSISSIPPI 

Order of Gownsmen; Varsity Track Squad, '28, 
Mississippi Club. 



William Richards Early, Jr. 

ATS! 
INDIANOLA, MISSISSIPPI 
Order of Gownsmen; Fraternity Baseball and Basket- 
ball; Scholarship Society: Junior and Senior German 
Clubs; Mississippi Club. 



George Herbert Edwards 

K A 

CEDARTOWN, GEORGIA 

Order of Gownsmen; Golf Team. '2S. '29; Freshman 

Football; Secretary and Treasurer Junior Class; 

Prowlers; Circle Club; Senior German Club; Georgia 

Club. 



Edward R. Fixlay 

<!• A 

COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Freshman Football and Basketball; Varsity Basket- 
ball; Fraternity Baseball; Basketball, and Track; 
Junior German Club; Order of Gownsmen; South Car- 
olina Club. 



Frank P. Glen 

K A 

BEAUMONT, TEXAS 

Order of Gownsmen; Fraternity Baseball and Basket- 
ball; Scholarship Society; Senior German; Texas Club. 



50 




Cafi and Gotun, 1929 




JUNIORS 



James Holt Green 

A T Si 

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Interfraternity Basketball, and Track; Senior German 
Club; Order of Gownsmen; South Carolina Club. 



Thomas Greville 

WASHINGTON', D. C. 
Order of Gownsmen; Pi Omega. 



Thomas Beverly Grizzard 

'!• r a 

COWAN, TENNESSEE 
Order of Gownsmen; Tennessee Club. 



Benjamin Francis Hatch 

a t a 

UNIONTOWN, ALABAMA 

Order of Gownsmen; Fraternity Baseball and Basket- 
ball; Junior and Senior German Clubs; Scholarship 
Society; Alabama Club. 



John Eluridge Hines 
2 x 

SENECA, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Order of Gownsmen; Freshman Football, Basketball, 
and Tennis; Varsity Basketball, '2S, '29, Captain- 
elect for '30; Varsity Tennis; "S" Club; Sigma Epsi- 
lon Secretary, '2S; Neograph; Sopherim; Blue Key; 
Proctor; President Junior Class; Scholarship Society; 
Honor Council, '2S, '29; Freshman "Purple," '26; 
Managing Editor "Purple;" "Cap and Gown" Class 
Editor, '2S; Student Vestry, '28; Sewanee Union Sec- 
retary. '29; Purple Masque; Discipline and Grievance 
Committee; Ratting Commission; Prowlers; Senior 
German; South Carolina Club; Omicron Delta Kappa 
Secretary and Treasurer. 



William M. Hodges 
i x 

NEW BRITAIN, CONNECTICUT 

Order of Gownsmen; Fraternity Baseball and Basket- 
ball; Senior German; "Mountain Goat;" "Purple." 




5" 




JUNIORS 



Johx Smith King 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 



Order of Gownsmen; Fraternity Baseball and Track; 
Junior and Senior German Clubs; Tennessee Club. 



Harry Lovelace 

a T a 

INDIA NOLA, MISSISSIPPI 

Order of Gownsmen; Freshman Football and Track; 

Varsity Track; Fraternity Baseball and Basketball; 

Junior and Senior German Clubs; Mississippi Club. 



John D. Mlllins 

k r 

CLANTON, ALABAMA 

Order of Gownsmen; Fraternity Baseball. Basketball, 
and Track; "Purple;" Pi Omega; Senior German; Al- 
abama Club. 



Thomas Parker 

•i' r a 

GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Order of Gownsmen; Sopberim; Neograpb; "Moun- 
tain Goat;" "Cap and Gown" Editor-elect for '30. 
Managing Editor, *29; Sewanee L T nion; Senior German 
Club; Secretary Student Vestry; South Carolina Club. 



Edmoxd Julius Phillips 
is e r r a a 

FULTON, KENTUCKY 
Order of Gownsmen; Fraternity Track, 



Walter Emmett Phillips 

1 N 

DECATUR, ALABAMA 

Oi'der of Gownsmen; Freshman Football and Track, 

'27; Fraternity Track; "Purple;" "Mountain Goat;" 

Senior German; Waiters' Union; Alabama Club. 



52 



JUNIORS 



Russel Ponder 

■I- r a 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

Order of Gownsmen; Freshman Football. '27; Varsity 

Football, '2S; Fraternity Baseball, Basketball, and 

Track; Glee Club; Prowlers; Senior German Club; 

Sphinx Club; Texas Club. 



Oney C. Raines 

K i 

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 

Order of Gownsmen; Varsity Tennis; Varsity Track. 



Charles D. Snowden 
e k n 

MILLBURN, NEW JERSEY 

Order of Gownsmen; Choir; Senior German Club; Pi 
Omega. 



Richard Leroy Sturgis 

1 N 

ROCK HILL, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Order of Gownsmen; Freshman Football Squad: Var- 
sity Football Squad; Fraternity Baseball and Basket- 
ball; Assistant Basketball Manager, '28; Freshman 
Basketball Manager. '29; Debate; "Mountain Goat"; 
"Cap and Gown"; "Purple"; Freshman "Purple"; Head 
Rat Leader. '28; Ratting Commission. '28; Sewanee 
Union; Waiters' Union; Junior and Senior German 
Clubs; South Carolina Club. 



Francis M. Thigpen, Jr. 

K X 

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA 

Order of Gownsmen: Freshman Football and Basket- 
ball. '2(1; Varsity Basketball; "S" Club; Prowlers; 
Blue Key; Student Vestry. '2S and '2!); Senior German 
Club; Fraternity Track and Baseball; Alabama Club. 



Edward Willard Watson 
h e r r a a 

GALVESTON, TEXAS 

Order of Gownsmen; Fraternity Baseball and Basket- 
ball; Scholarship Society; Senior German; Pi Omega 
Vice-President, '29; Texas Club. 




53 



Cafi and Goivn, 1929 






JUNIORS 



Roger A. Way 

1 N 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Order of Gownsmen: Freshman Football, Basketball, 
and Track, '27; Varsity Basketball, '2S; Fraternity 
Basketball and Track: Assistant Manager Varsity 
Track. "27; Manager of Freshman Track, '2S; Sewanee 
Union Executive Committee, '2S; Waiters' Union; Fire 
Department; Junior and Senior German Clubs; North 
Carolina Club. 



Hawkins D. Westmoreland 
a x a 

ATHENS, ALABAMA 
Order of Gownsmen; Alabama Club, 



Edward B. Wharton 

A T A 

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA 

Fraternity Baseball. Handball. Basketball, and 
Track; Senior German Club; Louisiana Club. 




54 



Tristram in Brittany 

Softly the tinkling of Camelot bells 

Made a tune for a saraband ; 
Silken the sails of our caravels 

As U'e voyaged to Ireland. 
Bright ii'as the moon for the perilous Quest 
Sprinkling a silvery path to the West, 

West to the court of my lady, 

My lady, my lady fair. 

Fnier ed with fragrance that April distils 

From the blooms of the blossoming days — 
Tulips, narcissi, and daffodils — 

Is the song in my lady's praise. 
Wistful, site walked in her garden there: 
II itched are my lips in a dark despair. 

Hitched in the praise of my lady, 

My lady, my lady fair. 

Opal and emerald and amethyst, 

With the color of Michaelmas skies; 
Glory of gems ichich are brought from the East 

Has the gloiu in Isolde's eyes. 
Brocades of yelloiv and satins her gown. 
Sapphires and rubies gleamed in her crown, 

Gleamed in the praise of my lady. 

My lady, my lady fair. 

Sweeter than breath of the Eastern wind 

Is the breath of my lady fair; 
Rarer than gold that is thrice refined 

Is the gold of my lady's hair. 
High mounts my song in joyous ascent, 
Singing its meed till its rapture is spent; 

Spent in the praise of my lady, 

My lady, my lady fair. 

William S. Knickerbocker 



55 




Order of G 



ownsmen 



Officers 

James F. Griswold President 

Leslie J. Williams ■ Vice-President 

William C. Schoolfield Secretary-Treasurer 

Committee Chairmen 

Frank Burroughs Grievance Committee 

Harry Cain Organizations Committee 

Bvrom Dickens Publications Committee 

The Order of Gownsmen is the students' governing body. For some years pre- 
vious it had been rather lax in asserting its rights and in performing its duties, 
but this year it awoke from its sleep and showed a real interest in student affairs. 
Among other things, it re-edited the students' handbook, which had been unchanged 
since 1924. The work of the Order is carried out by an Executive Committee, 
composed of the officers and the Chairmen of the Committees. In consideration of 
their attainment and added responsibility, the Gownsmen are granted certain priv- 
ileges. 

The Order is composed of all students who have completed 29 credit hours. This 
places the power in the hands of the two upper classes and the Theologs. 



56 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 





SOPHMORE 

Trie VilldlN COM£5 upON ]\\e. SC<2N£ 
Anc) gives thtf. oiirl &. fright. 



57 




Cafi and Goion, 1929 





Sophomores 

HALSTEAD T. ANDERSON, K A 

SUMMERTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Freshman Football: Fraternity Basketball, '2S, '29; 

Fraternity Baseball: Junior German Club; south 

Carolina Club. 

MARSHALL F. APPLE, K i; 

MARIANNA, ARKANSAS 



Fraternity Baseball, Basketball 
ball; Junior German Club; 



Track, and Hand- 
Arkansas Club. 



CHARLES FREDERICK BAARCKE, 2 N 

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA 

Fraternity Baseball. Basketball, and Track: Varsity 

Track Squad; Waiters' Union; Sewanee Union; Junior 

German Club; Sigma Epsilon; Alabama Club. 



CHARLES FINLEY BACON, $ r A 

ABILENE, TEXAS 

Freshman Track. '2S; Varsity Track Squad; Frater- 
nity Baseball, Basketball, and Track; Junior German 
Club; S. M. A. Club: Texas Club. 



MOULTRIE BALL, A T S2 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Basketball, '2S; Fraternity Baseball and 

Basketball; Junior German Club; Sigma Epsilon; Ne- 

ograph ; Tennessee Club. 



CHARLES HENRY BARRON, <I> A 6 

COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Freshman Football, Basketball, and Track, '2S; Var- 
sity Football and Track. '2(1; "S" Club; Fraternit> 
Baseball; Vice-President Sophomore Class; Prowlers; 
Junior German Club; Waiters' Union; Sewanee Union; 
Fire Department; Sphinx Club; South Carolina Club. 

JOSEPH SMITH BEAN, <I> 1" A 

WINCHESTER, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football, Basketball, and Track. '28; Var- 
sity Football, Basketball, and Track, '21); "S" Club; 
Fraternity Mas. ball and Track; Waiters' Union; Junior 
German; Sigma Epsilon; Rat Leader; Ratting Com- 
mission; Tennessee Club. 

J. D. BECKWITH, 2 A E 

LUMBERTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Freshman Football Squad. '2S; Fraternity Baseball 
and Basketball; Junior German Club; Assistant Man- 
ager Sewanee Union; Waiters' Union; North Carolina 
Club. 



58 



Soph 



pnomores 

R. L. BRENIZER, K * 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football and Track, '28; Varsity Track; 

Fraternity Basketball and Track ; Junior G rman 

Club; Tennessee Club. 

DAVID A. BRIDEWELL, K 2 

FORREST CITY, ARKANSAS 

Fraternity Basketball and Track ; Assistant Publicity 
Director of University; Assistant Secretary to the 
Dean; Assistant Manager of Glee Club; Purple 
Masque; Junior German ; Choir, '2S ; Treasurer Pi 
Omega; Contributing Editor of "Purple;" Book Re- 
view Editor of "Mountain Goat ;"' Class Editor "Cap 
and Gown ;" Assistant Editor Freshman "Purple," '2S ; 
Neograph ; Arkansas Club. 

HARRIS BRITTON, * -\ 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 

Student Vestry "IS. '2*1; Glee Club; Syncopators; Pur- 
ple Masque; Junior German Club; Tennessee Club. 

MOULTRIE BURNS, 2 N 

CAMDEN" SOUTH CAROLINA 

Freshman Football, '28; Fraternity Baseball and Bas- 
ketball ; "Purple;" Sigma Epsilon; Waiters' C/nion ; 
Sewanee Union; Owl Club; Junior German ; Assistant 
Manager Freshman Track; South Carolina Club. 

CHAUNCY W. BUTLER, 2 A E 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football, '2S ; Varsity Football ; Fraternity 
Baseball and Basketball ; Vice-President Freshman 
Class. '28 ; President Sophomore Class, '29 ; Prowlers; 
"V" Club; Rat Leader; Ratting Commission; Tennes- 
see Club. 



PAUL MALCOM BUTTON, B E r V A A 

PORT ARTHUR, TEXAS 
Pi Omega; Choir; Texas Club. 

TOM BYRNE, K <I> 

MOBILE, ALABAMA 

Fraternity Baseball and Track ; Freshman Football 
Squad, '28; Sewanee Union; Sigma Epsilon Commence- 
ment Orator, '2S; Junior German Club; Alabama Club. 

CHARLES C. CHADBOURN, SN 

FAVETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sigma Epsilon; Choir, "2S, '29; Student Assistant in 
Forestry; North Carolina Club. 




59 




_J 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 





Soph 



phomores 



RANDOLPH CASSELS CHARLES, K A 

TIMMONSVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Varsity Football Squad; Waiters' Union; Sigma Epsi- 
lon; Junior German Club; South Carolina Club. 



DAVID CULBRETH CLOCGH, K A 

DOVER, DELAWARE 

Fraternity Baseball; Fraternity Basketball; Junior 
German; Cosmopolitan Club. 



GEORGE COPELAND, K * 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

Freshman "Purple" Staff, '2S; Feature Editor "Pur- 
ple;" Class Editor "Cap and Gown." '29; Neograph; 
Sigma Epsilon; Varsity Debate; Junior German Club; 
Texas Club. 



NATHAN CRAWFORD, * V A 

MIDDLESBORO, KENTUCKY 

Interfraternity Handball: Junior German Club; Ken- 
tucky Club. 



DAVID W. CROSLAND, K 2 

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA 

Freshman Football and Track '2G; Varsity Football, 
'27, '2S; Fraternity Baseball, Basketball, and Track; 
Pi Omega; Choir; Pan-Hellenic Council Secretary. '29; 
Junior German Club; Fire Department; Alabama Club. 



NEWMAN R. DONNELL, 2 A E 

SAINT LOUIS, MISSOURI 

Freshman Football and Track, '2S; Fraternity Track; 
S. M. A. Club; Junior German Club; Glee Club. 



NORMAN DCMBLE, A T A 

FORT WORTH, TEXAS 

Interfraternity Baseball, Basketball, and Track; Var- 
sity Track, '2S; Junior German Club; Texas Club. 



REDMOND R. EASON, JR., ATA 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 
Syncopators; Junior German Club; Tennessee Club. 



6o 



Ca£ and Gown, 1929 




Soph 



phomores 

CHARLIE C. EBY, K <I> 

WEST MONROE, LOUISIANA 

Freshman Football and Track. '2S: Varsity Track, '29; 

Fraternity Basketball and Track; Sewanee Union; 

Waiters' Union; Sigma Epsilon; "Purple;" Junior 

German Club: Louisiana Club. 



JOHN M. EZZELL, <I> -1 9 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football. '28: Varsity Football, '211; "S" 

Club; Fraternity Baseball and Basketball; Prowlers; 

Sewanee Union; Waiters* Union; "Purple;" Pi Omega 

Scrgeant-at-Arms: Sphinx Club; Tennessee Club. 



HENRY W. GREGORY, JR., K 2 

FORREST CITY, ARKANSAS 

Fraternity Track; "Cap and Gown" Staff, '2S ; "Pur- 
ple;" Purple Masque; Pi Omega; Choir; Junior Ger- 
man Club; Arkansas Club. 



RICHARD HARWOOD, 2 A E 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 
Fraternity Handball and Baseball; Tennessee Club. 

CHARLES L. HAWKINS, A T U 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Freshman Football. '2S; Fraternity Baseball; Assist- 
ant Manager Football. '2S; Manager Freshman Foot- 
ball-elect, '29; Sales Manager "Cap and Gown;" Se- 
wanee Union; Waiters' Union; Sigma Epsilon; Junior 
German President, '29; Texas Club. 



MURRAY SIMS HITCHCOCK, 2 A E 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Fraternity Baseball; Junior German Club; Alabama 
Club. 



FRED T. HOLLIS, 2 N 

BENNETTSVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Intel-fraternity Handball. Baseball, Basketball. and 

Track; Choir; Junior German Club; South Carolina 

Club. 



BOOTHBY HOLLOWAY, i: A E 

CEDARTOWN, GEORGIA 
Golf Team; Junior German Club; Georgia Club. 




6i 




Caft and Gown, 1929 





Sophomores 



WILLIAM FOWLER HOLMES, ATA 

YAZOO CITY, MISSISSIPPI 

University Organist and Choir Director: Glee Club 

Accompanist; Sewanee Union; Purple Masque; Pi 

Omega; Debate, '2S; Junior German Club; Mississippi 

Club. 



CHARLES T. HOPPEN, 2 A E 

BOGALUSA, LOUISIANA 

Freshman Football and Track. '2S; Varsity Track 

Squad, "29; Cheer Leader, '29; Junior German Club; 

Prowlers; "Mountain Goat" Art Editor, '2S and '29; 

"Cap and Gown" Art Editor, '29; Louisiana Club. 



GODFREY L. HOWSE, <1> 1' A 

WICHITA, KANSAS 

Fraternity Basketball and Track; Freshman Track 

Squad; Sewanee Union; Sigma Epsilon; "Cap and 

Gown;" Junior German. 



MALCOLM JOHNSTON, ^ X 

PARIS, TEXAS 

Freshman Football, '28; Fraternity Baseball and Bas- 
ketball: Junior German Club; Texas Club. 



ASHFORD JONES, 2 A E 

NACOGDOCHES, TEXAS 

Fraternity Basketball and Track; Sewanee Union; 
Junior German Club; Pi Omega; Texas Club. 



CHARLES RICHARD KELLERMAN, K 2 

SOUTH PITTSBURG, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football and Track, '28; Varsity Football 

and Track. '29; Fraternity Baseball, Basketball, and 

Track; Waiters' Union: Pi Omega; Junior German 

Club; Tennessee Club. 



JACK M. KEYWORTH, ATR 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Freshman Football and Track, '28; Varsity Football 
and Track, '29; Fraternity Basketball; Junior Ger- 
man; Prowlers; Sphinx Club; Sigma Epsilon; Student 
Vestry, '2S; Secretary and Treasurer Sophomore Class; 
Waiters' Union; Texas Club. 



