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Full text of "Carolana 1990; Destined for Distinction"

Archives 
LD 

5038 

.C37 

I 1 990 

c. 1 



DESTINED FOR DISTINCTION 








'W 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/carolana1990dest16univ 



.**^ 




use SPARTANBURG LIBRARY 
ARCHIVES 




use SPARTANBURG LIBRARY 
ARCHIVES 



Carolana 1990 
use — Spartanburg 



Montage 

ompetitive 
Amusements . 
People 



1B 

BA 

. ...lOB 



Social 
Diversions. 
Successes 
Advertising 



Archives 

LD 

50.38 

.C.37 

1990 

c. ] 




....1B4 
....2DB 
....22D 



Destined 

for 
Distinction 



The decision to attend a universi- 
ty is one that every student 
should consider carefully. Sev- 
eral factors that weigh heavily in 
the decision are the size of the universi- 
ty, the cost of tuition and books, degree 
programs offered, difficulty of applica- 
tion and entrance requirements, and 
possibly what sports programs are of- 
fered. The combination of these factors 
produces a distinct picture of a universi- 
ty. Once all of these variables have 
been studied, a student may finally 
discover a university that he would like 
to attend. 

uses was established in 1967 to 
continue the nursing education pro- 
gram that was abolished by Spartan- 
burg General Hospital. The regional 
campus' first home was the basement 
of Spartanburg General, but the rapid 
growth of the student population ne- 
cessitated a move. However, the stu- 
dents continued to enroll in the univer- 
sity, which provided the support to 
warrant the construction of the Admin- 
istration Building on what was to be the 
final home of USC-Spartanburg. Such 
growth has continued through 1990, 
thus enabling the Spartanburg campus 
to expand into the modern facility it is 
today. 

For twenty-two years, USCS has 
served the community by educating its 
young people at a reasonable cost. 
Without this university, many young 
adults would have had to leave the 
Spartanburg area for an affordable edu- 
cation, or possibly would have not 
attended college. 

During the 1989-90 academic year, 
approximately 3500 students attended 
the University of South Carolina at Spar- 
tanburg. Thus, through their atten- 
dance, 3500 students affirmed that 
USCS is a distinct university. 

2 Opening 




The marigolds of spring add to the beauty of the campus. 




The class of 1989 were the first 
to participate in the graduation 
ceremonies involving the new 
portico. 




Intramural Softball offers students a chance for friendly competition 
on the university's quad. 



Opening 3 




These students take a moment to talk between classes. 
Registration is an integral part of USCS life. 




4 Opening 



Academics 




It's such a small thing, the diploma. A tiny 
rectangular booklet with your name in fancy 
letters and an autograph from President Holder- 
man sometimes does not match up with the 
rewards you feel you should reap from your many 
hours of work in college. 

Sometimes you were the last one in lab finishing 
an assignment that fascinated you. Other times the 
computers would not cooperate and you were 
forced to type a ten page assignment over twice. 

You were always wondering if the professor 
realized that you had other classes too. Sometimes 
the class schedule had an itinerary packed so tightly 
with readings and papers and midterms you won- 
dered if you could be a full-time student on one 
class alone. 

When you did get into the classes that you 
needed, you were there to learn and the greatest 
feeling of all was when you actually read all six 
chapters for the next lecture period. 

Yes, it is a small thing. That degree does not match 
up to half of what this university means to you, but 
you have worked hard to earn that degree. There is 
no doubt that USCS is destined for . . . distinction. 



Resa Walch is a counselor here at USCS. 




It is not unusual to see group 
study at USCS. 



Opening 5 



Going 

for the 

Gold 



As the year progressed, encompassed 
within was a year full of sports activ- 
ities. Practice, sweat, pain, and tears 
accompanied the teams through the 
best and worst. 

For each sport, practice always began long 
before the start of the season. Volleyball, cross 
country, and soccer began in the summer be- 
fore the school year began. 

Sweat was that perspiration that each athlete 
encountered before performing his best. Pain 
was that agonizing feeling that stemmed from 
pulled muscles. Tears were those streams that 
flowed from the eyes of students after watching 
their team play with intensity, only to suffer a 
loss. 

uses offers an eight-sport athletic program. 
There is an excellent balance between men and 
women's sports and between spectator appeal 
and life-long skills. 

Basketball has truly arrived at USCS. When 
coach )erry Waters arrived on the campus of 
USCS in 1980, he inherited the men's basketball 
team and led them to the NAIA District Six 
National Championship. In 1990, Coach Waters 
hopes to repeat although the team is young yet 
on the threshold of winning maturity. 

Success of all fronts has brought a new sense 
of excitement to being a Rifle Rouser for stu- 
dents, alumni, and friends. The boosters plan to 
follow the Rifles to away games and, of course, 
home games at the Hodge Center are always 
exciting, thanks to the cheerleaders, the pep 
band, and the dance team. 

Through it all, the best and the worst, each 
team member, fan, and coach contribute to the 
distinction of USCS. 



Total concentration Is needed to make the all Important tree throw shot from 
the foul line. 

Soccer is one of the more contact sports included in the USCS athletic 
program. 






■:« :r.' .m -sr wa. . 





6 Opening 




Monica Henderson runs down court to play defense. 



V 



- -^ 



Caria Gambrell is one of the many student- 
athlete at uses who excel both on and off the 
field. 




Opening 7 





8 Opening 




•*b^. 



^ 




Involved 



^ 




As part of an added dimension, organiza- 
tions of all types create the USCS distinc- 
tion. 
Winat does a club have to offer a stu- 
dents* Members of clubs are able to gain a great deal 
through participating in organizations. They are 
offered the opportunity to meet with others who 
share the same interests, to learn new ideas, and to 
be of service to the club. 

Clubs also allow the individuals the opportunity to 
gain responsibility, especially if they are given the 
opportunity to become officers. Many students 
think that being an officer is a glamorous position, 
but this is a total misconception. Many clubs do not 
succeed because the officers they elect do not 
realize the responsibilities that accompany the posi- 
tion. 

Officers of any organization must work together 
to achieve success. These officers mean a great deal 
to all phases of an organization. All the meetings, 
fund raisers, and special activities must be planned 
and coordinated by the officers with minimal help 
from the advisor. 

Thus, being a member of a club or organization 
means much hard work, but most members will 
agree that the clubs are loads of fun. 

By serving the school and the community, mem- 
bers of organizations show why USCS is destined for 
. . . distinction. 



The Afro-American Association tries to 
handle the Orientation rush. 




Doc Lindsay, the Pep Band director, 
concentrates on their performance dur- 
ing a home basketball game. 



Opening 9 



Beyond the Books 



ife at uses extends beyond the class- 
I room. As we look back to the 1989-90 
I school year, it is the USCS social life that 
*" brings back the fondest memories. This 
year, USCS life included both campus spon- 
sored events, as well as off-campus events, 
from RIOTS, to sporting events, to parties. 
Although USCS is known for its academic 
excellence and the beauty of its campus, the 
students of USCS most enjoy the many 
extra-curricular activities offered here. It is 
through these activities that we meet the 
most important part of our college years and 
the things that we will remember most — 
our USCS friends. 



The cafeteria is a popular USCS Hangout. 






Sandi Ceremuga. a senior nursing student, caretully watches the IV she has hung. 



10 Opening 




The CAB members give tree pizza during freshman orienlation. 




Computer classes are an integral portion of the USCS curriculum. 



Opening 1 1 




The increase in the size of USCS has gi\en rise to public safety need. 



The old Spartanburg Health Department served as the second home for the rapidly growing two year institution USCS. 




SOUTH CAROLINA 



.. .■^:>:^ M' 



Aging 



USCS exists to serve the people of the 
people of the Piedmont region. The institu- 
tion maintains low tuition and schedules 
courses at times convenient to both full and 
part-time working students. Such dedication 
by the university ensures that USCS will 
continue to grow in the future, and become 
one of the most respected institutions of 
higher learning in the Upstate region. 




12 Opening 




The RPR company works hard in order to 
alete the new building by 1990. 



Opening 13 



Graduation is the ultimate achievement in 
every college students career. 



The fall season allows 
Christina Glenn and Clint 
Baker to sit on the quad 
while enioying the sun- 
shine- 




14 Opening 



Definitely 
Distinctive 




Almost 3500 students, over 100 pro- 
fessors, administrators, and staff are 
a part of the USCS distinction. 
The following pages contain the 
participants in this story. Many faces are 
those of people who may be familiar and 
others are those of faces that one might like 
to know. 

The following pages will bring back mem- 
ories, such as Greek Rush. How about the 
time one finally made an "A" on that imposs- 
ible test? These are just a few of the memo- 
ries that will come alive through glancing at 
these pages. 

The following pages will allow us to re- 
member that special person as well as those 
we have never met. 

Most of all these pages contain the indi- 
viduals who make USCS definitely distinc- 
tive. 



Botany lab is a necessary portion of the botany requirement. 




Relaxation between classes allows social interac- 
tion between students on campus. 



Opening 15 



Student Life is more than just athletic 
games, homecoming, and Wet-and-Wild 
Day. Students do more than just go to 
class — they get involved. 

They participate in any number of 
activities, both in and out of school, 
providing them with an opportunity to 
meet others. Through their involvement 
with organizations, students meet with 
others of similar interests and are able to 
serve the school and the community. In 
athletics, the responsibility of being on a 
team is rewarded by the glory of victory, 
making all the pain worthwhile. 

Outside of school, students gather 
with friends and have a good time. Some 
prefer to go to jTraxx to show off their 
new dance step, some prefer to go to the 
movies, some to hear their favorite group 
in concert, and others prefer to cruise 
and just hang out with their buddies. 

The weekends may be seen as an 
escape from the previous week of school 
and a chance to enjoy one another's 
company. Yes, students life at USCS is 
destined for . . . distinction. 




16 Montage 





Montage 17 



M«0»N»T«A»G»E M«0«N«T»A«G*E M»0»N«T»A«G»E 



The Lighter Side 



Student Lite at USCS is more 
than just books, tests, and lec- 
tures. Student Life is often times 
found outside the classroom. Stu- 
dent Life is supporting the Running 
Rifles by attending the athletic 
events and cheering them on to 
the district championships. It is 
eating pizza and enjoying enter- 
tainers such as Ronny Romm and 
Chris Brady at RIOTS on Wednes- 
day afternoons. It is being en- 
riched by guest speakers like Neil 
Sheehan and Dr. Dorothy del 
Bueno at convocations. 

Student Life is being Creek and 



proudly wearing your letters. It is 
hanging out with friends between 
classes in the Rifle Range or in the 
Hodge Center at the "scope sta- 
tion." It is showing off your athlet- 
ic ability in intramurals and getting 
soaked during Wet and Wild Day. 
It is being involved in clubs and 
organizations. It is helping others 
through charitable projects such 
as Habitat for Humanity and Red 
Cross Blood Drive 

Student Life is wearing the latest 
fads and fashions. It is the crown- 
ing of Miss USCS and a Homecom- 
ing Queen. It is realizing that every 



day can be a Monday It is being 
late for class and having to park in 
the "additional parking." It is try- 
ing to decide on your major and 
changing it three times before you 
realize your "calling." It is 
searching for the perfect resume 
and the perfect job. 

But most of all. Student Life is 
what you'll remember the most 
about your college days. The 
times that you thought would last 
forever. The times which make 
Student Life at USCS "destined for 
distinction." 




Welcome — President, Mary Ann Mauney, addresses new members of the 
Piedmont Society Students are selected to become members based on scholarships 
and grade point ratio 

Classes closed? — Kelly Knighton attempts to find a class to fit Into her schedule 
Students who participate In late registration often find It difficult to get the classes 
they need. 




18 



M»0«N»T«A»G«E M»0«N»T»A»G«E M«0*N»T«A«G»E 



Fall 1989 — The Administration 
Building IS the tirst building most see 
as they enter the USCS campus 

Setting the table — Wilma Flintstone, 
alias Tom Nusz, participates in Gamma 
I'si Delta's skit during Greek Rush 
Week 




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1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


8 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


18 


17 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


Classes 
Begin 

30 


31 







August^ 
Again! 



Some students dread . 
the coming of August be- 
cause that means classes 
are about to swing back 
into action. Many stu- 
dents try to end their sum- 
mer vacation on an excit- 
ing note. To discover how 
some USCS students con- 
cluded their summer va- 
cations, the Carolana 
asked "How did you end 
your summer vacation?" 

Donna Cote — '! spent one 
week at the beach and the other 
rearranging my life." 

Marty Henderson — ".Attended 
a leadership seminar at Ohio 
University." 

Susan Seng — "I took a trip to 
Pennsylvania to visit family." 



Taking a break — Student Assistants 
|im Kramer. Susan Ivey, Tom Nusz, 
Kelly Rollins, Trina Feaster, and Tim 
Friar take time out from a hectic day. 



19 



New Kids on the Block 



On August 29, 1989, freshmen got 
their first feel of college life. Freshman 
Orientation Day was designed to in- 
troduce new students to USCS be- 
fore classes begin. The day started in 
the gym where all the students were 
divided into touring groups. Group 
leaders consisted of representatives 
trom on-campus organizations. These 
organizations included the Piedmont 
Society, Student Government Asso- 
ciation, Carolana, Carolinian, Gamma 
Psi Delta Sorority, Sigma Delta Psi 
Sorority, and Lambda Chi Alpha Fra- 
ternity. The freshmen toured the 
campus making stops in the Nursing 
Building auditorium, the Activities 



Building, the gym, and Tukey Theater. 
In each of these areas, they enjoyed 
short information sessions concerning 
the campus and college life. After the 
tours were over, the students re- 
turned to the gym to hear from )ohn 
Gardner of the USC-Columbia cam- 
pus Freshmen learned more about 
on-campus organizations by visiting 
information booths at the end of the 
day Games were provided by each 
organization booth to increase fresh- 
man participation. 



Slam dunk! — lames Huflman livens up his 
Freshman Orientation Day by showing his 
stuff during the slam dunk contest 






v 


^m^ 


« 1 


•'I 


m 



Hole-in-one — Rhett Carroll concentrates on mak- 
ing an accurate putt The putting green, which was 
one of the more popular games, was set-up by 
Campus .^ctivity Board 

Reading the catalog — While looking at the course 
descriptions. Ke\in Smith tries to find an appropriate 
class for his ma|or 




We want you! — Army ROTC officer 
Lewis explains the ROTC program to 
students during Freshman Orientation 
Day- College students are often a 
target for army recruitment 




Lending 
a Hand 



Patient, dedicated, and 
hard-working are just a 
few ways to describe 
freshmen advisors. Fresh- 
man advisor Dr. Sarah 
Rook says, "There are 
trade offs with advising 
freshmen as opposed to 
upper classmen. I do not 
mind giving the extra time 
because I know they are 
getting a good founda- 
tion." Ms. lanice Janiec, 
also a freshmen advisor, 
comments "I really enjoy 
it because I like students 
that age and think it is 
important for them to 
have faculty that they can 
talk to." 



Freshman Advisor — Janice 
Janiec assists freshman in 
choosing their college courses. 




21 



B*G •O'k'S't •o»r«e B«o*o»k«s*t*o*r«e B»o«o* k»s*t •©•r*e 



Buying the Books 



The one place at USCS that ev- 
ery student must go is the book- 
store. The bookstore is staffed by 
full-time employees and students. 
It supplies books for every class 
offered during the semester. It also 
sells notebooks, pencils, pens, 
highlighters — everything one will 
need in the classroom. School spir- 
it is promoted here by the sell of 
sweathshirts, t-shirts, sweaters, 
and even baby bibs, all displaying 
the "Running Rifle" logo. If you 
want to munch on something be- 
tween classes, the bookstore can 
help with this too. Soft drinks, can- 
dy bars, potato chips, and other 
snacks are all available here. The 
bookstore is usually where one 
gets their first feel of their new 
classes. 

The bookstore held a "back to 

They've got it all — From notebooks to sweatshirts, 
the bookstore has practically anything for the rifle fans 




school" drawing this year. Stu- 
dents filled out an entry form when 
they purchases their books. The 
first place prize was free books for 
the fall semester was won by Tay- 
lor Haynes. Ana Mayes won a 
book pack, the second place prize. 
The third place prize was a USCS 
sweatshirt, won by Angela Turner. 



Another check! — lanell Billlngsley 

u rites a check for another book that she 

needs for class 

A daily necessity — StucJents find that a 
book pack becomes necessary to haul all 
their books around campus 




22 



B»o»o»k»s«t •o«r»e B*o»o»k»s«t»o*r»e B»o»o» k»s«t •©•r -e 





My life savings — Buying his fall 
books, a student realizes tinat casin 
alone won't cover the cost ot 
books. 

And your change is . . . — 

Deanna Blanchard, a bookstore 
student employee, assists a 
student with the purchase of lab 
kits. The bookstore employees 
several USCS students. 



Students found out that 
the price of a college edu- 
cation is not cheap. Not 
only do they have to pay 
the constantly increasing 
tuition, they ais.o^have to 

S pay i*wCB^^^''^8.^^'^fe 
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and wher^did you get 
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Denise Jewell 



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23 



b • I • i • c S 



t • y P • u • b 



t.y 



Our Men in Blue 



You have seen them directing 
traffic. You have seen them writing 
tickets. You have even seen them 
in the classroom They are our men 
in blue - our public safety offi- 
cers. Our Public Safety department 
is made up of 13 officers, including 
seven full-time and four part-time 
professionals and tv^/o students. 
They protect the students and 
campus property 24 hours a day. 
All public safety officers are 
trained and certified by the South 
Carolina Criminal Justice Academ> 
and have the power of statewide 
arrest. The officers enforce the 



South Carolina traffic laws and is- 
sue regular Uniform Traffic Cita- 
tions. Most of the tickets are for 
illegal parking or failure to register 
vehicle but others have been given 
for speeding, driving under the in- 
fluence, and reckless driving. Pub- 
lic safety officers are now seen in 
the classroom. Officers |im Bowie 
and Brian Mullinax conduct safety 
and crime prevention programs on 
eighteen different topics. These 
topics include DUI and the new 
laws, rape prevention, drug abuse, 
and self-defense. 



To Honor, Protect, and Serve — The University Police 
symbol can be seen around campus on public safety 
vehicles. 





VND 735 — Student public safety officer Lee Sartor is- 
sues a citation for failure to register vehicle Public safe- 
ty hires qualified students to assist them throughout the 
year 

The patrol car — It is not often one can find a parked 
public safety car Public safety officers are usually pa- 
trolling the campus or helping students with car prob- 
lems. 





24 




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'f^^^^iJTS^^'^^"^'^'"'''''^ 



violation bond in this envelope 

, D PARKING MEIER VIOLAriON. METER* 

2 D PARKING IMPROPEHLV - 

3 D (PARKING OECAUlVPIIMPROPfRO ■ 

4 D PARKED IN NQ PARKING AREA GRASS 

5 D PARKED IN LOADING WNf OR SVC WN€ 

6 D NO PARKING PERMIT rOR """' 

7 D PAHKEDAT,FIREPtUGP|lNHRf lAM 

8 D PARKED IN RfSfRVIDSFAif 

9 D NO PERMIT f OH PARKING l.ARAOf 

10 D ►AllllRE TORIGiSIERVtMii i« 

11 D BLOCKING iSIDtWAlM.DWVt >*A' 
1? D PARKED IN OR SIOCKWG"*-- 

OFflCER 

RHJOtSI'O"'"-' 
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Ten dollars! — The owner of a Datsun will be sur- 
prised to find a $10 parking ticket on his wind- 
shield. The first two weeks of school were a popu- 
lar time for tickets. 

Another ticket! — Public Safety officer Phil Knox 
writes another parking ticket for illegal parking Stu- 
dents can not get anything past these guys 





Parking 
Violation 

Through rain, sleet, and 
snow, public safety is pa- 
trolling the campus and 
giving tickets. They can be 
found on-campus 24 
hours a day. Many stu- 
dents have been the vic- 
tim of on-campus cita- 
tions. These students in- 
formed us of their on- 
campus tickets when 
asked "What was the vio- 
lation when you received 
an on-campus ticket?": 



Rachelle Harder - 

ing." 



• "Illegal park- 



Randy Charles — "Reckless driv- 
ing!" 

Lanie Wofford — "Failure to reg- 
ister vehicle — no parking de- 
cal." 



Finally, a new parking decal 

— uses students were more 
than willing to pay $ 15 for this 
year's new parking decal. 



25 



e«e»k R»u»s»h G»r»e«e«k R»u»s»h G»r*e»e»k R»u»s»h 

What's All The Rush? 



The Creeks of USCS joined together 
September 11-15, 1989, for a week 
filled with fun, parties, and intensive 
RUSH' If you're wondering "What is 
RushT', formal rush is the act of enter- 
taining prospective members for a 
Creek organization. During this week, 
prospective members, rushees, enjoy 
learning more about the Creek system, 
making new friends, and attending 
scheduled events. A Creek orientation 
session was provided for all interested 
rushees on Wednesday, September 6. 
Dave Bellew explained how the Creek 
system works at USCS. Rushees then 
were invited to meet both sororities and 

Rush and Roll — Sisters of Sigma Delta Psi, Michelle 
Croxdale, Donna Moore, Lauren Brashier, lenny 
McDaniel, lulie McLean, and Lori Darby entertain 
rushees at their Grease skit. The sororities perfornned 
skits on Monday at Rush Week. 



the fraternity in individual information 
sessions in the Library Building class- 
rooms. The actual Rush Week started 
off on Monday with skits by the so- 
rorities, Camma Psi Delta and Sigma 
Delta Psi. The Camma Psis took the 
rushees on a trip to Bedrock with the 
Flintstones and Sigma Delta Psi brought 
back the past with a Crease skit. A 
scavenger hunt was provided by the 
men of Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity. 
Rush week supplied other events such 
as dinner at Sneakers sponsored by Sig- 
ma Delta Psi on Tuesday and a Toyland 
mixer with Camma Psi Delta and Lambda 
Chi Alpha on Wednesday. Thursday 



provided preference ceremonies by both 
sororities and a Hawaiian party by the 
fraternity and Friday was finally Bid Day! 
On Friday, bids were extended for 
membership by all three organizations. 
Camma Psi Delta Sorority pledged 11 
rushees, Sigma Delta Psi pledged 6, and 
Lambda Chi Alpha pledged 17 new mem- 
bers. The organizations celebrated their 
successes with mixers on Friday and Sat- 
urday in honor of their new members. 
Overall, all members of both sororities 
and the fraternity felt that Rush Week 
1989 was a success. 




Making Small Talk — Prospective soronty, Tisha Shaw 
and Carole Rice, tell about themselves during a rush 
function. Rush is an often hectic week for both ItrSr 
members and rushees 

Waiting for freshmen — Rob Phillips and Tommy .Auth, 
brothers of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity, make sure 
their booth is ready for display The Greeks set-up 
booths at Freshman Orientation Day to recruit new 
members. 



26 



G«r«e*e»k R»u*s*h G»r»e»e»k R»u»s«h G«r*e*e«k R»u*s»h 





Meet the Flintstones — Bedrock 
Impersonators Demise Hardin, Son)a 
Ruppe, I I Harmon, Lori Wiggins, and 
Catherine Hughes 

Fraternity of honest friendship — 

President Marty Henderson discusses 
Lambda Chi Alpha rush procedures with 
interested rushees. Prospective members 
found out more about Greek Life at an 
orientation session. 



