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Full text of "The Carolina journal of pharmacy [serial]"

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

AT CHAPEL HILL 




Pharmacy 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

North Carolina History of Health Digital Collection, an LSTA-funded NC ECHO digitization grant project 



http://www.archive.org/details/carolinajo541974nort 



he Carolina 



Journal of Pharmacy 



Volume LIV 



January 1974 



Number 1 




Jesse M. Pike, Sr. (second from left) of Concord greets Gerald Ford, Vice President of the 
United States. On the left is Harold J. Shinnick of Chicago, President of the National 
Association of Retail Druggists, and to Mr. Pike's right, John A. Johnson of Nebraska, first 
vice president of the NARD. 
— Photo compliments of the NARD Journal. 



IL OF PHARMAC* 



94th ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION AND AFFILIATED AUXILIARIES 

PINEHURST HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB, PINEHURST, N. C. 

SUNDAY— MONDAY— TUESDAY, MARCH 24-26, 1974 



11^1 I (Insulin, Lilly) 
(1(30 units of Insulin per cc.) 

A concentration suitable for most 
insulin-dependent diabetics 





Only U-100 syringes are to J with U-100 lletin, 



ILETlN r 

INSUUN' 
PROM*" J 




Leadership in 

Diabetes Research 

for Half a Century 



Additional information available to the profession on request 



Eli Lilly and Company 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46206 




JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY SALUTES THE 

FOLLOWING PERSONNEL FOR YEARS 

OF SERVICE IN WHOLESALING 

Herman Butler 10 years 

Jerry McBride 10 years 

Larry Salmon 10 years 

Ben Peoples 20 years 

William S. Cummings, Jr. 25 years 

R. L. Laughlin 30 years 

W. A. Sigmon 30 years 

135 YEARS OF SERVICE 

TO THE RETAILERS 

OF NORTH CAROLINA 




WilMBC, 




''OusH.' 



JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Now in our 76th Year of Service to the North Carolina Retail Druggists 



ENDEAVORING TO BETTER SERVE 




Scott Jbtug, Company, 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 
Representing 80 Years of Integrity and Reliable Service 



The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



January, 1974 

Vol. LIV Xo. 1 



Officers 

NORTH CAROLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 



President 

W. Whitaker Moose 
Mount Pleasant 



Vice-Presidents 

W. H. Wilson 

Raleigh 

L. M. Whaley 

Wallace 

Thomas R. Burgiss 

Sparta 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



CONTENTS THIS ISSUE 

Eighth Annual Pharmacy Seminar 5 

Burroughs Wellcome Sponsors Public Service 

TV Program 8 

Disasters — Major and Minor 11 

Tar Heel Digest 13 

N. C. Pharmacy Political Action Committee 

Newsletter 14 

Point of Sale Terminals Aid Inventory Control -1 

Tripartite Committee Meeting 23 

Administrative Guidelines — Tripartite Committee 26 

Organizational Activity at the Local/District Level ... 30 

Scrutable Prescriptions 31 

TJNC Pharmacy School Notes 32 

Doings of the Auxiliaries 33 

Marriages/Deaths 35 

Classified Advertising 36 



ADVERTISERS 

American Druggists' Insurance Company 6-7 

Colorcraft Corporation 30 

Eli Lilly and Company 2nd Cover 

Gilpin, Henry B 9 

ICN Pharmaceuticals ( King Associates) 4th Cover 

I. C. System, Inc 34 

Justice Drug Company 1 

Kendall Drug < 'ompnnv . 28 

Lo/.ier Drug Store Fixtures 26 

Owens, Minor & Bodeker 3rd Cover 

Ramsey Manufacturing Corporation 16 

A. II. Robins Company 12 

E. X. Rowel! Company 31 

Scott Drug Company 

Socman I'rintery 24 

Smith Wholesale Drug I 11 

Washington National Insurance < 'o 22 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, X. C. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Second 
postage paid at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



ABBOTT LABS. CHARGE 
DISMISSED BY JUDGE LARKINS 

In dismissing charges brought against Ab- 
bot Laboratories, which alleged the drug 
firm shipped contaminated drugs from its 
Rocky Mount plant, Federal District Judge 
John D. Larking, Jr. was critical of pre- 
trial publicity released to the press by the 
Food & Drug Administration and others. 

Judge Larkins commented ' ' as powerful 
and efficient as our government is, or can 
be, its laws and procedures do not have to 
be prostituted by prejudicial publicity 
'leaked' to the press in order to obtain con- 
victions, especially criminal misdemeanor 
convictions. ' ' 

The Abbott product in question was re- 
called in March, 1971. Two years later a 
Federal grand jury brought action against 
Abbott and five executives. 

Judge Larkins concluded "the FDA's 
press release was" not made in the interest 
of public health and safety, it was self- 
serving in an effort to pacify a demanding 
press. ' ' 

INCORPORATIONS 

(From Carolina Financial Times) 

Belwood Pharmacy, Inc., Route 3, Box 
105, Lawndale. 

Medical Center Pharmacy of Sanford, 
Inc., Sanford. 

Carolina Cut Rate Drug Store, Inc., 225 
West Trade Street, Charlotte. 

KERR BUYS WAREHOUSE 

Kerr Drug Company has purchased a 
26,000 square foot warehouse building in 
Raleigh formerly occupied by Homeway Fur- 
niture at 2511 Timberlake Drive. 



LARGER QUARTERS FOR 
SHEEK-TAYLOR DRUGS 

Sheek-Taylor Drugs' of Yadkinville moved 
into new and larger quarters in late No- 
vember. 



Mrs. Sue Taylor continues as pharmacist 
manager of the drug firm. 

ANTI-SUBSTITUTION 

Notice to local pharmaceutical society 
officers and others: If interested in sched- 
ulinga speaker on "Repeal of the Anti- 
Subsitution Laws, ' ' call or write 

Larry M. Rhye, C.M.R. 
604 South Magnolia Steet 
Mooresville, N. C. 28115 
Tel. (704) 664-2749 

Mr. Rhye is associated with A. H. Robins 
Company and there is no honorarium/travel- 
ing expense involved. 

The NCPhA has been informed an anti- 
substitution repealer Avill be introduced in 
the N. C. General Assembly in 1974 . 

DOLLARS FROM DUST 

All sorts of fund-raising efforts have been 
utilized over the years but here is a unique 
one : collecting dust. 

According to a reporter, the Boy Scouts 
of Rhodhiss have been collecting vacuum 
cleaner dust for sale to Greer Drug Com- 
pany of Lenoir, where the dust is used to 
produce an allergy vaccine. 

CORRECTION 

Authorship of the ' ' North Carolina 's First 
5th Generation Pharmacist" (December 
Journal, Page 32) was erroneously attrib- 
uted to Miss India Hood. 

In abstracting copy from The Hood His- 
torical File, a handwritten note ' ' For Miss 
India Hood ' ' was" incorrectly picked up as 
' ' By Miss India Hood. ' ' At the same time, 
in updating some of the information, part 
of the generation sequence was not in ac- 
cordance with the facts. 

The initial news item was but a prelim- 
inary to a previously planned comprehen- 
sive featurette on The Hood Pharmaceu- 
tical Family. We have asked Miss Hood to 
prepare the copy for a future issue of The 
Journal. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 5 

EIGHTH ANNUAL PHARMACY SEMINAR 

ON 

SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF PHARMACY PRACTICE 

Institute of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, Wednesday, Feb. 20, 1974 

Sponsored by 

N. C. Pharmaceutical Association and the School of Pharmacy, 

University of North Carolina 

8:15 REGISTRATION AND COFFEE 

9:00 GREETINGS 

George P. Hager, Ph.D., Dean, UNC School of Pharmacy 

PEESIDING— Claude U. Paoloni, Assistant Professor, UNC School of Pharmacy 

9:15 MAEKETING TRENDS & ISSUES IN PHARMACIES 

Eric I. Kulp, Associate Professor, Middlesex County College, Edison, New Jersey 

10:00 PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF COMPUTER CAPABILITY 

Ralph P. Rogers', Jr., Manager, N. C. Mutual Wholesale Drug Company, Durham 

11:00 THIS WORKS FOR ME 

Patient Medication Records — Jeff Whitehead, Enfield 
The Medication Record — Tom Burgiss, Sparta 
Chronic Sufferer Card- — Seth Miller, Lexington 

12:15 LUNCH AT THE ZOOM ZOOM 

PRESIDING — W. Whitaker Moose, President, N. C. Pharmaceutical Association 

1:30 THE ROLE OF THE PRECEPTOR IN PHARMACEUTICAL EDUCATION 
Stephen M. Caiola, Assistant Professor, UNC School of Pharmacy 

2:15 PANEL: UPDATING 

Paid Prescriptions — Frank F. Yarborough, Project Director. 

Mental Health — Robert J. Allen, Chief, Pharmacy Services, N. C. Division of Mental 

Health Services 
Nursing Home Standards — Benny Ridout, Pharmacist Consultant, N. C. Department 

of Social Services 

3:30 COFFEE BREAK 

3:45 PRESCRIPTION PRICE POSTING AND PRESCRIPTION SURVEYS 
Will Gulley, State Project Coordinator 
North Carolina Public Interest Research Group 

4:45 ADJOURN M EXT OF SEMINAR 



ADDITIONAL DETAILS, INCLUDING REGISTRATION FORM, MAILED DIRECT BY 
THE UNC SCHOOL OF PHARMACY AND THE NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEU- 
TICAL ASSOCIATION 



You're new here 
aren't you? 



Yes, I'm just helping 
out Fred today. 





Is this you, doing 
relief work? 

Many pharmacists work in more than one 
store. That's fine! 

Dw I who's going to pay the legal 
fees if that customer claims an error was 
made? 

It could be you! 



Protect yourself! Obtain your own Profes- 
sional Liability Policy from the company 
founded by pharmacists tor pharmacists! 
Even though you don't do relief work, you 
can be held liable for any alleged mistakes 
at your regular place of employment. If 
you already have a professional liability 
policy, is it Excess or Primary? What's 
the difference? 

The AD I insurance is Primary. That means 
in the event of a claim, we are there to 
defend you! Excess policies may or may 
not. Look for wording such as, "this policy 
shall apply only as excess over other valid 
and collectible insurance." 



BE SECURE! SEND IN THE APPLICATION AT RIGHT TODAY! 



The American Druggists' Insurance Company 

APPLICATION FOR PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY FOR THE PHARMACIST 



LIMITS $300,000 EFFECTIVE DATE. 
1. NAME 



2. ADDRESS- 



3. TELEPHONE. 

4. EMPLOYER_ 
ADDRESS 



5. WHEN DID YOU GRADUATE FROM PHARMACY SCHOOL?. 
WHAT SCHOOL? 



YEAR REGISTERED STATE. 



6. ARE YOU AN OWNER, PARTNER, OR CORPORATE OFFICER OF A RETAIL PHARMACY? 

YES NO (CIRCLE ONE) 

7. ARE YOU PRACTICING PROFESSIONALLY, FULL TIME OR PART TIME, ANY PLACE OTHER 
THAN A RETAIL PHARMACY? (FOR EXAMPLE, A HOSPITAL OR NURSING HOME) 

YES NO (CIRCLE ONE) 

8. DO YOU COMPOUND IN BULK, MANUFACTURE, OR WHOLESALE ANY DRUGS OR DRUG 
PRODUCTS? YES N0 (CIRCLE ONE) 

9. HAVE ANY PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY CLAIMS BEEN MADE AGAINST YOU? 

YES NO (CIRCLE ONE) 

10. PLEASE GIVE THE DETAILS CONCERNING ANY "YES" ANSWER(S) ON QUESTIONS 6 
THROUGH 9. 



SIGNING THIS APPLICATION DOES NOT BIND THE COMPANY TO COMPLETE THE INSURANCE, 
BUT IT IS AGREED THAT THIS FORM SHALL BE THE BASIS OF THE CONTRACT SHOULD 
A POLICY BE ISSUED. 



DATE SIGNATURE OF APPLICANT 

PLEASE SEND COMPLETED APPLICATION, TOGETHER WITH CHECK FOR $75. 
(PAYABLE TO AMERICAN DRUGGISTS' INSURANCE COMPANY) 

FOR THREE (3) YEARS PRE-PAID PREMIUM. NOT SOLD FOR LESSER PERIOD. 

SEND TO: HAMMETT INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 
P.O. Box 248 
Concord, North Carolina 28025 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



BURROUGHS WELLCOME SPONSORS PUBLIC SERVICE TV PROGRAM 

To Members of the NCPhA: 

Through the cooperation of Burroughs Wellcome Company, an exceptionally effective 
30-minute program — ' ' I Am Joe 'S Heart ' ' — will be broadcast by six North Carolina tele- 
vision stations. These are scheduled to coincide with National Pharmacy Week. 

Twice during the show a 30-second commercial ' ' Salute to Pharmacists ' ' will be seen 
by a TV audience which is believed to be far in excess of any previous National Phar- 
macy Week program sponsored by the NCPhA or others. 

Due to the quality of the program and the Pharmacy tie-in message, plus an opportunity 
to cooperate with the Burroughs Wellcome Company, whose public service record is un- 
excelled, members of the NCPhA are urged to 

DISPLAY TEE POSTERS 

"I AM JOE ' S HEART" 

AT A MAJOR CUSTOMER AREA IN YOUR PHARMACY! 

In North Carolina, the 30-minute special "I am Joe's Heart" plus the "Salute to Phar- 
macy ' ' will be shown by these stations, which together provide state-wide coverage : 



High Point WGHP Tuesday, January 22 

Raleigh/Durham WTVD Tuesday, January 22 

Wilmington WECT Thursday, January 24 

Greenville WNCT Friday, January 25 

Asheville WLOS Friday, January 25 

Charlotte WBTV Tuesday, February 5 



30 p.m. 
00 p.m. 
30 p.m. 
00 p.m. 
30 p.m. 
30 p.m. 



The above information will enable you to complete the enclosed posters. 
To assure additional coverage for the program, the NCPhA Committee on Public Rela- 
tions is providing back-up support to local pharmaceutical organizations and county chair- 
men. 

Pharmacy, at all levels, could use Some better understanding on the part of the public. 
One way to secure this is by urging your customers, friends, and neighbors, to view "I am 
Joe 's Heart ' ' when it is broadcast, in your area. 

Cordially yours, 
/s/ W. J. Smith 

Executive Director 



The letter appearing above was mailed to all North Carolina licensed pharmacies in 
early January by Burroughs Wellcome Company. Included with the mailing were posters 
and other information relating to the TV program. 

This high quality medical program, with associated salute to pharmacists, will be viewed 
by a majority of the state's TV audience. Note the prime time scheduling. While Burroughs 
Wellcome pays' tribute to the nation's pharmacists (100 top markets in the U. S.), a 
special note of thanks to BW for this back-up support during National Pharmacy Week. 




. 



Sometimes it takes more 
than your expert knowledge 
of the pharmacy business 
PUNCHto make your pharmacy go. mm 

BALLS 




PLASTIC 
COATED 

PLAYING 

pinnn 





You studied pharmacy and its appli- 
cation to human life; not changing 
markets, the changing economy, new 
products, sundries and advertising. 

That's where Gilpin comes in— 
we can provide the marketing and 
merchandising expertise to make your 
operation more profitable, more effi- 
cient, even more attractive, all at once 
or one at a time. 



And beyond that we can assist 
you in identifying your pharmacy as a 
part of the Care Drug Center Service 
Program. 

Sometimes it takes more than 
your knowledge of pharmacy to make 
your pharmacy go. For more 
information, write or call the Gilpin 
Sales Manager nearest you.* 



THE HENRY H 



GJJuFTlS 

COMBWMY 

Wholesale druggists since 184 

•Baltimore-Joe Meyerowilz, 7401 Pulaski Highway, Baltimon Oil 866-4600 Dovei Bill Warther, 756 South Little Creek Rd., Dover, Del 19901 i 102 i 4-S 

Norfolk-Max Kelly, 6435 Tidewater Drive, N I 3509 304 ' gtoi GaryMcl i Washington, D.C. 20032 



PHARMACY 

ACCOUNT SERVICE 




*GOOD RECORDS FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS— A proven accounts 
receivable system — Designed from the ground up for your needs 
— by the folks who went to computers in 1958. Better collection 
for you and prescription tax records for your customers. You also 
automatically earn interest on past due accounts if you desire. 



S 



PHARMACY 

BOOKKEEPING SERVICE 

*GOOD RECORDS FOR YOU— Twenty Nine years of bookkeeping 
for retailers plus 15 years of computer experience equals a system 
designed to give you the accounting service you need. 




PHARMACY 

"ADVERTISING PROGRAM 



HOW'S YOUR RETAIL IMAGE?— Good? Bad? Indifferent— Con- 
sult your Smith Representative about our Associated Druggist Pro- 
gram. Some of the advantages of this program are hometown 
newspaper advertising — buying advantages — clerk training pro- 
gram — In store promotion materials and store advertising fliers. 

Just three of the many SMITH services 

Also ask about retirement, group hospitalization and major med- 
ical. Call or write to 





li lHiTll 



OF SMITH OftUO COMPANY 



• Spartanburg 582-1216 

• Greenville 235-4159 

• Asheville 684-6121 

• Charlotte 825-5161 
Wofford and Forest Streets P. O. Box 1779 



S P A R I A N B U R G. S O U T H CAROLINA 29301 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



DISASTERS 



Major and Minor 



GASTON IA 

The episode began when someone broke 
the latch on the skylight on the roof of 
Eckerd 's, Abbey Plaza Shopping Center. 
This activated a rooftop burglar alarm 
system which alerted officers in the Belmont 
Police Department. 

A building search was fruitless but officers 
found a large quantity of drugs in plastic 
containers in a trash can located at the 
rear of the drug store. This prompted a 
second sweep of the store which netted 
Mark Steven Severs, age 19, of Charlotte, 
who had selected an ice cream freezer as a 
hiding place. 

STANLEYVILLE 

Marshall McCree Mabe, a convicted crim- 
inal who fought the law and law officers 
most of his life, tried to burglarize the 
Stanleyville Discount Drug Store off U. S. 52 
and was shot to death by officers who were 
waiting for him. 

The officers were notified Mabe would be 
after narcotics and cash. Surprised while 
opening the store's safe, Mabe lost his life 
in a shoot-out with the officers. 

DURHAM 

Items valued at §133 were taken from 
Kerr Drugs, Wellons Village Shopping ren- 
ter, Durham, by two unidentified women. 

GREENSBORO 

Controlled substances valued at $1,500 
were stolen from Elm Street Pharmacy in 
a December 13 breakin at the pharmacy. 
Entry was by way of a roof-top skylight. 

KINSTON 

Three Camp Lejeune men have been 
arrested and charged with armed robbery 
of Standard Drug Store #2 in late Nov. in 
ber. Tom Suddreth was hit on the head 
while the robbery was in progress. 

GASTON I A 

A Bess'emer City man was caught in tin 
act of breaking and entering Prescription 



Center Pharmacy in late November. Police 

said he wasn't caught red-handed because he 
had dark socks over each hand. 

CHARLOTTE 

A man wearing a wide-brimmed black 

hat with a gold band walked out of Eckerd 's 
Drug Store at the Tryon Mall on Novem 
ber 23 with a lot of time on his hands' — 
about 50 Timex watches. 

The light-fingered thief walked up to a 
counter in Eckerd 's and picked up and de- 
parted with the display. An Eckerd employ- 
ee thought another employee was changing 
displays. 

GREENSBORO 

Burglars entered North Elm Street Phar- 
macy in mid-December and stole approx- 
imately $1,500 in drugs. 

MOCKSVILLE 

Taken from Wilkins Drug Company in a 
mid-December breakin : Narcotics and sy- 
ringes valued at $800; a $100 watch and 
$150 in change, most of which was dropped 
on the floor as the thief made an exit from 
the pharmacy. 

BLACK MOUNTAIN 

A pre-Christmas robbery of Ward 's Eexall 
Drug Store in the WNC Shopping Center 
involved the loss of $1,500 in drugs ami an 
equal amount of cash taken from a safe- 
cabinet. 

HAVELOCK 

A roof top alarm system alerted local 
police to an attempted robbery of Clark's 
I'lininacy on December 15. The person, or 
persons, who cut a hole in the pharma<\ 's 

roof had departed by the time police ar 
rived. 

STATESVILLE 

Four young men were arrested on De- 
cember 17 as they left the Reveo Drug 
Center located in the Mammoth Mart Shop- 
ping ('enter. A silent alarm tipped off local 
police who made the arresl as the youths 

prepared to leave the store. 




Again this winter Robins offers you our fabulous 
"in-season" deal on the cough preparation line that's 
Number One in drug store sales. Now you can stock up 
on the Robitussi ns at this special low price just when 
the demand is greatest. Whether your business comes 
mainly from prescriptions or "professional recom- 
mendations," you know these top quality products are 
going to move off your shelves. So it's just good busi- 
ness to give them plenty of extra facings. Your Robins 
Representative will be around soon with all the facts. 

/J'H'POBINS A. H. Robins Company, Richmond, Virginia 23220 



Deal runs- 
January 15- 
February 27 

Put your facings 
where your 
profits are! 



The Carolina Journal of Phakm.u y 



13 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 



YADEINFILLE— John A. Wilkinson of 
Pfafftown and Earl Tate of Lenior have 
succeeded Pharmacist E. P. Gaddy at Yad- 
kin Drug Store. 

GREENSBORO— Lane Bexall Drugs, in 
the Jefferson Standard block area, will be 
consolidated with the Lane Pharmacy op- 
eration, 102 South Elm Street, on Decem- 
ber 28. The merger resulted after it was 
announced all structures' in the block, 
other than the Jefferson Standard Building, 
would be demolished after January 1. 

DURHAM — A Durham woman has filed a 
$1 million suit for damages against G. D. 
Searle & Company. Mrs. Linda Jean Bowling 
Mason claims Enovid-E, which she had been 
taking, ' ' seriously, grieviously and per- 
manently" injured her. 

CHARLOTTE— Effective January 2nd, 
Pharmacist Clarence L. Swearngan accepted 
employment with Park Place Pharmacy. 

// / /. LSBORO UGH— Eighty-seven inmates of 
the Villincs Rest Home attended a Christ- 
mas Party hosted by Pharmacist Evelyn 
Lloyd on December 6. 



STANTONSBURG Pharmacisl Rowland 

Strickland represented "Concerned Citizens 
for Better Schools in Wilson Count \ " al a 
meeting of the Wilson County Board of 
Education on December 3. Mr. Strickland 
discussed the consolidation of small high 
schools into larger, comprehensive-size high 
schools. 

TWELVE MEMBER PHARMACIST 

TEAM PROVIDE EMERGENCY 
RX SERVICE ON CHRISTMAS DAY 

On Christmas' Day members of the Gaston 
County Pharmaceutical Society provided the 
county with emergency prescription service. 

Twelve pharmacists, working in three 
hour shifts, dispensed prescriptions at the 
Big M Pharmacy, Gaston Mall, from 10 a.m. 
to 9 p.m. 

Money received above actual medical costs 
was turned over to Horizon House, an or- 
ganization that assists with drug rehabilita- 
tion and counseling service for those in need. 

One of the usual holiday pharmacy ser- 
vices was not open on Christmas Day due to 
move of the Gaston Memorial Hospital to 
its new $17 million facility. 

PHARMACIST AIDS 
CAP ACTIVITY 

Pharmacist William A. Simmons of Win- 
ston-Salem was featured in a story in a 
Winston-Salem newspaper, which gave ac- 
counts of work done by the Civil Air Patrol 
in that area. The photograph pictured work 
being done by the Winston-Salem CAP 
Squadron during a recent search for an air- 
craft missing on a flight from Hagerstown, 
Maryland to Atlanta, Georgia. 

Mr. Simmons, through the use of CAP 
equipment, can be in touch with any CAP 
radio station along the eastern seaboard. 
Such coordination was critical during this 
four-state search. 



14 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

THE NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACY POLITICAL 
ACTION COMMITTEE NEWSLETTER 

LEGISLATIVE FORECAST 

Volume 1 Number 1 January, 1974 

With the approaching legislative and congressional sessions upon us, major preliminary 
concerns for pharmacists are probable hills relating to: 
Statewide — 

1) Advance notice has been given that a member of the General Assembly will introduce 
a bill seeking repeal of North Carolina 's Anti-Substitution Law. 

2) Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) is expected to seek a prescriptive price- 
posting bill as well as urging repeal of the State 's anti-substitution law. With chap- 
ters at Duke, Wake Forest, Davidson and St. Andrews, these student organizations 
are expected to strongly support these measures. 

3) Currently being held over from the last session is a bill which seeks to repeal the 
N. C. Fair Trade Act. This bill is being pushed by the Consumers Council of North 
Carolina and the Consumers Division of the Attorney General's Office and being 
opposed by milk producers and distributors. 

4) Bills are anticipated in regard to new definitions of responsibilities of nurse prac- 
titioners and physician's assistants, especially in regard to rural health centers, 
etc. 

5) The Prescription Labeling Bill which is being held over from the last session in the 
Senate Judiciary Committee will probably be passed this session with one important 
change — the control mechanism will rest with the Board of Pharmacy and not the 
courts. This compromise was arrived at through a conference between pharmacy 
and medical representatives. This bill will allow exclusion of the new labeling re- 
quirements, however, with the expressed consent of the respective doctors. 

Nationwide — 

1) The Cost of Living Council is proposing nationwide price posting for prescription 
items. The specifics will be forthcoming in the Federal Register. 

2) Department of Health Education and Welfare has announced plans for Medicaid 
and Medicare prescriptions reimbursement on ' ' lowest price consistent with medical 
quality and therapeutic effect. ' ' This ' ' shopping around ' ' attitude may have dire 
repercussions on drug selections on pharmacists and doctors. 

3) Inclusions of prescription benefits, in various forms, are currently being considered 
by officials in the Nixon Administration for possible inclusion in a national health 
plan. 

4) State reaction to recent Supreme Court ruling that states may enact laws requiring 
ownership of a pharmacy by a pharmacist, is yet uncertain, but probable in some form. 

CURRENT PharmPAC HAPPENINGS 

After two meetings of the Executive Committee, PharmPAC faces the new year with 
the largest membership in its existence, an executive director, a statewide telephone com- 
munication network and unlimited potential for growth. County representatives for all 
counties have been selected and confirmation is expected soon from those who were asked 
to serve. Pharmacy stands ready to meet the challenge in North Carolina and PharmPAC 
makes this so, legislatively speaking. 

In order to make PharmPAC more effective, as well as keeping you informed of legis- 
lative happenings ^before being enacted and you have no say but in compliance) we need 
your aid. If you have not previously, fill in the blank below, and mail with a check for 
$10 (made payable to "PharmPAC" to P. O. Box 1313 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina 
27514. ACT TODAY!!! 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 



INDIVIDUAL PHARMACIST MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION 

In order to effectively work with the North Carolina Pharmacy Political Action Com- 
mittee, payment of $10.00 is hereby enclosed for payment of dues for calendar year L974. 



Pharmacist 



Address 

dty , N. C (Zip) 

Business Phone Home Phone 

County in which registered to vote 

Pharmacy where employed 



Mail completed application and cheek for $10.00 (payable to N. C. PharmPAC) in 
enclosed envelope to: X. C. PharmPAC, P. O. Box 1313, Chapel Hill, North Carolina :27r,14. 




CONVENTION PLANNERS 

C. Rush Hamrick, Jr. of Shelby, President 
of Kendall Drug Company and Past Pres- 
ident of The Traveling Men's Auxiliary of 
the NCPhA, has been named Chairman of 
the Wholesale Druggists-sponsored Conven- 
tion entertainment in Pinehurst. The event 
is scheduled for Monday night, March 24, in 
The Pinehurst Hotel. 

On the following night, the 'I'M A spon 
sored party will lie under the chairmanship 

of Bay I.. Black of Kernersville. Mr. Black 

is associated with Colorcra ft Corporation. 
Leonard G. Phillipps, Jr. (Owens-Illinois) 

Of Atlanta, will arrange the golf lourna meiit , 

set for Monday I'M. March 25. More than 

100 golfers participated in the B e '7:: 

tournament . 



C. Rush Hamrick, Jr. 



DRUG STORE SHOPPERS ARE 
DIFFERENT 

Today's shopper expects, and responds, to a Modern Shopping Atmosphere. 
3 out of 10 impulse purchases are inspired by 

DISPLAYS 
The right kind of drug store fixture is the KEY to VOLUME Sales 
We can assure you the right kind of fixture for every display purpose with 

COLUMBUS IMPERIAL DRUG 
STORE FIXTURES 

Let us DESIGN and engineer your DRUG STORE to promote and SELL merchandise. 

We have successfully given this service to our customers for over a quarter of a 
century. 

"Giving you the best design, the best fixture and the best service by 
professionals" 

CALL US FOR A SINGLE FIXTURE OR A COMPLETE STORE. 



RAMSEY 

MANUFACTURING CORPORATION 

513 East Trade Street 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Telephone 704-334-3457 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 




N. 



PRESIDING OFFICERS OF THE 
C. PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



The current president of the NCPhA, W. 
Whitaker Moose, is shown at the left. He 
will preside while the 94th annual meeting 
of the organization is in progress in Pine- 
hurst, March 24-26. 

President-Elect Wilson will be installed on 
March 26. The 1975 Convention is set for 
the new Winston-Salem Hyatt House, April 
13-15. 

At the conclusion of the 1975 Convention, 
Lloyd M. Whaley will assume the presidency 
of the NCPhA. While the 1976 Convention 
dates are still open, the Convention City 
(Wilmington) has been selected. 



W. Whitaker Moose 
Mount Pleasant 





(Bill) Wilson 
Raleigh 



Lloyd M. Whaley 
Wallace 



IRR ON 

QUflLITY 




E SYSTEMS 



FACILITIES 



20 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




J. M. Smith, Jr., President of Smith Drug Company and Glenn Hammett, Director of 
Smith Data Processing, show the central computer and data-phone equipment used to 
collect and process the information from the Electronic Cash Registers. 




These three Store and Forward Modules are self-contained magnetic tape units. They 
store transactions and forward them to the central computer when polled by telephone. 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 
POINT OF SALE TERMINALS AID INVENTORY CONTROL 

by John Smith, Staff Writer 
The Spartanburg Herald 



21 



One of the most modern advances in re- 
tailing was shown to a group of pharmacy 
students from the University of South Car- 
olina when they toured Smith Wholesale 
Drug Company recently. 

Generally, what the students saw was a 
new system of registering sales which will 
make the standard cash register seem as 
cumbersome and outdated as the abacus. 
The machines are produced by Singer 
Business Machines, an off-shoot of the com- 
pany that lets people zig-zag their way to 
tailor-made clothes'. 

The new cash register, called a ' ' point of 
sale terminal ' ' in computerese, will handle 
all the functions formerly done by the tradi- 
tional cash register, but it will do them bet- 
ter and more quickly than ever before. It 
will also handle a number of functions not 
possible with conventional machines. 

The new machine resembles the cash regis- 
ter in size, but that 's about all. An array of 
buttons to push replaces those now seen on 
cash registers. A sleek design for the ma- 
chine, with its sloping front and minimal 
number of buttons, gives it the space-age 
look most people associate with modern tech- 
nology. 

The system is relatively new to this area, 
with only a handful of stores in Greenville 
using the system. But Soon all Craft's Drug 
Stores will convert to the new system. 

It is Craft's decision which brought 
Smith into play. Craft's has its two Green- 
ville (S. C.) stores on the system, with the 
Spartanburg stores to follow soon. 

When in full operation Craft 's in con- 
junction with Smith, will be able to tell at 
the end of each day exactly what was sold, 
by whom, how much it cost, how much profit 
Craft 's made, and a running inventory will 
then tell Craft's what it has left on the 
shelves and if it needs to reorder merchan- 
dise. 

Craft's system will be set up roughly in 
this way: Three of the machines will be in 
each of 12 stores. (There will be one in one 
store plus one more in the warehouse.) 



Each machine will be connected to a data 
bank which is basically a sophisticated tape 
recorder. These data banks are then con- 
nected together in a series, with the final 
connection going to a data-phone system. 

The. phone arrangement will allow Smith 
to call Craft's after the store has closed 
for the day. The call will automatically re- 
sult in the data which has been gathered 
for the day to be transmitted by phone to 
Smith's central computer which will have 
the inventory information Stored in it. 

By entering this data from each of the 
stores into the main computer, the informa- 
tion is correlated and inventory details are 
determined. 

Obviously all of this is done out of sight 
of the customer, so what will the customer 
see that is different? Plenty. 

To begin with, the price tags on mer- 
chandise will be different. 

There will be three sets of figures on each 
tag. But customers need not worry about 
confusion. The price is clearly visible and 
well-defined. 

When the customer brings his merchan- 
dise to the counter the sales clerk will use a 
"wand" to scan the tag. The wand will 
"read" the information encoded on the 
tag and automatically display the cost on a 
display panel at the top of the machine. 

If no error has been made in making 
the tag, then there is no room for over, 
or under, charging the customer. 

(The wand picks up the information on 
inventory from the other two sets of figures 
at the same time it is getting the price in- 
formation.) 

A push of the appropriate button, and the 
four per cent sales tax is automatically 
computed and entered. 

If there is a discount, that too is com- 
puted automatically. 

The machine is highly versatile and will 
adapt to any number of other operations. 

For example, regular customers for pre- 
scriptions can have a code number which 
(Continued on Page 36) 



The NCPhA-Endorsed Insurance Plans 
Which Merit Member Participation 



BASIC PLAN: 



EXTENDED PLAN: 



DISABILITY INCOME PLAN 

Accident Total Disability — Lifetime 
Sickness Total Disability — Two Years 

Accident Total Disability — Lifetime 
Sickness Total Disability — Five Years 



MAJOR MEDICAL EXPENSE PLAN 

PLAN I: $18,000 Maximum Benefit including $30 Daily Room Limit 
PLAN II: $30,000 Maximum Benefit including $50 Daily Room Limit 
(Up to $45,000 Maximum Benefit including $75.00 Daily Room 
Limit Available) 

TERM LIFE PLAN 

Up to $20,000 For Members 
Dependents Coverage Also Available 

HOSPITAL INCOME PLAN 

$25.00 Per Day For Member 
$20.00 Per Day For Spouse 
$15.00 Per Day For Each Child 

Payable From The First Day of Hospital Confinement 

For Up to 15 Months 

RETIREMENT AND PROFIT SHARING PLANS 

Excellent plans are available for both the Self Employed 
and Corporate Entities. 



FOR DETAILS 

WRITE OR 
TELEPHONE: 



HOYT W. SHORE, C.L.U. and Associates 
821 Baxter Street — Suite 316 
Charlotte, North Carolina 28202 

Telephone: (704) 333-3764 




Washington National 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

EVANSTON, ILLINOIS 60201 



The Carouna Journal of Pharma< v 



23 



MINUTES 

TRIPARTITE COMMITTEE 

MEETING 

November 19, 1973 

Members Present: Messrs. Paoloni (Chair- 
man), Day, McLarty, Randall Werlcy, 
Willets and Caiola (Secretary) 
Members Absent: Messrs. Mebane and Pike 
Guests Present: Messrs. McAllister, Smith 
and Pittman 

1.0 Introduction of Mr. Pittman: 
Mr. Paoloni introduced Mr. A. Wayne 
Pittman, instructor at the School of Phar- 
macy, to the Committee. Mr. Pittman has 
major responsibility for practical experience 
course-work at the School. 

.\0 Review of the Minutes of the Last 
Meeting : 

Mr. Paoloni asked for comments on the 
minutes of the March 12, 1973 meeting of 
the Committee. These minutes were approved 
as originally distributed and finally cor- 
rected on April 3, 1973. 

3.0 Review of the Administrative 
Guidelines for the Committee: 
Mr. Paoloni presented to the Committee 
the ''Administrative Guidelines for the 
North Carolina Pharmacy Tripartite Com- 
mittee on Pharmacy Extern/Internship Pro- 
grams." The Committee reviewed the rough 
draft and made a number of changes and 
clarifications. Appendix T is the draft 
adopted by the Committee, which will be sent 
to the appointing organizations for their ap- 
proval. 

/// Continuing Education Programs and 
Regional Meetings for Externs, 
Interns and their Preceptors: 

Mr. Paoloni described the need for ed- 
ucational programs to be held next sum- 
mer for externs, interns and preceptors. The 
expanded role of the School in practical ex- 
perience training and externship/internship 
will need to be described in detail to all who 
are directly affected. It is necessary to ob- 
t.iin constructive feedback from externs, in- 
terns and preceptors' concerning proposed 
changes. Open discussion of planned pro- 



grams Avill also help obtain "grassroots" 
support for those practical experience re- 
quirements to be adopted. 

Because many of those pharmacists, ex- 
terns and interns who participate in the in- 
ternship/externship program next summer 
will also potentially participate in the School 
of Pharmacy practical experience course- 
work, a complete mailing list of these people 
is necessary. Therefore, Mr. McAllister sug- 
gested the development of an intern/extern 
registration form that would provide an 
XCR copy which, when received by the 
Board, would be sent to the attention of Mr. 
Paoloni. A relatively complete mailing list 
could be developed from these copies of the 
registration form. This procedure was 
adopted and the School of Pharmacy will 
have the necessary forms printed. The 
people on the above mailing list will be 
contacted concerning a series of regional 
meetings to discuss the changing externship 
/internship program. In order to contact 
those other people who would also be in- 
terested in these changes, announcement of 
the regional meetings will be made through 
the North Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 
and other mailings. 

5.0 "Concurrent Time" Practical 

Experience Training by the 

UNC School of Pharmacy : 

Mr. Paoloni referred to his memorandum 
of July 16, 1973 referring to "Concurrent 
Time of UNC School of Pharmacy Courses. ' ' 
This memorandum expressed the Tripar- 
tite Committee members' approval of grant- 
ing up to 400 hours of externship experience 
for participation in one or more of the fol- 
lowing School of Pharmacy courses: 

Orientation to Professional 

Practice 108 hours 

Pharmacy 108L 

Clinical Pharmacy Clerkship 1*7.1 hours 

Pharmacy 120 
Introduction to Clinical Pharmacy 

Practice 36 hours 

Total number of hours the 

student can gain: 419 hours 

(Continued on Page 24) 



24 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



TRIPARTITE COMMITTEE 
MEETING 

This memorandum was brought to the Com- 
mittee 's attention to obtain approval at a 
formal meeting. The Committee members re- 
iterated their support of the above pro- 
cedures as stated in the July 16 memoran- 
dum (see Appendix II). 

6.0 Consideration of the New TJNC 
School of Pharmacy Curriculum: 
Block Style During the Fifth 
(5/5) Year: 
Mr. Caiola stated that the School is" pres- 
ently going through the necessary channels 
of developing a block style curriculum for 
the senior. 5/5, year. In this program, one- 
half of the senior class would be in off- 
campus practical experience coursework un- 
der practitioner-preceptors while the other 
half of the class was on campus taking 
necessary didactic courses. During the sec- 
ond semester, that half of the class which 
was" on campus would go off campus to 
obtain practical experience, while those who 
were off-campus during the first semester 
would return to complete their didactic 
training. Developing a curriculum that al- 
lows the School active participation in the 
practical training of the students is a fur- 
ther example of the School seeing its re- 
sponsibility to train quality practitioners. 
The American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education (A CPE) has seen this as a re- 
sponsibility of schools of pharmacy, as in 
their revised accreditation standards they 
state that ' ' a curriculum be designed to in- 
clude an externship and other clinical com- 
ponents that will lead to the degree of 
professional competence in students required 
for admission to the licensure examination." 
A number of schools of pharmacy have de- 
veloped quality practical experience course- 
work in this block style. Mr. Wayne Pitt- 
man, an instructor at the School of Phar- 
macy who is responsible for much of the 
practical experience coursework, described 
a number of these programs to the Com- 
mittee. Mr. Pittmun recently attended a 
seminar of the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) which dealt 
with practical experience training. He stated 



For eighty-two years 
- - • - since 1885 

SeeMAN 



OF 



DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long asso- 
ciation with North Caro- 
lina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its fifty- 
third volume, and the first 
printed copy was "Seeman 
Printed." 




The Seeman Printery 

of DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 



that almost all schools are becoming very 
actively involved in directing practical ex- 
perience coursework as a part of their cur- 
ricula. 

Mr. Caiola mentioned that it is the re- 
sponsibility of the Tripartite Committee 
to develop the standards for student par- 
ticipation in practical experience course- 
work that v\ill serve as externship experi- 
ence. The Tripartite Committee will have to 
develop and implement the quality stan- 
dards -we will follow with our students and 
practitioners. At upcoming meetings" the 
standards Avill be presented to the Com- 
mittee for review and revision. 

Mr. Paoloni mentioned a number of prob- 
lems which need to be solved over the next 
year before implementation of the block 
style program. Regional meetings to explain 
the program and evaluate it as an ongoing 
learning experience, recognition of precep- 
tors, costs for students and preceptors' are 
a number of the problems which need to be 
faced and solved. Mr. Paoloni mentioned 
that the Area Health Education Centers 
(AHEC) under development around the 
State would aid us greatly in implementing 
this program. If funds are appropriated as 
requested, there will be a number of fac- 
ulty members of the School of Pharmacy 
permanently located in AHEC areas through- 
out the State. These faculty members would 
serve as guidance sources to the practi- 
tioner-preceptors within the given area. 
These faculty would also hold and coordinate 
continuing education programs and regional 
meetings that would aid in facilitating and 
evaluating the practical experience courses 
of the School. The Committee will be kept 
informed of the development of the AHEC 
programs. 

7.0 Appointment of New Members 

and Election of Officers for the 

Tripartite Committee: 

The Committee moved to postpone ap- 
pointment of new members' until 1974. Also, 
it was decided that the present officers should 
hold their respective positions until the next 
election, September, 1974 (sec Appendix I 
for guidelines on appointment of new mem- 
bers and election of officers). 



S.O Xc.rt Committee Meeting: 
Chairman Paoloni called the Committee 
to meet again on Monday evening, Jan- 
uary 14, 1974. The chairman and secretary 
will prepare an agenda and remind each 
member and ex officio member of this meet- 
ing at least 14 days prior to the meeting 
date. 

Respectfully submitted, 
/s/ Stephen M. Caiola 
Secretary 

TRIPARTITE COMMITTEE 

Chairman 

Claude IT. Paoloni, Chapel Hill 

Vice-Chairman 

Jesse M. Pike, Concord 

Secretary 

Stephen M. Caiola, Chapel Hill 

Representing the N. C. Pharmaceutical 

Association 

George C. McLarty, Jr., High Point 

A. H. Mebane, III, Greensboro 
George M. Willets, III, Chapel Hill 

Representing the N. C. Board of Pharmacy 
Harold V. Day, Spruce Pine 

Jesse M. Pike, Concord 
W. H. Randall, Lillington 

Representing the UNC School of Pharmacy 

Stephen M. Caiola, Chapel Hill 

Claude U. Paoloni, Chapel Hill 

LeRoy Werley, Chapel Hill 

ELEPHANT STEW 

1 elephant (medium size) 

2 rabbits (optional) 
salt and pepper 

Cut the elephant into small bite size pieces. 
This should take about two months. A.I.I 
enough brown gravy to cover. Cook over 
kerosene fire for about four weeks at 465°. 
This will Serve 3,800 people. If more are 
expected, two rabbits may be added, but do 
this only if necessary as some people do 
not like to find a hare in their stew. — Tar 
I/i, I Hull, /in, \. C. Assn. of Laundercrs and 
Cleaners, 



26 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

ADMINISTRATIVE GUIDELINES 

FOR THE 

NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACY TRIPARTITE COMMITTEE 

ON PHARMACY EXTERN/INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS 

|_NAME 

The name of this committee Shall be The North Carolina Pharmacy Tripartite Com- 
mittee on Pharmacy Extern/Internship Programs. 

||— PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES 

The Pharmacy Tripartite Committee shall be a service agency to the North Carolina 
Board of Pharmacy. It shall be the intention of the Tripartite Committee to discuss and 
make recommendations to resolve important problems of interest and concern relevant to 
the extern/internship program, to improve and insure effective learning and application of 
pharmaceutical knowledge in the professional development of the extern/intern into a safe 
and competent pharmacist. 

|||_FUNCTIONS 

The Tripartite Committee shall function as an advisory committee to the Board of 
Pharmacy in matters relating to the practical experience program for the extern/intern in 
pharmacy. Its functions shall include: 

1. Survey internship education within the state and compare with existing programs in 
other states. 

2. Recommend an organizational pattern and mechanism for internship education utilizing 
the capabilities of the profession, the school and the board of pharmacy. 

3. Provide opportunities for internship education through the recruitment of qualified and 
interested preceptors. 

4. Coordinate internship learning experiences with the academic background of the intern. 

5. Recommend procedures for preceptor qualification and provide the preceptor with the 
necessary guidance to enable him to structure a sound educational program for the in- 
tern. 

6. Provide continuing direction to the educational aspects of internship. 

7. Serve as coordinating group for intraprofessional communication on internship within 
the state. 

IV— MEMBERSHIP 

A) The appointing organization shall consist of the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy, 
the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association and the University of North Carolina 
School of Pharmacy. 

B) The appointed membership shall consist of three representatives of each appointing 
organization. 

C) Ex Officio membership shall consist of the Secretary-Treasurer of the North Carolina 
Board of Pharmacy, the Executive Secretary of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Association and the Dean of the University of North Carolina School of Pharmacy. 
By agreement of the Chairman and Secretary of the Tripartite Committee, other 
individuals may be invited to attend the meetings. Any officer or executive committee 
member of either the Board of Pharmacy or the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation and any faculty member of the University of North Carolina School of Pharmacy 
may be invited to attend the meetings by its appointing organization. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 27 

V— TERMS OF APPOINTMENT 

Each representative shall be appointed for a period of three years. The appointment year 
shall begin with the annual meeting of the Committee. Such appointments shall l>e stag- 
gered so that one representative of each appointing organization shall terminate his appoint- 
ment each year. Vacancies shall be tilled by the respective appointing organizations. Any 
representative may be reappointed by his appointing organization. 

VI— VOTING PRIVILEGE AND QUORUM 

Only appointed members shall have a vote, except that in the absence of an appointed 
member, a designated ex officio member of the appointing group shall have power to vote. 
A quorum shall consist of six voting members, providing the three appointing organizations 
are represented. 

VII— OFFICERS 

There shall be a Chairman, a Vice-Chairman and Secretary of the Pharmacy Tripartite 
Committee. The chairman shall be elected annually for a one-year term. Each year the 
chairman shall be elected on a rotation basis representing Successively each appointing 
organization and therefore, shall not succeed himself. The chairman shall take office at the 
conclusion of the meeting of his election. He shall preside at meetings and shall perform the 
usual functions' of chairman. 

The vice-chairman shall be elected annually. He shall have the duties generally assigned 
to vice-chairman and shall function as chairman in the absence of the chairman. He shall 
not represent the same appointing organization as the chairman. 

The secretary shall be elected for a two-year term. The secretary shall perform the 
functions customary for that position, shall be responsible for the minutes of each meeting, 
said minutes to be furnished the members of the committee and the ex officio members of 
the appointing organizations within three weeks after each meeting. 

VIII— ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

Election of the chairman and vice-chairman shall take place at the annual meeting. 
The secretary shall be elected every two years at the annual meeting. A majority vote of 
the members presenl is required. 

IX— MEETINGS 

There shall lie a regular annual meeting of the Committee in September. Special meetings 
may lie called by the chairman or by at least one representative from each appointing 
organization. Attendance at meetings shall lie limited to appointed members, ex officio mem- 
berg and other individuals who may he invited by the chairman to participate in the 
program, or whose presence may he requested by either of the appointing organizations. 
Notice of each meeting shall he given to regular members ami ex officio members at least 
14 days prior to the date of the meeting. 

X— COMMITTEE 

There shall he nn Executive Committee of three members, consisting of the chairman, 
vice-chairman and secretary who shall advise with the chairman at his request. Sub 

committees may he appointed by the chairman, reporting to the Tripartite Committee and 

each organization shall he equally represented on such subcommittees unless exempted 
by the Tripartite < lommittee. 



28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



XI— FINANCING 

The expenses of representatives to the Tripartite Committee shall be the responsibility 
of the respective appointing organization. 

XII— RELATIONSHIP OF TRIPARTITE COMMITTEE 
TO APPOINTING ORGANIZATION 

The Tripartite Committee shall be a service agency to the North Carolina Board of 
Pharmacy on matters related to the purpose and objectives of the Tripartite Committee. 
It shall function primarily as a means of constructive exchange of opinions' in achieving 
the purposes and objectives of the Committee. Recommendations of the Tripartite Com- 
mittee shall be advisory to, but not binding on, the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy. 
The Tripartite Committee may originate matters for consideration by, or may receive mat- 
ters for consideration from, the appointing organizations. 

XIII— ADDITIONS AND DELETIONS TO THESE GUIDELINES 

These Guidelines may be changed with a two-thirds vote of the Tripartite Committee 
members. 

XIV— APPROVAL 

The Administrative Regulations shall become effective upon approval by the Tripartite 
Committee and the appointing organizations. 




Service In Wholesale Quantities" 



USE OUR TOLL FREE 

NUMBER 800-222-3856 

ANY TIME DAY OR NIGHT 

ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY 



C. RUSH H AMRICK. JR 

President 



LXdrug company 

SHELBY, N.C. 



The Carolina Journal, of Pharmacy 29 

ABOUT THOSE "UNPAID" PAID PRESCRIPTIONS 

Paid Prescriptions processes more than 300,000 prescriptions each month. Of these, 95% 
are paid in thirty days. Tt is the 5% unpaid hillings which create problems, especially if the 
unpaid prescriptions go back for an appreciable period — three to six months. 

Mr. Frank Yarborough of PAID PRESCEIPTIOXS and Mr. Benny Ridout of the N. C. 
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SEEVICES are well aware of the situation and all along have 
sought corrective procedures. At a recent conference attended by these two pharmacists 
and a representative of the XCPhA, a planned payment procedure was announced as 
f oIIoavs : 

( 1 ) All unpaid Medicaid prescriptions through May 31, 1973, were paid by the 
end of 1973. This required maximum cooperative effort due to numerous reasons 
for initial rejection of claim. 

(2) A concerted effort will be made to "catch up" the unpaid claims submitted 
to Paid Prescriptions for the period June 1 through November, 1973. Payment 
for some of these prescriptions' will be made in January with a close-out for the 
6 months period set for March 1, 1974. 

Due to the nature of the program, each claim must be checked prior to payment. And 
errors and omissions do come in at all levels — at the certification point, in the pharmacy, 
and at the state level. The main thing: a continuing effort is being made to improve 
what is generally conceded to be one of the better state Medicaid prescription reimburse- 
ment programs. 

Hopefully, during 1974, the current system will be adapted to quickly identify the 
"problem prescriptions" so that payment will not be unduly delayed. We know that is the 
objective of Mr. Yarborough and Mr. Ridout as well as the NCPhA. 



WINDSOR The year-end contribution was made by 

Justice on behalf of its customers through 

An attempted robbery of Windsor Phar- ouf ^ ^ |f< 

macy on Christmas morning failed to come sinc6 the ',,,„„, was established by Jus- 

off for three young men when local police, ^ ^ pharmacy stll(leilts at UNC haV( . 

previously alerted, made the arrest. been assist6d with non . intoi . ( ,st loans which 

Police searched the pharmacy premises ;m . r( , p . (i(1 ;ift( . r fte stu(1( , nf graduatea ;iml 

after Pharmacist Ernest Carraway opened is in pnanun ,, prac ti ee . 
the front door. The three men refused to 
conic from an adjoining stockroom but tear 
gas took care of this situation. CONTRIBUTE TO 

A quantity of drugs, bagged up and ready TMA FOUNDATION 

to go, was in the stockroom with the three 
men. 



JUSTICE AIDS 122 STUDENTS 



Contributions to the TMA Foundation in 
memory of the late Harold Daniels of Dur- 
ham have been received from 

X. ('. Mutual Wholesale Drug Company, 
The Justice Drug Company of Greens- Durham and Gordon and Bush Hamriefc of 
boro has made another substantia] contribu- Kendall Drug Company, Shelby. 
tion to the Pharmacy Student Loan Fund Also a contribution to same foundation 

which is administered by the N. C. Phar- from Kendall Drug in memory of William 
oiaceutical Association. A. Yandell of Pineville, 



30 



The Carolina Journal op 1 Pharmacy 



ORGANIZATIONAL ACTIVITY AT THE LOCAL/DISTRICT LEVEL 



HICKMON ELECTED PRESIDENT 

OF CAPE FEAR 

PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

The Cape Fear Pharmaceutical Society 
was reorganized at a recent meeting of the 
pharmacy group in Fayetteville. 

Officers elected and installed are 

President : James B. Hickmon 
Vice-President : Bill Pinch 
Secretary : Leon Tomlinson 
Treasurer : Hunter Smith 

Serving as county representatives on the 
Board of Directors are 

Cumberland — Fred Ea chide, Fayetteville 
Eobeson — Donald H. Bissett, Lumberton 
Sampson — Shelton Brown, Jr., Clinton 

BURKE COUNTY 

The Burke County Pharmacists Society, 
meeting in Morganton on December 13, 
heard NCPhA Executive Director W. J. 
Smith of Chapel Hill discuss various legis- 
lative proposals of mutual interest to Phar- 
macy. 

The presiding officer was Charles M. 
Davis, Jr., president of the Society. 

DUDLEY ELECTED 

Newly elected officers of the Eockingham 
County Society of Pharmacists are W. G. 
Dudley, Jr., president; Charles D. Eice, 
vice president ; and F. Philip Link, secre- 
tary-treasurer, all of Eeidsville. 

DURHAM-ORANGE 

Thirty pharmacists met in Chapel Hill 
on January 8 to plan reactivation of the 
Durham-Orange Pharmaceutical Association. 

Gerald M. Stahl, Chief Pharmacist of 
Watts Hospital, Durham, was elected chair- 
man. A survey to determine member in- 
terest in organizational activity will be com- 



pleted prior to next meeting of the Durham- 
Orange group, which is set for early March. 
LeEoy Werley, Assistant Dean of the 
UNC School of Pharmacy, presided. 

WAKE COUNTY 

L. M. (Mac) McCombs, Lilly Bepresenta- 
tive, was lauded for his services to North 
Carolina Pharmacy at a dinner in Raleigh 
on. January 11. The dinner was sponsored 
by the Wake County Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 

The dinner signaled Mr. McCombs re- 
tirement from Eli Lilly and Company. The 
inscription on a shield-type plaque pre- 
sented to Mr. McCombs read: "In apprecia- 
tion of his vision, leadership and more than 
forty years of dedicated service to North 
Carolina Pharmacy. ' ' 

Mr. McCombs continues as secretary- 
treasurer of the Traveling Men's Auxiliary, 
NCPhA. 



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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 



SCRUTABLE PRESCRIPTIONS 

Editorial, Greensboro Record, 
November 30, 1973 



Slathers of evidence have accumulated in 
congressional hearings' in recent years that 
consumers obliged to buy prescription drugs 
are frequently gouged. 

.lust how much gouging has been done de- 
fies reduction to statistics. It is no secret, 
however, that the pharmaceutical industry 
has the nation 's highest profit rate among 
major manufacturers. And health-care ex- 
perts, both in and out of Congress, have 
testified that within that rate are a lot of 
profits enormously excessive. 

Whether they are excessive enough sub- 
stantially to have affected the cost of living 
spiral has' not been so thoroughly debated. 
Nor should that factor alone be determining 
when it comes to regulations making drug 
prices more realistic. But both need for 
cost-of-living debate and an expense bur- 
densome to millions of people are likely to 
recede if the Cost of Living Council adopts 
a rule proposed by one of its advisory com- 
mittees'. 

It is a simple rule, albeit one by statute 
outlawed in most of these United States: 
Drugstores throughout the country would 
have to post juice lists of prescription drugs 
offered by them. 

Taken alone, that step would do little more 
than warn a customer of how sharp the bite 
would be once a pharmacist had filled that 
no-price-hinted-at prescription sent over by 
his doctor. But in tandem with a regulation 
proposed by the Food and Drug Admin- 
istration, thai posted list could do a good 
deal in make drug prices more reasonable. 

The FDA proposal is that drug lists — -not 
only those posted But those advertised or 
circulated in catalogues — must contain both 
chemical and brand names of a product, the 
price of each and the dosage to which prices 

apply. 

That — assuming, of course, that the Cost 
of Living Council orders list-posting — should 
tell a customer all he needs' to know to do 
some budget-deflating comparison shopping. 

Such ;i nudge to candor will not be wel- 
comed liv many drug retailers. Big ,-md -mall 



alike have long opposed mandatory price 
exposures, in particular that which permits 
customers to ponder the price gap between 
expensive brand-name products ami their 
generic equivalents. 

Some small operators, of course, have 
good cause to be fearful. They will be in 
poor position to compete with big chains 
that can buy in bigger wholesale lots. They 
should be entitled to higher prices, say the 
little dogs, because they extend credit, have 
delivery service, anil keep tax records for 
their customers. 

And, those extra services taken into ac- 
count, slightly higher prices they should 
have — but not higher prices concealed from 
the customer. Prices, whether in the neigh- 
borhood drugstore or the national-chain out- 
let, should be posted for all to see. They 
should also be arranged in a manner facil- 
itating customer comparison not only of 
prices at different stores but of prices for 
similar products within the same store. 



DISTINCTIVE 




Carry your 
store's identity by color and 
personalized copy right Into your customers 
home for the life of the Prescription. 

Another plus value of the modern paper 
box with its clean fresh label. 

E. N. ROWELL CO., INC. 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



32 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



1)1 Pharmacy School Notes 



DRUG EDUCATION PROGRAM 

RECEIVES GRANT FOR VENEREAL 

DISEASE EDUCATION 

Under funds from the Merck Founda- 
tion and now managed through the Stu- 
dent American Pharmaceutical Association, 
the Drug Education Program at the School 
of Pharmacy has been awarded a $300 grant 
to develop educational materials regarding 
Venereal Disease. The money will be used to 
print a booklet on venereal disease and stu- 
dents, as well as purchasing materials to be 
used in venereal disease education. 

Similar grants were made to some 30 
pharmacy schools throughout the country. 
Staff coordinator for the local project is 
Steve Moore. Student coordinators are 
Bill Smith and Barry Wester. If the project 
can be of aid to pharmacists in their local 
efforts, they are asked to contact the Drug 
Education Program for further details. 

NARD-LILLY ESTABLISHES 

PHARMACY STUDENT AWARDS 

PROGRAM 

A national program designed to stimulate 
greater interest by pharmacy students in 
community pharmacy careers has been an- 
nounced jointly by The National Association 
of Eetail Druggists and Eli Lilly & Co., Indi- 
anapolis, Indiana. 

The new NAED-Lilly Award program will 
offer a $100 cash prize to one student in 
each of the nation's pharmacy colleges who 
writes what judges determine is the best 
paper on the advantages of community phar- 
macy practice. They will base their papers 
this year on the theme: "The Challenges 



and Opportunities of Being A Community 
Pharmacist. ' ' 

Eight finalists will be selected after con- 
sideration of all papers by committees com- 
posed of community pharmacists and fac- 
ulty members representing different colleges 
of pharmacy. All of the finalists' will receive 
an additional $100 plus an expense paid trip 
to the 1974 NAED Convention to be held 
September 29 to October 3 in the new MGM 
Grand Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. 

One of the eight will also be named win- 
ner of an additional national award of 
$1,000. 

The American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy is cooperating in the program by 
encouraging member college participation. 
The AACP will also advise the NAED in 
selecting pharmacy college faculty members 
who will serve on the award committees. 

Willard B. Simmons', Executive Secretary 
of the NAED, commended Eli Lilly & Co., 
for providing the grant that makes the pro- 
gram possible. 

PHARMACY SCHOOL CITED FOR 
HOLIDAY CONTRIBUTION 

The UNC School of Pharmacy was cited 
recently for its Holiday contribution to the 
Inter-Church Council for Social Service. 
Students, faculty and student organizations 
raised $40 which was donated to assist needy 
families. 

LeEoy D. Werley, III, Student Body 
President, credited the school's pharmacy 
senate with originating the fund drive which 
the Council used in the form of grants and 
loans to low income residents of Chapel Hill 
and Carrboro. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



33 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 

• Charlotte— Mrs. T. K. Steele 

• Mortar & Pestle Club— Mrs. Francis Stovall 

• Western X. C. — Mrs. Phillip Crouch 

• Raleigh — Mrs. Henry Williams 

CHARLOTTE 

With jams and jellies", pickles and relishes, 
candy and pies, Christmas decorations and 
gifts, the annual auction of the Charlotte 
Woman's Auxiliary was underway. Mrs. 
Bruce Medlin and Mrs. Charles Jarrett 
served as auctioneers. Bidding was brisk, 
resulting in one of the most successful auc- 
tions in the history of the Auxiliary. 

Held at the YWCA, this is an annual 
event held to help finance the benefit bridge 
in February and to meet other commit- 
ments. 

Mrs. Eobert Lewis", president, presided 
at the business session and Mrs. W. B. Haw- 
field presented an inspirational devotional 
on Tlte Real Meaning of Christmas. 

Mrs. Bruce Medlin helped to create a 
happy Christmas atmosphere with colorful 
decorations. 

MORTAR AND PESTLE CLUB 

The Mortar and Pestle Club of Durham 
held its December meeting at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Wells. Beautifully 
arranged Christmas decorations, soft candle- 
light, and a roaring log fire added much 
gaiety to the occasion. 

Special guests at the covered dish dinner 
were Mr. and Mrs. James P. Ilickmon, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Cocolas, Mr. and Mrs. 
George Pyne, and husbands of the club 
members. 

Mr. Pyne presented a delightful illustrated 
talk entitled "A Walk Around Durham" 
and ' ' The Metamorphosis of the Butterfly. ' ' 

Animal pillows which had been made at 
a ' ' Cut and Sew ' ' November meeting, and 



gifts for Operation Santa Claus, were on 
display. 

The January meeting, scheduled to be 
held at the home of Mrs. T. H. Mangum, 
will feature Dr. Paul Fehrenback of the 
Mental Health Program in Durham as guest 
speaker. 

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA 

The Western North Carolina Drug Club 
has had a busy year. Di October they had 
Mrs. James" R. Hickmon, Auxiliary State 
President, as a special guest. The covered 
dish luncheon, held in the home of Mrs. 
Glen Rogers, also included reports from 
members who attended the Fall Convocation 
in Chapel Hill. 

The November meeting, held at the Knife 
and Fork Restaurant, saw plans made for 
giving Christmas" gifts to the 50 patients at 
Haven Rest Home. Thirty-five of these pa- 
tients are from Broughton Hospital. 

Mrs. Tom Donnelly, Vice-President, con- 
ducted the October meeting, and Mrs. H. K. 
Garmany, President, presided at the No- 
vember session. 

The December meeting featured fun and 
fellowship for all, as members wrapped pres- 
ents for the patients at Haven Rest Home. 
Care had been taken to see that patients 
were given gifts according to their interests. 
It was learned that Some liked to quilt, 
others to read, work puzzles, crochet or 
knit, while others could enjoy fruits and 
hard candies. 

RALEIGH 

The Raleigh Women's Pharmaceutical 
Auxiliary was given quite at boost in its 
efforts in the slate project to alleviate Men- 
tal Illness. 

Mrs. Edward Coates, project chairman, 
reported that John R. Williams, executive 
vice-president of Burlington House, had 

arranged for the delivery of nineteen pairs 
of lined draperies, made to window men 

surements, to the Halfway Souse for Women. 

The Auxiliary president, Mrs'. Jerry Price, 

also reported she had received a bolt of 

material from llovt Aldridge of Beaunit In- 

(Concluded on Page 35) 



34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



TRIALS OF AN 
ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE 

IF — He talks on a subject, he is trying to 

run things. 
— He is silent, he is dumb and has lost 

interest. 
— He usually is at the office, why doesn't 

he get out? 
— He is out when we call, why doesn 't he 

stick around more often? 
— He can see us immediately, he doesn't 

have much to do. 
— We have to wait an hour for him, he 

doesn't run his office right. 
— He is not at home at night, he must 

be out carousing. 
— He is at home, he is neglecting outside 

contacts. 
— He is attending allied meetings, he is 

not handling our affairs. 
— He is not in important high places, he 

should be wherever it counts. 
— He does not agree with you, he is ig- 
norant or bullheaded. 
— He agrees with you, he is a "yes-man." 
— He seems too busy for casual talk, his 

job has gone to his head. 
— He enjoys casual talk, that's all he has 

to do anyway. 
■ — He takes two months to complete a 

project, he's" jumping into things. 
— He takes 10 months, he doesn't get 

things accomplished. 
— He gets things done without local help, 

that's what he should do. 
— His ideas are delayed because of no 

follow-through, it's all his fault. 
— He sends out frequent bulletins, it's 

too much to read. 
— He does not send out bulletins, he's not 

keeping us informed. 
— He appears more cordial to one mem- 
ber than another, he is playing politics. 
— He should give someone a short answer, 

trim him down to size in his next 

budget. 
— He tries to explain both pros and cons 

of something, he is pussy-footing. 
— He doesn 't explain things, he doesn 't 

let us know things' fully. 



— He is well dressed or drives a good- 
looking car, he thinks he is a big shot. 

— He isn't or doesn't, he isn't a proper 
representative of our important indus- 
try. 

— He takes a vacation, he has been on 
one all year. 

— He doesn 't take a vacation, the office 
isn 't run correctly. 

— He spends time out in the field, he's 
neglecting the bigger items in the in- 
dustry. 

— He is wrapped up in big things for the 
industry, why isn't he attending local 
meetings? 

— He is on the job a short time, he is in- 
experienced. 

— He has been there a long time, we need 
new ideas and it is time for a change. 

— Manufactured Housing Institute of S. C. 



I. C. System, Inc. 

The nation's most highly 
specialized collection service 



Your Association's Collection Service is 
an affiliate of a national organization cur- 
rently serving members of more than 700 
leading trade associations throughout the 
nation. 

Don't lose sales volume because cus- 
tomers owe you money and are trading 
somewhere else. Your Association's Col- 
lection Service will chase those debtors 
back into your place of business to pay 
YOU direct. You will get accounts OFF 
your ledger and IN your bank account — 
and you will also have many former cus- 
tomers back doing business with you again. 
For information, contact your Association 
office. It will pay you to do so. 

On request, A representative 

of the I. C. System will explain 

the collection program in detail. 

Call or write the NCPhA, Box 151, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 



MARRIAGES 

Miss Doris Kay MeMillon of Rhonda bo- 
came the bride of Grady Samuel Phillips, 
Jr. of demons on December 8 in Centenary 
United Methodist Church in Winston-Salem. 
Air. Phillips is a graduate of the UNC 
School of Pharmacy and is manager and 
pharmacist with Eevco Drug, Winston-Salem. 

DEATHS 
R. B. Bolton 

Robert Baugham Bolton, age 64, died 
December 8. 

A graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy (1931), Mr. Bolton was associated 
with various pharmacies prior to buying a 
pharmacy in Eich Square (1935). At the 
time of his death, Mr. Bolton was the 
owner/manager of Bolton \s Drug Com- 
pany. 



C. J. Sisk 

Charles Jones Sisk, age 69, Asheville 
Pharmacist, died December 10 in an Ashe- 
ville hospital after a long illness'. 

A graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy (1924), Mr. Sisk opened Malvern 
Hills Drug Store, Asheville, in 1946 follow- 
ing five years in Atlanta as a partner in the 
operation of Chestnut Street Pharmacy. In 
1937 he returned to Bryson City to operate 
the Sisk Drug Store and continued with 
this firm until moving to Asheville. 

He was a former president of the Western 
North Carolina Drug Club and a trustee of 
the Elks Lodge. 

Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Sandra 
S. Fleming of California ; a son, Pharmacist 
William T. sisk of Asheville; a sister, Mrs. 
Lila S. Cole of Florida; a brother, Phar- 
macist Robert C. Sisk of Asheville; and eight 
grandchildren. 



E. W. Woolord 

Edward Watson Woolard, age 80, Hen 

derson pharmacist, died December 18 at 
his home following a period of declining 

health. 



Licensed as a pharmacist in 1915, Mr. 
Woolard was Avell known in the Henderson 
area as the operator of a number of pro- 
gressive pharmacies. He was a member of 
the NCPhA for more than 50 years and 
was inducted into the Association's 50 Plus 
Club in Durham in 1965. 

Memorial services were held in Henderson 
at the Holy Innocence Episcopal Church on 
December 20. 

Survivors include his widow, Mrs. Edith 
Outlaw Woolard; one sister, Miss Elsie 
Woolard of Henders'on; one brother, Charles 
X. Woolard of Wilson; and one stepson, J. 
Frank Freeze of Raleigh. 



John Harper Best 

John Harper Best, age 76, died Jan- 
uary 1 in Wesley Long Hospital, Greens- 
boro. 

Following graduation from the UNC 
School of Pharmacy in 1923, Mr. Best 
moved to Asheboro where he managed the 
Standard Drug Company. Best Drug Com- 
pany was established in Greensboro in 1928, 
a pharmacy which he continued to operate 
until ill health forced retirement 18 months 
ago. 

Mr. Best became a life member of the 
NCPhA in 1936 and was inducted into the 
50 Plus Club in 1973. 

Survivors are the widow, Mrs. Ruth Ver- 
non Best; sons, Robert H. Best of Greens- 
boro and Cmdr. W. V. Best with the U.S. 
Navy at New Oilcans, La. 



(Continued from Page 33) 

dustries. A " cut-and-sew" project, sched 
uled for January 10 at the home of Mrs. 
R. E. Woodcock, will make curtains for the 
Men \s Halfway House. 

The generosity and thoughtfulness of 
these gentlemen and their companies' are 
greatly appreciated. Both these homes, 
which house mental patients returning to 
their communities, will lie more pleasant 
from these efforts as well as' from other club 
donations of household items. 



36 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



POINT OF SALE TERMINALS 

can be entered into the machine to keep a 
record of what and when drugs were pur- 
chased. This is' not planned initially at 
Craft 's, however. 

There are buttons to push for employee 
code numbers, employee discounts, whether 
the sale was cash or credit, and the depart- 
ment the merchandise is from. 

It is possible for the machine to compute 
the exact amount of change owed to the 
customer, though this is also possible with 
some present cash registers as well. 

Though nightly computations are pos- 
sible, to begin with Smith will supply 
Craft 's with a report on the data it com- 
piles each week. How often the reports are 
issued will vary. It can be done as rarely 
as once a month and still keep the customer 
(that is, the retailer) properly serviced. 

The exact schedule of reporting will be 
determined once the system is in operation 
and some evaluation is possible. 

All of this Sounds expensive and it is. 
Each register costs Craft's $2,765. though 
cost varies with how many machines are 
bought. Each scanner (the wand) costs an- 
other $950. 

This represents roughtly a $200,000 in- 
vestment by Craft 's. Craft 's president, S. H. 
Ashcraft, says that increased efficiency in 
ordering merchandise will just about elim- 
inate over or under stocking. 

Sales volume increase will be the principal 
advantage of the new system, according to 
Ashcraft, and this will make the system pay 
off. 

The Singer Company makes the full array 
of machines necessary to implement the sys- 
tem but the president of Smith Wholesale 
Drugs, J. M. Smith, says that Smith will use 
an IBM computer the company has for its 
end of the set-up. 

As to possible expansion of the system to 
include other retailers in Spartanburg who 
might be interested in converting to the new 
system, Glen Hammett, who heads the data 
processing division at Smith, says the firm 
has unlimited capacity for expansion. 

Talking of Smith 's complex of com- 
puters which will handle this latest advance 
in retailing, Hammett puts it simply : ' ' You 
can 't get any better. ' ' 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Classified advertising (single issue inser- 
tion) 10 cents a word with a minimum 
charge of $3.00 per insertion. Payment to 
accompany order. 

Names and addresses will be published un- 
less a box number is requested. 

In replying to "blind" ads, address Ad. 

No. , Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, 

P. O. Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 



WANTED: Above-average opportu- 
nity open to pharmacist as Assistant 
to the Director of Pharmacy Ser- 
vices, Caswell Center, Kinston, 
North Carolina. Call Michael Cra- 
ven for the details. (919) 527-6261. 



STAFF PHARMACIST needed for 
expanding Medical Center Hospital 
Pharmacy. Competitive salary com- 
bined with excellent fringe benefit 
package. Please send resume to: 
Personnel Department, North Car- 
olina Baptist Hospital, 300 South 
Hawthorne, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
27103 E.O.E. 



RELIEF PHARMACIST— Open for 
employment in the Raleigh-Durham- 
Chapel Hill area. Prior experience in 
both community and hospital phar- 
macy. NCPhA Box 1-1. 

RELIEF PHARMACIST available 
weekends only. Chapel Hill, Durham 
or adjacent areas. Call Forrest Mc- 
Call (919) 929-8826. 



FOR SALE: Complete set drug store 
fixtures and equipment, including 
show cases (lighted), gondolas, etc. 
Must move this month. Call Mrs. 
W. L. Sloan, Chapel Hill (919) 942- 
3872. 



FOR SALE — Twelve drug store 
shelves for medications; adjustable; 
almost new and in excellent condi- 
tion; some single side; some double 
with partition; size is variable from 
SVi ft. to 6V2 ft. average. Reply to 
Ad. No. 1-2. 



REMEMBER: 




The availability of a store planning 

and modernization service in this area 

through your (ft representative. 




CONSULTATION Our design consultant 
will work with you from rough idea 
through finished plan. He'll carefully 
analyze every facet of your operational 
needs and potential, and recommend 
practical solutions. 

DETAILED PLANNING For a single de- 
partment or a complete new store, our 
design consultant will prepare detailed 
plans assuring you the most effective 
arrangement, the best traffic patterns, 
the most sales stimulating Columbus 
fixtures, displays and decor. 

INSTALLATION He'll then supervise the 
installation of your new Columbus fix- 
tures, work with all trades involved to 
see that your new selling environment is 
complete and workable in every detail 
... in the shortest possible time. 



FOLLOW THROUGH And he'll help you 
through the "break-in" stage, seeing to 
it that your new fixtures serve you and 
your customers as designed. 



IN COOPERATION WITH THE 
COLUMBUS SHOW CASE COMPANY 

we are offering area druggists the finest, and 
most extensive lines of store merchandising 
display fixtures, plus complete store plan- 
ning and modernization service available 
anywhere. As one of America's oldest, most 
experienced manufacturers of store equip- 
ment, Columbus has everything you need to 
up-date your store and make it more prof- 
itable. Just ask your O.M.B. representative 
for details. 



nj os.minofl &fiOD€K€fi.inc. ^ffi 



Richmond, Va. Norfolk, Va. Wilson, N.C. 



||f§| Helping you maintain 

your professional 
status... 




with modern 
services and 
products for 
our customers 
in the two 
Carolinas and 
Virginia. 



W. H. King Drug Company 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Bellamy Drug Company 

Wilmington, North Carolina 



O'Hanlon-Watson Drug Company 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Peabody Drug Company 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



he Catolina 



Journal of Pharmacy 



Volume LIV February 1974 



Number 2 




Pinehurst Hotel and Country Club, Pinehurst, North Carolina Headquarters for the 94th 

Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

and Affiliated Auxiliaries 

Sunday — Monday — Tuesday, March 24-25-26, 1974 



APPLICATIONS FOR ROOM RESERVATIONS AT THE PINEHURST 
HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE 

NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

P. O. BOX 141, CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 27514 

TELEPHONE (919) 967-2237 







Additional information available to the profession on request. 




Ell Lilly and Company 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46206 



3GGGS& 



JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY SALUTES 




ETHEL B. PIERCE 

Secretary to the President 

FOR COMPLETION OF 50 YEARS 
OF SERVICE 




vAt"Bt, 




''OLes**- 



JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Now in our jjth Year of Service to the North Carolina Retail Druggists 



ENDEAVORING TO BETTER SERVE 




Scott Jutua Company, 

CHARLOTTE, N. G. 
Representing 80 Years of Integrity and Reliable Service 



The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



February, 1974 

Vol. LIV No. 2 



Officers 

NORTH CAROLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 



President 

W. Whitakf.r Moose 
Mount Pleasant 



Vice-Presidents 

W. H. Wilson 

Raleigh 

L. M. WriALEY 

Wallace 

Thomas R. Burgiss 

Sparta 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Rox 151 

Chapel Ilill, N. C. 



CONTENTS THIS ISSUE 

Convention-in-Brief 5 

Convention Officials and Chairmen 6 

Pinehurst — Millions of Dollars Worth of 

New Distractions' 7 

Tar Heel Digest 8 

A Message of Importance, to North Carolina Pharmacy 10 

State Board of Pharmacy News 15 

Legislative Update 17 

Disasters — Major & Minor 19 

North Carolina MD Survey 25 

The Last Article on Drug Abuse Education 29 

Pharmacists Seek Service in the Political Arena ... 32 

Doings of the Auxiliaries 34 

Marriages/Births/Deaths 35 

Classified Advertising 36 

ADVERTISERS 

Abbott Laboratories 20 

American Druggists' Insurance Company 12-13 

Colorcraft Corporation 21 

Eli Lilly and Company 2nd Cover 

Gilpin, Henry B 9 

ICN Pharmaceuticals (King Associates) 4th Cover 

I. C. System, Ine 32 

Justice Drug Company 1 

Kendall Drug Company 23 

Owens, Minor & Bodeker 3rd Cover 

Ramsey Manufacturing Corporation 30 

Reaeo Products 17 

A. H. Robins Company 16 

Roche Laboratories 14 

B. N. Rowell Company 8 

Scott Drug Company 2 



Seeman Printery 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories 

Smith Wholesale Drug 

The Upjohn Company 

Washington National Insurance Co. 



22 
18 
26 
24 
28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Second class 
postage paid at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



RANDALL ELECTED VP OF 
ACADEMY/GP 

William H. (Bill) Randall, Lillington 
pharmacist, has been elected vice president 
of the Academy of General Practice. 

Mr. Randall is secretary-treasurer of Lil- 
lington Enterprises, Inc., which operates two 
pharmacies and a nursing home. He has 
served the Academy as Region I repre- 
sentative. 

Professional affiliations in-state include 
the North Carolina and Cape Fear Phar- 
maceutical Associations and serves as a 
member of the N. C. Board of Pharmacy. 



OAKLEY INSTALLED AS 
PRESIDENT OF N. C. SOCIETY 
OF HOSPITAL PHARMACISTS 

William Oakley of New Bern has been 
installed as president of the North Carolina 
Society of Hospital Pharmacists. 

A 1968 graduate of the UNC School of 
Pharmacy, Pharmacist Oakley is director 
of pharmacy services at Craven County Hos- 
pital in New Bern. 

He succeeds W. T. Williams of Thomas- 
ville who has headed the Society during the 
past year. 



ROGERS APPOINTED MEMBER 
OF RESOURCE COMMITTEE 

James E. Holshouser, Jr., Governor of 
North Carolina has appointed Ralph Rogers, 
Jr., Manager of N. C. Mutual Wholesale 
Drug Company, Durham, to serve on a 
Citizens Advisory Committee to assist the 
State of North Carolina and the Federal 
Government in developing a plan for wise 
use of the resources of the Tar-Neuse River 
Basin. 

The appointment is for a 3-year period. 

As" a member of the Advisory Committee, 
Mr. Rogers will be working with the Plan- 
ning Division of the Office of Water and 
Air Resources, a division of the Department 
of Natural and Economic Resources. 



CEKADA ELECTED PRESIDENT 

OF THE ALASKA SOCIETY OF 

HOSPITAL PHARMACISTS 

Emil L. Cekada, M.P.H., Chief, Area 
Pharmacy Branch, Alaska Area Native 
Health Service, has been elected President 
of the Alaska Society of Hospital Phar- 
macists for 1974. 

Pharmacist Cekada is a graduate of the 
UNC School of Pharmacy and has a mas- 
ter 's degree in Public Health Administra- 
tion from the University of Minnesota. 

The Alaska Native Health Service in- 
cludes a network of seven hospitals and five 
outpatient facilities. 



SALLEY ELECTED 

Moss Salley of Asheville is the newly in- 
stalled president of the Buncombe County 
Pharmaceutical Society. 

He is a former member of the N. C. 
Board of Pharmacy and presently is owner/ 
manager of Salley 's Drug Store, Asheville. 

Serving with President Salley will be 
Ronnie Farr, vice president; Jo Queen, secre- 
tary and Harry Dover, treasurer. 



BRADLEY APPOINTED 

CONSULTANT PHARMACIST TO 

N. C. DIVISION OF FACILITY 

SERVICE 

J. W. (Bill) Bradley, III, Raleigh Phar- 
macist, has been appointed Pharmacist Con- 
sultant to the Division of Facilities Services 
of the North Carolina Department of Hu- 
man Resources. 

Mr. Bradley 's primary function will be 
to assist in upgrading the quality of phar- 
maceutical services now being provided in 
health care facilities' throughout North 
Carolina (hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, 
intermediate care facilities, etc.). 

A graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy (1963), Mr. Bradley operated North 
Hills Apothecary in Raleigh from 1969 to 
July, 1972. Just prior to assuming his cur- 
rent position, he was associated with Crom- 
ley 's Boulevard Pharmacy, Raleigh. 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 




Convention 

• North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

• Women's Auxiliary, NCPhA 

• Traveling Men's Auxiliary, NCPhA 



PINEHURST HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB 
Pinehurst, North Carolina 

March 24-25-26, 1974 
CONVENTION-IN-BRIEF 

Sunday, March 24 
1:00 p.m. Reunion of UNC School of Pharmacy Class of 1969— Crystal Room 
2:00 p.m. Convention Registration Desks Open 
-4:00 p.m. Meeting — North Carolina PharmPac — North Room 

7:00 p.m. Opening Session-Dinner — NCPhA and Auxiliaries — Ballroom Entertainment 
by the UNC Department of Music 



8:30 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
Afternoon : 



Evening : 



Monday, March 25 
Registration desks open 
NCPhA Business Ses'sion — South Room 

Woman's Auxiliary Coffee — Country Club of North Carolina 
Golf Tournament 

or Tours of Clarendon Gardens (transportation from Pinehurst Hotel every 
45 minutes), tennis, skeet or trap shoot at Gun Club, visit to World Golf Hall 
of Fame, or 

Informal Bridge — Dogwood Room 
Entertainment by the Wholesale Druggists of North Carolina — Ballroom 



Tuesday, March 26 

8:30 a.m. Registration desks open 

9:00 a.m. NCPhA Business Session — South Room 

11 ;00 :i.m. TMA Business Session — Crystal Room 

12:00 noon Woman's' Auxiliary Business Session and Luncheon — Ballroom 

2:00 p.m. NCPhA Closing Session and Installation — South Room 

Evening: Entertainment by Traveling Men's Auxiliary — Ballroom 



A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL 3-PAGE ROOM RESERVATION FORM WILL BE 
MAILED ON REQUEST TO: X. C. PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION, P. O. 
BOX 151, CHAPEL HILL, XORTH CAROLIXA 27514 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 
1974 CONVENTION 

The North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association & Affiliated Auxiliaries 

Pinehurst Hotel and Country Club, Pinehurst, North Carolina 

Sunday-Monday-Tuesday, March 24-25-26, 1974 

CONVENTION OFFICIALS AND CHAIBMEN 

NCPhA Convention Chairman: 

Al Mebane, 512 Audubon Drive, Greensboro 27410 

Pharmacy Phone: (919) 272-7139 
Woman's Auxiliary Convention Chairman: 

Mrs. Al Mebane (Betsy), 512 Audubon Drive, Greensboro 27410 

Home Phone: (919) 299-9490 
TMA Convention Chairman: 

(Tuesday, March 26) 

Ray Black, P. 0. Box " D, " Kernersville 27284 

Home Phone: (919) 993-8345 

Colorcraft Corporation: (919) 993-4511 
Wliolesale Druggist Sponsored Entertainment Chairman : 

(Monday, March 25) 

Rush Hamrick, Kendall Drug Company, P. O. Box 1060 

Shelby 28150 Business Phone: (704) 482-2481 
Golf Chairman : 

(Monday, March 25) 

Len Phillipps, Owens-Illinois, 3107 Sylvan Eoad, Atlanta, Georgia 30354 

PRESIDING OFFICERS 

N. C. Pharmaceutical Association : 

W. Whitaker Moose, P. O. Box 67, Mount Pleasant 28124 (704) 436-2311 

Woman 's Auxiliary, NCPhA : 

Mrs. James R. Hickmon (Pat) 1420 Paisley Avenue, Fayetteville 28304 

(919) 424-1556 
Traveling Men's Auxiliary, NCPhA: 

Mr. James E. Case, 2236 Colony Eoad, Charlotte 28209 (704) 374-0300 
PINEHURST HOTEL AND COUNTRY CLUB— (919) 295-6811 

General Manager : Bill Hall 

Convention Sales' and Coordinator : Kaye Gilbert 

Eeservations: Cory Edwards 

Food and Banquet Service : Horst Kwoka 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association— (919) 967-2237 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

PINEHURST— MILLIONS OF DOLLARS WORTH 
OF NEW DISTRACTIONS 



• ' New ' ' and ''exciting'' are overused 
words. But they 're the only ones that can 
describe what you find at Pinehurst today. 

Step inside. You 're in a new lobby. 
You 're Surrounded by luxurious new decor 
at every turn. And every room is new . . . 
light down to the wall sockets. 

Because we tore the entire interior out of 
the old Carolina Hotel and rebuilt it com- 
pletely. Xew walls, new bathrooms, new 
furniture, new comfort from top to bottom. 
To make your stay with us the most relax- 
ing and satisfying you've ever spent. 

Then we put together all the activities 
that families find to be the most fun and 
exciting. Moms, dads and children . . . 
there 's more of everything for everybody. 
There 's enough to crowd every day of your 
stay. 

We have 12 tennis courts — 10 Vel-Play 
and 2 Lay-Kold. There 's a complete tennis 
clubhouse, with living room, veranda, locker 
areas and a shop for all your tennis needs. 

There's our large L-shaped, heated swim- 
ming pool, with an even larger sun deck 
area. And our riding stables, with 200 miles 
of riding trails. There are 9 trap and 6 
skeet ranges for shooting. PedicycleS and 
bicycles for riding. An arcade for shopping. 
A game room that diverts the most ardent 
golfers. And varied activities for the chil- 
dren. 

Unwind and slim down in our new Health 
Spa. Relax in a sauna. Work out on exercise 
equipment. Loosen up in a whirlpool. Get a 
soothing massage. 

And when it's time to dine, you can enjoy 
;i wide selection in our Main Dining Room. 
Or you can get casual and intimate in our 
new steak house, The London Grill. Either 
way, the food is superb, made right to your 
liking. You may even cajole a recipe or two 
from our chefs. And in the evening there's 
live entertainment and dancing. 

Sip your favorite beverage aboard the 
E.M.S. Bounty. This is our new Club and 
Lounge, where the days of the clipper ships 
are authentically relived. We actually built 
an old sailing ship and pier inside the 



hotel, and you'll sit on the deck while en- 
joying live entertainment. 

And sightseeing through the Pinehurst 
area could take you days. There 's Pinehurst 
Village filled with little out-of-the-way shops 
full of ceramics, paintings, glassware, jewel- 
ry, antiques, even old-fashioned hard candy 
for the kids. 

Visit the beautiful horse farms . . . our 
area is a top training center for trotters and 
thoroughbreds. In fact, we have our own 
training center that handles 200 trotters, 
within walking distance of the hotel. 

And all through Pinehurst the dogwoods, 
magnolia, holly and Pinehurst pines give a 
beautiful show of color, and recall the 
grandeur of an earlier, slow-paced time. 

Come see what this naturally beautiful 
land and millions of dollars worth of new 
dedication to comfort and fun can mean to 
you and your family. Stay at our hotel; or 
if you want more privacy, choose one of 
our villas that adjoin the hotel, or our near- 
by condominiums. 

But do come . . . and we'll make sure 
that you '11 come again. 



SOME OF THE NCPHA 
CONVENTION GUEST SPEAKERS 

• W. J. Turennc, Editor 
Lilly Digest 

• Michael R. Ryan, Associate Director 
American College of Apothecaries 

• John J. Palya, Assistant, to Div. Mgr. 
Wyeth Laboratories 

• Donald E. Baker, Pharmacy Consultant 
Department of HEW 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

Hotel guests' with rooms at the Pinehurst 
Hotel qualify for 10 gallons of gas from the 
hotel's supply. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 



GREENSBORO— Pharmacist Marion Ed- 
monds was named "Manager of the Year" 
at the annual awards banquet of the Summit 
Center Merchants Association. 
HUDSON— Harold A. Bolide, Hudson Drug 
Company, has accepted the post of Hudson 
City Chairman for the 1974 Heart Fund 
Drive. 

JACKSONVILLE — C. Louis Shields has 
been elected chairman of the Local Board 
of Advisors of the First Citzens Bank & 
Trust Company. He is owner of Johnson 
Drug Company. 

RURAL HALL — Pharmacist Eoger H. 
Sloop, secretary-treasurer of "Warren Drug 
Company, Inc., has" been elected to the board 
of directors of the Commercial and Farmers 
Bank. 

MADISON— Charles D. McFall, owner of 
the McFall Drug Company, has been named 
a trustee of Campbell College, a four year 
liberal arts school at Buies Creek. 
RAEFORD—A full-time pharmacist ($13 
to $16,000 salary range) will be added to 
McCain Hospital's staff. Pharmacist Walter 
Coley has been serving at McCain part time. 
MOREHEAD CITY— Bob Cohen, phar- 
macist at Morehead City Drug Company, has 
accepted the county chairmanship for New 
Eyes for the Needy Inc. 
PINEHURST—W. E. (Bill) Viall Jr. of 
Carolina Pharmacy has been elected a mem- 
ber of the first Village Council of the newly 
incorporated Pinehurst. Nine Council mem- 
bers were chosen from 29 candidates. 



TAYLORSVILLE— Pharmacist Eowe B. 
Campbell Jr. lias been elected to a second 
one-year term as 1 chairman of the Alexander 
County Board of Education. He is co-owner 
of Town and Country Drugs and People's 
Drug Store, both of Taylorsville. 

DURHAM — A 24-member Durham Advisory 
Committee on Health Needs in the County 
includes Pharmacist Hunter Kelly. The com- 
mittee was selected by the Central Carolina 
Health Planning Council. 

ROANOKE RAPIDS— Bill Griffin of Griffin 
Drug Company has been cited (commenda- 
tion certificate) for 10 years sponsorship of 
Welcome Wagon. 

BESSEMER CITY— William Morris, owner 
/manager of Morris Drug Store, has been 
appointed by the Gaston County Board of 
Commissioners to the Board of Trustees of 
Gaston Memorial Hospital. 



DISTINCTIVE 




Carry your 
store's Identity by color and 
personalized copy right Into your customers 
home for the life of the Prescription 

Another plus value of the modern paper 
box with its clean fresh label. 

E. N. ROWELL CO., INC 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



Sometimes it takes more 

than your expert knowledge 

of the pharmacy business 

UNCH to make your pharmacy go. 

IALLS/ 

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utnni 
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You studied pharmacy and its appli- 
cation to human life; not changing 

markets, the changing economy, new 

products, sundries and advertising. 
That's where Gilpin comes in— 

we can provide the marketing and 

merchandising expertise to make your 
' operation more profitable, more effi- 
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or one at a time. 

rS^Tifr* v 'n ki Highway. Haiti ■ Mi !120a 101)866-4600 IXiver— Bill Warther, 756 South Little Creek Kd. Dover. Del 

• Max Kelly, 643o fidewatei Dine Norfolk, Va 1901 Washington-Gary McNamara, 901 Southern A enue, Washington, 1 1 C 20032 K 



And beyond that we can assist 
you in identifying your pharmacy as a 
part of the Care Drug Center Service 
Program. 

Sometimes it takes more than 
your knowledge of pharmacy to make 
your pharmacy go. For more 
information, write or call the Gilpin 
Sales Manager nearest you.* 



THE HKNKY B 



COMPANY 

Wholesale druggists since \i 



10 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



A MESSAGE OF IMPORTANCE TO NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACY 
FROM THE NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF PHARMACY 

January 21, 1974 



A fact about which many of our phar- 
macists are not fully aware is that since 
the Board of Pharmacy was created by the 
legislature in 1881, it has never received an 
appropriation from the state to carry on 
its several functions. During these years the 
Board has operated solely on the fees it 
collects' from examinations, license and per- 
mit renewals, etc. 

Most pharmacists are familiar in a gen- 
eral way with the functions and services of 
the Board such as that of examining can- 
didates for license, registering pharmacists 
by reciprocity, drug store inspections, en- 
forcement of pharmacy laws, etc. These 
functions, however, are only the "tip of 
the iceberg. ' ' There are many more things 
too numerous to mention here in which the 
Board must involve itself in the total reg- 
ulation of pharmacy practice in the state. 
The standard remark of a new member 
coming on the Board is, "I had no idea 
that the Board was involved in and re- 
sponsible for so many things'. ' ' Because of 
the close cooperation that has traditionally 
existed among the School of Pharmacy, the 
Association, and the Board, a proud reputa- 
tion of high level pharmacy practice in 
North Carolina has been established through- 
out the nation. 

During recent years additional responsi- 
bilities have been placed on the Board (e.g., 
enforcement of federal and state controlled 
substances, administering of a code of pro- 
fessional conduct for pharmacists, increased 
administrative hearings [in lieu of court 
prosecutions], etc.). The total work load 
of the Board is estimated to have about 
doubled during the past five years. 

Coupled with this increased activity the 
Board, like everyone else, is affected by in- 
flated costs. During the past four years' the 
non-salary expenses of the Board have in- 
creased at the rate of approximately 14% 
per year. Since fiscal 1971 the Board's ex- 
penses have exceeded its income (which is 
largely fixed). In fiscal y/c 1973, for ex- 
ample, this deficit was just short of $17,000. 



Tn fiscal y/c 1974 it is estimated to lie in 
excess of $25,000. These deficits were par- 
tially financed by surpluses accumulated 
during and following World War II and 
the Korean War when the inspection pro- 
gram was curtailed. The surplus funds' of 
the Board have now been exhausted. 

For several years the Board has recog- 
nized the problems with which it would 
be faced in the future such as the need 
to increase office space and personnel, a 
reorganization and substantial increase in 
the inspection staff, personnel retirement 
replacements, etc. (All of these problems 
have been compounded by inflation.) Prom 
time to time during this period the Board 
has considered how these problems were to 
be solved. The quarters now occupied by 
the Board in the Institute of Pharmacy 
are needed by the Association, just as the 
Board needs more space. Being reluctant 
to separate the offices of the Board and 
those of the Association, a feasibility study 
was conducted to determine whether the 
Institute Building could be remodeled to 
accommodate both needs. This study showed 
that an adequate restructuring of the build- 
ing was physically doubtful and in addi- 
tion would be prohibitively expensive. This 
being true, the Board must find new com- 
mercial quarters elsewhere at a considerably 
higher rent than it has been paying in the 
past. 

Due to unanticipated Board costs during 
this fiscal year the Board's financial posi- 
tion has deteriorated more rapidly than has 
been expected. This situation disturbs the 
Board 's timetable for making necessary 
changes. It will require immediate remedial 
action. 



BOARD FEE BALLOTS RETURNED 

AS OF FEBRUARY 11 
Total Ballots Returned 1232 

Favor Fee Change 1027 

Opposed to Fee Change 205 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



Things being what they are, the profes- 
sion is faced with a fundamental decision. 
Do pharmacists wish to continue self reg- 
ulation, and are they willing to pay the 
cost of this function; or do they wish to 
ask other departments of the state (S.B.I., 
Drug Authority, etc.) to take over a sub- 
stantial part of the Board's present law en- 
forcement activities and have the Board re- 
strict itself largely to the examining and 
licensing functions? (These changes in the 
law enforcement activities might easily take 
place without additional legislation.) The 
Board has given carefuly study to its im- 
mediate needs in order to carry on its 
usual duties as in the past. These are as 
follows : 

1. Relocate office and add two office staff 
members. 

2. Appoint an administrative assistant 
to the Secretary-Treasurer who will 
also serve as director of inspections and 
law enforcement. 

3. Employ at least three full time in- 
spectors. 

To finance the cost of meeting these needs 
which the Board feels are minimal will 
necessitate an increase in the Board's in- 
come that is slightly more than twice its 
present revenues. The projected cost of the 
expanded program for fiscal y/e 1976 is 
$189,254. The income of the Board for 
fiscal 1973 Oast complete vear) was 
192,545. 

The only way in which the Board can in- 
crease its revenue is by a change in the 
foes collectible by the Board. This will re- 
quire an act of the legislature (making 
immediate consideration even more urgent). 




The Board therefore proposes to request the 
legislature to revis'e fees as outlined below. 
(North Carolina is not unique in this sit- 
uation. Other boards of pharmacy have 
found it necessary to take similar action.) 
Tt is hoped that this proposal will receive' 
the full support of our pharmacists. Unless 
the Board's financial position is remedied, 
it will have no other recourse than to curtail 
its program to come within the financial 
resources available to it— almost immediate- 
ly. 

The Executive Committee of the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association has re- 
viewed and approved the proposed fee 
changes. The Board would also welcome 
the views of individual pharmacists. 



PROPOSED CHANGES IN BOARD FEES 



fi< venue Source 



1974 

From 

■ $25.00 

15.00 

25.00 

25.00 

Original Drug Store Permits . 50 .00 

* Based on present registrations, applications, etc. 



Fees 



To 



Drug Store Permits Renewals' 
Pharmacist Renewal License 
Examination Fee 
Reciprocity Fee 



$50.00 
30.00 
40.00 
75.00 
75.00 



Total 
Anticipated Revenue* 

$ 64,450.00 

89,010.00 

G.000.00 

5,625.00 

10,800.00 



Total $175,885.00 



You're new here 
aren't you? 



Yes, I'm just helping 
out Fred today. 




Is this you, doing 
relief work? 

Many pharmacists work in more than one 
store. That's fine! 

DU I who's going to pay the legal 
fees if that customer claims an error was 
made? 

It could be you! 



Protect yourself! Obtain your own Profes 
sional Liability Policy from the compam 
founded by pharmacists for pharmacists 
Even though you don't do relief work, yoi 
can be held liable for any alleged mistake: 
at your regular place of employment. I 
you already have a professional liabilit 
policy, is it Excess or Primary? What' 
the difference? 

The ADI insurance is Primary. That mean 
in the event of a claim, we are there t 
defend you! Excess policies may or ma 
not. Look tor wording such as, "this polic 
shall apply only as excess over other vali i 
and collectible insurance." 



The American Druggists' Insurance Company 

APPLICATION FOR PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY FOR THE PHARMACIST 



LIMITS $300,000 EFFECTIVE DATE. 
1. NAME 



2. ADDRESS- 



3. TELEPHONE^ 

4. EMPLOYER. 
ADDRESS 



5. WHEN DID YOU GRADUATE FROM PHARMACY SCHOOL?. 
WHAT SCHOOL? 



YEAR REGISTERED STATE. 



6. ARE YOU AN OWNER, PARTNER, OR CORPORATE OFFICER OF A RETAIL PHARMACY? 

YES NO (CIRCLE ONE) 

7. ARE YOU PRACTICING PROFESSIONALLY, FULL TIME OR PART TIME, ANY PLACE OTHER 
THAN A RETAIL PHARMACY? (FOR EXAMPLE, A HOSPITAL OR NURSING HOME) 

YES NO (CIRCLE ONE) 

8. DO YOU COMPOUND IN BULK, MANUFACTURE, OR WHOLESALE ANY DRUGS OR DRUG 
PRODUCTS? YES N0 (CIRCLE ONE) 

9. HAVE ANY PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY CLAIMS BEEN MADE AGAINST YOU? 

YES NO (CIRCLE ONE) 

10. PLEASE GIVE THE DETAILS CONCERNING ANY "YES" ANSWER(S) ON QUESTIONS 6 
THROUGH 9. 



SIGNING THIS APPLICATION DOES NOT BIND THE COMPANY TO COMPLETE THE INSURANCE, 
BUT IT IS AGREED THAT THIS FORM SHALL BE THE BASIS OF THE CONTRACT SHOULD 
A POLICY BE ISSUED. 



DATE SIGNATURE OF APPLICANT 

PLEASE SEND COMPLETED APPLICATION, TOGETHER WITH CHECK FOR $75. 
(PAYABLE TO AMERICAN DRUGGISTS' INSURANCE COMPANY) 

FOR THREE (3) YEARS PRE-PAID PREMIUM. NOT SOLD FOR LESSER PERIOD. 

SEND TO: HAMMETT INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 
P.O. Box 248 
Concord, North Carolina 28025 



Whether it's 
wet 
broken 
old 

deteriorated 
partial or 
full or 

discontinued 
Roche will 
take it back 




"Liberal" best 
describes the 
Roche return goods 
policy. 

It offers full credit reimburse- 
ment for complete containers of 
unsalable Roche items. 

It offers prorated credit for 
opened or incomplete containers. 
Claims are promptly processed, pay- 
ments are rapid. No wonder so many 



pharmacists favor the Roche 
return goods policy, one of 
the most practical in the 
industry. 
It keeps quality and 
salability in your inventory 
of Roche products. 



ROCHE LABORATORIES 
1 Division of Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. 
Nutley. New Jersey 07110 



That's the Roche 
Return Goods Policy 



Tiie Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 



STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Members — W. R. Adams, Jr., Wilson; David D. Clayror, Greensboro; Harold V. Day, 

Spruce Pine; Jesse M. Pike, Concord; W. H. Randall, Lillingron; H. C. McAllister, 

Secy.-Treos., Box 471, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



NEW PHARMACIES 

(1) Medical Center Pharmacy of Sanford, 
Inc., 555 Carthage Street, Sanford. 
C. M. McGee, pharmacist-manager. 

( 2 I Behvood Pharmacy, Inc., Route 3, 
Lawndale. Cecil Barrier, pharmacist- 
manager. 

(3) The Pharmaceutical Center of Burling- 
ton, 1606 Memorial Drive, Burlington. 
C. F. Delaney, Jr., pharmacist-man- 
ager. 

(4) Eevco Discount Drug Center, N. C. 
Highway 211, Lumberton. Matthew J. 
Atkinson, pharmacist-manager. 

(5) Scottie 's Drug Store, Highway Street, 
Madison. Larry C. Blanton, pharmacist- 
manager. 

CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP 

(1) McDonald's Drug Store, 732 Ninth 
Street, Durham. John C. McDonald, 
pharmacist-manager. 

(2) Park Place Pharmacy, 613 Providence 
Road, Charlottte. C. L. Swearngan, phar- 
macist-manager. 

(3) Thomas & Oakley Drug Store, 109 Main 
Street, Roxboro. Leonard Matthews, 
pharmacist-manager. 

I 4 ) McNeill 'a Pharmacy, 4th & Main Street, 
Tabor City. John A. McNeill, Jr., phar- 
macist-manager. Success'or to Harrel- 
son 's Pharmacy. 

I ."> ) Roberts Drug Store, Main Street, West 
Jefferson. James P. Sheets, pharmacist- 
manager. 
6 Craig Drug Company, Inc., 101 Syc- 
amore, Aberdeen. Ronald Y. Ward, 
pl i a rma cist-manager. 



KNOW ANYONE WHO IS 
LOOKING FOR A GOOD VET??? 
HERE'S WHAT TO TELL THEM: 

Reprinted from the ' ' Critter Chatter, ' ' 
publication of the Wake County S.P.C.A., 

January, 197-4 

1. Call your local veterinary medical asso- 
ciation. They will not recommend a vet 
who has had valid complaints lodged 
against him. 

2. Consult your pharmacist. Pet owners 
generally report to him whether the 
medication their vet prescribed has been 
effective. 

3. Next time you see someone in your com- 
munity walking his dog, ask him if he 
is happy with his vet. If he's a good 
neighbor, he'll be glad to level with you 
about the man 's qualifications. 

4. When you bring your pet into the vet 's 
office, take particular care to note 
whether he is gentle with your animal. 
Do you hear barking and yelping in the 
boarding kennels? That's a good indica- 
tion that dogs are healthy and frisky. 

5. Does he ask that you have your former 
vet mail him your pet 's medical history ? 
Equally important, does' he record his 
findings the first time he gives your pet 
a checkup? 

<i. Will the vet discuss his fee for services 
in advance? The ethical DVM will not 
hesitate to give you an estimate of the 
complete bill (barring unexpected com- 
plications) before you leave your pel in 
his custodv. 



RECIPROCITY 

•'harles Pelissier, 4213 Oak Park Road, 
Raleigh (from Mass'.). 




Again this winter Robins offers you our fabulous 
"in-season" deal on the cough preparation line that's 
Number One in drug store sales. Now you can stock up 
on the Robitussins at this special low price just when 
the demand is greatest. Whether your business comes 
mainly from prescriptions or "professional recom- 
mendations," you know these top quality products are 
going to move off your shelves. So it's just good busi- 
ness to give them plenty of extra facings. Your Robins 
Representative will be around soon with all the facts. 

/MH'PJOBINS A. H. Robins Company, Richmond, Virginia 23220 



Deal runs- 
January 15- 
Fcbruary 27 

Put your facings 
where your 
profits are! 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 



LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

("From NC-PharmPAC Bulletin) 

Labeling Bill Passes Legislature 

The much discussed prescription labeling 
bill has now been passed by both houses of 
the Legislature and stands as an amendment 
to the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. The 
compromise bill requires the name and 
strength of drug on each prescription unless 
explicitly exempted by written consent of 
the doctor. The bill will be enforced by the 
North Carolina Board of Pharmacy and will 
be in effect in about 90 days. The quantity 
factor for drugs was eliminated in the final 
bill. The XCPhA will be preparing blanks 
for use to exempt the labeling with the doc- 
tor 's consent. 



Record Membership in PJiarmPAC 

An intensive membership campaign has re- 
sulted in more than a 300</r increase in 
membership for 1974 in North Carolina 
PharinPAC. Currently there are 217 phar- 
macists, and 72 pharmacy members for a 
total of 289 active members. Membership 
remains open and for more information 
write P. 0. Box 1313 in Chapel Hill, North 
Carolina 27514. 



Attention 

With the probable speed in which action 
will be taken in the Legislature this ses- 
sion, you may well receive legislative news 
which requires immediate action. Please use 
your voice in this regard. We'll keep you 
informed. 



Legislative Forecast 

A bill regarding the advertising of pre- 
scription prices will be introduced this 1 ses- 
sion under the auspices of the North Car- 
olina Public Interest Research Group. As 
soon as this happens you will be notified. 
(NOTE: PIRG Director for North Carolina, 
Wilbur ' ' Wib ' ' P. Gulley, will be addressing 
the final session of the 8th Annual Seminar 
on Soeio-Eeonomic Aspects of Pharmacy 
Practice to be held at the Institute of Phar- 
macy on February 20 ; for more information 
contact NCPhA.) 

Surrey Leads to Probable Fee Increase 

With a large return of questionnaires, 
North Carolina pharmacists have expressed 
a positive opinion in regard to the doubling 
of licensure fees for the North Carolina 
Board of Pharmacy. With s'ome 1200 ques- 
tionnaires returned an overwhelming 8Z ( / ( 
of respondents favored the proposed changes 
in the fee structure of the North Carolina 
Board of Pharmacy. Many of the persons 
who were opposed wire residing out-of-state 
or favored a different fee restructuring. The 
matter lias been given to the Legislative 
Committee of the NCPhA for their action. 
It may be considered probable that action 
will lie forthcoming in the near future to 
get revision of state law, through the legis- 
lature, to reflect these changes. 




A. E. P. Tablets 



$18.75 per 1000 
$24.00 Doz. 100s 



Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 25 mg. Tablets 
$1.20 per 100 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 50 mg. Tablets 
$1.80 per 100 



Reavita Capsules 



$24.00 Doz. 100s 
$18.75 per 1000 



Your cooperation in stocking 
Reaco Products is appreciated 

REACO PRODUCTS 

P. O. Box 2747 
West Durham, North Carolina 



Two 'up front' 
cold products you can 

stand behind 




For temporary relief of nasal congestion headache, aches 
p.ina and fever due to -COLDS- SINUSITIS -FLU 

TfiADEMAfiK 

OfflGX 

QECOIX IGESTAN T/ANALGESIC 

an 



20 CAPSULES 



No Sedatives 
No Antihistamines 



or co 



Trades** 



ORNflCOl 



COUGH & COLD 
LIQUID 

For temporary relief from coughing 
and nasal congestion associated 
with the common cold and sinusitis 



NO ANTIHISTAMINES 
NO SEDATIVES /■ 



FLOZ. 
(118MI 



For coughs and colds 



,r . - 



nthKline Corp.. Philadelphia. Pa, 



Tiik Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



19 



DISASTERS 



Major and Minor 



BRYSON CITY 

Swain Drug Store reported the theft of 
49 watches, two cameras, $500 in cash and 
a quantity of controlled substances'. 

SYLVA 

A similar-type robbery of nearby Sylva 
Pharmacy involved the loss of merchandise 
and drugs. Pharmacist James Zachary said 
the breakin seemed to be the work of a 
professional team. Xo fingerprints were 
found. 

ROXBORO 

Several hundred dollars worth of mer- 
chandise was' taken from Cole's Pharmacy 
in which police have called "a very well- 
planned job. ' ' 

GREENSBORO 

Foster's Drug Store, 2112 "Walker Avenue, 
lost merchandise and drugs valued at $250 
in a mid- January robbery of the pharmacy. 

Country Park Place Pharmacy on Pisgah 
Church Road was robbed (January 20) of 
barbiturates, amphetamines, and tranquil- 
izers valued at $300. 

Two men were arrested at Pickard Phar- 
macy, .3410 Freeman Mill Road, in an at- 
tempted robbery of the rniarmacy. 

Following a rash of robberies of Greens- 
boro pharmacies, members of the city police 
manned a "cherry picker" to allow roof 
top surveillance over buildings suspected of 
being "hit." As the cherry picker rose 
above the Pickard Pharmacy, officers spotted 
two coats lying on the roof and an opening 
in the roof. Following the arrest, cash and 
ilrugs were taken from the men. 

GREENVILLE 

Two Greenville nun have been arrested 
and charged with receiving stolen merchan- 
dise taken in a robbery of Grimes Drug 
Store, Robersonville. 



SHELBY 

Barbara Marlowe Beck of Shelby lias been 
charged with three counts of forging a 
doctor's prescription and is being held in 
Cleveland County Jail in lieu of $1500 bund. 

STOKESDALE 

Thieves entered Banner Pharmacy and 
made off witli $1,500 worth of Controlled 
Substances'. A vibrator-type burglar alarm 
failed to go off because it was set too high. 
(Note: the drugs were recovered in Atlanta, 
Georgia — see related story this issue of The 
Journal). 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Controlled Substances and $70 in cash 
were taken in a break-in at Robinson's Pre- 
scription Shop. 

MOUNT AIRY 

A post-Christmas robbery of Square 
Pharmacy netted thieves a quantity of glue 
and watches. 

ALBEMARLE 

A money box and $100 in cash were taken 
in a break-in at Phillips Drug Store. 

WILLIAMSTON 

Entrance to Davis Pharmacy was gained 
by removing the pharmacy's skylight, then 
robbers removed more than $300 in drugs, 
mostly Controlled Substances. 

KERNERSVJLLE 

In an attempt to rob Pinnix Drug Store, 
thieves set off a burglar alarm and fled, 
leaving behind a laundry bag full of drugs. 

The burglars apparently hid in an un- 
occupied office upstairs until the pharmacy 
was closed, then cut through the floor and 
climbed down into the prescription depart- 
ment at the rear of the pharmacy. 



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The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



21 



TEACHEY ASSIGNED TO SK&F 
BURLINGTON TERRITORY 

James Teachey has been assigned to the 
Burlington, North Carolina territory as a 
Professional Sales Beprcscntative for Smith 
Kline & French Laboratories, the pharma- 
ceutical division of SmithKline Corporation. 

Mr. Teachey graduated from East Car- 
olina College in Greenville in 19G1 with a 
Bachelor's degree in chemistry and biology. 
He was a sales representative for Eichards 
Manufacturing Company before joining 
SmithKline. 

He lives in New Bern, North Carolina with 
his wife, Nanola, and their two children. 

HOOD HEADS BOARD 

John C. Hood, Kinston pharmacist and 
past president of the North Carolina Phar- 
maceutical Association, has been elected 
chairman of the Lenoir County Board of 
Health. 

