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January l^g v - 




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GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Patrick J. Campbell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

John S. Rogers 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 
Charles E. Nichols 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Joseph F. Lia 
120 North Main Street 
New City, New York 10956 

Second District, Sigurd Lucassen 
1 30 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 

Third District, Anthony Ochocki 

14001 West McNichols Road 
Detroit, Michigan 48235 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

2970 Peachtree Rd., N.W., Suite 300 
Atlanta. Ga. 30305 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140 N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116 

Seventh District, Hal Morton 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l BIdg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, John Carruthers 
5799 Yonge Street #807 
Willowdale, Ontario M2M 3V3 

Tenth District, Ronald J. Dancer 

1235 40th Avenue, N.W. 

Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2K OG3 




William Konyha, Chairman 
John S. Rogers, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

In processing complaints about 
magazine delivery, the only names 
which the financial secretary needs to 
send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 

In sending in the names of mem- 
bers who are not getting the maga- 
zine, the address forms mailed out 
with each monthly bill should be 
used. When a member clears out of 
one local union into another, his 
name is automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of the local union he 
cleared out of. Therefore, the secre- 
tary of the union into which he cleared 
should forward his name to the Gen- 
eral Secretary so that this member 
can again be added to the mailing list. 

Members who die or are suspended 
are automatically dropped from the 
mailing list of The Carpenter. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPENTER only cor- 
rects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not advise your own 
local union of your address change. You must also notify your local union 
... by some other method. 



This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



Local No. 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State or Province 



ZIP Code 




THE 
COVER 



(ISSN 0008-6843) 

VOLUME 100 No. 1 JANUARY, 1980 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

John S. Rogers, Editor 

IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

General President Sidell Retires 2 

William Konyha, New General President 5 

AFL-CIO Moves into the 1980s 6 

America's Elderly, Which Way Will They Go? 9 

Nuclear Energy and the Radical Agenda Robert W. Searby 10 

Did You Know? District Administration 14 

Contributors to Parkinsons Disease Campaign 17 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Report 8 

Ottawa Report _. 1 6 

Consumer Clipboard: Social Security 19 

Plane Gossip 23 

Service to the Brotherhood 24 

In Memoriam 29 

What's New? 3 1 

In Conclusion _ William Sidell 32 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001 

Published monthly at 3342 Bladensburg Road, Brentwood, Md. 20722 by the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, D.C. and 
Additional Entries. Subscription price: United States and Canada $5 per year, single copies 
SOi in advance. 



General President William Sidell 
stepped down at the end of December 
after serving for eight crucial years as 
leader of the three-quarter million 
members of the Brotherhood. 

He was the 16th General President 
of our organization in a succession of 
outstanding officers which stretches 
back almost a century to 1881 and 
our first General President, Gabriel 
Edmonston. 

Sidell is succeeded by First General 
Vice President William Konyha, 
shown at left in our cover picture. 
The elevation of Vice President 
Konyha to the top office follows the 
orderly succession provided by the 
Brotherhood Constitution and Laws. 

Sidell has served as General Presi- 
dent since the retirement of M. A. 
Hutcheson in 1972. He was elected to 
a full four-year term in 1974 and was 
again elected to office at the General 
Convention in St. Louis, Mo., in Oc- 
tober of 1978. 

The change in Brotherhood leader- 
ship was announced at a meeting of 
the General Executive Board in San 
Diego, Calif., in October. 

Sidell has been an AFL-CIO vice 
president since 1972 and was chair- 
man of the AFL-CIO Executive Coun- 
cil's Committee on Housing. 



NOTE: Readers who would like 
copies of this cover unmarred by a 
mailing label may obtain them by 
sending 50$ in coin to cover 
mailing costs to the Editor, The 
CARPENTER, 101 Constitution 
Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 
20001. 




Printed in U. S. A. 




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General President 
Sidell Retires 




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He has guided the progress of the Brotherhood 
through eight years of economic recession and inflation, 
leaves legacy for future leaders to follow. 



General President William Sidell, 
one of the most respected trade union 
leaders of the Seventies, announced 
his retirement at the recent meeting of 
the General Executive Board in San 
Diego, Calif. 

He officially retired as of December 
31, 1979, and has been succeeded by 
First General Vice President William 
Konyha under the orderly progression 
provided by the Constitution and 
Laws. 

Sidell has guided the progress of 
our international union through eight 
years of economic recession and 
double-digit inflation. He has served 
a total of 15 years as a General Offi- 
cer, moving from his native state of 
California in 1964 to become Second 
General Vice President, following 
service as General Executive Board 
Member from the 8th District. 

In his letter to the Board, officially 
announcing his plans for retirement, 
Sidell stated that his main reason for 
stepping down was his own evaluation 
of "the requirements and stamina and 
endurance it takes to do the job." 
(See the full text of his letter on the 
opposite page.) 

His hard work and diligent service 



to the Brotherhood at all levels over 
the past 40 years bear testimony to 
his determination to give full attention 
to any task before him. As we stated 
in The Carpenter when he took office 
as General President in 1972: "He's 
on the job early. He's usually behind 
his desk on the fourth floor of the 
General Offices in Washington before 
7:30 a.m. . . . His tools are a steadily 
ringing telephone, the Constitution 
and Laws, a sharp pencil, and plenty 
of facts on file. His helpers are a busy 
office staff. 

"Like an experienced journeyman — 
a man for all seasons — Bill Sidell 
never 'loses his cool' though he 
shoulders a workload as heavy as any 
man in the Brotherhood." 

His plans now are to move with 
Mrs. Sidell to their home in Poway, 
Calif., near San Diego, and enjoy a 
well-earned rest. 

Sidell, 64, held the top office of the 
Brotherhood since March, 1972, when 
he assumed the presidency following 
the retirement of M. A. Hutcheson. 
He was elected to a full four-year 
term in 1974 and a subsequent three- 
year term at the 33rd General Con- 
vention in St. Louis, Mo., in 1978. 



(The shorter term for General Officers 
was voted by convention delegates in 
1978 to conform with Brotherhood 
plans for a centennial observance of 
our founding in 1981.) 

During his tenure as General Presi- 
dent, Sidell has also served as a vice 
president of the AFL-CIO and of the 
AFL-CIO Building and Construction 
Trades Department. He has been par- 
ticularly active as chairman of the 
AFL-CIO Executive Council's Com- 
mittee on Housing and Urban Devel- 
opment. He has advocated for many 
years a low maximum interest rate on 
housing, through direct government 
financing. Recognition of his leader- 
ship in the fight for better housing 
came recently when the National 
Housing Conference held a special 
dinner in Washington, D.C., to pay 
tribute to his work. 

Highly respected for his thoughtful 
reasoning and quiet but forceful pre- 
sentations on critical issues, President 
Sidell was asked to serve as chairman 
on the opening day of the recent 
AFL-CIO Biennial Convention, intro- 
ducing another noted retiree, George 
Meany, and handling the convention 




Candid 
Views 
of a 
Busy 
Presidency 



William Sidell is best when he "throws away the script" and speaks from his heart and his convictions . . . and when he is 
chairing a heated group discussion. Here are four views: Above, at a Washington labor conference and with George Meany on 
the platform of the Los Angeles AFL-CIO Convention in 1977. Below, leading the discussion of a meeting of organizers and 
business representatives at the General Office and delivering the keynote address to the 32nd General Convention in Chicago. 




JANUARY, 1980 



agenda during the visit of President 
Jimmy Carter. 

Our retiring president "came up 
through the ranks" of the Brother- 
hood. Born in Chicago, 111., in 1915, 
he moved with his mother and father 
to Los Angeles county, Calif., in 
1920. There he completed his formal 
education and then followed in his 
father's footsteps, becoming an ap- 
Continued on Page 21 

At right, President Sidell presents 
testimony to a Senate committee 
regarding the housing situation. Senator 
William Proxmire is at left. Building 
Tradesmen fill the hearing room. 





J* 


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- 



With President Jimmy 
Carter during a meeting at 
the White House. 



With Secretary of Labor 
Ray Marshall following a 
conference. 



Among Many Tributes . . . 

Bill Sidell. who has been our colleague on the 
Executive Council for most of this decade and our friend 
for many more years, has served his fellow workers 
and the entire labor movement with honor and distinction. 

As chairman of the Executive Council's Housing 
Committee and a leading member of its Civil Rights 
Committee, Bill has provided a high order of experience 
and leadership. He has brought to the Council's 
deliberations wise counsel, endless energy and an 
unfailing commitment to the cause of workers and the 
goals of human dignity and freedom both here at home 
and throughout the world. 

In every office he has held in the Brotherhood of 
Carpenters, the California Labor Federation and the 
AFL-CIO, Bill Sidell has been the ideal trade union 
leader and we are honored and privileged to have been 
his colleague and his friend. 

GEORGE MEANY, retiring President, AFL-CIO, and 
LANE KIRKLAND, newly-elected President, AFL-CIO 

//; the 30 years I have been in the labor movement, Bill 
Sidell is one of the most dedicated, honest, hard working 
effective labor leaders that I have ever had the pleasure to 
meet or work with. His retirement although well deserved, 
will be a tremendous loss not only to the Carpenters and 
the Building Trades Department but to the labor move- 
ment and the country. I personally am delighted for him 
that he gets this opportunity to do what he wants, but 1 am 
saddened at the loss of a great personal friend and 
counselor. 

BOB GEORGINE, President, 

AFL-CIO Building and Construction Trades Department 




Sidell and Plumbers President Martin Ward sign a 
jurisdictional agreement, as other Brotherhood and UA 
officials look on. 




Sidell and National Housing Rehabilitation Assn. President 
Dukess, sealed right, initially sign a seven-union statement of 
principles which did much to motivate the industry. Cabinet 
officials and Building Trades President Bob Georgine are 
with them. 




Sidell with industrial leaders at a West Coast conference, 
where he led a panel discussion on the economy. 



THE CARPENTER 



William Konyha, lleui General President 



Under provisions of the Constitu- 
tion and Laws of the United Brother- 
hood, William Konyha, First General 
Vice President, succeeded William 
Sidell as General President on Janu- 
ary 1. 

Konyha, 64, has served as First 
General Vice President since January, 
1974, when he filled the vacancy 
created by the death of Herbert C. 
Skinner. 

For the past five years, Bill Konyha 
has worked closely with the retiring 
General President, and he will con- 
tinue the progressive programs ini- 
tiated by Sidell during his tenure. 

The new president has been active 
in the Brotherhood for more than 
three decades, starting as an appren- 
tice in 1932, working with his late 
father, one of the founders of Local 
1 1 80, Cleveland, O. Six years after he 
joined the union, Bill Konyha was a 
local organizer. After service in World 
War II, he returned to the trade and 
advanced to the presidency of his local 
union. 

He was appointed a general repre- 
sentative in 1952. His work at that 
time was directed primarily to repre- 
sentations at the atomic energy plant 
in Waverly, O. There were 2,000 
Brotherhood members employed at 
this project at the height of construc- 
tion, and the sound labor record 
achieved there prompted the US Sec- 
retary of Labor to cite Brother 
Konyha for his work there. 

The new General President served 
as president of the Ohio State Council 
of Carpenters from 1962 to 1972. He 
helped to launch a state pension pro- 
gram and a health and welfare pro- 
gram covering most of the State of 
Ohio. Konyha is a former vice presi- 
dent of the state AFL-CIO. 

He was elected a member of the 
General Executive Board at the 31st 
General Convention in San Francisco, 
Calif., and was named Second Gen- 
eral Vice President in April, 1972. 

The new General President is a 
veteran of service with the Seabees in 
World War II. He served as a first 
class carpenter in the South Pacific, 
receiving an honorable discharge in 
October, 1945. 

A strong advocate of job safety 
practices, Bill Konyha initiated new 
safety laws in construction which 
have become part of the safety stand- 
Continued on page 21 




The new General President at the microphone during a recent conference. 




Konyha in the front ranks, right, as Lumber and Sawmill Workers climbed the steps 
of the US Capitol on behalf of legislation for redwood workers. 




Konyha testifying before the US Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs 
Committee during a legislative campaign in 1977. 



JANUARY, 1980 



RFL-CIO 

uiith 



moues into the 1980s 
leadership . . . 



/ INVITES UNIONS NOT IN THE FEDERATION TO AFFILIATE 

V CALLS FOR FAIR DISTRIBUTION OF NORTH AMERICA'S ECONOMIC BENEFITS 

• STRESSES STRONG, SECURE DEFENSE, SUPPORT OF HUMAN RIGHTS 



North American labor assembled in 
Washington, D.C., in November, for the 
13th Constitutional Convention of the 
AFL-CIO. A full contingent of Brother- 
hood delegates participated in the depart- 
mental meetings and in the main conven- 
tion, as retiring General President Wil- 
liam Sidell wielded the gavel on opening 
day. 

It was a timely convention, closing out 
the 1970s on a note of renewed determi- 
nation by organized labor to come to 
grips with domestic economic issues and 
the foreign policy problems now entang- 
ling the Carter Administration and the 
United States. 

It elected new leadership to carry on 
the strong programs initiated by Retiring 
President George Meany, and it strength- 
ened its resources to organize the unor- 
ganized and fight the battles of rank-and- 
file wage earners in the years ahead. 

In a convention marked by an outpour- 
ing of warmth and emotion for George 
Meany, the gavel was passed to Lane 
Kirkland who set the course as "full 
ahead, steady as she goes," and immedi- 
ately issued a call to all unions outside 
the AFL-CIO to become part of the fed- 
eration. 

The 895 delegates who elected Kirk- 
land as the AFL-CIO's second president 
and Thomas R. Donahue as secretary- 
treasurer, spelled out the course also 
in adopting 122 resolutions, increasing 
the per capita tax, choosing a 33-mem- 
ber Executive Council including four 
new members and paying deep and 
touching tribute to Meany. 

They listened attentively to speakers in- 
cluding the President, Cabinet members 
and the leaders of Congress, leaders of 
the civil rights movement, a recently re- 
leased Cuban political prisoner and rep- 
resentatives of women and Hispanic 
groups in the four-day convention. 

The 369 resolutions that came before 
the convention demonstrated a deep con- 



cern with the major problems of energy, 
inflation, unemployment, human rights 
and social welfare as well as a host of 
problems facing workers on the job and 
in their communities. 

The man who had led the federation 
for 24 years in developing policy and 
action programs on these issues was up- 
permost, however, in the delegates' minds. 
Not a speaker failed to mention Meany's 
contributions, nor did the delegates omit 
a round of applause. 

Meany was named president emeritus 
of the AFL-CIO in a standing cheering 
ovation to which he responded from his 
wheelchair on the convention platform 
with memories of earlier years, and of 
those who had helped him. 

Kirkland, who had been nominated 
by Meany, recalling the retiring presi- 
dent's record, said "the life work of 
this one valiant man would do honor 
to a dozen men, if divided among their 
histories. He is living proof of how 
much difference one person, armed 
with his qualities, can really make in 
the course of human events." 

Noting a convention resolution on af- 
filiation of unions not in the AFL-CIO, 
Kirkland declared "all workers belong in 
the unions of their trade or industry and 
all true unions belong in the AFL-CIO. 
This AFL-CIO is the steward of the com- 
mon good of the trade union movement. 
Its delegates distill from the natural con- 
flicting passions and prejudices of workers 
at large the best and most generous im- 
pulses and qualities of American labor." 

Kirkland, who had served as secretary- 
treasurer of the federation for 10 years, 
was succeeded by Donahue who was 
elected by acclamation. For the past six 
years Donahue had been Meany's execu- 
tive assistant. 

The delegates supported unanimously 
a recommendation from the council to 



increase the per capita payment from 16 
to 19 cents per member per month to 
meet increasing costs and expenses and 
prevent future deficits. The new per capita 
is effective Ian. 1, 1980. 

Following the lead of the Committee 
on Resolutions and other convention 
committees, the delegates approved 122 
resolutions, a reaffirmation of AFL-CIO 
policies across the broad spectrum of 
labor's interests. 

Dealing with issues close to the daily 
headlines, the convention called for a 
strong windfall profits tax on oil com- 
panies and urged the President to veto 
anything less. It voiced its support of the 
President's action on Iran in light of the 
seizure of American hostages and called 
for worldwide efforts to stop the Holo- 
caust-like tragedy in Cambodia and speed 
shipment and distribution of relief sup- 
plies to millions facing hunger and death. 

The convention pledged new efforts 
to expose and counter the professional 
union-busters and the companies that 
employ them in adopting a series of 
resolutions on organizing and related 
areas. 

It called for trade and economic poli- 
cies that would halt the destruction of 
American jobs and erosion of the nation's 
industrial base and proposed a detailed 
program for fighting inflation and reces- 
sion. 

The dangers of corporate concentra- 
tion, the need for financial institution re- 
form, implementation of the Humphrey- 
Hawkins Full Employment Act. measures 
to deal with plant closings and reloca- 
tions and the continuing and insistent 
need for tax justice and tax reform were 
all dealt with. 

In a wide-ranging resolution on labor 
and the world, the convention reaffirmed 
AFL-CIO policy that human rights must 
be the heart of American foreign policy 
and stressed the need for a strong and 
secure defense. 



THE CARPENTER 





President Carter offers best wishes to George Meany upon 
his retirement, above, as General President Sidell, left, 
chairs the convention. Secretary of State Vance is 
immediately behind Meany. Secretary of Labor Ray 
Marshall is at right. 



At the Metal Trades Convention, above, from left, are 
Delegates George Laufenberg, Local 620, Madison, N.J.; 
D. G. Jackman, Twin Cities, Minn., District Council; Gen. 
Sec. John Rogers, and Gen. Pres. William Sidell. Not 
present for the picture (due to committee assignments) was 
G. D. Krahn, Local 1020, Portland, Ore. 



■■■■■■i 




Below, Paul Miller, 
Los Angeles District 
Council, and Charles 
Brodeur, assistant to 
the General President. 





General President Sidell dis- 
cusses matters on the agenda of 
the AFL-CIO Biennial Conven- 
tion with Lane Kirkland, 
former secretary-treasurer of 
the AFL-CIO who was elected 
by delegates to succeed George 
Meany to the highest post in 
the Federation. 



Below, General Executive 
Board Members Morton, Lia, 
and Lucassen with Building 
Trades President Bob Georgine, 
second from right. 



n~ X^'m—^N 



Below, the retiring 
General President and 
the new General 
President listen to a 
convention speaker. 



At the Union Label and Service Trades Conven- 
tion, above, from left: First VP Konyha; Bob 
Lowes, Detroit District Council; Pres. Sidell 
Anthony Ramos, Calif. State Council; Marilyn and 
Armando Vergara of Los Angeles, who were 
visitors; and Joe Pinto, Local 721, Los Angeles. 





Above, Bd. Members Ochocki, Greene and Lewis, 
with Joe Pinto of Los Angeles, third from right. 
Below: The five General Officers (General Treas- 
urer Nichols in the background) with Milan 
Marsh of Ohio at the delegates' table. 





Washington 
Report 




aaiiiiitLffliii 







I I I 1 I 



'BASIC NECESSITIES' UP 

Prices for the basic necessities of 
life rose more than twice as fast dur- 
ing the first nine months of 1979 as 
prices for all other consumer items, 
according to a new study. 

The National Center for Economic 
Alternatives said prices for food, 
housing, medical care and energy in- 
creased at an annual rate of 17.5% 
from January through September. For 
"non-necessities" the group said, the 
price rise was only 6.6%. 

The group said food, housing, energy 
and medical care comprise about two- 
thirds of the household budget for four 
out of five American families. 

MORE MULTI-EARNER FAMILIES 

At least two family members work in 
three out of every five husband-wife 
households, according to the Bureau of 
Labor Statistics. 

Since 1970, the number of these 
multi-earner families has increased by 
more than 3 million to a total of 28.4 
million. BLS said the steep annual 
increases in the number and proportion 
of working wives was almost exclusively 
responsible for the record rise. 

In 1970, there were 18,377,000 wives 
in the labor force. By March 1979, 
23,832,000 wives — nearly half of all 
wives 16 years of age and older — were 
working or looking for work. 

Over the past decade, it generally 
has been true that the lower the hus- 
band's salary the greater the likeli- 
hood that his wife works, according to 
the Labor Department. 

In light of rising inflation, this 
would seem to indicate that many wives 
work in order to maintain family in- 
come at a level they feel is necessary 
or acceptable. 



INTEREST-RATE RELIEF 

If the country is going to rely on 
restrictive monetary policy to fight 
inflation then steps should be taken 
"to shelter areas of great social need" 
from the "chill winds" of tight money, 
AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland 
declared. 

He told reporters in a Washington 
interview session that the recent 
actions of the Federal Reserve Board 
in raising interest rates was "the 
wrong move at the wrong time." He added 
that "the pure, deliberate and start- 
ling increase in just the price of 
money is going to compound the problem 
rather than solve it." 

The federation is concerned with the 
special needs of housing and urban 
affairs and the assurance of continued 
access to money at reasonable rates for 
these areas, he stressed, in line with 
the spirit of the National Accord 
worked out with the Administration. 

He recalled that the accord specified 
that those at the "bottom rungs of the 
ladder" should be spared the burden of 
sharing in the austerity that may come 
from the battle against inflation. 

LOANS FOR WOODLANDS URGED 

A National Forest Products Assn. 
spokesman recently urged Congress to 
enact legislation establishing a pilot 
program of government guaranteed loans 
as an incentive for private woodland 
owners to manage their lands for timber 
production. 

The program would allow landowners to 
borrow money periodically against the 
future value of their timber. Repayment 
of the loans would be deferred until 
the timber is harvested. 

He said a major reason owners choose 
not to make forestry investments is the 
many years of timber-growing time 
between initial investments and 
eventual cash returns. 

The proposed Forestry Loan Act, H.R. 
4718, addresses this problem, he said, 
by making possible periodic cash flows 
from forestry investments. 

HALF U.S. TO CONDOS AHEAD? 

Half of the U.S. population will be 
in condominiums in the next 20 years. 

This prediction, made a few years 
ago by the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development, now seems conserva- 
tive. Condominiums are no longer an 
obscure member of the housing family. 
They are a leading member. 

The National Association of Realtors 
states that the rate of price appre- 
ciation for condos is now comparable 
and, in some instances, surpassing 
single-family home appreciation. 



THE CARPENTER 




Msssi*- 



nmERIN'S ELDERLV 

Which Way Will Thy 6oi 



When it comes to political clout, the 
citizens who can be counted on to turn 
out at the polls are America's elderly. 

There were 24.1 million persons 65 
years of age and over in 1978, up 
from 20.1 million in 1970. 

In the 1976 presidential elections, 
62% of the elderly voted, a turnout 
more than ten points higher than the 
national average. 

In the November 1978 congressional 
elections, in fact, those 65 and over 
outvoted all age groups under 45 years 
—56% to 53%. 

Older men outvoted women by 63 % 
to 51% but, because women outnum- 
bered men by 4.5 million in 1978, 
older women cast 1 million more votes 
than men that year. 

Which way will the elderly go in 
1980? 

Their voice could be decisive be- 
cause the economic and social forces 
now buffeting all Americans will shape 
the political issues of the coming cam- 
paign and the elderly are directly 
affected. 

High-level inflation continues to un- 
dermine living standards and soaring 
fuel costs will burden many this winter, 
especially those on fixed incomes such 

JANUARY, 1980 



as the elderly. A recession deeper and 
longer than anticipated will throw mil- 
lions more out of work, probably dis- 
placing many among the elderly em- 
ployed. 

And discussions within the Carter 
Administration and in Congress over 
trimming Social Security benefits are 
certain to arouse the elderly voter. 

What is the condition of this politi- 
cally active elderly citizen? 

The Census Bureau recently issued 
an updated profile of the social and 
economic characteristics of the elderly 
as of 1978 and this is how they fared: 

• Population: The number of per- 
sons 65 and over rose by 20% since 
1970, from 20 million to 24 million. 
The number of women has increased 
faster and they now outnumber men, 
14.3 million to 9.8 million. 

• Family status: About 63 % of the 
elderly lived in families and 30% lived 
alone, with 6% institutionalized. 

• The institutionalized: About 1 
million elderly lived in long-term care 
institutions, about the same as in 1970. 

• Education: Nearly half of those 
65 and over never attended high 



school, but the proportion will rise as 
better-educated persons move into the 
retirement years. 

• Voting and registration: Apathy 
may afflict other voting groups, which 
show a decline of 10% over the past 
eight elections, but the elderly group 
has declined only 4% in presidential 
elections. 

• Job status: Nearly 2.5 million 
persons 65 and over were employed in 
1978. Service industries employed the 
largest proportion, 40%; retail trade 
was next with 21% and manufacturing 
employed 11%. 

• Income: Men 65 and over who 
earned income in 1977 had a median 
income of $5,526 compared to $12,243 
for men 55 to 64 years old. Women 
65 and over had a median income of 
$3,087 compared to $4,533 for women 
55 to 64 years old. 

• Poverty status: One of the more 
remarkable changes among the elderly 
in the 1970s was that about 1.5 mil- 
lion were helped out of poverty thanks 
to Social Security improvements. 

The Census Bureau reported that 
the total number of Americans below 
the poverty income level remained 
about the same — 25.4 million in 1970 
compared to 24.7 million in 1977. 
However, the elderly in poverty were 
reduced from 4.7 million to 3.2 mil- 
lion — from 25% of the total to 14%. 

A Census Bureau expert pointed out 
that, while the poverty threshold was 
raised to keep pace with the inflation 
rate, the elderly gained because the in- 
dexing of Social Security to the infla- 
tion rate kept them even while sub- 
stantial benefit hikes improved their 
income levels. 

• Housing: About 15 million house- 
holds were maintained by the elderly 
in 1978 and 3 of every 4 were owner- 
occupied. This could mean that prop- 
erty tax relief would aid the elderly. 
But if taxes become too burdensome, 
they might be found in protest. 

• Health: Persons 65 and over in 
1976 could expect to live an additional 
16 years on average, 14 years for men 
and 18 for women. By far the major 
cause of death in 1976 was heart dis- 
ease. On the average, 7 of 10 elderly 
visited a doctor in the previous six 
months and 1 in 4 visited a dentist. 
About 45% had not visited a dentist 
in five years. 

So that is a quick profile of the 
elderly American: lower income; some 
working; most homeowners; in need of 
health care; aided greatly by Social 
Security. But, above all, politically 
conscious and active. 





nuclear Energy and the 
Radical Agenda of Eauironmentalism 



by Robert W. Searby, 

Executive Director of New York State 

Committee for Jobs and Energy 

Independence 

EDITORS NOTE: The United Brother- 
hood, together with the AFL-CIO and 
the Building Trades Department, has 
gone on record in support of nuclear 
energy and the continued construction 
of atomic energy plants, with, of course, 
adequate safeguards against radiation 
hazards to combat inflation and reduce 
our dependency on foreign oil imports. 
We have asked an authority on this sub- 
ject to prepare this special article for 
our members. The views expressed by 
Mr. Searby are his own and not neces- 
sarily those of the United Brotherhood. 

SCENE 1: New York legislative bearings 
on energy policy. Twenty-eight people 
are there from business, labor and three 
local environmental groups. The busi- 
nesses and unions represented account for 
400,000 jobs and billions in taxes and 
wages. The environmentalists represent 
900 members. The environmentalists get 
priority time when TV cameras are roll- 
ing. They call themselves helpless people 
fighting to defend nature against business 
fatcats and labor hardhats. They contend 



the state needs less waste and a simpler 
life-style. Too much energy and growth 
destroys natural beauty. They oppose all 
new power plants. They demand stoppage 
of one project employing 1200 workers 
and that, if finished, would save ten mil- 
lion barrels of oil. Their membership 
exemplifies a new influential elite: upper- 
middle-class, comfortable, secure. Unlike 
the business people and tradesmen pres- 
ent, they answer to no one and produce 
few goods and services. If they are wrong 
in their actions, they bear no responsi- 
bility. Others pay the price of error. 



SCENE II: A socialist party caucus in 
New York City. You are invited to speak 
for the construction unions in an energy 
debate. Your opponent is James Benson 
from the anti-nuclear Council on Eco- 
nomic Priorities. You expect a tough 
energy debate. You're concerned with 
jobs and family income. Benson turns 
out to be a fuzzy-talking advocate of 
counter-culture visions. He says techni- 
cal questions are not his main concern; 
it's a revolution in lifestyles that matters. 
People's consciousness needs raising, 
schools have to be revolutionized and 
family structure changed; income redis- 
tributed according to his model of equity. 



The debate is, of course, not at all 
about energy. It's about basic values, 
risks of life, personal rights, political 
constitution and religious beliefs. Ben- 
son doesn't see it that way. He likes 
merely dictating his vision of good and 
truth, and calling it "energy and eco- 
nomics." You walk out into the city 
night filled with men and women 
rushing home from work, cars dodging 
each other, tall buildings, cabbies and 
cops — the smell and sight of real life. 
But your experience worries you. It 
hits you that Benson is dedicated to 
forcing his counter-culture values on 
you, your kids and your country. After 
all an army of James Bensons are now 
taken seriously as policy experts. His 
way of thinking and his values influ- 
ence government officials and the me- 
dia. You realize he was preaching rev- 
olutionary change and you're angered 
that few people are facing up to the 
fact. 



SCENE HI: Washington, D.C., Sunday, 
May 6th on the Mall. The event is the 
giant anti-nuke rally — over 60,000 peo- 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



pie. You're a reporter for your trade 
journal. Mingling with the crowd, you 
meet George, a student vacationing in 
D.C. He is politically moderate but in- 
tensely concerned with nuclear safety. 
You hear Governor Brown exhorting the 
crowd with a speech written for him by 
Tom Hayden, godfather of SDS and Jane 
Fonda's current spouse. Ms. Fonda is 
there too. George reacts badly to Fonda's 
speech: he is an anti-nuke but doesn't 
like her "excess baggage," he tells you. 
George's brother died in Vietnam about 
the time Jane Fonda was broadcasting 
from Hanoi, calling the NVA the "con- 
science of humanity." Politics aside, 
George can't forget that and admits her 
words fall on biased ears. Ralph Nader 
appears pronouncing nuclear energy 
"America's technological Vietnam." As 
you wade through the crowd you meet 
members of Mobilization for Survival, 
the Abortion Rights Movement, Clergy 
and Laity Concerned, SANE, Socialist 
Workers Party, Youth Against War and 
Facism, Young Socialist Alliance, 
Women's Strike for Peace. George de- 
cides that, although he's an anti-nuke, 
this isn't his movement. You leave 
George to file your story. It begins tome- 
thing like the New York Times lead arti- 
cle the next day: "The event was remi- 
niscent of the marches protesting Amer- 
ican involvement in Vietnam a decade 
and more ago. . . . The protestors gave 
the appearances of being graduates of 
an earlier era returning for a 10-year 
reunion." 

"America's technological Vietnam?" 
You begin to realize that Nader's char- 
acterization may reveal a lot about the 
anti-nuclear movement. Does the com- 
parison disturb you? It does me. Before 
our eyes, a nuts-and-bolts economic is- 
sue — secure, plentiful, affordable en- 
ergy — is being transformed into another 
radical movement. It would not be so 
disturbing if energy supply wasn't essen- 
tial to our personal and national well- 
being. But given a vulnerable economy, 
all citizens should be disturbed that many 
leaders of the antinuclear movement 
espouse political goals few of us can ac- 
cept The fact is that Jane Fonda is not 
the only one with ideological "excess 
baggage." 

In 1977 a task fjrce of top environ- 
mentalists was formed including the 
leaders of The Sierra Club, the Natural 
Resources Defense Council, the Friends 
of the Earth. The Wilderness Society, 
Zero Population Growth, the National 
Wildlife Federation, and the Environ- 
mental Defense Fund. They published a 
study called, The Unfinished Agenda: 
the Citizen's Guide to Environmental 
Issues. The title is misleading. Their 
chief interests are not narrow environ- 



mental issues. They deal with the way 
we live, where and how we live, how 
many of us live, what we believe and 
what we love. Stated directly, these en- 
vironmentalists don't like their fellow 
citizens one bit: they think there are too 
many of us and judge our way of life 
not worth living. According to them, we 
don't know what's best for us. So, by 
gaining power they have decided to 
fundamentally change us. With their at- 
titude few elections can be won directly. 
Therefore, few environmentalists run for 
office on their radical platform. Instead 
they use research centers, mass-media 
and a $48 million combined budget to 
lobby politicians. They have gained top 
positions in the federal and state regula- 
tory agencies from which to achieve their 
objectives. 

Reading The Unfinished Agenda you 
quickly learn that the primary concerns 
are not nuclear energy, coal, dams, fac- 
tories, forests, or cars. Their major 
theme is coercive population control. 
First, control of the amount of us; then, 
control of what we teach our kids and 
what we most value ourselves. 

Recall that this book is ostensibly 
about environmental issues. Yet, the 
taskforce returns to coercive population 
control in every chapter of their study, 
whether it's energy, agriculture, land 
use or natural resources. For exam- 
ple, they recommend ways to force 
families out of their homes by denying 
property tax and mortgage interest de- 
ductions. Desiring more open land, 
they consider suburbs of any kind to 
be vices. They oppose development of 
nuclear and coal resources as well as 
most of our domestic minerals. They 
oppose the use of fertilizers that have 
permitted bountiful increases in U.S. 
farm output. They oppose modern 
"energy wasting" farm machinery and 
suggest farmers return to hand tools. 
According to the environmentalist 
taskforce, Americans have wasted re- 
sources and created a profligate so- 
ciety. To remedy the situation, they 
recommend a National Planning Board 
composed of themselves of course, to 
set and enforce growth limits, allocate 
natural resources and generally moni- 
tor our use of them. 

After reading The Unfinished 
Agenda one can only conclude that the 
environmentalist movement is actually 
an anti-energy movement designed to 
compel drastic change in America at 
the cost of immense suffering for the 
mass of people. Thus Amory Lovins, 



the intellectual of the soft-technology 
cause, can write that, "It would be little 
short of disastrous for us to discover a 
source of clean, cheap abundant en- 
ergy because of what we might do with 
it. Agreeing with him, Paul Ehrlich, 
the population control expert and nu- 
clear energy opponent, says that, "Giv- 
ing society cheap, abundant energy . . . 
would be the equivalent of giving an 
idiot child a machine gun." Shocking? 
Radical? Sure it is. These people have 
a vision of society that has only been 
approximated in modern-day China 
and other such centers of human de- 
gradation. To believe they're only talk- 
ing about clean air, water, and energy 
alternatives is like believing that the 
Vietnamese communists really put 
people in "re-education camps" be- 
cause they're concerned about their 
three R's! These people are Coercive 
Utopians, indeed. 

But the authors of The Unfinished 
Agenda are the movement's extremists, 
you might say. On the contrary, they are 
the environmentalist moderate establish- 
ment. At least in their study, they seem 
sincerely concerned that their recom- 
mendations might adversely affect our 
personal freedoms. The authors hope 
somehow to preserve our basic demo- 
cratic system. To view naked revolution- 
ary aims, you have to look at other 
anti-nuclear environmentalists. 

Dr. Barry Commoner is seen on talk- 
shows and news interviews as the vener- 
able proponent of a bright solar future. 
But, pleasant image aside, he advocates 
revolutionary change for the United 
States. In his 1976 book, The Poverty of 
Power, Commoner wrote that, "The per- 
vasive and seemingly inevitable faults 
now exhibited by the United States eco- 
nomic system can best be remedied by 
reorganizing it along (marxist) Socialist 
lines." As he makes clear, his own inter- 
est in energy policy stems from the fact 
that energy can be manipulated so as to 
move the country toward socialism. The 
Poverty of Power is, according to Com- 
moner, America's failure to develop ade- 
quate energy resources. This failure, he 
claims, proves the contradictions in our 
system and the need for socialism. To 
hear Commoner make that claim is like 
hearing the leader of a violent street- 
gang criticize neighborhood residents for 
failing to control crime! 

"America's technological Vietnam." 
said Ralph Nader of nuclear energy. 
He is quite right. If you see it other- 
wise, you can't grasp the importance 
of the anti-nuclear movement. The hu- 



JANUARY, 1980 



11 



miliating defeat in Vietnam rendered 
America confused and impotent in 
world affairs. And, now, the nuclear 
energy issue may similarly determine 
our will to use domestic resources to 
sustain our economic health. It is, 
therefore, an important fact that key 
anti-war leaders are now in the anti- 
nuclear movement. Tom Hayden, Jane 
Fonda, Dave Dillinger, William Kunts- 
ler were all active then as now. Many 
of Ralph Nader's top organizers got 
their experience from the Vietnam 
protests, as did the leaders of Mobiliza- 
tion for Survival and other anti-nuclear 
groups. These leaders see the anti- 
nuclear movement as the next stage in 
the radicalization of American politics. 

Kuntsler said recently he considered the 
nuclear issue to be a means of "pulling 
the radical Left in this country together 
again." To understand why they are de- 
termined to stop our use of domestic 
energy, we have to recognize that these 
radicals see a unity of purpose spanning 
the anti-war and anti-nuclear move- 
ments. 

Revolutionary fervor waned when 
most of the anti-war protestors went on 
to careers and the concerns of making a 
living. As adults, they were integrated 
into the democratic system. Most protest- 
ing young men were, after all, concerned 
only with avoiding the draft. When the 
war ended so did their idealistic en- 
thusiasm. But speaking for the committed 
radical minority, Kuntsler has said that 
the revolution still can't come until our 
political system is made to totally col- 
lapse. The struggle continues. 

We should realize that the radical lead- 
ers of the anti-war movement considered 
a U.S. defeat in Vietnam to be a great 
victory for their cause. Anticipating vic- 
tory, Tom Hayden made this clear in his 
1970 book about the movement. Their 
major goal, Hayden wrote, was to give 
"encouragement to the Vietnamese revo- 
lutionaries while demoralizing the Amer- 
ican military and the puppets they sup- 
ported." In the same book Hayden 
described the current despots of all Indo- 
china as the "conscience of humanity" 
who were "opening our eyes to our own 
history as a genocidal nation, and start- 
ing us on the road to our own revolu- 
tion." Hayden's 1970 book (Trial) is 168 
pages of violent, hate-filled polemic 
against the United States and Western 
democracy generally. "The general goals 
of American revolutionaries," Hayden 
writes, "are not too difficult to state." 
"We want to abolish a private property 
system which collides violently with the 
aspirations of people all over the world. 
We want a transformation in which the 
masses of people, organized around their 



own needs, create a new, humane and 
participatory system." Hayden concludes 
by describing his vision of an America 
made in the image and likeness of the 
revolutionaries' own lifestyle; an America 
of the Woodstock Nation where "all tra- 
ditional social relations would be over- 
turned. "The family would be replaced 
by a mixture of communes, extended 
(group) families and organizations. 
Drugs would be commonly used as a 
means of deepening self-awareness. . . . 
Urban structures would be destroyed. . . . 
Education would be reorganized along 
revolutionary lines." 




But why concentrate on these 1970 
thoughts of an anti-Vietnam revolution- 
ary? Isn't the Vietnam experience behind 
us? Why dredge it up? Well, because 
Tom Hayden is a key intellectual figure 
of the anti-nuclear movement today, and 
he has never disavowed his revolutionary 
goals as revealed in his 1970 book. Like 
his colleague William Kuntsler, Hayden 
sees nuclear energy as another emotional 
issue to forward revolutionary goals. 
That is why the anti-nuclear movement 
mixes legitimate economic and safety 
questions with attacks on military de- 
fense, big business, big labor and our 
entire social system. In his book, Tom 
Hayden characterizes himself as a "sol- 
dier in an international socialist revolu- 
tion." We should take him at his word. 

On August 26th, Hayden and 
Fonda announced that they have 
founded the Campaign for Economic 
Democracy (no doubt financed by the 
huge profits from The China Syn- 
drome). The New York Times reports 
that "the group is attempting to tap 
the same feelings of distrust that 
helped fuel the student movement of 
the 60s while trying to relate such dis- 
trust to some problems of middle-of- 
the-road Americans, such as inflation 
and energy." (The Times describes 
Hayden as a "liberal." Think of the 
quotes from his 1 970 book Trial and 
then wonder how Tom Hayden can be 
called a liberal.) The report also says 



he intends to tap the large number of 
people attracted to the anti-nuclear 
movement. And, thus, the two move- 
ments are spanned for revolutionary 
purposes. As Hayden made clear in his 
SDS activity and writings, he wants to 
fuel the distrust of American institu- 
tions which he considers fundamen- 
tally corrupt. While belonging to the 
anti-energy movement that has blocked 
our use of necessary domestic re- 
sources, he now turns to tell us we 
should be aliented from our political 
and economic system. The chicken 
thieves have come from the barnyard 
to condemn the farmer for poultry 
shortages! 

All these views — of leisure-class elit- 
ists, counter-culture dreamers and hard- 
core radicals — are worlds removed from 
most working Americans. For most of 
us, nuclear energy is basically a nuts-and- 
bolts economic issue. We are uncon- 
cerned with revolutionary goals and 
abstract models of what humanity should 
look like. We want energy to make a 
decent and just living, provide for family 
needs and contribute to our community. 
We rightly understand secure and ade- 
quate energy to be necessary for healthy 
economic growth. Growth is the basis for 
job opportunity and security. They, in 
turn, guarantee us and our children the 
kind of livelihood we have come to ap- 
preciate in the United States. Among 
tradesmen, as among most citizens, few 
people think of nuclear energy in terms 
of social revolution. If today there exists 
distrust and alienation, it's caused by the 
belief that our political system is being 
abused. 

The environmentalist radicals exemp- 
lify abuse. They condemn "the system" 
yet are major recipients of its benefits: 
leisure, wealth, career mobility, educa- 
tion, social status, civil and political 
rights. And they would have none of 
these benefits without the military vig- 
ilance that secures our American com- 
monwealth. They talk about "economic 
democracy," "worker's rights," "con- 
sumer advocacy." Yet with their army of 
lawyers, reporters, researchers and lob- 
byists they stifle energy growth and dis- 
regard the overwhelming pro-energy 
opinions of organized workers. 

Despite its gross imperfections, we are 
by and large people of "the system." 
Even in the cynical post-Vietnam era, we 
still grasp the meaning of the prayer, 
"My country, right or wrong." It means, 
of course, that America is open to all the 
errors and vices of any other experiment 
in self-government. Yet, even when 
wrong, it remains a mother-land. This is 

Continued on Page 22 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



BUILT TO TAKE IT 
SO YOU DONT HAVE TO. 




CHEVY'S MASSIVE GIRDER BEAM SUSPENSION SYSTEM. 

Standard on all 2-wheel-drive Chevy pickups. A massive, 
steel beam forms the foundation of this rugged independent 
front suspension. Two contoured control arms with coil springs 
are attached to each end of the rigid steel beam. So the front 
wheels take bumps and ruts independently and help smooth 

the ride. Let Chevy's tough 
Massive Girder Beam 




suspension take the bumps for you. A big 

plus this year is the new Chevrolet 

Three-Year Perforation-From- 

Corrosion Limited Warranty. 

See your Chevrolet dealer for 

details. Ask about leasing, too. 




EPA EST. MPG EST. HWY. 

Remember: Compare the "estimated MPG" to 
the "estimated MPG" of other vehicles. Yoo 
may get different mileage depending on how 
last you drive, weather conditions and trip 
length Actual highway mileage will probably 
be less than the estimated highway fuel 
economy. Lower in California. 



Chevy pickups are equipped with GM-built engines 
produced by various divisions. See your dealer for 
details. 



Chevy C10 Fleetside Cheyenne 

with available rectangular headlights and 

chromed grille. 



BUILT TO STAY TOUGH 




Brotherhood's 
10 Districts 
toner IIS, Canada 



Do you know your home district, its board member, 
and how it functions? 



"The Carpenters' Convention, held in 
Chicago, this month, was no ordinary 
affair," Peter McGuire, editor and sec- 
retary-treasurer of the Brotherhood, told 
his readers in the August, 1881, issue of 
The Carpenter magazine. "It accom- 
plished a herculean task and will be for- 
ever regarded as one of the grandest 
events in the history of the trade. 

"After four days' steady and thorough 
deliberation, a constitution was framed 
and over 10,000 carpenters were thus 
united in one compact body. . . ." 

Peter McGuire was a man of vision in 
his time, but even he coud not have fully 
realized how large and dynamic an or- 
ganization the Brotherhood he helped to 
found would become. 

In 1881 there were less than 10 million 
wage earners in the entire United States 
and Canada. Today there are more than 
70 million. 

There were only 38 states in the United 
States. Today there are 50, stretching 
from Hawaii and Alaska and across the 
North American continent to Puerto 
Rico. 

In Canada, the Dominion government 
was only 14 years old, and the prairie 
provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta 
had not even formed. 

From 10,000 carpenters in 1881, the 
Brotherhood grew by January, 1980, to 
more than 700,000 skilled craftsmen and 
industrial workers, serving the two great- 
est industrial nations in the world. 

To serve the needs of the growing 
union. Brotherhood convention delegates 
at the turn of the century, about 1900, 
established a General Executive Board, 
made up of outstanding local leaders 
from the various regions of North Amer- 
ica. They came from s;ven sections of 
the country. In 1904, for example, the 
chairman of the GEB was from San 
Mateo, Calif., and board members assem- 
bled from Wilkesbarre, Pa.; Montreal, 
Que.; East Lake, Ala.; New Haven, 
Conn.; Kansas City, Mo., and Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

In time, Brotherhood leaders realized 
that, to give full representation to all 



regions of the US and Canada, they must 
divide the two nations into actual geo- 
graphic districts, and they voted to estab- 
lish seven districts. 

By the mid-1950s, however, general 
representatives in the field and the Gen- 
eral Executive Board Members began to 
realize that their work load was growing 
heavy, and delegates to the 27th General 
Convention authorized the General Ex- 
ecutive Board to send out through prop- 
ositions for a referendum vote of the en- 
tire membership: 1. move the General 
Office to Washington, D.C., 2. redistrict 
the geographical areas of districts, and 
3. grant to the General Convention legis- 
lative and judicial authority "so that final 
action can be taken in convention ses- 
sions." 

When the tabulation of the referendum 
vote was taken in November, 1957, all 
three propositions had been approved by 
the necessary majority. 

The 28th General Convention at St. 
Louis, Mo., 1958, then took action to 
carry out the mandate of the member- 
ship. 

Instead of one General Executive 
Board Member, Canada soon had two. 
The provinces of British Columbia, which 
had been in former District 6 with 1 1 
western states, Alaska, and the Hawaiian 
Islands, became a part of new Canadian 
District 10. The border between Mani- 
toba and Ontario became the boundary 
between the two new Canadian Districts 
9 and 10. Former District 1, composed of 
the New England states and New York 
remained intact. So did Districts 2 and 3. 
Kansas, Missouri, Texas, and Oklahoma, 
were moved from District 5, and, with 
Arkansas, made up the new District 6. 

District 5 lost the four states men- 
tioned above and picked up the Moun- 
tain State of Colorado. 

The big and booming Western States be- 
came Districts 7 and 8 as you see on the 
map on the opposite page. The new State 
of Hawaii became part of District 8. The 
new state of Alaska became part of Dis- 
trict 7. 

Today, each district is headed up by a 



General Executive Board Member, who 
is elected by the General Convention, 
and who is responsible for assisting local 
unions in his district, for advising and 
assisting in negotiations for collective bar- 
gaining and in organizing the unorgan- 
ized, and for carrying out a whole range 
of duties under the direction of the 
General President. 

Each district Board Member helps co- 
ordinate the work of the international 
staff of organizers and representatives in 
his district, with the advice and consent 
of the General Officers and the Director 
of Organization. 

In general, General Executive Board 
Members represent the international un- 
ion in their respective districts. 

Between conventions, the General Ex- 
ecutive Board — made up of the five Gen- 
eral Officers and the 10 District Board 
Members — is the supreme authority of 
the Brotherhood. 

The Constitution and Laws states it 
this way: "The General Executive Board 
shall have the authority to determine the 
number of its members, the geographical 
area of the Districts, and to make appro- 
priate provision for the administration of 
the various districts." 

Between board meetings — under Sec- 
tion 15 of the Constitution and Laws — 
the district board members "devote their 
entire time to the interest of the United 
Brotherhood, under the supervision of 
the General President." 

The General President chairs meetings 
of the General Executive Board, and the 
General Secretary serves as board secre- 
tary, recording the minutes. All corre- 
spondence and appeals to the General 
Executive Board are sent to the General 
Secretary, who presents them at the next 
regular meeting of the board. 

The Constitution and Laws provides 
for quarterly meetings of the General 
Executive Board, and special meetings 
are held "at the call of the chair." 

It's a democratic, efficient system of 
trade union government, and in our case, 
it has worked successfully for almost a 
century. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 













CAtWrt, tOUt 



The 10 districts of the United Brotherhood cover the United States and Canada. The board members from each district are 
shown below. 




Joseph F. Lia 

First District 
New City, N.Y. 



2 



Sigurd Lucassen 

Second District 
Springfield, N.J. 



3 



Anthony Ochocki 

Third District 
Detroit, Mich. 



4 



Harold E. Lewis 

Fourth District 
Atlanta, Ga. 



5 



Leon W. Greene 

Fifth District 
Burnsville, Minn. 




6 Frederick N. Bull — 

Sixth District / 

Oklahoma City, Ok. ' 



Hal Morton 

Seventh District 
Portland, Ore. 



8M. B. Bryant 
Eighth District 
Sacramento, Calif. 



9 John Carruthers - — 

Ninth District 
Willowdale, Ont. 



Ronald J. Dancer 

Tenth District 
Calgary, Alb. 



JANUARY, 1980 



15 



Ottawa 
Report 




BROADBENT PROPOSES CONTROLS 

Saying that it is "time to get tough 
with the foreign giants who control 
our energy industry," NDP leader Ed 
Broadbent called for the establishment 
of a permanent commission to control 
prices and profits of the multina- 
tional oil companies. 

"The exorbitant third quarter profit 
increases reported recently are simply 
additional and irrefutable evidence of 
the need for price and profit controls 
on the major companies operating in 
the Canadian oil industry," he said. 

He stated that the four largest sub- 
sidiaries operating in Canada — Imper- 
ial, Gulf, Texaco and Shell — had an 
average increase in profits of 55% on 
their Canadian operations in the first 
nine months of 1979. 

Broadbent said that "instead of 
trembling before the demands of the 
oil giants and promising them even 
more handouts and concessions if they 
will agree to develop and sell us 
our own energy resources, the Prime 
Minister should make it clear to them 
that the rules of the game are chang- 
ing in Canada, just as in the U.S." 

CLC LAUNCHES RADIO SHOW 

Over the past few years, the Canad- 
ian labor movement has launched a 
number of campaigns to explain to its 
members and to the public what trade 
unionism is all about. 

In another attempt to explain its 
case, the Canadian Labor Congress has 
gone into the business of radio pro- 
gramming, and it already seems to be a 
booming success. 

Last year, the CLC developed a radio 
package which would run for 13 weeks 
with each segment lasting 15 minutes. 



The program, called "The Workplace," 
would, according to plans, be broad- 
cast on at least 25 radio stations 
from coast to coast. Currently, the 
CLC has a definite "yes" from 21 sta- 
tions that will run the show this 
winter, while another 15 are still 
considering it. 

BOISE CASCADE STRIKEBREAKS 

Ontario Federation of Labor Secre- 
tary-Treasurer Terry Meagher says Boise 
Cascade Canada, Ltd., is strikebreaking 
and making unreasonable contract 
demands. 

He said the company's demand that 
woodlands workers, members of Local 
2693, Lumber and Sawmill Workers Union, 
must own and operate their equipment 
was absolutely unreasonable. The 
equipment used by each man costs up to 
$50,000. Workers have been on strike 
in Fort Frances, about 280 kilometres 
west of Thunder Bay, for 10 months and 
in Kenora for 13 months. Meagher also 
said the company which brought in 
employees from plants in New Brunswick 
to keep its mill operating is guilty of 
strikebreaking. He said strikebreaking 
should be outlawed because it causes 
violence. 

Meagher pledged union financial 
support to the workers. Last year, the 
federation raised about $30,000. 

PILKEY: 'CHANGE ONTARIO LAWS' 

Thousands of workers are forced to 
strike each year in Ontario over such 
fundamental issues as union security 
and mandatory dues check-off, says 
Ontario Federation of Labor president 
Cliff Pilkey. 

"Public attention has focused in 
recent months on such bitter labor 
struggles as Boise Cascade, Butcher 
Engineering and Radio Shack — all 
disputes triggered by an anti-union 
management over matter we once thought 
had been resolved 20, 30 and 40 years 
ago," Pilkey said. 

In a statement, Pilkey said unions 
are constantly decried for contributing 
to an acceleration of industrial unrest 
in this country. Yet these same voices 
are curiously mute in the face of 
corporate irresponsibility at the 
bargaining table. And Ontario's 
Conservative government has abetted 
these anti-union companies by refusing 
to bring the province's outdated labor 
laws into line with those in other 
jurisdictions. 

Pilkey' s statement was made before 
the OFL presented a brief calling for 
changes in the Ontario Labor Relations 
Act to Ontario's Minister of Labor. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 




In our November and December, 1979, issues we distributed 
postage-paid return envelopes, asking members to contribute gener- 
ously to the current fund-raising drive of the American Parkinsons 
Disease Association. The response has been gratifying. Contributions 
are arriving daily at the General Office. We urge you to continue your 
support. Keep the envelopes coming! 



moRE oonoRS 



to the Parkinson's Disease Drive 



Local 1 — Mike Gasperi, Herbert Hahn, 
Lambert H. Mueller, Walter Henricks, 
Jacob Stefan. 

Local 2 — Henry J. Rapp, Charles J. Dinn. 

Local 5 — John P. Morrin. 

Local 6 — James Hayes. 

Local 7— William J. Lunka, W. Kulyk, Wal- 
lace Morin, Kenneth Anderson. 

Local 8 — Ray Severini. 

Local 12— Wallace J. Tomas. 

Local 13 — Anthony Dodson, Lawrence F. 
Holmgren, William W. Gruetzmacher, 
Fred Henriksen, A. Gonzalez. 

Local 15 — Tarje I. Thorsland, Larry Ales- 
sandrini, Linda J. Christodora, Anthony 
Occhipinti. 

Local 19— Buford O. Brien, William Miller. 

Local 20— John Solle. 

Local 22 — C. Kirkpatrick, Mario Baffico, 
Louis J. Schnapp, Charles Steen, Ed- 
ward M. DeBono, Cornelius O. Sul- 
livan, Samuel Dahlberg, Douglas C. 
Christian. 

Local 24 — Edward Murnane. 

Local 25— P. J. Daniel. 

Local 28— Tollef Follinglo. 

Local 32 — Edmond J. Asselin, Joseph Duc- 
los. 

Local 33 — Chester MacKenzie, Austin M. 
Findler. 

Local 34 — Paul Lewis. 

Local 35 — Gerhard Dohse, George Phipps, 
Don Ayers. 

Local 36 — Frank V. Garcia, Henry T. 
Katka, John B. Souza, Mike E. Matta. 

Local 40 — C. S. White, John Sarantakes, 
Ole J. Sundby, Armondo J. VeTrano, 
Stephen J. Sodones, Peter Gerakas. 

Local 42 — Gene Petter, Paul Agius, William 
Fagerstrom, Conrad P. Diehl. 

Local 43 — Gerald Archambault. 

Local 51 — Albert O. Crowell, J. A. Moulai- 
son. 

Local 53 — Boriss Blumbergs, Bernhard 
Berntsen. 

Local 54 — Alex Gimbels. 

Local 55 — Olaf Helland, Roy Sparks. 

Local 58— Karl G. Selin, George W. North, 
Erik G. Granholm, C. Naffin, J. Clarke, 
Roy S. Simonson. 

Local 60 — Edgar W. Cleveland, M. A. 
Hutcheson. 

Local 61 — Dale J. Berry, James C. Pugh. 

Local 62— Gilbert Cox, Fred Sundberg, M. 
Paulsen. 

Local 65 — Alex J. Papp. 

Local 69 — Ralph R. Lewton. 

Local 77 — Vincenzo Santoro. 

Local 80 — John Milan, William Drislane, 
John Krogman, Arthur L. Fennel], John 



Wyllie, Frank Andrejko, Jacob Hui- 

zinga. 
Local 83— Ronald N. Parks. 
Local 87 — L. J. Shosten, Norman Kozberg. 
Local 90 — Franklin Gittings. 
Local 94 — Samuel Moscaritolo, Walter H. 

Candelet, Eugene DeLomba, James 

Sarganis, Vasken Johnson, Pasquale 

Ranone. 
Local 95 — Gregory A. Sanders. 
Local 100 — Arland Lucas. 
Local 101— Harry G. Kelley. 
Local 102 — D. T. Eaves, Norman F. Scott. 
Local 104 — Lorenza Henderson. 
Local 105 — William Konyha. 
Local 107 — Anthony D. Allensandro. 
Local 111 — Harold LaFrancis. 
Local 121— John L. Walker. 
Local 122 — Edward H. Stoops, Jr., James J. 

Andrews, Dionigi Fontana. 
Local 131 — Roy Laughren. 
Local 132 — Roosevelt Miller, James E. Love, 

Joseph F. Moore, Sr., Fred Johnson, 

A. Dzenitis. 
Local 133 — Everett Grass. 
Local 135 — Manny Sussman, Benjamin 

Schwartzman, Michael Mea, Leon Rus- 

sinoff, George Troue. 
Local 141— Ned Caddick. 
Local 144 — C. H. Edwards, Frank Jones. 
Local 162— Wallace R. Anderson, W. G. 

Madden, Eugene L. Russell, H. Mash- 

lakian, John C. Mello. 
Local 166— Robert T. Park, Sr. 
Local 171 — Bert Henderson. 
Local 174 — Joseph W. Jelenich, Charles A. 

Hakey, Robert Lathrop. 
Local 181 — Peter Andresen, Arve Skollerud, 

Einer L. Miller, Harold Larsen, Ton- 

ning E. Normann. 
Local 184— E. E. Collins, Ralph W. Lemas- 

ter, D. J. MacCalman. 
Local 186— Robert V. Phillipson. 
Local 188 — Nick Bonacci. 
Local 189 — Francis Danker. 
Local 190— Lyle H. Vassallo. 
Local 194 — Averd A. Conway, James F. 

Phillips, L. Kelleher. 
Local 196- — Orrin Husted. 
Local 199— John G. Cowan. 
Local 200 — Carson Harrington. 
Local 203 — J. Lehmann, Albert E. Paul. 
Local 207— Evan S. Hanby. 
Local 210 — George E. Grassmann, Iva Mar- 
row, Edward J. Morton, Louis Man- 

cini. 
Local 213 — Walter Jones, Lucas J. Swift. 
Local 226 — Andrew Staltz, Rudolph Ar- 

noldy, Norman Hartling, Samuel P. 

Thornburg, Walter A. Keasler. 



Local 225 — Douglas J. Roach. 

Local 230— David W. Walter. 

Local 235— Robert E. James, J. J. Hoef- 
linger, Leslie E. Peterson, Marvin K. 
Askew. 

Local 242 — Joseph Spisak. 

Local 246 — Helge Hesness, Michael Drebycz, 
Anthony Gruosso, Michael EdI, Henry 
Reese. 

Local 248 — Carl Lochbihler. 

Local 255 — Joseph F. Redding. 

Local 257 — James M. Wilson, Arthur Sand- 
berg, Max Buchwald, John A. Michael- 
son, John E. Tinquist, Aloys Post, 
Louis Sallay, Sr., Eugene J. Cirulli. 

Local 259 — Jake Turner. 

Local 260 — Eugene John Perego. 

Local 264— E. W. Tinker, Henry K. Pins. 

Local 265 — William L. Larsen, Ziggie A. 
Wacikowski. 

Local 267 — Dwight Wince. 

Local 272 — Gordon Elliott. 

Local 275 — Harry A. Gates, Harry E. 
Mitchell, Harry H. Skinner. 

Local 281 — Richard Brogan. 

Local 284 — Henry Tagliabue. 

Local 286— Edgar L. Rutter. 

Local 287 — Clyde Myers, Amos Decker. 

Local 308 — John A. Godar. 

Local 316 — James H. Hoover, C. F. Dick- 
son, Joseph R. Nevarez, Orrin Hale. 

Local 323 — Joseph Lia. 

Local 325 — Anthony Ossi, Charles Siegel, 
Samuel Ricco. 

Local 329— Fred Bull, Edward A. Thele, 
Rufus Lester Gray. 

Local 337 — Henry Wm. Tuck, Anthony 
Ochocki. 

Local 338 — William L. Bigelow. 

Local 340 — Robert A. Redmond. 

Local 342 — Robert Stewart. 

Local 345 — James E. Dalton. 

Local 350 — Arthur Johnson. 

Local 359 — Ernest Pearson, Fred G. 
Schmauk. 

Local 366 — Morris Kleinman, Bernard T. 
Imarata, Adolf Andersen, William 
Sinagra, Orlando Caputo, Devy Ander- 
son. 

Local 369 — Sidney Lovell. 

Local 372— T. V. Kennedy. 

Local 374 — John E. Rudin, Wayne Pihlaja. 

Local 383 — William Rubenstein. 

Local 385 — Louis Illiano, Manuel J. Alves, 
Domenick Cerasoli, John Beatty. 

Local 391 — Charles H. Morrison. 

Local 393 — Raymond L. Cline, Edward J. 
Mazak, J. R. Davies, Joseph M. Rob- 
inson, Sr. 

Local 400— Elmer F. Luther. 



JANUARY, 1980 



17 



Affiliates Which Have Contributed 


Local 2 


Local 340 


Local 1078 


Local 1835 


Local 30 


Local 400 


Local 1087 


Local 1964 


Local 64 


Local 403 


Local 1145 


Local 2023 


Local 74 


Local 421 


Local 1222 


Local 2087 


Local 90 


Local 448 


Local 1250 


Local 2122 


Local 106 


Local 470 


Local 1340 


Local 2130 


Local 107 


Local 492 


Local 1341 


Local 2170 


Local 133 


Local 642 


Local 1359 


Local 2205 


Local 142 


Local 728 


Local 1367 


Local 2240 


Local 153 


Local 773 


Local 1434 


Local 2248 


Local 181 


Local 848 


Local 1539 


Local 225 


Local 870 


Local 1672 


Local 2332 


Local 230 


Local 900 


Local 1738 


Local 2520 


Local 264 


Local 955 


Local 1741 


Local 2949 


Local 333 


Local 1065 


Local 1765 


Local 3204 


Five River Carpenters 


District Council 


Suffolk County District Council 


Fox River Valley District Council 


Mississippi 


State Council 


Orange County District Council 


Ventura C 


ounty District Council 


Carpenters District Council, Kansas City, Mo. Tri-City Carpenters District Council 


Twin City Carpenters 


District Council 


Capital District Council, Columbus 




Office Employees- 


—Gen. Office 





Local 404 — J. J. Ziegler. 

Local 410— Lloyd C. Kelly. 

Local 416 — Joe Gatlin. 

Local 422 — James W. Cooper. 

Local 424 — Charles Chalmers. 

Local 425— W. Ben Collins. 

Local 430 — Carl Josephson, Thomas P. Gus- 

sey. 
Local 434 — Roland Dunand. 
Local 437 — G. C. Woodrum. 
Local 440 — Chester A. Ostrowski, Frank 

Radomski. 
Local 453 — H. C. Newman. 
Local 454 — Catalino Vargas. 
Local 461 — Allen M. Danner, Clarence R. 

Meyer, Encio Ferraro. 
Local 468 — Adolphus King. 
Local 470 — Walter Yuckert, John K. Hoppe, 

Ben Mueller. 
Local 480 — Jim Dunbar. 
Local 486 — Vito Luceno. 
Local 488 — Jacob Anderson, Louis Watzky. 
Local 504 — John Jacobson. 
Local 508— Frank B. Taylor. 
Local 515 — Thomas F. Pankau. 
Local 517 — Frederick J. Dyer. 
Local 532 — Leon Parsons. 
Local 537 — Charles F. Woembeck. 
Local 540— Daniel B. Krug. 
Local 542 — John M. Jackson. 
Local 550 — Peder Pedersen. 
Local 558— Paul N. Bleuel, Charles Mc- 

Gowan. 
Local 563 — Milford B. Hilquist, James C. 

Cooper. 
Local 573 — Arnad E. Hendrickson. 
Local 578 — Joseph Shovey. 
Local 586 — Martin Ciezadlo, Lester E. Fox, 

Howard E. Kroeger. 
Local 602 — Walter A. Remko. 
Local 607 — Dennis Hoenes. 
Local 608 — M. Lorusso, Edwin Youngberg. 
Local 609— Lloyd Miller. 
Local 620 — Andrew Hopper, Arthur Story, 

Joseph McCollough. 
Local 623 — Robert E. Weidner. 
Local 627 — Henry T. Dunn. 
Local 635— William V. Scully. 
Local 642 — Marion Nelson. 
Local 643 — Norman K. Joseph, John J. 

Kuh. 
Local 650— Walter K. Harris. 
Local 665— Y. D. Campbell. 
Local 668 — Frank A. Baillie. 
Local 701 — Roy C. Smithson, Marvin L. 

Foreman. 



Local 703— David Lloyd. 

Local 710 — Al Blais, Eugene R. Hughes, 

Percy E. Spear, Bazil J. Bowerman, 

William T. Mansell, Jr. 
Local 715— William Neary, Herbert R. Eck- 

ert. 
Local 721 — Milan Brankovic, Julius L. 

Furiga, Bob Murray. 
Local 722 — Wesley P. Rawlings. 
Local 728 — Walter Mundschenk. 
Local 740 — Sherman Hartnett, William Ap- 

pe!. 
Local 745 — Duane E. Jahn, Fukuichiro 

Okami, Albert K. Sakamoto, James S. 

Hirakawa, Herbert I. Nagaji, George 

G. Tanino. 
Local 747— William R. Mitchell. 
Local 751 — William James, Louie N. Bian- 

chini. 
Local 756 — M. Bohne. 
Local 769 — Joseph Wimmer. 
Local 785 — Paul Greschner. 
Local 815— John S. Lilja. 
Local 836— Harry W. Foltz. 
Local 839 — Andrew Nelson, Clarence Al- 

landslee, Norman E. Eakley. 
Local 843 — Clarence Gilmour. 
Local 844— Bradford McKee. 
Local 845 — Daniel Danenhower. 
Local 849— Charles F. Mrotek. 
Local 857— Alberto D. Cuessy, T. 

Wheeler, Manuel 

Parker, Jr. 
Local 889— Clarence 

Schommer. 
Local 902— Richard 

Batkin, Joseph 

Bishop. 
Local 921— Roswell A. 

Sahlin. 
Local 925— Thomas J. Miller. 
Local 929 — Herlof V. Jensen, Joseph Vicent. 
Local 943 — Clarence W. Fain. 
Local 944 — Dale McKee, John Patane, Cecil 

R. Anderson. 
Local 945 — Oscar Kiso, Kenneth L. Frye. 
Local 948 — Michael J. Krizanao. 
Local 953 — George Murphy, Frank H. Han- 

num. 
Local 964 — Jack Dos Santos, Edward Jes- 

sup, Patrick Campbell. 
Local 971— Fred Pefley. 
Local 972— William T. Strahan. 
Local 977— Claude Ritchie. 
Local 978— Lexie R. Burk. 
Local 981— Albert Wulff. 



C. Perez, 

Noreen, 

M. Epstein, 
Leonardelli, 



Christian 
Alex K. 

Lawrence 

Morris 
Joseph 



Gaunya, Glen E. 



Local 982— Verne L. Sanford, William 

Leckner. 
Local 998— George Pihajlich. 
Local 999— Verne Hale. 
Local 1014— R. D. Jordan. 
Local 1020 — Craig Snodgrass. 
Local 1040— Carl Herron. 
Local 1044 — Charles Grago. 
Local 1050 — Ralph Zagrabbe, Anthony J. 

Spadaro. 
Local 1052— John W. Thorp, Harold Ny- 

berg. 
Local 1054 — Kenneth A. Olson. 
Local 1055 — Everett B. Loewe. 
Local 1062— Neal N. Crispin, Robert Von 

Flotow. 
Local 1065 — Jackson L. Purvine. 
Local 1073 — George Hindsley. 
Local 1089— N. L. Powers, C. A. Harley, 

Wm. A. Boardman, Avon A. Lee. 
Local 1093 — Edward Walters, Edward Le 

Tellier. 
Local 1094— L. H. Boswell. 
Local 1096— Harold H. Salyer. 
Local 1100— D. R. Stevens. 
Local 1102— Andrew B. Paul. 
Local 1107 — Henry G. Lewis. 
Local 1108— Joseph N. Isabella, Charles C. 

Roberts. 
Local 1109— Carl L. Myers. 
Local 1120 — Archie P. Johnson. 
Local 1138 — George J. Henry. 
Local 1140— Clayton J. Buche. 
Local 1145— Bobby R. Smythers. 
Local 1149 — Charles E. Jones. 
Local 1150 — Henrv Kartner, Ralph Young. 
Local 1164— Joseph Hausler, H. Klee. 
Local 1185 — Joseph Korpas. 
Local 1196 — Pantelija Maksimovich. 
Local 1200— Donald J. White. 
Local 1204 — Max Novick, Sidney Cooper, 

Sam Platock. 
Local 1216 — James Wilcox, Lynn Haws, 

Robert D. Wahl. 
Local 1222 — Burton Redlein, Frank Marl- 
ing, George W. Steenland. 
Local 1243 — Bennie W. Mcintosh. 
Local 1245 — Harvey Tidwell. 
Local 1248— Walter Evert. 
Local 1251— Carl Haave. 
Local 1252 — Donald D. Danielson. 
Local 1275 — Merrill E. Rice, Howard Ben- 
nett. 
Local 1280— Walter W. Elrod, E. R. Oswald, 

George Y. Izumi. 
Local 1281 — R. Henderson Covington. 
Local 1289— Jens A. Holm. 
Local 1292 — John Lamke. 
Local 1296 — Felix Cerasoli. 
Local 1298— R. M. Knapp. 
Local 1305 — Godfrev Bessette. 
Local 1307— Walter G. Gieseke, Floyd A. 

Stoner, W. H. Hanke. 
Local 1319— Charley H. Westerhold, W. D. 

Williams. 
local 1329 — Richard M. Layden. 
Local 1333 — Alan S. Weaver, Roy Shomo. 
Local 1335 — Wilford Yoakum. 
Local 1342 — John Meffen, Vincent T. Adi- 

nolfi, Oscar Peterson, Thomas Pasquale, 

Maria Megaro, Andrew Olson. 
local 1345 — Henry R. Drew, Frank J. 

Wozniak. 
Local 1351 — John F. Milheim. 
Local 1358— L. R. Krieger. 
Local 1365 — Frank Molzer. 
Local 1367— Nick Disanto, Heinrich Szlatki. 
Local 1382— Birchard Bass. 
Local 1394— P. W. Rieman, J. A. Shaw, 

Chester Holland. 
Local 1397 — Frank Knauer, Oiva Ketonen, 

Ernest H. Vester, Ewald Pediman, John 

Fabrizio. 
Local 1400 — Colon C. Kornder, Frank N. 

Norris. 

Continued on page 28 



18 



THE CARPENTER 




Facts You Should Know 
About Your Social Security 



CUPBOARD 



RECALLS 

Consumer Product 
Safety Alert 

Under laws administered by the 
US Consumer Product Safety Com- 
mission, an estimated 117 million 
potentially hazardous products 
have been called back from the 
marketplace and consumers since 
1973 (when CPSC was created). 
Most of these were voluntarily re- 
called by manufacturers who estab- 
lished programs to repair or re- 
place the products, or to refund 
the purchase price. Recent actions 
include the following: 

Children's Toys 

GIGGLE STICKS. Approximately 
four million Gabriel "Giggle Stick" 
toys are being recalled voluntarily 
by their manufacturer, CBS Toys, 
a division of CBS Inc., of New 
York City. The toys may pose a 
choking hazard to young children. 

The "Giggle Stick" consists of a 
hollow, yellow plastic tube. When 
shaken, the tube produces noises 
from a metal reed fastened within 
a small cylinder. Children can re- 
move the red end-caps of the toy, 
exposing the interior cylinder which 
houses the reed. There have been 
three reports since March, 1979, of 
children chocking on the reed, ac- 
cording to CBS Toys. 

This toy has been manufactured 
since December, 1978, and sold 
nationwide in variety stores for less 
than $2.00 each. New "Giggle 
Sticks" have been redesigned to 
eliminate the safety hazard; in re- 
tail stores they are labeled "New, 
Improved" on the red cardboard 
pennant attached to the toy. 

Parents can receive a full refund 
or a new "Giggle Stick" by return- 
ing the toy to their retailers, or by 
mailing it to: Gabriel Industries, 
Longmeadow Road, P.O. Box 980, 
Hagerstown, Md., 21740. 

BLOW-GUN TOYS. Approxima- 
tely 180,000 "Soft Shot Star 

Continued on page 30 



Over 34 million men, women, and 
children in the United States, or approxi- 
mately one out of seven persons, receive 
monthly cash benefits under the U.S. 
Social Security program. In addition, nine 
out of 10 workers in the United States 
are earning protection for themselves and 
their families under Social Security. These 
figures indicate that almost every family 
has a stake in Social Security, yet, how 
many of us really know what this pro- 
gram is all about? 

Social Security programs were estab- 
lished under Franklin D. Roosevelt's New 
Deal in 1935 as an aid to workers in a 
time of depression. At first Social Security 
covered only the worker upon retirement. 
In 1939, the law was changed to provide 
protection for certain dependents when 
the worker retired and for survivors when 
the worker died. 

Since the 1930's there have been many 
changes and expansions in the benefits 
offered by Social Security. When the pro- 
gram began, only workers in industry and 
commerce were covered. In the 1950's 
coverage was extended to include most 
self-employed persons, state, local, house- 
hold and farm employees, and members 
of the Armed Forces and the clergy 
Today, U.S. Social Security covers almost 
all jobs in the United States and is the 
nation's basic method of providing pro- 
tection for a worker's disability, retire- 
ment, or death. 

The first Social Security disability bene- 
fits were paid in July, 1957. Only dis- 
abled workers between the ages of 50 and 
65 were eligible for payments. Today, 
workers of any age under 65, as well as 
dependent family members, have protec- 
tion against loss of earnings due to total 
disability. 

In 1965, the Social Security program 
was expanded once again with the en- 
actment of Medicare, a federal govern- 
ment health insurance program which in- 
sured hospital and medical protection to 
people 65 and over. Since 1973, Medi- 
care coverage has been available to peo- 
ple under 65 who have been entitled to 
disability payments for two or more con- 
secutive years and to people with perma- 
nent kidney failure or who need dialysis 
or kidney transplants. 

As a result of legislation enacted in 
1972, Social Security benefits will in- 
crease automatically as the cost of living 
rises. 

HOW IT WORKS 

The process which allows today's Social 
Security program to operate is basically 
quite simple. Employees, employers, and 
the self-employed pay Social Security 
contributions during their working years. 
This money is used to pay benefits to 
people whose earnings at the time are 
substantially reduced because of retire- 
ment, disability, or death, and to pay the 



administrative costs of the program. In 
short, Social Security benefits are paid 
from the contributions of people in cov- 
ered employment and self-employment. 
This cycle continues so that each working 
generation provides for the generation 
which preceded it. 

Contributions are deducted from an 
employee's wages each pay day. In 1979 
and 1980, total payments amount to 
6.13% of an employee's wages. The em- 
ployer then matches the payments and 
sends the combined amount to the In- 
ternal Revenue Service. In 1980, the max- 
imum amount of earnings that will count 
for Social Security purposes and taxed 
accordingly is $25,900. 

ELIGIBILITY 

Monthly Social Security checks may 
go to workers and their dependents when 
the worker retires, becomes severely dis- 
abled, or dies. In addition, Medicare is 
available to people who are 65 or over or 
who are severely disabled. 

Retirement — A retired worker may re- 
ceive partial payments as early as he or 
she is 62. Full benefits can only be re- 
ceived if one retires at 65 or thereafter. 

Disability — A worker who becomes 
disabled before the age of 65 may receive 
disability checks. Under US Social Secur- 
ity, a worker is considered disabled if he 
or she has a severe physical or mental 
condition which prevents working and is 
expected to last at least 12 months or to 
result in death. Checks may start in the 
sixth full month of a worker's disability. 

Payments because of retirement, dis- 
ability, or death, may also go to certain 
members of a worker's family. In these 
cases, unmarried children, if they are 
under 18, may receive monthly Social 
Security payments. If they are full-time 
students they may receive payments until 
they are 22. Unmarried children who are 
over 18 may receive benefits if they are 
disabled before the age of 22 and con- 
tinue to be disabled. The spouse of a 
retired or disabled worker is eligible for 
payment if he or she is 62 or over. For 
the spouse of a decreased worker, the 
minimum age is 60. Finally, a wife under 
62 may receive retirement, disability, or 
death payments if she is caring for a 
worker's child who is under 18 or se- 
verely disabled. 

Monthly payments can be made to a 
deceased worker's widow or widower, 50 
years or older, if he or she becomes dis- 
abled within seven years after the work- 
er's death. A worker's parents also qualify 
for payments if they are at least 62 and 
were dependents of the deceased worker. 

Retirement, disability, or death benefits 
may also go to a divorced spouse, pro- 
viding that the marriage lasted at least 
10 years. 

Continued on page 20 



JANUARY, 1980 



19 



Social Security 

Continued from page 19 

BUILDING PROTECTION 

Before a worker can get monthly cash 
benefits, he or she must be fully insured 
and have credit for a certain amount of 
work under Social Security. The exact 
amount of work credit depends on the 
worker's age. Once Social Security pro- 
tection is earned, it stays with the worker 
from job to job, city to city, or state to 
state. The amount of payment depends on 
the worker's average earnings over a 
period of years. 

Under a special rule, payments may be 
made to dependents even if a worker 
dies without being fully insured as long 
as he or she has worked under Social 
Security for 1 Vz years in the 3 years 
before death. 

WHEN TO CONTACT 
SOCIAL SECURITY 

The Social Security Administration has 
over 1300 offices conveniently located 
throughout the country. Representatives 
of these offices also make regular stops in 
neighboring communities. 

Before you or your family can get any 
Social Security checks, you must apply 
for them. It is important for you to con- 
tact your Social Security office if: 



REQUEST FOR ££„, 

STATEMENT Nu "*" 

OF EARNINGS dak o. 



Please send a statement of my social security earnings to: 












MONTH 


DAY 


YIAH 













1 Norn* 
1 0*rf 
\ Addr«u 






/ t» Ink 
1 Or U.. 


SIGN TOUI NAMt HBff 
(DO NOT HUNT) 




1 -"•' 



Sign your own name only . Under the law, information in your social security record 
is confidential and anyone who signs another person's name can be prosecuted. 
If you have changed your name from that shown on your social security card, please 
copy your name below exactly as it appears on your card. 

I I 

TO GET YOUR EARNINGS STATEMENT: Help is available for those 
interested in estimating their Social Security retirement benefit but don't know 
what earnings they paid Social Security taxes on. Clip and fill out the coupon 
above, and mail it to: Social Security Administration, P.O. Box 57, Baltimore, 
Md. 21203. The SSA will send you a statement of earnings. Be sure to include 
your Social Security number and birth date. 