RCSSELL C. KNOX, B E 1' P A A 

ETOWAH, TENNESSEE 
Choir; Glee Club; Interfraternity Baseball; Tennessee 

Club. 



62 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 




Sophomores 



ROBERT G. LANG, A T Q 

FARMVILLE, \ORTH CAROLINA 

Interfraternity Baseball; Freshman Football and 
Track; Junior German Club; North Carolina Club. 



RANDOLPH NELSON LONG, <J> A B 

SELMA, ALABAMA 

"Mountain Goat" Staff; Junior German Club; Sphinx 
Club; Neograph ; Alabama Club. 



SAINT ELMO MASSENGALE, 2 X 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

Neograph ; Editor Freshman "Purple ;" "Mountain 
Goat ;" Assistant Manager Freshman Basketball ; Sig- 
ma Epsilon ; Organization Editor "Cap and Gown;" 
Publication Committee Junior German Club. 



ALFRED ST. JOHN MATTHEWS, B E V V A A 

SAINT AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA 
Fraternity Baseball ; Pi Omega ; Purple Masque. 



WALTER MATTHEWS, <I> V A 

LARKINSVILLE, ALABAMA 

Freshman Track Squad, '28 ; Fraternity Baseball and 
Track; Alabama Club. 



EDWARD CORNELICS NASH, A T A 

KAUFMAN, TEXAS 

Freshman Football and Track Squads, '2S; Fraternity 

Baseball ; Assistant Manager Basketball ; Freshman 

Manager Basketball Elect; Kat Leader; Junior German; 

Prowlers; Texas Club; Circle Club. 



EDWARD J. PETERS, K A 

SHAWNEE, OKLAHOMA 
Interfraternity Baseball and Golf; Oklahoma Club. 



CHARLES A. POELLNITZ, 2 A E 

GREENSBORO, ALABAMA 

Fraternity Basketball: Vice-President Sophomore 
Class; Junior German Club; Prowlers; Alabama Club. 




63 




Sophomores 



HENRY CLAY ROBERTSON, JR., * A 9 

ROME, GEORGIA 

Fraternity Baseball and Basketball; "Purple;" Ne- 
ograph, "27; Junior German; Georgia Club. 



J. W. RODGERS, 2 A E 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football; Fraternity Baseball and Basket- 
ball; Circle Club; Junior German; Tennessee Club. 



Gl'S ROUNSAVILLE, JR., A T A 

ALTO, TEXAS 

Freshman Track, "2S; Varsity Track. '29; Fraternity 

Baseball. Basketball, and Track; Junior German Club; 

Texas Club. 



JACK SAYLES, * V A 

ABILENE, TEXAS 

Freshman Track '2S: Varsity Track. '2S; Fraternity 

Baseball, Basketball, and Track; Circle Club; Junior 

German Club; Texas Club. 



JOSEPH W. SCHEUSSLER, JR., B E r V A A 

COLUMBUS, CEORCIA 

Pi Omega; Fraternity Basketball and Handball; 
Georgia Club. 



SAMUEL PORCHER SMITH, A T <> 

SPARTANBURG, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Freshman Football Squad. "27; Junior German Club; 
South Carolina Club. 



MILTON V. SPENCER, 4> 1' A 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

Freshman Football and Track, '28; Varsity Football 
and Track. '29; Fraternity Baseball, Basketball, and 
Track; Circle Club; Junior German Club; Texas Club. 



ROBERT B. STIMSON, 2 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 



A E 



Freshman Football. '2S: Varsity Football. '2!l; "S" 

Club; Fraternity Baseball, Basketball, and Track; 

Junior German club Vice-President, '2S, '29; Prowlers; 

"V" Club; Circle Club; Tennessee Club. 



64 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 




Sophomores 



FRANKLIN TAYLOR, 2 N 

MONTEAGLE, TENNESSEE 
Sigma Epsilon; Junior German Club; Tennessee Club. 



JEROME P. THOMPSON, ATA 

HELENA, ARKANSAS 

Neograph: Freshman "Purple;" "Mountain Goat;" 
Freshman Basketball and Track; Glee Club; Choir; 
Interfraternity Baseball; Junior German Club; Arkan- 
sas Club, 



EDWIN S. TOWLE, * V A 

FALLS CITY, NEBRASKA 

Fraternity Baseball and Basketball: Junior German; 
Glee Club. 



REGGIS VACCARRO, K 2 

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA 

Interfraternity Baseball; Junior German Club; Louis- 
iana Club. 



GEORGE DAVID WALKER, K 2 

HELENA, ARKANSAS 

Freshman Track. '2S; Varsity Track, '29; Fraternity 

Basketball; "Purple;" "Cap and Gown;" Neograph; 

Pi Omega; Arkansas Club. 



W. P. WALKER, * r A 

LULING, TEXAS 

Fraternity Baseball and Track; Junior German; 
Prowlers; Glee Club; Circle Club; Texas Club. 



CHARLES WALTER, K 2 

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA 

Fraternity Baseball; BTsketball, Track, and Golf; P? 
Omega: Junior German; Alabama Club. 



WILLIAM M. WEAVER, K * 

SELMA, ALABAMA 

Fraternity Basketball, Handball, and Track; Circula- 
tion Staff "Purple;" Sigma Epsilon; Choir; Owl Club; 
Alabama Club. 




65 




=__J 




Cafi and Gown, 1929 




Soph 



pnomores 

JOSEPH WEBSTER, A T A 

GALVESTON, TEXAS 

Fraternity Baseball and Track; S. M. A. Club; Junior 
German Club; Texas Club. 



L. SPIRES WHITAKER, ATA 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 

Fraternity Track; Sewanee Union; S. M. A. Club; Ne 
ograph; Tennessee Club. 



DAVID YATES, A T V. 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Freshman Basketball. '2S; Varsity Basketball, '29; 
Fraternity Baseball; Student Vestry. '2S, '29; Presi- 
dent Freshman Class, '-S; Honor Council; Glee Club; 
Sigma Epsilon; Neograph: Choir; Varsity Debate; 
North Carolina Club. 




6£ 




Gafi and Gown, 1929 





rRESHMAN 

The HeroiNe a.Nd Ware MfcfcT; 
Th<ry \&\\ »N \o\j<l &t Slgkt. 



6 7 




Cafi and Gown, 1929 





freshmen 

JAMES O. BASS, A T 9. 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Basketball: Fraternity Basketball; Freshman 
"Purple," Assistant Editor: Sigma Epsilon; Junior Ger- 
man; Tennessee Club; Neograph. 

CARL BIEHL, B E r r A A 

GALVESTON, TEXAS 

Freshman Track; Fraternity Basketball and Baseball; 
Pi Omega; Texas Club. 

R. DONALD BLAIR, K 2 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football and Track; Fraternity Basketball. 
Track, and Baseball; Purple Masque; Pi Cmega; Tennes- 
see Club. 

C. BRENIZER, K * 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 

Tennessee Club; Freshman Football; Interfraternity Bas- 
ketball. 

JAMES BRETTMAN, # T A 

WICHITA, KANSAS 

Freshman Track Squad; Fraternity Track; Junior Ger- 
man. 

JAMES BREW 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
Junior German: Tennessee Club. 

WILLIAM BLOUNT BROGDEN 

WINTER HAVEN, FLORIDA 
Union; Glee Club; Pi Omega. 

ROBINSON W. BROWN, ATA 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

Freshman Track; Fraternity Track; Texas Club; Junior 
German. 

G. MALLORY BUFORD, 2 A E 

FORREST CITY, ARKANSAS 
Arkansas Club; Junior German: Union. 

CLAYTON LEE BUR WELL, 2 N 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Freshman Football; Track and Tennis; Fraternity Bas- 
ketball; North Carolina Club; Sigma Epsilon; Junior 
German; Neograph; Waiters' Union; Sewanee Union; De- 
bate. 

STEPHEN L. BURWELL, K 2 

LEXINGTON, MISSISSIPPI 
Fraternity Track. Baseball and Basketball; "Purple." 

JOHN R. CAMERON, K 2 

WINONA, MISSISSIPPI 

Freshman Football Squad; Fraternity Track; Mississippi 
Club. 



68 



resnmen 



GORDON M. CAMPBELL, JR., <I> A 9 

LEXINGTON - , KENTUCKY 

Freshman Football and Track; Junior German; Sewanee 

Union; Sigma Epsilon; Kentucky Club. 

CECIL E. CANTRILL, JR., * A 9 

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY 

Freshman Football and Track; Fraternity Basketball; 

Sewanee L'nion; Sigma Epsilon; Kentucky Club; Junior 

German. 

O. D. CARLTON, A T 9. 

THOMASON, ALABAMA 
Sigma Epsilon; Junior German; Alabama Club. 

WOOD BOWYER CARPER, JR., X X 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

Fraternity Basketball; Freshman Basketball; Junior Ger- 
man; Sigma Epsilon; Choir. 

JACK COLE, 2 A E 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
Alabama Club; Freshman Track; Junior German. 

WILLIAM B. CONNOLLY, K X 

HELENA, ARKANSAS 

Fraternity Baseball ; Arkansas Club; Purple Masque; 
"Cap and Gown;" Pi Omega; Neograph ; Freshman "Pur- 
ple;' Joke Editor; Junior German; "Mountain Goat." 

DONALD H. COWAN, * A 9 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

Freshman Football and Track; Fraternity Basketball and 
Baseball; Alabama Club; Sigma Epsilon; Junior German. 

CHARLES CRENSHAW 

GREENWOOD, MISSISSIPPI 
Mississippi Club; Sigma Epsilon; Junior German Club. 

CHARLES W. CROSS, 2 A E 

CLARKSVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football; Vice-President Freshman Class; Ten- 
nessee Club; Junior German. 

FRANK M. CRUMP, <I> A B 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 

Freshman and Interfraternity Basketball ; Tennessee 
Club; Junior German ; Sigma Epsilon. 

J. HAVIS DAWSON, 2 X 

MOBILE, ALABAMA 

Freshman Football and Basketball; Fraternity Basket- 
ball, Track, and Baseball; Junior German; Alabama Club. 

WM. HASKELL DuBOSE, JR., A T V. 

SEWANEE, TENNESSFE 
Freshman Track; Sigma Epsilon; Choir; Junior German. 




6 9 




_J 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 




Fresh 



resnmen 

BERRYMAN W. EDWARDS, KA 

CEDARTOWN, GEORGIA 

Fraternity Basketball; Choir; Sigma Epsilon: 
Club; Junior German. 



Georgia 



HUMPHREY FOLK, 2 A E 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
Freshman Football; Junior German; Tennessee Club. 

FRANK VAN DUSEN FORTUNE, 2 N 

WOOSTER, OHIO 

Freshman and Fraternity Basketball; Freshman Track; 

Sigma Epsilon; Neograph: Freshman "Purple;" Student 

Vestry; Committee on Publications; Junior German. 

GEORGE THOMAS FOUST, B E r r A A 

CLARKSVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Sigma Epsilon; Fraternity Basketball, Baseball, and 
Track; Tennessee Club. 

JULIUS GEORGE FRENCH. B E r I' A A 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Freshman Football; Sigma Epsilon; Fraternity Basket- 
ball, Baseball, and Track: Texas Club; Debate; Choir; 
Crucifer. 

OTIS N. FUSSELL, 2 A E 

PONCHATOULA, LOUISIANA 

Freshman Football, Basketball, and Track; Louisiana 
Club; Fraternity Baseball and Track; Junior German. 

BERNARD CAUSE, K * 

SELMA, ALABAMA 

Alabama Club; Junior German; Fraternity Basketball, 
Baseball, and Track; Sigma Epsilon. 

DANIEL GILCHRIST, JR. 

COURTLAND, ALABAMA 



Alabama Club; 



Sigma Epsilon: Tennis; Sewanee Union; 
Junior German Club. 



WILKS GLOVER 

SPRINGFIELD, TENNESSEE 
Tennessee Club; Junior German Club. 

JOHN G. GOMILA, * A 9 

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA 

Assistant Freshman Football Manager; Louisiana Club; 
Fraternity Basketball. 

HUGH M. GOODMAN, 2 N 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football; Captain Freshman Basketball; Ten- 
nessee Club; Freshman Track; Junior German; Frater- 
nity Basketball, Track, and Baseball. 

JOHN ASHMORE GOWEN 

NEW BRITAIN, CONNECTICUT 
Choir; Glee Club; Neograph. 



70 



rresnmen 
IVAN W. HAFLEY, * I' A 

HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA 
Freshman Football; Alabama Club: Fraternity Baseball. 

ROBERT HALL, A T {> 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Sigma Epsilon; Junior German: Freshman Track: Fra- 
ternity Basketball: Alabama Club. 

ELWOOD HANNUM, B E F V A A 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

PI Omega: Choir; Fraternity Basketball. Baseball, Track, 
and Tennis: Cosmopolitan Club. 

ROBERT P. HARE, III, <P A 9 

ATLANTA, GEORCIA 

Freshman Tennis Team ; Fraternity Basketball ; Junior 

German ; Pi Omega; Sewanee Union ; Freshman "Purple" 

Assistant Editor; Georgia Club. 

JAMES HARRISON 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 
Choir; Sigma Epsilon ; Tennessee Club; Junior German. 

GEORGE E. HART, JR., A T Q 

INVERNESS, MISSISSIPPI 

Sigma Epsilon ; Mississippi Club; Junior German Club; 
Union. 

JOHN PEELER HENDERSON, 4> A 9 

BONHAM, TEXAS 

Texas Club; Junior German Club; Assistant Freshman 
Football Manager; Pi Omega; Secretary Union ; Assistant 
Editor Freshman "Purple;" Freshman Track ; Purple 
Masque ; Exchange Editor of "Purple;" Frat Baseball 
and Track. 

CARLOS DCDLEY HOLLIS, 2 N 

BENNETTSVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Junior German ; Freshman Football Squad; Assistant 

Basketball Manager; Freshman Track Squad ; Fraternity 

Basketball and Baseball ; South Carolina Club. 

OTIS JEFFRIES, 2 N 

DECATUR, ALABAMA 

Freshman Football ; Alabama Club; Freshman Track 

Squad; Junior German ; Fraternity Basketball, Track, 

and Baseball. 

ABNER JOHNSON, A T 9. 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

Glee Club; Choir; Georgia Club; Freshman Football 
Squad; Junior German 

JOSEPH L. KELLERMAN, K 2 

SOUTH PITTSBURG, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football; Fraternity Basketball; Freshman 
Track. 

RICHARD KENNEDY, * A 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Tennessee Club; Freshman Football Squad; Junior Ger- 
man. 





Caft and Gown, 1929 





rresnmen 

EDWARD L. LANDERS, K A 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 
Cosmopolitan Club; Junior German. 

FRANK CHARLES LANDERS, K A 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 
Cosmopolitan Club; Junior German. 

FRANK LAUGHLIN, JR., K 2 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

Freshman Football; Choir; Pi Omega; Gleo Club; Track; 
Fraternity Baseball, Track, and Basketball; Junior Ger- 
man Club; Freshman "Purple" Staff. 

HUGH CLARENCE MANFORD, 2 N 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 
Junior German; Freshman Track Squad; Texas Club. 

JAMES L. MANN, A X A 

COLLIERVILLE, TENNESSEE 
Tennessee Club ; Fraternity Baseball; Freshman Track, '29. 

JAMES MAYS, ATA 

HELENA, ARKANSAS 
Junior German; Cosmopolitan Club. 

DANIEL R. McALPINE, JR., AT(1 

NASHVILLE. TENNESSEE 

Freshman Basketball and Track-; Fraternity Basketball; 

Sigma Epsilon; Tennessee Club; Junior German; Student 

Vestry; Committee on Student Activities: Secretary and 

Treasurer of Freshman Class. 

WAYNE McCONNELL, $ A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Alabama Club; Union; Fraternity Baseball; Sigma Ep- 
silon; Junior German Club. 

KENNETH McDONALD, A T fi 

DALLAS, TEXAS 
Freshman Football: Texas Club. 

JOHN McREE, 2 A E 

HELENA, ARKANSAS 

Freshman Basketball; Fraternity Baseball and Basket- 
ball; Arkansas Club. 

JOHN MERRIMAN 

MONTEACLE, TENNESSEE 
Football Squad; Tennessee Club. 

N. THAYER MONTAGUE, A T A 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 

Glee Club; Sewanee Union; Tennessee Club; Fraternity 
Track; Junior German Club; Freshman Track; "Moun- 
tain Goat" Staff. 







Cafi and Gown, 1929 




Fresh 



reshmen 

BROWN MOORE 

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA 
Louisiana Club; Sigma Epsilon. 

EDWIN L. MLLLINS, K 2 

CLANTON, ALABAMA 

Freshman Track; Fraternity Basketball. Baseball, and 

Track; Alabama Club; Pi Omega; "Purple" Staff; Junior 

German Club. 

ALBERT G. PABST, <I> r A 

CALVESTON, TEXAS 
S. M. A. Club; Texas Club; Fraternity Baseball. 

CARLISLE PAGE, 2 A E 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 
Tennessee Club; Freshman Football; Junior German. 

W. T. PARISH, * A 

NEWPORT, ARKANSAS 

Arkansas Club; Junior German Club; Fraternity Baseball; 
Union. 

JAY D. PATTON, A T V. 

SOUTH ARIJMORE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Freshman Football. Basketball, and Track; Fraternity 
Basketball; Sigma Epsilon; Tennessee Club; Junior Ger- 
man; Grievance Committee. 

THOMAS PEACOCK, * A 8 

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA 
Junior German; Freshman Track Squad. 

E. WILTON PERRY, <I> A 1' 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

Texas Club: Junior German; Sewanee Union; Freshman 
Track; Circle Club; Fraternity Baseball and Track. 

D. WARD PHILLIPS, JR., 2 N 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Captain Freshman Football Team; Junior German; Fra- 
ternity Basketball and Baseball; Tennessee Club. 

FRANK B. PLLMMER, * A 9 

BEAUMONT, TEXAS 
Texas Club; Union; Fraternity Baseball. 

WILLIAM G. PRIEST, * r A 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

Fraternity Basketball, and Baseball; Freshman Football 

and Track Squads; Junior German; Texas Club; Circle 

Club. 

FRANK PULLEY, K * 

TARBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

"Purple;" Sigma Epsilon; Junior German Club; North 
Carolina Club; Interfraternity Tennis. 