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1 


2 


3 


4 


s 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


CrcA 
Rush 
Begins 

11 


13 


13 


14 


Greek 
Rush 
Ends 

16 


16 


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18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 



The Rush 
is On 

Joining a Greel< organi- 
zation is an important de- 
cision that many mai<e. 
Becoming a part of a sis- 
terhood or brotherhood 
means commitment, love, 
tun, friendship, and sacri- 
fices. Many students went 
Greei< this fall and com- 
mented when the CAR- 
OLANA asked "Why did 
you want to become a 
part of a Creek organiza- 
tion?"; 

Jerry Moore — "For the brother- 
hood and fellowship." 

Melanie Ginty — "To have fun, 
meet new people, and always 
have someone there for me." 



lenny Stephens 

friendship." 



"Fun and 



27 



R.j.f.j.e R»a»n»g»e R*i»f»l 



R 



•a»n*g*e 



Hey, What's Cookin? 



Students received a treat as they 
returned this fall. The cafeteria has 
been taken over by a new company, 
Epicure. Epicure offers more of a 
variety for students during lunch or 
class breaks. Instead of the basic 
menu offered before, students can 
decide on several different types of 
foods. If the student is in a hurry but 
yet wants a hot meal, he can eat the 
hot, prepared food. This changes 
from day to day and usually contains 
meat and vegetables. If a light meal is 
preferred, the student can enjoy a 
prepared salad, soup, or deli sand- 
wich. Students can also order ham- 



burgers, hot dogs, and fries, which 
are prepared as ordered. Breakfast is 
also served in the morning. For break- 
fast, one can choose from many items 
including biscuits, eggs, and bacon. 
Epicure also caters on-campus lunch- 
eons. Epicure is found at two other 
local colleges, Limestone College and 
Winthrop College. Bobby Barker, di- 
rector of Epicure at USCS, says that 
Epicure strives to cater to the students 
and is alvv-ays open to their sugges- 
tions. 



A study break? — Tonya Waters finds the 
Rifle Range a good place to study 





Enjoying lunch with friends — Mie McLean, Lori Darby, and Kristie 
Davis make the most of their lunch by sharing gossip. 

Make a selection — kelly Cullette avoids the lunch line and chooses 
a snack from the vending machine. Vending machines are located In 
the cafetena to provide another choice for students 




28 




R«i»f»l*e R»a» 



rrg 



A new face — Along with the new food 
service canne a new manager, Bobby Barker 
Epicure provided a new change for the 
uses cafeteria. 

What a mouthful! — Between classes, Scott 
Patterson enjoys the food provided by the 
new cafeteria, 







-•AJ^^>^ 



TI>,- (TM.X *l.7S ^ 

3lot Chars t ;i;.S 



Lunch 
Time 



Lunch Time is a favorite 
time of the day for most 
students. It gives them a 
break between classes 
and a chance to quiet 
their growling stomachs 
that have embarrassed 
them through the last two 
classes. Students an- 
swered, concerning their 
lunch time habits, when 
questioned "What and 
where do you usually eat 
lunch?": 

Patty Dotson — "Whopper 
with cheese and fries from Bur- 
ger King." 

Joel Matthews — "Ham sand- 
wiches at home." 

Sonja Ruppe — "Various food in 
the cafeteria." 



Gourmet burgers — Epicure 
offers a wide variety to satisfy 
any taste. 



29 



H»A»B»I«T»A»T H»A»B»I»T»A»T H»A«B«I»T«A«T 



A Helping Hand 



Spartanburg Colleges and Universi- 
ty Chapter Habitat for Humanity was 
originated to channel the efforts of 
college students to help build decent 
affordable houses for God's people in 
need. Spartanburg Colleges and Uni- 
versity Chapter is unique because it 
consists of four area colleges — 
uses, SMC, Wofford and Converse 
Our college chapter has set a goal to 
raise enough money to build a home 
which is about $28,000. Dunng the 
Fall semester, the college chapter pre- 
sented Spartanburg Habitat with a 
check for $3000 as our first install- 
ment. On the Spartanburg Colleges 
and University 
Board, Dr. Tom 
Davis served as 
vice-president 
and treasurer 
while Jennifer 
Chase served as 
president and 
)oni Rush served 
as chair of public- 
ity and promo- 
tions. Gamma Psi 
Delta Sorority 
held a rock- 
a-thon which 
generated over 
$300 toward our 
goal. Along with 
Gamma Psi Del- 



ta, Sigma Delta Psi and the Freshman 
Advisory Council sponsored a side of 
the Habitat House Banks that were 
placed around campus in the spnng 
semester. Many individuals and 
groups contributed much of their 
time to help stuff over 5000 enve- 
lopes for Spartanburg Habitat during 
late November. Many students, facul- 
ty and staff donated time to the con- 
struction of houses that are being 
built by Spartanburg Habitat 

Getting Involved — Everyone wanted a 
piece of the action Habitat participates in all 
the constructing of a house from nailing the 
walls together to painting the final product 





Lending a hand — Dr Olln Sansbury helps in the construction of one of the houses built by 
Spartanburg Habitat Many USCS students, faculty, and staff got involved in the act of helping 

others. 

The Finished Product — This is an example of one of the houses built by Spartanburg Habitat. 

Habitat for Humanity was formed to help eliminate the problem of housing by providing decent 

affordable housing for the less fortunate. 





H.A*B«I«T«A«T 



The first installment — loni Rush, Angela lohnson, and 
lenniler Cliase give Bill Ledbelter, president of Spartanburg 
Habitat lor Humanity, a thetk tor $iOOO The college chapter 
presented this as their first installment on the house they are 
liuilding 



Our goal is five — Tony Campolo, member of 
the National Habitat for Humanity, spoke to 
Converse College A love offering was also 
taken to help with the building of more homes. 

Working hard — David Morrison lends a hand 
with a board for part of a wall of the house. 
Campus chapters feel that "our love should not 
be just words and talk, it must be true love 
which shows itself in action" (1 |ohn 3:18) 

Here's our contribution — The president of 
Gamma Psi Delta Sorority, Jill Bishop, presents 
Dr, Tom Davis with a check for $300 for Habitat 
for Humanity. The sorority holds Habitat for 
Humanity as their philanthropy and conducted 
a rock-a-thon to raise money for Habitat. 



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1 



Tony Campolo 



Tony Campolo spoke 
at Converse College on 
October 8, 1989 in 
Twitchell Auditorium. He 
spoke on the topic of 
"Pulling Together In A 
World That Is Falling 
Apart." This was his Chris- 
tian response to a world in 
need. Mr. Campolo is a 
professor at Eastern Col- 
lege in Pennsylvania and 
the founder and president 
of Evangelical Association 
for the Promotion of Edu- 
cation, an organization in- 
volved in education, med- 
ical, and economic pro- 
grams in various Third 
World countries. He is an 
active supporter of mis- 
sion projects in urban 
communities. Mr. Cam- 
polo has written many 
books with his most re- 
cently published ones be- 
ing 20 Hot Potatoes 
Christians are Afraid to 
Touch and Crowing up in 
America. A love offering 
was taken up after Mr. 
Campolo's speech. The 
money was for Colleger 
Habitat for Humanity to 
use towards the construc- 
tion of their house. 



J 



L«i:.A»D«E*R*$*H*l*P L«E»A«D*E*R»S«H*I*P L«E«A»D«E«R»$«H»I*I 

Tomorrow's Leaders 



The Leadership Development Pro- 
gram was developed in the fall of 
1988. The main objective of this pro- 
gram is to provide the opportunity for 
selected students to reach their fullest 
potential as leaders. The program is 
spread over a two year period and 
offers between six and eight hours of 
credit. Students participating in Lead- 
ership Development are challenged 
to develop to their fullest potential as 
a leader. The program provides op- 
portunities to interact with leaders in 
the community as well as leaders on 
campus and includes an internship 
that enables you to apply your leader- 
ship skills. This internship may consist 



of becoming involved with communi- 
ty programs or campus organizations. 
To qualify for the Leadership Devel- 
opment Program, you must be willing 
to make a two year commitment and 
demonstrate a strong interest. You 
also must be a sophomore or junior, 
be in good academic standing, com- 
plete an application form, and be 
chosen by a committee. The program 
has been quite successful so far. This is 
another example why USCS students 
are "destined for distinction." 



Don't Fall! — Monica lenkins balances her- 
self on a wire as she tries to get to the oth 
er side. 




Is everyone on? — Members of the Leadership Development class try to squeeze everyone on 

the boards The class participated in a ropes course. 



On his way — Todd Thigpen starts to make his way across the ropes to the other side. This 

was one of the exercises members participated in 




• E»A«D«E»R«S«H«I*P [•E»A»D»E«R«S»H»I«P L»E»A«D«E»R»S»H»I»P 




A happy group — Members of the first 
Leadership Development class completed 
the program this year. They met to dis- 
cuss plans for their internships on Tues- 
days. 




The next group — Members 
of the second Leadership De- 
velopment class look forward 
to their day on the ropes 
course. This is one of the re- 
treats members get to partici- 
pate in, 

A Car Show — Clint Button's 
Internship involved one of his 
favorite hobbles. Clint's intem- 
ship was Teen Fest, who rais- 
ed money from the car show 
for the teen club The Ware- 
house. 



The 
Benefits 

Many students enrolled 
in the Leadership Develop- 
ment Program. The pro- 
gram is designed to encour- 
age students to develop 
their leadership abilities and 
provides means for them to 
put these abilities into ac- 
tion. Since the program be- 
gan in the Fall of 1988, the 
first class completed the 
program this year. Some re- 
sponses concerning the 
benefits of the Leadership 
Development Program 
from participating are as fol- 
lows: 

Kathy Greene — "I am in 
my final year with the Lead- 
ership Development Pro- 
gram. I now know what it 
takes to be a leader and the 
qualities of a good leader. 
This semester I will be doing 
my internship with the Sal- 
vation Army. I will get to put 
to use some of the skills that 
I have learned. I benefited 
from the program in that I 
learned what it takes to be a 
leader and I can grow from 
what I have learned. I rec- 
ommend this program for 
all wanting to learn about 
leadership." 

Jennifer Chase — "Partici- 
pating in Leadership Devel- 
opment has enabled me to 
see that great leaders are 
not born; they are real peo- 
ple with a vision that 
through hard-work and de- 
termination their visions be- 
come reality." 



C»0«N»V»0»C»A«T«i«0«N C«0»N«V»0«C»A*T«l»0 



Enriching USCS 



Convocations at USCS are a time 
for special programs and speakers. 
They occur eight to ten times 
throughout the school year and each 
one usually lasts about an hour. Con- 
vocations have been the subject of 
controversy around USCS lately. This 
is because the campus literally shuts 
down when a convocation is sched- 
uled - classes are cancelled, the 
library is closed, and the labs are 
closed. This is done in order to boost 
attendance at the convocation as well 
as give everyone an equal opportun- 
ity to attend including teachers, facul- 
ty, and staff. When asked about con- 
vocations, most students enjoy 
classes being cancelled but disagree 
with the closing of the library, labs, 
and cafeteria. They believe the time 
could be used to study if they were 
not particularly interested in the con- 
vocation speaker. Teachers occa- 
sionally give extra credit for atten- 
dance at convocations and others 



teachers make attendance a require- 
ment This also helps with attendance 
and allows students to hear an inter- 
esting speaker which they may have 
not chosen to hear. The speakers are 
chosen by a convocation committee 
the summer before each school year. 
Convocations have been a good tra- 
dition at USCS and will continue to 
benefit the students and faculty alike. 
-Patty Bagwell 



Serious business — Dr. Olin B Sansbury is 
serious about introducing the next 
convocation speaker 





Entertaining the crowd — Robert Kuttner, a well-known economist and journalist, spoke on the conse- 
quences of the Global Marketplace Mr. Kuttner was sponsored by the School of Business Administration 

and Economics. 

Enjoying her speech — Dr Dorothy del Bueno enlightened students with her convocation speech Dr del 

Bueno was sponsored by the School of Nursing. 




0« N« V«0 •C»A«T»l»0«N C«0«N»V»0«C*A«T«I«0«N 




And the speaker is . . . — Dr Ed 

Wilde, Vice Chancellor for Aca- 
demic Affairs, enjoys introducing 
the convocation speaker. 



N«0«V«E«M«B«F.«R 



bWjt 



;> |27 29 



111. 




Opinions 

Convocations have be- 
come a tradition at USCS. 
Each school usually spon- 
sors a speaker during the 
year to speak on a subject 
related to the basic con- 
centration in that school. 
Students, as well as facul- 
ty and staff, benefit from 
these speakers. Here is 
what Sonne students com- 
mented when asked their 
opinion of convocations: 

Tim Rogers — "I like them 
because classes are can- 
cailed!" 

Ava Pridemore — "I don't 
like teachers requiring us 
to go — I believe atten- 
dance should be option- 
al." 

Dana Bucci — "I really 
enjoy the speakers. The 
topics are usually very in- 
teresting." 



V.I.E*T»N»A»M V«I»E»T«N»A»M V»I«E»T»N«A»M 



A War or A Conflict? 



Vietnam was a major focal point 
tor study this past fall semester at 
uses. Many activities were designed 
for discussion and exploration of this 
topic The Fine Arts, Language, and 
Literature division of the School of 
Humanities and Sciences sponsored 
most of these activities. Students tak- 
ing English 101 during the fail semes- 
ter got their taste of Vietnam. Most 
English professors required their stu- 
dents to read books on Vietnam, 
attend lectures and roundtable dis- 
cussions, and write papers on their 
reaction to the war. 



Among the many events held in 
order to learn more about Vietnam 
was an art exhibit. The art gallery, 
located on the first floor of the Smith 
Building, displayed paintings and 
drawings depicting the war. The art 
pieces were from a variety of artists, 
all portraying their reactions. Another 
Vietnam-oriented event was the con- 
vocation featuring Neil Sheehan. Mr. 
Sheehan spoke to students, faculty 
and staff in October on incidents that 
occurred in Vietnam. Mr. Sheehan's 
book, A Bright Shining Lie, became a 
popular item in the USCS bookstore. 
General William Westmoreland also 



enlightened students with his comments 
concerning Vietnam and the war that 
never should have been. Colonel Earl 
Hopper also told of his experiences in 
the Vietnam ordeal. Debates and round- 
table discussions were other events. Dr. 
Ron Romine, Dr. )ohn Wilson and Dr. 
Dunn, from Converse College, held 
these roundtable discussions. These 
helped give students a deeper knowl- 
edge of the war. By making USCS stu- 
dents and faculty more aware of this 
often misunderstood conflict, only 
proves once again why USCS is "des- 
tined for distinction." 




Serious business — General William Westmoreland talks to students on his ordeals in Vietnam. General 
Westmoreland was one of the many speakers who visited the USCS campus to talk about Vietnam. 

Right about here — Colonel Earl Hopper points our Vietnam on the map. Colonel Hopper also spoke to 

students on Vietnam. 





V.I.E«T«N»A«M 



Telling H like it was — Neil 

Sheehan tells of his opinion 
concerning the Vietnam con- 
tlict. Neil Sheehan spoke at a 
convocation on October 31, 

The people — These pieces 
of art were on display in the 
art gallery. The art gallery is 
locateci on the first floor of 
the Smith Building 




Speaking 
Out 

Many students learned 
alot from the Vietnam topic 
this year By expbring this 
topic with speakers, stu- 
dents are more aware of 
the feelings of the partici- 
pants and the actual events 
of the war. Here are the 
reactions of some students 
when asked to share their 
personal feelings concern- 
ing Vietnam; 

Shane Workman — "I be- 
lieve America was right in 
going to Vietnam to free it 
from communist aggression 
but the United States gov- 
ernment was wrong in not 
altowing us to invade North 
Vietnam or cross into Cam- 
bodia and Laos which 
would have enabled us to 
win." 

Sheiry HolHingworth — 1 
think it was a waste of time 
because alot of people died 
that shouldn't have. We 
should have stayed out of 
Their problems." 
Brad Cole — "I have afot of 
respect for those involved 
because they stood up for 
their country." 



Tr^edy — This drawing was 
part of the Vietnam cSsplay. 




F«A»D«S F«A«S«H»l»0»N»S F»A»D«S F«A«S»H»I»0«N*S 




"Ive got to have it! — This is a popular 

Q~^ |)hrase among mosi sluclenls. The Limited 

provides an ideal place lo buy the per- 

_^ feet oulfil. 



Buying the latest 

— Camelot Mu- 
sic is a popular 
place for USCS 
students to buy 
the latest hits. 



He's Back — Batman thrilled fhe nation in 
the new motion picture this year. Batman 
topped the charts with record-breaking 
attendance at the theaters. 



r What's In 



The 1490 Carolana staff surveyed USCS students to find out their favorite fads and 
lashions. Here are the results: 



Prime Time TV Show: Cosby Show 

Cheers 
Color: Blue 
Red 
Actor: Mel Gibson 
Tom Cruise 
Movie: Look Who's Talking 

Batman 
Singer: Milli Vanilli 

Rolling Stones 
Sport: Football 

Basketball 
lunk Food: Pizza 

French Fries 



Car: laguar 

Corvette 
Clothing: Liz Claiborne 



Meg Ryan 
Song: Blame It On the Rain 

That's All There Is to Know 
Books: Bible 

Flowers in the Attic 
Pro Football Team: Dallas Cowboys 

Washington Redskins 
Perfume/Colognes: Poison & Polo 

, . Liz Claiborne & Draakar 






Reebok, L.A. Gear, Tretorn — Many students find wearing these 
brands comtortable lor traveling around campus. The Footlocker 
seems to be the best place to shop tor your athletic wear includ- 
ing shoes, sweatshirts, and caps. 



SALE! — Most studenl-s look lor that favorite sale sign while shopping. Most stores 
run sales quite often including The Limited Express. 





The biggest department store in the US — Macys is a great store to find the latest brand names. Students visit Atlanta or Columbia to shop here. 



Just Hangin' Out 



Most college students do more 
than just study and go to class. They 
lind time to have fun and just "hang 
out." AW colleges have places where 
students go to take a break from their 
hectic and busy class schedules. The 
most popular nights for USCS stu- 
dents to go out are Thursdays, the 
weekend warm-up, Fridays, and Sat- 
urdays. For students who are 21 years 
old or older, the Nu-Way, Clancey's 
and Bradny's are popular hang-outs in 
Spartanburg. For those who like to 
dance, | Traxx in Spartanburg and 
Encores in Greenville provide the ide- 
al atmosphere. For a more of a quiet 
evening, students enjoy seeing the 



latest movies at one of Spartanburg's 
SIX movie theaters. Bowling and Putt- 
Putt also supply a fun and sporty night 
out Parties are still a favorite activity 
tor students. Rifle Ridge, Pinegate, 
and Hunter's Glen are popular places 
tor USCS parties. Other students 
choose to stay at home with friends 
and just watch movies. Whatever 
they decide to do, students will make 
the most of their free time before it is 
back to the books. 

For a quiet evening — The Westgate 
Cinema is a favorite place to see the latest 
movies USCS students can choose from six 
area theaters if they prefer a night at the 
movies. 




Which way? — The Nu-Way is a popular hang-out for students 21 years old or older. It is located on Ken- 
nedy Street in Spartanburg. 

Remodeled and ready to do — Clancey's is one of USCS students' favonte hang-outs Clancey's was re- 
modeled this year With a new look and live entertainment, it continues to draw in a crowd 






A night on the town — I 

Traxx provides students a 
chance to dance and have fun 
after a long week of classes. It 
is usually well-packed on Fri- 
days with uses students. 




Where 
To Go 

College students need 
to take time out from 
studying and enjoy the 
so-called "best days of 
their life." Like ail colleges, 
uses students have their 
favorite places to go to be 
u'ith friends, relax, and 
just have a good time. 
These places take on dif- 
ferent atmospheres 
among different people 
and in different places. 
These are some of the 
places recommended by 
uses students when 
asked "Where's your fa- 
vorite hang-out?"; 
Danny Rebuck — "In 
front of the big screen TV 
at Mr. Ghatti's." 
Ashley Harry — 
"Clancey's because there 
is usually a lot of people 
from uses there." 
Tonya Williams — "The 
Gamma Psi Delta Sorority 
office!" 



^ 



iSeSml^ka^itism^ikiS^if^^^ 



E»X»A»M j*A*hA E»X«A»M J»A»M E»X»A»M J«A»M 



Exam Jam '89 



With one week before finals, you 
would expect students to be fran- 
tically trying to catch up on the work 
they have neglected since the 
Thanksgiving break or doing some 
early studying so they will not have to 
burn ihe midnight oil all next week. 
Well, students at USCS were an ex- 
ception this year to this pre-exam 
week routine. On December 6, 1989, 
one week before exams. Campus 
Activity Board sponsored the 1989 
Exam Jam. Students put down their 
books for a night of dancing and 
jamming with The Boomers. The per- 
formance was held in the Auxiliary 
gym. It began after the Rifle basketball 



Jammin' Out — The lead singer and guitar play- 
er for The Boomers lammed out during their 
performance The Boomers played a variety of 
different songs and types of music 




game and the crowning of Miss USCS. 
The Boomers rocked the gym with a 
variety of music, all pleasing to the stu- 
dents in attendance. Students enjoyed 
dancing to the latest hits performed by 
the band. CAB provided refreshments 
for students and also allowed for stu- 
dents 21 years old or older to bring their 
own beverages. The Exam jam offered 
students a chance to break away and 
loosen up before it was time to get 
serious and start studying. 



May I see an ID? — Dave Belle w, director of 
student activities, checks a student's ID at the 
Exam lam. Students 21 years old or older were 
banded and allowed to drink at the event. 




E«X«A«M J«A»M E*X»A«M J«A»M E*X«A«M j*A*M 





Dancing the night away — Donna 
Cooke, Laura Price, Adam Hatley, 
dance to the music ot The Boom- 
ers at the Exam lam Students en- 
joyed the night of fun before it 
was time to hit the books 

Banging on the drum — The 

drummer for The Boomers enjoys 
playing the latest hit songs. The 
Boomers performed for Exam lam 
'89, 



E»C»E«M»B«E»R 



Fan 
Pbul» 



Quiet! 



Finals are a hectic time 
for most students, it is the 
most dreaded weel< be- 
cause it is your last chance 
to prove yourself in your 
classes. It is the week that 
you get no sleep because 
of the "all-nighter" study 
sessions. It is the week 
you consume more cof- 
fee than you thought you 
would ever drink. It is the 
week when you must find 
a quiet place to study, 
uses students told the 
Carolana where they 
study for their exams: 
Caroline Johnson — "I 
study at home, usually in 
the den." 

Alison Hunt — "At Rifle 
Ridge Apartments in 
3-C." 

Tisha Shaw — "I usually 
study at work. Day's Inn in 
Gaffney." 



C»0«S«T 0*F C»0«L»L»E«G»E E • D • U • C • A • T • I • O • N 



A Future, A Fortune 



The cost of going to college is a 
major expense for most students and 
parents. The cost of tuition seems to 
be increasing annually at most institu- 
tions, including USCS. Many college 
students are having to take out loans 
and continually apply for grants. This 
is causing the average student loan 
debts of college graduates to mount 
up every year. Soon almost all gradu- 
ates will have accumulated a debt 
upon graduation. 