• You are unable to work because of 
an illness or injury that is expected to 
last at least a year. 

• You are 62 or older and plan to 
retire. 

• You're within 2 or 3 months of 65, 
even if you don't plan to retire. 



• Someone in your family dies. 

• You have any questions concerning 
your eligibility for monthly payments 
under the Social Security program. 

• You need a Social Security Card for 
employment and income tax purposes, or 

Continued on page 30 



For A Sparetime or Full Time Business, There's Good 





Now 

for SHARP 

EARN $5 to $8 An Hour Sp 

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THE CARPENTER 



Sidell Retires 

Continued from page 4 

prentice in Local 721, Los Angeles. 

The first office to which he was 
elected was that of warden of his local 
union. Later he became recording sec- 
retary, organizer, assistant business 
representative, business manager, and 
president. 

In 1957 he was elected secretary- 
treasurer of the Los Angeles County 
District Council of Carpenters. He 
was at one time secretary of the 
Southern California Conference of 
Carpenters, an executive board mem- 
ber of the California State Council, 
and has served in many other labor 
posts on the West Coast. 

Organized labor in California pio- 
neered in the establishment of pensions 
and health and welfare plans for 
workers, and Bill Sidell was one of 
the prime movers over the years. He 
became one of the foremost author- 
ities on the establishment and admin- 
istration of health and welfare and 
pension trusts. 

He is also a veteran of the Juris- 
dictional Appeals Board and well 
versed in jurisdictional matters. 
Among many other positions of public 
service, he was a member of the Con- 
struction Industry Wage Stabilization 
Committee during the critical wage 
freezes of President Nixon's Admin- 
istration. 

When we look back at the record 
of William Sidell as General Presi- 
dent, we see many progressive inno- 
vations he has made in our union's 
year-round program. For example, he 
initiated the regional conferences, 
which bring together the fulltime local 
and district council officers for vital 
briefings. He has promoted the pe- 
riodic training program for business 
representatives. During his tenure, he 
has expanded our relations with trade 
associations and employer groups in 
our construction and allied industries. 
Under his leadership, we have 
strengthened our organization in the 
field of rehabilitation, floor coverings, 
commercial diving, and other areas. 
Upon his recommendation, the 33rd 
General Convention established our 
busy Industrial Department. 

CHOP and VOC (Coordinated 
Housing Organization Program and 
Volunteer Organizing Committees) 
have breathed new life into Brother- 
hood organizing under his leadership. 

On top of all this, he agreed to 
serve as campaign chairman for the 
fund-raising efforts of the American 
Parkinsons Disease Association. 

He has, indeed, offered a full meas- 
ure of service to the Brotherhood. 



We paraphrase something said of 
him at a testimonial dinner: He is a 
man who rings true — with the sound 
of a well-made hammer, the rasp of 
a well-sharpened saw. With Bill 
Sidell, we met the challenges of the 
Seventies . . . head on. 

Konyha, President 

Continued from page 5 

ards of the State of Ohio. His work in 
this field has brought him citations from 
the City of Cleveland, from Cuyahoga 
county, the Ohio Senate and House of 
Representatives, and from other official 
groups. 

During his tenure here at the General 
Office, his role of Second General Vice 
President gave him an intimate relation- 
ship with jurisdictional problems of the 
United Brotherhood and he chaired sev- 
eral committees in an effort to resolve 
the vexing jurisdictional problems which 
plague our industry. He also participated 
in our relationship with national trade 
associations with which the United 
Brotherhood deals. 

As First General Vice President, he 
played an outstanding role in updat- 
ing and streamlining the United Broth- 
erhood Apprenticeship and Training 



Tools For a 
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mechanisms, while serving as chairman 
of the National Joint Apprenticeship and 
Training Committee. He has been a 
staunch fighter in protecting the tradi- 
tional apprenticeship training programs. 
Yet he has cooperated in all efforts to 
bring into active apprenticeship pro- 
grams minorities and women. 

During his tenure as First General 
Vice President, Konyha streamlined the 
United Brotherhood's union label pro- 
gram and provided accelerated pro- 
cedures for the viewing and approval of 
local union and district council bylaws. 

In all, Bill Konyha is in the tradition 
of Brotherhood leadership, and his back- 
ground and training will shape for him 
the capacity to deal with the difficulties 
which lie in his future. 






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Industrial 
Conference 



A United Brotherhood Industrial 
Conference has been scheduled for 
January 8 and 9, 1980, in Washing- 
ton, D.C. Announcements of the 
conference have been sent to all 
councils and local unions which 
represent industrial members in 
collective bargaining. Representa- 
tives planning to attend the con- 
ference should notify the General 
Office as soon as possible. Room 
reservations for conference par- 
ticipants may be made at the 
Quality Inn— Capitol Hill, 415 New 
Jersey Avenue, N.W., Washington, 
D.C. 20001 (202/638-1616). When 
making reservations please specify 
that you are attending the UBC 
Industrial Conference. 



RING PRICE RISE 

Due to the rising price of silver on the 
world market, all official sterling silver 
Brotherhood rings will cost $58, effective 
January 1, 1980. 



Nuclear Energy Agenda 

Continued from Page 12 



not patriotic bragging. Like imperfection 
in the constitution of a building, we con- 
cede the great flaws of our nation. That 
is precisely why our Constitution's pre- 
amble includes the common goal "to 
form a more perfect Union." But how 
long must we try? The revolutionaries in 
our midst say: listen to us, give us power, 
and we will create a new humanity. En- 
ergy policy is simply one means to that 
end. They insist that by uprooting the 
traditional values and institutions — in- 
cluding our patriotic allegiance — they 
will usher in a reign of perpetual peace, 
with planned parenthood, socialized in- 
dustry and labor, equal property and a 
guaranteed income for everyone every- 
where in a new world community on 
Spaceship Earth. So far, of course, all we 
have had from them is a shameful defeat 
in Vietnam, an impotent government, 
high inflation, and long lines of cars 
waiting for a loser's share of gasoline at 
our filling stations. 

Most Americans know better. While 
the radical environmentalists may hate 
our system, we see it for what it is: an 
accumulated heritage passed on by gen- 
erations of hard-working people and 
sometimes defended with their lives 
and honor. No ideal model of society 
was constructed by intellectuals and ac- 
tivists. Like any other progressive coun- 
try, America is a product of free men 
struggling over centuries — individually 
and collectively. It is a product of hard 
work, perseverence and the willingness 
to take risks. It is the product of people 
pursuing their legitimate self-interest, 
tempered by a genuinely liberal sense of 
national unity. In a world of oppression 
and poverty, what Americans have 
achieved is certainly revolutionary. But 
it is a revolution of personal freedom and 
duties, not abstract models; filled with 
hope not distrust, patriotic affection not 
alienated hatred. 

On the matter of nuclear energy we 
should demand honest and forthright 
public debate. But let's realize that en- 
vironmentalism has come to include a 
radical agenda incompatible with our 
freedom and national well-being. Be 
skeptical of catch-phrases like "consumer 
advocacy" and "economic democracy." 
We already have economic freedom. Im- 
perfect yes, but free nonetheless. What 
we need is the will to use our domestic 
energy and natural resources to preserve 
our freedom and better perfect our coun- 
try. Businessmen, workers and all other 
citizens should take as their motto: 
"Down with the Coercive Utopians; Up 
with laboring freemen!" 



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Getting the lengths of rafters by the span anil 
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In the U.S.A. send $5.00. We pay the 

postage. California residents add 30« 
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We also have a very fine Stair 

book 9" x 12". It sells for $3.00. We 

pay the Postage. California residents 
add 18( tax. 



A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 406, Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 



22 



THE CARPENTER 





GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO. 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 



TACT TRAINING 

An experienced plumber was giv- 
ing instructions to his apprentice. 

"Working in other people's 
homes," he said, "can sometimes 
lead to embarrassing situations, 
but you can always get out of them 
by using tact. For example, the 
other day, I walked into a bathroom 
and found a lady taking a bath. I 
backed out saying, 'Excuse me, sir.' 
In that way, the lady thought I 
hadn't gotten a good look at her 
and it was all right." 

The following afternoon, the ap- 
prentice staggered into the office 
in a beat-up condition. 

"What happened to you?" asked 
the boss. 

"You and your tact," cried the 
apprentice. "I went to the bridal 
suite of the Etter Plaza Hotel to fix 
a faucet. I was half-way through 
the bedroom before I realized there 
was a couple making love in the 
bed. The husband cussed at me, 
but I remembered what you had 
said, so I tipped my hat and said, 
'Excuse me, gentlemen!' " 



GAME TIME 

BOSS: I thought I told you to 
break up that crap game two hours 
ago. 

FOREMAN: I thought I did it 
pretty fast considering I only had $1 
to start with. 

BE READY TO VOTE IN '80 

MAN TO MAN 

BILL: How come when you tell 
about the fish you caught, you vary 
the size of it? 

PHIL: I never tell a man more 
than I think he will believe. 

SUPPORT VOC AND CHOP 

BEST FOOT FORWARD 

PATIENT: I've got a pain in my 
left foot. 

DOCTOR: It's just old age. 

PATIENT: Why doesn't my right 
foot hurt? I've had it just as long. 

LITTLE-BOY JOKE 

HOST: Are you sure you can cut 
your meat? 

LITTLE BOY: Yes. We often have 
it as tough as this at home. 




SIMPLE EXPLANATION 

A woman became furious when 
her husband jumped her bid at 
bridge. 

"Why did you do that?" she 
hissed. 

"Because," he replied casually, 
"I had one jack, two queens and 
four scotches." 



THIS MONTH'S LIMERICK 

There once was a silly, young suitor, 
Apprenticed to work as a tutor, 
Down the aisle he did stride, 
Wife-to-be at his side, 
And now he's sorry he pursued her. 
— Howard Downer 
Lebanon, Ore. 




SUCCESS STORY 

The young man started work as 
a stock-room boy. Within six months 
he was made a salesman. In an- 
other six months he was upped to 
sales manager, and shortly there- 
after he was made general man- 
ager. 

A few days later, he was called 
in by the president of the firm, who 
explained he would retire soon and 
would turn the presidency over to 
the newcomer. 

"Thanks," said the young man. 

"Thanks!" growled the president. 
"You've been with this firm only 
about a year. Is that all you can 
think of to say?" 

"Well," said the young man, 
"thanks a lot, dad." 

BE IN GOOD STANDING 

GOING NATIVE 

On a plane headed for Hawaii, 
two friends got into a discussion 
about the pronunciation of the word 
"Hawaii." One said the "w" was 
pronounced as a "v"; the other 
argued that the word was pro- 
nounced as it is spelled. They de- 
cided to ask a native when they 
landed. 

At the airport, the passengers 
were greeted with music, and 
friendly natives bedecked them with 
flowers and leis. The two friends 
pumped the hand of a particularly 
friendly native. 

"Tell me, my good man" asked 
the tourist, "Do you pronounce 
your island 'Hawaii' or Havaii'?" 

"Havaii," came the quick reply. 

"Thank you very much," said 
the American. 

"You're velcome!" 

DON'T GET BEHIND IN '80 
ARMY CHOW 

SERGEANT: Sand in the soup? Did 
you join the army to serve your 
country or to complain about the 
food? 

PRIVATE: I joined to serve my 
country, not eat it. 



JANUARY, 1980 



23 



LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Carpenters Local 929 had a luncheon on 
June 3, to honor members with 25, 30, and 35 
years of continuous membership in the Brother- 
hood. The following members were awarded 
pins: 

Picture No. 1— 25-year members, with 
officers of the local, First row, left to right, 
Drexel Hite, William Patterson, Forrest Fuller, 
M. F. Teegardin, Frank Despenza, George 
Teeples. Back row, left to right, Bob Roberts; 
president, Armand Pavageau; Don Self; trustee, 
Gene Aber; conductor, Jack Scott; warden, 
Mack Henton. 

Picture No. 2— 30-year members. First row, 
left to right, Allan Blood, James Hough, Fred 
Meyer, Odis Hooks, Carl Copelin, Claude McKay. 
Back row, left to right, Charles Porche, Wenzel 
Miller, Edward Lawhorn, Frank Smith, Tom 
Rayford, John Corbin, C. V. Brice. 

Picture No. 3— 35-year members. First row, 
left to right, Gust Linscheid, Cliff Welch, 
Dunbar Bell, James Jones, Jesus Romero, Ralph 
Faciane. Back row, left to right, Harlot Jensen, 
Elton Samuel, T. R. Campbell, Eulsee Johnson, 
Daniel Brock, Tom Bunce, Fernand Patin, True 
Maxfield, Jr., Lee Burgess, William Gaker, 
financial secretary-business representative. 

Those members who were unable to attend 
the luncheon were: 25-year members, Harry 
Bilbrew, Robert Castleberry, Oscar Cuneo, Felix 
Dominguez, Gedest Gribble, Merritt Hiskey, 
Arthur Lopez, James Maddox, Alvin Mclnnis, 
William Pendray, Vladimir Pezer, Elmer Thomp- 
son, David Tucker, Albert Wade, Virgil 
Washington, Frank Weeden, James Wells. 

30-year members— Farooq Akmal, Don 
Amundson, Alfred Barron, Frank Bates, R. E. 
Battenschlag, Lester Bluhm, Jess Bradshaw, 
Leonard Brown, Frank Charon, Ray Cooley, Andy 
Dunlap, Joe Fimbres, C. H. Friesen, Walter 
Glanzman, Henry Grenier, Leo Hepola, Doc 
Langworthy, Jack Mackey, Allen McNair, 
Anthony Merton, Robert Pipes, Joe Quails, Lloyd 
Sullinger, Edward Williams. 

35-year members — Ernest Andrus, Eugene 
Bates, Cedric Brockman, George Every, A. W. 
Gardner, Bert George, Emil Hansen, Lenard 
Honore, Sidney Jacobs, Harry Jones, Onnie 
Kautto, Robert McCarthy, Edward Montgomery, 
M. D. Self, Aired Spight, Ray Stafford, Carl 
Ulrich, George Winegar. 



OLATHE, KANS. 

Retired General Executive Board Member 
J. 0. Mack presented service pins to members 
of Local 714 at the local's dedication cere- 
mony for its new hall on July 28, 1979. The 
following members received awards: 

Picture No. 1— Seated: 25-year member 
Herschel Malone. Standing, from left: James 
Smith, Sherman Rainwater, Edward Torrez, 
Local 714 president Morris Eastland (in back), 
Mike Kunard, retired Gen. Exec. Board Member 
J. 0. Mack, and retired Kansas State Council 
of Carpenters Secretary Charles Miller. 

Picture No. 2— 30-year member Everett 
Delana. 

The local union also observed its 30th 
anniversary. 




Service 
Brotherhood 

A gallery of pictures showing some of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received pins for years of service in the union. 



Picture No. 1 



Picture No. 2 




Olathe, Kans. — Picture No. 1 



Delana 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



j sir 




San Diego, Calif. 



Connellsville, Pa. 



SAN DIEGO, CALIF. 

On Sunday, May 6, 1979, Local 1296 held a dinner in honor of its 
members with 25 and 50 years of service to the Brotherhood. Eleven 
members received their 25-year pins, and one member received a 
50-year pin. Pictured are honored members and Local 1296 officers. 

In the accompanying picture, front row, left to right: 25-year 
members Robert Butcher, Meryle Anderson, Ervin Reiner; 50-year 
member Andy Anderson; and 25-year members Jim Sherbacov, Sam 
Henderson, Johnny Hayes, and Warren Murdock. 

Back row, left to right: King Taylor, president; Luis Adams, 
financial secretary; Virgil Reno, recording secretary; 25-year member 
Andrew Luckey; Earl Emmert, trustee; Carol Braley, conductor; L. E. 
O'Dell, trustee; 25-year members J. C. Aldridge and C. B. Gordon; 
Danny Gomez, trustee; and D. Ostrowski, vice president. 




CONNELLSVILLE, PA. 

On June 23, 1979 members of Local 321, with 20 to 56 years of 
service to the Brotherhood, were honored at a banquet at the Scott- 
dale Elks. Spouses were invited to the celebration, and the following 
members received their service pins. 

Front row, left to right-. H. C. Hagerman, 40-years; Clarence 
Thornburg, 40-years; Frank Davis, 35-years; and Robert Haney, 
business representative for Sub District #1. 

Back row, left to right: E. C. Sutherland, 30-years; Guy D. Tusslie, 
Jr., 35-years; Fred Hagerman, 30-years; Claude Kislar, 30-years; 
Theodore Phillips, 30-years; William Daily, 30-years; Kenneth 
Gallentine, 25-years; and Raymond Kinneer, 20-years. 

Not pictured was 55-year member William J. Lint, the oldest living 
member of Local 321, who now resides in Sarasota, Fla. 

WILDWOOD, N.J. 

Local 1743, held its annual banquet on April 28, 1979, at the 
Golden Eagle Inn, Cape May. The 20 and 30-year Pins were awarded 
as follows: left to right: Chuck Mcllvaine, president; Ray Guzman, 
20 years; Owen Hand, 20 years; Ralph Ackreyd, 30 years; James 
Dougherty, 30 years; Deno Venturi, business representative. Those 
not present: Leslie Brunell, 20 years and John Smith, 20 years. 



Wildwood, N.J. 



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FREE SANDING BELTS 



DIRECT FROM THE MANUFACTURER 

Eighth Street, Reading, Pa.) 

9" X 1 1" Paper Sheets A/O Finishing Paper 



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DV1SA 



Exp. Date_ 



Name 



Address 



City, State & Zip . 




Plainfield, N.J. 

PLAINFIELD, N.J. 

On June 26, 1979, officers of Local 155 
visited the Greenbrook Manor Nursing Home to 
present to Albert Nelson a 70-year membership 
pin. A 70-year anniversary cake was ordered, 
along with a bowl of punch. It was a surprise 
party and Brother Nelson was overwhelmed. 
Brother Nelson is 91 and is still in good health. 
Other residents of the home joined in the 
celebration. The accompanying picture shows, 
left to right, Jules Peterson, president; John 
Lubsen, vice president; Albert Nelson; Norm 
Laustsen, financial secretary; Frank Minarck, 
business representative. 

EDITOR'S NOTE: Because of the great 
number of pictures of pin presentations 
and affiliate functions received each 
month for publication in the Service to 
the Brotherhood section, we are forced 
to select only a few pictures at a time 
for any local union. We plan to run the 
names of all pin recipients, but recording 
secretaries are advised that only a limited 
number of pictures can be printed. 



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JANUARY, 1980 



27 



More Donors 

Continued from page 18 

Local 1407 — Magdaleno Galvin. 

Local 1408 — Mike Douglas, Thomas B. 

Clark. 
Local 1419 — Walter M. Howard. 
Local 1423 — Chester A. Roberts, Ernest E. 

Phillips. 
Local 1437— Harry M. Ishimura, E. L. Gill. 
Local 1445 — Louis E. Bolinger. 
Local 1447 — Vincent Alpino. 
Local 1452 — John H. DeJongh, Raymond 

O. Bennett. 
Local 1453 — Howard E. Fields, Orison L. 

Long, Cyril Fritz. 
Local 1456 — Luigi Biada. 
Local 1488— Harry H. Gremler. 
Local 1497— Leslie L. McGrath, Glenn 

Deeds, Walter I. Noll. 
Local 1506 — Francis E. Storey. 
Local 1507— Wm. J. Ford. 
Local 1509— H. Lewis. 
Local 1519 — Clarence Stevens. 
Local 1522 — Timothy L. Dugan. 
Local 1539 — Donald Lavey, David Goodwin, 

F. A. Wornhoff, Edwin R. Lawson. 
Local 1553 — S. Miyahira. 
Local 1564 — Thomas F. Kaiser. 
Local 1571 — Clarence W. Uhrhammer, Wil- 
liam D. Saul. 
Local 1578 — George Schmidbauer. 
Local 1590— Culver R. Martin, Christian 

Ellenes, C. E. Dahlquist, Edgar T. 

Brooks, Joseph H. Bateman, William 

E. Pyles. 
Local 1595— Harry T. Holt. 
Local 1607— Carl J. Kelly, Gean V. Willes, 

Jacob W. Bailey, Charles H. Austin. 
Local 1618— Robert H. Michler. 
Local 1622— Chris Rong, Otto T. Sorensen, 

Otto Boehm, Kenneth A. Fods. 
Local 1632— Jack McVay. 
Local 1644 — L. W. Heinemann. 
Local 1693— Nicholas Alex, Clifford Dahl- 

strom. 
Local 1707 — Henry Mattila. 
Local 1708— Ray Plueger, R. L. Fletchall. 
Local 1715— H. C. Dugger. 
Local 1732— Wm. R. Osborne. 
Local 1741 — Elmer Knutson. 
Local 1752— A. M. McClendon, Alvin D. 

Turner, Ralph B. Johnson, Carl G. 

Kaiser, T. C. Smith. 
Local 1759— Joe T. Michael. 
Local 1772 — Paul Schwenke. 
Local 1780— Charles R. Craigmile, Odes 

Cremer, Roy S. Smith. 
Local 1787 — Jackie Vaughn. 
Local 1797— Ralph E. Snellen. 
Local 1815— Erwin J. Netzke, Bill Rosling- 

ton. 
Local 1822— Melvin L. Butler, John T. 

Madderra. 
Local 1832— Wilbur L. Slye. 
Local 1837 — Anthony D. Amico, Frank 

Honick. 
Local 1840 — Archie Ernste. 
Local 1846 — Milton Perrin, Davy P. La- 

borde, Sr., Austin Lee, Tellis Ma De- 
soto, Stephen H. Williams. 
Local 1849 — Richard W. Garretson, Eugene 

D. McVey. 
Local 1855— William B. Haygood. 
Local 1857— H. Morton. 
Local 1897— Harry G. Bernard. 
Local 1906— Mark J. Maillett. 
Local 1913— W. Tucker, E. R. Erickson, 

Wm. H. Schade, Edquard H. Gilbert, 

Ronald* P. Vincelli. 
Local 1921 — August E. Strandberg, Angelo 

Saviano, Henry Zucchi. 
Local 1922— John Zubek, Bill Kavouras. 
Local 1996— Frank W. Martin. 



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Local 2006 — William John Soule. 

Local 2014 — William V. Bruno, T. Rizzo. 

Local 2024 — Forrest W. Finerty, H. E. Mor- 
ris, George C. Walton. 

Local 2028 — Joseph F. Novak. 

Local 2029 — Peter Graziano. 

Local 2035— William Perkins. 

Local 2042 — Howard H. Neuman. 

Local 2043— William P. Hook, Lester C. 
Gammons. 

Local 2046— Theron L. Pollard, Otto Wil- 
son, Howard H. Holt, Joseph Nunnes. 

Local 2067— William E. Skinner. 

Local 2078 — Ernest Hassel, Roger W. Bengt- 
son, Eddie L. Neal. 

Local 2087— Claude Nickels. 

Local 2094 — Vilho L. Leppiaho, Joseph 
Igyarto. 

Local 2114— Walter I. Allen. 

Local 2127 — Mervin L. Buffington. 

Local 2139— John H. Durbin. 

Local 2155 — Frank Barbieri, John Cher- 
venak. 

Local 2205 — Beecher W. Songer. 

Local 2212 — George Boner. 

Local 2241 — Benjamin Williams. 

Local 2246 — Adolph E. Knutson. 

Local 2248— Charles Motter, Robert L. 
Adams. 

Local 2250 — Burwood Mclntyre. 

Local 2258— Heard J. Medine. 

Local 2265 — Charles Tisdale. 

Local 2274 — James M. Stuchul. 

Local 2288— Thomas R. Grossklaus, F. 
Garcia, W. A. Samuelson, Tony Briones. 

Local 2396— A. J. Barnhart. 

Local 2398— Pat H. lannucci, Edward Po- 
now, Floyd Brittain. 

Local 2435— Charles A. Wilt, Christopher 
Skinas, John M. Duda. 

Local 2456— Edgar F. Ahalt. 



Local 2461 — George Parker. 
Local 2471 — Leslie D. Goodlin. 
Local 2498 — Edward Puranen. 
Local 2710— Frank Blum. 
Local 2735 — James B. Allen. 
Local 2763 — Joe Kaczmarski. 
Local 2805— John C. Monroe. 
Local 2931 — Raymond K. Nelson. 
Local 2949— R. F. Lamon. 
Local 3161 — Jose Bielma. 
Local 3206 — George A. King. 
Local 3268 — John I. Gorman. 

No Local #: Hubert Atkins, A. Balbi, Sid 
Biglovsky, M. Blumhagen, Elie Borenstein, 
O. E. Brady, Harry Breese, S. Brooks, Del- 
ford Brown, G. D. Bruce, Alvin J. Carlsen, 
Vincent Chavez, Harold Cheesman, Martin 
Christensen, Anthony Corbo, Carl Dickey, 
C. J. Eriksen, M. Fairhurst, Norman Focht- 
mann, Philip Garrick, Earl A. Genz, Irvin 
J. Goldner, William Gonsalves, John Green- 
land, Richard P. Griffin, Carl A. Groth, D. 
Hadenfeldt, Edward R. Haerle, Samuel Heil, 
Calvin Hunter, Charles A. Hutchinson, Paul 
W. Irwin, Paul Jankus, A. Johansson, Julius 
Johnson, H. Kinzer, W. T. Kriek, Sterns M. 
Law, Holger I. Lawson, Willard L. Masters, 
A. C. Mears, Axel Nelson, Merrill I. Nilsen, 
Stanley Oakley, Frank Parkin, Parsons, Ivan 
O. Paulson, I. Perez, Paul Peterson, Max 
Plotz, Clifford Richardson, William E. Rob- 
erts, J. Schatz, Talendo Scotto, Donald C. 
Sinclair, O. Spaeth, David A. Stern, 
Strianese, James P. Sullivan, Ivan Sutton, 
S. M. Taylor, Gerald Theobald, S. Thomp- 
son, Sr., Willis Thompson, James Thomson, 
L. VanWagoner, Nicholson Verbanac, Ed 
Vienneau, Louis Walkenhorst, Robert Wel- 
lington, John E. Wellner, Dale Whitman, 
Jack Wussler. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



in mEmoRinm 



The following list of 371 deceased members and spouses repre- 
sents a total of $464,904.15 in death claims paid for the month. 



Local Union, City 

1, Chicago, III. — Geoffrey Crawley, Carl A. 
Moews. 

5, St. Louis, Mo Ulysses V. Allen, Rob- 
ert Hammer. 

7, Minneapolis, Mn. — Nels A. Johnson, 
Einar Laursen, Fred G. Lee, Julius 
Webster. 

8, Philadelphia, Pa. — James S. Burns, Al- 

bert G. Hill, Anthony Zwarych. 

18, Hamilton, Out., Canada — Mrs. Arthur 
Burden. 

19, Detroit, Mich. — Ernest Moers, Louis 
Sostaric. 

22, San Francisco, Calif.— Mrs. Fred S. 
Horst, John H. Roberts. 

24, Central Conn. — Carl Castiglioni, Joseph 
A. DiMauro, Edward Provitz, Sr., 
James P. Watson, William Wood. 

25, Los Angeles, Calif.— Earl C. Hakala. 

26, E. Detroit, Mich.— John F. Kane, Mrs. 
Walter A. Lindstead, Walter W. Ozark. 

33, Boston, Mass. — Zeferino Monteiro, 
Generoso J. Sacco. 

35, San Rafael, Calif.— Maurice W. Winans. 

36, Oakland, Calif. — Grandon C. Orr. 

38, St. Catharines, Ont., Canada — Jules 

Jean Jos Dugas. 
40, Boston, Mass. — Mrs. Robert C. Moores. 

42, San Francisco, Calif. — Edward S. 
Brown, Mrs. William Fagerstrom. 

43, Hartford, Conn. — John A. Johnson, 
Mrs. Richard Keating, Mrs. Einar Loh- 
ner. 

44, Champaign, III. — Mrs. Clyde L. Gaskill. 

54, Chicago, III. — James Suchy. 

55, Denver, Colo. — Herman R. Patrick. 
60, Indianapolis, Ind. — Ivan B. King, Clay- 
ton J. York. 

62, Chicago, III. — Harold N. Aamodt. 
64, Louisville, Ky. — Earl McQuillen. 

73, St. Louis, Mo. — Melvin L. Montgomery. 

74, Chattanooga, Tenn. — John L. Farrar. 
77, Port Chester, N.Y.— George T. Haihs. 

80, Chicago, III. — Duncan M. Wishart. 

81, Erie, Pa.— Theodore Stolz. 

85, Rochester, N.Y.— John J. Dabrody, 
Frank O. Edwards, Charles Latona, 
Ray Morrow, Roger H. Patric. 

87, St. Paul, Minn.— Edmund F. Deutsch- 
lander, Arnold G. Stone, Othmar A. 
Wagner. 

94, Providence, R.I. — Paul E. Fournier, 
Joseph F. Mosca, Joseph W. Sweeny. 

95, Detroit, Mich.— Thomas E. Redmond. 
99, Bridgeport, Conn. — Richard Carlson, 

Alfonso Gentili, James H. Norris. 
101, Baltimore, Md. — Charles W. Berger, 

Elwood R. Criswell, Commando Laster. 
104, Dayton, Oh.— Virgil I. McDaniel. 
107, Worcester, Mass. — Mrs. Edward Cie- 

pielowski, Norman Whittles. 
Ill, Lawrence, Mass. — Romeo Caouette. 
117, Albany, N.Y Mrs. George Volk. 

131, Seattle, Wash. — Arthur Lewis. 

132, Washington, D.C.— Willie Clay Darby, 
Benjamin I. Grover. 

134, Montreal, Que., Canada — Herve Cham- 
pagne, Alcide Gaboury, Mrs. Vincent 
Interlino, Joseph Lauzon, Mrs. Florian 
Poirier, Mrs. Richard Sweezey. 

135, New York, N.Y.— Jacob Kraus. 

141, Chicago, III. — Reinhold C. Jacobson, 
Einar P. Wickstrom. 

162, San Mateo, Calif. — Sulo Oaksen. 

163, Peekskill, N.Y.— Henry K. Kaste. 
171, Youngstown, Oh. — Joseph E. Kenney, 

Edward J. Oshelski. 



Local Union, City 

174, Joliet, 111.— Jack L. Helms, Frank 
Mondrella. 

176, Newport, R.I. — George D. Long. 

183, Peoria, III. — Edward J. Bergman, Rich- 
ard P. Owen. 

186, Steubenville, Oh— Russell S. & Adda 
Fisher. 

194, Oakland, Ca. — Leroy Gragg. 

195, Peru, III.— Carl D. Wright. 

198, Dallas, Tex.— Astor L. Pierce. 

199, Chicago, III John A. McCauley. 

213, Houston, Tx.— William L. Bauer, Sr. 
218, Boston, Mass. — John J. Davis. 

226, Portland, Ore.— Asa T. Williams. 

235, Riverside, Ca. — Heinz Wallkamm. 

239, Easton, Pa.— Harry Bechtel. 

248, Toledo, Oh.— Robert F. Powers. 

254, Cleveland, Oh.— Frank J. Graff. 

255, Bloomingburg, N.Y. — Frank Giam- 
brone, Harry C. Miller. 

260, Berkshire Co. & Vic, Mass. — Joseph 
P. Downey, Jr., Frederick J. Martin, 
Jr. 

262, San Jose, Calif.— Mrs. Roger W. Dean. 

264, Milwaukee, Wise. — Edward M. Albert, 
Leo J. Wieczorek. 

265, Saugerties, N.Y. — Bertrand S. Burr. 
267, Dresden, Oh.— Paul Gregg, John T. 

McMorris. 



Total for One Year 

By action of the 33rd General 
Convention, the Brotherhood death 
benefit was increased on January 1, 
1979, from $600 up to $2,000. As a 
result, the Brotherhood has paid out 
in one year — October, 1978, through 
September, 1979 — death benefits total- 
ing $8,463,265.32. 



278, Watertown, N.Y.— Chester L. Williams. 

297, Kalamazoo, Mich. — George E. Krogel. 

298, New York, N.Y.— Philipp Volk. 

311, Joplin, Mo. — Leon Pennel, Mrs. Jim- 

mie H. Templeton. 
320, Augusta/Waterville, Me. — Wesley W. 

Hilt. 
325, Paterson, N.J. — Arthur Rauer. 
337, Detroit, Mich.— William M. Fletcher, 

Mrs. Hubert Koski, Mrs. Raymond 

Vanier. 
342, Pawtucket, R.I. — Donat Choquette. 

344, Waukesha, Wise. — Charles H. Deist. 

345, Memphis, Tenn. — James E. Wilson. 
369, Tonawanda, N.Y. — James W. Thomp- 
son. 

383, Bayonne, N.J. — Sam Blum. 

405, Miami, Fla. — Frederick Ray Hershman, 
Marcel A. Soucy. 

411, San Angele, Tx. — Irving S. Berg. 

417, St. Louis, Mo. — Mrs. Milton Mitchell. 

424, Hingham, Mass. — Richard J. Fopiano. 

437, Portsmouth, Oh. — Elwood J. Madden. 

450, Ogden, Utah— Clarence T. Little. 

455, Somerville, N.J. — Mikko A. Kent. 

458, Clarksville, Ind. — Shelby Meriwether. 

461, Highwood, III. — Robert E. Peterson. 

470, Tacoma, Wa. — Homer Boyd. 

485, Christopher, III. — James Conner. 

488, New York, N.Y. — Eric Johnson, Jos- 
eph A. Stelmack. 



Local Union, City 

493, Mt. Vernon, N.Y — Daniel Hendron, 

John McCaul. 
500, Butler, Pa — Mrs. Paul W. Gillespie, 

Ira L. Kregar. 
508, Marion, III. — Earl Johnson. 
523, Keokuk, Iowa — Frank J. Thoeny. 
528, Washington, D.C.— Gilbert D. Garman. 
532, Elmira, N.Y.— John H. Perkins. 
540, Holyoke, Mass. — Adlard Moreau. 
550, Oakland, Ca Mrs. Thomas E. Mar- 
tin. 
559, Paducah, Ky.— Harry W. Smith. 
563, Glendale, Calif.— Mrs. Raymond F. 

Schambers. 
579, St. John's, Nfld., Canada— Reginald 

Lee, Mrs. Frank Parsons. 
583, Portland, Ore. — Percy M. Johnston. 
586, Sacramento, Calif. — Mrs. Alvin R. 

Foley, Robert C. Georges, Fred H. 

Limbocker, Nicholas Pavelko, Wilford 

J. Thomas. 
604, Murphysboro, III. — George Born, Sr. 
608, New York, N.Y.— John Healy. 
620, Madison, N.J. — Ole J. Bjornsen. 
622, Waco, Tx.— William J. Korenek. 

624, Brockton, Mass. — Donald C. MacGib- 
bon. 

625, Manchester, N.H. — Josephat Lavallee, 
Mrs. Henry Niquette, Arthur E. 
Plourde. 

637, Hamilton, Oh.— Mrs. David P. Verfer. 
643, Chicago, III.— William D. Smith. 
650, Pomeroy, Oh. — Mrs. Leo R. Story. 
665, Amarillo, Tx. — Scottie R. Tolbert. 
669, Harrisburg, III. — Albert A. Moyer. 
674, Mt. Clemens, Mich. — Mrs. Fred AI- 

gate. 
691, Williamsport, Pa.— Mrs. Charles A. 

Starr. 
721, Los Angeles, Calif.— Mrs. Alfred E. 

Tunell. 
725, Litchfield, III.— Roy Bender. 
727, Hialeah, Fla.— William H. Bolinger. 
739, Cincinnati, Oh.— Charles E. Schmerber. 
743, Bakersfield, Ca.— William A. Alpers, 

Mrs. John Maini. 
764, Shreveport, La.— R. D. Thomason. 
770, Yakima, Wash.— John R. Huck. 

781, Princeton, NJ. — Stanley A. Jarzyla. 

782, Fond du Lac, Wise. — Albert Borndal. 
785, Cambridge, Ont., Canada — Russell 

Maitland. 
787, New York, N.Y.— Karl E. Andersen, 

Alfred K. Grimsby, Ole & Andora 

Josephsen, Bernhard Katt, Ole Larsen. 
790, Dixon, III.— Roy Archer. 
792, Rockford, III.— Carl Bartscher, Mrs. 

Lee Epperson. 
848, San Bruno, Calif.— Ewald Ryll. 
891, Hot Springs, Ar.— William H Miller. 
902, Brooklyn, N.Y. — Antonino Tomasino. 
904, Jacksonville, III. — Mrs. Lee Hannel. 
906, Glendale, Ariz.— Mrs. Donald W. 

Fuller. 
932, Peru, Ind.— Charles R. Thurston. 
943, Tulsa, Ok.— Mrs. J. B. Duke, Mrs. 

Harvey Humphrey, Earl Self. 
955, Appleton, Wise. — William I. Neubauer. 
964, Rockland Co. & Vic, N.Y.— Mrs. 

Jerome W. Bright, Joseph W. Moreno. 
971, Reno, Nev. — Mrs. John Abbott, 

Thomas W. Dennis, Maynard A Holm. 
973, Texas City, Tx. — Kenneth Nunn, Jack 

P. Sholmire. 
978, Springfield, Mo.— Carl B Rhea. 
993, Miami, Fla.— Lloyd W. Williams. 

Continued on next page 



JANUARY, 1980 



29 



In Memoriam 

Continued from Page 29 

998, Royal Oak, Mich.— Mrs. Karl E. 
Beckman. William J. Mihay. 

1010, Uniontown, Pa. — Mrs. James A. 
Clingan. 

1044, Charleroi, Pa. — Fred Shearer. 

1065, Salem, Ore.— Mack G. Buning. Ray- 
mond B Lockard. 

1072, Muskogee, Okla. — Dewey G. Wallace. 

1074, Eau Claire, Wise. — Juno O. Anderson. 

1089, Phoenix, Ariz.— Dale Piles, Grady 
H. Richey, Paul M. Roca. 

1098, Baton Rouge, La. — Marion H. Wilson. 

1104, Tyler, Tx.— Grady DeWitt Merritt. 

1108, Cleveland, Oh.— Anthony C Szubski. 

1120, Portland. Ore. — Stewart F. VonHollen. 

1128, I.aGrange, III. — Albert M. Unger. 

1133, Scarborough, Ont., Canada— Alfred S. 
Rawn. 

1140, San Pedro, Ca.— K Hixson. 

1143, LaCrosse, Wise. — Mrs. Leonard S. 
Clark, Mrs. Robert W. Hayek, Arnold 
E. Lawrenz. 

1149, San Francisco, Calif. — Lewis F. 
Wilkerson. 

1162, New York, N.Y.— Onufry Ryzuk. 

1164, New York, N.Y. — Ottorino Soregaroli, 
James Winke. 

1178, New Glasgow, N.S., Canada— Mrs. 
George Cochrane. 

1185, Chicago, III.— Mrs. Frank D. Beem- 
ster, Louis M. C. Schovanec. 

1205, Indio, Calif.— Lloyd B. Westfall. 

1212, Coffeyville, Ka.— Wilbur B. Welling- 
ton. 

1222, Medford, N.Y.— Klaus Cordts, An- 
drew G. Schutz. 

1226, Pasadena, Tx. — Eugene J. Grigar. 

1227, Ironwood, Mi. — Carl Bernhard Tjern- 
lund. 

1235, Modesto, Calif.— James W. Cottles. 
1237, Dawson Creek, BC Canada — Milan 

Kramar. 
1251, New Westminster, BC Canada — Harry 

H. Friesen, Edmund G. Larsen. 
1263, Atlanta, Ga.— George W. Newell. 
1266, Austin, Tx.— R. G. Taylor. 
1273, Eugene, Ore. — Douglas Tweet. 
1278, Gainesville, Fla.— John C. Holder. 

1280, Mountain View, Calif. — Theodore F. 
Schirle. 

1281, Anchorage, Alaska — Edward C. Bate- 
man. 

1292, Huntington, N.Y.— William E. Poole, 

John A. Schlitz. 
1296, San Diego, Calif.— David Eaton. 
1305, Fall River, Mass. — Roger Bedard, Mrs. 

Eddie J. Cote, James D. Hay, Omer 

Lavoie. Mrs. John L. Moodie. 
1307, Northbrook, III Ralph B. Baren- 

brugge. 
1310, St. Louis, Mo.— Mrs. Albert C. Land. 
1334, Baytown, Tx. — Woodrow E. White. 

1341, Owensboro, Ky. — Charles T. Lanham. 

1342, Irvington, NJ. — Per Wilhelm Ander- 
son, Joseph A. Milne, Richard Single- 
ton, Mario A. Valeriani. 

1397, North Hempstead, N.Y. — Jose Henri- 
ques. 

1401, Buffalo, N.Y.— Mrs. Robert Wiesen- 
mayer. 

1407, San Pedro, Calif.— Adalberto Gon- 
zalez. 

1419, Johnstown, Pa. — John Harold Altimus, 
William R. Yahner. 

1423, Corpus Christi, Tx. — Paul Emory 
Strader. 

1452, Detroit, Mich. — Charles A. Dennis. 

1453, Huntington Beach, Ca.— Charles T. 
Wetzel. 

1457, Toledo, Oh.— Harley B. Moon. 
1460, Edmonton, A.B., Canada — Jan J. 
Kuna. 



1471, Jackson, Miss. — Mrs. William G. 
Barnhill, Benjamin F. McCann, Werner 
E. Wynne. 

1489, Burlington, NJ. — Mrs. Myron Wolver- 
ton. 

1498, Provo, Utah— Cree Kofford. 

1519, Ironton, Oh.— Noel A. Blythe. 

1529, Kansas City, Ks.— Donald D. Car- 
penter. 

1532, Anacortes, Wash. — Frederick T. Post. 

1539, Chicago, III.— Robert C. MacKenzie. 

1577, Buffalo, N.Y.— Andrew H. Lochte. 

1588, Sydney, N.S., Canada— Michael P. 
Donovan. 

1590, Washington, D.C.— Mrs. Brady Har- 
ley. 

1595, Conshohocken, Pa.— Mrs. Harry W. 
Shepherd, Jr. 

1599, Redding, Calif.— Guy M. Niel. 

1622, Hayward, Calif.— Eli L. Allen. 

1635, Kansas City, Mo.— Charles B. Cook. 

1650, Lexington, Ky. — Orville Goodpaster. 

1665, Alexandria, Va. — Charles L. Gordon, 
Jr. 

1669, Fort William, Ont., Canada— Paul V. 
Derhak, William Joseph Graham, Eino 
I, Kankkunen. 

1685, Pineda, Fla. — Christian P. Thomassen. 

1693, Chicago, III.— Joseph W. Davis, Sr., 
Ralph O. Struwe. 

1707, Longview, Wash. — William Mabius. 

1733, Marshfield, Wise.— Mrs. Rose Oelrich, 
Cecilia L. Schaefer. 

1752, Pomona, Calif. — Norwood Knott. 

1764, Marion, Va. — Jefferson P. Kegley. 

1765, Orlando, Fla. — Mrs. Benjamin F. 
Laing. 

1775, Columbus, Ind.— William H. Beck, 
Urban O. Dalton. 

1807, Dayton, Oh Mrs. D. Raymond Tan- 
ner. 

1811, Monroe, La. — Louis Albert Bridges, 
Mrs. Willard K. Sharp. 

1815, Santa Ana, Calif.— Reuben C. Mol- 
berg. 

1822, Ft. Worth, Tx.— Mrs. Loyd F. Bodkin, 
Johnnie W. Stewart. 

1823, Philadelphia, Pa. — Joseph E. Francis. 
1837, Babylon, N.Y.— Oscar O. Enoksen. 
1846, New Orleans, La.— Stanton J. Wolz, 

Sr. 
1849, Pasco, Wash.— William E. Weathers- 
bee. 

1856, Philadelphia, Pa.— John H. Muth. 

1857, Portland, Ore. — Jesse E. Bussing. 
1861, Milpitas, Ca.— Carl A. Frankson. 
1896, The Dalles, Ore.— Arthur V. LaValley. 
1946, London, Ont., Canada — Toivo Wal- 

back. 
1978, Buffalo, N.Y.— Linus C. Hoffman, 

Joseph A. Stack. 
2020, San Diego, Ca.— Alpheus Packard. 
2028, Grand Forks, N.D.— Jonatan D. 

Gislason. 

2046, Martinez, Calif.— Basil Coller, Carl A. 
Cullison. 

2047, Hartford City, Ind.— James Cole. 
2203, Anaheim, Calif. — Kenneth Anderson, 

Frank L. Kroeker. 
2205, Wenatchee, Wash.— Vern E. Hett. 
2217, Lakeland, Fla. — James Ready. 
2250, Red Bank, N.J.— Robert Hulse, Otto 

Richter. 

2264, Pittsburgh, Pa.— Bruce B. Long. 

2265, Detroit, Mich.— Ralph H. Amsden. 
2288, Los Angeles, Calif.— Harry R. Hol- 

lingshead, George R. Maag, Clyde M. 

Register. 
2337, Milwaukee, Wise. — Edwin Leitzke. 
2375, Los Angeles, Ca. — Edward F. Nitzel. 
2391, Holland, Mich.— Clifford W. DeFey- 

ter. 

2404, Vancouver, B.C., Canada — Melvin R. 
Curtis. 

2405, Kalispell, Mont.— Mrs. Richard C. 
Cleaver. 



2416, Portland, Ore.— Peter J. Petersen. 

2455, Crescent City, Ca.— Harold C. Arm- 
strong, Olaf S. Ness. 

2486, Sudbury, Ont. Canada— Mrs. Frank 
W. Reid. 

2519, Seattle, Wash.— Sidney L. Ross. 

2580, Everett, Wash.— Mrs. Ralph D. Page. 

2685, Missoula, Mont. — Armand N. Du- 
fresne. 

2767, Morton, Wash.— Jay N. Bickford, 
Charles Albert Mitchell. 

2805, Klickitat, Wash.— Walter S. Miller. 

3035, Springfield, Ore.— Wesley E. Fouts. 

3099, Aberdeen, Wash. — Clyde Capps. 

3214, Grand Forks, B.C., Canada— Peter 
Pereverzoff. 



Recalls On Toys 

Continued from page 19 

Launcher" blow-gun toys are being re- 
called voluntarily by their manufacturer, 
the Western Publishing Company (a divi- 
sion of Mattel, Inc.), of Racine, Wiscon- 
sin. The toys may pose a choking hazard 
to children. 

The toy consists of a white plastic tube 
and mouthpiece which measure approxi- 
mately 29 inches. It is sold with three 
small cardboard targets and three orange 
darts molded of soft vinyl, each approxi- 
mately three inches long. There have 
been reports of four children who 
choked on the toy's mouthpiece when it 
separated from the plastic tube, although 
no critical injuries resulted, according to 
the manufacturer. 

Model number 4990 is printed on the 
toy's package, but the toy and its com- 
ponents do not display any distinguish- 
ing identification. The toy sold for ap- 
proximately $2 in toy stores and other 
variety stores nationwide. 

Parents can receive a refund by return- 
ing the toy to their retailer or by mailing 
it to: Western Publishing Company, 1220 
Mound Avenue, Racine, Wisconsin, 
53404, Attention: Customer Relations 
Director. 



Social Security 

Continued from page 22 

if you have lost your Social Security 
Card. (You are permitted just one Social 
Security Number during your lifetime.) 

• You change your name. (This does 
not apply to change of last name in 
marriage.) 

It is important for you to contact your 
Social Security office before you reach 
65, not only about retirement payments, 
but also about Medicare, which is avail- 
able whether or not you retire. 

A long delay in applying for monthly 
benefits can cause loss of some benefits 
since back payments can be made for no 
more than 12 months. So think ahead! 

For more information about the Social 
Security program, contact your Social 
Security office or writ,- to: The Consumer 
Information Center, Pueblo, Colo., 81009 
for a free booklet entitled "Your Social 
Security." 



30 



THE CARPENTER 




s^ss* 



MONEY-SAVING BOOKS 

We seldom get into book reviews in 
"What's New?", but three books crossed 
our editorial desk recently which we 
think may be of value to our readers: 

WHY TRADE IT IN?— This is a 
paperback volume which tells you how 
to keep your car running longer. An 
automobile can go 
300,000 or more, 
provide years of 
dependable use, 
and at the same 
time, save its owner 
thousands of dol- 
lars, according to 
George and Suz- 
anne Fremon, the 
co-authors. WHY 
TRADE IT IN? 
does not explain 
how to repair, re- 
place, or adjust 
anything. But it 
does reveal the true economics of the 
automobile, new or used, big or small, 
and the benefits of preventive mainte- 
nance. The book tells how to find a 
competent mechanic and how and when 
to have a car serviced. Included are 
complete, easy-to-follow maintenance 
schedules. 



Whv 

Jradekln? 




INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Belsaw Locksmith 21 

Belsaw Planer 25 

Belsaw Sharp-All 27 

Black & Decker Back Cover 

Chevrolet Motor Division 13 

Chicago Technical College 26 

Clifton Enterprises 31 

Estwing Mfg. Co 28 

Cline-Sigmon Publishers 22 

Foley Manufacturing Co 20 

Full Length Roof Framer 22 

Industrial Abrasives Co 26 

Irwin Auger Bit 31 

Layout Pencil 22 

Stair-Square 27 



To order WHY TRADE IT IN?: Send 
$5.95, cash, check, or money order to 
Liberty Publishing Company, Inc., 50 
Scott Adam Road, Cockeysville, Md. 
21030. Telephone: (301) 667-6680. Order 
by title and Code No. ISBN O-89709- 
016-0. 



HOW TO BORROW MONEY— And 
who doesn't at times wonder that! Here's 
a book that's more expensive than the 
one above ($12.50), but it may save you 
money in the long run. Its full title is 
How to Borrow Money from a Bank: 
A Banker Reveals Secrets You Need to 
Know for Successful Borrowing. 

Written in a simple, easy-to-under- 
stand style by a banker, this is a source 
book of information 
if you need a small 
m'^yP^^i'-O (personal loan or a big 
[ iJ £$fjr&OJ-?' business loan. It ex- 
-. . ~ ~ J -' ji -- [plains how to lose 
I your fear of bankers, 
I which is often the 
I first hurdle. It con- 
I tains facts about what 
lone must legally dis- 
I close as well as what 
banks do not have the 
right to demand, and there are sugges- 
tions about what to say and what not to 
say to a lending officer. 



A Banker firwA 



To order HOW TO BORROW 
MONEY FROM A BANK: Send $12.50 
postpaid, with money back guarantee, to 
Global Enterprises, Box 539, Dept. 
11A-18, Baxter Springs, Kansas 66713. 

BUILDING LAYOUT— Few aspects 
of home building are as fundamental to 
quality professional workmanship as 
sound layout practice. Yet most builders 
acquire these specialized skills piecemeal 
or depend on layout professionals to do 
the work for them. What has always 
been needed is a guide to construction 
layout the average building tradesman 
can use whenever 
he needs reliable 
help solving his lay- 
out problems prac- 
tically, systematic- 
ally, and fast. 
There are chapters 
on transit work, 
working with 
square and odd- 
shape foundations, 
and much more. 
The book has 
charts, estimating forms, formulas, and 
layout mathematics, clear illustrations 
and step-by-step instructions. The author, 
W. P. Jackson, has more than 30 years 
of experience as a builder and developer 
of homes and garden apartments. 

To order BUILDING LAYOUT by 
W. P. Jackson: Send $10.50, cash, check, 
or money order to Craftsman Book 
Company, 542 Stevens Avenue, Solana 
Beach, Calif. 92075. 





\ 




3 easy ways to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor® "88" for all electric drills. 
Spade-type head, exclusive hollow ground point. 
Starts fast, cuts fast in any wood. 17 sizes, 1 A" 
to 114", and 4, 6 and 13 piece sets. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial® expansive bit bores 
35 standard holes, 7 /a" to 3". Fits all hand braces. 
And you just dial the size you want. No. 21 bores 
19 standard holes, 5 /a" to 1 3 /«". 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. De- 
livers clean, fast double-cutter boring action. 
Balanced cutting head. Medium fast screw pitch. 
Heat treated full length for long life. 18 sizes, 
'A" to 114", and sets. 

Every Irwin Wood Bit precision-made of finest 
quality tool steel, heat tempered full length and 
machine-sharpened to bore fast, clean, accurate 
holes. Buy Irwin . . . buy the best. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 
50 ft. & 100 ft. sizes 
Popular Priced Irwin self-chalking design 
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action reel. Leak proof. Practically 
damage proof. Fits pocket or hand. 

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every bit as good 
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Carpenters, 

hang it up! 

/■vSMSk Clamp these heavy 

V?f 1 B duty, non-stretch 

•N^v.^C* suspenders to your 

nail bags or tool 
belt and you'll feel 
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the weight off your 
hips and place the 
load on your 
shoulders. Made of 
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Adjust to fit all sizes 

Try them for 15 days, if not completely 

satisfied return for full refund. Don't be 

miserable another day, order now. 

Send check or money order to: 




Norman Clifton, 
member, Local 1622, 
Hayward, Calif. 
(Patent Pending) 



I CLIFTON ENTERPRISES 

I 4806 Los Arboles Place, Fremont, Ca. 94536 

I Please rush "HANG IT UP" suspenders at 
I $16.15 each includes postage & handling 
j California residents add 6%% sales tax 
j (97<1 Canada Res. please send U.S. equiv- 
1 alent. 

j NAME 

I ADDRESS 

I CITY STATE ZIP 



Please give street address for prompt delivery. 



JANUARY, 1980 



31 



IN CONCLUSION 



my Seruice Hs Vour President tomes to Hn End, 
Hs Able Brotherhood Leaders Assume Hem Duties 



It was more than 15 years ago — in 1964, to 
be exact — that I moved from my native state 
of California to a seat behind a desk here at 
the Brotherhood General Offices in Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

At that time I took up duties as your Second 
General Vice President, and, although our 
General Constitution provides for the orderly 
and eventual succession of the second general 
vice president to the office of the first general 
vice president to the office of president, I did 
not at that time give serious consideration to 
the awesome responsibilities of the higher of- 
fices. In fact, there was little expectation for 
me at that time that I would actually become 
your general president in the span of years be- 
fore my retirement. 

But Finlay Allan passed away in 1969, and 
in 1972, M. A. Hutcheson retired as your 
General President. I then found myself at the 
helm of our great organization. 

These 15 years at the General Office have 
provided me a thorough apprenticeship in 
trade union and United Brotherhood leader- 
ship. As I now look back on the decade and a 
half just ended, I can see clearly the wisdom 
of our convention delegates in years past who 
provided for our system of leadership succes- 
sion. 

As Second General Vice President, I coped 
with jurisdictional problems and many diversi- 
fied administrative duties assigned me by the 
General President. As First General Vice 
President, I dealt with our apprenticeship and 
training program, our Union Label program, 
local union and council bylaw procedures, 
and a host of other administrative duties. 
Couple this special service with my previous 
service as General Executive Board Member 
and as a local union, district council, and state 
council executive, and, one way or another, I 
was sure I was prepared for the top office in 
our union. 



I have now taken the final step of General 
President. At our last General Executive 
Board Meeting in San Diego I tendered my 
retirement as your top executive officer. You 
will find my retirement letter elsewhere in this 
issue of The Carpenter. 

Succeeding me as your General President 
is another from the ranks, who has also served 
well at every level of our organization. I leave 
in full confidence that the long chain of com- 
mand which began almost a century ago with 
Gabriel Edmonston will continue under the 
able leadership of Bill Konyha. 

Changes of leadership mean different things 
to different people. I have observed in my 40 
years of active participation in Brotherhood 
affairs that we have always prepared those 
leaders who follow to competently assume 
their new roles. I know that Bill Konyha will 
do a great job as your new General President. 

The vacancy of First General Vice Presi- 
dent will be filled by another who has passed 
through the chairs and knows the organization 
and knows what has to be done to meet the 
challenges of the 1980s — Patrick Campbell. 

I can assure you that while leaving the Gen- 
eral Office brings moments of sadness, it is 
comforting to know that I leave the organiza- 
tion in competent hands. 

My tenure at the General Office has been a 
difficult one. While I acknowledge each genera- 
tion of leadership has dealt with difficult prob- 
lems, the past decade and a half have been 
particularly vexing. There were the social tur- 
moils of the 60s, the stresses of the war in Viet- 
nam and the Nixon years, and not only the 
ravages of Watergate but the many constant 
overt attacks on organized labor. There was a 
particularly difficult period in the mid-70s 
when we had record unemployment, and infla- 
tion, for the first time, began to take on double- 
digit dimensions. 



32 



THE C A RPENTER 



There were the joys and fellowship of the 32nd 
and 33rd General Conventions and the anguish of 
the problems which confronted the General Execu- 
tive Board in finding solutions to the numerous 
monumental problems which faced our organiza- 
tion. The frustrations were many, but the rewards 
were great, and they offered balance to many dif- 
ficult days which we endured. 

I leave with a certain degree of satisfaction of 
having done my best. While I look forward to re- 
turning to California and enjoying what I believe 
to be a well-earned rest, it is sad to know that I will 
no longer be in the middle of things, working on 
your behalf, working with the thousands of local 
union officers, business representatives, and orga- 
nizers on the line. 

The General Office staff has been loyal and hard- 
working, and the membership owes a debt of grati- 
tude to them for much of the success of our en- 
deavors over the years. 

Success or accomplishment is not achieved 
alone, as no one can really accomplish anything 
without the contributions, cooperation, and sup- 
port of others. This I have truly had. 

Albert Einstein once said, "A hundred times 
every day I remind myself that my inner and outer 
life depend on the labors of other men, living and 
dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give 
in the same measure as I have received and am still 
receiving." 

The Brotherhood is entering its 99th year, and 
the planning has begun for the 34th General Con- 
vention to be held in Chicago in August, 1981 — 
our 100th anniversary. The second century of the 
Brotherhood will be confronted, I am sure, by tre- 
mendous change, as the first century has been. As 
I reflect upon the history of our organization, I see 
clearly those precepts which guided our founders 
in the early days and the ideals and objectives 
adopted in 1 881 which have fueled our momentum 
for these 98 years. I know now that what I may 
have questioned before was indeed unjust. For 
those who preceded me were truly on the proper 
course. 

Our organization continues to maintain its 
prominence in the trade union movement of North 
America. It was, in fact, the prime architect which 
created the labor movement as we know it today, 
and it remains in the forefront of organized labor. 
While I now remove myself from the nerve cen- 
ter of our activity through retirement, you can be 
assured that my heart will always be with you, my 



thoughts and my aspirations for the Brotherhood 
will always be there. 

Some scientists believe that, someday, they will 
be able to reproduce identical individuals like so 
many automobiles off an assembly line. This so- 
called genetic engineering has its frightening as- 
pects and its tremendous social implications. 

But I feel sure that those scientists can never 
duplicate the officers of an international labor 
union nor even a local business agent or recording 
secretary. The men and women of the labor move- 
ment are the products of individual dedication, 
spirit, experience, and most important the school 
of hard knocks. 

We have new leaders and a new vitality in our 
organization, as we enter the 1980s. I ask in closing 
that you give to my successor and his team the 
loyalty and support you have given me over the 
years. Good luck and Godspeed to each of you. 




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• Impact-resistant Super 



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• Precision chuck for 
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• Powerlul Black & Decker 
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Ball bearing construction. 



Heavy-Duty and long life Extra Heavy-Duty Holgun drills. 
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Whether you're a builder, contractor, or industrial power tool user, there's 
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Our four double insulated Heavy-Duty models give you all the quality 
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Our long life Extra Heavy-Duty models have the same features found in 
our Heavy-Duty models. In addition, they're built to deliver something extra: 
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To find out which of our Holguns B is best for you, visit 
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^■^^ Industrial/Construction Division 
Hampstead, MD 21074 




4 Heavy-Duty 
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United Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners of America 



February 1980 





We're Building The Twentieth Century 

Our First Television Commercial . . . See Page 7 





GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 
William Konyha 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Patrick J. Campbell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 



GENERAL SECRETARY 

John S. Rogers 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 
Charles E. Nichols 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Joseph F. Lia 
120 North Main Street 
New City, New York 10956 

Second District, Sigurd Lucassen 
130 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 

Third District, Anthony Ochocki 

14001 West McNichoIs Road 
Detroit, Michigan 48235 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

2970 Peachtree Rd., N.W., Suite 300 
Atlanta. Ga. 30305 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140 N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116 

Seventh District, Hal Morton 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l BIdg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, John Carruthers 
5799 Yonge Street #807 
Willowdale, Ontario M2M 3V3 

Tenth District, Ronald J. Dancer 

1235 40th Avenue, N.W. 

Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2K OG3 




William Konyha, Chairman 
John S. Rogers, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

In processing complaints about 
magazine delivery, the only names 
which the financial secretary needs to 
send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 

In sending in the names of mem- 
bers who are not getting the maga- 
zine, the address forms mailed out 
with each monthly bill should be 
used. When a member clears out of 
one local union into another, his 
name is automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of the local union he 
cleared out of. Therefore, the secre- 
tary of the union into which he cleared 
should forward his name to the Gen- 
eral Secretary so that this member 
can again be added to the mailing list. 

Members who die or are suspended 
are automatically dropped from the 
mailing list of The Carpenter. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 



NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPENTER only cor- 
rects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not advise your own 
local union of your address change. You must also notify your local union 
... by some other method. 



This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local No. 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State or Province 



ZIP Code 




THE 
COVER 



VOLUME 100 No. 2 FEBRUARY, 1980 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

John S. Rogers, Editor 

IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Unionized Construction Workers Are More Productive ._ 2 

Pat Campbell Assumes Office as First Vice President 5 

First Brotherhood Television Commercial 7 

Did You Know? Origins of the Labor Movement 8 

Louisiana, Oregon, Illinois Contestants Win Top Spots 10 

Awards Banquet Is One of the Largest .... 12 

Carpentry Apprentice Contestants 14 

Mill-Cabinet Apprentice Contestants 20 

Millwright Apprentice Contestants 22 

Training Conference at New Orleans 25 



Beginning the week of February 4, 
the United Brotherhood launches the 
first of a series of network television 
commercials, designed to show the 
US and Canadian public how impor- 
tant our skilled membership is in the 
overall scheme of things. The theme 
of the series is: "We're Building the 
20th Century." 

Our front cover shows a scene from 
this first network commercial, with 
Brotherhood members affixing our 
label to a wall map of North Amer- 
ica. See the full story on Page 7. 

Our back cover, meanwhile, dis- 
plays pictures from the 13th Annual 
International Carpentry Apprentice- 
ship Contest held December 5 and 6 
in New Orleans, La. 

In full color are the three top win- 
ners in the competition — from left, 
Derryl Cummings of Portland, Ore., 
first place millwright; John Monahan 
of Chicago, 111., first place mill-cabi- 
netmaker; and Albert Pitts of Shreve- 
port, La., first place carpenter. They 
are holding the handcrafted wooden 
trophies presented each year to the 
international champions. Pitts also 
holds the Olav Boen Award, which is 
presented to the first place carpenter 
by the Seattle Northwest Chapter of 
the Associated General Contractors. 



DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Report 



Ottawa Report — 26 

Service to the Brotherhood 27 

Plane Gossip _._ 32 

Consumer Clipboard 34 

In Memoriam 35 

What's New? 39 

In Conclusion William Konyha 40 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001 

Published monthly at 3342 Bladensburg Road, Brentwood, Md. 20722 by the United Brotherhood 
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CARPENTER, 101 Constitution Ave., 
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We're Building The Twentieth Century 

OiirrifHTalovislonCommerclal. S< 



Printed in U. S. A. 



Unionized 

Construction 

Workers Are more 

Productiue 



Large-scale study refutes 'anti-union 

outpourings of those seeking to destroy 

unionism in the construction industry.' 



Productivity 




Construction workers who belong 
to unions are about one-third more 
productive than non-union workers, 
according to the first large-scale statis- 
tical study ever done on labor produc- 
tivity in the U.S. construction industry. 
The study was released in Washington 
recently by the Center to Protect 
Workers' Rights. 

The study was conducted by Dr. 
Steven G. Allen, who holds a PhD in 
economics from Harvard University 
and is currently assistant professor of 
economics at North Carolina State 
University. 

Commenting on the study. President 
Robert A. Georgine of the Center 
said: 

"Dr. Allen has done the construc- 
tion industry, and those who use it, an 
enormous service in laying to rest 
many of the myths and misguided as- 
sumptions about unions that have gone 
unchallenged in the past. His careful 
analysis of nationwide data should go 
far to refute the anti-union outpour- 
ings of those seeking to destroy union- 
ism in the construction industry. 

"I am most gratified to note that the 
study supports what we have been say- 
ing all along: that American construc- 
tion unions foster free enterprise and 
are of positive social value to the 
American way of life." 

Dr. Allen based his study on output, 
employment, capital services and other 
pertinent data compiled nationally by 
the federal government. The data 
covers all sectors of the construction 
industry across the nation. 

"The study finds that output per 
employee is at least 29 percent greater 
in unionized establishments in con- 
struction," Dr. Allen said. "If this 
extra productivity is entirely attribut- 
able to labor, then union members are 
at least 38 percent more productive 
than other workers in construction." 

Moreover, he said, the productivity 
difference holds true regardless of such 
things as the size of the contracting 
firm involved, the amount of capital 
used, the age or schooling of the work- 
ers, the type of work, or the region of 
the country involved. 

In his paper. Dr. Allen also takes 
note of other recent studies covering 
other sectors of the economy which 
have reached similar conclusions about 
the link between unionization and pro- 
ductivity. For example, he cites re- 
search by Professor Charles Brown of 
the University of Maryland and Pro- 
fessor James Medoff of Harvard Uni- 
versity which indicates that output per 
manhour is 24 percent greater in 
unionized than nonunionized establish- 
ments in manufacturing. 



THE CARPENTER 



The Allen study also contradicted 
what Dr. Allen called a popular im- 
pression that union members work 
fewer hours annually. 

"There is no significant difference in 
annual hours worked between union 
and nonunion construction workers," 
he declared. 

In addition, Dr. Allen continued, 
the productivity findings suggest the 
reason for higher union wages is be- 
cause union work is more efficient, not 
because unions have a monopolistic 
control over the workplace. This is 
what allows union contractors to be 
competitive with non-union firms, he 
commented. 

Dr. Allen was not able to establish 
the exact causes for union productive 
superiority. He noted two possible rea- 
sons. These are: 

1. Unions insist on the maintenance 
of apprentice programs, so union mem- 
bers are likely to receive more training 
than nonunion workers. 

2. Union hiring halls reduce con- 
tractors' costs of finding and hiring 
competent workers. 

"These findings point out the need 
to re-examine the . . . opinion that 
unions have a negative impact on so- 
ciety," Dr. Allen concludes. "Construc- 
tion unions provide public or collective 
services benefitting both contractors 
and workers, such as training, job in- 
formation and esprit de corps, which 
would otherwise not be produced in 
their absence. If these services are 
ignored, an unbalanced and inaccurate 
view of unions necessarily results." 





Some Questions 
and Hnsuiers 

Dr. Steven G. Allen, author of the 
study and assistant professor of econom- 
ics at North Carolina State University, 
gives answers to questions about his pio- 
neering econometric study and the con- 
clusions he drew from it. 

Q. How can you measure productivity 
in an industry such as construction where 
the product is extremely heterogeneous? 

A. Productivity equals output per unit 
of input. Since construction is a very 
labor-intensive production process, con- 
tractors are especially concerned with 
labor productivity — that is, output per 
manhour worked. It is relatively easy to 
compute the denominator of this ratio, 
as there are a number of measures of 
labor input in construction computed by 
the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the 
Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics. However, problems arise in de- 
veloping the output measures needed for 
the numerator of this ratio. This process 
is easier in an industry such as coal, 
where the product is identical in different 
time periods and in different places at any 
given time period. A productivity measure 
for coal could be readily calculated by 
dividing tons produced by manhours used. 
In construction there is no unique physi- 
cal aspect of the product which can be 
used in developing a standard measure of 
output. As any homeowner knows, the 
number of manhours needed to build a 



1500 square foot house will depend on 
the number of rooms in the house, the 
terrain upon which it is situated, whether 
it has a basement and countless other 
factors. Thus, comparisons of square feet 
built per manhour are not likely to shed 
much light on the effectiveness with which 
labor is being utilized. 

There is one way to solve this measure- 
ment problem. Two houses which are 
physically identical should sell at the 
same price. If one of the two houses has 
a fireplace and the other doesn't, then the 
house with the fireplace should sell for 
more because (1) many consumers find 
fireplaces desirable and (2) it costs more 
to build a house with a fireplace. The pro- 
ductivity of the labor used to build these 
two houses could be compared by divid- 
ing the price of each house by the man- 
hours necessary to produce it. For in- 
stance, if an identical number of man- 
hours were used to build each house, it 
would then follow that the workers who 
built the house with the fireplace were 
more productive. 

The output measure used in this paper 
is value added, which equals total revenue 
minus the cost of materials and land. 
Value added is a more appropriate meas- 
ure than value put in place, because the 
latter includes the cost of factors such 
as land which are unrelated to labor 
productivity. 

Q. How do unions contribute to in- 
creased productivity? 

A. There seem to be two basic routes 
by which unions lead to increased pro- 
ductivity in construction. First, unioniza- 



FEBRUARY, 1980 



r^: 




Some Questions 
and Hnswers 

Continued from Page 3 

tion encourages investment in human 
skills. One must either complete an ap- 
prenticeship or pass a certifying examina- 
tion to become a union journeyman. In 
either case the worker must sacrifice some 
current income in the early stages of his 
career to learn skills which will make him 
more productive in the future. In contrast, 
the amount of training in the non-union 
sector depends solely upon market forces. 
There are relatively few non-union ap- 
prenticeship programs; instead, most train- 
ing is done informally on the job as 
needed. While this is better than no train- 
ing at all, there is little incentive for 
non-union contractors to give their work- 
ers as broad a vocational education as 
they would require to become union 
members. 

Furthermore, there is a tendency for 
employers to underinvest in the skills of 
their workers in a market such as con- 
struction. The skills learned by construc- 
tion workers increase their productivity 
for any employer. Contractors will be 
very reluctant to pay the costs of train- 
ing if the principal beneficiaries of this 
investment will be the other contractors 
who will employ the worker in the future. 
(In contrast, in many manufacturing jobs, 
the skills learned during training are pre- 
dominantly useful only to the employer 
providing the training because equipment 
and organizational systems are specific to 
that enterprise. In these cases, the em- 
ployer is willing to bear the costs of train- 
ing because he can then pay the worker 
less than the value of his contribution to 
output once he is trained. The employer 
is able to do this because there is no 
market outside his firm for these skills.) 
When training increases skills which are 
marketable, the worker "pays" for the 
training by receiving a wage below what 
he could earn elsewhere in a job where 
no training was being provided. Workers 
may not be able to finance their training 
through receiving lower wages in the non- 
union sector because (1) the minimum 
wage reduces the ability of employers to 
pass on training costs to the worker, so 
less training is provided and (2) workers 
and their families frequently cannot sub- 
sist on the reduced wages (even at $2.90 
an hour) and are unable to borrow against 
future earnings to close the gap between 



what they can earn from other employers 
in the short run. In contrast, in union 
apprenticeship programs wages are well 
above the legal minimum and rise steadily 
as the worker proceeds through the pro- 
gram. This is offset in later years when 
the journeyman's wages are reduced be- 
low what they would otherwise be. Fur- 
ther, the costs of classroom training are 
frequently subsidized by the government. 
Secondly, unions increase the efficiency 
of managers and supervisory personnel in 
a number of ways. Unions are generally 
able to provide on short notice a supply 
of skilled labor to contractors, greatly 
reducing the direct and indirect costs of 
recruiting and hiring. Such a service be- 
comes particularly valuable to contractors 
when the local labor market is very tight. 
Contractors also need fewer supervisory 
personnel when they hire union crews. 

Q. It is sometimes charged that unions 
serve to decrease efficiency and produc- 
tivity through various restrictive work 
practices, frequent strikes, etc. What evi- 
dence is available regarding the actual 
impact of these practices? 

A. There have been very few studies 
of these issues by neutral outside observ- 
ers. To our knowledge, only two such 
studies have been performed recently. In 
a study of union working rules, Allan 
Mandelstamm concluded: 

The only rules which exerted any 
restrictive effect whatsoever were a 
requirement that a certain number 
of men carry various sizes of glass, 
a limitation on overtime work, and 
the requirement that local men be 
hired on foreign jobs. Although no 
reliable quantitative estimate can be 
made of the effect of these rules on 
efficiency, their total impact would 
appear to be very small.* 

Professors Clinton Bourdon and Ray- 
mond Levitt compared union and non- 
union work practices in eight cities. They 
concluded: 

In general, union rules on jurisdic- 
tion, skill level, technology and work 
practices, hiring, and training are 
neither as inefficient nor as inflexible 
as they have been portrayed. For the 
most part, the union institutions help 
make large-scale construction more 
efficient by organizing and maintain- 
ing an external pool of skilled labor 
for many firms to use. In smaller- 
scale construction the rules are often 
overlooked or adapted, through loose 
interpretation, to fit the context.* * 



* Allan B. Mandelstamm, "The Effects 
of Unions of Efficiency in the Residential 
Construction Industry: A Case Study", In- 
dustrial and Labor Relations Review, vol. 
18 (July, 1965), page 512. 

** Clinton C. Bourdon and Raymond E. 
Levitt, A Comparison of Wages and Labor 
Management Practices in Union and Non- 
union Construction, Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, Research Report No. R-78-3, 
prepared for the U.S. Department of Hous- 
ing and Urban Development under Contrac- 
tor No. H-2327-R, March 30, 1978, page 73. 



Q. I thought that most differences in 
productivity can be explained by differ- 
ences in the amount of capital, technol- 
ogy, or managerial expertise. Isn't it pos- 
sible that your positive union produc- 
tivity effect results from the fact that 
unions have organized the largest, most 
efficient contractors? 

A. In most industries, output per man- 
hour depends more on the amount and 
quality of capital than on the amount 
and quality of labor. Construction is an 
exception because there is relatively little 
fixed capital equipment in this industry. 
The amount of output per unit of time 
depends mainly on the expertise of the 
individual worker in construction, whereas 
in manufacturing the pace of the produc- 
tion process is frequently predetermined 
by technology (e.g. assembly lines, con- 
tinuous processes). Thus, differences in 
the skills of the workforce are likely to 
have a bigger effect on productivity in 
construction. 

Still, there is evidence that the largest 
and most efficient contractors tend to be 
unionized. In order to separate the effects 
of unionization from the effects of capi- 
tal intensity and contractor size, a multi- 
ple regression analysis was necessary. 
Thus, our finding that union labor is at 
least 29 percent more productive means 
that, given two contractors with identical 
amounts of capital per worker and the 
same number of workers, the unionized 
contractors will have 29 percent higher 
productivity than the nonunion contrac- 
tor. 

Q. We all know that union wages are 
above nonunion wages. Isn't it possible 
that value added per worker is higher 
in the union sector because union wages 
are higher, not because union labor is 
more productive? 

A. This interpretation of the econo- 
metric results cannot be immediately dis- 
missed, but it involves some very strong 
assumptions about price determination 
in construction. Keep in mind that in esti- 
mating the union productivity effect we 
have controlled for differences in capital 
intensity, contractor size, observable labor 
quality, state price levels, region and sec- 
tor of construction. In order to interpret 
our result as a union cost effect, one 
must assume that with the same geograph- 
ical area and the same sector of the in- 
dustry, a union contractor with a given 
amount of capital and labor at his dis- 
posal can charge at least 29 percent more 
for a project than an otherwise identical 
nonunion contractor. How can such an 
enormous price difference exist within a 
market? No firm or individual will pay 
a 29 percent premium unless there are 
no substitutes, and it seems clear that the 
option of building nonunion is widely 
available. The available data show that in 
practically every area there is a sizeable 
nonunion labor force in each sector of 
construction, and that nationally less 
than half the construction labor force is 

Continued on Page 24 



THE CARPENTER 




CAMPBELL 



PATRICK CnmPBELL 
RSSUHIES OFFICE 
HS FIRST GERERRL 
UICE PRESIDERT 



Patrick J. Campbell, Second General 
Vice President of the Brotherhood 
since 1 974, became First General Vice 
President on January 1, succeeding 
William Konyha, who was elevated to 
the General Presidency with the recent 
retirement of William Sidell. 

Campbell, thus, assumes new duties 
as director of apprenticeship and train- 
ing and union label promotion and 
acquires many other duties assigned by 
the Constitution and Laws and the 
General President. 

The new First General Vice Presi- 
dent is a veteran from the ranks. He 
joined the Brotherhood in 1945 as a 
member of Local 964, Rockland 
County, N.Y., following four years of 
service with the Air Force in the South 
Pacific during World War II. 

Born in New York City on July 22, 
1918, he moved to Rockland county at 
the age of 20. Following military serv- 
ice in World War II, he became an 
apprentice in Local 964 and quickly 
progressed to journeyman carpenter, 
foreman, general construction foreman 
and superintendent before being elected 
president of Local 964 in 1954. 

In 1955, his accomplishments were 
recognized by General President M. A. 
Hutcheson, who appointed him to the 
international organizing staff. In 1957, 



he was appointed a General Represen- 
tative and assigned to the Niagara 
Power Project in upstate New York, 
one of the largest construction projects 
ever undertaken in the United States. 
He served as chairman of the labor- 
management committee for the entire 
operation. 

In 1966, he was appointed Assistant 
to the General President. In 1969 he 
succeeded to the position of First Dis- 
trict Board Member, and in 1974 he 
was promoted to the high office of 
Second General Vice President. 

Campbell has served as president, 
New York State Council of Carpenters, 
vice president of the New York State 
AFL-CIO, and as a director of the 
board of the Urban Development 
Corporation for the State of New York. 

Among many honors he has re- 
ceived are the Michael J. Quill Memo- 
rial Award for outstanding leadership 
in the field of labor, a Certificate of 
Appreciation from the New York State 
Department of Labor, and a Certificate 
of Merit from the US Department of 
Labor. 

He is married to the former Cathe- 
rine Keane and they have three chil- 
dren, Patrick, Cynthia and Kevin and 
four grandchildren. 




Vice President Campbell with Retired AFL-CIO President 
George Meany during a recent US visit of the secretary of 
the Irish Woodworkers Union, shown at center in the 
AFL-CIO President's office. Campbell has served as a 
fraternal delegate to the Irish Woodworkers' convention. 



IB^****^L. 






B^.^f '^^ii^-h •" ~iu 




,■>(■ 


H** iM^y ^Bp 




rlJM 








( A 






^<^., jlT /A 







As the new year began, Patrick Campbell and William 
Konyha were sworn into their new offices by Retiring 
President William Sidell. The oaths of office were taken in 
the General President's office in a brief ceremony attended 
by the other General Officers. 



As First General Vice President, Pat Campbell becomes 
co-chairman of the National Joint Carpentry Apprenticeship 
and Training Committee. He participated in the NJCATC's 
recent New Orleans meeting, above. Committee Members 
Joe Pinto and Ollie Langhorst are to his right. 




