(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Carolina journal of pharmacy [serial]"

>*Mf 





Ike Caxolina JqURNAL OF PHARMACY 

Volume XLIII JANUARY, 1962 Number 1 



c 




"Doctor says 
we both 

can take this one.' 



;/■' 



- 



§-■.; 






ZENTRON 



TNI 



is a liquid 



% 



hematinic for young and old alike. A comprehensive 

formula of iron, B complex vitamins, and vitamin C, 
Zentron corrects iron deficiencies — provides broad 
nutritional support. There are no known 
contraindications to Zentron. Order Zentron in 
eight-ounce bottles from your Lilly Service wholesaler. 

Each 5-cc. teaspoonful provides: 

Ferrous Sulfate (equivalent to 20 mg. of iron) . . . . 100 mg. 

Thiamine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B,) 1 mg. 

Riboflavin (Vitamin B 2 ) 1 mg. 

Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B 6 ) 0.5 mg. 

Vitamin B, 2 Crystalline 5 meg. 

Pantothenic Acid (as d-Panthenol) 1 mg. 

Nicotinamide 5 mg. 

Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C) 35 mg. 

Alcohol, 2 percent. 

Usual dosage: Infants and children — H to 1 teaspoonful {prefer- 
ably at mealtime) one to three times daily. 

Adults — 1 to 2 teaspoonfuls {preferably at mealtime) three times 
daily. 

Zentron™ (iron, vitamin B complex, and vitamin C, Lilly) 

This is a reminder advertisement. For adequate information for use, please consult manu- 
facturer's literature. 

Eli Lilly and Company • Indianapolis 6, Indiana, U. S. A. 



S&fy 



A Most Prosperous and 
Happy New Year 1 1 

AND— 

WHEN YOU WANT 

WHAT YOU WANT 

WHEN YOU WANT IT 

DO JUSTICE TO YOUR DRUG BUSINESS 
IN 1962!! 



rft"Bf^ 




JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Beginning our 64th year of Service to 
the Retail Druggists of North Carolina. 



The House of Friendly Service 




Scott £u%uc} Company 



Service Wholesalers Since 1891 



EASTER SHOPPING BAGS 




HOLIDAY VOGUE In pure white with 
touch of red. With I lb. My Hobby 
Box $6.50 



EASTER BASKETS 




DELUXE colorful bamboo basket with 
double handles. Wrapped in colorful 
cellophane, tied with ribbon and bow. 
Easter Eggs — both chocolate covered 
and confections $2.99 



EASTER BOXES 




EASTER BUNNY GIFT soft and cuddly 

plush rabbit atop 1 lb. My Hobby Box. 

$4.00 




THE RIVIERA decorated with smart 
French hats, satin lined. With 1 lb 
My Hobby Box $6.50 



EASTER PROFITS 

as you like 'em 

dAUi ■ ■ 

BASKET 




DECORATED CHOCOLATE EGG delici- 
ous center. Peek-a-boo box with handle. 
$.59 




DECORATED 


OVAL 


SATIN 


BOX 


with 


flo 


al corsage, wide 


ribbon 


and 


bow. 


Co 


itoins wide variety of fa 


orite 


cent- 


ers 


dipped in 


Milk a 


id Dark Choc 


olate. 


14 


. lbs 








S6.00 
















JUMBO PECAN EGG in Easter box. 
Divinity center, rolled in Creamy Cara- 
mel, covered with Pecans $.89 




10c CHOCOLATE EASTER EGGS 48 
pieces in display carton. 24 cream 
centers with fruits and nuts, 12 with 
cherry fruit, 12 with coconut in fine 
vanilla chocolate coating $4.80 



EASTER VALANCE KIT FURNISHED WITH YOUR ORDER 



For (hose who love fine things" 




CANDIES r""*— ' 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



EASTER PROFITS ... BY HOLLINGSWORTH'S COMPLETE SELECTION OF EASTER GIFT CANDIES. Your Hollingsworth's representative has OR 
important message for you . . . about sales at Easter. See him soon. INCREASE YOUR PROFITS ... BY THE BAG, BOX AND BASKETI 




NEW LOOK 
IN VITAMIN 
SUPPLEMENTS 
TO CORRAL 
YOUNG 
CUSTOMERS 



new 




3-layer 

PAMDAC 

Young cowpokes are usually slowpokes at taking medicine. 
But when they see these new 3-color tablets, apprehension 
will turn to demand. PALADAC with Minerals is probably the 
candiest looking, candiest tasting vitamin supplement you 
ever stocked. And since it affords nutritional supplementation 
in such an appealing dosage form, prescription business is 
sure to go hand in hand with over-the-counter volume. 

To be ready for the "stampede," order ample stocks now. 
10-vitamin/6-mineral for 





mulation... supplied in bottles PARKE-DAVIS 

OT OO and 1UU. 61262 PARKE, DAVIS & COMPANY. Detroit 31, Michigan 



The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



January, 1962 

Vol. xliii No. 1 

* 

Officers 

NORTH CAROLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

• 

President 

Robert B. Hall, 

Mocksville 

• 

Vice-Presidents 

John T. Stevenson, 

Elizabeth City 
Hot A. Moose 

Mount Pleasant 
John Lowdeb Marion 



Secretary-Treasurer 

Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

• 

Assistant 

Secretary-Treasurer 

C. M. Andrews 

Burlington 

• 
General Counsel 

F. O. Bowman 
Chapel Hill 



ADVOCATES FEDERAL LEASE 
INSURANCE PROGRAM FOR 
RETAILERS 

' ' Small independent businessmen can compete success- 
fully with chain operations in Class I store locations in 
shopping centers and downtown areas, if they can get into 
these locations, ' ' Herman C. Nolen, president of McKesson 
& Robbins, recently told the U. S. Senate Select Committee 
on Small Business. 

Mr. Nolen, speaking in behalf of small business lease 
guarantees, also said, ' ' Your committee is well aware of the 
problems independent merchants are having in getting a fair 
share of prime locations. 

"Leading institutions are naturally concerned with the 
security of their loans to developers. But their insistence 
on a 70% or more rental to businesses Avith Triple A-l 
financial credit rating works to exclude the small independent 
businessman from the fast-changing American business scene. 
This trend is not only unfair, but dangerous, in that it 
disturbs the traditional balance of large and small businesses 
that is vital to a sound economy. 

' ' McKesson & Robbins, ' ' Mr. Nolen said, ' ' firmly en- 
dorses this committee's action in seeking a sound program 
to guarantee leases for small independent businesses. We 
are convinced that the future of the independent, locally- 
owned drug store depends on equal access to shopping 
centers and other first-class business locations. ' ' 

Mr. Nolen said that McKesson strongly supports the 
Senate Select Committee 's suggested solution : a Federal 
program to insure lease bonds written by private surety 
companies. 

' ' From our experience, we don 't see how any wholesaler 
or private industry group can meet the growing need for a 
lease guarantee program and the heavy capital demands it 
requires," he said. 

Mr. Nolen recommended that the program's administra- 
tion be keyed to prompt processing of retailer requests and 
that careful analysis be required to insure that the best 
qualified independent retailers be chosen for guarantees in 
Class I locations. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate : $3.00 a year ; single copy, 25 cents. Entered aa 
second class matter July 5, 1922 at the post office at Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina under the Act of March 3, 1879. 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



The Daniels Celebrate 50th 
Wedding Anniversary 

Over 300 guests from all sections of the 
State helped Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Daniel of 
Zebulon celebrate their 50th wedding an- 
niversary on December 10. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Clifton Daniel of New 
York City were hosts for the anniversary 
party. 

Noted in the receiving line during the 3 
to 4 PM period (the party ran from 3 to 6 
PM) were Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Jackson of 
Lumberton, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Gurley of 
Windsor, Mr. Paul Bissette of Wilson, Mr. 
and Mrs. T. J. Ham, Jr. of Yanceyville, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ealph P. Rogers, Jr. of Dur- 
ham and a number of persons from Chapel 
Hill including Dean and Mrs. Edward A. 
Brecht, Miss Alice Noble, Mr. and Mrs. 
H. C. McAllister, Mrs. M. L. Jacobs and Mr. 
and Mrs. W. J. Smith. 

Drug Officials Seize "Sea-Con" 

In a crackdown by officials of the Food 
and Drug Administration, four cases of sea 
water bearing the brand name "Sea-Con" 
were seized at the Eckerd Drug Stores' 
warehouse in Charlotte in early December. 

FDA claims the Sea-Con label is "false 
and misleading" in its claim that the sea 
water is "adequate to prolong life, prevent 
premature aging and promote health. ' ' 

Under the federal seizure procedure, the 
water will remain in federal custody for 20 
days. If no one claims possession or other- 
wise protests the action the article will be 
destroyed. 

Owen's Pharmacy Sold 
to Dean Butler 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred R. Owen of Tryon have 
sold Owen's Pharmacy to Dean Butler of 
Valdese. The sale was completed prior to 
Christmas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen have operated the 
pharmacy since 1939, when they assumed 
ownership of the business then operated as 
Slack 1 s Pharmacy. 

Mr. Owen and his brother, Frank, will 
remain with the business, which will con- 
tinue to operate as Owen 's Pharmacy. 

The new owner is a native of Tignall, 
Georgia ; a graduate of the Morganton 



High School and the School of Pharmacy, 
University of North Carolina ('57). In 
recent years, Mr. Butler has been associated 
with the Rock Drug Store of Valdese. 

Big Bear Opens Super Drug 
in Burlington 

A 10,000 square foot, $150,000 large self- 
service drug store has been opened in 
Burlington by the Big Bear (National Food 
Store) supermarket chain of High Point. 

The new store will be managed by Carl 
Alexander. M. Rankin Caruthers will be 
in charge of the prescription department. 
A feature of the store is its ' ' Golden 
Nugget ' ' restaurant, with an eating area for 
25 people. 

The formal grand opening of Big Bear 
Super Drugs was held beginning November 
28. 

Named "Man of the Year" 

J. Fleming Lovett of Liberty has been 
named ' ' Man of the Year ' ' by the Liberty 
Rotary Club. Lovett, who is associated with 
his brother, Herbert, in the operation of the 
Liberty Drug Company, was cited for his 
work with young people, the American 
Legion, his church and the city schools. 

A native of Graham, Mr. Lovett came to 
Liberty in 1948 following graduation from 
the UNC School of Pharmacy. For action 
during World War II, he received the Bronze 
Star following action around Mortain, 
France. 

Thomas Will Head CC 

J. I. Thomas, Thomas Drug Store, Dunn, 
has been elected president of the Dunn 
Chamber of Commerce for 1962. 

Mr. Thomas is a former president and 
charter member of the Dunn Kiwanis Club; 
has served as treasurer of the Dunn Shrine 
Club for the past eight years; is a Mason, 
a Baptist and a leader in other Dunn com- 
munity activities. 



Cover Page 



New test to detect tuberculosis in humans 
is easy to apply, disposable and accurate. 
Called the Tuberculin Tine Test, it is being 
marketed by Lederle Laboratories, a Divi- 
sion of American Cyanamid Company. 
Sterile units are grouped in trays of 25 and 
unsnap easily from plastic bubbles. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

Robert I. (fiofe) Cromley Selected Local Convention 

Chairman 




By mail ballot vote of the Ealeigh members of 
the NCPA, Eobert I. (Bob) Cromley has been 
selected as Chairman of the 1962 NCPA Conven- 
tion. 

As evidence of Ealeigh 's faith in Mr. Cromley 
and his ability to get the job done, he polled the 
highest number of first place votes and the highest 
total of second place votes of about 40 candidates 
for the convention position. 

Mr. Cromley operates two pharmacies in Ealeigh 
— one in the Sir Walter Hotel and one in a shop- 
ping center off U. S. 1. He is a graduate of the 
Atlanta College of Pharmacy and since coming 
to 1ST. C. (1937) has been active in the state's 
organized pharmaceutical program. 

This is a repeat performance by Bob — he served 
as the 1944 Convention Chairman. 



Eobert I. (Bob) Cromley 



Members of Wake Pharmaceutical Society 
Map Convention Plans 

At a meeting of the Wake County Pharmaceuti- 
cal Society in Ealeigh on December 5, NCPA 
Secretary W. J. Smith presented a tentative con- 
vention schedule for the 3-day meeting period: 
April 8 through April 10. 

On Sunday, April 8, the tentative plans show 
four major items: a reunion of the UNC pharmacy 
class of 1952, an award session, a get-accruainted 
session and a dinner with keynote speaker. 

The NCPA sessions on Monday-Tuesday start 
with a breakfast. The TMA Golf Tournament and 
the W. H. King Drug Company Party are set for 
Monday. Business sessions, a social hour and the 
TMA Party are scheduled for Tuesday, April 10. 

The two auxiliaries — TMA and Woman's Auxil- 
iary — will meet during the 3-day period and will 
sponsor or be a part of special or regular con- 
vention programs. 

Headquarters will be at the Sir Walter Hotel. 
Boom reservation cards have been mailed. 



Tti^af' 




The HIGHLIGHTS are brighter than ever! 




The doctor gave his prescription, and just like 
any other parent.. .you rushed to have it filled. 
The big difference is— you are also the pharma- 
cist . . . and you may have a choice in ihe brand 
of drug! 

Of course, this is when the "just-as-good" drug 
could never be good enough. ..when, automati- 
cally, you reach for an established brand. What 



you know about the manufacturer's reputation 
...quality control above the "legal minimums" 
...experience and research... helps you make 
this decision. 

These are the "extras" that go into a brand-name 
product and the reason why many pharmacists 
and physicians select a Lederle product over the 
generic. ..for their families and their patients. 

LEDERLE LABORATORIES, A Division of AMERICAN CYANAMID COMPANY, Pearl River, New York 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

How the Public Views the Pharmacist 

By C. H. McGregor 

Burlington Industries Professor of Business Administration 
University of North Carolina 



The retail drug store has long occupied an 
important segment in our retail structure, as 
well as in our social structure. In the re- 
tail structure, the pharmacist has held the 
most unique position in distribution, for he 
has been the only retail merchant or retail 
employee required to have training or ex- 
perience in his field, and he is the only one 
who must prove his competency by exami- 
nation. Moreover, he has been expected by 
the general public, and required by legal 
authority and the pressures of his profes- 
sional association, to conduct his retail busi- 
ness in accordance with prescribed standards 
of professional ethics. Nfo other field of 
retailing has had a comparable code, and as 
a consequence, no retail merchant has been 
so highly esteemed or so much trusted as was 
the family druggist. 

Much concern is expressed today, however, 
about retail drug distribution, the character 
of the newly developing drug outlets, their 
operating methods, and the future status of 
pharmacy as a profession. Some of this 
concern may be groundless, and many of the 
fears may be premature, but the retail drug 
industry is today faced by numerous condi- 
tions and trends which warrant careful 
consideration by the industry as well as by 
the consuming public. 

In any growing nation, and especially in 
one dominated by competitive concepts, 
changes are necessary and can be expected 
in distribution channels and methods. The 
particular forms these changes might take 
in the drug field, and the effects they might 
have in the future upon traditional channels 
and practices, will depend primarily upon the 
attitudes and concepts held by consumers. 
Whether these attitudes and concepts are 
logical or not is immaterial, for in the 
market place, Avhat consumers think is the 
fact is more influential than what the fact 
might actually be. 

I have been assigned the task of discussing 
some of the concepts and attitudes consumers 



This significant talk was pre- 
sented by Professor McGregor at 
the 1961 Pharmacy Seminar, 
Moreheacl City. 

have developed with respect to retail phar- 
macy, and to outline briefly the reasons these 
particular concepts and attitudes have de- 
veloped. In this, it is somewhat presump- 
tuous on my part to try to speak for all con- 
sumers, for there are more than 180 million 
of them in this country today, they differ 
in many respects, and what one prefers an- 
other detests. But, on the basis of the 
observations it has been possible to make, a 
cursory investigation of a small sample of 
consumers, and study over a period of years 
of both consumers and distribution trends, 
indicate that some of the more significant 
views held today by consumers of retail 
drug distribution and pharmacists are the 
following : 

1. The consumer's image of what con- 
stitutes a drug store is confused and 
uncertain. 

2. The consumer's image of what a regis- 
tered pharmacist is, and of what he does, 
is not only blurred, but, more often 
than not, is distorted. 

3. Consumers are becoming inereasingl> 
price-conscious in their drug purchasing, 
and the majority appear to believe that 
prescription prices, in particular, are 
higher than justified. 

•i. Many consumers would today welcome 
any cooperative or group arrangement 
which might result in savings on drug 
purchases. 

5. A substantial number of consumers, 
especially those in the younger age 
groups, would as soon have their drug 
needs served in a department, food, or 
variety store as in a drug store. 
(Continued on page 37) 



10 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Free Management-Counseling Service 
Available to Retailers 



Available to retail pharmacy owners or 
managers is a service which is unique in the 
field of business enterprise. It is the Lilly 
analysis service. Retail pharmacy owners 
who utilize the management-counseling serv- 
ice obtain a personalized analysis report of 
their operations. A factual, impartial, com- 
prehensive, and confidential report enables 
retailers to simplify their management prob- 
lems and to make better-informed managerial 
decisions from the wealth of detailed in- 
formation. In fact, with more detailed in- 
formation in the 1962 analysis reports, its 
usefulness to retailers everywhere will be 
expanded. 

The Lilly analysis service for the retail 
pharmacy trade began in early 1933. The 
service was offered in order to provide 
proprietors with helpful suggestions and 
advice that would enable them to operate 
more efficiently or, at least, reduce operating 
losses. From the beginning, then, the serv- 
ice was provided in the interests of sound 
management. Although its objective has re- 
mained unchanged through the years, num- 
erous innovations have been made. 

In 1960, electronic computers were used to 
process the business figures submitted by re- 
tail pharmacy owners, managers, or their 
accountants to the Lilly Retail Pharmacy 
Operations Clinic. The first page of a Lilly 
analysis report, which is electronically pre- 
pared, enables owners or managers to make 
better-informed managerial decisions from 
the wealth of detailed information at their 
finger tips. 

The usefulness of the Lilly analysis serv- 
ice has been expanded for 1962. The new 
feature inaugurated this year is the in- 
clusion on the first page of "usual aver- 
ages ' ' of operating expenses in similar-type 
pharmacies. At a glance, the owner may 
quickly determine which items of expense 
compare favorably and which adversely. 
Other financial data summarized on this page 
are the retailer's dollar and percentage 
amounts of the items of income and expense. 
Also included are highlights of the prescrip- 
tion department and a comparison of total 



sales, prescription sales, and the number of 
prescriptions filled with the figures for the 
previous year. An example of the page of 
operating figures including the new "usual 
average ' ' feature is shown in the photo. 

Personalized analysis reports are prepared 
for retailers who submit their annual in- 
come and expense statements and prescrip- 
tion records. A completed report, which 
averages about five pages, includes a review 
of the key areas of retail pharmacy opera- 
tions — merchandise costs, inventory, salaries, 
rent, miscellaneous operating costs, and pre- 
scription department figures. Each of these 
items is compared with the averages of 
many similar-type pharmacies. Opportuni- 
ties for improvement are clearly revealed, 
and constructive suggestions are offered 
when indicated. 

To enable owners and managers to make 
better-informed managerial decisions for 
more efficient operations, the analysis covers 
facts concerning (1) the store's present 



rr 



Make McGowU 

For Labels -in Rolls or Flats 
Physicians 1$ Blanks and Files 

Drug Boxes - Call Checks 
Drjg and Delivery Envelopes 



all Style* and ColoM 



McCDURT LABEL CABINET CD. 



42-54 BENNETT \ " B T El i T / BRADFORD, 

STREET Yh&o I PENNA. 

Specializing in Labels for Drug Starts 

Clifford P. Berry, Representative 
P. 0. Box 306, Charlotte 1, N. C. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



position, (2) its previous position, and (3) 
how it compares with similar-type phar- 
macies. By means of electronic processing, 
all dollar amounts of income and expense are 
converted to a percentage of sales. Thus, the 
relationship between the various items can 
easily be seen, since all are based on a 
common figure. 

If a proprietor has maintained continuity 
in reporting, the second step is to compare 
the current operations with those of the 
previous year. For this reason, a file copy 
of a completed report is retained for one 
year. The analysis report provides the 
store management with information on 
whether the operations have improved or 
remained at satisfactory levels or whether 
undesirable trends are developing. 

Finally, the current operations are com- 
pared with those of pharmacies most like the 
one being analyzed. This procedure reveals 



where the operations compare favorably and 
where opportunities may exist for improve- 
ment. 

The statements of income and expense and 
prescription records submitted by retail 
pharmacy owners, managers, or their ac- 
countants form the basis for the annual 
LILLY DIGEST tabulations. The LILLY 
DIGEST is published as a service to retail 
pharmacy in the interests of sound manage- 
ment and is intended to provide current and 
reliable information concerning the opera- 
tions of retail pharmacies. Participation by 
retailers everywhere will insure that these 
objectives are maintained. 

For a free and confidential analysis of a 
retail pharmacy operation, all proprietors 
are invited to send their income and expense 
statements and prescription records to the 
Lilly Retail Pharmacy Operations Clinic, Eli 
Lilly and Company, Indianapolis 6, Indiana. 




TODAY... TOMORROW 

. . . and in the years ahead, competent wholesale drug service will play an integral part in 
the conduct of your business. More than ever before, proper inventories of selected mer- 
chandise will be a prime requirement for the successful operation of a pharmacy. 
As in the past, we, your service wholesaler, will stand ready to fill your merchandise re- 
quirements, to assist you in making your operations more profitable, and to work closely 
with you in providing the finest pharmaceutical service possible. 

The opportunity of serving you is genuinely appreciated, and you are invited to continue 
using our many management and merchandising services. Send your orders to us for com- 
plete filling and prompt delivery. 



WE ARE A G<<lKXy DISTRIBUTOR 

THE PEABODY DRUG COMPANY 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 




If you had to make your own children's multivitamins 



. . . chances are you'd try to make them very much like our new 
VI-DAYLIN® CHEWABLE with Entrapped Flavor. Entrapped 
Flavor means a better tasting chewabie children's multivitamin; 
one with no vitamin aftertaste. Here's why: 1. We coat all the 
vitamins in a digestible film that does not dissolve until it 
reaches the gastrointestinal tract. This means that unpleasant 
strong vitamin tastes are not released in the mouth, but in the 
g-i tract where they are most quickly absorbed. 2. We make 
certain that every Vi-Daylin Chewabie table tastes citrus sweet 
and good to every patient, everytime; we coat the flavoring oils 
in each tablet in a water soluble film. This film 
dissolves immediately in the mouth, releasing the 
full bouquet of our citrus-candy flavoring agents. 




Vl-Daylin — Vitamins A, D, B,, B z , B 6 , Bi 2 , C, and Nicotinamide, Abbott. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



13 



Mr. Parker Celebrates 50 th 
Business Anniversary 

Richard S. Parker of Murphy, on the oc- 
casion of his 50th business anniversary in 
Murphy, was the subject of a feature story 
in The Cherokee Scout, Nov. 30 issue. 

In a well written sketch by Frank Forsyth, 
Mr. Parker 'a early career in North Wilkes- 
lioro, where he was born, and his student 
days at Chapel Hill are recorded. Then 
follows his early years as a pharmacist, first 
in Asheville, Pinehurst, North Wilkesboro 
and Hickory and later as a sales representa- 
tive for W. H. King Drug Company. 

In March, 1911, Mr. Parker bought the 
B. B. Meroney Drug Store of Murphy for 
$3500 — $2000 cash and balance in notes. 



The notes were paid prior to due date, a 
practice Mr. Parker has followed over the 
past 50 years — discounting his bills. 

Active in the Presbyterian Church, Mr. 
Parker was recently awarded an honorary 
position witli King College of Bristol, Tenn. 
(a Presbyterian School). He is a 32nd 
degree Mason and a Shriner ; has served 
several terms as the Town Council and Chair- 
man of tlie Murphy School Board for many 
years. 

Richard S. Parker and Grace Abernathy 
Parker — they were married in Hickory, May 
15, 1911 — have four children — two boys and 
two girls. Mr. Parker recently sold one-third 
interest in his pharmacy to his son, James, 
and one-third interest to Kenneth Godfrey, 
a\1io reciprocated his pharmacist license from 
George in 1955. 




Richard S. Parker of Murphy shown in one section of his Rx Department which serves as 
an office. Photo — The Cherokee Scout. 



47% to m PROFIT 

for you on this fast-seller for chapped lips! 



By the Makers of STANBACK 



Hanger o 
I Disp 

Deal #2 

3 free with 12 
1 card of 12 tubes, plus 3 
47% PROFIT 

Your Cost 

Selling Price 

Your Profit 





.$2.80 
.$5.25 
.$2.45 



Deal #6 



12 free with 36 

3 cards of 12 tubes, plus 1 card (12 tubes) free 

50% PROFIT 

Your Cost $ 8.40 

Selling Price $16.80 

Your Profit $ 8.40 



., m .*f 



WaHj 




** ''' yi >i*?-^3H.I 



sj"** H '*JHl 



Counter Displays 

Deal #100 

28 free with 72-100 tubes packed in counter display 
52% PROFIT 

Your Cost $16.80 

Selling Price $35.00 

Your Profit $18.20 



ORDER NOW FROM YOUR WHOLESALER 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 

Brevard — Prescription #300,000, free to 
the customer, was filled recently by Renus 
Rich, Varner Drug Store pharmacist. 

Concord— Harry E. Halliard, MSR for 
Smith Kline & French Laboratories, has 
completed a public speaking training course. 
He is now available to speak to community 
groups on the subject "Prescription for 
Tomorrow." Mr. Hilliard's address is 2001 
Chatham Avenue, Charlotte. 

Elizabethtown — P. H. Moore of Wilming- 
ton has accepted a position with Hutchin- 
son's Drug Store. 

Kinston — Formal opening of Paderick's 
Pharmacy was observed on December 8-9. 
The pharmacist-owner, Hal Paderiek, is a 
UNC pharmacy graduate and prior to estab- 
lishing his own pharmacy was associated 
with Sewell's Pharmacy of Kinston. 



Laurinburg — William L. Frostick received 
a 2-year suspended sentence after being 
convicted of manslaughter. The charge, to 
which Frostick pleaded nolo eontendre, grew 
out of an automobile accident on September 
17. 

Raleigh — Clyde Mustian, a former drug 
store clerk, was convicted in city court on 
charges of dispensing and having unlawful 
possession of barbiturates. He was sentenced 
to a year on the roads. 

Whiteville — Thurman "Tim" Owens has 
joined Simmons Drugs as pharmacist. A 
1959 graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy, Mr. Owens in recent years has worked 
in Lexington. 

Raeford — To celebrate the grand opening 
of the newly remodeled Howell Drug Com- 
pany (December 1-2), heating pads were sold 
for $3.49 and free silver dollars went with 
each purchase of $9.95 or more. 

Rutherfordton — For best commercial float 
in the Rutherfordton-Spindale Christmas 
Parade, Lucius Cooke of Smith's Drug Store 
received a cup from the merchants associa- 
tion. 

Greensboro — In recognition of more than 
50 years of practice as a pharmacist, Isaac 
L. Zuckerman is the recipient of a gold 
prescription bottle from the Rexall Drug 
Company. Zuckerman is employed by Lane's 
Golden Gate Pharmacy. 



pride... 

of ownership with 
Greater efficiency . . . 
Bigger profits . . . 
More flexibility . . . 
is yours with 
SAGINAW STEEL 
STORE FIXTURES 
for information write to 

Gervin M. Wayt, 
300 Patton Street, 




Merganton, N. C. 
HEmlock 7-0486 



«« 



KEY FIXTURES INCREASE SALES" 



DEPARTMENT GROUPING 
This arrangement of the Candy, 
Cigar and Tobacco Departments, 
along with the Camera and Cos- 
metic Departments, insures efficient 
operation by one Clerk during dull 
periods which can be readily ex- 
panded and served by two or three 
sales people during the busy hours. 





FOOD-FOUNTAIN SERVICE 
Coffee Breaks, Lunch and 'Tween- 
meal Snacks keep these ten stools, 
turning and the cash register ring- i 
ing! With Bastian-BIessing's beau- 
tiful, compact, sanitary equipment 
you invite more customers; you J 
serve them quicker and better; so 
you get more turnover per stool 
and more profit per sale. For a 
layout designed to suit your particu- ( 
lar needs, to serve ten or two j 
hundred per hour, use the Coupon 
below. 



PROFESSIONAL DEPARTMENT 
In the overall store design the RX 
Department is given the preferred 
location for the best control of the 
complete store operation. In this 
design the merchandising section is 
conveniently located near the RX 
Department and Wrapping Counter. 
The RX Shelving is arranged in 
Bays, easily accessible to the work- 
counter. The bays provide ample 
space for stock. Use the coupon 
below for our specialized Pharmacy 
planning service. Over 25 years ex- 
perience in serving North Carolina 
Pharmacists. 

Clip Coupon and Majl 

We are planning to 

□ Expand □ Modernize 



Name 

Firm Name 

Street Address. 

City 

State 




□ Build 
New 
Store 



GRANT E. KEY, INC. 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Manufacturers of 

Key-Line Fixtures 

Distributors of 

Bastion-Blessing 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 



Friendly Relations— They Help Solve Those 
Competitive Problems 



By Erxest W. Fair 



' ' The chief trouble with the drug business 
is some of the people in it. ' ' 

Over the past years of interviewing phar- 
macists in every section of the country this 
writer heard that remark many times. It 
came from men who presented long and de- 
tailed discussion of their problems in doing- 
business among competitors they felt were 
guilty of every crime- in the business book. 

Getting along with one's competitors can 
never be easy. It takes lots of give and take, 
understanding and often outright help. But 
it pays off in many ways. Invariably the 
cities and towns where competitors do get 
along with one another are those in which 
every store is prospering. 

During the past year we've made a de- 
tailed study of those areas wherein such a 
situation was in existence. It brought forth 
a number of points which direct the way 
for others to follow in seeking the same 
ends. 

Even experienced pharmacists who go as 
far as to not even speak to competitors 
admit that the local situation would be much 
better for all concerned if such a program 
could be worked out. Invariably they in- 
sist, however, that "with the kind of com- 
petitors I have here ' ' such an end is im- 
possible of attainment. 

Xo pharmacist is either an ' ' angel ' ; or a 
' ' devil ' ' either personally or in a business 
way. The sources of friction exist every- 
where. And just as surely, as is being 
demonstrated in many areas every day, these 
can be eliminated and cordial competition 
can replace the undeclared war within the 
local trade that might exist today. 

Getting along with one 's competitors re- 
quires both group action and individual 
action on the local level. Each of us must 
contribute more than he receives to the 
local program for in many cases there will 



be one individual whose stubborness cannot 
be overcome except over a considerable 
period of time. 

In paragraphs to follow is a summariza- 
tion of what many pharmacists are doing to- 
day to foster pleasant competitive situa- 
tions in their own areas. It is offered for 
each reader's consideration. Perhaps we can 
never completely eliminate all of the 
' ' devils ' ' within the trade but at least the 
practice of these proven methods will tend to 
clip the edges of their wings somewhat. 

Local Group Organization is essential 
toward this end. Where the community is 
not large enough to support an association 
the pharmacists therein can benefit with a 
club which will meet for social and business 
problem discussion at least once a month. 
In such meetings we tend to get better 
acquainted with one another; understand 
everyone 's problem. With understanding we 
acquire the necessary tolerance of others 
mistakes. 

This same principle applies right down 
to areas where there may be but two stores 
in business. The better acquainted these 
competitors can become the less friction will 
develop between them. Sometimes it may 
take an enormous amount of bending over 
backward on the part of one to develop such 
a situation but the end result always justi- 
fies such sacrifice. 

Such meetings afford an opportunity to 
exchange experience, information and data 
which will contribute toward a healthier 
profit situation for all concerned. Experi- 
ence shows that when they are limited to 
business problems and no effort is made to 
make the relationship too personal, better 
results are usually obtained. 

Ignore Customer Gossip. More business 
friendships have been ruined by customer 

(Concluded on page 19) 



POWDERS 




TABLETS 

A combination 

of medically-proved ingredients 

that speaks for itself 

in the relief 

of every-day-type aches and pains 



FAST . . . starts working in minutes 
LONG-LASTING . . . keeps working for hours 
GENTLE . . . does not upset the system 



Over 100 million packages produced per year 
Distributed and advertised nationwide 



B. C. REMEDY CO. Durham, north Carolina 

Made and sold in North Carolina for over 50 years 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



19 



gossip than any other cause. There are al- 
ways individuals who love to see us boil 
over when they spill out tales of what a 
competitor is doing; and we can be dead 
certain their stoiT has about one part of 
truth to nine of pure fiction. 

Where highest degree of business amiabili- 
ty exists between competitors we invariably 
find that no one individual pays attention 
to such gossip from customers or anyone 
else. He listens to what they have to say 
and never forms an opinion or expresses a 
thought until he has made a personal check- 
up on that highly colored information. 

Avoid Business Jealousy. Often competi- 
tors will develop an unhealthy situation 
where a good one had existed solely over 
jealousy or resentment of the success of 
another. Invariably we have found the 
most successful pharmacists give full credit 
to the good ideas their competitors have de- 
veloped, do not try to challenge them, but 
instead expend their effort in developing 
ideas of their own. 

If our competitor has made a tremendous 
success of some new idea we will hardly 
contribute to a cordial relationship by 
countering with a duplicate of the idea at 
a lower price. It 's far wiser to expend our 
effort in developing something of our own. 

Readiness To Help one 's competitors in 
times of adversity or disaster has always 
built business friendships. Some times the 
temptation arises to take advantage of such 
a situation; it is always better resisted. 

Our Own Business Problems are usually 
sufficient to absorb any spare time one may 
have in this business. Taking time from 
these to worry about a competitor means 
work must go undone in our own store. 

' ' I really started going places when I 
forgot about the idea of keeping an eye on 
my competitors and trying to outguess 
them, ' ' one successful pharmacist told us 
not long ago, ' ' Now my system is to give 
every spare moment to working up new 
business getting ideas for my own store. ' ' 

"People tell me my big competitor is now 
worrying about me. I've come to the con- 
clusion that is the best way to get ahead." 

Work With Competitors in all types of 



civil organizations from the chamber of 
commerce to business and social clubs. Such 
a spirit of co-operation is catching. It also 
discourages the gossips and trouble makers 
who delight in setting one business man 
against another. 

Developing Co-Operative Promotions from 
time to time is an excellent way of increas- 
ing friendly relations between competitors. 
They give us a chance to work together on 
a single idea for the common good. 

Any or all of these can be used in any 
local situation, whether there be two stores 
therein or a score. All create an atmosphere 
of understanding toward one another. The 
latter is an guarantee there will be few mis- 
understandings. 

They will show each of us that mere of 
those competitors are "angels" than are 
' ' devils. ' ' 



The Folly of Price Cutting 

Figuring gross profit at 30%, a price cut 
of— 



5%, recpiires 14% more dollar volume and 
the handling of 20% more merchandise. 

8% requires 25% more dollar volume and 
the handling of 36%% more merchan- 
dise. 

10% requires 35% more dollar volume 
and the handling of 50% more merchan- 
dise. 

12% requires 50% more dollar volume and 
the handling of 73%% more merchan- 
dise. 

15% requires 70% more dollar volume and 
handling of 100%. more merchandise. 

20% requires 140% more dollar volume 
and the handling of 200% more mer- 
chandise. 

Example: If you cut the price 15% on a 
.00 sale, it is necessary to sell $170.00 
in volume and handle twice as much mer- 
chandise before you can make a profit of 
$30.00 to which the original $100.00 sale en- 
titles you. 



20 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



STATE BOARD OF PHARMACY 



Members 

HAROLD V. DAY, Spruce Pine 

FRANK W. DAY VAULT, Lenoir 

N. 0. McDOWELL, JR., Scotland 
Neck 

ROGER A. McDUFFIE, Greensboro 

ROBERT NEAL WATSON, Sanford 



h. c. McAllister 

Secretary-Treasurer 

P. 0. Box 471 

Chapel Hill, North Carolina 



"New Label 
Requirement" 



By N. O. McDowell, Jr. 

A new rule and regulation of the Board 
of Pharmacy requires, among other 
things, the name of the pharmacist who 
either fills or supervises the filling of all 
prescriptions to appear on the label. 
What is the purpose of this regulation ? 

This regulation, like all others, is de- 
signed to secure compliance with the 
pharmacy laws in the interest of pro- 
tecting the public health. The Board is 
charged with this duty and has for many 
years sought ways to secure full com- 
pliance with the laws, particularly as they 
relate to the illegal filling and refilling 
of prescriptions. Continued violations 
of these laws clearly indicate that some 
new approach to the problem is needed 
in order to stop repeated violations. Un- 



less violations of the pharmacy laws 
cease, either through voluntary efforts on 
the part of those involved, or by some 
means involving enforcement procedures, 
then pharmacy stands to lose its privilege 
of self-regulation. This label require- 
ment simply assures to the public that it 
is receiving that quality and safety of 
service to which it is entitled under the 
law. Further, it identifies to the public 
that person who is legally responsible in 
the event of errors or omissions in filling 
prescriptions. 

Q. When will enforcement begin on the new 
labeling regulation? 

A. This regulation was adopted by the 
Board of Pharmacy on October 31, 1961, 
to become effective July 1, 1962. This 
allows six months for the preparing of 
labels, etc., so as to be ready when en- 
forcement begins on July 1. 

Q. Won't it be difficult to find space on 
labels for all the information which this 
regulation requires ? 

A. Practically all the items required for a 
label are already being placed on pre- 
scription labels. The addition of the 
words "This prescription filled by John 
Doe" may be new to some operations. 
However, many pharmacies are already 
using this procedure, and it has proved 
to be very easy once a plan is designed 
to suit a particular operation. 
Many stores, particularly those with one 
pharmacist, can have labels printed (or 
a rubber stamp may be used) which will 
cany the required wording either at the 
top or bottom of each label. Stores with 
more than one pharmacist may find it 
advantageous to have small supplemen- 
tary labels printed with the names of the 
several pharmacists on different batches. 
If a prescription is filled by one phar- 
macist, his label would be attached. If 
it is refilled by a different pharmacist, 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 



then the first small label can be removed 
and one with the name of the pharmacist 
doing the refilling can be applied. If 
the label giving the other information 
as required does not need changing, then 
it could be left intact. 
The stores already using this procedure 
state that the small amount of time in- 
volved is well worth the effort since it has 
established a rapport with their customers 
which has been of great value, something 
which can contribute greatly to the 
image of pharmacy. 

(. What is to prevent unlicensed persons 
from placing the name of the pharmacist 
on prescription labels even though the 
pharmacist did not supervise the filling 
of the prescription ? 

l. No law, rule, or regulation can prevent 
violations. However, since the penalty 
for such a violation may be the loss of 
the permit to operate a pharmacy, it is 
felt that the pharmacist and/or owner 
will seek to comply in an effort to pre- 
vent such a loss. It is expected that 
regular checks will be made to determine 
if there is compliance. 

•• I am not a pharmacist but am the owner 
of a drug store. May I fill prescriptions 
when my pharmacist is absent from the 
store ? 

k. No. By virtue of a ruling of the Supreme 
Court of North Carolina unlicensed per- 
sons may fill prescriptions only under 
the immediate, direct, and personal super- 
vision of a licensed pharmacist or licensed 
assistant pharmacist. When no such 
licensed person is present and rendering 
such supervision the filling of prescrip- 
tions must cease. 

I. May I sell legend drugs to a rest home 
or convalescent home ? 

l. It is assumed that the cpuestion implies 
if such a sale can be made without bene- 
fit of a prescription. If this is the case, 
the answer is No. A prescription is re- 
quired for all legend drugs when sold to 
such places as rest homes, convalescent 
homes, or boarding homes. 



Kobi 



■ins 



JANUARY CHECK LIST 

Tear out for a handy check of 

your current stock of these 

Robins products that are receiving 

special promotion in your area 
THIS MONTH 



Robanul 

G Tab. 100'! □ lab. 500's 

Robanul -PH 



D lab. 100's □ lab. 500's 



DitlietapP Extentabs* 

□ Extentib 100's Q Eitentab 500's 



AlSbee with C 

□ Cap. 100's Q Cap. 500's Q Cap. 1000's 

Phenaphen 

□ Cap. 100's □ Cap. 500's □ Cap. 1000s 

Phenaphen 



□ Cap. % gr. 100's □ Cap. 'A jr. 500's 

□ Cap. Vs p. 100's □ Cap. 'A gr. 500's 

□ Cap. 1 p. 100's D Cap. 1 gr. 5D0's 



with Codeine 



Why not check your stock of 

all Robins products at the same time 

— and be prepared 




A. H. ROBINS CO., INC., RICHMOND 20, VA. 



22 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 




In color 
or black 
and white 



No Finer 

Snapshots at 

Any Price 



Supertone Prints 

"Truly the Finest in Snapshots' 1 

PRODUCED ONLY BY 

FOISTER-PALM PHOTO SERVICE 

161 East Franklin Street 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Phone 942-3025 




With$nap-$hri£* 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



23 



Potential Students Come 

from States Other Than 

North Carolina 

Students interested in studying pharmacy 
it the University of North Carolina are not 

onfined to the Tar Heel State as one might 
surmise. In a recent list of twenty-two 

equests for information received by the 
School, the following states were repre- 
sented : 



^orth Carolina — 13 

South Carolina — 2 

Virginia ■ — 3 

ennessee — -1 



New York — 1 
Pennsylvania — 1 

Maryland — 1 



Several hundred such prospects will be 
vritten, screened, interviewed, etc. by As- 
istant Dean Melvin Chambers in prepara- 
ion for the pre-pharmacy class of 1962. 

Since there is no limit on the number of 
[ualified pre-pharmacy students the Universi- 
y can accept, if you know of an alert, in- 
elligent, industrious student interested in 
Pharmacy as a career, write Dean Chambers. 
Je will get off a personal letter to your 
>rospect. 

Editorial from 
The Goldsboro News-Argus 

No man we know of has done as much 
! or pharmacy in North Carolina as John 
3. F. Hicks. 

No man has passed on to other men in 

is great number the deep dedication to 

diarmacy and its principles as a way of 
ervice. 

No man we know can point to so many 
uccessful pharmacists who got their first 
ncentives and much training under John 
i F. Hicks. 

No pharmacist can point to the beginning 
ufluence on such a national figure in modern 
rug chemistry as Coy Waller. 

No man can list as many years of happy 
ervice as co-laborer with the medical pro- 
ession in compounding and filling prescrip- 
ions for the alleviation of suffering or the 
ure or prevention of disease. 



From the days when he was graduated at 
the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy John 
Hicks of Goldsboro has been a recognized 
leader in the pharmacy profession. 

Former student of this pioneer are dis- 
cussing among themselves the staging of a 
dinner honoring Mr. Hicks. 

All Goldsboro and all pharmacists will en- 
dorse this idea and want to have a part in 
showing fitting respect and honor to one 
whose long life of service so richly deserves 
recognition. 

Coy Waller is the very man to bring the 
tribute upon the occasion of any dinner or 
occasion which may take shape. 

Half a Million for 
Siler City Drug 

Under heading of "500,000," Siler City 
Drug announced by way of a special half- 
page newspaper message that it had reached 
the half million point in number of prescrip- 
tions filled. 

For having presented Bx #500,000, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Harris of Eoute 1, Siler City, not 
only received the prescription without cost 
but two others which she had brought into 
the pharmacy. 

Since refills and narcotic prescriptions 
were not counted in the half million total, 
our estimate, based on 50% refills and the 
known narcotic total of 96,000, is that the 
pharmacy 's complete Ex figure is closer to 
850,000 than half a million. 

Siler City Drug was established in 1922 by 
Frank G. Brooks, Sr. C. M. Ferguson, Jr. 
of Durham joined the firm in July, 1950 and 
five years later, Frank G. Brooks, Jr. became 
the third pharmacist at the pharmacy after 
graduation from the School of Pharmacy, 
University of North Carolina. 

Looking to the future, the pharmacists of 
Siler City Drug have this to say : ' ' Becords 
of the past merely serve to stimulate us for 
the years ahead. As we look to the future 
we do so with even greater determination to 
render the best possible service we can to the 
people for whom we 've been ' ' Prescription 
Druggists Since 1922." 



24 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



For seventy-seven years 
- - - since 1885 



OF 



DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long asso- 
ciation with North Caro- 
lina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its forty- 
third volume, and the 
first printed copy was 
"Seeman Printed." 




The Seeman Printery 

of DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



NEWS BRIEFS 

Burlington — Mrs. Grey B. White, a 1954 
graduate of the UNC School of Pharmacy, 
is chief pharmacist at the newly opened 
hospital in Burlington. Her husband, Gra- 
ham White, is owner-manager of Burling- 
ton's Acme Drug Company. 

Wilson — Among eight professional floats 
in the Wilson Christmas Parade was one 
sponsored by the Wilson County Drug Club. 
More than 75 units participated in the event, 
including Miss Merry Christmas from Atlan- 
tic Christian College. 

Raleigh — The News & Observer (December 
4) carried a picture of a soda fountain just 
installed (1911) in Brantley's Drug Store, 
which in those days was the only one of its 
kind in the South, except one in Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

Spindale — Noah Simpson, manager of 
Spindale Drug Company, has been named 
vice president of the Spindale Merchants 
Association for the coming year. 

New Bern — A pre-Christmas visitor to 
Tony's Drug Store threw a brick thru the 
front door and departed with cash from the 
store's registers. Police are investigating 
the break-in. 

Valdese — The old flim-flam deal of getting 
employee confused over bill presented for 
purchase and one for change was worked 
successfully at the Waldensian Pharmacy. 
There are few pharmacies in the state that 
at one time or another have not contributed 
$10 when involved in a similar incident. 

Asheboro — Leo Carter has announced the 
Mann Drug Store has been granted a Eexall 
franchise. 

Mebane — James S. White, owner of the 
Carolina Eexall Drug Store, was pleased over 
the reception accorded the 2-day grand re- 
opening celebration of his newly remodeled 
self-service pharmacy. 

Wilmington — Speaking at a meeting of the 
Emeritus Club, C. Joseph Wheeler of Golds- 
lioro, said: "If my firm were to wipe out 
altogether its profits on an average prescrip- 
tion, it would result in a saving to the 
patient of only a half-cent a tablet." 

Winston-Salem — For obtaining barbitu- 
rates under false pretense, Judge Leroy W. 
Sams sentenced Maude Valentino Talbert to 
serve four months in jail. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




Albert S. Clay of Durham is inducted into N. C. Academy of Pharmacy by NCPA Presi- 
dent Robert B. Hall (right). George Harris, President of the Durham-Orange Drug Club, 
is at the left. 



A Happy New Year 

FOR YOUR PHOTOFINISHING NEEDS 

Let B & H Photo Company Serve You 

Complete Service on 
Black and White Kodacolor 

Ektachrome Anscochrome 

Kodachrome Movies and Slides 
Processed in Our Plant 

B & II PHOTO COMPANY 

3030 s. boulevard p. 0. box 1600 

phone 523-7093 charlotte 1, n. c. 




HAWAIIAN VOGUE FOR EASTER 
Handwoven straw shopping bag 
with 1 lb. Box Bountiful .... $6.50 



BAMBOO EASTER BASKET. Color- 
ful handled basket wrapped in 
bright cello and ribbon. Assorted 
chocolate covered foil eggs and 
other Easter candies $2.19 



EASTER HAT BOX. Ribbon 
Fruit and Nut Divinity Egg 
thick Milk Chocolate cootin. 



EASTER IN NASSAU 

White sequin decorated. With 

1 lb. Box Bountiful $6.50 



SALES MULTIPLY FAST with Nun- 
nally's complete selection of excit- 
ing Easter candies. Attractive 
Easter Valance Kit is furnished 
with your order. Ask your Nun- 
nally's representative, to show you 
the complete line that will KEEP 
PROFITS HOPP1N' AT EASTER. 





CAMY EASTtR fCGS 



J\/imuiM/^ 



BUTTER CREAM EGG 
Dark Chocolate Coating 



EASTER EGG SHOP. Open display 
box sells delicious candy eggs in 
chocolate and non-chocolate. Hand 
decorated or in colorful foil. 
12 pieces $1.00 



EASTER WOOD VIOLET OVAL 
Decorated Satin Box with floral 
corsage, wide ribbon and bow. 
Choice selection of favorite centers 
dipped in Milk and Dark Choco- 
late. 1 lb $3.25 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



27 




A son, Raymond Manos, to Lt. and Mrs. 
Gene Dutton, currently of the armed forces, 
living at 4516 Johnwall Court, Columbia, 
South Carolina, November 26, 1961. 

Engagements 

February 18th has been chosen for the 
wedding date of Miss Dorothy Bingham 
Reaves, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. E. 
Reaves, Jr. of Fayetteville, to Harold Ball, 
Eli Lilly representative. Both Miss Reaves 
and Mr. Ball are graduates of the UNC 
School of Pharmacy. 

Local Druggist Gets Vote 
of Confidence 

When they have to buy prescription drugs 
for themselves or their families, American 
homemakers rely almost completely on their 
local druggist, according to a survey of 
women homemaker-delegates assembled in 
Chicago this week (Sept. 24-28) for McCalPs 
Fifth Annual Congress on Better Living. 
Ninety-five percent of the 65 women repre- 
senting America 's families at the Congress 
said they always had prescriptions filled at 
the local drugstore or pharmacy; only two 
percent utilize the drug departments of de- 
partments stores, and not one had ever had 
a prescription filled by a drug discount 
house. — Reprinted from the N. C. Medical 
Journal, Nov. 1961. 



$500 Plus Two years Probation 

These comments by an Eastern North 
Carolina judge are significant when, viewed 
in relation to enforcement of the Food, 
Drug and Cosmetic Act. 

The pharmacist, charged on seven, counts 
of dispensing drugs without a physician's 
prescription, was fined $500 and placed on 
probation for two years. The pharmacist 
pleaded nolo contendere (no contest) : 

"Since some persons cannot take certain 
drugs because of certain reactions to them 
the Congress has enacted the laws for the 
protection of every one," he continued. 

"In some cases, persons actually lose con- 
sciousness immediately after inoceulation. 
If a doctor knows about it, he can give other 
treatments to counteract the effects, but if 
he doesn't, all he has is an unconscious 
person. 

There are also types of drugs which truck 
drivers sometimes used to get at truck stops 
on long distance trips to keep them from 
getting fatigued. They drive for seven or 
eight hours and then take one of these 'goof- 
balls' or 'bennies' and then drive another 
three or four hours. When the body of a 
human being can no longer react to these 
artificial stimulants, the driver collapses 
against the steering wheel and possible veers 
to the left side of the road and causes a 
head-on collision. 

"So you see, the Congress passed these 
laws not just for a few people, but for the 
protection of everyone. 

"If there are those who think the law is 
wrong, then there are ways to change it. 
If the law is right, then violations must be 
stopped." 



SMITH WHOLESALE DRUG CO. 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

A Young and Growing Service Wholesale House, 
Owned and Operated by Registered Pharmacists 



We Appreciate Your Business 



28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



Carolina Camera 

Top: Wilkins Harden (left), President of 
e American College of Apothecaries, is 
own with William S. Apple (center) of 
American Pharmaceutical Association 
d Henry H. Gregg, immediate past presi- 
nt of the ACA. The occasion was presen- 
tion of ACA's J. Leon Laseoff Memorial 
,vard to Dr. Apple. 

Center: Shown with Mrs. Leslie Myers of 
inston-Salem, president of The Woman's 
lxiliary of the NCPA, is (left) Mrs. 
entiss George of Kannapolis, president 
the Cabarrus County Auxiliary, and Mrs. 
jward Whitley of Concord. 

Bottom: Mrs. Myers is shown with officers 
the High Point Auxiliary, left to right : 
rs. William P. Shoemaker, president ; Mrs. 
pers ; Mrs. Ernest E. Anderson, hostess for 
meeting, and Mrs. S. 0. Bailey, a com- 
ttee chairman. 



DISTINCTIVE 




Carry your 
store's identity by color and 
personalized copy right Into your customers 
home for the life of the Prescription. 

Another plus value of the modern paper 
box with its clean fresh label. 

Representative: 

M. C. GRIER 

iiio ann st.. at. 3-3647 

Monroe, North Carolina 

• • • 

E. N. ROWELL CO., INC. 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



THE HENRY B. GILPIN COMPANY 

Full Line, Full Service Wholesale Druggists Since 1845 
Baltimore • Dover • Norfolk • Washington 




Norfolk Division 

Equipped for fast, 

efficient wholesale drug 

service to the pharmacists of 

the eastern section of North Carolina 

6435 Tidewater Drive • Norfolk, Virginia • Madison 2-6361 



30 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



There's 



\ \ I I 



PROFIT 



■% 






s 



in 




MILK 

and 

ICE 

CREAM 



Simpson Opens Pharmacy 
in Statesville 

Statesville 's Medical Center Pharmacy, 
with 26 departments occupying about 5,000 
square feet of floor space, was officially 
opened on December 4. 

The new pharmacy is owned by Mr. and 
Mrs. J. T. Simpson and Mr. and Mrs. John 
Gardner. Simpson is the manager; Gardner 
remains with his pharmacy operations in 
Mooresville. 

Mr. Simpson is a native of Rock Hill, 
South Carolina and a graduate in pharmacy 
(1951) of the University of South Carolina. 
For several years he was associated with 
Wilkins Harden of Columbia, and, immedi- 
ately prior to locating in North Carolina, 
he represented one of the pharmaceutical 
houses as a MSB. 

The new pharmacy occupies quarters in 
the Brookdale Square Shopping Center on 
Davie Avenue. 

He'll Bet on You! 

How long will you live? If you're a 35i 
year old man, the actuary figures that you 'II; 
probably reach the ripe age of 71 ; a 3a 
year old woman's life expectancy is three 
years longer. Did you know that insurance 
companies consider you a better risk if your; 
weight is 15-20 pounds below average? Or! 
that airline pilots once had to pay $25 extra' 
per thousand dollars of life insurance but are; 
now considered as safe a bet as you in your 
office or plant? Many factors — including 
some that probably wouldn't occur to you — 
figure in the determination of your life 
insurance policy. 



people like it 
and buy it 

Tastes Great . , . It's 



finejtate 



Life Expectancy Chart 



Age 

15 

20 
25 
30 
35 
40 
45 
50 
55 
60 
65 



MEN 


WOMEN 




Years- 


Age 


Years-' 


to-Go 




to-Go 


54.95 


15 


57.72 


50.37 


20 


53.11 


45.82 


25 


48. 5E! 


41.25 


30 


43.9S; 


36.69 


35 


39.4f| 


32.18 


40 


34.8£| 


27.81 


45 


30.4J 


23.63 


50 


26.11 


19.71 


55 


22.03 


16.12 


60 


18.23 


12.90 


65 


14.78 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 




in Exterior View of John Henley's New Clinic Pharmacy of Hope Mills. The brick used 
n the Pharmacy date back to 1839. 




crowd pleasers a la Lance! 




More people prefer and buy tasty Lance 
snacks than any other brand. And no wonder... 
They're always fresh and there's 

a wide variety to choose from. 
Please your crowd. Display Lance. 



INC. Charlotte, North Carolina 




32 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

HI Pharmacy School Iotes 




Satisfied customers constitute the best 
advertisement. All pharmacists will agree 
with this. It is pleasing to report that this 
has proved true for Miss Noble's book on 
the history of the School of Pharmacy 
particularly as shown by repeat orders. 
There should be a copy of this gratifying 
record in every North Carolina pharmacy. 
Copies are available at $5.15. Checks pay- 
able to U. N. C. Press should be sent to the 
School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Probably the best and strongest point 
made in the history of the School of Phar- 
macy is the interest and loyal support of the 
retail profession for its school. The appeal 
for annual contributions to the North Caro- 
lina Pharmaceutical Research Foundation for 
use in the School of Pharmacy was mailed on 
December 15. It is not too late for this re- 
minder for a most useful tax deductible con- 
tribution. 

Dr. Claude Piantadosi, Associate Profes- 
sor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry received a 
grant valued at $18,000.00 for two years 
from the National Science Foundation for 
the continuation of fundamental research 
on the Chemistry and Metabolism of Plasma- 
logen and related substances. The research 
holds interest in biochemistry for the under- 



standing of the role of these important 
biological substances in living tissue. 

The recent arrival of the fourth volume 
of American Men of Science, tenth edition 
completed this generous gift of Mr. Rowe B. 
Campbell, Peoples Drug Store, Taylorsville 
to the pharmacy library. 

Three television programs were given by 
pharmacy teachers on WUNC-TV during 
December. On December 6, Dr. Claude 
Piantadosi discussed "pH and Buffered 
Solutions" in the Nature and Science series 
for high school students. On December 13, 
Dean E. A. Breeht discussed "Accident 
Prevention" with special emphasis on pre- 
venting poisoning in children at 2:00 P.M. 
and "Careers in Pharmacy" at 4:30. In 
the Accident Prevention program emphasis 
was given to the "Dennis the Menace Takes 
a. Poke at Poison" published in comic book 
style by the United States Public Health 
Service. 

The Directory of Poison Control Centers 
published last April 1 by the Poison Control 
Center Clearinghouse, U.S.P.H.S. listed five J 
in North Carolina ; Mercy Hospital, Char- | 
lotte; Duke Hospital, Durham; Onslow Me- 
morial Hospital, Jacksonville; Northern 
Hospital of Surry County, Mount Airy; and 
James Walker Memorial Hospital, Wilming- 
ton. Since then a new Poison Control Center 
established by pharmacist Tommy Burgiss 
at Elkin has been added. It was surprising 
not to find the Center at Cabarrus County 
Memorial Hospital since it has been in suc- 
cessful operation for many years. Twenty- 
four hour service is required and intended 
primarily for technical information to phy- 
sicians. 

President Wade A. Gilliam of Winston- 
Salem and Secretary E. A. Breeht repre- 
sented the North Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Research Foundation at the annual meeting 
of the University of North Carolina Develop- 
ment Council held on December 2 at the 
Morehead Planetarium in Chapel Hill. 

Dean E. A. Breeht was a guest at the 
annual dinner meeting of the Dental Founda- 
tion of North Carolina held at the Carolina 
Inn on December 6. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



33 



The student organizations of the School 
of Pharmacy held its annual Chritsmas party 
at Maultsby's Cabin on December 8. 

The second program of the Tagore Cen- 
tenary was held on December 11 in the as- 
sembly room of Beard Hall. Tagore was a 
famous poet and artist of India, and his 
memory was honored by a campus society. 

Saul Borodkin passed the final oral ex- 
amination for the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy on December 15. His dissertation 
discussed the synthesis of sixty-six deriva- 
tives, sixty of them new compounds, of orotic 
acid. The compounds have interest as pos- 
sible anti-metabolites. The research was sup- 
ported by Smith, Kline and French Labora- 
tories. 

On Saturday, November 18, it was noticed 
by one of the custodians of the Pharmacy 
Building that the three valuable carbon 
dioxide fire extinguishers disappeared from 
the north end of the three halls. A visit to 
neighboring fraternity houses by Arthur 
Beaumont, Security Officer for the Univer- 
sity produced no results. The following 
Tuesday it was noticed that the extinguishers 
had been replaced as mysteriously as they 
disappeared. Whats more, official tags 
showed that each had been completely re- 
charged. Question, did one of the frater- 
nities borrow the extinguishers for the Beat 
Dook Parade? 

Student Branches, N.C.P.A. and A.Ph.A. 

The December meeting was held on the 
twelfth as a Christmas party in the Student 
Center of Beard Hall. 

Kappa Psi 

Beported by Hal Beaves, Public Belations 
Chairman 

On Thursday, November 16, Kappa Psi 
entered and won the championship at the 
annual intramural Bod and Gun Meet held 
just outside of Chapel Hill. Out of the four 
events held, the U.N.C. chapter captured two 
first place wins and tied for second place in 
a third event. Those boys who participated 
were: Gerald May, Bruce Honeycutt, Jerry 
Price, Bill Allgood, Arthur Hill and Hal 
Beaves. 

On Thursday night, December 7, the fra- 
ternity entertained members of the faculty 



at an Egg Nog Party which is held especial- 
ly for the Pharmacy School staff every year 
before adjourning for the Christmas holi- 
days. 

Another pre-Christmas get together ma- 
terialized in Monday night, December 11, at 
the fraternity house. This was the annual 
Christmas tree decorating party. Since most 
of the decorations must have a woman 's 
touch, pharmacy and pre-pharmacy girls 
were invited to help the boys prepare the 
house for the yuletide season. Refreshments 
were served, and there was fun for all. 

Phi Delta Chi 

The brothers of Phi Delta Chi moved into 
the house on December 1 following comple- 
tion of reconstruction, phase I. 

A Webeob high-fi stero record player was 
won in the Phillip-Morris Marlboro Contest. 

Historical Notes 
By Alice Noble, Research Historian 

On the roll of members of the N.C.P.A. 
from 1881 through 1895 is the name of John 
Vaughn Jordan. He was born in Philadel- 
phia, lived in Charleston, S. C, and made his 
home in New Bern from 1853 until his death. 
A friend said of him: "He is personally of 
polished and easy manner, justly merits the 
confidence he holds of the community and 
the influential place he has attained to as a 
druggist, man and citizen. . . . He is one of 
those men who sustain the proud position the 
sons of New Bern have held since the earliest 
history of our country. ' ' He married a New 
Bern lady, Mrs. Julia Lane, and had a 
family of two and one adopted child. 

When the War Between the States was 
declared, Mr. Jordan enlisted promptly in 
the service of the Confederacy. He organ- 
ized and was colonel of the 31st N. C. Regi- 
ment, which saw service in Georgia, South 
Carolina, on Roanoke Island and in Vir- 
ginia. He was a brave commander, was 
wounded at Drury's Bluff, was taken pris- 
oner at Roanoke Island, and after being 
exchanged, was wounded in the battle of 
Bermuda Hundred. His command was sur- 
rendered, under General Johnston, in the 
final days of the War. 

Shortly after Mr. Jordan established his 
(Concluded on page 36) 



34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



A MA: Percentage Leases Unethical 

The American Medical Association House 
of Delegates has officially adopted a Judicial 
Council supplementary report that — 

' ' Eentals by physicians for space leased by 
them to pharmacist based on a percentage 
of income are unethical; (and) rental fees 
charged by physicians for space leased by 
them to pharmacists must be reasonable 
according to the commonly accepted stan- 
dards of the community or they are 
unethical. ' ' 

The action was taken on November 29 by 
the House of Delegates meeting during the 
1961 AMA Clinical Session in Denver, fol- 
lowing a conference between the AMA Judi- 
cial Council and representatives of APhA, 
ACA and NABD on November 26. During 
this conference which resulted in the AMA 
action, APhA and its affiliate, the ACA, took 
the position that 

(1) it is unethical for physicians to own 
pharmacies; 

(2) sliding scale rental or rental of space 



STROTHER 
DRUG COMPANY 

of Richmond, Inc. 

3700 Saunders Avenue 

POWERS-TAYLOR DRUG CO. 

Richmond, Va. 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 

Full Line 

Full Service 

Member of 
Druggists Service Co. 

National Wholesale 
Druggists Association 

For Best Service Call Us 
Collect 

353-2771 

After Hours Call 
353-2777 



by physicians for pharmacies based oi 
a percent of income is unethical; and 
(3) unreasonable fixed fee rentals having 
no relation to the rental charge foi 
like facilities is unethical. 

While AMA took positive action on pharl 
macy rental arrangements with physicians 
they left standing their policy that it is 
not considered unethical for a physician tc 
own or operate a pharmacy provided there 
is no exploitation of the patient, pending 
further study and a report to be made at the 
AMA annual meeting next June. 

APhA Presents Pharmacy's 
Story to Kefauver 
Subcommittee 

Two members of the North Carolina Phar 
maceutical Association — H. C. McAllister of 
Chapel Hill and Wilkins Harden of Colum 
bia, South Carolina — were present in Wash 
ington on December 19 when the American 
Pharmaceutical Association presented its 
views to the Kefauver Subcommittee on An 
titrust and Monopoly. Mr. McAllister is 
president of the National Association of 
Boards of Pharmacy while Mr. Harden is 
the newly installed president of the Ameri 
can College of Apothecaries (page 28). 

In his testimony before the Senate Sub 
committee, A.Ph.A. Secretary William S 
Apple made these points, in part: 

— Americans annually spend $37 for tobac- 
co, $54 for liquor but only $12 for pre- 
scribed drugs, or $1 a month. 

— If every pharmacist eliminated his fee 
and every pharmaceutical plant went on a 
non-profit basis, some people would still com- 
plain about drug costs. 

— The community pharmacy, with its sup 
ply of life-saving drugs, is only minutesj 
away from 95% of the population. 

— The Kefauver hearings have distorted 
the public 's view of the pharmacist and he 
has been receiving all the complaints. 

■ — Pharmacists dispense some two million 
prescriptions a day and provide non-pre 
seription service to another four million. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 

High Point — Mrs. Zollie Collins, Jr. 

Winston-Salem — Mrs. Garland F. Benton, 
Jr. 

• Charlotte — Mrs. C. H. Smith 

• Rowan-Davie — Mrs. George A. Albright, 

Jr. 

High Point 

The High Point Pharmaceutical Auxiliary 
net November 28th at the home of Mrs. 
Toe Bland. Mrs. Bland opened with a 
Christmas devotion. 

Mrs. Al Bundy, Vice-President, introduced 
he guest of the evening, Mrs. Lewis Wag- 
itaff, who showed several new Cliritsmas 
leeorations and food ideas. After the pro- 
gram Mrs. Wagstaff was presented a gift 
! rom the group. 

The treasurer's report was given by Mrs. 
iVilliam Shoemaker, president, in the absence 
)f the treasurer. Mrs. Shoemaker presided 
>ver a short business session. Plans for the 
December meeting were discussed, and a 
tridge-social was decided on for the Christ- 
nas meeting to be held December 12th at 
he home of the President. 

Door prizes were won by Mrs. Carson 
Southern and Mrs. S. O. Bailey. 

Winston-Salem 

The December meeting of the Winston- 
Salem Apothecary Club was held at the 
tome of Mrs. A. R. Johnson. Twenty mem- 
>ers and three guests were present. 

The President, Mrs. Roger Sloop, opened 
he business session and the minutes were 
ead and approved. The treasury report was 
122.01 with 24 members having paid their 
ues. 

There was no unfinished business and it 
• r as decided that all new business would be 
n the agenda for the first meeting of the 
ew year. Goodbyes were given by all mem- 



bers to the Vice-President, Mrs. Byron 
Crowley, who is moving to Charlotte. 

The program for the evening featured an 
auction of gifts made by the club members. 
Mrs. Eddie Swicegood, professional auc- 
tioneer, carried out a most successful eve- 
ning with a final total of $6-4.50 for all items 
sold. 

Charlotte 

The Charlotte Woman's Druggist Auxil- 
iary held their regular monthly luncheon 
meeting at the Kirkwood Room, December 
12th. Mrs. A. K. Hardee, President, pre- 
sided. Christmas decorations were used. 
Edward Hemmle, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. H. 
Hemmle, served as Santa Claus and gave 
each member a gift. 

Each year the Auxiliary remembers the 
children at Good Samaritan Hospital with 
toys. 

Mrs. I. B. Nichols gave the Devotion. Re- 
ports were heard from the various commit- 
tees. 

Four Little Girls in Blue, introduced by 
Mrs. Ross L. Cooper, gave a musical pro- 
gram. 

Rowan-Davie 

Sixteen members of the Rowan-Davie Drug 
Auxiliary met December 6 for their regular 
monthly luncheon meeting at the Chanticleer 
Restaurant with Mrs. Paul Miller, presiding. 
An inspiring devotional was presented by 
Mrs. Ray Kiser. 

Mrs. Miller presented a plan to the mem- 
bers for making extra money to add to the 
treasury without the necessity of working 
on a project. Ketner's Food Town Stores 
will pay the organization $1.00 per member 
to make a tour of their meat and produce 
departments. It was requested the president 
make a tentative date for the tour and re- 
port to the club in January. 

Mrs. Billie Pittman conducted the annual 
Christmas program of exchanging gifts. The 
members voted Mrs. John Brown's gift as 
the one most attractively wrapped. The 
door prize was also won by Mrs. Brown. 

Hostesses for the day were Mesdames 
Robert Hall, E. D. Hoyle, M. H. Hoyle, Sr. 
and Robert Hoyle. 



36 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



The Harrison Narcotic Law 
andlts RegulationsExplained 

(Published and distributed by Smith 
Wholesale Drug Co., Spartenburg, S. C. 
Price $1.00) 

The newly revised edition of ' ' The Har- 
rison Narcotic Law and Its Eegulations Ex- 
plained" is being published and distributed 
as a service to pharmacy. This 40-page 
booklet is a compendium of the Harrison 
Narcotic Law, written to answer questions 
as to what the pharmacist can or cannot do, 
or must or must not do, under the Harrison 
Narcotic Law to conform to Regulations 5, 
effective March 20, 1959, and subsequent 
changes to and including December 21, 1960. 

This booklet has been and is now being 
used in several schools of pharmacy as part 
of their jurisprudence instruction; also, it 
is used in retail drug store prescription de- 
partments as a ready reference to the Nar- 
cotic Law. 

Bill Shelley, Pharmacist, Smith Wholesale 
Drug Company, edited this revision, with the 
advice and cooperation of Robert W. Morri- 
son, Dean, School of Pharmacy, University 
of South Carolina, and Thomas D. Wyatt, 
Chief Drug inspector, State of South Caro- 
lina. 

Within this booklet are several useful 
ready references, among them being a sum- 
mary of the four catagories of narcotic 
classifications, classes "A," "B," "X," 
and "M" briefly explained as outlined re- 
cently by the Commissioner, Bureau of Nar- 
cotics. Other important things that can be 
referred to quickly: reports to make and to 
whom by wholesalers and retailers; order 
form suggestions; oral or telephoned pre- 
scription regulations; how to dispose of un- 
wanted narcotics; steps that should be taken 
when a drug store changes ownership con- 
cerning narcotics; numerous do's and donts' 
concerning exempt narcotic preparations; a 
section is also devoted to suggestions for 
physicians. On the back cover is a ready 
reference table of classes and rates of taxa- 
tion under the Harrison Narcotic Law. 

Lucky Saucer 

A famous art collector was walking 
through Greenwich Village when he spied a 



mangy cat lapping milk from an old sauce:; 
in front of the store. The collector did ; 
double take when he saw the saucer. It vM 
old and very valuable. Casually sauntering 
into the store he offered to buy the cat fo:[ 
two dollars. "Sorry, mister," the pro 
prietor said, "The cat is not for sale.',' 
' ' Come now, ' ' said the collector, ' ' I need j 
hungry cat around the house to catch mica 
I'll give you ten dollars for it." "Sold,'[ 
said the owner, taking the ten. ' ' I wa 
wondering," added the collector, "whethe' 
for the ten dollars, you wouldn't mind in! 
eluding the caucer. The cat seems to b 
used to it. It'll save me a dish." " Sorrjl 
mister," was the firm reply. "That's m;| 
lucky saucer. So far this week, I 've sol 
68 cats." 



HISTORICAL NOTES 
(Continued from page 33) 

home in New Bern he became a clerk in th| 
drug store of F. J. Hughes, whom he afteij 
wards succeeded in business. When the Wa 
was over he re-enterd the practice of phaij 
macy and was regarded as one of the mos 
careful and competent men in his professioi 
(When the first North Carolina Pharmac 
Law was enacted in 1881 Colonel Jorda 
was licensed as a pharmacist.) A descri] 
tion of Jordan's Drug Store, written 
1885, says: "Colonel Jordan has been ei 
gaged in the drug business upwards t 
thirty years, during which time he has esta} 
lished a reputation which cannot be shake 
His name as a reliable and skilled pha 
macist is respected over the whole easten 
country. . . . His spacious store, new} 
furnished in a modern and attractive styl| 
is well located near the post office and 
filled to repletion with a comprehensive sto( 
valued at from $3,000 to $4,000. Th 
consists of a full line of pure foreign art 
domestic drugs and chemicals obtained fro 
the most reliable houses in the trade. Al: 
are carried the leading patent medicine 
perfumery, toilet articles and garden seed 
To the prescription department the druggi 
gives careful and special attention and he 
assisted in the store by competent help. . . . 
Colonel Jordan died in New Bern on Sej 
tember 5, 1895 in the 64th year of his ag 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



37 



HOW THE PUBLIC 
VIEWS THE PHARMACIST 

(Continued from page 9) 

6. Many consumers report that they have 
purchased drug products from mail- 
order companies and would be willing to 
have these companies fill their prescrip- 
tions, if not too much delay occurred. 

7. Insofar as can be ascertained, the ma- 
jority of consumers are convinced that 
Senator Kefauver is performing an out- 
standing public service through his in- 
vestigation of the ' ' evils of the drug 
industry. ' ' 

8. Consumers assume that governmental 
regulations afford them full protection 
in their purchase of drug products re- 
gardless of the outlets from which made 
or the conditions under which made. 

Many of these concepts and attitudes are 
tebulous at best, some are irrational, many 
re based upon incomplete or faulty inf orma- 
on, and some represent wishful thinking, 
egardless of their validity or rationality, 
owever, they appear to be held by a suf- 
cient number of consumers to cause serious 
'jncern among those who have an interest in 
rug distribution and the profession of 
harmacy. 

| The concepts consumers hold concerning 
le means by which their pharmaceutical 
feeds can be met most satisfactorily rest up- 
a the "images" they develop: (1) of what 
institutes a drug outlet, and (2) of the de- 
ree of competency they assume to be neces- 
iry on the part of the person who provides 
lem prescription service. These images 
ere at one time clear and unmistakable, 
bnsumers could identify a drug store, and 
ley knew that this was the sole source from 
hich they could supply their retail medical 
3eds. Moreover, they knew their pharma- 
st, usually referred to him affectionately as 
Doc," and they had full confidence in his 
aowledge and competency. 

Today, these images are anything but 
ear. In many communities, consumers are 
liable to distinguish a drug store from a 
apartment store or a variety store, and 
key can obtain their drug needs from a 
ide variety of retail outlets. Further, 
eir prescription needs are filled by strang- 
s and by personnel who spend most of their 



time dispensing everything except drug and 
medical products. The old ' ' Doc ' ' of the 
past generation has gone the way of the 
horse and buggy, and consumers have de- 
veloped the concept that filling prescriptions 
is merely a clerical function which can be 
performed by anyone who can read and 
count. 

The basic reasons for the confused images 
of drug distribution developed by consumers 
lie in the changes taking place in the retail 
structure. The two most important of these 
are: (1) the scrambling of merchandise lines, 
and (2) the increase in the size of retail 
stores. Neither of these developments is 
new, and both represent evolutionary rather 
than revolutionary changes. 

Scrambling of merchandise began in this 
country when the general store superseded 
the trading post. It was further extended 
when the mail-order and department stores 
developed. Retail drug stores were perhaps 
the earlier of the speciality stores to widen 
their lines, and in recent years scrambling 
has been extended to every line of retailing. 
In fact, it has increased to such an extent 
that it is today almost impossible to identify 
stores in any retail line. 

No mystery surrounds the reasons for the 
scrambling of merchandise lines, for it was 
and is a logical development based upon 
sound economic facts. Foremost of these 
were the individual merchant 's desire to 
serve his customers more completely and 
more satisfactorily, of his desire to utilize 
selling space more effectively, and of his 
need to cover the ever-increasing retail 
operating costs. At the same time manu- 
facturers were moving into mass production 
and many had excess capacity. If they were 
to sell their output in quantities sufficient 
to lower unit costs and enable them to 
realize the profits desired, they had to have 
wider and more intensive distribution at 
the retail level. 

The drug store was naturally one of the 
first retail outlets sought by manufacturers 
for wider distribution of their goods. This 
outlet usually had a prime location, it had 
high traffic density, it was open more hours 
than other retail stores, and few products 
were endangered with trading-down in con- 
sumers' eyes when they were placed in a 



38 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



HOW THE PUBLIC 
VIEWS THE PHARMACIST 

drug store. When still wider distribution 
was needed, manufacturers began to seek 
other types of outlets, and in this move they 
were assisted by the development of mass 
communication media. 

Through the use of these advertising 
media it was possible for the supplier to gain 
consumer recognition of his name and 
product, in many instances to obtain con- 
sumer preference, and sometimes to gain 
consumer insistence. Thus, the consumer's 
patronage and loyalty were shifted from the 
retailer to the manufacturer, and the latter 
could then use almost any kind of retail 
outlet for the distribution of his goods. 
Also, if he were able to pre-sell the con- 
sumer, he could force a retailer to stock his 
line whether the latter wanted to do so or 
not. Therefore, in view of this promotional 
power, and of the other economic conditions 
at both the retail and manufacturing levels, 
extensive scrambling of merchandise was 
inevitable. Moreover, it fostered the de- 
velopment of larger store units. 

Scrambling was further encouraged, and 
the growth in the size of retail establish- 
ments was further accelerated, by the ex- 
pansion of outlying shopping centers in 
recent years. These centers are real estate 
ventures, and they are operated in the man- 
ner that will net the greatest rental revenue 
for the developers. Consequently, the latter 
seek heavy traffic pulling outlets, which in- 
clude, first and foremost, food and drug 
stores. In these they want large rather than 




small establishments, since rent is 
primarily on sales volume. The operators o 
these centers, therefore, are not interested i 
a traditional drug store doing #60,000 
$100,000 annual business, but rather in on 
that will do from a quarter million and ujj 
This can mean but one thing, namely, ths 
the drug store in most shopping centei 
must be a large outlet with its line 
scrambled to such an extent that drug an 
medical products can scarcely be recognize, 
in the mix. 

When a retail outlet loses its identit 
because of a wide mix of merchandise, an] 
as it increases in both physical size and sale' 
volume, its relationship with customers b« 
comes impersonal. This impersonal natui 
becomes even more pronounced when selJ 
service is adopted, as it has been in most ci 
the stores that have taken on drug lines rj 
expanded from these lines into others. Als< 
the high mobility of our population an 
the rapid urbanization of the nation furthe 
foster the development of impersonal retai 
ing relationships. 

As retail relationships become more in 
personal, the consumer no longer patroniz< 
a store because of personal acquaintanc 
loyalty or the personal attention and servi( 
he might get. Thus, the national corporal 
name and the national brand names becon 
of paramount importance and replace tl 
personal confidence which the consume 
formerly placed in the retail drug proprietc 
and his personnel. 

With respect to the changing image he} 
of the pharmacist, one factor particular 
confuses the consumer on the competene 
necessary for filling prescriptions. This 
that he can see the pharmacist — in too mai 
stores — count the pills from a bottle 
merely change the label. The average co} 
sumer knows nothing of the checks ai 
double-checks which the pharmacist might 1 
required to make in these actions, so to hi: 
or her no more education or skill is require 
than in any other department of the stor 
In fact, it is doubtful if the average co: 
sumer thinks filling a prescription today 
as difficult as brewing a good cup of coff« 
or putting together a sandwich. And, pare; 
thetically, it appears that at least o| 
.jurist holds a similar opinion. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



39 



In view of the impersonal retail relation- 
hips which have developed, consumers' ob- 
ervations of the pharmacist at work, and 
heir inability to identify a drug store, it 
5 small wonder that consumers are willing 
3 transfer their patronage from the cus- 
jmary drug outlet to other types of retail 
utlets. Moreover, they have little hesitation 
l making this transfer, since they believe, 
r hope, that Uncle Sam, the state govern- 
lent or someone else has set up ample safe- 
uards against any mistakes, malpractice, 
t other evils which might befall them. 

These conditions react most adversely on 
le pharmacist as a professional man. The 
ssence of professional status is the develop- 
Lent and maintenance of confidential, 
rusted and continuing relationsips between 
te professional and his client. If the 
harmacist is to be considered a professional 
tan, it is imperative that the consumer 
fecognize his competency, the need for this 
mipetency in supplying his drug needs, and 
lat a personal relationship be established 
btween the pharmacist and his customer. 
he present trends in retailing appear to be 
lading in the opposite direction. 

In addition to the structural and other 
stribution changes, other developments 
( ive also affected the image consumers hold 

the drug outlet and the pharmacist. One 

these is that health care is taking a larger 
)rtion of the family budget, and as a con- 
squence, consumers are becoming more con- 
ious of drug costs. It is illogical, but 
merican consumers will make an all-out 
fort to save on the cost of necessities, while 

the same time they pay little attention to 
ice increases in non-essentials. 

This consciousness of drug prices is fur- 
ered by the drug investigations, the wide 
iblicity given these hearings, the develop- 
3nt of cut-price drug outlets, the large 
lount of advertising devoted to the savings 
I'ssible on mail-order drugs, the variations 
I prescription prices between stores in the 
^ne community, and the entrance of na- 
|»nal mail-order houses in the prescription 
jsiness. Also, as consumers note the num- 
|r of stores adding drug lines and prescrip- 



tion departments, they assume profit oppor- 
tunities to be unduly high in these lines. 

It is comparatively easy to outline the 
problems facing the traditional drug distri- 
bution channels and methods, as well as those 
confronting pharmacy as a profession. It 
is quite another problem, however, and a 
much more difficult one, to suggest what 
pharmacists as individuals, or through asso- 
ciation action, might do to meet these dif- 
ficulties. 

To many, the first and most logical ap- 
proach is that of seeking additional legisla- 
tion to protect what are considered to be 
the legitimate interests of present-day re- 
tail drug distributors. Simple and logical 
as this may appear, and necessary at it is 
that the pharmaceutical profession take 
every legal action necessary to assure the 
proper distribution of drug products, the 
legislative approach is a dangerous pro- 
cedure. 

The public is misinformed and inadequate- 
ly informed on marketing policies and 
practices. Much of the public also holds 
many misconceptions concerning retailing, 
and especially the retailing of drug products. 
But, they will be extremely suspicious of any 
attempts to limit the outlets in which they 
might buy, as well as the conditions under 
which they can buy. The legislative ap- 
proach, regardless of its validity and neces- 
sity, therefore faces the very real danger 
of public resentment, and more likely than 
not, it may play into the hands of the newly 
developing competition. 

I am neither a pharmacist nor a lawyer, 
but it appears that existing laws and regula- 
tions relating to pharmacy in North Caro- 
lina provide proper safeguards for the 
public and are adequate to protect the legiti- 
mate interests of drug retailers. Laws and 
regulations are meaningless, however, unless 
they are enforced effectively. The obliga- 
tion to see that these are enforced must rest 
upon the pharmaceutical interests of the 
state, including every individual retail drug- 
gist. If the latter stands by and does 
nothing about drug selling violations in his 
community, he is failing to assume both his 
community and professional responsibilities. 



40 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

This space available at 10^ per word; mini- 
mum of $3.00. Box numbers assigned and 
replies forwarded to advertiser upon re- 
quest. Mail copy and payment to Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy, Box 151, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 



BALANCES — Prescription balances repaired. 
Contact Phipps & Bird, Inc., P. O. Box 2V, 
Richmond 5, Virginia. Telephone Ml 4-5401. 



FOR SALE — Remington's Practice of Phar- 
macy, 12th Edition. (1961). 1,866 pages. 
Price $22.50. Available from NCPA, Box 
151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Professional Fee 

A survey sponsored by Reader's Digest 
indicated that 75% of pharmacists favor 
charging a professional fee for prescription 
filling. 

We do not know how many North Caro- 
lina pharmacists were included in the 
Digest's survey but our impression, based on 
conversations with numerous Tar Heel phar- 
macists, is that the percentage quoted is far 
too high for this state. However, there is 
no question but that this procedure of pric- 
ing prescriptions is gaining favor. 

Limits Practice 

The Massachusetts Board of Begistration 
has adopted a Code of Ethics which pro- 



hibits pharmacists in the state from partici- 
pation in mail order Ex programs, "pick- 
up stations," and "closed door Ex opera- 
tions. ' ' 

Sign 

At a street corner in Point Pleasant is a 
sign "DEAE CBOSSING." It is no mis- 
take in spelling. It is a school sign which 
tells how the town feels about its youngsters. 

Postcard from East Germany 

On postcard from East Germany this mes 
sage was penned: II Corinthians 4:8. 

Had the communist took the time to look 
the passage up here is what they would have 
read: "We are troubled on every side, jei 
not distressed; we are preplexed but not in 
despair; persecuted but not forsaken; cast 
down but not destroyed." 

Northeastern Christmas Party 

About 100 members and their wives at 
tended the Christmas Party sponsored trj 
the Northeastern Carolina Pharmaceutiea 
Society in Williamston on December 13. 

The program included a humorous tall 
by Mr. Davis of Ealeigh, an appearance b; 
"Miss North Carolina" (Susan Kay Wood 
all of Eoanoke Eapids) and the distributioi 
of prizes to all the ladies in attendance. 

Alfred N. Martin, president of tH 
Society, presided during the party. A 
favors for the occasion, Mr. Martin brough 
Stevens towels and imprinted coasters a 
special gifts for the ladies. 

Officers of the Society for 1962 will 1 
C. B. Clark, Jr. of Williamston, president 
Joe Tunstall of Washington, vice president 
and D. E. Davis, Jr. of Williamston, seen 
tary-treasurer. 



Quotable Quote by T. L. Jameson 

Well, they talk of changing times, and I know that I am old fashioned. But I'll b< 
that ten or fifteen years from now the druggist who is calling his customers by their firs 
names — who is waiting on them — who is answering their questions in a professional mannej 
and is taking the time to understand them — and who keeps his operation going with aj 
air of dignity and professional integrity — will be in business at the same old stand aft< 
a lot of the price sellers are gone. 



Ill4 k Cold S>05A«OM» 




upon !■*•»" 



Be sure of adequate stocks 

otics, antihistamines, decongestants 

and other seasonal remedies. 

Look to your full-line, 

full-service DSC wholesaler 

to fill your requirements — fast! 



Ofc WENS, M Mijj 



inor & 




ODEKER 



1010 Herring Avenue, Wilson, North Carolina 



MA.KE 
YOUR OWN 




BY BUYING 
PROFIT YIELDING MERCHANDISE 

from 

The W. H. King Drug Company 

"The House of Friendly and Dependable Service" 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

AND ITS ASSOCIATES 

O'Hanlon-Watson Drug Company 
winston-salem. n. c. 

Bellamy Drug Company King Drug Company Peabody Drug Company 
wilmington, n. c. florence, s. c. durham, n. c. 



Ike Caxolina JqURNAL OF PHARMACY 

Volume XLIII FEBRUARY, 1 962 Number 2 







O o qO OO ls 



d o 



O Q 



"What's this 
'Powerful Ally 
to Specific 
Therapy'?" 




It's an ally 

to your 
prescription 
department, 
too." 



Your Lilly representative is now creating a demand for 

BECOTIN-L_ 

B complex and C vitamin tablet. His basic message describes 
the many therapeutic uses for this potent formulation. 
By establishing Becotin-T as a part of total therapy, 

your Lillyman not only is creating new vitamin 
business, but he also is helping to sell vitamins where vitamins 
rightfully should be sold . . . in a pharmacy. 

Be ready to fill prescriptions and specifications for 
Becotin-T by ordering it from your Lilly service wholesaler. 



Becotini-T (vitamin B complex with vitamin C, therapeutic, Lilly) 

ELI LILLY AND COMPANY • INDIANAPOLIS 6, INDIANA, U.S.A. 

202503 



The Function of Distribution 

No pharmacy, large or small, can go into the markets of the 
world and buy, direct from manufacturers, the thousands of 
items that constitute its stock in trade. Distribution — supplying 
you with the merchandise you need to serve your patrons — is 
our function. Let us serve you quickly and efficiently from our 
comprehensive stocks, according to your current needs. Send 
your orders to us. 



WE ARE A 



DISTRIBUTOR 



DO JUSTICE TO YOUR DRUG BUSINESS!! 




rft"Bf, 




JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 



Greensboro, N. C. 



Beginning our 64th year of Service to 
the Retail Druggists of North Carolina. 



The House of Friendly Service 




^^^^MJWjjO^ '• : 



Scott ^btucf, Company, 



Service Wholesalers Since 1891 



The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



February, 1962 



Vol. xliii 



No. 2 



Officers 

NOETH CAEOLINA 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

• 

President 

Robert B. Hall 

Mocksville 

• 

Vice-Presidents 

John T. Stevenson, 

Elizabeth City 
Hoy A. Moose 

Mount Pleasant 

John Lowder Marion 



Secretary-Treasurer 
Editor 
W. J. Smith 
Box 151 
Chapel Hill, X. C. 
ik- 
Assistant 
Secretary-Treasurer 
C. M. Andrews 
Burlington 
• 
General Counsel 
F. 0. Bowman 
Chapel Hill 



More Often and More Effectively 

Among numerous comments received relating to publica- 
tion of ' ' How the Public Views the Pharmacist ' ' in the 
January, 1962 issue of The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, 
we quote from comment by Dean E. A. Brecht of the 
School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina : 

' ' Professor C. H. McGregor of the School of Business 
Administration deserves every credit for his excellent article 
on the current public opinion of pharmacy published in the 
January issue of this journal. The opinions were considera- 
bly discouraging even though Professor McGregor stated, 
"... what consumers think is the fact is more influential 
than what the fact might actually be." 

' ' This is our first clue for taking constructive action on 
the basis of this stimulating paper. We need to tell 
pharmacy's story to the public more often and more ef- 
fectively. 

' ' The opinions of pharmacy were less discouraging 
when I remembered that I was old enough to know that 
papers of similar import could have been written in 1952, 
1942, 1932, or even earlier. There has always been an 
opinion that prescription prices were too high, even when 
the average price was less than $1. This opinion is almost 
certain when the question is asked, ' ' Are prescription prices 
too high ? ' ' In reverse, now, customers frequently question 
the quality of prescribed medication if the cost is less than 
$3. 

"It is disappointing that the public thinks that the 
pharmacist is less professional at the present time when 
it is remembered that prescription volume was less than 109c 
of total volume twenty years ago and today it is about 30%. 
This tripling of percentage professional practice is more 
significant when it is realized, also, that total volume has 
increased materially. 

' ' I really fear that a substantial source of adverse 
public opinion is the increased busy-ness of the pharmacist 
today. So much time is required for professional service in 
the prescription room and increased managerial duties that 
there is less time for visiting with customers. I believe that 
this loss of leisurely personal contact is a definite source for 
reduced respect for the pharmacist. The only answer here is 
more pharmacists, now enabled by the larger building for 
the School of Pharmacy. 

"It is also true that opinion of a profession can be 
different from the same man 's opinion of the representa- 
tives of that profession that he knows personally. We were 
(Continued on page 4) 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Entered as 
second class matter July 5, 1922 at the post office at Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



F. R. Bell Sells Pharmacy 

F. B. Bell, owner of Bell's Drug Store, 
Beaufort, for the past 39 years, has sold the 
store to Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Whitehurst. 

Mrs. Whitehurst, an employee of the store 
for 17 years, will now manage the business. 
Assisting her will be Pharmacists Jackie 
Sewell and F. W. Heslep, and Mr. Bell on 
a part-time basis. 

Mr. Bell came to Beaufort from Eliza- 
beth City in 1910. Following two years of 
military service during WWI, he returned 
to Beaufort in 1919. Later, a period of ill 
health forced his temporary retirement, but 
he has been continuously associated with 
the store since 1925. 

Champion Non-Campaigner 

Tlie Greensboro Bally News (Jan. 21) 
ran an interesting, illustrated full page 
sketch of Carl Durham. Headed "He's the 
Champion Non-Campaigner, ' ' James Boss 
recounts how Mr. Durham got to Congress in 
1939 and how he remained there for 22 
years. 

This quote by John LTmstead sums up the 
situation : ' ' Carl didn 't make many speeches 
and I doubt if he kissed one baby in the 
22 years he was in Congress, but he was 
never too busy to listen to somebody from 
his district. ' ' 

Justice Contributes to 
Pharmacy Foundation 

The Justice Drug Company made a sub- 
stantial contribution to the permanent en- 
dowment fund of the North Carolina Phar- 
maceutical Besearch Foundation in lieu of 
its annual Christmas gift to the pharmacists 
of its trading area. Every pharmacist can 
take pride in the additional support to the 



foundation for its aid to the School o: 
Pharmacy. 

This increase support is additional to th 
three undergraduate scholarships supportei 
by the Justice Drug Company since 1931. 

New Edition of Dermatologic 
Formulary Now Available 

Tom Beamer, Chief Pharmacist at Duk 
Hospital, has released a new edition of th 
' ' Dermatologic Formulary ' ' which in prt 
vious editions has proved so popular througl 
out the State. 

The 1962 edition of The Formulary wai 
compiled by Mr. Beamer and Dr. Edit 
Hutto, Besident — Dermatology and Syphj 
lology — Duke University Medical Center, j 

Copies of the publication are available 
on request, and without charge. Write M: 
I. T. Beamer, Pharmacy, Duke Hospita' 
Durham, North Carolina. 




"A vitamin salesman to see you, sir." 



MORE OFTEN AND MORE EFFECTIVELY 

happy to find at the School of Pharmacy exhibit at the 
North Carolina State Fair last fall that a very favorable 
impression of the local pharmacist was repeated over and 
over by the visitors. 

' ' Pharmacy can gain a great deal from Professor Mc- 
Gregor 's paper by following through with a continuation of 
real service to the general public. In spite of all our prob- 
lems, business continues to be good, and we need to con- 
tinue every effort to maintain our traditional place in our 
communities." 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Gross Sales-dollar Rx Volume Up in 1961 



According to reports from 93 North Caro- 
ina pharmacies, gross sales and dollar 
prescription volume for 1961 were up about 
% over 1960. Since the number of phar- 
lacies participating in this state-wide sur- 
ey represents approximately 10% of the 
otal number of licensed pharmacies in North 
'arolina, the results are believed to accurate- 
ly reflect the 1961 vs. 1960 business compari- 
on picture. 

Concerning gross sales, only 15% of the 
harmacies had a drop in sales and one- 
pird showed a gain of better than 5%. 
fhe pharmacies of Western North Carolina 



showed higher gains while those in the 
central part of the state had lower gains 
than average. 

Only 5% of the western pharmacies 
showed a loss compared to 20% for the rest 
of the state. The central part of the state 
listed 70% of their pharmacies with a gain 
between 0% and 5%, leaving only 10% of 
their pharmacies with gains of more than 
5%. 

Compare these figures with the Eastern 
pharmacies, for example, with 37% report- 
ing gains of less than 5% and 40% show- 
ing more than a 5% gain in gross sales. 



Change In Gross Sales, 1961 versus 1960 

Up, Up, Not 

Down 0%-5% over 5% Available 

Western (22) 5% 36% 54% 5% 

Central (36) 20% 70% 10% 0% 

astern (32) 19% 37% 41% 3% 

?otal(93) 15% 50% 33% 2% 



With regard to changes in dollar prescrip- 
ion volume, we see a picture similar to that 
or gross sales. Overall, the average gain 
ras about 5% over 1960, with the western 
harmacies doing better than average for 
he state. 

Only 8% of all pharmacies participating 
a the survey showed a decline in prescrip- 



tion dollar volume and one-third listed gains 
of more than 5%. The central part of the 
state again had a majority of pharmacies 
in the 0%-5% gain category, whereas the 
pharmacies in other sections of the state 
had more of a spread in gains in dollar 
prescription volume. 



Change In Dollar Prescription Volume, 1961 versus 1960 



Western (22). 
entral (36).. 
lastern (32).. 

'otal (93) 



Down 

9% 

6% 

12% 

8<% 



75% of the participating pharmacies clas- 
ified themselves as traditional community 
harmacies. Although not sufficient reports 

ere received from other types of phar- 
macies to prepare a representative average, 
11 indications are that changes in gross 



Up, 

0%-5% 

27% 
55% 
28% 
38% 



Up, 
over 5 9 
45% 
26% 
43% 



37% 



Not 
Available 
19% 
13% 
17% 
17% 



ales and dollar prescription volume for suits. 



shopping center and professional pharmacies 
are in line with the average for all types of 
operations. 

The chain pharmacies indicated higher 
gains than our 5% average but the number 
reporting was insufficient for accurate re- 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

factors Influencing the Choice of a 
drug Store 

A. W. Jowdy and E. M. Smith 
School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina 



Purpose — The data presented in this re- 
port were collected in April 1961 by the 
Pharmacy Administration class at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. The study was 
part of a class exercise to illustrate motiva- 
tions associated with drug store patronage. 

Method — The survey was conducted in a 
southern city, which is primarily a universi- 
ty community with a population of 12,604. 
There were seven drug stores located in this 
community, six of which participated in 
this study. Interviews were conducted with 
567 drug store customers. 



Persons interviewed were selected at ran- 
dom at the participating drug stores. Each 
customer was asked the question, ' ' Why do, 
you shop here ? ' ' The interviewers as-; 
sisted the customers in answering only td 
the extent of explaining the question. The 
responses were recorded as nearly verbatim 
as possible. All reasons were then classified 
and tabulated as shown in Table No. 1. 

It was decided that bias could best be' 
avoided by not using a printed check listj 
However, it should be noted that there iq 
a bias away from delivery service since all) 



Table Xd. 1 — Factors which influence drug store selection as submitted by consumers ir^ 

a small southern town 



Motives 



Convenience (Location and 

Parking) 

Friendly and Courteous 

Employees 

Good Service 

Complete Stock and/or 

Desirable Merchandise. . . 
Store Atmosphere and/or 

Appearance 

Personal Relationship with 

Employees of Owner 

Fountain 

Pharmacist's Atility 

Prices 

Credit 

Layout and/or Ease of 

Shopping 

Quality Merchandise 

Hours 

Delivery 

Advertising, Ircmotions and 

Displays 

Post Office Substation* 



No. of Customers Submitting Factors 

for Individual Drug Store (Expressed 

In Per Cent) 



Store 
#1 



34.2 



15.0 
13.3 

6.7 

1.7 

9.2 
5.8 
2.5 
0.8 
9.2 



0.8 
0.8 



Store 

#2 



14.5 

18.2 
14.6 

1.8 

23.7 

4.5 

11.8 
5.5 



2.7 
2.7 



Store 
#3 



31.8 

14.2 
6.2 

19.4 

4.4 

3.5 
10.6 
1.8 
1.8 
0.9 

2.7 

0.9 

1.8 



Store 

#4 



48.9 

18.3 
6.1 

1.4 

4.1 

10.2 
4.1 
3.4 
1.4 



0.7 
1.4 



Store 

#5 



62.2 

15.7 
6.3 

3.9 

0.8 

1.6 



1.6 

3.9 

1.6 



0.8 



Store 
#6 



62.6 

10.2 
1.4 

7.2 

2.9 

1.4 

0.7 
0.7 
5.8 
0.7 

5.0 



1.4 



%of 

Total 
No. of 
Factors 



43.8 

15.2 

7.7 

6.4 

5.7 

5.2 
3.4 
3.2 

2.8 
2.4 

2.1 
0.7 
0.3 
0.3 

0.5 
0.3 



%of 

Total 

No. of 

Customers 



58.4 

20.3 
10.2 

8.6 

7.8 

6.9 
4.6 
4.2 
3.7 
3.2 

2.8 
0.9 
0.4 
0.4 

0.7 
0.4 



* Data for Post Office Substation were obtained from only one store and were omitted from the individual store columns to prevenj 
identification. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



ubjects were selected and interviewed at 
:he drug stores. There is the presumption 
:hat some customers do most, if not all, 
heir shopping by telephone for subsequent 
lelivery. These people were missed in this 
;tudy. It is believed that this is not a 
lerious weakness of the survey. 

Discussion — The study indicated the over- 
vhelming importance of convenience (loca- 
ion and parking) in influencing the selec- 
ion of a drug store in this community, for 
t was the most frequently mentioned motive 
or shopping at five of the six drug stores 
dvich participated in this survey. It was 
onsidered quite significant that this factor 
ras reported by 58.4% of the 567 customers 
pterviewed and constituted 43.8% of the 
'56 submitted. 

From the customer \s viewpoint, conven- 
ence was most often expressed relative to 
is residence, place of employment or to his 
>atronage at stores or shops immediately 
djacent to or near the drug store of his 
hoice. 

The second most frequently reported 
actor was Friendly and Courteous Em- 
loyees. It was given by 20.3% of the 
ustomers interviewed and constituted 
5.2% of the total number submitted. 

A personal relationship with employees 
r owners was mentioned sufficiently to in- 
icate that it should have been listed 
pparately. Kinship, close friendship and 
iutual civic club participation were sub- 
letted by 6.9% of the customers inter- 
lewed. 

The fact that 31.4% of the customers who 
articipated in this study listed one of the 

rsonnel factors (Personal Relationship 
ith Employees or Owners; Friendly and 
ourteous Employees; Pharmacist's Ability) 
i a reason for shopping at his drug store 
■nded to prove the importance usually at- 
ibuted to employees in successful retail 
iiarmacy operations. 

The fact that a store had a fountain or 
ive exceptional fountain service was listed 
7 4.6% of the customers interviewed. Two 
! the stores involved in this study did not 
fer fountain service. 

Surprisingly, prices were a rather insig- 



nificant factor and in terms of occurrence 
was reported by only 3.7% of the customers 
interviewed and constituted 2.8% of the 
total number of reasons given. 

It was a disappointment that Pharma- 
cist 's Ability was not specified more fre- 
quently. Several reasons have been postu- 
lated for this. First, that perhaps more than 
realized, the general public automatically ex- 
pects adequate pharmaceutical service from 
all drug stores as insured by State Board 
licensure and supervisory procedures. Sec- 
ond, the question posed possibly was biased 
away from this factor. Third, and perhaps 
most important, the public's image of the 
professional abilities of the pharmacist has 
been obscured by the maze of non drug items 
stocked in some of our drug stores. 

Conclusions — The study clearly demon- 
strated the importance of convenience and 
friendly employees as factors in the selec- 
tion of a drug store by consumers. The 
results are somewhat similar to those re- 
ported by consumers in a midwestern city.* 

It was definitely indicated that in the 
minds of the consumer, each store possessed 
different desirable characteristics and it 
would have been possible to construct an ac- 
curate image from the data submitted. 

Manpower Data 

The National Association of Boards of 
Pharmacy, under "Manpower Data 1961- 
1962" lists 1,659 North Carolina pharma- 
cists as being engaged in practice on Janu- 
ary 1, 1961. 

On basis of 3.5% needed annually as re- 
placements for deceased pharmacists, etc., 
58 pharmacists are put into this category. 

The potential replacements (number cur- 
rently enrolled in the School of Pharmacy) 
are: 1962—72; 1963—85; and 1964—33. 
The low figure in 1964 is accounted for by 
the shift this past year from the 4 to 5 
year program. The graduates in 1964 are 
transfers coming into the class with one 
year of completed college work (now clas- 
sified as the pre-pharmacy year). 

It is anticipated the 1965 figure will be 
at least 75 since the class (pre-pharmacy) 
totaled 119. 

* American Druggist, May 15, 1961, pg. 84. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 

Jacksonville— The 900,000th prescription 
filled by Johnson's Drug Company was a 
lucky prescription for the customer, who 
received a $90 gift certificate, $10 for each 
100,000 Rxs filled since the pharmacy 
opened 25 years ago. 

Lexington — Xew addition to the phar- 
macist's staff at Peoples' Drug Store is 
Bay G. Hagwood of Apex. He will assist 
Manager George Moorefield. 



Diagnosis — 

Insufficient Insurance 

RX— 

Maximum Coverage at 
Minimum Cost 

Druggist — 

The American Druggists' 
Insurance Go. 

"The Best Buy Is A. D. I." 



INSURANCE CO 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 




CONSULT OUR AGENT 

F. O. Bowman 

North Carolina State Agent 

P. O. Box 688 
Chapel Hi 1, North Carolina 



Greensboro — Keith Fulbright is manager 
of the new Franklin's O. Henry Drug Com- 
pany just opened in the O. Henry Shopping 
Center at Summit Avenue and Cone Blvd. 
This is the fifth Greensboro unit of Frank- 
lin's Drug Company. 

Valdese — Marshall Dutton, a native of 
Hickory is now manager of the Walden- 
sian Pharmacy. Until late 1961 he worked 
in Charlotte with Eekerd's Drug on Provi- 
dence Road. 

Raleigh — The Garrett-Parker Drug Store 
has been sold to William Peele Wimberley, 
who has been associated with the firm as a 
pharmacist emiDloyee. Wimberley is a 
graduate (BS in Pharmacy) of Temple 
University and North Carolina College 
(M.S. in Chemistry). 

Burlington— J. I. (Buddy) White of 
Acme Drug Company has been reelected to 
serve for a second term as president of the 
Burlington Merchants Association. 

Hickory — John Brady, Highland Drug 
Store, has been named associate Civil De- 
fense director of Hickory Township, by 
unanimous vote of the Hickory City Council 

Greensboro — Wilkerson Drug Company! 
has secured an 8-year contract for space at 
104 South Elm Street, two doors south of] 
its present location. Rent is specified ati 
$10,500 a year. The lease provides that a 
drug store shall be operated there and thatj 
no shoes, hosiery or women's handbags will 
be sold. 

Yanceyville — Guest speaker at a recent] 
meeting of the Yanceyville Rotary Club was 
James A. Smith, Jr., medical service repre- 
sentative for A. H. Robins Company of 
Richmond. 

Raleigh — After three years with the Aii 
Force most of which time was at an aii 
base in California, Fred Owen Phifer re 
turns to civilian pharmacy with the Village 
Pharmacy in Cameron Village. He is 
native of Marshville. 




KEY designed interiors will boost your sales because of better and more distinctive displays 

KEY" FIXTURES FOR CONSTANT PROFITS 

Meet the challenge of today's keen 
competition with modern KEY-DE- 
SIGNED Store fixtures. 

KEY-LINE Fixtures lend an air of 
distinction to your store that invites 
constantly increasing store traffic. 
Maximum display and self-selection 
meet the busy shopper's requirement. 

These are the results effected by 
our experienced design engineer. 

i modern Bastian-Blessing Food-Fountain is a 
lagnet that draws customers back into your store 
me and time again. It helps make 
our store a friendly place to shop. 

Continuous KEY-LINE Wall Cases give you 
' the maximum in uncluttered display space and 
convenience of self-selection. 
Clip Coupon and Mail 




We are planning to 

□ Expand □ Modernize 

Name 

Firm Name 

Street Address. 

City 

State 




□ Build 

New 
Store 



GRANT E. KEY, INC. 

Manufacturers — Distributors 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



10 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



In color or black and white 




No Finer Snapshots at Any Price 

Supertone Prints 

"Truly the Finest in Snapshots'' 

PRODUCED ONLY BY 



FOISTER-PALM PHOTO SERVICE 

161 East Franklin Street 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Phone 942-3025 




The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



The Future framework of Health Services 
at the Community Level 

By Dr. Henry T. Clark, Jr., Administrator 
Division, of Health Affairs, University of North Carolina 



As a prototype, I am picturing what I 
relieve to be a relatively simple setting — 
community of 7500-10,000 people with 
iome surrounding trade area. This is a 
•ommon locale in North Carolina. I believe 
nost of the principles I will present apply 

communities of other sizes. 

The main provisions of the scheme : 

1 The hospital will be the primary center 
of community health activity. The Hill- 
Burton Act has now assured most towns of 
5,000 or more of an adequate hospital or 
health center. 

13 Most, if not all, of the physicians of the 
towns will have their offices in or adjoin- 
ing the hospital. This means that ex- 
pensive diagnostic facilities and equip- 
ment (e.g., X-ray) and laboratory per- 
sonnel need not be duplicated by several 
physicians, that better service can be 
rendered because of the likelihood of 
better central equipment and technical 
help in the hospital, that some costs to 
patients will decrease because of a marked 
decrease in the fixed investment and the 
operating overhead of physicians ' offices, 
and that hospital operations and finances 
will be placed on a sounder basis by an 
assured flow of ' ' business ' ' from ' ' re- 
ferred" patients needing technical diag- 
nostic and laboratory services. 

The practicing physicians of the communi- 
ty will focus their work in different fields 
of medical service, recognizing that the 
science of medicine has become too com- 
plex for physicians to be an expert in 
all fields. By each man having some area 
or areas of special interest, the communi- 
ty physicians, functioning in an organized 
group, will assure better and more com- 



From an address by Dr. Clark at the 1961 
Seminar on Modern Pharmaceutical Practice, 
forehead City. 



prehensive professional coverage for the 
people of the community. Such a pattern 
will reduce the present need for an ex- 
pense associated with referral of patients 
to larger medical centers. 
D A department of home care will form one 
division of the hospital out-patient depart- 
ment. The program of this department 
will be to provide, where necessary, medi- 
cal, nursing, housekeeping, and other serv- 
ices to sick individuals in the homes in 
those cases in which the illness of the 
individual is not such as to require hos- 
pitalization. The potential savings in 
money to the sick individual and his 
family and in emotional wear and tear on 
many sick individuals, and the economy in 
the use of costly hospital facilities are 
obvious. 

Commented one Pharmacist, after 
hearing Dr. Clark's remarks: ''The 
Corner Drug Store will cease to exist 
if this scheme does prevail." 

Journal readers are invited to ex- 
press themselves on this issue. 

E Most public health personnel — city health 
officers, visit-nurses and social workers, 
health educators, sanitary engineers, etc. — 
will have their offices in one section of the 
hospital or adjacent to it. Because of 
the physical proximity of all community 
health personnel, there should develop a 
better general understanding of the func- 
tion of each man. Likewise, the joint 
planning, which is so necessary to the de- 
velopment of a positive, preventive health 
program but which frequently simply does 
not exist today, can develop in a fairly 
natural way. Such joint planning will 
cover hospital out-patient care, immuniza- 
(Continued on page 13) 




Bayer Aspirin is the most widely used 

brand of medicinal preparation in the world. 
If the Bayer Aspirin tablets sold only in the 
United States during 1960 were placed side by 
side, they would circle the earth nearly twice! 
Latest reports from America's leading and 
largest research organization show that in unit 
sales— meaning turnover— Bayer Aspirin 



continues to be the largest selling analgesic 
. . . outselling its nearest competitor by 30% ! 
And in addition, Bayer Aspirin today is the 
fastest growing pain reliever on the market. 
Remember Bayer Aspirin is the No. 1 
Drug Turnover Item. So give it your No. 1 
Display Space and get your full share of sales 
on "fastest growing" Bayer Aspirin. 



GLENBROOK LABORATORIES Division of Sterling Drug Inc.. 1450 Br 



York 18, N. Y. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



13 



UTURE FRAMEWORK 

(Continued from page 11) 

tion campaigns, community health educa- 
tion programs, and in effect an organized 
total community health effort. 

The hospital center could well be the 
focus of dental care in the community. 
As in the case of private medical practice, 
the provision of some expensive equip- 
ment, facilities and personnel by the indi- 
vidual dentist could be avoided by such 
a location, some degree of specialization 
on the part of dentists working in close 
proximity can develop, and the patients, 
in turn, will obtain better service. Fur- 
thermore, there should develop an increas- 
ing referral of patients between dentists 
and physicians which exists only to a 
small degree now. Such increased referral 
would benefit both the professional groups 
and the patients concerned. 
It may be that group practices and com- 
prehensive health insurance programs can 
spread widely from present beginnings. 
It would appear likely that, with the pas- 
sage of time many more physicians, den- 
tists, and pharmacists that at present 
will find they can function happily and 
more effectively on a salary that a fee- 
for-service basis and, indeed, the former 
two groups would then be in a position to 
give more attention to preventative health 
matters in their patients rather than con- 
centrating on aiding the sick patient. 
The type of organizational framework for 
community health care which I have been 
describing provides the logical setting for 
post-graduate educational activity and, 
indeed, even some research — which is large- 
ly absent at the community level today. 
In addition, it provides a workable 
organizational setting for community 
medical care planning. 

tAnd finally it provides a better organi- 
zational entity than usually exists now 
through which to develop regional medi- 
cal care plans. 

'.e Place of Pharmacy in this Framework 
With most physicians ' offices located in 
1 adjacent to a community hospital, the 
Ispital pharmacy will largely take over the 



prescription service of the corner drug store. 
This could be a factor of major importance 
in changing the pattern of self -medication 
of the general public. It would be especially 
effective in lowering the cost of drugs to the 
patient since standard and frequently in- 
expensive pharmaceuticals would be sold 
in place of much more expensive trade name 
products. This move, likewise, would im- 
prove the work and contributions of regis- 
tered pharmacists by enabling professionally 
trained men to devote their full effort to 
professional rather than merchandising 
activity. 

Some Related Questions 
A Would a move by the voluntary, non-profit 
hospitals toward a program of selling 
prescriptions to patients at cost be in the 
best public interest? 
B Assuming the major concentration of pro- 
fessional pharmacy service in the com- 
munity hospital, how much manufacturing 
and packaging of products is feasible at 
that point? 

C Does work in the hospital setting make 
(Continued on page 15) 




Reaco B-Complex with C. Tablets 

$20.00 Doz. 100s 

Reaco A & D Capsules $10.00 Doz. loos 

A. E. P. Tablets $24.00 Doz. 100s 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 10 mg. Tablets 

$2.25 per 100 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 25 mg. Tablets 

$4.50 per 100 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 50 mg. Tablets 

$7.50 per 100 

Reavita Capsules $34.80 Doz. ioos 

$28.00 per 1000 

Neo-Reavita $36.00 Doz. lOfls 

Your cooperation in stocking 

Reaco Products is appreciated 

REACO PRODUCTS 

P. O. Box 247 
West Durham, North Carolina 



47% to 52% PROFIT 

for you on this fast-seller for chapped lips! 



By the Makers of STANBACK 



Hanger or 
Easel Displays 

Deal #2 

3 free with 12 

1 card of 12 tubes, plus 3 tubes free 

47% PROFIT 

Your Cost $2.80 

Selling Price $5.25 

Your Profit $2.45 



chap- 




Deal #6 



FOR CHAPPED LIPS 

35* 




J 



chap.et .; 



^ap"«t|||j I 



Wilts BIjESfO UK 3 „ 



12 free with 36 
3 cards of 12 tubes, plus 1 card (12 tubes) free 

50% PROFIT 

Your Cost $ 8.40 

Selling Price $16.80 

Your Profit $ 8.40 






jpi EsMy 



■chap-et 

.' ^«BI 



45 



W gflB ] 



Counter Displays 

Deal #100 

28 free with 72-100 tubes packed in counter display 
52% PROFIT 

Your Cost $16.80 

Selling Price $35.00 

Your Profit $18.20 



ORDER NOW FROM YOUR WHOLESALER 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 



FUTURE FRAMEWORK 

(Continued from page 13) 

for better utilization of the professional 
training and skills of the pharmacist? 

B Again referring to the hospital situation, 
can the cost of medicine to patients be 
substantially reduced by development of 
stock drug inventories which cover all the 
essential old and new products but elimi- 
nate needless stocking of essentially 
similar products under different trade 
names ? 

E Eecognizing that the move toward con- 
centration of professional pharmacy serv- 
ice in the community hospital will be a, 
gradual one, can some move be made be- 
tween the community physicians and the 
pharmacists toward a standard drug list 
which would make for more economy in 
pharmacy operations and lower cost to 
patients? 

F How many one-pharmacist drug outlets 
exist in North Carolina ; what are the good 
and bad features of their operation; and 
what, should be done to improve this situa- 
tion? 

G What is the calibre of professional serv- 
ice provided by the individual pharmacist 
5-10-25 years following graduation from 
pharmacy school? 

H As a corollary, what programs should be 
developed for the pharmacist in the field 
of continuation education? 

I What is the best mechanism for rendering 
pharmacy service of the highest quality to 
the largest numbers at the lowest cost? 

J How many pharmacists would be needed 
in North Carolina to man this system? 

These are some of the questions I have 
about pharmacy as I look to the future from 
my combined position as health educator, 
as medical care planner and as a consumer 
of medical services? For some of you who 
may feel a little uncomfortable about some 
of these questions, you will be interested 
that I have comparable questions about 
future developments in medicine, dentistry, 
nursing, public health and many of the 
auxiliary health professions. I wish I could 
present my thinking in some of those areas 



because I would be immensely interested in 
your reaction. 

A Word of Comfort and Some Suggestions 

The implications in what I have said are, 
of course, that the practice of pharmacy 
will undergo a radical change in the years 
ahead. I think this will be the ease. How- 
ever, the change will be a gradual one, and. 
it will be slower in North Carolina than iiL 
many other parts of the United States- 
This is because there are fewer organized 
consumer groups — e.g., labor unions, to work 
for rapid changes here, because the people 
of North Carolina are traditionally con- 
servative toward change, and because the 
popular image of the pharmacist is still 
very favorable. 

Don 't be lulled, however, into a feeling 
that, because there are few organized con- 
sumer groups in North Carolina, the voice 
of the consumer will not have influence 
here. In the final analysis, the general 
public exercises its strongest influence at 
the voting booth. Though legislation per- 
taining to health care and pharmacy prac- 
tice is proceeding at a relatively slow pace 
in Raleigh, it is moving at a much faster 
clip in Washington. 

I have two suggestions now. 

The first concerns you as individual phar- 
macists. As professional men, you have a 
responsibility not only to work for the 
greatest good of the individual patient whom 
you serve but you should work for the best 
possible over-all health programs for your 
whole community. This means you should 
first decide what directions your community 
health program should take and then work 
actively with many other people and groups 
to implement your thinking. 

My second suggestion concerns you as 
members of various groups — e.g., the NCPA, 
the NC Board of Pharmacy, the NC Phar- 
maceutical Research Foundation, the School 
of Pharmacy. A great deal of study is 
needed to determine ' ' What is the best 
mechanism for rendering pharmacy service 
of the highest quality to the largest num- 
bers at the lowest costs?" and to answer 
some of the other questions I have posed. 
I wish those of you here would provide some 
of the impetus to get studies in this field 
under way soon. 



16 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



For seventy-seven years 
- - - since 1885 

SeeMAK 



OF 



DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long asso- 
ciation with North Caro- 
lina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its forty- 
third volume, and the 
first printed copy was 
"Seeman Printed." 




The Seeman Printery 

of DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



Work Completed on Revised Edition 
of the N. C. Dental Formulary 

A new edition of The North Carolina 
Dental Formulary lias been compiled by a 
joint committee of pharmacists and dentists 
working under chairmanship of Pharmacist 
Roger Sloop and Dr. Charles M. Westrick, 
both of Winston-Salem. 

The revised edition of The Formulary is 
now being printed and is expected to be 
ready by early April. The initial distribu- 
tion will be at the NCPA Convention, 
Raleigh, April 8-10. 

The revised edition represents a great deal 
of effort on the part of a number of phar- 
macists and dentists. As the publication be- 
comes available, we will have more to say 
about how it has been improved over the 
original edition. Persons familiar with this 
type formulary have stated the N. C. Dental 
Formulary to be the most outstanding state 
dental formulary in the U. S. 



Baker Sells Half Interest 
in Hoke Drug Company 

Walter Coley has purchased half interest 
in the Hoke Drug Company, Raeford, from 
owner Walter Baker. Mr. Coley has been 
associated with Hoke Drug since 1957. 

Hoke Drug Company was established in 
1911. Mr. Baker bought the store in 1924. 

Upjohn Files FT Suits 

The Upjohn Company has filed five suits 
charging five drug stores of Winston-Salem 
with selling its products at less than the 
minimum prices established under the North 
Carolina Fair Trade Act. 

Named in the suits are Dart Drug Com- 
pany, Inc., doing business as Hart Drugs, 
and three Eckerd stores of Winston-Salem 
and the parent Eckerd company of Char- 
lotte. 

Upjohn seeks $25,000 damages from the 
Eckerd group in one suit and $25,000 dam- 
ages from Dart Drug. 

Last year Dart Drug was named in fair 
trade suits by J. B. Williams Company, The 
Parker Pen Company and Miles Labs. Miles 
has also entered suits against Eckerd 's of 
Greensboro and Eckerd 's-Summit, Inc. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 




S. T. Forrest, President and 
General Manager, Justice Drug Company 



Forrest Appointed Bank Director 

Stephen T. Forrest, president and general 
manager of Justice Drug Company, Greens- 
boro, Xortli Carolina, lias been appointed as 
a member of the Greensboro Board of Di- 
rectors of the North Carolina National Bank. 

Mr. Forrest is a graduate of the Universi- 
ty of North Carolina School of Business 
Administration and served in the armed 
forces from 194] to 1945. 

A past president of the Traveling Men's 
Auxiliary of the North Carolina Pharma- 
ceutical Association, he also has active in- 
terest in the promotion of pharmacy. 

He is a member of the First Presby- 
terian Church and of its Board of Deacons; 
a member of the Board of Directors of 
Greensboro Rotary Club; a member of the 
Morehead Scholarship Committee, Greensboro 
Advisory Board of Guilford College, and of 
the Case Policy Committee of the Children's 
Home of North Carolina. His chief hobby 
is golf. Mr. and Mrs. Forrest have two sons 
and one daughter. 



THE HENRY B. GILPIN COMPANY 

Full Line, Full Service Wholesale Druggists Since 1845 
Baltimore • Dover • Norfolk • Washington 





Norfolk Division 

Equipped for fast, 

efficient wholesale drug 

service to the pharmacists of 

the eastern section of North Carolina 

6435 Tidewater Drive • Norfolk, Virginia • Madison 2-6361 



18 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



%h 



ins 



FEBRUARY CHECK LIST 

Tear out for a handy check of 

your current stock of these 

Robins products that are receiving 

special promotion in your area 
February 12— March 23 

Robanul 

□ lab. 100's □ Tab. 500s 

Robanul-PH 

□ lab. 100's □ lab. 500's 

Robaxin 

D lab. 50's □ lab. 500's 

Robaxin S Injectable 

□ Amp. 10 te. 5's □ Amp. 10 ec. 25's 

Robaxisal 

D T»b- 100's □ lab 500's 

Robaxisal- PH 

□ Tab. 100's □ Tab. 500's 
Dimetane Expectorant 

D 16 B. □ Gsl. 

Dimetane Expectorant-DC 

I □ IB BL □ Gil. 

DonnageE 

D 6 0!. 

Donnagel-PG 

In 6 «■ 

Donnagel . 

□ 6 o; ' with Neomycin 



Why not check your stock of 

all Robins products at the same tim 

— and be prepared 



A. H. ROBINS CO., INC., Richmond 20, va. 




Link Wins National Award 

F. Philip Link, Link Bros. Pharmacy, 
Eeidsville, has been notified by the Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical Association that his ex- 
hibit in the National Pharmacy Week Dis- 
play Contest won fourth place in the Com- 
munity Pharmacies class. 

The award will be presented to Mr. Link, 
or his representative, in Las Vegas on 
March 28 at the annual meeting of the 
A.Ph.A. 

As state winner, Mr. Link will receive 
the NCPA Plaque in Raleigh in early April. 



Forrest Appointed Council Member 

Rill Forrest, co-owner of the Akers Cen- 
ter Pharmacy, Gastonia, has been appointed 
to the Small Business Administration's ad- 
visory council for the State of North Caro- 
lina. 

Sixteen members were appointed to the 
advisory council to meet on call with SB A 
officials and help evaluate the agency's 
programs. 

Unusual Prescriptions 

In addition to writing the usual type pre- 
scriptions, Dr. Hilton S. Read supplements 
his medical prescribing with a bit of Dr. 
Anthony-type advice (also written so there 
will be no misunderstanding on the part of 
the patient as to exactly what orders have 
been issued) : 

For an overly-superstitious woman: 
"Make a study of voodoo and witchcraft." 

For a man who hated his boss: "Spend 
five minutes a day for a week jotting down 
all his good traits. ' ' 

For a young married couple: "Spend a 
weekend in a log cabin. ' ' 

For an overspending wife: "Cancel your 
charge accounts." 



Break-in at Peoples Drug 

Cameras, razors, lighters and #100 in cash 
were taken from Wilkesboro 's Peoples Drug 
Store on January 12. Burglars, who 
smashed the rear door of the firm, forced 
open the safe but left narcotics untouched. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

Preliminary Convention Schedule 

SIR WALTER HOTEL, RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



19 



APRIL 8 


APRIL 9 


APRIL 10 


(SUNDAY) 


(MONDAY) 


(TUESDAY) 


MORNING 


MORNING 


MORNING 




NCPA Breakfast- 


NCPA Breakfast- 




Business Session 


Business Session 




TMA Golf Tournament 


TMA Business Session 




Auxiliary Luncheon 


Woman's Auxiliary 
Luncheon and 




NCPA Past Presidents' 


Business Session 




Luncheon 


Academy of Pharmacy 
Luncheon 


AFTERNOON 


AFTERNOON 


AFTERNOON 


1952 Class Reunion 


NCPA Business Session 


NCPA Business Session 


Awards-Citations 


Tea at 


Officers Installation 




Governor 's Mansion 




50 Plus Assembly 




King Social Hour 


Get Acquainted 






Coffee Hour 






NIGHT 


NIGHT 


NIGHT 


Banquet 


Floor Show & Dance 


Floor Show & Dance 


Entertainment by 


Sponsored by W. H. 


Sponsored by the 


University of North- 


King Drug' Company 


Traveling Men's 


Carolina Glee Club 

| 


and its Associates 


Auxiliary, NCPA. 










Boss: Don't look now but I think we 
are being followed. 

Charlie: "BC" has what it takes to make 
it a leader. 



America's Fastest-Selling 
Headache Powder 

. . . and r £C" Tablets in 
the new red, white and blue 
bottles and cartons are 
gaining new customers 
every day 




headache 



neuralgia 



B.C. REMEDY CO. Durham, north carolin, 

Made and sold in North Carolina for over 50 years 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 



Price Honored As "Hospital 

Pharmacist of the Year" at 

Raleigh Meeting 

Guest speakers at the January 20 meeting 
>f the North Carolina Society of Hospital 
Pharmacists, held in Raleigh, were Mine- 
ree Pyne of Burlington, President-Elect 
\>f the N. C. Hospital Association, and H. E. 
Starling of the State Bureau of Investiga- 
ion. 

Frank Lowder of Winston-Salem succeeded 
rerald Stahl of Durham as president of the 
irganization. 

H. G. Price, chief pharmacist at Rex 
hospital for the past 25 years, was honored 
is "Hospital Pharmacist of the Year." 
•Several members of the Bex Hospital staff 
oined the pharmacists in paying tribute to 
.sir. Price. 

Dr. Melvin Chambers of the UNC School 
f Pharmacy outlined the program of the 
/Drug Symposium'' which is scheduled on 
uecessive Wednesdays in Chapel Hill be- 
ginning February 7. 

Other officers of the Society are Roy L. 
Salter, Jr. of Burlington, vice-president, 
Ind Miss Shirley M. Mikeal of Charlotte, 
ecretary -treasurer. 



O'Hanlon-Watson Donate 
Funds for Scholarship 

The 'Hanlon- Watson Drug Company 
lade a substantial contribution to the seho- 
arship fund of the School of Pharmacy in 
he name of the pharmacists of its trading 
rea as a constructive substitute for its 
nnual Christmas gifts. The scholarship will 
e awarded for the first time to a worthy 
tudent from the Winston-Salem trading 
rea. 



New Pharmacy for Wadesboro 

R. B. Tollison of Oakboro has opened a 
ew pharmacy in Wadesboro. 

A graduate of the University of South 
arolina School of Pharmacy, Mr. Tollison 



has operated a pharmacy in Oakboro in 
recent years. 



School of Pharmacy Record 
Available on Request 

The latest edition of The University of 
North Carolina Record, with announcements 
for the 1962-1963 session of the School of 
Pharmacy, is now available. 