MAXTON PLANS TIME CAPSULE 
TO BE OPENED IN THE YEAR 2074 

Descendants of Pharmacist Neil Duncan 
of Maxton, when they open a Time Capsule 
in 2074, will find a letter written by Mr. 
Duncan. 

The Time Capsule is part of Maxton 's 
Centennial Celebration this year. It will be 
buried under one of Maxton 's sidewalks' and 
in additions to letters will contain articles 
depicting life; in a small Southern town in 
1974. 

OBSERVES 49th ANNIVERSARY 

Overman & Stevenson is celebrating its 
49th anniversary of "dependable prescrip- 
tion service" to its customers of Elizabeth 
City and the Albemarle region. 

Highlights' in a newspaper message are 
some of the pharmacy's services: Family 
medication records, charge accounts and free 
delivery, free health information, sick room 
and convalescent supplies and a distin- 
guished line of merchandise. 

McLEOD ACCEPTS POSITION 
IN BUFFALO 

Donald McLeod, Associate Director of 
Pharmacy Services at Duke Medical Center, 
has accepted the position of Director of 



Pharmaceutical Services in Buffalo (N.Y.) 
General Hospital and Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacy in the State University of New 
York at Buffalo. Mr. McLeod will be in- 
volved in the clinical education of under- 
graduates as well as doctor of pharmacy 
students. 

Mr. McLeod will assume his new duties 
February 1st, and Mrs. McLeod (Priscilla 
Hager) will be going to Buffalo within the 
next month or two. 

BW-SPONSORED "JOE'S HEART" 

VIEWED BY THOUSANDS 

OF TAR HEELS 

Preliminary reports indicate that thou- 
sands of Tar Heels viewed "I am Joe's 
Heart" when the 30 minute program was 
televised by six major North Carolina TV 
stations during National Pharmacy Week. 

Sponsored by Burroughs Wellcome Com- 
pany, the 30 minute program included two 
30 second salutes" to pharmacists. 

North Carolina pharmacists provided ad- 
vance back-up support by displaying easel 
messages listing the program time plus 
supplementary newspaper publicity. 



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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



PINEHURST— A COMPLETE 
CONVENTION RESORT 

Golf — Five 18-hole courses, all of which 
begin at Pinehurst Country Club, only a 
half mile from The Pinehurst Hotel with 
continual transportation provided. G-reen 
fees ($8.00 per day) compliments of Owens- 
Illinois for the March 25 TMA-sponsored 
tournament. 

You are on your own for carts — $9.00 per 
18-hole round. Caddies are $6.50 for one 
bag and $8.50 for two bags. Either a cart 
or caddie must be used. 

Tennis — Twelve courts — 10 composition 
and 2 hard-surface. Beautiful clubhouse 
with showers, lockers, lounge and pro shop. 
Clinics, lessons, etc. available. Rates: $3.00 
for first hour and $2.00 each additional 
hour per person. 

Gun Cluo— Skeet and trap fields. $5.00 
per round for guns and ammunition — 25 
targets and 25 shells. 9 trap ranges, 6 skeet 
ranges. 

World Golf Ball of Fame — Interesting 
exhibits from all over the world. Admission 
is $1.00 per person. 

Hiding Club — Trail rides at $5.00 per 
person per hour. Over 200 miles of trails. 

Jugtown — A world famous pottery. Tour 
takes about two hours from time of de- 
parture to time of return to hotel. At Jug- 
town you can see pottery being made. Each 
piece is an original and is signed and dated. 
They have a retail shop where Jugtown Ware 
can be purchased. 

Clarendon Gardens — Beautiful horticul- 
tural gardens with plants in bloom year- 
round. 



TOPS IN TENNIS? 

John C. Hood of Kinston is interested 
in learning Avho is the best pharmacist ten- 
nis player in North Carolina. 

If you think you qualify, meet John on 
the Pinehurst tennis court, Monday PM, 
March 25, following close of the AM busi- 
ness session in The Pinehurst Hotel. 



For eighty-nine years 
. . . . since 1885 



seemcin 

OF DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long 
association with North Car- 
olina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its fifty- 
fourth volume, and the first 
printed copy was "Seeman 
Printed." 




A DIVISION OF 
FISHER-HARRISON CORP. 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



23 



ALWAYS HE'S GOOD COMPANY 

Former Parke-Davis District Manager 
W. L. Johnson, now retired, recently visited 
former Parke-Davisman, Riley McMaster, 
paralyzed from the neck down as the result 
of an auto accident 16 years ago. 

Mr. McMaster, owner of McMasters Drug 
Store, Winnsboro, South Carolina, has a 
spirit which inspired Eudora Garrison to 
express herself in The Charlotte Observer: 

' ' This man and his wife . . . are sur- 
rounded by the warmth and affection of 
friends and family. People come calling con- 
stantly with produce from their trees and 
gardens', or something special from their 
kitchen. Just as often, my friend produces 
choice items and distributes them throughout 
the village. 

' ' A visit with my friends is like a tonic. 
His interests have a happy balance, he asks 
a lot of questions' and then listens to the 
answers. There 's no gloom either in his con- 
versation or his outlook, and his retentive 
mind stores a wealth of information on a 
wide range of subjects. His" wit is quick, 
his sense of humor well developed ; always 
he's good company. 

' ' This couple is the catalyst that often re- 
news me, and dozens like me. By comparison, 
most of us are pygmies. It is a rare and 
cherished thing, she says, to be near him. 
And except for infrequent and short outings, 
she is there beside him, rendering living 
service, unaware of any effort. 

' ' T 've written of my friends before, but 
oh, it needs repeating. In a world of frantic 



rushing and so many empty hearts not 
caring, a visit to my friends in this warm 
and gentle little city is like the balm of 
Gilead to a person going 'round in circles. 

' ' Always I come home renewed and ready 
to begin again and do things better this 
time. I start out with a flourish, but my 
efforts are short-lived. 

' ' Mavbe I can visit them more often. . . . ' ' 



SHIELDS ELECTED 
BANK OFFICIAL 

C. Louis Shields, owner of Johnson Drug 
Company of Jacksonville, was recently 
elected Chairman of the Local Board of Ad- 
vis'ors of First Citizens Bank and Trust 
Company. The Board of Advisors is a liaison 
between First Citizens and the community 
it serves. 

Mr. Shields, graduate of the UNC School 
of Pharmacy, is a Mason, a Shriner, Chair- 
man of the Board of Trustees of Coastal 
Carolina Community College, member of the 
Onslow County Board of Health. He is' an 
Elder of the First Presbyterian Church. 

He is a Director and Secretary of the 
N. C. Mutual "Wholesale Drug Company, and 
a member of both State and National Phar- 
maceutical Associations. 

Mr. Shields is married to the former 
Martha Vance Sparkman of Burgaw. They 
have two sons: Robert of Wilmington, North 
Carolina, and Vance, a sophomore at Emory 
University School of Dentistry. 




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The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 25 

NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 
CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 

January 5, 1974 

Dear Doctor: 

In order to implement a request of the North Carolina Drug Authority, representatives 
of the X. C. Medical Society and the X. C. Pharmaceutical Association have mutually 
agreed to conduct a statewide survey: General Information for Pharmacists (copy en- 
closed). 

Specifically, the Drug Authority requested the two professional organizations "to 
develop and implement appropriate and mutually acceptable procedures for issuing, 
authorizing renewal and refilling prescriptions wherein the professional responsibilities of 
all parties are not inappropriately delegated to aides or assistants and wherein full com- 
pliance with applicable laws are met. ' ' 

TTe are enclosing a copy of President Gilbert's letter for your consideration. In addi- 
tion to President Gilbert, Drs. Charles W. Byrd of Dunn and H. David Bruton of Southern 
Pines assisted in compiling the survey questionnaire, which briefly summarizes the essential 
information desired. 

To participate in this project, please complete the survey form and return to XCPhA 
headquarters in the stamped, pre-addressed envelope which is provided. The completed 
surveys, by counties, will be reproduced by offset printing, with copies going to interested 
pharmacists in your county. 

As indicated by the survey form, all survey information will be treated confidentially and 
released only for professional use in accordance with the request of the Xorth Carolina 
Drug Authority. 

Cordially yours, 
/s/ W. J. Smith 

Executive Director 

NORTH CAROLINA MEDICAL SOCIETY 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

January 1, 1974 

Dear Members: 

Some months ago I mentioned the deplorable factor of our members giving authority 
to their non M.D. staff for okay of refills or giving new prescriptions to pharmacists. To 
my dismay, I soon found that this practice is rampant. 

This has led to a most profitable meeting between our Committee Liaison to the 
Xorth Carolina Pharmaceutical Association and the officers and representatives of the 
Pharmaceutical Association. After in-depth discussion concerning the above matter and 
to upgrade both our questionable practices along with theirs, a questionnaire was formulated, 
a copy of which you will be receiving. 

I implore you to get this questionnaire filled out and returned. I further implore you to 
make it mandatory that your assistants check witli you personally before any prescription 
is okayed. 

There is another offense that I personally have been guilty of and assumo you may 
have too. I have as'sumed that if I didn't indicate anything about a refill that the phar- 
macist would assume that I meant no refills. This omission is very often a source of delay 
and confusion. 

A copy of this letter is not only going to all members of the Xorth Carolina Medical 
Society but also will be mailed to the pharmacists'; so, please don't let me down. 

Sincerely, 
/s/ George G. Gilbert, M.D. 
President 



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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 27 

GENERAL INFORMATION FOR PHARMACISTS 

Xame of Doctor (Type or print) 

Name of Doctor 

(Please enter signature as used on prescriptions for Controlled Drugs) 

Address 

County City/Town P. O. Box/Street 

DEA (Formerly BXDD) Registration Number 



(Effective July 1, 1973, the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD) was abol- 
ished and all responsibilities pertaining to drug law enforcement teas transferred to a new 
agency known as the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) which remains in the 
Justice Department.) 

My prescriptions, both new and refills', will be phoned in by : 

Myself 

My Nurse (s) 

Her (their) name (s) 



(Note: The authority for prescribing medications and for authorising its renewal are vested 
only with the practitioner, and he cannot delegate this function to anyone else. However, 
staff members may act as the practitioner's agent and transmit the order.) 

When I write a PRN Prescription, generally, I mean : 

Refill indefinitely as follows (Controlled Substances Excepted) 

Call me after ( ) 3 months; ( ) 6 months; ( ) 1 year 

Other — Specify . 



(Note: The North Carolina Medical Society and the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation urgently requests that all prescriptions be MARKED with refill instructions at the 
time of issue to prevent some patients from forging refills and to avoid unnecessary calls for 
instructions.) 

C O M M E N T S 

The above information is to be treated as confidential matter and placed on file in all 
appropriate pharmacies as a guide to the pharmacist. 



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Tin: Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



29 



THE LAST ARTICLE ON 
DRUG ABUSE EDUCATION 

by 

Steven E. Moore, R.Pli. 

Associate Director 

Drug Abuse Education Program 

School of Pharmacy 

University of Xorth Carolina 

At first glance, the topic and source might 
seem a bit paradoxical, but really it is quite 
related. Tn the past few years the area of 
drug abuse education has" essentially become 
an empty term. The phrase drug abuse has 
been so overused and now has such evil 
and ominous overtones that numerous gov- 
ernmental and private agencies have called 
for its complete obsolescence by acclama- 
tion. Xot that the area which drug abuse 
education sought to remedy has any less im- 
portance, but the early ideas and concepts 
which were utilized in this regard have 
changed so much that it is only fitting that 
a new term be coined. Drug education, or a 
new and vitalized extension of drug abuse 
education, has now surfaced as has this 
phrase. Some of the current concepts which 
have led to this thinking among workers in 
the field are : 

1. There is no drug problem, but people 
problems which might resort to drugs for 
their resolution. For all too long, the 
problems with drugs were looked upon 
in a vacuum without proper regard for 
the problems which led to drug use. 
Purely medical appearances of drug prob- 
lems fail to acknowledge the social and 
personal problems which underlie this 
syndrome. Through acknowledgement 
and proper help of the people problems 
which confront individuals, the drug 
problems which have received so much 
attention might feasibly be rectified, even 
before appearing. 

2. Alcohol is our major drug of misuse. 
Regardless of the parameters of com- 
parison ("death, debilitating illness, lost 
man hours of work, cost to society, etc.) 
alcohol is by far the drug which is most 
abused by society. With total heroin ad- 
dicts numbering less than 500,000 at the 
peak of the heroin epidemic, conservative 



estimates place the number of alcoholics 
(persons addicted to alcohol) in the 
United States at eight to ten million. 
Regardless of societal sanctions or avail- 
ability, alcohol abuse remains a primary 
health problem and the primary abuse 
problem. 

3. Drug education is different from drug 
information. There is little research that 
would substantiate the premise that in- 
formation alone changes behavior. Thus, 
the idea that presenting facts on drug 
activity in the body could substantially 
reduce, drug abuse is not necessarily true. 
Several studies have shown that drug 
information improperly presented can 
actually arouse curiosity and lead to 
greater drug misuse than if no such in- 
formation had been given. (Among these 
improper presentations are biased, false 
or misleading facts, emotional appeals, 
judgemental techniques as well as au- 
thoritarian or ex-addict present ors.) As 
one leading worker in the field has said, 
"Drug education which talks only about 
drugs, is at best a waste of time. ' ' There 
is no doubt, however, that the proper 
basis of any workable drug education 
program is proper, factual and non- 
biased information concerning drugs in 
the body. With this information base 
(which unfortunately is the total pro- 
gram in many areas, which afterward 
claim ineffectiveness) added components 
of values clarification and decision 
making processes are added to accom- 
plish a comprehensive approach to effec- 
tive drug education. 

4. Positive approaches accomplish more 
than negative approaches. Since the ac- 
knowledgement of the "drug problem'' 
some time ago, numerous attempts to 
discourage drug use through negativism 
(no . . . dont 's . . . you shouldn't . . . 
it is bad to . . . etc.) have largely failed 
to achieve desired results. In benign re- 
taliation, the field of positive alternatives 
has developed. This concept employs the 
technique of providing numerous positive 
outlets for energy and enthusiasm with 
the ulterior motive that an individual who 

< Concluded on Page 31) 



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Tin: Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



31 



is busy and has a positive self image is 
less inclined to drug misuse. In effect this 
technique has experienced outstanding 
success in many areas where implemented. 

5. Abstinence is an impossible, therefore un- 
feasible, endpoint. Modern man loves to 
self medicate himself. "Whether from a 
bottle, a capsule or a tablet, the idea that 
for every problem there is a chemical 
solution is quite a part of our society. 
For that matter, there is also the fact 
that many people enjoy the effects' of 
various chemicals and "will continue their 
use for this purpose. There is simply no 
way to stop all non-medical or improper 
medical chemical use regardless of its 
advisability. The important thing now 
is to aid in developing rational chem- 
ical use patterns' within the parameters 
of societal mores. This is not to condone 
abuse but to reasonably work for ac- 
ceptance of rational and non-harmful 
self-medication. 

G. Good drug education might increase ex- 
perimentation but will probably decrease 
misuse. Many programs of drug educa- 
tion felt that failure had resulted when 
drug ingestion did not ceas"e after initial 
course implementation. After further 
course work, however, it was found that 
a rationale of drug consumption had de- 
veloped and real abuse had been curbed. 
Though a comprehensive program takes 
time and extensive work, the eradication 
of long term misuse at the risk of initial 
experimentation (which could well occur 
regardless of drug education attempts) 
s'eem justified in many areas. 

7. Drug education is most effectively 
handled in the home. Recent research in- 
dicates that predispositions in attitudes 
toward drug consumption are developed 
in the young child by parental example. 
Until adulthood, the modeled example of 
home experiences remain in many re- 
spects more potent stimuli than peer 
pressure or normal experimental desires'. 
Of paramount importance in this situa- 
tion is the fact that parental vocaliza- 
tions concur with physical actions, in 
other words, parents do what they say. 
The full role of these domestic influences 
on drug consumption has yet to be de- 



termined and may offer real inroads to 
the causes of drug misuse. 

8. Drug laws exaggerate values conflicts 
which may exaggerate the problem. In 
a sincere interest to curtail drug misuse, 
legislators have attempted to legislate 
morality into drug laws'. Perhaps the 
most blaring example of this is the laws 
regarding marijuana. Despite the fact 
that there has yet to be shown any real 
danger by nature of research recently 
conducted, that almost 20 million Amer- 
icans have utilized this drug, and unlike 
most drugs, there has yet to be reported 
a single case of death from overdosage 
in medical history, this drug remains 
classified and controlled as a dangerous 
drug. There remains little but emotional 
basis for these laws. Until rational and 
scientifically based laws are enacted, 
tempered with concerns' for people and 
their human way, the conflicts which 
cause values collisions precipitate yet 
new problems. 

9. Humanism is the best solution to people 
problems. As people working with people, 
the only way to possibly Seek solutions 
to problems which arise is to try to look 
at the causes of the problems. Develop- 
ing a sensitivity to the factors which 
cause human action and interactions' is 
the logical beginning. Enhancing com- 
munications and enlarging problem solv- 
ing techniques is the next step. Coordi- 
nating these various skills and using them 
in interpersonal relationships creates this 
dynamic humanism. 

It is" not an easy situation which we face. 
Many of the ideas which are easy to accept 
and work within may not be best for the 
resolution of the "drug problem." At best, 
some of the techniques which have been 
used in the past may not only be unpro- 
ductive but may actually be counterproduc- 
tive. Tt is necessary that we as pharmacists 
not work exclusively in the field of drug 
misuse prevention that combine our energies 
with others in the field. We all seek elim- 
ination of the problem, but also the most 
efficient and effective manner is desired. 
We must stay involved but we must remain 
effectively so. 



32 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

PHARMACISTS SEEK SERVICE IN THE POLITICAL ARENA 



JOHN T. HENLEY 

Veteran Legislator John T. Henley of 
Hope Mills is a candidate from Cumberland 
County for another 2-year term in the North 
Carolina Senate. 

Pharmacist by profession; owns and op- 
erates Clinic Pharmacy in Hope Mills, North 
Carolina. Was graduated from the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina School of Pharmacy 
in 1943. Served with the Ninth Infantry Di- 
vision in Europe during World War II. 

Mayor of Hope Mills for six years and a 
member of the Board of Commissioners of 
Hope Mills for two years. Member of the 
Official Board of Hope Mills Methodist 
Church. Member of the Fayetteville Kiwanis 
Club, Hope Mills Lions Club, Hope Mills 
Fire Department, and the American Legion. 

Served four terms in the North Carolina 
General Assembly in the House of Repre- 
sentatives. Served four terms in the Senate 
from the Fourteenth Senatorial District. In 
1961 served as Chairman of the House Ed- 
ucation Committee when many major Ed- 
ucation Bills were passed by the General 
Assembly. In 1963 served as chairman of 
the House Senatorial Bedistricting Commit- 
tee. In 1967 served as Chairman of the 
Senate Health Committee. In the 1969 Gen- 
eral Assembly served as Chairman of the 
Sub-Committee on General Government and 
Transportation, and Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on State Government. Served in 
1969-70 on the Capital Building Authority 
and Commission to Study the Use of Illicit 
and Harmful Drugs. 

Was appointed in August of 1963 as State 
Purchasing Officer by Governor Sanford, 
served in this capacity until February of 
1965. 

Was' appointed by Governor Scott to head 
a Study on State Government Bx>ganization 
in September, 1969 and as Chairman of the 
Governor's Committee on State Government 
Reorganization in May, 1970. 

Is presently serving in the Senate, now in 
session in Raleigh, and is a member of a 
number of Senate committees, including 



chairman of the Insurance Committee which 
has assigned to it the much-discussed No 
Fault Insurance Plan. 

HALL SEEKS STATE SEAT 

•T. M. (Mike) Hall Jr., Wilmington phar- 
macist, has announced he will seek the 
Democratic nomination as candidate for the 
State Senate from the Fourth District. 

Mr. Hall is a 20-year veteran of the New 
Hanover Board of County Commissioners, 
hence he is at home in the political arena. 

Mr. Hall sold Hall's Drug Store last 
Year. Married to the former Edith Morton 
the Halls have three children. He is a 
member of various civic, fraternal and 
health related organizations. 



I. C. System, Inc. 

The nation's most highly 
specialized collection service 



Your Association's Collection Service is 
an affiliate of a national organization cur- 
rently serving members of more than 700 
leading trade associations throughout the 
nation. 

Don't lose sales volume because cus- 
tomers owe you money and are trading 
somewhere else. Your Association's Col- 
lection Service will chase those debtors 
back into your place of business to pay 
YOU direct. You will get accounts OFF 
your ledger and IN your bank account — 
and you will also have many former cus- 
tomers back doing business with you again. 
For information, contact your Association 
office. It will pay you to do so. 

On request, A representative 

of the I. C. System will explain 

the collection program in detail. 

Call or write the NCPhA, Box 151, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



33 



BARNEY PAUL WOODARD 

Barney Paul Woodard of Princeton is a 
candidate for another 2-year term as a 
representative from the 14th House District 
(Johnston and Franklin counties) in the 
Xorth Carolina House of Representatives. 

Mr. Woodard was elected a state repre- 
sentative in 1966 and again in 1922. He is 
vice chairman of two House committees — 
Health & State Personnel — and a member 
of 5 other committees: Agriculture, Educa- 
tion, Finance, Eules and Wildlife. 

A graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy, Mr. "Woodard has operated Woodard 
Drug Store in Princeton for the past 35 
years. 

He served one term on the Princeton Town 
Board of Commissioners, acting as secre- 
tary-treasurer. He is' a former president of 
the Princeton PTA, Princeton School Ad- 
visory Council, and Johnston County School 
Board Association. 

LEON TOMLINSON 

Leon Tomlinson, owner and operator of 
Massey Hill Drug Company, Fayetteville, 
for the past 18 years, is a candidate for the 
Xorth Carolina House of Representatives 
from Cumberland County. 

A native of Georgia, Pharmacist Tomlin- 
son is a 1950 graduate of the University 
of Georgia School of Pharmacy. He served 
in the U. S. Army at Fort Bragg and re- 
mained in the area following completion of 
liis military service. 

He is a member of the Xorth Carolina 
Farm Bureau Federation, Fayetteville Area 
Industrial Development Corporation and the 
N". C. Pharmaceutical Association. Other 
affiliations include charter member of the 
Massey Hill Lions Club, a former board 
member of the Cape Fear "Valley Hospital, 
secretary of the Cape Fear Pharmaceutical 
Society and an institutional representative of 
the Boy Scouts of America. 



WILLIAM D. (BILLY) SMITH 

William D. (Billy) Smith, a senior phar- 
macy student at UXC-Chapel Hill, is a 



candidate for the Bladen County Board of 
Commissioners. 

Mr. Smith is an officer of Smith's Drug 
Store, Elizabethtown, and Clarkton Drug 
Center, Clarkton. In Chapel Hill he current- 
ly serves as an officer of Phi Delta Chi. 



WEBSTER ELECTED 
MAYOR OF FAIRMONT 

W. B. Webster of Webster's Pharmacy, 
Inc. of Fairmont, has been elected Mayor of 
his city. Xot only has" Mr. Webster served 
the Fairmont community since 1948 as a 
practicing pharmacist, but he has partic- 
ipated in many civic activities. 

He served five years on the Board of 
Education of the Fairmont City School Sys- 
tem, and for many years was the prin- 
cipal reorganize!- of the ' ' Tornado Club ' ' 
(school booster). 

He is" a past master of Fairmont Lodge Xo. 
528, a Shriner, and served as Training Union 
Director for the First Baptist Church. He 
is also a member of the local Board of 
Directors of Southern National Bank and 
Guaranty Savings and Loan. 

Mr. Webster, 1940 graduate of the School 
of Pharmacy of the University of South 
Carolina at Columbia, practiced for sev- 
eral years in Tabor City before entering the 
armed services' in 1942. He is now a Lt. 
Colonel in the L T .S. Air Force Reserve, Re- 
tired. 

He is married to the former Lillian 
Hughes of Tabor City and has three chil- 



dren. 




34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 

• Charlotte— Mrs. T. K. Steele 

• Cape Fear- — Mrs. Hunter Smith 

• Chapel Hill— 

CAPE FEAR 

The Cape Fear Pharmaceutical Auxiliary 
met at the home of Mrs. Sanford Price, 
Salemburg, Wednesday to complete their 
State Project, making stuffed animals and 
house dresses for 'Berry Center at Golds- 
boro. 

During a short business session, Mrs. 
James R. Hickmon, State President, told 
some of the plans for the Annual Conven- 
tion which -will be held at Pinehurst in 
March. Mrs. Cade Brooks asked the Auxiliary 
to assist in making table favors for the 
Convention at the meeting in February. All 
members were urged by the local President, 
Mrs. Shelton Brown, Clinton, to plan to at- 
tend the Convention at least one day. 

Members attending the "Sew-In" from 
Fayetteville were Mrs. James R. Hickmon, 
Mrs. Cade Brooks, and Mrs. Hunter Smith. 

CHARLOTTE 

The Charlotte Woman's Auxiliary of the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 
held its regular meeting at the YWCA, 
Tuesday, January 8, with Mrs. Robert Lewis, 
president, presiding. Mrs. Leslie Barnhardt 
gave the devotional. 

Luncheon was served on tables attractively 
decorated in blue and white by Mrs. Dalton 
Moore. Mrs. W. K. Gardner made appro- 
priate name tags using the Pharmacy sym- 
bol. 

Mrs. Newton Etheridge introduced the 
speaker, Dr. David S. Citron, Director of 
Family Practice at Charlotte Memorial Hos- 
pital. In an interesting and informative 
talk, Dr. Citron explained the need for doc- 
tors who are family practitioners and what 



Memorial Hospital is doing to meet the 
need. 

Tn the business session Mrs. C. H. Smith 
announced that Group House would be ready 
for occupancy February 1. Members were 
asked to donate available supplies promptly. 

Committees for the Benefit Bridge Feb- 
ruary 26th were announced by Mrs. Gordon 
Vail, Ways' and Means Chairman with tickets 
available from Mrs. Jesse Oxendine. 



CHAPEL HILL 

Members of the Executive Board of the 
NCPhA Woman's Auxiliary were guests of 
the Chapel Hill Auxiliary at their January 
luncheon meeting held at the Institute of 
Pharmacy. 

Mrs. Lee Werley, president, presided and 
Mrs. George P. Hager gave the invocation. 

Lloyd Senter, Carrboro pharmacist and 
chief of the South Orange Rescue Squad, 
gave a descriptive talk on the activities and 
future plans of the Squad. 

Mrs. James Hickmon, State Auxiliary 
President, was a special guest, and spoke to 
the Chapel Hill members. 

In the business session plans' were made 
for the March 5th benefit bridge with pro- 
ceeds going to the Rescue Squad. 




The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 



MARRIAGES 

The marriage of Miss Snowden Stanley 
Albright and Henry Crayne Howes was 
solemnized December 29 at Saint Michael's 
Episcopal Church in Raleigh. 

The bride is a graduate of UXC-Chapel 
Hill where she majored in English and Re- 
ligion. The bridegroom, a graduate of the 
UNC School of Pharmacy, Class of 1972, 
is a pharmacist with Revco Drugs. The 
couple will make their home in "Wilmington. 

BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Mitchener, Sr., 
pharmacists of "Wilmington, announce the 
birth of a daughter, Mary Ellen, born Jan- 
uary 10th. Mrs. Mitchener is the former 
Ellen Louise Pike of Concord. 



Mr. and Mrs. William J. Brooks, Jr. of 
Lattimore announce the birth of a son, 
James David Brooks, on December 7. Phar- 
macist Brooks is a graduate of the UNC 
School of Pharmacy, Class of 1969. 

DEATHS 

HUGH K. SCONYERS 

Hugh Right Sconyers, age 65, died Jan- 
uary 22 in Gastonia, North Carolina. 

Mr. Sconyers, a graduate of Mercer Uni- 
versity, was well known throughout North 
Carolina as a sales representative for Hol- 
lingsworth Candy Company. He was a past 
president of the Traveling Men's Auxiliary 
of the NCPhA and assisted in organizing 
the TMA Foundation. 

He is survived by his wife, the form or 
Marilou Ely, a brother and sister. 

Masonic services were held at the Ever- 
green City, Cemetery, Charlotte. 

PAUL L. McDANIEL 
Paul L. McDaniel, "Wilmington pharma- 
cist, died January 28. 

Mr. McDaniel was a graduate of the 
QNC School of Pharmacy (1930) and for 
a number of years operated Standard Phar- 
macy in Wilmington. He was a native of 
Fairmont. 



J. F. HOFFMAN 

Joseph FilSon Hoffman, Jr., High Point 
pharmacist, died January 19. 

A graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy (1911), Mr. Hoffman established 
(1914) the Hoffman Drug Company, High 
Point, and operated the pharmacy until sell- 
ing it in 1966. 

He served as a member of the Guilford 
County Board of Commissioners from 1933 
to 1945 and as a member of the Guilford 
County Board of Welfare (now Social Ser- 
vices) for the same period. 

A SUPERVISOR'S PRAYER 

Bear Lord, please help me — 

To accept human beings as they are — 

not yearn for perfect creatures; 
To recognize ability — and encourage it; 
To understand shortcomings — and make 

allowance for them; 
To work patiently for improvement — 

and not expect too much too quickly ; 
To appreciate what people do right — 

not just criticize what they do wrong; 
To be slow to anger and hard to 

discourage ; 
To have the hide of an elephant and 

the patience of Job; 
In short, Lord, please help me be a 

better boss! 

JOHN LUTHER 




36 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Classified advertising (single issue inser- 
tion) 10 cents a word with a minimum 
charge of $3.00 per insertion. Payment to 
accompany order. 

Names and addresses will be published un- 
less a box number is requested. 

In replying to ' ' blind ' ' ads, address Ad. 

No. , Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, 

P. O. Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 

FOR SALE: Fixtures from Boone 
Drug Company custom make by 
Grant E. Key in 1960 (14 years old). 
May be seen in operation at Boone 
Drug Company, Boone, N. C. Store 
size approximately 4000 square 
feet. Includes booths for fountain 
but not fountain equipment. In 
very good shape. Call 704-264-3766 
or write Boone Drug Company. 



FOR SALE — Twelve drug store 
shelves for medications; adjustable; 
almost new and in excellent condi- 
tion; some single side; some double 
with partition; size is variable from 
514 ft. to 6V2 ft. average. Reply to 
Ad. No. 1-2. 



Staff Pharmacist position open, in a 
community, 150-bed hospital that 
serves as a clinical work-shop for 
The Rockingham Community Col- 
lege School of Nursing — programs 
expanding in I. V. Additive-area, 
unit-dose dispensing, and clinical 
pharmacy at the community-level. 
Competitive salary with excellent 
benefits for an energetic, progressive 
professional. Send resume to: Joseph 
C. Fstes, Jr., c/o Annie Penn Me- 
morial Hosoital, Inc., 618 S. Main 
Street, Reidsville, N. C. 27320. 



WANTS NEW CHALLENGE— An 
aggressive pharmacist experi- 
enced in discount pharmacy op- 
eration desires new management 
or ownership opportunity. 



RELIEF PHARMACIST— Call Carl- 
ton O. Winters, 313 Brentwood Av- 
enue, Jacksonville, North Carolina 
28540. 

PHARMACY OPPORTUNITIES 
IN ALASKA 

Delivery of Pharmacy Services in Alaska 
is at a unique time in its history. The pro- 
viders are still small enough in numbers for 
every pharmacist in the State to have a 
direct say in what the future will bring. 
The State needs pharmacists who want to 
deliver quality health services and develop 
a strong Statewide system combining retail, 
hospitals and the uniformed services (Army, 
Air Force, Coast Guard and the U.S. Public 
Health Service). 

There are opportunities in Alaska — mostly 
in what are considered rural areas. There 
are less than 50 retail stores in this State. 
Twenty-five are in the urban areas of An- 
chorage and Fairbanks. In the last six 
months, one small community has attracted 
a pharmacist for their existing store. An- 
other community, without a store, has at- 
tracted their first pharmacist. In both cases, 
the communities already had two physicians 
and small hospital. 

There, are opportunities with the U.S. 
Public Health Service and the military. At 
this time, the latter does not utilize Civil 
Service pharmacists. The trend of many of 
their health care facilities is nonmilitary 
pharmacists. Also, with the military cut- 
backs, the number of pharmacists available 
for night, week-end and holiday work has 
decreased to two in Anchorage and none in 
Fairbanks. 

In closing, I will be glad to correspond 
with anyone interested in pharmacy prac- 
tice in Alaska. We provide direct care and 
also contract for pharmacy services with 
hospitals and drug stores. Therefore, the 
U.S. Public Health Service is interested in 
all phases of pharmacy practice. 

There are limited openings! Therefore, do 
not come without a definite commitment. 
Emil L. Cekada, M.P.H. 
Chief, Area Pharmacy Branch 
Alaska Area Native Health Service 
Box 7-741 
Anchorage, Alaska 99510 




WITH THESE SERVICES ... WE ARE 

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Cardinal ... A comprehen- 
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H independent pharmacies. 




Columbus Show Case Co. — prO» 
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lealth-beauty aid discount list 
over 1200 items with pre- 
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pomplete rack service pro 
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WILSON. N. C. 27893 



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products for 
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in the two 
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W. H. King Drug Company 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



O'Hanlon-Watson Drug Company 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



Bellamy Drug Company 

Wilmington, North Carolina 



Peabody Drug Company 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



'ke Carolina 



Journal of Pharmacy 



Volume LIV 



March 1974 



Number 3 



LIBRARY 




The Barbara Berry Singers (pictured above) will appear in Pinehurst on March 25 
as a part of the NCPhA convention entertainment program sponsored by the Wholesale 
Druggists of North Carolina. Seated, Barbara Berry. Standing, left to right: Marsha Jones. 
Anne Givens, Barbara Cobb and Carol Blake. 

Convention program 




Addltlonallnformatlon available to the profession on request. 

Eli Lilly and Company 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46206 



CONVENTION INVITATION 

Looking Forward to Meeting and Greeting Our 

Many Friends at the 

94th 

Annual Convention of the N.C.P.A. 

47th 

Annual Convention of the Woman's Auxiliary 

of the N.C.P.A. 

60th 

Annual Convention of the T.M.A. of the N.C.P.A. 

We'll See You There! ! 




*t"Be> 




''Ous*^ 



JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 

Greensboro, N. C. 
In our 77th Year of Srrviei to the North Carolina Retail Druggists 



ENDEAVORING TO BETTER SERVE 




Scott 3)tug, Company, 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 
Representing 80 Years of Integrity and Reliable Service 



The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



March, 1974 

Vol. LIY Xo. 



Officers 

NORTH CAROLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 



President 

W. Whitakeb Moose 
Mount Pleasant 



Vice-Presidents 

W. H. Wilson 

Raleigh 

L. M. Wiialey 

Wallace 

Thomas R. Burgiss 

Sparta 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Rox 151 

Chnpol mil, N. C. 



CONTENTS THIS ISSUE 



1974 Convention Programs 

Carolina Camera 

Tom Jones — Distinguished Service Winner 

Action at the Institute of Pharmacy 

Durham-Orange Conducts Survey of Member Interests 

Report : Survey on Board Fees Changes 

Disasters — Major and Minor 

Henry Roland Totten Memorial Garden Center 

State Board of Pharmacy News 

Tar Heel Digest 

Doings of the Auxiliaries' 

Births — Deaths 

Legislative Report from Raleigh 



4-1!) 



29 
30 

32 
33 
34 
35 
37 
38 
39 
40 



ADVERTISERS 

v merican Druggists' Insurance Company 22-23 

Colorcraft Corporation 31 

Eli Lilly and Company 2nd Cover 

Gilpin, Henry B. 9 

ICN Pharmaceuticals (King Associates) . .4th Cover 

I. C. System, Inc. 29 

Justice Drug Company 1 

Kendall Drug Company .32 

Owens, Minor & Bodeker . 3rd Cover 

26 

'.... 31 



Ramsey Manufacturing Corporation 
E. N. Rowell Company 

Scott Drug Company 

Seeman Printery 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories 
Smith Wholesale Drug . 
Washington National Insurance Co. 



36 

20 
10 
28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Second class 
postage paid at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. 



PROGRAM 



94th 

Annual 
Convention 

North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 
Woman's Auxiliary, NCPhA 
Traveling Men's Auxiliary, NCPhA 



PINEHURST HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB 
PINEHURST, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sunday, March 24, 1974 

Monday, March 25, 1974 

Tuesday, March 26, 1974 



CONVENTION THEME 
PHARMACY FORWARD IN '74 




Convention 

• North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

• Woman's Auxiliary, NCPhA 

• Traveling Men's Auxiliary, NCPhA 

PINEHURST HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB 

Pinehurst, North Carolina 

March 24-25-26, 1974 

CONVENTION-IN-BRIEF 

Sunday, March 24 

1:00 p.m. — Reunion of UNC School of Pharmacy Class of 1969 — Crystal Room 

(Reservations through Ben O. Williams) 
2:00 p.m. — Convention Registration Desks Open 

4:00 p.m. — Meeting of North Carolina PharmPac members — South Room 
7:00 p.m. — Opening Session/Dinner — NCPhA and Auxiliaries — Ballroom 

• Awards Presentations 

• Entertainment by UNC Department of Music 

Monday, March 25 

8:30 a.m. — Registration desks reopen 

9:00 a.m. — NCPhA Business Session — South Room 

9:30 a.m. — Woman's Auxiliary members depart from Pinehurst Hotel for a COFFEE at 
the Country Club of North Carolina 

1:00 p.m. — Golf Tournament — Pinehurst Country Club 
(Admission ticket at Registration Desk) 

2:00 p.m. — Tours of Clarendon Garden — Transportation from Pinehurst Hotel approx- 
imately every 45 minutes. 
Optional Activities: 

• Tennis 

• Skeet or trap shooting at Gun Club 

• Visit to World Golf Hall of Fame 

• Informal Bridge — Dogwood Room 

• Sight-seeing (brochures at Registration Desk) 

7:45 p.m. — The Wholesale Druggists of North Carolina Entertain — Ballroom 

• Bingo 

• The Barbara Berry Singers 

• More Bingo 



Tuesday, March 26 

8:30 a.m. — Registration desks reopen 

9:00 a.m. — NCPhA Business Session — South Room 
1 1:00 a.m. — TMA Business Session — Crystal Room 
12:00 noon — Woman's Auxiliary Business Session and Luncheon — Ballroom 

• Entertainment by Roland's Dance Studio of Fayetteville 

• Fashion Show by the Pinehurst Hotel Boutique 

2:00 p.m. — NCPhA Closing Session and Officer Installation — South Room 
8:30 p.m. — Traveling Men's Auxiliary Party — Ballroom 

• TV Personality Ray Wilkinson 

• Ed Turbeville's Orchestra for dancing 



Convention peocum 



94TH ANNUAL MEETING 
NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

PINEHURST HOTEL AND COUNTRY CLUB 

PINEHURST, NORTH CAROLINA 

Sunday-Monday-Tuesday, March 24-25-26, 1974 



THEME: PHARMACY FORWARD IN '74 
SUNDAY, MARCH 24 

1:00 p.m. — Reunion of UNC School of Pharmacy Class of 1969 — Crystal Room. Reser- 
vations through Ben 0. Williams 
2:00 p.m. — Convention Registration Desks Open 
4:00 p.m. — Meeting of N.C. PharmPAC members — South Room 

OPENING SESSION AND DINNER PROGRAM 

BALLROOM— 7 P.M. 

Alfred H. Mebane, III, Convention Chairman, Presiding 

CALL TO ORDER 

N. C. Pharmaceutical Association — W. Whitaker Moose, President 
Woman's Auxiliary, NCPhA — Mrs. James R. Hickmon, President 
Traveling Men's Auxiliary, NCPhA — James R. Case, President 

INVOCATION — E. W. Hackney 

DINNER 

PRESENTATION OF AWARDS 

MUSICAL PROGRAM — UNC Department of Music 

ANNOUNCEMENT — 1974 Pharmacist of the Year 



YOUR PICTURE COMPLIMENTS COLORCRAFT 

In addition to providing picture coverage of the Pinehurst Pharmaceutical Convention, 
representatives of Colorcraft Corporation — Ray and John T. Black and Horace Lewis — 
will make individual pictures of convention registrants, compliments of Colorcraft. Look 
for the Colorcraft Picture Booth in the Lobby of The Pinehurst Hotel & Country Club. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 7 

MONDAY, MARCH 25 

Morning Session, 9 a.m., South Room 
W. Whitaker Moose, Presiding 

CALL TO ORDER 
RITE OF THE ROSES 

Mrs. June Bush West assisted by Mrs. Jean Bush Provo 
NCPhA PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS— W. Whitaker Moose 

LEGISLATION— CURRENT AND PENDING — OF SPECIAL SIGNIFICANCE TO PHARMACY 

W. H. Randall, Chairman, NCPhA Committee on Legislation 
B. Paul Woodard, Member of the N. C. General Assembly 
John T. Henley, Member of the N. C. General Assembly 

PROMOTING YOUR PROFESSIONAL & AUXILIARY SERVICES 

Michael R. Ryan, Ph.D., Associate Director, American College of Apothecaries 

BIOAVAILABILITY: ITS IMPORTANCE IN DETERMINING PRODUCT EQUIVALENCE 

John J. Palya, Assistant to the Division Manager, Wyeth Laboratories 
REACTORS: 

William M. Oakley, President, N. C. Society of Hospital Pharmacists 
Donald Miller, Past President, N. C. Pharmaceutical Association 

PRIZE DRAWING 
ADJOURNMENT 

Afternoon free for golf or other entertainment activities available in the Pinehurst area. 
Details at the registration desks. 

Dining Room Service from 6 to 9. If not a guest at the Pinehurst Hotel, individual dinner 
tickets may be purchased from hotel 

BALLROOM — 7:45 P.M. 

The Wholesale Druggists of North Carolina Entertain 

• Bingo 

• The Barbara Berry Singers 

• More Bingo 



PRIZES FROM AROUND THE WORLD 

Convention registrants attending the one NCPhA business session on Monday and two 
sessions on Tuesday will have up to three opportunities, depending on number of business 
sessions attended, to win valuable prizes from Spain, Kenya, Japan, Pakistan, Philippines, 
Switzerland, Mexico, Norway, Sweden, Israel, France, Taiwan, Greece, India, Italy and the 
United States. The U.S. prizes include one from Tiffany's 1973 proof coin sets and merchan- 
dise certificates. 



8 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

TUESDAY, MARCH 26 

Morning Session, 9 a.m., South Room 
Lloyd M. Whaley, Presiding 
CALL TO ORDER 
INVOCATION — Paul Branch, Boone 

NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACY UPDATE 

UTILIZATION CONTROL AS INFLUENCED BY THE MEDICAID CO-PAY PROGRAM 

Benny Ridout, Pharmacist Consultant, N. C. Department of Social Services 

A BRIEF REVIEW OF RX BENEFIT PROGRAMS ADMINISTERED BY PAID PRESCRIPTIONS 

Frank F. Yarborough, Project Director, Paid Prescriptions 

THE NORTH CAROLINA MENTAL HEALTH PHARMACY SERVICE PROGRAM 

Robert J. Allen, Pharmacy Coordinator, Division of Mental Health Services, N. C. Depart- 
ment of Human Resources 

CONSULTANT PHARMACIST— A REVIEW OF RECENTLY ADOPTED REGULATIONS AND 
GUIDELINES 

Panelists 

William T. Williams, Immediate Past President, North Carolina 

Society of Hospital Pharmacists 

J. W. Bradley, III, Pharmacist Consultant, Division of Facility 

Services, N. C. Department of Human Resources 

Donald E. Baker, Pharmacy Consultant, Region IV, Community Health Services, Department 

of HEW, Atlanta 

REPORT — UNC SCHOOL OF PHARMACY — George P. Hager, Dean 
ADVERTISING: HOW TO CREATE A POSITIVE IMAGE 

W. Joe Davis, III, Creative Services Associates 

MANAGEMENT EXPERTISE— A PROFESSIONAL NECESSITY 

William J. Turenne, Editor, Lilly Digest 

PRIZE DRAWING 

ADJOURNMENT FOR LUNCH 



PINEHURST A COMPLETE and 2 hard-surface. Beautiful clubhouse 

CONVENTION RESORT with showers, lockers, lounge and pro shop. 

Clinics, lessons, etc. available. Rates: $3.00 

Golf— Five 18-hole courses, all of which f or fi rs t hour and $2.00 each additional 

begin at Pinehurst Country Club, only a ] 10ur per person. 

half mile from The Pinehurst Hotel with fl „i, 1c , *r nn 

Gun Club — Skeet and trap fields. $5.00 
continual transportation provided. Green . . _ 

^ per round for guns and ammunition — 25 

fees ($8.00 per day) compliments of Owens- • _ , 

KW * J / * . , targets and 25 shells. 9 trap ranges, 6 skeet 

Illinois for the March 25 TM ^-sponsored 

ranges, 
tournament. 

You are on your own for carts— $9.00 per World Golf Ball of Fame— Interesting 

18-hole round. Caddies are $6.50 for one exhibits from all over the world. Admission 

bag and $8.50 for two bags. Either a cart is $1.00 per person, 
or caddie must be used. Biding Club— Trail rides at $5.00 per 

Tennis — Twelve courts — 10 composition person per hour. Over 200 miles of trails. 




Sometimes it takes more 

than your expert knowledge 

of the pharmacy business 



&x& 



JNCH to make your pharmacy go. km 

ALLS 




Vaii efriirlm/^ r\V\ 



You studied pharmacy and its appli- 
cation to human life; not changing 
markets, the changing economy, new 
products, sundries and advertising. 

That's where Gilpin comes in— 
we can provide the marketing and 
merchandising expertise to make your 
operation more profitable, more effi- 
cient, even more attractive, all at once 
or one at a time. 



And beyond that we can assist 
you in identifying your pharmacy as a 
part of the Care Drug Center Service 
Program. 

Sometimes it takes more than 
your knowledge of pharmacy to make 
your pharmacy go. For more 
information, write or call the Gilpin 
Sales Manager nearest you.* 



RUN 









i 



THE HENHY B. 



GILPIN 

Wholesale druggists since 1845. 

•Baltimore-E.A. Turner. 7401 Pulaski Highway. Baltimore, Md. 21203/(301) 866-4600 Dover-W.E. Warther, 756 South Little Creek Rd.. Dover. Del. 19901/(302) 734-8281 
Nnrf' ,lk -Colon Sawyer, 6435 Tidewater Drive, Norfolk. Va. 23509/(804) 855-1901 Washington -Frank Antkowiak, 901 Southern Avenue, Washington, DC. 20032/(301) 630-4501 



£ 



PHARMACY 

ACCOUNT SERVICE 



*GOOD RECORDS FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS— A proven accounts 
receivable system — Designed from the ground up for your needs 
— by the folks who went to computers in 1958. Better collection 
for you and prescription tax records for your customers. You also 
automatically earn interest on past due accounts if you desire. 



SE 



PHARMACY 

BOOKKEEPING SERVICE 

*GOOD RECORDS FOR YOU— Twenty Nine years of bookkeeping 
for retailers plus 15 years of computer experience equals a system 
designed to give you the accounting service you need. 




PHARMACY 

'ADVERTISING PROGRAM 



HOW'S YOUR RETAIL IMAGE?— Good? Bad? Indifferent— Con- 
sult your Smith Representative about our Associated Druggist Pro- 
gram. Some of the advantages of this program are hometown 
newspaper advertising — buying advantages — clerk training pro- 
gram — In store promotion materials and store advertising fliers. 

Just three of the many SMITH services 

Also ask about retirement, group hospitalization and major med- 
ical. Call or write to 



• Spartanburg 582-1216 

• Greenville 235-4159 

• Asheville 684-6121 

• Charlotte 825-5161 

Wofford and Forest Streets P. O. Box 1779 



RTANBURG SOUTH CAROLINA 




WHOLESALE 



DIVISION OF SMITH D«UO COMPANY 



CALL TO ORDER 
REPORTS: 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy n 

TUESDAY, MARCH 26 

Afternoon Session, 2 p.m., South Room 
Thomas R. Burgiss, Presiding 



North Carolina Board of Pharmacy — H. C. McAllister, Secretary-Treasurer 

N. C. Pharmaceutical Association — W. J. Smith, Executive Director 

Committee on Community Pharmacy — Donald V. Peterson, Committee Member 

Continuing Education and Tripartite — Claude U. Paoloni 

Consolidated Pharmacy Loan Fund — Robert B. Hall, Chairman 

NCPhA Institute/Endowment Fund — B. Cade Brooks, Chairman 

Public Relations — Jack G. Watts, Chairman 

N. C. Pharmacy Political Action Committee — Rex Paramore, Chairman 

Resolutions — Lloyd M. Whaley, Committee Chairman 

Nominating — B. Cade Brooks, Committee Chairman 

Time and Place — L. M. Whaley, Committee Chairman 

Woman's Auxiliary — Mrs. James R. Hickmon, President 

Convention Report — A. H. Mebane, Chairman 

INSTALLATION OF OFFICERS— W. Dorsey Welch, Washington 

PRIZE DRAWING 

ADJOURNMENT 

EVENING ENTERTAINMENT 

Ballroom, 8:30 p.m. 
Variety Show sponsored by the Traveling Men's Auxiliary of the NCPhA, featuring TV 
Personality Ray Wilkinson followed by Dancing to Ed Turbeville's Orchestra 



OFFICERS OF THE N. C. PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



President: W. Whitaker Moose, Mount Pleasant, North Carolina 
1st Vice-President: W. H. Wilson, Raleigh, North Carolina 
2nd Vice-President: Lloyd M. Whaley, Wallace, North Carolina 
3rd Vice-President: Thomas R. Burgiss, Sparta, North Carolina 
Executive Director: W. J. Smith, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 



12 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 
THE PRESIDING OFFICERS 




The business part of the Pinehurst Con- 
vention will be the responsibility of these 
presiding" officers: 

North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 
W. Whitaker Moose, President 
Woman's Auxiliary, NCPhA 
Mrs. James E. Hiekmon, President 
Traveling Men's Auxiliary, NCPhA 
.lames' B. Case, President 



W. Whitaker Moose 
Mount Pleasant 






Mrs. James R. Hiekmon 
Fayetteville 



James R. Case 
Charlotte 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 13 

WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 
of the 
NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS 

President Mrs. James R. Hickmon, 1420 Paisley Avenue, Fayetteville 28304 

1st Vice-President Mrs. J. W. Kirkpatriek, Box 55, Waynesville 28786 

2nd J' ice-President Mrs. L. M. McCombs, Box 7, Creedmoor 27522 

Becording Secretary Mrs. M. E. Hedgepeth, P.O. Box 1006, Henderson 27536 

Corresponding Secretary .Mrs. J. Cody Newton, 2710 Mirror Lake Dr., Fayetteville 28303 
Treasurer. Mrs. Bruee R. Medlin, 201 Esplanade Drive, Charlotte 28213 

Parliamentarian Mrs. R. I. Cromley, Jr., 4732 Wildwood Road, Raleigh 270(>!> 

Historian Mrs. Paul Branch, Route 1, Box 358, Boone 28607 

Advisor. Mis. William G. Thames, 307 Lakeview Road, Hope Mills' 28348 

Advisor. Mrs. George H. Cocolas, 1298 Wildwood Drive, Chapel Hill 27514 

Coordinator Mrs. W. J. Smith, 908 Arrowhead Road, Chapel Hill 27514 

Convention Chairman Mrs. A. H. Mebane, III, 512 Audubon Drive, Greensboro 27403 

CONVENTION PROGRAM 

(All events at the Pinehurst Hotel unless otherwise noted) 

SUNDAY, MARCH 24 

1:00 p.m. — Reunion of UNC School of Pharmacy, Class of 1969 — Crystal Room 

2:00 p.m. — Registration Desks Open 

7:00 p.m. — Opening Session — Dinner, NCPhA and Auxiliaries — Ballroom 

• Awards Presentation 

• Entertainment by UNC Department of Music 

MONDAY, MARCH 25 

8:30 a.m. — Registration desks open 

9:30 a.m. — Depart hotel for COFFEE at the Country Club of North Carolina 

Afternoon — Free for activities including 

• Golf Tournament 

• Informal Bridge 

• Tennis 

• Tours of Clarendon Gardens (Transportation from Pinehurst 
Hotel approximately every 45 minutes) 

• Shopping, Sightseeing, Trap shooting, etc. 

7:45 p.m. — Bingo and Entertainment — sponsored by the Wholesale Druggists of North 
Carolina — Ballroom 

TUESDAY, MARCH 26 

8:30 a.m. — Registration desks open 

Morning — Free — continuation of activities such as bridge, tours, etc. 
12:00 noon — Woman's Auxiliary Business Session-Luncheon — Tickets from Registration 
Desk ($5.00). Entertainment will include a special program by Roland's Dance 
Studio of Fayetteville and a fashion show by the Pinehurst Hotel Boutique. 
8:30 p.m. — Traveling Men's Auxiliary Party — Entertainment by Ray Wilkinson, TV per- 
sonality, and Ed Turbeville's orchestra. 



Members of the Woman's Auxiliary are welcome to attend sessions of the NCPhA also. 



14 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



TUESDAY NIGHT, MARCH 26, ENTERTAINMENT SPONSORED BY 

THE TRAVELING MEN'S AUXILIARY OF THE NCPhA 

BALLROOM, PINEHURST HOTEL AND COUNTRY CLUB 




PRESENTING . . . 
RAY WILKINSON 

• THE MAN 

• THE TV-RADIO STAR 

• THE HUMORIST 

Wilkinson cleverly combines some of the 
more colorful and humorous true experiences 
from his varied professional, civic and per- 
sonal life, with fun-filled escapades from the 
vast storehouse of his imagination. 




Organized in 1946, Ed Turbeville's Orchestra has played for more public and private 
dances than any other orchestra in North and South Carolina. Program time: 8:30 P.M., 
Tuesday, March 26. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 15 

THE TRAVELING MEN'S AUXILIARY 

of the 

NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS— 1973- '74 

James R. Case, President Stanback Company, Ltd. 

Canie B. Smith, 1st Vice-President Dr. T. C. Smith Co. 

Ray L. Black, 2nd Vice-President Colorcraft Corporation 

L. M. MeCombs, Secretary-Treasurer Eli Lilly & Co. 

C. H. Smith, Assistant Secretary-Treasurer (Retired) Drug Package Co. 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Zack W. Lyon, 5 Years Peabody Drug Company 

Ray McArtan, 4 Years Whitman Chocolates 

C. Rush Hamriek, Jr., 3 Years Kendall Drug Co. 

Charles Harold Daniels, 2 Years Miles Laboratories 

W. H. Worley, Jr., 1 Year Dr. T. C. Smith Co. 

PROGRAM 
SUNDAY, MARCH 24 

(All events in The Pinehurst Hotel unless otherwise indicated) 
2:00 p.m. — Registration Opens 
7:00 p.m. — Dinner — Ballroom 

Includes Awards Session and Entertainment by the UNC Department of Music 

MONDAY, MARCH 25 

8:30 a.m. — Registration Opens 

9:00 a.m. — NCPhA Business Session — South Room 

1:00 p.m. — Golf Tournament — Pinehurst Country Club or tennis, skeet or trap shoot at 

Gun Club, visit to World Golf Hall of Fame or Clarendon Gardens 
7:45 p.m. — Entertainment sponsored by the Wholesale Druggists of North Carolina. Ball- 
room. Featuring The Barbara Berry Singers and Bingo. 

TUESDAY, MARCH 26 

8:30 a.m. — Registration Opens 
9:00 a.m.— NCPhA Business Session. South Room 
1 1:00 a.m. — TMA Business Session. Crystal Room 
2:00 p.m. — NCPhA Closing Session & Officer Installation. South Room 

8:30 p.m. — Entertainment sponsored by The Traveling Men's Auxiliary. Ballroom. Fea- 
turing Ray Wilkinson, TV personality and Ed Turbeville's Orchestra. 



GOLF AT THE PINEHURST COUNTRY CLUB 

Obtain your golf ticket at the TMA Registration Desk. TMA members will be assigned 
one of the five courses starting at 10:30 AM on Monday, March 25. Green fees compli- 
ments of Owens-Illinois. Either a cart or caddie must be used for which you are responsible. 



16 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 
CONVENTION ENTERTAINMENT CHAIRMEN 




Tho major convention entertainment events 
have been arranged by these three men: 

Len Phillipps, Jr. is chairman of the Golf 
Tournament. Three divisions: NCPhA, TMA 
and Ladies. Greens' fees courtesy of Owens- 
Illinois. You must be a convention registrant 
to participate. Pairings, rental of clubs, 
etc. is responsibility of participants. 

Rush Hamrick, Jr. is Chairman for the 
Monday night Party sponsored by the Whole- 
sale Druggists of North Carolina. The Bar- 
bara Berry Singers' will appear along with 
Bingo & Prizes. 

The TMA Party on Tuesday night was 
arranged by Ray Black, the TMA Entertain- 
ment Chairman. Features Ray Wilkinson and 
Ed Turbeville's Orchestra. 



Len Phillipps, Jr. 




C. Rush Hamrick, Jr. 



Ray Black 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 





Alfred H. Mebane, III 



Mrs. A. H. Mebane, III 



CONVENTION REGISTRARS 

The XCPhA and Woman's Auxiliary registrars — Pharmacist and Mrs. Alfred H. 
Mebane, III of Greensboro — are pictured above. Their efficient operation of the registra- 
tion procedures assures a smoothly flowing meeting. This year the registrars will be housed 
in a "registration room" set aside by The Pinehurst Hotel for this purpose. Tt is located 
to the left of the lobby entrance. 

The TMA registration will be supervised by Secretary-Treasurer L. M. McCombs and 
Assistant Secretary- Treasurer ('. H. Smith. 



PINEHURST HOTEL CHECK LIST 



The Carolina Dining Room will be open for breakfast and dinner each day (these meals 
are included as a part of your room rate). For in-between snacks and lunch, you will find 
the London Grill first rate. The adjoinhig Picadilly Pub has a cool one on tap and where 
desired, you can sip your favorite beverage aboard the H.M.S. Bounty. Downstairs, in The 
Pine Room, pool tables, games of skill plus crackers and candy. 



18 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



WILLIAM J. TURENNE 



William J. Turenne is a member of the 
Professional Relations Department of Eli 
Lilly and Company, the editor of the Lilly 
Digest and the NACDS-Lilly Digest. He also 
directs the Lilly Analysis Service and is 
primarily concerned with community phar- 
macy economics and their bearing on man- 
agement- practices. 

Turenne joined the firm as a sales' repre- 
sentative in suburban Boston on January 22, 
1964. After several assignments in sales, 
market research and economic studies he 
assumed his current position in June, 1973. 

Born in Massachusetts, Bill was graduated 
from Danvers High School in 1957 and in 
1958 from the New Preparatory School in 
.Cambridge. He received his B.S. in Phar- 
macy in 1962 from the University of Con- 
necticut. Bill is completing final require- 
ments for a master 's degree in Business' 
Administration at Boston College. Prior to 
employment by Eli Lilly and Company, he 
practiced community pharmacy in Massa- 
chusetts, where he maintains his license. 




'MANAGEMENT EXPERTISE— A PROFESSIONAL NECESSITY.' 
MARCH 26 NCPhA BUSINESS SESSION, PINEHURST 



MOSS ELECTED CHAIRMAN 

Pharmacist Fred M. Moss, Sr. of Gas- 
tonia has been elected Chairman of the Gas- 
ton County Board of Health. 

Mr. Moss, a graduate of the UNC School 
of Pharmacy and owner/manager of Moss 
Rexall Drugs, has been a member of his 
county board of health for many years. 

DR. WORK VISITS SCHOOL 
OF PHARMACY 

Dr. David R. Work was a recent visitor to 
the UNC School of Pharmacy whe ,- e he was 
formerly Assistant Dean for Fiscal Affairs'. 

Dr. Work is presently Director of Asso- 
ciation Affairs of the National Association 
of Retail Druggists, Chicago. He has held 
that position since June 1973. 



As one of the few pharmacist-attorneys 
in the United States, Dr. Work spoke to the 
senior class on changes in pharmacy law in- 
volving Federal and State Controlled Sub- 
stances Acts and other legal aspects of 
pharmacy. 

KERR DRUG ROBBED OF $3,400 

Nearly $3,400 was stolen from a safe at 
Kerr Drug Store in University Mall, Chapel 
Hill, on Maxell 6. 

Detectives s"ay four men may be respon- 
sible for the theft. It is believed one of the 
men took the money while his three partners 
distracted the clerks on duty at the time. 

The store manager, Pharmacist Bill Scar- 
borough, described the men as black and in 
their mid-20s. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 10 

CONVENTION SPONSORS 

In appreciation for substantial support of the 94th Annual Meeting of the North Car- 
olina Pharmaceutical Association and Affiliated Auxiliaries, grateful recognition is ex- 
pressed to the following Convention sponsors: 
BURROUGHS WELLCOME COMPANY 
COLORCRAFT CORPORATION 
ELI LILLY AND COMPANY 
GEIGY PHARMACEUTICALS 
MARION LABORATORIES, INC. 
MERCK SHARP & DOHME, INC. 
MERRELL-NATIONAL LABORATORIES 

N. C. MUTUAL WHOLESALE DRUG COMPANY (Sunday Night Entertainment I 
OWENS-ILLINOIS, RX CONTAINERS (Golf Tournament Greens Fees) 
PARKE, DAVIS AND COMPANY 
PFIZER PHARMACEUTICALS 
ROBINS, A. H. AND COMPANY 
ROCHE LABORATORIES 

SMITH KLINE & FRENCH LABORATORIES 

TRAVELING MEN'S AUXILIARY, NCPhA (Tuesday Night Entertainment) 
WYETH LABORATORIES 
YOUNGS DRUG PRODUCTS CORPORATION 
THE UPJOHN COMPANY r 



and these sponsors of the monday night entertainment: 

bellamy drug company, wilmington 

justice drug company, greensboro 

k end all drug company, shelby 

king, w. h. drug company, raleigh (icn pharmaceuticals) 

McKesson & robbins drug company, charlotte 

n. c. mutual wholesale drug company, durham 

o 'hanlon- watson drug company, winston-salem 

owens, minor & bodeker, wilson 

peabody drug co., raleigh 

scott drug company, charlotte 

smith, dr. t. c. company", ashevillk 



CONVENTION CONTRIBUTORS 

For essential financial assistance, the Convention Committers, mi behalf of the NCPhA 
and Affiliated Auxiliaries, expressed appreciation to: 



ORTHO PHARMACEUTICAL CORPORATION ABBOTT LABORATORIES 

SCHERING CORPORATION AYERST LABORATORIES 

SQUIBB, E. R. & SONS, INC. MENLY \ JAMES LABORATORIES 

WARNER/CHILCOTT 



Two 'up front' 

cold products uou can 

stand behind 




For temporary relief of nasal congestion, headache, aches. 
pains and fever due to -COLDS- SINUSITIS -FLU 

^^^^^ TRADEMARK 

ornex 



DECONGESTANT/ANALGESIC 




20 CAPSULES 



No Sedatives 
No Antihistamines 



For colds 



Tradfrmft* 

ORNACOl 



COUGH & COLD 
LIQUID 

For temporary relief from coughing 
and nasal congestion associated 
with the common cold and sinusitis 



NOANTIHISTAMI. 
NO SEDATIVES 



FL. OZ. 
1 18 ML) 




■ 



For coughs and colds 



Smith Kline & French Laboratories, Division of smithKime Corp.. Philadelphia. Pa. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 



ECKEL APPOINTED TO PAID 

PRESCRIPTIONS PEER REVIEW 

COMMITTEE IN REGION II 

Fred M. Eckel has been appointed to the 
PAID Prescriptions Peer Review Commit- 
tee in Region II. Mr. Eckel replaces Don 
McLeod who resigned subsequent to accept- 
ing a position in Buffalo, New York. 

In appointing Mr. Eckel, PAID Prescrip- 
tions continues the hospital pharmacy rep- 
resentation afforded by Mr. MeLeod and 
brings to the Committee Mr. Eckel's 1 own 
unique qualifications in the areas of institu- 
tional pharmacy and drug therapy. 

PAID Prescriptions is pleased to announce 
the acceptance of this appointment by Mr. 
Eckel. 



A KIND WORD FOR 
PHARMACIST ELLISON 

Occasionally a pharmacist is commended 
for an unexpected professional or public 
service deed but rarely in the form of a 
poem. 

In this instance, J. M. (Jerry) Ellison, 
staff pharmacist with Old Town Pharmacy 
of Winston-Salem, was the recipient of the 
following poem plus a case of Florida fruit 
from a grateful customer: 

A doctor 's fine, if you arc sick 

(But nurses really get there quick); 

Psychiatrists are for the birds — 
A lawyer 's usually full of words ; 

And engineers sometimes invent 
A gadget to your detriment ; 

\ teacher promulgates his views — 
A publisher may spread the news 

A politician ' ' shoots the bull ' ' 
Til] his constituency is full; 

But at the head of my top list 

ts my good friend, my Pharmacist ! 



REVCO MANAGER NAMED 
AREA SUPERVISOR 

The recent promotion of Clifford Owen 
Morgan, Jr., to Supervisor of Stores, Area 
VII, has been announced by Albert Seaboek, 



Vice President of Store Operations, Revco 
D.S., Inc. 

Morgan, with a background of 1:2 years 
in Pharmacy, joined Revco as a Pharmacist/ 
Store Manager in Rock Hill, South Carolina, 
in July, 1970, following management of a 
unit for Smith Drug Stores in that area. 

A graduate of the University of South 
Carolina's School of Pharmacy in 1961, 
Morgan worked for Smith Stores before 
being commissioned a Lieutenant with the 
U.S. Army in 1962. Serving three years, he 
was 1 Chief Pharmacy Officer at the Army 
Military Hospital, Ft. Devens, Massachu- 
setts. Upon release, he returned to his posi- 
tion with Smith before joining Revco. 

A native of Clover, South Carolina, Mor- 
gan is a member of the Sixth District Phar- 
maceutical Association, South Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association, and the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina Gamecock Club. 
His new responsibilities will be the super- 
vision of Revco stores in nine areas of North 
and South Carolina. 



ABBOTT SPONSORS NEW HEART 
ATTACK PREVENTION FILM 

"Gameplan: Life" is the title of a new 
16 mm motion picture release on the subject 
of heart attack prevention. Donald 'Connor 
in an appealing backstage s'etting presents 
the subject with reference to his own per- 
sonal experience Avith heart disease. 

John Hiller, star relief pitcher of the De- 
troit Tigers and 1974 winner of the Hutch 
enson Award, joins Donald O'Connor to tell 
of the pitfalls leading to their heart prob- 
lems. Both men are back performing and 
achieving in their respective professions. 

Filmed in Reno, Los Angeles' and Duluth, 
the 15 minute movie focuses on the events 
hading up to and during a heart attack 
and featuring the rescue efforts of the para- 
medic unit of the city of Los Angeles Fire 
Department. 

Abbott, a North Chicago pharmaceutical 
manufacturer, sponsored the film production 
as a public service to inform adults of the 
risk factors and what can be done to pre- 
vent heart attack. 



You're new here 
aren't you? 



Yes, I'm just helping 
out Fred today. 




Is this you, doing 
relief work? 

Many pharmacists work in more than one 
store. That's fine! 

DU I who's going to pay the legal 
fees if that customer claims an error was 
made? 

It could be you! 



Protect yourself! Obtain your own Profe: 
sional Liability Policy from the compar 
founded by pharmacists for pharmacist? 
Even though you don't do relief work, yc 
can be held liable for any alleged mistake 
at your regular place of employment, 
you already have a professional liabih 
policy, is it Excess or Primary? What 
the difference? 

The ADI insurance is Primary. That meai 
in the event of a claim, we are there 
defend you! Excess policies may or m 
not. Look for wording such as, "this poll 
shall apply only as excess over other va 
and collectible insurance." 



BE SECURE! SEND IN THE APPLICATION AT RIGHT TOD/ 



The American Druggists' Insurance Company 

APPLICATION FOR PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY FOR THE PHARMACIST 



LIMITS $300,000 EFFECTIVE DATE. 
1. NAME 



2. ADDRESS- 



3. TELEPHONE. 

4. EMPLOYER- 

ADDRESS 



5. WHEN DID YOU GRADUATE FROM PHARMACY SCHOOL?. 
WHAT SCHOOL? 



YEAR REGISTERED STATE. 



6. ARE YOU AN OWNER, PARTNER, OR CORPORATE OFFICER OF A RETAIL PHARMACY? 

YES NO (CIRCLE ONE) 

7. ARE YOU PRACTICING PROFESSIONALLY, FULL TIME OR PART TIME, ANY PLACE OTHER 
THAN A RETAIL PHARMACY? (FOR EXAMPLE, A HOSPITAL OR NURSING HOME) 

YES NO (CIRCLE ONE) 

8. DO YOU COMPOUND IN BULK, MANUFACTURE, OR WHOLESALE ANY DRUGS OR DRUG 
PRODUCTS? Y£S N0 (CIRCLE ONE) 

9. HAVE ANY PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY CLAIMS BEEN MADE AGAINST YOU? 

YES NO (CIRCLE ONE) 

10. PLEASE GIVE THE DETAILS CONCERNING ANY "YES" ANSWER(S) ON QUESTIONS 6 
THROUGH 9. 



SIGNING THIS APPLICATION DOES NOT BIND THE COMPANY TO COMPLETE THE INSURANCE, 
BUT IT IS AGREED THAT THIS FORM SHALL BE THE BASIS OF THE CONTRACT SHOULD 
A POLICY BE ISSUED. 



SIGNATURE OF APPLICANT 



PLEASE SEND COMPLETED APPLICATION, TOGETHER WITH CHECK FOR $75. 
(PAYABLE TO AMERICAN DRUGGISTS' INSURANCE COMPANY) 

FOR THREE (3) YEARS PRE-PAID PREM'UM. NOT SOLD FOR LESSER PERIOD. 

SEND TO: HAMMETT INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 
P.O. Box 248 
Concord, North Carolina 28025 
















• 



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V*;* 



hBCimw^ImmBmH ^ 



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fr^i 









ml 



. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 



NORTHEASTERN CAROLINA 
PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

John Morrell, medical service representa- 
tive of Ciba Laboratories, was guest speaker 
at the February 13 meeting of the North- 
eastern Carolina Pharmaceutical Society. 
"Hypertension" was the subject of Mr. 
Morrell 's speech. 

Tho meeting, held in Williamston at the 
Roanoke Country Club, was attended by 
pharmacists from the organization's 13 
county area. President Bud O 'Neal of Bel- 
haven, presided. 



CAROLINA CAMERA 

The Wake County Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation sponsored a dinner in Raleigh for 
L. M. (Mae) MeCombs, Eli Lilly medical 
service representative, now retired. 

The pictures (opposite page) were taken 
by Pharmacist Roger M. Crane of Raleigh. 

TOP: Mr. MeCombs with one of the more 
than 100 persons who attended the dinner. 
TOP CENTER: W. Forest Matthews (Merrell 
National), the master of ceremonies, presents 
a gift to Mr. MeCombs. Mrs. MeCombs is 
shown seated between Mr. Mac and Forest. 
BOTTOM CENTER: Testimonial speakers 
were, left to right, Dr. Annie Louise Wilker- 
son; David McGowan, Lilly MSR, and 
NCPhA Executive Director W. J. Smith. 
BOTTOM: The president of the Wake Coun- 
ty Pharmaceutical Association, Jerry John- 
son, presents inscribed plaque to Mr. Me- 
Combs. The inscription on the plaque: "In 
appreciation of his vision, leadership and 
more than forty years of dedicated service 
to North Carolina Pharmacy." 

Mr. MeCombs continues as secretary-trea- 
surer of the Traveling Men's Auxiliary of 
the NCPhA. The annual meeting of the 
TMA is set for March 26, Pinehurst. 



ROCKINGHAM COUNTY 
SOCIETY OF PHARMACISTS 

W. B. Apple, Jr., President of the First 
National Bank of Reidsvillc, was guest 
speaker for the first meeting in 1974 of the 



Rockingham County Society of Pharmacists. 
Mr. Apple talked specifically in the areas of 
"money, inflation, and investments," touch- 
ing briefly on the foreign money market and 
balance of payments. 

A point of business with the area phar- 
macists was tho fact that most frequently 
the pharmacist is required, by professional 
ethics, to consult with physicians regarding 
the medicines which patients are taking; the 
protection of patients ' health is uppermost 
in the minds of pharmacists, particularly as 
medicines become more and more sophisti- 
cated. 

It was pointed out by the practitioners 
present that their obligation to the patients ' 
care must be first, and only by consultation 
with the physicians can this be accomplished. 

In today 's world of complicated medicines 
and treatments', the pharmacist feels he must 
take his position in protecting the patients 
of Rockingham County, especially where 
Over-The-Counter medications are involved. 



WAKE COUNTY 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

Guest speaker at the February 5 meeting 
of the Wake County Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation was Pharmacist/Senator John T. 
Henley of Hope Mills. 

Senator Henley discussed the Rx label bill 
which will be effective June 1, Medicaid 
co-pay, the N. C. Drug Authority and the 
N. C. Board of Pharmacy's state- wide in- 
quiry regarding fees' collected by the Board. 

Senator Henley urged support of and par- 
ticipation in NC-PharmPAC (North Car- 
olina Pharmacy Political Action Committer . 

John Myhre conveyed the thanks of L. M. 
MeCombs to the group for the dinner given 
in his honor when he retired in January. 
Roger Crane commended Forest Matthews 
for his fine job as master of ceremonies at 
the dinner and program. 

Joey Edwards recommended the compila- 
tion of an up-to-date list of all Wake County 
physicians and dentists and their DEA num- 
bers. Mr. Edwards' was named chairman of 
a committee to recommend a plan for pro- 
viding night prescription service. 



DRUG STORE SHOPPERS ARE 
DIFFERENT 

Today's shopper expects, and responds, to a Modern Shopping Atmosphere. 
3 out of 1 impulse purchases are inspired by 

DISPLAYS 
The right kind of drug store fixture is the KEY to VOLUME Sales . . . 
We can assure you the right kind of fixture for every display purpose with 

COLUMBUS IMPERIAL DRUG 
STORE FIXTURES 

Let us DESIGN and engineer your DRUG STORE to promote and SELL merchandise. 

We have successfully given this service to our customers for over a quarter of o 
century. 

"Giving you the best design, the best fixture and the best service by 
professionals" 

CALL US FOR A SINGLE FIXTURE OR A COMPLETE STORE. 



RAMSEY 

MANUFACTURING CORPORATION 

513 East Trade Street 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Telephone 704-334-3457 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



27 




WAYNE F. WALL has been assigned to the 
Charlotte territory of The Upjohn Company. 
Mr. Wall recently completed several weeks 
of training at The Upjohn Company Train- 
ing Center in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He is a 
graduate of Middle Tennessee State with a 
major in Biology. In 1971 he received his 
master's in Biology from the same university. 







TOM JONES OF JACKSONVILLE — DISTINGUISHED SERVICE WINNER 
The Jacksonville Jaycees Distinguished Service Award recipient — Pharmacist Tom 
Jones — and his wife are being congratulated by Jacksonville Mayor Bruce Teachey. Jones, 
a graduate of the UNC School of Pharmacy, is pharmacist manager of Gibson's Pharmacy 
in Jacksonville. He has been active in local Jaycee projects and has presented more than 
50 speeches and radio interviews, primarily in the area of drug abuse information. 



The NCPhA-Endorsed Insurance Plans 
Which Merit Member Participation 



BASIC PLAN: 



EXTENDED PLAN: 



DISABILITY INCOME PLAN 

Accident Total Disability — Lifetime 
Sickness Total Disability — Two Years 

Accident Total Disability — Lifetime 
Sickness Total Disability — Five Years 



MAJOR MEDICAL EXPENSE PLAN 

PLAN I: $18,000 Maximum Benefit including $30 Daily Room Limit 
PLAN II: $30,000 Maximum Benefit including $50 Daily Room Limit 
(Up to $45,000 Maximum Benefit including $75.00 Daily Room 
Limit Available) 

TERM LIFE PLAN 

Up to $20,000 For Members 
Dependents Coverage Also Available 

HOSPITAL INCOME PLAN 

$25.00 Per Day For Member 
$20.00 Per Day For Spouse 
$15.00 Per Day For Each Child 

Payable From The First Day of Hospital Confinement 

For Up to 15 Months 

RETIREMENT AND PROFIT SHARING PLANS 

Excellent plans are available for both the Self Employed 
and Corporate Entities. 



FOR DETAILS 

WRITE OR 
TELEPHONE: 



HOYT W. SHORE, C.L.U. and Associates 
821 Baxter Street— Suite 316 
Charlotte, North Carolina 28202 

Telephone: (704) 333-3764 




Washington National 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

EVANSTON, ILLINOIS 60201 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



ACTION AT THE INSTITUTE 
OF PHARMACY 

February 5. XCPhA Committee on Insti- 
tutional Pharmacy (W. T. Williams, Chair- 
man) met at the Institute of Pharmacy, 
Chapel Hill, to discuss guidelines for im- 
plementing the new Federal regulations re- 
lating to pharmacy service (skilled nursing 
homes', intermediate care facilities, etc.). 
Committee will report on March 26 at Pine- 
hurst Convention. 

February 6. Meeting of officers and direc- 
tors, XC-PharmPac at Institute of Phar- 
macy. Discussed current status of pharmacy 
legislative program and reviewed plans for 
future. Encouraged by increased number of 
pharmacists seeking service in the 1974 ses- 
sion of The X. C. General Assembly. 

February 12. Durham-Orange Pharmaceu- 
tical Association Committee reviews survey 
(see this issue Journal) and plans for mid- 
March meeting of the organization. 

February 19. Meeting of XCPhA Endow- 
ment Fund Committee (B. Cade Brooks', 
Chairman). Chairman will announce commit- 
tee approved program on March 26 at Pine- 
hurst Convention. 

February 19. XCPhA Executive Commit- 
tee meets at the Institute of Pharmacy. De- 
tails of the ten item agenda will be published 
later. 

February 20. 8th Annual Seminar on So- 
cio-Economic Aspects of Pharmacy Service. 
90 pharmacists in attendance. All papers to 
he published jointly by ITXC School of 
Pharmacy and XCPhA. One paper — PRE- 
SCRIPTIOX DRUG PRICIXG AXD THE 
CONSUMER'S RIGHT TO KXOW— ap- 
pears in this issue of The Journal. 



A NEW CHALLENGE FOR 
MISS SABATINI 

Miss Gloria R. Sabatini, Director of Phar- 
macy Affairs', Smith Kline & French Lab- 
oratories, has taken a leave of absence from 
the company to assume the position of As- 
sistant Administrator for Policy Coordina 
tion in the Social and Rehabilitation Ser- 
vice, Department of Health Education and 
Welfare. 



The effective date of Miss Sabatini 's new 
responsibility was February 19. 

As Director of Pharmacy Affairs' for 
SK&F, Miss Sabatini became well known 
nationwide to pharmacy practitioners in all 
areas of practice. She was a XCPhA guest 
speaker in Boone (June 1973) while the 
93rd annual meeting of the Association was 
in progress. 

IN MEMORY OF 
HUGH SCONYERS 

Contributions to the TMA Foundation in 
memory of the late Hugh K. Sconyers have 
been received from the following: 
C. Rush Hamriek, Jr., Kendall Drug Com- 
pany, Shelby 
L. M. McCombs, Creedmoor 
Ralph P. Rogers, Jr., X. C. Mutual Whole- 
sale Drug, Durham. 



I. C. System, Inc, 

The nation's most highly 
specialized collection service 



Your Association's Collection Service is 
an affiliate of a national organization cur- 
rently serving members of more than 700 
leading trade associations throughout the 
nation. 

Don't lose sales volume because cus- 
tomers owe you money and are trading 
somewhere else. Your Association's Col- 
lection Service will chase those debtors 
back into your place of business to pay 
YOU direct. You will get accounts OFF 
your ledger and IN your bank account — 
and you will also have many former cus- 
tomers back doing business with you again. 
For information, contact your Association 
office. It will pay you to do so. 

On request, A representative 

of the I. C. System will explain 

the collection program in detail. 

Call or write the NCPhA, Box 151, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



30 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



DURHAM-ORANGE CONDUCTS SURVEY OF MEMBER INTERESTS 

The Durham-Orange Pharmaceutical Association has completed a Survey of member 
preference relating to programs and organizational activity. Here are the results (may be 
of interest to other local/sectional pharmacy organizations) : 
1. (a) How frequently should meetings of the Association be held? 



8 monthly 

2 semi-annuall}' 



20 bi-monthly 
annually 



1 2 quarterly 



(b) What day of the week"? 



Sunday 
7 Wednesday 
Saturday 



8 Monday 
12 Thursday 



9 Tuesday 
(i Friday 



(c) What time of the day or evening? 



5 7:00 a.m. (breakfast) 

2 6:30 p.m. (dinner) 

14 7:30 p.m. (after dinner) 

5 8:30 p.m. (late evening) 

1 9:30 p.m. (late evening) 



9 



00 a.m. (breakfast) 

00 p.m. (dinner) 

00 p.m. (after dinner) 

00 p.m. (late evening) 



Other, please specify : 



2. In what type of an environment should these meetings be held? 

22 professional (community pharmacy, hospital, pharmacy institute, university) 
17 restaurants 
3 private homes 

3. What type of meetings' and activities would you like the Association to pursue? 



(a) social activities 



(b) professional activities 



20 dinners 

4 dances 

2 games 
Others, please specify : 



22 political 

22 seminars 

20 continuing education (regular courses) 

27 discussion, no program (exchange of 

ideas) 
22 combined meeting with allied health 

professionals 
20 speakers 
12 field trips 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 



4. The members of the organization should lie limited to: 
11 only pharmacists 

27 pharmacists and persons engaged in pharmacy-related areas' 
practicing pharmacists only (community and hospital pharmacists) 

5. I am interested in the following current pharmacy problems: 
14 postmg of prescription prices 

33 improving the pharmacy image 

19 Anti-Substitution Bill 

25 closer relations' between pharmacists and physicians 

14 clinical pharmacy practice 

11 the role of the pharmacy technician 

(i. I am interested in the following community projects: 
21 mental health care 
9 free health clinics 
23 family practice involvement 

7. Would you be interested in serving as an officer of the organization? 
YES 8 NO 22 

8. Would you be interested in serving on a committee? 
YES 22 NO 10 



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Another plus value of the modern paper 
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E. N. ROWELL CO., INC 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



32 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



SURVEY ON BOARD FEES CHANGES 

2,965 letters sent to pharmacists: 

1,358 (45.8%) returns received (as of 2/20/74) ; 
1,115 (82.4%) support changes; 
237 (17.6%) do not support ; 

6 failed to indicate ' ' for " or " against. ' ' 
Of the 237 who do not support: 

70 live and practice out of state but keep licenses current in North Carolina ; 
42 additional were licensed by reciprocity and practice in state but also keep li- 
censes in one or more other states ; 

7 are retired or are not engaged in practice. 
Of the 237 who do not support: 

102 indicated no reason for their position; 
135 gave reasons as follows- — 

41 said funds should come from state appropriations, 

20 support all changes except increase in fee for pharmacist renewal license, 

12 would support proposed changes if they were gradual, 

14 feel increases are too great, 
30 gave miscellaneous reasons, 

3 would approve changes but with lower fee for out of state pharmacists. 
Of the 1,115 respondents Supporting changes: 
859 did so without comment; 
256 made comments — 

57 recommended one or more of the fees be made higher than proposed, 

49 favor self-regulation, 

44 gave miscellaneous reasons for support, 

29 recommended different fee schedules (including Cape Fear Pharmaceutical 

Society), 
20 strongly endorse, 
16 offered congratulatory messages to Board, 

15 felt all fees should be higher than proposed, 
14 suggested state or federal support, 

9 said all other costs have increased, 

3 recommended that the increases' be gradual. 




Service In \AZriolesaJ© QuarrtrtieQ" 



USE OUR TOLL FREE 

NUMBER 800-222-3856 

ANY TIME DAY OR NIGHT 

ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY 



GORDON G. HAMRICK 
Vice President 



DRUG COIVWRAiMY 



SHELBY. N.C. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



33 



DISASTERS 



Major and Minor 



HILDEBRAN 

A Valdese man has been charged with 
cracking a safe at the Viewmont Pharmacy 
Xo. 2 in Hildebran. 

WADESBORO 

Two men have been arrested for the rob- 
bery of Fox & Lyon Drug Store. Loot re- 
covered by police include cameras, electric 
razors, radios, movie projectors, watches and 
billfolds. 

LUMBERTON 

Stolen from Dean's Pharmacy: 200 U.S. 
Po9tal Money Orders, postage stamps valued 
at $4,710 and an unknown quantity of 
drugs. Agents of the FBI have joined local 
police in investigating the robbery. 

DENTON 

The January 20 break-in at Denton Drug 
Store involved the loss of over 18,000 as- 
sorted Controlled Substances. A burglar 
alarm system was by-passed. 

RUTHERFORD COLLEGE 

For breaking and entering College Phar- 
macy, Kevin D. Auten of Gasitonia received 
an IB-months active sentence. 

WASHINGTON 

People's Drug Store, Washington Square 
Shopping Center, robbed of a tape recorder, 
watches and radios in a break-in. 

MOORESVILLE 

Rev co Drug Center, Pirt City Shopping 
Center: Burglarized of drugs valued at 
more than $300. 

ROCKINGHAM 

Eckerd's, Tri-City Shopping Center: $400 
in drugs taken in addition to syringes and 
watches. Police said someone permitted him- 



self to be locked up in the store, then broke 
out with the stolen loot. 

FAYETTEVILLE 

Pharmacist Cade Brooks did Some detec- 
tive work on his own following robbery of 
his pharmacy. Scouting near his pharmacy 
following a silent burglar alarm alert, Mr. 
Brooks spotted a suspicious car and took 
down the license number. Later, police ar- 
rested the owner of the car. 

MOUNT PLEASANT 

A robbery of the Moose Drug Company 
apparently failed to satisfy the drug needs 
of an unknown party, or parties', since the 
drug firm was reentered one day later. Taken 
this time was drugs missed on first visit. 

ELIZABETH CITY 

Jacock 's Pharmacy lost drugs and cash 
in an early February robbery of the phar- 
macy. Pharmacist L. T. Holder estimated 
the value of drugs taken to be $406.00. 

BLACK MOUNTAIN 

Controlled Substances valued at $3 to 
$400 were taken from the Black Mountain 
Drug Company in a February 7 robbery. 

ROSEBORO 

Night visitors entered and removed drugs 
valued at several hundred dollars from Tart 
& West Drug Store in mid-February. 

WADESBORO 

A robbery of Fox & Lyon Drug Store was 
solved within 24 hours with the arrest of 
two teen-agers on charges of breaking and 
entering and larceny. Recovered: a slide 
projector, two tape players, several cameras, 
watches, flashbulbs and shaving lotion as 
well as $65 cash taken during the robbery. 



34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



HENRY ROLAND TOTTEN 
MEMORIAL GARDEN CENTER 



Most of the members of the N. C. Phar- 
maceutical Association recall the contribu- 
tions made by this great teacher over a half 
century. In the field of Pharmaceutical Bot- 
any, he taught most of you. 

It seems appropriate that we honor the 
memory of Dr. Totten who passed away Feb- 
ruary 11, 1974 less than three weeks after 
the death of his devoted wife, Addie Wil- 
liams Totten. 

A suit-able memorial for Dr. and Mrs. Tot- 
ten is proposed. The N. C. Botanical Garden 
is located on 329 acres of woods' and meadow 
land in Chapel Hill, owned by the University 
of North Carolina. This area is used for the 
teaching of botany; it is a laboratory where 
scientific study of plants is conducted; it is 
a recreation area; it is a place for the teach- 
ing of conservation. 



The Garden is modestly equipped for study 
purposes, as far as trails and greenhouses 
are concerned. There are no other buildings 
except a tool shed and a portable toilet. 

The immediate need is for a building 
which will contain a meeting room about the 
size of the auditorium in our Institute of 
Pharmacy in Chapel Hill, plus offices, in- 
door toilet facilities, and a work-room for 
students. 

The Garden will provide the land without 
charge. Funds for the Building in the 
amount of about $100,000 are being raised 
by public subscription. 

It is suggested that members' of the N. C. 
Pharmaceutical Association will want to 
participate in this memorial project. Gifts 
are tax exempt. 

For your convenience, a gift coupon is 
attached. 



HEREWITH IS MY CONTRIBUTION FOR THE TOTTEN MEMORIAL: 

Name: .•; 

Address : 

Make checks payable to : 

N. C. Botanical Garden, Inc. 

Totten Memorial Fund 

Send to : 

Box 2241, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 



ECONOMIC SEMINAR 



sented during the 1-day seminar will be pub- 
lished in The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. 



The well-attended (approximately 100 
registrants) Eighth Annual Seminar on So- 
cio-Economic Aspects of Pharmacy Practice 
was held at the Institute of Pharmacy, 
Chapel Hill, on February 20. 

The proceedings of the seminar will be 
published with copies available at a later 
date. In the meantime, various papers' pre- 



CITIZEN OF THE YEAR 

Pharmacist Lloyd Senter of Carrboro has 
been named "Citizen of the Year" by the 
Chapel Hill Chamber of Commerce in recog- 
nition of his numerous civic activities, in- 
cluding establishing the Orange County Res- 
cue Squad. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 



STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Members — W. R. Adams, Jr., Wilson; David D. Clayror, Greensboro; Harold V. Day, 

Spruce Pine; Jesse M. Pike, Concord; W. H. Randall, Lillingron; H. C. McAllister, 

Secy.-Treas., Box 471, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



NEW PHARMACIES 

1. The Treasury Drug Center, Falls Village 
Shopping Center, Raleigh, Thomas H. 
Cahill, pharmacist manager. 

2. Harrelson's Pharmacy, 107 West Main 
Street, Tabor City. William H. Harrel- 
son, pharmacist manager. 

3. Peoples Service Drug Store, In?., White- 
ville. Phillip T. Ward, pharmacist man- 
ager. 

4. Eckerd Drugs, Freedom Drive Mall, Char- 
lotte. John W. (Jack) Moore, pharmacist 
manager. 

5. Hardin's Drug, Forest City. Kenneth P. 
Hardin, Jr., pharmacist manager. 

(5. Reveo Discount Drug Center, Aberdeen. 
Jerry D. Ehoades, pharmacist manager. 

7. Reveo Discount Drug Center, Lowe's 
Plaza, Thomasville. Donald K. Richmond, 
pharmacist manager. 

8. The Medicine Shoppe, Fayetteville. Rad- 
ford H. Rich, pharmacist manager. 

9. Cashiers Rexall Pharmacy, Cashiers. 
Mark S. Zachary, pharmacist manager. 



(2) Jimmy Wiley Bagwell from Alabama. 
SupeRx Drugs, High Point. 

(3) Bobby Gene Gay from Georgia. Su- 
peRx Drugs, Winston-Salem. 

(4.) Earl Dennis Mann from Georgia. An- 
derson's Drug Store, High Point. 

(5) Audrey Smith Roach from Georgia. 
Reveo Discount Drug Center, Winston-Salem. 



ECKERD BUYS 13 LIGGETT 
STORES 

Eckerd Drugs, Inc., Charlotte, North Car- 
olina, has entered into an agreement with 
Drug Store Division, Inc., Erie, Pennsyl- 
vania, providing for the purchase by Ec- 
kerd 's for cash of thirteen Liggett Drug 
Stores in Georgia and Alabama. Of the nine 
stores in Alabama, seven are in Birmingham 
and two in Gadsden. Two of the Georgia 
stores are located in Athens and one each 
in Macon and Columbus. The takeover is 
scheduled to take place during the month of 
April. 



CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP 

1. Foothills Pharmacy, 202-A Harper Av- 
enue, N. W., Lenoir. Shirley M. Mikeal, 
owner and pharmacist manager. No change 
in name of pharmacy operation. 

2. Springs Road Pharmacy, Inc., 2400 
Springs Road, Hickory. Russell G. Sig- 
mon, Jr., pharmacist manager. 



BOARD OF PHARMACY 
EXAMINATIONS 

More than fifty candidates were in Chapel 
Hill on March 12-13 for the examination 
for pharmacists' licenses. Results of the 
exam will be announced by the Board in 
April. 



RECIPROCITY 

(1) Carol Ann Hogart Alexander from 
Maryland. Rex Hospital, Raleigh. 



SAFETY CLOSURES 

April in is the deadline after which date 
all prescription drugs in oral dosage forms 

must lie dispensed in safety closure con- 
tainers. 



36 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



For eighty-nine years 
. . . . since 1885 



seemcin 

OF DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long 
association with North Car- 
olina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its fifty- 
fourth volume, and the first 
printed copy was "Seeman 
Printed." 




A DIVISION OF 
FISHER-HARRISON CORP. 



THE SUCCESSFUL DRUGSTORE: 

HOW TO BUILD A MILLION 

DOLLAR BUSINESS 

NOTED AUTHORITY ON DRUGSTORE 

MANAGEMENT REVEALS PROVEN 
STRATEGIES FOR BUILDING MULTI- 
MILLION DOLLAR OPERATION 

According to Thomas E. Coleman, "It 
doesn 't matter what profit level you are at 
presently. By using certain tested techniques, 
it is possible to rise from your current profit 
level and build a million-dollar drugstore 
business. ' ' 

In Coleman's new book, THE SUCCESS- 
FUL DRUGSTORE: HOW TO BUILD A 
MILLION DOLLAR BUSINESS, to be 
published by Prentice-Hall on January 14, 
1974, he reveals these simple yet little-known 
profit-boosting techniques which multiply 
sales while cutting costs to the bone. His 
complete program for increasing sales deals 
with every aspect of drugstore management, 
from arranging more effective product dis- 
plays to beating the competition at +heir 
own game. 

Some of the vital areas this book covers 
are: how to generate a steady flow of in- 
creased customer traffic . . . how to use tem- 
porary promotions to get extra weekly sales 
. . . how to pinpoint the hot sales spots in 
any drugstore . . . how to get a 30% jump 
in sales through modernization . . . how to 
add special products and services to pull in 
new customers . . . and how to use various 
price tactics to make customers feel they are 
in a discount store, without sacrificing 
profits. 

Also included are detailed pointers on how 
to organize and use advertising most effec- 
tively, and how to avoid the common mis- 
takes in store operation that can drive cus- 
tomers away. 



If a member of the N. C. Pharmaceutical 
Association, you qualify for Group Rate Tour 
to Hawaii, leaving Greensboro-High Point 
Airport, June 1. 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



37 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 



RANDLEMAN — Pharmacist James King 
has returned to Eandleman following nine 
years of employment in Lenoir. He will be 
associated with Economy Drug Company. 

CANTON — In recognition of filling over two 
million prescriptions, Martin's Drug Store 
was presented a commemorative painting by 
representatives of Parke, Davis & Company. 



KING'S MOUNTAIN— Carl Wiesener, 
founder of the Mountaineer Pharmacy, has 
purchased Hugh G. Hallam 's interest in the 
pharmacy and is now sole owner. Pharma- 
cist Dennis Beatty is returning as" a mem- 
ber of the staff. 

PINEHURST—Ua\ C. Eeaves, Jr. served as 
chairman of the Annual Meeting (January 
31) of the Sandhills Area Chamber of Com- 
merce. The meeting was held in Southern 
Pines at the Southern Pines Country Club. 

FRANKLIN— Appointed to the board of 
directors of the Northwestern Bank of 
Franklin : Victor Perry, co-owner of Perry 's 
Drug Store. 

RALEIGH— A. F. Lockamy, Jr., Pharma- 
cist with Revco Drug Store #1198, has been 
elected president of King 'g Plaza Mer- 
chants Association. 



ROSE HILL — Carr Drug observed its grand 
opening celebration in early February. The 
store, located in Rose Manor Shopping Cen- 
ter, is owned and managed by Pharmacist 
Bob Carr, a graduate of the UNC School of 
Pharmacy. 

SYLYA — Carl L. Stringer, relief pharmacist 
at Sylva and Franklin pharmacies, attended 
the Consultant Pharmacist Conference held 
in Gainesville, Florida, January 23-24. 

TAYLORSYILLE— Pharmacist Rowe B. 
Campbell, Jr., Chairman of the Alexander 
County Board of Education, has filed for a 
second term as one of two board members 
from the Taylorsville School District. 

SILER CITY— Pharmacist Henry Dunlap 
is a candidate for the Chatham County Board 
of Commissioners. 

MARSHALL— E. L. Niles, Robert Phar- 
macy, has been elected to the Board of Di- 
rectors of the First Union National Rank in 
Marshall. 



UNION LEADERS PUSH 
LEGISLATIVE PROGRAM 

North Carolina Union officials have 
launched a legislative program which in- 
cludes 

• Repeal of the sales tax on food 

• Laws to regulate campaign financing 

• Consumer protection laws 

• A legislative ethics law 

• Retaining the 8 per cent ceiling on home 
mortgages 

• No-fault insurance 

• Posted prices for prescription drugs 

• Permission for public employees to bar- 
gain collectively 

AIs'o, unions favor abolishing the dcatli 
penalty, reform of juvenile law enforcement 
procedure, land use planning and laws giving 
tenants a better break. 



38 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 



• Cabarrus County — Mrs. Whitaker Moose 

• Cape Fear — Mrs. Hunter Smith 

• Greensboro — Mrs. W. S. Dukes 

• New Hanover — Mrs. Larry Hovis 

CABARRUS COUNTY 

The February Meeting of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of the Cabarrus County Pharma- 
ceutical Society met on Thursday, February 
14, at 7:30 p.m. with Mrs. E. W. (Argie) 
Hardy of 696 Miramar St., N.E. Concord. 
Twenty-one members and guests were pres- 
ent. The program for the evening was 
"Sweetheart Love-In" and consisted of 
two parts: 

1) Show and Tell: Members brought their 
favorite husband to show and also brought 
their tastiest hors d'oeuvres and finger foods 
which were shared for supper. The hostess 
provided the beverage and the dessert. 

2) Workshop: No work but fun and 
games ... it was an evening of warm fel- 
lowship and good food. Some of the activ- 
ities enjoyed by those present were dancing, 
bridge, canasta and just being together. 

CAPE FEAR 

The Gape Fear Pharmaceutical Society 
and Woman's Auxiliary held a joint dinner 
meeting on February 19th, at the Empire 
Steak House at Fayetteville. Eobeson, Samp- 
son, and Cumberland Counties were repre- 
sented. 

James B. Hickmon, president of the So- 
ciety, called the meeting to order; Leon 
Tomlinson gave the invocation. Following 
dinner, Mrs. James E. Hickmon, President 
of the NCPhA Woman's Auxiliary, de- 
scribed activities' being planned for ladies 
who will be attending the Convention at 
Pinehurst. Mr. Hickmon discussed activities 
of interest to the Association members. 

While the Cape Fear Pharmaceutical So- 
ciety members conducted their business ses- 
sions', Woman 's Auxiliary members held a 



business meeting in an adjoining room. A 
slate of officers was submitted and accepted 
as follows: President, Mrs. Sanford S. Price, 
Salemburg; Vice-President, Mrs. John T. 
Henley, Hope Mills; Secretary-Treasurer, 
Mrs. J. Cody Newton, Fayetteville; Histo- 
rian, Mrs. B. Cade Brooks, Fayetteville; 
Publicity, Mrs. James E. Hickmon, Fayette- 
ville. 

At the conclusion of the respective busi- 
ness session, a social hour was held. 

GREENSBORO 

The Greensboro Drug Club Auxiliary met 
for lunch on January 22 at the Greensboro 
Country Club, with President Mrs. David 
Montgomery presiding. The invocation was 
given by Mrs. Briggs Cook, Chaplain. 

Following lunch, minutes of the November 
meeting were approved, and the treasurer's 
report was read. 

Mrs. Jack Upton, Program Chairman, an- 
nounced that the February speaker would 
be Ealph Cambron of the Greensboro Bet- 
ter Business Bureau. 

Mrs. Dale Bracker, Ways' and Means 
Chairman, discussed the Trash and Trea- 
sure Sale to be held March 5 at the Bagley 
Street Market. Members were asked to begin 
collecting saleable items for this big project. 

The Auxiliary received two letters of 
thanks : one for help and cooperation during 
the recent Health Fair at Friendly Shop- 
ping Center Auditorium, and the other for 
stuffed animals donated to Operation Santa 
Claus. 

Mrs. Upton introduced Mrs". James Hick- 
mon, State Auxiliary President, who dis- 
cussed highlights of the March convention 
to he held in Pinehurst, plus her activities 
so far as Stats President. 

NEW HANOVER 

The New Hanover County Pharmaceuti- 
cal Auxiliary held a workshop on February 
6 at the home of Mrs. Hobart Whaley of 
Wilmington. Before the work began, the 
members enjoyed a pot-luck salad luncheon. 

The Auxiliary was honored to have pres- 
ent as a luncheon guest Mrs. James E. Hick- 
mon, State Auxiliary president. Mrs. Hick- 
mon discussed the convention to be held in 
Pinehurst in March. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



39 



BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Eon Holland of Dallas', 
North Carolina, announce the birth of a 
daughter, Amelia Ann, Sunday, February 
in. Mr. Holland, 1969 graduate of the UNC 
School of Pharmacy, is with Akers Center 
Pharmaey of Gastonia. 



DEATHS 

Burwell Temple 

Bur well Temple, age 66, a retired Kinston 
pharmacist and owner/manager of Temple 's 
Drug Store for several years, died February 
5 in a Kinston nursing home. 

He was the son of the late E. Henry 
Temple and Nanny Noble Temple of Lenoir 
County. He was a Mason, a Shriner and an 
Elk. 

Among the survivors is' a son, Pharmacist 
Burwell Temple, Jr. of Kinston. 



Samuel B. Etheridge 

Samuel B. Etheridge age 84, retired phar- 
macist of Washington, died February 17 at 
his home. 

A graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy (1908), Mr. Etheridge operated the 
S. B. Etheridge Drug Store in "Washington 
until his retirement in 1964. 

He had served as vice president of the 
Hood Industrial Bank, as a member of the 
board of directors of Guaranty Bank & Trust 
Company and Wachovia Bank & Trust Com- 
pany until 1968. 

He served as a member of the Beaufort 
County School Board and was a member of 
the State Board of Alcoholic Beverage Con- 
trol for 15 years, during the administration 
of Ihree governors. 

Surviving are two daughters, four grand- 
children and two sisters. 



Dr. Henry R. Totten 

Dr. Henry Eoland Totten, 81, a member 
of the UNC Botany faculty for 50 years, 
died February 9 in Chapel Hill. 



Dr. Totten was a distinguished botanist 
and teacher well known to many North Car- 
olina pharmacists for his course in botanical 
pharmacy. 

Mrs. Totten died in late Januarv. 



L. G. Crouch 

L. G. Crouch, operator of Asheville 's Ideal 
Pharmacy for 18 years, died February 1 en 
route to an Asheville hospital. Ho was 84. 

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Julia Ed- 
wards Crouch ; two sons, L. Glover Crouch 
of Greensboro and Pharmacist Phillip Crouch 
of Asheville; a daughter, two sisters and 
eight grandchildren. 



Eugene Rice 

Eugene Eice, 78, of Williamston died Feb- 
ruary 7 following a brief ilmess. 

A native of Danville, Virginia, Mr. Eice 
had been associated with Davis Pharmacy 
in Williamston since 1934. He was well 
known for his photographic work in Martin 
County and was a member of the Martin 
Countv Draft Board for 24 vears. 



DOINGS OF THE AUXILIARIES 

(from page 38) 

The purpose of the workshop was to con- 
tinue sewing clothing and stuffed animals 
for the mentally ill and retarded persons in 
hospitals and institutions. Not only did the 
members enjoy the company of each other, 
hut they also accomplished the making of 
additional items for the hospitals. 

It was discussed and agreed that some of 
the simpler work might be done by local 
mental health patients at the county clinic. 
Several of the New Hanover Auxiliary 
members are volunteer workers at the men- 
tal health clinic, and thoy offered to include 
this project in the activities of the patients. 



40 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Classified advertising (single issue inser- 
tion) 10 cents a word with a minimum 
charge of $3.00 per insertion. Payment to 
accompany order. 

Names and addresses will be published un- 
less a box number is requested. 

In replying to "blind" ads, address Ad. 

No.- , Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, 

P. O. Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 



RELIEF PHARMACIST— Call Carl- 
ton O. Winters, 313 Brentwood Av- 
enue, Jacksonville, North Carolina 
28540. Tel: (919) 347-1498 



28540. Tel: (919) 347-1498 
FOR SALE — Complete fountain unit 
in good working condition. Bargain 
priced. Call Dale Shepherd at Jef- 
ferson Drug, Jefferson, N. C. Tel: 
(919) 246-9492 



STAFF PHARMACIST needed for 
expanding Medical Center Hospital 
Pharmacy. Competitive salary com- 
bined with excellent fringe benefit 
package. Please send resume to: 
Personnel Department, North Car- 
olina Baptist Hospital, 300 South 
Hawthorne, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
27103 E.O.E. 



LEGISLATIVE REPORT FROM 
RALEIGH 

Status of pharmacy-related bills as of first 
week of March : 

(1) The prescription price posting bill 
(HB 1878) was referred to the House Ju- 
diciary Committee #2. Intense activity on 
the part of pharmacists residing in the home- 
towns of committee members has 1 had its 
impact. A co-sponsor now says he is opposed 
to HB 1878. Bill not expected to come out 
of committee unless significant effort on the 
part of NC-PIEG, etc. 

(2) The Board of Pharmacy fee bills— SB 
1300 and HB 1921 — were introduced on 
February 27 by Senator Henley and Eep. 
Woodard. Bills referred to Senate and 
House Finance Committees. Amends GS 90- 
60 to make the following increases' in fees: 
pharmacist licensee applicant examination, 
$40 (now $25) ; pharmacist license renewal, 
$25 (now $15) ; new license by reciprocity, 
$100 (now $25) ; original registration of a 
drug store, $100, and renewal thereof, $50.00. 

(3) A Fair Trade repealer, passed by 
The House, received an infavorable report 
in a Senate Committee (March 5). 

(4) No further action in regard to pre- 
Assembly talk about repeal of the State's 
Anti-Substitution Law. 

(5) A number of bills relating to the N. C. 
Drug Authority and Boards in general are 
being Screened. Some amendments antic- 
ipated. 

The Assembly is expected to adjourn by 
the first week of April. General sentiment is 
that annual sessions will not be continued. 





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he Carolina 



Journal of Pharmacy 



Volume LIV 



April 1974 



Number 4 




W. H. (Bill) Wilson (left) of Raleigh was installed as President of the North Carolina Phar- 
maceutical Association at the final NCPhA business session of the 94th annual meeting in 
Pinehurst on March 26. Here he is being congratulated by W. Whitaker Moose of Mount 
Pleasant, who headed the NCPhA in 1973-'74. 

Despite negative factors (gasoline shortage and a snow/ice storm midway during the con- 
vention), pharmacist attendance surpassed attendance at the 1973 Convention. 
Plans are underway for the 95th Convention, scheduled for the Winston-Salem Hyatt House, 
April 13-15, 1975. Featured will be a glass-bubble elevator which will traverse an Atrium 
above reflecting pools, bubbling fountains and hanging gardens all highlighted by a swim- 
ming pool tucked away under a waterfall with a 12-foot water slide. — Photo by Colorcraft. 




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The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



April, 1974 

Vol. LIV No. 4 



Officers 

NORTH CAEOLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 



President 

W. H. Wilson 

Raleigh 



Vice-Presidents 

L. M. Whaley 

Wallace 
Tom R. Burgiss 

Sparta 

E, W. Hackney 

Lumberton 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. ('. 



(MEATS THIS ISSUE 



Brooks Installed Vice-President, NCAP 5 

Retired Pharmacist Aims to Play Golf 6 

State Board of Pharmacy News 8 

Tar Heel Digest U 

Rx Drug Pricing and The Consumer's Right to Know 12 

N. C. Community Mental Health Programs 26 

Doings of the Auxiliaries 35 

Births-Deaths 3C 



ADVERTISERS 

Colorcraft Corporation 7 

Eli Lilly and Company 2nd Cover 

Gilpin, Henry B. p_ 

ICN Pharmaceuticals (King Associates) 4th Cover 

I. C. System, Inc. jj 

Justice Drug Company j 

Kendall Drug Company ... 95 

Owens, Minor & Bodeker x Y( } Cover 

Ramsey Manufacturing Corporation ifi 

E. N. Rowell Company 7 

Scott Drug Company o 

Seeman Printery 24 

Smith Wholesale Drug 10 

Reaco Products 12 

A. H. Robins Company jg 

The Upjohn Company 14 

Washington National Insurance Co. 20 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly bv the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, X C 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Second class 
postage paid at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



"SKIP" SYKES NAMED SOUTHERN 
AREA SUPERVISOR 

The recent promotion of B. N. " Skip ' ' 
Sykes, Jr. to Southern Area Supervisor has 
been announced by Mr. Joseph Keller, Sr., 
Executive Vice-President, S. E. Nichols, Inc. 

Sykes, with a background of 6 years in 
pharmacy, joined Nichols as a pharmacist 
in Wilson in October, 1972. 

A native of Graham, Sykes is a 1967 grad- 
uate of the L'.N.C. School of Pharmacy. He 
is a member of the Wilson County Pharma- 
ceutical Association, American Pharmaceu- 
tical Association and the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

His new responsibilities will be the super- 
vision of Nichols Pharmacies in North Car- 
olina, Virginia and Maryland. 

DRUG EDUCATION PROGRAM 

RECEIVES FUNDS FROM 

DRUG AUTHORITY 

The Drug Education Program at the 
School of Pharmacy has" been awarded $3740 
by the North Carolina Drug Authority. The 
funds will be utilized to prepare materials 
for instruction in drug education for educa- 
tors and Highway Patrol personnel, as well 
as support for a statewide conference on 
drug education. 

The conference, ' ' Drug Education — '74 ' ' 
will be held in Chapel Hill on May 4-5 and 
is open to all interested persons. For more 
information, contact Steve Moore, program 
coordinator, at the School of Pharmacy. 



BLOWING ROCK 

The Village Pharmacy lost an estimated 
15,000 Controlled Substances in a break-in. 
Entry wag by way of the front door which 
was broken with a rock. 



DURHAM-ORANGE ELECTS 
OFFICERS 

Bill Burch, manager of T. E. Holding 
Company of Hillsborough, is the newly 
elected president of the Durham-Orango 
Pharmaceutical Association. 



Other officers who will be serving with 
President Burch are Eobert J. Allen of 
Chapel Hill, vice president, and Patty Gid- 
dings of Durham, secretary-treasurer. 

Mr. Allen is chief of pharmacy services, 
N. C. Department of Mental Health, and Ms. 
Giddingg is associated with Eckerds as a 
pharmacist. 

A membership campaign is planned prior 
to an intensive activity program scheduled 
for September. 

ECKEL NAMED HOSPITAL 
PHARMACIST OF THE YEAR 

Fred M. Eckel, director of pharmacy ser- 
vices for North Carolina Memorial Hospital, 
has been named 1973 Hospital Pharmacist 
of the Year by the North Carolina Society 
of Hospital Pharmacists. 

The award was presented by the Pfizer 
and Eoerig Division of Pfizer Laboratories, 
New York. . 

In selecting Eckel for the award, the So- 
ciety cited his original and innovative con- 
tributions to the field of hospital pharmacy 
including numerous publications in the pro- 
fessional literature and presentations at na- 
tional and international hospital meetings. 

Eckel is a graduate of the Philadelphia 
College of Pharmacy and Science and re- 
ceived the master of science in hospital phar- 
macy from Ohio State University. In addi- 
tion to his hospital duties, he is an associate 
professor of hospital pharmacy in the UNC 
School of Pharmacy in Chapel Hill. 

GUEST SPEAKER AT 
COLUMBIA(SC) KE MEETING 

James L. Brisson, pharmacist-manager of 
Clarkton Drug Center, Clarkton, recently 
presented a program of continuing educa- 
tion to the South Carolina Alumnae Chapter 
of Kappa Epsilon in Columbia, S. C. 

The emphasis of Pharmacist Brisson 's 
program was on anti-depresSants. A follow- 
up discussion covered third party pharmacy 
service programs, substitution, pharmacy 
technicians and continuing education. 