Campbell recently participated in a pin ceremony of Local 
608, New York City. The group included, from left: Paschal 
McGuinness, business manager and secretary-treasurer, Local 
608; Denis Sheil, secretary, New York City District Council; 
Michael Cronin, 50-year member; Local 608 President 
John J. O'Connor; Charles Sweeney, 50-year member; 
and Campbell. 



FEBRUARY, 1980 



Washington 
Report 




RULING ON WILDCATS 

An international union cannot auto- 
matically be held responsible for wild- 
cat strikes by its members, the U.S. 
Supreme Court has ruled. 

In a unanimous decision, the court 
said federal law doesn't declare any 
automatic or implied obligation on a 
parent union to prevent an unauthorized 
walkout by one of its affiliates. 

The decision was seen as a signi- 
ficant victory for the Mine Workers and 
all of organized labor. The court's 
ruling was greeted enthusiastically by 
delegates to the UMWA's convention in 
progress in Denver, and at AFL-CIO 
headquarters here. 

The ruling stemmed from a suit filed 
against the UMWA, its District 17 and 
three Mine Worker locals. 

The company argued that unions serve 
as legal "agents" for their members 
and therefore are responsible if the 
members fail to abide by the terms of 
a contract. 

The court rejected these arguments, 
declaring that a union is responsible 
for a strike during the period covered 
by contract only if it has been 
authorized by the leadership and 
ratified by the membership. 

FROM CHEATING EMPLOYERS 

During Fiscal 1979, a record $98.7 
million was restored to 551,603 workers 
illegally underpaid by their employers, 
according to a year-end report by Labor 
Secretary Ray Marshall. 

The amount recovered for workers 
whose employers violated federal labor 
standards laws was 26% more than the 
$78.1 million restored to 538,197 



workers the previous year, the report 
said. 

Marshall attributed the gain to in- 
creased staff to enforce the law and 
administrative improvements. "The 
Carter Administration," he added, "is 
committed to vigorous enforcement of 
the federal wage and hour laws ; this 
will continue to be a top priority 
with us." 

SOCIAL SECURITY CHANGES 

Last month the maximum amount of 
earnings subject to the Social Security 
tax increased from $22,900 to $25,900. 

The change in the tax base means that 
workers earning above $22,900 will 
have greater protection, because a 
larger amount of their earnings will be 
credited towards benefits than before. 
They will be eligible for higher bene- 
fits in the event of retirement, dis- 
ability or death. 

Other changes, made January 1, man- 
dated by law, include an increase, from 
$260 to $290, in the amount of earnings 
required to earn a quarter of coverage. 
Four quarters of coverage will be 
credited for earnings of $1,160, 
up from $1,040. 

The annual amount that beneficiaries 
may earn without losing any benefits 
increased from $4,000 to $5,000 for 
those aged 65-71 and from $3,480 to 
$3,720 for those under 65. Benefits 
are reduced $1 for every $2 of earnings 
which exceed the ceilings. 



MURPHY RESIGNS BOARD 

A vacancy on the National Labor Re- 
lations Board has been created with the 
resignation of Betty Southard Murphy 
a few days before the expiration of 
her term on the board. 

Murphy, a Republican wrote President 
Carter that she had "decided not to 
accept the offer of an interim appoint- 
ment conveyed to me on your behalf by 
the Dept. of Labor, or renomination for 
a second term" even though "urged by 
both organized labor and the business 
community to remain. " 

AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland said 
that "Mrs. Murphy has done an outstand- 
ing job as chairman and as a member 
of the National Labor Relations Board 
and we regret her resignation. We know, 
however, that she will continue to 
make a real contribution to the im- 
provement of labor-management relations 
in the United States." 

William Lubbers, a 27-year career 
employee of the NLRB and a former top 
aide to Chairman John Fanning, has been 
appointed to fill the vacancy. 



THE CARPENTER 



UUe 'Air' Our First TU Commercial 



This month, the United Brotherhood 
goes on network television on a regu- 
lar schedule for the first time, General 
President William Konyha has an- 
nounced. 

Commencing on February 4 on the 
CBS and ABC television networks, a 
30-second commercial message about 
the United Brotherhood, its skilled 
members, and its role in the com- 
munity will appear on the "CBS 
Evening News with Walter Cronkite" 
beginning at 7 p.m., on most CBS 
network stations and on ABC's "Good 
Morning, America" between 7:30 and 
8 a.m. — six times in February, five 
times in April, once in May, and six 
times in September and October. 

The cover of your Carpenter maga- 
zine, this month, is a "still" from the 
videotape of the commercial. 

The theme of the campaign, which 
ends in October, is "We're Building 
The 20th Century." Highlighted is 
the fact that the Brotherhood is build- 
ing more than buildings and products, 
it is also building character, discipline, 
pride and the whole U.S. and Canadian 
way of life. 

In addition to the 30-second tele- 
vision commercials, the UBC will run 
full-page TV Guide ads during the 
weeks the commercials are shown on 
television. These advertisements ex- 
pand and amplify the role the Brother- 
hood is taking, and has taken, toward 
the building of the 20th century, in- 
cluding community involvement and 
contributions to local activities. 

The first part of the national cam- 
paign is scheduled for the weeks of 
February 4, February 11, February 
25, April 7, April 14 and April 28. 

The television commercial shows 
the hands of a carpenter craftsman 
performing various work processes on 
a piece of wood. Eventually, with 
chisel and jigsaw the wood is trans- 
formed into a completed Brotherhood 
union label which is then affixed to a 
hand-made wooden map of North 
America. While the carpenter's hands 
are at work, the announcer explains 
that these hands are also forming 
social equality, better working condi- 
tions, reaching out in the community 
when needed and that they hold the 
kind of values it takes to be a citizen 
of North America. 

Radio commercials, outdoor bill- 
board materials, newspaper ads as well 
as videotape copies of the television 
commercial and copies of the TV 
Guide ad, are available for any district 



*CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite' 
and ABC's 'Good Morning, America' 
begin series first week in February 



and state councils wishing to amplify 
the national program in their local 
areas. Local and district council lead- 
ers who participate in the promotional 
work can get more information by 
telephoning or writing the General 
Secretary's office in Washington, D.C. 

The ending scene from the television 
commercial (also shown on the front 
cover of this issue of The Carpenter) 
will be used as the illustration for the 
print and outdoor materials. 

This campaign marks the first year 
of a two-year public relations pro- 
gram of the Brotherhood leading up 
to the UBC Centennial in 1981. It 
came about as part of the overall 
organizing directives set up by the 
33rd General Convention in 1978. 

Once again, the Brotherhood is 
taking the lead in carrying the story 
of organized labor to the American 
people. The 1980 advertising cam- 
paign will go a long way in helping 
the public appreciate and understand 
the contributions the Brotherhood and 
the rest of organized labor are making 
to our society. 



\ WATCH FOR IT 

CBS, "Walter Cronkite" 

As we go to press, the UBC com- 
mercial is scheduled to appear "live" 
on 172 CBS network affiliate stations 
and "delayed" on 21 additional sta- 
tions. Check your local time and 
listings. "CBS Evening News" begins 
at 7 p.m. Eastern Daylight Saving 
Time. The dates are as follows: 

February 4, 8, 12, 14, 25, 27 
April 8, 10, 14, 16, 29 
May 2 

September 8, 11, 16, 19, 29 
October 1 

ABC "Good Morning, America" 

The Brotherhood commercial will 
also appear on almost all stations of 
the ABC network. "Good Morning, 
America" begins at 7 a.m. Eastern 
Daylight Saving Time on most East 
Coast ABC stations. The dates are as 
follows: 

February 4, 6, 12, 14, 27, 29 
April 7, 9, 15, 17, 29 
May 1 

September 8, 10, 16, 18 
October 1, 3. 

1 CLIP AND SAVE i 



Sidell Named to Panama Canal Supervisory Board 




William Sidell, who retired as General President of the United Brotherhood on 
December 31, was invited to the White House in mid-December, along with new 
General President William Konyha, to receive the best wishes of President Jimmy 
Carter. At that time. President Carter expressed the hope that our retiring officer 
would be able to continue to serve the public good. He subsequently nominated Sidell 
to the Panama Canal Commission Supervisory Board. Our former General President 
accepted, and, early in January, his appointment was confirmed. The new position will 
bring Sidell to Washington, D.C, from time to time for meetings of this governmental 
body. 



FEBRUARY, 1980 




Carpenters Were 
Prime movers 
Of US-Canadian 
Labor movement 



Administrative, organizing, legislative skills of early Brotherhood 
leaders helped to launch American Federation of Labor 



In the decades following the American 
Civil War, labor and industry in North 
America were undergoing drastic change. 
This was the period of the so-called 
"Industrial Revolution." 

Immigrants from Europe were pouring 
into the ports of Montreal, New York, 
Baltimore, and New Orleans, and the 
great American West was opening up. 
The Prairie Provinces of Canada were 
being homesteaded, and the timber indus- 
tries of the Pacific Northwest were in 
their infancy. 

This was a time when labor and man- 
agement clashed outside the steel mills 
of Pennsylvania, and iron and steel ty- 
coons brought in Pinkerton men as strike- 
breakers, when child labor worked in the 
coal mines, and radical, socialist thought 
moved in from Europe in an attempt to 
divide capital and labor in class strife. 

It was a time when sound minds and 
cool heads were needed to represent US 
and Canadian workers in their endless 
struggle for a better way of life. 

Fortunately, in those days, sound 
minds and cool heads appeared and pre- 
vailed — many of them Carpenters and 
Joiners, the founders of our organization. 
When you look at the record, the early 
leaders of our union were architects of 
the North American trade union move- 
ment . . . the master builders of a unique 
and democratic form of labor-manage- 
ment relations. 

The Noble Order of Knights of Labor 
had been founded by a small group of 
clothing cutters in Philadelphia in 1869, 
and its first Grand Master Workman, 
Uriah Stephens, declared that the Knights 
were not a political organization, or even 
a trade union organization, as we know 
them today. The Noble Order was "more 
and higher. ... It is the parent of prin- 
ciples, the house of reforms and educator 
of the masses." It was, in fact, a secret 
society which set about organizing any 
and all workers into some kind of mass 
organization which could accomplish 
little. 

The Socialist Movement, meanwhile, 
had come along and inspired several 
early trade union leaders with its talk of 
the struggles of the masses and labor 



versus capital. 

Through it all, there moved the old- 
time guilds and trade unions founded 
during the colonial period of North 
America along more practical lines — the 
Printers, the Molders, the Bakers, the 
Carpenters, and others. 

Samuel Gompers, the Cigarmakers' 
leader, had turned away from the radical 
elements of the workers movement when 
he saw radicals fighting police at Tomp- 
kins Square in a New York City riot. 

Peter McGuire had been a leader of 
the Workingmen's Party, a Socialist 
group designed to aid workers through 
political action, but he soon realized that 
the boycott, craft organization, and 
strong organizing was needed, if workers 
were to achieve their bread-and-butter 
goals. 

Gabriel Edmonston, a leader of a 
small federation of unions in Washing- 
ton, DC, learned of McGuire's efforts 
to unite Carpenters and Joiners all over 
North America, and he, too, turned to 
practical trade union activity and ignored 
the philosophical, mystical efforts of the 
Knights of Labor. 

McGuire was a firm believer in a 
united movement. In 1881 he launched 
The Carpenter in St. Louis, Mo., a four- 
page journal designed to organize the 
unorganized in the craft and he sent out 
a call for the first convention of "The 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners." 

The noted labor historian, Philip 
Taft, wrote of him: "He gave himself 
unsparingly to his own organization and 
to the general labor movement. In the 
first two decades of its existence, Mc- 
Guire was a tower of strength to the 
American Federation of Labor. He di- 
rected his own union, and he also con- 
tributed innumerable hours to organizing 
workers in other trades and negotiated 
with employers on their behalf. Few im- 
portant decisions were made without his 
advice." 

McGuire was "a comrade in arms" to 
Samuel Gompers, the first president of 
the American Federation of Labor. He 
served as secretary of the AFL, while 
Edmonston served as treasurer, and 
Gompers as president — two Carpenters 



and a Cigarmaker. Philip Taft notes 
that when McGuire was in ill health in 
later years, Gompers showed a deep con- 
cern for "the welfare of the man who, 
second only to him, might well be re- 
garded as the architect of the American 
Federation of Labor." Most Americans 
and Canadians know McGuire, also as 
"The Father of Labor Day" — the man 
who achieved this great workers' holi- 
day. 

It was Gabriel Edmonston and the 
Brotherhood, however, who officially 
launched organized labor's continent-wide 
drive for an eight-hour work day in the 
1880's. He introduced a resolution to 
that effect in the 1884 convention of the 
Federation of Trades and Labor Unions 
(which was the forerunner of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor, established in 
1886). The resolution decreed "that eight 
hours shall constitute a legal day's labor 
from and after May 1, 1886, and that 
we recommend to labor organizations 
throughout this jurisdiction that they so 
direct their laws as to conform to this 
resolution by the time named." 

The Knights of Labor opposed the 
move and the trade union affiliates of 
the Federation were not able to achieve 
the eight-hour day by May 1, 1886, 
so the Carpenters were asked to lead 
the fight for eventual success. For a 
time Edmonston also served as secre- 
tary of the Federation, while also serving 
as president of the Brotherhood, and 
later, when Peter McGuire died, William 
Huber, a later President of the Brother- 
hood, joined the AFL Council and took 
up the fight for an eight-hour day. 

Union carpenters and joiners had been 
formed as small unions and guilds since 
the Colonial period of North America, 
and when the time came to pull the 
scattered groups of organized workers to- 
gether into a federation in the late 19th 
Century, they were ready with experience 
and a truly democratic philosophy to lead 
the way to an evolutionary system, de- 
void of the stresses of politics and 
tyranny which have plagued the labor 
movements in many other countries of 
the world. This is a heritage of which we 
can be justly proud today. 



THE CARPENTER 




Ship carpenters and caulkers were among the earliest advocates of 
the shorter workday in North America. In 1832 Boston shipyard 
workers struck for a 10-hour day and lost, though they did achieve 
"two hours intermission at noon" to combat the extreme heat and the 
cholera epidemic. 




Peter McGuire was 20 when this picture 
was made. He had just entered appren- 
ticeship in New York as a joiner. 




Gabriel Edmonston of 
Washington, D.C., was the 
first general president of the 
United Brotherhood. He was 
also the first treasurer 
of the American Federation 
of Labor when that organi- 
zation operated on a budget 
of approximately $500 a 
year. Edmonston lobbied for ■ 
the eight-hour day before 
the US Congress, as the 
Brotherhood led the fight for 
a shorter workday. 




THE CARPENTER. 




Volume 1, Number 1 of The Carpenter was published 
in St. Louis, Mo. in May 1881, just months before the 
founding of the Brotherhood and the Federation of 
Organized Trades and Labor Unions, predecessor of 
the AFL. The Carpenter was a strong advocate of 
national and international trade unionism. 



Peter McGuire, left, with an early associate in the American 
labor movement. McGuire was ready at all times to assist local 
unions in other trades to form their own national organizations. 
(Pictures of McGuire on this page were recently supplied to 
us by McGuire's granddaughter, Mrs. Iris Rossel of Collings- 
wood, N.J.) 



FEBRUARY, 1980 



Louisiana, Oregon, Illinois Contestants 
Win Top Honors in 79 Carpentry 
Apprentice Contest 




Contestants leave the Fairmont Hotel before day- 
break with their tool boxes, ready to begin their 
manipulative tests. 



They enter the Rivergate for breakfast at 6:30 
a.m., a briefing at 7:30, and they start work at 
8 a.m. to the sound of a whistle. 



Contestants from Oregon, Illinois, 
and the host state of Louisiana took 
top honors in the 1979 International 
Carpentry Apprenticeship Contest, 
December 5 and 6, at the Rivergate 
Coliseum in New Orleans, La. 

There was a total of 76 carpenter, 
mill-cabinet, and millwright contest- 
ants in the 13th annual competition of 
fourth-year apprentices. They came 
from 38 states, the District of Colum- 
bia, and five Canadian provinces, and 
they competed for $9,500 in cash 
prizes and a wide array of trophies 
and plaques. 

The contest is sponsored by the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, the Associated 
General Contractors, and the National 
Association of Home Builders in a 
joint labor-management effort to fur- 
ther the cause of quality craft training 
in carpentry and related skills. 

Contestants undergo a four-hour 
written test and a grueling eight-hour 
manipulative test. While thousands of 
spectators watched, the carpentry ap- 
prentices built a complex concrete 



form and a workbench, the mill- 
cabinet apprentices assembled an office 
counter with shelves, a mail slot, a 
countertop, and a locked cabinet door, 
and the millwright apprentices pro- 
duced an all-metal array of gears, 
chains, ball bearings, and sprocket. 

Carpenters' apprenticeship and 
training director, First General Vice 
President William Konyha called the 
1979 contest one of the best in the 13 
years of competition. 

The competition was close, as 16 
judges with clipboards and score sheets 
moved among the 20-foot-square en- 
closures, rating each contestant under 
a point system. Each contestant bore a 
number, and there was no identifica- 
tion as to name or sponsor, so that 
even the judges did not know who the 
winners might be until the final tally. 

There were a total of 1 1 winners in 
the competition — five in carpentry and 
three each in mill-cabinet and mill- 
wright crafts. They were as follows: 
Albert Pitts of Shreveport, La., first 
place carpenter; Gary Philbin, Fuller- 
ton. Calif., second place carpenter; 
Steve Anderson, Fayetteville, Ark., 



third place carpenter; Florian Pikula, 
Kelowna, B.C., fourth place carpenter; 
and Charles Rauchut, Jr., Philadelphia, 
Pa., fifth place carpenter; John Mona- 
han, Chicago, 111., first place mill- 
cabinet; Richard Kuhn, Pittsburgh, 
Pa., second place mill-cabinet; and 
Paul Ignelzi, New York City, third 
place mill-cabinet; Derryl Cummings, 
Portland, Ore., first place millwright; 
Andrew Dobbie, Hamilton, Ont., sec- 
ond place millwright; and Jeff Area, 
Oakland, Calif., third place millwright. 

This marked the first time since the 
competition began in 1967 that the 
states of Arkansas and Louisiana have 
had winners. The winners circle has 
been largely dominated by the states 
of California, Pennsylvania, Michigan, 
and the province of British Columbia. 

The 1980 contest will be held in 
Cleveland, O., and the 1981 contest is 
scheduled for Denver, Colo. 

A training conference for appren- 
ticeship instructors and coordinators 
was held at the Fairmont Hotel in 
New Orleans preceding the 1979 con- 
test. More than 900 persons attended 
this conference. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



1 



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Top Left: /I New Orleans television 
newscaster and crew film a news segment 
at the Rivergate contest site. 
Top Right: The Crane and Rigging Assn., 
represented by John Johnson, director, 
right, presented an award for the first 
time to the millwright champion. 
Champion Cummings is shown with 
General President Konyha and Retired 
General President Sidell. 
Far Left: Contestants and their wives 
enjoyed a breakfast in the Emerald Ball- 
room of the headquarters hotel. 
Left: Judges in a last-minute huddle 
before a manipulative test. 




THE PRIZE-WINNING ELEVEN with General President William Konyha, first row left, and Retired President 
William Sidell. first row, right. The contest winners include, starting second from left, front row: First Place Mill- 
wright Derryl Cummings, First Place Mill-Cabinet John Monahan, and First Place Carpenter Albert Pitts. Second 
row, from left: Third Place Mill-Cabinet Paul Ignelzi, Third Place Carpenter Steve Anderson, Second Place Mill- 
wright Andrew Dobbie, Second Place Mill-Cabinet Richard Kuhn, Third Place Millwright Jeff Area, Second Place 
Carpenter Gary Philbin, Fifth Place Carpenter Charles Rauchut, Jr., and Fourth Place Carpenter Florian Pikula. 



FEBRUARY, 1980 



11 



Contest Ends 
With Coin 
Awards Banquet 
Rt Heui Orleans 
Hotel 





December 7 became an historic date 
for 1 1 contestants in the 1 3th Annual 
International Carpentry Apprentice- 
ship Contest. On the night of Decem- 
ber 7 at a large and sumptuous banquet 
in the Fairmont Hotel in New Orleans, 
La., they were declared winners in the 
1979 competition. 

The awards banquet drew a large 
gathering of contestants, wives, spon- 
sors, coordinators, and labor and man- 
agement leaders to the big hotel ball- 



Above: An array 
of trophies await 
winners, as former 
First Vice Pres. 
Konyha opens the 
ceremonies. 



Left: It was retir- 
ing President 
Sidell's last official 
speech, and he 
received a standing 
ovation. 



It was the last official function for 
William Konyha as Brotherhood Ap- 
prenticeship and Training Director be- 
fore assuming the office of the General 
President, and, in his opening remarks 
at the banquet, Konyha praised the 
work of the contestants over the past 
two days and indicated pride in the 
steady progress being made in the year- 
round international training program. 

Master of ceremonies was Richard 
W. Schwertner, Philadelphia, Pa., con- 
tractor, who serves as co-chairman of 



the National Joint Carpentry Appren- 
ticeship and Training Committee. 
There were welcoming addresses by 
D. P. LaBorde, St., executive secre- 
tary of the New Orleans District 
Council, and Angelo Flores, vice pres- 
ident of Gulf Engineering. 

Representatives of each of the three 
contest sponsors addressed the banquet 
—Thomas E. Dailey, senior vice presi- 
dent of the Associated General Con- 
tractors; Marlin Grant, National As- 
sociation of Home Builders representa- 
tive on the NJCATC; and Retiring 
President William Sidell. 

Sidell received a standing ovation. 
He told the audience that this would 
be his last major speech before retire- 
ment, and he found it fitting that he 
should address a group of young and 
capable apprentices about to go into 
the ranks of skilled journeymen, carry- 
ing on the century-old traditions of the 
Brotherhood. He expressed pride in the 
fact that the Brotherhood was one of 
the first unions to lift age limitations 
from apprenticeship training and that, 
over the years, the Brotherhood has 
worked so successfully with manage- 
ment in the ongoing, joint training 
program. 




Richard Schwertner 
Co-Chairman, NJCA TC 



D. P. LaBorde, Sr. 
Sec, New Orleans, DC 



Angelo Flores 
Gulf Engineering 



Thomas E. Dailey 
Senior VP, AGC 



Marlin Grant 
NAHB 



12 



THE CARPENTER 





ECONOMICALLY. 



1980 CHEVY EL CAMINO. Here's a downright practical half-tonner. Hardworking 
Chevy El Camino sports a 6^-ft. pickup box with payloads up to 1250 lbs., including cargo, 
equipment and passengers. Check the impressive mileage ratings. Our closest sales com- 
petitor offers nothing like it at all. A big plus this year is Chevrolet's three-year Perforation- 
From-Corrosion Limited Warranty. See your Chevy dealer for details. Ask him about leasing, too. 



DOUBLE-WALL CONSTRUCTION 
IN CARGO BOX WALLS HELPS 
PREVENT INSIDE DENTS FROM 
SHOWING ON THE OUTSIDE. 



CONCEALED STORAGE AND SPARE 
TIRE COMPARTMENT. THE SPARE 
TIRE INCLUDES EXTRACTOR FOR 
EASY REMOVAL 



STANDARD AIR-ADJUSTABLE 
SHOCKS WITH VALVE CON- 
VENIENTLY LOCATED 
INSIDE FUEL FILLER DOOR. 



CHEVY PICKUPS ARE EQUIPPED WITH 
GM-BUILT ENGINES PRODUCED 
BY VARIOUS DIVISIONS. SEE YOUR DEALER 
FOR DETAILS. 




EPA EST. MPG 



EST. HWY. 



20 26 



TOUCH MILEAGE TO BEAT 

Remember: Compare the "estimated MPG" to the 
"estimated MPG" of other vehicles. You may get dif- 
ferent mileage, depending on how fast you drive, j 
weather conditions, and trip length. Actual highway 
mileage will probably be less than the estimated 
highway fuel economy Lower in California. 



Carpentry Contestants 

IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER BY STATES AND PROVINCES 

Pictures at right show (I) a contestant taking his transit 
test and (2) Brotherhood Training Dept. Staffer John 
Casinghino discussing plans with Coordinating Judge 
Dick Hutchinson. 



1st Place 

LOUISIANA 

ALBERT LEON PITTS, 
25, of Local 764, Shreve- 
port, La., took top honors 
in carpentry at New 
Orleans. He has a brother, 
Chester, in Local 764, and 
has worked for Whittaker 
Construction, the Burden 
Co., the Austin Co., and 
the Werner Co. He 
switched to carpentry 
apprenticeship after attend- 
ing Louisiana Tech. He 
and his wife, Gail, live in 
Shreveport, where he hopes 
to eventually build a home 
"when interest rates go 
down." 




2nd Place 

CALIFORNIA 

GARY PHILBIN, 24, of 
Riverside, Calif., comes out 
of Local 2308 and the 
Orange County Apprentice- 
ship Training Center. He 
once attended the Univer- 
sity of California at Santa 
Cruz and Cal State at Long 
Beach. His work experience 
has been with John D. Lusk 
& Son and F. J. Grode, 
General Contractor. Philbin 
says he'd like to eventually 
contract for residential 
units. Meanwhile, he and 
his wife, Rosemary, enjoy 
dune buggying in their 
spare time. 




The written test 
was a four-hour 
activity worth 
20% of the final 
score for carpen- 
ters and 25% each 
for millwrights 
and mill-cabinet 
members. 





3rd Place /^SSm 




ARKANSAS J0 \M 




STEVE ANDERSON, 29, jW -^^^W 




is gaining cratt experience 4S 




with employers like Mid 1 1 J-A 




South Partitions, the Austin 




Co., the Baldwin Co., and r^W 




others, while building his v< 




own log home for his wife, 




Mary, and two voung sons. r*M J\ 




He attended the University WU \ 




of Illinois for two years _*r 




before moving into appren- 




ticeship with Local 1249 at 




Fayetteville. 1 





4th Place 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

FLORIAN PIKULA, 27, 
of Winfield, B.C., started 
his four-year apprentice- 
ship training with gusto. He 
built his own home for 
himself and his wife Janet 
during his first year. Then 
he went on to work for 
Kennedy-Elmslie Construc- 
tion, Ltd., of Kelowna. He 
has obtained his training at 
Okanagan College in 
Kelowna, and he is an 
active member of Local 
1370. 




5th Place 

PENNSYLVANIA 

CHARLES RAUCHUT, 
JR., 24, represented Local 
8 and the Philadelphia 
Apprenticeship Training 
School. Married to Kath- 
leen and the father of three 
young daughters, Rauchut 
has ambitions to become a 
foreman some day and to 
design and build his own 
home. Meanwhile, he is 
employed by J. J. White 
and the Altman Company, 
as he completes his final 
year of training. 







f 




* 

He 









14 



THE CARPENTER 



ALABAMA 




SIDNEY McMINN, 28, 
has been training under the 
Birmingham Joint Appren- 
ticeship Training Program. 
He lives with his wife, 
Connie, and baby daughter 
in Cullman, Ala., and be- 
longs to Local 2011. He 
attended Jacksonville State 
University for a time 
before entering apprentice- 
ship. He has worked for 
Blount Bros., Brice Build- 
ing Co., and Domitt 
Construction. 

ALBERTA 




ALEX KINASEWICH, 26, 
is now back in Edmonton, 
Alta., remodeling and 
extending his house and 
working for PCL. He's also 
completing his training in 
Edmonton as a member of 
Local 1325. Kinasewich 
has a BA degree from the 
University of Alberta, a 
wife, Pearl, and a five-year- 
old son Aaron. 




ARIZONA 




JUDD STARR, 30, is a 
member of Local 857. He 
attended high school in 
Minnesota and, later, Pima 
Community College in 
Tucson. Completing his 
apprenticeship training in 
Tucson, he is employed by 
Codd Construction. His 
wife Carole's father, Cal 
Hackworth, is also a mem- 
ber of Local 857. 

CONNECTICUT 




A contestant takes his 
transit test. 



RAYMOND BARB1ERI, 
22, and a member of Local 
24, Central Connecticut, is 
the son of Joseph Barbieri 
of Local 43 of Hartford. He 
is completing his training 
at the Wilcox Technical 
School in Meriden and he 
has worked for Eagle 
Cement Contractors and 
Anderson Fairooks Inc. 
Single, he lives in Torring- 
ton and builds and races 
cars in his spare time. 




DAVID IAN WILLSON, 

23, has two brothers in the 
trade — Reg and Rob. Reg 
is a member of Local 55 
and David and his brother 
Rob are members of Local 
1396 of Golden, Colo. 
David's training has been 
in Denver, and he is em- 
ployed by Weaver Con- 
struction. He is single and 
lives in Wheatridge. 



DISTRICT OF 
COLUMBIA 




CLIFTON CARLTON is a 
member of Local 132, as is 
his father, Harvey Carlton. 
He works for Skinker & 
Garrett Construction. He 
and his wife Donna and 
daughter live in Hyattsville, 
Md. 



FLORIDA 




RICHARD BISCOMB, 28, 
is a member of Local 2139, 
Tallahassee, and he is 
obtaining work experience 
with Winchester Construc- 
tion Co. He once attended 
Baldwin-Wallace College 
but is now in apprentice- 
ship training in Tallahassee. 
He is single, building a 
home and hopes to some 
day operate a small sawmill. 



GEORGIA 




RICHARD YOUNG, 22, 
of Local 256 is married, 
and he and wife Jeanne 
live in Savannah. He 
attended Windsor Forest 
High School and then went 
into apprenticeship training. 
E. L. Thompson Drywall 
Co. is his employer. He 
hopes to pick up some 
engineering courses. 



HAWAII 




STEVEN MOR1HARA, 
23, took the longest journey 
of all to compete in the 
New Orleans contest. He 
came from Honolulu and 
Local 745. His brother 
Mark also belongs to Local 
745. He is employed by 
Dura Constructors Inc. 

ILLINOIS 




MICHAEL POLCZYN- 
SKI, 23, comes out of the 
Tri-Counties Training Pro- 
gram and Local 480. He has 
worked for four construc- 
tion firms in the Belleville 
area, including Haege Con- 
struction. He has a brother 
Tom in Local 480. He 
plans to marry Judy Haege 
next August. 

INDIANA 




JEFFREY COURT- 
RIGHT, 23, is completing 
his training with the 
Northwest Indiana JATC. 
He works for Brant Con- 
struction of Griffith. He's 
married and has two 
children and lives in 
Griffith. Local 599 is his 
local union. Courtright 
enjoys running and par- 
ticipates in long distance 
road races. 



FEBRUARY, 1980 



15 



Carpentry 

Contestants, 

continued 



IOWA 







KENTUCKY 



STEVEN JOHN 
MICHAEL, 24, is training 
with the Five Rivers Dis- 
trict Apprenticeship Pro- 
gram at Cedar Rapids. He 
works for Chester Con- 
struction Co. of Marion. 
A member of Local 308, 
he and his wife Debora 
have two children and live 
in Walker, la. 

KANSAS 




WAYNE BENNETT, 22, 
has gained work skills with 
various AGC contractors in 
the area of his Local 1445, 
Topeka. His training has 
been with the Topeka, 
Lawrence Joint Apprentice- 
ship Training Center. He is 
single and lives in Eskridge, 
Kans. 







CYRIL SCHMITT, 27, 
was sponsored by the Falls 
City Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee. He and his wife 
Robin and two children live 
in Jeffersontown. He built 
his own house there in 
1977. A member of Local 
64, he is employed by 
Whittenberg Engineering 
and Construction Co. of 
Louisville. Schmitt attended 
the University of Kentucky 
for one year before entering 
apprenticeship. 

MANITOBA 




STAN JONASSON, Local 
343, was sponsored by the 
Carpenters Trade Improve- 
ment Fund of Winnipeg. 
He is married, and he and 
his wife Barbara live in 
Winnipeg. Koko Platz 
Builders of Portage La 
Prairie, Manitoba, is giving 
him on-the-job skills. 



MARYLAND 




VERNON R. PATTEN, 
26, is completing his train- 
ing in Baltimore. He works 
for Peter Kiewit Sons Co. 
A member of Local 1354, 
Patten is the grandson of 
another Brotherhood mem- 
ber, Russell Findley of 
Daytona Beach, Fla. He 
and his wife Deborah live 
in Edgewood with two 
young daughters. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

. • • • 




JOHN J. THOMAS, Local 
33, age 31, represented 
his state. He and his 
wife Nancy have a two- 
year-old son Jeffrey. He is 
completing training with 
the Boston JATC and is 
employed by Erection 
Specialties, Macomber Co., 
and Barletta. He lives in 
Randolrh. 



MICHIGAN 



Throughout this section of The 
IH Carpenter are pictures of the Interna- 

ls tional Carpentry Apprenticeship Con- 

B. test in New Orleans, La. Many spon- 

B sors, visitors, and participants have 

t. asked how they may obtain prints of 

5 these pictures which were taken by 

** the official photographer. 

3 We have arranged with our photog- 

™ rapher to supply 8" X 10" glossy 

~ prints at a nominal cost to all who 

request them. 



Simply list the pictures you wish to 
order. (Please describe fully, includ- 
ing page number and, where it is in- 
dicated, the names and identifica- 
tions.) Each print costs $4.00, which 
covers handling and mailing. State the 
quantity of each photo desired and 
send your order with your name and 
address plus cash, check or money 
order (payable to The Carpenter) to: 
Carpenter Contest Photos, Carpenter 
Magazine, 101 Constitution Ave., 



16 




MICHAEL MEASEL, 23, 
expects to start work on a 
house for himself and his 
wife Rose in the spring. 
Meanwhile, he works for 
Distinctive Carpentry and 
trains with the Detroit 
JATC. He is a member of 
Local 674 as are his father, 
Donald, Sr.; an uncle, 
Bud Dotter, and a 
brother, Donald, Jr. He 
lives in Utica. 



MINNESOTA 




PAUL HEINS, 28, attended 
junior college in Rochester, 
Minn., before going into 
apprenticeship training with 
Local 1382. He has been 
employed by the Kruse Co. 
and Alexander Builders, 
Inc., and he'd like to 
eventually become a home 
builder in his hometown of 
Elgin, where he lives with 
his wife and two children. 



N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. 

Following the Awards Banquet, 
pictures were taken of several state 
and provincial groups with the win- 
ners. Prints of these photographs may 
also be ordered as described above. 

Some of these groups and their 
code numbers for ordering prints are 
as follows: 

California winners and group . . . 
Roll l,No. 2 

New Jersey winner and group . . . 



THE CARPENTER 



! 



MISSISSIPPI 




GARY RICE, 26, is a 
member of Local 471, 
Jackson. He lives with his 
wife Rebecca in the small 
community of Terry. Rice 
says he is trying to get a 
one-man sawmill into oper- 
ation, and he plans to build 
a house "from scratch." 
. . . then "have about 10 
kids and let life run its 
course." Meanwhile, he 
works for Campbell Con- 
struction Co. An uncle, 
Warren Rice, is also a 
member of the Brother- 
hood. 

MISSOURI 




STANLEY JONES, 25, 
went from Hillcrest High 
School into apprenticeship 
training in Springfield. He 
is a member of Local 978 
and has worked for Carson, 
Mitchel, and Wirt Corps. 
He and his wife, Becky, 
have two children — Mary, 
four years, and Christy, six 
months. 




Roll 1, No. 5 
)range County, Calif. . . . 

Roll l,No. 6 
!ittsburgh winner and group . . . 

Roll 1, No. 7 
llinois winner and group . . . 

Roll 5, No. 29 
ouisiana winner and group . . . 

Roll 5, No. 30 
)ist. 6 with Arkansas winner . . . 

Roll 5, No. 33 
tagon winner . . . Roll 5, No. 35 



MONTANA 




• r*x 



DAVID POWELL, 27, 
hails from Helena and he 
spent four years in the US 
Air Force and two years 
with Helena Vocational 
Tech before moving into 
apprenticeship with Local 
153. He has been employed 
by Watters Construction. 
He and his wife, Becky, 
live in Helena, and among 
other pastimes, he likes 
fishing with his son, Danny. 



NEBRASKA 




DAVID NELSON, 22, is 
single and he lives in 
Omaha, where he is a mem- 
ber of Local 400. Nelson 
enjoys furniture making as 
a hobby. He is employed 
by several area firms — 
Cagle Inc., Murray Dry- 
wall, Commonwealth 
Electric, Johns Mansville, 
and others. 




fe — 



ROBERT McGINNIS, 27, 
has a BA degree from the 
University of Nebraska. He 
began apprenticeship train- 
ing in Lincoln, Neb., and 
completed it in Las Vegas, 
Nev. He belongs to Local 
1780 and works for Del 
Webb. He and his wife, 
Linda, live in Las Vegas. 



NEW JERSEY 





VINCENT SANTILLI, 28, 
is a member of Local 2250. 
He grew up on Staten 
Island but now lives in 
Long Branch, N.J. He has 
attended the Stevens Insti- 
tute and the New York 
Institute of Technology. 
His employer is Hall 
Construction. 



NEW YORK 



PAUL KUYKENDALL, a 
member of Local 943, lives 
in Tulsa with his wife, 
Stephanie, who is expecting 
their first child in July. He 
was his local's outstanding 
apprentice in 1977 and 
1979. He works for the 
Williams Company 

ONTARIO 




ERIC ANDERSON, 22, is 
a member of Local 20, as 
is his father, Edwin 
Anderson. He is single and 
lives in New York City 
and attends the NYC 
District Council Carpenters 
Apprentice School. His 
employer is E. F. 
Hauserman. Eric enjoys 
skiing and working on cars. 

OHIO 




NORMAN GRAWERT, 
23, is a member of Local 
27. He lives in Scarborough 
with his wife, Ruth. He is 
the son of Walter Grawert, 
also a member of Local 27. 
He's obtaining his work 
experience with Ontario 
Hydro and his classroom 
instruction with Local 27 
and the provincial council. 
Grawert is an outdoorsman 
and enjoys hunting, fishing 
and camping. 

OREGON 



DAVID MONTGOMERY, 

25, belongs to Canton, O., 
Local 69 and he works for 
Valentine Concrete Inc. 
He's single, lives in Massil- 
lon and plans to "enjoy 
life, stay in the trade and 
become a good carpenter." 




DALE HIRSCH, 27, of 

Local 1707 works for his 
father, Norman Hirsch, a 
member of Local 1707, who 
operates Hirsch Construc- 
tion of Longview, Wash. 
Dale's brother, Mark, is 
also a member of the local 
union. Apprenticeship 
training has been obtained 
at Lower Columbia 
College. Hirsch and his 
wife, Pam, have two 
children. 



FEBRUARY, 1980 



17 



Carpentry 

Contestants, 

continued 

RHODE ISLAND 




PAUL LANDRY, 22, is the 
third member of his family 
to belong to Local 342 of 
Providence. Other family 
members include his father, 
Paul, and his brother, 
Steve. The younger Paul is 
completing his classroom 
instruction at Carpenters 
Hall in Warwick, and he 
works for E. W. Burnam 
Construction of Warwick. 
He and his wife Marie 
have a young son, a third 
generation Paul. 

SASKATCHEWAN 




GLEN STRONG of Local 

1867 lives with his wife 
Dianne in Regina. He's 
completing his training at 
the Saskatchewan Technical 
Institute in Moose Jaw, 
and he's employed by 
Builders Contract Ltd of 
Regina. His brother Lloyd 
is also a Brotherhood 
member. Glen has a busy 
sideline, too. He composes 
music, and has already had 
his first recording circulat- 
ing. 



TENNESSEE 




WASHINGTON 



ROBERT TINKER, 24, or 
Hixson, Tenn., was the out- 
standing apprentice in Local 
74 during his third year of 
training. He trains 
in Chattanooga and has 
been employed by Gil- 
breath Construction, 
Parker Construction, and 
other local firms. He and 
his wife, Debra, hope to 
have their own home soon. 

TEXAS 




DAVID FLETCHER, 22, 
comes out of Austin, Tex., 
industrial schools and 
Local 1266. He has worked 
for R. C. Gray Construc- 
tion and Zapata Warrior 
Construction. He and his 
wife, Karen, raise registered 
Afghan hounds at their 
home in Leander, Texas. 

UTAH 




MICHAEL VAUGHN, 24, 
likes competition. He was 
a wrestler in West High 
School and was an expert- 
class desert motorcycle 
racer. He joined the Salt 
Lake City JATC program 
and Local 184, began work- 
ing for Christiansen Bros., 
Inc. He and his wife, 
Lorrie, have a son, Joshua. 




JOHN R. DAVIS, 27, of 
Spanaway, Wash., and 
Local 470 works with his 
hands. He enjoys working 
with stained glass, pottery, 
old cars and furniture. And 
he's also a skilled young 
carpenter, training at the 
school in Tacoma and 
working for Hansen, 
Hansen & Johnson of 
Sumner, Wash. He and his 
wife, Marta, have a four- 
month-old son, Mark. 

WEST VIRGINIA 




DONALD WOLFE, 25, of 
Morgantown and Local 
1339 would like to teach 
apprenticeship classes him- 
self some day. Meanwhile, 
he's completing his training 
with the North Central 
West Virginia District 
Council, and he has worked 
for four firms in his area, 
gaining experience. Donald 
is the son of Clifford Wolfe 
of Local 1339. He and his 
wife, Beverly, are expecting 
their first child in May. 




DONALD JOCHEM, 28, 
completed high school on 
Guam in the Western 
Pacific. When his family 
moved to the mainland, he 
enrolled for a time at the 
University of Wisconsin at 
Madison. In September, 
1975, he joined the appren- 
ticeship program of Local 
314. Like most of the con- 
testants, he hopes to 
eventually move into 
supervisory jobs in the 
trade. He works for O. E. 
Madsen & Son. He and his 
wife, Laurie, live in 
Mazomanie. 

WYOMING 




WADE CROTTEAU, 24, 
follows in the footsteps of 
his father, Norman J. 
Crotteau. Both are mem- 
bers of Local 1564. Wade 
works for Lower & Co., 
Inc., and he is completing 
his training in Casper. 
Young Crotteau and his 
wife, Bonnie, have a year- 
old son, Jason, and they 
live in Casper. 




18 



THE CARPENTER 



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for longer blade life. Improved dust clearance. 
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FEBRUARY, 1980 



19 



mill-Cabinet Contestants 

IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER BY STATES AND PROVINCES 



1st Place 

ILLINOIS 

JOHN R. MONAHAN, 
24 and single, is completing 
his training at the Wash- 
burne Trade School in 
Chicago. He is a member 
of Local 1922, and he 
hopes to some day become 
a foreman or supervisor, 
after gaining some "draft- 
ing room" experience. 
Employed by the Equip- 
ment Manufacturing Co., 
he lives in Midlothian, III. 
Monahan relaxes with 
volleyball, Softball, camp- 
ing, and hiking. 




7nri Plnrp 

PENNSYLVANIA 

RICHARD P. KUHN, JR., 
24, of Pittsburgh, Pa., and 
Local 1160 plies his trade 
with the Giltspur Industrial 
Exhibits Co. His major 
craft interest is creating 
solid wood iuniture for 
his home, which he shares 
with wife, Mary Pamela, 
and daughter, Jamie. He 
plans to set up a complete 
shop in his basement where 
he can pursue his furni- 
ture-building hobby. After 
he completed high school, 
Kuhn took additional craft 
training at Connelley Skill 
Learning School. 




3rd Place 

NEW YORK 

PAUL IGNELZI, 23, is 
completing his training at 
the New York City District 
Council Labor Technical 
College. He is a member 
of Local 1164, and he 
works for Craftsman 
Woodwork. He attended 
Queensboro College for 
a time after Holy Cross 
High School. He and his 
wife, Linda, live in White- 
stone, N.Y. 






* Vv 


%7 , * * " 











BRITISH COLUMBIA 



COLORADO 




WILFRED STURHAHN, 
23, says he hopes to "get 
rich and retire" some day, 
and he has made a good 
start with BC Millworks 
Products, a Vancouver 
firm. A former student of 
Vancouver Technical 
School, Sturhahn is 
married, and he and his 
wife, Kathryn, have an ll- 
month-old son, Kristofer. 



CALIFORNIA 




MATTHEW GOLDSTEIN, 
22, plans to open his own 
cabinet shop some day, but 
he's now employed by Jay 
Tee Supply Co. and is a 
member of Local 2095. 
Goldstein lives in Petaluma 
with his wife, Teri Lynn. 
He collects old tools and 
enjoys talking with the 
oldtimers in the trade. 




DANIEL VULETICH, 24, 
of Denver Local 1583 is 
single and is employed 
by Hughes and Company 
of the Mile High City. He 
has an uncle in the trade 
— Frank Greco, also of 
Local 1583. Vuletich also 
collects old tools, and he 
has begun assembling 
foreign coins. He is also 
purchasing some craft 
machinery to pursue his 
trade. 



DISTRICT OF 
COLUMBIA 




RICHARD K. ROBIN- 
SON, 27, of Hyattsville, 
Md., represented the DC 
metropolitan area in the 
contest. He attended 
Northwestern High School 
and the University of 
Maryland before entering 
apprenticeship and begin- 
ning work with W. T. 
Galliher & Bro. and the 
Washington Woodworking 
Co. He is a member of 
Local 1694, married with 
two children. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



INDIANA 




WADE WEARTH of 
Dyer, Ind., is 29, married 
to Dee and a member of 
Local 1005. He graduated 
from Indiana State Uni- 
versity with a degree in 
Industrial Arts (Teaching) 
and then decided to im- 
prove his manual skills 
through mill-cabinet 
apprenticeship. Though he 
works for Summit De- 
velopment Co., he is also 
self employed. He and his 
wife operate a hobby shop 
in Hammond. 

MASSACHUSETTS 




LEON BROWNELL, 22, 

comes out of the Boston 
Carpenters Apprenticeship 
and Training Center and 
Local 33. He has worked 
for Construction by 
Classic, Filene's & Sons, 
the Minton Corp. He lives 
a bachelor's life in 
Rockland and hopes to 
eventually build a home in 
New Hampshire. 



OHIO 




LARRY W. BISHOP, 24, 
of Richmond, O., is a 
member of Local 186 and 
his sponsor for the contest 
was the Steubenville JAC. 
He has attended Jefferson 
County Technical College 
and is employed by Guy 
Johnston Construction Co. 
Bishop has already built 
two homes for himself, 
wife Charlotte and one- . 
year-old son Daniel. 

NEW JERSEY 




FRANK DOUGHERTY, 
JR., at 31 was the oldest 
of the mill-cabinet con- 
testants. A member of 
Local 2250, he and his 
wife, Linda, have three 
children. He attended West 
Milford High School and 
Monmouth College before 
going to Middlesex County 
Vocational School for 
apprenticeship training. 
Dougherty works for 
Perma Clad Industrial Co. 



KENTUCKY 

STANLEY RADER of 
Local 1180, who lives in 
Valley Station, Ky., was to 
have been the representa- 
tive from his state in the 
competition. However, he 
was unable to participate 
because of birth complica- 
tions sustained by his wife 
at home. Mrs. Rader 
delivered a 9 lb. 1 oz. 
boy. Both are doing fine. 



Contest 
Judges 

Judges for the annual In- 
ternational Carpentry Ap- 
prenticeship Contest are 
drawn from labor and man- 
agement alike. Pictures to 
the right and below identify 
the 1979 judges. These men 
worked all day during the 
manipulative tests. With 
charts, tape measures, pen- 
cils, and clipboards they 
grade each contestant on a 
long list of items, using a 
point system and knowing 
the contestants only by their 
assigned contest numbers. 
Coordinating their work 
were two coordinating judges 
— Ben Collins, Brotherhood 
General Representative, and 
Richard Hutchinson, appren- 
ticeship coordinator for the 
Seattle, Wash., AGC. 




MILL-CABINET JUDGES— Stand- 
ing at far left, Doyle Brannon of the 
International staff reviews plans and 
rules with Mill-Cabinet Judges 
Walter Oliveira, Brotherhood; Frank 
Carlucci of Colonial Millwork, Inc.; 
Clarence H. Jones, Oklahoma Fixture 
Co.; and James Flores, Brotherhood. 




CARPENTRY JUDGES — John Casinghino of the International staff, at 
center rear of the table, goes over plans with Carpentry Judges (starting 
from Casinghino and going clockwise) Richard H. Grady, Brotherhood; 
Raymond Vogel, Jr., Brotherhood; Galen L. Fritchie, Kingery Con- 
struction Co.; Frank Barber, Barber & DeAtley Construction Co.; 
William Golly, Poole Construction Ltd.; and Edward Thien, Brotherhood. 




MILLWRIGHT JUDGES— Millwright Gen. Reps. Bill Nipper, Eugene 
Shoehigh and Jim Hunt, all at the far side of the table, brief the mill- 
wright fudges. From left foreground, they include Ronald Stein, Westing- 
house Electric Corp.; Arthur Timmons, E. H. Hinds Co.; Walter T. 
Olivieri, Brotherhood; Robert Rose, Brotherhood; and, in foreground 
right, John Moran, Irwin Schwertner Co., and Edward McGuffee, 
Brotherhood. 



FEBRUARY, 1980 



21 



millwright Contestants 

IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER BY STATES AND PROVINCES 



1st Place 






OREGON 


» ^^^^ ^ 




DERRYL CUMMINGS, 


^JBSAk * 


/>Jk 


33, of McMinnville, Ore., 




is married and the father 






of three children. He was 




LJfc^L* 


encouraged to join the 


fit? 


jHjSvjgjP'' 


trade by his stepfather. 




Charles Strudt, who, like 




iimA* 


Cummings, is a member of 




Local 1857, Portland. After 




attending community 


^Br^ ^^ m 




college at Salem, Cum- 


HLmm*.* 




mings attended the 


Wf% 




Willamette Carpentry 






Training Center at 




Corvallis and was most 








recently employed by 








Swinerton and Walberg, 








out of the firm's Portland 








office. Cummings tinkers 








with solar water heaters 








and parabolic mirrors. He 








and his wife, Julie, plan 








to build a passively-heated 






underground home. 







2nd Place 

ONTARIO 

ANDREW DOBBIE, 33, 
is the son of Angus 
Dobbie of Local 1916, 
Hamilton, Ont. The 
Ontario provincial champ 
and his wife, Maureen, 
have three children and 
live in Hamilton. Dobbie 
obtained training at George 
Brown College and he is 
employed by Adam Clark. 




3rd Place 

CALIFORNIA 

JEFF AREA, 23 of Castro 
Valley, Calif., is a member 
of Local 102, as are his 
father, James, and his 
brother, Steve. He is 
single, and he was spon- 
sored by the 46 counties 
of the Bay Area. After 
attending Charbot Junior 
College, he obtained ap- 
prenticeship training at 
Hayward. He is employed 
by the D.W. Nicholson 
Corp. 




ARIZONA 




DAVID CARPENTER, 

26, of Tucson is completing 
his training at the Tucson 
Carpenters Training Center, 
and he is employed by 
Atlantic Plant Mainten- 
ance. He and his wife, 
Susan, share work on their 
home, and he also works 
on a favorite hobby . . . 
automobiles. 

COLORADO 




RICHARD BOHM, 35, 
has a home in Wheatland, 
Wyo., but he works and 
trains in Denver, Colo. He 
is single with two children 
by a former marriage. His 
Local 2834 covers 
Colorado and Wyoming, 
and Bohm prefers to live 
in the latter. He won a 
Rotary Club award for 
industrial arts in high 
school in Minnesota. He 
picked up drafting skills 
at Northwest Technical 
Institute, Minneapolis, 
Minn., and moved on to 
work for Hennes Erecting 
of Appleton, Wis., and 
Babcock & Wilcox. 



DISTRICT OF 
COLUMBIA 



b i I 




DAVID NICHOLSON, 

27, lives in Front Royal, 
Va., but trains in the 
Washington, D.C. Training 
Center. He is employed by 
K. Ryan Construction Co. 
of Chicago. Nicholson is 
a member of Local 1831. 
He and his wife, Debra, 
share his hobby of collect- 
ing old and unique tools. 

ILLINOIS 




TONY ZUPAN, 24, lives 
with his wife, Monica, in 
Cal City, 111. He is a 
member of Local 1693, 
attends Washburne Trade 
School and is employed by 
Van's Industrial Sheet 
Metal. The contestant's 
father, Anton, Sr., is a 
member of Local 578. 



INDIANA 




JAMES GUESS, 29, is 
rebuilding a 77-year-old 
home when he is not 
studying with the North- 
west Indiana Carpentry 
Training Program or 
working with American 
Bridge and US Steel. He 
is a member of Local 
1043. He, his wife, Pam, 
and baby daughter, 
Amanda live in St. John, 
Ind. His father is a member 
of Local 599. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



KANSAS 




KELVIN NEWLAND, is 
single and is employed by 
various AGC contractors 
of Northeast Kansas. A 
member of Local 1445, he 
trains with the Topeka- 
Lawrence JATC. In his 
spare time he works on 
old cars and motorcycles. 

LOUISIANA 



MINNESOTA 




PETER BAROUSSE, 24, 

shares the trade with three 
other members of his 
family — father, Bill, 
brother, Bert, and wife, 
Donna, who is also an 
apprentice! He is a member 
of Local 1476, Lake 
Charles, and is employed 
by Woodson Construction 
Co. 

MICHIGAN 




ELDON HOMISTER, JR., 

24, is a member of Local 
2252, as are his father, 
Eldon, Sr., and a brother, 
Virgil. He works at the 
trade with McCormick, 
Hackett, Roberts and he 
hopes to some day start up 
a small shop of his own at 
home, which he shares with 
wife, Lynn, and two chil- 
dren in Delton, Mich. 




BOB DAHLQUIST, 28, 
represented the Wolverine 
State and Local 548. He is 
single and enjoys golf and 
bowling when he is not 
studying as an apprentice 
in St. Paul or working 
for McKenzie-Hague-Giles. 

MISSOURI 




' •™w«>W^( 



JIM RAINES comes from 
Kearney, Miss., is under- 
going apprenticeship train- 
ing in St. Paul, Minn., but 
works all over for Chris 
Jensen & Son, GC, DIC, 
EBY, B & W Automatic 
Systems. His family is 
union oriented. His wife, 
Shela, is a member of 
Electrical Workers Local 
124 and a cousin, Craig 
Raines, is a millwright in 
Local 548, St. Paul. 

NEVADA 




KEVIN LEE FLOYD, 22, 

and his father, Junius, are 
both members of Local 
1827, Las Vegas. He works 
for AJC Contractors and 
trains in Las Vegas, where 
he lives with his wife, 
Cary, and two children, 
Jennifer and Daniel. 



NEW JERSEY 







■**^4> 




STEPHEN LEZAN, JR., 
36, was the oldest of the 
millwright contestants at 
New Orleans. He is com- 
pleting his fourth year of 
training at Somerset 
County Vocational Tech, 
and he works for Campa- 
nella Construction. He is 
a member of Local 455, He 
and his wife, Denise, and 
two children live in 
Somerset. 



NEW YORK 




RICHARD PARISI is one 

of four members of his 
family who belong to 
Millwrights Local 740 of 
New York. Besides himself, 
there are his father, Mario, 
his uncle, Albert, and a 
cousin, Frank. He once 
attended Suffolk Com- 
munity College, before 
joining the training pro- 
gram of the NYC District 
Council. Married to 
Dolores, he works for 
Burns & Roe, Regor Con- 
struction, and J. B. Webb 
Corp. 




OHIO 



The Millwrights manipu- 
lative project completed. 



m&m 




THOMAS SARCHET, 22, 
lives in Salesville, O., and 
he works for Harold H. 
Davis of Cambridge. He 
is a member of Local 267. 
He owns 65 acres of land 
in Southeastern Ohio and 
he plans to build a home 
there. 



PENNSYLVANIA 




TIMOTHY E. DAVIS, 26, 
is a member of Local 2235 
and is single. He attended 
Westminster College before 
entering apprenticeship 
training, and he has been 
employed by Randolph 
Engineering, PBI, Schnei- 
der Inc. and Dick Corp. 
Otherwise, he lives in 
Monroeville and is building 
a 21-foot catboat in his 
spare time. 

TENNESSEE 




TRAVIS SULLIVAN, 26, 
and a brother, James, are 
both members of Local 
1544. He trained in Nash- 
ville, where he lives with 
his wife, Loreleim and son, 
Robert. Employers have 
included H & R Construc- 
tion, Crescent Engineering, 
Bushman Conveyors, 
Overhead Conveyors, and 
Wasco. 



FEBRUARY, 1980 



23 






millwright 
Contestants 



TEXAS 

DANNY BAGGETT, 23, 
of Balch Springs, Tex., 
unfortunately suffered an 
injury just prior to the 
contest and was disqualified 
under contest rules. Baggett 
was, however, a Texas 
champion and a member 
of Local 1421. He has 
worked for Grunal, Trac- 
master. Ken Theland, and 
Western Power, and he 
hopes to become a union 
contractor some day. 

WASHINGTON 




DAVID LUKE, single, 
attended Spokane Com- 
munity College before 
entering apprenticeship 
training at Pasco. He is 
presently employed by 
the Natkin Co., of Lewis- 
ton, Idaho, and is a 
member of Local 1862. 
His brother, James is a 
member of Local 98. Luke 
enjoys hunting, snowmobil- 
ing, and motorcycles. 

WEST VIRGINIA 




CORBETT BEACH, JR., 

22, is the son of another 
Brotherhood member, 
Corbett, Sr. The younger 
Beach is contemplating 
marriage, a family, and 
travel in that order. He 
is employed by Union 
Boiler Co., and is com- 
pleting his training in 
Morgantown. A member 
of Local 1 369, Beach 
lives in Wadestown. 



UNION PRODUCTIVITY 

Continued from Page 4 

unionized. Thus, it seems very unlikely 
that unions could be forcing consumers to 
pay unnecessarily high costs through con- 
trol of the labor supply. It might also be 
possible that we have not defined markets 
in an economically meaningful fashion. 
Perhaps the use of two-digit SIC cate- 
gories conceals a concentration of union 
members within certain occupations or 
subsectors. Unfortunately, there are no 
data currently available to test this hy- 
pothesis, so one must instead evaluate 
this potential flaw of the model with sub- 
jective impressions and incomplete infor- 
mation. 

The key issue is whether companies 
and individuals contract for union labor 
on construction projects because they 
have no other choice or because they feel 
that union labor will get the job done in 
the most efficient fashion. 

Q. Why do you include so-called "ob- 
servable labor quality" variables in your 
analysis? 

A. We know that experience and edu- 
cation contribute either directly or indi- 
rectly to the productive capacity of work- 
ers. Older workers presumably have more 
work experience than younger workers, so 
we include age as a proxy for increased 
skills. Education increases the capacity of 
workers to learn useful skills and, in some 
cases, may directly contribute to the 
development of such skills. We need to 
control for these factors in our analysis 
because higher productivity of union labor 
could conceivably result from greater ex- 
perience or education of union workers 
rather than unionization per se. With 
these controls we can then claim that 
union workers with, say 10 years of 
experience and a high school diploma are 
at least 38 percent more productive than 
nonunion workers with the same experi- 
ence and education. 

Q. What are the major implications of 
your findings? 

A. These results, along with those of 
Charles Brown, James Medoff and Kim 
Clark,* point out the potential contribu- 
tion of harmonious industrial relations 
towards the well being of all concerned 
parties — workers, employers, and consu- 
mers. Productivity depends not just on 
the amount of capital per person or the 
pace of technological change, but also 
upon human skills and the willingness of 
workers to perform up to their capacity. 
Through apprenticeship programs and 
high admissions standards, building trades 
unions have encouraged investment in 
human capital. This fact is usually 
ignored in popular discussions of the 



* Kim B. Clark, "Unionization, Manage- 
ment Adjustment and Productivity," NBER 
Working Paper Series No. 332, April 1979. 
Charles Brown and James L. Medoff, "Trade 
Unions in the Production Process," Journal 
of Political Economy, June 1978. 



effects of unionism, which instead tend 
to focus on racketeering or allegedly 
exorbitant wages. In discussing ways to 
promote productivity growth in the future, 
which must rank among this nation's 
highest priorities, the potential contribu- 
tion of collective bargaining should not 
be ignored. 

Of course many recent public policy 
debates have touched upon this issue as 
well. For instance, many of the oppo- 
nents of labor law reform have argued 
that increased unionization will reduce 
productivity growth in the future. Today 
we hear the claim that the Davis-Bacon 
Act is inflationary because it encourages 
the use of high wage union labor on fed- 
erally funded construction projects. Our 
results suggest that even if Davis-Bacon 
does promote employment opportunities 
for union members — and this has by no 
means been rigorously established — the 
costs to the government will not be 
affected at all to the extent that produc- 
tivity differences offset wage differences 
between union and nonunion labor. 

Q. If union labor is so much more 
productive than nonunion labor, why are 
open shop contractors growing so rapidly? 

A. Before one can answer this question, 
one needs some hard evidence that the 
open shop contractors are chasing union 
contractors out of the market. We know 
that union membership has not grown as 
rapidly as employment in the industry 
over the last 15 years or so. But I am 
not sure whether this reflects greater com- 
petitive vigor on the part of the open 
shop sector or differences in labor supply 
conditions. One can only become a union 
member after one has enough training 
and experience to meet a set of fairly 
rigorous standards. No such qualifica- 
tions are necessary to work on an open 
shop crew. Given the spurt in construc- 
tion demand in the mid to late 1960's, the 
union labor supply could only expand via 
a massive lowering of membership stand- 
ards. In contrast open shop contractors 
were able to recruit unskilled and semi- 
skilled labor from all sectors of the econ- 
omy. This enabled them to expand more 
rapidly to meet the increased demand for 
construction. My educated guess is that 
the open shop sector grew much more 
rapidly than the union sector during the 
late 1960's and early 1970's, giving them 
an increased market share, but that this 
trend has either stabilized or even re- 
versed in recent years. 




24 



/ill 

THE CARPENTER 



Training 
[(inference 
Holds Special 
[raft Sessions 




Gen. Pres. Konyha opened the Training 
Conference. He was at that time the 
Brotherhood's apprenticeship and training 
director. 




First Gen. Vice Pres. Campbell addressed 
the opening session. He became the 
Brotherhood's apprenticeship and training 
director last month. 



1 ^m* ' ' '^'tI 


i ^^R.' ; l m 








R? 1 
r f 




rJr 


< 1 




Delegates around one of the coffee urns 
during a break in the day-long sessions of 
the training conference. 



The semi-annual Carpentry Training 
Conference was held December 3-6 in 
New Orleans, La., in conjunction with 
the apprenticeship contest. 

In addition to two days of general 
sessions and panel discussions, the con- 
ference offered two additional days of 
special seminars for piledrivers-dock- 
builders, divers, floor coverers, mill- 
cabinetmakers, and millwrights. These 
gatherings were held in conference 
rooms at The Rivergate, site of the 
international contest. 

The Winter '79 Conference heard 
reports on PETS, the audio-visual 



From left: Jim 
Wooter, Central 
Ind.; CETA 
Coordinator Duane 
Sowers; New York 
Coordinator 
Maurice Tourella; 
and Mike 
McMillan, AFL- 
ClO, HRDl. 



Another panel, 
from left: Mike 
Young, Twin 
Cities; Joseph 
McGrogan, Calif.; 
Franklin Gray, 
Chattanooga; 
Don Anderson, 
Spokane; and Billy 
McNatt, Arlington 
Tex. 



Coordinator 
Dennis Scott chairs 
a panel discussion 
during the 
conference. 



training system developed by the 
Brotherhood, and on PIC, a govern- 
mental administrative program. In 
addition, there was discussion of ways 
and means of funding, expanding, and 
firming up apprenticeship training pro- 
grams. There were also discussions, on 
the second day, of "Apprenticeship as 
Adult Education" and "Apprentice- 
ship as Vocational Education." There 
was continued distribution of informa- 
tion on ways to get maximum use of 
CETA funds and ways of accommo- 
dating women and other special types 
of trainees. 




FEBRUARY, 1980 



25 



Ottawa 
Report 







CLC SAYS: 'SUPPORT NDP' 

The Canadian Labor Congress has 
promised its full support to the New 
Democratic Party as Canadians face a 
winter federal election campaign that 
came as a surprise to most political 
observers. 

The only party fully prepared — with 
organization and finances — is the 
governing Progressive Conservatives 
led by Joe Clark, who is at 40 Canada's 
youngest prime minister. 

But the Liberals, heartened by a 
Gallup poll that showed them well ahead 
of the Conservatives, got all their 
members in Parliament December 13 to 
defeat the budget introduced two days 
before. Two Liberal members left 
hospital beds to participate in the 
vote. 

Election day is February 18, and all 
Brotherhood members are urged to vote. 



MICHELIN BILL OPPOSED 

On December 28 the so-called Michelin 
Bill was passed in Nova Scotia. This 
bill is a threat to labor-management 
relations for the 70,000 members of the 
Nova Scotia Federation of Labor. 

The Michelin Bill, introduced in 
November, amends the province's Trade 
Union Act to require all employees of 
manufacturing plants in the province to 
form a single bargaining unit when 
organizing. Although the bill is 
primarily intended to appease Michelin 
Tire Canada Ltd. , it will have wide- 
sweeping consequences, including 
stripping the Labor Relations Board of 
its discretionary powers to determine 
appropriate bargaining units. 

Originally introduced last spring, 
the Bill was quickly withdrawn after 
the labor movement threatened to take 
actions to halt its passage. 



ENERGY LABOR STUDY OPPOSED 

Canada's Building and Construction 
Trades Unions say they will not 
participate in an industry study aimed 
at paving the future of management- 
labor relations at major energy 
projects. 

But a spokesperson for the Canadian 
Construction Association, which 
launched the study aimed at developing 
principles for industrial relations at 
energy construction sites, said it will 
proceed even if labor does not 
cooperate. 

Building Trades spokesman James A. 
McCambly said the study was initiated 
without any consultation with labor 
representatives about the study team 
or its terms of reference. "It is 
simply too late for labor to be of 
influence in the study," McCambly said. 
"The only course of action for the 
trade unions is opposition to the study 
and strict avoidance of it and of any 
efforts by the study team to involve 
labor. " 



QUEBEC'S RIGHT TO DECIDE 

Delegates to the recent NDP conven- 
tion confirmed the right to Quebecers 
to decide their own political future 
but strongly urged them to choose a 
united Canada in next spring's 
referendum. 

In passing an emergency resolution 
proposed by the DNP federal council, 
delegates reaffirmed NDP policy calling 
for a united Canada and said the party 
"declares its belief that the people of 
Quebec have the right to make their 
choice (on independence) without 
coercion. " 



INDEX FOR ELDERLY? 

New Democrat Stanley Knowles, tire- 
less parliamentary crusader for the 
elderly, may have moved the government 
to act on one' of his pet projects. 

For years the United Church minister, 
who represents Winnipeg North Centre, 
has been trying to convince fellow MPs 
that the government should devise a 
special cost-of-living index for the 
elderly. Pensioners never buy dispos- 
able diapers, jogging shoes or many of 
the other hundreds of items included in 
the consumer price index, Knowles says. 

Prime Minister Joe Clark was non- 
commital in the House, but later out- 
side the Commons, Sinclair Stevens, 
the minister responsible for the ac- 
tivities of Statistics Canada, said he 
would encourage the agency to look 
seriously at Knowles' plan. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 




Queens Village, N.Y. 



QUEENS VILLAGE, N.Y. 

During its quarterly meeting, July 9, 1979, 
Local 284 awarded a watch to retiring head 
trustee Arthur "Frenchie" Boucher, at a party 
held in his honor. 

Pictured from left to right are: John 
Schnakenberg, delegate to District Council; 
Henry Tagliabue, trustee; Frank Kobylarz, con- 
ductor; Raymond A. Schaefer, president; Gary 
Druhl, warden; George J. Albert, business 
representative, financial secretary, treasurer; 
Arthur Boucher, retiring head trustee; Harry 
Kahen, trustee; Ken Nelsen, trustee; Michael 
Donohue, recording secretary. 



LUBBOCK, TEX. 

Local 1884 recently presented service pins 
to the following members, from left to right: 
Business Representative Walter J. Allison; 30- 
year members R. W. Jackson, Jr., M.D. (Doc) 
Smith, and A. S. Berg; 25-year member J. W. 
Leamon; 40-yea- member D. C. Cannon; and 
President of Local 1884, Gavin L. Alsup. 

Members who received pins but were not 
present for the photograph were: 25-year 
members F. L. Adair, M. W. Jenkins, and LaFon 
Mantooth; 30-year members Robert R. Gaston, 
Royce E. (Pete) Lang, and James H. Martin; 
40-year member J. C. McClellan; and 45-year 
member J. A. Martin. 



MOUNTAIN VIEW, CALIF. 

On April 21, 1979 Local 1280 held its 21st 
annual 25-year pin presentation and dinner 
dance. Anthony Ramos, executive secretary of 
the California State Council of Carpenters, 
presented pins to the following ten members: 

Front row, left to right: Harold Kufeldt, Neil 
Noll, Jack Mandarich, Orville Shisler, and 
Harry Oliver. 

Back row, left to right: Paul Borg, Richard 




Service 
Brotherhood 

A gallery of pictures showing some of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received pins for years of service in the union. 



Griffin, Billy Parker, Craig Holden, and Herbert 
Renz. 

The following members also received pins 
but were not present for the ceremony: Oliver 
Allen, John W. Brown, Andrew Childers, Calvin 
Clark, Robert Elliott, John Gatter, Arthur King, 
Bob Prince, and Howard Stuart. 



HICKSVILLE, N.Y. 

The following members of Local 1772 re- 
cently received service pins for their years of 
service with the Brotherhood: 

Picture No. 1— Front row, left to right: 
A. Akerfelds, A. Schragel, W. Sohmer, D. Ker- 
schak, G. Beach, T. Rhatigan, and G. laculle. 

Back row, left to right: 25-year members 
Walter Gebhart, president, A. Rubcous, W. 
Piekos, M. McDaniels, J. Chmura, J. Calise, 
W. Firth, N. Descher; 35-year member L. Koch, 
and Business Representative Glenn Kerbs. 

Picture No. 2— 50-year member Julian 
Martinsen, now residing in Norway. 



Other members 
who received pins 
include: 25-year 
members J. Banville, 
C. Bartolotto, A. 
Capone, R. Foote, J. 
Galasse, E. Kelske, 
H. Koener, J. Kuskis, 
F. Podgerski, A. 
Toreze, W. Thompson, 
J. Valdeni, and E. 
Vjaters; and 50-year 
member Peter 
Hanson. 




MARTINSEN 



Attend your Local 

Union Meetings 

regularly. Be 

an active member 

of the Brotherhood. 



Mountain View, Calif. 



Hicksville, N.Y. 




FEBRUARY, 1980 



27 



LINCOLN, NEB. 

Local 1055 recently presented service pins to its 25-year members 
and completion certificates to its apprentices. The senior members 
who received awards are shown in the accompanying picture: 

Front row, left to right: Ed Doty, Walt Hupka, Dewey Dean, John 
Schultz, Conrad Hergenrader and Richard Dittenber. Back row, left to 
right: Eugene Shoehigh, international representative, Gilbert Hicks, 
Don Williams, J. B. Rickman, Ted Kennedy, Marc Roggenkamp, Herb 
Strand, Harold Alles and Ernst Gabriel. 






flft 



Merrill, Wise. 



Lincoln, Neb. 

MERRILL, WIS. 

Local 2344 presented pins to the following 30-year members at a 
meeting held July 19, 1979: 

Front row, left to right: Leonard Baumann, Al Kleinschmidt, Ted 
Hagedorn, Milton Grawien, and Walter Koebe. 

Back row, left to right: Arthur Wais, Milfred Jaeger, Wilbur Howard, 
Elmer Luedke, Elmer Frederick, and President Harold Robl, presenter 
of the pins. Absent from the photograph was Ralph Riesinger. 



DAYTON, O. 

A luncheon was recently held by Local 1807 to honor members with 20 to 50 
years of service. The following members received awards: 

Front row, left to right: Ernest Harris, 35-years; Henry Dix, 50-years; Ivan 
Plantz, 20-years; and Gerald Morgan, 25-years. 

Back row, left to right: Clarence Humbert, 20-years; Henry Spencer, 25-years; 
C. Bowen, 25-years; Orville Vittitow, 30-years; and Bill Hayes, 30-years. 

Not pictured were pin recipients Russell Hartzell, 50-years; Don Tanner, 
45-years; Bill Baker, 40-years; James Napier, H. D. Pratt and Basil Jones, 35-years; 
Louis Sowers and Cecil Jones, 30-years; Harry Grooms, Joe Kohnen, and William 
Floyd, 25-years; and James Faris, 20-years. 




Dayton, O. 




3000 TOOL CATALOG 

For over 50 years Woodcraft Supply has set 
the trend by introducing new and practical 
tools for the home and professional shop. 
This year is no exception. You'll find our 96 
page catalog filled with thoughtfully de- 
signed and beautifully made products which 
will allow you to get the results you want 
with the satisfaction of using the best tools 
available. Each product is well illustrated 
and fully described to help you choose the 
best tool for the job. We back this up with 
fast efficient service, personal attention to 
your needs and, of course, the Woodcraft 
guarantee. 

Send $ 1 .00, in coin or stamps, for your copy 
of this unique full color catalog. 

©WOODCRAFT® 

^^ Dept. C20 313 Montvale Ave. 
S v> WOBURN, MASS. 01888 J 



SAVES $$ SAVE TIME 



<TM 



STAIR-SQUARE 

New! Revolutionary! Scientifically Designed Tool! 

Fast . . . Easy . . . Accurate . . . 



Layout a stairway in minutes! 



• sturdy weather resistant alumi 

• use as template for cutting stri 

• automatically spaces risers 

• accurate within 1/10 inch 

• no difficult calculations 

• reduces costs 

Pays for itself!! 




PATENT PENDING 



IM 



AIM INDUSTRIES, P.O. Box 401522, Dallas, Tx. 75240 



Enclosed is my 
check or money 

order for 



Name 



(Please Print) 



STAIR-SQUARE 

@ $24.95 ea. 
plus 5% sales fax 
for Texas 
residents. 



Address 



City State Zip 

Please charge my VISA □ or Master Charge □ 

j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 cm 



Credit 
Card No. 



in 



Allow 4 - 6 WepkS for deliverv Master Charge i 1 1 I i Exp. Date , , . ■ 
rvnuw t o weeiss iui ucnveiy | ntefbank No LLLJJ Month/Year I I I I 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Estwing 







Always wear Estwing 
Safety Goggles when 
using hand tools. 
Protect your eyes from 
flying fragments and 
dust. Bystanders shall 
also wear Estwing 
Safety Goggles. 




\>-UW 




First and 
Finest 
Solid Steel 
Hammers 

. . . Our quality tradition has 
made Estwing the first choice 
of craftsmen for over 50 years. 



Estwing Solid Steel Hammers are 
unsurpassed in quality, balance and 
finish. Forged in one piece from fine 
tool steel — strongest construction 
known. Head and handle neck are 
fully polished. Available with 
either laminated leather grip or 
Estwing's exclusive nylon-vinyl 
deep cushion grip. 



Estwing 



Mfg. Co., 2647 8th Street, Dept. C-2 Rockford, IL 61101 



FEBRUARY, 1980 



29 



For A Sparetime or Full Time Business, There's Good 



I 



TBtlSSSw 




low you can cash in on the huge demanc 
for SHARPENING SAWS and TOOLS. 



CLIP OUT AND MAIL 
THIS COUPON TODAY - 
OR CALL TOLL FREE 

1-800-328-7140 

'(Except Hawaii or Alaska) 



EARN $5 to $8 An Hour Sparetime 

All over America, in small towns and big 
cities, people just like yourself are earn- 
ing big money in the saw sharpening 
business. Industry, home handymen, pro- 
fessional carpenters all need their equip- 
ment sharpened. It's a business that's 
growing every year. 

Foley will help you finance you and show 
you how to start and maintain a profit- 
able sharpening business of your own. 
There's no huge inventory to carry. You 
can set up in your garage, basement or 
spare room . . . wherever there's electricity. 
You can start earning profits as soon as 
you receive your equipment. 




Free Booklet 



This booklet tells 
how to start your 
own sharpening 
business; how to 
operate it prof- 
itably; who your 
potential cus- 
tomers are; and 
what kind of 
money you can 
make. 
Send your name 
and address to: 

Foley Manufacturing Company 

3243 Foley Building 

Minneapolis, Minn. 55418 



. . . RUSH 
COUPON 

JODAY! 
Get FREE 
Dook wirh 
focts and 
full details 



H^ > 



MANUFACTURING 

3243 Foley Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 55418 
Please send me the free booklet "Opportunities 
In A Sharpening Business Of Your Own." 



City 

Zip Code- 



FREE SANDING BELTS 

DIRECT FROM THE MANUFACTURER 



(American Made at 642 North 

With your order of one dozen or more belts, we will 
send you six FREE. All belts are aluminum oxide 
first quality. Our electronic presses make smooth 
bump-free splices. 

Check your size and how many dozen. We will ship 
assorted grits unless otherwise specified. 



□ I"x42" - 

□ l"x44" - 

□ 3"xl8" - 

□ 3"x21" - 

□ 3" x 23 3 A" - 
D3"x24" - 

□ 3"x27" - 

□ 4"x21 3 /4" — 

□ 4"x24" - 

□ 4"x36" - 

□ 6"x48" - 



$ 9.75/doz. 
9.75/doz. 
10.75/doz. 
11.25/doz. 
11.75/doz. 
11.75/doz. 
12.25/doz. 
13.75/doz. 
14.25/doz. 
17.95/doz. 
19.95/V2doz. (3 FREE) 



Other size belts on request 

INDUSTRIAL ABRASIVES CO. 

652 North Eighth Street 
Reading, PA 1 9603 



Eighth Street, Reading, Pa.) 

9" X 1 1 " Paper Sheets A/O Finishing Paper 



(100 sheets per package) 
A/O Cabinet Paper 

□ 40-D — $25/pkg 

□ 50-D- 

□ 60 D- 

□ 80-D- 

□ 100-C — 

□ 1 20-C — 

□ 150-C- 



22/pkg. 

20/pkg. 

17/pkg. 

15/pkg. 

15/pkg. 

15/pkg. 
Prompt delivery from stock. 
MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE. 

Add $2.00 for shipping and handling per doz. ordered 
PA residents add 6% sales tax. 



□ 180-A-$10/pkg. 
D220-A- 10/pkg. 
D280-A- 10/pkg. 

Wet or Dry S/C Paper 
D220-A-$19/pkg. 
D320-A- 19/pkg. 
D400-A- 19/pkg. 
D600-A- 19/pkg. 



□ Check or Money Order. 

□ Master Charge 

Acct * 



□ VISA 



Exp. Date_ 



Name . 



Address 



City, State & Zip . 




I ft 9 




Picture No. 1 



Picture No. 2 



DECATUR, ALA. 

Local 1274 recently had a dinner at The 
Burningtree Country Club to honor its 
members with 25 or more years of service. 
The wives of these honored members were 
also invited to the banquet. 