Copies are available by writing either the 
School of Pharmacy or the N. C. Pharma- 
ceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 

The Record is forty pages plus a sup- 
plement with a calendar of events for the 
School of Pharmacy running from June, 
1962 thru August 1963. 



Observes "Open House" 

The Bristow Drug Store, owned and 
operated by E. Clyde Robertson, observed 
"open house" on January 26-27. Ice cream 
and Pepsi-Colas were given away. 

John B. Kneece is the pharmacist. 



Make, McQo-uni 

For Labels -in Rolls or Flats 
Physicians 1^ Blanks and Files 

Drug Boxes - Call Checks 
Drjg and Delivery Envelopes 



Pieddlfxlio+t JlaMeMi 

all Styl&d. and. GoiaxA. 



McCOURT LABEL CABINET CO. 



42-54 BENNETT X-.yfflPl-/ BRADFORD, 

STREET V'°aZq T / PENNA. 

Sptcialiilng in Labels fat Drug Stares 

Clifford P. Berry, Representative 
P. O. Box 306, Charlotte 1, N. C. 



99 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



STROTHER 
DRUG COMPANY 

of Richmond, Inc. 

3700 Saunders Avenue 

POWERS-TAYLOR DRUG CO. 

Richmond, Va. 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 

Full Line 

Full Service 

Member of 
Druggists Service Co. 

National Wholesale 
Druggists Association 

For Best Service Call Us 

Collect 

353-2771 

After Hours Call 

353-2777 



Rogers-Houser Installed 

Two pharmacists have been installed as 
heads of their local merchants association 
for the coming year. 

Ralph P. Rogers, Jr. is president of the 
Durham Merchants Association while W. H. 
Houser is serving in a similar capacity with 
the Cherryville Merchants Association. 

Hamlet Pharmacy Sold 

T. E. Fussell and Thomas E. Smart have 
purchased Mabry's Drug Store, Hamlet, 
from C. S. Mabry. 

Mr. Fussell is a native of Rose Hill where 
he operated a pharmacy for several years. 
He has been associated with the Wabberson 
Drug (now Mabry's) since 1957. 

Mr. Smart is a junior in the School of 
Pharmacy, UNC. Manager and pharmacist 
in charge will be Mr. Fussell. 

Mabry's has operated as a pharmacy \rn-i 
der different firm names for -iO yearsJ 
First as Seaboard Drug Company, thenj 
successively as Mabry 's, Culbreth 's Drua 
Store, Wabberson Drug and finally a return 
to Mabry's (since 1959). 



FOR YOUR PHOTOFINISHING NEEDS 

Let B & H Photo Company Serve You 

Complete Service on 

Black and White Kodacolor 

Ektachrome Anscochrome 

Kodachrome Movies and Slides 
Processed in Our Plant 

B & II PHOTO COMPANY 

3030 s. boulevard p. 0. box 1600 

phone 523-7093 charlotte 1, n. c. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



23 



SMITH WHOLESALE DRUG CO. 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

A Young and Growing Service Wholesale House, 
Owned and Operated by Registered Pharmacists 



We Appreciate Your Business 




This Plaque highlights the wall directly across from the Front Entrance of the Institute 
of Pharmacy. It is a familiar scene to visitors. 



-&*06zat- Quality- 




Pays and Pays and Pays 

Sealtest Ice Cream — in dishes, cones and cartons — 
brings customers in, sells the ones that came for 
other products, and makes your cash register ring. 

Well-known quality keeps Sealtest preferred. 
National and local advertising keeps Sealtest pre-sold. 
And regular special flavors help keep Sealtest 
predominant. 

So, stock up with Sealtest Ice Cream. Display the 
Sealtest sign of quality. Then, count up 
your extra Sealtest profits! 

***** 

And be sure to Feature this Special Flavor 

'Choo-Choo Chocolate Marshmallow" 

for your Fountain and Take-Home Customers! 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 



News from the Local-District 
Pharmaceutical Societies 



Durham-Orange 

The first meeting of the new year of the 
Durham-Orange Drug Club was held Janu- 
ary 8 at The Little Acorn in Durham. 

Professor Clarence McGregor, Burlington 
Industries Professor of Business Adminis- 
tration at the University of North Caro- 
lina, discussed trends in retailing which have 
I and are influencing the public 's image of 
: Pharmacy. In a survey conducted by the 
i speaker, only 8 out of 20 faculty members 
said they personally knew their pharmacist 
; and 50% indicated they did not feel it 
j important to know their pharmacist. 90% 
i of those queried stated they were personal- 
! ly acquainted with a doctor. 

Cabarrus County 

Members of the Cabarrus County Phar- 

[ maceutical Society met in Concord at the 

| country club on January 4. The guest 

speaker was an agent of the Food and Drug 

Administration. 

Present as guests were members of the 
Cabarrus County Medical Society. Attend- 
ing from Chapel Hill were Dr. Melvin 
Chambers, Professors Brannon and Jowdy 
and Secretaries H. C. McAllister and W. J. 
Smith. 

In an open forum discussion following 
the formal talk by the FDA agent, subjects 
covered included the handling of out of 
state prescriptions, the status of ' ' PEN ' ' 
directions, mail order drugs and MD dis- 
pensing. 

One physician asked who to report to 
when a drug or product causes a reaction. 
He mentioned a bubble bath and a drink 
powder. 

Another stated it was embarrassing to 
prescribe a drug, then to have the phar- 
macist to report that the drug had been 
withdrawn from the market. The MD 
wanted to know whose responsibility it was 
to keep him informed of drugs no longer 
available. 



Wilson County 

H. C. McAllister, Secretary-Treasurer of 
the N. C. Board of Pharmacy, was guest 
speaker at the January 9 meeting of the 
Wilson County Drug Club. 

The speaker discussed the new regulation 
(effective July 1) adopted by the Board 
of Pharmacy relating to placing of phar- 
macist 's name on prescription labels. 



Lenoir County 

Paul Tart of Kinston was installed as 
president of the Lenoir County Pharma- 
ceutical Society at a meeting of the organi- 
zation in Kinston on January 22. He suc- 
ceeded John C. Hood, Jr. as head of the 
Society. 

Other officers are Ed Bradshaw, Jr., vice- 
president, and Hal Paderiek, secretary- 
treasurer. 

An open forum closed the meeting. Par- 
ticipating were A. L. Hogan, Mrs. Marsha 
Hood Brewer, Ed Bradshaw, Jr., Kenneth 
Moore and B. B. York, the latter a MSR for 
Physicians Products. 



Rowan-Davie 

Members of the Rowan-Davie Pharmaceu- 
tical Society met in Salisbury on January 
24 with Paul Miller of Spencer, president 
of the organization, presiding. 

NCPA President Robert B. Hall of 
Moeksville outlined the district-state Judicial 
Council setup which is now being activated. 
The Council rules and regulations will be 
considered at the forthcoming NCPA Con- 
vention in Raleigh. 

Edwin R. Fuller, a past president of the 
NCPA, commented on the NCPA Code of 
Ethics, which will be used as a basis of 
action by the Judicial Council. 

Next meeting of the Society will be in 
March. 



2(5 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Are you Ready for Tomorrow? 



By Ernest W. Fair 



Today's big uncertainty is not so much 
the threat of war and survival as that of 
what tomorrow will bring. In every area 
of one's life vast changes are taking place 
with each passage of the sun across the 
Heavens. In science, in education, in gov- 
ernment, and yes, in business, these changes 
carry the probability that those who fail 
to prepare themselves may Avell be left so 
far behind as to become lost. 

Business itself faces this challenge as 
evidenced by the great amount of study and 
research being devoted to the problem to- 
day. The pharmacist who ignores the prob- 
abilities these forecasts predict is not only 
setting up unnecessary roadblocks to future 
business attainment but endangering the 
very position he holds today. 

In paragraphs to follow are presented a 
number of ' ' probabilities ' ' brought out in 
nearly a score of such forecasts the writer 
has analysed during the past month. Any- 
thing of this nature cannot, of course, be 
presented with positive assurance that they 
will become actuality. They are, however, 
based on such thorough and complete study 
of business trends and probabilities that 
they cannot be ignored by any reader of 
these pages. 

Are you ready for tomorrow? Check these 
probabilities and make certain that should 
any develop, as they most probably will, 
such beforehand awareness will guarantee 
the business goals being sought. 

Different advertising approaches than 
those used today are almost a certainty for 
even as the year turned they were being 
developed. The old standard approaches 
which have served so well for years may 
require considerable amendment. 

Customers today have different thinking 
about their needs than in the past. They 
have also become much more responsive to 
new stimuli in advertising and selling. Many 
of the old routines leave today 's customer 
cold. 

Changes in- buying motives are equally ap- 
parent. Quality, provision for more leisure, 



tax saving factors, and similar buying mo- 
tives may be more important during the! 
forthcoming year than ever before. 

Practical buying motives can well return 
to the importance they have deserved in the 
past. 

Levels of leisure will rise in the future, 
as they are already doing today and there 
can well come a day when everyone will 
be on the 40-hour week. 

Not only will this have a marked effect 
upon our customers as such but new levels 
of leisure will also be up for consideration! 
within the store staff. 

These will require securing more work 
from fewer hours of salaried employment 
within the staff and by all means much more 
careful selection of employees than in thei 
past. 

Planning not for today — but for manyfi 
tomorrows will be a certainty. Businessi 
programs the pharmacist develops in everyj 
area will have to be scheduled out into fu- 
ture weeks and months rather than just the 
day or two surrounding the program. In- 
creased competition (and better competi- 
tion than ever before) will make this a re- 
quirement. 

More government attention to business 
competition is an almost certainty for the 
immediate future and will have to enter- 
into the planning of every pharmacist. 
Each trend of the past five years high- 
lights this change in philosophy ... all 
point to its continuance into the immediate 1 
future. Wherever competition exists busi- 
ness can well give thought to the existence! 
there of prying government investigators)] 
looking for something upon which to pounce. 

The tax factor is a positive certainty as 
entering into the smallest business decisionj 
which will be made in the future. Todays 
35 percent of income goes to taxes ; everyj 
sign points to a definite increase almostjl 
every year ahead. No thought is given byj 
any responsible government official from city! 
to national level on tax reduction other tliaiifl 
for publicity purposes. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



27 



Insofar as the pharmacist is concerned 
his will affect his business decision making 
it every step. It will mean the tax cost 
'actor will have to be kept in mind on every 
msiness decision confronting him. 

New looks at imports will have to be taken 
lot only from the specific field in which one 
s doing business but insofar as the overall 
msiness picture is concerned. Competition 
or "top dog" among the nations of the 
vorld is another certainty. In years past 
he spot has been ours without too much of 

struggle; tomorrow we will be faced with 
he greatest struggle our nation has ever 
nown as the USSR comes to the position in 
danning where the challenge will be thrown 
ull into the face of business itself; not just 
n missiles and propaganda. Whether or not 
mported goods affect the individual pharma- 
ist in his specific merchandise they are go- 
ng to affect him as a business man. 

Increased financial reserves will become a 
aecessity for every business in the future 
ust ahead. These will without a doubt be 
ifficult and uncertain times. The firms 
Vhich come through them are — always those 
a best financial position. Accumulation of 
lore financial reserve by every pharmacy 
.ill require added conservation and planning 
t every step of the business operation. 

Scarcity of top-notch white-collar em- 
loyees may very well become a major prob- 
?m soon. More and more of the men and 
-omen formerly stepping into this group are 
oing to college or entering the professions 
r going into business for themselves. The 
rain exists on the other side of the group 
1 increasing financial appeal of the trades. 
(he net result can be a most serious short- 
ge in business of worthwhile middle white- 
Dllar bracket workers. 

I More business will have to be done in 
torter hours. This is a definite trend in 
rery business area ; believe it or not it 
lay well be for the pharmaceutical field 
i the future. The plans whereby this is to 

accomplished will not be easy to come 
This is probably the most positive of 

II trends of tomorrow. 

Greater consumer demand for the "ex- 
as" in life is another growing trend of the 
tst two years and it is reaching our 
irticular field. It shows no sign of abat- 



ing. This demand reflects itself upon every 
item offered the consumer in the country 
today. These continuing demands for ' ' ex- 
tras" will affect just about every pharmacy 
in business for a long time into the future. 

More business restrictions at city and 
state government levels chiefly through tax- 
ing prerogatives are a virtual certainty. 
They should be planned for in any and all 
types of business and their local effect will 
be felt on even the smallest concern. No- 
where is there much thought given by local 
governmental bodies to actual application of 
tax reduction today; only tax increases and 
new sources of taxes. With such application 
comes rules and regulations affecting the 
conduct of business under such taxes. 

New definitions of "profit" necessitated 
by increasing taxation on such profits may 
cause complete re-alignment of business 
planning at every level. As the drive for 
more tax money increases and new sources 
for these dollars become harder to find there 
is sure to be concerted effort toward ex- 
tracting more tax dollars from existing 
sources. Squeezes on allowable business 
costs in tax figures may require greater 
control over existing profit accounting. 

Shrinking profit margins may virtually 
eliminate ' ' mistake making ' ' or the trial- 
and-error method of doing business. In 
yesterday's business operation margin was 
always allowed for this human element fac- 
tor. Today it is a burden being looked 
upon with considerable doubt in business 
generally. Tomorrow it is certain to be 
labeled an undesirable liability which can- 
not be tolerated. 

Greater emphasis on impact selling shows 
every indication of becoming a must for 
the future. It may develop to the point 
where display and advertising will have to 
be so effective as to create an instantaneous 
buying decision. Use of the old leisurely 
methods of selling may well bog down 
completely in the forthcoming highly com- 
petitive business period every pharmacist is 
likely to be facing soon. 

There is even a chance that selling tech- 
niques will call for less emphasis on verbal 
salesmanship ; that takes too much time and 
tomorrow 's customer may not be willing to 
give us that time. 



28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



DSC Pharmacy School Notes 




fessor of Biochemistry at the Cornell Medi 
cal Center in New York City. 

Dr. M. A. Chambers, Assistant Dean, and 
Professors James L. Brannon and A. Wi 
Jowdy attended the meeting of the Cabarrus 
County Pharmaceutical Society at Concord 
on January 4. 

Tom Croker, janitor for the School ol' 
Pharmacy during the 1940 's and 50 's died 
at his home on January 13. Students and 
faculty of that period mourn the loss ol 
this good and gentle friend. His health 
vas poor almost continuously after he re' 
tired four years ago. 

Dean Brecht as Chairman of the Chape' 
Hill Chapter of the American Eed Crosl 
presided at the capping of eleven Graj' 
Ladies on January 16 for volunteer service,' 
in North Carolina Memorial Hospital. 



During the Christmas Holidays, on De- 
cember 27, Dr. A. W. Jowdy, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacy Administration, Dean 
E. A. Brecht, and John Holloway for Hol- 
loway-Reeves and Associates, architects for 
the Pharmacy Building spent the day in 
Charlotte to give preliminary approval for 
the fixtures being constructed for the retail 
laboratory by John Seegers as subcontrac- 
tors to McKesson & Robbins, Inc. who made 
the low bid for the installation. At this time 
in mid-January during the past week more 
than one-half of the installation has been 
completed in Room 105 of Beard Hall. 

The retail laboratory will have the ap- 
pearance of a modern pharmacy and will 
provide facilities for more realistic practice 
in the areas of pharmacy management and 
dispensing. The only element which will be 
lacking will be real customers. Experience 
can be given in practice selling, drug store 
layouts, marking and display of merchan- 
dise, etc. 

Dr. and Mrs. William D. Cash visited the 
School of Pharmacy on December 28. Dr. 
Cash, a native of Spindale, received his 
Ph.D. in 1954 with a major in Pharmaceu- 
tical Chemistry. He is now Associate Pro- 



Kappa Psi 

By Hal Reaves, Public Relations Chairmari 

On Thursday evening, January 11, » 
brothers and pledges went to the Cerebra 
Palsy Hospital in Durham to give a parts 
for the children there. It was assuredly ai\ 
unforgettable experience for everyone. Re 
freshments were served and gifts were pre 
sented to the youngsters, who seemed 
thoroughly delighted with the party and 
visitors. 

At a recent fraternity meeting Miss Lyndaj 
Cauble was elected as the Kappa Psi Sweet-j 
heart for 1962. Lynda is presently a third] 
year student at the School of Pharmacyj 
Her new title will become official at the an-j 
nual Pledge Banquet to be held February 
23. 



Historical Note 
By Alice Noble, Research Historian 

I am most grateful for the many heart- 
warming messages I have received about my 
history as well as for the complimentary 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



reviews that have been published. Christmas 
was made extra pleasant by friends writing 
me that they were enjoying the book and I 
want to take this opportunity to try to 
express my appreciation of their kindness. 
The review by Wade Gilliam in the Decem- 
ber issue of this Journal was most gratify- 
ing. Two other reviewers have written so 
pleasantly about my efforts that it has been 
suggested that I carry what they had to say 
in this column. This I am doing in part — 
one was by a layman and the other by a 
pharmacist. 

The first, written by Louis Graves, ap- 
oeared in the Chapel Hill Weekly. I am 
quoting one paragraph: 

"The School of Pharmacy holds a unique 
position in relation to the State. By the 
neasure of value to the people of North 
Carolina no section of the University is 
uore important. A book is published today 
oj the U.N.C. Press, entitled The School of 
Pharmacy of the University of North Caro- 
lina: A History. This history tells the 
vhole story — all about the personalities, the 
purriculum, the struggle against and the final 
rictory over indifference, the physical im- 
provements — of the School of Pharmacy of 
he University. The writing is done in the 
aest of all styles, which means it is simple 
find direct. A distinct kindness the author 
las done the reader is not having any little 
igures spread through the text to refer to 
lotes or an appendix; instead she groups 
idequate references at the bottom of the first 
oage of every chapter. The type is large 
knd clear and the jacket and hard cover are 
)f beautiful color and design. All readers 
Ivill welcome the short preface and the 
biography of the author on the jacket. ..." 

The second, entitled ' ' Pep-Up Tonic f or 
Pharmacy, ' ' was contributed to the book 
ection of the Raleigh News and Observer, by 
Tune Bush West, Baleigh pharmacist and an 
.lumnus of the School. She says : ' ' At a 
ime when the doings of the Kefauver com- 
[aittee have been widely publicized ; when the 
lising cost of drugs continues to be choice 
lonversation; and when a judge in Cali- 
ornia takes it upon himself to remark that 
Iiharmacy is not a profession — there conies 



a book as refreshing to me as a good breath 
of fresh air. Alice Noble's The School of 
Pharmacy of the University of North Caro- 
lina is certainly a timely book. Every phar- 
macist in the state will get a boost in spirit 
when he reads this history. 

"... The years of struggle to establish 
the permanent school and an insight into 
the leaders of pharmacy that brought this 
about are detailed with exactness. 

"Pages are filled with names of old 
friends, events, committee members and 
speech-makers. Many pharmacists will not 
realize until they read this history that they 
actually are a part of history itself. 

' ' Apart from its vast store of chronicled 
events this book is easily read. I cannot 
help but comment on the excellence of the 
overall planning. That can be expected of 
Alice Noble. She has breathed in the atmos- 
phere of Pharmacy so long and given of her 
efforts to Pharmacy and pharmacists in 
many capacities since her first connection 
with pharmacy. It is fitting that she should 
write its history. ' ' 



DISTINCTIVE ^ 




Carry your 
store's identity by color and 
personalized copy right Into your customers 
home for the life of the Prescription. 

Another plus value of the modern paper 
box with its clean fresh label. 

Representative: 

M. C. GRIER 

iiio ann st., at. 3-3847 

Monroe, North Carolina 

• • • 

E. N. ROWELL CO., INC 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



30 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



There's 



\ \ I I . 

\ J :€»l JTi * 

* ■ $ * % H 



s 



in 



finejtate 






From Many Places 

The latest list of pre-pharmaey student 
jjrospects indicate a favorable nation-wida 
recognition of our School of Pharmacy. Note 
these: 

14 from North Carolina, 3 from Florida, 2. 
Delaware, 1 Indiana, 1 Panama, 1 Illinois. 
1 New York, 1 Free China (Taiwan). 

Eventually several hundred prospects will 
be interviewed and a high percentage en- 
rolled in the University. 



Contributions 

The NCPA received $1,000 in January 
from the estate of the late Thomas H. May 
of Wake Forest. In same mail was a $500 
check from another strong supporter of the 
NCPA. These funds plus others have beenj 
placed where designated : Endowment Fund, 
Institute, aid of needy students, etc. 



MILK 

and 

ICE 

CREAM 

people like it 
and buy it 

Tastes Great . . . It's 



finejtate 




Quick- 
3E3Rub 



[ CHATTANOOGA MIDICINI CO. 



big on TV 

Soltice is the modern Quick- 
Rub that is getting the most 
powerful TV push in its history 
this season. 

More and more of your 
customers are hearing about 
the chest rub that's pure white 
and nice to use. Be sure you 
have it for them. 



THE CHATTANOOGA MEDICINE CO. 

CHATTANOOGA 9, TENNESSEE 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 




Survivors are his wife, Mrs. Elizabeth Hill 
Johnson; one daughter and two sisters; and 
two brothers, Dr. Charles B. Johnson of 
Jacksonville and Dr. George Johnson of 
Wilmington. 



A son Jack Loyd, Jr., to Mr. and Mrs. 
Jack L. Tyler of Greenville, December 20th. 
Mr. Tyler recently opened the Pavilion 
Pharmacy at Greenville, going there from 
phapel Hill. . . A son, Baylus Cade, Jr. to 
Berniee and Cade Brooks of Fayetteville, 
^December 30, 1961. 



Deaths 

J. H. McLELLAND 

John Howard McLelland, born December 
8, 1882, died in Mooresville, January 8 
ollowing a lengthy illness. 

A graduate of Davidson College (1903), 
klr. McLelland attended Page's School of 
-•harmacy and received his license to prac- 
ice pharmacy in 1909. He was associated 
nth the George C. Goodman Drug Store of 
looresville for 23 years, then followed six 
ears as an insurance salesman with return 
D pharmacy with Troutman Drug Company 
h 1932. In recent years he has been as- 
ociated with the Goodman store on a part- 
pme basis. 

G. P. JOHNSON 

Graham Page Johnson, 59, Jacksonville 
jharmacist and founder of the Johnson Drug 
iompany (1932), died January 17. 
I A native of Wallace and a graduate of 
lie School of Pharmacy, UNC, Mr. John- 
I>n was a former chairman of the Jackson- 
ville District School Committee, a charter 

ember of the Kiwanis Club and an active 

irticipant in a number of civic organiza- 

jons and community projects. 



S. L. JONES 

Samuel L. Jones, 78, of Greensboro, died 
December 30. 

A native of Rockingham County, Mr. 
Jones had lived in Greensboro 53 years. He 
was first connected with Farris-Kluttz Drug 
Company and later with Stratford-Weather- 
ly Drug Company. From 1934 to 1946 he 
operated the Elm Street Pharmacy, and after 
selling this pharmacy, became associated 
with the McDuffie-Eubanks Drug Company. 
He remained with this firm until his retire- 
ment three years ago. 

ELERY W. OLIVER 

Elery Watson Oliver, age 69, Greensboro 
pharmacist, died January 28 at his home. 

A graduate of the Southern College of 
Pharmacy, Mr. Oliver purchased the West 
Market Street Pharmacy of Greensboro in 
1932 and operated it as Oliver 's Drug Store 
until his death. 

O. D. BIDDY 

O. D. Biddy, age 66, Brevard pharmacist, 
died January 23 after a short illness. 

Mr. Biddy was a veteran of World War I 
and was active in the first Field Trial Club 
in Western North Carolina. He was con- 
sidered one of the best informed men on 
bird dogs in Western North Carolina. 

Marriages 

William White Morris of Kennedy 's Drug, 
Inc. of Gastonia, and Miss Helen Madeline 
Hook of Bessemer City were married De- 
cember 30th at the Grace Lutheran Church 
of Bessemer City. 




€*1 



THE 6EER DRUG 
COMPANY 

kikredjg Sastem fMortket 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Carolina Camera 

Top: Dr. Melvin Chambers, Assistant 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy, University 
of North Carolina, is shown with exhibit, 
which was a part of a Health Careers Con- 
gress in Winston-Salem, Jan. 26-27. A num- 
ber of the approximate 300 high school 
students attending the Congress expressed 
interest in Pharmacy as a Career. Assist- 
ing Dr. Chambers during the two-day pro- 
gram were members of The Forsyth Phar- 
maceutical Society. 

Center: Zaek Lyon, Manager of The Pea- 
body Drug Company, Durham, has been 
highly complimented on the public relations 
message painted on the sides of the firm's 
new city delivery truck. Long-time Peabody 
employee, Leo Umstead, is pictured with the 
truck which makes two deliveries daily, 
Monday thru Friday, to the pharmacists of 
Durham. 

Bottom: It was a special occasion for 
Geer Drug Company Avhen the first motor 
truck load of Enfamil in the Carolinas and 
Georgia arrived at Spartanburg. Shown, 
left to right : Homes C. Geer, Trade Rela- 



tions Manager ; Jesse M. Eobinson, Mead 
Johnson Representative for Charlotte Area; 
D. A. Geer, Vice-President; Frank O. Ezell, 
Sales Manager; Robert F. Honeycutt, Mead 
Johnson Representative in Greenville Area ; 
and Oren W. Dillard, Receiving Clerk, The 
Spartanburg Division of Geer Drug Com- 
pany. 

Drug Symposium Gets 
Underway 

Due to the unanticipated large registration 
for the DRUG SYMPOSIUM, enrollment 
application forms received after February 
1st have been returned. In fairness to the 
Class, it was felt a limit on the number 
participating should prevail so that the 
registrants could benefit to the maximum 
extent. 

There is some possibility a similar type 
Drug Symposium may be scheduled in West- 
ern North Carolina. If interested, write to 
Dr. M. A. Chambers, School of Pharmacy, 
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 




crowd pleasers a la Lance! 




More people prefer and buy tasty Lance 
snacks than any other brand. And no wonder . . 
They're always fresh and there's 

a wide variety to choose from. 
Please your crowd. Display Lance. 



INC. Charlotte, North Carolina 




34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 

• High Point — Mrs. Zollie Collins, Jr. 

• Winston-Salem — Mrs. Garland F. Benton, 

Jr. 

• Charlotte— Mrs. C. H. Smith 

• Rowan-Davie — Mrs. George A. Albright, 

Jr. 

Rowan-Davie 

New members were welcomed into the 
Rowan-Davie Drug Auxiliary at a January 
17 luncheon-business meeting held at the 
Chanticleer Restaurant, Salisbury. Twenty- 
one members and a guest, Mrs. M. H. Hoyle, 
Jr. of Cooleemee, were present. 

Mrs. Paul Miller, president, conducted the 
meeting and Mrs. Justis M. Uffinger led de- 
votions on ' ' Custodians of God 's World. ' ' 

Mrs. Robert Milton, advisor, introduced 
new members, Mrs. Charles Sanders of 
Granite Quarry and Mrs. F. L. Skinner. 
Mrs. Robert Jordan and Mrs. Robert Rauch 
of Cooleemee were named new members but 
were not present. 

Mrs. Edwin R. Fuller introduced the 
speaker, Robert Lee Denny of the N. C. 
Dept. of Rehabilitation, who spoke on the 
rehabilitation program in Salisbury and 
Rowan County. The group gave Mr. Denny 
a token gift of appreciation. 

Mrs. Harold Kennedy, Mrs. Charles 
Sanders and Mrs. Jack Rodgers were host- 
esses for the meeting. Mrs. Milton won the 
draw prize. 

Winston-Salem 

The Winston-Salem Apothecary Club met 
January -A at the home of Mrs. M. V. Wil- 
liams. Eighteen members were present. 

The president, Mrs. Roger Sloop, opened 
the meeting. The regular business procedure 
was dispensed with so that the following new 
business might be discussed at length. 

By majority vote, Article V, Section I of 
the club by-laws was changed in that club 



dues would be increased two dollars. This 
would become effective next year, making 
the yearly dues five dollars instead of three. 

Janet Lowder was elected vice-president 
for the remainder of this year to fill Shirley 
Crowley 's place. Shirley recently moved to 
Charlotte. 

A discussion on ways to improve the in- 
terest and social activities of the club took 
place. Stemming from ideas given, it was 
decided the club would entertain the Forsyth 
Pharmaceutical Society in February with a 
covered dish supper and square dance. 

The club also voted to present the Win-i 
ston library with a copy of Miss Alice 
Noble 's book, ' ' The School of Pharmacy of 
the University of North Carolina." 

Charlotte 

On January 9th the Charlotte Women 'ej 
Auxiliary held its regular monthly luncheon' 
at the Kirkwood Room. Mrs. A. K. HardeeJ 
presided. Mrs. Robert Kunkleman gave thej 
devotional. 

Mrs. Ross L. Cooper, program chairman,, 
had planned the session as "Fun Day." 
There was a skit, and special prizes werd 
given for the most unusual hat and thej 
prettiest hat. 

Canasta, Bridge, and a day of fun fori 
members and guests completed the session] 

High Point 

The High Point Pharmaceutical Auxiliary 
met January 16th at the home of Mrs. A. Ai 
Koonts. Mr. James Sloop, owner of the 
Sweet Shoppe, addressed the auxiliary, using 
the topic "Let's Decorate A Cake." MrjT 
Sloop decorated two cakes which were given; 
as door prizes. 

Mrs. William Shoemaker, president, pre| 
sided at a business meeting after the speakfl 
er's talk. Local and state dues were disJ 
cussed as well as plans for a meeting to b^| 
held soon in Chapel Hill. 

Raleigh 

The January meeting of the Club was helcjj 
at the home of Mrs. Marion B. Melvin. Mrsl 
John H. Bius, President, welcomed the folll 
lowing guests; Mrs. Tommy Youngblood 
Mrs. Joseph Zambito, Mrs. Harold Thomasj 
Mrs. Dallas Evans, Mrs. Ford Walker, ancS 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 



Vfrs. John Bowling. We were pleased to 
lave Mrs. W. L. Loyd of Garner, N. C. as 
i new member and happy that Mrs. B. D. 
verr and Mrs. Ollie R. Davis former mem- 
>ers) are back in the club with us after a 
! ew months absence. 

Mrs. H. G. Price was commended for the 
xcellent work the Membership Committee 
ias done this year and Mrs. J. C. Warren 
rade a report of the doings of the Ways 
nd Means Committee. They are both chair- 
len of the aforementioned committees. 

Mrs. L. D. Morse, acting for Mrs. K. E. 
Tandy, Chairman of the Sick and Cheer 
'ommittee, announced that flowers had been 
ent to Mrs. Graham Gregory (birth of a 
|aby girl, Elizabeth Ann), Mr. D. L. Jor- 
an and Mr. Moffett Moore. Cards have 
een sent to Mrs. P. D. Gattis and Mrs. 
ohn Treadwell 's father, Mr. John W. Hearn 
f Monroe, X. C. She also announced the 
eath of Mr. Carl P. Harward, the father- 
iidaw of Mrs. Ben R. Harward. 

Following the meeting, delicious refresh- 



ments were served and bridge and canasta 
were enjoyed. Mrs. Frank Peacock won the 
high score in bridge and Mrs. Tom Sanders 
in canasta. 

Hostesses for the evening were Mrs. M. B. 
Melvin, Mrs. Forrest W. Matthews, Jr. and 
Mrs. L. D. Morse. 

Sloop Named ' 'Pharmacist of the 

Month" By Southeastern Drug 

Journal 

Roger H. Sloop of Winston-Salem was 
named "Pharmacist of the Month" by the 
Southeastern Drug Journal. 

A sketch about Mr. Sloop, which appeared 
in the January issue of SDJ, pointed up 
his activities in Pharmacy as well as numer- 
ous contributions in the civic and community 
life of Forsyth County. 

At the present time, Mr. Sloop is a mem- 
ber of the Forsyth County Board of Health 
and is completing an extensive revision of 
the North Carolina Dental Formulary, as 
chairman of the XCPA Dental Formulary 
Committee. 




)nly one customer ... but many sales 

or year-round sales, feature Tes-Tape® (urine sugar analysis paper, Lilly) in your 
abetic department. Diabetic patrons repeatedly purchase this easy-to-use, economical 
a accurate test that is specific for glucose. If you have no diabetic department let our 
lesman assist you in establishing a section from which accessories can be merchandised ef- 
ctively. Send your orders for Tes-Tape and other diabetic supplies to us 



WE ARE A OWt<y DISTRIBUTOR 

THE PEABODY DRUG COMPANY 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

This space available at 10^ per word; mini- 
mum of $3.00. Box numbers assigned and 
replies forwarded to advertiser upon re- 
quest. Mail copy and payment to Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy, Box 151, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 



BALANCES — Prescription balances repaired. 
Contact Phipps & Bird, Inc., P. O. Box 2V, 
Richmond 5, Virginia. Telephone Ml 4-5401. 



FOR SALE — Remington's Practice of Phar- 
macy, 12th Edition. (1961). 1,866 pages. 
Price $22.50. Available from NCPA, Box 
151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



WANTED TO BUY — Registered pharmacist 
wishes to buy good, established drug store 
in progressive town, population 3,000 up. 
Piedmont or Eastern area preferred. Reply 
Box MDR-2. 



FOR SALE — Modern drug store less than 
four years in operation. Located on 
Florida east coast in Cape area. 1961 
volume in excess of $180,000, over half in 
prescriptions. Rent $300.00. Gross profit 
38%. $25,000 will handle. Reason for 
selling: absentee management. Reply Box 
HLJ-2. 



FOR SALE — Well established pharmacy. In- 
ventory $15,772.88; fixtures after deprecia- 
tion $6,923.49. Gross sales in 1961 — 
$71,000.00. Asking price $18,000.00. 
Terms. $6,000 cash, balance financed thru 
bank for 4 years at 6%. JFG-2. 



AVAILABLE — Partnership in professional 
prescription shop. $6,500 cash. JZR-2. 



WANTED — Experienced pharmacist to take 
advantage of exceptional opportunity. Pre- 
mium salary with fringe benefits. Alternate 
5 day week with 6 day week. JTW-2. 

NEWS BRIEFS 

Wilson — John W. Gresham, as co-chairman 
of the "Miss Wilson Pageant," was re- 
sponsible for program advertising, a major 
undertaking since 250 retailers had to be 
contacted. 

Salisbury — Mrs. Ann Hogue Wells has ac- 
cepted a position as pharmacist with the 
Fulton Street Pharmacy. A sister, Virginia 
Hogue, is employed in Boiling Springs by 
the Boiling Springs Drug Company. 

Lincolnton — Has Cornwell has been named 
vice president of the North Carolina Rexall 
Club. 

Rutherfordton — Jimmy Cash, president 
and part owner of the Rutherford Drug 
Company, has been named "Young Man of 
the Year" by the Rutherford Jaycees. The 
honor came to Mr. Cash for his activities 
as president of the Rutherfordton Cham- 
ber of Commerce during the past year. 

Roxboro — A. H. Robins MSR James A. 
Smith, Jr. addressed members of the Roxboro 
Rotary Club on the night of January 18. 
Title of his talk was "The Drug Industry 
Answers the Kefauver Report." 

Morehead City — B. N. Austin, a phar- 
macist in West Jefferson for the past 10 
years, has joined the staff of the Morehead 
City Drug Company. 

Salisbury — Jack Rodgers has joined the 
staff of Doctor's Building Drug Company 
following several years with the VA Hos- 
pital in Salisbury. He is a pharmacy gradu- 1 
ate of the University of South Carolina 
School of Pharmacy and a lieutenant in the| 
Naval Reserve. 

Belmont — Bill James, owner of Watkins 
Pharmacy, was the subject of a character! 
sketch in the January 17 issue of Thei 
Belmont Banner. A native of Pineville, Mr. I 
James is a graduate (1956) of the SchooW 
of Pharmacy, University of South CarolinaJI 






that's about the size of it 

If you tried to purchase all of your needs direct, you would need thousands 
Df suppliers. However, with us as your service wholesaler, you are re- 
lieved of this burdensome task of multiple purchasing. In addition, your 
oookkeeping procedures are lightened, out-of-stock conditions are lessened, 
(and invoice checking is reduced to a minimum. "That's about the size 
1 it." 

Order your merchandise needs from us and take advantage of our many 
services. You will find our delivery service prompt and our courteous 
sales personnel eager to serve you. 



WE ARE A 



DISTRIBUTOR 



ODEKER 




'ubweM&ptojjdfc 



1010 Herring Avenue, Wilson, North Carolina 




today's health 



New prescription products are vital to today's ever-improving medical car 
Most of them are the result of extensive, highly complex research. Cordran 
(flurandrenolone, Lilly) and Cordran™-N (flurandrenolone with neomyc 
sulfate, Lilly), the new corticosteroid preparations for topical use, are go< 
examples. 

In addition to several years of exhaustive study and development, Cordr< 
and Cordran-N have undergone intensive clinical trial. These products ha 
rapidly achieved top prescription demand. To be sure that you maintain < 
adequate supply, have our salesman check your stock regularly. Your orde 
are invited. 



WE ARE A 



S^ 



t£eyv> 



ISTRIBUTOR 



THE W. H. KING DRUG COMPANY 

"The House of Friendly and Dependable Service" 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

AND ITS ASSOCIATES 

O'HANLON-WATSON DRUG COMPANY 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
BELLAMY DRUG COMPANY KING DRUG COMPANY PEABODY DRUG COMPANY 

Wilmington, N. C. Florence, N. C. Durham, N. C. 



U: 



lie Carolina JOURNAL OF PHARMACY 



Volume XLIII MARCH, 1962 Number 3 




'This is one vitamin 
I like to prescribe 

because it 
isn't advertised 

to the public." 




'Yes, Doctor, 
that's one reason 

it's such a 
■widely prescribed 
vitamin-mineral 
preparation." 



Another reason for the popularity of 



MI-CEBRINT 



with physicians 



is its value in helping to speed patient recovery. Mi-Cebrin T 
is a therapeutic formulation of vitamins and minerals; 
therefore, it should be controlled by the physician and dispensed 

by a pharmacist. This keeps the vitamin business 
where it belongs — in the pharmacy . Mi-Cebrin T is available from your 
Lilly service wholesaler in bottles of 30, 100, and 1,000. 



Mi-Cebrin® T (vitamin-minerals therapeutic, Lilly) 



3key 



The 82nd Annual Convention 

OF THE 

NORTH CAROLINA 
PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

APRIL 8,9, 10, 1962 SIR WALTER HOTEL 

Will Again Give Us 

AN OPPORTUNITY TO MEET AND GREET 

OLD AND NEW FRIENDS OF THE 

N. C. P. A.— Woman's Auxiliary— T. M. A. 

Look Forward to Seeing You There!! 




l«tMBE, 




JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Beginning our 64th year of Service to 
the Retail Druggists of North Carolina. 




Bayer Aspirin is the most widely used 

brand of medicinal preparation in the world. 
If the Bayer Aspirin tablets sold only in the 
United States during 1960 were placed side by 
side, they would circle the earth nearly twice! 
Latest reports from America's leading and 
largest research organization show that in unit 
sales— meaning turnover-BAYER Aspirin 



continues to be the largest selling analgesic 
. . . outselling its nearest competitor by 30% ! 
And in addition, Bayer Aspirin today is the 
fastest growing pain reliever on the market. 
Remember Bayer Aspirin is the No. 1 
Drug Turnover Item. So give it your No. 1 
Display Space and get your full share of sales 
on "fastest growing" Bayer Aspirin. 



GLENBROOK LABORATORIES Di 



ion of Sterling Drug Inc., 1450 Broadi 



York 18, N. Y. 



The House of Friendly Service 




Scott Jutug Company, 



Service Wholesalers Since 1891 




taking the story 
to the public 



SK&F 

Offers Services of 

the Speakers Bureau 



Phil Collins (pictured above) is a member of SK&F's Professional Serv- 
ice Department. He — like the more than 400 Representatives who are 
enrolled in the SK&F Speakers Bureau — has received special training in 
public speaking. To date, Phil and his colleagues have spoken before 
more than a million people, including TV and radio audiences. 

The SK&F Representatives describe highlights in medical and pharma- 
ceutical progress during the last 30 years, and discuss some of the 
problems of health care today. The speeches usually end with a lively 
question-and-answer session. 

If you would like to schedule an SK&F Speaker for a civic, social, or 
service group of which you are a member, just fill in and mail the 
coupon below. 



Your name. 



Addr 



Organization. 



Speaking date. 



(Please allow a month, if possible, for necessary arrangements.) 

Don't need speaker now. Send information on the Speakers Bureau, f/", 

H20 



Smith Kline & French Laboratories, 

1500 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia 1, Pennsylvania 



The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



March, 1962 

Vol. xliii Xo. 3 

• 

Officers 
NORTH CAROLINA 
PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

* 

President 

Robert B. Hall 

Mocksville 

• 

Vice-Presidents 

John T. Stevenson, 

Elizabeth City 
Hoy A. Moose 

Mount Pleasant 
John Lowder Marion 



Secretary-Treasurer 

Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

• 

Assistant 

Secretary-Treasurer 

C. M. Andrews 

Burlington 

• 

General Counsel 

F. O. Bowman 
Chapel Hill 



It's Convention Time 

Two factors of vital importance to the future of North 
Carolina Pharmacy will dominate the forthcoming Con- 
vention of the NCPA and Affiliated Auxiliaries, scheduled 
for Raleigh, April 8-10: 

(1) How to improve and increase pharmaceutical service 
in the world of today, and 

(2) How to most effectively meet the challenge of prob- 
lems brought about by the rapidly changing pattern of 
distribution at all levels — manufacturer, wholesaler and 
retailer alike. 

Of prime importance is the opportunity for members to 
have a direct voice in charting their organization's future 
course. Resolutions will be considered, issues decided, 
officers installed and the stage set for continued work and 
progress. 

Delegates will find much else of interest, including stimu- 
lating dramatic features, colorful entertainment, nationally 
known speakers, and the sharing of their pharmaceutical 
experiences. In brief, there is no greater opportunity to 
spark additional dedication and determination for the big 
job that lies ahead. 

You '11 find complete details in this issue of The Journal. 
Make your plans now to join Presidents Hall-Myers-Kimball 
in Raleigh in April. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate : $3.00 a year ; single copy, 25 cents. Entered as 
second class matter July 5, 1922 at the post office at Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 
Dean Brecht Returns Cover Page 



Dean Brecht has returned to his duties 
at the School of Pharmacy following surgery 
and hospitalization at Memorial Hospital, 
Chapel Hill. 

To Las Vegas 

Several pharmacists from North Carolina 
will attend the annual meeting of the Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical Association, scheduled 
for Las Vegas in late March. 

Phil Link of Reidsville, fourth place 
winner in ARhA 's National Pharmacy Week 
Window Display Contest, will receive the 
award by way of Robert Neal Watson, who 
will accept on behalf of Mr. Link. 



Alfred N. Martin (left) of Roanok 
Rapids and Kenneth Wiggins of Goldsbor 
examine the Exempt-Poison Register re 
cently made available by the State Boar' 
of Pharmacy. 

The new edition of the Register is vastlj 
improved over the edition in use in the stat 
for the past ten years. Space is provided fo 
3,000 exempt and 1,000 poison sales entries 
Heads for the more frequently sold items 
such as Paregoric and THcC, are printe 
to reduce the labor involved in recordin 
sales. 

A copy may be obtained from : Stat 
Board of Pharmacy, Box 471, Chapel Hil| 
N. C. Price |2.35 postage paid. 




Representatives of the NCPA, TMA and Woman's Auxiliary meet during one of severi 
Pre-Convention Planning Sessions. Standing, left to right: R. I. Cromley, M. B. Melvi) 
Forrest Matthews, Homer Starling and W. J. Smit'i. Seated, left to right: Mesdamj 
Cromley, Smith, Melvin and Starling. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



4: 



NCPA— TMA— WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

THE CONVENTION IN BRIEF 

Sir Walter Hotel, Raleigh, Sunday-Monday-Tuesday, April 8-10, 1962 

Sunday, April 8 

:30 P.M.— Class Reunion, UNC School of Pharmacy, Class of 1952 

:00 P.M. — Awards, Citations, 50 Plus, Academy of Pharmacy 

:00 P.M.— Get Acquainted Coffee Hour 

:00P.M. — Annual Banquet. Entertainment by UNC Men's Glee Club 

Monday, April 9 
:30 A.M.— NCPA Breakfast-Business Session 
:00 A.M.— TMA Golf Tournament 

: 00 Noon — Woman's Auxiliary Luncheon-Fashion Show 
:30 P.M.— NCPA Past-Presidents' Luncheon 
:00 P.M.— NCPA Business Session 

00 P.M. — Woman 's Auxiliary — Tea at Governor 's Mansion 
:30 P.M. — Entertainment featuring ' ' Doraine and Ellis" 

Tuesday, April 10 

:30 A.M.— NCPA Breakfast-Business Session 

:00 A.M. — TMA Business Session 

:00 Noon — Woman's Auxiliary Luncheon, and Annual Business Session 

:00 P.M.— NCPA Business Session 

:00 P.M.— Officer Installation 

:00 P.M.— Social Hour at Carolina Country Club 

:30P.M.— Entertainment: "TMA Pharmaceutical Phollies" 



Refer to pages 5 through page 25 for complete information about the convention: 
the programs of the NCPA, the TMA and the Woman's Auxiliary; Committees, Speakers, 
Special Events, Displays, Entertainment and General Announcements. 

Have your picture made in color, courtesy of B & H Photo Company, Charlotte. An 
sxpert color photographer will be available during the 3-day meeting. Free photo card 
f/ith your registration badge. 

Miss North Carolina will be present Sunday afternoon and night (Banquet). 

To Preside in Raleigh 





Robert B. Hall, President 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Asson. 



Mrs. Leslie M. Myers, President 
Woman's Auxiliary, NCPA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Two of the NCPA Guest Speakers 




J. WARREN LANSDOWNE 

1961-1962 President of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association and Manager 
of the Professional and Trade Relations! 
Department of Eli Lilly and Company.; 
Owned and operated a community phar- 
macy from 1926 to 1933. Editor of Tile 
and Till; Associate Editor of the Lilly 
Digest. 

Subject : "Know Something, Be Something, 
Do Something." 

Monday, April 9, 10 :00 A.M. 




WILLIAM J. WISHING 

Mr. Wishing joined Smith Kline & 
French Laboratories in 1949 as a Profes-. 
sional Service Representative. In 1956 he 
was made a Regional Manager, and in 1958 
became a Divisional Sales Manager. A 
graduate of the University of Notre Dame. 
Served in the U. S. Army during World 
War II. 



Subject: "Pharmaceutical Marketing 

day and Tomorrow. ' ' 
Tuesday, April 10, 11 :00 A.M. 



To- 



SERVING NORTH CAROLINA 
DRUG STORES FOR OVER 

43 YEARS 



BH 

PHOTO 



QUALITY 



emu 

SERVfCE 



CO: 



BLACK & WHITE 

COLOR 
PHOTO FINISHING 



WE HAVE NORTH CAROLINA'S ONLY 

KODACHROME PROCESSING PLANT 

We process in our own plant 

Kodachrome — Ektachrome 

Kodacolor — Block and White 

Copying — Enlarging 

We will make your picture 

In Color at the convention April 8, 9, 10 

HAH PHOTO COMPANY 

3030 s. boulevard p. 0. box 1600 

phone 523-7093 charlotte 1, n. c. 




If you had to make your own children's multivitamins 

chances are you'd try to make them very much like our new 
VI-DAYLIN® CHEWABLE with Entrapped Flavor. Entrapped 
Flavor means a better tasting chewable children's multivitamin; 
one with no vitamin aftertaste. Here's why: 1. We coat all the 
vitamins in a digestible film that does not dissolve until it 
reaches the gastrointestinal tract. This means that unpleasant 
strong vitamin tastes are not released in the mouth, but in the 
g-i tract where they are most quickly absorbed. 2. We make 
certain that every Vi-Daylin Chewable table tastes citrus sweet 
and good to every patient, everytime; we coat the flavoring oils 
in each tablet in a water soluble film. This film 
dissolves immediately in the mouth, releasing the 
full bouquet of our citrus-candy flavoring agents. 




Vi-Daylin-Vitamins A, D, B,, B 2 , B 6 , Bu, C, and Nicotinamide, Abbott. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



13 



Meet Miss North Carolina at the Convention 



You '11 have an opportunity to meet Miss 
North Carolina (Susan Kay Woodall of 
Eoanoke Eapids) at the Convention. During 
Sunday afternoon (April 8), Miss North 
Carolina will be present in the lobby of The 
Sir Walter Hotel and that night she will be 
guest of honor at the banquet. 

Miss North Carolina graduated in 1957 
from Eoanoke Eapids High School and from 
the University of North Carolina in 1961 
where she majored in English and education. 
Susan has been Miss Dixie Classic; Miss 
Holiday of 1957 at Eoanoke Eapids; Miss 
Harvest Festival at Eoanoke Eapids; Miss 
International Cup Eegatta of 1956 ; Miss 
Coast Guard Academy (football queen) of 
1961; one of 12 beauties in annual YAK 
selections ; member of ' ' Beat Duke Court ' ' 
at UNC; Beauty representative of Woman's 
College student body in 1958. 

A photographer (B & H Photo Company, 
Charlotte) will be present to make pictures. 
Following the 7 P.M. banquet in the ball- 
room of The Sir Walter, the 65-voice UNC 
Glee Club will entertain from a repertoire of 
sacred, folk and patriotic songs, show tunes, 
Carolina songs and novelties. 



The Glee Club of the University of North 
Carolina, pictured on the opposite page, is 
one of the institution 's oldest and best known 
organizations. Alumni of the University 
are familiar with "Hark the Sound of Tar 
Heel Voices" first made famous in 1909-1910 
by the Glee Club and Glee Club quartets. 

Averaging around thirty appearances an- 
nually, the Glee Club generally makes a Fall 
and Spring Tour. In this particular in- 
stance, the Club will come directly to the 
Baleigh Convention from an appearance in 
Wilmington at the Azalea Festival. 

Numbered among the Club's more famous 
alumni is Andy Griffith of Broadway and 
TV fame. The present director of the Club, 
Dr. Joel Carter, began his work at Carolina 
in 1949. 

The Glee Club 's appearance at the conven- 
tion is under sponsorship of Justice Drug 
Company. 

Craft Heads Gaston Club 

Officers of the Gaston County Pharmaceuti- 
cal Society are: Boy E. Craft, president; 
Henry C. Bell, vice-president; John Mc- 
Donald, secretary; and Tom M. Holland, 
treasurer. 



r 

pride... 




of ownership with 
Greater efficiency . . . 
Bigger profits . . . 
More flexibility . . . 
is yours with 


wmm 


SAGINAW STEEL 
STORE FIXTURES 


>w. ^ 


for information write to 

Gervin M. Wayt, 
300 Patton Street, 


Morganton, N. C. 
HEmlock 7-0486 

J 



when he thinks of 
high-quality B vitamins 





he probably thinks first of 

Combex^ 



Five frequently pre- 
scribed, fast-moving 
B-complex products 

COMBEX KAPSEALS** — bot- 
tles of 100, 500, 1,000, 
and packages of 5,000, 
for increased require- 
ments of B-complex 
factors 

COMBEX WITH VITAMIN C 

KAPSEALS-bottleS of 100, 

500, 1,000, and pack- 
ages of 5,000, for com- 
bined B-complex and C 
deficiencies 

THERA-COMBEX* KAPSEALS— 

bottles of 100 and 1,000, 
to supply higher potency 
B-complex and C 

TAKA-COMBEX" KAPSEALS — 

bottles of 100 and 1,000, 
aid starch digestion, pro- 
vide B-complex vitamins 

TAKA-COMBEX ELIXIR — 16- 

fluidounce bottles, for 
convenience of adminis- 
tration in the young and 
elderly .„„ 



PARKE-DAVIS 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 



rr 



DORA1NE AND ELLIS — THEIR STORY" 



The success story of the famous husband- 
Life singing team, Doraine and Ellis, 
scheduled to appear at the NCPA Con- 
tention on Monday night, April 9, under 
Sponsorship of the W. H. King Drug Com- 
pany and Associates, is a fascinating one. 
It all started on a Sunday evening in March 
a number of years ago when a very young 
and beautiful soprano, Doraine Eenard, 
and a very young and handsome tenor, Ellis 
E. Lucas, made their professional debut as 
a singing team at a Sunday evening musicale 
sponsored by the management of an exclusive 
residential hotel in Columbus, Ohio. The 
pattern for the success story of this fabulous 
singing team was cut that night. At the 
conclusion of the program, Doraine and 
Ellis were immediately engaged for a re- 
peat performance. 

On September 3 of that year they were 
married in a simple ceremony attended only 
oy Doraine 's mother, Elsa Eenard, a re- 
nowned costume designer known profession- 
ally as Elsa of Hollywood, and A. Herman 
Amend, the famous Ohio impresario, who 
Ijerved as Ellis ' best man. Doraine 's mother 
;iad designed magnificent growns for many 
! ashionable weddings, always looking toward 
[he day when she would create something 
txtra special for the wedding of her only 
laughter. Doraine, however, had other ideas 
iind insisted on a simple wedding. Perhaps 
jhis is one reason why each of the many 
iflorious costumes that Elsa of Hollywood 
has created for Doraine in subsequent years 
Has had that indefinable "Extra Special" 
iouch. 
Today the names of Doraine and Ellis 
re a legend in the field of entertainment. 
' ,n his talented couple has been for a number 
'f years America's foremost singing team. 
: viewing a performance of Doraine and 
JCllis, one is immediately impressed by their 
lonsummate teamwork. This perfection is 
■ased on the large number of appearances 
hey have made together. It can be said in 
11 sincerity that there has never been a 
inging team in the world of entertainment 
bat has made as many appearances before 
uch a wide variety of audiences as this at- 
ractive husband-wife team. 



From the beginning of their work together, 
Doraine and Ellis contended that great 
American composers such as Herbert, Rom- 
berg, Friml, Kern, Youmans, Berlin, Porter, 
Gershwin, Eodgers, and others had created 
a definite musical art form. Doraine and 
Ellis have devoted their entire efforts to 
the interpretation of the music of these 
composers. Devising unique costumed pres- 
entations of the standard favorites of the 
Broadway Musical Theatre and continually 
adding exciting adaptations of the newest 
hits, they won for themselves a large and 
enthusiastic following. How enthusiastic the 
followers of Doraine and Ellis are is best 
attested to by the fact that this duo is one 
of the most repeated attractions in the 
history of the theatre. The appearance of 
Doraine and Ellis has become an annual 
event on a number of series. 

During the early stage of their career as a 
singing team, Doraine and Ellis scored 
triumph after triumph in the leading thea- 
tres, hotels, and supper clubs of the nation. 
Doraine and Ellis have found great demand 
for their services on artist series and at 
colleges and universities in the United States 
and abroad. Their show, ' ' A Costumed 
Cavalcade of Broadway's Greatest Musical 
Hits," has won the acclaim of audiences and 
critics wherever they have appeared and 
their travels have taken them through twenty- 
three countries. They have starred in every 
theatrical medium. They have appeared on 
all major radio and television networks. 
Their work includes a series of shows tran- 
scribed at the BBC Studios in London, 
England. 

A very important phase of their profes- 
sional activities is their appearances as the 
entertainment feature for large state and 
national conventions. With the emphasis on 
family participation in the social side of 
these meetings, executive and business lead- 
ers throughout the country have, time and 
time again, proclaimed the show presented by 
this talented husband-wife team to be the 
ideal convention entertainment. 



WHAT'S IIM A 
BOTTLE OF 

100? 



Of course, there are 100 cap- 
sules by count. But are you 
sure they always add up to 
100 per cent in quality? 

Everytimeyou need a drug 
for your family, don't you 
choose a brand name? And 
doesn't the reputation be- 
hind that name stand for 
top quality? When the prod- 
uct bears the Lederle name, 
you know the quality is 100 
per cent. Do you honestly 
feel that way about a "just- 
as-good," cut-price generic? 

The next time a patient 
comes in with a generic Rx, 




LEDERLE LABORATORIES 

A Division of 

AMERICAN CYANAMID COMPANY 

Pearl River, New York 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 21 

The Traveling Men's Auxiliary Program 



The 350 member TMA is bringing a top 
entertainment attraction to the Convention 
on Tuesday night, April 10, Ballroom of 
The Sir Walter. Staged and produced ex- 
clusively for the TMA by Harmony House 
Attractions, the show will star Ellis E. Lucas 
as Master of Ceremonies. 

On the opposite page are pictured some of 
the stars to appear: Ruth Dave in ''Music 
Hath Charm"; Pedro and Pedro, Jr. in 
" Topsy Turvy"; Rex Earner and Eilene in 
"Musical Madcaps''; Prince Hara in "The 
Thief of Bagdad" and Xickey ReDavid in 
"Keep Your Eyes on the Ball." 

TMA Golf Tournament 

Monday, April 9, 9 A.M. at The Raleigh 
Country Clult. W. W. Morton is chairman of 
this event. Green fees and the trophy, 
courtesy of the B. C. Remedy Company. 

Golf prizes by the wholesale druggists of 
North and South Carolina and Virginia. 

TMA Business Session 

The annual TMA business session is sched- 
uled for Tuesday, April 10, 11 A.M. in The 
Raleigh Room of The Sir Walter. Leon 
Kimball, president, will preside; J. Floyd 
Goodrich, secretary-treasurer, Avill summarize 
the year's activities. 



TMA Membership 

Membership of The Traveling Men's Aux- 
iliary of the NCPA is now past the 350 
point, making the organization one of the 
largest of its type in the United States. 

Yet most of the medical service representa- 
tives and other sales representatives calling 
on the retail and wholesale pharmacies of 
North Carolina are not members of the 
TMA. Since a major reason for noii- 
niembership is a lack of information about 
the TMA and its purposes, pharmacists can 
assist the organization by encouraging eligi- 
ble prospects to affiliate. A non-member can 
lie identified if his name does not appear on 
the TMA Roster Poster mailed to all X. C. 
pharmacies in 196] or by referring to this 
same list in the XCPA Year Book. 

The TMA 's, in addition to assisting with 
most pharmacy programs in the state, 
sponsor entertainment as the concluding 
event of each year's convention. Since this 
involves several thousand dollars, TMA 
convention-attending members pay $15 ; non- 
attending members (see application form be- 
low ) pay so annual membership dues. The 
dues in each instance include a 12-months 
subscription to The Carolina Journal of 
Pharmacy. 



HERE IS MY APPLICATION 

I for 1962-'63 membership in The Traveling Men's Auxiliary of the North Carolina Phar- 
[ niaceutical Association and subcription to The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. 

Name _ 

Street Address 

City 

J Firm Represented 

Please make your $5.00 check payable to "Traveling Men's Auxiliary, XCPA" aud mail 
to Mr. J. Floyd Goodrich, 2121 West Club Blvd., Durham, North Carolina. 

Xote: If you attend Convention, the Attending Membership is $15, payable at the 
TMA Registration Desk in the Lobby of The Sir Walter Hotel, Raleigh. 



22 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




MARCH CHECK LIST 

Tear out for a handy check of 

your current stock of these 

Robins products that are receiving 

special promotion in your area 
March 26— May 4 



Dimetapp Elixir n# 

□ tin. 1 pint D Dh. 1 pi. 

Dimefapp Extents 

□ Eilentib 100s D Eilenlib 500's 

Donnazyme 



□ lib. 100s □ lib. 500's 

Enfozyme 

□ lib. lOD's D W. 5»8's 

Donnafal 

□ Eitintibs IOCS □ Eitentabs 500'5 C lib. 100's Q lib. 500's 

□ lab. 1000s D Cap- '00's □ Cap 500's £ Cap 1000's 
D Elii 1 pml D Elu. I «•'■ 



Robanul 

(2 lib. 100's □ lib 500s 

Robanul-PH 



□ lib. 100's D I* 500's 



Why not check your stock of 

all Robins products at the same time 

— and be prepared 




A. H. ROBINS CO., INC., RICHMOND 20, VA. 



Andes Sells Parsons Drug 

William 0. Bias, an associate Avith G. E.I 
Andes in the management of Parsons Drug 
Store, Wadesboro, for the past several years,! 
has purchased the pharmacy from Mr. Andes.l 

The pharmacy will continue to be operatecfl 
as Parsons Rexall Drugs. 

Mr. Andes, who has announced his retired 
ment, is a native of Timberville, Virginia 
He came to Wadesboro in 1930 and over tha 
years has been actively identified with tht 
progress of that Anson County town. H( 
is an ex-mayor of Wadesboro. 

Shields Named "Man of the Year"] 

Louis Shields, Jacksonville pharmacist:! 
has been named "Man of the Year" by tha 
Jacksonville Junior Chamber of Commerce 

Shields work with the Onslow Countjj 
Board of Health, the Downtown Merchant;. 
Association, the PTA and the Jacksonville 
Chamber of Commerce were cited when thaj 
award was made. 

Recently Mr. Shields was appointed by 
Governor Terry Sanford to serve OnsloA^ 
County on the North Carolina Committei 
for Better Schools. 

Powell Heads Health Board 

Pharmacist E. S. Powell of Oxford ha 
been elected chairman of the GranvilL 
County Board of Health. 

A graduate of the School of Pharmacy! 
TJNC, Mr. Powell continued at the Schoo 
with advanced studies. Later, he aceepteJ 
a position with Woolard's of Henderson anol 
in 1952, with Herring and Williams of Osl 
ford, which he now owns and operates. 

Amnions is Guest Speaker 

Guest speaker at a recent meeting in Bejl 
Springs was Raymond Amnions, pharmal 
cist associated with Townsend's Pharmac\l 
Subject of Mr. Amnions' talk was "Till 
Future of Red Springs as Seen Through tli'j 
Eyes of a Pharmacist." 

Heads Heart Drive 

Thomas W. Youngblood, Raleigh pharmal 
cist, heads the 1962 Heart Days for Bus! 
ness campaign in the Capital City. 

Bill Wilson, manager of Kerr Hexa'-j 
Drugs, is assisting Foungblood in CamercB 
Village. 



The Cakolixa Journal of Pharmacy 

The Greatest Race In History 



23 



By John S. Morgan 

Associate Managing Editor, Steel 

Reprinted from Steel, 

Copyrighted 1961 by Penton Publishing 

j A rabbit and a turtle were having a race. 

The rabbit, named Boss, was soon far ahead, 

iut was stopped by a steward from the 

Racetrack Employees Union, Local No. 6. 

1 "You can't go that fast," said the 

fteward. "It violates Section 2B of the 

pntract. ' ' 

I The rabbit argued until lie saw that the 
Jurtle had crawled ahead. He realized that 
jebate was useless, so he went on at a re- 
uced speed, that was still faster than the 
lurtle's pace. He had passed his opponent 
nee more, when he was again stopped, this 
ime by a representative from the Depart- 
ment of Justice. 
"We are charging you with unfair compe- 
tion, ' ' the government man declared. ' ' You 

fe taking unreasonable advantage of the 
rtle." "But Ave agreed to compete," 
otested the rabbit. He was going to say 
«ore but thought it wiser to rind his lawyer 



to draft a reply. That took time. When he 
returned to the track, the turtle Avas far 
ahead. 

He hurried on as fast as Section 2B would 
permit and had regained a good lead when 
his path was blocked by burly pickets from 
the International Truck Drivers Union. They 
had been trying to organize a carrot proc- 
essing plant, one of his major suppliers, 
and only yesterday had created a disturbance 
over truck delivering to him. Boss rabbit 
rushed back to his lawyer, got him to drop 
everything and go to court on the matter. 
The judge granted an injunction on the 
ground that the picketing constitued an 
illegal secondary boycott. 

By the time all that had been cleared up, 
the turtle was nearly at the finish line. The 
rabbit made four leaps to pass him. But 
his victory wasn't declared official until three 
years later when a grievance filed by Local 
No. 6 was disallowed and he had Avon his 
competition case in a government suit. 
Moral: It's tough to be the front runner, 
but it's still the best position. 



THE HENRY B. GILPIN COMPANY 

Full Line, Full Service Wholesale Druggists Since 1845 
Baltimore • Dover • Norfolk • Washington 





Norfolk Division 

Equipped for fast, 

efficient wholesale drug 

service to the pharmacists of 

the eastern section of North Carolina 

6435 Tidewater Drive • Norfolk, Virginia • Madison 2-6361 



24 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



In color or black and white 




No Finer Snapshots at Any Price 

Supertone Prints 

"Truly the Finest in Snapshots 



PRODUCED ONLY BY 

FOISTER-PALM PHOTO SERVICE 

161 East Franklin Street 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Phone 942-3025 




The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 25 

WOMAN'S AUXILIARY CONVENTION COMMITTEES 



Mrs. M. P.. 
.Mrs. .loli 
Mrs. Toi 

JPine State Luncheon and 
Fashion Show 

Mrs. J. C. Warren, Chairman 
Mrs. Homer Starling, Co-chairman 
Mrs. W. A. Burwell 
Mrs. L. D. Morse 
Mrs. Hooper Wilson 

Woman 's Auxiliary Tea 
Mrs. John Treadwell, Chairman 
Mrs. Romas T. White, Co-chairman 
[Mrs. R. L. Alphin 
Mrs. R. I. Cromley 
Mrs. L. H. Grumpier 
Mrs. W. F. Matthews 
(Mrs. B. F. Page 
Mrs. Tom Sanders 
{Mrs. Homer Starling 

{Woman's Auxiliary Luncheon — 
I Sealtest Foods 

JMrs. Harold Diggettc, Chairman 
Mrs. Franklin S. Wells, Co-chairman 
Mrs. J. S. Coxe 
Mrs. L. H. Grumpier 
Mrs. D. L. Jordan 

Prizes 

Mrs. R. I. Cromley, Chairman 

Mrs. Forest Matthews, Co-chairman 

Mrs. R. L. Alphin 

VIrs. K. E. Handy 

drs. L. D. Morse 

Mrs. Frank Peacock 

Transportation- 

Jrs. Moffitt Moore, Chairman 



Melvin, General Chairman 
n H. Rius, Co-chairman 
1 Sanders, Co-chairman 

Mrs. K. E. Handy, Co-chairman 

.Mrs. Oscar Davis 

-Mrs. Graham Gregory 

Mrs. Hugh Hinton 

.Mrs. Billy Murray 

Mrs. Frank Peacock 

Decorations 

Mrs. I). L. Jordan, Chairman 

Mrs. L. H. Crumpler, Co-chairman 

Mrs. J. R. BrockweU 

Mrs. J. S. Coxe 

Mrs. R. E. Treadwell 

Mrs. Romas T. White, Jr. 

Publicity 

Mrs. Homer Starling, Chairman 
Mrs. Robert I. Cromley, Co-chairman 
Hospitality 

Mrs. H. G. Price, Chairman 
Mrs. R. E. Woodcock, Co-chairman 
Mrs. B. T. Allen 
Mrs. John Bins 
Mrs. H. W. Brege 
Mrs. Walter R. Crump, Jr. 
Mrs. Walter File 
Mrs. Ben Harward 
Mrs. .John M. Horton 
Mrs. Banks Ken- 
Mrs. W. L. Lloyd 
Miss Evelyn Newsome 
Mrs. James E. North 
Mrs. J. E. Phillips 
Mrs. H. M. Thomas 
Mrs. Ford Walker 
-Mrs. T. W. Younghlood 



The Auxiliary Program Includes 
SUNDAY: Awards meeting at 3 P.M. fob 
owed by Get Acquainted Coffee Hour; Ban- 
uiet at 7 with entertainment by the Uni- 
'ersity of North Carolina Men's Glee Club. 
banquet tickets available from the XCPA. 
'hitertainment sponsored by Justice Drug 
'oinpany. 

MONDAY: Luncheon with Pine State 
'reaiuery as hosts, and a fashion show by 
dlisberys. Tea at the Governor's Mansion. 
•wor Show featuring Doraine ami Kills in 



"A Costumed Cavalcade of Broadway's 
Greatest Musical Hits" with W. II. King 
Drug Company & Associates as hosts. 

TUESDAY: Luncheon sponsored by Seal- 
test Foods (Southern Dairies) and annual 
business session; officer installation at 4 
P.M.; Social Hour (o P.M.) at Carolina 
Country Club, sponsored by W. H. King 
Drug Co. and Associates. At 8:30 P.M., 
"Pharmaceutical Phollies" floor show ami 
dance sponsored by The Traveling Men's 
Auxiliary of the XCPA. 



KEY" FIXTURES INCREASE SALES 



A MODERN FRONT _». 

Provides the right setting 
for a modern Pharmacy! It 
is a picture window thru 
which your entire store be- 
comes your display window. 
KEY Fixtures inside your 
store give that Ultra Modern 
look ! 1 




Cleancut modern lines t' 
provide maximum 'lisp 
space inside your store 
point of sale. A pi 
where people love to sh 
Absence of that 'clutteii 
appearance. These are 
marks of good design 
good display. Ask for 
plan for your store, 
the Coupon below. 



MODERN 
FOOD-FOUNTAIN — > 
The magnet that brings 
them back again and again! 
A department that can con- 
tribute 38% or more of 
your total volume and over 
50% of your profits. Bas- 
tian-Blessing food fountains 
add beauty and friendliness, 
as well as profits to your 
store. Ask for a design to 
suit your needs. Use the 
Coupon below. No obliga- 
tion. 




Clip Coupon and Mail 



We are planning to 

D Build 
New 
□ Modernize Store 



□ Expand 

Name 

Firm Name 

Street Address 

City 

State 



GRANT E. KEY, IN( 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Manufacturers of 

Key-Line Fixtures 

Distributors of 

Bastion-Blessing 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



27 



The Image of Pharmacy — A Physician's 

Point of View 

By Edgar T. Beddingfield, Jr., M.D. 
Medical Society of the State of North Carolina 



It is indeed a high honor for me to be 
privileged to be with you tonight, and I am 
grateful for the opportunity. I certainly feel 
it home among pharmacists. As many of 
ou know, I spring from a family of North 
grolina pharmacists — my father, my uncle, 
m brother, and my cousin were or are 
petitioners of pharmacy, and I am proud of 
[he fact that for several years I was a mem- 
ber of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Msociation through the Student Branch in 
|he University School of Pharmacy. 

You should know, however, that I was 
lot the first choice of your Program Com- 
aittee in selecting a speaker to fill this 
tart of your program. The original invita- 
ion was extended to Dr. Claude Squires of 
lharlotte, President of the Medical Society 
f the State of North Carolina. It is un- 
ortunate that illness has necessitated Dr. 
•quires ' curtailing his engagements, and the 
ivitation was then extended to me. Thus, 
iy presence here tonight reminds me of an 
xperienee that I had in my country practice 
f medicine a few years ago. I was called at 
:00 a.m. to make a home call to see a colored 
iild. I had never been called to this partieu- 
I home before, and when I followed the di- 
ctions and finally arrived at the house, I 
mnd it was just outside the city limits of 
/llson, about ten miles distant from my 
ome. On examining the youngster, who had 
fever, I discovered that he had a moderate- 
' severe tonsillitis, and announced this diag- 
3sis to the mother, a large "Aunt Jemima " 
-pe who had been hovering suspiciously in 
ie background. "Tonsillitis?", she said, 
That's just what Dr. Jones said when he 
,w him yesterday." I thereupon exploded: 
If Dr. Jones, who is nearby in Wilson, is 
mr regular doctor and he saw the child 
■sterday, why in the world do you call me 



out at this hour? Why didn't you call Dr. 
Jones?" Drawing herself up, she acidly an- 
nounced ' ' Well, Dr. Beddingfield, I want you 
to know I did call Dr. Jones, and he's tied 
up with a labor case — so I called you. When 
you can't get meat, taters will do!" Hav- 
ing been cut down to size, I beat a hasty re- 
treat ! 

Tims, I regret the meaty address that I 
know Dr. Squires would have brought to you, 
but I am grateful for the opportunity to 
bring you a few potatoes! Seriously, I 
bring to you the best wishes of President 
Squires and the officers and staff of the 
Medical Society of the State of North 
Carolina. 

My presentation has been entitled, "The 
Image of Pharmacy— A Physician's Point 
of View." In the course of these remarks, 
I hope to bring to you not only a glimpse 
of yourselves as we physicians see you, but 
to also add an appraisal of your public 
image as we perceive it to be. 

(Continued on page 37) 



Banquet Address at the NCPA 
eminar on Modern Pharmaceutical 
jraetiee, Morehead City. 




E. T. Beddingfield, Jr., M.D. 



28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



There's 



\ \ i i 



PROFIT 



$ 






* 



in 



finejtate 



MILK 

and 

ICE 

CREAM 

people like it 
and buy it 

Tastes Great . . . It's 



finejtate 



Free Prescriptions 

The pharmacists of Henderson have beefj 
asked by the Vance Board of County Conl 
missioners to institute a plan whereby eacr 
drug store will supply $25 of prescription 
free each month to indigent persons in I 
county who are certified by the Vane 
County Board of Welfare. 

The request followed a proposal that tM 
county cease the purchase of drugs at wholoj 
sale, a practice that has prevailed in I 
county for several years. 

Sues for $15,960 

Mrs. Leonia Austin of Clinton has file', 
suit against the Gaddy Pharmacy for $15,96' 
for injuries allegedly sustained on tl 
premises of the firm. 

Mrs. Austin contends she stepped into 
hole at the entrance of the pharmacy r| 
suiting in injury to her arm, knee and bacF 

Tyler Named Chairman 

Jack Tyler, owner-pharmacist of the Med,! 
eal Pavilion Pharmacy, Greenville, serve, 
as Pitt County Chairman of the Heart Put 
Drive. 

A graduate of Sanford High School ai 
the UNC School of Pharmacy, Mr. Tyl 
was associated with Eubanks Drug Sto 
of Chapel Hill for four years. He openi 
the Greenville pharmacy in the early fall 
1961. 

Kritzer Retires 

Everett L. Kritzer, manager and seni 
pharmacist at Purcell's Drug Store, Alb \ 
marie, since August, 1932 has retired aft 
nearly a half century in pharmacy. 

A native of Richmond, Virginia, M 
Kritzer spent his early days in Spenci 
where his father was part owner of a dn 
store. With the exception of two yea 
with the Air Corps during WWI, Mr. Kri 
zer worked in Spencer until 1929 at whi 
time he accepted a position with Pureel 
of Salisbury. Three years later he we 
to Albemarle as pharmacist-manager of I 
Pureell store in that town. 

He is a member of the Albemarle Rota 
Club, the First Lutheran Church, the Ame 
can Legion and the 40 & 8. 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



P re-Pharmacy Students 
Entertained by NCPA 

President Eobert B. Hall of the NCPA 
ddressed the pre-pharmacy students of UNC 
t a special program given in their honor at 
tie Institute of Pharmacy on Sunday, 
'ebruary 18. 

The students were welcomed to The Insti- 
lte by NCPA Secretary Smith, and follow- 
lg President Hall 's address, Executive Com- 
jiittee members Edwin R. Fuller and Hoy A. 
'[oose were introduced. 

i Dean Edward A. Brecht introduced mem- 
3rs of the School of Pharmacy faculty who 
;tended the program. A short talk by 
javid Runnion, President of the Students 
ranch of the NCPA-APhA, concluded the 
( >rmal part of the special session. 
, Summer employment forms were made 
/ailable to the pre-pharmacy students with 
bout thirty of the students requesting as- 
jstance in locating work for the coming 
turner months. 

I Purpose of the program was to identify 
•le NCPA and its activity to the pre- 



pharmacy students and additionally, to give 
the students an opportunity to visit the 
Institute of Pharmacy. 

N. C. Fair Trade Statute Upheld 

The North Carolina Fair Trade Act was 
held constitutional in a recent Federal court 
decision by Judge L. Richardson Preyer of 
Greensboro. 

In making the decision, Judge Preyer 
held the Parker Pen Company is entitled 
to a permanent injunction against Dart Drug 
Company, Inc. of Winston-Salem. Dart 
Drug, which did not sign a fair trade eon- 
tract with Parker, contended the N. C. Fair 
Trade Act is in conflict with both the North 
Carolina and United States Constitutions. 

In commenting on Dart's contention that 
fair trade legislation was spawned in con- 
ditions of depression and should be con- 
sidered in the light of the "present age of 
affluence," Judge Preyer said: "We think 
that the legislature is better fitted to re- 
solve the economic issues involved than the 
courts. ' ' 




crowd pleasers a la Lance! 




More people prefer and buy tasty Lance 
snacks than any other brand. And no wonder.. 
They're always fresh and there's 

a wide variety to choose from. 
Please your crowd. Display Lance. 



NC. Charlotte, North Carolina 




30 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

III Pharmacy School Notes 




Mrs. Ernest Morrell of Southern Pines 
presented a valuable gift to the Pharmacy 
Library consisting of the "Standard Cyclo- 
pedia of Horticulture" by L. H. Bailey, 
1914-1917 edition in six volumes. The late 
Mr. Morrell was a well-known horticulturist 
who spent some years in England, Egypt, 
and Germany. He spent his last 40 years 
in Southern Pines and Khode Island land- 
scaping various estates and serving as an 
advisor on gardening. It was interesting 
that Dr. Jack K. Wier, Assistant Professor 
of Pharmacognosy, had been discussing the 
need in the library for this valuable ref- 
erence Malcolm Burroughs, third-year stu- 
dent from. Wadesboro, provided transporta- 
tion for this heavy set of books. 

Outstanding success has been enjoyed by 
the professional symposium with six Wednes- 
day night lectures on antibiotics and cardio- 
vascular drugs which began on February 7 
and was arranged by Assistant Dean Cham- 
bers as Director of Pharmacy Extension. A 
total of 55 pharmacists enrolled attending 
from as far away as Elizabeth City. 

The annual industrial trip, February 11- 
17, took 68 undergraduate students, two 
graduate students, and 22 wives or husbands 
of graduating students to the Upjohn Com- 
pany, Parke, Davis & Company, and Eli 



Lilly & Company. Doctors M. A. Chamber 
and Jack K. Wier served as chaperones. Th> 
tired returnees expressed their enthusiasm- 
for this opportunity to understand th 
broader aspect of pharmacy at the induijj 
trial level. Two of the graduating student 
are sons of Parke, Davis & Company repnl 
sentatives. 

The Justice Drug Company presented iiij 
dividual copies of the Physician's Deal 
Eeference to the graduating students anl 
members of the faculty. This reference I 
particularly useful in Dr. Thompson's coursj 
in Prescription Specialties and Dr. Piant; 
dosi 's course in Dispensing. 

On January 26-27 Dr. Chambers repra 
sented the School of Pharmacy at Norti 
Carolina's first annual Health Career's Co* 
gress at the Robert E. Lee Hotel in Winstoi. 
Salem. 

Mr. James Kai Jin Lim, graduate studerJ 
from Singapore, passed the final examination 
for the degree of Master of Science with I 
major in Pharmacy. The subject of hi] 
thesis was ' ' The Solubilization and Stabilit 
of Phenobarbital. ' ' The final examination 
was held on February 8. 

Dean Brecht demonstrated traction splinjl 
ing on February 12 at Chapel Hill Fiw 
Station No. 2 for a special class of approxa 
mately 35 students from the fire departmei-j 
and police department. The course is beinl 
taught by Dr. Oscar Paris, chairman of Firs! 
Aid, who is an assistant professor (fl 
Zoology. 

Dean Brecht made his annual visit to tl 
Charlotte Woman's Druggist Auxiliary ol 
February 13. Also present were MrJ 
Leslie Myers, president of the State Auxill 
iary, Mr. John T. Stevenson, viee-presidei.j 
of the State Auxiliary, and two past pres' 
dents and advisors, Mrs. F. F. Potter anl 
Mrs. Tom Holland. 

The Eetail Laboratory passed final ill 
spection on February 14 with flying color! 
Pharmacists who have visited this new': J 
completed facility of the School of Phal 
macy have expressed enthusiasm for the e j 
cellence of its fixtures. Dr. A. W. Jowd 
Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Adminilj 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 



.tration, is receiving excellent response from 
'manufacturers who have been solicited for 
stocking the laboratory type of retail phar- 
imacy. 

The prepharmacy students in General Col- 
lege were guests at a special reception held 
ht the Institute of Pharmacy on February 
18. Students were addresed by Mr. W. J. 

mith, secretary, and Mr. Robert B. Hall, 
^resident of the N.C.P.A. Also present were 
past president Ed Fuller and vice-president 

oy Moose. 

The independent students of the School of 

harmacy now have attractive athletic shirts 
intramural activities as a gift from 
feowe Campbell, Peoples Drug Store, Taylors- 
yille. In the basketball competition both 
bf the first two games were won against 
the School of Law and the School of Dentis- 
Iry. 

I From time to time pharmacists have re- 
quested information concerning better ways 
fo obtain distilled water. Recently the an- 
nouncement of an electrically heated water 
Itill has been obtained from Barnstead and 
js available from the Standard Scientific Sup- 
oly Corporation, 808 Broadway, New York 
fi, N. Y. at approximately $124.50. In the 
specification its capacity is V2 gallon per 
liour using 115 volt current at l%o kilowatts 
•Der hour plus 4 gallons of cooling water per 
liour. Its small size requires only 21 inches 
.vide, 10 inches deep, and 19 inches high. 
I Two babies were born in the pharmacy 
[taff during the past month. On February 
p a baby girl, Helen Allison, was born to 
vlr. and Mrs. John E. Haynes. Mrs. Haynes 
s a secretary at the School. 
<\ A second baby girl, Anna Marie, was born 
10 Mr. and Mrs. Lueien Faust. Mrs. Faust 
\s a part-time instructor on the staff. 
E A letter was received recently from 
Teorge Crevar, former graduate student. He 
p now research pharmacist at St. Jude's 
lospital in Memphis, Tennessee, where he 
3 also teaching Pharmaceutical Prepara- 
tions at the School of Pharmacy in addition 
jo continuing graduate work for the doc- 
iorate degree. A baby girl, Tracy Britton, 

as born to the Crevar 's on November 11. 

Student Branches 

The February meeting of the Student 
branches of the N.C.P.A. and APhA was 



addressed by Professor C. H. MacGregor of 

the School of Business Administration on 
' ' How the Public Views the Pharmacist. ' ' 

Kappa Psi 

Report by Hal Reaves, 
Public Relations Chairman 
Beta Xi Chapter of Kappa Psi Pharma- 
ceutical Fraternity is proud to announce 
the installation of the following officers for 
the ensuing term: Reagent, William Hugh 
Fuller, Jr., Smithfield; Vice-reagent, James 
O. Baity, Mt. Airy; Secretary, William 
Allgood, Roxboro ; Treasurer, Halbert Mc- 
Kinnon, Lumberton ; Chaplain, Benjamin 
Brown, High Point ; Historian, Hal Reaves, 
Asheboro ; Pledgemaster, William Patterson, 
Greenville; Social Chairman, Arthur Hill, 
Lewes, Delaware; Intramural Manager, Jesse 
L. Welch, St. Pauls. 

Phi Delta Chi 

Reported by Larry T. McCoy, Jr., 
Correspondent 

Phi Delta Chi sent four delegates to the 
44th Grand Council which was held Decem- 
ber 27-29 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The 
delegates were : William Ray Johnson, III, 
Fred C. Chamblee, L. H. Stocks, III, and 
Larry T. McCoy, Jr. 

On January 11 the following were initiated 
into the fraternity: Ronald Buchanan, Joseph 
Leon Davis, and Larry T. McCoy, Jr. 

The officers for the spring semester are: 
President, Fred Chamblee, Carrboro ; Vice- 
president, William Ray Long, Kannapolis; 
Secretary, L. H. Stocks, III, Hookerton; 
Treasurer, Hugh Floyd Hayes, Thomasville; 
Social Chairman, Willis Ray Johnson, III, 
Jacksonville; Correspondent, Larry T. Mc- 
Coy, Jr., Cove City; Assistant Correspond- 
ent, Joseph Leon Davis, Conway; Master- 
at-Arms, George Walker Bender, Fayette- 
ville; Assistant Pledge Master, Gilbert C. 
Hartis, Winston-Salem; Inner Guard, Max 
Hatley, Oakboro ; Prelate, Joe Greeson, 
Burlington; Intramurals Manager, Ronald 
Buchanan, Greensboro. 

During the spring semester informal rush, 

the following were pledged: Henry Watkins, 

Spindale; Harrell Dean Bryan, Chinquapin; 

Hugh Smith, Jr., Pink Hill; Dempsey Hill, 

(Concluded on page 35) 




HEADACHE POWDER MARKETED 
IN THE 50-POWDER PACKAGE 



GREATER VOLUME 

for you 
MORE PROFIT 

per sale 
MORE ECONOMY 

for your custom 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



33 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 

• Gaston — Mrs. Anita Friday 

• Charlotte— Mrs. C. H. Smith 

• Chapel Hill — Mrs. Don Skakle 

• Greensboro — Mrs. James M. Waugh 

• Cabarrus — Mrs. Harry Barringer 

Gaston 

The January 16th meeting of the Gaston 
Pharmaceutical Auxiliary was held at the 
home of Mrs. John O. McDonald. Mrs. 
'Lewis Bulwinkle, Executive Secretary of the 
National Foundation, spoke on the local work 
•of the March of Dimes. Mrs. Fred Moss, 
pivics projects chairman, directed the group 
{in making Valentine tray favors for Gaston 
Memorial Hospital. Mrs. Truman Hudson 
announced plans for a square dance. Co- 
hostesses for the meeting were Mrs. John 
,0. McDonald, Mrs. Donald K. Carter, and 
Mrs. Jack Friday. 

j Eighteen members were present for a 
luncheon on February 21, 1962 at the Holi- 
day Inn. Mrs. Bichard Curtis gave the de- 
votional. Attention was called to plans for 
[the state convention in April. A nominating 
Committee consisting of Mrs. John Ameen, 
(Mrs. Fred Moss, and Mrs. John 0. McDonald 
was appointed to secure a slate of officers. 
[Co-hostesses were Mrs. Bichard Curtis and 
Mrs. William H. Houser. Mrs. James B. 
Lewis, guest speaker, chose ' ' Trends in 
Fashion for Spring" as her theme. 

Charlotte 

The Charlotte Woman's Druggist Auxil- 
iary held their regular monthly luncheon 
meeting Tuesday, February 13 at 12:30. 
! Dean E. A. Brecht and Mrs. Leslie Myers, 
President of the Woman's Auxiliary of the 
NC.P.A. addressed the group. Other special 
quests were Mrs. John T. Stevenson, Eliza- 
beth City, first vice-president, and Mrs. 
frhomas M. Holland, Mt. Holly, Advisor, 
both from the State Auxiliary. 



Plans were discussed for the annual bridge 
and canasta party which is to be held at the 
Esso Building on February 20. The pro- 
ceeds go toward scholarships for a worthy 
girl or boy in North Carolina. 

Members of this Auxiliary are looking 
forward to the convention in Baleigh. 

Chapel Hill 

On January 17th the members of the 
Chapel Hill Woman 's Pharmaceutical Aux- 
iliary met at the home of Mrs. Henry Clark 
for bridge and luncheon. Following the 
luncheon there was a business meeting, at 
which time Mrs. M. A. Chambers, President, 
extended the invitation made by the Phar- 
macy Wives to the Auxiliary for a joint 
meeting, January 23rd, at the Institute of 
Pharmacy. 

Also, it was decided that the February 
meeting would be held at Schrafft's Country 
Inn for luncheon and a fashion show. The 
five senior girls of the Pharmacy School 
are to be invited as guests. 

Mrs. George Cocolas announced that the 
preparations for the benefit bingo, to be 
held at the Institute of Pharmacy on March 
9th, were now underway. 

Joint Meeting 

On January 23 at the joint meeting with 
the Pharmacy Wives, Dr. Kempton Jones, 
one of the general practitioners serving 
Chapel Hill citizens, and representatives from 
the American Cancer Association teamed up 
to provide a very informative program re- 
lated to the incidence of cancer in women. 
Two films were shown to amplify the message 
vital to the Avell-being of women and, follow- 
ing each film, Dr. Jones provided time for a 
question and answer period. 

Following formalities, members of the 
two associations retired to the lobby of the 
Institute for a short social period to mingle 
and become better acquainted. 

Greensboro 

Dr. Buth M. Collings, professor at Wom- 
an's College, University of North Carolina 
was speaker for the regular luncheon meet- 
ing of the Greensboro Drug Club Auxiliary 
on January 23 at the Mayfair Cafeteria. 

Dr. Collings' subject was the work of the 
Children 's Home Society of North Caro- 
ls Continued on page 43) 




MILES PRODUCTS 

Division of Miles Laboratories. Inc., Elkhart, Indiana 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 




A daughter, Sarah Katharine, to Mr. and 
rs. Bill Swanu of Hazelwood, December 
tli. ... A daughter, Mary Lucy, to Mr. 
id Mrs. Eobert Elliott of Chapel Hill, 
muary 5, 196:!. Mrs. Elliott, a senior at 
e TJNC School of Pharmacy, is the former 
ibecca Harper, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
L. Harper of Hendersonville. ... A son, 
imes A. Oldham, IV to Mr. and Mrs. 

A. Oldham III of Kenly, January 20th. 

. Lucia Michele, a daughter, horn to Mr. 
d Mrs. Grover Creech of Selma, February 
t. . . . A daughter, Krista Lynne, to Mr. 
d Mrs. Phillip Crouch of Asheville, Fel.ru- 
y 8th. ... A fourth son, James Grey, born 

Mr. and Mrs. Emory Milner Watson of 
•eensboro, February 12th. ... A daughter, 
nanda Fadyne Day, born to Mr. and Mrs. 
arold Vami Day of Spruce Pine, February 
th. 

Marriages 

Miss Sarah Diane Ralph to Billy Worth 
inier, January 28 at St. Stephens Episco- 
1 Church of Erwin. Mr. Lanier is with 
cKnight 's Drug Store of Coats. . . . Mrs. 
ary Davis Williams to Wilbur A. Love- 
mp, January 20 at St. John 's Lutheran 
Lurch of Winston-Salem. Mr. Lovekamp is 
th Parkview Pharmacy of that city. 

Deaths 
C. R. EDWARDS 

Charles Bufhn Edwards, born Sept. 28, 
J07, died February i. 

■A graduate of the School of Pharmacy, 

tiiversity of North Carolina, Class of 1932, 

r. Edwards had operated a pharmacy in 

bemarle since 1950. Prior to that time, 

had been associated with various phar- 

icies, mostly in Piedmont Xorth Carolina. 

L. B. JOINER 
Leon Benjamin Joiner, born May (>, 1894, 
d March 1 at Rowan Memorial Hospital 
■Wing a heart attack. 

A graduate of the Southern College of 
lariiincv, Mr. Joiner moved to Salisbury 
1930 as an employee of Plircell's. In re- 
it years lie was owner-operator of the 
i in Drug Company. 



Mr. Joiner served as first president of the 
Rowan-Davis Pharmaceutical Association. 
MRS. WAYNE F. RHYNE 

Mrs. Wayne F. Rhyne of Gastonia suffered 
a heart attack on the afternoon of February 
13 and died that evening. Mrs. Rhyne had 
remained a member of the Woman's Auxil- 
iary since the death of her husband several 
years ago. 

UNC PHARMACY SCHOOL NOTES 

(Continued from page 31) 
Deep Run; Wayne Keith, Lexington; and 
William Home, Hamlet. 

The Annual P. D. C. Weekend is scheduled 
for March 30-31. On Friday, March 30, 
there will be a combo party at the house, 
featuring the Hot Nuts. Saturday evening, 
March 31, will be open house, followed by a 
banquet at the Holiday Inn in Durham. 
The banquet will include alumni and faculty. 
An invitation is extended to all alumni. 

Completes Fifty Years 
On February 15 W. B. (Bill.) Gurley of 
Windsor completed his 50th year in Phar- 
macy. Although Bill has a few years to go 
before he qualities for his 50 Year Phar- 
macist Pin, he worked for his father, a phy- 
sician, in the family drug store before going 
to Chapel Hill for his formal education in 
Pharmacy. 

On his 50th year in Pharmacy, Bill re- 
ceived numerous congratulatory messages 
from friends and co-workers. Formal rec- 
ognition of the event was accorded him at 
the meeting of the Northeastern Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Society, which was held in 
Williamston on Bill's 50th business anni- 
versary. 

More Dollars for Welfare Drugs 

State Welfare Commissioner Ellen Win- 
ston has announced she hopes to be able to 
increase the present sill monthly allowance 
for drugs for welfare recipients to $20. 

''Ten dollars a month for medical care is 
much too low for many people who must 
have a substantial amount of drugs,'' she 
said. Dr. Winston noted that the proposal 
would have to he approved by the State 
Hoard of Public Welfare ami included in 
the Welfare Department's next budget. 

If an increase is provided, I he Federal 
Govt, will pay $6.50 of the $10 increase. 




Boss: Don't look now but I think we 
are being followed, 

Charlie: ?f BC" has what it takes to make 
it a leader. 



America's Fastest-Selling 
Headache Powder 

. . . and rf BC 9f Tablets [in 
the new red, white and blue 
bottles and cartons are 
gaining new customers 
every day 




headache 
neuralgia 



B. C. REMEDY CO. Durham, north caroling 

Made and sold in North Carolina for over 50 years 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



37 



HE IMAGE OF PHARMACY 

(Continued from page 27) 

At the outset, allow me to reassure you 

jiat your image from the physician 's stand- 

ipint is for the most part a very favorable 

le. In reading a book recently, which 

Lcidentally was written by a physician, I 

Ime upon this paragraph: "Probably all 

;edieal men will agree that in the banks 

t no occupation can a greater proportion of 

turteous gentlemen be found than in the 

pharmaceutical. This and our joint in- 

irests should make us all pull together in 

:jir great interlocking fields of duty to the 

,ck and suffering. ' ' My friends, these 

ibrds were written in 1922 and personally I 

bmit that they are as true today. 

However, as a profession, you do have 

■oblems, and I would be remiss in this op- 

n-tunity should I fail to point out a few of 

lese a little later in my remarks. 

|| First of all, you are members of the health 

:ofession even as are physicians, and there- 

•re whatever I might say in the way of 

iticism or suggestions for improvement will 

I from a medical standpoint, which all of 

;u should be in sympathy with. 

Needless to say, medicine has no desire to 

jiiticize one of its closest allies — pharmacy 

lor to join in the popular sport of condemn- 

;?, discrediting, or maligning. As you 

ly well know, the medical profession has 

pered some rather painful below-the-belt 

:acks itself recently from those who have 

knowledge of medicine or health care. 

e need your help and we certainly want to 

lp you. 

Let 's be quite blunt about our mutual 
pblems: Neither the medical profession 
r pharmacy is perfect. I'm sure members 
both can find faults to criticize in the 
ler. 

However, no matter what flaws or failings 

discover, they must not be allowed to keep 

two professions from working together 

.harmony for the best health and medical 

e of the people of North Carolina. Let 's 

ticize and correct, but let's not antagonize 

squabble. We've got a tremendous job 

do, and nothing must distract it, 

n my title, I have employed the word 

ftnage, " and I note that some of your 

3 'Sequent discussions in this seminar will 



devote some attention to this concept. There- 
fore, although this word "image" is proba- 
bly overused and worn, this as a result of the 
reports of some of our Madison Avenue 
friends, I think it is useful in our discus- 
sion at this point to think for a moment on 
this phrase: "The Image of Pharmacy." 
What do people really think of pharma- 
cists — of drug stores — of the industry.' Why 
do they hold these opinions? Why are you 
concerned about it? What, if anything, can 
you do about it? 

There is some danger in considering an 
image as equivalent to an average, or com- 
posite picture. This is best illustrated by the 
story about a panel of movie critics who Avere 
debating as to just what features should be 
found in an ideal actress. After considerable 
discussion and comparison of film strips, and 
photographs, they finally concluded that such 
an actress would have the bewitching eyes of 
Ava Gardner, the beautiful hair of Rhonda 
Fleming, the legs of Marlene Dietrich, the 
foreparts of Jayne Mansfield and the hind 
parts of Marilyn Monroe. A janitor who 
was sweeping up the conference room came 
up with the rather salty remark that, "I 
could really use the parts you fellows are 
throwing away ! ' ' 

The idea of image, then, is more than a 
composite. Image is the association plus the 
actual product. 

We have observed from many areas in the 
business world that the psychological associ- 
ations may be changed in a positive or nega- 
tive fashion to alter the image. For example, 
most of you remember a few years ago when 
Pepsi-Cola, was considered and spoken of, 
rather crudely, as a "belly-wash." Now we 
all automatically think of being young and 
"fair and debonair — the modern light one" 
while we're being sociable with a Pepsi, for 
those who think young? 

The Simonize people recently developed 
a skin lotion that by all laboratory and 
technical tests was far superior to any 
similar product on the market. However, 
most of us associate the word ' ' Simonize ' ' 
with sweaty young men in coveralls on a hot 
Saturday afternoon laboriously putting a 
new shine on the family car with a gummy, 
sticky substance out of familiar flat orange 
cans. This association was attested to in 



38 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



THE IMAGE OF PHARMACY 

the pre-marketing field trials done with the 
Sinionize Skin Lotion. A representative 
would call at homes, show the housewife the 
lotion in a plain bottle, and invite her re- 
action after she had tried it on her hands 
and arms. The initial reactions were in- 
variably those of commendation and ap- 
proval : But when the ladies were informed 
that this delightful product was made by 
Simonize, all to frequently there was a rush 
for soap, water, and towel to rid them- 
selves of the sticky goo! 

Allow me to repeat our definition: Actual 
product plus psychological association equals 
IMAGE. You pharmacists supply the 
actual product in your stores — your profes- 
sional talents and the medicaments them- 
selves — and, by and large, it is a very good 
product. However, the component of psy- 
chological association that helps to make up 
your total public image is an area in which 
you might strive for improvement. Frequent- 
ly, you are the first contact that the sick 
person has with the health team: He drops 
in and asks your advice. Perhaps you 
advise this person to see a physician, and 
you then see him again when he returns with 
a prescription. Afterwards, you might well 
see this patient perhaps even more often 
than the physician as his program of therapy 
requires his return to you for periodic re- 
fills. It seems to me that in these contacts 
you have a great opportunity and a responsi- 
bility to create a favorable image for your- 
self, your store, the physician, and for our 
free enterprise system of Medical care in 
general by striving to develop pleasant 
psychological association within this custom- 
er-patient in your frequent contacts. 

We physicians are most anxious to work 
with pharmacy, but occasionally you engage 
in practices which we cannot agree with and 
for which we cannot defend you to the public. 
Of course, this works both ways. There are 
some pharmacists and some stores on the 
fringe of your profession whose ethics are 
not flawless, just as there are some physi- 
cians who are a disgrace to their profession. 
We must both keep our houses clean so that 
we can face public inspection without secret 
trembling or fear that a skeleton in some 
forgotten closet will start rattling. 



I shall try to be specific, and at this poii 
I am reminded of the Quaker farmer i 
Pennsylvania who awaked one night to di 
cover a burglar in his house. Quietly seeu 
ing and loading his shotgun, he salved h 
anti-violence Quaker doctrine by aniiouncinj 
' ' friend, I wouldst not harm thee for all tl 
world, but thou standest where I am aboi 
to shoot. ' ' 

One of the principle complaints that 
have heard around the country against jc\ 
from physicians and public alike concerij 
drug prices. Whether you like it or noj 
you are a part — the ultimate distribution ou 
let — of the drug industry. The Kefauvij 
hearings certainly did your industry litt 
good. Many doctors have noted the concei 
of their patients over these hearings. Thi. 
concern has affected many physicians, 

However, leadership in the medical pp 
fession through the American Medical A 
sociation, and in this state through the Sta 
Medical Society, is doing its utmost to ke(j 
the practicing physician well-informed 
all aspects of medical and drug costs. 

So far, I believe the most vociferous criti 
of the drug industry and the AMA amoii 
physicians have been the medical educatoi 
I am concerned at the inability of the 
dustry and medicine to reach educators wi 
basic information about costs, economics ai 
competitive enterprise. 

Many of these educators are well-informe 
outspoken men. Their criticism of us oft 
is biting, and certainly their opinions a 
respected by many physicians. Therefoi 
both industry and medicine must reach the 
influential men, convincing them that o 
integrity as physicians and pharmacists 
behind the drugs and service produced. 

I know and you know, that most of t 
charges hurled regarding drug prices ha 
no foundation in fact. We know that on 
six cents of the consumer dollar goes for 
health services, compared to an equal amou 
for recreation and five cents for alcohol a 
tobacco. We know that although total mei 
cal costs (in terms of a devalued dollar) a 
up 108% compared with 20 years ago, ho 
ever, food is likewise up 151%, shoes 169 f / 
movies 130%, and men's haircuts 218' 
We know that of the dollar spent for heal 
care, 20 years ago you pharmacists got 2 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



39 



if it; today you get 20^. Incidentally, 
kventy years ago physicians fees took 30^ 
!f that health dollar, today it is 25^. 
I We know these things, but somehow both 
lur professions are failing to communicate 
liese facts to the public. This is a defect 
n our communications, and I respectfully 
juggest that each of you arm himself with 
iuch readily available facts from your asso- 
jiation office, and utilize these facts in your 
laily contacts to help dispel some of the cur- 
lent misinformation. 

I I am certainly not suggesting that over- 
Iricing and profiteering commonplace among 
me retail pharmacists in North Carolina. I 
luspect that there are instances where it does 
pist, and I am certain that you join with me 
fi condemning these practices where they 
tsist. Your disapproval should be brought 
forcibly to the attention of the culprits. 
■ our association might consider the advisa- 
bility of establishing a grievance committee 
tithin the framework of your State Associa- 
lon where persons who feel they have been 
[ictimized might have a forum for sympa- 
petic and fair-minded consideration and 
. ediation of their complaints. We have 
heh a committee in the Medical Society 
hi find it valuable in the self-policing of our 
► embership as well as its value in our public 
dations program. 

i Again, to be specific on a few points which 

p not require elaboration: 

i There are still areas where counter pre- 

jribing exceeds the bounds of propriety and 

iihics; there remain too many instances of 

[leely dispensing prescription-legend drugs 

111 the lame excuse of ' ' doing the poor man 

[[favor, " too frequently there is unfavorable 

i (jmment to the patient regarding a medica- 

llent prescribed for him by his physician. 

(I've never known anyone to have much luck 

1 ; th this, ' ' rarer, but still with us inf requent- 

|| is the problem of substitution; unfortu- 

||itely prevalent is the completely negative 

•titude in your recruitment program to the 

• liungster seeking advice about pharmacy as 

' ' career; and last, too many prescription 

.partments portray an unfavorable image 

llth their disarray, litter, and state of 

'anliness. All of these, of course, are 

rennial problems, and I know that con- 



tinued progress is being made in solving 
them. 

On a broader front, I would challenge you 
to an ' ' operation bootstrap ' ' to elevate your 
professional status as individuals and not to 
be content to remain as pill-counting tech- 
nicians, but to rise to your potential. 

For example, in addition to compounding 
extemporaneous prescriptions, the pharma- 
cist must be a storehouse of scientific infor- 
mation of all drug and chemical agents with 
special reference to their pharmacologic and 
therapeutic usefulness, their toxicity and 
methods of proper handling. The nature 
and number of requests from physicians will 
require a better understanding, and the 
public has been trained to expect the phar- 
macist to understand and be able to advise 
them on such substances as pesticide chemi- 
cals, and the general composition of all 
commonly used household aids, in addition 
to those products designated as medicine. 

Physicians, too, need to know the com- 
position of such products and will rely 
upon the pharmacists' encyclopedic store- 
house to guarantee that they apply proper 
first aid remedial measures when the occasion 
demands. 

Poison control centers, on a local level, 
now in their pharmacy, will be a challenge 
to the pharmacist. Poison control centers 
will mean the maintenance of card files, 
catalogues, bulletins, and other data from 
which to advise the physician regarding the 
composition of toxicological substances. 

Today, the pharmacist must be an expert 
on drugs, a source of up-to-date informa- 
tion that can be used by the physician much 
more expeditiously than the overwhelming 
body of modern technical literature. Today 
he is handling more potentially dangerous 
drugs than ever before to meet the prescrib- 
ing habits of the physician. For instance, 
both the pharmacist and the physician must 
evaluate claims and judge efficacy and safety 
of new or competing medications. In this, 
the pharmacist is assuming an important role 
as consultant to the physician. 

The rapid growth and application of medi- 
cal knowledge has become so widespread that 
no one group can encompass the field, our 
search for ever-better health care of humani- 
ty is bringing the doctor and the pharma- 



40 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



THE IMAGE OF PHARMACY 

cist together again through the need for 
exchange of information and ideas. As 
individual practitioners in our communities, 
as members of the modern medical team, and 
as organized groups on the local, state and 
national levels, we are interdependent. Suc- 
cessful solution to the problems we face will 
require a close collaboration which serves not 
only our professional interests but also the 
public welfare. 

Finally, I challenge you as citizens and 
as members of the overall health team to be- 
come more interested and more active in 
political affairs affecting our professions. 
Take time from your busy daily routine to 
become immediately informed, vocal, and 
literature regarding pending legislation in 
the Congress which threatens not only our 
free enterprise system of health care but 
which poses real danger to the economic 
and health security of our nation. I refer 
specifically to the King- Anderson Bill, de- 
signated HB 4222, which will probably come 
to a floor vote in the House of Representa- 
tives in April or May. In spite of dis- 
claimers, this is socialized medicine in that 
it is compulsory and standards for care are 
set by the Federal Government. Time does 
not permit a full analysis of the pitfalls and 
dangers inherent in this Bill, but I would 
point out that this proposed program is first 
of all not necessary — the proponents of the 
Bill have vastly exaggerated the need: It 
does not provide a sound program for those 
who are in need; it would lower standards of 
health care; it would foster abuses; it is 
prohibitively expensive and would endanger 
the fiscal structure of the entire Social 
Security system. Insurance experts say that 
the program as proposed with a %% in- 
crease in Social Security Tax on employee 
and employer would be inadequate to meet 
the costs of the program, yet this increase 
alone would drain North Carolina of an 
additional Twenty-Two Million of tax dol- 
lars annually. 

I do not bring this to you as a partisan 
political issue. Responsible people in both 
parties are seriously concerned. As a life- 
long democrat, I do take issue with those 
who would automatically label as defectors 
we who do not choose to be labeled with the 



Walter Reuther — Sammy Davis, Jr. — Fran 
Sinatra — Dean Martin wing of the party. I 
short, I hold that in this state and elsewhen 
there remains a place and a need for coi 
servative philosophy within the majority c 
this state. 

I submit to you that your taking a fin 
stand in such political matters affecting yotf^ 
profession is your duty as responsible, edi 
cated community leaders and is consistel 
with a favorable public image. In th J 
connection, I would like to publicly commen 
two of your members serving in the Gener;' 
Assembly: John Henley of Hope Mills an 1 
Keith Fearing of Manteo. Both these me 
showed themselves to be dedicated legislatoi 
and public servants. They were respectfi 1 
and cooperative when approached on legii 
lative matters affecting medicine and pha, 
macy, and we in the Medical Society are veij 
grateful to them. 

Gentlemen, I believe the problems of tl 
pharmaceutical industry are not insurmoun 
able. I believe that most of them can q 
overcome in the immediate future. 

I believe also that medicine and the dni 
industry are essential allies in the batt] 
against disease and illness. 

Actually, our problems are fundamental 
similar to those of our nation. We have b 
fore us today grave threats to the basic f re! 
doms of our economic system. These incluc 
the freedom of competitive enterprise . I 
the freedom to own property and pass it (j 
to our heirs . . . and the freedom of voluntai 
organization. 

It is unfortunate that some segments C 
our population think only of the freedo> 
to make profits and to sell. Although the 
are important bulwarks of our econom 
American enterprise must never lose sight e 
another very important freedom — the frej 
dom to serve, to help and to benefit humanitl 
free of governmental directive and pressui) 

Those of us in the medical and pharmace 
tical profession have an immense obligatio 
to preserve our freedoms to serve mankii 
by improving its health and happiness. 

Modern medicine would be a travesty wit 
out modern drugs, just as the pharmaceutic 
industry would be helpless without pb 
sicians. 

Both of our organizations have flaws whr 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



41 



eed illumination and removal. I hope 
octors will continue to point out what they 
elieve to be weaknesses in the drug industry 
rmor, just as I hope you in the pharmaceut- 
ical field will offer us the same type of 
jriendly criticism. 

Fighting or bickering among ourselves 
ould be fatal. But working together we 
an enter the space age confident that ours is 
le greatest contribution to human life and 
pppiness — good health. 

I Above all, all of us need to ask ourselves 
his question: Are we more concerned with 
anipulating the public image than with 
ptually remaking ourselves to become the 
trt of person that we would like to appear 
) be? I hope that we are not. 

Thank you very much. 

Successful Drug Symposium 
Concluded 

Fifty-four pharmacists enrolled and at- 
[inded the "Drug Symposium," which was 
■included on March 14 with a lecture by Dr. 
(nomas C. Gibson, Assistant Professor of 

edieine, School of Medicine, University of 
; orth Carolina. 

I A similar type program will be available 
i the pharmacists of Western North Caro- 
lia provided a sufficient number (minimum 
25) indicate interest. Write to: Dr. 
|. A. Chambers, School of Pharmacy, UNO, 
napel Hill. 

Eastern North Carolina pharmacists have 
Iso expressed interest in the Symposium. 
p appropriate time would be the early fall 
bnths and the lecture site dependent on 

e town closest to heaviest concentration of 

gistrants. 



Career Literature Used 

Pharmacy career literature supplied by the 
NCPA and the School of Pharmacy served a 
2-fold purpose in Eeidsville: Phil Link used 
the information as a basis for a talk to 
about 30 interested Eeidsville students on 
the morning of February 28. 

Later, Hunter Gammon used material to 
prepare a talk for the Science Department of 
Wentworth High School. 75 students were 
in attendance. 



DISTINCTIVE 




Carry your 
store's identity by color and 
personalized copy right into your customers 
home for the life of the Prescription. 

Another plus value of the modern paper 
box with its clean fresh label. 

Representative: 

M. C. GRIER 

iiio ann st., at. 3-3647 

Monroe. North Carolina 

• * • 

E. N. ROWELL CO., INC. 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



SMITH WHOLESALE DRUG CO. 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

A Young and Growing Service Wholesale House, 
Owned and Operated by Registered Pharmacists 



We Appreciate Your Business 



42 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



For seventy-seven years 
- - - since 1885 

SeeMAN 

OF DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long asso- 
ciation with North Caro- 
lina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its forty- 
third volume, and the 
first printed copy was 
"Seeman Printed." 




The Seeman Printery 

of DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 




TAR HEEL DIGES1 



Albemarle — Jim Godfrey has been name 
the new manager of Pureell's Drug Stor<' 
succeeding E. L. Kritzer who retired o 
February 5. Mr. Godfrey has been an en 1 
ployee of the Pureell organization since 194'J 

Graham — Jesse Beale is the new manage 
of the Graham Drag Store. He will I 
assisted by Joe Browning, who for the paa 
two years has been employed in Greensbor 
by Edmonds Drug. 

Maxton — Cash and merchandise wer 
stolen from the Austin-Gilbert Drug Con: 
pany on the night of February 13. Include 
in the items taken was a 32-calibre pisto 

Durham — The Durham-Orange Drug Clu 
has endorsed fluoridation of the water suj 
ply for both Durham and Chapel Hill. 

Williamston — February 12 marked tu 
30th anniversary of Davis Pharmacy, ownel 
and operated by Pharmacist David 1 
Davis. 

High Point — A cash box containing abou 
$70 was taken from Anderson's Drug Stoi 
during business hours on February 16. I 
is believed the box was picked up by 8 
customer while Ernest Anderson, the mai| 
ager, was busy in the prescription depar 
ment. 

Fayetteville — George Matthews was r< 
cently awarded two top awards of tl 
Fayetteville Kiwanis Club: the E. J. Wei 
cup for civic leadership and the secretary 
cup for outstanding work with the Boys an 
Girls Committee. 

Monroe — A new pharmacy will occupy tt 
site of St. Luke's Lutheran Church, recentl 
torn down. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



43 



Doings 

(Continued from page 33) 
ina, an organization in which she has been 
nterested for some time. 

The speaker was introduced by Mrs. Doris 
laytor, second vice-president of The Wo- 
nan's Auxiliary of the NCPA. 

Mrs. Edith Myers, president of The 
Roman's Auxiliary of the NCPA was 
pecial guest. She urged all members to 
ilan to attend the state convention. 

Mrs. Ben F. Collins, local president, pre- 
ided over the business session during which 
eports from the various committees were 
eard. 

A letter of appreciation was read from 
he Auxiliary Scholarship recipient, Mr. 
venneth Capes of Burlington. 

Mrs. Collins announced that Dr. Marshall 
lorris will be speaker for the February 
leeting. Also in February, the Auxiliary 
i to be entertained by the Greensboro Drug 
'lub. 

Cabarrus 

The Woman 's Auxiliary of the Cabarrus 
'ountv Pharmaceutical Society met with its 



President, Mrs. Prentiss George, Jr., at her 
home in Kannapolis. 

Mrs. George called the meeting to order. 
Mrs. Gordan Bane conducted the devotions, 
which challenged us as an organization to 
press forward in the new year with the chal- 
lenges that present themselves. 

Mrs. Harry A. Barringer, Secretary, read 
the minutes. They were approved as read. 

Mrs. Ernest Porter gave the Treasurer's 
report. 

Dr. John Vincent Arey, a prominent Con- 
cord gynecologist, was the guest speaker. 
He used as his subject, ' ' Cancer of Women. ' ' 
He stated that cancer would be the number 
two killer in 1962, outranked only by heart 
disease. The publicity given cancer control 
and therapy is wonderful, but often doesn't 
get to the right people. Dr. Arey stressed 
that cancer can be cured by early diagnosis 
and treatment. 

Mrs. L. A. Crowell, Jr. of Lineolnton, 
mother of Mrs. George, was a special guest. 

The next meeting is to be with Mrs. Her- 
bert Hames. 






RESPONSIBILITY . . . OBLIGATIONS 

harmacy has the responsibility of providing the community with the finest drug service 
ossible for the maintenance of good health. To fulfill this requirement, the professional 
bility of a pharmacist is needed, coupled with complete and comprehensive stocks of 
harmaceuticals. The service wholesaler recognizes a responsibility to pharmacy and rep- 
:sents one source for obtaining merchandise. 

fe, your service wholesaler, maintain adequate inventories to meet our obligation to you. 
tore significant, however, is our ability to make deliveries promptly and to furnish the 
test pharmaceutical information and financial guidance. We invite you to take advantage 
f these services and to send your Lilly orders to us. 



WE ARE A ^**€XXX/ DISTRIBUTOR 

THE PEABODY DRUG COMPANY 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



44 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

This space available at 10^ per word; mini- 
mum of $3.00. Box numbers assigned and 
replies forwarded to advertiser upon re- 
quest. Mail copy and payment to Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy, Box 151, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 



BALANCES — Prescription balances repaired. 
Contact Phipps & Bird, Inc., P. O. Box 2V, 
Richmond 5, Virginia. Telephone Ml 4-5401. 



FOR SALE — Remington's Practice of Phar- 
macy, 12th Edition. (1961). 1,866 pages. 
Price $22.50. Available from NCPA, Box 
151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



WANTED TO BUY: Registered pharmacist 
wishes to buy professional pharmacy or 
partenership; will consider a pharmacy with 
fountain; Eastern N. C. JHGW-3. 



STORE WANTED: Registered pharmacist 
wishes to buy Piedmont drug store. Will 
aslo consider leasing entire operation. Please 
reply JDC-3. 



High Honor 

John Michael Lazarus, a third year medi- 
cal student at Tulane Medical School, New 
Orleans, has been inducted into Alpha Omega 
Alpha, scholastic honor society. Normally, 
students are not elected until their senior 
year, hence Mike becomes one of a few 
junior medical students to achieve this honor. 

Mike is the son of a pharmacist — Joe 
Lazarus of Sanford; is himself a pharmacist 
(UNC School of Pharmacy) and is the 
brother of Larry Lazarus of Spindale, who 
also graduated in pharmacy from the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. 



Mooresville — Hugh C. Caldwell, a native 
Spartanburg, South Carolina, will work 
the Medical Center Pharmacy and will spei 
two days of each week in Statesville, whe 
he will assist John T. Simpson, Jr. in tl 
operation of his newly established pha 
macy. 

Tryon — H. O'Neil Benson has joint 
Owen's Pharmacy as pharmacist accords 
to an announcement by Dean Butler, own 
of the pharmacy. 

Black Mountain — SKF Bepresentati 
Olgie F. Tarr was a guest speaker at a 
cent meeting of the local Botary Club. 

Sanford — Miss Stephanie Diane Stephe 
son, a student at the UNC School of Pha 
macy, is a contestant in the "Miss Sanford 
beauty pageant. She has been employed 1 
the Lee Drug Store of Sanford as a sal 
clerk. 

Greensboro — William P. Brewer, executi 
vice president, of Justice Drug Company, 
a member of a new committee to wo 
closely with the Greensboro College in 
development program. 

Rockwell — M. B. Barnhardt, in the U. 
Middle District Court, was fined $1,000 aft 
pleading guilty to a charge of dispensii 
legend drugs without prescription. 

Waynesville — Curtis Drug Store was re 
resented in the Nurses ' annual Valenti 
dance by Bose Ann Green. 

Albemarle — Allan F. Eakle has resign 
as pharmacist with Phillips Drug to acce 
a position with Purcell Drug Store. A n 
five of West Virginia, Mr. Eakle has ma 
his home in Albemarle for the past 
months. 

Cherryville — W. H. Houser, Jr. has be 
elected president of the Cherryville M( 
chants Association. 

Morganton — William W. Jones, a 19' 
graduate of the UNC School of Pharmae 
has purchased Whiteley's Pharmacy fro' 
the estate of the late Iley C. Whiteley. 

Concord — Wallace L. Pennington has 
cepted a, position with Eli Lilly and Coi 
pany as a MSB in Bichmond, Virginia. 

Boone — O. K. Bichardson and party 
friends spent a week in February in Be 
muda. The Bermuda golf links receivi 
a work-out. Leaving Bermuda at 3 P.1V 
OK was back home by 10:30, including au 
drive from Charlotte. 



From O. M. B. — you get the 



n 




O. WENS. jy ilMOB j |B 



ODEKER 



1010 Herring Avenue, Wilson, North Carolina 



April 8-9-70 




TtfelcomeL 




AS A TOKEN OF FRIENDSHIP 



AND HOSPITALITY 



WE PRESENT YOU WITH A KEY TO 



Suite 1046 







IN THE HOTEL SIR WALTER 




Visit 


us often during the 82nd Annual Convention of the 


North Carolina 






Pharmaceutical Association 






THE W. H. KING DRUG COMPANY 




"The 


House of Friendly and Dependable 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

AND ITS ASSOCIATES 

O'HANLON-WATSON DRUG COMPANY 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 


Service" 


BELLAMY 


DRUG 


COMPANY KING DRUG COMPANY PEABODY DRUG COMPANY 


Wilmington, 


N. C. Florence, N. C. 


Durham, N. C. 



X 



he Carolina JqURNAL OF PHARMACY 



Volume XLIII APRIL, 1962 



Number 4 




nnntk 



RECEIVED 
MAY 21962 

U OF I UB MED SCI 




'Oh, yes, add this 
package of 
Tes-Tape" 




■~>4 * 



'Y~~ 



^ 



For extra sales, display 



TES-TAPE 



The trim, colorful Tes-Tape display suggests a natural 
"tie-in" sale to the 1,300,000 diabetics now buying 
Insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. Every diabetic 

is a potential $ 140-per-year customer for diabetic 

supplies. Encourage them to shop at your pharmacy 
by displaying professional items such as Tes-Tape. 



Tes-Tape s (urine sugar analysis paper, Lilly) 

Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis 6, Indiana, U. S. A. 



Sfefy 



7-WAYS 



TO COMPETE IN TODAY'S MARKET— 

1. SELL THE PERSONALIZE SERVICE OF THE 
INDEPENDENT DRUGGIST. 

2. CREATE YOUR OWN DISCOUNT IMAGE WITH 
SPECIALS AND ADVERTISING. 

3. CONCENTRATE ON MERCHANDISING NEW 
PRODUCTS. 

4. BE ADAPTABLE, FLEXIBLE AND STUDY YOUR 
CUSTOMERS. 

5. CONCENTRATE ON NATIONAL BRANDS IN 
INVENTORY AND DISPLAYS. 

6. MODERNIZE OR MOVE! 

7. WORK WITH YOUR FULL-LINE, FULL-SERVICE 
WHOLESALER FOR BEST RETURN ON INVESTED 
DOLLARS. 




^IMBCr, 




**o L 



JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 



Greensboro, N. C. 



Beginning our 64th year of Service to 
the Retail Druggists of North Carolina. 




Boss: Don't look now but I think we 
are being followed. 

Charlie: ff BC" has what it takes to make 
it a leader. 



America's Fastest-Selling 
Headache Powder 

. . . and rr BC" Tablets in 
the new red, white and blue 
bottles and cartons are 
gaining new customers 
every day 




B. C. REMEDY CO. Durham, north Carolina 

Made and sold in North Carolina for over 50 years 



II 



KEY FIXTURES INCREASE SALES" 








DEPARTMENT GROUPING 

rhis arrangement of the Candy, 
rigar and Tobacco Departments, 
.long with the Camera and Cos- 
netic Departments, insures efficient 
.peration by one Clerk during dull 
■eriods which can be readily ex- 
■anded and served by two or three 
ales people during the busy hours. 




FOOD-FOUNTAIN SERVICE 
Coffee Breaks, Lunch and 'Tween- 
meal Snacks keep these ten stools 
turning and the cash register ring- 
ing! With Bastian-Blessing's beau- 
tiful, compact, sanitary equipment 
you invite more customers; you 
serve them quicker and better; so 
you get more turnover per stool 
and more profit per sale. For a 
layout designed to suit your particu- 
lar needs, to serve ten or two 
hundred per hour, use the Coupon 
below. 



•PROFESSIONAL DEPARTMENT 
jn the overall store design the RX 
'•epartnient is given the preferred 
>cation for the best control of the 
.omplete store operation. In this 
esign the merchandising section is 
Miveniently located near the RX 
'epartment and Wrapping Counter, 
he RX Shelving is arranged in 
-ays, easily accessible to the work- 
Junter. The bays provide ample 
pace for stock. Use the coupon 
Blow for our specialized Pharmacy 
"lanning service. Over 25 years ex- 
icrience in serving North Carolina 
harmacists. 

_ Clip Coupon and Mail 



We are planning to 

□ Expand □ Modernize □ Build 

New- 
Store 

Name 

Firm Name 

Street Address 

City 

State 




GRANT E. KEY, INC. 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Manufacturers of 
Key-Line Fixtures 

Distributors of 

Bastion- B Jessing 



The House of Friendly Service 




Scott ^utug, Company, 



Service Wholesalers Since 1891 



The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



April, 1962 
Vol. xliii No. 4 

* 

Officers 
NOKTH CAROLINA 
PHAEMACETJTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

• 
President 

John T. Stevenson 
Elizabeth City 

• 

Vice-Presidents 

Hoy A. Moose 

Mount Pleasant 

Harry A. Barringkr 

Concord 

W. T. Boone 
Ahoskie 



Secretary-Treasurer 

Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

• 

Assistant 

Secretary-Treasurer 

C. M. Andrews 

Burlington 

• 

General Counsel 

F. 0. Bowman 
Chapel Hill 



KNOW SOMETHING 
BE SOMETHING 
DO SOMETHING 

Warren Lansdowne, the immediate past president of the 
APhA, says there are three things we must do to preserve 
Pharmacy: 

' ' The first is to know something. A pharmacist is not 
a pharmacist unless he knows pharmacy and has qualified in 
accordance with legal and educational requirements. There 
is not one of us who will let his best friend dispense our 
prescription simply because he means well and is eager to 
help. We want a man who knows; and I am confident that 
the Senator from Tennessee would also want a man who 
knows. But now, of all times, pharmacy needs men who 
know — men who know that the greatest enemies of our way 
of professional life are ignorance without understanding 
and knowledge without wisdom. 

' ' The second thing you and I must do, along with know- 
ing something, is to be something. All the knowledge in the 
world cannot make us effective unless we are something. 
A pharmacist who abdicates his profession to deal in pots, 
pans, stepladders, bicycles is a familiar illustration of the 
destruction of a professional man by what he does. 

' ' A pharmacist can know all there is to know about the 
practice of pharmacy. He can be a model of good behavior 
in his profession and his community, yet he will never 
dispense a prescription or be of service to a physician un- 
less he does something. 

' ' Charting the course of American Pharmacy is a job 
for pharmacists who can keep their vision clear, keep their 
feet on the ground, keep their minds alert, and who will in- 
vest in the local and state associations and the APhA. All 
faithful and dedicated men did not live in 1776; I am 
confident that today 's pharmacists, as well as those of the 
new generation, will answer this call. ' ' 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate : $3.00 a year ; single copy, 25 cents. Entered as 
second class matter July 5, 1922 at the post office at Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Barton Is Candidate 

William H. Barton, pharmacist-operator 
of the Pleasant Garden Drug Store, has 
announced his candidacy for a post on the 
five-member Guilford County School Board 
subject to the Democratic Primary in May. 

Mr. Barton is a native of Calhoun, 
Georgia ; attended North Georgia College 
and received his degree in pharmacy from 
the Southern College of Pharmacy. He is a 
past president of the Greensboro Drug 
Club. 

Convention News In May 

Athough this issue of The Journal will 
appear after the Raleigh Convention, its 
news copy and pictures were prepared ahead 
of the annual meeting. Hence, from com- 
plete coverage of the April 8-10 meeting, 
watch for the May issue of The Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy. 

William Joyce Appointed Pfizer 
District Manager in Winston-Salem 

Appointment of William D. Joyce of 
Winston-Salem, N. C. as district manager of 



the Winston-Salem district sales office, Mid 
Atlantic region, for Pfizer Laboratories di 
vision of Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc., was an 
nounced recently by Charles Kapp, Pfizei 
Laboratories Sales Manager. 

A graduate of Wake Forest Collegel 
Winston-Salem, N. C, with a B.S. degree ii| 
General Science, Mr. Joyce joined Pfizer ii 
1952, as a professional service representa 
tive. 

Mr. Joyce served in the United State:, 
Navy. A native of Madison, N. C, he an< 
his family now live in Winston-Salem. 



Cover Page 



Because only normal, healthy monkeys an 
used in the production of Orimune I, II, an.j 
III, Lederle 's oral polio vaccines, they an 
thoroughly examined by a veterinarian win 
checks for possible abnormalities in thi 
animal. Lederle uses approximately 850* 
Rhesus monkeys annually in its oral poll 
production program. 




Henry P. Cogdell (right) is shown presenting Service Plaques to former presidents of th 
Wayne County Pharmaceutical Society. Left to right: Herbert Taylor, who receive 
plaque for Luther Bunch, now of Wilmington; E. L. Pilkington, Sr. (1961-62) and Willi 
C. Rose (1953-60). 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



It Takes More Than Added Sales to Up Profits 



By Ernest 

"Our store is not making the profit it 
should and the sole reason is that sales are 
not high enough. We've got to increase our 
sales and do it right now by a sizeable 
figure ! " 

How many pharmacists have made this 
statement at one of their store meetings 
recently? The number has been legion 
through the years and will doubtless con- 
tinue. 

However actual experience is showing 
many that it takes a great deal more than 
added sales to up the profit of a store. As 
this realization spreads the misconception is 
sure to diminish. 