Jean Fincannon, pharmacist employee at 
Columbus Drug Store, Whiteville, is pres- 
ident of the South Carolina Alumnae Chap- 
ter of Kappa Epsilon. 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



BROOKS INSTALLED 
VICE-PRESIDENT, NCAP 

Dr. A. W. Smith, DVM of Farmville, 
X. C, was elected as the new President of 
the Xorth Carolina Association of Profes- 
sions at the March Annual Meeting held in 
Raleigh. He succeeds William B. Gibbs, P.E., 
of Burlington in this leadership position. 
Other officers elected to serve 1974-75 are: 
1st Vice-President, B. Cade Brooks, phar- 
macist from Fayetteville ; 2nd Vice-Pres- 
ident, John L. Thompson, Jr., DDS of Shel- 
by ; Secretary, Thomas G. Thurston, M.D. 
of Salisbury; and Treasurer, Bosworth Beck- 
with, architect from Raleigh. These officers 
will serve until March, 1975. 

Mrs. John B. Chase, Representative from 
Wayne County, was the after-dinner pro- 
gram speaker. She was introduced by Pres- 
ident William B. Gibbs. Mrs. Chase is Chair- 
man of the House Health Committee and 
reported to the group of professional prac- 
titioners on current health legislation now 
pending before the 1974 General Assembly. 
She stated, "In my evaluation of the past 
two sessions, legislators are responding fa- 
vorably to the health and medical needs of 
all citizens. ' ' She discussed the Rural Health 
Clinics as a means of bringing primary 
health care to rural and urban people who 
find it most difficult to obtain private care. 
Tin' AHEC programs were described as a 
means for on site professional training. With 
state and federal funds pooled together, this 
proposes' expansion of these training pro- 
grams and to provide better distribution of 
health care personnel. 

In-coming President, A. W. Smith, DVM 
<if Farmville, presented President Gibbs with 
a diamond five-star lapel pin, the ensignia 
for tin- Xorth Carolina Association of Pro- 
fessions, and a past-president plaque in 
recognition of his 1 services to XCAP during 
L973-74. This marked the eleventh annual 
meeting of the association. Membership is 
comprised of six state professional groups: 
medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary 
medicine, architecture, and professional en- 
gineering — -all working together to improve 
tin- quality and standards of professional 
education and to uphold ethical standards 
of professional practice in the interest of 



the health, safety, and welfare of the pub- 
lic they serve. 

During the afternoon board of directors 
meeting, members expressed opposition to 
several bills, now before the General Assem- 
bly, which were considered dangerous to the 
effective functioning of XCAP members ' 
regulatory and licensing boards. Members 
voted to oppose those provisions of pending 
bills which would weaken the functions of 
their present boards in protecting the best 
interest of the public and the professions 
they represent. 



DIRECTORS OF NCAP 
FROM NCPhA 

1973-74 

Charles M. Whitehead, R.Ph. P.O. Box 158, 

Ramseur 27316 
William H. Wilson, R.Ph. 2000 Fairview 

Road, Raleigh 27608 
George H. Edmonds, R.Ph. 6105, Summit 

Sta., Greensboro 27405 

1974-75 
B. Cade Brooks, R.Ph. 114 Gillespie Street, 

Fayetteville 28301 
Kenneth Edwards, R.Ph. Stantonsburg Drug 

Co. Stantonsburg 27883 
Mack Elmo McCorkle, R.Ph. 274 Graham- 

Hopedale Rd., Burlington 27215 



NCPhA CONVENTION DETAILS 
TO BE PUBLISHED IN MAY 

Details of the 94th annual meeting of the 
Xorth Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 
which was held in Pinehurst on March 24- 
26, will appear in the May issue of The 
Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. 

Despite adverse factors ('gasoline short- 
age, high cost .' of the convention head- 
quarters and a snow/ice storm on March 
25), more pharmacists' attended the 1974 
convention as compared with 1973. Atten- 
dance of the two auxiliaries, while not rec- 
ord breakers, measured up to pro-meeting 
predictions. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



RETIRED PHARMACIST AIMS 
TO PLAY GOLF 

By Nita Hilliard 

(Beprinted from the 

Watauga Democrat, 2/21/74) 

Back in 1947 when O. K. Eiehardson first 
went to work at Boone Drug Company, the 
store was advertising such remedies as: 

Kleerex — "Pimples disappear overnight. 
Blackheads, too. No waiting." 

Mentho-Miihion — "Don't cough your head 
off." 

Bismarex — 'Tor acid and indigestion. 
Insist on genuine Bismarex and refuse other 
so-called antacid powders recommended to 
be 'just as good.' " 

A lot of things have changed since then 
and Eiehardson has witnessed and been in- 
strumental in many of the changes in the 
drug business and in Boone during the last 
27 years'. 

But now Eiehardson has decided to retire. 
He wants to spend time fixing up his sum- 
mer home and playing golf. But he says he 
will still be helping his brother Wayne out 
some at the drug store. 

He and his brother Wayne became part- 
ners with G. K. Moos"e in the drug store in 
1947. Wayne had been working there for a 
number of years and 0. K. had received a 
great deal of experience in Sylva, Elkin, 
and Winston-Salem. 

The two brothers from Sparta had long 
dreamed of being partners in the drug busi- 
ness. They both graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Tennessee in Memphis with pharma- 
ceutical degrees. 

Since then they have watched their busi- 
ness and Boone grow. ' ' There wasn 't any 
business here then except in the block Boone 
Drug is' in and the block Eivers Printing 
Company is in and a few others," he said. 

Since then the downtown business district 
has expanded and shopping centers have 
been built in the area. 

' ' The shopping centers have hurt busi- 
ness some, but they haven't hurt our down- 
town area as much as" some towns. ' ' 

He says that although he was active in 
promoting industry for the area that ho 
really hated to see it change. 






E 



1 






Although he has officially retired, the 
familiar face of Pharmacist O. K. Richard- 
son will still be seen on occasion at Boone 
Drug Company as he helps out his brother, 
Wayne, as needed. 



But he adds, "We can't stay in the way 
of progress. The only way to go is for- 
ward. ' ' 

And Boone Drug Company lias grown with 
the area. The Bichardsons have expanded to 
the King Street Pharmacy and the Deer- 
field Pharmacy and have sold an interest in 
the company to Pharmacists' Joe Miller, 
Jim Purman and Johnny Stacy. 

Drugs have changed a lot through the 
years, too. And Eiehardson, mainly, attrib- 
utes this to the Federal Drug Administra- 
tion. 

' ' Seventy -five percent of the drugs used 
today were not on our shelves 20 years 
ago, ' ' he says. 

He feels that the Federal Drug Adminis- 
tration has brought many improvements' to 
the industry. But adds that the improve- 
ments in the drugs have been reflected in 
higher costs. 

' ' Some drugs are investigated for as long 
as five years and the companies must make 
back their investments. ' ' 






The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



A point, of confusion in the drug industry, 
he says, is that there are many different 
name brands for the same medication and 
since doctors prescribe medication by brand 
names rather than generic names, the phar- 
macist must keep a large stock. 

He also pointed out that often prices vary 
according to the brand names, but that 
druggists are not allowed to substitute 
products without the doctor's permission. 

' ' But I 've always believed in saving all 
I can for the patient and I have found most 
doctors to be reasonable. ' ' 

TMA FOUNDATION 

Recent contributors to the TMA Founda- 
tion include 

Kendall Drug Company, Shelby, in memory 
of Mrs. W. P. Farthing, Charlotte 

PHARMACIST SURVEYS 

HOSPITAL PATIENT 

REACTION 

Members' of the Bladen County Hospital 
Executive Board have initiated a series of 



visitations with patients at the hospital in 
an effort to help determine both the needs 
of the institution and the desires of the 
people as they relate to the county-owned 
hospital. 

Pharmacist Alfred Gene Smith, a member 
of the board from Elizabethtown, made a 
tour of the hospital recently and on the 
basis of his visit, has prepared a report for 
consideration by the board. 



JACKSON PHARMACY 
COMPLETES REMODELING 

Jackson Pharmacy, Hendersonville, has 
just completed an extensive remodeling of 
its facilities at 147 Fourth Avenue West. 

The pharmacy was started by E. L. Fea- 
gin, Sr. in 1928. In 1948, E. L. Feagin, Jr. 
joined his father and in 1950, L. E. Feagin 
became associated with the pharmacy's' staff. 

In 1952, Jackson Pharmacy was expanded 
to tako care of increased sales and later, in 
1^63, a second remodeling of the pharmacy 
took place in order to provide better service. 



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8 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Members — W. R. Adams, Jr., Wilson; David D. Clayror, Greensboro; Harold V. Day, 

Spruce Pine; Jesse M. Pike, Concord; W. H. Randall, Lillingron; H. C. McAllister, 

Secy.-Treas., Box 471, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



PRESCRIPTION REFILLS 

This response by Board of Pharmacy Sec- 
retary-Treasurer H. C. McAllister to a query 
by a pharmacist seeking information regard- 
ing prescription refills is shared with Jour- 
nal readers for its comprehensive treatment 
of the subject— Editor. 

The matter of authorizing the refilling of 
a prescription is a most difficult one to de- 
fine in legal terms. This is because the laws 
relative to refills are somewhat indefinite. 
For example, the federal law (Food, Drug 
and Cosmetic Act) does not speak to the 
matter of refilling of prescriptions except in 
the so-called Durham-Humphrey Amend- 
ments. The Federal Food and Drug Admin- 
istration has expressed the ' ' opinion ' ' that 
the designation "refill prn" is not a spe- 
cific designation. This matter, however, has 
never been determined by the courts, and at 
this time the prohibition is simply an agency 
opinion. 

The state law (Food, Drug and Cosmetic 
Act) is somewhat more specific in that it 
states, as outlined in the Bulletin, prescrip- 
tions may not be refilled except. "on specific 
authorization of the prescriber. ' ' 

The legends which appear on the two pre- 
scription blanks that you forwarded are 
doubtless holdovers' from a system that was 
used at N. C. Memorial Hospital a number 
of years ago. The statement, "This pre- 
scription may be refilled as patient desires 
or as checked below," was used on the pre- 
scription blanks at Memorial Hospital for 
a number of years', and these filtered out 
throughout the whole state. Some four or 
five years ago, however, this statement was 
changed to, "This prescription may not be 
refilled unless so indicated below. ' ' This re- 
vision seems to be more consistent with the 
requirements of law. My pergonal feeling as 
a pharmacist is that the pharmacy shares a 
responsibility with the physician to see that 
the patient gets the appropriate quantity of 
drugs suitable to his particular condition, 
and that drugs in excess of this amount 
should not be dispensed. This type of med- 



ication control involves more than ' ' specific 
authorization" and "indication of number 
of refills." 

With regard to your statement as to the 
number of times the prescription might be 
refilled being placed on the prescription 
label, my personal reaction to this is similar 
to your own. It should be observed, however, 
that some physicians desire that this infor- 
mation be placed on the label. Last fall I 
visited the Family Practice Unit at the Med- 
ical University of South Carolina. This is an 
experimental program in which the pharma- 
cist participates with the physician and 
other health practitioners in the total man- 
agement of patient care. At this facility they 
are using the designations on the label the 
number of times' the prescription might be 
refilled. I asked about this, and the physi- 
cian stated that it was at their request that 
this information was indicated so that the 
patient would continue the medication for 
the period desired before coming back to 
the clinic, but at the same time they wanted 
only a limited quantity of medication in the 
patient's hands at one time. I agree with 
you, however, that in the majority of in- 
stances where this information is placed on 
the label the objective is" economic and not 
medication control. 

As you may be aware, the Pharmaceutical 
Association presently has underway a project 
in connection with the State Medical So- 
ciety to bring some order out of Avhat is now 
a very confusing situation with regard to 
the refilling of prescriptions. A question- 
naire is being sent to each practicing physi- 
cian in this state requesting that he furnish 
information relative to procedures that are 
to be employed in his practice concerning 
the matter of refilling of prescriptions, tele- 
phoning of prescriptions, etc. When this 
project has been completed, copies of the 
questionnaire will be available from the 
Pharmaceutical Association for physicians 
in each area of the state. I suggest that you 
contact Mr. Smith about the progress of this 
project. 



Speedy delivery is a waste of time 
if your order is filled incorrectly. 




rbu know the feeling— you receive 
he order, but part of the order isn't 
shat you ordered. The speediest 
■lelivery in the world isn't going to 
ielp after something like this happens. 
That's why our policy is to treat 
ach order as if your business 



depended on it. And it's the same 
reason our batting average is so high 
with you and thousands of 
pharmacists just like you. 

If your present source is not 
filling your orders correctly, write or 
call the Gilpin Division Manager 



nearest you.* He may be just wha 
the doctor ordered. 



THE HENRY B 



GILPIN 

COMBUMY 

Wholesale druggists since 1845. 



iltimore-E.A. Turner. 7401 Pulaski Highway. Baltimore, Md. 21203/(301 ) 866-4600 Dover-W.E. Warther. 756 South Little Creek Rd., Dover, Del. 19901/(302) 734-8281 
i-Colon Sawyer, 6435 Tidewater Drive. Norfolk. Va. 23509/(8041 855- 1901 Washington -Frank Antkowiak, 901 Southern Avenue. Washington. D.C 20032/(301 ) 630-4500 



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sult your Smith Representative about our Associated Druggist Pro- 
gram. Some of the advantages of this program are hometown 
newspaper advertising — buying advantages — clerk training pro- 
gram — | n s tore promotion materials and store advertising fliers. 

Just three of the many SMITH services 
Also ask about retirement, group hospitalization and major med- 



ical. Call or write to 





WHOLESALE DRUG 



DIVISION OF SMITH 0KU9 COMP4NY 



• Spartanburg 582-1216 

• Greenville 235-4159 

• Asheville 684-6121 

• Charlotte 825-5161 

Wofford and Forest Streets P. O. Box 1779 



SOUIH CAROLINA 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 



RALEIGH— Treasury Drug Center, a divi- 
sion of J. C. Penney Company, opened 
March 4; in the new Falls Village Shopping 
Center. A feature of the Center is an elec- 
tronic pill-counting machine. 

WILMINGTON— Vince J. Lindensehmidt, 
pharmacist manager of Walgreen Drug 
Store, has been honored by Walgreen Com- 
pany for 30 years' service. He received a 
gold emblem marking his years of service. 

LILLINGTON— The State Board of Elec- 
tions has appointed William H. (Bill) Ran- 
dall a member of the Harnett County Elec- 
tions Board. 

DURHAM — A Durham woman has filed a 
suit against Eckerd Drugs for $100,000 as 
damages on claims that she suffered severe 
illness after following directions on a pre- 
scription label. 

I: I JZABETHTOWN— The Bladen County 
Heart Fund was the recipient of $105 raised 
through the sale of coffee for two weeks at 
Smith Drug Store. Pharmacist Alfred Gene 
Smith arranged for the drug store to donate 
all coffee sales to the Heart Fund. 

lilLMINGTON—NLrs. Donna Gail Booth 
Xeal has been appointed by Gov. James 
Holshouser to the Nutrition Advisory Com- 
mittee of the X. C. Department of Human 
Resources'. Mrs. Xeal, a graduate of the 
UNC School of Pharmacy (1966), is director 
of pharmacy services for Babies Hospital. 



WA YNESYILLE— Pharmacist Hermit Wells 
of Canton has been named to the new Hay- 
wood County Board of Elections. Wells, 
operator of Midway Pharmacy for the past 
15 years, has been active in the Republican 
Party for many years. 

BOONE — A loan closet has been set up as 
a joint project of the Health Department 
and Carolina Pharmacy to provide equip- 
ment on a loan basis to persons who have 
difficulty purchasing such items as wheel- 
chairs and hospital beds'. 

BURLINGTON— Charles F. Delaney is 
pharmacist-manager of the Pharmaceutical 
Center now open at 1606 Memorial Drive, 
across from Memorial Hospital. Supplemen- 
tary services features are patient medication 
records and home health care aids, including 
a rental system. 



I. C. System, Inc. 

The nation's most highly 
specialized collection service 

Your Association's Collection Service is 
an affiliate of a national organization cur- 
rently serving members of more than 700 
leading trade associations throughout the 
nation. 

Don't lose sales volume because cus- 
tomers owe you money and are trading 
somewhere else. Your Association's Col- 
lection Service will chase those debtors 
back into your place of business to pay 
YOU direct. You will get accounts OFF 
your ledger and IN your bank account — 
and you will also have many former cus- 
tomers back doing business with you again. 
For information, contact your Association 
office. It will pay you to do so. 

On request, A representative 

of the I. C. System will explain 

the collection program in detail. 

Call or write the NCPhA, Box 151, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



12 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



PRESCRIPTION DRUG PRICING AND THE 
CONSUMER'S RIGHT TO KNOW 

By Wib Gulley, Director 
North Carolina Public Interest Research Group 



It is good to be with you this afternoon. 
I would bike firat to express my appreciation 
to Mr. Paoloni, the School of Pharmacy, and 
to the N.C. Pharmaceutical Association for 
the opportunity to speak to you. 

Let me tell you briefly about the orga- 
nization for which I work — the North Car- 
olina Public Interest Eesearch Group. The 
group 's membership and funding conies' 
primarily from about 8,000 college students 
at four schools: Davidson College, Duke 
University, St. Andrews College, and Wake 
Forest University. Member students con- 
tribute $3.00 a year to support NC PIEG. 
Their money goes to hire a staff to work with 
them on a full-time basis' and to fund re- 
search and action on various projects. The 
organization is run by an elected students 
Board of Directors, and the scope of involve- 
ment includes consumer protection, environ- 
mental preservation, and corporate respon- 
sibility. 

I have looked forward to talking with you 
because I think it necessary that consumers 
and pharmacists broaden the discussion of 
our mutual concerns. I have spent a great 
deal of time in the past year studying the 
matters of prescription drugs, pharmacies, 
and the pharmaceutical industry, as" well as 
talking with a number of pharmacists about 
their profession. There are many unanswered 
questions which wo should be discussing to- 
gether: Should legal patents for new drugs 
extend for 17 years? What is the wisdom of 
using polypharmacals as opposed to single- 
entity drugs? I hope, then, that my talk 
will be the beginning of an enlarged di- 
alogue between pharmacists and the con- 
sumers of North Carolina. 

The subject of my concern today is the 
lack of price availability for prescription 
drugs, price availability to the consumer- 
patient before purchase. Most folks believe 
that it makes little difference where they 
have a prescription for medication filled. 
NC PIRG went out to test this" hypothesis in 
a series of surveys last year. We surveyed 
the prices of five drugs in April in the 
towns of Durham and Laurinburg, and in 



the city of Winston-Salem last October we 
surveyed the prices of four prescription 
drugs. What we found were huge variations 
in price for identical prescriptions. One 
pharmacy in Durham charged $6.00 for 40 
tablets of 400,000 units of Potassium Peni- 
cillin G, while another drugstore in the same 
city charged only $1.20 to fill the same pre- 
scription. We found that one pharmacy in 
Winston-Salem charged over three and one- 
half times what another pharmacy would 
for a prescription of Tetracycline (hydro- 
chloride). The problem of wide price vari- 
ations does not belong merely to the cities 

Whiie you may not agree with all the 
conclusions of the North Carolina Public In- 
terest Research Group, it is important you 
inform yourself of PIRG activity and similar 
consumer-oriented organizations in North 
Carolina — Editor 




A. E. P. Tablets $18.75 per 1000 
$24.00 Doz. 100s 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 25 mg. Tablets 
$1.20 per 100 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 50 mg. Tablets 
$1.80 per 100 

Reavita Capsules $24.00 Doz. 100s 
$18.75 per 1000 

Your cooperation in stocking 
Reaco Products is appreciated 

REACO PRODUCTS 

P. O. Box 2747 
West Durham, North Carolina 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



13 



in North Carolina, for we also found drug- 
stores in Laurinburg charging three times 
what other drugstores in that town would 
require to fill a prescription for Pentids. 
The complete results of our surveys can be 
found in the appendices. 

Further examples could be given, but one 
aspect of the problem is clear. Consumer- 
patients sometimes' pay far too much to have 
their prescriptions filled because they do not 
know what the price will be ahead of time. 
It seems safe to say that no one with a pre- 
scription for Penicillin G would pay $6.00 
to have it filled if he knew that he could 
obtain the same medication elsewhere for 
81.20. 

The question facing you and I at this point, 
however, is no longer whether the prices for 
prescription drugs will be made more freely 
available. Recent actions by the North Car- 
olina Superior Court in Wake County have, 
I would argue, made this point moot. Two 
years ago, Eevco Drugs brought suit against 
the XC Board of Pharmacy for its regula- 
tion prohibiting price advertising. Last June 
the case was decided in their favor, and Su- 
perior Court Judge Donald Smith struck 
down all restrictions on advertising of drug 
prices. That decision is currently on appeal, 
but I think it is fair to say that Judge 
Smith 's decision will in essence be upheld. 
I do not say this because I do or do not 
favor the ruling, but because the facts are 
that most of the court decisions from other 
states (advertising prohibitions have fallen 
in 12 states since 1962) have struck down 
advertising restrictions and because I think 
that the plaintiffs' (Eevco 's) reasoning will 
also bo sustained here. Tho advent of ad- 
vertising means' significantly increased price 
availability, as well as price competition, 
for prescription drugs, and as consumers we 
believe that this will be in the public in- 
terest. 

It La useful, I think, to look at the argu- 
ments raised in support of an advertising 
prohibition and at the reasoning which the 
Superior Court accepted in ruling again si 
the NC Board of Pharmacy. One of three 
principal contentions of some pharmacy 
boards is that the advertising of prescription 
drug prices increases their use. This argu- 
ment ignores the fact that prescription 



drugs may not be sold except upon the 
authorization of a physician or a dentist, 
and thus it is the doctor — not the patient — 
who controls the dispensing of prescription 
medications. In 1971, the Pennsylvania Su- 
preme Court rejected this argument and 
noted: 
"We must therefore conclude that be- 
cause of the highly regulated structure 
of the pharmaceutical profession, and 
the fact that the consumer cannot choose 
his purchases, it would appear most un- 
likely that advertising the prices of re- 
tail prescription drugs would or could 
have any impact on the demand or con- 
sumption of such drugs. 

(441 Pa. 186, 272 A.2d 487, 1971) 
In some cases, pharmacy boards have ar- 
gued that price advertising of prescription 
drugs is likely to endanger the public health 
and safety because it would encourage small 
retailers to buy unusually large quantities 
of drugs to obtain a lower price. As a re- 
sult, they argue, the drugs will be on the 
pharmacists' shelf for an extended period 
of time during which they may deteriorate. 
Thus the public would eventually be sold 
adulterated drugs. Such reasoning does not 
take into account N.C. General Statute S90- 
69, in which the General Assembly outlawed 
the sale of adulterated drugs and made the 
pharmacists criminally responsible should 
they sell them. 

The third objection often raised to price 
advertising is that the prohibition aids phar- 
macists in "monitoring" patients. The ar- 
gument is that advertising will make it more 
likely that consumers will go from pharma- 
cist to pharmacist seeking a cheaper price 
when they buy drugs. This argument is im- 
plausible on several grounds. The physician 
is likely to be the principal monitor of what 
drugs a patient will use. Second, there arc 
no facts to indicate the extent, if any, to 
which pharmacists in North Carolina engage 
in monitoring. Third, consumers' today arc 
very mobile — as is the population as a whole 
— and they will continue to buy drugs from 
different pharmacies and to buy numerous 
non-prescription drugs which may be an- 
tagonistic. Finally, T would suggest to you 
thai even with price advertising, consumer- 
( Continued on page 15) 



When 
a first aid 
ointment 

contains 
3 antibiotics, 

doesn't sting, 

is well 
tolerated, 

helps prevent 
infection, 

promotes 
healing and 

gives you an 
excellent return 
on your money, 

its easy to 
recommend. 



Note on the label: Mycitracin 
should not be used in the eyes. 
Also, in serious burns or deep 
puncture wounds, it should not 
be used without consulting 
a physician. 




TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC OINTMENT 



(22gg 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 



patients will fill their prescriptions in the 
long run in the Same way that they now bin- 
food. Most people might shop around at 
first, but they will tend to pick one store 
for a variety of reasons including conve- 
nience, service and price and continue to 
shop there by habit. For this reason I be- 
lieve that the opportunity to maintain pa- 
tient profiles, an essential service for the 
modern pharmacy, will not be decreased by 
lawful price advertising. 

The record of this case, Rerco vs. the N.C. 
Board of Pharmacy, shows that the Board 
of Pharmacy could give no "factual data 
to support the proposition that price adver- 
tising of prescription drugs leads to in- 
creased consumption of such drugs . . . in- 
terferes with the proper control or monitor- 
ing of prescription drugs . . . (or) leads to 
the Sale of adulterated prescription drugs." 
(Supplemental Memorandum in Support of 
Plaintiffs' Motion for Summary Judgment). 
Tn his descision, Judge Smith took note of 
these facts and said, in sum, that: 

The evidence before the Court shows, 
and the Court finds, that there is no fac- 
tual data . . . indicating restrictions on 
the advertising of drug discounts or 
prescription drug price information has 
any real, rational or substantial rela- 
tionship to the public health, order, 
safety, or the general welfare. 

What is said in a fundamental way here 
is that the job of pharmacists has changed 
from the pre-World War T days when 90% 
of all prescriptions were compounded from 
bulk drugs by the pharmacist. The role of 
today's pharmacist is' both that of a health 
professional and that of a retailer. By 1967, 
almost 95% of all prescriptions were pre- 
fabricated by the manufacturer (p. 54, The 
Drug Makers and the Drug Distributors, a 
background paper for the HEW Task Force 
on Prescription Drugs, 1968. The HEW 
study went on to say that "independent 
pharmacies (and) chain drugstores . . . 
combine the professional activities of the 
pharmacists with the merchandising activ- 
ities of a small or large scale retailer." 

If price advertising of prescription drugs 
is to be lawful practice in Xorth Carolina 
as I have argued, should we leave the mat- 
ter at that? T would s'ay "no," and T think 



it is here that Ave may find agreement. Ad- 
vertising will increase price availability and 
foster price competition for prescription 
medications, and we favor its use in North 
Carolina. It is, however, an incomplete and 
potentially deceptive method for helping the 
public know what they will pay before they 
purchase. 

We find two major weaknesses with the 
advertising of drug prices. One is that only 
a relatively few drugs will lie advertised, in 
all likelihood. This means that a pharmacy 
could publish the prices of a few "loss 
leaders ' ' to attract customers into their 
store and then make up an inflated margin 
by raising prices on all other drug products. 
A second weakness lies in the fact that ad- 
vertising by its very nature discriminates 
against smaller economic units and favors 
the larger financial entities which have cor- 
responding larger revenues for advertising. 

It is for these reasons that NC PIRG has 
worked to promote a supplemental means of 
making price information for prescription 
drugs available to the public. A copy of a 
bill to be introduced this week in the North 
Carolina General Assembly outlines this 
supplemental method and can be found in 
the Appendices. In essence, it says two 
things. The first is that the prices of all 
prescription drugs shall be made available 
and shall be quoted by the pharmacy upon 
request. The second is that each pharmacy 
shall post and maintain a list of the one 
hundred most commonly prescribed drugs 
and their current selling price. 

We feel that this lull, coupled with the 
advent of price advertising, will provide 
strong protection for the consumer in the 
purchase of prescription drugs. The addition 
of price posting and statutory availability 
is needed to insure that the price informa- 
tion reaching the public will be of a broad, 
uniform and consistent nature. Let me stress 
here that I believe that this bill is in your 
interests, too, because you also desire to 
avoid the potential deceptions and pitfalls 
of unrestricted price advertising. 

There have been objections raised to price 
posting by some pharmacists, including your 
President, Mr. Moose. Tn his testimony to 
the N.C. Legislative Joint Health Commit- 
tee last October, Mr. Moose cited several 
(Continued on page 17) 



DRUG STORE SHOPPERS ARE 
DIFFERENT 

Today's shopper expects, and responds, to a Modern Shopping Atmosphere. 
3 out of 10 impulse purchases are inspired by 

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Let us DESIGN and engineer your DRUG STORE to promote and SELL merchandise. 

We have successfully given this service to our customers for over a quarter of o 
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professionals" 

CALL US FOR A SINGLE FIXTURE OR A COMPLETE STORE. 



RAMSEY 

MANUFACTURING CORPORATION 

513 East Trade Street 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Telephone 704-334-3457 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



17 



reasons for the price variations' including 
different pricing methods (fee, mark-up, 
and mixed systems) and varying sources of 
supply. 

The consumers reply to this is simple: it 
is not our business" how a pharmacist chooses 
his supplier or by which method he prices 
his product, but none of these factors gives 
any reason why the consumer should not 
know what the price for his prescription will 
1)0 before purchase. There remains no reason 
why a consumer-patient should not bo able 
to shop comparatively. 

Concerns other than price do play a large 
role in where a consumer chooses to fill a 
prescription. How convenient is the phar- 
macy's location? What services are offered? 
How helpful is the pharmacist? But the price 
of a prescription remains a major factor in 
this decision, and the consumer should be 
able to obtain the price as surely as he can 
obtain any of the other information. 

In many conversations with pharmacists, 
T have also been told that services' play a 
role in determining the price that a pharma- 
cist will charge. This is undoubtedly true, 
and we agree that the consumer-patient 
should know the services offered by a phar- 
macy when he chooses where to have a pre- 
scription filled. But this information is al- 



ready freely available upon request — by 
phone or in person. 

In addition, we have spelled out the au- 
thority of the Board of Pharmacy, which 
will administer the bill should it become 
law, to require the posting of additional in- 
formation "including the listing of avail- 
able services." 

In conclusion, we find no reason why any 
consumer should not be able to readily ob- 
tain comparative price information before 
purchasing prescription drugs. The plain 
fact is that this is not the situation at pres- 
ent. Advertising will provide Some remedy 
to this problem, but we believe that price 
advertising must be supplemented with the 
controlled, more uniform, broadened infor- 
mation from price posting, Pharmacists will 
benefit by these supplemental measures be- 
cause they will mitigate the economic biases 
of open advertising. And I say to you that 
pharmacists will benefit more fundamentally 
because they will be seen by their commu- 
nity as professionals who are keeping the 
public's welfare in mind. They will see ev- 
idence of a constructive, forward-looking at- 
titude that is not blinded and hampered by 
greed or out-dated styles of business. I ask 
you to work together Avith us in this spirit. 
Thank you. (Continued on page 21) 





Behind every Allbee with C deal 
there's plenty of professional promotion 



No wonder Allbee with C remains the leading vitamin in 
its class in drug store sales. It's consistently promoted to 
the medical and dental professions by detailing, journal 
ads, sampling and direct mail. This year Allbee with C ads 
will appear in seventy medical and dental journals. 
Not only is Allbee with C the best seller, it's also the 
B-complex with C vitamin most often prescribed by 
doctors and dentists. Over a million scripts are filled 
annually. And this doesn't even include professional 
recommendations and OTC sales. 

On deal April 1 -May 30 

Here's your big chance to stock up on Allbee with C at the 
lowest prices of the year and make even greater profits 
on this best seller. Your Robins representative will be 
around soon to discuss the deal and facings with you. 



Put your 
facings 
where your 
profits are! 



A. H. Robins Company 
Richmond, Virginia 23220 



/I-H-ROBINS 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



19 



BROWN APPOINTED DIRECTOR 

OF PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, 

PAID PRESCRIPTIONS 

PAID Prescriptions, Inc. of Raleigh, 
North Carolina is pleased to announce the 
appointment of H. Shelton Brown, Jr. as 
Director of Professional Services effective 
April 1, 1974. Previously Mr. Brown was 
associated with W. A. West, Tart-West 
Druggists, Roseboro, North Carolina. 

Mr. Brown is a 1970 Graduate of U.N.C. 
School of Pharmacy. His professional in- 
terests and experience have been in both 
community and institutional hospital phar- 
macy practice, and more recently in retail 
pharmacy. He has taught clinical pharmacy 
at U.N.C. and has taken graduate level 
courses in Pharmacology. He has been a fre- 
quent speaker at professional seminars and 
civic meetings. 

Married to the former Velma Ferrell, they 
have two sons, Shelt and Ferrell. 



UNC CONFERENCE 

Members of the NCPhA Executive Com- 
mittee and other interested pharmacists con- 
ferred (April 3) with N. Ferebee Taylor, 
Chancellor of UNC-Chapel Hill, and Dr. 
Cecil G. Sheps, Vice-Chancellor of Health 
Sciences, relative to matters of mutual in- 
terest. 

The conference was initiated by a resolu- 
tion adopted in Pinehurst on March 26 at 
the 94th annual meeting of the NCPhA. 

The pharmacists present at the conference 
were impressed with the understanding and 
dedication of Chancellors Taylor and Sheps. 

POISON PREVENTION WEEK 

Poison Prevention Week was widely ob- 
served throughout North Carolina, March 
17-23. All public information mediums were 
used — newspapers, radio and TV — plus ex- 
hibits, civic club appearances by pharma- 
cists, distribution of literature, etc. 

The NCPhA series of PP slide programs 
were in constant use. All requests for the 
national poster and supplementary aids were 
handled by the NCPhA. 

Quoting from one bulletin : ' ' Director of 
Pharmacy Services at Watts Hospital, Ger- 
ald Stahl conducted a tour for pre-schoolers 
who watched Stahl mix pink ear drops and 
show samples of various medications. He 
emphasized that medicines should always be 
administered by a parent or other adult." 

ATTEND LEGISLATIVE 
CONFERENCE IN WASHINGTON 

XCPhA President W. H. Wilson of Ra- 
leigh and NCPhA Immediate Past President 
W. Whitaker Moose of Mount Pleasant at- 
tended the March 27-28 Legislative Confer- 
ence in Washington. 

The Conference was sponsored by the Na- 
tional Association of Retail Druggists. 

While in Washington, Pharmacists Wilson 
and Moose conferred witli these North Car- 
olina Congressmen: Walter B. Jones, L. H. 
Fountain, Richardson Preyer and Earl B. 
Ruth. 

LEGISLATIVE REPORT 

R\ Price Posting Bill given unfavorable report by the House Judiciary Committee #2. 
Of 19 committee members, 2 supported the bill. Board of Pharmacy Fee Bill passed House 
in late March and Senate in early April. Details in May Journal following adjournment of 
the Assemblv. 




The NCPhA-Endorsed Insurance Plans 
Which Merit Member Participation 



BASIC PLAN: 



EXTENDED PLAN: 



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Up to $20,000 For Members 
Dependents Coverage Also Available 

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FOR DETAILS 

WRITE OR 
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821 Baxter Street— Suite 316 
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Telephone: (704) 333-3764 




Washington National 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

EVANSTON, ILLINOIS 60201 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 



APPENDIX A 
PRESCRIPTION DRUG SURVEY RESULTS 
Prices of both generic and brand-name prescriptions were compared store by store for 
each drug listed. We also surveyed the patient services offered by each pharmacy. Six ques- 
tions were asked: Do you keep patient profiles? are you open nights? do you deliver? do you 
extend informal credit to your customers? is dehvery free? do you offer other services? 
Services were rated as follows: 0-2 Services = minimal, 3-4 services = some, 5-6 services = 
most. Dashes indicate information refused. 

DURHAM, APRIL, 1973. 



Store # 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 

High is 0.00 times Low* 



Type of 


Services 






DRUG 






store 


provided 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


chain 


min 


$1.20L 


$5.84 


$1.28L 


$1.68L 


$4.60L 


chain 


min 


1.86 


5.84 


1.28L 


1.68L 


4.60L 


chain 


min 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


chain 


min 


2.92 


5.77 


2.00 


2.80 


5.25 


chain 


min 


2.47 


5.47 


— 


— 


— 


chain 


some 


3.07 


5.39 


2.10 


3.37 


5.25 


] 


nd 
nd 
nd 


most 


4.00 


7.00 


4.00H 


3.60 


5.85 







4.50 


4.50L 













nd 


most 


6.00 


7.50H 


— 


— 


— 




nd 


some 


2.50 


6.00 


2.00 


3.50 


6.75H 




nd 


min 


6.00H 


6.00 


4.00H 


4.00H 


6.00 


ind 


some 


6.00H 


6.00 


— 


— 


— 


chain 


min 


1.92 


5.32 


1.68 


1.68L 


4.60L 


ind 


most 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


chain 


min 


1.69 


5.07 


2.13 


2.49 


6.00 


cl 


lain 


min 


1.88 


5.07 


1.59 


2.49 


4.77 



5.00 



1.67 



3.13 



2.38 



1.47 



1— TETRACYCLINE 

2— ACHROMYCIN V (BRAND NAME) 

3— POTASSIUM PENICILLIN G 

4— PENTIDS (BRAND NAME) 

5— ORTHONOVUM 



* That is, the consumer paying the high- 
est price for Tetracycline ($6.00) pays 5.00 
times as much as the consumer paying the 
lowest price, ($1.20) 



22 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



LAURINBUEG, APRIL, 1973. 



Store # 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



High is 0.00 times Low 



Type of 


Services 


store 


provided 


ind 


some 


ind 


some 


ind 


some 


ind 


min 


ind 


some 


ind 


min 



1 2 

$2.50 $5.50L 
3.35 6.00 

4.17H 6.70H 
2.00L 6.10 
3.25 6.00 



DRUG 






3 


4 


5 


$3.50 


$3.75 


$5.50H 


2.40 


3.35 


5.50H 


8.00H 


10.00H 


5.50H 


1.45L 


3.50 


5.40 


3.25 


3.25 


5.25L 



2.08 



1.22 



5.16 



3.08 



1.05 



WINSTON-SALEM, OCTOBER, 1973. 



Store # 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



Type of 


Services 






DRUG 




store 


provided 


1 


2 


3 


4 


chain 


some 


$2.79 


$3.79 


$8.49 


$1.96 


chain 


some 


4.15H 


4.25 


12.00 


2.85 


chain 


some 


3.15 


3.35 


9.50 


2.75 


chain 


min 


2.50 


4.65 


13.53 


2.83 


chain 


min 


2.25 


3.00 


9.50 


2.19 


ind 


most 


3.05 


4.00 


11.50 


2.85 


ind 


— 


2.05 


2.68 


10.70 


2.00 


ind 


some 


2.89 


— 


7.79 


1.89 


chain 


min 


2.73 


3.97 


8.46 


1.89 


chain 


min 


1.65 


1.72L 


7.80 


1.98 


chain 


min 


1.60 


1.80 


7.80 


1.98 


chain 


min 


2.07 


2.47 


7.80 


1.99 


ind 


some 


3.95 


3.95 


11.45 


2.83 


ind 


some 


3.00 


5.95H 


10.00 


3.00H 


ind 


most 


— 


3.50 


9.50 


2.00 


ind 


— 


3.00 


3.00 


13.75H 


2.00 


chain 


min 


2.99 


3.79 


8.46 


1.89 


ind 


some 


1.75 


3.00 


12.00 


2.80 


chain 


min 


1.15L 


2.09 


9.08 


2.00 


chain 


min 


1.43 


2.19 


9.08 


1.99 


ind 


some 


1.99 


3.49 


8.44 


1.99 


chain 


min 


1.80 


2.25 


7.78L 


1.87L 


ind 


some 


2.25 


2.50 


10.50 


2.83 


ind 


most 


1.80 


4.00 


10.00 


2.50 


ind 


most 


2.20 


2.90 


11.10 


1.89 



High is 0.00 times Low 



2.61 



2.46 



1.77 



1.60 



1— TETRACYCLINE 

2— ACHROMYCIN V (BRAND NAME) 

3— VALIUM 

4— INSULIN V-80 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 23 

U.S.P. DRUG PRODUCT PROBLEMS REPORT 

Published by the U.S.P. Convention, Inc., 12601 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, Md. 20852 
Edited by Joseph G. Valentino, J.D. 

Listed below are case studies which have resulted from the Drug Product Defect Re- 
porting Program.* 

These new case studies' are intended to help practitioners become aware of problems 
involved in producing and maintaining high quality in drug products, thereby assisting them 
in detecting defective products and helping them avoid subjecting drugs to deleterious con- 
ditions of storage and handling. No reflection on any particular manufacturer, distributor, 
pharmacist, or product is intended or should be inferred from the case studies. 

CASE STUDIES 

A. Casein in Milk Precipitates in Infant Vitamin Drops 

A report from a New Jersey pharmacy that a partial bottle of an infant vitamin 
drop preparation containing foreign material had been returned by a customer brought 
a possible explanation and suggestion for administering the drops from the company. 
The foreign materials, the company explained, were suspected to be casein, colored 
brown by some of the caramel in the drops. Casein might have been introduced into the 
drops as traces of milk from the dropper which was used to place the drops in the 
child 's mouth while there was some milk in the mouth. The pH of the drops is low 
enough to cause the precipitation of casein when trace amounts of milk are added to 
drops. The company suggested however, that the drops may be mixed with the baby 's 
formula by adding the drops to the milk. In this 1 way the drops are quickly diluted by 
the large volume of milk and with the resulting increase of pH there is no precipitation 
of the casein. 

B. Unit Dose Container Labels Redesigned 

Reports of labeling inadequacies, especially of medications prepared in packets or 
unit dose packages seem to be more and more frequent and more frequent as the trends' 
move toward single unit dispensing. Most reports reflect the need for units to be labeled 
completely when utilized in the hospital setting as they are often separated from the 
carton or box in which they come from the manufacturer, when they are sent to nursing 
stations' or patient medication trays. Some examples follow: 

1. Two products, one a powder, the other an effervescent tablet, were intentionally 
not labeled by the manufacturer so that the medication could be dispensed with- 
out revealing the name of the product to the patient. These products have h:id 
the packaging redesigned, after numerous reports indicated a preference for hav- 
ing the information on the unit. 
-. A suspension packaged in unit dose form will now carry the words "Shake will 
before using'' as' suggested by a report from a West Virginia hospital pharmacist. 

3. A hospital pharmacist from Alabama sent in a report which prompted one coni- 
pany to stamp the expiration date on the individual packets of its multiple 
vitamin. 

4. Several pharmacists reported capsules prepared for inhalation were on the market 
with only the lot number and the name of the manufacturer on the individual foil 
pouches containing the capsule. This pouch has been redesigned to include the 

generic and trade names of the product as' well as the strength. 

5. Two different products were packaged in units containing two dosage units. How 
ever, only the strength of one dosage unit was on the label. Many pharmacists 
reported that this was confusing to pharmacy personnel and nursing staff. Both 
companies have now redesigned the unit packages to clearly indicate that the 
strength listed is per tablet or capsule instead of being mistaken for per package. 



24 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



For eighty-nine years 
. . . . since 1885 



seemon 

OF DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long 
association with North Car- 
olina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its fifty- 
fourth volume, and the first 
printed copy was "Seeman 
Printed." 




A DIVISION OF 
FI6HER-HARRIS0N CORP 



WIVES UPSET OVER KENNEDY 
ALLEGATIONS 

The wives of some pharmacists are upset 
over failure of their husbands to bring home 
all those reported ' ' valuable gifts' ' ' being 
distributed by the pharmaceutical industry. 

One wife reports that her husband did 
bring home an unsold box of Valentine 
candy — after Valentine Day. But so far as 
TV sets, record sets, etc., zero so far. 

Senator Kennedy may not be aware of it 
but an offshoot of the Senate sub-committee 
hearing may be to increase the divorce rate, 
at least that is a possibility in North Car- 
olina i 



PUNCH WITH A PUNCH 

Due to the numerous (one) requests for 
the original formula of Meeting House 
Punch, here is the concoction : 

4 barrels of beer 

24 gallons of West Indian Bum 
35 gallons of New England Bum 

25 lbs. Brown Sugar 
25 lbs. Loaf Sugar 

465 Lemons 

The original formula was served to work- 
men who raised the steeple of the Old South 
Church, Boston. Since steeple raising is of 
limited occurrence, any significant event, 
such as a ramp eaters convention, will suffice 
for Meeting House Bunch. 



SANDOZ GRANT TO 
DR. LOEFFLER 

CHABEL HILL— Dr. Larry J. Loeffler, 
assistant professor of medicinal chemistry 
at the UNC School of Pharmacy in Chapel 
Hill, has received a |27,820 research grant 
from Sandoz Pharmaceuticals of Hanover, 
N. J. 

The grant will support research in the 
development of methods potentially useful 
for measuring very small quantities of er- 
got alkaloids which are found in biological 
fluids such as plasma or urine. These com- 
pounds are part of drugs used in the treat- 
ment of ailments like migraine headache and 
excessive bleeding. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 



DOBRENSKI TO HEAD SK&F'S 
PHARMACY MARKETING 

Joseph Dobrenski, Jr., E.Ph., has been 
appointed Manager, Pharmacy Marketing, 
U.S. Pharmaceutical Products, Smith Kline 
& French Laboratories, it was announced 
today. 

In his new position, Mr. Dobrenski will 
assume responsibility for SK&F marketing 
activities to community pharmacists. 

Mr. Dobrenski joined SK&F in 1971 as 
Senior Product Manager for the ' SK-Line ' 
of high-quality, widely used ethical drug 
products. He was formerly employed at the 
Ciba Pharmaceutical Company in various 
product marketing positions. For several 
years prior to that he was a principal with 
Modern Apothecaries', Inc., operating phar- 
macies in Bloomfield and South Orange, 
Xew Jersey. 

Mr. Dobrenski is a graduate of Eutgers 
University, College of Pharmacy and has 
attended New York University, Graduate 
School of Business. 

He is a member of the New Jersey Phar- 
maceutical Association, the American Phar- 
maceutical Association and the American 
Marketing Association. He has served as a 
Fellow with the American College of Apoth- 
ecaries. 

Mr. Dobrenski and his wife Faith, cur- 
rently reside in Cherry Hill, New Jersey 
with their three children, where he is still 
active in community pharmacy. 

ABBOTT SELECTS WOLINSKI 
AS SALES TRAINER 

E. J. Wolinski, Ealeigh, North Carolina, 
Abbott Professional Eepresentative has 



been selected to become a Eegional Sales 
Trainer for Abbott Laboratories in the 
Southeastern Eegion. It is the responsibility 
of the Trainer, in addition to his regular 
responsibilities, to work with a newly hired 
representative during the first week of em- 
ployment. During this period the Trainer 
imparts considerable product knowledge and 
stresses the basic fundamentals that are 
necessary to enable a new representative to 
become an effective Abbott Medical Eepre- 
sentative. 

E. J. Wolinski was picked by his manage- 
ment for this important assignment as a 
result of his proven ability and excellent 
work record. 

DR. PIANTADOSI HEW 
GRANT RECIPIENT 

Dr. Claude Piantadosi, Head and Profes- 
sor, Division of Medicinal Chemistry and 
Pharmacognosy, UNC School of Pharmacy 
is the recipient of a research grant from the 
Department of Health, Education and Wel- 
fare in the amount of #44,205. The project 
title is "Synthesis and Study of Hypolip- 
idemic Agents. ' ' 

Eesearch will involve synthesis and study 
of hypolipidemic agents as specific inhibitors' 
of a select group of enzymes important in 
lipid metabolism. It is further believed that 
such specific inhibitors would also be of 
great value in studying other physiological 
processes relative to arteriosclerosis. 

Collaborating with Dr. Piantadosi in this 
research are Dr. Eobert G. Lamb, Depart- 
ment of Pharmacology and Dr. Iris Hall, 
Dr. K. S. Ishaq and Dr. G. L. Carlson from 
Division of Medicinal Chemistry, School of 
Pharmacy. 



*Kfr 




,l S©*-\/ic© In WI-iol©saJ© C^jEurttitieei 



USE OUR TOLL FREE 

NUMBER 800-222-3856 

ANY TIME DAY OR NIGHT 

ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY 



GORDON S. HAMRICK 
Vice President 



DRUG CXDMRANY 

SHELBY. N.C. 



26 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES 

DIVISION OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES 

Ealeigh, N. C. 27611 
March 20, 1974 

Dear Fellow Pharmacists: 

May is "Mental Health Month" in North Carolina. The Division of Mental Health 
would like the citizens of this State to learn what services are available at the local level. 

To accomplish this objective, the mental health center in your area will be planning 
activities to foster this enlightenment. 

As you well know, medication plays an important role in the successful aftercare 
management of our patients. More important, though, are the pharmaceutical Services 
provided with those drugs. 

I would like to have your help. Only with your assistance can the quality of pharma- 
ceutical services be improved for our outpatient mentally ill. 

Below is a list of the area mental health center programs in the State. If your 
county has a pharmaceutical association, contact the mental health center as a group. 
Offer your services — they will welcome your support. Even if you do not have a phar- 
macy organization in your county, contact the mental health center as an individual. 

Here are just a few things you can do for the mental health center: 

1. Refer patients 

2. Monitor drug therapy compliance 

3. Participate in drug abuse education programs 

4. Counsel patients on the correct use of and the importance of their medications 
Pharmacists in Union, Montgomery, Moore, Hoke, Richmond, Lenoir, Cherokee, 

Macon and several other counties have worked with their mental health centers to pro- 
vide better pharmaceutical follow-up care for their patients'. Why don't you join with 
them? 

During the next several months, I will be describing in the Journal, county pharma- 
ceutical programs developed for mental health. If you have an interest in this for your 
county, please contact me at (919) 829-4506. 

Sincerely, 
/s/ Robert J. Allen, M.S. 

Chief, Pharmacy Services 

NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMS 

REGION I 

AREA 1 

Jackson, Haywood, Macon, Oicrolrc, Clay, 
Graham, Sivain 

Smoky Mountain Mental Health Center Ben D. Monroe, Ph.D. 

P.O. Box 91 Area Director 

Marble, North Carolina 28905 (704) 837-5680 

Smoky Mountain Mental Health Center 

P. O. Box 2784 

Cullowhee, North Carolina 28723 (704) 293-9281 

Smoky Mountain Mental Health Center 

P. O. Box 278 

Hazelwood, North Carolina 28738 (704) 456-7891 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

AREA 2 



Buncombe, Madison, Mitchell, Yancey 

Blue Eidge Community Mental Health Center 
356 Biltmore Avenue 
Asheville, North Carolina 28801 

Blue Ridge Mental Health Center 
Yancey County Health Department 
Burnsville, North Carolina 28714 

Blue Eidge Mental Health Center 
Mitchell County Health Department 
Bakersville, North Carolina 28705 

Blue Eidge Mental Health Center 
Madison County Health Department 
Eoute 5, Box 231 
Marshall, North Carolina 28753 



Lawrence D. 
Area 
(704) 



27 



Bur well 
Director 

2^4-2:^1 



(704) 682-212^ 



(704) 688-2371 



(704) 649-353] 



AREA 3 



Watauga, Ashe, Alleghany, WilTces, Avery 

New Eiver Mental Health Center 
210 West King Street 
Boone, North Carolina 28607 

New Eiver Mental Health Center 
101-A West Main Street 
Wilkesboro, North Carolina 28697 

New Eiver Mental Health Clinic 
Alleghany County Health Department 
Sparta, North Carolina 28675 

New Eiver Mental Health Clinic 

c/o Nurse Eesidence 

Jefferson, North Carolina 28640 

New Eiver Mental Health Clinic 
Avery County Health Department 
Newland, North Carolina 28657 



Brooke B. Johnson, Ph.D. 
Area Director 
(704) 264-9007 

(919) 838-3551 
667-6046 
838-4391 



(919) 372-4095 



(919) 246-4542 



(704) 733-4971 



AREA 4 



Transylvania, Henderson 

Transylvania Mental Health Center 

P. O. Box 666 

Brevard, North Carolina 28712 

Henderson County Mental Health Clinic. 

629 Justice Street 

Hendersonville, North Carolina 28739 



Gordon Kendall 

Director 

(704) 883-3955 

Almou Kerr 

Director 

(704) 692-!)l 35 



28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 
AREA 5 



Caldivell, Burke, Alexander, McDowell 

Foothills Mental Health Center 

208 Kirkwood Avenue, P. 0. Box 967 

Lenoir, North Carolina 28645 

Foothills Mental Health Center 
300 S. Sterling Street 
Morganton, North Carolina 28655 

Foothills Mental Health Center 

P. O. Box 995 

Taylorsville, North Carolina 28681 

Foothills Mental Health Center 

P. 0. Box 699 

Marion, North Carolina 28752 



Pete Reichle 

Area Director 

(704) 754-4552 



(704) 487-6841 



(704) 632-9759 



(704) 652-544-1 



AREA 6 



Rutherford, Poll 

Rutherford County Mental Health Center 
306 South Ridgecrest Avenue 
Rutherfordton, North Carolina 28139 

Polk County Mental Health Center 

P. O. Box 1158 

Tryon, North Carolina 28782 



Ailecn Hamrick 

Director 

(704) 286-9141 

Norman Boyer, M.D. 

Director 

(704) 859-6661 



AREA 7 



Cleveland 

Cleveland County Mental Health Center 
808 N. Washington Street 
Shelby, North Carolina 28150 



E. J. Rankin 
Area Director 
(704) 482-3801 



AREA 8 



Gaston, Lincoln 

Gaston County Mental Health Center 

P. O. Box 3897 

Gastonia, North Carolina 28052 

Lincoln County Mental Health Center 

P. O. Box 657 

Lincolnton, North Carolina 28601 



William F. Baxter, Jr. 
Area Director 
(704) 867-4411 



(704) 735-1496 



Catawba 

Family Mental Health Services 
346 Third Avenue, N. W. 
Hickory, North Carolina 28601 



AREA 9 



Martin Amacher, ACSW 

Area Director 

(704) 328-5361 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



AREA 10 



Mecklenburg 



Mecklenburg County Mental Health Center 

501 Billingsley Boad 

Charlotte, North Carolina 28211 

Mecklenburg Center for Human Development 
3520 Ellington Street 
Charlotte, Xorth Carolina 28211 



William O 'Connor 
Area Director 
(704) 374-2023 

Joseph V. Baldwin, M.D. 

Director 

(704) 374-2603 



AREA 11 



Rowan, Iredell, Davie 

Tri-County Mental Health Center 
113 Confederate Avenue 
Salisbury, Xorth Carolina 28144 

Tri-County Mental Health Center 

120 Court Street 

Statesville, Xorth Carolina 28677 

Tri-County Mental Health Center 

805 Hospital Street 

Mocksville, North Carolina 27028 



Larry Parrish 
Administrator 
(704) 633-3616 



(704) 872-891G 



(704) 634-3205 



Surry, Yadkin 

Surry County Mental Health Center 

Rockford Street 

Mt. Airy, Xorth Carolina 27030 

Yadkin County Mental Health Center 
Professional Building 
Yadkinville, Xorth Carolina 27055 



REGION II 
AREA 1 



Jimmy Shaw 

Director 

(919) 786-6744 

Mrs. Maria Wolfe 

Director 

(919) 679-8265 or 679-2710 



AREA 2 



Forsyth, Stokes 



Forsyth County Department of Mental Health 
704 Government Center 
Winston-Salem, Xorth Carolina 27101 

Forsyth County Adult Mental Health Clinic 
740 Cleveland Avenue, X. E. 
Winston-Salem, Xorth Carolina 27102 

Child Guidance Clinic of Forsyth County, Inc. 

1200 Glade Street 

Winston-Salem, Xorth Carolina 27104 

Alcoholism Program of Forsyth County 
740 Cleveland Avenue, X. E. 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27101 



Richard Spencer, M.D. 
Area Director 
(919) 727-2421 



(919) 727-202-J 

Paul Bragg, M.A. 
Administrator 
(919) 723-357] 

John Canupp, ACSW 
Administrator 
(919) 727-2866 



30 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



Stokes County Mental Health Clinic 
Stokes County Health Department 
Danbury, North Carolina 27016 



Rockingham 



AREA 3 



Koekingham County Mental Health Center 

P. O. Box 55 

Wentworth, North Carolina 27375 



Mrs. W. F. Davis, E.N. 

Administrator 

(919) 591-7437 or 591-8161 



Billy Witherspoon, MPH 
Administrator 
(919) 349-7021 



AREA 4 



Guilford 

Guilford County Mental Health Center 
300 Edgeworth Street 
Greensboro, North Carolina 27401 

Guilford County Mental Health Center 

404 N. Wrenn Street 

High Point, North Carolina 27260 

The Henry Wiseman Kendall Center 
4015 W. Wendover Avenue 
Greensboro, North Carolina 27407 



Donald Fontana 
Administrator 
(919) 373-3630 



(919) 888-9929 

Daylon T. Greene, ACSW 
Administrator 
(919) 294-4860 



Alamance, Caswell 

Alamance County Mental Health Center 

1946 Martin Street 

Burlington, North Carolina 27215 

Caswell County Mental Health Clinic 
Caswell County Health Department 
Yanceyville, North Carolina 



AREA 5 



John Moon, Bus. Off. 
Area Director 
(919) 228-1727 



(919) 694-433:'. 



AREA 6 



Orange, Person, Chatham 



Orange County Mental Health Center 

310 West Franklin Street 

Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 

Person County Mental Health Center 

214 Chublake Street 

Roxboro, North Carolina 27573 

Hillsborough Psychology Clinic 
125 East King Street 
Hillsborough, Noi tli Carolina 27278 

Chatham County Mental Health Clinic 
Chatham County District Health Department 
Route 1 
Pittsboro, North Carolina 27312 



Pat Walton 

929-0489 

Silas Colcy, M.D. 

Area Director 

(919) 929-4723 



(919) 599-821' 



(919) 732-2104 



(919) 542-2924 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 



AREA 7 



Durham 

Durham County Mental Health Center 
300 East Main Street 
Durham, North Carolina 27701 

Durham Child Guidance Clinic 
Trent and Elba Streets 
Durham, North Carolina 27705 



Doug Suddeth 

John G. Giragos, M.D. 

Director 

(919) 688-4366 

William Anderson, M.D. 

Director 

(919) 286-4456 



AREA 8 



Vance, Warren, Franklin, Granville 

Scott-Parker Mental Health Clinic 
940 County Home Eoad 
Henderson, North Carolina 27536 

Family Counseling and Education Center 
Route 1, Box IX, West River Road 
Louisburg, North Carolina 27549 

Jerry Hedrick Mental Health Clinic 
College St. Extension 
Oxford, North Carolina 27565 



William Taylor, M.D. 
Area Director 
(919) 492-4011 



(919) 496-4111 



(919) 693-2611 



REGION III 
AREA 1 



Cabarrus, Union 

Cabarrus County Mental Health Clinic 
102 Church Street, N. E. 
Concord, North Carolina 28025 

Union County Mental Health Clinic 
Union County Health Department 
P. O. Box 23 
Monroe, North Carolina 28110 



Robert Wayne Harrelson, ACSW 

Director 

(704) 786-5146 

Tom Danek 

Coordinator 

(704) 289-2369 



Da vidson 

Davidson County Mental Health Center 
23 \V. Third Street, P. O. Box 503 
Lexington, North Carolina 27292 



AREA 2 



John W. Vainer, M.D. 

Director 

(704) 24 6-5 395 



AREA 3 



Moore, Hole, Richmond, Montgomery 

Sandhills Mental Health Center 
Medical Center Building 
Pinehurst, North Carolina 28374 



Eileen Hanson 

Donald R. Shulte, M.D. 

Area Director 

(919) 295-6853 



32 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 
AREA 4 



Robeson, Bladen, Scotland, Columbus 

Southeastern Mental Health Center 

209 West 28th Street 

Lumberton, North Carolina 28358 

Columbus County Mental Health Center 
County Hall, Box 267 
Whiteville, North Carolina 28472 

Scotland County Mental Health Center 

1304 Biggs Street 

Laurinburg, North Carolina 28352 

Bladen County Mental Health Clinic 

P. 0. Box 1176 

Elizabethtown, North Carolina 28337 



John McKec 

A. Eugene Douglas, M.D. 

Area Director 

(919) 738-5261 



(919) 642-2363 



(919) 276-7360 



(919) 862-2195 



Cumberland, Sampson 



AREA 5 



Cumberland-Sampson Mental Health Center 

1406 Owen Drive 

Fayetteville, North Carolina 28302 



Billy K. Graham, ACSW 

Director 

(919) 323-0601 



AREA 6 



Lee, Harnett 

Harnett County Mental Health Center 

P. O. Box 457 

Buies Creek, North Carolina 27506 

Lee-Harnett Mental Health Center 
P. O. Box Q-103 Carbonton Eoad 
Sanford, North Carolina 27330 



Ralph McCoig, ACSW 
Area Director 
(919) 893-5727 



(919) 775-4129 



Johnston 

Johnston County Mental Health Center 

P. O. Box 411 

Smithfield, North Carolina 27577 



AREA 7 



Pred Wright 
Administrator 
(919) 934-4185 



AREA 8 



Wale 



Area Mental Health Program for Wake County 
Room 226, Wake County Courthouse 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27602 

W. H. Trentman Mental Health Center 
3008 New Bern Avenue 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27610 



James W. Kirkpatrick 
Area Director 
(919) 755-6238 

Nicholas Pediaditakis, M.D. 

Clinical Director 

(919) 834-6484 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

AREA 9 



33 



Stanly, Anson 



Tadkin-Pee Dee Mental Health Center 
Stanly Unit, P. 0. Box 1396 
Albemarle, North Carolina 28001 

Yadkin-Pee Dee Mental Health Center 
Anson Unit, Drawer 431 
Wadesboro, North Carolina 28170 



Ervin Funderburk, Jr., ACSW 
Area Director 
(704) 694-5916 



(704) 694-4070 



AREA 10 



Eandolph 

Randolph County Mental Health Center 
147 Me Arthur Street 
Asheboro, North Carolina 27203 



Ann H. Suggs, M.D. 

Director 

(919) 629-9188 



REGION IV 



New Hanover, Brunsicick, Pender 

Southeastern Mental Health Center 
718 South Fifth Street 
Wilmington, North Carolina 28402 



AREA 1 



John Wilson 

Administrative Director 

(919) 763-7342 



Onslow 

Onslow County Mental Health Center 
225 Wilmington Hwy., P. O. Box 547 
Jacksonville, North Carolina 28540 



AREA 2 



Donald Dawson 
Area Director 
(919) 347-5118 



IV ay in 

Wayne County Mental Health Center 
715 East Ashe Street, P. O. Box 1360 
GoMsboro, North Carolina 27530 



AREA 3 



Liston G. Edwards 
Area Director 
(919) 735-4331 



Wilson, Greene 

Wilson-Greene Mental Health Center 
1709 S. Tarboro Street 
Wilson, North Carolina 27893 



AREA 4 



Kivettc II. Bowman, M.D. 

Director 
(919) 291-8021 



Edgecombe, Naslt 

Edgecombe-Nash Mental Health Center 

P. O. Box 4047 

Pocky Mount, North Carolina 27801 



AREA 5 



Billy W. Royal, M.D. 

Director 

(919) 446-0461 



34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 
AREA 6 



Halifax 

Halifax County Mental Health Center 

P. O. Box 577 

Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina 27870 



Craven, Jones, Pamlico, Carteret 
Neuse Clinic 

2000 Neuse Blvd., P. 0. Box 2535 
New Bern, North Carolina 28560 



Lenoir 

Lenoir County Mental Health Center 
111 South McLewean Street 
Kinston, North Carolina 28501 



Pitt 

Coastal Plain Mental Health Center 
1827 West Sixth Street 
Greenville, North Carolina 27834 



AREA 7 



AREA 8 



AREA 9 



AREA 10 



Hertford, Bertie, Gates, Northampton 

Roanoke-Chowan Mental Health Service 
316 South Academy Street 
Ahoskie, North Carolina 27910 

AREA 1 1 

Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, Hyde, Martin 

Tideland Mental Health Center 

106 Highland Drive 

Washington, North Carolina 27889 



AREA 12 



Pasquotank, Chowan, Perquimans, Camden, 
Dare, Currituck 

Albemarle Mental Health Center 
Medical Building, 113 N. Elliott Street 
Elizabeth City, North Carolina 27909 



AREA 13 



Duplin 

Duplin County Mental Health Center 

P. O. Box 499 

Kenansville, North Carolina 28349 



Soong H. Lee, M.D. 

Director 

(919") 537-6174 



Doug Sudduth 

Director 

(919) 638-4171 



Arthur Stevenson, Ph.D. 

Director 

(919) 527-7086 



Miriam Pleasant 

Joseph Frankford, ACSW 

Administrative Director 

(919) 752-7151 



Ruth Straka 

John H. Stanley, M.D. 

Director 

(919) 332-4137 



John Fuller 

Michael Bailey, M.A. 

Acting Director 

(919) 946-8061 



Charles R. Franklin, Jr., MSW 
Area Director 
(919) 335-0803 



E. J. Raman, Ph.D. 

Director 

(919) 296-4541 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 

• Charlotte — Mrs. T. K. Steele 

• Greensboro — Mrs. Wyndham Dukes 

• Raleigh — Mrs. Henry K. E. Williams 

• Bowan-Davie — Mrs. J. Michael Fuller 

• WXC Drug Club Auxiliary — Mrs\ Sandra 
Crouch 

CHARLOTTE 

Southpark Auditorium was a hub of ac- 
tivity Tuesday, February 26th, as five hun- 
dred guests gathered to play bridge or ca- 
nasta at the 10 AM or 8 PM Benefit Par- 
ties given by the Charlotte Woman 's Auxil- 
iary of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Association. Proceeds from the parties go 
for a scholarship to The School of Pharmacy 
at Chapel Hill and for a scholarship at 
UNCC. 

Mrs. Eobert Lewis, president, recognized 
the following committees: 

Chairman — Mrs. Gordon Vail 
Co-chairman — Mrs. Newton Etheredge, Jr. 
Setting up tables — Mrs. Bruce Medlin 
Bagging and Collecting Prizes — Mrs. Fos- 
ter Thomas 
Door Prizes' — Mrs. W. K. Gardner 
Chance Prizes — Mrs. Thomas H. Williams 
High and Low Score Prizes — Mrs. W. D. 

Smith, Mrs. Don Weathers 
Sale of Tickets — Mrs. Jesse Oxendine 
Eefreshments — Mrs. T. K. Steele 
Thank-You Notes— Mrs. C. H. Smith 

Ivey 's Department Store presented a de- 
lightful fashion show at both parties, show- 
ing styles and colors for spring and summer. 

The success of the Benefit Parties is due 
in part to the cooperation of the Wholesale 
and Eetail Drug Houses. We would like to 
express our appreciation to the many firms 
for their donations. The Flower Basket at 
Southpark did much to enhance the beauty 
of the surroundings. 

GREENSBORO 

The February meeting of the Greensboro 
Drug Club Auxiliary was held at the Greens- 
boro Country Club, with the president, Mrs. 
David Montgomery, presiding. The Invoca- 
tion was given by Mrs. Dale Bracker, in the 
absence of Mrs. Briggs Cook, Chaplain. 



Following officer and committee reports, 
Mrs. Jack Upton, Program Chairman, an- 
nounced that the March speaker will be Dr. 
Martha Sharpless, who will discuss Poison 
Prevention and Control. 

Mrs. Bracker, Ways and Means Committee 
Chairman, discussed the Old and New Sale 

ROWAN-DAVIE 

Dr. Malcolm Parada, a physician with the 
Salisbury Clinic for Women, presented a film 
on self-detection of breast cancer in women 
at the March 20 meeting of the Eowan- 
Davie Drug Auxiliary. 

The meeting, held in the home of Mrs. 
Eobert Milton, Salisbury, included a discus- 
sion of the forthcoming NCPhA Convention 
in Pinehurst. Terrariums to be used as cen- 
terpieces at the convention were on display. 

Mrs. Stephen Fuller presided at the busi- 
ness meeting. Mrs. Mark Smith was a guest 
at the meeting. 

PRODUCTIVE RELATIONSHIP 

Mrs. James E. Hickman, President 
Woman's Auxiliary of the NCPhA 
1420 Paisley Avenue 
Fayetteville, North Carolina 28304 
Dear Mrs. Hickman: 

Thank you for your letter of February 11, 
1974 describing the involvement of your 
dedicated members in the area of Mental 
Health Services. I can say without reserva- 
tion that the quality of life for those you 
have touched has greatly improved. Human 
kindness such as yours cannot be bought, 
cannot be legislated; for this kindness, we 
arc deeply grateful. 

Your husbands, the Pharmacists of North 
Carolina, who are a vital resource to the ef- 
fective after care management of our pa- 
tients, should be very proud of you. I am 
sure the Division of Mental Health Services 
can rely on you and your husbands for a 
continued productive relationship. 

Sincerely, 

N. P. Zarzar, M.D. 

Director 

Division of Mental Health Services 

Department of Human EeSources 

State of North Carolina 



36 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. R. N. Sykes of Wilson an- 
nounce the birth of a daughter, Mary Mar- 
garet, on March 8. Mr. Sykes is pharmacist 
manager of Nichols Pharmacy, Wilson. 



Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Fitchett of Durham 
announce the birth of a boy, Christopher 
William, on February 15. Mrs. Fitchett, the 
former Judy Benson, is a 1972 graduate of 
the UNC School of Pharmacy, Dr. Fitchett 
received his Ph.D. from UNC in 1973. 



Mr. and Mrs. William Nathan Thrower, 
Jr. of Gastonia announce the birth of a son, 
John William, on February 25 at Presby- 
terian Hospital, Charlotte. Bill is a 1968 
graduate of the UNC School of Pharmacy 
and is now owner-manager of College Park 
Pharmacy, Belmont. 

DEATHS 
W. L. Lamar 

W. L. Lamar, 83, died in Waltcrboro, 
South Carolina on February 26. 

Mr. Lamar operated a drug store in Albe- 
marle from 1930 to 1950 at which time he 
moved to Denton to become associated with 
the Denton Drug Store. He retired in 1971. 

Ho was a graduate of Auburn University, 
Class of 1911. Surviving are four sons'. 

William P. Taylor 

William Pleasant Taylor, age 88, Roanoke 
Rapids pharmacist, died March 29. 

For more than fifty years Mr. Taylor 
operated the Roanoke Pharmacy of Roanoke 
Rapids. 

Prior to his retirement, he served as a 
founder and president of the Roanoke 
Rapids Rotary Club, president of the Mer- 
chants Bureau and at one time was a mem- 
ber of the Roanoke Rapids City Council. 

WNC AUXILIARY 

At a luncheon meeting of the Western 
North Carolina Drug Club Auxiliary in 
Asheville on March 19, plans were made for 
a book and bake sale to be held in April. 
• The next meeting of the Auxiliary was 
scheduled for April 16. 



RALEIGH 

The Raleigh Woman's Pharmaceutical 
Auxiliary held a ' ' Sweetheart Supper ' ' on 
February 7, honoring husbands with a cov- 
ered dish supper. Fifteen couples attended 
the dinner at the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. I. 
Cromley, Jr. 

A brief business meeting was" followed by 
a slide presentation of the improvements at 
Shelley School, a program for pre-school 
mentally retarded children. 

The Auxiliary is planning a bridge bene- 
fit on April 4th with Mrs. Hollis Arley as 
chairman and Mrs. Joseph Rowe assisting. 
Mrs". W. J. Rhodes and Mrs. Robert Sea- 
born are collecting prizes for this special 
project. Mrs. Roger Crane, Mrs. Jerry John- 
son, and Mrs. Daryl Estes are making ar- 
rangements for bridge cards which will be 
used as high prizes. 

A special note of thanks is" due Mrs. L. E. 
Coats, who directed the drapery project at 
the Halfway House in Raleigh, and Revco 
Drugs, who donated 200 pairs of hosiery to 
the Women's House. 

WANTED TO BUY— Soda Fountain, 
bobtail or otherwise. Call the NCPhA 
(919-967-2237) for my name and 
telephone number. 

POSITION OPEN for experienced 
wholesale drug salesman to repre- 
sent leading North Carolina firm. 
Established territory with Raleigh 
base. Commission guarantee plus 
expense allowance. Must be famil- 
iar with market area and know 
wholesale drug business. Phone 704- 
332-5977 to arrange interview in 
Raleigh. 

WANTS NEW CHALLENGE— An 
aggressive pharmacist experienced 
in discount operation of Pharmacy 
desires an ownership or new man- 
agement position. If you have a chal- 
lenging position available, reply to 
classified ad: CHALLENGE. 

WANTED: Prescription Balance. 
Call or write Larry Blanton, Rite-Aid 
Discount Pharmacy, 2317 Randle- 
man Road, Greensboro. 



REMEMBER: 




The availability of a store planning 

and modernization service in this area 

through your ffi§) representative. 







CONSULTATION Our design consultant 
will work with you from rough idea 
through finished plan. He'll carefully 
analyze every facet of your operational 
needs and potential, and recommend 
practical solutions. 

DETAILED PLANNING For a single de- 
partment or a complete new store, our 
design consultant will prepare detailed 
plans assuring you the most effective 
arrangement, the best traffic patterns, 
the most sales stimulating Columbus 
fixtures, displays and decor. 

INSTALLATION He'll then supervise the 
installation of your new Columbus fix- 
tures, work with all trades involved to 
see that your new selling environment is 
complete and workable in every detail 
... in the shortest possible time. 



FOLLOW THROUGH And he'll help you 
through the "break-in" stage, seeing to 
it that your new fixtures serve you and 
your customers as designed. 



IN COOPERATION WITH THE 
COLUMBUS SHOW CASE COMPANY 

we are offering area druggists the finest, and 
most extensive lines of store merchandising 
display fixtures, plus complete store plan- 
ning and modernization service available 
anywhere. As one of America's oldest, most 
experienced manufacturers of store equip- 
ment, Columbus has everything you need to 
up-date your store and make it more prof- 
itable. Just ask your O.M.B. representative 
for details. 



Omens. fTlinofl & 6oD£K£fl,inc. /fljj$ 



Richmond. Va. Norfolk, Va. Wilson, N.C. 



Congratulations 

to the 1974 graduates of the 
University of North Carolina 

SchOOl Of PhamiaCV.eooD luck and best wishes 

* FOR A SUCCESSFUL CAREER 



IN THE PHARMACEUTICAL 
PROFESSION. 




PEABODY DRUG COMPANY 

1230 Avondale Drive ■ Durham, North Carolina 
Telephone 919 682 6116 



BELLAMY DRUG COMPANY 

3808 Oleander Drive • Wilmington, North Carolina 
Telephone 919-763 3341 



W. H. KING DRUG COMPANY 

P. O. Box 231 - Raleigh, North Carolina 
Telephone 919 834 3681 



O'HANLON-WATSON DRUG COMPANY 

P. O. Box 614 ■ Winston-Salem, North Carolina 
Telephone-91 9-765 3252 



"Helping you maintain your professional status" 



'he Carolina JOURNAL OF PHARMACY 



Volume LIV 



Moy 1974 



Number 5 




COMPLETES SUCCESSFUL YEAR— Mrs. James R. Hickmon of Fayetteville (right), President 
of the Woman's Auxiliary of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 1973-'74, 
ends a most productive year by presenting the traditional presidential symbol to her succes- 
sor, Mrs. J. Weaver Kirkpatrick of Waynesville. 

During her term of office, Mrs. Hickmon logged more than 4000 miles of travel in connec- 
tion with Auxiliary programs and projects. The Auxiliary, with more than 400 members, is 
one of the largest organizations of its type to be affiliated with a state pharmaceutical 
association. 






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with Dar von 

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Indianapolis, 
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Congratulations! 

TO THE 1974 SCHOOL OF 

PHARMACY GRADUATING CLASS 

Our Best Wishes for Success and 
Happiness in the Years Ahead! 





^"B t , 




JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 

Greensboro, N. C. 
In our 77th Year of Service to the North Carolina R< tail Druggists 



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500 

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Searle 
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Smith Kline & French 
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Mead Johnson 
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Advertising Program 
Money Saving Special Buys 



Merchandise 
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Chanel 

Mem 

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Yardley 

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Love 

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Hallmark 

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WITH 

"Our Gift Gallery" 

Max Factor 
English Leather 

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SCOTT DRUG COMPANY 

Full Service Wholesaler Since 1891 

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The Carolina 



JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



May, 1974 

Vol. LIV No. 5 



Officers 

XORTII CAROLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 



President 

W. Whitakee Moose 
Mount Pleasant 



Vice-Piesidents 

W. H. WlLSt N 

Raleigh 

L. M. Wiialey 

Wallace 

Thomas R. Burgiss 

Sparta 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Rox 151 

Chapel ITill, X. C. 



CONTENTS THIS ISSUE 



Despite OK, Drug Price Ads Unlikely 5 

Exam Results Announced by N. C. Board of Pharmacy 6 

Tar Heel Digest 8 

State Legislative Review 11 

Fourth Annual PharmPAC Meeting 13 

Third Party Programs and the Retail Pharmacist . . . 15 

Disasters — Major and Minor 19 

UNC Awards Night Program 23 

VD— The Gift That Keeps on Giving 24 

Pinehurst Convention Report 27 

Moments to Remember 36 

Doings of the Auxiliaries 38 

MarriagesyDeaths/Classified Advertising 40 



ADVERTISERS 



12 
L0 



Abbott Laboratories 

Ciba 

Colorcraft Corporation 8 

Ely Lilly and Company 2nd Cover 

Gilpin, Henry B. 9 

ICN Pharmaceuticals (King Associates) 4th Cover 

I. C. System, Inc. 11 

Justice Drug Company 1 

Kendall Drug Company 13 



Lozier 

Owens, Minor & Bodeker 

Ramsey Manufacturing Corporation 

E. N. RoweD Company 

Scott Drug Company 

Seeman Printery 

Smith Wholesale Drug 

Washington National Insurance Co. 



14 

3rd Cover 
18 

19 

2 

25 

16 
22 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Second class 
postage paid at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



SUES DOCTOR AND ALCON 
FOR $300,000 

A Virginia man is suing Dr. Eugene V. 
Grace of Durham and Alcon Laboratories 
of Texas for $300,000 damages for loss of 
sight in his left eye. 

Charles E. Weaver alleges that Dr. Grace 
diagnosed he had a glaucoma condition and 
prescribed the use of a drug manufactured 
by Alcon. 

The Virginia man further alleges that the 
drug firm had not warned doctors" that the 
drug could cause eye damage, including 
retinal detachment, and that it was sold by 
the firm without adequate instructions con- 
cerning its proper use and possible side ef- 
fects. 

The suit was filed in the U. S. Middle Dis- 
trict Court in Greensboro. 



Guest lecturers were 

Thomas E. Burgiss of Sparta 
B. Cade Brooks of Fayetteville 
William H. (Bill) Mast of Henderson 
W. H. (Bill) Wilson of Raleigh 
Ralph P. Rogers, Jr., of Durham 
Donald Peterson, of Durham 
W. Whitaker Moose of Mount Pleasant 
L. Milton Whaley of Wallace 

The registrants who attended the lecture/ 
discussion programs received a broad range 
of viewpoints relating to the problems and 
opportunities existing in community phar- 
macy. While the topic was the same, the 
eight lecturers presented their own version 
of community pharmacy, as practiced today 
and likely to be practiced in the future. 



JOHN MITCHENER III, 
PRESIDENT-ELECT 

Newly elected officers of the Northeastern 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Society are 

President: John Mitchener, III 
Vice-President: John B. Stallings 
Secretary-Treasurer: Joe Minton 

The April 10 meeting in Williamston fea- 
tured discussions on price posting, prescrip- 
tion copies and continuing education. 

John Mitchener and Jim Blount were au- 
thorized to go to Chapel Hill on a fact- 
finding mission concerning continuing ed- 
ucation. 

Presiding officer at the meeting was W. 
P. O'Neal, Jr., president. 



PROGRAMS ON "COMMUNITY 

PHARMACY" CONCLUDE WITH 

PRESENTATION OF ATTENDANCE 

CERTIFICATES 

A series of lectures on ' ' Community Phar- 
macy" sponsored by the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association at the Institute 
of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, concluded with 
presentation of attendance certificates on 
April 15. 



SAVED A MAN'S LIFE 

The TV screening of the 30 minute show, 
I AM JOE 'S HEART, which was sponsored 
by Burroughs Wellcome Company, is re- 
ported to have saved a man's life in Cal- 
ifornia. 

After viewing the program, the man 
thought he was having the same problem 
with his heart as "Joe" exhibited on TV. 
A trip to a nearby hospital resulted in a 
"Code B Call" which medical authorities' 
later stated was responsible for saving the 
man's life. 

Since millions of viewers saw the 30 min- 
ute program, similar unreported incidences 
must have taken place elsewhere. The phar- 
maceutical industry does many things right; 
here is" one example. (See commendation 
resolution this issue of The Journal.) 



Pharmacist of the Year Dinner hon- 
oring Edwin R. Fuller, June 29 at 
the Holiday Inn, Salisbury. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



N.C. COURT OF APPEALS 

DECISION RELATING TO THE 

ADVERTISING SECTION OF CODE 

OF PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT 

Widespread publicity has been given to 
the decision of the North Carolina Court of 
Appeals to sustain a previous decision by 
Wake County Superior Court Donald L. 
Smith relating to the Pharmacists ' Code of 
Professional Conduct, specifically Section 8 
relating to advertising. 

Judge Smith had declared invalid a State 
Board of Pharmacy rule against public ad- 
vertising of prescription drugs, with or with- 
out prices. The Board appealed the decision 
to the N. C. Court of Appeals. 

Here is the reaction to the decision by 
The Charlotte Observer as written by Jack 
Horan : 



DESPITE OK, DRUG PRICE ADS 
UNLIKELY 

The way is clear for drugstores to adver- 
tise the price of prescription drugs in North 
Carolina and thus provide price-shopping in- 
formation for consumers, but it 's unlikely 
that any drugstores will immediately do so. 

Tuesday, the state Board of Pharmacy 
voted unanimously not to appeal an April 3 
decision of the state Court of Appeals, ac- 
cording to board attorney Ken Wooten. 

The court had upheld the substance of a 
Wake Superior Court ruling that struck 
down the board 's regulations against adver- 
tising drug prices or discount plans. 

Thus, there are no legal prohibitions 
against advertising drug prices in the state. 
Most pharmacists oppose it and drug chains' 
liave been reluctant to try it elsewhere. 

But the drugstore chain that brought tin- 
suit, Rcvco Southeast Drug Centers Inc., 
says it lias no plans to take advantage of 
the law and begin media advertising of its 
prices. 

Myron Winkelnian, Revco vice president 
for profes'sional services, said from Cleve- 
land, Ohio, that Revco does not advertise 
drug prices even in areas where competing 
drugstores do so. 

' ' We 've made all of our prices public 
through our ' dial-a-discount ' program," 



Winkelman said, referring to Revco 's adver- 
tising campaign that urges a shopper to 
call a Revco drugstore to get a price quota- 
tion for his prescription. 

In 1972, Revco challenged the Board of 
Pharmacy 's 1 professional code that bars 
pharmacists from being associated with the 
advertising of the drug chain's 10 per cent, 
discount plan for senior citizens and infants. 

A Wake Superior Court judge invalidated 
the entire code, including a part that for- 
bids the advertising of prescription drugs or 
their prices. 

The Court of Appeals then held that the 
law granting the pharmacy board the power 
to adopt a professional code was unconsti- 
tutional because the 1969 legislature had not 
given specific guidelines to the board. 

The Appeals Court, though, did not rule 
upon the merits of banning price or dis- 
count plan advertising. As a result, the 
pharmacy board and the state's pharmacists 
can ask the 1975 legislature to draw up an- 
other law granting power to regulate adver- 
tising that would meet court tests. 

Whitaker Moose, a Mount Pleasant phar- 
macist and immediate past president of the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 
said he believes pharmacists will ask for 
another law. 

Last month, a three-judge federal court 
in Richmond, Va., declared unconstitutional 
a Virginia law that barred the advertisuig 
of prescription drug prices, saying the law 
violated the consumers' right to know. 



LIFE MEMBER 

Marcus Cameron of Sanford is now a Life 
Member of the North Carolina Pharmaceu- 
tical Association. 

A graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy (1956), Mr. Cameron is associated 
with Robert Neal Watson in the ownership/ 
management of Jonesboro 's Lee Drug Store. 

Following graduation, Mr. Cameron was 
employed as a pharmacist in Greensboro and 
Jonesboro (1960) and later established 
Cameron's Drug Store, Sanford, which was 
dissolved at the time he formed his present 
business relationship with Jonesboro 's Lee 
Drug Store. 



6 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

EXAM RESULTS ANNOUNCED BY N. C. BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Pharmacists Licensed by Board Examination, March 1974 

6105. David Kent Allen, Briareliff Apts. 6-F, Wilson 27893 

6106. David Lloyd Ballard, Apt. C4-9, Twincastles Apts., 340 Maplewood Avenue, Win- 
ston-Salem 27103 

6107. Robert Stewart Beddingfield, 270 West Conn. Avenue, Southern Pines 

6108. Joseph Frederick Bennes, 179 Greenway Park, Chapel Hill 27514 

6109. Margaret Veil Bennett, 946 North Main Street, Louisburg 27549 

6110. Gregory Keith Bower, General Delivery, West Jefferson 

6111. Jerry Allen Bridgers, 2225 Oak Drive, Tarboro 27886 

6112. Nancy Catherine Caddell, 2810 E. Bessemer Avenue, Greensboro 

6113. James D. Carpenter, 4632-F Fillmore Drive, Wilmington 

6114. Eoger Wiley Cash, 2120 Clearview Court, Gastonia 28052 

6115. Larry R. Cloer, Eoute 6, Box 1033, Franklin 28734 

6116. Rebecca Buchanan Coltrane, 920-J Lakecrest, High Point 

6117. Henry Bryant Combs, Jr., Route 4, Box 619, Chapel Hill 

6118. Helene Costella Copening, 5B 200 Seven Oaks Road, Durham 

6119. John Gregory Cranford, Bldg. 1, Apt. 13, Flint Ridge Apts., Hillsborough 27278 

6120. Carol Elizabeth Craven, 18A Colonial Apts., Durham 27707 

6121. Michael Maxwell Desist, Route 6, Box 7, Betty Ann Apts., Marion 

6122. Paul Louis Doering, 3723 S.W. 20th Street, Gainesville, Fla. 32608 

6123. Jean C. Benson Douglas, 1109-A Olive Street, Greensboro 27401 

6124. Thomas Randall Duckett, 45 Morris Street, Asheville 28806 

6125. Nancy Levinson Eason, 175 Greenway Park, Chapel Hill 27514 

6126. William C. Finch, Jr., 3594 Fayetteville Road, Lumberton 

6127. William Michael Gallimore, Route 7, Box 595, Chapel Hill 27514 

6128. Gwendolyn B. Griffin, 203 Webb Drive, Forest City 

6129. Gregory Neil Hale, Medical Center Pharmacy, 124 North Center Street, Hickory 
28601 

6130. Henry Donald Hamilton, Route 5, Box 243-D, Washington 27889 

6131. Bruce Rollin Harrison, Troy Drug Company, Troy 27371 

6132. Robert Ray Henley, 1938 Shiloh Drive, Fayetteville 

6133. Clyde Eugene Hensley, 16 Westwood Village, Marion 28752 

6134. Patsy Stoltz Huff, 1330-5 Kings Arms Apts., Chapel Hill 27514 

6135. Hale Steven Jaynes, 126 Hillcrest Drive, Lincolnton 

6136. Stephen Roscoe Jones, Route 4, Box 643-N, North Wilkesboro 

6137. Richard Van Kennerly, Route 1, Box 17-J, Siler City 27344 

6138. Catherine Caudill Koontz, Whaley Drug Company, Rockfish Plaza, Wallace 28466 

6139. Jill Elizabeth Lane, Route 1, Box 165, Sophia 

6140. Roy Otis Lewter, 10 Patriot Court, Kernersville 27284 

6141. Ronald Lee Martin, 909 Center Church Road, Eden 27288 

6142. Glenn Edward McLeroy, 313 Dacian Avenue, Durham 

6143. William Hewin Morris, K-l Camelot Apts., Chapel Hill 27514 

6144. Ruth Sparrow Parish, 3752 Avera Avenue, Winston-Salem 27106 

6145. David Larry Patterson, 817 Rockford Street, Mt. Airy 27030 

6146. Dale Brent Pilson, c/o Kramer Singleton, 2416 Cooksbury Drive, Durham 27704 

6147. Jesus Jose Poblet, 1401 Meadow Lane, Charlotte 28205 

6148. George David Rudd, Route 4, Box 208B, Chapel Hill 27514 

6149. Clayton Wayne Sasser, Route 2, Stanfield 28163 

6150. Billie K. Griffin Slade, Apt. 16, Park Apts., Williamston 27892 

6151. Henry Lewis Smith, 628 Chateau Apts., Chapel Hill 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

6152. Larry Alan Sneed, 4514 Southland Avenue, Alexandria, Va. 22312 

6153. Donna Lee Soyars, 1204 Barnes Street, Reidsville 27320 

6154. Linda Griffin Spivey, 75 Shangri-La, Apex 

6155. Sharon Griffin Tabb, P. 0. Box 804, Manteo 27954 

6156. Frances H. Thompson, 716 Chateau Apts., Route 7, Chapel Hill 27514 

6157. James Gordon Tucker, Jr., Box 1227, Elizabethtown 28337 

6158. Alvin Dell Woody, 106 Hillcrest Street, Jonesville 28642 




NCPhA executive Director W. J. Smith presents resolution adopted by unanimous vote of 
the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association commending Burroughs Wellcome Company 
for its efforts to upgrade the quality of medical education programs on prime-time television 
by sponsoring an outstanding show — "I Am Joe's Heart." 

In the photograph, L-R: Burroughs Wellcome Advertising Manager Cliff Parish; Smith; 
Terry Stevens, Assistant to Sales Promotion Coordinator, and Peter Howsam, Vice President, 
Marketing. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 

FAYETTEVILLE— Pharmacist Ellon S. 
Martin of the Prescription Center Pharmacy 
has completed a three-day seminar in Balti- 
more conducted by United Surgical on the 
proper post operative management of pa- 
tients' who have undergone colostomy, ileos- 
tomy or ileal conduit surgery. 
GREENSBOBO— William P. Brewer, exec- 
utive vice president of Justice Drug Com- 
pany was among 10 business and professional 
leaders initiated into Phi Kappa Phi, na- 
tional academic honor society, at a recent 



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dinner meeting at N. C. State University, 
Raleigh. 

MARION — Eichard Wood, a native of Pick- 
ens, South Carolina, has accepted a position 
as pharmacist at Marion Pharmacy. Wood 
is a pharmacy graduate of Mercer Univer- 
sity. 

HIGHLANDS— Mark Zaehary of Cashiers 
joined the staff of Highlands Rexall Phar- 
macy on March 1. Before taking his present 
position, Mark was pharmacy manager with 
Eckerds of Forest City. 

WAYNESVILLE— Pharmacist Joe T. Rus- 
sell has accepted a position with Merrimon 
Avenue Pharmacy, Asheville. 
BO ONE— Effective May 1, Mrs. Carol C. 
Norris became associated with the Boone 
Drug Stores where she will serve on a ro- 
tating basis between the three existing 
stores and a new one under construction. 
WHITEVILLE— Phil Ward is the manager 
of Peoples Drug Store which opened in the 
Whiteville Plaza Shopping Center in early 
April. He is a 1971 graduate of the UNC 
School of Pharmacy. 

ASHEVILLE— William E. Horton, phar- 
macist at the Asheville Mall Pharmacy, was 
guest speaker at a recent meeting of the 
Buncombe County Chapter of American 
Medical Assistants. 

KERNERSVILLE— Pharmacist John Pinnix 
has been named a member of a county-wide 
committee to study health services in Win- 
ston-Salem and recommend the best organi- 
zation chart for county health programs. 
MAIDEN — Charles Carpenter has been 
elected president of the recently formed 
Maiden Merchants Association. He was for- 
merly associated with Conover Drug Store. 
OXFORD — One of the judges of the recent 
Granville County Science Pair was Pharma- 
cist William Dement. 

M R G A NTON— Charles Davis, Jr. of 
Broughton Hospital was one of 130 pharma- 
cists who completed a two-day seminar on 
steroid therapy at the Regency Hyatt in 
Atlanta. 

SOUTHERN P I NES— Pharmacist Joe 
Brantley of Mann Drug Company was a 
recent guest speaker at a meeting of the 
Union Pines Science Club. 



K^jccuy ueiivery is a waste or time 
if your order is filled incorrectly. 




i know the feeling — you receive 
prder, but part of the order isn't 
tt you ordered. The speediest 
very in the world isn't going to 
laftei something like this happens 
That's why our policy is to treat 
i order as if your business 



depended on it And it's the same 
reason our batting average is so high 
with you and thousands of 
pharmacists just like you. 
..... If y ,ur present source is not 
filling your orders correctly, write or 
call the Gilpin Division Manager 



nearest you.* He may be just what 
the doctor ordered. 



THE HENRY B 



GILPIN 

Wholesale druggists since 1845 



^n.ngion i-rank Antk.nviak, 901 Southern Avem,,-. Washington, 1 1 C 20032 (301) 630-4500 



It is your business 

if she didn't take her 

high blood pressure 

pills today! 

"How's your back today?" . . . 
"Did the antacid work?" 

Sound familiar? Such questions are 
common in the pharmacy today, showing 
that the pharmacist — as a key member of 
today's health team — is interacting with 
his patients/customers because he is 
deeply concerned. 

"Mrs. Jones, did you take your 
high blood pressure pills today?" 

An especially important question, because 
more and more physicians are treating 
hypertension earlier and more vigorously 
to help reduce the risks of eventual organ 
damage. Missed medication spells danger, 
since such neglect may become a habit. 
Manv pharmacists consider it their 



concerning adherence to antihyperten- 
sive regimens. 

Such opportunity for interaction will 
increase in the months and years ahead as 
more patients come into the treatment 
system. Because the problem is so tre- 
mendous — 23 million Americans are 
hypertensive, yet only half are detected 
and only an eighth are under adequate 
treatment — mass screening efforts have 
been organized throughout the country. 
For example, CIBA has been conducting 
CHEC (Community Hypertension Evalu- 
ation Clinics) programs for more than a 
year across the nation. Many thousands 
screened, many thousands referred to 
their physicians. 

CIBA is also launching a series of hyper- 
tension-oriented seminars for pharmacists' 
postgraduate education as part of our 
commitment to meet your needs. 
The challenge is before us. Now is the time 
for true interaction to solve what is now 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



STATE LEGISLATIVE REVIEW 

The North Carolina General Assembly, 
after meeting 64 days and considering more 
than 3,700 bills, the 1974 session was" ad- 
journed on April 13. This was the state's 
first experiment in annual legislative ses- 
sions. 

Of the 3,700 bills introduced, 1,675 were 
enacted into law. The rest were either de- 
feated, killed in committee or withdrawn. 

Included as a part of the 170-member 
Assembly were two pharmacists: Senator 
John T. Henley of Hope Mills and Repre- 
sentative Barney Paul Woodard of Prince- 
ton. Their public service record was out- 
standing. 

While the Assembly was in session, phar- 
macists from all areas of the state were ac- 
tive in expressing their viewpoints on pro- 
posed legislation of interest to the profes- 
sion. Organized back-up support was pro- 
vided by the NCPhA Legislative Committee 
and the North Carolina Pharmacy Political 
Action Committee. 

Highlights of the '74 Assembly session, 
as viewed from the standpoint of major 
pharmacy interest, follows: 



LABEL BILL : 

Requires name and strength of drug on 
Rx label unless otherwise directed by the 
prcscriber. Effective June 1, 1974. 



HOARD OF PHARMACY FEES: 

New schedule of fees effective May 1, 
1974. Major impact not until late 1974 when 
hilling for 197fi license renewals will be 
made. 



RX PRICE POSTING: 

Despite strong support by N. C. Public 
I nt .rest Research Group, N. C. Consumers 
Council and others, Mil given unfavorable 
report by House Judiciary Committee #2. 



REPEAL OF N. C. FAIR TRADE ACT: 

Given unfavorable report by committee to 
which referred. 



REPEAL OF STATE'S ANTI- 
SUB STITION LAW: 

Although considerable pre-Assembly ses- 
sion talk that such a bill would be intro- 
duced, the proposal did not pick up sufficient 
support to justify introduction of the bill. 

A number of bills relating to the N. C. 
Drug Authority were passed following in- 
troduction by Senator Henley and others. 
No major change anticipated. 

All state boards, including the Board of 
Pharmacy, will be more closely supervised as 
a result of legislation enacted by the '74 
Assembly. 

LEMELIN, JAYCEE NOMINEE 

A Charlotte pharmacist, Daniel Lemelin, 
was one of ten outstanding young men of 
Charlotte and Mecklenburg County selected 
as a nominee for the 1973 distinguished ser- 
vice award by the Charlotte Jaycees. 



I. C. System, Inc. 

The nation's most highly 
specialized collection service 



Your Association's Collection Service is 
an affiliate of a national organization cur- 
rently serving members of more than 700 
leading trade associations throughout the 
nation. 

Don't lose sales volume because cus- 
tomers owe you money and are trading 
somewhere else. Your Association's Col- 
lection Service will chase those debtors 
back into your place of business to pay 
YOU direct. You will get accounts OFF 
your ledger and IN your bank account — 
and you will also have many former cus- 
tomers back doing business with you again. 
For information, contact your Association 
office. It will pay you to do so. 

On request, A representative 

of the I. C. System will explain 

the collection program in detail. 

Call or write the NCPhA, Box 151, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



What does man have in common with Samson? 



Neither man nor the gorilla can synthesize vitamin C. 
Interestingly, the slow loris, a primate much further 
down the evolutionary scale, can convert L-l,4-gu- 
lonolactone to ascorbic acid in its liver and presum- 
ably does not require an exogenous source of 
ascorbic acid. 

Because man can neither synthesize vitamin C nor 
store most of the water soluble vitamins, these nu- 
trients must be replenished continuously in order to 



maintain normal tissue levels. 

Generally, this is accomplished in his daily diet. 
But under conditions of illness, stress, in convales- 
cence or following surgery, vitamin stores may be 
depleted or metabolic demands increased. 

In such cases, Surbex-T may be indicated. 
Surbex-T restores the water soluble vita- 
mins with each tablet providing 500 mg. of 
vitamin C plus high potency B-complex. 



SURBEX-T @ 500 mg. of Vitamin C with High Potency B-Complex 
Restores what the body cannot effectively store 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



13 



FOURTH ANNUAL PHARMPAC 
MEETING HELD 

On Sunday, March 24, sixty-eight mem- 
bers of PharmPAC met in Pinehurst to dis- 
cuss activities this past year and future 
plans for the organization. Chairman Rex 
Paramore and Executive Secretary Steve 
Moore presided at the 4 p.m. meeting. 

The work of the directors and officers was 
recognized. Current membership is 311 in- 
cluding members in all but the 27th Legis- 
lative District in North Carolina but includ- 
ing 81 counties. The goal of 1000 active 
members for calendar year 1975 was an- 
nounced. Each of the current members will 
be asked to enlist two new members in this 
effort. Membership dues billing will be car- 
ried out in October for next year. 

The four pharmacist candidates for the 
Legislature were introduced (two were pres- 
ent) for their comments. (Note: Aid for 
their respective campaigns is urgently re- 
quested from pharmacists and their friends 
for their upcoming primary and general 
election contests.) 

The renting of office space at the Institute 
of Pharmacy and the establishment of the 
telephone communication system through the 
office was reported and discussed. It was an- 
nounced that the PharmPAC constitution 
would be revised and presented to the mem- 
bership for their consideration in the near 
future. The treasurer's report was given. 

By a unanimous vote of the membership, 
the rules were suspended and elections were 



held with open nominations and voting. The 
Board of Directors for this next year are: 
First District : W. P. O 'Neal, Belhaven 
Second District: Rex Paramore, Nashville 
Third District: W. H. Randall, Lillington 
Fourth District: W. H. Wilson, Raleigh 
Fifth District: Tom R. Burgiss, Sparta 
Sixth District: Marion McCurdy, Mebane 
Seventh District: B. Cade Brooks, Fayette- 

ville 
Eighth District: Whitaker Moose, Mount 

Pleasant 
Ninth District : Hal Cornwell, Lincolnton 
Tenth District: W. H. Houser, Cherryville 
Eleventh District: Kermit Wells, Canton 

Executive Committee and Offcers to serve 
are : 

Chairman : Rex Paramore ; Vice-Chair- 
man : W. P. O'Neal; Treasurer: Marion 
McCurdy ; Executive Secretary : Steve Moore ; 
At-large-members: M. Elmo McCorkle, W. 
L. Searboro. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The R. G. Thomas Company, specialist in 
Drug Store planning, has recently moved to 
a new location at 304 Meacham Street, Char- 
lotte, N. C. The new facility has over 2,000 
square feet of showroom, offices, and ware- 
house space. Various types of Lozier store 
fixtures are on display and plans are to carry 
in stock standard fixtures and pegboard ac- 
cessories for immediate delivery. 



^Jp 




'Service In Wnotesed© Queurtrtioei 



USE OUR TOLL FREE 

NUMBER 800-222-3856 

ANY TIME DAY OR NIGHT 

ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY 



GORDON G. HAMR1CK 

Vice President 



DRUG COIVIF^XJMY 



SHELBY. N.C. 



DRUG STORE FIXTURES 

• LAYOUT & DESIGN 

• DECOR 

• MERCHANDISING 

• STORE ACCESSORIES 

• EXPERT INSTALLATION 

• LEASING 

" Now Serving North Carolina Pharmacists 
with Quality Equipment and Service at the 
Lowest possible cost." 










j.y . s sow* 



ROLAND G. THOMAS 

STORE DESIGN 

304 MEACHAM STREET 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 28203 

(704) 376-5150 



ROBERT J. NYBERG 

STORE DESIGN 

532 HARVARD ST. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 27609 

(919) 787-0516 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 



THIRD PARTY PROGRAMS AND THE RETAIL PHARMACIST 

By Frank F. Yarborough, R.Ph., Director of Peer Review and 
Project Director for the N. C. Title XIX Medicaid Drug Program 



Third party programs are becoming in- 
creasingly more important to the retail phar- 
macist. Most recent estimates say that by 
1975, 60-70% of all prescriptions will be 
paid for at least in part by a third party, 
and the largest payors will be the Federal 
or State governments. If the currently pro- 
posed legislations are passed, this figure 
could be much higher. 

In addition to the currently available pro- 
grams, the growth of third party coverage 
will receive considerable impetus from the 
following : 

1. H.M.O. Legislation— the H.M.O. Act 
authorizes $375 million in Federal 
funding to help Start up H.M.O. 's 
throughout the country over the next 
five years. Many of these will provide 
prescription coverage through their 
own pharmacy or through existing 
community pharmacies. When existing 
community pharmacies are utilized, the 
program must be administered by a 
carrier such as PAID Prescriptions. 
Other H.M.O. 's will generate prescrip- 
tions that will not be covered by the 
H.M.O. 's, but the trend Should be 
toward coverage of prescription drugs. 
In providing for the prescription 
drugs, the bill authorized the H.M.O. 
to maintain, review and evaluate a 
drug-use profile and evaluate patterns 
of drug utilization to assure proper 
drug therapy. PAID Prescriptions' 
Peer Review program can support the 
pharmacist in drug therapy, review 
and evaluation. 

2. National Health Insurance Legisla- 
tion — The President's latest NHI pro- 
posal covers all prescription drugs and 
biologicals and any other life-saving 
and sustaining medication. The Com- 
prehensive Health Insurance Plan 
(HIP) will cover most working people 
(EHIP), low-income and high-risk in- 
dividuals (AHIP) and persons eligible 
for Medicare. CHIP will presumably 
reimburse Pharmacists at the lowest 
cost at which the drug is generally 
available. The balance would have to 



be paid by the patient if the physician 
insists on a higher priced drug. This 
legislation has not been finalized, but 
with an election coming up this year, 
some form of CHIP will probably be 
passed. 
3. Prescription Benefits under union or 
corporation coverage — Regardless of 
NHI, more unions and businesses are 
offering prescription drug coverage as 
a non-salary fringe benefit. This trend 
is expected to increase as companies 
such as PAID Prescriptions demon- 
strate their ability to competently ad- 
minister and control prescription drug 
programs. 

Consider what this means to the retail 
pharmacist. More people will receive 
medical services resulting in an increas- 
ing volume of prescriptions. More of 
these prescriptions will be filled be- 
cause they will not result in a financial 
burden on the patient. Since the ma- 
jority of the drug bill will be paid for 
by the third party, the patient -will be- 
come more interested in service and 
less interested in price. The current 
consumer interest and involvement in 
price posting and advertising will di- 
minish because the patient will pay 
only a fixed deductible or copay. The 
cost of the prescription will be set by 
the regulations governing the program. 
PAID Prescriptions currently administers 
government programs under Medicaid and 
Commercial programs sponsored by unions 
and businesses. Pharmacists are generally 
familiar with government programs, but 
PATD covers almost one million enrollees 
through approximately 200 commercial con- 
tracts. PAID is currently processing better 
than 380,000 prescriptions each month, and 
30,000 of approximately 50,000 II. S. phar- 
macies arc enrolled in PAID 's commercial 
program. New contracts continue to be 
ridded each month and new pharmacies are 
enrolled. 

94th Annual Convention. NCPhA 
Pinehurst. N. C, March 26, 1974 

(Continued on Page 17) 



£ 



PHARMACY 

ACCOUNT SERVICE 



*GOOD RECORDS FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS— A proven accounts 
receivable system — Designed from the ground up for your needs 
— by the folks who went to computers in 1958. Better collection 
for you and prescription tax records for your customers. You also 
automatically earn interest on past due accounts if you desire. 



£ 



PHARMACY 

BOOKKEEPING SERVICE 



*GOOD RECORDS FOR YOU — Twenty Nine years of bookkeeping 
for retailers plus 15 years of computer experience equals a system 
designed to give you the accounting service you need. 




PHARMACY 

ADVERTISING PROGRAM 

HOW'S YOUR RETAIL IMAGE?— Good? Bad? Indifferent— Con- 
sult your Smith Representative about our Associated Druggist Pro- 
gram. Some of the advantages of this program are hometown 
newspaper advertising— buying advantages— clerk training pro- 
gram — in store promotion materials and store advertising fliers. 

Just three of the many SMITH services 
Also ask about retirement, group hospitalization and major med- 



ical. Call or write to 





WHOLESALE DRUG 



• Spartanburg 582-1216 

• Greenville 235-4159 

• Asheville 684-6121 

• Charlotte 825-5161 
Wofford and Forest Streets P. O. Box 1779 

H [iiiKniiiii«.iiiiiiimnHB 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 



THIRD PARTY PROGRAMS 

The PAID Prescriptions commercial pro- 
gram is unique in several respects. Cost of 
drug and fee are usually equivalent to the 
State 's Medicaid program. However, under 
most commercial programs, PAID reim- 
burses those pharmacies that provide ad- 
equate professional services an additional 
twenty-five cents per prescription. Also, 
PAID is sponsoring a pilot project in Spo- 
kane, Washington under which the pharma- 
cist is paid a $3.00 fee if he refuses to fill 
any prescription that might result in an ad- 
verse drug reaction or a drug-drug inter- 
action. Through these two reimbursement 
mechanisms, the pharmacist is" encouraged 
to utilize his professional knowledge. 

The commercial claim form has been de- 
signed as simply as possible, and by the 
use of a plastic identification card, much 
of the patient information can be recorded 
by an imprinter. The claim form and card 
both are designed to fit the standard Bank 
Americard and Master Charge imprinters. 

In order for the pharmacist to enroll in 
the commercial program, a simple applica- 
tion form must be completed and mailed to 
the specified address. If the pharmacy wishes 
to apply for the Class II (higher) fee, an 
additional simple form must be completed 
and sent as well. 

The pharmacist is not required to pay any 
charge when he enrolls in the program. After 
he is 1 paid $100.00 in prescription charges, 
he is billed a one-time enrollment fee of 
$15.00 which must be paid if he wishes to 
continue his participation in the program. 
If the pharmacist insists, PAID will furnish 
an imprinter with appropriate pharmacy 
identification for a nominal fee of $10.00. 
No other payment is required. 

When the client is enrolled he is given a 
plastic I.D. card and a directory of par- 
ticipating pharmacies. The current North 
Carolina directory lists about 200 pharma- 
cists, of which better than half are repre- 
sent ill by four of the large chains who are 
automatically enrolled under a blanket con- 
tract at the request of the chain 's home 
office. 

In the past the independent pharmacist 
has not participated to the extent that the 



chain pharmacies have. This may be due to 
the additional paperwork and the fact that 
most third party programs differ from some 
traditional pharmacy practices. Now the in- 
creasing third party involvement in the pre- 
scription business 1 mandates that all phar- 
macies become involved in these programs. 
Irving Rubin, Editor of Pharmacy Times 
made the following comment in his March, 
1974 editorial: 

"However, just as 3rd parties must 
keep an eye on what providers of med- 
ical care do, so must the providers make 
sure that the 3rd parties' don't bite off 
too much in terms of the cost-quality 
ratio of medical care. 

In line with this, pharmacists — as 
medical care providers — must speak up 
loudly and clearly when 3rd parties try 
to establish or hold fees' at unrealistic 
levels or attempt to cram the lowest 
cash drugs down patients' throats. 

To sum up: Both 3rd parties and pro- 
viders of medical care must play the role 
of constructive watchdogs in the interest 
of the patient! " 

This is PAID Prescriptions ' goal. We can 
accomplish this only with the help of the 
pharmacist. 

References 

1. M. Laventurier, "What's Good About Third 
Party Programs." 

2. The VOICE of the Pharmacist, ACA, January 
31, 1974. 

3. "Does Nixon's NHI Plan Mean More Woes," 
page 3, Drug Topics, March 4, 1974. 

4. I. Rubin, "Editorial," Pharmacy Times. March, 
1974. 

5. T. Collins, "Where to Now with Third Party?". 
Chain Store Age, March, 1973. 

Free, on request to the N. C. Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation: (1) Application for Membership as a 
Participating Pharmacy in Paid Prescriptions; 
(2) Application for Group Classification; and (3) 
Sample copy of billing form. 



CONTRIBUTIONS TO TMA 
FOUNDATION 

• by Zack W. Lyon of Durham in memory 
of Hugh Sconyers and Harold Daniels 

• by W. H. Worley, Jr. of Hickory in mem- 
ory of Hugh Sconyers' and Harold Daniels 

• by L. M. McCombs of Creedmoor in mem- 
ory of Hugh Sconyers and Barney Barnette. 



DRUG STORE SHOPPERS ARE 
DIFFERENT 

Today's shopper expects, and responds, to a Modern Shopping Atmosphere. 
3 out of 10 impulse purchases are inspired by 

DISPLAYS 
The right kind of drug store fixture is the KEY to VOLUME Sales . . . 
We can assure you the right kind of fixture for every display purpose with 

COLUMBUS IMPERIAL DRUG 
STORE FIXTURES 

Let us DESIGN and engineer your DRUG STORE to promote and SELL merchandise. 

We have successfully given this service to our customers for over a quarter of o 
century. 

"Giving you the best design, the best fixture and the best service by 
professionals" 

CALL US FOR A SINGLE FIXTURE OR A COMPLETE STORE. 



RAMSEY 

MANUFACTURING CORPORATION 

513 East Trade Street 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Telephone 704-334-3457 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



19 



DISASTERS 



Major and Minor 



GOLDSBORO 

A break-in at Ash Street Pharmacy netted 
thieves close to $1,000 in merchandise and 
resulted in some $300 damage to two doors. 

KANNAPOLIS 

For the second time in less than a month 
the F. L. Smith Drug Store was invaded by 
thieves who stole a quantity of controlled 
drugs. Two weeks previous to the April rob- 
bery, the pharmacy was entered but the 
drugs, valued at $165, were left on the roof 
of the pharmacy. 

KANNAPOLIS 

For breaking into the F. L. Smith Drug 
Store and stealing drugs from a locked cab- 
inet, Harold Otis Darnell of Shelby has 
received a 24 to 36 month prison sentence. 



THOMASVILLE 

The major portion of $2,000 worth of 
drugs stolen from Medi-Save Drug Center 
have been recovered. Maurice Hoffman, 19, 
of High Point, when arrested, had the drugs 
in his possession. 

CHARLOTTE 

A bomb threat was reported at Massey 
Hill Drug Store on March 27. Someone 
called the pharmacy and said a bomb was 
due to explode in about 30 minutes. Police 
and firemen searched the building but found 
no bomb. 

HENRIETTA 

Tri-Community Drugs. Quantity of drugs 
taken in a. break-in. After an unsuccessful 
attempt to enter the pharmacy by way of 
the back door, the robbers knocked out a 
plate glass door on the front of the building. 



HICKORY 

King 's Drugs. Drugs taken in a break-in 
but most damage ($500) from a smashed 
front door and drug cabinet. 

NORTH WILKESBORO 

Horton's Drug Store. Back door forced 
open, then drug cabinet forced open and 
more than 4000 Controlled Substances taken. 

CANTON 

Champion Cut Rate Drug Store. When a 
cabinet containing Controlled Substances was 
forced open, an alarm system was activated. 
In a hasty departure from the premises, the 
intruders broke the front door. Left behind : 
a radio to monitor police calls and burglar 
tools. 