Picture No. 1 shows 30 to 35-year members. 
Front row, left to right: Joe M. Loggins, E. 
P. Tillery, James E. Duboise, Billy Haddock, 
and Juddie Chandler. 

Back row, left to right: Hollis McCaghren, 
John R. Pike, R. S. Williams, Harvey Chavis, 
W. R. Wade, W. A. Baber, and Sanford Parker, 
deceased. 

Picture No. 2 shows members with over 40 
years of service. From left to right: W. 0. 
Campbell, S. A. Stevenson, W. B. Rice, Fred 
Black and John C. Darmer. 

Picture No. 3 shows 25 to 30-year members. 
Front row, left to right: Luther Seibenhener, 
George Kirchner, Walton McGee, R. H. Clay, 
John Reagin, John T. Boothe, John C. Harrison 
and Flur Berryman. 

Back row, left to right: Vernon Patton, 
George E. Drinkard, James H. Irvin, Frank C. 
Stone, Phil Morris, Hollis Bates, Jack Sandlin, 
Gordon Cooper, Monroe McRight, Carl 
Stevenson, Thomas Mann, William Loggins, 
Almon Smith, M. V. Moore and James A. 
Fowler. 

Picture No. 4 shows 35 to 40-year members. 
Front row, left to right: Paul C. Johnson, 

A. C. Lee, Robert Moore, R. H. Garrett, 
C. M. McRight, Raymond Reagin, and 
Casper Frost. 

Back row, left to right: Paul Pitt, Frank 
Bentley, Eunice Alldredge, Sullivan Crow, 
S. E. Clark, Virgil Snoddy, Oscar Holderfield, 

B. R. Nelson, Marion R. Sims, Andrew West, 
James Pike, W. H. Rutherford, W. G. Coggins, 
Lewis Hardison and W. N. Locke. 




Picture No. 3 




Picture No. 4 




This VET Did It - and YOU 
Can Do It 
Too! 




Make Up to $10 an Hour— even while learning! 



Be a LOCKSMITH! 










Train 
FAST 

at Home! 



If you enjoy fixing things, you're a "natural" 
to make hundreds of EXTRA DOLLARS a 
year in the fascinating business of Lock- 
smithing. Rising crime has increased de- 
mand for service a thousandfold. Yet there's 
only one Locksmith for every 17,000 people! 

COLLECT CASH PROFITS ALMOST AT ONCE! 

You're "in business" ready to make $5 to 
$10 an hour a few days after you begin 
Belsaw's shortcut training. Easy, illustrated 
lessons complete with ALL practice equip- 
ment PLUS 

• ALL TOOLS YOURS TO KEEP 

• KEY MACHINE YOURS TO KEEP 

• EXPERT PERSONAL ASSISTANCE 

• BUSINESS-BUILDING HELP 



enable you to get your share of this always- 
profitable business. Hundreds we've trained 
are doing it. So can YOU. 

MAIL COUPON to discover how Locksmith- 
ing can keep the extra money coming in dur- 
ing spare time — or in your own full-time 
business. Ideal for retirement— good jobs, too. 
BELSAW INSTITUTE, 290F Field Bldg. 
Kansas City, MO. 64111 
Acredited Member NHSC. 

N. Hunt, Wilmington, Del.— "I make $50 a 

week extra." 

R. Davis, St. Louis, Mo.— "I cleared $110 last 

Saturday." 

Ed Boyle. Pittsburgh, Pa. — "My business going 

at top speed. I'm moving to bigger quarters." 




FREE 



I THIS DO-ALL PRO I 

MACHINE YOURS ■ 

TO KEEP!" 

I 



MAIL THIS COUPON . NO SALESMAN WILL CALL 



BELSAW INSTITUTE, 290F Field Bldg. 
Kansas City, MO. 64111 

Rush FREE book, "Keys to your Future." 

Name 



r> UM ft Sof.im TtHH Doparlmenl. AFL-CIO 



Can add $25 

„to $40 a week 

to your in- I 

come. . .and 

doesn't cost 

I you a penny 

extra! 



Address, 
City 



.State. 



-Zip- 



I 
1 
I 
I 



FEBRUARY, 1980 



31 



'"*"• 



This point 
lets you bore 
holes up to Wi" 

with small electric drill 



IT'S HOLLOW GROUND to bore 
cleaner, faster at any angle 



Now step-up the boring range of 
your small electric drill or drill 
press to I'/j" with Irwin Speed- 
bor "88" wood bits. I/4" shank 
chucks perfectly. No wobble. No 
run-out. Sharp cutting edges on 
exclusive hollow ground point 
start holes faster, let spade type 
cutters bore up to 5 times faster. 
You get clean, accurate holes in 
any wood at any cutting angle. 
Each Irwin Speedbor "88" 
forged from single bar of finest 
tool steel. Each machine-sharp- 
ened and heat tempered full 
length for long life. 17 sizes, 74" 
to I'/V', and sets. See your Irwin 
hardware or building supply 
dealer soon. 



* 






IRWIN 



SPEEDBOR "88" 
WOOD BITS 

at Wilmington, Ohio, Since 1885 



CARPENTERS PENCIL & 
LUMBER CRAYON HOLDER 



Designed for the 
construction industry. 
Holds both lumber pencil 
and crayon. Always 
ready, no more breaking 
one or the other. 
Economical, too — if uses 
95% of pencil and 
crayon. Designed by a 
carpenter. You can't 
loose — it's sold on a 
30-day full return 
guarantee. 

Complete dealer infor- 
mation available. 



$525 



which covers tax and handling 
Buy 2 or more and pay $5 
each. California residents 
add 6'/2% safes fax, 33 cents. 
No COD's. Personal checks 
allow 2 weeks for check 
to clear. 



SUPER & COMPANY 

2603 Elliot St., Santa Clara, Calif. 95051 
Telephone: 408-246-0369 



THE WRITTEN TEST 





Participants in the 13th Annual Car- 
pentry Apprenticeship Contest at New 
Orleans, Dec. 5 and 6, taking the written 
test. Contestants are permitted to use 
pocket calculators to figure their math 
problems. 



LAYOUT LEVEL 

• ACCURATE TO 1/32* 

• REACHES 100 FT. 

• ONE-MAN OPERATION 

Son Time, Money, do a letter Joi 
With This Modem Water Level 

In just a few minutes you accurately aet batten 
for slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, forms, futures, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 

HYD ROLL EVE L* 

... the old reliable water 
level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 60 ft. 
clear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft of 
leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
man operation — outside, in- 
side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anywhere you 
can climb or crawll 

Why waste money on delicate 1 4J)*' 
instruments, or lose time and ac- 
curacy on makeshift leveling? Since 1960 
thousands of carpenters, builders, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Send check or money order for $14.95 and 
your name and address. We will rush you a 
Hydrolevel by return mall postpaid. Or - buy 
three Hydrolevels at $9.95 each, postpaid. Sell 
two for $14.95 each and have yours freel No 
C.O.I). Satisfaction guaranteed or money hsjej L 

FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 

HYDROLEVEL* 

P.O. Box G Oc.an Springs, Miss. 39544 




SAVE TIME 
and MONEY 

ON EVERY 

STAIRCASE 



mggggP 




ELIASON 
STAIR GAUGE 



Saves its cost in ONE day — does a better 
job in half time. Each end of Eliason Stair 
Gauge slides, pivots and locks at exact 
length and angle for perfect fit on stair treads, ris- 
ers, closet shelves, etc. Lasts a lifetime. Patented. 
Postpaid If payment sent with order, 
or COD. plus postage Only 



$34.95 




ELIASON STAIR 4141 coioad ° Ave N 

naHArnn.Jn..... Minneapolis. MN 55422 

GAUGE COMPANY 62 377746 

Carpenters, 

hang if up! 

-^ VL Clamp these heavy 

(tni B duty, non-stretch 

, «» v '-v# suspenders to your 

nail bags or tool 
belt and you'll feel 
like you are floating 
on air. They take all 
the weight off your 
hips and place the 
load on your 
shoulders. Made of 
soft, comfortable 2" 
wide red nylon. 
Adjust to fit all sizes 

Try them for 15 days, if not completely 

satisfied return for full refund. Don't be 

miserable another day, order now. 

Send check or money order to: 




Norman Clifton, 
member, Local 1622 
Hayward, Calif. 
(Patent Pending) 



| CLIFTON ENTERPRISES 

| 4806 Los Arboles Place, Fremont, Ca. 94536 

I Please rush "HANG IT UP" suspenders at 
I $16.15 each includes postage & handling 
j California residents add 6%% sales tax 
j (.97<:). Canada residents please send U.S. 
I equivalent. 

j NAME 

| ADDRESS 

I CITY 



_STATE 



_ZIP 



Please give street address for prompt delivery. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 





GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO- 
PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 
AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 
SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 
AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 



ACCEPT BEST OFFER 

A wealthy builder visiting one of 
his construction sites noticed his 
wallet was missing. 

"I've just lost my wallet with 
$250 in it and I'll give $5 to the 
person who returns it," he an- 
nounced to the crew. 

"I'll make it $15," shouted one 
of the assembled workers standing 
nearby. 

— Union Tabloid 

LOOK FOR THE UNION LABEL 



EARLY DELIVERY 

Young Nurse: Don't feel embar- 
rassed about your baby being born 
in an elevator. Last year one was 
born in the parking lot. 

Young Mother: Yes, I know, that 
was me too. 

— UTU News 

BE READY TO VOTE IN '80 

FORMULA FOR AGING 

"I hope you don't think I'm too 
young to marry your daughter," the 
anxious young man said. 

"That's all right," the father re- 
plied. "You'll age fast enough." 



EASY RIDERS 

Three motorcycle gang members 
pulled into a truck stop, parked 
their choppers, and went into the 
cafe. They sat down uninvited at a 
table with a rather large, but quiet, 
trucker and proceeded to eat his 
meal. 

The trucker said nothing, got 
up, paid his bill, and walked out. 
One biker walked over to the cash 
register: 

Biker: That trucker ain't much of 
a man, is he? 

Cashier (looking outside): Not 
much of a driver either — just ran 
over three shiny motorcycles as he 
pulled out of here. 

— Marcus Beleck 

Local 1266, Austin, Tx. 

ATTEND UNION MEETINGS 

WHERE, WHERE? 

He — "Would it be improper if I 
kissed your hand?" 

She — "Not improper, just out 
of place." 



BE IN GQQllif ANDING 




WHAT'S SO FUNNY? 

Little Boy: I'm sorry, but I think 
you are sitting in my seat. 

Big Boy: Oh yeah! Can you prove 
it? 

Little Boy: I think so. I left my pie 
and ice cream on it! 

— Yvette Martin 
North Fork, Calif. 



THIS MONTH'S LIMERICK 

Camel-Driver Abu Abdulle 
Pitched his tent over another oil 

pool. 
He drilled through the deck, 
Then joined the OPEC, 
To shake down the fast-driving 
fool. 

— M. B. Medwed 
Local 13, Chicago, 




SLIGHT ALTERATIONS 

David: Can you say "Richard and 
Robert had a rabbit" without pro- 
nouncing the R's? 

Mickey: I give up. How? 
David: Dick and Bob had a 
bunny. 

— Yvette Martin 
North Fork, Calif. 



DON'T GET BEHIND IN '80 



SOUND OF SILENCE 

This young apprentice decided in 
his third year of training that there 
was too much worldly living 
around him, so he entered a mon- 
astery instead. He had to take a 
vow of silence . . . well, almost. He 
was allowed only two words every 
10 years. 

All went well. He meditated; he 
studied; he lived the quiet life. 
After 10 years, he was called in by 
the abbot and asked if he had 
anything to say. 

"Food cold," he replied in his 
two allowed words. 

The abbot thanked him, and he 
went back to his meditations for 
10 more years. 

At the end of another decade of 
sitting around the gardens and 
sweeping his cell he came before 
the abbot and uttered two more 
words: "Bed hard." 

Again the abbot thanked him, 
and he returned to the monastic 
life. 

Ten years passed, and then the 
monk said, "Light weak." 

The abbot nodded. 

Ten years later, the monk went 
before his superior for the fourth 
time to again utter his two words. 
Th i s tim? he said, "I quit." 

The abbot looked at him a mo- 
ment and said with a sigh, "I'm 
not surprised, Brother Carpenter. 
All you've done is complain since 
you got here." 

— Jim Rushton 



FEBRUARY, 1980 



33 



High Cost of Auto Parts 



If You Assemble Your Own 
Car, Cost Is 4V2 Times As Much 



Something we always suspected is now 
out in the open. When you buy a single 
part for your car aren't you frequently 
outraged at the cost? Example — $15.00 
for a six inch molding strip! 

Now, a timely AP story reveals that if 
you buy all of the parts in an automobile, 
it will cost you about 4Vi times as much 
as the assembled car. 

"It would cost $26,418 to replace all of 
the parts on a totally wrecked 1979 
standard automobile priced at $5,741," 




the Alliance of American Insurers said 
in a report on the study. 

The industry group advocates auto 
safety, and one of its tools is periodic 
studies of the escalating costs of replace- 
ment parts. 

"Even moderate damage can make a 
car not worth repairing, especially if it 
is 3 or 4 years old," the report said. 

The alliance represents 131 insurance 
firms, many of which specialize in auto 
insurance. The companies pass on the 
repair costs in premiums paid by policy- 
holders, meaning that many drivers who 
have no accidents help pay for those who 
do. 

"The study illustrates why the rising 
cost of automobile crash repair is an 
important factor in the total cost of auto- 
mobile insurance and shows why even 
minor crash damage is so expensive to 
fix," the report said. 

The $26,418 parts total is on a 1979 
Chevrolet Impala, with no sales tax 
added, the industry group said. The same 
car bought new with a typical list of op- 
tions costs $5,741, the alliance said. 



Breathing Other People 9 s 
Smoke Called Health Hazard 



The heartfelt advice of a well-known 
heart specialist, especially to heart pa- 
tients, is this. When people smoke around 
you, don't breathe it. Leave it! 

Writing in the prestigious New Eng- 
land Journal of Medicine, Dr. Wilbert 
S. Aronow, Professor of Medicine and 
Chief of Cardiovascular Research at the 
University of California at Irvine, de- 
scribed a study he did on ten men with 
angina. 

On each of three mornings the men 
sat for two hours in one of three air 
quality environments. Then their exer- 
cise tolerance was tested. 

The men did best after breathing 
smoke-free air. They developed chest 
pains sooner doing less exercise after 
"passively" puffing other people's cig- 
arette smoke in a well-ventilated room. 
The same smoke exposure with no venti- 
lation produced the poorest performance 
of all. 

Why such effects? In an interview, 
Aronow said that it all goes back to the 
law of (oxygen) supply and demand. 

"Arteries are part of our 'piping sys- 
tem,' " he explained. "Blood flows 
through them to various parts of the 
body, including the heart. In coronary 



artery disease, one or more of the ar- 
teries leading to the heart is partially or 
totally clogged. 'Clogged pipes' can't de- 
liver blood and oxygen as fast." 

Angina occurs when oxygen demand 
exceeds supply, Aronow added. Here's 
where tobacco smoke adds insult to an 
already injured system. 

One culprit he points to is nicotine. 
Nicotine causes an increase in the heart's 
oxygen needs by boosting blood pressure 
and resting heart rate. Such effects were 
observed in Aronow's subjects after 
smoke exposure, and he feels nicotine 
was presumably the cause. Research by 
others has shown that nonsmokers can 
absorb nicotine when subjected to other 
people's puffing. 

So far we have increased oxygen de- 
mands on a diseased system less able to 
deliver. Add to that the double-barreled 
effect of carbon monoxide in decreasing 
oxygen supply. 

Aronow noted that oxygen must hitch 
a ride on blood hemoglobin to travel 
around the body. But if carbon monox- 
ide is hitching too, it gets picked up two 
hundred forty-five times more readily. 

What's more, wh-;n the level of car- 
Continued on Page 38 




REinus 

Consumer Product 
Safety Alert 

Under laws administered by the 
US Consumer Product Safety Com- 
mission, an estimated 117 million 
potentially hazardous products 
have been called back from the 
marketplace and consumers since 
1973 (when CPSC was created). 
Most of these were voluntarily re- 
called by manufacturers who estab- 
lished programs to repair or re- 
place the products, or to refund 
the purchase price. Recent actions 
include thefollowing: 

Energy-Sauing 
Devices 

Approximately 15,000 air-damper 
systems for fireplaces and wood- 
burning stoves manufactured by 
the Chim-A-Lator Co. should be 
modified to prevent possible fire 
hazards. 

Excessively hot chimney tempera- 
tures could cause some of the air 
dampers to close unexpectedly: if 
this happens, smoke or flames 
could be forced back into the room. 
The systems have been manufac- 
tured since 1969 as energy-saving 
devices to reduce heat loss up 
chimneys while they are not in use. 
The company has agreed to pro- 
vide free devices to keep the damp- 
ers open even in extreme heat. 
Consumers may obtain the device 
by writing to: Chim-A-Lator Co., 
8824 Wentworth Ave. S., Minne- 
apolis, Minn., 55420 (telephone: 
612-884-7274). The devices became 
available in December. 



To report a product hazard or a 
product-related injury, consumers 
should write to the U.S. Consumer 
Product Safety Commission, Wash- 
ington, D.C. 20207, or use the 
agency's toll-free Hotline. In the 
continental U.S. the number is 
800-638-8326. In the state of Mary- 
land, call 800-492-8363. In Alaska, 
Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Vir- 
gin Islands call 800-638-8333. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



The following list of 800 deceased members and spouses repre- 
sents a total of $1,016,245.94 in death claims paid for the month. 



Local Union, City 

1, Chicago, 111.— Eric S. Aldrin. 

2, Cincinnati, Oh. — Mrs. Jacob Fricker, 

Thomas J. Schwab, Jr. 

3, Wheeling, W. Va. — Mrs. Dana Dayton. 
5, St. Louis, Mo. — Alphonse C. Enzmann, 

Russell G. Wick. 

7, Minneapolis, Mn. — Floyd R. Foust, 
George H. Gustafson, Vincent Olson, 
Arthur E. Osmonson, Edward Steinweg. 

8, Philadelphia, Pa. — Olav M. Brandvik. 

9, Buffalo, N.Y. — Robert P. Gassman, Mrs. 

Holger Olsen, Chester D. Widenor. 

10, Chicago, III.— John W. Burns, Sr., Mrs. 

Cornelius Feenstra, Joseph I. L. Peter- 
sen, Mrs. Paul Sanetra. 
12, Syracuse, N.Y. — Richard L. Tarpey. 

14, San Antonio, Tx.— Mrs. Floyd R. 
Lyons, Jesse W. Myers, Sr., Frank 
Sellers. 

15, Hackensack, NJ. — Osmund Hornnes, 
Mrs. Philip Melillo, Nikolaus Schuch, 
John E. Strand, George Topczij. 

16, Springfield, 111. — John D. Claussen, 
Richard J. Sprinkel, Oscar L. Tuegel. 

19, Detroit, Mich.— Earl M. Hoffman, Ver- 
non W. Lough, Charles J. Schemanski. 

20, New York, N.Y.— John E. Johansen, 
Hans Nybro. 

22, San Francisco, Calif. — Roland Jacks, 
Vernon P. Nielson, Anderson C. Rains. 
24, Central Conn. — Dennis Devine. 

26, E. Detroit, Mich. — Norman Strieker. 

27, Toronto, Ont., Canada — Giovanni Cec- 
coni. 

30, New London, Conn. — Ralph S. Martin. 
32, Springfield, Ma.— John S. Bulat, Lionell 
H. Dowell. 

34, Oakland, Ca.— Beverly S. McElderry. 

35, San Rafael, Ca.— Edmund W. Griffin, 
Leonard Haussler. 

36, Oakland, Ca — John A. Aho, Mrs. Dick 

Felix, Sven A. Hockanson, William 
Musselman, Joseph P. Rayon. 

40, Boston, Mass. — Archie Anstey, Frederick 

G. Fletcher. 

41, Woborn, Mass. — Harold E. Williams. 

42, San Francisco, Ca. — Mrs. Lorenzo 
Morri, Theodore V. Wilson, Fred L. 
Wirthlin. 

43, Hartford, Conn. — John E. Zahner. 

44, Champaign, III. — Albert Adell, Ross 
Glasgow. 

50, Knoxville, Tn. — James A. Kerbo, Robert 

L. Stinnett. 

51, Boston, Ma. — Oscar B. Carlson, Daniel 
J. Healy. 

53, White Plains, N.Y.— Andrew Grosso. 

54, Chicago, III. — George Salach. 

55, Denver, Colo. — Vincent L. Brown, Rus- 

sell D. Lighter, Owen C. Worth. 
58, Chicago, III.— Peter J. Beeftink, John A. 
Carrigan, Robert T. Kronberg, Mrs. 
Einar Soderstrom, Clarence G. Sum- 
merfelt. 

60, Indianapolis, Ind. — Arnold V. Day. 

61, Kansas City, Mo. — Roy Donovan, 
Johnnie R. Hodges, William P. Litjen, 
Kenneth S. Mowery, Clarence H. 
Roever. 

62, Chicago, 111. — Eric Helmer, Bernard J. 
O'Connor. 

64, Louisville, Ky. — Robert Chaney. 

66, Olean, N.Y.— Cecil Work. 

67, Boston, Ma. — Basil A. Slavin, Mrs. 
Arthur J. Sprogis, Thomas P. Tyrrell, 
Jr. 



Local Union, City 

71, Fort Smith, Ar.— David H. Westbrook. 

73, St. Louis, Mo.— Mrs. Thomas G. Buck- 
ley. 

74, Chattanooga, Tn. — James Harrison 
Campbell. 

77, Port Chester, N.Y.— Lawrence J. 

Bologna. 
80, Chicago, 111.— William D. McAfee. 
82, Haverhill, Ma. — Arthur Robidoux. 
87, St. Paul, Mn. — Erick A. Larson, Frank 

H. Rossbach, Robert F. Schultz. 

89, Mobile, Ala. — Arthur Loyd Dickerson. 

90, Evansville, Ind. — John R. Brand, Clar- 
ence Mills, Paul Nemer. 

94, Providence, RI — Howard E. MacDuff, 
Iver H. W. Nelson. 

95, Detroit, Mich. — Daniel Fields, Elmer 
Gautherat, Felix Olsonoski. 

102, Oakland, Ca.— Floyd W. O'Neal. 

103, Birmingham, Ala. — Mrs. James B. 
Johnson. 

105, Cleveland, Oh. — Mrs. Lenvard Gaston, 
Emery Papp, Mrs. Dale Stakich. 

106, Des Moines, Iowa — Mrs. William E. 
Coffey. 

107, Worcester, Mass. — Mrs. Harry Dow, 
Edward F. Sullivan. 



Total for One Year 

By action of the 33rd General 
Convention, the Brotherhood death 
benefit was increased on January 1, 
1979, from $150 (under Schedule II) 
up to $2,000. As a result, the Brother- 
hood has paid out in one year — 
October, 1978, through September 
1979— death benefits totalling $8,463,- 
265.32. 



112, Butte, Mont. — Lawrence W. Ericson, 
Samuel H. Neely, Peter P. Zemljak. 

117, Albany, N.Y. — Omer C. Garant, Jere- 
miah P. Harris, Daniel A. Herrick. 

120, Utica, N.Y.— Fred Enos. 

131, Seattle, Wa Wilgus E. Belshee, Ivar 

K. Eidem, Mrs. John D. Festa, Ernst 
H. Hanson, Mrs. H. W. Hawkinson, 
Carl A. Oberg, Mrs. Dalton Rothfus, 
Pat E. Urness. 

132, Washington, D.C. — George S. Garinger, 
Mrs. Robert E. Light, Mrs. Rush H. 
Sayre, Reed Whitehurst, Sr. 

133, Terre Haute, Ind Mrs. Charles L. 

Bedwell, Everett Gross. 

134, Montreal, Que., Canada — Michel Blais, 
Edward T. Green, Romeo Horth, 
Mederic Taillefer, John A. Zielinski. 

135, N.Y., N.Y.— Fred DeBerardinis, An- 
tonio Servidio, Louis Zilberzweig. 

142, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Charles P. Cavanaugh, 
Fred R. Shenkle, Mrs. Fred R. Shen- 
kle, Norman L. Tragesser. 

146, Schenectady, N.Y. — Anthony Kasper. 

153, Helena, Mt. — Robert A. Barney, Mar- 
vin C. Bottleson. 

161, Kenosha, Wise. — Frank J. Marvin. 

162, San Mateo, Ca. — James G. Curry. 
166, Rock Island, 111.— Mrs. Wilbert C. Teel. 

168, Kansas City, Ks. — Mrs. James R. 
Burnett, Everett Mooney, Henry J. 
Stengel. 

169, E. St. Louis, 111.— Leo Lett. 

171, Youngstown, Oh. — George R. Sals- 
berry. 



Local Union, City 

174, Joliet, 111.— William S. Stirbis. 

180, Vallejo, Ca.— Harry C. Schwab. 

181, Chicago, III — Andrew Holm, William 

A. Marutzky, Ronald S. Solverson. 

182, Cleveland, Oh.— John Lindak. 

183, Peoria, 111 — Albert E. Abel. 

184, Salt Lake City, Utah— Kenneth C. 
Conway, James J. Lefevre, Lloyd B. 
Metcalf. 

186, Steubenville, Oh.— Mrs. John Mc- 

Keegan. 
191, York, Pa.— Mrs. Raymond S. Witmer. 
194, Oakland, Ca.— J. T. Bell, Mrs. Edward 

B. Cox, Stanley Kinder. 

198, Dallas, Tex. — Jesse Vernon Riggs. 
203, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. — John Pearse. 

210, Stamford, Conn. — George F. Bartolac, 
Hilmer Larson, Frank Swenson, John 
W. Thopsey. 

211, Pittsburgh, Pa.— James C. Grogan, Sr., 
Adam L. Heurich. 

215, Lafayette, Ind.— Harry C. Wingard. 
218, Boston, Ma.— Philip L. Lamb, Em- 
manuel S. Pazar, Louis E. Porter. 

225, Atlanta, Ga.— William H. Bledsoe, 
Carl T. Hannah, Oscar A. O'Kelly. 

226, Portland, Ore. — Mrs. Leroy J. Hurd. 
228, Pottsville, Pa.— John W. Mengel. 
230, Pittsburgh, Pa.— Michael H. Fischer. 
232, Fort Wayne, Ind.— Mrs. Amos L. 

Blosser. 
235, Riverside, Ca. — Louis R. Curiel, Clar- 
ence C. Farnham, Guy B. Marquand. 
242, Chicago, III.— William Charvat, Robert 

Christensen, John Karl, Mrs. Fred 

Mueller. 
246, N.Y., N.Y.— Eric Strang. 
252, Oshkosh, Wise. — Emil Jorgensen, John 

Matsche, Frank J. Selenka. 
257, N.Y., N.Y.— Joseph Falcone, Mrs. 

Henry Rickert, Frank A. Tavernese, 

George Ward. 

259, Jackson, Tn.— Artie L. Baker. 

260, Berkshire Co. & Vic, Ma.— Charles 
Hartman. 

261, Scranton, Pa. — Emil Adams. 

262, San Jose, Ca. — Herbert A. Bruening, 
Mrs. Harry Buswell. 

264, Milwaukee, Wise. — Harley Berning. 

266, Stockton, Ca.— Clifford L. Isbell, Jesse 
A. Phillips, Bernard R. Treadwell. 

267, Dresden, Oh.— Mrs. Otto L. Parrish. 

272, Chicago Hts., Ill — Rege M. Fredrick- 
son, Joseph G. Sylvester, Mrs. Egbert 
VanDerNoord, William G. Webb. 

275, Newton, Ma. — Roberts Smits. 
278, Watertown, N.Y.— Claude Aldrich, 
James Trainham. 

283, Augusta, Ga. — Reginald J. Sharpton. 

284, N.Y., N.Y.— Frank Putz, Frederick C. 
Sutter, Sr. 

286, Great Falls, Mont— Mrs. Donald T. 
Stewart, Joseph Weyer. 

287, Harrisburg, Pa. — Tracy M. Dorn, Mrs. 
Bruce W. Hockenberry, Jr. 

299, Fairview, N.J.— Mrs. Herbert O. Blatt, 

Peter Gordineck. 
302, Huntington, W.Va.— Robert J. Burns, 

Mrs. Laird R. Chandler, Mrs. Ray M. 

Stoner. 
308, Cedar Rapids, Iowa — Jorgen Wilson. 
311, Joplin, Mo. — Mrs. Clarence A. Tillock. 
314, Madison, Wise. — Jerome E. Vogel. 
320, Augusta/ Waterville, Me. — Irvine Bolst- 

ridge. 



FEBRUARY, 1980 



35 



321, Connellsville, Pa. — Joseph E. Feren- 

cuha. 
324, Waco, Tx. — Joseph Bailey Burns. 
329, Oklahoma City, Ok. — Norbert Arnold 

Wittman. 

337, Detroit, Mich.— Walter Bluck, Clifton 
E. Ross. 

338, Seattle, Wa.— John W. Truman. 

342, Pawtucket, R.I. — August J. Caron, 

Lawrence J. Martineau. 
345, Memphis, Tn. — Mrs. D. A. Miles. 
350, New Rochelle, N.Y David L. Kohli, 

Ernest Schreiber, John E. Schudy. 
355, Buffalo, N.Y.— Mrs. Michael Dischner, 

William O. Haese. 

361, Duluth, Mn.— Hans Hovland. 

362, Pueblo, Co.— Toby Vigil. 

364, Council Bluffs, la. — Leroy Acklie. 
366, N.Y., N.Y. — Austin J. Morrissey, Bar- 

nett Slobodin, Samuel Ziperman. 
373, Ft. Madison, la.— Mrs. Walter Wilkins. 

378, Edwardsville, III. — George J. Ostendorf. 

379, Texarkana, Tx. — Dan Grounds. 
383, Bayonne, NJ. — Mrs. Joseph Rolnik. 
385, N.Y., N.Y.— Mrs. Leroy Adams, 

Domenick Lombardi. 

393, Camden, N.J.— Reuben S. Graham. 

402, Northampton/Greenfield, Ma. — Joseph 
A. Muka. Sr. 

411, San Angelo, Tx.— Verner E. Cart- 
wright. 

413, South Bend, Ind.— Mrs. Billie Shaffer. 

416, Chicago, III — George Schwader. 

417, St. Louis, Mo. — James F. O'Rourke. 
419, Chicago, III. — Walter F. Schoenborn. 
422, New Brighton, Pa.— Edwin C. Baker. 
424, Hingham, Ma. — John J. Giardino, 

Robert Gustavson. 

433, Belleville, III.— Mrs. Edward Lahr. 

434, Chicago, III. — Albert Dykstra. 
440, Buffalo, N.Y.— Robert D. Zent. 

446, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., Canada— Russell 

Ambeault. 
450, Ogden, Utah— William S. Miller. 
452, Vancouver, B.C., Canada— Carl T 

Craig, Jack Eyber, Michael Patrick, 

Mike Stokes. 

454, Philadelphia, Pa. — Mrs. Andrew Hail- 
and, Joseph J. Jones. Otto Weiss, Jr. 

455, Somerville, NJ. — Frans C. Franson. 
465, Ardmore, Pa. — Daniel J. Cullen, An- 
drew Pillarella. 

468, Inwood, N.Y. — Herbert Guenzel. 

469, Cheyenne, Wyo. — Frank E. Fowler. 

470, Tacoma, Wa. — Raymond H. Ellison, 
Mrs. Anthony Hulscher, John D. Mar- 
tinolich, Peter U. Person, Charles 
Zemek. 

480, Freeburg, III.— Mrs. Floyd Sudholt. 

483, San Francisco, Ca. — Lois Baker, Rus- 
sell Collins Long, Marvin H. Staudt. 

488, N.Y., N.Y. — Thorleiv Jensen, Gunnar 
Johnson, Mrs. Henning Wiik. 

490, Passaic, NJ.— Matthew Belli. 

492, Reading, Pa. — Albert L. Frank, Law- 
rence Schmidt, Harvey L. Stump. 

501, Stroudsburg, Pa. — Mrs. Jay Miller. 

507, Nashville, Tn. — James Reece Baird. 

508, Marion, III. — Raymond R. Grisham. 
512, Ypsilanti, Mi.— Leo R. Singer, Ben- 
jamin H. Strong. 

522, Durham, N.C.— William T. Herndon. 
530, Los Angeles, Ca. — Javier Arias. 
538, Concord, N.H.— Donat Labbe. 
550, Oakland, Ca. — Louis Aloysius Vierra. 
553, San Diego, Ca. — Leeland T. Brown, 

Michael J. Lee. 
559, Paducah, Ky.— Mrs. Randolph Keith, 

Thomas I. Peterson, Mrs. John Sumner. 

562, Everett, Wash.— Oscar K. Hoist, Vernon 
D. McGrath. 

563, Glendale, Calif. — Eugene L. LaFon- 
taine. 

583, Portland, Ore — Roy J. Brown. 



586, Sacramento, Calif. — Murrey J. Albers, 
Albert C. Brady, Clyde L. Byrd, Clar- 
ence P. Jones. 

599, Hammond, Ind. — Fred F. Friedline, 
Arvid Carl Johnson, David I. Pulliam, 
Kenneth W. Ray, Mrs. John Sumner. 

603, Ithaca, N.Y.— Dana R. Rumsey. 

608, N.Y., N.Y.— Daniel Meder, George F. 
Pauls. 

610, Port Arthur, Tx.— Virgil Jacobs, Rich- 
ard L. Spence. 

618, Sikeston, Mo. — Mrs. Grey Johnson. 

620, Madison, NJ. — Mrs. John Brachocki, 
Arnold T. Terkelsen. 

623, Atlantic Co., NJ.— Mrs. Jerry Elliff. 

625, Manchester, N.H. — Joseph B. Simard. 

627, Jacksonville, Fla.— Mrs. E. C. Blume, 
Mrs. Edmund E. Scydick. 

633, Granite City, III.— Mrs. Irving J. Dick. 

635, Boise, Idaho — Ira C. Buchanan, John 
E. McBride. 

639, Akron, Oh. — Edward A. Havens. 

643, Chicago, III.— Edward R. Thullen. 

655, Marathon, Fla. — George T. Albury. 

658, Millinocket, Me.— Mrs. Calvin H. 
Jacques. 

660, Springfield, Oh.— Roy F. South. 

665, Amarillo, Tx.— Kirk Chester, Mrs. Ed. 
K. Doores, Isaac F. Goodrich. 

668, Palo Alto, Ca.— Henry W. Grotheer. 

690, Little Rock, Ark.— Claudie E. Lackie, 
John G. Milner. 

696, Tampa, Fla. — Milton F. Ramsey. 

698, Covington, Ky. — Benjamin L. Good- 
ridge, Louis J. Krumpelman, Rosco 
Wilson. 

705, Lorain, Oh. — Reuben H. Heisner. 

710, Long Beach, Ca.— Ray T. Hackett, 
Victor Logsdon. 

715, Elizabeth, N.J.— Paul Aylward. 

719, Freeport, III.— Mrs. Richard Kehl. 

720, Baton Rouge, La. — Mrs. Calvin E. 
Palmer. 

721, Los Angeles, Ca. — James E. Bedwell, 
Alton M. Brandel, Mrs. Israel Mejia. 

727, Hialeah, Fla.— Roy C. Stringer. 
736, Tucson, Az. — Ernest S. Owen. 

739, Cincinnati, Oh. — Raymond Riga. 

740, N.Y., N.Y.— John Dees. 

742, Decatur, II.— Harold E. Blankenship, 
Mrs. Harry J. Hendrian, Mrs. Sherman 
Hubler. 

743, Bakersfield, Ca.— Perry E. Lee. 

745, Honolulu, Hi.— Clifford B. Hing, Mrs. 

James K. Ito, Manuel Pasco, Walter 

D. Tsuda. 
751, Santa Rosa, Ca. — John Lefor. 
756, Bellingham, Wash. — Joseph R. Maroe, 

Mrs. Harold R. Robinson. 
764, Shreveport, La. — Charles E. Johnston, 

Alfred H. Williams, Cecil Marion 

Williams. 

767, Ottumwa, la. — Mrs. Robert M. Beem. 

768, Kingston, Pa.— Thomas Shaffer. 

769, Pasadena, Ca. — Oscar E. Olson. 

770, Yakima, Wa.— Martin Dahl, Guy W. 
Garland. 

772, Clinton, Iowa — Mrs. L. Fay Hudson, 

Theresa E. Rigby. 
780, Ostoria, Or.— Ernest L. Albert, William 

A. Bjornsgard. 
783, Sioux Falls, S. Dak.— Helmer O. Ris- 

lov, William Schroeder. 
787, N.Y., N.Y.— Knut B. Alexander, 

Sigbjorn Nedland, Dominick Solitario. 
801, Woonsocket, R.I. — Mrs. Lester Landry, 

Urban Peck. 
803, Metropolis, III.— William T. Jackson, 

Joseph P. Williams, Murlie A. Worthen. 
815, Beverly, Ma. — George W. Ayers. 
819, W. Palm Bch., Fla.— Mrs. Allen A. 

Cameron, Mrs. Ira Cox, Barnabas B. 

Huff, Sr. 



821, Springfield, NJ.— Chester Piecyk. 

824, Muskegon, Mi. — Frank Kwiecien. 

829, Santa Cruz, Ca. — Orion Hopping. 

845, Norwood, Pa. — Joseph F. Verzella. 

857, Tucson, Az.— Robert C. Oldfather. 

865, Brunswick, Ga. — Columbus E. Arnold, 
Mrs. Ben Gulley, Russell Lee Rowell. 

871, Battle Creek, Mi.— Mrs. Harry Leins. 

889, Hopkins, Mn. — Marvin Campbell. 

891, Hot Springs, Ark.— Mrs. Nobel R. 
Wells. 

898, Benton Harbor, Mi.— Ernest Schmidt, 
Dan Stanard. 

900, Altoona, Pa. — Joseph Kubica. 

902, Brooklyn, N.Y. — Albert Andreassen. 

925, Salinas, Ca. — George Duke, George 
Jones, Ralph McKie. 

929, Los Angeles, Ca.— Ansel H. P. Ball, 
Augustus Boomhower, Robert Mc- 
Carthy. 

937, Dubuque, Iowa — Mike J. Schmit. 

943, Tulsa, Ok.— Donald M. Breeland, 
Norman W. Leazer. 

944, San Bernardino, Ca. — Alfred William 
Huddleston, Sr., Kenneth Ryan, Mrs. 
Robert Somers. 

953, Lake Charles, La. — Thomas Fontenot. 

954, Mt. Vernon, Wa. — Olav Albin Nilson. 
958, Marquette, Mi. — Louis Leardi. 

964, Rockland Co. & Vic, N.Y— Theodore 
E. Fogelin. 

971, Reno, Nev.— John D. Giossi. 

974, Baltimore, Md. — James Greenidge. 

978, Springfield, Mo. — Marvin H. Ronning. 

993, Miami, Fla. — Harold Dalland. Mahlon 
S. Gerard. Grant E. Gravitt, Harry V. 
Hurlock, Ralph Shuman. 

998, Royal Oak, Mi.— Hollie A. Monnie. 

1001, North Bend, Ore.— Edward Gold- 
bloom. 

1005, Merrillville, Ind.— Charles Titus. 

1020, Portland, Ore.— Dean R. Hanson. 

1022, Parsons, Ks.— Mrs. Walter D. Lee. 

1025, Medford. Wise— Walter H. Schaefer. 

1036, Longview-Kelso, Wash. — Raymond G. 
Bruner. 

1042, Plattsburg, N.Y.— Walter P. Light. 

1050, Philadelphia, Pa Salvatore Giglio, 

James Menzano, Joseph J. Sullivan. 

1051, Sacramento, Ca. — Lee Roy McKee. 

1052, Hollywood, Ca.— Arthur G. Burhans. 

1053, Milwaukee, Wise. — John J. Rolbiecki, 
Sr. 

1054, Everett, Wash.— Harry A. Walden. 
1062, Santa Barbara, Ca.— Wilford T. Dick- 

erson. 

1072, Muskogee, Ok.— Wilburn H. Smoot. 

1073, Philadelphia, Pa.— Charles M. Gar- 
finkel, Morris Sibulkin, Benjamin R. 
Wilson, Sr. 

1089, Phoenix, Az. — Edward E. Mernagh. 
1093, Glen Cove, N.Y.— Erling J. Johansen, 
Mrs. John Lombardi. 

1098, Baton Rouge, La. — George H. Decuir, 
Joseph S. Dubroc, Adam Farrell, Nor- 
man Thornton, Cinclair H. York. 

1099, Clinton, Ok.— Jewel Fred Taylor. 
1102, Detroit, Mi.— Vernon R. Howe. 
1104, Tyler, Tx.— Benjamin F. Acker, Floyd 

L. Martin. 

1108, Cleveland, Oh.— Mrs. Leonard O. 
Muttick, William Smallwood. 

1109, Visalia, Ca.— Wilbur Purdin. 
1126, Annapolis, Md. — John E. Saulit. 
1128, LaGrange, III.— Robert W. Tunning. 
1138, Toledo, Oh.— Ralph Beck, Mrs. Wes- 
ley D. Favorite, Lester H. Peterson. 

1146, Green Bay, Wise. — Daniel L. Letour- 
neau. 

1148, Olympia, Wa. — Kesten P. Jaeger, 
Gilbert E. Lawrence. 

1149, San Francisco, Ca. — John H. R. Kiser. 

1150, Saratoga Springs, N.Y. — Mrs. Martin 
Kreisel. 

Continued on Page 38 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



i 



m*?m 



■MdLlA 



Does The Be/saw Pay? 
YOU BET! 



onto** 

100% 

fa 



■ "On Saturdays, my big day, I take ir $45 to $55. 
Other days I average less, but I figure I make 
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I am presently enlarging my shop, and thank 
Belsaw and their fine equipment for making it 
possible." 

V. O. Miller Hubert, North Carolina 2S5S9 

■ "I was disabled by an accident while employed 
as an iron worker. They declared me 100% dis- 
abled and said I'd never work again. I don't think 
I could work for anyone else but I started my 
sharpening business part-time and now it's turned 
into a full-time job with more work than I can do." 

Tampa, Florida 336 14 

■ "I had dreamed of retiring for years, but was 
afraid to quit my salaried job. I had never used 
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week — without advertising at all. Now, for the 
first time in my life, I can say that I am content." 

Farris Cornelius Wellington, Texas 79095 



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It's great to be your own boss." 
DAVID SWANSON-Utica, Michigan 



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FREE BLUEPRINTS 

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Send for the free blueprints we are 
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These prints cover not only floor plan, 
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Included will be Chicago Tech's well 
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28 pages of practical introduction to 
construction plan redding based an 
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this instruction to his present and 
future work. 

Investigate Chicago Tech Training 
Why this unusual offer of the free 
blueprints and lesson in Plan Reading? 
Simply this — to introduce you to the 
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Take Advantage of This Free Offer! 

So, mail the coupon below for the free 
ranch blueprints and accompanying lesson 
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how for less than five dollars per week 
you can use your spare time at home to 
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ESTABLISHED 1904 • APPROVED FOR VETERANS 

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2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVENUE/CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60616 



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I 



Namn ,. 




An 




Cur 


».i. 


7Jn 



Occupation. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Continued from Page 36 

2416, Portland, Ore.— Claude E. Dunn, Mrs. 

Michael S. Jones. 
2425, Glendive, Mt. — Clarence H. Knapp. 
2430, Charleston, W.Va.— Floyd W. Joseph. 
2456, Washington, D.C.— Earl G. Straub. 
2463, Ventura, Ca. — Kenneth L. Davis. 
2484, Orange, Tx. — Eugene L. Barrett, 

Everett Stewart. 
2519, Seatle, Wa.- Einar K. Sundberg. 
2555, Port Angeles, Wa.— Lester A. Cum- 

mings, Ronald G. Pearson. 
2581, Libby, Mt.— Roland J. Greenup. 
2633, Tacoma, Wa. — Amos Doers, John I, 

Ness, Joe Tedesco. 
2667, Bellingham, Wa. — Leroy F. Sander. 
2682, N.Y., N.Y.— John E. Bridges, Frank 

Miley. 
2693, Thunder Bay, Ont., Canada— Lloyd 

K. Johnston, Gary Rossiter, Hans J. 

Sharpe. 
2714, Dallas, Ore.— Gerald D. Strahle. 
2739, Yakima, Wa.— Robert W. Lynch, 

William A. Rozinski. 
2805, Klickitat, Wa.— Ronald R. Kamp. 
2848, Dallas, Tx.— Leon C. Barrow, J. C. 

Thompson. 
2881, Portland, Ore. — John Ashenberner, 

Elmer E. Harris. 
2907, Weed, Ca.— Lloyd F. Lair. 
2935, Creston, Wash.— Mrs. Murray Gill. 
2949, Roseburg, Ore.— Richard L. Harders, 

Richard P. Lehnen, Bob Rowland, 

Carroll H. Van Winkle. 



Parkinson's Disease 
Effort Continues 

The Brotherhood continues its 
active support of the American 
Parkinson's Disease Association's 
vital work. Please mail your con- 
tributions to the APDA campaign 
as follows: United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Wash- 
ington, D.C. 20001, Attention: 
Parkinson's Disease Drive. A list 
of recent contributors will appear 
in our March issue. 



3002, Calgary, A.B., Canada — Fernando 

Raposo. 
3023, Omak, Wa.— Brady L. Haugen. 
3064, Toledo, Ore.— Raymond A. Pugh. 
3091, Vaughn, Or.— Mrs. Hoyt Michael. 
3119, Tacoma, Wa. — Catherine Hegedus, 

Mae E. Spurgeon. 
3161, Maywood, Ca. — Mrs. Carlos M. 

Murillo. 
3182, Portland, Ore.— Martin A. Epps. 
3206, Pompano Beach, Fla. — Allen L. 

Harris. 
3210, Madison, Ind. — Parker Knox. 



OTHER PEOPLE'S SMOKE 

Continued from Page 34 

bon monoxide in the blood starts to rise, 
the oxygen on board is bound more 
tightly to hemoglobin. So less oxygen is 
available to the body tissues and heart 
on at least two counts. 

With over four thousand components 
of tobacco smoke, could any of the 
others be hard on a nonsmoker's heart? 
This should be studied, Aronow feels. 

Meanwhile, he would like heart pa- 
tients especially to take the following 
caution "to heart." You might breathe 
easier, and perhaps longer, if you don't 
breathe other people's smoke. 

— Marion Wells, Research Director, 
American Physical Fitness Research In- 
stitute. Provided as a public service by the 
American Physical Fitness Research 
Institute (APFRI), 824 Moraga Drive, 
West Los Angeles, Calif. 90049. 



Imports are killing too many American 
industries, demand the union label and 
the "Made in USA" designation on all 
products. 



Your home workshop 



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popular patterns. Other Belsaw operators turn out picture 
frames, fencing, clock cases, furniture, bee hives, bed slats, 
surveyor's stakes ... all kinds of millwork. Handles tough 
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Men and women everywhere are using this one 

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READ WHAT BELSAW OWNERS SAY: 

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enough money to pay tor two-thirds the cost of 
the Planer It really does a good |0b " 
R. S. Clark -Springfield, Ohio 

"This machine pays tor itself making money 
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machine and I confess it is more than I really 
expected tor the price It does everything you 
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Stephen Schultz - Orangeville, Penna. 

"I've been a planer man for years and am now 
retired The Belsaw has earned me $60,000 in 
eleven years it's the best investment I 
ever made " 
Robert Sawyer Roseburg, Oregon 

"I recommend the Belsaw as the most useful 
shop tool any craftsman could own We use 
one every day in the Workbench model shop 
couldn't get along without it 

Jay Hedden. Editor 
Workbench Magazine 



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38 



THE CARPENTER 




On mi™ 

TAP, TURN, TOGGLE BOLT 




A new toggle bolt hollowall fastener 
from Homecraft division of Gries can 
be hammered directly into sheetrock 
walls. There is no need for a drill. The 
unique hardware features a one-piece 
pressure die cast zinc alloy bullet that 
pierces the wall and automatically flips on 
its tempered steel mounting screw to form 
a superstrong metal "T" behind the wall, 
requiring only a tap, turn and tighten 
installation. The Vi-inch diameter bullet 
toggle makes the smallest hole of any 
expansion type fastener. For more in- 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Belsaw Locksmith 31 

Belsaw Planer 38 

Belsaw Sharp-All 37 

Black & Decker 19 

Chevrolet Motor Division 13 

Chicago Technical College 37 

Clifton Enterprises 32 

Eliason Stair Gauge 32 

Esrwing Mfg. Co 29 

Foley Mfg. Co 30 

Full Length Roof Framer 39 

Hydrolevel 32 

Industrial Abrasives Co 30 

Irwin Auger Bit 32 

Layout Pencil 32 

Stair Square 28 

Tremont Nail Co 39 

Woodcraft Supply Co 28 



formation contact: Homecraft Division; 
Gries; 400 Beechwood Avenue; New 
Rochelle, New York 10802. 



BENCH-TOP WORK CENTER 




SINCE 
1819 



A new bench-top Workmate® Work 
Center from Black & Decker features in- 
dividually adjustable vise jaw handles and 
swivel grips that permit secure holding of 
objects of virtually any shape, and a work 
surface that can be tilted to three differ- 
ent work angles. With the base and vise 
jaws molded from specially formulated 
blends of foamable and impact-grade 
Tenite polypropylene, supplied by East- 
man Chemical Products, Inc., it also has 
outstanding impact resistance and sur- 
face hardness while weighing only 14 
pounds. A combination of mounting 
clamps and suction cups permits mount- 
ing on practically any work surface. The 
unit retails for about $35.00. For infor- 
mation write: Black & Decker (U.S.) 
Inc., 701 East Joppa Road, Towson, 
Maryland 21204. 



FINGER-JOINTED GUIDE 

An increasing volume of nominal 2- 
inch thick end-jointed (finger-jointed) 
framing lumber is being produced in all 
widths, making it necessary for specifiers, 
suppliers and users to become familiar 
with the advantages and acceptances of 
this material. 

Among advantages of structural end- 
jointed material listed by the Western 
Wood Products Association are : Specified 
standard lengths and special lengths for 
custom requirements, benefit of season- 
ing, more uniform grade characteristics, 
inherent internal stresses relieved, yards 
well and excellent builder acceptance. 

A new publication from WWPA ex- 
cerpts approval of the material by model 
building codes. 

The four-page "Guide to Finger- 
Jointed Dimension Lumber" is available 
from Western Wood Products Associa- 
tion, 1500 Yeon Building, Portland, Ore- 
gon 97204. 




THE 



HISTORV OF CUT NAU£ 
H W i AMERICA 






A unique collection of Old Fashioned 
cut nails guaranteed to charm all 
interested in the memorabilia of 
Early American building. Included 
in the package is a description of 
the history of Cut Nail making in 
America. 

20 Nail Kit $3.50 ppd. 

Mass. residents add 5% sales tax 

SEND FOR OUR 

FREE CATALOG TODAY 

TREMONT NAIL CO 

P.O. Box 111 Dept. C20 

Wareham, Mass. 02571 

^v Phone: (617) 295-0038 J 



Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
TIRE length of Common-Hip-Valley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is % 
inch rise to 12 inch run. Pitches in- 
crease Yz inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
ings for each pitch. The smallest 
width is Yi inch and they increase 
Y±" each time until they cover a 60 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof is 48'-9%" wide. Pitch 
is 7%" rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons, Hips and 
Jacks and the Cuts in ONE MINUTE. 
Let us prove it, or return your money. 



Getting the lengths of rafters by the span and 
the method of setting op the tables Is tally pro- 
tected by the 1917 & 1944 Copyrights. 



In the U.S.A. send $5.00. We pay the 

postage. California residents add 30 <t 
tax. 

We also have a very fine Stair 

book 9" x 12". It sells for $3.00. We 

pay the Postage. California residents 
add 18« tax. 



A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 405, Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 



FEBRUARY, 1980 



39 



IN CONCLUSION 



IHE JOB AHEAD 
REQUIRES 



nno sncRiFitE 



The orderly transition of 

leadership in the 

Brotherhood is in the finest 

traditions of the labor movement 



This is my first official message to you as your 
General President, and I approach it with humility 
and deep thought. 

When one stops to realize that other men ... in 
generations past ... for almost a hundred years 
. . . have borne this title of General President, 
faced similar problems, answered the many letters, 
delivered the speeches, and made many of the 
decisions for three-quarters of a million people . . . 
the largest Building Trades organization in North 
America . . . one cannot help but be humble . . . 
and grateful to every fellow member of the 
Brotherhood for the honor bestowed. 

These are truly big shoes which I must fill, start- 
ing with Gabriel Edmonston, our first president in 
1881, and going down through the years to our 
much admired and able Bill Sidell, who retired a 
month ago. 

I pledge to you as I take on these new responsi- 
bilities that I will do my utmost to carry out the 
full responsibilities of the office and that I will 
build for the future, with your help, on the stable 
foundation of our past. 

Ours is a democratic organization which adapts 
to the times. We have weathered depressions and 
economic booms, wars, and anti-labor drives of 
all kinds through the years, and I know that we 
will bear up well under the challenges of the 1980s. 

The orderly transition of leadership in the 
Brotherhood assures our continued success. 
Though Bill Sidell has put aside the daily responsi- 
bilities of this office, I know that I can call on him 
for advice and counsel, when it is needed. I know, 
too, that I will have your other General Officers, 
Pat Campbell, John Rogers, and Charlie Nichols 
working with me. 

Meanwhile, we take on the tasks before us in 
the spirit of cooperation and trust which has guided 
us through the years, and I firmly believe that we 
will meet all challenges with firmness and under- 
standing. 

We are taking an aggressive stance in our 
organizing program, for example. There are still 
thousands of unorganized workers in our crafts 
and industries, and our 33rd General Convention 
at St. Louis took resolute action to expand our 
organizing activities. Under convention mandate, 
we have established an Industrial Department at 
the General Office, and, last month, our councils 
of industrial locals across the country held their 
first joint conference to plan the work ahead. Our 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



VOC program, under which volunteer organizing 
committees go out and personally contact other 
industrial workers, is being "reborn," and you will 
hear much of VOC in the months ahead. 

CHOP, too, will be renewed, as the housing 
industry struggles to recover from the exhorbitant 
interest rates and land costs which keep it in check. 
The US and Canadian housing industries are 
suffering from the shoddy workmanship of thou- 
sands of unskilled, "scab" workers who have 
drifted into the trade. We once had a dominant 
position in the housing industry. A union-built 
house was the rule and not the exception. Since 
World War II, and the great increase in com- 
mercial construction, we have let this dominant 
position slip away from us, and we must get it back. 

Your former general president, Bill Sidell, 
fought hard to assist the ailing housing industry 
and to bring craft skills back into home building, 
and I intend to continue to expand his efforts. 

About the time you read this, we will have 
launched a program of promotion and public 
relations — which was also authorized by the 
33rd General Convention. You will find elsewhere 
in this issue of The Carpenter a report on our first 
television commercial, designed to acquaint the 
US and Canadian public with the fact that we are 
an experienced, social conscious trade union, 
aware of its public responsibilities. We will con- 
tinue such promotional work up to and through 
our centennial year of 1981. 

We are proud of the fact that we are approach- 
ing our 100th birthday, next year, and we want to 
demonstrate to the public that we are a labor union 
in the best sense of the term. 

We ask every member to join in our coming 
observance of the first century milestone. We urge 
every local union, district council, and state and 
provincial council to plan some commemoration 
of our 100th birthday, next year. 

There is still another timely action which must 
be taken by the membership in the months im- 
mediately ahead. This is an election year in the 
United States and an election year, by circum- 
stance, in Canada as well. We must be prepared to 
vote in 1980 for the candidates for public office 
who support our efforts and our long-range goals. 

Every member of the Brotherhood must be 
registered and qualified to vote, no matter what 
the party affiliation. We must have bargaining 
strength at the ballot box as well as at the contract- 



negotiating table. Our own political action group 
— CLIC, the Carpenters Legislative Improvement 
Committee — will be seeking your continued 
support. I urge you to join in this activity. 

This is only a brief summary of what's ahead 
of us in 1980, and we will discuss these and other 
matters in future issues. I am confident that nothing 
can stop us from growing, prospering and increas- 
ing our effectiveness, if we practice true fellowship, 
perform our work, and make the necessary sacri- 
fices to achieve the better life in the decade ahead. 

A final note: The fund-raising drive of the 
American Parkinson's Disease Assn. is our special 
undertaking. APDA needs your continued sup- 
port. I can think of no better tribute to our retired 
General President, who headed up this campaign, 
than to make this year's effort a huge success. 




WILLIAM KONYHA 



General President 



. rp 



^wfffiJ 





13th Rnnual 

International 

Carpentry 

Apprenticeship 

Contest 



The National Joint Carpenter Apprenticeship and Train- 
lg Committee in session in New Orleans. From left, 
round the conference table, members include: Fred Hum- 
hreys, Home Builders (NAHB); Peter Johnson, Associated 
ieneral Contractors (AGC); Marlin Grant, NAHB; Hans 
Vachsmulh, AGC; William Pemberton, AGC; Ernest 
ones, AGC, committee secretary; R. W. Schwertner, 
IGC, co-chairman; Gen. Pres. William Konyha, Brother- 
ood (UBC), co-chairman; James E. Tinkcom, technical 
'irector, UBC; George E. Vest, Jr., UBC; Louis Basich, 
IBC; Joseph Pinto, UBC; Ollie Langhorst, UBC; First 
len. Vice Pres. Patrick Campbell, UBC, who succeeds 
'res. Konyha to the co-chairmanship; and Bradford M. 
VBrien, U.S. Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training; 
dvisory member. Preston Haglin, NAHB, and Advisory 
iember Jean Berube, BAT, were not present. 




V c« 




March 1980 




United Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners of America 












11 


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1 


1 


• 


I 


1 1 









♦ 



c 



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Beginning a series of articles 
by national and international 
leaders on problems of 
the new decade 





GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 






GENERAL PRESIDENT 
William Konyha 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Patrick J. Campbell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Sigurd Lucassen 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

John S. Rogers 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 
Charles E. Nichols 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENTS EMERITI 
M. A. Hutcheson 
William Sidell 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Joseph F. Lia 
120 North Main Street 
New City, New York 10956 

Second District 



Third District, Anthony Ochocki 
14001 West McNichols Road 
Detroit, Michigan 48235 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

2970 Peachtree Rd., N.W., Suite 300 
Atlanta. Ga. 30305 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140 N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116 

Seventh District, Hal Morton 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, John Carruthers 
5799 Yonge Street #807 
Willowdale, Ontario M2M 3V3 

Tenth District, Ronald J. Dancer 

1235 40th Avenue, N.W. 

Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2K OG3 




William Konyha, Chairman 
John S. Rogers, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

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which the financial secretary needs to 
send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 

In sending in the names of mem- 
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with each monthly bill should be 
used. When a member clears out of 
one local union into another, his 
name is automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of the local union he 
cleared out of. Therefore, the secre- 
tary of the union into which he cleared 
should forward his name to the Gen- 
eral Secretary so that this member 
can again be added to the mailing list. 

Members who die or are suspended 
are automatically dropped from the 
mailing list of The Carpenter. 



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rects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not advise your own 
local union of your address change. You must also notify your local union 
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THE 
COVERS 



(ISSN 0008-6843) 

VOLUME 100 No. 3 MARCH, 1980 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

John S. Rogers, Editor 

IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

View from Pennsylvania Ave. US Vice President Walter Mondale 2 

A Blueprint for the 80s 

New Era for Our Cities HUD Secretary Moon Landrieu 4 

A Blueprint for the 80s 

The Legacy of George Meany 6 

Brotherhood Industrial Conference 8 

Reciprocal Agreements of the Pro-Rata Pension Plan 1 1 

Did You Know? Our Ties with the AFL-CIO 14 

Sigurd Lucassen, Second General Vice President 16 

Contributors to Parkinsons Disease Campaign 23 



DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Report 7 

Ottawa Report 1 

Consumer Clipboard: Tax Deductions for Travel 17 

Plane Gossip — 1 9 

Local Union News 20 

Service to the Brotherhood 25 

In Memoriam - 34 

What's New? ------ 39 

In Conclusion William Konyha 40 



POSTMASTERS. ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001 

Published monthly at 3342 Bladensburg Road, Brentwood, Md. 20722 by the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, D.C. and 
Additional Entries. Subscription price: United States and Canada $7.50 per year, single copies 
750 in advance. 



FRONT COVER: A craftsman 
works best with blueprints and precise 
specifications. But there are no blue- 
prints to guide us as workers and 
breadwinners in the uncertain years of 
the 1980s . . . and, perhaps, it is best 
that there aren't. 

We have the mandates of the 33rd 
General Convention, and, next year, 
as we mark our 100th birthday at the 
34th General Convention, we will 
have additional resolutions and man- 
dates. Aside from these, we must call 
upon our national and international 
leaders to analyze and describe what's 
ahead. 

In this issue, we begin a series of 
articles written especially for The Car- 
penter called "Blueprints for the 80s". 
Watch for additional articles in this 
series in the April and May issues of 
your Brotherhood magazine. Photo by 
H. Armstrong Roberts 



BACK COVER: The response to 
our June, 1979, cover — displaying 
tools, a tool box, and a quotation by 
R. G. Collingwood — was so good 
that we soon ran out of copies. To 
meet the continuing requests from our 
readers, we are reprinting the June 
cover on our March, 1980, back cover. 
There is no mailing label to mar its 
appearance, and it should reach you 
suitable for framing. 

The author of the quotation, R. G. 
Collingwood, was a British historian 
who died in 1943. He is best known 
for his book, The Idea of History, 
published by Oxford University Press. 
— Art by Ray Neely 





Printed in U.S.A. 




'We have asked for 325,000 Federally-assisted housing units— 
25% more than in the current budget.' 

'When President Carter unveiled his 1981 budget, its largest new 
domestic program was for youth employment and training. By 
1982, we expect to spend $6 billion to give our poorest young 
people the boost they need.' 




VICE PRESIDENT MONDALE 



Vice President Walter F. Mondale 
is a native of Minnesota. He served as 
State Attorney General from 1960 to 
1964, then was appointed to the Sen- 
ate to fill the seat vacated by Hubert 
Humphrey's election as Vice Presi- 
dent. During his twelve years in the 
Senate, Mondale was instrumental in 
drafting civil rights, housing, labor, 
and education legislation. In 1976, he 
was elected Vice President of the 
United States. 



By WALTER MONDALE 

Vice President 
of the United States 

Pennsylvania Avenue angles south- 
east across Washington toward the 
White House, jogs around the Treasury, 
and makes a beeline for the Capitol. 

As Vice President, I probably travel 
that route more often than any other 
member of the Federal Government. 
It's my job not only to report to the 
President, but also to preside over the 
Senate. And just as my office links the 
Executive and Legislative Branches, I 
feel it should serve as a corridor be- 
tween the President and the people as 
well. 

That's why, just over a year ago, I 
reported to your 33rd General Con- 
vention on the progress we were mak- 
ing in this Administration. Now, as 
the American people again face the 
crucial decision of who should lead 
our nation for the next four years, it's 
time to re-examine the record and look 
at the tasks ahead. 

Three years ago, the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners was 
the first Building Trades union to en- 
dorse Jimmy Carter for President. You 
endorsed him because he understood 
the importance of jobs, decent housing, 
a stronger economy, and help for our 
poor, our elderly, and our children. 

When we ran for office, the housing 
industry was depressed, and ten mil- 
lion Americans were out of work. 

In three years, we've turned that 
situation around. We raised the mini- 
mum wage to $3.15 an hour. Today, 
over 9 million more people are on the 
job than on the day we took office. 
More than a million of those are con- 
struction workers, and 206,000 are 
carpenters. 

Housing starts have averaged nearly 
2 million a year for the three years 
we've been in office. This Administra- 
tion is committed to a strong housing 
industry. President Carter has asked 
Congress for authority to buy mort- 
gages quickly in times of distress. In our 
new budget we have asked for 325,000 
Federally-assisted housing units — 25% 
more than in the current budget. 

We're committed not only to open- 
ing new jobs, but to protecting the 
rights of American workers already on 
the job. President Carter was the first 
President in our history to fight with 
you for common situs picketing and 
labor law reform — and together we'll 
keep up the fight. We protected the 
Davis-Bacon Act against all attacks, 
and you can count on our protection in 
the future. 

Let no one underestimate the impor- 



THE CARPENTER 



tance of employment, housing, and 
worker rights to our people. But we 
also recognize that one overriding 
problem threatens our jobs, our homes, 
our very way of life — and that is in- 
flation. Last year's inflation rate rose 
to 13% — and over 5% of that was 
caused by soaring energy costs. 

The single most effective way to 
fight inflation is to reduce our depend- 
ence on foreign-controlled oil. Energy 
prices should reflect the costs of pro- 
duction. Instead, we find ourselves at 
the mercy of a few nations that hold 
most of the energy cards. For too long, 
they have set the price — an artificially 
high price — and the rest of the world 
has paid it. 

America cannot afford to keep pay- 
ing that price. We must put Americans 
to work developing our own sources 
of energy — sources that can't be cut 
off by any nation on earth. 

We can develop cleaner ways of 
burning coal, and methods to trans- 
form it into liquids and gas. 

We can use grain and other forms 
of biomass to produce gasohol. By 
1981, we expect to produce enough 
gasohol to replace 10% of the un- 
leaded gasoline used in this country. 

We can tap the oil found in shale 
and tar sands, vast deposits of natural 
gas locked beneath the Gulf of Mex- 
ico, and our boundless wind and geo- 
thermal and solar power. 

America has abundant natural re- 
sources, and — just as crucial — the 
highly-trained workforce needed to 
develop those resources. We can do 
it. But we must be willing to invest the 
money needed to build new industries, 
and we must get on with the job. 

That's why President Carter sent 
Congress this country's first compre- 
hensive energy program neary three 
years ago, and why we're encouraged 
by its progress. Soon we will have a 
windfall profits tax that will take the 
unearned profits reaped by American 
oil companies, and invest that money 
in developing new sources of energy 
here at home. 

We will have an Energy Mobilization 
Board, that will get fast decisions on 
whether to build crucial energy projects. 

And we will provide new measures 
to help Americans conserve energy by 
insulating their homes, to build better 
mass transit systems, and to help low- 
income Americans pay their fuel bills. 

No one should deceive the Amer- 
ican people that energy prices will go 
down. But we can promise that every 
time you pay your electric bill, or fill 
your car with gas, or buy heating oil 
for your home, you will be investing 
in America's energy future. Together 



we can build a future in which we 
once again control our own energy 
supplies. We can secure that future 
because President Carter looked ahead 
and understood the energy crisis; be- 
cause he rallied our nation to face it, 
and enacted the programs needed to 
build true energy security. 

We are fighting inflation on other 
fronts as well. We forged an historic 
National Accord, in which labor and 
business and government leaders join 
forces to battle inflation. 

We have steadily reduced the fed- 
eral budget deficit. The 1981 budget 
that President Carter sent to Congress 
in January reduced the deficit we in- 
herited by 75%— from $66 billion to 
$16 billion. 

At the same time, we have main- 
tained the commitment to progressive, 
compassionate government for which 
you elected us. Hubert Humphrey 
once said, "The moral test of govern- 
ment is how it treats those who are in 
the dawn of life: the children; those 
who are in the twilight of life: the 
elderly; and those in the shadows of 
life: the sick, the needy, and the 
unemployed." 

This Administration meets that 
moral test. We have worked with you, 
through programs like Job Corps and 
CETA, to help train our young people 
so that they can enjoy the dignity and 
reward of work. 

The first requirement for a good job 
is a good education. President Carter 
raised Federal support for education 
by 75%. He doubled the amount of 
financial assistance available to stu- 
dents who want to go on to technical 
school or college. When we took office, 
one out of three high school seniors in 
this country wasn't even eligible to 
apply for a government grant or loan 
to continue his education. Today, 
every student in America can apply 
for Federal aid. 

After a young person crosses the 
threshold from school to the world, he 
faces another obstacle: work experi- 
ence. Whether he has graduated from 
school or dropped out, the first job is the 
hardest to get. And the less education 
and training that young person has, the 
harder it is to find a job with a future. 

For that reason, President Carter 
launched the most massive youth em- 
ployment program in history, and 
more than doubled the number of 
CETA jobs that help young people 
gain job experience. 

Even so, as head of the Administra- 
tion's Youth Employment Task Force, 
I found that there are still some two 
million youngsters in school today 
who are at least two years behind in 




More than a million construc- 
tion workers are back to work, 
and 206,000 are carpenters, 
the Vice President reports. 

their basic skills. Some cannot read 
and write nor add and subtract. An- 
other two million are out of school 
and unable to get a job, or keep one. 
After an exhaustive study of how edu- 
cation and skills and jobs are linked, 
I recommended to the President a 
major new effort to help the kids most 
in need of training and experience. 

In January, when President Carter 
unveiled his 1981 budget, its largest 
new domestic program was for youth 
employment and training. By 1982, 
we expect to spend $6 billion to give 
our poorest young people the boost 
they need — an increase of 150% 
since we took office. 

We will target funds for 3,000 of 
the nation's most needy school dis- 
tricts, both urban and rural. 

We will concentrate on teaching 
basic literacy skills to one million dis- 
advantaged youths. 

We will work to match the needs 
of employers with the opportunities 
for young people. 

And through programs that are al- 
ready working, we will help provide 
some 450,000 job opportunities to 
young people in and out of school. 
Our children are our most precious 
resource, and we are determined to 
preserve their future. 

Vital to that future are decent, safe 
neighborhoods for our families. When 
we came to office, our urban centers 
were crumbling, their people discour- 
aged, and the Federal Government 
not lifting a finger to help them. 

We reversed that trend. President 
Carter created America's first urban 
policy and increased economic devel- 
opment funding for our cities by an 
amazing 4,000% — from $60 million 
to $2.4 billion. As a result, construction 
in our cities is on the rise, and new jobs 
are opening in the building trades. 

Continued on Page 33 



MARCH, 1980 













the [ominc 

of n HEUI ERR 

FOR OUR CITIES 



BY MOON LANDRIEU 

U.S. Secretary of Housing and 
Urban Development 



'There is a greater amount of 
interplay between the private 
and public sectors than ever 
before.' 

'Land and materials will be 
more expensive, financing will 
be more costly, and there will 
be greater competition for 
investment capital.' 




LANDRIEU 



On July 27, 1979, President Carter 
nominated Moon Landrieu as Secre- 
tary of Housing and Urban Develop- 
ment. The Senate confirmed the nom- 
ination on September 12, and Lan- 
drieu, a native of New Orleans, took 
the oath of office on September 24, 
1979. 

A graduate of Loyola University 
College of Business Administration in 
1952 and School of Law in 1954, 
Landrieu opened his own law office 
in New Orleans in 1957 and main- 
tained his private practice until 1970. 

From 1960 to 1966, Landrieu 
served in the Louisiana Legislature, 
and from 1966 to 1970, he served as 
Councilman-at-Large on the New Or- 
leans City Council. He was elected 
Mayor of the city of New Orleans in 
1970, and he was reelected in 1974. 
Prior to his nomination as secretary 
of HUD, Landrieu was president of 
Joseph C. Canizaro Interests, a New 
Orleans urban development firm. 



We have arrived at a significant 
moment in our nation's history. We 
are closing out a decade marked by 
turmoil and crisis. 

But we are not simply ending a 
decade. We are also closing out an 
entire era. One which began with the 
New Deal. It was an era characterized 
by expanding government at every 
level, by large categorical govern- 
mental programs and by an increased 
dependence, at every level, on the in- 
stitutions of government. 

The old era has drawn to a close, 
the 1980's signal the coming of a new 
era for cities, for urban administra- 
tors, for representatives of government 
at all levels, and for citizens. 

I see many encouraging signs 
ahead. I believe our cities are making 
strides to solve their problems them- 
selves, there is a greater amount of 
interplay between the private and pub- 
lic sectors than ever before. 

Granted, there are unhealthy pock- 
ets in every urban area, but I believe 
our cities today are fundamentally 
healthy. They are sound: they will 
prevail. 

Since we now know some of the 
factors we will have to consider dur- 
ing this time of transition, we are 
ready to confront the realities which 
will have to be faced and dealt with. 

The major questions we face are: 

What will our communities look 
like in twenty years? 

What new factors are affecting 
them? 

How can we shape future develop- 
ment to cope with changing times and 
to help conserve our cities? 

To some extent the face of change 
is clear. The next two decades will 
virtually parallel the postwar period in 
their potential for shaping the cities 
of the future. There has been, and will 
continue to be, a dramatic increase in 
the number of new households. We 
anticipate that as many as 1.9 million 
households will be formed annually 
over the next five years. At the same 

THE CARPENTER 



time, households will decrease in size. 
It is clear that at least 40% of the 
housing which will be needed in the 
Year 2000 will have to be built be- 
tween now and then. 

The mix of resources to support 
this expected growth will be different: 
land and materials will be more ex- 
pensive, financing will be more costly, 
and there will be greater competition 
for investment capital. Gains in pro- 
ductivity and real income will almost 
surely be smaller and governmental 
expenditures will be limited. 

Most importantly, energy use — in 
housing, transportation and develop- 



• inevitable growth — we will have 
282 million people by the year 
2000, 

• slower growth of large metro- 
politan areas: more rapid growth 
in smaller metropolitan and non- 
metro areas, and 

• continued dispersion of blue col- 
lar jobs 

We will have to adopt a bolder, 
broader approach that is based on the 
interdependence of cities, suburbs and 
rural areas. We will need consistent, 
predictable policies — not the stop and 
start patchwork of the past. 

We will have to focus our efforts 




'We are now paying 
for the priority given 
in the past to new 
development over 
reuse and rehabili- 
tation.' 



ment projects — will be a pervasive 
consideration. 

These developments will lead to 
some predictable consequences, be- 
sides an increased demand for housing 
with greater pressure on the private 
sector to provide streets, sewers and 
other land improvements. There also 
will be a greater need for energy con- 
servation. 

Our past faith in limitless energy 
and unlimited land have produced 
some costly problems which become 
more acute each day. These will in- 
tensify in their visibility and their ef- 
fects in the new area. 

We are now paying for the priority 
given in the past to new development 
over reuse and rehabilitation. We are 
paying for the encouragement of 
farmland conversion over redevelop- 
ment and in-fill. 

Our cities are auto-dependent — 
they are vulnerable to gasoline short- 
ages and contribute to our national 
reliance on imported oil. 

To position ourselves properly as 
we enter the new era, we must take a 
fresh look at the current condition and 
future direction of our urban areas in 
terms of: 

• energy costs and supply, 

• inflation and slow gains in real 
income, 

• slower economic growth and re- 
duced productivity, 



on providing attractive communities 
that are good for the residents, busi- 
ness and government. We must look 
for additional opportunities to direct 
development into energy-efficient com- 
munities — new and old. 

We must continue to build the 
workable, innovative partnerships be- 
tween the public and private sectors 
that have characterized the relation- 
ships between government and citizens 
during the past three years. Govern- 
ment, acting alone, cannot carry our 
country into the new era that awaits 
us, nor can business do this alone. 
Together, however, government and 
business can push back the limits and 
find new opportunities for desirable 
and profitable growth. 

In the brief time I have been at 
HUD I have become aware of a 
wealth of good ideas that can be fac- 
tored into intelligent planning for our 
urban future. 

I have found the president's urban 
policy to be a treasure trove of such 
ideas. And I have been encouraged by 
urban conservation ideas of industry, 
the urban counties approach to the 
solution of problems, the negotiated 
investment strategy, and the new 
private sector involvement presaged 
by the success of the urban develop- 
ment action grant program. 

We need to examine these ideas — 
and others like them — to find what 



potential they hold for helping us to 
coordinate future urban development. 
And when I say we, I mean you, and 
your colleagues, and representatives 
of the private sector — working with 
representatives of federal, state and 
local government. 

President Carter recently estab- 
lished a national commission on the 
1980's to help us chart a national 
agenda for the coming decade. 

As our contribution to that effort, 
we will ask a prestigious organization 
to bring together a diverse group of 
local and state officials, housing indus- 
try leaders and developers to focus on 
those emerging urban development is- 
sues which have direct local impor- 
tance. This process will help us ex- 
amine ways in which we can and 
should shape development during the 
1980's. 

I believe that we have — in large 
measure — the programs and policies 
we need to carry us through the 
next two decades and the accompany- 
ing transition period. For the immedi- 
ate future, I think we will have to 
fine-tune these programs, and work to 
assure coordination among the federal 
agencies that administer programs 
which bear on our urban areas. 

We must work to eliminate con- 
flicting aims and conflicting require- 
ments among federal programs and 
assure that these programs can be ap- 
plied in a coherent manner to the 
housing and community development 
circumstances of the communities you 
and your colleagues represent. 




'We anticipate that as many 
as 7.9 million households will 
be formed annually over the 
next five years. At the same 
time, households will 
decrease in size.' 



MARCH, 1980 













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The Fighting Spirit of George Meany Is Laid to Rest 



George Meany, who led the AFL- 
CIO as president for nearly a quarter- 
century from the merged federation's 
inception in 1955 until his recent re- 
tirement, died at the age of 85 on 
January 10. Less than two months 
earlier, he had presided for the last 
time at an AFL-CIO convention. 




1 



The Legacy of 
GEORGE MEANY 



George Meany, our leader and our friend, has been taken from us. 
But what he did, what he said, ivhat he meant shall always be with us. 

He left us with much more than memories of a strong, warm, 
compassionate man. His legacy is the AFL-CIO itself. 

George Meany constructed this house of labor out of the same 
granite that his Maker used in creating him. He forged the strongest, 
most independent, most democratic labor movement in the world. 

American ivorkers, whether they carried a union card or not, 
considered George Meany their spokesman. In forum after jorum, his 
voice ivas their voice; expressing their hopes, fears, needs and 
aspirations with clarity and wisdom. 

But George Meany was much more than an American trade union 
leader. Throughout the ivorld, workers in other countries have 
established their own free, democratic movements with the help, 
guidance and inspiration of George Meany. 

Behind the Iron Curtain and in all countries ruled by dictators, George 
Meany was hated by the oppressors because he was a beacon of hope 
for the oppressed. He was their spokesman , too — sounding a message 
of freedom, of free men and ivomen living their lives as they wished. 

We thank God for giving us George Meany. We thank his family 
for sharing him with us and with all who love liberty. 

But, most of all, we thank him and pledge to carry out his final 
admonition to us: "Yours is a good labor movement. Now go out and 
make it better." 




AFL-CIO President Lane 
Kirkland delivered the 
eulogy, which we reproduce 
above, at the funeral 
services. In the picture at 
left, President Carter can be 
seen among the mourners. 
—AFL-CIO Photo. 



Trade unionists from many parts of 
North America and the world at- 
tended funeral services at Washing- 
ton's Cathedral of St. Matthew the 
Apostle. The President and Vice Presi- 
dent of the United States were among 
many notables who shared the deeply 
moving occasion. 



'*. 