Caft and Gown, 1929 




rreshmen 

WILLIAM PRICE RICHARDSON, JR., B E T T A A 

LEXINGTON", KENTUCKY 
Sigma Epsilon; Fraternity Baseball. 

FRANK M. ROBBINS, JR., ATA 

SIGNAL MOUNTAIN, TENNESSEE 

Junior German; LJnion; Tennessee Club; Fraternity Bas- 
ketball ; Choir. 

EARL RUDOLPH 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Alabama Club; Junior German; Fraternity Basketball; 
Freshman Track. 

ROYAL K. SANFORD, K i; 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Freshman Football and Track; Pi Omega; Junior Ger- 
man Club; Neograph; Freshman "Purple;" Fraternity 
Track; "Cap ana Go\yn;" "Purple" Staff; S. M. A. Club. 

JOSEPH SCOTT, A T Q 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 
Choir; Sigma Epsilon; Junior German Club. 

JOHN SHUTE, K A 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
Tennessee Club; Fraternity Basketball and Track. 

DRAYTON BEECHER SMITH, K 2 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football Squad; Pi Omega; Fraternity Basket- 
ball. Baseball, and Track; Junior German Club; Tennes- 
see Club; Circulation Staff "Purple." 

JOHN MORGAN SOPER, <I> A 9 

HARRODSBURG, KENTUCKY 

Freshman Football, Basketball, and Track; Sigma Epsi- 
lon; Fraternity Basketball and Baseball. 

BENJAMIN SPRINGER 

CALVESTON, TEXAS 
S. M. A. Club: Texas Club; Pi Omega; Freshman Track. 

JOSEPH STRAS, * F A 

CARDINAL, KENTUCKY 

Freshman Football; Fraternity Baseball, Basketball, and 
Track; Junior German. 

SHIEHL STRONG 

CLARKSVILLE, TENNESSEE 
Tennessee Club; Declamation. 

WILLOUGHBY SYLER 

HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA 

Pi Omega; Track; Alabama Club; Waiters' Union; De- 
bate. 



74 



Cafi and Goivn, 1929 




Freshmen 

RICHARD TAYLOR, K * 

WINCHESTER, TENNESSEE 

Freshman "Purple;" Tennessee Club; Sigma Epsilon; 
Fraternity Basketball; "Cap and Gown." 

FRED THOMPSON, K 2 

DALLAS, TEXAS 

Fraternity Basketball; Fraternity Track; Freshman 
Track Squad; Texas Club; Junior German Club. 

ROBERT B. TOOMBS, K A 

GALVESTON", TEXAS 
Fraternity Basketball; Texas Club. 

CHARLES UNDERWOOD 

SEWANEE, TENNESSEE 
Freshman Track; Tennessee Club; S. M. A. Club. 

CHARLES WILLIAM VACGHAN, 3 N 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football ; Tennessee Club; Freshman Track 

Squad; Junior German; Fraternity Basketball. Track, 

and Baseball ; President of Freshman Class. 

EDWARD JOHN WALKER, JR , A T A 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Track ; Editor Freshman "Purple;" Sewanee 

Union; Tennessee Club; "Mountain Goat" Staff; Junior 

German ; Freshman Track; Neograph. 

JOHN WALTON 

ALLENSVII.LE, KENTUCKY 
Glee Club; Choir; Pi Omega. 

A. P. WARD, JR., <I> I' A 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

Fraternity Basketball; Freshman Track; Junior German; 
Texas Club. 

JOHN HICKMAN WHALEY, JR., KA 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Tennessee Club; Freshman Football Squad; Junior Ger- 
man Club; Assistant Editor Freshman "Purple;" "Moun- 
tain Goat." 

GRANVILLE WILLIAMS, <I> r A 

CHICKASHA, OKLAHOMA 
Golf; Cosmopolitan Club. 

HEDLEY JAMES WILLIAMS, B E T T A A 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

Choir; Sigma Epsilon: Fraternity Basketball and Base- 
ball. 

JOHN F. WILLIAMS, K A 

FORT WORTH, TEXAS 
Freshman Football Squad; Texas Club. 




75 




Cafi and Gown, 1929 





rresnmen 

EDWARD CHARLES WILSON, A T A 

MERIDIAN - , MISSISSIPPI 

Glee Club; Syneopators; Freshman Track; Junior Ger- 
man; Mississippi Club; Fraternity Basketball. 

WALTER TRAVIS WILSON, JR., REITAA 

NAVASOTA, TEXAS 

Pi Omega; Texas Club; Choir; "Mountain Goat." 

MALCOLM WISE, 2 N 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football; Fraternity Basketball, Baseball, and 
Track; Tennessee Club. 

CLARK WOOD, K 2 

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 

Pi Omega; Fraternity Basketball, Baseball, and Track; 
Junior German; Arkansas Club; "Purple." 

ROBERT WORRALL, 2 N 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Freshman Football and Basketball; Fraternity Basket- 
ball and Baseball; Tennessee Club. 

M. LESLIE WUESCHER, JR., S A E 

BOCALOSA, LOUISIANA 

Freshman Football and Track Squads; Junior German; 

Fraternity Basketball, Baseball, and Track; Louisiana 

Club. 

ARTHI'R H. YERXA, JR., A T fi 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Freshman Track; Sigma Epsilon; Junior German; Texas 
Club. 




76 



Cafi and Goivn, 1929 





77 



L__ 




=J 



Caft and Goivn, 1929 





Faculty of the Theological School 



The Rev. George Boggan Myers, 
LL.B. 

University of Mississippi; B.D., University of 
the South. 

Professor of Philosophy of Religion, El/iiis 
and Sociology 



The Rev. William H. DuBose, B.A., 
M.A 

University of the South; D.D., Virginia Theo- 
logical Seminary. 

Professor of Old Testament Language and 
Interpretation 



The Rev. Cary B. Wilmer, B.A. 

William and Mary; D.D., University of the 
South. 

Professor of Practical Theology, and Acting 
Professor of English Bible 

The Rev. Charles Luke Wells 

B.A.. Harvard; B.D., Cambridge; Ph.D., Har- 
vard. 

Dean of the Theological School and Profes- 
sor of Ecclestical History and Canon Laiv 



The Rev. Robert MacD. Kirkland, 
B.A. 

University of Chicago; M.A., University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Professor of New Testament Language and 
Interpretation 

The Rev. Wilson L. Bevan, M.A. 

Columbia; S.T.B., General; Ph.D., Munich. 
Professor of Systematic Divinity 



Caft and Gown, 1929 




Theologs 



THOMAS EARL DUDNEY, 2 A E 

DALLAS, TEXAS 

Sopherim, Purple Masque; Blue Key; Scholarship 
Society. 



JONES S. HAMILTON, K 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
Millsaps; Winchester Parish. 



JOHN WATSON MUTTON 

WATERBURV, CONNECTICUT 

Order of Gownsmen; Scholarship Society; Alto Mis- 
sion. 



GEORGE W. RIDGWAY, B E r r A A 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN 

Sacristan St. Luke's Chapel; Bridgeport. Ala. Mis- 
sion; Scholarship Society; Order of Gownsmen; Stu- 
dent Vestry, '28. 



CHARLES FREDERICK WULF, B E TT A A 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 

Order of Gownsmen; Phi Beta Kappa; Scholarship 

Society; Glee Club, '25. '27, '2S; Choir; Sigma Epsi- 

lon; Kentucky Medal for Greek. '26. 




79 




Theologs 



EDWARD CLARK BENEDICT, B E T Y A A 

APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA 

Purple Masque: Stage Manager of Union: Order of 
Gownsmen; Student Vestry; Pi Omega. 



FRANCIS D. DALEY, 2 N 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

Phi Beta Kappa; Scholarship Society; Honor Council; 

Sopherim; Blue Key; Alpha Phi Epsilon; "Mountain 

Goat:" Varsity Debate; Chi Rho. 



STANLEY DEAN, B E r r A A 

ROCHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA 

Order of Gownsmen; St. Luke's Librarian; Purple 
Masque. 



HURLBUT A. GRISWOLD, 2 A E 

NEW BRITAIN, CONNECTICUT 

Sopherim: Editor "Mountain Goat:" Instructor in 
Bible; Chi Rho; Glee Club State Manager; Alpha Phi 
Epsilon; Purple Masque; Sewanee Union Secretary- 
Treasurer. '27, '2S. Treasurer, '28, '29; Manager Mov- 
ing Picture Department, '2S, '29; Order of Gownsmen; 
Publication Committee: Senior German, 



WILLIAM STEPHEN TURNER, S A E 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

"S" Club; Pi Omega: Alpha Phi Epsilon; Blue Key: 
Senior German; Chi Rho; Debate; Purple Masque. 



8o 



Theologs 



WINSTEAD LEGGETT 

TARBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 
Pi Omega ; Roarch Cove Mission. 



JOHN CARLTON TURNER, ^ A E 

GREEN'VILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 

('hi Rho; Ssnior German ; Order of Gownsmen ; Fra- 
ternity Basketball ; Pi Omega; South Carolina Club; 
Union. 



JACK WALTHOCR, X «I> 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

Director Glee Club; Varsity Track; Sewanee Synco- 
pators ; Prowlers ; Georgia Club ; Senior German ; Pur- 
ple Masque; Blue Key; Cheer Leader. 




81 





'Sums bhuu for blnru, b\$- 
jmttttg tnrl| bg tnrt|, fnr ant 
mania mit retreat ttor t o%r 



— Byron: Don Juan. 




look tttyrw 

Atfjbtira 









Ca-f) and Gotun, 1929 




Athletic Board of Control 

William H. MacKellar. Esq President 

William C. Schoolfield Vice-President 

Gaston S. Bruton, Esq Secretary 

Telfair Hodgson, Esq. . . . Treasurer 

B. F. Finney, Esq. 
G. B. Baker, Esq. 
W. B. Nauts, Esq. 
M. S. Bennett, Esq. 
H. M. Gass, Esq. 
Dr. R. M. Kirry-Smith 
J. C. Bruton 
W. E. Boyd 



85 






1 


"iV ^^ 






1- 


Ik ; ^ 


1 


*" _w : k 




Mm 


1 






I i V 



Bevkett 



KlRCKPATRICK 



CUBBAGE 



The Coaching Staff 



As their Professor of Physical Education and as Head of the Department of Ath- 
letics, Sewanee boasts of Coach Mike Bennett. He is well known throughout the 
South, and as a recognition of his merit he was this year selected by the coaches of this 
country for the purpose of introducing football into Mexico. 

Coach Kirckpatrick, famous for his prep-school champions at Montgomery Bell, 
is a new addition to the Tiger coaching staff. He is in charge of football and devotes 
most of his time to the backfield. 

Coach Cubbage has charge of the line during football season. In the spring he 
directs the track team. In all seasons he is the same genial and able "Uncle Ben." 

Coach Emmerson, who had for many years turned out championship basketball 
teams for the Y. M. C. A., of Nashville, was this year secured as our basketball coach. 
His sterling ability was soon evident, and within the next year he should have one of 
the strongest basketball teams in the South. 



86 




The Varsity Managers 

Stanyarne Burrows Manager Football 

Warren Way Manager Basketball 

Frank Burroughs Manager Track 

Leslie Williams . Manager Golf 

Robert Cann Manager Tennis 

The Cheer Leaders 




Thompson 



Walthour 



HOPPEN, C. 



87 



L 




W///////U 




Cafe and Goivn, 1929 





0009 



"S" Club 



Bruton, President; Schoolfield, Vice- 
President; Turner, Secretary cunt 
Treasurer; Autin, Barron, Bean, J. 
Bean, R., Bryant, Burroughs, Bur- 





rows, Cravens, W., Ezzelle, Frever, 
Frizzelle, Griswold, Hines, Hope, 
Stimson, Thigpen, Tollev, Walthour, 
Way, Williams, Yates, Boyd, C. W., 
Cravens, D., Young, A. E., Young, 
P. D., Eby, Brenizer, Keyworth, 
Chattin, Deovies, Peteet, Boyd, C. 
M., Hoppen, H. 






Caft and Gown, 1929 





Cafi and Goian, 1929 





Varsity Football Squad 

7*o/i Row 
Charles, Bkckvvith, Kellerman, Ryan, Ezzell, Spencer, Stimson, 
Butler, Ware, Eby, Harrison 

Middle Row 
Coach Cubbace, Manager Burrows, Pearce, W. Cravens, P. Young, 
Crosland, A. Young, J. Bean, Ponder, Keyworth, Barron, C. W. 
Boyd, Smith, Coach Bennett 

Bottom Row 
Tolley, DeOvies, R. Bean, Ciiattin, Autin, Captain Bruton, 
Schoolfield, Griswold, Hoppen, C. M. Boyd, Petf.et, Coach Kirck- 
patrick. 



90 



Caft and Gown, 1929 






Schoolfield circles Bama s right end 



R 



eview 



of the S 



eason 



Though this year's football season was one of the most disastrous in the history of 
the school, yet we find a solace in the noble fight made on Thanksgiving. Never will we 
forget the sight of the small purple team as it stiffened on its own two-yard line and 
held the large Vandy backs for no gain four times in succession. 

Sewanee, 14; Bryson, o 
Sewanee, minus the services of four regulars, inaugurated her 1928 football season 
by avenging a defeat of last year at the hands of Bryson College. The final score was 
14-O. At no time during the game was the Tiger line in danger; he carried the fight 
to the opposition throughout the fray. Early in the second quarter the Purple started 
a drive from their own forty-yard line and it was never stopped until Reuben Bean 
had deposited the oval over the Bryson goal line. Boyd added the extra point with a 
dropkick to make the score, 7-0. In the second half Sewanee drove Bryson off their 
feet, but lacked the punch to score more than once. In the closing minutes of play 
Charlie Boyd intercepted a pass and wriggled back down to the eight-yard line. There 
the Bryson line stiffened and two thrusts at the line netted little. On the next play 
Schoolfield passed over the goal line to Ezzell for our second touchdown just as the 
whistle blew. On an attempted place kick, Tolley fumbled th; ball, but Schoolfield 
picked it up and raced around end for the extra point. Boyd, Schoolfield, Ezzell, A. 
E. Young and Joe Bean played best for the winners, while McDill and King were 
most consistent for the losers. 

Sewanee, o; Texas A. & M., 69 
On the following Saturday the Tigers journeyed to the Lone Star State to do 
battle with Texas A. & M. With the thermometer standing at 96 degrees they took 
the field amidst the cheers of a few Sewanee rooters. There was an exchange of punts 
and then the powerful Texas backs went into action. For a few minutes the Tiger 
battled bravely and withstood the assault; but the pitiless rays of "Old Man Sol," and 



91 




the fierce drives of Dorsey, Conover, Burges and Zarofonetis were too much. The 
game was only a few minutes old when the Purple wilted before the onslaught. Se- 
wanee had her stars in Schoolfield and "Buddy" Young, who played like demons and 
backed up the wavering line until exhausted by the heat. Dorsey, Conover and Burges 
starred for the Texans. 

Sewanee, 13 ; Transylvania. 14 

Presenting a fighting little team that fought hard all the way, Transylvania 
twisted the Tiger's tail in one of the wierdest exhibitions of football ever seen on 
Hardee field. It was an off day for the Purple warriors and they certainly showed 
it on every occasion. Inability to hold the pigskin within the fifteen-yard line cost 
them a victory. Autin was the offensive star of the game, scoring both of the touch- 
downs. Boyd's returning of punts was unusually good, while in the line Ezzell, Buddy 
Young and Joe Bean are to be commended for their nice work. Crutcher and Has- 
selton starred for Transylvania. 




Piper scores on Alabama 
92 




Sewaxee, 38; Cumberland, 



The Tigers had now suffered two successive defeats, so that the Cumberland Bull- 
dogs felt confident of their ability to administer a third. But the Purple showed a 
complete reversal of form to swamp the lawyers by the score of 38-0. 

During the game the Tigers developed an offense that was invincible and fre- 
quently took to the air to gain yardage. There were a galaxy of stars. Charlie Boyd 
scored three of the touchdowns, running one back from the kickoff ; Barron did the 
same trick but was called back. Schoolfleld, Autin and Reuben Bean played nice 
games to complete the backfield luminaries. In the line Captain Bruton and Griswold 
plugged up holes in fine fashion. Bean and Ezzell also played jam up ball in the line 
and were responsible for numerous tackles. Cook played a wide-awake game for Cum- 
berland. Several times his red head was seen to come up last from the pile of gridiron 
warriors. High and Clark divided honors in the backfield. 

Sewaxee, 12; University of Alabama, 42 
On the following Saturday when Purple met Crimson in the Legion Stadium at 
Birmingham, there was celebrated the twenty-fourth meeting of Tiger and Tide. 




Schoolfirltl eludes an Alabama tackier 
93 



L 





That evening when the sun sank behind the clouds, the schools were tied in their stand- 
ing, each having won twelve games. 

Every game of the twenty-four has been fiercely contested, and this one was no 
exception. The Tiger was outclassed, but his fighting spirit won the sincere admira- 
tion of the twelve thousand who witnessed the game. The line lacked weight, but the 
backfield functioned like clockwork; and led by the versatile Schoolfield, who shot 
passes with unerring accuracy, the Purple scored two touchdowns. Schoolfield starred 
in the backfield, while Ezzell and Piper on the flanks, were at all times menaces to the 
Crimson offense. Ezzell had to retire from the game early in the fourth quarter, and 
as he left the field a Birmingham! sports writer was heard to ask, "who is that man?" 
"Ezzell," was the rejoinder. "I'll say he is," was the sports writer's reply. Hicks 
and Holm starred in the backfield for "Bama," while Skidmore starred in the line and 
at kicking the extra points from placement. 

SewaxeEj 6; University of Florida. 71 
HEAT, intolerable Heat — again the Tigers struck this, combined with a powerful 
driving eleven and they fell before the onslaught of the Florida Alligator by a 71-6 
decision. The score at the end of the first quarter was 6-6, but the Tiger strength 





Reuben Bean stops Vandy's smash at the line 
94 



a Caft and Gown, 1929 




was spent and from then on it was a Tiger rout. 

The mountaineers were handicapped by the lack of substitutes, which were needed 
in the intense heat. The result was that they had no more chance with Florida than 
would a Tiger with an Alligator battling in the water. The second team was sent in 
to stem the tide at the beginning of the second half, but they were unable to cope with 
the hard-driving Florida backs and were soon replaced by the first string. Young, 
Bruton and Stimson played best for the Tigers in the line ; Schoolfield and Autin ex- 
celled in the backfield. For Florida, Clark was most consistent in the line, while Ber- 
thea, Goodbread and Sauls starred in the backfield. 