Profits of a pharmacy in today's market is 
determined not by the volume of sales nor by 
the gross margin on sales alone BUT by 
return on investment. And the one certain 
way to secure the highest possible return on 
investment is achieving the greatest possible 
turnover of inventory at lowest possible cost 
over a year's period of time. 

This calls for exacting inventory control 
but unless whatever control method is 
adopted is directed along proper lines even 
then results may be disappointing. 

To attain this very desirable goal of maxi- 
mum number of turnover of inventory in- 
vestment the pharmacist must have accurate 
records of stock purchases and sales. Then 
these records must be interpreted so as to 
determine stock return each year. Eegulat- 
ing purchases to achieve greater turnover 
and minimum inventory go hand in hand at 
all times in any highly profitable operation. 

Experts agree, and experience proves, that 
in order to accomplish the latter the phar- 
macist's inventory control system must (a) 
determine how much of each item is in stock 
a.t a specific time, and (b) determine how 
much of each item has been sold over the 
year. 

Major merchandise items should be classi- 
fied into a group based on movement, de- 
livery time and freight costs. Then setting 
inventory levels, making periodic counts and 
buying to fit established turnover rate are 



W. Fair 

the next objectives experienced retailers 
advise should be followed if the desired 
profits are to be achieved. 

When hundreds of items are present in any 
store's inventory the only practical way to 
work out this problem is on an average 
inventory turnover, if as close a control must 
be exercised today is to be maintained. This 
is achieved by taking the total of the yearly 
inventory at the beginning and end of the 
specific period of counting plus the in- 
tervening inventory divided by this number. 

As an example of the foregoing a $25,000 
beginning inventory added to a $20,000 end- 
ing inventory and a $22,000 mid-year 
inventory totals $67,000. This divided by 
the figure three (the number of inventory 
figures used as above) gives the average of 
$22,334 sought in this particular case. 

When this has been done the next step is 
to determine the cost of goods sold and the 
turnover rates. The true and certain measure 
of effective use of one's capital investment in 
inventory is the number of times the average 
inventory cost may be divided and this re- 
sults' in a reduction of the total cost of 
goods sold. 

As an example of this phase let us take 
au opening inventory of $50,000 and add 
purchases of $60,000 to arrive at the figure 
of $110,000 for the cost of goods on hand. 
From the last named figure deduct a closing 
inventory of $40,000 to arrive at $71,000 as 
costs of goods sold. If the average inventory 
at cost is $30,000 then this gives a turnover 
rate of approximately 2.3 times which is 
found by dividing the $71,000 figure by the 
$30,000 figure above. 

The effect of turnover on capital require- 
ment always determines how funds are re- 
leased for expansion or other profit making 
figures as the rate of turnover is increased. 
For example, on a $50,000 annual sales cost 
figure with stock turnover of two times per 
year this results in a release of $25,000 of 
capital for other use. However if the turn- 
over is increased to four times per year it 

(Concluded on page 25) 




taking the story 
to the public 



SK&F 

Offers Services of 

the Speakers Bureau 



Phil Collins (pictured above) is a member of SK&F's Professional Serv- 
ice Department. He — like the more than 400 Representatives who are 
enrolled in the SK&F Speakers Bureau — has received special training in 
public speaking. To date, Phil and his colleagues have spoken before 
more than a million people, including TV and radio audiences. 

The SK&F Representatives describe highlights in medical and pharma- 
ceutical progress during the last 30 years, and discuss some of the 
problems of health care today. The speeches usually end with a lively 
question-and-answer session. 

If you would like to schedule an SK&F Speaker for a civic, social, or 
service group of which you are a member, just fill in and mail the 
coupon below. 



Your name. 
Address 



Organization. 



Speaking date. 



(Please allow a month, if possible, for necessary arrangements.) 

Don't need speaker now. Send information on the Speakers Bureau. □ 

H20 



Smith Kline & French Laboratories, 

1500 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia 1, Pennsylvania 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

State Has 34 Newly Licensed 
Pharmacists 



Thirty-four candidates for pharmacy 
licenses passed the N. C. Board of Pharmacy 
examinations given in Chapel Hill, Feb. 20- 
22, at the Institute of Pharmacy and the 
UNO School of Pharmacy. 

Mrs. Sarah Upchurch Browning of Chapel 
Hill made the highest grade on the examina- 
tion. Bobert Lee Gordon of Cary and James 
Frederick Meares of Wilson tied for second 
highest score. 

Two pharmacists from other states were 
registered by reciprocity — Thomas Myles 
King, Jr. (Texas), now in Winston-Salem, 
and Harvey A. K. Whitney (Michigan), 
now located in Durham with " , '°. Duke Hos- 
ital Pharmacy. 



Pharmacist licenses have been issued to: 
, Robert L. Barbour, 427 Glenwood Avenue, 
Burlington ; Barbara Jane Bell, 2505 Staf- 
ford Avenue, Raleigh ; Barry Max Bell, 1721 
Danbury St., Gastonia; Charles David Bell, 
;504 Fenimore St., Winston-Salem ; Alpheus 
Worth Benthall, Box 2, Carthage; and 
Arthur Long Bradsher, Jr., #11 Carolee 
j\.pts., Durham. 

Sarah Upchurch Browning, 1506% Mason 
?arm Road, Chapel Hill ; Gary Stanley 
hooper, 215 Monfredo St., Rutherfordton; 
3 hillip Francis Crouch, 12 7% Tacoma Circle, 
^.sheville; Sterling Gray Dixon, C-63 Flemi- 
ng Drive; and Mrs. Ann Bills Garrou, Box 
24, Valdese. 

Charles Thomas Gibson, 404 East Mulberry 
!t., Goldsboro ; Samuel Stephen Goodwin, 
00 Johnson St., Monroe; Robert Lee Gordon, 
reneral Delivery, Cary ; Adrian Clay Gupton, 
Joute #2, Louisburg; James Jackson Horn, 
ioute 1, Lawndale; Kent Loewe Huffman, 
727 Indiana Avenue, Winston-Salem ; and 
i>avid Eugene Keever, 505 North Cedar, 
iincolnton. 

Bobby James Kincaid, 1204 Madison 
Lvenue, Greensboro ; Walter Harold Lasater, 
119 Iredell St., Apt, 2, Durham; George 
lollins McLarty, Jr., 906 Tabor Street, High 
'oint; James Frederick Meares, 909 Corbett 
.venue, Wilson; William White Morris, 123 



Eastover Drive, Gastonia ; and Robert Greer 
Parker, 208A New Drive, Winston-Salem. 

Adie Grey Pelt, 801 East Mulberry St., 
Goldsboro ; Hazel Green Post, 47 Pearl 
Lane, Chamblee, Georgia ; Miles Herbert 
Purser, 519 Buchrow Avenue, Hampton, Vir- 
ginia ; Jesse Van Putnam, Central Drug 
Store, Bessemer City; and Ernest Augustus 
Randleman, Jr., Box 230, Mount Airy. 

Benjamin S. Savoia, Jr., 715 N. Main St., 
Salisbury; Donald Judd Smith, 607 Price 
St., Forest City; Larry Glenn Snider, 1 
Spring St., Canton ; Van Darwin Weaver, 
Box 597, Spring Hope; and John Richard 
White, 628 E. Montgomery, Henderson. 

Rotins MSR Addresses Rotarians 

Roy M. Moss, a medical service representa- 
tive of the A. H. Robins Company, was guest 
speaker at a recent meeting of the Kannap- 
olis Rotary Club. 




Reaco B-Complex with C. Tablets 

$20.00 Doz. 100s 

Reaco A & D Capsules $10.00 Doz. loos 

A. E. P. Tablets $24.00 Doz. 100s 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 10 mg. Tablets 

$2.25 per 100 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 25 mg. Tablets 

$4.50 per 100 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 50 mg. Tablets 

$7.50 per 100 

Reavita Capsules $34.80 Doz. ioos 

$28.00 per 1000 

Neo-Reavita $36.00 Doz. ioos 

Your cooperation in stocking 

Reaco Products is appreciated 

REACO PRODUCTS 

P. O. Box 247 
West Durham, North Carolina 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



Death Takes A Holiday 

This article prepared by Tom Burgiss of Bridge Street Pharmacy, Elkin, is part of Tom's observance 
of National Poison Control Week. During the Week, he made five radio talks, spoke to several school 
groups, arranged a window display and distributed poison antidote bags, prepared and distributed 
2,000 copies of a check list by adding insert in Winston-Salem Journal, and finally, arranged for 
editorial coverage in The Elkin Tribune. What an outstanding 1 -pharmacist performance! 



A popular drama of a few years ago was 
entitled "Death Takes a Holiday." A 
weird title, to be sure, yet in the normal 
human desire to live many of us wish it 
could be possible for the Grim Reaper to 
take a long vacation. 

But despite our tremendous advances in 
all the services, death takes no holiday, and 
nowhere is this truer than in the matter of 
deaths by accidental ingestion of poisons in 
the home. 

Countless deaths occur annually due to ac- 
cidental, suicidal, homicidal and industrial 
poisonings. Eight persons die every day 
r from accidental or suicidal ingestion of 
chemicals. The sad feature of these deaths is 
that the great majority occur among children 
aged from 3 to 5 years. And the cause? 
In many cases the culprit is a common house- 
hold remedy or some chemical product used 
iin the home. About 600,000 children will 
\ swallow poison this year and three out of 
I four of these poisonings will be children 
I aged one and two years. Saddest of all is 
I that about 500 of these unfortunates will die. 
Yet ordinary, common-sense precautions in 
\the home could prevent these poisonings. 
It's simply the old story of "Familiarity 
breeds contempt. ' ' 

The most frequent poisoning agents are 
internal and external medicines, with aspirin 
leading the danger list. The large number 
of cases of aspirin poisoning are unquestion- 
ably tied in with the widespread use of this 
.drug and the ignorance of its toxie qualities. 
The general use of aspirin, helped along by 
ads and TV commercials, has led the public 
to assume it is harmless and can be used as 
a cure-all. Another danger is the increasing 
use of candy-flavored aspirin and the 
dangerous practice of administering it to 
youngsters and telling them it is candy. The 
result is that when a child gets hold of a 
bottle of aspirin he eats it as if it were 
candy — and another innocent life is en- 
dangered. 



Other dangerous agents are nail polish, 
perfume, household bleach and cleansers, 
rust remover, paint thinner, garden sprays, 
iioor wax, sleeping pills, mothballs, cold pills, 
tranquilizers, cough syrup, and liniment. 
The list is endless — and dangerous. 

The child has an uncontrollable urge to put 
tilings in his mouth, and lie wants to know 
how tilings taste. And, worst of all, he has 
no sense of danger. 

It is obviously impossible for anyone, even 
the poison expert, to know all the poison 
hazards a ehild may encounter around the 
house and neighborhood, but the major 
sources of danger are clear. 

A quarter of a million trade-name chemi- 
cal products currently in use in homes and 
industry, with modern technology adding 
hundreds of new products each year. In the 
cosmetics field alone, as many as 1,000 to 
2,000 new items appear each month. Investi- 
gators conclude that 79 per cent of these 
products should be considered moderately 
toxic or worse. 

March 18-24 is Poison Control Week. It 
should serve as a good reminder to every 
pharmacist to do his duty toward more com- 
( Continued on page 26) 

Carolina Camera 

(opposite page) 

Top: John Grandy (left), Vice-President 
of the Mecklenburg Pharmaceutical Society, 
is shown presenting a $75 contribution to 
Gilbert Colina, Co-Director of the Mercy 
Hospital Poison Control Information Center. 
The funds will be added to the Center's 
financial budget for the coming year. 

Center & Bottom: UNC pharmacy seniors 
and their wives plus a number of faculty 
members are shown on a visit to the pharma- 
ceutical laboratories of Parke, Davis and 
Company and Upjohn. The two groups, 
divided for this visit, joined in Indianapolis 
for a combined tour of the Laboratories of 
Eli Lilly & Company. 




TftADE MARK 



Quality. 













w<a 








Pays and Pays and Pays 

Sealtest Ice Cream — in dishes, cones and cartons — 
brings customers in, sells the ones that came for 
other products, and makes your cash register ring. 

Well-known quality keeps Sealtest preferred. 
National and local advertising keeps Sealtest pre-sold. 
And regular special flavors help keep Sealtest 
predominant. 

So, stock up with Sealtest Ice Cream. Display the 
Sealtest sign of quality. Then, count up 
your extra Sealtest profits! 

***** 

And be sure to Feature this Special Flavor 

DATE WITH A NUT 

for your Fountain and Take-Home Customers! 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



13 



Symposium "Graduates" Receive Certificates 



At the final session of the ' ' Drug Sym- 
posium" held at the School of Pharmacy, 
UNC, on March 14, fifty-six pharmacists re- 
ceived attendance certificates. 

The 6-session program covered antibiotic 
and cardiovascular drugs; the teachers came 
from the University 's School of Medicine. 
Direction of the Symposium was under the 
management of Dr. Melvin Chambers, Chair- 
man of the NCPA Extension Division Com- 
mittee. 

Attendance certificates were presented to 
the following: 

Durham : William A. Alwood, George A. 
Carpenter, Miss Ida N. Keetsock, Carl J. 
Kelley, Lloyd M. Biggsbee, Mai Bobbins, 
Gerald M. Stahl and Harvey A. K. Whitney. 

Ealeigh: Billy Thomas Allen, Miss Bar- 
bara Bell, H. B. Honeycutt, Mrs. Shirley 
Medlin, H. G. Price, Mrs. Jean Provo, Bill 
Wilson and Frank Yarborough. 

Winston-Salem : John W. Andrews, Miss 
Virginia Caudle, Donald K. Chapman, C. T. 
Dixon, James W. Fulton, Ernest J. Eabil, 
Roger Sloop and Harry W. Wilson. 

Concord: Harry A. Barringer and Paul 
Tucker. 

Burlington: Millard Denson, Sandy D. 
iGriffin, Roy L. Salter, Jr., and Jack Watts. 
I Kannapolis: Miss Peggy Chandler and 
Herbert J. Hames. 

Lexington: John F. Harman, Jr. and Seth 
Miller. 

1 Pinetops: John Martin and John S. Willi- 
prd. 

Smithfield: James L. Creech and Oliver 
Fleming. 



Fayetteville : Mrs. Joanne Hambright and 
Mrs. Myerna L. Williamson. 

Charles M. Barnett, Henderson; Donald 
H. Bissett, Benson; Arthur Brothers, Eliza- 
beth City; Marcus Cameron, Sanford; 
Samuel M. Cavanaugh, Eose Hill; J. B. Clay, 
Oxford; Alfred Cole, Jr., Eoxboro and Eoy 
W. Collette, Mocksville. 

W. Grover Creech, Selma ; W. O. Lombard, 
Rockwell; Eobert H. Seaborn, Gary; Lloyd 
M. Senter, Carrboro ; Harry Walker, Xorli- 
na ; W. Artemus West, Eoseboro ; James E. 
Williams, Eockingham; and B. P. Woodard, 
Princeton. 

Picture Missed 

For the first time in several years, the 
UNC Photo Lab failed to make an acceptable 
picture — in this case, the group picture of 
the Symposium ' ' graduates ' ' with their 
certificates. We do not know what technical 
difficulty developed but we do know the 
picture was missed, which is regrettable 
since the planned follow-up publicity had to 
be dropped. 

Logan Named National Sales Manager 
Howard M. Logan, a former regional sales 
manager for Pfizer Laboratories and ex- 
Navy Lieutenant, has been named national 
sales manager of Hart Laboratories of 
Clemmons. He assumed his duties on March 
1. 

Hart Laboratories resulted from the 
merger of Drug Specialties of Clemmons with 
A. J. Parker Company of Philadelphia. A 
new plant now under construction in Clem- 
mons is expected to be completed by June 1. 



SMITH WHOLESALE DRUG CO. 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

A Young and Growing Service Wholesale House, 
Owned and Operated by Registered Pharmacists 



We Appreciate Your Business 




HEADACHE POWDER MARKETED 
IN THE 50-POWDER PACKAGE 



IS 



\ Stanb 



nback Co., Ltd.,\ Salisbury. N. C. 



GREATER VOLUME 

for you 
MORE PROFIT 

per sale 
MORE ECONOMY 

for your custom^ 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 



Alice Noble Honored by Foundation Directors 



! President Wade A. Gilliam, Winston- 
Balem, presided at the Sixteenth Annual 
Meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
iNorth Carolina Pharmaceutical Eesearch 
{Foundation held at the School of Pharmacy 
an March 14. After a brief report by Miss 
Noble as research historian in the School of 
Pharmacy, a position supported by the foun- 
dation, President Gilliam presented the fol- 
lowing citation and a check for the hono- 
rarium : ' ' Citation of Merit — Alice Noble 
ivas presented this citation of merit and hono- 
rarium to amount $1,000 for distinguished 
and loyal service in the School of Pharmacy 
lof the University of North Carolina as secre- 
tary, associate editor, correspondent, librari- 
an and archivist, research historian, and 
author at this sixteenth annual meeting of 
the Board of Directors of the foundation on 
March 14, 1962." 

The meeting was attended by 18 of the 24 
directors of the foundation with officials of 
the University of North Carolina, faculty of 
the School of Pharmacy, and secretaries of 
the state association and the Board of Phar- 
macy as guests. Greetings were presented 
personally by Chancellor W. B. Aycock and 
Health Affairs Administrator Henry T. 
Clark, Jr. for the University of North Caro- 
lina. 

I Six directors began new four-year terms: 
[Joe P. Barbour, Sr., Burlington; J. Paul 
Gamble, Monroe; Wade A. Gilliam, Winston- 
Salem ; and W. L. West, Boseboro, elected by 
«the N.C.P.A., and Paul B. Bissette, Sr., Wil- 
son, and D. A. Dowdy, High Point, elected 
;by the directors. 

It was reported by Secretary E. A. Brecht 
'that expenditures for the year were #5,010 
for pharmaceutical education and research, 
§4,500 for the publication of the book on the 
history of the School of Pharmacy written 
;by Alice Noble, and $1,450 for operating ex- 
penses. Contributions received for the year 
were $21,300 making a net worth of the 
foundation to amount $249,000 of which 
$210,500 were permanently invested in en- 
dowment funds. The foundation received its 
first becmest consisting of 100 shares of 
3ommon stock in General Motors Corp. 



valued at $5,687.50 received from the late 
Thomas H. May to establish an endowment 
fund to the memory of him and Mrs. May 
with the income specified for undergraduate 
scholarships. 

The Board of Directors approved a tenta- 
tive maximum budget for the current year to 
amount $18,550 for continuing activities: 
research fellowships, the research historian- 
ship, undergraduate scholarships, special 
library materials, faculty professional 
grants, etc. Two additional projects were 
given approval for support if necessary: 
$1,000 to underwrite extension professional 
seminars by the School of Pharmacy to be 
held in each congressional district of the 
state and $500 as initial support for a 
sociological research project in pharmacy. 

Nine wives of the directors who accom- 
panied their husbands were entertained at 
lunch by Mrs. W. B. Aycock at the Chan- 
cellor 's home. 



Another Special Offering 

To The Druggists of 

America 

The 

HOMEOWNERS 

POLICY! 

If You Are Now Insured 
With Us Then Extend To 

Homeowners And 
SAVE! 




CONSULT OUR AGENT 

F. O. Bowman 

North Carolina State Agent 

P. O. Box 688 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 



16 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



THE HENRY B. GILPIN COMPANY 

Full Line, Full Service Wholesale Druggists Since 1845 
Baltimore • Dover • Norfolk • Washington 




Norfolk Division 

Equipped for fast, 

efficient wholesale drug 

service to the pharmacists of 

the eastern section of North Carolina 

6435 Tidewater Drive • Norfolk, Virginia • Madison 2-6361 



FOR YOUR PHOTOFINISHING NEEDS 

Let B & H Photo Company Serve You 

Complete Service on 

Black and White Kodacolor 

Ektachrome Anscochrome 

Kodachrome Movies and Slides 
Processed in Our Plant 



B & H PHOTO COMPANY 

3030 s. boulevard p. 0. box 1600 

phone 523-7093 charlotte 1, n. c. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

HI Pharmacy School Iotes 



17 




[ A number of pharmacists have come to the 
pcliool of Pharmacy to interview students 
an the graduating class for positions begin- 
ning in June. It has been found that 
|i:00 p.m. on Monday through Thursday is 
Ithe best time for these interviews, and they 

Eill be arranged upon request sent to Dean 
. A. Brecht. It is well to request such an 
ppoiiitmeut about one week in advance, 
jlnformation on available students will also 
be in the hands of all of the members of the 
acuity at the Raleigh convention. 
A handsome silver tray, 22" long, has 
been received as the 1961 gift from the 
Woman 's Auxiliary of the Xorth Carolina 
(Pharmaceutical Association. This tray is 
displayed with pride with the other silver 
'pieces that have been given to the School 
land will be used for receptions in the 
Student Center. 

| Dean E. A. Brecht was absent from his 
jbffice February 20 to March 5 for an opera- 
tion to remove a benign tumor of the parotid 
Sflanrt. The operation was a complete suc- 
cess. 

The School of Pharmacy Intramural 
Basketball team played its last game in the 
■semi-finals against the team from the School 
)f Dentistry which had an advantage of 



several inches of height per man. The Phar- 
macy School team won its first four games. 
In this game there were only five students 
available: Ronny Buchanan, Greensboro; 
George Markhani, Fayetteville ; Lemuel 
James Merritt, Belmont; Richard Wilder, 
fhadbourn; and William T. Williams, Wil- 
son. Early in the second half, Ronny Bu- 
chanan sprained his ankle and had to be 
taken to the Infirmary by Dean Brecht. The 
game continued with four pharmacy students 
against five dental students. The pharmacy 
students lost by one point after leading until 
the last few seconds of the game. Perhaps 
the loss was not serious since the final meant 
a meeting with the Intramural team com- 
posed of Physical Education majors. 

It is expected that two pharmacy students 
will be playing baseball fairly regularly on 
the varsity team for the University of Xorth 
Carolina this spring. They are Larry Neal, 
fourth-year student from Kannapolis, and 
James Heywood Hull, Jr., third-year stu- 
dent from Shelby. 

The annual meeting of the Board of 
Directors of the North Carolina Pharmaceuti- 
cal Research Foundation was held at Beard 
Hall on March 14. A report of its meeting 
is carried elseAvhere in this issue of The 
Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. 

The professional symposium consisting of 
6 two-hour lectures on consecutive Wednesday 
nights was completed on March 14. Dean 
Brecht and Dr. Chambers, director of the 
symposium, presented certificates to 58 
pharmacists. There was general expression 
of satisfaction with the value of the sym- 
posium to the practicing pharmacist. 

The Visitation Committee of the Xorth 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association met all 
day at the School of Pharmacy on March 16. 
Its report will be presented at the Raleigh 
convention. 

Two out-of-state visitors at the School on 
March 20 were Dr. Sami Hamarneh, Acting 
Curator, Smithsonian Institution, and George 
C. Straayer, Director of Professional and 
Trade Relations for the Sehering Corpora- 
tion. 

(Continued on page 20) 



18 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 




BETTER HEALTH . . FOR EVERYONE 

As a service wholesaler, we are proud to stand beside you on the community health team. 
Our desire is to serve you in the fullest interests of better health for everyone. 
We are proud of our comprehensive stocks and of our ability to serve you competently and 
without delay. Take advantage of our speedy service and send yoiflf orders to us. 



WE ARE A OCIXXX/ DISTRIBUTOR 

THE PEABODY DRUG COMPANY 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 




crowd pleasers a la Lance! 




More people prefer and buy tasty Lance 
snacks than any other brand. And no wonder.. 
They're always fresh and there's 

a wide variety to choose from. 
Please your crowd. Display Lance. 



INC. Charlotte, North Carolina 




The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



Answer to Socialized Medicine 

Editorial — Daily Independent , Kannapolis 



19 



It lias been charged that the medical 
'raternity and allied groups have little if any 
nterest in the medical problems of elderly 
leople in the lower-income brackets — and 
hat, therefore, the federal government must 
irovide medical care, preferably by adding 
t to the social security system. 

Those who have been misled into believing 
hat should find much food for thought in 
I joint announcement made by the National 
Association of Blue Shield plans and the 
American Medical Association in mid-Janu- 
Lry. It is approved now by the North Caro- 
ina Medical Society. 

j The announcement concerned a new, na- 
ionwide program of surgical and medical 
are benefits for all low-income people over 
■5. The cost is estimated at about 83 a 
lonth. No government subsidies are in- 
olved. Siugle persons whose incomes are 
; 2500 or less and married couples in the 
4000 and under categories will be eligible. 
'he plan will pay all medical and surgical 
osts, along with the bills for X-ray, anesthe- 
aa, and various tests. People over 65 with 
dgher incomes can also enroll, and in their 
ase an additional charge can be levied by 
he physician concerned. 

Dr. F. J. L. Blasingame, executive vice- 
resident of the AMA, said the plan repre- 
9nts "another important step in the direc- 
ion of achieving through voluntary, private 
litiative and effective solution to the prob- 
?m of meeting health care needs of the 
ged. " And the new plan is in addition to 
ther effective programs — such as the Kerr- 
plls bill, passed last year, which provides 
(ederal subsidies, through a system of joint 
'ederal-state administration, for elderly 
•eople in the very low income brackets. Also, 
lere are many state and local welfare pro- 
rams which provide medical services for 
eople who cannot afford to pay. 
\ These are some of the answers to those 
'ho claim that we need socialized medicine, 
overnment dominated medicine, or a catch- 
U program of giving government-paid medi- 



cine to anyone drawing social security bene- 
fits whether they need assistance or not. 

What is Fair Price? 

Editorial — Daily Herald, Roanoke -Rapids 

During these years of nidation and de- 
preciating money, have you heard your 
neighbor cuss the price of something? How 
many times have you engaged in the whimsi- 
cal practice of calling someone else a gouger 
— without knowing anything about the other 
fellow's business? 

A prime example of this kind of senseless 
game took place between a couple of friends, 
whom we may refer to as A and B, at a golf 
club recently. At the moment the manu- 
facturing drug industry, and the prices of 
its products have been subjected to con- 
siderable discussion. 

Friend A, while sipping his Scotch and 
soda, complained that he was having to take 
some pills that cost 50 cents apiece. His 
companion B, an executive of a drug manu- 
facturing firm, couldn't refrain from point- 
ing out that the drink A was having cost 
95 cents! Suddenly A began to look at the 
50 cent pill in a new light. Perhaps he 
began to visualize the years of research and 
development, the costly processes of pro- 
duction and distribution, and training and 
skill of the physician who had prescribed 
the life-saving drug. 

What is a fair price for such a drug? 
What is a fair price for a Scotch and soda? 
These are things we have to judge on more 
than here-say, prejudice and headline- 
seeking pronouncements. 

To Enter Military Service 

Charles F. Hiines and Terre M. Smith, 
class of 1961 of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy, will report to Fort Sam Houston in 
Texas, April 18, for basic officers training. 

Charles says he will then be stationed at 
Fort Totten in New York. Both are being 
commissioned 2nd Lieutenants. 



20 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



UNC SCHOOL NOTES 
(Continued from page 17) 

Student Branches 
The March meeting of the Student 
Branches of the N.C.P.A. and A. Ph. A. was 
addressed by Dr. Henry T. Clink, Jr., Ad- 
ministrator of the Division of Health 
Affairs, University of North Carolina. He 
discussed his paper, " The Future Frame- 
work of Health Services at the Community 
Level," as published in the February issue 
of this journal. 

Kappa Epsilon 
Reported by Deank P.. Hughes 

The Lambda Chapter of Kappa Epsilon 
had its rush party in the Student Lounge 
of the Pharmacy School on March 6, 1962. 
Fourteen girls attended, making the party 
a huge success. Eed and white carnations 
were provided by Phi Delta Chi. 

The pledging ceremonies took place on 
March 15, and the Lambda Chapter proudly 
announces the pledging of the following- 
girls : Mary Lou Johnson, Clayton ; Nancy 
Bullock, Roxboro; Sara Burris, Madison; 
Carol Clayton, Charlotte ; Jean Farmer, 
Charlotte; Barbara Goodwin, Beaufort, S. C. ; 
Miriam Greene, Hickory ; Mandy Horsley, 
Gastonia; Mary Elizabeth Jamison, Char- 
lotte: Evelyn Lloyd, Hillsboro ; Becky 
Profntt, Barnsville; Betty Ring, High Point; 
Linda Bouth, Asheboro ; and Jerry Sue 
Stroud, Roanoke Rapids. After the pledging 
ceremonies, a party for the new pledges was 
held in the Student Lounge. Kappa Psi sent 
a yellow and lavender mixed floral arrange- 
ment. 

Two former pledges were initiated before 
the pledging ceremonies. They are Tai-Yee 
Lai, Hong Kong and Mary Francis Johnson, 
Raleigh. 

We are happy to report that Meredith 
Patton, Margaret McCann, and Deane 
Hughes have been invited to join Rho Chi. 

Plans are now in progress for future 
parties and the Founders' Day Tea in May. 

Kappa Psi 

Reported by Hal Reaves, 

Public Relations Chairman 

On Friday night, March 2, Beta Xi 

chapter held its annual Pledge Banquet and 



formal dance at the Carolina Inn. DirM 
was served at seven o'clock, after whie 
guest speaker Chancellor R. B. House \va 
introduced. He delivered a very inspirini 
speech and used his harmonica to furtht 
entertain the group. Faculty guests wer 
Dr. and Mrs. George Cocolas, Dr. and .Mi- 
Jack Wier, Dr. Earl T. Brown, and Mis 
Alice Noble. 

On Monday night, March 12, sixtee 
pledges were initiated into the brotherhfl 
of our fraternity: Hal Amnions, Luinhertoii, 
Ed Hickmon, Wilmington; Tom Lynct 
Charlotte; Bob Lafferty, Concord; Bi 
Bunch, Edenton ; Danny Randall, AsheviM 
George Bryan, Chinquapin; Darrell Hodge: 
Winston-Salem; Ronald Langdon, Coats. 
Larry Denning, Coats; Larry Paul, Burling 
ton; Mike Wood, Raeford; Jim MeBridi. 
Louisburg; Frank Freeman, Louisburga 
Mike Brown, Rocky Mount; and Jack Uptoi ( 
Smithfield. 

On the following Wednesday night foua 
new pledges were received by the chapters 
Martin Kazmaier, Far Hills, N. J.; Bi: 
Farmer, Warrenton; Ed Coats, Dunn; an 
Kenneth Capes, Burlington. 



Make McGauit 

For Labels -in Rolls or Flats 
Physicians 1^ Blanks and Files 

Drug Boxes - Call Checks 
Drug and Delivery Envelopes 



Pleiciiplio-ri Jlabeli 

all Style*. a*uL Qalaii. 




42-54 BENNETT 
STREET 



BRADFORD, 
PENNA. 



Specializing in Labcli for Drug Steret 

Clifford P. Berry, Representative 
P. 0. Box 306, Charlotte 1, N. C. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 



Historical Note 
By Alice Noble, Research Historian 

This month we honor Dr. James Dallas 
"'room (1844-1914), of Maxton, who en- 
listed in the Confederate Army at the age 
If seventeen. He was commissioned as 
Captain and Surgeon in the Second North 
Carolina Infantry, having served previously 
from Private up to First Lieutenant in the 
tame regiment. He was wounded at the 
Battle of Bentonville. His devotion to the 
Southern cause continued throughout his 
intire life. He was very active in the 
jvork of the local camp of Confederate veter- 
jns, seldom missing a meeting and serving 
in the organization in several official capac- 
ties. 

i Eeturning from the Confederate Army he 
taught school for awhile and later secured 
I medical education at the Physicians and 
Surgeons College in Baltimore and at the 
Medical College of the State of South Caro- 
uia. He obtained the degree of M.D. in 
'876. He practiced medicine the rest of 
>is life in Maxton (formerly called Shoe 
ileel), and also until his later years con- 
ucted a drug store. 

! He received his license to practice phar- 
tacy in this state in 1881 and was a charter 
lember of the North Carolina Pharmaceuti- 
il Association. He served the organization 
ii many capacities and was its president in 
1889-90. He was a strong advocate of high 
kandards for pharmaceutical practice and 
'be following paragraph in his presidential 
Udress is pertinent to present day phar- 
macy : 

"An important matter which I wish to 
ill to your attention (if we would elevate 
br profession) is the selection and training 
- apprentices. We should remember that 
ie boy of today is to be the man of tomor- 
w, and we fear that too little care is ex- 
ij'cised very often in selecting the scientific 
ispenser of the future. The growing de- 
'and of the age demands that those who are 
i follow the profession should have a higher 
iandard of education. We should, there- 
're, encourage the advancement of knowl- 
"ge as pertaining to our profession in 
ery way, and more especially by stimulat- 
,g those we have under our care to become 



proficient in their calling. Let us endeavor 
to send good material to the colleges, young 
men with preliminary instruction, sufficient 
for a solid pharmaceutical foundation — see 
to it that they have proper principles in- 
stilled into them so that when they go out 
from you they may reflect credit upon the 
profession. By these simple means each 
one of us may be instrumental to some 
extent in elevating the profession of the 
future. Let us be sure that our plans are 
v, ell laid whether we may be able to carry 
them out or not. ' ' 

In the archives of the School of Pharmacy 
there is a lovely picture of Dr. Croom which 
indicates, what has been written of him — 
that lie was a gentleman of the old school in 
every way who led a quiet, simple and retir- 
ing life, sincerely desiring to serve the world 
in the least conspicuous way. The late Dr. 
E. V. Zoeller was a great admirer of this 
physician-pharmacist, quoted him often, and 
dropped by to see him occasionally. It is 
fitting that appreciation be shown for Dr. 
Croom 's contributions to the profession of 
pharmacy. 



STROTHER 
DRUG COMPANY 

of Richmond, Inc. 

3700 Saunders Avenue 

POWERS-TAYLOR DRUG CO. 

Richmond, Va. 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 

Full Line 

Full Service 

Member of 
Druggists Service Co. 

National Wholesale 
Druggists Association 

For Best Service Call Us 

Collect 

353-2771 

After Hours Call 
353-2777 



22 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 

• Charlotte— Mrs. C. H. Smith 

• Greensboro — Mrs. James M. Waugh 

• Cabarrus — Mrs. Harry Barringer 

• High Point — Mrs. Zollie Collins, Jr. 

• Winston-Salem — Mrs. Garland F. 

Benton, Jr. 

• Pharmacy Wives — Mrs. David 

Quackenbush 

Charlotte 

The Charlotte Woman 's Druggist Auxil- 
iary held their monthly meeting on March 
13 at the Kirkwood Boom with Mrs. A. K. 
Hardee presiding. 

A special report was heard on the annual 
benefit bridge and canasta party held Febru- 
ary 20. 

After the business meeting there was a 
fashion show (Millinery by Ivey's Depart- 
ment Store) with Mrs. Fred Harback doing 
the commentary. 

Those modeling were Mrs. Leonard House, 
Mrs. Graham Lawrence, Mrs. Bruce Wingate, 
and Mrs. Gilbert Colina. 

All members were urged to attend the State 
Convention. 

Greensboro 

Dr. Marshall Morris was speaker for the 
regular luncheon meeting of the Greensboro 
Drug Club Auxiliary at the Mayfair Cafe- 
teria, February 27th. Dr. Morris talked on 
Heart Disease — Its Prevention and Treat- 
ment. Dr. Morris was introduced by Mrs. 
Louise Eussell. 

Mrs. Doris Collins, President, presided 
over the business session, during which re- 
ports were heard from the various com- 
mittees. 

Hostesses for the day were Mrs. B. F. 
Whiteley, chairman, and Mrs. J. H. Best, 
Mrs. E. B. Kinard, and Mrs. John A. Banzen- 
hofer. The door prize was won by Mrs. 
Martha Dowdy. 



Cabarrus 

The Woman's Auxiliary of the Cabarru 
County Pharmaceutical Society met Marcl 
15 with Mrs. Herbert Hames in Kannapolis. 

The president, Mrs. Prentiss George, Jr| 
presided. Mrs. Denford Oxendine conducted 
the devotions. 

Mrs. Ernest Potter gave the treasurer's re| 
port and Mrs. Harry A. Barringer read thi, 
minutes of the previous meeting. 

The Society celebrated its first anni 
versa ry at this meeting. It was organizes 
March 22, 1961 under the guidance of Mrs 
Floyde F. Potter of Charlotte. There wa 
an anniversary cake with the inscription 
Happy Anniversary Pharmaceutical Auxi] 
iary, 1961-1962. 

High Point 

A white elephant sale was held amonjii 
members of the High Point Pharmaceutic:! 
Auxiliary at the March 20 meeting, at thl 
home of Mrs. Bill Dunn. Proceeds f ror' 
the sale will be used as a contribution t ) 
the Lucille Bogers Scholarship Fund. 

Mrs. William Shoemaker, president, cor 
ducted the business session, at which tim;] 
plans were made to attend one day of thl 
state convention in Baleigh in April. Officer 
for the year 1962-1963 will be elected at A 
dinner meeting in May, after which the chr 
will adjourn until September. 

Mrs. David Dowdy, Jr. and Mrs. Carson j 
Southern won the door prizes. 



Invitation to Pharmacy 
Wives Graduation: 

The Pharmacy (Student) Wives 
Organization cordially invites all former 
pharmacy wives to the annual Senior 
Tea and Graduation, to be held Sunday, 
May 20, at 4:00 p.m. at the Institute of 
Pharmacy in Chapel Hill. Please reply, 
if you can come, to Mrs. W. J. Smith, 
P. O. Box 151, Chapel Hill. 

Mrs. O. O. Grabs, Jr. 
Senior Tea Chairman 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



23 



Pharmacy Wives Organization 

1962 lias been a busy year ! On January 
5rd, the Pharmacy Wives and the Chapel 
ill Woman 's Pharmaceutical Auxiliary met 
igether at the Institute of Pharmacy to hear 
ir. Kemp Jones speak on Cancer Detection. 
re also saw two movies presented by guests 
pm the Cancer Society. We were very 
[terested and enlightened on the subject, 
id enjoyed very much the Avomen from the 
uxiliary being with us and serving as our 
|)stesses. 

| On February 6th, we held a social business 
leeting. After our short session, we made 
[tractive place cards for the trays as 
aster favors for about 300 patients in the 
tspital. 

Hat making was the subject that Mrs. 
prena McBroom talked to us about on the 
7 th of February. We saw and heard many 
ays and things one can do to change an 
d hat or make a brand new one. She 
towed us several types of materials and 
pes with which to make lovely hats. We 
id a wonderful time trying on hats of all 
fferent shapes, sizes, and styles — especially 
: you love hats as we all do ! 
On March 14th we were guests of Mrs. 
illiam B. Aycock, wife of the Chancellor 

the University of North Carolina, for a 
cial-business meeting. About thirty mem- 
rrs attended. 

Bingo Party Nets $227 
For Scholarship Fund 

A Bingo Party sponsored by the Chapel 
ill Woman's Pharmaceutical Auxiliary for 
e benefit of the State Scholarship Fund 
Itted $227.00. Held in the Institute of 
larmacy on the night of March 9, the party 
b attended by more than 125 persons. 
All Bingo prizes, favors and refreshments 
ire donated by the following individuals 
d firms : 

Chapel Hill: Allstar Lanes, Inc., A & P, 
rolina Theater, Glen Lennox Pharmacy, 
iMarick Beauty Salon, Mann's Drug Store, 
, B. Bobbins, Sutton 's Drug Store, Varsity 
jieater, and Colonial Stores. 
Wholesale Druggists: Bobert B. Bellamy, 
stice Drug Company, McKesson & Bobbins, 
C. Mutual Wholesale Drug, O'Hanlon- 
atson, Owens, Minor & Bodeker, Peabody 



Drug Company, and Scott Drug Company. 

American Chicle Co., B. C. Bemedy Co., 
Borg-Erickson Corp., P. H. Hanes Knitting 
Co., Hankscraft Company, Hollingsworth 
Candies, Iona Mfg. Co., James W. Harrison, 
Lance, Inc., and Liggett & Myers Tobacco 
Company. 

National Presto Industries, NCPA, Nun- 
nally's Candies, Sealtest Foods, Smith Kline 
& French Labs., Stanback Company, Texas 
Pharmacal Co., Westclox and Whitman 
Candies. 

A great deal of effort went into the 
project, mostly by officers of the Auxiliary 
who are : Mrs. M. A. Chambers, president ; 
Mrs. David McGowan, vice-president; Mrs. 
George Cocolas, secretary; Mrs. George 
Harris, treasurer ; Mrs. Donald Skakle, his- 
torian; and Mrs. Fred Hawkins, advisor. 




Quick 

f ili Rub 



big on TV 

Soltice is the modern Quick- 
Rub that is getting the most 
powerful TV push in its history 
this season. 

More and more of your 
customers are hearing about 
the chest rub that's pure white 
and nice to use. Be sure you 
have it for them. 



THE CHATTANOOGA MEDICINE CO. 

CHATTANOOGA 9, TENNESSEE 



24 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



There's 

H "* * * s 

*-r Hi€*jJ¥l -* 

' ; * 
$ 

in 



* ' $ * % * 



finejtate 



MILK 

and 

ICE 

CREAM 

people like it 
and buy it 

Tastes Great . . . It's 



finejtate 




The family of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Price, J 
of Mooresville was rounded out to two bo: 
and two girls with the birth of Mary Iren 
February 14th. . . . Gary and Betty Faulkni 
of Monroe, are announcing the birth < 
Wendy Kay, March 3rd. . . . March 17th w: 
the birth date of Francis Duke James, Jl 
of Hazelwood ; they have one other chilH' 
a daughter, Camilla April, two years old. . .1 
The Delvin Huffstetlers of Raleigh are a:' 
nouncing the birth of Ricky Keeney, Marc' 
20th. 

Deaths 
JOHN A. UNDERHILL 

John A. Underhill, 59, died March 25 J 
Rex Hospital, Raleigh, following a heafl 
attack. 

Mr. Underhill was a native of Wendell ar: 
a graduate of the UNC School of Pharmat, 
(1926). At one time he operated a pharmat 
in Madison; in recent years worked as sjii 
employee pharmacist, mostly in High PoiD 

R. E. L. COOK 

R. E. L. Cook, 92, died in Raleigh on Marc 
10. He operated Cook's Temple Pharmac 
for many years. 

H. L. BISHOP 

H. L. (Cotton) Bishop, 47, co-owner ( 
the B & B Pharmacy of West Asheville die 
March 31 in an Asheville hospital after 
four-week illness. 

Mr. Bishop, a native of Buncombe Count 
graduated from Asheville High School 
1932 and was licensed to practice pharmac 
in 1941. He became co-owner of tl 
B & B Pharmacy in 1953 after 22 years <ij 
work in West Asheville pharmacies. 

Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Kathlec 
Byrd Bishop ; the mother, Mrs. D. F. Bishoj 
Sr. ; four sisters and a brother, D. F. Bish([ 
of Miami, Florida. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 



IT TAKES MORE 

(Continued from page 7) 

dll result in a release of $37,500 and at five 
Lines the sum of $40,000 for other business 

e. 

Eelease of such capital reduces the high 
ost of carrying large inventories brought 
pout by the ever present factors of interest 
jii money invested, losses due to obsolesence, 
pe cost of storage and insurance, taxes in in- 
pntory, shipping and handling costs and 
.milar factors. These costs always mount 
tod become greater under conditions where 
lirnover is far too low or where stocks have 
een stripped to low levels in order to 
bread inventory investment over the widest 
ossible range of goods. 

Many studies have been made on the sub- 
let and the general average figure result- 
cg therefrom shows that the cost of pro- 
iring and carrying inventory run around an 
irerage of 15 percent of the invoice cost of 
jerchandise. Using this 15 percent of the 
tvoice cost figure here is a very worthwhile 
t of statistics showing the effect of turn- 
L*er on carrying cost. 

Annual Stock Inventory Carrying Carrying 

! sales turnover cost cost 

f cost per reduction 
value 



year 

bso.ooo 1 

j 50,000 2 

} 50,000 4 

t 50,000 5 



$50,000 $7,500 

25,000 3,750 $3,750 

12,500 1,875 5,625 

10,000 1,500 8,500 



j This presents a graphic illustration of ex- 
J'tly what happens to carrying costs when 
Je rate of turnover is increased. The last 
^lumn figures shown above represent ex- 
|?nse dollars which have been turned into 
:;ofit dollars through proper inventory con- 
|ol and securing more turnover on the same 
lalthy inventory. If the firm today has a 
pgle stock turnover today on a $50,000 
knual sales cost (to cite a minimum ex- 
pple) by increasing that turnover to four 
pes in the given year it can up its profit 
• ,625 on that particular investment, 
i In any such planning management should 
iver be caught up in the mistake too fre- 

ently made when such a program is being 
.-dertaken, i.e., carrying short inventories. 

lis is never the ready answer to the prob- 

n although it always appears to be the 

vious one. 



Actually stripping inventories to bare 
minimums never fails but to result in in- 
creased expense simply because the cost of 
acquisition of goods increases. Placing 
frequent small orders always results in 
adding heretofore not present costs. 

Another factor which should not be over- 
/ooked in this planning is the proven princi- 
ple that increasing turnover invariably re- 
duces the cost of possession of merchandise 
in the store's inventory through insurance, 
inventory taxes, interest, space cost, wages, 
obsolesence, mark-downs, etc. Right along 
with this axiom goes the also well proven 
one that where the cost of acquisition is 
increased more than the cost of possession 
loss is certain to result. 

The best rate of turnover is always that 
at which the store can obtain the lowest 
combined costs of acquisition and possession 
and a proper balance maintained between the 
two all through the sales year. Too slow 
turnover increases costs of acquisition. As 
the rate of turnover increases there is usually 
a steady reduction in the cost of possession. 

It should never be forgotten, too, that over- 
stock of slow movers can tie up capital while 
stocks of fast moving items are starved and 
rush orders must be placed which in turn 
costs too much money to justify the pro- 
cedure. 

The open door to increased profits in all 
stores can sometimes be increased sales but 
unless these increased sales are coupled with 
a more rapid turnover they may result in less 
desired profit than the business was enjoying 
at the starting level. In many cases the 
store would have been better off concentrat- 
ing on turnover alone . . . the eventual profit 
picture would have been better. 

Whatever planning is devised at any time 
it should never be forgotten that turnover 
rate is always a key to the profit possibilities 
in any pharmacy operation. 

Permit Revolked 

The pharmacy permit of K and F Drug 
Store, 1212 Fort Bragg Road, was revolked 
on March 21 by the State Board of Phar- 
macy. The action was based on grounds that 
the pharmacy was being operated without a 
licensed pharmacist. 



26 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



For seventy-seven years 
- • - since 1885 

SeeMAN 



OF 



DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long asso- 
ciation with North Caro- 
lina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its forty- 
third volume, and the 
first printed copy was 
"Seeman Printed." 




The Seeman Printery 

of DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



DEATH TAKES A HOLIDAY 

(Continued from page 11) 

■ 

niimity services and, consequently, betb 
public relations. I am speaking primarily 
of course, to those pharmacists in sBJfil 
towns where there is no Poison Contr' 
Center. The lack of these Centers creates I 
tremendous need. 

To the general public, our profession w| 
put in a poor light during the Kefauv 
Hearings. Good offense appears to me 
be the best defense we can offer. With ii 
minimum of effort on the part of the phai 
macist, a Poison Control Center can be si 
up in every town in North Carolina, 
letter or post card to the following address 
will yield enough information to set up 
Center. I plead for a state-wide proje< ! 
Let 's get in the driver 's seat ! 

1. "National Clearinghouse for Poison Cc 

trol Centers ' ' 
U. S. Dept. of Health, Education ai| 

Welfare 
Public Health Service 
Washington 25, D. C. 

2. "Your Safety— State Highway Em- 

ployees ' ' 
N. C. State Highway Commission 
Department of Safety 
Ealeigh, N. C. 

3. (April 1961, Vol. 15 No. 4) Arizona 

Poisoning Control Information Cente 
College of Pharmacy 
University of Arizona 
Tucson, Arizona 

4. "North Carolina Pesticide Manuel" 

(1959) 
North Carolina Dept. of Agriculture 
Ealeigh, N. C. 

5. ' ' Product and Overdosage Inf ormatior 
Smith Kline & French Laboratories 
Philadelphia 1, Pa. 

6. Dr. Richard Stromner 
Wisconsin School of Pharmacy 
Extension Division 
Madison, Wisconsin 

Two good reference books for the Poi 
Center are : 

Clinical Toxicology of Commercial Pn 

ucts 

(Authors — Gleason, Gasselin and Hodgj 
Williams & Wilkins Co. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Handbook of Emergency Toxicology (2 

edition) 
Office of the Chief Medical Examine! 

State Health Dept. 
Commonwealth of Virginia 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



27 



vfyarmacy Dean Announces 

61 Honor Students at UNC 



Dean E. A. Brecht of the School of Phar- 
taey, University of North Carolina, has 
nnounced the names of pharmacy students 
baking the Honor Eoll (average of 92.5 or 
etter) and the Dean's List (average of 90 
r better) for the fall semester, which ended 
i January. This list does not include pre- 
harmacy freshmen who are students in the 
eneral College. 

The Honor Eoll included: George Walker 
ender, Fayetteville; Daniel Guilford Bra- 
ey, Red Springs; Benjamin William Brown, 
ligh Point; Malcolm Winston Burroughs, 
N^adesboro ; Emil Lewis Cekada, Durham; 
villiam Gerald Coin, Rockingham; Briggs 
[Idward Cook, Stokesdale; Robert Lee Deal, 
Liberty; Larry Edward Denning, Coats; 
[harles Norvell Gross, Pfafftown ; William 
['red Harriss, High Point; Hubert Theodore 
luggins, Jr., Dallas; Mary Lou Johnson, 
layton; William David Medlin, Durham; 
jlargaret Jane McCann, Mount Airy; John 
Lgrippa Mitchener, III, Edenton; Ellen 
Louise Pike, Concord; Roy Patton Rabb, II, 
jlarion; Danny Lee Randall, Asheville; Billy 
[lac Smyre, Newton; Gary Martin Stamey, 
L.sheville; Beverly Carol Thompson, Chapel 
[ill; John David Wilson, Lowell. 

; The Dean 's List also included : Jack Lewis 
Jexander, Brevard; Alexander Fernando 
lelmont, Lima, Peru; Irving Vestal Boyles, 
r., Pilot Mountain; Julian Willis Bradley, 
II, Raleigh; Robert Michael Brown, Rocky 
fount; Carol Elizabeth Clayton, Charlotte; 
:eorge Washington Davis, Jr., Fremont; 
|harles Robert Deadwyler, Jr., Salisbury; 
ames Floyd Deaton, Liberty; Rebecca 
£arper Elliott, Hendersonville; James Hay- 
ood Gooch, Jr., Mebane ; Willard Wilson 
riggs, Jr., Norwood; Kenneth Pershing 
[ardin, Jr., Forest City; Gilbert Max Hat- 
■y, Oakboro ; Deane Bett Hughes, Hampton, 
' a. ; James Heyward Hull, Jr., Shelby ; Mary 
Elizabeth Jamison, Charlotte ; Mary Frances 



Johnson, Raleigh ; David Randall Lewis, 
Goldsboro; Evelyn Pauline Lloyd, Hills- 
boro; Halbert Hill McKinnon, Jr., Lumber- 
ton; Jones Haynie Miller, Durham; Harry 
Thomas Murrell, Jr., Albemarle; William 
Earl Patterson, Greenville, S. C. ; Meredith 
Gail Patton, Hickory ; Joseph Charles Per- 
kins, Bakersville; Carolyn Rebecca Proffitt, 
Burnsville; Kader Roy Ramsey, Jr., Jackson- 
ville ; Thomas Bingham Reaves, Fayette- 
ville ; Paul Hart Richardson, Wendell; Wil- 
liam Otto Sheaffer, Chapel Hill; Albert 
Hunter Smith, Fayetteville; Hugh Jarrette 
Smith, Jr., Pink Hill; Lewis Henry Stocks, 
III, Hookerton ; Jerry Sue Stroud, Roanoke 
Rapids, N. C. ; James Robert Taylor, En- 
field; Burwell Temple, Jr., Kinston; Leon 
Stokes Walker, Denton. 




Carry your 
store's identity by color and 
personalized copy right Into your customers 
home for the life of the Prescription. 

Another plus value of the modern paper 
box with its clean fresh label. 

Representative: 

M. C. GRIER 

wo ann st., at. 3-3847 

Monroe, North Carolina 

* • • 

E. N. ROWELL CO., INC 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



28 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina 
CLASS OF 1962 




WILLIAM N.ANDERSON 

ZE8ULGN 



W. BARKER ROBERTH.BARRETT.il 
\RRB0RQ PJNEHURST 



DONALD W.BEAVER 
CONCORD 




GEORGE W. BENDER GEORGE R.BUCHANAN CHARLES B. CARPENTER mL LEw}S C £ KADA 
FAYETTEVILLE GREENSBORO CLARB4QNT DURHAM 




FREDERICK CHAMBLEE GARY V.CLGf^lNGER ROY W.CGLLETTE, JR. GEORGE W. DAVIS. Jfc| 
CARRBORO DALUS MOCKSVILLE FREMONT 




JAMES B.DAVJS JAMES F.DEATON, EVERETTE M.OONN REBECCA H.ELLIOTTTHOMAS M.EUTSLEK 
0AKBOR0 LIBERTY LEAKSVILLE HENDERSONVILLE MARION 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



William Nelson Anderson 

Zebulon 

orn August 30, 1940; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
Ldress: 322 W. Rosemary Street. Member 
Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches. Employ- 
ent preference : Piedmont or Western section. 

Rudy Watkins Barker 

Carrboro 

srn December 31, 1939; unmarried. Address: 
iurel Avenue, Carrboro. Will enter UNC Medical 
hool upon graduation. 

Robert Harrison Barrett, II 
Pinehurst 

Drn June 1, 1938; unmarried. Local address: 
14 S. Greensboro Street, Carrboro. Member 
Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches. Practical 
perience at Craig Drug, Aberdeen. 

Donald Worth Beaver 

Concord 

srn November 19, 1939. Chapel Hill address: 
!2 Teague Dormitory. Member A. Ph. A. Student 
ranch: Phi Delta Chi. Practical experience at 
ike's Drug Store, Inc., Concord. Has accepted 
aployment after graduation. 

George Walker Bender 
Fayetteville 

>rn January 22, 1940; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
dress: 323 Teague Dormitory. Member A. Ph. A. 
d NCPA Student Branches; Pharmacy Senate; 

li Delta Chi: Inner Guard, Worthy Master of 
ms, Pledge Master. Practical experience at 
nder's Drug Store #1, Fayetteville. Has ac- 

pted employment after graduation. 

George Ronald Buchanan 

Greensboro 

>rn March 31, 1939; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
dress: 321 Avery Dormitory. Member A. Ph. A. 
d NCPA Student Branches; Phi Delta Chi. 
•actical experience at College Drug, Greensboro, 
nployment preference: Piedmont section. 

Charles Berman Carpenter 

Claremont 

)rn September 5, 1940; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
dress: 330 Parker Dormitory. Member A. Ph. A. 
d NCPA Student Branches. Practical experi- 
ce at Bushee's Pharmacy, Claremont. Employ- 
?nt preference : Western or Piedmont section. 

Emil Lewis Cekada 

Durham 

)rn March 25, 1936; unmarried. Address: 915 
•een Street, Durham. Attended College of 
illiam & Mary and East Tennessee State. Holds 
S. Degree from W. & M. Member A.Ph.A. and 
-PA Student Branches; Pharmacy Senate; Phi 
lta Chi; Rho Chi (Vice-president). Practical 
perience at Veterans Hospital, Kerr Rexall 
'ugs, Crabtree Pharmacy, Durham. 

Frederick Clifton Chamblee 
Chapel Hill 

irn February 2, 1940; unmarried. Address: 
6 Fetzer Lane, Chapel Hill. Member A.Ph.A. 
d NCPA Student Branches; Pharmacy Senate; 
ii Delta Chi : President, Secretary-Treasurer. 
'actical experience at Colonial Drug, Chapel Hill 
d Eckerd Drugs. Durham. Employment prefer- 
ce: Eastern or Piedmont section. 

Gary Vox Clonixger 
Dallas 

>rn February 12, 1940; married. Chapel Hill 
dress: 140 Bagley Drive. Member A.Ph.A. 



Student Branch; Kappa Psi. Practical experience 
at Summey Drug Co., Dallas and Professional 
Pharmacy, Inc., Durham. Employment prefer- 
ence: Charlotte, Gastonia or Durham area. 

Roy Wilson Collette, Jr. 

Mocksville 

Born February 13, 1940; married, one child. 
Chapel Hill address: 173 Daniels Road. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Pharmacy 
Senate; Phi Delta Chi: Corresponding Secretary. 
Practical experience: Part time during school and 
full time during summer since 1954. Employment 
preference : Central section. 

Nick Collias 
Charlotte 
(Photograph not available) 
Born September 6, 1937; married. Chapel Hill 
address: 3 Justice Street. Member A.Ph.A. and 
NCPA Student Branches; Pharmacy Senate. 
Practical experience at Medical Pharmacv, Char- 
lotte. 

George W. Davis, Jr. 

Fremont 

Born October 25, 1932; married, one child. 
Address: 107 Blackwood Drive, Carrboro. At- 
tented Atlantic Christian College. Member A.Ph.A. 
and NCPA Student Branches. Practical experi- 
ence at Fremont Pharmacy and Sutton's Drug 
Store, Chapel Hill. Employment preference : 
Coastal or Piedmont section. Military service: 
veteran. 

James Brooks Davis 
Oakboro 

Born February 15, 1940; married. Address: 308 
W. Popular Avenue, Carrboro. Attended Wingate 
Junior College before coming to UNC. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches. Employ- 
ment preference: Piedmont section. 

James Floyd Deaton, Jr. 

Liberty 

Born September 1, 1925; married, one child. 
Address: Liberty, N. C. Holds B.S. Degree in 
General Science from Wake Forest. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Phi Delta 
Chi. Practical experience at Deaton Pharmacy, 
Liberty. Has accepted employment after gradua- 
tion. 

Everette Matthews Dunn 

Leaksville 

Born July 23, 1940; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 117 W. Rosemary Street. Member A.Ph.A. 
and NCPA Student Branches; Pharmacy Senate; 
Kappa Psi. Practical experience at Kirkpatrick 
Drug Co., Leaksville. Employment preference: 
Piedmont or Greensboro area. 

Rebecca Harper Elliott 

Hendersonville 

Born March 8. 1940; married, one child. Chapel 
Hill address: 236 A-Jackson Circle. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Rho Chi; 
Kappa Epsilon (president, secretary) ; Secretary 
Freshman Class. Practical experience at Rose 
Pharmacy. Has accepted employment after gradu- 
ation. 

Thomas Maxwell Eutsler 

Marion 

Born July 27, 1940; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 318 Teague Dormitory. Attended Mars 
Hill College before enrollment at UNC. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; IDC Com- 
mittee. Practical experience at William Meyer 
Drug and Thorton Pharmacy of Denver, Colorado. 
Emplovment preference: Middle to Western part 
of N. 'C. 



30 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 
School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina 
CLASS OF 19S2 







LIONEL CECIL EVANS 
ROANOKE RAPIDS 



JAMES R.GIBSQN JAMES HA WOOD 600CH LARRY B.GOOD 
HAYESVJLLE MEBANE MOUNT AIRY 




JOE DAVID GREESON HAYES EARL HALL HOMER G.HALL.JR, WILLIAM F.HARRISJ 
BURLINGTON WITTIER SILER CITY HIGH POINT 




GILBERT C.HART IS. JR. JAMES A.HATHCGCK.JR. GILBERT M.HATLEY MOODY Z.HONEYCUTT,. 
WINSTON-SALEM CHARLOTTE 0AK8GR0 DREXEL 




HUBERT T. HOGGINS, JOHN L.KENNEDY MYRA K INLAW DAVID R.LE^ IS ROBERT D.LILL 
DALLAS STATESVILLE LUMBERTON GOLDSBORO JAMESVILLE 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 



Lionel Cecil Evans 

Roanoke Rapids 

orn January 7, 1927; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
idress: 306" Teague Dormitory. Holds B.S. De- 
ree in biology from Wake Forest. Member 
Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches. Military 
jrvice: veteran. 

James Robert Gibson 

Hayesville 

orn October 28, 1939; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
idress: 117 W. Rosemary Street. Attended 
C. State College. Member A.Ph.A. and NCPA 
tudent Branch; Kappa Psi (regent). 

James Haywood Gooch 

Durham 

orn April 28, 1934; married, one child Chapel 
[ill address: 157 Daniels Road. Member A.Ph.A. 
id NCPA Student Branches. Practical experi- 
ice at Sloan Drug Co., Chapel Hill. Employ- 
lent preference: Eastern or Piedmont section, 
[ilitary service : Veteran. 

Larry B. Good 

Mount Airy 

orn October 19, 1938; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
idress: 407 McCauley Street. Attended N. C. 
tate College with 3 vears in Chemistry, before 
irollment at UNC. Member A.Ph.A. and NCPA 
tudent Branches; Pharmacy Senate; IDC Repre- 
otative. Practical experience at Dobson Drug 
tore, Dobson, and Hospital Pharmacy, Mount 
iry. Employment preference: Piedmont section. 

Joe David Greeson 

Burlington 

orn September 24, 1940; unmarried. Chapel 
Kill address: 222 Teague Dormitory. Member 
.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Phi Delta 
Jhi (vice-president, prelate). Practical experi- 
lce at Mann's Drug, Burlington. Has accepted 
nployment after graduation. 

Hayes Earl Hall 

Whittier 

orn February 1. 1931; married, one child, 
hapel Hill address: Tarheel Trailer Park. Holds 
S. Degree (science) from Western Carolina 
ollege in addition to expected Pharmacy Degree, 
ember A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches, 
mployment preference : Western section. Mili- 
ry service: veteran USN. 

Homer Glenn Hall, Jr. 

Siler City 

orn September 1, 1934; married. Address: 724 
rookwood Apts., Siler Citv. Member A.Ph.A. 
id NCPA Student. Branches; Phi Delta Chi. 
ractical experience at Taylor Drug Store and 
hatham Rexall Drug Co., Siler City. 

William Fred Harriss 

High Point 

orn November 28, 1939; married. Chapel Hill 
Idress: 15 Lake Shore Drive. Member A.Ph.A. 
id NCPA Student Branches; Phi Eta Sigma; 
ho Chi (president). Practical experience at 
ann's Drug Store, High Point. Has accepted 
nployment after graduation. 

Gilbert Clyde Hartis, Jr. 

Winston-Salem 

lorn June 21, 1940; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
(idress: 206 Fetzer Lane. Member A.Ph.A. and 
jCPA Student Branches; Pharmacy Senate; Phi 
lelta Chi (Secretary, president, ass't. pledge 
Jaster). Practical experience at Patterson's Drug 



Employment preference : 



Store, Winston-Salem. 
Piedmont section. 

James Alden Hathcock, Jr. 
Charlotte 

Born October 23, 1940; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 117 W. Rosemary Street. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Kappa 
Psi. Practical experience at Eckerd Drug Stores. 
Employment preference: Central or Piedmont 
section. 

Gilbert Max Hatley 
Oakboro 

Born April 7, 1940; married. Address: 317 Pine 
Street, Carrboro. Attended Wingate Junior Col- 
lege before matriculation at UNC. Member A.Ph.A. 
and NCPA Student Branches; Pharmacy Senate; 
Phi Delta Chi. Practical experience at Tollison's 
Pharmacy, Oakboro. Employment preference : 
Central section. 

Moody Z. Honeycutt, Jr. 

Drexel 

Born September 24, 1931; unmarried. Address: 
716 Poplar Street, Carrboro. Holds A.B. Degree 
(Business Administration) from Lenoir Rhyne 
College. Member A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student 
Branches. Practical experience at Crosby's Phar- 
macy, Drexel. Employment preference : Western 
section. Military service: veteran. 

Hubert Theodore Huggins, Jr. 
Dallas 

Born February 12, 1939; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address : 02 Teague Dormitory. Attended Mars 
Hill College before enrollment at UNC. Member 
A.Ph.A. Student Branch. Practical experience at 
Lowell Drug Co., Lowell. Has accepted employ- 
ment after graduation. 

John Lowry Kennedy 
Statesville 

Born August 23, 1939; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 117 W. Rosemary Street. Member 
A.Ph.A. and N.C.P.A. Student Branches; Phar- 
macy Senate; Kappa Psi (Intramural manager); 
Vice-president of Intramural Council, U.N.C. 
Practical experience at Statesville Drug Co. and 
Kings Mountain Drug Co. Employment prefer- 
ence: Piedmont section. 

Myra Kixlaw 

Lumberton 

Born December 8, 1940 ; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 208 Spencer Dormitory. Transferred to 
UNC from Woman's College of UNC. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Kappa 
Epsilon. Practical experience at Medical Arts 
Pharmacy and Dean's Pharmacy, Lumberton. 
Employment preference : Eastern or Central 
section. 

David R. Lewis 

Goldsboro 

Born May 24. 1935; married, three children. 
Chapel Hill address: 12 Hamilton Road. Attended 
Wake Forest College. Member A.Ph.A. and 
NCPA Student Branches. Practical experience: 
three months, one year part-time. 

Robert Delano Lilly 
Jamesville 
Born January 30, 1933; married, three children. 
Address: 507 Oak Avenue, Carrboro. Attended 
N. C. State before enrollment at UNC. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; President 
of Pharmacy School Junior and Senior Classes. 
Practical experience at Smith Drugs. Hickory. 
Has accepted employment after graduation. Mili- 
tary service in USAF. 



32 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina 
CLASS OF 1962 




JAMES HAROLD LITTLE CONNIE MAC MC GEE GARY U. MC KENZIE RICHARD S.MC KINLI 
OAKBQRO CHARLOTTE FAIRMONT KANNAPQLIS :• 




GERALD F.MAY WILLIAM D.MEDLIN HARRY DAVIS MILAM JOSEPH CHILLER 

LOUISBURG DURHAM SUTHERLJN.VA. . BOONE 




, 



FRED H. MOSS. JR. HARRY T . MURRELL . JR . LARRY KENT NEAL RICHARD B.OVERTOf 
GASTON I A ALBEMARLE KANNAPOLIS RALEIGH 




M.G.PATTERSON ELLEN L.PIKE JERRY D.PRICE KADER ROY RAMSEY FRANC IS E.RAP| 
ROXBORO CONCORD RALEIGH JACKSONVILLE LUCAMA 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



33 



James Harold Little 
Oakboro 

rn July 20, 1935; married. Chapel Hill address: 
3 Airport Road. Attended N. C. State. Holds 
3. Degree (Agricultural Education), in addition 
expected Pharmacy Degree. Member A. Ph. A. 
d NCPA Student Branches; Kappa Psi. Two 
irs teaching experience at Deep River High 
hool, Lee County. Employment preference: 
edmont section. Military service: veteran. 

Connie Mac McGee 

Carrboro 

n December 10, 1934; married, three children. 
Idress: Box 131, Carrboro. Attended Charlotte 
liege before matriculation at UNC. Member 
Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches, Kappa Psi. 
'actical experience at Senter's Drug Store, Carr- 
ro. Military service : veteran. 

Gary Walker McKenzie 

Fairmont 

)rn October 7, 1938; married, one child. Chapel 
iddress: 126 Bagley Drive. Transferred to 
VIC from Mars Hill College. Member A. Ph.A. 
i NCPA Student Branches; Phi Delta Chi. 
lployment preference: Raleigh-Durham-Chapel 
ll-Charlotte area. 

ElCHARD S. MCKINLEY 

Kannapolis 

rn December 20, 1939; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
iress : 117 W. Rosemary Street. Member 
Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Kappa Psi. 
actical experience at Black's Drug Store, 
mnapolis. Has accepted employment after 
iduation. 

Gerald Franklin May 

Louisburg 

rn March 17. 1938; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
dress: 117 W. Rosemarv Street. Member 
Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Kappa Psi. 
actical experience at Hospital Pharmacy, Dur- 
n, Eckerd Drugs and Walgreen, Raleigh. Has 
epted employment after graduation. 

William David Medlin 

Durham 

rn October 29, 1930: married. Chapel Hill 
Iress: Glenn Heights. Member A. Ph. A. and 
SPA Student Branches; Rho Chi. Practical es- 
sence at Hospital Pharmacy, Durham. Em- 
yment preference: Western section. Military 
"vice: veteran USN. 

Harry Davis Milam 

Danville, Va. 

(rn August 31, 1933; unmarried. Address: 312 
Lindsav Street, Carrboro. Holds B.S. Degree 
jm V.P.i. Member A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student 
lanches. Military service : veteran. 

Joseph Claude Miller 

Boone 

rn February 17, 1939; married. Address: c/o 
I de Jones, Carrboro. Transferred to UNC from 
J iversity of Iowa. Member A.Ph.A. and NCPA 
I ident Branches; Phormacy Senate (reporter). 
I actical experience at Boone Drug Co., Boone. 
Is accepted employment after graduation. 

Fred M. Moss, Jr. 

Gastonia 

,5rn July 20, 1936; married. Chapel Hill 
sjlress: 410 North Street. Holds B.S. Degree 
pmmerce) from The Citadel in addition to ex- 
ited Pharmacy Degree. Member A.Ph.A. and 
3 ; PA Student Branches. Practical experience at 
>5{;ton's Drug Store, Chapel Hill. Has accepted 
< ployment after graduation. 



Harry Thomas Murrell, Jr. 
Albemarle 
Born April 25, 1940; married. Chapel Hill ad- 
dress: Apt. 5, Elkin Hills Apts. Member A.Ph.A. 
and NCPA Student Branches; Kappa Alpha 
(vice-president) ; Pharmacy School Freshman Class 
president. Practical experience at Murrell's Phar- 
macy, Albemarle. Has accepted employment after 
graduation. 

Larry Kent Neal 
Kannapolis 
Born December 15, 1940; unmarried. Chapel 
Hill address: 117 W. Rosemary Street. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Kappa Psi; 
President of Student Body and Sophomore Class, 
UNC Pharmacy School. Practical experience at 
Pike's Drug Store, Locust. Employment prefer- 
ence: Piedmont area. 

Richard Buxton Overton, Jr. 
Raleigh 
Born December 20, 1939; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 407 Ruffin Dormitory. Member A.Ph.A. 
and NCPA Student Branches. Practical ex- 
perience at Azalea Pharmacy, Richmond, Va. Has 
accepted employment after graduation. 

Margaret Greene Patterson 
Roxboro 
Born November 25, 1939; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 201 Whitehead Dormitory. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Kappa 
Epsilon (chaplain, pledge mistress) ; Secretary- 
treasurer of Junior and Senior Classes, School of 
Pharmacy. Practical experience at Thomas & 
Oakley Drug Store, Roxboro. Employment pre- 
ference: Central section. 

Terry Julian Pickett 
High Point 

(Photograph not available) 
Born March 31, 1939; married. Address: 602 
W. Main Street. Carrboro. Member A.Ph.A. and 
NCPA Student Branches. Practical experience at 
Anderson's Drug Store. High Point. Has accepted 
employment af'.er graduation. 

Ellen Louise Pike 
Concord 
Born August 6, 1940 ; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 304 Whitehead Dormitory. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Pharmacy 
Senate; Rho Chi; Kappa Epsilon (vice-president) ; 
Secretary-treasurer of Student Body, UNC School 
of Pharmacy. Practical experience at Medical 
Center Pharmacy and Cabarrus Memorial Hospital 
Pharmacy, Concord. Has accepted employment 
after graduation. 

Jerry Douglas Price 
Raleigh 
Born January 28. 1941; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 11*7 W. Rosemary Street, Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Pharmacy 
Senate; Kappa Psi; Vice chairman of Professional 
Interfraternity Council. Practical experience at 
Eckerd's Drug Store, Raleigh. 

Kader Roy Ramsey, Jr. 
Jacksonville 
Born Januarv 10, 1939; unmarried. Address: 
312 N. Lindsav Street. Carrboro. Transferred to 
UNC from Campbell College. Member A.Ph.A. and 
NCPA Student Branches. Practical experience at 
Howard Drug Co., Jacksonville. Employment 
preference : Central section. 

Francis Eugene Paper 
Lucama 
Born December 12, 1932; married. Chapel Hill 
address: Tar Heel Trailer Park. Holds B.S. 
Degree (Agriculture Education) from N. C. 
State College. Member A.Ph.A. and NCPA Stu- 
dent Branches. Practical experience at Glen 
Lennox Pharmacy, Chapel Hill. Has accepted 
employment after graduation. 



34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 
School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina 
CLASS OF 1962 




THOMAS B. REAVES GARY RAY ROBERSON JACK R. ROMINE ROBERT JOEL' ROTH 

FAYETTEVILLE DRAPER ASHEVJLLE SHAKER HEIGHTS, OH 10 




IWELL TEMPLE, JR. WILLIAM G.THAMES BEVERLY C.THOMPSON MITCHELL W. WATTS 
KINSTON HOPE MILLS CHAPEL HILL TABOR CITY 




. J. WEATHERLY DONALD L. WEATHERS #L T.WILL JAMS MARTHA ANN ^YKE GARY LEE YINSLIW 
SHELBY WILSON SHELBY SILVER SPRING, W 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 



Thomas Bingham Reaves 

Fayetteville 

jrn December 26, 1940; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
dress: 218 Teague Dormitory. Practical ex- 
rience at Reaves' Drug Store, Fayetteville. Has 
cepted employment after graduation. 

Gary Ray Roberson 

Draper 

rn May 11, 1940 ;' married. Chapel Hill address: 
2 Aycotk. Member A. Ph. A. and NCPA Student 
anches. Practical experience at Tri-City Phar- 
icy, Spray. Employment preference: Central or 
estern section. 

Jack Richard Romine 

Asheville 

jrn January 14, 1940; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
dress: 2 7 Valley Park Drive. Member A.Ph.A. 
d NCPA Student Branches. Practical ex- 
[rience at Grove Park Pharmacy, and Memorial 
ission Hospital, Asheville. Employment pre- 
rence: Western section. 

Robert Joel Roth 

Shaker Heights, Ohio 

)rn June 14, 1940; unmarried. Address: 714 
ipular Street, Carrboro. Member A.Ph.A. and 
3PA Student Branches; Freshman Council; 
terfraternity Council. Practical experience at 
>th-Warren Pharmacy. Has accepted employment 
ter graduation. 

Joseph David Runnion 

Lenoir 

)rn Ssptember 5, 1939; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
dress: 117 W. Rosemary Street. Member 
Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches (president) ; 
|ippa Psi (chaplain). Practical experience at 
ayvault's Tainter's. Evans', Dula Hospital 
liaimacy, Lenoir. Employment preference: Pied- 
mt section. 

Gene Miles Shuford 

Lincolnton 

>rn March 12, 1940 ; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
dress: Chi Phi House. Member A.Ph.A. and 
jPA Student Branches; Chi Phi; Monogram 
ub; Freshman, Varsity Football. Practical ex- 
rience at City Pharmacy, Newton. Employment 
eference : Charlotte or Greensboro area. 

Albert Hunter Smith 

Fayetteville 

)rn May 6. 1940; married, two children. Ad- 
ess: Route 1. Box 282B, Durham. Member 
Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Phi Delta 
li. Practical experience at Fayetteville Drug Co. 
as accepted employment after graduation. 

James Robert Taylor 

Enfield 

>rn August 25, 1938; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
dress: 117 West Rosemary Street. Attended 
lowan Junior College. Member A.Ph.A. and 
3PA Student Branches; Pharmacy Senate; 
ippa Psi. Practical experience at Harrison 
rug Co., Enfield. Employment preference: 
stern section. 

Burwell Temple, Jr. 

Kinston 

>rn August. 7, 1935 ; married, one child. At- 
ided E.C.C. and University of Maryland. Mem- 
r A.Ph.A. Student Branch; Kappa Psi; Vice- 
esident of Senior Class, School of Pharmacy, 
•actical experience at Air Force Pharmacy, Duke 
ispital Pharmacy, Temple Drug Co., Kinston. 



Employment preference: Central or Eastern sec- 
tion. Veteran USAF. 

William Glenn Thames 

Hope Mills 

Born February 23, 1935; married, one child. 
Chapel Hill address: 152 Daniels Road. Attended 
Campbell College. Member A.Ph.A. and NCPA 
Student Branches. Practical experience at Clinic 
Pharmacy, Hope Mills, Professional Drug Co., 
Fayetteville. Has accepted employment after 
graduation. Veteran USN. 

Beverly Carol Thompson 

Chapel Hill 

Born April 17, 1940; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 900 Christopher Road. Member A.Ph.A. 
Student Branch; Kappa Epsilon (treasurer) ; Rho 
Chi (historian); A.Ph.A. corres. Secretary; recom- 
mendations chairman, Kappa Delta. Employment 
preference: Chapel Hill area. 

Mitchell Wayne Watts 

Tabor City 

Born December 5, 1939; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 117 W. Rosemary Street. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Pharmacy 
Senate (President); Kappa Psi (social chairman; 
\ ice-president of Freshman, Sophomore Classes, 
and Student Body, School of Pharmacy). UNC 
Dance Committee Secretary. Practical experience 
at Harrelson's Pharmacy, Tabor City. Employment 
preference: Western or Piedmont section. 

William John Weatherly, III 

Warsaw 

Born November 12, 1937; unmarried. Chapel 
Hill address: 117 W. Rosemary Street. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Kappa Psi. 
Practical experience at Goldsboro Drug Co. and 
Johnson Drug Co., Jacksonville. Employment 
preference: Eastern section. 

Donald Lawrence Weathers 

Shelby 

Born December 8, 1939 ; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 117 West Rosemary Street. Member 
A Ph A and NCPA Student Branches; Kappa 
Psi; Monogram Club: Track & Cross Country. 
Vice-president of Junior Class, School of Phar- 
macy. Practical experience at Suttle's Drug Store, 
Shelby. Employment preference: Piedmont or 
Durham-Chapel Hill area. 

William Thurston Williams 

Wilson 

Born December 20. 1939; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 306 Teague Dormitory. Attended Atlan- 
tic Christain College. Member A.Ph.A. and NCPA 
Student Branches; Treasurer of IDC; Dorm Presi- 
dent IDC Representative: University Entertain- 
ment Committee Treas. of Society of Janus. Prac- 
tical experience: six months. Employment prefer- 
ence: Eastern or Western section. 

Martha Ann Wyke 

Shelby 

Born February 26, 1940: unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 319* Whitehead Dormitory. Member 
A.Ph.A. and NCPA Student Branches; Kappa 
Epsilon; Rho Chi (secretary-treasurer). Practi- 
cal experience at Cornwell Rexall Drugs. Shelby. 
Employment preference: Piedmont section. 

Gary L. Tingling 

Silver Spring, Md. 

Born Februarv 26, 1939; unmarried. Chapel Hill 
address: 314" Stacy. Member A.Ph.A. Student 
Branch. Practical experience at various drug 
stores, including Peoples Drug Store. 



36 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

This space available at 10^ per word; mini- 
mum of $3.00. Box numbers assigned and 
replies forwarded to advertiser upon re- 
quest. Mail copy and payment to Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy, Box 151, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 



BALANCES — Prescription balances repaired. 
Contact Phipps & Bird, Inc., P. O. Box 2V, 
Richmond 5, Virginia. Telephone Ml 4-5401. 



FOR SALE — Remington's Practice of Phar- 
macy, 12th Edition. (1961). 1,866 pages. 
Price $22.50. Available from NCPA, Box 
151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



FOR SALE — 90 feet of wall fixtures, 4 
gondolas, wrapping counter and 13 foot 
prescription counter with 31 drawers. Priced 
to move quickly. Inspection invited. Call 
Spring Hope, N. C. 4788091 before 6 or 
4788721 after 6. 



FOR SALE — -An excellent reference book for 
general pharmacy use — Clinical Toxicology 
of Commercial Products. More than 1100 
pages of information in daily use by Poison 
Control Centers, etc., including an ingredi- 
ents and therapeutics index, over 1 5,000 
trade names of products, arranged alpha- 
betically, which might be ingested acci- 
dentally or suicidally; general formulations 
and manufacturers names and addresses. 
Available from the NCPA, Box 151, Chapel 
Hill, N. C. at $16 a copy. 



Hickory— William R. McDonald, III, hi 
mediate past president of the Hickory Juni 
Chamber of Commerce, is a candidate f 
state vice president of the organization. 

Oxford — Hall's Drug Store, in its 84 
year, is being extensively remodeled. 

Dublin — James H. Freeman, formerly 
Fayetteville, has opened the Dublin Dri 
Company. A graduate (1955) of the UK 
School of Pharmacy, Freeman was former 
associated with Bender's Drug Store 
Fayetteville. 



Black Mountain — In some fashion, a d( 
belonging to John Kluttz got "mailed" in 
mail box located in front of Uzzell's Rex;' 
Drug Store. Postal authorities were callr 
and the "package" returned to owner. 

Valdese — The Valdese Drag Company ar 
Rock Drug Company will alternate tl 
Sunday open hours. The rotation pi? 
started on March 11 with Valdese Drc 
Company open; on March 18 the Rock Dn 
was open. 

Tabor City — H. G. Dameron is a Candida 
(May 26 Democratic Primary) for a seat < 
his county's board of Education. He servi 
as mayor of Tabor City from 1955 to 195 

Pleasant Garden — Grand opening of tl 
unique (interior Avails of sand faced briell 
Pleasant Garden Drug Store was observi 
in mid-March. 

Lexington — Plans for the development 
a new Community Medical Center in the 2( 
block of West Center Street have beJ 
announced by Stanford Tate, who is seer 
tary-treasurer of the corporation which w 
construct and operate the Center. T 
Center will include a pharmacy, offices f 
four doctors and a medical laboratory. 

Burlington — Eckerd's Drug Stores h 
signed a 17 year lease for 10,000 square fe 
of floor space in the Cum-Park Plaza Sho 
ping Center. 

Durham — James A. (Jimmy) Smith, J: 
MSR for A. H. Robins Company in the Du 
ham area, has been named a director of tl 
Durham Junior Chamber of Commerce. 



IF YOU ARE PLANNING TO 

...START A 
NEW STORE 



tEMODEK 



I* 



we 



off* 



r 




COMPLETE LAYOUT and 
MERCHANDISING 

PLANS 



Without Obligation: 

WE AID YOU 

WHEN YOU NEED 

IT THE MOST 



t ss-Wo^ 



^ 



/a °*8&»A 



HANDLING OF YOUR 
OPENING ORDER 



IDERED -PICKED • PACKED • DELIVERED 
CLASSIFICATION OF MERCHANDISE 




OWENS, MINOR & BODEKER, INC 

1010 Herring Avenue, Wilson, North Carolina 




CALL US 



r." / 
/ 
/ 



Whatever 
you 

want... 
whenever 

yo» 

want 
it! 



The W. H. King Drug Company 

"The House of Friendly and Dependable Service" 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

AND ITS ASSOCIATES 

O'Hanlon-Watson Drug Company 
winston-salem, n. c. 
Bellamy Drug Company King Drug Company Peabody Drug Company 
wilmington, n. c. florence. s. c. durham, n. c. 



«na 



„•** 



m 



-IS** 



;? 




i'ke Carolina JqURNAL OF PHARMACY 

Volume XLIII MAY, 1962 Number 5 




Zentron™ is the hematinic for finicky youngsters (and oldsters, to!) 

When iron deficiency is the problem, Zentron provides the answer, especialfyar 
youngsters or older folks who prefer a liquid. Zentron restores hemoglobin in anqtic 
patients and provides broad nutritional support by combining iron with B comliX 
vitamins and vitamin C. Its perky strawberry flavor is readily accepted whether gun 
alone or mixed with formula, water, or fruit juice. 

Zentron is indicated for the prevention and treatment of iron-deficiency ane.ia 

and the prevention of vitamin B complex and B g g ■ _ ™ ! . 

vitamin (' deficiencies. There are no contrain- W&M Mm |P|| |i J& 

dications to its use. Order it in eight-ounce hot- fln^P I 111 %M I 'M I 

ties from your Lilly service wholesaler. (iron, vitamin B complex, and vitamin C, Lilfl 






Justice Sales Representatives 





(back row) 

0. C. TROGDON 40 years R. G. CARROLL 15 years 

J. M. WAUGH 13 years J. C. KNIGHT 12 years 

L. R. DAVIS 30 years 

(front row) 

R. F. WHITELEY 27 years R. G. WELLS 9 years 

T. B. WAUGH 43 years W. H. ANDREWS 13 years 



Over 200 YEARS of Service and Experience 
for the Druggists of North Carolina 




WltMBE, 




'■'oles**-' 



JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 



Greensboro, N. C. 



Beginning our 64th year of Service to 
the Retail Druggists of North Carolina. 



Ijc 

WEmwnmm. >w. 
■ 1 * A 

H 1 i 






BD6L!fl3iiHHrf 
Hk. V I 


w ^ 





Boss: Don't look now but I think we 
are being followed. 

Charlie: ff BC" has what it takes to make 
it a leader. 



America's Fastest-Selling 
Headache Powder 

. . . and ff BC" Tablets in 
the new red, white and blue 
bottles and cartons are 
gaining new customers 
every day 




headache 
neuralgia 



B. C. REMEDY CO. Durham, north Carolina 

Made and sold in North Carolina for over 50 years 



The House of Friendly Service 





Scott aUtug, Company, 



Service Wholesalers Since 1891 




summertime itches 
mean extra riches 
when you feature 

CALADRYL 

Calamine and Benadryls Hydrochloride* Lotion and Cream 

Summer after summer, customers keep 
coming back for CALADRYL. And no won- 
der. Its soothing antipruritic antihistaminic 
actions relieve the itching and discomfort 
of prickly heat, insect bites, hives, mild 
sunburn, and other warm weather skin irri- 
tations promptly and effectively. 
This summer, profit most handsomely 
by promoting this long-time favorite. 
CALADRYL is a product your customers 
know, trust, and will almost certainly need. 
Stock up now on both lotion and cream. 

CALADRYL Lotion supplied in 6-oz. glass and 80-cc. 
plastic squeeze bottles; Cream in IV2 oz. tubes. 

^Benadryl Hydrochloride 
(diphenhydramine hydro- 
chloride, Parke-Davis) 



PARKE-DAVIS 





The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



May, 1962 
Vol. xliii No. o 

* 

Officers 

NOETH CAEOLINA 
PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

• 

President 

John T. Stevenson 
Elizabeth City 

• 

Vice-Presidents 

Hoy A. Moose 

Mount Pleasant 

Harry A. Barringer 

Concord 

W. T. Boone 

Ahoskie 



Secretary-Treasurer 

Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

• 

Assistant 

Secretary-Treasurer 

C. M. Andrews 

Burlington 

• 

General Counsel 

F. 0. Bowman 
Chapel Hill 



Five Do's 



Increasingly, non-pharmacy outlets are eyeing the pre- 
scription department as a potential opportunity to up 
lagging net profits. While the lion's share of prescription 
volume remains in the pharmacy, we have no positive as- 
surance this situation will prevail in the years ahead. 

To be forewarned is to be forearmed. These five "do's" 
are rephrased from information supplied by the Druggist' 
Service Council and are suggested as practical aids to meet 
the challenge now posed by new competitive forces for the 
prescription dollar: 

1. Do make sure your prescription department reflects a 
professional image. Is the Rx Dept. spotlessly clean? Is 
the pharmacist properly dressed? Are diplomas and licenses 
shown? Are reference works readily available? Is there 
a new products display? Are customers comfortable while 
waiting? Does the entire department look professional? 

2. Do have good professional relations. Work with your 
doctors. Keep yourself informed; be a "drug counselor" 
to the already busy doctor. 

3. Do use public and community relations. These range 
from ad mats, films, speeches, radio and TV scripts, state- 
ment stuffers to exhibits. Seek every opportunity for ap- 
pearing before the public ; make your talents and your 
knowledge available to the community. 

•4. Do evaluate your maintenance drug prices. More than 
any other class, patients on maintenance drugs do shop 
around. More and more pharmacists are coming to an 
agreeable position on these drugs — one which satisfies their 
customers and their own economics. 

5. Do practice personal professional selling with service. 
This is the key to your professional survival ; emphasize pro- 
fessional knowledge with personal service at every oppor- 
tunity, with every prescription that is filled, with every re- 
quest that involves utilization of your professional training. 
Keep your professional profile up to par. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Entered as 
second class matter July 5, 1922 at the post office at Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Medical Society States Position on 
Distribution of Enovid 



The following resolution, relating to 
Enovid, has been adopted by the Executive 
Council of the Medical Society of the State 
of North Carolina: 

Resolution 

"The Medical Society of the State of 
North Carolina is cognizant of the pilot 
study in Mecklenburg County involving a 
cooperative program between the Health 
Department and the Welfare Departments 
wherein a group of women from lower in- 
come groups have been provided an oral 
contraceptive drug, Enovid. 

This Society intends to follow this study 
and any projected extension of the program 
with a great deal of interest. 

The present position of this Society is as 
follows : 

1. Enovid is presently believed to be a 
safe, effective oral medication for contracep- 
tion, when properly used under the super- 
vision of a physician. 

2. This Society commends the pilot study 
effort on the basis of presently available 
information. 

3. This medication should be restricted to 
women who have had an adequate medical 
evaluation, including physical examination, 
indicating that each woman is a suitable 
candidate for such therapy. 

4. Participation in such a program should 
be on a voluntary basis on the part of the 
woman participating. 

5. Inasmuch as certain disorders in uterine 
bleeding may result as a consequence of 
oral Enovid contraceptive therapy, patients 
receiving this therapy must be seen by a 
physician at regular intervals, particularly 
during the first few months of such therapy 
in each patient. 

6. Participation in this program must be 
limited to women who have been certified as 
indigent by their local Welfare Departments, 
and such certification must be periodically 
reviewed. 

7. Enovid and similar oral progestational 
a rents are extremely potent biologically 



active agents, and such medication must \ 
dispensed in conformity with the pharmac 
laws of this State. The dispensing of sue 
potent medication must not be relegated 1 
untrained and unlicensed individuals an 
this Society is of the strong conviction th; 
(a) the prescribing of this medication 1 
done in each instance only by a licensed ph; 
sician, and (b) the dispensing of sue 
medication should preferably be left 1 
traditional drug outlets; i.e., register? 
pharmacists, by cooperative arrangements : 
the local level between the government: 
agencies involved and the local medical afi 
pharmaceutical groups; and in any instant 
wherein this described local cooperative a; 
rangement cannot be implemented, that tl 
custody, storage and dispensing of th 
medication become the direct and sole i 
sponsibility of a licensed physician. 

That a copy of this Resolution be sent 
the North Carolina State Board of Publ 
Welfare ; North Carolina State Board 
Health; Governor of the State of Norl 
Carolina ; North Carolina Board of Pha 
macy; North Carolina Hospital Associatio 
and to each County Medical Society Pre; 
dent. 



Cover Page 

Top: The state's only twin women pha 
maeists, Mrs. Jean Provo and Mrs. Ju 
West of Raleigh, are shown with Mr. E. 
Daniel of Zebulon. The convention "coff 
hour" under the supervision of Jean ai 
June, was one of the highlights of t 
annual NCPA meeting, April 8-10. 

Bottom: An annual event during t 
closing minutes of each convention — t 
exchange of president's pins. President Hi 
(left) is transferring the diamond pre: 
dent's pin to Mr. Stevenson while he, 
turn, accepts a past president's pin. Tr 
occasion signifies the assumption of t 
official duties by the incoming president 
the NCPA. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

Convention Highlights 



A combination of things — an exceptional 
business program, above-average entertain- 
ment and central location — brought approxi- 
mately one thousand pharmacists, members 
of the auxiliaries and guests to Ealeigh on 
April 8-10 for the 82nd annual meeting of 
the NCPA and affiliated auxiliaries. While 
the official attendance figure was less than 
1,000, the half-day and one-day convention- 
attenders plus those who were only able to 
make it to the night sessions brought the 
final total to the estimated 1000 figure. 

The convention saw a tie vote develop in 
one of the NCPA business sessions on a 
major issue — a request that the State Board 
of Pharmacy rescind its regulation (effec- 
tive July 1) in which the name of the phar- 
macist is required to appear on Ex labels 
after ' ' filled by. ' ' The tie vote — 54 to 54 — 
was broken by NCPA President Hall in 
favor of the Board's regulation. 



About half of the UNC Pharmacy Class 
of 1952 returned for a reunion luncheon. 
W. H. (Bill) Randall of Lillington, a mem- 
ber of the Class, was speaker for the oc- 
casion. The Class has made an impressive 
record in many areas of professional, busi- 
ness and community life. 

Something new was added to the conven- 
tion this year — a special awards session on 
Sunday afternoon. In the past, the awards 
were incorporated in the regular convention 
sessions extending over a 3-day period. 

Pictured this month are some of the phar- 
macists and others who received recognition 
for their services as pharmacists and as 
community leaders. The $500 Presidential 
Scholarship Award, sponsored by the Pepso- 
dent Division of Lever Brothers, went to 
Stephen Wayne Cagle of Concord. 
(Continued on page 11) 




Charles D. Blanton, Jr., center, receives the A. H. Robins "Bowl of Hygeia" Award for 
Outstanding Community Service from Richard A. Velz (left), Director of Robins' Public 
and Trade Relations, while NCPA President Robert B. Hall looks on. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



The Convention in Pictures 

(Opposite page) 

Top: INDUCTED INTO 50 PLUS CLUB 
pharmacist license 50 plus years and mem- 
;r NCPA) : Standing, left to right: John 

Birmingham of Hamlet, Frank Roland 
ell of Beaufort, F. Jackson Andrews of 
urham, J. F. Sherard, Sr. of Burlington, 
id Ralph P. Rogers, Sr. of Durham. In the 
ireground, D. G. Ridenhour of Mount Gilead 
eft) and W. A. Burwell of Raleigh. 
Not present but qualifying for certifi- 
ites: Kelly Bennett of Bryson City, J. B. 
)p'pedge of Huntsville, Alabama, John C. 
ike Foster of Tryon, Leon Smith of Kanna- 
)lis, Roy J. Johnson of Asheville and Wil- 
im P. Taylor of Roanoke Rapids. 
Bottom: New members of the North Car- 
ina Academy of Pharmacy are shown, 
ft to right: John Friday of Gastonia, 
3car Smith of Pilot Mountain, John 
itchener of Edenton and Grover Creech 

Selma. Others inducted but not present 
are Oliver Fleming of Smithfield, Fred 
oss of Gastonia and Waits A. West of 
Dseboro. 

CONVENTION NOTES 

All of the convention pictures appearing 

this issue of The Journal were made by 

W. Brege, owner-operator of The Pro- 

ssional Pharmacy, Kaleigh. 

Normally, photography might be classed 
Mr. Brege 's hobby but he has progressed 

yond this stage. Some of his work lias 

peared in Life Magazine and his services 

e in demand by United Press and other 

ws organizations. 

The B & H Photo Company of Charlotte 
now mailing color pictures made at the 
nvention. As a goodwill gesture, B & H 
ide pictures of delegates over the 3-day 
riod of the annual meeting, and, as a 
llowup, the negative along with a framed 
lor print has or is being mailed to all 
rsons who participated in this special 
ent. 

It's Pinehurst in 19o'3. Headquarters will 

The Carolina Hotel. The entire facilities 

the hotel, including more than 300 

oms, will be available to the XCPA and 

auxiliaries. 



R>bins 

MAY CHECK LIST 

Tear out for a handy check of 

your current stock of these 

Robins products that are receiving 

special promotion in your area 

May 7 — June 15 

Ambar 

n No. 1 Extentabs 100's □ No. 1 Extentabs 500's 
PI No. 2 Extentabs 100's □ No. 2 Extentabs 500's 
nTab. 100's □ Tab. 500's 

NaClex® 

|H Tab. 100's nTab. 500's 

Dimetane 

h Extentabs 100's □ Extentabs 500's 
nTab. 100's LTJTab. 500's 
|D Elix. 16 oz. □ Elix. Gal. 



Dimetane 

|n Ampuls 1 cc, 10 mg. per cc, 6's 
n Ampuls 1 cc, 10 mg. per cc, 100's 
j - 1 Vials 2 cc, 100 mg. per cc, ea. 

Donnazyme 

pTab. 100's nTab. 500's 

Entozyme 

□ Tab. 100's D,Tab. 500's 



Injectable 



5) 



?/ 



Why not check your stock of ail V 

Robins products at the same time I 
— and be prepared Jfat 

I A. H. ROBINS CO., INC., RICHMOND 20, VA. 



Yesterday 

the last wholesaler 

went out of 

business 



At 4 p.m. yesterday the last wholesaler's salesman 
called on you. It was a routine call. He checked 
your "want book." He checked your stock — pointed 
out several items you needed. He discussed a new 
idea that had worked well in another store. He 
pointed out an item that had increased in price. 

He told you to order short on a product because 
he knew of a free-goods deal that would break 
soon. He advised you to go easy on a so-called 
"hot" item that was slowing down. He did all the 
things you've come to expect as a part of your 
wholesaler's service — and he did them for the 
last time! 

Yes, the middleman was dead — the long, long 
battle was finally over. Starting today you buy 
everything direct. No more do you pay the whole- 
saler his percentage. But did you really gain? 

You lost the ability to order 'A or Vnof a dozen. 

You lost once-a-week, twice-a-week, three- 

times-a-week deliveries. 

You lost the advantage of being able to pick 



up that expensive bottle of vitamins for a 

favorite customer. 

You lost a friendly creditor — one who would 

wait and wait when business was slow. 

You lost a bookkeeper — one that kept your 

account from getting snarled. 

You lost a warehouse that was at your beck 

and call. 

You lost a friend. 

There was no helping it. The wholesaler had 
to die. He lived through the advent of the five and 
ten, the chain store and the discount house. He 
watched his net drop to 3%, 2' '< and 1.2%. He 
watched you buy more and more, direct from his 
sources of supply. And he just rolled over and died. 

( Aren't you glad that everything written here 
is fantasy — and that you, the retailer, can keep it 
that way. Buy direct from your wholesaler — the 
business you save may be your own! ) 

SEA & SKI COMPANY 



Reprinted uith Permission by 

JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



North Carolina Service Wholesaler 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



CONVENTION HIGHLIGHTS 

(Continued from page 7) 

COFFEE HOUR 

JEJnder the capable management of Mrs. 
Jean Provo and Mrs. June West (cover 
page), ably assisted by members of the Wake 
County Pharmaceutical Society, the "Get 
Acquainted Coffee Hour ' ' on Sunday af ter- 
10011 brought together several hundred of 
the early arrivals. 

A special attraction at the Coffee Hour 
md later that day at the annual banquet 
ivas "Miss North Carolina" who graciously 
participated in much picture-taking and con- 
versation with the delegates. 

Dr. Joel Carter and his University of 
North Carolina Glee Club was a tremendous 
lit at the Sunday night banquet. In a well- 
laced program, the Glee Club presented 
dassical, folk, popular and religious numbers 



to an appreciative audience, which ) nicked 
the ballroom from wall to wall. "Miss 
North Carolina," at one time a voice student 
at the University, did two numbers with the 
Club. 

BUSINESS SESSIONS 

As customary in the past, the NCPA busi- 
ness sessions got underway early with 
"business-starter breakfasts." Number 
place mats were lucky place mats for some 
since prizes were awarded in this manner. 

Appearing during the first business session 
(April 9 morning session) were W. H. 
Randall, Jr., President Hall, J. Warren 
Lansdowne, David R. Uran and W. J. Smith. 
Details of these talks and reports will appear 
later in The Journal or the Year Book. 

Mr. Lansdowne \s comment that "the 
general public, as a whole, would rather 
(Continued on page 13) 




THE CLASS OF '52. Standing, left to right: Harold V. Day, Claxton Harris, Leo 
Darter, John Friday, Glenwood Williams, Earl Brown, Hugh Fletcher, Alex Clelland, A. C. 
Dollar, Marshall Sasser, Henry Cogdell, Clayburn Hawkins, Bill Randall and Herman 
Hallet Daniels. 

Seated, left to right: L. R. Burris, Jr., J. P. Horton, Jr., Cade Brooks, Keith Fulbright, 
B. B. Beddingfield and Doug Bain, Jr. 



Kill 



MB 



■ 




POWDER 
PACKAGE 

Less than 

PER DOSE 




STANBACK IS THE ONLY 

HEADACHE POWDER MARKETED 

IN THE 50-POWDER PACKAGE 



0t*H* 



ctftf°* 







* Guaranleed by 
.Good Housekeeping 



Co.. Ltd..\ Salisbury. N. C. 



GREATER VOLUME ! 

for you 
MORE PROFIT 

per sale 
MORE ECONOMY 

/or your custom 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



13 



CONVENTION HIGHLIGHTS 

(Continued from page 11) 

ive on a prescription that cost $4 rather 
han die on one that cost 50 cents ' ' was 
ridely commented on by the press. 

The NCPA past presidents, meeting dur- 
ng the luncheon adjournment, were shown 
lides (projected on screen) of twenty past 
residents dating back to 1881. For identify- 
ug 17 of the 20 pictures, Wade A. Gilliam 
f Winston-Salem received a Danish ham. 

MONDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

A series of reports consumed most of the 
fternoon session. Dean Brecht presented 
lie report of the School of Pharmacy and 
he Pharmaceutical Research Foundation; 
lie Extension Division report was made by 
h. Melvin Chambers; the UNC Visitation 
'ommittee report by Gilbert Hartis and the 
.egislative Report by Wade A. Gilliam. 

The two concluding reports — Board of 
Pharmacy and Public Relations — were 
bvered by H. C. McAllister and James W. 
larrison. 

The afternoon session was closed with 
ae screening of a movie "The Misery 
lerchants." R. T. Austin, District Sales 



AfaAe McGowU 

For Labels -in Rolls or Flats 
Physicians 1$ Blanks and Files 

Drug Boxes - Call Checks 
Drug and Delivery Envelopes 



P*&L&iipiio*i Jlalxeli. 

all Style*, and Calais 



McCOURT LABEL CABINET CO. 



ORD, 
NA. 



42.54 BENNETT VT&ffW BRADF 

STREET r'gJKVV PENf 

Specializing in Labels far Drug Starts 

Clifford P. Berry, Representative 
P. 0. Box 306, Charlotte 1, N. C 



Manager for Glenbrook Labs., commenting 
prior to the movie, said that this country's 
11 million arthritis sufferers waste more than 
$250 million of their money every year on 
phony products. ' ' 

MONDAY NIGHT ENTERTAINMENT 
A beautifully-paced, expertly woven pat- 
tern of songs by Doraine and Ellis. Costumed 
presentations from some of Broadway's 
greatest musical hits were presented by this 
husband and wife team to the obvious en- 
joyment of their listeners, as indicated by 
repeated encores. 

TUESDAY MORNING SESSION 

Dr. Charles M. Westrick of the N. C. 
Dental Society and Roger Sloop, NCPA 
Chairman of the Dental Formulary Com- 
mittee, discussed the forthcoming revised 
edition of The Dental Formulary, which will 
be available by June 1st. 

A special committee of dentists and phar- 
macists, headed by Dr. Westrick and Mr. 
Sloop, have used the original Formulary to 
compile a vastly improved and expanded 
publication in its second edition. Increasing- 
ly, dentists are becoming more prescription- 
writing conscious, hence publications such 
as the N. C. Dental Formulary are gaining 
favor with the dental profession. 

The two concluding addresses of the morn- 
ing session were presented by Dr. Wayne 
Rundles of the Duke University Medical 
Center and by William J. Wishing, SKF 's 
divisional sales manager. Mr. Wishing 's 
paper will appear in the June issue of The 
Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. 

ACADEMY OF PHARMACY 

During the noon adjournment, members of 
the Academy of Pharmacy met for lunch. 
Guest speaker was David R. Uran, President 
of the Ethical Drug Advertising Company, 
who stressed the importance of the pharma- 
cist in building a favorable image. 

CONCLUDING BUSINESS SESSION 

The Tuesday afternoon session was de- 
voted to reports, resolutions, and officer in- 
stallation ceremony. 

Reporting were Thomas J. Ham, Jr. 
(NCPA-Institute Endowment), Harold V. 
(Continued on page 15) 



VM 



wj 



I 





The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 



CONVENTION HIGHLIGHTS 

(Continued from page 13) 
ay (Papers & Queries), Eoger A. McDuffie 
Judicial Council), Dr. Albert Jowdy (Inter- 
rofessional Relations), W. L. West (Public 
ealth & Welfare), Edwin E. Fuller (Con- 
itution & By-Laws), Ben B. Harward 
Membership), J. C. Jackson (Committee on 
resident's Address) and Jesse M. Pike 
Time and Place). 

RESOLUTIONS 

Seven resolutions were adopted; two not 
>proved. The label resolution was dis- 
lssed by J. C. Jackson, Paul Tart, W. M. K. 
ender, John Henley and others prior to the 
L-54 tie vote. 

Here are the resolutions as presented by 
r. John Stevenson of Elizabeth City, the 
lairman of the Besolutions Committee: 

Resolutions Adopted 

L) Commended Ciba, Lederle, MSD, SKF 
id Upjohn for their financial support of a 
jw public relations program appearing in 
eader's Digest and Sat. Evening Post and 
iggested program be extended to include 
wspapers. 



(2) That members of the XCPA give pref- 
erential display, advertising and coopera- 
tion to firms who distribute their products 
exclusively through wholesale and retail 
pharmacies. 

(3) Reaffirmed its support of the Kerr- 
Mills bill as being the most practical answer 
to medical care for the aged. 

(4) Expressed opposition to enactment of 
King-Anderson Bill and at same time pledged 
its support to state and local programs which 

(Continued on page 17) 



The Convention in Pictures 

(Opposite page) 

Top: Miss North Carolina is shown with 
(left) J. Warren Lansdowne, Manager of 
Eli Lilly's Professional and Trade Relations 
Department, and J. L. Coaker, Lilly's area 
manager with headquarters in Charlotte. 

Bottom: Three members recognized for 
their outstanding professional and com- 
munity services, left to right: Seth Miller of 
Lexington, Phil Link of Reidsville and Earl 
H. Tate of Lenoir. 



FOR YOUR PHOTOFINISHING NEEDS 

Let B & H Photo Company Serve You 

Complete Service on 

Black and White Kodacolor 

Ektachrome Anscochrome 

Kodachrome Movies and Slides 
Processed in Our Plant 

B & H PHOTO COMPANY 

3030 s. boulevard p. 0. box 1600 

phone 523-7093 charlotte 1, n. c. 




taa 



cftvo mo 





wmmrn 



1st prize in MELOZETS 
"DIETBALANCER 
DISPLAY CONTEST 

Look at all you win. First class accom- 
modations for two, round trip to Paris 
via Air France jet. Plus your own 
brand new Renault Dauphine auto- 
mobile for use in Europe, with free 
delivery to your home when you re- 
turn. Plus $2,000.00 in cash. 

50 SECOND PRIZES- 

Philco Transistor Radios 

Handsome 9-transistor model in rich 
leather case. Plays for hundreds of 
hours on flashlight batteries. Con- 
gress Model, retails for $68.95. 

For Everyone Who Enters- 
Set of 8 Highball Glasses 

Created especially for this Contest. 
Beautifully decorated with mortar 
and pestle symbol. 

FREE DISPLAY KIT MAKES IT EASY TO ENTER 

This contest is designed to help you increase sales by promoting Melozets as an aid in 
"balancing" 900-calorie dietary products. You enter by creating a display of Melozets 
and 900-calorie products, and sending a snapshot of it to Contest Headquarters. Your 
display should show how Melozets "balances" 900-calorie products by supplying 
bulk, the element that's missing from these products. Displays are judged on originality 
— not the amount of stock they show. You don't have to spend a cent for extra stock. 
Everything you need for entering is contained in the Melozets "Diet-Balancer" 
Display Kit shown here. Rules, entry blank, display ideas and a variety of display 
materials are all included in the Kit. It's absolutely 
free. Just use the coupon here. Be sure to act now be- 
cause the Contest closes on June 30, 1962. 

SEND NOW FOR FREE KIT 

i 

Melozets Display Contest 

P.O. Box 25 A • Mount Vernon 10, N. Y. 

I want to enter the Melozets "Diet-Balancer" Contest. 

Please send a free Kit with everything I need to enter. 

Name 

S tore 





Addr 



City- 



. Zone- 



. State- 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 



CONVENTION HIGHLIGHTS 

(Continued from page 15) 

ncourage individual effort as a prime answer 

b providing adequate medical services. 

(5) Endorsed Quality Stabilization Bill. 

K) Commended members of the Extension 

Jivision and its Chm., Dr. Melvin Chambers, 

or their progressive work on behalf of Phar- 

iacy and pledged continued support to the 

fivision. 

(T) Eequested suppliers of prescription 

rugs, who maintain different prices for 

irious outlets, to abandon such policies. 

Resolutions Not Adopted 

1) Requesting the State Board of Pharmacy 
i issue an "intern certificate" to persons 
irolled in the internship (practical ex- 
•erience) program. 

2) Requesting the State Board of Pharmacy 
i rescind its rule (effective July 1) which 
ill require name of pharmacist, who fills or 
apervises the filling of prescriptions, on the 
■reseription label. 



NOMINEES 
The committee on nominations, W. Dorsey 
Welch, Jr., Chairman, presented the follow- 
ing slate of nominees, subject to mail ballot 
vote in May: 

N. C. Pharmaceutical Association 

For President : Hoy A. Moose of Mount 
Pleasant and O. K. Richardson of Boone. 

For 1st Vice President: Harry A. Bar- 
ringer of Concord and I. T. Reamer of Dur- 
ham. 

For 2nd Vice President: W. T. Boone of 
Ahoskie and John W. S. Biggs of Green- 
ville. 

For 3rd Vice President: Robert H. Milton 
of Salisbury and Earl H. Tate of Lenoir. 

For Member of the Executive Committee : 
C. Louis Shields of Jacksonville and John 
T. Stevenson of Elizabeth City. 



Board of Pharmacy 
David D. Claytor of Greensboro 
Ernest Rabil of Winston-Salem. 
(Concluded on page 19) 



and 




NCPA OFFICERS, 1962-'63. Left to right: Hoy A. Moose of Mount Pleasant, Harry 
. Barringer of Concord, John T. Stevenson (president) of Elizabeth City, W. T. Boone of 
hoskie and W. J. Smith (Secretary-Treasurer) of Chapel Hill. 




SOME CLOUDS HAVE SILVER LININGS 

The medical literature describes them as "maturity-onset diabetics." 
You see them frequently when they return for prescription refills. Their 
problem may be for life, but their cloud has a silver lining. Reason? Many 
of them are now free from the pain and inconvenience of daily injections, 
and the diabetes remains under control on a single oral dose of Diabinese 
taken each morning with breakfast. 

That silver lining would not have been possible without a whole series 
of important medical advances, from the discovery of insulin to the 
breakthrough of oral antidiabetic therapy. How many of your customers 
are familiar with this typical example of medical progress? 



DIABINESE' Tablets 



BRAND OF CHLORPROPAMIDE | FULL 
PRODUCT INFORMATION ABOUT DIABINESE IS AVAILABLE IN BLUE BOOK, RED BOOK, IN THE 
PRODUCT BROCHURE ENCLOSED IN EACH PACKAGE, AND FROM YOUR PFIZER REPRESENTATIVE. 

Science for the world's well-being® (Pfizer) 
PFIZER LABORATORIES Division, Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc. New York 17, N.Y. 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



1!J 



Brewer to Head TMA 

During the annual business session of the 
TMA, William P. Brewer of Greensboro was 
elected president of The Traveling Men's 
Auxiliary for the coming year. 

Serving with President Brewer will be 
Forrest Matthews of Baleigh, vice president; 
J. Floyd Goodrich of Durham, secretary- 
treasurer; and C. H. Smith of Charlotte, 
assistant secretary-treasurer. 



CONVENTION HIGHLIGHTS 

(Continued from page 17) 
Pharmaceutical Research Foundation 
F. J. Andrews of Durham, Eowe B. Camp- 
bell of Taylorsville, F. Herman Cline of 
Charlotte, David R. Davis of Williamstou, 
W. H. Houser of Cherryville, J. C. Jackson 
of Lumberton, Roger A. McDuffie of Greens- 
boro and T. M. Stanback of Salisbury. 

OFFICER INSTALLATION 

At this point, the meeting was adjourned 
:o reconvene immediately in an adjoining 
oorn (ballroom) for the combined (NCPA, 
TMA and Woman's Auxiliary) officer instal- 
ation ceremony. 

Officers of the NCPA as well as its two 
affiliated auxiliaries were installed on Tues- 
jday afternoon during a joint officer installa- 
tion ceremony. 

i Honorary life membership in the TMA 
were presented to C. M. Andrews of Burling- 
ton and W. J. Smith of Chapel Hill by the 
secretary- Treasurer of the organization, J. 
Floyd Goodrich of Durham. 

The TMA Board of Governors consists of 
five persons : Leon Kimball of Winston- 
Salem (5 years) ; Bruce Wingate of Char- 
lotte (4 years) ; 0. G. Duke of Morehead 
pity (3 years) ; Reuben C. Bussell of Char- 
lotte (2 years) ; and A. G. Cox of Durham 
(1 year). 

RESOLUTION ADOPTED 

The TMA went on record in opposition to 
bpen hospitality rooms or set-up bars for 
[serving alcoholic beverages to guests at the 
pharmaceutical conventions by any firm or 
Individual; also publicizing such rooms by 
■nrds, placards or otherwise is to be elimi- 
nated at future conventions. 



DUES PAYING MEMBERS FOR 
25 YEARS 

Special recognition went to these TMA 
members for their support of the organiza- 
tion for minimum of 25 years: 

J. G. Barnette, E. B. Read & Sons Co., 
Sanford 

Gamble Bowers, Owens, Minor & Bodeker, 
Richmond 

A. G. Cox, B. C. Remedy Company, Dur- 
ham 

Allen R. Cross, Penslar Company, Durham 

.1. M. Darlington, 'Hanlon- Watson Drug 
Co., Winston-Salem 

Walter D. Druen, Tilden Company, Lynch- 
burg 

C. Rush Hamrick, Sr., Kendall Drug Com- 
pany, Shelby 

Henry F. Miller, Strother Drug Company, 
Richmond 

M. G. Morris, E. R. Squibb & Sons, Greens- 
boro 

W. W. Morton, B. C. Remedy Company, 
Durham 

F. F. Potter, Bristol-Myers, Charlotte 

C. H. Smith, Drug Package Corp., Char- 
lotte 

F. J. Stanback, The Stanback Company, 
Salisbury 

H. C. Starling, W. H. King Drug Co., 
Raleigh 

T. B. Waugh, Justice Drug Company, 
Greensboro 

LIFE MEMBERSHIPS 

Four TMA life memberships were 
awarded: J. C. Allen of McKesson & Rob- 
bins, Charlotte; F. T. Matthews of Lance, 
Inc., Greensboro; H. J. Farnsworth, Shaeffer 
Pen Company, Greensboro ; and W. P. 
Rogers, Merck Sharpe & Dohme, Asheville. 

TMA ENTERTAINMENT 

The TMA floor show and dance on Tues- 
day night officially closed the 82nd annual 
meeting. The professional acts brought in 
from various sections of the country com- 
bined to make up one of the best shows ever 
sponsored by the TMA. The TMA Enter- 
tainment Chairman — Forresl Matthews of 
Raleigh — was highly commended for his 
effort in staging such an outstanding show. 



all NEW 

physiologic formula 

for all newborns 




Prepared formula for infants, Wyeth 



A MAJOR TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCE 
!N INFANT NUTRITION 

S-M-A NEW FORMULA S-26 is an all new physiologic formula made 
possible by an exclusive Wyeth process. This new process permits 
preparation of a formula with composition and nutritional benefits 
closer to those of human milk than has ever before been possible. 

more digestible protein as in human milk- 
high in lactalbumin, low in casein 

By elect rodialy sis Wyeth reduces the mineral content of the whey 
portion of cow's milk, leaving lactalbumin readily available. As a result, 
The protein in S-M-A NEW FORMULA S-26 is mostly lactalbumin, 
as in human milk. 

new low mineral content- 
Total mineral content and calcium and phosphorus levels have been 
reduced to approximately the physiologic amounts found in human milk. 



provides these extra benefits for health and growth 

• well tolerated 

• improved digestibility 

• good weight gains and growth rate 

• fewer formula-related problems 

• easily prepared 

• no extra cost to parents 



essential 
information 
on your 
inventory 
and 
stocking of 

S-M-A 
NEW 

FORMULA 
S-26 



• S-M-A NEW FORMULA 8-26 is supersed- 
ing S-M-A. From now on, Wyeth will fill 
all S-M-A orders with S-M-A NEW FOR- 
MULA S-26 

• It is suggested, however, that you retain 
your current stock of S-M-A. There will 
probably be some mothers or physicians who 
wish infants to be continued on S-M-A. 

• In general, all requests for S-M-A may be 
filled with S-M-A NEW FORMULA S-26. 
Your physicians will find that S-M-A NEW 
FORMULA S-26 will be well tolerated and 
will provide excellent nutrition. 



S-M-A NEW FORMULA S-26 WILL 

BRING NEW SALES FOR YOU 

An Improved Formula at No Increase in Price 

Intensive detailing and ethical promotion will stimulate increased sales 
in your Infant Needs Department. To assure your supply for new 
requests, order now. 

Retailer's cost: $0.83 per lb. can of powder 

TO. 21 per 13 fl. oz. can of liquid 
(On direct order — minimum $50) 



Wyeth Laboratories • Philadelphia 1, Pa. 




Brighten your &&&&; 




with 



Fixtures 



We Can Help You! 



1. Our Experienced Designers can plan your store to 
to increase Sales and Profits for You! 

2. Our Skilled Workers and Modern Product/on Facili- 
ties can quickly turn your Plans into Reality! 

3. The installation is completed by Factory Trained 
Experts with "know-how" to get the job done with 
Minimum Inconvenience to You. 

4. Your increased sales and profits will meet the con- 
veniently spaced payments tailored to suit your needs- 
All payments and dealings are directly with us. Ask 
for Our Financing or Leasing Plans. 



Clip Coupon an;l Mail 



□ Modernize 

We are planning to □ Expand | 

□ Build New Store . 



Name 

Firm Name 

Street Address. 
City 



_State_ 




GRANT E. KEY. INC. 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



23 



300 Attend Auxiliary Sessions 



: Woman's Auxiliary members, numbering 
pproximately three hundred, transacted im- 
prtant business during the convention, as 
ell as enjoying extensive entertainment. 
! From the moment of their registration un- 
II the final curtain on the TMA party, there 
as no idleness — it was all business — and 
ileasure. In addition to participation in the 
Ver-all convention events, they were guests 
F Pine State Creamery on Monday for a 
.ncheon. Ellisbergs of Raleigh put on a 
;ishion show at the conclusion of the 
.ncheon. 

, On Tuesday, Southern (Dairies) Division 
l Sealtest Foods entertained with a lunch- 
pn, and at its conclusion the annual business 
•ssion of the Woman 's Auxiliary was held, 
eports were heard from standing com- 



mittees, and the President, Mrs. Leslie Myers, 
told of her duties during the year. Since 
the Minutes of the Business Session will be 
printed in the N.C.P.A. Year Book, details 
are omitted here. 

In the session, however, a change in By- 
Laws was voted, outlining procedures for 
granting of Life Memberships in the Auxil- 
iary. A slight change was also made, per- 
mitting the allocation of funds to be made 
by the current and/or incoming Executive 
Board. This was done in an effort to avoid 
hurried actions by the outgoing Board when 
they are trying to meet a deadline for such 
allocations of money. 

At the Installation Ceremony short talks 
were made by the XCPA President, Robert 
(Concluded on page 33) 




OFFICERS OF THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY, NCPA l962-'63. Seated, left to right: 
rs. David D. Claytor of Greensboro, 1st vice president; Mrs. John T. Stevenson of 
lizabeth City, president; Mrs. W. H. Randall of Lillington, secretary. 

Standing, left to right: Mrs. Leslie M. Myers of Winston-Salem, advisor; Mrs. Robert 
. Milton of Salisbury, treasurer; Mrs. L. R. Burris, Sr. of Valdese, historian; Mrs. M. B. 
elvin of Raleigh, Parliamentarian; and Mrs. Floyde F. Potter of Charlotte, advisor. 



WHAT'S BEHIND THE MIRROR? 

It's your medicine cabinet, and on its shelves, brand-name products for their patients. They 
we bet, are products with familiar labels, brand know that Lederle goes far beyond the "offi- 
names— not "just-as-good," cut-price generics cial" requirements to produce only the finest. 
— because these are for your family and you The next time customers ask about the "differ- 
just don't take chances. This, of course, is why ence in drugs" why not tell them of your per- 
your physicians also specify Lederle and other sonal and professional trust in the brand name? 




LEDERLE LABORATORIES, A Division of AMERICAN CYANAMID COMPANY, Pearl River, New York 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 



Mount Airy — A. B. Macon, Hollingsworth 
Drug Store, has returned from California, 
where he met with several Rexall officials 
regarding future company plans. 

Durham — Ralph P. Rogers, Jr., has been 
appointed chairman of the budget committee 
of the Durham County Board of Health. 

Leaksville — Emory M. Watson, until re- 
cently a MSR for Parke Davis & Company, 
has returned to retail pharmacy as an em- 
ployee of Chandler Drug Store. He operated 
the Center Pharmacy of Sanford for several 
years. 

High Point — Some change and a small 
quantity of merchandise are missing from 
the Anderson Drug Company as a result of 
a break-in. 

Greensboro — S. T. Forrest, President of 
Justice Drug Company, has been named 
chairman of the Greensboro chapter of the 
National Federation of Independent Busi- 
ness. 

Winston-Salem — Mrs. Maude Tolbert has 
been charged with pretending to be a 
doctor in phoning in a barbiturate prescrip- 
i tion to be filled by a local pharmacy. 

GTeensboro — Guest speaker at a recent 
; meeting of the Reviewers Club was Roger 
A. McDuffie, whose title was "Old Drug 
Stores of Greensboro." 

St. Pauls — Brisson Drugs is being re- 
modeled and enlarged. An adjoining build- 
ing is being taken over by the pharmacy in 
its remodeling program. 

Troy — Agents of the SBI have arrested 
Allan James Blake, Jr., of Candor on charges 



of having 1500 amphetamine tablets in his 
possession for sale. Blake is an operator of 
a combination grill and service station be- 
tween Biscoe and Candor on Route 220. 

Ayden — Bruce B. Reinhardt was the sub- 
ject of a "Personality of the Week" sketch 
in the April 6 issue of the Ayden Tribune. 
Reinhardt, a graduate of PCP and a veteran 
of WW II, is the owner-operator of Bruce's 
Drug Store. 

Valdese — L. R. Burris has been appointed 
a member of the Board of the United Whole- 
sale Druggists of Atlanta. 

Concord — Oren J. Hill, Geigy Pharmaceu- 
tical MSR, is a candidate for the Republican 
nomination to the Cabarrus Board of County 
Commissioners. 

Nags Head — The prescription drugs of 
Miller's Drug Store were not damaged in 
the recent storm due to removal of the drugs 
to second floor quarters. Most of the store's 
stock of cosmetics and front merchandise 
was destroyed. 

Cliffside — A recent meeting of the local 
Lions Club was addressed by O. F. Tarr, 
Asheville representative of Smith Kline & 
French Labs., who told his audience that 
nearly 5 million lives had been saved in the 
last ten years as a result of pharmaceutical 
research. 

Fayetteville — L. E. Reaves has announced 
plans for the establishment of a 7,500 
square foot Rexall store in the new Tally- 
wood Shopping Center, now under construc- 
tion on the Raeford Road. 

Lincolnton — Gene Adams, Lincoln Drugs, 
is recovering from a recent eye operation. 

Lumberton — A quantity of merchandise 
and some cash were taken in an April 12 
robbery of the Medical Arts Pharmacy. 

Raeford — Howell Drugs won the trophy in 
the 1962 championship of the Pacific Mills 
Bowling League. 

Benson — Charles Stevens, a graduate of 
the UNC School of Pharmacy, has joined 
W. L. Rogers and Frank Clifton as a partner 
in the operation of the Benson Drug Com- 
pany, Mr. Stevens served two years in the 
U. S. Army and for the past three years 
was associated with a pharmacy in Garner. 



26 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



There's 

h $ s f 



\ i i , 



PROFIT 



\ 



1 « N 

s $ $ * 

in 



«s 



flnejtate 



MILK 

and 

ICE 

CREAM 

people like it 
and buy it 

Tastes Great . . . It's 



finejtate 



Hickory Pharmacy To Expand 

The Medical Center Pharmacy, Hickory, 
will occupy enlarged quarters in a new pro- 
fessional building, which is expected to be 
completed by early spring of 1963. 

The owners of the pharmacy, Fred B. 
Fitzgerald and Mack E. Means, have joined 
with a group of Hickory professional men 
to erect a 2-story professional building on 
Second Avenue, NE, near the present site of 
the Medical Center Pharmacy. 

In addition to the pharmacy, the first floor 
of the building will be occupied by offices 
and treatment rooms of six Hickory doctors. 
Parking facilities for about 140 cars will be 
available. 

Mr. Fitzgerald, a former MSR for Squibb, 
is a native of Opelika, Alabama, and a 
pharmacy graduate of Auburn University 
(1949). He served in the TJ. S. Navy 
during WW II. 

Mr. Means is a native of Rock Hill, South 
Carolina and a graduate of the School of 
Pharmacy, University of South Carolina 
(1948). He served in the Air Force during 
WW II and is a former MSR for Parke 
Davis & Company. 

E. L. Cekada, Pharmacy Student 
Wins Lehn & Fink Gold Medal Award 

Emil Lewis Cekada, of Durham, N. C., 
graduating senior at the School of Phar- 
macy, University of North Carolina, Chapel 
Hill, N. C, has won the Lehn & Fink Gold 
Medal Award. This plaque is awarded an- 
nually to a student chosen for his note- 
worthy achievement in pharmacy. The 
presentation was made May 16 at the Awards 
Night Program. 

The Gold Medal Award program is now 
in its 38th year, having been established in 
1924 by Lehn & Fink Products Corporation, 
a leading producer of proprietary drugs, 
cosmetics and toiletries, as a scholarship in- 
centive for pharmacy students. The shield- 
shaped plaque, incorporating the medal, is 
individually engraved with the name of each 
of the 63 participating colleges and the 
year's winner. It is displayed on campus 
throughout the school year, acting as a. 
visual challenge and stimulus. 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



27 



New Loan Funds Established 

The late Myrtle T. Ehyne made a bequest 
to the X. C. Pharmaceutical Association in 
her Will in memory of her late husband, 
I Wayne Frank Ehyne. The bequest, amount- 
ing to $500, has been assigned to the Con- 
solidated Pharmacy Fund, specifically desig- 
nated as the "Wayne Frank Ehyne Phar- 
macy Student Loan Fund." 

Mr. Ehyne received his pharmacy license 
in 190!'. He made his home in Georgia for 
several years; served in WWI and estab- 
lished Ehyne's Drug Store (originally East 
Gastonia Pharmacy) in 1925. Today, the 
pharmacy is owned and operated by John 
Friday. 

Mr. Rhyne died January 21, 1959. The 
loan fund will serve as a permanent memorial 
in memory of this pharmacist who served 
his profession so well. 