DISTINCTIVE 




Carry your 
store's Identity by color and 
personalized copy right Into your customers 
home for the life of the Prescription 

Another pjus value of the modern paper 
box with its clean fresh label. 



N. ROWELL CO., INC 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



U srwiJ Bartmi 
i8. Roboft Blum 

Gat aid Carlson 

.1 ft ,■■■■ ':i "I li 



M 



\: 



UNC SCHOOL Of PHARMACY 
CONTINUING EDUCATION 
ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

William R. Adams, Jf . Wilscm 
Charles D. Wanton, Jr., Kings Mountain 
David 0. Clayiot, Greensboro 
James t. Creech, SmithfliW 
Oavid R. Davis, Jr., WiHmnwion 



m\u 



^Sll, 



Jesse M, Pike, Crtncmrl 
nam H, Randall, Jr., liiiirtgtofi 
'i. Moss SallBv, Jr., Asfteville 

WJ. Smith, CTapel Hill 



30 p.m. 


THE BOLE OF THE PRECEPTOR 


IN 




PHARMACEUTICAL EDUCATION 






Stephen M. Cairrla, Assistant Professor. UNC Sen 




2:15 p.ti 


UPDATING, Panel 






Paid Prescription* - Frank Yertrrjroiioh. R.Ph , 


Raleigh; 




Mental Health - Robert J. Alien, R.Ph., 






Nursing Home Standards - C. "Etennv" Ridou 


. R.Ph.. 




Pharmacy Consultant. N.C. Department o 


Social 




Services, Raieipb 




3:30 s 


It. BREAK 




3:45 a 


n PRESCRIPTION PRICE POSTING 


AND 




PRESCRIPTION SURVEVS 






Wilbur "iVio" P. Gullev. State Protect Direct 


t, North 




Carolina Pualir. Interest Research Group 




4:45 p. 


I AOJOURSMENT 





PHOTOGRAPHY BY GERALD GENTR1 



^ 



%', 



kj 



new 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 
COMMITTEE 

Claude U. Pstilnm. Chairman. C'lonei H 
Thomas R. Surgia, Sparta 
A. tvla Davis. GtstasvSfe 
joe C. Estiis, Jr.. RBfffevifle 



jfff 



\> 



The NCPhA-Endorsed Insurance Plans 
Which Merit Member Participation 



BASIC PLAN: 



EXTENDED PLAN: 



DISABILITY INCOME PLAN 

Accident Total Disability — Lifetime 
Sickness Total Disability — Two Years 

Accident Total Disability — Lifetime 
Sickness Total Disability — Five Years 



MAJOR MEDICAL EXPENSE PLAN 

PLAN I: $18,000 Maximum Benefit including $30 Daily Room Limit 
PLAN II: $30,000 Maximum Benefit including $50 Daily Room Limit 
(Up to $45,000 Maximum Benefit including $75.00 Daily Room 
Limit Available) 

TERM LIFE PLAN 

Up to $20,000 For Members 
Dependents Coverage Also Available 

HOSPITAL INCOME PLAN 

$25.00 Per Day For Member 
$20.00 Per Day For Spouse 
$15.00 Per Day For Each Child 

Payable From The First Day of Hospital Confinement 

For Up to 15 Months 

RETIREMENT AND PROFIT SHARING PLANS 

Excellent plans are available for both the Self Employed 
and Corporate Entities. 



FOR DETAILS 

WRITE OR 
TELEPHONE: 



HOYT W. SHORE, C.L.U. and Associates 
821 Baxter Street— Suite 316 
Charlotte, North Carolina 28202 

Telephone: (704) 333-3764 




Washington National 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

EVANSTON, ILLINOIS 60201 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



23 



AWARDS NIGHT PROGRAM 

School op Pharmacy 
April 25, 1974 
AWARD 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD 



KAPPA EPSILON AWARD 

KAPPA PSI AWARDS 

Reginald Ferrell Award 
Outstanding Senior Award 
Asklepios Key 

PHI DELTA CHI AWARDS 

Outstanding Senior Award 
Senior Scholastic AAvard 
Scholastic Improvement Award 

RHO CHI AWARDS 

Rho Chi First Year Award 
Achievement Certificates 

STUDENT BODY AWARDS 

Student Body President Award 
Pharmacy Student Body Award 
Best Instructor Award 

STUDENT BRANCHES AWARD 
McKesson & Robbing Award 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY AWARDS 
Pharmacy Faculty Award 
Buxton Williams Hunter Award 
Upjohn Achievement Award 
Lilly Achievement Award 
Bristol Award 
Merck Awards 



M. L. Jacob Award 

Division of Pharmacy Practice Award 

Rexall Award 

Fraternity Scholastic Award 



RECIPIENT 
Robert Buckner Hall 

Sanne Dail Jones 



Randolph Fletcher Spainhour 
Stephen Donald Burch 
David Stewart Wheeler 



Stephen Grady Russell 

John Michael Felts 

Michael Haskins Tucker 

Annette Elizabeth Aman 
(See listing below) 

Leroy Delbert Werley, III 

Sanne Dail Jones 

Larry James Loeffler 

Larry O 'Neal Spears 

Ann Martin Cranford 

Sanne Dail Jones 

Sandra Grace Hardee 

Pamela Upchurch Joyner 

Martha Anderson Pittman 

Martha Jean Gabriel 

Steven Kelly McCombs 

Leroy Delbert Werley, III 

Steven Dale Wyrick 

Sandra Grace Hardee 

Frank James Grill 

Kappa Epsilon 



Annette Elizabeth Aman 
Vicki Lee Ball 
James Bryson Brannon 
Charles Michael Brooks 
James Curtis Broome, Jr. 
Debra Sue Ellis 
Charles Thomas Faison 
Charles Robert Fenske 
George Eleden Francisco, Jr. 
Susan Emma Gibbs 



Rho Chi Achievement Certificates 

Dawn Smith Gilmore 
Pamela Susan Haithcock 
Susan Eleyse Harrell 
David Lee Jamison 
Frances Anne Krohn 
Everett Lee Lewis, Jr. 
Samuel Floyd Lewis 
Elizabeth Anne Livengood 
William Douglas Mitchell 
Bessie Deborah Moore 



Person Bennett Pittman 
Allan Marion Propst 
M.uita Louise Quigley 
Bryan Frazier Reed 
Nancy Reade Richardson 
Peggy Ellen Rushmoro 
Jeffrey James Smith 
Kenneth Wayne Spencer 
Joseph Jutson Ward 
Lu Lee Williams 



24 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



VD— THE GIFT THAT KEEPS 
ON GIVING 

"Venereal Disease — The Gift That Keeps 
On Giving, ' ' the second program in the 
Squibb Community Awareness Program is 
now available to pharmacists from the N. C. 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc., established the 
Community Awareness" Program to assist in 
the pharmacist's professional development 
and recognition in the local community. 

' ' The Squibb Community Awareness Pro- 
gram was designed to help the pharmacist's 
community service activities by providing 
comprehensive educational materials on var- 
ious health-related social programs' for pre- 
sentations to local community organiza- 
tions, ' ' explains Michael Bongiovanni, pres- 
ident of the U.S. Pharmaceutical Company, 
of E. R. Squibb. 

This informative presentation on venereal 
disease was written by Dr. David Madorsky, 
Director, Medical Activities, Fort Sam Hous- 
ton, Texas, and Chief, Health and Environ- 
ment Service, Brook General Hospital. 

A leading authority on venereal disease, 
Dr. Madorsky has published several papers 
on the subject including "Young physi- 
cians ' Knowledge of Venereal Disease, ' ' in 
the Journal of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. 

The presentation covers the broad field of 
venereal disease — what it is; how it is" con- 
tracted; its powers to infect or maim, ajid 
how it is cured. 

This packaged presentation includes 58 
slides, a glossary, a script which should take 
about 30 minutes to present, and background 
material. 

' ' Each presentation in the Squibb Com- 
munity Awareness Program contains all the 
necessary materials to enable the pharma- 
cists, with a minimum of preparation, to 
make a meaningful presentation to commu- 
nity audiences such as the PTA, student 
groups, and civic and fraternal organiza- 
tions, ' ' Bongiovanni said. 

He pointed out that the pharmacist, as" a 
member of the health care team, is well 
qualified, through education, professional 
training and broad experience, to discuss a 



wide range of health-related social problems 
facing contemporary society. 

"Venereal Disease — The Gift That Keeps 
On Giving, ' ' is now available from the N. C. 
Pharmaceutical Association on loan and 
without charge. Pharmacists' wishing to bor- 
row a Squibb Community Awareness Pro- 
gram should contact W. J. Smith, Executive 
Director, NCPhA. 

The Squibb Community Awareness Pro- 
gram is an on-going one, with additional 
presentations being developed in various 
areas of public health concern. 

' ' Drugs of Abuse, ' ' the first program in 
the Squibb Community Awareness series', is 
still available on loan and without charge. 

ELECTION RESULTS 

Primary results in recent elections yielded 
the following: 

Senator John Henley (D-Cumberland) was 
victorious in his re-election bid. If the '75 
session of the Senate includes a Democratic 
majority, Pharmacist Henley is slated to 
serve as Senate president pro tern. 

Representative Barney Paul Woodard 
(D- Johnston) led the ticket in his reelection 
bid. Woodard will be subject to the Novem- 
ber election to serve another term. 

J. M. (Mike) Hall (D-New Hanover) ran 
unopposed in the Senate race and will meet 
his Republican opponent in the November 
election. 

Leon Tomlinson (D-Cumberland) ran well 
in his first bid for a legislative seat, but 
failed to obtain one of the top spots on the 
ticket for the nomination. 

(From Bulletin of the North Carolina 
Pharmacy Political Action Committee) 

Dear Mr. Smith : 

I want to thank you for the opportunity 
to deliver the address of welcome to the del- 
egates of the 1974 annual convention of your 
Association. 

Lib and I enjoyed the evening more than 
anything we have attended in a long time. 
You are to be complimented for the excel- 
lent planning and organization demonstrated 
in the opening session of the convention. 
Billy G. McKenzie, Chairman 
Pinehurst Village Council 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 



For eighty-nine years 
. . . . since 1885 



seemon 

OF DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long 
association with North Car- 
olina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its fifty- 
fourth volume, and the first 
printed copy was "Seeman 
Printed." 




A DIVISION OF 
FI6HER-HARRIS0N CORP. 




Mrs. J. Weaver Kirkpatriek 



Mrs. J. Weaver Kirkpatriek, who was in- 
stalled as" president of the Woman 's Auxil- 
iary, NCPhA, at their session March 26, at 
Pinehurst. 

While attending Waynesville High School, 
Mrs. Kirkpatriek received the DAR Good 
Citizenship Award. At Western Carolina 
University she completed work for a B.S. 
in Education and two years later received 
her M.A. degree. While in college she was 
a member of Sigma Kappa Sorority. She is 
now a member of the National Education 
Association. For two years' she taught third 
grade. 

At the First Baptist Church, she sings in 
the adult choir, is leader of Acteens (teenage 
girls 7-12th grades), and is Outreach Leader 
Adult I Sunday School. She is Vice-Pres- 
ident of the Kindergarten Club. 

Mrs. Kirkpatriek 'a husband, Weaver, a 
graduate of UNC School of Pharmacy, is 
with Eckerd Drugs' at Waynesville Plaza. 

They have two children — Kirk, 5, and 
Angell, 2. 



26 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




Francis A. Stovall of Durham receives 50- President Moose congratulates C. Raymond 
year certificate from NCPhA President Whit- Whitehead of Ramseur. In the background: 
aker Moose. Mr. Whitehead's son, Michael (escort). 




Urbano Soler of Miami, Florida and A. C. Wallace, Star, are pictured with President Moose 
and B. Cade Brooks (escort) of Fayetreville. Pharmacist Soler was a classmate of Mr. Wal- 
lace at UNC during the early 20s and later, after leaving Cuba, was employed by Mr. 
Wallace. 

Two pharmacist qualifying for 50 year certificates/pins were Sam C. Hall of Oxford and 
Leonidas Jackson of Erwin but not present for the ceremony. 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



27 



PINEHURST CONVENTION REPORT 



Presentation of Awards featured the open- 
ing session of the 94th Annual meeting of 
the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation arid Affiliated Auxiliaries, when they 
convened at the Pinehurst Hotel, Pinehurst, 
Sunday evening, March 24th. The Conven- 
tion Chairman, A. H. Mebane, III, Greens- 
boro, presided. 

Official calls to order were proclaimed by 
W. Whitaker Moose, Mt. Pleasant, president 
of the NCPhA; Mrs. James E. Hickmon, 
Fayetteville, for the NCPhA Woman's Aux- 
iliary; and J. E. Case, Charlotte, for the 
Traveling Men 's Auxiliary. 

The Invocation by Eugene Hackney of 
Lumberton preceded the dinner. Guests were 
officially welcomed to Pinehurst by Billy G. 
McKenzie, Chairman of the Pinehurst Town 
Council. 

President Moose replied to the Address of 
Welcome and conducted the Awards Session 
which followed. He was assisted by Pres- 
ident-Elect W. H. Wilson, Ealeigh, who read 
qualifications and biographical highlights of 
the award recipients. 

Seven pharmacists were inducted into the 
' ' 50+ ' ' group as a mark of having been 
licensed as" pharmacists for fifty years. They 
were: Francis Earle Campbell, Hamlet; 
Howard Q. Ferguson, Eandleman; A. W. 
Palmer, Sanford; E. W. Eollins, Winston- 
Salem; Urbano Soler, Miami, Florida; Fran- 
cis A. Stovall, Durham; and C. Eaymond 
Whitehead, Eamseur. Also eligible but un- 
able to be present were Sam C. Hall, Ox- 
ford, and Leonidas Jackson, Erwin. 

The annual Eobin 's Bowl of Hygeia 
Award for outstanding community service 
went to James L. Creech, Smithfield. The 
Don Blanton Award, recognizing the phar- 
macist contributing most to the advance- 
ment of North Carolina pharmacy during 
the past year, was presented to Steven E. 
Moore of Chapel Hill. 

The M. B. Melvin Award for outstanding 
public relations work by a locally organized 
professional group was awarded to the 
Mecklenburg Pharmaceutical Society. The 
award was accepted on behalf of the So- 
ciety by Dan Lemelin, immediate past pres- 
ident. 



The Academy of Pharmacy of the NCPhA, 
an organization of pharmacists who meet 
rigid requirements for qualification, received 
the following into membership : Eobert P. 
Harris, Hope Mills; Evelyn P. Lloyd, Hills- 
borough; Steven E. Moore, Chapel Hill; C. 
Michael Whitehead, Eamseur. 

Presidential awards were presented to W. 
Whitaker Moose, current president of the 
NCPhA, and Mrs. Moose; and to W. H. 
Wilson, Ealeigh, president-elect, and Mrs. 
Wilson. 

Following entertainment by a group from 
the UNC Department of Music, Chapel Hill, 
under the direction of Eobert P. Porco, the 
closely guarded identity of the 1974 Phar- 
macist-of -the- Year was made known. 

Edwin E. Fuller has" been chosen for this 
highest of awards, and will be honored later 
at a Mortar-and-Pestle dinner to be held in 
his home town of Salisbury. Mr. Fuller, grad- 
uate of UNC School of Pharmacy, and op- 
erator of pharmacies in his city, is a director 
of the N. C. Pharmaceutical Eesearch Foun- 
dation, member of the Academy of Phar- 
macy, and a past-president of the N. 0. 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

His local activities include work with the 
Boy Scouts, Cancer Society, Community 
Chest, YMCA, National Conference of Chris- 
tians and Jews, Sales and Marketing Exec- 
utive Club, County Board of Social Services, 
Merchants Association, Chamber of Com- 
merce, and his civic club. 

He is a member of the First Baptist Church 
of Salisbury, where he serves as a member 
of the Board of Deacons and as a Sunday 
School teacher in the Junior High School 
Department. 

The Fullers have three sons and a daugh- 
ter — two of the sons following in their fa- 
ther 's footsteps as pharmacists. 

MONDAY, MARCH 25 

The session was opened by annual me- 
morial service (Eite of the Eoses) for de- 
ceased members. The service was conducted 
by Mrs. Jean Bush Provo and Mrs. June 
Bush West of Ealeigh. 

(Continued on Page 29) 



28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




NCPhA President Whitaker Moose and Fran- 
cis Earle Campbell of Hamlet, pictured dur- 
ing 50 year pin-pinning ceremony. Donald 
Miller (escort) in center. 



NCPhA President Whitaker Moose presents 
50 year certificate to Howard Q. Ferguson 
of Randleman. NCPhA Secretary W. J. Smith 
(escort) at left. 




President Moose presents 50 year certificate 
to A. W. Palmer, Sanford. Gene Hackney 
(escort) obtained his first drug store experi- 
ence as an employee of Mr. Palmer. 



E. W. Rollins (center) of Winston-Salem 
with his son, Stuart (escort) and President 
Moose. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



PINEHURST CONVENTION 

Following XCPhA President Whitaker 
Moose 's address, W. H. Randall, Chairman 
of the XCPhA Committee on Legislation, 
moderated a panel discussion on legislation. 
Panelists participating were Senator John 
T. Henley and Representative Barney Paul 
Woodard. 

The Associated Director of the American 
College of Apothecaries, Dr. Michael R. 
Ryan of Memphis, Tennessee, provided an- 
swers to the perennial question : Can Com- 
munity Pharmacies Succeed on Professional 
Services' Alone and If So, How? 

Using case histories to document his topic, 
Dr. Ryan pointed out how some community 
pharmacies in the United States are pres- 
ently providing auxiliary health care ser- 
vices in addition to the customary profes- 
sional pharmacy dispensing function. 

Among the pharmaceutical services now 
emphasized by some pharmacies are patient 
medication records, prescription and over- 
the-counter consultations, physician infor- 
mation and others. The auxiliary services 
include surgical and post-operative supplies, 
orthopedic fittings, convalescent appliances, 
and clinical laboratory analyses, to name a 
few. 

The pharmacies, which were cited as ex- 
amples represented a general cross-section 
of environments — small town, rural, metro- 
politan, shopping centers, neighborhood and 
medical center. 

Dr. Ryan concluded by outlining methods 
used by Some pharmacies in marketing their 
services via newspaper ads, direct mail, 
catalogs, etc. 

The session was concluded with an illus- 
trated program on ' ' Bioavailability : Its 
Importance in Determining Product P]quiv- 
alcnee. " The moderator was John J. Paly a 
of Wyeth Laboratories and two reactors: 
William M. Oakley of New Bern and Don- 
ald Miller of Morganton. 

An unanticipated ice storm delayed the 
TMA-sponsored golf tournament until the 
following day. Entertainment (bingo and 
The Barbara Berry Singers) sponsored by 
the Wholesale Druggists of North Carolina 
completed the day's activities. 



RESULTS OF GOLF TOURNAMENT 

An ice storm on the day of the scheduled 
TMA-sponsored golf tournament in Pine- 
hurst delayed the event by one day. Of the 
44 participants, TMA Golf Chairman Len 
Phillipps (Owens-Illinois) announces the 
winners to be as follows: 

1. TMA 

Low Net : John Hammett 70 and John Alex- 
ander 70 (tie) 
High Net: Elliott Morton 75 

2. NCPhA 

Low Net: David D. Claytor 71 and Benny 

Ridout 71 (tie) 
High Net: Ellison Neal 76 

3. WOMEN 

Low Net: Audrey Kinard 71 
High Net : Barbara Buchanan 

LOW GROSS 

1. TMA— Carlos Fry 74 

2. NCPhA— Artemus West 85 

3. WOMEN— Lynn Smith 92 

HIGH SCORE FOR THE DAY— 123— Bob 

Case 

A footnote to Len 's Report : Owens-Illi- 
nois enjoyed sponsoring the golf tournament 
this year and looks forward to a repeat at 
Winston-Salem in 1975. 

TUESDAY, MARCH 26 

Two panel presentations featured the 
March 26 morning business session of the 
NCPhA Convention. The invocation was by 
Paul Branch of Boone. 

Beimy Ridout, Pharmacist Consultant for 
the N. C. Department of Social Services; 
Frank F. Yaiborough, Project Director of 
Paid Prescriptions, and Robert J. Allen, 
Pharmacy Coordinator, Division of Mental 
Health Services, N. C. Department of Hu- 
man Resources, were participants in a pre- 
sentation entitled "North Carolina Phar- 
macy Update.' ' 

A review of recently adopted regulations 

and guidelines covering delivery of pharmacy 

service to extended care facilities was pre- 

( Continued on Page 31) 



30 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




r 



t*jt 




Officers of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 1974-'75 (left to right) C. 
Michael Whitehead, Ramseur, and George H. Edmonds, Greensboro, members of the Exec- 
utive Committee; Eugene W. Hackney, Lumberton, Third Vice-President; William H. Wil- 
son, Raleigh, President; Lloyd M. Whaley, Wallace, First Vice-President and Tom R. Bur- 
giss, Sparta, Second Vice-President. 




OFFICERS OF THE TRAVELING MEN'S AUXILIARY, NCPhA 1974-'75: Left to right: L. M. 
McCombs, Secretary-Treasurer; Carl Geanes, 2nd Vice-President; Ray Black, 1st Vice- 
President; Canie B. Smith, President. Not shown, David F. McGowan, Assistant Secretary- 
Treasurer. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 



PINEHURST CONVENTION 

sented by William T. Williams, Chairman 
of the XCPhA Committee on Institutional 
Pharmacy, and J. W. Bradley, III, Phar- 
macist Consultant, Division of Facility Ser- 
vice, N. C. Department of Human Eesources. 

Dean George P. Hager of the UNC School 
of Pharmacy discussed the School's progress 
for the past year and his pending retirement 
as head of the School on July 1. 

He was followed by W. Joe Davis, III, of 
Raleigh, head of Creative Services Associ- 
ates', whose topic ' ' How to Create a Positive 
Image ' ' will be published in The Journal at 
a later date. 

Comments by W. J. Turenne, Editor of 
Lilly Digest, the concluding speaker for the 
Tuesday AM session, follows: 

' ' Today 's community pharmacy may, from 
an outward look, resemble the corner drug 
store of yesterday in terms of the friendly 
smile and courteous service that one re- 
ceives — but the pharmacist of today prac- 
tices in a vastly more complex professional 
environment than his predecessor. 

"Certainly clearly definable trends exist 
which illustrate the dramatic changes that 
have taken place in the practice of com- 
munity pharmacy. For example, pharmaceu- 
tical and medical research during the past 
two decades have provided many new and 
potent medications. The community pharma- 
cist of today has the responsibility of sifting 
through an avalanche of technical informa- 
tion to best serve the needs of other health 
professionals and to assure the patient 's 
proper use of prescribed medications. 

' ' The net effect of these changes under- 
score the increased time demands on the 
professional role of the pharmacist of today. 

' ' In this' environment he must be even 
more acutely aware of operating efficiencies, 
for his economic survival depends on his 
ability to perform needed pharmaceutical 



TUESDAY, MARCH 26 
Afternoon Session 

Thomas R. Burgiss presided during the 
final business session of the 94th annual 
meeting of the NCPhA. 



For the most part, the session was devoted 
to a review (reports) of Association activity 
initiated or completed in recent months. Re- 
porting were 

H. C. McAllister, Chapel Hill 
W. J. Smith, Chapel Hill 
Donald V. Peterson, Durham 
Claude IT. Paoloni, Chapel Hill 
Robert B. Hall, Mocksville 
B. Cade Brooks, Fayetteville 
Jack G. Watts, Burlington 
Rex Paramore, Nashville 



RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED 

(following presentation by L. M. Whaley, 
Chairman) 



1. SUBJECT: PROMPT DISSEMINATION OF 
PRICE INCREASES 

WHEREAS, payment of Medicaid prescrip- 
tions in North Carolina is based on cost, as 
listed in Red Book and supplements thereto, 
and 

WHEREAS, there is a considerable time 
lapse between an announcement of price in- 
creases and when these new prices are pub- 
lished in the Red Book and supplements 
thereto, and 

WHEREAS, reimbursement to the pharma- 
cist by the Administrator of the Medicaid 
Prescription Program is based on the pub- 
lished price, and 

WHEREAS, some manufacturers apparently 
do not realize the necessity of notifying the 
publisher of the Red Book and supplements' 
thereto as promptly as the information is 
sent to wholesale druggists and pharma- 
cists; therefore 

BE IT RESOLVED, The North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association bring this prob- 
lem to the attention of pharmaceutical manu- 
facturers so that they may take appropriate 
action to assure the prompt dissemination 
of price changes to the publisher of Red 
Hot, I. and supplements thereto. 

(Continued on Page 33) 



32 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




Pharmacist/Senator John T. Henley (extreme left) pictured with Pharmacist/ Representative 
Barney Paul Woodard (3rd from left) and these NCPhA convention attending Representa- 
tives of Burroughs Wellcome Company: Jack F. Munroe, Jr., Sales Promotion and Training 
Manager; Terry W. Stevens Assistant to Sales Promotion Coordinator and Charles H. Hick- 
man, Regional Sales Manager. 




Officers of the Woman's Auxiliary who were installed at the March 27 annual business 
session, are (from right to left): Mrs. Bruce R. Medlin, Charlotte, Historian; Mrs. James R. 
Hickmon, Fayettev'lle, Advisor; Mrs. A. C. Dollar, Winston-Salem, Parliamentarian; Mrs. 
W. J. Smith, Chapel Hill, Coordinator; Mrs. A. H. Mebane, III, Greensboro, Treasurer; 
Mrs. W. G. Thames, Hope Hills, Advisor; Mrs. Loy M. McCombs, Creedmoor, 2nd Vice- 
President; Mrs. J. Weaver Kirkpatrick, Waynesville, President; Mrs. J. Cody Newton, Fay- 
etteville, Recording Secretary. Mrs. M. E. Hedgepeth, Henderson, 1st Vice-President, war 
unable to be present. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



33 



PINEHURST CONVENTION 

2. SUBJECT: PRESCRIPTION PRICE 
POSTING 

WHEREAS, the North Carolina Public In- 
terest Research Group advocates the manda- 
tory posting of prescription prices, and 

WHEREAS, the posting of a list of pre- 
scription drugs can be misleading, will cre- 
ate confusion and contribute to a curtail- 
ment of needed professional services, and 

WHEREAS, the objective of the sponsor 
will not be realized from the price posting 
of a list of prescription drugs, and 

WHEREAS, the present policy of the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, based 
on action of the NCPhA Executive Commit- 
tee, is in opposition to prescription price 
posting, therefore 

BE IT RESOLVED, the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association endorse the ac- 
tion of the Association 's Executive Com- 
mittee as reflecting majority member opin- 
ion on prescription price posting, and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that this 
action by Association members, in conven- 
tion assembled, be transmitted promptly to 
the entire NCPhA membership. 

3. SUBJECT: HEWS LOWEST COST 
PROPOSAL 

WHEREAS, H.E.W. has proposed a reim- 
bursement policy on drugs at the lowest 
cost at which the drug is generally available 
unless there is a demonstrated difference in 
therapeutic effect; and 

WHEREAS, implementation of such a policy 
will lower the quality of medication for re- 
cipients of HEW funded programs, will ad- 
versely effect the prescribing habits of phy- 
sicians and the dispensing practices of phar- 
macists', and from an administrative stand- 
point, will be costly and difficult to imple- 
ment, and 

WHEREAS, limiting the dispensed drug to 
the lowest cost would in many instances lower 
the quality and therapeutic equivalence of 
the dispensed product, the end result being 
directly opposite to HEW's cost-saving pro- 



posal, and 

WHEREAS, this proposal would necessitate 
a reduction in pharmaceutical research and 
development programs which, in the past, 
have been responsible for major life-saving, 
life-extending drug discoveries, therefore 

BE IT RESOLVED, the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association oppose HEW's 
"lowest cost" proposal since it will ad- 
versely effect doctor/pharmacist/patient re- 
lationship far out of proportion to any eco- 
nomic benefits to be realized; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that mem- 
bers of North Carolina's Congressional del- 
egation in Washington be notified of this 
action taken by the N. C. Pharmaceutical 
Association. 

4. SUBJECT: COMMENDATION OF DEAN 
GEORGE P. HAGER 

WHEREAS Dr. George Phillip Hager, Dean 
of the School of Pharmacy of the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has volun- 
tarily rendered his resignation from the 
deanship of that School, and 

WHEREAS, he is a respected leader in all 
aspects of the pharmacy profession not only 
in the State of North Carolina, but on a 
national and international basis as well, and 

WHEREAS, Dean Hager has so unselfishly 
dedicated his life, his energies and his 
dreams to us, therefore 

BE IT RESOLVED, lie be recognized by 
the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion for his superb contributions to that in- 
stitution since his assumption of the position 
of Dean, January 1, 19C>(>, and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the phar- 
macists' of North Carolina, here today as- 
sembled, offer this resolution as a sincere 
token of our esteem and respect to this great 
educator, scientist, and humanitarian. 

5. SUBJECT: COMMENDATION OF BUR- 
ROUGHS WELLCOME COMPANY 

WHKREAS, Burroughs Wellcome Company, 

in an effort to upgrade the quality of med- 

( Continued on Page 34) 



34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



PINEHURST CONVENTION 

ical education programs on prime-time tele- 
vision, sponsored an outstanding show — "I 
am Joe's Heart" — in the top 100 markets 
in late January and early February, and 

WHEREAS, Burroughs Wellcome Company, 
in addition to scheduling the show on six 
North Carolina television stations, provided 
excellent pre-show publicity to all pharma- 
cies of North Carolina, and 

WHEREAS, the half-hour show included 
two thirty-second salutes to pharmacy which 
emphasized the professional role of the phar- 
macist, and 

WHEREAS, post-reaction to the show has 
been very favorable, indicating a high de- 
gree of acceptance on the part of the view- 
ing public, therefore 

BE IT RESOLVED, the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association commend Bur- 
roughs Wellcome Company for its sponsor- 
ship of the television show — ' ' / am Joe 's 
Heart ' ' — and to extend its cooperation and 
support in similar endeavors' in the future, 
and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that a copy 
of this resolution be forwarded to appro- 
priate officers of Burroughs Wellcome Com- 
pany. 

6. SUBJECT: PHARMACY OWNERSHIP 

WHEREAS, Pharmacy is a profession, and 

WHEREAS, it is the best interests of the 
public and the Profession of Pharmacy that 
the profession remain in the hands' of phar- 
macists, and 

WHEREAS, it is in the best interest of the 
patient to know his or her pharmacists, and 

WHEREAS, a prescription is more than a 
commodity and should be treated as such, 
therefore 

BE IT RESOLVED that the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association go on record as- 
favoring the North Dakota State Board's 
decision to restrict drug store ownership to 
pharmacists and that we make our wishes 
known to our own State Board of Pharmacy 



for consideration. (Submitted by Joe Bar- 
bour, Jr. of Burlington and adopted as 
amended.) 

7. SUBJECT: APPRECIATION 

WHEREAS, the 94th Annual meeting of the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 
and its Affiliated Auxiliaries has been an 
unqualified success; therefore 

BE IT RESOLVED that the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association express its grate- 
ful appreciation to: 

1. The "Pharmacy Family" of Moore 
County, without whose loyal assistance 
and cooperation this meeting could not 
have been so fruitful and productive; 

2. The Service Wholesale Druggists of 
North Carolina, for their entertainment 
on Monday evening, which did much to 
enliven the Convention ; 

3. The Traveling Men's Auxiliary, who 
will be treating us to the humor of Ray 
Wilkinson and the music of Ed Turbe- 
ville on this closing night of the meet- 
ing; 

4. The Woman's Auxiliary, who always 
enhance the meeting; 

5. Individuals who have contributed many 
tedious hours providing touches of 
beauty and interest during the enter- 
tainment features, such as dinner fa- 
vors', decorations, etc. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that this 
appreciation be made known to the above 
through providing copies of this resolution 
to them. 

OFFICER NOMINEES 

(Nominees submitted by B. Cade Brooks, 
Chairman of the Committee on Nominations) 

First Vice-President: Thomas R. Burgiss 
of Sparta and Paul Branch of Boone. 

Second Vice-President: Eugene W. Hack- 
ney of Lumberton and Marion B. McCurdy 
of Mebane. 

Third Vice-President: G. Haywood Jones 
of Zebulon and Herman Lynch of Dunn. 

Member of the Executive Committee, 1 
year term : Marsha Hood Brewer, Pine Hill ; 
Virginia Callaham, Asheville; John A. Daw- 
son, Jr., Charlotte; Kenneth Edwards, Stan- 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 



tonsburg; William H. Mast, Henderson; and 
Alfred Gene Smith, Elizabethtown. 

Member of the N. C. Board of Pharmacy, 
5 year term: W. H. Randall, Lillington, and 
C. Louis Shields, Jacksonville. 

For directors of the N. C. Pharmaceutical 
Research Foundation : David D. Claytor, 
Greensboro; James L. Creech, Smithfleld; 
John C. Hood, Jr., Kinston ; J. C. Jackson, 
Lumberton; A. P. Rachide, Jacksonville; 
Ralph P. Rogers, Jr., Durham; B. R. Ward, 
Goldsboro ; and Waits' A. West, Roseboro. 

TIME AND PLACE 

The Time and Place Committee recom- 
mended (1) that NCPhA members be sur- 
veyed in regard to a cruise-type or air-flight 
type convention in 1977 or if a majority of 
voting members register opposition to this 
proposal, (2) to schedule the 1977 Conven- 
tion in Greensboro. 

The 1975 Convention will be held in Win- 
ston-Salem (April 13-15) and in 1976, Wil- 
mington has been selected as the convention 
city. 

Mrs. James R. Hickmon, President of The 
Woman 's Auxiliary, summarized the high- 
lights of the Auxiliary's program for 1973- 
'74. During the year, Mrs. Hickmon traveled 
more than 4000 miles in the state which is 
one indication of the organization 's wide- 
spread activity program. 

REGISTRATION 

The Convention Manager/Registrar, A. H. 
Mebane, announced that total registration, 
despite negative factors, such as the short- 
age of gasoline and weather (limited 1-day 
registrants), was 390. The pharmacist reg- 
istration was up from 1973. 

OFFICER INSTALLATION 

Officers for the Association year (March 
27, 1973 through April 15, 1975) were in- 
stalled by W. D. Welch of Washington. 

W. H. (Bill) Wilson of Raleigh was in- 
stalled as President of the NCPhA. Serving 
with him will be Lloyd Miltoii Whaley of 
Wallace, First Vice-President (President- 
Elect) ; Tom R. Burgiss of Sparta, Second 
Vice-President ; and Eugene W. Hackney of 
Lumberton, Third Vice-President. 



Three Executive Committee members-at- 
large were installed: George H. Edmonds of 
Greensboro, Joe C. Miller of Boone, and C. 
Michael Whitehead of Ramseur. 

W. J. Smith of Chapel Hill continues as 
Executive Director of the NCPhA and Editor 
of The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. 

The installation followed Committee re- 
ports as fallows': N. C. Board of Pharmacy, 
H. C. McAllister, Chape] Hill; N. C. Phar- 
maceutical Association, W. J. Smith, Chapel 
Hill; Committee on Community Pharmacy, 
Donald V. Peterson, Durham ; Continuing 
Education and Tripartite, Claude U. Pao- 
loni, Chapel Hill; Consolidated Pharmacy 
Loan Fund, Robert B. Hall, Mocksville; 
NCPhA Institute/Endowment Fund, B. Cade 
Brooks, Fayetteville ; Public Relations, Jack 
G. Watts, Burlington; N. C. Pharmacy Po- 
litical Action Committee, Rex Paramore, 
Nashville; Resolutions, Lloyd M. Whaley, 
Wallace; Nominating, B. Cade Brooks, Fay- 
etteville; Time and Place, L. M. Whaley, 
Wallace; Woman's Auxiliary, Mrs'. James 
R. Hickmon, President, Fayetteville; and 
Convention Report, A. H. Mebane, III, 
Greensboro. 

It was announced that the 1975 meeting 
will be held at the Winston-Salem Hyatt 
April 13, 14 and 15. 

EVENING ENTERTAINMENT 

The evening entertainment consisted of a 
variety show sponsored by The Traveling 
Men's Auxiliary of the NCPhA, featuring 
TV Personality Ray Wilkinson and Ed 
Turbeville Orchestra. 



Dear Mr. Smith : 

I want to thank you for the opportunity 
to deliver the address of welcome to the del- 
egates of the 1974 annual convention of your 
Association. 

Lib and I enjoyed the evening more limn 
anything we have attended in a long time. 
You are to be complimented for the excel- 
lent planning and organization demonstrated 
in the opening session of the convention. 
Billy G. McKenzie, Chairman 
Pinehurst Village Council 



36 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



MOMENTS TO REMEMBER 

The Pinehurst Convention — 1974 

by 

Mrs. James E. Hickmon, President 

NCPhA Woman's Auxiliary 

Hospitality : The gentle rolling Sandhills' of 
Pinehurst with dogwoods and azaleas in full 
bloom welcomed us to the convention. Betsy 
Mebane, Woman's Auxiliary Convention 
Chairman, her husband, Al, NCPhA Conven- 
tion Chairman, and the Hospitality Com- 
mittee, greeted us with big smiles in the 
beautiful lobby of the Pinehurst Hotel. 
Awards: Many outstanding contributions to 
the profession of Pharmacy were recognized 
on Sunday night at the Awards Session. 
Banquet: Unique, beautiful terrariums and 
lovely spring flowers filled the tables in the 
ballroom for the Sunday night Awards Ses- 
sion. We feasted on a delicious array of food 
and enjoyed the good fellowship that 
abounds at our conventions. Entertainment 
was 1 provided by a group from the UNC 
Music Department. What a thrill it was to 
hear and enjoy this contemporary group, 
who sang some old favorites as well as new 
ones. At the close of the evening, Edwin 
Fuller was announced as our 1974 Pharma- 
cist-of-the-Year. His wife, Elaine, one of 
our own past-presidents', was aglow with 
pride as this deserving honor was bestowed 
upon her husband. 

Coffee at the Country Club of N.C.: We 
didn't let a little rain dampen our spirits 
one bit! Loading into cars, we arrived at 
the Country Club of N. C. for a Coffee on 
Monday morning. The table was beautifully 
decorated with seasonal flowers. The piping 
hot coffee and Sweet rolls were delicious. We 
enjoyed the chance to mingle and make new 
friends as we looked out on the glistening 
golf greens. En route, the lovely homes and 
winding streams with waterfalls were so 
pleasing to the eye. 

Tour of Clarendon Gardens: Beer. use of rain 
our tour of the gardens was cancelled. How- 
ever, this gave us an opportunity to visit the 
local attractions and shops in the area. Our 
choices were numerous: World Golf Hall of 
Fame, Jugtown, The Shaw House, Midland 
Crafters, The Sandhills Woman's Exchange, 



and others. Beturning to the hotel late in the 
afternoon, we proudly "showed off" what 
we had purchased. 

Entertainment Monday Night: Everyone got 
a BINGO card and listened to our caller 
say ' ' 66-clickity-click. ' ' BINGO resounded 
through the hall time and time again as ex- 
cited lucky winners stepped forward to re- 
ceive numerous prizes given by the Whole- 
sale Druggists of N. C. We were then en- 
tertained by the Barbara Berry Singers. 
Their hand- clapping, sing-along songs were 
a treat for all. Then more BINGO. With 
one eye on the TV watching N.C. State win 
the national championship, and the other 
eye on our Bingo card, we ended the night 
with prizes to take home, and memories of 
a fun-night, thanks' to the N. C. Wholesale 
Druggists. 

Luncheon and Business Session: Tuesday's 
luncheon served in the ballroom was a time 
to enjoy good food at tables lavishly dec- 
orated with Easter arrangements under the 
guidance of Bernice Brooks and members 
of the Cape Fear Pharmaceutical Auxiliary. 
During the meal we were entertained by 
Greg Brooks, son of Bernice and Cade 
Brooks, and Sunday Berch. Their dance rou- 
tines were delightful to watch. 

An inspiring invocation by Margaret Ha- 
ger preceded the Memorial Service conducted 
by Ida Wells in tribute to Mrs. P. A. Hayes, 
a past-president who had passed on. A de- 
lightful greeting by Lou Culbreth provided 
a hospitable tone for the Business Session. 

We listened with pride to the reports of 
the committees, and were pleased that we 
had spent over 2,000 hours of INVOLVE- 
MENT in our projects of Mental Health 
and Mental Betardation. Then nominations 
and the President's pictorial report were 
followed by an inspiring installation of offi- 
cers by Erie CocolaS, retiring board mem- 
ber, who made us aware of the achievement 
of the past year and the promise of con- 
tinued success in the coming year. 

As we listened carefully to Pinky Jackson, 
a past-president, the excitement grew as she 
told of the accomplishments of one of our 
members'. It was not until the end of her 
remarks that she announced that the Wom- 
an's Auxiliary was honoring Lou Culbreth 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



37 



with a Life Membership, an honor she well 
deserved. 

With the help of our charming Pages, 
door prizes were presented to lucky mem- 
bers. Thus closed the 47th Annual Business 
Session of the Woman 's Auxiliary of the 
NCPhA. 

Tuesday Evening: TV Personality Ray Wil- 
kinson entertained with his colorful and 
humorous true experiences from his inter- 
esting personal life. Then with our dancing 
shoes on, we danced the night away to the 
music of Ed Turbeville's Orchestra. His 
repertoire of music was a delight to hear 



and dance to. Thanks to the TMA for a fun- 
filled night. 

IT WAS A GREAT CONVENTION! We 
are indeed grateful and indebted to each 
and everyone who worked to make it one of 
the best conventions yet. Our thanks to the 
Convention Committees, the Pages, the spon- 
sors of our activities, the registrars, the 
members of the Woman's Auxiliary, the 
NCPhA, the Wholesalers, and the TMA. To 
Vivian and W. J. Smith, and the Institute 
staff, who were everywhere and always there 
to help, a special thanks! 



Position Available: 



Responsibilities . 



Qualifications : 



Assistant to Director, Continuing Education Program, School of Phar- 
macy, University of North Carolina 

Supervision of Pharmacy Laboratories. 

Pre-lab lectures, examinations. 

Participate in Continuing Education activities ; 

Work in Pharmacy Audio tape Service; Supervise Audio-Visual Aids 

A. Knowledge, Skills and Abilities 

1. thorough knowledge of Pharmacy Practice 

2. thorough knowledge of compounding prescriptions and drug 
products 

3. Ability to teach 

4. Ability to maintain effective working relationships with others 

B. Desirable Experience and Training 

1. Graduate of an accredited School of Pharmacy, preferably the 
University of North Carolina and living in Orange County or 
adjacent county 

2. Is a registered pharmacist or qualified to become registered in 
State of North Carolina 

3. Is knowledgeable with audio-visual equipment and its utiliza- 
tion ; to record, edit, and prepare tapes for learning purposes 

Apply by sending curriculum vitae, transcripts, and names of three references to : 
Mr. Claude U. Paoloni, Assistant Professor 
School of Pharmacy 
University of North Carolina 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 
(phone— 966-1121) 

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 



38 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 

• Charlotte — Mrs. T. K. Steele 

• Greensboro — Mrs. Wyndham Dukes 

• Chapel Hill — Mrs. LeKoy Werley 

• Pharmacy Student Wives — Mrs. George 
Coeolas 

• New Hanover — Mrs. James Mitchener 



CHAPEL HILL 

In January the Chapel Hill Auxiliary held 
a luncheon at the Institute of Pharmacy to 
honor State Auxiliary President Pat Hick- 
mon. Lloyd Senter spoke about the work of 
the South Orange Rescue Squad and the 
construction of their new Squad Building. 

On March 5 the Institute was the scene 
of the Auxiliary's very successful benefit 
bridge. Many beautiful prizes and favors 
were donated by local businessmen and $200 
was raised for the building fund of the 
South Orange Rescue Squad. 

In April husbands joined the auxiliary 
members for a pot-luck supper at the Insti- 
tute of Pharmacy. New officers were elected 
at a short business meeting. 

The officers will be installed at the May 7 
meeting, where the members will also hear 
a program on home canning and freezing. 

CHARLOTTE 

The Charlotte Woman 's Auxiliary of the 
NCPhA held its April meeting at the YWCA 
with Mrs. Robert Lewis, president, presid- 
ing. Mrs. Bruce Medlin presented the de- 
votional. 

Mrs. Newton Etheredge introduced Flor- 
ence Morrow, Wig Consultant at Iveys, who 
presented an interesting program and dem- 
onstration on the styling and care of wigs, 
using members as models. 

During the business session, the Auxiliary 
allocated money as follows: $5^5 to the 
School of Pharmacy for a scholarship tu- 
ition; $100 to the library at UNC-C for 
books on pharmacy; $100 to Boys' Town of 
Pineville; $100 to the Institute of Phar- 
macy toward the purchase of a range for 
the kitchen. 



In other business, the Auxiliary voted to 
accept Janice Dinmick as the recipient of 
their scholarship next year. Mrs. Leslie Barn- 
hardt presented proposed amendments to the 
By-Laws, which will be voted on in May. 
Mrs 1 . Lewis reported on the annual conven- 
tion held at Pinehurst. 

Officers were elected for next year as fol- 
lows: President, Mrs. Harry Bizzell; 1st 
Vice-President, Mrs. W. D. Smith ; 2nd Vice- 
President, Mrs. Don Weathers; Recording 
Secretary, Mrs. W. B. Hawfield; Correspond- 
ing Secretary, Mrs. Bruce Medlin; Trea- 
surer, Mrs. John F. Morton; Parliamenta- 
rian, Mrs. Leslie Barnhardt; Historian, Mrs. 
Charles Jarrett ; Advisor, Mrs. Robert Lewis. 

GREENSBORO 

The March meeting of the Greensboro 
Drug Club Auxiliary was held at the Greens- 
boro Country Club with Mrs. Jack Upton 
presiding in the absence of Mrs. David 
Montgomery, president. 

The Invocation was given by Mrs. Carroll 
C. Graham. Following the luncheon, Dr. 
Martha Sharpless spoke on Poison Preven- 
tion and Control. 

Mrs. Upton, Program Chairman, discussed 
plans for the April meeting when members 
will entertain husbands for dinner at Lan- 
cers Gate. The May meeting is scheduled for 
the Country Club and will include Installa- 
tion of Officers for the new club year. 

Mrs. Dale Bracker, Ways and Means 
Chairman, reported on the Old and New 
Sale, stating that most goods were sold by 
12 noon after a 10:30 a.m. opening. 

Mrs. Graham, Chairman of the Nominat- 
ing Committee, presented the following slate 
of officers, which was accepted as submitted : 
President, Mrs. David Montgomery ; Vice- 
President, Mrs. W. P. Brewer; Secretary, 
Shirley Barrick; Treasurer, Mrs. Dale 
Bracker; Chaplain, Mrs. J. Frank Pickard; 
Historian, Mrs. George Edmonds. 

PHARMACY (Student) WIVES 
ORGANIZATION 

Shirley Wright (Mrs. Keith), a senior 
wife who wanted to see Pharmacy Student 
Wives in action before leaving Chapel Hill, 
has realized her desire. 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



39 



Shirley started a personal campaign to 
contact Student Wives and was pleasantly 
surprised by her response. 

For the past year, the Club had been In- 
active. Thanks to Shirley's enthusiasm as 
well as advice and willingness' to help from 
Erie Cocolas and Vivian Smith, the future 
of the club looks bright. 

The group has had several very successful 
projects including a bake sale, a rummage 
sale, a project of making tray favors for 
hospital patients, etc. Future plans include 
a dinner and installation of new officers as 
the final school year function. 

PHARMACY STUDENT WIVES 

Mrs. James E. Hickmon, immediate past- 
president of the XCPhA Woman's Auxil- 
iary, installed officers for the Pharmacy Stu- 
dent Wives organization, at a dinner meet- 
ing held at the Institute of Pharmacy, April 
27th. 

Officers to serve for the 1974-75 school 
year are: President, Mrs. Jeffrey Blanch - 
ard, Warner Robins, Georgia; 1st Vice- 
President, Mrs. Daryl Blackburn, High 
Point ; 2nd Vice-President, Mrs. Darry Wes- 
ter, Louisburg ; Secretary, Mrs. Bill Eason, 
Rocky Mount; Treasurer, Mrs. Les Alsup, 
Asheville; Historian, Mrs. Don Heaton, Ra- 
leigh ; Advisor, Mrs. George Cocolas, Chapel 
Hill. Guests at the dinner included husbands 
of the members, Jim and daughter Becky 
Hickmon of Fayetteville, Dr. Cocolas, and 
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Smith. 



NEW HANOVER COUNTY 

The April meeting of the New Hanover 
County Pharmaceutical Auxiliary was held 
at Tuesday's Restaurant and featured the 
Installation of Officers for the new year. 

Mrs. Milton Whaley, wife of the NCPhA 
President-Elect, conducted the Installation. 
New officers are as follows: Mrs. Les Collins, 
President ; Mrs. John Bullock, Vice-Pres- 
ident; Mrs. Larry Hovis, Secretary; Mrs. 
Lindsay Odom, Treasurer; Mrs. James 
Michener, Historian ; and Mrs. Hobart 
Whaley, Projects Chairman. Each new officer 
received a corsage bearing the symbols of 
her office. 



The Auxiliary was happy to welcome two 
new members, Mrs. H. Crayne Howes and 
Mrs. Mike Wellons. 

WAKE COUNTY 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

Frances Morisey, Secretary 

The Wake County Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation met on Tuesday, April 2, 1974, at 
Balentines Restaurant. There were 24 mem- 
bers and guests present for the dinner 
meeting. 

Frank Yarborough called the meeting to 
order and introduced our speaker for the 
evening, Bill Randall of Lillington. Mr. 
Randall, a member of the Board of Phar- 
macy, spoke to us about the responsibilities, 
philosophy, and activities of the Board. 

Minutes of the last meeting were read and 
approved. Treasurer Roger Crane reported 
current balances of $379.49 in checking and 
$478.64 in savings. We now have 109 paid 
members and 3 paid interns. 

President Jerry Johnson recognized and 
welcomed visitor Brian Roberts from New 
York whose father is associated with Bur- 
roughs Wellcome in the Research Triangle 
Park. 

Frank Yarborough introduced our new- 
est member, Shelton Brown. Mr. Brown re- 
cently moved to Raleigh from Clinton, N. C. 
and will be working with Paid Prescriptions. 

Frank Yarborough, who is Wake County 
chairman for the North Carolina Pharma- 
ceutical Research Foundation, asked our 
support in providing contributions to the 
Foundation during the current fund raising 
campaign. Individuals were urged to make 
their contributions directly to Frank. 



DURHAM-ORANGE 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

Guest speaker at the May 9 meeting of 
the Durham-Orange Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation was Dr. Bill Hall, Group Leader for 
Research & Development, Burroughs' Well- 
come Company, Greenville. 

Dr. Hall discussed PMA's recently an- 
nounced position on drug sampling, incentive 



40 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



gifts and prizes, and training programs for 
medical service representatives. The Asso- 
ciation voted to support H. R. 14392 intro- 
duced by Congressman Andrews "to amend 
the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to exclude 
from gross income the amount of certain 
cancellations of indebtedness under student 
loan programs." 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Classified advertising (single issue inser- 
tion) 10 cents a word with a minimum 
charge of $3.00 per insertion. Payment to 
accompany order. 

Names and addresses will be published un- 
less a box number is requested. 

In replying to ' ' blind ' ' ads, address Ad. 

No.- , Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, 

P. O. Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 



WANTED— A spirit-filled Christian 
pharmacist for an established phar- 
macy, part ownership, no cash nec- 
essary. QMG-6. 

WANTED — A pharmacist to work 
or buy a well established drug store 
in a town with about 20,000 popula- 
tion in eastern part of the state. 
LMEC-6. 

Manage your own store or start as 
co-owner with right of full owner- 
ship if desired. Located in growing 
community near Asheville. Only 
drug store in town with new medical 
clinic and locally owned 60 bed 
nursing center. Attractive proposi- 
tion to ambitious pharmacist. Call 
704-749-5971 after six. 

PHARMACIST WANTED— To man- 
age shopping center pharmacy in 
Central North Carolina town. Op- 
portunity for buy-in on favorable 
terms to right party. This is an 
above-average position with unlim- 
ited chance for advancement. Ad- 
ditional details from: FR-5. 



MARRIAGES 

Hocutt Memorial Baptist Church in Clay- 
ton was the setting of the March 23 mar- 
riage of Miss Donna Ann Flowers and 
Richard Thomas Crowder. 

The bride is a medical secretary for two 
Raleigh doctors. The bridegroom is a 1973 
graduate of the UNC School of Pharmacy 
and is associated with Beddingfield Drug 
Company of Clayton. 



Miss Phyllis Ussery Huffman and Henry 
Neill Graham of Charlotte were married 
March 9 at the Moravian Little Church on 
the Lane. 

Mrs. Graham is secretary at the Little 
Church on the Lane. Pharmacist Graham, a 
graduate of the UNC School of Pharmacy, 
is a major in the United States Army Re- 
serve and president of Graham Ceramics. 



Miss Elizabeth Jane Warner and David 
Lloyd Ballard were married April 6 in 
Love's United Methodist Church of Walker- 
town. Mr. Ballard, UNC School of Pharmacy 
graduate, is with Revco Drug Stores of 
Winston-Salem. Mrs. Ballard is a student of 
respiratory therapy in the Allied Health 
Division of Forsyth Technical Institute. 



DEATHS 
J. M. Pinnix Jr. 

John Marshall Pinnix Jr., 63, of Kerners- 
ville died April 12. He had been in declining 
health for several years. 

Since 1963, he had been a partner in Pin- 
nix Drug Store, Kernersville, which his fa- 
ther founded in 1904. From 1961 thru mid- 
February 1970 he served as a member of the 
Kernersville Board of Alderman. 

Survivors' include a son, J. M. Pinnix III, 
and a brother, Joe L. Pinnix Sr. 



Pharmacist of the Year Dinner hon- 
oring Edwin R. Fuller, June 29 at 
the Holiday Inn, Salisbury. 




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June 1974 



Number 6 




ROOFTOP VIEW OF A PHARMACY — You ore familiar with the usual front entrance view 

of your pharmacy but growing more common is this one taken from the roof of Smith's 

Drugs, KM Plaza, Kings Mountain. 

In this instance, most of the loss was sustained through damage to the building and rain 

which damaged merchandise adjacent to the rooftop entrance. Smith's manager, Pharmacist 

Terry Heatherington, reported two bottles of Nembutal taken in the robbery. Two boxes of 

syringes were found atop the suspended ceiling which police believe were simply forgotten 

by the thieves in their haste to escape. 

With the growing installation of electronic alarm devices, thieves are bypassing front and 

rear pharmacy entrances to gain Controlled Substances. Increasingly, the favorite entrance 

is the one pictured. 

Currently, North Carolina pharmacy robberies, involving drugs, average one a week. 



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The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



June, 1974 

Vol. LIV No. 6 



Officers 

XOETH CAEOLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 



President 

W. H. Wilson 
Raleigh 



Vice-Presidents 

L. M. Whaley 

Wallace 
Tom R. Burgiss 

Sparta 

E. W. Hackney 

Lumberton 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



CONTENTS THIS ISSUE 



A Tribute to George Hager 5 

Officers-Elect, 1975- 76 7 

Safety Closures 8 

Is Store Modernization Profitable? 10 

State Board of Pharmacy News 13 

Tar Heel Digest 15 

Pharmacist of the Year 16 

Drug Education — '74 17 

How to Create a Positive Image in Pharmacy 19 

Creech Honored for Outstanding Community Service 24 

Controlled Substances Act Amended 25 

Report of the Continuing Education Committee 26 

Officers of Local/Sectional Pharmacy Organizations 28 

Doings of the Auxiliaries 30 

Births/Deaths 31 

ADVERTISERS 

American Druggists' Insurance Co. .15 

Colorcraft Corporation 12 

Eli Lilly and Company 2nd Cover 

Geer Drug Company Center Page Insert 

Gilpin, Henry B. 9 

ICN Pharmaceuticals (King Associates) 4th Cover 

I. C. System, Inc 13 

Justice Drug Company 1 

Kendall Drug Company ....... 23 

Lederle Laboratories .14 

Owens, Minor & Bodcker 3rd Cover 

Ramsey Manufacturing Corporation 

E. N. Rowell Company 

Scott Drug Company 

Seeman Printery 

Smith Wholesale Drug 

Reaco Products . 

The Upjohn Company 

Washington National Insurance Co. 



20 
12 

2 
12 

6 
27 
18 
00 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly bv the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. ( 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Second class 
postage paid at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



MUTUAL DRUG SALES PASS 
$19 MILLION MARK 

The more than 300 stockholders, wives of 
stockholders and guests who attended the 
annual meeting of North Carolina Mutual 
Wholesale Drug Company (Chapel Hill, 
May 15) received an impressive report cov- 
ering the company 's operation for the year 
ending March 31, 1974. 

Annual sales: |19 million plus 
Sales increase: 20% over previous year 
Total rebates: $2 million plus 
Stockholders: 258 
Employees: 90 

Computer facility to be enlarged 
Warehouse facility to be expanded 
141 stores in advertising program 
Gift Show scheduled in Raleigh in July 
President Banks Kerr and Executive Vice 
President (Manager) Ralph P. Rogers, Jr. 
were commended for their outstanding ef- 
fort in supervising what is now one of the 
largest wholesale drug operations in the 
United States. 

To provide for further expansion of the 
operation, announcement was made that 
Mutual has purchased eight acres of land 
presently adjoining the firm's Durham ware- 
house. 

Each lady present received a ceramic mor- 
tar and pestle and numerous prizes were 
awarded. 

INSTITUTE OF PHARMACY 
RECIPIENT OF UNIQUE FUND- 
RAISING PROJECT INITIATED BY 
N. C. MUTUAL WHOLESALE 
DRUG COMPANY 

As a result of a unique fund-raising proj- 
ect, the North Carolina Institute of Phar- 
macy received $1480.00. The money will be 
used to partially defray expense of renovat- 
ing two rooms in the Institute, soon to be 
vacated by the N. C. Board of Pharmacy. 

The N. C. Mutual Wholesale Drug Com- 
pany of Durham put together n package of 
merchandise valued at $1400. Chances to- 
wards the $1400 package were sold to Mu- 
tual 's stockholders at $10 each (148 par- 
ticipated). 

S. C. Morris of the Morris Drug Company, 
Bayboro, won the merchandise. And the In- 



stitute will receive a check from Mutual 
after all the financial transactions have been 
completed. 

Since $5000 will be needed for the project, 
the chairman, B. Cade Brooks of Fayette- 
ville, will welcome suggestions for programs/ 
projects to secure the additional needed 
funds. 

FOUNDATION FUND DRIVE 

As of April 30, current contributions to 
the N. C. Pharmaceutical Research Founda- 
tion totaled $10,199. 

This represents a 2% gain over 1973 but 
a 59% decrease as compared to 1972. Indi- 
vidual contributions (number) were 500 in 
1972, 338 in 1973, and 255 so far this year. 

Contributions varies from $5 (25) to $150 
(1) and $100 (13). The goal is an average 
of $10 per pharmacy. 

SUMMER VISIT FOR THE ROLLINS 

Pharmacist Stuart Rollins of Winston- 
Salem is on a 6-weeks self-education-vaca- 
tion to Europe, Africa and Great Britain 
with his wife and son. 

The Rollins' will visit a number of phar- 
macy dispensaries and pharmaceutical firms 
(Burroughs- Wellcome, Ciba-Geigy) and a 
UNC Pharmacy Graduate, Maynard New- 
man, in London. 

PHARMACY CLOSED 

Bissette's Drug Store #4, 420 West 
Thomas Street, Rocky Mount, was closed 
on May 14. The prescription inventory and 
files were purchased by Almand's Drug 
Store. 

PHARMACIST O'NEAL 

OFFICIATES AT HOSPITAL 

GROUNDBREAKING CEREMONY 

The new 23-room addition to the Pungo 
District Hospital, Belhaven, got underway 
on May 11 when Pharmacist W. P. O'Neal 
turned the first spade of dirt at ground- 
breaking services. 

Mr. O'Neal, a former mayor of Belhaven, 
is chairman of the hospital's board of trus- 
tees. 

Pungo Hospital services a large area of 
Eastern North Carolina including eastern 
Beaufort, Hyde and parts of Washington 
counties. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



A TRIBUTE TO GEORGE HAGER 

not a farewell 



More than two hundred friends and asso- 
ciates assembled in Chapel Hill on May 13 
to pay tribute to UNC Pharmacy Dean 
George P. Hager, who is retiring on July 1. 

Program participants included Keverend 
Prank C. Perry, Pastor of the Holy Trinity 
Lutheran Church, Chapel Hill; William H. 
Wilson, President of the NCPhA; William 
H. Eandall, President of the N. C. Board 
of Pharmacy; Dr. Cecil G. Sheps, Vice 
Chancellor for Health Sciences, UNC; and 
N. Ferebee Taylor, Chancellor of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 

Leroy D. Werley, Jr., Assistant Dean of 
the UNC School of Pharmacy, was master 
of ceremonies for the dinner program held 
at the Carolina Inn. 

Quoting from the dinner program "it is 
usually fitting at a testimonial like this to 
list the tributee's accomplishments. But in 
this case, they are so impressive, diverse and 
numerous that this entire space would 
amount to a listing showing chairman, re- 
cipient, member or some other titles' of this 
or that federal, national, international, state 
or local organization. ' ' 

Typical of the tributes were these by 
Chancellor Taylor : 

I am delighted to have this opportunity to 
express, on behalf of us all, our very deep 
appreciation for all that George Hager has 
meant to this University community. Al- 
though he will soon be completing eight and 
a half years as Dean of our School of Phar- 
macy, I have had the opportunity of work- 
ing with him for only a little more than 
two years. This, however, has" been ample 
time for me to come to know what an im- 
portant contribution he has made to the 
growth and development of our School of 
Pharmacy, to the pharmacy profession in 
our State and in the nation, and to the 
achievement of the mission of this Univer- 
sity. 

When George Hager came here in 1966, 
he had already achieved an enviable national 
reputation in the profession of pharmacy 
and in scientific circles. His vigorous and 
far-sighted leadership of our School of 
Pharmacy has not only brought about a 



substantial increase in the number of men 
and women who are being trained as pro- 
fessional pharmacists to meet the needs of 
our State, but has also significantly ex- 
panded the graduate program and developed 
a broader strength in the scientific base of 
the School. 

Pharmacy has always played a crucial 
part in the delivery of health care and, as 
is true of all professions involved in this 
complex and important field, it is to be 
expected that changes will occur in the role 
of the pharmacy profession. It is appro- 
priate, therefore, that a University such as 
ours should — in each of the health profes- 
sions — play a part in helping to discern 
and anticipate the future by experiments 
and demonstrations. Through Dean Hager 's 
leadership, our School of Pharmacy has not 
only kept pace with these problems as they 
are perceived nationally and in the State, 
but it has also been in the front ranks — 
together with our Schools of Medicine, Den- 
tistry, Nursing, and Public Health — in de- 
veloping demonstrations and training at the 
frontiers of change. 

All of you know of Dean Hager 's per- 
sonal characteristics. He lives and breathes 
the profession of pharmacy. His work as 
Dean has been characterized, at one and 
the same time, by a far-sighted view of the 
goals and potential of the profession and 
by thoroughness and meticulous attention 
to detail. He is possessed of such a deep 
and pervasive sense of responsibility that, 
during his illness last fall, some of us were 
concerned that he was converting his room 
in the hospital into a satellite Dean 's office, 
and it took some real doing to convince him 
that he should, in the interest of his own 
health, desist — for a while at least — from 
carrying out those responsibilities. 

Dean Hager 's career is distinguished, not 
only because of the leadership that he lias 
provided to our School of Pharmacy, but 
also because of his professional activities 
on the national scene. He was President of 
the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy from 1965 to 1966 ; and since 
(Concluded on Page 7) 



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PHARMACY 

♦ADVERTISING PROGRAM 

HOW'S YOUR RETAIL IMAGE?— Good? Bad? Indifferent— Con- 
sult your Smith Representative about our Associated Druggist Pro- 
gram. Some of the advantages of this program are hometown 
newspaper advertising — buying advantages — clerk training pro- 
gram — | n s tore promotion materials and store advertising fliers. 

Just three of the many SMITH services 
Also ask about retirement, group hospitalization and major med- 



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• Greenville 235-4159 

• Asheville 684-6121 

• Charlotte 825-5161 
Wofford and Forest Streets P. O. Box 1779 

—man 



The Carolina Journal or Pharmacy 




L. M. Whaley 

NCPhA OFFICERS-ELECT 

Lloyd Milton Whaley of Wallace, pres- 
ident-elect of the North Carolina Pharma- 
ceutical Association, will be installed at the 
Association's annual convention scheduled 
for Winston-Salem, April 13-15, 1975. 

Other officers-elect, who were chosen in 
mail balloting which has been underway for 
the past thirty days', are Thomas B. Burgiss 
of Sparta, first vice-president; Eugene W. 
Hackney of Lumberton, second vice-pres- 
ident; and Herman Lynch of Dunn, third 
vice-president. 

Three pharmacists were elected to the As- 
sociation 's Executive Committee for one- 
year terms: Ms. Marsha Hood Brewer of 
Pink Hill, Kenneth Edwards of Stantons- 
hurg, and Alfred Gene Smith, Elizabeth- 
town. 

W. .J. Smith of Chapel Hill continues 1 as 
executive director and managing editor of 
the Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. 

W. H. Randall of Lillington will be rec- 
ommended by the Association for appoint- 
ment to succeed himself as a member of the 
North Carolina Board of Pharmacy. 

David D. Claytor of Greensboro, James 
L. Creech of Smithfield, John C. Hood, Jr. 



of Kinston, aud Ralph P. Eogers, Jr. of 
Durham were elected directors of the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Research Founda- 
tion. 

The Elections Committee, which met in 
Chapel Hill on May 24 to open, review and 
tally the results of the mail ballot election 
was composed of Linda Butler, chairman, F. 
Randolph Jones, Steve Moore and Lloyd 
Senter. 



PAOLNI SPEAKS TO PHARMACY 
GROUP 

Professor Claude U. Paoloni, Director of 
Continuing Education, UNC School of Phar- 
macy, was recent guest speaker at the Le- 
noir County Pharmaceutical Society. 

Paoloni spoke on curriculum changes, the 
revised intern/extern program and the 
School 's' participation in the Area Health 
Education Centers throughout the state. 

Professor Paoloni was also an attendee at 
the 70th Annual National Association of 
Boards of Pharmacy meeting held in At- 
lanta. 



A TRIBUTE TO GEORGE HAGER 

1967, he has been the National Civilian 
Consultant for Pharmacy to the Surgeon 
General of the United States Air Force. 

While we are honoring George Hager 
this evening for his achievements as Dean 
of our School of Pharmacy, I know that all 
of you join me in expressing our pleasure at 
the fact that the Hager family is remaining 
in Chapel Hill, and that George will con- 
tinue to contribute to the School of Phar- 
macy as a senior member of the faculty. It 
is good to know that he will still be at the 
School working in other ways for the achieve- 
ment of the goals to which he has dedicated 
his life — goals' which are important to the 
[Jniversity and to all of us. 

And now, if I may, I would like to read 
to you two letters that have been addressed 
to Dean Hager on this occasion. (Letters 
of commendation written by Senators Helms 
and Ervin). 



THIS PATIENT REQUESTS THAT 

SAFETY CAPS NOT BE USED ON 

HIS PRESCRIPTIONS. 



Date 



I, hereby authorize the pharmacists at COMMUNITY 
DRUG STORE, Inc. to fill my prescriptions in con- 
tainers with NON-SAFETY closures. I also accept 
the liability involved. 

Signature 



ARE YOU READY FOR 
SAFETY CONTAINERS? 



As of April 16, 1974, all prescription 
drugs will require safety (child-resistant) 
containers, with the exception of sub- 
lingual nitroglycerin. Previously, the 
only medications requiring such packag- 
ing were: preparations containing as- 
pirin, 5% or greater quantity of methyl 
salicylate, and all controlled substances. 

There are two instances in which the 
safety container regulation does not 
apply: 

1. If the prescriber specifically indi- 
cates on the face of the prescription that 
the child-resistant container is not 
required. 

2. If the patient indicates a preference 
for a regular container. To protect 
themselves, pharmacists should have the 
patient sign a release. This should be 
done on each and every prescription 
presented by the patient. Pharmacists 
may find it helpful to order a rubber 
stamp containing a statement similar to 
the following: 

"Pharmacist, please do not dispense 
in safety package 



'Patient Name 



Date" 



Child-resistant containers may not be 
re-used; among other reasons, re-use may 
adversely affect the mechanical function- 
ing of the container. 



The 3 x 5 card pictured 
above is currently in use by 
Pharmacists Stan Tate and 
Seth Miller at Community Drug 
Store, Lexington. After 
completion, the card is filed 
alphabetically for quick 
reference. The label at top 
of card is a duplicate of 
label attached to appropriate 
prescriptions . 

As an alternative to this 
general release form, some 
pharmacists obtain patient' s 
signature on reverse side of 
each prescription. In this 
instance, a rubber stamp with 
appropriate statement will be 
helpful . 

In the case of safety contain- 
ers not presently available 
from supply sources, keep a 
record of your orders and 
order dates. Later, this infor- 
mation may be needed. 



Speedy delivery is a waste of time 
if your order is filled incorrectly. 




>* 









v 




■.«* 




| ou know the feeling— you receive 
ne order, but part of the order isn't 
.'hat you ordered. The speediest 
elivery in the world isn't going to 
,elp after something like this happens. 
That's why our policy is to treat 
pch order as if your business 



depended on it And it's the same 
reason our batting average is so high 
with you and thousands of 
pharmacists just like you. 

If your present source is not 
filling your orders correctly, write or 
call the Gilpin Division Manager 



nearest you.* He may be just what 
the doctor ordered. 



THE HENHY B 



GILPIN 

COMBVJY 

Wholesale druggists slnce 1^45. 



ti S„ti TU ^-TH' I'ulaski Highway ^'li'more. Md. 21203/(301 . 866-4600 Dover-W.E Warther, 756 South Little Creek Rd., Dover, Del. 19901/1302) 734-8281 
-Colon Sawyer. 6435 Tidewater Dnve. Norfolk. Va. 23509/.804. 855-1901 Washington -Frank Antkowiak, 901 Southern Avenue. Washington, D.C. 20032/7301 1 630 4500 



10 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

"IS STORE MODERNIZATION PROFITABLE?" 

(This is the third in a series' of articles by Eoland G. Thomas) 

The term "modernization" often causes a negative response because of its general 
connotation; namely, replacing everything old with new and spending several thousands of 
dollars every ten years or so. Eeplacing old with new is certainly a part of modernization 
but it's" only that. Any physical change that improves space utilization, efficiency, traffic 
flow, merchandise appeal, control, appearance, etc. is modernization. Eeplacing old fixtures 
usually helps most any store but modernization should not stop there. 

Modernization has many facets and it begins with a proper attitude, one that is positive 
and realistic, and modernizing for the right reasons. Perhaps a better definition of modern- 
ization would be any physical change that provides a reasonable return on investment, either 
directly or indirectly, for each dollar spent, one should expect to get that dollar back plus 
a reasonable margin, either by the savings the change created or by the increased profit 
generated. In essence, we should view modernization as a good investment rather than a 
business expense. Just how much return on investment will offer depends on (1) how badly 
the change is needed, (2) the trading area potential, (3) the store's characteristics, and 
(4) how well the change is planned and carried out. 

In short, modernization can be almost anything from cleaning merchandise to painting 
the walls; from rearranging merchandise to replacing ineffective displays; and from re- 
placing old light bulbs to expanding the store. The list goes on and on and much can be 
accomplished with little cost. 

The results of modernization will vary considerably from one store to another. Most any 
improvement will pay off, but keep in mind that modernization is only one spoke in the 
wheel. It is not a panacea. Maximum results will be achieved only when all other aspects 
of your store are in good order. For example, you can invest thousands of dollars in modern- 
ization without increasing profits if your location is deteriorating, or your store is too 
small to meet your customers' needs, or parking is limited. Modernization will not neces- 
sarily guarantee growth in these situations although it may give your store a temporary 
boost. 

Where should you begin a complete modernization of your store? What steps should you 
take? 

Before any major improvements are attempted, your location should first be analyzed. 
(See "Drug Store Location Analysis" in the September, 1973 issue of the Carolina Journal 
of Pharmacy) Is your store located in a growth area? Do you have adequate parking? Is 
your store large enough? (Eefer to the Lilly Digest to compare sales per square foot be- 
tween smaller and larger stores) Perhaps your best choice would be to seek another loca- 
tion that offers a greater potential. Next, you should examine carefully the store's over-all 
performance in sales per square foot, turnover rate, Ex volume percentage of total, depart- 
ment sales, rent factor, salaries, etc. You can compare your data with the Lilly Digest 
compilation. 

If your present location offers the potential, you can then begin your modernization 
plans. First, you should call in an experienced drug store planning specialist to assist you. 
His experience and knowledge will be an asset to your business. His reputation, reliability, 
and years of experience should be checked out thoroughly. He should be capable and willing 
to provide you with valuable infor-nation concerning over-all drug store operation. His lay- 
out should be detailed and merchandised. After all, layout is merely the placement of de- 
partments and mrrchandise. The store planner should have good reasons for everything 
shown on his plans, and you should not hesitate to ask a lot of questions because you will 
live with the results for a long time. Beware of the one who simply follows directions with- 
out offering his advice. He should show a sincere desire to help you accomplish the best 
results, not just in selling you a store full of fixtures. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



Once your plans are finalized, determine the total costs, including building modifications, 
electrical, plumbing, etc., and the amount of increase in volume required to pay for the 
modernization. Modernization does not generally increase overhead and often decreases it. 
Therefore, any additional gross profit generated becomes net profit. 

Take full advantage of your complete modernization. Involve your store personnel by 
showing them your plans and expected results. Plan a sales event and advertise the fact 
that your store is undergoing improvements for the benefit of your customers'. After mod- 
ernization has been completed, look for ways to improve your store continuously. Modern- 
ization should be a day-to-day effort. 

Here are additional suggestions to help you keep your store progressive: (1) evaluate 
your location and store size often, (2) visit other drug stores whenever possible, (3) don't 
be too quick to copy a now idea without checking its results, (4) don't put off making 
needed changes, (5) seek professional assistance when needed, (6) keep your store unclut- 
tered, clean, and neat, (7) merchandise properly, (8) adopt promotional programs to help 
you create the image you want, (9) keep complete records of department activity, (10) 
utilize your space profitably, (11) use effective layout and decor, and (12) employ friendly 
personnel who show an interest in your customers' needs. Any improvement, whether phys- 
ical or operational, should be viewed as a profitable investment, not just another unwanted 
business expense. By taking the proper steps and looking at modernization for what it 
really is, modernization has to be profitable. 

(Note: Please direct all comments and questions to Mr. W. J. Smith.) 




Jubilation reins supreme as ICN's Zack Lyon of Durham came this close to making a hole 
in one. The event — TMA sponsored golf tournament — took place on one of Pinehurst's 
world champion golf courses and was a part of the 1974 convention of the NCPhA & 
affiliated auxiliaries. For the veracity of this report, check with Davol's John Alexander 
(right) of Atlanta. — Photo by Colorcraft 



12 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



For eighty-nine years 
. . . . since 1885 



seemcin 

OF DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long 
association with North Car- 
olina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its fifty- 
fourth volume, and the first 
printed copy was "Seeman 
Printed." 




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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 13 

STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Members — David 0. Claytor, Greensboro; Harold V. Day, Spruce Pine; Jesse M. Pike, 
Concord; Jerry Price, Raleigh; W. H. Randall, Lillington; H. C. McAllister, 
Secy.-Treas., Box 471, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



NEW PHARMACIES 

(1) The Medicine Shoppe, 600 North Elm 
Street, Greensboro. A. Omega Dean, 
pharmacist manager. 

(2) Meadowbrook Pharmacy, Medical Arts' 
Building, Deerfield Road, Boone. Joe 
C. Miller, pharmacist manager. 

(3) The Town Pharmacy, P. O. Box 244, 
Leland. David Sherrill, pharmacist man- 
ager. 

(4) Comwell Eexall Drugs, Windsor Shop- 
ping Center, Dallas. James David Dal- 
mas, pharmacist manager. 

(5) Village Pharmacy of Robersonville. 
South Main Street, Robersonville. Frank- 
lin A. Measamer, pharmacist manager. 

(6) Clow Drug #2, Highway 301 North, 
Pine Needle Square Shopping Center, 
Smithfield. Russell D. Wright, pharma- 
cist manager. 

(7) Medical Arts Pharmacy, 103 Groce 
Street, Forest City. James Thomas 
Lamb, pharmacist manager. 

(8) Almand's Discount Drugs, Oakwood 
Shopping Center, Fairview Road, Rocky 
Mount. James A. Speight, pharmacist 
manager. 



AIR FORCE PHARMACY MEETING 
FEATURES DEAN HAGER 

Dr. George P. Hager, Dean of the UNC 
School of Pharmacy, was a featured speaker 
at the United States Air Force Pharmacy 
Offices Seminar held at Brooks Air Force 
Base, Texas. 

Dean Hager, as' National Civilian Consul- 
tant in Pharmacy to the Air Force Surgeon 
(hihi;i1, spoke on the many new opportuni- 
ties for pharmacists in more closely inte- 
grated roles with other health professionals 
in patient care. He also presented informa- 
tion regarding developing pharmacist educa- 
tional specialties now being offered in the 
various schools' of pharmacy. 



Accompanying Dean Hager was Professor 
Leonard Berlow, a retired Air Force Colonel, 
who is the UNC School of Pharmacy Direc- 
tor of Drug Abuse Education and Public 
Relations. 

RECIPROCITY 

Judith Ann Leisten from Iowa. W. L. 
Ketchum Drug Company, Jacksonville. 



I. C. System, Inc, 

The nation's most highly 
specialized collection service 



Your Association's Collection Service is 
an affiliate of a national organization cur- 
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leading trade associations throughout the 
nation. 

Don't lose sales volume because cus- 
tomers owe you money and are trading 
somewhere else. Your Association's Col- 
lection Service will chase those debtors 
back into your place of business to pay 
YOU direct. You will get accounts OFF 
your ledger and IN your bank account — 
and you will also have many former cus- 
tomers back doing business with you again. 
For information, contact your Association 
office. It will pay you to do so. 

On request, A representative 

of the I. C. System will explain 

the collection program in detail. 

Call or write the NCPhA, Box 151, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



Partner! 




That's how Lederle sees you in the vital business of protecting the 
nation's health. Only our roles differ— yours is to maintain and enhance 
your professional standing by dispensing the finest pharmaceuticals 
available; ours is to develop new pharmaceuticals, maintain the quality 
of current products, and provide a good deal more: 

750 professional representatives to help you. 

Lederle Distribution Centers augmented by wholesalers located 
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An additional 90-day dating on new product releases. 

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Lederle products, credit policies, promotions— whatever. Call our 
"answer-man" Jim Wallin, (914) 735-5000, at Lederle. 

It's the least we can do for a partner. 



LEDERLE LABORATORIES, A Division of American Cyanamid Co , Pearl River, N.Y. 10965 865-4 



The Carolina Journal, of Pharmacy 



15 




Store. The honoree was Kojak, a little Pe- 
kingese. 

WILMINGTON— Wendell L. Jones has been 
named manager of the Walgreen Drug Store 
to succeed Vincent J. Lindenschmidt. 

WHITEVILLE — Controlled Substances were 
taken in early May at a break-in at Sim- 
mons Drug Store. An alarm system alerted 
local police but the night visitors had de- 
parted on arrival of the police. 



TAR HEEL DIGEST 

FUQUAY-VARINA— The A. G. Elliott, Jr. 
home was partially damaged by fire on May 
1. Pharmacist Elliott is owner of Elliott's 
Pharmacy. 

BOONE — Eemodeling of Boone Drug Com- 
pany, front and interior, is underway. 
ASHEFILLE— Shelia N. West, the daugh- 
ter of a prominent political figure, has been 
arrested and charged with armed robbery of 
the Skyland Pharmacy and possession of 
Controlled Substances. 

CHINA GROVE— Pharmacist Jessie Beale 
of Mooresville was guest speaker at a recent 
meeting of the China Grove-Landis Pilot 
Club. 

A SHE VILLE— James E. Singletary, Jr. has 
been appointed director of pharmacy ser- 
vices at Memorial Mission Hospital. He is 
a graduate in pharmacy of the Medical Col- 
lege of South Carolina and received a Doc- 
tor of Pharmacy degree from the Univer- 
sity of Cincinnati. 

MOUNT AIRY— Pharmacist John E. Mills 
of Wolfe Drug Store heads a committee to 
study Mount Airy 's off-street parking sit- 
uation and make "realistic recommenda- 
tions ' ' to improve the available parking in 
the central downtown business area. 

BOONE — Last year 30 farmers in Watauga, 
Ashe and Caldwell counties earned $19,000 
by selling 50,000 pounds of catnip at 38 
cents a pound. In one case, one-sixth of an 
acre of catnip brought $355. 

DUNN— What is believed to be the first cof- 
fee hour ever held to honor a dog was sched- 
uled recently at Butler and Carroll Drug 



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PROGRAM 



W. H. Wilson, Presiding 
President, North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



INVOCATION 

The Reverend Victor G. Cole, Pastor 
First Baptist Church of Salisbury 



WELCOME 

The Honorable William C. Stanback 
Mayor of the City of Salisbury 



TRIBUTES TO MR. FULLER 

Glenn E. Ketner 

President, Rowan Investment Company 

Edwin E. Koontz 

Director, Department of Social Services 

Robert B. Hall, Mockjville 

Past-President, North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



PRESENTATION OF AWARD 

W. Whitaker Moose, Mount Pleasant 

Immediate Past-Prcddent, North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Program Honoring Edwin R. Fuller of Salisbury as Pharmacist of the Year scheduled at the 
Holiday Inn, Salisbury, June 29, 7 P.M. locally. Dinner reservations ($6 per person) avail- 
able from the Salisbury Merchants Association or direct from the N. C. Pharmaceutical 
Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 



THTe l wT38» BOUnia W the 

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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 



"DRUG EDUCATION— 74" 

Reported by Steve Moore 

"There's a brand new language" and in- 
deed there is in drug education. This senti- 
ment is very evident in ''Drug Education — 
74," a conference held at the School of 
Pharmacy on May 4-5. No more do we deal 
in an area that sees drug use as a problem 
in itself, but in areas that see drug use as 
an intertwined part of youthful growth ex- 
periences and solutiors of problems. In aid- 
ing youth to resolve their problems and de- 
velop greater self esteem, the use of drugs 
and the situations which nurture their use 
decrease. In providing positive outlets for 
youthful enthusiasm and initiative, the neg- 
ative use of drugs is thereby decreased. Mi- 
chael Sonnenreich, Vice President of the 
National Coordinating Council on Drug Ed- 
ucation, pointed out the great change in the 
formerly ominous field of drug education 
into new areas such as" ' ' caring, " " feel- 
ing, " " helping, " " loving, ' ' and ' ' commu- 
nicating. ' ' Coupled with similar changes in 
publications, audio-visuals and teaching 
methods, drug education has progressed from 
fear and threat to humanistic concern and 
feeling. Xenia Wiggins from the Southern 
Regional Education Board pointed the new 
advances in affective education methods 
(working with individual needs and values) 
as opposed to older methods (drug facts and 
laws) as the manner of accomplishment of 
this objective. The public school teacher is 
more fully seen as a caring, interested friend 
rather than an authoritarian disciplinarian 
dealing in absolutes. 

Techniques utilized to accomplish this are 
varied. Ann Arrigo, of the Arizona Correc- 
tion and Reform Department, has utilized 
dramatic arts as a manner of enhancing self 
esteem (the lack of which is a definite cause 
in drug use) and thereby decreasing the need 
and eventual use of drugs. Jim Sehreier, n 
business instructor at Mount Mary College in 
Milwaukee, utilizes the technique of dealing 
with supervisor-employee conflicts as a man- 
ner of examining drug problems'. Further 
analysis of drug advertising and distribu- 
tion methods aid the students in clarifying 
their values in regard to drug use. Barry 
Humphreys, of the Greenville City Schools, 



utilizes the entire field of health education 
in order to develop more positive attitudes 
and ideas in students'. Conference partic- 
ipants added many other novel ideas for 
accomplishing effective drug education tech- 
niques. 

Though the expertise in the field is grow- 
ing, money to accomplish these ends is de- 
clining from the federal government. This 
was the message from Dr. John Olsen, the 
head of the Prevention Division of the Na- 
tional Institute of Drug Abuse. Dr. Olsen 
further pointed out the necessity of develop- 
ing local funding sources to accomplish these 
objectives in the future. Mr. Roy Epps, di- 
rector of the North Carolina Drug Author- 
ity, pointed out the resources and financial 
capability of his agency to work in drug 
education in the state, as did Mr. Bob Frye 
of the Department of Public Instruction. 

Yes, there is a brand new language, and 
included in this is the School of Pharmacy, 
which continues as a vital force in drug ed- 
ucation in North Carolina. As a five-year 
veteran in this effort, the School continues 
to serve as a technical assistant to the var- 
ious agencies in the state working in the 
field. Drug Education '74 will quickly be 
assimilated into yet newer efforts' in this 
regard. 



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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



19 



HOW TO CREATE A POSITIVE 
IMAGE IN PHARMACY 

By "W. Joe Davis, III 
Creative Services Associates 
Raleigh, N. C. 27607 
Introduction 

My topic concerns methods for creating a 
positive image in pharmacy through adver- 
tising. The term ' ' positive image ' ' refers 
to a professional type of promotion and is 
therefore interchangeable, to a degree, with 
professional advertising. 

Since Michael Evan of the American Col- 
lege of Apothecaries touched a bit on profes- 
sional/positive image advertising earlier in 
his speech, I hope to take up where he left 
off. 

For the past three and a half years, I've 
learned a lot about pharmacy needs in the 
area of advertising and promotion. My ex- 
perience with Creative Services Associates, 
producing, promoting, selling, and servicing 
some aspects of positive-image advertising 
has given mc a Somewhat unique education 
in pharmacy advertising. I 've observed much. 
I 've learned a lot about what people think 
of pharmacy and what pharmacists think of 
pharmacy. My approach has been quite in- 
dependent with no strings attached. 

Outside of CSA 's illustrated Health News 
Editorials, I have seen only three other ser- 
vices which fall under the heading of pro- 
fessional-type advertising. And these deal 
mostly in low-level humor, health trivia, or 
the use of the same tired, old proclamation 
of service, quality, and convenience — worn 
out themes, to say the least. 

It \s easy to see, then, why CSA is in busi- 
ness. Our primary goal is to provide the na- 
tion \s best pharmacy-to-public health infor- 
mation service. Secondly, to learn how to 
deal with the positive-image problem in de- 
tail. And thirdly, to develop these ideas into 
personalized, individual programs for use 
by our North Carolina subscribers. 

Pharmacists Hold "Trump Cards" 

If I were to operate a pharmacy, I 'd start 
with taking advantage of the "trump 
cards" held by each pharmacist. The first 
trump is his recognized public image as a 
source of health information. CSA helps its 
clients take advantage of this trump card 




W. Joe Davis, III 

through our service of Health News Ed- 
itorials, a weekly newspaper column, which 
among other things, routinely covers areas 
dealing with nutrition, vitamins, FDA rules 
and regulations, cancer and heart disease 
research and development, longevity, sea- 
sonal topics, and pharmacy-related current 
events. The main point being to live up to 
the health-information role the public, holds 
of the pharmacist. 

The second trump to capitalize on is the 
individualization and personalization of these 
editorials and any other advertising that 
you may subsequently do — accomplished 
through the proper design and use of special 
logos, store names, and/or through pictures 
of the pharmacist or pharmacists. Such per- 
sonalization helps to "bring the ad home" 
to the local newspaper reader. It becomes 
more than just another ad. It becomes a 
personal message, which capitalizes on the 
pharmacist 's already established reputation. 

So, take advantage of these two trumps: 
1) Your recognition as a source of health 
information, and 2) the personalization and 
individualization of your editorial. 

The major point of all this strategy is 
that if you feel the public deserves to be in- 
formed aboul health matters, then don't be 
(Continued on Page 21) 



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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 



shy to so inform them. Play your two trump 
cards while in the process of bridging this 
communication divide. You'll find you can 
attract a vefy favorable readership while 
regularly polishing your professional image. 

Follow the Leader Syndrome 

What about display advertising? Let's 
consider this 1 form of advertising in as pos- 
itive a fashion as your imagination can be 
made to stretch. It would be nice to ignore 
this part of advertising, but let's face it, a 
part of pharmacy 's - advertising life is dis- 
play advertising. 

Here, pharmacy seems to be playing every- 
one's favorite childhood game — to wit, Fol- 
low-the-Leader ! The chain stores started 
large scale display advertising, to be fol- 
lowed by the coops, and now many of the 
larger independents. 

My personal initial response to this state 
of affairs would be to stop this game plan 
in its price/product advertising tracts! At 
least in its present form. Okay, you say, you 
want that discount image and ean't live 
without it. I'll have to agree that such ad- 
vertising has transformed a once profes- 
sional, neighborhood pharmacy image into 
one of the community 's leading discount 
stores. But his strict, hard-sell approach is 
being done up in such a lax and lazy fashion, 
it's personally baffling to me. Take the ex- 
ample of Mutual (NC Mutual Drug) — not 
to pick a fight; I respect their organization 
and know they do a wonderful job in dis- 
playing in major newspapers. Certainly, they 
are challenging the other chains' who display 
their ads in these same papers on the same 
day for the public's attention — and winning 
their share, and often times, more than their 
share of the market. But when, on the local 
level, their members re-run the same dis- 
play, per se, duplicating what has just been 
run the same week in the area's major news- 
paper, then I have to wonder. 

Let 's look at it from a positive angle. 
What 's the major strength of your home- 
town drug store? Isn't it your years of ser- 
vice, your integrity, the trust that you have 
gained over the years? If it isn't, then don 't 
be surprised if your lot soon goes the way 
of the politician of today. Isn 't your strength 
basically your tradition? Such intangibles 



the people in your community have long 
identified with, so don 't ' ' blow " it by hid- 
ing it — drive the point home! Don't dilute 
this individuality with what is at the core 
a rather cold, impersonal, headquarter- 
oriented re-run of an advertisement. Per- 
sonalize it, at the very least! 

Do what Alfred Gene Smith of Elizabeth- 
town did the other week with his Mutual ad 
slick. He ran his picture beside George 
Washington's and said, "George and I are 
having a birthday. Come and enjoy it with 
us with these giant savings! " Then the ad 
slick appeared indicating the specials. Here, 
Alfred Gene took the matter-of-fact, lazy 
re-run ad slick, gave it a bit of personaliza- 
tion, added a bit of humor, and instantly he 
turned a rather dull prospect of an adver- 
tisement into a lively, timely, interesting, and 
effective display. This is what I mean by 
' ' bringing it home ' ' to the people of your 
hometown. 

In other words, when you use a display 
Slick other than of your own making or per- 
sonalizing, you lose the personal, lively, 
hometown quality that identifies your special 
tradition — a tradition that takes advantage 
of a life-time of hard work and image- 
building. You can do a better job with a 
little more effort. Perhaps one day in the not 
too distant future, CSA will put together a 
package of such ideas. 

Two other points are worth making in 
conjunction with these remarks on display 
ads. First, vary the Size of your displays. 
The same size ad, week-in, week-out is par- 
ticularly monotonous. One week, run an in- 
dex of specials, small in size; follow the next 
week with a considerably larger ad to pro- 
ject the feeling that, "Wow, this week you 
really have the specials to offer!" For the 
average independent if they'll run just three 
or four full-page sales, tied in with special 
celebrations such as the George Washington 
Birthday example or a Back-To-School 
theme, then they'll still do a good job of 
keeping the discount image. In between, how- 
ever, smaller, index-like displays of varying 
sizes from month to month would also be 
important to keep the public conditioned to 
your price-conscious approach to merchan- 
dising. 

(Continued on Page 23) 



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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



23 



Incidentally, for those of you who may be 
interested, CSA will soon have an advertis- 
ing display do-it-yourself aid for stores who 
see the value in personalizing and maintain- 
ing their own individuality. It's designed to 
tie in with products which offer advertising 
rebates . . . 

Posters and Other Forms of Positive-Image 
Promotion 

Quality, service, and convenience have 
long been one of pharmacy 's bastions of 
self-expressed virtues. Outside of in-store 
posters which list these services, extoll your 
quality, and emphasize your conveniences, I 
really don't know what you can do or say 
that would be news to anyone. 

It 's simply an over-worked area. So, my 
suggestion would be to post these topics 
prominently in your store and let it go at 
that. Especially effective would be a neatly 
displayed poster in your prescription de- 
partment offering information about your 
services, and perhaps even about your pre- 
scription pricing policy, if you wish to be 
aggressively bold! In addition, printing such 
items on your carry-out bags would also be 
advantageous. It's sort of like your phar- 
macy attire. You put on the white jacket, 
shirt, or pull-over to look the part of the 
professional and then forget it. Printed bags 
and just one of those in-store posters are lit- 
tle things that you can do to help creative a 
more positive image. 

Finally, one of the biggest needs I see in 
pharmacy advertising (and I suspect the 
consumer sees it exactly the same way) is 
the need to promote the theme of prevention 



in lieu of a straight remedy approach. Sev- 
eral times a year, if it were me, I would tie 
in large displays with poison-prevention week, 
heart, fund drives, etc., to get across the idea 
that you want people to stay healthy. You 
already place much emphasis on remedy 
sales, so why not give equal time to preven- 
tion topics? The public image of you as an 
advertiser would swell! Other examples in- 
clude special ads such as an immunization 
chart for kids and a physical fitness and 
examination reminder for adults — the doc- 
tors would even love this type! 

Who would do these displays? Well, again, 
I hope CSA will one day be offering this 
sort of creative material for its clients. 
That 's another of our goals. 

There 's no limit to what we can do for the 
professional enhancement of the pharmacist 
in North Carolina (and elsewhere) — given 
the time and support. 

Summary 

As far as the consumer is concerned, then, 
it is my belief that you, the pharmacist, 
should offer him something positive, so he'll 
rest easier with his traditional image of the 
pharmacist (a traditional image that gages 
the pharmacist as a source of health infor- 
mation, as a personal health official whom 
the consumer can go to for advice, and as 
one who is as interested in prevention as in 
remedy.) This discount stuff is fine if you 
must, but keep it in the right perspective — 
personalize it. 

Perhaps one day CSA can help you with 
such advertising expertise. Until then, thank 
you for a fine audience. It's been a pleasure 
addressing you this morning. 



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24 



The Caeolina Journal of Pharmacy 



SMITHFIELD PHARMACIST IS 

HONORED FOR OUTSTANDING 

COMMUNITY SERVICE 

BY NORTH CAROLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

James L. Creech, a community pharmacist 
from Smithfield, has been honored by the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 
as its 1974 recipient of the A. H. Eobins 
"Bowl of Hygeia" Award for outstanding 
service to his community. 

Creech received the award plaque on March 
24 during the association's annual conven- 
tion in Pinehurst. He is owner of Creech's 
Pharmacy at 109 South Third Street in 
Smithfield. 

Norman D. Schellenger, manager of A. H. 
Bobing Company's Carolina Division, pre- 
sented the award on behalf of the state as- 
sociation. Also participating in the cer- 
emony was the association 's president, Whit- 
aker Moose of Mount Pleasant, who himself 



received the "Bowl of Hygeia" Award in 
1967. 

Creech is a graduate of the University of 
North Carolina School of Pharmacy, and has 
been active in the fields of mental health 
and alcohol recovery. 

He is a member and past president of the 
Smithfield Kiwanis Club, a member and past 
master of the Masonic Lodge in Smithfield, 
and immediate past president of the John- 
ston County Mental Health Association. He 
is also a director of the state Mental Health 
Association, and chairman of \e Policy 
Advisory Board for the Johnston County 
Alcohol Becovery Program. 

Creech is a member of Centenary United 
Methodist Church in Smithfield, which he 
has served as board chairman, treasurer and 
Church School superintendent and teacher. 

In pharmacy, he is a member and past 
president of the North Carolina Pharmaceu- 
tical Association, and also is a director of 
the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Besearch 
Foundation and a member of the North 




James L. Creech (left), Smithfield, N.C., pharmacist, receives the A. H. Robins "Bowl of 
Hygeia" Award for outstanding community service by a pharmacist from Norman D. Schel- 
lenger, manager of the Carolina Division of A. H. Robins Company. The ceremony took 
place March 24 during the association's annual convention in Pinehurst. The "Bowl of 
Hygeia" Award is presented annually to a North Carolina pharmacist through the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 



Carolina Academy of Pharmacy. He is also 
a member of the National Association of 
Retail Druggists and a former president of 
the Johnston County Drug Club. 

The Bowl of Hygeia, most widely recog- 
nized international symbol of pharmacy de- 
rives from Greek mythology. 

Hygeia was the daughter and assistant of 
Aesculapius (sometimes spelled Asklepios), 
the God of Medicine and Healing. Her clas- 
sical symbol was a bowl containing a me- 
dicinal potion, with the serpent of Wis- 
dom (or guardianship) partaking of it. 
This is the same serpent of Wisdom which 
appears on the caduceus, the staff of Aescu- 
lapius which is the symbol of medicine. 

The "Bowl of Hygeia" Award, presented 
annually through the North Carolina Phar- 
maceutical Association, is a handsome ma- 
hogany plaque measuring 10 by 13 inches 
and featuring the Bowl of Hygeia cast in 
bronze. It is modeled after a sterling silver 
bowl made by a Mexican silversmith and 
given to the A. H. Robins Company by its 
Latin American representatives in 1953 on 
the Richmond (Va.) ethical pharmaceutical 
manufacturing firm's 75th anniversary. 

An appreciation of the time and per- 
sonal sacrifice devoted by pharmacists to 
the welfare of their respective communities 
prompted E. Claiborne Robins, chairman of 
the board and chief executive officer of the 
company, to estabbsh the award in 1958. 
It is now presented annually by participat- 
ing pharmaceutical associations in each of 
the United States, the District of Columbia, 
Puerto Rico and the provinces of Canada. 
The recipients are selected by their respec- 
tive associations. 

CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES 
ACT AMENDED 

Effective April 12, 1974 

G.S. 90-87. Defines chemical term "iso- 
mer. ' ' 

G.S. 90-88 (d). Makes board action of 
Drug Authority effective after 30 days. 

G.S. 90-88 (i). Gives Drug Authority re- 
sponsibility to notify registrants, SBI, 
Board of Pharmacy, and District Attorneys 
within 30 days after a controlled substance 



has been scheduled, rescheduled, or deleted. 
G.S. 90-88 (i) Gives Drug Authority re- 
sponsibility to maintain a list of substances 
that are excluded, exempted, and excepted 
from control. 

G.S. 90-89 (b). Schedules "Drotebanal" 
as a controlled substance in Schedule I. 

G.S. 90-89 (c). Schedules 2,5-dimethox- 
amphetamine ; 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxamphet- 
amine; and 4-methoxamphetamines as con- 
trolled substances in Schedule I. 

G.S. 90-90 (a). Rewrites definition and 
excludes ' ' naloxone hydrochloride. " It is a 
narcotic substance that cannot be abused 
and is used in the treatment of addicts. 

G.S. 90-90 (d). Schedules methaqualone, 
and reschedules amobarbital, secobarbital, 
and pentobarbital, as controlled substances 
in Schedule II. 

G.S. 90-91. Schedules benzphetamine, chlor- 
phentermine, chlortemine, mazindal, and 
phendimetrazine as controlled substances in 
Schedule III. 

G.S. 90-92 (e). Schedules fenfluramine as 
a controlled substance in Schedule IV. 

G.S. 90-93. A technical language correc- 
tion that deletes the words "dispensed" and 
' ' dispensing ' ' and inserts the words ' ' sol- 
ids ' ' and ' ' selling. ' ' The section deals with 
selling drugs over the counter without a 
prescription. 

G.S. 90-95 (d) (2). Defines the quantity 
of phencyclidine (% gram or more) and 
cocaine (1 gram or more) when illegally 
possessed that constitutes a felony. Current 
statute refers to "100 dosage units, cap- 
sules, tablets, or equivalent quantity. ' ' 

G.S. 90-108 (a) (1). It is unlawful to 
impersonate a physician to obtain any type 
of prescription drug. 

G.S. 90-101 (f) and G.S. 90-107. Author- 
izes appropriate Drug Authority employees 
to inspect the records and inventory of in- 
dividual practitioners. 

G.S. 90-102 (c). A rewrite of this section 
for clarification to give it more specificity 
concerning the registration of practitioners 
that are doing research with controlled sub- 
stances. 

Article 5 of Chapter 90. The Drug Author- 
ity (13 member board) will be responsible 
for scheduling and rescheduling all con- 
trolled substances. 



26 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



REPORT OF THE CONTINUING EDUCATION COMMITTEE 

By Claude U. Paoloni, Chairman 
Eeport or the Committee on Continuing Education 



During this short convention year I must 
confess there has not been too much time 
for your Committee to meet. One point in 
our favor, however, is that practically all 
members are seasoned veterans on this Com- 
mittee having served at least two or more 
years consecutively and are quite familiar 
with the educational problems and needs of 
the profession. They are a continual sound- 
ing board for me and indeed their counsel 
is highly regarded. 

The programs and activities for this fiscal 
year are summarized and attached to this 
report. Programs were conducted in seven 
different cities throughout the state. These 
were: 

Cities Numbers of C. E. Offerings 
Asheville 1 (7 more are scheduled) 

Chapel Hill 4 

Charlotte 2 (7 more are scheduled) 

Bocky Mount 4 
Thomasville 1 
Wilmington 8 
Wilson 4 

Total number of offerings this fiscal year 
to- date was 24 programs ranging from a 
single 2 hour offering to programs of 16 
hours. Next month the fourth Pharmacy 
Seminar on Assessing Quality of Drug 
Usage Systems in Health Care Facilities will 
take place in Greensboro, April 16 and 17; 
the following month Drug Education '74 
will be presented in Chapel Hill on May 4 
and 5. Copies of these programs are avail- 
able. A limited number of programs for the 
Asheville and Charlotte Pharmacy Seminar 
on Selected Subjects — the first session held 
last week — are also available. In addition, 
plans are underway for six regional Precep- 
tor — Extern/ Internship meetings for early 
summer. Watch out for this announcement. 
We would like to have every pharmacist — 
preceptor and his student, extern or intern, 
attend. Although not planned for this fiscal 
year, a unique non-credit course on Basic 
Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics is 
scheduled to begin September 3 and continue 
for 14 consecutive weeks every Tuesday 



evening from 7:30-9:30 P.M. in Chapel Hill 
at the School of Pharmacy. Because this 
course registration is limited, I am making 
this announcement early so that those of 
you who are interested in attending can for- 
ward your registration early. Copies of this 
program are also available. 

The School of Pharmacy's Audio Phar- 
macy Tape Service has distributed, this fis- 
cal year to-date approximately 1158 cas- 
settes, representing 1072.3 total tape hours 
of instructions. Our tape catalog is being 
up-dated. A list of new tapes to be included 
is attached to this report. 

We believe impressive gains are being 
made in continuing education activities by 
the pharmacists of North Carolina. Unfor- 
tunately, only a relatively small number of 
the pharmacists participate in these pro- 
grams. Let me give you a "for instance." 
Last fiscal year, ending June 30, 1973, there 
were 43 continuing education activities (pro- 
grams, seminars, symposia, etc.) offered; 
5— in Chapel Hill, 38— out of Chapel Hill, 
for a total of 176 hours of instruction. This 
amounted to a total over 5700 student con- 
tact hours. These were made up of 1491 reg- 
istrations which were amassed by fewer than 
491 registrants (not all were pharmacists). 
Average contact hours per registrant was 
11.6 hours. I must admit, many of those who 
participated in our continuing education 
programs did so because they are required 
to gain a minimum number of continuing 
education hours to meet relicensure require- 
ments for other states in which they are 
registered. 

One matter of concern to us is the resolu- 
tion in continuing education which was 
adopted two years ago at the 92nd annual 
meeting of this Association held in Wilming- 
ton. Essentially it states: 

" — Resolved that the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association recommends 
that all North Carolina pharmacists par- 
ticipate in a minimum of fifteen hours 
of continuing education annually. Such 
education should be in the form of post- 
graduate studies, institutes seminars, 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



27 



lectures, conferences, workshops, exten- 
sion studies, tape services, correspon- 
dence courses' and other similar meth- 
ods of continuing professional pharma- 
ceutical education, and be it further 

Resolved that the pharmacists of North 
Carolina should, through the North Car- 
olina Pharmaceutical Association, sup- 
port the requirements for continuing 
education of pharmacists as a pre-requi- 
site for relicensure in North Carolina." 

Presently there are J.U states (California, 
Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Minnesota, Ne- 
vada, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma and 
Washington) that have mandated continuing 
education for pharmacists plus one (Missis- 
sippi) who require it for pharmacists serving 
as consultants to hospitals and nursing 
homes. Moreover, in our State continuing 
education courses are required for all regis- 
tered optometrists desiring relicensure; the 
North Carolina Medical Society now requires 
continuing education as a pre-requisite for 
membership. Another significant and impor- 
tant development on the national scene is 
the American Pharmaceutical Association 
and the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy joint Task Force in Continuing 
Competence in Pharmacy. Its objectives are 
to prepare a statement of basic principles 
and policies with respect to the continuing 
competence of pharmacists. 

There are various factors that apparently 
influence the need of continuing education 
for professionals. These include: 

(1) The numerous scientific and techno- 
logical developments in the past sev- 
eral decades 

(2) The increasing number of persons 
seeking health care 

(3) The changing patterns and manage- 
ment and delivery of health care 

(4) The growing recognition of the need 
to protect the public from unqualified 
personnel (a recognition shared by 
an increasing proportion of health 
professionals, including members of 
the profession of pharmacy). 

We can expect to see and hear much more 
about continuing competence through educa- 
tion. It is said 90% of all the known knowl- 



edge man possesses has come about during 
the last 25-50 years. Today, it is believed 
the volume of knowledge doubled itself in 
about 7 years; and, it has been suggested 
that scientific knowledge doubles at even a 
faster rate. Essentially, what this means is 
that one cannot spend a career with the 
knowledge that he started off with because it 
isn't good enough. Four of five years down 
the road one has got to practically double 
the knowledge that he, or she, started with 
to stay up-to-date. 

The question, ' ' How do we adapt in or- 
der to best cope with these changes taking 
place in our profession? "Do we want to 
continue with the voluntary route? — the. 
mandatory route? Would we prefer a type 
of certification by examination procedure 
to assure continuing competency? — etc?" 
Whatever the route, I believe that fulfilling 
every pharmacist 's educational needs is, and 
will be, a challenge for the School, the Pro- 
fession and the Board. Your answers to the 
questions are sincerely solicited. 




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REACO PRODUCTS 

P. O. Box 2747 
West Durham, North Carolina 



28 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

OFFICERS OF LOCAL/DISTRICT PHARMACEUTICAL 
ORGANIZATIONS— 1974 

Information obtained from various sources. For additions' and corrections, please write: 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, P. 0. Box 151, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 

ALAMANCE PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

President: W. S. GARDNER, P. O. Box 1207, Burlington, N. C. 27215 
Vice-President: WALT SAUNDERS, 5014 Forest Oaks Drive, Greensboro 27406 
Secretary-Treasurer : JACK G. WATTS, 2426 Briarwood Drive, Burlington 27215 
Legislative Chairman: JACK G. WATTS, same as above 

BUNCOMBE COUNTY PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

President: W. MOSS SALLEY, JR., Salley's Drug Store, 85 Patton Ave., Asheville 28801 
Vice-President: W. RONNIE FARR, 20 Hy Vu Drive, Asheville 28804 
Secretary : MRS. JO LOHR QUEEN, P. O. Box 6765, Asheville 28806 
Treasurer: HARRY DOVER, 100 W. Euclid Parkway, Asheville 28804 

BURKE PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

President: CHARLES DAVIS, 837 E. View Street, Morganton 28655 
Vice-President: BROOKS HARRELL, Grade Hospital, Morganton 28655 
Secretary-Treasurer .- BILLIE E. PITTMAN, Route 1, Box 410-A, Valdese 28690 

CAPE FEAR PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

President: JAMES R. HICKMON, 1420 Paisley Avenue, Fayetteville 28304 
Vice-President: BILL FINCH, 3594 Fayetteville Road, Lumberton 28358 
Treasurer: HUNTER SMITH, 1634 Cedar Creek Road, Fayetteville 28306 
Secretary : LEON TOMLINSON, 1916 Morganton Road, Fayetteville 28303 
Directors: (Cumberland) FRED RACHIDE, 3006 Cliff dale Road, Fayetteville 28303 
(Robeson) D. H. BISSETT, 1200 N. Elm Street, Lumberton 28358 
(Sampson) SHELTON BROWN, JR., 205 Kerr Street, Clinton 28328 
Legislative Chairman: JAMES R. HICKMON, same as above! 

CLEVELAND COUNTY DRUG CLUB 

President: HOWARD BRADBURN, 1400 Briarcliff Road, Shelby 28150 
President Elect: D. WAYNE DEAL, 901 N. Lafayette Street, Shelby 28150 
Secretary -Treasurer : CHARLES D. BLANTON, P. O. Box 272, Kings Mountain 28086 

COLUMBUS COUNTY PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

President: T. Q. (TIM) OWENS, JR., 217 George St., Whiteville 28472 
Vice-President : Brantley A. Norris 1 , Norris Economy Drugs, Whiteville 28472 
Secretary-Treasurer : JEAN M. FINCANNON, Columbus Drug Store, Whiteville 28472 

DURHAM-ORANGE PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

President: WILLIAM H. BURCH, T. E. Holding & Company, North Hills Shopping Ctr., 

Hillsborough 27278 
Vice-President: ROBERT J. ALLEN, 59 White Oak Trail, Rt. 3, Chapel Hill 27514 
Secretary-Treasurer : PATRICIA GIDDINGS, Route 2, Box 272-A, Chapel Hill 27514 

FORSYTH PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

President: RONALD H. SMALL, 3141 W. Polo Rd., Winston-Salem 27106 
Secretary-Treasurer : A. C. DOLLAR, 1017 Eaglewood Drive, Winston-Salem 27106 
Legislative Chairman : RONALD H. SMALL, same as above 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 29 

GASTON COUNTY PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

President: KADER EAMSEY, JR., 701 W. Franklin Avenue, Gastonia 28052 
Vice-President ; HENRY BESS, 2922 Union Road, Gastonia 28052 
Secretary-Treasurer: BEN LAMM, 609 Neil Street, Gastonia 28052 
Legislative Chairman: KADER RAMSEY, JR., same as above 

NORTHEASTERN CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

President: John Mitchener, III, P. O. Box 6, Edenton 27932 
Vice-President : John B. Stallings, 128 Osceola Drive, Greenville 27834 
Secretary-Treasurer : Joe Minton, 401 Carolina Drive, Murfreesboro 27855 

GUILFORD COUNTY SOCIETY OF PHARMACISTS 

President: GEORGE McLARTY, 3436 Hillside Drive, High Point 
President Elect: JOE JOHNSON, 5004 Lancaster Road, Greensboro 27410 
Vice-President : ARNOLD CHERSON, 514 S. Elm Street, Greensboro 27406 
Secretary-Treasurer : AL MEBANE, 512 Audubon Drive, Greensboro 27410 

LENOIR COUNTY PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

President: MICHAEL W. CRAVEN, Vernon Hall Cottage, Kinston 28501 
Vice-President: ROBERT L. DEWAR, LaGrange Pharmacy, P. O. Box 647, LaGrange 28551 
Secretary-Treasurer : BARBARA MESCHKE, 2104 Hardee Road, Kinston 28501 
Legislative Chairman: BARBARA MESCHKE, same as above 

MECKLENBURG PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

President: SAM E. LOMAN, 5500 Coriolanus Ct,, Charlotte, N. C. 28212 

1st Vice-President : THOMAS C. McCALL, 1101 Redcoat Drive, Charlotte 28211 

2nd Vice-President: CARL THOMAS DAGENHART, JR., 1416 Burnley Road, Charlotte 

28210 
Secretary: ELIZABETH CRITCHER, 4741 Hedgemore Drive, Apt. 1-K, Charlotte 28209 
Treasurer: JEAN F. ROBINSON, 8077 Regent Park Lane, Charlotte 28210 
Legislative Chairman: CARL THOMAS DAGENHART, JR., same as above 

NEW HANOVER COUNTY PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

President : JOHN C. BULLOCK, JR., 2212 Lynnwood Drive, Wilmington 28401 
Vice President: W. A. MORTON, 108 S. 5th Street, Wilmington 28401 
Secretary-Treasurer : HOBART G. WHALEY, 168 Stonewall Jackson Drive, Wilmington 

28401 
Legislative Chairman: MRS. FELMA BASS, 5936 Market Street, Wilmington 28401 

ONSLOW COUNTY PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

President: DANNY YATES, 1204 Clifton Road, Jacksonville 28540 
Vice-President : LARRY DENNING, 1102 Clifton Road, Jacksonville 28540 
Secretary : JAMES GURGANUS, 805 Smallwood Drive, Jacksonville 28540 
Treasurer: LOUIS SHIELDS, 406 Brentwood Drive, Jacksonville 28540 
Program Director: RONALD DEL CASTILHO, Rt. 3, Jacksonville 28540 
Legislative Chairman: RAY JOHNSON, 1101 Clifton Road, Jacksonville 28540 

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY SOCIETY OF PHARMACISTS 

President: W. G. DUDLEY, JR., P. O. Box 29, Reidsville 27320 
Vice-President ; CHARLES RICE 

Secretary-Treasurer : PHIL LINK, P. O. Box 89, Reidsville 27320 

Legislative Chairman: CLAYBURN HAWKINS, Hawkins Rexall Drug Co., Madison 27025 
Co-Chairman: JOE ESTES, 501 McCoy Road, Reidsville 27320 

(Continued on Page 32) 



30 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 

• Charlotte-^Mrs. T. K. Steele 

• Raleigh — Mrs. Henry Williams 

CHARLOTTE 

Tuesday, May 14, was a day of surprises 
for the Charlotte Woman 's Auxiliary of the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association. 
Three charter members were named honor- 
ary members at the luncheon meeting held at 
the Y.M.C.A. They were Mrs. Foster Thomas, 
Mrs. Joseph Monroe, and Mrs". Bland Robin- 
son, all of them past presidents and active 
members since its organization in 1938. Mrs. 
Leslie Barnhardt presented proposed amend- 
ments to the Auxiliary 's By-Laws. 