Sewanee, o; University of Tennessee, 37 
Sewanee presented a rejuvenated team in Knoxville on the following week-end; 
and although beaten by the decisive score of 37-0, played a better defensive game, the 
line being almost impregnable. Reuben Bean was both the offensive and defensive 
star for the Tigers. His ability at backing up the line was one of the chief reasons why 
the Vols were so unsuccessful in that sector. Jack Autin returned some beautiful 
punts with his customary grace and ease. Likewise, he showed his track ability by 
overtaking the fleet-footed McEvcr in order to stave off a touchdown. As proof that 




Griswold nails I andy near their own goal line 
95 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 





the game was more closely contested than the score might indicate, we will state that 
Sewanee made seven first downs to Tennessee's eleven. 

Sewaxee, 6; Tulaxf, 41 

On Saturday, November the seventeenth, Sewanee and Tulane met in New Or- 
leans for their annual gridiron battle. The Purple went into the game minus two 
of their stars; Schoolfield was nursing a bad shoulder, while Joe Bean was out with a 
bad knee. Tulane scored early in the game and shortly afterward the Tigers did 
likewise, but failed to gain the extra point. 

For three quarters the Greenies led by this narrow margin of one point. Both 
teams were playing excellent defensive games. Ezzell and Bill Cravens were smear- 
ing Tulane's end runs, while Bean and "Buddy" Young were plugging the line. Often 
the celebrated Banker was being thrown for losses of from one to five yards. 

Then near the close of the fourth quarter it was necessary to remove Ezzell, Cra- 
vens and Griswold from the line-up. Immediately the Sewanee defense cracked, and 
Banker and Armstrong began to gain at will. The final score was 41-6. 

Sewaxee, o; Vaxderbilt, 13 

It was Thanksgiving day and once more the Purple and White was hoisted op- 
posite the Black and Gold. What did it matter that Sewanee was doped to lose by a 
lopsided score, for on Thanksgiving dope means nothing to the Tiger. Amidst the 
tumultuous cries of "Yea, Sewanee's Right," the teams took the field and the battle 
was on. 

The Commodore soon found that this was no senile beast, but a growling, angry 
Tiger which would not yield. Time after time the Vandy backs worked the ball for a 
first down only to find further advance impossible. That small line of Purple would 
not be crossed in times of danger, while the backfield, though unable to gain, hurled 
itself at every attack. 

Sewanee's light ends performed in heroic manner against the towering Vanderbilt 
flankmen. The center of the line, composed of three light men, Stimson, Griswold 
and Ryan, was impenetrable. Bruton, performing in his last college game, brought 
back memories of the past year at Thanksgiving. Schoolfield and Bean were demons 
on the defense. All the team was heroes, for though defeated, they gave their best. 
Seven Tiger luminaries ended their gridiron careers in this game — Captain Bruton, 
Jim Griswold, Jack Autin, Billy Schoolfield, Chester Chattin, Reuben Bean and 
Charlie Boyd. 96 



Cafi and Goivn, 1929 




FRESH MAX TEAM 



The Freshman S 



eason 



This year "Hec" Clarke, a former Tiger star and for the past few years the freshman foot- 
ball coach, was once more in charge. He was ably assisted by Buck Haynes, a wearer of the 
Purple and White in the memorable Sewanee-Vanderbilt game of 1924. The entire squad set- 
tled down to work early in the season, and the result was one of the best freshman teams in the 
South. Only one game was lost throughout the season. 

The first opponent was Bryson College, which was trampled to the tune of 20-7. Worrall 
ran, punted and passed to lead the Sewanee frosh in total yardage gained. He scored the sec- 
ond touchdown on an end run for eleven yards and passed to Fussell for the third. Phillips had 
rammed off tackle for the initial counter. 

The next game was fought to a 0-0 tie in weather more suitable for a boat race than for 
football; Hardee Field was a quagmire. In such conditions brilliant runs were impossible, and 
fumbles played a leading role. The Sewanee frosh threatened early in the game and in the 
closing minutes of the final quarter. Centre never offered a serious threat at scoring, though 
their Indian Chief, Tennikat, pounded through for many gains in mid-field. Jeffries was Se- 
wanee's most consistent back; Joe Kellerman, substituting for Worrall, was a close second. 
Goodman played a good defensive game and received several passes for short gains. Patton 
usually beat the ends down the field to make the tackle on punts. Both teams packed plenty of 
power and were fighting hard at all stages of the game. Sewanee gained more yardage and 
looked the better team. On a dry field we would pick them to win, but who knows? 

On the following week-end it was once more Sewanee versus Kentucky. This time it was the 
Tiger frosh who took the train for a foreign field. The destination was Georgetown. Once 
more the field was muddy and water-soaked. For the first ten minutes neither team could score, 
then near the end of the first quarter Worrall received a punt which he returned forty-eight 
yards for a touchdown. After this, it was only a question as to how high the score would mount. 
Near the close of the game, Jeffries made the longest run of the day by dashing around end for 
fifty yards and a touchdown. Phillips and Hafley tore the Georgetown line to shreds by their 
plunges and were always to be depended upon for a few yards. The final score was 34-0, Se- 
wanee. 



97 




Cafe and Gown, 1929 




Then came the hefty team from Chattanooga. For a freshman aggregation they were one of 
the heaviest teams ever seen on Hardee Field. Taking the opening kick-off, they marched 
straight up the field for a touchdown. This seemed to incite the Tigers who now began to 
fight in earnest. Worrall led the attack with his usual calm, but steady and consistent gains. 
Never in his career did he play a more spectacular game. It was he who placed the ball in 
position for scoring the first touchdown, it was his steady arm which shot the oval into Jeffries' 
waiting arms to score the second. It was his sensational run which scored Sewanee's third 
marker. On this run, man after man, attempted to bring him down; at least six seized his 
elusive hips, but none held them. Joyfully, the side lines prophesied a freshman victory against 
Vanderhilt on Thanksgiving. But such was not to be, for on the following week Worrall broke 
his leg in a scrimmage against the Varsity. 

On Thanksgiving morning the freshmen clashed with the rats from Vanderbilt. The scene 
was a black, muddy field in Sulphur Dell in Nashville. For the first few minutes the Purple 
frosh had the better of the engagement and threatened the Vandy goal, but the attack soon 
wilted and the absence of Worrall's guiding hand began to be felt. The young Commodores 
started up the field on a drive which ended when Leonard swept around end for a score. From 
then on throughout the first half the Tigerettes were chiefly on the defensive. 

In the second half, the Purple frosh took the offensive and mixing many passes with line 
plays, threatened to score on two occasions, but in both instances the final punch was lacking. 
The game ended with the counter standing, 13-0 in favor of Vandy. 

But in spite of the defeat, there is nothing but praise to be said for the entire freshman team. 
They went into the game demoralized by the loss of their leader and heavily outweighed in the 
line. We only hope that they will be a:, successful on the Varsity as they have been as freshmen, 




FRESHMAN SQUAD 



98 



Caft and Gown, 1929 




BASKET BfcLL 




99 




Review of the Varsity 
Season 

Sewanee's basketeers answered the call in early 
November to find themselves in a new gym and with 
a new coach, namely, Lucien Emmerson. The Ti- 
ger's first opponent was the Nashville Ramblers, 
who came up on the Mountain to take the Tigers for 
a ride — the final score was 28-23. Eaton, of the 
Ramblers, was high point man for the evening, with 
15 points. Thigpen was Sewanee's best bet with four 
field goals and a foul. Hines and Captain Williams 
starred on the defense, holding the Ramblers to seven 
points in the first half. 

Coming back after the holidays the Mountaineers 
paid a return visit to Nashville. On the first night 
they were decisively beaten by the Ramblers who 
had the advantages of a home floor and an inten- 
sive holiday campaign. On the following night the 
Burk Terrors furnished the opposition. For a time 
the Tigers came very near proving that there's noth- 
ing in a name and for three quarters led the way. 
But Chest's men finally rallied and put the game on 
ice in the closing few minutes of play. Thigpen was 
Sewanee's offensive gun; Frizzelle and Hines were 
the greatest hindrances to the Terror forwards. 

Thanksgiving memories crowded the following 
week-end when Vandy's Commodores were met in 
Nashville. Again the contest bore the earmarks of 
a Sewanee victory; but the Tigers "pooped" after 
leading to the three-quarter mark, and so satisfied 
the ancient aphorism that there's many a slip 'twixt 
the hoop and the crip. Yates caged 16 points to lead 
the field in scoring; Bruton and Thigpen were the 
most powerful on the defense. 

Bryson was easy and the Tigers jumped into the 

lead to run up a score of 39-32. Joe Bean led the 

scoring with 16 points to his credit, Thigpen was 

next with 11. Wil.iams and Hines co-starred on 

the defense, forcing the opposition to take long and 

wild shots from difficult angles. 

Tidal waves are disastrous and "Bama's" was no exception. Led by a blonde streak named 

Larrick, they twisted the Tiger's tail and tied it into forty-six knots. Bruton, Williams and Yates 

played best for the losers. 

Then came Coach Floyd's charges from Vanderbilt. The first half ended 13-7 in the Pur- 
ple's favor, with the entire Sewanee team functioning smoothly. But in the second half "lady 
Luck" turned a deaf ear to the Tiger's pleas, and the Commodores swept to victory. 




Caft and Goivn, 1929 




The following week-end witnessed the team's de- 
parture on a road trip. The first stop was in Chat- 
tanooga, where we lost a thrilling match to the Moc- 
casins. Mr. Lotspeich shot three goals in the closing 
moments of the game to nose out the Jungaleers by 
the close count of +1-36. On the following night 
the team seemed dead against a powerful Georgia 
Bulldog which swept to a 41-19 victory. Georgia 
soil gave place to South Carolina sod, and Tiger 
met Tiger in a Clemson lair. An even first half and 
an overwhelming attack in the second spelled defeat 
for Sewanee. Cody's crew were dead shots, "miff 
sed." Columbia was the next stop and South Caro- 
lina was the foe. The Tiger was weary, taking the 
short end of a 37-23 score to end a disastrous road 
trip. Bruton performed wonderfu ly in his home 
town, playing one of the best games of his career. 

Their trip being over, the Tigers took a new 
lease on life and from this time improved daily. In 
a return engagement with Chattanooga they won an 
exciting game by the close count of 34-33. A last 
minute rally by the Moccasins almost carried home 
the bacon. Thigpen starred on the offense to lead 
the scoring with 13 points; Bruton and Williams 
played nice defensive games. The next game was 
on Washington's birthday; and the Tigers were true 
to their word, for they certainly gave the Vols the 
fight of their lives. Hope starred on both the de- 
fense and the offense. The final score was 22-15. 

The Tigers ended the season by journeying to 
Murfreesboro, where they played the Middle Ten- 
nessee Teachers. The game was fast and furious 
with the Tigers doing most of the "teaching." Hope 
starred for Sewanee; but along with two others he 
had to retire ear'.v in the game, when Referee 
Bowser Chest served the riot act. In this game five 
Purple basketeers sang their Swan Song — Captain 
Williams, Bruton, Hope, Frizzelle and Bryant. 

Hitherto basketball at Sewanee had been the 
"ugly duckling" of our sports. No man was hired 
to coach basketball and to do that alone. But this year the A. B. C. 
with an expert instructor. 

The season itself demonstrated conclusively that Sewanee will enjoy and support a well 
coached team; for all the games were witnessed by large and enthusiastic crowds. With a strong 
nucleus of regulars on which to mould the powerful freshman aggregation, there can be no doubt 
but that basketball has gained a strong position among the sports of the mountain. 




decided to give it a fair trial 




Fresh 



resnman 



The scores which the Freshman basketball team piled up this season look like 
those of a one-sided bowling match. In the season they took 322 points to their op- 
ponents' 137. Never has the mountain boasted of a more powerful freshman team. 

The season was inaugurated with a 52-15 victory over McMinnville High School. 
McAlpine led the attack with 19 points; McRee, Dawson and Goodman followed 
close on his heels. Soapcr excelled as a guard. In the next game the smooth-working 
freshman machine rolled up 56 points to Winchester High School's 10. Dawson piled 
up 24 points to share the limelight with Fortune. Next came the Castle Heights 
Military Academy. They were fresh from an invasion of the East in which they had 
defeated the West Point Plebes. But the freshmen refused to be impressed and pro- 
ceeded to "drub" the Cadets, 41-19. In this game, Dawson shone against his Alma 
Mater with 15 points to his credit. McRee was not far behind with 10 points. Then 
came two games with M. B. A., of Nashville. On the mountain the frosh were the 
victors by the score of 58-24, in the city they won 30-21. In both games McAlpine 
and Goodman led the scoring, while Soaper continued to perform brilliantly as a 
guard. In the return game with Castle Heights the freshmen registered their only 
defeat of the season. They were minus the services of Dawson, their star forward, 
but nevertheless made a valiant fight before losing by the close score of 26-25. Fussell 
was the star of the game. As a climax to the year the frosh journeyed to Shelbyville 
to play the Shelbyville High School. The final score was 60-12 in favor of Sewanee. 
McRee was high point man with 25 points. 

With such promising material for next year's varsity, Coach Emmerson predicts a 
brilliant future for Sewanee's basketball team. 



Cajf> and Goivn, 1929 




103 




Cafi and Gown, 1929 




Review of Varsity Track 



Sewanee, 62; Tennessee, 55 

Sewanee opened her track season by staging a 
thrilling battle with the Vols on Shields-Watkins 
held at Knoxville. Sewanee's outstanding events 
in the meet were: Schoolfield's vaulting, Eby's 
mile, Craven's hurdling, and the relay. School- 
field soared over the bar at twelve feet; Eby broke 
his own and the Sewanee record to win the mile ; 
Cravens won both the low and high hurdles. At 
the end of the meet proper, the Tiger was leading 
by a narrow two-point margin. The relay was 
necessary to decide the meet. It was then that 
our relay team, composed of Barron, Keyworth, 
Brenizer, and Captain Autin, circled the oval four 
times in three minutes and twenty-nine seconds to 
lower the Sewanee record to win the meet. 

Sewanee, 55 ; Alabama, 57 

"Bama's" Crimson Tide came Tiger hunting 
on the mountain and there was plenty of excite- 
ment for all, when the hunt was called on Hardee 
Field. The track was fast, and only a stiff wind 
kept some Alabama and Sewanee records from be- 
ing cracked. Bradley, of Alabama, opened the 
meet by winning the century in ten flat. From 
then on it was a nip and tuck affair all the way 
with Alabama holding the lead. Eby was high 
point man for the Tigers, winning both the mile 
and the half. Cravens and Frever took care of the 
low hurdles to keep our record unspotted in this 
event. The loss of Captain Autin, who was out 
with a pulled tendon, was keenly felt. The meet 
ended with Alabama two points up — there was no 
changing of the results, for 'Bama brought no relay 
team with them. 

Sewanee, 61 ; Kentucky, 56 

On the following Saturday Sewanee's mile re- 
lav team once more copped them the meet. The — 
supposedly-tame — Wildcats from Kentucky furnish- 
ed the opposition, and upset the dope bucket by 
proving to be quite ferocious. The score was tied 



104 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 




no less than four times. Freddie Freyer was high- 
point man for the Purple, capturing firsts in the 
century and two twenty, and following Billy Cra- 
vens to the tape in the hurdles. Cravens captured 
the high and low hurdles to be next in line for high- 
point man for the Tigers. McLane of the Wild- 
cats was high-point man of the meet, with firsts in 
the high jump, broad jump, and javelin. The re- 
lay was to decide the meet. Hope, Keyworth, Bren- 
izer and Autin ran the event for Sewanee. Breni- 
zer, running third, overcame a five-yard lead to 
give the baton to Autin, who breezed home to give 
the Tigers the bacon. 

Sewanee, 38; Vanderbilt, 74 

When Tiger met Commodore in Dudley Field, 
it was just a case of meeting a team that was too 
good. After the hundred, in which Sharpe beat the 
diminutive Freyer by inches, Sewanee never had a 
look-in. There were no records broken, but Cra- 
vens and Freyer set a premium on the low hurdles 
by finishing one and two as they had in previous 
meets. Schoolfield won the pole vault by clearing 
twelve feet. Cravens and Freyer were high-point 
men for the Tigers with eight points each. Catoe, 
of Vanderbilt, took firsts in the two-twenty and the 
quarter to be high-point man of the meet. Pete 
Young jumped his way to a trip to the Conference 
by clearing the bar at five feet and ten inches. 

The Conference 

Though L. S. U. won the conference meet for the 
second consecutive year, Sewanee feels justly proud 
of the few men she entered. On a wet field School- 
field (no pun intended) soared over the bar at al- 
most twelve feet to place third in the pole vault. 
Captain-elect Young received the right to wear 
wings on his jersey by taking fourth in the high 
jump. Billy Cravens went over the low hurdles 
fast enough to place fourth with such competition 
as Beard and Virgin of Auburn. The relay, with 
Julian Hope starring, broke the record which it 
had made earlier in the season to finish fourth. 

The football relay, a new thing started this year, 
is a race in which a football is passed rather than 
a baton. The Tigers also placed fourth in this 
event, but it did not count in the scoring of the day. 




105 




Caft and Gown, 1929 




Track Squads 



Varsity 



Captain- 


Autin 


C. M Boyd 


Keyworth 


Manager 


Burroughs 


Brenizer 


Sayles 


Baarcke, 




W. Cravens 


Schoolfield 


Bacon 




DOSSETT 


Spencer 


Barron 




Eby 


G. D. Walker 


Ball 




Freyer 


Walthour 


J. Bean 




Hope 


Yates 


R. Bean 




Freshman 


P. D. Young 


BlEHL 




Fortune 


McAlpine 


Campbell 




Goodman 


Patton 


Dawson 




Kellerman 


Syler 



1 06 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 




Golf 



This year Sewanee's golf team was composed of Williams, Edwards, Butler and Holloway. 
Their outstanding achievement was a victory over Vanderbilt. 

In the first match Georgia defeated our boys 11-7, though Williams won all three of his 
points. 

The "rambling wreck" from Georgia Tech was too much for us, so we went down by a 
10I/U7I.2 score. The team seemed slightly off form in this match. 

Alabama met Sewanee on a Chattanooga course and trounced us 1 5 % - 3 % . Williams split 
his points with Pritchett, now the S. I. C. champion. 