Bishop Fund 

Another loan fund — The H. L. Bishop 
Pharmacy Student Loan Fund — has been 
established with a contribution by Balfour 
Brookshire of West Asheville. 



Mr. Bishop (known to his friends as 
"Cotton") died March 31 after a brief ill- 
ness. He and Mr. Brookshire were co- 
owners of the B & B Pharmacy of West 
Asheville. 

The Consolidated Fund 

The newly established "Consolidated Phar- 
macy Fund" will be a holding fund for loan 
and special funds. A pharmacy or a firm 
can establish a "named" loan fund for as 
little as $100. Loans to pharmacy students 
are non-interest and are repayable after 
graduation. 

Robert B. Hall of Mocksville has been ap- 
pointed chairman of the Consolidated Phar- 
macy Fund. He and his committee will em- 
bark on a fund-raising program during the 
coming months. 

Fuller Elected 

Edwin R. Fuller, a past president of the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 
and the Salisbury-Spencer Merchants Associ- 
ation, has been elected president of the 
Salisbury Lions Club. 




is A'Coxnrri In— 



Choose from our full stocks of 

Summer Merchandise and get your share 
of the Vacation and Leisure Time market. 



DISTRIBUTOS 

THE PEABODY DRUG COMPANY 

DURHAM. NORTH CAROLINA 




28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Montesanti Buys Second Pharmacy 

Joe Montesanti, Jr. is now the owner of 
two of the oldest pharmacies of Southern 
Pines; the Broad Street Pharmacy estab- 
lished in 1904 and the Southern Pines Phar- 
macy established in 1908. 

The new ownership arrangement was 
worked out during March after Mr. and Mrs. 
Graham Culbreth decided to sell the South- 
ern Pines Pharmacy, which they had 
operated since 1945. The sale of the phar- 
macy to Mr. Montesanti became effective on 
April 1. 

Both pharmacies will continue operating 
in their present locations, with no changes in 
personnel. Under the new ownership, Mr. 
Culbreth will be in charge of the prescrip- 
tion department of Southern Pines Phar- 
macy. 

Eemaining in the Southern Pines Phar- 
macy building but not included in the sale, 
and operating as an independent business, 
will be Mrs. Culbreth's surgical support 
service, which she established in 1958. 



Mutual Drug to Occupy 
New Building in October 

A 37,000 square foot, 1-story building will 
be erected in Durham to house the North 
Carolina Mutual Wholesale Drug Club, ac- 
cording to an announcement by D. L. Boone, 
Jr., treasurer and general manager of the 
wholesale drug firm. 

It is expected the building will be ready 
for occupancy by October. 

Fined $750 

Six pharmacists in the Charlotte area 
have been fined $750 each for dispensing 
legend drugs without proper authorization 
The action was brought by the Food & 
Drug Administration. 

The drugs involved included tranquilizers 
sedatives, barbiturates and antibiotics. Six 
to eight counts were filed against each of 
the defendants. 



THE HENRY B. GILPIN COMPANY 

Full Line, Full Service Wholesale Druggists Since 1845 
Baltimore • Dover • Norfolk • Washington 




Norfolk Division 

Equipped for fast, 

efficient wholesale drug 

service to the pharmacists of 

the eastern section of North Carolina 

6435 Tidewater Drive • Norfolk, Virginia • Madison 2-6361 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



29 



News from the Local Associations 



Alamance 

Robert Neal Watson, a member of the 
State Board of Pharmacy, was guest speaker 
at the April 18 meeting of the Alamance 
Pharmaceutical Society, held in Burlington. 

Mr. Watson, who was introduced by Jack 
G. Watts, discussed the new labeling regula- 
tion, which will be in effect after July 1. 

Other members of the State Board of 
Pharmacy present at the meeting were Roger 
McDuffie of Greensboro and H. C. Mc- 
Allister of Chapel Hill. Guests present in- 
cluded Claude Paoloni of Greensboro and 
H. E. and J. P. Lovett of Liberty. 

Millard Denson, president, presided over 
the meeting. J. Prank Sherard, a recent 
addition to the 50 Plus Club of the NCPA, 
was inducted as an honorary life member 
of the Society. 

Durham-Orange 

The senior class of the School of Phar- 
macy, University of North Carolina, were 
guests of the Durham-Orange Drug Club at 
a dinner at Schrafft's Country Inn on April 
26. 

I. T. Reamer, Chief pharmacist at Duke 
Hospital, and W. J. Smith, NCPA Executive 
Secretary, made brief talks. Reamer dis- 
cussed the hospital pharmacy internship pro- 
gram while Smith pointed out the advantages 
of affiliating and actively working with the 
local pharmaceutical societies. 

Including members and guests, approxi- 
mately 100 persons attended the dinner. 

Stroud Brewer, Bill Wells and W. J. 
Smith were selected to work out details of 
a club-sponsored picnic to be held during 

Wilmington 

Dean E. A. Brecht of the UNC School of 
Pharmacy was guest speaker at the April 
14 meeting of the Wilmington Drug Club. 
His topic was "Pharmaceutical Ethics." 

Dean Brecht was introduced by Carl Knox, 

a local representative of William S. Merrell 

Company. Assistant Dean Melvin Chambers 

also attended the meeting as a guest of the 

club. 

Northeastern 

A program presented by a representative 

of Lederle Laboratories highlighted the April 

18 meeting of the Northeastern Carolina 



Pharmaceutical Society, held in Williamston. 
A motion that the NCPA be asked to run 
a mail ballot vote on the labeling regulation 
of the State Board of Pharmacy resulted in 
a tie vote. The president of the Society, 
C. B. Clark, Jr., voted not to request such 
a mail ballot on the part of the State Asso- 
ciation. 

Cleveland County 

At the March 18 meeting of the Cleveland 
County Drug Association, held in Shelby, the 
organization voted to send a local newspaper 
representative on the NCPA-sponsored tour 
of Eli Lilly Laboratories. 

Ollie Harris, Cleveland County Coroner, 
was guest speaker. 

Forsyth Pharmaceutical 

The Annual Health Fields Golf Tourna- 
ment and Buffet Supper, sponsored by the 
Forsyth Pharmaceutical Society, was held 
on May 16 at Tanglewood near Winston- 
Salem. 

Co-sponsors for the event were Hart 
Laboratories, O'Hanlon-Watson Drug Com- 
pany and Justice Drug Company. Roger 
Sloop, Skeets - Benton, Floyd Carr and 
Charles Dixon were in charge of arrange- 
ments. 

$30,000 Grant to dr. Piantadosi 

Dr. Claude Piantadosi, a member of the 
teaching staff of the School of Pharmacy, 
University of North Carolina, has received 
a $30,538 research grant from the National 
Institute of Health for a 3-year basic re- 
search on ' ' The Synthesis and Enzymatic 
Study of Potential Anticancer Agents. ' ' 

According to Dr. Piantadosi, ' ' the synthe- 
sis of the compounds to be studied will yield 
valuable tools for further research on irre- 
versible enzyme inhibition. This will open a 
broad pathway for the creation of many 
compounds with potential antitumor action 
and with different properties and various 
spectra of action. ' ' 

The grant not only highlights the im- 
portance of the research activity now un- 
derway at the School of Pharmacy but 
reflects credit on and recognizes the out- 
standing research ability that Dr. Piantadosi 
has and is exhibiting in his work. 



30 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 






For seventy-seven years 
• • - since 1885 

Se-eMAH 

OF DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long asso- 
ciation with North Caro- 
lina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its forty- 
third volume, and the 
first printed copy wa9 
"Seeman Printed." 




The Seeman Printery 



of DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



PR Aids Available k£ 
irom Abbott 

Nearly 30 kinds of free or low-cost publi, 
relations and promotional aids for retai 
pharmacists are available from Abbott Labifc 
ratories to all pharmacies qualifying for thl 
company 's Beliable Prescriptions® and Pr<i 
scription Specialists® programs. 

' ' These materials help the pharmacist meet 
criticisms about prescription prices at thf. 
local level, and they assist him in promotin 
his professional pharmacy as the best plac 
to have prescriptions filled, ' ' said Joseph S 
Bowe, Manager of Abbott 's Drug Trade Dei 
partment. "They represent the most extei 
sive public relations program offered to th 
retailer by any pharmaceutical manun 
f acturer. ' ' 

Many of the completely new 1962 material 
emphasize the facts about prescriptio 
drugs : cost, quality, research. These theme 
are carried in laity leaflets that can b 
handed to or mailed to customers, mailing 
to physicians, newspaper advertisements am 
radio scripts. All these materials are frer 

For pharmacies desiring to coordinat 
advertising themes on book matches, deliver 
envelopes and labels, letterheads, envelope 
and sealing tape, these items are availabl 
at Abbott's cost. Free promotional material 
include special occasion cards, identificatioi 
badges, doorknob hangers and personal ta: 
record folders. 

All materials carry the individual phar 
macy's imprint. 

A kit illustrating all available items cai 
be seen by consulting the local Abbott repre 
sentative. 

Newport Pharmacy Incorporated 

A charter of incorporation has been issuec 
to Newport Pharmacy, Inc., Newport. 

Members of the board of directors an 
Seymour P. and Jane W. Eubin, Homer H> 
and Mabel A. Wellons, all of Havelock 
Authorized capital stock is $100,000, a thou- 
sand shares at $100 par value each. 

Personnel Changes 

Gary Stanley Cooper from Eutherford 
Drug Company to Lexington Drug Company 1 
Lexington. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 



Lilly Announces New 
Anti-Malignancy Drug 

From the periwinkle plant, already the 
source of a drug useful in generalized Hodg- 
kin 's disease, lias come a new agent (Vin- 
cristine) which in early clinical tests shows 
promising activity against a variety of 
malignancies. 

Preliminary reports on Vincristine were 
Submitted at the recent meeting of the 
American Association for Cancer Research, 
by representatives of a number of cancer 
research institutes and by Eli Lilly L \: 
Company. 

Currently, Lilly, in its cancer-screening 
program, is investigating 5 to 7.00(1 com- 
pounds annually. 

McAllister Installed As 
Chm. of House of Delegates 

At the recent meeting of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association, held at Las 
Vegas, H. C. McAllister of Chapel Hill was 
installed as chairman of the APhA House of 
Delegates (the Association's legislative and 
policy-making body) . 

Also, during the coming year, Mr. Mc- 
Allister will serve as a member of the Ameri- 
can Council on Pharmaceutical Education — 
the official accrediting agency for schools of 
pharmacy in the U.S. 

Colina Appears on Southeastern 
Hospital Program in New Orleans 

Gilbert Colina, Chief pharmacist at Char- 
lotte's Mercy Hospital, was a member of a 
panel discussion group on ''Legal Aspects of 
Drug Dispensing After Pharmacy Hours" 
at the April 25-27 meeting of the Southeast- 
ern Hospital Conference, New Orleans. 

Dr. Colina — he has an honorary degree 
awarded by Belmont Abbey — is a past presi- 
dent of the Southeastern Society of Hos- 
pital Pharmacists. 

Draw 1-Year Terms for 
Theft-Sale of Drugs 

Two Salisbury men have received one year 
prison sentences in Federal Court on charges 
of theft of drugs from the Salisbury VA 
hospital. 

E. E. Fulmer, a former medical service 
representative, was convicted of receiving 



the i hugs, knowing they were stolen; and 
.In lie Edward Siler, a former employee of 
the hospital, was convicted of taking the 
drugs from the pharmacy. 

According to testimony of agents of the 
FBI, an investigation started at the hos- 
pital early this year after some drugs were 
reported as missing. For a period of time, 
daily inventory of a selected list of drugs 
was maintained without knowledge of the 
employees of the hospital. On the basis of 
this inventory, it was determined that certain 
drugs were being taken on specified days. 

The FBI agents testified that Siler was 
observed taking the drugs from the hospital. 
According to Siler, the drugs were turned 
over to Fulnier, who later paid him about 
$350 to $400 from March 1960 to March 
1962. 

About 75 pharmacies normally visited by 
Fulnier were checked by agents of the FBI 
but no leads were uncovered. 

A number of character witnesses appeared 
for Fulmer and, on request for probation, 
the judge stated: "I just don't feel that 
the court can meet its responsibilities in a 
planned, deliberate theft of this type by im- 
posing probation. ' ' 



DISTINCTIVE -^^ 






W^^^ H 










perse 
home 

An 

box \ 

$ mi 

; E 


: ri*^f^^^^^ Carry ^o 
^^^^store's identity by color ar 
nalized copy right into your custome 
for the life of the Prescriptio 

other plus value of the modern pap 
with its clean fresh label. 

Representative: 

M. C. GRIER 

3 ANN ST.. AT. 3-3847 

Monroe. North Carolina 
• • • 

:. N. ROWELL CO., INC. 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 


it 
id 

rs 

n. 

er 



32 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 

• Charlotte — Mrs. C. H. Smith 

• Greensboro — Mrs. James M. Waugh 

• Winston-Salem — Mrs. Garland F. 

Benton, Jr. 

• Rowan-Davie — Mrs. A. E. Morris 

• Gaston — Mrs. Jack Friday 

• Alamance 

Rowan-Davie 

The Rowan-Davie Drug Auxiliary held its 
April luncheon meeting at the Chanticleer, 
with the president, Mrs. Paul Miller, presid- 
ing. The devotions ' ' Legend of the Dog- 
wood " was given by Mrs. Harold Kennedy. 

Mrs. Thomas E. Camp presented the pro- 
gram on Lesser Known Wild Flowers and 
stated that these were listed as "not to be 
picked. ' ' She gave a brief history of each 
flower and showed drawings done by Mrs. 
William Pence. 

Mrs. John H. Brown gave a report on the 
convention, stating that the Rowan-Davie 
Auxiliary was well represented. 

Mrs. Camp, chairman of the nominating 
committee, presented the slate of officers for 
the coming year. They were unanimously 
elected as follows : President, Mrs. John 
H. Brown; Vice-President, Mrs. Justin 
Uffinger; Secretary, Mrs. Harold Kennerly; 
Treasurer, Mrs. R. A. Kiser; Historian, Mrs. 
John Upchurch ; Advisor, Mrs. Paul Miller. 

Mrs. Robert Hoyle won the draw prize, 
with Mrs. Alvin E. Morris, Jr., and Mrs. 
E. D. Hoyle winning prize Easter eggs. 
Hostesses for the day were Mrs. Thomas B. 
Moore, Mrs. Henry Ridenhour, and Mrs. 
Uffinger. A visitor, Mrs Charles H. Klutz, 
arranged the tables. 

Charlotte 

The April meeting of the Charlotte 
Auxiliary was held at the C & C Cafeteria, 
and husbands were special guests. 



Mrs. A. K. Hardee, president, conducted 
the meeting, and the program chairman, 
Mrs. Ross L. Cooper, introduced the speaker. 
Mr. Charles Wickham of Merrill Lynch, 
Pierce, Fenner, and Smith, Inc., spoke on 
Stocks and Bonds. Formerly of Kinston, 
Mr. Wickham now resides in Charlotte where 
he is a member of Christ Church, director of 
the Charlotte Sportsman's Club, and vice- 
president of the Charlotte Tennis Associa- 
tion. 

Plans for attending the state convention 
were discussed by the members. 

Gaston Auxiliary 

The Gaston Pharmaceutical Auxiliary met 
on April 18 at the home of Mrs. S. J. Brown. 
Twelve members were present for the lunch- 
eon. 

Mrs. Richard Curtis gave the devotions. 
Highlights of the recent convention in 
Raleigh were given by members who attended 
the meeting. 

Guest speaker was Mrs. Lowell Jennings 
who had just returned from West Africa 
where she and her husband served three 
years as medical missionaries. 

Officers for the coming year were elected. 
They are: President, Mrs. Bill Forrest; 
Vice President, Mrs. Richard Curtis; Secre- 
tary, Mrs. Earl Williams; Treasurer, Mrs. 
Truman Hudson; Historian, Mrs. John O. 
McDonald; and Advisor, Mrs. Jack Friday. 

Mis. William H. Clifton, a new bridge, was 
a guest of the Auxiliary. Co-hostesses were 
Airs. S. J. Brown, Mrs. John Ameen and 
Mrs. Bill Medlin. 

Greensboro 

The Greensboro Drug Club Auxiliary 
varied its regular luncheon meeting on 
April :34th and met at the home of Mrs. 
Carroll C. Graham, where luncheon was 
served on the patio to the twenty-seven 
members present. 

President Doris Collins opened the busi- 
ness session, asking for reports from various 
committees. Ruby Graham, publicity chair- 
man, was asked to give a brief resume of the 
state convention. 

The nominating committee presented a 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



33 



ate of officers for the coming year. The 
lub elected the slate presented: Mrs. Lon 
I). Eussell, president; Mrs. M. B. McCurdy, 
lice-president ; Mrs. D. C. Dowdy, secretary; 
Mrs. R. L. Lane, Treasurer; Mrs. D. W. 
jlontgoinery, chaplain; Mrs. J. V. Farring- 
hn, historian ; Mrs. Ben F. Collins, Jr., Mrs. 
laude Paoloni, and Mrs. Carroll C. Graham, 
.dvisors. 

A guest at the luncheon was Mrs. McNeil, 
kother of Mrs. Lib Pickard. A special 
hank-you was extended to Mrs. William P. 
brewer and Mrs. Graham for serving as 
ostesses. 

Winston-Salem 

The Winston-Salem Apothecary Club held 
dinner meeting at the Womans' Club in 
onor of Mrs. Leslie Myers, retiring presi- 
lent of the Woman's Auxiliary of the N. C. 
Pharmaceutical Association. Mrs. Eoger 
Bloop presided and presented Mrs. Myers 
pith a gift of silver. 

i A short business meeting followed the 
{inner at which time new officers were 
dected as follows: President, Mrs. Garland 
Benton ; Vice-President, Mrs. Frank Lowder ; 
treasurer, Mrs. Bob Callahan; Secretary, 
drs. William Simmons. 

A treasurer's report was given, and it was 
lecided by the club that a donation of $50 
,)e made to the Lueile Rogers Scholarship 
?und and $50 to the Institute of Pharmacy. 
j Mrs. A. L. Fishel reported an opening 
late for a club tour of the Winston Winn- 



Dixie Store. All members not participating 
in the first tour were asked to come. 

Mrs. William Insch gave a report on the 
year book for next year, and plans for a 
more detailed discussion were to be made 
at the next meeting. 

Alamance 

Members of the Alamance Auxiliary 
journeyed to the Carolina Inn at Chapel Hill 
for their May meeting. After the luncheon, 
with Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Smith as hosts, a 
short business meeting was held, presided 
over by Mrs. David Hix, president. 

Election of officers for the new year was 
the primary business transacted. The slate 
of officers named by the Nominating Com- 
mittee Chairman, Mrs. C. A. Wharton, was 
unanimously elected as follows: President, 
Mrs. Sandy Griffin ; Vice-President, Mrs. 
Elmo McCorkle; Secretary, Mrs. Jack Watts; 
Treasurer, Mrs. George Dillard; Chaplain, 
Mrs. A. C. Sumner, Sr. ; Mrs. Peter Barbour. 



300 ATTEND AUXILIARY SESSIONS 
(Continued from page 23) 

B. Hall, TMA President Leon Kimball, and 
Mrs. Myers. During this report Mrs. Myers 
reported a membership for the new year of 
almost 700; she also reported on the Vivian 
Spradlin Smith and Lueile Swearngan Eogers 
Scholarship Funds, and the Woman's Auxil- 
iary Emergency Loan Fund. 



SMITH WHOLESALE DRUG CO. 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

A Young and Growing Service Wholesale House, 
Owned and Operated by Registered Pharmacists 



We Appreciate Your Business 



34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



III Pharmacy School Iotks 




A handsome display cabinet for the silver 
service collection of the School of Pharmacy 
has been received as a thoughtful gift from 
the Northeastern Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Society. The cabinet was made of solid 
oak by Calvin Burch of Chapel Hill who 
specializes in reproductions of antique furni- 
ture. 

Dr. Claude Piantadosi, associate professor 
of pharmaceutical chemistry, has received a 
three years research grant valued at $30,- 
000 from the National Institutes of Health 
on potential anticancer agents. Recently, 
Dr. Piantadosi was appointed as a member 
of the University Research Council. 

The American Foundation for Pharma- 
ceutical Education renewed graduate fellow- 
ships for 1962-63 to Carl T. Bauguess, Jr. 
for a major study in pharmacy and Allen F. 
Hirseh for a major study in pharmaceutical 
chemistry at the School of Pharmacy. The 
foundation also awarded a graduate fellow- 
ship to Edward M. Smith for a major study 
in pharmacy administration at the University 
of Alabama. 

Mr. Sami Hamarneh, Acting Curator, Di- 
vision of Medical Sciences, Smithsonian In- 
stitution, Washington, D. C, was a visitor at 
the School of Pharmacy on March 20. 



Great interest was shown in the archil! 
maintained by Miss Noble as research h 
torian and in the museum. 

The annual convention of the Americ 
Pharmaceutical Association, American I 
sociation of Colleges of Pharmacy, and I 
Rho Chi Society held at Las Vegas on Mar 
25-30 were attended by three faculty me ! 
bers: Assistant Dean M. A. Chambers, Pi! 
fessor James L. Brannon, and Profess 
Paul J. Wurdack and three undergradua 
students, John H. Myhre, Jerry Price, a? 
Lewis H. Stocks, III. Dr. Wurdack pi 
sented a paper on diagnostic agents. E 
Chambers served as official delegate for t 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Associate 
in the House of Delegates. He also p^ 
sented a paper before the historical sectii 
prepared by Alice Noble on the history 
the School of Pharmacy. 

Dr. James C. Kellett, Jr., assistant pr 
fessor of pharmaceutical chemistry, attend 
the meetings of the American Chemii 
Society in Washington, D. C, on Mar 
25-29. 

Dean E. A. Brecht took part 
program for careers in the health scienc 
sponsored by the auxiliary of the medic 
society at High Point on March 30. T' 
well-planned event was attended by 400 hij 
school students from the area. Pharmaci 
H. B. Leonard, Jr., represented the loc 
pharmacists. 

The annual convention of the North Car 
lina Pharmaceutical Association in Raleij 
on April 8-10 was attended by most of tl 
pharmacy faculty and graduating clas 
Reports were given by Dean E. A. Brecb 
Assistant Dean M. A. Chambers, and Pr 
fessor A. W. Jowdy. 

Dr. Claude Piantadosi attended the annu 
meeting of the Federated Societies 
Atlantic City April 13-19. 

Dean E. A. Brecht addressed the Wilmin 
ton Drug Club on April 14. He was a 
companied by Assistant Dean M. A. Char 
bers. 

John Agrippa Mitchener, III, and Bever 
Carol Thompson were initiated into t 



t 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 



Order of the Old Well in recognition and 
honor of campus service and accomplish- 
ment. 

Student Branches of the NCPA and APhA 

The meeting on April 17 was addressed by 
Dr. Thomas Gibson of the Cardiology De- 
partment of North Carolina Memorial Hos- 
pital. As a native of England he was well 
qualified to speak on the effect of the 
health acts and compare the practice of the 
health professions under socialized medicine 
with those in this country. John Myhre gave 
a brief report as delegate to the national 
convention of the student chapters at Las 
Vegas. 

Rho Chi 

Fourteen students were initiated into mem- 
bership in the Xi Chapter of Rho Chi, the 
national honor society in pharmacy, at a 
dinner meeting on April 17: Graduate stu- 
dents Bahram Farhadieh, Yoon Chin Kim, 
James K. Lim, and Vilhjalmur Skulasson; 
fourth year student William David Medlin of 
Durham; and third year students Malcolm 
Winston Burroughs of Wadesboro, Deane 
Bett Hughes of Hampton, Virginia, Marga- 
ret Jane MeCann of Mt. Airy, John Agrippa 
Mitchener, III, of Edenton, William Earl 
Patterson of Greenville, South Carolina, 
Meredith Gail Patton of Hickory, Billy 
Mac Smyre of Newton, Gary Martin Stamey 
of Asheville, and Lewis Henry Stocks, III, 
of Hookerton. Six members of the fourth 
year class were initiated into membership 
last year. The new initiates were introduced 
at the Student Branch meeting following 
the initiation. 

Kappa Psi 

Reported by Frank Freeman 

Beta Xi Chapter attended the N.C.P.A. 
convention held in Raleigh, North Carolina, 
on April 9 and 10. They gave a luncheon at 
Bailey 's Restaurant on Monday, April 9, for 
all active members and alumni. After the 
meal there was a discussion pertaining to the 
proposed new fraternity house for the chap- 
ter. The alumni were brought up to date 
on the plans made so far and were shown the 



architects' plans for the future structure. 
They were very enthusiastic and assured us 
of their support. Plans were started for a 
campaign designed to contact all other 
alumni possible. The brothers were very 
glad to have these alumni, and a good time, 
as well as a good meal enjoyed by all. 

The Kappa Psi's attended several of the 
festivities at the convention and learned a 
lot about pharmacy in North Carolina as 
it stands today. 

Phi Delta Chi 

George Walker Bender, fourth year student 
from Fayetteville, received the endowed Phi 
Delta Chi scholarship for improvement in 
scholarship for the spring semester. 

The Alpha Gamma Chapter of Phi Delta 
Chi held a dinner meeting at the S & W 
Cafeteria in Raleigh on April 9 for alumni 
attending the convention of the North Caro- 
lina Pharmaceutical Association. 

Historical Note 
By Alice Noble, Research Historian 

The School of Pharmacy Museum has been 
enriched recently by a gift of much value. 
It is a beautiful wooden mortar-and-pestle 
of some dark wood and highly polished. It 
is very handsome and different from any 
in our collection. The interesting relic of 
the days of long ago was presented to the 
Museum through the thoughtfulness and 
generosity of Norman Cheshire Cordon, Jr., 
L T .N.C. '26 of Chapel Hill, and belonged to 
his grandfather, Thomas Benbury Houghton. 
The mortar stands 7 inches high and is 6 
inches in diameter. Both the mortar and 
the pestle are in as perfect condition as 
they were when they were used by their 
original owner several years before the 
Civil War. 

Mr. Houghton was born on "Locust Grove 
Plantation," near Edenton, on November 
17, 1832. He studied pharmacy in Balti- 
more and later practiced the profession in 
eastern North Carolina — a part of the time 
in Edenton, presumably on Broad Street. 
It was during those days that he acquired 
and used daily the mortar and pestle now 

(Continued on page 37) 




0¥er 



ea?s or rroijress 



[?£ 




Ma Telephone 
M c telfsj%OfBQ(| Zj| 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



37 



UNC SCHOOL NOTES 

(Continued from page 35) 

a the pharmacy museum at the State Uni- 
ersity. 
It is not as a pharmacist, however, that 
ifr. Houghton is best remembered. After 
en years in the drug store he decided to 
tudy for the ministry and entered the 
piscopal Seminary in Alexandria, Va. 
Vith the outbreak of the War Between the 
tates, he volunteered and served as Chaplain 
hroughout the conflict with the 50th North 
larolina Regiment, Army of Northern Vir- 
inia. The date of his commission Avas 
Tanuary 26, 1862. When the War ended he 
ivas called to the rectorship of the Church of 
he Advent in Williamston, where he re- 
named until his death on November (or 
December) 28, 1894. 

I am indebted to W. S. Wolfe for locating 
ind adding to the archives invaluable data 
ibout the White Sulphur Springs in his 
lome town of Mount Airy. I have been 
fascinated always to hear my elders talk 
about their days at the Mount Airy 
springs; the beauty of the grounds; the 
[handsome hotel with its wonderful hospi- 
tality; and occasionally I found press stories 
•about this health resort. When I began my 



Carolina Camera 

(Pictures on opposite page) 

Top: The pre-Civil War mortar and pestle 
pictured is the subject of this month's 
"Historical Note" by Miss Alice Noble, 
| Research Historian. 

Bottom: N. 0. McDowell, Jr. used this 
i effective window display to contrast the new 
with the old — in this case, medicines and 
l telephones. It was a cooperative venture 
between McDowell's Pharmacy and the 
■ Carolina Telephone Company. 

Sulfur and molasses were displayed with 
! antibiotics ; the old fashioned crank-type 
phone with the latest compact model. A 
sign (not shown) pulled everything together 
with this statement: "Your Pharmacist's 
Services Are As Close As Your Telephone." 
The display created a great deal of 
favorable comment and attention. 



researches about our medicinal springs I was 
surprised that I could find practically 
nothing about the Mt. Airy White Sulphur. 
When Mr. Wolfe was in Chapel Hill a fe.v 
weeks ago I told him of my diligent and 
unsuccessful efforts to locate data about the 
springs in his town and of how important 
such information was for our records about 
medicinal springs. He wrote me almost 
immediately after his return home that he 
was locating material and in an incredibly 
short time the mail brought a wonderful 
collection of pictures of the hotel, the 
grounds, and several informative newspaper 
clippings of varying dates, etc. An entire 
morning was spent in classifying and filing 
the treasures. Of course, I included in the 
records a statement of appreciation to Mr. 
Wolfe not only for his helpfulness but also 
for the time and thought he had given to 
my request. 

Not long ago while searching through the 
files of the News and Observer for certain 
information, I came across an advertisement 
in the December, 1894 issue inserted by John 
Young McRae, "A famous druggist of 
Raleigh whose stand was on the N. W. 
corner of Martin and Wilmington Sts. ' ' 
Mr. McRae was licensed as a pharmacist in 
1881 and a charter member of the N.C.P.A., 
continuing his affiliation until he moved to 
Virginia in 1907. I thought the ad rather 
amusing — it certainly shows the difference 
between then-and-now publicity. Here is 
its text : ' ' Careful mixing prescriptions a 
beloved specialty. Dispensing cool and de- 
licious drinks a pleasant pastime. I am still 
in the ring — not a political or pugilistic 
ring but the ring of political and pharma- 
ceutical trade, I hold the belt." 



The 1963 NCPA CONVEN- 
TION will be held in Pinehurst, 
North Carolina. Headquarters 
will be at The Carolina Hotel. 



38 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Press Representatives to Visit Lilly 

Under sponsorship of the NCPA, a group 
of North Carolina newspaper representatives 
will visit the Laboratories of Eli Lilly & 
Company in June. Purpose of the visit is 
to familiarize members of the press with 
what goes into the manufacture of modern 
day drugs, from research to the finished 
product. 

Pharmacists and pharmaceutical organi- 
zations are sponsoring local members of the 
press, who will make the trip by chartered 
flight (Piedmont Airlines) from the Smith 
Reynolds Airport, Winston-Salem. 

Some of the papers to be represented are 
the Goldsboro News Argus, the Washington 
Bally News, the Gastonia Gazette, the 
Fayetteville Observer, the Salisbury Evening 
Post, the Lumberton Bobesonian, Lexington 
Dispatch, Baeford News- Journal, Whiteville 
News Beporter, Shelby Daily Star, States- 
ville Becord-Landmark, Northampton County 
Times-Neivs, Gates County Index, Bertie 
Ledger Advance and Hertford County 
Herald. 

Some additional space remains on the 



charter plane. If you desire your papei ; 
represented on this visit to one of thel 
world's largest pharmaceutical manufactur-1 
ing concerns, call the NCPA, Chapel Hilli 

To Tour Upjohn Company 

A special treat is in store for a group of J 
pharmacists, pharmacy owners and theirl 
wives on August 5-7, when they will tour thel 
research and manufacturing facilities of The] 
Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo, Michigan. 

The 3-day tour will originate and conclude! 
at the Smith Reynolds Airport, Winston-] 
Salem. The party will travel to Kalamazoo] 
by charter plane on Sunday afternoon,' 
August 5; will be guests of Upjohn until! 
Tuesday afternoon, August 7, when theli 
plane returns to Winston-Salem. 

For reservations, call the NCPA, Chapel) 
Hill. 

New Pharmaceuticals Drop 30% 
in 1961 

Introduction of new pharmaceuticals 
dropped 30% in 1961 as just 506 new] 
products were marketed compared with the; 
record-breaking 718 new items in 1960. 




crowd pleasers a la Lance! 




More people prefer and buy tasty Lance 
snacks than any other brand. And no wonder.. 
They're always fresh and there's 

a wide variety to choose from. 
Please your crowd. Display Lance. 



INC. Charlotte, North Carolina 




The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



39 




Jriday the 13th was a lucky day for the 
|G. Brooks, Jr. of Siler City ... it was the 
Eth date for their fourth child, Lisa, 
fcighing in at 9 lb. 1 oz. . . . Karen Lynn 
[ones, born Friday, April 27th, is the 
■ond child for Pharmacy Student William 
I Thames and Mrs. Thames. Karen 
nighed 5 lb. 11 oz. 

Marriages 

-Miss Alice Virginia Hogue, pharmacist at 
liling Springs Drug Company, and Broadus 
Irl Harris, were married April 15th at 
liling Springs. 

lApril 29th was the wedding date of Sarah 
In Butts and John Marshall Sasser. Mr. 
Isser is pharmacist at Creech's Pharmacy, 
lithneld. 

Deaths 
W. B. ENNETT 
tWilliam Borden Ennett, 35, Swansboro 
larmaeist, was fatally wounded on April 
I when the hook of a hanger in some clothes 
was loading in his car tripped the trigger 
a shotgun lying on the car seat. 
A graduate of the UNO School of Phar- 
acy (1955), Mr. Ennett had been employed 
various pharmacies in recent years, mainly 
Ahoskie and Jacksonville. Prior to em- 
oyment with a Haveloek pharmacy, where 
was working at the time of his death, he 
anaged Whiteley's Pharmacy of Morgan- 
n until the pharmacy was sold. 
Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Rose H. 
nnett; a son and a daughter. Burial was 
the family cemetery near Swansboro. 

L. I. GRANTHAM 
Lewis Irving Grantham, 78, retired phar- 
acist of St. Pauls, died April 26 following 
period of declining health. 
Mr. Grantham was a native of Smithfield. 
e attended Campbell College and Page's 
chool of Pharmacy. For many years, Mr. 
rantham operated the Grantham Drug 
ompany of St. Pauls. He was a charter 
lember of the St. Pauls Rotary Club and an 
der of the Presbyterian Church. 



Survivors include his wife and two daugh- 
ters. 

Parke, Davis & Company Names 

Robert M. Styles Field Manager 

Robert M. Styles recently was named a 
field manager in Parke, Davis & Company's 
Atlanta, Georgia Branch, according to N. L. 
Yarbrough, manager of U. S. sales opera- 
tions. 

In his new position, Styles will be head- 
quartered in Charlotte, N. C, where he will 
supervise the firm's pharmaceutical repre- 
sentatives in North Carolina. 

A navy veteran, Styles joined Parke- 
Davis 10 years ago in Atlanta, after receiving 
a Bachelor of Science degree from the Uni- 
versity of Georgia, and working in retail 
pharmacy. He is a native of Douglasville, 
Georgia. 

He resides with his wife and three children 
at 1026 Montford Drive, Charlotte. 

Parke-Davis' Atlanta Branch serves North 
Carolina, South Carolina, most of Alabama, 
Florida, and Georgia, and a part of Tennes- 
see. G. F. Johnson is manager of the 
Branch. 



STROTHER 
DRUG COMPANY 

of Richmond, Inc. 

3700 Saunders Avenue 

POWERS-TAYLOR DRUG CO. 

Richmond, Va. 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 

Full Line 

Full Service 

Member of 
Druggists Service Co. 

National Wholesale 
Druggists Association 

For Best Service Call Us 

Collect 

353-2771 

After Hours Call 
353-2777 



40 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

This space available at 1 0^ per word; mini- 
mum of $3.00. Box numbers assigned and 
replies forwarded to advertiser upon re- 
quest. Mail copy and payment to Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy, Box 151, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 



BALANCES — Prescription balances repaired. 
Contact Phipps & Bird, Inc., P. O. Box 2V, 
Richmond 5, Virginia. Telephone Ml 4-5401. 

FOR SALE — Remington's Practice of Phar- 
macy, 12th Edition. (1961). 1,866 pages. 
Price $22.50. Available from NCPA, Box 
151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

FOR SALE — Small drug store, stock of drugs, 
fixtures and fountain (comparatively new); 
an excellent opportunity for a young licensed 
pharmacist to own his pharmacy in a fast- 
growing town. Price and terms can be ar- 
ranged. Lease available at a reasonable 
price, or can be rented by the month. This 
pharmacy has always been a profitable 
operation. Reason for sale: Owner will soon 
be 80 years of age. JHSS-5, c/o Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy, Box 151, Chapel Hill, 
N. C. 



Asheville — A $200,000 building permit for 
a 250 by 120 foot concrete block warehouse 
and office building has been issued to the 
Dr. T. C. Smith Company. 

Wallace — Fred Hawkins, SKF medical 
service representative, with headquarters in 
Chapel Hill, was guest speaker at a recent 
meeting of the Wallace Lions Club. The 
speaker was introduced by Dr. Deane 
Hundley. 

Sylva — Formal opening of the new East- 
gate Pharmacy was observed on April 20. 
The pharmacy, located adjacent to the 



Doctors Building on the Waynesville Higl 
way, is operated by Pharmacist Leo Cowai 
Concord — Eudy Hardy of Cabarrus Mean 
rial Hospital Pharmacy was guest speaker a 
the May 6 evening service of the Eoyal Oak 
Methodist Church. 

Clinton — Eugene Graves, a former en: 
ployee of a Dunn drug store, has bee: 
sentenced to a 6-month jail term for ud 
lawfully obtaining drugs from the Newto: 
Grove Drug Company and for attempting 1 
do so at the Hospital Pharmacy of Clinton 

Benson — Franklin E. Wells, formerly man 
ager of Kerr Drugs located in the Ridgewoo< 
Shopping Center of Ealeigh, has joined J. I 
Warren in the operation of Warren Druf 
Company. The pharmacy has been incori 
porated with Wells as a part owner. 

Rockingham — An unusual plant with H 
foot runners gracing the walls of the Foj 
Drug Company was the subject of a news 
story in the Richmond County Journal, Maj 
2 issue. It has been suggested the plant i' 
getting some extra special drug store vitai 
mins with its plant food. 

Mebane — The Carolina Rexall Drug Store 
owned and operated by James S. White, ha^ 
placed first in sales and service of 179 Rexal 
drug stores of North Carolina. The Dunn 
Pharmacy of Dunn ranked 10th in sales. 

Hendersonville — Justus Pharmacy is act- 
ing as a collection point for empty cigarette 
packages manufactured by Liggett and 
Myers. The company will "buy" the emptjj 
packages at a penny each with the funds 
going to the Western Carolina College fod 
scholarships. 

Morehead City — Douglas J. Odom, sales 
representative for the past 22 years for 
Powers-Taylor and Strother Drug, is a can- 
didate for office of justice of the peacej 
Morehead township. 

Durham — Warren C. Sharpe has been 
named manager of Walgreens Drug Store. 
He succeeds Edward R. Barlow, who has] 
transferred to the Raleigh unit of Wal-j 
greens. 

Fayetteville — The pharmacy permit of 
K & F Drug Store has been reinstated by the! 
State Board of Pharmacy. T. L. Brodie con- 
tinues in charge of the pharmacy department. 



e 



f 


LS^H 


7/[\ 


I 


^ 




j= 




\Td 


** 


a 


£\) // 



Get your share 
of the 
Vacation Market 



FIRST AID & HEALTH... SWIMMING ACCESSORIES... 
HAIR NEEDS... PICNIC & BEACH SUPPLIES... 
CAMERAS, FLASH BULBS & FILMS... BABY NEEDS.. 
SUN TAN PREPARATIONS... TOILETRIES 
& COSMETICS... SUN GLASSES 




M^l 



check your stocks of these product categories 
and ask our salesman 



lohipum 



OWENS, U 
Km ItI 



INOR & 



e>ie 




ODEKER 



1010 Herring Avenue, Wilson, North Carolina 




yesterday's knowledge . . . today's result 

The so-called modern home conveniences that we have come to accept as everyda\ 
necessities are the result of engineering progress. Likewise, in the field of pharmaceuticals 
economical present-day therapeutic agents are the result of many years of scientific research 
clinical study, and mass-production facilities. V-Cillin K^ (penicillin V potassium, Lilly) 
one example of this achievement, is a tremendous improvement over the initial form | 
penicillin which was discovered over twenty years ago. 

For quick, competent service, send your orders for V-Cillin K and other high-quality 
Lilly products to us. 



WE ARE A 



DISTRIBUTORS 



The W. H. King Drug Company 

"The House of Friendly and Dependable Service" 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

AND ITS ASSOCIATES 

O'Hanlon-Watson Drug Company 
winston-salem, n. c. 
Bellamy Drug Company King Drug Company Peabody Drug Company 
wilmington. n. c. florence, s. c. durham, n. c. 




l \z~} 



*s*r 4 



rrSL 




URPH 



^ 




'he Carolina JqURNAL OF PHARMACY 

Volume XLIII JUNE, 1962 Number 6 




Summer calls 

for SURFADIL 



(cyclomethycaine and methapyrilene, Lilly) 



When your customers are plagued with 
summertime skin problems, you can turn 
their frowns to smiles with Lotion Surfadil. 

Surfadil is an effective, rapid-acting com- 
bination of a soothing anesthetic and a 
potent antihistamine plus a protective ad- 



sorbent. It stops minor pain and itchiM 
almost instantly and helps prevent furtnjj 
sunburn with its special sunscreen ingll 
client, titanium dioxide. 

Suggest Surfadil to your customers— yoll 
build friendships as well as sales. 

Available in 75-cc. spillproof plastic cc- 
tainers in appealing counter-display c;- 
tons of ten bottles. 



Put Surfadil (Lotion No. 
M-64) on your want list now. 



Eli Lilly and Company • Indianapolis 6, Indiana, U.S. 



LOOK WHAT'S COMING ! ! ! 

MARK YOUR CALENDAR NOW! 

THREE BIG DAYS 
SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY 
AUGUST 12th, 13th, 14th 
HOURS 2:00 P.M. TO 9:00 P.M. 

THE SIXTH ANNUAL JUSTICE HOLIDAY GIFT SHOW 
IN THE SHOWROOM AT JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY. 

DINNER EACH DAY 6:00 P.M. TO 7:00 P.M. 

This will be your opportunity to shop and prepare for your Holi- 
day trade. Let your Justice representative know which day you 
prefer to visit the Show. We shall be looking for you. 

AIR-CONDITIONED 
FREE PARKING 
DOOR PRIZES 

GRAND PRIZES 




// Is Good Business for You to Support Your Full-Line, 
Full-Service Wholesaler in Every Way You Can! 

Member NWDA Wholesaler Member DSC Wholesaler 

JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 

Greensboro, N. C. 
64 Years of Service to North Carolina Retail Druggists 




Boss: Don't look now but I think we 
are being followed. 

Charlie: ?f BC" has what it takes to make 
it a leader. 



America's Fastest-Selling 
Headache Powder 

. . . and r(, J5C" Tablets in 
the new red, white and blue 
bottles and cartons are 
gaining new customers 
every day 




headache 
neuralgia 



B.C. REMEDY CO. Durham, north Carolina 

Made and sold in North Carolina for over 50 years 



The House of Friendly Service 




Scott Jbtug Company, 



Service Wholesalers Since 1891 



ANNOUNCING 





SUSPENSION 



A new medical preparation for the treatment of dandruff —afforded 
95% control of dry or oily dandruff symptoms in 714 cases studied 



What is loquin? Ioquin is a non- 
toxic suspension of 10% w/v di- 
iodohydroxyquin (U.S. P.) in an 
aqueous base pleasantly scented 
with lavender. It washes hair 
clean, as it effectively controls 
dandruff. 

How Effective is loquin? In clini- 
cal trials, loquin produced satis- 
factory control in more than 95% 
of 714 patients studied. The pa- 
tients were about evenly divided 
between men and women, and 
patients ranged in age from two 
months to eighty years. 

How Safe is loquin? The investiga- 
tors found loquin to be extremely 
well tolerated . . . even by patients 
treated regularly over a period of 
several months. However, some 
patients may be sensitive to the in- 
gredients in loquin. And patients 
with known iodine sensitivity 
should use loquin with caution. 
How do you use loquin? Treat- 
ment with loquin is a simple wash 
and rinse procedure. Most cases 
of simple dandruff can be brought 



under control in two to three 
weeks and kept under control 
with weekly applications (some 
cases are controlled with even less 
frequent applications). 
What are the Indications? loquin 
is indicated for the treatment of 
mild or severe seborrheic derma- 
titis . . . and is equally effective for 
dry or oily types of seborrhea. 
How is loquin Supplied? loquin is 
supplied in 115-ml. (4 fl.oz.) green 
plastic squeeze bottles. Handy for 
the shower. List No. 6907. 

In Summary . . . loquin is an ef- 
fective new preparation for the 
treatment of common dandruff, 
including difficult and long-stand- 
ing cases. It has been shown to 
be safe and effective in clinical 
trials. It is a professional product 
in every sense of the word. It will 
be detailed to physicians and sold 
through the drug trade only. For 
complete details, see your Abbott 
man, or drop us a line... 
we'll be happy to send 
you the literature. 2 o 52 3 9 




The Carolina 

JOURNAL op PHARMACY 



June, 1962 

Vol. xliii Xo. 6 

• 

Officers 

NOETH CAEOLINA 

PHAEMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

• 
President 

John T. Stevenson 
Elizabeth City 

• 

Vice-Presidents 

Hot A. Moose 
Mount Pleasant 

Harry A. Barringer 
Concord 

W. T. Boone 

Ahoskie 



Secretary-Treasurer 

Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Assistant 

Secretary-Treasurer 

C. M. Andrews 

Burlington 



General Counsel 

P. 0. Bowman 

Chapel Hill 



ADVERTISING RX LEGEND 
DRUGS TO THE PUBLIC 

In the absence of an effective statute or administrative 
regulation in North Carolina prohibiting the advertising of 
prescription drugs to the public, the Judicial Council of the 
NCPA has listed this practice as being a violation of the 
Association 's Code of Ethics. 

A recent hearing by one of the District Judicial Councils 
directed attention to this practice. While most pharmacists 
readily recognize the necessity for control over the legend 
drugs, some commercial interests with investments in Phar- 
macy do not readily understand why such drugs should not 
be pushed through public promotion nor do they understand 
why such aggressive merchandising be considered a violation 
of any code of ethics. 

The A.Ph.A. has just released a special communication in 
this area. Commenting on the exploitation of prescription 
legend drugs to the public, the A.Ph.A. says this practice 
leads to increased risk of misuse of the drugs by laity. 
"Stimulated demand for any dangerous drug markedly in- 
creases the risks of misuse and consequent harm. Further- 
more, improper supervision increases the opportunities for 
unsupervised, self-dosing by the public as well as opportuni- 
ties for illicit traffic in such articles." 

Concluding, the A.Ph.A. says "the public needs the help 
of reasonable but strong legislation to protect itself and to 
protect reputable pharmacists from dishonest, unprofessional 
or shortsighted commercial interest. ' ' Until such time as 
legislation is enacted in North Carolina, The Judicial 
Council of the NCPA proposes to act within the framework 
of the Association's code of ethics on the practice of ad- 
vertising pharmaceutical preparations that are available to 
the public only on prescription. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Entered as 
second class matter July 5, 1922 at the post office at Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 






Ben Collins Elected 

Ben Collins has been elected president of 
the Greensboro Drug Club succeeding Claude 
Paoloni. 

Other officers named at a meeting of the 
club held in Greensboro on May 17 are 
Carroll Graham, vice president ; Thomas 
Yost, secretary; and Jack Ranzenhofer, 
treasurer. 

Serving on the board of directors will be 
Dave Clay tor, Stephen Forrest, Walter 
Hendrix, Al Mebane and Claude Paoloni. 

Guest speaker was Robert Neal Watson of 
Sanford, a member of the State Board of 
Pha rmacy. 

200 Attend Winston-Salem Event 

More than 200 persons attended the Health 
Fields Golf Tournament and buffet supper 
in Winston-Salem on May 16. 

Sponsors were the Forsyth Pharmaceutical 
Society, Hart Labs., O'Hanlon-Watson and 
Justice Drug companies. 



Fire Destroys Taylor Drug 

One of the most destructive fires in Siler 
City's history destroyed the Taylor Drug 
Store on May 6. 

In addition to the drug store, all offices 
on the second floor of the two-story building 
were lost. The building and part of con- 
tents were covered by insurance. 

The prescription files were saved and taken 
to the Chatham Drug Company, a pharmacy 
owned by the same corporation which con- 
trolled the Taylor Drug Store. 



Henry H. Dunlap was pharmacist-managl 
of Taylor's and will now serve in a similjj 
capacity at Chatham Drug. 



Up-Front Merchandise 
Subject of Club Program 

Zaek Lyon, manager of Peabody Dru 
Company, Durham, was guest speaker at I 
June 4 meeting of The Durham-Orange Druj 
Olub. Title of his illustrated talk was "Tl 
Future Role of the Druggist in the Sale c 
Up-Front Merchandise." 

Plans for a club-sponsored family picnil 
were announced by Bill Wells. 

George Harris, president, presided at tr 
meeting, which was held at Harvey's Cafi 
teria, Durham. 




Caught from Sam Jenkins' fish pond whi 
Sam was absent. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 

WANTED: Pharmacist to operate Drug Store in Knightdale, N. C. 
Located 10 miles east of Raleigh in thickly populated community. 
Building and assistance available. The town has a Medical Center 
with both a Medical Doctor and a Dentist. There is no other drug 
store in this Community. 

G. L. WALL 

T931 New Bern Avenue 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone TE3-1706 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Pharmaceutical Marketing: Today and 

Tomorrow 

By W. J. Wishing, Division Sales Manager, Washington Divisional Sales Office 
Smith Kline 4r French Laboratories 



My subject is "Pharmaceutical Market- 
ing: Today and Tomorrow," and it's a 
tough one. I suppose no one minds very 
much talking about the present, but proph- 
esying the future — especially the future 
jof pharmaceutical marketing — has its share 
of booby traps. 

Josh Billings, the nineteenth century Will 
Rogers, summed up the matter this way: 
l" Don't never prophesy, for if you prophesy 
wrong, nobody will forget it, and if you 
prophesy right, nobody will remember it." 
' The way to attack this subject, it seems 
to me, is to begin by looking at the trends of 
the past. I will try to summarize these 
trends first. Then the next step is to ex- 
amine present developments — and I'll also 
try to do this. Finally, I'll attempt to 
project past trends into the future. 

The first point that strikes me when 
looking at the past is the enormous increase 
during the past ten years in the number of 
prescriptions filled by pharmacists. This 
number has risen 74 per cent in ten years — 
from 400 million in 1950 to 700 million in 
1960. 

Between 1958 and 1960 alone, total 
prescription volume in dollars rose from 
$1.7 billion to more than $2 billion — an 
increase of more than 14 per cent. 

From these two facts, it is clear that the 
trend in prescription writing has been defi- 
nitely upward. 

Another important trend is the ratio of 
refills to total prescriptions. Since 1948, 
this refill ratio has climbed from 41 per 
cent to within sight of the 50 per cent 
mark. Many people believe that this trend 
is one of the most significant ones in the 
industry. They say it is evidence of the 
growing importance in prescription depart- 
ment operations of "maintenance" drugs, 
which are used in chronic ailments. 



A Feature Address of the 1962 NCPA 
Convention. 



The rise in the number of prescriptions 
filled, in the dollar volume and in refills 
has been accompanied by a rise in the cost 
of producing pharmaceuticals. And, of 
course, there has also been an increase in 
the average retail price of drugs. 

Let me give you the figures. In the past 
ten years, the index for all medical care 
prices rose 44.8 per cent. The price index 
for all commodities and services climbed 15.4 
per cent. Prices for prescriptions and other 
drugs rose only 13.5 per cent. 

In other words, drug prices have risen 
less than all other commodities and services 
and one-third as much as all other medical 
care items. As a matter of fact, drug prices 
as reflected in the Consumer Price Index 
have actually declined slightly during the 
past year and a half. 

Finally, there is one more trend that 

analysts of the industry say is important — - 

the number of new prescriptions written 

each year. The trend in these has been 

(Continued on page 11) 




William J. Wishing 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Pharmacist of the Year 




Thomas J. Ham, Jr. of Yaneeyville, a past presi- 
dent of the NCPA and The Dixie Sunrisers 
(NARD), will be honored as "Pharmacist of the 
Year" at a testimonial dinner in Yaneeyville on 
July 25. 

A graduate of the Medical College of Virginia 
(Ph.G.), Mr. Ham has been closely identified with 
the progress of Yaneeyville and Caswell County 
for the past forty years. His record with the 
NCPA is well known ; he headed a successful 
campaign to erect and equip the Institute of) 
Pharmacy; now seeks a $50,000 endowment fund 
for the NCPA-Institute. 

Details of the forthcoming "Pharmacist of the 
Year ' ' dinner have been released in The Tar Heel 

Digest. 



Thomas J. Ham, Jr. 



THE HENRY B. GILPIN COMPANY 

Full Line, Full Service Wholesale Druggists Since 1845 
Baltimore • Dover • Norfolk • Washington 





3 ; ' : ~. 

Norfolk Division 

Equipped for fast, 

efficient wholesale drug 

service to the pharmacists of 

the eastern section of North Carolina 

6435 Tidewater Drive • Norfolk, Virginia • Madison 2-6361 



ready for 

SUN n Si 



for sun-strained eyes 

COLLYRIUM 

LOTION DROPS 

ideal booster for summer sales 





this COLLYRIUM 
counter display 
brings profits up to... 

you buy 

116 units 

60 units 
'21 units 

11 units 

COLLYRIUM LOTION 

Bottles of 4 ft. oz. with eyecup 
Bottles of 7 fl. oz. with eyecup 

COLLYRIUM EPHEDR1NE 
EYE DROPS 

Plastic squeeze bottles 

of 4 fl. drams .33 

Sorry, no assortments 

"Based on minimum direct order. 




Wyeth Laboratories 
Philadelphia 1, Pa. 



It's a helluva 
long way to Kokomo 



The last wholesaler went out of business April 9. 

Almost 50,000 retail drug stores now buy direct 
— direct from manufacturers in New York, 
Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas. ..and Kokomo. All 
of a sudden time and distance are becoming 
important. So are other things. 

Freight rates are a real problem so you buy 
prepaid shipments. In some cases you have to. 
You can't sell salt but the guy who sells you 
salt. ..WOW! 

Your inventory has reached its highest peak. 
But still you keep losing sales. You run out of a 
style you can't get fast. You run out of a size you 
can't get fast. You run out of a color. 

You become bogged down in the biggest, most 
confusing maze of bookkeeping you ever saw. 
Hundreds and hundreds of invoices. 

You find yourself spending more and more time 
corresponding with credit managers you don't 
know. They want payment right on the button . . . 
before needed reorders will be shipped. 

You aren't getting important and valuable 



information your wholesaler's salesman used to 
give you. Little unimportant things that added all 
together are big important things. Things that 
keep you competitive. The list goes on — and you 
know it . 

But something new is happening — The Magic 
Pipeline is gone! The manufacturer's cost of doing 
business is skyrocketing. Thousands of invoices! 
Thousands of smaller shipments! Heavier freight 
costs! Something had to give and it did! Your 
discount. The big 40% or 45% or 50% had to go 
and you lost everything you gained! 

The facts of life remain the facts of life. You 
can eliminate the wholesaler, but you can't elimi- 
nate his function. "It's a helluva long way to 
Kokomo." 

(Aren't you glad that everything here is just 
fantasy and that you can keep it that way.) 

Let the manufacturer manufacture in Kokomo 
and everywhere else. Buy everything you can 
from the expert in your business. Buy direct from 
your wholesaler. The business you save may be 
your own! 



SEA & SKI COMPANY 



Reno, Nevada 



Reprinted with Permission by 

JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



'North Carolina Service Wholesaler 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



PHARMACEUTICAL MARKETING 

(Continued from page 7) 

steadily moving upward for many years. 
But — and please note this — in 1960 the 
number of new prescriptions written by the 
average U. S. physician dropped abruptly 
from 2,551,000 to 2,384,000— a decrease of 
6.5 per cent. 

This fact leads me to talk about the 
present. 

Why did physicians write fewer new 
prescriptions in 1960? (The figures for 
1961, by the way, aren't available yet.) 
An understanding of this statistic may give 
us some insight into problems of pharma- 
ceutical marketing today. It may also give 
us an idea of what to expect in the future. 

American Druggist had this to say about 
the drop in new prescriptions: 

"While all the data turned up by Ameri- 
can Druggist's 1960 prescription survey are 
important the figures relating to the number 
of prescriptions written by the average 
physician are particularly significant — be- 
cause they measure the reaction of the 
physician ... to the unprecedented atten- 
tion which prescription drugs got in the 
news during 1960. 

"Because the Kefauver hearings and the 
news coverage they got cast doubts on the 
reasonableness of prescription prices — and 
on the efficacy of many Bx products — the 
typical physician reached for his pen and his 
pad of Bx blanks less frequently last year 
than he would have if the hearings had never 
taken place.' ' 

I am sure most of you are familiar with 
what took place during the hearings before 
Senator Kefauver 's Antitrust and Monopoly 
Subcommittee. As a result of these hear- 
ings, the Kefauver-Celler Bill was proposed. 
This Bill has now been referred to the 
Subcommittee on Patents, Trademarks and 
Copyright for consideration of its patent 
provisions. It is still a threat. 

There is little doubt in the minds of 
most of us that this proposed legislation 
would be detrimental to the industry. Its 
patent provisions certainly would take away 
much of the incentive for research. It is 
hard to believe that so obviously discrimina- 
tory a bill could get through Congress. But 



even if it does not, the hearings have had 
serious fallout. 

So far as the manufacturer is concerned, 
there have been changes in regulations that 
will increase the cost of doing business. 
Some of these regulations seem impractical. 
One of them make it necessary for the manu- 
facturer to enclose in all commercial pack- 
ages a brochure covering all the actions and 
reactions to be expected from a product. 
This same information has always been 
included in our promotional material to both 
pharmacists and physicians, whether dis- 
tributed by direct mail or left by a detail 
man. We also distribute a product book 
giving complete information on our line. 

The hearings have also stirred up agita- 
tion, on the part of some, to encourage 
doctors to prescribe generically. I be- 
lieve most of us are convinced that there is 
a great deal of danger in prescribing potent 
drugs on a generic-name basis. Each manu- 
facturer 's product may work somewhat 
differently from another so far as absorption 
and efficacy are concerned even though both 
may meet United States Pharmacopeia stand- 
ards. Extensive studies have repeatedly 
shown this to be a fact. 

American Druggist points out that public- 
ity from the hearings may have affected re- 
tail pharmacists in another way: 

Only the fact that the total number of 
doctors in private practice increased last 
year — and the fact that the number of re- 
fills also increased — kept retail pharmacy 
from showing an overall loss in the total 
number of Bxs filled. As it was, the pro- 
fession eked out only a 1 per cent gain over 
1959, compared with a 7.9 per cent rise for 
1959 over 1958. 

So far I have mentioned only a few cur- 
rent developments. There are others. E. B. 
Weiss, Vice President of Doyle Dane Bern- 
bach Advertising Agency, mentioned some 
of these in a talk before the American Phar- 
maceutical Association Convention last year. 
Mr. Weiss is a specialist on Pharmaceutical 
Advertising. 

Here is a condensed version of his list : 

1. Labor union drug stores 

2. Mail-order drug sales 

(Continued on page 13) 




The right formula for your 
prescription department ! 



a 




The prescription department is the professional center of your store and should dominate 
all other departments. Dramatic lighting found in "Key Lumilite Rx Canopies" focus the 
shopper's attention on your Rx department and at the same time provides excellent 
lighting for compounding your prescriptions. 

Ask for our layout engineer services 



Clip Coupon and Mail 



We are planning to 

□ Expand □ Modernize □ Build 

New 
Store 

Name 

Firm Name 

Street Address 

City 

State 




GRANT E. KEY, INC 

Man ufacturers 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



13 



PHARMACEUTICAL MARKETING 

(Continued from Page 11) 

3. Competition of the hospital clinic phar- 
macy. 

4. Pood chains buying up drug chains. 

5. Discount chains putting in drug de- 
partments. 

6. New chains of low margin drug outlets. 

7. Group medical centers, with pharmacy 
services. 

8. In-home drug selling. 

9. Sales of over-the-counter products by 
general retailers. 

Mr. Weiss remarks : ' ' Not all are low- 
margin competitors. But most are low- 
margin, or do a mighty convincing job of 
persuading the public that they are low- 
margin. All of them in total pose new 
competition for the traditional drug outlet 
on a scale such as you never have had to 
contend with before. ' ' 

It 's pretty clear, I think, that changes are 
taking place in the world of pharmacy. 
There is one other tendency that I have not 
so far mentioned — severe price competition. 

One of the most significant facts about 
prescription prices in 1960 is that for the 
second year in a row the average price was 
lower in chain drug stores than in inde- 
pendents. 

In 1959, the chain average was 1 cent 
below the independent; in 1960, it was 3 
cents below. 

Por many years in the past, the average 
chain price had traditionally been a little 
higher than the independent average — prob- 
ably because the chains tend to do con- 
siderable business with the more expensive 
medications for which people "shop." 

American Druggist has expressed the 
opinion that the average price in chains is 
dropping because chains have decided to 
fight the new prescription ' ' discounters. ' ' 

The growth of the discounters has ap- 
parently caused chain drug executives to re- 
examine traditional prescription pricing 
practices. In the past, pricing has been 
based on identical margins applied to all 
medications. Such pricing, the chains are 
finding, gives the discounter a chance to 
pose as a benefactor of the public, especially 
when pricing the more expensive drugs. 

It is also worth noting that between 



1958 and 1960, the number of chain drug 
units increased from 3,751 to 4,044 — a gain 
of 7.8 per cent. The number of independents 
dropped 1 per cent in the same period. 

These are the highlights of the present. 
What about the future? 

In January, the President of Smith Kline 
& French addressed financial analysts in 
New York. As you know, financial analysts 
are a pretty shrewd group. They always 
want to know what we think is going to 
happen in the future. President Munns out- 
lined four principal problems that, in his 
judgment, will face the pharmaceutical in- 
dustry in the years ahead. Here is what he 
said: 

' ' It does not take much crystal-gazing to 
foresee that the road ahead has a few 
sharp turns. I think the drug industry can 
expect some rough spots, which I would group 
under four general headings. ' ' 

' ' First, research will become more com- 
plex. Second, the cost of doing business will 
rise. Third, marketing will become more 
exacting. Fourth — but far from least — 
government regulations will become more 
burdensome. ' ' 

Now, your first reaction may be that these 
are headaches of the pharmaceutical manu- 
facturer alone, and that they have only 
marginal relevance for the wholesaler and 
the retailer. But I doubt if that is the case. 

Let's think about these trends for a 
moment. 

If research becomes more complex — and 
if the government continues to make it 
difficult to get new products on the market — 
the result will obviously be fewer new 
products. Fewer new products probably 
means fewer new prescriptions and more 
emphasis on refills. This problem could well 
lead to a slowdown in the upward trend of 
prescription writing. 

But on the positive side, we can expect a 
growing demand for useful medicines stimu- 
lated in part by a rising standard of living. 

The national birthrate remained level in 
1960 instead of going up as expected. We 
can't count on the so-called population 
explosion to help prescription drug sales very 
much. Most of this explosion is taking 
place in other parts of the world. It is true, 

(Continued on page 15) 





ONLY A FEW DAYS BETWEEN SODAS 

You see it happening to youngsters time after time — one day ill with 
fever, sore throat, chest pains ... a short time later back at your store 
working on ice cream sodas. And almost always it is an antibiotic that 
turns the trick— Terramycin Syrup, for example. 

For you, of course, these triumphs of modern drug therapy are nothing 
new. You know that the rapid recovery of these children, with less worry 
and economic strain for parents, follows a pattern that has become almost 
commonplace with the availability of modern antibiotics. You can remem- 
ber when recovery itself was more uncertain, convalescence more extended, 
cost and care more burdensome. Do all of your customers appreciate the 
significance of these advances? 

IcrralTiyCin oxytetracycline with glucosamine I full product information 

ABOUT THE VARIOUS DOSAGE FORMS OF TERRAMYCIN IS AVAILABLE IN BLUE BOOK, RED BOOK, 
IN THE PRODUCT BROCHURES ENCLOSED IN PACKAGES, AND FROM YOUR PFIZER REPRESENTATIVE. 

Science for the world's well-being- Pjizer) 
PFIZER LABORATORIES Division, Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc. New York 17, N. Y. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 



PHARMACEUTICAL MARKETING 

(Continued from page 13) 

however, that people are living longer and 
the total population is increasing. 

Despite the complexity of future research, 
the technical know-how of the American drug 
industry will, I believe, be quite able to cope 
with it. There is really no reason, therefore, 
why the achievements of the past should not 
be matched by equally remarkable discover- 
ies in the future. 

Just consider one big possibility — new 
dosage forms. One of the problems now 
with dosage forms is to find a way of 
getting drugs through the barrier of the 
gastrointestinal mucosa. Many drugs must 
be taken by injection today because they are 
either not readily absorbed in the intestinal 
tract or else because the body's chemicals 
break down or change the substance before 
it can act. 

New dosage forms may be evolved to 
solve these problems. If they are, we may 
expect to see a whole new armamentarium of 
products, many of them new forms of drugs 
now on the market. 

I don't feel, therefore, that we need to be 
unduly pessimistic about the possibility of 
new products. I merely want to underline 
the fact that they are going to be harder 
to find. 

Rising costs, the second problem President 
Munns mentioned, are obviously going to 
affect all of us. The manufacturer will have 
to tighten up his operation in every way to 
keep costs level. He will probably resort 
increasingly to automation, because labor 
costs are a large part of the cost burden. 

At the retail level, pharmacies will also 
need to cut costs. Larger operations are 
probably in a better position to keep costs 
down than are independents. Some people 
feel there are too many retail pharmacies in 
this country, and they may be right. Per- 
sonally, I doubt whether there will be fewer 
stores; but I am certain there will be fewer 
of the small, marginal operations that fill 
less than ten, or even less than twenty, 
prescriptions a day. I see a trend toward 
larger prescription departments rather than 
toward smaller ones. 

The profit squeeze is going to have other 
effects on retail pharmacies. Total retail 



drug store sales have failed to keep pace 
with general business increases, and I think 
we all know why. The shelves of any super- 
market give the answer. 

A few drug stores located in areas of 
heavy traffic have successfully met the com- 
petition of the supermarkets by expanding 
their stocks of general merchandise, by self- 
service and by aggressive promotion. But 
expansion of this kind does not seem to be 
the answer to the average retail pharma- 
cist 's problem. 

A better answer might be specialization 
and greater concentration on the professional 
aspects of pharmacy, not only in the pre- 
scription department, but also in non-pre- 
scription health needs, such as sick-room 
supplies and surgical appliances. Some 
stores will also have large physician supply 
departments. 

But this fuller line operation requires good 
volume to carry the inventories necessary for 
proper service. The outlook is not rosy for 
the store with small volume. The trend 
will probably be towards more emphasis on 
professional pharmacy and less on the 
merchandising of sundries. 

It is clear that as competition for the 
consumer dollar increases, marketing will also 
become more competitive. An example of 
what the chains are now doing to combat the 
discounters is an announced new policy of 
Walgreen. The plan will be varied to fit 
local conditions, but in general prescriptions 
with ingredient costs under a certain level, 
are priced to produce a specified gross 
margin. Prescriptions with ingredient costs 
above that level are priced at cost plus flat 
fee. 

It is not unlikely, then, that one of the 
trends of the future will be changes in 
methods of pricing. 

Finally, there is the question of govern- 
ment regulation. We have some fairly good 
ideas of how it will affect the manufacturer. 
But, what will intensified government con- 
trols over the pharmaceutical industry do to 
the wholesaler and retailer? 

Perhaps the most noticeable effect of the 
Kefauver hearings was the attention they 
focused on generic drugs. 

Generic prescribing has been urged at 
different times for different reasons. Some 
(Continued on page 17) 



Quality 




Pays and Pays and Pays 

Sealtest Ice Cream — in dishes, cones and cartons — 
brings customers in, sells the ones that came for 
other products, and makes your cash register ring. 

Well-known quality keeps Sealtest preferred. 
National and local advertising keeps Sealtest pre-sold. 
And regular special flavors help keep Sealtest 
predominant. 

So, stock up with Sealtest Ice Cream. Display the 
Sealtest sign of quality. Then, count up 
your extra Sealtest profits! 

And be sure to Feature this Special Flavor 

BERRY PATCH 
for your Fountain and Take-Home Customers! 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 



PHARMACEUTICAL MARKETING 

(Continued from page 15) 
retail pharmacists have favored it because 
it appeared on the surface to simplify their 
inventory problems with so-called duplicate 
products. 

I realize that so-called duplicate products 
can be a problem to the retail pharmacist, 
but there is a tendency to magnify the im- 
portance of this problem — a tendency to 
overemphasize the relatively few cases of 
real duplication. If the typical pharmacy 
removed from its inventory all of the true 
duplicates (and I don't mean merely similar 
products or products with similar therapeutic 
actions), I doubt whether this would result 
in any substantial decrease in investment or 
any significant increase in turnover. 

From a therapeutic point of view, there 
is no doubt that generic equivalents are not 
really equivalent in all cases. Good proof 
of this fact comes from a recent experience 
in Los Angeles. 

On January 18, 1962, the New England 
Journal of Medicine published a study ex- 
plaining why the Los Angeles County Hos- 
pital System had gone back to buying thyroid 
from a brand-name supplier. 

"A thyroid preparation supplied as a 
nonbrand name was shown to be ineffective 
clinically, ' ' the study reported. Physicians 
wondered why, since the generic product was 
labeled as meeting U.S.P. standards. And a 
chemical assay showed it contained the 
amount of iodine required by the U.S.P. 
Nevertheless, symptoms of thyroid deficiency 
persisted in patients using it, and the 
patients improved when switched to a brand- 
name thyroid. 

In this instance, a brand-name thyroid was 
clearly superior, even though a generic 
' ' equivalent ' ' also met U.S.P. standards. 
For thyroid, U.S.P. standards required only 
that a preparation contain a specified amount 
of iodine. ' ' Equivalents ' ' are not necessari- 
ly equivalent simply because both meet 
U.S.P. requirements. 

Even if they were equivalent, it is doubt- 
ful if across-the-board generic prescription 
writing would save the public much money. 
As claimed we have gone through an ex- 
ercise in our company to estimate what sav- 
ings might be realized if the pharmacist dis- 



pensed generic instead of trademark name 
products. Using different assumptions, we've 
arrived at estimates as low as 3 per cent 
and as high as 7 J/2 per cent. 

Far overbalancing the savings to the 
consumer are the risks inherent in dis- 
pensing so-called generic equivalents. We 
have examined collections of generic ' ' equiv- 
alents. " It is interesting how often the 
label reads "distributed by (blank) labora- 
tories. ' ' Please note the difference — ' ' dis- 
tributed by, ' ' not ' ' manufactured by. ' ' In 
such cases, an unknown source is obscured 
by a little-known distributor. 

I am not suggesting that these products 
are always either impure or substandard. 
Many of them meet specifications. On the 
other hand, where any degree of risk is in- 
volved, we must ask ourselves whether it is 
worth taking. 

I do not want to deliver a lecture on the 
dangers of generic prescribing, but I feel 
certain that this is one of the chief matters 
in which government planners are interested. 
Even if the Kefauver-Celler Bill should die 
in committee it is likely that another bill 
will be proposed. In fact, we know now that 
Mr. Kennedy has recommended generic pre- 
scribing in his recent Message on Consumer 
Protection. 

I believe the trend towards generic pre- 
scribing is real. There are certainly power- 
ful forces trying to make it a reality. It 
seems to me that all of us — manufacturer, 
wholesaler and retailer — must stand together 
against any attempt to cheapen the quality 
of the medicine and pharmacy practiced in 
America today. 

And so I come to the end of my prophecy. 
I hope you have not found my predictions 
too gloomy. The truth is that, in spite of 
our problems, I am optimistic about the 
future. I have every confidence — as I am 
sure you have — that American know-how 
will be able to find important new medicines 
for sick people. I am also confident that we 
have the ingenuity to find ways of solving 
our marketing problems. 

But I must leave with you one last 

thought — an idea that I believe may be the 

clue to the future. While we await what 

tomorrow has to bring, we should be hard 

(Concluded on page 32) 




t 



k 



%*M 



1 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



19 



Pharmacy Awards at UNC 

Top — E. A. Brecht, Dean of the School 
of Pharmacy, presenting the Distinguished 
Teaching Award to Dr. H. R. Totten, Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacy. 

Center — George C. Eiehhorn, President of 
the Manufacturing Division of the Vick 
Chemical Company, Greensboro, presenting 
Honorable Mention in the Lunsford Richard- 
Json Pharmacy Award national contest along 
with $100 cheek to Allen Frederick Hirsch, 
graduate student majoring in pharmaceuti- 
cal chemistry at the University of North 
! Carolina. 

Bottom — The following were honored by 
i awards at the School of Pharmacy of the 
University of North Carolina on May 15: 
((first row, left to right) Dr. H. R. Totten, 
Distinguished Teaching Award ; William 
Fred Harriss, Faculty Valedictorian Award 
and Bristol Award; Beverly Carol Thompson, 
The Buxton Williams Hunter Medal; Larry 
Kent Neal, Pharmacy Student Body Award 
and Outgoing Student Body President Key; 
Rebecca Harper Elliott and Ellen Louise 
Pike, Merck Awards; and Mary Lou Johnson, 



Rho Chi First Year Award; second row, Allen 
Frederick Hirsch, Honorable Mention in 
Lunsford Richardson Pharmacy Award; 
William David Medlin, Rexall Pharmacy 
Administration Award; William Thurston 
Williams, Pharmacy Senate Award; Larry 
Edward Denning, M. L. Jacobs Memorial 
Award; Frederick Clifton Chamblee, Phi 
Delta Chi Outstanding Award ; and Joseph 
David Bimnion, McKesson and Bobbins 
Gavel Award to president of the Student 
Branches. 

Not pictured: Emil Lewis Cekada, Lehn & 
Fink Gold Medal Award. 



Pharmacies Closed 

These retail and hospital pharmacies have 
surrendered their pharmacy permits during 
1962: 

Southside Pharmacy, Charlotte 
Lincoln Cut Rate Drugs, Lincolnton 
Wilson & Holmes, Charlotte 
Lincoln Hospital Pharmacy, Durham 
Albemarle Drug Company, Albemarle 
Olivers Drug Store, Greensboro 
Johnson Drug Company, Murfreesboro 
Knightdale Pharmacy, Knightdale 



FOR YOUR PHOTOFINISHING NEEDS 

Let B & H Photo Company Serve You 

Complete Service on 

Black and White Kodacolor 

Ektachrome Anscochrome 

Kodachrome Movies and Slides 
Processed in Our Plant 

B & II PHOTO COMPANY 

3030 s. boulevard p. 0. box 1600 

phone 523-7093 charlotte 1, n. c. 



DON'T SPEND 
AGES LOOKING 




BUY AT 

GEER'S 
HOLIDAY 
GIFT 
SHOW 

Sun., Mon. & Tues. 
August 5, 6, 7, 1962 

at 

Spartanburg Memorial 

Air Conditioned 

Auditorium 



The Geer Drug Co. 

Spartanburg, S. C. 



DISTINCTIVE 




Carry your 
store's identity by color and 
personalized copy right into your customers 
home for the life of the Prescription. 

Another pjus value of the modern paper 
box with its clean fresh label. 

Representative: 

M. C. GRIER 

iiio ann st.. at. 3-3847 

Monroe, North Carolina 

• • • 

E. N. ROWELL CO., INC. 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



CHALLENGE 

What insurance company is 

Stronger than 

American Druggists'? 

Our Asset — Liability Ratio 

is $5.22 to $1.00 

BE—SURE 

IN— SURE 

with 

A.D.I.— 

YOUR BEST BUY 



.SECURITY 




CONSULT OUR AGENT 

F. 0. Bowman 

North Carolina State Agent 

P. O. Box 688 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 




A daughter, Shannon Suzanne, to Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward Smith, April 27th. Mrs. Smith 
will be remembered as Sue Ballantine. Both 
parents are UNC School of Pharmacy 
graduates, and Mr. Smith is now in graduate 
school at Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Charles Glenn Barger, a 
son, Charles Glenn, Jr., born April 28th. 
Mr. Barger is with Kerr Bexall Stores of 
Durham. 

A daughter, Bess Adair, to Mr. and Mrs. 
Seymour Holt, May 5th. The Holts are 
living in Jacksonville, Florida, where Mr. 
Holt is associated with the Eli Lilly Co. 

A daughter, Linda Carol, born May 11th 
to Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Deaton, now of 
Martinsville, Virginia. The Deatons have 
one other child, a son. 

A daughter, Jo Lynn, born May 20th to 
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon O'Briant of Durham, 
weighing 6 lb. 3 oz. Mr. O'Briant is with 
Kerr Bexall, Lakewood Shopping Center, 
Durham. 

Engagements 

The May 20th edition of the Ealeigh 
News and Observer announced the engage- 
ment of Miss Linda Ann Cromley, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Bobert I. Cromley of 
Ealeigh, to Hamilton E. Hicks, Jr., son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Hicks of Wilmington. A 
July wedding is planned. 

Deaths 

L. J. LEA 

Lumartin J. Lea, 77, of Laurinburg, died 
May 13 at the Scotland Memorial Hospital. 

From 1935 to his retirement in the spring 
of 1959, Mr. Lea was associated with the 
Scotland Drug Company of Laurinburg. At 
one time (1927) he operated the Lea Drug 
Company of Burlington. 

J. H. BIGHAM 

J. H. Bigliam, associated with Eckerd 



drug stores of Charlotte for the past 12 
years, died May 12. 

MYRA KINLAW 

.Miss Myra Kinlaw, a senior pharmacy 
student at the University of North Caro- 
lina School of Pharmacy, was killed May 19 
in an automobile accident near Chapel Hill. 

Miss Kinlaw was the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Mark Kinlaw of Lumberton. 

The driver of the car, C. B. Siedler, III of 
Washington, D. C, also was killed in the 
accident. A third University student, 
Lawrence Maloney of Long Island, New York 
suffered severe cuts and a broken arm when 
thrown 162 feet from the auto. 

The accident occurred near Chapel Hill's 
new Eastgate Shopping Center. The auto 
in which the students were riding hurtled out 
of control about. 430 feet along the highway 
shoulder until it slammed into a bridge sup- 
port. The engine was found about 100 feet 
from the wreckage. 




Reaco B-Complex with C. Tablets 

$20.00 Doz. 100s 

Reaco A & D Capsules $10.00 Doz. ioos 
A. E. P. Tablets $24.00 Doz. 100s 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 10 mg. Tablets 

$2.25 per 100 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 25 mg. Tablets 

$4.50 per 100 
Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 50 mg. Tablets 

$7.50 per 100 

Reavita Capsules $34.80 Doz. ioos 

S28.00 per 1000 

Neo-Reavita $36.00 Doz. ioos 

Your cooperation in stocking 
Reaco Products is appreciated 

REACO PRODUCTS 

!'. (). Box 2747 
West Durham, North Carolina 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



^From Beer Bottles to Perfume Bottles 
for the Liquids' 9 

By Mrs. Sarah Upchurch Browning 
Pharmacy Dept., N. 0. Memorial Hospital, Chapel Hill 



My husband, Bob, and I spent the past 
summer working in a mission hospital in 
Nigeria, West Africa. Our trip was made 
possible by a Smith Kline and French 
Foreign Fellowship for Medical Students 
which is carried out thru the Association 
of American Medical Colleges. (Bob is a 
fourth year medical student at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina.) These Fel- 
lowships provide for the wife to go with 
the husband and work if she is in a related 
medical profession. While we were in 
Nigeria, we were under the sponsorship of 
the Baptist Mission Board at the Baptist 
Hospital in Ogbomosho. 

Nigeria is a Federation made up of three 
regions — the Northern (the largest), the 
Eastern, and the Western. Until October 1, 
1960, Nigeria was a British Protectorate. 
On that date it became an independent na- 
tion of thirty-five million people with an 
area about one-third larger than Texas. The 



structure of the government is patterned 
after the British Parliamentary System. 
Lagos, the capitol or federal district, is an 
island surrounded by a lagoon. The calm 
of the lagoon is created by a breakwater 
built by the British. This makes it the best 
closed port north of South Africa on the 
west coast. 

There are four main tribes: the Ebo, 
Fulani, Yoruba, and Hausa. There are 
some 250 other smaller tribes and ten 
principal languages with scores of lesser 
dialects. The British began early to pre- 
pare these people for independence. They 
ruled that no white man could own land. 
Most Europeans are associated with a native 
of the country. Partly as a result of this 
and other wise policies of the British, the 
white man is made to feel very much at home. 
The people are very friendly and always 
speak a cheerful welcome. The government 
(Continued on page 37) 




Curious Children following Mrs. Browning in "Bush" Village 



The most widely accepted pediatric 
vitamins are now available with 
10 mg. prophylactic iron 

TRI-VI-SOL 

VITAMIN DROPS WITH IRON 

DECA-VI-SOL 

CHEWABLE VITAMINS WITH IRON 



These two new formulations— one for infants, one for older children 
— are distinctive additions to the line of Vi-Sol u ' vitamins, which 
now provides a choice of Tri-Vi-Sol vitamin drops with and without 
iron and Deca-Vi-Sol chewable vitamins with and without iron. To 
help prevent iron deficiency anemia, ". . . the most common deficiency 
disease of infancy and childhood,"* both Tri-Vi-Sol vitamin drops 
with Iron and Deca-Vi-Sol chewable vitamins with Iron supply 
infants and children with the iron the\ need at the ages they need it. 





SIZE 


YOUR 
COST 


FTM 
RETAIL** 


TRI-VI-SOL® 

vitamin drops with Iron 


bottles, 
30 cc. 


SI. 60 


$2.39 


DECA-VI-SOL® 

chewable vitamins with Iron 


bottles, 
50 tab. 


SI. 79 


$2.98 



Order these important new additions to your pediatric line from 
your wholesaler today. 

*Mead Johnson & Company minimum resale prices established by retailer contracts undei 
state Fair Trade Laws. In states not having Fair Trade Laws, these are suggested prices. 

Note: Store Tri-Vi-Sol vitamin drops with Iron under refrigeration. 

♦Jacobs, I.: GP 27:93-97 (Jan.) 1960. 4?46i 

Mead Johnson 
Laboratories 

Sy?nbol of service in medicine 




24: The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

Hicks Honored at Testimonial Dinner 

By Don Whitley of The Goldsboro News-Argus 



John E. F. Hicks, A Goldsboro pharma- 
cist referred to by many as ' ' Dr. Hicks, ' ' 
was honored as one of Wayne County's most 
outstanding citizens on May 8. 

Tribute was given Hicks at a testimonial 
dinner at Goldsboro Country Club, under 
sponsorship of Wayne County Pharmaceuti- 
cal Society. 

Those attending the dinner praised Hicks 
as a great leader and a man who has con- 
tributed much to his fellowman and to 
society. 

Included in tributes was a telegram from 
Gov. Terry Sanford and letters of recogni- 
tion from noted personalities throughout 
North Carolina and other states. 

Principal speaker was Dr. Coy W. Waller, 
vice president of pharmaceutical research 
at Mead Johnson and Company, Evansville, 
Indiana. Dr. Waller is a native of Smith 
Chapel in Wayne County. He was given his 
first job in a drug store on Walnut Street, 
Goldsboro. Hicks owned and operated the 
drug store. 

' ' He always had three very strong objec- 
tives — getting a strong background, making 
sure students put their knowledge to work 
and always rendering service to the public," 
Dr. Waller said. 

The former Wayne resident said Hicks 
helped to cultivate professional people about 
him and was never embarrassed to call on 
them for help. 

Dr. Waller encouraged pharmacists to 
follow the example set by Hicks in setting 
goals high and dedicating services to the 
betterment of patients. 

Goldsboro News-Argus Editor, Henry Belk 
described Hicks as a man of mixed emotions. 
' ' Few people have the varied interests that 
he has. Next to pharmacy would come the 
Episcopal Church of which he is a member," 
Belk said. 

The editor continued that Hicks has many 
talents and a great love for music. He is a 
charter member of the Goldsboro Masonic 
Lodge, having served as Master and Secre- 
tary. "This is a deserving tribute b> a 
splendid citizen thai means much to phar- 



macy and Goldsboro, ' ' Belk said. 

Also on the speakers slate was E. I 
Pilkington, past president of Wayne Count; 
Pharmaceutical Society. Pilkington was on 
of about 10 students in the first class o: 
pharmacy taught by Hicks. The class wa 
held in Hicks ' drug store on Walnut Street 

Pilkington pointed out that the testi 
monial dinner afforded an opportunity fo 
"Hicks' boys" to publicly express thei 
feelings with regards to a wonderful man. 

"Some of his boys (students) were me; 
of the depression years that would not hav 
benefited to higher education if it had no 
been for Hicks, ' ' Pilkington said. 

The former student said further tha 
' ' some men are able to serve mankind wit 
a feeling of dedication and a sense of I 
sponsibility. They serve with inspiratioi 
first from God and second from man. Sue 
a man is John E. F. Hicks, ' ' he said. 

W. J. Smith, executive secretary of th 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Associatior 
said Hicks represents an era between th 
old and the new. He is a man that kne 1 
and used home remedies and witnessed th 
advent of modern drugs of today. He i 
the only pharmacist in the State, still i 
active practice, who was a student of thj 
late Professor Joseph Remington, the autho 
of Remington's Practice of Pharmacy. Mi 
Hicks is a graduate of the Philadelphi 
College of Pharmacy & Science, Class o 
1909. 

The State Pharmaceutical official ai 
nounced the establishment of the "Joh; 
E. F. Hicks Pharmacy Student Loan Fund' 
and assured that a loan will be made to 
student of pharmacy at the School of Phai 
macy, Chapel Hill within 10 days. 

Smith also presented a double pen s( 
with a symbol of pharmacy to Hicks. 

Dr. G. C. Dale said there were four grea 

horsemen that had touched his heart and hi 

career. He named them as Dr. William H 

Smith, Dr. Donald Cobb, Dr. Henry B. Ivej 

-the last name was John E. F. [licks. 

(Continued on page 27) 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



25 




John E. F. Hicks: Goldsboro Pharmacist, Graduate of The Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy & Science, Class of 1909, and President of the Wayne County Pharmaceutical 
Society. 



SMITH WHOLESALE DRUG CO. 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

A Young and Growing Service Wholesale House, 
Owned and Operated by Registered Pharmacists 



We Appreciate Your Business 



wB *s «•» «« 




POWDER 
PACKAGE 

Less than 







relief 







\ Stanback Co.. Ltd. A 



STANBACK IS THE ONLY 

HEADACHE POWDER MARKETED 

N THE 50-POWDER PACKAGE 



GREATER VOLUME 

for you 
MORE PROFIT 

per sale 
MORE ECONOMY 

for your custome) 




Salisbury. N, C. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



27 



HICKS HONORED 

(Continued from page 24) 

Dr. Dale pointed out that Hieks had de- 
scended from the noble, pioneer family of 
jWilliam Whitfield. He was a descendant, 
but he built his own environment. ' ' He is a 
gentleman and a teacher of men, ' ' Dr. Dale 
said. 

In responding to the tributes, Hicks said 
he was overwhelmed by the magnificent 
honors, but stated that any tribute to him 
should be shared with ' ' His boys. ' ' He 
encouraged young pharmacists to keep 
abreast with research and new findings in 
drugs. "New products are developed every 
day that need to be studied and kept up 
with, ' ' he said. 

Hicks is a native of Faison, Duplin County. 
He moved to Goldsboro as a child. After 
graduating from high school, he attended the 
School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, for one 
year. He entered service and served in the 
Navy Hospital Corps. 

Hicks opened a drug store in Goldsboro in 
1912. He began his first class with 10 stu- 
dents in 1935. 

Special guests at last night 's meeting were 
Mrs. John T. Stevenson, president of the 
Woman's Auxiliary of the N. C. Pharma- 
ceutical Association ; John T. Stevenson, 
president of the N. C. Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation; Dr. Melvin Chambers, assistant dean 
at the School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill. Dr. 
Jack K. Wier, member of the School of 
Pharmacy, University of North Carolina ; 
and Dr. Jack K. Wier, a member of the 
faculty of the UNC School of Pharmacy 
and H. C. McAllister, secretary-treasurer 
of the N. C. Board of Pharmacy. 

Tom Robinson, Goldsboro pharmacist and 
mayor pro tern of the town, served as 
toastmaster and chairman of the committee 
on arrangements for the testimonial dinner 
in honor of Mr. Hieks. 

New Hotel for Chapel Hill 

Plans have been announced for the erec- 
tion of a 75 room "Royal Carolinian" hotel 
in Chapel Hill. 

Of particular interest to pharmacists is 
that the hotel will be located near the Insti- 
tute of Pharmacy, where meetings and Board 



exams necessitate over-night accommodations. 
The near-by hotel will be a definite asset to 
the NCPA's program of seminars, sym- 
posiums, etc. 

Initially, the hotel will have 75 rooms but 
later on plans call for a 50 room addition. 
Features include a roof-top pool, dining 
room, interior parking areas, elevators, an 
interior garden, air conditioning and wall 
to wall carpeting. 

The $1.5 million investment is being 
financed by an unidentified group of Chapel 
Hill residents. 

Justice Entertains 
Graduating Class 

The annual dinner honoring the graduat- 
ing class of the School of Pharmacy, Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, under sponsorship 
of Justic Drug Company, was held at The 
King Cotton Hotel on May 2. 

Prior to the dinner, members of the phar- 
macy graduating class and their wives 
visited the Justice Drug Company where they 
saw a wholesale drug operation at first hand. 

Justice has sponsored similar dinners for 
the past fifteen years. The event is now 
one of the highlights of the pharmacy stu- 
dent 's filial years at Chapel Hill. 

Exhibit in Winston-Salem Pulls 

75 Requests from Students 

and Teachers 

More than 75 persons requested additional 
pharmacy career information as a result of 
an exhibit in Winston-Salem during a recent 
Career-O-Rama. 

The pharmacy phase of the Career-O- 
Rama was under sponsorship of the Forsyth 
Pharmaceutical Society, with John W. 
Andrews in charge of exhibit arrangements. 

Present at the exhibit, on a rotation basis, 
to answer questions and distribute litera- 
ture were Ernest Rabil, Harry Wilson, James 
Way, Vaighn Bryson, Bill Northcott, Gil- 
bert Hartis, Leslie Myers, Rufus Hairston, 
Arthur Johnson, A. C. Dollar and C. T. 
Dixon. 

Dr. Melvin Chambers, Assistant Dean of 
the UNC School of Pharmacy, is handling 
the requests for additional information. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



Carolina Camera 

: Top — Pictured in front of Frank Day- 
rault's pharmacy of Lenoir is the store's 
delivery ear, named "The Medicine Drop- 
per." Note the modern, open front to the 
pharmacy. 

I The pharmacy has ten employees — five 
inen and five women. Dayvault's was 
sstablished 25 years ago by Frank, who re- 
■nains as owner-manager. Employee turn- 
over is low; the pharmacy has set a record 
|by going nine years without changing any of 
the women employees. 

! Center — Mrs. William B. Aycock, wife of 
the chancellor of the University of North 
Carolina, was guest speaker when wives of 
graduating students of the School of Phar- 
macy received special recognition during 
'graduation exercises" held at the Institute 
of Pharmacy, Sunday afternoon, May 20. 
j Mrs. Hunter Smith, retiring president of 
the Pharmacy Wives Organization, opened 
the program and introduced Mrs. O. O. 
Grabs, chairman for the day. Mrs. Grabs 
welcomed the guests, and introduced David 
3uackenbush, a junior in the School of 
Pharmacy, who sang the "Lord's Prayer" as 
an invocation. Following Mrs. Aycock's re- 
marks, there was a report by the Pharmacy 
Wives Historian, Mrs. Thomas Lever III. 

Diplomas awarding the "P.H.T. " degree 
(pushing hubby through) to student wives 
\rere first presented to husbands, who in 
turn, gave them to their wives. 

Following the program, a reception was 
held honoring the new graduates. 

Seated, left to right: Mrs. Roy W. (Toi- 
lette, Jr., Mocksville; Mrs. William B. 
Aycock, Speaker; Mrs. C. M. McGee, Char- 
lotte; Mrs. Burwell Temple, Jr., Kinston. 
I Middle row, left to right : Mrs. Hunter 
Smith, Fayetteville, retiring president; Mrs. 
Gary Roberson, Draper; Mrs. William D. 
Medlin, Durham ; Mrs. George W. Davis, Jr., 
Fremont; Mrs. Francis E. Raper, Rocky 
Mount; Mrs. Hayes E. Hall, Whittier. 

Back row, left to right: Mrs. William G. 
Thames, Hope Mills; Mrs. Harold Little, 
Oakboro; Mrs. James B. Davis, Oakboro; 
Mrs. Gary Cloninger, Dallas; Mrs. David R. 
Lewis, Goldsboro. 

More than 500 persons attended the dedi- 
cation of the new Washington Building 



(910 Southern Avenue) of The Henry B. 
Gilpin Company on May 6. At the lectern 
is James E. Allen, president of the company. 

At the dedication ceremony a guest 
speaker was Dr. William S. Apple, Execu- 
tive Director of the American Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association, who said: 

' ' The Gilpin Company has achieved an 
honored place among the pharmaceutical 
wholesalers of America. This group renders 
a comprehensive social and economic service 
by serving as the link between the pharma- 
ceutical manufacturer and the pharmacy. 
Because of your work, the wonders of science 
and medicine are immediately available 
through professional channels to every man, 
woman and child in this area.'' 

Gold Bottle 

Furman Wilson, Eexall Representative, 
presents gold bottle to S. C. Hall while his 
brother, J. P., looks on. Presentation of 
the gold bottle was in recognition of 83 years 
of service by Hall 's Drug Store to the 
citizens of Oxford and Granville County. 
Hall's Drug was established in 1879 by the 
late J. G. Hall, father of the two brothers 
now operating the pharmacy. 



Make McGount 

For Labels -in Rolls or Flats 
Physicians 1^ Blanks and Files 

Drug Boxes - Call Checks 
Drug and Delivery Envelopes 



all £iyte<L atttL Calo^d. 



EH3 



42-54 BENNETT 
STREET 




EEE E5] 



BRADFORD, 
PENNA. 



Specializing in Labels tor Drug Stores 

Clifford P. Berry, Representative 
P. O. Box 306, Charlotte 1, N. C. 



From SK&F — for the pharmacist 

overdosage information — one of the many 
services offered to pharmacists by SK&F 

SK&F regularly supplies pharmacists with product in- 
formation pages containing overdosage information. 
Other SK&F services available to you are: 

• Pharmacy News — published expressly for 
pharmacists. 
• Medical films suitable for lay audiences- 
write for a copy of the SK&F Medical 
Film catalog. 

• Comprehensive physician's literature 
on new SK&F products. 

• Speakers Bureau — SK&F representa- 
tives speak before your organization on 

matters of medical and health progress. 

• Disaster assistance — if you become the 
victim of a natural disaster not normally 
covered by insurance— such as a flood, hur- 
ricane, or tornado — which damages SK&F 
products, contact your SK&F representative for 
assistance (the amount of consideration granted 
will depend on the circumstances in each individual 
case). 
• Newspaper mats — two-column advertisements (with 
ample space for your pharmacy's name and address) de- 
fending the profession of pharmacy— suitable for use in your 
local newspaper or for reprinting as handouts for your customers. 
To take advantage of these services yourself, write to Smith Kline 
& French Laboratories, 1500 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia 1, Pa. 

SMITH KLINE & FRENCH LABORATORIES, PHILADELPHIA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 




OF THE AUXILIARIES 

» Charlotte— Mrs. C. H. Smith 

• Greensboro — Mrs. James M. Waugh 

• Gaston — Mrs. Jack Friday 

• High Point — Mrs. Zollie A. Collins, Jr. 

High Point 

The High Point Pharmaceutical Auxiliary 
net for dinner Tuesday evening, May 1st at 
A.1 Boling 's Steak House, for the election of 
iew officers. 

: Selected to serve for the new year are 
■Mrs. Al Bundy, President; Mrs. William 
Shoemaker, Vice-President; Mrs. Joe Bland, 
Secretary-Treasurer; Mrs. S. O. Bailey, 
Sunshine Chairman. 

Members viewed their accomplishments for 
the year in a scrapbook which was passed 
Ground during the meeting. 

Mrs. Cecil Branan and Mrs. Zollie Collins, 
Ft. were presented door prizes. 
I The next meeting was announced for 
September. 

Gaston County Pharmaceutical 
Auxiliary 

Mrs. William G. Forrest was elected presi- 
lent of the Gaston County Pharmaceutical 
Auxiliary at the monthly meeting held 
May 17th. Mrs. Jack Friday, the outgoing 
president presided and installed the new 
bfncers who are Mrs. Forrest, president ; Mrs. 
Richard Curtis, vice-president; Mrs. Earl 
jWilliams, secretary; Mrs. Truman Hudson, 
Treasurer; and Mrs. John O. McDonald, 
listorian. 

Announcement was made that a cash 
donation will be sent to Gaston County 
Pharmacy Scholarship fund. 

The meeting was held at the home of Mrs. 
Forrest with Mrs. Wilbur Blanton and Mrs. 
Wade Carter serving as joint hostesses. 

Pharmacy Wives 

The Pharmacy Wives, at their May 8 
meeting, held their annual election of officers, 
and the following were named to serve for 



the new year: President, Susie Grabs; Vice- 
President, Evelyn Miller; Secretary, Mary 
Lou Kennedy; Treasurer, Grace Brown; 
Historian, Anne Lever; Refreshment Chair- 
man, Joanne Keith; Hospitality chairman, 
Nan Alexander; Publicity chairman, Judy 
Quackenbush. 

Plans were discussed for the Senior Tea to 
be held May 20th and for a picnic at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Smith on May 
19th. 

Charlotte 

The Charlotte Woman's Druggist Auxil- 
iary held their final meeting of the year May 
8th at the Kirkwood Boom. Annual re- 
ports were heard, and a convention report 
was given. 

Mrs. A. K. Hardee, President, presided. 
Mrs. L. E. Barnhardt installed officers for 
the new year as follows: President, Mrs. Boss 
L. Cooper; first vice-president, Mrs. Worth 
Blackmon; second vice-president, Mrs J. O. 
Parks; recording secretary, Mrs. T. K. 
Steele ; corresponding secretary, Mrs. Gilbert 
Colina; treasurer, Mrs. Leonard House; 
advisor, Mrs. A. K. Hardee. 




big on TV 

Soltice is the modern Quick- 
Rub that is getting the most 
powerful TV push in its history 
this season. 

More and more of your 
customers are hearing about 
the chest rub that's pure white 
and nice to use. Be sure you 
have it for them. 



THE CHATTANOOGA MEDICINE CO. 

CHATTANOOGA 9, TENNESSEE 



32 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Greensboro 

The Greensboro Drug Club Auxiliary held 
its last meeting of the 1961-62 year at the 
Mayfair Cafeteria on May 22, 1962. 

Mrs. Doris Collins, president, called the 
meeting to order. A prayer for a new year 
was offered by Mrs. Jean Andrews. 

Mrs. Collins expressed her appreciation to 
all the committee chairman and those who 
had served with them during the year. 

After the various committee reports were 
heard, Mrs. Jean Andrews installed the 
following officers for 1962-63: President; 
Mrs. Lon Eussell, Vice-president ; Mrs. M. B. 
McCurdy, Secretary; Mrs. D. C. Dowdy, 
Treasurer; Mrs. R. L. Lane, Chaplain; Mrs. 
D. W. Montgomery, Historian ; Mrs. J. V. 
Farrington. 

The meeting was then turned over to the 
new president, Louise Russell, who presented 
Doris Collins with an engraved Paul Ttevere 
bowl. 

The door prize was won by Mrs. White. 
Hostesses for the day were Mrs. G. H. 
Steele, chairman, Mrs. O. W. McFalls, Mrs. 
James Waugh, and Mrs. Steve Frontis. 

There being no further business the meet- 
ing was adjourned until the fall. 



Howie Opens Pharmacy in Marion 

Grand opening of the new Marion Phar- 
macy, located in Marion at 6 North Main 
Street, was observed in early May. Favors 
and prizes, including a TV set, were given 
away during the opening event. 

The pharmacy is owned and managed 
by W. W. Howie, formerly employed by 
Evans Eexall Drug Store. Mr. Howie is a 
graduate of the School of Pharmacy, Uni- 
versity of South Carolina, and for four years 
was a medical service representative for Eli 
Lilly & Company in Columbia, South Caro- 
lina. 



PHARMACEUTICAL MARKETING 

(Continued from page 17) 
at work telling the public the value of the 
services we have today. The inner workings 
of our industry have been grossly distorted. 
People have been given false ideas about 
drugs and the manner in which they are 
made, priced and dispensed. 

Our task for the present, as I see it is tc 
tell our story to the public. And I think 
this is a task in which you must share, foi 
every branch of pharmacy, stands to gai| 
or lose by how clearly and forcefully we 
state our case. 

The pattern of pharmaceutical marketing 
tomorrow may well depend upon how well w« 
accomplish this task today. 

FROM BEER BOTTLES 

(Continued from page 39) 
sonnel, especially pharmacists, and speaking 
from experience, I can truly say that it is 
a most fulfilling and rewarding experience! 

While we were in Nigeria, we were fortu 
nate enough to be able to travel over a large! 
area of the country and see for ourselvey 
what a vast land of contrast it is. Ws 
visited the delta region with its many stream.'] 
and isolated villages accessible only bj| 
canoe ; the capital region with its bustling I 
cosmopolitan business district; and the north.' 
em region on the edge of the Sahara with its 
vast expanses of sand, its camel caravans; 
and its cattle herders. It is only through 
wise leadership and a real desire to under I 
stand each other and to cooperate that a 
nation with such widely divergent interest^ 
and tribal backgrounds can stay unitedli 
This was truly a wonderful and enlightening 
experience for us. 

When it was time to leave Nigeria many oi 
the people came to ask if we would ever rei 
turn to Nigeria to help their people 's needsf 
Others asked if Ave would speak favorably oa 
their country, in hopes that others migh 
come. The time had passed so fast, and ye' 
we had learned so many things about a 
fascinating country and its people. Oui 
attachment was great, and it was mucl 
harder to leave than I had ever anticipated) 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



33 




TAII HEEL DIGEST 

Greensboro — William P. Brewer of Justice 
Irug Company is a candidate for a director 
-' the State College Alumni Association. 

Coats — L. E. MeKnight is chairman of the 
rats' Annual Tractor Rodeo, which is 
Iheduled for Sept. 14-15. Prizes totaling 
|1400 will be given away. 

Charlotte — Guest speaker at a recent meet- 
Jig of the Charlotte Eastern Iviwanis Club 
Fas Boy M. Moss, local medical service 
fcpresentative of the A. H. Robins Company. 

Greensboro — Burglars visited the Elam 
Kg Company on the night of May 13 
laving with about $200 of J. V. Farring- 
[ni's merchandise. Entrance Avas gained 
B breaking a glass in the front door. 

i Waynesville — Don Leathenvood, until re- 
entry a MSR for Eli Lilly & Company 
•i Kuoxville, Tenn., has accepted a position 
[ith Smith's Drug Store. 

Charlotte — A mural designed to make 
latients more comfortable while alone in 
rresbyterian Hospital's lead-shielded cobalt 
loom is being painted by John H. Rosser, 
be hospital's chief pharmacist. So far the 
jiural is composed of mountains and trees; 
Kll take Rosser 6 to 9 months to complete 
"orking a few hours each week. 

Charlotte — Robert M. Styles has been pro- 
moted to field sales manager with the 
jithnita Branch of Parke Davis & Company. 
Ie will have headquarters in Charlotte ami 
li'ill supervise PD sales in North Carolina. 



Weldon — Joe Selden, Seidell's Pharmacy, 
was program chairman for the June 14 
meeting of the Weldon Rotary Club. 

Lenior — While in Las Vegas for A. Ph. A. 
meeting, Frank Dayvault added some extra 
time for a visit to California, Oregon and 
Washington. 

Raleigh — Woodrow Price, Managing Edi- 
tor of the Raleigh News tf- Observer, is also 
reporter for the NARD Journal. 

Spring Hope — The Weaver and May Phar- 
macy has (dosed. Van Weaver, one of the 
owners of the pharmacy, has moved to 
Wilson. 

Valdese — Joe E. Smith, chief pharmacist 
at the Valdese General Hospital, has re- 
turned to the University of Michigan, where 
he will continue his graduate studies. He 
plans to do graduate work in hospital 
pharmacy. 

Extension Committee Meets 

The XCPA Extension Division Committee 
met in Chapel Hill on June b'. Purpose of 
the meeting was to plan the committee 's 
program for the year. 

M. A. Chambers is chairman of the com- 
mittee. Other members are : 

Harry A. Barringer, Concord; V. L. Fair- 
cloth, Charlotte; Oliver Fleming, Smithfield; 
C. B. Hawkins, Bryson City; John Martin, 
Pinetops; Ernest Rabil, Winston-Salem; 
W. Moss Salley, Jr., Asheville ; Gerald M. 
Stahl, Durham; and James E. Williams, 
Rockingham. 

Dr. Totten Honored at UNC 

Chapel Hill — The annual Awards Xight 
program was held at the School of Phar- 
macy of the University of Xorth Carolina on 
Tuesday, May 15. Dr. H. R. Totten, Pro- 
fessor of Botany, received the Distinguished 
Teaching Award consisting of an engraved 
mortar and pestle. The winner of this award 
was selected by the pharmacy faculty from 



34 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



s 



There's 

88 % $ s 

_ \ i / 

> I , j : t%l 1"! i > 

in 



s 



finejtate 



MILK 

and 

ICE 

CREAM 

people like it 
and buy it 

Tastes Great . . . It's 



finejtate 



the faculty of the General University fo 
inspiring teaching to pharmacy students 
Professor Totten was appointed to the Du 
partment of Botany in 1913 and taugh 
courses in botany and pharmacognosy fo 
pharmacy students. It is a true satement ti 
say that Dr. Totten has taught more phar 
macists in North Carolina than any othe 
teacher. 

William Fred Harris, High Point, re 
eeived the Pharmacy Faculty Award consist 
ing of a mounted mortar and pestle for tint 
highest scholastic average for a graduating 
student. He also received the Bristo 
Award in Pharmacy, a medical dictionary 
for noteworthy achievement in pharmacy. 

The Buxton Williams Hunter Medal ii 
Pharmacy for scholarship and campus 
citizenship was presented to Beverly Caro 
Thompson, daughter of Professor Hernial 
0. Thompson of the pharmacy faculty. 

The Pharmacy Student Body Award vfl 
received by Larry Kent Neal of Kannapoli.j 
as being the outstanding graduating stu 
dent selected by a student committee. Mr 



STROTHER 
DRUG COMPANY 

of Richmond, Inc. 

3700 Saunders Avenue 

POWERS-TAYLOR DRUG CO. 
Richmond, Va. 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 

Full Line 

Full Service 

Member of 
Druggists Service Co. 

National Wholesale 
Druggists Association 

For Best Service Call Us 

Collect 

353-2771 

After Hours Call 
353-2777 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 



feal also received the Key for the dit- 
toing Student Body President. 
I Emil Lewis Cekada, Durham, received the 
jehn and Fink Gold Medal Award for note- 
rorthy achievement. The Merck Awards in 
Iharmacy for noteworthy achievement were 
iresented to Mrs. Bebecca Harper Elliott 
| Hendersonville and Miss Ellen Louise Pike 
If Concord. Miss Pike also received the 
Lappa Epsilon Award presented by the local 
Iiapter of this national sorority for pliar- 
nacy students. 

< The Pharmacy Senate Award for loyalty 
jnd service was presented to William 
[hurston Williams, Wilson. 
( William David Medlin, Durham, received 
he Bexall Award, a mounted antique mortar 
md pestle reproduction, presented for ex- 
lellence in pharmacy administration. 
The M. L. Jacobs Memorial Award, a key 
resented by the Bho Chi National Honor 
Society, was presented to Larry Edward 
penning, third-year student from Coats, for 



excellence in Organic Pharmaceutical Chem- 
istry. 

The Eho Chi First Year Award was pre- 
sented to Mary Lou Johnson, Clayton, for 
the highest scholastic average during the 
prepharmaey year of study in the General 
College of the University. 

The McKesson and Bobbins Gavel Plaque 
was presented to David Eunnion of Lenoir 
for serving as president of the Student 
Branches of the North Carolina Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association and the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association by Eeuben Russell of 
the Charlotte division of the company. 

Allen Hirsch, graduate student majoring in 
pharmaceutical chemistry, was presented with 
an honorable mention and a check to amount 
$100 in the national competition for the 
Lunsford Richardson Pharmacy Award. The 
presentation was made by Mr. George C. 
Eiehhorn, president of the manufacturing 
division of the Vick Chemical Company, 
Greensboro, N. C. 



Get your piece of the 
Vacation Market Pie 




3G 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



%b 



ms 



JUNE CHECK LIST 

Tear out for a handy check of 

your current stock of these 

Robins products that are receiving 

special promotion in your area 
June 18 — August 10 



Robanul 



□ lib IDG's □ Tab. 500's 



® 



Robanul-PH 

D lab 100's D lab. 500's 

Donnagel 

□ Susp 6 01 

Donnagel-PG 

□ Susp 6 or 

DOIinGCJGi with Neomycin 

□ Susp 6 m 

Ambar 

D lab 100's Q lab 500's 
. □ No I Eitenlabs 100's □ No. I Eitenlabs 500's 

□ No 2 Eitenlabs 100's □ No. 2 Eitenlabs 500's 

NaClex 

D lab 100's □ lab 500's 

Allbee with C n 

□ Cap 100's □ Cap 500's □ Cap. 1000's 



Why not check your stock of .| 

all Robins products at the same time <§ 

— and be prepared jfeMlL 

A. H. ROBINS CO.. INC., RICHMOND 20, VA. 



Weldon Drug Has New Home 

The Weldon Drug Company, Weldon, ha 
moved into its new building on the corner 
of Washington Avenue and Fourth Streelu 

The pharmacy was purchased by Kell| 
Turner on May 7, 1951 and since that tiinl 
lias shown a steady growth. 

Historical Collection 

The Sunday, May 6 issue of The Concori 
Tribune featured Pharmacist Charles Porll 
or's historical collection, which includes oil 
letters, coffee grinders, Edison phonographs 
as well as show globes, mortar & pestles anJ 
other pharmaceutical equipment with a paif 
ticular appeal to pharmacists. 

Geer Drug Announces Plans for I 
New Distribution Center in 
Greenville 

Plans for construction of an extensive nei 
distribution center in Greenville for Th 
Geer Drug Company, representing an in 
vestment of more than a half million dollars 
were announced today by B. Owen Geei 
president of the statewide wholesale dm 
firm which also serves parts of Georgia an 
North Carolina. 

The 55,00(1 sq. ft. building will he con 
structed on the north side of Universit 
Ridge between Church Street Expresswa 
and Cleveland Street, near the proposed ne^ 
Bell Tower Shopping Center on the ol 
Furman University campus and the nev 
Citizens and Southern National Bank build 
ing. Land for the new building was pui 
chased from Furman University. 

The South Carolina firm has three division 
— Charleston, Greenville and Spartanburg 
with home offices in Charleston, where th 
company was founded by Dr. Andrew J 
Geer, native of Anderson County, in 189( 
The company began its Spartanburg opera 
tions in 1910 and first opened its Greenvill 
offices in 1919. 

Off Sick List 

Miss Virginia Caudle and Frank Lowde 
have returned to their work at City Memoria 
Hospital, Winston-Salem, following illnes? 
In their absence, the pharmacy was operate' 
by Kent Huffman, Mrs. Phebe M. Kirkmai 
with an occasional assist by Charles Dixor 
who is in the regular employment of Boh 
bitt 's College Plia rniacv. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

FROM BEER BOTTLES 

(Continued from page 22) 



37 



tppears quite stable, and the leaders are 
sincere in pursuing progress toward a higher 
tandard of living for the people. The 
greatest need of the country is the creation 
hf an informed middle class which would 
irovide a stabilizing influence. 

The medical facilities of the country are 
tdministered by the government except for 
he mission hospitals. There is a real need 
'or trained physicians in this area. There 
Is a ratio of one physician per 60,000 people 
Ls compared with one per 750 in the United 
(■States. 

I Motor transportation is limited except in 
hie few large cities, but the number -of cars 
s increasing rapidly. Most people travel 
)y lorry which is a large enclosed truck with 
benches in the back. These trucks are used 
:o carry both passengers and freight as 
:hey jostle up and down the road with 
jrarious mottos on their cabs such as: "Live 
md Let Live," and "Here I Come Oh 
Lord." Bicycles are a popular means of 
oeal travel. There are small donkeys in 
the North, but it is unlawful to have 
'horses or cattle in the South because they 
'provide a reservoir for the dreaded sleeping 
sickness transmitted from cattle to man by 
the tsetse fly. 

Malnutrition is prevalent everywhere. 
This is caused mainly by a protein deficient 
diet. This protein deficiency often leads 
to a disease called kwashiorkor. Bob made 
L special study of this disease while we were 
(there. The children are breast fed until two 
ko four years with little or no supplementary 
feeding. When the breast feeding is dis- 
continued, the child is given yam, casava 
(similar to Irish potato) and eko (grits) 
with little or no protein foods. Protein 
foods such as meat, eggs, beans, peas, and 
bananas were readily available, but the 
people were just not accustomed to giving 
them to the children. In addition to the 
study of kwashiorkor, Bob saw patients in 
ithe clinic and in the hospital and assisted 
; with surgery, tuberculosis clinics, and baby 
clinics. 

Ogbomosho, where we worked for the sum- 
mer, is Nigeria's third largest town with a 



population of approximately 200,000. It is 
nothing like a city as we think of one. There 
are no houses more than two stories. Most 
are mud dwellings with thatched or tin roofs, 
and there is no pure water supply or sewage 
disposal. Most of the people make their 
living farming or trading. 

The Baptist hospital in Ogbomosho Avas 
begun in 1907 and rebuilt in its present site 
in 1959. It has 65 ward beds and 25 
maternity beds ; two operating rooms with an 
adjoining sterilizing unit; a pharmacy; a 
laboratory and small blood bank; emergency 
out-patient surgery room ; X-ray unit ; large 
waiting room chapel; and three out-patient 
rooms for doing dressings, weighing babies, 
and giving medication. There are seven 
missionaries on the staff — three doctors, 
three nurses, and a business manager. There 
is also a staff of about thirty native workers 
including midwives, registered nurses, nurses 
aides, laboratory technician, X-ray techni- 
cian, cashier, chaplain, and record room 
personnel. The pediatric, men's and women's 
ward and operating buildings are built in a 
quadrangle. Each unit has about twenty 
ward beds and five semi-private or isolation 
beds. The wards are about twenty yards 
apart and are connected by covered walk- 
ways. A latrine is attached behind each 
unit. The units are required to be separate 
by the Ministry of Health. Some diseases 
most frequently seen are vulvo-vaginal fistu- 
las, filaria, malaria, gastritis and duodenal 
ulcer, inguinal hernias, tuberculosis, protein 
deficiency in children, tetanus, snake bites, 
and sickle cell anemia. 

About a week after we got to Ogbomosho, 
the nurse who was in charge of the phar- 
macy was called home because of illness in 
her family. This left me in charge of the 
pharmacy. Since most of the drugs were 
from British Drug Companies with British 
trade names, I was at somewhat of a 
disadvantage. Luckily at North Carolina 
Memorial Hospital where I served my ap- 
prenticeship, they operate under the generic 
system of nomenclature. This training was 
of great help to me in learning the contents 
of all of the unfamiliar trade names. 

Working in the pharmacy with me were 
three Nigerian helpers — Ladoyin, Sam, and 
(Continued on page 39) 



38 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




Child with Kwashiorkor, 
Showing Edema of Legs 
and Feet, Dermatosis, 
Pot-Belly and Sagging 
Jaws. 




Bob Browning with Patient. Interpreter in right foreground. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



39 



FROM BEER BOTTLES 

(Continued from page 37) 
Suberu. They know their jobs quite well 
and were a great help to me. The phar- 
macy contained a quite adequate stock with, 
l f course, the main emphasis on antihelmin- 
thics, antimalarials, and antibiotics. 

The pharmacy service consisted of three 
parts: in-patient dispensing, out-patient dis- 
pensing, and supplying smaller mission dis- 
pensaries. Sam was in charge of the in- 
patient dispensing and Suberu the out- 
' patient dispensing. In each case they filled 
'.all the orders for items such as vitamins, 
worm medicine, and antimalarials which were 
inot for Dangerous Drugs, a British classi- 
fication similar to our prescription drugs as 
opposed to over-the-counter drugs. I filled 
: the Dangerous Drug orders. Suberu gave the 
drugs to the out-patients with instructions 
j in their native dialect. 

On busy clinic days (Monday, Wednes- 
day, and Friday), we would fill 300 to 400 
"prescriptions" (orders written on the 
[ patients chart by the doctor) a day plus the 
orders from the wards. Because of this 
; large volume, it was necessary to "pre- 
i package ' ' as many items as we could. This 
; was one of Ladoyin's main jobs. Tuesday, 



Thursday, and Saturday were spent getting 
ready for the busy clinics and supplying the 
hospital and the dispensaries. 

Since glass bottles and containers were 
still very scarce and expensive, we had to 
use paper envelopes for the tablets and 
capsules and everything from beer bottles 
to perfume bottles for the liquids. The 
envelopes were especially bad because of the 
extremely humid climate which encouraged 
the deterioration of the medicine. Prescrip- 
tion bottles are becoming more readily 
available now though. 

Although some supplies were difficult to 
obtain at times, in general the drugs could 
be obtained more readily than I had antici- 
pated. Many of the British drug concerns 
have wholesale houses in Nigeria and de- 
livery could usually be expected in two or 
three weeks from them. 

It was hard for me to leave the pharmacy 
without anyone in charge except the doctors 
and nurses whose time is needed so much 
in their own work. After we left, we re- 
ceived word that the government had given 
the hospital three months to find a pharma- 
cist or close. There is a great need in this 
country and others for trained medical per- 
(Concluded on page 32) 




One of Village Water Faucets in Ogbomosho 



40 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

III Pharmacy School JVotes 




It was a great loss to the School of 
Pharmacy when Professors Earl T. Brown 
and Paul J. Wurdack resigned from the 
faculty for the coming school year. Dr. 
Brown was Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
and joined the faculty in 1956. He plans 
to return to western North Carolina. Dr. 
Wurdack, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy, 
joined the faculty in 1961. He taught 
Materia Medica and part of the dispensing 
laboratory during the fall semester and 
Pharmaceutical Preparations during the 
spring semester. He plans to return to the 
School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Pittsburgh. 

The School of Pharmacy was pleased to 
receive the generous gift of a silver bon bon 
dish and server from the senior girls of 
Kappa Epsilon. 

The term papers in the senior course of 
Pharmacy Management II taught by Dr. 
A. W. Jowdy were placed in the Pharmacy 
Library as valuable references for future 
students and pharmacists. 

May 9 was a noteworthy date because 
offers for summer positions for under- 
graduate students were received on the same 
day from two North Carolina pharmacies. 
Information on these two positions were 
the only ones received this year, and each 



summer some of the beginning pharmacj 
students find it impossible to gain experienet 
credit due to lack of positions for thf!r 
purpose. 

The School of Pharmacy obtained a neW) 
degree of international recognition with the 
publication of a four-page article about it in'l 
the Korean language written by Yoon Chir 
Kim, graduate student. A number of illus- 
trations were included in the article asJ 
published in ' ' Pharmaceutical Garden, ' ' the! 
journal of the student body, College of Phar- 
macy, Seoul National University. 

John A. Mitchener, III, rising fourth-yearjj 
student from Edenton, was appointed to serve 
for a second year on the Men's Honor 
Council of the University of North Caro-'l 
Una. 

The graduating students were honored 
by the Durham-Orange Drug Club at a] 
dinner meeting held at Schrafft 's Country. 
Inn on April 26. 

The 14th annual Justice Drug Company 
banquet honoring the graduating student, 
was held at the King Cotton Hotel in Greens- j 
boro on May 2. During the afternoon the^ 
students toured through the modern plant' 
of the company. 

The annual election of officers for the stu-j 
dent body of the School of Pharmacy wasj 
held on May 8: President, Tom Smart of I 
Hamlet; Vice President, Heyward Hull of j 
Shelby; and Secretary-Treasurer, Lyndal 
Cauble of Cliff side. 

Seventeen new Instructors of First Aids 
for the American Bed Cross Avere authorized, 
on May 8 by completing the course taught 
by Instructor-Trainer E. A. Brecht. Thea 
new first aid instructors were: fourth-year] 
pharmacy students Donald Beaver of Con-fl 
cord, George Bonald Buchanan of Greens- 1 
boro, Joe David Greeson of Burlington, Gil- 
bert Max Hatley of Oakboro, Connie Mael 
McGee of Charlotte, Gary Walker McKenzie. 
of Fairmont, and Albert Hunter Smith of] 
Fayetteville ; third-year pharmacy students i 
Deane Hughes Bender of Chapel Hill, Wil- 
liam Elliott of Forest City, Larry McCoy of I 
Cove City, John Myhre of Overland Park,; 
Kansas, David Quackenbush of Charlotte, 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



41 



Gary Stamey of Asheville, Lewis Henry 

Stocks of Hookerton; and three residents 

i jof Chapel Hill, Garrett Aldridge, Loyd 

George Kasbo, and Samuel Webster Wilburn. 

Dr. M. A. Chambers, Assistant Dean, and 
JDr. Jack K. Wier, Assistant Professor of 
(Pharmacognosy, represented the School of 
Pharmacy at the testimonial dinner honoring 
Ijj. E. F. Hicks given by the Wayne County 
Pharmaceutical Society at Goldsboro on 
'May 8. 

1 Dean Chambers represented the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association at the 
annual meeting of the North Carolina 
[Academy of Science on May 11 in Winston- 
Salem. 

Pharmacy Week-end was held May 11 and 
12. Fraternity dinners and a semi-formal 
dance at the American Legion Hut were 
held on Friday. On Saturday pharmacy 
students and faculty members played in a 
golf tournament in the morning. In the 
afternoon Phi Delta Chi won the softball 
game against Kappa Psi by a score of 11 to 
10. This was followed by a picnic and an 
informal dance at the Legion Hut. 

On May 14 Mr. H. C. McAllister, Secretary 
of the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy, 
addressed pharmacy students on the purposes 
and requirements for practical experience 
credit. 

The Awards Night program was held on 
May 15. A complete list of the awards is 
published elsewhere in this issue of the 
Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. Alumni 
will be pleased to learn that Dr. H. E. Totten 
was honored with the Distinguished Teaching 
Award for a member of the General Uni- 
versity faculty who has inspired and stimu- 
lated students in his Botany courses through 
the years. Last year Dr. J. T. Dobbins of 
the Chemistry Department received this 
award. Thoughtful gifts to the members of 
the graduating class were distributed from 
the following firms: Eli Lilly & Company, 
Brockway Glass Company, Burroughs- 
Wellcome & Company, The Chapstick Com- 
pany, Merck, Sharp & Dohme, Owens, Minor 
& Bodeker, The Pangburn Company and 
The Upjohn Company. 

Dean E. A. Brecht was installed as presi- 
dent of the Chapel Hill-Durham Chapter of 
the Torch Club on May 16. 

Sorrow was felt in the whole School of 



Pharmacy when graduating student Myra 
Kinlaw, from Lumberton, lost her life in 
an automobile accident on May 19. 

Rho Chi 
The following officers were elected for 
the coming school year by the Xi Chapter 
of the national honorary pharmaceutical 
society: President, Billy Mac Smyre, New- 
ton; Vice President, Meredith Patton, 
Hickory ; Secretary-Treasurer, Margaret Mc- 
Cann, Mount Airy ; and Historian, William 
Patterson, Greenville, S. C. 

Kappa Epsilon 
Founder 's Day Tea was held in the Stu- 
dent Center of Beard Hall on Sunday, May 
13. 

Kappa Psi 

Reported by Frank Freeman, 

Public Relations Chairman 

On Friday, May 11, Beta Xi Chapter held 
its annual banquet in conjunction with 
Pharmacy Week-End. Present at the banquet 
were active members and a majority of the 
faculty. Bill Fuller, regent, opened the 
proceedings with a short speech and an 
introduction of the faculty and other guests. 
Following this was the annual presentation 
of awards. The first award presented was 
the Past Regent 's Award, presented to Bob 
Gibson. The Achievement Award was pre- 
sented to Larry Neal. Larry Denning, re- 
cently initiated into Rho Chi, received the 
Scholarship Award for having achieved the 
highest scholastic average among the active 
members. The Best Pledge Award was 
presented to Frank Freeman. The Reginald 
Ferrell Award was presented by David 
Runnion, outgoing chairman of the awards 
committee, to Bill Fuller. 

Following the awards, a steak supper was 
enjoyed by all. Following the supper, every- 
one attended and enjoyed the dance spon- 
sored by the Pharmacy School. 

On Saturday, May 12, Beta Xi attended 
the annual picnic and following the picnic, 
the dance featuring the Rhythm Rockers 
from Virginia Beach, and a good time was 
had by all. 

Beta Xi would at this time like to thank 
the Pharmacy School and the various com- 
mittees responsible for the past week-end. 



42 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



For seventy-seven years 
• • - since 1885 

SeeMAJi 



OF 



DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long asso- 
ciation with North Caro- 
lina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its forty- 
third volume, and the 
first printed copy was 
"Seeman Printed." 




The Seeman Printery 

of DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



Phi Delta Chi 

Mr. Gilbert Clyde Hartis of Winstoil 
Salem was initiated into honorary member 
ship in the Alpha Gamma Chapter at a dinne 
meeting held at Brady 's on May 7. 

The Outstanding Senior Award was prt 
sented to Brother Fred Chamblee of Can 
boro at the Awards Night program. 

Student Branches — N.C.P.A. and A.Ph.A. 