Brotherhood leaders joined in paying 
their last respects. In the picture at the 
top of the page, Gen. Sec. John Rogers 
and Gen. Treas. Charles Nichols can be 
seen among the host of labor leaders. 
Pictures above are of Gen. Pres. William 
Konyha, First Gen. Vice Pres. Patrick 
Campbell, Gen. Pres. Emeritus William 
Sidell, and Gen. Sec. Rogers beside the 
bier in the AFL-CIO Headquarters 
lobby. — Photos by Merkle Press. 



THE CARPENTER 



Washington 
Report 




LABOR AND THE OLYMPICS 

Once again the U.S. labor movement 
has proven to be one very big step 
ahead of the White House. When 
President Carter announced his proposal 
for a boycott of the Moscow Olympic 
games, he was just 17 months behind 
the AFL-CIO. On Aug. 8, 1978, the 
AFL-CIO Executive Council called on 
the U.S. Olympic Committee "to take 
the lead among nations in moving the 
1980 Moscow Games to a country which 
respects human rights and the true 
Olympic spirit." 

But this wasn't the first time that 
labor's foresight was far ahead of the 
U.S. Government. It happened on another 
occasion when the International Olympic 
Committee insisted on taking this 
great celebration of sportsmanship and 
fair play into a country oppressed 
by a brutal totalitarian regime — 
Hitler's Germany of 1936. The AFL in 
October of 1935 asked that the U.S. 
withdraw from the games, but the IOC 
pooh-poohed the idea. However, 
American labor's stand was fully 
verified when Propaganda Minister 
Herman Goebels boasted gleefully that 
"the Olympic games were worth 20 
divisions. " 

GRANT TO GOODWILL 

The Labor Department has awarded 
Goodwill Industries of America a grant 
of $541,000 to provide job training 
and placement for about 500 handicapped 
persons in 12 cities. Goodwill has 
labor and business advisory councils 
in the cities to identify three or 
four major occupational areas, such as 
computer programming, secretarial, 
clerical or electronics assembly for 
which training is feasible and handi- 
capped individuals are available. 

MARCH, 1980 



WAGE LIMITS CITED FOR 1980 

President Carter's Pay Advisory 
Committee has formally recommended 
that wage and fringe benefit increases 
this year be held within a range of 
7.5% to 9.5%. 

The recommendation is a relaxation 
of and a departure from the anti- 
inflation program's first year, when 
the Council on Wage and Price Stability 
had sought adherence to a single 
figure of little more than 7%. 

Inflation last year averaged close 
to 13%, bringing the complaint from 
union leaders that workers were being 
asked to shoulder an unacceptably 
heavy burden in the fight against 
inflation. 

Reacting to those complaints and 
others, President Carter last fall 
appointed the advisory committee, 
comprised of six labor representatives, 
six business representatives and six 
from the public. The committee was to 
thrash out a new wage and benefit 
standard on which the three sectors 
might agree. 



BUYING-POWER WARNING 

Although some economic figures are 
showing mixed signs, the sharp decline 
of workers' buying power is a clear 
warning that rising unemployment, 
production cutbacks and a full-blown 
recession may develop quickly, AFL-CIO 
Research Director Rudy Oswald 
declared recently. 

Pointing out that present economic 
conditions — particularly the rapid 
inflation rate — are much the same as 
those just prior to the very severe 
recession of 1974-75, Oswald noted that 
the heaviest price increases were in 
such areas as oil and food. That 
period of rapid inflation, he noted, 
"triggered a big decline of workers' 
purchasing power," which was "a major 
contributing factor to the very severe 
recession of 1975" when unemployment 
shot up to 9%. 

Oswald said a key counter move would 
be Federal Reserve Board action to 
lower interest rates, which would 
"show a commitment to provide for 
expansion of the economy that would 
cushion rising unemployment." 

Oswald renewed the call for more 
emphasis on targeted jobs programs 
aimed at areas where high levels of 
unemployment develop. He stressed that 
lower interest rates and stepped-up 
job creation in hard-hit areas would 
help mitigate some of the price- 
pressure increases, which would have 
a deflationary effect. 





Industrial Conference Talks 
Coordination, Data Distribution 



Genera! President William Konyha reminded local and council leaders attending 
the Industrial Conference of the great potential for organizing in the allied industries. 
With him on the platform during the opening session were, from left, Organizing 
Director James Parker, First General Vice President Patrick J. Campbell and General 
Treasurer Charles E. Nichols. 




Alan Kistler, director of organization and 
field services for the AFL-CIO, offered 
the full support of his office and staff 
to the Brotherhood's Industrial 
Department. 



Alan Barkan, director of the AFL-CIO 
Committee on Political Education 
(COPE), discussed the Federation's 
political support program to combat 
anti-union activity. 




John E. Higgins, Jr., deputy general 
counsel of the NLRB, discussed the role 
of non-lawyer advocates in NLRB 
representation proceedings and their 
rights and responsibilities. 



Basil Whiting, deputy assistant secretary 
of the Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration, talked of OSHA's "New 
Directors" training program and how the 
Brotherhood might participate. 



The Brotherhood's young and vig- 
orous Industrial Department — estab- 
lished by the 33rd General Convention 
in 1978 — held its first major confer- 
ence since its formal establishment, 
last year, January 8 and 9, in Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Attending were 140 representatives 
from industrial locals and councils 
from throughout North America, in- 
cluding eight from Canada. 

Participants worked intensely for 
two days firming up general plans for 
gathering and distributing economic 
and legal information of value to in- 
dustrial unions. The structure of the 
new department and its general func- 
tions were explained by General Presi- 
dent William Konyha, with further 
background provided by Organizing 
Director Jim Parker and Associate 
General Counsel Bob Pleasure. 

"We must use this conference as a 
means of arming ourselves with some 
of the information and training we 
need to put ideas into practice," 
Konyha said. "We don't have all the 
answers ... a substantial portion of 
the conference is built around your 
participation, comments, and advice." 

There were discussion sessions with 
representatives of the National Labor 
Relations Board and the Occupational 
Safety and Health Administration. 
Legislative problems confronting the 
forest products industry were dis- 
cussed by Congressman Donald Bon- 
ker of Washington State, Joe McGrath 
of the National Forest Products Assn., 
and Clarey Adamson, secretary of the 
Brotherhood's Willamette Valley, 
Ore., District Council — providing 
views from government, industry, and 
labor. 

The need for coordinated bargain- 
ing and collective bargaining standards 
within the UBC on a national basis 
was emphasized by General President 
William Konyha in his keynote speech 
to the conference. President Konyha 
explained how education of the Broth- 
erhood's industrial membership — 
which now represents approximately 
one out of every four members of the 
Brotherhood — is essential to success, 
in coordinated bargaining. 

Much emphasis was placed upon 
training of local leaders as to their 



8 



THE CARPENTER 




Above: Organizing Director Jim Parker 
described the operation and functions of 
the Brotherhood's Industrial Department 
to a full house of local union and 
council representatives. 

Right: Washington State Congressman 
Donald Bonker, above, and Joe 
McGrath, legislative representative of the 
National Forest Products Assn., below, 
discussed recent developments in the 
forest products industry. 

Far Right: Associate General Counsel 
Bob Pleasure introduces two NLRB 
leaders — seated from left, Robert Volger, 
acting executive secretary, and William 
A. Lubbers, general counsel. 

Lower Right: Brotherhood Legislative 
Advocate Jay Power describes activity in 
the Congress of vital interest to industrial 
members. Seated from left are Associate 
General Counsel Pleasure, Assistant 
General Counsel Kathy Krieger; and 
Clarey Adamson, secretary of the 
Willamette Valley, Ore., District 
Council. 



duties in office and the preparation of 
shop stewards for in-plant representa- 
tion. 

There was a meeting of shipbuilding 
locals and councils concurrent with 
other sessions on the second day. Rep- 
resentatives attending this meeting dis- 
cussed the need for an improved sys- 
tem of communication between ship- 
building locals concerning provisions 
of contracts with major shipbuilders. 

Industrial unions were urged to par- 
ticipate in the Carpenter Labor-Man- 
agement Pension Plan. A session on 
pension and welfare benefits was con- 
ducted by Ken Camisa, senior vice- 
president of the Martin E. Segal Com- 
pany. 

A training film explaining formal 
representation procedures of the 
NLRB was shown to delegates, and 
there were workshops on bargaining 
on the final afternoon. 



MARCH, 1980 



Ottawa 
Report 




FULL-EMPLOYMENT ACT URGED 

A Federal Government Full Employment 
Act is urgently required to deal with 
the chronically high levels of unem- 
ployment in Canada, NDP leader Ed 
Broadbent said recently. 

Speaking to the Halifax Board of 
Trade, Broadbent referred to the 
recently released unemployment 
statistics. 

"The latest figures show that, in 
real terms, more than one million 
Canadian men and women are looking for 
work in this country and can't find 
it," he said. 

Broadbent estimated that current 
unemployment rates mean a loss of 
about $5-billion annually in lost pro- 
duction of goods and services. 

"Unemployment rates like these mean 
the federal government revenues are 
about $l-billion a year lower than they 
should be. In addition, the federal 
government pays out $5-billion annually 
in unemployment insurance and welfare 
costs. " 

The NDP leader accused both Liberals 
and Conservatives of not giving a 
high enough priority to reducing 
"such scandalous unemployment figures." 

The NDP leader said the Full Employ- 
ment Act would have the same purpose 
as the Humphrey Hawkins bill passed 
last year by the United States 
Congress. 



SLIGHT JOBLESS DROP IN '79 

Canada's unemployment rate dropped 
to 7.1% in December from 8.1% a year 
earlier and the annual average unem- 
ployment during 1979 was 7.5%, a 
drop from 1978*s 8.3%, Statistics 
Canada reported recently. 






MANY CONTRACTS EXPIRE IN '80 

Major agreements covering 410 bar- 
gaining situations involving 694,435 
employees in industries other than 
construction will expire in 1980, 
according to information contained in 
the Labour Canada publication "1980 
Calendar of Expiring Collective Bar- 
gaining Agreements." Each bargaining 
situation covers 500 or more employees. 

The Calendar also contains a listing 
of 197 major construction agreements 
that expire in 1980. 

NEW BRUNSWICK AGE ACTION 

Mandatory retirement due to age has 
been wiped out in New Brunswick. 

In a precedent decision by the NB 
Human Rights Commission about 70% of 
the provinces' work force can choose 
their own retirement age. 

Michael O'Brien, Human Rights 
director also said the decision under- 
scores a recent report of a Senate 
committee on retirement which 
recommended abolition of mandatory 
retirement in five years. 

O'Brien said the orders applied only 
to non-pension employees because 
company pension plans usually stipulate 
retirement age. 

PRICE HIKES HIGHEST 

Canada had the sharpest increase in 
consumer prices in November among 
the six leading non-communist indus- 
trialized countries, the Organization 
for Economic Cooperation and 
Development reported recently. 

The report by the organization said 
prices in Canada rose by 1.0% compared 
with 0.9% in the U.S. and Britain. 
Prices rose by 0.4% in West Germany 
and 0.7% in France. In Japan, prices 
declined in November by 0.4%. 

In the 12 months ended in November, 
the annual rate of increase was: 
Britain 17.4, U.S. 12.6, France 11.5, 
Canada 9.4, West Germany 5.3 and 
Japan 4.9%. 

ONTARIO'S LABOR LAWS 

Thousands of workers are forced to 
strike each year in Ontario over such 
fundamental issues as union security 
and mandatory dues check-off, says 
Ontario Federation of Labor President 
Cliff Pilkey. 

"Public attention has focused in 
recent months on such bitter labor 
struggles as Boise Cascade, Butcher 
Engineering and Radio Shack — all 
disputes triggered by an anti-union 
management over matters we once thought 
had been resolved 20, 30 and 40 years 
ago," Pilkey said. 

THE CARPENTER 




Areas in color are those in which Brotherhood members are covered by pension reciprocity agreements. 

Reciprocal Agreements 

of the PRO-RATA Pension Plan 



A major step forward in bringing lifelong pension 
coverage to Brotherhood members was taken in 1971 
when the Pro-Rata Pension Agreement was established. 

The agreement is a basic document which permits 
members to move from one pension plan to another as 
their work assignments change while working in various 
areas, drawing pro-rata benefits from each of the various 
plans upon retirement . . . and not losing benefits in any. 
It is a form of "portability" long sought in the building 
and construction trades. It means that a member can, 
with certain limitations, change jobs and maintain his 
pension protection at the same time. 

The plan is simple. Local Union or District Council 
Pension Plans A, B, C, and D, for example, will notify 
the General Office in Washington, D.C., that they want 
to participate in the Pro-Rata Pension Plan. Reciprocal 
agreements are signed by the trustees of each plan, and, 
in so doing, the various plans become a part of the 
international reciprocal program. 

A member of the Brotherhood does not achieve pro- 
rata pension protection merely by being a member in 
good standing. His local union or district council has to 
negotiate a pension plan with employers, if it has not 
already done so. Then the trustees of that plan have to 
enter into reciprocal pro-rata agreement with other 



plans. This is done by signing the International Pro-Rata 
Agreement. 

In addition to the pro-rata reciprocal pension agree- 
ment, there was also established in 1971 the nationwide 
Carpenters Labor-Management Pension Fund. This pen- 
sion plan, which is primarily for groups not covered by 
local union and district council plans, is administered in 
Wilmington, Del., by American Benefit Plan Adminis- 
trators, Inc. (For information about this nationwide plan, 
write to the address listed at the bottom of Page 13 or 
telephone (302) 478-5950.) It is broken down into two 
categories — an Industrial Pension Plan and a Construc- 
tion Industry Pension Plan. A member in the Labor- 
Management Plan is automatically covered by the Pro- 
Rata Reciprocal Plan. 

This program, coupled with the pro-rata reciprocal 
plan, offers a national program which enables local 
unions and district councils to negotiate their own pension 
plans under a basic pattern of benefits and standards, 
and, as the volume and number of plans increase, 
expenses will be lowered, and more and more members 
will be able to move freely from job to job without fear 
of pension loss. 

Local unions and district councils can obtain more 
information about the reciprocal pension program by 
writing to the General Office. (See next two pages.) 



MARCH, 1980 



11 



The Carpenter magazine publishes the following list, periodically, so that Pro-Rata Pension Plan participants 
and administrators may have the most recent list of plans which offer reciprocity. 



ARIZONA 

Arizona State Carpenters Pension 

Trust Fund 
5125 North 16th Street, Suite A104 
Phoenix, Arizona 85016 



ARKANSAS 

Carpenters Pension Fund of Arkansas 

504 Victory Street 

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 



CALIFORNIA 

Carpenters Pension Trust Fund for 

Northern California 
995 Market Street 
San Francisco, California 94103 

Carpenters Pension Trust for 

Southern California 
520 South Virgil Avenue 
Los Angeles, California 90020 

Mill Cabinet Pension Fund for 

Northern California 
995 Market Street 
San Francisco, California 94103 

San Diego County Carpenters 

Pension Fund 
3659 India Street, Room 100 
San Diego, California 92103 

Southern California Lumber Industry 
Retirement Fund 

650 South Spring Street, Room 1028 
Los Angeles, California 90014 



COLORADO 

Centennial State Carpenters Pension 

Trust Fund 
789 Sherman Street, Suite 560 
Denver, Colorado 80203 



CONNECTICUT 

Connecticut State Council of Carpenters 
State-Wide Pension Plan 
860 Silas Deane Highway 
Wethersfield, Connecticut 06109 



FLORIDA 

Broward County Carpenters Pension 

Trust Fund 
Florida Administrators, Inc. 
7300 North Kendall Drive— 

P.O. Box 695 
Miami (Kendall), Florida 33156 

Local Union 1685 Pension Fund 
P.O. Box 956 
Melbourne, Florida 32901 

Mid-Florida Carpenters Pension Fund 
Florida Administrators, Inc. 
3203 Lawton Road— P.O. Box 20173 
Orlando, Florida 32814 



Palm Beach County Carpenters District 

Council Pension Fund 
Florida Administrators, Inc. 
1655 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 413 
West Palm Beach, Florida 33401 

South Florida Carpenters Pension 

Trust Fund 
Florida Administrators, Inc. 
7300 North Kendall Drive— 

P.O. Box 695 
Miami (Kendall), Florida 33156 

Carpenters District Council of Jacksonville 

and Vicinity Pension Fund 
c/o Florida Administrators, Inc. 
P.O. Box 16845 

2050 Art Museum Drive, Suite 106 
Jacksonville, Florida 32216 



IDAHO 

Idaho Branch, Inc. 
A.G.C.-Carpenters Pension Trust 
1662 Shoreline Drive, Suite No 200 
Boise, Idaho 83706 



ILLINOIS 

Carpenters Pension Fund of Illinois 

P.O. Box 470 

28 North First Street 

Geneva, Illinois 60134 

Chicago District Council of Carpenters 

Pension Fund 
12 East Erie Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60611 



KANSAS 

Kansas Construction Trades Open End 

Pension Trust Fund 
c/o Fringe Benefit Funds 
202 West Thirty-Third Street 
P.O. Box 5096 
Topeka, Kansas 66605 



LOUISIANA 

Local Union 1098 Pension Trust 

6755 Airline Highway 

Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70805 

District Council of New Orleans and 

Vicinity Pension Trust 
315 Broad Street 
New Orleans, Louisiana 70119 

Northeast Louisiana District Council of 

Carpenters Pension Plan 
c/o Southwest Administrators 
P.O. Box 4617 
Monroe, Louisiana 70805 



MARYLAND 

Cumberland Maryland and Vicinity Building 
and Construction Employees' Trust Fund 
125 South Liberty Street 
Cumberland, Maryland 21502 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Massachusetts State Carpenters 

Pension Fund 
Heritage Building 
One Militia Drive 
Lexington, Massachusetts 02173 

Western Massachusetts Carpenters 

Pension Fund 
26 Willow Street, Room 24 
Springfield, Massachusetts 01103 



MICHIGAN 

Michigan Carpenters' Council 

Pension Fund 
241 East Saginaw Street 
East Lansing, Michigan 48823 



MISSOURI 

Carpenters District Council of 

Kansas City 
3114 Paseo 
Kansas City, Missouri 64109 



NEBRASKA 

Lincoln Building and Construction 

Industry Pension Plan 
Suite 211 — First National Bank Building 
100 North 56th Street 
Lincoln, Nebraska 68504 
Attention, Ronald L. Miller, Adm. 

Omaha Construction Industry 
Health, Welfare and Pension Plans 
3929 Harney Street 
Omaha, Nebraska 68131 



NEVADA 

Carpenters Pension Trust Fund for 

Northern Nevada 
33 St. Lawrence Avenue 
Reno, Nevada 89501 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Northern New England Carpenters 

Pension Fund 
472 Chestnut Street 
Manchester, New Hampshire 03101 



NEW JERSEY 

Carpenters & Millwrights Local No. 31 

Pension Fund 
41 Ryan Avenue 
Trenton, New Jersey 08610 

E. C. Carpenters' Fund 

76 South Orange Avenue 

South Orange, New Jersey 07079 



Continued on next page 



WE URGE YOUR SUPPORT OF PENSION RECIPROCITY 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



RECIPROCAL 
AGREEMENTS 

Continued from page 12 

NEW MEXICO 

New Mexico District Council of 

Carpenters Pension Fund 

Trust Fund Administrator of Compu- 

Sys. Inc. 
P.O. Box 11104 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87112 

NEW YORK 

Nassau County Carpenters Pension Fund 
1065 Old Country Road 
Westbury, New York 11590 

New York City District Council of 

Carpenters Pension Fund 
204-8 East Twenty-Third Street 
New York, New York 10010 

Suffolk County Carpenters Pension Fund 

Box "F" 

Medford, New York 11763 

Westchester County New York 

Carpenters' Pension Fund 
10 Saw Mill River Road 
Hawthorne, New York 10532 

Carpenters Local Union 964 

Pension Fund "B" 
130 North Main Street 
New City, New York 10956 

OHIO 

Miami Valley Carpenters' District 

Pension Fund 
Far Oaks Building 
2801 Far Hills Avenue 
Dayton, Ohio 45419 

Ohio Valley Carpenters District 

Council Benefit Funds 
c/o Pension and Group Consultants, Inc. 

Administrator 
Room 902—6 East Fourth Street 
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 



Work in Broward County? 

CARPENTERS 

IF you worked in the jurisdiction of 
the Broward County Carpenters' 
District Council (Fort Lauderdale, 
Hollywood, Pompano Beach, Boca 
Raton, Florida, and adjoining 
areas) from October 1969 to April 
1975, and 

IF your employer deducted money 
from your pay for Vacation Fund 
contributions, and 

IF you believe you may still be due 
some benefits from the Broward 
County Carpenters Vacation Trust 
Fund, 

THEN contact the Board of Trustees 
of the Fund and they will deter- 
mine if any benefits are still due to 
you. When writing, include your 
full name, current address and so- 
cial security number. 

BROWARD COUNTY 

CARPENTERS 

VACATION TRUST FUND 

P.O. BOX 560695 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 33156 



OREGON 

Oregon-Washington Carpenters 

Employers Trust Fund 
321 S. W. Sixth Avenue 
Portland, Oregon 97208 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Carpenters' Pension Fund of 

Western Pennsylvania 
One Allegheny Square — Suite 310 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 



RHODE ISLAND 

Rhode Island Carpenters Pension Fund 
14 Jefferson Park Road 
Warwick, Rhode Island 02888 



TENNESSEE 

Middle Tennessee District Council 

of Carpenters Pension Fund 
200 Church Street 
Nashville, Tennessee 37201 

Tri State Carpenters and Joiner District 
Council of Chattanooga, Tennessee 
and Vicinity Pension Trust Fund 

P.O. Box 6035 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 37401 



UTAH 

Utah Carpenters', Cement Masons' and 

Laborers' Trust Fund 
849 East Fourth South 
Salt Lake City, Utah 84102 



WASHINGTON 

Carpenters Retirement Trust 

of Western Washington 
P.O. Box 1929 
Seattle, Washington 98111 

Millmen's Retirement Trust of 

Washington 
c/o Local Union 338 
2512 Second Avenue, Room 206 
Seattle, Washington 98121 

Washington-Idaho-Montana Carpenters- 
Employers Retirement Trust Fund 
East 123 Indiana— P.O. Box 5434 
Spokane, Washington 99205 



WEST VIRGINIA 

Chemical Valley Pension Fund of 

West Virginia 
Raymond Hage and Company, Inc. 

Employee Benefit Plan Consultants 
1050 Fifth Avenue 
Huntington, West Virginia 25701 



WYOMING 

Wyoming Carpenters Pension Plan 
141 South Center— Suite 505 
Casper, Wyoming 82601 



NATIONWIDE 

Carpenters Labor-Management Pension 

Fund 
American Benefit Plan Administrators, Inc. 
3906 Concord Pike, P.O. Box 7018 
Wilmington, Delaware 19803 



Buckle Up 




The official emblem of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America is now emblazoned on spe- 
cial belt buckles for carpenters and 
millwrights, and you can order such 
buckles now from the General Offices 
in Washington. 

Manufactured of sturdy metal, the 
buckle is 3Vs inches wide by 2 inches 
deep and will accommodate all modern 
snap-on belts. It comes in a gift box. 

$5.50 each 

Mail in your order now. Print or type 
your order plainly, and be sure the name 
and address is correct, and indicate which 
buckle you want — Carpenter or Millwright. 
Please indicate the local union number of 
the member for whom the buckle is pur- 
chased. 

Send order and remittance to: 

GEN. SEC. JOHN S. ROGERS 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters 

and Joiners of America 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 



Buy direct 
from factory 
and SAVE— 



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And no other bench offers so many ways to securely clamp and hold 
your work. No more lost time and ruined projects from make-shift jigs or 
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Whether it's wood or metalworking, carpentry, cabinet-making, clock 
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applications. 

• Available with 1 or 2 Storage Drawers and 
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Please rush FREE Catalog and details of 30-Day Trial. No 
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NAME 



ADDRESS 




MARCH, 1980 



13 



Our Ties 
With the Rest 
of the 

north nmericon 
Labor mouement 

In federation there is strength and understanding. The Brotherhood has 
been an active participant in the work of the national federations since 
their establishment decades ago. 




The United Brotherhood and 105 other 
national and international labor unions 
in the U.S. voluntarily constitute the 
American Federation of Labor and Con- 
gress of Industrial Organizations, more 
commonly called the AFL-CIO. In addi- 
tion, the Brotherhood is affiliated with 
the Canadian Labour Congress, or the 
CLC, in Canada. 

Established in 1955, the AFL-CIO is a 
union of unions. It serves as a collective 
spokesman for the entire American labor 
movement both nationally and abroad, 
representing approximately 13,600,000 
workers. Specifically, it represents labor 
before Congress, and, through its par- 
ticipation in international labor bodies, it 
represents American labor in world 




affairs. Additionally, it helps to organize 
the unorganized, advises workers on polit- 
ical issues, and is involved with voter 
registration and community services. 

Every member union of the AFL-CIO, 
including the Brotherhood, is an autono- 
mous body which conducts its own af- 
fairs, decides its own economic policies, 
negotiates its own contracts, determines 
its own dues, and provides its own mem- 
bership services. Each member union is 
free to withdraw from the AFL-CIO at 
any time. Yet, it is through voluntary 
participation with the AFL-CIO that 
labor unions play a role in establishing 
overall policies for the American labor 
movement. 

In order to remain affiliated with the 
AFL-CIO, every member union must 
comply with the AFL-CIO Ethical Prac- 
tices Codes which establish basic stand- 
ards of union democracy and financial 
integrity. 

The organizational structure of the 
AFL-CIO insures the preservation of the 
democratic process within the Federation. 
The United Brotherhood is a full-scale 
participant in all activities. 

The supreme governing body of the 
AFL-CIO is the national convention. As 
delegates to the national convention, 
which are held every two years, our Gen- 
eral Officers and other elected delegates 
represent our entire membership. The 
convention elects the AFL-CIO president, 
secretary-treasurer, and 33 vice presi- 
dents. Thse officers constitute the AFL- 
CIO Executive Council, a body which 
governs Federation affairs between con- 
ventions, supplements convention policies, 
and keeps them up to date. At the last 
national convention, held in November, 
former Secretary-Treasurer Lane Kirk- 
land succeeded George Meany as presi- 
dent. One of the Brotherhood's General 
Officers has always served as a vice presi- 
dent on the AFL-CIO Executive Council. 

Our Affiliations 

The AFL-CIO also has nine trade and 
industrial departments. As separate or- 
ganizations, they seek to promote the in- 
terests of closely related groups of work- 
ers in different unions. These departments 
have their own executive bodies, hold their 



own conventions, and manage and finance 
their own affairs within the framework 
of the AFL-CIO Constitution. They have 
representation at AFL-CIO conventions, 
and, in addition, they function on the 
state and local level. 

Most of the national and international 
unions within the AFL-CIO are affiliated 
with one or more of these nine depart- 
ments, depending on the type of workers 
in their jurisdictions. The Brotherhood is 
affiliated with the Building and Construc- 
tion Trades Department, the Maritime 
Trades Department, the Metal Trades 
Department, and the Union Label and 
Service Trades Departments. 

There are "central bodies" in most 
major cities of North America, where 
representatives of various unions meet 
periodically to tackle mutual problems 
and serve the general purposes of orga- 
nized labor. The Building Trades, the 
Union Label and Service Trades, and 
other groups also work together at the 
state and local level. 

The Building and Construction Trades 
Department is one of the oldest depart- 
ments in the AFL-CIO. It is concerned 
with those members of its 17 affiliated 
unions who work in building, highway, 
marine, and heavy construction, or in 
sand, gravel, and rock mining. In addi- 
tion, it includes certain types of construc- 
tion material manufacturing employees. 

The Metal Trades Department was or- 
ganized in 1908. It deals with the mem- 
bers of its 22 affiliated unions who work 
in the metal trades industries. Its greatest 
strength lies in the shipbuilding industry 
and in heavy manufacturing. 

The Maritime Trades Department, or- 
ganized in 1943, has 43 international un- 
ions with members working in the mari- 
time industry in the U.S. and Canada. 

The Union Label and Service Trades 
Department is the largest department in 
the AFL-CIO. Organized in 1909, it has 
87 international union affiliates. The 
Brotherhood's First General Vice Presi- 
dent traditionally has been our represen- 
tative to this department as he is in 
charge of the Union Label, according to 
the Constitution and Laws. The Union 
Label Department seeks to promote con- 
sumer interest in union made and serv- 



14 



THE CARPENTER 





STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION 
of the 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR AND CONGRESS OF INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATIONS 










NATIONAL CONVENTION 
(Every 2 Years) 




GENERAL BOARD 

Executive Council and 






STAFF 

Accounting 
Civil Rights 
Community Services 
Data Processing 
Education 

International Affairs 
Legislation 
Library 
Occupational Safety 

and Health 
Organization and 

Field Services 
Political Education 
Publications 
Public Relotions 
Purchasing 
Reproduction 

and Mailings 
Research 
Social Security 
Urban Affairs 




1 














one princlpa 
each nation 


1 and in- 

jnion and 




EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 
President, Secretary-Treasurer, 33 Vice Presidents 








ternational 






affiliated Department 
















i 








STANDING COMMITTEES 

Civil Rights 
Community Services 
Economic Policy 
Education 
Ethical Practices 
Housing 

International Affairs 
Legislative 
Organization 
Political Education 
Public Relations 
Research 

Safety and Occupa- 
tional Health 
Social Security 
Veterans' Affairs 






OFFICERS 
President and Secretary-Treasurer 
Headquarters, Washington, D. C. 








































105 

NATIONAL AND 

INTERNATIONAL UNIONS 








■^i^BUt^i^i^B 


TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL 

DEPARTMENTS 

Building Trades 
Food & Beverage Trades 
Industrial Union 
Label Trades 
Maritime Trades 
Metal Trades 
Professional Employees 
Public Employee 
Railway Employees 






1 












60,000 Local Unions of 

National and International 

Unions 






































STATE CENTRAL BODIES 

m 50 Sfares. and 
1 Commonwealth 




107 Local Unions Directly 
Affiliated with AFL-CIO 


































T 










668 

Local Department 

Councils 




Membership of the AFL-CIO, January 1, 1979 

13,600,000 






LOCAL CENTRAL BODIES 
in 746 Communities 





























THE ORGANIZA TION CHART OF THE AFL-CIO 



iced products and urges the purchase of 
products which bear the union label. The 
United Brotherhood, one of the founders 
of this department, has always been a 
leader in union label promotion. Our 
label has been used ever since it was 
first presented to the Brotherhood's Gen- 
eral Convention in 1900. Found on wood, 
plastic, and metal products, it symbolizes 
high standards of workmanship and fair 
and respectable working conditions. 

Each year, the Union Label Depart- 
ment sponsors a Union-Industries show 
to display the products and skills of un- 
ion workers. The Brotherhood partici- 
pates in this show which is held in a dif- 
ferent city each year, and the district 
council in the designated area, in coopera- 
tion with the First General Vice Presi- 
dent's office, arranges an exhibit for the 
show. 

Standing Committees 

There are many standing committees 
of the AFL-CIO which carry out specific 
goals established at the national conven- 



tion. The Brotherhood is involved with 
many of these committees. Former Gen- 
eral President Sidell was chairman of the 
Housing Committee. In addition, General 
Treasurer Nichols works closely with 
COPE, the AFL-CIO's Committee on 
Political Education, although the Broth- 
erhood has its own, independent legisla- 
tive committee, CLIC. 

Recently, the Brotherhood worked with 
the Community Services Committee in 
the consumer price watch monitoring 
effort. Finally, the CARPENTER maga- 
zine is a member of the International 
Labor Press Association, which is sup- 
ported by the AFL-CIO. 

The Canadian Ties 

In Canada, the Brotherhood is affiliated 
with the Canadian Labour Congress. As 
with the AFL-CIO, the CLC holds a con- 
vention every two years, with Brother- 
hood delegates in attendance. It is 
through the central body of the CLC that 
labor is represented on the national level 
to the Canadian federal government. 



Within each of Canada's provinces 
there are provincial federations of labor. 
Every union is affiliated with a provin- 
cial federation, and the federation, in 
turn, acts as labor's spokesman before 
the provincial government. 

Finally, on the local level, local labor 
councils exist for local union affiliation in 
specifically designated geographic areas. 
These councils make the unions' positions 
known to local governments, and, in addi- 
tion, they coordinate community activities 
and elections. 

In the U.S. and in Canada, the AFL- 
CIO and the CLC represent the voice of 
labor as a whole. George Meany fought 
for "strength in unity," and he firmly 
believed that "the united strength of 
labor is greater than all the wealth of 
the employers . . ." As Samuel Gompers 
put it, "No great fortune has been 
amassed through the efforts of one in- 
dividual. The combined minds of all as- 
sociated together in the industry, their 
labor, their cooperation and service are 
necessary to the success of the under- 
taking." 



MARCH, 1980 



15 



lurd Lucassen Becomes 
Second Gen'l Vice President 



Brotherhood Replaces 
Gavel for AFL-CIO 




LUCASSEN 

Sigurd Lucassen, Second District 
Board Member from Springfield, 
N.J., has been named Second Gen- 
eral Vice President of the Brother- 
hood, filling the vacancy created by 
the recent elevation of Patrick J. 
Campbell to First General Vice 
President. 

Lucassen's appointment was an- 
nounced by General President Wil- 
liam Konyha at the winter meeting 
of the Brotherhood's General Exec- 
utive Board in Bal Harbour, Fla., 
last month. 



Union Job for 
Energy Savings 

A total of 184 window units 
were recently replaced on three 
floors of the Brotherhood's Gen- 
eral Offices in Washington, D.C. 

A crew of four men from Local 
132 of the District of Columbia in- 
stalled the windows for the window 
distributor and contractor, R. L. 
Hott, Inc., of Silver Spring, Md. 
The units, which were installed on 
the upper office floors, were manu- 
factured aluminum units from De- 
Vac, Inc., of Minneapolis, Minn. 

The installation is an effort to 
make the building more energy effi- 
cient in the years ahead. The head- 
quarters staff will make a compari- 
son of energy consumption and 
cost evaluation — before and after 
the installation. 



Lucassen completes the slate of 
five resident officers who govern the 
affairs of the Brotherhood between 
conventions. The line-up now con- 
sists of General President William 
Konyha, First General Vice Presi- 
dent Patrick J. Campbell, Second 
General Vice President Sigurd 
Lucassen, General Secretary John 
S. Rogers, and General Treasurer 
Charles Nichols. Konyha and 
Campbell moved into their new 
positions in January, following the 
retirement of William Sidell as Gen- 
eral President on December 31. 

Lucassen has served as Second 
District Board Member since March, 
1978, when he replaced Raleigh 
Rajoppi upon Rajoppi's retirement. 
Prior to that, Lucassen had served 
as a General Representative since 
1972. 

Lucassen, 52, is a member of 
Local 2250, Red Bank, N.J. He 
joined the local union in 1952 and 
was elected a business representa- 
tive in 1960. In 1963 he was elected 
to the general executive board of 
the New Jersey State Council of 
Carpenters, and he became presi- 
dent of the state council in 1975, 
succeeding Rajoppi. 

Lucassen comes from a truly 
union family. The son of a Nor- 
wegian immigrant, he was born in 
Brooklyn, N.Y. His late father was 
a carpenter and a member of Local 
1162, College Point, N.Y. His 
mother retired at the age of 82 after 
working for many years as a mem- 
ber of the International Ladies Gar- 
ment Workers Union. 

Lucassen's son, Harold, 28, is a 
member of Local 2250, like his 
father. A 26-year-old daughter be- 
longs to the Laborers union as an 
employee of the Garden State and 
Monmouth Race Tracks. The 
daughter, Carol, married the Labor- 
ers business agent on March 4, 
1978, the same day that her father's 
appointment to the General Execu- 
tive Board became effective. Lucas- 
sen and his wife, Audrey, will be 32 
years married in September. 




Many years ago, a Brotherhood crafts- 
man produced the wooden gavel and 
sounding block used by the late AFL-CIO 
President George Meany to call con- 
ventions and meetings of the AFL-CIO 
Executive Council to order. (It has been 
a tradition for almost a century that the 
Carpenters produce the official AFL, and, 
later, AFL-CIO, gavel.) 

At the recent convention of the AFL- 
CIO in Washington, D.C, Meany rapped 
the gavel upon the sounding board to 
confirm the unanimous election of Lane 
Kirkland as his successor and, strange as 
it seems, the. sounding board split in two. 

Last month, in brief ceremonies. Broth- 
erhood Gen. Pres. William Konyha pre- 
sented to AFL-CIO Pres. Kirkland a new 
gavel and sounding board, created of 
black walnut by Brotherhood Member 
Jimmie Payne of the District of Colum- 
bia, first place cabinetmaker at tlte Inter- 
national Carpentry Apprenticeship Con- 
test held in Kansas City, Mo., in I96S. 



COPE Conferences 

COPE— the AFL-CIOs Commit- 
tee on Political Education — has an- 
nounced area conferences kicking 
off the 1980 US political campaign. 
Anti-labor forces will be working to 
defeat labor's friends in the Congress 
and in state legislatures, this year, 
and leaders of the Carpenters Legis- 
lative Improvement Committee (CLIC) 
are urged to join forces with COPE 
wherever possible in this crucial elec- 
tion year. 

The COPE conference schedule is 
as follows: 

Portland, Ore., Portland Hilton, 
March 11-12 — Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, 
Montana, Oregon, Washington. 

Los Angeles, Calif., The Biltmore, 
March 14-15 — Arizona, California, 
Nevada. 

Denver, Colo., Denver Hilton, 
March 18-19 — Colorado, Kansas, New 
Mexico, Utah, Wyoming. 

Dearborn, Mich., Hyatt Regency 
Dearborn, March 24-25 — Illinois, In- 
diana, Michigan, Ohio. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Radisson 
Downtown, March 28-29 — Iowa, Min- 
nesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, 
South Dakota, Wisconsin. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



Travel Expenses Deductions 
for Building Tradesmen 
in 1979 US Tax Returns 



Editor's Note: A detailed report on US 
Internal Revenue Service travel-expense 
deductions for Carpenters and other 
Building Tradesmen was prepared re- 
cently by George C. Hank, certified pub- 
lic accountant, for the Western Pennsyl- 
vania District Council of Carpenters. 

The report is of value to all Brother- 
hood members in the construction trades, 
and we have obtained permission to re- 
print excerpts from it below. 

By George C. Hank, CPA 

If you're a Brotherhood member who's 
on the road a lot, you should know about 
income tax deductions which may be 
available to you. 

WHAT'S CALLED 'HOME' 

The first item for consideration must 
be the taxpayer's "home" for travel ex- 
pense purposes. IRS, with substantial 
court backing, has long held that a per- 
son's "home" for tax purposes, is his 
place of business, employment, station or 
post of duty, even though his family resi- 
dence is located in a different place . . . 
maybe even a different city or different 
state. The job, and not the taxpayer's 
pattern of living, must require the travel- 
ing expenses. Or, put differently, for the 
expense to be deductible, it must be 
shown that the expenses were incurred as 
a result of employment necessity, not per- 
sonal convenience. 

For example, if an employee's place of 
employment is permanently in Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., and he lives in Greensburg, 
Pa., such travel expense is not deductible. 
However, if the employee is permanently 
employed in Pittsburgh, Pa., and his home 



CLIC Tax Credit 

Contributions to the Carpenters 
Legislative Improvement Committee 
(CLIC) can earn you a tax break in 
your 1979 US federal tax returns. 
Under current Internal Revenue rules, 
you may take a tax credit on Line 38 
of the "long form" for contributions 
to candidates for public office, polit- 
ical committees, and newsletter funds 
of candidates and elected public of- 
ficials. CLIC is in the "political com- 
mittees" category. 

To figure your credit, add up the 
amounts you gave (and be sure to 
keep your receipts for proof). Enter 
half of this amount on Line 38, but 
do not enter more than $50 ($100 if 
you are married and filing a joint 
return). 



is also there, travel expense for a tem- 
porary job assignment in Greensburg, 
Pa., would be deductible. 



WORK AWAY FROM HOME 

In commuting to a temporary or minor 
assignment with no overnight stay, the 
IRS has allowed a deduction of the ex- 
penses of the daily round-trip transporta- 
tion where the taxpayer has a temporary 
or minor assignment beyond the general 
area of his tax home and returns home 
each evening. However, the Tax Court 
has held that whether or not a job is 
temporary or indefinite relates to the is- 
sue of whether the taxpayer is "away 
from home" and, accordingly, whether it 
is reasonable for a taxpayer to move his 
residence. The Tax Court has said that 
the fact that a job is temporary will not 
necessarily convert commuting expenses 
into ordinary deductible expenses. 

The issue to be decided in such a case 
is whether the temporary assignment is 
beyond the general area of his place of 
regular employment. The Tax Court has 
also held that a position could cease to 
be temporary at a time that there was a 
change in the job status. Such a change 
could occur where an employee was as- 
signed temporarily to a job site beyond 
the general area of his regular employ- 
ment and later was assigned permanently 
to the job site. The commuting expenses 
while the assignment was a temporary 
one would be deductible, those after the 
permanent assignment would not be de- 
ductible. 



TRAVELING WITH BULKY TOOLS 

The cost of driving to and from work 
with bulky tools, etc., is deductible only 
if it is an additional expense, such as 
renting a trailer, etc. This replaces the 
pre- 1976 more lberal IRS "but for" de- 
duction rule. The Supreme Court has 
stated that if "additional expenses" are 
incurred to transport tools, etc., to work, 
these additional expenses "may be de- 
ductible." IRS says that it considers the 
Supreme Court's "additional expense" 
test as a repudiation of its "but for" test. 
IRS, therefore, revoked its ruling that 
contained the "but for" test and said 
that a taxpayer may deduct only addi- 
tional expenses incurred because of the 
need to transport tools, etc., to work and 
only if the amount of these additional 
expenses can be determined accurately. 
If the transportation meets this test of 




Continued on page 18 



REMUS 

Consumer Product 
Safety Alert 

Under laws administered by the 
US Consumer Product Safety Com- 
mission, an estimated 117 million 
potentially hazardous products 
have been called back from the 
marketplace and consumers since 
1973 (when CPSC was created). 
Most of these were voluntarily re- 
called by manufacturers who estab- 
lished programs to repair or re- 
place the products, or to refund 
the purchase price. Recent actions 
include the following: 



Coffee Percolators 

Millions of owners of potentially 
defective Corning Ware coffee per- 
colators have not yet responded to 
the company's offer to compensate 
consumers for taking the coffee- 
makers out of use. 

CPSC and Corning warned consu- 
mers last September that virtually 
all Corning glass/ceramic perco- 
lators manufactured since 1960 
should be considered potentially 
hazardous and that consumers 
should immediately stop using 
them. The handle assembly may 
separate without warning from the 
white pot, possibly subjecting con- 
sumers to burns from hot liquid. 

Corning has established a compen- 
sation program to persuade consu- 
mers to stop using the coffeemakers 
(both electric and stove-top white 
glass/ceramic models). More than 
18 million such coffee percolators 
have been sold since 1960. 

Consumers are urged not to return 
the coffeemakers to Corning or to 
retailers, but instead to write to the 
company for details on the com- 
pensation program. The address is: 
Corning Glass Works, P.O. Box 
5750, Corning, New York, 14830. 
At least six weeks should be al- 
lowed for the company's response. 



MARCH, 1980 



17 



TRAVEL DEDUCTIONS 

Continued from page 17 

accurately determinable additional ex- 
penses, the taxpayer can deduct this 
amount even if he couldn't meet the "but 
for" test. Where a taxpayer shows that 
he incurred additional expenses to trans- 
port tools, etc., to and from work, he 
gets a deductible expense only for that 
portion of the cost of transporting the 
tools, etc., which exceeds the cost of 
commuting by the same mode of trans- 
portation without the tools, etc. It's im- 
material that he might or would have 
used a less expensive mode of transporta- 
tion if he didn't have to carry the tools, 
etc. 

Meals, lodging and other away-from- 
home travel expenses can qualify for 
deductible expenses provided they are in- 
curred in an overnight or period of time 
away from home expenses. 

Hiring in the heavy construction in- 
dustry is usually on a single project basis 
and lasts no longer than the project 
needs the skill of the particular em- 
ployee. Consequently, construction work- 
ers often keep a residence in one place 
and live away from their families during 
periods of work at various locations. 

NO DEDUCTION FOR BOOMER 

A construction worker who usually 
works in and around one city and has 
his home there can deduct his away- 
from-home expenses when he has to take 
temporary work elsewhere. 

A "boomer" or itinerant construction 
worker who moves from job to job and 
takes his family and residence with him 
can't deduct any away-from-home ex- 
penses. 

A worker who maintains his abode 
and makes his job contacts through his 
union or otherwise in a city in which he 
rarely works, may nevertheless be able 
to deduct away-from-home expenses for 
the jobs in various other places away 
from that city. He can if his residence is 
relatively fixed and he uses it as a "busi- 
ness headquarters" from which to operate 
in getting and going to the jobs, but not 
if he keeps it there for purely personal 
reasons. 

If the anticipated or actual duration 
for a job is about a year or longer it 
generally won't be considered a tempo- 
rary job for which the travel expenses 
will be allowed. 

IN PURSUIT OF BUSINESS 

Though legally an employee, a wage 
earner whose livelihood is regularly 
gained from a series of relatively short 
employments for various employers be- 
cause of the necessities of a regular 
trade, such as a carpenter, is deemed to 
have a trade or business. As a result he 
can deduct expenses incurred "in pursuit 
of business" instead of being limited to 
expenses required by the employer. This 
means that his travel expenses to a tem- 



porary job are deductible business ex- 
penses rather than non-deductible per- 
sonal expenses. For example, it has been 
held that a carpenter who worked away- 
from-home for three months at one job 
site and 15 months at another was on a 
temporary assignment and that therefore, 
his travel expenses were deductible. The 
trend seems to be away from the me- 
chanical time test (one year or more). It 
appears that if the taxpayer can point to 
strong home ties and to facts that indi- 
cate that he will return to his home as 
soon as a job opportunity presents itself 
that his claim will be viewed more fav- 
orably. 

Reasonable transportation allowances 
to its employees who work on a con- 
struction project located at a distance 



Are You Tired 
At the End of Day? 

• Your heart beats 103,689 times; 

• Your blood travels 168,000 miles; 

• You breathe 23,040 times; 

• You inhale 438 cubic feet of air; 

• You eat VA pounds of food; 

• You drink 2.9 pounds of liquid; 

• You lose 5.8 pounds of waste; 

• You give off 85.6° of heat; 

• You perspire 1.43 pints; 

• You generate in energy 45 ft/tons; 

• You speak 4,800 words 
(women more); 

• You move 750 major muscles; 

• Your nails grow .000046 inches; 

• Your hair grows .01714 inches; 
and . . . 

• You exercise 7,000,000 brain cells 
(some people less). 

Is it any wonder you feel tired? Your 
body is, indeed marvelously made so that 
you can accomplish this and everything 
else you do every day of your life. The 
big question is, what are you attempting 
to achieve with this opportunity? This 
energy? Is it being lived selfishly and 
without purpose? Is this an aimless drift- 
ing, not caring nor desiring to put our 
lives to good purpose? If the motto, "To- 
day is the first day of the rest of your 
life" is worth thinking about at all, it's 
worth putting into practice. If you do, 
you may find that you won't feel as 
though you're pulling all the load. 

; — From St. John's Hospital's Emphasis, 
Anderson, Indiana. 



from the principal or regular place of 
business are not wages if the job is a 
temporary one. The payments are reim- 
bursement for bona fide ordinary and 
necessary expenses incurred in the em- 
ployer's business. They are, therefore, 
not subject to withholding or Social 
Security taxes. 

To establish the fact that the em- 
ployee is entitled not to have tax with- 
held on allowances paid to him for meals 
and lodging. IRS says that the employer 
cannot rely solely on the employee's 
certification that he is working away 
from his "permanent residence." The 
employee must be working for a tem- 
porary period on a project located at a 
distance from his principal or regular 
place of employment. 

TEMPORARY VS. PERMANENT 

IRS has laid down rules for determin- 
ing whether a job is temporary or per- 
manent. Under those rules, withholding 
is required on any allowance if: 

(1) the employee has actually worked 
for a substantially continuous period of 
one year in any particular project area; 
or, 

(2) at the time of hiring, it is expected 
that the employee may be employed in a 
particular project area for more than 
one year; or, 

(3) it becomes apparent at any time 
that the employee's services in a partic- 
ular project area may reasonably be ex- 
pected to continue for more than one 
year. 

IRS has postponed "indefinitely" tough 
rules on local transportation. Back in 
1976 IRS issued Rev. Rul. 76-453, re- 
voking Rev. Rul. 190 which ruled that 
reasonable transportation allowances to 
employees who work on a construction 
project located at a distance from the 
principal or regular place of business are 
not wages subject to withholding or So- 
cial Security taxes if the job is a tem- 
porary one. 

Under the latest annuoncement, the 
effective date of the ruling, has been 
suspended indefinitely. Instead, IRS says 
that it will shortly issue proposed regs 
dealing with this area. 

Under Rev. Rul. 76-453 the transpor- 
tation expenses incurred by a taxpayer 
in going between his residence and place 
of work even though temporary, would 
be non-deductible commuting expenses 
regardless of the nature of the work, the 
distance traveled, the mode of transpor- 
tation or the degree of necessity. Hence, 
reimbursement would be subject to with- 
holding. It is expected that the new regs 
will be considerably different from the 
postponed ruling originally proposed in 
Rev. Rul. 76-453. 

With the ever-apparent trend to make 
the deductibility of travel expenses more 
stringent, it is necessary for the taxpayer 
to be kept informed of the exer-changing 
requirements for travel expense to assist 
in minimizing his tax liabilities. 

All members should maintain a log of 
the distances traveled and an itemized 
account of the expenses involved. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 




GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 



FRIENDS IN TV LAND 

A cabinetmaker took his son into 
a Hollywood cafe. The boy spotted 
a prominent television cowboy at a 
nearby table. 

After he stared for a time, the 
cowboy nodded a "hello," prompt- 
ing the boy to say to his father: 

"Gee, I've seen him in so many 
television shows, I think he knows 
me." 

— Union Tabloid 

ARE YOU REGISTERED TO VOTE? 

FRIENDS! ROMANS! 

PSYCHIATRIST: Let me congratu- 
late you on the progress you've 
made lately. 

PATIENT: What progress! Six 
months ago I was Julius Caesar, 
now I'm a nobody. You call that 
progress? 

SUPPORT VOC AND CHOP 

SOFTENING THE BLOW? 

Little girl to her parents: 

"Well, here's my report card — 
and I'm tired of watching television 
anyway." 



LONG AND SHORT OF IT 

One day a man came into a 
lumber yard. He asked for a 4 x 2. 

Lumber Man: "You mean a 2 x 
4?" 

Man: "No, a 4 x 2." 

Lumber Man: "Are you sure?" 

Man: "Wait, I will ask my broth- 
er." 

Minutes Later . . . 

Man: "You're right. I want a 2 
x 4." 

Lumber Man: "How long do you 
want it?" 

Man: "A long time. We're build- 
ing a house." 

— Rich Voss 

Grandview, Wash. 
BE READY TO VOTE IN '80 

OPEN AND CLOSED SHOP 

An apprentice greeted his new 
boss on his first day at work in the 
shipyard: 

"Good morning, sir," said the 
young man. 

"Welcome aboard, Smith," said 
the boss. "Always remember our 
motto: 'If at first you don't succeed 
— you're fired.' " 

* * * 
DON'T GET BEHIND IN '80 

______ 




UP AT SUNRISE 

City Slicker: What time do you go 
to work? 

Farmer: I don't go to work; I'm 
surrounded by it. 

— UTU News 



THIS MONTH'S LIMERICK 

There once was a lonesome 

baboon. 
That bedded down beside a 

lagoon, 
Every night about nine, 
On a banana he would dine, 
And proceed to growl low at the 

moon. 

— Howard Downer 
Lebanon, Ore. 




O, MOTHER MINE! 

The carpenter and his wife were 
having a discussion. 

"Now look, Alice," he said, care- 
ful to keep his voice down so the 
little old lady sitting in the living 
room wouldn't hear him. "I don't 
want to be harsh, but your mother 
has been living with us for 20 years 
now. Don't you think it's about 
time she got a place of her own?" 

Alice gasped in astonishment. 
"My mother!" she said. "I thought 
it was your mother!" 

— Emil Buehler 
Local 1251 
New Westminster, B.C. 

UNION DUES BRING DIVIDENDS 

BARGAINING POWER 

A millwright bought a parrot at 
an auction after some spirited bid- 
ding. 

"I suppose this bird talks," he 
said to the auctioneer. 

"He's been bidding against you 
for the past 10 minutes," came the 
reply. 

— Union Tabloid 

BE IN GOOD STANDING 

SMART DEDUCTION 

TEACHER: Johnny, name two 
documents that have contributed 
heavily to our government. 

JOHNNY: Form 1040 and 1040A. 

—UTU News 
LOOK FOR THE UNION LABEL 

ALL IN THE FAMILY 

FRIEND: It is hard indeed to lose 
one's relatives. 

FREDDY: Hard? It's impossible. 

WATERED DOWN 

TOM: Does this pen write under- 
water? 

CLERK: Yes, and other words too. 



MARCH, 1980 



19 



local union news 



Carpenters' District Council Wins Stock 

In Repayment Of $254,000 Wages, Benefits 



TVA Council Service 



In a unique, perhaps history-setting 
quarter-of-a-million-dollar back wage set- 
tlement, the District Council of Greater 
St. Louis, may have established a legal 
precedent in a case recently settled in 
Oregon. 

As a result of the diligent efforts, finan- 
cial backing and suggestion of a class 
action suit by the Council, 350 former 
Brotherhood members are now stock- 
holders in Spartan Manufacturing Co., a 
firm which emerged as the successor to 
Permaneer Corporation under Chapter X 
of the Federal Bankruptcy Act. Perma- 
neer was declared bankrupt in 1977, 
owing its employees (who were then 
members of the Brotherhood) $63,000 in 
back wages and $105,000 in accrued va- 
cation pay. The company also was 
$80,000 in arrears to the employees' 
health and welfare trust fund and owed 
the union $6,000 in dues and initiation 
fees it had collected under a payroll dues 
checkoff system. In all, $254,000 was 
owed the workers and their benefit funds 
when Permaneer finally closed its doors. 

The awarding of stock in the successor 
company, rather than the usual few-cents- 
on-the-dollar-owed cash settlement, was 
an innovative idea of the bankruptcy 
court, said Jess Ullom, an attorney with 
the St. Louis firm of Harris and Ullom, 
who handled the claims for the union. 
Had the court not made provision for 
the awarding of stock in lieu of cash, he 
said, the claims could have been wiped 
out altogether, since there were a number 
of large claims and an extremely small 
amount of funds to settle them all. How- 
ever, Spartan Manufacturing showed 
signs of doing well, and the court decided 
that a stock settlement would serve the 
best interests of all claimants. 




Displaying the results of the unique court 
settlement won by the district council — 
6,402 shares of stock — are Council 
Exec. Sec.-Treas. Ollie Langhorst, right, 
Asst. Exec. Sec.-Treas. Larry Daniels, 
left, and attorney Jess Ullom. 



A significant aspect of the case was the 
fact that throughout the two-and-a-half- 
year battle, the workers involved were 
no longer members of the union. "It's a 
simple case of doing what's right for the 
workers," Carpenters' District Council 
Executive Secretary-Treasurer Ollie Lang- 
horst said. "Our union had an obligation 
to our former members, regardless of 
their present union membership status. 
We've never run out on a member and 
we're not about to do so under these con- 
ditions." 

As a result of the union's dedication to 
serving its members, despite the fact that 
they were no longer affiliated with the 
union, the former Permaneer employees 
who joined the union's class claim against 
the company now own 6,402 shares of 
common stock in Spartan Manufacturing. 

In December, 1979, more than two 
years late, the District Council received 
229 shares of stock for unpaid dues and 
initiation fees and the Health and Welfare 
Trust Fund was awarded 4,140 shares for 
its claim. 

At one time, Permaneer Corp. was the 
world's largest manufacturer of do-it- 
yourself assembly furniture. The com- 
pany had plants throughout the nation, 
with two plants in Missouri, at Union 
and Wright City. Permaneer was, in fact, 
founded in the St. Louis area by Abe 
Portnoy, a member of the Brotherhood 
who proudly carried his union card — and 
kept it current — until his recent death. 

Fortunately for the former employees, 
Langhorst conceived the idea of filing a 
class claim on their behalf. Ullom is con- 
vinced that the class claim was the de- 
ciding factor in achieving an award for 
the unpaid wages. 

"The employees were in a position 
where they had a lot of valid claims. Had 
they fought for those claims individually, 
they would most probably have been 
challenged. The claimants would have 
been forced to go to Oregon to appear 
before the court to establish their 
claims — at their own expense. The trip 
alone would have cost each of them more 
than they stood to gain from the proceed- 
ings," Ullom said. 

"By filing a class claim, however, the 
union added considerable weight to the 
individual worker's position. Together 
they had enough clout that the court 
didn't even challenge the accuracy or the 
amounts of the claims. Also, by the Car- 
penters' Council filing a class claim, all 
the former employees had the legal repre- 
sentation provided by the union. No at- 
torney's fees have been paid by the 
claimants. The move even helped those 
who chose to file individual claims, since 
the court once it had acknowledged the 
class claim, couldn't ignore the others," 
the attorney added. 




The Tennessee Valley Council of Car- 
penters, which negotiates with the Ten- 
nessee Valley Authority, held its 45th 
Annual Wage Brief last August 3 and 4 
in Jackson, Tennessee. 

A banquet was held in honor of Doyle 
Williams, who recently retired after 24 
years as business representative of Local 
259. Jackson, Tenn. 

Shown above: General Executive 
Board Member Harold Lewis, right, and 
Bill Sims, left, presenting Williams a 
plaque for his outstanding service. 

Three Generations 




A father and son were recently in- 
stalled in the two top elective offices of a 
New York City local. Denis R. Sheil, 
right, became president of Local 1536 
and his son, Denis III, left, was installed 
as secretary-treasurer. The man in the 
middle is the grandfather of the younger 
Sheil and father-in-law of the elder. He is 
Bill Johnson of Local 1456, a veteran 
of more than 60 years in the Brother- 
hood. Johnson's father, the late Charles 
Johnson, Sr., was at one time treasurer 
of Local 1456, so there are actually four 
generations of Brotherhood members 
represented here. 



Texas Local Donates 
Welcome-Sign Work 

Members of Local 1804, Angleton, 
Tex., pitched in and erected four signs 
for their hometown of Angleton, Tex., 
which display the words "Welcome to 
Angleton." The signs were donated as 
part of a Beautify Angleton Today Cam- 
paign. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



Millwrights Meet 
In St. Louis Area 

In December, 1979, the Brotherhood 
sponsored a regional meeting in St. 
Louis, Mo., of union millwright repre- 
sentatives from 11 states around Mis- 
souri. General Secretary John Rogers 
and First General Vice President Patrick 
Campbell attended the meeting and ad- 
dressed the group. 

The purpose of the meeting was to 
discuss and solve problems and to outline 
various programs in the millwright trade. 

After group sessions in the morning, 
union representatives talked with their 
industry counterparts who were also 
convening in St. Louis, and they too 
reviewed mutual problems and ideas. 
Discussions were held with representa- 
tives of the Crane and Rigging Assn. of 
the Heavy Specialized Carriers Confer- 
ence. 



Attend your local union meetings 
regularly. Be an active member of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 



General Secretary 
Rogers, standing, 
and First General 
Vice President 
Campbell, seated, 
at the meeting of 
millwright repre- 
sentatives held in 
St. Louis in De- 
cember. The 
Brotherhood spon 
sored the meeting 
for millwrights to 
discuss problems 
in the trade. 




General Secretary Rogers and First 
General Vice President Campbell dis- 
cussed the agenda prior to the meeting. 
From left to right are: Madison County, 
III., D C Sec.-Treas. John Ubaudi, St. 
Louis D C Exec. Sec.-Treas. Ollie 
Langhorst, Rogers, and Campbell. 



Secretary Rogers and First Vice 
President Campbell met with Donald 
Sanders and John Johnson, president and 
director, respectively, of the Crane and 
Rigging Assn., to discuss areas of mutual 
concern. From left to right are: Rogers, 
Sanders, Johnson, and Campbell. 




i? i .■■* -h 



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21 



There is still time . . . to register as a qualified voter in 
many states for the US general elections next November. 
You and every adult member of your family should be 
on the voter rolls. 




HELPS START EM ON THEIR WAY 



Help your candidates to win ... by making your 
membership contribution to CLIC—the Carpenters Legis- 
lative Improvement Committee. 



Merged In Newfoundland 




Here is the newly-elected executive of merged Local 579, 
St. Johns, Newfoundland. Heretofore, there were three con- 
struction locals in the Province of Newfoundland and 
Labrador, which have now merged into one provincial local 
union. The executive of the local union was elected from a 
convention of delegates that met in Grand Falls on June 16, 
1979. Attending the convention were General Executive Board 
Member John Carruthers, Director of Organizing James 
Parker, and staff members of the Ninth District, as well as 
Director of Organizing for Canada, Rene Brixhe. 

Local 579 officers from left to right in the picture are: 
Tom Perry, financial secretary; Vincent Burton, vice presi- 
dent; John Hickey, Pat Healey, Carson Burt, and Ben Knee, 
trustees; Eric Lane, recording secretary; Cyril Parsons, con- 
ductor; Cyril Troke, president; and Howard Fudge, warden. 

Editor's Note: In a mix-up with our printers, we recently 
published a picture of the officers of Local 284, Queens 
Village, N.Y., to illustrate the caption above. We now, 
belatedly, correct the error. 




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22 



THE CARPENTER 




In our November and December, 7979, Issues we distributed 
postage-paid return envelopes, asking members to contribute gener- 
ously to the current fund-raising drive of the American Parkinsons 
Disease Association. The response has been gratifying. Contributions 
are arriving daily at the General Office. We urge you to continue your 
support. Keep the envelopes coming.' Mail them to: Parkinson's Disease 
Drive, c/o United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. 



mORE DOHORS 



to the Parkinson's Disease Drive 



Local 1 — Felix Donofrio, Frank Vesely, 
Anthony B. Mach. 

Local 3 — Joseph Fender, Myles Mcintosh. 

Carpenters Ladies Aux. #3. 

Local 4 — William M. Fox. 

Local 7 — Nels W. Loberg. 

Local 8 — Lawrence J. Fowler. 

Local 9 — William M. Belinson, John C. 
Loomis, Emmett Lynch. 

Local 11 — John Pech, M. C. Sinclair. 

Local 12— John R. West. 

Local 13 — Alex Zaleski, Patrick Maye, 
Henry Prevot, Egbert Buurma, Jos. F. 
Binder, Thure H. East. 

Local 14 — Tom S. Garza, Joseph J. Guer- 
rero. 

Local 15 — Richard Callaghan, Joseph W. 
Kuprel. 

Local 19 — Joe Hadam, Charles E. Cosgro. 

Local 20 — Harlow Haagensen, William 
Donahue. 

Local 22 — Werner Dehnbostel, Robert Lind- 
quist. 

Local 24 — Frederick A. Odell. 

Local 25 — Charles P. Melendez, John Earle. 

Local 30 — Ray Occhialini, Joseph R. Frank- 
lin, Fred W. Doyle. 

Local 31 — John Albarella, Timothy S. War- 
ren. 

Local 33 — George W. Rowe, Jon R. Mc- 
Phail. 

Local 34 — Jeffrey Chung, James Burnett. 

Local 35 — James C. Ulmer, George Phipps. 

Local 36— W. N. Wheller, Carl Elser, G. 
Eggen, Glen Kitzenberger. 

Local 42 — George Bauer, Angelo Balistreri, 
Frank Mendibles. 

Local 46 — Arvi A. Pajula. 

Local 47 — D. Richard Adams, Sam Boma- 
rito. 

Local 50 — Jim Greene. 

Local 54 — Steve Novak, John Baumruk, Jr. 

Local 55 — Joseph C. Kasenga. 

Local 58 — Robert J. Kirschke, Frans A. R. 
Franson, G. Bert Carlson, George Kru- 
valis, Adolf Hoglund. 

Local 60— Floyd H. Bradley. 

Local 61 — Charles E. Cates, John R. Hail- 
man, John Vittorino, Henry L. Dahlke, 
James O. Mack. 

Local 62 — Bert Solberg, Arnold A. Johnson. 

Local 65 — John Rosenvinge. 

Local 66 — A. Engburg. 

Local 67 — John D. Cameron, Elmer R. 
Graves. 

Local 71— W. H. Pesterfield. 

Local 77 — John Kucher. 

Local 80— John P. Latimer, David D. Wales, 
Adolph R. Cairo, Eugene Kleehammer, 
Arthur N. Anderson. 

Local 85— Ralph Brye. 



Local 94 — Leo Kallio, Jerome J. Kearney, 

Albert W. Berg. 
Local 95 — Peter Semegen. 
Local 98— John H. Hill. 
Local 99 — Thomas L. Neverdousky, Thomas 

Chapin. 
Local 101 — Milton K. Holbrook, Jr., Joseph 

A. Hoffman, J. R. Cunningham. 
Local 104— Fred W. Pollard, Kathryn 

Brown, Riengi Swigart. 
Local 105 — Ernest Gower. 
Local 106 — Jim Reynolds. 
Local 107 — Maleo Petrosinelli. 
Local 117 — Anthony Stackrow. 
Local 120 — Joseph B. Soldano. 
Local 131— Olav Gzerde. 
Local 132— John R. Earp, Sr., Gottlieb 

Huber, M. L. Reiser, August A. Do- 

mick, Saul S. Stein. 
Local 135 — Peter Segatti, Christian Sperber, 

Jacob Weicenfeld, Benjamin Lipman, 

Jack Cohen. 
Local 155 — Carl L. Wassen. 
Local 162 — Eiler M. Nielsen. 
Local 165 — Gerard DeFilippo. 
Local 168— Lyall L. Watson. 
Local 170 — Ladies Aux. 
Local 171 — George Schuller. 
Local 180 — J. VanMeter] Victor Southard. 
Local 181 — Walter M. Johnson, Stalzer. 
Local 182 — Nicholas Nestor. 
Local 183 — Fred Zimmermann, Connor Baz- 

zelle. 
Local 184— John W. Harper. 
Local 188— Robert Dunford. 
Local 194 — James Thomson, James W. Barn- 
ford. 
Local 197— Seo R. Sands. 
Local 210— Timothy S. Barry. 
Local 211 — John Betkowski. 
Local 213 — Jim Hickey, H. M. Bennett, 

W. A. Robberson. 
Local 215 — Chester Snider. 
Local 218 — Charles Mallett, George Par- 
sons. 
Local 222 — Rick Land. 
Local 226 — Emanuel Schunk. 
Local 235 — Donald & Doris Bush. 
Local 242 — John Macaitis. 
Local 246 — W. Berberich, Alfred Schaefer, 

James Baione, Albert U. Mancini, Helge 

Hesness. 
Local 248— Ralph K. Moore. 
Local 255 — Frank Niessen. 
Local 257 — Axel Larson, Michael Del Mese, 

George McNeil, James H. Glass, Max 

Buchwald, Ebro Furlani. 
Local 260 — Maurice W. Howes, Russell S. 

Smith. 
Local 261 — Charles J. Pumilia. 
Local 265 — Frank A. Bopp. 



Local 269 — James Le Claire. 

Local 272— W. Galick. 

Local 275— Stanley J. Whittaker. 

Local 280— George L. Ball. 

Local 281 — John Kozak. 

Local 284 — W. Dowd, M. Wozniak, Pietro 

Montella, Hugh F. Hamilton, August 

Drewes. 
Local 287 — Monte L. Boroner, Galen Lahr, 

Henry J. Barnes. 
Local 297— E. C. Christensen. 
Local 299 — Louis Schmitt. 
Local 308 — Norman L. Huston. 
Local 314 — Robert H. Strenger. 
Local 337— Ray Brett, John A. Kelly. 
Local 341 — Paul Dzenciolowsky. 
Local 350 — Rocco Consigliere, Victor Cris- 

tiano. 
Local 355 — William Yuzwak. 
Local 365 — George A. Rahn. 
Local 366 — Louis Polo, Vilho Haimila, 

Anthony Maiellaro, Eino J. Salo. 
Local 369— Willard B. Carson. 
Local 374 — Harry Brunea. 
Local 379— John & Ruth Thrapp. 
Local 384 — Ron Dellinger. 
Local 385— Italo Cociani, Halter L. Hool, 

Camillo Serrone, Joseph Pomerantz, 

Victor Bernardon, Nick Peters. 
Local 391— Henry Cook. 
Local 393 — A. Kroenbring. 
Local 401— John J. Sudek. 
Local 402 — Jean P. Corriveau, W. Sautter. 
Local 404 — Dave Rittenhouse. 
Local 413 — Mark J. Thomas. 
Local 418 — Oren Bryan. 
Local 425 — Arthur P. Reyes. 
Local 433 — Leroy Hoffmann. 
Local 434 — Anton Putman. 
Local 440— Herbert W. Schultz, Anthony J. 

Schultz. 
Local 455 — Edward Ingram, J. F. Rinehart. 
Local 462 — Daniel F. Acita. 
Local 465 — Joseph P. Urbanski. 
Local 468 — George Adler, Joseph Noble, 

John Malinski, John Gerhardt. 
Local 470— Emil Indrebo, T. K. Thompson. 
Local 475— Alexander T. McLellan, Peter 

Foundas. 
Local 483 — John Wilkinson. 
Local 488— Albert E. Jarw, U. S. Bjork. 
Local 490— William Modla. 
Local 492— Richard H. Gans. 
Local 500— Albert H. Goucher, Russell V. 

Bowser. 
Local 514 — Edward F. Blazejewski. 
Local 515— Paul E. Crabb. 
Local 528 — Robert J. Hohnson. 
Local 530— David J. Hegarty. 
Local 538 — Harry Olson. 
Local 558 — J. L. Holdmann, Sr. 



MARCH, 1980 



23 



Local 562— Earl Werness, Carl T. Morten- 
sen. 
Local 563 — Curtis O. Lundeen, Domenick 

Manardo, George E. Brown. 
Local 578 — Joseph Shovey. 
Local 599— Robert DeCamp, Gunnar Hult- 

man. 
Local 606 — Leonard W. Snell. 
Local 608— Frank Torretto, C. J. Keane. 
Local 609— Berkley L. Barnett. 
Local 612— Robert J. See. 
Local 616 — Harry R. Reed. 
Local 620 — Furio Bucco, Louis A. Lindia, 

Thomas J. Anderson, Frank Giordano, 

Carl O. Peterson, Clifford A. Egbert. 
Local 623— Carl W. Thomsen, Edward A. 

Walsh, Jr. 
Local 625— Fred Ebol. 
Local 627— Lee M. Overly, Sr. 
Local 635 — Lawrence Rosera. 
Local 643 — Erling M. Lindstad, P. A. 

Zemba. 
Local 660— Rudolph H. Kaasch. 
Local 668— W. H. Haynes, Charles J. 

Moore. 
Local 678 — Melvin Reynolds. 
Local 691 — John D. Harvey. 
Local 701— Guy Holmes. 
Local 703— L. P. Wright. 
Local 710 — Charles Fessenbecker, M. M. 

Gohner, Earl F. Noel. 
Local 715— C. R. Brown, Philip Berardi- 

nelli. 
Local 721 — Morris Locker, Walter A. Chru- 

stek, M. D. Murchis, Pinto. 
Local 740— R. McEnroe, Harold Christin- 

sen, Abraham Goldberg, Armand Pa- 

gano. 
Local 745 — Masaru Yahata, Teruichi Fujita, 

Richard C. Inouye, Nadao Honda, Y. 

Fujimoto, Moises C. Ancheta, Masanori 

Tsuchida, H. Hoshgeschurz, Julian F. 

Mendoza, Sr. 
Local 747— Curtis C. Wright, Ross Rupert. 
Local 751 — Leslie J. Merrill, Norman 

Houghtaling. 
Local 764— Gene P. Hill, Robert W. Mit- 

cheltree, A. R. Lewis. 
Local 769 — Harold L. Jones, Gerrit Truin, 

Chet Anderson. 
Local 785 — George Boehm. 
Local 787— Edwin B. Hollowell, Hjalmar D. 

Skaar, Martin Johnson, E. Oftedal. 
Local 819— Albert G. Petersen. 
Local 829— Samuel J. Goodson, Robert E. 

Bunnell. 
Local 839 — Sherman Dautel, Oscar Christ. 
Local 841— David Perko. 
Local 848— Billie E. Katz. 
Local 849— John H. Murray. 
Local 857 — M. H. Fenimore. 
Local 865— Culis E. Kirkland. 
Local 872 — Gary Neukom. 
Local 902— Joseph K. Theisen, Wilhelm 

Marquardt, Peder Pedersen, Ralph Di- 

Giorgio, John H. Donaldson, Richard 

Klose, Nils R. Johansen, Petter A. 

Pedersen, Joseph Leonardelli. 
Local 921— Vincent McKenzie, Nye W. 

Lane. 
Local 925 — Edward Francis. 
Local 948 — John J. Pavlovich. 
Local 971— Carl L. Harris, Gary D. Long, 

Stanley Szajner, Donald E. Alford. 
Local 976— Clifford Wasserbeck. 
Local 978— Jack C. Taylor, Bob Kessler. 
Local 996 — Maurice Alexander. 
Local 997 — George Biever, Karl Scheifley. 
Local 1016 — Hagan Wynn. 
Local 1040— Arthur E. Baldry. 
Local 1042— Frederick Plumadore, W. B. 

Murray. 
Local 1048— M. G. Baker, Standley Zalar. 



Affiliates Which Have Contributed 


Local 16 


Local 280 


Local 666 Local 1185 


Local 1996 


Local 28 


Local 300 


Local 668 Local 1196 


Local 2168 


Local 34 


Local 372 


Local 715 Local 1274 


Local 2274 


Local 40 


Local 397 


Local 739 Local 1310 


Local 2283 


Local 47 


Local 422 


Local 841 Loca i i 471 


Local 2350 


Local 58 


Local 455 


ft?}"" Local 1506 


Local 2356 


Local 67 


Local 461 


Local 964 ¥ . , , c , 
Local 978 Local 553 
Local 1165 Local 1582 


Local 2410 


Local 122 


Local 475 


Local 2489 


Local 184 


Local 542 


Local 1172 Local 1708 


Local 2599 


Local 211 


Local 609 


Local 1176 Local 1715 


Local 2860 


Local 226 


Local 616 


Local 1181 Local 1846 


Local 3203 


United Counties Carpenters District 


Maumee Valley Carpenters District 


Council 




Council 




Carpenters District Council of 


Monmouth County Carpenters District 


Western Pennsylvania 


Council 




Miami Valley Carpenters District Council Illinois State Council 




Missouri State Council 


Carpenters District Council of Greater 


Tri City Carpenters 


District Counci 


St. Louis 




Carpenters District Council Weschester South Mississippi Carpenters District 


City, N.Y. 




Council 




Santa Clara Valley District Council 


Milwaukee District Council 


Los Angeles County District Council Carpenters District Council New Orleans, 


Chicago Carpenters 


District Counci 


La. 




Carpenters District Council of Utah 


Ohio Valley Carpenters District Council 


Kentucky State Council 


Luther A. Sizemore Foundation 



Local 1049 — Esco. D. Choisser. 

Local 1050 — Fred J. Megaro. 

Local 1052— Charles Cole. 

Local 1054 — Stan Tastad. 

Local 1062— Earl C. Hiser. 

Local 1072— David Lee. 

Local 1089— Earl Kurtzeman, Earl Kurt- 

zeman, C. S. Scotten. 
Local 1093 — Eugene Merkel. 
Local 1100— Glenn D. Davis, III. 
Local 1120 — Carey A. Pond. 
Local 1138— Donald L. Phillips. 
Local 1142 — Hubert Oneal, Paul Binder. 
Local 1145 — L. G. Jim Hudgins. 
Local 1149 — Ted L. Knudson, Oscar Ber- 

gene, Emmett J. Fischer. 
Local 1159— Carl Hall. 
Local 1162— Collins Wilson. 
Local 1164 — Marcy Montagna, Max J. 

Spitznagel, Alexander Honzer. 
Local 1171— Donald C. Schieck. 
Local 1172 — Ed Morgan. 
Local 1182— E. Louis Heath. 
Local 1184 — Eric Christenson. 
Local 1204 — Carmine M. Vespa, Benjamin 

Slaff, Joseph Pianpiano, Harvey F. 

Hahn. 
Local 1207— Roy S. Martin. 
Local 1222 — Andrew Shulha. 
Local 1243 — Hiram L. Okhtokiyuk. 
Local 1276— Paul W. Hensel. 
Local 1296— Mr. & Mrs. L. E. Abbott. 
Local 1303 — Carl Leskinovitch, Hjalmar C. 

Thorp. 
Local 1305— Edward Chistolini. 
Local 1308— Marcus Hertel, William O. 

Martin. 
Local 1319 — Ora M. Brown, Malcolm Ward. 
Local 1323— Al Melder. 
Local 1325 — Jean Fortin. 
Local 1335— Jack M. Vigil. 
Local 1342 — Ralph Aversa, John Specian, 

H. J. Rudolph Nelson, Gustav Kail, 

Rocco Branca, Philip A. Calabrese. 
Local 1359 — James Johnoff. 
Local 1394 — R. Burleson. 
Local 1397 — George E. Corcoran. 



Local 1400— John C. Little, Arthur W. 

Phillips, George Zurow. 
Local 1407 — Francis E. Heisterman. 
Local 1408— Bill Wright, Barbara May, 

Manuel Soto. 
Local 1426 — Levi A. Wilder. 
Local 1453 — Charles J. Peters. 
Local 1456 — Everett McNuIty, Gargvar Nil- 
sen, Trygve Stange, August Nelson, 

Emil F. Dantes, Raul D. Surerus, Julio 

Mobilo, George Warford. 
Local 1462 — Leonard G. Contino, Francis 

M. Kreider. 
Local 1478— Arthur J. Risch. 
Local 1485 — Melvin E. Spears. 
Local 1487 — James A. Lyman. 
Local 1497 — John H. West, Joe Boardman, 

Jovenal Rosales. 
Local 1506 — Doug McCarron. 
Local 1507— Wayne E. Wood, Lyle A. 

Parks, Sr. 
Local 1509 — Michael Lyons. 
Local 1536 — Thomas E. Cartledge. 
Local 1539 — Frank Lozar, Leo J. Janicki. 
Local 1548 — Carl R. Doster. 
Local 1564 — Hilmer Hansen. 
Local 1565— R. L. Vicars. 
Local 1570— Charles J. Peters. 
Local 1571 — Harold Asch. 
Local 1577— John J. Kent. 
Local 1582 — Emil A. Baseler. 
Local 1583 — Paul J. Skizinski, Frederick J. 