Tuition increases constitute many 
opportunities for the academic insti- 
tution. As long as an academic institu- 
tion is committed to quality costs will 
continue to be a concern. Increases in 




Financial Aid — With tuition increase becoming 

more common, more and more students are 

checking in on loans, grants, and scholarships. 

Acquiring a debt — Doua Lo tills out her loan 

papers for the Spring semester Many students are 

having to take out student loans to afford an 

education. 



tuition are used for faculty salaries, to 
maintain quality professors, and to 
keep up with the ever-growing 
knowledge and technology bases. 
The institution must have new labora- 
tory equipment, new computers, 
new books, and other essential inno- 
vations. Also part of the revenue 
from the increase goes to student aid 
Contributions do not help with these 
existing costs but only increase edu- 
cational opportunities such as scholar- 
ships. Tuition will probably continue 
to increase only causing students to 
pay what seems like a fortune for a 
future. 



Once again — Signs were placed outside the Administra- 
tion Building to direct students to the Cashier's office to 
pay their bills. 




RECORDS OFFICE 

& 

FEE PAYMENT 
3rd FLOOR 




C«0«S»T 0*F C»0«L»L»E«G»E E • D • U • C • A • T • I • O • N 





Help Awaits — Financial Aid officer Marie 
Soutter looks through student financial aid files. 
The Financial Aid office provides assistance to 
students. 

The loan — The loan application is getting to 
be a popular sight for many students. 




An Education 



uses had a tuition in- 
crease at the beginning of 
the 1989-90 academic 
school year. Tuition was 
raised from $1600 a year 
to $1750 a year for South 
Carolina residents. USCS 
continue to provide an 
excellent education at a 
fair price. The Carolana 
asked some students how 
they felt about the cost of 
tuition and the education 
that they are receiving at 
USCS: 

Kristi Henderson — '1 
think tuition is reasonable 
and I feel we have great 
teachers." 

Carole Rice — "I feel I am 
receiving a quality educa- 
tion at a fair price." 
Todd Rogers — "I feel the 
professors are very well 
qualified, the courses are 
challenging, and the tu- 
ition is reasonable." 



C«A'R«E*E«R C«0*U«N«$«E«L»l'N«G C«E«N«T'E«R 

Choosing The Right Career 



The Counseling and Career Devel- 
opment Center provides valuable in- 
formation and services to students The 
Center has two counselors, Resa Walch 
and Carol Smith, who assist students 
inn their search for a major and a 
career. Students can use Sigi Plus, a 
computer system that helps explore 
career choices and matches the stu- 
dent's interests with potential careers 
There are also several interest tests 
which the Center provides to help 
identify the best career for the student 
The counselors are also available to just 
discuss any problems one may be hav- 
ing. Students can also find information 
on graduate schools and graduate 



school entrance exams such as the 
LSAT and GMAT The counselors also 
hold several workshops a semester on 
a varsity of topics for both students and 
faculty/staff. 

The Counseling and Career Devel- 
opment Center has a plan of action for 
students. Career Pursuit. In the fresh- 
man year, students should self-explore 
career decisions. As sophomores, stu- 
dents should begin exploring different 
careers. By the junior year, students 
should have narrowed down their ca- 
reer choices and be preparing for the 
job search. As a senior, students should 
be actively involved in the job search 
process. 



On Your Mark ... — The Career Pursuit board, located 
outside the Counseling and Career Development Center, 
challenges students to a successful college career The 
board also welcomes students to explore the Counseling 
and Career Development Center 





CAREER 




1 

1 


PURSUIT 


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Exploring career opportunities — Resa Walch, a counselor in the Counseling and Career Development Cen- 
ter, assists Ian Carlos with SIgi Plus Sigi Plus Is an Individualized computer career exploration tool 

Helping out — Trinia Feaster, a student assistant for Minority Student Affairs assists Tonya Adams. The Mi- 
nority Student .affairs office is located in the same area as the Counseling and Career Development Center in 

the Hodge Center 



V 



C«A«R»E»E«R C«0«U«N»S*E«L«1«N-C 



On the telephone — LaDonna Perry, director of 
Minority Student Affairs, discusses plans for upcoming 
events for minority students witti a colleague over the 
telephone Minority Student Affairs helps coordinate 
activities for minority students 

Busy, busy, busy — Leon Wiles, Dean of Students, and 
Sylvia Morgan are busy at work. Dean Wiles' office is 
also located In the Hodge Center 




What 
To Be 



Choosing a major is a 
difficult tasi< for some stu- 
dents. Many students will 
change their major two or 
three times before they 
figure out what it is that 
they really want to do. 
Once the right major is 
found, the challenge 
moves to finding the right 
career. Some students 
replied as follows when 
asked, "What is your ma- 
jor and why did you 
choose it?": 

Stephanie Lovelace — 
"My major is Elementary 
Education because I enjoy 
being around children and 
want to help shape their 
future." 

DeeAn Jarvis — "Ac- 
counting is my major. I 
CHOSE IT SO I would 
make lots of money." 
Lori Ann Poole — "I 
chose Secondary Educa- 
tion as my major because 
I want to help others and 
to give a little back to 
education of what was 
given to me." 



•N»T»R»A»M»U»R»A«L»S I»N»T»R»A«M«U«R«A-L«S 



Thrill of Competition 



Intramurals are a popular event on 
the uses campus. It provides students a 
chance to take a break from their stud- 
ies and show off their athletic abilities 
Students form teams for the many intra- 
mural events and choose unique names. 
Then it turns into a blood-thirsty fight for 
the much coveted championship t-shirt. 
These events are planed by Coach )ohn 
Daurity and are scheduled for both fall 
and spring semesters. The activities are 
held on Monday, Wednesday, and Fri- 
days dunng the 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. break. 
Intramural events include tennis, softball, 
wallyball, Carolina tag football, soccer, 3 
on 3 basketball, volleyball, ping-pong, 
Wet-N-Wild, and the Great Pumpkin 
Run. 

The Longgones were the winners of 
the Softball intramurals. Members 



included David Watson, Shane Hunter, 
Alan Batson, |eff Lister, Andy Carter, Tim 
Friar, Lily Burger, Brian Broun, and Dale 
King. Football was won by The Puppets 
which consisted of Vic Pace, Scott Cher- 
ry, |im jablonski, lose Coral, Adam La- 
boranti, Tony Green, and Keith Parkin- 
son. The Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity 
took tops in the Wet-N-Wild activity. Eric 
FHeisman, Danny Rebuck, and Robbin 
lohnson all took first places in the Great 
Pumpkin Run. And because of popular 
demand, the Big Turkey Trot was crated 
which saw Eric Prince and Danny Re- 
buck in the lead. 

One More Buckel — llll Bishop helps Lamlxia 
Chi Alpha Fraternity win the Wet-N-Wild 
competition Each team consisted of eight 
players, including two females 





Table tennis anyone? — Brad Colson and lerry Berry pradice their skills at ping-pong 
during a break between classes. Ping-Pong is an intramural event. 

Loose ball — Students and faculty members fight for the ball in the annual Etxjny-lvory 
basketball game. The faculty beat out the students this year. 





>*iU 



N»T»R»A»M«U»R*A»L»S l«N»T»R»A»M*U»K»A»L«b 





Go Ball Go — Two students 
try to get the ball past their 
opponent's flag by using 
high-pressured hoses. Stu- 
dents are usually soaked af- 
ter participating in Wet- 
N-Wild activities 

Running around campus — 

Bo Keller participates in the 
Great Pumpl<in Run, This 
year, due to the popularity 
of the Great Pumpkin Run, 
the Big Turkey Trot was also 
held as an intramural event 





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On the 
Side 

Intramurals pro- 
vide a lot of fun and 
excitetnent and exer- 
cise for many stu- 
dents. By participat- 
ing, it gives them a 
chance to make new 
friends and experi- 
ence the thrill of 
competition. The 
Carolana questioned 
some uses students, 
"Why do you enjoy 
participating in intra- 
murals?": 

John Jones — "Be- 
cause it gives you a 
chance to meet oth- 
er students and get 
exercise." 

Laura Seymour — "It 
gives me a chance to 
participate in activ- 
ities that otherwise 
would be unavail- 
able to me." 

Billy Smith — "I en- 
joy the competition 
of the events." 



R 



O • T R 



0»T R«l»0«T R«l«0«T R«l»0»T 



A Riot!? 



What's fun and exciting, happens 
on Wednesday afternoons and occa- 
sionally at night and provides free 
food' Its a RIOT - A Really Intense 
Outrageous Time. RIOTs are spon- 
sored by the Campus Activity Board 
Various types of entertainers are 
brought on campus to perform for 
uses students. Free food, usually 
Dominoes pizza, is often provided to 
encourage student participation This 
year CAB brought back two all-time 
favorites - Ronny Romm and Chris 
Brady. Ronny Romm started the RIOTs 
off for the 1989-90 school year. His 
psychic abilities once again amazed a 
large crowd of students. Chris Brady 
thrilled students at an evening RIOT. 
He sang crowd favorites including 



limmy Buttet and Eagles songs Chris 
Brady took requests from the audi- 
ence and even had Sonja Ruppe and 
Alison Hunt from the Gamma Psi Del- 
ta Sorority join him on stage for one 
of his sing-a-longs Other RIOTs in- 
cluded readings from Jonathan Frid of 
"Dark Shadows"; a performance by 
the band The Green Olives; Rick 
Kelley, singing the best of Motown; 
and a showing of the "Rocky Horror 
Picture Show" on Halloween. So next 
time someone yells "RIOT!" Don't 
panic because it is only a Really In- 
tense Outrageous Time and it is alot 
of fun! 



The comedy zone — Comedian Mark Rossi entertains 
a group of students with his jokes. The Computer 
Science Club sponsored this RIOT along with CAB. 



* Pr«<rt 




i 




"loai 




Rockin' the quad — Students enjoy listening to one of the RIOTs featuring a rock band When the 

weather permits, the quad is a favorite spot for afternoon RIOTs. 

The number is ... — Mike Hanke assists Ronny Romm with part of his performance Ronny Romm 

started the RIOTs this year in September 




R.|»0»T R»1«0»T R«l»0»T R«1«0»T R»I.O»T 





Swim to the left ... - Sonja 
Ruppe and Alison Hunt |Oin Chris 
Brady in a sing-a-long to lummy 
Buffet's song "Fins." Chris Brady 
performed at an evening RIOT 
this year 

Risque Business — Four students 
from use performed short skits 
about the effects of drug abuse. 
They brought an important mes- 
sage to students through their 
comical skits. 



My 
Favorite 

RIOTs are a fun break for 
students from their busy class 
schedules. RIOTs are scheduled 
during the break usually on 
Wednesdays or Fridays. This 
year, however, some RIOTs 
were also scheduled for the 
evenings. The student re- 
sponse was great fro both day 
and evening RIOTs. Everyone 
has their favorite perfonners. 
These are some of the favor- 
ites that were mentioned when 
the Carolana asked, "What 
was your favorite RIOT?": 
Denlse Hardin — "Chris Brady 
because there were alot of 
people there and I like his mu- 
sic." 

Jill Bishop — "Rick Kelley be- 
cause he was very energetic 
and gets the students in- 
volved." 

David Sims — "Risque Business 
because I felt the actors did a 
great job." 

Always a lat^h — There is al- 
ways fun to be had by J at a 
RIOT Students like RIOTs whethi- 
er they are held in the Hodge 
lobby or in the opjad. 




M«A»N«I«C M»0«N«D«A«Y»S M«A«N«I«C M • • N • D • A • Y • S 



Monday Again? 



We have all had them - days 
when everything we touch goes 
wrong. Ironically, those days always 
seem to fall on Monday when we are 
so desperately trying to recover from 
the weekend and get back into some 
type of routine. The term "Manic 
Monday" has been used to describe 
days when - you sleep until 7:00 on 
a day that you have an 8:00 class, 
there is nothing decent in your closet 
to wear and no time to eat breakfast. 
You grab your books and out the 
door you go only to find that your car 
won't start so you have to take dad's 
old clunker. M school, you run to 
class and try to slip in the door with 



out too much noise. The teacher cuts 
his eyes at you as he continues to 
work a math problem. Wouldn't you 
know it — you're without your 
homework and it's the first time all 
semester he decides to take it up to 
be graded. On the way home, a cop 
pulls you over for doing 55 mph in a 
35 mph zone. You accept the ticket 
and drive straight home without any 
plans to leave the house because you 
realize it has been "lust another Man- 
ic Monday I" -Patty Bagwell 

Last minute studying — Michelle Cater 
crams tor a test before class. Monday seems 
like a good day for test, at least that's what 
many professors think. 





Taking a break 



Not a pleasant sight 



Stuart Reynolds relaxes outside the library On a pretty day, an outside nap provides the 

needed energy to make It through the day. 

— You know it must be Monday when you come out of class and see Public Safety offi- 
cer lim Bule writing you a ticket for Illegal parking. 





M»A«N»1*C M*0*N»D«A»Y«S 




I just don't get tt! — lill Bish- 
op knows what a bad day is 
after reading Accounting the 
ory all afternoon. 

Ifs not that bad, Dean! — 

Dean Spencer )ust doesn't 
think that there should be 
any classes on Monday 




M • A • R • C • H 



Mmlc 
Monday 



UboIc 
UoDday 



Mmlc 
Mooday 



MbcIc 
Mondsy 



ZS U 17 



I* » II 



Oh No! 

Mondays seem to be the 
day that whatever could 
possibly go wrong, does go 
wrong. It is the day you 
forget your homework, 
you have a pop test in ev- 
ery class, and, of course, 
you are not prepared, you 
oversleep, you can't find a 
parking place except in the 
"additional parking" lot, and 
you wonder why you just 
did not stay at home in the 
bed all day. Many students 
often dread to see Monday 
roll arourKl. The Carolana 
asked students to tell us 
about their worst Monday. 
Brian Dismukes — "I found 
a really great parking place 
on a rainy Monday, only to 
open my door and step 
ankle-deep into a puddle of 
water." 

MicheUe Taylor — "I had 
an- SNA meeting at 12:00 
•p.m. but thought it was at 
1:00 p.m. and sat in my car 
and read through the 
whole meeting." 
Tatty Bagwell — "1 wore 
sweats to school — I forgot 
1 was suppose to dress up 
for a meeting. I had to go 
home and change." 



P»L*A»C»E«M»E«N»T P»L»A«C»E»M«E»N»T P»L»A*C«E»M»E*N«T 



Preparing Professionals 



The Placement Office at USCS is an 
opportunity often missed by many stu- 
dents. The Placement Office offers valu- 
able ser\ices to USCS students. Al- 
though all USCS students are wel- 
comed, the office is geared mostly 
towards seniors. Here seniors can partic- 
ipate in workshops given by the Direc- 
tor of Placement on resume writing, 
interviewing, and )ob search skills. They 
also can get assistance with the prepara- 
tion of their resume and information on 
job opportunities. Seniors are eligible to 
participate in specific recruitment days 
held for their particular major or in on- 
campus interviews. A Placement library 
is available with many books, articles, 
company literature and examples for 



your job search. Underclassmen can 
find valuable information in the Place- 
ment Office, too Part-time jobs, off- 
campus and on-campus, are posted in 
this office and are available for students 
to apply for employment. The Place- 
ment Office also holds an annual Career 
Fair and Summer job Fair Students can 
learn more about their chosen career 
fields and specific company information 
by interacting with professionals. Ex- 
plore the Placement Office; you may be 
surprised' 



For your information — The Placement Office 
posts part-time )obs, off-campus and on- 
campus. and workshop and recruiters' schedules 
on a bulletin board outside the office The office 
IS located on the second floor of the 
Admin5lration Building 




RECRUITERS 
SCHEDULES 



r.r.'~^ -^a 




Getting the facts — A USCS student talks to a representative from the 

Spartanburg Police Department RepresentatK'es from a vanety of fields 

attended the Career Field to talk to students. 

Resume writing — Heather Fletcher takes advantage of the resources 
library The Placement library contains information on resumes, inter- 
viewing, |ob searching, reference matenals, and area companies. 




I 



P»L«A«C»E«M«E.N»T 



An information center — Virginia Rector, Di- 
rector of Placement, shows Rodney Reed 
some valuable information in the Placement 
library The Placement Office provides many 
useful services to students 

Register here — Tom Nusz and Tim Friar ass- 
ist uses students at the registration table at 
the Career Fair Many USCS students took 
advantage of the opportunity to meet with 
business representatives. 




On My 
Own 

Once you reach your 
senior year of college you 
should start preparing to 
search for a job. The first 
step is to prepare a re- 
sume to sell yourself to 
potential employers. As 
you begin constructing 
your resume, you have to 
decide exactly what it is 
you want to do. Several 
students told the Car- 
olana their career objec- 
tive: 

Candace Harmon — "To 
take Dan Rather's place 
on the CBS News!" 
Susan Hayes — "To be an 
accountant so I can make 
enough money to sup- 
port myself and my 
child." 

Sherry Hollingsworth — 
"To eventually earn a 
Ed.D and teach math at a 
university." 



S*T*U«D«E*N*T A«$«$«I*S«T«A»N»T*$ 

Working On-Campus 



The 1989-90 school year brought a 
change to the on-campus student 
employment process^ Previously, 
most students got on-campus jobs by 
word-of-mouth from other students 
or professors or through the Financial 
Aid Office. There was really no formal 
process and only lucky students or 
students qualifying for financial aid 
got hired for these jobs. Now the 
hiring process is more complex and 
gives students a more equal oppor- 
tunity for on-campus jobs. The first 
step for students wanting an on-cam- 
pus job is to visit the Placement Of 



Are these the right papers? — Kelley Rollins and 

Lome Blackwell make sure they have all the nght 

papers as they begin to process a loan. They are 

student assistants in the Financial Aid Office. 



fice, located on the second floor of 
the Administration Building. Here the 
student views the bulletin board 
which lists all on-campus jobs. The 
next step is to fill out an on-campus 
student employment employment 
application. If you are interested in 
one of the jobs on the board and are 
qualified, this application will be for- 
warded to the person in charge of 
hiring for that specific job. If you did 
not find a job you were interested in 
or did not qualify for one, your appli- 
cation is filed and reviewed as other 
jobs are submitted to the Placement 



Office. Your application will then be 
forwarded to a job in which you qualify. 
Once your application has been for- 
warded, the person in charge of hiring 
for that job reviews all applications 
which he received. He then interviews 
candidates for the position and makes a 
decision. The applications of students 
not hired are routed back to the Place- 
ment Office to be filed. Your application 
then starts the process all over again. 




S«T»U*D»E»N»T A»S»S»I*S»T»A«N»T»S 





Getting the job done — Marilyn Remsburg and 
Tim Friar, student assistants for the admissions 
office, type letters to prospective students. 
Students help in most all duties of the office. 

Hard at work — lennifer Chase studies some 
important work as she works In the Chancellor's 
office Students gain much knowledge and 
experience by working on-campus. 



My Job 



Most students who 
work on-campus find it 
both fun and rewarding. 
There are a variety of dif- 
ferent jobs available for 
students which come 
with many different tasks, 
from typing letters to gra- 
ding papers to preparing 
the out-going mail. Here 
are what some student as- 
sistants replied when 
asked "Why do you like 
working on campus?": 
Crystal McCullough — "1 
like it because I get to 
meet lots of the pro- 
fessors and work with dif- 
ferent types of people." 
Tim Friar — "Because you 
get to know the school 
and your boss will work 
with you if you heed off 
for a test or to study." 
Toni Nusz — "I like work- 
ing on-campus because 
you make a lot of contacts 
- faculty, staff, and pro- 
fessionals - and you 
learn information which 
will be helpful once you 
get out of college." 



S»E«N»l«0-R M«E«M*0«R»l»E»S S«E»N»l»0*R M»E»M«0»R«l*E»S 




Victor Austin — "My fonoest memory will be the cohesiveness 
that took place during the First Annual Black Student, Faculty, and 
Staff Symposium." 



Stacey Seay — "I'll remember being SCA president my senior 
year, 1989-1990, most of all." 





]ill Bishop — "My best memories of USCS are the friends I have 
made and the experiences I have had. I have enjoyed the 
closeness of the sorority and planning activities for SGA." 



d 



ITracy Jackson — "When my friends brought my crown, sash, and 

|roses from the Miss USCS pageant to my house the day after the 

pageant since I had to miss it will be what I remember the most." 



• E»N»l»0»R M»E»M«0«R»1»E«S S»E»N«1»0«R M«E«M*0*R«l*E«$ 




Sonja Byrd — "My best memory would have to be MCing the 
Annual Black Heritage pageant." 



Laura Vmciguerra — "I will remember how happy I was to experience 
the revitalization of school spirit at USCS." 





John Stevenson — "The impression that will stay with me is how 
friendly the people have been, how outgoing the student body is, 
and how helpful the faculty have been." 



Melanie Meetze — "My fondest memory is the friendly and strong 
relationship between students and professors in the accounting 
department." 



G»R«A»D«U»A»T»l*0»N G«R«A«D«U»A»T»l»0«N 



The most awaited event in college 
life is graduation. The hard work and 
dedication of four years culminates in 
the presentation of a college degree 
at the graduation ceremony. This dig- 
nified ceremony serves as the final 
recognition for the efforts put forth 
by those graduating. The purpose of 
a college education is to teach one 
how to think. The fulfillment of this 
purpose prepares college graduates 
for the real world by enabling them to 
deal effectively with decisions that 
must be made in successful business 
ventures. It is a major accomplish- 
ment to complete the requirements 
for a college degree. A great many of 
those students who enter college do 



At Last 



not finish. It is those with determina- 
tion and a desire to succeed that 
finally attain a Bachelor's degree. 
Most importantly, it is up to those 
who receive college degrees to be- 
come the leaders of tomorrow. With- 
out well-educated individuals to press 
forward the research needed to bet- 
ter society, the world would cease to 
advance in scientific technology, as 
well as in business and social struc- 
tures. 

Teacher of the Year — Dr Olin Sansbury 
congratulates and gives Mr Warren Carson a 
plaque at the 1989 graduation ceremony for 
being named Teacher of the Year Mr. Carson 
was named Teacher of the Year for the entire 
use system. Way to go Mr Carson and USCS' 




II 




Waiting anxiously — 1989 graduates wait for the ceremony to begin. 1989 graduates were the rirst to walk across the 

new portico built on the Administration Building. 

Hey Mom! — A nervous graduate points out her parents to her friend by waving at them. Graduation from college is 

one of the most important events in most people's lives. 





U* A«Tn«0«N 



By Candlelight — The nurses 
celebrate graduation with a 
candlelight service. The cere- 
mony proves to be touching 
and special to the graduating 
nurses. 

Hooray! — Three excited 
graduates are happy to finally 
have graduated af'er four 
years Graduation day finds 
alot of smiling faces. 



M • A • Y 



Hold On To 
The Movement 



Single file and yet together. 
We have shared our greatest 

days. 
And we carry common memo- 
ries 
In different ways. 

Though we don't know where 

we're going, 
We will cherish where 

we've been. 
I want to cry, 
I want to shout . . . 
Want to let this feeling out. 

Hold on to the moment. 
Let the feelings show. 
Hold on to the moment. 
Never let it go. 

I can picture us together 
With my arms around my 

friends, 
lust let me hold on to this 

moment. 
Before it ends. 
There was laughter. There 

were tears. 
Through the many golden years. 