The election for student branch officers wai 
held on May 8 with the following results 
President, John Myhre, Overland Park 
Kansas; "Vice President, L. H. Stocks 
Hookerton; Secretary, Linda Tennant, Cross 
nore ; Treasurer, Hal McKinnon, Lumberton 
Assistant to the President, Bob Lafferty 
Concord; and Executive Committee Member 
Frank Freeman, Louisburg. The new officer 
were installed at the Awards Night program 

Historical Note 
By Alice Noble, Research Historian 

North Carolina pharmacy is proud of tin 
service records of the members of the pro 
fession who fought for the South in th( 
War Between the States. I am happy this 
month to pay tribute to four Confederal 
soldiers who practiced pharmacy long ago 

(1) J. S. M. Davidson (b. Quincy, Fla. 
Sept, 27, 1830-d. Charlotte, Jan. 16, 1889)! 
who practiced pharmacy in Quincy before 
the War. During the conflict he was ai 
active participant attaining the rank oi 
Major. When peace was declared he move* 
to Charlotte, where he had married, anc 
engaged in the drug business. (2) Henry 
S. Furman, of Franklinton (b. May 9| 
1832-d. about 1907). With the outbreak of 
the War ' ' feeling the obligations of a 
patriotic citizen, he volunteered in 1862 as a| 
private in Company I of the Fifty-Fifth 
regiment, the command in which he was] 1 
associated during the remainder of the four 
years' struggle. After about six months' 
service in the line, his business experience 
and training were availed of by his regi-. 
ment and he was promoted to the rank of 
quartermaster-sergeant, in Avhich capacity he 
rendered faithful and efficient service. He,! 
fought at Gettysburg and saAv service in the 
siege of Richmond and Petersburg, and: 
finally was surrendered at Appomattox."! 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



43 



for many years after the War he conducted 
I successful drug store in Franklinton. (3) 
Ibsolom Lindsey Grimes (b. Davidson Co., 
!»ct. 10, 1843-d. in Thomasville, June 4, 
■889) . "When the tocsin of war sounded 
h 1861 he was among the earliest volunteers. 
■ e was engaged in many a battle, and Avas 
(ommissary Sergeant of the 10th Battalion 
f North Carolina artillery when the banner 
M the South was furled at Appomattox . . . 
to citizen of the county was more beloved 
ban he . . . He was an original member 
If the N.C.P.A. and took much interest in 
Y, rarely failing to attend a meeting." (4) 
*ohn Buxton Williams, M.D. (b. 1884-d. 
Lugust, 1887) — a native of Warren Co. and 
flter of Oxford, where he was associated with 
B O. Furman in the firm of Williams and 
Furma n, Druggists. He served in the Con- 
federate Army with the 43rd N. C. Begi- 
Lent, both in the heavy artillery and in the 
lignal corps. He received the degree of 
\.B. from the University of North Carolina 
\a 1864 and that of M.D. from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in 1868. For ten years 
Le practiced medicine in Franklin Co. and 
then moved to Oxford, where he was not only 



regarded as a medical practitioner of skill 
and experience, but also operated success- 
fully the pharmacy previously mentioned. 



Kecently a friend in New Bern sent to 
me for the museum a copy of the National 
Almanac for the year 1863, published by the 
Gargling Oil Co., of Lockport, N. Y. It is 
an interesting pamphlet. It states that the 
composition and manufacture of the oil 
(characterized as a liniment) were the "re- 
sults of study and application by a practical 
and theoretical chemist, Dr. Geo. W. Mer- 
chant, diplomated (I never heard the expres- 
sion before) by the Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy." The company adds that it 
paid Dr. Merchant $50,000 (no small sum 
even for those days) for the recipe with the 
trade-mark. " G. W. Merchant, Lockport, 
N. Y. " was blown into each bottle and his 
signature was over the cork. I counted 50 
diseases for which the liniment was recom- 
mended. The almanac calendar included not 
only the customary data, but listed im- 
portant occurrences both past and present 
under the heading, "phenomena." 




crowd pleasers a la Lance! 




More people prefer and buy tasty Lance 
snacks than any other brand. And no wonder... 
They're always fresh and there's 

a wide variety to choose from. 
Please your crowd. Display Lance. 



NC. Charlotte, North Carolina 




44 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

This space available at 1 0# per word; mini- 
mum of $3.00. Box numbers assigned and 
replies forwarded to advertiser upon re- 
quest. Mail copy and payment to Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy, Box 151, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 

BALANCES — Prescription balances repaired. 
Contact Phipps & Bird, Inc., P. O. Box 2V, 
Richmond 5, Virginia. Telephone Ml 4-5401. 

FOR SALE — Remington's Practice of Phar- 
macy, 12th Edition. (1961). 1,866 pages. 
Price $22.50. Available from NCPA, Box 
151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

FOR SALE — Oliver's Drug Store, 457 West 
Market Street, Greensboro, N. C. Price: 
Stock at inventory cost plus fixtures. Ideal 
location near Greensboro College and The 
New Towne Motel. Please reply to above 
address. 



New PR Film Available from Lilly 

The importance and necessity of quality 
control in the pharmaceutical industry are 
highlighted in a new motion picture en- 
titled ' ' Quality and People. ' ' Emphasizing 
the role of people rather than regulations, 
the film shows both the man on the street 
and the man on the health team how and 
why pharmaceutical products are subject 
to rigid control procedures. 

A 16mm color film "Quality and People" 
brings into focus many of the problems 
responsible manufacturers face in develop- 
ing raw materials into finished and safe 
medicines. The film also points out that 
quality control does not end when a product 
is packaged. The drug service wholesaler, 
pharmacist, and physician all have an equally 
important part in assuring a patient that 
he receives a quality medicine in exactly the 
right amount and at exactly the right time. 



Filmed at the Indianapolis manufactui 
ing and control facilities of Eli Lilly an 
Company, ' ' Quality and People ' ' is prt 
sented as a public service. Contact you 
Lilly salesman for further information r< 
garding showing of this 25-minute film, 

Jenkins Buys Johnson Drug 

Ronald Jenkins, owner of the Murfrees 
boro Pharmacy, has bought out the Johnso 
Drug Company of Murfreesboro and is noA 
operating the business under the nam 
Chowan Sundry Shop, Inc. 

Wilson Johnson, Jr., who has operated th 
Johnson Drug Company for the past thre 
years, will continue to work with Mr. Jenkin 
at the Murfreesboro Pharmacy. 



Represent NCPA 

The North Carolina Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion was represented at 
(1) The Regional Conference on Aging 
Charlotte, April 13-14, by Jesse Mj 
Pike of Concord. The conference wal 
sponsored by the American Medicai 
Association's Council on Medical Senfl 
ice, Committee on Aging. 
(3) The Chapel Hill (April 13) meeting 1 
hear Philip Desmairais, Deputy Assist] 
ant Secretary of the U. S. Departmen- 
of HEW, present President Kennedy 'I 
program for health "insurance'.; 
through Social Security by W. L. Wes I 
of Eoseboro and NCPA secretary W. J; 
Smith. 

(3) The 59th annual meeting of the NortM 
Carolina Academy of Science, Winston 
Salem, by Dr. Melvin A. Chambers oi 
Chapel Hill. 

(4) The Conference on Health Careers' 
Winston-Salem, May 22, sponsored bjl 
the N. C. Health Council, The Bowmafi 
Gray School of Medicine and Tin 
Nemours Foundation, by Wade A. Gil- 
liam of Winston-Salem and Dean E. A 
Brecht, Dr. M. A. Chambers and W. J 
Smith of Chapel Hill. 

The keynote address at this Confer- 
ence was by George B. Griff enha gen 
Director, Division of Communications 
American Pharmaceutical Association. 





r-* 



^rf^ 






normal demand 

The future holds little opportunity for success for the entrepreneur who 
acks knowledge of business economics. Direct quantity purchasing often 
results in exceeding the normal demand of adequate inventory require- 
ments. Frequently, overstocking necessitates disposing of these commodi- 
pies at a loss. 

In contrast, normal demand is the amount of merchandise that can be 
bought, sold, and paid for within prescribed credit limits. Purchasing 
through us, your service wholesaler, permits suitable inventory to be 
obtained in accordance with normal demand and avoids economic chaos. 
Take advantage of our comprehensive stocks and order from us today. 



WE ARE A 



DISTRIBUTOR 



loktpuw 



ODEKER 




'ukneu&ptwljitb 



1010 Herring Avenue, Wilson, North Carolina 




The W. H. King Drug Company 

"The House of Friendly and Dependable Service" 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

AND ITS ASSOCIATES 

O'Hanlon-Watson Drug Company 
winston-salem, n. c. 
Bfxlamy Drug Company King Drug Company Peabody Drug Company 
wilmington, n. c. florence, s. c. durham. n. c. 




'ke Carolina JOURNAL OF PHARMACY 



Volume XLIII 



JULY, 1962 



Number 7 




Summer calls 

for SURFADIL 



(cyclomethycaine and methapyrilene, Lilly) 



When your customers are plagued with 
summertime skin problems, you can turn 
their frowns to smiles with Lotion Surfadil. 

Surfadil is an effective, rapid-acting com- 
bination of a soothing anesthetic and a 
potent antihistamine plus a protective ad- 



sorbent. It stops minor pain and itchiii 
almost instantly and helps prevent furtrr 
sunburn with its special sunscreen ingi) 
dient, titanium dioxide. 

Suggest Surfadil to your customers— yoi 
build friendships as well as sales. 

Available in 75-cc. spillproof plastic cd 
tainers in appealing counter-display cl 
tons of ten bottles. 



Put Surfadil (Lotion No. 
M-64) on your want list now. 



S8&, 



Eli Lilly and Company • Indianapolis 6, Indiana, U.S 



Now s the Time! 

To Make Your Plans to Attend 

The Sixth Annual 

Justice Holiday Gift Show 

SUNDAY-MONDAY-TUESDAY 

AUGUST 1 2TH, 1 3TH, 14TH 

Hours: 2:00 P.M. to 9:00 P. M. 

Dinner: 6:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M. Each Day 
Smorgasbord by King Cotton Hotel 

Twenty-five manufacturers' representatives, your Justice salesman, 
our Justice staff and a complete selection of back-to-school and Christ- 
mas gift merchandise await your presence. 

Come early and allow plenty of time for shopping our thirty-five 
booths of merchandise. 



4U W & 



[DSC] 




''OCES**-*' 



JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 

Greensboro, N. C. 
64 Years of Service to North Carolina Retail Druggists 




Illuminated Shadow Box Displays in Look Reprints in Full 
Full Color Tempting Color 



NUNNALLY'S ATLANTA • AUGUSTA 



The House of Friendly Service 




Scott Jutug Company 



Service Wholesalers Since 1891 



there's more than profit in M YADECT 

A vitamin Inrmula »iih mineral. 

it's the high-potency vitamin supplement 
you can recommend with confidence 

Nine vitamins with 11 minerals and trace elements formulated to rigid qual- 
ity standards by Parke-Davis. MYADEC is designed for use in prophylaxis or 
treatment whenever vitamin requirements are increased. 
To make more sales and serve your customers better . . . stock and display 
I Parke-Davis I a " ^ sizes. MYADEC is supplied in bottles of 30, 100, and 
L, ...... ...7.1, »... — J 250 capsules. 




The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



July, 1962 

Vol. xliii No. 7 

ik- 
Officers 

NORTH CAROLINA 
PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

* 
President 

John T. Stevenson 
Elizabeth City 

• 

Vice-Presidents 

Hoy A. Moose 
Mount Pleasant 

Harry A. Barringer 
Concord 

W. T. Boone 

Ahoskie 



Secretary-Treasurer 

Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Assistant 

Secretary-Treasurer 

C. M. Andrews 

Burlington 



General Counsel 

E. 0. Bowman 

Chapel Hill 



APHA ANNOUNCES NEW 
PUBLIC RELATIONS SERVICE 

The American Pharmaceutical Association has announced 
the establishment of a new Public Relations Service on a 
year-round subscription basis to help pharmacists explain 
and gain community recognition for their professional 
responsibilities and training. 

Although public relations aids have been available on a 
limited, sporadic basis from the APh.A., other organizations 
and pharmaceutical firms, this year-round subscription 
program is a new concept in pharmaceutical public relations 
which warrants the unqualified support of all pharmacists. 
To be emphasized will be the professionalism of practice and 
the basic reason pharmacists are entitled to respect and just 
remuneration. 

The first year 's service will stress ' ' Your Route To Good 
Health Is Through Your Pharmacist. " To be highlighted 
will be the pharmacist 's role as a 
— dispenser of prescribed medication including all the 

necessary professional services involved, 
— advisor to his community on household health needs in- 
cluding the use of his pharmacy as the health education 
center, 
— authoritative source of drug information for physicians 

and others who prescribe medication, 
— a key member of the world's finest health team. 

Pharmacists who subscribe to the Service will receive a 
basic program supplemented by new materials every four 
months — all for $5.00 a year. All "charter subscribers" 
will receive a beautiful 3 ring vinyl binder with two pockets 
for keeping their PR Service materials, subsequent supple- 
ments and the monthly APh.A. Journal feature PRx Notes. 

To qualify as a " charter subscriber ' ' mail your $5.00 
check to : American Pharmaceutical Association, Public Re- 
lations Service, 2215 Constitution Avenue, XW, Washington 
7, D. C. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Entered as 
second class matter July 5, 1922 at the post office at Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

Moose President-Elect NCPA 



Hoy A. Moose of Mount Pleasant has 
been elected president of the North Caro- 
lina Pharmaceutical Association for 1963- 
64 and will be installed at the Association's 
annual convention scheduled for Pinehurst, 
May 12-14, 1963. 

Other officers-elect, who were chosen in 
mail balloting which has been underway 
for the past thirty days, are Harry A. Bar- 
ringer of Concord, first vice president; W. T. 
Boone of Ahoskie, second vice president; 
Earl H. Tate of Lenoir, third vice president; 
and John T. Stevenson of Elizabeth City, 
currently serving as president of the Associ- 
ation, member of the executive committee for 
a three-year term. 

W. J. Smith of Chapel Hill continues as 
executive secretary and managing editor 
of The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy. 

David D. Claytor. of Greensboro will be 
recommended by the Association for appoint- 
ment as a member of the State Board of 
Pharmacy. He will succeed Eoger A. Mc- 
Duffie of Greensboro who is retiring after 
serving as a member of the Board since 1933. 

F. J. Andrews of Durham, J. C. Jackson 
of Lumberton, Roger A. McDuffie of Greens- 



boro and T. M. Stanback of Salisbury wer[- 
elected directors of the North Carolin 
Pharmacutical Research Foundation. 

Results of the mail balloting were tabu] 
lated and announced by an elections eomj 
mittee consisting of Mrs. Jean Bush Prov| 
of Raleigh, chairman; James L. Creech o 
Smithfield, C. E. Page, Jr. of Henderso 
and Roger H. Sloop of Winston-Salem. 

President-elect Moose is a graduate ol 
the School of Pharmacy, University ol 
North Carolina, and operates the Moo? 
Drug Company of Mount Pleasant. 

He is mayor of Mount Pleasant and ha> 
been serving as town treasurer and a con! 
missioner for the past twenty years. Othe 
activities include director of the Piedmor 
Bank & Trust Company, director of Civ'J 
Defense, member of the Cabarrus Count! 
Morehead Scholarship Committee and tres] 
surer of the Boosters Club of Mount Pleasarfl 
since it organization in 1955. 

Currently, Moose is serving as first vie 1 
president of the North Carolina Pharmaceut 
cal Association. He is a member of th 
North Carolina Academy of Pharmacy anj 
a past secretary-treasurer of the Cabarrufl 
County Pharmaceutical Society. 



Cover Page 




Hoy A. Moose 



Kelly E. Bennett of Bryson City, whe, 
not in his prescription department, is out o 
some mountain top singing the praises ( 
Western North Carolina. He is a 1-ma 
chamber of commerce for the mountai 
region. 

Kelly went to work for a dollar a weel 
helped his father set up a pharmacy i 
1905 ; was serving in the N. C. Senate I 
1917 (youngest member during that sefl 
sion). Served as mayor of Bryson City f( 
14 years ; is a " Pharmacist of the Year jj 
(1954). 

After passing the 70 mark, Kelly is sti 
active in many areas of the religious, civ 
and business life of Western North Carolin. 
He has been characterized as the "Apost 
of the Great Smokies ' ' but he prefers tl| 
simple designation — Mountaineer. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

North Carolina Newsmen Visit Eli Lilly 
and Company 



In a mutual effort to improve the public's 

knowledge of the drug research and develop- 
ment, newsmen from all sections of the 
state recently returned from a three-day 
visit to Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis. 

The N\ C. Pharmaceutical Association, 
local pharmaceutical societies, individuals 
and Lilly cooperated in sponsoring the trip. 
The newsmen toured the vast Lilly research 
and manufacturing facilities and met with 
the industry 's top executives, both informally 
and for a regular press conference. 

It was the first time the $200 million 
dollar-a-year drug firm had opened its 
facilities to an out-of-the-state press group. 
Spokesman for the industry and for the 
North Carolina pharmaceutical representa- 
tives declared the trip quite successful. 

Pictured below and next page are some 
of the individuals who made the trip, which 
was by Piedmont Airlines charter plane from 
"Winston-Salem to Indianapolis on June 13 
and return on June 15. 

Since the return of the newsmen to North 



Carolina, several news and feature stories 
have appeared. To mention a few: "About 
Medicine, Doctors and Such'' by Willard G-. 
Cole in the Lumberton Post; ''Pharmaceuti- 
cal Learning" by Jiggs Powers in the White- 
ville News Eeporter and the State Port Pilot 
of Southport; "Quality, Eesearch and Integ- 
rity Are Watchwords of Miracle Medicines" 
by Don Whitley in the Goldsboro News 
Argus ; ' ' Manufacture of Drugs Is Time- 
Consuming, Expensive ' ' by L. F. Amburn, 
Jr. in the Statesville Record & Landmark; 
"Newsmen of State Tour Labs and Produc- 
tion Lines of Drug House" by Bill Wright 
in The Fayetteville Observer ; ' ' Newspaper- 
men Get Behind The Scene Look At Eli 
Lilly Firm" by Fred O. Sink, Jr. in The 
Lexington Dispatch and 2-col. story in the 
High Point Enterprise by Braxton Younts. 
One of the newsmen was so impressed with 
his brief visit to the Lilly Laboratories that 
he intends to return for a longer stay to 
pick up sufficient information for a series of 
feature stories. 

(Continued on page 9) 




LILLY PRESS GROUP. (Left to right) W. J. Smith, NCPA; Bill Noblitt, 
Shelby Daily Star; Tom Mclntyre, Gastonia Gazette; L. F. Amburn, Jr., Statesville 
Daily Record-Landmark; Bill Wright, Fayetteville Observer; Don Whitley, Goldsboro 
News-Argus; Don Seaver, Charlotte Observer; Braxton Y'ounts, Jr., High Point Enter- 
prise; Charlie Cross, Piedmont Airlines; Penn Gray, Lumberton Robesonian; Pete 
Dickens, Piedmont Airlines; Jiggs Powers, Whiteville News Reporter; Peter B. Young 
(with bag), Raeford News-Journal; Stanley Anderson, Piedmont Airlines; Willard G. 
Cole, Lumberton Post; Fred O. Sink, Jr., Lexington Dispatch, David McGowan, Lilly 
MSR; and Arnold Kirk, Kannapolis Daily Independent. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



N. C. Newsmen Visit Lilly 
Laboratories 

Top: Some of the Lilly executives are 
shown during a press conference set up 
especially for the visiting newsmen. Right : 
Fred O. Sink, Jr. of the Lexington Dispatch 
checks out a capsule-filling operation with 
one of Lilly's tour guides. 

Second Row: Four of the visitors (Jiggs 
Powers of the Whiteville News Eeporter in 
center) listen intently to guide's explana- 
tion of a flow chart. Right: Don Seaver 
of The Charlotte Observer, W. J. Smith of 
the NCPA, David MeGowan, Lilly MSR, 
and Piedmont's Charlie Cross prior to de- 
parture for Indianapolis. 

Third Row: Penn Gray (center) of the 
Lumberton Robesouian with a handful of 
gallstones. Right: Don Seaver gets a 
close-up view of one of Lilly's numerous 
mechanical devices on the production line. 

Bottom: NCPA's W. J. Smith with George 
Finney, Lilly's assistant director of guest 
relations, who was directly in charge of the 
press group while in Indianapolis. 

Right: Fred O. Sink, Jr. of the Lexing- 
ton Dispatch, Braxton Younts, Jr. of the 
High Point Enterprise and L. F. Amburns, 
Jr. of the Statesville Daily Record and 
Enterprise view a pictorial chart involving 
the production of ampoule medication. 

All pictures by Roland Giduz of the News 
of Orange County. 



NEWSMEN VISIT LILLY 

(Continued from page 7) 

Typical of some of the comments : 

Braxton Younts in the High Point Enter- 
prise : ' ' For one whose previous association 
with the manufacture of pharmaceuticals 
had consisted in getting an occasional pre- 
scription filled, the trip was most educa- 
tional." 

L. F. Amburn, Jr. in the Statesville 
Record & Landmark: "It was the most 
educational day and a half I have ever 
spent. The tour made ' ' believers ' ' of every- 
one in the group, and it was not filled with 
propaganda. They explained the reasons for 
the cost of drugs and then let the newsmen 
see for themselves how the drugs are pro- 
duced — from the research stage on up 
through shipment to points worldwide. The 
trip would have opened the eyes of Senator 
Estes Kef auver. ' ' 

Bill Wright in The Fayetteville Observer: 
' ' There was the feeling this was an attempt 
by the drug house to bring the public micro- 
scope on its operations into clearer focus; to 
correct the image of those from whom the 
public must get its information. To do this 
the company pulled out all stops on candid- 
ness. ' ' 

Jiggs Powers in the Whiteville News 
Reporter: "We feel sure we speak for all 
members of the N. C. fourth estatemen who 
made the trip when we say our trip to the 
fine Eli Lilly and Company plants in Indi- 
anapolis will never dim in our memories. 
The hospitality of Lilly and associated 
sponsor, NCPA, and local pharmacists will 
never be forgotten." 



Pharmacist of the Year Dinner Scheduled for Yancey ville 

Plans for the "Pharmacist of the Year" dinner, scheduled for Yanceyville on Wednes- 
day night, July 25, 7 P.M., at the Bartlett Yancey School Cafeteria, have been announced 
by the NCPA. To be honored as ' ' Pharmacist of the Year ' ' is Thomas J. Ham, Jr., a 
past president of the NCPA and presently Chairman of the NCPA-Institute Endowment 
Fund. 

Guest speakers include S. M. Bason, President of the Bank of Yanceyville; Erwin D. 
Stephens, Editor of the Caswell Messenger; Dr. Houston L. Gwynn, a local physician; and 
J. C. Jackson of Lumberton, who will cover Mr. Ham's efforts in advancing Pharmacy in 
North Carolina. 

Dinner tickets ($4) may be obtained from the NCPA, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Ladies are most welcome — many will attend. Dress will be informal. 



WHO PUT THE ALL IN FALL PROFITS? 




FALL PROMOTION IN 



The Saturday Evening 



FEATURING ... MY HOBBY BOX — stock all sizes for maximum sales this Fall! 
MONTREAT CHOCOLATES — a new design for new sales! 
GET ALL YOUR FALL PROFITS... 





IU« USUAL/ CANDIES /""*'* 



SHOW HOLLINGSWORTH'S 
NEW SHADOW BOX — dramati- 
cally feature your best selling 
chocolates ... as seen in THE 
SATURDAY EVENING POST... 1 ; 
in this new illuminated display! 



SEE YOUR HOLLINGSWORTH'S REPRESENTATIVE — for the best selection of your most START THIS BIG POST PROMOTION 
profitable chocolates, order early and assure best Fall delivery. A complete POST Promotion SELLING FOR YOU ... EARLY! HOI 
sales kit is yours for the asking. 



LINGSWORTH'S PUT THE_ALL IN FALL 
PROFITS! 



HOLLINGSWORTH'S UNUSUAL CANDIES • AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



Hogan Named Vice President of BC 



Milton E. Hogan, Jr., vice president and 
trust officer of the Durham office of the 
North Carolina National Bank, has ac- 
cepted a position as vice president of the 
B. C. Eemedy Company, effective July 1, it 
was announced today by B. C. Remedy's 
President Dewey S. Minis. 

Hogan, a native of Chapel Hill, came to 
Durham in 1948 as comptroller with De- 
positors National Bank, which through 
merger is now North Carolina National 
Bank. 

As trust officer he has been closely con- 
nected with the B. C. Remedy Company, 
jand has served as a member of the Board 
iof Directors of the Company for the past 
Itwo years. 

Hogan graduated from the University of 
North Carolina in 1939. For two years he 
was associated with the Planters National 
Bank and Trust Company in Rocky Mount. 
In 1941 he was named a bank examiner with 
the TJ. S. Treasury Department, working in 
the Fifth Federal Reserve District out of 
Richmond. 

On leave of absence from the Treasury 
Department, he enlisted in 1942 as a private 
in the U. S. Army. During four years of 
Army service, he was commissioned an 
officer in the Anti-Aircraft Artillery and 
was later assigned to the War Department 
under the Adjutant General. 

Since coming to Durham, Hogan has been 
active in many community activities includ- 
ing treasurer and director of the Cancer 
Society and the Child Guidance Clinic ; 
president of Durham-Orange County Heart 
Association, member of the United Fund 
Budget Committee, Allied Arts, Occoneechee 
Boy Scout Council Finance Committee, and 
chairman, Tobacco Market Promotion Fund. 

He is presently affiliated with a number 
of organizations including the Sales Execu- 
tive Club, Lions Club, Chamber of Com- 
merce, Raleigh-Durham Bond Club, and the 
Trust Section of the North Carolina Bank- 
ers ' Association. 

He is a member of St. Philips Episcopal 
Church. 



Hogan is married to the former Edith 
Horsfield. They have two children, Alice 
Holt and Richard. The Hogans live at 1500 
Alabama Avenue in Durham. 



Sue over Name, Mark 
Hart Laboratories, Inc. of Clemmons has 
instituted legal action in the Forsyth 
Superior Court to prevent a retail pharmacy 
of Winston-Salem from using the trade name 
(Hart Drug Company) and a trade name (a 
red heart). 

Originally, Hart Drug Company operated 
in Winston-Salem as Dart Drug Company. 

Hart Laboratories, Inc. is sueing for 
$50,000 and an order restraining Dart Drug 
from doing business as Hart Drug Com- 
pany. 

Hart Laboratories alleges it was the first 
and original owner of the trade name "Hart" 
and that it spent time and care in building a 
reputation. It is also claimed the defendant 
advertises and uses a red heart with the name 
"Hart" written thereon, almost identical to 
the plaintiff's mark. 





Milton E. Hogan, Jr. 




Time-tested formula 

Time-tested acceptance 

Time-tested profit-maker 



Your customers have a choice when they buy 
"BC". America's fastest-selling headache 
powders or the popular "BC" tablets 



Over 100 Million Packages Per Year 

backed by concentrated local and 

national advertising 



B. C. REMEDY COMPANY 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



13 



How to Profitably Sell to Your Pharmacy's Customers 
While Gaining Physician and Public Respect 



By David R. Uran 



Anyone who waits on a customer in a 
pharmacy can cause that customer to come 
jback often. ... or never return again. 
Each sale can be more or less profitable, 
depending on the knowledge, ability and 
personal interest of the sales person. 

The sales made can increase the reputation 
of the pharmacy or can damage it by 

i eventually offending physicians and custom- 
ers. When selling proprietary or home 
treatment medicines, unless certain rules 

•and precautions are followed, the impression 
of being a counter-prescriber may be given. 
Every time a sale is made of such com- 
monly sold products as laxatives, indigestion 
or headache remedies, unless certain selling 

.rules are followed, any pharmacy can lessen 
its professional reputation. It is possible 

s to sell such products in a way that protects 
your customers against harm, increases phy- 

isician and customer respect and at the same 

time helps to increase prescription volume. 

All this factual information is gathered 

; from data secured from observations of 
selling methods of more than 2000 phar- 
macies; among them some of the most suc- 

• cessful in the United States and Canada. 
When a pharmacist receives his license to 
practice pharmacy he is granted certain 

.' privileges and in return assumes definite 
responsibilities. One of them is the selling 
of home treatment drugs that may be 

I potentially dangerous if used improperly. 
An important problem affecting the future 

. success of every pharmacy is the growing 
tendency for people to buy medicines from 
other sources than a pharmacy. If you 
permit soda clerks, delivery boys, cosmetic 
girls or the porter to sell medicines, then 

, your customers will assume that the immedi- 
ate supervision of a pharmacist is not 
needed. If they believe this to be a fact, 
is there any good reason why they should not 
purchase medicines anywhere? 

But, the knowledge of a pharmacist, 
properly used, is essential for the safety of 
the public. Otherwise great harm can be 
caused by improperly using many of the 
medicines now being advertised for over- 



the-counter sale. Many of your customers 
are over-dosing themselves with headache 
remedies, cough medicines, laxatives or 
stomach mixtures — getting a temporary re- 
lief while masking a serious problem. It 
is the duty of a pharmacist to search out 
these people and properly advise them to 
go to a physician. 

Recently, in New York State, Kenneth S. 
Griswold, Secretary of the Board of Phar- 
macy, used his influence to have a regula- 
tion approved which forbids anyone but a 
pharmacist or a senior or junior pharmacy 
student, under the immediate supervision of 
a licensed pharmacist, to sell certain pro- 
prietaries, including aspirin and its com- 
pounds. Whether or not you have such a 
law, it is sound judgment to follow this 
procedure. Let your customers see that 
you are trying your best to protect their 
interests. If you do, then you can right- 
fully expect them to secure all their medi- 
( Continued on page 14) 

DAVID R. URAN 

The author of this paper, David R. Uran, 
spent eight years with an advertising agency 
as a copy writer and promotional manager. 
He is president of the Ethical Drug Advertis- 
ing Company, which he founded in 1946. 

He is a member of three national phar- 
maceutical societies and is also executive 
secretary of two local ones. 

Mr. Uran's ethical ads have set the 
standards for pharmacy publicity. His 
economic reports are frequently presented to 
national and state pharmaceutical conven- 
tions. 

Recently, the headquarters of Ethical Drug 
Advertising Company were moved from New 
York to Atlanta, Georgia. Clients of the 
Company — there are many in North Caro- 
lina — have already r been notified. 

In addition to presenting this talk at 
the 1962 NCPA Convention, Mr. Uran ad- 
dressed the annual meeting of the N. C. 
Academy of Pharmacy, which was scheduled 
as a part of the convention. 



u 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



HOW TO PROFITABLY SELL 

ciues from you because you are a pharmacist, 
for to buy from anyone else might be 
dangerous. 

In order to specifically illustrate how 
easy it is for any pharmacy to lose its pro- 
fessional reputation almost overnight, con- 
sider these facts before you sell your next 
obesity remedy. Recent harmful publicity 
about these products perfectly illustrates 
the inherent danger to prestige. 

In 1956 I wrote the following report, 
which unfortunately received limited public- 
ity: 

Some Facts About Obesity and 
Reducing Remedies 

There is so much publicity about being 
overweight that almost everyone in the drug 
industry is putting out a weight reducer. 
The opportunity to sell such products easily 
may cause you to overlook possible long- 
term loss of confidence by customers who do 
not benefit. 

There are four types of reducing-aids now 
being advertised : 

1. Candies, containing some vitamins, re- 
ported to lessen appetite by raising blood- 
sugar levels. There is no evidence of this 
because diabetics who have very high 



// 



Make, McGawU 

For Labels -in Rolls or Flats 
Physicians 1$ Blanks and Files 

Drug Boxes - Call Checks 
Drug and Delivery Envelopes 



all Styled, and Galo-ld. 



EHSHEi 



42-54 BENNETT 
STREET 




BRADFORD, 
PENNA. 



Specializing in Labels for Drug Stores 

Clifford P. Berry, Representative 
P. O. Box 306, Charlotte 1, N. C. 



level blood-sugar contents often have! 
terrific appetites. 

2. Bulk producing drugs, that swell when 
they absorb water and fill up the stomach, 
to diminish hunger. Medical research 
discloses that these medicines, of thel 
methylcellulose type, rapidly pass from! 
the stomach to the lower intestines andl 
then have little effect. 

3. Various types of passive exercise or 
massaging equipment, advertised to re- 
duce any part of the body to which they 
are applied. 

4. Drugs which have some effect on the cen- 
tral nervous system to reduce appetite 
and burn up excess fat. The amphet- 
amines are prescriptions restricted for 
good reasons but some products contain- 
ing phenylpropanolamine can be sold 
over the counter. They work for a while.l 
but the body builds up a tolerance to 
them and the larger doses then needed 
can cause harmful side effects. 

(Note: This was written before Metracal.) 

Many of your customers will tell you that, 
after taking these reducing remedies, they 
lost weight. Since a very small percentage 
are obese because of a glandular imbalance, 
any method that causes people to eat less 
will help. These advertised remedies claim 
it is possible to reduce without dieting, but 
their instructions suggest a lower calorie 
intake. 

People get fat because they eat more than 
they need. When they eat less they reduce. 
If they continue eating less they do not 
gain the lost weight back. Contrary to 
general belief, if excess weight is not more 
than 20% above ideal weight for height, 
no harm usually results. There is more 
danger reducing, then gaining back again 
and reducing and gaining constantly. 

The ideal advice you can give any customer 
is to diet only under a physician 's super- 
vision. Unfortunately, all of them will 
not follow this advice. Therefore, when you 
sell any reducing remedy you should explain 
both benefits and disadvantages. 

If the customer will follow the diet 
instructions it can be helpful. Anything 
that gives a definite plan to encourage 
regular proper dieting is beneficial. They 
can lose weight. Also explain that after 
a few months, if they go back to old eating 
habits they will gain the weight right back. 

When you sell that way you will not be 
blamed by the customer who regains weight. 
Particularly if you state that a physician's 
guidance and prescriptions is a better and 
safer method. " 

Among the most popular remedies sold 
are products for indigestion. The public 
considers them to be harmless and there- 
fore they can safely buy them at cigar 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 



counters, gas stations or any other location. 
'These sales have been lost to pharmacy and 
Jmany people rushed into an earlier grave 

because pharmacists have not taken the 
jtime to explain the possible dangers involved 

I to those who repeatedly take them. Con- 
sider these researched facts : 
What You Should Know When Selling 

Indigestion Remedies 
Indigestion is not a disease, out a symp- 
,tom. Nausea, vomiting, heartburn, pain in 
the chest, abdominal pain, gas or belching 
are all considered indigestion. The patent 
medicine advertisers talk about stomach 
, upset and hyperacidity. They imply an 
■ antacid or alkalizer drug can restore the 
, digestive tract to normalcy and relieve indi- 
gestion. 

But, modern research discloses any of the 
above symptoms can occur when the normal 
proportion of acid is present in the stomach 
juices and hyperacidity is not the chief 
cause of stomach distress. 

The average so-called indigestion is usual- 



ly a temporary condition, generally due to a 
nervous reaction or something eaten. For 
such a condition most any of the packaged 
indigestion remedies are helpful. Belief 
is usually speedy and the patient gets 
better more quickly than without taking 
any medication. 

Trouble develops ichen indigestion symp- 
toms constantly re-occur; are temporarily 
relieved, giving a false sense of security, 
while a serious cause of these symptoms is 
being masked and great harm can develop. 
Indigestion symptoms may be caused by: 

1. A gastric or duodenal ulcer. 

2. Gall bladder or pancreas disease. 

3. A remote sign of diaphragm, heart, 
liver or a brain disorder. 

4. A systemic disease such as cancer or 
tuberculosis. 

5. A reaction from antibiotic, hormone or 
tranquilizer medication. 

6. Pelvic organ disorders. 

7. The first symptom of a coronary heart 

(Concluded on page 17) 




PEABOD* DRUG CC iPANY fU 



305 W. PETTIGREW STREET 
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 




Each day your prescription business 
becomes more important to you . . . and to us. 

And, to merit your business, we want to remind 

you of the services that only a full-line, 

full-service wholesaler can give — 

We feature complete stocks of pharmaceuticals 

We stock all new items 

We furnish full information on new specialties and 

We deliver the product when you need it! 



WHAT'S IM A 



100? 



Of course, there are 100 cap- 
sules by count. But are you 
sure they always add up to 
100 per cent in quality? 

Every timeyou need a drug 
for your family, don't you 
choose a brand name? And 
doesn't the reputation be- 
hind that name stand for 
top quality? When the prod- 
uct bears the Lederle name, 
you know the quality is 100 
per cent. Do you honestly 
feel that way about a "just- 
as-good," cut-price generic? 
The next time a patient 
comes in with a generic Rx, 
give him the benefit of your 
ownpersonaltrust 
...give him the full s 
100 per cent... a Lederie or 
other brand- name product. 




LEDERLE LABORATORIES 

A Division of 

AMERICAN CYANAMID COMPANY 

Pearl River, New York 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 



HOW TO PROFITABLY SELL 

(Continued from page 15) 
attack, which can be an indigestion or 
pain in the pit of the stomach. 
8. Practically any serious or systemic 
disease may have indigestion as an 
accompanying symptom. 
All the above information is important to 
remember because every time you sell an 
indigestion remedy you are risking your 
reputation unless you observe certain pre- 
cautions. If your customer happens to have 
a stomach upset due to a serious cause, when 
he finally does go to a physician for relief, 
both of them will blame you for not advis- 
ing your customer to get there sooner. 

You must sell packaged indigestion 
remedies, but sell them in this way : 

1. Ask the customer if his indigestion oc- 
curs more than two or three times each 
successive month — 

2. Or, if any vomiting symptom has lasted 
more than a few hours — 

3. Or, if he has a single severe attack 
accompanied by much pain. 

If the answer is yes to any of these ques- 
tions — Advise him to go to a physician. This 
is not only your duty as a pharmacist but 
a protection against future severe criticism. 

Do not get the impression that I am 
opposed to the sale of over-the-counter 
remedies. There are many occasions when 
the relief they offer is helpful, providing 
certain precautions are observed. The chief 
reason why people buy such products any- 
where is their dangers have not been proper- 
ly explained. And, people will not blame 
a supermarket if repeated purchases of 
headache remedies have masked symptoms 
and permitted a serious condition to take 
hold. But, they will lose faith in a phar- 
macist who has the knowledge to guide them 
and doesn't. 

How Can You Sell Patent Medicines 

Without Offending Physicians, While Also 

Protecting Your Customers and Your 

Reputation? 

Every thinking pharmacist, who notices 
customers repeatedly buying medicines, 
should advise them that they would be 

wiser to consult a physician, who can find out 
the cause of the trouble. 



People want to buy home remedies and you 
just can't tell them not to get them and go 
to a physician for every minor discomfort 
or pain. Most patent medicines do offer 
some relief. Supplying pre-packaged medi- 
cines is not counter -prescribing, when the 
customer asks for them by name or requests 
a good product — if they tell you the purpose 
they want it for. You must never diagnose 
the condition. 

But, always remember that every time you 
sell a packaged medicine, a certain percent- 
age of the buyers will not be sufficiently 
helped and then will consult their physician. 
The first thing they will tell the physician 
is, "I got a bottle of Blank cough medicine 
from Blank's pharmacy and it didn't help 
me. What shall I do, Doctor?" They will 
not tell their physician they asked you for 
this product. 

Then the physician — and who can really 
blame him — will say, ' ' Don 't you know 
better than to let a druggist prescribe medi- 
cines for you. Next time come to me right 
away before you become as sick as you now 
are." That physician has you in his mind 
as a counter-prescriber. Overnight, you can 
lose your professional reputation. This is 
most unfair to the pharmacy, but knowing 
an injustice is being done to you does not 
solve the problem. You must sell in a ivay to 
prevent this trouble. 

Everytime you sell any packaged medi- 
cine, as you are wrapping up the package, 
you Must say to the customer, "This is a 
good product and should help you. But, if 
relief does not come soon, go to your phy- 
sician so he can find out what your trouble 
really is. ' ' 

Xow, if the customer has to go to the 
physician, she will say, "I bought a bottle 
of cough medicine from Blank's pharmacy 
and he told me to go and cheek with you if 
it didn 't help. ' ' Your ethical reputation is 
secure. The physician and the customer 
will both like you more. If every pharmacy 
would sell in this manner, professional 
reputation and customer good-will would 
increase. Greater profits would result for 
people would realize the importance of 
securing all medicines from a pharmacist. 
And, most important of all, many lives 
would be saved. 



18 



Tile Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



NCPA Executive Committee 
Meets in Chapel Hill 

The NCPA Executive Committee, meeting 
in ('Impel Hill on June 27, heard reports 
from President Stevenson and Secretary 
Smith ill the area of VA Pharmacy Service, 
the NCPA-sponsored newsmen visit to Lilly, 
Pharmacist of the Year program and new 
local-sectional pharmaceutical societies. 

Local and national legislation, with em- 
phasis on the Quality Stabilization Bill, was 
the subject of a lengthy report to be con- 
sidered by the committee. Also discussed 
was a forthcoming program of the Extension 
Division Committee under the direction of 
Dr. Melvin Chambers. 

Committee members present for the meet- 
ing in addition to President Stevenson, who 
presided, were Harry A. Barringer of Con- 
cord, W. T. Boone of Ahoskie, Robert B. 
Hall of Mocksville, Sam W. McFalls of 
Greensboro, Hoy A. Moose of Mount Plea- 
sant and W. J. Smith of Chapel Hill. 

Edwin R. Fuller of Salisbury was unable 
to attend. He was installed as president 
of the Salisbury Lions Club at the exact time 
the committee was in session in Chapel Hill. 

Self-Policing Plan Endorsed 

At the 2:00 P.M. session of the executive 
committee, officers and directors of the Cape 
Fear Pharmaceutical Society outlined de- 
tails of a self-policing plan which the 
Society wishes to undertake in the 10 county 
area comprising the Society's membership 
area. 

The proposal Avas unanimously adopted by 
the executive committee and the secretary 
instructed to transmit the committee's ap- 
proval of the proposal to the State Board of 
Pharmacy. 

Officers of the Society present for the 
meeting were Hubert Rogers of Lumberton, 
J. I. Thomas of Dunn, and Cade Brooks 
of Fayetteville. Directors present were 
Mrs. Herman Lynch of Dunn, J. C. Jackson 
of Lumberton, John Henley of Hope Mills 
;iik1 W. L. West of Roseboro. 
Rules Adopted 

The concluding business of the day was 
the adoption by the executive committee of 
eleven rules to implement the Association's 



Code of Ethics. Present during this session [ 
were members of the NCPA State Judicial 
Council and officers-directors of the Cape 
Fear Pharmaceutical Society. 

The eleven rules adopted by the committee 
will he published with a copy going to each 
member of the NCPA. 

Also approved was a procedure setup 
(discipline) to be followed by the Judicial 
Councils at hearings involving alleged viola- 
tions of the rules. Eventually it is antici- 
pated the suggested procedure will lie a part 
of the Association 's by laws. 

Another Loan Fund Established 

Another non-interest pharmacy student 
loan fund has been established as a part of 
the Consolidated Pharmacy Fund of the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association. 

The latest addition to the Fund has been 
named in honor of Stacy Buckner Hall, the 
father of Robert B. Hall, immediate past 
president of the NCPA. 

Mr. Hall, a native of Cumberland County, 
received his license to practice pharmacy 
in 1925 ; has been in Mocksville since 1929, 
most of the time with the Hall Drug Com- 
pany. 

Two Tar Heels Appear on 
Virginia Program 

Two North Carolina pharmacists — Thomas 
J. Ham, Jr. of Yanceyville and H. C. Mc- 
Allister of Chapel Hill — were guest speakers 
on the recent (July 8-10) program of the 
Virginia Pharmaceutical Association, held 
at Roanoke, Virginia. 

Mr. Ham's subject was "Patterns of Prog- 
ress" which was part of the Association's 
Section on Pharmacy Economics. Pharmacy 
during the past 25 years — its problems and 
its progress — was discussed by Mr. Mc- 
Allister under the title "Profession or 
Pandemonium." 

Pays After 38 Years 

Howard Yandle says his faith in humanity 
lias been restored. Sutton's Drug Store, 
Chapel Hill, was established in 1923. Re- 
cently, a prescription filled and charged by 
Sutton's in 1924 was paid by mail. In going 
through some old papers, the customer came 
across Sutton's 38-year-old unpaid state- 
ment ; mailed cash in settlement. 

It was a 40c prescription. 



Oft > vn 



ilpf 1* ^ $f-> 'mt >« '**%!* •**•■**' ** 



ITCHY 




SELL SOPRONOL 



relieves athlete's foot 




quickly and safely 


brings 


SOPRONOL DEAL BRINGS YOU THESE BIG PROFITS 


your 
profits 
up to 


get POWDER SOLUTION OINTMENT 
buy free 2 oz. 5 oz. 2fl.oz. 1 oz. 4 oz. 


116 28 53.1% 54.6% 53.1% 53.1% 52.8% 
60 12 51.5% 53.1% 51.5% 51.5% 51.1% 
21 3 49.1% 50.7% 49.1% 49.1% 48.7% 
11 1 46.7% 48.4% 46.7% 46.7% 46.3% 


54.6 % * 



Propionate-caprylate Compound, Wyeth 



SOPRONOL 



y^.-kiute^^t 



V V 



til ' 



•Based on minimum direct order 
$50.00 when sold at R.F.T. 



Wyeth Laboratories Philadelphia 1, Pa. 




From SK&F — for the pharmacist 

overdosage information — one of the many 
services offered to pharmacists by SK&F 

SK&F regularly supplies pharmacists with product in- 
formation pages containing overdosage information. 
Other SK&F services available to you are: 

• Pharmacy News — published expressly for 
pharmacists. 
• Medical films suitable for lay audiences- 
write for a copy of the SK&F Medical 
Film catalog. 

• Comprehensive physician's literature 
on new SK&F products. 

• Speakers Bureau — SK&F representa- 
tives speak before your organization on 

matters of medical and health progress. 

• Disaster assistance— if you become the 
victim of a natural disaster not normally 
covered by insurance— such as a flood, hur- 
ricane, or tornado — which damages SK&F 
products, contact your SK&F representative for 
assistance (the amount of consideration granted 
will depend on the circumstances in each individual 
case). 
• Newspaper mats — two-column advertisements (with 
ample space for your pharmacy's name and address) de- 
fending the profession of pharmacy— suitable for use in your 
local newspaper or for reprinting as handouts for your customers. 
To take advantage of these services yourself, write to Smith Kline 
& French Laboratories, 1500 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia 1, Pa. 

SMITH KLINE & FRENCH LABORATORIES, PHILADELPHIA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 



Buy Interest in Main Drug 

The interest of the late L. B. Joiner in 
he Main Drug Company of Salisbury has 
>een sold to Bobby Clay Lindsey and 
Denharn Holshouser. 

Mr. Holshouser has been associated with 
Jain Drug since 1941. Mr. Lindsey, a 
graduate in pharmacy from the University 
bf Tennessee, started work with Main Drug 
(vhen he was in high school. In recent years 
he has been employed by Purcell's. 
! Pharmacist W. A. Parks continues with 
(\Iain Drug. 

To Open in Mount Airy 

Ernest Eandleman has returned to Mount 
\iry from Washington, D. C, where he has 
been employed in recent years. 

As soon as a new building is completed on 
West Lebanon Street in the north end of 
Mount Airy, Mr. Eandleman plans to open 
Randleman Drugs. 

Attend P-D Class in Washington 

Among the 44 newly employed sales repre- 
sentatives who attend a week-long Parke- 
Davis medical and sales training class in 
Washington, June 17-23, were S. P. Vandi- 
viere of Chapel Hill and H. T. White of 
Salisbury. 

New Pharmacy for Monroe 

To celebrate the opening of their new 
pharmacy in Monroe — Faulkner's Drugs — ■ 
Edward G. Faulkner and his son, Gary, gave 
away a riding lawn mower and a silver- 
plated tea service. In addition, visitors to 
the pharmacy during a 2-day period received 
gifts, including carnations to the first 100 
women customers. 

Open in Charlotte 

Clarence L. Swearngan and James S. 
Thomas opened their new pharmacy — East- 
wood Drug Center — located opposite the 
Eastwood Golf Course of Charlotte on June 
15. 

Prior to going into business for themselves, 
both pharmacists were associated with Walk- 
er Drugs of Charlotte. Mr. Swearngan is a 
graduate of the UNC School of Pharmacy 
and his partner graduated from Howard 
College in 1951. 



Pharmacy Re-established in Oakboro 

Jesse Pike of Concord has added a fourth 
pharmacy to his operation by re-establishing 
a pharmacy in quarters recently vacated by 
Tollison's Pharmacy of Oakboro. 

Arthur B. Jones, who has been working 
witli Mr. Pike in Concord, will manage the 
new pharmacy. 

In addition to two pharmacies in Concord, 
a third member of the Pike group of stores 
is Pike's Drug Store of Locust. It is 
managed by Ellison Neal. 

Service Pharmacy Closed 

Donald Bissett has closed the Service 
Pharmacy (formerly Peacock Drug Com- 
pany) and is now associated with Johnson's 
Drug Store, Lumberton. 

Part of the drug stock was sold to the 
Benson Drug Company and part moved to 
Lumberton where it has been included as 
part of the inventory of Johnson Drug Store. 

Mr. Bissett bought the Peacock Drug 
Company last year from the heirs of the late 
Moses Peacock, who founded the pharmacy 
more than 50 years ago. Prior to locating 
in Benson, Mr. Bissett was manager of a 
Garner pharmacy. 



STROTHER 
DRUG COMPANY 

of Richmond, Inc. 
3700 Saunders Avenue 

POWERS-TAYLOR DRUG CO. 
Richmond, Va. 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 

Full Line 

Full Service 

Member of 
Druggists Service Co. 

National Wholesale 
Druggists Association 

For Best Service Call Us 

Collect 

353-2771 

After Hours Call 
353-2777 







A Check-out Section with Con- 
fections, Gifts and impulse items 
at point of sale. 




The Lumilite Canof 
spotlights your Profe 
sional Service an 
adds prestige to th 
most important di 
partment. 






Self-Service for Hair Needs and 
Toiletries well displayed for quick 
sales. 



The "KEY" Word 

in Modern Store 

Fixtures is . . . 




Self-Service Wall Displayers wi' 
glass enclosed Cosmetic Inse 
Section. 



VERSATILITY 




These merchandisers and 
many more are produced 
on a quantity basis to give 
you quality displays at 
lowest possible prices. 



A Curved Glass Showcase for 
your Gift or Cosmetic Section 
lends Glamour to your displays. 




1 

• We are planning to 


□ Modernize ■ 

□ Expand 

□ Build New Store* 






| r.ity 


State | 








Gondolas with Glass Shelves ar 
carton storage below for yow 
finest self-service displays. 



Display Front Wrapping Count- 
ers increase impulse sales. 






Special Design for increasin 
Camera and Film sales. 



GRANT E. KEY, Inc. 

Manufacturers 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 




Self-Service Gondolas for most 
flexible displays. 



Modernistic Display for increa; 
ing Sales of your finest Cosmetic: 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



23 




CAR HEEL DIGEST 

Bryson City — Bruce Hawkins has been 
ippointed to the State Board of Elections 
lj Governor Sanford. 

Spencer- — Paul Miller has been named a 
nember of the North Bowan High School 
■nd Spencer Elementary School committees. 
He is president of the Rowan-Davie Phar- 
maceutical Society. 

Sylva — The Sylva Pharmacy has moved 

text door to a building with double the 
pace utilized in its former location. Mrs. 
Klex Howard is general manager ; Robert 
ivemp, the pharmacist. 

i Wilmington — A group of six teenage em- 
ployees of Lane's Brooklyn Pharmacy have 
been charged by police with embezzling 
iin estimated $3,000 in cash from the 
iharmaey. 

Kings Mountain — A brief but severe wind 
storm ripped out the plate glass windows 
)f the Kings Mountain Pharmacy and the 
Vtedical Pharmacy in late May. Both 
)harmaeies suffered extensive water damage. 

Rutherfordton — Charles F. Turner has ac- 
cepted a position with the Rutherford Drug 
Company. He is a past president of the 
Cleveland County Pharmaceutical Society. 

Thomasville — Tommy Harris and Frank 
Murr of the Mann stores of Thomasville 
iave been presented certificates for prize- 
vinning ads in The Thomasville Times. 
The contest was sponsored by the News- 
paper Advertising Executives Association 
bf the Carolinas. 



Hamlet— F. E. Campbell, Campbell Phar- 
macy, is emoted in The Hamlet News- 
Messenger: "Hamlet is going to spread 
suddenly, like a barrel with the hoops 
broken out." 

Greensboro — William H. (Bill) Barton 
of Pleasant Garden was one of three suc- 
cessful candidates for membership on the 
Guilford County Board of Education. Mr. 
Barton received 8,005 votes; his name will be 
submitted to the next General Assembly for 
appointment. 

Greensboro — Guest speaker at the phar- 
maceutical section of the Old North State 
Society, June 13, was H. C. McAllister of 
Chapel Hill. 

Mount Airy — Scpiare Pharmacy, a familiar 
landmark at the corner of West Pine and 
South streets for the past 28 years, will 
move this summer into new, expanded 
quarters in the Toast community. Lacy 
Lancaster is owner of the pharmacy; F. O. 
Garren the pharmacist. 

Hickory — Fred W. Medlin, a graduate of 
the USC School of Pharmacy and former 
MSR for Eli Lilly and Company, has joined 
the pharmacist staff of Medical Center 
Pharmacy. 

Sanford — The Lee Drug Store of Jones- 
boro Heights is expanding. Area that was 
once occupied by a barber shop is being 
incorporated into the pharmacy. 

Pikeville — Milton Hicks was installed as 
president of the Pikeville Lions Club on 
June 12. He is owner-operator of Pikeville 
Drug Store. 

Wilson — Bissette's Drug Store #3, 132 
South Goldsboro Street, has been closed. 
W. Y. Whitley, the pharmacist, has accepted 
employment in Stantonsburg with Kenneth 
Edwards. 

Winston-Salem — The annual managers' 
meeting of Eckerd Drug Company of the 
Carolinas was held at Howard Johnson's 
Motor Lodge on June 18-19. E. M. O'Her- 
ron, Jr., of Charlotte was in charge of the 
sessions. 



24 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



For seventy-seven years 
. - - since 1885 

SeeMAN 



OF 



DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long asso- 
ciation with North Caro- 
lina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its forty- 
third volume, and the 
first printed copy was 
"Seeman Printed." 




The Seeman Printer y 

of DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



Officers Installed by Two 
Mecklenburg Groups 

At a joint meeting of the Mecklenbur 
Pharmaceutical Society and the Meekler 
burg Pharmaceutical Society Woman's Aus 
iliary, held at the Charlotte City Club o 
June 25, officers for the year were installed 

The new officers of the Mecklenbur 
Pharmaceutical Society are Herbert Temph 
president ; William Proctor, vice president! 
and Mrs. Earl Horner, secretary-treasurer 
Charles Norris is the immediate past presi 
dent. 

Mrs. Keith Denny was installed as presi 
dent of the Auxiliary. Serving with her wi] 
be Mrs. P. T. Milliones, vice president; Mrt: 
Clarence Swearngan, secretary; and Mrs, 
Perry Hawkins, treasurer. Mrs. Cliffon 
Hemingway is the immediate past president 

The dinner was sponsored by McKesso; 
& Robbins. 



DISTINCTIVE 




Carry your 
store's identity by color and 
personalized copy right into your customers 
home for the life of the Prescription. 

Another pjus value of the modern paper 
box with its clean fresh label. 

Representative: 

M. C. GRIER 

iiio ann st.. at. 3-3847 

Monroe, North Carolina 

• • • 

E. N. ROWELL CO., INC 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 




William P. Powell 



Citizen of the year 

William P. Powell, pharmacist at the 
Community Medical Center Pharmacy, 
Mars Hill, has been named "Citizen of the 
Year ' ' by the Mars Hill Civitan Club. 

In presenting the award, Dean B. M. Lee 
of Mars Hill College cited Mr. Powell's 
work in organizing and promoting a youth 
program at the Mars Hill Community 
Center.. 

Mr. Powell was valedictorian of the 1950 
graduating class of Mills River High School; 
graduated from the UNC School of Phar- 
macy in 1954, where he was awarded the 
Lein and Fink gold medal, and then served 
two years in the army in Germany. 

Since locating in Mars Hill in 1957, he 
has been president, secretary-treasurer, proj- 
ects chairman and program chairman of the 
Civitan Club. He is a Master Mason, charter 
member, treasurer and chairman of the com- 
mission of finance of the Mars Hill Method- 
ist Church. 



WANT THE RED CARPET TREATMENT? 

i PLAN NOW TO ATTEND 

Geer's Holiday Gift Show 

'THE FINEST IN DIXIE" 

SPARTANBURG MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM 
SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY 

AUGUST 5-6-7 1962 ^" 4 

HOURS: SUNDAY 10 A.M. to 11 P.M. MON & TUES 1 P.M. to 11 P.M. 

THE GEER DRUG CO. SPARTANBURG, S. C. 




26 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



THE HENRY B. GILPIN COMPANY 

Full Line, Full Service Wholesale Druggists Since 1845 
Baltimore • Dover • Norfolk • Washington 




Norfolk Division 

Equipped for fast, 

efficient wholesale drug 

service to the pharmacists of 

the eastern section of North Carolina 

6435 Tidewater Drive • Norfolk, Virginia • Madison 2-6361 



FOR YOUR PHOTOFINISHING NEEDS 

Let B & H Photo Company Serve You 

Complete Service on 

Black and White Kodacolor 

Ektachrome Anscochrome 

Kodachrome Movies and Slides 
Processed in Our Plant 



B & 11 PHOTO COMPANY 

3030 s. boulevard p. 0. box 1600 

phone 523-7093 charlotte 1, n. c. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

News from the Local -Sectional Societies 



27 



The Greensboro Society 
of Pharmacists 

About fifty pharmacists met in Greensboro 
n June 25 at which time a new pharma- 
eutical organization — The Greensboro So- 
Lety of Pharmacists — was organized. 

Marion Edmonds was elected president. 

The by-laws of the Society outline four 
mjor objectives, limit membership to phar- 
lacists, and, as a qualification for member- 
fcdp, specifies that the member must comply 
dth the Code of Ethics of the NCPA and 
he APh.A. 

Additional requirements for membership 
re, in part: 

(1) The Pharmacy owned and operated 
y any applicant, or in which an applicant 
s employed, must not display either outside, 
aside, or in the windows of the Pharmacy 
ny advertising materials which detract from 
he professional appearance of the Phar- 
uaey. 

' (2) The Pharmacy must not display signs 
>r use literature containing the words ' ' cut 
ate," or equivalent, nor use any misleading 
ir false statements in their advertisements, 
lor advertise prices for prescription legend 
Irugs. 

(3) There shall be a registered pharmacist 
>n duty at all times the Pharmacy is open 
! or business. 

' (i) The use of words or phrases such as 
'fresh," "pure drugs" or "prescriptions 
■ompounded exactly as prescribed" in any 
idvertisement is considered unethical and 
nisleading. 

Monthly meetings will be held beginning 
it 10 P.M. 

Mecklenburg Pharmaceutical 

About 50 members of the Mecklenburg 
Pharmaceutical Society attended a mid-June 
neeting in Charlotte at which time Eobert 
Seal Watson of Sanford discussed the 
lew (effective July 1) prescription labeling 
'•equirement of the State Board of Phar- 
nacy. 

Mr. Watson, a member of the State Board 
bf Pharmacy for the past 14 years, was 
quoted in The Charlotte News ' ' I predict 



all states eventually will follow North Caro- 
lina Avith this regulation." 

Cape Fear 

Hubert Eogers, Pine Street Drugs, Lum- 
berton, was elected president of the newly 
organized Cape Fear Pharmaceutical Society 
at a meeting of the Society in Fayetteville on 
June 13. 

Elected to serve with President Rogers 
was J. I. Thomas of Dunn, vice president, 
and Cade Brooks of Fayetteville, secretary- 
treasurer. 

The Society is scheduling quarterly meet- 
ings in Fayetteville. Membership will come 
from a 10-county area adjacent to Cumber- 
land County. 

Northeastern 

The Northeastern Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Society met in Williamston on June 13 with 
Dr. Melvin Chambers of Chapel Hill as 
guest speaker. 

Topic of Dr. Chamber's remarks was the 
forthcoming program of the UNC Extension 
Division. The society voted to sponsor a 
5-program Drug Symposium at Williamston 
beginning in October. 

Alfred N. Martin, past president of the 
organization, received a miniature gavel in 
recognition of his services. Charlie Daught- 
ridge handled the presentation. 

Dixon Elected 

Charles T. Dixon, Bobbitt's College Phar- 
macy, Winston-Salem, has been elected presi- 
dent of the Forsyth Pharmaceutical Society. 

Other officers are: William E. Insch of 
Ciba Products, first vice president; Arthur 
R. Johnson of Flynn's Drug Store, second 
vice president ; James A. Way, Jr. of Sum- 
mit Street Pharmacy, third vice president; 
and J. O. Sizemore, Jr. of MSD, secretary- 
treasurer. 

Guest speaker at the June 21 meeting was 
Robert Neal Watson, a member of the State 
Board of Pharmacy. 

The Society voted to contribute $100 to 
the pharmacy student loan fund of the 
NCPA. 




FRUIT- FRESH DISPLAY CASE (1 DOZ.) 



FRUIT- FRESH— TheAscorbicAcid Mixture that homemakers want for 
freezing, canning, serving fresh-cut fruits. Backed by extensive 
promotion to boost your sales. 
SPECIAL DISPLAY ALLOWANCE 

gives you $1.00 on every box of 12 
cans you order. Offer good until 
June 30, 1962. To collect your dol- 
lars, just send proof of purchase 

to Consumer Products 

Division, Merck & Co., 

Inc., Rahway, N. J. 




Your Cost 


$7.92 


Selling Price @ 98^ 


$11.76 


YOUR PROFIT 


$3.84 



PLUS $1.00 EXTRA 
DISPLAY ALLOWANCE UNTIL JUNE 30 



CONSUMER PRODUCTS DIVISION . MERCK & CO., Inc. . rahway, new JERSEY 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

DIC Pharmacy School Motes 



29 




The Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy cle- 
ee was conferred on 64 students at Com- 
encement on June 4. This was the second 
rgest class to receive this degree at the 
:hool of pharmacy; 65 degrees were con- 
rred in June of 1949 when many of the 
udents were veterans who took dispensing 
id other laboratory courses during the 
mmer. The outdoor exercises in Kenan 
;adium were considerably dampened but 
)t terminated by two fairly steady light 
owers which may have been helpful in 
[towing the need for an indoor coliseum 
ilequate for functions of this type. There 
'as a total of 360 guests for the special 
harmacy Convocation and the Senior 
icnic held at the School of Pharmacy 
irlier in the day. For the first time it was 
pcessary to have the convocation directed 

an extra lecture room by a public address 
ptem. 

At the pharmacy convocation the graduat- 
g students repeated in unison the follow- 
g pharmacist's oath composed by Dr. J. 
ampton Hoch, Professor of Pharmacognosy 
i the School of Pharmacy, Medical College 
' South Carolina. 

"I promise to do all I can to protect and 
lprove the physical and moral well-being 

society, holding the health and safety of 



my community above other considerations. 
I shall uphold the laws and standards 
governing my profession, avoiding all forms 
of misrepresentation, and I shall safeguard 
the distribution of medical and potent 
substances. 

''Knowledge gained about patients I shall 
hold in confidence and never divulge unless 
compelled to do so by law. 

"I shall strive to perfect and enlarge 
my knowledge the better to contribute to the 
advancement of pharmacy and the public 
health. 

' ' I furthermore promise to maintain my 
honor and credit in all transactions and by 
my conduct never to bring discredit to my- 
self or my profession, nor to do anything 
to diminish the trust reposed in my pro- 
fessional brethren. 

' ' May I prosper and live long in favor 
as I keep and hold to this my oath, but 
should I violate these sacred promises may 
the reverse be my lot. ' ' 

The Class of '62 established a scholarship 
endowment fund to honor the memory of 
their classmate Myra Kinlaw who lost her 
life in an automobile accident shortly be- 
fore graduation. Each student contributed 
$2.00 for the senior gift to place a plaque 
in the Student Center of the School of 
Pharmacy and pay for the scholarship in its 
initial year. Students made pledges for 
substantial annual contributions to establish 
the endowment fund to be offered to the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Research 
Foundation. 

Professor George Cocolas and graduate 
student Wolfgang Passl sang in the Chapel 
Hill Choral Club when Dvorak's "Requiem" 
was presented on Sunday night of the com- 
mencement Aveek-end. 

Five members of the School of Pharmacy 
were initiated into Sigma Xi, the national 
honorary research society, this year: Pro- 
fessors Margaret Ann Shaw and Paul J. 
Wurdack for full membership and graduate 
students Allen Hirsch, James Lim, and 
Vilhjalmur Skulason for associate member- 
ship. 

(Continued on page 31) 




HEADACHE POWDER MARKETED 
IN THE 50-POWDER PACKAGE 



GREATER VOLUME 

for you 
MORE PROFIT 

per sale 
MORE ECONOMY 

for your custon 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 



■ UNC PRARMACY SCHOOL NOTES 
(Continued from page 29) 
Deans Breeht and Chambers attended the 
Itate-wide conference on health careers 
Sponsored by the North Carolina Health 
founcil at Winston-Salem on May 22. It 
Jvas pleasing that the key-note address was 
riven by a representative of pharmacy, Mr. 
ijreorge B. Griffenhagen, Director of Com- 

Fiunications, American Pharmaceutical Asso- 
iation. His analytical and constructive 
Iddress was mimeographed and is available 
from the Council, P. O. Box 10554, Raleigh, 
K. C. The conference was also attended by 
IV. J. Smith, Secretary of the North Caro- 
.ina Pharmaceutical Association, and "Wade 
X. Gilliam, President of the North Carolina 
3 harmaceutical Research Foundation. 
I The importance of career conferences 
inward the stimulation of recruitment for 
careers in the health professions is empha- 
sized by the disappointing fact that, in 
parly June, only 75 students have been 
Admitted for the prepharmacy course in 
General College beginning in September. 



This is approximately 35% less than the 
120 prepharmacy students admitted for the 
preceding year. Prepharmacy students visit 
the campus during the summer to take place- 
ment tests so that preregistration can sim- 
plify the enrollment process in September. 

The informal fraternity of The Shack 
honored Dr. Earl T. Brown with a farewell 
party at Watts Grill on May 25. Norman 
Cordon served as the toastmaster and brief 
remarks were made by John TJmstead, Repre- 
sentative to the General Assembly and Uni- 
versity Trustee, and Dean Breeht. 

The faculty-staff farewell party in fare- 
well to Professor Earl T. Brown and Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. Paul J. Wurdack was held 
in the Student Center on June 12. 

Dr. M. A. Chambers, Assistant Dean, led 
the discussion of forthcoming extension 
programs in pharmacy at the June meeting 
of the Northeastern Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Society held at Williamston on June 13. 

The practical examinations of the North 
Carolina Board of Pharmacy were held in 
Beard Hall on June 19. 




crowd pleasers a ia Lance! 




More people prefer and buy tasty Lance 
snacks than any other brand. And no wonder... 
They're always fresh and there's 

a wide variety to choose from. 
Please your crowd. Display Lance. 



INC. Charlotte, North Carolina 




The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



33 



Class of 1962— U.N. C. School of Pharmacy 



Sixty-four students graduated with the 
iegree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
it the University of North Carolina on June 
l, 1962. In the cap and gown picture they 
vere: first rou<: Joseph Claude Miller, 
Boone; Kader Boy Eamsey, Jr., Jackson- 
ville; Beverly Carol Thompson, Chapel Hill; 
Jargaret Greene Patterson, Eoxboro; 
[lartha Ann Wyke, Shelby; Ellen Louise 
Pike, Concord; Rebecca Harper Elliott, 
jlendersonville ; Gary Von Cloninger, Dallas ; 
Ubert Hunter Smith, Fayetteville; Nick 
Collias, Charlotte. 

Second row: Larry Kent Neal, Kannap- 
•lis; Burwell Temple, Jr., Kinston; 
Thomas Bingham Eeaves, Fayetteville; 
lames Floyd Deaton, Jr., Liberty ; James 
3aywood Gooch, Jr., Mebane; Thomas Max- 
veil Eutsler, Marion; Boy Wilson Collette, 
»r., Mocksville; James Robert Taylor, En- 
ield; Lionel Cecil Evans, Boanoke Bapids; 
(jene Miles Shuford, Lincolnton. 

Third row: Joseph David Bunnion, Lenoir; 
fiary Walker McKenzie, Fairmont; James 
Brooks Davis, Oakboro ; George Washington 
bavis, Jr., Fremont; George Banald Bu- 
chanan, Greensboro; Frederick Clifton 
Jhamblee, Carrboro; George Walker Bender, 
jFayetteville ; William Glenn Thames, Hope 
Bps; William John Weatherly, III, War- 
Law; Homer Glenn Hall, Siler City; Francis 
Eugene Baper, Lucama. 

Fourth row: David Bandall Lewis, Golds- 
poro; William Thurston Williams, Wilson; 
Barry Thomas Murrell, Jr., Albemarle; 
Richard Buxton Overton, Jr., Raleigh; 



William Fred Harriss, High Point; Moody 
Zebulon Honeycutt, Jr., Drexel; William 
David Medlin, Durham; Rudy Watkins 
Barker, Carrboro; Charles Berman Carpen- 
ter, Claremont. 

Fifth row: James Harold Little, Oakboro; 
Connie Mac McGee, Charlotte; Gilbert Max 
Hatley, Oakboro; James Alden Hathcock, 
Jr., Charlotte; Gary Bay Boberson, Draper; 
Everette Matthews Dunn, Leaksville ; Donald 
Worth Beaver, Concord; Harry Davis 
Milam, Sutherlin, Va.; Hayes Earl Hall, 
Whittier; Larry Buford Good, Mt. Airy. 

Sixth row: Gerald Franklin May, Louis- 
burg; Gary Lee Tingling, Silver Spring, 
Md. ; Gilbert Clyde Hartis, Jr., Winston- 
Salem; Jerry Douglas Price, Baleigh; 
Bobert Delano Lilley, Jamesville. 

Graduates not present for the plutograph 
were: Bobert Harrison Barrett, II, Pine- 
hurst; Emil Lewis Cekada, Durham; James 
Bobert Gibson, Hayesville ; Joe David 
Greeson, Burlington; Hubert Theodore Hug- 
gins, Jr., Dallas; Myra Kinlaw (deceased), 
Lumberton ; Fred Morris Moss, Jr., Gas- 
tonia; Terry Julian Pickett, Archdale; 
Bobert Joel Both, Shaker Heights, Ohio. 

About the Picture 

Due to a photographic error, the '62 Class 
picture is slightly out of focus. Although 
the picture is not up to standard, it is 
reproduced in order to maintain a continuous 
record of the pharmacy graduates. 



SMITH WHOLESALE DRUG CO. 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

A Young and Growing Service Wholesale House, 
Owned and Operated by Registered Pharmacists 



We Appreciate Your Business 



34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



There's 

88 % * * f 

\ A i I , 






^ 



in 



finejtate 



MILK 

and 

ICE 

CREAM 

people like it 
and buy it 

Tastes Great . . . It's 



finejtate 



.^^^jSlj^Z^^^jIljl.^ 



Lewis Retires 

L. Craig Lewis, who has represented II 
Lilly and Company in North Carolina f] 
twenty-eight years, will retire June 30. 

Lewis was employed September 18, 193a 
as a salesman in Winston-Salem. Last ye;I 
he was transferred to new headquarters I 
High Point. 

Born in Gastonia, Lewis was graduate, 
from Mount Holly High School in 1924 an 
attended the University of North Carolin 
He became registered as a pharmacist in h: 
native state in 1927 and was employed i 
retail pharmacies in Belmont before joinin 
Lilly. 

He is a member of the Forsyth Count 
Pharmaceutical Association and Phi Deltl 
Chi, professional pharmacy fraternity. 

Lewis and his wife, Hazel, live at 2601 
Forest Drive, Winston-Salem. He is th.j 
father of two sons, Lee Craig Lewis, Jr., o.j 
Fort Hood, Texas, and Carlos Edwin Lewia 
His mother, Mrs. L. P. Lewis, lives i| 
Mount Holly. 

Spotlight on the Tates 

The Cleveland Times of Shelby, June I 
issue, edited by Mrs. Bush Hamrick, Jr., ha 
an interesting feature highlighting thi 
careers of a prominent Cleveland Count; 
pharmaceutical family. 

B. C. Tate operated Peoples Drug Stort 
of Grover from 1919 to 1952. His two son*- 
Ellis and Sherwood, are now in Pharmacy'} 
ranks. 

Ellis Tate, after teaching for several years 
enrolled in Pharmacy at the University o: 
South Carolina. He graduated June 1 anc 
is now with a pharmacy in Columbia, Soutt 
Carolina. 

The second son, Sherwood, is a graduate 
(1958) of the Southern College of Pharl 
macy and is employed in Shelby by Suttle'^ 
Drug Store. 

Little John Joins Pfizer 

William L. Littlejohn, Jr., a native of 
Morganton and a graduate of the Universi- 
ty of North Carolina, has been appointed a 
professional service representative for Pfizer 
He makes his home in Baleigh, North Caro- 
lina. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 




U. (laughter, Carol Ann, weighing 8 lbs. 
Ilk was born March 4th to Mr. and Mrs. 
1 Swann of Hickory. . . . Thomas Lee 
atler, Jr. was born May 6th to Mr. and 
'rs. Butler of Chapel Hill. Mrs. Butler 
! the former Patricia Page, UNC Phar- 
Lcy School graduate, and daughter of Mr. 
d Mrs. Clarence Page of Henderson. . . . 
fen Mobley, Jr. was born May 24th, weigh- 
L 7 lbs. 15 oz. to Mr. and Mrs. Mobley of 
Arlington. . . . Mr. and Mrs. George Harris 
: Glen Lennox Pharmacy, Chapel Hill are 
Uouncing the birth of their fourth child — 
eir first boy, George William Harris, born 
'ay 31st, ... A daughter, Lynn Cecilia, 
'?ighing 6 lbs. V-/i oz. was born June 2 
j Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Keating, Ashe- 
Ue. 

Engagements 

August 11th has been chosen as the date 
| the wedding of Miss Mary Lou Williams 
\ Narrows, Virginia, and James Micheal 
gbert, pharmacist at Franklin Drug Com- 
itny of Greensboro. Miss Williams was a 
me graduate of Woman's College, Greens- 
>ro, and Mr. Egbert is a 1961 graduate of 
ie TJNC School of Pharmacy. 

Marriages 

Sigmon-Sieving 

Miss Joanne Vivian Sieving of Newton 
id Eussell Grady Sigmon, Jr. of Conover 
ere married June 8th at the Holy Cross 
iutheran Church of Newton. Mrs. Sigmon 
associated with the Catawba County 
Welfare Department, and Mr. Sigmon is 
ith Medical Center Pharmacy, Hickory. 

Slaughter-Miller 

Thomas Gower Slaughter and Miss Mary 
'ranees Miller, both of Charlotte, were 



married June 9th at Mt. Bethel Evangelical 
and Reformed Church of Blowing Rock. 
Mrs. Slaughter teaches at Hawthorne Junior 
High School, Charlotte, and Mr. Slaughter 
is a pharmacist at Eckerd Drugs, also of 
Charlotte. 

Deaths 
R. D. HEIST 

Raymond D. Heist, retiree of Parke-Davis 
& Co. died on June 13, 1962 of a heart attack 
at his home, 3701 Monument Avenue, Rich- 
mond, Virginia. 

Mr. Heist was a graduate of the Medical 
College of Virginia (1913), practiced phar- 
macy in Cocoa and West Palm Beach, 
Florida until entering employment of Park, 
Davis & Co. in 1918. He covered territories 
in both Eastern and Western North Caro- 
lina until his retirement in 1957. 

He was a life member of N.C.P.A. Travel- 
ing Men's Auxiliary, Sudan Temple, New 
Bern, N. C, and a member of the St. Pauls 
Episcopal Church, Richmond, Va. 

Survivors are his wife, Evelyn Hamilton 
Heist, and two nephews, Francis and Wil- 
liam Cannon of Emporia, Virginia. 

B. M. SALLEY, SR. 
Branson Martin Salley, Sr., 61, of Char- 
lotte died June 12. He was employed by 
Eckerd drug stores for several years and at 
the time of his death was associated with 
McKesson & Bobbins. 

N. T. TAYLOR 

Norwood T. Taylor, 52, Raleigh pharma- 
cist, died June 3 in Rex Hospital. 

A graduate of the UNC School of Phar- 
macy, Mr. Taylor had been associated with 
Person Street Pharmacy for more than 
twenty years. 

Survivors include his wife; a son, Nor- 
wood, Jr.; two brothers and two sisters. 
Interment was in the family cemetery at 
Jackson. 



36 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

This space available at 1 0<f per word; mini- 
mum of $3.00. Box numbers assigned and 
replies forwarded to advertiser upon re- 
quest. Mail copy and payment to Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy, Box 151, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 

BALANCES — Prescription balances repaired. 
Contact Phipps & Bird, Inc., P. O. Box 2V, 
Richmond 5, Virginia. Telephone Ml 4-5401. 

FOR SALE — Remington's Practice of Phar- 
macy, 12th Edition. (1961). 1,866 pages. 
Price $22.50. Available from NCPA, Box 
151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

WANTED — Piedmont drug store in small or 
medium size town. JDC-7. 

PHARMACISTS — Don't be without SWISS 
OINTMENT; a tried and true medication for 
all skin irritations. Sold in drug stores 
only, through your jobber. 



Buys Central Drug 

Jessie Putman has purchased the Central 
Drug Store of Bessemer City from the 
former owner, J. C. Williams. 

Mr. Putnam is a native of Kings Mountain 
and graduated from the School of Pharmacy, 
University of North Carolina, Class of 1961. 

Moves to Candor 

Robert Giles has moved the Morven Drug 
Company from Morven to Candor. Hence- 
forth the pharmacy will operate as the 
B & B Drug Company. 

Salley Employees Aid 
Attack Victim 

Quick work by two employees of Salley 's 
Drug Store, Asheville, was credited with 



possibly saving the life of a Califon 
visitor on June 30. 

A tour bus from California stopped 
front of the pharmacy and a guide i 
into the pharmacy and said a passenger h 
stopped breathing while suffering an attai 
Two employees of the pharmacy — Rola 
Wells and Don Ward — rushed the victim tc 
hospital, administering oxygen in the mea 
time from a portable tank carried on t 
delivery truck of Salley 's. 

Following a period of hospitalization, £ 
visitor was permitted to continue his b 
tour. 

Coaker Speaks to Lenoir Rotary 

Guest speaker at a recent meeting of tl 
Lenoir Rotary Club was George Coaker 
Charlotte, district manager of Eli Lilly ai 
Company. He was introduced by Pliarni 
cist C. O. Huntley. 

Car Enters Pharmacy 

Faulty brakes resulted in a car smashit 
into the front entrance of Capps Dru 
Store, Ahoskie. The car plowed into a 
unoccupied seating area, stopped just sho 1 
of the prescription department. Damage t 
the pharmacy was placed at about $1500. 

Cosmetic School Attended 
hy 92 Cosmeticians 

A cosmetic school sponsored by the D 
T. C. Smith Company at Grove Park In| 
in Asheville, June 20, was attended by 9 
cosmeticians from pharmacies of Western 
N. C. and Eastern Tennessee. 

F. Stacy Smith, Norman F. Young an, 
Canie B. Smith were in charge of the schoo; 
One of the models appearing during th[ 
school was Miss Linda Tennant of Crossnorq 
a student at the TJNC School of Pharmacol 

Modeling Underway at 
Statesville Drug 

Extensive remodeling of the front of th 
Statesville Drug Company is underway acj 
cording to an announcement by Lyle Davij 
and Sam Hickman, co-owners. 

The building is being painted and a ne\ 
glass front installed. 




FOR PROFIT 




Each day your prescription 
business becomes more 
important to you . . . and to us. 
And, to merit your business, 
we want to remind you of 
the services that only 
a full-line, full-service 
wholesaler can give — 
We feature complete stocks 
of pharmaceuticals 
We stock all new items 
We furnish full information 
on new specialties and 
We deliver the product 
when you need it! 



Joktpym 



ODEKER 




'uAineM&pwljdA> 



1010 Herring Avenue, Wilson, North Carolina 




Showroom Opens 
August 1 

Visit us in Raleigh 

and see the 1962 

Christmas line. 



lljeW, be looking for. 

you/ 



The W. H. King Drug Company 

"The House of Friendly and Dependable Service" 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

AND ITS ASSOCIATES 

O'Hanlon-Watson Drug Company 
winston-salem, n. c. 
Bellamy Drug Company King Drug Company Peabody Drug Company 
wilmington. n. c. florence, s. c. durham. n. c. 



'lie Caxolina JqURNAI OF PHARMACY 

Volume XLIII AUGUST, 1 962 Number 8 

mm. 




CEIVED 
G 271962 

IUSMEDSCJ// 




> 





Summer calls 

for SURFADIL 



(cyclomethycaine and methapyrilene, Lilly) 



When your customers are plagued with 
summertime skin problems, you can turn 
their frowns to smiles with Lotion Surfadil. 

Surfadil is an effective, rapid-acting com- 
bination of a soothing anesthetic and a 
potent antihistamine plus a protective ad- 



sorbent. It stops minor pain and itching 
almost instantly and helps prevent further 
sunburn with its special sunscreen ingre- 
dient, titanium dioxide. 

Suggest Surfadil to your customers— you'll 
build friendships as well as sales. 

Available in 75-cc. spillproof plastic con- 
tainers in appealing counter-display car- 
tons of ten bottles. 



Put Surfadil (Lotion No. 
M-64) on your want list now. 



SSeey 



Eli Lilly and Company • Indianapolis 6, Indiana, U.S.A. 



THANK YOU ! ! 



FOR YOUR ATTENDANCE AT OUR 
SIXTH ANNUAL GIFT SHOW 

OUR REGULAR HOLIDAY SHOWROOM 
WILL OPEN SEPTEMBER 1ST 

Hours: 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. 

Monday through Friday 

(Other Hours By Appointment) 



FOR COMPLETE HOLIDAY SELLING SELECTIONS, 
WE LOOK FORWARD TO YOUR VISITS 




» tMBf , 




''Ol.ES**-' 



JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 



Greensboro, N. C. 



64 Years of Service to North Carolina Retail Druggists 



BETTER BUY... BIGGER PROFI 

Biggest Sales increase ! 



• STANBACK is the Only Nationally-Advertised Head- 
ache Powder Marketed in a 50-Powder Package. 

• Costs Less Than Any Other Nationally-Advertised Head- 
ache Powder — Less than 2c Per Dose! 

• Gives Your Customers Faster Relief — Because It Is in 
Fine Powder Form. 

• Gives You Greater Volume — and More Profit Per Sale! 

NO WONDER that sales of the STANBACK 50-Powder 
Package are increasing constantly — faster than any 
other size. 



It Pays to 
Stock and 
Display the 





POWDER 
PACKAGE 



Stanback Co., Ltd., Salisbury, N. C 



SJders Q U jck 



*$*r*% 




The House of Friendly Service 




Scott Jutug, Company, 



Service Wholesalers Since 1891 



ANNOUNCING 

IOQUIN 

DHodohydroxypuin. <\j SUS p ENS ION 




A new medical preparation for the treatment of dandruff— afforded 
95% control of dry or oily dandruff symptoms in 714 cases studied 



What is loquin? Ioquin is a non- 
toxic suspension of 10% w/v di- 
iodohydroxyquin (U.S. P.) in an 
aqueous base pleasantly scented 
with lavender. It washes hair 
clean, as it effectively controls 
dandruff. 

How Effective is loquin? In clini- 
cal trials, loquin produced satis- 
factory control in more than 95% 
of 714 patients studied. The pa- 
tients were about evenly divided 
between men and women, and 
patients ranged in age from two 
months to eighty years. 

How Safe is loquin? The investiga- 
tors found loquin to be extremely 
well tolerated . . . even by patients 
treated regularly over a period of 
several months. However, some 
patients may be sensitive to the in- 
gredients in loquin. And patients 
with known iodine sensitivity 
should use loquin with caution. 
How do you use loquin? Treat- 
ment with loquin is a simple wash 
and rinse procedure. Most cases 
of simple dandruff can be brought 



under control in two to three 
weeks and kept under control 
with weekly applications (some 
cases are controlled with even less 
frequent applications). 
What are the Indications? loquin 
is indicated for the treatment of 
mild or severe seborrheic derma- 
titis . . . and is equally effective for 
dry or oily types of seborrhea. 
How is loquin Supplied? loquin is 
supplied in 115-ml. (4 fl.oz.) green 
plastic squeeze bottles. Handy for 
the shower. List No. 6907. 

In Summary . . . loquin is an ef- 
fective new preparation for the 
treatment of common dandruff, 
including difficult and long-stand- 
ing cases. It has been shown to 
be safe and effective in clinical 
trials. It is a professional product 
in every sense of the word. It will 
be detailed to physicians and sold 
through the drug trade only. For 
complete details, see your Abbott 
man, or drop us a line. . . 
we'll be happy to send 
you the literature. 20=239 




The Carolina 

JOURNAL of PHARMACY 



August, 1962 
Vol. xliii No. 

* 

Officers 

NORTH CAROLINA 
PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

• 
President 

John T. Stevenson 
Elizabeth City 

• 

Vice-Presidents 

Hoy A. Moose 
Mount Pleasant 

Harry A. Barringer 
Concord 

W. T. Boone 
Ahoskie 



Secretary-Treasurer 

Editor 

W. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Assistant 

Secretary-Treasurer 

C. M. Andrews 

Burlington 



General Counsel 

F. 0. Bowman 

Chapel Hill 



A Simple, Common lame 

During his recent Message on Protecting the Consumer 
Interest, President Kennedy urged that drugs be given a 
' ' simple, common name in order to avoid confusion and to 
enable the purchaser to buy the quality drugs he actually 
needs at the lowest competitive price. ' ' 

From this statement, the consumer might easily assume 
two things — that no efforts are made at present to give 
drugs simple, common names in addition to their brand 
names and that, if this were done, drug prices would be 
lower. But both of these assumptions would be incorrect. 

At present, the common names of drugs are decided by a 
well-thought-out system in which a number of scientific 
agencies, both national and international, participate. Every 
effort is made to find a simple name, but it is absolutely es- 
sential that the name adhere to basic principles of scientific 
nomenclature. If not, the names will be meaningless to the 
medical profession and to scientists generally. 

Usually the common name reflects the chemical make-up 
of the drug; and since the chemical name is often long and 
complicated, the common name may have to be far from 
simple. No one has suggested a way to avoid this difficulty. 

Moreover, the use of common names does not assure that 
a drug will be cheap. For example, the Rhode Island Di- 
vision of Public Assistance examined 10,000 drug pre- 
scriptions for welfare recipients for the purpose of deter- 
mining the actual savings to the State if drugs were pre- 
scribed by their common names instead of their trademark 
names. It was found that by using common names, a sav- 
ing of less than five percent would have resulted. 

Government pressure on the medical profession to pre- 
scribe medicines under their common names instead of their 
brand names is based on the theory that different ver- 
sions of the same drug, produced by different companies, 
are of equal quality. It would be hard to find a more 
dangerous fallacy. 

This fallacy is based on the theory that the therapeutic 
performance of a medicine can be predicted solely by carry- 
ing out the United States Pharmacopeia assay for deter- 
mining the drug content. But this is not necessarily so. 
Almost all pharmaceutical products contain ingredients 
other than the active drug, and the manufacture of these 
products involves such steps as mixing, compressing, coat- 
ing, heating, filtering. Any of these operations, if improp- 
erly controlled, may significantly affect the therapeutic 
(Concluded on page 34) 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Entered as 
second class matter July 5, 1922 at the post office at Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Personality of the Week 

The June 28 issue of the Ayden Tribune 
honored Pharmacist Sherwood MacDonald 
Edwards of Ayden as "Personality of the 
Week." 

A graduate of the UNO School of Phar- 
macy, Mr. Edwards worked in Raleigh 
immediately after graduation, then served 
in the Navy. He has been associated with 
his father in the operation of Edwards 
Pharmacy since 1946. 

The paper lists some of Mr. Edwards' 
activities, which include member of the 
board of directors of the Ayden Golf and 
Country Club and the First National Bank; 
secretary of Ayden Clinic Builders; has 
served six years on the Ayden School Board 
and is a director of the Ayden Development 
Corporation. He has served as secretary of 
the Ayden Rotary Club since 1948. 



Paul Branch Now with 
Carolina Pharmacy of Boone 

Paul E. Branch, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee School of Pharmacy, is 
now associated with J. P. Greene at the 
Carolina Pharmacy, Boone. 

At college, Branch served as president of 
the A.PhA. Student Branch, secretary of 
Rho Chi and was awarded the Merck scho- 
lastic award at graduation. 

Mr. Branch is a native of Elizabethton, 
Tenn. His wife the former Miss Wanda 
Smith of Banner Elk, is a registered nurse 
and a graduate of the East Tennessee State 
School of Nursing. 



Professional Women's Club on the subject 
"The Relationship of Mental Health am 
Faith." 



Carraway Joins Rx Staff 
at Windsor Pharmacy 

Ernest L. Carraway, Jr., recently dis 
charged from the Air Force, has joinec 
Bill Gurley in Windsor at the Windsoi 
Pharmacy. 

Mr. Carraway attended high school all 
Williamston and is a graduate in pharmacj 
of the UNC School of Pharmacy. He was' 
licensed as a pharmacist in 1958 and prioi 
to entering military service as a commis 
sioned officer, was employed in Wilmingtor 
by the Cape Fear Pharmacy and Peoples 
Drug Store. 



Spotlight on Oscar Smith 

Oscar W. Smith of Pilot Mountain was 
the subject of a 3-col. feature appearing ii 
the July 9th issue of the Winston-Salen. 
Journal. 

Smith, owner-operator of Pilot Mountain's 
Smith Drug Store, is active in all phases oi 
the community life of his town and countj 
(Surry). He attended UNC in 1932.'33 al 
a self-help student and later (1937) gradu 
ated from Southern College of Pharmacy. 

Since he is involved in so many activities 
Smith has learned how to get the most our 
of boards, committees, etc. "I found out' 
when I was mayor to call on a busy man to 
get something done. People who aren't busy 
find too many excuses." 



ABC Chief 

John Treadwell, owner of Person Street 
Pharmacy, Raleigh, and former council 
member, has been appointed chairman of the 
Wake County ABC Board. 



Rudy Hardy Addresses Club 

A gifted speaker in the Charlotte area is 
Rudy Hardy of Concord, hospital pharma- 
cist. Recently (June 26) he spoke to 
members of the Concord Business and 



Cover Page 



As the photographer (Wallace Patterson; 
of Chapel Hill) prepared to record the pres, 
entation of the Mortar & Pestle Plaque tq 
T. J. Ham, Jr. (left) of Yanceyville, one of; 
Tom 's friends called for a big smile. Tom 
was equal to the occasion as the picture indi- 
cates. NCPA President John T. Stevenson 
of Elizabeth City, who presided at the din- 
ner and presented the award, is shown with 
Mr. Ham. 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

Board Announces Exam Results 



Twenty-four candidates for pharmacy 
license passed the N. C. Board of Pharmacy 
xaminations given recently in Chapel Hill 
It the Institute of Pharmacy and at the 
tr. N. C. School of Pharmacy, 
i Highest grade on the examination was 
uade by Ingrid Beekert Powers of Chapel 
Jill. Second highest score was made by 
Villiam Fred Harriss of High Point. 
II Five pharmacists from other states were 

egistered by reciprocity. 
|| These results were announced by H. C. 
JeAllister, Chapel Hill, Secretary-Treasurer 
[If the Board of Pharmacy. 
, The twenty-four passing the final exami- 
nations for license were: Mimmie B. Barnes, 
Charlotte; Norwood P. Blanchard, Jaekson- 
iille; Stanley D. Bornmann, Daytona 
3eaeh, Florida ; Hugh Cannon Caldwell, Jr., 
vlooresville ; 

« Walter I. Davis, Raleigh; Everett M. 
')unu, Draper; James M. Egbert, Greens- 
boro; Rebecca Harper Elliott, Henderson- 
•ille; William S. Farrior, Greensboro; 
Somer G. Hall, Jr., Siler City; William S. 
Jlarmon, Silver Spring, Md. ; 
' William F. Harriss, High Point ; James 
\. Hathcock, Jr. Charlotte; Charles L. 
Lazarus, Spiudale; George D. Matthews, 
Jr., Greensboro ; Gerald F. May, West 
Jefferson; Harry T. Murrell, Jr., Albemarle; 
Ellen Louise Pike, Concord; 
, Ingrid B. Powers, Chapel Hill; Jerry D. 
Price, Raleigh; Seth M. Smith, Jr., Char- 
lotte; Edward L. Smithwiek, Jr., Raleigh; 
Edward F. Swann, Jr., Hickory; and Frank 
IF. Yarborough, Caiy. 

: The pharmacists from other states who 
were registered by reciprocity are as follows: 
Jack Austen Amnions, Maryville, Tenn. ; 
Benjamin John Bubin, Chapel Hill; Mrs. 
Spurgenia Rutland Burton, Cedar Grove; 
Joseph Oliver Hicks, Winston-Salem; and 
George McDonald Jervey, Hendersonville. 

By Reciprocity 

These pharmacists have been licensed to 
practice pharmacy in North Carolina by 
reciprocity from other states: 



Linford D. Snead, Charleston, West 
Virginia (from West Virginia). 

James Ronald Beaver, South Norfolk, Va. 
(from Virginia). 

Cannon Foster Page, Jacksonville, Florida 
(from Alaljama). 

Paul Elmer Branch, Carolina Pharmacy, 
Boone (from Tennessee). 

Paul Whiteside Rasor, Jr., 105 West First 
Avenue, Easley, South Carolina (from South 
Carolina). 

Ira Eosenberg 4th TAC Hospital, Seymour 
Johnson Air Force Base, Goldsboro (from 
Virginia). 

William Ray Rogers, 8 Moss Hill N. W., 
Gainesville, Georgia (from Georgia). 



Change in Name 

Register Drug Store, Clinton, North Car- 
olina has a new operating name — Dawkins 
& Matthews Drug Store. 

Tate Named Member of 
General Assembly 

Earl H. Tate, Lenoir pharmacist, has 
been named Caldwell County's new member 
of The General Assembly. 

Mr. Tate, mayor of Lenoir for 2-4 years, 
was named by the County Democratic Execu- 
tive Committee to fill the unexpired term of 
Rep. Danny M. Courtney, who is moving out 
of the county. 

The committee also named Mr. Tate as 
the party's candidate for the office in the 
November general election. 

Tate is immediate past potentate of 
Oasis Temple of the Shrine and a past 
president of the North Carolina League of 
Municipalities. He is a past president of the 
Lenoir Chamber of Commerce, is now serv- 
ing as a director of the Lenoir Merchants 
Association and recently was elected a vice 
president of the N. C. Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation (to be installed on May 14, 1963). 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




Thomas J. Ham, Jr. (left), Xort 
Carolina's Pharmacist of th 
Year is shown with Glenn B. Ut 
dike, Sr., Virginia 's Pharmacis 
of the Year. Operating pharms 
cies in different states but withi 
12 miles, the two pharmacist 
have been friends for years an 
maintain a close professions 
working relationship. The Vi 
ginia Award is a major converi 
tion event; North Carolina taka 
its award ceremony to the r<j 
cipient's hometown. 



Pharmacists of the Year present at the July 25 dinner honoring T. J. Ham, Jr. (Left ti 
right) W. L. West (1959), Wade A. Gilliam (1956), Eoger A. McDuffie (1960), E. C 
Daniel (1951), Kelly E. Bennett (1954), W. B. Gurley (1958), T. J. Ham, Jr. (1962) anc 
J. C. Jackson (1961). 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




.rogram Participants — (left to right) J. C. Jackson, Pharmacist Member of the State 
l-oard of Health; S. M. Bason, President of the Bank of Yanceyville; Mr. Ham; Erwin D. 
tephens, Editor of the Caswell Messenger; NCPA President John T. Stevenson; and Dr. 
Houston L. Gwynn, local physician. 

K J. Ham, Jr. Honored as Pharmacist of 

the Year 



( ' ' Tom Ham has been good for Yancey - 
lle; Yanceyville has been good to Tom 
am. ' ' 

i Thus was characterized North Carolina 's 
)62 ' ' Pharmacist of the Year ' ' by one of 
^e speakers appearing on the July 25 Mor- 
.r & Pestle Award Dinner program, held in 
anceyville. 

During a three hour dinner-award session, 
>ur speakers (pictured above) highlighted 
.r. Ham's career from the time he estab- 
fehed the Yanceyville Pharmacy in 1922 
itil mid- '62. The speaker 's remarks were 
■ntered on the purpose for which the 
Mortar & Pestle Award" was established 
-presented annually by the XCPA "in 
cognition of meritorious achievements in 
search and scientific contributions to the 
lvancement of public health and welfare ; 
)table aid to the progress of the educa- 



tional, civic and business life of his com- 
munity ; and for distinctive organizational 
activity enabling pharmacists to extend the 
scope of their professional training." 

Much of the program was along serious 
lines but here and there one of the speakers 
injected a bit of humor. Notably was the 
story by Erwin D. Stephens, editor of The 
Caswell Messenger, which involved Mr. Ham 
and a chicken snake that temporarily took 
exclusive charge of his prescription depart- 
ment. 

Mr. Ham is a native of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia and a graduate of the John Marshall 
High School of that city. He attended the 
University of Richmond and the Medical 
College of Virginia (Ph.G.). After two 
years of practice as a pharmacist in Vir- 

(Concluded on page 36) 



WHO PUT THE ALL IN FALL PROFITS? 




FALL PROMOTION IN 



The Saturday Evening 



FEATURING ... MY HOBBY BOX — stock all sizes for maximum sales this Fall! 
MONTREAT CHOCOLATES — a new design for new sales! 
GET ALL YOUR FALL PROFITS... 





SHOW HOLLINGSWORTI 
NEW SHADOW BOX — dramJ 
cally feature your best sell 
chocolates ... as seen in TJ 
SATURDAY EVENING POST 
in this new illuminated dispi 



SEE YOUR HOLLINGSWORTH'S REPRESENTATIVE — for the best selection of your most START THIS BIG POST PROMOT 
profitable chocolates, order early and assure best Fall delivery. A complete POST Promotion SELLING FOR YOU ... EARLY! I 
sales kit is yours for the asking. LINGSWORTH'S PUT THE.ALL IN F 

PROFITS! 

HUGH K. SCONYERS -1618 PROVIDENCE ROAD • CHARLOTTE, N. C. 
HOLLINGSWORTH'S UNUSUAL CANDIES ■ AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

Handling That Good Employee Who 
Needs Correction 

By Ernest W. Fair 



11 



"When I have a man working in my 

harmacy whose further presence is any- 

hing but desired it 's an easy matter to 

andle . . . just give him his walking 

apers, ' ' a pharmacist told us the other day, 

but when I have a really good man who 

ust needs a little straightening out . . . 

|that's a different proposition altogether." 

Most of us have such people on our staff 

right now . . . employees who are too good 

to lose but still cannot be permitted to 

continue with their present working 

methods. How to get the job done without 

risking loss of the individual or impairing 

his or her future efficiency is therefore a 

problem. 

' Here, in paragraphs to follow, are some 
of the steps being used in solution of this 
problem by a number of pharmacists today. 
They offer any reader one or more techniques 
usable in his own pharmacy. 

"Show him how the suggested steps can 
improve his chances for promotion." This 
step is particularly applicable with the 
ambitious individual definitely interested in 
improving his position in the world. 

Directing the specific correctional steps in 
his work procedures which one desires into 
discussion with this theme as the main 
point can be artfully done by any pharma- 
cist. Making certain that the specific im- 
pression that his chances for advancement 
within the pharmacy depend on such correc- 
tions will often find no further suggestions 
will be needed. 

Use informality in all your suggestions 
land do it privatelv. ' ' In most cases these 
particular employees are sensitive to any 
((correction given them before their fellow 
(workers and they usually mistrust over 
formality. The more we can combine both 
'the above points into specific handling of 
each case the easier it will always be to 
•put over our point. 

"Make certain each individual understands 
every detail of the problem — therein may 
lie the real fault. ' ' Too often we lay out 
work programs in a general way, tend to 



skip over specific detail concerning assign- 
ments . . . and it is often these very 
specific detail that each individual needs 
most to do his or her job right. Where 
correctional situations have been developing 
in large numbers this may very well be the 
basic problem. 

' ' Competition set up against another em- 
ployee he or she admires can often auto- 
matically secure correction of working 
faults. ' ' This is particularly applicable 
where such individuals are working closely 
together in a given job. A little careful 
observation by the pharmacist of attitudes 
between employees can point up such a 
situation without trouble. 

"Point it out as a common problem at a 
staff meeting and imply several on the staff 
are ' guilty. ' ' ' Where it is obvious that 
individual correction may not get the job 
done this is often good procedure. All of 
us tend to exercise a little self examination 
when such challenges are hurled at the 
group wherein we are present. 

This is particularly true of the worth- 
while employee with whom we are concerned. 
He or she tends to do much more self 
examination than the run-of-the-mill type. 

' ' Look for possible dissatisfaction with 
the detail Avork he or she has been doing." 
This occurs very often. Such detail work 
must be done, however, and the pharmacist's 
problem is to either try to lessen it for each 
such particular work assignment or devise 
ways and means of attaining the work goal 
without so much detail. It is very often 
possible to follow the latter procedure. In 
many cases such employees may be letting 
this detail work get the best of them by the 
wrong attitude toward it. 

"Eecheck the individual's background 
and qualifications ... he or she may feel they 
are doing something beneath their talents." 
When one makes such a check up it will 
often be surprising how frequently this will 
turn up. Since it is chiefly an attitude of 
mind the management job is to change the 
(Concluded on page 13) 




New bottle 
packaging 



Time-tested formula 

Time-tested acceptance 

Time-tested profit-maker 



Your customers have a choice when they buy 
"BC'\ America's fastest-selling headache 
powders or the popular "BC" tablets 

Over 100 Million Packages Per Year 

backed by concentrated local and 

national advertising 



B. C. REMEDY COMPANY 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



13 



HANDLING THAT GOOD EMPLOYEE 

(Continued from page 11) 

employee's viewpoint; show him or her that 
the bothersome work detail requires such 
talents as he or she does possess. 

"I wonder if you would go about that 
in this way to make it easier on the others 
here — . ' ' This approach, as used by one 
particular pharmacy owner, has solved the 
problem for him many times over the past 
years. He finds the better type of employee 
always concerned with working as a team 
■with fellow individuals; not as a solo. If 
he or she can be given the idea that what 
they have been doing passes an extra load 
onto others self -correction will follow in 
almost every case. 

' ' Divide the assignment into sections 
which can be adapted one at a time into 
daily routine. ' ' With many people their 
work efficiency rises to great degree when 
approached in this manner as opposed to 
where they are given nothing but ' ' the big 
picture" in a work assignment. It is also 
much easier to discover and correct such 
faults in work routines when these same 
routines are broken down into basic com- 
ponents and the problems attacked in each 
segement. Add to this the fact that it is 
always easier for any of us to grasp one 
detail at a time rather than a dozen at 
once and this procedure becomes even more 
adaptable to a wide diversity of problems. 

"Present it as a problem you previously 
;have not made plain even though you know 
in your own mind that you have. ' ' This 
employment of a subtle approach (and 
passing the blame onto onself) can often 
secure response where nothing else will. It's 
an old routine but personnel men tell us 
lit was never before used more successfully 
in business than it is being used today. 

' ' Check closely the individual with which 
he or she has been working — a change may 
give him or her the example needed to do a 
better job." Even the best of us are in- 
fluenced in small or large measure by those 
with whom we work everv day. This is 



particularly true if such association has been 
going on for many months. Time after time 
we will find that changing such associates 
can bring about marked work productivity 
in not only one but both individuals in- 
volved. 

' ' There 's always a chance personal prob- 
lems can be the main cause. This will take 
delicate handling but will be well worthwhile 
if he or she happens to be one of our top 
employees." It's never easy to delve into 
the personal affairs of our employees and 
some times dangerous business but where it 
is obvious that something outside lies at 
the bottom of the trouble the pharmacist 
has little choice but to take this step. 

' ' Approach the faltering employee 
through an associate he or she particularly 
trusts. ' ' In many cases, it is found, more 
effective corrective steps on a work problem 
can be handled by a fellow employee than 
by ' ' the boss. ' ' In order to avoid possible 
dissension through such an approach it is 
wisest procedure to approach this latter 
employee with the problem as being one of 
both his and the other fellow 's responsi- 
bility. Employing such a team approach 
will have less chance of repercussion than 
the other obvious procedure. 

"Secure correction of the work problem 
by example before his or her eyes. ' ' There 
are many of us who get a point much quicker 
when something is demonstrated to us than 
when explained orally. If such an individual 
is involved this is always the most satis- 
factory approach toward handling the 
problem. 

"Presage it with compliments on the 
good work he or she has been doing in other 
areas of the job." This is a form of sugar 
coating but it works with all of us . . . 
bitter pills are always much easier to swal- 
low when sugar coated. 

Get tough? No, never — if he or she is 
the type of individual who needs the get 
tough method of approach the chances are 
that man or woman is definitely not the type 
we want on our staff in the long run. 



14 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



For seventy-seven years 
• - - since 1885 

SeeMAH 



OF 



DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long asso- 
ciation with North Caro- 
lina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its forty- 
third volume, and the 
first printed copy was 
"Seeman Printed." 




The Seeman Printer y 

of DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



Combined Medical-Pharmacy 
Meeting 

As part of the scientific program of it 
annual convention, the American Colleg 
of Apothecaries will join with members o 
the American Academy of General Practie 
in attending the Sixth Annual Symposium o: 
Infectious Diseases sponsored by the Aeaj 
emy of General Practice and the ITniversit; 
of Kansas School of Medicine. 

In announcing this combined session, AGi 
President Wilkins Harden of Columbia 
South Carolina, indicated that it is his undei 
standing that "this is the first time that i 
national medical society and a nationa 
pharmaceutical association have joined i: 
such a combined scientific program." 

All pharmacists are invited to attend thi 
ACA Convention, whose formal program wi] 
start on September 11. Headquarters hota 
will be the Hotel Muehleback and registra 
tion information may be obtained by writi 
ing the American College of Apothecaries 
Hamilton Court Hotel, 39th and Chestnu! 
Street, Philadelphia 4, Penna. 



Madison Drug Enlarged 

To celebrate the completion of extensiv 
remodeling of their pharmacy, Madison Druj 
Company, Madison, Manager Carlyle Hughe 
and Pharmacist Clayburn Hawkins hel< 
open-house during one July week period. 

One of the major features of the remodel 
ing program inchuled taking over space v 
an adjoining building to provide additiona 
sales area. 

Madison Drug Company was establishe< 
in 1914; was incorporated in 1933 and hai 
been managed by Carlyle Hughes sinc< 
1946. 

Mr. Hawkins, a '52 graduate of the UN( 
School of Pharmacy, has been with th< 
pharmacy for the past eight years. 



Now Reduced 

A Ealeigh bookstore displayed this sigi 
in a show window: "You Can Make Monej 
in the Stock Market"— Originally $5.00 
Now Eeduced to $1.98." 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



15 




ictured above are, left to right, G. G. Buchanan and his Son, George R., of Greensboro, 
ad Gilbert Hartis, Jr. and his Father of Winston-Salem. Here we have a unique situa- 
on: (1) Both Mr. Buchanan and Mr. Hartis are Parke, Davis MSR's; (2) They work 
l adjoining territories; (3) their sons graduated from the UNC School of Pharmacy, with 
;S in Pharmacy on same day — June 4. Of all the Hundreds of P-D MSR's, this situation 
ii probably a First in the Nation. 



FOR YOUR PHOTO FINISHING NEEDS 

Let B & H Photo Company Serve You 

Complete Service on 

Black and White Kodacolor 

Ektachrome Anscochrome 



Kodachrome Movies and Slides 
Processed in Our Plant 



B & II PHOTO COMPANY 

3030 s. boulevard p. 0. box 1600 

phone 523-7093 charlotte 1, n. c. 




"SCRIPTS" THAT END HAPPILY FOR ALL CONCERNED 

The first time you meet some of your customers, they are tense, irritable, 
barely pleasant. You are not surprised when the prescription calls for a 
calming agent— Vis taril 50 mg. tablets #50. When the patients are sent 
back for refills, they are relaxed, calm, pleasant. 

Of course, all this is a familiar story to you. You have seen so many 
people helped — and their long-suffering families and friends helped, too 
— by modern drug discoveries like Vistarjl that relax tension, reduce 
anxiety, and permit a more tranquil reaction. Are your customers aware 
of the way drug research — as in this case — responds to the demands of 
modern life? 

VISTARIE Capsules and Oral Suspension hydroxyzine pamoate 

YT0IAKI.L 1 tirClllCTcll OOllltlOn hydroxyzine hydrochloride | full 

PRODUCT INFORMATION ABOUT VISTARIL IS AVAILABLE IN BLUE BOOK, RED BOOK, IN THE 
PRODUCT BROCHURE ENCLOSED IN EACH PACKAGE, AND FROM YOUR PFIZER REPRESENTATIVE. 

Science for the world's well-being® (Pfizer) 
PFIZER LABORATORIES Division, Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc. New York 1 7, N. Y. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 



What is a Drug Worth? 

Editorial, July 19, 1962 issue of The Kannapolis Daily Independent 



What is a prescription drug worth — a 
drug which may save your life, restore you 
to health, or prevent a prolonged illness dur- 
ing which your earning power might be 
fully stopped? 

No one can answer such a question with 
mathematical accuracy. And no layman has 
the knowledge that would enable him to 
make statistical breakdowns that show the 
cost of finding, developing, producing and 
distributing drugs. 

But there are answers — important and 
powerful answers. For instance, a mid- 
western businessman recently wrote a letter 
to a senator who has been most critical of 
the pharmaceutical industry. In it he said: 
"On October 29, 1961 my wife was taken 
seriously ill — a gangrenous blocked intestine. 



I don't know whether the $82 worth of drugs 
she received cost 82 cents or $8,200 to pro- 
duce, and I couldn't care less. The profits 
which the drug companies made financed the 
necessary research to develop drugs and 
equipment which saved my wife's life. I am 
getting fed up with the attitude . . . that 
profits are criminal, sinful and should be 
eliminated. I hope that neither you nor I 
have our life span cut short by the lack of 
a drug which was not developed." 

Drug research is costly — in money, time, 
energy, often disappointment. The risks of 
failure are inevitably great. The financially 
successful discoveries must carry the load 
of the failures. Otherwise, progress must 
end — and an appalling human waste must 
follow. 



YOU! ARE INVITED TO 

GEER'S DISPLAY ROOM 

IT'S PACKED FULL - THE BEST SELECTION 

of 

Gifts - Holiday - Staple 

MERCHANDISE 
Open afjtet nout£ by, appointment 

The Geer Drug Company 

846 W. Main St. Spartanburg, S. C. 



18 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



% bi 



ins 



AUGUST CHECK LIST 

Tear out for a handy check of 

your current stock of these 

Robins products that are receiving 

special promotion in your area 
August 13 — September 21 

Dimefane Extents® 

O Extentabs 100's Q Extentabs 500's 

° ^imetane Tablets • Elixir 

□ Tab. 100's □ Tab. 500's n Elix. Pint Q Elix. Gal. 

- Dimetane -Ten injectable 

□ Amp. 1 cc. 6's □ Amp. 1 cc. 100's 

□ Dimetane -lOO injectable 

□ Vials 2 cc. 



IDonnafa! 



Extentabs' 



□ Extentabs 100's □ Extentabs 500's 

□ Donnatal Tab. • Cap. • Elix. 

D Tab. 100's n Tab. 500's Q Tab. 1000's 
n Cap. 100's O Cap. 500's □ Cap. 1000's 
Q Elix. Pint Q Elix. 1 Gal. 

Donnagel-PG 

□ Susp. 6 oi. 

- Donnagel with Neomycin 

n Susp. S oz. 

a Donnagel 

n Susp. 6 oz. 

I Allbee with C Capsules 

□ Cap. 100's □ Cap. 500's □ Cap. 1000's 

° Adeabee Tablets 

□ Tab. 100's □ Tab. 500's 

Adabee-M Tablets 

D Tab. 100's D Tab. 500's 

Why not check your stock of 

all Robins products at the same time 

— and be prepared 




A. H. ROBINS CO., INC., RICHMOND 20, VA. 



Elmore Installed 

Oscar A. Elmore, Cromley's Pharmacy, 
Ealeigh, has been installed as president of 
the Wake County Pharmaceutical Society 
for the coming year. 

Other officers are: Forrest Matthews, 
president-elect; Hugh Hinston, vice presi- 
dent ; Miss Evelyn Willif ord, secretary ; Bill 
Brannon, treasurer; and H. G. Price, member j 
of the executive committee. 

Attend Leadership Workshop 

The July Leadership Workshop conducted 
at Chapel Hill by the N. C. Council of 
Women's Organization, was attended by four 
members of the NCPA Woman's Auxiliary: 
Mrs. John T. Stevenson, Elizabeth City, 
President; Mrs. D. D. Claytor, Greensboro, 
First Vice-President; Mrs. James R. Casteel 
and Mrs. B. W. Spencer, Jr., Durham. 

Classes were offered in Leadership Skills, 
Parliamentary Procedure, Public Speaking, 
World Affairs, etc. The Workshop con- 
cluded with a luncheon at the Carolina Inn, 
July 19th, which was also attended by Mrs. 
W. J. Smith of Chapel Hill. 

Rowan-Davie Auxiliary 

Mrs. John H. Brown was installed presi- 
dent of the Rowan-Davie Auxiliary at their 
last meeting of the year. Mrs. Paul Miller, 
outgoing i) resident, installed Mrs. Brown and 
the following new officers: Vice-President 
Mrs. Justin Uffinger; Secretary, Mrs. 
Harold Kenerly; Treasurer, Mrs. R. A. 
Kiser; Historian and Yearbook, Mrs. John 
Upehurch. 

Mrs. Brown led the devotions and Mrs. 
Upehurch presented to Mrs. Miller a token 
gift of silver as appreciation for her serv- 
ices as president. 

Mrs. Brown named the following chair- 
men of committees: Devotions, Mrs. Ed- 
ward Reynolds; Hostesses, Mrs. D. A. 
Thompson; Membership, Mrs. E. R. Fuller; 
Telephone and Hospitality, Mrs. Frank 
Carrigan and Mrs. Thomas E. Camp. 

Following the luncheon, the group toured 
Lewis 5 Antique Shop at Spencer. 

Mrs. Kiser won the draw prize. Hostesses 
were Mrs. J. F. Carrigan, Mrs. Fuller, and 
Mrs. Upehurch. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

N. C Leader in Botanical drugs 



19 



Plants for food. Plants for fiber. Plants 

or beauty. Plants for shelter. North Caro- 

ina grows some of them all. 

But what about plants for drugs? Here 

gain the Tar Heel State is well represented. 

In fact, North Carolina has been — and 

till is — one of the more important sources 

f crude botanical drugs, or "botanicals." 

"Most of the drug plants are available in 

bundauce in their native habitats," says 

)r. James W. Hardin, associate professor 

■ botany at North Carolina State College. 

"While collecting these plants helps pro- 

ide a livelihood for many "pickers," Dr. 

lardin is convinced that "it is the pickers 

,dio are scarce, not the plants." 

One reference has listed over 1,400 past 
nd present medicinal plants in North 
arolina. Kelatively few are marketable, 
lowever; and the annual commercial demand 
f some of these may range from a few 
;rams to several tons. 

Dr. Hardin says profits from collecting 
md cultivating these crude drug plants are 
iften exaggerated. "On the other hand," he 
idds, "picking these botanicals can be cmite 
irofitable." 

"It is true," he continued, "that the market 
:or some drug plants can be flooded by a 
ew hundred pounds. But in the ease of 
Cotton Boot bark, Deertongue or some 
)thers, the picker can sell — at a good price 
— as much as he can collect." 

To help present and prospective pickers, 
Hardin has prepared a bulletin titled "North 
parolina Drugs Plants of Commercial 
Value." 

In the bulletin he points out some of the 
opportunities as well as the cautions that 
pickers should keep in mind. Advice is 
given on identification, collecting, cleaning, 
drying, packing and marketing. 

Free copies of the bulletin may be ob- 
tained from county agricultural agents 
or by writing to the Department of Agri- 
cultural Information at State College, 
Raleigh. 

Dr. Hardin also says that pickers can get 
information from buyers of the drug plants, 
which he lists as Bear & Weiss, Crude 



Botanical Drugs, Wilmington ; Blue Ridge 
Drug Co., West Jefferson; Greer Drug and 
Chemical Corp., Lenoir; S. B. Penick & 
Co., Asheville; Todd Herb Co., West Jeffer- 
son; and Wilcox Drug Co., Boone. 

While he does not rule out commercial 
cultivation of drug plants, Dr. Hardin ad- 
vises prospective growers to start such en- 
terprises only after studying the situation 
carefully. 

"Plants collected in their natural habitats 
are often of better marketable quality than 
those cultivated as a crop." He says. 
"Also, it is often true that the market de- 
mand can be satisfied by the collection of 
native plants." 

Dr. Hardin makes a strong plea for pickers 
to think about the future when removing 
plants. Follow modern methods of conserva- 
tion he advises, to insure a continued crop 
year after year. 



The "Why" of A.O.I. 

Looking for 
the "Very Best"? 

Consider the COMPANY 
founded for you. 

Insurers to the Health Professions 

Try Us and See — 
Contact our Agent — Today 



tf£ 



e .SECURITy. 5> 



INSURANCE CO 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 



'%< 



CONSULT OUR AGENT 

F. O. Bowman 

North Carolina State Agenl 

P. O. Box 68S 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 




TRADE MARE 



Quality. 



- 



<***% 




■ 1 \< '' "- 




Wto 






> 







•""•™ ...» V'-., /> . 



Pays and Pays and Pays 

—— — — — . — — — — — a 

Sealtest Ice Cream — in dishes, cones and cartons — 
brings customers in, sells the ones that came for 
other products, and makes your cash register ring. 

Well-known quality keeps Sealtest preferred. 
National and local advertising keeps Sealtest pre-sold. 
And regular special flavors help keep Sealtest 
predominant. 

So, stock up with Sealtest Ice Cream. Display the 
Sealtest sign of quality. Then, count up 
your extra Sealtest profits! 

***** 

And be sure to Feature this Special Flavor 

BANANA STRAWBERRY SPLIT 

for your Fountain and Take-Home Customers! 




The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 



Dedicated Pharmacists Over 60 Years Ago Created An 
Insurance Company to Answer Pharmacist's Needs 



It was during 1902, 1903 and 1904, that 
the druggists of America were up in arms in 
^protest against the treatment accorded them 
(by most fire insurance companies. There was 
ja definite feeling that fire insurance rates on 
drug stores were much to high and many 
druggists had suffered bitter and disap- 
pointing experiences arising out of the ad- 
justment of fire losses which had occurred 
in their drug store. 

This matter had been brought to the at- 
tention of several pharmaceutical and drug 
associations. In particular, at the Annual 
Convention of the National Association of 
Retail Druggists in 1904, held in St. Louis, 
there was a considerable amount of time 
devoted to the problem. 

As a result of the discussion at that time, 
a committee was appointed to investigate 
the matter and to determine whether the 
i retail druggists of America should possibly 
iform an insurance company of their own, to 
augment, and possibly finance the National 
Association of Retail Druggists. 

At the 1905 convention this committee re- 
ported their findings and indicated that in 
I their opinion, such a venture would be 
worth-while. However, after consideration 
and discussion, the Convention turned down 
the suggestion as made by the committee. 
Thereafter, several of the gentlemen active 
on the committee, who had investigated the 
matter at some length, were of the opinion 
that such a venture could be worth-while 
and would certainly serve the drug trade in 
a most useful manner. 

As a result of the investigation made by 
the committee and the interest stirred in the 
minds and hearts of the gentlemen com- 
posing that committee, steps were taken to 
organize a fire insurance company to serve 
the druggists and to be owned by the drug 
trade of the country. 

Organization was started and a corpora- 
tion was formed in Cincinnati, Ohio, that 
being the home of one of the leaders of the 
group, Mr. Frank H. Freericks, a druggist 
and lawyer, with offices and a retail drug 
store in Cincinnati. Authority to do busi- 
ness in Ohio was arranged and stock was 



sold to the druggists of the country, although 
the actual selling of that stock and the 
raising of the necessary capital was truly a 
difficult problem at the time. However, the 
corporation progressed and was authorized 
for business in 1906 and actually, wrote its 
first policy in 1907. 

The Company first operated in Ohio, but 
slowly and gradually spread through other 
states of the country. Its practice was to 
write a very modest policy, covering only on 
the stock of merchandise of retail drug 
stores. It made a cost saving to its drug- 
gists policy holders from the very beginning 
by reducing the established rates then 
charged for fire insurance by other capital 
stock insurance companies. It also provided, 
and still provides, a loss adjustment service 
designed for the benefit of druggists. 

As the Company grew and as its assets in- 
creased to the point that such would be safe 
and conservative, the size of the policy which 
the Company would provide was increased 
(Continued on page 23) 



Ft 



Make McGawit 

For Labels -in Rolls or Flats 
Physicians 1^ Blanks and Files 

Drug Boxes - Call Checks 
Drug and Delivery Envelopes 



P*e&o>up£io.*t JlaMeU 

all Style* and QolaM. 




42-54 BENNETT 
STREET 



, THE RIGHT , 

LABEL 

.RIGHT AT/ 

HAND 



BRADFORD, 
PENNA. 



Specializing in Labels lor Drug Stores 



Clifford P. Berry, Representative 
P. O. Box 306, Charlotte 1, N. C. 



Brighten your ** 





with 






Fixtures 



We Can Help You! 

1. Our Experienced Designers can plan your store to increase 
Sales and Profits for You! 

2. Our Skilled Workers and Modern Production Facilities can 
quickly turn your Plans into Reality! 

3. The installation is completed by Factory Trained Experts 
with "know-how" to get the job done with Minimum 
Inconvenience to You. 

A. Your increased sales and profits will meet the conven- 
iently spaced payments tailored to suit your needs. All 
payments and dealings are directly with us. Ask for Our 
Financing or Leasing Plans. 



Clip Coupon and Mail 




< ,5r '" r ^ V * s > fc > «*. 


We are planning to 




^-r^T^> ^*^J^ 


1 □ Expand □ Modernize 


□ Build 

New 


"^m * • WS^^ 


Name 


Store 


^3P^ 


Firm Name 




GRANT E. KEY, INC 

Manufacturers 


Street Address 

City 




' State 




LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



23 



DEDICATED PHARMACISTS 

!nd the Company expanded into other states, 
jntil at the present time, it is operating and 
,oing business in 39 states of the country. 
i Originally, only fire insurance was pro- 
ided. Then, damage by lightning was 
dded, followed by wind damage. Other 
overages and perils were provided from 
lime to time and expansion was arranged, 
o as to insure drug store fixtures and later, 
jven drug store buildings. Of course, at the 
Iresent time full lines of insurance are pro- 
vided to the retailer, not only for his store 
tut also on his home and other properties. 
The original company name, The American 
Druggists ' Tire Insurance Company, was 
jhanged by dropping the word ' ' Fire ' ' at 
She time that casualty insurance lines were 
«dded. 

' At the present time, the Company will 
write a policy of adequate amount, insofar 
is the value of the normal retail drug store 
s concerned. The Company has always been 
j»wned and controlled by retail druggists 
jind now has approximately one thousand 
stockholders, practically all of whom are 
connected with the drug trade, in one way 
!)r another. It is represented by independent 
agents in the 39 states and does render and 
axtend a service to the drug trade of those 
states, which no other company can equal. 
Certainly no other company so successfully 
Serves the retail drug trade throughout the 
sountry. While there are other druggists' 
insurance companies who operate in smaller 
sections of the country, only the American 
Druggists' Insurance Company is specializ- 
ing in providing insurance service to the 
entire drug trade throughout the nation, 
from coast to coast. 



When liability and casualty lines were 
undertaken in 1956, the coverage line Avas 
complete. It is, thus, only natural, that the 
Company has come to be the leading insurer 
of druggists, in providing them with full 
protection, including malpractice coverage, 
which protects against claims made when it 
is suggested that an error has been made in 
the filling of a prescription or in the opera- 
tion of their store. 

The Company has now reached a financial 
stability which has made it one of the 
strongest insurance companies in the country. 

Thus, from a very modest beginning and 
from the orginial plan of writing insurance 
only in the amount of $1,000.00 or so, on 
the stock of a retail drug store, the com- 
pany has grown to now provide insurance 
on most of the worth-while drug stores of 
the country and will write practically all 
needed insurance coverage. Its assets now 
exceed $4,000,000.00 and the saving it has 
made to policyholders throughout its his- 
tory, approximately $5,000,000.00, all of 
which has been saved by the retail drug 
trade in the cost of insurance. 

The Company is at the service of everyone 
connected with the drug trade and can 
provide excellent insurance facilities. 

Thus, the aims, hopes and dreams of those 
dedicated pharmacists of almost sixty years 
ago, have been carried to fullfillment and will 
continue to benefit the drug trade of the 
country. They worked hard and provided 
well, to create ' ' the druggists own insurance 
company, ' ' a wonderful demonstration of 
what can be accomplished by a determined 
and cooperative effort by druggists, to cor- 
rect a situation and solve a problem then 
needing attention. 



SMITH WHOLESALE DRUG CO. 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

A Young and Growing Service Wholesale House, 
Owned and Operated by Registered Pharmacists 



We Appreciate Your Business 






not* 



.H^. 






*S 




pi 





LOOK FOR THE TIE-IN PROMO 
TION THAT MAKES YOU NUNNALLY'i 
HEADQUARTERS 

For Your Windows and Counters 

For New Depth in Appeal 

LOOK FOR YOUR NUNNALLY'S REPRESENTATIVE 



THE CANDY OF THE SOUTH 



Illuminated Shadow Box Displays in Look Reprints in Full 
Full Color Tempting Color 

W. T. THREEWITTS, JR., 300 A. ASHLAND DRIVE, GREENSBORO, N. C. NUNNALLY'S ATLANTA • AUGUST/ 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 



Theoretical Town of 1,000 People 



If all the people of the world could be 

duced proportionately into a theoretical 
)wn of 1,000 people, the picture would look 
jmething like this: 

In this town, there would be 60 Americans, 
tie remainder of the world would be 
?presented by 940 persons. This is the 
,roportion of the United States to the 
lopulation of the world 60 to 940. 

The 60 Americans would have half the 
[icome of the entire town, with the other 940 
ividing the other half. 

About 330 people in the town would be 
lassified as Christians; 670 would not. At 
;ast 80 townspeople would be practicing 
ommunists, and 370 others would be under 
ommunist domination. White people would 
otal 303, with 697 non-white. 

The 60 Americans would have an average 
ife expectancy of 70 years, the other 940, 
than 40 years on the average. The 60 
Americans would have an average of 15 
imes as many possessions per person as all 
he rest of the people. The Americans would 
•roduce 16% of the town's total food 
upply. Although they eat 72% above the 
laximum food requirements, they would 
ither eat most of what they grew, or store 
t for their own future use at enormous 
ost. 

Since most of the 940 non-Americans in 
he town would be hungry most of the 
ime, it could lead to some ill feeling 
oward the 60 Americans who would appear 
p be enormously rich and fed to the point 
If sheer disbelief by the great majority of 
[he townspeople. The Americans would also 
aave a disproportionate share of electric 
bower, coal, fuel, steel and general equip- 
nent. 

The 60 Americans and about 200 others 
•epresenting Western Europe, and a few- 
favored classes in other areas in South 
America, South Africa, Australia, and a 
,tew wealthy Japanese, would be relatively 
well off. But the majority of the 1,000 
•people would be ignorant, poor, hungry, 
ind sick. Of the 630 non-Americans, 300 
ivould have malaria, 85 would have shisto- 



somiasis, 3 would have leprosy. Forty-five 
will die from malaria, cholera, typhus and 
other infections. One hundred and fifty- 
six will die from starvation and malnutri- 
tion. None of the 60 Americans will ever 
get these diseases or probably ever be 
worried about them. 

The 60 Americans would each be spending 
at least $87 per year on liquor and tobacco 
but less than $20 for the drugs needed for 
the finest medical care in the world — and 
would be loudly claiming that medicines 
cost too much ! 