Ruble. 
Local 1590— Thomas DeWitt. 
Local 1607 — George C. Mannameyer. 
Local 1609— Robert M. Schmid. 
Local 1622— Albin Herbert. 
Local 1632 — Horace Strong, Adam R. Hein- 

baugh, Harold Flood. 
Local 1635 — H. F. Shoemake. 
Local 1648— Heinz Pikarek. 
Local 1665 — James P. Hicks. 
Local 1693 — Jack W. Broseau, John Lucas, 

William Ritchie. 
Local 1708— Don Ed Martin. 
Local 1715 — Arben W. Thompson. 
Local 1741— Darryl Pleuak. 

Continued on Page 38 



24 



THE CARPENTER 




Service 
Brotherhood 

A gallery of pictures showing some of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received pins for years of service in the union. 



San Mateo, Calif. — Photo No. 1 




San Francisco, Calif. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Millmen's Local 42 held a dinner dance on 
October 27, 1979 to honor its 25-year 
members and their wives. 

Members who received pins are pictured in 
the accompanying photograph: 

Front row, left to right: Donaciano M. 
Munis, Julio S. Allazetta, Howard C. Thompsen, 
Orlando Pascoa, Guenter E. Wolff, Egar 
Vonsteht. 

Second row, left to right: Louis Evanglisti, 
Victor Ciappara, Egidio Muscat, Albert G. 
Gruetzner, Carlos M. Jimenez, Holger C. 
Andersen, Moises Mayorga. 

Third row, left to right: Don A. Ramacciotti, 
Rich A. Suarez, Rosendo Camacho, Mike 
Kuchinsky, Paul Agius, Ernest Lenarcic. 

Fourth row, left to right: Harold L. Bushaw, 
Jose Cobo, James Cornwell, Augustine-Sanchez. 

Members who received 25-year pins but 
were not present for the picture include: 
Edward R. Ballardo, Justo Centeno, Leone 



Cesca, Kermit Elledge, Raul M. Guadamuz, 
Jack D. Holmes, Clifton F. Kenne, Roman 
Krauss, Max Liss, Richard H. Madsen, Henry J. 
Mello, Richard J. Nissen, Charles Olsen, Dan 
Santiago, Hans Sauerwald, Juan A. Schielzeth, 
Jacob X. Stone, Walter L. Tayler, George H. 
Theuser, Bernard Tohl, Giovoanni Torre, Robert 
J. Welch, Paul Wutsch, Henry J. Wynne, 
Robert M. Zeige. 



PALATKA, FLA. 

Local 1500 recently honored six of its 
long-term members with a ceremonial dinner. 
Pictured in the accompanying photograph are, 
from left to right: 35-year members George 
Bair, John R. Johnson; 30-year members R. H. 
Holcombe, J. R. Smith; 25-year member G. H. 
Copeland; and Alvin Howe, president, Local 
1500. 

25-year member Elzear Gionett also received 
a pin but was absent for the photograph. 




Palatka, 
Fla. 




San Mateo, Calif. — Photo No. 2 

SAN MATEO, CALIF. 

On October 13, 1979, Local 162 held an 
"Old Timers Dance" in Dunfey Hotel, San 
Mateo, to celebrate its 80th anniversary and 
to honor its 45 and 50-year members. Over 
400 people attended the dance and pin 
presentation ceremony. General Treasurer 
Charles Nichols presented pins to the 
following members: 

Picture No. 1, left to right: 45-year 
members U.S. Simonds, Joe Gonsalves, K. 
Henry Johnson, and General Treasurer Charles 
Nichols. 

Picture No. 2, left to right: 50-year 
members Ralph DiRenzo, E. R. Chenier, Algot 
Nelson, W. 0. Christianson, and General 
Treasurer Charles Nichols. 




Aurora, 



AURORA, ILL. 

Members of Local 916 were recently 
presented certificates of award by The Aurora 
Trades and Labor Assembly for their years of 
service to the labor movement. Some of the 
honored members are pictured in the 
accompanying photograph. 

Front row, left to right: Pete Sliauter, 
32-year member, past president, Local 916 and 
vice president, Aurora Trades and Labor 
Assembly; Ted Scheidecker, 57-year member, 
past president, Local 916 and delegate to the 
Aurora Trades and Labor Assembly. 

Back row, left to right: Harl Ray, secretary- 
treasurer, Illinois State AFL-CIO; Art Moore, 
president, Aurora Trades and Labor Assembly; 
Henry Does, 25-year member, president, Local 
916 and past president, Aurora Trades and 
Labor Assembly; Fred Burgess, business agent, 
Local 916. 

23-year member John Kish also received an 
award but was not present for the photograph. 



MARCH, 1980 



25 




Lakewood, Colo. 



Chicago, III. — Picture No. 2 



LAKEWOOD, COLO. 

Local 1396 held a pin awards dinner on 
June 19, 1979. The following members 
received service pins: 

Front row, left to right: 30-year members 
John Bolchunos, Richard Lile, Lt. Governor 
Nancy Dick, and Allen Hansen; and 40-year 
member Thomas Wilking. 

Back row, left to right: 25-year members 
Roger Noland and Richard Andrews; and 30-year 
members Llewllyn Halboth and Stephen Cross. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Local 434 held a pin presentation ceremony 
in July, 1979. George Vest, president of the 
Chicago District Council, presented four 60- 



year pins and twenty-seven 25-year pins to 
deserving members of the brotherhood. 

Picture No. 1 shows, from left to right, 
60-year members Jesher Reichert, Roland 
Dunand, and Harry Sikma. 

Picture No. 2 shows 25-year members. Front 
row, left to right: Robert Mack, Hendrikus 
Putman, Fred Bruhn, Nicholas Veenstra, John 
Domiter, and Alvin Costa. 

Second row, left to right: Lawrence Williams, 
Edward Isbell, Harry Nelson, William Hurt, 
Edward Grabowski, and Robert Scholtens. 

Back row, left to right: Guenther Frank, 
LeRoy Schwertfeger, Thomas Hoogland, and 
Edward Hedstrom. 

60-year member Carl Echman was unable 
to attend the ceremony. 



V 



ill 

1 I mi 



Chicago, III. — Picture No. 1 






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Bloomfield, N.J. — 45-Year Members 

BLOOMFIELD, N.J. 

Last July 14, Local 1342, Essex County, 
presented 909 membership pins. Of the 909 
eligible, 575 attended a special awards break- 
fast at the Town and Campus in West Orange, 
N.J. 

The breakdown of those eligible was as fol- 
lows: 160 25-year pins, 330 30-year pins, 130 
35-year pins, 112 40-year pins, 15 45-year pins, 
55 50-year pins, 55 55-year pins, 35 60-year 
pins, 12 65-year pins, and 5 70-year pins. 

The accompanying pictures show members 
who received pins from 45 years on up to 
65 years. Those in the pictures are partially 
identified as follows: 

45-YEAR PINS— Left to right, front row 
Thomas Skoie, Eilert Tonnesseon, Samuel 
Tamburello, Sol Halem, Ralph Bellomo, Roy 
Turner, Eric Lindberg, Joseph Baldyga, Andrew 
Olson, Michael Potuto, Fred Pomerleau, and 
Pere Lage Peterson. 

50-YEAR PINS (No. 1) — Left to right, Charles 
Campbell, Irwin Day, Henry Frostland, Nathan 
Chodakowsky, William Umbreit, Eric Lindberg, 
Thomas Pataky, Allen Ashley, Frank Apgar, 
Harold Bishof, Carlo Picchiello, Eugene 0'Horo, 



Frank Houck, and William Koenig. 

50-YEAR PINS (No. 2)— Left to right, Stewart 
F. Kumfert, Rudolf Steiner, Anthony Chiarval- 
loti, Paul Zacher, George D. Meikle, Kurst 
Kirste, Simon Simonsen, Joseph Baudi, Ralph 
Aversa, Emil Zbuska, Liberatore Mautone, and 
Joseph Lynch. 

60-YEAR PINS— Left to right, Joseph Carrara, 
Bror Olson, Joseph Florczak, Engvald Hansen, 
Leander Hansen, Edward Redmond, Frank 
Farrell, and Alexander Swanson. 

65-YEAR PINS— Left to right, James Hoatson, 
Lawrence Conroy, General Executive Board 
Member Sigurd Lucassen, Charles Levine, and 
Joseph Baldyga, Sr. 




65-Year Members 



Above: 50-Year 
Members, No. 1 




Right: 50-Year 
Members, No. 2 



60-Year 

Members 



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P. O. Box 405, Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 



MARCH, 1980 



27 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 

On July 5, 1979, Local 180 held a ceremony 
for the installation of officers and the award- 
ing of membership pins. Anthony L. Ramos, 
executive secretary of the California State 
Council of Carpenters, swore in the new 
officers. The following members received 
service pins: 

Picture No. 1— Left to right: 25-year mem- 
bers William Trader, Karl Spangler, and Pete 
Zorn. 

Picture No. 2— Left to right: 30-year mem- 
bers Moses Tyson, Walter P. Gardiner, Roy 
Creager, and Stanley Johnston. 

Picture No. 3 — Left to right: 35-year mem- 
bers George Anderson, Robert Adams, Martin 
Lenzi, Gordon McKinley, and Robert Sanders. 

Picture No. 4 — Front row, left to right: Elias 
Holland, and Robert Bitcon. Back row, left to 
right: Charles Ayers, Dan Boatwright, and 
Fred Eichner. 

Picture No. 5 — 45-year member Mehlsen 
Jensen. 

Other members who received pins were.- 
15-year members Roosvelt Ross, Elroy Krueger, 
Meyer Featherston, Neil Serr, J. W. Strohmeyer, 
and Carl Jones; 20-year members Dewey Jones, 
Friedrich Buhler, Leon McGill, Emidio Fonseca, 
Joe Nicholson, Pete Rubio, Larry Sandberg, 
Darwin Healy, Roger Williams, and Andy 
Oyervides. 




Vallejo, Calif. — Picture No. 3 



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28 



THE C ARPENTER 




Carlsbad, N.M. 

CARLSBAD, N.M. 

On July 15, 1978, Local 1245 held a pin 
presentation ceremony at the Sally Port Inn in 
Roswell, N.M. to honor its members with 20 to 
50 years of service to the brotherhood. 

Some of the members who received pins are 
pictured in the accompanying photograph. The 
recipients in the front row include, from left 
to right, 40-year members J. H. McBride (dark 
suit), and Harry Hamby; 50-year member Gene 
Burgoon; Mrs. Cecil Garcia, receiving a 25-year 
pin for her deceased husband; and 40-year 
member Ernie Brown. 

The following members also received their 
service awards: 40-year members Arnold 
Arndt, W. C. Bass, Claude Cunningham, R. E. 
Dick, Forest Guthrie; 35-year members B. K. 
Bruce, 0. M. Call, Everett Crow, Omer Daniel, 
Leon Dick, Johnny Dick, Lucas Fletcher, Gerald 
Hand, Paul Heath, Inocente Leyva, Wayne 
Mabry, Walter Means, Manford Moore, C. B. 
Porter, Ervin Porter, D. J. Reeves, Jack Russell, 
J. C. Setters, M. E. Singleterry, Walter Smith, 
W. T. Smith, Paul Stout, M. J. Sullivan, Ralph 
Thornton, Harvey Tidwell, William Trammel, 
Ira Waldrop, T. J. Walker; 

30-year members Charles Corder, J. 0. Davis, 
Ross Delaney, Raymond Foreman, Leonard Gil- 
lespie, Robert Griesemer, George Hendren, 
C. C. Hill, Arthur Huggins, Julio Juarez, E. F. 
Kornegay, Bruce Larrick, David Long, Santiago 
Lopez, Adan Munoz, J. K. McCurdy, Birger 
Olin, W. H. Orton, Horace D. Price, James Read, 
Archie Rogers, M. D. Segura, William Tucker; 

25-year members D. R. Allen, R. M. Call, 
Joe Fitzgerald, Ed Franco, J. D. Gibbs, B. C. 
Goodman, Edgar Ham, Gene Harvey, Weldon 
Hawk, P. 0. Hawkins, Rudie Kneese, Neal 
Rasco, Robert Richards, H. M. Roark, Claude 
Roork, A. R. Sabean, Leonard Stephenson, Jim 
Tabor, Howard Walker, Jay Whisenhunt, R. L. 
Whitehurst; 

20-year members Daniel Armijo, Charles 
Baker, Martin Calderon, H. A. Cogdill, Henry 
Haney, Marvin Harris, Leon Harvey, Frankie 
Joy, William Locklear, Seaburn Locklear, Pedro 
Najera, Ruben Najera, Irenio Ortega, 0. H. 
Palmer, Cecil Pistole, William Primrose, John 
Sulser, John Summergill, James Thompson. 



GRAND FALLS, NFLD. 

Loggers Local 2564 recently honored three 
of its members with service pins. Business 
Representative Everett Boyd presented the 
pins. 

Picture No. 1 shows Chesley Batten, second 
from left, receiving his 25-year pin. 

Picture No. 2 shows Andrew Delaney receiv- 
ing his 20-year pin. 

Picture No. 3 shows John Walsh receiving 
his 20-year pin. 




Grand Falls, No. 1 




Grand Falls, No. 3 



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29 



BUZZARDS BAY, MASS. 

At a recent meeting of Local 1331, the fol- 
lowing members received longevity pins: 

25-year members— Essio J. Lanza, Thomas 
E. Milne, Edward W. Preston, Earl Raymond, 
Frank Rowe, Charles Whitney, and Russell 
Wing. 

30-year members— Paul Alleborn, Roy 
Anderson, James Bradley, Ira Comeau, Richard 
Curry, James J. Doyle, Edward Dunford, Henry 
Erickson, George Fernandez, George Geoffrion, 
Fred Hughes, Hollis Jennings, Percy Lang, Paul 
Machnik, and Luigi Picciuolo. 

35-year members— Fred Benttinen, Francis 
Doherty, John Gonsalves, Warren Harrington, 
Joseph Lombard, Carlton Moody, Willy K. 
Oehme, Kusti O'Jala, Joseph Peters, Mathias 
Palawski, Joseph Teixeira, Moses Tokee, and 
George Wilson. 

40-year members— Ray Leafer, and Karl 
Stranius. 

45-year member— Olof. B. West. 

55-year member— Eric Lindfors. 




Phoenix, Ariz. — Picture No. 1 



Phoenix, Ariz. — Picture No. 2 




PHOENIX, ARIZ. 

On September 17, 1979, Local 1089 had a 
pin presentation ceremony for 25-year mem- 
bers, 50-year members, and past officers. 

Picture No. 1 shows from left to right: 50- 
year members Henry Schoof and John Pivoda. 

Picture No. 2 shows from left to right: 
retired Warden Walt Williams, and retired 



Phoenix, Ariz. — Picture No. 3 

Business Representatives Ed Martin and Bill 
Stiles. 

Picture No. 3 shows, front row, left to right: 
25-year members Vince Normile, Michael 
Wynnyczok, Joe Mailnzak, D. C. Stacey, Reno 
Menegon, James W. Porter, Donald Carlson, 
Henry Cruz, Joseph Earll, Albin Humble, Vernon 
White, Jack McNabb. 



Second row, left to right: 25-year members 
John E. Guerra, Marvin Barnes, Robert McClure, 
Maurice King, Sam Fleming, George Cornwell, 
Charles D. Gibson, Jack W. Brown, Edward 
Pederson. 

Third row, left to right: 25-year members 
Frank L. Dalton, G. C. Borders, John Doolin, 
Leslie E. McKee, Paul R. Peterson, Richard 
Hoffman. 



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THE CARPENTER 



Picture No. 2 



Picture No. 3 



Picture No. 4 



SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. 

On April 28, 1979, at an afternoon buffet, 
Local 944 awarded pins to 467 members with 
25 or more years of continuous membership 
in the Brotherhood. Some of the deserving 
members are pictured in the accompanying 
set of photographs. 

Picture No. 1— 65-Year Member Donald 
Thompson. 

Picture No. 2 — 50-Year Members Paul Mayer 
and Alfred Withers. 

Picture No. 3— 45-Year Member Raymond 
Shuldberg. 

Picture No. 4 — 40-Year Members Otis 
Burrows; Coy W. Duke ; Homer Ford; Herbert 
R. Heston ; J. Milton Johnsen; Charles R. 
Pearce ; Morley Scott; S. L. Steffensen. 

The following members also received 
service awards: 

55-Year Member— C. S. Stowe. 

50-Year Member— G. Avert Carlson. 

45-Year Member— John Writer. 

40-Year Members— F. B. Bryant, D. E. 
Crabtree, L. J. Craig, Clark R. Griffin, Edwin D. 
Hoover, Frank L. R. Hunt, Edward C. Koelzer, 
Ed F. Manning, Howard H. Morrison, Robert L. 
Nelson, Chester J. Rogers, Ben Walston, 
J. J. Wiens. 

35-Year Members— Charles J. Abele, 
Frederick Adolphi, Paul Alton, Joseph Ando, 
William W. Andrews, Ira C. Ayers, John A. 
Bentley, George Bovee, Charles L. Campbell, 
Clarence Dahlsied, Henry Daros, Earl E. 
Depeugh, John De Lange, John J. Duke, H. W. 
Dulaney, John Eder, Victor Emanuelson, Ray 
Flansburg, Otis W. Fosmo, Merrill D. Funk, 
John Gallentine, Henry Garland, Martin 
Gaustad, John C. Griffin, J. W. Hicks, A. G. 
Huddleston, E. R. Hunter, Sam Igyarto, 
Richard L. Jennings, Roland J. Jennings, 
Charles W. Jobes, Jack Kaczor, W. H. Keil, 
Orval J. Kiefer, Frank M. Landes, Raymond 
D. Landon, James H. Lyon, F. B. Miller, 
Emil S. Mintz, George W. Moore, Chester 
Munroe, Kenneth B. Nelson, R. J. Ohlund, 
Leo L. Owens, Thomas Owens, Jr., F. W. 
Rickerson, Charles Rodocker, Herman C. 
Rogers, Wilbert 0. Sands, Edward J. Sawinski, 
Elmer J. Senk, Theodore N. Schaff, William L. 
Simcox, Earl E. Smith, Frank Spriet, Cecil 
Starkey, Ted St. Pierre, Robert B. Thurman, 
Garrett Vandien, E. A. Ware, G. L. Whitacre, 
Allen F. Williams, Ray E. Wolaver, Harvey L. 
Wood, Earl Young, Melvin L. Zolber; James R. 
Arnold; D. C. Bakerink; William H. Baucom; 
Frank Boyer; V. E. Burkett; Cornelius Button; 
William Carleton; Med Choate; Winton Cowell; 
Arthur Dahl; James C. Darling; Francis 
DeClerck; Charles B. Duncan; Donald Dunning; 



Fred W. Forcht; Weldon Gibson; Troy Goss ; 
Dan E. Grant; A. L Griffin; William H. Griffin; 
Gilbert Halterman; B. J. Hayden; Kenneth H. 
Hayden; Elmer Herd; George Hood; Grover 
Howell; Joe W. Hudson; Robert S. Huss ; N. E. 
Ingle; Cecil James; Kenneth B. Marquiss; 
Maurice M. McCoy; Carl L. McCraw; D. W. 
McEuen; Dale McKee; Eugene A. McKray; 
Granville A. Miller; John W. Painter; A. S. 
Palmquist; Hollis Parrish; Charles D. Prograce; 
L. E. Randolph; Wallace Clawson; James C. 
Darling; William J. Roberts; Precilino Orona ; 
Leslie M. Robbins; Bert Rogers; William E. 
Ryan, Jr.; Harry M. Saffel; Louis Sandkamp; 
Alex Scialabba; H. B. Stowe ; Alf Tusberg; 
Roland B. Upham; Cary Vaughn; Jack H. 
Walker; Luther M. Walker; Gilbert Wilcox; 
Frank M. Wilson; Yerxa T. Watson. 

30-Year Members— Otis M. Ammons, Walter 
Ansel, Paul Arivett, George D. Atchison, Lonnie 
S. Barrier, Joe E. Barry, Paul L. Betancourt, 
Loyd Boatright, J. C. Bourns, Frank Brasier, 
Semion B. Buchanan, Pasquale Buglino, Francis 
Byrd, James S. Canoles, A. D. Cheek, Grant 
Cohick, C. M. Conaway, Harold Cosner, John D. 
Cox, Phillip Cruz, Alex M. Dailey, Claude Dixon, 
George J. Ferguson, Margil Flores, Joseph 
Frank, Carroll Furgerson, Arthur Garon, T. L. 
Graham, Leard Hagans, R. E. Haggard, John H. 
Hancock, Clifton R. Harrison, Werdie Helie, 

A. G. Hernandez, Kenneth F. Herring, Howard 

B. Hewitt, Benjamin R. Hill, A. W. Huddleston, 
James Hunter, William V. Jacob, Raymond B. 
Johnson, W. W. Jolly, A. R. Keehnel, Richard C. 
Klaus, Gustave A. Lutz, Samuel Macon, Willie 
W. Macon, Manuel R. Madrid, Fred J. Maier, 
Finley J. McKay, Clinton S. McNeely, Harry E. 
Miller, Merle C. Miller, James W. Morris, P. L. 
Nesbitt, Ira K. Nevling, Zack T. Norris, Karl H. 
Oesterblad, Herman J. Olson, Robert E. Patrick, 
Harley L. Pearce, Loren T. Perce, W. F. Perkins, 
Jesus Reyes, Ernest M. Richards, Charles E. 
Roberts, C. C. Romson, Gustave A. Rosengren, 
Alfred M. Rushton, Edward A. Salvini, Melvin 

H. Schamma, Jim Schauer, Robert L. Shough, 
Eddie Skipper, W. T. Smith, Woodrow W. Smith, 
William P. Stewart, Dale E. Tarr, Ray L. 
Thompson, Robert Trarbaugh, Earl W. Van 
Metre, Joe P. Walker, Ralph C. Worden, Billy J. 
Zastrow; Leonard DeLange; Elias Abacherli; 
Cecil R. Anderson; Louis Bensen; James E. 
Berry; Charles Borowski; Shelby Bourns; 
Deemal S. Brooks; Bezearilu Brown; Robert M. 
Carbajal; Vernon H. Clemons; Jesse D. 
Crawford; Joseph A. Duperron; Sam Edmondson; 
L. R. Enslow; C. 0. Evans; James Farris; John 
E. Farthing; Sam N. Finch; E. C. Gorden; 
Theodore R. Fisher; Raymond E. Fry; Cecil C. 
Furney; Elum Gray; Max W. Harmon; James T. 
Hawkins, Jr.; Floyd A. Herns; Edwin L. Hornsby; 
R. G. Humphries; Andrew Johnson, Jr.; Robert 
H. Johnson; Max C. Jones; Elmer E. Hooks; 
George Hopkins; Victor Kanta; E. W. Kelley; 



James P. Kelly; Howey N. Kendall; John K. 
Kovaciny; Frank C. Kunzweiler; Paul Lopez; 
Seferino M. Lopez; John C. Martin; Reid C. 
McKee; John H. Miller; Harold E. Minikel; J. C. 
Morgan; Jack L. Names; Victor J. Pelchy; Jesse 
G. Pepper; Bernard Phillips; Hubert Phillips; 
Orley Philpott; C. R. Pinard; Emmett L. Polee ; 

B. F. Reindel; George D. Reul; H. F. Reyes; 
Manuel Reyes; Gilbert Rios; William A. 
Satterfield; H. W. Saveland, Jr.; G. E. 
Rounsavall; James C. Shipley; Elmer Smith; 
Frank A. Smith; Leo Socha; Elden R. Stanton; 
William A. Stephens; John A. Toyer; Howard A. 
Trisler; W. C. Turner; Vincent Van Valer ; John 
F. West; A. L Whitworth; Leo 0. Willhite; 
Howard Williams; James W. Wood. 

25-Year Members— Verln Aiken, Robert H. 
Anderson, Lonnie Atkeson, Earl E. Aubrey, 
Jesse Barnhart, Howard R. Blum, L M. Booth, 
Jess R. Briones, Herman Broome, Rosviell 
Brown, Fred E. Bullock, William E. Call, Don 
Campfield, Jackson Carter, Raymond Coccia, 

C. R. Cook, Ralph E. Cowan, Olin Leon Cordell, 
Andrew J. Dalquest, Elvin Delzell, Theodore M. 
Denmark, Frank Doll, Richard Fehrenbach, Carl 
Forbis, Samuel C. Frisby, Paul Gienger, James 
W. Gilliam, Ernest E. Griffin, John Grigsby, 
William A. Haggard, Arthur B. Hall, Claude L. 
Head, George W. Hover, Frank H. Imus, Joseph 
A. King, Ralph E. King, Elvest D. Knott, Lester 
Lauritzen, E. W. Littlepage, Charles G. Love, 
W. W. Mackey, Roy J. Malone, Carl L. Miller, 

A. D. Mitchell, Bert E. Morgan, Harley L. 
Muldrow, Charles E. Myers, David Orona, 
Adolph Orrantia, Carl J. Owens, Arnold S. 
Palhegyi, Louis A. Palhegyi, Sam Perea, James 
M. Phillippi, Charles D. Prather, Phillip 
Redondo, Hi I Hard E. Rhoades, James T. Rose, 
Carl A. Schafer, L. F. Schelin, James D. Smith, 
Barney M. Spranger, Daniel F. Stegall, Gregory 
Stevens, Lawrence E. Sublett, Paul Thibadeau, 
Sanford S. Thompson, Mike Treadwell, John 
Ulman, Henry Unsell, Bioggio Vaccarella, 
Danny T. Vraa, Robert Vitale, George Von 
Gruben, Aubrey R. West, Joe D. White, L. A. 
Whiteley, J. D. Wood, Ezra Wolter, L. R. 
Zieglmeier; Earl Williams; Richard L. Arias; 
John M. Bakker; John L. Basay; Herman C. 
Block; Harold E. Bogle; Cornelius Brinkman; 
Joseph Campeau; Leigh M. Cavanaugh; Luis A. 
Colunga; Ralph L. Creller; Oscar Deibert, Sr.; 
Delmar Dopier; Nicholas Durst; Robert B. 
Dryer; Gerald T. Edwards; Roland E. Ellingson; 
Arlie J. Files; Chester B. Franklin; Robert 
Fredrickson; Amos A. Gatlin; Roy E. GattS; 
Frank E. Goodwater; Ivan Goodwin; Milliard 
Gream; Charles R. Greenup; Richard Gutierrez; 
Gordon Headlee; Loren M. Headly; Ben Hale; 
Ralph R. Johnson; T. E. Johnson; Wilhelm 
Kalmar; Paul Heldt; G. L. Lane; Paul H. 
Mackzum; Herbert A. Meek; Ernest Mendoza; 

Continued on Page 38 



MARCH, 1980 



31 



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Picture No. 2 




Picture No. 3 



Picture No. 4 



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Picture No. 5 



Picture No. 6 



SEATTLE, WASH. 

Local 131 held a pin presentation on March 
18, 1979 for those members with 25 years of 
continuous membership as of 1979. A buffet 
lunch was served and spouses were invited for 
the celebration. The following members were 
honored: 

Picture No. 1 — Front row, left to right: Einar 
A. Abelsen, William A. Albrecht, Oscar T. 
Anderson, A. P. Beaudoin, Bjorn Bjomson, 
Knut Brekne, and 40-year member Ralph 
Susort. 

Back row, left to right: Clarence Capon, 
John A. Cochran, John Arrington, Gerald 
Costello, Walter A. Cooper, Tom A. Beck, 
Ray T. Collins, and Clifford Clements. 

Picture No. 2— Front row, left to right: 
George Craggs, Richard Feaser, Olav D. 
Ferkingstad, Oscar C. Elduen, Forrest Freymuth, 
Leon Federici, and Leo R. Geiss. 

Back row, left to right: Grover Edeburn, 
C. W. Fry, George W. Gerlach, Don Goldbrand, 
Don Groce, Ted Gustafson, Gunnar K. 
Hagen, and Jerry Halsen. 

Picture No. 3 — Front row, left to right: 
Frank Helina, Byron V. Hartley, Joseph D. 
Hanby, Gerhard Jaasund, Wm. Jackson, Emil 
Johnson, and Richard Johnson. 

Back row, left to right: Robert Hamlin, 
Donald Hosking, Sverre Hatley, Orrun Hollum, 
Konrad Huus, Joe D. Johnson, Harold A. 
Johnson, and Ernest A. Keller. 

Picture No. 4 — Front row, left to right: 
Gerhard M. Kvernenes, Eugene Lahore, Frankie 
Kremel, Kenneth Loken, Monrad Kleppe, 
Elton F. Luschen, and Edwin 0. Mathison. 



Back row, left to right: Jim McNeill, Harry 
E. Marriott, Sidney Misner, Martin Messing, 
Eldun Morse, Nikoli Muchin, Irving Nickolas, 
and Robert Norton. 

Picture No. 5 — Front row, left to right: 
Orrin L. Olson, Karl Olsoy, Lowell D. Nyreen, 
Helmer Pedersen, Clifford Nyland, Ralph Bjur, 
and Jack Probst. 

Back row, left to right: Wayne Recor, Roy 
Rasmussen, George Roberge, Richard Rosaia, 
Charles Salvatore, Fred J. Schneider, Selmer 
L. Sather, and John Schneider. 

Picture No. 6 — Front row, left to right: 
Floyd R. Shank, Richard C. Smith, Melvin B. 
Smith, Fred Ross, Fred Stark, Morris St. John, 
and Donald Stotts. 

Back row, left to right: Leslie R. Smith, 
George Toupin, Ludvig Sortland, Karl Saglie, 
Charles Treat, Edward Tusty, Adolf Stroh, 
and Brady Waters. 

Picture No. 7 — Left to right: Conrad 
Westerlund, Jim Sutton, and J. Robert Winquist. 

The following members received 25-year pins 
but were unable to attend the ceremony: 
Gelacio G. Ancheta, Richard L. Baber, George S. 
Belden, N. J. Bellchambers, Paul E. Berg, 
Montgomery Bowman, Alfred V. Boyd, Benford 
Brackeen, Jay J. Bradshaw, William M. Byan, 
Robert D. Buckingham, Elmer H. Burman, 
Robert L. Campbell, Cyrus W. Carlson, Lawrence 
B. Carlson, Sam Carson, Jack Cassell, Neil D. 
Clark, Maurice J. Claseman, Palmer N. Dahl, 
Stanley Dahlin, Wm. E. Dooley, Emil B. 
Fagerberg, Bruce P. Filbin, Eugene S. 
Fingarson, Casper S. Fischer, Robert M. 
Fjellman, James P. Foley, Robert W. French, 
Henry R. Gallacci, Dominick Gallina, 
E. Gambacorta, Llewellyn Gittins, William L 




Picture No. 7 



Gordon, Herbert E. Grace, Alvin B. Granberg, 
Donald B. Grothe, Roger D. Harnden, Obert P. 
Havdahl, Victor L. Heckman, Peter Heimdal, 
Lester E. Hill, Albert Jackson, Leo Jaeger, 
Donald B. Johnson, Oscar F. Johnson, John 
Kalheim, Alvin L Kline, Victor E. Kortlever, 
Fred W. Kraft, S. J. Kristjanson, Eino E. 
Kumma, Arne Langloe, Kolbjorn Leed, Peter 
Majewski, Anders S. Marken, Thomas K. 
McGuire, Frank P. McNulty, Louis W. Milliken, 
Robert Miori, Irvine V. Mitchell, Melbourne 
Mitchell, Neils K. Moller, Edward Olsoe, 
Norwald J. Osnes, James L. Parsons, Paul R. 
Paulson, Peder Pedersen, Lawrence Pederson, 
Donald Philips, Robert J. Pittis, Fred M. Rask, 
Finn Rasmussen, Raymond Renas, Ralph E. 
Renstrom, William E. Roberts, Horace W. 
Robinson, Chester A. Schlee, Henry 0. Severson, 
Claude 0. Sherman, John R. Simons, Herbert 
W. Simonton, Jens M. Skare, Russell D. Sleister, 
Herb G. Steward, Tommy 0. Svege, David L. 
Swanberg, John W. Sweazey, Edward J. 
Taratuta, Selmer R. Tellefson, Philip J. Thorne, 
Raymond T. Turner, Albert E. Ward, Grant E. 
Welden, Francis J. Werckman, George S. 
Werstiuk, Sorin F. West, Marvin L. Wickham, 
and Walter Yocum. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



VICE PRESIDENT MONDALE 

Continued from Page 3 

In areas once blighted and abandoned 
to crime, new office buildings and shops 
and parks are coming to life. Every Fed- 
eral dollar invested in revitalizing our 
inner cities through Urban Development 
Action Grants brings another $6 from 
business and industry. 

Neighborhoods are able to repair their 
streets, rehabilitate old facilities and build 
new community projects with the help of 
Community Development Block Grants. 

And today, the Economic Development 
Administration spends more to encourage 
private investment in our cities than ever 
before in its history. 

In cities like Toledo and Detroit and 
Los Angeles and Atlanta businesses are 
returning to the inner city, new indus- 
tries are moving in, and the people feel a 
new pride and optimism about their com- 
munities. 

We're doing one thing more for the 
people of those cities. We're making sure 
that every one of them has an equal op- 
portunity for earning a living, for a qual- 
ity education, for equal justice under the 
law, and for full participation in govern- 
ment. 

President Carter has appointed more 
women and members of minorities to his 
Administration than any other President 
in history. He has appointed more minor- 
ity judges than all previous Presidents 
combined. He has increased funding and 
personnel for civil rights enforcement, to 
put some teeth into the law. 

President Carter has done these things 
because, like you, he believes that Amer- 
ica must live up to its promises: Promises 
of freedom, of social justice, of oppor- 
tunity for all. 

Those promises make America the 
beacon of freedom and compassion for 
the hungry and homeless and oppressed 
people of the world. That's one reason 
that the character of our President is so 
important. For in him, the world sees 
reflected the character of our nation. 

Today we have a President of whom 
every American can be proud. We have 
an honest, caring, strong, and now experi- 
enced President, who risked his political 
future for peace in the Middle East. We 
have a President who is strengthening our 
national security, who has faced squarely 
the difficult problems of energy and infla- 
tion, and who has put in place sensible, 
long-term programs to solve them. 

We have not yet perfectly fulfilled the 
promises of America, but we are working 
towards them. That is the job for which 
we elect our national leaders. That is the 
responsibility of the President. I believe 
that President Carter is living up to that 
responsibility, and fulfilling the trust you 
placed in him three years ago. 

And, when you examine his record, I 
believe that you will agree. 



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MARCH, 1980 



33 



The following list of 640 deceased members and spouses repre- 
sents a total of $779,139.60 in death claims paid for the month. 



3, Wheeling, W.Va.— John L. Cox. 

5, St. Louis, Mo. — Orville B. Kopp, Frank 

Kraus, Mrs. John C. Matern, Joseph A. 

Posek. 

7, Minneapolis, Mn. — Mrs. Celestin Gast, 

Carl H. Hassel, Alfred Johnson, Edward 
Kieser, Mrs. Arthur Meyers, Vernon F. 
Morris, William B. Twaites. 

8, Philadelphia, Pa. — Nicholas Smigo. 

11, Cleveland, Oh.— Charles Dembek, Sr., 
Mrs. Edward Kilpatrick. 

12, Syracuse, N.Y. — Peter M. Dilaj. 

13, Chicago, III. — Anthony (Jarvis) Dziabas, 

Mrs. Frank A. Flynn, Christian H. 
Nielsen, Alfred Olsen. 

14, San Antonio, Tx. — Lewis S. Ham. 

15, Hackensack, NJ. — Mrs. Daniel Del Ben, 

August Semendinger, Theodore Vetter. 
16^ Springfield, III.— Mrs. Russell L. Shipley. 

18, Hamilton, Ont., Can. — Donat J. Abut, 
Mrs. Jack Brockhill. 

19, Detroit, Mich. — Louis Kogelschatz, Al- 
bert C. Olsen, Charles Storage, Mrs. 
Luther Swiney. 

20, New York, N.Y.— Alfred Abbruzzese. 
22, San Francisco, Calif. — John Hennessy, 

James Thorne. 

24, Central Conn. — Raymond P. Andersen, 
Roy W. Dow, Mrs. Francis Dumark, 
Mrs. Frank Schaaf. 

25, Los Angeles, Calif.— Charles O. Hall. 

26, E. Detroit, Mich.— Mrs. Alex Pawluk. 

27, Toronto, Ont., Can. — Peter Kowman. 

28, Missoula, Mont. — John H. Schultz. 

30, New London, Conn. — Kenneth R. Cilley, 
Fred Meyers, Theodore E. Pearson. 

34, Oakland, Ca. — Mrs. Norman Bass, Hugh 

L. Erwin, Laurence H. Maxwell. 

35, San Rafael, Ca. — Daniel Harry Franzel, 
Joseph R. Fredette, Harry Jensen, Wil- 
liam H. Reynolds, Earl E. Usner. 

36, Oakland, Ca.— William J. Wentling. 
41, Woborn, Mass. — George E. Legge, 

Frank Sampieri. 
48, Fitchburg, Mass. — Ellery D. Newhall, 

Linus Olson. 
50, Knoxville, Tn.— Mrs. Robert E. McFalls. 

53, White Plains, N.Y.— Mrs. Hans Schulz. 

54, Chicago, III. — George A. Kubis, Sr., 
Joseph J. Reichert. 

55, Denver, Colo. — Paul D. Fanning, Sr., 
Mrs. Karl Spengler, Alfred L. Wick- 
man. 

58, Chicago, III. — Mrs. Walter Hamer. 

60, Indianapolis, Ind. — Hopeel C. Dearing, 
Arthur B. Felton, Daniel M. Phillippe. 

61, Kansas City, Mo. — Robert L. Cunning- 
ham, Clarence C. Gamble, John L. 
Reedy, James T. Smith, Gilbert J. Tay- 
lor, Loye W. Wisdom. 

62, Chicago, III. — Trygve Hansen. 

63, Bloomington, III. — Paul Smallwood, Sr. 

64, Louisville, Ky. — Woodrow W. Patterson. 

65, Perth Amboy, N.J. — Louis J. Paone. 
67, Boston, Ma. — Gasper Lakan, Philip E. 

Laplume, Sidney J. Ollerhead. 
74, Chattanooga, Tn. — William R. Conley, 

William F. Underwood. 
78, Troy, N.Y.— Mrs. Fred W. Cardany. 
85, Rochester, N.Y. — Simon McCallum. 
87, St. Paul, Mn.— William F. Brausen, 

Raymond A. Larson. 
89, Mobile, Ala.— Mrs. J. F. Robertson. 

93, Ottawa, Ont., Can. — Evangeliste Labelle. 

94, Providence, R.I. — Pasco W. Albanese, 
Mrs. Edward M. Turnquist. 



95, Detroit, Mich.— Gordon L. SielofT, 

Henry L. Speckin, Robert E. Wallace. 
101, Baltimore, Md. — Dennis K. Crist, John 

E. Zimnawoda. 

104, Dayton, Oh.— Raymond F. Hull, Mrs. 
Richard E. Kline, Mrs. Eston C. Miller. 

105, Cleveland, Oh.— Charles Robert Fitz- 
patrick, Arthur E. Hanus. 

106, Des Moines, Iowa — Walter J. Rubel. 

107, Worcester, Mass. — Joseph Mathewson. 
110, St. Joseph, Mo. — Mrs. Jesse Weiberg. 
112, Butte, Mont. — James V. Henderson. 
117, Albany, N.Y.— William J. Murray, Les- 
lie R. Zimmer, Sr. 

122, Philadelphia, Pa.— Walter P. Smyth. 

131, Seattle, Wa.— Kalle (Charles) Niemi. 

132, Washington, D.C.— Harry H. Bryant. 

133, Terre Haute, Ind. — Edgar French. 

134, Montreal, Que., Can. — Mrs. Maurice 
Tremblay. 

141, Chicago, III. — Victor T. Pearson. 

142, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Joseph C. Gravant, 
Mrs. William Hilliard, Walter Malek. 

149, Tarrytown, N.Y.— Robert Edgar. 

150, Plymouth, Pa Frank J. Medura. 

161, Kenosha, Wise. — Ira Moran. 

162, San Mateo, Ca. — Mrs. Howard N. 
White, Sr. 

163, Peekskill, N.Y.— Karl Dorstewitz. 

168, Kansas City, Ks Fred Burkard. 

169, E. St. Louis, III. — Louis Zeisset. 

171, Youngstown, Oh. — Frank Beckes, Mrs. 

Arthur A. Bolt, J. William Lewis, 

George A. Pisarsky. 
176, Newport, R.I. — John M. Jessey. 

180, Vallejo, Ca.— Benton Arthur Wright. 

181, Chicago, III. — Dennis C. Casper, Emil 
Jacobsen, Herman Zoller. 

182, Cleveland, Oh. — Mrs. Frank Hudecek, 
Stefan Mikulski, Thomas W. Rees. 

183, Peoria, III.— Frank Lee Hibbs, Karl A. 
Schmidt, Delbert G. Slocum. 

184, Salt Lake City, Ut.— Owen Busenbark, 
Morris Wade. 

186, Steubenville, Oh. — Donald Davis, John 
T. Hannan. 

188, Yonkers, N.Y.— Joseph Fetchko. 

189, Quincy, III.— Mrs. Cyril H. Bollan. 

190, Klamath Falls, Ore.— John V. Kerlin. 
194, Oakland, Ca.— Harry B. Strand, Orville 

F. Tagge. 

200, Columbus, Oh.— Harold R. Conrad, 
Mrs. Paul L. Keyser, Douglas Meaige. 

203, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. — George Mallet. 

206, New Castle, Pa. — George L. Mallinak. 

210, Stamford, Conn. — Herman J. Beaudoin, 
Frederick R. Cogswell, Robert Gaugler, 
Clarence L. Hendrix. 

213, Houston, Tx.— Mrs. Watson D. Allen, 
Robert Y. Boyer, Bobby R. Caston, 
Mrs. James S. Hickey, Thomas Tiner, 
Word H. Williams. 

215, Lafayette, Ind. — William Schmidt. 

222, Washington, Ind. — Thomas L. Caskey. 

225, Atlanta, Ga. — Theodore G. Hunton, 
Milton M. Woody. 

226, Portland, Ore.— Leslie B. Frizzell, 
Arthur Grimm, Guilford Raymond 
Hough. 

235, Riverside, Ca. — Herman F. Aszman. 
244, Grand Junction, Co. — Mervin L. Tims. 
246, N.Y., N.Y. — Max Ackerman, Mrs. John 

Franco, Mrs. Angelo Tancredi, Albert 

W. Tempelhof. 
255, Bloomingburg, N.Y. — Mrs. Oliver A. 

Keller, John R. Obermeier. 
257, N.Y., N.Y.— Mrs. Gebhard Erler, 

Nicholas Fiore. 



258, Oneonta, N.Y.— Edward Stillfors. 

259, Jackson, Tn. — Nolan C. Wooley. 

261, Scranton, Pa Gustav Walter. 

262, San Jose, Ca. — Angelo Chirico. 

265, Saugerties, N.Y.— Albert E. Koechel. 

266, Stockton, Ca. — Horace E. Allen, Mrs. 
Lloyd E. Crawford, John Urbani. 

275, Newton, Ma. — Donald O. Melanson. 
278, Watertown, N.Y.— Claude Aldrich, 

Walter E. Mills. 
280, Niagara-Genesee & Vic, N.Y John 

F. Maley. 
284, N.Y., N.Y.— Gasper Schifano. 
287, Harrisburg, Pa. — Jacob F. Clouser. 
295, Granite City, III.— Melvin Cargnino, 

Herbert L. Vujtech. 
298, N.Y., N.Y.— Frank Nostramo. 
311, Joplin, Mo. — Claude L. Marsh, John 

Trimble. 
314, Madison, Wise. — Owen M. Owens. 
316, San Jose, Ca. — John C. Pope, Mrs. 

Martin D. Reyes, Manuel R. Torres. 
319, Roanoke, Va. — Mrs. Carl Gordon. 
329, Oklahoma City, Ok.— John Fred 

Adams, Robert J. McRell. 
335, Grand Rapids, Mi. — William J. Hame- 

Iink. 

337, Detroit, Mich.— Mrs. John Knott. 

338, Seattle, Wa.— Delmar D. Byas, Walter 
I. Graham. 

340, Hagerstown, Md. — Ralph N. Myers. 
347, Mattoon, III.— Mrs. Emit L. Allen, Mrs. 

Marion L. Fouts. 
355, Buffalo, N.Y.— Joseph A. Gelz. 

359, Philadelphia, Pa.— Vincent A. Cor- 
coran, Joseph H. Ludwick. 

360, Galesburg, III.— Mrs. Harry N. Stickle, 
Mrs. Ambrose P. Taylor. 

361, Duluth, Mn. — Andrew G. Andersen, 
Mrs. Gust Jarvi. 

365, Marion, Ind. — Mrs. Kenneth Ohler. 

366, N.Y., N.Y.— Benjamin Miller, Jean 
Scarpelli, Mrs. Nick Sulich. 

368, Allentown, Pa. — George F. Everett, 
Mrs. Lionel G. Keller, Louis A. Marin. 

378, Edwardsville, III.— Leo P. Grebel, 
George A. Schwalb. 

379, Texarkana, Tx.— Willie E. Sherrer. 
393, Camden, NJ. — Mrs. Samuel C. Flynn. 
396, Newport News, Va. — John P. Suitor. 

398, Lewiston, Idaho — Howard L. Layman. 

399, Phillipsburg, NJ Morris H. Williams. 

400, Omaha, Neb.— William E. Kramer. 
402, Northampton/Greenfield, Ma. — Mrs. 

Philip Kania. 
406, Bethlehem, Pa.— Ray B. Nagle, Charles 

M. Schneider. 
410, Ft. Madison, Iowa — Francis Kaas, Mrs. 

Daniel Marier. 
413, South Bend, Ind.— Clark J. Dentler, 

John Maurice Wickizer. 
416, Chicago, III. — Mrs. Christian Bredesen, 

Frank Skale. 
425, El Paso, Tx. — Sevenstar Sachse. 
430, Wilkensburg, Pa. — John W. Poslusney. 
437, Portsmouth, Oh. — William M. Lowder. 
446, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., Canada — Joseph 

Hilistrom. 
450, Ogden, Utah— Carl J. Burkhart, Or- 

mond Seibert. 

453, Auburn, N.Y. — Stanleigh B. Fordyce, 
Arthur William Wenzel. 

454, Philadelphia, Pa. — Mrs. Theodore 
Bright. 

458, Clarksville, Ind. — Ray Annis. 
468, N.Y., N.Y.— Theodore Puwalski, 
George Roswell. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



470, Tacoma, Wa. — Mrs. Michael W. Dixon. 

472, Ashland, Ky. — Raymond N. Castle. 

475, Ashland, Mass. — Leonard M. Prov- 
encal, Sr. 

483, San Francisco, Ca.— Marpheal B. Kel- 
ley, John F. Lindgren, Emil Nelson. 

490, Passaic, N.J. — Harry Barr, Mrs. Sidney 
G. Bergsma. 

503, Lancaster, N.Y. — James Kozlowski. 

507, Nashville, Tn.— Thurman P. Billingsley. 

526, Galveston, Tx. — Mrs. P. E. Simmons. 

530, Los Angeles, Ca. — Lance Vredenburg. 

557, Bozeman, Mt Edward P. Miller. 

561, Pittsburg, Ks. — Delbert E. Laycox. 

572, Belleville, Ont., Can.— Clayton A. 
Holmes. 

583, Portland, Ore. — Benjamin J. VanRooy. 

586, Sacramento, Calif. — Jack C. Price. 

599, Hammond, Ind. — Charles E. Hampsten, 
Norbert H. Overgage. 

602, St. Louis, Mo.— Aubrey Haley. 

603, Ithaca, N.Y.— Albert F. Schnitzer. 

604, Murphysboro, III. — Otto K. Kahne. 

608, N.Y., N.Y — Pasquale Aceto. 

609, Idaho Falls, Idaho— John L. Larsen, 
Lawrence Wadsworth. 

610, Port Arthur, Tx.— Clifton Downey, 
Sam S. Papania. 

620, Madison, NJ.— Charles L. Bayles, Mrs. 
Frank Gunnander, Edward Hulbert. 

623, Atlantic Co., NJ.— John J. Gillespie, 
Thomas I. McGrath, Sr. 

624, Brockton, Ma. — Nelson W. Bailey. 
633, Granite City, III.— William H. Thomas, 

Sr. 

635, Boise, Idaho— Rothwell M. Sparkman. 

639, Akron, Oh. — Michael Petrosky. 

654, Chattanooga, Tn — William K. Cart- 
wright, Harry B. Wehunt, Sr. 

660, Springfield, Oh.— Charles B. Bumba- 
lough, Reyn Chapman. 

665, Amarillo, Tx.— George D. Brunson. 

669, Harrisburg, III — Raymond Healy. 

691, Williamsport, Pa.— Harold C. Hamm. 

694, Boonville, Ind — James F. Cooper. 

701, Fresno, Ca.— Claude P. Appleby, How- 
ard B. Campbell, Orville B. McMurtry. 

710, Long Beach, Ca.— Mrs. Duane C. 
North. 

715, Elizabeth, NJ — John A. Thompson. 

720, Baton Rouge, La.— John W. Tannehil, 
Harry W. Wilkinson. 

721, Los Angeles, Ca.— Ray P. Greaves, 
Glen Ledgerwood, Willy Ott, Palmer A. 
Zangrilli. 

738, Portland, Ore. — Lloyd E. Bogart. 
740, N.Y., N.Y.— Frank W. Johnson. 

742, Decatur, II — Clarence Hart, Raymond 
E. Spriggs. 

743, Bakersfield, Ca.— Michael Telese, Herb- 
ert A. Woods. 

745, Honolulu, Hi.— Mrs. Stanley S. Higa, 
Mrs. John K. Mahoe, Tokuo Sawada. 

751, Santa Rosa, Ca — William A. Gill, 
Jolmer J. Saarijarvi. 

763, Enid, Okla.— Mrs. Kenneth K. Kessler. 

764, Shreveport, La. — Johnie Craton. 

799, Jessup, Pa.— Mrs. Stanley Osenkarski. 
801, Woonsocket, R.I — Arthur Brouillard. 
807, Paden City, W.Va.— Mrs. W. C. Cross. 
819, W. Palm Bch., Fla.— Ernest D. Hart, 

Sidney Joseph Metcalfe. 
824, Muskegon, Mi. — Dick Deephouse. 
832, Beatrice, Neb. — Lee Davis, Jr. 
839, Des Plaines, III.— Stanley Palek. 
843, Jenkintown, Pa. — Frank J. Lutter. 
845, Norwood, Pa. — Mrs. Angelo Micalizzi. 

848, San Bruno, Ca. — Mrs. Irvin Janke. 

849, Manitowoc, Wise. — Peter P. Jebavy. 
851, Anoka, Minn. — Andrew Heie. 

857, Tucson, Az. — Alva Larue, Jose R. 

Leon, Gilbert Miranda, Eduardo E. 

Monje. 
865, Brunswick, Ga. — David E. Jordan. 
870, Spokane, Wa.— Glenn Taylor. 



873, Cincinnati, Oh.— Mrs. Harry A. Streit- 

horst. 
889, Hopkins, Mn. — William P. Armstrong, 

Maurice Lee Hughes. 
899, Parkersburg, W.Va.— Troxil D. Weaver. 
902, Brooklyn, N.Y. — Gerner Johansen, 

Olaf Sorum. 
906, Glendale, Az.— Henry Bolen. 
929, South Gate, Ca.— Mrs. Robert J. 

Bailey, Frank Charon. 
947, Ridgway, Pa. — William T. Topolski. 
951, Brainerd, Mn. — Walter M. Bingman. 

953, Lake Charles, La.— Drebon A. Win- 
bourn. 

954, Mt. Vernon, Wa.— Clark A. Nesmith. 

955, Appleton, Wise. — George W. Taylor. 
976, Marion, Oh. — Paul L. Castanien. 
978, Springfield, Mo. — Mrs. William Austin. 
982, Detroit, Mich.— Albert A. Bruland. 

992, Janesville, Wise— Alfred S. Skau. 

993, Miami, Fla.— Gelbert Manske, John 
Willoughby. 

997, Pottstown, Pa.— Ralph R. Dice. 

998, Royal Oak, Mi Sam Cook, Eric H. 

Franzen, Carl P. Voelker, Sr. 

1000, Tampa, Fla.— Mrs. Basil L. Grubaugh. 

1006, New Brunswick, NJ. — Joseph Mogil- 
nicki. 

1014, Warren, Pa.— Mrs. Chesley B. Rowan. 

1024, Cumberland, Md. — Mrs. Clarence 
Barton. 

1050, Philadelphia, Pa.— Albert Ciarlante. 

1052, Hollywood, Ca.— Mrs. Joseph J. 
White. 

1055, Lincoln, Neb.— Mrs. Thure J. Ander- 
son. 

1060, Norman, Ok. — Joe Martin. 

1062, Santa Barbara, Ca. — John Roufs. 

1065, Salem, Ore.— Oscar Bynum, Alfred R. 
Hartman. 

1067, Port Huron, Mi.— Roy E. Taylor. 

1080, Owensboro, Ky.— Mathis E. Alvey, 
Jerry O. Sapp. 

1089, Phoenix, Az.— Mrs. Chesley L. Cham- 
berlain. 

1091, Bismarck, N.D.— John J. Ficek. 

1094, Corvallis, Ore.— George Booth, Ernest 
Helms. 

1095, Salina, Ks. — Louis B. Spivey. 

1097, Longview, Tx.— William O. Davis, 
Ernest Alton Westbrook. 

1098, Baton Rouge, La.— Clifford Louis 
Porche, Warren S. Stewart. 

1099, Clinton, Ok.— Jack A. Taylor. 

1108, Cleveland, Oh.— Frank J. Juhasz, 
Jorma V. Makila, Mrs. Casper Schmidt. 

1109, Visalia, Ca. — Marciano Mendoza. 
1114, So. Milwaukee, Wise— Mrs. Tellef E. 

Gunderson. 

1126, Annapolis, Md.— Earl R. Phebus. 

1128, LaGrange, III. — Patrick L. Dennert. 

1138, Toledo, Oh.— Carl Kocis, Jr. 

1146, Green Bay, Wise. — Felix Agamaite, 
Sr., Noel Delfosse, John W. Winkler. 

1149, San Francisco, Ca. — Walter J. Grace, 
William T. Thompson. 

1156, Montrose, Co.— Charles A. Petefish. 

1159, Pt. Pleasant, W.Va.— Fred E. Harmon, 
David E. Sullivan. 

1162, College Point, N.Y.— Antonio Galarza, 
Michael Napoleon. 

1164, N.Y., N.Y — Morris Bricker, Ray- 
mond Larsen, Joe Eisenberg, Joseph 
Fanara, Jack Polinsky, Mrs. Joseph 
Spina. 

1173, Trinidad, Colo. — Charles Cuzzetto. 

1180, Louisville, Ky. — Junior E. Sturms. 

1184, Seattle, Wa.— James G. B. Chambers, 
Fritz Johnsen, Leonard Keller, Joseph 
F. Peruchini, Sr., Mrs. Paul Solie, 
George R. Williams. 

1185, Hillside, III Albert G. Martiny. 

1187, Grand Island, Neb. — Andy E. Johnson. 

1188, Mt. Carmel, III.— Wesley J. Perry. 
1194, Pensacola, Fla.— Alpha A. Mott, Mrs. 

C. R. Bush, Sr. 



1196, Arlington Hts., III.— Randall Proven- 
zano. 

1204, N.Y., N.Y.— Moses A. Gomez, David 
Parver, Sam Sklar. 

1205, Indio, Ca.— Kerry R. Barnes, Neal L. 
Wray. 

1222, Medford, N.Y.— Joseph F. Scheffer, 
Alfred Westbrook, Joseph A. Ciccarello. 
William Potucek, Andrew O. Turcotte. 

1235, Modesto, Ca. — James L. Barfus, 
Larkin R. Smith. 

1237, Dawson Creek, B.C., Can.— Horst D. 
Enke. 

1240, Oroville, Ca.— Mrs. Kenneth W. Mal- 
colm, Walter T. Kluender, Gilbert L. 
Vanzandt. 

1242, Akron, Oh. — George W. Burgess. 

1243, Fairbanks, Alaska — Norman L. Sicard. 

1250, Homestead, Fla. — Jon Charles Wilging, 
Mrs. Jasper M. Purvis. 

1251, New Westminster, B.C., Can.— Charles 
R. Sinclair, Leonard Hystad, Isaac 
Loeppky, George Shapka, William 
James Wihte. 

1256, Sarnia, Ont., Can. — Mrs. Joseph 

Kramer. 
1262, Chillicothe, Mo.— Arthur L. McBee. 
1264, Bathurst, N.B., Can.— Emile Landry. 
1266, Austin, Tx. — Mrs. Wesley Atchison, 

Jr., Albert C. Braddock. 
1274, . Decatur, Ala. — Grady C. Waldrep, 

Melbourne F. Hutcheson, Tommie L. 

Vinson, Louis M. Wright. 
1275, Clearwater, Fla. — Louis J. Rose, 

Richard V. Sheff. 

1280, Mountain View, Ca.— Gerald H. 
Dampier, Antonio Z. Marquez. 

1281, Anchorage, Alaska — Gerald D. James. 
1289, Seattle, Wa.— John H. Habbestad, 

Carrol M. Miller, Mrs. LuVerne L. 

Bengtson, Jacob D. Boender, Edwin A. 

Dorum, James L. Haas, Emil Krieg. 
1292, Huntington, N.Y. — Lars Eidsheim. 
1296, San Diego, Ca.— Gerald W. Oleson, 

Oliver W. White. 
1305, Fall River, Mass. — Manuel F. Semas. 
1308, Lake Worth, Fla.— Mrs. Jackie W. 

Cross. 
1314, Oconomowoc, Wise. — Carl F. Scheit. 
1319, Albuquerque, N.M. — George E. Cole, 

Sr., Mrs. James King. 
1323, Monterey, Ca. — Alvin V. Anderson. 
1325, Edmonton, Alb., Can. — Frank Buslo- 

wicz, Herman Trojer, Barry W. Taylor. 
1329, Independence, Mo. — Mrs. Edgar L. 

Smith. 
1332, Grand Coulee, Wa.— Elmer Sand, 

Mrs. Clifford A. Teague. 
1335, Wilmington, Ca.— Clifford W. Smith, 

Floyd Kemp. 
1339, Morgantown, W.Va. — Howard L. 

Straight. 

1341, Owensboro, Ky. — Orain N. Haley, 
Lloyd Ray Weatherholt. 

1342, Irvington, NJ. — Frank Aichelmann, 
William A. Bruns, Mrs. Anthony Car- 
angelo, Mrs. William Lampe, Herman 
Napoliello, Irving Shapiro, Axel W. 
Swenson, Henry Thompson. 

1351, Leadville, Colo.— Mrs. Hubert E. 
Ingels. 

1358, La Jolla, Ca.— Richard A. Holz, Sig- 
urd E. Kodalen. 

1359, Toledo, Oh.— James L. Heaps. 
1361, Chester, 111.— Carl Huffstutler. 
1365, Cleveland, Oh.— Sieg R. Joachim, Eric 

A. Herpmann, Mrs. Martin Lindler. 
1373, Flint, Mi.— Jessie Z. Kelsoe, Mrs. 

John B. Kenny, John A. Schnitzler, 

Nels W. Swanson. 
1379, N. Miami, Fla.— Lester Pflug, Mrs. 

Joseph W. Richards. 
1382, Rochester, Mn. — Knute Nelson. 
1386, St. John, N.B., Can.— Roger Losier. 
1392, New Glasgow, N.S., Canada— Keir R. 

Milligan. 



MARCH, 1980 



35 



1393, Toledo, Oh.— Merle H. Jackson, 
Stanley H. Black. 

1394, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. — Max E. Cum- 
mins, Charles Medlin. 

1397, North Hempstead, N.Y.— John Buzek. 
Matthew Hepp. 

1400, Santa Monica, Ca Mrs. John K. 

Bodle, Mrs. Claude B. Lapsley, Wil- 
liam F. Toth. 

1401, Buffalo, N.Y.— James Beller. 

1407, San Pedro, Ca. — Mrs. Juan Alvarez, 
Manuel Basauri, Theodore Carter, Aure- 
lio M. Garibay, Cornelius G. Lopez, 
Biterbo D. Ortega. Louie T. Zankich. 

1408, Redwood City, Ca.— John E. 
Machado, Ora M. Naegle, John A. 
Seminoff. 

1411, Salem, Ore.— Ralph K. Robertson, 
Robert Smailes, Leo C. Browning. 

1412, Paducah, Ky. — Robert A. Parker. 
1416, New Bedford, Ma. — Alexis Stebenne, 

Mrs. Andrew Daigle. 
1421, Arlington, Tx. — Mrs. Royce H. Allen. 
1423, Corpus Christi, Tx. — James F. Ash. 
1426, Elyria, Oh. — Ernest Denecia. 

1437, Compton, Ca. — Albert J. Carstens, 
Reber H. Gorrell. 

1438, Warren, Oh.— Kenneth C. Hofmeister. 
1443, Winnipeg, Mani., Canada — John B. 

Rodger. 
1445, Topeka, Ks. — Mrs. William A. Lignitz. 

1452, Detroit, Mi. — Harvey R. Seeholzer, 
Tadeusz Tynek, Mrs. Charles W. Pocket. 

1453, Huntington Bch., Ca. — Mrs. Delbert 
D. Gardner. 

1456, N.Y., N.Y.— Jacob Balban, Mrs. 
Harry R. Carlsen, Mrs. Leslie J. Hug- 
gan, Mrs. William McCaskill, Ralph 
Nelson, John O'Neil, Anders K. Prang. 
George Roed, Mrs. Charles A. Shea, 
Mrs. Kjeld Svarrer, Olaf Danielson, Al- 
fred K. Foss, Odd K. Saetran, John 
Wartinen. 

1460, Edmonton, A.B., Canada — Hal Allan 
Kellogg. 

1477, Middletown, Oh. — Percy G. Massie. 

1478, Redondo Bch., Ca.— Harold K. John- 
son. 

1485. LaPorte, Ind.— John D. Watt, Mrs. 

Edward Ludwig. 
1489, Burlington, NJ.— James L. Kelsey. 

1506, Los Angeles, Ca. — Royal W. Arm- 
strong, Mrs. Hugo P. DeBene. 

1507, El Monte, Ca.— George A. Dexter, 
Carl Willard Anderson, Mrs. Ellis Cash, 
Anton J. Kazda, Harold Meek, Mrs. 
Gregory J. Sirk. 

1512, Blountville, Tn.— Dudley Birchfield. 
1518, Gulfport, Ms.— Mrs. James W. 

Pucheu. 
1529, Kansas City, Ks.— James W. Malott. 
1534, Petersburg, Va.— Richard F. Charvat. 
1536, N.Y., N.Y.— Gerard Chipman, William 

Turner. 
1541, Vancouver, B.C., Can. — Werner Sieck. 

1553, Los Angeles, Ca. — Nicholas A. Cirillo, 
Thomas J. Metcalf. Arthur Morandi. 

1554, Miami, Fla.— William B. Gifford, Mrs. 
Daniel Miller. 

1571, San Diego, Ca. — Mrs. James M. 

Chambers. 
1573, West Allis, Wise.— William Simmons. 

1581, Napoleon, Oh. — William Clingerman. 

1582, Milwaukee, Wise. — Lester Rusch. 
1590, Washington, D.C.— Edwin C. Murphy, 

Enok P. Olson. Everet E. Grimes. 
1592, Sarnia, Ont., Canada— Ivan L. Cook. 

1595, Conshohocken, Pa. — Richard J. Reilly, 
Edward E. Deuter. 

1596, St. Louis, Mo.— William Eckel, Mar- 
tin Kuehn, James B. Kuhl, Mathias 
LaRue, Mrs. Otis J. Pendleton, John H. 
Simonin, Peter Battioli, Sr., Laszlo L. 
Dohm, Clardy W. Newhouse, Mrs. Otto 
Trostel. 

1599, Redding, Calif.— Charles M. Davis. 



1607, Los Angeles, Ca.— Donald D. Carter, 

George Kresen. 
1622, Hayward, Calif. — Reinhard Cornelius 

Bahnsen, Virgil A. Brunstedt, Joseph 

L. Cabral, Mrs. Herbert G. Robinson, 

Mrs. Leslie L. Williams. 
1632, San Luis Obispo, Ca. — Mrs. Donald 

McNamara. 
1635, Kansas City, Mo. — Lionel A. McFall, 

Edwin R. Thomas, Peter P. Tischinski. 
1638, Courtenay, B.C., Canada— Taavi 

Sjoman. 
1648, Laguna Beach, Ca. — Frank V. Del- 

gado. 
1650, Lexington, Ky. — John C. Baker, Isaac 

Lloyd Wells, Linville Wills. 
1665, Alexandria, Va. — Thomas F. Cupps, 

Jack A. Dickens, Clement L. Elliott. 
1667, Biloxi, Ms.— Nathaniel Raley. 
1669, Thunder Bay, Ont., Can. — Alexander 

Berehula, Augusto Vicenzino. 
1688, Manchester, N.H.— Paul M. Toll. 

1693, Chicago, III.— Charles M. Boros, 
Frederick S. Druehl, Maynard N. 
Marsh, Harry H. Gaude, Rudolph A. 
Johnson, Herbert Schodrof. 

1694, Washington, D.C.— Emmett L. Mali- 
coat. 

1699, Pasco, Wa.— Mrs. David E. Moore. 

1723, Columbus, Ga. — Aubrey G. Weed. 

1733, Marshticld, Wise. — Lance J. Nowak. 

1739, Kirkwood, Mo.— Fred C. Hackmann, 
George W. Prehn. 

1741, Milwaukee, Wise. — John Spanheimer, 
Albert C. Burkhalter, Joseph J. Schra- 
mek, Louis H. Werner. 

1750, Cleveland, Oh.— Mrs. George R. 
Chess, Albert Gam, Arthur Bauer, Israel 
Friedman. Edmund I. Kunes, Lester 
Landesman, Samuel Weltman. 

1752, Pomona, Ca.— Mrs. Claude R. Baker, 
Douglas E. Wilson, Jr., Earl Lowe. 

1753, I.ockport, III. — Laurence M. Nord- 
strom, Albert H. Spiers, Jr. 

1757, Buffalo, N.Y.— Victor L. Dominczak, 

Alfred F. Pogorzala. 
1770, Cape Girardeau, Mo. — Millard Mc- 

Clain. 
1772, Hicksville, N.Y. — Michael Anzalone, 

Chester R. Emery. 
1775, Columbus, Ind. — Harry E. Davis, 

Thomas Jackson, Mrs. Orville M. 

Brown. 
1780, Las Vegas, Nev. — James O'Day. 
1784, Chicago, III. — Max Alexander, Casi- 

mir Gorski. 
1792, Sedalia, Mo. — George W. Simmons. 
1795, Farmington, Mo.— Earl E. McClellan. 
1797, Renton, Wash.— Mrs. Roy V. Rich- 
ardson. 

1804, Moose Jaw, Sask., Can.— William W. 
Swetlikoff. 

1805, Saskatoon, Sask., Can.— Richard G. 
Cousins, Edward Plantz, Oren William 
McDaniel. 

1806, Dallastown, Pa.— Joseph D. Steinfelt. 

1807, Dayton, Oh.— Mrs. Cecil E. Jones, 
Robert C. Carpenter. 

1815, Santa Ana, Ca. — Nicholas J. Novel- 
ich, Jr., Agustin E. Ponce, Robert Lee 
Gebhart, Clyde L. Hamby. 

1818, Clarksville, Tn.— Mrs. Elvis Warren. 

1823, Philadelphia, Pa. — Mario A. Decencio. 

1831, Washington, D.C.— William H. Clark, 
Jeter Rex DeVauIt. 

1832, Escanaba, Mich. — Mrs. Harold E. 
Anderson. 

1835, Waterloo, Iowa — Mrs. Walter Meyer- 
hoff, Walter Porter. 

1836, Russellville, Ark. — James Boley 
Churchill. 

1837, Babylon, N.Y.— Mrs. Alfred Albert- 
son, Alfred Albertson, Arne Larsen. 

1845, Snoqualmie, Wash. — Dallas Baker. 

1846, New Orleans, La. — Joseph Anzalone, 
Elroy J. Leblanc, Francis H. Sallinger, 



Clarence L. Davis, Alexander W. Gre- 
the, Leslie Gros, Iberia J. Limoine, 
O'Neal St. Julien, Jay W. Stevens, 
Robert W. Taylor. 
1849, Pasco, Wash.— Walby A. Oney. 

1855, Bryan, Tx.— Floyd A. Mauldin. 

1856, Philadelphia, Pa.— Thomas P. Neville, 
Philip Hemer. 

1861, Milpitas, Ca.— Mrs. Frank H. James, 
Mrs. Edward E. Johnson, Charles H. 
Stafford. 

1883, Macomb, III.— Vilas W. Bell. 

1884, Lubbock, Tx. — Fitzhugh Lee Adair, 
Claude H. Irwin, Dail H. Sanders. 

1888, N.Y., N.Y.— Henry V. Meyers. 

1889, Downers Grove, III.— Elmer Leonard 
Mochel, Mrs. Otto F. Vix. 

1894, Woodward, Ok.— Edgar Earl Storm. 

1896, The Dallas, Or.— Mrs. Theo. E. 
Lanman. 

1897, Lafayette, La— Frank C. Tong, Mayo 
Roberie. 

1911, Beckley, W.Va.— Willie E. G. Foster. 

1913, San Fernando, Ca.— Rolland Chartier, 
George R. Billups, Jacob Floyd Keller, 
Jacob H. Maag, III, Mount Vernon 
Sherwood. 

1914, Phoenix, Az. — Louis Steve Tankers- 
ley. 

1919, Stevens Point, Wise Felix J. Kir- 
sling. 

1921, Hempstead, N.Y.— John C. Randazzo, 
Mrs. Thomas Thompson, Rolf Lilleby. 

1922, Chicago, III.— Fridrich Schmid, Frank 
C. Pavelec. 

1926, Chanute, Ks. — Charles A. Lovelady. 
1929, Cleveland, Oh.— Joseph Tominc. 
1931, New Orleans, La. — Junious C. Raines. 
1939, Clifton, N.J.— Guerino J. DeLotto. 

1946, London, Ont., Canada — Borge Nielsen. 

1947, Hollywood, Fla.— Charles W. Jordan, 
Brooks E. McCarty. 

1963, Toronto, Ont., Canada— Steve Warij. 

1964, Vicksburg, Ms. — Herman A. Kemp, 
Archie L. Burr. 

1971, Temple, Tx.— Elvin Wolff. 

1975, Calgary, Alb., Can. — James A. Nering. 

1976, Los Angeles, Ca. — Francis Bush. 

1977, Rome, Ga.— James F. Cordell. 
1987, St. Charles, Mo.— Frank J. Huning. 
1990, Prince Albert, Sask., Canada— Neil 

Goranson. 
1996, Libertyville, III.— Lenard G. Noble. 
1998, Prince George, B.C., Can.— Mrs. Eric 

Cederwall. 
2020, San Diego, Ca.— Bill O. Smith. Donald 

H. Roeder. 
2024, Miami, Fla.— Carl G. Anderson. 
2029, Lehighton, Pa.— William G. Reinbold. 
2035, Kings Beach, Ca.— Kenneth E. Hiatt. 

2044, Fernandina Bch., Fla.— Wayne R. 
Morris. 

2045, Helena, Ark,— Mrs. Malcolm K. 
Hicks, Hobert W. Cooper. 

2046, Martinez, Calif. — Jack J. Anderson, 
Edwin F. Fredrickson, Mrs. George E. 
Matthews, Mrs. Joseph Parkel, Leroy 
Peebles, Raymond T. Saling. 

2047, Hartford City, Ind.— Robert C. 
Canada, Mrs. William J. Crouse. 

2067, Medford, Ore.— John W. Casad, 
William L. Coombs, Mrs. Dames Eller- 
brook. 

2073, Milwaukee, Wise. — Walter Bartkow- 
iak, George Jaworski. 

2076, Kelowna, B.C., Can.— Edward J. 
Cartwright. 

2077, Columbus, Oh.— Clyde D. Slone. 
2087, Crystal Lake, III.— Mrs. Leslie Olsen, 

Sr. 

2094, Chicago, III.— Mrs. Algot Carlson, 
Edwin Carlson, Kenneth Maier, William 
Price, Edward Williams. 

2095, San Rafael, Ca.— William P. Buch- 
wald. 

Continued on page 38 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



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PARKINSON'S DONORS 

Continued from page 24 

Local 1750— A. R. Moore, Paul A. Ciricillo, 

Richard Shafts. 
Local 1752 — C. C. Cheesebrough. 
Local 1772 — Edwin Funfgeld, James A. 

Winters, P. Forgione, Glenn Kerbs. 
Local 1780— Manley W. Smith, David 

Bronder, Sam Sivigliano, Lloyd W. 

Drennen. 
Local 1815 — Miguel Carillo, Adam M. 

Perstac. 
Local 1816 — Eugene R. Schlotterbeck. 
Local 1822— W. K. Riddle. 
Local 1823 — Joseph Ellman. 
Local 1836 — Samuel E. Sprafke. 
Local 1837 — Axel Hansen, Stephen D. 

Smith. Albert Maier, Antonio D. Amico, 

Herman W. Strieker, Berent Roed. 
Local 1846 — William Addison. 
Local 1856 — George J. Loos, Jr., Samuel 

Craven. 
Local 1861 — Eugene Phillips. 
Local 1869— Mike Talley. 
Local 1913— W. R. Gearhart, John E. 

Dolan, Manuel Romanse, Wayne D. 

Whettam. 
Local 1921 — Joseph Conlin, Sven Dahlberg, 

Donato Pastore, Stephen Lupski. 
Local 1934 — Thomas J. Benson. 
Local 2027— A. D. Marsteller, Peter P. 

Laco. 
Local 2043— Karl W. Franz. 
Local 2046— Charles W. Mitchell, Joseph E. 

Hobbs, Deano Cerri, Alfred J. Abono. 
Local 2067— Waldo H. Lindstrom. 
Local 2073 — Mario S. Hernandez. 
Local 2094— John M. Olsen. 
Local 2114— R. A. Wallace. 
Local 2155 — Ottavio Loviglio, Gustav Bac- 

kon, Irving Zeidman, Albert Eiskamp. 
Local 2164 — John A. Cardinez. 
Local 2203 — Calvin Shane, Jack R. Lechei. 
Local 2212 — John Seis. 
Local 2231— E. W. Vanderplou. 
Local 2235 — Dennis L. Whitehead, Richard 

J. Surman. 
Local 2241 — Angelo Angelico. 
Local 2250 — S. Lucassen, Alvin C. Birkner, 

Andrew A. Ness. 
Local 2265 — Paul Polyasko, Anthony Lind. 
Local 2287 — Harold Lampe. 
Local 2288— Syd Ellin. 
Local 2317 — Leonard E. Whitesell. 
Local 2337 — Peter Lewandowski. 
Local 2375 — Charles H. Popejoy, Garland 

I. Swart. 
Local 2398— Albert Koch. 
Local 2463 — R-ssell B. Kreig. 
Local 2486 — Aurele Lacelle. 
Local 2564— Chesleef T. Cassell. 
Local 2565 — Thomas Cowan. 
Local 2633 — Jack Kuznek. 
Local 2669 — Andrew Kowalchuk. 
Local 2687 — Norman G. Bashore. 
Local 2710— Helen Prebish. 
Local 2767— Oliver R. Davis. 
Local 2837— Winston E. Boyer. 
Local 2941 — John J. Schonneker. 
Local 2947 — John Giammarinaro. 
Local 3127 — Jacinto Cruz. 
Local 3128— Stephen Chiz. 
Local 9244 — Jack Meyrowitz. 

Contributions are still needed. Send 
your check by mail today! 



IN MEMORIAM 

Continued from page 36 

2103, Calgary, Alb., Can.— Joe R. Deezar. 
2114, Napa, Ca. — Edwin W. Adams, William 

W. Sloan. 
2127, Centralia, Wa. — Anton L. Anderson, 

David L. Hahn. 
2141, Scottsbluff, Neb.— Mrs. Charles E. 

Shotwell. 
2144, Los Angeles, Ca.— Leslie C. Blake. 
2170, Sacramento, Ca. — Mrs. Arthur V. 

Price, Mrs. Walter R. Gossett, Mrs. 

Millard T. Guess. 
2127, Santa Ana, Ca. — Leroy D. Denison. 
2182, Montreal, Que., Can. — Louis E. Agos- 

tini, Mrs. Jean Gauthier, Roch L'ltalien, 

Jean-Mare Marehand, Gerard Turcotte. 

2194, Philadelphia, Pa. — Ludwik Jankowski. 

2195, Gardiner, Ore.— John M. Melhus. 
2203, Anaheim, Ca. — Mrs. Floyd J. Eggers. 
2212, Union, NJ. — Mrs. Alexander Razzetti, 

Joseph Resonie. 

2219, Corpus Christi, Tx.— Thomas L. Ma- 
gee. 

2227, Montevallo, Ala.— Dave H. Price. 

2250, Red Bank, N.J.— Edward S. Frank, 
Mrs. W. Alvin Martin. 

2258, Houma, La. — Mrs. Felix Blanchard. 

2264, Pittsburgh, Pa.— Mrs. Edward F. 
Keenan, Robert J. Schraeder, Louis 
Edw. Srsic. 

2274, Pittsburgh, Pa.— Fred D. Notestine, 
Sr., Joseph V. Overly, Tucker L. Young, 
Edwin Cyphers, Mrs. Merl Hewitt. 

2288, Los Angeles, Ca.— Mrs. Edmund W. 
Hall, David Romes, Earl H. Rankin, 
Albert J. Stoner. 

2308, Fullerton, Ca. — Mrs. Jessie L. Chavers. 

2311, Washington, D.C.— Mrs. Alfred V. 
Sykes. 

2317, Bremerton, Wash. — Mrs. James E. 
McCown. 

2340, Bradenton/Sarasota, Fla. — Horace 
Williford. 

2350, Scranton, Pa.— Frank Rafferty. 

2361, Orange, Ca.— William H. Seffens. 

2375, Los Angeles, Ca.— Russell K. Hard- 
man, Albert Lee Horton. 

2382, Spokane, Wash.— Ernest W. Sherrard. 

2399, Mont-I aurier, Que., Can. — Joseph 
Cyr. 

2404, Vancouver, B.C., Can. — Mrs. Ernest 
E. Forbes. 

2434, Worthington, Mn.— Donald B. Breh- 
mer. 

2463, Ventura, Ca.— John C. Brown, Ken- 
neth L. Davis. 

2487, Plainfield, III.— Spencer G. Vath. 

2498, Longview, Wash. — Vurvin B. Davis. 

2519, Seattle, Wa.— Ralph E. Lancaster. 

2521, Triangle Lake, Ore. — Mrs. Linfred A. 
Hulburt, Mrs. Harry Miller, Walter W. 
Syphers. 

2548, Peru, Ind Mary Cole. 

2554, Lebanon, Ore. — Mrs. Charles M. 
Crawford. 