— Author Unknown 



Most students will agree that they 
enjoy watching an athletic team anni- 
hilate an opponent, but would these 
same students be willing to sacrifice 
the majority of their time and energy 
to make a winning team? Students 
often envy the prestige of owning a 
team jacket with their name written 
across the back or the pride of being a 
district champion, but these honors 
result only from endless hours of train- 
ing. 

Athletes are a special breed of peo- 
ple who set high goals for themselves 
and do everything physically possible 
to achieve these goals. They endure 
the cuts, bruises, and broken bones, 
all for a single moment of victory. 

Through it all, the best and the 
worst, each team member, fan, and 
coach, contributes by keeping USCS 
destined for . . . distinction. 




62 Competitive Amusements 





Competitive Amusements 63 



Soccer 



Previous head soccer 
coach, Frank Kohlenstien, 
the only soccer coach at 
uses since the Rifles started 
the soccer program in 1980, 
left uses to assume the head 
coaching position at the Uni- 
versity at North Carolina at 
Charlotte on )uly 21, 1989. 

David Linenberger re- 
placed Kohlenstein at the 
helm of the USCS soccer 
program. "I am very excited 
and looking forward to tak- 
ing over the successful soc- 



cer program at USCS, Lin- 
enberger said. "I hope I 
can continue the success 
and take it another step 
further as we go into Divi- 
sion II this season." 

With our soccer players 
coming from a variety of 
countries and our new 
head coach, the USCS 
soccer program is defi- 
nitely destined for . . . dis- 
tinction! 





Raul Gomez displays his soccer prowess 
during an offensive play. 



Jerry Randakai maneuvers the ball away 
from the Wofford defense. 




64 Competitive Amusements 




(Back Row) Raul Gomez, Rafael DiBos, Scott Vogel, Billy Hinson, Michael Gray, Richard Wright, Chris King, Pat O'Toole, (Middle Row) David Linenberger, Carlos Osoriu, jerry 
Kandakai, Marcelo Guzman, Fabio Pacheco, Scott Dymond, Andrew Hyslop, lose Coral, Scott Cherry, Danny Moss, Reynaldo Lopez, Darren Farkas, Mark Smith, Darren Ambrose, 
Andy Wright, Victor Pace, Danny Rebuck, and Will Poe. 




^ 



Determination marks the play of Raul 
Gomez, 



Pat O'Toole and Marcelo Guzman pass 
the ball between themselves. 



Competitive Amusements 65 




Kicking Up A Storm 



It's one of those 
games that your 
mother would never 
let you play under 
any circumstances! 
It's full of head- 
butting, kicking, 
shouting, body slam- 
ming, and the illegal 
use of the hands. It 
has bruises, mud, 
abuse, and even oc- 
casional blood shed. 
It's all about action, 
excitement, glory, 
and postgame cele- 
bration. It's called 



soccer, and on this 
campus a specific 
group of Running Ri- 
fles play it to perfec- 
tion. 

They are whis- 
pered about in admi- 
ration, and adoring 
fans follow their 
games. The players 
themselves are men 
of daring, with de- 
ceptive skills; all of 
which are wrapped 
up in a little boy's 
love for having fun. 
Not the bulky equip- 



ment of football- 
just men. They are 
our soccer players. 

Here at USCS, soc- 
cer is one of the more 
glorified sports. With 
their record of 7-3-0 
overall and winning 
the District title for 
the last two years, we 
have a reason to be 
proud. 

The soccer team 
made it to the semi- 
finals this year, but 
were defeated by 
Lander. 



Richard Wright, Darren Fartas, and Marcelo 
Guzman celebrate after a goal. 



Frank Kohlenstein proudly displays his last USCS 
championship title 





66 Competitive .Amusements 









Competitive Amusements 67 



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1 1 




Serving practice is essential for the Lady 
Rifles in the quest for District Six champ- 
ionships 



As Monica Henderson completes her 
pre-game warm-ups. extreme concen- 
tration IS noted on her face. 



Angle's form says she's ready for a 
perfect set up. 




68 Competitive Amusements 



Volleyball 



The soccer team 
are not the only ones 
who received a new 
coach at their helm. 
The volleyball team's 
first year head coach 
Nancy Cummings, 
led them in their con- 
secutive NAIA Dis- 
trict six champion- 
ship, as well as a rec- 
ord of 34-4 for the 
Lady Rifles. 

Even though the 
squad had only four 
returning players 
from last season, the 
Lady Rifles defeated 
Presbyterian College 



in the finals 15-4, 15-7, 
to gain the District title. 
Cummings stated that 
she was pleased that 
the uses volleyball 
team were ranked sec- 
ond behind Presby- 
terian going into the 
tournament. She said 
she feels that the rank- 
ing motivated the team 
to play their best. 

Lady Rifles Carla 
Gambrell, Angle Cam- 
brel!, and Monica Hen- 
derson were named to 
the All-Tournament and 
All-District teams. 




Hey girls - no lying down on the job' 



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(Kneeling) Wendy Workman, Rae Freeman, Lisa Wilson; (Row One) Tern Cash, Kristin Zamora, Chris Fall, Monica Henderson, Michelle Thompson, Angie Gambrell, (Row Two) 
Assistant Coach Shannon Gregg, Stephanie DeKeyer, Michelle Scruggs, Carla Gambrell, Anesia Bittner, Coach Nancy Cummings 



Competitive Amusements 69 



ii^ri-!* 



."N 



TV 




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18 



t 



Members of the volleyball team pa- 
tiently await the arrival of the referees 
— they waited an hour and a half. 



"Peppering" is a warmup exercise be- 
tween two team members by alternat- 
ing the bumping and spiking techniques. 



Senior Caria Campbell passes the ball to 
the setter, CarIa was one of the many 
standouts on the team 




70 Competitive Amusements 



Digging for Vic 




Volleyball is fast becoming 
one of the most competitive 
sports in America today. It may 
not have as much national rec- 
ognition as football or basket- 
ball, but it is just as exciting to 
watch. 

The Lady Rifles finished the 
season with a 35-8 record and 
their third consecutive NAIA 
District six and Bi-District II titles. 
As a result, they advanced to 
the NAIA National Volleyball 
Tournament in Laie, Hawaii, on 
the campus of BYU Hawaii. 

Although they failed to win 
any of the four games in Hawaii, 
they did take Fresno Pacific CA, 
the eventual National Tourna- 
ment Champion, to a third 
game which Fresno won 15-13. 

Seniors Caria and Angle Gam- 
brell, along with Monica Hen- 
derson were named to the All- 
District Six team. 



First year head coach Nancy Cummings 
prepares the volleyball team for pre- 
game warmup drills 



Captain CarIa Gambrell patiently listens 
to the referee as he explains the court 
boundaries. 



Chris Fall spikes the ball violently over 
the net for a kill. 



Competitive Amusements 71 




Team members line up in preparation 
for the start of tfie meet 




72 Competitive Amusements 




Country 




The cross country team, 
under the direction of head 
coach Al Dunn, competed 
for its fourth crown in five 
years. Francis Marion won 
the title in 1988. 

After the first three meets 
were not run due to a clerical 
error and Hurricane Hugo, 
the season was delayed a 
month. The Rifles were the 
chosen favorites when they 
hosted the NAIA District Six 
Championships on Novem- 
ber 4. In both the Citadel 
Invitational and the South 
Carolina Intercollegiate 
meets, the Rifles placed 
ahead of any other District 
schools entered. 



David Fish and Dan Lane participate 
in the District Six Championship 




Row One: Terry Hefstetter, loe Keaton; Row Two; Kevin Bowden, Keith Parkinson, Robbie McFarland, David Fish, Dan Lane, Andres VIver, Coach Al Dunn 



Competitive Amusements 73 



Breaking All the Rules 



During the 1989-90 mens 
basketball season, the Rifles 
compiled an impressive win- 
loss record and either tied or 
broke many school records. 
They are as follows: Most 
points in a game by an indi- 
vidual: Tied by Ulysses Hack- 
ett vs. Tennessee Temple. 
The record is 38 points. Most 
points in a game by a team: 
Set by uses vs. Allen Univer- 
sity, The record is 129 points. 
Most free throws by a team 
in a game: Set by USCS vs. 
Allen University, The record 
is 41 of 49 Largest winning 
margin in a game: Set by 
USCS vs, Allen University. 
The record is 75 points 
(129-54) Most free throws 
made in a game by an indi- 
vidual. Tied by Willie Mur- 
daugh vs. Georgia College. 
The record is 13. Congratula- 
tions to the Running Rifles. 



The team huddles to listen to Coach 
Waters explain a new strategy 



Extreme concentration is on the face 
of Ulysses as he attempts to add 
another point to his record. 



Ulysses Hackett watches as fellow 
teammate Steve Stroup goes for a 
two point basket. 



74 Competitive Amusements 






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21 



! 



(standing) Bill Anderson. Darren McDullie, lohn kaminski, head coach - jerry Waters, Ulysses Hackett, Steve Stroup, Skip Henson, assistant coach - Steve Roberts, assistant coach 
Steve Anthis (sitting) student coach - Bo Keller, Willis Woodruff, left Waters, Mark Myratt, Mike Hayes, Marc Slaton, Willie Murdaugh, manager - Robbie McFarland. 




Senior Mike Hayes guide the ball toward the 
uses goal. 



Rifle Ulysses Hackett slam dunks the ball with 
seemingly effortless ability. 



Competitive Amusement 75 




76 Competitive Amusements 



Man Behind the Team 




^^' *"»—■- ^B 


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Mark Mynatt keeps the ball away from 
an aggressive opponent. 




Jerry Waters enters his 
tenth season at the helm of 
the uses Rifles. During his 
previous nine seasons. Wa- 
ters has guided the Rifles to 
an overall record of 190-75. 
Waters received his 200th 
win as a collegiate coach last 
season w/hen the Rifles de- 
feated Benedict College 
101-72. 

Waters also serves USCS 
in another capacity as an as- 
sistant athletic director in 
charge of facilities. 



Up, up, and away There are two 
more for the victorious Runnin' Ri- 
fles 



Steve Stroup concentrates on a per- 
fect delivery of a free throw. 



Competitiv 



e Amusements 77 



Men's Basketball 



Beginning with the 
1989-90 season, the USCS 
men's basketball team began 
the move from NAIA to 
NCAA Division II status. 

The Rifles, who are dual 
members of the NAIA and 
NCAA this year, competed 
for one final NAIA Champ- 
ionship before moving to Di- 
vision II next season, USCS 
will be looking for its third 
and last NAIA District Six title 
this year, USCS had won Dis- 
trict Six titles in 1981 and 
1982. 



The Rifles, who returned 
three starters and three valu- 
able reserves from last sea- 
son's squad which finished 
21-10 and advanced to the 
District Six semifinals, have 
an excellent opportunity to 
win the district. 

The 1989-90 Running Ri- 
fles featured one of the 
more athletic and better 
shooting teams. This year's 
team was highlighted by a 
more up-tempo style of play 
that was exciting to watch. 



left Waters attempts to "fake out" the opponent and pass the ball to a 
teammate 



Wilhe Murdaugh runs down court in preparation for one of his infamous slam 
dunk 




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Even though the Rifles are ffl in 1990, last seasons 
memories are engraved in our minds. Richard Smith, 
from the 1989 team, makes 2 points 



78 Competitive Amusements 




Todd Gambrell outmaneuvers the opponent from Bristol College as he makes a 
jump shot from the outside of the lane. 



Competitive Amusements 79 



W. Basketball 



The uses women's bas- 
ketball team will look to im- 
prove on last year's 15-13 
mark as the Lady Rifles begin 
their second season under 
head coach Tammy Holder. 

That 15-13 mark of a year 
ago looks very good after 
one considers USCS started 
last year at 4-11 before 
catching fire and winning 11 
out of its last 13 games. 

This year's addition of the 
Lady Rifles twelve player 
squad, six of which are new- 
comers, seemed to be quick- 
er, in better shape, and have 
better offensive balance; 
however, they were smaller, 
younger, less experienced, 
and did not possess as much 
perimeter power as in the 
past. 



loey Paugh concentrates on her op- 
ponents actions in hopes that she 
can steal the ball. 



Last year's leacJing soccer was Dawn 
Bowden. 



Senior Monica Henderson attempts 
to pass the ball to a teammate, while 
defending the opponent. Monoca 
was chosen for All-District 



80 Competitive Amusements 





R. 1 Troye Mathews, Missy Keith, Shon Cray, Robyn lohnson, Franky Norns, Monica Henderson, Kris Ruffo R 2 Head Coach Tammy Holder, Missy Sullivan, loey Paugh, Peadra 
Howard, Caria Gambrell, Angie Tennyson, Jemetna Hannah, Tomncida Crawford. 




wdy Rifle Girls?!! Many of 
ered in the Ebony-Ivory gajin^ 



Competitive Amusements 81 



How Great Is She? 



Tammy Holder began her 
second season as the head 
coach of the Lady Rifles. The 
former assistant coach at the 
University of South Carolina 
for four seasons under Nan- 
cy Wilson became UCS- 
Spartanburg's eight head 
coach when she was hired in 
)u!y 1988. 

After a slow start last sea- 
son, uses won 1 1 of its last 
13 games to finish 15-13 in 
Holder's first season at the 
Spartanburg campus. USCS 
also recorded an 11-5 mark 
in District Six, good for sixth 
place. 

With the Lady Game- 
cocks, Holder was involved 
in recruiting, travel arrange- 
ments, and court instruction. 



^ 




DOMINO'S 
PIZZA 

DELIVERS 




82 Competitive Amusements 




Competitive Amusements 83 




^5^. 



84 Competitive Amusements 



1^ 




d Bui< U 




This year the Lady Rifles 
began their final season of 
District Six before they go to 
full NCAA Division II status 
during the 1990-91 season. 
As a result, the Lady Rifles will 
be facing stiffer competition 
in Division II schools, who 
they must play as LISCS com- 
plies with the switch in affilia- 
tions, and the usual battles in 
the district. 

"I feel we have been com- 
petitive thus far in the sea- 
son. Our first game against 
Lincoln Memorial was our 
toughest so far," said head 
coach Tammy Holder. "A 
winning season is still ex- 
tremely probable and a 20- 
win season would be a 
dream, but not out of 
reach." 



Last year's best leaper, Shon Cray, 
displays her ability as she scores 
three for the Lady Rifles! 



Women's basketball is one of the 
more exciting and fast-paced sports 
at uses 



Competitive Amusements 85 



Golf 



The men's golf team won its first full tourna- 
ment of the year when they won the Western 
Carolina University/Maggie Valley Intercollegi- 
ate in November under head coach Neal 
Doyle. 

The Rifles have three more fall tournaments 
before they hibernate until spring, including 
the uses Fall Festival of Golf on October 23 
and 24 at the Links O'Tryon Golf Course. 

In the Western Carolina Tournament, the 
Rifles won the Tournament by nine strokes 
over the closest of 11 competitors, Western 
Carolina gold in the two-day 36-hole tourna- 
ment. Mitch Turner led the way for the Rifles 
with a total of 144, good for a third-place tie in 
the individual race. Jamie Amick and Taylor 
F^ough shot a 147 while Steve Walden shot a 
156 and Mike Seivy notched a 159 score. 



Coach Doyle watches as one of his players' ball tlies 
through the air, in hopes that it will land perfectly on the 
green 








86 Competitive Amusements 



















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Row One Keith Parkenson, Chris Bridges, Kevin McKee, Mitch Turner, Mike Collins, Taylor Rough, Daniel Neveu, Coach Neal Doyle 




Taylor Hough watches intently as Mitch Turner practices 
his swing at Lan-Yair Country Club 



Competitive Amusements 87 



Baseball was added as an Intercollegiate 
sport at uses in 1986. During the first season, 
coach John Daurity and a new, talented ball 
team made a name for USCS Baseball. They 
advanced to the District Six playoffs, finishing 
third with a record of 34-18-1. During their 
second season, the Rifles did not miss a beat as 
they advanced to the playoffs and finished 
second with a record of 36-9. Last season the 
Rifles again advanced to the playoffs with a 
record of 35-10. Coach Daunty predicts that 
this season should be as exciting as previous 
ones with a winning season, another playoff 
appearance, and perhaps a first place trophy. 

Three playoffs out of there season and an 
overall record of 103-37-1 is definitely some- 
thing to be proud of, and a great way to begin 
a new era of sports at USCS. 




an athletic team, means alway^ 




R1 Mike Mobile, Dale Nelson, Tommy Hodge, Ron Hill, Dean Spencer, David Holzbach, Clay Overcash, Clay Carter, Todd Ellison, Eric Hersman, lem McCuthen, Coach )ohn Daurity. 
R2 Ben Waddel. Dennis Thompson, Chris Cranford, David Fish, Danny Tasylor, Nick Klock, Robby Gwinn, left tipscomb, Greg Houston, Steve Barr, Kerry Avery. R3 Andy White, 
)ohn Panepinto, letf Brooks, Rodney Sattertield, Ronny Martin, Marrk Faile, Chris Fowler, Eric Pnnce, Mathew Price, Mark Bishop. 



88 Competitive Amusements 




left Lipscomb patiently waits on the next pitch. 



Warm up pitch are a vital part of 
training that insures limited injuries. 





Stnke One! 

Strike Two! 

Strike Three! 

You're out of there! 






^:^r:sPf'-^^-'-^ 






Competitive Amusements 89 



About the Coach 



It takes a great coach to make a great team, 
uses was very fortunate to acquire coach 
John Daurity to begin the baseball program. 
He is widely respected and known for his 
ability in his field. Formerly the head coach of 
the Wofford Terriers, he had previously spent 
ten years coaching and teaching at various 
high schools. During his five seasons at 
Wofford, he recei\ed the honor of NAIA 
District Six Coach of the Year, and had three of 
his players drafted by professional teams. In 
the short time he has spent at USCS, there 
have been twelve players drafted by pro 
teams. His skill, effort, and patience have been 
shown on and off the field. )ohn Daurity is a 
wonderful man and the backbone of Rifle 
Baseball. 



Coach lohn Daurity lines the field with chalk 




Kevin Carr practices his pitching form for an up-comIng 
game. 




90 Competitive Amusements 



One of the running nfles practices his powerstroke in the cage. 







Oh No" It's the peanut gallery!!!! 




"^«»fe^5Ks*SS»^.. 



Coach lohn Daunty gives batting 



.»i^ tips at daily practice 



Stretching is vital to an athletes agility 
as well as preventing injuries. 



Competitive Amusements 91 



To be a successful softball player one must 
have the ability and coordination to run, catch, 
throw, and bat. Practicing is a long, tedious 
task for many athletes: yet the rewards are 
overwhelming. 

The 1989 Lady Rifles worked hard all year 
and their prowess showed on the field. Many 
of their accomplishments include placing third 
in the District Six Tournament, a ranking in the 
NAIA Top Twenty, and defeating the previ- 
ously number one team of Francis Marion. 
Other accomplishments include beating 
NCAA Division I Georgia Tech four consecu- 
tive times, and eliminating Ohio State in the 
Virginia Invitational Tournament. 

The 1990 season proved to be a season of 
surprising accomplishments as they competed 
against Division I teams and top District Six 
NAIA member schools. 



Aneisa Bittner places softballs in the pitching machine for 
betting practice 



Shannon Montgomery waits lor the perfect pitch. 



Tracey Long warms up to avoid an in|ury when practice 
starts 





92 Competitive Amusements 



t -« 



rmff 



« 





:f V 




Top R. Tracey Long, lohnsie McCall, Cindy Patton, Mandy Simmons, Pauline O'Bere, Mary Jones Middle R Kris Ruffo, Dana Brastield, Linda Campbell, Keeta Blankenship, Chris Tall, 
Michelle Thompson, Robin Elder, Bottom R Laura Vinciguerra, Monica Henderson, 




^^■^i^'< r-mess^^SSc 



\-v. 



">"iJ?y-'r; 



Competitive Amusements 93 



Softball 



To be a successful softball player, one must 
have the ability to run, catch, throw, and bat. 
Practice for the Lady Rifles softball team is 
tedious. With long hours and the weather they 
play in, the softball team must be really dedi- 
cated 

The 88-89 squad worked hard all year and 
their prowess paid off. Many of their accom- 
plishments included placing third in the District 
Six Tournament, and defeating the previously 
number one team of Francis Marion. The 
89-90 season proved to be one of equal 
accomplishment. 





.:> Jf-. ■ 




*,-^ 



Hey guys' Are we through playing yet? 



• - _ • » 






» ^ 




94 Competitive Amusements 




and Dana Brasfield "take five,' 



Pauline O'Berc, the team's pitcher, adjusts her batting 
glove before practice. 



Competitive Amusements 95 



Women's Tennis 



The women's tennis at USCS have put long 
hard hours into practicing. Adding to this 
dedication is second year coach, Tammy Hold- 
er. Holder was a stand out on the tennis team 
at William and Mary for four years. 

In Holder's first year, the 89 season, the Rifles 
opened the season when they took on the 
1988 National Champions, Lander College. 
The rest of their schedule was packed with 1 1 
matches with other top NAIA power, including 
Furman and Coastal Carolina. 

The Lady Rifles look to the future with such 
young talented athletes. 





R1 Annette Esl<enazi, Leslie Whiten. Patricia Vener. R2 Tammy Holder, Christy Davis, Lisa King, Missy Keith. 



96 Competitive Amusements 



'.~\\1'n'i<'i VT '{l'\ '.-. *,■ 




Two members of the tennis team take a break. 



Practice makes perfect for Lisa Engleberth. 



Lisa Engleberth is still waiting for perfection! 




Competitive Amusements 97 



Men's Tennis 



Although they don't get quite as much 
recognition as the basketball or soccer team, 
the uses tennis team is still a hardworking 
member of the USCS athletic department. 
They spend many hard hours of practice to 
perfect their "aces", and backhands, often in 
the cold. 

The 1988-89 men's tennis team looks to 
Alan Ferguson for direction. "Ferguson has 
really pumped the team for next year," says 
women's coach Tammy Holder. 

The last three seasons have really been the 
"birthing" for our tennis team. The rifles fu- 
ture, is now looking for hope with some new 
talented athletes for the tennis team. 



The tennis team builds strength for a tough schedule 
ahead 



Bill Castleman shows his prowess as a tennis player 



Erich Shaver, from 1988-89 USCS squad, has got "the 
look" as he practices his backswing. 





98 Competitive Annusements 



Stott Flynn returns the ball, to an unseen opponent, with 
ease 



Coach Alan Ferguson, watches as practice progresses into 
a real workout 




R1 lorge Calvez, Paul Ganim, lose Rincon, lose Cueto, R2 Ian Carlos Cueto, Ajay Loganadan, Bill Casleman, Kevin Shaver, Coach Alan Ferguson 



Competitive Amusements 99 



uses Spirit 



It takes someone really special to be on the 
uses cheerleading squad. The cheerleaders 
practice three times a week for two hours. Not 
only must they maintain a substantial grade point 
average, but they must attend all home and away 
games. 

Go-Co the gorilla has returned once again to 
promote some spirit from the crowd. With out 
own )oe "lohnny" Brookshire donning the cos- 
tume, we are a sure win. 