Led by Captain Williams, the Tiger met Commodore in Nashville and defeated him 22-14. 
None of the Sewanee team had a score higher than eighty. Williams turned in a 69 on one 
of the rounds. 

The scene shifted to Asheville, where the Tigers continued their winning by defeating the 
University of North Carolina. 

In the Conference Meet the bcvs found it difficult to adapt iheir play to the style necessary 
on the course, but once they got under way they turned in some good scores. Williams defeated 
Duchwall, the champion captain of the Florida team, hut was eliminated by Prichett, who later 
became champion. The rest of our team was in the second flight, but they failed to show for 
the money. 



1 ennis 

In their first match the Sewanee netmen fell before Georgia Tech in straight sets, 6-0. 
Against Vanderbilt they showed better form, but again lost, 6-0. Yates and Cann extended their 
men to extra games and three sets, but Cram was too big a ticket for Allen. 

In the match with Southwestern of Memphis, the Tigerst lost, 7-2. Raines and McFadden 
won the two sets for Sewanee. Chattanooga invaded the mountain and shut out the Tiger, 6-0. 
In the match with Howard College our boys showed a reversal of form and won, 4-3. Brown 
and Raines won their sets in the singles, Raines and McFadden repeated in the doubles, and 
Allen with Cann, cinched the meet with their spectacular play in the last match of the day. 

Sewanee's outstanding netman, however, was a freshman. C. L. (Teddy) Burwell played 
several close matches with netmen of national prominence. He defeated Tamio Abie, the Davis 
Cup player from Japan; carried Van Ryn to extra games, and pla\ed both Grant, of Atlanta, 
and Cram, of Vanderbilt, to even breaks. 



107 




Caft and Gown, 1929 




Interfraternity Athletics 

Almost as full of interest and excitement as the intercollegiate contests are the interfrater- 
nity games. As an incentive for effort in these tournaments and leagues the A. B. C. gives a 
large silver cup to the fraternity earning the greatest number of points. First, second and third 
places are counted. 

A. T. O.'s Win Basketball Title 

Early in the interfrat basketball tourney the Sigma Nus and the A. T. O.'s began to stand out 
as the best teams on the mountain; and the last game found them playing each other for the 
title. The game was closely contested with the A. T. O.'s emerging as the victors. 



S. A. E.'s Annex Track Meet 

In the interfraternity track meet the S. A. E.'s and the A. T. O.'s fought it out almost from 
the start. The Omegans held the lead most of the way, but the final drive of Hoppen, Page, 
and Company, was not to be denied. The Sig Alph Eps cinched the contest by taking the relay. 
The K. A.'s placed third in the meet. 



Sigma Nus Win in National Sport 



Taking a lead early in the season, the Sigma Nu baseball team was by far the best in the 
league. Their heavy hitting team was never stopped. In every game they piled up the score al- 
most at will. At this writing, second place is disputed by the Deltas, S. A. E.'s, and Phi Gams. 

Phi Delts Supreme Among Racketeers 

The Phil Delts played the S. A. E.'s in the finals for the tennis crown. Barron, Soaper and 
Daggett defeated Poellnitz, Butler and McRee by a 2-1 count, McRee defeating Daggett for the 
S. A. E.'s counter. 

Phi Gams Are Golfers 

The Phi Gams proved that "Eckie" Williams was not their only golfer by winning the inter- 
frat golf title. The tourney was slow in getting under way because of inclement weather; but 
once started, the Fiji foursome, composed of Walker, "Granny" Williams, Sayles and Frizzelle, 
showed its ability. It showed good form throughout and merited its victory. Chattin lent en- 
couragement by his consistent effort. 



Bengals Like New Handball Courts 

The handball contests of this year were played on the new courts in the basement of the new 
gym. The Bengal team, composed of Schuessler and Schuessler, seemed to find these courts io 
their liking, for they swept over all competition until they reached the Deltas, champions of last 
year. Here they met Berry and Freyer. The match was fast and furious, going to four games; 
but finally the Bengals broke through to win the victory. 



108 




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tljttujH otifrr, all agm. Si M 



— Pope: Windsor Forest. 




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Cafi and Gown, 1929 






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Caft and Gown, 1929 




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Caft and Goxvn, 1929 




The Pan - Hellenic Council 




_j_joJHE Pan-Hellenic Council has for its object the promotion of better 
interfraternity relations and the government of fraternity activities. 
Its membership consists of two representatives from each of the na- 
tional Greek letter societies. 

The Council issues rules governing rushing of new men and, in cases of vio- 
lation of these regulations, acts as a court to try the offending fraternity or indi- 
vidual. It is significant to note that there have been no cases of violation of 
Pan-Hellenic rules during the past five years. Much favorable comment on the 
Sewanee system of rushing has been heard from various universities in the 
South, and in some cases the plans adopted by Sewanee Pan-Hellenic in 192.;. 
have been copied by neighboring schools. 

The second Sunday after the opening of the school year is usually designated 
by Pan-Hellenic as Pledge Day. At this time men who have received invita- 
tions to join fraternities go to the house of their choice to be welcomed by their 
future brothers. 

Officers of Pan-Hellenic Council for the year 1 928-1 929 were: E. A. R. Lem- 
mon, president, and John Cleghorn, secretary. 



"3 




^^J 




Cafi and Gown, 1929 






BASS 



^A 





HABT 



cJ.D PATTON 




- 




SMITH 



De 0V1E5 



LOVELACE 





.TPATTON^^. .^c', t >-;,,, .*sse^ EARLY 

UU1EEN .^fcw LAMr 



KEYWOBTH ^^P^ 

^as^k. YATES 






M^C ALLEY 



3 VS^W> 



' IsV* 






JOHNSON 





HATCH 




HALL, 



* 




HAWKINS DEER.1H& BOYD 



BALL 





O&d 



YERXA DuBOSE WALPINE MCDONALD SCOTT 



"+ 



Cafi and Goivn, 1929 




ALPHA TAU OMEGA 



Founded at Virginia Military 
Institute, 1865 

Tennessee Omega Chapter, 
Installed, 1877 




Colors: 
Old Gold and Sky Blue 

Flower: 
White Tea Rose 



Chapter Membership 

In Officio 

Rt. Rev. Thomas F. Gailor, S.T.D. 

Dr. B. F. Finney Dr. G. M. Baker 







In Facilitate 








W. M. MacKeli. 


\R 


R. B. Davis 




D 


(. W. H. DuBose 


W. B. N.AUTS 




W. L. Bevans 
In Urbe 




J- 


M. Scott 


P. 


S. Brooks 


P. S. Brooks, 


Jr. 








In Academia 








McCallev 


Early 


Lovelace 






Hall 


deOvies 


Green 


T. H. Smith, S. 


P. 




Hart 


Clavbrook 


Hatch 


Yates 






Johnson, A. W 


Dearing 


Ball, 


W. M. Bass 






McAlpine 


Patton, T. 


Hawkins, C. L. Carlton 






Patton, T. D. 


Boyd, W. E. 


Keyworth DuBose 






SCOIT 






Verxa 










"5 




IH 



116 




ii 7 




Caft and Gown, 1929 




118 



Caft and Gown, 1929 





SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 



Founded at University of 
Alabama, 1856 

Tennessee Omega Chapter, 
Installed, 1881 




Colors: 
Royal Purple and Old Gold 

Flower: 
Violet 



Chapter Membership 

In Officio 
Reynold M. Kirby-Smith, M.D. 



In Facilitate 
T. S. Long 



In Urbe 
H. E. Clark 



Chapter Mother 
Mrs. F. M. Preston 

In Theologia 



T. E. DuDNEY 


H. A. Griswold 




J. 


Turner 






w. s. 


Turner 














In 


Accidentia 










Burrows 




Chadwick 




Rodgers, 


W. 




Hollowa\ 


Bruton 




POELNTTZ 




Tabor 






Jones, A. 


Hoppen, 


H. 


Beckwith 




Buford 






McCree 


AUTIN 




Butler 




Cross 






Page 


Peteet 




DONNELL 




Folk 






SIMMS 


Cann 




Hoppen, C 




FUSSELL 






WlLHOIT 






Weuscher 












f .,:- 



119 



Cw§ and Gown, 1929 




J.MULUNS CAMERON LA.UGHL1N 



KAPPA SIGMA 



Founded at University of 
Virginia, 1867 

Omega Chapter Installed, 
1882 




Colors: 
Scarlet, Green and White 

Flower: 
Lily-of-the-Valley 



Lemmon 
Clechorn 
Green, W. M. 
McFadden 
Raines 
Crosland, D. 
King, J. S. 



Chapter Membership 

In Officio 
A. L. Lear, M.D. 

//; Theologia 
Jones Hamilton' 



Thigpen 

Braun 

Bridewell 

Gregory 

Hannon 

Kellerman, R. 

Vaccaro 



Smith, D. 



In Academia 

Walker, G. D. 

Walter 

Ware 

Blair 

Burwell, S. 

Cameron 

CONNOLY 

Tkompcon, F. 



Crosland E 
Kellerman, J. 
Laughlin 
Merrili. 
Mullins, E 
mullins, j. 
Sanford 



Wood 





Cafi and Gown, 1929 






123 




Cafi and Gotvn, 1929 





LONG 



124. 



I 




PHI DELTA THETA 



Founded at Miami University, 

i8+S 

Tennessee Beta Chapter 
Installed, 1883 




Colors: 
Orchid and Azure 

Flower: 
White Carnation 



Chapter Membership 
//; Facilitate In Officio 

H. M. Gass Telfair Hodgson 



Atkins 



In Urbe 

Fazick 

Chapter Mother 

Mrs. Eccleston 



Holt 



Cain 

Daggett 

Pearce 

schoolfield 

Stewart 

Barron 





In Ac 


ademia 




Eritton 




Cantrill 




EZZELL 




Cowan 




Long 




Crump 




Piper 




Gomila 




Robertson 


H. 


Greene, J. 


h 


Campbell 




Hare 




Plummer, 


F. 


Eoaper 





Hayley 

Henderson 

Kennedy 

McConnell 

Parish 

Peacock 




125 




126 



Ca{> and Gown, 1929 




DELTA TAU DELTA 



Founded at Bethany College, 
West Virginia, 1859 

Beta Theta Chapter Installed, 
1883 




Colors: 
Purple, White and Gold 

Flower: Pansy 



Chapter Membership 
In Facilitate 



W. W. Lewis 


C. C. 


Montgomery 




Dr. 


G. B. Myers 




In 


A cadi 


■mill 








Berry 


BUZARD 




Nash 






Brown, R. W. 


Bryant 


Craig, B. M. 




Thompson 






Clemons 


Burroughs, F, G. 


Craig, W. B. 




Whitaker 






Hargraves 


Freyer 


Wharton 




Eason 






Mann 


Allen, I. L. 


DUMBLE 




ROUNSAVILLE 






Montague 


Brown, C. 


Holmes, W. F. 
Walker 




Smith, W. 
Wilson, C 


E. 




Robbins 




127 



Caft and Goivn, 1919 





■■■■■■■MB 



129 




=J 




Cafi and Gown, 1929 





GLENN J.WfLLlAMS E.LANDERS TOOMBS PETEBS 




WHALEY CLOU&H C .LANDERS H.WILLIAMS B.EDWARDS 



130 



Caft and Gown, 1929 




KAPPA ALPHA 



Founded at Washington and Lee 
University, 1868 

Alpha Alpha Chapter 
Established 1883 




Colors: 
Crimson and Gold 

Flowers : 
Magnolia and Crimson Rose 



Chapter Membership 



//; Facilitate 
Col. D. G. Cravens 



In Urbe 
Frank Hickerson 



Cravens, D. G. 

Beatty 

Cravens, W. M. 

Hope 

Tolly 

Williams, H. 

Dossett 



Chapter Mother 
Mrs. D. G. Cravens 



Edwards, G. 

Glen 

Sory 

Young, P. D. 

Anderson 

Boyd, C. W. 

Charles 



In Academia 
H. 



Clough 

DURDE.V 

Gray 

mcculloch 
Peters 
Edwards,, B. 
King, R. E. 



W. 



Landers, F. C. 
Landers, F. R. 

Morris 
Shute 
Toombs 
Whaley 
Williams, J. F. 




131 



Caft and Gown, 1929 




WILLIAMS 



132 



L 




-J 



Caji and Gown, 1929 




PHI GAMMA DELTA 



Founded at Jefferson College, 
Canonsburg, Pa., 1848 

Gamma Sigma Chapter, 
Established, 191 8 




Colors: Royal Purple 
Flower: Heliotrope 



Chapter Membership 

In Facultate 
Dr. C. L. Wells J. P. Jervey 







In 


Urbe 






In Theologia 




James 


Keith Wricht 




Frances Hopkinson Craichill 










In 


Academia 






Williams, L. 


T. 




Crawford, 


N. 




Bean, J. S. 


Hafley 


Boyd, C. M. 






Frizzelle 






Sayles 


House 


Bean, R. C. 






Parker 






Spencer 


Pabst 


Chattin' 






Ponder 






Walker, W. P. 


Perry 


T WITTY 






Towle 






Brettmann 


Priest 


Brunner 






Bacon 

Ward 






Grizzard 
Williams, G. 


Stras 




133 




Cafi and Gown, 1929 





13+ 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 





135 




^ 



=J 




Cafi and Gown, 1929 





'GOODMAN 



JEFFRIES 



D HOLLIS 



CARPRR 



136 



Ca^> and Gown, 1929 




SIGMA NU 



Founded at Virginia Military 
Institute, 1869 

Beta Omicron Chapter, 
Established, 1894 




Colors: 
Black, White and Gnld 

Flower: 
White Rose 



Chapter Membership 

In Facilitate 
S. L. Ware 

Chapter Mother 
Mrs. S. L. Ware 



Blair 
Brailsford 
Griswold, J. F. 
Johnston, E. M. 
MURPHEY 

Riley 

Way, W. W. 

Davidson 



In Accidentia 

Mixes Hollis, F. T. 

Hodges Johnson, M. 

Phillips, W. E. Massencale 

Sturgis Taylor, T. F. 

Way, R A. Burwell, C. L. 

Baarcke Carper 

Burns Dawson 

Chadbourn Fortune 



Goodman 

Hollis, C. D. 

Jeffries 

Manford 

Phillips, D. W. 

Vaughan 

Wise 

WORRALL 




'37 




Caft and Goivn, 1929 





H ANNUM 



9 

RICHARDSON 



} <£ 




FOUST 



WILSON 



138 



ROYAL BENGAL CLUB 



Founded at the University of the 
South in 1926 

Alpha Chaptkr 




Colors: 
Green and White 

Flower: 
White Jassamine 





Chapter Membership 








//; Theologia 






Benedict, E. C. 


Ridgeway Dean 

In Acidemia 




WULF 


schuessler, g. d. 

Knox 

Watson 


Button Eiehl 
Matthews, A. Faust 

SCHUESSLER, J. W, FRENCH 

Williams, II. J. Wilson, W. 


T. 


Hannum 
Phillips, E. J 
Richardson 




139 




Caft and Gown, 1929 





140 




=J 




Cafi and Goivn, 1929 




: KAPPA PHI 



Founded at the University of the 
South in 1927 

Alpha Chapter 




Colors: 
Red and Blue 

Flower: 
Red Rose 



Chapter Membership 

In Theologia 
Frank Pulley George Hahn 









//; Academia 






Dickens 






Burger 


Eoy 




McGehee 






Brenizer, R. 


Weaver 




Sanderson 






Byrne 


Brenizer, 


C 


Williams, 


J- 


N. 


COPELAND 

Taylor, R. 


Gause 





*To become chapter of Pi Kappa Phi during fall of 1929. 




'si • 



141 



L 



=J 




Caft and Gown, 1929 



Stray Greeks 



Ik Officio 

C. W. Underwood, n K A 

University of the Sout/i. 

Secretary to the V ice-Chancellor 



In Facultate 



G. S. Bruton, X $ 

NORTH CAROLINA 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B. C. CUBBAGE, A r P 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE 
Assistant Coach 

J. F. Daughetiy, <f> K ^i 

DICKINSON 

Acting Professor of Physics 



A. G. WlLLEY, K K K 

DARTMOUTH 

Professor of Biolo//y 

C. B. WlLMER, n K A 

WILLIAM AND MARY 

Professor of Practical Theology 
G. F. Rupp, A Z 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE 
Professor of Forestry 



Jack Walthour, X i> 

CORNELL 

Fred McNeil, T T 

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA 



In Academia 



Hawkins Westmoreland, A X A 

VANDERBILT 

Charles Snowden, 9 K X 

CENTENARY 



John Harvey, AS* 

ILLINOIS 



142 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 




H3 




Caft and Gown, 1929 





Phi Beta Kappa 

National Honorary Scholastic Fraternity 
Founded at William and Mary, December 5, 1776 

Beta of Tennessee 

Establislicd in 1926 
Roll 



In Facilitate 

George Merrick Baker 
William Haskell DuBose 
Benjamin Ficklin Finney 
Henry Markley Gass 
Wm. Skinkle Knickerbocker 
William Boone Nauts 
Sedley Lynch Ware 
Cary Breckinriuce Wilmer 




In Academia 

Francis Dapnall Daley 
William Byrom Dickens 
William C. Schoolfield 
George D. Schuessi.er 
Edgar Allan Stewart 
Charles Frederick Wulf 



144 



Cafe and Gown, 1929 




Alpha Phi Epsilon 

National Honorary Forensic Fraternity 
Founded at University of Alabama in 191S 

Alpha Alpha Chapter 





Establislied in 1926 






Roll 




Cain, H. P. 


Dickens, W. B. 


Prof. W. H. MacKellar 


McNeil, F. A. 


Fredson*, J. 


McGehee, W. C. 


Daley, F. D. 


Griswold, H. A. 


Sanderson', A. E. 


Bruton, J. C. 


Prof. E. M. Kayden 
Prof. T. S. Long 


Turner, W. S. 



Membership in Alpha Phi Epsilon is limited to those gownsmen who have shown 
proficiency in the forensic field. Monthly meetings are held in the various frater- 
nity houses and in the homes of the faculty members. In these meetings the various 
problems of national life are discussed; this year especial attention was given to 
those problems which concern the student at Sewanee. The program of the year 
was climaxed by a formal banquet, held during the latter part of May. 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 %* 










Sigma Upsilon 










N 


ltional Honorary Literary Fraternis- 






Found 


ed at the University of the South 


in 


1906 








Sopherim Chapter 












Mother Chapter 












Roll 












A r/ivc j\ Ic in bership 






Dickens, W. B. 
Ball, W. J. 
Blrcer, N. K 






Cain, H. P. 
Davidson", J. S. 
Dearing, F. P. 
Hines, J. E. 