Mrs. Eobert Lewis', President, summarized 
the year's accomplishments, which included 
taking in $1,500 from the Benefit Bridge 
and the Bazaar. Gifts were made to the 
following : 

$500 scholarship to Pharmacy Student at 
UNC, Chapel Hill 

$100 to library for pharmacy books at 
UNC, Charlotte 

$100 to Institute of Pharmacy for kitchen 
remodeling 

$100 to Boy's Town, Pineville, N. C. 

$ 25 to Broughton Hospital 

In addition the Auxiliary helped furnish 
Group Home for the mentally retarded, fur- 
nished Guidance Counselors in the schools 
with information on Pharmacy as" a career, 
made 50 stuffed animals for the mentally 
retarded, and collected several box loads of 
gifts for Western Carolina Center. Mr. Bob 
Woodall accepted the check for Boy's Town 
and Mrs. James Hickmon for the Institute 
of Pharmacy. 

A highlight of the meeting was the instal- 
lation of the new officers. Mrs. Robert Lewis 
introduced Mrs. James Hickmon, Past-Pres- 
ident of the State Auxiliary, who installed 
the following officors: 

President — Mrs. H. L. Bizzell 

First Vice-President — 'Mrs. W. D. Smith 

Second Vice-President — Mrs. Don 
Weathers 



Recording Secretary — Mrs. W. B. Hawfield 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Bruce 
Medlin 

Treasurer — Mrs. John F. Morton 

Parliamentarian — Mrs. Leslie Barnhardt 

Historian — Mrs. Charles Jarrett 

Advisor — Mrs. Robert Lewis 

Mrs. Hickmon delighted the members with 
a short musical program, singing and play- 
ing her autoharp. 

Mrs. Lewis was presented a silver pitcher 
in appreciation for her diligent and efficient 
year 's work. Mrs. Hickmon also received a 
gift of silver. 

Special guests attending the meeting were : 
Mrs. W. L. Hickmon, Mrs. Margaret McGinn, 
and Mrs. Harry Bizzell, Jr. 

After the meeting Mrs. James Hickmon 
with several members took a tour of the 
Group Home for mentally retarded. 



RALEIGH 

The Raleigh Woman's Pharmaceutical 
Auxiliary has been busy during the Spring 
months of 1974. The March meeting, at the 
home of Mrs. W. J. Rhodes' provided an op- 
portunity for final details of the Benefit 
Bridge in April. 

Held in conjunction with Shelley School, 
a pre-school program for retarded children, 
the benefit was most successful. McJoseph 's 
provided an attractive fashion show, and the 
Raleigh Club together with parents of Shel- 
ley School children provided door and table 
prizes. 

Mrs. Jerry Price, Club President, reported 
that members had been able to accomplisli 
more than had been originally anticipated in 
the Mental Health projects. Both Halfway 
Houses — for Men and Women — were entirely 
furnished with draperies. 

The May luncheon meeting, held at the 
home of Mrs. John Treadwell, featured in- 
stallation of officers for the new year as 
follows: Mrs. Roger Crane, President; Mrs. 
Robert C. Seaborn, Vice-President; Mrs. 
Jerry Johnson, Secretary; Mrs. Henry K. 
Williams', Treasurer; Mrs. Barrell Estes, 
Reporter. Mrs. Richard B. Overton, a past- 
president, conducted the Installation. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 



BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Measamer of Sober - 
sonville announce the birth of a son, Frank- 
lin Alexander, Jr., on May 19. The father 
is a graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy and is pharmacist manager of The 
Village Pharmacy of Bobersonville. 



Mr. and Mrs. Eobert Henley of Fayette- 
ville announce the birth of a son, Eobert 
Eay Jr., on April 26. Pharmacist Henley is 
associated with his father, Senator John T. 
Henley, and others in the operation of Clinic 
Pharmacy, Hope Mills. 

DEATHS 
Carl Durham 

Former Congressman Carl T. Durham of 
Chapel Hill, a pharmacist who Served in the 
U. S. House of Eepresentatives for 22 years 
before retiring in 1961, died April 29 at 
Duke University Medical Center. He was 81. 

Mr. Durham was twice chairman of the 
Joint Atomic Energy Committee in Con- 
gress. He headed an early space committee 
and was chairman of the House Armed Ser- 
vices Committee. 

A graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy, Mr. Durham was associated with Eu- 
banks Drug Store, Chapel Hill, when the 
district nominating committee selected him 
to be the congressional candidate in 1938. 
Before retiring, he was elected to eleven 
consecutive terms in the U. S. House of 
Eepresentatives. 

He was elected to the UNC Board of Trus- 
tees in 1937 and in 1958 was awarded an 
honorary doctor of laws degree by the Uni- 
versity. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Louise 
Durham of Chapel Hill; one son, Carl Dur- 
ham Jr. of Wilmington; three daughters, 
eight grandchildren and 26 great-grand- 
children. 

M. B. Phillips 

M. Brown Phillips, owner and operator of 
Phillips' Drug Store, Albemarle, for many 
years, died April 24 in Charlotte. 

A graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy, Mr. Phillips was associated with var- 
ious Concord pharmacies in the early 20s 



and in 1936, purchased the Moose Drug 
Company of Albemarle, which he operated 
until sale of the pharmacy to T. M. Yost. 

Survivors include Mrs. Phillips, a stepson 
and two stepdaughters; a brother, 0. J. 
Phillips of Florida; a sister and five grand- 
children. 

W. C. Hollowed 

W. Clyde Hollowell, Greenville pharma- 
cist, died May 19 following a period of de- 
clining health. 

A 1934 graduate of the UNC School of 
Pharmacy, Mr. Hollowell was president and 
manager of the Hollowell Drug Stores of 
Greenville. 

He was a veteran of WW II, member of 
the Elks and Greenville Country Club, past 
secretary of the Northeastern Carolina Drug 
Club and a director of the Phi Delta Chi 
Fraternity, Alpha Gamma Chapter of Chapel 
Hill. 



TRAFFIC OFFICIALS SAY 
BRANTLEY MUST RELOCATE 

John C. Brantley, Jr. has been given 90 
days to move out of his drug store, the 
oldest in Ealeigh, to make way for a new 
street to help move traffic on Hillsborough 
Street. 

Brantley, whose father started the phar- 
macy in 1910, was informed that condem- 
nation proceedings were underway and that 
he must relocate the pharmacy by August 16. 

North Carolina has deposited $101,400 
with the Wake Superior Court to pay for the 
property. 

Mr. Brantley is considering the possibility 
of filing a suit against the state and the 
city to stop the condemnation. He said ho 
had received many calls from supporters and 
old customers. 

The pharmacy was moved to its present 
Hillsborough Street location in 1947 from 
the old Masonic Temple on Fayetteville 
Street. When the late Clyde Hoey was gov- 
ernor of North Carolina, it is said a person 
could set his watch by the time Gov. Hoey 
left his office at 10 a.m. to walk to Brant- 
ley's for a glass of Coca Cola. 



32 



The Carolina Journal, of Pharmacy 



WAKE COUNTY PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

President: Joe Edwards, Revco Pharmacy, Kings Shopping Center, Raleigh 

Vice-President : Roger Crane, 5309 Old Forge Circle, Raleigh 27609 

Secretary : Pat Bumgarner 

Treasurer: George D. Morgan, Box 278, Zebulon 27344 

Legislative Chairman : Joe Edwards, same as above 

WILSON COUNTY PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

President: WALT BASS, Kerr Drugs, Parkwood Shopping Center, Wilson 27893 
Secretary-Treasurer : BRAME MORRISON, Morrison Drug Store, 403 W. Nash Street, Wil- 
son 27893 




Mrs. Robert L. Lewis, President of the Charlotte Woman's Pharmaceutical Auxiliary, is pre- 
senting Mrs. James R. Hickmon with a check for $100 toward the remodeling of the kitchen 
at the Institute of Pharmacy. 

Mrs. Hickmon, immediate past president of the NCPhA Woman's Auxiliary, was in Charlotte 
to install officers for the coming year and to visit the group home for mentally retarded 
which the Charlotte organization helped to furnish. Other major Charlotte projects were 
scholarships to the School of Pharmacy at UNC-CH and for pre-pharmacy at UNC-C, and 
$100 to Boys' Town at Pineville. — Photo by Colorcraft 



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PHARMACEUTICALS 



W. H. King Drug Company 
Ebenezer Church Road 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Telephone: 919-782-8400 

Bellamy Drug Company 
3808 Oleander Drive 
Wilmington, N. C. 
TeleDhone: 919-799-3320 



Peabody Drug Company 
Ebenezer Church Road 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Telephone: 919-782-8400 

O'Hanlon Watson Drug Company 
421 East on Service Road 
Yadkinville, N. C. 
Telephone: 919-463-5505 



>ne Carolina 



Journal of Pharmacy 



Volume LIV 



July 1974 



Number 7 




The Coca-Cola syrup dispensing unit pictured above was popular 75 years ago but today is 
a rare pharmaceutical antique. The unit shown is the property of the North Carolina Phar- 
maceutical Association and is on display in the lobby of the North Carolina Institute of 
Pharmacy, Chapel Hill. 

Pictured with the Coca-Cola unit is Pharmacist Guy O. Tripp of Wilmington, formerly asso- 
ciated with the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy as an inspector, now retired. Background 
to the picture is this: 

Mrs. Hoy Moose, recognizing the value of the Coca-Cola unit from a historical display 
standpoint, suggested it deserved en appropriate, protected area in the Institute lobby. Phar- 
macist Tripp took up the challenge and did this: 

Provided an appropriate display cabinet stand (pictured) and a glass case (not pictured) as 
a protective element, all with his compliments as a gift to the North Carolina Pharmaceu- 
tical Association. 

The syrup dispensing unit is identical to unit now appearing in one of Coca-Cola's TV com- 
mercials and may be seen at Coca-Cola's Atlanta headquarters. It is reported (unverified) 
the unit was at one time given free with purchase of five gallons of Coca-Cola syrup; now 
has a minimum price tag of $1000.00. 



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OTHER EXPENSES 

TOTAL EXPENSES 

TOTAL INVENTORY 

TOTAL MERCHAN- 
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NET PROFIT 



Should equal ONE average days sales 
Should equal FIVE average days sales 

Should equal TWO average days sales 
Should equal EIGHT average days sales 
Should equal FIFTY average days sales 

Should equal TWENTY average days sales 
Should equal TWO average days sales 





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In Our 77th Year of Service to the North Carolina Retail Druggists 



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f er\c 




July, 1974 

Vol. LIV No. 7 



Officers 

NORTH CAROLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 



President 

W. H. Wilson 
Raleigh 



Vice-Presidents 

L. M. Whaley 

Wallace 
Tom R. Burgiss 

Sparta 

E. W. Hackney 

Lumberton 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



CONTENTS THIS ISSUE 

Dr. Blaug Named Dean of the UNC School 

of Pharmacy ^ 

State Board of Pharmacy News 7 

Medicaid Rx Co-Pay Reduced to 50<? 8 

Tar Heel Digest 15 

80-Member N. C. Pharmacy Tour Group Visits Hawaii 16 
Marion Laboratories Expands its' Clinical 

PreRx Program ■*•« 

U. S. District Court Upholds Public Right 

to Select Pharmacist 19 

Drug Education Program Funded at UNC 

School of Pharmacy 21 

UNC Pharmacy School Notes 23 

Interpretations of the Skilled Nursing Facilities 

Standards for Certification and Participation 

in Medicare & Medicaid 24 

Pharmacist Reaction to Price Posting Publicity. 28 

Classified Advertising 32 

ADVERTISERS 

Colorcraft Corporation 7 

Eli Lilly and Company 2nd Cover 

Geer Drug Company Center Page Insert 

Gilpin, Henry B 9 

ICN Pharmaceuticals (King Associates) 4th Cover 

I. C. System, Inc. 32 

Justice Drug Company 1 

Kendall Drug Company .13 

Lozier Storage Shelving • 10-11 

Owens, Minor & Bodeker 3rd Cover 

Ramsey Manufacturing Corporation 

A. H. Robins Company 

E. N. Rowell Company 

Scott Drug Company 

Seeman Printery 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories 

Smith Wholesale Drug 

Washington National Insurance Co. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, in. u. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Second class 
postage paid at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



ROBBERY AT KERR DRUG 
THWARTED 

An alleged armed robber tangled with the 
wrong crowd at Kerr Drugs on May 16, 1974 
and was promptly apprehended by Golds- 
boro police after being disarmed by drug 
store employees, authorities reported. 

James Edward Humphrey, 29, of 420 
Dixie Trail, was charged with armed rob- 
bery and jailed under a $10,000 bond for 
trial May 22 in district court. 

According to police, the suspect, wearing 
a wig and disguised as a" hippie, ' ' entered 
the store around 8 p.m., walked around for 
a few minutes, then walked up to the phar- 
macy counter and pulled a gun on manager 
Bob Edwards. 

The gun was later identified as a .22 cal- 
iber blank pistol. 

Detectives said the suspect forced Ed- 
wards to give him about $64 in cash from 
a cash register and then ordered Edwards 
and another employee to go into a back room 
of the drug store. 

The two men refused and "a tussle" fol- 
lowed during which they managed to dis- 
arm the suspect, detectives reported. 

Meanwhile, an unidentified witness alerted 
patrolmen parked at Ball Park service sta- 
tion that a robbery was underway at the 
drug store. 

Police were as the scene moments later 
and took the suspect into custody. 

HENLEY IN LINE FOR SENATE 
PRESIDENT PRO TEM 

(From Baleigh News & Observer, June 11) 

Veteran State Sen. John T. Henley, 
D-Cumberland, is in line for election as 
president pro tern of the Senate in the 1975 
General Assembly. 

No opposition to Henley has surfaced. He 
has been actively seeking support from in- 
cumbent Democrats and those who have won 
the. Democratic nomination for Senate seats 
and has apparently gathered enough com- 
mitments to win. 

' ' Yes I have the commitments, ' ' said Hen- 
ley. "The boys have been very kind to me." 

Henley has served four terms in the House 
and four terms in the Senate. 



The position of president pro tern is filled 
by the majority party and, although the 
Bepublicans say they have a chance to take 
control of the Senate, it likely will stay with 
a Democratic majority. The president pro 
tern, then, is in effect the majority leader. 

BW PROMOTES PHARMACISTS 
HOLLAND & SEIGLER 

Effective July 1 Pharmacist David Hol- 
land and Pharmacist Lawrence Seigler were 
promoted to Assistant Department Heads 
in the Compressed Products Department of 
Burroughs Wellcome Company, Pharmaceu- 
tical Manufacturing Division, Greenville. 

CAROLINA COLOGNE 

Mrs. Connie Krochmal of Baleigh is the 
editor of an interesting book — Guide to 
Natural Cosmetics — which was compiled 
from various sources, including the assis- 
tance of Pharmacist R. I. Cromley, Jr. of 
Raleigh. 

The book contains 559 all-natural beauty 
aids recipes and is available from Quad- 
rangle/The New York Times, 10 East 53rd 
Street, New York, N. Y. 10022 at $8.95 per 
copy. 

MEMORIAL CONTRIBUTION 

Kendall Drug Company, Shelby, recently 
made a contribution to the TMA Founda- 
tion in memory of Mrs. J. P. Henderson. 

GUEST SPEAKER 

Pharmacist Seth Miller of Lexington was" 
a guest speaker at a recent district meeting 
of the North Carolina Nursing Home Asso- 
ciation and later (June 20) at the organiza- 
tion 's annual meeting in Myrtle Beach. 

HAROLD L. COX JOINS 
A. H. ROBINS 

Harold L. Cox has joined A. H. Robins 
Company as a medical service representa- 
tive. He has been assigned to the Asheville 
area. 

BREVITY 

The Lord's Prayer has 56 words. 
Lincoln's Gettysburg Address has 266. 
The Ten Commandments have 297. 
The Declaration of Independence has 300. 
But the government order setting the price 
of cabbage has 26,911 words. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



DR. SEYMOUR M. BLAUG NAMED DEAN OF THE 
UNC SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Dr. Seymour M. Blaug of the University 
of Iowa has been appointed Dean of the 
UNC School of Pharmacy and Professor of 
Pharmacy, effective Aug. 15. 

The appointment was made this morning 
by Chancellor Ferebee Taylor, after ap- 
proval by the UNC Board of Governors. 

Dr. Blaug succeeds Dr. George P. Hager, 
who will return to teaching and research 
after eight years in the administrative role. 

Dr. Blaug joined the University of Iowa 
faculty in 1955 and has been a Professor of 
Pharmaceutics there since 1962. 

A native of New York City, Dr. Blaug 
earned the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Co- 
lumbia University College of Pharmacy and 
the Ph.D. degree from the University of 
Iowa. 

Dr. Blaug is a research specialist in drug 
stability, dosage form development and 
evaluation, drug interactions, factors affect- 
ing absorption of drugs and pharmaceutical 
aerosols. He won the coveted Abbott Award 
in 1969 for his contribution to the scientific 
literature in the field of hospital pharmacy. 

A member of the Iowa Pharmacy Asso- 
ciation, Dr. Blaug has been a member of the 
House of Delegates for the past 10 years 
and was chairman of the House of Delegates 
in 1969. 

Other scholarly and professional orga- 
nizations of which Dr. Blaug is a member 
include the American Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation, Sigma Xi, Eho Chi, the Academy 
of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the New 
York Academy of Sciences. 

Among Dr. Blaug 's publications are 40 
articles written individually in professional 
journals and several chapters in the latest 
editions of "Remington's Pharmaceutical 
Sciences, " " Prescription Pharmacy ' ' and 
' ' American Pharmacy. ' ' He also holds a 
U.S. patent for a biologically-absorbable 
packing material. 

PRESIDENT WILSON ON THE GO 

NCPhA President Wilson of Raleigh is 
busy meeting his responsibilities as pres- 



ident of the N. C. Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. Note this schedule: 

June 4. Guest speaker at meeting of Wake 
County Pharmaceutical Association. Installed 
officers. 

June 8. Met with officers and committee 
members' of the Student Branch of the 
NCPhA, Chapel Hill. NCPhA Executive 
Committee member Michael Whitehead of 
Ramseur also present. 

June 12. Guest speaker at meeting in Wil- 
liamston of the Northeastern Carolina Phar- 
maceutical Society. 

June 17. In Chapel Hill to confer with 
NCPhA Secretary W. J. Smith regarding 
NCPhA programs and projects. 

June 29. Presiding officer at the Edwin R. 
Fuller (Pharmacist of the Year) dinner in 
Salisbury. 

Note : Local and sectional pharmacy or- 
ganizations interested in scheduling Pres- 
ident Wilson as a guest speaker, call him at 
(pharmacy) 919-832-4641 or (residence) 
919-787-5440. 




Dr. Seymour M. Blaug 




Here's your chance to stock up on Robitussin* Robitussin-DM™ 
and Robitussin-PE- at special low prices for greater sales and 
profits this fall and winter. The Robitussin family issf/7/ the leader in 
drug store sales. Last year it reached an all time high in share of market, 
gaining 15% while the cough preparation market was up only 8%. 
That's almost double the market growth! The Robitussins are also heavily 
prescribed. In spite of all this Rx volume, some 75% of all Robitussin and 
Robitussin-DM business is OTC. And don't overlook Robitussin-PE. It recorded a 
whopping 40% increase last year and is moving up fast in scripts and OTC sales. You 
know these products will move off your shelves, so give them the facings they have earned. 
Your Robins Representative will be around soon with all the details. 

Stock up on the No.1 sellers 

and put your facings where your profits are! 

AH Robins Company, Richmond. Va 23220 ^'H'POBINS 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Members — David D. Claytor, Greensboro; Harold V. Day, Spruce Pine; Jesse M. Pike, 
Concord; Jerry Price, Raleigh; W. H. Randall, Lillington; H. C. McAllister, 
Secy.-Treas., Box 471, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



NEW PHARMACIES 

(1) Revco Discount Drug Center, Inter. 
Germantown & Patterson Road, Winston- 
Salem 27105. Frank C. Spencer, Jr., phar- 
macist manager. 

(2) Hollingsworth Drug Company, Main 
Street, Rich Square 27869. J. Winston Hol- 
lingsworth, pharmacist manager. Successor 
to Bolton's Drug Company. 

RECIPROCITY 

Barbara Sue Potter from Iowa. 

NABP VOTES CE REQUIREMENTS 
SHOULD NOT BAR RECIPROCITY 

Delegates to the 1974 NABP convention 
voted that no pharmacist will be prevented 
from transferring his license from one state 
to another because he has not met the con- 
tinuing education requirement of the state 
into which he wants' to move. This policy 
was approved as an amendment to the 
NABP bylaws at the final business session 
of the convention, Wednesday morning, May 
8, in Atlanta, Georgia. 

The association also reendorsed continu- 
ing education as a requirement for relicen- 
sure in a resolution backing up the CE by- 
law amendment. In all, NABP passed seven 
resolutions at the final business session of 
the convention. 

NABP delegates voted to approve asso- 
ciation membership in the Federation of 
Associations of Health Regulatory Boards 
(FAHKB) and encourage all eligible or- 
ganizations to join FAHRB. In another 
resolution, delegates asked FAHRB to 
' ' study and make recommendations to the 
various states on how to proceed in the ed- 
ucation, training, and duties" of paramed- 
ical people. 

In one resolution, the association urged 
HEW to require the listing of manufactur- 
er's names for drug products on drug labels. 
In another, NABP proposed that HEW and 



the Drug Enforcement Administration de- 
velop a communication network to inform 
key people in all pharmacy organizations 
about changes' in the scheduling of controlled 
substances. 

Delegates also passed resolutions (1) en- 
couraging all states to use the Blue Ribbon 
Examination for Licensure, and (2) ap- 
proving activities of the association officers, 
executive committee, and staff since the 1973 
convention. 

Before the voting began, the Virginia 
State Board of Pharmacy withdrew its pro- 
posal to eliminate all reference to the time 
and length of internship requirements from 
the NABP bylaws. The Minnesota board 
withdrew its proposed resolution that states 
requiring CE for relicensure exchange pro- 
gram acceptance on a reciprocal basis. 



Remember the °Day 
...in c Hctures 



olorcraft 




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Film Processing Service 

There Is A Plant Located 
Near You 

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WILMINGTON 

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DURHAM 



If You Don't Know Photofinishing 
Know Your Photofinisher 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



labels. Cooperation in providing corrected 
labels is essentia] so that local pharmacies 
can be paid. 



MEDICAID RX CO-PAY 
REDUCED TO 50c 

Final regulations relating to co-payments 
in the Medicaid Program have been pub- 
lished. These regulations require changes' in 
the amount of some co-payments. 

Effective July 1, 1974, the co-payment for 
Medicaid prescriptions (Legend Drugs & 
Insulin) was reduced from $1.00 to 50^ per 
prescription. 

Other reductions: Physicians' Services re- 
duced from $2.00 per visit to $1.00 per visit; 
Hospital Outpatient reduced from $2.00 per 
visit to $1.00 per visit; Each pair of eye- 
glasses and repairs costing more than $5.00 
reduced from $3.00 per service to $2.00 per 
service ; Chiropractic Services reduced from 
$2.00 per visit to $1.00 per visit. 

County Directors of Social Services have 
been notified: 

PAID PRESCRIPTIONS continues to 
have problems with pharmacy claims con- 
taining county issued Medicaid labels with 
five digit account numbers, missing account 
numbers, transposed numbers, etc. As a re- 
sult, the claim cannot be processed and pay- 
ment to the pharmacy is delayed. 

To resolve this problem, pharmacy claims 
received on and after June 1, 1974, which 
contain inaccurate county issued Medicaid 
labels' will be returned to the pharmacy with 
instructions to work with county depart- 
ments of social services to provide corrected 

NORTH CAROLINA MEDICAID PHARMACY SERVICE PROGRAM 

Total 
$1,736,531 
1,634,712 
1,411,440 
1,467,371 
1,211,093 
1,241,041 
1,209,112 
1,405,335 
1,354,019 
1,178,354 
1,374,191 
1,310,188 

The above information represents payments by PAID PRESCRIPTIONS. For delivery 
of pharmacy service, go back two months; for billing, one month. Payment is made on the 
10th of each month. 



PAID PRESCRIPTIONS 
TWO HUNDRED 1973 PHARMACY 
CLAIM RETURNS OUTSTANDING 

December of 1973 was the first month that 
PAID Prescriptions returned a "Pharmacy 
Claim Return Statement" to pharmacies' 
(please review bulletin from PAID dated 
December 12, 1973). This program change 
allowed PAID to pay all correct claims while 
inquiring about missing or incorrect infor- 
mation on other claims. The claim in ques- 
tion is coded " F " on the pharmacy voucher 
sent with the monthly check and is carried 
forward on the check vouchers until the 
' ' Pharmacy Claim Return Statement ' ' is re- 
turned with the missing information. It is 
then processed and paid in your next check. 

After the Supplemental check run dated 
June 7, 1974, PAID notes that there are 
around two hundred 1973 statements (repre- 
senting almost 10% of the statements is- 
sued) that have not been returned to PAID 
Prescriptions for payment. These ' ' Phar- 
macy Claim Return Statements ' ' must be 
completed and returned promptly to prevent 
further delay in payment. 



Month 


Prescriptions 


July 1973 


334,070 


August 1973 


310,023 


September 1973 


264,130 


October 1973 


272,382 


November 1973 


270,028 


December 1973 


283,881 


January 1974 


270,589 


February 1974 


313,271 


March 1974 


301,779 


April 1974 


264,620 


May 1974 


308,655 


June 1974 


293,769 



WE SERVICE THE PEOPLE WITH 
NO ROOM FOR ERROR AND NO TIME TO WAIT. 



Every customer is demanding, but among the most 
demanding are hospital pharmacists— the folks with no room 
for error and no time 
to wait. ^"ss ^ 

With life and 
death on the line every 
hour of every day, 
we service and 
satisfy their needs. So . 
it stands to reason 
if we can satisfy 
their needs, we 
can do the same 
for your phar- 
macy. To meet 
these demands, 
we've imple- 
mented our 
DATAREX 1 
Service as 
continuous 
inventory control 
for day-by-day 
stocking of 
all essential 
requirements. 
And when emer 
gencies arise, we've 
made provisions for 
that, too. Needless to 
say, a service like this has 
caught on. 

Today more and mdre hospitals are turning 
But we understand there's (no room for error 
and no time to wait in your pharmacy either. 

GILPIN 

com rvuvry 

Wholesale druggists since 1845. 




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12 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



WAKE COUNTY 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

Reported by Patricia Bumgarner, Secretary 
The Wake County Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation met on June 4, 1974 at Ballentines 
Restaurant. There were 32 members' and 
guests present for the dinner meeting. 

President Jerry Johnson called the meet- 
ing to order. Treasurer Roger Crane re- 
ported that the association has $334.91 in 
its checking account and $478.65 in savings. 
He announced that membership dues for 
1974-75 are now due. 

President Johnson then introduced Bill 
Wilson, President of the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association. Mr. Wilson 
spoke to us concerning our role in working 
with the UNC School of Pharmacy, its new 
Dean, and the leaders in continuing educa- 
tion. Mr. Wilson then conducted the instal- 
lation of officers for 1974-75. They are as 
follows : 

President Elect 
Joe Edwards 

Vice President 
Roger Crane 

Secretary 

Patricia Bumgarner 

Treasurer 
George Morgan 

Exec. Comm. Mor. 
Joe Rowe 

Mr. Wilson then presented the Pharmacist 
of the Year Award to Jerry Johnson. The 
presidential gavel was turned over to Don 
Carter who presented Jerry Johnson with a 
plaque in appreciation of his service to the 
association. 

President Carter announced the following 
committee appointments : 

Membership 

Joe Edwards, Chairman 

George Morgan 

Jay Salem 

Bill Perry 

Public Relations 
Joe Rowe, Chairman 



Bill Bradley 
Elaine Watson 

Entertainment 
Cindy Shinn, Chairman 
Bob Cromley, Jr. 
Larry Bullock 

Program 

Members of Executive 
Committee 

Professional Relations 
Jerry Johnson, Chairman 
Benny Rideout 
Forrest Matthews 
Al Clay 

Nominations 

Roger Crane, Chairman 

John White 

John Brown 

Telephone 

Kathy Edwards, Chairman 

Prances Morisey 

Larry Warren 

President Carter then called for new busi- 
ness. Benny Rideout called to our attention 
that effective July 1, co-payment of prescrip- 
tions by welfare recipients would be de- 
creased to 50^. He asked us to be alert to 
the fact that an account number must be an 
eight digit number to be a valid number. 
Joe Edwards announced a preceptor — intern/ 
extern dinner to be held June 18, and asked 
all who could to come. 

Jerry Johnson called to our attention a 
newspaper clipping involving the injury of 
a child after purchasing chemicals from a 
pharmacy and making a homemade bomb. 



PHARMACIST OF THE YEAR 

Details of the Edwin R. Fuller ' ' Pharma- 
cist of the Year" dinner in Salisbury on 
June 29 will appear in the August issue of 
The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. 

The dinner was attended by 120 pharma- 
cists, their wives, members of the Fuller 
family, associates, friends and guests. A 
meeting of the NCPhA Executive Committee 
preceded the dinner. Picture coverage was 
provided by Colorcraft. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



13 



NORTHEASTERN CAROLINA 
PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

Keported by Joe Minton 

The Northeastern Carolina Pharmaceuti- 
cal Society held its regular meeting at the 
Roanoke Country Club in Williamston, North 
Carolina on June 12, 1974. President John 
Mitchener, III called the meeting to order 
and introduced the guest speaker, Bill Wil- 
son, President of the North Carolina Phar- 
maceutical Association. 

President Wilson 's program was on con- 
tinuing education and he stated that the 
NCPhA was on record supporting some type 
of program in N. C. He said only one of 
every four pharmacists in North Carolina 
was presently taking advantage of the vol- 
untary programs being offered. President 
Wilson went on to say that fourteen states 
already have a mandatory program for re- 
licensure. 

A motion was made and passed to furnish 
the refreshments for an area preceptor-in- 
tern meeting. 

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY 

H. C. McAllister, Secretary-Treasurer of 
the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy, was 
guest speaker at a recent meeting of the 
Rockingham County Society of Pharmacists. 

Mr. McAllister emphasized the Board's 
active role in helping pharmacists better 
serve North Carolina. 



IREDELL PHARMACEUTICAL 

Reported by Lynn Waugh, Jr. 

The Iredell Pharmaceutical Association 
met May 29 at The Holiday Inn, Statesville, 
for its' quarterly assembly of members. 

The guest speaker was Horace Hord of 
Pfizer Laboratories, who presented a film 
and hosted the members at a breakfast. 

A brief business session concluded the 
meeting. 

COMMENDATION FOR 
PHARMACIST LOWDERMILK 

For setting up and supervising a series 
of hypertension screening clinics at the Uni- 
versity Mall, Chapel Hill, Pharmacist Ed- 
ward L. Lowdermilk was awarded the North 
Carolina Heart Association 'g State Founders 
Award for Volunteers. The presentation took 
place at the Heart Association's annual 
meeting in Winston-Salem. 

Eight clinics were conducted from a booth 
set up in the Mall during Heart Month. Of 
the approximate 1000 persons screened, 
about one-third were found to have an ele- 
vated pressure. 

Volunteers assisting Pharmacist Lowder- 
milk came from the University's schools of 
pharmacy, medicine and nursing. 

Pharmacists interested in setting up a 
similar-type program may secure additional 
information by calling Mr. Lowdermilk at 
the Chapel Hill Pharmaceutical Center — 
919-967-2207. 



OFFICERS OF THE IREDELL PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

1973-1974 

President: Larry N. Marlin, 642 E. Broad Street, Statesville 28677 
First Vice President : Judy Webb, Statesville 28677 

Second Vice President: J. L. Patterson, 510 E. Broad St., Statesville 28677 
Secy-Treasurer: H. Lynn Waugh, Jr., 507 Red Fox Trail, Statesville 28677 



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The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



15 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 

SMITHFIELD— Mrs. J. Marshall Sasser has 
been appointed 1974 membership campaign 
chairman for the Johnston County Mental 
Health Association. 

WADESBORO— Tollison 's Pharmacy spon- 
sored a contest for local amateur photogra- 
phers during June, July and August. 
WINSTON-SALEM— Crown Drug opened 
its 8th store in a new 7,500 square foot 
building at the Wakertown Shopping Cen- 
ter in late May. Jim Cass, who has been 
assistant manager of the Crown Drug Store 
at Yadkinville, has been named manager of 
the new operation. 

ZEBULON — A mother's day ad prepared 
by Pharmacist John Malone for the Zeoulon 
Record has been selected to appear in the 
national publication, Publisher 's Ideas Ex- 
change. 

CONCORD— In recognition of filling its two 
millionth prescription, Pfizer Laboratories' 
presented a plaque to Pike 's drug stores at 
a mid-May ceremony in Concord. 
SILER CITY— Willis Whitehead has been 
elected president of the Siler City Chamber 
of Commerce for 1974-75. 
NORTH WILKESBORO — Gene Deacon, 
president of Blue Ridge Craft Distributors, 
has sold his interest in the Blue Ridge Phar- 
macy to Pharmacist LaMar Creasman. 
YANCEYVILLE— Yancey ville Drug Com- 
pany will occupy a new and larger building 
later this summer. The drug firm, established 
by the late Tom Ham, now owned by the 
Davis Brothers, Tommy and Joe, will be 
located across the street from the present 
Yanceyville Drug Company. 



For eighty- nine years 
. . . . since 1885 



seemcin 

OF DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long 
association with North Car- 
olina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its fifty- 
fourth volume, and the first 
printed copy was "Seeman 
Printed." 




A DIVISION OF 
FISHER-HARRISON CORP. 



16 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 




Hawaii Visitor/Pharmacist Phil Link of Reidsville is pictured on stage at the Hawaiian Hut, 
Honolulu, with one of the hula entertainers. Link, a member of an 80 member North Car- 
olina Pharmacy tour group, spent a week in the colorful islands in June and were impressed 
with the native's fascinating cultures, the flowers and fruit, their handicrafts, exciting songs 
and ancient chants. If interested, there is a nearby tour member who will be honored to 
share his or her experiences with you. 




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CHARLESTON, S. C.-JULY 28, 29, 30 
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AGED TRIAL BALANCE 



CONSUMER 
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■„ _.„«. DATE OF AMOUNT OF 
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DATA PROCESSING COMPANY 

A DIVISION OF 

THE GEER DRUG COMPANY 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 



MARION LABORATORIES 

PHARMACEUTICAL DIVISION 

EXPANDS ITS CLINICAL PRE Rx® 

PROGRAM; ENDS ALL 
UNSOLICITED DRUG SAMPLING 

Marion Laboratories Pharmaceutical Di- 
vision has announced that its highly suc- 
cessful PRE Rx® Program will be expanded 
to cover all oral prescription drugs marketed 
by the company. Simultaneously, all unsolic- 
ited sampling of prescription products will 
l>c discontinued. 

Although the Pharmaceutical Division has 
been a modest distributor of physician sam- 
ples in the past, its primary marketing aim 
will be to extend the PRE Rx concept. The 
PRE Rx, an original program developed by 
the company 13 years ago, is designed to 
provide multiple benefits to the physician, 
patient and pharmacist. 

The program works in the following man- 
ner: 

1 ) Physicians are given prescription forms 
without any preprinted product on the 
blank. The doctor is briefed on using 
the Rx form for patients in whom a 
small amount of medication is" indicated 
for a limited number of days as a trial 
clinical supply. This occurs before a 
larger treatment course of a chronic 
disease is initiated. Frequently a doctor 
prefers a limited preclinical supply to 
observe patient acceptance, response 
end-points, et cetera. The patient is not 
charged for this preclinical treatment 
prescription by the cooperating phar- 
macist who honors and dispenses PRE 
Rx® medication. 

2) Patients tako the PRE Rx to a phar- 
macy of choice, who when honoring 
this pretreatment course prescription 
dispenses the limited medicine and re- 
turns" the business reply card form at- 
tached to the PRE Rx to the company 
for reimbursement. No charge is made 
to the patient because the pharmacist 
is reimbursed for his services by the 
company. Should the doctor indicate 
refills will be necessary, the patient is 
then charged for any subsequent refills 
of medicine. 



Initially the PRE Rx was introduced be- 
cause it was a more professional format in 
marketing prescription medication. Only six 
products were authorized for PRE Rx pro- 
gramming. Beginning in September the pro- 
gram will be expanded to cover approx- 
imately 15 oral prescription medication. Fur- 
thermore to improve upon the PRE Rx to 
meet the new needs' of the medical commu- 
nity, the following innovative additions are 
now being planned: 

• An increase in the pharmacist's product 
replacement, which increases the re- 
imbursement to equal approximately 
$2.70. The major product, PAVABID®, 
will be used in all reimbursements over 
and above the replacement of the med- 
ication dispensed in the PRE Rx. 

• Adopt a more universal PRE Rx® Plan 
to be called "Patient PRE Rx." This, 
upon successful premarketing approval 
by doctors, will allow physicians to use 
their prescription blanks to institute Pa- 
tient PRE Rx. Maintaining physician 
identity with the patient is an impor- 
tant benefit. 

• Of course no charge to the patient will 
remain a key attribute of the Patient 
PRE Rx. 

By expanding PRE Rx to cover all Marion 
Laboratories prescription ORAL medica- 
tions, the company realizes the medical 
communities ' increasing responsibility to 
maintain legitimate drug distribution and 
national accountability for prescription 
medicines. As this expanded PRE Rx plan 
rolls out, the monies used for traditional 
sampling of prescriptions will be reallo- 
cated in a program for indigent patients 
selected by physicians for a larger supply of 
medicine. Already instituted by the company 
years ago on several products, the indigent 
program has now increased in use to the 
place, the company predicts, where it will 
become second to the universal PRE Rx plan 
previously discussed. 

A company spokesman said, ' ' The an- 
nouncement of these important policy 
changes reflects Marion Laboratories' in- 
volvement in perceiving, thinking-through 
and decisively acting on issues in medicine 
that have economic, social and consumer 
impact." 



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sult your Smith Representative about our Associated Druggist Pro- 
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newspaper advertising — buying advantages — clerk training pro- 
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Just three of the many SMITH services 

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H»llMHIlllli>Ml.llll!B»lTWrFl 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



19 



U.S. DISTRICT COURT UPHOLDS 

PUBLIC RIGHT TO SELECT 

PHARMACIST 

The decision of United States District 
Court Judge John H. Pratt in the meth- 
adone case vindicates the position of APhA 
that the Food and Drug Administration may 
not deprive physicians and patients access 
to the drug methadone through the duly li- 
censed pharmacist and pharmacy of their 
choice when that drug is prescribed for re- 
lief of severe pain. Methadone is frequently 
prescribed for such purposes in cases in- 
volving terminal cancer and other intrac- 
table conditions. The Court invalidated an 
FDA regulation having the effect of requir- 
ing patients to obtain the prescribed meth- 
adone from hospitals willing to dispense the 
drug to outpatients. 

The suit initiated by APhA, three prac- 
ticing pharmacists and a physician in no 
way challenged Food and Drug Administra- 
tion regulations governing the prescribing 
and dispensing of methadone in the treat- 
ment of heroin addicts. These regulations 
are clearly within the statutory authority 
granted by Congress to the Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare and its del- 
egate agency, the Food and Drug Adminis- 
tration. Judge Pratt's decision has in no 
way affected these safeguards' on addict 
treatment programs. APhA has consistently 
supported the necessity of adequate con- 
trols on narcotic addiction treatment pro- 
grams which, unlike community pharmacies, 
have often been implicated as a primary 
source of diversion of methadone to illicit 
use. 

In commenting on Judge Pratt 's decision, 
Dr. William S. Apple, APhA Executive Di- 
rector, stated: "The Court's decision pro- 
vides judicial recognition of the national 
policy established by Congress that commu- 
nity pharmacists are to be fully available 
in meeting public health care needs. This 
means that every pharmacist is legally en- 
titled to dispense any drug legally avail- 
able for medical purposes. The FDA has 
never come forward with any factual sup- 
port for its contention that methadone 
should be segregated from the thousands of 
other narcotic, stimulant and depressant 



drugs for which community pharmacists have 
been assigned control responsibility and au- 
thority by Congress and every state legis- 
lature. There never has been any evidence 
that community pharmacies have been re- 
sponsible for any methadone diversion prob- 
lem. To the contrary, the Drug Enforcement 
Administration, which is the agency em- 
powered by Congress to control drug dis- 
tribution, has publicly commended the role 
played by pharmacists in their professional 
efforts to curb drug abuse. ' ' 

Dr. Apple commented further: "APhA 
will continue to safeguard the right of phar- 
macists to practice their profession and to 
exercise the responsibilities for which they 
are educated and licensed. It is our goal to 
protect the continued availability to the 
public of the broadest range of pharmaceu- 
tical service the profession of pharmacy is 
able to offer." 



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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 



'KEY FACTS' PAMPHLET 

CAPSULATES PHARMACEUTICAL 

INDUSTRY 

A new edition of "KEY FACTS— About 
tin- U.S. Prescription Drug Industry," cur- 
rently being distributed by the Pharmaceu- 
tical Manufacturers Association (PMA), 
describes in capsule form many facets of 
the discovery, manufacture, marketing and 
purchasing of prescription medicines. 

The 1974 "Key Facts," replacing pre- 
vious PMA booklets of the same title, con- 
denses into 12 colorful pages some basic in- 
formation about the structure of the phar- 
maceutical industry and its social and eco- 
nomic implications for the consumer. In- 
dustry statistics compiled through Decem- 
ber 1973, in addition to recent data from 
the Departments of Health, Education, and 
Welfare, Labor, and Commerce and other 
sources, are consolidated in this handy ref- 
erence. 

Some of the factbook findings: 

• The average prescription in 1973 cost 
the consumer $4.32, and only one-fourth of 
all prescriptions cost 65 or more. 

• The same amount of medicine costs 2 
percent less today than it did 10 years ago. 

• Since the discovery of the first tran- 
quilizers in 1955, the number of hospitalized 
mental patients has declined 51 percent and 
the average term of hospitalization is down 
from 33 months to less than a year. 

• The tuberculosis patient's average hos- 
pital stay has decreased from 461 days in 
1950 to 78 days in 1973. 

• For every drug product that becomes 
available to the consumer, 8,000 compounds 
are studied and discarded. 

• A single batch of medicine may under- 
go as many as 1,000 quality control checks 
before it is released by the manufacturer. 

• More than $800 million annually is 
spent in drug research and development by 
pharmaceutical firms. 

• The pharmaceutical industry, the most 
research-intensive of all U.S. industries, 
spends five times' as much of its sales in- 
come on research as does American industry 
overall. 

The new "Key Facts" is being distrib- 
uted extensively by PMA to educators, med- 
ical journalists, pharmaceutical industry 



personnel, consumer groups, physicians, 
pharmacists, nurses and other health care 
professionals. 

Copies are available in quantity at cost — 
$8 per hundred, from: Public Relations Di- 
vision, Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation, 1155 15th St., N.W., Washington, 
D.C. 20005. Single copies will be sent free 
upon request. 

DEANS ACCEPTS POSITION AT 

DUKE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL 

CENTER 

William P. Deans has accepted a position 
at the Duke University Medical Center as a 
Pharmacy Supervisor on the Cushing Satel- 
lite Pharmacy. 

The position will consist of coordinating 
the combined activities of both clinical and 
distribution pharmacy on a 175 bed general 
surgery wing at the Duke University fa- 
cility. 

For the past year, Mr. Deans has been a 
pharmacy resident in Chapel Hill at the 
North Carolina Memorial Hospital. He is 
a graduate of MCV, Richmond, Virginia, 
and prior to moving to Chapel Hill, was as- 
sociated with the Terminal Drug Store of 
Wilson. 

DRUG EDUCATION PROGRAM 

FUNDED AT SCHOOL OF 

PHARMACY 

The North Carolina Drug Authority has 
announced the award of $27,521 to the Drug 
Education Program at the School of Phar- 
macy. The award will be used to continue 
and enlarge the interdisciplinary student 
training project at the University, formerly 
sponsored through Project SPEED (Student 
Professionals Engaged in Education on 
Drugs) in Washington, D. C. The funds 
will be used also to expand the capabilities 
of the program in consultant work regard- 
ing drug education throughout the state. 

The Program at the School is currently in 
its sixth year of operation and has been a 
pioneer in drug education in North Car- 
olina. Its various programs have been in- 
volved with students and teachers through- 
out the state. The program director is Leon- 
ard Berlow and the Associate Director is 
Steve Moore. 



DRUG STORE SHOPPERS ARE 
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3 out of 10 impulse purchases are inspired by 

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MANUFACTURING CORPORATION 

513 East Trade Street 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Telephone 704-334-3457 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



23 



III Pharmacy School Sotes 



UNC SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
RECEIVES $386,228 GRANT 

The UNC School of Pharmacy has been 
awarded a federal capitation grant of 
$386,228 by the Health Resources Adminis- 
tration of the Department of Health Educa- 
tion and Welfare. 

The grant announcement was made this 
morning from the office of Congressman 
L. H. Fountain. According to a spokesman 
for Fountain, the grant is based on the 
number of enrolled students and is 1 in sup- 
port of school improvements including cur- 
riculum development, the training of phar- 
macy students for new roles and levels of 
service, clinical pharmacy programs, drug 
abuse education and related programs. 

According to Dr. George P. Hager, dean 
of the Pharmacy School, federal support is 
necessary to ensure continuation and de- 
velopment of pharmaceutical education. 

"Last year," Dr. Hager pointed out, 
' ' schools of pharmacy were denied the full 
amount of these federal grants by the ad- 
ministration 's impoundment of funds for a 
period of time. 

' ' This situation was eased after legal ac- 
tion, in behalf of all pharmacy schools, 
which made the distribution of funds man- 
datory. ' ' 

The $386,228 figure is slightly higher than 
last year's award and marks the fourth suc- 
cessive year that the school has received a 
federal capitation grant. 



DEAN HAGER 



Dr. George P. Hager, who retired as Dean 
of the UNC School of Pharmacy on June 30, 
will vacation in Minnesota during July and 
early August. 

Dr. Hager and family will return to 
Chapel Hill in August to set up his new 
office in the School of Pharmacy. Then, dur- 



ing the next twelve months, he will be busy 
with in and out of the state commitments. 

It is anticipated the newly appointed 
Dean, Dr. Seymore M. Blaug, will arrive in 
Chapel Hill by August 15. See news item 
this issue of The Journal. 



1974 REGIONAL PHARMACY 

PRECEPTOR-EXTERN/INTERN 

MEETINGS COMPLETED 

A series of regional pharmacy preceptor- 
extern/intern meetings under sponsorship of 
the North Carolina Pharmacy Tripartite 
Committee were completed in early July. 

The meetings were held in Ealeigh, States 
ville, Charlotte, Asheville, Fayetteville 
Greensboro and Greenville with the follow 
ing speakers: C. U. Paoloni, Steven Caiola 
Jerry Price, Jesse Pike, Sr., Harold Day 
Bill Randall, David Claytor and Bill Adams 

Local program coordinators were Joe Ed- 
wards in Raleigh, Lyle Davis in Statesville, 
Wayne Rinehart in Charlotte, Moss Salley 
in Asheville, James Hickmon in Fayette- 
ville, Tom Owens in Greensboro and J. B. 
Stallings in Greenville. 

Objectives of the program, as announced 
by Chairman Paoloni of the Tripartite Com- 
mittee were to 

(1) familiarize you with changes in the 
practical experience requirements for 
North Carolina licensure. 

(2) present information regarding changes 
in School of Pharmacy curriculum in- 
fluencing practical experience. 

(3) inform attendees of the Area Health 
Education Centers concept in North 
Carolina and its function to improve the 
delivery of pharmacy service through 
education. 

(4) gain constructive opinions and sugges- 
tions for improving practical experi- 
ence, coursework and training from 
pharmacy practitioners — preceptors — 
and students. 



24 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



INTERPRETATIONS OF THE SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES 

STANDARDS FOR CERTIFICATION AND PARTICIPATION 

IN MEDICARE AND MEDICAID PROGRAMS 

By J. W. (Bill) Bradley, III, Pharmacy Consultant 

Division of Facility Services, Department of Human Besources 

P. 0. Box 12200, Ealeigh, N. C. 27605 (919) 829-7461 



As an introduction, I would like to say 
that the Division of Facility Service's main 
objective is to affect optimal patient care. 
My position with the Division of Facility 
Services is primarily to ascertain the quality 
of pharmacy services being provided in 
health care institutions or facilities through- 
out North Carolina. Also the Division of 
Facility Services has two definite objectives; 
first, to survey for Medicare-Medicaid cer- 
tification and survey for North Carolina li- 
censure requirements. A second function is 
consultation or to offer advice in preventing 
or affecting a cure for facility problems. 

In the three months that I have been with 
the Division, I have tried to develop a phar- 
macist to pharmacist rapport on an individ- 
ual basis as well as" on an institutional level. 
I have tried to become aware of the level of 
pharmacy services being provided in health 
care facilities throughout North Carolina. 
Also with the help of various professionals, 
namely the Board of Pharmacy, the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, and 
the extraordinary assistance from the School 
of Pharmacy, I have been given an overview 
of what pharmacy in North Carolina was, 
what it is, what it should be, and what it 
may be. Therefore I have discovered who I 
can recommend for advice and assistance if 
requested from facilities within North Car- 
olina. We have offered our division 's Ser- 
vices on an informal basis and will be more 
than willing to consult with professionals 
in alleviating difficulties, especially before 
fheir facilities are surveyed and deficiencies 
documented. 

These standards as published in the Jan- 
uary 17, 1974 Federal Begister w^re effec- 
tive February 19, 1974. First of all, phar- 
maceutical services entail more than the de- 
livery of prescriptions to a facility. The 
pharmacist should be directly involved in 
the entire drug picture from the inception of 
the physicians' drug order to the drugs ad- 
ministration to the patient and thus a vital 



member of the patient care team. The phar- 
macist should be concerned with all the fa- 
cets related to pharmacy services. In other 
words, the pharmacist should be an active 
staff member and be adequately compensated 
for his time. The pharmacist should develop 
better corelationships between other profes- 
sions in the facility not only in nursing and 
physicians services but in other drug related 
fields. He could create an institutional re- 
educational program, and should be directly 
involved in drug accountability in the utili- 
zation of pharmaceuticals. It is imperative 
that the pharmacist set up a patient profile 
system so that he may review the patient's 
entire drug therapy. The pharmacist being 
a member of the skilled nursing facility 's 
staff, should develop policies and procedures 
to be implemented throughout the facility, 
such as an adequate stop order policy, a 
proper emergency drug kit and emergency 




J. W. Bradley, III 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 



prescription services. Also, he would be re- 
sponsible for the control and accountability 
of all pharmaceuticals, especially controlled 
substances. 

In other words, the whole concept of a 
consulting pharmacist is erroneous. A con- 
sultant usually stands outside and views 
problems. Then he makes suggestions in how 
these problems can be solved, but is not in- 
volved in doing such. In these new federal 
standards you will find the word consultant 
is not used. The pharmacist should be a 
qualified staff member of the facility and his 
authority Should be defined. This is neces- 
sary if quality pharmaceutical services are 
going to be provided. The staff pharmacist 
does not necessarily have to be the same 
pharmacist that provides drugs for the facil- 
ity. The facility should have an agreement 
with both the pharmacist provider and the 
pharmacist they considered a staff pharma- 
cist and their responsibilities designated. 
Titles are insignificant, but the concept of 
the pharmacist as a department head in the 
facility is much more important. Drug activ- 
ities that primarily involve nursing services 
have been separated from pharmacy services 
and placed in the nursing regulations, name- 
ly these are drug administration, conform- 
ance with physicians orders, and storage of 
drugs and biologicals. The pharmaceutical 
standards and nursing services standards 
are cross referenced. Because these func- 
tions are carried out in the nursing service 
unit, do not let this relocation construe that 
the pharmacist does not have a responsibility 
in the administration of drugs. With the 
relocation of these standards you will see a 
better working relationship between the 
pharmacist, the nurse, and the physician. 

In the definition of pharmaceutical ser- 
vices you will see that the faciUty is respon- 
sible for providing drugs and biologicals for 
its patients in so far as they are covered 
under the Medicare and Medicaid programs 
and for insuring that pharmaceutical ser- 
vices are provided in accordance with ac- 
cepted professional principles and appro- 
priate federal and state laws. The pharma- 
cist is responsible to the administrator of 
the facility. When the pharmaceutical ser- 
vices are not in compliance, the administra- 
tor is responsible, consequently it would be 



to the pharmacist 's advantage to have an 
up-to-date pharmacy agreement with the fa- 
cility specifying his responsibilities to the 
facility and the administrator 's responsi- 
bilities to the pharmacist. 

Standard A, Supervision of Services, spec- 
ifies that the pharmacist review the drug 
regimen of each patient at least monthly. 
This is very important to the facility be- 
cause it can provide a method to prevent 
medication error, medication duplication, to 
reduce drug interaction, and most impor- 
tantly to prevent over and under utilization 
of pharmaceuticals. Definitions are provided 
in the federal standards. Some of these def- 
initions that are pertinent are: approved 
drugs and biologicals, drug administration 
and drug dispensing, and a definition of a 
pharmacist. It is definitely specified that 
the pharmacist is licensed as a pharmacist 
in the state in which be is practicing. Con- 
sequently, out of state pharmacists not li- 
censed in North Carolina cannot legally pro- 
vide pharmaceutical services or fill prescrip- 
tions for patients in North Carolina skilled 
nursing facilities. 

Also the pharmacist should have had 
training or experience in the specialized 
functions of institutional pharmacy. The 
pharmacist may possibly have a residency 
in hospital pharmacy, could have attended 
seminars concerning institutional pharmacy 
or could have self training through home- 
study plans. In the governing body and man- 
agement standards, it is stipulated that if 
the facility does not employ a qualified pro- 
fessional person to render a specific service 
such as pharmacy, that the facility have ar- 
rangements for such a service through a 
written agreement with an outside resource. 
In the pharmacy standards, it specifies that 
there should be quarterly reports written 
by the pharmacist. This quarterly report 
which should include staff performance has 
to be presented to the pharmaceutical ser- 
vices committee. These quarterly reports 
should be an analysis of the total pharma- 
ceutical services provided, and if there are 
improvements to be made, these recommen- 
dations should be included in the reports. 
This committee oversees pharmaceutical ser- 
vices in the facility and is the instrument 
(Continued on Page 26) 



26 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



for improvements. This committee also meets 
quarterly and documents its" activities, find- 
ings, and recommendations. Consequently, 
the staff pharmacist's quarterly report 
could be coordinated with the pharmaceu- 
tical services committee's quarterly report. 

Standard B — Control and Accountability. 
This standard specifies that the pharmacist 
has established policies and procedures for 
the control and accountability of all drugs 
and biologicals throughout the facility and 
that the pharmacist is responsible for ap- 
plying them. Also, it specifies that only ap- 
proved drugs and biologicals are used in the 
facility and are dispensed in compliance 
with federal and state laws. It is" essential 
that the pharmacist review all pharmacy 
laws and keep up to date with all changes. 

The staff pharmacist should establish pol- 
icies and procedures via the pharmaceutical 
services committee that prevent drug usage 
and distribution outside of controlled chan- 
nels". These policies and procedures should 
provide for an accounting of the receipt and 
disposition of all pharmaceuticals with a 
definite emphasis on drugs subject to the 
Comprehensive Drug Abuse and Control Act 
of 1970. In the policies and procedures out- 
lined by the pharmaceutical services com- 
mittee, there should definitely be an inclu- 
sion of standing order procedures from each 
physician concerning over-the-counter drugs 
such as aspirin, acetaminophen, milk of mag- 
nesia, mineral oil, etc. The pharmacist must 
determine if records are being kept up-to- 
date and whether the number of drugs being 
received correspond to the number of drugs 
being administered and the number remain- 
ing. The pharmacist should report his find- 
ings in his quarterly reports and include 
any suggestions for change. If there are 
any immediate problems, he should report 
them to the administrator and the director 
of nursing so that corrections can be started. 
Since it has been suggested that the phar- 
macist use individual patient profiles for the 
complete drug utilization picture, it would 
be a simple procedure for the pharmacist to 
balance the number of drugs dispensed with 
the number of drugs being administered. 
The administration factor would be exem- 
plified in the medication record used in the 
facility. Therefore, the pharmacist's hours 



on duty must equal the hours that the med- 
ication room is operational. The pharmaceu- 
tical services committee should definitely es- 
tablish who has access to the keys for the 
medication room in a facility and who is 
responsible for them. 

If possible the pharmacist should try to 
dispense from the physicians original drug 
order or from a direct copy thereof to elim- 
inate error. The physician should try to di- 
rectly communicate with the pharmacist 
concerning drug therapy changes or addi- 
tions. 

Standard C — Labeling of Drugs and Bio- 
logicals. Since there are several distinct 
methods of drug distribution in skilled 
nursing facilities, each with its own charac- 
teristics, there should be clear definitions of 
labeling requirements for each method. The 
label on each patient's individual prescrip- 
tion should contain the patient's full name, 
the name and address of the pharmacy, 
name of the physician, the date of issuance 
(being the last date that the prescription 
was issued or refilled), the administration 
directions clearly spelled out, the name, 
strength, and quantity of the drug being 
dispensed, and the name of the pharmacist 
dispensing the drug. The expiration date of 
the drug should be included when necessary 
as 1 well as cautionary statements and appro- 
priate accessory labels. The labeling of drugs 
and biologicals is based on current state, 
federal, and local regulations. The label of 
each single unit dose package should con- 
tain the name and strength of the drug, the 
lot or control number and should be def- 
initely identified with each specific patient 
as to the patients full name and prescribing 
physician's name. The criteria for the unit 
dose labeling requirement means that the 
name of the patient and physician does not 
have to be on the label of the unit dose con- 
tainer but the name of the patient and the 
physician must be identified with the unit 
dose package in such a manner as to pos- 
itively insure that drugs will be adminis- 
tered to the right patient. The pharmacy 
services committee should establish a cri- 
teria for the labeling and storage of over- 
the-counter drugs. 

Standard D — Pharmaceutical Services 
Committee. This committee is comprised of 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



27 



at least the pharmacist, the director of nurs- 
ing, the administrator and at least one phy- 
sician. With the increasingly broad spectrum 
of pharmacy services in institutions, it is 
important that this committee monitor and 
develop sound policies of drug distribution, 
control, and usage. It is clearly established 
in this standard that the pharmaceutical 
services committee should determine the con- 
tents of the emergency drug kit (which 
should be in compliance with state and fed- 
eral regulations), develop an approved 
method for ordering medications in the fa- 
cility, receive and act on the pharmacist's 
written report and establish stop-order pol- 
icies to assure proper drug utilization. The 
difference between a policy and a procedure 
is that a policy is" the authoritative decision 
as to HOW a particular activity is accom- 
plished or a situation is dealt with. The 
procedure is the method IN WHICH that 
policy is carried out. The pharmaceutical 
services committee is not expected to develop 
a formulary but there is no reason to pre- 
clude this committee from doing so. 

The Nursing standards' require that drug 
utilization be checked against physicians 
orders. This is necessary to prevent misuse 
of discontinued medication or to prevent 
the administration of a drug whose direc- 
tions have been changed. The medication 
record, which is part of the medical record, 
should include at least : the patient 's full 
name, the physician's name, name of the 
drug, strength, frequency of dosage, route 
of administration, the time that the drug 
was administered and the initials of the 
person who administered the drug. The med- 
ication record is necessary to provide, in 
the facility, an over-all record of patient 
drug therapy. It can also act as a record of 
receipt and disposition of drugs'. The phar- 
macist should observe whether this is being 
accomplished. 

Nursing standards also prohibit prepour- 
ing of medication or that the person who 
prepares the medication for administration 
should also perform the drug administra- 
tion act. Administration of medication is a 
nursing function, but the pharmacist should 
establish a working professional relation- 
ship with nursing personnel. 



DEATHS 
Joseph Lazarus 

Joseph Lazarus, age 67, Sanford pharma- 
cist, died June 24 in the Lee County Hos- 
pital after a short illness. 

A graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy, 1925, Mr. Lazarus was owner/man- 
ager of the Lee Drug Store, Sanford, for 
nearly 50 years. 

Survivors' include his wife, Virginia Moss 
Formy-Duval Thomas Lazarus; two sons, 
Dr. Michael Lazarus of Boston and Phar- 
macist Larry Lazarus of Sanford; a step- 
daughter and a sister and eight grandchil- 
dren. 



Donna Marie Dingier 

Donna Marie Dingier, 14-year-old daughter 
of Ken Dingier (Suttle's Drug, Shelby) was 
killed in a fall from a pickup truck about 
9:30 on the evening of Saturday, June 1. 
She died on the way to Charlotte Memorial 
Hospital at about 10:20. Donna, a rising 
9th grader at Shelby Junior High is sur- 
vived by her father and mother (the former 
Margaret Austin of Statesville), sisters 
Julia (16) and Barbara (12) of the home, 
and half-sister Mrs. Janice Dingier Arnold 
of Coleta, California and half-brother, Ken- 
neth L. Dingier, Jr. of Phoenix, Arizona. 
Burial was in Cleveland Memorial Park, 
Shelby. 



KING BROTHERS OPEN NEW 
PHARMACY IN MURPHY 

Hill and Eddie King have opened a new 
pharmacy — King's Pharmacy, Valley Biver 
Avenue — in Murphy. 

William L. (Bill) King is a 1971 grad- 
uate of the UNC School of Pharmacy. He 
lias been employed as a relief pharmacist in 
Western North Carolina and adjacent Geor- 
gia-Tennessee areas. 

His brother, Eddie, is a graduate of the 
School of Pharmacy, Mercer University. 



28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



THE THINGS THAT COUNT 
AT A PHARMACY 

By Pharmacist Dave Montgomery 

Greensboro 

(Reprinted from The Greensboro Record, 

April 10) 

Please permit me to comment on the sub- 
ject of prescription prices and to rebut some 
of the statements presented in the article, 
' ' Survey reveals drug prices vary widely, ' ' 
written by Sherry Johnson, which appeared 
in The Greensboro Record on April 2, 1974. 

Although I have not seen published the 
complete finding of the survey made by the 
Price Interest Eesearch Group, I strongly 
suspect that the wide variations in prices 
of prescriptions did not occur with any great 
frequency between a given number of phar- 
macies if the sampling was representative. 
I also suspect that the ' ' tremendous profit 
margin" reported to be present "in some 
cases" does not occur with any significant 
frequency when the number of prescriptions 
(whether generic or not) is taken into ac- 
count. 

As with any commodity, the price that 
the consumer pays for a prescription is gov- 
erned by a cost of acquisition, cost of dis- 
pensing (or operating cost), and profit. The 
typical independent pharmacy buys prescrip- 
tion products either directly from a drug 
manufacturer or from a wholesale distributor 
(whose price is generally 10 to 20 per cent 
above the direct price). Due to the great 
number of different products the pharma- 
cist must stock and the large number of 
these products cannot be acquired directly 
from a manufacturer (by reason of eco- 
nomics or distribution policy), most drug 
products in the neighborhood pharmacy come 
from the local wholesaler. This fact has great 
import in providing the consumer with pre- 
scription services, which I shall deal with 
presently, but of equal importance is the 
effect it has on stabilizing cost of aquisition 
among pharmacies. In gome large discount 
(sic) stores, prescription products are chan- 
neled through a company-owned warehouse 



at a cost of acquisition lower than that af- 
forded to the independent pharmacies. Ac- 
cording to national surveys conducted by 
educational institutions, government agen- 
cies, professional associations and pharma- 
ceutical companies, the average independent 
pharmacy earns a net profit of five per cent 
or less. 

The area of operating expense and the 
resulting quality of drug distribution ser- 
vice, is what should be of primary concern 
to the consumer and his pocketbook. Cer- 
tainly no one can deny that a drug product 
is a marketable and consumable product sub- 
ject to all of the pressures of competition 
in our free enterprise system. But I feel that 
a drug product has certain characteristics 
which cause it to be in a category far re- 
moved from the usual consumer product. 

To begin with, it is a potentially danger- 
ous commodity unless it is prescribed, se- 
lected and dispensed (sold) with expertise 
and consumed with prudence tempered by 
proper instruction. On the other hand, its 
absence can also produce dire situations. 
The public is generally aware of the process 
involved in the prescribing of a drug, but 
there are many facets' to be considered in 
its selection and dispensing which influence 
its action and may not be as apparent to 
the consumer. Beginning with its manufac- 
ture, the desired effect will be achieved only 
if proper procedures of formulation, the use 
of high quality ingredients, and the thor- 
ough testing of the finished product are car- 
ried out to insure that the product is ther- 
apeutically effective. It is true that there are 
certain requirements' made by the govern- 
ment to insure product effectiveness and 
safety. This is true of other commodities 
also. These requirements insure that the 
product contains what it is supposed to con- 
tain (within certain limits), that it is pure 
(within certain limits), that it is properly 
packaged and stored, and that it provides 
the proper amount of usable drug once it is 
inside of, or in some cases, on the outside of 
our bodies. 



Reaction to drug price/ Rx price posting publicity by three pharmacists 
is here presented. Since another Rx price posting bill is anticipated in 1975 
after The General Assembly is convened, other related comments will be 
published in the August issue of The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



Unfortunately, due to the tremendous 
number of manufacturers, the great variety 
of products and the understandably limited 
capabilities' of the government agencies 
faced with such a ponderous task, it is nec- 
essary for the consumer to ultimately rely 
on the professional knowledge, skillful ap- 
plication of the involved sciences and the 
integrity of his physician and pharmacist. 
The physician and pharmacist, in turn, rely 
on the information available to them and on 
the reputation of the manufacturer. 

That therapeutic effectiveness is not equal 
among all brands of a particular drug is a 
well known fact substantiated by govern- 
mental and private research organizations. 
In some cases the cheaper brands are as ef- 
fective as the more expensive ones. But the 
fact remains that the majority of recalls 
due to product inferiority is greater among 
the products' manufactured by ' ' generic ' ' 
companies, which like the "brand name" 
companies, have been allowed to market 
their products by the government. I disagree 
with the statement by Miss Gillette (a mem- 
ber of Wake Forest University 's PIRG chap- 
ter) that the consumer understands the dif- 
ference in what he is getting in the same 
way that he understands the difference be- 
tween a Cadillac and a Volkswagen. I do 
agree, however, that a person should shop 
for his prescriptions. But he should shop 
not for price but for service and confidence. 

He should choose a pharmacy where com- 
plete pharmaceutical service is provided. 
Some stores carry only fast moving products 
and are limited by their own warehouse in- 
ventories as to what drug products they 
carry. Some stores utilize technicians who 
may not be properly supervised by a phar- 
macist. Other stores use the prescription de- 
partment in image discounting. Delivery 
services, charge accounts, medication re- 
ords, health counciling, and high ethics 
should be regarded as being as important as 
the price when choosing a pharmacist. Per- 
sonally I would shy away from any store 
in which a rjroper inquiry (telephone or 
otherwise) about the amount charged for a 
prescription was not openly answered. 

In view of the vast number of different 
companies now marketing drug products un- 
der generic and brand names, I really cannot 



imagine how a bill to post prescription prices 
could be implemented in a workable fashion. 
What would be the likelihood of a consumer, 
who is suffering from an acute illness, re- 
ceiving any real benefit from having to 
choose between different brands of a generic 
drug carried in different pharmacies? In 
many cases, due to antisubstitution laws in 
this state, neither the consumer nor the 
pharmacist have a choice. Would it not be 
more reasonable for a consumer to choose a 
reputable pharmacist who will consult with 
the physician in an effort to provide quality 
products at the most economical prices? 

As a consumer, I too am all for increasing 
my buying power, but I am afraid that not 
all so called consumer group-movements are 
pursuing their causes with wisdom and fair- 
ness to parties concerned. 



SHOPPING AROUND FOR 
DRUGS OPPOSED 

By Pharmacist Carl D. Taylor, Ahoskie 

(Reprinted from The Baleigh News $• 

Observer, April 24) 

To the Editor : Your recent editorial prais- 
ing the court decision to rescind the ban on 
prescription drug price advertising shows a 
complete lack of understanding of modern 
patient care and the interaction of all health 
care team members. 

I find it appalling that a newspaper with 
considerable influence takes a stand urging 
patients to shop from pharmacy to pharmacy 
for prescription medication. At a time when 
physicians, pharmacists, and the entire health 
care team, are urging patients to select one 
pharmacist or pharmacy, you are encourag- 
ing or implying the opposite. 

It is important that a patient select a 
pharmacy as carefully as he selects a physi- 
cian. Many pharmacists are now maintaining 
patient medication profiles or medication 
records which provide a current record of all 
medications the patient is taking, plus drug 
allergies, chronic conditions, etc., plus a rec- 
ord of nonprescription medications for each 
patient. This is a very valuable record since 
most patients now see more than one physi- 
cian. Examples: general practitioner, oph- 
thalmologist, urologist, dentist, etc. 



30 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



A patient may be seeing as many as three 
or four physicians and receiving prescrip- 
tions from each. The possibility of drug in- 
teractions or adverse reactions' becomes very 
great. A pharmacist with medication records 
can detect and prevent these potentially 
harmful reactions if the patient utilizes only 
one pharmacy. The pharmacist is the only 
health care practitioner with a complete rec- 
ord of the patients drug regimen. 

However, if the patient uses several dif- 
ferent pharmacies, possible interactions or 
adverse reactions will go undetected. For 
example: A patient saw his family doctor 
in 1971 with a throat infection, received a 
prescription for penicillin and had a mild 
allergic reaction which was recorded on his 
medication record by his pharmacist. He 
sees a urologist in 1974 and forgets about 
his allergic reaction to penicillin. The urol- 
ogist gives him a prescription for penicil- 
lin; he takes it to his pharmacist who de- 
tects the possible allergic reaction from the 
1971 record. 

The pharmacist has prevented a possible 
severe reaction by informing the urologist 
who changes the medication. This reaction 
would not have been prevented had the pa- 
tient been shopping from pharmacy to phar- 
macy. 

ASK YOUR PHARMACISTS 

By Eonald H. Small, President 

Forsyth County Pharmaceutical Society 

Winston-Salem 

In reply to the Journal editorial ' ' Posting 
Drug Prices" (April 12): We contend that 
prices are generally available to the public: 
Simply ask your pharmacists. 

Prices of prescriptions do vary as do 
prices of any other given product or ser- 
vices. The question then remains, why is 
there a variance and how can price informa- 
tion best be presented to the public? 

Ketail prices vary generally in proportion 
to the Services offered. Delivery, charge ac- 
counts, patient profiles, etc. add to operating 
expenses and the erst must be passed on to 
the consumer. Another factor to be con- 
sidered is the pharmacy's source of supply. 
Wholesalers' prices also vary according to 
services rendered, and the ability to obtain 



an item in a few hours as opposed to a few 
days may often cost more. 

Prices may also legitimately vary due to 
quantity purchased. Generally prices on larg- 
er amounts will save the pharmacy and thus 
the customer 's money. Some operations have 
the ability to buy and move greater quanti- 
ties of drugs in a short time and thus save 
money. 

Another variant in cost of drugs may be 
the drug itself. Some generic brands, while 
cheaper than name brands, may be of ques- 
tionable quality and potency. 

After considering the above, it can readily 
be seen that prescription prices can vary 
while remaining legitimate and fair. 

While we feel it is the right of the con- 
sumer to obtain prices upon request, it re- 
mains a difficult problem as to how best to 
provide meaningful information accurately 
and with speed. It is generally felt that 
price shopping by phone is not the most sat- 
isfactory method. Continual interruptions to 
a pharmacist who is in the process of filling 
a prescription Serve to distract his attention. 
Ill patients waiting in the store for prescrip- 
tions to be filled will be kept waiting longer. 
Often a caller is unfamiliar with the drug 
and may not be able to give the pharmacist 
accurate information thus causing a mis- 
understanding and possible errors in pricing. 
Trying to guess a drug 's name from sketchy 
information can be time consuming, but 
pharmacists will generally try to do this if 
it is felt that the request is legitimate. 

Another method of obtaining information 
is through posted prices, generally of the 
100 most prescribed drugs. This can be mis- 
leading. It is almost impossible to give a 
complete breakdown of all the drugs in all 
the different quantities dispensed. Mixing 
more than one drug into a prescription can 
also cause difficulty in how best to present 
this information. Posting prices does not 
necessarily assure competitive prices on all 
drugs. It is possible to give incorrect im- 
pressions by having low listed prices and 
then overcharging on other items to make up 
the difference. 

It is felt that the best method of obtain- 
ing price information is simply to request 
it before the prescription is filled. It is less 
time consuming in the long run and more 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



31 



accurate. Shopping by posted prices requires 
a visit to the store anyway, so why not use 
the direct approach and save time and 
money ? 

MARRIAGES 

THUTT -BO WEN 
Miss Kathryn Ann Bowen and Thomas 
Russell Thutt, both of Clinton, were married 
June 8 in Centenary Methodist Church of 
Harrells. Both Mr. and Mrs. Thutt are grad- 
uates of the UNC School of Pharmacy. Mrs. 
Thutt is employed at Sampson County Me- 
morial Hospital of Clinton, and her husband 
is with Tart and West, Eoseboro. 
SMITH-WHITCOMB 
Miss Beverly Whitcomb, 5th year student 
at the UNC School of Pharmacy, and Bus- 
sell Eugene Smith, graduate of the School, 
were married May 19 at the First Methodist 
Church of Davidson. Mr. Smith is with 
Eckerd's Arlan's Plaza of Durham, and 
Mrs. Smith is interning at Eckerd's Forest 
Hills Pharmacy. 

PHILLIPS-CBAVEB 
Miss Myra Graver, 1973 graduate of the 
UNC School of Pharmacy, and Donald Gil- 
bert Phillips were married June 9 at Hed- 
rich's Grove United Church of Christ, Lex- 
ington. Mrs. Phillips has accepted a position 
at Womack Hospital Pharmacy, Fort Bragg. 
Mr. Phillips is a communications advisor 
with Carolina Telephone and Telegraph in 
Fayetteville. 

PALMEB-EONEYCVTT 
Jerry Wilson Palmer, graduate of UNC 
School of Pharmacy, and pharmacist at Up- 
church Drugs of Durham, was married May 
25 to Miss Helen Elizabeth Honeycutt of 
North Wilkesboro. Mts. Palmer, graduate 
of UNC School of Nursing, has accepted a 
position as an epidemiologist at Duke Uni- 
versity Hospital. 

MOBETZ-CBEWS 
Jonas Clayton Moretz, Jr., pharmacist at 
Eckerd Drugs of Reidsville, and Miss Nancy 
Elizabeth Crews of Walkertown were mar- 
ried May 25 at the Loves United Methodist 
Church. Mrs. Moretz is a rising senior in 
the UNC-G School of Nursing. Mr. Moretz 
is a graduate of UNC School of Pharmacy. 



KING-BOG AN 
Miss Charlotte Gail Hogan of Burlington 
and Alvin Darrell King of Asheboro were 
married May 26 in the Sarah P. Duke Me- 
morial Gardens on the Duke University cam- 
pus. Mr. King, graduate of UNC School of 
Pharmacy, is with Revco Drug Center of 
Winston-Salem. 

DEDBICK-DBA UGEON 
Miss Beba LaBue Draughon and Stephen 
Cannaday Dedrick, both graduates of the 
UNC School of Pharmacy, were married 
May 26 at Saint Stephen 's Episcopal Church 
of Erwin. Following a wedding trip to Ha- 
waii, the Dedricks are living in Durham, 
where he is a pharmacist at Duke Univer- 
sity Medical Center. She has been employed 
at Lanier Drug Company of Erwin. 

SMITH-WILLIS 
Miss Margaret Jordan Willis of Greens- 
boro and Donald Lee Smith of Jamestown, 
were married May 18 at First Baptist 
Church of Greensboro. Mrs. Smith, graduate 
of UNC School of Pharmacy, is employed 
by Melvin's Pharmacy, Raleigh. Mr. Smith 
is a computer systems analyst for the N. C. 
Department of Social Services, Raleigh. 

TTJCKEB-LASLEY 
Miss Martha Hope Lasley of Madison and 
Michael EasJcins Tucker of Ahoskie were 
married May 19th in the Oak Grove Baptist 
Church of Madison. Mr. Tucker, 1974 grad- 
uate of the School of Pharmacy at UNC, 
was vice-president of his class, and a mem- 
ber of Phi Delta Chi. Mrs. Tucker is em- 
ployed as a registered nurse in Clinical Re- 
search at Memorial Hospital, Chapel Hill. 

CANNON-BUBBIS 
Miss Marianne Aurelia Burris, daughter 
of Pharmacist and Mrs. Loy Ray Burris of 
Valdese, and William Bruce Cannon, grad- 
uate of the UNC School of Pharmacy, were 
married June 8 in the Waldensian Presby- 
terian Church of Valdese. The couple will 
live at Foxcroft Apartments, Chapel Hill. 
Mrs. Cannon is majoring in early childhood 
education at UNC-CH and Mr. Cannon is 
employed by Eckerd's of Durham. 



32 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Willis Whitehead of Siler 
City announce the birth of a daughter, Lo- 
retta Diane, on May 5. Pharmacist White- 
head is an immediate past member of the 
executive committee of the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association. 



I. C. System, Inc. 

The nation's most highly 
specialized collection service 



Your Association's Collection Service is 
an affiliate of a national organization cur- 
rently serving members of more than 700 
leading trade associations throughout the 
nation. 

Don't lose sales volume because cus- 
tomers owe you money and are trading 
somewhere else. Your Association's Col- 
lection Service will chase those debtors 
back into your place of business to pay 
YOU direct. You will get accounts OFF 
your ledger and IN your bank account — 
and you will also have many former cus- 
tomers back doing business with you again. 
For information, contact your Association 
office. It will pay you to do so. 

On request, A representative 

of the I. C. System will explain 

the collection program in detail. 

Call or write the NCPhA, Box 151, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



GREENSBORO 

The May meeting of Greensboro Drug 
Club Auxiliary was a luncheon at the Greens- 
boro Country Club. Hostesses were Mrs. E. 
R. Kinard, Jr., Mrs. Marion M. Edmonds 
and Mrs. George H. Edmonds". 

The invocation was given by Mrs. Briggs 
E. Cook. 

Mrs. Dave W. Montgomery, President, ex- 
pressed appreciation for the cooperation re- 
ceived during the year. 

Following reading and adoption of the 
minutes Mrs. R. F. Whitley, the author of 



the charge, installed the new officers for 
1974-75. They are as follows: 

President: Mrs. David W. Montgomery 
Vice-President: Mrs. William P. Brewer 
Secretary: Mrs. Roger C. Barricks 
Treasurer: Mrs. Dale C. Bracker 
Chaplain: Mrs. J. Frank Pickard 
Historian : Mrs. George H. Edmonds 
The meeting concluded with a discussion 
of improvements for the new year. 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Classified advertising (single issue inser- 
tion) 10 cents a word with a minimum 
charge of $3.00 per insertion. Payment to 
accompany order. 

Names and addresses will be published un- 
less a box number is requested. 

In replying to ' ' blind ' ' ads, address Ad. 

No. , Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, 

P. O. Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 



WANTED— A spirit-filled Christian 
pharmacist for an established phar- 
macy, part ownership, no cash nec- 
essary. QMG-6. 

WANTED: Late model cash register 
with billing capability. JBB-7. 

OPPORTUNITY open for an experi- 
enced pharmacist to manage new 
pharmacy to be established at At- 
lantic Beach. Call or write Julian 
Upchurch, Upchurch Drugs, Dur- 
ham, N. C. 27704. 

FOR SALE — Two glass island fix- 
tures. Ideal for cosmetics or gifts. 
$60.00 each. Also glass wall fix- 
tures in 5 foot sections, total 30 
feet. All for $275.00. Cost $600.00 
6 months ago. Jerry D. Rhoades, 
Box 2, Southern Pines, N. C. 919- 
692-8800. 

FOR SALE — One complete set of fix- 
tures including Rx balance, ice ma- 
chine, display cases, etc. T. W. 
Hough, Tollison Pharmacy, Wades- 
boro, N. C. 694-2188. 



REMEMBER: 




The availability of a store planning 

and modernization service in this area 

through your (E) representative. 




CONSULTATION Our design consultant 
will work with you from rough idea 
through finished plan. He'll carefully 
analyze every facet of your operational 
needs and potential, and recommend 
practical solutions. 

DETAILED PLANNING For a single de- 
partment or a complete new store, our 
design consultant will prepare detailed 
plans assuring you the most effective 
arrangement, the best traffic patterns, 
the most sales stimulating Columbus 
fixtures, displays and decor. 

INSTALLATION He'll then supervise the 
installation of your new Columbus fix- 
tures, work with all trades involved to 
see that your new selling environment is 
complete and workable in every detail 
... in the shortest possible time. 



FOLLOW THROUGH And he'll help you 
through the "break-in" stage, seeing to 
it that your new fixtures serve you and 
your customers as designed. 



IN COOPERATION WITH THE 
COLUMBUS SHOW CASE COMPANY 

we are offering area druggists the finest, and 
most extensive lines of store merchandising 
display fixtures, plus complete store plan- 
ning and modernization service available 
anywhere. As one of America's oldest, most 
experienced manufacturers of store equip- 
ment, Columbus has everything you need to 
up-date your store and make it more prof- 
itable. Just ask your O.M.B. representative 
for details. 



Ot Mns.fTlinofl & BoD£Kttunc. /fljj^ 



Richmond, Va. Norfolk, Va. Wilson, N.C. 



O 0) 



tsi 




^ke Carolina JOURNAL OF PHARMACY 



Ji 



Volume LIV 



August 1974 



Number 8 



L1BKAKY. 

Ml© * 1974 




Members of The Consolidated Pharmacy Fund Committee of the North Carolina Pharmaceu- 
tical Association are shown, left to right: B. R. Ward, Goldsboro; Howard Q. Ferguson, 
Randleman; Robert B. Hall (Chairman), Mocksville; and G. Tom Cornwell, Morganton. 
The committee supervises general control over contributed funds designated specifically to 
aid needy/deserving students of the School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina. 
Since the Fund was established, a total of 829 loans has been approved by the committee. 
Due to repayments, more than $2 has been loaned for every dollar contributed. At the 
present time, there are 64 individually named funds all operating under the designation: 
Consolidated Pharmacy Fund. 

The committee, meeting in Chapel Hill on July 17 at the Institute of Pharmacy, appropriated 
sufficient funds to take care of anticipated loan applications in late August when the new 
school year opens. 






Your pharmacy 
is 5 steps ahead 
with Dar von 

propoxyphene hydrochloride 




Eli Lilly and Company 
Indianapolis, 
Indiana 46206 



S&ty 



Darvon® Compound-65 Darvoif, 65 mg. 

propoxyphene hydrochbride 



Each Pulvute® contains 65 mg. propoxvphene Hydrochloride, 
227 mg. aspirin, 162 mg. phenacettn, and 32.4 mg. caffeine. 



We Salute and Thank 

All of Our Good Customers Who 

Joined Us on Our 18th Annual Holiday 

Gift Show 

Excursion 

August 4 & 5, 1974 




rfl»8t, 







JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 

Greensboro, N. C. 
In our 77th Year of Servict to tht North Carolina Retail Druqgists 



50 

REASONS WHY 

500 

RETAIL PHARMACIES BUY 

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FROM ONE SOURCE 



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Ret ailing Servic es 

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Prescriptions 



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Burroughs-Wellcome 
Sandoz 

Market Knowledge 
Merchandising Programs 




Store Layout 
Retailing Management 



Robins 
Geigy 



LILLY 




M 


Searle 
Roche 




Financing 



Smith 



Kline & 
Endo 



French 



Mead Johnson 
Stuart 

Advertising Program 
Money Saving Special Buys 



Merchandise 
Lines 



Service 



Wl H Quality 
'Our Gift Gallery" 



Chanel 

Mem 

Regency 

Yard ley 

Tuvara 

Love 

Shulton 

Hallmark 

Waltham 

Ten-O-Six 

Jade East 



Max Factor 
English Leather 

Allercreme 

British Sterling 

Prince Matchabelli 

Helena Rubenstein 

Nina Ricci 

Jean Nate' 

Elizabeth Arden 

Bal-de-bain 

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Lanvin 

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SOME PEOPLE JUST LIKE US 

SCOTT DRUG COMPANY 

Full Service Wholesaler Since 1891 

Exclusive Cosmetics — Fragrances — Accessories 

Exquisite Gifts — Fine Jewelry 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Telephone (704) 375-9841 



s>M*/. 




f fTlC 



The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



August, 1974 

Vol. LIV No. 



Officers 

NORTH CAROLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 



President 

W. H. WlLSON 

Raleigh 



Vice-Presidents 

L. M. Whaley 

Wallace 
Tom R. Burgiss 

Sparta 

E. W. Hackney 

Lumberton 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



CONTENTS THIS ISSUE 



MDs Insist on Private Telephone Lines 4 

Federal Court Dismisses Charges Against 

Five Drug Firms 5 

Edwin R. Fuller Presented Mortar & Pestle Award . . . . 7 

Action by the NCPhA Executive Committee 11 

Substitution of Generics for Brand Name Drugs 12 

Tar Heel Digest 15 

Rite of the Roses 18 

NCPhA Committee on Community Pharmacy 21 

Report: Consolidated Pharmacy Fund 25 

Marriages/Deaths 27 

Prescription Price Posting . Yes 28 

Prescription Price Posting No 29 

Disasters — Major and Minor 31 

Classified Advertising 32 



ADVERTISERS 
American Druggists' Insurance Company 

Colorcraft Corporation 

Gilpin, Henry B. 

I. C. System, Inc. 

ICN Pharmaceuticals (King Associates) 

Justice Drug Company 

Kendall Drug Company 

Lederle Laboratories 

Lilly, Eli and Company 

Owens, Minor & Bodoker 

Ramsey Manufacturing Corporation 

Reaco Products 

E. N. Rowell Company 

Scott. Drug Company 

Seeman Printery 

Smitli Kline & French Laboratories 

Smith Wholesale Drug Company 

The [Tpjohn < lompany 

Washington National Insurance Company 



19 

13 

9 

32 

4th Cover 
1 

15 

24 

2nd Cover 
3rd Cover 

20 
30 

13 

o 

. . 27 
14 
10 
22 
20 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Second class 
postage paid at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



MEDICAL KIT FOR TRAVELERS 

Washington pharmacist. Dorsey Welch, 
newly returned from a trip to Brazil, reports 
that a standard treatment for a common 
complaint in Brazil is (as referred to by 
the natives) low motel. 

Tn this connection, a national magazine 
(Patient Care) says that medical travel kit 
will meet the basic needs of a traveler for 
two weeks. 

Respiratory infection (cold symptoms, 
sinusitis, allergy or other signs of upper 
respiratory congestion) : Chlor-Trimenton, 
14-16 tablets; Ornade, 14-16 capsules; 
Coricidin D, 14-16 tablets'; or Benadryl, 
10 capsules. 

Diarrhea (more than twice in 24 hours) : 
Lomotil, 30 tablets. 

Constipation: Dulcolax suppositories' or 
milk of magnesia tablets. 

Gastrointestinal upset: Donnatal, 30 tab- 
lets. 

Motion sickness: Dramamine, 15 tablets. 

Aches and pains: Darvon, 24 capsules; 
or Empirin Compound with codeine, 24 
tablets. 

Plus adhesive tape, antiseptic, aspirin, 
bandages, a first aid book (Bed Cross) and 
gauze. 

You may prefer to assemble your own 
custom-designed kit. In any event, this per- 
sonalized service for the traveler will be 
appreciated. Obviously, in some cases, (Con- 
trolled Substances) a doctor will be involved. 

MDs INSIST ON PRIVATE 
TELEPHONE LINES 

The President of the Guilford County So- 
ciety of Pharmacists received this letter 
signed by 50 Greensboro MDs: 

Dear Sir: 

It has become increasingly apparent that 
there is too much time being lost waiting 
on a pharmacist to answer the telephone 
when prescriptions are called in. It is most 
disconcerting to us that private telephone 
lines are not put in all drug stores so 
that the physicians of Greensboro will have 



the benefit of its use. We would insist 
that this be done in the hope that more 
time then would become available for us 
to treat our patients and less time be used 
on the telephone. 

The letter was discussed by members of 
the TSTCPhA Executive Committee at a meet- 
ing in Salisbury on June 29. The general 
opinion of the committee was that in many 
instances, where a pharmacist has three or 
four lines, the physician would reach the 
pharmacist more quickly than on a private 
line. 

Some pharmacists have stated a solution 
might be a reciprocal arrangement whereby 
the MD would put in a private line for the 
exclusive use of MD and pharmacists. 

PIKE ATTENDS SK&F ADVISORY 
COUNTY MEETING 

Jesse Miller Pike, Sr., B.Ph., President 
and Chairman of the Board, Pike's Drug 
Stores, Inc., Concord, North Carolina, par- 
ticipated recently in the Pharmacy Ad- 
visory Council sponsored by Smith Kline & 
French Laboratories in Philadelphia. 

The thirteen-member Council serves' as a 
sounding board on SK&F policy, positions 
and programs. This year's dialogue focused 
on issues of importance to both the profes- 
sion and the industry including the OTC 
market, today 's business' environment, hyper- 
tension and pharmacy services. Bepresenta- 
tives of community, hospital and student 
pharmacy, as well as pharmaceutical whole- 
salers, attended the three-day event. 

The SK&F Pharmacy Advisory Council 
was" established in 1962 as a forum for the 
exchange of ideas, as well as a means of 
creating better understanding within the 
pharmaceutical field. 



NARD CONVENTION 

Las Vegas 

Sept. 29-October 3 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



FEDERAL COURT DISMISSES 

CHARGES AGAINST FIVE DRUG 

COMPANIES IN CLASS ACTION 

ANTITRUST SUIT 

Judge Franklin T. Dupree, Jr. of the 
federal court in "Raleigh, N. C. has thrown 
out all charges in the antibiotics antitrust 
damage suit filed by the State of North Car- 
olina in January, 1969 against Pfizer and 
four other companies — American Cyanamid 
Company, Bristol-Myers Company, Squibb 
Corp., and the Upjohn Company. 

This decision comes only a few months 
after the acquittal of Pfizer, Cyanamid, and 
Bristol in a criminal antitrust suit in- 
volving the same issues in the federal court 
in New York, in November, 1973. 

In the North Carolina case, the defendants 
were charged with conspiracy to fix prices 
and exclude competition, and Pfizer Avas 
charged with having obtained the patent on 
the antibiotic tetracycline by making mis- 
representations' to the Patent Office. Judge 
Dupree found that the defendants were not 
guilty of any of the conspiracy charges and 
further found that Pfizer did not make any 
misrepresentations to the Patent Office. The 
Judge decided that an uncompromising duty 
of disclosure is required of an applicant be- 
fore the Patent Office, and he rejected the 
State's contention that this high standard 
had not been met. 

The North Carolina case was a class action 
on behalf of the state and all cities, coun- 
ties, public institutions and consumers in 
the state. The case was tried before Judge 
Dupree in 1973 and briefs were completed 
in February, 1974. The transcript of the 
trial occupies almost 100 volumes' and 11,000 
pages. 

Mr. Edmund T. Pratt, Jr., Pfizer 's Chair- 
man and Chief Executive Officer, said, "Par- 
ticularly after such a long and thorough 
trial of the issues, we were most pleased to 
receive this further decision completely vin- 
dicating the company." 

NARD CONVENTION 

Las Vegas 

Sept. 29, October 3 



CPD INITIATES COUNTDOWN 

"Reprinted from Consumer Protection News 
June 1974 

For an inaugural blast-off, the CPD staff 
did a deadline mini countdown. 

The "Revco Discount Drug Store in Ra- 
leigh was chosen for the test site because 
it was convenient. 

The results were impressive and may or 
may not reflect the prevailing quantity rate 
citywide. 

Aspirin — a bottle of 100 — count: 100. Ac- 
curate. 

Cough drops — a bag of 30 — count: 31. 
Over 1. 

Writing paper — a tablet of 40 — count : 39 
sheets. Under 1. 

Bobby pins — canister of 350 — count : 357. 
Over 7. 

Envelopes — boxes of 50 and 100 — count 50, 
100 respectively. Accurate. 

Cotton balls — package of 260 — count: 260. 
Accurate. 

Paper ring reinforcements — package of 
500— count: 523. Over 23. 

Memo pads — package of 4 pads (60 pages 
each) — count: 60 pages each. Accurate. 

Saccharin tablets — bottle of 1,000 — count: 
1,083. Over 83. 

While a CPD staffer knelt in the Store, 
counting the pages of a writing tablet, a 
little old lady approached the rack and 
watched for a moment. She then reached for 
her purchase — a box of envelopes. 

Deftly, she flipped the lid and her fingers 
flew as she, too, did a quick countdown. 



DR. BRECHT RETURNS TO 
CHAPEL HILL 

Former UNC School of Pharmacy Dean 
E. A. Brecht has returned to Chapel Hill 
following retirement from the faculty of 
the School of Pharmacy, Northeast Louisi- 
ana University. 

Dr. Brecht will make his home at 404 East 
Rosemary, Chapel Hill. Telephone: 919-967- 
4254. 




PLAQUE PRESENTATION— Edwin R. Fuller (left), 1974 Pharmacist of the Year, receives 
NCPhA mortar and pestle plaque from W. Whitaker Moose, immediate past president of 
the NCPhA. Photo by Colorcraft. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



EDWIN R. FULLER, PHARMACIST OF THE YEAR, PRESENTED NCPhA 
MORTAR & PESTLE AWARD 



Edwin E. Fuller, Salisbury, who was desig- 
nated North Carolina Pharmacist-of-the- 
Year at the Association 's annual meeting 
in Pinehurst, was honored at a dinner at 
the Holiday Inn, Salisbury on June 29th, 
attracting more than one hundred colleagues, 
family and friends from over the state. 

Wilnam H. Wilson of Ealeigh, President 
of the NCPhA, served as presiding officer. 
Mr. Fuller's pastor, The Eeverend Victor 
G. Cole of the First Baptist Church of 
Salisbury brought the Invocation, and guests 
were officially welcomed by William C. Stan- 
back, Mayor of the City of Salisbury. 

Tributes to Mr. Fuller were brought by 
Glenn E. Ketner, President, Eowan Invest- 
ment Company and Edwin E. Koontz, Di- 



rector, Department of Social Services for 
Eowan County. Eeprescnting the pharmacists 
of the state was Eobert B. Hall of Moeks- 
villc, a Past-President of the NCPhA. 

Presentation of the Award was made by 
W. Whitaker Moose of Mount Pleasant, im- 
mediate Past-President of the Association. 

June 29th was a red-letter day for the 
Fullers. Climaxing the Mortar-and-Pestle 
Award Dinner was a reception hosted by the 
Fuller children in honor of the Fuller's 33rd 
wedding anniversary. 

The dinner and reception provided an 
excellent opportunity for a family reunion 
including the four children, three daughters- 
in-law, two grandchildren, and mothers of 
both Mr. and Mrs. Fuller. 




Although short on its spelling. Holiday Inn of Salisbury extended a warm welcome to the 
1974 Pharmacist of the Year and guests who attended the dinner party on June 29. Photo 
by Colorcraft. 




The 1974 Pharmacist of the Year program participants are pictured (I. to r.): William C. 
Stanback, Mayor of Salisbury; The Reverend Victor G. Cole, Pastor, First Baptist Church of 
Salisbury; Edwin E. Koontz, Director, Rowan Department of Social Services; Glenn E. Ketner, 
President, Rowan Investment Company, Salisbury; William H. Wilson, Raleigh, President, 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, who presided; Edwin R. Fuller, 1974 recipient; 
W. Whitaker Moose, Immediate Past-President, NCPhA, Mt. Pleasant; Robert B. Hall, 
NCPhA Past-President, Mocksville. Photo by Colorcraft. 




Former pharmacists of the year are pictured with the 1974 award recipient: 
Pictured (I. to r.) Hoy A. Moose, Mt. Pleasant; John T. Henley, Hope Mills; Jean Bush Provo, 
Raleigh; Edwin R. Fuller, 1974 recipient, Salisbury; June Bush West, Raleigh; W. Dorsey 
Welch, Washington; Robert B. Hall, Mocksville; B. R. Ward, Goldsboro; Wade A. Gilliam, 
Winston-Salem. Photo by Colorcraft. 






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WHOLESALE DHUG 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



ACTION BY THE NCPhA 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The Executive Committee of the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association met in 
Salisbury on June 29, 1974, prior to the 
Edwin R. Fuller "Pharmacist of the Year" 
dinner. 

All members of the committee were pres- 
ent: "W. H. Wilson (Chairman), Tom Bur- 
giss, George Edmonds, Eugene Hackney, 
John C. Hood, Jr., Donald Miller, Joe Miller, 
L. M. Whaley, Michael Whitehead and W. J. 
Smith (Secretary). 

Here is a digest of the two-hour session : 

1. Newly appointed UNO Pharmacy School 
Dean Blaug to be invited to attend August 
meeting of the NCPhA Executive Commit- 
tee. 

2. Bequest by 50 Greensboro doctors for 
private telephone lines into pharmacies. Ac- 
tion by Guilford County Society of Pharma- 
cists scheduled in early fall. 

3. NCPhA will investigate possibility of 
sponsoring an Antabuse Drug Program sim- 
ilar to one now operational in Oregon. 

4. Board of Pharmacy has tentative plans 
to vacate its Institute of Pharmacy quarters 
by January 1, 1975. 

5. President Wilson and Committee Mem- 
ber Whitehead met with officers of the UNO 
School of Pharmacy Student Branch of the 
NCPhA. Program set for fall semester. Co- 
operative joint organizational effort best in 
years. 

fi. Triplicate Prescription Blanks sug- 
gested by the North Carolina Drug Au- 
thority. Committee recommendation: Would 
serve no useful purpose and would be ex- 
pensive and time-consuming to install. 

7. Committee instructed Secretary Smith 
to advance the release date of The Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy to first week of the 
month. 

8. Medicaid Prescriptions: 

(a) Favors $1.00 co-pay — do not support 
the 500 co-pay implemented (effective July 1, 
1974) as a result of a Federal directive. 

(b) Favors $2.50 professional fee (cur- 
rent $2.00 fee is unrealistic in the face of 
current operational costs). 



(c) Major changes in the Medicaid pre- 
scription program: Providers should be no- 
tified prior to release of information to re- 
cipients (in the case of the 50# co-pay, re- 
cipients were notified 10 days' ahead of the 
providers). 

9. H. Shelton Brown, Jr., Director of 
Professional Relations', Paid Prescriptions, 
outlined a proposed "computerized patient 
profile system ' ' which Paid is developing. 
NCPhA will follow progress of the system. 

10. NCPhA President Wilson and Exec- 
utive Director Smith will attend August 29- 
September 1 meeting of the Southeastern 
Executives Meeting in Orlando, Florida. 
Other committee members expressed interest 
in attending the meeting. 



HOSPITAL PHARMACY NOTES 

William T. Williams has been appointed 
Director of Pharmacy Services, Eastern 
North Carolina Hospital, Wilson. 

Before accepting the ENC Hospital posi- 
tion, Williams was employed in the Com- 
munity General Hospital at Thomasvillc as 
director of pharmacy, purchasing and cen- 
tral supply. 

In his new position, Pharmacist Williams 
will be responsible for the hospital's phar- 
macy operation, inventory and cost record 
for drug supplies and as a resource person 
for in-service training and staff development. 

Williams is immediate past president of 
the N. C. Society of Hospital Pharmacists 
and is presently Chairman of the NCPhA 
Committee on Institutional Pharmacy. 



L. T. Holder has been named Director of 
Pharmacy Services, Caldwell Memorial 
Hospital, Lenoir. He succeeds Fred Fitz- 
gerald who recently resigned. 

A 1972 graduate of the TJNC School of 
Pharmacy, Pharmacist Holder until recently 
was associated with a Elizabeth City phar- 
macy. He resigned from the N. C. Highway 
Patrol to study pharmacy. 



12 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



SUBSTITUTION OF GENERICS FOR PRESCRIBED BRAND NAME DRUGS 
RESULTS IN $1800 REFUND TO PAID PRESCRIPTIONS 

Information was received that . . . Phar- 
macy of, North Carolina was substituting 
cheap generic drugs for brand name drugs. 
An onsite inspection was made of a local 
nursing home that was being supplied by . . . 
Pharmacy revealed that in the majority of 
cases bottles were labeled with brand names 
and the generic counterpart was dispensed. 
With the substitutions being established a 
check was made on the corresponding pre- 
scriptions on file in . . . Pharmacy. These 
showed that brand name drugs had been or- 
dered on every prescription. And finally a 
check of our audit report showed the pre- 
scriptions had been billed to Paid Prescrip- 
tions at brand name prices. 

Copies were made of all check vouchers 
Sent to ... . Pharmacy for the period De- 
cember 1, 1972 through December 31, 1973. 
These copies were taken to . . . Pharmacy 
and, after a list of the generic drug on hand 



was made, a comparison was taken to deter- 
mine the number of claims that had been 
substituted. After determining these drugs a 
tally was taken to obtain a total cost of 
tlie claims paid less the professional fee. 

A cash differential between generic and 
brand name drugs was calculated by com- 
paring the Bed Bool- AWP for the brand 
name drugs with the cost of the generic sub- 
stitute for fifteen of the most commonly used 
drugs. This difference (overcharge) equaled 
52% of the total cost of drugs. The over- 
charge amount was agreed upon by the 
owner of . . . Pharmacy and the North Car- 
olina Department of Social Services. A re- 
fund was made by check payable to Paid 
Prescriptions'. This check was in the amount 
of $1,833.78 and deposited in Paid Pre- 
scription 's Operating Account on January 
25, 1974. 



The determination of the amount of the refund was established by using a listing of 
fifteen of the most commonly substituted drugs. The computations are as follows: 



Drug AWP 

1. Phenergan Tabs 25 Mg. 7.88 

2. Trinsicon Pulvules 4.13 

3. Lanoxin 25 Mg. 1.05 

4. Hydrodiuril 50 Mg. 6.06 

5. Pavabid 10.38 

6. Amcil 14.89 

7. Darvon 65 Mg. . 7.02 

8. Thorazine 50 Mg. 4.40 

9. Lufyllin 200 Mg. 5.03 

10. Macrodantin Caps 50 Mg. 12.33 

11. Darvon Comp. 65 7.30 

12. Kaon Pt. 3.94 

13. Noctec 500 Mg. 5.00 

14. Fiorinal 3.30 

15. Noctec Syrup Pt. 2.14 



Generic Substitution 



1.99 

1.80 

.36 

1.00 

1.80 

12.00 

3.73 

3.17 

3.00 

9.50 

4.50 

1.50 

1.04 

.60 

.70 



AVG. COST OF BRAND NAME IS $6.35 



AVG. COST OF GENERIC $3.05 



The Carolina Journal, of Pharmacy 



13 



6.35 
3.05 



X 100 = 48% or 52% overcharge 



It was determined by count of prescriptions on check vouchers that 1380 claims were 
overcharged to Paid Prescriptions by the established 52%. 
Total money of the 1380 RX's = $6286.50 
Fee Paid " 2760.00 

Drug Cost $3526.50 

$3526.50 
x 52% 
$1833.78 Total Refund 



A NOTE ABOUT THE AUDIT 

The expenditure of federal and state funds 
carries -with it an audit potential. From time 
to time, when deemed appropriate, Paid 
Prescriptions and the Division of Social 
Services of the N. C. Department of Human 
Resources conducts audits of the state's $20 
million Medicaid Ex Program. 

Here is the end result of one such audit; 
others will appear in the future. 



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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 




HUDSON — Pharmacist Harold Bolick has 
been elected a director of the newly orga- 
nized Hudson Merchants Association. He is 
associated with Hudson Drug Company. 
KING — Joe Perkins, co-owner of Stokes 
Pharmacy, has been named a member of 
the Stokes County Planning Board. 



TAR HEEL DIGEST 



ELEIN — Edwin Eoyal has been elected to 
a three-year term on the board of directors 
of the N. C. Merchants Association. 
WARSAW— Bill Taylor, Jr., UNC Phar- 
macy Graduate 1972, has accepted a position 
with the Buffalo General Hospital, Buffalo, 
New York. He will be chief pharmacist 
resident in the clinical residency program 
at the hospital. 

rALDESE— The Rock Drug Store was 
chosen "Business of the Month" in June 
by the Valdese Jaycees. An inscribed plaque 
was presented to Buddy Peile. 
TR YO N— Charles E. Davis, Jr., a pharma- 
cist at Tryon Pharmacy, retired effective 
July 1 according to Ellis M. Fincher. His 
successor is Pharmacist Odel Matthews of 
Columbus. 

TA YL ORS VILLE— People's Drug Store 
moved to its new 3200 square foot building 
across from the Alexander County Hospital 
in early August. 



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Graduating Class, School of Pharmacy, I ) 
Picture made in the lobby of Hill Hall, * 




:i-y of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
I' 1974 (Rain prevented outside photo). 



18 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



RITE OF THE ROSES 

Conducted by Mrs. June Bush West 
and Mrs. Jean Bush Provo 

I think it is fitting that before we step 
forward, we pause and honor the twelve 
fellow-pharmacists who are not with us to- 
day. 

As I started to think about what I would 
say, it became increasingly clear that aside 
from the dark void left by their absence I 
was struck with the fact that these twelve 
pharmacists devoted their lives to serving 
others. The remembrance of them brought a 
myriad of small pictures into focus and 
when gathered up and threaded together left 
me with an indelible impression of twelve 
unselfish contributions to society. 

I was" at a loss to express my feelings 
until it came to me . . . the only way I know 
how to express myself is through poetry, so, 
I dedicate this poem to our twelve late 
friends and I give to you: 



Twenty-four hands 

Memory -laden and beautiful 

Scarred, perhaps, 

Yet they held high the banner of hope 

Against the dark edges of despair . . . 

Searched endlessly for beauty 

And the culmination of their dreams. 

Willing hands that stretched outward . . . 
always . . . 

To help the suffering 

To brighten the hollow, saddened eyes 

of the sick 
To warm the palsied souls of the aged 
And yet . . . 

Still frame the small, frightened face of 
a crying child. 

Twenty-four remarkable hands 

Quick with life and the joy of living, 
Quick with life and the joy of giving . . . 
Holding friendship in every palm 
A fountain, where all the sorrowing could 




Mrs. June Bush West and Mrs. Jean Bush Provo 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



19 



drink 
And lighten the poison of pain . . . 

Twenty-four impatient hands 

Weary of the long fingers of disillusion- 
ment 

Work-laden, heavy with tedious tensions 
Unceasing in their efforts to alleviate 

The fears of the living 

The fears of the dying 

The fears of the lonely . . . 
Forever, hands outstretched . . . 

To shaking frames wifh thick 
tongues . . . 

To the confiised, blinded by misery 

Like dark birds in flight . . . 
Each hand, all-loving, all-caring, 
All reservoirs of strength 
For the never-ending passing parade of 

humanity 

Each fleeting memory is as short-lived as the 

Flaming beauty of a wild rose . . . 

All leaving small scars that never heal 

But remain precious to us . . . 

Small secrets in this" net of remembrance. 

Twenty-four beautiful hands . . . 
Now uplifted through the portals to 

eternity 
Touching the harp with angel wings 
All dwelling in pearl beauty. 



ISAAC L. ZUCKERMAN— 

November 13, 1973 
ROBERT BAUGHAM BOLTON— 

December 8, 1973 
CHARLES JONES SISK— 

December 10, 1973 
KDWARD WATSON WOOLARD- 

December 18, 1973 
JOHN HARPER BEST— 

January 1, 1974 (Life Member) 
PAUL L. McDANIEL— 

January 28, 1974 



Prescription 
for Peace 



I say 



sleep 



So now 

peace . . . 
All hands stilled ... all stilled . . 
All resting in the Master's Hand . 
But never forgotten. 

DECEASED MEMBERS 

FRED LAMBERT HOOPER— 

April 23, 1973 
ARCHIE DUVAL WALKER— 

April 29, 1973 
SHARON ILENE FISHER— 

June 21, 1973 
SAMUEL HOWARD PRICE— 

June 24, 1973 
CURTIS HILL OAKLEY— 

August 28, 1973 
JIM1MTE BARNETT— 

October 28, 1973 



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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 



REPORT: NCPhA COMMITTEE ON 
COMMUNITY PHARMACY 

By Donald V. Peterson, Chairman 
During the past year the Committee on 
Community Pharmacy has adopted projects 
and considerations designed to attract phar- 
macy students to community practice; and, 
for the practicing pharmacists, to stimulate 
his desire and imagination in his own store 
operation as well as in his becoming an 
influence in his community. 

Under the direction of our esteemed secre- 
tary, W. J. Smith, we have been conducting 
; , series of one-hour evening lectures at the 
Institute, bringing in outstanding community 
pharmacists from throughout the state to 
speak to our students about community 
practice. These speakers have been relaying 
to the students their personal experiences, 
satisfactions, ideals, and goals that have 
made their practices so meaningful to them. 
Forty-five students in the 4th and 5th-year 
classes enrolled for this series, and atten- 
dance has ranged from 25 to 30 for each 
lecture. We hope this program can be con- 
tinued next year and expanded to include 
the 3rd-year students as well. 

The energy crisis continues to plague 
everyone regardless of his type of work. 
We, as pharmacists, certainly are aware 
of this because we are hit from all sides 
with cost increases created by oil shortages: 

1. The increased cost of gasoline, plus 
your delivery man sitting idle in a gas 
station line for as long as an hour, are 
only two factors you need to consider in 
determining your cost of deliveries. 

Further, we suspect the demand for de- 
livery service has increased since Mrs. 
Jones would prefer to see you burning 
your gasoline rather than her burning her 
own to drive to your store. 

Although we did not conduct an actual 
study on delivery costs, it is suspected that 
this figure now approaches $1.00 per de- 
livery. For this reason, some stores have 
adopted a policy of only one or two deliv- 
ery runs per day ... as opposed to the 
"delivery within the hour" days of old. 



2. We urge the officers of this associa- 
tion to fight for inclusion of pharmacy in 
any provisions made for emergency gas- 
oline supplies to other medical personnel. 
Why get the doctor to the patient if we 
cannot get the medicine to the same pa- 
tient? Many stores are greatly dependent 
on telephone business. 