2573, North Bend, Ore.— John E. Robert- 
son. 

2588, John Day, Ore.— Harold L. Blume. 

2601, Lafayette, Ind. — Isaac Feller. 

2650, Bourbon, Ind.— Ralph Decker. 

2659, Everett, Wash.— Herbert Lundin. 

2693, Thunder Bay, Ont., Can. — Rosaire 
Cloutier. 

2715, Medford, Ore. — Mrs. John LaTour- 
rette, Sr. 

2755, Kalama, Wash. — David A. Hudson. 

2761, McCleary, Wash. — Keith E. Simpson. 

2765, Nassau Co., N.Y. — Vincent Parrinello. 

2767, Morton, Wash. — Mrs. Leonard E. 
Clevinger, Cecil K. Nelson. 

2772, Flagstaff, Az. — Crescendo R. Lopez. 

2787, Springfield, Ore.— Cecil P. Bateman. 



2806, Tigerton, Wi.— Thomas A. Buss, Sr. 

2817, Quebec, Que., Can. — Jean-Paul Roy. 

2881, Portland, Ore. — Marion T. Downing, 
Michael Groznik. 

2902, Bums, Ore. — Frank C. Holloway, 
Floyd M. Teeman. 

2927, Martell, Ca.— Charles F. Brecht. 

2949, Roseburg, Ore.— F. Ray Allison, Wil- 
liam L. Henderson, Mrs. Charles 
Mitchell, Cecile A. Mitchell. 

2993, Franklin, Ind.— Carroll W. Wesley. 

3090, Murfreesboro, N.C. — Joseph L. Tyler. 

3091, Vaughn, Or.— Ale Curt Alvarez, 
George D. Morin. 

3127, N.Y., N.Y.— Harry Eckblom. 
3154, Monticello, Ind. — Denzil C. Busick, 
Troy B. Farley. 

SAN BERNARDINO 

Continued from Page 31 

Richard Meidlinger; John W. Miller; Elwood L. 
Mitchell; Odell 0. Mitchell; Wibur L Myers; 
Bert A. Peterson; Millard D. Piatt; Oscar Pool; 
James R. Preston; William H. Price; R. E. 
Rasmussen; Walter A. Reierson; Paul Samson; 
A. L. Scott; M. F. Shoemaker; Joseph C. Short, 
Sr. ; Walter J. Sprenger; Robert W. Stachura; 
Chester C. Steele; John M. Sullivan; Edward 
Swanson; E. E. Thornton; William L. Thurman; 
M. M. Tilton; Joseph VanGese; Salvador C. 
Vazquez; Marcel P. Vernay; James B. Viero; 
Wallace Watson; Bert N. Weinmann; Merle 
Willhite; Aubrey L. Williams; Thomas W. 
Wright; Laurence Youngsman. 




IS THIS A 

UNION 

JOB? 



Every home in America 
should be quality-built and 
union-built. Support 
OPERATION CHOP— the 
Brotherhood's drive to organize 
every carpenter in residential 
housing. 



V. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



NEW GENERATOR LINE 




PRESSED-METAL TILES 




Metal ceilings were originally intro- 
duced around the time of the Civil War. 
Unlike plaster, the metal could withstand 
rough-housing. In 1902, metal ceilings 
were- a Victorian rage. Surviving today 
is everything from Greek Revival to 
Victorian to Deco-Style designs. These 
are all pressed from original dyes and 
are not reproductions. 

The various six-inch, one-foot and 
even two-foot designs come on 2 ft. x 8 
ft. sheets. Their bright silvery finish may 
be treated with a clear lacquer, an oil- 
based paint, or, left as is. Cornice is 
also available in numerous sizes. For 
information and prices write or tele- 
phone: Chelsea Decorative Metal Com- 
pany, 6115 Cheena, Houston, Texas 
77096, Telephone (713) 721-9200. Cata- 
logues are available, free of charge. 



INDEX OF 
ADVERTISERS 

Belsaw Planer 30 

Belsaw Sharp-All 21 

Belsaw Workbench 13 

Black & Decker 37 

Chicago Technical College 22 

Clifton Enterprises 27 

Estwing Manufacturing Co 33 

Foley Manufacturing Co 26 

Frog Tool Co., Ltd 39 

Full Length Roof Framer 27 

Goldblatt Tool 33 

Hydrolevel 29 

Industrial Abrasives Co 28 

Layout Pencil 29 



New line of gasoline engine-powered 
generators with 1,800 rpm operation has 
been introduced by the Homelite Division 
of Textron Inc. Models, ranging from 3.6 
KW to 11.8 KW continuous duty output, 
are designed for extra heavy duty use 
where continuous power is needed for a 
long period of time. The equipment is 
particularly ideal for general contractor 
applications in which electricity is re- 
quired to operate portable tools, com- 
pressors, continuous work lighting, flood- 
lights, etc., and where permanent electric 
power has not yet been established on a 
construction site. Model G4800-1, with 
4.8 KW output, shown above, weighs 315 
pounds and is priced at $1,840. A similar 
unit with electric start is priced at $1,979, 
according to the manufacturer. For more 
information write: Homelite, Division of 
Textron, Inc., Charlotte, N.C. 28217. 

SHEET CARRIER 




The Corner Carrier™ allows one per- 
son to transport a large, fragile sheet of 
building material upright, without fear 
of dropping or damaging it. It has two 
metal brackets that attach to the bottom 
corners of a 4 by 8 foot sheet of ply- 
wood, wallboard, Masonite or particle 
board. The brackets are connected by a 
rope with attached handle. $9.95 from 
Degah Industries, 167 McKendry, Menlo 
Park, Calif. 94025. (415) 325-6827. 



PLEASE NOTE: A report on new prod- 
ucts and processes on this page in no 
way constitutes an endorsement or recom- 
mendation. All performance claims are 
based on statements by the manufacturer. 




Makes Holes Disappear! 

• LOOKS LIKE WOOD 

• CARVES LIKE WOOD 

• STAINS LIKE WOOD 

• FAST SETTING 

• WATERPROOF 



Amazing Frog Dough fine grained 
crack filler will enable you to save that 
lost piece of furniture, restore thai an- 
tique, or repair that woodcarving. Frog 
Dough is never coarse and grainey. It 
goes on smooth. 

Colors: Natural, Oak, Light Birch, 
Walnut, Cherry-Mahogany 
Yellow Pine. 

Send for a Vi pint can $3.50 ppd. 



Dealer inquiries invited also. 



FROG TOOL CO. Ltd. 
700 W. Jackson Blvd, Depl 4D Chicago IL 60606 



Energy 
Credit 

If you installed 
energy savers, you 
may be eligible for 
a special energy 
tax credit. 



Internal Revenue Service ^* 





MARCH, 1980 



39 



IN CONCLUSION 



mnnpouiER mid 

SKILLS TO 

SOLUE OUR 

EHERCV PR0RLEH1S 



The energy equivalent of 

millions of barrels of oil 

can be saved every day, 

if new and existing 

buildings are made 

energy efficient. 



The leadership of American labor recently en- 
tered into a National Accord with the Carter Ad- 
ministration. Its main purpose from the standpoint 
of the late George Meany and others who signed 
the document was "to provide for American labor's 
involvement and cooperation with the Administra- 
tion on important national issues." Its ultimate 
purpose was to assure the wage earners, the bread- 
winners of the nation, that their voices would be 
heard above the tumult of the special interests con- 
stantly lambasting the White House. 

Point No. 5 in this National Accord provides for 
our involvement and cooperation in solving the 
problems of energy. It reads, in part: 

"In view of the availability, location and cost of 
oil and gas, our nation must reduce its dependence 
on petroleum as an energy source and particularly 
its dependence on imported petroleum. 

"Toward that end, the President has proposed a 
comprehensive energy program, which includes 
conservation measures, limitations on oil imports 
and a windfall profits tax to capture some of the 
increased revenues from higher oil prices for pub- 
lic purposes. Proceeds from the windfall profits tax 
will be used to help finance the development of un- 
conventional energy sources, such as synthetic 
fuels; to carry out projects which conserve overall 
energy requirements, such as expanded public 
transit facilities; to provide incentives for greater 
conservation; and to expand financial relief from 
higher energy costs for the poor and needy." 

We heartily subscribe to the intent of this Ac- 
cord. Former President William Sidell participated 
in its signing last September, and your present Gen- 
eral Officers are pursuing its goals. The AFL-CIO's 
Executive Council has gone on record as agreeing 
with the President's call for conservation and a 
crash program to develop alternate sources of en- 
ergy. It also is working for establishment of the 
windfall profits tax. 

The American labor movement has demonstrated 
the ability to tackle critical national problems 
and overcome them. Canadian labor, likewise, has 
shown what free trade unionists can do in difficult 
times. 

Many of us remember the days in the shipyards 
of World War II, the Levittowns of emergency 
housing in the 1940s, the rush to build army 
camps, the work of the Seabees in which I partici- 
pated, and some can now tell of the super-secret 
Manhattan project when America was first able to 
harness nuclear energy. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



The skilled manpower which accomplished these 
marvels of more than three decades ago is still 
available in another generation. American and 
Canadian Building Tradesmen have continued to 
support a four-year apprenticeship program which 
provides highly skilled craftsmen for today's indus- 
trial demands. It has been shown on many occa- 
sions that North America's "hard hats" are among 
the most patriotic in our society. 

I am sure that every clear-headed American 
and Canadian must feel the frustration that I do 
when I see the OPEC nations add fuel to world- 
wide inflation by raising crude oil prices, almost 
every month. We see what is happening in our 
domestic energy-producing industry — tremendous 
profits from high gasoline and fuel oil prices and 
major companies buying into more and more re- 
lated energy industries. The way things are going, 
a few major companies will eventually control 
every natural source of energy in North America 
and thereby control supply and demand. 

It is imperative that we become more self suffi- 
cient and achieve energy independence. Alternate 
sources of energy must be developed, and skilled 
US and Canadian workers must be put to work 
building the coal degasification plants, the gasahol 
facilities, and other installations which our experts 
tell us can be logically developed. There is a tre- 
mendous amount of coal underground in North 
America which can be put to use by one means or 
another. 

President Carter has indicated that more should 
be done to develop solar power. There are now 
solar-powered installations serving as demonstra- 
tion projects all over the country. If the housing 
industry can be revitalized, I see no reason why we 
cannot create new homes which take full advantage 
of the sun's rays, of heat exchanges, and of insula- 
tion know-how. 

The American Institute of Architects made a 
study recently in which it found that energy con- 
sumption in America's buildings could be reduced 
by 50% to 75% by designing new buildings and 
redesigning existing buildings to be energy effi- 
cient. The energy equivalent of 12.5 million barrels 
of oil per day could be saved by 1990. 

You can be sure that the real estate interests of 
North America are already adjusting their invest- 
ments and sales to meet the changes brought on 
by the energy situation. Single family homes close 
to industry in the suburbs or on rail or bus lines 
will rise in price. 



Housing in the central-city ghettos "will not 
benefit from the flow back to the central city unless 
whole sections are renovated or cleared and crime 
rate reduced," according to one real estate report. 
New towns will be built near suburban railroad or 
mass transit stations, according to another study. 

On the surface, there appears to be discourage- 
ment in the business and investment community 
when an exploratory well is drilled for oil off our 
shores and only natural gas is discovered. Don't be 
fooled by this. The American Gas Assn. reported 
recently that 25 million Americans earn about 
$250 billion working in industries and commercial 
establishments relying on gas. That's a large seg- 
ment of our working population. 

There are so many other aspects to the energy 
problem, and I cannot go into all of them here, 
but suffice it to say that most solutions depend upon 
skilled manpower to develop them. And this is 
something which the US and Canada have in good 
supply. We're ready to meet the energy challenges 
presented to us. 




WILLIAM KONYHA 



General President 




There is no truer and more abiding happiness 
than the knowledge that one is free to go on do- 
ing, day by day, the best work one can do, in the 
kind one likes best, and that this work is absorb- 
ed by a steady market and thus supports ones own 
life. Perfect freedom is reserved for the man who 
lives by his own work and in that work does what 

he wants to do. 

—R.G. Qollingwood 



April 1980 




United Brotherhood of Carpenters & 




^ 



i. 



."isSa^ *•• 






u 











GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W.. 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Patrick J. Campbell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Sigurd Lucassen 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

John S. Rogers 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 
Charles E. Nichols 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENTS EMERITI 

M. A. Hutcheson 
William Sidell 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Joseph F. Lia 
120 North Main Street 
New City, New York 10956 

Second District, 



Third District, Anthony Ochocki 

14001 West McNichols Road 
Detroit, Michigan 48235 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

2970 Peachtree Rd., N.W., Suite 300 
Atlanta. Ga. 30305 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140 N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116 

Seventh District, Hal Morton 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, John Carruthers 
5799 Yonge Street #807 
Willowdale, Ontario M2M 3V3 

Tenth District, Ronald J. Dancer 

1235 40th Avenue, N.W. 

Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2K OG3 




William Konyha, Chairman 
John S. Rogers, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

In processing complaints about 
magazine delivery, the only names 
which the financial secretary needs to 
send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 

In sending in the names of mem- 
bers who are not getting the maga- 
zine, the address forms mailed out 
with each monthly bill should be 
used. When a member clears out of 
one local union into another, his 
name is automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of the local union he 
cleared out of. Therefore, the secre- 
tary of the union into which he cleared 
should forward his name to the Gen- 
eral Secretary so that this member 
can again be added to the mailing list. 

Members who die or are suspended 
are automatically dropped from the 
mailing list of The Carpenter. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 



NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPENTER only cor- 
rects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not advise your own 
local union of your address change. You must also notify your local union 
... by some other method. 



This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



Local No. 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State or Province 



ZIP Code 




)008-o843) ^^^} ^^ 



(ISSN 0008-4843) 

VOLUME 100 No. 4 APRIL, 1980 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

John S. Rogers, Editor 

IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Industrial Productivity, A Detailed Study 2 

What's Ahead for Consumers? __ Esther Peterson 4 

A Blueprint for the 80s 

Occupational Safety and Health Hazards Cong. Edward Beard 6 

A Blueprint for the 80s 

New Insights on Black Trade Unionists Norman Hill 7 

AFL-CIO, Brotherhood Winter Meetings 9 

Did You Know? Union Activity at the Local Level 10 

Members in the News 13 

More Donors to Parkinsons Disease Drive 22 



DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Report 8 

Ottawa Report _.. — 1 2 

We Congratulate 1 4 

Local Union News 16 

Consumer Clipboard: The Importance of Wills 24 

Apprenticeship and Training 25 

Plane Gossip 28 

Service to the Brotherhood _ 29 

In Memoriam _ 36 

What's New? 39 

In Conclusion 



THE 
COVER 



William Konyha 40 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001 

Published monthly at 3342 Bladensburg Road, Brentwood, Md. 20722 by the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, D.C. and 
Additional Entries. Subscription price: United States and Canada $7.50 per year, single copies 
750 in advance. 



Spring, 1980 arrives in North Amer- 
ica with many economic uncertainties. 
Though the people shown shopping on 
a New York City street on our April 
cover look prosperous and serene, 
many of them are probably like many 
other Americans and Canadians — liv- 
ing from payday to payday on ex- 
tended credit. 

More and more, North American 
consumers are falling behind in their 
earnings, as they strive to keep up with 
mounting living costs. 

It is time, says organized labor, for 
decisive action. The AFL-CIO Execu- 
tive Council, at its recent meetings, 
called for a revitalization of the Amer- 
ican economy through the focusing of 
national policies "more clearly and 
decisively" to meet the dangers of in- 
flation and recession. 

In one of our major "Blueprint for 
the 80s" articles, this issue, Consumer 
Authority Esther Peterson says that 
consumers must assert more control 
over the marketplace, if they are ever 
to recover from the pits of inflation. — 
Photo from H. Armstrong Roberts. 



NOTE: Readers who would like copies 
of this cover unmarred by a mailing label 
may obtain them by sending 50t in coin 
to cover mailing costs to the Editor, The 
CARPENTER, 101 Constitution Ave., 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. 




Printed in U.S.A. 



Unionized Industrial Workers 

Are more Productiue 

Ihan non-Union Industrial markers 



Several recent academic studies 
have taken a close look at the effect 
industrial unions have in the workplace 
and their findings dispel many com- 
mon misconceptions about unions. 

Using newly available computerized 
U.S. data which distinguishes between 
union and non-union establishments, 
as well as interviews with manage- 
ment, union officials, and labor rela- 
tions experts, plus in-depth observa- 
tions of union and non-union plants in 
the cement industry, the studies find 
that: 

• Unionization causes a 15 to 20% in- 
crease in labor productivity in manufac- 
turing plants, controlling for technology 
and other factors which may influence 
productivity; 

• In the cement industry, unionization 
led to a 6 to 8% increase in labor pro- 
ductivity; 

• In the wood household furniture in- 
dustry, labor in unionized establishments 
was 15% more productive than in non- 
union establishments; 

• By providing workers with a voice 
both in the workplace and in the political 
arena, unions can ant do positively affect 
the functioning of the economic and 
social systems. Contrary to the image 
commonly portrayed in the press, unions 
are democratic political organizations 
which are responsive to the will of their 
members. 

These conclusions were reached in 
"The Two Faces of Unions" written 
by Richard B. Freeman and James L. 
Medoff, professors at Harvard Uni- 
versity, Department of Economics, 
and by Kim B. Clark, in "Unioniza- 
tion, Management Adjustment and 
Productivity" and "Unionization and 
Productivity: Micro-Econometric Evi- 
dence" published by the National Bu- 
reau of Economic Research. Freeman 
and Medoff's study examines data on a 
wide variety of union and non-union 
manufacturing and non-manufacturing 



Studies Find That Unions In The Industrial Sector 
Actually Increase Productivity and Benefit 
Society By Providing Greater Voice 
To The Workers 



establishments and summarizes much 
of the research conducted on unions' 
effects in the workplace. Clark studied 
128 union and non-union cement 
plants over a three-year period and 
also took an in-depth look at the 
changes which took place at seven 
plants when they were unionized. 

Professors Freeman and Medoff find 
that perhaps the most important con- 
tribution made by unions in increasing 
labor productivity is to establish a col- 
lective voice in the workplace through 
which workers can communicate with 
management. While an individual 
worker may be unwilling to voice 
grievances about wages and working 
conditions because of fear of punish- 
ment a union provides the means of 
making these grievances heard. Ninety- 
nine percent of major collective bar- 
gaining agreements contain grievance 
procedures and 95% provide for arbi- 
tration of disputes. In addition, collec- 
tive bargaining offers an opportunity 
for workers to express preferences 
concerning contract provisions, com- 
pensation and fringes, and working 
conditions. 

Freeman and Medoff found that be- 
cause of the collective voice and due 
process that unions provide, unionized 
workers are more likely to grieve un- 
fair conditions or change them through 
collective bargaining and less likely to 
leave their jobs. The lower labor turn- 
over among union workers which was 



identified by the study, is one factor in 
the increased productivity of unionized 
plants. Training costs, inexperience 
and hiring costs are all reduced by 
lower turnover rates. 

Another cause of increased produc- 
tivity in unionized establishments is 
the organizational changes made by 
management when a plant is union- 
ized. Clark, in her study of the cement 
industry, found that unionization 
causes a fundamental change in the 
relation between labor and manage- 
ment and that, as a result of this 
change, management is forced to 
adopt "a more professional, business- 
like approach to labor relations." This 
in turn leads to greater productivity. 

Clark found that unionization 
caused the following changes in labor- 
management relations: procedures for 
settlement of workplace disputes and 
the filling of job vacancies, the training 
of in-plant workers for higher level jobs 
rather than hiring from the outside and 
an orderly procedure for layoffs and 
recalls. In addition, the probationary 
period was shortened from an indefi- 
nite period of time to a 30 to 90-day 
period when the plant was unionized. 

Management responds to these 
changes by replacing paternalism and 
favoritism with a greater degree of 
fairness in its operations. Set personnel 
procedures replace discriminatory de- 
cisions by front-line supervisors. In all 
six plants studied by Clark, the plant 



THE CARPENTER 



manager was replaced after the plant 
was unionized in order to carry out 
this new management approach. 

The studies show, then, that the 
greater voice for workers made possi- 
ble by unions and the changes this en- 
tails in the workplace actually makes 
a unionized establishment more pro- 
ductive. The studies show that the 
workplace changes caused by union- 
ization also lead to the following bene- 
ficial results in society: 

• Unions reduce wage inequality because 
they emphasize equal pay for equal work, 
and they eliminate discretionary wage 
policies. Critics have argued that unions 
actually cause wage inequality because 
they force workers out of the union sec- 
tor and into the low-wage, non-union 
sector. Non-union wages are lowered 
even more by the increased competition 
of workers who can't find union jobs. 
Freeman and Medoff found that not only 
do unions raise the wages of their mem- 
bers, but the net effect is to stabilize 
wages among all workers in a plant or 
industry. 

• Discrimination against minorities is 
less in union plants than in non-union 
plants. In the union workplace, jobs are 
filled by seniority rather than favoritism, 
workers in the same job are paid equal 
rates and discipline is based on set pro- 
cedures rather than the discretion of a 
foreman. There is thus less of an oppor- 
tunity for discrimination against minor- 
ities in the union workplace. 

While the studies' conclusions will 
not come as a surprise to most union 
members, much of the public will find 
them to be contrary to the negative 
stereotypes about unions that increas- 
ingly are being printed in the popular 
and academic press. As Freeman and 
Medoff note about the treatment of 
unions in the press, "In recent years, 
unionism has become a more periph- 
eral topic and unions have come to be 
viewed less positively. Less and less 
space in social science journals, maga- 
zines, and newspapers is devoted to 
unions. What is written is increasingly 
unfavorable." 

Yet Freeman and Medoff's and 
Clark's studies show that under close 
scrutiny, the negative stereotypes about 
unions simply do not hold up. 




Productivity Ideas on Assembly Line, 
Stanford Dean Tells Industrialists 



Corporations should listen more 
closely to the people on the assembly 
line if they want ideas on how to im- 
prove the nation's productivity. 

So says the man who recently became 
dean of Stanford University's Business 
School in Palo Alto, Calif. 

"We had better start admitting that 
the most important people in an orga- 
nization are those who actually provide 
a service or make and add value to 
products, not those who administer the 
activity," says Rene C. McPherson, 
chairman of the Dana Corporation, writ- 
ing in a recent issue of Leaders maga- 
zine on "The People Principle." 

McPherson says that in his experience, 
"many companies spend far more for 
them (people) than for any other cate- 
gory, yet human input ranks distressingly 
low as a feasible solution to the prob- 
lem." 

He says industry should "let our peo- 
ple 'get the job done.' " Expand rather 
than reduce the input side of productivity 
measurements. Look for something more 
than a unit of labor, or hard work, from 
people. Listen to them. Learn from ex- 
perts. 

"Until we believe that the expert in 
any particular job is most often the per- 
son performing it, we shall forever limit 
the potential of that person, in terms of 
both his contribution to the organization 
and his own personal development. 

"Consider a manufacturing setting: 
Within their 25-square-foot area, nobody 
knows more about how to operate a 
machine, maximize its output, improve 
its quality, optimize the material flow 
and keep it operating efficiently than do 
the machine operators, material handlers 
and maintenance people responsible for 
it. Nobody. 

"For years much of industry did not 
recognize, or refused to accept, that prin- 
ciple. People were reduced to the status 
of school children as soon as they 
stepped into the plant, their time ruled 
by an elaborate system of time clocks, 
bells, and buzzers, their work dictated by 
an enormous volume of procedures and 
production standards. 

"Improving production efficiency was 
thought to be the sole province of man- 
agement, and the people actually making 
the product were seldom asked for sug- 
gestions. Nor did they feel inclined to 
offer any. The big game was to beat the 
system, not change it. 

"In today's setting that is a sure 
formula for disaster. People today work 
very hard, and we should not approach 
productivity only from the standpoint of 
working harder. There is another, more 
rewarding and exciting solution. The ex- 
perience, perspective and basic operating 
intelligence possessed by our people 



represent a large asset that is still vastly 
underutilized. 

"Our primary objective, therefore, 
must be to draw from our people the 
ideas, suggestions, solutions, and com- 
mitment to purpose necessary for the 
continued success of our organizations 
and our economic system." 

McPherson suggests five ways organi- 
zations can maintain a climate for pro- 
ductivity: 

1 . Face-to-face communication. "Noth- 
ing more effectively involves people, 
sustains credibility or generates enthu- 
siasm than face-to-face communication. 
As a total group, both within depart- 
ments and on an individual basis, our 
people must meet regularly to discuss 
goals, objectives, financial performance, 
the status of suggestions, the future, or 
whatever else is on their minds." 

Although he said he does not believe 
in corporate procedures, one corporate 
policy he is in favor of "is the one 
requiring managers and leaders to meet 
with all their people regularly — to talk, 
to explain, to listen." 

2. Discuss organizational performance 
figures with all employees. "Bad news is 
as important as good news and candor is 
essential. If we are managing well, our 
people have tough goals to meet, and 
they must know how they are doing as 
judged against performance yardsticks." 

3. Provide training and opportunity 
for development for employees seeking 
improvement in skills, expanding career 
opportunities or furthering their general 
education. 

"Tailor the programs to their specific 
requirements and listen to their evalua- 
tions of those programs. Forget about 
trying to cost-justify education; rely in- 
stead on instinct. Smart companies dur- 
ing the last recession used the period as 
an opportunity to expand their education 
programs for people with reduced work 
loads." 

4. Provide job security. "Concentrate 
on eliminating cyclicality and business 
fluctuations . . . and establish an environ- 
ment where layoffs and work shortages 
are not inevitable. No matter how shel- 
tered people are by supplemental unem- 
ployment benefits, layoffs are bad. They 
create an attitude of uncertainty, disrupt 
productive programs, undermine our 
credibility and erode the spirit of op- 
timism and aggressiveness so important 
in our work areas." 

5. Create incentive programs that rely 
on ideas and suggestions, as well as on 
hard work, to establish a reward pool. 

"Distribute this pool as a percentage of 
income to everyone in the particular 
operation, without respect to rank. 
Group cohesion is vital." 



APRIL, 1980 



UUHHT'S RHEflD FOR [OnSUIIIERS? 
IT DEPEHDS OR THEIR POLITICAL CLOUT 



By ESTHER PETERSON 

Special Assistant to the 
President for Consumer Affairs 



Without the benefit of a crystal ball, 
no one can predict with certainty what 
the 1980's will be like for American 
consumers. The next decade's legisla- 
tive, regulatory and economic frame- 
work, upon which consumer progress 
or regression will be built, will largely 
be decided by consumers themselves 
in three important ways. 

First, will they elect candidates who 
believe in consumer protection, par- 
ticipation and representation? 

Second, will consumers themselves 
play a more active role in the govern- 
ment decision-making process? 

And third, will consumers assert 
more control over the marketplace by 
voting more responsively with their 
purchasing dollars and by creating 
more viable alternatives to the existing 
marketing system? 

When consumers go to the polls 
next November, one of their main re- 
sponsibilities will be to carefully ex- 
amine the voting records and plat- 
forms of all who seek to represent 
them. In the past few years, because 
of changes in the campaign finance 
laws, special interest groups have 
enormously increased their clout with 
elected representatives, making many 
legislators beholden to one group or 
another when they vote. The promise 
of campaign contributions from Polit- 
ical Action Committees, or the threat 
of having these contributions with- 
held, has led many representatives to 



ESTHER PETERSON 

As Special Assistant to the President for Consumer 
Affairs, Ms. Peterson serves as consumer spokesperson 
and advocate on President Carter's personal staff. She 
held a similar post under President Lyndon Johnson. 
A native of Utah, she taught for a time there and in 
Boston, Mass. A longtime trade unionist with the 
Amalgamated Clothing Workers, she later became legis- 
lative representative of the AFL-CIO Industrial Union 
Department. Before going to the White House, she was 
consumer adviser for Giant Food, Inc., one of the 
nation's large supermarket chains. 




support narrow exemptions or special 
favors that benefit one narrow interest 
at the expense of all others. Consum- 
ers, because they are unorganized and 
unable to make large campaign con- 
tributions, have suffered as a result. 

Perhaps the best example of this 
disturbing process is shown by the 
recent move in Congress to curtail 
many of the consumer protection ac- 
tivities of the Federal Trade Commis- 
sion (FTC). In essence. Congress is 
punishing the FTC for doing its man- 
dated job all too well. The FTC is 
under fire for conducting aggressive 
and strong consumer protection initia- 
tives against the anti-competitive prac- 
tices of the oil and automobile indus- 
tries and the unfair or deceptive tactics 
currently used by some members of 
industries such as funerals, used cars, 
hearing aids, advertising, home insula- 
tion, insurance, and over-the-counter 
drugs. Unfortunately and ironically, 
these are the very industries that con- 
sistently generate the largest number 
of consumer complaints. 

By and large, all the FTC is pro- 



posing with regard to these industries 
are minimum rules of fairness and 
disclosure to give consumers enough 
information to enable them to make 
wise buying decisions and to assure 
that methods of redress are available 
if legitimate problems arise. Sounds 
reasonable, doesn't it? Nevertheless, 
one by one, well-organized lobbyists 
for these industries, using the almighty 
campaign contribution as incentive, 
have persuaded many Members of 
Congress that fairness to consumers 
was less important than special treat- 
ment for them. 

The FTC experience is also sympto- 
matic of how many representatives 
are treating essential health and safety 
laws and regulations. The halls of 
Congress ring out with cries of "the 
cost of regulation," but it is becoming 
increasingly difficult to hear a whisper 
by someone with enough courage to 
consider the cost of not regulating — 
the cost to our safety, our health, and 
the overall quality of our lives. 

For example, federal auto and high- 
way safety rules saved 100,000 lives 




'Consumers will be able fo effect positive change in the next 
decade by taking steps on their own to combat two of the 
most pressing issues of our time— inflation and energy 
shortages.' 

An Executive Order would require every agency and 
department to 'establish regular procedures to bring 
consumers into agency deliberations early enough to make 
a difference . . .' 



THE CARPENTER 



between 1966 and 1979. Product 
safety regulations are estimated to 
have reduced crib deaths by half, and 
the attainment of the Clean Air Act's 
goals is estimated to reduce our na- 
tion's overall mortality rate by 1% — 
saving 125,000 lives per day. 

Of course, it is not always easy to 
put dollar amounts on these benefits. 
What value can be placed on the life 
of a two-year old child who did not 
die from swallowing a liquid drain 
cleaner because of a safety closure? 
How do we assign a benefit to a six- 
year old who suffers only superficial 
burns rather than grotesque and 
permanent disfigurement because she 
wore flame-retardant sleepwear? And 
how do we assign a value to economic 
costs which were not incurred as a 
result of improved on-the-job safety 
requirements; or the buildings which 
did not deteriorate because of cleaner 
air? 

Consumers should ask candidates 
where they stand on these issues. 
These are the questions that separate 
consumer champions from those who 
march to the drums of the special in- 
terest lobbies. But, equally important 
are candidates' stands on the issue of 
public participation in the regulatory 
process. 

Prior to the publication of Ralph 
Nader's Unsafe at Any Speed, which 
is sometimes cited as the dawn of the 
age of the consumer, government pol- 
icy-makers were very rarely respon- 
sive to the needs of individual con- 
sumers. Regulators tended to talk only 
to the representatives of the affected 
industry before making their decision, 
but most of them made no attempt to 
bring consumers in or to evaluate what 
the effect of any given decision would 
be on the average citizen. Thus, when 
the Food and Drug Administration 
was deciding whether or not to allow 
a certain drug to be marketed or the 
Federal Aviation Administration was 
deciding whether or not to require a 
certain safety feature on a particular 
airplane, to a large degree, the only 
people consulted were representatives 
of the pharmaceutical and aircraft in- 
dustries. The consumers who would 
swallow those drugs or fly in those air- 
planes were most often represented by 
an empty chair. 

In the past few years, we have be- 
gun the arduous process of correcting 
this imbalance. Realizing that the 
major obstacles to meaningful citizen 
participation are a lack of technical 
expertise to prepare well-documented 
arguments and a lack of financial re- 
sources to sustain consumers over the 




long course of a regulatory proceed- 
ing, steps have been taken to break 
down these barriers. 

Two of these steps are worth ex- 
amining. The first is a move, strongly 
supported by President Carter, to re- 
imburse citizens for the cost of their 
participation in federal regulatory pro- 
ceedings. By all accounts, where citi- 
zens have, participated, the result has 
been fairer, more balanced and more 
carefully evaluated policy. The second 
step is President Carter's issuance of 
Executive Order 12160 "Providing for 
Enhancement and Coordination of 
Federal Consumer Programs" which 
essentially will require every execu- 
tive agency and department to estab- 
lish regular procedures to bring con- 
sumers into agency deliberations early 
enough to make a difference and in a 
way that assures that consumers' views 
will be given serious attention and 
consideration. Under the Executive 
Order, each agency is required to for- 
mulate a plan that will detail how the 
agency will function with regard to 
consumer advocacy, consumer partici- 
pation; consumer education informa- 
tion, and complaint handling; training 
of agency personnel in consumer af- 
fairs; and provision of technical assis- 
tance to consumer groups. These pro- 
posals were published .in the Federal 
Register on December 10, 1979 and 
will be open for public comment until 
March 10, 1980. Copies of the plan 
are available free by writing Con- 
sumer Information Center, Depart- 
ment 645 H, Pueblo, Colorado 81009. 

The agencies' plans, in and of them- 
selves, will not, of course, be an over- 
night solution to the lack of consumer 
participation in government. Rather, 
they will give consumers the tools to 
gain access to individual agency struc- 
tures and processes. Obviously, the 
plans will not work unless consumers 
make them work by commenting on 
the proposals and continuing to work 
with the agencies as issues of concern 
arise. 

So we see that consumers can 
change the system and make it work 
more effectively, but only if they par- 
ticipate. This participation, of course, 
is not limited to the federal govern- 
ment, but is equally important at the 
state and local level as well, where 
such critical issues as utility and in- 



'Consumers can change the 
system and make it work more 
effectively, but only if they 
participate.' 

surance rates are decided. 

The final way consumers will be 
able to effect positive change in the 
next decade is by taking steps on their 
own to combat two of the most press- 
ing issues of the time — inflation and 
energy shortages. Each of us votes 
with our dollars every time we go to 
the store. Will we buy over-processed, 
over-advertised, over-packaged items 
or search for the best quality at the 
lowest prices? Will we push up the in- 
flation rate by purchasing items in 
short supply or buying things we don't 
really need, or will we carefully com- 
parison shop and learn to manage our 
money so we don't unnecessarily over- 
extend ourselves? Will we let our 
precious energy dollars escape through 
the chimney or through cracks in 
walls, doors, windows and attics, or 
will we properly winterize and insulate 
our homes? Will we continue our ex- 
pensive and all-consuming love affair 
with the automobile, or will we use 
more public transportation, car pools 
and alternate means of getting around 
like bicycles and even our feet? These 
are questions each of us must ask our- 
selves, but we can go even one step 
further. We can begin to work in our 
neighborhood and our communities to 
create real alternatives to traditional 
ways of doing things. We can plant 
and harvest community gardens, set 
up cooperative buying clubs for food 
and household items, barter our skills 
and talents for those of others, help 
each other with home repairs and 
neighborhood revitalization, and work 
with local planning agencies in such 
areas as avoiding duplication of health 
care services, monitoring the quality 
of auto and home repair services and 
providing information about how local 
goods and services compare in terms 
of quality and price. In essence, we 
can do a great deal to help ourselves. 

I look to the 1980's for I believe in 
our people. I believe they will hold 
their elected representatives account- 
able to their needs and concerns. I 
believe they will demand and gain a 
larger role in determining the kinds of 
rules and regulations that will affect 
their lives. And I believe the market- 
place will begin to reshape itself to 
meet the competition that consumers 
themselves will inject into the system. 



APRIL, 1980 




EDWARD 

P. 

BEARD 

is a Democratic Congressman from 
Rhode Island and a trade unionist. He 
is a member of Painters Local 195, 
Providence, and was at one time 
assistant foreman for maintenance 
painters at the Rhode Island School of 
Design. He served in the Rhode Island 
House of Representatives before his 
election to Congress in 1974. He has 
been reelected by his constituents 
since that time. 



Most of the legislation we have 
seen in this area since 1976 
smacks of union busting and 
regression . . .' 




Occupational Safety 
Had Health Hazards 
To Get more attention 

In The Coming Decade 






• ■-■ 



By EDWARD P. BEARD 

Democratic Representative, Rhode Island, 

Chairman, Subcommittee on 

Labor Standards 

The jurisdiction of the House Sub- 
committee on Labor Standards in the 
U.S. Congress puts us squarely in the 
middle of some of the critical issues 
facing organized labor now and cer- 
tainly in the foreseeable future. These 
issues include long-standing legislation 
such as the Longshoremen's and Har- 
bor Workers' Compensation Act, the 
Walsh-Healey Act, the Davis-Bacon 
Act, the Federal Employees' Com- 
pensation Act, the Black Lung Bene- 
fits Act and, of course, the Fair Labor 
Standards Act. Many of these laws 
have recently come under fire from 
conservative elements of our society, 
and legislation has been introduced 
from time to time to severely amend 
the provisions of these Acts and, as 
in the case of the Davis-Bacon law, 
to repeal the law entirely. While there 
may be certain provisions that might 
lend themselves to amendment from 
the standpoint of modernization, in- 
flation-fighting or clarity, most of the 
legislation we have seen in this area 
since 1976 smacks of union-busting 
and regression, generated by a variety 
of political and economic trends. I 
expect to see more of this kind of 
legislation in 1980. 

COMPENSATION CHALLENGE 

The major aspect of my work with 
the Subcommittee on Labor Standards 
has to do with compensation. It is this 
area of industry-government-labor re- 
lationships that I hope will be broad- 
ened to reflect the reality of our eco- 
nomic and social condition. The 
emergence in the 70's of solid evi- 
dence of an enormous variety of long- 
latent occupational diseases places a 
great responsibility upon government, 



industry and labor to meet the chal- 
lenge of hazardous substances in the 
workplace. Our recent hearings into 
such serious problems as asbestosis, 
"brown lung," radiation, chemical 
agents, etc., clearly show that any 
consideration of workers' compensa- 
tion must take account of the very 
nature of the places where work is 
performed by the labor force of the 
nation. 

LOBBYING ACTIVITY 

During the hearings on the effects 
of working in an asbestos environ- 
ment, industrial representatives spent 
hours refuting medical testimony, at- 
tempting to shift causation to other 
agents, such as smoking cigarettes. 
This attitude still prevails while more 
and more cases of asbestosis and 
mesothelioma continue to show up in 
increasing numbers. This is just a 
sample of the occupational problems 
that continue to face our labor force. 
The recent cases of chemical effects 
on workers demonstrate starkly that 
our state compensation laws are woe- 
fully inadequate to cope with the 
emerging problems of occupational 
hazards. Gone are the usual yardsticks 
of traumatic injury: a broken leg, 
loss of an eye, a slipped disk. Work- 
men's compensation must reflect ALL 
the hazards that workers might face. 
To that end, I have introduced a bill 
in the Congress, the National Work- 
ers Compensation Standards Act, 
(H.R. 5482) which would implement 
all 19 of the "essential" recommenda- 
tions of the National Commission of 
State Workers Compensation Laws. 
My bill parallels the legislation intro- 
duced in the Senate by Senators Har- 
rison Williams of New Jersey and 
Jacob Javits of New York. These bills 
do not call for a Federal takeover of 
workers' compensation and they do 
not allow for Federal interference 



THE CARPENTER 



with the administration of state com- 
pensation laws. Under these bills, if 
a state did not meet Federal minimum 
standards and a worker was deprived 
of compensation due under Federal 
standards, he or she could file a claim 
for redress with the Benefits Review 
Board of the Department of Labor. 
However, the greatest effect of the 
passage of such legislation would be 
to galvanize the states to upgrade their 
administration and bring their stand- 
ards up to par. In 20 of the states, a 
worker who is permanently and totally 
disabled can receive benefits as little 
as $25 per week. In some states, if a 
worker is killed on the job, his widow 
can receive no more than $90 per 
week, no matter what the size of her 
family and irrespective of her own 
ability to find work. In a number of 
states, whole classes of workers are 
totally excluded from receiving any 
compensation benefits from an occu- 
pational injury or disease. 

Most importantly, we must recog- 
nize the disturbing fact that we do not 
know what the long-term health effects 
will be from worker exposure to many 
substances commonly used in the 
workplace. Such was the case only 
40 years ago with regard to asbestos 
and our failure to act in that instance 
has not only spawned an occupational 
disease epidemic of major proportions 
but also threatens to bankrupt the 
companies responsible for its manu- 
facture. Rather than repeating this 
mistake by simply waiting for another 
disaster in occupational health, we 
should act now to provide economic 
protection for both the worker and 
the employer. 

UNION EXPERTISE 

One of the most encouraging obser- 
vations I made during our hearings 
last year was the extraordinary ex- 
pertise and thorough grasp of the 
workplace realities of the Safety and 
Health representatives of a number of 
large unions. I think this augurs well 
for the 1980's, along with the recent 
accession to the presidency of the 
AFL-CIO of Lane Kirkland. As Mr. 
Kirkland himself said: ". . . organized 
labor is on the threshold of another 
major surge forward." I take this to 
reflect the swiftly-changing rank-and- 
file composition of our unions, 
younger people, better-educated, more 
women, minorities. A great oppor- 
tunity lies ahead for organized labor 
to once and for all rid itself of the 
lunch-pail caricature that has been 
perpetuated by anti-labor forces that 
would attempt in the 1980's to con- 
tinue the adversary relationship be- 
tween industry and labor. 




NORMAN HILL 



new Insights 

on 

Black Trade Unionists 



by NORMAN HILL 

Executive Director, 
A. Philip Randolph Institute 

Economists and other scholars have 
always differed over the consequences 
of trade unionism for black workers. 
Some academics, especially conserva- 
tive economists, have attempted to 
prove that unions harm blacks by re- 
stricting entry into skilled trades, by 
openly discriminating against non- 
whites, by scaring off new businesses 
with high wages, and by provoking 
long and costly strikes. Under close 
scrutiny, however, none of these 
changes have much credibility. 

A recently-published article, "The 
Two Faces of Unionism" by Richard 
L. Freeman and James L. Medoff of- 
fers some new insights into the black- 
labor relationship. The article, which 
appears in the Fall issue of The Public 
Interest, convincingly challenges the 
notion that unions are enemies of 
black people. Indeed, Freeman and 
Medoff, both of them faculty members 
at Harvard University, present some 
solid data indicating that union mem- 
bership is a valuable asset for black 
workers. 

Increased income and superior 
fringe benefits are the most important 
advantages enjoyed by black union 
members. For example, blacks who 
work in unionized plants earn approxi- 
mately 35% more than their counter- 
parts in non-union shops. And, as 
Freeman and Medoff point out, the 
fringe benefits of union members are 
worth 14% more than the benefits 
offered to non-union workers. The big- 
gest differences in fringe benefits are 
in life and health insurance coverage 
(48% more for union members), pen- 
sions (21% higher), and vacation pay 
(19% more). 

Trade unions also help to narrow 
the income gap between black and 
white workers. Whereas non-union 
blacks earned 15% less than non- 
union whites, the gap between black 



and white union members in blue- 
collar occupation was 9%. 

Freeman and Medoff explain this 
lower black/white gap by pointing out 
that "unionization reduces discrimina- 
tory differences within organized firms 
through the standard-rate and promo- 
tion by seniority policies." In other 
words, union contracts which specify 
wage rates for each job, and which 
establish a clear seniority system for 
advancement effectively prevent em- 
ployers from discriminating by race. 

Moreover, black trade unionists 
who encounter racial discrimination 
at the hands of an employer can chal- 
lenge their bosses through the griev- 
ance process outlined in the union 
contract. Blacks in non-union firms, 
however, must turn to outside legal 
action which can be both costly and 
slow. 

As to the claim that unions attempt 
to restrict black membership, the 
Harvard economists present data 
showing that blacks are more likely 
than whites to be union members. At 
the present time, about 30% of all 
blacks are union members, while only 
about 24% of white workers hold 
union cards. 

Even in the prestigious construction 
unions, blacks and other minority 
groups have made significant advances. 
According to Freeman and Medoff, 
18.1% of apprenticeships in the 
skilled trades were held by minority 
workers in 1976. 

In light of all this, it seems to me 
that the mutually beneficial relation- 
ship between blacks and trade unions 
will become stronger in the coming 
years as even more blacks enter unions 
with the hope of improving their eco- 
nomic position, and of protecting their 
jobs. After all, black workers, even 
without reading the statistics in the 
Freeman-Medoff article, have long 
understood trade unionism: they know 
that it pays — and pays handsomely — 
to have a union card. 



APRIL, 1980 



Washington 
Report 




1 1 1 1 1 



Jm 




HUMPHREY-HAWKINS ON HOLD 

The Full Employment Action Council 
has assailed President Carter's de- 
cision to postpone the 4% unemployment 
goal called for under the Humphrey- 
Hawkins Act. 

The Council — a coalition of labor, 
church and civil rights groups — has 
urged Carter to reconsider and the 
Congress to reaffirm the goals: a 4% 
jobless rate and a 3% inflation rate 
by 1983. 

Carter, in sending his Fiscal 1981 
budget and Economic Report to Congress, 
said last year's "huge OPEC oil price 
increases" made the economic outlook 
worse and the Humphrey-Hawkins goals 
"no longer practicable." Therefore, 
he added, he decided to extend the 
4% jobless goal to 1985 and the 3% 
inflation goal to 1988. 

Murray Finley, president of the 
Clothing and Textile Workers and co- 
chairperson of the Coalition, called 
Carter's action "economically wrong" 
and "morally wrong. " 



DAVIS-BACON MOVE REJECTED 

The House of Representatives re- 
cently beat down a new attack on the 
Davis Bacon Act by a decisive 266-130 
margin. 

The test came on a proposed amend- 
ment to a labor-supported bill that 
would set up a $1.2 billion "counter- 
cyclical" program to help local and 
state governments maintain public 
services during a recession. 

Rep. Robert S. Walker (R-Pa. ) tried 
to delete the bill's requirement that 
any construction funded by the federal 
grants must comply with Davis-Bacon 
Act requirements for local prevailing 
wages and benefits. 

Only a hardcore of the House con- 
servative coalition voted with Walker 
on the issue. His amendment was sup- 
ported by 93 Republicans and 37 Demo- 
crats. It was beaten by the votes of 
215 Democrats and 51 Republicans. 



PRODUCTIVITY UP, DOWN 

The nation's productivity declined 
by 0.9% during 1979, marking only the 
second time since 1947 that such an 
annual decline occurred, the Bureau 
of Labor Statistics reported. However, 
factory productivity rose 1.8% last 
year. 

The 0.9% fall in national produc- 
tivity was the result of an increase 
in output of only 2.3% and a 3.3% rise 
in hours of all persons. 

The 1.8% rise in manufacturing pro- 
ductivity last year resulted from a 
4.0% gain in output and a 2.2% increase 
in hours worked. Unit labor costs rose 
7.2% over the year. 

Within the manufacturing sector, 
durable goods productivity was up 
0.9% in 1979 while productivity of 
nondurable goods was up 3.1%. 



TWO LABOR MILESTONES 

The U.S. Labor Department notes that 
1980 marks the 140th anniversary of 
the establishment of the 10-hour day 
in the U.S. Union carpenters played a 
legendary role in achieving the 10-hour 
day, and they led the fight later 
for an 8-hour day. 

It also will be the 100th anniversary 
of the first employee suggestion box. 
Lemuel Boulware , General Electric' s 
union-hating labor management expert, 
once said that the only contribution 
that suggestion boxes ever turned 
up was to make workers "increasingly 
fluent in their obscene characteriza- 
tions of management." 



AID TO AUTO WORKERS 

Labor Secretary Ray Marshall has 
approved Michigan's request for a $280 
million federal loan to cover unem- 
ployment insurance benefit payments to 
jobless workers through April. Spread- 
ing auto plant layoffs have worsened 
the state's situation. 

The loan request came at a time when 
many states experience their highest 
benefit claim loads, according to the 
Labor Department. The loan will provide 
Michigan with immediate financial 
relief until sometime this month, when 
it is projected that tax receipts will 
begin to exceed benefit payments. 



B 



THE CARPENTER 



HFL-CIO Winter meetings Tackle 1980 Issues 



The highest governing body in the 
American labor movement, the AFL-CIO 
Executive Council, and the executive 
boards of various departments and affili- 
ates convened in Bal Harbour, Fla., in 
February for their regular winter meet- 
ings. 

A full agenda of domestic and foreign 
issues was debated and acted upon. 
Among the actions taken were the fol- 
lowing: 

• Congress was urged to act quickly 



to stem the sharp downturn in housing 
construction. 

• The AFL-CIO reminded the Carter 
Administration of its participation in the 
program of voluntary wage and price 
restraints, but it warned that, if the vol- 
untary program fails, labor continues to 
support a system of mandatory controls 
that will cover all sources of income. 

• The AFL-CIO reiterated its support 
for a strong national defense program for 
the US. 



• It called for a full inquiry into the 
vast and continuing abuse of corporate 
power, wealth and influence in legislative 
bodies and the marketplace. 

• Five Building Trades unions — the 
United Brotherhood, the Ironworkers, the 
Asbestos Workers, the Marble Polishers, 
and the Plasterers — went on record as 
supporting the re-election of Jimmy Car- 
ter as President of the United States, 
bringing the total number of unions which 
have come out for Carter to 15. 




The Brotherhood's General Executive Board assembled for business 
sessions in Florida prior to the AFL-CIO Executive Council meetings. 
Above, US Labor Secretary Ray Marshall, at the far end of the table, 
discusses domestic economic issues with board members. 



General President William Konyha, at the left side of 
the table, participates in a meeting of the Governing 
Board of Presidents of the AFL-CIO Building and 
Construction Trades Department. 




The AFL-CIO Executive Council in session. Again, Labor 
Secretary Ray Marshall, center foreground, is a guest. Beside 
him are AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland and Secretary- 
Treasurer Thomas Donahue. 



General President William Konyha participates in a meeting of 
the AFL-CIO Maritime Trades executive board for the first 
time since his election to that body earlier this year. 




The AFL-CIO's Committee on Political Education (COPE) 
took up the political issues of 1980. Sitting in a session, from 
left, Milan Marsh, representing the Ohio State Federation of 
Labor; General Treasurer Charles Nichols; and General 
Secretary John Rogers. 



A press conference was held with leaders of the Building Trades 
unions which have endorsed President Jimmy Carter for 
re-election. Among those participating were John Lyons of the 
Iron Workers, left; J. C. Turner of the Operating Engineers; 
General President Konyha; and leaders of three other unions. 



APRIL, 1980 




State and local 
Central Bodies 
Bre [enters 
far much 
Union action 



Your local union's ties with state and local central labor bodies 
strengthen your political action, aid in collective bargaining, 
and offer quick assistance in time of major disaster. 



When you become a member of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America you become, 
though affiliations and dedication, a 
member of the entire North American 
labor movement. 

In the opening paragraphs of the 
Brotherhood's Constitution and Laws, 
Section 3, "Our Principles," it states: 

"We, as a body, pledge ourselves to 
give full support to the objects of the 
American Federation of Labor and 
Congress of Industrial Organizations 
and the Canadian Labour Congress 
consistent with the objects and prin- 
ciples of the United Brotherhood and 
its Constitution and Laws." 

Then, if you'll turn back to Section 
62 and "Affiliations" you'll find it 
stated in part: "It is the duty of all 
local unions to affiliate with the appro- 
priate central, state, and provincial 
bodies of the AFL-CIO and Canadian 
Labour Congress. . . . All local unions 
shall affiliate with all provincial, state 
and local Building and Construction 
Trades Councils where such bodies 
exist unless good and sufficient reason 
for not becoming so affiliated, or re- 
maining so affiliated, is furnished to 
the General President, and the Gen- 
eral President grants an exemption 
from such affiliation." 

There are in the United States today 
50 state central bodies, and in every 
province of Canada there are compar- 
able provincial labor bodies. 

There are also in the United States 
744 local central bodies. The AFL- 
CIO secretary-treasurer reported to 
the recent AFL-CIO Biennial Conven- 
tion in Washington, D.C., that six new 
central bodies were granted charters in 
the past two years and that eight cen- 
tral bodies were merged to form four 
central bodies. Two central bodies 
were reinstated, and five central bodies 
were disbanded. 

The local central body is the grass- 



roots command post and listening post 
of the labor movement. Each local 
union of Carpenters, Millwrights, 
Painters, Electricians, Clothing Work- 
ers, etc., sends delegates to each cen- 
tral body. Usually there is a single 
central labor body for a single city. It 
sometimes draws together not only the 
affiliates of the AFL-CIO and/or the 
CLC, but also representatives of un- 
ions outside the Federations — the 
Teamsters, the Auto Workers, and, 
sometimes, the Miners, for example. 

Why join hands with other trade 
unions? Sometimes your union has dis- 
putes with some of these unions over 
jurisdictional matters. There are also 
times when you're organizing the same 
unorganized workers. Why let bygones 
be bygones at other times? 

Because these differences among un- 
ions are eventually settled. The un- 
organized are organized. The question 




A typical phone bank of trade union 
volunteers, set up by an area labor 
federation during a recent election to 
push voter registration and get out the 
vote on election day. 



of who does what work will be re- 
solved. 

What remains . . . and what always 
remains . . . are the mutually shared 
problems of organized labor: oppres- 
sive laws affecting wage earners, un- 
fair competition in the marketplace 
from "scab" products and services, 
frequent calls from health and welfare 
agencies for help in time of public 
disaster. 

In addition to the central labor body 
— sometimes called the CLC for cen- 
tral labor council, or by some other 
title — there are other central, citywide 
or areawide labor bodies. The Union 
Labor Trades have their local Union 
Label Councils. The Building and Con- 
struction Trades have their central 
bodies . . . which sometimes bargain 
on a citywide basis. The Maritime 
Trades Department of the AFL-CIO, 
with which the Brotherhood is affili- 
ated, has its Port Councils. The AFL- 
CIO Community Services Department 
has Community Services groups at the 
local level working with the United 
Way, the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, 
and scores of other volunteer groups. 

A primary purpose of state and lo- 
cal central bodies is to combat oppres- 
sive legislation at the state and city 
level. Twenty states in the US have 
"Right to Work" laws which deny 
union shop protections. Many states 
do not have programs of workmens 
compensation or unemployment com- 
pensation which meet federal stand- 
ards. 

The central body's fight for good 
labor legislation through political ac- 
tion — pushing voter registration, get- 
ting the labor vote out on election 
days, making speakers available to 
public groups, promoting labor's 
cause through the media of communi- 
cations. 

The national US political arm of 
Labor is COPE — the Committee on 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



Political Education. COPE works with 
state and central COPE committees 
throughout the United States, and it 
joins forces with such international- 
union political groups as our own 
CLIC — the Carpenters Legislative Im- 
provement Committee. 

Some of the strongest support for 
the work of state, provincial and local 
central bodies comes from women 
members and ladies auxiliaries. Many 
of the Brotherhood auxiliaries have 
conducted letter-writing campaigns — 
addressing the grievances of the labor 
movement to state and federal legisla- 
tors. They have been the most depend- 
able workers in voter registration 
drives and in working phone banks, 
telephoning members and urging them 
to join them in political activities for 
the good of all wage earners and their 
families. 

The annals of the Brotherhood are 
filled with instances of Brotherhood 
leadership in the work of central 
bodies. They are the first to respond 
when the Red Cross and state agencies 
ask for volunteers to rebuild after na- 
tural disasters like Hurricane Agnes, 
Camille, and Hazel. When tornadoes 
tore through the Southwest and Middle 
West, it was the Brotherhood locals 
who got the crews together and reha- 
bilitated the devastated communities. 

The AFL-CIO Department of Or- 
ganization points out that many state 
bodies are headed by Brotherhood 
leaders serving as president or secre- 
tary-treasurer. They cite states like 
Alaska, Georgia, Hawaii, Ohio, and 
Missouri — where the head man carries 
a Brotherhood card. 

Continued on page 14 

Brotherhood members join with other 
Buildings Tradesmen and the Red Cross 
to supply emergency housing for 
disaster victims. Here they build new 
homes for victims of Hurricane Camille. 




When the jobless rate reached 8% in New Jersey a few years ago it was the state 
labor federation and the state Building and Construction Trades Council which 
planned and coordinated this demonstration of 30,000 workers at the State House 
in Trenton. . 




PLEASE DONT BUY fL 

IMPORTED MENS CLOTHING C tarfl 

SOLD HERE BBBm 

No local boycott is effective without the support of the members of other unions. The 
AFL-CIO Union Label and Service Trades Department tries to maintain local label 
councils to work with every central labor body — promoting union-made products 
and union services. They are most effective in consumer boycotts. 




APRIL, 1980 



11 



Ottawa 
Report 




LABOR'S ELECTION GAINS 

This month, the Trudeau Administra- 
tion begins to function at the federal 
level, and Canadian labour is taking a 
somewhat "wait and see" attitude, 
slowly but surely gaining legislative 
strength in the provinces with the New 
Democratic Party. 

Joe Clark's Conservatives were able 
to do little to reduce the nation's 
high unemployment and continued 
inflation, and Prime Minister Trudeau 
returns to the same problems he left 
behind him last year. 

Ed Broadbent and the NDP increased 
the party's standings by 5 seats in the 
Parliament, from 27 to 32, while 
increasing the popular vote from 17% 
to about 20%. Though the NDP lost some 
ground in the east, it picked up 
strength in the west — two additional 
seats in Manitoba and two more in 
Saskatchewan. In British Columbia, NDP 
took 12 of the 28 seats, increasing 
its seats by four. 

Canadian Labour Congress President 
Dennis McDermott pledged continued 
support for the NDP, saying that "the 
steady gains made by the party in the 
past 12 months points to an encouraging 
future for the NDP." 

CLC CONVENTION IN MAY 

The Canadian Labour Congress assem- 
bles in convention on May 4 in 
Winnipeg, Man., and the Brotherhood 
expects to have a full contingent of 
delegates on hand for the delibera- 
tions. 

CLC President Dennis McDermott 
indicates that the CLC expects to 
hammer out a strong and detailed slate 
of proposals to present to the Trudeau 
Administration and the Parliament 
later this year. 



'80 BARGAINING HEAVY 

Ministry of Labour report says col- 
lective bargaining heavy in 1980. 

A report issued by the Research 
Branch of the Ontario Ministry of 
Labour indicates that collective bar- 
gaining will be heavier in 1980 than 
in 1979. 

The Research Branch's thirteenth 
annual report of collective agreement 
expirations says that 3,270 agreements 
covering 587,000 employees will expire 
in 1980, compared to 2,210 agreements 
covering 398,000 employees in 1979. 

The report notes that 89 of the 
agreements set to expire next year 
cover bargaining units of 1,000 or 
more employees totalling 45% of all 
employees who will be negotiating new 
contracts. 

Key industries affected by contract 
expirations next year include con- 
struction, pulp and paper, rubber, 
food and beverage, retail trade, elec- 
trical products, health services, and 
government. 

The report notes that negotiations 
in 1980 will take place in an economic 
climate marked by continuing high 
unemployment and increasing inflation. 

Concerning the outlook for collective 
agreement settlements, the report 
states that adequate protection against 
inflation, improved pensions and job 
security will be among the key issues 
in 1980 negotiations. 



QUEBEC HEALTH AND SAFETY 

Quebec's new Health and Safety Act 
is being recognized as a major victory 
for workers everywhere. 

The new law was adopted recently 
after months of extensive debate and 
public hearings in Quebec's National 
Assembly. It followed one of the 
strongest political campaigns in the 
Quebec Federation of Labour's history, 
a four year series of technical briefs, 
public conferences and industrial 
strikes. 

One goal of the new law is to let 
Quebec catch up with recent legal im- 
provements in other Canadian provinces. 
During the last five years in Sas- 
katchewan, Manitoba, British Columbia 
and elsewhere there has been a trend 
towards better health and safety laws 
with stronger protection of worker 
rights. Quebec, and some other prov- 
inces such as Ontario and Nova Scotia, 
did not keep pace with this trend. 
The new Act, in one full sweep, brings 
Quebec's health and safety law up to 
date. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



mEmBERS in the news 



"*< 



MEMBERS 100th BIRTHDAY 

As the Brotherhood makes plans for its big centen- 
nial anniversary, it realizes that a lot can happen in 
100 years! C. A. Ingalls of Local 
470, Tacoma, Wash., could prob- 
ably vouch for that. On October 
22, 1979, he celebrated his 100th 
birthday. 

Ingalls was initiated into Local 
470 on October 26, 1933, and he 
still remains an active and en- 
thusiastic union member. He is a 
"young at heart" centenarian and 
keeps fit by bowling once a week. 
As of June, 1978, there were 
approximately 11,900 people in the United States who 
were at least 100 years old. Of these, 72% were female, 
leaving only 3,332 who were male. 

Perhaps longevity is a characteristic of union car-' 
penters! We know of two other Brotherhood members 
who have witnessed the passage of a century. Knute 
Rye of Local 80, Chicago, 111., reached the age of 100 
on June 30, 1979. In 1978, John Nordstrom of Whis- 
pering Pines, Ind., celebrated his 101st birthday and 
became the oldest living carpenter known in his state! 




BANJO WITH A HOLE 



Mark S. Cox of Local 3 19, Roanoke, Va., has an invention 
which will open the eyes . . . and ears ... of bluegrass 
music lovers. By cutting a hole into the head of a banjo, he 

has discovered a way to direct 
the clear sound of his music 
out to the audience rather 
than "out the back door." 

The hole sits at a 60-degree 
angle from the center of the 
customized head, which he 
calls, after himself, the 
"Coxhead." Banjoes often 
do not project the higher 
pitched notes purely, but the 
Coxhead "works miracles . . . 
makes a banjo clear." 

Several years ago, Cox 
discussed his invention with 
Don Reno, the "legendary king of the five-string banjo," and 
asked him for his support and professional opinion. At 
this time, the hole was in the center of the head, similar to 
a guitar. Reno played the banjo and liked the sound, but 
suggested that a hole in a different place might project 
an even clearer sound. Cox decided to move the hole 
off-center to its present position. 

Don Reno was convinced enough of the "soundness" of 
Cox's invention to use it at a New York University concert, 
in front of a large audience. Upon breaking a string on his 
Coxhead, he was forced to resort to his own, expensive banjo 
for the remainder of the concert. Later, when playing a 
tape-recording of the concert, he was amazed at the difference 
in sounds of the two banjoes — the Coxhead projected a 
much stronger sound. 

Mark Cox hesitates to describe the procedure he uses to 
cut the hole into the banjo head. He does admit that he 
uses an O-ring, but as for the rest, he says, "Well, I ain't going 
to tell nobody." 










Jagodzinski's furnace completed, left above, and Jagodzinski 
himself, right, at his regular job. 



WOOD-BURNING FURNACE 

Ben lagodzinski of Local 210, Stamford, Conn., has 
figured out a way to "beat the fuel crunch." He has built a 
"Super Wood Burning Furnace" which he states, will 
adequately heat a 12-room house and at the same time cut 
heating bills from 50% to 70% a year. 

Jagodzinski's furnace is practically cost-free to operate, for 
it runs on scrap wood, a material easily obtainable by a 
carpenter. Says Jagodzinski, "This furnace is just what a man 
who works with wood needs to smash those high heating 
bills." In addition, it is good for all hot water systems, and 
it can either be operated alone or tied into another system. 

Jagodzinski claims that his system can be easily installed 
"by a good carpenter mechanic who has had some welding 
and cutting torch experience." Working a few hours a day, 
it only took him a week to install his own furnace. 

Any member interested in obtaining information or plans 
of this wood burning furnace (at a price) may write to: 
"The Super Wood Burning Furnace," P.O. Box 2056, 
Glenbrook, Conn. 06906. 



LIFE SAVING ON THE JOB 



On January 2, 1979, a frightening accident occurred on a 
construction site at 4555 North Pershing Avenue, Stockton, 
Calif. William Wilds of Local 266 fell to the ground while 

working on the roof of a 
building under construction. 
His breathing had stopped. 
Jr. Tankersley, a fellow 
construction worker, surveyed 
the situation and, without 
hesitation, began to resusci- 
tate the victim. His efforts 
were only momentarily 
successful, and he was forced 
to repeat the procedure. 
Finally, he was able to restore 
and sustain Wild's breathing. 

Without a doubt, 
Tankersley's quick and 
skillful actions enabled him 
to save Wild's life. The 
Stockton City Fire Depart- 
ment and its paramedic personnel sent a letter of commen- 
dation to Jr. Tankersley, indicating that he was "an 
individual possessing a deep concern for his fellow man." 

Tankersley received an award from his district council for 
his performance. Pictured in the photograph are, from left 
to right, Jr. Tankersley; Dennis Johnson, president of Local 
266; and Norvell (Mack) McClellan, executive secretary, 
Delta- Yosemite District Council. 




APRIL, 1980 



13 



UUE COnCRHTUlRTE 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



ENOUGH FOR TWO 



HANDICAP SHELTER 

Several years ago. volunteers from the 
Kansas State Council of Carpenters 
donated their time and talent to prepare 
an outdoor recreation area in Sycamore 
Valley, Kans., with all facilities designed 
for the convenience of handicapped per- 
sons. 

The Kansas State Federation of Labor 
raised the necessary funds for the project. 
Union carpenters voluntarily worked 
under the leadership of Kansas State 
Council Secretary-Treasurer Morris East- 
land, Kaw Valley District Council Presi- 
dent Lloyd Jenkins, and Local 1445, 
Topeka, Kans., Business Representative 
Dan Workman. They constructed a shel- 
ter house, built and stocked a lake, and 
erected a fishing dock. 

The project has been very successful. 
In 1978, 36 handicapped people attended 
a Christmas party in the shelter, and in 
the summer of 1979, more than 75 went 
to a barbecue. 

The shelter house is too small, how- 
ever, to accommodate the growing num- 
ber of individuals who want and deserve 
to enjoy the facilities. Kansas State Fed- 
eration of Labor Executive Vice Presi- 
dent James Yount recently indicated that 
the building for the handicapped will be 
expanded. The State Federation has be- 
gun a campaign to raise the necessary 
funds for the expansion project. Money 
and volunteers are welcome. 



MAYOR, RETIREE 

A year ago, A. D. McKenna decided 
to retire with Mrs. McKenna to the lit- 
tle Colorado mountain community of 
Ridgway, population 
, 300, when he put 

away his tools in 
Las Vegas, Nev., 
jl and became an in- 
active member of 
. Local 1780. He had 
1 been recording sec- 
^^rm«A- »- retary for 10 years, 

W.M xSW^^fci president and busi- 

,, ,, ness agent for five 

McKenna ° , 

years, and assistant 

business agent for two years. From 1965 
to 1978 he headed up the apprenticeship 
training program in Las Vegas. 

Retirement didn't last long. The elders 
of Ridgway decided to make him a town 
trustee and a building inspector. Re- 
cently, they went all the way, naming 
him mayor and putting him in full 
charge of the town administration. 



LABOR TALK AT VMI 




General Representative Richard 
Griffin, at right in the picture, recently 
delivered an evening lecture on labor- 
management relations at Virginia Mili- 
tary Institute, Lexington, Va. He spoke 
to a labor economics class taught by 
Col. A. H. Morrison, center. A student 
attending was Ins son, Pat Griffin, a cadet 
lieutenant, who is shown at left in the 
picture. A lively discussion among the 
students followed Griffin's talk. 



GEORGE MEANY AWARD 




Howard Carl, member of Local 1559, 
Muscatine, la., was recently presented 
the George Meany A ward for his contri- 
butions to Scouting. 

In a ceremony at the Muscatine Trades 
and Labor Assembly, Carl received a 
special medallion from the AFL-CIO 
citing him for his "outstanding service to 
youth." 

Bro. Carl put in 43 years of service to 
youth through Scouting, and held many 
Scouting positions. Awards include 
Silver Beaver, District Merit Award, 
Nazareth Cross, Scoutcr's Key, Com- 
missioner's Arrowhead, and the Eisen- 
hower Award. 

Carl retired in 1968 and has been a 
member of Local 1559 for 36 years. 

In the picture from left to right are 
Jim Kramer, president, Muscatine Trades 
and Labor Assembly; Howard Carl; 
Chester Hank, financial secretary Local 
1559, and Dwight Reichstcin, president 
Local 1559. 




Ladies Auxiliaries 539 and 875 have 
an annual Las Vegas Night to raise 
money for a scholarship for the son or 
daughter of a member of locals in the 
Milwaukee area. The scholarship is for 
$300. This year they were able to give an 
extra scholarship amounting to $100. 

The picture shows, from left, Virginia 
Berthelsen, chairman; Mrs. Risse, mother 
of Linda, who received the extra award 
of $100; Karen McShane, winner of the 
$300 scholarship; and Mrs. Hildegarde 
Gage, president of Ladies Aux. 875. 



Did You Know? 

Continued from page 11 

When Missouri faced the threat of a 
"Right to Work" referendum, orga- 
nized labor in that state banded to- 
gether to defeat the union wreckers. 
In Kansas City, where the central 
body was not functioning, local Broth- 
erhood leaders revived the central or- 
ganization and went on to beat the 
referendum. 

AFL-CIO organizers tell us that 
Carpenters have a "lot of talent" at the 
state and central level, and they appre- 
ciate their leadership. 

Unfortunately, with hard times 
upon the industries we serve, and in- 
flation making inroads, many local and 
district units of the Brotherhood are 
finding it hard to stay in good stand- 
ing with their central bodies. Per 
capita dues, over and above those paid 
to the international union, are some- 
times hard to come by. 

Yet, state and central bodies are 
vital to the existence of the North 
American labor movement. Labor 
cannot match, dollar for dollar, all of 
the political and lobbying activities of 
the big corporations. Nor can it mount 
mobile task forces of workers to run 
all over the continent doing the things 
which local people do best at the local 
level. 

In essence, labor has manpower and 
womanpower, and, when all is said 
and done, that strength lies at the 
state and local level. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 




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local union news 



Pension-Hike Rally, 
Westinghouse Plant 

Approximately 20 Westinghouse re- 
tirees and members of Local 3130 par- 
ticipated in a recent lunch-hour rally in 
front of the Westinghouse plant at 
Hampton, S.C. The demonstration was 
part of a coordinated national effort by 
Westinghouse local unions to get the 
company to negotiate on pension in- 
creases for its retired employees. 

The retirees were asking for the 7% 
increase which General Electric retirees 
received in May, 1979. Some Westing- 
house retirees receive as little as $90 a 
month retirement benefits because of the 
low wages they earned a decade ago when 
they retired. 

The local union has a Christmas party 
for all retirees every year. In recent years 
the company has joined in the annual 
recognition. 



y 


i 


W 





1 In 5A 




irir 




T%J^ 







Among those at the lunch-hour rally were 
Arthur Phillips, Marjorie McAlhaney, 
and Eunice Priester. 




Displaying placards in Hampton were 
James DeLoach, Jake Freeman, and 
Cowan Tuten, business representative. 



Members Warned: No 
Alaska Gas Line Work 

A fraud is being perpetrated on con- 
struction workers seeking work in Alaska. 
Edward Perkowski, business representa- 
tive of Local 1243, Fairbanks, Alaska, 
tells about it in a recent letter to the 
General Office: 

"For the past several months, we have 
been beseiged with telephone calls and 
inquiries about work on an Alaska gas 
line," Perkowski writes. 

"These inquiries are the result of false 
newspaper advertising. For $10 or $15, 
by writing to a box number, the unsus- 
pecting applicant is promised a list of 
contractors to write to for high-paying 
jobs on the gas line 'available now.' Usu- 
ally these addresses are nothing more 
than the addresses of the various local 
unions. 

"We are asking you to inform the 
business agents and members of our Car- 
penters locals of this fraud." Needless 
money is being spent on long distance 
telephone calls and trips to Alaska. 

"There is no gas line being built at 
this time. It is very much in the "talking" 
stage, no money is available for con- 
struction nor has the planning been done. 
If the line is built at all, it will be well 
into 1982 or 1983. The work on the gas 
line will not come close to employing the 
number of men that the oil pipeline did. 
Both Fairbanks and Anchorage are highly 
depressed areas with the result that some 
of our own members have gone else- 
where seeking employment." 

Stamford Local 210 
Digs Up Its History 

In preparation for the Brotherhood's 
100th anniversary, Local 210 of Stam- 
ford, Conn., has undertaken a project 
to investigate and record its own local 
union history. It hopes to receive assist- 
ance from academic and governmental 
agencies in this effort. The local will 
study minutes of past meetings and rec- 
ords that go back to almost the turn of 
the century. In addition, it will conduct 
an extensive program of interviewing old- 
er members to gather information about 
early union days. Little has been written 
on the history of individual local unions. 
The Brotherhood commends Local 210 
for its efforts and encourages other locals 
to join in commemorating this special 
event which is now only one year away. 



When you see the Union Label, you 
know the workers who made that product 
enjoy fair wages and working conditions. 



NY Wins Bond Issue 




Volunteers from Brotherhood locals 
in the New York City area manned a 
telephone bank at NYC Central Labor 
Council offices recently, getting union 
members out to vote for a state bond 
issue (Proposition One) which will create 
jobs and improve mass transportation in 
the state. 

"There is no doubt in my mind that the 
hundreds of thousands of union members 
across the state who voted in favor of 
Proposition One made the difference," 
says New York State AFL-CIO Presi- 
dent Ray Corbet t. 



Busy Retirement 




-Sh 




Russell Dennewitz of Chillicothe, O., 
will be SO in October. He retired from 
Local 1255 after 42 years of membership, 
but he continues to ply his trade in his 
home workshop. In the picture above, 
he and Mrs. Dennewitz display a hutch 
he built. He also produces tool boxes for 
workers at the Mead Paper Co. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



Visalia, Calif., Local 
In Historic Building 

There was a wedding in Local 1109's 
union hall, last year. The bride wore 
candlelight beige, and the congregation 
was hushed as Carpenter Apprentice 
Willie Russell married Denise Johnson. 

Russell and his bride were married in 
ceremonies performed by Russell's father, 
who is pastor to a small church congre- 
gation which rents the union hall for 
weekly services. 

The Russell-Johnson wedding was one 
of many functions performed in the 100- 
year history of the historic old building 
which houses offices of Local 1 109, Visa- 
lia, Calif. The Visalia Labor Temple, as 
it is called, was built about 1876 as a 
stately residence for a wealthy Califor- 
nian, according to a history of the build- 
ing written by Roy Brooks, a long-time 
owner. 

Brooks tells of a conversation he had 
with an old teamster who claimed the 
house was built of redwood lumber 
brought down from a Sierra Nevada 
Mountain sawmill in Tulare County. 

The teamster said he personally had 
driven the six-horse or mule team which 
brought the lumber to the young San 
Joaquin Valley community. 

The house was owned by the Superior 
Court judge of the county — Wheaton A. 
Gray — but when Gray was appointed to 




On Christmas Eve, 1954, flood waters 
lapped at the door to Local 1109's offices 
in the historic Visalia, Calif., Labor 
Temple. 

the appellate bench in Los Angeles, the 
property was sold to a family named 
Cutler, the teamster told Brooks. 

The house was sold by the Cutlers to 
Brooks' parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert 
Ellis Brooks, about 1920. The younger 
Brooks, who did not live in Visalia at 
the time of the purchase, eventually 
joined his father to form A. E. Brooks 
and Son, Funeral Directors. 

His father had begun as an undertaker, 
Brooks said, in Visalia in 1903 and 
needed a larger chapel on a quiet street. 

He converted the Cutler home to a 
funeral parlor, adding two large rooms 
to the original building. The large room 
on the School Street side became the 



chapel and the room on the south side of 
the original structure was used to display 
caskets and other funeral merchandise. 

The younger Brooks served as county 
coroner and public administrator for 16 
years and used one of the upstairs rooms 
for his offices. 

"In those years — from about 1932 to 
about 1952, this building served very 
well, but 'as all things human change' 
improvements were planned . . . and the 
old quarters downtown (were) to be put 
on the market," Brooks said. 

At this point the carpenters entered the 
picture, and the story of the Visalia 
Labor Temple is taken up by Charles E. 
Nichols, now general treasurer of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters, but 
who in the early 50s was business repre- 
sentative of the Tulare-Kings Counties 
Building and Construction Trades Coun- 
cil. 

Nichols noted that Carpenters Local 
1484 — predecessor of Local 1109 — was 
chartered in 1903 and housed in rented 
quarters for 50 years. 

In 1953, however, a group of unions — 
carpenters, laborers, painters and plaster- 
ers and cement masons — formed a com- 
mittee to purchase a labor temple. 

Nichols was elected chairman of the 
committee and as he recalls: 

"It was the only labor temple that I 
know of at that time which had wall-to- 

Continued on Page 19 




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APRIL, 1980 



17 



Big Business Day, April 1 7, 
To Expose Corporate 'Crimes' 

A broad coalition of labor, consumer, religious and en- 
vironmental groups has unveiled plans aimed at curbing what 
it calls the corporate abuse of power. 

The coalition set April 17 as "Big Business Day" to make 
the public more aware of, in the words of sponsor Ralph 
Nader, "the corporate crime epidemic that is sweeping the 
country." 

The coalition also released an analysis which proposed a 
"Corporate Democracy Act" to make big businesses more 
accountable to workers, consumers, communities and share- 
holders. 

"Just as the 1950s scrutinized the labor movement and the 
1970s big government, this 'Day' will mark the 1980s as the 
decade to correct the abuses of big business," declared Wil- 
liam Wynn, president of the million-member United Food 
and Commercial Workers. 

"We in the labor movement think it's time for a Landrum- 
Griffin Act for big business," Wynn added. 

The Landrum-Griffin Act of 1959 was enacted' following 
the exposure of abuses in some unions. It imposed certain 
procedures and disclosure requirements, mainly on unions. 

Robert A. Georgine, president of the AFL-CIO Building 
and Construction Trades Dept., said in a statement issued at 
a news conference that the building trades have put "control 
of corporate power on the top of our agenda for the 1980s." 

Georgine said corporations are attacking construction 
unions, seeking the repeal of Davis-Bacon prevailing wage 
laws as well as job health and safety laws, and supporting 
anti-worker candidates in political campaigns. 

William Olwell, UFCW vice-president who spoke for Wynn 
at the news briefing, said the coalition is not against corpora- 
tions as such but the "management cadre" which has no 
regard for stockholders, employees or the nation. He said 
plant closings and runaway plants are "a serious problem." 

James Farmer, executive director of the Coalition of 
American Public Employees, expressed alarm over corpora- 
tions which, he said, "strip-mine" the cities by exploiting the 
advantages of public services until they decide to fight pub- 
lic spending and move on. 

Nader stressed that the proposed "Corporate Democracy 
Act" is not regulatory — it does not create a new federal 
agency. Rather, he said, it aims to establish principles of 
accountability. 

The proposed law would cover about 800 of the biggest 
companies — those with more than 5,000 employees or more 
than $250 million in assets or sales. 