Without these spirit leaders the leaders the 
union of the student body would die. Thanks to 
these ladies, and gorilla, the athletes will have fans 
no matter where they gol 





Even though the USCS cheerleading squad is small, they still 
show remarkable spirit and pride in their school 




"Who is that masked '~orilla?" 



IC"! fJompetitive Amusements 




Lisa Roberts displays perfect form as she cheers on the basketball team- 



Captain Nikki Daniels, shows how to be a real pom-pom girl! 




R1 Captain Nikki Daniels, Patncia Graham, R2 Lea Smith, Lisa Roberts, Tracy Mahaffey. 



Competitive Amusements 101 



^0> 







O 



^. 



Volleyball 



M. Basketbal 



Soccer 



Sept. 2 
Sept 6 

Sept 8 
Sept 9 
SepI 10 
Sept 13 
Sept 16 
SepI 20 
Sepl 23 
Sept 30 
Oct 1 
Ocl 10 
Oct 14 
Oct. 15 
Ocl 18 
Oct. 22 
Ocl 25 
Oct 28 



Catawba 
Furman 

Fresno Pacific 

Davis S Elkins 

Alderson Broaddus 

Lander 

UNC Ashevllle 

Baptist 

Belmont Abbey 

Lock Haven 

C W Post 

UNC Ctiarlotte 

Longwood 

Pembroke State 

Clemson 

UNC Greensboro 

South Florida 

Rollins 



Sept. 


2 


Scrimmage Day 


Sept. 


7 


BMC (Scrimmage) 


Sept. 


8 


North Carolina A i T 


Sept. 


11 


Limestone 


Sept. 


13 


Voorhees 


Sept. 


15-16 DECB Invitational 


Sept. 


18 


Central Wesleyan 


Sept. 


20 


Presbyterian 


Sept. 


23 


Gardner-Webb 


Sept. 


25 


Limestone 


Sept. 


27 


Erskine 


Sept. 


29-30 Catawba Invitational 


Oct. 


2 


Columbia 


Oct. 


3 


KofforcJ 


Oct. 


4 


Claflin 


Oct. 


9 


Benedict 


Oct. 


11 


DSC Aiken 


Oct. 


14 


Columbia 


Oct. 


16 


Newberry 


Oct. 


18 


Francis Marion 


Oct. 


20-21 Newberry Invitational 


Oct. 


23 


Converse 


Oct. 


25 


Coker 


Oct. 


28 


Gardner -Webb 


Oct. 


31 


S.C. State 


Oct. 


31 


Baptist 



Nov. 


20-S1 


at Rotary Area D 


xla Classic 


Nov. 


E7 


Erakina 




Dec. 


1-2 


at Catawba/7-UP 


nv I tat lonal 


Dk. 


& 


Allan 




Omc. 


t 


Saorgla Coll. 




Dec. 


31 


Flor Ida ntlantic 




Jan. 


5 


Er»kine 




Jan. 


B 


Franc is Mar ion 




Jan. 


10 


Landar 




Jan. 


13 


Langwood 




Jan. 


18 


use Alkan 




Jan. 


EE 


\aC Braansboro 




Jan. 


E<. 


flrmetrong State 




Jan. 


srj 


Coluflbus 




Feb. 


b 


Lander 




Feb. 


8 


UNC Greensboro 




Fab. 


lO 


L.ong»«ood 




Fab. 


14 


Llvlngatona 




Feb. 


15 


use fliken 




Fab. 


17 


Florida Atlantic 




Fab. 


19 


FranciB ftar Ion 




Feb. 


22 


Co lumbus 




Feb. 


?<• 


Georg la Co 1 1 . 




Fab. 


e7 


Araatrong Stata 







Cross Country 



W. Basketbal 



Sept 


9 


Sept 


23 


Sept 


30 


Oct. 


7 


Oct. 


14 


Oct. 


21 



UGA Invitational 
Winthrop Invitational 
Baptist Coll. Invitational 
The Citadel Invitational 
UNCC Invitational 
Pritchard Ray Memorial/nscs 
All-Comers 
District Six Tourney at USCS 




Nov. 


27 


Lincoln Manorial 


Nov. 


28 


Linastone 


Dec. 


1 


Georgia Collage 


Dec. 


4 


Converse 


Jan. 


8 


Francis Marion 


Jan. 


10 


Lander 


Jan. 


13 


Eckerd 


Jan. 


15 


Rollins 


Jan. 


18 


DSC Aiken 


Jan. 


20 


Wof ford 


Jan. 


24 


Armstrong State 


Jan. 


27 


Columbus 


Jan. 


29 


Longwood 


Feb. 


3 


Armstrong State 


Feb. 


6 


Lander 


Feb. 


8 


UNC Greensboro 


Feb. 


10 


Benedict 


Feb. 


12 


Converse 


Feb. 


14 


Livingstone 


Feb. 


15 


use Aiken 


Feb. 


17 


Hofford 


Feb. 


19 


Francis Marion 


Feb. 


21 


Rollins 


Feb. 


22 


Columbus 


Feb. 


24 


Georgia College 



5— 




102 Competitive Amusements 



Golf 



Softbal 



M. Sl W. Tennis 



Feb. 27-28 Pacer Invitational 

Mar. 6-7 College of Charleston Invitational 

Mar. 13-14 USCS Invitational 

Apr. 7-8 South Carolina State Invitational 

Apr 21-22 District Six Tournament 

June 9-11 NAIA National Tournament 




Feb. 


20 


Furman 


Feb. 


24 


Georgia Southern 


Feb. 


28 


Coker 


Mar. 


2-3 


West Georgia Tournament 


Mar. 


5 


Assumption 


Mar. 


8 


UNC Ashoville 


Mar. 


13 


Francis Marion 


Mar. 


16 


Tampa 


Mar. 


18 


St. Leo 


Mar. 


19 


Stetson 


Mar. 


20 


Columbus 


Mar. 


23 


UNC Greensboro 


Mar. 


24 


imc Charlotte 


Mar. 


29 


Limestone 


Apr. 


3 


Benedict 


Apr. 


5 


Gardner-Wehb 


Apr. 


« 


Central Wesleyan 


Apr. 


7 


osc Aiken 


Apr. 


10 


Limestone 


Apr. 


13 


Lander 


Apr. 


17 


Voorhees 


Apr. 


19 


Claflin 


Apr. 


21 


Lander Tournament 


Apr. 


27 


District Six Tournament 



Basebal 



Pab. 


18 


Sun. 


Georgia College 


Feb. 


24 


Sat. 


wingate 


F«b. 


25 


Gun. 


Benedict 


Feb. 


27 


Tue. 


■offord 


Mar. 


2 


Fri- 


Benedict 


Mar. 


3 


Sat. 


Liaeatone 


Mar. 


4 


Bun. 


Presbyterian 


Mar, 


7 


Wed- 


Presbyterian 


Mar. 


9 


Fri. 


Francis Harioo 


Mar. 


10 


Sat. 


CallComia (Pa.) 


Mar. 


11 


Sun. 


Wofford 


Mar. 


12 


Hon. 


High Point 


Kar. 


13 


Tue. 


Higb Point 


Kar. 


14 


Wed. 


Wingate 


Mar. 


15 


Thu. 


Erskine 


Har. 


16 


Fri. 


Virginia 


Mar. 


17 


Sat. 


Virginia 


Mar. 


IB 


Sun. 


Francis Marion 


Har. 


19 


Hon. 


Columbus 


Mar. 


20 


Tue. 


LaGrange 


Har. 


21 


Wed. 


Columbus 


Mar. 


22 


Thu. 


Kennesaw State 


Mar. 


23 


Fri. 


Georgia College 


Mar. 


24 


Sat. 


DSC Aiken 


Mar. 


25 


Sun. 


Limestone 


Mar. 


29' 


-Apr.: 


3 Carolina Classic 


Apr. 


4 


Med. 


Morris 


Apr. 


7 


Gat. 


Columbus 


Apr. 


8 


GUD. 


Armstrong State 


Apr. 


9 


Hon. 


Central Wesleyan 


Apr. 


10 


Tue. 


Erskine 


Apr. 


14 


Gat. 


Central wesleyan 


Apr. 


15 


Sun. 


Armstrong State 


Apr. 


16 


Hon. 


The Citadel 


Apr. 


IS 


Hed. 


Voorhees (DH) 


Apr. 


20 


Fri. 


Morris 


Apr. 


21 


Sat. 


use Aiken 





Feb. 


6 


Limestone 


Fed. 


iO 


Armstrong State 


Feb . 


13 


Lander 


Feb. 


18 


Francis Marion 


Feb. 


22 


Livingstone 


Feb. 


2! 3 


Western Carolina 


Feb. 


24 


Presbyteri an 


Feb. 


25 


Coker 


Feb . 


2 7 


S.C. State 


Mar. 


1 


Wo-f-ford 


Mar. 


2 


UNC Asheville 


Mar . 




Er sk 1 ne 


liar . 


^ 


Newberry 


Mar. 


6 


Li mestDne 


har . 


10 


Georgia College 


Mar. 


16 


The Citadel 


Mar . 


23 


Presbyter 1 an 


Mar . 


3 C- 


Coastal Carolina 


Apr . 


1 


Lees-McRae 


Apr. 


/-, 


Wo-f-ford 


Apr. 


5-a 


District 6 Tourney 


May 


21-26 


NAIA National Tourney 








Competitive Amusements 103 



When an individual enters USCS, he will pass 
hundreds of meaningless faces known only to 
those that are familiar with the visages. Maybe it is 
the look of someone who has failed a big test or 
maybe it is the look of drive and determination in 
the eyes of an athlete. 

From the first week that students arrived at 
USCS to the last, the campus bustled with classes, 
parties, RIOTS, studying and just run of the mill 
congregating among friends and professors. 

Freshmen being initiated to college life found 
orientation and registration a prodigious ordeal — 
quite a different experience. 

However, anomalies changed into familiarities 
as students learned the ways of college life. A 
way that is singular, like no other that these 
students will know in any other stage in their life. 

Although a commuter campus college, USCS 
offered a great variety of involvement for stu- 
dents. Publications sought help, the Student Gov- 
ernment Association solicited for members, con- 
certs were held and occasionally a beer bust was 
held on the soccer field. 

For those not wanting to participate in anything 
strenuous, there was always an empty table in 
the Hodge Center to be used for relaxing and 
conversing. 

All of the faces, personalities, and impressions 
contribute to the USCS distinction. 




USCS 
Tutoring Center 

Library — Room 274 



TUTOR APPOINTMENTS FOR: 



STUDENTS - (See Sign-Up Instruction.): 

• PlfOM ngnup for appointment, in blocked-in time 

• Keep a record of your appointment. 

• Please be on time. 



areas oiUy. 



Thank* for your cooperation. 




104 People 





People 105 



'fsl 



Dr. Dlin B. 
Sansbury, Jr. 




Dr. Olin B. Sansbury, |r. has had a distinct influence on USCS while serving as 
chancellor. Before coming to USCS, he held many prominent positions in the 
educational realm. When asked what makes USCS a distinct university, he replied, "The 
most significant thing is the close relationship and identity with the area that it serves." 
He also referred to the school's community ties as having a positive effect on the 
students from the Upstate, as well as students from other areas. 



106 People 



Carolina Piedmont 
Foundation 




The Carolina Piedmont Foundation was started in 1973 to "accept gifts of charitable 
benevolent, cultural and educational purposes for the exclusive use of the University of 
South Carolina at Spartanburg." The organization is governed by interested citizens of 
the Upstate community who wish to support the university. The president of the 
Carolina Piedmont Foundation is Senator Horace Smith. The foundation has been 
involved in many projects that have greatly benefited USCS. Funds for the Smith 
Building and the Mary Black School of Nursing was provided through this foundation. 
Also, support has been given for faculty research, scholarly activities, and computer 
equipment. 



^ 



People 107 




Edwin F. Wilde 

Vice Chancellor 

for Academic Affairs 




Andrew T. Crosland 
Assistant Vice Chancellor 





Jane Davisson 
Assistant Vice Chancellor 



Eric S. Jolly 
Assistant Vice Chencellor 




J. Thomas Davis, III 

Associate Chancellor 

for Student Affairs 




Janice B. Yost 

Associate Chancellor 

for University Relations 



School of Business 




School of Business Dean 



Dr. Jerome Bennett has been married to his wife, Anne, for thirteen years. They have two children, Jerome, Jr. and 
Cyndy. Dr. Bennett enjoys photography, stamp collecting, and golf in his spare time. 

Bennett received a Bachelor of Science degree from Georgia Tech in textile engineering. He has a Masters degree in 
Business Administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Bennett received a doctorate in 
accounting from the University of South Carolina. 





School of Education 




Dr. lames Cooke has a Bachelor of Arts in History and English from Concord 
College. He has a Masters degree in Elementary Education from the University 
of Maryland, and he has a Doctorate in Reading from West Virginia 
University. 

Cooke has been married to his wife, Pamela, for ten years. They have three 
children, jason, Jordan, and Tyler. Gardening and writing are Dr. Cooke's 
favorite hobbies. 



School of Education Dean 




School of Fine Arts, 
Language, and Literature 




School of Humanities 
and Sciences Dean 



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Fine Arts, Language, and 
Literature Chairperson 



Dr. Sharon Hahs received a Bachelor of Science in chemistry 
from Illinois Wesleyan University. She followed this degree with a 
Masters and a Doctorate degree in inorganic chemistry from the 
University of New Mexico. 

Dr Hahs has been married for twenty years to her husband, Billy. 
They have two daughters, Cara and Ona. Sharon Hahs enjoys 
many things. Her favorite interests are repairing mechanical things 
and playing the piano. 



Dr Nancy Moore has a Bachelor of Science in Education from 
Austin Peay University, She has a Masters degree from the 
University of Tennessee, and she has a Doctorate from the 
University of South Carolina Both of these degrees are in English. 

Nancy Moore has been married to her husband, Lawrence, for 
twenty-five years. They have two children, Eddie and Cathy. Dr. 
Moore enjoys net fishing, hiking, and working in civil rights. 




School of Social and 
Behavioral Sciences 




Dr. Edward Babin has a Bachelor of Science degree from Southwest Louisiana 
University, a Masters degree from the University of Arkansas, a Doctorate 
degree from the University of Georgia. All of these degrees are in geography. 
Dr. Babin has been married to his wife for one year. His hobbies are lifting 
weights, reading the newspaper, and collecting old geography books, Babin 
serves as division chairperson for the School of Social and Behavioral 
Sciences. 



School of Social and Behav- 
ioral Sciences Chairperson 




School of Science and Math 




Dr. Cecelia Adair has a Bachelor of Science degree in Secondary Education. 
She has a Master of Arts and a Doctorate in Mathematics. She received each 
of these degrees from the University of South Carolina. 

Dr. Adair enjoys yardwork, reading, and music as hobbies. 



School of Science 
and Math Dean 




School of Nursing 





V 



If 



Virginia Barker was married to the late Forest Charles 
Barker. She has one son, Forest Charles Barker II. Barker 
enjoys reading, sewing, and music in her spare time. 

Dr. Barker received a Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
Education from Indiana University. She has a Masters of 
Science in Nursing Administration, and she has a doctorate 
in Administrative F4igher Education. She received these two 
degrees from Bloomington University. 



School of Nursing Dean 



^ 




Nancy Babb 
Director of ADN Program 



Cecelia Cogdell 
Director of BSN Program 



BSN Program 




ADN Program 




Student 
Government 

Association 
President 

Stacy Seay 




lib People 






Sheree Adams 


Laurinda Allison 


Deandra Alverson 


lunior 


Sophomore 


Sophomore 


Spartanburg, S.C. 


Gaffney, S.C. 


Pelzer, S.C. 




Patrick Ariail 

Freshman 
Laurens, S.C. 




Thomas Auth 

lunior 
Greenville, S.C. 




Rhonda Baker 

Sophomore 

Lawrenceville, GA 






Andrea Baskin 


F^olly Bishop 


lill Bishop 


Freshman 


Sophomore 


Senior 


Inman, S.C. 


Spartanburg, S.C. 


Inman, S.C. 



People 117 




Teena Bixler 

Freshman 

Taylors, SC 




Beth Blanton 

Sophomore 

Blacksburg, SC 




Kathy Blanton 

Freshman 

Simpsonville, SC 




Rene Blanton 

Sophomore 

Spartanburg, SC 




Charlie Bobo 

Junior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Carol Boone 

Senior 
Greenville, SC 




Neal Bowers 

Freshman 
Columbia, SC 




Pam Bradley 
Freshman 
Inman, SC 




Betty Brannon 

Senior 

Greer, SC 



118 People 




Lauren Brashier 

Junior 
Simpsonville, SC 




Tina Brewer 

Senior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Joe Brookshire 
Senior 
Taylors, SC 




Jennifer Broome 

Freshman 
Spartanburg, SC 




Joe Brown 

Senior 
Landrum, SC 




Walking to classes is a good way to keep in shape 



People 119 






Teresa Brown 

Sophomore 

Hickory Grove, SC 



Tim Brown 

lunior 
Greer, SC 



Stanley Bruce 

Senior 

Greer, SC 





Tina Bryant 


Steven Bujitor 


Junior 


Sophomore 


Duncan, SC 


inman, SC 



Adam Hatley plans a CAB activity 




120 People 






Lily Burger 


Anna Marie Caldwell 


)anice Caldwell 


Sophomore 


Senior 


Sophomore 


Easley, SC 


Spartanburg, SC 


Caffney, SC 




Kim Caldwell 

Freshman 

Spartanburg, SC 




Daniel Camp 
Sophomore 
Roebuck, SC 




Larry Campbell 

Junior 

Inman, SC 




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Linda Campbell 


Stephanie Carruth 


Chad Cartee 


Junior 


Freshman 


Freshman 


Starr, SC 


Landrum, SC 


Campobello, SC 



People 121 




Greg Center 
Freshman 
Inman, SC 




Jennifer Chase 

Junior 
Simpsonville, SC 




Thomas Chasteen 
Sophomore 
Pacolet, SC 




Dean Childers 

Freshman 
Spartanburg, SC 




Kelee Cobb 

Freshman 

Blacksburg, SC 




Joseph Colvin 
Freshman 
Dillon, SC 







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Donna Cooke 

Freshman 
Spartanburg, SC 




Lesia Cooley 

Sophomore 

Pelzer, SC 




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Debra Corn 
Freshman 
Inman, SC 



122 People 




Greg Crooke 
Sophomore 
Moore, SC 




Michelle Croxdale 

Sophomore 
Spartanburg, SC 




Melissa Danner 

lunior 

Moore, SC 




Loretta Darby 

Senior 
Greenville, SC 




Kay Davis 

Senior 
Union, SC 




Dr Lindsay leads the Pep Band in a stirring number 



People 123 




Tammy Dellinger 

Senior 

Gatfney, SC 




Melanie Demott 

Junior 
Spartanburg, SC 




Elizabeth DeYoung 

Sophomore 

Greenville, SC 




Yvette Diaz 

Junior 

Greenville, SC 




Cameron Dillard 

Sophomore 
Spartanburg, SC 



Would you like to buy some donuts, 
and help Gamma Psi Delta? 




124 People 




Deborah Dobey 

Freshman 

Landrum, SC 




Patty Dotson 

Sophomore 

Spartanburg, SC 




Janet Dove 

Senior 
Easley, SC 




Mae Drummond 

lunior 

Greer, SC 




Michelle Duckett 
Sophomore 
Chesnee, SC 




Jennifer Dunaway 
Sophomore 
Duncan, SC 




Johanaca Dunlap 

Sophomore 
Spartanburg, SC 




Jondia Durham 

Freshman 
Greenville, SC 




Chanda Dyar 

Junior 
Chesnee, SC 




Cindy Easier 

Junior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Kris Einsman 

Senior 

Greer, SC 




Scott Ellis 

Freshman 

Caffney, SC 




Christy Ellison 

Sophomore 

Whitmire, SC 




Wendy Evans 

Junior 
Greenville, SC 




Clenda Farley 

Senior 
Gaffney, SC 




Jennifer Farmer 

Freshman 
Greenville, SC 




Alice Farr 

Senior 
Union, SC 




Hope Ferry 

Junior 

Simpsonville, SC 



126 People 




Scott Few 

lunior 
Greer, SC 




i 



Cheryl Fortanberry 

junior 

Gaffney, SC 




Linda Fortune 

Freshman 

Spartanburg, SC 



^ 





Robin Foster 

Senior 
Union, SC 




Yolanda Fowler 

Freshman 
Spartanburg, SC 




The Carolana staff seems to be having 
fun at Freshman Orientation. 



People 127 




Mitzi Gary 

Freshman 

Spartanburg, SC 




Tommy Gilchrist 

Senior 
Spartanburg, SC 




Matthew Gilstrap 

Freshman 

Laurens, SC 




Christina Glenn 

Senior 
Jonesville, SC 




Dana Gossett 
Sophomore 
Gaffney, SC 



These students relax between 
classes with a game of ping pong in 
the Hodge Building. 




128 People 




Patricia Graham 
Soplnomore 
Moore, SC 




Renee Cray 

)unior 
Startex, SC 




Joel Greene 
Freshman 
Inman, SC 




Michael Greer 

Freshman 
Spartanburg, SC 




Melissa F^ager 

Junior 

Simpsonville, SC 




Andrea Hall 

Senior 

Greenville, SC 




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vionica FHall 


Jessie Hand 


Jametria Hannah 


Freshman 


Sophomore 


Sophomore 


Inman, SC 


Blacksburg, SC 


Andrews, SC 



People 129 




Tom Harcum 
Freshman 
Inman, SC 




Denise Hardin 

Freshman 
Spartanburg, SC 




Tracy FHardy 

Freshman 

Cray Court, SC 




Jennifer Harmon 
Sophomore 
Caffney, SC 




Ashley Harry 

Senior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Amanda Hart 

Junior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Michael Harvey 

Senior 

Inman, SC 




Angle Hawkins 

Senior 

Inman, SC 




Renee Hawkins 

Freshman 
Spartanburg, SC 



130 People 




Patricia Hawthorne 

Freshman 

Anderson, SC 




Jeff Hayes 

Senior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Susan Hayes 

Freshman 

Spartanburg, SC 




Merritt Hearon 

Sophomore 

Union, SC 




lanet Henderson 

Senior 

Chesnee, SC 




Munching again? 



People 131 




Lue Ella Henderson 

Senior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Eric Hersman 

Freshman 

Ripley, WV 




Jennifer Hiette 

Sophomore 
Simpsonville, SC 




Glen Hinson 

Sophomore 

Salisbury, NC 




Kimberly Hodge 

lunior 
Greenville, SC 



lanell Blllingsley seem to be having fun 
during her sorority skit. 