3. From the other direction, price in- 
creases are occuring at a phenomenal rate. 

Each week, hundreds of price increases 
are passed on to your store by the manu- 
facturer and the wholesaler. You have 
some protection on your front-of-the-store 
inventory if the manufacturer or whole- 
saler invoice shows you the new suggested 
retail price. However, if there is no sug- 
gested retail price, do you have a sure- 
fire system for your stock clerk to use to 
catch these price increases? In the pre- 
scription department, the problem seems 
to get worse! Again, price increases oc- 
cur every day . . . yet many stores are re- 
filling prescriptions today for the same 
price they charged when the prescription 
was originally filled. 

We, as a committee, urge you to develop 
a system to catch the increases and pass 
them along to the customer. One simple way 
would be through the use of "red alert" 
sticker on your stock bottle to make all 
pharmacists in your store aware to the fact 
that it represents a new price. It is quite 
possible that this one thing is contributing 
dramatically to the declining net profit of the 
average drug store. 

The electronic age of today offers tre- 
mendous help to you in combatting these 
declining profits! Wholesalers are offering 
you new services now, with more to come in 
the future. Accounts receivables programs, 
advertising ami merchandising programs, 
preprinted price stickers, electronic ordering, 
merchandise movement data, and complete 
accounting systems are some of the pro- 
grams your wholesaler has developed, or 
is developing, for you. He is there to serve 
you! We urge you to analyze these pro 
grams and work closely with him in ordei 
(Continued on Page 23) 



When 
a first aid 
ointment 
contains 
3 antibiotics, 

doesn't sting, 

is well 
tolerated, 

helps prevent 
infection, 

promotes 
healing and 

gives you an 
excellent return 
on your money, 

it's easy to 
recommend. 



Note on the label: Mycitracin 
should not be used in the eyes. 
Also, in serious burns or deep- 
puncture wounds, it should not 
be used without consulting 
a physician. 





TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC OINTMENT 



IjQfljHj 



1973, Tm Upjohn Company, X 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



23 



COMMUNITY PHARMACY 

to develop a more efficient operation. Some 
of the benefits you can derive are: 

1. Virtual elimination of pricing errors; 

2. Reduction in man hours devoted to 
ordering, pricing, stocking, and pro- 
moting; and, 

3. Improved inventory control. 

We also urge this association to study the 
practical utilization of computers for set- 
ting up a statewide patient profile system 
to which all stores could have access. 

At the local level we find that many areas 
of our state do not have a pharmaceutical 
society, while those that do exist generally 
find themselves weakened because of a lack 
of communication between the hospital phar- 
macist, the independent pharmacist, and the 
chain store pharmacist. We should bear in 
mind that professionally our ideals are the 
same, and we should be able to study our 
problems together as professionals and put 
aside our differences as businessmen. A 
strong effort needs to be exerted at the local 
level if were are to enhance the image of 
pharmacy at the national level. 

One item that is going to affect us locally 
is coming from far-off Washington. The 
Kennedy hearings have produced testimony 
by HEW's Assistant Secretary of Health, 
Dr. Charles Edwards, that the department 
is not only studying manufacturer 's prices, 
but what you charge your customers as" well. 
Without a strong, united effort at the local 
level we might very well find ourselves fill- 
ing prescriptions by use of a "Federal cook- 
book" which tells us what reimbursement we 
will receive on any given prescription. 

One way we can be of service at the local 
level as to take advantage of every speaking 
opportunity before civic groups in an effort 
to clear up the confusion being created by 
the Public Interest Research Group (PIRG). 
Newspaper articles reporting this group's 
surveys are confusing to the general public 
and damaging to our profession if we allow 
it to go uncontested. The articles do not 
give enough information to allow it to reach 
an intelligent conclusion, consequently the 
public dismisses all questions concerning 
what quality product was dispensed, what 



the reputation of the manufacturer is, 
whether a generic brand was dispensed by all 
stores included in the survey or are some 
stores too small to carry generics as well 
as branded pharmaceuticals. 

My case in point here is from an article 
in the Durham Morning Herald on the 12th 
of this month. Here, the surveyors com- 
pared the cost of a prescription for Propox- 
yphene at a small, independent drug store 
to that of a large chain. Besides not men- 
tioning strength, formula, quantity, or manu- 
facturer, this article failed to point out that 
this 1 small independent is located in one of 
the poorest sections of Durham and prob- 
ably does not even stock a generic. Propox- 
yphene. PIRG further put the independent 
at a disadvantage by naming the stores in- 
volved. Is it possible that one of this group 's 
aims is to drive the independent out of 
business? Ladies and gentlemen, we can not 
afford to sit idle and wait for an answer 
to that question. 

Another tool available to you is this pam- 
phlet. "How Do You Choose Your Phar- 
macy?," which has been approved by this 
committee and is available for you to dis- 
tribute from the Institute of Pharmacy. 

Ladies and gentlemen, our profession 
faces many trials today . . . from the de- 
cisions which our pharmacy students must 
make as to what areas in which to pursue 
their careers, all the way to the decisions 
coming out of Washington. If we are to pre- 
serve what we have worked and fought for 
all these years, each of us must get involved. 



INCORPORATE 

Brevard Pharmacy, Inc., West Main 
Street, Brevard. Kathleen R. Weaver, Hazel 
E. McCormick and John K. Smart, Jr. 

Omega Prescription Center, Inc., 600 North 
Elm Street, Greensboro. A. Omega Dean. 

Belmont Pharmacy, Inc., 219 Gilmer 
Street, Reidsville, W. G. Dudley, Jr., Charles 
Arnold Britt and Gregory L. Jenkins. 



Partner! 




That's how Lederle sees you in the vital business of protecting the 
nations health. Only our roles differ— yours is to maintain and enhance 
your professional standing by dispensing the finest pharmaceuticals 
available; ours is to develop new pharmaceuticals, maintain the quality 
of current products, and provide a good deal more: 

750 professional representatives to help you. 

Lederle Distribution Centers augmented by wholesalers located 
throughout the U.S. to assure prompt delivery. 

Research, development and packaging, integrated to produce 
products to fill a need. 

A liberal return goods policy. 

An additional 90-day dating on new product releases. 

And a special department to handle all your questions on new 
Lederle products, credit policies, promotions— whatever. Call our 
"answer-man" Jim Wallin, (914) 735-5000, at Lederle. 

It's the least we can do for a partner. 



LEDERLE LABORATORIES, A Division of American Cyanamid Co , Pearl River, N. Y. 10965 865-4 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 



CONSOLIDATED PHARMACY 
FUND 

By Bobert B. Hall, Chairman 
(Report submitted to the 94th Annual Con- 
vention of the North Carolina Pharmaceu- 
tical Association, March 26, 1974) 

T am happy to report that the Consolidated 
Pharmacy Fund, the formal name for our 
student loan fund, is healthy and rendering 
a tremendous service to students who need 
this kind of financial help. 

As you are aware, the Consolidated Phar- 
macy Fund is composed of funds' which have 
been contributed by helpful pharmacists and 
others, and the money is then lent to stu- 
dents on a non-interest basis. Repayment be- 
gins within 6 months after a student grad- 
uates, at a monthly rate which is commen- 
surate with his earnings. 

As of February 15, there were outstand- 
ing loans in the amount of $17,542.50. Over 
the six year period of the Consolidated Fund, 
we have found it necessary to charge off a 
total of $1,124.00, considered to be uncol- 
lectible. (A part of this we still expect to 
collect in the future.) 

Over this 6-year period, a total of 814 
loans have been made, representing $87,457.- 
72. 

Eight hundred fourteen times Ave have 
been able to help a student who required 
financial assistance. We think this record 
speaks for itself. 

As for the future: we have sufficient cash 
on hand to take care of the expected push 
during April and May, up until the time 
of graduation. Most students find that the 
end of the year brings expenses which are 
unexpected and unbudgeted. This loan fund 
will be read for them, thanks to the gen- 
erosity of interested friends. 

T am sure the students are as grateful as 
your committee members are, to have this 
fine help. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

We wish to mention another fund to you, 
even though it does not fall within the Con- 
solidated Pharmacy Fund. It is a new 
Scholarship Fund, established as a memorial 



to the late Ralph P. Rogers, a former pres- 
ident of the NCPhA, father of a daughter 
and two sons, one of who is Ralph, Jr., 
manager of N. C. Mutual Drug Wholesale 
Company. Awards will be made from the 
earnings of this fund, and will be in the 
form of a scholarship. 

Many of you know of the extensive schol- 
arship programs financed by our Woman's 
Auxiliary. These include one to the memory 
of Mrs. Rogers — so we think it is sig- 
nificant that both these fine people who are 
no longer with us, live in the present through 
help to students. 



VISIT HEE HAW SET 

Pharmacist Phil Link of Reidsville re- 
cently spent three days watching the TV pro- 
gram, Hee Haw, being taped. 

Phil was a guest of Archie Campbell, one 
of the Hee Haw headliners. Phil and Archie 
were college buddies at Mars Hill back in 
the 30s and have maintained correspondence 
/telephone contact over the years. 

Hee Haw does not have a studio audience 
— the applause and laughter are dubbed in 
— so Phil was fortunate to be among a rel- 
ative handful who got to see the interesting 
proceedings first hand. 

KING NAMED COMMISSIONER 

Winfred A. King, Mount Airy pharma- 
cist, has been named to the Mount Airy 
Board of Commissioners. 

A pharmacist in Mount Airy since 1949, 
Mr. King has been a partner and secretary- 
treasurer of Wolfe Drug Company since 
1967. 

He is a past president of the Mount. Airy 
Merchants Association and is a past exalted 
ruler of the Mount Airy Elks Lodge. Fol- 
lowing graduation from the UNC School of 
Pharmacy, he served in the IT. S. Navy dur- 
ing World War II. 

The Mount Airy Times, in commenting on 
Pharmacist King's selection as a commis- 
sioner, editorially termed it "A Good 
Choice." 



The NCPhA-Endorsed Insurance Plans 
Which Merit Member Participation 

DISABILITY INCOME PLAN 

BASIC PLAN: Accident Total Disability — Lifetime 

Sickness Total Disability — Two Years 

EXTENDED PLAN: Accident Total Disability — Lifetime 

Sickness Total Disability — Five Years 

MAJOR MEDICAL EXPENSE PLAN 

PLAN I: $18,000 Maximum Benefit including $30 Daily Room Limit 
PLAN II: $30,000 Maximum Benefit including $50 Daily Room Limit 
(Up to $45,000 Maximum Benefit including $75.00 Daily Room 
Limit Available) 

TERM LIFE PLAN 

Up to $20,000 For Members 
Dependents Coverage Also Available 

HOSPITAL INCOME PLAN 

$25.00 Per Day For Member 
$20.00 Per Day For Spouse 
$15.00 Per Day For Each Child 

Payable From The First Day of Hospital Confinement 

For Up to 15 Months 

RETIREMENT AND PROFIT SHARING PLANS 

Excellent plans are available for both the Self Employed 
and Corporate Entities. 



FOR DETAILS 

WRITE OR 
TELEPHONE: 



HOYT W. SHORE, C.L.U. and Associates 
821 Baxter Street— Suite 316 
Charlotte, North Carolina 28202 

Telephone: (704) 333-3764 



Washington National 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

EVANSTON, ILLINOIS 60201 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



27 



MARRIAGES 
Price-Smith 

Miss Gwendolyn Jean Smith of Greensboro 
and Bonnie Lee Price of High Point were 
married June 16th at Montlieu Methodist 
Church of High Point. Mr. Price, 1972 grad- 
uate of the UXC School of Pharmacy, is with 
Mann 's Drug Xo. 4. The couple will be living 
at the Cloisters Apartments, High Point. 



Ayscue-Norwood 

Miss Kitty Arlenc Xorwood and Diciglit 
Milton Ayscue were married June 23 in the 
Warrenton Baptist Church, Warrenton, Mr. 
Ayscue, graduate of UXC School of Phar- 
macy, also attended East Carolina Univer- 
sity. He is with People's Drug of Eden. 



DEATHS 
Kelly E. Bennett 

Kelly Edmond Bennett, Bryson City phar- 
macist, died June 28. 

A graduate of the UXC School of Phar- 
macy (1912), Mr. Bennett was owner /man- 
ager of the Brvson City Drug Company for 
more than fiO years. 

He served as mayor of Bryson City for 
fourteen years and was a member of the 
North Carolina Senate in 1917, 1931 and 
1937. 

In the early 20s, he served as a trustee of 
the University of Xorth Carolina and from 
192(i to 1925, was a member of the N.C. 
Hoard of Pharmacy. He was named "Phar- 
macist of the Year" in 1954. 

A pharmacist with wide ranging interests, 
Mr. Bennett was characterized as "a one- 
man chamber of commerce for his mount;, in 
region, serving without pay for the pride 
and joy of it. ' ' 

Of the survivors, one, a daughter, Mrs. 
Mary Alice Greyer, also a pharmacy grad- 
uate of UNC, has been associated with her 
father in the operation of Bryson City Drug 
Company since 1936. 



For eighty-nine years 
. . . . since 1885 



seemcin 

OF DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long 
association with North Car- 
olina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its fifty- 
fourth volume, and the first 
printed copy was "Seeman 
Printed." 




A DIVISION OF 
FI6HER-HARRISON CORP. 



28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 
Rx PRICE POSTING— YES 

by Wilbur P. Gulley, Durham 



From Winston-Salem Journal, 
June 2, 1974 

In 1971, Americans spent four and a half 
billion dollars' on out-of-hospital prescrip- 
tion drugs. Soaring prices for medications 
have pinched all consumers, but they hit 
hardest at those who can least afford to pay : 
the elderly with fixed incomes, the poor and 
the chronically ill. 

Based upon our research in the area of pre- 
scription drugs for the last year and a half, 
NO PIRG (Public Interest Eesearch Group) 
believes that these commodities are serious- 
ly over-priced. There are several major rea- 
sons for this, including excessive spending 
for advertising and marketing by the big 
drug companies, out-of-date patent laws for 
new drugs, and, most importantly, a lack 
of real price competition among companies 
in the drug industry. Directly related to this 
is the report by the Federal Trade Com- 
mission that in 1970 the top twelve drug 
firms exhibited a higher rate of return than 
any other industry group. 

It is difficult for average consumers to 
have any influence over these problems in 
the drug industry. But there is another 
major reason for high drug prices that 
exists closer to home. Through surveys con- 
ducted in 1973 and 1974, NC PIRG found 
that the same prescription may cost five 
times at one pharmacy what it does at an- 
other pharmacy in the same town. 

We found, for example, that a consumer 
in Durham may pay $6.00 for 40 capsules 
of penicillin (a common antibiotic) simply 
because he or she has no way of knowing 
that the same prescription costs $1.20 at 
another pharmacy in town. Similarly, in 
Winston-Salem, 40 capsules of tetracycline 
(another common antibiotic) may cost $4.15 
at one pharmacy and only $1.15 at an- 
other. 

The main reason, I would suggest that 
some consumers pay five times what another 
consumer might pay for the same prescrip- 
tion is simply price secrecy. Today it is 
difficult to impossible for consumers to find 



out the price they are to pay for a prescrip- 
tion drug ahead of time. Prices are not 
listed or posted in a pharmacy, and our 
surveys showed that about half the time 
drug stores in Winston-Salem and Durham 
refused to give out prices over the phone. 

We believe that, as with most other prod- 
ucts, the consumer has a right to know the 
price of a prescription drug before he or 
she buys. Any consumer should be able to 
compare prices before purchase, and such 
comparisons should not be burdensome (like 
expecting a consumer to drive from phar- 
macj' to pharmacy to get an idea of price 
variations). 

The belief that prescription-drug price 
secrecy has no justification has led the courts 
to strike down prohibitions against adver- 
tising in 12 states in the last decade. Re- 
strictions on advertising prices have been 
a part of the total problem of price secrecy 
for drugs. Last month, the N. O. Court of 
Appeals upheld a lower court 's ruling that 
restrictions on advertising by the N. C. 
Board of Pharmacy were unlawful and 
without merit. 

Allowing advertising is not, by itself, 
the answer, however. Because larger firms 
will have a financial advantage over smaller 
ones and because most ads will give only 
a few prices, advertising can be unfair and 
potentially deceptive. 

We believe that a better answer lies in 
coupling advertising with a new state law 
that would require greater price availability. 
A bill we sunnorted in the General Assem- 
bly this spring would have required all 
pharmacies to post the prices of the 100 
most popular drugs and to make the price 
of all drugs available in person or by 
phone. Unfortunately, members of the House 
of Representatives turned a deaf ear to 
the bill and voted it down. 

Today 's price secrecy in prescription drugs 
is a holdover from a time when assurance of 
quality was largely in the hands of in- 
dividual pharmacists. Then, it was impor- 
tant for prices to take a back seat to a 
(Concluded on Page 32) 



, 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



Rx PRICE POSTING— NO 

bv Stuart Rollins, Pfafftown 



From The Winston-Salem Journal, 
June 2, 1974 

With Wake Forest University's regular 
sessions laid to rest 'til next fall, the WFU- 
NC PIRG (Research Group) will most like- 
ly be somewhat "quietened" until then. 

But only to rest for a while and come 
back with both barrels. 

We as pharmacists should not turn our 
backs to this group and hope they will go 
away. This is a powerful lobby of con- 
scientious, (and courageous) men and women 
from numerous campuses throughout our 
state, a popular group by the very things 
they stand for: fairness for all people and 
a fair shake for the hard-earned dollar. 

But, here in Winston-Salem, pharmacists 
are concerned with methods' used by the 
group to achieve their goal — the posting of 
prices of the 100 most popular Ex items. 

We, for the most part, don't object to 
the inquiry into prices of Rx drugs — only 
the method to accomplish the inquiry since 
pharmacists are split between ethics (pro- 
fessionalism) and the Almighty Dollar when 
it comes to the nitty-gritty of "what the 
price of so-and-so?" 

Down in Raleigh a month or so ago, legis- 
lation concerning the posting of Rx prices 
was killed in committee (tabled). Come fall, 
it will come back as sure as cold weather. 

Actually, whether the Research Group 
realizes it or not, they have already won 
their case. Pharmacists in Winston-Salem 
and North Carolina must clean our own 
consciences if they need cleaning. We must 
.ioin together in common causes to give a 
fair, ethical price to our customers. 

T '11 face up — pharmacists are a proud 
gioup and members of one of the oldest 
professions. We arc as proud of our pro- 
fession as doctors and dentists' even though 
a greater percentage of our undertaking 
deals witli commodities rather than witli 
service. 

We might have a soda fountain thrown 
in for convenience, but it is analogous to 
the blocks in a doctor's office for pediatric 
patients. 



We find it hard to "swallow" price as 
the only factor in our business. We want 
to be respected as part of the community to 
help people as other professionals arc, and 
there's certainly no other person who works 
as long and hard at it as the pharmacist. 

True, pharmacists have got to be the most 
unorganized group of professionals in this 
city when it comes to having a common 
opinion on anything. Unbeknownst to the 
Research Group (until now), the pharma- 
cists in this city cannot agree among them- 
selves what, if anything, can or should be 
done about this "hot headed" group that 
is causing, as one pharmacist put it, who-do- 
they-thing-they-aro vibrations among us. 

So, a fundamental problem, even among a 
relatively small group of pharmacists, is that 
we have not been able to organize ourselves 
for even one editorial response to NC- 
PIRG's study. This makes us considerably 
vulnerable. 

What if the "Prescription Posting for 
100 Most Popular Rxs" becomes reality? 
Locally, the Board of Aldermen is reported 
to endorse the drive to post prices. 

I feel that many believe that to have 100 
"loss-leaders" listed at the supermarkets 
leads to generally lower prices throughout 
the store. The same people believe that post- 
ing the 100 prices of Rxs* will lead to lower 
Rx prices'. This is not true. 

I believe that posting prices will lead to 
higher, not lower, prices of Rx prices over- 
all. The posted items, of course, will be sold 
at wholesale — with the loss made up by 
various other methods, such as cutting ser- 
vice, cash-and-carry marketing, shorter hours 
and longer lines and a sort of "throw it at 
them " attitude. 

Naturally, one would expect my views to 
be on the side of the pharmacists, but I do 
try to be objective in my thoughts and to 
put myself in the position of the Research 
Group. 

What they are doing is certainly ad- 
mirable, and it will be interesting to see 
how it all comes out — and also to speculate, 
after the yuiarmacists' and the grocers', in 
whose closets they'll be looking for skeletons 
next. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



30 



COIT WRIGHT 

Coit Wright, chief pharmacist of the Spar- 
tanburg, South Carolina General Hospital, 
died recently. Pharmacist Wright was a 
graduate of the UNC School of Pharmacy. 



DRUG LOSS 

During a predawn breakin on July 12, a 
large quantity of Controlled Substances was 
stolen from the King Drug Company, King, 
North Carolina. An unusual aspect of this 
robbery was that records were taken with 
the drugs. 



RELIEF PHARMACIST 

Belief Pharmacist available for employ- 
ment in the Morehead City /Jacksonville area 
in August. Call the NCPhA for details. 




A. E. P. Tablets $22.50 per 1000 
$30.00 Doz. 100s 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 25 mg. Tablets 
$1.20 per 100 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 50 mg. Tablets 
$1.80 per 100 

Reavita Capsules $24.00 Doz. 100s 
$18.75 per 1000 

Your cooperation in stocking 
Reaco Products is appreciated 

REACO PRODUCTS 

P. O. Box 2747 
West Durham, North Carolina 




Recently, Eli Lilly and Company cited the Wilson Drug Company, Wilson, North Carolina, 
on the occasion of filling 1,000,000 prescriptions, with a commemorative gift jar. Observing 
the event from left to right are: W. C. Moyer: Lilly Representative; Herschel Robinson: Lilly 
District Manager; Marshall L. Newbern: President of Majority Stockholder; Gerhman Wil- 
liamson: Pharmacy Technician; Mrs. Blanche Wyatt: Registered Pharmacist; Wayne Avery: 
Registered Pharmacist. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 



DISASTERS 



Major and Minor 



PISTOL IDENTIFICATION LEADS 
TO ARREST 

A .38 Smith and Wesson pistol, stolen 
along with a quantity of Controlled Sub- 
stances from Lanier Drug Company, Erwin, 
enabled Brunswick, Georgia police to tie 
the robbery to two men with long criminal 
records. 

.Tames Stephen "Wilson and John Andrew 
Kuhar of Merritt Island, Florida were 
stopped by state troopers near Brunswick, 
Ga. for speeding. The pistol and drugs were 
traced to the Lanier Drug Company robbery. 



GASTON I A 

Burglars threw a cement block through 
a glass door of Eckerds Drug Store, 1117 
South York Road, and stole two portable 
television sets. 



WARSAW 

Controlled Substances, cash and assorted 
merchandise were stolen (late June) from 
the Warsaw Drug Company. A safe was 
ripped open. The pharmacy is operated by 
Jack and John "Weatherlv. 



STOREROOM COLLAPSES 
FOLLOWING HEAVY RAIN 

Thompson's Pharmacy and Gift Shop on 
Falls Road, Rocky Mount, was damaged in 
late June when a storm culvert under the 
pharmacy caved in following heavy rains in 
the area. 

A 10 x 20 foot storeroom located at the 
rear of the pharmacy gave way dropping 
merchandise into the water-filled cavity. 

Later, a hole dug by city crews to carry 
off drain water from the pharmacy area was 
used by an unknown subject to gain entrance 
to the building and to escape with approx- 
imately SI 000 in drugs. 



WINDSOR 

This past Christmas, three men were ar- 
rested in the act of robbing Windsor Phar- 
macy. Later, on Bill Gurley 's birthday, the 
pharmacy was again broken into with the 
loss of about $500 of Controlled Substances 
and a number of watches. 

Ernest Carraway, one of the pharmacy 
owners, says he is all set for Labor Day 
Since his unknown visitors prefer holidays. 
Ernest has a shotgun all primed for the oc- 



SOUTHERN PINES 

A small quantity of barbiturates was stolen 
by thieves who broke into the Sandhill Drug 
Company, 154 North West Broad Street, in 
early July. For reasons unknown, the thieves 
pulled merchandise from shelves and scat- 
tered it over the floor. 




32 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Rx PRICE POSTING 

pharmacy 's reputation for pure and accurate 
prescriptions. But currently more than 9f5 
per cent of all medicines arriving at the 
pharmacy are pre-mixed and pre-packaged 
by the manufacturer and quality is tightly 
regulated by the Food and Drug Admin- 
istration. 

There are, of course, factors beside price 
to consider when choosing a pharmacy. Lo- 
cation, services, convenience and courtesy 
will continue to influence shoppers. But in- 
foi'mation as to the services offered is open- 
ly available to all consumers at present. 

What is not available is one of the most 
important factors in the decision of where to 
have a prescription filled — the price. 

This" state of affairs demands a change. 



Currin-Jackson 

Miss Sylvia Love Currin of Oxford and 
William Allan Jackson of Greenville were 
married in Oxford on July 7. The bride- 
groom, a 1973 graduate of the UNC School 
of Pharmacy, is associated with Eevco Drug 
Store, Lexington. 







'm Mentioned in This Issue." 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Classified advertising (single issue inser- 
tion) 10 cents a word with a minimum 
charge of $3.00 per insertion. Payment to 
accompany order. 

Names and addresses will be published un- 
less a box number is requested. 

In replying to ' ' blind ' ' ads, address Ad. 

No. , Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, 

P. O. Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 

FOR SALE — Complete set of fixtures 
by Grant Key, including several 
lighted show cases. Also, adjustable 
stock room metal shelving. Contact 
Frank Barnett, Wollard's Drug, 
Henderson, N. C. 27514. Phone 919- 
438-4121. 

PHARMACIST WANTED: Excep- 
tional opportunity open at K Mart 
Pharmacy, 1916 Stone Rose Drive, 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 27801. Call or 
write Tom Whitaker, Pharmacy 
Manager, for details. 

I. C. System, Inc. 

The nation's most highly 
specialized collection service 

Your Association's Collection Service is 
an affiliate of a national organization cur- 
rently serving members of more than 700 
leading trade associations throughout the 
nation. 

Don't lose sales volume because cus- 
tomers owe you money and are trading 
somewhere else. Your Association's Col- 
lection Service will chase those debtors 
back into your place of business to pay 
YOU direct. You will get accounts OFF 
your ledger and IN your bank account — 
and you will also have many former cus- 
tomers back doing business with you again. 
For information, contact your Association 
office. It will pay you to do so. 

On request, A representative 

of the I. C. System will explain 

the collection program in detail. 

Call or write the NCPhA, Box 151, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



j^k I itlil II I Ml I ^k. PREPARED TO COVER 

[Tip Top ... a computerized ^^ 



WE ARE 

COVER YOUR MANY 

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he CaroLi 



atouna 



Journal of Pharmacy 

Volume LIV September 1974 Number 9 

LIBRARY 




The President-Elect of the American College of Apothecaries, J. Gary Newton (left) of the 
Prescription Center, Fayetteville, is shown with the ACA Associate Director, Michael R. 
Ryan, Ph.D., (Center) and W. Whitaker Moose, Immediate Past President of the N. C. Phar- 
maceutical Association. Dr. Ryan was a NCPhA Convention Speaker in Pinehurst. 

— Photo by Colorcraft. 



The most widely prescribed 
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potassium 

phenoxymethyl 

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absorption. 

Indications : For the treatment of mild to mod- 
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infections and mild staphylococcal skin and 
soft-tissue infections that are sensitive to peni- 
cillin G. See the package literature for other 
indications. 

Contraindication : Previous hypersensitivity to 
penicillin. 

Warnings: Serious, occasionally fatal, anaphy- 
lactoid reactions have been reported. Some 
patients with penicillin hypersensitivity have 
had severe reactions to a cephalosporin ; inquire 
about penicillin, cephalosporin, or other aller- 
gies before treatment. If an allergic reaction 
occurs, discontinue the drug and treat with the 
usual agents (e.g., epinephrine and other pres- 
sor amines, antihistamines, corticosteroids). 
Precautions: Use with caution in individuals 
with histories of significant allergies and/or 



asthma. Do not rely on oral administration in 
patients with severe illness, nausea, vomiting, 
gastric dilatation, cardiospasm, or intestinal 
hypermotility. Occasional patients will not 
absorb therapeutic amounts given orally. In 
streptococcal infections, treat until the organ- 
ism is eliminated (minimum of ten days). With 
prolonged use, nonsusceptible organisms, in- 
cluding fungi, may overgrow; treat superinfec- 
tion appropriately. 

Adverse Reactions: Hypersensitivity, includ- 
ing fatal anaphylaxis. Nausea, vomiting, epigas- 
tric distress, diarrhea, and black, hairy tongue. 
Skin eruptions, urticaria, reactions resembling 
serum sickness (including chills, edema, arthral- 
gia, prostration), laryngeal edema, fever, and 
eosinophilia. Infrequent hemolytic anemia, leu- 
kopenia, thrombocytopenia, neuropathy, and 
nephropathy, usually with high doses of paren- 
teral penicillin. [05iB7 3 »] 
'equivalent to phenoxymethyl penicillin 

Additional information available — 
to the profession on request. 
Eli Lilly and Company 
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The Carolina 

JOURNAL °f PHARMACY 



September, 1974 

Vol. LIV No. 9 



Officers 

NORTH CAROLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 



President 

W. H. Wilson 
Raleigh 



Vice-Presidents 

L. M. Whaley 

Wallace 
Tom R. Burgiss 

Sparta 

E. W. Hackney 

Lumberton 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



CONTESTS THIS ISM 



Consolidated Pharmacy Fund 4 
Burroughs Wellcome Establishes Pharmacy 

Education Program 5 

Tar Heel Digest 7 

State Board of Pharmacy News 8 

Prentice O 'Neal Has Many Memories 10 

Disasters — Major and Minor ... 13 

Creech to Visit Richmond as Guest of A. H. Robins 15 

U.S. P. Drug Product Problems Report No. 8 17 

Traveling Men's Auxiliary Membership Roll, 1974-75 18 

Lederle Surveys Attitudes Toward ' ' The Pill ' ' 20 

The State of the Profession — As I View its Changes 22 

UNC School of Pharmacy Notes 28 

Third Technician Needed 31 

Marriages — Deaths 33 



ADVERTISERS 

Abbott Laboratories 

Burroughs Wellcome Company 

Ciba Pharmaceutical Company 

Classified Advertising 

Colorcraft Corporation 

Gilpin, Henry B. Company 

ICN Pharmaceuticals (King Associates) 

IC Systems, Inc. 

Justice Drug Company 
Kendall Drug Company 
Lilly, Eli & Company 
Owens', Minor &: Bodeker 

Paid Prescriptions 

Ramsey Manufacturing Company 
E. \\ Rowell Company 
Scott Drug Company 

Seeman Printery 

Smith Wholesale Drug Company 
Washington National Insurance Company 



16 
6 

32 

36 

11 

9 

4th Cover 

13 

1 



2nd Cover 

3rd Cover 

12 

30 

11 

2 

. 24 

14 

34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly bv the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Second class 
postage paid at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



THE CONSOLIDATED PHARMACY 

FUND RECEIVES SUBSTANTIAL 

ADDITION 

A long-time .supporter of the Consolidated 
Pharmacy Fund of the North Carolina Phar- 
maceutical Association, Pharmacist Howard 
Ferguson of Randleman, has made a sub- 
stantial contribution to the Fund. 

Although some of the individually named 
funds operating as a part of the Consol- 
idated Pharmacy Fund have accumulated a 
net value larger than the Ferguson Fund, 
the recent contribution received from Phar- 
macist Ferguson is the largest single addi- 
tion to the Consolidated Fund since it was 
established more than twelve years ago. 

Major purpose of The Consolidated Phar- 
macy Fund is 1 to provide financial assistance 
to needy and deserving students at the UNC 
School of Pharmacy. A number of applica- 
tions for assistance are anticipated in late 
August as the new school year gets under- 
way. 



JOIN 

thi' XCPhA-sponsored tour to the Oth An- 
nual Midyear Clinical Meeting of the Amer- 
ican Society of Hospital Pharmacists, De- 
cember 7-12. Details from the NCPhA. 



SK&F ASSIGNS JIMMI HODKIN 
TO GREENSBORO TERRITORY 

Jimmi Hodgin has been assigned to the 
Greensboro, North Carolina territory as a 
Professional Sales Representative for Smith 
Kline & French Laboratories, the pharma- 
ceutical division of SmitliKline Corporation. 

Before joining SK&F, Mrs. Hodgin ran 
a speech and language diagnostic and ther- 
apeutic service in Greensboro. She grad- 
uated from the University of North Car- 
olina at Greensboro in 1966 with a Bach- 
elor 's degree in speech and psychology. She 
also received a Master's degree in speech 
and psychology from the University in 1967. 

She lives in Greensboro with her husband, 
Robert. 



HIGHLANDS PHARMACY 

CELEBRATING 50TH 

ANNIVERSARY 

In 1924, Charles J. Anderson founded a 
small store in Highlands which today is' 
owned and operated as Highlands Rexall 
Drugs by Pharmacist J. L. Alexander. 

The pharmacy was purchased by Pharma- 
cist Clarence Mitchell in 1944 and later (in 
1971) sold by him to Mr. Alexander. Over 
the years the pharmacy has gradually ex- 
panded under the management of the three 
owners. 

Within the past year Mr. Alexander has 
added a Second pharmacy to his operation: 
Cashiers Valley Rexall Drug Store managed 
by Pharmacist Mark Zachary. 

Prior to moving to Highlands, Mr. Alex- 
ander was associated with a .VTorganton 
pharmacy as part owner. 

The Alexanders have four children, Tim, 
Lisa, Vickie and Wes. Mrs. Alexander is a 
former officer of the Woman 's Auxiliary of 
the NCPhA. 



RECOMMENDED PHARMACY 
PROGRAM 

PAID PRESCRIPTIONS has an excellent 
40 minute illustrated program with major 
focus on the peer review committee setup 
operational in the state. 

Recommended for presentation to local 
and sectional pharmaceutical organization 
members. If interested in scheduling the 
program, call either H. Shelton Brown or 
Frank Yarborough at PAID PRESCRIP- 
TIONS, telephone (919) 782-3316. 



ESTES RECUPERATING 

Hospital Pharmacist (Annie Penn Me- 
morial Hospital) Joseph C. Estes, Jr. is 
recuperating at home from a cardiac epi- 
sode suffered on May 25. 

Mr. Estes ' physician says he can return 
to work as soon as he can walk two miles 
without abnormally elevating his heart rate. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



PAID PRESCRIPTIONS TO 

ADMINISTER FLORIDA 

MEDICAID DRUG PROGRAM 

PAID Prescriptions has been named by 
the State of Florida to administer the pre- 
scription drug Segment of the State's Med- 
icaid program. 

Currently, Florida has approximately 
400,000 Medicaid recipients and the pro- 
gram's prescription drug payments will to- 
tal 820 million annually. 

The terms of the contract call for PAID 
Prescriptions to assume total financial re- 
sponsibility for providing Medicaid phar- 
maceutical benefits throughout the State of 
Florida in return for fixed capitation rate. 

PAID 's headquarters will be in Jackson- 
ville, Florida, where a 9,200 square foot 
center has been established. Approximately 
45 people will be initially employed on the 
project. The program was scheduled to be 
implemented on July 1, 1974. 

PAID Prescriptions currently administers 
the statewide Medicaid prescription drug 
programs in North Carolina, Arkansas and 
part of California with a total claims value 
of $70 million. 

PAID has Subcontracted with Health Ap- 
plication Systems to provide management, 
systems support and computer facilities for 
this program. 



cies inviting their pharmacists to partic- 
ipate by returning a simple qualifying 
form. The entries will become part of a 
drawing to take place during the National 
Association of Retail Druggists (NARD) 
annual meeting September 29 to October 3. 
The name of one pharmacist from each 
of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, 
and Puerto Rico will be drawn. A check 
for $500 will go to the pharmacy school of 
choice in the pharmacists name to be used 
as a loan for a deserving student. 

The Pharmacy Education Program is an- 
other part of Burroughs Wellcome 's con- 
tinuing commitment to pharmacy. Earlier 
this year Burroughs Wellcome Co. included 
a ' ' Salute to Pharmacy ' ' in its nationwide 
telecasts of " I Am Joe 's Heart ' ' ; and two 
publications — Wellcome Trends in Pharmacy 
and Wellcome Trends in Hospital Pharmacy 
go to pharmacists on regular basis. Bur- 
roughs Wellcome Co. throughout its history 
has consistently promoted its retail prod- 
ucts through the pharmacist. 

Any pharmacist not receiving an entry 
form is encouraged to notify the Company 
either through a Medical Sales Representa- 
tive or by writing Pharmacy Education 
Program, Burroughs Wellcome Co., 3030 
Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, 
N. C. 27709. 



BURROUGHS WELLCOME 

ESTABLISHES PHARMACY 

EDUCATION PROGRAM 

A 826,000 Pharmacy Education Program 
lias been established by Burroughs Well- 
come Co. to assist practicing pharmacists in 
aiding the education of deserving students 
in pharmacy schools throughout America. 

The program lias Inch created because 
Burroughs Wellcome shares with the phar- 
macist a strong desire to retain the high 
standards which have characterized the pro- 
fession throughout its history. One of the 
best methods for assuring this is to provide 
financial assistance to students who need it. 

Burroughs Wellcome Co. is now contact 
ing over 00,000 retail and hospital pharma 



TMA MEMBERSHIP ROLL 

An up-to-date list of members of The 
Traveling Men's Auxiliary of the NCPhA 
for 1974- '75 appears on pages 18-19 and 
alternate pages thereafter. 

Where desired, the pages may be removed 
from the Journal and attached to cardboard 
for an easy reference poster. On request, an 
extra copy of the Journal will be mailed 
without charge. 

If your favorite sales representative is 
not listed among the 240 plus members of 
The TMA, an application blank may be ob- 
tained by writing: Mr. L. M. McCombs, 
Secretary-Treasurer, TMA, P. O. Box 7, 
Creedmoor, N. C. 27522. 



NO TOOLS NEEDED. 

Empirin Compound 250s 
still have easy-open.easy-close, fiddle-free caps 




Good sales sense 

No need to create cap-opening difficulties for 
people who can't cope with child-resistant 
closures. The elderly and the handicapped. House- 
holds without children. (To accommodate these 
users, each manufacturer of aspirin-containing 
analgesics Is permitted by law to make .,ne size 
available without a safety closure,) 
The Empirin Compo ind 250 tablet bottle is the 
right choice for them. Easy to open. Easy to close. 
Easy to take. 



Good profit sense, too 

Every Empirin Compound "250" you sell can bring 

you a prof It of up to $1.10? Yet one facing uses only 

4% inches— scarcely more than most analgesic 

100'sdo. 

Make the most of every analgesic Incn on your shelves. 

Make it with Empirin compound 250's. 

•Based on suggested list prices. 



& 



Burroughs Wellcome Co. 

Research Triangle Park 
North Carolina 27709 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 



WINSTON-SALEM— Gilbert C. Hartis, Jr. 
has been promoted to district manager of 
Region o of Eevco Discount Drug ('enters, 
Inc. 

SHELBY— Health Care Services of North 
Carolina, Inc. has" purchased Smith Drugs. 
Frank J. Griffin, Jr. is the new store man- 
ager. Walker Gregory will retire in a few 
mouths and until that time will remain as 
manager of the prescription department. 

SMITHFIELD— Richard Stephens, formerly 
of Mann Drugs, High Point, has joined the 
pharmacist staff at Clow Drug. 

BOONE — Howard M. Logan has accepted a 
pharmacist position with Carolina Phar- 
macy. He has practiced pharmacy in Shelby 
and West Jefferson and at one time was 
rfales manager for Hart Laboratories of 
Winston-Salem. 

ASHEVILLE — Antifreeze is expected to he 
in short supply this fall and winter. Re- 
cently Eckerd 's 100 case shipment of anti- 
freeze was sold in ten days at $4.95 a gallon. 

STANTONSBURG—Thv July !> program of 
the Wilson County Pharmaceutical Associ- 
ation was presented by Pharmacist A. Row- 
land Strickland, Jr. \vhosv topic was ''Tests 
for and Potency of Drugs for Diabetes." 

HILLSBOROUGH— Pharmacist Evelyn P. 
Lloyd hit the campaign trail on behalf of 
the candidacy of Judge Jim Carson for At- 
torney Genera] Of North Carolina and Wil- 
liam Stevens for the U. S. Senate. 



WINSTON-SALEM— Mr. and Mrs. Allison 
James have moved to St. Clairsville, Ohio. 
During recent years, ill health has limited 
Mr. James, a former president of the 
NCPhA, was active participation in phar 
inacy events. He is the oldest (HH) past 
president of the NCPhA. 

CHARLOTTE— Pharmacist D. L. Lemelii) 

of Walker 's Drug Store will represent North 
Carolina at a Venereal Disease Conference 
scheduled concurrent with the 1974 Annual 
Convention, of the NARD, Las Vegas. 

WILMINGTON— \ newcomer to the city is 
Pharmacist George K. Cawthorne, formerly 
associated with Watts Hos'pital Pharmacy, 
Durham. 

ST A TESVILLE— Fred Lowry has been 
elected president of the North Carolina 
Gideons. He is the owner/manager of Lowry 
Drug Company. 

LINCOLNTON—A 1973 graduate of the 
UNC School of Pharmacy, Steve Jaynes, 
has accepted employment with Lawing- 
Keziah Drug Company. 

BELMONT— Mrs. Carol E. Jones is moving 
to the University of Michigan where her 
husband, Maurice, will enter to work on his 
Doctor of Pharmacy degree. 
WILMINGTON— A recent TV show in- 
cluded Pharmacist F. Alex McCrackin who 
discussed prescription drugs and the cost 
of prescription medication. 
ROXBORO— The Administrator of the Per- 
son County Memorial Hospital, J. E. Fer- 
guson, has announced the hospital will em- 
ploy a pharmacist full time beginning this 
fall. Mrs. Elizabeth Killian has been rec- 
ommended for the post. 

BOONE— Pharmacist Carol C. Norris is as- 
sociated with Roone Drug, Inc. Prior to 
moving to Boone, Mrs'. Norris was assistant 
chief pharmacist at Wake Memorial Hos- 
pital, Raleigh. 

SMITHFIELD— T)w new (#2) Clow Drug 
Company opened in Pine Needle Square 
Shopping Center by Jim Clow has 10,000 
square feet of floor space. In addition to 
Pharmacist Clow, there are three other phar- 
macists associated with the organization: 
Russell Wright, Jim Parker and Richard 
Stephens. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Members — David D. Claytor, Greensboro; Harold V. Day, Spruce Pine; Jesse M. Pike, 
Concord; Jerry Price, Raleigh; W. H. Randall, Lillington; H. C. McAllister, 
Secy.-Treos., Box 471, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



NEW PHARMACIES 

Big Value Discount Drugs, 1102 "West 
3rd Street, Ayden. Jack L. Tyler, phar- 
macist-manager. 

The Medicine Shoppe, 814 Church Street 
North, Concord. Preston R. Forrester, 
pharmacist-manager. 

Professional Pharmacy of Havelock, Slo- 
cum Shopping Center, Havelock. Ed Ed- 
mondson, pharmacist-manager. 
Peoples Service Drug Store, Inc., Martin 
Plaza, Williamston. B. R. Bonney, phar- 
macist-manager. 

Revco Discount Drug Center, 1318 Shel- 
by Road, U. S. 74, Kings Mountain. Jo- 
seph B. Summey, pharmacist-manager. 
Upchurch Drugs, Causeway Shopping 
Center, Atlantic Beach. Julian Upchurch, 
pharmacist-manager. 

Kerr Discount Drugs, 102 West wood 
Shopping Center, Fayetteville. Fred 
Rachide, pharmacist-manager. 
K Mart Pharmacy, 1001 Patton Avenue, 
Asheville. Tom Allison, pharmacist-man- 
ager. 



RECIPROCITY 

James Harold Babcock from New York 
Dennis Bryon Hanson from Ohio 
David Alexander Jones from Michigan 



TRANSFER OF OWNERSHIP 

1. Tom Jones Discount Drug Center, Forest 
Hills Shopping Center, Garner. Thomas 
H. Jones, pharmacist-manager. Formerly 
Forest Hills Pharmacy. 

2. Salem Pharmacy, 2112 Old Lexington 
Road, Winston-Salem. Charles Delaney, 
pharmacist-manager. 

3. Lee Drug Store, 101 South Steele Street, 
Sanford. Charles L. Lazarus, pharmacist- 
manager. 



MEDI-CENTER PHARMACY 

On August 9 a pharmacy permit was is- 
sued to Medi-Center Pharmacy, 415 Dun- 
ston Avenue, Durham, N. C. 27707. William 
H. Burch, pharmacist-manager. 



BOARD EXAMS 

More than one hundred candidates for 
license to practice Pharmacy in North Car- 
olina were in Chapel Hill, August 20/21, for 
the 2-day exam session conducted at the 
UNC School of Pharmacy by the N. C. 
Board of Pharmacy. 



» 




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10 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



PRENTICE O'NEAL HAS MANY 
MEMORIES 

From The Beaufort-Hyde News, 
Bellhaven, N. C. 

Young Prentice O 'Neal, with a relatively 
new bride, a bouncing 1926 Chevrolet and 
$2.25 in a savings account rolled down Bel- 
haven 's only paved street, paid a month 's 
rent for the building he 's in and O 'Neal 's 
Drug Store was in business. 

That was on July 11, 1931. 43 years ago 
in the bowels of a depression. 

A native of the New Holland community 
in Hyde County, his family moved to Bel- 
haven in 1918, shortly before young Pren- 
tice was sent to the University at Chapel 
Hill to study pharmacy. 

He graduated in 1926, anl worked at Sut- 
tons Drug Store in both Chapel Hill and 
Durham before taking over as manager of 
Randall Mann drug store in High Point. 

Times were tight in 1926, but not so much 
for the pharmacist. As that time Civil and 
Electrical engineers were begging for jobs 
that would start them at a salary of $75. a 
month . . . and drug stores were searching 
everywhere for pharmacists with starting 
salaries of $150. a month. 

That's why young Prentice could afford 
to pay $600. for a new Chevrolet, including 
bumpers, and still manage to buy a small 
amount of stock in the Randall Mann drug- 
store. 

But, by 1931, he'd had enough of the big 
city, so he took his bride of 1929, the late 
Mae Leigh of Chapel Hill, packed his' gear 
and headed home. 

How was the trip we asked him. "Inter- 
esting. I had taken the small amount of 
money I got from my stock in the High 
Point Store, and the banker there advised 
me to deposit it in the First National Bank 
at Raleigh. I thought about it, decided not 
to, and that bank closed down in a matter 
of days. 

"When I got here to Belhaven I : ntended 
to deposit it in the Guaranty Bank here, 
but before I got around to it this bank 
had closed too. So, actually the only money 
I lost with the closing of the banks was" 
what I had in a savings account, here . . . 
and that was a grand total of $2.25. ' ' 



So, here he was in Belhaven. What was 
it like? 

' ' There was only one paved street but 
we had a population of about 2,500 which 
is actually more than we've got now. You 
might say I 've seen the town prosper, but 
not grow. But, the character of the town 
was friendly then, as it is" now, and I be- 
lieve that 's the reason we had no bread 
lines here during the depression. People 
helped each other, and that's the way we 
made it. In that respect, it has not changed. ' ' 

Shortly after arriving here he rented the 
building he's in from S. J. Peele for $40 
a month, but before he could open his doors 
for business he had to stock up. 

' ' Up in Washington Jess Harrington and 
Sam Ethridge had bought a defunct drug 
store, and I bought my fixtures from them. 
I got a soda fountain, wall cases and a few 
other things. It took 50 gallons of alcohol 
and a week of hard work to get the fixtures 
clean enough to use. 

"With that done Jim Hayes and I took 
a truck to Raleigh to buy my Supplies for 
the drug store from the W. H. King Com- 
pany. I bought enough supplies for the 
whole store for less than $1,000 which really 
wouldn 't be enough to equip one shelf to- 
day. To open a drug store today, supplies 
would cost about $75,000." 

On July 11, 1931, he opened his doors for 
the first time. How was business? 

"Well, Dr. Ellis G. Winstead wrote the 
first prescription I filled and it was for a 
man who lived in Fairfield. It was a pre- 
scription for bichloride of mercury . . . 
something to help kill infection . . . they 
don 't prescribe this anymore. 

' ' Well, at the end of the first day we 
had taken in $35 — and I was as happy as 
I could be. That was really something! " 

The store grew, and so did the family. 
Two sons, two daughters and eight grand- 
children. 

In time he found time for public service. 
He became a member of the town board 
in 1938, and in two different hitches, 1943- 
49, and 1959-70, he gave 19 years to the 
community as mayor. 

How about some memories? "There are 
too many to recall. For some reason I '11 
always remember the 1920 Independence 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



Day Celebration. Milton Bishop headed a 
committee that got a plane to come here, 
and people paid to take rides. Albert White 
and I bought several gallons of ice cream 
for the occasion, and we got Dave Lucas, 
a well-known colored man that a lot of 
people will remember, to pack the ice cream 
down with ice and salt. Well, Dave packed it 
so well that by the time it came to serve it it 
was so hard we could not dip it out, and 
while people stood there waiting to be 
served, we had to pour water in it to soften 
it up . . . maybe that's why I remember 
the occasion so well, but, it was a great 
day. ' ' 

' ' And then, too, I '11 never forget the man 
who came into the store, bought a cone of 
ice cream . . . ate the ice cream and handed 
me the empty cone . . . 'here, mister,' he 
said, 'here's your cone back' ..." 

"Memories flood together in a wonderful 
life . . . and T can truthfully say that if 



T had my life to live over again I wouldn 't 
change it for anything. 

''I love this community and these people 
and I can 't think of a better life than walk- 
ing down the street meeting friends along 
the way. ' ' 



ESTATES AND WILLS 

Guest speaker at. the July meeting of the 
Rockingham County Society of Pharmacists 
was Attorney William McLcod of Eeidsville. 

Mr. McLeod spoke on Estates and Wills. 
He brought out the importance of having a 
will and the problems' that occur when a 
will has not been written. 

Some other aspects he brought up were 
inheritance tax, joint bank accounts and life 
insurance policies. 



'Remember the "Day 
...in^ctures 



olorcraft 




Photo PxoceiAox 



North Carolina's Most Complete 
Film Processing Service 

There Is A Plant Located 
Near You 

For the Finest Quality Plus Fast 

Dependable Service on All Your 

Photo Needs, Contact the Plant 

Nearest You. 



CHARLOTTE 

KERNERSVILLE 

FAYETTEVILLE 



WILMINGTON 

RALEIGH 

DURHAM 



If You Don't Know Photofinishing 
Know Your Photofinisher 



DISTINCTIVE ^^ 




Carry your 
store's Identity by color and 
personalized copy right Into your customers 
home for the life of the Prescription 



Another plus value of the modern 
box with its clean fresh label. 



paper 



N. ROWELL CO., INC. 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



We wrote 
the book on 
pharmaceutical 
benefit programs 





PAID Prescriptions has 
been a pioneer in the develop- 
ment and administration of 
third party prescription drug 
programs for almost a decade. 
Currently, we administer pro- 
grams covering over 4,000,000 
people through a network of 
close to 30,000 participating 
pharmacies in the United States 
and Puerto Rico. State agencies, 
insurance companies, labor 
unions, school districts, profes- 
sional associations, medical 
foundations, we're involved 
with them all. 

We're also specialists in 
providing consultation, facili- 



ties management and total 
program administration for 
Medicaid pharmaceutical 
benefit programs. Our major 
projects in this area include 
Title XIX Drug Programs for 
the States of Arkansas and 
North Carolina, and a portion 
of California. 

Through our administra- 
tive agent, Health Application 
Systems, we have access to 
hundreds of highly experienced 
computer and administrative 
specialists in the area of phar- 
maceutical benefit programs. 

We know that you, as a 
major partner in the health care 
system, may be asked about 
services such as we provide. 
That's why we'd like you to 



know about Paid Prescriptior 
In fact, if you know someone 
now who could benefit from 
our services, we would be 
pleased to send our new "Basi 
Drug Program" brochure 
without cost. It's available by 
writing to Pharmaceutical 
Benefit Information Center, 
Paid Prescriptions, 875 Mahl 
Road, Burlingame, CA 940 1( 



IP 



SP 



PAID 
PRESCRIPTIONS 



Other offices in San Bernardino, CA 
Raleigh, NC; Chicago, IL: Seattle, V 
Clifton, NJ; Washington, DC. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

DISASTERS 



13 



Major and Minor 



CLARKTON 

A prescription department-installed alarm 
system foiled an attempted robbery of (Mark- 
ton Drug Center in late July. 

The person or persons who entered the 
pharmacy did so by cutting through the 
roof and coming down a rope. Tt was be- 
lieved the person or persons bypassed the 
door alarm but was not aware of the pres- 
sure alarm device installed in the prescrip- 
tion department. 

When officers arrived on the scene, the 
alarm system had caused a rapid departure 
of the person or persons from the pharmacy. 
The pharmacist manager, Jimmy Rris"son, 
found two empty bags in the pharmacy ap- 
parently for removal of merchandise. 

Prior to the breakin, local officers spotted 
an automobile which appeared to be out of 
place during the early morning hours. A 
record of the license was made and the au- 
tomobile traced to Fayetteville. 

JONESVILLE 

More than $1700 in cash and 3000 Con- 
trolled Substances taken from Mann Drug 
in a late July robbery of the pharmacy. 

OXFORD 

Eooftop thieves broke into Williams Drug 
Company and escaped with almost $1000 
worth of merchandise and cash. The thieves 
limited their loot to birth control pills and 
cash from the register. 

SALISBURY 

Mark Drug Company was entered via a 
vent in the roof and drugs valued at $481 
taken. 

ROBERSONVILLE 

A call to David Grimes Drug Store in- 
formed the store personnel that a bomb was 



set to go off. The store was emptied and 
police notified. Later it was suggested the 
call was a prank. 

CASHIERS 

Cashiers Valley Eexall Drug Store. Two 
men, David Lee Shaney and Kirk Eugene 
Partney, both of Fayetteville, were arrested 
and charged with breaking, entering and 
larceny. 



I. C. System, Inc. 

The nation's most highly 
specialized collection service 



Your Association's Collection Service is 
an affiliate of a national organization cur- 
rently serving members of more than 700 
leading trade associations throughout the 
nation. 

Don't lose sales volume because cus- 
tomers owe you money and are trading 
somewhere else. Your Association's Col- 
lection Service will chase those debtors 
back into your place of business to pay 
YOU direct. You will get accounts OFF 
your ledger and IN your bank account — 
and you will also have many former cus- 
tomers back doing business with you again. 
For information, contact your Association 
office. It will pay you to do so. 

On request, A representative 

of the I. C. System will explain 

the collection program in detail. 

Call or write the NCPhA, Box 151, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



PHARMACY 

ACCOUNT SERVICE 



3E 



*GOOD RECORDS FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS— A proven accounts 
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PHARMACY 

'ADVERTISING PROGRAM 






HOW'S YOUR RETAIL IMAGE?— Good? Bad? Indifferent— Con- 
sult your Smith Representative about our Associated Druggist Pro- 
gram. Some of the advantages of this program are hometown 
newspaper advertising — buying advantages — clerk training pro- 
gram — In store promotion materials and store advertising fliers. 

Just three of the many SMITH services 

Also ask about retirement, group hospitalization and major med- 
ical. Call or write to 





WHOLESALE DRUG 



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• Spartanburg 582-1216 

• Greenville 235-4159 

• Asheville 684-6121 

• Charlotte 825-5161 
Wofford and Forest Streets P. O. Box 1779 

Mii.iiMjiiiiii«.iiM!«jiairw 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 



SMITHFIELD PHARMACIST 

JAMES L. CREECH TO VISIT 

RICHMOND AS GUEST OF 

A. H. ROBINS 

Smithfield pharmacist James L. Creech, 
the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation 's 1974 recipient of the A. H. Robins 
"Bowl of Hygeia " Award for outstanding- 
community Service by a pharmacist, is 
among this year 's award winners who have 
accepted an invitation to visit A. H. Robins ' 
Richmond headquarters in October. 

Award-winning pharmacists from each of 
the United States, the District of Columbia, 
Puerto Rico, and the provinces of Canada 
have been invited to visit Richmond for 
three days beginning October 13. They will 
be guests of the pharmaceutical manufac- 
toring firm and its board chairman, E. Clai- 
borne Robins. 

While in Virginia, the pharmacists will 
tour A. H. Robins' manufacturing plant and 
research center, and be honored at a recep- 
tion and dinner. They also will spend a day 
touring Williamsburg, the restored colonial 
capital of Virginia, and will visit Rich- 
mond 's well-known Valentine Museum. 

In addition to visiting Richmond, the 
award winners will be featured in a special 
full-page advertisement which A. H. Robins 
will sponsor in the October 14 issue of Time 
Magazine. The ad will include photographs 
of all the recipients and indicate that they 
have been cited for outstanding service to 
their respective communities. 

The "Bowl of Hygeia" Award is pre 
sented annually by the participating state 
pharmaceutical associations, which select 
their respective recipients. This is the 17th 
year that A. II. Robins has sponsored the 
"Bowl of Hygeia'' program and the award 
now is one of the most coveted in the phar- 
macy profession. 

Creech is the 16th North Carolina phar- 
macist to receive the award. Previous re- 
cipients were Harold Vann Day of Spruce 
Pine, in 1959; Ralph R. Rogers Jr. of Dur- 
ham, in 1960; William II. Randall of Lil- 
lington, in 1961; Charles I). Blanton Jr. of 
Kings Mountain, in 1962; David R. Davis 
of Williams-ton, in 1963; John T. Henley 
of Hope Mills, in 1964; Jesse Miller Pike 
of Concord, in 196:"; John E. Mills of Mount 



Airy, in 1966; William Whitaker Moose of 
Mt. Pleasant, in 1967; Roger H. Sloop of 
Rural Hall, in 1968; Thomas R. Burgiss of 
Sparta, in 1969; Mrs. Marsha H. Brewer 
of Pink Hill, in 1970; Edwin R. Puller of 
Salisbury, in 1971 ; Lloyd M. Whaley of 
Wallace, in 1972; and Lloyd M. Senter of 
Carrboro, in 1973. 



DR. SCHAEFFER NAMED TO POST 

IN MCV/VCU PHARMACY 

SCHOOL 

Dr. Howard J. Schaeffer has been named 
chairman of the department of pharmaceu- 
tical chemistry in the Medical College of 
Virginia School of Pharmacy at Virginia 
Commonwealth University. He was formerly 
head of the department of organic, chemis- 
try at the Wellcome Research Laboratories 
at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. 
The appointment was effective in July. 

Well known as an educator and scientific 
investigator, Dr. Schaeffer \s research was 
recognized with the Ebert Prize in 1965. 
He received his pharmacy degree from the 
University of Buffalo and the M.S. and 
Ph.D. degrees from the University of Flor- 
ida at Gainesville. 

Dr. Schaeffer, 47, is a past chairman of 
the Medicinal Chemistry section of the 
Academy of Pharmaceutical Sciences - and 
of the Academy's executive committee. He 
has served on the editorial board of the 
Journal of Medicinal Chemistry and as a 
member of the study section on medicinal 
chemistry at the National Institutes of 
Health. He currently serves on the Amer- 
ican Chemical Society's Medicinal Chemis- 
try Long-Range Planning Committee. 

Following his association with the South- 
ern Research Institute in Birmingham, Al- 
abama, he joined the staff of the University 
of Buffalo School of Pharmacy in 1959 as 
chairman of the department of medicinal 
chemistry. He left the university in 1970 
to join Wellcome. 

Dr. Schaeffer succeeds Dr. .1. Doyle Smith 
who resigned the chairmanship to devote 
more of his efforts to teaching. 

A native of Rochester, New York, Dr. 
Schaeffer is married to the former Barbara 
Plehn. The couple has four children. 




What does man have in common with Samson? 



Neither man nor the gorilla can synthesize vitamin C. 
Interestingly, the slow loris, a primate much further 
down the evolutionary scale, can convert L-l,4-gu- 
lonolactone to ascorbic acid in its liver and presum- 
ably does not require an exogenous source of 
ascorbic acid. 

Because man can neither synthesize vitamin C nor 
store most of the water soluble vitamins, these nu- 
trients must be replenished continuously in order to 



maintain normal tissue levels. 

Generally, this is accomplished in his daily diet. 
But under conditions of illness, stress, in convales- 
cence or following surgery, vitamin stores may be 
depleted or metabolic demands increased. 

In such cases, Surbex-T may be indicated. 
Surbex-T restores the water soluble vita- 
mins with each tablet providing 500 mg. of 
vitamin C plus high potency B-complex. 



SU RBEX- T 500 mg. of Vitamin C with High Potency B-Complex 
Restores what the body cannot effectively store 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 
U.S.P. DRUG PRODUCT PROBLEMS REPORT NO. 8 



17 



Published by the U.S.P. Convention, Inc., 12601 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, Md. 20852 
Edited by Joseph G. Valentino, J.D. 

Listed below are case studies which have resulted from the Drug Product Defect Re- 
porting Program.* 

These new case studies are intended to help practitioners become aware of problems 
involved in producing and maintaining high quality in drug products, thereby assisting 
them in detecting defective products and helping them avoid subjecting drugs to dele- 
terious conditions of storage and handling. No reflection on any particular manufacturer, 
distributor, pharmacist, or product is intended or should be inferred from the case studies. 



CASE STUDIES 
I. Product Recoils 

A. Exploding Aerosol Container 

A Drug Product Defect Report stating 
that an aerosol container exploded on a 
physician 's desk prompted the company to 
have detail representatives pick up all stock 
of the product from the wholesale level. 
Prior to the report they had stopped distri- 
bution of the product but the report 
prompted the recall and pick up of the mer- 
chandise. 

B. Corroded Caps 

One Company 's gallon containers of Po- 
tassium Chloride had "dirty caps," "possi- 
bly rust or corrosion ' ' according to a Penn- 
sylvania hospital pharmacist's report. The 
company 'a investigation disclosed that the 
lacquer on the metal caps used to close the 
plastic bottles did not withstand the low 
pH of the solution. The solution then cor- 
roded the metal of the cap where it con- 
tacted the threads of the bottle. The plastic 
gallons with metal caps were recalled be- 
cause of the reaction between the solution 
and cap. The company will use plastic caps 
in the future. 



D. Label on Ampuls Differs from Package 
A hospital pharmacist in Louisiana re- 
ported receiving 100 ampuls labeled Calcium 
Chloride Injection in a box labeled Calcium 
Gluconate Injection and with Calcium Glu- 
conate inserts. The product was recalled. 

E. OTC Acne Cream Exhibits Mold Growth 
A North Carolina community pharmacist 

was responsible for the recall of an OTC 
acne cream because of mold growth. The 
report noted ' ' apparent mold growth inside 
the lid and on the product. ' ' The pharma- 
cist also indicated this had occurred at least 
twice before but he had not reported it. 

F. Potency Mix-Up 

Due to a report from a hospital pharma- 
cist in Washington State, an injectable local 
anesthetic was recalled. The drug is avail- 
able in several strengths and is packaged in 
packages of 12. At least one such package 
contained 11 vials of one strength and 1 vial 
of another. The firm was aware of the mix 
up but had thought all such packages had 
been removed from the market. A recall was 
made to remove any others. 



G. Pyrogen Reaction 

A hospital pharmacist in Florida was re- 
sponsible for a recall of Normal Serum Al- 
bumin. She noticed that two patients given 
the same lot of the drug had experienced 
chills and fever shortly after administration. 
The company recalled the drug because of 
the adverse reactions. 

(Continued on Page 35) 
* The work upon which this publication is based was performed pursuant to Contract 
No. FDA 72-88 with the Public Health Service, Food and Drug Administration Department 
of Health, Education and Welfare 



('. Chloride Error 

A Virginia hospital pharmacist reported 
an approximate 50% error in stating on the 
label the chloride content of a protein hy- 
drolysate injection. The firm agreed this 
could be of clinical importance especially 
in newborns. A recall letter was sent to no- 
tify users of the label error. 



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20 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



LEDERLE SURVEYS ATTITUDES 
TOWARD "THE PILL" 

Do women resent the responsibility in- 
volved in taking the pill? 

Not as much as many of us have thought, 
say women taking part in research on to- 
day 's attitudes toward oral contraception, 
currently being conducted by Lederle Lab- 
oratories, a division of American Cyanamid 
Company. 

In fact, some women indicated they would 
be hesitant to relinquish their responsibility 
for birth control. If there were a similar 
pill for men, they agreed nearly unanimously 
that they wouldn 't trust men to take it. 

These attitudes are emerging in the early 
stages of a study of current views of oral 
contraception by Lederle Laboratories. The 
study is being expanded to seek women 's 
views across the country. 

Mrs. Dagmar O'Connor, a family coun- 
selor and sex therapist at New York Med- 
ical Center, has been named special consul- 
tant to Lederle on the project and will 
travel this spring to cities in four geographic 
areas to continue research begun in New 
York. The in-depth attitude research di- 
alogues will be conducted in Minneapolis, 
Atlanta, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., 
and New York City. 

The research is designed to take stock 
of opinions whicli have evolved about oral 
contraceptives after American women and 
their physicians have had nearly 15 years 
experience with the pill. 

Although women taking part in initial 
dialogues prefer to keep the birth control 
responsibility much as it is now, related 
issues are emerging : the need for improved 
communications between sex partners' about 
contraception ; the pill 's influence on man- 
woman and family relationships; its influ- 
ence on women 's attitudes toward them- 
selves. 

' ' We are trying to sort out the barrage 
of information about the pill, the arguments 
and the influential events which ha\ e shaped 
women 's attitudes about oral contracep- 
tion, " says' Mrs. O'Connor. "The pill has 
created not only a major revolution in 
women 's attitudes toward sex, but in some 
women 's overall attitudes toward life. We 



need to know more about these major trends 
and influences. ' ' 

Mrs. O'Connor lias a private family coun- 
seling practice in Manhattan. She is Director 
of Training for the Sexual Therapy and 
Educational Center of the New York Med- 
ical College Department of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology, where she is also an instructor. 
Her background in family development and 
marriage counseling is a vital asset in Mrs. 
O 'Connor 's work with Lederle 's dialogues 
with women on contraception. She lectures 
extensively on ''Woman and Sex" at col- 
leges, before professional medical groups, 
hospital staffs' and Planned Parenthood 
counselors. She is currently instituting a 
special new program at New York Medical 
f'ollege entitled "The Woman: Relating to 
Her Body." 

Before entering the field of psychology, 
Mrs. O'Connor was a medical researcher in 
gynecology. She and a male co-therapist/ 
psychoanalyst trained with famed research- 
ers Masters - and Johnson at the Reproduc- 
tive Biology Foundation in St. Louis. Her 
master 's degree in psychology is from God- 
dard College, Plainfield, Vt, The Swedish - 
born Mrs. O 'Connor has studied at the 
Woking Technical Institute in England ; the 
Karolinska Institute and the College of 
Veterinary Medicine in Stockholm, Sweden; 
Heidelberg University in Germany ; and 
Lausanne University in Switzerland. 

Current views' of women participating in 
Lederle 's attitude-probing dialogues to date 
are presented in a lively, informative leaf- 
let, "Women Talk About the Pill," avail- 
able to the public by request to : 

Lederle Laboratories 
Public Affairs Department 
Pearl River, New York 10965 



EXHIBIT AT FARM WEEK 
FESTIVAL 

A health orientated exhibit installed by 
Charles Woodard and Wallace Nelson 
(Woodard's Pharmacy, Hertford) at a re- 
cent Farm Week Festival attracted favor- 
able attention. 

Some of the literature and exhibit mate- 
rial was supplied by the NCPhA. 



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22 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



THE STATE OF THE PROFESSION— AS I VIEW ITS CHANGES 

By W. Whitaker Moose, Immediate Past President, NCPhA 



After several opening remarks, President 
Moose said, "I prepare a speech much as 
you would prepare a compounded prescrip- 
tion, each word chosen as carefully as you 
would choose ingredients; the order of com- 
bining, and weighing each phrase and idea 
just as carefully as you would weigh on 
your balances and mix in your pharmacies. 
The finished product is one that is as" care- 
fully thought out as logic will permit, but 
there is one problem ; it will bore you to 
tears! So, this morning, my comments will 
be extemporaneous. Even if T should not 
say anything that you feel of value, the 
anticipation and expectation of my putting 
my foot into my mouth should be exciting. ' ' 

"In the very beginning, I would like to 
express my sincere thanks and appreciation 
to a number of people who have made my 
tenure as president of your association a 
most rewarding and enjoyable experience. 
The first names to come to mind would be 
the Smiths, W. J. and Vivian, and the ded- 
icated staff at the Institute of Pharmacy. 
North Carolina and pharmacy in general is 
extremely lucky to have someone of W. J. 's 
caliber and ability, and I shall fondly re- 
member our association in years to come. 
Next, I would like to express my gratitude 
to the long line of past presidents and offi- 
cers who have each in his own way con- 
tributed so much to make our organization 
what it is today. I would like to give special 
thanks to the two past-presidents that I 
have had the opportunity to serve under and 
learn from: John Hood, and Donald Miller. 
Without their dedicated ground-work many 
of the programs and policies that I will 
probably be given credit for could not have 
come about. I would like to thank the 
PharmPAC organization who so closely 
worked with our legislative committee, and 
executive committee in this year of political 
decision. I would like to also thank the 
members of the various N.C.Ph.A. commit- 
tees that worked selflessly for pharmacy 
during the past year. Special thanks also 
should go to Senator John Henley and Rep- 
resentative Barnie Paul Woodard who were 

Pinehurst, March 25, 1974 



pharmacy 's watchdogs in the current legis- 
lative session. And finally, I would like to 
express my appreciation to all of you mem- 
bers who gave support, advice, and criticism 
during the year. 

' ' If this address had a title, I suppose 
it would be : ' The State of the Profession — 
As I View its Changes. ' In the area of leg- 
islation this has been, as expected an active 
year. The prescription labeling bill has 
been passed in the compromised form worked 
out by Senator Henley and others. Although 
this bill is not just as we would have liked 
it, it is certainly far better than originally 
proposed, and is a bill we can live with. 
The prescription price posting bill has been 
killed in committee due to the dedicated 
work of too many individuals to name at 
this time, but suffice it to say it was a great 
victory for pharmacy especially when as 
little as 12 months ago we were advised that 
a position in opposition to price posting was 
not defensible, and that we would fall flat 
on our faces if we attempted to oppose this 
type of legislation. As hag already been re- 
(Continued on Page 24) 




W. Whitaker Moose 
Mount Pleasant 



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24 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



For eighty-nine years 
. . . . since 1885 



seemcin 

OF DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long 
association with North Car- 
olina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its fifty- 
fourth volume, and the first 
printed copy was "Seeman 
Printed." 



W 



A DIVISION OF 
FISHER-HARRISON COP^. 



THE STATE OF THE PROFESSION 

ported the change in Board of Pharmacy 
fees has been passed in accord with the vast 
number of North Carolina pharmacists 
wishes. There were other proposed bills that 
we kept close watch on during the legisla- 
tive session such as prescription advertising, 
and the nurse practitioner bill, but these 
never materialized, much to our pleasure. In 
the area, of National legislation and policy, 
at the same time were fighting the dragon 
of price posting on the state level, the Cost- 
of-Living Council announced plans requir- 
ing all pharmacies to post the prices of the 
100 most popular prescription items. It is 
our understanding that this plan will not go 
into effect since C-O-L- will disband on 
April 1. Another area of interest to pharma- 
cists is HEW's announced plan for payment 
on the lowest cost, and the testimony that 
this announcement brought out. Politics 
makes strange bed-fellows, but who would 
have thought that retail pharmacy would 
be praised by Senators Edward Kennedy 
and Gaylord Nelson for keeping the lid on 
inflation while P. M. A. (Pharmaceutical 
Manufacturing Association) points an ac- 
cusing finger to the pharmacist for high 
drug costs. It makes' you wonder who your 
friends are! 

' ' And now that in one short year I have 
gone from a young rebel to an elder states- 
man in the area of pharmacy affairs what 
advice do I have for the profession for the 
future? My first word of caution is that 
more and more, of our profession is going 
to be at the mercy of government, and if we 
are to protect our interests we must become 
more politically active. If you can 't run for 
an office yourself, work in a candidate's 
campaign ; if you can 't give time, then give 
money, just make yourself known to the 
candidate so that when the time for a favor 
arises you will have an opening. Another 
area, just as vital to the future of pharmacy 
as we know it is your active support and 
involvement with organized pharmacy, espe- 
cially with your state association and such 
fine organizations at N. C. Pharm PAC. 

' ' Another area of increasing concern is 

the influence of Consumerism. During the 

past year, your executive committee and as- 

(Concluded on Page 26) 



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26 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



THE STATE OF THE PROFESSION 

sociation president have spent considerable 
time and thought answering the charges 
leveled by the P.I.R.G. (Public Interest Re- 
search Group) and other consumer advo- 
cates. We were successful in discrediting the 
validity of their price surveys and many of 
their other charges that attempted to under- 
mine and demine pharmacy, but several facts 
are none-the-less clear : Prescription prices 
are difficult for the public to obtain, and I 
feel that we must seek a workable compro- 
mise in this area. The second fact is that 
price variations for prescriptions are con- 
siderable, and while we can offer explana- 
tions and logical reasons, the consumer that 
pays #8.00 in one pharmacy and is charged 
$12.00 in another for what he or she con- 
siders the identical item just will not listen 
to your arguments. They think they have 
been had! For a long time pharmacy has 
looked down on its members that charged 
too little for their Services, but what about 
those that charge too much? If we are to 
remain a respected profession then we must 
identify and weed out the gougers and 
others that tend to give all of us a bad 
name. 

' ' My advice to anyone who would like to 
help pharmacy in the future would be to 
pay more attention to our public relations 
efforts. We must tell and re-tell what we do 
for the consumer and do it better than any- 
one else! 

"The final area of influence upon our 
profession is that of the courts. Two major 
and far-reaching court decisions have re- 
cently been rendered. One, the lifting of 
the advertising ban on prescription prices 
can greatly influence the way you will be 
forced to practice your profession in years 
to come. The second, the North Dakota vs. 
Snyder case could influence who can own a 
pharmacy. Just what effect will this decision 
have on North Carolina? As I understand 
it, the unanimous Supreme Court decision 
simply means that if a State legislature re- 
quires ownership of a pharmacy by a phar- 
macist then no federal law will interfere. 
In my opinion, the only way a North Car- 
olina Legislature would pass a similar law 
is if it could be proved beyond a doubt that 
chain ownership in some way affects the 



quality of health care delivered by the phar- 
macy. With the evidence at hand, I do not 
believe such a case can be made at this time. 
But this leads, I think, to a very healthy 
situation, for should the quality of deliver- 
ance of pharmaceutical service by the chains 
deteriorate, this decision stands as an ever- 
present threat to wrought change. And it 
would have a similar effect on the indepen- 
dent to attempt to prove his way of practic- 
ing pharmacy better for the overall com- 
munity health. And the ultimate benefactor 
of such a situation, I feel, would be the 
consumer— and that's not such a bad 
thought." 

PHARMACISTS GUIDE TO SK&F 
COUGH & COLD PRODUCTS 

A booklet entitled ' ' Pharmacists ' Guide 
to SK&F OTC Cough and Cold Products" 
lias been prepared by Smith Kline & French 
Laboratories as a professional service to 
pharmacists. The booklet is designed to aid 
the pharmacist in recommending over-the- 
counter cough/cold medication and is being 
made available through SK&F Professional 
Sales Representatives. 

The Scientific information contained in 
the booklet includes an outline of the chem- 
ical and physical composition, molecular 
formulas, and related pharmacological data 
on the SK&F cough/cold line. The booklet 
also guides the pharmacist in cautioning 
users against possible adverse reactions and 
in detecting potential interactions with 
other drugs. 

"Pharmacists' Guide to SK&F OTC 
Cough and Cold Products ' ' is part of an 
ongoing effort to provide pharmacists with 
relevant data on SK&F nonprescription 
products. Having this information readily 
accessible, the pharmacist can feel confident 
that his recommendation suits the needs of 
a specific patient. 

ASHEBORO 

To disable a burglar alarm at Asheboro 
Drug Company, midnight intruders shot the 
alarm five times. A shotgun was used. While 
a number of persons heard the shots, no one 
reported the incident to police. 



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28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

DIC Pharmacy School Notes 



Student officers of the UNO School of 
Pharmacy and pharmacy related organiza- 
tions for the year 1974- '75 are listed below: 

Student Body President : 
Pete Champion 

Student Branches: 

Phil Shoffner — President 
Jeff Smith — Asst. to President 
Lacy Garner — Vice President 
Bryan Eeed — Secretary 
Robert MeKenzie — Treasurer 

Kappa Psi: 

Pete Champion — Regent 
Steve Jones" — 1st Vice Regent 
Charles Brinkley— 2nd Vice Regent 
Bryan Reed — Secretary 
Bobby Bischoff — Treasurer 

Phi Delta Chi: 

Phil Icard — President 
John Uhrin — Vice President 
Louis Mizzell — Secretary 
Gerald Hargis — Treasurer 
Rob Bizzell — Alumni Chairman 

Kappa Epsilon: 

Diane Andrako — President 
Cathy Pemberton — Vice President 
Annette Aman — Treasurer 
Violet Fisher — Secretary 

Bho Chi: 

Walter Meadows — President 
Bruce Dunham — Vice President 
Joyce Hardy — Secretary Treasurer 
Nancy Gilliam — Historian 

ADMITTED TO RHO CHI 

Requirements for admission to Rho Chi 
include (1) must be at least a fourth year 
student and (2) have an overall academic 
average of 3.0 or better. 

These graduates qualified and were ini- 
tiated into the National Pharmacy Honor 
Society: Jeffrey Galen Blanchard, Walter 
Bernard Collie, Bruce Lee Dunham, Melba 
Darlene Purr, Carolyn Ann Garris, Nancy 
Turner Gilliam, Joyce Carol Hardy, Gerald 
Wayne Hargis, Norman Byard Hedrick, 



David Alan Hoffman, Wyllis Eugene James, 
Jr., Warren Rickman Jones, William Thad 
King, II, Wing Sang Lee, Walter Vernon 
Meadows, Jr., Linda Susan Messer, Mary 
Kathryn Palmer, Thomas" Fain Taylor, Wil- 
liam Dorsey Vick, III, Frances Drennan 
Whaley, Margaret Jordan Willis, and Cindy 
Ann Worsley. 

AND MEANWHILE, 
BACK AT THE RANCH . . . 

Things have been quite busy this summer 
with the Drug Education Program. Why, 
you might ask, has" the program been so 
busy in a period when students are gone for 
the summer? The answer is simple — the Pro- 
gram is in many ways a new program this 
year. Following funding from the North Car- 
olina Drug Authority in June, extensive 
groundwork has been accomplished to follow 
the new idea in drug education — stop talk- 
ing about the drug and start talking about 
the person. As" such, there is no real drug 
problem but there are problems which people 
have, which lead to drug use. In recent 
weeks, workshops' have been held with teach- 
ers from Rowan, Wake, Gates, and Yancey 
counties talking about people and the prob- 
lems they have, how they like to feel good 
and what to do when problems arrive. These 
will continue through the year. 

Of vital importance, however, is the class- 
room work at the School of Pharmacy. 
Over 120 students from over 18 different 
majors" have enrolled in the class which 
seeks to talk about people and their use of 
drugs. Led by School of Pharmacy faculty, 
and aided by specially trained pharmacy 
students who serve as small group leaders, 
the students develop a better understanding 
of why drugs might be used, and most im- 
portant of all — viable, positive alternatives 
to drug use or situations which might lead 
to harmful drug use. 

Yes, things on the ranch have changed, but 
the business of effective drug education con- 
tinues on. „,, ,, 

— Steve Moore 

Associate Director 

Drug Education Program 

School of Pharmacy 



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DRUG STORE SHOPPERS ARE 
DIFFERENT 

Today's shopper expects, and responds, to a Modern Shopping Atmosphere. 
3 out of 10 impulse purchases are inspired by 

DISPLAYS 
The right kind of drug store fixture is the KEY to VOLUME Sales . . . 
We can assure you the right kind of fixture for every display purpose with 

COLUMBUS IMPERIAL DRUG 
STORE FIXTURES 

Let us DESIGN and engineer your DRUG STORE to promote and SELL merchandise. 

We have successfully given this service to our customers for over a quarter of a 
century. 

"Giving you the best design, the best fixture and the best service by 
professionals" 

CALL US FOR A SINGLE FIXTURE OR A COMPLETE STORE. 



RAMSEY 

MANUFACTURING CORPORATION 

513 East Trade Street 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Telephone 704-334-3457 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 



THIRD TECHNICIAN NEEDED 

By Watt Huntley, Brunswick Beacon 
Shallotte, N. C. 

Once a man went to see the doctor about 
a pain he was having. "Doctor," he said, 
"I was asking the druggist about this pain, 
and he . . ." 

Interrupted the doctor indignantly, "And 
what fool advice did he give you?" 

"He told me to see you," replied the 
man. 

Doctors and druggists have worked as a 
team ever since doctors gave up mixing their 
own medicines from herbs, powders, and 
elixirs they kept on a shelf in the back 
room. But now, thanks to the federal gov- 
ernment, this team needs a third skill to 
help make the sick well again. 

If you've bought any medicine lately, 
were you able to open the container that 
held it? 

The government has some new safety 
regulations about medicine bottles. If you're 
normal, chances are it took you quite a 
while to read the instructions written in 
Braille on top of the bottle cap. 

Then you had to figure out what they 
meant, and then try to make them work. 

If you were quite sick, instead of just 
so-so sick, the chances are you had to get 
someone else to open the bottle for you. 
You didn't have the eyesight, patience, or 
strength to get that tricky top off. 

What the medical team needs now is a 
mechanic who will make house calls to open 
medicine bottles. 

Designating these mechanics as Phara- 
Medical Technicians would create a whole- 
new profession within the health field and 
give useful, congenial jobs to thousands of 
people— both men and women, on an equal 

basis. 

In our sex-minded society, this new pro- 
fession could meet a new social need as well 
as a medical one by sending women techni- 
cians to men patients, and vice versa. 

The Feds could promulgate this new ac- 
tivity in the name of individual personal 
safety. This is a subject in which they have 
such a morbid busybody interest, we'll all 
be in padded cells by 1984— if we haven't 
yet strangled to death on seat belts and 



shoulder straps which Big Brother has al- 
ready decreed for his reckless little brothers 
and sisters. 



LILLY ANNOUNCES PRICE 

INCREASE ON ITS STANDARD 

INSULIN PRODUCTS 

Faced with sharply rising production 
costs, Eli Lilly and Company has increased 
the prices of its standard Insulin products 
by 10 percent. This is the first price in- 
crease on these products in 28 years. 

The company also announced the third 
price reduction for its antibiotic Keflex® 
(cephalexin monohydrate, Lilly) in less than 
three years. With this latest reduction, Ke- 
flex dosage forms have been reduced by 21 
to 35 percent since the antibiotic was intro- 
duced in the United States in 1971. These 
reductions followed improvements in pro- 
duction yields and other efficiencies. 

Concerning Insulin, Thomas H. Lake, 
Lilly president, said, "We know that many 
diabetics are on lifetime therapy and it is 
only with great reluctance that we are rais- 
ing our Insulin prices. Inflationary produc- 
tion costs finally forced us to make this 
decision. 

"Prices for pancreas glands, from which 
Insulin is made, are now 129 percent above 
those in 1968, ' ' Lake continued. ' ' The most 
dramatic increase for these glands came in 
the past year when prices jumped 85 per- 
cent. In addition, wages are about 50 per- 
cent above 1968 levels. 

"For nearly three decades we have used 
every means possible to avoid raising our 
Insulin prices. Today Lilly Insulin prices 
are about 90 percent less than they were in 
1923, the year the product was introduced." 
(See enclosed chart.) 

Special beef and pork Insulin prepara- 
tions, used by only a very small percentage 
of diabetics, were increased in price by 15 
percent. 

The new Insulin and Keflex prices are 
those that the Lilly firm charges its nearly 
420 wholesale distributors in the U.S. These 
wholesalers, in turn, sell Lilly pharmaceu- 
ticals to retail and hospital pharmacies. The 
new juices become effective today. 




It is your business 

if she didnf take her 

high blood pressure 

pills today! 

"How's your back today?" . . . 
"Did the antacid work?" 

Sound familiar? Such questions are 
common in the pharmacy today, showing 
that the pharmacist — as a key member of 
today's health team — is interacting with 
his patients/customers because he is 
deeply concerned. 

"Mrs. Jones, did you take your 
high blood pressure pills today?" 

An especially important question, because 
more and more physicians are treating 
hypertension earlier and more vigorously 
to help reduce the risks of eventual organ 
damage. Missed medication spells danger, 
since such neglect may become a habit. 
Many pharmacists consider it their 
professional responsibility to interact posi- 
tively with patients/customers on advice 



concerning adherence to antihyperten- 
sive regimens. 

Such opportunity for interaction will 
increase in the months and years ahead as 
more patients come into the treatment 
system. Because the problem is so tre- 
mendous — 23 million Americans are 
hypertensive, yet only half are detected 
and only an eighth are under adequate 
treatment — mass screening efforts have 
been organized throughout the country. 

For example, CIBA has been conducting 
CHEC (Community Hypertension Evalu- 
ation Clinics) programs for more than a 
year across the nation. Many thousands 
screened, many thousands referred to 
their physicians. 

CIBA is also launching a series of hyper- 
tension-oriented seminars for pharmacists' 
postgraduate education as part of our 
commitment to meet your needs. 

The challenge is before us. Now is the time 
for true interaction to solve what is now 
recognized to be a major 
national health problem. C> 1 D A 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



33 



MARRIAGES 

HARDY-SMITH 

Miss Susan Leigh Smith and William 
Murphy Hardy, Jr. were married July 20 at 
Christ Episcopal Church, Rocky Mount. Mr. 
Hardy, 1972 graduate of UNC School of 
Pharmacy, is a Medical Sales Representa- 
tive for Dista Products. 

SHIGLEY -CALLAHAN 
Mrs. Virginia Callahan and Henry H. 
Shigley were married June 28th at Central 
United Methodist Church of Asheville. Mrs. 
Shigley, pharmacist at St. Joseph 's Hos- 
pital, and Mr. Shigley, former owner of 
Grove Park Pharmacy, are living at the 
Grove Park Apartments, 30 Edgemont Road, 
Asheville. 

AY SCUE -NORWOOD 
Miss Kitty Arlene Norwood of Areola 
wag married June 23 to Dwight Milton Ays- 
cue of Warrenton. The Ayscues are making 
their home in Eden, where he is employed 
by Peoples Drug Company. Mr. Ayscue is 
a 1974 graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy. 

JACKSON-CURRIN 
William Allan Jackson, pharmacist at 
Revco Drug Stores of Lexington, and Miss 
Sylvia Love Currin of Oxford, were married 
July 7 at Hester Baptist Church of Oxford. 
Mr. Jackson was a member of the 1973 
graduating class of UNC School of Phar- 
macy. 

8 TE WA R T-McKE NZIE 
Miss Ellis June McKenzie and James C. 
Stewart, Jr. were married June 30 at Cub 
dee Presbyterian Church. The Stewarts will 
live in Greensboro where Mr. Stewart is em- 
ployed at Edmonds Drug of Greensboro. 

LEWIS-CARLTON 
Norman Colin Lewis, graduate of the 
UNC School of Pharmacy, and pharmacist 
at Day's Drug Store, Spruce Pine, was mar- 
ried July 6 to Miss Dacia Carlton of War- 
saw. 



MORGAN-GOODMAN 

Miss Judith Ann Morgan of Westgate 
Pharmacy, Statesville, and William Hardin 
Goodman of Hickory were married July 27 
in the First Baptist Church, Forest City. 

DEATHS 
Robert C. Hair 

Robert Clifton Hair, age 72, Pineville 
Pharmacist, died in Charlotte on July 22. 

A graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy (1923), Mr. Hair was the owner/ 
operator of Pineville Drug Company and 
served as mayor of Pineville for a total of 
seven years between 1949 and 1963. 

Survivors m elude his wife; a son, a 
brother and sister and four grandchildren. 

Ralph Holmes 

Ralph Turbiville Holmes, age 79, States- 
ville, died July 28 at Presbyterian Hospital, 
Charlotte. 

At the age of 14 Mr. Holmes was em- 
ployed by Burwell & Dunn Drug Company 
of Charlotte and remained with this com- 
pany until 1932. He established Holmes 
Drug Company after leaving Burwell & 
Dunn, selling the firm to the Miller Brothers 
in 1962 but continuing thereafter as an em- 
ployee of the Miller operation. 

BASIC BIOPHARMACEUTICS & 
PHARMACOKINETICS 

A unique, non-credit course on Basic Bio- 
pharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics is 
scheduled to begin September 3, 1974 and 
continue for 14 consecutive weeks every 
Tuesday evening from 7:30-9:30 P.M. in 
Chapel Hill at the School of Pharmacy. 

A descriptive brochure outlining the con- 
tents of the course may be obtained by writ- 
ing: Claude U. Paoloni, Director of Con- 
tinuing Education, School of Pharmacy, 
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 
N.C. 27514. 



DRUG INTERACTIONS CHART 

Free, on request to the NCPhA, a drug in- 
teractions chart, 11" x 16", compliments of 
Pictorial Packaging. 



The NCPhA-Endorsed Insurance Plans 
Which Merit Member Participation 



BASIC PLAN: 



EXTENDED PLAN: 



DISABILITY INCOME PLAN 

Accident Total Disability — Lifetime 
Sickness Total Disability — Two Years 

Accident Total Disability — Lifetime 
Sickness Total Disability — Five Years 



MAJOR MEDICAL EXPENSE PLAN 

PLAN I: $18,000 Maximum Benefit including $30 Daily Room Limit 
PLAN II: $30,000 Maximum Benefit including $50 Daily Room Limit 
(Up to $45,000 Maximum Benefit including $75.00 Daily Room 
Limit Available) 

TERM LIFE PLAN 

Up to $20,000 For Members 
Dependents Coverage Also Available 

HOSPITAL INCOME PLAN 

$25.00 Per Day For Member 
$20.00 Per Day For Spouse 
$15.00 Per Day For Each Child 

Payable From The First Day of Hospital Confinement 

For Up to 15 Months 

RETIREMENT AND PROFIT SHARING PLANS 

Excellent plans are available for both the Self Employed 
and Corporate Entities. 



FOR DETAILS 

WRITE OR 
TELEPHONE: 



HOYT W. SHORE, C.L.U. and Associates 
821 Baxter Street — Suite 316 
Charlotte, North Carolina 28202 

Telephone: (704) 333-3764 




Washington National 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

EVANSTON, ILLINOIS 60201 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 



U.S.P. DRUG PRODUCT PROBLEMS REPORT NO. 8 



(Continued from Page 17) 
H. Tablet Mix-Up 

A Virginia pharmacist reported finding 
tablets of two different sizes in a bottle of 
steroid tablets. The firm analyzed the odd 
size tablet and found it to be an antihista- 
mine. It is believed the mix up was" caused 
by someone at the manufacturing plant 
slipping a partially filled barrel containing 
the antihistamine tablets under the tablet 
filler to be filled with the steroid tablets. 
This resulted in one barrel of mixed tablets 
and ultimately a Class I, hazard to health, 
recall. 



II. Product Improvements and Problems 

A. Same Name — Different Formulation 

An alert community pharmacist reported 
a possible point of confusion for pharma- 
cists and physicians with the product Pheno- 
barbital and Belladonna Tablets No. 2. It 
seems that there are two products marketed 
with the same unofficial generic name, con- 
taining the same ingredients, but with dif- 
ferent amounts of Belladonna. One of the 
companies replied that a cautionary state- 
ment would be added to their labeling and 
cataloeues stating that the brand must be 
specified to avoid confusion with compet- 
itors ' products of the same name but differ- 
ent formulas. 



B. Pharmacist Receives "Too Fresh" 
Product 

A Georgia community pharmacist reported 
a topical skin lotion which was gray-light 
chocolate color instead of the medium peach 
lotion that he was accustomed to receiving. 
The company quickly responded saying that 
the product actually is the gray-light choc- 
olate color when first manufactured. It grad- 
ually becomes redder as a minute amount of 
blue food and drug color, that is part of 
the color system, oxidizes giving the me- 
dium peach skin tone. Apparently, the prep- 
aration reached the pharmacist before the 
color change was completed. 



C. Route of Administration Missing from 
Amp 

A Texas hospital pharmacist reported that 
one company 's ampuls of Magnesium Sul- 
fate Injection did not have the routes of 
administration printed on each ampul. The 
company responded to him saying they ap- 
preciated having this brought to their at- 
tention and that steps were being taken 
immediately to include the information on 
each ampul. 

D. Abuse Schedule Symbol Causes Label 
Confusion 

Many pharmacists have reported the pos- 
sibility of errors in dispensing a line of 
cough medications in which the DEA legend 
symbol could be mistaken for the initials 
used in some of the product proprietary 
names. The company has informed the phar- 
macists that the symbol will be moved to 
another location on the label to eliminate 
the confusion. 

E. Misprint in Catalogues 

A New York City pharmacist pointed out 
that the generic name for one brand of 
prednisone was" listed in the company cat- 
alogue incorrectly as prednisolone, while the 
statement directly under it said that each 
tablet contains prednisone. The company 
will correct this when that page is reprinted 
in the near future. 

P. Unit Dose Packaging Improved 

Many pharmacists have reported to the 
DPDE System their concern over the label- 
ing of unit dose packages of an iron med- 
ication. The preparation is available in a 
tablet and in a timed releas'c capsule form. 
The label of the unit dose does not distin- 
guish between the two, but rather states 
only the trade name of the product. This 
leads to the possibility that the extended re- 
lease capsule might be given when the tab- 
let is ordered, and vice versa. The company 
reports that the label on the capsule form 
will be changed to indicate the difference, 
to a bottle which is substantially heavier 
and as such should take more punishment 
while in. transit. 



36 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Classified advertising (single issue inser- 
tion) 10 cents a word with a minimum 
charge of $3.00 per insertion. Payment to 
accompany order. 

Names and addresses will be published un- 
less a box number is requested. 

In replying to "blind" ads, address Ad. 

No. , Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, 

P. O. Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 



RELIEF PHARMACIST — Available 
at all times in Durham, Chapel Hill, 
Burlington and surrounding area. 
Seven years experience, liability in- 
sured. Up to 50 references. James 
Hall (919) 563-6830. 



PHARMACY CALENDAR 

Meeting at the Institute of Pharmacy 

AUGUST 

15 — Health Manpower Council 

21 — NCPhA Committee on Institutional 

Pharmacy 
22— NCPhA Committee on Mental Health 
26 — Training Session (Moore) 
27 — Training Session (Moore) 
At UNC School of Pharmacy 
20 — Board of Pharmacy Exams 
21 — Board of Pharmacy Exams 
29— NCPhA President W. H. Wilson and 

NCPhA Executive Director W. J. Smith 
30 — will be in Orlando, Florida for 

meeting of the Southeastern Conference 
31 — of Pharmaceutical Association 

Executives. 



RELIEF PHARMACIST — Available 
— will travel to any part of North 
Carolina but prefer Central or East- 
ern N. C. Phone Robert Lucas, Dur- 
ham, North Carolina (919) 489- 
8540. 

OPPORTUNITY OPEN for an expe- 
rienced Hospital Pharmacist in 
North Central North Carolina. Sal- 
ary plus liberal fringe benefit pro- 
gram (averages 30% supplement 
to base salary). Call or write the 
NCPhA for additional details. 



CS SALES TO PHYSICIANS 

Controlled Substances may be sold to a 
physician with the billing through a com- 
munity pharmacy, however the Substances 
cannot be shipped through the pharmacy to 
be picked up by the physician. 

The Substances must go directly to the 
physician 's office because his name and ad- 
dress would be on the order form. 



RAILROAD NOSTALGIA 

Of interest to UNC Pharmacy graduates: 
The Carrboro train station, which has not 
been in use for years, is soon to become a 
restaurant featuring authentic railroad nos- 
talgia. 

So far the owners have not taken kindly 
to our suggestion the deluxe dinner include 
a cinder in the eye. 



HOSPITAL PHARMACISTS 
CANDIDATE/OFFICER 

Fred M. Eckel, Director of Pharmacy 
Services at North Carolina Memorial Hos- 
pital, Chapel Hill, is a candidate for Pres- 
ident-Elect of the American Society of Hos- 
pital Pharmacists. 

Another North Carolina pharmacist, Mil- 
ton W. Skolaut, Director of Pharmacy Ser- 
vices at Duke University Medical Center in 
Durham, is serving his third 3-year term as 
Treasurer of the ASHP. 



PEOGEAM SUGGESTION : Paid Prescriptions of Ealeigh has an illustrated, 45-minute 
program detailing the operational procedures involved with the Medicaid Pharmacy Peer Ee- 
view Committees of North Carolina. Eecommended for local and sectional pharmaceutical 
organization programs'. To schedule this program, call either Prank Yarborough or Shelton 
Brown, Paid Prescriptions, Ealeigh, Tel (919) 782-3316. 







OWENS, MINOR & BODEKER, INC 

WILL DO THE REST 

TO GIVE YOU 

THE BEST 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE SYSTEM 

EVER.... 




NOW BIGGER AND 
BETTER THAN EVER! 



Ask your ICN Representative* 



mm 




W. H. King Drug Company 

Raleigh, North Carolina 


O'Hanlon-Watson Drug Company 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 


Bellamy Drug Company 

Wilmington, North Carolina 


Peabody Drug Company 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



lie Carolina 



Journal of Pharmacy 



Volume LIV Ocrot 

JL 1 1) tv r\ IV 

OCT 4 1974 



SCHOOLj OF PHARMACIA ' 



October 1974 



Number 10 




Dean Seymour Blaug (center, front row) of the School of Pharmacy, University of North 

Carolina, Chapel Hill, is shown with members of the Executive Committee of the North 

Carolina Pharmaceutical Association. 

During a 2-hour session with the Association's executive committee on September 5, Dean 

Blaug outlined his educational approach to the practice of pharmacy. The committee was 

impressed with his plans for the future and, at the conclusion of the Dean's presentation, 

voted unanimous approval of and support for the pharmacy educational program at UNC- 

CH. 

Others appearing in the picture, front row, left to right: Milton Whaley, Wallace; NCPhA 

Secretary W. J. Smith, Chapel Hill; Dean Blaug; W. H. Wilson, Raleigh, and John C. Hood, 

Jr., Kinston. 

Back row, left to right: W. Whitaker Moose, Mt. Pleasant; Tom Burgiss, Sparta; Eugene 

Hackney, Lumberton; B. Cade Brooks, Fayetteville; George Edmonds, Greensboro; and 

Michael Whitehead, Ramseur. 

— Photo by Photographic Laboratory, Communication Center, University of North Carolina. 



The most widely prescribed 
oral penicillin... V-Cillin K @ 

potassium 

phenoxymethyl 

penicillin 




fcf --if* . 

f l U 



Tablets V-Cillin K: 125, 250, and 500 mg.*; V-Cillin K, for Oral Solution: 125 and 250 mg.*/5 ml. 
Brief Summary. Consult the package literature for prescribing information. 



Description: V-Cillin K® (potassium phenoxy- 
methyl penicillin, Lilly) is the potassium salt of 
V-Cillin® (phenoxymethyl penicillin, Lilly). This 
chemically improved form combines acid sta- 
bility with immediate solubility and rapid 
absorption. 

Indications : For the treatment of mild to mod- 
erately severe pneumococcal respiratory tract 
infections and mild staphylococcal skin and 
soft-tissue infections that are sensitive to peni- 
cillin G. See the package literature for other 
indications. 

Contraindication : Previous hypersensitivity to 
penicillin. 

Warnings : Serious, occasionally fatal, anaphy- 
lactoid reactions have been reported. Some 
patients with penicillin hypersensitivity have 
had severe reactions to a cephalosporin; inquire 
about penicillin, cephalosporin, or other aller- 
gies before treatment. If an allergic reaction 
occurs, discontinue the drug and treat with the 
usual agents (e.g., epinephrine and other pres- 
sor amines, antihistamines, corticosteroids). 
Precautions: Use with caution in individuals 
with histories of significant. allergies and/or 



asthma. Do not rely on oral administration in 
patients with severe illness, nausea, vomiting, 
gastric dilatation, cardiospasm, or intestinal 
hypermotility. Occasional patients will not 
absorb therapeutic amounts given orally. In 
streptococcal infections, treat until the organ- 
ism is eliminated (minimum of ten days). With 
prolonged use, nonsusceptible organisms, in- 
cluding fungi, may overgrow; treat superinfec- 
tion appropriately. 

Adverse Reactions: Hypersensitivity, includ- 
ing fatal anaphylaxis. Nausea, vomiting, epigas- 
tric distress, diarrhea, and black, hairy tongue. 
Skin eruptions, urticaria, reactions resembling 
serum sickness (including chills, edema, arthral- 
gia, prostration), laryngeal edema, fever, and 
eosinophilia. Infrequent hemolytic anemia, leu- 
kopenia, thrombocytopenia, neuropathy, and 
nephropathy, usually with high doses of paren- 
teral penicillin. [o 5 i873«] 
^equivalent to phenoxymethyl penicillin 

Additional information available 
to the profession on request. 
Eli Lilly and Company 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46206 



FOR ALL YOUR CHRISTMAS BUYING 


REQUIREMENTS IN THE FOLLOWING LINES 


Amity 


Sasheen Ribbon 


April Showers 


Remington 


Brite Watchbands 


Schick 


Burley 


Gillette 


British Sterling 


Musk Oil 


Mermen 


Cosmetics 


Shulton Old Spice 


Fragrances 


Clairol 


Colonial Arts, Crafts and Gifts 


Speidel 


Water Pik 


G.E. Christmas Light 


Sets & Bulbs Cross Pen & Pencil Sets 


Epco 


Calculators 


Westclox 


Candles 


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Bal de Bain 


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Pro Brush 


Panasonic 


Eastman 


J. B. Williams 


Polaroid 


Hai Karate 


Jean Nate 


3-M 


Faberge 


CHECK WITH YOUR JUSTICE SALESMAN- 


DO JUSTICE TO YOUR CHRISTMAS BUSINESS! 


JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 




Greensboro, N. C. 


In Our 77th Year 


of Service to the North Carolina Retail Druggists 



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500 

RETAIL PHARMACIES BUY 

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Money Saving Special Buys 



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WITH 

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SOME PEOPLE JUST LIKE US 

SCOTT DRUG COMPANY 

Full Service Wholesaler Since 1891 

Exclusive Cosmetics — Fragrances — Accessories 

Exquisite Gifts — Fine Jewelry 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Telephone (704) 375-9841 







The Carolina 

JOURNAL « PHARMACY 



October, 1974 

Vol. LIV No. 10 

Officers 

NORTH CAROLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 



President 

W. H. Wilson 
Raleigh 



Vice-Presidents 

L. M. Whaley 

Wallace 
Tom R. Burgiss 

Sparta 

E. W. Hackney 

Lumberton 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



CONTENTS THIS ISM 



Oscar Smith Elected Board Chairman 4 

Fulton Appointed to Board of Pharmacy Staff 5 

Seminar: The Prescription Advertising Dilemma 7 

Steve Roberts Confers with Governor Holshouser 8 

Disasters — Major and Minor 

State Board of Pharmacy News 13 

Upjohn Pharmacy Consultant Panel Convened 15 

Audit of Pharmacy X Results in Refund 17 

Tar Heel Digest 21 

Letters to the Editor 23 

N. C. Pharmaceutical Research Foundation, 

1973- '74 Report .27 

UNC School of Pharmacy Notes' 28 

Births/Marriages/Deaths 29 

Woman's Auxiliary of the NCPhA 30 

NCPhA Committees— 1974-1975 32 

ADVERTISERS 
American Druggists' Insurance Company 15 

Burroughs Wellcome Company 6 

Colorcraf t Corporation 12-14 

Gilpin, Henry B. Company 9 

ICN Pharmaceuticals (King Associates) 4th Cover 

IC Systems, Ine 21 

Justice Drug Company 

Kendall Drug Company i7 

Lederle Laboratories 2 * 

Lilly, Eli & Company 2nd Cover 

Owens, Minor & Bodeker, Inc 3rd Cover 

Ramsey Manufacturing Company 22 

Robins, A. H. Company 10 

Reaco Products 13 

Scott Drug Company 2 

Seeman Printery 25 

Smith, Kline & French Laboratories 16 

Smith Wholesale Drug Company 19 

The Upjohn Company 20 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Second class 
postage paid at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



OSCAR SMITH ELECTED 
BOARD CHAIRMAN 

The Board of Trustees of Surry Com- 
munity College at, their regular meeting on 
August 12, elected Oscar Smith, a Pilot 
Mountain pharmacist, as their Board Chair- 
man for the 1974-75 year. Mr. Smith suc- 
ceeds Bill Allen, an Elkin attorney, as 
chairman. Mr. Smith has served on the Board 
since the college was granted its charter in 
1964. During this time, he has served on 
various committees and recently has served 
as chairman of the Finance Committee. 

Mr. Smith, a Surry County native grad- 
uated from Pilot Mountain High School and 
the Southern College of Pharmacy in At- 
lanta, Georgia. For many years, Mr. Smith 
has been active in the church and in civic 
activities, having served as mayor of Pilot 
Mountain four times. Presently Mr. Smith 
is a member of the Board of Directors of 
Workmen 's Federal Savings' and Loan, the 
Board of Directors of the Northern Hospital 
of Surry County, and the Board of Directors 
of the Bank of Pilot Mountain. 

He is married to the former Betty Boaz. 
They have three children: Oscar W. Smith, 
Jr. of Winston-Salem ; Mrs. Sue Ray Willis 
of Gainesville, Georgia; and Miss Mary Eliz- 
abeth Smith, a student in the School of 
Nursing at the University of North Car- 
olina. 

TO CONTROL DIVERSION 
OF CS DRUGS 

Announcement has been made of a $220,- 
000 grant to the State Bureau of Investiga- 
tion, the N. C. Drug Authority, the N.C. 
Board of Pharmacy and the Federal Drug 
Enforcement Administration to enable these 
organizations to make a concerted effort to 
curb illegal distribution of Controlled Sub- 
stances. 

The funds will enable the organizations to 
expand their inspections staffs. In the case 
of the Board of Pharmacy, two pharmacists 
will be employed and specially assigned to 
the project for which the funds are being 
made available. 

It is our understanding eight inspector/ 
agents will be assigned to three district 



areas where they will be readily available to 
direct immediate attention to illegal activities 
associated with Controlled Substances. 

With this additional manpower, hopefully 
the high incidence of pharmacy robberies 
can be reduced from the present level. 

MOUNT BENNETT 

A peak in the Great Smoky Mountains 
National Park has been named for the late 
Pharmacist Kelly Bennett of Bryson City. 

"Mount Bennett" is located near Bryson 
City and was officially named by the U. S. 
Board of Geographic Names. Naming of the 
peak had the support of the Western North 
Carolina Historical Association, the N. C. 
National Park, Parkway and Forests De- 
velopment Commission, and the National 
Park Service. 

Pharmacist Bennett, known as the ' ' Apos- 
tle of the Great Smokies, ' ' was a pioneer in 
the establishment of the Great Smokies as a 
national park. 

In commenting on the naming of ' ' Mount- 
Bennett" a friend said: "The mountains 
were forever in his eyes and his thoughts. 
To him, they were heaven and heaven was 
his home. ' ' 

MILLER ENTERS LAW SCHOOL 

Donald Miller, a past president of the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 
has" enrolled in the Wake Forest Law School. 

This past year Mr. Miller successfully 
completed some work at Lenoir Rhyne in 
Hickory which enabled him to meet the Law 
School admission standards. Mr. Miller, like 
some of his precessors, sees a future for 
the pharmacist attorney (one has just been 
employed by the N. C. Board of Pharmacy). 

Mr. Miller 's current address is Donald Mil- 
ler, 20 WF University Trailer Park, Win- 
ston-Salem, N. C. 21906. 

FIXTURES & EQUIPMENT 
FOR SALE 

Acme Drug Company, 148 South Steele 
Street, Sanford, North Carolina. Wall cases, 
display fixtures and equipment for sale. Call 
Pharmacist A. W. Palmer or better still, 
visit the pharmacy. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



A STUDY OF AMBULATORY 

PHARMACY SERVICES FOR 

SOCIAL SECURITY RECIPIENTS 

Marc Laventurier, Vice President of 
PAID Prescriptions, is pleased to announce 
the implementation of a pilot project spon- 
sored by the Social Security Administration. 
This study will consider how out-of-hospital 
prescription drugs might be administered 
under national health insurance or Medicare. 

Mr. Vincent Gardner, Chief of the Drug 
Studies Branch of Social Security's Office 
of Research and Statistics, is the Project 
Officer for this $559,839 contract with 
PAID Prescriptions of Burlingame, Cal- 
ifornia. James B. Cardwell, Commissioner 
of Social Security, said that the contract is 
part of the Social Security Administration's 
continuing study to assess the effects of co- 
payments and deductible on the costs' of pro- 
viding outpatient drug benefits and on the 
administrative costs involved. 

Under the contract, PAID Prescriptions 
will administer out-of-hospital drug insur- 
ance programs in cooperation with the Med- 
ical Care Foundation of Sacramento and 
the San Joaquin Foundation for Medical 
Care in Stockton. Participants in this Study 
mil be selected by Social Security from the 
rolls of Medicare beneficiaries in these two 
counties. About 4,800 participants will be 
divided into four groups, each with different 
arrangements for co-payments and deduc- 
tible: 

A. Group I will be given full drug cov- 
erage with no patient cost-sharing. 

B. Group II will pay a SI per prescrip- 

tion co-payment. 

C. Group TIT will pay a 25 percent co- 
payment per prescription. 

I). Hroup IV will pay a 25 percent co- 
payment per prescription after a $50 
annual deductible has been met. 

The latter group is similar to the current 
Administration's proposed Comprehensive 
Health Insurance Plan (CHIP). The other 
three groups are similar to those most com- 
monly proposed under other national in- 
surance plans. 



Extensive data on drug utilization and ad- 
ministration costs will be compiled and an- 
alyzed in anticipation of passage of some 
form of National Health Insurance Plan 
in the near future. 

FULTON APPOINTED TO BOARD 
OF PHARMACY STAFF 

Thomas A. Fulton, Jr., a pharmacist/at- 
torney, effective August 1, 1974, was ap- 
pointed Administrative Assistant to Secre- 
tary H. C. McAllister of the N. C. Board of 
Pharmacy and Director of Inspection. 

Following graduation from the UNC 
School of Pharmacy in 1968, Mr. Fulton 
was associated with Eckerds of Chapel Hill. 
Later, he enrolled in the UNC Law School 
from which he graduated this year. His 
license to practice law in the state was 
issued in August following passage of the 
Bar examinations. 

Mr. Fulton's office is located in the In- 
stitute of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill. 

NCPhA COMMITTEES 

NCPhA Committees for the current As- 
sociation year appear on pages 32-33-34-35. 

Additional committees will be appointed; 
one, as suggested by UNC Pharmacy Dean 
Seymour Blaug, a Committee on Education, 
will be set up immediately. 

All NCPhA members expressing written 
interest (with the exception of those failing 
to sign and return blue acceptance form) 
have been notified of their appointment by 
President Wilson. 



A SALUTE TO 

Thomas M. Stanback and David A. Dowdy 
Still active and working a full week: 
Thomas M. Stanback, Salisbury, age 90. 
D. A. Dowdy, High Point, age 78. 
Retirement at age 65 was of little interest 
to these two pharmacists. They continue to 
lead productive lives and, both successful, 
are an inspiration to their associates and 
friends. 



NO TOOLS NEEDED. 

Empirin Compound 250s 
still have easy-opeaeasy-close, fiddle-free caps 



7) 





t5 »lABt£TS MC-81-30645 

EMPIRIN* 

COMPOUND 

ANALGESIC 

yjmmSkjZ*** ****> 3* *f« Wamtim 8* *• 

S*£*ti«2!»« i •*•» — <*» -""■"VST 








Good sales sense 

No need to create cap-opening difficulties for 
people who cant cope with child-resistant 
closures. The elderly and the handicapped. House- 
holds without children. (To accommodate these 
users, each manufacturer of aspirin-contr-'ning 
analgesics is permitted Py law to make one size 
available without a safety closure.) 
The Empirin Compound 250 tablet bottle is the 
right choice for them. Easy to open. Easy to close. 
Easy to take. 