McGehee, \V. C 
Parker, Thos. 
Patton, Theo. 



Alumni 

Daley, F. D Grisvvolo, H A. 

Dudney, T. E. Martin, A. C. 

Washington, J. S. 

Sopherim began its wrrk early this year, electing some able men to membership early in 
October. As is usually the case, th? meetings were held bi-mor.thly. At these meetings numer- 
ous original writing were presented to the society. In the realm of poetry, Dearing and Patton 
excelled. Burger and Cain were among the best of the prose writers. Frequent visits made by 
members of the English Department added to the dignity and merit of the year's work. 

Sopherim claims as alumni seme of the best writers of the South. It elects its members from 
gownsmen who have shown interest and ability in writing. It attempts to foster and to en- 
courage this ability by affording the student an opportunity for presenting his work to his fellow- 
students for their criticism. During some years a particular field of writing is stressed, as was 
the short story last year. This year, however, a rather elastic program was followed; essays, 
short stories, orations, and poetry were attempted. 



146 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 




Blue Key 



National Leadership Fraternity 
Founded at University of Florida in 192+ 





Sewanee Chapter 






Established in 1927 








Roll 








//; Facilitate 








Prof. W. II. MacKell 


\R 






In A cade 1 nia 






AuTIN 


Daley 




Hines 


Boyd, C. M. 


Dickens 




HOPPEN, II. 


Boyd, W. E. 


Griswold, I. 




Peteet 


Brown, C. 


Q 




SCHOOLFIELD 


Bruton 






Thigpen 


Burroughs 


Wm 






Tolley 


Burrows 






Turner, W. S, 


Cain 








Waltiiour 


Cravens, D. 
Cravens, W. 


[■^wcx-V- ■ 




Way, W. 
Williams, L. J 


f 







Blue Key is a kind of College Kiwanis for discussing and treating the problems which arise 
in the course of school life. Only gownsmen are eligible for election to membership, and those 
men elected are supposed to have done something for the school in order to merit this distinction. 

The work of the organization is not advertised, but it performs a very useful function in 
affording an active nucleus for constructive work by the student body. As an instance of its 
work we find the students' fire department, which is sponsored by Blue Key. 



H7 



Cafi and Gotvn, 1929 




Scholarship Society 

William Bvrom Dickens President 

Frederick Reese Freyer Vice-President 

Professor H. M. Gass Secretary-Treasurer 

Roll 

In Facultate 

Dr. Baker Dr. Ware Rev. Guerry 

Dr. Bevan Dr. Wells Mr. Kayden 

Dr. DuBose Dr. Wilmer Mr. Lonc 

Dr. Finney Mr. Gass Mr. Nauts 

Dr. Knickerbocker Mr. R. B. Davis Mr. Scott 

In Theologia 

Craighill Dudney Mutton 

Daley McNeil Ridcway 

Wulf 

In Aca/lcmia 

Ball, W. J. Glen Murphey- 

Brunner Gordon Parker 

Burroughs Griswold, J. F. Schoolfield 

Burrows Hatch Schuessler, G. D. 

Cain Hines Stewart 

Craic, B. M. Johnston Watson 

Early McGehee Way, W. 

Merriman, P. 

148 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 




Neog 



rapl 



St. Elmo Massexcale President 

Jerome Thompson Secretary-Treasurer 



Roll 



Ball 






Connolly 


Walker, D. 


Bass 






Copeland 


Walker, E J. 


Bridewell, 


C. 


L. 


Fortune 


WlIITAKER 


BURWELL 






GOWEN 

Long 

Sanforu 


Yates 



The society of Neograph was founded in 1903. The first meeting was held in St. Luke's 
Hall. Its purpose is to encourage originality in writing and thinking and to afford its members 
practice in these. The membership has varied from time to time, but usually it has been limited 
to ten or fifteen undergownsmen. Neograph continued and flourished at Sewanee from 1903 until 
1920, when it was allowed to decline and to become dormant. In 1923 the organization was re- 
vived by those members of Sopherim who were alumni of Neograph. The society holds bi- 
monthly meetings, at which times original papers are submitted by the members. 



149 



Caft and Gown, 1929 




The Debating Season 

Sewanee started the past debating season with a vim. The men, 
whose pictures appear above, were eager to familiarize themselves with 
the debate resolutions and so took advantage of the opportunity for de- 
bating in the literary societies. All but three of last year's team were 
back and much improved through experience, so that we need feel no 
surprise at the success of the season as a whole. 

Major MacKellar, our debate coach, is proud of the fact that he 
develops not a few but many men in the art of forensics. This year 
there were twenty men on the team and all were given a chance at dis- 
playing their ability. The policy of using a different set of men for each 
debate is followed as much as possible. 

This year's schedule included the following debates: Two with 
Vanderbilt, two with Kentucky, two with Southwestern, and one with 
Tulane. In addition, there were several engagements with smaller 
schools. Most of the encounters were of the no-decision type, while 
victories were gained in all except two of the decision affairs. Both 
Tulane and Southwestern were too much for the mountain boys who 
journeyed to New Orleans and Memphis. 



150 



Caft and Gown, 1929 





OVRL I C AT10N15 



151 




*► 



POLITICS 



The word politics is in its derivation a high word. Originally, the man in politics was deemed 
the most worthy and able of his particular community. But time has brought its changes; we 
have found scandal after scandal in our political offices, until today we feel a certain doubt in 
regard to the man "in politics." The American people have, through their own conduct, cheap- 
ened a noble word. 

In its early life Sewanee was tainted by no touch of student politics. The intrinsic worth of 
the individual and not the voting strength of his fraternity was the only point considered. The 
school with its supreme idealism was accorded a place above such petty and trivial actions. But 
within the last few years we have felt creeping into our college life the evils of fraternity politics. 
It has been whispered that certain fraternities were forming combines and that they were 
"swapping votes." One student has remarked that he did not like the idea of politics, but that 
he was forced to join the movement in self-defense. The astute campus politician might ask us, 
"what of it," and hasten to inform us that in other schools fraternities openly exchange votes 
before an important e'ection. Again we would be compelled to admit the truth of the statement, 
but somehow we have always cherished the idea that Sewanee was different from other schools, 
we have boasted that ours is a school of gentlemen. After all, are we going to tolerate an evil 
just because it exists elsewhere? 

Our university purposely adopted a system of dormitories in order that we might live as one 
large family. They wished to avoid all inter-fraternity strife, and the long years of inter-fra- 
ternal good will have been their vindication. Are we, in spite of this, going to allow our frater- 
nities to become mere political organizations? If so, then we do not deserve to call ourselves real 
fraternity men; but rather we belong to a pin-wearing political party. 



Now we pause and look back at the work performed on this volume, and as we do so we think 
of our staff. Some have been rather slow in handling their tasks, but we are sure that they have 
all done their best and so we wish to express our appreciation to the entire staff. Especial y do 
we wish to thank Thomas Parker and Edgar Stewart for the immediate attention which they gave 



to every task with which they were entrusted. 




jy^i^^kj 1 -^^-^ — 



152 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 




jap a 



ndG 



own 



Staff 



William Byrom Dickens EdUqr-in-C hief 

Earl R. Lemmon Business Manager 

Thomas Parker Managing Edi'.or 

Edgar Stewart Literary Editor 

George Copeland Class Editor 

David Bridewell Class Editor 

Osceola Gordon" Photographic Editor 

Charles Hoppen 4rt Editor 

Richard Sturgis Athletic Editor 

Thomas Byrne Athletic Editor 

Newall Blair Humor Editor 

St. Elmo Massengale Organization Editor 

Business Staff 

William McGehee Advertising Manager 

David Walker Assistant Advertising Manager 

Hill Pearce and Charles Hawkins Circulation Managers 

The following, though not members of the staff, were of invaluable assistance: 
Miss Delia Tate, John Crawford, William Connolly and Godfrey Howse 



153 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 





Purple Staff 

Harry P. Cain Editor-in-Chief 

J. E. Hines Managing Editor 

Richard Sturgis Athletic Editor 

Edward Johnston Local Editor 

George Copeland Feature Editor 

William McGehee Contributing Editor 

David Bridewell Contributing Editor 

Business Manager 
C. W. Underwood 

Student Business Manager 
John Davidson 

Circulation Staff 

Moultrie Burns John Ezzell 

William Weaver David Walker 



'54 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 




01 qq 



Mountain Goat Staff 

H. A. Griswold Edilor-in-Cliicf 

Nash Burger Managing Editor 

Charles Hoppen irt Editor 

Theodore Patton Poetry Editor 

Literary Staff 

Bridewell Daley Parker 

Connolly Dearing Phillips 

Craig, M. Hodges Whaley 

Art Staff 

Cross, J. Meribel Wilson 

Harrison Montgomery' Wright 

Ware 

William Craig Business Manager 

Frank Brunner Advertising Manager 

Robert Chadwick Circulation Manager 

Lonc, Anderson, Walker, McGehee, Montacue Business Staff 



155 




Cafi and Gown, 1929 




Publications at Sewanee 

The Sewanee Review 

Is the oldest periodical of its kind in America, having been founded in 1892. In 
spite of the fact that no remuneration is given for articles, the Review numbers among 
its contributors many of the foremost thinkers in the country. During the last three 
years it has been edited by Dr. W. S. Knickerbocker, who has raised it to a higher 
standard than it had ever before enjoyed. 



The Sewanee Purple 

Though under the financial management of the Athletic Board of Control, has only 
students on its editorial staff. It maintains a high standard of journalism and ranks 
well among similar publications in other Southern institutions. 



The Cap and Gown 

Is entirely under student control, the management being elected by the Order of 
Gownsmen. Each year the staff attempts to improve on the annual produced the 
previous year, until at present it has attained a distinguished level among college 
year books. 



The Mountain Goat 

Founded in 1925, is the youngest of the publications at Sewanee. During its early 
life it barely survived, but each year there has been an improvement. This year the 
editorial and business staffs have cooperated in putting out the .best issues which have 
ever appeared. It has well earned its popularity as a college humorous magazine. 



>5« 




a Cafi and Gown, 1929 




3 



3 



n 





\ 1 


1 — ) 1 



r- 



157 




Proctors 

John Calvin Bruton 
Head Proctor 

Walter Ernest Boyd The Inn 

John Elbrirge Hines, Jr Cannon 

Stanvarne Burrows, Jr Hoffman 

Franklin G. Burroughs, Jr Miller 

Leslie J. Williams Benedict 

William Cleveland Schoolfiei.d Johnson 

Paul Earle Sloan, B.A St. Luke's 



158 




Cafi and Gown, 1929 




Honor Council 



Roll 

John - Calvin Bruton, Jr Seniors 

Arch Peteet, Jr Seniors 

Walter Ernest Boyd Juniors 

John Elbridge Hikes, Jr Juniors 

David Yates Sophomores 

Humphrey Estes Folk Freshmen 



The Honor System 

The Honor Council consists of two Seniors, two Juniors, one Sophomore, and 
one Freshman. Before these men all infringements of the Honor System are brought 
up, and they assign the penalty for the infringement. 

The Sewanee Code of Honor applies not only in the classroom and on examina- 
tions, but also in the fraternities, in the relations between students, and in every 
phase of Sewanee life. 



159 



Caft and Gown, 1929 





Student Vestry 

Roll 

Rev. Moultrie Guerry Chaplain 

William C. Schoolfield Senior Warden 

David Yates Junior Warden 

Chester C. CHATTIN Treasurer 

Thomas Parker Secretary 

Francis M. Thicpen Daniel R. McAlpine 

Harris Britton Edward C. Benedict 

Frank Fortune William S. Turner 



The Student Vestry 

The Student Vestry is a representative bcdy of ten students elected from the classes of the 
College of Arts and Sciences and from the Theological School. It acts as an advisory council 
to the Chaplain in respect to student needs; it fosters all plans and organizations which tend to 
emphasize development of the Christian spirit at Sewanee; and it unites in purpose with re- 
ligious movements in other colleges. 

The Vestry carries on its work through five standing committees. These committees are 
designated as follows: Missions, Religious Education and Worship, Personal and Social Service, 
Finance, and Publicity. 



1 60 



Caft and Gown, 1929 





Freshman, Sophomore and Junior 
Class Officers 



Freshman Class 

Charles W. Vaughan ..... President 
Donald R. McAlpine . . . Vice-President 
Charles W. Cross . . Secretary-Treasurer 



Sophomore Class 

Chauncey W. Butler President 

Jack M. Keyworth .... Vice-President 
Charles H. Barron . . Secretary-Treasurer 



Junior Class 

John E. Hines President 

Georce H. Edwards .... Vice-President 
Samuel W. Frizzelle . Secretary-Treasurer 



161 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 





Purple Masque Dramatic Club 

Members of the Club 

Malcolm Beatty President 

Stanley Dean Secretary 

William McGehee Business Manager and Treasurer 

H. A. Griswold Director 

E. C. Benedict Stage Director 

Blair, D. Gregory McCullocii 

Bridewell Harvey McNeil 

Cain Henderson Turner, W. 

Dudney Hines Walthour 

Matthews, A. 

i 

Guest Artists 
Miss Mary Ware Miss Jean Wright 

Purple Mas<iue enjoyed this year its most prosperous season. In the fall it pre- 
sented Barry Connors' "Applesauce". After several delays, the second play, "You 
and I", was presented about the middle of April. The season was closed with the 
successful presentation of Roi Cooper Megrue's "Tea for Three" at commencement. 

New stage sets and other equipment, installed in the Union during the Christmas 
holidays, were used for the first time during the presentation of "You and I". 
The new effects added greatly to the success of the performance. 

The greatest achievement of the year was the acceptance of Purple Masque into 
the national honor dramatic society, Alpha Psi Omega. 



162 



Caft and Gown, 1929 




The University Choir 



Members 



William F. Holmes . . 
Peter W. Lambert 



. . Organist 
Sacristan 



Ball, W. J. 

Carper 

Chadbourn 

Clechorn 

Dearing 

DuBose 

Fortune 



French 

Gowan 

Gregory 

Hannum 

Harrison 

Johnson 

Lambert 

Lauchlin 

Robbins 



Scott 

Sears 

Thompson 

Walker, E. J. 

Williams, II . J. 

Weaver 

Yates 



163 




The Glee Club 

Jack Walthour, Director 
H. A. Griswold, Stage Manager 

Officers 

Arch Peteet President 

John Cleghorn Vice-President 

W. E. Boyd Secrelary-Ti easurer 

Osceola Gordon Business Manager 

Members 

First Tenors Second Tenors First Basses Second Basses 

Dearing Cleghorn Boyd, W. E. Patton, T. 

Buzard Peteet Brailsford Knox 

Wilson Allen Walker, W. P. Donnp.ll 

Montague Britton De Ovies Johnson, A. 

Brogden Ponder Craig, B. M. Walton 
Newell Thompson, J. M. Gowen 

Griswoi.d, H. A. 

The Glee Club this year, under the direction nf Jack Walthour, measured up in every way 
to the standard set by those of previous years. The try-outs and the choice of members were 
conducted early in the fall, so that practice might get under way. 

The trip arranged by Manager Gordon included Chattanooga, Nashville, Pulaski, Jackson, 
Memphis, Birmingham, and Atlanta. In each of the larger cities radio programs were arranged, 
and the presentations were received with that acclaim which has been accorded our glee clubs 
of the past. 

164 



L 




Caft and Goivn, 1929 




Sewanee Syncopators 



Melvin Craig (Director) Saxophone 

Jerry Thompson - Saxophone 

Redmond Eason Trumpet 

Russell Knox Trombone 

Jack Walthour Banjo 

Harris Britton Banjo 

Arch Peteet Drums 

Edward Wilson Piano 

Traveling with the Glee Club, and indeed a feature of the tour, were the 
Sewanee Syncopators, long famous as a collegiate orchestra. They were ably di- 
rected by Melvin Craig, who likewise excelled with his saxophone. Walthour again 
maintained his reputation as a banjo player, and Eason "rang rings around" his 
trumpet. 

The orchestra as a whole was composed of a group of boys whose skill was 
worthy of a much larger and more experienced orchestra. Their playing showed 
the results of long and earnest practice. 



.65 



Ca-fr and Gown, 1929 




Sigma Epsilon Literary Society 

Officers 

William McGehee President 

Edward Johnston •' • Vice-President 

Albert Sanderson • Secretary-Treasurer 



Baarcke 

Ball, M. 

Ball, W. 

Boyd, W. E. 

Burns, M. 

Burrows, S. 

burwell, c. l. 

Byrne 

Cain 

Campbell 

Cantrill 

Carlton 

Carper 

Chadbourn 



Members 

Charles 

Cowan 

Crenshaw 

De Ovies 

Dickens 

DuBose 

Eby 

Fortune 

Foust 

Fredson 

French 

Gilchrist 

Hall 

Hart 

Harvey 



Hawkins, C. I 

Howse 

Keyworth 

Massengale 

Murphy 

Pulley 

Richardson 

Scott 

Soaper 

Sturcis 

Taylor, R. 

Williams, II. 

Yates 

Yer.ya 



166 




=_J 




Pi Omega Literary Society 

Officers 

Edward W. Watson President 

Thomas Greville Vice-President 

John P. Henderson Secretary 

Alfred Matthews Treasurer 

Members 

Biehl Lemmon 

Blair, N. Matthews, A. 

Bridewell Schuessler, J. 

Counts Schuessler, G. 

Dean Sears 

Ezzell Smith, D. 

Greville Snowden 

Hahn Springer 

H annum Strong 

Henderson Svler 

Holmes, W. F. Turner, J. 

Jones, A. Turner, W. 

Legcett Walker, D. 
Watson 



167 




Thanksgiving Dances 

GERMAN CLUBS 

Officers of the Sexior German Club 

Leslie J. Williams President 

William C. Bryant Vice-President 

Mark M. Tolley Secretary-Treasurer 

Officers of the Junior German Club 

Charles L. Hawkins President 

Robert B. Stimson Vice-President 

John M. Ezzell Secretary-Treasurer 

Sewanee is noted throughout the South for its fine dances and the beautiful girls who attend 
them. This year set a standard which will be difficult for future years to parallel. 

Francis Craig and his orchestra were so successful at Thanksgiving that they were summoned 
again in order to preside at the Easter dances. The latter dances were the first to be held in 
the new gymnasium where there was ample room for the largest crowd ever before attendant 
at a Sewanee dance. 