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132 People 






Christy Holland 


Kevin Hewlett 


Stacey Hunter 


Freshman 


Sophomore 


Sophomore 


Gaffney, SC 


Spartanburg, SC 


Easley, SC 




Sherri Hyatt 

Freshman 
Gaffney, SC 





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Teresa Hyatt 

Freshman 

Spartanburg, SC 







^ 



Jeff Israel 

Freshman 

Spartanburg, SC 




Jimm Israel 

Freshman 

Spartanburg, SC 




Susan Ivey 

Senior 
Union, SC 




Angle Jackson 

Freshman 
Chesnee, SC 



People 133 




Dean )ackson 
Freshman 
Greer, SC 




Rhonda lackson 

Freshman 
Campobello, SC 




Susan )ago 

Freshman 

Simpsonville, SC 




Teresa James 

Junior 
Greenville, SC 




Lillian Jeter 

Sophomore 

Union, SC 




Eugene Johnson 

Junior 
Spartanburg, SC 




Kay Johnson 

Senior 
Taylors, SC 




Melissa Johnson 

Freshman 

Moore, SC 




Serena Johnson 

Junior 
Anderson, SC 



134 People 




Allison lolly 

lunior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Tonya Jolly 

Sophomore 

Spartanburg, SC 




Bennie |ones 

Freshman 
Woodruff, SC 




Tanisha Jones 

Sophomore 

Spartanburg, SC 




Tracy Jones 
Freshman 
Lyman, SC 




Experiments in chemistry lab can be 
tedious- 



People 135 



%. 



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iT 




Steve Kanke 


Tammie King 


Senior 


Sophomore 


Simpsonville, SC 


Belton, SC 




Tani Klinck 
Sophomore 
Taylors, SC 




Phil Kornet 

Freshman 

Greenville, SC 




Celeste Lane 

Sophomore 

Greer, SC 



Was that |oke supposed to 
funny' 





136 People 




Delenna Ledford 

Junior 

Taylors, SC 




Wendy Lewis 

Freshman 

Spartanburg, SC 




Angela Littlejohn 

Senior 

Gaffney, SC 




Lori Lombardo 

Senior 
Greenville, SC 



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Dana Lothridge 

Freshman 
Gray Court, SC 




Kelly Ludwick 

Senior 

Inman, SC 




Pam Lyda 

Freshman 

Spartanburg, SC 




Michelle Manley 

Freshman 
Fountain Inn, SC 




Chan Marett 

Freshman 
Blacksburg, SC 



People 137 



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Cindy Martin 

Junior 
Greenville, SC 




Dawn Martin 

Junior 

Inman, SC 




Martin Lewis 

Freshman 

Taylors, SC 




Kimberly Mathis 

Junior 
Spartanburg, SC 




Marge McAlhaney 

Sophomore 

Greenville, SC 




Jeannie McBride 

Senior 
Forest City, NC 




Andrea McClintock 

Sophomore 

Greenville, SC 




Bill McGraw 

Senior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Ronna McCraw 

Junior 

Gaffney, SC 



138 People 




Mark McCuen 

Freshman 
Greenwood, SC 







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lerry McDaniel 

Freshman 

Taylors, SC 




)oey McDowell 

junior 
Campobello, SC 




Bobbie McGraw 

Senior 
Spartanburg, SC 




Charles McGraw 

Junior 
Spartanburg, SC 




uses provides quality daycare for students 
with children. 



People 139 




Andy McKinney 

Sophomore 
Greenville, SC 




Angela McMakin 

Sophomore 
Spartanburg, SC 




Theresa Means 

Junior 

Union, SC 




Melanie Meetze 

Senior 

Gaffney, SC 









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Aimee Messer 
Freshman 
Greer, SC 



Some students find that they prefer off 
campus housing. 




'.' Peopl;.' 




T. Pederson Meyer 

Senior 

Taylors, SC 




Michael Meyerhsitz 

Junior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Tonya Miller 

Freshman 
Caffney, SC 




Tonya Mitchell 

Junior 

Taylors, SC 




Kevin Mitchum 

Freshman 
Spartanburg, SC 




Jannyne Moody 

Freshman 
Greenville, SC 






Stan Moon 


Donna Moore 


Sheri Moore 


Freshman 


Junior 


Senior 


Spartanburg, SC 


Spartanburg, SC 


Inman, SC 



People 141 






Marcy Morgan 


Tammy Morgan 


Dotty Morris 


Freshman 


Junior 


Junior 


Spartanburg, SC 


Spartanburg, SC 


Inman, SC 




Michelle Morrow 

Junior 

Greenville, SC 




Vivian Mosley 

Junior 
Roebuck, SC 




Alice Moss 

Sophomore 

Blacksburg, SC 




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Chris Neal 


Toni Nusz 


Theron Odom 


Junior 


Junior 


Freshman 


Campobello, SC 


Spartanburg, SC 


Greer, SC 



142 People 




Dwayne Oedewaldt 

Senior 

Spartanburg, SC 





David Onfinik 


Duane Owens 


Senior 


Senior 


Taylors, SC 


Gray Court, SC 




Lori Suzanne Owens 

Sophomore 

Campobello, SC 




Jeff Padgett 

Freshman 

Walhalla, SC 




These guys make their own tape 
at the CAB recording activity. 



People 143 




Austin Page 

Freshman 

Duncan, SC 




Theresa Page 

Sophomore 

Spartanburg, SC 




Ashley Patterson 

Freshman 

Woodruff, SC 




Emily Patterson 
Sophomore 
Caffney, SC 




Cindy Patton 

Freshman 

Fountain Inn, SC 



Melissa McKittrick works hard in the 
Humanities and Sciences Office. 




144 People 




Pamela Penland 

Freshman 
Simpsonville, SC 




Paula Pennington 

Sophomore 

Blacksburg, SC 




Shelly Phillips 

Freshman 
Gaffney, SC 




Jotana Piatt 

Senior 

Woodruff, SC 




Mark Pierce 

Senior 
Gaffney, SC 




Stephanie Poole 

Junior 
Greenville, SC 





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Stephanie Powell 
Sophomore 
Marietta, SC 




David Pratt 

Senior 
Liberty, SC 




Gina Price 

Sophomore 

Blacksburg, SC 



People 145 





John Price 

lunior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Tracey Pridemore 

Sophomore 

Union, SC 




Eric Prince 

Sophomore 

Greenville, SC 




Ida Rainey 

lunior 
Mauldin, SC 




Lisa Reardon 

Sophomore 

Union, SC 




Jill Reid 

Junior 

Campobello, SC 



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k 


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1 

1 


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fi 



Brian Rhinehart 

Freshman 
Spartanburg, SC 




Carol Rice 

Freshman 

Caffney, SC 




Mellita Rice 

Freshman 

Spartanburg, SC 



146 People 




Richard Ricks 

Junior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Christopher Rider 
Sophomore 
Chesnee, SC 




Christy Riley 

Sophomore 

Union, SC 




Susan Roark 

Freshman 
Cowpens, SC 




Jeffrey Rogers 

Freshman 

Campobello, SC 



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1 

mSBSi 










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h #« 


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The students at USCS support 
the athletes with cheers. 



People 147 






Mike Rossi 

Sophomore 

Lexington, SC 



Stick it - or get a ticket! 



STUDENTS 

Expires 8^5/90 




Hollis Roper 


Ivey Rorie 


Ashley Ross 


Junior 


Junior 


Sophomore 


Simpson\iile, SC 


Inman, SC 


Blacksburg, SC 




Sonja Ruppe 

Junior 
Gaffney, SC 






2000 



L 



uses 



143 People 




Kristina Sanders 

Senior 

Inman, SC 




Monica Sanders 

Senior 
Spartanburg, SC 




Rodney Satterfield 
Sophomore 
Seneca, SC 



1 



J 




Ansley Scott 

Sophomore 

Anderson, SC 




Michael Scruggs 

Freshman 

Chesnee, SC 



:->^ 



iA. 




Michelle Scruggs 

Freshman 

Chesnee, SC 






Stacey Seay 


Janet Seigler 


Jill Sellars 


Senior 


Sophomore 


Freshman 


Spartanburg, SC 


Greenwood, SC 


Spartanburg, SC 



People 149 







Susan Serig 

Sophomore 

Inman, SC 




Gerry Seymour 

Sophomore 

Inman, SC 




Michelle Sexton 

Senior 

Moore, SC 






Tisha Shaw 


Paul Sheppard 


Randall Sims 


Freshman 


Sophomore 


Freshman 


Gaftney, SC 


Greenville, SC 


Taylors, SC 






John Sinderman 


Ruth Skinner 


Angie Smith 


Senior 


Senior 


Junior 


Spartanburg, SC 


Chesnee, SC 


Spartanburg, SC 



150 People 




Helen Smith 
Sophomore 
Moore, SC 




Russel Smith 

Senior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Lisa Snelgrove 
Sophomore 
Clinton, SC 




Deanna Sowards 

Freshman 
Spartanburg, SC 




Jennifer Sparks 

Freshman 
Spartanburg, SC 



III 



^E^^-f 





Snacking makes studying more 
fun. 



People 151 




Cindy Staggs 

Junior 
Columbus, NC 




Monica Stanley 

Sophomore 
Spartanburg, SC 




Jennifer Stevens 

Freshman 

Chesnee, SC 





i 




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m 




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k 




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Tracy Stephens 

Sophomore 

Greer, SC 




Amy Stepp 

Senior 
Lockhart, SC 



I just love those ice cream sandwiches. 




152 People 




Stacey Stephens 

Freshman 

Mauldin, SC 




John Stevenson 

Senior 
Greenville, SC 




Deborah Stewart 

Senior 

Enoree, SC 




Lydia Stone 

Freshman 

Spartanburg, SC 





Wayne Stone 

Sophomore 

Woodruff, SC 




Wanda Swartwood 

Sophomore 

Summerville, SC 




Brandon Swofford 

Senior 

Gaffney, SC 




Shannon Swofford 

Senior 

Gaffney, SC 




Gigi Talbot 

Senior 

Greenville, SC 



People 153 




Cwynn Tapp 
Sophomore 
Chesnee, SC 




Patti Teal 

Sophomore 

Greenville, SC 




Sharone Teamer 

Freshman 
Spartanburg, SC 





Denise Thompson 

Sophomore 

Greer, SC 



Keisha Thompson 

Freshman 

Woodruff, SC 




Rachel Thompson 

Sophomore 

Columbia, SC 




Faith Tredwell 
Sophomore 
Taylors, SC 




Stacey Tredwell 
Sophomore 
Taylors, SC 




Wayne Truesdaie 

Sophomore 
Campobello, SC 



154 People 




Catherine Tucker 

Freshman 

Landrum, SC 




Janice Tucker 

Senior 

Spartanburg, SC 




)uiie Tucker 

Freshman 

Campobello, SC 




Rhonda Tucker 

Freshman 
Anderson, SC 




Christina Turner 

Freshman 

Landrum, SC 




Dr Ron Romine seems to be 
having fun on the Leadership 
Development class trip. 



People 155 




Teresa Waddell 

Senior 
Woodruff, SC 




Linda Wagner 

Senior 
Spartanburg, SC 




Kevin Wallace 
Sophomore 
Laurens, SC 




Robert Walker 

Senior 
Campobello, SC 




Ginger Waters 

Junior 

Gaffney, SC 



Smile, Dana Cossett! You're on can- 
did camera! 




156 People 




Melissa Watson 

Sophomore 

Greenville, SC 




Robert Weaver 

Senior 

Inman, SC 




Robert Weisner 

Sophomore 
Gray Court, SC 




Luanna West 

Sophomore 

Inman, SC 




James West II 

Junior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Amy Westmoreland 

Sophomore 

Greenville, SC 




Amanda White 

Senior 
Woodruff, SC 




Kim White 

Junior 
inman, SC 




Regina White 

Freshman 
Chesnee, SC 



People 157 





Richard White 

Freshman 
Spartanburg, SC 




Laura Willard 

Senior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Ainsley Williams 

Junior 

Taylors, SC 




Angela Wills 

Freshman 

Spartanburg, SC 



"*• - - — -11" 



There's another home run tor 
the baseball team. 




^SB People 






Keith Wilson 


Sheri Wilson 


Chris Wofford 


Freshman 


Senior 


Senior 


Inman, SC 


Campobello, SC 


Spartanburg, SC 




Donna Woodruff 

Senior 

Woodruff, SC 




Lee Bright walks down the steps to 
face a test. 



People 159 




Linda Yandell 

Senior 

Spartanburg, SC 




Robin Yannello 
Sophomore 
Caffney, SC 




Sonya Young 

Senior 

Spartanburg, SC 



"Your total is $2.63 " 




People 160 




ON 



1 can picture us tog^ 

With my arms around my friends. 

just let me hold on to this moment, 

Before it ends. 

There was laughter. There were ^ars, 

Through the golden years. 




£ 1? ■ 



Single ftlen^W^iWBpi'ther, 
We have shared our greatest days. 
And' we starry common mernodfis 
^jSi^i^mH ways. •^^^^Km 

Though we don't know where we're gping 

We will cherish where we've been "^ 

I want to cry. 

I want to shout . . . 

Want to let this feeling out. 

Hold on to the moment. 
Let the feelings show. 
Hold on to the moment 
Never let it go. 




Abthor Unknown 



A college education requires more than classroom 
instruction because well-roundedness is acquired 
through a learning process involving interaction, re- 
sponsibility, and commitment. USCS offers an array or 
organizations for student involvement in order to 
uphold the institution's dedication to academic stud- 
ies. By participating in various organizations, USCS 
students have the opportunity to grow intellectually, 
as well as physically, socially, and culturally 

The religious organizations offer individuals spintual 
support and fellowship. Participants find spiritual en- 
richment as they strengthen their faith and share with 
others. In addition to the religious groups, the more 
philanthropic students find personal satisfaction in 
helping others in the service organizations. Partici- 
pants learn that commitment to such organizations 
benefits both the community and the service mem- 
ber. 

Students who excel academically are granted 
membership to the various honor societies which 
provide incentive and reward to the diligent students. 
Individuals in these honor societies are judged on 
character, loyalty, and school service before they gain 
acceptance. The more creative students gain experi- 
ence and develop their talents by working with the 
literary magazine, the newspaper, the yearbook, and 
the musical organizations. 

Whether the benefits be social, spiritual, or 
character-building, students find participation in USCS 
organizations personally rewarding and an important 
part of a college education. 




162 Social Diversions 





Social Diversions 163 



Afro 

American 

Association 



The AAA strives to increase cultural aware- 
ness, foster harmonious interracial relations 
among all members of the university commu- 
nity, and to promote the development of its 
members as individuals. Annual participation in 
a variety of Black History Month activities 
highlights the group's active contribution to 
campus life. Victor Austin, president of AAA, 
works with each member of the club as well as 
other organizations on campus to promote 
the AAA's purpose. AAA also has numerous 
guest speakers throughout the year. 

Under the advisement of Leon Wiles, the 
Afro-American Association strives to unite the 
students at USCS through the pursuit of aca- 
demic excellence and to promote an atmos- 
phere of unity among black students toward 
common goals. 

(Row 1) Missy Keith, Lisa Spurgeon, Lisa Macl< (Row Two) 
Robin Brown. Serena lohnson, Teresa Miller, Melody 
Smith, Timilyn Dean, Melinda Lyn, Chenique Middleton, 
Audrey Madden (Row Three) )oe Colvin, Rob Douglas, 
Andre Smith, Tony Lynch, Mark Griffin, Patrice Hawthorne, 
Jerome Rivers, lerome Clowney, Michael Morton, Victor 
Austin, Ladonna Perry (advisor), Lyndon lohnson 

Dean Leon Wiles serves as Dean of Students as well as 
AAA advisor, 

Wendy Lewis is one of the more active .AAA members on 
campus. 




164 Social Diversions 



I . L— »./-\. 



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■^w 




Kenneth Nelson, David Morrison, Paul Sheppard, Stacey Tredwell, Tonya Winegard, Wendy Workman, Kathy Doll, 
Don Basha, Cordon Rodgers, Mike Alexander, Mary Crare .Alexander, Randall Cem McCutcheon, Britt lones. 



'To present to athletes and 
coaches, and ail whom they influ- 
ence, the challenge and adven- 
ture of receiving Jesus Christ as 
Savior and Lord, serving Him in 
their relationships and in the fel- 
lowship of the Church." This is the 
commitment of the F.C.A. 

Under the leadership of club 
president Kenneth Nelson, the 
F.C.A. is responsible for many of 
the community service projects 
on campus. One example is the 
Huddle Program that encourages 
future F.C.A. involvement of the 
area high school and college stu- 
dents at the adult level while 
building on the spiritual founda- 
tion set from the junior high Hud- 
die experience. 







In addition to being the baseball coach, John Daurity also advises the F.C.A. 




Kenneth Nelson plays his guitar. 



Social Diversions 165 



Student Government 
Association 



The SGA is a student organization 
that has grown tremendously over 
the past few years. The SGA is a vital 
part of the USCS campus, it is 
manned by 60 active members. 

Under the guidance of President 
Stacy Seay, the Student Government 
Association has accomplished many 
goals set at the beginning of the year 
such as discussing the parking prob- 
lems with Chancellor Olin. B. Sansb- 
ury as well as banning smoking here 
on the USCS campus. 

The SGA developed a new slogan 
this year, "The Honor Is To Serve," 
because the SGA understands that 
the most important function is to 
serve, insuring that all student needs 
are met at all levels. The SGA is 
composed of elected officials who 
strive to conduct student affairs ef- 
fectively. 

This year, in order to project a 
more positive reputation of USCS, 
five members of the SGA, Stacey 
Seay, Jennifer Broome, Sharone 
Teamer, Ainsley Williams, and Chris 
Rider, participated in the Educational 
Opportunity (ED-OP) Night as the 
area high schools. 





Deandra Alverson, Laura Vinciguerra, Marge McAlhaney, and Jill Bishop take the SGA oath of office. 




SGA advisor Dr. Thomas Pucci. 




Class Senators: SlicK'RlocK^Ashley Harry, Ainsley Williams. Travis ForaTLynn woire.TsTandin^JlCyls 
Hatley, Sharone Teamer, Michelle Morrow, and Leslie Laucenee. 



:e, Adam 



cial Diversions 



Executive Council Ofticers; Victor Austin, Marge 
McAltianey. Bo Keller, lill Bishop, Stacey Seay, Chris Rider, 
Jennifer Broome, Deandra Alverson, Ivey Rorie, and Laura 
Vinciguerra. 




SCA President Stacey Seay 
and Freshman Class Presi- 
dent Jennifer Broome take 
time out of their busy sched- 
ules to pose for a picture. 



Social Diversions 167 



The Carolinian 



The Carolinian, which began in 
1968, has undergone many changes 
inn its twenty-one year history. Since 
each year usually brings a new editor 
and staff, the paper has seen 
numerous design and style changes 
which have also been influenced by 
current styles and trends. 

While the staff does have fun, 
producing a newspaper is serious 
work. Typically, most of the editors 
work everyday except Thursday, 
and, on Wednesday, — the day the 
paper is put together — most of the 
staff spends the entire day and night 
in the office. 

The paper is also active in national 
college press associations and at- 
tends conferences annually to keep 
up with current styles and to allow 
an intense learning experience for all 
members of the staff. 

The newspaper, which is fully 
computerized, handles all of its pro- 
duction except for the actual print- 
ing, which is done off campus. Fun- 
ding is provided from student activ- 
ity funds and advertising, which is 
provided by national sales represen- 
tative firms. 



Sports editor Steve Grainger works diligently to meet his 
deadline. 

(Row One) Bill jong-Ebot, Heather Hedges, Christine 
Santos, Ray Merlock (Advisor). Christy Ellison, Steve 
Grainger, lohn Stevenson (Row Two) Eugene Johnson, 
Marsha Griffin, Amanda Hart, Kerry Cox, Melissa Danner 




168 Social Diversions 




Marsha Criflin, the ads manager, talks to a prospective 
advertiser 



Editor lohn Stevenson is all smiles after meeting the 
deadline. 



Social Diversions 169 



s^ 



$ 



-:vii^ 




rnational Club 



The -iuei national Club was 
founded by Dr. Regis Robe, Direc- 
tor of International Education. The 
advisor is Ms. Miller, a Professor of 
French. 

In the past, members have rep- 
resented over 15 countries. Many 
of those include: Japan, Venezula, 
Laos, Spain, France, Mexico, Viet- 
nam, Korea, Germany, Columbia, 
and Libera. 

Their object is to help foreign 
students, as well as Americans, 
and to understand the culture and 
language of others. 

The club holds meetings on 
and off campus with a variety of 
activities. The club has traveled to 
Williamsburg, Virginia, and Wash- 
ington, D.C. This year they plan to 
travel to Spain. 



Members of the International Club gather in airport lobby. 




The International Club sponsors a foreign student exchange program each year 




r! r)iversions 




Club members enjoy a day of International cuisine. 



Four guest of the International Club 
perform an Indian folk dance- 



Soda! Diversions 17 



Campus 
Activity 



Board 



Prior to 1987, the programming 
function performed by CAB was the 
responsibility of the Entertainment 
Committee Chairperson Karen 
Wood. She attempted to enhance 
the prestige and to increase campus 
awareness of this organization by 
developing an identity separate 
from the SGA. The adoption of the 
name Campus Activity Board and 
the design of the CAB logo were 
two steps in this process. At the end 
of the 1987-88 school year this sep- 
aration was formalized. The Cam- 
pus Activity Board drew up a consti- 
tution, and through the vote of the 
SGA full senate, became a separate 
entity devoid of SGA control. CAB is 
now a fully functioning program- 
ming board with four paid positions, 
carrying out the responsibility of 
programming a wide variety of ac- 
tivities and events for the benefit of 
the entire student body. 



Senior Tracy lackson is the president of the Campus Activity 
Board on the USCS campus, 

Chris Brady entertains the USCS student body during a RIOT 
sponsored by CAB. 




172 Social Diversions 



Dave Wilkle, SherrI Moore, Adam Hatley, Michelle 
Morrow, Steve Thompson, Tracey Jackson, and Ainsley 
Williams are the CAB members. 



"The Mix" entertains the USCS student body during a 
popular CAB function, RIOT day- 




Social Diversions 173 



Freshmen Advisory Council 



The FAC, formerly PALS, is a 
voluntary service which works 
with the Freshman Center during 
orientation, registration, and ad- 
visement. These students serve as 
peer counselors to incoming 
freshman and transfer students. 

In the Spring of 1985, FAC be- 
came an official organization 
when a constitution and by-laws 
were drafted and approved by 
the Student Affairs office. 

The FAC is open to all second 
semester freshmen and upper- 
classmen who are familiar with 
the campus and want to do the 
work that FAC does. This year the 
FAC sponsored several communi- 
ty service projects such as visiting 
nursing homes and providing for 
needy families. 




Standing Donnette Stewart (advisor), Cindy Easier, lennifer Chase, and Janet Haile. 



Mountaineering Club 



The newly formed Moun- 
taineering Club involves students 
in outdoor activities. This adven- 
turous club participates in rock 
climbing, hiking, camping, and 
cross country snow skiing. 

This organization was formed 
by students who wanted a more 
challenging college life. One 
member says "with the dub I can 
do things I never though possible 
or was too afraid to try." 




Gy lacobson (advisor), Chucl< Wall, .Adam Owens (President), Todd Camden (v. President), and Ivey Rorie (Sec./ 
Treas.) 



174 Social Diversions 



Gospel Choir 



The Gordon-CoIIoms Gospel 
Choir is one of the busiest stu- 
dent organizations on the USCS 
campus. Under the direction of 
Warren Carson, the choir 
boasts 75 members and has 
traveled to several states to give 
concerts. In addition, the choir 
is in great demand locally. 

The choir performs mostly 
contemporary gospel music, 
but spiritual and gospel songs 
are also part of the repertoire. 
The choir is open to any inter- 
ested student; no experience in 
singing or playing gospel music 
is required, only a sincere inter- 
est and lots of energy. The choir 
rehearses on an average of 
about three hours per week. 