Good profit sense, too 

Every Empirin Compound "250" you sell can bring 
you a profit of up to $1.10* Yet one facing uses only 
4% inches— scarcely more than most analgesic 
100's do. 

Make the most of every analgesic inch on your shelves. 
Make it with Empirin Compound 250's. 



* Based on suggested list prices. 



22» / Burroughs Wellcome Co. 

TA / Research Triangle Park 
w«itcom»/ North Carolina 27709 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy r t 

CONSUMERS ALL: THE PRESCRIPTION ADVERTISING DILEMMA 
A SEMINAR ON CONSUMERS AND PHARMACISTS 

Institute of Pharmacy, 109 Church Street, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Wednesday, October 23, 1974 
8:30 — Registration. Coffee and Donuts 
9 : 00— FIRST SESSION 

W. Whitaker Moose, Presiding 

Chairman of the NCPhA Committee on Consumer Relations 
WELCOME 

Seymour Blaug, Dean, UNC School of Pharmacy 
OPENING ADDRESS 
' ' How Consumers See Pharmacy ' ' 
Ms. Lillian Woo, Chairman, N. C. Consumers Council 
PANEL DISCUSSION 

"Legal Perspectives on Prescription Advertising" 
Gene Benoy, N. C. Attorney General's Office 
' ' Political Consumerism and its Extensions to Pharmacy ' ' 
Wilbur P. Gulley, Executive Director, N. C. Public Interest Research Group 
11:45— LUNCHEON (at the Zoom Zoom) 
1:15— SECOND SESSION 

Rex Paramore, Presiding 

Chairman, North Carolina PharmPae 

ADDRESS 

' ' Potential Implications of Prescription Advertising on Pharmacy ' ' 

William H. Wilson, President, NCPhA 

PANEL DISCUSSION 

' ' Prescription Advertising and Chain Stores ' ' 

William L. (Bill) Scarboro, Kerr Rexall Drugs, Ealeigh 

"Prescription Advertising and Institutional Pharmacy" 

Fred Eckel, N. C. Memorial Hospital, Chapel Hill 

"Prescription Advertising and its Effects' on Other Professions" 

William A. Gibbs, Past President, N. C. Assn. of Professions 

CLOSING REMARKS 

"Alternatives to Compulsory Prescription Advertising" 

State Senator John T. Henley, Hope Mills 

SPONSORED BY 

School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina 

Committee on Consumer Affairs, N. C. Pharmaceutical Association 

Copy of the program and advance registration form may be obtained by writing the N. C. 

Pharmaceutical Association, P. O. Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 or calling 919-967-2237. 

Registration, including lunch, is $15.00. 



SCUPPERNONG/JAMES GRAPES TOOK COPY AND RAN 

Besides being a first rate pharmacist, B. Gentlemen: 
Cade Brooks of Fayettevlile produces some Please mail twelve copies of the Drug In- 

of the best Scuppernong/ James Grapes in tcractions' Chart as published by Pictorial 

Eastern North Carolina. For comparison Packaging. Anesthesia took my personal copy 

rating, ship a bushel of your vineyard best and ran. 
to W.J., Chapel Hill, for immediate test. Hospital Pharmacist 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



..~ 




Pharmacist Steve Roberts of the Black Mountain Drug Company (right) Chats With 
Governor Holshouser on the Governor's Recent Visit to Black Mountain. Fred Gal- 
lagher, the Governor's Aide, is Next to the Governor and the Rev. C. W. Solomon of 
Montreat Awaits an Opportunity to Speak to Him. — Photo by Danny Dalton. 



"V 



it3.' 



* 



WHAT YOU SEE HERE IS OUR FLEET OF 

95 TRUCKS GIVING THE FASTEST SERVICE 

IN THE PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY. 



It's hard to catch a Gilpin truck sitting still, since we keep our 
entire fleet on the road almost constantly. That's the only place they're 
doing you any good. 

If you place an order with us today, one of our trucks would 
be leaving our closest distribution point that very day to provide you 
the fastest service in the industry. 

Of course, speedy delivery is a waste of time if your order is 
filled incorrectly. That's why we're constantly striving to provide you 
with the most accurate filling of orders possible. 

How do you know these aren't just idle advertising claims 9 
Because when you see more of our trucks than we ^^y, 
do, you know we're backing up what we say. GILPIN 

Wholesale druggists since 1845. 



Don't miss a trick- 
treat yourself 
to greater sales 
and profits: 




Good Product: 

kaolin and pectin 
plus antispasmodic 
agents to help relax 
the stomach and 
calm intestinal 
distress. 

Good Price: 

lowest of the year. 

Good Timing: 

just ahead of the 
winter "flu" season 
when diarrhea 
is at its peak. 

See your Robins 
representative. 




Donna|P 






4«.€fe 



Established on Professional Recommendations. • Promoted onl y to Professionals. 

A H Robins Company. Richmond, Virginia 23220 

/WDOBIISIS 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



DISASTERS 



HENDERSON 

Henderson Drug Company #2, Henderson. 
Cash ($1000), drugs, watches and rings 
taken in an armed holdup on August 19. 

Two black men, armed with a sawed-off 
shotgun, forced employees and customers of 
the pharmacy to lie on the floor while the 
robbery was in progress. The robbers were 
after two specific drugs — Preludin and 
Ritalin — and prior to leaving the phar- 
macy, took wallets, rings' and wristwatches 
from the pharmacy 's customers and phar- 
macists on duty. The $1000 cash was taken 
from the pharmacy's registers. 

DURHAM 

Revco Drugs, West Main Street. An un- 
determined amount of cash w T as taken from 
the store's safe in an August 16 break-in. 
The burglars apparently fled after they 
tripped the alarm in the prescription de- 
partment. 

LUMBERTON 

Johnson's Drug Center, 2700 North Elm 
Street. Plastic bags, filled with watches, 
knives, shavers and other items, were left by 
thieves as they made a hasty departure from 
the Drug Center. Some drugs were reported 
missing in the break-in which occurred in 
late August. 

BENSON 

Benson Drug Company. Controlled Sub- 
stances valued at $1000 were taken in an 
August 15 robbery. Money in the cash regis- 
ters was left untouched. 

BELMONT 

College Park Pharmacy. Someone threw 
a metal milk container through the front 
door of the pharmacy and carted off two 
television sets and a stereo set. Although 
the pharmacy has a burglar alarm, the 
thieves were gone when police arrived. 



Major and Minor 



KING 



King Drug Company. Second robbery in 
a month. The glass" back door was shattered 
and drugs taken by thieves. 

LAURINBURG 

Mann 's Drug Store. Two women, Joy Dean 
Gilbert and Montez Jones Griffitts of Harts- 
ville, South Carolina have been charged with 
breaking and entering the drug store (Au- 
gust 10). Police in responding to a burglar 
alarm, apprehended the two women in the 
drug store. Three pillow cases with one 
containing drugs were found by police at 
the time of the arrest. 

LIBERTY 

Liberty Drug Company. Two young blacks 
(August 26), in an armed robbery of the 
pharmacy, took cash from the pharmacy 's 
register. 

DAVIDSON 

Parks Drug Store. After breaking the 
pharmacy's front door (August 25), some- 
one stole 39 bottles of Empirin with Codeine 
and 39 bottles of Hasacode from the phar- 
macy. 

GASTONIA 

Big M Mart Pharmacy. Thieves broke 
through a glass door in an attempt to rob 
the pharmacy, however police were alerted 
by an alarm and arrived in time to prevent 
any loss. 

MOUNT HOLLY 

Charlie's Drugs. Police arrested two Ten- 
nessee men inside the pharmacy (August 29) 
after a silenl alarm was triggered. At the 
time of the arrest, the two men had Con- 
trolled Substances valued at $2000 ready 
for removal from the pharmacy. 



If you can't say something great 
about your photo finisher... 

" . . our sales have increased 15% per year . . ". 

". . if something isn't right, they make it right . .". 

'.'. . happy customers show their photos and bring in new customers . . I 

". . with promotions, Colorcraft has something going all the time . . '.' 

...switch to Colorcraft I 



WILLIAM H. (Bill) WILSON 

Owner, 

Hayes-Barton Pharmacy 

Raleigh, N.C. 



LUCIUS J. STANLEY 

Stanley's Super Drug 
Charlotte, N.C. 




"Colorcraft has given such 
good service that our sales 
have increased 15% per 
year. Colorcraft's work is top 
quality and we don't have 
to explain that to customers 
- . . they can see it." 



"If something isn't right, 
they make it right. Colorcraft 
always helps with a problem 
even if it's checking over a 
customer's camera. Their 
service and pricing is good 
and my customers are satis- 
fied ." 



CURRY E. MURRAY 

Manager, Foster Drugs 
Greensboro, N.C. 



JAMES O. ENZOR 

Asst. Vice President 
Eckerds Drug 
Greenville, N.C. 




' 'We get new customers from 
regular customers who show 
theirfriendsColorcraft proc- 
essing. The work is great and 
our customers prove it. They 
give us prompt pick-up and 
delivery and quality work." 



"When it comes to promo- 
tions, Colorcraft has some- 
thing going all the time. When 
there are specials, the Color- 
craft rep stays right on it. 
We've constantly got pro- 
grams and specials devel- 
oped by Colorcraft." 



and switching's easy. Contact any Colorcraft office listed. 



E5Z3. 




COLORCRAFT 



3000 Croasdaile Rd., 
P.O. Box 2975 
Durham, N.C 27705 



Charlotte, N.C. 
2515 Distribution St. 
(704) 372-2233 



Wilmington. N C 

116 North Front St 28401 

(919) 763-6263 

Fayetteville, N.C. 

241 Tillinghast St . 28302 

(919) 483-4658 



Kernersville, N.C. 

Main & Mountain Sts . 27294 

(919) 993-4511 

Raleigh, N.C. 

1818 No Boulevard. 27104 

(919) 833-6425 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



13 



STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Members — David D. Claytor, Greensboro; Harold V. Day, Spruce Pine; Jesse M. Pike, 
Concord; Jerry Price, Raleigh; W. H. Randall, Lillingron; H. C. McAllister, 
Secy.-Treas., Box 471, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



NEW PHARMACIES 

1. Parkway Pharmacy, 795 Corporation 
Parkway, Winston-Salem. Stephen R. Cars- 
well, pharmacist-manager. 

2. Revco Discount Drug Center, East Main 
and N. C. 24-26 Bypass, Albemarle. Charles 
Oliver, pharmacist-manager. 

3. Revco Discount Drug Center, 1265 16th 
Street, N. E., Hickory. J. Calvin Weir, phar- 
macist-manager. 

4. Springs Road Pharmacy, Inc., 2400 
Springs Road, Hickory. Russell G. Sigmon, 
Jr., pharmacist-manager. 



William Kennon and Albert W. Kennon, all 
of Durham. 

HIGHLAND DRUG CLOSED 

Highland Drug Store, 964 16th Street 
N.E., Hickory, has been closed. 

The pharmacist manager, D. L. Chronister, 
is now associated with Conover Drug Com- 
pany, Conover, North Carolina. 



Professional Pharmacy, 123 West Hargett 
Street, Raleigh, closed in late August. 



CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP 

Eckerd Drugs, 1025 Randolph Street, 
Thomasville. William C. Yarborough, phar- 
macist-manager. Successor to Medi-Save 
Drug Center. 



CLOSING DUE TO MD EXODUS 

The migration of physicians from down- 
town Raleigh to suburbs and shopping cen- 
ters was responsible for the closing of one 
of the city 's oldest pharmacies' — The Pro- 
fessional Pharmacy located in the Profes- 
sional Building and owned and managed by 
Pharmacist William C. Griffin. 

Pharmacist Griffin has been associated with 
the pharmacy since 1964. Eollowing the death 
of Howard W. Brege in 1970, he purchased 
the pharmacy and lias boon owner /manager 
since that time. 



INCORPORATIONS 

Brevard Pharmacy, Inc., 2 West Main 
Street, Brevard. Kathleen B. Weaver, Hazel 
E. McCormick and John K. Smart, Jr. 

Hill's Pharmacy, Inc., 302 Wachovia Bank 
Building, Durham. Arthur Lee Hill, III, A. 




A. E. P. Tablets $22.50 per 1000 
$30.00 Doz. 100s 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 25 mg. Tablets 
$1.20 per 100 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 50 mg. Tablets 
$1.80 per 100 

Reavita Capsules $24.00 Doz. 100s 
$18.75 per 1000 

Your cooperation in stocking 
Reaco Products is appreciated 

REACO PRODUCTS 

P. O. Box 2747 
West Durham, North Carolina 



14 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



NACDS-UPJOHN AWARD TO 
JACK DAWSON 

Jack Dawson, R.Ph., 1973-74 Chairman of 
the Professional Eelations Committee of the 
National Association of Chain Drug Stores 
(NACDS) has been named winner of the 
1974 NACDS-Upjohn Award. 

Dawson, Vice President of Professional 
Services for Eckerd Drugs, Inc., of North 
Carolina, was cited for his dedication as 
well as his contributions to the NACDS 
Committee and the Annual Pharmaceutical 
( 'onference. 

In addition to a plaque, the award in- 
cludes a $1,000 tuition assistance scholarship 
to be presented to a pharmacy school of the 
winner 's choice. 

Dawson, a 1943 graduate of Butler Uni- 
versity School of Pharmacy (Indianapolis', 
Tnd.), has had a diverse and distinguished 
career including eight years in industry and 
10 years as a practicing community phar- 
macist. "For the past three years he has 
been a member of The Upjohn Company's 
Pharmacy Consultant Panel. 



°Remember the ^Day 
...in c Hctures 



olorcraft 




Pkoto Ptoceiiot 



North Carolina's Most Complete 
Film Processing Service 

There Is A Plant Located 
Near You 

For the Finest Quality Plus Fast 

Dependable Service on All Your 

Photo Needs, Contact the Plant 

Nearest You. 



CHARLOTTE 

KERNERSVILLE 

FAYETTEVILLE 



WILMINGTON 

RALEIGH 

DURHAM 



If You Don't Know Photofinishing 
Know Your Photofinisher 




John A. Dawson, Jr., R.Ph., Vice President for Professional Services, Eckerd, Inc., Charlotte, 
is shown with Reed B. Peterson, R.Ph. (left), Vice President, The Upjohn Company Domestic 
Pharmaceutical Marketing. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 



PHARMACY CONSULTANT 
PANEL CONVENED 



Officers from The Upjohn Company and 
the Upjohn Pharmacy Consultant Panel re- 
cently met at Brook Lodge, the company's 
business and conference center located just 
north of this small Southwestern Michigan 
community. 

The panel, now in its third year, was 
formed to provide a continuing dialogue 
between The Upjohn Company and the var- 
ious pharmacy specialties. The 10-man panel 
is comprised of hospital pharmacists and 
community pharmacists, as well as repre- 
sentatives of drug chains, professional phar- 
macy organizations, academia and the reg- 
ulatory area. 

This year 's three-day meeting focused on 
Upjohn 's policies and services, packaging 
and training. A special program on Bio- 
availability was also presented to panel 
members. 

During much of the open discussion time 
panel members and Upjohn officials talked 
about new legislative developments and pro- 
posals. They also studied the expanding 
role of the pharmacist in health care de- 
livery. 

Panel members include: 

• Clifford E. Barnett, R.Ph., Executive 
Secretary, Tdaho State Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation, Boise, Idaho; 

• Joseph H. Beckerman, Pharm.D., Direc- 
tor of Pharmacy Services, UCLA Hospital, 
Los Angeles, Calif. ; 

• Maurie Bechtel, R.Ph., owner of Bech- 
tel 's Pharmacy, Muskegon, Mich.; 

• Dominic J. Cavallo, Pharm.D., Vice 
President and Director of Professional Ser- 
vices, Longs Drug Stores, Inc., Walnut 
' Ireek, Calif. ; 

• John A. Dawson, Jr., R.Ph., Vice Pres- 
ident for Professional Services, Eckerd Inc., 
Charlotte, North Carolina; 

• Kurt Kleinmann, R.Ph., Director of 
Pharmacy, Montefiore Hospital and Medical 
Center, New York City ; 



PHARMACY SEMINAR ON 
SELECTED SUBJECTS 

Beginning October 16 and continuing on 
successive Wednesdays through November 19 
the UNC School of Pharmacy and the North- 
eastern Carolina Pharmaceutical Society will 
co-sponsor a 5 weeks continuing education 
program — ' ' Pharmacy Seminar on Selected 
Subjects" at the Martin General Hospital, 
Williamston. 

Program details will be mailed by the 
UNC School of Pharmacy. 




The most competitive insurance cov- 
erage designed specifically for the 
pharmaceutical field is provided by 
American Druggists' Insurance Co. — 
backed by claim service unexcelled by 
by any other! 

We know the pharmacists problems 
best, because ADI was founded by 
pharmacists for pharmacists over 65 
years ago. ADI provides "blue ribbon" 
multi-peril packages exactly to your 
needs. Contact your ADI agent now. 

Hammett Insurance Agency, Inc. 

P. O. Box 248 
Concord, N. C. 28025 

AMERICAN DRUGGISTS' 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

30 E. Central Parkway 
Cincinnati. Ohio 45202 




MIKE HOWARD e 



LENNIE CASEY MIKE FAGLEY 
HORACE FLANIGAN ION COLEY 



PHARMACY 
TIME q.S. 

Your SK&F Representative wants to help you 
in any way with anything to do with Smith Kline & 
French Laboratories, and has virtually unlimited back-up 
resources to do it. 



Just ask. 



Smith Kline & French Laboratories 
Division of SmithKhne Corporation 



SK&F 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



17 



AUDIT OF PHARMACY X RESULTS IN $3,402.45 REFUND 

Representatives of Paid Prescriptions and the N. 0. Department of Social Services 
recently audited the records of Pharmacy X following recommendation by a Peer Review 
Committee. 

The auditors found certain drugs were being double or triple ordered by a nursing home 
and sent to Pharmacy X. Dispensing dates were altered on invoices to make the charges 
appear reasonable. Examples' are shown below: 









Estimated 


Date 


Date 


Patient 's Name 


Drug Name 


Amount 


Bay 


« Supply 


Dispensed 


Altered to 


A 


Quinidine 


100 




25 


3-8-74 




// 


a 


100 




25 


3-11-74 


3-19-74 


it 


a 


100 




25 


3-12-74 




B 


Chloral 


30 




30 


3-7-74 




a 


Hydrate 


30 




30 


3-8-74 


3-18-74 


C 


Periactin 


65 




22 


3-13-74 




a 


a 


65 




22 


3-14-74 


3-24-74 



According to the nursing home, the drugs were returned to Pharmacy X but Phar- 
macy X had no records of receiving or of disposal of the drugs. 

Audit of ABC Convalescent Medicaid patients was made from drugs provided by 
Pharmacy X to three (3) patients selected by the nurse and one (1) patient selected by 
the auditor. Drug orders from the patients ' charts were recorded and the doses admin- 
istered were compared against the doses' dispensed by the pharmacy and billed to the pro- 
gram. A ten percent (10%) error factor was calculated as follows: 



Amount Paid 
$116.50 



Overcharge 
$12.45 



% Error 
10.3% 



The error factor was applied to all payments made to X Pharmacy, beginning with 
May, 1973, and including through May, 1974. 



Total Payments 
$34,024.52 x 10% 



Total Amount of Overcharge 
$3,402.45 



This amount was agreed to by the pharmacist and refunded June 6, 1974. 




"Service InWholesaJe Queurtrttea' 1 



- r ?v> 



USE OUR TOLL FREE 

NUMBER 800-222-3856 

ANY TIME DAY OR NIGHT 

ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY 



l^KENDALL 



SHELBY. N.C. 



18 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



flFST PHARMACY 



r |~ " ■* l -o nis l ?H4 ss 

IS- I ILETIN NPH 4011 

L/HS 140 1.24 
RFST 801 P 

3 



100 13-8 099 ?H4 
ALOACTAZIOE TAR 

SF46 
RFST PHY 



12-OQOR 2H4 1240 
OONNATAL TARLFTS 

ROB 
RFST PHY 




102OJ 13-8009 

?H4 1020 
RFST PHY 
?3?o \» R 



■500 26-6 148 2H4 1677 

OARVOCFT N 100 TARLFTS 
L/TA1893 
RFS-T-- PHY 



26-6148 T 26-6148 
2H4 ?677|2H4 36771 
RFST P+IyI RFST PHY| 



Tsoo 


oo-oqs? 2H4 3780"' 


LASIX 


TARLFTS 40Mr, 




HCST R 




RFST PHY 



no -oo s? 
2H4 3780 
RFST PHY 
002SR 



19-OJTO 2H4 HP" 

]RAYFR ASPTR1N TARS 300S 
2.89 
RFST Oil 



28-4670 2H4 " RMI 
|POLAROID 108R FILM 

POLACOXflR 5.66 
RFST 531 



24-699 1 
2H4 20001 
RFST PHy[ 



0> 



19-95 70 
2H4 HP* 
REST Oil 
?-*9 

^ " i an — » 

19-95 70 
?H4 HPM 



19-9570 ' 
2H4 HPM 
RFST Oil 
2.PQ 



28-467" 
?H* RMA 
RFST 531 
9.66 



2.89 



28-4679 
2H4 RMA 
REST 531 
5.66 



RFST 67? 
3.95 



18-8680 ?H4 
VISINE EYF OPS isr.c 

7401 PL 1.38 

RFST 212 



18-8680 
2H4 PPT 

RFST 212 
P 1 .38 

> I 



1P-86R0 
2H4 PPT 

RFST 212 
P 1.38 



•" 18-8680 ' 


"" 18-86 80 "1 


2H4 P"T 


2H4 PPTl 


REST 2'2 


REST 2I2l 


t !-». 


P 1.38 J 



This is another SMITH service that will help the retailers and their customers. 

What is STP? It is a Label Program that will provide shelf labels and price stickers 
for every item ordered. Supplied in invoice sequence. 

What is the cost? $12.00 per month plus two (21 cents per line. The organization and 
and fast re-orders written or phoned in. No special devices to rent or lease. SWDC now 
supplies a want-pad with a space for this order number. (2) The week, month and year 
purchased (coded). (3) The current cost (code option) (otc and rx). (4) A space for 9 
characters your choice or 3 digit product code classification or left blank for you to write 
in anything you desire. (5) Rx items State Medicade number (optional). (6) Otc retail 
price profit or mark-up code. Your choice of profit is optional in 5 categories' based on 
movement (M-N-O-P-Q). (7) The retail price on otc items is calculated based on their 
choice of category. You will receive a bi-monti.ly management report of items by vendor 
or product code classification showing amounts purchased plus the profit they are making 
on otc items. 

What is on the stickers and shelf labels? (1) SWDC 6 digit order number for accurate 
concise coding of all items' provided by the labels also allows participation in a method 
of purchasing more economic for the retailer and the wholesaler. 



stp 



Shelf Labels 
Turnover Reports 
Price Stickers 



Another SMITH Service that will provide you shelf labels and price 
stickers for every item ordered. Supplied in invoice sequence. 



£ 



PHARMACY 

ACCOUNT SERVICE— BOOKKEEPING SERVICE 

*GOOD RECORDS FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS— A proven accounts 
receivable system — Designed from the ground up for your needs 
— by the folks who went to computers in 1958. Better collection 
for you and prescription tax records for your customers. You also 
automatically earn interest on past due accounts if you desire. 

*GOOD RECORDS FOR YOU — Twenty Nine years of bookkeeping 
for retailers plus 15 years of computer experience equals a system 
designed to give you the accounting service you need. 




PHARMACY 

ADVERTISING PROGRAM 

HOW'S YOUR RETAIL IMAGE?— Good? Bad? Indifferent— Con- 
sult your Smith Representative about our Associated Druggist Pro- 
gram. Some of the advantages of this program are hometown 
newspaper advertising — buying advantages — clerk training pro- 
gram — In store promotion materials and store advertising fliers. 

Just four of the many SMITH services 
Also ask about retirement, group hospitalization and major medical. 






Call or Write to: 




f 


SPARTANBURG - 582-1216 




^3§j3jf GREENVILLE - 


- - 235-4159 CHARLOTTE - - 


- - 825-5161 


j™<4 ROCK HILL - 


- - - 328-5830 ASHEVILLE - - 


- - 684-6121 


/ \ GAFFNEY - - 


- - 487-4949 ANDERSON - - 


- - 646-3641 



mvinoM o' •■ 



imiTll'll« l 'll«IlHILJ 



Well absorbed 
even when taken immediately after meals 



E-Mycirf 

erythromycin enteric-coated tablets, Upjohn 

250mg 

Formulated for quality. . . 
Priced for economy 




E-MYCIN TABLETS— 250 mg— For Oral Admin- 
istration (erythromycin enteric-coated tablets, Upjohn) 
E-Mycin Tablets are specially coated to protect the con- 
tents from the inactivating effects of gastric acidity 
and to permit efficient absorption when administered 
either immediately after meals or when given between 
meals on an empty stomach. 
Indications: 

Staphylococcus aureus: Acute infections of skin 
and soft tissue of mild to moderate severity. Re- 
sistance may develop during treatment. 
Diplococcus pneumoniae: Upper respiratory-tract 
infections (e.g. otitis media, pharyngitis) and lower 
respiratory-tract infections (e.g., pneumonia) of 
mild to moderate degree. 
Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Eaton agent, PPLO): In 
the treatment of primary atypical pneumonia, 
when due to this organism. 
See package insert for other indications. 
Contraindication: Contraindicated in patients with 
known hypersensitivity to erythromycin. 
Warning: Safety for use in pregnancy has not been 
established. 

Precautions: Erythromycin is principally excreted by 
the liver. Caution should be exercised in administering 
the antibiotic to patients with impaired hepatic func- 
tion. Surgical procedures should be performed when 



indicated. 

Adverse Reactions: The most frequent side effects of 
erythromycin preparations are gastrointestinal, such 
as abdominal cramping and discomfort, and are dose- 
related. Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea occur infre- 
quently with usual oral doses. During prolonged or 
repeated therapy there is a possibility of overgrowth 
of nonsusceptible bacteria or fungi. If such infections 
occur, the drug should be discontinued and appropriate 
therapy instituted. Mild allergic reactions such as urti- 
caria and other skin rashes have occurred. Serious 
allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, have been 
reported. 

Treatment of overdose: The drug is virtually nontoxic, 
though some individuals may exhibit gastric intoler- 
ance to even therapeutic amounts. Allergic reactions 
associated with acute overdosage should be handled 
in the usual manner — that is, by the administration 
of adrenalin, corticosteroids and antihistamines as in- 
dicated and the prompt elimination of unabsorbed drug, 
in addition to all needed supportive measures. 
How supplied: 250 mg — in bottles of 100 and in unit- 
dose packages of 100 enteric-coated tablets. Caution: 
Federal law prohibits dispensing without prescription. 
For additional product information, consult 
the package insert or see your Upjohn 
Representative. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 

ROBERSONVILLE— Grand opening of The 
Village Pharmacy was observed in late Au- 
gust. The pharmacy is owned and managed 
by Pharmacist Frank Measamer. 
SMITHFIELD— Steven D. Peine of St. 
Louis, Missouri is manager of Eckerd's Store 
in the Rose Manor Shopping Center. He 
succeeds Thomas Blackman, who recently 
resigned. 

HILLSBOBOUGH— Miss Evelyn Lloyd, 
James Pharmacy, is one of six new mem- 
bers recently named to the Historic Hills- 
borough Commission by the State Depart- 
ment of Cultural Resources. 
FAYETTEVILLE— Fred J. Rachide has 
been made manager of Kerr Drugs, which 
was opened at West wood Shopping Center, 
on August 14. He is a 1969 graduate of the 
dNC School of Pharmacy. 
HILLSBOROUGH— Mrs. Shirley Paull re- 
cently assumed the position of pharmacist 
manager of T. E. Holding Drug Store. She 
succeeds Bill Burch who has established a 
pharmacy in Durham. 

LUMBEBTON— Eugene W. Hackney, an 
officer of the NCPhA, has been elected Pres- 
ident of the Lumberton Chamber of Com- 
merce for the coming year. 
I.I LLINGTON — -Blood pressure readings 
were given free of charge on August 28 at 
Forest Hills Pharmacy, Lafayette Drug 
and Powell's Pharmacy. The readings were 
iiruler the supervision of the Community 
Hypertension Evaluation Clinic and spon- 
sored by the Lillington Jaycees and Rotary 
Club and CIBA Pharmaceutical Company. 



RALEIGH— The Professional Pharmacy, 
which closed August 29, has been reopened 
as a restaurant by Walter Timm, owner of 
Timm 's Heating & Air Conditioning. 
HOPE MILLS— Pharmacist/Senator John 
T. Henley was a guest speaker at a recent 
meeting of Chapter 855 of the American 
Association of Retired Persons. The meet- 
ing was held at the Haymount United 
Methodist Church, Favctteville. 
ELIZABETH CITY— Ray Bonney, Jr. is 
now a partner with J. T. Todd in the op- 
eration of Todd 'a Pharmacy. Since his 
graduation from the UNC School of Phar- 
macy, Pharmacist Bonney has been associ- 
ated with People 's Drug Store. 



I. C. System, Inc. 

The nation's most highly 
specialized collection service 



Your Association's Collection Service is 
an affiliate of a national organization cur- 
rently serving members of more than 700 
leading trade associations throughout the 
nation. 

Don't lose sales volume because cus- 
tomers owe you money and are trading 
somewhere else. Your Association's Col- 
lection Service will chase those debtors 
back into your place of business to pay 
YOU direct. You will get accounts OFF 
your ledger and IN your bank account — 
and you will also have many former cus- 
tomers back doing business with you again. 
For information, contact your Association 
office. It will pay you to do so. 

On request, A representative 

of the I. C. System will explain 

the collection program in detail. 

Call or write the NCPhA, Box 151, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



DRUG STORE SHOPPERS ARE 
DIFFERENT 

Today's shopper expects, and responds, to a Modern Shopping Atmosphere. 
3 out of 10 impulse purchases are inspired by 

DISPLAYS 
The right kind of drug store fixture is the KEY to VOLUME Sales . . . 
We can assure you the right kind of fixture for every display purpose with 

COLUMBUS IMPERIAL DRUG 
STORE FIXTURES 

Let us DESIGN and engineer your DRUG STORE to promote and SELL merchandise. 

We have successfully given this service to our customers for over a quarter of a 
century. 

"Giving you the best design, the best fixture and the best service by 
professionals" 

CALL US FOR A SINGLE FIXTURE OR A COMPLETE STORE. 



RAMSEY 

MANUFACTURING CORPORATION 

513 East Trade Street 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Telephone 704-334-3457 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



23 




July 18, 1974 
Mr. Garry Newton, F.A.C.A. 
American College of Apothecaries 
915 Hay Street 
Fayetteville, N. C. 28305 

Dear Mr. Newton : 

We are sorry for not responding sooner 
to your letter of June 12, 1974 regarding 
up-dating of Red Book pricing. 

Please be assured that we are doing 
everything possible to publish price changes 
as s'oon as we receive them. Because of press 
closing times, it takes approximately three 
weeks from the time the change is received 
until it is published in Drug Topics. Of 
course, if we receive advance information 
from manufacturers this can be published 
sooner. 

If any pharmacist finds that price changes 
are being made by manufacturers and these 
are not reflected in our price change columns, 
we hope that they will notify us so that we 
can contact the manufacturer directly. 

Concerning the AWP price, we determine 
this price from a group of wholesalers that 
provide us with their list prices. An ap- 
proximate price would not be possible since 
there is a variation in percentage mark-up 
from manufacturer to manufacturer as well 
as from product to product within a manu- 
facturer 's line. Quite often we receive 
the change in the manufacturer's direct 
price before we receive the new price from 
our wholesaler suppliers. This is the reason 



that the AWP might not be included with a 
change in direct price. 

Perhaps the third party prescription pro- 
gram could institute a temporary AWP 
which could be the same percentage above 
the new direct price as the old AWP was 
above the old price. This would provide a 
temporary re-imbursement until a new AWP 
could be established. 

We certainly appreciate your suggestion 
and the resolution of the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association asking manu- 
facturers to provide price changes to us 
promptly. Please contact us if we can be 
of any further service. 

Sincerely yours, 
Jerome M. Levine 
Business Manager 

DRUG TOPICS RED BOOK 



Marion Laboratories, Inc. 
10236 Bunker Ridge Road 
Kansas City, Mo. 64137 

Dear Sir: 

The Iredell Pharmaceutical Association 
has by unanimous consent rejected the pro- 
gram of PreRx prescriptions. The member- 
ship has been associated with this type of 
PreRx service in the past and has found it 
to be unsatisfactory; therefore, the mem- 
bers wish to inform you of their intent not 
to honor these prescriptions as PreRx. 

As pharmacists we recognize the progress 
you have initiated as a drug manufacturer 
in limiting unsolicited Sampling of pre- 
scription products and encourage this type 
of farsightedness in planning you have ex- 
hibited. We believe the continued advance- 
ment of the health professions will require 
programs with a dynamic outlook to the 
future. 

The Iredell Pharmaceutical Association 

appreciates the interest and concern Marion 

Laboratories lias shown to Pharmacy in the 

pasl and encourages your continued support. 

Sincerely, 

Larry X. Marlin, President 
Iredell Pharmaceutical Association 



(Continued on Page 25) 



Partner! 




That's how Lederle sees you in the vital business of protecting the 
nations health. Only our roles differ— yours is to maintain and enhance 
your professional standing by dispensing the finest pharmaceuticals 
available; ours is to develop new pharmaceuticals, maintain the quality 
of current products, and provide a good deal more: 

750 professional representatives to help you. 

Lederle Distribution Centers augmented by wholesalers located 
throughout the U.S. to assure prompt delivery. 

Research, development and packaging, integrated to produce 
products to fill a need. 

A liberal return goods policy. 

An additional 90-day dating on new product releases. 

And a special department to handle all your questions on new 
Lederle products, credit policies, promotions— whatever. Call our 
"answer-man" Jim Wallin, (914) 735-5000, at Lederle. 

It's the least we can do for a partner. 



LEDERLE LABORATORIES, A Division of American Cyanamid Co.. Pearl River. N. Y. 10965 865-4 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 



For eighty-nine years 
. . . . since 1885 



seemon 

OF DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long 
association with North Car- 
olina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its fifty- 
fourth volume, and the first 
printed copy was "Seeman 
Printed." 



*7 



A DIVISION OF 
FISHER-HARRISON CORP. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 
(From Page 25) 

Dear President Ford: 

Tn your speech to the joint session of Con- 
gress, you implied that a major health bill 
is eminent. If such be the case, may I pre- 
sume to make what I believe to be a construc- 
tive suggestion? 

Tn many cases a constant expense factor 
is medication. Much has been said and 
much has been done regarding that factor, 
BUT, the pharmacists of our nation have 
been excluded from the planning boards in 
setting up and implementing such programs. 
These people are highly trained profes- 
sionals who know their business, and are thus 
more able to implement a progressive, 
efficient system than others not so trained. 

I realize that a certain number of legal 
consultants are necessary in the formation 
of such programs, but I feel that the plan- 
ning boards have been top-heavy in their 
balance of legal minds as opposed to those 
people who will actually be governed by, and 
do, the work. The result has been awkward, 
cumbersome systems that have, at best, been 
difficult to work with and needlessly ex- 
pensive. 

May I respectfully suggest that future 
planning by such bodies include some compe- 
tent pharmacists on the planning boards? I 
believe that such a policy will not only save 
a good deal of money, but will also increase 
the efficiency of the program. 

Thanking you in advance for your con- 
sideration of my suggestion and wishing 
you every success in your efforts for our 
country, T remain 

Cordially yours, 

Robert H. Seaborn, Pharmacist 

Melvin 's Glenwood Pharmacy 

Raleigh 



INVENTORY CONTROL 

Coming, Nov. 13, Chapel Hill. How to 
maximize profits through effective stock man- 
agement. 



26 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



DECEMBER 7-12, BAL HARBOUR, 
FLORIDA 

This" Midyear Clinical Meeting of the 
American Society of Hospital Pharmacists 
promises to be the biggest and best yet! 
Besides the general sessions, there are con- 
tributed papers sessions', clinic forums, case 
reviews, specialized practice clinics, exhibits, 
and of course fabulous Miami Beach. To en- 
able pharmacists from North Carolina to 
obtain maximum benefits with minimum ex- 
pense and trouble, a group package is being 
provided (complete with escort). 

The package includes: round trip (non- 
stop) air service from Raleigh-Durham Air- 
port (depart December 7, a.m., and return 
December 12, a.m.), ground transportation 
from airport to hotel and return, and guar- 
anteed accommodations at the Americana 
Hotel (double occupancy; tax included). The 
total cost for this package is #225.00 per 
person. 

NOTE: The quoted price is based upon a 
minimum of 20 persons. In the event of 
a smaller number moderate price adjust- 
ments might be necessary with, tour mem- 
ber's agreement. Tour price does not in- 
clude meeting registration, baggage han- 
dling inside hotel, meals, local tours, or 
additional personal expenses (e.g. tele- 
phone calls, room service, etc.) The tour is 
available to NCPhA members and, spouses, 
only. 

The group size will be limited in order to 
enable ease of movement. If you wish to be 
included in the tour, please send a $25.00 
deposit to ASHP Tour, P. O. Box 151, Chapel 



Hill, N. C. 27514. Remainder of money will 
be due by November 22, 1974. Act today to 
insure your inclusion! 



COMMUNITY ADVISORY 

COMMITTEE SELECTED FOR 

DRUG EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Drug Education Program at the 
School of Pharmacy at the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has announced 
the selection of the following community 
members to the Community Advisory Com- 
mittee for the upcoming school year: Erma 
Kirkpatrick, Chapel Hill Drug Action Com- 
mittee ; Frederick Schroeder, Assistant Dean, 
Student Life Department, UNC-CH; Isaac 
McGraw III, Remco Resource Center, Dur- 
ham ; Robert Epting, Attorney at Law ; 
Constance Toverud, Carolina Friends School; 
Tom Ferretti, Student Health Action Com- 
mittee, UNC-CH; W. J. Smith, N. C. Phar- 
maceutical Association; Dr. Donald Harriss, 
Student Health Service, UNC-CH ; Rev. Fred 
Reid, Chaplaincy Service, N. C. Memorial 
Hospital; Sallie Fonvielle, student, UNC- 
CH ; Robert Allen, Department of Mental 
Health, Raleigh ; Dr. Donald Stedman, School 
of Education, UNC-CH. 

The Program, now in its sixth year of 
operation, works extensively throughout the 
state in drug education, as well as pro- 
viding unique learning experiences to stu- 
dents at the University. The Program is 
funded through the North Carolina Drug 
Authoritv. 



Please note: The Florida Board of Pharmacy has asked that the following information 
be conveyed to that State's licensees' who wish to participate in tape programs for con- 
tinuing education credit: 

' ' The registrant will make a list of from five to ten questions as he listens to 
the tape. This list should be sent with the renewal application as his proof of 
participation and a copy retained for his reference. Credit will be based on the 
length of the tape." 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 27 

RESEARCH FOUNDATION 

Final report, covering 1973- '74 fund drive, has been released by Secretary George 
P. Hager and Assistant Secretary Claude U. Paoloni. 

A total of $11,395 was received from 325 contributors. Contributions were received from 
68 counties. Guilford County was at the top of the list in total dollars contributed. 

The most popular contribution level was $10 — 110 contributors favored this amount. 
Contributions varied from $1 (7) to $150 (1). 

Seven organizational contributions were received: 

Burroughs Wellcome Company $2,000.00 

Ethel M. Looram Foundation 500.00 

Justice Drug Company 500.00 

N. C. Mutual Wholesale Drug Company 100.00 

N. C. National Bank 250.00 

Revco Drug Stores, Inc. 300.00 

Sandoz-Wander, Inc. 1,000.00 

FOUNDATION SUPPORT OF TEE SCEOOL OF PEARMACY— An accounting of 
the expenditures will indicate the excellent support given to the School of Pharmacy by the 
Foundation. 

Faculty Professional Grants, including travel $ 5,747.82 

Faculty and Student Research Support 5.70 

Honoraria and Lectureships 622.85 

Library 3,153.01 

Dean 's Discretionary Fund 587.49 

Equipment 759.64 

Student Activities ... 630.08 

Professional Societies 100.00 

Books and Publications 323.72 

" Script "—School of Pharmacy Newsletter 2,381.97 

Pharmacy Practices 191.46 

SHAC Program 500.00 

Scholarships and Loans 9,280.00 

Analytical Services 652.58 

Fiscal Agents and Auditor 1,821.54 

Directors and Executive Committee 155.50 

Office Expenses 1,783.92 

Miscellaneous (24.52) 

Administrative Salaries 650.00 



TOTAL $29,322.76 



28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



111 Pharmacy School Sotes 



GRADUATES, UNC SCHOOL OF 

PHARMACY, FOR THE PAST 

5 YEARS 

1970 128 

1971 128 

1972 162 

1973 129 

1974 136 



STUDENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

SELECTED FOR DRUG EDUCATION 

PROGRAM 

The Drug Education Program at the 
-School of Pharmacy at the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has announced 
the selection of the following students to 
the Student Advisory Committee for the 
upcoming school year: Pete Champion, Clay- 
ton, N. C. ; Don Thrower, Belmont, N. C. ; 
Rill Pickard, Greensboro, N. C. ; Violet 
Fisher, Jacksonville, N. C. ; Patsi Claytor, 
Greensboro, N. C. ; George Francisco, Vir- 
ginia Beach, Va. ; Pete Allen, Gastonia, 
N. C; Tom West, Eoseboro, N. C. ; Elaine 
Kimball, China Grove, N. C. 

The Program, now in its sixth year of 
operation, works extensively throughout the 
state in drug education, as well as providing 
unique learning experiences to students at the 
University. The Program is funded through 
the North Carolina Drug Authority. 



KAPPA PSI 

Reported by Michael R. Teague 
A hardy greeting to all Kappa Psi alum- 
ni and to all pharmacists throughout the 
state. As the new school year begins, the ac- 
tive brothers of Kappa Psi are anticipating 
another full and rewarding year and, like- 
wise, we extend our best wishes for a suc- 
cessful and gratifying year to all North 
Carolina pharmacists. 



Our first concern as school begins is fall 
rush. This year 's rush will be particularly 
difficult since the entering class of phar- 
macy students is predominately females 
(over 50%), therefore cutting down on 
prospective rushees. But the Brothers are go- 
ing to ignore this and still have a good 
rush. The day before classes convened we 
had a pre-rush hot dog-beer blast, inviting 
both females and males of the transfer 
students and the incoming class. Our new 
dean of Pharmacy School, Dr. Seymour 
Blaug, attended, enabling him to meet 
many of the students in the different 
organizations of Pharmacy School. The affair 
was a smashing success, and a hopeful in- 
dicator of things to come during the year. 

As all alumni of UNC-Chapel Hill know, 
football season is here. The Brothers of Kap- 
pa Psi extend a warm and hospitable wel- 
come to all its alumnus to attend the games 
and parties afterwards. Please call the house 
for any reservations. 

To conclude, Kappa Psi is as strong as 
our alumni so please give us your sugges- 
tions, come See us, and continue your sup- 
port. 

STUDENT BRANCH OF THE 
NCPhA 

The Student Branch of the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association is currently final- 
izing plans for a very productive and in- 
teresting year. The Executive Committee has 
been working hard during the summer to 
create an agenda that will hopefully increase 
the students' interest and thereby the total 
membership of the organization over that of 
the past few years. 

Perhaps one of the most important func- 
tions of Student Branch is to offer programs 
(speeches, debates, presentations, etc.) 
concerning trends in Pharmacy as a pro- 
fession. The first program of the semester 
will consist of a debate featuring Mr. W. 
Whitaker Moose, last year's President of 
the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Associa- 
(Concluded on Page 31) 



The ( 'arolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred W. Best announce 
the birth of a daughter, Anna Melissa, Au- 
gust 15th, weighing 6 lbs. 11 oz. Mr. Best, 
1970 graduate of UNC School of Pharmacy, 
is with Eckerd 's, Akers Shopping Center, 
Gastonia. 



MARRIAGES 

R UFFS TE TLER-CARNES 
Miss Dorothy Barnette Carries and Noah 
Haywood Huffstetler III were married Au- 
gust 10 at First Presbyterian Church of 
Mount Holly. Mrs. Huffstetler, 1974 grad- 
uate of the UNO School of Pharmacy, is with 
Eckerd 's of Durham, Mr. Huffstetler is a 
student at X T NC School of Law. 

BBADY-GOBRELL 
William Edward Brady, 1970 graduate of 
the UNC School of Pharmacy, and Miss 
Gwyn Hodgin Gorrell were married August 
17 at Presbyterian Church of the Covenant, 
Greensboro. Mr. Brady is with Rite-Aid 
Pharmacy ; the couple will be living at 
Route 2, McLeansville. 

GOODMAN-MORGAN 
Miss Judith Ann Morgan of Statesville 
and William Hardin Goodman of Hickory 
were married July 27th at the First Baptist 
Church of Forest City. Mrs. Goodman, a 
1972 graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy, is with Westgate Pharmacy of States- 
ville. The couple will be living at 626-E 
Walnut Street. 

KING-HARGETT 
Miss Linda Carol King and Ernest George 
Hargett II were married August 4 in Jarvis 
Memorial United Methodist Church, Green- 
ville. The bridegroom is associated with 
Biggs Drug Store. 

GARRETT-SPEARS 
Miss Virginia Pet Garrett and Larry 
'Neal Spears were married August 3 in 
Brooksdale Methodist Church, Roxboro. The 
bridegroom is a staff pharmacist at Moore 
Memorial Hospital, Pitiehurst. 



DAMON-ROSSER 
Miss Ann Ella Rosser, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. John Rosser of Charlotte, and 
William Mercer Damon were married Au- 
gust 3 in Sardis Presbyterian Church of 
Charlotte. Mrs. Damon, 1974 graduate of 
the UNC School of Pharmacy, is with For- 
syth Memorial Hospital Pharmacy in Win- 
ston-Salem. The Damons are making their 
home at 2721 Reynolda Park Road. 

FRYE-CLARK 
William Patriclc Frye, 1972 graduate of 
UNC School of Pharmacy, and Miss Janet 
Elizabeth Clark were married August 12 in 
Catholic Student Center, Chapel Hill. The 
couple will live at Apt. 8, 4923 Central Av- 
enue, Charlotte. Mrs. Frye will be associated 
with Charlotte Memorial Hospital, and Mr. 
Frye will be with Revco of Charlotte. 

DEATHS 
R. L. Hutchins 

Boscoe Lewis Hutchins, 79, Winston- 
Salem, died July 22. He was associated with 
a brother, Pharmacist J. A. Hutchins, in the 
operation of five Hutchins' drug stores in 
the 40s. 

R. E. Gardner 

Ralph Edward Gardner, 58, operations 
manager for McKesson-Robbins, Inc., Char- 
lotte, died August 9 in the Veterans Admin- 
istration Hospital, Salisbury. 

James H. Godfrey 

James Heath Godfrey, Jr., 54, an employee 
of Eckerd 's of High Point, died August 9. 

Mrs. Naomi S. Starling 

Mrs. Naomi Sikes Starling, 70, of Raleigh, 
died August 12 in Wilmington. 

Mrs. Starling was the wife of the former 
president of the W. H. King Drug Company, 
Homer Starling, and in 1947- '48 served as 
president of the Woman 's Auxiliary of the 
NCPhA. 

Survivors include Mr. Starling ; two daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Nannette Starling Craig of At- 
lanta and Mrs. Mary Ruth Cooke of Greens- 
boro; a brother, Lambert E. Sikes of Se- 
attle, Washington, and five grandchildren. 



30 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 



• CHAPEL HILL— Marian Chambers 

FALL CONVOCATION 
FEATURES DR. BOYD 

The Woman 's Auxiliary Fall Convocation, 
to be held at the Institute of Pharmacy, will 
have as its luncheon speaker Dr. Bernard 
Boyd, James A. Gray Professor of Biblical 
Literature, UNC-CH, who recently returned 
from his annual summer archeological ex- 
pedition to Beer-Sheba. 

Dr. Boyd has an illustrious background 
in Religion and Archeological Exploration, 
and is" also one of the most inspirational 
speakers today. In talking to the Auxiliary, 
he will be discussing the woman of today who 



is being exposed to Women's Lib and Equal 
Rights, and who is also concerned with keep- 
ing her family 's welfare paramount. 

Dr. Boyd, known nationally through his 
television courses which are distributed by 
National Educational Television, is one of 
the most popular professors at Carolina, with 
his lecture hall unable to accommodate all 
students who wish to enroll in his classes. 

The Auxiliary 's Convocation which opens 
at 10:30 a.m., October 16, will feature a 
revised repeat of a Skit directed toward 
conducting meetings and other functions. 
Special guests will include Dean and Mrs. 
Seymour Blaug, officers of the NCPhA, Mrs. 
Bernard Boyd, and others. 

Auxiliary members may make reservations 
(luncheon, $2.00) through the NCPhA 
office, Box 151, Chapel Hill 27514. Eligible 
non-members may also make reservations, and 
may affiliate with the Auxiliary at the Con- 
vocation Registration Desk. 




Members of the Woman's Auxiliary Convocation Committee met at the Institute of Phar- 
macy September 5 to complete details for the October 16th meeting. 

Left to right: Mrs. Morris Hedgepeth, Convocation Chairman, Henderson; Mrs. Whitaker 
Moose, Mt. Pleasant; Mrs. George Cocolas, Chapel Hill; Mrs. L. M. Whaley, Wallace; Mrs. 
W. P. Wells, Durham. Mrs. Moose and Mrs. Whaley are responsible for luncheon arrange- 
ments; Mrs. Cocolas is in charge of production of supplies; Mr,. Wells will direct a skit to be 
presented during the morning session of the meeting. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 



CHAPEL HILL 

The first meeting of the 1974-75 year of 
the Chapel Hill Pharmaceutical Auxiliary 
was held September 3 at the Institute of 
Pharmacy. President Jacqueline Olsen re- 
ported on the ideas' and suggestions made at 
an executive board meeting held a week 
earlier. 

A lively discussion followed and the en- 
thusiasm of the members indicated that it 
will be an active and productive year for 
the Chapel Hill Auxiliary. 

The first event was ? money-making proj- 
ect — a Rummage Sale held September 21 on 
the porch of the Institute of Pharmacy. 

Officers of the Chapel Hill group are : Pres- 
ident, Mrs. J. L. Olsen; Vice-President, Mrs. 
M. E. Wall ; Secretary, Mrs. George Har- 
ris; Treasurer, Mrs 1 . M. W. Skolaut; His- 
torian, Mrs. M. A. Chambers; Advisor, Mrs. 
L. D. Werley. 

Members of the Chapel Hill Auxiliary are 
looking forward to seeing you at the Pall 
Convocation, October 16, when we will be 
serving as hostesses for the Coffee which 
precedes the business - session and luncheon. 



FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

SELECTED FOR DRUG EDUCATION 

PROGRAM 

The Drug Education Program at the 
School of Pharmacy at the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has an- 
nounced the selection of the following fac- 
ulty members to the Faculty Advisory Com- 
mittee for the upcoming school year : Ann 
Evans, School of Nursing; Dr. Arthur Mc- 
Bay, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy ; Dr. 
Bennic Barker, School of Dentistry ; Dr. Al- 
bert Johnson, Schools of Social Work and 
Public Health ; Dr. Warren Johnson, De- 
partment of Psychology ; LeRoy Werley, 
School of Pharmacy; Dr. James Pence, De- 
partment of Speech; Helen Urquhart, Di- 
vision of Family Medicine. 

"BEANS AND JEANS" 

Members of the Pharmacy Wives fStu 
dent) Organization donned their jeans and 



gathered at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. 
Smith, Sunday, September 15, for a cook-out 
complete with beans, hot-dogs, corn-on-the- 
cob, home-made ice cream, and other goodies. 
Decorations included the "Blue Jean 
Man" which had been used to promote the 
party, and a corn-shock with pumpkins. 

STUDENT BRANCH OF THE 
NCPhA 

(Continued from Page 28) 
tion, and Mr. Web Gully, Executive Director 
of the North Carolina Public Interest Re- 
search Group. Plans are being completed for 
the October program, which will be con- 
cerned with the legislative aspects of the 
profession, with hopes of a presentation by 
a member of a committee on the Federal 
Level. The November program is still in the 
planning stages, but progress is being made 
toward a panel discussion of bioavailability 
and generic equivalency. The panel will con- 
sist of representatives from the Pharmaceu- 
tical Manufacturers Association, the Fed- 
eral Drug Administration, and a small manu- 
facturing company. 

The Student Branch also is planning nu- 
merous projects for the upcoming scholastic 
year. These include: 

Survey of 1974 graduating class as to in- 
come and field of practice. 

Placement service for interns and externs 
in conjunction with the Institute of 
Pharmacy. 

Survey of interns as to income and field 
of practice. 

Operating First Aid Booths at home foot- 
ball games. 

Hypertension screening booth in conjunc- 
tion with Anti-Hypertension Week. 

Programs in conjunction with Pharmacy 
Week and Poison Prevention Week. 

Of course the Student Branch will also 
find time for socializing. A mixer is being 
planned for early September in order for 
the members to become acquainted with each 
other. The Organization also takes part in 
the annual UNC Pharmacy School Weekend. 

It is evident that the Student Branch is 
entering a busy year with an emphasis on the 
increase of membership as well as an em- 
phasis on professionalism. 



32 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

THE NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 
OFFICERS 1974-1975 

President: William H. Wilson, 2206 Dixie Trail Ext., Raleigh 27607 

1st Vice-President: L. Milton Whaley, P. O. Box 151, Wallace 28466 

2nd Vice-President: Tom R. Burgiss, Drugcare of Alleghany, Inc., Sparta 28675 

3rd Vice-President: Eugene W. Hackney, P. O. Bqx 1085, Lumberton 28358 

Secretary-Treasurer & Executive Director: W. J. Smith, Box 151, Chapel Hill 27514 

COMMITTEES 1974-1975 

Executive 

William H. Wilson, (Chairman), 2206 Dixie Trail Ext., Raleigh 27607 

Tom R. Burgiss, Drugcare of Alleghany, Inc., Sparta 28675 

George H. Edmonds, 808 Pebble Drive, Greensboro 27410 

Eugene W. Hackney, P. O. Box 1085, Lumberton 28358 

John C. Hood, Jr., P. O. Box 247, Kinston 28501 

Donald J. Miller, 309 Walton Road, Morganton 28655 

Joe C. Miller, 102 Hillcrest Circle, Boone 28607 

W. Whitaker Moose, P. O. Box 67, Mount Pleasant 28124 

L. Milton Whaley, P. O. Box 151, Wallace 28466 

C. Michael Whitehead, Ramseur Pharmacy, Inc., P. O. Box 158, Ramseur 27316 

W. J. Smith, P. O. Box 151, Chapel Hill 27514 

Board of Consultants 

B. Cade Brooks, Chairman, Fayetteville Drug Company, 114 Gillespie Street, Fayetteville 

28301 
James L. Creech, Creech's Pharmacy, Smithfield 27577 

Marion M. Edmonds, Edmonds Drug Co., P. O. Box 6105, Greensboro 27405 
Robert B. Hall, Hall Drug Co., Box 385, Mocksville 27028 
W. Dorsey Welch, Jr., P. O. Box 433, Washington 27889 

Legislation 
W. H. Randall, Chairman, P. O. Box 995, Lillington 27546 
Donald K. Chapman, 340 Westoak Trail, Winston-Salem 27104 
James R. Hickmon, 1420 Paisley Avenue, Fayetteville 28304 
Albert F. Lockamy, Jr., 3151 North Blvd., Raleigh 27604 
Bill Mast, 127 Watson Drive, Henderson 27536 
Alfred Gene Smith, P. O. Box 426, Elizabethtown 28337 
Roy Smith, Newland Pharmacy, P. O. Box 552, Newland 28657 

National Legislative Affairs 

Jesse M. Pike, Chairman, P. O. Box 3277, Wil-Mar Station, Concord 28025 

Gerald N. (Jerry) Branson, 4940 Windhaven Court, Dunwoody, Georgia 30338 

George P. Hager, 339 Burlage Circle, Chapel Hill 27514 

Seymour Holt, 6325 North Ewing Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46220 

Claude Timberlake, 8506 Crown Place, Waynewood, Alexandria, Virginia 22308 

Community Pharmacy 

R. Ragan Harper, Jr., Chairman, 102 North Roxford Rd., Kings Mountain 28086 
Ernest L. Carraway, Jr., Windsor Pharmacy, Windsor 27983 
Gene F. Herring, 610 Doris Avenue, Jacksonville 28540 
Evelyn P. Lloyd, P. O. Box 767, Hillsborough 27278 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 33 

Addie B. Pegram, P. O. Box 97, Apex 27502 

Fred Semeniuk, 1402 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill 27514 

Oscar L. Umstead, Presidential Apts., 1000 Ruby Street, Durham 27704 

Employer/Employee Relations 
M. B. McCurdy, Chairman, 115 E. Center Street, Mebane 27302 
Ralph Ashworth, P. O. Box 98, Cary 27511 
Patricia C. Giddings, Route 2, Box 272-A, Chapel Hill 27514 
Julius Howard, 2059 Carolina Beach Road, Wilmington 28401 
Thomas Knapp, Route 2, Roswell Drive, Kernersville 27284 
Donald V. Peterson, 5102 Kenwood Road, Durham 27704 
Brenda A. Zurek, 207-D Yorkleigh Lane, Jamestown 27282 

Institutional Pharmacy 

W. T. Williams, Chairman, c/o Pharmacy Department, Eastern North Carolina Hospital, 

Wilson 27893 
J. W. Bradley, III, 5938 Ponderosa Drive, Raleigh 27612 
Thomas R. Burgiss, Drugcare of Alleghany, Inc., Sparta 28675 
Fred M. Eckel, UNC School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill 27514 
Seth G. Miller, 412 Arbor Drive, Lexington 27292 
John H. Myhre, 1005 Park Avenue, Garner 27529 
W. M. Oakley, 3515 Canterbury Road, New Bern 28560 
Jerry D. Price, 1236 Fairlane Drive, Cary 27511 

Ernest J. Rabil, Bobbitt's College Pharmacy, Hawthorne at Lockland, Winston-Salem 27103 
Virginia C. Shigley, 30 Edgemont Road, Apt. 24, Asheville 28801 
Consultants: 
Benny Ridout, Pharmacist Consultant, N. C. Department of Social Services, Medical Services 

Division, 325 N. Salisbury St., Raleigh 27611 
Frank Yarborough, Project Director, Paid Prescriptions, P. O. Box 18964, Raleigh 27609 

Public Health and Welfare 

Kenneth Edwards, Chairman, Stantonsburg Drug Company, Stantonsburg 27883 

W. Grover Creech, 105 Longview Drive, Smithfield 27577 

Thomas E. Holding, III, P. O. Box 548, Wake Forest 27587 

G. Haywood Jones, Zebulon Drug Company, P. O. Box 338, Zebulon 27597 

Larry Lazarus, Route 3, Box 143, Sanford 27330 

W. R. Viall, Jr., Carolina Pharmacy, Inc., P. O. Box 25, Pinehurst 28374 

B. Paul Woodard, Woodard's Pharmacy, Princeton 27569 

Consumer Affairs 
W. Whitaker Moose, Chairman, P. O. Box 67, Mount Pleasant 28124 
W. T. Boone, Boone's Professional Pharmacy, P. O. Box 69, Ahoskie 27910 
John C. Bullock, Jr., 2212 Lynnwood Drive, Wilmington 28401 
A. H. Mebane, III, 512 Audubon Drive, Greensboro 27410 
Steve Moore, 506 Chateau Apts., Chapel Hill 27514 
Leslie M. Myers, 590 QuartcrstafF Road, Winston-Salem 27104 
A. Rowland Strickland, Jr., P. O. Box 14, Stantonsburg 27883 
William E. Vaughn, 405 Overland Drive, Chapel Hill 27514 
Thomas F. Womblo, III, 202 Brandon Avenue, Tarboro 27886 

Mental Health 

Hunter L. Kelly, Chairman, Murdoch Center, Burner 27509 
Robert J. Allen, Route 3, 59 White Oak Trail, Chapel Hill 27514 



34 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

Oliver G. Fleming, 501 Lakeview Drive, Ahoskie 27910 

Mrs. James F. Fowler, 903 Mocksville Avenue, Salisbury 28144 

L. William Harris, 558 Tripolis Street, Concord 28025 

C. Larry Lazarus, Route 3, Box 143, Sanford 27330 

Evelyn D. Williford, 507 North Glen Drive, Raleigh 27609 

Professional Relations 
C. Michael Whitehead, Chairman, P. O. Box 158, Ramseur 27316 
Hugh C. Caldwell, Jr., P. O. Box 479, Mooresville 28115 
Ida N. Keetsock, 3826 Hermine Street, Durham 27705 
Henry A. Leigh, P. O. Box 62, Cullowhee 28723 
Virginia "Ginger" Lee Lockamy, 3500 Horton, Raleigh 27607 
Carl L. Stringer, 96 Golf View Drive, Franklin 28734 
Rodgers S. White, 224 Robinwood Circle, Lenoir 28645 

Continuing Education 

Claude Paoloni, Chairman, 300 Spruce Street, Chapel Hill 27514 
Michael W. Craven, Vernon Hall Cottage, Kinston 28501 
William "Pat" Frye, 5517-M Albemarle Road, Charlotte 28212 
Stephen G. Honaker, Sr., 1342 Pinebluff Road, Winston-Salem 27103 

F. Alex McCrackin, 221 Pine Valley Drive, Wilmington 28401 
Richard G. Ripley, 520 West Main Street, Elkin 28621 
Stuart W. Rollins, Folkstone Road, Grandview, Pfafftown 27040 
Virginia C. Shigley, 30 Edgemont Road, Apt. 24, Asheville 28801 
Gerald M. Stahl, Watts Hospital, Pharmacy, Durham 27705 

R. Nathan (Skip) Sykes, Jr., 2606 Canal Drive, Wilson 27893 
Olin H. Welsh, P. O. Box 477, Cary 27511 

Delivery of Pharmaceutical Services 
Gary Newton, Chairman, Prescription Center, Box 3401, Fayetteville 28305 
Thomas R. Burgiss, Drugcare of Alleghany, Inc., Sparta 28675 
Melvin A. Chambers, UNC School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill 27514 

David D. Claytor, Medical Center Pharmacy, 408 E. Wendover Avenue, Greensboro 27401 
Carey W. Gaynor, Jr., Route 1, Fountain 27829 
Milton W. Skolaut, 1509 Pinecrest Road, Durham 27705 
Frank F. Yarborough, P. O. Box 545, Raleigh 27603 

Endowment Fund Committee 

B. Cade Brooks, Chairman, 114 Gillespie Street, Fayetteville 28301 

Joseph Bland, 1248 South Main Street, High Point 27260 

James L. Creech, Creech's Pharmacy, Smithfield 27577 

George H. Cocolas, 1298 Wildwood Drive, Chapel Hill 27514 

J. C. Jackson, Hedgpeth Pharmacy, P. O. Box 1085, Lumberton 28358 

Banks D. Kerr, P. O. Box 10627, Raleigh 27605 

Hoy A. Moose, A. W. Moose Drug Company, Mount Pleasant 28124 

Ralph P. Rogers, Jr., 1513 Sycamore Street, Durham 27707 

John T. Stevenson, 512 East Main Street, Elizabeth City 27909 

W. Dorsey Welch, Jr., P. O. Box 433, Washington 27889 

Consolidated Pharmacy Loan Fund 
Robert B. Hall, Chairman, Hall Drug Company, P. O. Box 385, Mocksville 27028 

G. Tom Cornwell, Cornwell Drug Company, P. O. Box 790, Morganton 28655 
Howard Q. Ferguson, Economy Drug Company, Randleman 27317 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 



Nancy Pike Mitchener, 203 North Granville Street, Edenton 27932 
B. R. Ward, 1901 East Walnut Street. Coldsboro 27530 

Tripartite Committee 
Chairman: Claude U. Paoloni, Chapel Hill 
Secretary: Stephen M. Caiola, Chapel Hill 

Representing the UNC School of Pharmacy 
Stephen M. Caiola, UNC School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill 27514 
Claude U. Paoloni, UNC School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill 27514 
LeRoy D. Werley, Jr., UNC School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill 27514 

Representing the N. C. Board of Pharmacy 
Harold V. Day, Day's Drug Store, Spruce Pine 28777 
David D. Claytor, Medical Center Pharmacy, 408 E. Wendover Ave., 
W. H. Randall, Jr.. P. O. Box 995, Lillington 27546 

Representing the N.C. Pharmaceutical Association 
John A. (Jack) Dawson, Jr., 1201 Meadowood Lane, Charlotte 28211 
Marion M. Edmonds, P. O. Box 6105, Greensboro 27405 
George M. Willets, 302 Colony Woods Drive, Chapel Hill 27514 



Greensboro 27401 



NORTHEASTERN 

Reported by Joseph G. Minton 

The Northeastern Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Society met August 22 in Williamston. 

Dr. Cornelius Partrick of Washington, 
North Carolina discussed the operations of 
the North Carolina Board of Medical Ex- 
aminers of which he is a member. 

Dr. Partrick pointed out that the Board 
has the responsibility of licensing new doc- 
tors, the relicensing of out-of-the-state doc- 
tors desiring to practice in North Carolina, 
plus administering appropriate regulations to 
assure the public of proper medical care. 

The speaker explained the Physician As- 
sistant and Nurse Practitioner Programs 
including the special training and duties of 
each. 

WAKE COUNTY 

Reported by Patricia Bumgarner 
The Wake County Republication candidate 
for the N. C. House of Representatives, Mr. 
Ward Purrington, was guest speaker at the 
September 3 meeting of the Wake County 
Pharmaceutical Association. 



Thirty members and guests were present 
at the meeting, held in Raleigh at Parker 's 
Bar-B-Q. 

Next meeting of the Association will be 
at Burroughs Wellcome headquarters in Re- 
search Triangle Park on October 1. A Christ- 
mas Party is planned for December 7 at 
the Flying Cloud Restaurant. 

Don Carter, president of the Association, 
presided at the September 3 meeting. 



DURHAM-ORANGE 

The initial meeting of the Durham-Orange 
Pharmaceutical Association for the current 
Association year got underway at Colonial 
Tnn, Hillsborough, on September 13. 

UNC School of Pharmacy Assistant Dean 
LeRoy Werley discussed the School's cur- 
riculum and planned changes for the future. 

Approximately 60 members and guests 
attended the meeting. Announcement was 
made next meeting of the D-0 Association 
would be at Burroughs Wellcome, Research 
Triangle Park. 



36 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

PHARMACY MEETINGS— IMMEDIATE PAST, CURRENT AND FUTURE 

August 21. Meeting of the NCPhA Committee on Institutional Pharmacy at the In- 
stitute of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill. W. T. Williams of Wilson, Chairman, presided. 

August 21. Meeting of the New Hanover County Pharmaceutical Society in Wilmington. 
William H. (Bill) Wilson, President of the NCPhA, guest speaker. 

August 22. Meeting of a 5-county pharmacy organization in Kcnansville. William H. 
(Bill) Wilson, President of the NCPhA, guest speaker. 

August 22. Meeting of the Forsyth Pharmaceutical Society in Winston-Salem at the 
Hyatt House (headquarters for the 1975 NCPhA Convention). NCPhA Executive Director 
W. .1. Smith, guest speaker. 

August 22. Meeting of the NCPhA Committee on Mental Health at the Institute of 
Pharmacy, Chapel Hill. Chairman Hunter Kelly of Durham, presided. 

September 3. Meeting of The Chapel Hill Auxiliary at the Institute of Pharmacy, 
Chapel Hill. Mrs. J. L. Olsen, president, presided. 

September 5. Meeting of the NCPhA Executive Committee at the Institute of Pharmacy, 
Chapel Hill. Two hour conference with newly appointed UNC School of Pharmacy Dean 
Seymour Blaug. 

September 13. Meeting of the Durham-Orange Pharmaceutical Association at the 
Colonial Inn, Hillsborough. 

September 15. UNC Pharmacy Student Wives "Beans & Jeans" Party at the W. J. 
Smith Residence, Chapel Hill. 

September 16. Meeting of the Tripartite Committee at the Institute of Pharmacy, Chapel 
Hill. 

September 17. Meeting of the N. C. Board of Pharmacy, Institute of Pharmacy, Chapel 
Hill. 

September 19. Annual meeting of the N.C. Pharmaceutical Research Foundation at 
the UNC School of Pharmacy and Carolina Inn, Chapel Hill. 

September 25. Meeting of the UNC School of Pharmacy Student Branch of the NCPhA/ 
APhA, Bea.rd Hall, Chapel Hill. Subject: Rx Price Posting. 

September 26. Meeting of the N. C. Medical Society Committee Liaison to the N. C. Phar- 
maceutical Association. Mid Pines Club, Southern Pines. Dr. Charles W. Byrd of Dunn, 
chairman. 

September 30. Meeting of the Community Advisory Board of the Drug Education Pro- 
gram, Beard Hall, Chapel Hill. 

October 1. Meeting of the Wake County Pharmaceutical Association at Burroughs 
Wellcome Headquarters, Research Triangle Park, N. C. 

October 6. Meeting of the Pharmacy Continuing Education Committee of the NCPhA 
and the UNC School of Pharmacy. Institute of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill. 

October 15. Meeting of the N. C. Board of Pharmacy, Institute of Pharmacy, Chapel 
Hill. 

October 16. Fall Convocation of The Woman's Auxiliary of the NCPhA. Institute of 
Pharmacy, Chapel Hill. Dr. Bernard Boyd, guest speaker. 

October 23. Seminar — The Prescription Advertising Dilemma. Institute of Pharmacy, 
Chapel Hill. Sponsored by the UNC School of Pharmacy and the NCPhA Committee on 
Consumer Affairs. 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS TO THE TMA MEMBER LIST, 
SEPTEMBER JOURNAL 

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Journal of Pharmacy 



)he Carolina 

Volume LIV November 1974 Number 11 

LIBRARY 

NOV 12 1974 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY ' 




ri^Jk, .iAi. 



HAGER PORTRAIT PRESENTED TO SCHOOL 

Presentation of a portrait of Dr. George P. Hager was made at the recent annual meeting 
of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Research Foundation. Dr. Hager was Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, from 1966 to 1974. He 
was succeeded by Dr. Seymour M. Blaug. 
In the picture are: Mrs. Hager, Dr. Hager, son, Andy and daughter, Debbie. 

— Photo by Danny Dalton 



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Brief Summary. Consult the package literature for prescribing information. 



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Indications : For the treatment of mild to mod- 
erately severe pneumococcal respiratory tract 
infections and mild staphylococcal skin and 
soft-tissue infections that are sensitive to peni- 
cillin G. See the package literature for other 
indications. 

Contraindication : Previous hypersensitivity to 
penicillin. 

Warnings : Serious, occasionally fatal, anaphy- 
lactoid reactions have been reported. Some 
patients with penicillin hypersensitivity have 
had severe reactions to a cephalosporin; inquire 
about penicillin, cephalosporin, or other aller- 
gies before treatment. If an allergic reaction 
occurs, discontinue the drug and treat with the 
usual agents (e.g., epinephrine or other pres- 
sor amines, antihistamines, corticosteroids). 
Precautions: Use with caution in individuals 
with histories of significant allergies and/or 



asthma. Do not rely on oral administration in 
patients with severe illness, nausea, vomiting, 
gastric dilatation, cardiospasm, or intestinal 
hypermotility. Occasional patients will not 
absorb therapeutic amounts given orally. In 
streptococcal infections, treat until the organ- 
ism is eliminated (minimum of ten days). With 
prolonged use, nonsusceptible organisms, in- 
cluding fungi, may overgrow; treat superinfec- 
tion appropriately. 

Adverse Reactions: Hypersensitivity, includ- 
ing fatal anaphylaxis. Nausea, vomiting, epigas- 
tric distress, diarrhea, and black, hairy tongue. 
Skin eruptions, urticaria, reactions resembling 
serum sickness (including chills, edema, arthral- 
gia, prostration), laryngeal edema, fever, and 
eosinophilia. Infrequent hemolytic anemia, leu- 
kopenia, thrombocytopenia, neuropathy, and 
nephropathy, usually with high doses of paren- 
teral penicillin. [051873B] 
^equivalent to phenoxymethyl penicillin 

Additional information available 
to the profession on request. 
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The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



November, 1974 

Vol. LIV No. 11 



Officers 

NORTH CAROLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 



President 

W. H. Wilson 

Raleigh 



Vice-Presidents 

L. M. Whaley 

Wallace 
Tom R. Burgiss 

Sparta 

E. W. Hackney 

Lumberton 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



CONTENTS THIS ISSUE 



Eckerd Acts to Combat Expense Rise 4 

Jerry Bridgers Wins Casli Award Sponsored by 

Burroughs Wellcome 5 

Inventory Control Seminar 7 

Pharmacists (53) Licensed by N. C. Board of Pharmacy 8 

The Pharmacist Who Decided to be a Gem Cutter 10 

State Board of Pharmacy News 13 

Tar Heel Digest 15 

Blanton Reelected President of NCPRF 17 

Disasters — Major and Minor 19 

Pharmacist Recommends "CHEC" Community 

Hypertension Evaluation Clinic . . 21 

Current Comment by Dean Blaug 22 

UNC School of Pharmacy Notes . 27 

Marriages-Births-Deaths 29 

Gordon Appointed State Drug Administrator 31 

Classified Advertising 32 



ADVERTISERS 

Burroughs Wellcome Company 6 

Colorcraft Corporation 30 

Gilpin, Henry P>. Company 9 

ICN Pharmaceuticals (King Associates) 1th Cover 

TC Systems, Inc. 20 

Justice Drug Company 1 

Kendall Drug Company 11 

Lilly, Eli & Company 2nd Cover 

Owens, Minor & Bodeker, Inc. 3rd Cover 

Ramsey Manufacturing Company 18 

Scott Drug Company 2 

Seeman Printery 26 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories 12 

Smith Wholesale Drug Company 14 

Washington National Insurance Company 24 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Second class 
postage paid at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



ECKERD ACTS TO COMBAT 
EXPENSE RISE 

To avoid a recession, depression, bank- 
ruptcy or foreclosure, various steps are be- 
ing taken by management to combat an 
economy which at best is of major concern 
to everyone. 

In an " Action Required ' ' bulletin to 
supervisory personnel, Eckerd Drugs, North 
Carolina Division, meets the problem this 
way: 

' ' Increases in expenses caused primarily 
by the energy crisis have created an alarm- 
ing expense crisis within our company. 

"The cost of electric power has increased 
30 per cent over last year and is still rising. 
Water bills have increased 25 per cent. 
Paper bags, cups, etc. have increased to 30 
per cent. The cost of repairs has almost 
tripled. ' ' 

To combat these cost increases, Eckerd is 
installing ' ' turn off lights ' ' decals next to 
light switches, turning store air condition- 
ing units on only 30 minutes before store 
openings and cutting them off one hour be- 
fore closing. 

"Repair all leaking faucets" the direc- 
tive reads. "One drop of water per second 
is 648 gallons of water a year wasted." 

Before calling a repairman, store managers 
are being told to check fuses, reset buttons 
and drains. One employee solved a plumbing 
problem with a 10 cent cork and an empty 
mayonnaise jar, saving an estimated $150 
plumbing bill. 

KNOW-HOW 

It's what you do with what you have that 
counts. 

Previously, we presented the tobacco 
seed-cigarette story. Here's an update on 
iron: 

A $5.00 bar of iron made into 

1. Horseshoes is worth about $11.00. 

2. Screwdrivers about $250.00. 

3. Needles about $3,000. 

4. Watch springs about $250,000. 

The difference is application of "know- 
how. ' ' 

Pharmacists have plenty of know-how. 
It's just a case of application. 



JERRY BRIDGERS WINS CASH 
AWARD SPONSORED BY 
BURROUGHS WELLCOME 

Jerry A. Bridgers of Thorne Drug Com- 
pany in Tarboro, North Carolina has been 
selected as a winner in the Burroughs Well- 
come Co. Pharmacy Education Program. The 
drawing took place in Las Vegas during the 
National Association of Retail Druggists 
(NARD) Convention (MGM Grand Hotel, 
Sept. 29-Oct. 2, 1974). 

A check for $500 in the name of Jerry A. 
Bridgers will be presented to University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to be- 
come a permanent revolving loan fund to 
assist deserving pharmacy students in the 
completion of their education. The $26,000 
Pharmacy Education Program is sponsored 
by Burroughs Wellcome Co., one of the 
nation's leading pharmaceutical manufac- 
turers. 

During this convention one name was 
drawn from each of the 50 states plus the 
District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. 

This program is part of Burroughs Well- 
come 's continuing effort to aid pharmacists 
everywhere in retaining the high standards 
which have characterized their profession 
throughout its history. Providing financial 
assistance to those who need it is one way 
of insuring the future. 

Bridgers was among more than twelve 
thousand pharmacists who participated in 
this year 's Pharmacy Education Program. 



ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF 
PHARMACY 
Immediate opening for Assistant Direc- 
tor of Pharmacy for 340-bed community 
hospital providing both in-patient and 
out-patient services. Full benefits in- 
cluding free retirement. 

For Further Information Contact: 

Jim Cline, Personnel Director 
High Point Memorial Hospital, Inc. 

225 Boulevard 

High Point, North Carolina 27261 

Telephone (919) 886-4121 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



BUSY TIME FOR PRESIDENT 
WILSON & DEAN BLAUG 

The local/district pharmaceutical society 

speaking schedules of NCPhA President 

W. H. Wilson and UNO School of Pharmacy 

Dean Seymour Blaug are listed below: 

W. E. Wilson, President 

N. C. Pharmaceutical Association 

September 19. Meeting N. C. Medical Care 
Commission. 

September 29. Rockingham County Society 
of Pharmacists, Reidsville. 

October 4. Meeting with Medicaid Officials, 
Raleigh. 

October 9. Mecklenburg Pharmaceutical So- 
ciety, Charlotte. 

October 22. NCPhA Executive Committee, 
Chapel Hill. 

October 24. Forsyth Pharmaceutical Society, 
Winston-Salem. 

Seymour Blaug, Dean 

School of Pharmacy, TJNC 

September 26. Forsyth County Pharmaceu- 
tical Society, Winston-Salem. 

October 9. Northeastern Carolina Pharma- 
ceutical Society, Williamston. 

October 16. Southeastern District Meeting in 
Kinston. 

October 27. Buncombe County Pharmaceu- 
tical Society, Asheville. 

Xovember 20. New Hanover County Phar- 
maceutical Society, Wilmington. 



WON NONE AND LOST ELEVEN 

Seymour Blaug, the new Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy, is looking forward to 
Carolina 's football season. "Last year at 
Iowa wc won none and lost, eleven," he said, 
"and the opposition scored over 500 more 
points than we did. Basketball was our big 
sport. Why, we won half our games, and from 
crowd support and interest you would have 
thought we were the national champions." 

Dean Blaug also commented that in many 
ways Chapel Hill was exactly like Towa. 
"When they started paving the street in 
front of the School of Pharmacy on the 
same day we had our registration T thought 
T was back in Iowa. ' ' 

— From the Chapel Hill Newspaper 



CHAMPUS PRESCRIPTIONS 

Since the Medical Review Division of 
North Carolina Blue Cross-Blue Shield has 
experienced some difficulty in processing 
some CHAMPUS PRESCRIPTIONS sub- 
mitted for payment, the pharmacist asso- 
ciated with the agency has suggested dis- 
semination of the following information : 

' ' All contracting pharmacists who are fil- 
ing prescription drug claims under the 
CHAMPUS program are cautioned as to 
the importance of following the guidelines 
as issued by the Director of this program. 

"Recent audit activity indicates that in 
some instances claims have been rejected as 
presented, due to incorrect billing procedure. 

"Audit processes' and review activity of 
claims have also indicated possible viola- 
tions of legend drugs refills; contacted phy- 
sicians advise that no refills were authorized 
in some instances where claims were filed. 
Such refill activity indicated violation of 
Federal and State regulations, and in in- 
stances where DEA drugs are involved, this 
violation becomes more serious. 

' ' In some instances claims indicate pos- 
sible addiction and abuse on the part of 
some patients and customers'. Pharmacists 
are urged to obtain explicit refill authoriza- 
tion from the prescribers where abuse is 
suspected. ' ' 

SOME DRUGS IN SHORT SUPPLY 

Several North Carolina newspapers have 
highlighted the shortage of drugs includiiig 
heparin, ampicillin and bacitracin. 

Tf the supply situation becomes critical, 
one possibility would be emergency loans 
from federal medicine depots. 

Of more immediate interest to the average 
pharmacist is the number and frequency of 
ciist increases. One wholesaler said the price 
level of 20,000 items has' risen in roccnl 
months with more to come. 

The one item mentioned most frequently 
by pharmacists is Quinidine. Whatever pub- 
lished price used is likely to be too low and 
not available at the published price. 

For years, Pharmacy and the pharma- 
ceutical industry were unique in maintaining 
stable prices but inflationary pressures are 
now making it increasingly difficult to do so. 



NO TOOLS NEEDED. 

Empirin Compound 250s 
still have easy-opeaeasy-close, fiddle-free caps 



/ 




250 TABLETS HOC 81 306 6! 

EIVIRIRIN* 

compound 

analgesic 

himai Unfair,- .,.,_,„ *!.*. „, rj^wv*-*^ 




Good sales sense 

No need to create cap-opening difficulties for 
people who can't cope with child-resistant 
closures. The elderly and the handicapped. House- 
holds without children. (To accommodate these 
users, each manufacturer of aspirin-containing 
analgesics is permitted Py law to make one size 
available without a safety closure.) 
The Empirin Compound 250 tablet bottle is the 
right choice for them. Easy to open. Easy to close. 
Easy to take. 



Good profit sense, too 

Every Empirin Compound "250" you sell can bring 
you a profit of up to $1.10* Yet one facing uses only 
4% inches— scarcely more than most analgesic 
100's do. 

Make the most of every analgesic inch on your shelves. 
Make it with Empirin Compound 250's. 

•Based on suggested list prices. 

Burroughs Wellcome Co. 

Research Triangle Park 
North Carolina 27709 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



S E M I N a E 




TORy COtllROL 



10:00 
10:30 



a.m. 
a.m. 



with emphasis on stock management methods and purchasing policies 

Sponsored by 

NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

"Wednesday, November 13, 1974 

Institute of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 

REGISTRATION 

WELCOME 

W. H. "Wilson, President, N. C. Pharmaceutical Association 
STOCK MANAGEMENT 

Arthur S. Dods, Division Manager, Capital Division 
Johnson $■ Johnson 

COMPUTER CONTROL OF INVENTORY 
"W. Frank Fife, General Manager 
Owens, Minor $ BodeTcer, Inc. of North Carolina 
LUNCHEON— at the Zoom Zoom 

HOW TO MAXIMIZE YOUR RETURN ON INVENTORY INVESTMENT 
D. C. Huffman, Jr., Executive Director 
American College of Apothecaries 

THE IMPORTANCE OF A BALANCED INVENTORY 
Donald Aliern, President 
Scott Drug Company 
INVENTORY CONTROL AS PRACTICED BY A 

(1) PROFESSIONAL PHARMACY 

J. Gary Newton, Prescription Center, Fayetteville 

(2) COMMUNITY PHARMACY 

W. S. Dukes, McFalls Hillsdale Pari- Drug Company, Greensboro 

(3) CHAIN PHARMACY 

Donald J. Deaton, Regional Vice-President, Bevco Drug Stores, Inc. 
At the conclusion of the Seminar, each registrant will receive a copy of a 52-page illustrated 
manual, STOCK MANAGEMENT, compliments of Johnson & Johnson. 

Registration limited to 100 persons. Four (4) hours Continuing Education Credit 



12:30 
1:30 



p.m. 
p.m. 



TO REGISTER, CALL (919-967-2237) THE NCPhA. $10.00 FEE INCLUDES LUNCHEON 
AND SUPPLIES. 



PHARMACISTS LICENSED BY THE N. C. BOARD OF PHARMACY 

September 17, 1974 
Adams, Michael Winston, 102C Eastbrook Court, Greenville 27834 
Adcock, Ollie Thurston, Jr., 414 East Vance Street, Fuquay-Varina 27520 
Ange, Dalton Ray, Route 1, Box 208- A, Cove City 28523 
Angel, Carolvn Dianne, 100] Sunset Drive, Apt. 4, Monroe 28110 
Ayscue, Dwight Milton, 912 Klyee Street, Eden 27288 (Continued on Page 8) 



8 The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 

(Continued from Page 7) 

Brown, Henry Stephen, P. O. Box 965, Yadkinville 27055 

Caldwell, John Wilson, III, 223 Oakland Circle, Newton 28658 

Cannon, William Bruce, 467 Melanie Court, Foxcroft Apts., Chapel Hill 27514 

Carter, Nancy Barham, 1203 Mountain Road, Asheboro 27203 

Damon, Ann Eosser, 2721 Reynolds Park Road, Winston-Salem 27107 

Daniel, Katherine Baldwin, Route 2, Box 563, Cary 27511 

Davis, Lucye Gray, 222-B Ransom Street, Chapel Hill 27514 

Digh, Earl Thomas, Jr., 210 Wilson Street, Morgantown 28655 

Dillon, Thomas Blaine, 300 Arbor Acres, Lexington 27292 

Eason, Ernie Larry, 1400 Green Oaks Lane, Apt. 3, Charlotte 28205 

Felts, John Michael, 1359 North 6 Street, Apt. 29, Albemarle 28001 

Frenier, Edward Damon, #5 Edgewood Apts 1 ., Route 4, Chapel Hill 27514 

Fries, Nancy Kathyrn, 157 Palaside Drive, Concord 28025 

Futrell, William Randolph, Jr., 525 Stockton Street, Statesville 28677 

Gabriel, Martha Jean, 607 Longview Street, Greensboro 27403 

George, Samuel Lorman, 1830 Sanford Drive, Elizabeth City 27909 

Gibson, Robert Van, Jr., 266 South Main Street, Mooresville 28115 

Gray, Richard Howard, Route 2, Box 272, Vanceboro 28586 

Grill, Frank James, Route 1, Box 576, Valdese 28690 

Hardee, Sandra Grace, Apt. 518, 2101 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Harmon, David Kirby, 5820 Littlehorn Drive, S. W., Roanoke, Virginia 24018 

Harris, William Lee, Jr., Route 2, Box 125, Morrisville 27560 

Hewitt, Harold Edward, Jr., Wayside Plaza Apts. #110, 700 Ninth Ave., Fort Worth, Texas 

76104 
Hicks, William Jackson, Jr., 5405-C Dana Drive, Raleigh 27606 
Howard, Robert Barrick, 6614-B Lake Hill Drive, Raleigh 27609 
Jones, Sanne Dail, 302 Main Street, Oxford 27565 

Joyner, Pamela Upchurch, 2250 Charles Drive, Apt. 40D, Windsor Terrace, Raleigh 27612 
Kendall, Ralph Herndon, Jr., B-2 Candlewood Apts., Sanford 27330 
Keyes, Maurice Clyde, Jr., 124 1/2 W. Rosemary, Chapel Hill 27514 
Lewis, Norman Colin, Route 2, Box 110, Apt. 3, Spruce Pine 28777 
Mangum, Thomas Bryant, Route 9, Box 1312, Sanford 27330 
Marsh, Oliver Lee, Jr., Box 2500, Pine Grove Mobile Court, Chapel Hill 27514 
McCombs, Steven Kelly, P. O. Box 306, Faith 28041 
Pace, Robert Terrell, 2201 Old Sptg. Rd., East Flat Rock 28726 
Parker, Roger Edwin, 246 Hawthorne Road, N. W., Winston-Salem 27104 
Pickler, Randy Craig, 204 Southwick Apts., Southern Pines 28387 
Pittman, Martha Anderson, 130 Wilkins Drive 2-B, Durham 27705 
Ray, Michael Bryan, 14 Wilburn Road, Asheville 28806 
Roberts, Samuel Allen, 439 Foxcroft Apts., Chapel Hill 27514 
Roughton, Billy Gerald, 204 Allendale Drive, Greenville 27834 
Smith, Margaret Willis, 4008 Twickenham Court #202, Raleigh 27612 
Stegall, Michael Jackson, P. O. Box 1622, New Bern 28560 
Sutton, Joel Elmore, Jr., Apt. #59, Greenway Apts., Greenville 27834 
Vass, Regina Kaye Eanes, 5904 B-2 Monroe Road, Charlotte 28212 
Welsh, Olin Henderson, Jr., 1201 Wicklow Drive, Cary 27511 
Wheeler, David Stewart, 2917-D Cottage Place, Meadow Oaks Apts., Greensboro 
Williams, Lynwood Ashley, 5804 Forest Drive, Oak Forest Estates, Raleigh 27604 
Worley, James Thomas, P. O. Box 242, West Jefferson 28698 



WE SERVICE THE PEOPLE WITH 
NO ROOM FOR ERROR AND NO TIME TO WAIT. 



Every customer is demanding, but among the most 
demanding are hospital pharmacists— the folks with no room 
for error and no time 
to wait. 

With life and 
death on the line every 
hour of every day, 
we service and 
satisfy their needs. So 
it stands to reason 
if we can satisfy 
their needs, we 
can do the same 
for your phar- 
macy. To meet 
these demands, 
we've imple- 
mented ouii 
DATAREX| 
Service as a 
continuous 
inventory control 
for day-by-day 
stocking of 
all essential 
requirements. 
And when emer 
gencies arise, we've 
made provisions for 
that, too. Needless to 
say, a service like this has 
caught on. 

Today more and mire hospitals are turning 
But we understand there's fno room for error 
and no time to wait in your pharmacy either. 

GILPIN 

COMBkNY 

Wholesale druggists since 1845. 




THE HENRY B 



10 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



THE PHARMACIST WHO DECIDED TO BE A GEM CUTTER 



by v Paquita Jurgensen 
Chapel Hill Newspaper, August 18, 1974 

Elliott Brummitt is a man who mixes 
chemicals and herbs to make medicine and 
chips away at colored stones to make jewelry. 

A pharmacist and owner of Sutton's Drug 
Store for the past 10 years, his latest busi- 
ness venture is the Charles' Hopkins Jewelry 
Store, located in Amber Alley beneath the 
drug store, which he purchased last March. 

Brummitt, who had never been a "rock 
hound" or shown much interest in jewelry, 
said an evening course in gem cutting under 
Henry Hurlbert on the TJNC Campus about 
three or four years ago was the trigger for 
the latest facet in his life style. 

"When you take that first finished stone 
off the machine you become addicted for 
life," he said. 

Since that time, Brummitt has cut and 
polished many stones to mount as rings, 



pendants, and brooches. One of his creations, 
a handsome pink sapphire he wears on his 
right hand, is mounted in an original Charles 
Hopkins heavy gold setting, a mounting he 
discovered in the store following the trans- 
fer of ownership. 

Brummitt said the jewelry store will still 
operate under its original name, a name 
made famous all over the State and beyond 
by its founder, the late Charles Hopkins who 
specialized in original jewelry. "The store 
will, in essence, remain much the same, ' ' 
said Brummitt. "I have added background 
music and I will bring in some new ma- 
chinery. ' ' 

In addition to his own jewelry creations 
— and some commercial items such as ear- 
rings — Brummitt will also offer some Charles 

(Continued on Page 11) 




Elliott Brummitt, a pharmacist turned jeweler, mounts a stone in an original gold mounting 
above in the workshop area of Charles Hopkins Jewelry Store in Amber Alley, Chapel Hill. 
Pharmacist Brummitt, who continues as the active manager/owner of Sutton's Drug Store 
(located over the jewelry store), purchased the business in March. 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



11 



(Continued from Page 10) 
Hopkins' reproductions. "I came across 
these old rubber easting molds' used by Mr. 
Hopkins and I plan to make wax molds from 
these for recasting," he said. 

Brummitt said among the new machinery 
he is installing will be a casting machine 
for making gold settings, using the lost 
wax process. 

In keeping with the organic theme of 
today, Brummitt also said he will cut only 
natural gem material on a regular basis and 
synthetics only upon request. "It takes four 
to eight hours to cut a stone and when you 
get through with a synthetic, you will have 
a £5 piece of material," he said. 

To turn rough ruby, emerald, sapphire, 
garnet, and other precious and semi-precious 
stones into gems, he will be using 500 cut- 
ting designs to create "one-of-a-kind" 
stones along with others in popular cuts. 
He also plans to specialize in opals, fire- 
filled stones which, in recent years, have 
been in great demand. 

' ' Many of the designs — mountings and 
stones — will be based on individual re- 
quests," said Brummitt, "and I will be do- 
ing some restoration work on heirloom jewel- 
ry — such as repairing old setting or re- 
placing lost stone or chipped stones. 

He will not, however, be cutting any 
diamonds. "You have to be a registered 
diamond cutter or you can't purchase rough 
diamonds," he said. 

Another interesting addition to the jewel- 
ry store will be electroplating — refinishing 
flatwear, jewelry, and other items in need 
of gold or silver replating. 



Managing the store for Brummitt is Mary 
Lynn Fuller who also handles special or- 
ders. Brummitt is continuing pharmaceutical 
duties in the drug store but plans to hire 
an assistant in the prescription department 
to allow himself more time cutting stones. 
He is already two months behind on orders. 

A native of Henderson, Brummitt re- 
ceived degrees in psychology and pharmacy 
from the University here. He has 1 also studied 
art and sometimes does portrait work as 
well as landscapes. An avid flyer, he keeps a 
four passenger Mooney based at Horace "Wil- 
liams Airport which he uses for both busi- 
ness and pleasure. 

PIKE CONTINUES AS MEMBER OF 
NARD EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The North Carolina delegation to the 
NARD Convention, Las Vegas, September 
30-November 3, returned with news of the 
election of Jesse M. Pike to the NARD 
executive committee for a three year term. 

A major topic at the NARD Convention 
was APhA President Bob Johnson's recom- 
mendation that pharmacist 's* dispensing 
fees be adjusted upward immediately. He 
pointed out drug prices have been advancing 
(average 200 per week in North Carolina) 
but pharmacists are locked into third party 
dispensing fees that, in some cases, are pre- 
70 established fees. 

POSTAGE STAMP 

From the Winston-Salem Sentinel: Q. Is it 
legal for a local drug store to charge 15 
cents for a 10 cent postage stamp? And the 
reply by local postmaster: Yes. 




"Sor-vioe InWhdesale Q^_»&r^^t^tieQ* , 



USE OUR TOLL FREE 

NUMBER 800-222-3856 

ANY TIME DAY OR NIGHT 

ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY 



GORDON G HAMRICK 

Vic» Pmdtnt 



DFtLJG COMRWMY 



SHELBY. N.C. 




MIKE HOWARD 



LENNIE CASEY MIKE FAGLEY 
HORACE FLANIGAN ION COLEY 



PHARMACY 
TINE q.S. 

Your SK&F Representative wants to help you 
in any way with anything to do with Smith Kline & 
French Laboratories, and has virtually unlimited back-up 
resources to do it. 

t , -I Smith Klme & French Laboratories Ol/ C* I"* 

JUSt aSK. Division of SmithKhne Corporation ^1 lUl 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



13 



STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Members — David D. Clayror, Greensboro; Harold V. Day, Spruce Pine; Jesse M. Pike, 
Concord; Jerry Price, Raleigh; W. H. Randall, Lillingron; H. C. McAllister, 
Secy.-Treas., Box 471, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



NEW PHARMACIES 

1. Mann Drug Store of Boone, Boone 
Heights Shopping Center, Boone. Thom- 
as E. Harris, pharmacist manager. 

2. Crown Drug of Eural Hall, Village 
Square Shopping Center, Highway 65, 
Rural Hall. Thomas D. Sprinkle, phar- 
macist manager. 

3. Drexcl Discount Drug Center, Rt. 9, 
Morganton. Moody Z. Honeycutt, phar- 
macist manager. 

4. Eckcrd Drugs, 226 Four Seasons Mall, 
Greensboro. Mary O. Cline, pharmacist 
manager. 

5. Medical Village Pharmacy, 964 16th 
Street, NE, Hickory. Ronald J. Shokes, 
pharmacist manager. 

6. Bethlehem Village Pharmacy, Rt. 5, Hick- 
ory, Glenn A. King, pharmacist manager. 

7. Foster Drug Company, Inc., 700 Wilkes- 
boro Street, Mocksville. William L. Fos- 
ter, y)harmacist manager. 



CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP 



1. Medical Arts Pharmacy, 1600 North 
Main Street, Waynesville. Thomas E. 
Curtis, pharmacist manager. 

2. Pineville Drug Company, 314 Main 
Street, Pineville. George F. Woodard, 
pharmacist manager. 

3. Smith's Drugs, 4 East Warren Street, 
Shelby. William H. Bradbum, Jr., phar- 
macist manager. 

McAllister commended 

H. C. McAllister, Secretary-Treasurer of 
the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy, was 
lauded by the North Carolina Medical Care 
Commission for his service to the Commis- 
sion over a ten year period. 

While serving as a member of the Com- 
mission, Mr. McAllister was responsible for 
the expenditure of funds, primarily Fed- 



eral, for the construction of new hospital 
facilities throughout North Carolina. 

The framed, commendation certificate 
presented to Mr. McAllister was signed by 
Holt McPhearson, former Editor of the High 
Point Enterprise. 

RECIPROCITY 

Mclanie Manning Hickey from Virginia. 
Lawrence Craig Ostrye from West Vir- 
ginia. 

John Joseph Spagnolo from Rhode Island. 
James Dean Fisher from New Vork. 

INCORPORATE 

Medical Park Pharmacy, Inc., 708-A 
Fleming Street, Hendersonville. By Eugene 
L. Molton, Lynn Molton and Charles W. 
Wray, attorney. 

COMPUTERIZATION OF 
RENEWAL NOTICES 

Pharmacist license annual renewal notices 
for 1975 will lie mailed in the next sixty 
days by the North Carolina Board of Phar- 
macy. 

While the notices are more detailed than 
in previous years, due to the computerized 
form, less time will be required for com 
pletion. 

The Board of Pharmacy is working with 
the North Carolina Cooperative Health Infor- 
mation System in computerizing its' records. 
Ultimately, the Board will be able to com- 
pile information hard to come by in the 
past. 

Of immediate benefit will be a computer 
mailing list printout, which will be kept up- 
to-date with information supplied by the 
Board. Of incidental note, any mailing list 
totaling more than 1000 names and ad- 
ilri'«p< will be 50 c /c inaccurate in five years, 
hence the necessity for constant revision. 



stp 



Shelf Labels 
Turnover Reports 
Price Stickers 



Another SMITH Service that will provide you shelf labels and price 
stickers for every item ordered. Supplied in invoice sequence. 



£ 



PHARMACY 

ACCOUNT SERVICE 



*GOOD RECORDS FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS— A proven accounts 
receivable system — Designed from the ground up for your needs 
— by the folks who went to computers in 1958. Better collection 
for you and prescription tax records for your customers. You also 
automatically earn interest on past due accounts if you desire. 



PHARMACY 

ADVERTISING PROGRAM 



3 



HOW'S YOUR RETAIL IMAGE?— Good? Bad? Indifferent— Con- 
sult your Smith Representative about our Associated Druggist Pro- 
gram. Some of the advantages of this program are hometown 
newspaper advertising — buying advantages — clerk training pro- 
gram — In store promotion materials and store advertising fliers. 



Just three of the many SMITH services 
Also ask about retirement, group hospitalization and major medical. 



Call or Write to: 

SPARTANBURG - 582-1216 
GREENVILLE - - - 235-4159 CHARLOTTE - - - - 825-5161 
ROCK HILL - - - - 328-5830 ASHEVILLE - - - - 684-6121 
GAFFNEY - - 487-4949 ANDERSON - - - - 646-3641 

manmammmci— m 





WHOLFSAL'L OHUG 



I • I O N or »HITM 0HU9 COKMNT 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 



YADKIXriLLE— Mrs. Millie Clark, the 
wife of Tom Clark, manager of 'Hanlon- 
Watson Drug Company, has been named 
Assistant Home Economics Agent for Yad- 
kin County. 

BOONE — Pharmacist Jim Furman has been 
elected vice chairman of Watauga County 's 
Community-Campus Eelations Committee. 
SAXFORD — Mrs. Edna Perkinson, former- 
ly of Winston-Salem, has accepted a phar- 
macist position with John 's Pharmacy. 
The owner of the pharmacy, John Terrell, 
is now director of pharmacy services at 
Lee County Hospital. 

MADISON— Charles D. McFall, McFall 
Drug Company, is a member of the Com- 
mittee on Investments, Campbell College. 
MOORESVILLE— Sherri Sanders Whitesell 
has accepted a position as full-time staff 
pharmacist for Lowrance Hospital. Mrs. 
Whitesell is the daughter of Pharmacists Mr. 
and Mrs. C. H. Sanders of Granite Quarry, 
the granddaughter of Pharmacist and Mrs. 
"Roy Burgiss, and niece of Tom Burgiss of 
Sparta. 

CO YCORD — Preston Forrester has opened 
The Medicine Shoppe on North Church 
Street, Concord, a unit in a chain of national 
prescription centers with stores in 34 states. 
Mr. Forrester, native of Greer, S. C, has 
lived in Concord about 10 years. He has been 
associated with Pike's ami the Medical Cen- 
ter in Concord, and Purcell's in Albemarle. 
NEW BERN— Craven Drugs, a Walgreen 
Agency Drug Store, has been located on the 
Old Cherry Point Highway. Owners and 



managers are Ealph Hamilton, Church Over- 
ly, and George Davis. 

MAIDEN — Charles Carpenter, a partner in 
Campbell's Drug Store, has been named to 
head his community's participation in the 
Eastern Catawba County United Fund. Mr. 
Carpenter is president of the Maiden Mer- 
chants Association and has had previous ex- 
perience in United Fund work. 

HILLSBOROUGH— Evelyn P. Lloyd, phar- 
macist at James Pharmacy, has been 
named to the Historic Hillsborough Com- 
mission, according to an announcement by 
Grace J. Eohrcr, Secretary of the Depart- 
ment of Cultural Resources. 

DURHAM— Ralph P. Rogers, Jr., executive 
vice-president of N. C. Mutual Wholesale 
Drug Company, is listed as one of the found- 
ing group of a proposed new accident and 
health insurance company in Durham. Pre- 
incorporation subscriptions for its common 
stock are currently being offered to the 
public. 

MO CKS VILLE— Bill Foster has opened 
a new pharmacy in Lowe 's Shopping Center 
in Mocksville. Mr. Foster has been a phar- 
macist at Hall Drug Company of Mocksville 
for the past 9 years. He is a 1965 graduate 
of the UNC School of Pharmacy. 

SCOTLAND NECK—N. 0. McDowell, Jr., 
was recently sworn into office as a member 
of the Town Commissioners. He fills an un- 
expired term of the late Forrest G. Shearin. 
Mr. McDowell will serve until the next Board 
election in November of 1975. 

BELMONT — Sam Comstock, pharmacist at 
Catawba Pharmacy, attended the 17th an- 
nual graduate refresher course sponsored by 
the University of Southern California 
School of Pharmacy, August 17-28 in Hono- 
lulu, Hawaii. Mr. Comstock took 39 hours 
of accredited education in the 13 day course. 

ELIZABETH CITY— Norman T. Covert has 
been employed by People's Service Drug 
Store in the Southgate Mall. Covert, for- 
merly with Todd's Pharmacy, and prior 
to that in business in Portsmouth, Va., is 
a graduate of the University of Toledo 
("Ohio) School of Pharmacy. 



16 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



1 



BLANTON REELECTED PRESIDENT 
OF NCPRF 

Charles D. Blanton, Kings Mountain phar- 
macist, was reelected president of the N. C. 
Pharmaceutical Research Foundation at the 
annual meeting of NCPRF 's board of di- 
rectors in Chapel Hill on September 19. 

Ralph P. Rogers, Jr. of Durham was elec- 
ted vice-president and Dr. George P. Hager 
continues" as secretary. Two designated banks 
serve as treasurer for NCPRF. 

During a morning session of the direc- 
tors, reports were received from Dr. Hager 
(new faculty members), L. D. Werley (en- 
rollment and admissions), G. H. Cocolas 
(curriculum changes), Rebecca Stewart 
(finances), J. K. Wier (student aid) and 
C. t T . Paoloni (extension program). 

Following a luncheon (see cover page), 
the new directors and directors-elect were in- 
troduced. 

The afternoon session was devoted to a 
report on the 1973-74 Fund Drive, a financial 
and auditor's report, review of the 1974-7;) 
budget and election and installation of 
officers. 

F. J. Andrews of Baltimore was named 
an emeritus director/executive committee 
member of NCPRF. 



ASSET VALUE OF NCPRF PASSES 
THE HALF MILLION MARK 

For the first time since the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Research Foundation was 
organized 28 years' ago, the asset value of 
XCPRF has passed the half million dollar 
mark. 

Officers of the Foundation, reporting to 
t lie Foundation Directors on September 19, 
listed NCPRF assets at 8523,279.35. 

Although the market value of stocks owned 
by the Foundation has declined, a contri- 
bution of $78,000 more than offset the loss 



HOW TO AVOID A 
SLEEPLESS NIGHT 

A recent news report listed a North Car- 
olina drug chain executive with more than 
one million shares of his company's stock, 



now valued at $8 million but at one time, 
more than $30 million. 

Two North Carolina pharmacists discuss- 
ing the report, one said he would lose a 
lot of sleep with a paper loss of more than 
$20 million; the other quickly noted he 
could sleep well knowing that he was the 
owner of a million shares of a going con- 
cern no matter what the stock market did 
or did not do in the future. 



NEWS BRIEFS 

DUNN — Byron Johnson, 1971 graduate of 
the UNC School of Pharmacy, is opening a 
pharmacy on Tilghman Drive, Dunn. Na- 
tive of Dunn, he is returning to his home 
town after serving his internship at the 
hospital in Laurinburg, and then practicing 
in Monroe. 

SHALLOTTE— Aviary Lcdbetter, a 1971 
graduate of UNC 's School of Pharmacy, 
has joined the staff of Shallotte Rexall 
Drug Store, owned and managed by Phar- 
macist W. R. Roycroft and his son, Doug- 
las. 

MARION — Pharmacist Bob Setzer of Evans 
Rexall Drug Company has been elected a 
Director of the McDowell County Board of 
Directors. He will serve a 3-year term. 
KINGS MOUNTAIN— E. Wilson Griffin, 
Pharmacist-owner, Griffin's Drug Store, has 
announced his pharmacy's association with 
AD PHARMACY buying group. 
FRANKLIN — Victor H. Perry, co-owner of 
Perry 's Drug Store, has been named by the 
board of directors of Stringers Sickroom 
Supplies & Professional Services to serve 
as president of its two sickroom appliance 
centers in Franklin and Sylva. Pharmacist 
Perry serves as a director of the North- 
western Bank. 

KINGS MOUNTAIN— Pharmacist Ragan 
Harper has been named to the Cleveland 
County Morehead Selection Committee. He 
is owner and manager of Harper's Prescrip- 
tion Pharmacy. 

TARBORO — Ken Updegrave, formerly of 
Zebulon, has accepted a position with Kerr 
Drugs. 



DRUG STORE SHOPPERS ARE 
DIFFERENT 

Today's shopper expects, and responds, to a Modern Shopping Atmosphere. 
3 out of 1 impulse purchases are inspired by 

DISPLAYS 
The right kind of drug store fixture is the KEY to VOLUME Sales . . . 
We can assure you the right kind of fixture for every display purpose with 

COLUMBUS IMPERIAL DRUG 
STORE FIXTURES 

Let us DESIGN and engineer your DRUG STORE to promote and SELL merchandise 

We have successfully given this service to our customers for over a quarter of a 
century. 

"Giving you the best design, the best fixture and the best service by 
professionals" 

CALL US FOR A SINGLE FIXTURE OR A COMPLETE STORE. 



RAMSEY 

MANUFACTURING CORPORATION 

513 East Trade Street 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Telephone 704-334-3457 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



1!) 



DISASTERS 



Major and Minor 



BETHEL 

Bethel Pharmacy. $300 in cash and a large 
quantity of Controlled Substances taken in 
a September 13 break-in of the pharmacy. 

DURHAM 

Kerr Drug Store, Wellons Village Shop- 
ping Center. Some merchandise damaged 
due to a fire which a fire investigator re- 
ported was deliberately set. 

ANDREWS 

Andrews Pharmacy. Three Tennessee 
youths have been arrested following larceny 
of approximately $700 worth of Controlled 
Substances from the Andrews Pharmacy. 

CLINTON 

Matthews Drugs. Approximately $4,000 in 
cash and checks were stolen from the store 
along with drugs and an assortment of mer- 
chandise, including cameras, watches, tape 
players, etc. Entry was" made by drilling 
open the metal lock on the front door. 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Morehead City Drug Company. Four teen- 
agers have been arrested and charged with 
breaking into the pharmacy and stealing a 
large quantity of drugs and hypodermic 
needles. According to police, the four went 
into the drug store with three leaving and 
one hiding in the store's attic. After the 
store closed, the back door was opened by the 
person who had hid in the attic. 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Eobinson 's Prescription Shop. Police arc 
investigating the theft of drugs' from the 
pharmacy. This is the second time the phar- 
macy has been burglarized this year. 



CHARLOTTE 

Sterling Drug Company, 1501 Elizabeth 
Avenue. Two men pulled pistols and forced 
Pharmacist William V. Proctor and his 
daughter to lie on the floor while one man 
emptied the cash register. Later, one of the 
men forced Proctor to open a safe in a small 
post office in the pharmacy and point out 
where he kept certain drugs. The loss was 
about $300.00. 

BURG AW 

Durham Drug Company. Shipment of 
drugs taken following break-in. 

BOONE 

Carolina Pharmacy, King Street. Back 
door of pharmacy forced and drugs plus 
cash from the register taken. 

NORTH WILKESBORO 

Eckerd 's Drug Store, AVest Park Shopping 
Center. Break-in netted the thieves more than 
12,000 Controlled Substances. 

DURHAM 

McDonald's Drug Store. Contents of a 
locked metal cabinet taken following entry 
by way of a door which was forced. 

SMITHFIELD 

Medical Center Pharmacy. Entry gained 
by breaking out a drive-in window. Cash 
stolen from the register. 

CHARLOTTE 

King Drug Company, 3106 Eastway Drive. 
A lii.ui came into the pharmacy, drew a pistol 
and forced employ cc Ruby Dover to open 
the ^tore's cash register. The man took the 
Mils before fleeing on foot. 



20 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




Dear Mr. Smith: 

T am enclosing an editorial from the Jour- 
nal of Pharmaceutical Sciences (July 1974) 
that I alluded to in our recent telephone 
conversation. 

I had the same experience as Dr. Feld- 
mann ; being unable to buy an exempt nar- 
cotic cough syrup in a Winston-Salem phar- 
macy from a specific pharmacist, hoAvever, I 
did purchase the medicine at the same 
pharmacy from a different pharmacist the 
next day. 

The North Carolina Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation should make an appeal to its mem- 
bership not to be too strict in their judge- 
ments (and that's all that it is) as to who 
needs an exempt narcotic. 

Thomas E. Gnau 

Director of Radiopharmacy 

The Bowman Gray School of 

Medicine 
Winston-Salem 

Note: The Editorial referred to by Phar- 
macist Gnau is headed "Extremism in the 
Pursuit of Drug Abuse Prevention. ' ' 

Included in the editorial was a letter writ- 
ten by a frustrated physician from Owens- 
boro, Kentucky: 

"Hey, out. there! Somebody listen to me. 
I'm getting sick and tired of these restric- 
tions on the drugs T prescribe for my pa- 
tients. Sure, I know we have a drug prob- 
lem in this country, but T 'm not a part of 
it, and my patients are not and the phar- 
macists are not. 



' ' Why can 't I phone in a prescription for 
a few sleeping pills any more? Why must my 
patient be required to come to me for a new 
prescription for nerve pills each time he runs 
out? How much worse is it going to get? 
And finally, who is doing all this?" 
And this comment by Dr. Feldman: 
On a more personal basis, we had an 
experience ourselves" during this past winter 
flu season in which attempts to obtain a 
bottle of an exempt narcotic cough syrup 
met with no success in a number of local 
pharmacies. The pharmacists on duty at these 
pharmacies refused to dispense the requested 
cough syrup despite offers of identification 
and despite the fact that the request was 
being made by a local resident. 