Commencement brought diplomas for some of us, and also Jack Crawford, "the Clown Prince 
of Jazz", with his New York orchestra. They made the mountain fairly rollick with music, 
and the dances were in every way a success. 



1 68 



Cafi and Goivn, 1929 







PROWLERS 



Officers 

Stanyarne Burrows President 

Leslie J. Williams Vice-President 

Walter E. Boyd Secretary-Treasurer 





M 


EMBFRSHIP 




Allen 


Butler 


Griswold, J. I*. 


Riley 


Anderson 


Cain 


UlNES 


Rodgers 


Barron 


ClIATTIN 


Hope 


Sa\-les 


Beatty 


Cleghorn 


Hoppen, C. 


SCHOOLFIELD 


Berry 


Craig, M. 


Hoppen, H. 


SORY 


Boyd, C. M. 


Cravens. D. 


Johnston, E 


Spencer 


Boyd, C. W. 


Cravens, W. 


Keyworth 


Stimpson 


Boyd, W. E. 


De Ovies 


Long 


Thigpen 


Brailsford 


DURDEN 


McCulloch 


Tolly 


Brown 


Edwards 


Nash 


Walker 


Bruton 


Ezzell 


Pearce 


Walthour 


Bryant 


Freyer 


Peters 


Way 


Burroughs 


Frizzelle 


Poelnitz 


Williams 


Burrows 


Green, J. H. 


Ponder 





169 



Caft and Gown, 1929 





Tennessee Club 

Bvrom Dickens Owner of Still 

Reuben Bean Operator of Still 

Chester Chattin Bootlegger 

Consumers 

Allen Cravens, D. Harrison, J. L. Merriman, P. Sorv 

Ball, M. Cravens, W. Harwood Montague Stimson 

Bass Cross Hawkins, J. W. Moore, J. C. Strong 

Bean, J. Crump, D. Havlev Moore, O. Taylor, F. 

Blair, R. D. Crump, F. Holmes, E. L. Morris, N. B. Tailor, R. 

Blount De Ovies Kellerman, J. Morris, R. A. Tolley 

Bratton Du Bose Kellerman, R. Page Underwood 

Braun Eason Kennedy Patton Vaughan 

Brenizer, C. Ezzell Kinc, J. S. Phillips, C A. Walker, E. J. 

Brenizer, R. Folk Knox Phillips, D. W. Whaley 

Brew Foust Logan Phillips, E. J. Whitaker 

Britton Glover Mann Roebins Williams, J. N. 

Brunner Goodman Marable Robinson, J. Wii.hoite 

Butler Gordon McAlpine Rodgers Wilson, J. B. 

Castleberrv Grisard McDonald Ryan Wise 

Chamlee Grizzard McDowell Sears Woolford 

Clemons Hamilton McGehee Shute Worrall 

Counts Harrison, J. J. Merriman, J. Smith, D. Yerxa 




170 



Cafi and Goivn, 1929 




Texas Club 

Samuel Frizzelle "Jesse James' 

W. E. Boyd "Frank James" 

Cornelius Nash "Bill Ilickock" 

Outlaws 

Bacon Dudney Keyworth Robinson, L. Toombs 

Dennett Dumble King, R. L. Rounsaville Walker, W. P. 

Biehl French Manford Sayles Ward 

Boyd, C. M. Glen McDonald Scott Ware 

Boyd, C. W. Gray Pabst Simms Watson 

Brown, C. Hawkins, C. L. Perry Smith, W. Webster 

Brown, R. Henderson Piper Spencer Williams, H. P. 

Claybrook Johnson Plummer, F. Springer Williams, J. F. 

Copeland Jones Ponder Thompson, F. Wilson, W. T. 

Priest 

: . TEXAS 

\)fe l #! CLUB 




i 7 i 



Caft and Goivn, 1929 




Alabama Club 

Lancston McCallev Ruling Barron 

Hill Pearce Second Barron 

John Clechorn Third Barron 

Other Barrons 

Austelle Craic, W. Hitchcock; Rice 

Baarcke Crosland Long Rudolph 

Beatty Dawson Matthews, W. Stewart 

Buzard Gause McConnell Svler 

Byrne Gilchrist Mullins, E. Thicpen 

Carlton Hafley Mullins, J. D. Walter 

Chadwick Hall Murphey Weaver 

Cole Hannon Phillips, W. E. Westmoreland 
Craic, B. Hatch Poellnitz 




ALABAMA 
CLUB 



172 



Cafi and Gown, 1929 




South Carolina Club 

William Schoolfield "Cock of the WaW 

John Bruton "Game Cock" 

John t E. Hines "Cockerel" 

The Flock 

Anderson Burroughs Mollis, F. Smith, S. P. 

Ball, W. J. Burrows Hope Sturgis 

Barron 7 Charles Parker Turner, J. 

Braii.sford Finlay Pinckney Turner, W. 

Burns Green, J. H. Robertson Twitty 

Hollis, D. Sloan 




i73 




Caft and Gown, 1929 







Georgia Club 

Frederick, Freyer Fire Cracker 

Edward Johnston Soda Cracker 

George Riley Whip Cracker 

Other Crackers 

Berry Edwards, B. McFadden 

Bryant Edwards, G. Schuessler, G. 

Cowan Hare Schuessler, J. 

EN ; T HOLLOWAY' WALTHOUR 

Purden Jeffries Young, A. E. 

Massengale 

AH SHVS EVERY THING WNT 
PERCHES DOWN HEflH 

0M, GEORGIA 

— * ffe^gL) 




'74 




Arkansas Club 



William Daggett idmiral 

David Bridewell Captain 

Jerome Thompson" First Male 





Refugees 








Apple 




Mays 






Buford 




McRee 






Button 




Newell 






Connolly 




Parish 






Gregory 




Reddinc 






Harcraves 




Walker, 


G. 


D 



Wood 




ARKANSAS 
CLUB 



175 




J 



Caft and Gown, 1929 






• J : " • • • f . Jdl '' /* 

> «■ ^ 

Louisiana Club 

Harry Hoppen Exalted Pelican 

Earl Lemmon Sacred Pelican 

Edward Wharton /Vis? Pelican 

The Brood 

Autin Lew 

Cann Moore, B. 

Ebv Tannfhii.l 

fussell vacc.aro 

Gomil.a Wade 

Hoppen C. Wharton 

WUESCHER 

■ 

LOUISIANA CLUB 

V V \ 
V" V x 

176 





North Carolina Club 



Warren Way .... 
Albert Sanderson . 
David Yates 



Pine Tree 

. . . Pine Cone 
Pine Tar 



Pine Needles 
Beckwith Hay 

Burwell, C. L. Lang 

Chadbourne Lecgett 

Craighill Pulley 

Dowdy Way, R. 






■firm 

' f 






NORTH CAROLINA 
CLUB 



il 



\/ 



,.-</ 



177 







Caft and Goivn, 1929 




■>■ M»P 









PHILLIPS BARRON EBY PATTON WILLIAM5 





. m 

W Won 



EZZELL M c ijEHEE 






URCrlS HAWKINS 










WAY HOLLIS KEYWORTH KELLERMAN BALL 







BURNS CHARLES KNOX BECKWITH 




BAARCKE WHARTON BRENJZEB BRA1LSPORD E)EAN 



178 



Caft and Gown, 1929 




Sphinx Club 




An Into fraternal Social Organization 



179 



Caft and Gown, 1929 





1 80 




Cafi and Gown, 1929 




^_ 



nVI\ DRTA 





The Owls 






Mother Owl 






Mrs. "E" 






Owls 




Ball, M. 


Byrne 


Hollis, F. 


Barron 


Cross, C. 


Murphev 


Beckwith 


DuBose 


Robertson 


Buford 


Henderson 


Turner, J 


Burks 


Hollis, D. 


Weaver 



182 










fnr-nnttftttg anfc mtsrlfirf-mak- 
tng mankrij from Ijia trirtij, M 



'Byron: Don Juan. 




look 3Uw 

3foaturr 





edicaW 






'An : s 

mi 



7 



i 1 

A 



As a token of our appre- 
ciation, toe, the editors, 
dedicate the Beautv Sec- 
tion to "the fairest of 
them all", Mrs. Margue- 
rite Clark Williams. 








> imi 




r^ tBt! 








W^M^mmwJjf H 




™ 



MAD6E HABDY 




Believe It Or Not! 



Believe it or not, but — 

The Sigma Nus pledged a man this year that wasn't an 
athlete — Wood Carper. 

The Kappa Phis have a man who doesn't politic — J. N. 
Williams. 

The Kappa Sigs have a man that doesn't drink — John 
Cameron. 

The K. A.s have a man that averaged over "jo — Bob 
Toombs. 

The Bengals have an athlete — Julius French. 

The A. T. O.s have a member who isn't a ladies' man — 
George Hart. 

The Phi Gams have a man who can't uproot a tele- 
phone pole or pull a ten-ton truck with his teeth — Witt 
Perry. 

The S. A. E.s have a man who thinks S. A. E. is the 
best fraternity in the world — Bob Cann. 

The Deltas have a man who speaks to mere mortals — 
Frank Robbins. 

The Phi Delts will have a good man in the chapter 
next year — wait a minute, give us time to think! 



* * 



Not 



ice 



It having been frequently remarked that Sewanee had 
no place for politics, did not want them, and should not 
have any; 

It having been further declared that politicking has a 
bad effect on the school ; 

Be it resolved, That we shall permit all elections to 
be absolutely without prejudice or other harmful influence ; 
Furthermore, we, the undersigned, shall not attempt to 
run any election whatsoever. 

In conclusion, we believe this experiment to be for the 
good of the institution, and trust that our successors will 
say the same thing. 

In witness whereof we do affix our seal. 

The Tammany Tigers. 
Harry P. Cain, Head and Jaws. 
Newell Blair, Front Paws. 
C. W. McGehee, Back Paws. 
E. A. Lemmon, Tail. 
P.S. — Anyway, we're graduating. 




Mary: "IVe have to learn all about the larynx, the pharynx, 
and the trachea tonight." 

Marie: "What are you going to do? Go out and neck?" 



* * 



Doc: "What would you do if you were all alone on a 
desert island with a baby?" 
Woof- Woof : "It would all depend on the baby." 



KAPHA ALPHA 
COUNTRY CLUB 

"Dieu et les dames" 
(God, women!) 

WHY WORRY? 



We stand for the Old South (whatever 

that is). 

We guarantee your social standing in 

the South. 

We got plenty men in Prowlers, T. N. 

E., Kappa Beta Phi, etc. 

Join Us and Be Exclusive 

(IF YOU DO, YOU WILL BE) 



R?dmg and Hunt Club Meets 



The Sewanee Riding and Hunt Club (hunting done 
the night before and riding done the next day in the Walsh 
tan-bark arena) finished a very successful year. A large 
number of new members were taken in and great enthusi- 
asm marked the interest taken in the club's work through- 
out the entire year. President Stewart, in making his re- 
port, thanked the members for their hearty co-operation 
and wished them every success in the coming year. There 
was a strong feeling on the part of the Roman group 
that the Attics should be barred out, their quarry usually 
being pointed out by Master of Hounds Gass. This was 
eventually ironed out, chiefly through the efforts of the 
newer Attics with the help of their Romanist room-mates. 

Mr. McGehee, speaking for the Monday-Wednesday- 
Friday-at-9 :30 group, reported an almost 100 per cent 
successful season. One member had worked out some 
new and novel methods and a technique which carried him 
far beyong the others in its results. Mr. McGehee had 
had excellent opportunities for observing the effects of this 
new system as well as the actual operation thereof. Mr. 
Byrne had also had some experience along this line and 
spoke of it. Mr. Byrne then reported on the 1 1 130 group 
on M.W.F. He considered the year as marking a definite 
step forward in the club's progress, although he had en- 
countered some difficulty in assisting others. 

Mr. Boyd, of Houston, reported that his group had 
not done so well as the others, but attributed it to lack 
of experience and knowledge of the club's aims. He also 
said that there was strong opposition to the generally ac- 
cepted forms of riding, mentioning Mr. Fortune as be- 
ing particularly opposed. President Stewart said that time 
would doubtless have an effect on the Freshman's attitude. 

Mr. Byrne was elected president for the coming year; 
Mr. Brunner, vice-president; Mr. Durden, secretary- 
treasurer, on the condition that he continue his unbroken 
record of never having attended the arena except as set 
forth in the Rules and Regulations of the club. 

Mr. Johnston was highly commended for his outstand- 
ing achievement. Mr. Stewart was elected honorary 
president, and Mr. McGehee honorary vice-president. 

The Club then adjourned over the summer. 
* * * 

Great Expectations 

To see Dr. Ware miss a quiz section. 
To see Squat McCauley satisfied with only one girl.' 
To get the right sized shirt back from the laundry. 
To shoot a thirty-five — see Dean of College for instruc- 
tions. 

For further material see Tom Dudney. 
To see a Cap and Gown out on time. 
To see John Bruton refuse a nomination. 



KAPPA PHI 



Modeled on the Wigwam Plan 



POLITICS 



OUR 



HOBBY 



Do You Want to Get in the Campus 

Organizations? 
Then Hook Up With Kappa Phi. 

Our Boast: 
"A member in every organization ex- 
cept T. N. E. and Kappa Beta Phi." 



WATCH OUR SMOKE! 



Great Legends 



Chili Hawkins once was rude to someone (information 
by Keyworth ) . 

Dr. Ware once failed to meet a class. 

Dr. Baker once shot a fifty. 

McCauley went a whole term without a special. 

Richardson had an heretical thought. 

Prof. Daugherty "jipped" a guy out of half a point (in- 
formation by Plumer). 

Harry Cain stayed away from the hospital three days. 

Moby Dick lost a rooster fight. 

Doc Hines objected to something. 

Dr. Kirkland stayed home all day. 

Jerry: "I don't see why Bill asked Mary up for the 
dances. She can't dance well at all." 

Gus: "No, she can't dance, but she sure can intermis- 
sion." 



Inferno — Or Just Plain HeU 



A great stone archway, with some writing above, gave 
entrance to the place. Stone steps led up to it, and a mas- 
sive doorway, through which one might enter, yawned 
darkly. 

Timidly we approached it, for we had heard of its 
terrors from afar. And, although no one was to be seen 
from the outside, a tremendous turmoil and confusion 
sounded from within. Seeing no one to bar our way, 
slowly we slipped inside the door, but at once almost 
wished we had not done so, for the noises which had 
sounded so terrifying from without were now increased 
ten-fold. Shrieks, cries, groans, every noise ever known 
to issue from human throats fell upon our ears at once, 
as well as many strange and undefineable sounds which 
were strange to us. Clicks, and pops, and gurglings, as 
well as the noise of human throats, resounded through 
the corridor. 

A strong odor smote our nostrils, an odor as of that 
stuff which cheers men's souls, but somehow stronger 
and almost terrifying. The place reeked of it. 

Above, someone was banging on doors; noises, cries, 
odors, yells, people running and falling, sounds of blows, 
all created a horrible sort of medley that filled us with 
fear. 

We turned to flee. A snake glided across our path. 
We whirled around and sought to run the other way, and 
saw an apparition of six dogs, one after the other, walk 
across our path, all seemingly just alike. 

Quaking with fear at the terrors of this madhouse, we 
darted into a room, our breath coming in quick, terrified 
pants. There before our eyes, in the room, sat a strange 
sort of parrot, which began to laugh like mad and curse 
at the top of its crazy voice. 

With one jump we were out of the window and tear- 
ing across the lawn ; behind us we heard a crash as a door 
fell under strong blows, and the breaking of glass as some 
poor fellow went through a window. 

As we passed the door through which we had entered 
we saw the name written above it, "Cannon Hall." 

Quivering and shaking at the remembrance of the hell 
that lay within, we ran and ran, off into the night. 



* * 



John: "Dumble sure is dumb, isn't he?" 

Charles: "Is he? He's so dumb he thought when Mr. 
Guerry announced in chapel for students to keep away 
from the hospital at night that he was talking about the 
freshmen in Hell Week." 




Student: "Come on, let's go to the library." 
Scholar: "Can't; I gotta study." 



* * 



City Slicker: "Milking a cow?" 

Country Bozo: "Naw, just feeling her pulse?" 



SIGMA NU 

Be Athletic: Join Sigma Nu 

We have outstanding athletes of campus, also as- 
sorted explorers, ambassadors and good-fellows. 

What Would 

College Be 

Without Athletes? 

We May Be Loud 

We May Be Crude 

We May Be Stewed 

We May Be Rude 

But What's the Matter with Sigma Nu ? 

She's All Right! 

Our Road House Ideal 

ALWAYS DOING SOMETHING 



Magnolia Masticators 



At last the Magnolia Masticators came to the business 
of the afternoon. It was their first meeting, and after an 
unusually successful gormandizing of four days and 
nights (they would have continued it a week, but had to 
call time to find new waiters and supplies). President 
Yates called for order. He really doesn't eat so much; 
it just takes him a long time. Faculty Adviser Kayden 
had lost the order, and so at the motion of Brother Eason, 
the great lover of beans, order was dispensed with and 
they ate without ordering. The president had some dif- 
ficulty in confining the activities to the business of the day. 
Vice-President Bruton was fined three plates of ice cream 
for gargling his soup ; such manners cause delay, and so he 
was instructed to follow the etiquette set forth in the By- 
Laws and to thereafter inhale all liquids. Eventually 
several important matters were settled. Freshman Can- 
trill was elected to membership over the objection of Bro. 
Daley, who felt that the newcomer was most likely to 
break all existing records now held by the well-known 
Baltimore divine. Brother Tolley requested a subsidy for 
his proficient rating of the waiters. It was felt that every- 
one was improving in that respect, and would soon equal 
Brother Tolley's ability. Brother Pete Young claimed 
the wafHe-eating championship and reigned undisputed. 
On a motion of Treasurer Westmoreland, chairman of the 
"Get There at One Minute to Eight" committee, a reso- 
lution was passed commending the committee for its good 
work and promising hearty co-operation. Brother A. E. 
Young suggested that the entire DuBose group be taken 
in, but it was revealed that they had enjoyed previous ex- 
perience in logging camps and were therefore ineligible. 
Brother Boyd, popular Texan proctor, was rebuked for 
trying to get a head start. 

On motion of Brother Patton, formerly of M. B. A., 
the meeting adjourned. 

* * * 

"I thought you loved a blonde?" 
"I did, but she dyed." 

* * * 

Shaky: "How do you know she's a good girl?" 
Stude: "I went by to take her riding, and she put on her 
low-heeled shoes." 