Many of the 60 Americans wouldn't even 
have brains enough to be thankful for the 
privilege of being Americans. Quite often 
a few would pass up an education even 
though hundreds of others in town would 
give anything to obtain it. 



i— !■• 




Quick 
FFF^Rub 



MIOIC1NI CO. 



fair-weather friend 

Spring and Summer are the 
seasons for sore muscles... 
and Soltice is the modern 
Quick Rub that's great for sore 
muscles. 

That's why Soltice keeps on 
selling when the weather turns 
fair. 

THE CHATTANOOGA MEDICINE CO. 

CHATTANOOGA 9, TENNESSEE 



26 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



DISTINCTIVE ^^ 




Carry your 
store's identity by color and 
personalized copy right into your customers 
home for the life of the Prescription. 

Another pjus value of the modern paper 
box with its clean fresh label. 

Representative: 

M. C. GRIER 

iiio ann st., at. 3-3847 

Monroe. North Carolina 

• • • 

E. N. ROWELL CO., INC. 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



Pharmacy Manager 

Everett M. Dunn is now associated wi 
the Draper Pharmacy of Draper as maS 
ager. 

When the new Joe Chandler Pharmacy 
opened in the Medical-Dental-Pharina 
Building on Highway 14, Mr. Dunn w| 
divide his time between the new pharmw 
and the one where he is presently locate'. 

Leslie Julian Buys Missildine's 

The 64 year-old Missildine Pharmacy I 
Try on has been bought by Pharmacist LesLi 
Julian, owner of the Try on Pharmacy. T!| 
sale became effective on August 1. 

Scheduled to retire shortly is J. C. "Cobi 
Foster, a pharmacist in the employ of Mil 
sildine's since 1936. 

Mr. Julian is a native of Morristown, Tel 
nessee and a graduate in pharmacy of tl 
University of Tennessee. Prior to loeatii. 
in Tryon, first as an employee of OweJ 
Pharmacy and later as owner of the Try^ 
Pharmacy, he operated a pharmacy in Nel 
land, N. C. 



STROTHER 
DRUG COMPANY 

of Richmond, Inc. 

3700 Saunders Avenue 

POWERS-TAYLOR DRUG CO. 
Richmond, Va. 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 

Full Line 

Full Service 

Member of 
Druggists Service Co. 

National Wholesale 
Druggists Association 

For Best Service Call Us 

Collect 

353-2771 

After Hours Call 
353-2777 




Reaco B-Complex with C. Tablets 

$20.00 Doz. 100s 

Reaco A & D Capsules $10.00 Doz. lOOs 
A. E. P. Tablets $24.00 Doz. lOOs 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 10 mg. Tablets 

$2.25 per 100 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 25 mg. Tablets 

$4.50 per 100 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 50 mg. Tablets 

$7.50 per 100 



Reavita Capsules 
Neo-Reavita 



$34.80 Doz. 100s 
$28.00 per 1000 
$36.00 Doz. 100s 



Your cooperation in stocking 
Reaco Products is appreciated 

REACO PRODUCTS 

P. O. Box 2747 
West Durham, North Carolina 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



27 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 

Wilmington — Fire originating in an ad- 
joining building did extensive smoke damage 
to Walgreen's Drug Store in mid-July. In- 
cluded in the damaged property was an 
air conditioner on top of Walgreen's. 

Sanford — Mann's Drug Store will estab- 
lish an 8,000 square foot store on the corner 
of Wicker and Vance Streets. Harvey 
Greeson is the manager. 

Lenoir — Al Moir, Eli Lilly MSB, was guest 
speaker at the July 16 meeting of the 
Lenoir Optimist Club. He was presented 
by Jim Bennick of the Lenior Drug Com- 
pany. 

Greensboro — The Greensboro Historical 
Museum will mark O. Henry's 100th birth- 
day with the dedication Sept. 11 of a rep- 
lica of his uncle's drug store in which the 
short story writer worked as a young man. 

Durham — More than $2,000 in cash was 
stolen from Eekerd's Forest Hills Drug 
Store on the night of July 29. Entry was 
by way of the roof where the thieves sawed 
and punched a hole. 

Asheville — CIBA MSB Lawrence D. Ford 
was guest speaker at the July 19 meeting 
of the Biltmore Lions Club. 

Clayton — Due to inability to attend meet- 
ings, C. H. Beddingfield has resigned as a 
member of the Johnston County Board of 
Health. He has been a member of the 
Board since August, 1946. 

New Bern — An out-of-state tourist, en- 
route to Florida, stopped in Clark's Drug 
Store to make a long distance call. A wal- 
let containing $1,800 in cash, left in the 



telephone booth, was found and later re- 
turned to the tourist. 

Reidsville — TTrbana Soler, a graduate of 
the L T NC School of Pharmacy and for many 
years operator of a pharmacy in Cuba, was 
guest speaker at a recent meeting of the 
Beidsville Pilot Club. Mr. Soler, now an 
employee of the Mann drug stores, left Cuba 
about two years ago after having his prop- 
erty confiscated by the Castro Government. 

Jacksonville — W. L. Ketchum, founder 
and owner of Ketchum Drug Company, is 
celebrating his 49th year of business. 

Asheville — Harold E. Boper has returned 
to Florida. He is now associated with the 
Medical Arts Pharmacy of Melbourne. 

Albemarle — While Brown Phillips was 
hospitalized in Charlotte, Jim Mitchener of 
Concord and G. E. Andes of Wadesboro 
came in on an emergency basis to take care 
of the pharmacy's prescription service. 

Charlotte — B. M. Styles attended a 4-day 
conference for sales executives of Parke- 
Davis at White Sulphur Springs, West Vir- 
ginia, on July 25-28. 

Asheville — J. C. McGee, Sr. of Lord's Drug 
Store was a patient at Duke Hospital, Dur- 
ham, in late July. 

Asheboro — Cards have been mailed an- 
nouncing the removal of Beaves Pharmacy 
to 1717 North Fayetteville Street and a 
name change to "Car Drugs." The phar- 
macy is owned by Charles A. Beaves. 

Greenville — Mrs. Brooks Beddingfield, 
wife of Pharmacist Brooks Beddingfield, has 
been nominated for the post as president of 
the Democratic Women of Pitt County. 

North Wilkesboro — William T. Boyd, 
formerly of Dobson, has accepted a posi- 
tion with Horton's Drug Store. 

Hildebran — Narcotics valued at $300 
were stolen from Brandon's Pharmacy on 
the night of July 27. Entry was by way of 
a skylight on the roof. 

Gastonia — George Templeton, Smith Drug 
pharmacist for the past ten years, has re- 
signed. He is moving to Greensboro where 
he will be associated with the White Oak 
Drug Store. 



28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



There's 

H % $ $ s 

\ \ I / , 



PROFIT 






/ 



in 



finejtate 



MILK 

and 

ICE 

CREAM 

people like it 
and buy it 

Tastes Great . . . It's 



iinejtate 



"One-Stop" Store for High Point 

Plans for construction of a 75,000 squari 
foot "one-stop store" in High Point havi 
been announced by National Food Store:; 
and Eose's Stores Inc. 

The store, estimated to cost $2 million, 
including land, will be identified as "H & E' 
for George E. Hutchens, chairman of board 
National Food, and T. B. Eose, Jr., presif 
dent of Eose's. 

The unit will be composed of a super! 
market, a delicatessen, a variety, junior de| 
partment, general merchandise store, and si 
pharmacy. 

More than 100 persons are expected to be 
employed. Plans call for a parking lot tp 
take care of 1100 cars. 



McKeithan Opens Pharmacy in 
Laurinburg 

Family Pharmacy, Laurinburg, owned by! 
Pharmacist Herb McKeithan, was formally 
opened to the public on July 13-14. A 
drive-in prescription window is featured. 

A native of Raeford and a graduate in 
pharmacy of the UNC School of Pharmacy, 
Mr. McKeithan has made his home in 
Laurinburg for a number of years. He 
was associated with the Legion Drug Store 
prior to establishing the Family Pharmacy. 

Miller New Lilly MSR 
in High Point Area 

Ronald C. Miller is Eli Lilly and Com- 
pany's new salesman in High Point, North 
Carolina. He succeeds L. Craig Lewis, who 
retired recently, announces George L. 
Coaker, manager of the pharmaceutical 
firm's Charlotte District. 

Born in Logansport, Indiana, Miller was 
graduated from high school there in 1953. 
He attended Tulane and Northwestern Uni- 
versities and received a Bachelor of Science 
degree in pharmacy from Purdue Univer- 
sity in January of this year. 

Miller is a member of the American Phar- 
maceutical Association and Eho Chi, phar- 
macy honor society. He is registered as a 
pharmacist in Alabama. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



North Carolinian Introduces 
New Kind of Toothbrush 

| A totally new kind of toothbrush, a dis- 
losable brush made by Du Pont with denti- 
rice-eoated nylon bristles, is offered ex- 
lusively by the John L. Watkins Company, 
|nc., of Havelock, North Carolina. The in- 

!sible mint-flavored dentifrice, an ex- 
usive development of the Watkins Com- 
pany, is released and activated at the in- 
fant the toothbrush is immersed under 
-ater. 

Designed primarily for the hotel, motel, 
nd airline market for complimentary use 
Is a travel convenience, the unique tooth- 
rush will also be available on sundry 
iounters everywhere. 

The toothbrush will be manufactured and 
iackaged at Du Pont's Plastics Depart- 
lent, Product Division plant at Leominster, 
Massachusetts. The packaging equipment 
jermits volume users to have their name 
nd address imprinted on each package. 

C. H. Watkins, Jr., President of the Wat- 
tins Firm, has spent four years on the 
>roduct design and development. He said 



that the market potential is important be- 
cause of the disposable nature of the item. 
He believes that someday soon the traveling 
American will not be required to bring 
along his toothbrush. "After all," He de- 
clared, "Soap is now commonplace whereas 
a few years ago was the most essential item 
in your shaving kit or cosmetic bag." 

Assigned to Texas Hospital 

Lt. Terre M. Smith (UNC Pharmacy '(51 ) 
writes from Texas of his recent assignment 
to Brooke General Hospital as Assistant 
Chief of Enlisted Personnel. He has also 
been accepted in the Adjutants School in Ft. 
Benjamin Harrison, Indiana. 

Lt. Smith says his present work is inter- 
esting but strictly non-pharmacy ; that the 
army has little need of pharmacists as 
pharmacists and that all pharmacists with a 
service obligation should be made aware of 
this. 

Lt. Smith's Texas address is 255 Rampart 
Street, Apartment 18, San Antonio, Texas. 

Prior to entering military service, Lt. 
Smith was associated with the Glen Lennox 
Pharmacy of Chapel Hill. 




BETTER HEALTH . . FOR EVERYOHE 

A.s a service wholesaler, we are proud to stand beside you on the community health team. 
Dur desire is to serve you in the fullest interests of better health for everyone. 
Ve are proud of our comprehensive stocks and of our ability to serve you competently and 
without delay. Take advantage of our speedy service and send your orders to us. 

WE ARE A oClZtZY DISTRIBUTOR 

THE PEABODY DRUG COMPANY 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



30 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



331 Pills 



A man placed 331 pills in a bottle. Three 
hundred of these pills contained common 
bicarbonate of soda, thirty were composed 
of a harmless, common drug, but one con- 
tained potassium cyanide. All the pills were 
mixed together, and when they were emptied 
on the table, all looked alike. 

"How many here are willing to take 
a chance and swallow one of these pills?" 
the man asked, but no one moved to accept 
the challenge. The man said, "I guess right 
now that you men put very little value on 
your time, but it might be interesting for 
you to know that in one out of 331 instances 
when a man attempts to beat a traffic light 
a fatality occurs." 

Long-Time Therapy 

A local doctor became quite popular over- 
night when he was "written up" in a large 
city paper which told of his many years 
of service, achievement, etc. As he was 
approached one morning soon afterwards, by 
a middle-aged woman, she beamed at him 



and wanting to impress him as being j 
acquaintance, she gushed: "Oh, Docto 
I guess you don't remember me. Twen 
years ago you came to see me at home ai 
told me to stay in bed until you called bat 
again. But you never came back!" 

The doctor, being equal to the occasio: 
answered rather briskly. "Did I? We 
then, what are you doing out of bed?" 

Ten Commandments of 
Business 

(1) Love your work — it pays. (2) Hand 
the hardest job first each day. (3) Do n< 
be afraid of criticism — criticize yourse 
often. (4) Be glad and rejoice in oth( 
fellow's success — study his methods. (5 
Do not be misled by dislikes. Acid ruii 
the finest fabrics. (6) Be enthusiastic — 
is contagious. (7) Be fair, and do at leaf 
one decent act every day in the year. 
Honor the chief. There must be a head t 
everything. (9) Have confidence in youi 
self and make yourself fit. (10) HarmoniZ| 
your work. Let sunshine radiate and pen(, 
trate. 



THE HENRY B. GILPIN COMPANY 

Full Line, Full Service Wholesale Druggists Since 1845 
Baltimore • Dover • Norfolk • Washington 




** sfe. 




Norfolk Division 

Equipped for fast, 

efficient wholesale drug 

service to the pharmacists of 

the eastern section of North Carolina 

6435 Tidewater Drive • Norfolk, Virginia • Madison 2-6361 



=1 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

OR Pharmacy School Notes 



31 




! Dr. Bryant William Fitzgerald lias been 
opointed Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 
i begin his new position on September 1. 
,!e is a native of Yonkers, New York, and 
keived his Bachelor's degree in pharmacy 
l/oni Columbia University in 1952 and 
[aster's and Doctor's degree from the ITni- 
prsity of Connecticut in 1954 and 1962. 
£e also had graduate study at the Uni- 
ersity of Wisconsin and taught for one year 
t Ferris Institute, Big Bapids, Michigan. 
[e had two years of service in the United 
tates Army, most of it in Germany. He 
: licensed as a pharmacist in New York 
ad New Hampshire. He is married. His 
jsearch was concerned with emulsifying 
roperties of carrageenin and a study of the 
ccumulation of radio-active zinc in oysters, 
'uring the past year he has served as a 
eseareh fellow on the latter project under 
oonsorship by the Atomic Energy Com- 
ussion. His special interests are physical 
harmacy and instrumental analysis. 
Beginning July 1 copies of Miss Noble's 
look on the history of the School of Phar- 
lacy should be ordered directly from the 
chool of Pharmacy with checks marked 
ayable to the N. C. Pharmaceutical Be- 
^arch Foundation. This direct handling 
'ill facilitate personal autographs from the 



author which are requested so frequently. 
The cost of the book is $5.15 including sales 
tax. 

A generous gift from the Greensboro Drug 
Club Auxiliary afforded the addition of 
three silver sandwich plates and two bonbon 
dishes to the collection of the school for use 
for formal receptions in the Student Center. 

Dr. J. C. Kellett, Jr., Assistant Professor 
of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, received a 
training grant valued at $3675 for the year 
from the National Science Foundation for 
"undergraduate science education program." 
This program will enable undergraduates 
to undertake research projects directed by 
Dr. Kellett in preparation for graduate 
specialization. 

Dr. George H. Cocolas, Assistant Professor 
of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, received a 
grant from the National Institutes of Health 
valued at $4,600 to renew for a second year 
his research on glutamic acid analogs. 

Pharmacists Allen A. Lloyd of Hillsboro 
now has another publication to his credit. 
He and Mrs. Lloyd were editors of a 40 
page booklet : "History of the Hillsborough 
Methodist Church, 1807-1961." 

On June 27 Dean E. A. Brecht and Dr. 
Jack K. Wier, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macognosy, had the pleasure of visiting a 
North Carolina firm of considerable distinc- 
tion and eminence in its field of specializa- 
tion. The Carolina Biological Supply Com- 
pany at Elon College was established in 
1929. It specializes in biological specimen 
and laboratory supplies affording employ- 
ment for between 200-300 persons. In 
addition to the central plant at Elon College 
it has a collection station in Louisiana and 
a branch plant in Oregon. The main plant 
at Elon College is divided into 14 scientific 
departments. It was like meeting an old 
friend to find Tom Begister as the head of 
the Department of Permanent Botanical 
Microscopic Slides. Some pharmacists will 
remember him as a laboratory assistant in 
one of Dr. Totten's pharmacognosy classes. 

Dr. Shu Sing Cheng came from Formosa 



32 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



UNC PHARMACY SCHOOL NOTES 

to the campus in 1956 for a major graduate 
study in pharmaceutical chemistry. He 
received the degree of Master of Science in 
January of 1959 and the Doctor of Philoso- 
phy in June of 1961. He served in the 
School of Pharmacy as a graduate assistant 
and part-time instructor and during the past 
two years also as a research associate in 
the Department of Bacteriology. On July 
1 he began a new position as research as- 
sociate in problems of organic synthesis at 
the Worcester Foundation for Experimental 
Biology at Shrewsbury, Massachusetts. 

Dr. J. C. Kellett completed a week of 
refresher experience in community phar- 
' macy at the Glen Lennox Pharmacy of 
Chapel Hill in mid-July. This faculty 
refresher experience was sponsored by the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Research 
Foundation. 

Historical Note 
By Alice Noble, Research Historian 

I have enjoyed reading Ferry Hill 
Plantation Journal — 1838-39, kept (writ- 
ten) by the owner, John Blackford. It is 
concerned with day by day happenings on 
his plantation located on the Maryland side 
of the Potomac River across from Shephards- 
town, Va. (now West Virginia). The docu- 
ment, found recently, was edited by Pro- 
fessor Fleacher M. Green, of the U. N. C. 
History Department, and published by the 
University Press. It records with evident 
faithfulness the plantation life and pro- 
vides invaluable historical data of the 
times. Of course, I was particularly in- 
terested in what it had to say about drugs 
and medicinal care. The Blackford family, 
both white and black, suffered many ills. 
Mrs. Blackford was an invalid. In spite of 
the fact that three physicians are named as 
making professional calls to the home, 
Blackford himself (as did most planters of 
the pre-Civil War South) administered patent 
and standard medicines to members of his 
household both white and black. These prep- 
arations included Sedlitz Powers, Brand- 
reth Pills, castor oil, calomel, epsom salt, 
spirits of niter, salpeter, magnesia and 
laudanum. I wonder why the patients did 



not "give up the ghost" with the drasl 
treatments. For instance, a slave wj 
given first grains of calomel at night and| 
big dose of castor oil the next morninji 
Brandreth's Pills was Blackford's favori 
remedy. ' ' I took three pills last night, ' ' sal 
he, "and three early this morning." The: 
pills were a very popular patent medicii 
apparently. A Shepherdstown newspap 
advertised them as "an effective remec 
for consumption, influenza, colds, indigestk 
and headache." It declared that 9,000,01 
boxes had been sold in a five-year period, ai, 
that more than 300,000 patients had be<} 
cured of their ills by the use of the pill 
Dentists too made occasional visits to tl 
plantation. Blackford records: "Dr. JenW 
the dentist, called about nine o'clock ad 
was engaged until evening "filing, fixin 
and pluging Helena and Jennett's teeth fc' 
which he charged and I paid him $9.00. 

Care of the sick on the long ago plantatic 
was strenuous for the victims! 

The Swansboro Historical Association h; ! 
inaugurated ambitious plans for the restorj 
tion of old landmarks. A most fortuna 
event occurred recently when the organizatiq 
was given one of the town's oldest housi 
to restore — a gift valued at several thousar 
dollars. In addition, the State Departmei 
of Archives and History has obtained a grai 
of $1,000 from the Richardson Foundation I 
assist in the restoration of the old hous 
County records indicate that it was bui 1 
between 1780 and 1800. Our special ii 
terest in the project is because it 9 
acquired in 1850 by Daniel A. Harget, (j 
Swansboro, and descended to his son q 
the same name who lived in the house unra 
his death in 1936. The home is a charmhr 
old frame building — two-stories in heiglf 
with porches upstairs and down, and eis 
chimneys. The restored building will i 
used both as a meeting place for the histor. 
cal society and for housing a communil 
museum. Incidentally, the old brick store i 
which Pharmacist Harget conducted his dru 
store is still in existence and pictures of bol 
the pharmacy and the Harget home ai 
preserved in the U.N.C. pharmacy archive 

In the Colonial era the word, "gentleman 
or "Gent." often followed a person's sign; 
ture— sort of like "Ph.D.," "M.D.," et 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



33 



"ily members of certain prescribed profes- 
ms and trades were entitled to this desig- 
tion. I was delighted to see in a published 
It of occupations eligible for the distinction 
kt pharmacists were included. 
(Since the commemoration of the War 
itween the States is a timely subject for 
linking and reading, I am recommending a 
iscinating book about the era entitled, 
\-satz (substitutes) in the Confederacy, 
(thored by Mary Elizabeth Massey and 
iblished in 1952 by the University of South 
irolina Press. Considerable space is de- 
'ted to drugs and medicines. 

Address Changes 

J James E. Hickmon from Wilmington to 
.aleigh; Arthur A. Anderson from Reids- 
dle to Martinsville, Virginia ; Steve A. 
^ppas from Gastonia to Charlotte; Harold 
. Roper from Asheville to Melbourne, 
lorida. 

Recent Additions to the 
NCPA Membership Roster 

H. M. Logan, Winston-Salem; David L. 
hronister, Hickory; Fred W. Medlin, 
tatesville; R. F. Coppedge, Jr., Asheville; 
ames S. Liverman, Jr., Charlotte; Ernes- 



tine B. Wilkes, High Point; L. D. Snead, 
Charleston, West Virginia; Mrs. Mattie S. 
Gardner, Charlotte; William S. Farrior, 
Greensboro ; and Cannon Foster Page, 
Jacksonville, Florida. 

NCPA Meetings 
NCPA district meetings for members of 
the Association have been scheduled for 
Asheville on August 21, and Hickory on 
August 22. The possible formation of a 
Western N. C. Pharmaceutical Society and 
a Northwestern Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Society will be discussed. 

BIRTHS 

A daughter, Martha Sue, born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Ernest L. Carraway, Jr., June 26th, at 
Selfridge Air Force Base, Michigan. Mr. 
Carraway recently returned to civilian prac- 
tice and is associated with Windsor Phar- 
macy at Windsor. Mrs. Carraway is also a 
pharmacist, the former Loretta Johnson. 

A daughter, Carol Devan, born August 1st 
to Shelby and Jim (J.A., Jr.) Sitison. Jim, 
a former student at the UNC School of 
Pharmacy, is in military service, stationed 
at New Orleans. 




crowd pleasers a la Lance! 




More people prefer and buy tasty Lance 
snacks than any other brand. And no wonder... 
They're always fresh and there's 

a wide variety to choose from. 
Please your crowd. Display Lance. 



INC. Charlotte, North Carolina 




34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




Dear Mr. Smith: 

Bob Abrams has recently told the Phil- 
adelphia Branch of the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association of your successful 
press tour of the Eli Lilly & Company. In 
view of the favorable response to your tour, 
we are considering a similar project here 
in Philadelphia as part of our Chapter's 
National Pharmacy Week program. 

We would greatly appreciate further de- 
tails of your tour and, if at all possible, 
we would like a copy of the invitation 
which you extended to the press. Your as- 
sistance and any recommendations you wish 
to provide will be deeply appreciated. 

Harry B. Kostenbauder 

President 

Philadelphia Branch 

American Pharmaceutical Assn. 



Hollingsworth to Introduce 
New Line of Chocolates 

The Annual Sales convention of Holling 
worths candies was held July 9th and 10 1 
in Augusta, Georgia. 

Hollingsworth salesmen were showr 
new line of chocolates as well as a tes 
line of pecan candies that have proven 
successful. A number of specialties 
been given to the salesmen to present 
druggists this fall. 

Sam Maguire, company president, ai. 
nounced plans for expanded growth < 
Sales and Production in 1962. The eon 
pany's progress in 1961 was heralded I 
Mr. Maguire as unique in the candy ii 
rlustry. With this confidence as a keynol 
he presented new Hollingsworth point I 
sale material that will create more sellin 
space in the druggists' stores and better dis 
play of Hollingsworth's candies. 

The Fall advertising program which wa 
previewed at the meeting includes nations 
publications as well as new illuminated poini 
of sale which ties-in with the overall pre 
gram. 

Hollingsworth salesmen were advised tha. 
they could contact their customers earliej 
this year in order to help them plan theij 
candy buying for the greatest volume pre! 
gram. 



A SIMPLE, COMMON NAME 

(Continued from page 5) 

performance of the medicine without the assay showing any 
deviation of the drug content from ' ' official standards. ' ' 

Several studies of the subject have revealed that two 
drugs having the same active ingredients may affect patients 
in different ways. ' ' Indiscriminate changing of brands may 
actually become a life or death matter, ' ' according to Dr. 
Eino Nelson, of the University of California Medical Center 
of San Francisco. 

Simple, ' ' common names ' ' — especially for drugs of com- 
plicated chemical structure — will be hard to find. Even if 
this obstacle is overcome, there is little or no reason to think 
that the use of common names will result in lower drug 
prices. And what is most important, the general use of 
such names would almost certainly bring about a dangerous 
compromise in the quality of our medicines. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 




A daughter, Judy Ann, to Mr. and Mrs. 
r illiam L. Johnson, Jr. of Garner, July 
17th. Weight, 6 lbs. 1 oz. 

Marriages 

j Miss Helen Jeanette Hunter, alumna of 
UNC School of Pharmacy who has made her 
■home in Florida for several years, was 
married June 16th to Stonewall Gorput 
■King, Jr. They were married at the Avon- 
dale Methodist Church of Jacksonville, 
Florida. 

Miss Linda Ann Cromley, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Irvin Cromley of 
Raleigh, was married July 7th to Lt. Hamil- 
ton Edward Hicks, Jr. Mr. Comley was 
NCPA Convention chairman for the 1962 
Annual Meeting held at Raleigh. 

The 1962 graduating class of the UNO 
School of Pharmacy is figuring prominently 
in the bridal columns of the state's news- 
papers. 

On June 24th Margaret Greene Patterson 
jof Roxboro and Kader Ramsey, Jr. of 
Jacksonville were married. Living in 
, Greensboro, Mrs. Ramsey is with Cone 
Memorial Hospital in the Pharmacy De- 
partment, and Mr. Ramsey is associated 
with Crutchfield-Browning Drug Co. 

Another pharmacy couple, Beverly Thomp- 
son of Chapel Hill and Rudy Barker of Carr- 
boro, were married July 26th. Mrs. Barker 
'is with Durham Drug Company of Durham, 
and Mr. Barker is with Sutton's Drug Store 
of Chapel Hill before entering Medical 
School in September. Mrs. Barker's father 
[is Dr. H. O. Thompson, professor at the 
UNC School of Pharmacy. 

Donald Worth Beaver, also of the 1962 
class, was married June 24th to Miss Sonja 
Renee Barnliardt of Kannapolis. Mr. 
Beaver is with Pike's Drug Store of 
Concord. 

George Ronald Buchanan, another 1962 
graduate, was married July 6th to Miss 
Sandra Coe. Mr. Buchanan is associated 



with Edmonds Summit Center Drug Store 
of Greensboro. His father, G. G. Buchanan, 
is representative of Parke Davis Company in 
the Greensboro area. 

Deaths 
GEORGE A. THREEWITTS 

George Albert Threewitts 57, died in a 
Rocky Mount hospital on July 15. 

Mr. Threewitts had operated the Three- 
witts Drug Store of Littleton since 1930. 

A. E. JOINER 

Arthur Eugene Joiner, 65, of High Point, 
died July 23 from a stroke suffered three 
days previously. 

Mr. Joiner was a graduate of the Southern 
College of Pharmacy and had made his 
home in High Point since 1922. At the time 
of his death, he owned and operated Arthur's 
Pharmacy. 

Surving are his wife, Mrs. Edith Joiner; 
three sisters and a brother, Hanson Joiner 
of North, South Carolina. 

L. W. MACKESSON 

Louis Walton MacKesson, 84, Statesville 
pharmacist, died July 16 following several 
years of declining health. 

Mr. MacKesson was a native of Burke 
County and a pharmacy graduate of UNC, 
Class of 1902. He founded the Statesville 
Drug Company in 1904 and was active in 
the pharmacy until its sale in 1947. In re- 
cent years he did part-time work for Purcell 
Drug Company of Statesville. 

Survivors include his wife; a daughter 
and two sons. 

W. A. BURWELL 

William Armstead Burwell, 70, Raleigh 
pharmacist, died July 26. 

Mr. Burwell was associated with the 
Hunter Drug Company of Warrenton for 
some years after receiving his pharmacy 
license in 1912. From 1923 to about ten 
years ago he was a Lilly MSR in the Ra- 
leigh area. In recent years, Mr. Burwell 
did relief work in and near Raleigh. 

Mr. Burwell was one of about a dozen 
pharmacists inducted into the Association's 
"50 Plus Club" in April of this year. 



36 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

This space available at ^04 per word; mini- 
mum of $3.00. Box numbers assigned and 
replies forwarded to advertiser upon re- 
quest. Mail copy and payment to Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy, Box 151, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 

BALANCES — Prescription balances repaired. 
Contact Phipps & Bird, Inc., P. O. Box 2V, 
Richmond 5, Virginia. Telephone Ml 4-5401. 

FOR SALE — Remington's Practice of Phar- 
macy, 12th Edition. (1961). 1,866 pages. 
Price $22.50. Available from NCPA, Box 
151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

PHARMACISTS— Don't be without SWISS 
OINTMENT; a tried and true medication for 
all skin irritations. Sold in drug stores 
only, through your jobber. 



Nunnally Holds 
Sales Meeting 

Nunnally* Candies held their Annual Sales 
conference at the plant headquarters in 
Augusta, Georgia on July 11th and 12th. 

Many new gift boxes were introduced to 
the salesmen. At the same time the men 
were shown new sales promotional material 
and point of sale ideas that are designed 
with the druggist in mind. 

Nunnally's new concept of selling this 
year is to enable the druggist to display 
maximum Nunnally's gift candies in a mini- 
mum amount of selling space. The Nun- 
nallys displays are planned to give complete 
flexibility to a druggist floor plan. 

During this annual sales conference Sam 
Maguire, Nunnally's president, reviewed the 
success of Fall 1961 and also gave the sales- 
men a preview of the company's Fall 1962 
advertising plans. Nunnally's will continue 
its inherent identification of prestige. The 
candy of the South has been established as 
the pride of gift giving and its new adver- 
tising campaign further enhances this im- 
pression. 



PHARMACIST OF YEAR 

(Continued from page 9) 
ginia, he assumed ownership of the Yancey 
ville Pharmacy, Yaneeyville, N. C, in Au 
gust, 1922. 

He is a past president of the North Caro 
lina Pharmaceutical Association (1948- '49) 
the Dixie Sunrisers (NARD) ; Yanceyvill< 
Rotary Club and a Past Master Mason. 

As chairman of the Institute of Pharmacj 
Building Fund, he headed a successful driv( 
to raise funds to construct and equip tht 
Association 's headquarters building 
Chapel Hill. Now his effort is centered on an 
endowment fund to assure adequate finances 
for the Institute and other Association proj 
eets. 

The current ' ' Pharmacist of the Year ' 
the fifteenth pharmacist to be so honored by 
the N. C. Pharmaceutical Association. The 
program, unique in some of its aspects, was 
inaugurated by the NCPA in 1948. 

Much of Mr. Ham's success was attrib 
uted to Mrs. Ham, who, as one speaker 
said "was finance director, bill payer and 
protector of the pharmacy's credit." The 
fact that the Yaneeyville Drug company is 
one of the state's most progressive small 
town pharmacies is a tribute to both Mr. 
and Mrs. Ham. 

Total attendance at the dinner was 158 
persons. Included were pharmacists from 
North Carolina and Virginia ; officials of the 
North Carolina and Virginia Pharmaceutical 
Associations ; the North Carolina and Vir- 1 
ginia Boards of Pharmacy; the School of 
Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, and the Medical Col- 5 
lege of Virginia ; and relatives of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ham. 

Decorations and the dinner menu, which 
included Uncle Ben's Smoke House Special, 
were arranged by Mrs. E. B. Abernethy of i 
Providence, North Carolina. 

Former recipients of the "Mortar & 
Pestle Award" have been: E. W. O'Hanlon 
and Wade A. Gilliam of Winston-Salem; 
Clyde Eubanks, Chapel Hill; Julius Suttle, 
Shelby; E. C. Daniel, Zebulon; Charles M. 
Andrews, Burlington; J. C. Hood, Kinston; 
W. L. West, Roseboro ; Kelly E. Bennett, 
Bryson City; R. R. Copeland, Ahoskie; W. 
A. Ward, Swannanoa ; W. B. Gurley, Wind- 
sor; Roger A. MeDuffie, Greensboro and 
J. C. Jackson, Lumberton. 




the modern bridge 

A modern bridge is taken as a matter of course . . . yet, how 
handicapped we would be without the safe, convenient passage it 
provides. We, your service wholesaler, can aptly be called "the 
modern bridge" between retail pharmacy and manufacturers. The 
pharmacist can pass safely over that bridge and avoid the treacher- 
ous currents of excessive buying and its attendant dangers. 

Our bridge has a solid foundation built on economic soundness 
with numerous spans of service. Your turnover orders and 
patronage are always appreciated. 



WE ARE A 



DISTRIBUTOR 



Joklpuou, 



ODEKER 




'uAmM&fVwfiitb 



1010 Herring Avenue, Wilson, North Carolina 



ENJOY 



BACK-TO-SCHOOL 





PROFITS 




Make 




Your Store 




V Headquarters 


The Lesson 


] for 


for the Time^ 


J^ School Supplies 


is^ 000 ^ 


/ by 




Ordering at Once 




from 


THE W. H. KING 


DRUG COMPANY 


'The House of Friendly and Dependable Service" 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



AND ITS ASSOCIATES 

O'HANLON-WATSON DRUG COMPANY 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
BELLAMY DRUG COMPANY KING DRUG COMPANY PEABODY DRUG COMPANY 

Wilmington, N. C. Florence, S. C. Durham, N. C. 



ike Caxollna JqURNAL OF PHARMACY 

Volume XLIII SEPTEMBER, 1 962 Number 9 

KECEIVED 

OCT 2»82 





have-not 



Contradictory? Well, not necessarily. Some have-nots can be economically 
sound yet wanting in other respects. 

Take the matter of nutrition, for example. Improper food intake or a re- 
strictive diet can deprive active men of the vitamins necessary for good health. 

If this is the problem, Multicebrin" provides an effective answer. Its six 
essential vitamins help turn the nutritional have-not into a healthy want-not. 

Stock low? Order some today from your Lilly service wholesaler. 

Multicebrin! (pan-vitamins, Lilly) 



SSefy 



OUR REGULAR CHRISTMAS 
SHOWROOM IS NOW OPEN!! 

2500 Square feet of Air-Conditioned Shopping 
Space filled with Selected Fall and Holiday Gift 
Items. 

For all who prefere leisurely personal attention 
shopping, R. C. Shearin, E. B. Williams and G. 
D. Andrews are available To Serve you — 9:00 
A. M. to 4:00 P. M. Monday through Friday. 
(Other hours by appointments) 

Let Your Justice Representative Know 
When We Can Expect Your Visit . 





JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 



Greensboro, N. C. 



64 Years of Service to North Carolina Retail Druggists 




The doctor gave his prescription, and just like 
any other parent... you rushed to have it filled. 
The big difference is— you are also the pharma- 
cist . . . and you may have a choice in the brand 
of drug! 

Of course, this is when the "just-as-good" drug 
could never be good enough.. .when, automati- 
cally, you reach for an established brand. What 



you know about the manufacturer's reputatio* 
...quality control above the "legal minimums 
...experience and research. ..helps you mak 
this decision. 

These are the "extras" that go into a brand-nam 
product and the reason why many pharmacist, 
and physicians select a Lederle product over th 
generic. . .for their families and their patient: 



LEDERLE LABORATORIES, A Division of AMERICAN CYANAMID COMPANY, Pearl River, New York 



The House of Friendly Service 




Scott ^btug, Company, 



Service Wholesalers Since 1891 




According to recent statistics, population increases have been greater in the middle and 
older age groups. This trend cannot help but be reflected in an expanded market for 
GERIPLEX. Feature and suggest GERIPLEX whenever the opportunity presents itself. 



• Each Kapseal contains eight vitamins, five minerals, plus rutin and the starch digestant, I parke-DAVIS 
Taka-Diastase" (Aspergillus oryzae enzymes). Available in bottles of 30, 100, and 500. L« ...... «,.~», ».™„.,.,. 



The Carolina 

JOURNAL o F PHARMACY 



September, 1962 



Vol. xliii 



No. 9 



Officers 

NORTH CAROLINA 
PHARMACEUTICAL 

ASSOCIATION 

• 
President 

John T. Stevenson 
Elizabeth City 

• 
Vice-Presidents 

Hoy A. Moose 
Mount Pleasant 

Harry A. Barringer 
Concord 

W. T. Boone 
Ahoskie 



Secretary-Treasurer 

Editor 

VV. J. Smith 

Box 151 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Assistant 

Secretary-Treasurer 

C. M. Andrews 

Burlington 



General Counsel 

F. 0. Bowman 

Chapel Hill 



Pharmacists in the Manger 

A picture widely circulated shows a dog lying on a 
mound of hay in a manger, barking, growling and snapping 
at the cows who are trying to eat the hay. Some pharma- 
cists, like the dog, go their lone-wolf ways, snapping at 
the outside world and lulling themselves into a simulated 
state of independence. 

Some characteristics of our pharmacist in the manger: 

He doesn't attend meetings of pharmacy operators. He's 
either "too smart already" or "too busy." 

He is stand-offish and aloof. 

He doesn 't read pharmacy journals. 

He doesn 't belong to any association. He reaps the 
fruits of its work but refuses to contribute to the cost. 

He views his fellow pharmacists through jaundiced eyes 
of suspicion and distrust. 

He never visits other pharmacists. 

He doesn't feel like he's part of the pharmaceutical 
profession but an industry within himself. 

He seldom recognizes his civic responsibilities to his 
community. 

He is not professional-minded. 

Despite the appreciable percentage of pharmacists in 
the manger, it is encouraging to find intelligent and pro- 
fessional-minded pharmacists attending Association meet- 
ings, discussing mutual problems and enjoying real fellow 
ship. Such individuals are pharmacy's hope for the future. 

Effective solutions to the numerous problems now facing 
Pharmacy will tax the best brains and talents all organized 
pharmacy has to offer; surely nothing can be expected 
from the pharmacists in the manger. Now, more than ever, 
it is well to keep in mind "Either we shall hang together 
or we shall hang. ' ' 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy is published monthly by the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Subscription rate: $3.00 a year; single copy, 25 cents. Entered as 
second class matter July 5, 1922 at the post offi:e at Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina under the Act of March 3. 1879. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




Thalidomide Fallout 

Small sample package of an antibiot 
given to a patient by a North Carolii. 
physician was refused in the belief dn| 
was ' ' experimental. ' ' The patient request* 
a prescription. 

The public is beginning to question tl| 
safety of many established drugs. Pha 
macists can do much to allay fears in th 
area. 



Cover Page 



Dr. Paul C. Olsen will address Seminar 
on October 10. 



On Monday morning, August 20, Ecken 
Drug Store, Raleigh, filled prescriptic, 
#1,000,000. In recognition of the occasion 
Pharmacist-Manager Thomas W. Youn£ 
blood presented Mrs. Oliver A. Bell with 
$25 savings bond after Mrs. Bell ha 
brought to the pharmacy what now is listej 
as Rx 1,000,000. 

Further details on page 10-41. 




\ 1-Day 

Pharmacy Seminar 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

Pharmacy and the New Frontier 

Wednesday, October 10, School of Pharmacy, University of N. C. 

Sponsored by Extension Division, N. C. Pharmaceutical Association, 

in cooperation with the School of Pharmacy, University of 

North Carolina 



PROGRAM 

:00 A.M. — Refreshments 

:30 A.M. — "The Changing Bole of Government in Health Care" 

Frederick N. Cleaveland, Professor & Chairman, Dept. of Political Science, UNC 
"Government and the Drug Industry" ■ 

Paul C. Olsen, Vice President and Director of Marketing Research, Topics Publish- 
ing Company, New York 

"Trends in Public Opinion Toward Health Care" 

Wayne A. Danielson, Associate Professor, School of Journalism, University of 
North Carolina 
Luneh 

:00 P.M. — "Medical Practice in England" 

Thomas C. Gibson, Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, University of 

North Carolina 

"Pharmaceutical Practice in England" 

A. B. Kaiser, A visiting pharmacist from England 

PANEL: "Conflicts and Interests" 

A. "How the Public Views the Pharmacist" 

Clarence H. McGregor, Burlington Professor of Business Administration, 
UNC 

^."Changing Pattern of Medical Care — Its Effect on Pharmacy" Henry T. 
Clark, Jr., Administrator, Division of Health Affairs, UNC 

C. " Sociological Studies in the Professions" 

Harvey L. Smith, Director, Social Research Section, Division of Health Af- 
fairs, UNC. 

Enrollment Application Forms Available from Either NCPA, Box 151, Chapel Hill or 
)r. Melvin Chambers, School of Pharmacy, UNC, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



The Annual Workshop of the Woman's Auxiliary of the NCPA will be held same 
day (October 10) in Chapel Hill at the Institute of Pharmacy. Ladies, if you plan 
to attend the Workshop, suggest that your husband attend the Pharmacy Seminar. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



NCPA Members Meet in Ashe ville— Hickory 



Two NCPA district meetings were held 
during August under sponsorship of the 
N. C. Pharmaceutical Association — August 
21 in Asheville at the Battery Park Hotel 
and August 22 at the Oasis Diner, Hickory. 

Guest speakers at both meetings Ave re 
NCPA President John T. Stevenson of Eliz- 
abeth City and W. J. Smith of Chapel Hill. 
The format of both meetings Avas the same 
— a dinner Avith 2-hour business session fol- 
loAving. 



Plans were discussed and tentative ar- 
rangements made for establishment of a 
Western N. C. Pharmaceutical Society in 
the Asheville area and a Northwestern Caro- 
lina Pharmaceutical Society in the Hickory 
area. 

Wilbur S. Ward of Swanannoa Avas picked 
to head a committee to survey the feasibility 
of establishing a new pharmaceutical So- 
ciety in Western North Carolina. Assisting 
him will be Eoger Y. Spittle and Phillip F. 
Crouch of AsheA r ille, M. Aubrey Scott, Jr. 
of Skyland, Henry A. Leigh of Waynesvdlle, 
William P. Powell of Mars Hill, E. L. Niles 
of Marshall and Kelly E. Bennett of Bry- 
son City. 

David L. Chronister of Hickory is chair- 
man of a similar committee now at work in 
his section of the state. Working Avith Mr. 
Chronister are Earl Tate of Lenoir, James 
W. Harrison of North Wilkesboro and 
Wayne Richardson and J. C. Miller of 
Boone. 



Dutton Returns from Military Service 

Gene R. Dutton has returned from mili- 
tary service to accept a position as Chief 
Pharmacist at the Valdese General Hospital. 

While in service, Mr. Dutton Avas chief of 
pharmacy service at the LT. S. Army Hos- 
pital, Fort Jackson, South Carolina. 

He Avill make his home in Hickory, 2104 
Sixth Street, N.W. 



Mayberry & Harrell to 
Operate Economy Pharmac 1 

Economy Pharmacy, Winston-Salen 
which lias operated at North Liberty an 
25th Streets for the past 12 years, ha 
moved to a new location : 4534 North Cherr 
Street, which eventually will be known a 
the Forest Hills Shopping Center. 

With the move came a partial change i 
ownership. H. C. Mayberry, the former sol 
owner, has formed a corporation with Olli 
C. Harrell as part-oAvner. Mayberry is pres 
dent ; Harrell, secretary-treasurer. 

Mayberry, a native of JonesA'ille, attende 
Mars Hill College and received a B.S. d< 
gree in pharmacy at the University of Nort 
Carolina in 1947. He served in the Nav 
from 1944 to 1946 as a pharmacist's mat* 

Before establishing his own pharmacy, h 
Avas a pharmacist at Bobbitt 's Pharmac 
in the Reynolds Building for three years. 

Harrell is a natiA'e of Colerain, attende 
Campbell College and the L T NC School o 
Pharmacy, B.S. in Pharmacy '57. He wa 
associated Avith O 'Hanlon 's until Patterso 
Drug purchased the assets of that firn 
During the past year, Mr. Harrell Avas en 
ployed by Patterson Drug. 

The building being vacated by Econom 
Pharmacy has been rented to F. L. Dougla: 
operator of the Model Pharmacy. 

Prize Winners at Justice Gift 
Show Announced 

Winners of the grand prizes at Justic 
Drug Company 's Sixth Annual Gift Shov 
held in Greensboro, August 12-14, were 

J. Gray Smith, Smith Drug Store, Stokes 
dale ; Edward D. Whisenant, Sutton 's Druj 
Store, Chapel Hill; and Ray Carpentei 
Ray 's Drug Store, Walnut Coa-c Each re 
ceived a $225 3-quarter ton GE Thinlin 
Air-Conditioner. 

John Honbarger, Siler City Drug Co. 
Siler City, Avon a $90 Waltham men's Avris 
watch and a $85 Waltham ladies wris 
Avatch went to Charlie Speranza, Medica 
Center Pharmacy, Burlington. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



M> 



obms 



SEPTEMBER CHECK LIST 

Tear out for a handy check of 

your current stock of these 

Robins products that are receiving 

special promotion in your area 

September 24— November 2 

Robinul 

□ Tab. 100's □ Tab. 500's 

Robinul -PH 

□ Tab. 100's □ Tab. 500's 

Pabalate-SF 

□ Tab. 100's □ Tab. 500's 

c Pabalate 

□ Tab. 100's DTab. 500's 

Pabalafe-HC 

□ Tab. 100's □ Tab. 500's 

Dimetane ixtentabs 

□ Extentabs 100's □ Extentabs 500's 

□ Dimetane 

□ Tab. 100's □ Tab. 500's □ Elix. Pint □ Elix. Gal. 

I Dimetane Expectorant 

□ Pint □ Gal. 

Dimetane Expectorant-DC 

□ Pint □ Gal. 

DonnatalExtentabs® 

□ Extentabs 100's □ Extentabs 500's 

Don natal 

□ Tab. 100's □ Tab. 500's □ Tab. 1000's [i 

□ Cap. 100's □ Cap. 500's □ Cap. 1000's 

□ Elix. Pint □ Elix. Gal. 

Why not check your stock of 

all Robins products at the same time 

— and be prepared 




A. H. ROBINS CO., INC., RICHMOND 20, VA. 



Proposes 1-Man Supervisor 
of Boards 

A hearing in Raleigh on August 17 to 
consider ;i proposal to establish an agency 
to supervise occupational boards in North 
Carolina was attended by H. C. McAllister 
and Rufnn Bailey, representing the State 
Board of Pharmacy, and Hoy A. Moose and 
W. J. Smith, representing the NCPA. 

A sub-committee of the Commission on 
Reorganization of State Government had 
proposed placing all of North Carolina's 
28 occupational licensing boards under the 
control of a reviewing authority to be ap- 
pointed by the Governor of the State. The 
sub-committee contended that the boards 
as now constituted make them responsible 
to the members of the regulated occupations 
rather than to the people of the state. 

Ten boards were represented at the hear- 
ing. All expressed opposition to the pro- 
posal. The commission is expected to hand 
down its decision in September. 

School-Boards Meet in Asheville 

North Carolinians were active in the Au- 
gust 27-28 District 3 meeting of the National 
Assn. of Boards of Pharmacy and American 
Assn. of Colleges of Pharmacy held in 
Asheville. 

Dean E. A. Brecht and Robert Neal Wat- 
son were co-chairmen for the meeting. Frank 
Dayvault of Lenoir gave the address of wel- 
come at the opening session and Dr. Ben 
Cooper, formerly of TJNC but now of the 
University of Georgia, delivered one of the 
featured addresses of the meeting — "Some 
Legal and Professional Aspects of the Code 
of Ethics." 

Mr. Blanton on Sick List 

C. D. Blanton, a past president of the 
NCPA and co-owner of the Kings Mountain 
Drug Company, is seriously ill in Kings 
"Mountain. His many friends wish for him 
a speedy recovery. 



If the last wholesaler 
goes out of business - 

remember 



Remember when you came into town and 
opened your first store, so brand new and shiny? 
You with a diploma and a dream. It wasn't easy, 
but that didn't matter. You had to build that store 
big and strong and all yours. You had to build a 
dream for you and your family and render a 
service to your community too. Remember that 
wonderful feeling when you finally realized the 
complete faith and trust your customers had in 
you? 

Remember something else too. Something 
important — the help you received when it was 
needed so much. Yes, when the chips were down 
and the dreams were new and the desire burning 
— and you weren't too sure who D&B was — 
EVERY WHOLESALER IN THE AREA 
CAME THROUGH. They came through with 
ideas and credit and service. They brought you 
experience that you couldn't buy — and they gave 
it to you. 

You weren't buying too much direct then, not 
much at all. You still hadn't sold yourself on the 
myth of direct buying. 

And the years went by and the store grew strong 
and you prospered. The so-called "opportunities" 
came. You started to buy certain lines direct. You 
took business away from the very wholesalers 
that made your growth possible. Of course you 
didn't buy everything direct — you really couldn't. 
You needed 

• A warehouse 

• A creditor who was willing to wait for 
his money 

• A bookkeeper 

• The special rush orders 

• The fill-in orders when you couldn't make 
up that minimum shipment 



• The size or style you ran out of 

• The items that just don't sell fast enough 
to buy direct 

So you used your wholesaler. Often you made 
it a one-way street. And today you're risking his 
life, risking the loss of the valuable services your 
wholesaler provides. Think what this loss can 
mean to you. Think about it — and take action. It 
may be later than you think! 

In this series of advertisements, we've been 
both praised and damned, but I've laid it on the 
line as I've seen it, felt it and lived it. What I've 
said has not applied to all; but some of it has 
applied to almost everyone. Many letters have 
come in from all over the country. One was from 
Joe Stickley, owner of Stickley Drug, Madisonville, 
Tennessee. I thought you'd like to read what he 
had to say. 

"I enjoyed reading those Sea & Ski whole- 
saler letters. Every DAM word of them is 
true. If it had not been for the wholesale house 
I would never have existed. I appreciate them 
and I have stayed close to them, my days are 
about gone, but I hope the wholesale drug 
house lasts forever." 

I hope the wholesale house lasts forever too. I 
know it will. I want you to know that Sea 8s Ski 
and most manufacturers across the country 
would never have existed without them. I don't 
intend to forget it. 

Buy direct FROM YOUR WHOLESALER. 
He's the best friend your business ever had. Re- 
member, the business you save may be your own. 

SEA & SKI COMPANY 

Reno, Nevada 



Reprinted with Permission by 

JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

North Carolina Service Wholesaler 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



11 



1962 President's Address 



Mr. President-Elect, Members of the N.C.- 
P.A., Distinguished Guests: 

I have searched the works of many authors 
to find a poem, quotation, or phrase suitable 
for this occasion. Nowhere could be found 
one that properly expressed the gratitude 
I have for having had the privilege of serv- 
ing as your president this past year. Many 
miles have been covered; many days have 
been spent serving; but now they seem as 
only meters instead of miles — and hours 
instead of days. 

From the first meeting — the Pharmacist- 
of-the-Year Banquet honoring Mr. J. C. 
Jackson in Lumberton last June — to the 
last one, a meeting with your convention 
committees here two weeks ago, I have 
received complete confirmation on two points 
already known by us. One — North Caro- 
lina pharmacists and their families are the 
most gracious, genteel persons to be found 
anywhere. Two — the North Carolina Phar- 
maceutical Association is very fortunate in 
having as Executive Secretary W. J. Smith, 
whose capabilities are unsurpassed, and 
Vivian, his equally capable wife. I honestly 
do not know how I could have completed the 
year without their wonderful cooperation. 
I want to express my appreciation to the 
personnel in the Institute of Pharmacy in 
Chapel Hill. They were always willing to 
help in every way possible. We are indeed 
also fortunate in having girls as dedicated to 
their work as Miss Rosemary Williams, our 
most recent Association employee. 

The prime objective of the year has been 
to make every effort to accomplish the 
recommendations made by our immediate 
past-president, Mr. Puller, in his presi- 
dential address last year. I am of the 
opinion this has been done as nearly as 
possible. 

As in the past, district meetings were held 
throughout the year. They extended from 
Waynesville to Williamston with meetings 

(Presented at the session of the Annual 
Convention of the North Carolina Pharma- 
ceutical Association convening Monday 
morning, April 9, 1962) 



also being held in Shelby, Salisbury, 
Winston-Salem, Durham, Greensboro, Fay- 
etteville, and Goldsboro. 

Our Seminar on Modern Pharmaceutical 
Practice was held in Morehead City last Fall. 

Your Executive Committee met this year 
with the Senior members of the Faculty of 
the School of Pharmacy and with the mem- 
bers of the State Board of Pharmacy, and 
their Secretary, Mr. H. C. McAllister. We 
felt that for too long there had been criti- 
cism among our members of the School of 
Pharmacy, the Board, and the N.C.P.A. Ex- 
ecutive Committee in regard to many rumors 
which have made the rounds year after year. 
It is so easy to criticize when ignorant of 
the true facts. The meetings were held in 
order to bring about a clearer understanding 
of the responsibility of all three groups — 
the N.C.P.A., the State Board, and the 
School, to the students and the pharmacists 
of the State. I think the meetings accom- 
plished just that. I know our Committee 
better understands the problems of the other 
groups now. 

The Executive Committee, at the sugges- 
( Continued on Page 23) 




Robert Buckner Hall 



Ml to 52% PROFIT 

for you on this fast-seller for chapped lips! 



By the Makers of STANBACK 



Hanger or 
Easel Displays 

Deal #2 

3 free with 12 

1 card of 12 tubes, plus 3 tubes free 

47% PROFIT 

Your Cost $2.80 

Selling Price $5.25 

Your Profit $2.45 




Deal #6 



FOR CHAPPED LIPS 

35« 




12 free with 36 
3 cards of 12 tubes, plus 1 card (12 tubes) free 

50% PROFIT 

Your Cost $ 8.40 

Selling Price $16.80 

Your Profit $ 8.40 



•igff —■| 



Counter Displays 

Deal #100 

28 free with 72-100 tubes packed in counter display 
52% PROFIT 

Your Cost $16.80 

Selling Price $35.00 

Your Profit $18.20 



ORDER NOW FROM YOUR WHOLESALER 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

At Upjohn— No Friable Pills But Plenty 
of First-Rate Prescription Products 



13 



Kalamazoo 's pride — The Upjohn Company 

-has come a long way since 1886 when 

he late Dr. W. E. Upjohn founded a small 

msiness to market a unique pharmaceutical 

>roduct — the friable pill. 

' Today, The Upjohn Company operates 
(aainly from two buildings — an ultra mod- 
ern manufacturing building (23 acres under 
Ine roof) six miles out of Kalamazoo and 
Ihe research complex, which is quartered in 
he heart of the city in buildings used by 
Jjpjohn prior to moving its offices and manu- 
facturing facilities outside the city. 
| Upjohn no longer produces the friable pill 
l>ut it is marketing over 500 products, in- 
cluding such well known prescription items 
is Medrol, Orinase, Albamycin, Solu-Cortef 



and countless products which are well known 
to the public among which are Phenolax 
Wafers (introduced in 1908), Unicap Vita- 
mins, Citrocarbonate and Cheracol. 

Upjohn matches the quality of its prod- 
ucts with the calibre of its guest relations 
as a group of Tar Heels, who recently 
toured the manufacturing and research com- 
plex, will certify. During their 2-day stay 
in Kalamazoo, the group, composed mostly 
of pharmacists and their wives, got a close- 
up view of Upjohn 's research division, 
where the ' ' team approach ' ' is used in 
solving problems. More than 375 technical 
people, with the support of an equal num- 
ber of non-technical employees, are engaged 
(Continued on Page 15) 




TAR HEELS VISIT THE UPJOHN COMPANY, KALAMAZOO: First row, left to 
right; Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Reaves, Jr., Mrs. T. J. Ham, Jr., Mrs. W. L. West, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. J. Smith and Mr. and Mrs. Hoy A. Moose. Second row: Mr. and Mrs. James 
T. Barnes (Mr. Barnes is Executive Director of the Medical Society of the State of 
North Carolina), Mrs. Preston Forrester, W. L. West, Mr. and Mrs. B. Cade Brooks and 
Mr. and Mrs. Clifton S. Brinkley. Top row: Bert Barnes (Piedmont Airlines Co-Pilot), 
Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Edwards, Preston Forrester, Mr. and Mrs. Eobert H. Seaborn, Charles 
B. Cross, Division Chief Flight Attendant, Piedmont Airlines, and Captain John Wilkes 
of Piedmont Airlines. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 



AT UPJOHN 

1 originating and developing new idea.s and 
roducts. 

Pharmaceutical processes familiar to phar- 
lacists, such as crude drug extraction, tube 
intment filling, capsule filling, etc. were 
?viewed at the manufacturing plant but 
ith one big exception: instead of singles, 
pjohn 's production is in the millions. We 
ave no exact figures but we did observe 
nd estimate the Orinase production coming 
rom one filling line to be about $300,000 
er day at prescription price. 
As the Tar Heel visitors moved along the 
roduction and packaging areas of Upjohn 's 
-floor, Portage Eoad plant, they viewed 
mpoule filling, Gelfoam production, soft 
lastic capsule manufacturing, the prepara- 
:on of effervescent salts and other processes, 
if particular interest was the fragrant 
rude drug extraction division for over in 
ne isolated room were bales of wild cherry 
ark (doubtless later to show up as an in- 
redient of Cheracol) marked "Asheville, 
rorth Carolina". 

Impressive was the building in which 
fiese processes are housed. Thirty-three 
cres of floor space with some corridors 
lore than 1,100 feet in length. The main 
lanufacturing floor provides for straight- 
ne movement of materials from the south 
ide of the building where bulk chemicals 
nd packaging materials are received through 
lie maunfaeturing, packaging and labeling 
reas, to the north side where finished phar- 
laceutical products are stored for shipment 
I rail and by truck. Here, too, are the 
uality control laboratories whose techni- 
ians check carefully all ingredients and all 
nislied products. A classified arrangement 
ermits Upjohn to come up with samples of 
u y Upjohn product marketed in recent 
ears. 

Due to the vast floor space (33 acres), 
lectric-powered ''widgets" haul mail and 
quipment down its fifth-mile-long corridors. 

Opposite Page 

Typical scenes inside Upjohn 's 
uoclern manufacturing plant. Center 
)hoto shows Cheracol on the filling- 
ine. 



For the convenience of employees and vis- 
itors, cafeterias, lounges and recreation areas 
are scattered throughout, the building. 

Across the road from the main manufac- 
turing building is Upjohn 's general office 
building. A mere glimpse of this building 
is sufficient to indicate that here is one of 
the most impressive office buildings in the 
nation. Our information is that the build- 
ing was constructed to take care of Up- 
john 's needs for many future decades, 
something which is quite evident as one 
views the facilities provided for Upjohn 's 
offices and office employees. 

The grounds, beautifully landscaped with 
flowers, trees, shrubs, fountains and a Lin- 
coln Memorial-type water pool leading up 
to and under the office building, highlights 
"quality" that has been a keynote of Up- 
john 's products since 1886. 

Directly in charge of the North Carolina 
visitors from the time they arrived in Kala- 
mazoo on August 5 until their departure 
two days later was Don Hall of Upjohn 's 
Trade and Guest Eelations. Don, a native 
of Augusta, Georgia, quickly won his way 
into the hearts of the Southerners and later 
was voted as being the Yankee most likely 
to prevent another war between the north 
and the south. 

Upjohn 's hospitality at the Harris Motor 
Hotel, in downtown Kalamazoo, was equal 
to the products it distributes world-wide. 
Of special remembrance was the smorgas- 
bord that introduced the visitors to Up- 
john and Michigan's brand of welcome. 

As a side-light to the visit, mention should 
be made of Kalamazoo's "mall" — the first 
of its type in the U. S. Some years ago the 
city fathers decided to plow up four blocks 
of the main street and replace with trees, 
flowers, fountains and comfortable benches. 
The results have been spectacular. Mostly, 
the business leaders are pleased with the 
appearance of their "mall" but one thing 
they were unanimously agreed upon — they 
liked having the Upjohn Company as a part 
of Kalamazoo and would vigorously oppose 
any effort to move the operation to our 
favorite site for a future pharmaceutical 
house — The Eesearch Triangle of Baleigh- 
Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina. 



recommend 
Benzedrex® Inhaler 

for temporary relief of nasal congestion 
. . . in seconds 




^Benzedrex' Inhaler is the only inhaler that contains 

the outstanding volatile vasoconstrictor, propylhexedrine. 

It provides effective temporary relief of the congestion 

of head colds and allergic rhinitis — in a matter of seconds. 

'Benzedrex' Inhaler insures complete, prolonged shrinkage of 
the nasal mucosa, without causing excitation or wakefulness. 



YOUR CUSTOMERS KNOW THE BENZEDREX® INHALER 

Display ' Benzedrex' — you can recommend it with confidence. 



Smith Kline & French Laboratories, Philadelphia 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



17 




TAR HEEL DIGEST 

Laurinburg — C. H. Williams has accepted 
a position with the Legion Drug Store. 
Prior to moving to Laurinburg, Mr. Wil- 
liams was associated with the Asheboro Drug 
Company of Asheboro. 

Roanoke Rapids — Ron Beaver, a graduate 
of the School of Pharmacy of the Medical 
College of Virginia, has joined the pharma- 
cist staff at Roanoke Pharmacy. While serv- 
ing in the U. S. Army, Beaver was on the 
staff of the Brooke Army Hospital in San 
Antonio, Texas. 

Durham — Mr. and Mrs. Ralph P. Rogers, 
Jr. and family have returned from a 4- 
weeks visit to California and other western 
states. The Rogers made the trip by auto- 
mobile and "camped out" a great deal of 
the time 

Greensboro — An eye operation hospitalized 
Roger McDufhe for two weeks at Duke Hos- 
pital during August. 

Albemarle — A new 32 X 48 foot building 
to house a pharmacy is under construction 
near the recently cmpleted Medical Arts 
Building. 

Goldsboro — Tom Robinson, now serving 
his 14th year as a member of Goldsboro's 
board of aldermen, has served longer than 
any other member. He has also been Mayor 
Pro tempore since May 5, 1949. 

Charlotte — Federal agents have brought 
charges against James T. Hough, Sr. for 
selling Penicillin Tablets, Dexedrine and 
Metandren without prescription. 

Graham — Extensive remodeling of the 
Graham Drug Store is underway. Xew fix- 
tures have been added and the prescription 



department is being relocated on the right 
side of the pharmacy. Following completion 
of the remodeling, the interior of the phar- 
macy will receive a new coat of light green 
paint. 

Salisbury — Thomas E. Cobb is the new 
chief pharmacist at the Salisbury VA Hos- 
pital. He transferred from a similar posi- 
tion at Lake City, Florida. 

Hickory— Al Moir, Eli Lilly MSB, was 
guest speaker at a recent meeting of the 
Viewmont (Hickory) Optimist Club. 

Winston-Salem— William M. (Bill) Cra- 
ven, an assistant manager at Eckerd's Park- 
way Plaza Store for the past year, has been 
appointed to the newly created post of ad- 
vertising director for Eckerd's Winston- 
Salem division. 

Marion — After 23 years of service, E. A. 
Tennant has retired from his work at Evans 
Rexall Drug. He worked with the late Dean 
Tainter for ten years and since 1949 has 
been with Evans. The Tennants have moved 
to Lowell. 

Rocky Mount — Frank E. Raper will be 
associated with his brother, Don, in the op- 
eration of Hicks Drug Store. Frank has 
two degrees — a degree in Agriculture from 
State College (1954) as well as a BS in 
Pharmacy, FNC, 1962. He served as a 
pilot in the Army while in military service. 

Raleigh — Joseph Zambito, formerly man- 
ager of the Prescription Shop, is now in 
West Palm Beach, Florida with Ranches 
Drug Store. 

Winston-Salem — Two Eckerd employees — 
Coleman L. Paschal and Xat Muncus — have 
won national merchandise display contests. 
Paschal won a $50 first prize in a contest 
sponsored by Chain Store Age ; a contest 
sponsored by Old Spice brought $500 to 
Muncus as a second place prize winner. 

Chadbourn — S. G. Koone has been elected 
chairman of the "Citizens for Better Edu- 
cation" organization, which is in favor of a 
$2 million bond issue to provide "our chil- 
dren with the best education possible." A 
major objective of the organization is to 
consolidate four schools of western Columbus 
County into a 500-student high school. 




TIE-IN WITH HOLLINGSWORTH'S 

TIE-IN WITH THIS BIG POST PROMOTION 

SHOW THE FULL HOLLINGSWORTH'S LINE 
of select chocolates in Valentine's 
most beautiful heart boxes. 

GO RIGHT TO THE HEART OF PROFITS. 

HOLLINGSWORTH'S Unusual Candies / Augusta, Georgia 



r. Hugh Sconyers / 1618 Providence Road / Charlotte, N. C. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



19 




In Durham, at Eckerd's Main Street 
store, a negro crossed a negro picket line, 
entered the store and stole $27 in cash from 
a pocketbook of one of the store 's employ- 
ees. 

Going next door to Woolworth 's the ne- 
gro ordered a slice of pie, paying for it 
was a $20 bill taken from the Eckerd store. 

Our reporter does not specify whether the 
policeman, who arrested the negro, permit- 
ted the thief to finish the pie before hur- 
rying him off to the local jail. However, 
he did report the same negro had been in 
trouble over stealing a preacher's trousers 
and money while baptizing services were 
underway. 

But not all the difficulty is confined to 
Durham. Over in High Point, Cecil's Drug 
Store is minus one automatic hand dryer 
which was ripped from a rest room wall 
and carted away. 



From The Randolph Guide of Asheboro 
we learn The Ramseur Pharmacy of Ram- 
seur was established in 1911 by N. F. March 
"at the insistence of Sheriff Watkins. " 
C. R. Whitehead, now sole owner of the 
pharmacy, became manager and part owner 
with the late M. E. Johnson in 1924. 



interesting observation at the Goldsboro din- 
ner honoring Mr. John E. F. Hicks: "The 
first V-> ounce of Folic Acid made at Lederle 
cost the company about 15 million dollars. 
Today, the cost is about $3.25." 

And continuing, Dr. Waller related his 
favorite experiment involving the structure 
determination of Aureomycin: "In one ex- 
periment when the reaction was run with 
the flask % full, good yields of two identi- 
fiable products were obtained. When the 
same experiment was run with the flask % 
full, only unidentifiable tar materials re- 
sulted. Just the right amount of oxygen in 
the air above the material in the flask was 
required. ' ' 



A local teenage rock and roll fan called 
v hat she thought was her favorite music 
shop but reached a pharmacy by mis-dialing. 
"Have you got 'Two Red Lips and Seven 
Kisses','' she asked. "No." was the reply, 
"but we have two torn cats and seven 
kittens. " "Is that a record ? ' ' asked the 
teenager. ' ' We think it is, ' ' the pharmacy 
employee said. 



Something received but never expected — 
a character recommendation request from 
the University College of Addis Ababa, 
Ethiopia. 



' ' You have locked bowels, ' ' diagnosed the 
physician. 

"That's impossible," replied the patient, 
"I have an active case of diarrhea." 

Remembering the advice of a medical 
lecturer — careful examination and stick to 
your diagnosis — the doctor replied : ' ' You 
have locked bowels but they are locked in 
an open position." 



Dr. Coy W. Waller, now director of Mead 
Johnson pharmaceutical research, made this 



Joe Lazarus, pharmacist and owner of Lee 
Drug Company, Sanford, was riding down 
the street in Sanford recently when a friend 
blew his horn and motioned for Joe to pull 
over to the side of the road. After the two 
cars had stopped, Joe's friend (who hap- 
pened to be the local undertaker) wanted 
to tell him his back tires were slick. 




Time-tested formula 

Time-tested acceptance 

Time-tested profit-maker 



Your customers have a choice when they buy 
"BC". America's fastest-selling headache 
powders or the popular "BC" tablets 



Over 100 Million Packages Per Year 

backed by concentrated local and 

national advertising 



B. C. REMEDY COMPANY 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



21 




YOUR ROUTE TO GOOD HEALTH IS THROUGH YOUR 
PRACTICING PHARMACIST, who is ready to serve you, 
your physician and your community. His education and 
experience qualify him as an authoritative drug adviser 
to your physician, dispenser of life-saving medication to 
you and consultant on household health needs to the 
entire community. Make use of your pharmacist's pro- 
fessional services today. 

Recommended: Mail $5 to American Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation, 2215 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington 7, 
D. C, for 12 months Public Relations Service. First mailing 
includes National Pharmacy Week supplies.. 



NATIONAL PHARMACY WEEK OCT. 7-13 



SMITH WHOLESALE DRUG CO. 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

A Young and Growing Service Wholesale House, 
Owned and Operated by Registered Pharmacists 



We Appreciate Your Business 




The right formula for your 
prescription department ! 



a 




The prescription department is the professional center of your store and should dominate 
all other departments. Dramatic lighting found in "Key Lumilite Rx Canopies" focus the 
shopper's attention on your Rx department and at the same time provides excellent 
lighting for compounding your prescriptions. 



Ask for our layout engineer services 

< ' i 1 1 » Coupon and Mail 



We are planning to 

□ Expand □ Modernize □ Build 

New 
Store 

Name 

Firm Name 

Street Address 

City 

State 




GRANT E. KEY, INC 

Manufacturers 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



2:] 



PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

(Continued from page 11) 

tion of Mr. and Airs. W. J. Smith, also met 
with the Pre-Pharmacy students in the form 
of a program and reception. This was held 
in the Institute of Pharmacy with the in- 
[tention of making the Pre-Pharmacy stu- 
dents feel more a part of pharmacy. Also, 
it gave the N.C.P.A. an opportunity to 
familiarize the students with the work of 
the Association and with their home away 
from home — the Institute of Pharmacy. 

And now to consider some other phases of 
Association work: 

Fair Trade 

I realize it might appear the Fair Trade 
situation has not improved, but our efforts 
in support of Fair Trade are finally being 
felt. Numerous legal actions have taken 
place this past year. The verdict of the case 
heard in Federal District Court in Greens- 
boro was most favorable to us. There re- 
main many other eases to be heard in our 
State Courts. No one knows what the out- 
come might be, but at least we are getting 
action. 

N. C. Pharmaceutical Research Foundation 
and the N.C.P.A. Endowment Fund 

As recommended, our members have given 
most able financial assistance to the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Research Founda- 
tion and the N.C.P.A. Endowment Fund. 
The reports to be given later at the con- 
vention will confirm this, I am sure. 

I have not been responsible for these ac- 
complishments ; neither has the N.C.P.A. 
Executive Committee. These accomplish- 
ments are attributable directly to you, our 
members. Without your wholehearted sup- 
port nothing could have been done. 

However, let us not think the time has 
come to rest on our laurels. We are still 
faced with many old problems as well as 
with new ones. These problems should not 
discourage us. Problems beget worry. 
Worry CAN BE a tremendous motivating 
force. I think this is borne out by a recent 
survey made in North Carolina. In spite of 
the problems of price-fixing indictments, con- 
tinued congressional investigations of drug 
prices, mail order prescription services, dis- 




count houses, the discriminatory pricing 
methods of some pharmaceutical manu- 
facturers to name a few, most of the retail 
drug outlets enjoyed nice increases in sales 
in 19(51. 

Our President-Elect, Mr. Stevenson, 
stands prepared to lead us through the 
1962-1963 Association year with competence 
and wisdom. In order that the journey not 
be made too smooth for him, I should like 
to plant a few seeds for thought. 

Recommendations 

Local Clubs — There is a great need for 
more and stronger local drug clubs in our 
state. There are sections with a large 
concentration of pharmacists, but without 
a local organization. I firmly believe strong 
local associations are a necessity if our state 
association is to grow and have the strength 
it should. Our many battles must be fought 
and won on the local level before we can 
effectively fight on the state and national 
levels. 

While I am cognizant of the necessity of 
continuing meetings of district scope, I rec- 
ommend that our President-Elect place 
special emphasis on the local organizations, 
offering assistance and cooperation through 
furnishing speakers from among the N.C.- 
P.A. officers, etc. 

Further, I strongly recommend that the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 
spare no effort to develop an effective plan 
in 1962-1963 for organizing new drug clubs, 
reactivating old clubs, and creating more 
active participation in existing clubs. 

("Continued on Page 27) 



all NEW 

physiologic formula 

for all newborns 



St 



New 



7L 



J 



Formula 




Prepared formula for infants, Wyeth 



A MAJOR RESEARCH ACHIEVEMENT 
IN INFANT NUTRITION 

S-M-A NEW FORMULA S-26 is made possible by a technological 
breakthrough exclusive with Wyeth Laboratories . . . the large scale 
electrodialysis of milk whey. 

more digestible protein as in human milk- 
high in lactalbumin, low in casein 

The result of electrodialysis is a whey with the salt content drastically 
reduced. This demineralized whey is predictable in composition and 
stability, and results in a prepared formula with a protein composi- 
tion almost identical with the natural food for infants, human milk. 

new low mineral content- 
Total mineral content and calcium and phosphorus levels have been re- 
duced to approximately the physiologic amounts found in human milk. 



provides these extra benefits for health and growth 

• well tolerated 

• improved digestibility 

• good weight gains and growth rate 

• fewer formula-related problems 

• easily prepared 

• no extra cost to parents 



essentia! 



• S-M-A NEW FORMULA S-2<> is supersed- 
ing S-M-A. From now on, Wyeth will fill 
information a ll S-M-A orders with S-M-A NEW FOR- 

3n your MULA S-26 



nventory 



• It is suggested, however, that you retain 



pfl" your current stock of S-M-A. There will 

Stocking Of probably be some mothers or physicians who 

wish infants to be continued on S-M-A. 

S-M-A 

r • In general, all requests for S-M-A may be 

iNEW filled with S-M-A NEW FORMULA S-26. 

FORMULA You1 ' Physicians will find that S-M-A NEW 

FORMULA S-26 will be well tolerated and 
will provide excellent nutrition. 



S-26 



jS-M-A NEW FORMULA S-26 WILL 

BRING NEW SALES FOR YOU 

An Improved Formula at No Increase in Price 

Intensive detailing and ethical promotion will stimulate increased sales 
in your Infant Needs Department. To assure your supply for new 
requests, order now. 

Retailer's cost: *0.83 P er m - can °f powder 

SO. 21 per 13 fl. oz. can of liquid 

(On direct order — minimum $50) 



Wyeth Laboratories • Philadelphia 1, Pa. 





ONLY A FEW DAYS BETWEEN SODAS 



You see it happening to youngsters time after time — one day ill with 
fever, sore throat, chest pains ... a short time later back at your store 
working on ice cream sodas. And almost always it is an antibiotic that 
turns the trick— Terramycin Syrup, for example. 

For you, of course, these triumphs of modern drug therapy are nothing 
new. You know that the rapid recovery of these children, with less worry 
and economic strain for parents, follows a pattern that has become almost 
commonplace with the availability of modern antibiotics. You can remem- 
ber when recovery itself was more uncertain, convalescence more extended, 
cost and care more burdensome. Do all of your customers appreciate the 
significance of these advances? 

1C1 lalllVCin OXYTETRACYCLINE WITH G LUCOSAM I N E | FU LL PRODUCT INFORMATION 
ABOUT THE VARIOUS DOSAGE FORMS OF TERRAMYCIN IS AVAILABLE IN BLUE BOOK, RED BOOK, 
IN THE PRODUCT BROCHURES ENCLOSED IN PACKAGES. AND FROM YOUR PFIZER REPRESENTATIVE. 



Science for the world's well-being " I jizer 
PFIZER LABORATORIES Division, Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc. New York 17, N. Y. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



2t 



PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 
(Continued from page 23) 

This would serve to make the Association 
nore aware of local needs; it would also 
enable the N.C.P.A. to more widely explain 
and publicize work and projects of the Asso- 
ciation. 

Public Relations — It is a necessity that a 
greater effort be extended in the field of 
Public Relations. I fear the drug price 
investigations of recent years have done 
much to create doubt in the mind of OUR 
public not only in regard to the hometown 
pharmacist, but the entire drug industry as 
well. Many of these doubts, as well as 
other difficulties encountered by us, could be 
remedied through proper public relations. 
While public relations is primarily your 
responsibility in your own store and com- 
munity, we should not neglect the im- 
portance of statewide public relations. Our 
Association realizes this, and has initiated 
a most novel statewide public relations plan. 
In order to be successful, however, it must 
have your wholehearted support. 

Most of us present today have had the 
pleasure of touring one of the major 
pharmaceutical houses. We have been very 
much impressed with the research and 
quality control facilities as well as other 
factors affecting the cost of drug manu- 
facturing. On one of the visits a member 
of the group made this statement, "If only 
the members of the press could see this ; then 
they would better understand what goes into 
the cost of medication." This is exactly 
what the Association has planned. The 
members of the North Carolina press are 
to see it. 

In June, the Eli Lilly Company has 
graciously consented to be host to them on 
the same basis they have accepted pharma- 
cists groups for years. It is necessary only 
that the N.C.P.A. arrange transportation 
and do the contact work. As to transporta- 
tion, planes have been chartered. Now we 
need your financial aid through special 
donations to pay for the transportation. 
While we are speaking in the field of 
public relations, and especially with re- 
lationship to the news media, I should like to 



urge that the N.C.P.A. establish an annual 
award to be made to the member of the 
press who had contributed the most to the 
profession of Pharmacy through his journal- 
istic endeavors. The size and name of 
said award would be decided upon by the 
Executive Committee of the N.C.P.A. 

Recruitment — The need for an expanded 
pharmacy-student recruitment program is 
imperative. There is a critical shortage of 
pharmacists in our State. But, of course, I 
don't have to tell you that. We must EN- 
ROLL, GRADUATE, and LICENSE many, 
many more than are now becoming available 
each year. 

In my travels over the state, some have 
said we have no shortage of pharmacists; 
our problem is too many drug stores. When 
a town of about 5,000 people has 6 drug 
stores, this would seem to be true. But 
when the latest figures show we have one 
store per 4,000 people — about twice the 
national average for potential customers — 
and 36 pharmacists per 100,000 people, giv- 
ing us a rank of 47th in the United States, 
we do not have too many drug stores and 
do have a shortage of pharmacists. When 
we license by reciprocity approximately the 
same number we license by board examina- 
tion each year; when we graduate about 
half the number who start in pharmacy 
each year; then we have been neglectful 
somewhere. Beard Hall has ample space for 
many more students. It is our duty to in- 
terest as many as possible of the higher 
type high school student in studying Phar- 
macy. This has become more difficult with 
the advent of the five-year curriculum. 
The five-year curriculum has also brought 
about a term I find most distasteful — PRE- 
PHARMACY STUDENT. I have had the 
opportunity to talk with many of the pre- 
pharmacy students. So many of them feel 
they are not a part of pharmacy at all. 
They are just general college students. I 
am no educator, but I feel definite steps 
should be taken by those in a position to 
do so to make these students feel a part of 
the profession they have chosen, even if it 
means teaching them elementary pharmacy 
courses in Beard Hall during their fresh- 
( Continued of Page 29) 



DISPLAY PHILLIPS' TABLETS HERE 



ON THE SPOT 




AND AT THESE 3 OTHER HOT SPOTS 



TOBACCO COUNTER 




FOR TOP SALES AND EXTRA PROFITS! 



Your customers are "pre-sold" on Phillips' Tablets 
with powerful Advertising on TV, in Life, Look, 
Saturday Evening Post, Ladies' Home Journal, 
other national leaders, Plus Sunday Supplements, 
Farm Journals, and Outdoor Magazines. 



GLEN BROOK 
LABORATORIES 

Division of Sterling Drug Inc. 
1450 Broadway, New York 18, N.Y. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



2 f > 



PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

(Continued from page 27) 
ran year. As I have said — we must re- 
Wit, the School of Pharmacy must educate 
'nd graduate — then we assume another re- 
ponsibility— that of PRECEPTOR. Our 
raining of the apprentice must be so 
liorough that he becomes completely pre- 
pared to successfully stand the Board Ex- 
minations. This is necessary, because it is 
bought by some that the difficulties en- 
ountered by the examinee are a direct result 
f lack of training by the Preceptor. 

Legislative— I urge that we continue our 
igilance in legislative matters, informing 
.ur Senators and Representatives not only 
L regard to legislation directly affecting 
is, but our friends and neighbors as well. 
ks you know, there is a bill in Congress 
that threatens to socialize the health pro- 
'essions, a bill whose provisions completely 
by-pass the man who has had the health wel- 
fare of his community at heart for cen- 
turies — the neighborhood druggist, a bill that 
provides free medical care for hundreds of 
:housands who are financially able to care for 
'themselves. This same bill allows thousands 
bf others not financially able to take care of 
themselves to be deprived of free medical 
benefits because they are not covered by the 
old-age, survivors, and disability insurance 
program. Of course, you know I refer to 
the King-Anderson Bill. Why should we be 
saddled with this type legislation when we 
already have enacted into law the Kerr- 
Mills law which provides medical care to 
all — I repeat ALL — those who are truly in 
financial need. I beg you to fight the 
King-Anderson Bill with every ounce of 
energy you have, and fight just as hard to 
jsee that the Kerr-Mills provisions are made 
effective in this state. 

Scholarship — There is a definite need for 
reviewing our scholarship program. All of 
us know, of course, that the cost of educa- 
tion has risen considerably in the past twenty 
years. Still — so many of our scholarships 
have not been increased. In 1940 a $150 
scholarship was a nice start toward a year's 
education. Now $150 is so small compared 
with the cost needed to complete a year in 
Pharmacy. Therefore, we need the amounts 



of our existing scholarships increased great- 
ly. 

We must also direct our attention to the 
Pre-Pharmacy students' needs for scholar- 
ships. They are not eligible for Pharmacy 
School aid; their scholarships must come 
from the General College. We need to 
establish aid for them as first year students, 
with the understanding that these scholar- 
ships will continue to lie available to them 
so long as they follow the curriculum of 
Pharmacy. Of course, the aid would be 
withdrawn after the first year if the student 
changed his major. This type scholarship 
might, have the effect of causing many more 
Pre-Pharmacy students to continue in Phar- 
macy. 

Perhaps we should undertake, on a local 
basis, the goal of having at least one 
scholarship available in each high school in 
North Carolina. With the extreme shortage 
of pharmacists in our state today, we should 
consider it gross neglect if just one prospec- 
tive pharmacist could not attend Pharmacy 
School due to the lack of funds. 

Ethics — More emphasis should be placed 
on professional ethics. The value of ethics 
was stressed by your President during the 
annual visit to the Student Branch of the 
N.C.P.A. It is hard for a young graduate 
to follow such advice when he is associated 
with another pharmacist who might not be 
as ethically inclined as he should be. The 
reactivation of the District and State Judi- 
cial Councils I hope will have a decided 
effect on improving our shortcomings. Their 
forthcoming report, I feel, will inform you 
of our intentions to remedy laxities in this 
area. 

Fee System — I also recommend that the 
membership give deep thought to the estab- 
lishment of a fee system for prescriptions. 
If this system had been in effect in some 
West Coast states, there would have been no 
question of price-fixing. I feel it is only a 
matter of time until this system will become 
necessary if we are to remain a profession. 
This system is already being used in some 
types of prescriptions in other states. We 
should through thorough investigation be 

(Concluded on Page 31) 





i£4X^- t *JUL!LyLGUL 




VinrwLms^ , 



H/yuxyud ymui> C^uburcubj^ /jfjtLsrncLnri^Juj ' MJiw^lUks-, 



/as£> cuvru *is£> git pymsujd, ^j mtua, j*£smAmja - /JJmAjlawu ey>uo^ 




lin." 



(an unsolicited testimonial from an actual letter) 




Vi-Daylin-Vitamins A. D. B,. B 3 . B 6 . C. and Nicotinamide. Abbott. 







The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



:n 



PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 
(Continued from page 31) 

prepared to decide which path to follow- 
when faced with the decision. 

Constitution and By-Laws — I request the 
work of the Constitution and By-Laws Com- 
mittee be continued. Many hours of diligent 
endeavor were involved in this work, but the 
undertaking was of such magnitude that it 
could have been completed this year only if 
[done in a haphazard manner. The Com- 
mittee, however, is composed of Academy of 
Pharmacy members who demand perfection. 
(A very commendable trait. 

I have discussed problems, old and new; 
made recommendations, some possibly good, 
others bad, but in concluding I would like 
just a moment more of your time to discuss 
jthe one thing utmost in ALL our minds — 
The North Carolina Pharmaceutical Associ- 
ation. Every pharmacist in North Carolina 
should covet membership in the N.C.P.A. 
Every member should support the Associa- 
tion with his whole-hearted personal loyalty 
and labor. Through Association work we 
come to know each other better and form 
friendships to last over the years. We 
'come to understand that each and all have 
our own problems and troubles. Our Associ- 
ation has many, many ways of helping you — 
many ways of helping you to that certain 
limit possible in any organization. After 
phat it is up to you — each of you for your- 
self. The Association will never be able 
to make you a GO-GETTER if you are not 
■so inclined. The Association cannot make 
'a phenomenal success of a failure, or make 
an inefficient member efficient. That is 
jasking too much of any Association. 

After all — an Association is an organi- 
zation made up of individuals for a common 
purpose. As individuals we must stand on 
our own two feet. We speak of ETHICS ; 
we speak of LAWS ; we sneak of REGULA- 
TIONS. We do not understand how other 
professions are able to regulate themselves 
without being policed constantly. The ex- 
planation is very simple. A thousand laws, 
a thousand regulations, a thousand inspec- 
tors cannot and will not remedy our situa- 
tion until we, each of us, individually, de- 
cide the time has come for us to be ethical 



people with such a determined dedication 
to our profession that no one — NO ONE — 
would dare attempt in any way to commit 
any degrading act. 

I have spoken this morning of legislation, 
but we cannot depend on legislation to see 
us through. We must face our difficulties 
with confidence, plan our work intelligently, 
refuse to be discouraged by setbacks or 
failures. We must depend on ourselves be- 
cause each man in the profession of phar- 
macy has his own particular problems. He 
is the one and the only one qualified to deal 
with the perculiar difficulties facing him. 
How well he will succeed in finding his solu- 
tions depends on how he faces the job. If he 
thinks success and proceeds on that basis, he 
usually succeeds. If he is afraid he can't 
make a go of it, he is licked. No philosophy 
can save him from his own defeatist attitude; 
no Association activity can reach far enough 
down to lend him the strength he would need. 

Eefore I close, I would like to express 
my appreciation to the many committees 
that have functioned so efficiently during 
the year. Most certainly, I am very grate- 
ful to the various convention committees for 
the excellent job in arranging for our 82nd 
Annual Meeting. It has been a heart- 
warming experience to find so many members 
dedicated to their profession. 

I have searched as diligently to find proper 
words for closing my address as I did to find 
proper words to open it. My daughter, on 
noticing the difficulty I was having, made 
what I considered a very appropriate sug- 
gestion. She said, "Daddy, you closed the 
Convention last year with a prayer. Why 
don't you close your address the same way?" 
Let us pray. 

Prayer 
Most kind and gracious Heavenly Father, 
we thank Thee for the privilege of being 
members of one of the world's oldest and 
most honored professions. We thank Thee 
for our Association and for the accomplish- 
ments You have allowed us. We thank Thee 
for the guidance You have given us this 
past year, and we ask that Yon continue 
to guide and direct us this year in all that 
we do, in order that what we do shall be 
for Your honor and glory, not ours. Amen. 



32 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



FOR YOUR PHOTOFINISHING NEEDS 

Let B & H Photo Company Serve You 

Complete Service on 

Black and White Kodacolor 

Ektachrome Anscochrome 

Kodachrome Movies and Slides 
Processed in Our Plant 

IB A II PHOTO COMPANY 

3030 s. boulevard p. 0. box 1600 

phone 523-7093 charlotte 1, n. c. 




crowd pleasers a la Lance! 




More people prefer and buy tasty Lance 
snacks than any other brand. And no wonder... 
They're always fresh and there's 

a wide variety to choose from. 
Please your crowd. Display Lance. 



INC. Charlotte, North Carolina 




The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



33 



111 Pharmacy School Notes 




The annual drive for funds for the North 
[Carolina Pharmaceutical Research Founda- 
tion was scheduled for September this year. 
'Pharmacists serving as county chairmen ac- 
cepted appointment to call on fellow phar- 
macists to explain the work of the foundation 
and solicit contributions for this source of 
aid to the School of Pharmacy. 

Four additional special pharmacy scholar- 
ships valued at $250 each were added for 
the coming school year: two from the Pea- 
body Drug Company of Durham, and one 
leach from Scott Drug Company of Charlotte 
and McKesson & Robbins, Charlotte Divi- 
sion. It was pleasing to learn that Miss 
Kay Emily Johnson, prepharmaey student 
from Washington, D.C., was awarded a 
scholarship valued at §500 from the Na- 
tional Honor Society provided by the Na- 
tional Association of Secondary-School Prin- 
cipals. 

The finishing touch was given by Dr. 
A. W. Jowdy, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macy Administration, to the display of 
merchandise contributed by manufacturers 
in the Retail Laboratory. The area, com- 
plete with nearly everything for a good 
community pharmacy excepting real custom- 



ers, will be used by students in the business 
management courses. 

Three graduate students completed final 
requirements for degrees with majors in 
pharmaceutical chemistry. William West 
Taylor, Instructor of Hospital Pharmacy, 
completed his research for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. The title of his 
dissertation was "Antitussives: Past and 
Present, Their Chemistry and Biological 
Properties." Yoon Chin Kim, from Korea, 
and Yiljahlmur Skulason received the de- 
gree of Master of Science. Mr. Kim's thesis 
was entitled "A Study in the Synthesis of 
jB-Alkylglutamic Acids : Isolation as Py- 
roglutamie Acids," and Mr. Skulason's the- 
sis was entitled "The Synthesis of Some 
x, ^-Unsaturated ^-Substituted o-Lactones. " 

Mr. Robert II. Bartholomew, 45, died of 
a heart attack on July 22. He was Public 
Information Officer for the Division of 
Health Affairs and had responsibility for 
releasing news to the public press concern- 
ing the School of Pharmacy. 

Professor Jowdy attended the Seminar 
on Pharmacy Administration of the Amer- 
ican Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 
held at the University of Pittsburgh, July 
8-14. 

Dean E. A. Breeht attended a meeting at 
Atlanta on July 27 for deans of the phar- 
macy colleges in the Southeastern United 
States on graduate pharmaceutical educa- 
tion. 

A large class of students in Public Health 
Nursing of the School of Public Health 
held their classes in Beard Hall during the 
second half of the summer. One of the 
students was Mrs. Paul Walker, Newton, 
wife of a recent graduate of the School of 
Pharmacy. 

Alice Noble 's book, ' ' The School of Phar- 
macy of the University of North Carolina, 
A History ' ' continued to receive excellent 
reviews. One of the best was written by 
John E. Kramer in the American Journal 

(Continued on Page 34) 



34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



UNC SCHOOL NOTES 

of Pharmacy (the publication of the Phila- 
delphia College of Pharmacy and Science). 
It is quoted here to show its incisive brevity : 
' ' This volume recounts in some detail not 
only the history of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of North Carolina from 
its inception in 1897, but it chronicles two 
earlier attempts to provide pharmaceutical 
instruction at that University. With great 
clarity, the author tells of the difficult early 
days of the School, and pays tribute to such 
stalwarts as John G. Beard, E. V. Howell, 
M. L. Jacobs, H. M. Burlage, I. W. Rose, 
E. A. Erecht and others who led the School 
to its present leading position in the field of 
pharmaceutical education. 

"Incidentally, only someone who has long 
been associated with an educational insti- 
tution (she first joined the school in 1921) 
and has been an integral part of and con- 
tributor to its progress could have compiled 
and written such a perceptive history. ' ' 

News was received that Miss Noble 's book 
was one of the two published during the 
past year by the University of North Caro- 
lina Press to be placed on exhibit for the 
year by the Special Libraries Association, 
the Association of American University 
Presses. 

Historical Note 

By Alice Noble, Research Historian 

I am having a wonderful time this sum- 
mer continuing my research on drugs used 
in Colonial North Carolina — a project in- 
terrupted by other pressing demands upon 
my time. In the early days the mainstays 
of treatment apparently were calomel, opium, 
ipecac, and the famous rattlesnake root, 
It is amazing the amount of attention de- 
voted to the last named plant in eighteenth 
century literature. Moreover, in inventories ' 
of estates again and again "a basket with 
snake root" is listed. This herb was much 
used as a medicine in the form of a de- 
coction and chiefly as a remedy for snake 
bite. In his famous Natural History of 
Carolina, etc. (1722-6) Mark Catesby in- 
cluded a plate and a botanical description 



of snake root but without mentioning jn 
medicinal uses. 

In William Byrd's Dividing Line Histo] 
(1728) he refers to snake root frequentm 
and with great respect. For example: ""tyl 
found in the Low Ground several plants <| 
Snake Boot, which is said to be much til 
strongest antidote yet discover 'd again! 
the poison of the rattlesnake. The leaves <| 
it resemble those of Fern, from whence I 
obtained its name. Several stalks shoot fro 1 
the same root, about six inches long, th;l 
lie mostly on the ground. It grows in I 
very rich soil, under the protection of soul 
tall tree, that shades it from the meridial 
beams of the sun. The root has a fairl 
spicy taste, and is preferr'd by the Soutll 
ern Indians to all other counter-poisons i 
this country. But there is another sort prJ 
ferr'd by the Northern Indians, that the 
call Seneca Battle-Snake-Root, to which wor 
derf ul Vertues are ascrib 'd in the cure ol 
Pleurisys, Feavers, Rhumatisms, and Drop 
sys; besides being a powerful antidot 
against the Venom of the Rattlesnake.'! 
Another observation of Colonel Byrd il 
quoted: "... Lately the Seneca Rattfcl 
snake Root has been discover 'd in this Coun, 
try, which being inf us 'd in Wine, and dran]. 
Morning and Evening, has in Several In] 
stances had a very happy effect upon th| 
Gout, and enabled Cripples to throw awa:» 
their Crutches and walk several miles, and: 




The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 



|at is stranger Still, it takes away the 
i in in half an hour . . . Our common 
ike root with which you are so well ac- 
:ainted in England is a noble plant, and 
iithe powder of it be put into Canary it 
stores the vigor of the Stomach effec- 
ully, if a man take 2 or 3 swallows of it 
viietinies. At my first arrival here I was 
ljubled with a violent diarrhea, which no 
ildicine would cure but this, and then I 
Is cur'd presently, and have contin 'd well 
■ft since." (Spelling and punctuation that 
d Colonel Byrd.) 

[ am adding a receipt for rheumatism 
ijorded in the 1766 volume of the Annual 
\gister, published in London, which is an 
propriate accompaniment to the observa- 
nts of Colonel Byrd on rheumatism and 
lit: 

The famous American receipt for the 
t'umatism: Take of garlic two cloves, of 
itn ammoniac one drachm; blend them by 
lising together; make them into two or 
tiee bolusses, with fair water, and swal- 
f them one at night, and one in the morn- 
\' y . Drink, while taking this recipe, sassa- 
fcs tea made very strong, so as to have 
I teapot filled with chips. This is general- 
I found to banish rheumatism, and even 
Itradictions of the joints, in a few times 
king. It is very famous in America, and 
• hundred pounds have been given for the 
lipe. 

lean Fund Aids 44 
lharmacy Students 

The W. J. Dean Pharmacy Student Loan 
),nd, established two years ago at the sug- 
rction of Joe Catanese of Charlotte, has 
pvided 44 loans to needy, deserving phar- 
ifcy students. 

The Fund is administered by the NCPA. 
leh gross of Dean merchandise distributed 
i North Carolina contains a card worth 
%, which when mailed to the NCPA is 
ileemed for cash. Generally, 2000 cards 
< ! allowed to accumulate for a total value 
t $500. A special checking account has 
I 'ii established from which loan funds are 
i bursed. 



The loans are non-interest ; payable after 
the student graduates and is employed. Some 
of the original loans have already been re- 
turned and reloaned. Due to the repayment 
feature plus the frequent addition of new 
cash to the Fund, The W. J. Dean Phar- 
macy Student Loan Fund is expected to be- 
come one of the major loan funds at Chapel 
Hill. 

Hospital Pharmacists Attend 
Seminar at Chapel Hill 

A special seminar for hospital pharma- 
cists was held in Chapel Hill at the UNC 
School of Pharmacy on September 8-9. The 
program emphasis was on methods of test- 
ing and quality control for commonly used 
hospital drugs. 

Seminar instructors were Dr. James Bran- 
non, Dr. George Cocolas and Dr. James 
Kellet, professors in the UNC School of 
Pharmacy. 

Dr. M. A. Chambers, assistant dean, was 
director of the seminar. 

W. A. Ward on the Mend 

Former XCPA President W. A. Ward of 
Swannanoa is recovering from a recent ill- 
ness which necessitated hospitalization for 
21 days. 

Xow at home at Cherry Hill (Swannanoa ), 
W. A. has been ordered to take it easy for 
the time being but with good fishing weather 
coming up, this is going to be a task. 





NOTICE 




Due to 


unforeseen 


develop- 


ments, the Poliomyeletis Pro- 


gram, as 


announced on page 47, 


has been 


deferred by 


the State 


Medical 


Society. 





36 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 




BUREAU OF NARCOTICS 

Baltimore 2, Maryland 

Dear Mr. Smith: 

For years we have been receiving copies of 
The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy and I 
have never failed to read it carefully. 

This is just a little personal note to you 
as Editor of the magazine to tell you how 
much the publication means to us officially, 
and to me personally. I make many speeches 



to pharmacy groups, clubs, other types ,f 
organizations, and have frequently u'j 
some of the sage as well as humorous ittig 
which have appeared from time to time! 
The Journal. 

The August Journal contained two ite* 
which I have cut out for my scrapbo.. 
One is the article about ''331 Pills" sjf 
the other is the ' ' Ten Commandments t 
Business". 

Bertha D. Baldwin 
Administrative Assistant 

Dear Mr. Smith: 

I was delighted to receive a copy of 
Second Edition of the North Carolina D'* 
tal Formulary, which you sent me. This I 
without a doubt, the finest dental formula 
I have ever seen. It surpasses by far 1 
previous editions that have been publisll 
by other state pharmaceutical associatio. 
I am confident that it will stimulate pi 
scription writing by the dentists in yr 
state. 

Schering Corporatiil 
Arthur M. Schmidt 



YOU! ARE INVITED TO 

GEER'S DISPLAY ROOM 

IT'S PACKED FULL - THE BEST SELECTION 

of 

Gifts - Holiday - Staple 

MERCHANDISE 
Open aftet noul£ by, appointment 

The Geer Drug Company 

846 W. Main St. Spartanburg, S. C. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 37 

[nnouncing 

Tip North Carolina Dental Formulary, Second Edition 

ublished Jointly By 

The North Carolina Dental Society 
The North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

. Loose-leaf in attractive gold lettered binder 

121 pages of information. An up-to-date, simplified, practical guide to modern drugs 
lr use in dental practice, including sections on the mechanics of prescription writing, 
nergency drugs and pertinent tables and charts. 

Part 1. The Prescription (7 Sections) 
Part 2. Patient Medication (11 Sections) 
Part 3. Office Medication (18 Sections) 
Part 4. Emergencies (5 Sections) 

List of Manufacturers — Addresses 

Index 

ompiled by these representatives of the X. C. Dental Society: 

Dr. Charles M. Westrick, dim., Winston-Salem 
| Dr. A. J. Franklin, Denton Dr. W. J. Helsabeck, King 

Dr. O. J. Freund, Winston-Salem Dr. J. S. Hood, Lexington 

I Dr. D. M. Getsinger, Chapel Hill Dr. E. B. Hopkins, W-Salem 

nd these representatives of the N. C. Pharmaceutical Association : 

Roger H. Sloop, Chm., Winston-Salem 
lames W. Fulton, Winston-Salem; G. Haywood Jones, Zebulon, W. Darle Shouse, King 

More than a year in preparation. This second edition is a substantial improvement 
rer the original edition. Exs written by dentists are on the rise in North Carolina; this 
ormulary will enable you to further enhance your professional services. 

Price $3.00 per Copy Postpaid 



'. C. Pharmaceutical Assn., P. 0. Box 151, Chapel Hill, X. C. 

heck enclosed for $3.00. Mail copy of The North Carolina Dental Formulary to 



ddress: 

or attach label 



38 



The Carolina Journal, of Pharmacy 



PINE STATE'S 
POPULARITY 

Helps Build Volume 
and Maintain Profit 

SELL 

North Carolina's 
Favorite . . . 



finejtate 




ICE CREAM 



TASTES GREAT . . . IT'S 



finejtate 



Make. McGowU 

For Labels -in Rolls or Flats 
Physicians 1$ Blanks and Files 

Drug Boxes - Call Checks 
Drug and Delivery Envelopes 



all Stylei. and GolaM. 



McCOURT LABEL CABINET CO. 



42-54 BENN 
STREET 



ETT \ „]£**>■ / BRADFORD^ 
Vhand T / PENNA. 



Specializing in Labtlt lor Drug Stores 

Clifford P. Berry, Representative 
P. O. Box 306, Charlotte 1, N. C. 



STROTHER 
DRUG COMPANY 

of Richmond, Inc. 

3700 Saunders Avenue 

POWERS-TAYLOR DRUG CO. 

Richmond, Va. 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 

Full Line 

Full Service 

Member of 
Druggists Service Co. 

National Wholesale 
Druggists Association 

For Best Service Call Us 

Collect 

353-2771 

After Hours Call 
353-2777 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



39 




1 A sou, Howard Nelson, was born August 
j to Mr. and Mrs. Sanford Price of Salem- 
urg. Mr. Price is pharmacist at Butler's 
©rug Store of Clinton. The Prices have 
Inother son, Scott, age one. 
j Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wells of Benson arc 
liniouncing the birth of a daughter, Annah 
Ihearin, August 11th. The Wells recently 
fioved to Benson from Raleigh. 
f The Bob Ranches of Mocksville, are an- 
louncing the birth of a son, Robert Paul, 
Lugust 8th. 

Marriages 

GIBSON— WILLIAMS 

[ Charles Thomas Gibson, son of Mr. and 
•Irs. W. S. Gibson of Goldsboro, and Judith 
Lnn Williams were married August 26th at 
,!t. Mary's Catholic Church of Goldsboro. 
llr. Gibson is pharmacist at Wayne Memo- 
lial Hospital. Mrs. Gibson is also on the 
taff there. 

GREESON— GILLEY 

Joe David Greeson, pharmacist at Mann 

Drug Co. in Thomasville, and Miss Barbara 

knn Gilley of Graham were married at Lowe 

Memorial Church of Burlington, August 

2th. 

FLETCHER— PRICE 

James Hugh Fletcher of Valdese and 
(Miss Mildred Jane Price of Casar, were 
married at the home of the bride, July 29th. 
Mr. Fletcher operates the Valdese Drug 
Company of Valdese. 

Deaths 

R. S. PARKER 

'. Richard S. Parker, 78, of Murphy, died 
August 18 in a Murphy hospital following 
ra brief illness. 



Mr. Parker was a native of North Wilkes- 
boro and a 1905 graduate of the School of 
Pharmacy, University of North Carolina. 
He established Parker's Drug Store in 
March, 1911 and was actively in charge of 
the pharmacy at the time of his death. 

Survivors include the widow, two daugh- 
ters and two sons. 

J. C. McGEE 

James Conrad McGee, born July 25, 1905, 
died September 1 following a brief illness. 

An Asheville pharmacist and operator of 
Lord \s Drug Store since 1950, Mr. McGee 
was associated with various Asheville phar- 
macies before buying the Charlotte Street 
Pharmacy in 1942. 

After selling the Charlotte Street Phar- 
macy, he was co-owner of Martin's of Can- 
ton until 1948 at which time he returned 
to Asheville. 

He was vice-president of the Asheville 
Drug Club in 1946. A son, J. C, Jr., is 
owner-operator of Asheville 's Kenilworth 
Drug Store. 

JOHN NELSON 

John Basil Nelson, Sr., 55, pharmacist 
employed by Mann Drug Company of Reids- 
ville, died August 25 in a Burlington hos- 
pital after one week of critical illness. 

J. F. SMITH 

James Fibnore Smith, 73, owner and op- 
erator of Smith's Drug Store of Gibson for 
the past nine years, died August 9. 

Prior to moving to Gibson, Mr. Smith 
operated a pharmacy in West End. He was 
a native of Marion, South Carolina and 
served in the Navy during WW I. 

C. E. GILLIKEN 

Claude Elton Gilliken, born Feb. 14, 1906, 
died August 3. 

Mr. Gilliken was owner-manager of the 
Kenly Drug Company at the time of his 
death. He was a native of Morehead City 
and a graduate of the Southern College of 
Pharmacy (1926). 



.. ..... ... .. .... .. 





The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



41 



Carolina Camera 

(Opposite Page) 
Top — The handsome cabinet to display the 
fcilver collection of the School of Pharmacy 
Ivas presented as a gift from the North- 
eastern Carolina Pharmaceutical Society. It 
fvas built in 1961 by Calvin Burch, Chapel 
Hill. The cabinet houses the following silver 
pieces presented for use in student and 
faculty receptions. In chronological order, 
the flower urn was presented in 1959 by 
Classmates in memory of Newton Lewis 
Beach, Jr. of Morganton, alumnus who was 
killed in the Battle of Chateau-Thierry, 
■World War I. The punch level bowl and 
Iray were presented in appreciation to Alice 
Noble by friends in 1959, and the ladle was 
presented by a North Carolina family of 
pharmacists in the same year. A sandwich 
tray was presented by Miss Alice Noble in 
[I960. The pair of three-branch candelabra, 
1960, and tray, 1961, were presented by the 
Woman's Auxiliary of the N.C.P.A. The 
pitcher was given by the graduating class 
of 1961. A bon-bon dish and server was 
given by the senior women students in 1962. 
[Three sandwich plates and two bon-bon 
jlishes were presented by the Greensboro 
Drug Club Auxiliary in 1962. 



Center — Arnold Kirk (center) of The 
Kannapolis Daily Independent won the $100 
first prize in the NCPA-sponsored feature 
story contest, which followed a visit to the 
Eli Lilly Laboratories by North Carolina 
newsmen. 

L. J. Correll (left) of the F. L. Smith 
Drug Company, Kannapolis, is shown pre- 
senting the prize to Mr. Kirk while Pharma- 
cist John B. Woodard looks on. 

Nine entries were recieved for judging in 
the contest. With a maximum of 27 points, 
Kirk's entry was rated 26 points by judges 
Kenneth R. Byerly of the UNC School of 
Journalism, Mack Webb of The Durham 
Sun and Woodrow Price of the Raleigh News 
& Observer. 

Bill Noblitt of The Shelby Daily Star 
and Bill Wright of The Fayetteville Ob- 
server shared second place honors. L. F. 
Amburn, Jr. of the Statesville Landmark 
placed third. 

Bottom — Eckerd Drug of Raleigh, which 
started filling prescriptions in 1926, filled 
its millionth prescription on August 2i>. To 
appropriately recognize the occasion, L. M. 
McCombs (left) of Eli Lilly's medical serv- 
ice staff presented an inscribed apothecary 
jar to (1 to r) Pharmacists Robert T. Britt, 
Clyde L. Futrell and T. W. Youngblood. 
(See cover page). 




"ONE STOP" 



The success of neighborhood shopping centers is dependent upon their providing the con- 
venience and economy of "one-stop" service for all types of merchandise. 
Likewise, the service wholesaler is a "one stop" service center for all your requirements. 
Products of numerous manufacturers are represented in our comprehensive stocks. Our 
staff and facilities are fully devoted to keeping pace with pharmaceutical advancements. 
We, your service wholesaler, appreciate your patronage and invite you to take advantage 
of the many services we offer — with only "one stop." 

WE ARE A &C(£&y DISTRIBUTOR 

THE PEABODY DRUG COMPANY 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



42 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



For seventy-seven years 
- - - since 1885 

SeeMAN 



OF 



DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long asso- 
ciation with North Caro- 
lina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its forty- 
third volume, and the 
first printed copy was 
"Seeman Printed." 




The Seeman Printery 

0/ DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



Auxiliary Sets Fall Workshop 
Program 

Mrs. John T. Stevenson, president, h; 
announced the program of the 1962 Worl 
shop to be held in Chapel Hill on Wedne 
day, October 10, under sponsorship of Tl 
Woman's Auxiliary of the NCPA. 

The program will get under way at 
AM with a coffee and registration in tl 
Institute of Pharmacy. The business pri 
gram starts at 10 AM. At 10:30, the grou 
will be divided into two sections for s 
hour and a half discussion. 

Topic of group 1 will be "Parliamentai 
Procedure ' ' with Mrs. W. T. Boone, Mi 
Romas T. White and Mr. Clyde Ball as dis 
cussion leaders. 

Group 2 will discuss ' ' Public Speaking 
with Mrs. Hoy Moose, Mrs. John Frida 
and Dr. Donald K. Springen as leaders. 

The presidents of local auxiliaries, execij 
tive board members, committee chairmen an 
special guests will be heard from at 
luncheon at The Carolina Inn, scheduled fo 
12:30. 

A major part of the program at th 
luncheon will be taken up with an explana 
tion of the Auxiliary 's service project 
the year. 

Luncheon tickets ($2.25 each) may b 
obtained from Mrs. W. J. Smith, Box 151 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Auxiliary Contributions 

The most recent additions to the Insti 
tute of Pharmacy furnishings include twi 
office chairs, walnut, upholstered in whit 
vinyl. These were made possible by a eon 
tribution from the Raleigh Woman \s Druj 
Club. Earlier, a set of kitchen cutlery wai 
given by the Pharmacy (Students) Wive 
of Chapel Hill. 

Loan Funds 

Over the years the Woman 's Auxiliary 
of the NCPA has placed major effort 01 
raising loan funds to aid needy pharmacj 
students. The combined total now exc 
$10,000. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



43 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY PROJECT 

. . . Bedside Bags for the Sick 

Sample Bedside Bags Designed 
By Mrs. Claude Piantadosi 

Mrs. Claude Piantadosi, wife of UNC 
Pharmacy Professor, Dr. Claude Piantadosi, 
is shown with a number of bedside bags 
which will be used as samples in this year 's 
Woman Auxiliary service project. 

An experienced designer of children 's 
clothing, Mrs. Piantadosi put her talents to 
work for the Auxiliary as it got its current 
project underway. The bags will go to 
chronically ill patients prior to Christmas; 
will be made of washable fabric with straps 
which button over the rail of hospital beds 
and will contain such fillers (toiletries, cos- 
metics, stationery, pens, toothbrushes, combs, 
brushes, mirrors, calendars, etc.) as may 
be contributed to the Auxiliary. 




ilrs. George W. Markham, Fayetteville (center), chairman of the Project Committee, eon- 
erring with Chapel Hill Auxiliary members Mrs. A. W. Jowdy, Jr., Mrs. M. A. Chambers, 
Irs. David McGowan and Mrs. George Cocolas on methods and procedures to be used for the 
rccessful promotion of a plan to place bedside bags in all North Carolina santariums, 
ursing and rest homes as a Christmas service project. 



44 



The Carolina Jourxal of Pharmacy 




Carry your 
store's identity by color and 
personalized copy right into your customers 
home for the life of the Prescription. 

Another plus value of the modern paper 
box with its clean fresh label. 

Representative: 

M. C. GRIER 

iiio ann st.. at. 3-3647 

Monroe. North Carolina 

• • • 

E. N. ROWELL CO., INC 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



VA Service Extended 
Through December 31 

The Veterans Administration PharmJ 
Service contract has been extended throul 
December 31, hence continue to mail ~m 
prescriptions filled through December 31 ■ 
the NCPA, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. j 

Prior to December 31, further instrl 
tions will be mailed outlining the procedvr 
to be followed in handling VA prescripticr 
during 1963. 

In Military Service 

Norwood P. Blanchard, Jr., of Wallace | 
at Cape May, New Jersey for basic trainiiji 
with the U. S. Coast Guard. 

Prior to entering service, Mr. Blancha*: 
was an employee of Jacocks Pharmac 
Elizabeth City. 

Samuel S. Goodwin, after completing baas 
training, is now stationed at Fort Sill, Okj, 
homa. He expects to return to Monroe I 
Christmas. 



THE HENRY B. GILPIN COMPANY 

Full Line, Full Service Wholesale Druggists Since 1845 
Baltimore • Dover • Norfolk • Washington 




Norfolk Division 

Equipped for fast, 

efficient- wholesale drug 

service to the pharmacists of 

the eastern section of North Carolina 

6435 Tidewater Drive • Norfolk, Virginia • Phone 855-1901 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



45 



dlpin Announces 
Cooperative Marketing 
'rogram 

iJoseph P. Fitzsimmons, General Sales 
ianager of The Henry B. Gilpin Company, 
[7-year old wholesale drug distribution firm, 
is announced a new cooperative marketing 
,-ogram which Gilpin is making available 
, pharmacy owners in the market area 
Irved by Gilpin 's four houses in Balti- 
•ore, Maryland; Dover, Delaware; Norfolk, 
irginia ; and Washington, D. C. This new 
-ogram is known as ' ' CSP ' ' — Community 
aield Pharmacy program — designed to of- 
|E an opportunity for all-out cooperation 
■■y manufacturers, wholesalers, and phar- 
lacies to generate maximum sales exposure 
or drug products. 

Mr. Fitzsimmons stated that participation 
I the CSP program will provide pharmacy 
jwners with a means for effective merchan- 
ising under current competitive conditions 



and a vehicle to encourage increased phar- 
macy patronage. A CSP subscribing member 
will be encouraged to prominently display a 
CSP decal emblem on the front of his store. 
There will be no contractual obligation for 
a member to buy, stock, or display any spe- 
cific merchandise, but it is expected that a 
member, at his own discretion, will cooperate 
in stocking and displaying certain products 
featured in the CSP advertising program. 
This advertising program will include 331 
weekly spot commercials, as well as other 
consumer advertising for special promotions 
and merchandising programs designed to in- 
crease pharmacy traffic. 

The Gilpin Company is happy to an- 
nounce this new service and cordially in- 
vites all pharmacy owners in its trading 
area to participate in the ''Community 
Shield Pharmacy" program for increased 
advertising efficiency and accelerated con- 
sumer sales. Check with your Gilpin repre- 
sentative for further information. 




Far Heel Group at Kalamazoo Airport as they prepare to Return to Winston-Salem fol- 
owing visit to the Upjohn Company. At extreme right — James T. Barnes, Executive 
director of the Medical Society of the State of North Carolina. 



46 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Here Is Where I Stand 

A politician was asked what stand he had 
taken on the sale of whiskey. Here is his 
reply to a constituent: 

"If, when you say whiskey you mean the 
Devil's Brew, the poison scourge, the 
bloody monster that defiles innocence, de- 
thrones reason, destroys the home, creates 
misery and poverty — Yes, literally takes the 
bread from the mouths of little children ; if 
you mean the evil drink that topples the 
Christian man and woman from the pin- 
nacles of righteous, gracious living into the 
bottomless pit of degradation and despair, 
shame and helplessness and hopelessness, 
then certainly I am against it with all ray 
power. 

"But, if, when you say whiskey, you mean 
the oil of conversation, the philosophic 
wine, the ale that is consumed when good 
fellows get together, that puts a song in 
their hearts and laughter on their lips and 
the warm glow of contentment in their 
eyes ; if you mean Christmas cheer ; if you 
mean the stimulating drink that puts the 
spring in the old gentleman's step on a 
frosty morning ; if you mean the drink that 
enables a man to magnify his joy, and his 
happiness and to forget, if only for a little 
while, life's great tragedies, and heartbreaks 
and sorrows; if you mean that drink, the 
sale of which pours into our treasuries un- 
told millions of dollars, which are used to 
provide tender care for our little crippled 
children, our blind, our deaf, our dumb, our 
pitiful aged and infirm, to build highways, 
hospitals and schools, then certainly I am 
in favor of it." 



Replica of Porter Drug Store 
Opened to the Public 

The just-completed replica of the W. C. 
Porter and Company drug store, Greensboro, 
was dedicated on September 11 — the 100th 
anniversary of the birth of William Sydney 
Porter (O. Henry). 

An O. Henry Room adjoining the drug 



store replica was opened to the public af r 
the dedication ceremony. 

Will Porter (O. Henry) was an employ 
of the W. C. Porter and Company dim 
store in 1879 and on August 30, 1881 I 
came one of the first licensed pharmacii 
of the state. He was later to gain fame ;t 
a writer of short stories. 

Of three O. Henry cachets of stami 
available for the September 11 dedicate, 
one depicts the Porter drug store. 

Proposal to Establish Hospital 
Pharmacy Deferred 

A proposal to establish a pharmacy I 
the Roanoke-Chowan Hospital of Ahosk I 
has been deferred. 

Some phases of the proposal were o' I 
posed by local pharmacists according toll 
news report appearing in the Ahoskie Dai 1 
News. 

The administrator of the hospital ha 
recommended the pharmacy be establish^! 
after it was determined more than $120,0(1 
worth of drugs were administered to p' 
tients from October 1, 1961 through Jul 
1962. 

Pharmacy Graduate Now Heads 
Federal Bureau of Narcotics 

Henry L. Giordano, the new Federal Cons'i 
missioner of Narcotics who has succeeded 
Harry J. Anslinger, retired, is a native I 
San Francisco, California and a pharmac 
graduate of the University of California 
1935. 

Commissioner Giordano practiced as I 
pharmacist from 1934 to 1941 at which timfl 
he entered government service as an agetf 
of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics. 

Following military service (1943-1946), hi 
returned to the Bureau, serving in varioul 
capacities in Minnesota, Missouri and Wash 
ington, D. C. On November 3, 1958 he 9 
designated Deputy Commissioner of Narf 
cotics. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



47 



Mutual Problems Considered at Medical- 
Pharmaceutical Committee Meeting 
in Durham 



Representatives of the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association met in Durham 
)n September 13 with representatives from 
the Medical Society of the State of North 

arolina for a general discussion of mutual 
problems. 

. Subjects discussed included Kerr-Mills leg- 
slation with emphasis on the drug part of 
■he program, national legislation, including 
he Anderson-Javits proposal for 1963, new 

rug regulations including certain proposals 
f-hich will tend to reduce pharmaceutical 
(dvertising in medical and pharmaceutical 
publications, and certain distribution prob- 
lems involving Thalidomide and Enovid. 

' The series of "Paregoric" feature stories 
k'hich appeared in The Charlotte Observer 
rere discussed by the joint group and spe- 
lial consideration given to the Observer 's 
tditorial call for legislative action at the 
Itate level. An opinion poll will be con- 
lueted by the NCPA to determine if Pare- 
boric should be restricted to prescription 
ale. 

Since one of the major features of the 
jlerr-Mills "medically indigent over-65" 
's drug therapy, the NCPA will prepare a 
jroposal for supplying drug medication to 
persons certified as being eligible for Kerr- 
•■lills assistance. 

i The committee agreed to hold semi-annual 
.-leetings. 

Present from the Medical Society were 
})r. Edgar T. Beddingfield, Jr. of Stantons- 
Purg; Dr. Donald Koonce of Wilmington 
Snd Mr. William N. Hilliard of Raleigh. 

President Stevenson of Elizabeth City 
Steaded the NCPA committee. Others pres- 
ent included President-Elect Hoy A. Moose 
>f Mount Pleasant, Edwin R. Fuller of 
Salisbury, I. T. Reamer of Durham, W. 
Porsey Welch, Jr. of Washington and W. J. 
Smith of Chapel Hill. 



Pharmacists to Cooperate in State- 
Wide Sabin Oral Polio 
Immunization Program 

The Executive Committee of the NCPA 
has endorsed the following request and 
urges all pharmacists to cooperate with 
county medical societies in implementing the 
program: 

"The Medical Society of the State of 
North Carolina will recommend shortly that 
its 77 constituent county societies implement 
a mass, all-age, Sabin oral poliomyelitis 
immunization program. 

' ' We are anxious to obtain the endorse- 
ment of this program from your Association 
and to solicit the aid of the pharmacists 
everywhere in North Carolina when the mass 
immunization clinics are held this winter. ' ' 
S. F. Ravenel, M. D., Chairman 
Poliomyelitis Vaccine Committee 
of the Medical Society of the 
State of North Carolina 

Program Details 
State-wide plans for implementing the 
Medical Society 's mass, all-age, Sabin oral 
poliomyelitis immunization program were 
discussed at a meeting in Durham on Sep- 
tember 15. NCPA Secretary W. J. Smith 
represented the Pharmaceutical Association. 
Details of the program will go to members 
of the NCPA by special bulletin. 

Apothecary Club Endorses 
Auxiliary Project 

Reported by Mrs. William Simmons 

Twenty-one members of the Apothecary 
Club met September 6 for a covered dish 
supper at Ardmore Methodist Church. Mrs. 
Garland Benton presided over the business 
meeting which followed. Minutes were heard, 
as well as a report from the treasurer. 

Members were reminded that dues of 
$5.00 are to be paid by the November meet- 
ing. The Social Committee was asked to 



48 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



plan the February meeting, which will prob- 
ably feature a Bingo party. 

The State Auxiliary project of Bedside 
Bags for Shut-ins was discussed. Mrs. John 
Andrews was asked to determine the number 
of bags needed for the Winston-Salem area, 
and the president was asked to obtain a 
sample bag. 

Mrs. M. V. Williams and Mrs. Leslie 
Myers expressed thanks for remembrances 
during their illnesses. 

Motion was made by Mrs. Myers, sec- 
onded by Mrs. Roger Sloop, that enter- 
tainment for meetings be left up to the 
hostesses, with programs still being planned 
by the Program Chairman. 

A song fest, with Mrs. Andrews as ac- 
companist, closed the meeting. 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

This space available at 10^ per word; mini- 
mum of $3.00. Box numbers assigned and 
replies forwarded to advertiser upon re- 
quest. Mail copy and payment to Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy, Box 151, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 

BALANCES — Prescription balances repaired. 
Contact Phipps & Bird, Inc., P. O. Box 2V, 
Richmond 5, Virginia. Telephone Ml 4-5401. 

FOR SALE — Remington's Practice of Phar- 
macy, 12th Edition. (1961). 1,866 pages. 
Price $22.50. Available from NCPA, Box 
151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

PHARMACIST — Desires working partnership 
in either a potentially good new store or an 
established older store. Prefer drawing ac- 
count rather than a salary. Able to make 
modest financial investment. Age 48, mar- 
ried, one child, a son, age 9. Aggressive 
merchandiser and front man as well as good 
prescription man. Excellent relation with 
medical profession both on telephone and 
in person. Congenial and easy to work with. 
For references and interview write CFPJ-9, 
Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



AVAILABLE — From the NCPA "Clinic' 
Toxicology of Commercial Products" 
Gleason, Gosselin and Hodge. Every phc 
macy should have a copy of this publicatii 
for reference in acute poisoning (home at 
farm). Price $16.00 postpaid. 

FOR SALE — Profitable pharmacy in Weste 
North Carolina. Excellent location for c 
aggressive pharmacist with get up and g 
If ycu qualify, let's talk terms. H L W- 
c/o NCPA, Box 151, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

NEWS BRIEFS 

Lexington — John H. Welborn attended tl 
recent national tennis tournament at tl 
Forest Hills court in New York State. 

Durham — A case of Timex watches value 
at $275 was stolen from the front of Kerr 
Lakewood Shopping Center Drug Store, j 
delivery truck had left the merchandise I 
front of the store before store hours. 

Laurinburg — Herb McKeithan has bee' 
appointed a member of the Scotland Count 
Board of Health. He succeeds the late L. I 
Lea. 

Kings Mountain — Guest speaker at th 
August 30 meeting of the Shelby Kiwam 
Club was Charles Blanton. Title of his tali; 
was "Before and After Thalidomide." 

Scotland Ne:k — Mrs. Billy Cooke won 
Catalina sweater in a California Fashio: 
Sweepstakes contest sponsored locally b 
Rexall agency Hall's Drug Store. 

Leaksville — Joe Chandler has opened . 
professional pharmacy in the Medical-Den 
tal-Pharmacy Building on NC #14 (V;v 
Buren Road). Featured are a waiting loung 
for customers and a drive-in window. Even 
ett M. Dunn is associated with Mr. Chandle 
in the operation of the pharmacy. 

Belhaven — W. P. O'Neal, Belhaven phar! 
macist, was the subject of a feature, il 
lustrated story in the August 30 Washington 
Daily News. As chairman of the Board o: 
Trustees of the Pungo District Hospital I 
Belhaven, M r . O'Neal has helped to inak 
modern hospital facilities available to moi'i 
than 17,000 patients over a 13 year period 



V»V»V*V»T»V»T»VeY»y*y»f»V»V«v#V»V#V»V»YiT»V»\eV»V»V#V»VtV»y»V»V'jTtV*Y»V#\«V» 



°CTOB ej 



oo 



TO 



0^ 



Nationa 

Pharmacy 




°^ 



°°^o e 



ER 



L 



o K 



.«o 



o 



c-r° 



f3&^ 




OCXOB 



Your full-iine, full-service 
Wholesaler salutes 
\ National Pharmacy Week 

and pledges it his full-line support, 
the identical support he gives you, 
his colleague in Pharmacy. 



Joktpym 



O wens, mm 
9&w HI 



INOR & 



rte 




ODEKER 

'itiweM & pie/fa 



1010 Herring Avenue, Wilson, North Carolina 



:KKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKh 




Signs of Good Business 

The increased prescription demand for Pulvules® Darvon® (dextro 
propoxyphene hydrochloride, Lilly) means additional sales and 
profit opportunities for all pharmacies with active prescription de- 
partments. To insure continued "signs of good business." avc J j )l ,J'he 
possibility of out-of-stock conditions which will cause you to lose 
both profit and prestige. Take advantage of our complete and 
comprehensive Lilly stocks and our quick, dependable service. 
Your patronage is always appreciated. 



WE ARE A 



DISTRIBUTOR 



The W. H. King Drug Company 

"The House of Friendly and Dependable Service" 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

AND ITS ASSOCIATES 

O'Hanlon-Watson Drug Company 
winston-salem, n. c. 
Bellamy Drug Company King Drug Company Peabody Drug Company 
wilmington, n. c. florence, s. c. durham. n. c. 



Sj& 









or- 



" 






^ 










1962 YEAR BOOK OF THE N. C. P. A. flnlVPlf 

!% e r«Wm« Journal of Pharmacy 

Volume XLIII OCTOBER, 1962 Number 10 



before 



after 





Same man. Same appearance. But Mr. After is taking Mi-Cebrin® T, 
receiving vitamin-mineral supplementation that can't be seen. Re- 
placement of the nutritional reservoir following surgery or prolonged 
illness is Mi-Cebrin T's own cup of tea. 

Like all Lilly vitamins, it does its job extremely well. It can do a 
job in your pharmacy, too. 

Got enough to meet the demand 7 Contact your Lilly service whole- 
saler for replenishment. Mi Cebnn® T (vitamin-minerals therapeutic, Lilly) 



S&ty 



Our Thanks to You! 
Our Good Customers! 



We Appreciate and Acknowledge Your 
Contribution Toward Making 1962 Our 
Most Successful Year m History. 

Our Sincere Wishes for Your Continued 
Success, Health, and Prosperity in the Years 
Ahead. 

Support Tour Full'Line, FulVService 
Drug Wholesalers 




,*£MBf/> 




''Otts^ 



JUSTICE DRUG COMPANY 



Greensboro, N. C. 