The Gospel Choir's members seem to be having a 
great time. 




Mr. Carson conducts the Gospel Choir. 



Social Diversions i7" 



GAMMA 



DELTA 



Gamma Psi Delta was founded 
in January 1987 with the purpose 
of encouraging a spirit of sorority 
and love among its members. 
Members are strongly dedicated 
to high scholarship, trust, love, 
encouragement and understand- 
ing only found in a sisterhood. 

Gamma Psi Delta not only of- 
fers everlasting friendship but also 
encourages participation in other 
campus activities and provides 
leadership development. It also 
provides service to the campus 
and community. Members are ac- 
tive in helping with campus proj- 
ects, with their philanthropy — 
Habitat for Humanity, and in the 
Adopt-a-Highway program. So- 
cial activities are also a a part of 
Gamma Psi Delta. 



sisters Forever 

Lori Wiggins teeter-totters for Gamma Psi Delta in a teeter- 
totter-thon at Westgate Mall to raise money for Habitat tor 
Humanity. 




'7& Social Diversions 




Its d Happy New Year at Gdmma Psi Delta's annual Rose 
Ball held on New Year's Eve 



DiriiKii 



Lett to Right lenny Stephens, Tonya Williams, lanell 
Billingsley, Sherri Hyatt, Tammy Morgan, Denise Hardin, 
Sonja Ruppe, Lori Ann Poole, Susan Serig, Marcy Morgan, 
Kristi Henderson, Crystal McCullough, Jill Reid, Tisha Shaw, 
Lori Wiggins, lill Bishop, Alison Hunt, Laura McCuire, 
Melanie Ginty, Missy Collins, Toni Nusz, Carole Rice, 
Catherine Hughes, lulie Tucker Not pictured: Ashley 
Harry, Tina Brewer, Kris Einsmann, Candace Harmon, 
lennifer Harmon, Anna Hughes. 



Social Diversions 177 



The fraternity of Lambda Chi 
Alpha was colonized at USCS 
April 10, 1984. The high standards 
and ideals of the International 
headquarters made it hard for the 
small colony to carry on. With the 
help of a very successful alumnist, 
the colony received its charter on 
April 16, 1988. 

The colony grew in size and has 
become a major force in student 
activities through soccer games 
and blood drives. The colony has 
also assisted in many prospective 
student visitation days by serving 
as guides, messengers, and clean- 
up crews. The colony also reaches 
out to the community. The Lamb- 
das raised money for the Diabetes 
Foundation. Their blood drives 
have enabled the less fortunate to 
purchase blood on account. The 
fraternity is constantly growing. 



The Lambda Chi Alpha office is a place where one can get 
away from college stress 

Stylln', Dialin', and Profilin' from head to toe. 



LAMBDA 

CHI 

ALPHA 




178 Social Diversions 




Kow One Randy Charles, Brett Howell, left Padgett, 
Tommy Auth, Rob Phillips, Alex Cacedo, David Clark; Row 
Two: Chris Abee, Steven Hedden, |ohn Ham's, )oey 
Gilreath; Row Three: Marty Henderson, Mike Bobo, Not 
Pictured: Tim Camp, Stan Bruce, Kenneth Campbell, Eddie 
Ellis, Andrew Huefner, Eugene lohnson, Benjy Mixon, |erry 
Seymour, Robby Moon, Rusty Gilbert, Larry Holingsworth, 
lames West, Lee Bright, jerry Moore, Scott Phillips, Michael 
Scruggs, Shane Workman 



This IS your typical Lamba Chi Alpha frat boys. 



The fraternity is hard at work to prepare tor the spring 
initiation of new pledges 



Social Diversions 179 



Student 
Nur: 



Association 



The Student Nurses Association 
was founded in December of 
1967. Membership is open to all 
nursing students in any of the 
school's three nursing programs, 
as well as to those students en- 
rolled in pre-nursing courses. 

Purposes of the SNA include 
providing programs representa- 
tive of fundamental and current 
professional interest, contributing 
to the education of the whole 
person and their professional role. 

Monthly meetings are held in 
the Mary Black School of Nursing. 
Guest speakers represent a broad 
cross-section of health care issues. 
Several social events are held 
throughout the year. The group 
sponsors at least one philanthrop- 
ic event per year. 

Currently more than 40 stu- 
dents are active in the SNA. Facul- 
ty advisors are Mary jo Tone, Cin- 
dy Jennings, and Angle Davis. 



SNA gives aid to HUGO victims. 




180 Social Diversions 




Row one (L-R) Kaye Belue, Kathy Guest, Theresa Page, 
f'atti Schwartz, lame Daniel, MIchele Taylor, Angelise Davis 
-advisor Row two: Judy HIgglnbotham, )udy Calvert, 
Tonl Campbell, Vickie Parrls, Stacey Payne, Sandi 
Ceremuga, Chanda Dyar, Angela Phillips, Tina Gobilot, 
Millie Wyse, Mary )o Tone -advisor Row three: Debl 
Strevel, Mary Smith, Barbara McCutcheon, Cheryl Belue, 
Carolyn Campbell, juanila Cooper, Kim Hoppes. 



^ SNA members at the National SNA Convention in Cincin- 
nati, Ohio last April 



Maggie's 
Drawers 



Maggie's Drawers does not re- 
fer to a woman's undergarment. 
Instead, it began in 1972 to pro- 
vide a vehicle for the creative 
efforts of uses students. Pro- 
fessor Donald Knight and Andy 
Crosland were the first advisors. 
The rather unusual name is a result 
of a policy, then in effect, that all 
school publications be named to 
fit the rifle motif. The more obvi- 
ous names were all taken, and the 
first editor — A Vietnam veteran 
— suggested Maggie's Drawers 
which signifies a miss on the target 
range. 

Anyone interested is allowed 
to submit poems, short stories, or 
art work to the editorial staff for 
consideration. 



■•^p lennv 
ore 





Lunch breaks are a rarity when working for Maggie's 
Drawers. 



Yes or No' Maggie's Drawers has the answer. 



Maggies Drawers committee works diligently to chose these submis- 
sions 



Social Diversions 183 



University Singers 



The University Singers is a 
choral organization open to all 
students at USCS. It is advised 
by Janice Janiec. No audition is 
required for membership in the 
group and one hour credit is 
given per semester. Each mem- 
ber of the singers is eligible for a 
scholarship and each semester a 
student remains a member 
qualifies him or her for addition- 
al monies. 

The chorus meets during 
class periods in two separate 
sections. 




Ms. Janice \an\ec directs the University Singers. 




What's so funny lohn? 
Ms. laniec takes a break during rehearsals 



184 Social Diversions 




The University Singers participate in a Christmas Con- 
cert in the Tuckey Theater. 




The University Singers entertained many students and 
faculty at the Christmas Concert. 




Sing for us Dave. 



Social Diversions 185 



Photo 
Club 



There are many myths about 
the Photo Club. The fact is, all you 
have to do is like to learn, pro- 
duce photographs, and have fun! 

In the past years, their meetings 
have featured Thomas McCarver, 
a prominent photojournalist at the 
Spartanburg Herald-Journal, a 
view from a former member and 
many educational films on photo- 
graphy. Field trips are also a vital 
part of the clubs. 

This year they have planned 
more films, field trips, and more 
photo contests than ever. If you 
are interested, see Becky Gray at 
Audiovisuals on the bottom floor 
of the Media Building. 



Marlene Kopish, an avid photographer, takes a photo of 
the rosebush during a Photo Club outing 

Row One: Marlene Kopish, Rhonda Baker, Lisa Ann Brown, 
Heather Fletcher; Row Two Becky Cray (advisor), Ceri 
Caren 




Teresa Wadell develops pictures that will be used in the 
Carolana. 




186 Social Diversions 



Society of 

Free 
Thinkers 






Advised by Jim Griff is, this orga- 
nization is devoted to expanding 
the cognitive abilities of its mem- 
bers. To gain a better understand- 
ing of pertinent issues of today, 
detailed discussions are held on 
such topics as abortion and space 
exploration. 

The Society of Free Thinkers are 
the primary publishers of Cogito. 
Printed several times each semes- 
ter, the newsletter serves as a 
forum in philosophy and public 
affairs. 



4 

1 

! 
i 




i , 


K ^ 




l^^ir^\ 




■fcL • 


4% 


f!sr<; ^ 


H 



Row One: |im Griffis (advisor), Karen Neeld, Michelle Morrow, Ivey Rorie; Row Two; Donnie 
Johnston, Kyle Burnett, Kenny Robertson, Laura Vinciguerra, Nick Klock, )eff Hayes 



jim Criftis, the SO FT. advisor, 
presides over a meeting. 



Social Diversions 187 



Shoestring 
Players 



The Shoestring Players began thirteen years 
ago by rehearsing in the parl<ing lot of the 
Rodeway Inn and performing in the aban- 
doned Rodevvay Bar and Grill. The following 
year, the Shoestring Players performed at the 
Spartanburg Arts Center and in the Hodge 
Center Gymnasium before moving into the 
Tuckey Theatre. The Players now boast a 
season of four major productions and have 
produced several National Irene Acting Schol- 
arship Nominees including a regional finalist in 
the American College Theatre Festival Compe- 
tition. Several students work as professional 
actors each summer in theaters such as the 
Sante Fe Opera House in New Mexico, the 
Medorah Players in North Dakota, the South- 
ern Arena in Mississippi, and the Lost Colony in 
North Carolina. 



Gary-John Crary waits for interested students to approach 
the Shoestring Players' booth during Orientation. 

Freddie Malone rehearses her lines and stage positions 




188 Social Diversions 



Iimm Cox, lean Croes-Danty. Clark Nicholson, Mary 
Schnieder rehearse lor an upcoming play. 




Ray Lee gives directions with a special emphasis during 
rehearsal 



Social Diversions 189 



Campus Crusade 
For Christ 




Members Nancy Price, Tabatha Martz, Dana Cossett, Shannon Swofford, Dawn Cossett, Rhonda Baker, Lisa Avant, Cwyn Tapp, Amy Seay, leanne Thomas, Melissa Hager, Tonya 
Winegard, Stacey Tredwell, Britt lones, David Causey, Richard White, Cordon Rodgers, Cory Mittelstadt, Hart Coker, Bob Brantley, Wayne Hyatt, Chad Gardner, David Morrison, 
Keith Rams, Lee Dillard, David Watson 



Not Necessarily All 
Sociologists Club 





i 



^-.^ 









Members; Martha Spires, Tim Huckaby, loni Phillips, Kristie Mulligan, Ruth Morris, Karen Nield, Steven Grainger, Mary Ann Mauney, Denise Stevenson, Sarah Barton, 
Karen Berry, Natalie Horbit, Lisa Faulkner, Dr. Clif Flynn, Kelley Rollins, Tasha Good, 



190 Social Diversions 



Society of 




lona 
Journalists 




The uses chapter of the Soci- 
ety of Professional Journalists was 
formed in the fall semester. It 
presently has about twenty mem- 
bers. 

The goal of the chapter is to 
prepare students for entry into 
the media field. Preparation in- 
cludes bringing students in con- 
tact with professional journalists 
around the country; discussing 
media issues in formal and infor- 
mal settings, often with the partic- 
ipation of local media practi- 
tioners; attending conventions, 
seminars, and workshops nation- 
wide. 

Membership in the organiza- 
tion is open to all students inter- 
ested in journalism. The USCS 
chapter is one of over three hun- 
dred other campus chapters. SPJ's 
national headquarters is in Chi- 
cago. 



SP) Advisor Dr. William long-Ebot. 



Standing (L-R); Tiffany Ervin, lennifer Broome, Kerry Cox, 
Angela Kelly, Laura Price, lanet Bagwell Kneeling Sean 
Slone, lohn Stevenson, Dr. Ray Merlock, Dr. William )ong- 
Ebot. 



Social Diversions 191 



The University Business Society 
is an entertaining and informative 
club that promotes participation 
from all its members. The purpose 
of UBS is to provide an opportun- 
ity for those students who are 
interested in business to meet 
successful area business leaders 
and to help prepare its members 
for the future. The University Busi- 
ness Society offers business stu- 
dents a chance to become ac- 
quainted with one another, and 
to become familiar with the skills 
and requirements needed to be 
successful within their fields. 

During the club meetings every 
week, guest speakers were in- 
vited to educate members on im- 
portant business topics. Each year 
the club plans several social 
events. 



The Univers 
Business 

Society 



ity 



Gift baskets for special members of the society. 

Row one (L-R): Brent Poole, Dr Steve Berry. David Turner, 
lames P Balles, Greg Parrish, Jeffrey Smith. Clint Button, 
Randall Harvey. David Plemmons, A|ay Loganadan, David 
Miller, Tim Gulp. Row two. Marge Griffin, .Amy Gardner, 
Cindy Easier, Wendi McDaniel, Kay Elmore, Misty 
Mayfield, Lilly Lancaster- advisor, Victoria Fowler, 
Deborah Stewart, Elizabeth Edwards, Laura Poteat. 





192 Social Diversions 



Psychology 
Club 




The Psychology Club is open to 
all students, faculty, and staff at 
uses, and it is especially recom- 
mended to those who are inter- 
ested in a major or concentration in 
psychology. Guest speakers are 
from the community. Related activ- 
ities and socials are all a part of the 
agenda and help build comraderie 
among the members. A field trip to 
a facility where psychologists work 
is generally scheduled each year. 
The club is newly reformed under 
the the advisement of K. Macrae 
and is constantly growing. 



Jennifer Poole Introduces a guest speaker. 



Bart Mitchell, Angie Wills, lohn Feith, Kristina Sanders, 
Phyllis Azzarito, Cathey Mauldin, Laura Ann Woody, 
Rhonda Hardin, Carolyn Copley, jlll Corrigan, Tracey Perry, 
Scott Patterson, Gigi Talbot, Karen Macrae - Advisor, 
Edward Overstreet, Dawn Brooks, Steve Kamke. 



Social Diversions 193 



Piedmont 



The purpose of the Piedmont 
Society is to enhance the devel- 
opment and the growth of the 
U.S.C.S. honor students as well as 
instill within them a sense of com- 
mitment and loyalty to the Uni- 
versity. 

The organization currently has 
over 200 active members. Mem- 
bership in the Piedmont Society is 
based solely on academic excel- 
lence. All Piedmont, Founders, 
and Upstate Scholars are invited 
to membership. Full-time students 
who have completed thirty se- 
mester hours and have a 3.75 
cumulative GPR are invited to 
membership. If they have com- 
pleted sixty semester hours and 
have a cumulative GPR, those full- 
time students are invited for 
membership. Also, part-time stu- 
dents who have completed nine- 
ty semester hours and have a 3.5 
cumulative GRP shall be invited 
for membership. 

This organization is advised by 
Jeff Lea, Cliff Flynn, and Lilly Lan- 
caster. 



Piedmont Society president, Mary Ann Mauney, presides 

over a November meeting. 

Members of the Piedmont Society take a vote on a 

proposal 




194 Social Diversions 




5 Dr Cliff Flynn. advisor for Piedmont 
Society, discusses the upcoming club 
trip to Washington, D.C, in March. 



Betty Brannon, Ruth Skinner, and Dr. 
Cliff Flynn discuss upcoming Pied- 
mont Society events. 



Club members wait for the meeting 
to start. 



Social Diversions 195 



Sigma 





Sigma Delta Psi is a local social sorority founded 
on March 23, 1987 by Monica Sanders, Anne 
Harlan, Amanda Hart, and Shiela Roberts. It began 
with only ten members but grew to forty-five by 
October 1988. Sigma Delta Psi members enjoy the 
closeness of sisterhood and the bonds of lifelong 
friendships. 

Sigma Delta Psi's philanthropy is F.A.C.T. (Fight 
Against Cancer Today) to help those afflicted with 
cancer. Each member must dedicate a certain 
amount of time monthly to the function. 

Members of the sorority must maintain a 2.0 
grade average and all officers have high academic 
standards they must also meet. 

Sigma Delta Psi holds many mixers throughout 
the year. Lambda Chi Alpha and Sigma Delta Psi 

threw a mixer called "The Lei" with a Hawaiian 
theme. 

A semi-formal banquet occurs in March of each 
year to celebrate the sorority's anniversary. Sigma 
Delta Psi hopes to obtain a national charter by 
1990. 

Sigma Delta Psi acknowledges the starfish be- 
cause their membership, or arms, can grow from 
five to fifty and when one arm brakes, another 
grows in its place. 





It IS not unusual to see Sigma girls eating in the office. 

Tfiis soronty girl received a Hersheys Big Kiss from her secret Santa. 



196 Competitive Amusements 



^ft^^^.^ V / ^^H^H 




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^B^b^MKk >-«] 


'■'*' Mm m m 





Silting: Robin Beckham, NIkkl Daniels, Marge 
McAlhaney, Lesia Cooley, Angela Daniels, Amanda 
Hart, lanelle Hartman, Standing: Lauren Brashier, 
Deandra Alverson, Jennifer Heitte, Rhonda Barnes, 
Kristie Davis, Monica Sanders, Tammie King, lenny 
McDaniel, Lori Darby, Angel Wills, Tasha Good, Sonya 
Clary 




Open Rush is the most important event for the sorority. 



Social Diversions 197 



Omicron 



The Omicron Delta Kappa Na- 
tional Leadership honor society 
recognizes students, faculty, 
alumni, and community leaders. 
Those invited to join must be in 
the top thirty-five percent of the 
Junior or Senior class. They must 
have held a major leadership role 
in one of the following areas: 
academics, athletics, campus or- 
ganizations, publications, or per- 
forming arts. 

The uses circle of ODK spon- 
sors the annual USCS Awards 
Night program where each school 
and division recognizes its out- 
standing Freshman and Sopho- 
more leader. Honorary member- 
ships are bestowed upon alumni 
of USCS and citizens in the com- 
munity for outstanding leader- 
ship. 

This organization is advised by 
Dr. j. Tom Davis. 



Row one: Gloria Graves, lean Danfy, Row two: Gary-|ohn 
Crary, Tracey lackson, Linda Pulley, Mary Ann Mauney, 
Liza Kuecker, Laura Price, Warren Carson, Dr. Tom Davis- 

ODK members discuss plan for upcoming induction cere- 
mony. 




Kappa 




198 Social Diversions 




(JUK members discuss important business. 



Naomi Taylor lights candles symbolizing the five areas of 
campus life. 



Social Diversions 199 



Carolana 



During the summer of 1989 
thirteen students were chosen to 
produce the yearbook. They 
worked diligently to produce a 
yearbook that coincided with the 
theme. The yearbook was a com- 
plete and total success, even 
though they were faced with 
many problems as deadlines 
quickly approached. Student 
schedule conflicts made it difficult 
to have a set meeting time for the 
entire staff. All staff members re- 
ceived stipends based on their 
positions. The yearbook is a 
worthwhile, yet often overlooked 
organization on the campus. It 
symbolizes the collection of 
memorabilia during the college 
years. The Carolana offers an op- 
portunity for growth and jour- 
nalistic experience. 



Editor Monica Stanley talks with the staff about upcoming 
deadlines. 

Sports Editor Kristi Henderson adjusts the camera before 
going to take a picture 




Organizations Editor Sharone Teamer types copy for an 
uocoming deadline. 




200 Social Diversions 




Editor Monica Stanley works dilisently to correct proofs as 

well as answer phone calls. 

The Carolana office: where it all begins. 



Row One: Cahnda Dyar, Rene 
Blanton, Kristi Henderson, Toni 
Nusz; Row Two; Carolyn lolly, Ray 
Holland, Sharone Teamer, Moncia 
Stanley 



Social Diversions 201 



3and 



The Pep band was estab- 
lished in the fall of 1974 to 
provide music, entertainment, 
enthusiasm, and support for the 
uses Rifles basketball team. 
Under the direction of Dr. Bryan 
Linsay, better known as "Doc", 
the pep band has flourished to 
an all time high of forty mem- 
bers. 

In addition to performing at 
the basketball games, the Pep 
Band plays for community func- 
tions. One requirement for be- 
ing in the Pep Band is that you 
must be enrolled in Music 130. 
Many scholarships are available 
to qualified applicants. 




The Pep Band pause for a moment to catch their breath after a performance. 




Doc and the rest of the Pep Band read over their notes before they begin the 
days performance. 



Doc gets into the swing of things. 



202 Social Diversions 



The organization section of Carolana 1990, Destined for Distinction, would like to thank the following organizations 
for their cooperation in providing information about their organizations. However not all organizations on campus were 
displayed in this section. As Organization Editor, I feel it is my responsibility to acknowledge all organizations on the USCS 
campus. The organizations are as follows: 

Accounting Club 

University Business Society 

Afro-American Association 

Alpha Psi Omega 

Art Club 

Baptist Student Union 

Campus Activity Board 

Campus Crusade for Christ 

Student Government Association 

Computer Club 

Dance Club 

Fellowship of Christian Athletes 

Gamma Beta Pi 

Gamma Psi Delta 

International Club 

Kappa Delta Pi 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

Literary Club 

Math Club 

Model United Nations 

Not Necessarily all Sociologists Clubs 

Omicron Delta Kappa 

Piedmont Society 

Photo Club 

Pi Sigma Alpha 

Political Awareness 

Psychology Club 

Freshmen Advisory Council 

Science Club 

Sigma Delta Psi 

Society of Free Thinkers 

Student Nursing Association 

Understudies 

United Students 

Cheerleader 

Young Republicans 

Pep Band 

Gospel Choir 

Shoestring Players 

University Singers 

Carolana 

The Carolinian 

Cogito 

Maggie's Dr^^vers 

Poets 

Communication Club 

Mountaineering Club 

SHARONE TEAMER 



ORGANIZATION EDITOR 



Social Diversions 203 



Studying, of course, was part of the year. That 
was why each student applied for admission to 
college, to study. Yet it seemed that some students 
had to be prodded each step of the way. The year 
was filled with students skipping class, turning 
assignments in late and not doing the assigned 
readings. 

Studying was to serve a purpose— to become 
better educated beings— and the university want- 
ed proof that the students were holding up to their 
end of the bargain. Thus the GAAP test was given 
to the sophomores as a standard to evaluate the 
students on a holistic level. 

Term papers were brought to the computer age 
as library searches were expedited with the installa- 
tion of the computerized card catalog. A struggling 
student could always find support, through peers 
and mentors alike. 

One step closer the students set forth in their 
search of their niche in society. 

Although there are students who are content 
with "just getting by", there are those students who 
aim for higher goals. Awards and achievements are 
a vital motivational force for the outstanding stu- 
dents on campus. It honors those who have 
worked diligently throughout their educational ca- 
reers. Awards and achievements range from schol- 
arships to service awards for organizational involve- 
ment. Each recipient is deserving of their honors. 









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204 Successes 





Successes 205 






■iTis;?!^-i^'mmrjs&wsfSs^.\ 



Tracy 
Jackson 



Applications for Miss USCS were taken during the week of 
November 28, 1989, in the Student Affairs office. Miss 
USCS, Tracy Jackson, was crowned on December 1, 
during the halftime ceremonies of the USCS-Georgia 
College basketball game. The winner was determined 
through academic record, extracurricular activity involve- 
ment, and a personal interview consisting of a panel of 
faculty and students. Also a Miss Senior, lunior. Sopho- 
more, and Freshman were crowned. Each young lady is 
deserving of these honors. 