I. C. System, Inc. 

The nation's most highly 
specialized collection service 



Your Association's Collection Service is 
an affiliate of a national organization cur- 
rently serving members of more than 700 
leading trade associations throughout the 
nation. 

Don't lose sales volume because cus- 
tomers owe you money and are trading 
somewhere else. Your Association's Col- 
lection Service will chase those debtors 
back into your place of business to pay 
YOU direct. You will get accounts OFF 
your ledger and IN your bank account — 
and you will also have many former cus- 
tomers back doing business with you again. 
For information, contact your Association 
office. It will pay you to do so. 

On request, A representative 

of the I. C. System will explain 

the collection program in detail. 

Call or write the NCPhA, Box 151, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 



PHARMACIST RECOMMENDS 

"CHEC" COMMUNITY 

HYPERTENSION EVALUATION 

CLINIC 

Enclosed are some clippings -which T think 
may interest your readers. 

Sponsoring Free Public Blood Pressure 
Clinics is a professional service which phar- 
macists elsewhere can encourage and pro- 
mote. 

T first learned of this possibility through 
Ciba'S medical representative in our area, 
John Morell. High blood pressures concern 
us for this situation is particularly wide- 
spread here in the Northeast. 

I met with our local physicians at their 
monthly hospital meeting to explain -what we 
had in mind and to ask their consent and 
encouragement. They agreed unanimously. 
And they get the readings for those who 
should be encouraged to see their doctors 
soon and for those who should see a phy- 
sician that very day! 

I then solicited assistance from some of 



the leaders of the Rescue Squad who helped 
recruit nurses to read pressures, .Taycees to 
promote advertising, etc. 

During September 20th and 21st, we 
cheeked 650 people. Many have re-established 
active contact with their physicians, par- 
ticularly those delinquent in taking their 
medication regularly. And I know of several 
instances where high pressures were dis- 
coverer! for the first time. 

Follow-ups with those tested and reviews 
with our physicians will follow when we 
receive the IBM print-out from Ciba. 

Public comment to date has been gen- 
erally favorable. And the results certainly 
warrant doing this service again in the 
future. 

Such services as these can be promoted 
by pharmacists throughout our state. T hope 
more will consider this opportunity. 
Sincerely, 

John A. Mitchener, III 
Mitchener's Pharmacy 
Edenton 



CHEC —Community Hypertension 
Evaluation Clinic 



Place 

Time 
Date 

Sponsor 



Edenton — Chowan Rescue Squad Headquarters At 
The Corner Of Broad And Queen Streets 



9 A. M. To 5 P. M. 
September 20 - 21 

Rescue Squad And CIBA Pharmaceutical Company 




22 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




CURRENT COMMENT 

by Dr. Seymour M. Bloug, Dean 

School of Pharmacy/ University of North Carolina 



Some of the problems faced by pharmacy 
today emanate from a changing organiza- 
tional form of delivery of professional ser- 
vices in the U.S. The roles carved out for 
pharmacy in the health care delivery system 
will depend greatly upon what we as phar- 
macy educators and you as pharmacists do. 

Undoubtedly there are many ways of de- 
fining or describing what is meant by a 
health care system. Regardless of your 
definition, a viable system will likely in- 
clude certain elements such as: 

1. The health maintenance concept 
where emphasis will be placed on health 
rather than sickness. The system will in- 
corporate programs of preventive medicine. 

2. Consumer input. Health care deliv- 
erers are responding to the demands of 
the consumer that he or she be involved 
in all facets of the health care delivery 
system. Thus, we will see consumers serv- 
ing on professional licensing boards and 
on the boards of health care centers where 
consumers will help to make policy that 
affect professional services and budgets. 
Indeed, in the state I recently left 
(Iowa) there will be two consumer repre- 
sentatives serving on the boards of phar- 
macy, medicine, and dental examiners, 
effective July 1, 1975. Nationally, our 
professional activities will be coming un- 
der close scrutiny by the public. 

3. Comprehensiveness. Although this 
term infers the coverage of all members 
of a family in a single program, I am 
using it to mean the removal of financial 
and organizational barriers to consulta- 
tion with health care deliverers. 

4. Finally, there is a fourth element 



which involves cost control and prepay- 
ment. We are reaching or have about 
reached the limit of what people will pay 
for health care. Every developing health 
care system is putting a great deal of 
effort into various ways to control cost. 
The evolving systems are almost certain 
to operate on some kind of prepayment 
plan. Prepayment seems to be one element 
about which there is almost universal 
agreement. 

The place of pharmacy in this health care 
system is one which Ave in education are 
establishing, in part, through changes that 
have already been initiated and will be 
initiated through our pharmacy curriculum. 
The role of the pharmacist is no longer re- 
mote or passive in relation to the total 
health care needs of the patient. It was not 
too many years back that the criterion for 
a successful pharmacy education wag the 
graduation of pharmacists who would do 
exactly as the physician ordered, no more 
and no less. This type of action did not 
always serve the best interest of the patient. 
Changes in the pharmacy curriculum are 
strengthening the students'' theoretical back- 
ground in the basic medical sciences and 
in areas such as biopharmaceutics and me- 
dicinal chemistry and natural products. We 
hope to expand the students' background 
in the areas of community pharmacy man- 
agement and the socio-economics of health 
care through an expansion of our pharmacy 
administration program. The clinical-hos- 
pital pharmacy program and continuing ed- 
ucation programs are enabling our students 
and practicing pharmacists to apply this 
acquired theoretical knowledge to life sit- 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



23 



nations, largely because they are more 
knowledgeable about disease, the complexity 
of multiple drug therapy regiments, and 
arc better able to communicate effectively 
with patients, physicians, and other health 
professionals'. Community pharmacists should 
not look on clinical pharmacy as a threat 
to their practice. It bears the same relation- 
ship to the community practice of pharmacy 
as docs medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, 
pharmaceutics, and pharmacy administration. 
Perhaps only a small number of pharmacists 
will be called clinical pharmacists instead 
of community pharmacists. However, clin- 
ical pharmacy makes an important contribu- 
tion to the overall education of a com- 
munity pharmacist just as the other dis- 
ciplines in the pharmacy curriculum do. 

Many community pharmacists think of 
clinical pharmacy as something that is prac- 
ticed only in a hospital setting. Although it 
is true that the conventional community phar- 
macy is not the ideal environment in which 
to teach clinical pharmacy concepts due in 
part to the lack of adequate patient data, 
wc must not lose sight of the fact that com- 
munity pharmacists comprise over seventy 
percent of our profession. Surely, the core 
training students receive in clinical phar- 
macy is applicable to ambulatory as well 
as' hospitalized patients. It is time for 
practitioners and educators to develop dem- 
onstration projects — projects that demon- 
strate the effectiveness of new roles for 
pharmacists in the community setting. Cer- 
tainly this has been and is being dem- 
onstrated in the hospital setting. It is time 
to show students and pharmacists how they 
can use their clinical training in a com- 
munity pharmacy setting. Pharmacists, par- 
ticularly those in small towns and cities, 
are not preoccupied exclusively with drug 
products aa such. They are concerned about 
the prescriber's purposes and their pa- 
tient's needs', and always have been. Thus, 
they are, and always have been, "patient 
oriented" as well as product oriented. We 
are a profession that is tied to a product as 
well as a professional service. Tt is difficult 
to divorce one from the other. 



BUNCOMBE COUNTY 

Guest speaker at the September 22 meet- 
ing of the Buncombe County Pharmaceutical 
Society was Harry A. Woggon, director of 
the Comprehensive Alcoholism Program of 
the Blue Ridge Community Mental Health 
Center. 

Moss Salley, president of the Society, pre- 
sided at the meeting. 

WAKE COUNTY 

Reported by Patricia Bumgarner, Secretary 

The Wake County Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation met October 1 at Burroughs Well- 
come, Research Triangle. There were 35 
members and guests present for the dinner 
meeting. 

George Morgan, treasurer, announced 90 
paid members for the year. 

NCPhA President W. H. Wilson urged 
maximum attendance at the "Consumers 
All" seminar scheduled for Chapel Hill, 
October 23. 

Plans for the Christmas Party were out- 
lined by Joe. Edwards. It is scheduled for 
December 7 at the Flying Cloud Restaurant. 

The November 5 meeting will be held at 
the Milburnie Fishing Club. Spouses are in- 
vited. 

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY 

William H. Wilson, a Reidsvillc pharma- 
cist in the early 1950 's and presently the 
President of the North Carolina Pharma- 
ceutical Association, was guest speaker at 
the September 29th meeting of the Rocking- 
ham County Society of Pharmacists. 

The meeting was held in Reidsville. 



NOT VICIOUS VAMPIRES 

Quotable quote from the Minnesota Phar- 
macist : 

"Pharmacists are not vicious vampires 
vanquishing veracity and voters' venerable 
vitality, but rather an amiable anachronism 
ambitiously aiming to alleviate ailments 
and attendant addictions." 

You may want to run that by a second 
time. 



The NCPhA-Endorsed Insurance Plans 
Which Merit Member Participation 



BASIC PLAN: 



EXTENDED PLAN: 



DISABILITY INCOME PLAN 

Accident Total Disability — Lifetime 
Sickness Total Disability — Two Years 

Accident Total Disability — Lifetime 
Sickness Total Disability — Five Years 



MAJOR MEDICAL EXPENSE PLAN 

PLAN I: $18,000 Maximum Benefit including $30 Daily Room Limit 
PLAN II: $30,000 Maximum Benefit including $50 Daily Room Limit 
(Up to $45,000 Maximum Benefit including $75.00 Daily Room 
Limit Available) 

TERM LIFE PLAN 

Up to $20,000 For Members 
Dependents Coverage Also Available 

HOSPITAL INCOME PLAN 

$25.00 Per Day For Member 
$20.00 Per Day For Spouse 
$15.00 Per Day For Each Child 

Payable From The First Day of Hospital Confinement 

For Up to 15 Months 

RETIREMENT AND PROFIT SHARING PLANS 

Excellent plans are available for both the Self Employed 
and Corporate Entities. 



FOR DETAILS 

WRITE OR 
TELEPHONE: 



HOYT W. SHORE, C.L.U. and Associates 
821 Baxter Street— Suite 316 
Charlotte, North Carolina 28202 

Telephone: (704) 333-3764 




Washington National 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

EVANSTON, ILLINOIS 60201 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



25 



TAKE WITH CARE 

(Editorial, Wilmington Star, 9/7/74) 

Back about the turn of the century and 
for a few years thereafter, a person could 
buy on the open market all sorts of self- 
care medicinal products, many containing 
opiates which, while they did little to cure 
the ailment, made a person feel good and 
killed pain. At the same time, it became 
easy to become addicted and public opinion 
finally stepped in to provide officials with 
authority to develop standards and require 
certain of these habit-forming drugs to be 
bought only on a prescription of a physician. 

The Food and Drug Administration was 
put in charge of setting the standard and 
determining which of the drugs' should re- 
quire prescriptions before they could be 
dispensed. 

The FDA is now going one step farther, 
looking into possible overuse or misuse of 
nonprescription medicines — the kind you 
hear touted with nauseating frequency on 
television. Since about 1972, the federal 
agency has systematically been checking the 
nonprescription medicines to be sure they're 
properly made and labeled according to 
what they contain, and, what is more im- 
portant, that the information be there to 
enable the customer to use the drug cor- 
rectly. 

A few months ago, in June, the FDA de- 
cided to issue a new standard for antacids. 
The new standard limits the label claims 
that can be made for the product and the 
kind of ingredients that will be allowed in 
this class of nonprescription drugs. 

It has also promised to come out soon 
with similar standards for laxatives, cough 
and cold preparations and pain killers. 

Apparently, also to counteract the type 
of information broadcast on the tube, it 
is launching a campaign to help put the 
role of self-medication into better perspec- 
tive and to make consumers' more aware of 
their own responsibility in using nonpre- 
scription medicines correctly. 

The FDA probably won't go as far as 
eliminating certain drug claims from any 
broadcasts, as federal law has done to 
cigarettes, but undoubtedly, this lias been 



considered. It may be that the FDA is re- 
luctant to use this approach, knowing that 
the ban has done little to cut actual con- 
sumption of tobacco. 

The FDA should now concentrate on see- 
ing that nonprescription drug customers are 
adequately advised and warned not to take 
these medicines for granted but to take them 
with care. 

AHEC PROGRAMS 

Under direct sponsorship of AHEC (Area 
Health Education Centers), with the sup- 
port of local pharmacists, these typical 
programs, as an example, will be made avail- 
able: 

1. Professional & Financial Rewards of 
Implementing a Patient Oriented Pharma- 
ceutical Practice. 

2. How the Pharmacist Can Meet Modern 
Competition Today. 

3. Opportunities for the Pharmacist in 
Health Care Facilities. 

4. Inventory Control and Its Importance 
to Pharmacists. 

5. How to Develop a Positive Public Rela- 
tions Program. 

6. Preventive Dentistry and Role of the 
Pharmacist. 

7. Medicaid Rx Program and Peer Review. 
Details from 

Claude U. Paoloni, School of Pharmacy, 
UNC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514, or 
-■nil 919-966-1121. 



NC MUTUAL EXPANDS 

North Carolina Mutual Wholesale Drug 
Company, Durham, has underway a $925,000 
expansion and renovation program which 
will add 36,000 square feet to its warehouse 
(about 60,000 square feet at present). 

A fully automated order processing and 
conveyor system is' being added along with 
expansion of the computer facility. 

The executive vice president of NC Mutual, 
Ralph P. Rogers, Jr., said construction is 
expected to be completed in six months. 

\c Mutual serves more than 250 retail 
drug stores in North Carolina and has 
annual sales of more than §20 million. 



26 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



For eighty-nine years 
. . . . since 1885 



seemon 

OF DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long 
association with North Car- 
olina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its fifty- 
fourth volume, and the first 
printed copy was "Seeman 
Printed." 



-^ 



A DIVISION OF 
FISHER-HARRISON COR D . 



DOCTORS RETURN 1600 
COMPLETED SURVEY FORMS 

Of 2400 copies of a survey (General In- 
formation for Pharmacists) mailed to mem- 
bers of the North Carolina Medical Society, 
1600 were completed and returned to the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association. 

The questionnaire included information 
relating to the names of MD office nurses 
authorized to transmit information concern- 
ing prescriptions and prescription refills; 
the MDs understanding of "PRN" and his 
DEA number. 

The mailing did not include all counties 
since some local/sectional pharmacy orga- 
nizations had previously conducted a similar- 
type stirvey and others preferred to do their 
own mailing, such as the Cape Pear Phar- 
macy group of Fayetteville. 

Reproductions of the completed question- 
naires, by counties, have been mailed to in- 
terested pharmacists at 25$ per completed 
questionnaire. The number varied from one 
in some counties to more than 100 ( Forsyth, 
Buncombe, etc.). 



UNC PHARMACY TAPE SERVICE 
CATALOGUE AVAILABLE 

A revised Audio Tape Service catalog is 
now available from the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of North Carolina. 

The catalog lists about 100 cassette tapes 
in the areas of drug abuse, pharmaceutics 
and biopharmaceutics, pharmacy admin- 
istration, professional practice and public 
health. Tapes are sold for $2.50 each. Pre- 
sentations are from 30-90 minutes duration. 

Professor Claude U. Paoloni, the School's 
Director of Continuing Education, invites 
pharmacists to write for a free catalog. Ad- 
dress requests to : 

Pharmacy Tape Service 
School of Pharmacy 
University of North Carolina 

at Chapel Hill 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



27 



III Pharmacy School Notes 



ENROLLMENT 

In the UNC School of Pharmacy, Fall Se- 
mester of 197-1: 

Class of 1975—140 

Class of 1976—138 

Class of 1977—143 

Class of 1978—159 

In addition, there are 29 graduate stu- 
dents for a total enrollment of 609 (the total 
for 1973 was 618). 

A significant trend is that more and more 
women are enrolling in the school. The per- 
centage for the first (2/5) class was 59.1%. 

PHARMACY STUDENTS NAMED 
TO WHO'S WHO 

Sixteen UNC School of Pharmacy ad- 
vanced students have been named to Who's 
Who Among Students in American Uni- 
versities' and Colleges. 

Selected students were in their fourth and 
fifth years of pharmacy study. They were 
chosen on the basis of high scholastic achieve- 
ment and participation in extracurricular 
activities. 

They are: Annette Elizabeth Aman, Diane 
Carol Andrako, Jeffrey Galen Blanchard, 
Peter Wilson Champion, Patricia Lynn Clay- 
tor, Walter Bernard Collie, Danny Pay Dal- 
ton, Nancy Turner Gilliam, Joyce Carol 
Hardy, Gerald Wayne Hargis, Walter Ver- 
non Meadors, Jeffrey James Smith, Thomas 
Fain Taylor, William Dorsey Vick, III, 
Joseph Jutson Ward and Nancy Joyce Ful- 
cher. 

PHARMACY SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
RECEIVES $1000.00 AWARD 

The University of North Carolina School 
of Pharmacy was the recent recipient of a 
11000.00 scholarship award. The award was 
presented to the school by John A. Dawson, 
Jr., Vice President and director of profes- 
sional services, Eckerd Drugs, Inc., Char- 
lotte, North Carolina. Dawson had received 
the National Association Of Chain Drug 
Stores/Upjohn Award as Chairman of the 
XAf'DS professional relations committee and 



chairman of the NACDS pharmaceutical 
conference in recognition of outstanding ser- 
vice to pharmacy and the chain drug in- 
dustry. 

The donated award will be used by The 
University of North Carolina School of 
Pharmacy to assist worthy students to com- 
plete their pharmacy education. 

OFFICERS ELECTED 

Bobby Bischoff of Dunn has been elected 
president of the UNC School of Pharmacy 
Student Body for the year 1975-76. 

A 4-5 student, Bobby has served as' trea- 
surer of Kappa Psi and was president of the 
3-5 pharmacy class. 

Other officers elected are : 

5-5 Class 

President : Bruce Dunham 

Vice-President : Pick McKinncy 

Secy-Treas. : Ann Finley 

4-5 Class 

President : Billy Burns 

Vice-President : Charles Faison 

Secy-Treas. : Karen Smith 

3-5 Class 

President: John Watts 

Vice-President: Earl Lingle 

Secy-Treas. : Suzanne Emerson 

2-5 Class 

President: Mark Langdon 

Vice-President: Mike Brewer 

Secy-Treas. : Susie Drake 

STUDENT BRANCH 

The September meeting of the Student 
Branch of the NCPhA/APhA featured a 
"debate" on Prescription Price Posting, 
with Wilbur Gulley, Director of North Car- 
olina 's Division of Public Interest Research 
Group taking a pro position and Whitakcr 
Moose, immediate past president of the 
\('I'li.\, presenting the con side of the pro- 
posal. 

Approximately 100 members of the 
Branch attended the program which was 
held in the auditorium of the John Grover 
Beard Pharmacy Building at UNC/CH. 



28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 



CAPE FEAR 

The Cape Fear Valley Pharmaceutical 
Auxiliary held their September luncheon- 
business meeting at the Highland Country 
Club, with Mrs. Sanford Price, president, 
conducting the meeting. 

Following the luncheon, plans were dis- 
cussed for determining the best and most 
effective methods of implementing the state 
project, Mental Health, in the three county 
area covered by the Auxiliary membership. 

A money-making project was discussed, 
and all members gave their approval and 
support. A joint Christmas Party with the 
Cape Fear Pharmaceutical Association was 1 
also discussed. 

Mrs. Price encouraged members to at- 
tend the State Auxiliary 's Fall Convocation 
in Chapel Hill on October 16th. A good 
representation from the Cape Fear group 
is expected to attend. 



WILMINGTON 

The New Hanover Women 's Pharmaceu- 
tical Auxiliary held its October meeting at 
the home of Mrs. John Bullock. Members 
enjoyed a covered dish supper before the 
business session. 

Mrs. Edythc Blanton, Director of Volun- 
teer Services at Cherry Hospital in Golds- 
boro, was the guest speaker. The use of 
drugs in speeding the patient back to an 
active role in the community was discussed. 
Slides of Cherry Hospital were shown. 

The importance of volunteers and the 
needs of the patients were discussed. Many 
material items for patients ' comfort are not 
provided by the state, and are available 
only through the generosity of the public. 

Plans were made to help the program at 
Cherry Hospital and to seek to aid the local 
programs for mental health. 



The New Hanover Auxiliary looks forward 
to an active year, and members' were inspired 
by the speaker to provide materials and ser- 
vices to assist in the year's emphasis on 
mental health. 

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA 

The Western North Carolina Auxiliary 
held a luncheon meeting September 17th, 
with Mrs. J. Weaver Kirkpatrick, state 
auxiliary president, as special guest. 

In remarks to the group, Mrs. Kirk- 
patrick encouraged attendance at the Fall 
Convocation. She also asked members to 
be aware of happenings in the state auxiliary 
and to take an active part. 

Plans were made to continue working with 
the local nursing home, and to inquire fur- 
ther to see if the Mental Health Association 
had started a Group Home in the area. (Not 
enough funds were available for a home last 
year.) 

RALEIGH 

The September meeting of the Ealeigh 
Woman's Pharmaceutical Auxiliary, held at 
the home of Mrs. Roger Crane, Club Pres- 
ident, started the club 's new year after the 
three months summer recess. 

A general business meeting provided a 
time for members to discuss goals and 
projects for the coming year. It was sug- 
gested and approved that contributions' to 
the Fairmont Child Development Center for 
"Retarded Children would provide both local 
and state mental health projects, because 
of their special needs. 

Suggestions of ways to raise money for 
the donation to the Center included a wine- 
tasting party, a Chinese auction, and a flea 
market. 

On October 3, Mrs. Robert Seaborn hosted 
a Chinese auction where articles donated by 
members and parents of the children at the 
Center were secretly bid on in the old Chinese 
custom. Some of the interesting articles for 
auction included an antique seed box, a 
hand-knitted baby sweater and cap, and a 
jar of brandied fruit. Approximately $120 
was raised to purchase special educational 
toys and stipplies for the Center. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



MARRIAGES 

R USSELL-ME TZGER 
Miss Sally Ann Metzger and Stephen 
Gaddy Russell wore married September 7 
at the University Presbyterian Church of 
Chapel Hill. Mr. Russell, graduate of UNC 
School of Pharmacy, is with Gibson Phar- 
macy of Salisbury. He is a past-president 
of Phi Delta Chi Fraternity. 

HE A TEERIKGTOX-COPELAND 
Pharmacist Terry TV. Heatherington was 
married September 14 to Miss Donna Cope- 
land. The wedding was performed at First 
Presbyterian Church of Gastonia. Mr. Heath- 
erington, graduate of UNC School of Phar- 
macy, is manager and part owner of Smith 
Drugs of Kings Mountain. 

BOWER-KING 
Miss Pamela Scott King and Richard 
Kent Bower were married September 1 in 
Parkway Baptist Church of Greensboro. Mr. 
Bower, graduate of UNC School of Phar- 
macy, is with Rite-Aid Pharmacy. 

MEACEAM-PENRY 
Miss Te.rie Louise Penry, pharmacist at the 
Prescription Shop in Roxboro, and Joseph 
Thomas Meacham, Jr. of Asheville were mar- 
ried September 28 in Long Memorial United 
Methodist Church of Roxboro. The Mea- 
ehams will live in Asheville where the groom 
is a staff writer for The Asheville Citizen. 

WHEELER-WILLCOX 
Miss Winniford Susan Willcox and David 
Stewart Wheeler were married September 28 
in St. Paul's Episcopal Church of Green- 
ville. The couple live in Greensboro where 
Mr. Wheeler is' pharmacist at Cone Me- 
morial Hospital. 

ANGE-CAULEY 
Valton Ray Ange, 1974 graduate of UNC 
School of Pharmacy, and Brenda Sue Cauley 
were married August 25 in the Northwest 
Christian Church of Kinston. Mr. Ange is 
with Professional Pharmacy of Havelock. 
Mrs. Ange is employed by the Craven 
County Board of Education as a teacher 
in Havelock Junior High School. 



BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Owens of High 
Point announce the birth of a son, Tim- 
othy Scott, on September 21, Mr. Owens is 
a 1970 graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy. 



Mr. and Mrs. J. Wayne Avery of Wilson 
announce the birth of a son, Kevin Dwayne 
on August 26. Mr. Avery, 1968 graduate of 
UNC School of Pharmacy, is with Wilson 
Drug Company. 

DEATHS 
M. C. Miles 

Morton Clifton Miles, age 81, Henderson 
pharmacist, died September 6. 

Mr. Miles was a native of Warrenton 
and for 47 years operated Miles Pharmacy 
in Henderson. He was a 1917 graduate of 
the UNC School of Pharmacy and served 
in France during WW I. 

Billy Lee Price 

Billy Lee Price, 47, Conover pharmacist, 
died September 20 following a heart at- 
tack. 

Pharmacist Price was the owner/manager 
of Conover Drug Company. He was a native 
of Newton, a graduate of the Newton- 
Conover High School and the UNC School 
of Pharmacy. 

He was a charter member of Woodlawn 
Baptist Church, where he served as a deacon, 
trustee, usher and was also in charge of 
the church blood bank. 

In addition to his- wife, he is survived 
by two sons, Billy Lee Price Jr., a student 
a1 the UNC School of Pharmacy, and Rob- 
ert Alex Price of the home; a daughter, 
Tamara Annette Price of the home; four 
sisters and two brothers. 



30 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



MDs/PHARMACISTS REVIEW 

PHARMACY TOPICS OF MUTUAL 

INTEREST 

Benny Ridout, representing the N. C. Di- 
vision of Social Services, and W. J. Smith, 
representing the North Carolina Pharma- 
ceutical Association, attended a joint Phar- 
macy and N. C. Medical Society committee 
meeting in Southern Pines on September 26. 

Mr. Ridout reviewed the dispensing rec- 
ords of all MDs currently participating in 
the Medicaid Pharmacy Service Program. 
The committee reaffirmed its Sept. 1973 de- 
cision to drop one MD from the program 
but the MD is appealing the decision to 
the State Board of Social Services. 

The committee deferred action until next 
meeting of current practice of some MDs in 
making a professional charge to authorize 
renewal of a prescription. Tt was pointed 
out the practice is growing. 

A proposal by Pharmacist Seth Miller of 
Lexington in regard to a " STAT ' ' emer- 
gency drug kit for use in an institutional 
setting (extended care facility, etc.) was re- 
ferred to a committee to be composed of 
three representatives from the NCPhA, the 
N. C. Medical Society and the N. 0. "Nursing 
Homes Association. 

LPNs and Nurses Aides dispensing drugs 
in intermediate care facilities was discussed 
but no action taken. 

A policy statement on drug substitution 
laws will be prepared by the committee for 
possible use during the 1975 session of The 
N. C. General Assembly. 

The Poison Prevention Act of 1970, with 
special regard to child-resistant closures, was 
discussed. Most of the MDs present stated 
they had received complaints regarding in- 
ability of some patients to open the safety 
containers. Recommer- elation : Information 
regarding safety packaging to appear in 
Medical Society Bulletin. 

Name of Rx drug on Rx label: Since the 
law was implemented July 1, 1974, compli- 
ance with the law has been good. 

Dr. Charles W. Byrd of Dunn presided. 
Other MDs present included Dr. John L. 
McCain of Wilson, Dr. Thomas R. Harris of 
Shelby, Dr. R, A. Fewell of Burlington, Dr. 



Edgar T. Beddingfield, Jr. of Stantonsburg 
and Dr. John A. Payne of Sunbury. 

TEW COMPLETES GEIGY'S 
BASIC TRAINING 

Lynn C. Tew of Dunn, North Carolina has 
completed the basic indoctrination training 
class of GEIGY Pharmaceuticals. The course 
comprises four weeks of lectures, presenta- 
tions, discussions and testing at GEIGY 's 
training center at Bear Mountain, N. Y. and 
meetings with executives at the company 
headquarters in Summit, New Jersey. 

As a GEIGY representative he will supply 
the latest technical pharmaceutical informa- 
tion to physicians at every level, research 
clinicians', university professors and phar- 
macists. He will return to the training cen- 
ter for more advanced instruction in the 
near future as part of GEIGY 's continual 
education program. 

GEIGY Pharmaceuticals is a leading pro- 
ducer of prescription medicines for the treat- 
ment of diabetes, arthritis, gout, mental de- 
pression, epilepsy and nasal congestion. 



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The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



31 



GORDON APPOINTED STATE 
DRUG ADMINISTRATOR 

Eobert L. Gordon, a graduate of the TJNC 
School of Pharmacy, has been appointed 
State Drug Administrator to aid in imple- 
menting regulations established by the 
North Carolina Food, Drug and Cosmetic 
Act, which is administered by the N. C. 
Department of Agriculture. 

Pharmacist Gordon was associated with 
Ashworth's Drug Store, Cary, for eight 
years, then established Gordon's Pharmacy 
in 1971. 

A business and civic leader of Cary, 
Pharmacist Gordon helped to organize a 
new bank for the area, Capitol National 
Bank. He served as Chairman of Cary's 
Business and Professional Day and as a 
member of Cary 'S Board of Adjustments. 

EESPONSIBILITIES OF TEE STATE 
DRUG ADMINISTRATOR 

The purpose of the State Drug Admin- 
istrator is to more fully implement the re- 
quirements established by the North Carolina 
Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act in regard to 
regulations of the manufacture, transport, 
storage and sale of drugs, cosmetics and 
medical devices. Some of these being, but 
not limited to: 

1. Administering the day-to-day activities 
of the Drug Branch, Food and Drug 
Protection Division. 

2. Establishing and maintaining a current 
Good Manufacturing Practice inspection 
program for basic manufacturers, ware- 
houses and repackers of prescription 
and over-the-counter drugs within the 
State. 

3. Monitoring of marketed drugs. 

4. Investigation of cases of obvious or 
potential drug fraud. 

5. Investigation of dangerous practices of 
sale or dispensing of legal drugs (not to 
supercede or interfere with regulations 
by the State Board of Pharmacy of li- 
censed pharmacists dispensing prescrip- 
tions) Sucli as the dispensing of drugs 
from vending machines. 

6. Evaluation of currently marketed drugs 
and cosmetics for misbranding. 



7. Establishing and maintaining a current 
official establishment inventory. 

8. Assisting in development of proper 
labeling and manufacturing techniques 
of so-called "not new" drugs' (home 
remedies manufactured in the State). 

9. Advising the State Chemist on needed 
law and regulation changes. 

in. Keeping abreast of the status of new 
drug clearance activities on the Fed- 
eral level. 

11. Establishing and maintaining a co- 
operative State-Federal relationship for 
regulatory control of the drug industry 
where at all possible. 

12. Evaluation of advertising claims (radio, 
T.V., newspaper, magazine) as to their 
authenticity. 

13. Assisting the Feed Branch of the Food 
and Drug Protection Division and the 
Veterinary Division regarding animal 
drugs in feeding or therapeutic use, and 
in the inspection of feed manufacturers 
handling medicants. 

14. Levying of embargoes on suspect adul- 
terated or misbranded materials with 
the intent of their removal from the 
channels of commerce. 

15. Institution of necessary civil or crim- 
inal actions under the statutes when it 
becomes evident that voluntary com- 
pliance cannot be obtained, or when the 
flagrant nature of violation indicates 
such steps. 

l(i. To dedicate whatever time is necessary 
towards accomplishing a solution of a 
crisis, i.e. fire, flood, dangerous or haz- 
ardous product recall, etc. 

17. To assist the State Chemist in any and 
every possible way to help him fulfill 
his duties and responsibilities to the 
Department of Agriculture and to the 
people of North Carolina. 



32 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Classified advertising (single issue inser- 
tion) 10 cents a word with a minimum 
charge of $3.00 per insertion. Payment to 
accompany order. 

Names and addresses will be published un- 
less a box number is requested. 

Tn replying to "blind" ads, address Ad. 

No. , Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, 

P. O. Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514. 

FOR SALE — Slightly used Burroughs 
5 total bookkeeping machine set up 
for a drug store. Purchased two ma- 
chines but we find one will suffice 
for our two drug stores. Cost $4000, 
will sell for $2000. Inspection in- 
vited. Call Clarence Johnson, Hollo- 
well's Drug Stores, Greenville, North 
Carolina. (919) 752-3155. 

DRUG STORE FOR SALE— Over 10 
years in business — $300,000 a year. 
Prescription average one-third of 
sales. 4000 square feet. Located in 
neighborhood shopping center inside 
city limits of city population over 
20,000 in foothills of Piedmont Sec- 
tion of North Carolina. This is a two 
pharmacist store (present owner not 
registered). BOX MS-11. 

FOR SALE— Beautiful 3/4 acre 
wooded lot (only 15 total), Morehead 
City Country Club. A minute away 
from course. Newport River view. 
Minutes from beach. $12,500. Small 
down payment, balance at 8% for 
10 years if desired. Box LB-10. 

FOR SALE — Complete set of front 
fixtures and soda fountain equip- 
ment. Write "Fixtures" c/o the 
Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. 



HENRIETTA 

Tri-Community Drug Store. Two Gaston 
County men arrested with burglary tools. 
Break-ins or attempted break-ins at the drug 
store in the past three years have resulted 
in a total of 18 arrests. 



COLD/COUGH BOOKLET 

' ' How To Chose a Cold, Cough or Sinus- 
itis Product, ' ' a new brochure designed for 
the pharmaicst to distribute to the con- 
sumer, has been prepared by Smith Kline & 
French Laboratories. The brochure recom- 
mends the pharmacist as an important source 
of drug product information for his cus- 
tomers and suggests consulting with him 
for answers to specific questions about whal 
;i cold product does and when it should be 
used. Quantities of the eight-page brochure 
are being made available to pharmacists 
Hi rough SK&F Professional Sales Repre- 
sentatives'. 

The causes and symptoms of common 
colds, coughs, and sinusitis are explained 
in the brochure along with the advantages of 
SK&F over-the-counter cough/cold products. 
Related factors such as drowsiness" and con- 
venience in taking the medication are also 
discussed. 

' ' How to Choose a Cold, Cough or Sinus- 
it is Product" is designed to help the phar- 
macist guide patients in selecting the most 
appropriate SK&F non-prescription medica- 
tion to treat specific cough /cold symptoms. 



STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGE- 
MENT AND CIRCULATION (ACT OF OC- 
TOBER 23, 1962); SECTION 4369, TITLE 39, 
UNITED STATES CODE 

Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, published 
monthly at Chapel Hill, North Carolina. 

Publisher: The N. C. Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation, 109 Church Street, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Editor, Managing Editor, and Business Man- 
ager; W. J. Smith, 109 Church Street, Chapel 
Hill, North Carolina. 

Owner: N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, 
109 Church Street, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. 
Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and other se- 
curity holders owning or lidding 1 percent or 
more of total amount of bonds, mortgages or 
other securities: None. 

Average number of copies each issued during 
preceding 12 months: Total No. Copies printed, 
2400. Circulation: by carriers 0, by mail 1932. 
Total paid circulation 1932. Free distribution 
139. Office use, left-over, 329. Total copies, 2400. 

Single issue nearest to filing date: No. copies 
printed, 2400. Paid circulation, 0. Mail subscrip- 
tion, 1925. Total paid circulation, 1925. Free 
distribution, 139. Office use, left-over, spoiled 
after printing, 336. Total copies, 2400. 

/ certify that the statements made by me 
above are correct and complete. 
S/s W. J. Smith 
Editor, Business Manager 
September 25, 1974 




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he Carolina 



Journal of Pharmacy 

Volume LIV December 1974 Number 12 



nee I* W* 




f pWAItfiCf 

I 



Gilbert Hartis, Winston-Salem pharmacist, is pictured with a grandfather clock which he 
built and presented to the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association. The clock is now 
on display in the lobby of the North Carolina Institute of Pharmacy, headquarters building 
of the NCPhA. 

A graduate of the UNC School of Pharmacy, Mr. Hartis was a medical sales representative 
for Parke-Davis from 1937 to December 1972. Originally, his territory extended from 
Kernersville to Spruce Pine and Glen Alpine but in recent years, the territory in and 
around Winston-Salem had been his work area for P-D. 

Since his retirement, Mr. Hartis has devoted much of his time to building grandfather 
clocks, the one pictured above being the 40th to leave his workshop. The quality of the 
workmanship is the same that Mr. Hartis exhibited while representing Parke-Davis: Su- 
perior. 



The most widely prescribed 
brand of V-CillinK @ 

Oral peniCllllll... phenoxymethyl 



potassium 

phenoxymethyl 

penicillin 



Tablets V-Cillin K: 125. 250. and 500 mg.*; V-Cillin K.for Oral Solution: 125 and 250 mg.*/5 ml. 
Brief Summary. Consult the package literature for prescribing information. 



Description: V-Cillin K® (potassium phenoxy- 
methyl penicillin, Lilly) is the potassium salt of 
V-Cillin® (phenoxymethyl penicillin, Lilly). This 
chemically improved form combines acid sta- 
bility with immediate solubility and rapid ab- 
sorption. 

Indications : For the treatment of mild to mod- 
erately severe pneumococcal respiratory tract 
infections and mild staphylococcal skin and 
soft-tissue infections that are sensitive to peni- 
cillin G. See the package literature for other 
indications. 

Contraindication: Previous hypersensitivity to 
penicillin. 

Warnings : Serious, occasionally fatal, anaphy- 
lactoid reactions have been reported. Some 
patients with penicillin hypersensitivity have 
had severe reactions to a cephalosporin ; inquire 
about penicillin, cephalosporin, or other aller- 
gies before treatment, if an allergic reaction 
occurs, discontinue the drug and treat with the 
usual agents (e.g., epinephrine or other pres- 
sor amines, antihistamines, corticosteroids). 
Precautions: Use with caution in individuals 
with histories of significant allergies and/or 



asthma. Do not rely on oral administration in 
patients with severe illness, nausea, vomiting, 
gastric dilatation, cardiospasm, or intestinal 
hypermotility. Occasional patients will not 
absorb therapeutic amounts given orally. In 
streptococcal infections, treat until the organ- 
ism is eliminated (minimum of ten days). With 
prolonged use, nonsusceptible organisms, in- 
cluding fungi, may overgrow; treat superinfec- 
tion appropriately. 

Adverse Reactions: Hypersensitivity, includ- 
ing fatal anaphylaxis. Nausea, vomiting, epigas- 
tric distress, diarrhea, and black, hairy tongue. 
Skin eruptions, urticaria, reactions resembling 
serum sickness (including chills, edema, arthral- 
gia, prostration), laryngeal edema, fever, and 
eosinophilia. Infrequent hemolytic anemia, leu- 
kopenia, thrombocytopenia, neuropathy, and 
nephropathy, usually with high doses of paren- 
teral penicillin. [os^b] 
'equivalent to phenoxymethyl penicillin 

Additional information available 

to the profession on request. 
Eli Lilly and Company 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46206 



THE STAFF, SALESMEN AND OFFICERS OF 

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Wish for Each of You the 

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1975 



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The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



December, 1974 

Vol. LIV No. 12 



Officers 

NORTH CAROLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 



President 
W. H. Wilson 

Raleigh 



Vice-Presidents 

L. M. Whaley 

Wallace 
Tom R. Burgiss 

Sparta 

E. W. Hackney 

Lumberton 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



CONTENTS THIS ISSUE 



National Spotlight on Tar Heel Pharmacists 4 

The Chapmans Selected as '75 Convention Chairmen 4 
NCPhA Committee Reviews National Pharmacy 

Legislative Proposals 5 

J. Gary Newton Heads' American College of Apothecaries 7 

Homer Andrews : Pharmacist of the Month 8 

Seminar Zeros' in on Effective Inventory Control 11 

Tar Heel Digest . ... 13 

State Board of Pharmacy News . ... 15 

Disasters — Major & Minor 19 

Minutes: Tripartite Committee Meeting 24 

Doings of the Auxiliaries ... 2 ^ 

Marriages/Births/Deaths 2 ^ 

UNC Pharmacy School Notes 30 
New Rules/Regulations Adopted by Commission 

on Health Services 3 * 

ADVERTISERS 

Burroughs' Wellcome Company 6 

Colorcraft Corporation 

Gilpin, Henry B. Company 

IC Systems, Inc 15 

ICN Pharmaceuticals (King Associates) 4th Cover 

Justice Drug Company 1 

Kendall Drug Company 

Lederle Laboratories 

Lilly, Eli & Company 2nd Cover 

Owens, Minor & Bodeker, Inc 3rd Cover 

. 90 

Paid Prescriptions 

Ramsey Manufacturing Company I 6 

o-i 

Reaco Products 

Scott Drug Company 

Seeman Prmtery 

Smith, Kline & French Laboratories 
Smith Wholesale Drug Company 

The Upjohn Company 1° 

Washington National Insurance Company 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Second clas* 
postage paid at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




Fred M. Eckel, Director of Pharmacy Ser- 
vices, North Carolina Memorial Hospital, is 
the new president-elect of the American So- 
ciety of Hospital Pharmacists. 
Eckel, who is also Associate Professor of 
Hospital Pharmacy, UNC School of Phar- 
macy, will assume the office immediately. 
He is a graduate of the Philadelphia College 
of Pharmacy and Science and received his 
graduate degree from Ohio State University. 
He is the author of many published articles 
and is active in professional pharmacy. 

NATIONAL SPOTLIGHT ON 
TAR HEEL PHARMACISTS 

Eecent elections have brought major rec- 
ognition to these North Carolina Pharma- 
cists and placed them in posts of responsi- 
bility where they can be of service to others: 

Fred Eckel, Director of Pharmacy Ser- 
vices at N. C. Memorial Hospital, Chapel 
Hill, has been elected President of the 
American Society of Hospital Pharmacists. 

Mr. Eckel will assume the office to which 
he has been elected next April in San Fran- 
cisco. 

The organization has more than 4000 
members and is the most rapidly growing 



national pharmacy group in the United 
States. Milton Skolaut of Durham is Trea- 
surer of ASHP. 

Gary Newton of Fayetteville (Prescrip- 
tion Center) was installed as President of 
the American College of Apothecaries at 
the ACA annual meeting, just concluded in 
Kansas City. 

The Executive Committee of the NARD 
includes a North Carolina Pharmacist: 
Jesse M. Pike of Concord. Mr. Pike's elec- 
tion took place in Las Vegas" in early Oc- 
tober. 

Hopefully, Mr. Pike will head the NARD 
in a few years. If so, he will be the first 
pharmacist to reach this NARD level since 
John Goode of Asheville was elected more 
than 30 years ago. 



THE CHAPMANS SELECTED AS 
'75 CONVENTION CHAIRMEN 

A husband and wife team — The Donald 
Chapmans of Winston-Salem — will head the 
1975 NCPhA convention planning commit- 
tees. The annual meeting, scheduled for 
April 13-14-15, will use the new Winston- 
Salem Hyatt House as headquarters. 

Mr. Chapman is Director of Pharmacy 
Services at North Carolina Baptist Hospital ; 
is a past president of the Forsyth Pharma- 
ceutical Society and the N.C. Society of 
Hospital Pharmacists; and in 1972- '73, 
served as a member of the NCPhA Executive 
Committee. 

Mrs. Chapman, a nurse by profession, is 
a past-president of the NCPhA Woman's 
Auxiliary, and is currently serving as pres- 
ident of the Apothecary Club of Winston - 
Salem. 

The Chapmans met with the convention 
staff of The Hyatt House on November 11 
along with NCPhA President Wilson and 
Secretary Smith. Room reservation cards 
will be mailed in January. 

Officers and directors of The Traveling 
Men's" Auxiliary met in Greensboro on No- 
vember 24 to initiate plans for TMA par- 
ticipation in the '75 Convention. More spe- 
cific details in the January issue of The 
Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



NCPhA COMMITTEE REVIEWS NATIONAL PHARMACY 
LEGISLATIVE PROPOSALS 



The National Legislative Affairs Com- 
mittee (pictured below) of the North Car- 
olina Pharmaceutical Association met in 
Chapel Hill at the Institute of Pharmacy, 
November 15-16. 

During the two-day session, the commit- 
tee reviewed various legislative bills and 
proposals, now pending in Washington, of 
interest to Pharmacy. While many co-related 
subjects were discussed, prime attention was 
devoted to 

• Maximum Allowable Cost for Drugs 
(MAC). Committee will prepare a position 
paper for submission to the Hearing 
Clerk, FDA, Rockville, Maryland. 

• National Health Insurance Proposals. 

• Eecommends a restudy of the Poison Pre- 
vention Packaging Act of 1970 as ap- 
plicable to prescription safety closures. 

• Opposes any effort to require a pharma- 
cist to substitute a generic drug for a 
specific medication prescribed by a person 
authorized by law to prescribe. 



• Urges prompt enactment of federal legis- 
lation relating to crimes against phar- 
macies (obtaining controlled substances 
by force). Suggests DEA restudy its posi- 
tion on this problem. 

• Supports passage of the Teague (HR 
2918) Bill which provides veterans free- 
dom of choice in obtaining prescription 
drugs. Suggests the commanders of Amer- 
ican Legion posts be alerted to the neg- 
ative aspects of mail order Rx service. 
Members of the committee are: 

Jesse M. Pike, Concord, a member of the 
Executive Committee of the National Asso- 
ciation of Retail Druggists. 

G. N. Brunson, Coordinator, Health & 
Welfare Programs, Merck Sharp & Dohme, 
Dunwoody, Georgia. 

George P. Hager, Chapel Hill, former 
dean of the UNC School of Pharmacy. 

Seymour Holt, Indianapolis, Indiana, 
President of Dista Products Company. 

Claude V. Timberlake, Washington, Vice 
President of the National Pharmaceutical 
Council. 




^V 



Notional Legislative Affairs Committee of the NCPhA (left to right) — Holt, Timberlake, 
Brunson, Pike and Hager. 



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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



FAYETTEVILLE PHARMACIST 
J. GARY NEWTON HEADS 
AMERICAN COLLEGE OF 
APOTHECARIES 

Several North Carolina pharmacists at- 
tended the recent annual meeting of the 
American College of Apothecaries which 
was held in Kansas City. 

Their attendance was two-fold: To par- 
ticipate in the well-structured ACA pro- 
grams and to honor Pharmacist Gary New- 
ton of Fayetteville who was installed as 
the ACA president for the coming year. 

The program content was excellent and 
carried out with what we see as a major 
objective of ACA: To assemble successful 
pharmacy programs and to disseminate the 
information in readily usable form to its 



members. (One speaker outlined his de- 
velopment of an ostomy care service pro- 
gram which grosses $1000 per day). 

It was a pleasure meeting some friends 
of long standing. Example: George A. 
Stevenson of The Upjohn Company. While 
George is officially listed as Upjohn 's na- 
tional pharmacy affairs coordinator, in my 
book he is an ambassador of goodwill for the 
company to which he brings a degree of 
expertise unmatched throughout the phar- 
maceutical industry. 

Present at the ACA meeting from North 
Carolina : Mr. and Mrs. Gary Newton, Fay- 
etteville; James W. Adams, Asheville; Hal 
C. Reaves, Jr. and Lewis N. Cooper of 
Pinehurst; and Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Smith, 
Chapel Hill. 




Mrs. Nancy Pike Mitchener of Edenton holds the $500 North Carolina prize-winning entry 
in the $26,000 Burroughs Wellcome Company Pharmacy Education Program. A check for 
$500 in the name of Jerry A. Bridgers of Tarboro has been presented to the UNC School 
of Pharmacy. 

Appearing in the picture with Mrs. Mitchener are, left to right, Marcus Cameron of 
Sanford, Cade Brooks of Foyetteville, Mr. and Mrs. B. D. Arnold of Raleigh, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ernest Rabil of Winston-Salem, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. West of Roseboro and H. C. McAllister, 
Chapel Hill. 



The Carolina Journal, of Pharmacy 



HOMER ANDREWS, PHARMACIST 
OF THE MONTH 

(Editorial Comment From the 
Burlington Daily Times-News) 

The time now has passed for most people 
in evaluating candidates who will be on 
ballots in Tuesday's general election. 

And, as always, there is now the ques- 
tion of how effective the candidates have 
been in drawing support. A more funda- 
mental question, however, properly asks 
whether or not many people will vote. 

That is not a question in the E. Homer 
Andrews household on Fountain Place in 
Burlington. 

' ' The Lord has been good to me and has 
blessed me with good health. With that 
good health, I'll cast my vote Tuesday," 
said Mr. Andrews as" he talked about his 
record of never having missed a voting op- 
portunity since he first was registered as a 
student in pharmacy at UNC-CH in 1914 
and became a voting citizen that year. 

Mrs. Andrews also will cast her vote. 
She doesn 't remember having missed going 
to the polls' since she and her husband were 
married in 1917. 

The former Burlington postmaster and 
chairman of the County Board of Com- 
missioners has a basic feeling about his 
voting. 

' ' I feel privileged, ' ' he says, ' ' to have this 
right, and I am grateful that I can exer- 
cise it. It is a right for every citizen of 
course, and I simply will never understand 
how many of our people don 't care about it. 
I believe that if a person who can vote 
doesn 't exercise that privilege, he or she 
should not complain about government. 
The voting booth, however, gives us our 
chance to be a part of government. It is 
fundamental in the foundation on which our 
form of government is built. ' ' 

He has a type of lecture he can give to 
anyone who would pause long enough to hear 
it. He can talk about the apathy found 
today as many people apparently have lost 
their interest in government at all levels. 

' ' This is not right, ' ' he says. ' ' If our 
country got into trouble, solutions could 
not be found by turning our heads' and 
walking away. That's what we should think 



about today. We should see that we can 
make out of government what we decide 
through our participation, our voting. It 
starts right down in the home precinct, and 
it goes right to the top of the nation it- 
self." 

This is the type of commentary he shares. 

Mr. Andrews hasn't been sick on a voting 
day at any time in his adult years. He was 
in the Army in Europe in 1916 and cast an 
absentee ballot. There was another occasion 
in 1938 when he was attending a convention 
of postmasters in Wilmington and a mixup 
in the train schedule posed a delay. He and 
two other postmasters hired a taxi to bring 
them home, and they arrived in time to 
vote. 

Mr. Andrews has not limited his" interests 
only to the voting ballot box, however. 

He moved from Chapel Hill to Burlington 
in 1915 and established his career in phar- 
macy as he also started taking part in com- 
munity affairs. 

After years of civic, religious, educational 
and political interests, he became Burling- 
ton's postmaster in 1934, a position he held 
for 30 years'. 

On retirement from the postal service, he 
was appointed to fill a vacancy on the Coun- 
ty Board of Commissioners upon the resig- 
nation of Frank E. Copeland, Jr., who suc- 
ceeded him as postmaster. He was named 
chairman of the board immediately and was 
elected to a four-year term two years later, 
serving until 1970. 

Since leaving the county board, he has 
spent most of his time in his profession as 
a pharmacist. He has worked a 47-hour week 
for the past 14 months, 42 hours at Graham 
Drug and 5' hours at Medical Village Apoth- 
ecary. He now will be reducing his schedule 
to a 40-hour week, mostly at the Apothecary. 
He did take a 15-day vacation in Europe 
during this period. 

He, therefore, remains highly active. 

And come Tuesday morning, he'll be ac- 
tive in carrying through what he recognizes 
to be his duty, his privilege. He'll be at 
Hillcrest School to cast his vote again. 

"And I hope there are enough people 
ahead of me in line that I '11 have to wait for 
hours, ' ' he saj s. 



And most of the time they find it orrthe other end of 
a phone call. Calls from concerned 
pharmacists just like yourself. 

Each one a different question 
about correct usage, dosage and 
proper application of * 
pharmaceuticals. And 
each one could lead 
to trouble without the 
correct answers right 
then and there. 

Our men have 
had dozens of years 
experience in 
troubleshooting 
your questions. fl 
They're not a bunch 
of whiz kids, so, 
sometimes they 
may not know the 
answer. But when 
they don't, they'll 
do their best to I 

find out and call 
you back right away. 

It's part of the complete 
service package offered by Gilpin. 

When trouble calls on you, the Gilpin troubleshooters 

are as close as your phone._^_™«« ! *'* -r 

GILPIN 

Wholesale druggists since 1845. 



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Diplococcus pneumoniae: Upper respiratory-tract 
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mild to moderate degree. 
Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Eaton agent, PPLO): In 
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when due to this organism. 
See package insert for other indications. 
Contraindication: Contraindicated in patients with 
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Warning: Safety for use in pregnancy has not been 
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Treatment of overdose: The drug is virtually nontoxic, 
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How supplied: 250 mg — in bottles of 100 and in unit- 
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For additional product information, consult 
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TU~ TT™„U. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



SEMINAR ZEROS IN ON EFFECTIVE INVENTORY CONTROL 



Stock management methods and pur- 
chasing policies, with emphasis on max- 
imizing return on inventory investment, key- 
noted the November 13th Seminar on "In- 
ventory Control ' ' sponsored by the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association. 

With the Institute of Pharmacy audi- 
torium filled to capacity by registrants from 
all areas of the state, a well-informed "fac- 
ulty" (see picture below) outlined practical 
suggests for controlling an important ele- 
ment of any pharmacy operation: Inventory. 

Methods for obtaining better turnover — 
average is 4 but some pharmacy owners 
are doing much better — were outlined; the 
pitfalls' of "deals" came in for comment 
and buying policies were examined in depth. 

One speaker pointed out that if there 
is only one canary in the community, don't 
lay in a gross of bird seed. Another said 
the most expensive area in the pharmacy 



is the stockroom (best: a loading and un- 
loading platform). One speaker recounted 
how his firm had purchased an established 
pharmacy, remodeled it, and increased Ex 
volume from 40 to 140 per day while cutting 
inventory by $8000.00. 

(Continued on Page 36) 

May I congratulate you and the NCPhA 
for a very informative and helpful Seminar 
on Inventory Control. It was a fine program 
and the speakers were excellent. The in- 
formation will be of help to our pharmacy. 

Jim Patterson 

Statesville 
The obvious interest displayed by those 
present at the Seminar on Inventory Con- 
trol certainly indicates the success of the 
Seminar. 

Pete Mathews 

Wilson 




Smith Wholesale Drug Company of Spartanburg was a recent host to forty seniors and five 
faculty members from U.S.C. College of Pharmacy. The visit is part of their course in Drug 
Marketing and Drug Store Management. The group was welcomed by B. E. Shelley, 
Executive Vice President, and Frank Milstead, Sales Manager, and given a tour of the 
Smith Data Processing center, warehouse, viewed their order entry display terminals in 
the telephone order room, and other modern up-to-date facilities for processing wholesale 
drug orders. 

Following the tour, J. M. Smith, Jr., President of Smith Wholesale Drug Company, 
spoke to the group on drug wholesaling and what can be expected in the future in com- 
puter services for retail drug stores and hospitals. The students were accompanied by Dr. 
Joe Hunter, Professor of Pharmacy Administration and Dr. Joe W. Kosh, Professor of 
Pharmacology. Other members of the staff present were Ronnie C. Adams, F. D. Butler and 
R. S. Etheredge. 





OLGIE TARR 



HAL RUPP CHARLIE EDWARDS 




WALKER CRUMP JOHN HARRISON JACK CANUPP 




MIKE HOWARD 





BOYD BARNETTE 



LENNIE CASEY MIKE FAGLEY 
HORACE FLANIGAN JON COLEY 




PHARMACY 
TIME q.S. 

Your SK&F Representative wants to help you 
in any way with anything to do with Smith Kline & 
French Laboratories, and has virtually unlimited back-up 
resources to do it. 

Jn c+ a el/- Smith Kline & French Laboratories ^ i t f » W~ 

Ubl dbK. Division of SmithKlme Corporation ^llCff" 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



13 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 

DALLAS — Cornwell Drug Stores opened a 
new pharmacy in the Windsor Shopping 
Center of Dallas. Store manager is David 
Dalmas. 

ELIZABETH CITY— Overman & Stevenson 
has climaxed two years of planning with 
the completion of interior renovation, in- 
cluding carpeting, wall decor, and augmented 
lighting. 

GARNER — When Tom Jones Pharmacy 
opened early in October, the grand prize 
was one day 's" interest on a million dollars 
(#210). 

MO CKSVILLE— Michael C. Eudy, 1972 
graduate of UNC School of Pharmacy, has 
joined the staff of Hall Drug Company. 
Prior experience had been at Duke Hospital 
Inpatient Pharmacy and at Pollard 's Drug 
Store, Burnesville. He is married to the 
former Linda Eskridge and they have twin 
sons, one year old, Joseph and Joshua. 
ROCKY MO UNT— Bradley Humphreys, 1971 
graduate of UNC School of Pharmacy, has 
been promoted from staff pharmacist at 
Nash General Hospital to manager of the 
hospital's pharmacy services department. He 
is responsible for supervising, coordinating 
and controlling the diverse aspects of the 
pharmacy services department. 

FRANKLIN— Victor Perry of Perry's Drug 
Store, has been appointed to serve on the 
Macon County Board of Education, with a 
term ending April, 1977. He is filling the 
unexpired term of J. C. Jacobs who re- 
signed due to his candidacy for Chairman 
of the Macon County Board of Commis- 
sioners. 



NEWTON — Paul M. Walker, pharmacist 
and manager of Newton Drug Company 
since 1958, has" been promoted to vice pres- 
ident and general manager of operations of 
Cornwell Drug Stores. Walker, also a di- 
rector and member of the management com- 
mittee of the firm, will continue to manage 
Newton Eexall Drug. Of the Walkers' three 
children, two are now studying pharmacy — 
one at Medical College of South Carolina, 
the other at University of North Carolina. 

RALEIGH — Pam Joyner, a pharmacist at 
Wake Memorial Hospital, spoke recently to 
members of the Lupus" Club. They met in 
the Mayor 's Room of the Sheraton Motel, 
Raleigh. 

WINDSOR— Bill Pittman, pharmacist at 
Pugh 's Pharmacy, spoke to the Windsor Ju- 
nior Woman 's" Club at their regular monthly 
meeting. This year the Club is sponsoring 
a Drug Seminar for interested parents and 
adults. Mr. Pittman 's subject was Drug 
Abuse. 

SMITHFIELD—M. T. (Bill) Upchurch of 
Upchurch Pharmacy was presented a plaque 
by the Eexall Company commemorating the 
operation of his" pharmacy as a Eexall 
Agency for 39 years. 

DUNN— Lynwood Ashley Williams, 1973 
graduate of UNC School of Pharmacy, and 
formerly of Ealeigh, is with Eckerd's Drug 
Store at the Dunn Plaza Shopping Center. 
Miss Elizabeth Eoach, pharmacy intern, is 
also with Eckerd's. She is a native of Dunn, 
and graduated this year from UNC School 
of Pharmacy. 

LINCOLNTON—Jimmie C. Bowers, phar- 
macist and manager of Economy Drug since 
1955, has been promoted to Vice-President 
and General Manager of Purchases and In- 
ventory Control of Cornwell Drug Stores, 
Inc. He is also a Director of Cornwell Drug 
Stores and member of the Management 
Committee. 

DREXEL — Moody Honeycutt, Jr. and Larry 
L. Huffman have opened a new pharmacy 
on Highway 64-70 West at the Upper Drexel 
intersection. 

ALBEMARLE— J. Mike Felts, UNC Phar- 
macy graduate, is now assistant manager 
of Eevco #813 which opened September 2nd. 



Partner! 




That's how Lederle sees you in the vital business of protecting the 
nations health. Only our roles differ— yours is to maintain and enhance 
your professional standing by dispensing the finest pharmaceuticals 
available; ours is to develop new pharmaceuticals, maintain the quality 
of current products, and provide a good deal more: 

750 professional representatives to help you. 

Lederle Distribution Centers augmented by wholesalers located 
throughout the U.S. to assure prompt delivery. 

Research, development and packaging, integrated to produce 
products to fill a need. 

A liberal return goods policy. 

An additional 90-day dating on new product releases. 

And a special department to handle all your questions on new 
Lederle products, credit policies, promotions— whatever. Call our 
"answer-man" Jim Wallin, (914) 735-5000, at Lederle. 

It's the least we can do for a partner. 



LEDERLE LABORATORIES, A Division of American Cyanamid Co. . Pearl River, N. Y. 10965 865-4 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Members — David D. Claytor, Greensboro; Harold V. Day, Spruce Pine; Jesse M. Pike, 
Concord; Jerry Price, Raleigh; W. H. Randall, Lillington; H. C. McAllister, 
Secy.-Treas., Box 471, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



NEW PHARMACIES 

1. Eckerd Drugs, Shamrock Plaza, Clinton. 
A. Michael Costin, pharmacist manager. 

2. Eckerd Drugs, Sky City Plaza 662, Hen- 
dersonville 28739. Francina M. Eogers, 
pharmacist manager. 

3. Wake County Out-Patient Pharmacy, 
3000 New Bern Avenue, Ealeigh. Pamela 
M. Brothers, pharmacist manager. 

4. Old Fort Drug Store, Cor. Thompson & 
Railroad Streets, Old Fort 28762. Elmer 
L. Bishop, Jr., pharmacist manager. 

5. B-C Community Drugs, 608 Tilghman 
Drive, Dunn 28334. Byron Johnson, phar- 
macist manager. 

6. Belmont Pharmacy, Inc., 1309 Coach 
Eoad, Eeidsville 27320. Gregory L. Jen- 
kins, pharmacist manager. 

CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP 

1. Bryson City Drug Company, 108 Everett 
Street, Bryson City 28713. Mary Alice B. 
Greyer, pharmacist manager. 

2. Scottie Stores Discount Drugs, 338 North 
Main Street, Kernersville 27284. F. 
Hampton Lnngdon, pharmacist manager. 

RECIPROCITY 

1. Ann Elizabeth Bejcek, Statesville (from 
Ohio) 



2. Cooper Cleland Clifton, Jr., Highlands 
(from Indiana) 

3. Susan Elaine Carmignani, Boone (from 
Missouri) 

I. C. System, Inc. 

The notion's most highly 
specialized collection service 

Your Association's Collection Service is 
an affiliate of a national organization cur- 
rently serving members of more than 700 
leading trade associations throughout the 
nation. 

Don't lose sales volume because cus- 
tomers owe you money and ore trading 
somewhere else. Your Association's Col- 
lection Service will chase those debtors 
back into your place of business to pay 
YOU direct. You will get accounts OFF 
your ledger and IN your bank account — 
and you will also have many former cus- 
tomers back doing business with you again. 
For information, contact your Association 
office. It will pay you to do so. 

On request, A representative 

of the I. C. System will explain 

the collection program in detail. 

Coll or write the NCPhA, Box 151, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 




"SerA/ico ln\A/T-»ol©euaJe> Queu-rtrttee" 



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3 out of 10 impulse purchases are inspired by 

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MANUFACTURING CORPORATION 

513 East- Trade Street 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Telephone 704-334-3457 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 



PHARMACY FROM THE VIEWPOINT OF THE CONSUMER 



Irving Rubin, Editor of Pharmacy Times, 
suggested that Pharmacy could benefit by 
establishing better communication with the 
consumer and representatives of consumer 
organizations. In North Carolina, Editor 
Rubin 's suggestion resulted in a 1-day Sem- 
inar on Consumers and Pharmacists held 
in Chapel Hill on October 23 under spon- 
sorship of the NCPhA and the UNC School 
of Pharmacy. 

The program, arranged by Steven Moore 
with the cooperation of NC-PharmPac, in- 
cluded representatives of the N.C. Con- 
sumers Council, the Consumers Division of 
the N. C. Attorney General's Office, Public 
Interest Research Group and pharmacists. 

Although the press devoted major at- 
tention to the highly critical comments of 
Mrs. Lillian Woo, post reaction to the sem- 
inar by a majority of the approximately 100 
registrants to the 5-hour program has been 
favorable. In order to provide free and open 
discussion of issues important to both con- 
sumers and pharmacists, the NCPhA plans 



to continue to maintain the relationship as 
initialed by the October 23 Seminar. 

The Seminar Proceedings will be pub- 
lished, either in its entirety by the Con- 
tinuing Education Division of the UNC 
School of Pharmacy (cost estimates and 
budget limits will influence the decision) 
or selected papers will be published in The 
Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. 

The Chairman of the Consumer Relations 
Committee of the NCPhA, W. Whitaker 
Moose of Mount Pleasant, presided during 
the AM Seminar session, while the Chairman 
of NC-PharmPac, Rex Paramore of Nash- 
ville, assumed this responsibility following 
a luncheon at the Zoom Zoom. 

"I want to thank you for allowing me to 
attend the Seminar on October 23. It was 
most interesting and informative. The timing 
of the material and the bringing of the con- 
sumer leaders into the panel discussion was 

superb. ' ' 

N. D. Schellenger 

A. H. Robins Company 



TRIBUTE TO BILL PRICE, CONOVER PHARMACIST 

Reprinted from Newton Observer- News-Enterprise 



Some people are givers ; others, takers. Bill 
Price, Conover druggist, was among the for- 
mer. In fact, one would almost be led to be- 
lieve that he lived by the creed, " I 'd rather 
wear out than rust out. ' ' 

He wasn 't satisfied with merely dispensing 
drugs, many times at early and late hours 
with himself as special messenger in times 
of emergency; but he always took the time 
to add an extra helping of understanding and 
sympathy. 

Never minding that his hours were long, 
he always kept a smile on his face and had 
a bearing that was a blend of confidence and 
humility. 

Young and old felt a rapport with Bill. 
They were able to sense that he liked people. 
In fact, he could hardly do enough for them. 

In addition to other civic work, one of his 
outstanding ambitions was to see Woodlawn 
Baptist Church — where he worked in almost 
every capacity — complete its sanctuary. That 
Woodlawn Baptist needs that sanctuary was 



evidenced when numerous friends met to- 
gether Sunday to pay honor to the memory of 
Bill Price, whose life has touched a re- 
sponsive chord in the lives of countless 
others. 

Many people at the post office-drugstore 
complex in Conover who counted Bill a good 
friend are experiencing a sense of poignant 
loss along with Bill's family. Perhaps the 
following episode will be felt for years to 
come. 

On Thursday, Bill was exuberant over Bil- 
ly's coming home from college, with plans to 
attend the Newton-Conover football game. 
It took Charles Carpenter, who had worked 
side by side with Bill for over 10 years, to 
convince Billy that both he and Alex should 
attend that game — his father would have 
wanted it that way. 

Following the boys' late arrival at the 
game, the home team seemed to play harder, 

(Continued on Page 21) 



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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



19 



DISASTERS 



Mai or and Minor 



a J 



HENRIETTA 



Tri-Community Drug Store broken into 
for the fourteenth time, September 29th. 
Some §60 worth of narcotics taken in the 
robbery. 

GASTON IA 

Ehyne Drug Store, safe containing $1,000 
in cash and a large quantity of morphine and 
narcotics was stolen. Safe, "cut open like a 
can of corn and its contents removed," was 
recovered from a South Fork River canal at 
Spencer Mountain. 

CONCORD 

A physician 's office on the ground floor of 
Pike's Drug Store was entered October 17th. 
Three men were arrested for breaking and 
entering Pike 's Drug Store, possession of 
burglary tools, as well as" breaking and en- 
tering Dr. Harding Keedler 's office. 

GREENSBORO 

Revco Drug Store, King's Shopping Cen- 
ter, $250 worth of drugs stolen. Entry was 
by breaking a plate glass window with a 
piece of concrete. 

PITTSBORO 

The Haywood-Moncurc Community Health 
Center ; theft reported early on the morning 
of September 27 by the pharmacist. Large 
amount of drugs, syringes, needles, and 
other medical supplies missing. 

ROBERSONVILLE 

Grimes Drug Store, Robersonville, drugs 
valued at $300. Three persons arrested, 
charged with felony possession of a con- 
trolled substance and receiving stolen prop- 
erty. They, and one other, were taken to 
Pitt Memorial Hospital for treatment of 
possible overdose of drugs, according to the 
Robersonville paper. 



SHELBY 



Revco Drug, Ingles Shopping Center, $205 
in drugs, including a large quantity of 
codeine. Entrance gained by using two sledge 
hammers and other tools to break a 3x2 y 2 
foot hole in the wall. Store had two break- 
ins in ten days. 

WINSTON-SALEM 

Crown Oldtown Pharmacy and an ad- 
jacent physician's office were entered early 
on the morning of October 6th. Drugs and 
$50 in cash were missing from the doctor 's 
office; an undetermined amount and variety 
of drugs were taken from the pharmacy. 
Entrance was" gained by knocking a hole in 
the wall. 

GIBSON 

Gibson Drug Company. One of two per- 
sons who forced entry into the pharmacy in 
a drug-related robbery was arrested. A 
record check revealed eight previous arrests 
for similar offenses. 

WELDON 

Selden's Pharmacy's entire inventory of 
Controlled Substances was taken in a No- 
vember 5th robbery which was charac- 
terized as a "professional job." 

SMITHFIELD 

Upchurch 's Pharmacy entered by removing 
bolts from several door bars, then bending 
back the bars. An undetermined amount of 
drugs stolen. 

HUNTERSVILLE 

Neil's Drug Store. Approximately 18 
watches from a display booth stolen. Sev- 
eral watches were found on the floor which 
indicated the thieves' attempt was apparent- 
ly interrupted. 



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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 



SPECIAL PROGRAM FOR 
LOCAL PHARMACEUTICAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 

Claude U. Paoloni, Director of Continuing 
Education, UNC School of Pharmacy, has 
released this communication to officers of 
local pharmaceutical organizations: 

I am pleased to inform you that a special 
program is available to the pharmacists of 
your society. Primarily it provides your 
members with the opportunity to meet our 
new Dean, Dr. Seymour M. Blaug. 

In addition, we will bring to your phar- 
macists other faculty members who will 
discuss on-going school programs which we 
realize are of great importance, not only 
to our students but to practicing pharmacists 
as well. 

What I propose is specifically outlined in 
the attached sheet. In general, however, we 
will be delighted to appear before one of 
your periodic meetings with three 15-minute 
presentations and a faculty panel to answer 
questions and discuss suggestions your 
members may have. 

Thus, we are pleased to offer your group 
an hour or hour and a half program (or as 
long as it may take) that should be of in- 
timate interest to every pharmacist. 

If your group would like to have this 
program, you may simply call me (collect) at 
(919) 966-1121 to arrange for a convenient 
time. Or, if you would prefer, please com- 
plete the enclosed card, and I will be back 
in touch with you to set up a program. 

1) Pharmaceutical Education: Past, Pres- 
ent and Future 

Seymour Blaug, Ph.D., Dean, 
School of Pharmacy 
A brief overview of trends and develop- 
ment in pharmacy education with sug- 
gestions as to how they might affect 
pharmacy education at the School of 
Pharmacy, UNC. 

2) The Curriculum of the School of Phar- 
macy 

LeRoy D. Werley, Assistant Dean, 
Student Affairs 
A brief discussion of changes being made 
in the curriculum of the School of Phar- 
macy with reasons' for changes. 



3) The Practitioner's Contribution to the 
School of Pharmacy 

Fred Eckel, Associate Professor 
of Hospital Pharmacy 
An overview of the educational objectives 
of the Division of Pharmacy Practice 
with an emphasis on how the state 's prac- 
titioner can assist the Division in its 
educational programs. 

4) Faculty Panel: Questions and Sugges- 
tions 

Claude 17. Paoloni, Assistant Professor 
An opportunity for audience participa- 
tion with panel members. 

TRIBUTE TO BILL PRICE 

(Continued from Page 17) 

the band to give one of its better perfor- 
mances, and the hometown fans to root that 
much harder. 

And, in such fashion, we're in Bill Price's 
debt. Conover must retain the identity which 
Bill Price felt was worth striving for. 




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The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



23 



For eighty-nine years 
. . . . since 1885 



seeman 

OF DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long 
association with North Car- 
olina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its fifty- 
fourth volume, and the first 
printed copy was "Seeman 
Printed." 



W 



A DIVISION OF 
FISHER-HARRISON CORP 



McCLELLAN APPOINTED 

PRODUCT PROMOTION 

MANAGER 

C. J. McClellan, III has been appointed 
Product Promotion Manager for Lederle 
Laboratories Pharmaceutical Department, 
according to E. M. Lynch, Product Group 
Director. Lederle Laboratories is a Division 
of American Cyanamid Company. 

Mr. McClellan is responsible for promo- 
tional activities for cardiovascular/renal 
and central nervous system products. After 
joining Lederle in 1967 as a medical sales 
representative in Florida and North Car- 
olina, he was appointed District Manager 
in 1973 serving in New York State 's Hudson 
Valley. 

A graduate of North Carolina State Uni- 
versity, Mr. McClellan holds a B.S. degree 
in industrial management and he has done 
additional work in chemistry and business 
at the University of North Carolina and 
the University of Miami. 

The McClellans reside in Campbell Hall, 
New York. 



HUMPHREYS PROMOTED BY 
NASH GENERAL HOSPITAL 

Nash General Hospital has announced the 
promotion of Bradley Humphreys, staff 
pharmacist, to manager of the hospital's 
pharmacy Services department, according to 
Charles L. Rowe, assistant administrator, 
general services. 

Humphreys is responsible for supervising, 
coordinating and controlling the diverse as- 
pects of the pharmacy services' department. 

A Plymouth, N. C. native, Humphreys 
graduated from Plymouth High School in 
1966. He received his Bachelor of Science 
degree in pharmacy from the School of 
Pharmacy at the University of North Car- 
olina at Chapel Hill in 1971. 

While attending UNC, Humphreys served 
as an instructor in the university's medica- 
tion assistant program. 

Prior to coming to Nash General in 1971, 
Humphreys completed an internship program 
at North Carolina Memorial Hospital, Chapel 

mil. 



24 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

MINUTES 
TRIPARTITE COMMITTEE MEETING 



Members Present: 



Guests Present : 



September 16, 1974 
(By Stephen M. Caiola, Secretary) 

Messrs. Claytor, Dawson, Day, Edmonds, Paoloni (Chairman), Ean- 
dall, Werley and Caiola (Secretary); Ex officio members: Blaug, 
McAllister, Smith. 



Champion, Shoffner. 
1.0 Welcoming of Guests: 

Mr. Paoloni welcomed Dr. Seymour Blaug, Dean of the School of Pharmacy, Peter 
Champion, President of the Student Body and Phil Shoffner, President of the 
S.A.Ph.A.-S.N.C.Ph.A. to our Committee meeting. He asked that they freely par- 
ticipate in all matters under discussion. 
2.0 "Review of Minutes of Last Meeting: 

Mr. Paoloni asked for corrections to the minutes of the last meeting. There being 
none, the minutes were considered approved. 
3.0 Review of the Southern School of Pharmacy 's Practical Experience CourseworTc 
for Externship Credit : 

Mr. Caiola reviewed the Professional Practice Laboratory 501, 502 and 503 course- 
work of Southern School of Pharmacy. He stated that it was comparable to the 
UNC coursework which provides externship credit. The Committee recommended 
that the Board of Pharmacy approve this coursework as being acceptable to 
receive up to 400 hours of externship credit. For a student to receive this extern- 
ship credit, the Southern School of Pharmacy must verify in writing to the Board 
the exact number of hours the student spends in this coursework. 
4.0 Review of the Pharmacy Internship Program for the Veterans Administration Hospital, 
Fayetteville, N. C. : 

Mr. Paoloni reviewed the proposed program with the Committee. Mr. McAllister 
stated that if the pharmacist-preceptor for the intern was duly registered in some 
state and was functioning in a legal manner and if the intern would register with 
the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy, there would be no problem with allowing 
credit for the well structured internship program. 

5.0 Report on the Summer, 1974 Preceptor — Extern/Intern Meetings: 

Mr. Paoloni reviewed the results of the preceptors' and externs '/interns ' ques- 
tionnaires from the Summer, 1974 meetings. He stated that the purpose of these 
questionnaires was to give the Division of Pharmacy Practice of the School the 
feelings and thoughts of the pharmacists and future pharmacists of our state 
concerning the externship/internship program. The role of the School is to be 
increased, as in Fall, 1975, the senior (5/5) students will be spending one full 
semester in professional practice experiences. The School will use the questionnaire 
results to assist them in better structuring their professional practice coursework. 

6.0 Revision of the Notebook and Program Instructions: 

Mr. McAllister asked that the Committee begin revision of the Noteboolc as it must 
be completed by February, 1975. New statements/questions on packaging, labeling, 
the Drug Enforcement Administration, etc. must be added. Also, consideration 
should be given to restructuring the entire program due to our graduates relatively 
poor performance on the practical portion of the State Board Examination. Mr. 
Paoloni, Mr. Werley, Mr. Caiola, Mr. WilletS and Mr. Shoffner will begin the 
revision process before our next meeting. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 



7.0 Eevieio Tentative Criteria for Selection of Preceptors and Pharmacies for the UNC 
School of Pharmacy Practical Experience— Externship Program : 

Mr. Pittman reviewed some of the criteria the School might use in selecting and 
retaining practitioner-preceptors for the professional practice coursework. The 
Committee tentatively adopted the following: 

1. The practitioner-preceptor must be dedicated to teaching the extern/student 
(at least 2-3 discussion hours/week in addition to supervised practice). 

2. The practitioner-preceptor must attend continuing education meetings to 
discuss techniques of externship training and evaluation. 

3. The practitioner-preceptor must have two (2) years of experience as a 
licensed pharmacist before he/she is eligible to precept a student, A waiver 
of this requirement could, on special occasion, be granted by the School. 

4. The ratio of students to practitioner-preceptors should be 1:1. 

5 The practitioner-preceptor must be in good standing with the Board of 
Pharmacy and adhere to the N.C.Ph.A. Code of Professional Conduct. (The 
pharmacist in a Federal facility must be registered and be in good standing 
with the Board of Pharmacy in some state.) 

6. The practitioner-preceptor must be a participating member of two of 
the following professional organizations: A.Ph.A., N.A.K.D., N.A.C.D.S., 
A.S.H.P., N.C.Ph.A., N.C.S.H.P., county or local area pharmaceutical asso- 
ciation. 

7. The practitioner-preceptor must have a willingness to critically evaluate 
students and be evaluated by them. 

8. The practitioner-preceptor must maintain a current library of texts and 
journals. (He will be assisted by the School in obtaining this library.) 

At future Committee meetings, the above criteria will be expanded upon and 
criteria for selection of pharmacies will be discussed. 
8.0 Election of Committee Officers for the 1974-1975 year: 

Mr. Paoloni asked for nominations for Committee officers for the 1974-1975 year. 
He reviewed the necessary portions of the Committee Guidelines referring to elec- 
tions and elections proceeded. 

The officers for the 1974-1975 year are as follows: 
Chairman: "William H. Eandall 

Vice-Chairman : Claude U. Paoloni 



Secretary : 



George Willets 



ERWIN 

Lanier Drug Company. Thieves were 
foiled in their attempt to enter the phar- 
macy, but were successful in gaining entry 
to the office of a physician, where they took 
$32 from a petty case box, and a quantity of 
drugs from a safe. 

DUNN 

B-C Community Drugs. After entering 
through the Pharmacy's drive-in window, an 
unknown party, or parties, made off with 
1500 Valium and 800 Darvon. 



ANDREWS 

Burch Drugs was one of the businesses 
damaged by fire November 2, when blazes 
which the Fire Chief said were apparently 
the work of a firebug, damaged several 
stores. 

MURRELLS INLETS. C. 

Murrells Inlet Pharmacy. For the fifth 
time in less than a year, the pharmacy (in 
late September) was broken into by night 
intruders. An alarm system caused the thieves 
to make an exit prior to arrival of police. 



26 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



FALL CONVOCATION 

Dr. Bernard Boyd, Professor of Religion 
at UNC-CH, and internationally known di- 
rector of several archaeological expeditions, 
was luncheon Speaker at the Fall Convoca- 
tion of the NCPhA Woman's Auxiliary, 
when it convened at the Institute of Phar- 
macy, October 16th. 

Mrs. J. Weaver Kirkpatrick, President 
of the Auxiliary, presided at the business 
session which preceded the luncheon. She 
was introduced by Mrs. Morris Hedgepeth, 
Convocation Chairman. William H. Wilson, 
NCPhA President, brought greetings from 
the parent group. 

The Auxiliary heard reports on their ma- 
jor project for the year, that of assistance 
to Mental Health and Mental Retardation 
patients. Emphasis for the club year is on 
Group Homes or Half-Way Houses, with 
special interest in helping to provide small 
equipment and furnishings. In addition, 
Auxiliary members are continuing their 
"sew-in" projects which assist in providing 



house dresses, bibs, and other articles of 
clothing to patients in mental institutions. 
A skit entitled A Comedy of Errors, a 
take-off on parliamentary procedure, was 
presented by a cast from the membership. 
Attempting to teach while entertaining, the 
1974 Revision of the Skit described a newly 
organized club trying to conduct its meet- 
ing using correct parliamentary rules, but 
rinding it rough going. 

Participating in the skit were Mrs. George 
Cocolas, Mrs. Hope-to-do-Better, the Pres- 
ident; Mrs. Jeff Blanchard, Pharmacy Stu- 
dent Wives President, playing Mrs. Nellie- 
All- Wrong, Vice-President; Mrs. Grover 
Creech, Mrs. Chatty Talk-A-Lot, Secretary; 
Mrs. Daryl Blackburn, Miss Put-It-Off, the 
Treasurer. Mrs. W. P. Wells played the part 
of the Parliamentarian, Mrs. Would-Be-Or- 
derly; and Mrs. James Olsen, Chapel Hill 
Auxiliary President, was Mrs. Make-It-Go, 
projects chairman. Narrator for the skit 
was Mrs. James R. Hickmon, immediate 
past-president. 




Dr. Bernard Boyd (front row, left), guest speaker at the Fall Convocation of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of the NCPhA, is pictured with Dean Seymour Blaug of the UNC School of 
Pharmacy and Mrs. J. Weaver Kirkpatrick, auxiliary president. Officers of local pharma- 
ceutical auxiliaries are shown in the background. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



27 



Committee Chairmen reporting during the 
business session included Mrs. Donald K. 
Chapman, chairman for the 1975 Conven- 
tion; Mrs. Grover Creech, Pharmacy Student 
"Wives Scholarships; Mrs. B. Cade Brooks, 
Institute of Pharmacy Redecorating; Mrs. 
L. M. McCombs, Hospitality ; and Mrs. Bruce 
Medlin, Historian. Mrs. B. L. Lewis, Chair- 
man of the Mental Health Project, illus- 
trated her report with slides of the Group 
Homes in Charlotte. 

Local auxiliary presidents who were recog- 
nized for brief reports included Mrs. Budy 
Hardy, Cabarrus County; Mrs. Sanford 
Price, Cape Fear Valley; Mrs. James Olsen, 
Chapel Hill; Mrs. H. L. Bizzell, Charlotte; 
Mrs. William P. Wells, Durham; Mrs. David 
W. Montgomery, Greensboro; Mrs. L. G. 
Collins, Wilmington; Mrs. Jeffrey Blan- 
chard, Student Wives; Mrs. Boger Crane, 
Baleigh; Mrs. Bobert E. Lewis, Salisbury; 
Mrs. Donald Chapman, Winston-Salem. Mrs. 
H. K. Garmany, president of the Western 
North Carolina Auxiliary, was unable to be 
present. 

W. J. Smith, NCPhA Executive Director, 
introduced special guests Dean and Mrs. 
Seymour Blaug of the TJNC School of 
Pharmacy, and members of the NCPhA 
Board of Consultants, who were in session 
on that same date 

B. Cade Brooks, Chairman of the Institute 
of Pharmacy, thanked the women for their 
support of the remodeling and redecoration 
program at the Institute, and reported on 
future plans. 

Following the meeting, Mrs. Mebane 
Pritchett, wife of the director of the More- 
head Foundation, conducted a tour of More- 
head House. 

The Convocation Committee, in addition 
to Mrs. Hedgepeth, included Mrs. Milton 
Whaley and Mrs. Whitaker Moose, who pre- 
pared the luncheon; Mrs. George Cocolas, 
who wrote and produced supplies; and Mrs. 
W. P. Wells, Avho directed the skit. Mrs. Hoy 
Moose presented the luncheon invocation. 



EVANS NAMED CHAIRMAN 
OF NCNB'S MARION BOARD 

Pharmacist James E. Evans has been 
named Chairman of the Marion Board of 
Directors of North Carolina National Bank. 

Evans, a native of Abbeville, South Car- 
olina, has been in Marion since 1935, first 
with the McDowell Cut Bate Drug Store 
which he later purchased and operated as 
Evans Bexall Drugs until 1972 at which 
time the pharmacy was sold to Cornwell 
Drug Company. 

Active in the business, civic and religious 
life of Marion and McDowell County, Mr. 
Evans served twenty years on the Marion 
Draft Board and was chairman at the time of 
his retirement in the Spring of 1974. In 
1950, he was named "Mr. Bexalite" by the 
Bexall Drug Company publication. 



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28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 

• CHAPEL HILL — Marian Chambers 

• GREENSBORO— Mrs. Roger C. Barricks 

• CHARLOTTE— Mrs. Delia Medlin 

CHAPEL HILL 

October was a busy month for members 
of the Chapel Hill Auxiliary. Probably 
you've already heard or read a detailed re- 
port of the Fall Convocation which was 
held at the Institute on October 16. Or 
better still, if you attended you know that 
it was a very successful and informative 
meeting. 

Then on October 21, we had the pleasure 
of seeing our State President, Brenda Kirk- 
patrick again at a luncheon at the Governor 's 
Inn, Research Triangle Park. The local pres- 
ident,. Jackie Olsen, presented a sterling Old 
Well Charm to Brenda as a small token of 
appreciation for her fine work this year and 
to express wishes for happiness and good 
things ahead. 

The manager and staff of Hickory Farms 
of Ohio at University Mall, Chapel Hill were 
gracious hosts to the Chapel Hill group in- 
cluding several husbands and guests, on 
October 29. The history of the firm and a 
short description of the various types of 
cheeses and their method of manufacture 
preceded a sampling tour of the store. Hot 
tea and strawberry cake topped off the 
evening and there was ample time to 
browse and ask questions. The door prize, 
a lovely and very useful cheese planer, was 
won by Stella Paoloni. 

GREENSBORO 

The Greensboro Drug Club Auxiliary met 
at the Blandwood Carriage House October 
22, 1974 for the annual 3-D luncheon. The 
pharmaceutical auxiliary was host to wives 
of doctors and dentists'. 

The invocation was given by Mrs. J. 
Frank Pickard. 

For the program, Sammy Doyle and the 
Page High School Ensemble presented a 



unique choral arrangement. An antique dis- 
play arranged by Carolyn Faison was" ad- 
mired. 

CHARLOTTE 

The beginning of a new club year found 
the Charlotte Auxiliary at the YWCA for 
their October meeting. Everyone arrived 
early, giving them a chance to recall a most 
pleasurable evening back in July when mem- 
bers' and their spouses gathered at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Oxendine for a cov- 
ered dish supper, and an evening of fun 
and fellowship. 

After a summer filled with travel, garden- 
ing, freezing and canning of food, members 
were happy to be able to once again gather 
at the home of the president, Mrs. H. L. 
Bizzell, for a covered dish luncheon in Sep- 
tember. 

Guest speaker was Joe Millsaps, Chair- 
man of the Board of the N. C. Zoological 
Society, who, by showing slides, made mem- 
bers more aware of the world of animals 
around us, and what WE in North Carolina 
are going to have in OUR ZOO. 

THE WAKE COUNTY 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

Reported by Patricia Bumgarner 

The Wake County Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation met November 5, 1974 at Milburnie 
Fishing Club. There were 52 members and 
guests present for the dinner meeting. 

President Don Carter called the meeting 
to order. The minutes of the last meeting 
were read and approved. 

Treasurer, George Morgan, reported 
$722.08 in checking and 1486.59 in Savings. 
He announced that we now have 104 paid 
members. 

President Carter reminded us that the 
December meeting will be our Christmas 
Party. It will be Saturday, December 7, 
1974 at the "Flying Cloud" Restaurant. 
The checks should be received by November 
23 with the entree choice of rib eye steak 
or stuffed flounder indicated. Checks made 
payable to the Wake County Pharmaceutical 
Association may be mailed to Don Carter, 
c/o Longview Pharmacy. Plan now to at- 
tend! 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



MARRIAGES 

HUNTEB-ROYAL 

Miss Marsha Royal and Ralph Bordon 
Hunter were married September 29 in the 
Elizabeth Baptist Church of Kenansville. 
Mrs. Hunter is a graduate of Rex Hospital 
School of Nursing, and is employed at Samp- 
son County Memorial Hospital. Mr. Hunter, 
graduate of UNC School of Pharmacy, is 
with Reynolds Drugs of Clinton. 

GBILL-BENFIELD 

Vanessa Diane Benfield of Rutherford 
College and Frank James Grill of Valdese 
were married October 5 in Abernethy Me- 
morial United Methodist Church of Ruther- 
ford College. Mr. Grill is a graduate of 
the School of Pharmacy at UNC-CH and 
is employed by Hudson Drug Company of 
Hudson. 

BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Kirkpatrick, Jr. 
of 6707 Amster Road, Richmond, Virginia, 
are announcing the birth of a daughter, 
Mary Forrest, September 3, at Forsyth Me- 
morial Hospital, Winston-Salem. Mrs. Kirk- 
patrick is the former Mary Ann Fulton, 
and was a 1968 graduate of the UNC School 
of Pharmacy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Williams announce 
the birth of a son, Jeffrey Brent, on July 
16th. At the age of two months, Jeffrey 
underwent surgery, and has made a com- 
pletely successful recovery. 

Mr. Williams is a 1969 graduate of UNC 
School of Pharmacy and is presently di- 
rector of the Drug Information Program 
at the School. 

DEATHS 
J. Weldon Royal 

J. Weldon Royal, owner and operator of 
Denton Drug Store, Denton, since 1941, 
died October 3, after suffering an apparent 
heart attack a few hours earlier at his home. 
He was a member of the Board of Directors 
of the Denton Branch of Central Carolina 
Bank, and served as chairman of the David- 
son County Library Board of Trustees 1960- 
1968. He was a charter member and past- 



president of the Denton Lions Club, a 
member of Denton Masonic Lodge, and 
Woodmen of the World. At the First Baptist 
Church he served as a trustee, a deacon, and 
member of the building committee. 

Pallbearers at the funeral service were 
employees and former employees of the phar- 
macy. 

W. L. Rogers 

W. L. Rogers of Benson, an 87-year-old 
retired pharmacist, died October 1. Mr. 
Rogers' went to Benson from Pembroke in 
1961 and entered business with Charles 
Stevens at Benson Drug Company. He re- 
tired two years ago. 

Mr. Rogers, member of the Benson United 
Methodist Church, had practiced pharmacy 
in South Carobna before coming to this 
state. 

Rudolph Pittman 

Rudolph Pittman, Smithfield pharmacist, 
died October 21 following a period of de- 
clining health. Mr. Pittman, a 1949 grad- 
uate of the UNC School of Pharmacy, was 
Director of Pharmacy Services at Johnston 
Memorial Hospital. 

Prior to locating in Smithfield, Mr. Pitt- 
man was associated (1950) with the Bur- 
lington Drug Company and later (1953) he 
became part owner and manager of the 
Barbour-Pittman Drug Store, Burlington. 
He accepted a position with Griffin Phar- 
macy in 1959. 

George David Grimes 

George David Grimes, Sr., 83-year old 
owner and operator of Grimes Drug Store, 
Robersonvile, died October 27th at Roberson- 
ville Township Hospital. He had worked in 
his pharmacy on Friday, was admitted to 
the hospital on Saturday evening when he 
became critically ill. Death occurred at 12:30 
Sunday morning. 

Mr. Grimes, born in Robersonville, had 
spent all hia life in that area, returning 
to practice his profession there upon com- 
pletion of his education. He was a member 
of the First Christian Church, and had been 
a Mason and Shriner for fifty years. 

Among his survivors are his widow and 
one son, George David Grimes, Jr. 



30 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



111 Pharmacy School Notes 



DESERVED RECOGNITION 

Appreciation is expressed to: 

(1) Phil Shoffner, President of the UNC 
Student Branches of the NCPhA/APhA, 
and 50 UNC School of Pharmacy students 
for reviewing the legal section of the Board 
of Pharmacy notebook and for preparing 
a set of questions and answers relating to 
the subject. 

The Tripartite Committee (Nov. 18) 
urged the students, with faculty assistance, 
to extend their effort to other parts of the 
notebook. 

J2) Wayne Pittman of the UNC School 
of Pharmacy staff for formulating a set 
of preceptor guidelines applicable to the 
intern/extern program. Most of Mr. Pitt- 
man's recommendations were adopted by 
The Tripartite Committee (Nov. 18). 

PHARMACY FACULTY PRESENT 
DRUG EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Professors Leonard Berlow and George 
Cocolas of the UNC School of Pharmacy 
presented a drug education program to 
faculty and students of Livingstone Col- 
lege, Salisbury. 

"Why Kids Use Drugs" was the Berlow 
topic while Dr. Cocolas spoke on drug 
chemical properties and effects on the body. 

The UNC School of Pharmacy has been 
active throughout the State in presenting 
drug education programs. 



KAPPA PSI 

Eeported by Michael Teague 
Kappa Psi's pledge class consists of eight 
prospective brothers as follows: Stephen 
Dodson Bennett, III, Bocky Mount; Steve 
Evans, Ash; Ernest Eandall Fish, Canton; 
Earle William Lingle, Jr., Granite Quarry; 
Stephen Lawrence Moore, Huntersville ; Wil- 
liam Leonard Eeaves, Southern Pines; Max 
Gardner Eeece, Jr., Siler City; Eobert 
Vernon Wheeler, Creedmoor. 

As alumni return to the Chapter House, 
brothers of Kappa Psi hope that they will 
notice improvements in the general appear- 
ance of the house. As preparation for the 
Province III Convention in the Spring, 
other house improvements will be made. 



STUDENT BRANCHES 

Guest speaker at the November 20 meet- 
ing of the Student Branch of the NCPhA/ 
APhA was Ben G. Bailey, serving as The 
Upjohn Company's Medical Sciences Liaison 
for Education since 1969. 

Topic of Mr. Bailey's presentation was 
"Drug Bioavailability: Its Importance in 
Determining Product Equivalence." 

The speaker, a graduate of the University 
of Georgia School of Pharmacy (1957) has 
been associated with The Upjohn Company 
since 1963. Prior to that, he was in profes- 
sional practice in Atlanta for six years. 



DR. OLSEN ELECTED TO 
PHARMACY POST 

Dr. James L. Olsen, Associate Professor 
of Pharmacy, UNC School of Pharmacy, 
was elected to the house of delegates — 
teachers of Pharmacy section — of the Amer- 
ican Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 
His election was announced at the recent 
AACP meeting in New Orleans. 

Dr. Olsen is Director of the UNC School 
of Pharmacy Drug Product Program. 




The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 31 

kifw RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PROCUREMENT, 
STORAGE ^AND ^ADMINIST^TION OF DRUGS IN SKILLED NURSING 

HOMES INTERMEDIATE CARE FACILITIES AND COMBINATION 
HOME^ AS ADOPTED BY THE COMMISSION ON HEALTH SERVICES 
OF THE NORTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES. 

EFFECTIVE NOV. 6, 1974 

DRUGS 

1. Procurement . 

All legend drugs and biologicals shall be obtained only on the written order of a 
physician, dentist, or other practitioners licensed by law to prescribe drugs in this state 
(verbal orders shall be countersigned by the prescriber within 48 hours). Non legend 
drugs mav be kept in the facility only with the approval of a physician and pharmacist. 
There shall be strict adherence to the provision for drug procurement as defined in State 
and Federal laws. The label of each container of the prescription drug administered 
within the facility (either by qualified personnel or permitted self-administration) shall 
show the following: 
a. The occupant's full name; 

b The date of issuance (date issued or refilled) ; 

c The administration directions clearly stated (and not abbreviated) and when the 
prescribing practitioner's directions change, the container should be relabeled; 

d. The name of the prescribing practitioner; 

e. The serial number of the prescription ; 

f. The name as prescribed, strength, and quantity of the drug; 

g. The name and address of the pharmacy; 
h The name of the dispensing pharmacist; 

i. The expiration date of the drug when indicated and any other necessary auxiliary 

st3.tGII16IltS. 

NOTE- The above requirements may be waived in facilities employing a 24-48 hour 
drug supply utilizing the unit dose distribution and administration system. Each 
dose should be readily identified with the patient and physician. Also, each 
patient's doses shall be stored in a separate and secure manner within com- 
pliance of all Federal, State, and local laws. 
2. Staff Pharmacist Requirements 

a. Must have appropriate training or experience in institutional pharmacy and must 

keep up-to-date concerning changes in institutional pharmacy, 
b Must be a member of the facility's staff with the pharmacist's responsibilities and 
reimbursement clearly defined in a signed agreement. The pharmacist must be clearly 
responsible for all pharmaceutical services, 
c Must monitor the complete drug therapy of each patient monthly and report any 
suggestions for change to the proper official (i.e., administrator, charge nurse, or 
physician). The staff pharmacist should review all new drug orders against existing 
drug orders to prevent drug interactions, etc. 

d. Develop written policies and procedures to control all pharmaceutical services in- 
cluding drug procurement, distribution, control and accountability, storage, and 
utilization, (i.e., up-to-date stop order policies and procedures, emergency drug kit 
policy and procedures). 

e. Must submit a written report quarterly on the status of the pharmaceutical Services 
being provided in the facility to the pharmacy services committee or equivalent which 

should: 

(1) Be composed of the staff pharmacist, administrator, chief nurse, and at least 

one physician; 



32 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

(2) Guarantee that the developed policies and procedures are implemented; 

(3) Meet at least quarterly and document its recommendations. 
3. Storage 

a. Drugs (all medicines, poisons, biologicals, and other pharmaceuticals) should be 
securely stored in compliance Avith Federal and State regulations. 

In existing facilities that use locked drug cabinets in which all drugs must be stored, 

policies and procedures should be implemented by the administrator to assure that 

proper security, control and accountability precautions are being observed concerning 

drug storage. 

In all other facilities, all drugs (except permitted self -administered drugs) must be 

stored in a designated medication room that is provided with a dead-bolt lock on 

the door. 

Only two keys should be available to the drug cabinets or medication room with 

responsibility pinpointed as to who may have access to the keys. 

b. All controlled substances (Classes II-V) shall be stored in compliance with Federal 
and State laws with emphasis' on the rules and regulations from the North Carolina 
Drug Authority and the Pharmacy Laws of North Carolina. 

(1) All Schedule II drugs and other drugs deemed subject to abuse shall be stored 
in a separately locked permanently affixed box or drawer in the medication room 
or medicine cabinet. Access to keys for this box shall be strictly controlled with- 
in the provisions stated above in section a. 

c. Examples of proper storage should include as follows: 

(1) Refrigerated drug storage shall be provided as required insuring a temperature 
between 36 °F. and 59 °F. Recommended temperature for refrigerated drug 
storage is 42°F. Normally, a refrigerator used for drug storage will not be used 
for other refrigerated storage. In existing facilities, where multi-use refrigerators 
are provided, the drugs shall be stored in a separate locked box of adequate size 
to hold the containers'. In new facilities, special refrigerators shall be provided 
in medication preparation rooms and used for drug storage only. 

(2) Any poison, chemical or drug, or any preparation thereof, the use of which is 
limited to external application and which is labeled "For External Use Only" 
shall be stored in a locked area separate and apart from internal preparations 
with the exception of eye and ear preparation and small ointment and creams 
intended for external use. 

(3) Poisons or chemicals (i.e., cleaning fluids, detergents) which are not for use 
in the treatment of human illnesses shall not be stored in the drug cabinet or 
storeroom with medications. 

(4) Medication drug carts shall be locked and stored within the medication room 

or a designated properly secure room (with accessibility requirements as stip- 
ulated in 3. Storage) when not in use. 

(5) Unless a member of the facility's staff authorized to have access to drugs is 
present, the drug cabinet or medication room has to be locked. 

(6) All non-legend drugs must be stored in a properly designated area within 
the medication room or drug cabinet and they must be properly labeled. 

4. Administration 

a. All medications, except as indicated in section b. following, including nonlegend 
drugs, shall be administered only on the order and in accordance with the directions 
of a physician or dentist and these orders shall be entered in the occupant's' medical 
record. Medications shall be administered to occupants in accordance with the North 
Carolina Nurse Practice Act or in accordance with other State and Federal laws. 

b. Residents may self-administer medications only on the specific written order of a 
physician. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 33 

c. Each dose of medication, other than self-administered medications, shall be recorded 
in the occupant 's medical record with the following information indicated : 

(1) Date, 

(2) Time (hour), 

(3) Name and strength of drug, 

(4) Quantity of drug, and 

(5) Name or initials of person administering the drug. 

5. Emergency Drug Kits 

a. Definition of Emergency Drugs for Homes — Emergency drugs for homes are those 
drugs, the prompt use and immediate availability of which, are generally regarded 
by physicians as essential in the proper treatment of sudden and unforeseen adverse 
changes in an occupant 's condition, which changes threaten his life or well-being. 

b. Acquisition and Storage of Emergency Drugs in the homes: 

(1) Emergency drugs shall be stored in a sealed container hereafter referred to as 
the "emergency drug kit." 

(2) The contents of the emergency drug kit to be determined and approved by 
the pharmacy services committee or equivalent and the availability of controlled 
substances in the emergency drug kit shall be in compliance with current 
Federal, State, and local laws. The emergency drug kit shall be periodically 
reviewed and examined quarterly by the staff pharmacist and potentially out- 
of-date drugs shall be removed and replaced. 

(3) Drugs may be acquired for the emergency drug kit on the signed order of a 
physician. The staff pharmacist shall attach a list of contents to the emergency 
drug kit and keep it up-to-date. 

(4) Storage of the emergency drug kit shall be in a secure readily available loca- 
tion under the direct supervision of the nursing staff. The emergency drug kit 
will be sealed with a non-reusable easily breakable seal. 

(5) After emergency drug kit is used and its seal broken, the kit shall be returned 
to the pharmacist supplier for promptly restocking, resealing, proper dating, and 
returned to the facility. 

(6) Emergency drugs shall be administered only on the orders of the physician in 
accordance with the North Carolina Nurse Practice Act. 

c. Eecords — Items used from the emergency drug kit shall be entered on the occupant's 
clinical record according to the standard home procedure. In addition, the physician 
ordering a drug from the emergency drug kit shall place therein a prescription for 
such items. 

6. Miscellaneous 

a. The contents of all individual prescriptions shall be kept in the original container 
bearing the original label of the prescription showing the information as outlined 
in "Procurement" above. (Transferring medications from one container to another 
constitutes "dispensing" which is an act restricted by law to pharmacists and, 
under certain conditions, to physicians.) 

b. When orders for any given occupant's medication, other than those self-administered, 
have been discontinued, such orders shall be entered in his medical record and notice 
of discontinuance, bearing the date of such discontinuance, shall be affixed to the 
prescription container. In the event the use of the medication is not to be resumed, 
the unused medication shall be destroyed. The manner of carrying out this procedure 
should be developed in consultation with a pharmacist. 

c. When an occupant has been discharged, hi^ unused medication shall be destroyed 
within compliance of State and Federal law, or upon approval of the patient's 
physician or dentist, taken out with him. 



34 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

d. All controlled substances (Schedule TT-V) secured pursuant to a prescription issued 
to an occupant and no longer required for that occupant shall be disposed in ac- 
cordance with the Eules and Regulations for North Carolina Controlled Substances 
Act. (Re: Section 5.22 of Chapter 1, Part 5). 

Section 5.22 — Disposal of Unused Controlled Substances from Nursing Homes 
Controlled substances dispensed to a licensed nursing home which for any reason 
are unused shall be returned to the pharmacy from which they are received. The 
pharmacist who receives these controlled substances shall destroy them in accordance 
with the procedure outlined by the North Carolina Drug Authority and shall keep 
a record of this destruction available for a minimum of two years. This record of 
destruction shall be kept on the most current form as furnished by the North Carolina 
Drug Authority. 

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES 
Division of Facility Services 
P. O. Box 1200 Raleigh 27605 

TO: North Carolina Skilled Nursing Facility Pharmacists 

FROM: J. W. Bradley, III, Consultant Pharmacy 

SUBJECT : Reimbursement for the Pharmacist's' Expertise in the Skilled Nursing Facility 
The Department of Health, Education, and Welfare's Conditions of Participation for 
Skilled Nursing Facilities as published in the Federal Register, Volume 39, Number 12, 
dated January 17, 1974, became effective February 19, 1974. These new standards recognize 
the pharmacist 's professional ability in not only the dispensing of medications but the 
professional advice, knowledge, skills, and judgement that will be used as supervisor of 
pharmaceutical services in a nursing home. The aforementioned advice will be referred 
to the patient's attending physician, medical director, nursing director, dietician, and 
administrator in skilled nursing facilities. The pharmacist 's participation is mandatory un- 
der these regulations, 1 will be performed with the pharmacist utilizing the medical chart 
in the facility, and may be accomplished by a staff pharmacist independent of a prescription 
provider pharmacist. There should be a formal reimbursement mechanism established by the 
facility for the pharmacist 's professional time and advice used to rectify or prevent 
difficulties. 

There seems to be some confusion concerning the pharmacist 's reimbursement factor for 
the time spent in the facility other than for the dispensing of drugs. The pharmacist's 
responsibilities should be delineated in a job description, formal contract, or written agree- 
ment which should include the facility's obligations to the pharmacist including reim- 
bursement for professional expertise, the pharmacist 's qualifications, the amount of time 
devoted in the facility, and the agreement's duration. 

In the Standard published below, it is noted that to exercise the provisions of this Standard, 
an efficacious agreement has to be effected (as stipulated in the Standards) and narrative 
written reports must be submitted to the administrator for evaluating, developing, super- 
vising, and coordinating all aspects of pharmaceutical service. (Reference 405.1127 (a)). 
This is a professional analysis from the pharmacist to the administrator and the Phar- 
maceutical Services Committee to upgrade the accuracy and adequacy of quality pharma- 
ceutical services. 

405.1121 Condition of Participation— GO VEBNING BODY AND MANAGEMENT 

(i) Standard: Use of Outside Resources 

If the facility does not employ a qualified professional person to render a specific 

service to be provided by the facility, there are arrangements for such a service 

1 " Carolina Journal of Pharmacy," July, 1974, Page 24. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 



through a written agreement with an outside resource— a person or agency that will 
render direct service to patients or act as a consultant. The responsibilities, func- 
tions, objectives', and the terms of agreement, including financial arrangements and 
charges of each such outside resource are delineated in writing and signed by an 
authorized representative of the facility and the person or the agency providing the 
service. The agreement specifies that the facility retains professional and admin- 
istrative responsibility for the services rendered. The financial arrangements pro- 
vide that the outside resource bill the facility for covered services (either Part A or 
B for Medicare beneficiaries) rendered directly to the patient, and that receipt of 
payment from the program(s) to the facility for the services discharges the liability 
of" the beneficiarv or any other person to pay for the services. The outside resource, 
when acting as a consultant, apprises the administrator of recommendations, plans 
for implementation, and continuing assessment through dates, signed reports which 
are retained by the administrator for follow-up action and evaluation of performance. 
(See requirement under each service—** 405.1125 through 405.1132.) 
If their prerequisites arc met, the reimbursement factor to the pharmacist would be an 
allowable cost or reimbursable expense prorated to the facility in respect to the percentage 
number of Medicare and Medicaid recipients being served. The pharmacist involvement 
with the private patient's drug regimen should be reflected in the private patient's per 

diem charges. 

For detailed information regarding reimbursement procedures, please contact the appro- 
priate provider relations representative as follows: 
Medicare— Medicaid— 

Mr. C. Benny Bidout, Pharmacy Consultant 
North Carolina Department of Human Resources 
Division of Social Services 
325 North Salisbury Street 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 
Telephone number: (919) 489-7431 Telephone number : (919) 829-2060 



Mr. Ken Davenport 

Mr. Dave Clarke 

North Carolina Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

Post Office Box 2291 

Durham, North Carolina 2770 



NORTH CAROLINA DRUG AUTHORITY 

P. O. Box 27786 
222 North Person Street 
Suite 208 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 
Mr. J. W. Bradley 
Pharmacy Consultant 
Department of Human Resources 
Division of Facility Services 
P. O. Box 12200 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27605 
Dear Mr. Bradley: 

As a result of several inquiries the Drug Authority has researched the laws and has 
rendered the following opinion regarding controlled substances in nursing homes: 

The onlv legal procedure that can bo followed that will enable a nursing home to 
have on' hand any quantity of morphine or other Schedule II drugs is through pre- 
scription. A physician can lawfully prescribe medication for specific patients. He 
cannot store or "leave in the custody of another person controlled substances for the 
general use of patients. 

If we may Tie of further assistance, please let us know. 

Sincerely yours, 
F. E. Epps, Director 



36 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Classified advertising (single issue inser- 
tion) 10 cents a word with a minimum 
charge of $3.00 per insertion. Payment to 
accompany order. 

Names and addresses will be published un- 
less a box number is requested. 

In replying to "blind" ads, address Ad. 

No. , Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, 

P. O. Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514. 

WANTED — Pharmacist for central 
Carolina town of 30,000. Profes- 
sional store, good hours, salary open. 
MP-12. 

VIRGINIA PHARMACIST— Desires 
to reciprocate to Triangle area or 
eastern N. C. For resume, write: 
Pharmacist, P. O. Box 58, Centre- 
ville, Va. 22020. 

FOR SALE — Large 1000 pound floor 
safe. Call Larry Lazarus, Lee Drug 
Store, Sanford, N. C. 
FOR SALE— Well established, prof- 
itable community pharmacy in a 
progressive medium size town near 
S. C. border. Above average oppor- 
tunity for an aggressive pharmacist. 
BW-12. 



MANUFACTURING PHARMA- 
CIST to be in charge of mixing, 
quality control, analysis of anal- 
gesic powders and tablets, lip 
balms, breath fresheners. 
Stanback Co., Ltd. 
Box 639 
Salisbury, N. C. 28144 
INVENTORY CONTROL 



SUCCESSFUL BP CLINIC 
IN STATESVILLE 

A Blood Pressure Clinic conducted at 
Westgate Pharmacy, Statesville, under the 
supervision of the Davis Hospital School 
of Nursing resulted in 255 BP checks on 
September 28. 

The Clinic was organized by Pharmacist 
Jim Patterson, owner/manager of Westgate 
Pharmacy. Ho has been elected a director of 
the Statesville Merchants Association. 



NORTHEASTERN CAROLINA 
PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 

Reported by Joe Minton 
Northeastern Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Society met Wednesday, October 9 at Ro- 
anoke Country Club in Williamston, N. C. 
The meeting was called to order by President 
John Mitchener, III followed by the guest 
speaker Dean Seymour Blaug of the UNC 
School of Pharmacy. 

Dean Blaug spoke on the pharmacy cur- 
riculum and possible course changes with 
the addition of more pharmacy administra- 
tion courses for students interested in retail 
practice. Dean Blaug expressed interest in 
continuing education and an area health ed- 
ucation center concept of keeping pharma- 
cists and allied health professionals abreast 
of new developments. Student evaluation of 
courses, course content, and student ad- 
visors were also mentioned. 

Gerald May and Bud O'Neal were se- 
lected as a nominating committee for 1975 
officers after which President Mitchener 
closed the meeting. 



INVENTORY CONTROL 

(From Page 11) 

Of special interest was the question and 
answer session. This enabled the registrants 
to clarify points or bring up inventory ele- 
ments not included as a part of the formal 
program. 

Money Management: Placement of mer- 
chandise orders at the proper time makes 
it possible to operate on suppliers' money 
for 30 to 40 days without penalty. 

The registrants Avere impressed with 
OMB 's (Frank Fife and Pete Mathews) 
demonstration of a merchandise order system 
(the computer received an order for 160 
different items in 30 seconds). 

Each registrant received a portfolio of 
references relating to inventory control plus 
a copy of a 52-page manual, Stock Manage- 
ment, compliments' of Johnson & Johnson. 

Since the Seminar was "taped," indi- 
vidual presentations will appear in future 
issues of The Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy. 








ern/ 
Tistmas 



■ ■ ■ May there be gladness in your heart, 
family and warm friends around you, gifts 
and good things to enjoy. That's our Christ- 
mas wish for you. 

May the New Year prove to be most fruitful, 
rich in good health and happiness and in the 
fulfillment of your highest hopes., \ \ \ v\ 

\M\\ \\\\V 



<WJ)jyMu>tyear 



OWENS, MINOR & BODEKER INC 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA • NOBfrtTir Tm. ,. . ST. fc "* K **/ »"Wl 

• NORFOLK, VIRGINIA • WILSON, N. CAROLINA 




W. H. King Drug Company 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Bellamy Drug Company 

Wilmington, North Carolina 



Peabody Drug Company 

Raleigh, North Carolina