Over 64 Years of Service to Retail Druggists of North Carolina 



The House of Friendly Service 




Scott ^btug, Company 



Service Wholesalers Since 1891 




February 12, 1963 



V< ' 



^Qr 



YOU'RE HOPING FOR 

VALENTINE TRAFFIC 




THE CANDY OF THE SOUTH 

Atlanta • Augusta 




W. T. Threewitts, Jr., 300 A Ashland Drive, Greensboro, N. C. 



NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 1962-63 

President John T. Stevenson, Overman & Stevenson, Elizabeth Cit 

First Vice-President Hoy A. Moose, A. W. Moose Co., Mt. Pleasan$ 

Second Vice-President Harry A. Barringer, Pearl Drug Co., Concoro 

Third Vice-President W. T. Boone, Boone's Pharmacy, Ahoski 

Secretary-Treasurer W. J. Smith, Box 151, Chapel Hil 

Assistant Secretary CM. Andrews, 1318 West Davis St., Burlingtoi 

General Counsel 
F. O. Bowman, Box 688, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Committees 



Executive 

John T. Stevenson, Chm Elizabeth City 

Harry M. Barringer Concord 

W. T. Boone Ahoskie 

Edwin R. Fuller Salisbury 

Robert B. Hall Mocksville 

Sam W. McFalls Greensboro 

Hoy A. Moose Mount Pleasant 

W. J. Smith, Sec. Chapel Hill 

Extension Division 

M. A. Chambers, Chm Chapel Hill 

H. A. Barringer Concord 

V. L. Faircloth Charlotte 

Oliver Fleming Smithfield 

C. Bruce Hawkins, Bryson City 

John Martin Pinetops 

Ernest J. Rabil Winston-Salem 

W. M. Salley, Jr Asheville 

Gerald M. Stahl Durham 

J. E. Williams Rockingham 

NCPA — Institute Endowment 

T. J. Ham, Jr. Chm Yancey ville 

David R. Davis Williamston 

Edwin R. Fuller Salisbury 

Sam W. McFalls Greensboro 

R. P. Rogers, Sr Durham 

Consolidated Pharmacy Fund 

Robert B. Hall, Chm Mocksville 

W. M. K. Bender Fayetteville 

Marion Edmonds Greensboro 

Gilbert Hartis Winston-Salem 

Haywood Jones Zebulon 

Papers and Queries 

W. T. Boone, Chm Ahoskie 

James L. Creech Smithfield 

C. C. Graham Greensboro 

S. D. Griffin, Jr Burlington 

A. K. Hardee Charlotte 



Practical Pharmacy & Dispensing 

C. D. Blanton, Jr., Chm Kings Mountaii 

Hugh M. Clark Goldsbor. 

B. F. Collins, Jr. Greensbon 

H. V. Day Spruce Pin 

J. C. Hood, Jr Kinstoi 

Inter-Professional Relations 

W. D. Welch, Jr., Chm Washingtoi 

Charles T. Dixon Winston-Saler 

T. M. Holland Mount Holl;' 

Seth Miller Lexingto: 

I. T. Reamer Durhan 

Constitution and By-Laws 

Edwin R. Fuller, Chm Salisbur; 

W. T. Boone Ahoski 

W. B. Gurley Windso 

•James W. Harrison N. Wilkesbor>| 

Leslie M. Myers Winston-Salen' 

R. N. Watson Sanf or< 

Public Relations 

David D. Claytor, Chm Greensbor 

Joe P. Barbour, Jr Burlingto^ 

Jesse M. Pike Concor< 

Poison Prevention Week 

T. R. Burgiss, Chm Elkii 

E. A. Brecht Chapel Hill 

C. S. Brinkley Kernersvilhl 

Rowe Campbell, Jr Taylorsvilk 

Calvin Floyd Roanoke Rapid; 

N. O. McDowell, Jr Scotland NecH 

O. K. Richardson Boone 

Robert Smith Mount Air^ 

Public Health & Welfare 

J. C. Jackson, Chm Lumbertoi 

J. P. Barbour, Sr Burlingtoi 

W. B. Gurley Windsor 

Frank Lowder Winston-Salen 

C. E. Page, Jr Hendersoi 1 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Legislative 

\M. H. Randall, dim Lillington 

b. D. Blanton, Sr. Kings Mt. 

IjWade A. Gilliam Winston-Salem 

[Roger A. McDuffie Greensboro 

ijHoy A. Moose Mount Pleasant 

p. K. Richardson Boone 

W. Latham West Roseboro 

Resolutions 

boy A. Moose, Chm Mt. Pleasant 

IT. W. S. Biggs ■. . . . Greenville 

pL. M. Edmonds Greensboro 

John P. Friday Gastonia 

|r. R. Robinson, Jr. Goldsboro 

"UNC Pharmacy School Visitation 

Leslie M. Myers, Chm. Winston-Saleni 

Herbert Hollowell Edenton 

R. L. Irwin Elkin 

[R. W. Kiger Shelby 

Paul W. Miller Spencer 

tBen K. Mobley Burlington 

[June Bush West Raleigh 

Trade Interest 

John T. Henley, Chm. Hope Mills 

John Andrews Winston-Salem 

'Earl Tate, Lenoir Lenoir 

Robert L. Hood Pink Hill 

W. B. Van Valkenburgh Asheville 

Membership 

'Ralph P. Rogers, Jr., Chm. Durham 

R. W. Collette Mocksville 

E. B. Eadie Charlotte 

W. H. Houser Cherryville 

C. L. Shields Jacksonville 

Dental Formulary 

'.Roger Sloop, Chm Winston-Saleni 

(James W. Fulton Welcome 

^G. Haywood Jones Zebulon 

■W. Darle Shouse King 

Fair Trade 

Harry A. Barringer, Chm. Concord 

B. Cade Brooks Fayetteville 

M. D. Denson Burlington 

John Mitchener Edenton 

Fred M. Moss Gastonia 

Ernest Rabil Winston-Salem 

S. S. Slesinger Charlotte 



Elections 

Jean Bush Provo, Chm Raleigh 

David D. Claytor. Greensboro 

James L. Creech Smithfield 

Roger Sloop Winston-Salem 

Delegates 
American Pharmaceutical Association 

E. A. Brecht Chapel Hill 

H. C. McAllister Chapel Hill 

National Assn. of Retail Druggists 

T. .J. Ham, Jr., Chm Yanceyville 

J. C. Jackson Lumberton 

Alfred N. Martin Roanoke Rapids 

W. D. Welch, Jr. Washington 

State Judicial Council 

C. D. Blanton, Sr. Kings Mountain 

Roger A. McDuffie Greensboro 

Edwin R. Fuller Salisbury 

W. D. Welch, Jr. Washington 

W. Latham West Roseboro 

District Judicial Councils 

District 1 : C. D. Blanton, Sr., Kings Mt., 
H. V. Day, Spruce Pine and W. M. Salley, 
Jr., Asheville. 

District 2: R. A. McDuffie, Chm., Greens- 
boro; C. M. Andrews, Burlington & W. A. 
Gilliam, Winston-Salem. 

District 3: E. R. Fuller, Chm., Salisbury; 

F. H. Cline, Charlotte and J. C. Jackson, 
Lumberton. 

District 4: W. D. Welch, Jr., Chm., Wash- 
ington; W. B. Gurley, Windsor, and A. N. 
Martin, Roanoke Rapids. 

District 5 Judicial Council: W. L. West, 
Chm., Roseboro; Oliver G. Fleming, Smith- 
field, and R. X. Watson, Sanford. 



Cover Page 



A sign familiar to thousands of visitors 
to the North Carolina Institute of Pharmacy. 
Located at the entrance of the Institute, 
the sign may be seen either from Franklin or 
West Rosemary Streets. Chapel Hillians 
frequently direct visitors to the Institute 
thusly "At the sign of the mortar & pestle 
opposite the Chapel Hill High School." 



recommend 
Benzedrex® Inhaler 

for temporary relief of nasal congestion 
. . . in seconds 




^Benzedrex 1 Inhaler is the only inhaler that contains 

the outstanding volatile vasoconstrictor, propylhexedrine. 

It provides effective temporary relief of the congestion 

of head colds and allergic rhinitis — in a matter of seconds. 

f Benzedrex' Inhaler insures complete, prolonged shrinkage of 
the nasal mucosa, without causing excitation or wakefulness. 



YOUR CUSTOMERS KNOW THE BENZEDREX® INHALER 

Display ' Benzedrex'' — you can recommend it with confidence. 



Smith Kline & French Laboratories, Philadelphia 



Uht Carolina Journal of ^Ijarmacp 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

AT CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

W. J. Smith, Managing Editor 

Entered as second-class matter July 5, 1922, at the post office at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 

under the Act of March 3, 1879 

Annual Subscription, $3.00 Single Numbers, 25 Cents 

Vol. XLIII OCTOBER, 1962 No. 10 

CONTENTS 



Officers — Committees — Delegates 4 

Opening Session 9 

Eite of the Eoses 9 

Reports 

Secretary-Treasurer 13 

TJNC School of Pharmacy 22 

Pharmaceutical Eesearch Foundation 2-4 

Extension Division 25 

TJNC Visitation 27 

Legislative 29 

Public Eelations . . 30 

NCPA— Institute Endowment 33 

Papers & Queries 33 

Judicial Council 33 

Inter-Professional Eelations ' 34 

Public Health & Welfare 35 

Constitution and By-Laws 37 

Membership 38 

President 's Address, Report on 38 

Time & Place; Nominations; Officer Installation 2D 

Membership Roll 

Pharmacists — Life Members 41 

Associate Members 54 

Woman's Auxiliary 

Officers — Committees 55 

Business Session 56 

President 's Report 58 

Traveling Men's Auxiliary 

Officers — Governors — Members 60 

State Board of Pharmacy 

Members 68 

81st Annual Eeport 69 

Pharmacists 86 

Assistant Pharmacists Ill 

Eetail and Hospital Pharmacies 112 



1962 YEAR BOOK 



Brighten your 








with 



ti 



Fixtures 



We Can Help You! 

1. Our Experienced Designers can plan your store to increase 
Sales and Profits for You! 

2. Our Skilled Workers and Modern Production Facilities can 
quickly turn your Plans into Reality! 

3. The installation is completed by Factory Trained Experts 
with "know-how" to get the job done with Minimum 
Inconvenience to You. 

4. Your increased sales and profits will meet the conven- 
iently spaced payments tailored to suit your needs. All 
payments and dealings are directly with us. Ask for Our 
Financing or Leasing Plans. 

Clip Coupon and Mail 



We are planning to 

□ Expand □ Modernize 



Name 



□ Build 
New- 
Store 



Firm Name 

Street Address. 

City 

State 




GRANT E. KEY, INC. 

Manufacturers 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



PROCEEDINGS 

Eighty Second Annual Convention of the 
NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

HOTEL SIR WALTER 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

April 8-10, 1962 



OPENING SESSION 

The 82nd annual convention of the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association was 
opened on April 8, 1962 in the ballroom of 
the Hotel Sir Walter, Raleigh, by President 
Robert B. Hall. Mrs. Leslie M. Myers of 
Winston-Salem, president of The Woman's 
Auxiliary, and Leon Kimball of Winston- 
Salem, president of The Traveling Men's 
Auxiliary, opened the sessions of their or- 
ganizations. 

A dinner followed an invocation by Oscar 
A. Elmore. Troy Johnson, Raleigh phar- 
macist and president of the Wake County 
Pharmacists Society, officially welcomed the 
delgates to the city. 

In his introductory remarks, President 
Hall complimented the two auxiliaries on 
their general support of Pharmacy, the an- 
nual meetings, scholarship and loans funds 
and their aid to the School of Pharmacy and 
the Institute of Pharmacy. 

"Miss North Carolina" (Susan Kay 
Woodall of Roanoke Rapids), present as a 
guest of the Association, was introduced. 
She impressed the delegates with her beauty, 
talent and enthusiasm for the programs be- 
ing carried on by the Jaycees of North 
Carolina. 

The University of North Carolina Glee 
Club, under the direction of Dr. Joel Carter, 
closed the first session Avith a well-paced and 
thoroughly enjoyed program, involving clas- 
sical, folk, popular and religious numbers. 
' ' Miss North Carolina, ' ' at one time a mem- 
ber of the Glee Club, did two numbers with 
the group to the obvious enjoyment of those 
present. 

SECOND SESSION 

An invocation by Charles M. Andrews 
opened the second session, which got under- 



way on the morning of April 9 following an 
8:30 A.M. business-starter breakfast. 

W. H. Randall, Jr. of Lillington presented 
a memorial tribute to members of the NCPA 
who had died since the close of the 1961 an- 
nual convention. 

Rite of the Roses 

Conducted by 
W. H. Randall, Jr., Lillington 

We pause in our busy convention schedule 
to pay our respects to those members of our 
Association who have passed away during 
the past year. We do this for several rea- 
sons. 

First, to show our respect to the memory 
of those whom we honor. This is very im- 
portant since this memory is one of the most 
important things to all people. This is 
vividly illustrated in times of war when mili- 
tary men are approaching what seems to be 
almost certain death in a particular engage- 
ment. They make every effort to be sure 
that if they are killed they may be identified 
because they fear to leave no memory, no 
memorial of their lives. 

Secondly, we honor these members because 
of our respect for their families and loved 
ones. It's a public proclamation to these 
loved ones that our Association valued the 
lives of these departed members and that we 
desire an opportunity to demonstrate the 
sincerity of our esteem for them. 

Thirdly, it is valuable as a lesson to our- 
selves that these services paid to the dead 
are useful only as lectures to the living. 
From their lives we should receive instruc- 
tions for the proper use of our lives. Surely 
these men have left us a challenge in our 
chosen profession of Pharmacy to examine 
their lives, their dreams, their activities and 



ygr 




A Check-out Section with Con- 
fections, Gifts and impulse items 
at point of sale. 





The Lumilite Canopy 
spotlights your Profes- 
sional Service and 
adds prestige to this 
most important de- 
partment. 



Self-Service for Hair Needs and 
Toiletries well displayed for quick 
sales. 



The "KEY" Word 

in Modern Store 

Fixtures is . . . 




Self-Service Wall Displayers with 
glass enclosed Cosmetic Insert 
Section. 



VERSATILITY 




These merchandisers and 
many more are produced 
on a quantity basis to give 
you quality displays at 
lowest possible prices. 




A Curved Glass Showcase for 
your Gift or Cosmetic Section 
lends Glamour to your displays. 




1 We are planning to 


□ Modernize ■ 
3 Expand | 

□ Build New Store | 






1 City 


Statfi | 







Gondolas with Glass Shelves and 
carton storage below for your 
finest self-service displays. 



Display Front Wrapping Count- 
ers increase impulse sales. 






Special Design for increasing 
Camera and Film sales. 



GRANT E. KEY, Inc. 

Manufacturers 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 




Self-Service Gondolas for most 
''exible displays. 



Modernistic Display for increas- 
ing Sales of your finest Cosmetics. 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



11 



their contributions to society that we may 
use them as guideposts to advance our pro- 
fession. 

Surely no more fitting use could be made 
of a beautiful flower than to symbolize lives 
here on earth during which time we have 
obligations to perform. This flower grows, 
bursts into bloom to fill the surrounding air 
with its fragrance and the eye with its 
beauty and then passes away. So it is with 
the lives such as those we remembered today. 

If we were to visit the Hall of Fame, at 
University Hights, New York, we would find 
there a bronze tablet with the name Eobert 
Edward Lee, Commander in Chief of the 
Confederate Army, and the following in- 
scription : 

"Duty then is the sublemate word in our 
language. Do your duty in all things, you 
can not. do more, you should never work to 
do less." 

These members we honor today did this. 
They did their duty to their profession and 
in so doing they served well their family, 
their community, their state and their na- 
tion for our profession is a profession of 
service. 

Ernest Stuart Benson, Wilmington 
February 10, 1961 

William Donalson Allen, Morganton 
April 26, 1961 

Loamie Gilbert, Benson 
May 1, 1961 

Charles A. Brady, Sr., Hickory 
May 5, 1961 

Herbert Cooper Greene, Charlotte 
May 31, 1961 (Life member) 

James Edwin Johnson, Jr., Lumberton 
June 24, 1961 (Life member) 

Jarvis Marion Alligood, Greenville 
July 9, 1961 

Leonard W. Aiken, Mars Hill 
August 8, 1961 

Hey C. Whiteley, Morganton 
September 7, 1961 

Eobert Boscoe Herring, Oxford 
September 17, 1961 

Herman Corthell Price, Creedmoor 
October 22, 1961 



Joe M. Anderson, New Bern 
November 6, 1961 

Gary Anderson Littlefield, Gastonia 

November 14, 1961 (associate member) 

Graham Page Johnson, Jacksonville 
January 17, 1962 

Elery W. Oliver, Greensboro 
January 28, 1962 

Charles Euffin Edwards, Albemarle 
February 4, 1962 

Leon Benjamin Joiner, Salisbury 
March 1, 1962 

H. L. Bishop, West Asheville 
March 31, 1962 

Honorary Member 

Dr. John W. Dargavel, Chicago, Illinois 
October 9, 1961 

PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

First vice-president John T. Stevenson was 
called to the chair where he presided during 
the presentation of President Hall 's address. 
The address was published in the September 
issue of The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, 
pages 11-23-27-29-31. 

Following presentation of the President's 
Address, a Committee on the President's 
Address was appointed by Mr. Stevenson: 
N. 0. McDowell, Jr., Chairman; J. C. Jack- 
son and C. E. Page, Jr. The committee was 
instructed to report at the last convention 
session. 

Additional committees were announced by 
President Hall — Nominating : W. D. Welch, 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

This space available at 10^ per word; mini- 
mum of $3.00. Box numbers assigned and 
replies forwarded to advertiser upon re- 
quest. Mail copy and payment to Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy, Box 151, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 

BALANCES — Prescription balances repaired. 
Contact Phipps & Bird, Inc., P. O. Box 2V, 
Richmond 5, Virginia. Telephone Ml 4-5401. 



Quality. 




Pays and Pays and Pays 

Sealtest Ice Cream — in dishes, cones and cartons — 
brings customers in, sells the ones that came for 
other products, and makes your cash register ring. 

Well-known quality keeps Sealtest preferred. 
National and local advertising keeps Sealtest pre-sold. 
And regular special flavors help keep Sealtest 
predominant. 

So, stock up with Sealtest Ice Cream. Display the 
Sealtest sign of quality. Then, count up 
your extra Sealtest profits! 

***** 

And be sure to Feature this Special Flavor 

SWISS STYLE CHOCO CHIP 

for your Fountain and Take-Home Customers! 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



13 



Jr., Chm., C. D. Blanton, Sr., M. M. Ed- 
monds, E. R. Fuller, A. N. Martin, M. B. 
Melvin, and W. L. West. Time and Place: 
Jesse M. Pike, Chm., Fred Moss and Stanley 
Slesinger. 

Edwin R. Fuller, a past president of the 
NCPA, introduced guest speaker, J. Warren 
Lansdowne, Manager of Professional and 
Trade Relations, Eli Lilly and Company. 

In discussing ' ' Know Something, Be 
Something, Do Something, ' ' Mr. Lansdowne 
said, in part, ' ' we have learned to fly higher 
and farther and faster than birds in the sky 
... we have learned to navigate through 
space with precision and control ... we 
have learned to swim deep and long like fish 
in the sea . . . now we must learn to walk on 
the earth like men." 

CONTRIBUTION TO APhA FUND 

Following an explanation of the need for 
funds to finance the APhA-supported ' ' De- 
fend the Profession" program, on motion of 
Slesinger-Bain, the NCPA Secretary- 
Treasurer was authorized to contribute $500 
to the American Pharmaceutical Association. 

David R. Uran, President of the Ethical 
Drug Advertising Company, was introduced 
by J. C. Jackson. Mr. Uran's address, 
"How to Operate a Profitable Pharmacy 
that Enjoys Physician and Community Re- 
spect, ' ' was published in the July, 1962 is- 
sue of The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, 
pages 13-14-15-17. 

The second session closed with the annual 
report of the NCPA Secretary-Treasurer, 
W. J. Smith. 

Report of W. J. Smith 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Mr. President, Members of the Association, 
Ladies and Gentlemen : 

As President Hall and your Executive 
Secretary made their rounds of the local and 
district pharmaceutical societies during the 
past year, we were occasionally charac- 
terized as the ' ' gloom and doom Boys " as a 
result of our efforts to point up the turmoil 
and change taking place at all levels of 
Pharmacy. 

While we are optimistic over the future of 



Pharmacy, and particularly here in North 
Carolina where more than 20 million pre- 
scriptions are being filled each year, we feel 
a responsibility to be realistic about the 
present situation ; to keep ourselves well in- 
formed so that we will be in the best pos- 
sible condition to cope with the problems 
now looming on the horizon. 

New forms of competition, investigations 
and judicial decisions, changes in the pric- 
ing and profit structure and an increasing 
awareness that non-pharmaey groups are 
nibbling at House of Pharmacy must be 
noted and steps taken to effectively meet 
the challenges posed. 

So far as this Association is concerned, our 
officers and our committees are already 
dressed for combat. As this meeting pro- 
gresses, you will receive a glimpse of the 
progress of the battle. And, as this meeting 
concludes, you will see some of our guide- 
lines for the future. 

Of immediate interest is our plan for 
strengthening the local pharmaceutical so- 
cieties for here exists the best opportunity 
to discuss and to formulate effective so- 
lutions to our problems. At the present 
time we have twenty local and sectional 
groups functioning in the state, but more 
needs to be done and will be done. 

Plans have already been formulated for a 
10-county Cape Fear Pharmaceutical So- 
ciety, with Fayetteville as the hub ; for a 
Northwestern Pharmaceutical Society in the 
Lenoir-Hickory-Statesville-Elkin-Boone tri- 
angle ; and for a new organization in West- 
ern North Carolina extending from Asheville 
to Murphy. A special effort will be made to 
bring organized activities, programs and 
projects to the now unorganized areas of the 
state. 

Coming up in June is an entirely new pub- 
lic relations venture of the Association. I 
refer to the NCPA-sponsored tour of the Eli 
Lilly Laboratories by a selected group of 
feature and editorial writers from some of 
our newspapers. It is our feeling that the 
Kefauver-type of publicity can best be re- 
futed by exposing our opinion molders to 
the facts at first hand. Since none of us 
have traveled this road before, we are unable 
to predict the results, but as we see it, no one 
need have fear of the truth. 



47% to 52% PROFIT 

for you on this fast-seller for chapped lips! 



By the Makers of STANBACK 



Hanger o 
Easel Displays 

Deal #2 

3 free with 12 

1 card of 12 tubes, plus 3 tubes free 

47% PROFIT 

Your Cost $2.80 

Selling Price $5.25 

Your Profit $2.45 



chap- 




Deal #6 



FOR CHAPPED LIPS 

3S 




£ M3 
wins »mms 










12 free with 36 
3 cards of 12 tubes, plus 1 card (12 tubes) free 

50% PROFIT 

Your Cost $ 8.40 

Selling Price $16.80 

Your Profit $ 8.40 



'■4 



gpEsBmj 




»T -ml' 

fecSBJ 

chfMrtJJUJ 



Counter Displays 

Deal #100 

28 free with 72-100 tubes packed in counter display 
52% PROFIT 

Your Cost $16.80 

Selling Price $35.00 

Your Profit $18.20 



ORDER NOW FROM YOUR WHOLESALER 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



15 



You members are the Association. What 
the Association does or does not do bears a 
direct relationship to your interest, to your 
willingness to work on Association projects, 
to your financial support. In all these areas 
you have measured up well. 

You have and are providing the funds 
with which to do the job. Specifically, as the 
Association's audited report for 1961 will 
show, for the first time in the history of the 
NCPA the annual dues collections passed 
the $20,000 mark. Other revenue from var- 
ious sources brought the total income to 
more than $50,000. 

Since disbursements amounted to slightly 
more than $45,000, net income from the 
year's operation, taking into account depre- 
ciation and contributions to the endowment 
fund, amounted to more than $6,000. 

This figure is significant since it exceeds 
the total income of the NCPA in 1940. 

Slowly, the Association moves ahead in 
terms of active, dues-paid members. To do 
this we must more than replace those who 
are dropped from the membership roll for a 
variety of reasons — death, failure to pay 
dues and an occasional resignation. 

As a specific example of our progress, 
during the first three months of this year, 52 
new pharmacist-members affiliated with the 
NCPA. This figure is more than the total 
of pharmacists licensed during the same 
period. Obviously, to do this, we had to ob- 
tain some of the members from those phar- 
macists who for one reason or another had 
been eligible for membership in the past but 
had failed to affiliate. 

Membership 

Pharmacist Members 1208 

Associate Members 56 

Life Members 29 

Honorary Members 5 

Student Branch Members 187 

Total 1485 

During 1961, 96 new members affiliated 
with the NCPA. Thirty-five members were 
dropped for non-payment of dues. The de- 
ceased list totaled 23, including one honorary 
member. 



Student Assistance 

Increasingly, the NCPA is taking a more 
active part in assisting pharmacy students 
at Chapel Hill, particularly in the area of 
financial aid. Through financial grants, tui- 
tion loans, emergency loans and the like, 
approximately fifty students have been 
helped during the past six months. 

The Association has no funds for outright 
gifts . . . it's all non-interest loans. We tell 
the student "We help you now; you help 
someone after you graduate." And the plan 
is working. 

The Dean Fund is growing ; now amounts 
to $2,550. We made our 35th loan from this 
Fund this past week. 

VA Prescriptions 

The VA Pharmacy Service Program con- 
tinues to grow despite the fact a majority 
of the medication prescribed for persons eli- 
gible for this service is shipped from the VA 
Dispensary in Winston-Salem. 

During 1961, more than $100,000 in VA 
prescriptions were processed for member 
pharmacies throughout the State. And 
present indications are that 1962 will sur- 
pass 1961. The VA Program, incidentally, 
is financed by a service fee paid to the 
NCPA by the Finance Division of the 
Veterans Administration. 

Before concluding, we would like to ex- 
press our personal thanks to President Bob, 
whose youthful spirit and enthusiasm 
coupled with "let's get the job done" has 
aided significantly in maintaining the Asso- 
ciation 's program. Time, nor distance, nor 
sacrifice, nor personal expense delayed Bob 
from his appointed rounds. He like so many 
of our past presidents faithfully and con- 
scientiously discharged the duties of the of- 
fice to which you elected him. 

The Association's executive committee, 
the committees, the auxiliaries, the local and 
sectional groups, and individuals countless 
and unnamed, all have contributed their 
share to meeting the challenge of the Six- 
ties. With similar support in the future, 
Pharmacy can approach the mid-60's confi- 
dent of its continuation as one of the es- 
sential services of mankind. 




headache 
j^ralgia 



$ 

i New bottle 
packaging 



Time-tested formula 

Time-tested acceptance 

Time-tested profit-maker 



Your customers have a choice when they buy 
"BC". America's fastest-selling headache 
powders or the popular "BC" tablets 

Over 100 Million Packages Per Year 

backed by concentrated local and 

national advertising 



B. C. REMEDY COMPANY 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



™j3CMSMT! 



YOU WANT 

r harmaccutical information 

Revenue from profitable stores 
wot patient convalescent needs 



.upplied Doctors quickly and 



-by our own Store Planning Oept. 



TO SERVE 



RICHMOND 



"Health Team" with Surgical 



YOU BETTER AND 



fast mi 



oving novelty and gift items I chondis e wi,h specific 

j Specialty Sales Dep't. is 



NORFOLK" 



I Shorter "check-In" time required wilh our I.B.M. BilV .,„.. \ UU I I C H III A 

Informative and easily read invoices >»* *"« <™>™ «™ w^y ™° «"d mf B v, iug FASTER > If I L5UIH "XTZT 

[gested retail prices shown when supplied 'by manu- _^ / £/SA 



Tl I. Telephone orders quickly on, 
by trained telephone sales p 
elepnone Orders handled quickly 2. Telephone information iervic 

swering hundreds of questions daily concerning 

C L.hideo-cod, 

Jales training for store personnel > c 



®\^ca§ mmm 



BODEKERJNC. 



The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 17 

RICCA AND NELSON 

Certified Public Accountants 

111 corcoran street building 

durham, north carolina 

April 4, 1962 
Mr. W. J. Smith, Secretary-Treasurer 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 

Dear Sir: 

We have examined the Statement of Assets and Liabilities of the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association as of December 31, 1961 and the related Statements of Income 
and Expenses for the year then ended. Our examination was made in accordance with 
generally accepted auditing standards, and accordingly included such tests of the accounting 
records and such other auditing procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. 

In our opinion, the accompanying Statement of Assets and Liabilities and the related 
Statement of Income and Expenses present fairly the financial position of the North Caro- 
lina Pharmaceutical Association at December 31, 1961 and the results of its operations for 
the year then ended, in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles applied on 
a basis consistent with that of the preceding year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Ricca And Nelson 
C. Anthony Ricca 
Certified Public Accountant 



FOR YOUR PHOTOFINISHING NEEDS 

Let B & H Photo Company Serve You 

Complete Service on 

Black and White Kodacolor 

Ektachrome Anscochrome 

Kodachrome Movies and Slides 
Processed in Our Plant 

B & II PHOTO COMPANY 

3030 s. boulevard p. 0. box 1600 

phone 523-7093 charlotte 1, n. c. 



18 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



PINE STATE'S 
POPULARITY 

Helps Build Volume 
and Maintain Profit 

SELL 

North Carolina's 
Favorite . . . 



finejtate 




V- 



ICE CREAM 



TASTES GREAT . . . IT'S 



flnejtate 



For seventy-seven years 
• - - since 1885 

SesMAK 



OF 



DURHAM 



Has been producing good 
printing, and with prompt- 
ness. Machines and tech- 
niques in printing have 
changed but the inherent 
quality is maintained. 
We are proud of our long asso- 
ciation with North Caro- 
lina druggists through The 
Carolina Journal of Phar- 
macy and its editors. The 
Journal is now in its forty- 
third volume, and the 
first printed copy was 
"Seeman Printed." 




The Seeman Printery 

of DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 19 

Exhibit " A " 

NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 
CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 

Statement of Assets and Liabilities as at December 31, 1961 

ASSETS 

Current Assets: 

Cash on Deposit $ 6,007.32 

Petty Cash 100.00 

Accounts Receivable — Regular 190.00 

Accounts Receivable — Veterans Administration 9,828.80 

Investment — Building and Loan Stock 12,500.00 



Total Current Assets $ 28,626.12 

Fixed Assets: Cost Reserve Boole Value 

Land $ 12,074.95 $ -0- $ 12,074.95 

Office Equipment 6,613.79 3,871.45 2,742.34 

Building Equipment and 

Fixtures 12,394.08 9,552.80 2,841.28 

Building 73,426.74 16,295.32 57,131.42 

Automobile 3,200.00 2,000.00 1,200.00 



Total Fixed Assets $107,709.56 $31,719.57 $ 75,989.99 

Other Assets: 

Scholarship Fund $ 321.18 

Endowment Fund— N. C. P. A 14,433.87 

Student Loan Fund 722.58 

Prepaid Insurance 297.20 

Loans to Pharmacy Students 4,127.50 

Investment at Cost 6,671.00 

Investments — Auto Fund 2,260.32 



Total Other Assets 28,833.65 



TOTAL ASSETS $133,449.76 



liabilities 



Current Liabilities. 



Accounts Payable — Regular $ 1,039.87 

Accounts Payable — Veterans Administration 8,925.50 

Prepaid Dues 50.00 



Total Current Liabilities $ 10,015.37 

net worth 

Balance — January 1, 1961 $117,035.73 

Add : Net Income — Exhibit " B " 6,398.66 



Total Net Worth— December 31, 1961 123,434.39 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET WORTH $133,449.76 



20 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

Exhibit " B ' ' 

NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 
CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 

Statement of Income and Expenses for Year Ended December 31, 1961 

Income : 

Dues— Year 1961 $18,827.00 

Dues— Year 1960 252.50 

Dues — New Members 1,210.00 

Dues— Students 374.00 $20,663.50 

Journal Advertising 9,944.96 

Service Allowance — Veterans Administration 11,253.95 

Contributions 1,676.50 

Convention Revenue 2,927.23 

Dividends Earned 823.85 

Journal Subscriptions 352.00 

Institute Maintenance 925.00 

Seminars and Registration Fees 1,289.62 

Revenue — Dental Formularies 16.00 

Sales — Professional Supplies 418.66 

Sales— Books 334.50 

Interest Income 64.95 

Other Income 15.00 

Total Income $50,705.72 




BE PROUD OF YOUR NAME - AND USE IT 

Popular, fast-selling liquid preparations, repackaged and bearing your store's name, serve 
as a constant reminder of your professional service. How better to enhance the prestige 
of your pharmacy or build customer confidence than by professional competence. Feature 
Lilly products in your pharmaceutical repackaging department. Now is the time to pur- 
chase Lilly high-quality gallons at "low" quality prices. Have our salesman check the gal- 
lons in your bulk stock section during his next call. For a gallon assortment, send your 
order to us today. 

WE ARE A QCC&Cy DISTRIBUTOR 

THE PEABODY DRUG COMPANY 

DURHAM. NORTH CAROLINA 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 21 

Expenses : 

Printing — Journal of Pharmacy $ 7,625.85 

Salaries and Allowances — Officers 9,275.00 

Salaries— Others 10,055.15 

Insurance 1,405.16 

Public Relations Expense 776.95 

Dues and Subscriptions 316.40 

Meetings and Seminar Expense 2,285.64 

Office Supplies, Expenses and Printing 2,627.37 

Telephone and Telegraph 353.75 

Postage 2,118.70 

Legal and Audit 1,790.00 

Bank Service Charges 21.19 

Building Maintenance 1,082.43 

Heat, Lights and Water 789.62 

Photographs 57.97 

Payroll Taxes 446.00 

Other Taxes and Licenses 181.13 

Travel 65.68 

Awards 424.14 

Purchases — Books 278.18 

Convention Expense 2,895.60 

Auto Expense 600.45 

Contributions 40.00 

Purchase — Professional Items 152.25 45,664.61 

$ 5,041.11 

Other Deductions : 

Depreciation 4,198.20 

Net Operating Profit $ 842.91 

'Endowment Fund: 

Contributions $ 3,548.50 

Earnings to Fund — Interest 507.25 4,055.75 

Student Loan Fund : 

Contributions 1,500.00 



NET INCOME— TO EXHIBIT "A" $ 6,398.66 



SMITH WHOLESALE DRUG CO. 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

A Young and Growing Service Wholesale House, 
Owned and Operated by Registered Pharmacists 



We Appreciate Your Business 



22 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



THIRD SESSION 

The Monday afternoon session was opened 
at 2 P.M. by President Hall. Following some 
general comments pertaining to the impor- 
tance of NCPA reports in the day by day 
functioning of the Association, President 
Hall called for and received official presenta- 
tion of the following reports, which are pub- 
lished on the following pages: 

Pharmaceutical Research Foundation — 

E. A. Brecht 
UNC School of Pharmacy — Dean Brecht 
Extension Division — Dr. Melvin Chambers 
UNC Visitation— Gilbert C. Hartis 
Legislative — Wade A. Gilliam 
Public Relations — James W. Harrison 
Board of Pharmacy — H. C. McAllister 

Report on the School of 
Pharmacy 

By E. A. Brecht 

President Hall, Members of the North Caro- 
lina Pharmaceutical Association and 
Guests : 

It is always a pleasure to present this 
brief report on the School of Pharmacy at 
the annual meeting of the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association. This privilege 
is another item of evidence of the close 
cooperation between the School and the As- 
sociation. This report can be brief because 
the details of news from the School of Phar- 
macy are reported monthly in The Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy. 

I would like to begin by asking all of the 
members of the faculty and staff at the 
School of Pharmacy to rise. While most of 
you are acquainted with most of the faculty 
and staff, it is important that no introduc- 
tion should be overlooked, and I am happy 
to see several of our new faculty members 
present this afternoon. I must explain that 
a few of our faculty are prevented from 
attending by class schedules. (The members 
of the faculty and staff were introduced by 
name and position.) 

It is particularly pleasing that Miss Alice 
Noble is here so that I may acknowledge 
publicly the completion of her important 
work as Research Historian in the publica- 
tion of her book, "The School of Pharmacy 



of the University of North Carolina, A His- ! 
tory. ' ' This book has received unanimously 
complimentary commendation in numerous 
reviews. Particular attention was paid to 
the interesting format which made it read- 
able as a narrative while including the es- 
sential details of the school 's history. 

The sale of this book has been most pleas- 
ing. It is available for $5.00 plus sales tax 
from the UNC Press, Chapel Hill, until July 
1. At that time its sale will be continued by 
the N. C. Pharmaceutical Research Founda- 
tion which subsidized its publication. It 
should be a prized possession in every phar- 
macy of the state. 

There was a total enrollment in the School 
of Pharmacy for the fall semester of 265 for 
this school year. This is a decrease of 11 
students from the previous year. This de-; 
crease, while not large, is most disappointing 
as a failure to attain the desired gradual 
increase of students enabled by the facilities 
of the new building for the school. There-' 
fore, the recruitment of qualified students.: 
to become greatly needed pharmacists, rep- 
resents an urgent problem. The best recruit- 
ment, first after the organized effort at the 
School of Pharmacy, continues as the re- 
sponsibility of the pharmacists and phar- 
macy students. By working together to show 
the attractive careers available in pharmacy,' 
particularly in North Carolina, it should be 
possible to fill the capacity of the new build-, 
ing with a gradual buildup until 100 new 
pharmacists can be graduated per year. At 
this level of graduation it is estimated that 
at least 10 years will be required to fill the I 
needs within the state for pharmacists. 

Last year it Avas reported that a late 1 
resignation and a death during the preced- 
ing summer left the faculty short handed i 
for the year. This year it is very pleasing > 
to report that every teaching position was 
filled by the following new appointments: 
Dr. J. C. Kellett, Jr., Assistant Professor of 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry, undergraduate 
student at the University of South Carolina 
and Ph.D. from Purdue University; Dr. 
Margaret Ann Shaw, Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacy, undergraduate student at the 
University of Kentucky and Ph.D. from the 
University of Florida; Dr. Jack K. Wier, 
Assistant Professor of Pharmacognosy, un- 
dergraduate student at the University of 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



23 



Nebraska and Ph.D. from the University of 
Washington; and Dr. Paul J. Wurdaek, 
Assistant Professor of Pharmacy, under- 
graduate student at the University of Pitts- 
burgh and Ph.D. from the same institution. 
Also, Mr. Edward D. Sumner was appointed 
Instructor of Pharmacy in a position made 
vacant by the resignation of Mr. Edward M. 
Smith who is continuing his graduate work 
at the University of Alabama for a Ph.D. in 
Business Administration to continue his 
teaching interests in the field of Pharmacy 
Administration. At this time I am sorry to 
report that we have two resignations from 
the faculty at the end of this school year: 
Dr. Earl T. Brown, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacy who has not made definite plans 
for next year and Dr. Wurdaek who will 
return to the University of Pittsburgh. 

It was also reported one year ago that 
Pharmacy Extension had come to a tem- 
porary halt through the resignation of the 
Director of Extension. This void has been 
filled very well during the year by the as- 
signment of this effort to Dr. M. A. Cham- 
bers, Assistant Dean. Two very successful 
postgraduate refresher courses were held. 



The seminar on Modern Pharmaceutical 
Practice was held at Morehead City in the 
fall. Three of the lectures were published 
in the Carolina Journal of Pharmacy from 
which they received nationwide interest: 
' ' How the Public Views the Pharmacists ' ' 
by C. H. McGregor, Burlington Industries, 
Professor of Business Administration, "The 
Future Framework of Health Services at 
the Community Level ' ' by Dr. Henry T. 
Clark, Jr., Administrator of the Division of 
Health Affairs, and "The Image of Phar- 
macy — A Physician's Point of View" by 
Dr. Edgar D. Beddingfield, Jr., General 
Practitioner. The professional symposium on 
antibiotics and cardiovascular drugs was 
held at the School of Pharmacy on six con- 
secutive Wednesday nights in February and 
early March. The faculty was provided 
from the School of Medicine. Its success 
was indicated by paid enrollment of 60 
(when a predicted enrollment of 20 would 
have been considered good) and attendance 
from cities as distant as Murphy and Eliza- 
beth City. Dr. Chambers served as Chairman 
of the Committee on Extension Division of 
the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Asso- 



THE HENRY B. GILPIN COMPANY 

Full Line, Full Service Wholesale Druggists Since 1845 
Baltimore • Dover • Norfolk • Washington 




"** 3ju 




Norfolk Division 

Equipped for fast, 

efficient wholesale drug 

service to the pharmacists of 

the eastern section of North Carolina 

6435 Tidewater Drive • Norfolk, Virginia • Phone 855-1901 



24 



ciation, and full cooperation was received 
from the Association and Extension activi- 
ties of the school. 

Dean Chambers also deserves credit for 
accepting the primary responsibility for 
another new project. The School of Phar- 
macy sponsored an exhibit to the theme 
"Pharmacy for Good Health" at the North 
Carolina State Fair, October 16-21. Approx- 
imately 14,000 people, of all ages, stopped, 
looked, and asked questions. The exhibit 
was manned by members of the faculty in 
rotation as teaching loads permitted. The 
outstanding conclusion, which was appre- 
ciated by frequent repetition, was the respect 
and high regard held by the visitors for 
their local pharmacists. The public image 
of the pharmacist was very good. 

The retail laboratory is approaching com- 
pletion. The fixtures were installed in 
February. The stock is now arriving in 
generous measure on a complimentary basis 
from the pharmaceutical manufacturers. Dr. 
A. W. Jowdy, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macy Administration, has charge of this new 
type of laboratory to give experience to the 
senior students in practical applications of 
management problems. 

You know from the monthly "U. N. C. 
Pharmacy School Notes" that the school 
has continued to receive many thoughtful 
gifts such as continuing scholarships, a few 
new scholarships, items of historical interest 
for the museum, and special items for the 
pharmacy library. This thoughtful generos- 
ity is sincerely appreciated. 

A detailed "Report to the Chancellor" is 
prepared at the end of the school year and 
is available on request. 

In closing, in keeping with the annual cus- 
tom, I have with me a list of the students 
in the graduating class who have not com- 
mitted themselves to employment in June. I 
know that one of the functions of this an- 
nual meeting is a clearing house for em- 
ployment information. It is regrettable that 
the number of positions available greatly 
exceeds the number of new pharmacists. 
However, this list is available to anyone who 
may wish to have a copy, and the faculty and 
I shall be happy to bring prospective em- 
ployers together with these graduating stu- 
dents. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

Pharmaceutical Research 
foundation, Inc. 

By E. A. Brecht, Secretary 



President Hall, Ladies and Gentlemen: 

President Wade A. Gilliam has asked me 
to present the report of the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Research Foundation be- 
cause he is reporting as Chairman of the 
Legislative Committee on this program. 

If this report were limited to one para- 
graph it would be reported very concisely 
that in 15 years the Foundation has re- 
ceived #287,000 in contributions and $64,000 
in interest on investments for a total receipt 
of $351,000. The Foundation has disbursed 
$88,000 for pharmaceutical education and 
research while the operating costs were only 
$14,000 for a total expenditure of $102,000. 
The net worth is $210,500 in endowment 
funds and $38,500 in expendable funds. This 
total net worth is $249,000, only slightly 
short of a quarter of a million mark. 

This brief financial summary shows a 
pleasing success for the do-it-yourself pro- 
gram initiated by this association for the 
benefit of the School of Pharmacy as long 
ago as 1946 when Mr. E. C. Daniel of Zebu- 
Ion was President. There has been a pleas- 
ing balance between the expenditure for a 
constructive program in education and re- 
search while the permanent investment funds 
enjoyed a steady increase. 

For the current year, an expenditure of 
$9,508.98 was made for undergraduate schol- 
arships, a research fellowship for one semes- 
ter, special library materials, support for 
the position of Research Historian, faculty 
professional grants, and the publication of 
the History of the School of Pharmacy. 
Operating expenses to amount $1,464.90 were 
additive to make the total expenditure for 
the year of $10,973.88. 

At its annual meeting on March 14, the 
Board of Directors gave approval to a tenta- 
tive budget for the expenditure of $19,550. 
Two new items of interest were added for 
inclusion in the new budget. The first was 
the assurance of a sudsidy, if needed, to 
support pharmacy extension courses to be 
given in the districts of the state. The 



second was the appropriation of 



for 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



25 



token support to a socio-economic study of 
the profession. 

In 1961 the rush of work for the Secretary 
prevented the organization of County Chair- 
man for the annual solicitation of support to 
the Foundation. The result was a great de- 
crease in the number and amounts of con- 
tributions made by pharmacists. Therefore, 
the County Chairman Plan will be used again 
in 1962. Past experience in 1958 and 1960 
showed that the personal interest of the 
County Chairman was greatly helpful to the 
growth of the Foundation. The record of 
the Foundation speaks for itself and can 
serve as the source of real pride in helping 
our profession. No pharmacist should be 
satisfied until he has taken full part in the 
success. Please be ready with a smile and a 
check when the County Chairman calls at 
your pharmacy later this year. 

Report of Extension Committee 

Dr. Melvin A. Chambers, Chairman 

The primary purpose of this committee is 

to stimulate the intellectual growth of the 

Pharmacy Practitioner by reviewing basic 

principles and by introducing new develop- 



ments which will enhance his professional, 
social and economic strengths. 

The scope of the activities of this com- 
mittee must necessarily be broad to accom- 
plish its purpose. Its activities should be 
under constant scrutiny, appraisal, and re- 
vision to meet the ever changing needs of 
the practicing pharmacists. To accomplish 
its purpose, the committee undertook a se- 
ries of programs. The first project was one 
of helping local drug clubs in programming 
their meetings. The nature of this aid was 
to provide speakers in specified subject 
areas. These subjects range from scientific 
pharmacy and business principles to general 
problems. A few of the societies took ad- 
vantage of the offer. It is hoped more drug 
clubs will avail themselves of this service in 
the future. 

A seminar on modern pharmaceutical 
practice was held in Morehead City last 
October. The purpose of the program was 
to focus attention on current problems, to 
look at these problems in a broad perspec- 
tive and to interpret their effect upon North 
Carolina pharmacy as Avell as the future of 
pharmacy. 

To meet our objective, we called upon 




crowd pleasers a la Lance! 




More people prefer and buy tasty Lance 
snacks than any other brand. And no wonder.. 
They're always fresh and there's 

a wide variety to choose from. 
Please your crowd. Display Lance. 



INC. Charlotte, North Carolina 




26 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



speakers holding office in national associa- 
tions and speakers from the state. Two ad- 
dresses which seemed to ellicit the greatest 
response were presented by Dr. McGregor 
who spoke on "How the Public Views the 
Pharmacists," and Dr. Clark who spoke on 
"Changing Patterns of Medical Care. Its 
Effect on Pharmacy." Both of these speak- 
ers are from the University of North Caro- 
lina and their remarks have attracted na- 
tional interest. Their papers have been pub- 
lished in recent issues of the Carolina Jour- 
nal of Pharmacy and are commended to you 
for close reading. About 35 pharmacists at- 
tended the seminar in Morehead City. What 
we lacked in numbers was certainly com- 
pensated for in quality as we had some very 
lively discussions. 

In an effort to bring pharmacy's message 
to prospective students, we supported and 
participated in a Health Careers Congress in 
Winston-Salem in January. The purpose of 
this meeting was to stimulate the formation 
of health career clubs in high schools which 
in turn would interest junior and senior high 
school students in careers in the health 
fields. 

Recognizing a need and a desire on the 
part of pharmacists to improve their pro- 
fessional knowledge and skill, a drug sym- 
posium on antibiotic and cardiovascular 
drugs was held in Chapel Hill recently. This 
consisted of weekly meetings on Wednesday 
evenings for six weeks and was given by the 
faculty members of the School of Medicine. 
The pharmacists responded overwhelmingly 
and enthusiastically. About 60 participated 
in the seminar and came from as far east as 
Elizabeth City and as far west as Bryson 
City. The attendance was maintained at a 
high level throughout the course. It is be- 
lieved the response to this program was 
great because it answered a need of the 
pharmacists. Our people are seeking more 
knowledge so they can perform more effec- 
tively in their communities. 

This impels us to believe pharmacists 
would participate to an even greater extent 
if this type program would be made more 
readily available to them. One way of mak- 
ing it more readily available is by taking 
the program to a more localized site such as 
a pharmaceutical district. This has not been 



possible in the past because we could not 
draw a sufficient number of participants at 
a reasonable registration fee to pay ex- 
penses. I am very happy to report the di- 
rectors of the North Carolina Pharmaceu- 
tical Research Foundation have recently 
agreed to underwrite the deficits of phar- 
maceutical district seminars. This now en- 
ables us to have a symposium in each dis- 
trict next year. The locations will be picked 
on the basis of local interest and accessi- 
bility. 

It is recommended that a general seminar 
on problems of current interest be repeated 
next year. A suggested theme for this is 
"Role of the Pharmacist in Community 
Health Care." 

Working with the Committee on Exten- 
sion Services next year will be a graduate 
student in the Department of Sociology and 
Anthropology. This arrangement has been 
made possible by the directors of the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Research Founda- 
tion through partial support to a research 
program he has undertaken. This worth- 
while study which is to analyze the profes- 
sional needs, attitudes and behavior patterns 
of pharmacists has very practical benefits 
for the Extension Committee and far reach- 
ing implications for pharmacy. 

We need to seek answers to questions like: 
What characterizes a successful pharmacist? 
Do pharmacy educators and practicing phar- 
macists view success in essentially the same 
terms? What criteria do both groups use in 
deciding what success is? How important is 
success to the retail pharmacist? What are 
some of the leading sources of occupational 
satisfaction and dissatisfaction in the work 
routine of the pharmacist? Do the criteria 
of success differ with the setting in which 
the pharmacist practices? Is the retail phar- 
macist concerned with the profession of 
pharmacy as a whole or does he view the 
situation in predominantly personal terms? 
Answers to these questions may help us 
to understand why pharmacists want to 
unionize, or work in discount houses, pre- 
scription mail order firms, use automatic 
drug vending machines, etc. This informa- 
tion will enable leaders in pharmacy to plan 
more intelligently and to put pharmacy in 
its proper professional status. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



27 



Report of the Visitation 
Committee 

G. C. Hartis, Chairman 

The Visitation Committee of the N.C.P.A. 
visited the U.N.C. School of Pharmacy, its 
faculty, and the senior class on Friday, 
March 16, 1962. This committee was created 
by the N.C.P.A. about thirty years ago and 
was charged with the responsibility of visit- 
ing the School of Pharmacy annually and 
making constructive suggestions for the wel- 
fare and usefulness of the institution. 

The day's activities began with a visit 
to the model drug store in the school. The 
fixtures are in place and merchandise is 
being received and put on display. This will 
be a very fine addition to the school. I am 
sure you will want to visit this model drug 
store on your next visit to Chapel Hill. A 
one-hour discission with the faculty fol- 
lowed. The chairman gave a restatement of 
the responsibilities of the committee. Dr. 
Brecht introduced the faculty and gave us 
a report on the school, the work of the Ee- 
search Foundation, and urged a more active 
recruitment program for new pharmacy stu- 
dents. 



DISTINCTIVE 




Carry your 
store's identity by color and 
personalized copy right Into your customers 
home for the life of the Prescription. 

Another pjus value of the modern paper 
box with its clean fresh label. 

Representative: 

M. C. GRIER 

1110 ANN ST.. AT. 3-3847 

Monroe. North Carolina 
• • • 

E. N. ROWELL CO., INC 

BATAVIA, NEW YORK 



The Visitation Committee endorses the 
request from the faculty that great improve- 
ment is needed in the number of pharmacists 
who annually give financial support to the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Eesearch 
Foundation. This foundation was organized 
in 1946 specifically to help the School of 
Pharmacy. While the foundation has at- 
tained a high degree of success its support 
has not come in proper proportion from the 
pharmacists themselves. The committee 
urges every pharmacist to make an annual 
contribution to the foundation so that the 
number of contributions will increase from 
between 100-400 in recent years to at least 
1000 which is nearly the number of phar- 
macies in North Carolina and only about 
two-thirds of the number of licensed phar- 
macists actively engaged in professional 
practice. 

The committee recommends that every 
pharmacist increase his effort in sending 
more and better students to the School of 
Pharmacy, so that the acute shortage of 
pharmacists may become a problem of the 
past in the near future. The excellent facili- 
ties of the new building for the School of 
Pharmacy enable enrollment of approxi- 
mately 120 students in each class. The 
build-up of students has lagged. The best 
recruiting of new students has always been 
done by the pharmacists and alumni of the 
school. Each one can increase this effort by 
selecting bright, promising students while 
they are beginning their coursework in high 
school, encouraging them by allowing them 
to work in local pharmacies, and directing 
their attention to the attractive careers 
available in the profession. 

The committee commends the faculty iu 
recognizing the specific problem of leading 
students in the School of Pharmacy to better 
scholastic attainment. This is a matter of 
stimulating leadership and encouragement. 
A study of failures and drop-outs, not only 
in the School of Pharmacy but in other 
kinds of colleges and universities, shows 
that there is far too much wasted time and 
expense on the part of the students who 
failed to meet scholastic obligations in spite 
of ability well-known on the basis of modern 
admission regulations. 

The Committee called attention to a fairly 
serious problem in which the North Carolina 



28 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Pharmaceutical Association has taken steps 
to be of help. It refers to the difficulty of 
some pharmacy students each summer in ob- 
taining positions in pharmacies to obtain 
the practical experience required before a 
student can qualify for his licensing exam- 
ination. Students still face a problem in 
which experience is required and they can't 
get experience required to obtain a position 
and experience can't be gained without ob- 
taining a first position. The students do not 
expect the salaries of licensed pharmacists 
for this work. It may be necessary for phar- 
macists to make available an extra position 
solely for the purpose of helping the student 
meet his requirements. 

The faculty and committee members dis- 
cussed the merits of the Quarter System as 
compared to the Semester System. It would 
not be easy to change back to the Quarter 
System in the School of Pharmacy when 
other units of the University are on the 
Semester System. The members of the com- 
mittee favored the Quarter System because 
they believed this system would allow stu- 
dents to take fewer subjects at a time and 
to meet classes daily for each subject. This 
concentration on fewer subjects at a time 
should make for better grades and fewer 
drop-outs. 

Examinations were discussed with a num- 
ber of faculty members taking part. Some 
committee members felt that quizzes given 
more often and covering less material would 
help encourage students to study daily in- 
stead of waiting until a few days before a 
big quiz and then studying all night. 

The Committee met with the senior class 
at 11:00 A.M. for one hour. The following 
suggestions and comments were made by stu- 
dents to the Committee and do not neces- 
sarily have the endorsement of the Com- 
mittee. 

1. Increase in the teaching of merchandis- 
ing problems ; advertising ; sale of sun- 
dries, trusses, vaporizers, cameras, and 
surgical appliances; displays; and sales- 
manship. 

2. More attention be given to ethics and 
the teaching of ethics. 

(Dean Brecht explained to the committee 
later that Ethics was applied and taught in 



each course as applicable instead of as a 
single subject). 

3. Continuing study of the curriculum ree 
ommended to cut out any overlapping of 
subjects. 

4. Possibility of two year pre-pharmacy 

and three year pharmacy. 

5. Professors rotate courses on three year 
basis. Students felt this would develop 
new approaches and keep courses up-to- 
date. 

6. A report on the work of graduates after 
first year. This would assist the School 
in evaluating presently offered courses. 

7. Students were overwhelmingly in favor 
of quizzes at regular class time instead 
of at night if questions were such as 
could be answered during time allotted. 

8. Visit to different types of stores in 
small groups to learn types of opera- 
tions. 

9. One student wanted to know why Or- 
ganic Chemistry of the School of Phar- 
macy is not accepted when transfers are 
made to the School of Medicine. 

10. Include more business English in Busi- 
ness Management as partial course. 

11. Night quizzes should be so prepared that 
students could complete them in one 
hour. 

The committee met for one hour before 
lunch to study the comments and sugges- 
tions of the students. The more inportant of 
these are listed above. 

During a two hour afternoon session mem- 
bers of the committee discussed the com- 
ments and suggestions of the students, as 
well as their own, with the Dean and As- 
sistant Dean. 

Assistant Dean Chambers closed the meet- 
ing with a plea for increased employment of 
undergraduates during summer vacation. 
This work is very important to these stu- 
dents because it will help them learn what 
Pharmacy really is. Please give serious 
thought to using one of these students in 
your store this summer. 

In closing this report our group requests 
the carryover of a present committee mem- 
ber for the purpose of co-ordinating the 
work of and giving valuable experience to 
the new committee. 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



29 



Report of the Legislative 
Committee 

Wade A. Gilliam, Chairman 
Your Legislative Committee does not have 
any specific recommendations relative to any 
proposed Legislation for the 1963 General 
Assembly. 

The Committee is aware of the fact that 
there may yet appear on the scene, proposed 
legislation affecting Pharmacy. If so I am 
sure that members of the Committee, who- 
ever they may be, will be on the alert and 
that, you will be promptly notified. May I 
say just here, that if there is any proposed 
legislation pro or con affecting Pharmacy, 
please be prepared to talk with your Legis- 
lators and express your feelings. Keep an 
eye on legislation and let yourself be heard 
when it is necessary. 

To illustrate what I mean by this 
let us go back to 1959. As you will remem- 
ber, Mr. Henley introduced the two bills, 
which were to set forth in the law, what the 
Board of Pharmacy was doing and is doing 
by regulation. The Bills passed the House 
but were defeated in the Senate Judiciary 




Reaco B-Complex with C. Tablets 

$20.00 Doz. 100s 

Reaco A & D Capsules $10.00 Doz. loos 

A. E. P. Tablets $24.00 Doz. 100s 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 10 mg. Tablets 

$2.25 per 100 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 25 mg. Tablets 

$4.50 per 100 

Pyridoxine HC1 (B6) 50 mg. Tablets 

$7.50 per 100 

Reavita Capsules 
Neo-Reavita 

Your cooperation in stocking 
Reaco Products is appreciated 

REACO PRODUCTS 

P. O. Box 2747 
West Durham, North Carolina 



$34.80 Doz. 100s 
$28.00 per 1000 
$36.00 Doz. 100s 



Committee by one vote. The proposed legis- 
lation was re-endorsed by the 1960 Conven- 
tion and ordered referred to the N.C.P.A. 
Legislative Committee. Your Legislative 
Committee prepared to act subject to a mail 
ballot approval of the two Bills by the mem- 
bers of the N.C.P.A. An overwhelming ma- 
jority of the ballots received were in favor 
of the proposed Bills, but the sad picture is 
this: Less than 50% of the ballots were 
returned. This indicated an attitude of in- 
difference on the part of the pharmacists 
throughout the State. Rep. John Henley 
stated that the Bills were defeated in 1959, 
not so much by the opposition but by the 
apathy and indifference on the part of phar- 
macists. 

With the poor response to the mail ballot 
in 1961, it was deemed unwise to introduce 
the proposed Bills in 1961 Legislature. 

My reason for giving this background is 
to emphasize very forcibly, the fact, that un- 
less the pharmacists in the State wake up 
and become more interested in what is going 
on in the Legislature, good legislation will 
fail to be enacted into law and some bad 
legislation will get through successfully. 

This is not only true at the State level, 
but at the National level. Proposed Na- 
tional legislation of vital interest to phar- 
macists are H. B. 4222 and S. 909 intro- 
duced by Rep. King and Sen. Anderson re- 
spectively, which provide health care serv- 
ices for the aged through the Social Security 
System. 

The Kerr-Mills Law provides for admin- 
istration of health needed for the aged at 
the State level. State Governments are qual- 
ified to more adequately administer health 
services to the aged at the point of greatest 
need. The Legislative Committee feels that 
the implementation of the Kerr-Mills Law is 
the best answer to the problem of health 
services for the aged. We suggest that the 
N.C.P.A. Besolutions Committee give con- 
sideration to a resolution endorsing the im- 
plementation of the Kerr-Mills Law by the 
General Assembly of the State of North 
Carolina, and that the N.C.P.A. oppose 
H. E. 4222 and S. 909. 

We urge you also to be on the alert for 
other proposed National legislation of vital 
interest. Pharmacists should give careful 
study to the merits of SJ Bes. 159 and HJ 



30 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Res. 636 (Quality Stabilization Bill). The 
N.A.R.D. is listed as one of more than fifty 
organizations supporting this legislation. 
Also, we suggest the Committee on Resolu- 
tions formulate a resolution in support of 
SJ Res. 159 and HJ Res. 636. 

The outlook for enactment of this legis- 
lation is much brighter than similar-type 
legislation introduced in the past. 

In conclusion, we urge all North Carolina 
pharmacists to take a more active part in 
local, state and national legislative matters. 
Do not hesitate to express your views to your 
state and national legislators. These men so- 
licit and welcome your opinions. 

Report of Public Relations 
Committee 

James W. Harrison, Chairman 
Mr. President, Fellow Members : 

The report of this Committee will deal in 
the most general way with a somewhat in- 
complete summation of some of the activi- 
ties of members attempting a public rela- 
tions program. 

This committee regrets that it was unable 
to hold one or more regular meetings dur- 
ing the year in which it might have formu- 
lated and set in motion an adaptable pro- 
gram of public relations. As a consequence, 
it may be concluded that we have, as a com- 
mittee, shunted our duties onto the broad 
shoulders of our executive secretary and his 
office staff. In this Ave have fared better 
than we might have fared. Practically 
every communication you have received from 
the secretary during the year has had one 
or more ideas for maintaining good relations 
with the public. On the whole, you have re- 
sponded splendidly and taken those ideas 
and adapted them to your own operation. 

Much has been accomplished, but much 
more could and must be accomplished. Some 
of you have participated in National Phar- 
macy Week. Our own Phil Link placed 
fourth in the APhA Window Display Con- 
test. Several pharmacists have been honored 
by civic groups; some have entered the 
Academy of Pharmacy for the first time, and 
other members have maintained their mem- 
bership by their religious, civic, pharmaceu- 
tical and other activities. Many have taken 



advantage of the aid offered by various 
manufacturers, especially the newly created 
or re-promoted speakers bureaus. Drug Clubs 
and local and sectional pharmaceutical so- 
cieties have done outstanding work during 
the year. Many groups and individual phar- 
macists have persuaded, perhaps by cajolery, 
but I am inclined to believe, by their own 
exuberance and sincerity, the seemingly im- 
possible in prompting the press of the state 
to view pharmacy in a more favorable light. 

A splendid idea has been advanced by 
Marion Edmonds of Greensboro and has 
been and even now acted upon. I refer to 
the plan by which a drug club or society or 
other group underwrites the expenses of a 
member of the press in a visit to a major 
pharmaceutical manufacturer where he or 
she will learn firsthand how private enter- 
prise in that particular field is making pos- 
sible the best health welfare the world has 
ever known. 

That this idea was once attempted sev- 
eral years ago by a drug club takes away 
not one whit of credit to Mr. Edmonds. 
Rather does it make his efforts to shine 
more brightly because he followed through 
while the other failed through lethargy, lost 
interest, failure to get concerted action or 
some other reason. 

Needless to say, this host, the pharmaceu- 
tical manufacturer need not put on his Sun- 
day suit for these knights of the typewriter. 
The everyday activities will be revealing 
enough. 

Much has been done in achieving better 
relations with the public; much more must 
be done. The public is a most unpredictable 
creature. To arouse its interest, to satisfy 
its tastes, to impress or persuade it, will call 
for all the art you possess if your relations 
with it are to be good. 

In recent years the public image of phar- 
macy has undergone some changes. Some of 
these changes have been of deteriorating na- 
ture much like that of a devotee discovering 
his idol has feet of clay. 

It is not the purpose of this report to 
criticize the pharmacist, the manufacturer, 
the distributor, or any segment of the in- 
dustry for this condition. Nor is it an at- 
tempt to shift the blame for this condition 
on any power-mad politician or legislator, 
even though we may sincerely believe those 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



31 



people have animosity toward the entire in- 
dustry that springs from their own unselfish 
ends as much as it stems from unfounded 
suppositions. 

However, we must take another look at our 
own actions. Have we used all our talent 
and our art to create a favorable image of 
pharmacy in the senses of the public? Are 
we truly mindful of the fact that to the pub- 
lic the pharmacist is PHARMACY? Do we 
realize what a wonderful opportunity this 
belief of the public presents to us to mold 
this unpredictable creature to view us as a 
necessary member of the health team that 
contributes to its welfare? Do we serve the 
public and the community to the utmost of 
our professional ability? Do we fully note 
the changing competitive conditions and dis- 
card those traditional methods that are 
obsolete and no longer applicable to today's 
conditions ? 

The answer is that some of us are creating 
a false image by sins of omission more so 
than by sins of commission. There could 
come a time when it will be too late to re- 
pent. This fact needs no elaboration. On 



STROTHER 
DRUG COMPANY 

of Richmond, Inc. 
3700 Saunders Avenue 

POWERS-TAYLOR DRUG CO. 
Richmond, Va. 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 

Full Line 

Full Service 

Member of 
Druggists Service Co. 

National Wholesale 
Druggists Association 

For Best Service Call Us 
Collect 

353-2771 

After Hours Call 

353-2777 



the whole, the majority of pharmacists do 
create a favorable image. 

In North Carolina we are more fortunate 
than pharmacists in many other states. 
Here we enjoy to a greater degree the old 
time respect, regard and trust of the public. 
Here the image of pharmacy has not deteri- 
orated so much. This does not mean that 
our people are more provincial or less sophis- 
ticated than others ; it could mean that we 
have done more to earn that respect, regard 
and trust. Actually people everywhere on 
this continent are motivated by the same 
impulses, senses and passions, differing only 
in minor ways due to climate, occupation, 
race, wealth, or dependence on others. 

Despite this condition in our own state, 
it would be like chasing a shadow, or like a 
pebble talking back to the sea for us to 
think we have King's right to a favorable 
image. Relations with the public begin on 
contact and it is a continuous and continual 
condition that must be constantly nourished 
to maintain it. 

A public relations program for the phar- 
macist may be adopted for your use from 
the devices created by the resources and 
brains of the entire industry. You may 
combine them with the fruits of your own 
creative ability. Indeed, such a program will 
naturally include your own strong sense of 
professional responsibility; your own sense 
of responsibility to the public interest. 

Many manufacturers have advertising and 
promotional programs crying to be used. 
They are yours for the asking. As a mem- 
ber of this Association you have access to 
tried and proved devices in the form of dis- 
plays, leaflets, speeches and other pertinent 
material. Not only this, but you will have 
free use of the resources and talent of the 
officers of the Association as well as the aid 
of any future Public Relations Committee. 

Your personal actions will be a major fac- 
tor in your public relations. Make yourself 
available. Let the public know you as a 
good citizen, a stalwart for clean community 
life. Take part in the religious life of your 
community, whether you worship Jehovah, 
Allah, Aba Inki, or God's beauty. Be up- 
right and ethical in dealing with your fel- 
lows. Be a reliable source of information in 
your role as pharmaceutical consultant to 
the busy doctor. Be an active participant in 



32 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



the affairs of your professional societies and 
associations at the local, sectional, state and 
national levels. 

Vigorously communicate the true facts 
about pharmacy to the public and you create 
the proper psychological attitude in the pub- 
lic at each and every contact. Always re- 
member that pharmacy, now or at any time, 
is exactly as its practitioners make it. It's 
as simple as that. 

* * # # 

This Committee is conscious of the feeling 
in some quarters that a trained and salaried 
public relations staff might function better 
for this Association. This idea deserves 
your serious consideration. It is our belief 
that, should such an agency be engaged, a 
pharmacist wholly conversant with phar- 
macy's problems have a voice in its function. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James W. Harrison, Chairman 

J. R. Curtis 

T. M. Holland 

W. R, McDonald III 

W. Moss Salley Jr. 

BOARD OF PHARMACY 

The 81st annual report of the N. C. Board 
of Pharmacy, as presented by H. C. McAllis- 
ter, Secretary-Treasurer, is published in its 
entirely beginning on page 68. 

The privilege of the floor was extended to 
Prentiss George of Kannapolis, who dis- 
cussed the results of a survey involving the 
sale of drugs by some non-drug outlets in the 
state. 

Following a general discussion, motion by 
Pike-Slesinger was passed that the Asso- 
ciation 's executive secretary obtain a state- 
ment from major pharmaceutical manu- 
facturers and the state 's wholesalers as to 
their sales policies with special reference to 
non-pharmacy outlets. 

The third session was concluded by a 
screening of a film, ' ' The Misery Mer- 
chants, " by R. T. Austin, District Sales 
Manager of Glenbrook Laboratories. 

FOURTH SESSION 

An 8:30 A.M. business-starter breakfast 
helped to get the fourth NCPA business ses- 
sion underway with about 75 members and 



guests present. Thomas J. Ham, Jr. intro- 
duced Jeff Henley of Richmond, a past 
president of the NARD and the Virginia 
Pharmaceutical Association. Mr. Henley, a 
native of North Carolina, said he learned his 
"3 R's" at an early age — reading, riting 
and the Road to Richmond. ' ' 

Following some introductory remarks by 
Roger Sloop, NCPA Chairman of the N. C. 
Dental Formulary, a dental member of the 
committee, Dr. Charles M. Westrick of Win- 
ston-Salem, gave an interesting report of 
the value of dental formularies, of the back- 
ground work leading to revision of the 
Second Edition of the N. C. Dental Form- 
ulary and of the growing cooperation exist- 
ing between the dental and pharmaceutical 
professions. 

Editor 's Note : The Second Edition of the 
N. C. Dental Formulary was delivered by 
the publisher in August; is in general use 
in this and other states. The N. C. Dental 
Society purchased 800 fillers for binders re- 
maining from the first edition. 

CANCER CHEMOTHERAPY 

Late developments in ' ' New Agents in 
Cancer Chemotherapy" was presented by Dr. 
Wayne Rundles of the Duke University Med- 
ical Center. Introduced by I. T. Reamer, 
Dr. Rundles' presentation was mainly by 
graphs and charts, which highlighted the re- 
sults being obtained from a limited number 
of cancer-inhibiting drugs. 

PHARMACEUTICAL MARKETING 

The address "Pharmaceutical Marketing 
— Today and Tomorrow ' ' by guest speaker 
W. J. Wishing, Divisional Sales Manager for 
Smith Kline & French Laboratories, Avas 
published in the June, 1962 issue of The 
Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, pages 7-11- 
13-15-17-32. 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE 

Edward Haupt of Newton suggested that 
pharmacists assist pharmacy students in 
need of practical experience by setting up 
a summer rotation program whereby the stu- 
dent would work a month at each location. 
Since some students find it difficult to locate 
employment during the summer months, it 
was Mr. Haupt 's belief that the 30-day rota- 
tion plan would be a practical answer to the 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



33 



problem. Members of the Association will 
be queried on their willingness to cooperate 
in such a plan. 

FIFTH SESSION 

The fifth and final NCPA business session 
was opened at 2 P.M. on April 10 by Presi- 
dent Hall. The first order of business was a 
report by Thomas J. Ham, Jr., Chairman of 
the NCPA-Institute Endowment Fund. 

NCPA Endowment Fund 

Thomas J. Ham, Jr., Chairman 
Mr. President, Members of the Association, 
Ladies and Gentlemen : 

From 5 to 8 to 12 to 16. That has been 
the pattern of your support of the Endow- 
ment Fund during the past three years. 

My figures refer to dollars with three 
zeroes. 

My report to you one year ago placed 
the Fund balance at $12,700; today it is 
$16,800. 

We are making headway, slowly to be 
sure, but headway nevertheless. 



Lift Off! 

Now is the time to countdown 

Make all your "risks" sound 

Blast-off with A.D.I. 

Security-wise, you'll soar 
sky high- 



JNSURANCE/CO 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 




CONSULT OUR AGENT 

F. O. Bowman 

North Carolina State Agent 

P. O. Box 688 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 



We are still far short of our immediate 
goal of $50,000 but we are approaching the 
half-way point. So, in the months ahead, 
let us all make an investment in the future 
of Pharmacy by making a liberal contribu- 
tion to the NCPA Endowment Fund. 

Sometime during the year the committee 
will write you in more detail about the 
Fund. In the meantime, we continue the 
memorial program, the student aid program 
and specials, such as the policy of one whole- 
sale house in contributing $100 as a me- 
morial to deceased members of the firm. 

The $1,000 willed to the Fund by the late 
Thomas H. May of Wake Forest has been 
received. We hope this generous gesture on 
the part of Mr. May will strike a responsive 
chord among others in our Association. 

Harold V. Day, Chairman of the Papers & 
Queries Committee, commented on the 
activities of his committee, which has de- 
voted its efforts to compiling information 
about ' ' Price Differentials. ' ' 

Mr. Day reported some information had 
been transmitted to the Federal Trade Com- 
mission. Also, the FTC is studying informa- 
tion obtained from various pharmaceutical 
manufacturers relating to their sales policies, 
discounts and rebates. Recommendations and 
action by FTC will be delayed due to tre- 
mendous quantity of collected information 
on hand. 

The Association 's recommended policy of 
"one price to all" was reemphasized. 

JUDICIAL COUNCIL 

Roger A. McDuffie, Chairman of the Judi- 
cial Council, distributed copies of some sug- 
gested rules to implement the Association's 
Code of Ethics. Mr. McDuffie said copies of 
the rules plus the district judicial council 
setup would be mailed to all members of the 
NCPA (Note: this was done during the 
summer of 1962). 

COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Next on the agenda were committee re- 
ports as follows: 

Inter-Professional Relations — Dr. Albert 
Jowdy 

Public Health and Welfare — W. Latham 
West 
Constitution and By-Laws — E. R. Fuller 

Membership — Ben Harward (read by Hoy 
Moose) 



34 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Report of the Interprofessional 
Relations Committee 

Dr. A. W. Jowdy, Chairman 
Mr. President, Mr. Secretary and fellow 
members of the association. 

The Committee On Interprofessional Re- 
lations was composed of Dr. Earl T. Brown, 
Mr. W. G. Dudley, Jr., Mr. Claude U. 
Paoloni, Mr. James A. Way, Jr., and Dr. 
A. W. Jowdy. 

At a meeting of the committee in Chapel 
Hill, it was decided that this year, your 
committee should concern itself first with 
establishing liaison with its counterpart in 
the Medical and Dental Societies. It was the 
feeling of the committee that even though 
the most effective interprofessional relations 
must take place at the local level, there were 
wide areas where effective liaison at the 
state level could prove beneficial to the phar- 
macist, to the physician, to the dentist and 
last, but not least, to the patient. 

Correspondence with the Medical Society 
revealed that an interprofessional relations 
committee did not exist. The work which 
has fallen into this category, however, has 
been most effectively handled between the 
executive secretaries of the two organiza- 
tions. Very cordial letters were received from 
Mr. James T. Barnes and Dr. John R. Ker- 
nodle, Executive Secretary and President, 
respectively, of the Medical Society of the 
State of North Carolina, expressing interest 
in our venture. 

A letter from Dr. Norman Ross, president 
of the N. C. Dental Society, stated the ap- 
pointment of Dr. Charles M. Westrick and 
his Dental Formulary Committee as repre- 
sentatives of the Dental Society. 

In addition to these activities, letters were 
sent at random to a number of pharmacists 
over the state seeking their advice as to proj- 
ects which could be jointly undertaken by 
this committee — and a number of worthwhile 
suggestions were received which (in the 
interest of time) will not be enumerated 
here. 

It is well to point out, that in all our cor- 
respondence, the emphasis has been on the 
positive — , that is emphasizing the need for 
close liaison between members of the health 
team for joint projects which would best 



serve the interest, not only of members of' 
the health team, but also the patient. 

It is unnecessary to enumerate the many 
activities undertaken by the individual drug 
clubs over the state in the field of interpro- 
fessional relations. Many have accomplished 
and are continuing to accomplish very 
worthwhile objectives in this most important 
field. 

However, for the interest of those who 
may desire possible topics or projects in the 
field of interprofessional relations, the f ol- 
lowing are listed. None, we might add are 
original or novel, but may serve as a starter 
for local or district societies: 

(a) Supply to Dentists, copies of the newly 
revised N. C. Dental Formulary, a re- ! 
port on which was given this morning 
by Dr. Westrick and Mr. Sloop. 

(b) Attempt to secure physicians and den- 
tists for speakers at pharmaceutical so- 1 
ciety meetings, especially men to speak 
on their specialty. 

(c) Supply to physicians and dentists in- 1 
formation relative to Narcotic, FDA 
and State-laws and regulations affect- 
ing the prescribing and the dispensing 
of medicines. 

(d) Joint meetings, if possible, between 
members of the allied health profession 
organizations with topics for discussion 
which are of mutual interest. 

(e) Planned joint meeting between the 
grievance committees of the allied 
health organizations. This is a delicate 
area and an important requisite would 
be for the respective chairmen to meet 
privately at some time prior to the joint 
committee meeting to agree upon rules 
and procedures. 

We of the committee urge each of you to 
work with your local groups in Interprofes- 
sional Relations. 

Respectively submitted : 
Earl T. Brown 
W. G. Dudley, Jr. 
Claude U. Paoloni 
James A. Way, Jr. 
A. W. Jowdy, Chairman 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



35 



Public Health and Welfare 

W. Latham West, Chairman 
The Committee on Public Health and Wel- 
fare does not have much to report on the 
active working of this committee since the 
adjournment of the 1961 session of the Gen- 
eral Assembly. However, I can report on 
the results of the combined efforts of The 
North Carolina Medical Society, The North 
Carolina Dental Society, The North Carolina 
Association of Hospital Administrators and 
The North Carolina Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation to enact legislation intended to im- 
plement the provisions of the Kerr-Mills 
Act which was passed by the Congress in 
1960, intended to provide medical care for 
the aged and aging. 

At the time of the meeting of the N.C.- 
P.A. in Greensboro last year, I reported to 
you that legislation which implemented the 
Kerr-Mills Act had been introduced into the 
General Assembly by Dr. Eachel Davis, a 
member of the legislature from Lenoir 
County, and that the legislation known as 
"An Act To Provide Medical Care To The 
Aging" had been sent to the Health Commit- 




HOT COLDS FIGHTER 

Soltice is the modern Quick 
Rub that's coming up fast. 
Heavy TV exposure will 
make it more popular than 
ever with the fans this sea- 
son. Book it into your store 
and watch the action. 



THE CHATTANOOGA MEDICINE CO. 

CHATTANOOGA 9, TENNESSEE 



tee of the House of Representatives for its 
study and recommendations. On April 26, 
1961, the Health Committee held hearings 
on the bill and persons and groups who 
either favored or opposed the enactment of 
the legislation, appeared before the commit- 
tee to express their views. I appeared be- 
fore this committee and expressed the sup- 
port of Pharmacy for this legislation. After 
this public hearing the Health Committee of 
the House of Representatives gave the bill 
a favorable report. The House of Repre- 
sentatives passed the legislation and it was 
sent on to the State Senate. It was imme- 
diately sent to the Health Committee of the 
Senate and was given considerable study by 
this committee. However, certain concen- 
trated opposition brought about the defeat 
of the bill by this Senate Health Committee. 
So the combined effort of Medicine, Den- 
tistry, Pharmacy and Hospital Administra- 
tors to bring medical aid to the aged in 
North Carolina was defeated. More than 
thirty states have implemented the Federal 
Act with satisfactory results. 

During the past twelve months, the Ken- 
nedy administration in Washington has used 
every means possible to bring about the pas- 
sage of legislation whereby medical care for 
the aging would be under social security. 
This is essentially the same legislation which 
President Kennedy introduced and spon- 
sored in the 1960 session of the Congress 
when he was a member of the U. S. Senate. 
This concept of medical care for the aging 
was defeated in the 1960 Congress and the 
Kerr-Mills bill was passed instead. The 
presidential election of 1960 elevated Sena- 
tor Kennedy to the Presidency of the United 
States and the new Chief Executive has 
shown no disposition to retreat from his 
campaign promise, advocating the estab- 
lishment of a medical care program for the 
aged as a feature of social security. All 
areas of the Federal Government which has 
to do with Public Health and Welfare have 
organized and have used every effort to en- 
act this type of legislation for the care of 
the aging. These government agencies are 
joined by the Labor Unions, retired govern- 
ment employees, retired teachers, social wel- 
fare workers and others in support of health 
care for the aging through social security. 






36 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



The problem is not simply the question of 
whether some 10 to 15 million aged and ag- 
ing Americans are to get assistance in meet- 
ing health problems but whether the medical 
services of the Nation — the finest in the 
world — are to remain free or whether 
they are to fall under the domination and 
dictation of the Federal Government. 

No one denies that thousands of aged 
Americans are not receiving the medical and 
hospital care they want and need. But 
neither are thousands of American babies, 
and thousands of young and middle-aged 
Americans. If medical care for those over 
65 years of age is right and proper, then 
free medical care for those under 65 is 
equally right and proper. If Congress is 
pressured into granting it to one group to- 
day, it is foolish to suppose it will resist the 
pressure to grant it to the other tomor- 
row. The point is that medical care for the 
aging under social security is simply a first 
step — an opening wedge. The ultimate goal 
is the complete federalization of the Na- 
tion's drug, medical and hospital services — ■ 
a measure that the welfare-statists have 
been advocating since the days of Wagner- 
Murray-Dingell bill. 

The first objection to the President's pro- 
gram of medical care is that it Avould be 
the first step toward socialized medicine for 
all Americans. 

The second objection is that, — what the 
Federal Government pays for, it eventually 
controls. The advocates of medical care for 
the aged, of course, deny that this is the 
case, but there is a long list of examples to 
prove that this is true. Wherever the Fed- 
eral Government provides the funds — for 
municipal airports, for housing and slum 
clearance, for education and research grants, 
for farm programs — it eventually attaches 
conditions and sets standards. A recent ex- 
ample is the executive order relative to de- 
segregation of all school in those population 
explosion areas due to national defense ac- 
tivities, where Federal funds are supplied to 
assist in building and operating the local 
school systems. It can be argued that it 
would be wrong for the Federal Government 
not to supervise and control operations 
where Federal Aid is furnished. However, 
the fact remains that Federal subsidizing 
means Federal control. 



A third objection stems from the financial 
aspects of the social security system itself. 
In the first 25 years of its existence social 
security took in some $70 billion through 
compulsory taxes on the earnings of Amer- 
ican workers. During the same time it paid 
out $50 billion in benefits. At the end of 
25 years it had $20 billion left in assets, and 
at the present rate of benefits it now has 
$360 billion in obligations. In other words, 
for every dollar that social security now has 
in the till, it must eventually pay out $18.00 
in benefits. This means among other things, 
that the Nation's younger workers, who gen- 
erally need every penny to meet present ob- 
ligations, must be taxed the rest of their 
lives to pay for free medical care for the 
aged and aging Americans, including mil- 
lions who are able and willing to care for 
themselves. 

A fourth objection to the medical care 
plan is that it is a compulsory program for 
which all Americans covered by social secur- 
ity must pay, regardless of whether they 
want or need the benefits provided. 

There has been such a powerful propa- 
ganda campaign in behalf of medical care 
for the aging within the last few years that 
opposing it is like opposing motherhood, 
patriotism and virtue itself. Nothing 
touches the heart of the American people 
more forcefully than the picture of aged 
men and women who find themselves, after 
a lifetime of toil, incapable of providing the 
medical care and hospitalization they need. 
The plight of these aged Americans is an 
evil that the Nation, the States and the 
communities of America must work to over- 
come just as they work to overcome ju- 
venile crime and ignorance and poverty in 
all of its other forms. However, to maintain 
that the only answer is to force all Ameri- 
cans into a compulsory system of Federal 
medical insurance, is to advocate a system 
that would inevitably become a greater evil 
than the one it is designed to remedy. 

In closing this report and these observa- 
tions, I can tell you that reports from Wash- 
ington during the last two or three weeks, 
indicate that certain key members of the 
House of Eepresentatives are considering 
certain revisions to the proposed legislation 
for medical care for the aged, under social 
security. If President Kennedy agrees to 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



37 



accept these revisions, he will have a good 
chance of winning at least two more votes 
in the House Ways and Means Committee — ■ 
thus giving him a 13-12 margin instead of 
the 14-11 line-up now against him. If this 
compromise is accomplished and the House 
of Representatives passes the compromise 
legislation, there is little doubt that the 
Senate will pass it with several votes to 
spare. Then, with a foot in the door, com- 
pulsory medical insurance is on its way. 

Report of By-Laws and 
Constitution Committee 

Edwin R. Fuller, Chairman 

Among the many committee appointments 
made by your President to carry on the work 
of our association during the past year, was 
a committee charged with the responsibility 
of revising our Constitution and By-Laws. 
As you are well aware, many of them date 
back to their adoption more than 80 years 
ago. 

This was to have been a comprehensive 



rr 



Make McGowU 

For Labels -in Rolls or Flats 
Physicians 1^ Blanks and Files 

Drug Boxes - Call Checks 
Drug and Delivery Envelopes 



all Styled, a&td Galatd. 




Specializing in Labels for Drug Stares 



Clifford P. Berry, Representative 
P. O. Box 306, Charlotte 1, N. C. 



report of this committee with specific recom- 
mendations for your consideration in mod- 
ernizing these instruments that governs our 
associations policies. However, as was 
pointed out in the very fine address by Presi- 
dent Hall yesterday morning this has proven 
to be quite an undertaking. The task has 
been magnified by the conditions resulting 
from the ever changing pattern of drug dis- 
tribution. After consultation with your exec- 
utive committee it is deemed advisable that 
we appear on the program to ask for more 
time to study the needed changes. 

Those of you who were privileged to hear 
Mr. Warren Lansdoune at the business ses- 
sion on Monday morning will recall his ref- 
erence to the changes made in the state of 
Michigan and 11 other states whereby, they, 
as a matter of policy, affiliate with their 
local-state and national associations under a 
federated membership plan. Frankly, we 
would like very much to watch carefully the 
progress of these pioneers in this direction. 

There are in our own state some local 
clubs that have adopted or are considering 
the adoption of their own versions of this 
unified membership system. As we observe 
the seemingly multitude of problems that 
confront us in Pharmacy today we become 
more and more alert to the fact that all ot 
them — every problem that arises — is caused 
because some person or persons who depends 
upon the drug industry for their livelihood 
fails to accept their responsibility as an in- 
dividual part of this great profession. Every 
human being reflects either credit or dis- 
credit upon those with whom he associates. 

It is indeed gratifying to hear the learned 
speakers at this convention express their 
optimism for our future. I sincerely believe 
we will become stronger as the moral fibre 
of the individual becomes stronger and when 
we determine what course to chart for our 
future. 

It is for these reasons that we trust that 
President -Elect Steveson will see fit to 
re-appoint this committee for the coming 
year. In the meantime, I am confident that 
this committee or any committee appointed 
by your President will welcome any advice, 
suggestions or recommendations from you 
the individual member. We need your help 
in deciding what our future will be. 



38 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Report of Membership Committee 

Ben R. Harward, Chairman 
Our organized membership campaign for 
the NCPA began in 1956 and has been con- 
ducted annually since then. Since most of 
the membership prospects come to our at- 
tention through the North Carolina Board of 
Pharmacy and the Institute of Pharmacy, 
necessarily most of the work of recruiting 
is carried on through our office in Chapel 
Hill. Each year letters are mailed to newly 
licensed pharmacists and other prospects, 
explaining the benefits of membership in the 
Pharmaceutical Association and urging them 
to join. Personal contacts are also made 
when practical to do so. There are 72 mem- 
bers in the present graduating class of the 
School of Pharmacy — the largest four year 
class in the history of the school. Many of 
this group when licensed will join the N.C.- 
P.A. 

The weak link in our membership cam- 
paign has been pharmacists coming to us 
from other states. Many of them are not 
familiar with our operation or with the 
facilities at Chapel Hill. To rectify this, the 
Association's executive committee has au- 
thorized Secretary W. J. Smith to offer free 
membership to such individuals for the re- 
mainder of the year in which they are 
licensed to practice pharmacy in North Caro- 
lina, with the understanding they will be 
billed for dues the following year. 

Our minimum goal of new members an- 
nually is 100. During the year 1961 we were 
able to obtain ninety-six percent of this 
minimum as compared to eighty-five percent 
in 1960. The present total membership of 
the N.C.P.A. as of March 19, 1962, is 1284 
members. From January 1st through March 
19th of this year, forty-one new members 
have affiliated with our organization. If 
this present rate of new members being 
added continues throughout the year, we 
should have our largest new membership 
ever for 1962. Let us all dedicate ourselves 
to the task of getting every pharmacist to 
be a member. 

RESOLUTIONS 

The Eesolutions, as acted upon at the 81st 
convention, were published in the May, 1962, 
issue of The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy, 
pages 15-17. 



J. C. Jackson, acting on behalf of N. 0. | 
McDowell, Jr., who was absent, presented \ 
the report of the Committee on the Presi- 
dent's Address. 

Report of Committee on the 
President's Address 

N. 0. McDowell, Jr., Chairman 

We, the committee to review the presi- 
dent's address, submit the following report: 

First, we commend President Hall for his 
outstanding leadership and his conscientious 
approach to the duties of his office during 
the past year. His personal sacrifice in mak- 
ing the travel necessary to attend the many 
district meetings and his timely message 
presented at these meetings shows a dedi- 
cated interest in the betterment of our pro- 
fession. 

We agree with his remarks regarding the 
meetings held during the past year with the 
faculty of the School of Pharmacy and with 
the Board of Pharmacy in that it is always 
easy to criticize when ignorant of the true 
facts. It is hoped that future Association 
presidents will follow President Hall's ex- 
ample and see that such meetings are con- 
tinued. 

We agree with President Hall that our 
Association must be made stronger and that 
it deserves the support of all its members. 

We concur with our president in that to 
better our image and to achieve the ends 
which can save our profession we must: 

(1) Continue the fight for Fair Trade, build 
more and stronger local drug clubs, support 
the Association's efforts to better our pub- 
lic relations and to review our prescription 
pricing systems. 

(2) Strive to secure capable students for 
our school and to endeavor to aid in their 
apprentice education in a manner befitting 
the high standards of the profession. 

(3) Work in every way possible to secure the 
defeat of the King-Anderson Bill which can 
bring destruction to the profession through 
socialism. 

And further, we most heartily concur with 
President Hall's final remarks regarding 
ethics, laws and regulations and interpret 
his words to clearly appear as "handwriting 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



39 



on the wall" that we in Pharmacy must de- 
cide, here and now, that we all must rise 
above the many continued violations of 
ethics and laws, most of which stem from an 
overpowering desire to increase our material 
wealth, with our regard for the protection 
of the public health. Our president has 
shown us the way iu stating that this must 
be done by each of us, individually. It is 
also clear that he means we cannot afford to 
I wait, but must tackle the job at once if we 
. expect pharmacy to grow in statue in the 
i eyes of the public which it is dedicated to 
i serve. 

We sincerely feel that President Hall's 

addess can well serve as a guidepost for the 

future of pharmacy in North Carolina and 

I as much can point the way in the fight for 

more dedicated pharmaceutical service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. O. McDowell, Jr., Chairman 

J. C. Jackson 

Clarence E. Page, Jr. 

TIME & PLACE 

The Committee on Time & Place, Jesse M. 
Pike, Chairman, recommended Charlotte as 
the 1963 convention city but the report, was 
amended, leaving the final selection up to the 
Executive Committee after a telegram ar- 
rived with invitation from The Carolina 
Hotel, Pinehurst. 

Joseph P. Bland extended an invitation 
from High Point, which, after discussion, 
was referred to the Executive Committee for 
consideration. Note : The NCPA Executive 

' Committee later decided on Pinehurst (May 

:' 12-14) as the 1963 convention site. 

The Committee on Nominations, W. Dor- 

, sey Welch, Jr., submitted the following slate 
of officer-nominees, which was accepted with- 

\ out change : 

COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS 

W. D. Welch, Jr., Chairman 

For President: Hoy A. Moose of Mount 
Pleasant and O. K. Richardson of Boone. 

For First Vice-President : Harry A. Bar- 
ringer of Concord and I. T. Reamer of Dur- 
ham. 

For Second Vice-President: John W. S. 
Biggs of Greenville and W. T. Boone of 
Ahoskie. 



For Third Vice-President: Bobert H. Mil- 
ton of Salisbury and Earl H. Tate of Lenoir. 

For Member of the Executive Committee : 
(3-year term) C. Louis Shields of Jackson- 
ville and John J. Stevenson of Elizabeth 
City. 

For Member of the State Board of Phar- 
macy : (5-year term) David D. Claytor of 
Greensboro and Ernest J. Babil of Winston- 
Salem. 

For Directors of X. C. Pltarmaeeutical Re- 
search Foundation: F. J. Andrews of Dur- 
ham, Bowe B. Campbell of Taylorsville, F. 
Herman Cline of Charlotte, David B. Davis 
of Williamston, W. H. Houser of Cherryville, 
J. C. Jackson of Lumbertno, Boger A. Mc- 
Duffie of Greensboro, T. M. Stanbaek of 
Salisbury. 

OFFICER INSTALLATION 

At 4 P.M. the fifth NCPA business ses- 
sion was adjourned for ten minutes to be 
reconvened in the Virginia Dare Ballroom 
for the joint officer installation ceremony. 
Seated at the head table were Presidents 
Hall, Myers and Kimball. 

Mrs. Myers, president of The Woman's 
Auxiliary, and Leon Kimball, president of 
the TMA, each discussed the activities of 
their organizations, summarizing briefly the 
accomplishments during the past year (for 
details see Auxiliary sections in this Year 
Book). 

President Hall covered the highlights of 
the NCPA year just completed, then intro- 
duced J. Floyd Goodrich, who presented 
TMA Life Membership certificates to C. M. 
Andrews and W. J. Smith. 

John T. Stevenson was installed as Presi- 
dent of the NCPA; Mrs. Stevenson as presi- 
dent of The Woman's Auxiliary and Wil- 
liam P. Brewer, president of The Traveling 
Men 's Auxiliary. In turn, these newly in- 
stalled officers installed the following slates: 

NCPA : Hoy A. Moose of Mount Pleasant, 
first vice-president; Harry A. Barringer of 
Concord, second vice-president; and W. T. 
Boone of Ahoskie, third vice-president. 

Woman's Auxiliary: Mrs. David D. Clay- 
tor of Greensboro, first vice-president; Mrs. 
C. D. Blanton, Jr. of Kings Mountain, second 
vice-president; Mrs. W. H. Randall of Lil- 
lington, secretary; Mrs. Bobert H. Milton of 
Salisbury, treasurer; Mrs. L. B. Burris, Sr. 



40 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



of Valdese, historian; Mrs. M. B. Melvin of 
Raleigh, parliamentarian; and Mrs. Floyde 
F. Potter of Charlotte and Mrs. Leslie Myers 
of Winston-Salem, advisors. (Officer list on 
page 000) 

Traveling Men's Auxiliary: Forrest Mat- 
thews, Jr. of Raleigh, vice president; J. 
Floyd Goodrich of Durham, secretary- 
treasurer; and C. H. Smith of Charlotte, as- 
sistant secretary-treasurer. (See officer- 
board of governors list on page 60). 

At the conclusion of the formal installa- 
tion ceremony, which involved questions and 
answers, President Hall said : 



' ' Ladies and Gentlemen, you have heard 
the promises of the men and women who will: 
guide the NCPA and its Auxiliaries through 
the coming year. When they call on you for 
help, give them your cheerful cooperation. 
Or better still, offer them your assistance." ' 

As the final order of business, President 
Hall transferred the President's Pin to Mr., 
Stevenson and Mr. Stevenson, in turn, at- 
tached a Past President 's Pin to Mr. Hall 's 
coat lapel. 

With a pledge to fulfill the duties of the 
office to the best of his ability in the months 
ahead, President Stevenson adjourned the 
81st NCPA convention at 5:10 P.M. 



_=fi*^ ' 




«s- 



NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 
1962 MEMBERSHIP ROSTER 

(Corrected to September 1, 1962) 
Life Members are shown in bold face type. 



Adair, Walter Holmes — Roxboro 
Adams, Charles Edwin — Fuquay Springs 
Adams, James Walter — Asheville 
Adams, Leron Dale — Mount Holly 
Adams, Wilbur Royster — Carolina Beach 
Adams, William Robert, Jr. — Wilson 
Adkinson, Newton Frank — Avondale 
Ahlin, Bjorn — Sylva 
Airheart, Jack W. — Concord 
Akins, Frank T., Jr. — Asheville 
Albright, George Bishop — Salisbury 
Allen, Billy Thomas — Raleigh 
Allen, Harry H., Jr. — Cherryville 
Allen, Robert Eugene — Hickory 
Allen, William Franklin — Cherryville 
Ameen, John U. — Gastonia 
Amnions, Dallas Lee — Salisbury 
Amnions, Raymond M. — Red Springs 
Anders, G. Howard — Chapel Hill 
Anderson, Arthur Alexander — 

Martinsville, Va. 
Anderson, Carolyn Cox — Lansing, Michigan 
Anderson, Ernest R., Jr. — High Point 
Andes, Garrette Earl — Wadesboro 
ANDREWS, CHARLES McDONALD— 

Burlington 
Andrews, F. Jackson — Durham 
Andrews, John Puett — Winston-Salem 
Andrews, John Warren — Winston-Salem 
Andrews, Richard Homer — Burlington 
Arena, James Edward — Durham 
Arnold, Broddie Duke — Raleigh 
Ashworth, Ralph Hilliard — Cary 
Atkinson, Matthew James — Lumberton 
Aucello, Frances Marie — Fort Bragg 
Austell, Ronald Lowery — Shelby 
Austin, Beverly Newton — Morehead City 

— B— 

Bain, Jones Douglas, Jr. — Clayton 
Baker, Walter Presley — Raeford 
Balas, John B. — Charlotte 
Ball, Dorothy Reaves — Fayetteville 
Ball, Harold Lee — Fayetteville 
Bane, Gordon H. — Concord 
Banner, Robert Dale — Spruce Pine 
Barber, Robert W. — Raleigh 
Barbour, Joseph Parker — Burlington 



Barbour, Joseph P., Jr. — Burlington 

Barbour, Robert Layton — Burlington 

Barbrey, Herman Sutton, Jr. — Raleigh 

Barefoot, Lexie Glenn — Asheville 

Barger, Charles Glenn — Raleigh 

Barlow, Edward R. — Durham 

Barnett, Charles Mason — Henderson 

Barnett, Frank, Jr. — Henderson 

Barnett, Jinimie — Henderson 

Barringer, Harry Alexander — Concord 

Barringer, John Marshall — Carthage 

Bartlett, John Bradley — Durham 

Barton, William H. — Pleasant Garden 

Basart, Jasper M. — New Bern 

Bass, James Albert — Wilson 

Batten, Welch Middleton — Elizabeth City 

Bauguess, Carl Thomas, Jr. — Chapel Hill 

Beale, Garland Wood, Jr. — Broadway 

Beale, Jesse J., Jr. — Burlington 

Beason, Robert Hoyle — Boiling Springs 

Beavans, Samuel Clark — Enfield 

Beck, Albert L, Jr. — Hendersonville 

Beck, Quay H.— Fletcher 

Beck, William C. — Hendersonville 

Beddingfield, Bruce Brooks — Greenville 

Beddingfield, Charles Herman — Clayton 

Bell, Barbara Jane — Raleigh 

Bell, Barry Max — Gastonia 

Bell, Frank Roland — Beaufort 

Bell, Henry C. — Gastonia 

Bell, L. R. — Tarboro 

Bender, Walker Meares K. — Fayetteville 

Bennett, Donald Leon — Albemarle 

BENNETT, KELLY EDMOND— 

Bryson City 
Bennick, James E. — Lenoir 
Benson, Harley O'Neil — Tryon 
Benson, Lawrence Monroe, Jr. — Charlotte 
BEST, JOHN HARPER— Greensboro 
Biggs, John Waller Smallwood — Greenville 
Birkitt, Sebastian Poisal — Charlotte 
Birmingham, John Steele — Hamlet 
Bishop, Robert Ellis — Kinston 
Bissett, Donald Hines — Lumberton 
BISSETTE, PAUL BRANCH— Wilson 
Bissette, Paul Branch, Jr. — Wilson 
Bius, John H. — Raleigh 
Black, William E. — Concord 



42 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Bland, Joseph F. — High Point 

Blanton, Charles Donald — Kings Mountain 

Blanton, Charles Donald, Jr. — 

Kings Mountain 
Blue, D. Adolph — Carthage 
Bobbitt, A. Bracey — Winston-Salem 
Bobbitt, Hilliard Fletcher — Glen Alpine 
Boger, Richard Albert — New Bern 
Bolton, James Cener, III — Woodland 
Bolton, Robert Baugham — Rich Square 
Booker, Elsie Hudson — Chapel Hill 
Boone, Demetrius Leonard — Durham 
Boone, William Thomas — Ahoskie 
Booth, Guthrie Donald — Durham 
Bostian, Thomas Richard — Kannapolis 
Bostic, Russell Alton — Beulaville 
Bowen, Norman George — Durham 
Bowers, Jimmie C. — Lineolnton 
Bowers, John Robert — Bethel 
Boyd, Allan Craig — Greensboro 
Boyd, Shelton Bickett— Mt, Olive 
Bracker, Dale Conrad — Greensboro 
Bradley, William Vernon, Jr. — Kannapolis 
Bradshaw, Edward Luther — Kinston 
Bradshaw, Edward Luther, Jr. — Kinston 
Bradsher, Arthur Long, Jr. — Durham 
Bradsher, Hugh Tate— High Point 
Brame, Philip Augustus — North Wilkesboro 
Brame, Robert Marvin, Jr. — 

North Wilkesboro 
Branan, Cecil L. — High Point 
Brannon, James L. — Chapel Hill 
Brantley, John Calvin, Jr. — Raleigh 
Brantley, William Cain — Winston-Salem 
Breeht, Edward A.— Chapel Hill 
Brewer, Marsha Hood — Pink Hill 
Bridges, Albert Reid — Rutherfordton 
Brinkley, Clifton Scott — Kernersville 
Brison, John Edgar — Gastonia 
Brison, Samuel Pressly — Belmont 
Brisson, Edward — St. Pauls 
Brisson, Lloyd Clifford — Fayetteville 
Britt, Grady— Raleigh 
Britt, Robert Timothy — Raleigh 
Brodie, Thomas Lewis — Fayetteville 
Brooks, Baylus Cade — Fayetteville 
Brooks, C. McLane — Monroe 
Brooks, Frank Gibbons — Siler City 
Brooks, Frank Gibbons, Jr. — Siler City 
Brooks, Harvey Ray — Goldston 
Brookshire, James Edwin — Winston-Salem 
Brookshire, Lorain Balfour — Asheville 
Brothers, Arthur Etheridge — Elizabeth City 
Brown, Earl Triplett— Chapel Hill 



Brown, Henry Shelton — Goldsboro 
Brown, John Herndon — China Grove 
Brown, William Colfax — Greensboro 
Browning, Alton Cain — Greensboro 
Browning, David Benjamin — Kinston 
Browning, Joseph Fletcher, Jr. — Burlington 
Bruce, Thomas Milton — Hot Springs 
Bryan, W. D. — Tarboro 
Bryant, Alvin — Durham 
Bryson, Vaughn Douglas — 

Jacksonville, Florida 
Buchanan, Christine Tunstall — Boise, Idaho 
Buchanan, Elmer William — Greensboro 
Buchanan, Ernest Chadwell — Kinston 
Buckner, Wilfred B. — Statesville 
Buhmann, Walter L. — Asheville 
Buie, Wayne M. — Winston-Salem 
Bullock, Benjamin W. — Durham 
Bullock, John Chester, Jr. — Wilmington 
Bunch, Luther Elmo — Carolina Beach 
Bunn, Richard Speight — Elizabeth City 
Burch, Eidson I T . — Andrews 
Burgiss, Thomas Reeves — Elkin 
BURGISS, THOMAS ROY— Sparta 
Burnett, John Paul, Jr. — Rocky Mount 
Burris, Loy Ray — Valdese 
Burris, Loy Ray, Jr. — Valdese 
Burrus, Brainard M. — Canton 
Burrus, Samuel Brainard — Canton 
Burt, Milton Stanley — Durham 
Butler, Alman Byron — Clinton 
Butler, James Gene — Shelby 
Bynum, Carney Washington — New Bern 

— C— 

Cable, Maurice LeRoy — Asheville 
Cagle, Carlus Vann — Greensboro 
Cain, Charles Macbeth — Henrietta 
Cain, Leighton Dewey — Kannapolis 
Caldwell, Hugh Cannon, Jr. — Mooresville 
Caldwell, Palmer L. — Faison 
Calhoun, Rudgely Millwee — High Point 
Callahan, Virginia L. — Asheville 
Callicutt, Richard Douglas — High Point 
Cameron, Marcus — Sanford 
Campbell, Charles Clifford — Maiden 
Campbell, Francis Earle — Hamlet 
Campbell, Howard Turner — Maiden 
Campbell, Rowe B. — Taylorsville 
Campbell, Rowe Bogle, Jr. — Taylorsville 
Canaday, Ralph Clarence — Four Oaks 
Cannon, Claude Claiborne — Durham 
Capps, Earl U. — Ahoskie 
Cardell, Jeremiah Curtin — Lenoir 
Carraway, Ernest L., Jr. — Windsor 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



43 



Carrigan, James Frank — Salisbury 
Carroll, G. Leon — Wilmington 
Carroll, William Wright, Sr. — Dunn 
Carswell, A. Paul — Durham 
Carswell, Virgilia H. — 

Providence Forge, Virginia 
Carter, Donald Kermit — Lowell 
Carter, Lee C. — Sanford 
Carter, Leo Harrison — Asheboro 
Carter, Ralph Edward, Jr. — Wilmington 
Carter, Wade A. — Lowell 
Caruthers, Morrison Rankin — Burlington 
Cash, James E. — Eutherfordton 
Cassel, A. S. — North Wilkesboro 
Caudle, Virginia — Winston-Salem 
Causey, John H. — Rutherford College 
Cavanaugh, Samuel MacDonald — Rose Hill 
Caviness, Edith Ann — Rockingham 
Chambers, Melvin A. — Chapel Hill 
Champion, Herbert O. — Waynesville 
Chandler, Peggy Black — Kannapolis 
Chandley, Albert Brookshire — Asheville 
Chapman, Donald Kenneth — Winston-Salem 
Charles, Fred Richard — Charlotte 
Christensen, Carl Viggo — Charlotte 
Chronister, David Lee — Hickory 
Clapp, Ernest Bernard — Newton 
Clark, Claude Baxter, Jr. — Williamston 
Clark, George Edward — Warsaw 
Clark, Hugh Mercer — Goldsboro 
Clarkin, John R., Jr. — Hamlet 
Clay, Albert S.— Chapel Hill 
Clay, James Baker — Oxford 
Clayton, Albert Winfrey, Jr. — Durham 
Claytor, David Dortch — Greensboro 
Clelland, Alee W., Jr.— Fayetteville 
Clifton, William Horace — Gastonia 
Clinard, Betty Tate— Charlotte 
Cline, Frederick Herman — Charlotte 
Clodfelter, Walter Allen, Jr. — Ahoskie 
COBB, CLARENCE HARPER— Durham 
Cobb, James Louis — High Point 
Coble, George S. — Stanley 
Cochrane, Arthur Linwood, Jr. — Jackson 
Coeolas, George Harry — Chapel Hill 
Cogdell, Henry Paul — Kenly 
Cohen, Robert I. — Kinston 
Cole, Alfred F., Jr. — Roxboro 
Cole, Thomas R— Sanford 
Coleman, Robert Astor — Burlington 
Coley, Walter Newton — Raeford 
Colina, Gilbert — Charlotte 
Collette, Roy Wilson — Mocksville 
Collins, Ben F., Jr. — Greensboro 



Connell, James Paul Beardsley — Henderson 
COPELAND, ROBERT ROYAL— Ahoskie 

Coppedge, John Benjamin — 

Huntsville, Alabama 
Coppedge, Raymond Franklin, Jr. — 

Asheville 
Copses, Charles Peter — Charlotte 
Cornwell, Amos Halsted — Lincolnton 
Cornwell, George Thomas — Morganton 
Courts, Ben Carter — Chapel Hill 
Courts, Ellyn Gardner — Chapel Hill 
Cowan, Leo B. — Sylva 
Cowan, Marvin Russell — Greenville 
Cowan, William L. — Forest City 
Coward, Billy Thomas — Kannapolis 
Cox, Robert Olin — Winston-Salem 
Cox, Rupert — Dunn 
Craft, Roy Edwin — Gastonia 
Craig, Lyle Benjamin — Aberdeen 
Craig, William Franklin — Charlotte 
Crawford, Harvey Dinsmore — 

Black Mountain 
Creech, Howard Welda — New Bern 
Creech, James Leonard — Smithfield 
Creech, Leonard Ralph — Oxford 
Creech, W. Grover — Selma 
CREECH, WILLIAM H.— Selma 
Creekmore, Raymond L. — Acme 
Croft, Curtis D. — Belmont 
Cromley, Robert Irvin — Raleigh 
Cromley, Robert Irving, Jr. — Raleigh 
Crowell, Charles Milton — Mooresville 
Crumpler, Leonard H. — Raleigh 
Grumpier, Wilbur Aubrey — New Bern 
Crutchfield, Thomas Garrett — Greensboro 
Culbreth, Graham McKenzie — 

Southern Pines 
Curtis, James Richard — Bessemer City 
Curtis, Thomas E. — Waynesville 

— D— 

Dameron, Hubert Gordon — Tabor City 
Daniel, Elbert Clifton— Zebulon 
Daniels, H. Hallet — Ahoskie 
Darden, Robert Jackman — Clinton 
Darlington, James M. — Winston-Salem 
Daughtry, Ben Philip — Smithfield 
Daughtry, Ruffus Lynwood — Reidsville 
Davis, Arch Lyle — Statesville 
Davis, Charles E., Jr. — Winston-Salem 
DAVIS, DAVID RAMSEY— Williamston 
Davis, David Ramsey, Jr. — Williamston 
Davis, McDonald, Jr. — Roseboro 
Davis, Marvin Lee — Elm City 



44 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Davis, Thomas Peete — Yanceyville 
Davis, William Edward — Eeidsville 
Dawkins, William Atlas, Jr. — Clinton 
Day, Harold Vann — Spruce Pine 
Day, Lewie Griffith — Spruce Pine 
Dayvault, Frank Wilson — Lenoir 
Deal, Harland Murlee — Lenoir 
Dean, Fletcher Sims — Lumberton 
Deaton, Donald Jason — 

Martinsville, Virginia 
Dees, Eobert Register — Burgaw 
DeLozier, T. Martin — Robbinsville 
Dement, William Taylor — Oxford 
Denny, Keith Earl — Charlotte 
Denson, Millard D. — Burlington 
Dever, James Henry — Greensboro 
Dewar, Robert L. — LaGrange 
Dillon, Henry Edwards — Elkin 
Dimmick, Graham B., Jr. — Charlotte 
Dixon, Charles Thomas — Winston-Salem 
Dixon, Sterling Gray — Beaufort 
Dixon, Walter Reginald — Charlotte 
Dockery, Wesley Prichard — Valdese 
Dollar, Aubrey Chester, Jr. — ■ 

Winston-Salem 
Donnell, Viola Richards — Dobson 
Donnelly, Thomas Milton — Asheville 
Dowdy, David Astor — High Point 
Dowdy, David Astor, Jr. — High Point 
Dowdy, Donald Carlisle — Greensboro 
Dowdy, J. Henry — High Point 
Doyle, Lewis Benton, Jr. — Goldsboro 
Dudley, William Garland, Jr. — Reidsville 
Duffy, Henry Bryan — New Bern 
Duggins, Jack Steven — Asheboro 
Duguid, Helen — Kinston 
Dukes, Wyndham Stloe — Greensboro 
Dunlap, Henry H., Jr. — Siler City 
Dunlap, Ralph Harry — Winston-Salem 
Dunn, Bill Mack — High Point 
Dunn, Everette Matthews — Leaksville 
DURHAM, CARL THOMAS— Chapel Hill 
Dutton, Gene Raymond — Hickory 
Dutton, Marshall Wilson — Hickory 
Duvall, Clyde Jefferson — Brevard 

— E— 

Eadie, Edward Blease — Charlotte 
Eakle, Allan Fairfax — Albemarle 
Edmonds, George Heston — Greensboro 
Edmonds, Marion Myers — Greensboro 
Edmondson, Edwin Wilson — Polloeksville 
Edwards, James C. — Wilmington 
Edwards, James W. — Winston-Salem 



Edwards, Kenneth — Stantonsburg 
Edwards, Otho Crowell — Raleigh 
Edwards, Sherwood McDonald, Jr. — Ayden 
Edwards, Snowdie McGroover — Ayden 
Eidam, Ben H, Jr. — Asheville 
Elliott, Augustus Green, Jr. — ■ 

Fuquay Springs 
Elliott, Rebecca Harper — 

Hendersonville 
Elmore, Oscar Allen, Jr. — Raleigh 
Erwin, Joe D. — Greensboro 
Etheridge, Samuel Bushell — Washington 
Etheridge,Thomas Jarvis — Bailey 
Eubanks, Clyde Lee — Chapel Hill 
Eubanks, James Norwood — Greensboro 
Evans, Dallas Mason — Raleigh 
Evans, Floyd Herbert — Greensboro 
Evans, Harold E. — High Point 
Evans, James Edward — Marion 
Evans, William Bryant — Greensboro 

— F— 

Faircloth, Vernon L. — Charlotte 
Fairley, Allene Warren — Dunn 
Fairley, Robert Brittain — Dunn 
Farrar, Joseph Ernest — Greensboro 
Farrington, John Vanstory — Greensboro 
Farrior, William Sloan — Greensboro 
Faucett, John William, Jr. — Greensboro 
Faulkner, Edward Garfield, Jr. — Monroe 
Feagin, Eugene Lloyd, Jr. — 

Hendersonville 
Feagin, Laurence Edward — 

Hendersonville 
Fearing, Malcolm Keith, Jr. — Manteo 
Fearing, Woodson Bradford, Jr. — Manteo 
Feeney, Barney A., Jr. — Salisbury 
Ferguson, Clarence McDonald, Jr. — 

Siler City 
Ferguson, Howard Quinn — Randleman 
Ferguson, J. Frank, Jr. — Durham 
Ferguson, Lewis M. — Taylorsville 
Ferguson, Louis Edward — Winston-Salem 
Fincher, Ellis Murphy — Cliffside 
Finger, Zack Lester — Morganton 
FISHEL, ARTHUR L— Winston-Salem 
Fisher, Clarence G. — Thomasville 
Fisher, Don Rea Hedrick — Thomasville 
Fisher, Lester Jerry — Statesville 
Fisher, Paul Lewis — Jonesville 
Fitchett, Carl Evander, Sr. — Dunn 
Fleming, Oliver G. — Smithfield 
Fleming, Robert Edward, Jr. — 

Rocky Mount 
Fletcher, James Hugh — Valdese 






The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



45 



Floyd, Calvin Moore, Jr. — Roanoke Rapids 
Flynn, Hubert Lanier — Winston-Salem 
Fordham, Christopher C, Jr. — Greensboro 
Forrest, Bedford Brosier — Hillsboro 
Forrest, William G. — Gastonia 
Forrester, Preston Reynolds — Albemarle 
Foster, Dan William — Asheville 
Foster, J. C. Coke — Tryon 
Foster, Robert William — Greensboro 
Fowler, Evelyn Blanchard — Salisbury 
Fox, Carolyn Twiggs — Winston-Salem 
Fox, Howard Spencer — Winston-Salem 
Fox, James Hamilton — Asheboro 
Fox, Junius Claude, Jr. — Chapel Hill 
Fraley, Thomas Maurice — Statesville 
Franklin, Russell Edmund — Greensboro 
Friday, John Paul — Gastonia 
Fulbright, Keith Norman — Greensboro 
Fuller, Edwin Rudolph — Salisbury 
Fulton, James W. — Winston-Salem 
Furr, Fitzhugh Lee — Louisburg 
Fussell, Thomas Edmund — Hamlet 
Futrell, Clyde Loraine — Cary 

— G— 

Gabriel, James Chandler — Troutman 
Gaddy, Henry M. — Asheville 
Gaddy, Phil— Marshville 
Gamble, Charles Franklin — Monroe 
Gamble, Joseph Paul — Monroe 
Gammon, Hunter Oakley — Reidsville 
Gardiner, Paul L. — Greensboro 
Gardner, John T. — Mooresville 
Gardner, Mattie Smith — Charlotte 
Gardner, Windfield Scott — Burlington 
Garren, Falton 0. — Mt. Airy 
Garrou, Elizabeth Ann Bills — Valdese 
Gaskins, William Floyd — Haveloek 
GATTIS, PHILIP D— Raleigh 
Gaylord, Jeremiah Thomas — 

Overland Park, Kansas 
Gibson, John Howard — Whiteville 
Gibson, Willie Stephen — Goldsboro 
Gilbert, Lacy Earl, Jr. — Wagram 
Gilbert, Loamie Mercer, Jr. — Maxton 
Giles, Robert Troy — Candor 
Gillespie, Charles B., Jr. — Burnsville 
Gilliam, Alvis B., Jr. — Reidsville 
Gilliam, Wade Axom — Winston-Salem 
Gilmore, Lamar M. — Kannapolis 
Glenn, Jamerson Samuel — Mt. Olive 
Glenn, Roland A. — Denton 
GODWIN, CLYDE FILLMORE— 

Pine Level 



Goforth, J. Philip — Asheville 
Goodrum, Cloyd Smith — Davidson 
Goodwin, Samuel Stephen — Monroe 
Gordon, Freda Hobowsky — 

Norfolk, Virginia 
Gordon, Robert Lee — Cary 
Gowan, Steve W. — Wallace 
Graham, Carroll C. — Greensboro 
Graham, Henry Neill — Charlotte 
Graham, John Calhoun — Red Springs 
Graham, Leon Irvin — Wallace 
Grandy, John I. — Charlotte 
Grantham, James G. — Charlotte 
Grantham, Reid Bridgers — Red Springs 
Greene, Henry Wilson — Wilmington 
Greene, James Paul — Boone 
Greene, James Simpson — Morganton 
Greenspan, Joseph — Charlotte 
Gregory, Robert L. — Mooresville 
Gregory, Walker S. — Shelby 
Gresham, John William — Wilson 
Greyer, Mary Alice Bennett — Bryson City 
Griffin, E. Wilson, Jr. — Kings Mountain 
Griffin, Octavus — Boanoke Rapids 
Griffin, Sandy D., Jr. — Burlington 
Griffin, William Cicero — Baleigh 
Griffin, William Crane — Roanoke Rapids 
Griffin, William Russell— Old Fort 
Griffin, William Russell, Jr. — 

Winston-Salem 
Griffith, Wiltshire — Hendersonville 
Griffith, Wiltshire, Jr. — Hendersonville 
Grimes, George David — Robersonville 
Guion, Howell Newton — Marshville 
Gupton, Adrian Clay — Louisburg 
Gurley, William Burden — Windsor 
Guthrie, Clarence Hudson — Beaufort 

— H— 
Hackney, Eugene W. — Lumberton 
Hackney, Sara Alice Jackson — Lumberton 
Hagwood, Ray Gordon — Dobson 
Hair, Robert Clifton — Pineville 
Haithcock, Jimmy Reid — Mount Gilead 
Hall, Homer Glenn, Jr. — Asheboro 
Hall, James Malcolm, Jr. — Wilmington 
Hall, John Perry — Oxford 
Hall, Robert Buekner — Mocksville 
Hall, Sam Cannady — Oxford 
Hall, Stacy Buekner — Mocksville 
Ham, Thomas J., Jr. — Yanceyville 
Hambright, Joanne Bullard — Fayetteville 
Hames, Herbert J. — Kannapolis 
Hammond, Henry A. — Charlotte 



46 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Handy, Kenneth E. — Ealeigh 
Hankey, Lewis C. — Asheville 
Hansen, Edwin Leroy — Charlotte 
Hardee, A. Kirk, Jr. — Charlotte 
Harden, Wilkins — Columbia, S. C. 
Hardy, Charles Edward — La Grange 
Hardy, Rudolph — Concord 
Hargett, Christopher Barker — Greenville 
Harman, John F., Jr. — Lexington 
Harmon, William Sidney — Hertford 
Harper, Wendell James — Goldsboro 
Harper, William Lacy — Hendersonville 
Harrell, Ollie Cecil — Winston-Salem 
Harrelson, William Howard — Tabor City 
Harrington, Gerald Kelly — Sanford 
Harris, Barbara Holman — Rocky Mount 
Harris, George Wesley — Chapel Hill 
Harris, Joseph Claxton — Durham 
Harris, Joseph Claxton, Jr. — Durham 
Harris, Larry C. — Cliffside 
Harris, Robert Parker — Rocky Mount 
Harris, Virginia Hogue — Boiling Springs 
Harris, William B. — High Point 
Harrison, James — North Wilkesboro 
Harrison, John R. — Troy 
Harrison, Robert Franklin — Draper 
Harrison, Steven Vance — Walnut Cove 
Hartis, Gilbert Clyde — Winston-Salem 
Harward, Ben Russell — Raleigh 
Hathcock, James Alden, Jr. — Winston-Salem 
Haupt, Edward — Newton 
Hauss, Harry Lynn — China Grove 
Hawkins, Charles Bruce — Bryson City 
Hawkins, Clayburn Irvin — Madison 
Hawkins, Hal Burgess — Moravian Falls 
Heath, Raymond E. — Burlington 
Heath, R. Veston— Snow Hill 
HEDGEPETH, ROMULUS AUGUSTUS— 

Lumberton 
Hege, Gerald Dean — Whiteville 
Hemby, Samuel Eustace, Jr. — Charlotte 
Hemingway, Frank M. — Bethel 
Henderson, G. E.— Shallotte 
Hendrick, Arthur Boyd — Kannapolis 
Hendrix, Jennings O'Neal — Canton 
Henley, John Tannery — Hope Mills 
Henriksen, Harold Eugene — Wilmington 
Henry, Floyd George — Greensboro 
Herndon, Harris Howard — Winston-Salem 
Herrin, J. Clegg — Henderson 
Herring, Elbert N.— Myrtle Beach, S. C. 
Herring, Rufus McPhail — Clinton 
Hickman, Jack H. — Charlotte 
Hickmon, James Ralph — Raleigh 



Hicks, Allen Milton — Pikeville 

Hicks, Charles G. — Raleigh 

Hicks, Jean Snyder — Gastonia 

Hicks, John E. F. — Goldsboro 

Higdon, Milton L. — Forest City 

High, Paul J. — Lincolnton 

Hill, Jonathan Adoneran — Wake Forest 

Himes, Charles Farris — Brevard 

Hines, Robert Milton — Tuscaloosa, Alabama 

Hinton, Malory Hugh — Raleigh 

Hix, David T. — Gibsonville 

Hobbs, Alden — Kinston 

Hobbs, Martha Ann Smith — Kinston 

Hocutt, Delma Desmond — Henderson 

Hoffman, E. N. — Lumberton 

Hoffman, Joe F., Jr.— High Point 

Hoffman, Walter Conrad — Guilford College 

Hogan, Alexander Lacy — Kinston 

Holland, John S. — Winston-Salem 

Holland, Louis Lea — -Hamlet 

Holland, Thomas M. — Mount Holly 

Holland, Willis Froneberger — Mount Holly 

Hollowell, Aubrey Ellis — Raleigh 

Hollowell, William Clyde — Greenville 

Hollowell, W. Herbert, Jr. — Edenton 

Holt, Fred A.— North Wilkesboro 

Holt, Maryellen Millaway — Burlington 

Holt, W. Seymour — Jacksonville, Fla. 

Honeycutt, George W. — Rockingham 

Honeycutt, Herman Ross — Raleigh 

Hood, John Cogdell — Kinston 

Hood, John C, Jr. — Kinston 

Hood, Robert Lonn— Pink Hill 

HOOD, THOMAS RUFFIN— Dunn 

Hooper, Fred Lambert — Sylva 

Home, Henry Ruffin — Fayetteville 

Horner, Lucille Earl — Charlotte 

Horton, John Palmer, Jr. — Wilkesboro 

Horton, William Donald — N. Wilkesboro 

HOUSE, JOSEPH— Beaufort 

House, Joseph, Jr. — Griffon 

Houser, William Edward — Cherryville 

Houser, William Henry — Cherryville 

Howard, Julius F. — Wilmington 

Howard, William M. — Winston-Salem 

Howe, A. Gregory — Petersburg, Va. 

Howell, William Lawrence, Jr. — Raeford 

Hoyle, Edgar D. — Cooleemee 

Hoyle, Marion Hudson — Cooleemee 

Hudson, Gus William — New Bern 

Hudson, Ray Truman — Gastonia 

Huffman, Kent Loewe — Winston-Salem 

Huffstetler, Delvin Sylvanus — Raleigh 

Humphries, A. T. — Charlotte 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



47 



Hunsucker, Evelyn Stutts — Gibson 
Hunter, James Boyce — Charlotte 
Hunter, Joseph Everett, Jr. — 

Columbia, S. C. 
Huntley, Clarence Oscar — Lenoir 
Huntley, Winfred Arlington — Lexington 
Huss, Kelly William — Cherryville 
Hutchins, James Alexander — Winston-Salem 

— I— 

Ingle, Calvin Eldridge — Weaverville 
Ingram, James Thomas — Roanoke Rapids 
Inman, George Graham — Rockingham 
Irwin, Dwayne Alton — Elkin 
Irwin, Robert Louis — Elkin 

—J- 

Jackson, Jasper Carlton — Lumberton 
Jackson, Leonidas — Erwin 
Jackson, Payton Donald — Dunn 
Jackson, William Carlton — Lumberton 
JAMES, ALBERT ALLISON— 

Winston-Salem 
James, Francis Duke — Hazelwood 
Jarrett, Charles Leonard — Washington 
Jefferies, C. L. — Raleigh 
Jenkins, Ingram, Jr. — Biscoe 
Jenkins, Paul Ronald — Murfreesboro 
Jenkins, Sam — Walstonburg 
Jenks, Keithan Blanchard — Graham 
Jernigan, Rupert Watson — Chapel Hill 
Johnson, Arthur Richardson — 

Winston-Salem 
Johnson, Jerome Karl — Raleigh 
Johnson, Rowland H. — Robbins 
Johnson, Roy Josiah — Asheville 
Johnson, Sidney B., Jr. — Charlotte 
Johnson, Troy Humphrey — Raleigh 
Johnson, Walter P. — Kinston 
Johnson, William Lewis, Jr. — Garner 
Johnson, William Luther — Gibson 
Johnson, William Spurgeon — Rocky Mount 
Johnson, Woodrow Wilson — Fuquay Springs 
Johnston, Clyde Anthony — Littleton 
Jolley, Carl Edgar — Forest City 
Jones, Alpheus, Jr. — Warrenton 
Jones, Arthur Raley, Jr. — Concord 
Jones, Charles Flourney, Jr. — Oxford 
Jones, David Edward — Beaufort 
Jones, Don P. — Charlotte 
Jones, George Haywood — Zebulon 
Jones, John Lee — Canton 
Jones, John Lee, Jr. — Canton 
Jones, William Warren — Morganton 
Jordan, William Merritt, Jr. — Marion 



Josey, Charles William — Old Fort 
Jowdy, Albert W., Jr.— Chapel Hill 
Joyce, Gladys Elizabeth — Mayodan 
Julian, Leslie B. — Tryon 

— K— 

Kale, Robert Glenn — Durham 

Kauffman, William II. — Asheville 

Keating, Thomas M. — Asheville 

Keever, David Eugene — Lincolnton 

Keever, Zeb Thomas, Jr. — Lincolnton 

Kellett, James Clarence, Jr. — Carrboro 

Kelly, Hunter Liggett — Durham 

Kemp, Robert Carlton — Andrews 

Kendrick, Melvin C. — Greensboro 

Kerr, Banks D. — Raleigh 

Kiger, Robert W. — Shelby 

Kinard, Edward R., Jr. — Greensboro 

King, Alfred Henderson — Durham 

King, Roland Gabriel — New Bern 

King, Van Hill, III — Goldsboro 

King, Winfred A. — Mount Airy 

Kirby, Carl M., Jr. — Southport 

Kirby, James T. — Southport 

Kirkman, Paul Madison — Winston-Salem 

Kirkman, Phebe Pettingill — Winston-Salem 

Kirkpatriek, Thomas Morgan, Jr. — 

Leaksville 
Kiser, Arthur George — Asheville 
Kiser, Frank — Asheville 
Kiser, Ray Alexander — China Grove 
Kluttz, John — Black Mountain 
Knight, C. V.— Wilson 
Knight, James Oliver — Rocky Mount 
Knight, Richard A. — Pinehurst 
Koonce, Samuel G. — Chadbourn 
Koonts, Archie Alva — High Point 
Kritzer, Everett Loftus — Albemarle 

— L— 

Lamar, W. L. — Denton 
Lambert, Martin Lee, Jr. — Charlotte 
Lambeth, Donald C. — Morganton 
Lamm, Lewis Marion — Mount Airy 
Lane, Oveda Fisher — Wilmington 
Lane, Robert L. — Greensboro 
Langdon, F. Hamptou — Greensboro 
LANGDON, RALPH EDWARD— 

Fayetteville 
Langdon, Roscoe — Columbia, S. C. 
Langston, Douglas O. — Franklinton 
Langston, Milton Beron, Jr. — New Bern 
Lanier, LeRoy, Jr. — Fayetteville 
Lanning, Edward Ray, Jr. — Lexington 
Larson, Verl Allen — High Point 



48 



The Carolina Journal, of Pharmacy 



Lasater, Walter Harold — Pittsboro 

Lassiter, Lueious Melvin, Jr. — Kinston 

Latta, Patsy Ruth Upchureh — Durham 

Lawing, Kenneth Lee — Conover 

Lazarus, John Michael — New Orleans, La. 