Ashley Harry and escort proceed to the floor for introductions 



206 Competitive Amusements 




MISS SENIOR 
Sonja Byrd 



MISS JUNIOR 
Toni Nusz 




MISS SOPHOMORE 
Marge McAlhaney 



MISS FRESHMAN 
Lynn Wolfe 




cholarships 




Nursing Scholars — (Row One) Melissa lohnson. Donna Luthrldge, Elizabeth Barnette; (Row Two) Karen Radford, Tammy Grizzle, Monica 
Stanley, lanice Daniel 




«p^- ttk 



4 " - t 





Dritz General Scholarship — Ruth Skinner 



208 Successes 




D.L. Scurry Scholar — Betty Brannon 




Founders and Upstate Scholars — (Row One) Virginia Waters - Upstate, Darlene Weathers — Founders, Lisa Rode - Founders, Becky 
Rush - Founders; (Row Two) Mollis Roper — Upstate. Sharon Landen - Upstate, Tracy Stephens - Founders 



Successes 209 



and more Scholarships 




Founders and Piedmont Scholars — (Row One) lennifer Owens — Piedmont, Valerie Vanover - 
Two) Alan Cassell - Founders, lames Vess - Founders. Lydia Stone - Piedmont, Randall Sims 
Ashley Patterson - Piedmont 



Founders, Donna Cooke - Founders, (Row 
- Piedmont, loseph McDowell - Piedmont, 




Dritz Corporation Business Scholarship — Deborah Stewart 



210 Successes 




V.F.W. Scholarship — Tom Nusz 




D.L. Scurry — Christina Turner, Rebecca Hutt, |oy Harris, Richard Nesmith 



Successes 211 




Founders Scholars — lennifer Stephens, Regina White 




Martie Chastain Scholar — David Miller 



212 Successes 




University Business Society Scholar — David Plemmons 




Minority Incentive Grant Scholars — Rhonda Tucker, Trinia Feaster 



Successes 213 




Piedmont Scholars — Melanle Meetze, Wendy Lewis 




Sultzer Ruti Scholar — Kay Elmore 



214 Successes 




OIney Scholar — Gloria Graves 




Piedmont Scholar — Angela Wills 






i. 



School of Business Scholar 

Margaret Prince 



Successes 215 



Scholarship Recipients 



Nursing Scholars 



Misti Mason 
Virginia Smith 
Sherri Hyatt 
Cindy Loehr 
Patricia Spencer 
Patricia Worthy 
Laurie Fraim 
Heather Linder 
Stacy Treadway 
Elizabeth Barnette 
Cindy Barshaw 
Cherly Corbin 
Jodie Greene 
Tammy Grizzle 
Paula Sherbert 
Aletta Wilson 
Phyllis White 
Tammy Abernathy 
Zoe Boyd 
Janice Daniel 
Kristin lones 
Kelly Newton 
Dana Lothridge 
Nancy Camell 
Earlene Foster 
Sandra Newton 
Debbie Alexander 
Deborah Crouch 
Ann Hawkins 
Sonya Lemons 
Janet Martin 
Cheryl McDowell 
Karen Radford 
Rebecca Turner 
Cheryl Belue 
Jayne Case 
Sandi Ceremuga 
Angela McAbee 
Jennifer Sparks 
Susan Phillips 
Deborah Dobey 
Kathleen Dashio 
Melissa Johnson 
Kristi Henderson 
Catherine Rayfield 
Jessie Hand 
Larry Parr 
Monica Stanley 
Kimberly Kirby 



Elaine Scruggs 
Lori Smith 
Becky Tillotson 
Peggy Burgess 

Founder's Scholars 

Susan Parrish 
Wayne Poole 
Rachael Schrier 
Tonya Kirkland 
Lara Jones 
Heather Fletcher 
Angle Jackson 
Travis Barbare 
Linda Campbell 
Alan Cassell 
Lisa Collins 
Donna Cooke 
Angela Davis 
Peggy Branham 
Richard Bridges 
Tara Farr 
Peggy Flacy 
Melissa Hager 
Sharon Landen 
Mark Coggins 
Angela Daniel 
Nikki Daniels 
David Fish 
Brent Marcengill 
Marge McAlhaney 
Rhonda Melton 
James Vess 
Danny Moore 
Valerie Parks 
Pamela Penland 
Lori Poole 
Diane Roder 
Hollis Roper 
Virginia Waters 
Regina Ashmore 
Wayne Cox 
Jennifer Duke 
Amanda McCullough 
Craig Pruitt 
Becky Rush 
Tracey Stephens 
Angela Turner 
Emily Barton 
Jennifer Stephens 



Valerie Vanover 
Darlene Weathers 
Regina White 
Mary Burnett 
Daniel Camp 

Piedmont Scholars 

Randall Sims 
Gregory Smith 
Lydia Stone 
Angela Wills 
Jennifer Owens 
Ashley Patterson 
Lori Georguson 
Christopher Gephart 
Lori Holbert 
Wendy Lewis 
Christi Ezell 
Angela Millwood 
Anissa Lemmons 
Susan Serig 
Melissa Watson 
Kathy Greene 
Frank Hart 
Joseph McDowell 
Deanna Perkins 
Lisa Rode 
Kevin Brown 
Melanie Meetze 

Minority Incentive Grant 

Sonja Byrd 
Michael Morton 
Trinia Feaster 
Ida Rainey 
Rhonda Tucker 
Calvin Long 
Jimmy Sercey 

D.L. Scurry 

Rebecca Huff 
Susan Barnes 
Bruce Birchett 
Betty Brannon 
Paul Duncan 
Joy Harris 
Janet Henderson 



216 Successes 



Richard Nesmilh 
lanet I'arris 
Christina Turner 



Scholars 



Sheila Seymour 



OIney Scholar 



Melissa Danner 
Gloria Graves 
Melanie Lindsey 
Sheila Seymour 
Ann Stinson 



Part-time Student Scholars 



Debra Chapman 
Frances Hammett 
Sheila Hartsell 
Jill Smith 
Nancy Smith 



Sloan Scholar 



Laura Vinceguerra 



Rotary Scholars 



Elizabeth Brophy 
Lee Whitaker 
Donna Brooks 



Dritz Scholars 



Kathy Breazeale 
Ruth Skinner 
Tammy Dellinger 
Deborah Stewart 



Frances Hackett 



Stephanie Corbett 
John Lick 



J.H. Rhinehard 



Tonzia Dixon 



Gamma Beta Phi 



Christine Foote 



Mary Black School of Nursing 



Tina Gobillot (ADN) 
Jeanne Allred (BSN) 



Olin B. Sansbury 

Steve Grainger 

Rick O'Brien 

Shelley Harder 

School of Science and Behavioral 
Science 

Rhonda Hardin 

J. Davis Kerr 

France Johnson 

Sultzer Ruti 

Kay Elmore 

Wilde 

Lara Jones 



Earl Gordon 

Ruby Lee 

School of Education 

Delia McDowell 

uses Staff 



Rebecka McKnight 



Martie Cahstain Scholar 



David Miller 



Science and Math Scholars 



Christopher Neal 



V.F.W. Scholar 



Toni Nusz 



U.B.S. Scholar 



David Piemmons 



School of Business Scholar 



Margaret Prince 



Dick Yost 



Linda Ramsey 

James Greer 

John Stevenson 

Doris Haneline Nursing 

Deborah Strevel 

S.C. Electric and Gas 

Rachael Thompson 

Edith Thrower Nursing 

Rita Williams 

Inman-Riverdale Scholars 

Mary Briggs 
Diane Hood 

Administrative Employees 

Harry Bagwell, Jr. 

Henry Jacobs 

Matthew Fortner 

Teresa D. Splawn Memorial 

Stephanie Brown successes 217 



The end of May has a significant meaning to USCS 

liors. All looked ahead to new experiences, yet 
. ctter prepared for them because of USCS. They 
knew that their diploma meant more than just 
graduation, it also meant student life that was active, 
sports that brought national attention to their win- 
ning records, academics that both challenged and 
frustrated, faculty who supported and encouraged, 
organizations that added an opportunity for involve- 
ment, and fellow students who helped each other 
grow and have fun together Being at USCS made a 
difference for everyone who was here— a difference 
that made them a marketable prospective employ- 
ees and cultivated the progress of the whole person. 

Since its founding, USCS has witnessed the ever 
changing community of Spartanburg. More and 
more each year the city expands and further devel- 
ops commercially, yielding a vast variety of busi- 
nesses. 

Many businesses in the area buy advertisements in 
the yearbook as a way of advertising and showing 
support for the school. 

A major advantage in purchasing an ad in the 
yearbook is that the 3500 students are not the only 
readers of the yearbook. The faculty, staff, adminis- 
trators, parents, and businesses also see the adver- 
tisements and therefore patronize their business. 

It is through the Carolana that the community 
recognizes the school and the school recognizes the 
community. 




_r» ' .Ws T . 




218 Advertising 





Advertising 219 




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220 Advertising 



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Advertising 221 







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222 Advertisine 



r=;: 



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Advertising 11^ 



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224 Advertising 




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Advertising 225 






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226 Advertising 




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SWEATSHIRTS 



SHORTS 
AND SWEATS 






Come Explore Your College Store! 

uses 

BOOKSTORE 




Advertising 227 



V 




Student Nurses Association 
Mary Black School of Nursing 

Congratulations 





Class of 1990! 



1 



"for the up-to-date Professional" 
uniforms • duty shoes • choir robes 



PAGE'S 



Betsy Whisnant 
PRESIDENT 



811 N. Church St. 
Spartanburg, S.C. 29303 



803-573-7289 





' Art-Craft 



■-&> FRAME 




PINEWOOD SHOPPING 

CENTER 

1001 N. PINE STREET 

SPARTANBURG, S.C. 

29303 
PHONE: (803) 585-3700 



Spartanburg's Most Complete 

Artist Material 

& 

Craft Shop 



Ellis' 

CLOTHES OF DISTINCTION 

Congratulations 
Class of 1990! 

HILLCREST SHOPPING CENTER 
Spartanburg, SC 29302 

Phone 803-585-4871 



228 Advertising 




Advertising 229 




t^ARTANBURG'S PREMIERE HOTEL 




Radisson Inn 
and Conference Center 



Dining 

Catwicl<'s Restaurant & Gathering Place 



at Hearon Circle and 1-85 
Sleeping 



Banquets & Meetings 
for groups of 10 to 600 




150 Luxuriously 
Appointed Rooms 

Special Rate: 
$39.00 - $45.00 

7136 Asheville Highway 
Spartanburg, SC 29303 

(803) 578-5530 
Toll Free (800) 333-3333 



OFFICE AIDE 

BUSINESS OR PERSONAL 
SERVICES 

Mailing Service • Mailing Lists • Word Processing "FAX Service UPS Shipping • Business 

Cards • Printing Needs • Paper Supplies • Copies • Laser Printing • Notary Service • 

Resumes • Term Papers 

OFFICE AIDE • 1846 Boiling Springs Rd. • Spatanburg, SC 29303 
Hours: M T Th F 8-6, Sat. 8-4, Closed Sun. & Wed. 

578-6943 





PHILLIPS 

DELIVERY 

SERVICE 



• UPSTATE COURIER • 

• SAME DAY DELIVERY • 

MAIL SERVICE 

BUS FREIGHT • AIR FREIGHT 

PACKAGE DELIVERY 

LICENSED • DEPENDABLE • BONDED 

"Fast Service Since 1971" 



MACK FULBRIGHT 
DISTRIBUTING CO., INC. 



P.O. BOX 4305 - 447 WEST CENTENNIAL STREET 
SPARTANBURG, SOUTH CAROLINA 29305-4305 



Entrance at Centennial and Traxler Street, directly behind M & M 
Chevrolet Co. 



TOOLS, FILTERS, CHEMICALS SPECIALIST 

AUTOMOTIVE AND INDUSTRIAL TOOLS 

EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES 



TELEPHONE: (803) 583-5211 

1-800-273-5211 (70 MILE RADIUS) 

FAX NO. (803) 591-0273 



230 Advertising 



BF Goodrich 

BF GOODRICH T A RADIALS 



Long Mileage 

Fuel Saving Radials 

Passenger cars, vans, light trucks 



Long tread lite 

Outstanding traction 

Sure handling 

Distinctive appearance 

ALL SERVICES BY PROFESSIONALS 



Wheel Alignment 
Computer Balancing 
Mag Wheel Alignment 
Brakes Shocks A/C 
Batteries 



TIREAMA 



Financing Available 
ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS HONORED 



582-5491 
N Church St 



574-8240 
102 Southport Rd 



DAILY 8AM-6PM 
SAT 8AM- 12PM 



FREE CHECKING 

FOR 

EVERYONE! 




AMERICAN 
FEDERAL 

The Black Sheep Bank! 



Carl T. Grizzle 
Area Manager 

MANPOWER OF SPARTANBURG, INC. 

319 North Pine St. 

Spartanburg 

South Carolina 29302 

(803) 585-2285 

MANPOWER® 

TEMPORARY SERVICES 



Financial Wizards bank at over 130 full service offices and more than 
110 24-hour bank locations across South Carolina. Plus they can Bank- 
by-Phone from almost anywhere. 




CONGRATULATIONS 
CLASS OF 1990! 




Advertising 231 



-»^ 







A fresh approach 
to dinner. 






At Piccadilly, 
dinner is your 
choice of delicious entrees, 
vegetables, salads and des- 
serts. Good, balanced meals 



prepared fresh 
and served up ready- 
to-eat. Which saves you time. 
And money. So, try something 
fresh. Try Piccadilly for dinner 



Piccadilly Cafeteria 

WESTGATE MALL 

SERVING CONTINUOUSLY FROM 11:00 AM TO 8:30 PM EVERY DAY 

CARRY-OUT AVAILABLE 




BONDS FURNITURE COMPANY, 
INC. 

Fine Furniture and GE Appliances 

Wade Hampton Blvd. Greer, SC 29651 

Telephone 877-3336 



Automotive & 
Industrial Parks 



Congratulations 
Graduates! 



Boiling Springs Rd. 



^#^^^^ 



578-8550 



"The Dealership Where The Customer Counts" 

SALES -SERVICE -PARTS 
FULL SERVICE BODY SHOP 



Service 

Dept 

8-5 

Mon-Fri 




Sales 
8-6 

Mon-Fri 
8-5 
Sat 



"Located Just Minutes From Spartanburg" 



HWY 221 S 
NORTH FROM 
SPARTANBURG 



Ronald Burns 

Bobby Cash 

-OWNERS- 



461-2237 




232 Advertising 




Advertising 233 





SPARTAN MILLS 



CONGRATULATIONS 
CLASS OF 1990! 




PIEDMONT 
JEANS 



Good Luck 

1990 
Graduates! 



5581 Hwy 221 



461-7595 



Patrons of the 

1989-90 

Carolana 



Sunshine Preschool 
Watson's Furniture 
Gregory Motor Co. 



Thank You 

for 

Your Support 



234 Advertising 




Autographs 



1 




Advertising 235 







le 



Autographs 




236 Advertising 




Autographs 




Advertising 237 



M^;. -. ^i-'t-i^im 



Autographs 



I 



I 



fc 




238 Advertising 





Advertising 239 



-ancy Ballenger ir;d Toni Nusz: sisters until the end 
.jb;ir Safety is a vital force in USCS traffic control. 




The 




r 



At the beginning of 
September each stu- 
dent embarked on a 
year unlike any other 
before. 

The out-of-the-or- 
dinary and unspeak- 
able became every- 
day and common- 
place. No sane person 
would ever believe 
that a person would 
stand in line for over an 
hour to change a class. 
And that same student 
would later in the year 
volunteer time to raise 
money for a charity, or 
give a pint of much 
needed blood. These 
are some of the behav- 
iors that brought stu- 
dents closer. 



There were suc- 
cesses and there were 
failures. Of course, 
each student wanted 
to forget the failures, 
whether playing on 
the field, in the aca- 
demic field or in the 
personal field. 

Each student began 
the year poised for 
perfection. Hopes 
were high. Goals were 
set. For some, this 
would be the end of 
their days in college 
— closer than before. 
For others, this would 
be the beginning. For 
all, this year was des- 
tined for ... distinc- 
tion. 




240 Closing 



Benches are a great place to relax between classes. 



The Bookstore has a wide variety of 
Items to choose from. 




Christie Cooper works at her on- 
campus job. 



Closing 241 




Alex Hayceake tries to decipher the course offer- 
ings pamphlet during registration. 




242 Closing 





Adding a new perspective from each student is 
how the university grows and progresses toward its 
academic goal of excellence. The input from the 
collective minds of the student body helps to build 
upon the USCS tradition. This interaction takes the 
thoughts of years past and adapts them for use in a 
future context, allowing the university to develop 
and grow. 

All students add to as well as takes from this 
institution certain aspects and characteristics which 
are unique to their educational experience. Through 
interaction with others, we gain a great deal of 
insight and information about the world around us. 
Opening doors to knowledge and imparting that 
unto others allows the dialogue of shared ideas to 
be continued. This unique exchange of ideas is one 
in which the student as well as the school will be 
enhanced forever. 

With its vast array of classes, organizations, and 
social activities, USCS allows students to experiment 
with many opportunities which are new and differ- 
ent. 

All of these aspects have allowed USCS to be- 
come destined for . . . distinction. 




The fall season is evident in the 
changing color of the trees. 

Wet-and-Wild day is the highlight of 
all USCS activities 



Closing 243 




of an 




For some reason, you keep coming back. 
Your last final exam has been completed. You 
just want to say "good riddance" and "No more 
pencils, no more books, no more teachers ..." 

What a year. Sometimes you were so busy 
you didn't know whether you'd be able to get 
everything done. 

And then graduation. All those who were 
able to study as well as participate in other 
college activities got a chance to show off. 
Underclassmen gazed longingly at the black- 
clad rows of students in the Quad. Graduates- 
to-be looked around at each other, wondering if 
they would met in person they were standing 
next to before; a long time ago. You speculated 
how that diploma was going to feel in your 
hands, and knew that no matter how mans 
others went through the same ritual before you, 
your own experience was going to be distinc- 
tive. 




The class of 1989 raise their hand In salute as they sing the traditional USC 
alma mater. 



244 Closing 






1 




^ 








^ 





lay graduate enjoys the su 
' prepares to enter the woil 

resp'jnsiLiiM V 




This student cuddly plays with a stray cat between classes. 




The bookstore offers cold drinks for 50 cents. No refund 
or exchange without a receipt 



Closing 245 




College is a place to make lasting 
friendships 



in li 



'«■"• 
-<--%, 



Teamwork is a distinctive part of the 
uses tradition. 

The completion of the new building 
is underway by the RPR Company. 




246 Closing 




Vou 
and I 



"Destined for distinction was you; it was 1. 
It was the story of things changing and the 
story of things remaining the same. It was a 
story of the successes and it was a story of 
the failures. It was a story of growth outside 
the school and it was a story of growth 
within the school. 

But most of all . . . it conveyed the pride 
students took in making USCS destined for 
. . . distinction. 



iJe^S^XJ^ i 




I The purpose of college is not only to gain an education, but to make lasting 
friends. 

Dr. Moore advises this student on what courses he should take in the spring 
semester in order to graduate on time. 



Closing 247 




If 

the 
end 



As the year comes down to an end, 
Spartanburg and USCS have grown. Many 
new food establishments have staked their 
claim in Spartanburg. Also, brand new apart- 
ments have been constructed. Not only has 
Spartanburg grown, USCS has grown, with 
it. A new building is in the process of 
construction in order to better serve the size 
and needs of the campus. The athletic teams 
have added numerous District Six champ- 
ionships to our honor. The clubs and organi- 
zations also experienced growth. Some 
clubs became more active and some receiv- 
ed their largest membership ever. Growth 
occurred academically, athletically, and in 
organizations. This sentence ends "Destined 
for Distinction", a story filled with growth, 
accomplishments, victories, honors and 
most of all, people. 



-A 




The cafeteria serves as more than a place to dine. It is a study area, a gossip 
center, and a place to relax. 



f"*' 






248 Closing 







d 



If 



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*•».. 



ufViA 







SPEED 
LIMIT 







SPEED 
CHECKED 



BY METER 





The speed limit, should it be raised to 25? 





H^ee^ uses 




This banner was stolen from the administration building 
during Womanfest. 

Closing 249 



4 



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Chemistry labs give students an oppor- 
tunity to understand the concepts in- 
volved. 

Kevin Parris registers for courses during, 
early registration. 

The uses campus luminesses in the light 
of the night. 




250 Closing 



. ' . . ' 









u 



■HC- 



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Wet-and-Wild day provides fun for students of all ages 



3000 0«L 



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Harriet McDuffie explains the registration process to incoming freshmen. 



On the preceding 250 pages, a partial 
explanation of USCS's distinction appears. 
This explanation is partial because she is 
constantly changing. 

uses consists of many different people 
from many different worlds all coming to- 
gether on one campus. The feeling that one 
has as a member of the student body is 
beyond words. Regardless of how ardently 
at times one may try to hold in one's school 
pride, the loyalty to USCS will come out; it us 
unsuppressible. Her attitude and spirit tri- 
umph because of the thousands of individu- 
als who pass through her doors each year. It 
is these people — the student, the professor, 
and the administration — that make USCS 
the special place that it is to you. YOU make 
it the most important part in the destination 
for . . . distinction. 



Closing 251 



The faces 




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252 Closing 



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Closing 253 



The faces 




254 Closing 




Closing 255 




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■Beingme first buiIHrng on this campus, the Adminlstra- 
toanjbuilding serves as. the step^Hsg stone to USCS. 



256 Closing 



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''• Rin^raffiti 261 



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Rifle Graffiti 263 



Editor's 
Notes 




When I was chosen to be the editor of the 
Carolana in November, I had no idea what the 
future was to bring. Filled with excitement and 
apprehension, I undertook the task. Hodge 244 has 
never been the same. 

The hours that the staff and I have spent in the 
yearbook room amongst croppers, grease pencils, 
layout sheets, and copy sheets have been filled 
with laughter and exasperation. Meeting deadlines 
is a chore which every yearbook staff must face; to 
us, they have meant spending many Friday eve- 
nings, Saturday mornings, and holidays in that hot 
Hodge building. When deadlines are not met 
because of an incorrectly drawn layout, editors 
tend to get irate. When the tension is about to 
snap, one must laugh. It is at these times that I am 
thankful to have such a hard-working, diligent staff. 

The completion of the Carolana would be 



impossible without the help of many wonderful 
people. I would like to extend a special thanks to 
my best friend. Tammy Grizzle, for the time, love, 
and support that she has given me this year. 
Without Dr. William Jong-Ebot, I do not know how 
the book would have gotten finished. Thanks for all 
the time you spent proofreading pages. To Audio 
Visuals, the Carolana is indebted. 

I would also like to thank my staff. They have 
worked hard on this book and have put up with 
me through thick and thin. You guys are the best 
staff anyone could ever have. Being editor of the 
Carolana has been a challenge, one that I am 
thankful to have undertaken. This past year has 
been the worst and best of my life. I have learned 
many valuable lessons from my editorship; it has 
been an experience I will never forget. 

Sincerely, 
Monica Stanley 



264 Editor's Page 



itv Qj 5oy'tL'i^[iS"l 



1 EDO D<