* * * 

Gilchrist: "How come you flunked out?" 
Crenshaw: "Oh, just a matter of course." 




"If hat's the matter with Regis?" 
"He's tight." 
"Why, is he Scotch?" 
* * * 

A girl has all the breaks over a man. 
When a man spills his cigarette ashes he 
stands a good chance of burning a bole in 
his clothes. 



Be Chummy With the 
Faculty! 

(It Pays) 

WE EXCEL IN EVERYTHING 

We Have the Best: 

Ideals 

Windowglass 
Big Men 

OUR SUMMER HOME IN 
HOUSTON 

"Outstanding for 40 Years" 



Oldest in More Ways Than One 
We Used to Be a Lot Better 



ALPHA TAU OMEGA 



Delta Tau Delta 

GENTLEMEN ALL! 

(Or At Least We Think So) 



Hook Up With the Delts — We Have a Big 
Blue Motor 



To Be a Delta Is To 

Be Accepted 
To Be a Delta Is 

To Speak Spanish 

Nothing in Excess 
Activities 
Drinking 
Mingling With Sewanee 

Somehow We Are Different 




If absence makes the heart grow fonder, Tom Byrne 
ought to be crazy about his English 2 class. 



* * * 



A girl has all the breaks over a man. When a man 
spills his cigarette ashes he stands a good chance of burn- 
ing a hole in his clothes. 



* # * 



Truth is stranger than fiction, but neither one is half 
as strange as the tales those Texas boys tell. 



Aviation Examiner: To be a pilot takes plenty of 
nerve and endurance. You must be able to stand long 
periods of strife and trouble, and not be disturbed by any 
confusion or loud noises around you. You must have 
the ability to pay absolutely no attention to worrisome de- 
tails. In short, learning to fly is just one long endurance 
contest. Have you had any experience in that sort of 
thing? 

Tolley and Pearce (together) : Oh, yes sir. History 
I was so much pie to us. 



"Everybody ought to put something aside for a rainy day.' 
"Why should I? I don't go out on rainy days." 



THE TURNER TROOP BOY 
SCOUTS OF AMERICA 

Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon 

(Copyrighted, 1929, by H. A. Griswold) 

IS THERE AN S. A. E. IN 
YOUR HOME? 

Eventually, Why Not Now? 

Did You Know the New U. S. Census Lists 

34,168,750 S. A. E.s in Tennessee 

Alone ? 

BE BROTHERS WITH 
EVERYBODY 



Faculty Members and Outstanding 

Students Interviewed Regarding 

Compulsory Classes 

For the benefit of its readers the 1929 Cap and Gown 
(Byrom Dickens, Editor; Earl Lemmon, Business Man- 
ager; Get Your Subscriptions in Early — Only $1.50 
Down, and Besides, the Editors Need the Money. Yes, 
the 1929 Cap and Gown has gotten views of our pro- 
fessors and Big Men on compulsory class attendance: 

Dean Baker: You knew when you came to this in- 
stitution that we had compulsory classes, so it seems to me 
you ought to attend. You know this is a superior student 
body, anyway. Furthermore, how can I play golf and 
keep up with class cuts, too? Go to class, say I. 

Harry Cain: What did Major Mac say about it? 
I'm opposed to that. Much obliged for asking me. I'll 
write an editorial in the Purple about it, if I find time, 
otherwise 111 get Hines to write it. My leg isn't feeling 
so good today, guess I better be getting out to the hospital. 
S'long. 

Mr. Martin: Compulsory classes! Just a vulgar 
American idea. Barbarous! Now in the highly cultured 
universities of France and England no gentleman would 
insist on another gentleman attending a class. Students 



Royal Bengal 
Club 

AFFILIATED WITH 

Y. M. C. A. and O. H. C. 
And Other Religious Groups 

A Pull With 

PHI BETA KAPPA 
ANGLO-CATHOLIC PARTY 
ST. LUKE'S SEMINARY 

We Have: 

Watson, the Schuesslers, Bene- 
dict, Dean, and other feature 
attractions. 



OUR Traditions the Oldest 
OUR Chapters the "Mostest" 
OUR Pin the Prettiest 

Be Distinctive and Join 

Kappa Sigma 

A Bunch of Good Fellows. 

Do You Like to Drink? 

Do You Like to Be Talked About? 

THEN KAPPA SIGMA 

IS THE LODGE FOR 

YOU! 



are so dumb anyway they can't learn anything. Abolish 
classes, and while we're at it, abolish everything. 

John Bruton: Although I don't know just what 
"compulsory classes" means, still I'm in favor of it if the 
Dean is. 

Byrom Dickens: I agree with Cain. 

Ted Chattin: I agree with Dickens. 

Dr. Knickerbocker : Classes should all be compulsory. 
Your only trouble here in the backward South is that you 
don't have enough classes. Classes all day and all night, 
then maybe you would learn something. Look at me! 
When I went to college I studied all the time. 

There are lots of people in this college — it really isn't 
a University — you know, who would rather see a football 
game than study. Football is ruining colleges. 

Er, now, er, er, what were we talking about? 

Billie Schoolfield: Compulsory classes are a knotty 
problem all right. Some say have them, and some say not. 
Now if you ask me for a direct answer, which I hope you 
won't, I will say that compulsory classes are a knotty 
problem all right. That answer might be modified some- 
what under other circumstances. 

Frank Brunner: Sure, compulsory classes are O. K. 
Of course, I seldom find time to meet any of them myself, 
but they are a fine thing. 



Our greatest trouble on getting home from school was 
in learning to sleep at night, instead of in the daytime. 



* * * 



Axle: You know Bill Braun never has grown up. 
Poncho: Why? How is that? 
Axle : He still drinks out of a bottle. 



* * * 



Ed: I saw your girl when I was down in Mont- 
gomery, but she didn't see me. 

Charlie: Yer, so she told me. 



Fresh : How about lending me five bucks ? 

Gownsman: I wouldn't lend five dollars to my own 
brother. 

Fresh : Well, of course you know your family better 
than I do. 



s 



ewanee 



M 



en 



WE OFFER YOU ALL ADVANTAGES 
OF A NEW YORK CLUB 

Big New House, Finished With 

Bedroom 

Bath 

Kitchens 

Laundry 

Pressing Shop 

Restaurant 

Men's Furnishings 

A Plenty Big House — All We 

Need ?s a Chapter To Go 

In It 

PHI DELTA THETA 



ARE YOU A HELL-RAISER? 



IF SO 



Phi Gamma 
Delta 

WANTS YOU 



No Matter What We Take, We Turn Out 
Texans 

We Have the Only Two Three-Letter 
Men in School 

But What Can We Do With 

Them? 



JOIN PHI GAMMA DELTA 

And Look. Like Ponder 



I hate women. 

They are fickle. 

They are out after all they can get. 

They make trouble in the world. 

They can't be trusted. 

They have no taste. 

They don't know a real man when they see one. 

She just sent back my pin. 



* * * 



One: Wish I had my school days to live over again. 

Two: Yeah, your family would probably put you to 
work. 



* » » 

It is said that Mississippi is to make an attempt to 
stamp out lynching. They are tired of so many negroes 
hanging around. 




"V" Club 

Officers 

Langston McCalley President 

William Schoolfield Vice-President 

Byrom Dickens Secretary-Treasurer 



Members 

Barron Griswold, J. F. 

Boyd, W. E. Hines 

Butler Lemmon 

Cain Parker 

Cann Patton, T. 

Claybrook Stimson 

Williams, J. N. 



WE SHOW THE NEW STYLES FIRST 

A Store Worthy of the Confidence It 

Has So Long Held With 

College Boys 

MAKE OUR STORE YOUR NASHVILLE HEAD- 
QUARTERS 

Where You Are Always Welcome 



619-621 
Church St. 



CJCc&fanrdwwrniM!^ 



Facing 
Capitol Blvd. 



-->- 



Mail Orders Given Prompt Attention 



WHEN IN NASHVILLE 



IT'S 



HOTEL HERMITAGE 



<==3DC=* 



SEWANEE STUDENT HEADQUARTERS 



TRUNKS EXI'ltliSS 

Drayage 01 Every 
Type 

We're Always Moving 
If You Want It Moved, 

CALL 

HARRY E. HAWKINS 

Sewanee, Tenn. 

PARCEL POST FREIGHT 



BAKERS 



C 



igars 
anay 
igarettes 



SEWANEE 



RILEY'S GARAGE 

Phone 55 

Taxis, Gas, Oil, Tires 
Repairing 

SEWANEE, TENNESSEE 



P. S. Brooks & Co. 

Dry Goods 

Groceries, Shoes 

Men s Furnishings 

Etc. 

Sewanee, Tennessee 



Equipped with many years experience for making photographs of all sorts, 
desirable for illustrating college annuals. Best obtainable artists, work- 
manship, and the capacity for prompt and unequalled service. 



Photographers to the. 
1929 Caft ana Gown 




220 WEST 42ND STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



SINCE 1868 



OUR FIRM HAS BEEN SERVING THE PUBLIC 
IN THEIR 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

NEEDS 

MAY WE PLACE OUR FACILITIES AT YOUR 
DISPOSAL 

GALE-SMITH & COMPANY 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 



LARRY BAUMAN 

rvith 

L. A. BAUMAN CO. 

FEATURING 

Kuppenheimer Good Clothes 
and Langrock New Haven Fine Clothes 

417-419 Church Street Nashville, Tenn. 



Nashville's Most Distinguished Hotel 




Dispensers of True Southern 
Hospitality 

Direction 

Dinkler Hotels Co., Inc. 

Carlinc Dinkler, Pres. 

Andrew Jackson Hotel 

E. E. Gambill, Manager 



THE B. H. STIEF 
JEWELRY CO. 



DIAMOND MERCHANTS 

SILVERSMITHS 

STATIONERS 

JEWELERS 



Stief's Corner 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

Phillips and. 

Buttorff Mfg. 

Company 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



Neeley, Harwell &? 
Company 

WHOLESALERS 

324-26 Public Square 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Dry Goods, Furnishing Goods 

Hosiery, Blankets, Floor 

Coverings, Etc. 



Send Us Your Orders 



THE 

UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 



What Sewanee Stands For 

THE EDUCATION OF THE WHOLE MAN- 

His BODY, in a physical environment and training almost 
ideal. 

His MIND, through courses in a scientifically correct curricu- 
lum, and through contact with a faculty strong in scholarship 
and personality. 

His CHARACTER, through the constant influence of Chris- 
tianity as expounded and exemplified in the life of the Uni- 
versity Community. 

THE MAKING OF A CITIZEN— 

In theory, through the influence of that ideal of patrioticism 
which we call the Sewanee Spirit. 

In practice, through the dynamic living as a citizen in a com- 
munity of which the student body constitutes the citizenship. 

INDIVIDUALITY, ORIGINALITY, INITIATIVE 

Taught to thinl( independently, plan independently), 
but to act as a community member. 





1868 Sewanee, Tenn. 1929 

for catalogue address box z 



Member Association of Military Colleges and Schools 
of the United States 

Member of Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 



A School of Fine Tradition and Christian Influences, 
Essentially Military 



Military 



10,000- Acre Domain, 2,000 Feet Elevation 

Broadest Certificating Privileges 

Small Classes — Intelligent Leadership 

Military Training and Discipline and Life 

Clean, Healthful, Amateur Athletics 



Academy 



Sanitary 




Complete 


Meat 




Grocery 


Market 




Department 


Choice Meats 




Always ready to serve 






Up-to-the-minute refrig- 




representative selections. 


eration. Unexcelled 




Fresh fruits and vege- 


cleanliness. 




tables our specialty. 


A 


Combined Service 


That meet 


i all the needs of the people of Sewanee. 


We invite 


you to visit our several departments at 


any time. 


Our business is created for the 


purpose 


of satisfyin 


g Sewanee students and resident: 

We Have 
It; 

Can Get It; 
Or 

It Isn't Made 




Drug 




Stationery 


Department 




Department 


Highest quality chem- 




With a full line to meet 


icals and drugs. Pre- 




every need of the public. 


scriptions carefully com- 






pounded by registered 




s 


pharmacist of years' ex- 




perience. 




riollings worth 


SOFT 


Whitman's 


Candies 


DRINKS 


Candies 




UNIVERSITY SUPPLY 


STORE 








E. W. MANER, Manager 






Sewanee, Tennessee 




Telephones 46-5 1 



GLORIA 

Supreme High Patent 

The Flower of Flours 

RISING SUN 

Superlative of Self-Rising 
Flour 

1 he Flour That Guarantees the 
Biscuits 

RIGHT ALWAYS ALL WAYS 

Nashville Roller 

Mills 

THE RED MILL 
Nashville, Tenn. 



SAM BACHERIG 

4 South Main Street 
MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 



Nothing But Fine Clothes 
Especially Designed 

FOR 

COLLEGE MEN 

Especially Favored 

BY 

SEWANEE MEN 



OPEN ALL YEAR TO THE 
PUBLIC 

Whittle Springs 
Hotel 

S. L. Sloan, Manager 

Kerbela Temple Co. 

OPERATING 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 




74 Broad St., N. W. 
ATLANTA, GA. 




Use the Memphis Gateway 



to T 



exas 



ftUNMHNE^PECML ^' fEXflN 



Providing the finest passenger transportation 
southwest. Through sleepers, modern equip- 
ment. Famous Missouri Pacific dining car 
service all the way. Both trains now operat- 
ing on faster schedule. 



Tickets, Reservations, Information 
J. M. Bryan, Cen. Agt., Pass. Dept. 

Missouri Pacific Railroad Co. 

313 Independent Life Bldg. 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 




'A Service Institution" 



COMPLIMENTS 



J. BAYARD SNOWDEN 

REAL ESTATE 
INVESTMENTS 



MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 





NOT FOR MONEY! 






NOT FOR GLORY! 






BUT FOR GOOD! 












mSQLEOWHEi 


p-rr 






T3^ 




\* w ' 0/ 


•MY NAME 









There s Style and Real Service 
in Every 

"FAMOUS KALAMAZOO" % 

CADET UNIFORM 



There is Comfort and Satis- 
faction in Every Superior 
Quality" Cap 

Catalogue Free, or Lei Us Show You 

THE HENDERSON-AMES CO. 

KALAMAZOO, MICH. 




Compliments 
of 

ENSLEY COMPANY 



INCORPORATED 



Been There Service 

71 Union Avenue 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 



Mid-South's Largest Dealers 
in Sporting Goods 



Cox Sons and Vinmg 

131 E. 23rd St.. New York 
MAKERS OF 



CAPS, GOWNS 
HOODS 

For All Degrees 

Church Vestments and 
Clerical Clothing 




Jacob Thompson 



D. G. Walker 



THOMPSON & WALKER 

Real Estate 

Helena, Arkansas 



AU REVOIR— BUT NOT GOOD-BYE! 

To Sewanee Graduates 



Your measurements are on file at our Home Office, and we 
no doubt have a representative wherever you may go. Write 
us for his name or for Fabric Samples. You will find Stetson 
D Service and Values as outstanding in the future as here- 
tofore. 

"Nationally Known — Justly Famous" 




Clothes for College 

Men ' ,, 

MADE FOR YOU /: , J&V 



main offices 

4 North Howard Street 

BALTIMORE, MD. 




Compliments of 

JAMES SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 



Compliments of 



DUFF DRUG CO. 



Chattanooga, Tenn. 



THE FOLLOWING 

Merchants of Chatta- 
nooga 

Have helped make possible the 1929 
CAP AND GOWN, and de- 
serve your patronage: 

Sterchi Bros. & 
Fowler 

James M. Shaw 

T. H. Payne d^ Co. 

Hardie & Caudle 



Compliments 
of 



THEDFORD'S 
BLACK-DRAUGHT 



c=aoc=» 



IN USE NEARLY 100 YEARS 



«=3DC=0 



Manufactured in Chattanooga, Tennessee 
by 

The Chattanooga Medicine Co. 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF A 

FRIEND 



J. V. WILSON 

& SON 

TULLAHOMA, TENNESSEE 

Society Brand" 
Clotkes 

Complete Stock, of 

Men s Furnishings 

Display at Supply Store 



Our Capital, $2,500,000 
COMPLIMENTS 

Union JnDemniiv 
Company* 



SURETY 




CASUALTY 



union indemnity building 
New Orleans, La. 



Sales C^OT^Cl/S 



ervice 



I H t UK I VERSA! CAB 



Satisfaction 



WINCHESTER 

MOTOR 

COMPANY 

WINCHESTER, TENN. 



KELLY- 
SPRINGFIELD 
TIRES 



' i 



Wrecker Service 

Phone 333 



Compliments of 

Baggenstoss Bakery 
Company 

Tracy City, Tennessee 



RIVOLI THEATRE 

Winchester, Tenn. 



THE HOME OF FUST RUN 

Paramount, First National, and 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

Pictures 



Good Music 



Good Projection 



Compliments of 

S. ROCCAFORTE 

ATTORNEY AND NOTARY 

Maritime Building 
NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA 



PATRONIZE OUR 
ADVERTISERS 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



Idle wild Dairy Farm 

Patterson, Louisiana 




L. K. WILLIAMS 

Proprietor 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



HARRY P. WILLIAMS 



Patterson, Louisiana 



The things that you cannot find in other places 
you can find in our well-assorted stock. 

Vaugnan Hardware 
Company 

Franklin County's Leading 
Hardware Store 

WINCHESTER 



You Can't Find a More Pleasant Place 

To Spend Your Leisure 

Time Than at 

The Capitol Billiard Parlor 

Winchester, Tenn. 



ALL KINDS OF 

Toasted Sandwiches, Cold 
Drinks, Tobaccos 

L. L. Stanton, Manager 





INSURANCE 


Fire, 


Windstorm, Casualty, Accident, 




Health, Life, Bonds 


The 


Home of Insurance Service 




Special and Prompt Attention 




lo Seivanee Lines 




V. R. WILLIAMS 


Office 


Phone 37 Res. Phone 121 




Winchester, Tenn. 





Jackson's 


Garage 


A 


utomobile and General 
Repair Work 


Auto Accessories, Batteries Charged 
and Rebuilt 




A. F. Jackson, Proprietor 


Phone 88 


Sewanee, Tenn. 



Our Advertisers 

Have 

Made Your 

Annual Possible 

X 

I hey Deserve 
Your Patronage 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Bank of Sewanee 

Sewanee, Tenn. 



We Specialize in Collegiate 
Work 

CLEANING AND PRESSING 

SEWANEE BARBER 
SHOP 

W. Yarborough, Proprietor 



emo 
ge Annual 




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