Lazarus, Joseph — Sanford 

Lazarus, Larry — Forest City 

Leatherwood, Jerry Robert — High Point 

LeGette, John S. — Charlotte 

Leigh, Henry A. — Waynesville 

Leonard, Holland, Jr. — High Point 

Leonard, Thomas Donald — Charlotte 

Lewis, Robert L. — Charlotte 

Lewis, William Clyon — Kannapolis 

Lewis, Wilson Knowles — Mount Olive 

Libbus, Thomas Anthony — New Bern 

Lindsay, Bobby Clay — Salisbury 

Link, Francis Philip — Reidsville 

Linn, Tom Latan — Landis 

LISK, DANIEL CLYDE— Charlotte 

Liverman, James Stanley, Jr. — Charlotte 

Lloyd, Allen Alexander — Hillsboro 

Lloyd, William L. — Garner 

Logan, Howard Marion — Winston-Salem 

Lombard, William Oly — Rockwell 

London, Lawton W., Jr. — Kings Mountain 

Lore, Sara Fountain — Winston-Salem 

Lovelace, W. M., Jr. — Hudson 

Lovett, Herbert Edward — Liberty 

Lowder, James Franklin — Winston-Salem 

Lowder, John Henry — Marion 

Lowder, Thomas M., Jr. — Greensboro 

Lowry, Fred W. — Statesville 

Lowry, Hughes D. — Pembroke 

Lutz, Horace Cleveland — Hickory 

Lutz, Howard Robert — Hudson 

Lynch, Herman Wright — Dunn 

Lynch, William F. — Hillsboro 

Lyon, Robert Phillips — Wadesboro 

— M— 
Mabry, Charles Snellings — Hamlet 
Macon, Arthur Boise — Mt. Airy 
Malion, Harold Edward — Fairmont 
Mancini, Lawrence Harold — 

Ypsilanti, Michigan 
Markham, George Wilbur — Fayetteville 
Marsh, John W. — Charlotte 
Marsh, William Luther — Marshville 
Martin, Alfred Newman — Roanoke Rapids 
Martin, John Wilford — Macclesfield 
Martin, Robert Milus — Ahoskie 
Martin, Roy J. — Charlotte 
Martin, S. L., Jr. — Leaksville 



Massengill, David Waugh — Bristol, Tenn 
Mast, William H. — Henderson 
Mathews, George W. — Asheville 
Matthews, John Ivey — Raleigh 
Mauney, Harry McCombs — Hayesville 
Mauney, Walter McCombs — Murphy 
Maurer, William Burland — Kannapolis 
May, Gerald Franklin — West Jefferson 
Mayberry, Herbert Clarence — 

Winston-Salem 
Mayrand, Louis Phillip — Winston-Salem 
McAdams, Jack Webster — Burlington 
McAllister, Harmon Carlyle — Chapel Hill 
McAllister, Larry Bikle — Graham 
McBride, Thomas L. — Marshville 
McCollum, Numa Hill, Jr. — Leaksville 
McCorkle, Mack Elmo — Burlington 
McCrimmon, Dan Grier — Pittsboro 
McCurdy, Marion Boger — Greensboro 
McDaniel, Paul L. — Wilmington 
McDonald, Eugene James — Jacksonville 
McDonald, Joanne Schell — Hickory 
McDonald, John Cameron — Durham 
McDonald, William Russell III — Hickory 
McDowell, Norfleet Owen, Jr. — 

Scotland Neck 
McDowell, Norfleet Owen, Sr. — 

Scotland Neck 
MeDufne, Roger Atkinson — Greensboro 
McFall, Charles D. — Madison 
McFalls, Oliver Wendell — Greensboro 
McFalls, Samuel Woodrow — Greensboro 
McFarland, Thomas W. — Charlotte 
McGee, James Conrad, Jr. — Asheville 
McGugan, Vance G. — Mocksville 
McKAY, DANIEL McNEILL— Durham 
McKeithan, Herbert, Jr. — Laurinburg 
McKenzie, C. B. — Winston-Salem 
McKnight, L. E., Jr.— Coats 
McLarty, George Collins, Jr. — High Point 
McLean, Alton Lee, Jr. — Fuquay Springs 
McLean, George Woodrow — Clinton 
McNeely, Jimmy L. — Charlotte 
McNeill, John Albert — Whiteville 
McNeill, John Parker — Norwood 
Means, Mack R. — Hickory 
Meares, James Frederick — Wilson 
Mebane, Alfred Holt III — Greensboro 
Medlin, Fred Wilson — Statesville 
Medlin, W. E. — Gastonia 
Melvin, Marion Butler — Raleigh 
Meroney, Carl P. — Columbus 
Merritt, Morris E. — Wilmington 
Metts, Horace M. — Charlotte 









The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



49 



Miles, Morton Clifton — Henderson 
Millaway, Eugene Delano — Burlington 
Miller, Archibald James — Hendersonville 
Miller, James Monroe — Hickory 
Miller, Joseph Larry — Statesville 
Miller, Paul W. — Spencer 
Miller, Eobert Edward — Elizabeth City 
Miller, Seth George — Lexington 
Miller, William James — Statesville 
Milliones, Peter T. — Charlotte 
Mills, John Craton — Mt. Airy 
Mills, John E.— Mt. Airy 
Mills, Oscar Walter — Spray 
Mills, Roger Carlton — Hickory 
Milton, Robert H. — Salisbury 
Mitchell, Clarence Eugene — Highlands 
Mitchell, Henry Gaither — Burlington 
Mitchell, John D. — Kannapolis 
Mitchell, Russell Gray — Greensboro 
Mitchell, Thomas Wayne — Cary 
Mitchener, James W. — Concord 
Mitchener, John Agrippa, Jr. — Edenton 
Mitchener, Nancy Pike — Edenton 
Mobley, Benjamin K. — Burlington 
Mock, Charles Henry — Boone 
Moir, A. L. — Hickory 
Montesanti, Joe, Jr. — Southern Pines 
Montgomery, David Weatherspoon — 

Greensboro 
Moore, A. Roy — Wilson 
Moore, Horace W. — Lexington 
Moore, John W. — Asheville 
Moore, Milton Alvin — Tarboro 
Moore, Milton Alvin, Jr. — Tarboro 
Moore, Thomas B. — Salisbury 
Moorefield, George M. — Lexington 
Moose, Hoy Archibald — Mount Pleasant 
Moose, Hubert Foy — Statesville 
Moose, Walter Lee — Greensboro 
Moose, William Whitaker — Mt. Pleasant 
Morris, Alvin E., Jr. — Faith 
Morris, Eugene M. — Brevard 
Morris, Stephen Carroll — Newton Grove 
Morris, William White — Shelby 
Morrison, Brame P. — Wilson 
Morton, William A. — Wilmington 
Moss, Fred Morris — Gastonia 
Mosteller, William H. — Albemarle 
Mueller, Reinhold Ernst — High Point 
Mullinax, Joseph L., Jr. — Williston, S. C. 
Murr, George Frank — Thomasville 
Murray, Billy Roger — Raleigh 
Murrell, Harry Thomas — Albemarle 



Murrell, Harry Thomas, Jr. — Albemarle 
Musgrove, William McKinley — Catawba 
Myers, Leslie M. — Winston-Salem 

— N— 
Nance, Bernie J. — Concord 
Nance, John S., Jr. — Charlotte 
Neal, David Ellison — Kannapolis 
Needham, Billy Wright — Mount Airy 
Neil, Joseph W. — Huntersville 
Nelson, Stacy Gordon — Aulander 
Neville, Augustus — Spring Hope 
Newbern, Marshall Louis — Nashville 
Newton, J. Cody — Fayetteville 
Newton, J. Gary — Fayetteville 
Nichols, Lois W. — Charlotte 
Nicholson, Michael A. — Troy 
Niles, Ed Lee — Marshall 
Norris, Charles Allen — Matthews 
Northcott, William Warren — Winston-Salem 

— 0— 

Oakley, Calvin Sneed — Mebane 
Oakley, Curtis Hill — Roxboro 
Oakley, James Ray — Ahoskie 
O'Briant, Gordon Lee, Jr. — Durham 
O'Daniel, James Sidney, Jr. — New Bern 
Odom, Lindsay A. — Wilmington 
O'Neal, Walton Prentiss — Belhaven 
Osborne, Doris Hinshaw — Asheboro 
Overman, Harold Speight — Elizabeth City 
Owen, Fred R. — Tryon 
Owens, Thurman Quinton — Whiteville 
Owens, Thurman Quinton, Jr. — Whiteville 
Oxendine, Jesse E. — Charlotte 

— P— 

Paderick, Hatherly C. — Kinston 
Padgett, Hughel F. — Durham 
Page, Cannon Foster — Jacksonville, Fla. 
Page, Clarence Eugene, Jr. — Henderson 
Page, Jane Welch — Washington 
Paoloni, Claude U. — Greensboro 
Pappas, Steve A. — Charlotte 
Paramore, Rex A. — Nashville 
Parham, Linda J. — Kinston 
Parker, Fred B. — Jacksonville 
Parker, Robert Greer — Winston-Salem 
Parker, Walter Wellington, Jr. — 

Henderson 
Parks, William Allen — Salisbury 
Parrish, Alton Sherwood — Newton Grove 
Parrish, Leland Frederic — Rocky Mount 
Patterson, Forrest Tribble — Burlington 
Patterson, James L. — Lenoir 



50 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Pattern, James B., Jr. — Canton 
Patton, William Harrison — Marion 
Pearson, Sarah Pegram — Apex 
Pecora, Ruth Patterson — Salisbury 
Pegram, Addie Bradshaw — Apex 
Peile, James I., Jr. — Burlington 
Pelt, Adie Grey, Jr. — Goldsboro 
Perry, Victor Horn — Franklin 
Petrea, Fred Smith — Greensboro 
Peterson, Donald Vance — Burgaw 
Phifer, Fred Owen — Raleigh 
Phillips, Millard Brown — Albemarle 
Phillips, William Penn — Morganton 
Phillips, William Webster — Charlotte 
Piantadosi, Claude — Chapel Hill 
Pickard, Jefferson Franklin — Greensboro 
Pickard, John Milton — Durham 
Pike, Jesse M. — Concord 
Pike, Joseph William, Jr. — Concord 
Pilkington, Edward Lee, Sr. — Goldsboro 
Pinnix, John M., Sr. — Kernersville 
Pinnix, Joseph Leak — Kernersville 
Pinnix, William Maple — New Bern 
Pittman, Billie E. — Valdese 
Pittman, G. Rudolph— Smithfield 
Polk, John Wayne — Dunn 
Ponder, William N. — Hendersonville 
Poole, Laurie B. — Thomasville 
Porter, Charles Davis — Concord 
Powell, Edward Sholar — Oxford 
Powell, Fred L. — Burlington 
Powell, William P.— Mars Hill 
Pressly, Charles Payson — Charlotte 
Prevo, James Miller — Asheboro 
Price, Billy Lee — Conover 
Price, Hubert Graham — Raleigh 
Price, Samuel Howard — Mooresville 
Price, Samuel Howard, Jr. — Mooresville 
Price, Sanford Scott — Salemburg 
Proctor, William Vinson — Charlotte 
Propst, Gold Blanton — Morganton 
Provo, Jean Bush — Raleigh 
Pruett, Irvin J. — Angier 
Puckett, W. Moorefield — Robbins 
Pugh, Edward Stuart — Windsor 
Purcell, D. Craig — Salisbury 
Putnam, Jessie Van — Bessemer City 

— R— 

Rabil, Ernest John — Winston-Salem 
Rachide, Albert Paul — Jacksonville 
Raneke, John McMillan — Lumberton 
Randall, William Hurley, Jr. — Lillington 
Ranzenhofer, John Arthur — Greensboro 



Raper, Donald J. — Rocky Mount 
Rauch, Robert K. — Mocksville 
RAY, FREDERICK, JR.— Sanford 

Reamer, I. Thomas — Durham 
Reaves, Charles Adams — Asheboro 
Reaves, Hallie Craven — Asheboro 
Reaves, L. E., Jr. — Fayetteville 
Reese, Joe Neal — Kannapolis 
Register, Milton Otis — Clinton 
Reinhardt, Bruce Bastian — Ayden 
Rhem, John Fitzhugh — Florence, S. C. 
Rhodes, Charles Reginald — Charlotte 
Rhodes, Daniel Edward — Morganton 
Rhyne, Clarence Little — Charlotte 
Rice, Harry Curtis — Charlotte 
Rice, Leslie Davis — Maxton 
Rich, Harold C— Garland 
Rich, Reims Edgar, Jr. — Brevard 
Richardson, Luther Wyatt — Goldsboro 
Richardson, Odell Kellie — Boone 
Richardson, Vernon Herbert — Walnut Cove 
Richardson, Wayne Robert — Boone 
Ridenhour, Davidson Giles — Mount Gilead 
Ridenhour, Henry Baxter — Spencer 
Riggsbee, Edgar Lloyd — Chapel Hill 
Riggsbee, Victor Lee, Jr. — Charlotte 
Ring, Luther Branson — 

Tarpon Springs, Fla. 
Rives, Herbert Lisle — Bethel 
Roberson, Culas — Spray 
Roberts, Stephen Burgin — Black Mountain 
Robertson, William N., Jr. — Laurinburg 
Robinson, Carlton — Morehead City 
Robinson, Derwood Paul — Oxford 
Robinson, Harriett Agnes — Lumberton 
Robinson, Thomas Rufhn, Jr. — Goldsboro 
Rogers, Hubert Newton, Jr. — Lumberton 
ROGERS, RALPH PEELE— Durham 
Rogers, Ralph Peele, Jr. — Durham 
Rogers, William LeRoy — Benson 
Rollins, Ernest William — Winston-Salem 
Rollins, Stuart Wingo — Rural Hill 
Roper, Harold Edward — Melbourne, Florida 
Rose, Willie C. — Goldsboro 
Rose, Winfleld P. — Greensboro 
Roughton, Rawlings H. — Charlotte 
Rouse, Louis Livingston — Fayetteville 
Royall, George Edwin, Jr. — Elkin 
Rubin, Seymour R. — Newport 
Russell, G. Clark — Greensboro 
Russell, Jesse Milton, Jr. — Asheville 
Russell, Joe Terrell — Canton 
Russell, Lon D. — Greensboro 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



51 



Russell, Ritchie A. — Winston-Salem 
Russell, Thomas Wayne — Greensboro 

— S— 

Salley, William Moss — Asheville 
Salley, William Moss, Jr. — Asheville 
Sanders, Charl H. — Granite Quarry 
Sasser, John Marshall — Smithfield 
Saunders, John Wesley — Raleigh 
Saunders, Walter K., Jr. — Burlington 
Savage, Matthew Council — Roanoke Rapids 
Scarboro, William Louis — Raleigh 
Schaefer, Brownie Dickson — Fayetteville 
Scharff, Robert Edgar — Clemmons 
Scott, Milon A., Jr. — Skyland 
Seaborn, Robert H. — Cary 
Secrest, Vann V., Jr. — Monroe 
Selden, Joseph Staneell — Weldon 
Semeniuk, Fred — Chapel Hill 
Senter, Lloyd M. — Carrboro 
Senter, Plennie Lloyd — Carrboro 
Setzer, E. S., Jr. — Greensboro 
Sewell, Evelyn Salter — Beaufort 
Sewell, Guion Linwood — Kinston 
Shaheen, William Maxwell — Blowing Rock 
Shaw, Margaret A. — Chapel Hill 
Shearin, Robert Hunter — Greensboro 
Sheets, James Paul — West Jefferson 
Sheffield, Barnard Cleveland, Jr. — Warsaw 
Shepherd, Dale M. — West Jefferson 
Shepherd, Roy C, Jr. — Lexington 
Sherard, Gene S. — Burlington 
Sherard, John Prank — Burlington 
Sherrill, Fred Lee, Jr. — Conover 
Sherwood, Norman W. — Lenoir 
Shields, Clarence Louis — Jacksonville 
Shigley, Henry Hall — Asheville 
Shoemaker, William Preston — High Point 
Shook, Eulan — Hickory 
Shore, Vollie A., Jr. — Durham 
Shouse, W. Darle — King 
Shuford, Grady W.— Forest City 
Shultman, Simon L. — Charlotte 
Sigmon, Russell Grady, Jr. — Hickory 
Simmons, Foster Joel — Hickory 
Simmons, Hansford R. — Jacksonville 
Simmons, Peggy Costner — Lincolnton 
Simmons, William Alfred — Winston-Salem 
Simpson, John Thomas, Jr. — Statesville 
Simpson, Noah J. — Spindale 
Simpson, Thomas Skinner — Winston-Salem 
Sinclair, Allen — Albemarle 
Sisk, Charles Jones — Asheville 
Sisk, William T. — Asheville 



Skakle, Sybil Austin— Chapel Hill 
Slaughter, Thomas G.— Charlotte 
Slayton, Mary Thomasine — 

Washington, D. C. 
Slesinger, Stanley S. — Charlotte 
Sloan, William Lee — Chapel Hill 
Sloop, Roger Hester — Winston-Salem 
Smith, Alfred Gene — Elizabethtown 
Smith, Donald Judd — Forest City 
Smith, Edward M. — Tuscaloosa, Alabama 
Smith, Edwin Harrison, Jr. — Tarboro 
Smith, Emett Aaron, Jr. — Charlotte 
Smith, Henry Edwin — Thomasville 
Smith, James Grey — Stokesdale 
Smith, Joe E. — Valdese 
Smith, John Hubert, Jr. — Varina 
Smith, L. Wriston — Kannapolis 
Smith, Oscar Wilbur — Pilot Mountain 
Smith, Ralph Wright, Jr.— Charlotte 
Smith, Robert Garland — Mount Airy 
Smith, Roger Austin — Raleigh 
Smith, Terre Milton— Chapel Hill 
SMITH, WILLIAM JULIUS— Chapel Hill 
Smith, William Oscar — 

W. Palm Beach, Florida 
Snead, Linford Dunlap — Charleston, W. Va. 
Snyder, Shuford E. — Asheville 
Soler, Urbano — High Point 
Solomon, A. Melvin — Charlotte 
Southern, Joseph Carson — High Point 
Sparks, James Ellis — Elizabeth City 
Spencer, B. W., Jr. — Durham 
Speranza, Charles F. — Chapel Hill 
Spirko, Paul — Fontana Dam 
Spittle, Roger Y. — Asheville 
Stahl, Gerald M.— Durham 
Stalvey, John C. — Knightdale 
Stamps, J. N.— High Point 
STANBACK, THOMAS MELVILLE— 

Salisbury 
Stanford, Joyce Nelson — Chapel Hill 
Stanley, Verner E. — Charlotte 
Stanton, William Harper — New Bern 
Steele, George H., Jr. — Greensboro 
Stevens, Charles L. — Benson 
Stevens, Mac Watson — Broadway 
Stevenson, John Thomas — Elizabeth City 
Stevenson, Paul A. — Elizabeth City 
Stevenson, Ralph S. — Concord 
Stewart, Jesse Southerland — Fremont 
Stimson, J. H. — Statesville 
Stine, Charles R. — Charlotte 
Stone, Benjamin Franklin — Elizabethtown 
Stone, Harry Curtis, Jr. — Salisbury 



52 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Stone, Joe D. — Pilot Mountain 
Stone, Wilbert L. — Franklinton 
Stonestreet, Dewey Harding — 

Winston-Salem 
Stoots, John K. — Troy 
Stowe, Harry Eeid — Charlotte 
Street, James Thomas — Eoxboro 
Stroupe, L. S. — Kings Mountain 
Summey, Purvey Burpee — Mount Holly 
Summey, William Lewis — Dallas 
Sumner, Edward Donald — Chapel Hill 
Suttlemyre, Claude Philip — Hickory 
Sutton, LuButh — Durham 
Swan, William J. — Hazelwood 
Swaney, Charles Arthur — Winston-Salem 
Swearngan, Clarence LeEoy — Charlotte 

— T— 

Talbert, George Bobert — Winston-Salem 

TART, DAVID WHITFIELD— Greensboro 

Tart, Paul Edwin — Kinston 

Tate, Earl Henry — Lenoir 

Tate, Samuel B. — Asheville 

Tate, W. Stanford — Lexington 

Tatum, Joseph Myron — Asheville 

Tatum, Mary Ellington — Winston-Salem 

Taylor, Herbert Thomas — Goldsboro 

Taylor, James G. — Conway 

Taylor, LeEoy Boone — Conway 

Taylor, Sue Sheek — Yadkinville 

Taylor, William P. — Eoanoke Eapids 

Taylor, William West— Chapel Hill 

Teague, James Ralph — High Point 

Temple, Herbert A. — Charlotte 

Temple, Eufus Henry — Kinston 

Tennant, Walter Douglas — Crossnore 

Terrell, John Arthur, Jr. — Sanford 

Thomas, Henry Grady — Wilson 

Thomas, James Seymour — Charlotte 

Thomas, John Ivey — Dunn 

THOMAS, PHILIP LANGSTON— 

Shallotte 
Thompson, Charles Dale — Graham 
Thompson, Dalma Adair — Salisbury 
Thompson, Herman O. — Chapel Hill 
Thompson, James L. — Eeidsville 
THOMPSON, PAUL HERMAN— Fairmont 
Thorne, Samuel Thomas — Charlotte 
Thornton, George Palmer — Goldsboro 
Thornton, John W., Jr. — Dunn 
Tilles, Irving — High Point 
Tilley, John Everett — Jamestown 
Timberlake, Claude Vernon, Jr. — 

Alexandria, Va. 



Timberlake, Harry Wilson — Eoanoke Eapids 
Tollison, Eobert B. — Wadesboro 
Tomlinson, Leon C. — Fayetteville 
Toms, Bate C. — Salisbury 
Toms, Elmo Eeid — Wilmington 
Townsend, James H. — Eed Springs 
Tripp, Guy Oscar — Wilmington 
Trosper, Edith Woodman — Chapel Hill 
Tunstall, Joe Peyton — Washington 
Turlington, Jesse E. — Lumberton 
Turner, Charles F— Shelby 
Turner, Christopher G, Jr. — Scotland Neck 
Turner, George Wilson — Wilmington 
Turner, Joseph Kelly, Jr. — Weldon 
Tyler, Jack Loyd — Greenville 
Tyson, Jesse Williams — Greensboro 
Tyson, Wendell Brown — Eocky Mount 

— U— 

Umphlett, Harry Bassett, Jr. — 

Elizabeth City 
Umstead, Oscar Logan — Durham 
Underwood, Dannie Davis — Greensboro 
Underwood, Hamilton Polk, Jr. — 

Fayetteville 
Underwood, Maurice Edward — Wilmington 
Upehurch, Julian Emmett, Jr. — Durham 
Upchurch, Malcolm Thurston — Smithfield 
Usher, Harold Griffin — Burlington 
Uzzell, Steve C. C. — Black Mountain 

— V— 

Vanderburg, William Lee — Burlington 
Van Valkenburgh, William B. — Asheville 
Varner, Sebron Edward, Jr. — 

Huntsville, Alabama 
Viall, Wesley Eussell, Jr. — Pinehurst 
Vinson, Emmett Littlebury — Halifax 
Vinson, Joe Battle — Zebulon 

— W— 

Wade, Clifton Elsworth — Colerain 
Wagner, John Wesley — Charlotte 
Walker, Archie Duval — Currie 
Walker, Harry Wilbur — Norlina 
Walker, Hubert Long — Greensboro 
Walker, Paul M. — Newton 
Walters, James Edward — Morven 
Ward, Bernard Eudolph — Goldsboro 
Ward, Joseph Willard — Jacksonville 
Ward, Waits Artemus — Swannanoa 
Ward, Wilbur Shepherd — Swannanoa 
Warren, Bowman Glidewell — Eural Hall 
Warren, Claude F. — Statesville 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



53 



Warren, J. C. — Benson 

Watson, Emory Milner — Leaksville 

WATSON, ROBERT NEAL — Sanford 

'Way, James Arthur, Jr. — Winston-Salem 

iWeaver, Van Darwin — Wilson 

iWebster, Park E. — Concord 

iWebster, Willie Broox — Fairmont 

Welborn, John Henry — Lexington 

Welch, William Dorsey, Jr. — Washington 

Wells, Franklin Ennis — Benson 

Wells, Robert Rodney — Shelby 

[Wells, William Potter — Durham 

[West, June Bush — Raleigh 

West, Waits Artemus — Roseboro 

West, Wilbur Latham — Roseboro 

Whaley, Hobart Glenn — Wilmington 

Whaley, Lloyd Milton — Wallace 

Wheeler, Claude Cameron, Jr. — Creedmoor 

Wheeler, Cyrus Rankin — Oxford 

White, Clarence Bernard — Henderson 

White, Grey Bullock — Burlington 

White, J. Graham — Burlington 

WHITE, GEORGE SPENCER— Lexington 

White, James Stark — Mebane 

White, John Richard — Henderson 

WHITE, LUTHER— Wilmington 

White, Ralph Lawrence — Troy 

Whitehead, Charles Raymond — Ramseur 

Whitehead, Willis Lee — Sanford 

Whitehurst, Paul Adams — Murfreesboro 

Whiteley, Roland Scott — Greensboro 

Whitford, Bryan Henry — Rocky Mount 

Whitley, Howard Emsley — Concord 

Whitley, Jesse Rose — Hendersonville 

Whitley, Wyatt Yelverton — Fremont 

Whitney, H. A. K., Jr. — Durham 

Whitson, William James — Phelps, New York 

Wier, Jack Knight— Chapel Hill 

Wiggins, Kenneth L. — Goldsboro 

WIGGINS, WILLIAM WINSTON— 

Raleigh 
Wilkes, Ernestine B. — High Point 
Williams, Archibald Hunter A. — Oxford 
Williams, Bruce — Hendersonville 
Williams, Charley Harold — Laurinburg 
Williams, Earl Gaston — Gastonia 
Williams, Glenwood Lee — Fayetteville 
Williams, James E. — Rockingham 
.Williams, John Cossie — Bessemer City 
Williams, Lawrence Lanier — Lexington 
Williams, Martin H. — Lexington 
Williams, Martin Van Buren — 

Winston-Salem 



Williams, William Alexander — Williamston 
Williford, E. H., Jr. — Kannapolis 
Williford, Evelyn Doris — Angier 
Williford, John Samuel — Pinetops 
Willis, Robert Moore — Southport 
Wilson, Carol Bray — Durham 
Wilson, Claude Arthur — Monroe 
Wilson, Harry W., Jr. — Winston-Salem 
Wilson, Joseph Helsebeck — Winston-Salem 
Wilson, Robert Charles — Hendersonville 
Wilson, Thomas Harvey — Gastonia 
Wilson, William Hooper — Raleigh 
Winstead, D. D., Jr. — Washington 
Winter, Carlton O. — Jacksonville 
Wohlford, Herbert William — Charlotte 
Wolfe, Benjamin Houston — Burlington 
Wolfe, Robert P.— Mount Airy 
Wolfe, William Samuel — Mount Airy 
Womble, Logan Nyal — Plymouth 
Wood, John Dee — Burlington 
Woodard, Barney Paul — Princeton 
Woodard, George F. — Matthews 
Woodard, John Bennett — Kannapolis 
Woodson, Joseph Thomas, Jr. — 

Woodbury, Tenn. 
Woodward, Grover Ben — Franklin 
Woody, Robert Rickman — Burlington 
Woolard, Edward Watson — Henderson 
Wooten, Ruth Ayeock — Raleigh 
Wyche, Gordon Vincent — Weldon 

— Y— 

Yandle, Howard Avant — Chapel Hill 
Yarborough, Frank Flowers — Cary 
Yost, Thomas Marion — Greensboro 
Young, Charles W., Jr. — Elizabeth City 
Young, Thomas F. — Leicester 
Youngblood, Frances Rimmer — Charlotte 
Youngblood, Thomas Watson — Raleigh 

— Z— 

Zachary, James Neville — Sylva 
Zuckerman, Isaac L. — Greensboro 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Bowman, Frederick O. — Chapel Hill 
Graham, Frank Porter — New York City 
Holton, Charles William — 

Essex Falls, New Jersey 

Jones, Rowland, Jr. — Washington, D. C. 
Noble, Alice— Chapel Hill 



54 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 
Adams, James C. — Landis 
Alrnand, Charles Aubrey — Rocky Mount 
Anderson, William A. — High Point 
Angel, T. W., Jr. — Franklin 
Barbour, Thelbert Alonzo — Burlington 
Black, Baxter F., Jr. — Kannapolis 
Brown, Samuel James — Gastonia 
Bryan, J. E. — Lumberton 
Cahill, Edgar Leon — Winston-Salem 
Chandler, James Thomas — Leaksville 
Correll, Leslie James — Kannapolis 
Coxe, James Sherwood — Raleigh 
Creech, Joseph A. — Selma 
Dallas, G. L. — Leaksville 
Elks, Chester A. — Scotland Neck 
Faulkner, Edward G. — Monroe 
Gamble, Joe Paul, Jr. — Monroe 
Garland, Robert G.— High Point 
Gwin, Charles Eugene — Salisbury 
Hedriek, Hoyt Carlynn — Monroe 
Hickman, Sam G. — Statesville 
Holmes, Ralph T— Statesville 
Jenkins, Edmund Thomas — Winston-Salem 
Ketchum, W. L. — Jacksonville 
Lovingood, Jack B. — Hendersonville 
McGhee, Joseph T. — High Point 
McGill, J. L. — Kings Mountain 



McLarty, George — High Point 
McNeill, W. C— Whiteville 
Matthews, George David — Stoneville 
Matthews, Johnnie Lee — Rocky Mount 
Matthews, Weldon C. — Morehead City 
Niven, Howard Archibald — Charlotte 
Overton, John Tyler — Southern Pines 
Pearce, Ennis Lee — Rocky Mount 
Pinner, Beaman L. — Asheville 
Pinnix, John Marshall, Jr. — Kernersville 
Reeves, Elmer J. — Charlotte 
Richardson, Joseph Phillips — 

Winston-Salem 
Riddle, Steve W. — Burlington 
Royal, J. Weldon — Denton 
Royall, George E. — Elkin 
Rumfelt, Jack Norman — Belmont 
Russell, Rufus C. — Greensboro 
Secrest, Vann V. — Monroe 
Sumner, Alfred Cooper — Burlington 
Suttle, Julius Albert, Jr.— Shelby 
Taylor, Charles Alexander — Mount Holly 
Treadwell, John E. — Raleigh 
Upchureh, John O. — Salisbury 
Viall, Wesley R. — Pinehurst 
Vinson, James Thomas, Jr. — Goldsboro 
Walters, Chester R. — Salisbury 
Wharton, Charles A. — Gibsonville 




The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



55 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 
NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS 1962-1963 

President Mrs. John T. Stevenson, 817 W. Church Street, Elizabeth City 

First Vice-President Mrs. David D. Claytor, 1208 Quail Drive, Greensboro 

Second Vice-President Mrs. C. D. Blanton, Jr., 403 Phifer Road, Kings Mountain 

Secretary Mrs. W. H. Randall, P. 0. Box 277, Lillington 

Treasurer Mrs. Robert H. Milton, 329 Club Drive, Salisbury 

Historian Mrs. L. R. Burris, Sr., Laurel Road, Valdese 

Parliamentarian Mrs. M. B. Melvin, 1907 St. Marys Street, Raleigh 

Advisor Mrs. Floyde F. Potter, 1227 Wendover Road, Charlotte 

Advisor Mrs. Leslie Myers, 420 Lawndale Drive, Winston-Salem 

Committee Members, 1962-1963 

Mrs. "Wesley Viall, Sr Pinehurst 

Mrs. W. L. West Roseboro 

Resolutions 
Mrs. William H. Houser, Chm. . Cherryville 

Mrs. T. R. Robinson Goldsboro 

Mrs. S. G. Koonce Chadbourn 



Nominating 

Mrs. Ralph P. Rogers, Chm Durham 

Mrs. Robert B. Hall Mocksville 

Mrs. L. Craig Lewis Winston-Salem 

Ways and Means — Project 
Mrs. George W. Markham, dim. . Fayetteville 

Mrs. M. A. Chambers Chapel Hill 

Mrs. L. E. Reaves, Jr. Fayetteville 

Project — Sub-Committee 
Mrs. Claude Piantadosi, Chm. . . . Chapel Hill 

Mrs. R. B. Hall Mocksville 

Mrs. F. F. Potter Charlotte 

Mrs. James L. Creech Smithfield 

Membership 

Mrs. David Claytor, Chm Greensboro 

Mrs. Fred Moss Gastonia 

Mrs. Sanf ord Price Salemburg 

Hospitality 
Mrs. C. D. Blanton, Jr., Chm Kings Mt. 



"Doings" 

Mrs. George Cocolas, Chm Chapel Hill 

Mrs. James R. Casteel Durham 

Mrs. George W. Harris Chapel Hill 

Publicity 

Mrs. Rush Hamrick, Jr., Chm. Shelby 

Mrs. C. L. Futrell Cary 

Mrs. E. E. Merchant, Jr Winston-Salem 

Special. Committee — Revising Handbook 

Mrs. W. D. Welch, Jr., Chm. Washington 

Mrs. W. J. Smith Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Ralph P. Rogers Durham 




Auxiliary Officers: Seated, 1 to r, Mesdames Claytor, Stevenson and Randall. Standing, 1 to 
r, Mesdames Myers, Milton, Burris, Melvin and Potter. 



56 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

Liaison Committee 

Alamance Mrs. Sandy D. Griffin, Jr., Burlington 

Asheville Mrs. Rush Blanton, Asheville 

Cabarrus Mrs. P. L. George, Jr., Kannapolis 

Chapel Hill Mrs. M. A. Chambers, Chapel Hill 

Charlotte Mrs. Ross L. Cooper, Charlotte 

Gaston Mrs. William G. Forrest, Gastouia 

Greensboro Mrs. L. D. Russell, Greensboro 

High Point Mrs. J. A. Bundy, High Point 

Lizzie Hancock Mrs. Frank Barnett, Henderson 

Pharmacy Wives Mrs. 0. O. Grabs, Jr., Chapel Hill 

Raleigh Mrs. J. E. Gillespie, Raleigh 

Rowan-Davie Mrs. John H. Brown, China Grove 

Winston-Salem Mrs. G. F. Benton, Winston-Salem 



Mrs. L. Dale Adams, Mt. Holly 
Mrs. Brooks Beddingfield, Greenville 
Mrs. C. D. Blanton, King Mountain 
Mrs. Shelton B. Boyd, Mt. Olive 
Mrs. Ed Bradshaw, Jr., Kinston 
Mrs. Lee R. Brandon, Hickory 
Mrs. C. B. Clark, Jr., Williamston 
Mrs. James L. Creech, Smithfield 
Mrs. Graham Culbreth, Southern Pines 
Mrs. Harold Day, Spruce Pine 
Mrs. Robert R. Dees, Burgaw 
Mrs. J. Paul Gamble, Monroe 
Mrs. H. O. Gammon, Reidsville 
Mrs. W. S. Gibson, Goldsboro 
Mrs. Steve Gowan, Wallace 
Mrs. W. B. Gurley, Winsor 
Mrs. R. M. Herring, Clinton 
Mrs. L. L. Holland, Hamlet 
Mrs. F. L. Hooper, Sylva 
Mrs. Palmer Horton, Wilkesboro 
Mrs. R. L. Irwin, Elkin 



Mrs. J. C. Jackson, Lumberton 

Mrs. W. A. James, Belmont 

Mrs. Zack Lyon, Durham 

Mrs. E. J. McDonald, Jr., Jacksonville 

Mrs. N. O. McDowell, Jr., Scotland Neck 

Mrs. William J. Miller, Statesville 

Mrs. J. C. Mills, Mt. Airy 

Mrs. Roy Moore, Wilson 

Mrs. James R. Oakley, Ahoskie 

Mrs. John Wayne Polk, Dunn 

Mrs. Frank E. Raper, Rocky Mount 

Mrs. L. E. Reaves, Jr., Fayetteville 

Mrs. Ralph P. Rogers, Jr., Durham 

Mrs. Carlton Robinson, Morehead City 

Mrs. Charles L. Stevens, Benson 

Mrs. Claude Suttlemyre, Hickory 

Mrs. John A. Terrell, Jr., Sanford 

Mrs. Harry TJmphlett, Elizabeth City 

Mrs. Wilbur Ward, Swannanoa 

Mrs. James E. Williams, Rockingham 



EXCERPTS FROM THE MINUTES OF THE THIRTY-FIFTH 
ANNUAL BUSINESS SESSION 



The Woman's Auxiliary of the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association met 
for the thirty-fifth annual business meeting 
at twelve noon on April 10, 1962, in the 
Virginia Dare Ballroom of the Sir Walter 
Hotel, Raleigh, North Carolina, with the 
president, Mrs. Leslie M. Myers, presiding. 

The invocation was given by Mrs. Homer 
Starling of Raleigh, a former State Presi- 
dent of the Auxiliary. 

Greetings were brought by Mrs. John 
Bius, president of the Raleigh Woman's 
Drug Club, the Hostess Auxiliary. The re- 
sponse was given by Mrs. Robert B. Hall, 



wife of the president of the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

Mrs. Myers appointed a Committee on 
Minutes: Mrs. Eugene Merchant, Mrs. Paul 
Miller, and Mrs. B. W. Spencer, Jr. She also 
appointed an Auditing Committee: Mrs. 
A. W. Jowdy, Jr., Mrs. Robert B. Hall, and 
Mrs. George W. Markham. 

The Parliamentarian, Mrs. George Mark- 
ham, had been appointed to serve as chair- 
man of a special committee on Constitution 
and By-Laws, and also Chairman of a 
Special Committee regarding Life Member- 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



57 



ships. Mrs. Markham recommended that 
Article VII, Section 2 of the By-Laws be 
amended to include the word incoming. The 
section, as amended by the vote of the ses- 
sion, now reads : ' ' One fourth of the money 
received from dues shall be reserved for 
operating expenses and the remainder shall 
be contributed to the Scholarship Fund 
established at the University of North Caro- 
lina by the Woman's Auxiliary, or any 
worthwhile project decided upon by the cur- 
rent or incoming Executive Board. ' ' 

Mrs. Markham further recommend that 
Section 3 be added to Acticle IV — Member- 
ships: "A Life Membership shall be avail- 
able upon application to any active member, 
who has done outstanding work for a mini- 
mum of ten (10) years, upon payment of 
One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) to the 
Woman's Auxiliary, for use in their Scholar- 
ship program, or for other current Pharmacy 
project needs. The Woman 's Auxiliary may 
award a Life Membership to any member 
voted for such honor by the membership of 
the Auxiliary provided the Treasurer trans- 
fers the amount of One Hundred Dollars 
($100.00) to the aforesaid funds." This 
recommendation was also seconded and car- 
ried. 

The Historian, Mrs. Rush Hamrick, Jr., 
reported a new scrapbook had been secured 
as approved by the Executive Board at their 
February meeting. She asked that material 
be sent to her for inclusion in the book. 

STANDING COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Mrs. Thomas M. Holland reported for the 
Executive Board. Four meetings were held 
during the year and the following business 
was transacted : Approval of the selection of 
a nominating committee, appointment of the 
committee on Life Membership, planning of 
the October Workshop. It was also voted 
to allot $35 to the Pharmacy (Students) 
Wives Auxiliary toward the expenses of their 
Christmas party and Senior Tea. 

A sum of one hundred and fifty dollars 
was appropriated toward clerical help and 
office expenses borne by the N. C. Pharma- 
ceutical Association in Auxiliary work, as 
well as $35 toward expenditures incurred by 
the Woman 's Auxiliary during official meet- 
ings held at the Institute of Pharmacy. It 



was also voted to allot up to $250 to Raleigh 
for convention expenses. 

The Hospitality chairman, Mrs. David D. 
Claytor, reported that 133 messages had been 
sent to members or their families. 

The Membership chairman, Mrs. John T. 
Stevenson, reported 179 new members; con- 
vention attendance of 273; total membership 
of 681. 

Mrs. Myers made the following announce- 
ment : " It is with regret that I announce 
the death of three of our members during the 
past year: Mrs. J. Howard Mock of Ashe- 
ville, Mrs. G. T. Cornwell of Morganton, and 
Mrs. Wayne T. Rhyne of Gastonia. 

Resolutions submitted by Mrs. W. T. 
Boone, Chairman, were adopted in appre- 
ciation to Auxiliary officers and committee 
members; to Frances Holland who was re- 
tiring from the Executive Board; to Vivian 
Smith for assistance to the Auxiliary; to 
the NCPA, TMA, wholesale houses, manu- 
facturers, retail establishments, and individ- 
uals who had given prizes, entertainment, 
etc. at the convention; to the women of Ra- 
leigh who had served as hostesses for the 
convention. 

Mrs. Homer Starling reported for the 
Publicity Committee. She listed news re- 
leases which had been prepared and mailed 
to major newspapers of the State, as well 
as the Auxiliary write-ups in the Carolina 
Journal of Pharmacy. 

Mrs. George Cocolas, editor of "Doings" 
reported that one issue of the bulletin has 
been mailed to members during the year, in 
which was included convention news, mem- 
bership materials, etc. 

The report of the Nominating Committee 
was given by Mrs. Hoy Moose, and the fol- 
lowing slate was accepted as submitted: For 
President, Mrs. John T. Stevenson; for First 
Vice-President, Mrs. David D. Claytor, 
Second Vice-President, Mrs. Charles D. Blan- 
ton, Jr. ; Secretary, Mrs. W. H. Randall ; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Robert H. Milton; Parlia- 
mentarian, Mrs. M. B. Melvin; Historian, 
Mrs. L. R. Burris, Sr. ; Advisors, Mrs. 
Floyde F. Potter and Mrs. Leslie Myers. 
The Installation service was announced for 
four o'clock in the afternoon. 

At the convention planning session, the 
local auxiliary presidents had chosen to re- 



58 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



port the activities of their respective groups 
by exhibits, in order for members to view 
their work during the entire three convention 
days. The exhibit was located on the mez- 
zanine of the Sir Walter, and was arranged 
by Mrs. Paul Miller and Mrs. Edwin Fuller. 

Presidents of the local auxiliaries were 
recognized by name and asked to stand. Mrs. 
Myers announced that the total Woman's 
Auxiliary membership was composed of ap- 
proximately 50% members at large and 50% 
from organized local auxiliaries. 

Mrs. Myers recognized wives of Pharmacy 
students who had served as Pages during the 
convention. She also expressed appreciation 
and gratitude to Mrs. M. B. Melvin, general 
convention chairman, and her committees for 
their hospitality throughout the meeting. 

Mrs. John T. Stevenson, First Vice-Presi- 
dent, took the chair while the President gave 
her report. 

PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

Mrs. Leslie Myers 

This has been a busy year, one full of 
activity. I was inspired by so congenial a 
group, and confident that we were working 
toward a common goal, to encourage women 
concerned with the profession of Pharmacy 
to take an active interest in pharmaceutical 
affairs. 

The Executive Board held a brief meeting 
following the business session at the Country 
Club in Greensboro. 

I was invited to the Senior Pharmacy 
Wives Tea in May. These girls are well 
versed in each phase of our work, and we 
welcome them to activity in local groups 
upon their husbands ' graduations. 

An Executive Board meeting to act on 
recommendations of the past president was 
held in May. Committee appointments were 
made and confirmed in June. 

The tenth Annual Leadership Training 
Workshop sponsored by the NCCWO was 
held July 17-20 in Chapel Hill. Five of your 
officers, plus three members of the Cabarrus 
County Auxiliary attended. During the 
Workshop, plans were made for our Officer's 
Day in October. 

On October 3rd, the Officer's Day was at- 
tended by 60 members of our organization. 
Small informal discussion groups, led by 



experienced persons, was the format used 
to acquaint those attending with information 
pertinent to their offices in the local auxilia- 
ries. Projects and programs that have been 
used successfully by each group were dis 
cussed. Mrs. W. J. Smith, assisted by the 
Chapel Hill Auxiliaries, was hostess for a de- 
lightful buffet luncheon. 

High Point and Rowan-Davie Auxiliaries 
asked me to come as a guest to their monthly 
meeting in October. I was honored by the 
ladies in Raleigh, Cabarrus County, and 
Greensboro during November and January. 

Other activity in January consisted of an 
Executive Board meeting followed by a con- 
vention planning session in the afternoon. 
As a result, the membership drive and local 
auxiliary reports were presented in a differ- 
ent manner this year. 

After several preliminary discussions, Dr. 
Melvin Chambers presented a program for 
recruiting Pharmacy students which would 
enlist the help of the Woman 's Auxiliary. 
The Executive Board heartily endorsed the 
plan but felt that the limited time remaining 
in both our fiscal year and the high school 
year would not permit a fair trial of the pro- 
posed plan. 

Our newsletter, ' ' Doings, ' ' was edited, 
published, and mailed to each member in 
February. The Charlotte ladies were my 
hostesses in February. 

I was a luncheon guest at the Burlington- 
Alamance and Lizzie Hancock Chapter in 
March. The Apothecary Club of which I am 
a member honored me at their annual dinner. 
Truly, I have never received so great a trib- 
ute from those who know best my limita- 
tions. This concluded official visits to the 
local auxiliaries. 

These are highlights of a most eventful 
year. To see the enthusiasm that each group 
possessed in their numerous activities was 
indeed a challenge to me. The Chapel Hill 
Pharmaceutical Auxiliary and Pharmacy 
Student Wives gave generously of their time 
to make us welcome at each visit to the In- 
stitute. 

The Endowment Principle of the Vivian 
Spradlin Smith Scholarship is $6,500.00. 
The Scholarship went to a most deserving 
girl in the senior class. 

The Lucile Swaringen Rogers Scholarship 
Fund now totals $2,579.98. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



59 



The Student Emergency Loan Fund is 
$1,199.70. 

Our Reserve Fund has a balance of 
$524.25. 

In past years the outgoing president was 
not retained on the Executive Board. Each, 
in turn, left recommendations which would, 
in her opinion, improve the efficiency of the 
organization. I feel that the incoming presi- 
dent will bring new ideas and inspiration for 
us to work with and, therefore, I do not 
choose to make a recommendation. 

I wish to thank sincerely this year 's offi- 
cers; members of appointive committees, 
and the entire membership for their loyal 
support; Mrs. W. J. Smith for her invalu- 
able assistance and encouragement to me; 



and Mrs. M. B. Melvin, State Convention 
Chairman and her assistants, Mrs. John Bius 
and Mrs. Tom Sanders for the success of 
this convention. 

Mrs. James L. Creech presented Mrs. 
Myers with a gift of silver from the Aux- 
iliary as a token gift of appreciation for her 
work during the year. 

Mrs. Myers resumed the chair and recog- 
nized Mrs. Leon Kimball, luncheon hostess 
for Sealtest Foods, and other members of the 
Sealtest family, also Mrs. Harold Diggette, 
luncheon chairman, and members of her com- 
mittee. 

Following announcements by Mrs. Melvin 
and Mrs. Stevenson, Mrs. Leslie Myers, 
President, declared the meeting adjourned. 




60 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

1962-1963 ROSTER TRAVELING MEN'S AUXILIARY OF 
THE NORTH CAROLINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

W. P. Brewer, President Leon Kimball 5 years 

Forrest Matthews, Jr., Vice President Bruce Wingate 4 years 

J. Floyd Goodrich, Secretary-Treasurer O. G. Duke 3 years 

C. H. Smith, Asst. Secretary-Treasurer Reuben C. Eussel 2 years 

A. G. Cox 1 year 

Mr. Pharmacist — These men and these men alone contributed financially toward your 
entertainment at the TMA party held in Raleigh this year. Support those representatives 
that are interested in you and your association. Ask the man who calls on you if he is a 
member. 



Abbott Laboratories, R. Vance Eller, 1817 Dublin Drive, Greensboro 

Abbott Laboratories, F. A. Stovall, 221G Pershing St., Durham 

Albers Drug Co., N. O. Phillips, Box N, Bristol, Tennessee 

American Greeting Corp., Loyd A. Simmons, 20-4 Westmoreland Drive, Greensboro 

American Pharmaceutical Co., A. W. Baker, Box 715, Valdese 

American Pharmaceutical Co., C. H. Davies, 120 Bruckner Blvd., New York, N. Y. 

American Safety Razor Co., Mark S. Lehr, 1045 W. Market St., Greensboro 

Ascher, B. F. & Co., Inc., Carl Lewis, Box 236, Kenly 

Atlantic Tobacco Co., O. R. Davis, 1430 S. Wilmington St., Raleigh 

J. H. Austin Co., J. H. Austin, Box 4142, Charlotte 

Ayerst Laboratories, J. Howard Mock, 1220 N.E. 157th St., N. Miami Beach, Fla. 

Ayerst Laboratories, Romas T. White, Jr., P. O. Box 6313, Raleigh 

B. C. Remedy Co., H. M. Adams, Route #7, Rock Spring Dr., Winston-Salem 

B. C. Remedy Co., L. P. Bullock, Jr., 503 Louise St., Wilson 

B. C. Remedy Co., F. T. Clayton, 1217 Gunnison Place, Raleigh 

B. C. Remedy Co., A. G. Cox, 2513 Club Blvd., Durham 

B. C. Remedy Co., W. T. Hamlin, 1102 N. Gregson St., Durham 

B. C. Remedy Co., W. Morris Long, 709 Shepherd St., Durham 

B. C. Remedy Co., W. W. Morton, % Company, Durham 

B. C. Remedy Co., R. F. Norton, Box 119, Carolina Beach 

B. C. Remedy Co., R. T. Scott, 2123 Sprunt Street, Durham 

B. C. Remedy Co., W. W. Wall, Box 521, Hickory 

B & H Photo Co., W. S. Barnett, Box 1600, Charlotte 

Bauer & Black, Walter A. Wardlaw, 3206 James PL, Greensboro 

Becton, Dickinson Co., J. A. Hessen, Jr., 265-A Hillside Ave., Charlotte 

Bellamy, R. R. & Son, A. B. Bethune, 1212 Azalea, Wilmington 

Bellamy, R. R. & Son, J. D. Colwell, % Company, Wilmington 

Bellamy, R. R. & Son, W. B. Lennon, 2918 Park Ave., Wilmington 

Bellamy, R. R. & Son, Harry H. Montgomery, 3808 Oleander Dr., Wilmington 

Bellamy, R. R. & Son, J. E. Woodburn, % Company, Wilmington 

Bennett-Lewallen Co., Cecil K. Henderson, % Company, Winston-Salem 

Borden Co., The, Burgess Moore, % Company, Asheville 

Borden Co., The, J. P. Morgan, 1309 Marlborough Rd., Raleigh 

Borden Co., The, G. Warren Newton, 315 S. Grace St., Rocky Mt. 

Borden Co., The, Bob Yarbrough, 461 Oakdale Rd., Charlotte 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 61 

Breon Laboratories, Inc., J. L. Moore, 2343 Grant Ave., Ealeigh 

Bristol Laboratories, Howard A. Wynne, Jr., 3549 Apache Dr., Ealeigh 

Bristol-Myers Co., F. F. Potter, 1227 Wendover Rd., Charlotte 

Brockway Glass Co., Inc., John D. Floyd, 2844 Columbus Circle, Charlotte 

Brockway Glass Co., Inc., J. Lowell Smithey, 701 Green Glen Dr., DuBois, Pa. 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co., Dean J. Shelton, 2703 Wynnewood Dr., Greensboro 

Chicago Pharmacol Co., Carter A. Henson, 609 2nd Ave. PI. N.E., Conover 

Ciba Pharmaceutical Co., L. A. Coleman, 819 Ashwyn Drive, Charlotte 

Ciba Pharmaceutical Co., William A. Diehl, 3304 Hall Place, Raleigh 

Ciba Pharmaceutical Co., Charles G. Perry, 506 Peach St., Kannapolis 

Cliff-Weil, Inc., E. L. Rock, P. O. Box 1897, Richmond, Va. 

Coca-Cola Co., Wingo Avery, 1813 Pembroke Rd., Greensboro 

Coca-Cola Co., David W. Britt, 622 N.E. 25th St., Winston-Salem 

Coca-Cola Co., E. M. Greeson, Jr., 1813 Pembroke Rd., Greensboro 

Coca-Cola Co., Warren Portwood, 3411 Leonard St., Raleigh 

Colorcraft Corp., Nelson StraAvbridge, Box 249, Durham 

Creomulsion Co., George VonAspern, 400 Woodlawn Ave., Greensboro 

H. H. Cutler Company, Victor McGee, 633 West Ave., Wadesboro 

Davol Rubber Co., John Alexander, 2775 North Hills Dr., N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 

Dean Rubber Co., J. A. Catanese, Box 2401, Charlotte 

Dome Chemicals, Inc., Bob Sherrill, 2620 McClintock Rd., Charlotte 

Drug Package Co., C. H. Smith, Box 1001, Charlotte 

Endo Products, Inc., Edwin C. Brown, 21 Chateau Place, Asheville 

Endo Products, Inc., H. H. Matthews, 3200 Coleridge Dr., Raleigh 

Geer Drug Co., J. W. Brown, Box 124, Arden 

Geer Drug Co., W. Henry Davis, 268 Royal Pines Dr., Arden 

Green Drug Co., Frank O. Ezell, 894 Greenville Highway, Spartanburg, S. C. 

Geer Drug Co., Carlisle Friday, Jr., 1908 Windham PI., Charlotte 

Geer Drug Co., D. A. Geer, 102 Greenbriar Rd., Spartanburg, S. C. 

Geer Drug Co., Holmes C. Geer, 846 W. Main St., Spartanburg, S. C. 

Geer Drug Co., R, Glenn Holt, 319 Amherst Dr., Spartanburg, S. C. 

Geer Drug Co., Charles Trippe, 203 Midway Dr., Spartanburg, S. C. 

Geigy Pharmaceuticals, Donald H. Boughton, 4204 Windsor Place, Raleigh 

Geigy Pharmaceuticals, Thos. E. Edwards, 805 Poplar St., Kinston 

General Electric Co. Photo Lamp Dept., Walker B. Sorrells, P. O. Box 2144, Charlotte 

Gillette Safety Razor Co., E. D. Gardner, 2320 Prince St., Durham 

Gilpin, H. B. Co., Robert Colb, 1205 Tuscarora Ave., Elizabeth City 

Gilpin, H. B. Co., Charlie Daughtridge, 300 W. 12th St., Washington 

Gilpin, H. B. Co., L. Scott Grauel, 6435 Tidewater Dr., Norfolk, Va. 

Glenbrook Laboratories, R. T. Austin, 2582 Woodward Rd., N. E., Atlanta 6, Ga. 

Glenbrook Laboratories, Tom Wagoner, P. O. Box 1253, Pulaski, Va. 

Globe Laboratories, Bennett Early, Box 5177, Roanoke, Va. 

Glover, H. Clay, Inc., Irving Standiford, 2817 Sherwood St., Greensboro 

Hoffman-La-Roche, J. Lee Jones, 2206 Lawndale Dr., Greensboro 

Hollingsworth Candies, Hugh K. Sconyers, 1618 Providence Rd., Charlotte 

Hynes Sales Co., Bryce W. Griffith, Route 4, Box 500, Charlotte 

Johnson & Johnson, J. Darrell Dail, P. O. Box 11252, Raleigh 

Johnson & Johnson, E. Lee Hamilton, 4317 Federal St., Rockville, Md. 

Johnson & Johnson, Cleveland C. Wilkins, 1012 Evergreen Ave., Goldsboro 

Johnson, Robert Wood Co., Stuart R. Knapp, Jr., P. O. Box 6058, Raleigh 

Justice Drug Co., W. H. Andrews, % Co., Greensboro 

Justice Drug Co., W. P. Brewer, % Co., Greensboro 

Justice Drug Co., R. G. Carroll, 404 Summit Ave., Statesville 

Justice Drug Co., L. R. Davis, % Company, Greensboro 



62 The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 

Justice Drug Co., Stephen Forrest, % Company, Greensboro 

Justice Drug Co., J. C. Knight, % Company, Greensboro 

Justice Drug Co., O. C. Trogclon, % Company, Greensboro 

Justice Drug Co., J. M. Waugh, % Company, Greensboro 

Justice Drug Co., T. B. Waugh, % Company, Greensboro 

Justice Drug Co., R. G. Wells, % Company, Greensboro 

Justice Drug Co., R. F. Whiteley, % Company, Greensboro 

Kendall Drug Co., John W. Canipe, % Company, Shelby 

Kendall Drug Co., John W. Canipe, % Company, Shelby 

Kendall Drug Co., Raymond Canipe, Box 39, Shelby 

Kendall Drug Co., J. P. Grice, % Company, Shelby 

Kendall Drug Co., C. Rush Hamrick, Sr., Box 39, Shelby 

King, W. H. Drug Co., R. L. Alphin, 337 Buncombe St., Raleigh 

King, W. H. Drug Co., Raymond Brockwell, 2803 Exeter Circle, Raleigh 

King, W. H. Drug Co., R. L. Brown, % Company, Raleigh 

King, W. H. Drug Co., Charles R. Daniel, % Company, Raleigh 

King, W. H. Drug Co., O. G. Duke, Mitchell Village, RFD #1, Box 277, Morehead City 

King, W. H. Drug Co., Douglas J. Finch, 405 W. Gannon Ave., Zebulon 

King, W. H. Drug Co., Earle Jones, % Company, Raleigh 

King, W. H. Drug Co., Frank D. Peacock, 2413 Ridge Road, Raleigh 

King, W. H. Drug Co., Tom Sanders, % Company, Raleigh 

King, W. H. Drug Co., David V. Scarlett, Box 866, Clinton 

King, W. H. Drug Co., H. C. Starling, % Company, Raleigh 

King, W. H. Drug Co., Jack T. Yeargan, 2909 Boone Trail, Ealeigh 

Lance, Inc., B. B. Dean, 1226 Banbury Rd., Raleigh 

Lance, Inc., C. L. Moser, 1919 Woodberry Rd., Charlotte 

Lance, Inc., E. P. Ward, Box 8688, Richmond 26, Va. 

Lederle Laboratories, Reginald B. Childers, 402 Carolina Ave., Raleigh 

Lederle Laboratories, Edward D. Jackson, 2509 Arnold Drive, Charlotte 

Lederle Laboratories, Clifford J. Lopp, P. O. Box 102, Lexington 

Lederle Laboratories, Ed. E. Thomison, 3015 Finley Place, Charlotte 

Lever Bros., Pepsodent, Ralph G. Lien, 814 Hawthorne Lane, Charlotte 

Lilly, Eli & Co., George L. Coaker, 6119 Glenridge Rd., Charlotte 

Lilly, Eli & Co., L. M. McCombs, Box #7, Creedmoor 

Lilly, Eli & Co., David F. McGowan, Old Mill Ed., Greenwood, Chapel Hill 

Lilly, Eli & Co., Jack G. Watts, 2426 Briarwood Dr., Burlington 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., M. J. Dean, % Company, Charlotte 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., Charles W. Haigler, % Company, Charlotte 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., P. S. Hawfield, % Company, Charlotte 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., W. B. Hawfleld, 203 S. College St., Charlotte 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., George L. Hull, % Company, Roanoke, Va. 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., Ted Johnson, 1300 Hawthorne Lane, Charlotte 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., P. W. Kendall, % Company, Charlotte 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., Joel E. McConnell, % Company, Charlotte 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., Ray R. McGee, % Company, Charlotte 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., Joe E. Myers, Jr., % Company, Columbia, S. C. 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., J. Auddy Parker, % Company, Charlotte 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., Reuben C. Russell, % Company, Charlotte 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., Tobie K. Steele, % Company, Charlotte 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., James E. Thrower, % Company, Charlotte 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc., Ronnie Trotter, % Company, Charlotte 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Co., R. L. White, 5622 Preston Lane, Charlotte 

Maryland Baking Co., Graham W. Gregory, 2302 Stevens Rd., Raleigh 

Massengill, S. E. Co., Manning C. Carrington, Box 121, Durham 



The Carolixa Journal of Pharmacy 63 

Massengill, S. E. Co., Thompson Hiles, 120 Westwoocl Rd., Asheville 

Massengill, S. E. Co., James H. Morris, Jr., 902 Stoney Hill Rd., Redwood City, California 

Massengill, S. E. Co., Herbert Taylor, 113 Grace St., Williamston 

Massengill, S. E. Co., J. C. Woodard, 602 Sunset Dr., High Point 

Mayrand, Inc., J. C. Edmonds, Whiteville 

Mayrand, Inc., R. E. Woodcock, 3117 Georgian Terrace, Raleigh 

Meade Johnson & Co., Thomas C. Clark, 605 Pine Valley Dr., Wilmington 

Meade Johnson & Co., Jack Featherston, 2824 Butner St., Durham 

Merck, Sharp & Dohme Co., Warren R. Ehrhardt, Box 1313, Rocky Mt. 

Merck, Sharp & Dohme Co., W. P. Farthing, 2040 Coniston Place, Charlotte 

Merck, Sharp & Dohme Co., E. E. Fulmer, Box 1279, Salisbury 

Merck, Sharp & Dohme Co., A. S. McCord, Jr., Highland Park, North Wilkesboro 

Merck, Sharp & Dohme Co., Ivey A (Mack) McDaniel, 501 E. Club Blvd., Durham 

Merck, Sharp & Dohme Co., Jimmie A. Sherrill, 517 Westview St., Lenoir 

Merck, Sharp & Dohme, W. E. Sutton, P. O. Box 1353, Wilmington 

Merck, Sharp & Dohme, Tommy H. Temple, 127 Hudson St., Raleigh 

Merrell, Wm. S. Co., Garland F. Benton, Jr., 1605 Northwest Blvd., Winston-Salem 

Merrell, Wm. S. Co., Jimmy Gunter, 1219 Thurston Drive, Wilson 

Merrell, Wm. S. Co., Carl G. Knox, 1206 Azalea Drive, Wilmington 

Merrell, Wm. S. Co., Forrest Matthews, Jr., 2509 Kenmore Dr., Raleigh 

Miles Laboratories, Inc., C. Harold Daniels, 211 W. Knox St., Durham 

Miles Laboratories, Inc., Robert F. Skinner, 202 Trelawney Rd., Bayside, Va. 

Mitchum Co., The, J. R. "Jack" Toler, 4569 Woodlark Lane, Charlotte 

Montag, Inc., L. Melvin Wells, 102 Sparger Place, Greensboro 

National Hygienic Prod. Corp., A. C. Stewart, Box 484, Smithfield 

Nifty Mfg. Divn. St. Regis Pa. Co., Robert L. Travis, 3859 Stonehaven Dr., Charlotte 

Norris, Garland C. Co., Osborne S. Lucas, 2536 York Rd., Raleigh 

North Carolina Mutual Drug, D. Boone, 504 Compton PI., Durham 

North Carolina Mutual Drug, T. H. Mangum, 3503 Eastis Dr., Durham 

North Carolina Mutual Drug, W. D. Pearce, 210 Pogue St., Raleigh 

North Carolina Mutual Drug, T. S. Williams, 301 Hughes St., Apex 

Norwich Pharmacal Co., James E. North, 308 Shephard St., Raleigh 

Nunnally's Candies, W. T. Threewitts, Jr., 300 A Ashland Dr., Greensboro 

O 'Hanlon-Watson Drug Co., J. Herbert Ball, 2401 Bitting Rd., Winston-Salem 

O 'Hanlon-Watson Drug Co., J. M. Darlington, 2232 Westover Dr., Winston-Salem 

O 'Hanlon-Watson Drug Co., L. P. Miller, 1255 Wedgewood Dr., Winston-Salem 

O 'Hanlon-Watson Drug Co., I. H. Rider, % Company, Winston-Salem 

O 'Hanlon-Watson Drug Co., James D. White, 324 Anita Drive, Winston-Salem 

Ortho Pharm. Corp., Roy C. Muse, Jr., 3130 Pinehurst Place, Charlotte 

Owens-Illinois Glass Corp., A. S. McKaig, 1506 Liberty Life Bldg., Charlotte 

Owens-Illinois Glass Corp., J. M. Morgan, 1300 Baxter St., Charlotte 

Owens, Minor and Bodeker, Inc., Gamble Bowers, % Company, Richmond, Va. 

Owens, Minor and Bodeker, Inc., W. Frank Fife, 304 Wilshire Blvd., Wilson 

Owens, Minor & Bodeker, Inc., Ray Howell, 2402 Wade Avenue, Raleigh 

Owens, Minor and Bodeker, Inc., Gilmer Minor, % Company, Richmond, Va. 

Owens, Minor and Bodeker, Inc., L. S. Whittle, Box 962, Goldsboro 

Owens, Minor and Bodeker, Inc., Cecil Williamson, 602 N. 25th St., Wilmington 

Owens, Minor and Bodeker, Inc., Bruce W. Young, 1606 Highland Dr., Wilson 

Pangburn's Candy, C. W. Morris, 1182 Wembleton Dr., Raleigh 

Parke-Davis & Co., G. G. Buchanan, Box 1254, Greensboro 

Parke-Davis & Co., E. M. Burkett, 732 Circle Drive, New Bern 

Parke-Davis & Co., Walter I. Davis, Box 10694, Cameron Village, Raleigh 

Parke-Davis & Co., Joseph E. Gillespie, Box 6028, Raleigh 

Parke-Davis & Co., G. C. Hartis, 24 Gloria Ave., Winston-Salem 



64 The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 

Parke-Davis & Co., J. L. Holloway, Box 538 Bt. #3, Wilmington 

Parke-Davis & Co., N. Eugene Hood, Jr., 464 Liberty St., Eock Hill, S. C. 

Parke-Davis & Co., Fred Johnson, 420 Golfview Ed., N.W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Parke-Davis & Co., Eobert M. Styles, 5456 Topping Place, Charlotte 9 

Parke-Davis & Co., Gordon Vail, 3133 Pendelton, Charlotte 

Parker Pen Co., Henry J. Bladen, 533 Frank Dr., Charlotte 

Peabody Drug Co., C. T. Byerly, 2315 Sprunt St., Durham 

Peabody Drug Co., W. M. Cannady, 501 Park Drive, Oxford 

Peabody Drug Co., Wade O. Daniels, 3004 Buckingham Ed., Hope Valley, Durham 

Peabody Drug Co., Zack Lyon, 925 Urban Ave., Durham 

Peabody Drug Co., G. O. Peele, % Company, Durham 

Penslar Co., The, A. E. Cross, 1204 N. Fairwater Dr., Norfolk, Va. 

Pet Dairy Products Co., W. B. Bowman, 2356 Eosewood Ave., Winston-Salem 

Pet Dairy Products Co., G. E. Garst, 3717 Frazier Dr., Greensboro 

Pet Dairy Products Co., Jesse P. Jones, % Company, Waynesville 

Pet Dairy Products Co., J. C. Mitchell, % Company, Burlington 

Pet Dairy Products Co., W. H. Tuttle, % Company, Waynesville 

Pfeiffner Co., The, L. D. Davidson, Box 362, Monroe 

Pfizer Laboratories, Charles B. Simmons, 209 Willanda Dr., Wilmington 

Pharmaceutical Products, Inc., Charles B. Parham, 1127 E. Morehead St., Charlotte 

Pharmaco, Inc., James E. Jordan, 325 Auman St., Asheboro 

Physicians Products Co., Wayne Everhart, 909 E. Lexington Ave., High Point 

Physicians Products Co., F. A. Frayser, Jr., 707 Spring Dr., Biehmond 29, Va. 

Pictorial Paper Package Corp., L. A. Bass, Box 591, Wilson 

Pine State Creamery Co., Willard S. Allen, % Company, Ealeigh 

Pine State Creamery Co., W. B. Frazier, % Company, Henderson 

Pine State Creamery Co., J. Dwight Johnson, % Company, Goldsboro 

Pine State Creamery Co., Ben W. Kilgore, % Company, Ealeigh 

Pine State Creamery Co., James D. Kilgore, 500 Glenwood Ave., Ealeigh 

Pine State Creamery Co., Sam N. Mann, % Company, Ealeigh 

Pine State Creamery Co., W. E. Spence, % Company, Ealeigh 

Pine State Creamery Co., Edward E. Sweat, % Company, Ealeigh 

Poythress, Wm. P. & Co., Inc., Peter A. Moore, 26261/2 St. Mary's St., Ealeigh 

Bead, E. B. & Sons Co., J. G. Barnette, Box 955, Sanford 

Eeese Chemical Co., Harold M. Pickett, 1152 Eio St. St. Johns Dr., Jacksonville, Florida 

Eoerig, J. B. & Co., Samuel G. Deal, 2408 Ashley Ed., Charlotte 

Eoerig, J. B. & Co., Walter W. Hendrix, Jr., 1210 Whilden Place, Greensboro 

Eorer, Wm. H. Inc., H. D. Gray, 3022 Glendale Ave., Durham 

Saginaw Industries Co., Gervin M. Wayt, 300 Patton St., Morganton 

Schering Corp., John M. Horton, 1310 Dogwood Lane, Ealeigh 

Schering Corp., Melvin W. Kerner, 3800 Sulkirk Ed., Charlotte 

Schering Corp., Steven Schneider, 2003 Murdoch Ed., Biehmond 29, Va. 

Schering Corp., M. Dale Warner, 803 Fairfield Ave., Kinston 

Schering Corp., James Bay Willis, 811 Murray Ave., Durham 

Schmid, Julius Inc., M. C. Gillen, 5044 French St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Schmid, Julius Inc., Clarence Marcus, 624 Willivee Dr., Decatur, Ga. 

Scott Drug Co., Oren H. Baucom, P. O. Box 10627, Charlotte 

Scott Drug Co., W. L. Blanton, 2900 Whitson Ed., Gastonia 

Scott Drug Co., Lore S. Brown, Box 246, Hamlet 

Scott Drug Co., Dan Busley, Box 1444, Statesville 

Scott Drug Co., Carlos Fry, P. O. Box 652, Carthage 

Scott Drug Co., Carl Geanes, % Company, Charlotte 

Scott Drug Co., I. E. Helms, Box 22, North Wilkesboro 

Scott Drug Co., Jack Hemby, % Company, Charlotte 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 65 

Scott Drug Co., R. B. Julian, Box 571, Salisbury 

Scott Drug Co., Walter Scott, P. O. Box 10627, Charlotte 

Scott Drug Co., Walter Scott, III, % Company, Charlotte 

Scott Drug Co., E. Pannie Smith, Box 10671 Cameron Village, Baleigh 

Scott Drug Co., Lee Talton, % Company, Charlotte 

Scott Drug Co., Bobby Wall, % Company, Charlotte 

Scott Drug Co., J. A. Wolfe, P. O. Box 10627, Charlotte 

Sealtest Foods, O. 0. Allsbrook, % Company, Wilmington 

Sealtest Foods, Joe Beatty, % Company, Charlotte 

Sealtest Foods, C. Bay Black, 2040 Oleander Dr., Wilmington 

Sealtest Foods, Luke Blackmer, % Company, Charlotte 

Sealtest Foods, Worth Blackmon, Box 1787, Charlotte 

Sealtest Foods, W. B. Brown, Box 3007, Wilmington 

Sealtest Foods, William E. Brown, 1002 Montpelier Dr., Greensboro 

Sealtest Foods, Henry Coghill, 535 Nash St., Rocky Mt. 

Sealtest Foods, Harold W. Diggett, 3026 Medlin Dr., Baleigh 

Sealtest Foods, W. Vance Hart, 1309 Spry St., Greensboro 

Sealtest Foods, Norman Hint on, % Company, Rocky Mt. 

Sealtest Foods, C. E. Hudgins, % Company, Wilson 

Sealtest Foods, E. A. Hutchens, Route #1 River Road, Advance 

Sealtest Foods, R. Leon Kimball, 646 Roslyn Rd., Winston-Salem 

Sealtest Foods, Bill Messick, Box 1787, Charlotte 

Sealtest Foods, J. T. Shumate, Box 586, Albemarle 

Sealtest Foods, Guy Smith, % Company, Fayetteville 

Sealtest Foods, F. H. Suttle, % Company, Wilmington 

Sealtest Foods, Cullie Tarlton, % Company, Charlotte 

Sealtest Foods, A. P. Thomas, % Company, Winston-Salem 

Sealtest Foods, Edsel Thomas, % Company, Charlotte 

Sealtest Foods, William H. Thomas, % Company, Wilson 

Sealtest Foods, Bruce Wingate, % Company, Charlotte 

Searle & Co., F. Garland Coble, 901 Fairmont St., Greensboro 

Searle & Co., Benjamin W. Sams, Jr., 1910 Ann St., Wilmington 

Sheaffer Pen Co., H. J. Farnsworth, 110 Arden PI., Greensboro 

Sherman Laboratories, Grayson A. Smith, 936 E. Dayton Ave., High Point 

Smith, Dr. T. C, Co., Canie B. Smith, % Company, Asheville 

Smith, Dr. T. C. Co., Stacy Smith, % Company, Asheville 

Smith, Dr. T. C. Co., Norman F. Young, 7 Forestdale Rd., Asheville 

Smith, Kline & French Labs., Boyd Lee Barnette, 419 Glenbrook Dr., Raleigh 

Smith, Kline & French Labs., Walker R. Crump, Jr., 2510 Beechridge Rd., Raleigh 

Smith, Kline & French Labs., Fred Hawkins, Box 711, Chapel Hill 

Smith, Kline & French Labs., James T. McGhee, 714 E. Hammond St., Durham 

Smith, Kline & French Labs., C. W. Walker, 500 Chancery PI., Greensboro 

Smith, Kline & French Labs., Richard Weir, 1500 Spring Garden St., Phila., Pa. 

Smith, Miller & Patch, Henry P. Ferrell, 2611 Clark Ave., Raleigh 

Smith Wholesale Drug Co., M. H. Byrd, 112 Greenbriar Rd., Spartanburg, S. C. 

Smith Wholesale Drug Co., Morris S. Michael, Box 6011, Asheville 

Smith Wholesale Drug Co., Frank Millstead, 3331 Eastwood Dr., Charlotte 

Smith Wholesale Drug Co., Chas. Rhoden, 842 Churchill Dr., Shelby 

Smith Wholesale Drug Co., A. C. Viekers, 1250 Patridge Rd., Spartanburg, S. C. 

Squibb, E. R. and Sons, J. C. Canipe, Jr., 5724 Doncaster Dr., Charlotte 

Squibb, E. R. and Sons, W. W. Jordan, Box 6353, Raleigh 

Squibb, E. R, and Sons, L. E. Lee, 2838 Selwyn Ave., Charlotte 

Squibb, E. R. and Sons, M. G. Morris, 315 Isabelle St., Greensboro 

Squibb, E. R. and Sons, Ray E. Weathers, 2310 Sprunt St., Durham 



66 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Stanback Co., L. S. Bright, 2212 Shannon St., Ealeigh 

Stanback Co., C. E. Caison, 412 Cape Fear Ave., Fayetteville 

Stanback Co., T. Jim Matthews, % Company, Salisbury 

Stanback Co., J. D. Sorrell, 104 Park View, Wilson 

Stanback Co., F. J. Stanback, % Company, Salisbury 

Stanback Co., R. K. Stuart, 402 Glascock St., Ealeigh 

Strother Drug Co., G. A. Gurganus, Box 716, Greenville 

Strother Drug Co., H. F. Miller, % Company, Richmond, Va. 

Strother Drug Co., D. J. Odom, Box 95, Morehead City 

Sylvania Electric Products, Inc., Bruce Brannon, 5020 Greenbrook Dr., Charlotte 

Taylor Biscuit Co., Guy B. Beattie, P. O. Box 2508, Raleigh 

Tilden Co., The, Walter D. Druen, Box 165, Lynchburg Va. 

Upjohn Co., Ralph L. Billeter, 2616 Glendale Ave., Durham 

VanPelt & Brown, Inc., Edward P. Hammond, 2205 Bay St., Charlotte 

VanPelt & Brown, Inc., W. Lawrence Jones, 327 Mclver St., Greensboro 

VanPelt & Brown, Inc., C. M. Lancaster, 532 Barksdale Dr., Raleigh 

Warren-Teed Pharm., Ford Walker, P. O. Box 265, Raleigh 

Weco Products Co., G. E. Cory, 3600 Madison Ave., Greensboro 

Welton Labs., Inc., Claude S. Welton, 177 Verona Ave., Newark, N. J. 

Westclox Div., Glenn Davis, 1728 Jameston Dr., Charlotte 

White Laboratories, Inc., Charles D. Andrews, 1104 Meade Dr., Greensboro 

Whitman's Candies, Ed Cook, 400 63rd. Ave. N. Myrtle Beach, S. C. 

Whitman's Candies, Ray McArtan, 801 E. Morris Circle, Dunn 

Winston Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Leonard Morrow, Rutherfordton 

Winston Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Milton L. Teague, 705 W. 24th St., Lumberton 

Winston Pharmaceuticals, Inc., William A. Welch, P. O. Box 5275, Winston-Salem 

Winthrop Labs, C. H. Blanton, Rt. #3 Guilford College Station, Greensboro 

Winthrop Laboratories, Inc., Ken Perry, 409 Stacy St., Raleigh 

Write Right Div., Union Bag-Camp Paper Corp., E. Howard Cox, 2020 W. Club Blvd., 

Durham 
Young 's Rubber Corp., Delmas Gault, 2035 Providence La., Dallas, Texas 
Young's Rubber Corp., Ed Hoffman, 1508 Airline Park Blvd., Metairie, La. 
Young's Rubber Corp., Henry A. Trudeau, 3915 Winfield Dr., Charlotte 
Young's Rubber Corp., Waite Warren, 408 Rutland Dr., Charlotte 




The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 



67 



Life Membership 
Life Membership 
Life Membership 
Life Membership 
Life Membership 
Life Membership 
Life Membership 
Life Membership 
Life Membership 
Life Membership 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 
Life Membership, 



LIFE MEMBERS 
TRAVELING MEN'S AUXILIARY 

, J. E. Allen, '2116 Matheson Avenue, Charlotte 
, J. W. Bennick, % Scott Drug Co., Charlotte 

W. A. Burwell, 115 Hudson St., Raleigh 
, J. Ben Coppedge, 5801 Park Rd., Charlotte 

W. R. Dixon, 1405 E. Blvd., Charlotte 

W. O. Ezell, 890 Greenville Hwy., Spartanburg, S. C. 

H. J. Farnsworth, 110 Arden PL, Greensboro 
, F. L. Furr, Box 161, Louisburg 

J. Floyd Goodrich, 2121 Club Blvd., Durham 
, J. W. Harrell, 1917 Sunset Dr., Raleigh 
, D. Frank Hayes, Powhatan Apts., W. Mkt. St., Greensboro 

P. A. Hayes, % Justice Drug Co., Greensboro 

R. D. Heist, 3701 Monument Ave., Richmond 30, Ya. 

W. L. Johnson, Gibson 

W. B. Lyon, 417 Crestland Ave., Greensboro 

W. McElveen, 205 Audrill Ter., Charlotte 

F. T. Matthews, 611 Myers Lane, Greensboro 

N. B. Moury, 7620 Marsha St., Orlando, Fla. 

W. P. Rogers, 27 Farwood Ave., Asheville 

T. S. Simpson, % Justice Drug Co., Greensboro 

M. W. Stone, Box 703, Charlotte 

Phil VanEvery, % Lance Inc., Charlotte 

Joe Wear, Box 217, Wickliffe, Ky. 

F. J. Williams, Sr., 1302 Broad St., Durham 
S. E. Woodall, Box 8688, Richmond, Va. 




EIGHTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF PHARMACY 

MAY 1, 1961 - APRIL 30, 1962 
MEMBERS AND ORGANIZATION 



COMMISSIONED BY HIS EXCELLENCY 
THE GOVERNOR OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Eoger A. McDuffie, Greensboro Term expires April 

N. O. McDowell, Jr., Scotland Neck Term expires April 

Robert Neal Watson, Sanf ord Term expires April 

Harold V. Day, Spruce Pine Term expires April 

Frank W. Day vault Term expires April 



28, 1963(1 

28, 1964' 

28, 1965: 

28, 1966' 

28, 1967 



President 

Roger A. McDuffie 

Vice-President 

Robert Neal Watson 

Secretary-Treasurer 

H. C. McAllister, Chapel Hill 

General Counsel 

J. Ruffin Bailey, Raleigh 

Special Counsel 
F. O. Bowman, Chapel Hill 

Inspector 
John B. Balas, Charlotte 



Chapel Hill, N. C 
May 1, 1962 
To His Excellency 
Governor Terry Sanford 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Dear Sir: 

In compliance with Article 4, Section 90-57 of the General Statutes of North Carolina, 
we are pleased to submit to you and to the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 
the Eighty-First Annual Report of the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy. This report 
contains the proceedings of the Board for the fiscal year ending April 30, 1962. 

Respectfully yours, 
N. C. Board op Pharmacy 
H. C. McAllister 

Secretary-Treasurer 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



69 



EIGHTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF PHARMACY 



Membership 
Mr. F. W. Dayvault was elected to suc- 
ceed himself for a period of five years end- 
ing April 28, 1967. At the June meeting the 
officers of the previous year were re-elected 
to serve for a period of one year. The 
officers and members are as follows: 

Eoger A. McDuffie President 

E. N. Watson Vice-President 

H. C. McAllister (non-member) 

Secretary- Treas u re r 

F. W. Dayvault 

N. 0. McDowell, Jr. 
Harold V. Day 

Other personnel of the Board: 

General Counsel J. Buffin Bailey 

Special Counsel F. O. Bowman 

I Inspector J. B. Balas 

Meetings 
The Board held ten meetings during the 
year. These were regular meetings and were 
held at the office of the Board, 109 Church 
Street, in Chapel Hill. As usual, the exami- 
nations for license were held in June and 
February. The results of the examinations 
are reported below. The facilities at the 
new building occupied by the School of 
Pharmacy, and which are made available 
to the Board for holding the examination in 
Practical Pharmacy, contribute materially to 
the usefulness, dignity, and ease of admin- 
istration of this branch of the examinations. 
This improvement accrues to the satisfaction 
: of both the Board and the candidates tak- 
ing the examination. 

Administration 
The personnel complement of the Board 
has remained unchanged during the year. 
In last year's report the Board brought to 
your attention the need for additional field 
and office personnel and outlined the rea- 
sons for this need. The demands for services 
of various kinds made upon the Board of- 
fice continue to grow in number and char- 



acter. In some areas of the Board 's work 
the situation has become critical. The con- 
tinued work-load "spreading" is beginning 
to have its effect in diluting the thorough- 
ness and quality of the Board 's services in 
these areas. Specific references to these 
needs will be made subsequently in this re- 
port. 

Examinations 

The objective of and approach to the ex- 
amination function of the Board is often 
not well understood. Frequently the state- 
ment is made to the effect that something 
must be wrong with board examinations 
when graduates of a recognized school of 
pharmacy fail to pass. 

In order to fully understand the nature 
of board examinations, it is necessary to re- 
view all of the statutory prerequisites for 
licensure. In addition to requiring gradua- 
tion from a ' ' reputable school or college of 
pharmacy, ' ' the law says that the candidate 
must have acquired one year of practical 
pharmacy experience under the instructions 
of a licensed pharmacist and that he must 
pass a ' ' satisfactory examination. ' ' When 
the candidate for license has been graduated 
from an accredited school of pharmacy, the 
Board accepts such graduation as a certifi- 
cation of his educational fitness. For the 
Board to reexamine him on his educational 
attainments would not only be a duplication 
of what the school has done but might also 
indicate a lack of confidence in the school's 
educational program, in which case its "ac- 
creditation ' ' should be discontinued. 

Board examinations presuppose educa- 
tional fitness. The Board's job is to see 
whether the candidate for license has 
learned, through the period of practical 
training and experience required by the 
statute, to translate formal knowledge 
gained in school into terms of practice and 
to surround that practice with such safe- 
guards as are necessary to protect the pub- 
lic. 



70 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Tradition has established the practice of 
permitting candidates who have been grad- 
uated from a school of pharmacy to take the 
' ' written ' ' examinations before they have 
completed their practical experience and 
then be admitted to the final "practical" 
portion of the examinations after complet- 
ing the practical experience. There is usu- 
ally a high failure rate among these candi- 
dates. This is as should be expected if the 
examinations accomplish the purpose for 
which they were designed — which is a deter- 
mination of safety and fitness to practice. 
Obviously a candidate cannot have a knowl- 
edge of procedures used in practice in which 
formal knowledge is applied unless he has 
had the benefit of that practice experience. 
Except for the value of gaining experience 
in taking a board examination, the candi- 
date for license would be well advised to 
refrain from taking any portion of the ex- 
amination until he has acquired the mini- 
mum of practical experience as required by 
the statute. 

In June, 1961, twenty-three candidates 
qualified for admission to the examination; 
fifteen passed and were registered. They are 
as follows: 

Council Foy Bradshaw, Chapel Hill 
James Peter Copses, Charlotte 
Ruff us Lynwood Daughtry, Princeton 
Charles Farris Himes, Brevard 
William Lewis Johnson, Jr., Garner 
Phebe McDonald Kirkman, Winston-Salem 
Eugene James McDonald, Reidsville 
Linda Jones Parham, Kinston 
Dorothy Bingham Reaves, Fayetteville 
Walter Adrian Rice, Winston-Salem 
John Wesley Saunders, Raleigh 
Robert Hunter Shearin, Warrenton 
James Paul Sheets, West Jefferson 
Terre Milton Smith, Reidsville 
Gordon Vincent Wyche, Weldon 

Charles Farris Himes scored the highest 
grade, and James Paul Sheets scored the 
second highest grade. 

In February, 1962, forty-five candidates 
qualified for admission to the examination; 
thirty-four passed and were registered. They 
are as follows: 

Robert Layton Barbour, Burlington 
Barbara Jane Bell, Raleigh 



Barry Max Bell, Gastonia 
Charles David Bell, Winston-Salem 
Alpheus Worth Benthall, Carthage 
Arthur Long Bradsher, Jr., Roxboro 
Sarah Upchurch Browning, Chapel Hill 
Gary Stanley Cooper, Rutherfordton 
Phillip Francis Crouch, Asheville 
Sterling Gray Dixon, Durham 
Ann Bills Garrou, Valdese 
Charles Thomas Gibson, Goldsboro 
Samuel Stephen Goodwin, Monroe 
Robert Lee Gordon, Cary 
Adrian Clay Gupton, Louisburg 
James Jackson Horn, Lawndale 
Kent Loewe Huffman, Winston-Salem 
David Eugene Keever, Lincolnton 
Bobby James Kincaid, Greensboro 
Walter Harold Lasater, Durham 
George Collins McLarty, Jr., High Point 
James Frederick Meares, Wilson 
William White Morris, Gastonia 
Robert Greer Parker, Winston-Salem 
Adie Grey Pelt, Goldsboro 
Hazel Green Post, Morrisville 
Miles Herbert Purser, Hampton, Virginia 
Jessie Van Putnam, Bessemer City 
Ernest Augustus Randleman, Jr., Mount 

Airy 
Benjamin S. Savoia, Jr., Salisbury 
Donald Judd Smith, Forest City 
Larry Glenn Snider, Canton 
Van Darwin Weaver, Spring Hope 
John Richard White, Henderson 

Sarah Upchurch Browning scored the 
highest grade. 

Registration by Reciprocity 
Thirty-nine applications for reciprocal 
registration have been accepted and the ap- 
plicants registered. One application was re- 
jected. 

Seventeen pharmacists registered in North 
Carolina have been certified to other states. 
All applications from North Carolina have 
been accepted by the states to which appli- 
cation was made. Those registered in this 
state are as follows: 

James Stanley Liverman, Jr., June 1, 1961, 

from South Carolina 
James Leonard Brannon, Jr., June 30, 1961, 

from Illinois 
Herbert James Hames, June 30, 1961, from 

South Carolina 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



71 



Robert Louis Gregory, June 30, 1961, from 

South Carolina 
Robert Frank Shimon, June 30, 1961, from 

Wisconsin 
Denford Harold Oxendine, June 30, 1961, 

from South Carolina 
Roy Lee Garrett, June 30, 1961, from Vir- 
ginia 
Arthur Alexander Anderson, July 3, 1961, 

from Georgia 
Dillard Arnold Connelly, August 1, 1961, 

from South Carolina 
James Thomas Burton, September 2, 1961, 

from Georgia 
Don Douglas Norman, September 19, 1961, 

from Georgia 
Harry Mallchok, September 19, 1961, from 

Michigan 
Richard Lee Cox, September 19, 1961, from 

West Virginia 
Thomas Lee Richards, Sr., September 19, 

1961, from Alabama 
I Herman Matthews Burney, October 2, 1961, 

from District of Columbia 
Robert Carlton Kemp, October 5, 1961, from 

Georgia 
Marshall Louis Newbern, October 18, 1961, 

from South Carolina 
James D. Boatright, November 1, 1961, 

from Georgia 
William Wells Rogers, November 1, 1961, 

from South Carolina 
i Jerry D. Collins, November 1, 1961, from 

South Carolina 
Willie Hugh Jennings, November 1, 1961, 

from Virginia 
Walker Eugene Kimbell, November 1, 1961, 

from Georgia 
1 Frances Marie Aucello, December 11, 1961, 

from Connecticut 
Alford Howard Graham, December 11, 1961, 

from Mississippi 
Claire Darden Rankin, December 14, 1961, 

from Iowa 
Donna Marie Robertson, December 15, 1961, 

from West Virginia 
• Charles Robert Newton, January 29, 1962, 

from South Carolina 
Joseph Latimer Mullinax, January 29, 1962, 

from South Carolina 
[ Haskell J. Hall, January 29, 1962, from 
South Carolina 



Donald Thurston Miller, February 21, 1962, 

from Pennsylvania 
William Earl Nelson, February 21, 1962, 

from Georgia 
George Mitchell Turner, February 26, 1962, 

from South Carolina 
Thomas Myles King, Jr., March 7, 1962, 

from Texas 
Harvey A. K. Whitney, March 7, 1962, from 

Michigan 
Martin Lee Lambert, Jr., March 20, 1962, 

from Alabama 
Lam Boykin Britton, Jr., April 17, 1962, 

from South Carolina 
James Peter Wallent, April 17, 1962, from 

Massachusetts 
James Holden Ward, April 17, 1962, from 

Mississippi 
Arthur Raley Jones, Jr., April 17, 1962, 

from South Carolina 

Pharmacists Reregistered 
Seven pharmacists whose licenses were 
allowed to lapse or who were on the in- 
active list have been reinstated during the 
fiscal year. They are as follows: 

Elizabeth W. Mattison 
Willard I. Herring 
Jose Ramos 
Lee C. Lewis 
Emory M. Watson 
Harold L. Ball 
W. C. Sharpe 

Pharmacists Removed from the 
Registered List by Request or Failure 
to Renew — 27 
Frank Warren Bennett 
Barbara Bess Carson 
Benjamin F. Cooper, Jr. 
Donald French 
George Ray Graham 
Robert Gardner Ham 
Reeves Hawkins 
Wilson Walter Henry 
Johnnie M. Holmes, Jr. 
Robert Louis Holt 
Edwin Cavanaugh Howard 
Robert Monroe Inman 
Edward Parker Judy 
William Burton Lyon 
William Clyde McManus 



72 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Douglas Rhett Mowrey 
John L. Mullen 
Nicholas F. Nixon, Jr. 
Nathaniel Lewis Prather 
Luther W. Richardson 
William A. Sappenfield 



John Bennett Sprinkle 
Maggie Suominen 
Miriam Suzanne Thorpe 
Richard Kendrick Webb 
Charles Pleasant Willson 
Gerald Waymon Wilson 




The Carolina Journal op Pharmacy 73 



In Memoriam 

Pharmacists Who Have Died During the Year 
(31 Pharmacists) 

Leonard W. Aiken— 8-8-61 Mars Hill 

Jarvis Marion Alligood — 7-9-61 Greenville 

Joe M. Anderson — 11-17-61 New Bern 

Oscar David Biddy— 1-23-62 Brevard 

H. L. Bishop— 3-31-62 Asheville 

Charles Alvin Brady — 5-5-61 Hickory 

Ellie Burton Bristow — 5-27-61 Rockingham 

Garland A. Batman— 10-1-61 Wilson 

William B. Ennett— 4-17-62 Swansboro 

Boscoe C. Faulconer — 2-20-62 Burlington 

Loamie Gilbert — 5-1-61 Benson 

Eric P. Glenn— 8-17-61 Morehead City 

Lewis I. Grantham— 4-26-62 St. Pauls 

Herbert Cooper Greene — 5-31-61 Charlotte 

Needham B. Herring — 6-15-61 Wilson 

Eobert R. Herring— 9-17-61 Oxford 

John Palmer Horton — 10-5-61 North Wilkesboro 

Graham P. Johnson — 1-17-62 Jacksonville 

James E. Johnson — 6-24-61 Lumberton 

Leon B. Joiner — 3-1-62 Salisbury 

James Fleming Lyon — 5-7-61 Arlington, Va. 

John H. McLelland— 1-8-62 Mooresville 

William George Nelson — 6-6-61 Atlanta, Ga. 

Elery Watson Oliver — 1-30-62 Greensboro 

Moses A. Peacock — 8-27-61 Benson 

Herman C. Price — 10-22-62 Creedmoor 

Harry B. Rimerman — 6-18-61 Cape May, N. J. 

John F. Simpson — 12-25-61 Raleigh 

John A. Underbill — 3-25-62 High Point 

William F. Welborn — 11-3-61 Lexington 

Hey C. Whiteley— 9-7-61 Morganton 



74 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



SUMMARY OF PHARMACISTS ON THE ACTIVE ROSTER 



A. Total number of pharmacists in good standing on roster 

B. Total number actively engaged in pharmaceutical 

pursuits (in State) 

1. In retail pharmacy 

a. As owners 

b. As partners 

c. As employees 

2. Part-time retail employees 

3. In hospital pharmacy (civilian) 

4. In hospital pharmacy VA. (in State) 

5. In wholesale & mfg. labs 

6. As field rep. for mfg. & wh 

7. Teaching (students) & govt 

8. In misc. ph. pursuits 

C. Total number who reside IN State & NOT engaged 

in ph. pursuits 

1. Unemployed (at time of renewal) 

2. Retired 

3. Otherwise engaged 

D. Number who reside OUT of State 

E. Number serving with Armed Forces 

F. Number in "B" who are women 

G. Number in "A" who are women 

H. Number of women not engaged in pharmacy pursuits 

(G minus F) 



289 

227 

199 

8 

25 

166 

7 

16 


3 
2 


7 

1 



6 

40 

15 

30 

47 



658 

553 

508 

96 

128 

284 

14 

18 

2 



7 

5 

1 

24 

1 



23 

77 

2 

35 

66 

31 



390 

329 

301 

92 

82 

127 

5 

11 

4 

1 

9 

2 



3 


3 

54 



17 

28 

11 



271 

228 

204 

85 

50 

69 

4 

5 

2 

3 

6 

4 

2 

12 

3 
9 

29 

3 
4 



143 

115 

95 

32 

25 

38 

8 

4 



4 

3 



1 

13 


10 
3 

15 

3 
5 



131 

107 

100 

41 

22 

37 

4 

1 



2 







17 



12 

5 

7 






179 

110 

83 

33 

15 

35 

27 













57 


51 
6 

12 






2C61 

1669 

1490 

387 

347 

756 

69 

55 

8 

10 

28 

13 

4 

133 

2 

76 
55 

234 
17 
88 

150 

62 



EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS OF PHARMACISTS ACCORDING TO AGE 





o 

CD 

a 




CO 

o 

CO 


OS 

o 


o 

"3 


o 
co 


o 
»o 

CO 


o 
u 

09 

> 

O 


"c3 

+3 

o 


Qualifications of Pharmacists in "B" (Summary) 

Non-graduates 

Graduates of 2 year courses 

Graduates of 3 year courses 

Graduates of 4 year courses 






227 

227 







289 

289 








553 

553 







658 

658 


10 



17 

302 

329 

11 



19 

360 

390 


35 
61 
89 
43 

228 

37 

74 

104 

56 

271 


24 

78 

10 

3 

115 

29 

92 

16 

6 

143 


56 

40 

10 

1 

107 

66 

52 

10 

3 

131 


66 
34 

10 


110 

117 

49 

13 



179 


191 

213 

136 

1129 


Total in "B" 

Qualifications of Pharmacists in "A" (Summary) 

Non-graduates 


1669 
260 


Graduates of 2 year courses 


267 


Graduates of 3 year courses 


162 


Graduates of 4 year courses 


1372 


Total in "A" 


2061 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 
summary of pharmacies registered 



75 



Total number of pharmacies in State 

^ Number classified as hospital pharmacies 
Number serviced by one pharmacist 
Number serviced by two pharmacists 

Number serviced by three pharmacists 

Number serviced by four pharmacists 

Number serviced by six pharmacists 

Number classified as retail pharmacies 

Number serviced by one pharmacist 

Number serviced by one pharmacist and one or more part-time pharmacists 

Number serviced by one pharmacist and one or more assistant pharmacists 

Number serviced by two pharmacists 

Number serviced by two pharmacists and one or more part-time pharmacists 

Number serviced by two pharmacists and one or more assistant pharmacists 

Number serviced by three pharmacists 

Number serviced by four or more pharmacists 

Number serviced by permitted physicians 

Number serviced by permitted physician and one assistant pharmacist . . . 
Ownership of retail pharmacies (hospitals excluded) is vested as follows : 

Stores owned solely by pharmacists 

Stores owned by pharmacists & non-pharmacists (pharmacist over 50%) .... 
Stores owned by pharmacists & non-pharmacists (non-pharmacist over 50% ) 

Stores owned by pharmacists & non-pharmacists (50%-50%) 

Stores owned solely by non-pharmacists 



16 
8 
5 
1 
1 

556 

102 

16 

332 

10 

3 

41 

7 

7 



516 
91 
76 
88 

200 



31 



976 



1007 



HOURS OPEN PER WEEK OF RETAIL PHARMACIES 



Under 60 8.84% 

60-64 11.43% 

65-69 12.84% 

70-74 12.76% 

75-79 18.55% 



80-84 11.63% 

85-89 13.90% 

90-94 5.92%, 

95-99 2.49% 

Over 100 1.15% 




76 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Prescriptions 
An average of 19,739 prescriptions' were 
reported as being dispensed in 857 phar- 
macies. This is approximately six hundred 
prescriptions per pharmacy less than were 
reported last year. Projecting the number 
filled per pharmacy to the total number of 
pharmacies, there were slightly less than 20 
million prescriptions filled in the state last 
year. The drop of approximately % million 
is doubtless accounted for by the fact that 
no epidemic occurred during this period as 
was the case the preceding year. 

Pharmacists 
On May 1st there were 2,061 pharmacists 
on the active roster. This represents a net 
increase of 42 over the previous year. How- 
ever, the net increase in those pharmacists 
who are engaged in pharmaceutical pursuits 
was only 10. For the first time in more than 
fifteen years there occurred a decrease in 
the number of pharmacists in community 
practice (retail). This loss was twenty-three. 
In addition, there was a loss of 10 in those 
pharmacists who were in community prac- 
tice on a part time basis. With this change 
in areas of practice, there was an increase 
in those located in civilian hospital practice 
(6) and in V.A. hospitals (5), and manu- 
facturers' representatives (5). It is im- 
portant that the causes for the loss in the 
number of pharmacists in community prac- 
tice be identified and that the necessary 
steps be taken to correct this situation. Sev- 
eral years ago the hope was expressed that 
by 1970 there would be 2.0 pharmacists per 
outlet. If this figure were applied today we 
would have a deficit of approximately 500 
pharmacists. To achieve our goal we must 
have a net increase of at least 65 pharma- 
cists per year in the area of hospital and 
community practice. 

Pharmacies 
There was a net increase of 14 pharmacy 
outlets in the state last year. One of these 
was a hospital pharmacy; the remainder 
were retail pharmacies. The loss in the num- 
ber of pharmacists in practice depressed the 
ratio of pharmacist to pharmacy outlet from 
1.54 to 1.53. It is too early to determine 
whether this is a temporary situation or the 



beginning of a trend. As stated earlier, it 
is important that this be determined. If it 
is found to be a trend, it will be necessary 
to adopt such remedial measures as are ap- 
propriate. 

Special Eeport 

(Presented at the annual convention of 
the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation and the Old North State Pharmaceu- 
tical Association) 

Last year the Board pointed out some of 
the things which it felt were challenging the 
very future survival of our profession in 
the form, dimensions and relationships of 
the past. It called attention to the Federal 
antitrust suits, mail order prescription serv- 
ices, Senate subcommittee investigations — 
with resultant public reactions — continued 
Federal encroachment in the area of the 
regulation of professional practice, the de- 
teriorating public image of pharmacy, etc. 
The Board also pointed out the challenges 
to the private practice of pharmacy as rep- 
resented by the industrial health services, 
hospitals, nursing and rest homes, state 
operated services, etc. Since that time there 
have been added the discount houses, closed 
door union pharmacies, vending machines for 
prescription drugs, supermarket prescription 
departments, and other equally unorthodox 
mechanisms. Blend all of these things to- 
gether and they assume a form and char- 
acter that can be portrayed in a single de- 
scription — the phantom pharmacist, the 
pharmacist who nobody sees, or knows, and 
of whose existence the public becomes less 
and less aware — the pharmacist about whose 
situation something must be done, lest all 
of us also become in fact phantoms whose 
real existence is only in the fantasies of 
memory. 

What has just been said might appear to 
some of you to be a gross exaggeration of 
the perils that face our profession. You 
might say that you know better because you 
are in daily contact with the public and that 
your patrons know and appreciate you. This 
also is true beyond doubt. But does the 
fruit of the tree know that the heart of the 
trunk is being devoured until the trunk can 
no longer support the fruit? 

As president of the National Association 
of Boards of Pharmacy, the Secretary of the 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



77 



North Carolina Board met with the boards 
and faculties of the schools of thirty-six of 
the fifty states during the past year. Here 
firsthand information was gathered that will 
serve to document what is happening in 
other areas of our country, and which in 
turn serves as a basis on which to make a 
judgment, and to express a very real concern 
that, the elements that make up the phantom 
pharmacist do in fact endanger pharmacy in 
North Carolina. Compared with some other 
areas of the country, you do not know how 
fortunate you are. It would be interesting 
and informative to make some comparisons, 
but this must wait for another time. The 
situation can be summed up by quoting from 
a letter recently received from one of our 
own graduates, who has been located in 
another area of the United States for some 
years. After mentioning many of the things 
enumerated above, he closed his letter by 
saying, "Please don't let what's happening 
to pharmacy here happen to it in North 
Carolina." Whether or not these things 
happen in North Carolina, and to you, 
will depend largely on you — on what you 
are willing to do for yourself, or what 
you are willing to let be done for you — (and 
it might be added, or what you will allow 
to be done to you). In order to adequately 
protect ourselves, perhaps we should examine 
some of our defenses. 

In last year's report the Board made brief 
mention of the several mechanisms of voca- 
tional control. It was pointed out how all 
vocational activity is controlled by three 
main forces — competition, government (e.g., 
law), and profession. The application of 
these forces to the various areas of voca- 
tional endeavor is a study within itself. 
However, certain general observations can 
be made. For example, as the requirements 
for entering the several vocations increase, 
control tends to migrate from competition 
through government to profession. A com- 
mon laborer has very little to control his 
vocational activity other than the competi- 
tion of getting a job, while, on the other 
hand, the vocational pursuits of a neurosur- 
geon are limited almost solely by the dic- 
tates of professional ethics, which limits are 
those within his professional skill. 

It would be useful to relate each of the 
forces of vocational control to the practice 



of pharmacy. In this report, however, the 
Board will have to limit itself largely to 
the force of law, with only brief mention of 
the other forces — competition and profes- 
sion. The latter two are more properly dealt 
with by those having primary responsibili- 
ties in these areas. However, in order to 
keep them in proper perspective, they will 
be treated here in the order of their opera- 
tion. 

Competition. 

In this context, competition might be de- 
fined as the effort of two or more parties, 
acting independently, to secure the custom 
of a third party by the offer of the most 
favorable terms. The offer of the most 
"favorable terms" through quantity or qua- 
lity, forthwith or by deception, for the "cus- 
tom of a third party" has created what we 
know today as the "jungle of the market 
place" — and here the laws of the jungle 
prevail. The cunning outwit the stolid. The 
fleet of foot overtake the plodder. The 
strong devour the weak, and terror reigns in 
the hearts of all but the mightiest. It is im- 
mediately evident that this is not the force 
of vocational control that should be applied 
to pharmacy if the health needs of the pub- 
lic are to be adequately protected. Unhap- 
pily, there are some among our number who 
have not yet accepted this premise. 

Government. 

The force of government (or law) is, per- 
haps, by far the most frequently used force 
to regulate vocational pursuits. How often 
have you heard the statement that there 
ought to be a law against doing this thing 
or permitting that condition to exist? The 
desire expressed here, of course, is to use 
the authority of the government to effect 
control of some undesirable situation or to 
make a given condition more desirable. Leg- 
islation is a normal course of procedure in 
a society such as ours — a society made up of 
such diverse groups and interests that the 
force of government is about the only ele- 
ment of control that is common to all seg- 
ments. That we have legislated control of 
practically every aspect of pharmacy prac- 
tice is self-evident. We have set up legal 
requirements as prerequisites for entry; we 
have surrounded practice with a multitude 



78 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



of restrictions. We have regulated the places 
where pharmacy is practiced, and we have 
provided procedures and conditions for re- 
moving those from practice who have failed 
their legal and sometimes their moral re- 
sponsibilities. Just as the force of competi- 
tion is not a suitable mechanism for the con- 
trol of the practice of pharmacy, so is gov- 
ernment (e.g., law) not the most desirable 
one, since the progress of law frequently 
lags behind the development of ethics. This 
is true because not all ethical principles can 
be effectively established by legislation, and 
legislators (and sometimes pharmacists 
alike) either do not comprehend or cannot 
agree on the mandates pronounced by ethics. 
However, the nature of pharmacy being 
what it is, we must have adequate control in 
order to protect the public from ignorance, 
incompetence, and lack of integrity in its 
practice. 

In order that the force of law, where it 
is used as a basis for the control of phar- 
macy, might be better understood, it will be 
useful to review the derivation of its au- 
thority and the basis on which it rests. Gen- 
erally speaking, a government may exercise 
certain basic powers which it has to regulate 
the lives and to preserve or to restrict the 
liberties of its citizens — the power to tax, 
the power to require the bearing of arms, 
the police power, etc. It is the police power 
and its application for the protection of the 
public health through the medium of the 
Board of Pharmacy that we are interested 
in here. The police power of the state can 
be properly exercised only for the protection 
of the public health, safety, welfare and 
morals of its citizens and for no other pur- 
pose. The legislatures in all of the states 
have employed this power to regulate the 
practice of pharmacy, and the courts 
throughout the land have determined that 
this is a proper application of the police 
power of the state. This has been necessary 
in order for the public to be adequately pro- 
tected from ignorance, incompetence, and 
lack of integrity in the practice of phar- 
macy. This being true, the legislatures of 
the several states must avail themselves of 
the services of those who are conversant 
with these matters (e.g., pharmacists) in 
order that the public might be adequately 
protected. It is, then, for this purpose that 



boards of pharmacy have been created in 
all states. As agents of the people they have 
been endowed with powers of varying lati- 
tude to regulate the practice of pharmacy 
in the public interest. These powers can be 
used for no other purpose. To do so would 
not only be illegal but would also constitute 
a betrayal of a public trust. It is important 
that these facts be remembered so that all 
board actions might be firmly lodged in pub- 
lie protection and not in a misdirected or 
thinly disguised personal or professional ag- 
grandizement in the name of the protection 
of public health. Failure to strictly and im- 
partially observe this restraint when profes- 
sional problems arise or to aggressively pur- 
sue duty in the face of economic pressures 
undermines and destroys the privilege and 
right of self -regulation in the name of the 
state. It is with this background in mind 
that the Board desires to focus your at- 
tention on some of the problems with which 
it is faced and to explain in more detail a 
part of the action it has taken to resolve 
these problems. 

Law Revision. 

For more than twenty years the Board has 
periodically called to the attention of the 
pharmacists of the state the need for the 
modernization of our pharmacy laws. Our 
present laws were passed to deal with a 
situation which existed between 1881 and 
1905. Our laws are inadequate to cope with 
the many problems which exist today and 
which have been characterized as repre- 
sented in the phantom pharmacist and the 
unorthodox distribution mechanisms that 
presently exist and continue to arise every 
day. The Board simply does not have the 
tools with which to work in discharging its 
responsibilities to the public and to the pro- 
fession. As was stated before, this matter 
has been brought to the attention of our 
pharmacists on numerous occasions during 
the past twenty years. More especially dur- 
ing the past three sessions of the Legislature 
have we attempted to create support among 
our pharmacists to get at least part of the 
modernization job done, but this support has 
either been passive or simply did not exist 
at all. So we are today exactly where we 
were twenty years ago in regard to this mat- 
ter. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



79 



Supreme Court Decision. 

Prior to March, 1958, the basic funda- 
mentals of our pharmacy law had not re- 
ceived the scrutiny of our high court. Only 
a minor issue had been the subject of court 
interpretation. Although the Board felt that 
it knew what was intended by the law, in 
the absence of court interpretation it could 
not be sure since the Board's position was 
constantly being challenged by pharmacists, 
attorneys, and anyone else whose interest it 
served to place a different interpretation on 
the law from that held by the Board. In 
1958 this was all settled. In that year a 
case brought by the Board was appealed to 
the Supreme Court. The facts in the case 
were that an unlicensed clerk with fourteen 
years experience filled a prescription for 
twelve half grain phenobarbital tablets 
while not under the immediate supervision of 
a pharmacist, but who could have called or 
consulted with one of two pharmacists then 
on duty at two other stores owned by the 
same person as the store in which the act 
occurred. In handing down the opinion in 
favor of the Board, the court made a number 
of significant statements, the substance of 
which is as follows: 

(1) Unquestionably, the General Assem- 
bly, in the exercise of the police 
power of the State, may regulate the 
practice of pharmacy . . . 

(2) The fact that the unlicensed clerk had 
had fourteen years experience in fill- 
ing and compounding prescriptions as 
an aid to and under the supervision of 
a registered pharmacist is beside the 
point. If defendants said contention 
were accepted, the unlicensed person, 
in deciding whether he needed the ad- 
vice or direction of a registered phar- 
macist, would necessarily be the sole 
judge of his own qualifications and 
competency . . . The construction con- 
tended for by defendants would write 
into the statute a provision it does 
not contain, namely, a provision to 
the effect that during the temporary 
absence of the licensed pharmacist 
an unlicensed person may conduct or 
have charge of the store. 

(3) These statutes are to be construed in 
pari materia and when so construed 



provide that it shall be unlawful for 
any person not licensed as a pharma- 
cist or assistant pharmacist to com- 
pound, dispense or sell at retail any 
drug, etc., upon the prescription of a 
physician or otherwise, or to com- 
pound physicians' prescriptions ex- 
cept as an aid to and under the im- 
mediate supervision of a person li- 
censed as a pharmacist or assistant 
pharmacist under this article. 

This case is perhaps the most significant 
thing that has happened to pharmacy in 
North Carolina in the past fifty years. In it 
the court said who could do what, when and 
where. 

In 1947 the General Assembly of North 
Carolina passed the following resolution: 
"Whereas, the illegal practice of pharmacy 
involving the use of many dangerous drugs 
and the internal use of these drugs and med- 
icines by the public is emminently danger- 
ous to the public health and welfare — such 
illegal practice is hereby declared to be 
against public policy." The Board of Phar- 
macy cannot, nor does it desire, to escape 
the implications contained in the court de- 
cision and the legislature's pronouncement 
to discharge its responsibility to protect the 
public. On the contrary, the Board views 
these as mandates for the exercise of the 
police power in vocational control. 

Practitioner Responsibility. 

Registration as a pharmacist is not a 
right but a professional privilege. No one 
has a right to enter a profession, but he is 
privileged to do so under certain conditions. 
The conditions which must be met by a 
person entering a profession must also be 
observed as long as the privilege of remain- 
ing in the profession is exercised. U. S. 
Supreme Court Justice Cordozo said, "Mem- 
bership (in a profession) is a privilege 
burdened with conditions. Compliance with 
(these conditions) is essential at the moment 
of admission, but (they are) equally es- 
sential afterwards. Whenever the condi- 
tions (are) broken, the privilege is lost." It 
might be added to what Justice Cordozo has 
said that failure to observe the conditions 
burdening membership in a profession, while 
at the same time attempting to exploit or 



80 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



even enjoy the privileges thereof, results- in 
the creation of a false situation in the form 
of an illegal monopoly at the public ex- 
pense. This, of course, cannot stand. These 
things being true, it becomes immediately 
evident then that each pharmacist who holds 
the privilege of a license must assume the 
burden of obligation to protect the public 
from ignorance, incompetence, and lack of 
integrity to the same extent that the Board 
has the responsibility to see that he does it. 
This is the situation with which the Board 
finds itself faced. 

It was stated earlier that repeated efforts 
had been made to equip the Board with the 
necessary tools to perform its function but 
that these had not been fruitful. However, 
the fact that we have failed to secure these 
needed changes in no way lessens the Board's 
obligation to the public. It was, therefore, 
necessary for the Board to find some other 
means whereby it could discharge its duty 
under the law. 

Eealizing that it could not foresee all 
possible situations which might arise in the 
control of the practice of pharmacy, the 
Legislature very wisely endowed the Board 
with the power to make certain rules and 
regulations. G. S. 90-57 states, in part, "The 
Board of Pharmacy shall have . . . power 
and authority ... to adopt such rules, regu- 
lations, and bylaws ... as may be necessary 
. . . for the discharge of the duties imposed 
under this article . . ." The Board has used 
this authority on numerous occasions to 
make definitions, to clarify or restrict prac- 
tice acts, to prescribe practical experience 
recpiirements and for many other purposes. 
The most recent exercise of the rule making 
power of the Board was employed to require 
that, among other things, the pharmacist dis- 
pensing or immediately supervising the dis- 
pensing of a prescription indicate this on 
the prescription label by the use of the 
words "Filled by" or "Dispensed by'' fol- 
lowed by the name of the pharmacist who 
filled or supervised the filling of the pre- 
scription. This regulation has stimulated 
considerable discussion. For that reason, 
most of the remainder of the report will be 
devoted to a clarification of the Board's 
purposes in adopting the regulation and an 
explanation of what it is hoped may be ac- 
complished through its operation. 



The - imme4ia.te - aim . of the regulation is 
to enable the public to receive a positive rep- 
resentation that it has received what it is 
entitled to under the law. You will recall 
what the Supreme Court had to say on this 
matter. All of the information required by 
the new regulation to be placed on the label, 
with the exception of the representation of 
who filled the prescription, has customarily 
been placed on prescription labels in the 
past. The only thing that has been added 
is the certification of the pharmacist. In con- 
sidering the propriety of making this latter 
requirement, the Board was reminded of the 
analogy that can be drawn between this 
and the practices in other professions. A 
lawyer signs documents he prepares. An 
architect signs his blueprints and specifica- 
tions. Yes, a doctor signs his prescriptions. 
These are all certifications of the respon- 
sibility of the practitioner. Should the pub- 
lie be denied like certification when it has 
prescriptions filled? This, in effect, is what 
the regulation does — it simply certifies to 
the public that it is receiving what the law 
says it is entitled to receive. 

The basic underlying principles and phi- 
losophies which prompted the Board to 
make the regulation have been dealt with 
above at some length. The mechanics of 
what is required and the requirements them- 
selves are very simply met, although some 
who are doubtless motivated by self-interests 
might have led you to believe otherwise. As 
stated above, the required certification can 
be made simply by placing on the label (or 
an auxiliary label) "Filled or dispensed by" 
and the name of the pharmacist. This in- 
formation may be printed, typed, rubber 
stamped, or written in longhand. It is sim- 
ply the representation to the public that the 
Board is interested in. So much for legal 
control. 

Profession. 

We come now to the final force regulat- 
ing vocational activity — profession. 

The three generally recognized basic re- 
quirements prerequisite to profession are: 

(1) that practitioners acquire an intel- 
lectually based technique; 

(2) that practitioners assume a relation- 
ship of responsibility toward clients; 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



81 



(3) that practitioners are organized into 
responsible associations, which set 
standards of practice and exert con- 
trol over the action of their members 
through codes of ethics. 

Your attention is invited in particular to 
Item 2 — practitioner responsibility to client. 
(This in profession is a duty, whereas it is a 
mandatory requirement in government or 
jlaw. In either mechanism of vocational con- 
trol, however, it is a requirement. How does 
this requirement relate to the phantom phar- 
macist as represented in the prescription call 
check in our large emporia of scrambled 
merchandise, and the discount house and 
supermarket? How does it relate to the un- 
orthodox prescription mechanisms of the 
mail order prescription services, or the pick- 
up stations? In each and all of these the 
public gets what it believes is a commodity 
of commerce. It pays for what it believes 
is only a commodity of commerce. It sees 
no pharmacist making judgments on the Rx 
he fills. It sees no pharmacist to give it any 
special direction or advice on the use of its 
medication. There is no pharmacist to whom 
it might direct questions or from whom it 
might secure counsel and advice. There is 
only the gum chewing clerk, the over-anxious 
checkout girl, or the ever-faithful postman — 
all of whom say "five dollars, please." The 
phantom pharmacist — the man who may or 
imay not be there. Is it very difficult to 
understand that even beyond certification to 
the public, the Board desires to relate phar- 
maceutical services to the pharmacist? We 
have come to charge many of the ills that 
face our profession to outside forces. There 
is no doubt that this charge is valid to an 
extent. But the fault for these things is ours 
land ours alone. It is purely and simply a 
matter of individual pharmacist responsi- 
bility. No pharmacy or drug store — no pre- 
sription department in a discount house or 
supermarket can be operated under the law 
in any state unless a pharmacist is there 
and "conducts or manages" this pharmacy, 
drug store, or prescription department. 
Whether he will sell his professional privi- 
lege for the conduct of some of these outlets 
or how he permits them to be operated is 
his responsibility. If there is no pharmacist, 
there can be no pharmacy, drug store, or 



prescription department. This, too, is his 
responsibility. He cannot delegate nor can 
he abdicate this responsibility to any other 
person, be he owner or otherwise. This the 
Supreme Court has said and the Board will 
be sensitive to this dictum. Our situation 
demands that we relate the individual phar- 
macist to his professional service, as opposed 
to that of commodity distribution and that 
we make this an inseparable relationship 
over which this pharmacist has sole control. 
Professional responsibility to client is the 
only answer to the phantom pharmacist. Re- 
member what Justice Cordozo said — "Mem- 
bership (in a profession) is a privilege bur- 
dened with conditions. Whenever the condi- 
tions (are) broken, the privilege is lost." 

BAILEY AND DIXON 

Attorneys at Law 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

August 8, 1962 

North Carolina Board of Pharmacy 
Post Office Box 471 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 
In re: Annual Report 

Gentlemen : 

It is our pleasure to submit this our an- 
nual report of our activities as general 
counsel for the North Carolina Board of 
Pharmacy during the fiscal year of 1961-62. 

The business of the Board of Pharmacy 
has been great in volume and varied in sub- 
ject matter this past year, and the under- 
signed has been in attendance at all meet- 
ings and at many conferences in connection 
with the work of the Board. Many of the 
problems handled by the Board this year 
have been the same routine disciplinary 
cases. However, it is felt that these dis- 
ciplinary cases should be declining more in 
volume than they seem to be. It is the 
feeling of this office that the members of the 
pharmaceutical profession may not have 
taken as seriously as they should some of 
their legal responsibilities, and, therefore, 
the number of disciplinary cases and variety 
of problems seems to be greater than would 
ordinarily be expected. 

All cases involving a disciplinary action 
have been handled consistent with the 
authority delegated to the North Carolina 



82 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 



Board of Pharmacy by the legislature and 
with conscientious consideration given to 
the responsibilities placed upon the Board. 

The rules and regulations of the Board 
have been reviewed from time to time during 
the year, and new rules have been promul- 
gated which should bring about higher 
standards of practice among the pharma- 
cists in the state and which should instill 
greater confidence in the pharmacists by the 
people who receive the services of this pro- 
fessional man. One of the important rules 
has been the new labeling law, and, although 
there have been many to speak out against 
the same, it is felt that this is certainly 
worthy of the attention of all for the pur- 
pose of improving the doctor-pharmacist- 
patient relationship. 

This office is happy to have served the 
Board during the past year, and in spite of 
many unpleasant situations which have 
arisen and have been handled by the Board, 
it is felt that much has been accomplished 
even though at times it is apparent that we 
are only scratching the surface. We will 
continue to do all that we can to see that 
the law is enforced impartially, fairly and 
with vigor throughout the entire State of 
North Carolina. 

Yours very truly, 
BAILEY AND DIXON 
J. Ruffin Bailey 
JRB:st 

Charlotte, N. C. 

August 11, 1962 
To: Members of the 
North Carolina Board of Pharmacy 
In re : Annual Report 

I submit herewith my report for the 
period from May 1, 1961 to April 30, 1962 
inclusive. 

The following inspections and investiga- 
tions were made: 

Retail Pharmacies 1287 

Hospitals 17 

Class 5 (Narcotic) 61 

Sundry Stores 9 

Manufacturers 3 

Investigations 44 

Total 1421 



During the period of this report I have 
attended all regular meetings of the Board I 
and two examinations held during this time J 
Respectfully submitted, 
John B. Balas 

Inspection and Law Enforcement 

The Board finds it necessary to again call 
attention to its needs particularly in the. I 
area of personnel. Presently there is only 
one inspector to cover the entire state. At-j 
torney Bailey called attention to the fact, 
that it appears that the Board is "only 
scratching the surface." The lack of ade-J 
quate personnel is one of the reasons fori 
this. The demands for services (both in!] 
volume and variety) made upon the Board 
have increased immensely during the past 
ten years. This demand has now reached the ■ 
point where it cannot be fully satisfied. The 
reason for this is lack of personnel. The de-J 
ficiency of personnel is caused, as was! 
pointed out last year, by the Board's in-J 
ability at present to finance any expansion^ 
in this area. The revenue of the Board re-l 
mains essentially what it was ten years ago. jj 
Due to the expansion in the demand for 
services and the increase in the cost of 
rendering these services, the cost of Board-: 
operation has increased 44% during the ten< 
year period. The Board is presently having I 
to adjust its activities to its income and oc-1 
casionally it operates at a loss. If a need I 
for a given service, particularly in the area] 
of law enforcement, goes unsatisfied some'i 
other means will be found to meet the need, j 
This is already beginning to occur. It is 
understood that the State Bureau of In-. 
vestigation has four agents assigned to drug I 
control work. Presently the activities of j 
these agents is directed to nonprofessional,: 1 
illicit channels of distribution. If the pro- J 
f'ession fails to adequately police its own I 
ranks, there is no alternative but for this|> 
function to be taken over by other agencies. 
The profession is best equipped to police itsji 
own ranks, but this can be done only through i 
adequate financing. The Board urges that; 
careful consideration again be given to the 1 
recommendations made last year. 



The Carolina Journal of Pharmacy 83 

REPORT ON AUDIT 
OF NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 
May 1, 1961 to April 30, 1962 

Board Members 

I Koger A. McDuffie Greensboro 

i R. N. Watson Sanf ord 

Harold V. Day Spruce Pine 

' Frank W. Dayvault Lenoir 

N. 0. McDowell, Jr Scotland Neck 

Officers 

Roger A. McDuffie President 

R. N. Watson "Vice President 

H. C. McAllister See.-Treas. 

Raymond L. Price 

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 

609 Commercial Building 
Raleigh, N. C. 
June 2, 1962 
To The Officers & Members of the 
North Carolina Board of Pharmacy: 

Gentlemen : 

As requested, we have made an audit of the financial records of Mr. H. C. McAllister, 
Secretary-Treasurer of the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy, for the period from May 1, 
1961 to April 30, 1962, and the attached Statement of Cash Receipts & Disbursements 
presents a summary of Operations for the fiscal year. 

All Receipts entered on the Cash Book were in agreement with duplicate receipts on 
file and were properly deposited in the bank. Disbursements for the fiscal year were made 
for apparently proper purposes and are supported by signed, paid checks, receipted bills, 
etc. 

The Balance On Hand at April 30, 1962 consists of the following: 

Cash in Banks: 

The Bank of Chapel Hill $21,515.71 

The University Nat '1 Bank 

of Chapel Hill (Savings) 10,494.59 832,010.30 

Investments : 

U. S. Treasury Bonds (2%%) 5,000.00 

Total Balance April 30, 1962 $37,010.30 

The Cash in Banks was reconciled and verified. The five U. S. Treasury Bonds of 
$1,000.00 each were inspected. 

The fidelity bond for the Secretary & Treasurer, in the amount of $5,000.00, has been 
continued to October 1, 1962. Two fire insurance policies of $2,500.00 each, or a total of 
$5,000.00 on office equipment, were examined. 

The records, as heretofore, are in splendid condition and no difficulty was experienced 
in the verification thereof. In the course of the examination, all books, records and papers 
were placed at our disposal and every assistance rendered and cou