It would provide for less corporate secrecy, ample notifica- 
tion to workers on plant closings, free speech and "whistle- 
blower" protection for workers, greater shareholder rights, 
an independent majority on boards of directors and stiffer 
criminal penalties for corporate criminal conduct, 

Three key Democrats announced they would support busi- 
ness reform legislation. 

Senator Howard M. Metzenbaum (D-Ohio) said he has 
ordered the staff of his Senate Antitrust Subcommittee to 
pursue corporate governance legislation. Metzenbaum also 
said he would soon introduce plant closing legislation. 

Rep. Benjamin Rosenthal (D-N.Y.) said "excessive cor- 
porate power is on the verge of overwhelming our political 
and government institutions." To reverse this "dangerous 
trend," he said he would introduce a Corporate Democracy 
Act and open subcommittee hearings early next year. 

Rep. Frank Thompson, Jr. (D-N.J.) said he would spon- 
sor a version of corporate reform and hold hearings on 
relevant provisions before his Subcommittee on Labor- 
Management Relations. 

Over 200 groups will be promoting Big Business Day. 

Economist John Kenneth Galbraith, one of the sponsors, 
said: "Because I would like to see big business better under- 
stood, I urge that we all take a day to see how it sets prices, 
persuades consumers, influences legislation and otherwise 
plans our lives." 



Members on the March 



WRPEN' 







When members of Local 1256, Sarnia, Out., marched on parade, 
last Labor Day, they had in their ranks har Kitunen, shown 
at left in the accompanying picture. Kitunen is 85 years old and 
a member of the Brotherhood for 40 years, still in good 
standing. He walked the full length of the two-mile parade 
route. In the picture, from left, are: Kitunen, Business 
Representative Gerald Lacasse, President John Hammond, 
John Cepak, and Trustee Carl Dewhirst. 



New York Carpenter 
Carries His Own Tune 

Stuart Craine of Local 3054, London, Ont., sends us a news 
clipping about a carpenter who has a special problem. We 
haven't determined whether or not the man is a member of the 
Brotherhood, but here's the story: 

"George Dillard of Riverhead, N.Y., called police to complain 
that, although he had no radio on, he was hearing a radio sta- 
tion playing rock music in his head. 

"The police dispatcher at first advised the 56-year-old carpen- 
ter to take a couple of aspirin, but when he called a second 
time, policeman David Cheshire went to Dillard's home. Putting 
his ear next to Dillard's head, Cheshire also heard the music 
from WKCI-FM in Hamden, Conn. 

"The next move was to ask Dillard to take out his new false 
teeth, and that did the trick. His dentures evidently were pick- 
ing up the radio transmission." 



For Bomb Group Vets 



For the many World War II veterans in our organization we 
pass along the following information: 

The 303rd Bomb Group and attached units of the 8th Air 
Force, WWII, Molesworth, England, 1942-1945, will hold a 
Mini-Reunion in conjunction with the 8th Air Force gathering, 
October 29-November 2, 1980 at Orlando, Fla. Further infor- 
mation on the reunion or association is available by sending a 
4x9'/2 stamped, self addressed envelope to: Joseph Vieira, 6400 
Park Street, Hollywood, Fla. 33024. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 




UNION LABEL PLAYING CARDS 



Now you can order union-made, union- 
printed playing cards from the Union 
Label and Service Trades Department AFL- 
CIO. 

Each top quality, plastic-coated card 
bears the "Union Label, Union Shop Card, 
Made in USA, Jobs" logo of the depart- 
ment, and the Allied Printing Trades Label. 

You can use these cards as prizes, gifts, 
donations to card clubs, to retired mem- 
bers' organizations, etc. They can be dis- 
tributed throughout the labor movement 
as well as to the general community. 

The cards are available in volume in 
multiples of 24 decks per carfon, the price 
is 550 per deck which includes our cost 
plus shipping. 

To order, send check and order blank 
below to the Union Label and Service 
Trades Department AFL-CIO. 

MAIL WITH CHECK TO: 
Union Label and Service Trades Depart- 
ment AFL-CIO 

815 Sixteenth St. NW Suite 607 
Washington, D.C. 20006 
Send carton(s) of Union Label Play- 
ing Cards at 550 per deck, 24 decks per 
carton to: 

NAME: 

ORGANIZATION: 



STREET ADDRESS 



CITY, STATE 



ZIP 



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Take a Hand in 

America's 
Future. 




Metal Forms, Florida 




Members of Palm Beach County, Fla., 
District Council recently demonstrated 
their skills for a local owner-builder who 
had, heretofore, been non-union. They 
did superior form work on a high-rise 
beachfront apartment building, using 
metal forms, as shown in the photograph 
above. 

Installing the forms, above, are Kauko 
Trygg, steward, and Joseph Klima, both 
of Local 1308. In the picture below, Roy 
Forrs and Klima stand in front of the 
building. Three floors were poured and a 
fourth formed. 




Visalia Building 

Continued from Page 17 

wall carpeting and was plush through- 
out." 

Nichols adds: "Of course, years and 
finances took their toll on the care of 
the building. However, under the new 
leadership, the building is a showplace in 
Visalia and the membership should be 
proud they have such a labor temple . . . 
The building has survived earthquakes 
and floods, and like our union, will be 
standing for many, many more years." 



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APRIL, 1980 



19 




General President Konyha and Ohio 
plaque. 

General President 
Named Honorary 
Ohio Governor 

General President William Konyha was 
significantly honored by his native state 
of Ohio on January 30, when he was 
named "honorary governor" for the day 
by both houses of the state legislature and 
Governor Rhodes. 

A reception honoring President Konyha 
was held in the state capitol, which was 
attended by members of the state legis- 
lature. On that occasion, Governor 
Rhodes presented to the honoree a com- 
memorative plaque. 



Campbell Named to 
Label Trades Board 

First General Vice President Patrick J. 
Campbell has been elected to the execu- 
tive board of the AFL-CIO Union Label 
and Service Trades Department. 

The election, which took place at the 
board's recent winter meeting in Bal 
Harbour, Fla., follows through on a con- 
stitutional amendment adopted at the de- 
partment's convention last November, 
which provided for expansion of the 
board to 17 vice presidents, plus the 
president and secretary-treasurer. 



Contractor of Year 





The apprenticeship and training com- 
mittee of Ventura County, Calif., gives 
special recognition each year to con- 
tractors who actively participate in the 
apprenticeship and training program. 
The 1979 Contractor of the Year Award 
went to Mid-Coast Builders. In the 
picture, left to right, J. D. Butler, com- 
mittee secretary, with Ray Cook, 
president of the company, and Arlan 
Hobnan, vice president of Mid-Coast. 
Cook has been a union member since 
August, 1948, and Arlan Holman since 
December, 1958. 



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20 



THE C A RPENTER 



Stewards Training Completed in Cicero 




Millwrights Local 1693 of Cicero, III., recently celebrated the completion of its 
stewards training program for 1979. Those members who received certificates of 
completion, were: Howard Anderson, John Burdew, Nicholas Bonder, James Blake, 
James Caruso, Joseph Cermak, Clyde Cleinmark, William Dunlop, Edward Ficek, 
Joseph Nemec, Sr., Joseph Nemec, Jr., James Kelly, David Schneider, Ronald 
Shudrowitz, Edward Zaylik and Edwin Zieleskiewicz. 



Marine Piledriving Safety Awards to Members 




For upgrading safety on the job, 10 members of Local 100, Muskegon, Mich., were 
recently presented safety awards by their employer, the Bultema Dock and Dredge Co. 
The men were given special recognition for their marine piledriving work at the James 
Campbell Power Plant, Port Sheldon, Mich. Honorees included, from left, William 
Grimm, Delbert Knight, Don Bird, Business Agent Kenneth McMillan, LeRoy Van 
Vleet, Wayne Kober, Edwin Lakso, Alan Lakso, Ron Dahlke, and Mel Larsen. 



Three Generations 

When James Malone joined Local 714, 
Olathe, Kans., last year, he became the 
third generation of his family to belong 
to the Olathe local. He is shown here 
at the left, with Herschel Malone, a 
member 27 years, and Bud Malone, a 
22-year member. 



The Daniels family of Olathe Carpenters 
Local 714 spans three generations also. 
All three were present at the dedication 
ceremonies of Local 714's new hall. 
From the left, Gary Daniels, a 15-year 
member; O. P. Daniels, Sr., 35 years and 
O. P. Daniels, Jr., 28 years. Kansas City 
Labor Beacon photos. 




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APRIL, 1980 



21 



to the Parkinson's Disease Drive 



Have You and Your Local Union Contributed to the Campaign? 



In 1975, the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America joined forces with the American Park- 
inson's Disease Assn. in a major fund-raising campaign. 
Its purpose is to reduce the suffering of persons crippled 
with Parkinson's Disease, to underwrite some of the cost 
of research, and to help in the distribution of life-saving 
information about the disease. 

General President Emeritus William Sidell has served as 
national campaign chairman since that time, and Brother- 
hood members have contributed thousands of dollars to 
the program of the American Parkinson's Disease Asso- 
ciation. 



Last November and December, The Carpenter Maga- 
zine distributed to its readers special postage-paid return 
envelopes for contributions to APDA. Many contributions 
are still being received at the General Office in Washing- 
ton, D.C., for forwarding to APDA. The most recent 
donors are listed below. 

Funds are still needed. We urge you to send cash, 
check, or money order payable to: The American Parkin- 
son's Disease Assn. c/o United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001. Your contribution is tax deduct- 
ible. 



LOCAL 1 

Albert C. Alex 
LOCAL 8 

Thomas J. Clark, 
August C. Wolf 
LOCAL 15 
Frederick Breitling, 
Joseph Hall, 
Alexander Prodigo 
LOCAL 19 
Stephen Slavinsky 
LOCAL 20 
Tommy Galletta 
LOCAL 22 
Frank W. Clark, 
Ray Fitzsimons 
LOCAL 24 
Carl Bonci, 
Clarence H. Taft 
LOCAL 40 
M. F. Callinan, 
Joseph Hickey 
LOCAL 42 
R. V. Turner 
LOCAL 43 
Hans C. Christensen, 
Stanley Ellis, 
Andrew C. Ives, 
William Gendron 
LOCAL 49 
Richard J. Mclnnis 
LOCAL 58 
Osmund Solberg 
LOCAL 60 
Clarence Metz 
LOCAL 62 
Gerald P. Anderson, 
Morris W. Jones 
LOCAL 80 
John J. Watt 
LOCAL 95 
Hymie Adelson, 
Thomas F. McNiel 
LOCAL 99 
Anthony Del Bene 
LOCAL 101 
Andrew E. Sears 
LOCAL 110 
G. Manning 
LOCAL 117 
John T. Ragule 
LOCAL 122 
Fernando McNamee 
LOCAL 131 
Clyde Burmaster, 
John Hanson, 
James L. Parsons, 
Vernon D. Whiteley 



LOCAL 135 

Rudolph A. Vasquez 
LOCAL 160 
Frank Verderame 
LOCAL 162 
Curtis L. Nutt 
LOCAL 181 
P. E. Wisniewski 
LOCAL 182 
Chester Guzik 
LOCAL 183 
Van Wilkerson 
LOCAL 184 
Bill Irvine 
LOCAL 195 
Clarence N. Pacetti, 
Owen Mclntire 
LOCAL 200 
John M. Walsh 
LOCAL 210 
Thomas Yoczik 
LOCAL 213 
Frank W. King 
LOCAL 215 
Chester Snider 
LOCAL 226 
Harry Wheaton 
LOCAL 228 
Thomas J. Heenan 
LOCAL 257 
Matthew Oliver 
LOCAL 272 
Garret Vander Werff 
LOCAL 286 
Wayne Smith 
LOCAL 287 
Emanuel F. Ventura, 
Elmer F. Faus, 
John A. Rydberg 
LOCAL 325 
William Fenney 
LOCAL 340 
Fred E. Davis 
LOCAL 369 
R. Steigerwald 
LOCAL 385 
Manuel Zamora 
LOCAL 393 
John O'Brien 
LOCAL 404 
Edward L. Wilbraham 
LOCAL 413 
Russell K. Sipress, 
Michael Kruk 
LOCAL 416 
August Persson 
LOCAL 417 
Milton L. Mitchell 



LOCAL 434 

Leroy M. Madsen 
LOCAL 469 
Steve Seim 
LOCAL 488 
Robert E. Suneson 
LOCAL 503 
Edwin Draper 
LOCAL 548 
L. W. Greene 
LOCAL 558 
Stanley E. Holmes 
LOCAL 563 
Leonard Swedberg 
LOCAL 587 
Norman D. Neilan 
LOCAL 608 
Noel F. Casey 
LOCAL 620 
Victor E. Barbolini 
LOCAL 627 
George Belcher 
LOCAL 701 
George R. Jones 
LOCAL 714 
Morris Eastland 
LOCAL 715 
Robert Aulert, 
Mark Cowen 
LOCAL 745 
Clarence M. Waldram, 
Martin T. Alcalde, 
Tatsuo Honda 
LOCAL 747 
Louis M. Lee 
LOCAL 751 
George Starr 
LOCAL 792 
Robert Kissick, 
Rick Brockman 
LOCAL 839 
Clarence J. Henske, 
Thomas E. Birong 
LOCAL 857 
George R. O'Hagin 
LOCAL 902 
Salvatore Benducci 
LOCAL 906 
John R. Saunders 
LOCAL 933 
Jay Helmstetler, 
Don Metteer 
LOCAL 964 
Ben Ardire 
LOCAL 971 
Paul Jones 
LOCAL 973 
Louis J. Boone 



LOCAL 982 

Edward R. Klein 

LOCAL 996 

Maurice Alexander 

LOCAL 997 

George Biever, 

Karl Scheifley 

LOCAL 1050 

Alfred Vernacchio 

LOCAL 1062 

A. Toscan 

LOCAL 1067 

John Wilkins 

LOCAL 1074 

Marvin S. Nauman 

LOCAL 1098 

Lester Benefield 

LOCAL 1100 

Allen H. Nelson 

LOCAL 1102 

Jack McMillan 

LOCAL 1120 

James Swanson, 

Marvin Hall 

LOCAL 1138 

Ross Randolph 

LOCAL 1149 

L. Schmidt 

LOCAL 1204 

Harry Katz, 

Milton Bush 

LOCAL 1216 

Richard Debree 

LOCAL 1227 

Paul R. Joki 

LOCAL 1275 

J. F. Mitchell 

LOCAL 1301 

Edward L. Shepler 

LOCAL 1319 

Robert & Nina Hernandez 

LOCAL 1342 

Leon Hinds 

LOCAL 1396 

James Kintner 

LOCAL 1397 

R. Wickboldt, 

Albert Proffitt 

LOCAL 1408 

John A. Crockett 

LOCAL 1478 

Benjamin Entwistle 

LOCAL 1505 

William W. Anderson 

LOCAL 1507 

H. J. Baumgartner, 

Edmund B. Friend 



LOCAL 1577 
Charles A. Wild 
LOCAL 1618 
J. B. Russell 
LOCAL 1637 
O. E. Lynch 
LOCAL 1648 
John D. Stewart 
LOCAL 1664 
R. Fred Butler 
LOCAL 1772 
Raymond Auer 
LOCAL 1780 
Glenn L. Prosser 
LOCAL 1823 
Wilfred Whatley 
LOCAL 1837 
John A. Plonski 
LOCAL 1846 
Byron J. Babin 
LOCAL 1906 
George M. Walish, 
Edward Greider 
LOCAL 1913 
Pete A. Kaldhusdal 
LOCAL 1921 
Frank Maltese 
LOCAL 1978 
George Gleason 
LOCAL 2018 
Thomas Niemiec, 
Frank S. Krajacich, 
Donald E. Johnson 
LOCAL 2026 
R. A. Mason 
LOCAL 2094 
Steve Neuwirth 
LOCAL 2103 
Ken Rudderham 
LOCAL 2230 
H. W. Allred 
LOCAL 2250 
Henry Bennett 
LOCAL 2264 
L. Hall 
LOCAL 2288 
Guillermo Enriquez 
LOCAL 2719 
Ed A. Cooper 
LOCAL 2738 
Henry Elmore 
LOCAL 2765 
Ralph Larsen 
LOCAL 2851 
Elery Thielen 
LOCAL 2947 
Martin Lippe 
Continued on Next Page 



22 



THE CARPENTER 





LAYOUT LEVEL 

• ACCURATE TO 1/32' 

• REACHES 100 FT. 

• ONE-MAN OPERATION 

Save Time, Money, do o letter Job 



With This Modern Water Level 

In juet a few minutes you accurately set batten 
for slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, forms, fixtures, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 

HYDRO LEVEL? 

... the old reliable water 
level with modern feature*. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 
clear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft of 
leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
man operation— outside, in- 
side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anywhere you 
con climb or crawl! 

Why waste money on delicate ^jpM* 
instruments, or lose time and ac- 
curacy on makeshift leveling? Since 1960 
thousands of carpenters, builders, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Send check or money order for $1435 and 
your name and address. We will rush yon a I 
Hydrolevel by return mall postpaid. Or — buy H 
three Hydrolevels at $935 each, postpaid. Sell 
two for $1435 each and have yours free I 
C.O.D. Satisfaction guaranteed or money back. 

FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 

HYDROLEVE! 

P.O. Box G Ocun Springs, Miss. 39S64 



Carpenters, 

hang it up! 

Clamp these heavy 
duty, non-stretch 
suspenders to your 
nail bags or tool 
belt and you'll feel 
like you are floating 
on air. They take all 
the weight off your 
hips and place the 
load on your 
shoulders. Made of 
soft, comfortable 2" 
wide red nylon. 
Adjust to fit all sizes 

Try them for 15 days, if not completely 

satisfied return for full refund. Don't be 

miserable another day, order now. 

Send check or money order to: 




Norman Clifton, 
member, Local 1622, 
Hayward, Calif. 
(Patent Pending) 



r 

| CLIFTON ENTERPRISES 

I 4806 Los Arboles Place, Fremont, Ca. 94536 
I Please rush "HANG IT UP" suspenders at 
I $16.15 each includes postage & handling 
| California residents add SVz% sales tax 
j (.97<:). Canada residents please send U.S. 

equivalent. 
j NAME 

| ADDRESS 

I CITY 



.STATE 



_ZIP 



Please give street address for prompt delivery. 



Magazine over 600,000 
Mark in February Tally 

The Carpenter reported in its Decem- 
ber, 1979, issue that it had broken the 
half-million circulation barrier and was 
still adding names and addresses. 

Our computerized mailing list depart- 
ment, in the three months since, has 
added more than 100,000 additional 
members to the master list, and the tally 
as of February 15 stands at 607,264. 

General Secretary and Editor John S. 
Rogers urges local secretaries to continue 
their updating of membership lists and 
thanks them for work already accom- 
plished. 

There are three-quarters of a million 
Brotherhood members scattered across 
North America, but, in recent years, less 
than a half million of them have been 
receiving their monthly Carpenter to 
which they are entitled. 




SPARE 
TIME or 



SHARPENING BUSINESS! 



On our 
30-DAY 

FREE 
TRIAL 
OFFER 



Parkinson's Donors 

Continued from Page 22 

The following local unions contributed as 
groups: 41, 85, 104, 206, 232, 261, 410, 434, 
483, 1086, 1319, 1391, 1583, 1759, 2015, If 

2212, 2258, 2273, 2748, 3206. 



You risk nothing by accepting 
this offer to see how easily 
you can turn your spare time 
Into big Cash Profit* with your 
own Complete Sharpening 
Shop. No selling ... no pre- 
vious experience needed. Our 
famous Sharp-All and show- 
how Instruction set you up to 
mate $200, $500. $700 a 
month CASH sharpening Saws, 
Knives, Scissors, Lawnmowers, 
Shop and Garden Tools . . . 
all cutting edges. 

Send for all the facts! 

Our Free Book tells 
how to start a profit- 
able, lifetime home 
sharpening business, 
how we help you grow, 
how we'll finance you. 

SHI lor FKE detiili moi coupon below or postcird today i 

ALLC0..731A Field Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 64111 




No Obligation... .No Salesman Will Call 



The following state and district councils 
contributed: Southeast Missouri District 
Council, Hudson County District Council, 
Metropolitan District Council, New Jersey 
State Council, and Central New Jersey Dis- 
trict Council. 

Individual contributors who did not list 
their local union numbers when submitting 
contributions: Glen C. Goodfellow, Vernon 
A. Gumm, H. Hansen, Thomas Higginson, 
George C. Johnson, George I. Johnson, 
J. Krofl, Mrs. Wm. Kroll, Edward Lindson, 
Clifton Miracle, L. B. Paff\ Roger A. Palmer, 
Adolphe Paul, Frank Ptarcinsk, Sr., Leo 
Ruona, Andrew Shusta, R. Tombs, Joseph 
VandederkofT, Roland Ward, Eugene Adkins, 
D. Anderson, Manuel Autore, E. Barger, 
Reinhold H. Behrendt, R. C. Boyd, S. O. 
Brunson, Nick Carlomagno, Dennis R. Carr, 
Carmine T. Cassano, O. J. Cyr, Fred W. 
Dahke, Ronald J. Dancer, Ray Daniels, Tom 
Dias, G. L. David, F. Doernbrack, Everett 
Erickson, Roy P. Farmer, Peter Flanigan, 
Vincent Fugieri, E. C. Gehrels, Frank Geniec, 
Robert Giesick, R. E. Goodwin, William Gun- 
neson, Peter M. Hager, Carl A. Hagwell, Neil 
Hapworth, Aanon Haraldsen, William J. 
Hartman, D. R. Hatt, Frank Haveman, L. P 
Hittepole, John H. Ho'.zermer, Frank Johner, 
Antone Jose, John T. King, S. Knight, 
Joseph Kozloski, A. Lagardo, Frank N. 
Laprise, Harry D. Larsen, Joseph Lia, 
Harold Lu:as, C. J. Luska, W. H. McBride, 
Mary S. McSharry, Rufino Mr.dolora, 
George H. Mitchell, Hideo Nakagawa, J. M. 
Ochoa, Elmer C. Olson, Hans D. Olson, 
Ragnar Persson, E. J. Pozzi, William E. Price 
Fred Prior, M. S. Rice, G. D. Roseboom, 
Teruki Sakogawa, Anthony Salvo, D. Sny- 
der, John Stun, R. Tetar, Melvin M. Tucker, 
Josep Waldner, Merton E. Walker, M. Wil- 
liams, Jack Zimick, R. Zimick. 



'YES, I I BELSAW 731A Field Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 64111 

• please send me the FREE BOOK that gives full details. 



City-State Zip_ 



Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
TIRE length of Common-Hip-Valley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is % 
inch rise to 12 inch run. Pitches in- 
crease Yn inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
ings for each pitch. The smallest 
width is % inch and they increase 
%" each time until they cover a 50 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof is 48'-9}i" wide. Pitch 
is TW rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons, Hips and 
Jacks and the Cuts in ONE MINUTE. 
Let us prove it, or return your money. 



Getting the lengths of rafters by the span anil 
the method of setting op the tables Is filly pro- 
tected by the 1917 & 1944 Copyrights. 



In fhe U.S.A. send $5.00. We pay the 

postage. California residents add 30 % 
tax. 

We also have a very fine Stair 

book 9" x 12". It sells for $3.00. We 

pay the Postage. California residents 
add 18« tax. 



A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 405, Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 



APRIL, 1980 



23 




SUMER 
CLIPBOARD 



The Importance 
off a 

Legally-Sound 

Will 

Preparing a will is an essential for 
every family. Along with your birth cer- 
tificate and your marriage license, your 
will may be one of the most important 
documents you will ever need. Only by 
drawing up a will may you control the 
way in which your property is divided 
after your death. 

The first important step in preparing a 
will is to select your executor, that is, 
the man, woman, or institution who will 
settle your estate after you die. You may 
name your spouse as your executor . . . 
many people do. Or, you may name a 
relative, a friend, an attorney, a bank, or 
a trust company to settle your affairs. 
Some people name both an executor and 
a co-executor, one to handle the per- 
sonal aspects and the other to handle the 
business details of the estate. The impor- 
tant thing to remember is that your exec- 



utor could have a great influence on your 
family's stability and financial security, 
and therefore he or she must be a respon- 
sible and capable person. 

Your executor's job can be compli- 
cated. He or she will be in charge of 
working with your lawyer to help with 
the legal aspects of the settlement. In 
addition, he will manage all of your as- 
sets, including real estate, securities, cash, 
and bank accounts. He will be responsi- 
ble for collecting any money due your 
estate, including salary, pension, profit 
sharing plan, Social Security, or Vet- 
eran's Administration benefits. He must 
see that insurance companies are notified 
and that everyone named in the policies 
is paid. Your executor will be responsi- 
ble for paying off your debts, arranging 
for your family's immediate living ex- 
penses, and distributing your estate to the 
people you name in your will. Finally, 
he must prepare and file all estate, in- 
come, and inheritance taxes according to 
rigid legal schedules. 

If you die without leaving a will, that 
is, if you die intestate, the consequences 
may be complicated and not in line with 
your intentions. You will have no say as 
to how your estate is divided. State law, 
alone, will determine the division and ad- 
ministration of your property. In spite of 
this, approximately 7 out of every 10 in- 
dividuals in the United States die without 
leaving a will. 

If you die intestate, you will not have 
your own chosen executor. State law will 
decide the shares of your survivors — if 
the law says there are no surviving rela- 
tives close enough in kinship to inherit, 
the state will take all. There can be no gifts 
to friends or charities if there is no will. 



In many states, your surviving spouse 
will have priority as an administrator 
over your children. Yet, this may cause 
problems if your spouse is not the parent 
of your children, or if, in addition to 
children by a previous marriage, you are 
survived by children with your present 
spouse. Many families have feuded bit- 
terly over the division of property in 
these kinds of situations. 

Most state laws say that if you are 
survived by children and no spouse, and 
no will, each child would have an equal 
right to administer your estate. This could 
also lead to problems. Further, if your 
children are minors, you can only legally 
designate their guardian by means of a 
will. 

The tax consequences of dying without 
a will can be extremely complicated. 
Your estate is entitled to a federal marital 
deduction due to property left to a surviv- 
ing spouse. Depending on what you have 
arranged, your spouse may be stuck with 
a taxable income and no option to dis- 
pose of the assets producing this income. 

Finally, if you are the proprietor of a 
business and you die without a will, you 
will have no say as to whether your busi- 
ness is continued or liquidated. 

If you die without a will, all of your 
personal and complicated decisions may 
be left up to an impersonal administrator 
chosen by the state. Take the time to 
carefully plan your will — by thinking 
ahead, you can provide for your family 
and loved ones, and at the same time 
spare them many unnecessary problems 
and misunderstandings. 

The cost of preparing a legally-recog- 
nized will is not exhorbitant. Check with 
attorneys in your area on costs. 



REMUS 

Under laws administered by the 
US Consumer Products Safety Com- 
mission, an estimated 117 million 
potentially liazardous products 
have been called back from the 
marketplace and consumers since 
1973 (when CPSC was created). 
Most of these were voluntarily re- 
called by manufacturers who estab- 
lished programs to repair or re- 
place the products, or to refund 
the purchase price. Recent actions 
include the following: 



Hair Dryers: 

CPSC has accepted 26 additional 
voluntary corrective action plans of 
manufacturers and importers of 
hand-held hair dryers made with 
asbestos. 

The 26 companies account for 
nearly 10% of those hand-held air 
dryers manufactured with asbestos 
since 1969. The other 90% were 



distributed by 1 1 other companies 
whose corrective actions were ap- 
proved by CPSC last May. 

Of the 26 firms, eight have 
agreed to repair their hair dryers; 
three will refund the purchase price 
or replace the dryers with asbestos- 
free dryers; and 15 will exchange 
their dryers for refunds, new 
asbestos-free dryers or other prod- 
ucts. 

The 26 companies include: Afro 
Products, Inc., of Ottuma, Iowa; 
Allied Stores Marketing Corp., of 
New York City; Arrow Trading 
Co., of New York City; B&E Sales 
Co., of Detroit, Michigan; Brother 
International Corp., of Piscataway, 
New lersey; Formac, Inc., of City 
of Industry, California; Hartman 
Products, of Hawthorne, Califor- 
nia; W.P. Hemenway Co., of Port- 
land, Oregon; Hiraoka New York 
Inc., of New York City; Hitachi 
Sales Corp., of Compton, Califor- 
nia; Interpur of Orlando, Florida; 
and M.S.S. Direct Ltd., of Haup- 
pauge. New York. 

Also included are: Market Im- 



porting Services Inc., of New York 
City; New York Merchandise Co., 
of New York City; Pace Setter, of 
Burbank, California; Panasonic 
Co., of Secaucus, New Jersey; 
Pearlduck Inc., of Garden City, 
New York; Sanyei New York 
Corp., of New York City; Sanyo 
Electric Inc., of Compton, Cali- 
fornia; Save-Way Industries Inc., 
of Hialeah, Florida; Swank Co., 
Inc., of New York City; T.G. & Y. 
Stores Co., of Oklahoma City, 
Oklahoma; Wakefern Food Corp., 
of Elizabeth, New Jersey; Windsor 
Industries. Inc., of Melville, New 
York: F. W. Wool worth Co., of 
New York City; and Zayre Corp., 
of Framingham, Massachusetts. 

Nearly 100 different models and 
styles of hair dryers are covered 
under the corrective action plans. 
CPSC staffers have compiled a list 
providing the specific action which 
the 26 firms have agreed to. The 
list can be obtained free by writing 
to: Hair Dryers, U.S. Consumer 
Product Safety Commission, Wash- 
ington, D.C. 20207. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



APPRENTICESHIP & TRIIII1II1G 



Mid-Year Meeting 
Set for Portland 

The mid-year meeting of the Carpen- 
try Training Conference is scheduled for 
April 28, 29, and 30 in Portland, Ore. 
Participants will gather at the Sheraton- 
Portland in Lloyd Center. 

First General Vice President Patrick J. 
Campbell and Richard Schwertner of the 
Associated General Contractors, co-chair- 
men of the National Joint Carpentry Ap- 
prenticeship and Training Committee, 
sent announcements of the meeting in 
January to all local unions, district, state 
and provincial councils, all directors and 
coordinators of training programs, and 
the chairmen and secretaries of all joint 
committees. 

Topics for consideration by the con- 
ference should be submitted to First Gen- 
eral Vice President Campbell at his office 
in Washington, D.C. 

Bids for the 1982 International Contest 
are being accepted. Committees wishing 
to submit bids can obtain information on 
procedures from Vice President Camp- 
bell. Denver, Colo., has been selected as 
the site for the 1981 contest. 

The 1980 Contest will be held in Cleve- 
land, O., on October 16, 17 and 18. The 
Apprenticeship and Training Conference 
will begin October 12. 



13th Annual Completion Ceremonies in Boise 




The Southwest Idaho Carpenters and Millmen Joint Apprenticeship and Training 
Committee, covering Local 635, Boise, and Local 1298, Nampa, held its 13th Annual 
Completion Ceremonies in Boise, last September 12. There were 16 graduating 
apprentices — 13 carpenters and three-mill-cabinetmen. 

FRONT ROW, (seated) left to right, Neil Fralish, Roger Nebeker, and Gregory 
Nitz, mill-cabinet apprentices; Joe Harris, Idaho state director of the U.S. Bureau of 
Apprenticeship and Training. 

SECOND ROW, left to right, Noel Krigbaum, Instructor, Southwest Idaho Car- 
penters JATC; Vernon Dahms, James Ahmer, Bruce Aitken, Loren Reiter, Marshall 
Williams, Robert Swan, and Merle Klitzman, carpenter apprentices. 

THIRD ROW, Lloyd Miller, coordinator, Idaho AGC-Carpenters Apprenticeship 
and Training; Ralph Farley, executive secretary, Rocky Mountain District Council; 
Pete Riha, Riha Construction and chairman of Southwest Idaho Carpenters JATC; 
Mark Boyd, business representative, Local 635, and secretary, SW1 Carpenters JATC; 
Edward Foust, business representative, Local 1298, and committee member, SWI 
Carpenters JATC; Ernie Paine, coordinator, Idaho AGC-Carpenters Apprenticeship 
and Training; George Sullens, past instructor, Southwest Idaho Carpenters JATC; and 
Roger Whitney, instructor, Southwest Idaho Carpenters JATC. 



Western Pennsylvania Graduation 

The Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship Committee of Western 
Pennsylvania, MBA Division, presented completion certificates 
to more than 60 apprentices in recent 1979 ceremonies in 
Pittsburgh, Pa. Included in the class was Betsy Buick, shown 
at center in the picture at right. Also shown at right are General 
Secretary John S. Rogers, a guest; Robert P. Argentine, 
secretary of the Western Pennsylvania District Council; Albert 
Gouker; Ms. Buick; Melvin Gouker; Second General Vice 
President Sigurd Lucassen, also a guest; and William Water- 
kotte, secretary of the JATC. 




n 



1 n \ 


IJEI! 


| I 


ll 












r m 














Haue Tools, 
Will Trauel, 
Arizona Grad 
Decides 

Kenneth Bruce Goodman of Local 857, 
Tucson, Ariz., recently completed his 
four-year apprenticeship training, and he 
decided to hit the road like the journey- 
men of yesteryear. Alfred Valles, coordi- 
nator of the Southeastern Arizona Car- 
penters Apprenticeship and Training 
Committee, sends us Goodman's first- 
person report on his experience. 

"As I approached the final days of my 
apprenticeship with the Southeastern Ari- 
zona Carpenters Apprenticeship Program, 
I began to think back to the trials and 
tribulations encountered during my tenure 
with the program . . . those 'grief filled' 
days when a bit more common sense and 
experience would have certainly made a 
difference. 

"Incredible, when I think of those 100- 
plus-degree temperature days, when just 
being outside was a tremendous strain, 
but working 30 feet high and catching 
those strong rays off of a newly-sheated 
plywood deck was just about intolerable. 

"And who could forget those fabulous 
expressions of gratitude that apprentices 
inherently receive from their journeymen 
counterparts ('bring some toenails or look 
for the skyhook'). 

"Well, with those days coming quickly 
and quietly to a close, I was reminded of 
the promise that I had made to myself at 
the outset of the program. That was: 'If 
you ever get through this program, travel- 
ing with your tools is a must!' So at the 
conclusion of my apprenticeship, I de- 
cided to go to Europe. 

"However, before leaving for my Euro- 
pean experience, I began to dwell on the 
true meaning of apprenticeship. The con- 
clusions that I came up with were self- 
evident. It seemed obvious to me that 
learning the trade, although extremely im- 
portant, was not the end of the line. It 
seemed imperative that traveling through 
unfamiliar surroundings with one's tools 
was needed for a complete understanding 
of what a carpenter really is. I thought of 
myself as a modern-day journeyman, 
about to embark on the same travels, 
across the same paths, over the same ter- 




Goodman during his fourth year of 
apprenticeship training at an Arizona 
construction site. 



rain, that craftsmen from the ancient 
guilds followed centuries before. 

"It was with this philosophy in mind 
that I started to arrange my first experi- 
ence as a true bonafide 'journeyman.' I 
thought of myself as a freed, indentured 
servant who had just emancipated himself 
by gaining the knowledge of a trade. 

"Gradually, as I proceeded to arrange 
details with my initial contacts in The 
Netherlands, I felt an affinity to a tradi- 
tional sense of apprenticeship. In Soestjik, 
the home of Queen Juliana of The 
Netherlands, I met some good people 
who let me overstay my welcome in ex- 
change for my carpentry expertise. 

"It seemed to me at this time that the 
barter system eventually would be the 
most interesting route to take. Indeed, it 
did prove to be most efficient. My next 
stop in Holland was Nijmegan and, using 
the name of a long lost friend of my 
previous hosts, I was able to secure at 
least one night's rest when I first ar- 
rived there. The next morning while in 
conversation with my new acquaintances 
we inevitably talked about our occupa- 
tions. When my new friends found out 



that I had just graduated from a four- 
year apprenticeship program in carpentry, 
they immediately began to discuss the 
possibilities of me staying there as long 
as I wished in order to help them do 
some remodeling in their beautiful home. 
An agreement was easily worked out, 
with the stipulation that they were to 
become my tour guides in Southern Hol- 
land. 

"And so it went, a fence in Stras- 
bourg, France; an incredible renaissance 
renovation near Florence, Ita^y; a minor 
repair job in Athens, Greece; and giving 
a helping hand with an apartment in 
Safat, Israel. Unquestionably, these ex- 
periences added most to my conceptual 
understanding of where the term journey- 
man originated. 

"The educational value of my tour was 
so incredible and unique that during my 
travels I began to think that more of our 
trades people and especially apprentices 
who have graduated or are near gradua- 
tion from one of our apprenticeship pro- 
grams would benefit immensely from a 
similar experience ... a type of exchange 
program! The skilled trades people in 
Europe provided me with one of my most 
satisfying learning opportunities because 
of their dedication to their trade and 
commitment to detail. The motivation to 
complete an apprenticeship program 
might be immeasureably increased, if the 
apprentice knew that he or she might 
have an opportunity to participate in such 
an exchange program. This type of pro- 
gram could be run very similar to the 
university exchange programs that we see 
in existence at most of our top univer- 
sities. Needless to say, it could also open 
a door to a direct line of communication 
between our own AFL-CIO and the 
brothers and sisters in trade unions over- 
seas. 

"Upon my return to the States, I 
realized what an important impact this 
trip had on me and my future in the 
trade. Working in the field became more 
meaningful to me and communicating to 
others what carpentry could really be in 
the traditional sense was again made 
more apparent. Since then I hve been 
working part-time with the Tucson Young 
Woman's Company here in Arizona, 
where, among other varied responsibil- 
ities, I have been helping young women 
get prepared to enter the same registered 
apprenticeship program that I graduated 
from." 



Alberta Graduates with Their Projects 

When fourth-year apprentices assembled for graduation 
exercises at Lethbridge Community College, Lethbridge, Aha., 
last year, they gathered among some of their projects for this 
picture. Shown in the training facilities of the college are: at far 
right, Frank Plato, instructor and a member of Local 846 as 
well as a former president of Local 1569, Medicine Hat; Robert 
Coyle, business representative of Local 846, second from right; 
and his son, Dale, third from left, who is a graduate. 




26 



THE CARPENTER 



WE PUT A LOT INTO IT. 



Unitized body-frame design with 
Massive Girder Beam front suspension. 



Highly efficient, 

staged 2-barrel carburetor. 



Extensive anti- corrosion 
protection includes ELPO dipping. 




EPA EST. MPG EST.HWY. 



SO YOU CAN GET A LOT OUT OF IT. 



TOUGH, ECONOMICAL CHEVY VAN. Load it up Chevy Van can take it. 

Heavy loads, long loads, bulky loads. Chevy does the job with the help of its Massive 

Girder Beam front suspension, long cargo floor of up to 174" (on 125" 

wheelbase models when no passenger seat is ordered) and higher and 

wider rear and sliding side door openings than the two nearest sales 

competitors'. Chevy Van comes in both 110" and 125" wheelbases. 

Plus it delivers impressive fuel economy. Check out its new 1980 

Three-Year Perforation-From-Corrosion Limited Warranty! See your 

Chevy dealer for details. Ask him about leasing, too. Got a tough job? 

Get a tough Chevy Van. 



17 24 



TOUGH MILEAGE TO BEAT 

Remember: Compare the "estimated 
MPG" to the "estimated MPG" of other 
vehicles You may get different mileage, 
depending on how fast you drive, 
weather conditions, and trip length 
Actual highway mileage will probably 
be less than the estimated highway 
tuel economy. Lower in California. 



CHEVY TRUCKS 



Chevy Vans are equipped with 
GM-built engines produced by various 
divisions. See your dealer for details. 




BUILT TO STAY TOUGH 




GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED 



JOB HAZARD 

A psychiatrist examining a busi- 
ness agent asked, "Do you ever 
hear voices without being able to 
tell who is speaking or where the 
voices are coming from?" 

"Sure." 

"And when does this occur?" 

"When I answer the telephone." 

ATTEND UNION MEETINGS 

EXACT FARE 

A woman boarded a crowded 
bus and groped rather desperately 
for her money. When a man offered 
to pay her fare she said no, she 
could find the money. This went on 
for several agonizing minutes until 
the man finally insisted upon pay- 
ing the woman's fare, explaining to 
her, "Madam, three times now you 
have unzipped my pants." 

ARE YOU STILL CLICING? 

SMALL MENU 

ROBERT: I don't eat anything 
that's been sprayed or that's not 
organic. 

TOM: How do you feel? 

ROBERT: Hungry. 



TAXING PROBLEMS 

Charlie Rice says it's gospel truth 
that an irate citizen recently wrote 
the Bureau of Internal Revenue to 
this effect: "I realize it's a great 
privilege to pay my United States 
taxes, but if things go any higher, 
I'm going to have to give up that 
privilege." 

• 

A letter to the Internal Revenue 
Bureau: "Gentlemen, I have not 
been able to sleep nights on account 
of worrying about not having re- 
ported on a good deal of income. 
So I'm enclosing my check for 
$1,000. If I find I still can't sleep, 
I'll send the rest of it." 



The Bureau of Internal Revenue 
received a typed income tax return 
from a bachelor, who had listed one 
dependent. The examiner returned 
it with a notation: "This must be a 
stenographic error." 

"You're telling me," the taxpayer 
answered in writing after the pen- 
ciled notation. 

• 

If Patrick Henry thought taxation 
without representation was bad, he 
should see it with representation. 




CLUBBED AGAIN 

"Is Jim a confirmed bachelor?" 
"He is now. He sent his picture to 
a lonely hearts club, and they sent 
it back with a note saying, 'We are 
not that lonely.' " 



THIS MONTH'S LIMERICK 

There was a young lady from 

Boston 
Who once drove about in an 

Austin. 
Then she snared a rich "daddy" 
And now drives a Caddy 
That's big enough to get lost in. 

— Maurice "Buzz" Gjertsen 
Local 81, Erie, Pa. 




PARDON ME, MADAM 

There was a lot of excitement on 
a local bus the other day when a 
man got up and offered his seat to 
a woman — and she fainted. When 
she came to, she thanked him — and 
he fainted. 

LOOK FOR THE UNION LABEL 

PLUMBER'S HELPER 

A plumber wrote the U.S. Bureau 
of Standards that he had used and 
found hydrochloric acid excellent 
for cleaning out clogged drains and 
wanted to know if this was safe to 
do. The Bureau wrote back: "Our 
studies and research reveal that the 
efficacy of hydrochloric acid for the 
purpose stated in your letter is with- 
out question. However, the use of it 
results in a corrosive residue that is 
incompatible with metallic perma- 
nence." The plumber wrote back to 
the Bureau that he was glad they 
had found he was correct. The Bu- 
reau again wrote to him, stating, 
"We must point out to you without 
qualification that we can under no 
circumstances assume responsibility 
for the resulting toxic and noxious 
residues from the employment of 
hydrochloric acid in the plumbing 
uses to which you have put it, and 
we most strongly urge that you re- 
sort to alternative procedures that 
will not have the deleterious conse- 
quences we alluded to in our earlier 
communication." The plumber liked 
this letter, too, and wrote the Bu- 
reau to tell them so. The Bureau 
thereupon sent the plumber a final 
letter, which stated: "Stop using 
hydrochloric acid. It eats the hell out 
of pipes." 

REGISTERED TO VOTE? 

IN DEEP FAT 

Pile Driver: You say you couldn't 
stand the nudist colony? Why? 

Lather: Why! They gave me the 
worst job in the place- — frying 
bacon. 

— UTU News 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



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Knoxville, Tenn. — Picture No. 2 



KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

On November 17, 1979, Local 50 
honored its members of 25 or more years 
with a buffet at Ramsey's Cafeteria. This was 
the first pin presentation ceremony held by 
the local since December, 1968. A total of 
211 members qualified for service pins, and 
60 recipients attended the buffet. 

Picture No. 1 shows Financial Secretary Roy 
W. Hundley presenting a pin to Margaret Cox 
for her 29 years of service as secretary of 
Local 50. Pictured from left to right are: 
Trustees Danny Maples and Roy Harber; Treas- 
urer William R. Harper; Vice-President Claude 
Bridges; Dictrict Council Representative 
Kenneth McCormick; Margaret Cox; Roy W. 
Hundley; President Carl Tipton; Business Rep- 
resentative Paul Stamps; and Recording 
Secretary D. R. Gilbert. 

Picture No. 2 shows, front row, left to right: 
Oliver Minge, James L. Grigsby, James R. 
Stewart, Wiley Cantrell, Gilbert Kelly, M. E. 
Evans, Luther Murr, Ralph Stanford, Ivan Hance, 
Roy Hundley, Margaret Cox, H. D. Hickle, 
W. M. Bayne, Walter Isbill, D. R. Gilbert, Ray 
Franklin, Clyde Arwood, William A. Mitchell, 
Carl Tipton, Lennis Warren, Gentry Stinnett, 
Walter Carey, and Hugh B. Lindsay. 

Second row, left to right: Melvin Jones, 
Claude Davenport, John Mann, James Chris- 
topher, James Walsh, Ralph Murrell, James 
Owenby, Carl Cowden, Conrad Wilson, Carl 
Myers, Millard Liles, Roy Hartsook, Robert 
Davis, J. E. Stanley, R. M. Ladd, C. H. Wright, 
and Kenneth Spencer. 

Back row, left to right: V. S. Brown, Marion 
Henry, M. H. Phillips, Eldridge Payne, Floyd 
Bradburn, Fred Tindell, R. L. Miller, J. D. Itson, 
C. T. Morgan, Porter Webb, Charles Giles, 
Gilbert McLemore. Flavil McGee, Arnold Akin, 
Grover Whitt, William Sellers, John Giles, Ed 
Stamps, Paul Stamps, Neal Mason, and Ralph 
Franklin. 

The following members also received pins 
but were not present for the photograph: 

25-year members Clint Adams, George F. 
Beeler, Come r Bradley, Phillip Bunch, James 
R. Byerley, Jack Cagle, R. L. Carney, L. M. 
Degges, Richard Denton, Howard Drake, Collier 
Edmonson, Jack H. Evans, A. J. Fain, Henry 
Festor, J. R. Gilliland. Charles L. Hammer, 
A. M. Harrill, Amos W. Harris. James Harris, 
Charles J. Haun, Charles R. Hester, D. C. 
Hopkins, Roy F. Ingram, James E. Johnson, 
Roscoe Johnson, Lon Kidwell, Edward Lane, 



Service 
Th 



a. 




Brotherhood 

A gallery of pictures showing some of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received pins for years of service in the union. 




Knoxville, Tenn. — Picture No. 1 

George Large, Harley A. Loy, Robert McFalls, 
John B. Moore, Hubert Myers, Ralph Noe, Wm. 
H. Oxendine, Mack W. Porter, George Pressley, 
H. R. Reed, Boyd Renfro, J. D. Ridenour, Robert 
Simms, Ralph H. Smith, Bob Taylor, W. B. 
Taylor, Dot Watson, Paul Weaver. 

30-year members N. B. Adams, Henry Arm- 
strong, W. C. Arnold, J. D. Arthur, Harry 
Atkins, Alfred Barham, Arthur Boring, Roy A. 
Bowling, Lloyd Brewer, Sherman Brady, W. R. 
Bullock, Wm. H. Burchfield, Arlie L. Burkett, 
Fred Carpenter, Clyde Cate, J. A. Chambers, 
Amos Chandler, Mike Cheatham, Carson 
Childress, D. E. Cosmah, Norman Clark, John 
Coward, Ralph Crass, Clyde Crawford, E. C. 
Donaldson, Brytus Dockery, Donald Edlin, Clyde 
England, Joe Farmer, Charles H. Flood, David 
Fraker, Burl Franklin, L. L. Gasaway, Lester 
Giles, Horace Greene, Ed Guilliams, M. L. 
Gupton, G. W. Hamilton, Gilbert Hensley, Henry 
Higgins, Everet Jones, Byron Kelly, Arlie King, 
James R. Kirkland, Burnie Kirkpatrick, Raymond 



Knouff, Clarence Kunkel, A. G. Law, S. H. 
Linebarger, David Littles, Ronald Lynch, Allen 
L. Lytle, John Mahan, A. P. Martin, Carl McBee, 
Gordon McCarrell, James G. McGee, Creed 
Miller, Rufus G. Moore, John Myers, 0. H. 
Park, H. K. Pelfrey, J. R. Pesterfield, Robert 
Phillips, Clyde Price, Alvin Rader, C. W. 
Ratcliff, John P. Raymer, John J. Renfro, Carl 
Richesin, Merle Robinson, Vos Russell, Everett 
Seals, Chester Sharp, D. E. Sheppard, Ambus 
Simpson, Wm. P. Smith, James Spivey, Jack 
Stanton, John T. Stephens, James L. Stevens, 
John P. Stinnett, Thomas E. Thompson, Finley 
Tipton, Clyde Townsend, Howard Travis, Earl 
Trent, Robert Trentham, James Vance, A. F. 
Walker, Elmer Walker, Clarence Wear, Clifford 
M. Wear, James H. Wear, Edward Weaver, Clyde 
Webb, Ernest Webster, W. H. West, J. W. 
Wheeler, Hobert White, Ray L. White, Roy 
Whitehead, Oddie Whitley, Lloyd Wisecarver, 
Woodrow Wright, George Yancey, Oscar 
Yarbrough. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 




Ypsilanti, Mich. — Picture No. 1 



Ypsilanti, Mich. — Picture No. 2 



YPSILANTI, MICH. 

On October 4, 1979, Local 512 held a pin 
presentation and luncheon to honor its 40, 50, 
and 60-year members. Those who received 
pins are pictured in the following photographs. 

Picture No. 1, left to right: F. Ray Gilbert, 
business representative and financial 
secretary, Local 512; Anthony Ochocki, Third 
District general executive board member; 
Roland D. Fletcher, 60-year member; Leonard 
Zimmerman, general representative; and 
Albert C. Schempp, assistant business 



representative, Local 512. 

Picture No. 2, front row, left to right: 
F. Ray Gilbert, business representative and 
financial secretary, Local 512; Richard Miller, 
secretary, Michigan State Carpenters Council; 
Anthony Ochocki, Third District general 
executive board member; Ernest Niethammer, 
50-year member; Roland D. Fletcher, 60-year 
member; Leonard Zimmerman, general 
representative; and Earl H. Schmude, 
secretary-treasurer, South Central District 
Council. 

Back row, left to right: 40-year members 



Guy Wurm, William Rose, John Miller, John 
Bird, Mark Wire; John W. Martin, president, 
Local 512; Albert Schempp, assistant business 
representative. 

The following members also received pins 
but were not present for the photograph: 
50-year member John Ankenbrand; 40-year 
members Alvin Beuerle, Albin V. Burke, Erwin 
E. Clark, Glenn B. Fletcher, Clyde E. Hoffman, 
Sr., Cris Olsen, Arthur Peer, Raynor Pilbeam, 
Guy Stivers, John M. Stone, Benjamin Strong, 
deceased, Earl Suggitt, Lloyd W. Turner, 
Carl Wild. 



AUGUSTA, GA. 




Two members of Local 283, Augusta, were 
presented with their 25-year pins in December, 
1979. Shown in the picture are Billy Martin 
Gay and Charles L. Porcher. Members not 
present but also awarded pins were Houston 
M. Allen and John DelGenio. 



WATERTOWN, WIS. 




Local 3187 held a Christmas party on 
December 15, 1979, at Home Plate Inn and 
honored the following members with service 
pins: Front row, left to right: Marvin Becker, 
20-years; Herb Heller, 32-years; and Herb 
Zeir, 27-years. 

Back row, left to right: Fraklin Uttech, 
20-years; Lawrence Olstad, 28-years, and 
Edward Izubke, 21-years. 

23-year member Herb Budiewitz was not 
present for the photograph. 



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31 



PORTLAND, ORE. 

Last fall, Local 226 conducted a pin 
presentation ceremony in its meeting hall at 
Cascade Plaza. Those honored represent a 
total of more than 1500 years of membership 
in the Brotherhood. 

Picture No. 1 shows 35-year members. 
Front row, left to right: George Lingelbach, 
Richard L. Whitney, Lee Johnston, Oscar 0. 
Bersaas, Edward F. Toelle. 

Second row, left to right: Truman Kerns, 
Arthur D. Barton, Samuel H. Tyner, Roderick 
R. MacKay, Earl 0. Boyer, Halvard Rundberg, 
Harvey Krieger, Charles Lynn. 

Third row, left to right: Carl A. Larson, 
E. J. Lord, Jack Dove, L. M. Kelly, Maurice 
Miller, George Howard Smith, Louis J. 
Burgoyne, Fred Hearsum, Harry Kay, Russell 
V. Fisher. 

Back row, left to right: Lloyd E. Bradley, 
Roy Parish, William E. Knauer, Cecil F. Burt. 

Picture No. 2 shows 35-year members. 
Front row, left to right: Andrew F. Sears, 
Wilhelm E. Sonju, Herbert Petri, Ival McCord, 
Bernard A. Heckman, John Gephart. 

Second row, left to right: Leonard Arness, 
J. L. Miller, James W. Johnson, Herbert 
Westerman, Daniel Malaer, Vernon A. Peterson, 
Elmer Albro. 

Back row, left to right: Kenneth M. Sisco, 
John D. Fortune, Howard F. Ratliff, Earl J. 
Rowley, Anton Emblem. 

Picture No. 3 shows two past presidents 
receiving pins. From left to right: Chuck 
Miller, past president; John Doig, current 
president; Don Staudenmier, executive 
secretary, Portland District Council; Marvin 
Hall, executive secretary, Oregon State 
Council; and Gary Larsen, past president. 

Another past president who was honored 
with a pin but was unable to attend the 
ceremony was E. E. Charpentier. 




Portland, Ore. — Picture No. 2 

MM ' ' ; 




Portland, Ore. — Picture No. 3 



Winnipeg, Man. 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 

In October, 1979, Local 343 celebrated its 
92nd anniversary and held a pin presentation 
ceremony for its longstanding members. 
There was a large gathering of members 
in attendance for the ceremonies. 
Members who received awards were, from left 
to right: Robert Alarie, 20-years; Mike Artimo- 
wich, 25-years; Fred Grewe, 25-years; Michael 
Pasieka, 25-years; Paul Hutzal, 30-years; Peter 



Marchyshyn, 30-years; Peter Stepaniuk, 30- 
years; and William Pentland, 35-years. 

Other members who received service pins 
but were unable to attend the ceremony were: 
20-year members Walter Kowalzik and Brian 
A. McCann; 25-year members John Cheguis, 
Joseph Gratton, Dmytro Iwanicki, Emile 
Langhan, Deitrich Lessing, and Jacob Neufeld; 
30-year members Fred Byron, William Kamke, 
Dave Pearson, and Walter Rakoczy; 60-year 
member H. S. Ford. 



CHILLICOTHE, O. 

Local 1255 recently presented 30-year pins 
to 14 members. Four of the members had 
more than 40 years of service each. Those 
honored included: Everett Trader, John Satter- 
field, Harry Smith, Harry Harris, Ernest 
Atwood, Joseph Clark, Bertsel Curtis, Russell 
Dennewitz, Harry Ginther, Jr., John Lovsey, 
M. M. McCarley, Bert McCown, Everett Oldaker, 
and Homer Penwell. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



MIAMI, FLA. 

In November, 1979, Local 1509 held a 
meeting to present service pins to its long- 
standing members. The following members 
were honored: 

Picture No. 1 shows 25-year members. Fron 1 
row, ieft to right: Mario Alleva, business 
representative; Norwood Roberts; Ernest Van 
Eyk; Ben Roberts; Alfonse NunziatO; Albert 
Leavey; William Spangler; Augustin (Gus) 
Martinez; Sidney Bates; and J. E. Sheppard, 
president. 

Second row, left to right: Thomas Puma; 
Albert Pioth; Robert Markel; Norbert Nowak; 
Cruz Martinez; Edmond Ponce de Leon; Charles 
Schnetzer; O'Neil Martin, Erwin Rudolph; James 
Osipov; and Vincent Leo. 

Back row, left to right: Buford Richardson; 
Nollie Frye; Earl Biddle; Charles Canada; 
Barry Balz ; Verlon Baldwin; John Amerson; 
Louis Benoit; and George Hogan. 

Picture No. 2 shows 30-year members. Front 
row, left to right: Mario Alleva, business 
representative; Fred Jevnaas; William Maori; 
Thomas Mercer; Walter McCoy; Clifford I. 
Taylor; James Cain; Jack Roberts; and Ester L. 
Woods. 

Back row, left to right: Charles Vector; 
Charles Higgins; John Edwards; John Cook; 
Daniel Arace; John Gritzke; Henry Trowell, 
Arthur Little, and J. E. Sheppard. 

Picture No. 3 shows, from left to right: 
35-year members Jose Otero, one of three 
remaining charter members of Local 1509, and 
R. A. Jones. 

Picture No. 4 shows, from left to right: 
40-year members Robert Artioli and Gus 
Matson. 

Picture No. 5 shows, from left to right: 
25 and 30-year members Norwood Roberts, 
Jack Roberts, and Ben Roberts, all brothers. 




Miami, Fla. — Picture No. 3 



Miami, Fla. — Picture No. 4 



CICERO, ILL. 

Millwrights Local 1693 recently conducted a 
25-year membership pin presentation. Pic- 
tured are: William Gundich, financial secretary; 
William Cook, vice president, Chicago District 
Council; Henry Duzka, 25-year member; W. 
Bud Hine, business manager; Donald Schultz, 
25-year member; and Earl Oliver, president 
and business representative, Local 1693. 
The pins were presented following a regular 
business meeting. 



MADISON, N.J. 

On December 18, Local 620 presented 
25-year pins. Starting from the left: Angelo 
lossa, George Sarno, Business Representative 
George Laufenberg, Alistair Anderson and Leo 
Moran. 

Also receiving 25-year pins but not pictured 
were: Arthur Conklin, Berger Frostad, George 
Gordon, Clifford Helmer, Robert Pomeroy, 
Edward Reading, Martin Snover, and Charles 
Watkins. 




Miami, Fla. — Picture No. 5 




Madison, NJ. 



APRIL, 19 80 



33 



BALTIMORE, MD. 

Last fall, millwrights Local 1548 presented pins to its longstanding 
members. Those members who received awards are pictured in the 
accompanying photographs. 

Picture No. 1 shows 20-year members T. Bowers, D. Duke, J. 0. 
Johns, N. Nichols, J. Woods, V. Vermillion, R. Sewell, E. Togersen, and 
J. Percell. 

Picture No. 2 show 25-year members J. Bland, J. Duke, C. Henderson, 
D. Ohlander, D. Meadows, R. Sumpter, F. Sours, J. Ziegler, Sr., 
D. Williams, and J. Nash. 

Picture No. 3 shows 30-year members M. Jensen, V. Turner, 0. Jones, 
B. Teague, P. Wandasiewicz, E. Gilbert, J. Olivier, B. Martin, 
P. Bollinger, and J. Macken. 




Baltimore, Md. — Picture No. 1 





Baltimore, Md. — Picture No. 2 




Baltimore, Md. — Picture No. 3 



POINT PLEASANT, W.VA. 



On October 4, 1979, Carpenters Local 1159 presented pins to the 
men shown in the accompanying picture. Left to right, L. W. Holley, 
40 yrs. ; Jules Biron, 35 yrs. ; T. C. Caudill, 30 yrs.; Fred Tripp and 
Jack Hart, 25-yr. pins. 




BATON ROUGE, LA. 

In November, 1979, Local 1098 held its second annual 25-year 
membership awards banquet at the Knights of Columbus Hall. 
Financial Secretary E. J. Ardoin presented the service awards to the 
following members: From left to right: M. A. Couvillion, Alex Willie, 
W. D. Abies, Clifton Allen, Mance Martin, Leal LaCaze, and Wilbert 
Bordelon. 

Other members who received 25-year pins were Clyde Cooper, 
Clyde Harrell, James R. Hull, A. J. Neck, Lloyd Rivett, and Jessie 
Talbot, Sr. 




Baton Rouge, La. 



ROCKFORD, ILL. 

At a meeting last fall, Local 792 honored its 25 and 30-year 
members for their longtime service in the union. 30-year members 
received gold membership cards, and 25-year members received 
service pins. The following members were honored: 

Picture No. 1— 30-year members, from left to right: William 
Highbarger, Financial Secretary Leroy Anderson, M. S. Belknap, Arthur 
Lindgren, Clarence Corey, William Karwelis, Erick Beck, Wilbur Hoffman, 
Algot Carlson, William Canterbury, Gunnard Bjork, Cloyd Bennett, 
Henry Norquist, Herbert Larson, Dewey Nettz, Herman Johnson, Milton 
Holmes, and Business Representative Lewis Blais. 

Picture No. 2— 30-year members, from left to right: Financial 
Secretary Leroy Anderson, Charles Stanfel, Olav Dyrlid, George Kiesling, 
Warren Atkins, John James, Russell Marsili, Tom Trefftz, Joe 
Wilhelmsen, John Sandona, Paul Lundberg, Bert Anderson, Howard 
Sweeney, William Highbarger, Willard Blomquist, Harry Lillieberg, 
and Dewey Nettz. 

Picture No. 3— 25-year members, from left to right: Financial 
Secretary Leroy Anderson, Erwin Splittgerber, Phil Ross, Duane Propp, 
Cletus Brandt, Kornelius DeJong, Lewis Steuer, and Business 
Representative Lewis Blais. 




W 



M& 



M M 




Rockford, III. — Picture No. 1 








tM*>$ : > - 


grin 


|Ja 


V ' ^Lr U 


T^! 






rn^rn- 


■** 1 


t' v "^fllJ 





Rockford, III.— Picture No. 2 




4-ibJ 



Point Pleasant, W. Va. 



Rockford, III.— Picture No. 3 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



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The following list of 721 deceased members and spouses repre- 
sents a total of $919,389.84 in death claims paid for the month. 



Local Union, City 

1, Chicago, III.— Mrs. Harold W. Halsall. 

2, Cincinnati, Oh. — Mrs. Joseph J. Montag, 

William W. Van Hise. 

7, Minneapolis, Mn. — Mrs. Royal Nystrom. 

8, Philadelphia, Pa. — Mrs. Frederick J. Hass, 

Mrs. John J. Kane. 

10, Chicago, III.— Mrs. Frank D. Carroll. 

11, Cleveland, Oh. — George Bartholme, Sr., 

Frank S. Duale, Alex F. Piwarski, 
George M. Wilson, Sr. 

12, Syracuse, N.Y. — Fred Van Derhoof. 

13, Chicago, III. — Joseph A. Fiddick. 

14, San Antonio, Tx. — Fred Mahan, William 
J. Petray. 

15, Hackensack, NJ. — Salvatore Brancato, 

Dominick Gadaleta. 

18, Hamilton, Ont., Can.— Donald E. 

Mowat. 

19, Detroit, Mich. — Mrs. Gordon Hawe. 

20, New York, N.Y.— Michael P. Giovanelli, 

Arthur Iverson. 
22, San Francisco, Calif. — Benjamin W. 
Dawson, Mrs. Robert Jensen, Mrs. Gary 
McCamish, Charles C. McManus. 

25, Los Angeles, Calif.— Willis P. Paige. 

26, E. Detroit, Mich — Mrs. Achiel Amez, 
Harold A. Fa'rver, Mrs. William H. In- 
nes, George A. Stimac, Dyonizy Zdy- 
bicki. 

27, Toronto, Ont., Can. — Henry Skrzypek. 
33, Boston, Ma. — John M. Dunphy. 

35, San Rafael, Calif. — Mrs. Theodore E. 

Cirul, Cecil A. McCreary, John Olson. 

36, Oakland, Calif.— Lester Blevens, Clar- 

ence Hedstrom, Matt Johnson, Mrs. 
William Wirkkala. 

40, Boston, Ma. — John T. Lawrence. 

41, Woborn, Mass. — Walter Amero, Jr., 
Joseph E. Meuse. 

42, San Francisco, Ca. — Frank Seifert. 

43, Hartford, Ct.— Ruel E. Smith. 

44, Champaign, III. — Carl Austin Hendrick- 

son. 
47, St. Louis, Mo. — John F. Bopp, Mrs. 
Joseph Rede. 

50, Knoxville, Tn. — George E. Brooks, Mrs. 

Elmer Nelson. 

51, Boston, Ma. — August Karo, John Snook. 
53, White Plains, N.Y.— Mrs. John R. John- 
son. 

56, Boston, Ma. — Jacob S. Newell. 

58, Chicago, 111.— Carl J. Carlson, Fred 

Pearson. 

59, Lancaster, Pa. — Claude O. Barton. 

60, Indianapolis, Ind. — Mrs. Floyd H. Brad- 
ley, Sheldon Ercelle Dotson. 

61, Kansas City, Mo. — Walter F. Larsen, 
Joseph M. Lowe, Walter McCarty, Earl 
L. Momberg. 

62, Chicago, III. — James Spencer, Sr. 

64, Louisville, Ky. — John L. Allen, James E. 

Williams, Clem O. Wood. 
69, Canton, Oh.— Malvin T. Carroll. 
71, Fort Smith, Ark. — Eunice M. Brown. 

73, St. Louis, Mo. — Mrs. James Sheets. 

74, Chattanooga, Tn. — Sterling M. Franks. 
80, Chicago, III. — Ernest A. Heide, Samuel 

G. Howard, Peter Lundquist, Mrs. Vir- 
gil Massey. 

83, Halifax, N.S., Can.— Redvers Myers, 
Mrs. Clinton Nickerson, John Rector. 

87, St. Paul, Mn.— Frank T. Ferretti, John 
R. Larson, Rodney M. Slaughter. 

90, Evansville, Ind. — Robert L. Morris. 

93, Ottawa, Ont., Can. — Leopold Beaure- 



Local Union, City 

gard, Marinus Vandermeer. 

95, Detroit, Mich. — Manuel Montalvo, Jo- 
seph E. Waite. 

98, Spokane, Wa. — Harold A. Mathews, 
Stephen Edward Napier. 

101, Baltimore, Md.— Everett R. Billings, 
Victor Borlie, Robert Damsgaard, Lee 
M. Elliott,' Lawrence J. Foreacre, Albert 
P. Moore. 

102, Oakland, Ca. — Harry Gula, James M. 
Pollock, Mrs. Ivan Rawlings. 

103, Birmingham, Al. — Francis Lee Parsons, 
Barney C. Pierce. 

104, Dayton, Oh.— Michael W. Delaney, 
Watson W. Wisebaker. 

105, Cleveland, Oh. — Mrs. Harry Alexander, 
Antonio Clemente, Emil Dileno, Mrs. 
Patrick J. Moran. 

106, Des Moines, Iowa — Theodore Mikesell. 
109, Sheffield, Al.— Hendrix E. Gatlin, Jeff 

Lee Trimm. 
117, Albany, N.Y.— William T. Wood. 
121, Vineland, NJ.— Fred H. Kreckman. 



Death and Disability 

The Claims Department of the Gen- 
eral Treasurer's Office requests that 
all Financial Secretaries bring the fol- 
lowing to the attention of their mem- 
bership at the earliest opportunity: 

A "block" entitled TOTAL FOR 
ONE YEAR appears in the center of 
the In .Mcmoriam column on page 35 
of the February 1980 Carpenter Mag- 
azine. 

The information contained in this 
section should have read as follows: 
"By action of the 33d General Con- 
vention, the Brotherhood death bene- 
fit was increased on January 1, 1979. 
Schedule I was increased from a 
maximum of $600.00 to a maximum of 
$2,000 and Schedule II was increased 
from a maximum of $150.00 to a 
maximum of $300.00. As a result, the 
Brotherhood has paid out in one year 
— October 1978 through September 
1979, death benefits totalling $8,463,- 
265.32." 

All questions pertaining to death 
and disability benefits should be ad- 
dressed to the General Treasurer's 
Office, ATTENTION: Claims Depart- 
ment. 



128, St. Albans, W.V.— Lalie R. Cowger, Sr. 

129, Ha/.leton, Pa.— Joseph B. Kellner, John 
Tomasko. 

131, Seattle, Wa.— Elmer Bellah, Donald L. 
Goldbrand, Ellsworth J. Hawkins, Sr., 
Graydon J. Holden. Harvey J. Kinsey, 
William Kirby, Elmer R. Kukkonen, 
Mrs. Stephen P. Lewis. James R. Neu- 
man. 

132, Washington, D.C.— Hubert H. Arbo- 
gast. Homer C. Dell. Frank A. Dressier, 
Harold W. Holland, John E. Lund, Mrs. 
Vernon E. Marsteller. 

134, Montreal, Que., Can. — Marcel Leduc, 
Niilo Yrjola. 

135, New York, N.Y.— William A. Mann, 
Rubin Schwartz, Frank D. Pietro. 

155, N. rijinfic Id, N.J. — Adam Nuernberger. 



Local Union, City 

161, Kenosha, Wise. — Fred Sorenson. 

162, San Mateo, Ca. — Clarence Bergsing, 
Ted Erickson, James M. Peck. 

168, Kansas City, Ks. — Louie Buchmeier, 
Mural S. Cesar. 

181, Chicago, 111. — Sverre Haarsaker, Alfred 
Knudsen. 

182, Cleveland, Oh— Adolph H. Gottlieb, 
Adam Hechio. 

183, Peoria, 111.— Leo V. Nixon. 

184, Salt Lake City, Ut.— Mrs. Edwin Ink- 
ley. 

186, Steubenville, Oh.— William E. Davis, 

Sr., Homer C. Morgan. 
188, Yonkers, N.Y. — Ettore Joseph Giovine. 

194, Oakland, Ca.— Mrs. Ralph C. Burleigh, 
William McCauley, Charles A. Zerlang. 

195, Peru, III.— William Babington, Sr., 
Bradley B. Turner. 

198, Dallas, Tx. — Andrew T. Ewing, Marvin 
G. Webster. 

199, Chicago, III. — George Salata. 

200, Columbus, Oh.— Cyrus L. Atherton, 
Robert H. Myers, Norman C. Pickett. 

201, Wichita, Ks.— Dee E. Stahlman. 
207, Chester, Pa. — Mrs. Andrew Gibbs. 

210, Stamford, Conn.— Pearly V. Pelkey, 
Joseph Seagren. 

211, Pittsburgh. Pa.— Wesley R. Spatig. 
213, Houston, Tx.— Calvin N. Cherry, Jr., 

Mrs. Charles F. Itzen, Raymond D. Lea. 
215, Lafayette, Ind. — Vincent R. Schuster. 
218, Boston, Ma. — Mrs. Harold LeGrow. 
222, Washington, Ind. — Phillip S. Wineinger. 

225, Atlanta, Ga.— Marion O. Ayers, Wil- 
liam N. Griffith, Edward A. Hagans, 
William J. McCurry, Frank O. Trusty, 
Sr. 

226, Portland, Ore. — William Bohannon, 
George D. Lunsford, Mrs. Dan T. 
Smith, Mrs. Henry Workman. 

228, Pottsville, Pa.— Charles Enalavage, Sr. 
230, Pittsburgh, Pa.— Joseph S. Cherubin. 
235, Riverside, Ca.— Mrs. Milton Ofstad. 
242, Chicago, III. — Mrs. John E. Lakinger, 

John A. Lechner, David Noble, Gordon 

Pearson. 
246, New York, N.Y.— John Skura, Jr., 

Stephen Urban, Alfred Zicherman. 

254, Cleveland, Oh. — Harry Bissontz. 

255, Bloomingburg, N.Y. — Adam Papuga. 

256, Savannah, Ga. — Lincoln B. Hiott. 

257, New York, N.Y.— Gunne Eikild, Leslie 
Eliasen, Edward Franzen, Axel Hokan- 
son, Herschel E. O'Neal, Knute Peter- 
son. 

259, Jackson, Tn.— Mrs. Roy Pitner. 

261, Scranton, Pa. — Elmer Harris, Raymond 

Hird, Aloysius G. Nolan, Joseph Przed- 

zinkowski. 

264, Milwaukee, Wise. — Onufry Charnecl.i. 

265, Saugcrties, N.Y. — Anthony Sarcona. 

266, Stockton, Ca.— Virgil P. Gregory. 

267, Dresden, Oh. — Dempsey P. Moore. 
272, Chicago Hts., III.— William F. Mancke. 
275, Newton, Ma. — Mrs. John J. Pendergast. 
280, Lockport, N.Y.— Howard F. Brigham, 

James Gervase. 
300. Ventura, Ca.— Vondell Gales. 
302, Huntington, W.V.— Mrs. Fulton L. 

Burchett, Ross V. Hoback. 
304, Denison-Sherman, Tx. — Leo H. Smith. 
314, Madison, Wise. — Mrs. Preston J. Er- 

dahl, Sr., Joseph B. Gehin, Mrs. John 

Murphy. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



316, San Jose, Ca. — Mrs. Edmund P. Pain- 

chaud. 
320, Waterville, Me. — Mrs. Wallace Bou- 

rassa. 
325, Paterson, NJ. — Joseph Hagen, Peter 

Heyn. 
329, Oklahoma City, Ok.— Charles R. Fruit, 

Lemuel M. Hise, Clyde R. James, Wil- 

lard Wilson Plowman, Sr., Wilbur P. 

Smith. 
333, New Kensington, Pa. — Laverne D. 

Householder. 

337, Detroit, Mich. — Carl H. Benson, John 
E. Lee. 

338, Seattle, Wa.— Elling Olsen. 

340, Hagerstown, Md. — Snively E. Glesner. 

343, Winnipeg, Mb., Can. — Mrs. Harry Gar- 
rek. 

344, Waukesha, Wise. — Mrs. Alvin H. Gloe, 
Stanley A. Graser. 

345, Memphis, Tn. — Leland Kellum, James 
L. Phifer. 

359, Philadelphia, Pa. — John Campbell, Em- 
erich Koshak, Victor E. Marquart, John 
T. Ragg. 

360, Galesburg, III. — George W. Hyman, 
Clifford M. Pearson. 

366, New York, N.Y.— Walter Fisher, Per 
W. Johansson, Mrs. Patrick Quirke. 

367, Centralia, 111. — Irvie Dock. 

368, Allentown, Pa.— Emil A. Gilly, Clar- 
ence Molinaro, Paul A. Pobuda, Elmer 
Roeder. 

372, Lima, Oh. — James V. Kindle. 
374, Buffalo, N.Y.— Andrew Hadvabne. 

378, Edwardsville, III. — Raymond Hoffman. 

379, Texarkana, Tx. — Shack Clements, Mrs. 
Curtis M. Whatley, Mrs. Earl R. Whit- 
son. 

386, Angels Camp, Ca. — Max Keller. 

398, Lewiston, Idaho — Mrs. Ralph C. Guest, 
Mrs. Bert Kloster. 

400, Omaha, Neb. — Adolph Gunnar Carl- 
son. 

403, Alexandria, La. — Joe Ace Terral, Jr. 

410, Ft. Madison, Iowa — Byard Logan. 

413, South Bend, Ind. — Henry I. Carpenter. 

422, New Brighton, Pa.— William R. Her- 
man. 

424, Hingham, Ma. — Earl Dingwell. 

425, El Paso, Tx.— James W. Harper. 

434, Chicago, III. — Michael Hawtree, Peter 

Kaczmarek, John P. Stephenson. 
440, Buffalo, N.Y.— Alfred L. Zachowicz. 
452, Vancouver, B.C., Can.— Mrs. Eldar P. 

Jonsson, Mrs. W. McBurney, Mrs. 

Romeo Simonetto. 
455, Somerville, N.J. — Hugo H. Leusenring. 
458, Clarksville, Ind.— Paul Walter Misch- 

nick. 
465, Ardmore, Pa. — Robert H. Weatherby. 

468, New York, N.Y.— Vincent J. Miller. 

469, Cheyenne, Wy. — Donald R. McCoy. 

470, Tacoma, Wa. — Orville L. Ammann, 
Joseph S. Funkenbusch. 

488, Bronx, N.Y. — Oscar Antsman, Vincent 

Cappelli, Vidal Cirino. 
490, Passaic, N.J. — George Weisfeld. 

492, Reading, Pa.— Mrs. Robert McCor- 
mack, Walter W. Reich. 

493, Mt. Vernon, N.Y.— Paul F. Capparella, 
William H. Christe, Giacinto Di Vin- 
cenzo. 

496, Kankakee, III. — Raymond J. Lipperini. 

497, Crossett, Ark.— Charlie Edward Pam- 
plin. 

500, Butler, Pa.— Carl M. Snodgrass. 

504, Chicago, III. — John Shmigelsky. 

507, Nashville, Tn.— Russell S. Douglas, Sr., 
Ted B. Richmond. 

512, Ypsilanti, Mich. — Ben Romans. 

515, Colo. Springs, Colo. — Caryl D. John- 
son, Marshall M. Stark. 

517, Portland, Me. — James R. Cooke. 

526, Galveston, Tx. — Paul L. Bundick, Joe 
East. 



528, Washington, D.C. — Jacob Bouchard. 
535, Norwood, Ma. — Nesbit Clark, Julius 

Jeanguenin, William Johnson, Joel Ko- 

ski, Edward M. Reid. 

540, Holyoke, Ma. — Clarence B. Hamel. 

541, Washington, Pa. — George T. Williams. 
543, Mamaroneck, N.Y. — Gustav Albers, 

Dominick Troilo. 

563, Glendale, Ca.— Harry A. Peters. 

579, St. Johns, Nfld., Can.— Clyde Budden. 

608, New York, N.Y.— Joseph Adjutor Cou- 
ture, Mrs. Edward W. Moore. 

610, Port Arthur, Tx.— Mrs. Homer W. 
Bailey. 

620, Madison, N.J. — Mrs. George Chamber- 
lain. 

623, Atlantic Co., NJ.— Allan R. Van Sant. 

627, Jacksonville, Fla. — Mrs. Leroy Brad- 
ley, John L. Copeland, Mrs. Luther L. 
Sides, Robert H. Turner. 

639, Akron, Oh. — Mrs. Ernest Darlak, 
Thomas I. Frissell. 

642, Richmond, Ca.— Albert N. Schmit, Wil- 
liam Swart. 

650, Pomeroy, Oh. — Lawrence Reed, Green 
W. Vance. 

658, Millinocket, Me.— Joseph A. Bartlett. 

665, Amarillo, Tx. — Dewell L. Johnson, 
Lysle K. Stout. 

668, Palo Alto, Ca.— Mrs. Clifford Ander- 
son, John E. McKinnon, Mrs. David 
M. Napier, Mrs. Lionel L. Padilla. 

669, Harrisburg, III. — Mrs. Bluford Seets. 
678, Dubuque, Iowa — Frank L. Bellows, 

William R. Haber, Ernest E. Meader. 
690, Little Rock, Ark.— Vernon V. Henry. 
698, Covington, Ky.— Peter B. Beers, Jr., 

Mrs. Joseph C. Herrmann. 
703, Lockland, Oh. — Harry A. Bergen. 

709, Shenandoah, Pa. — Thomas L. James. 

710, Long Beach, Ca. — Lawrence G. Treinen. 
715, Elizabeth, N.J. — Renaldo Bertolami. 

719, Freeport, III.— John E. Donker. 

720, Baton Rouge, La. — Earnest R. Richard- 
son. 

721, Los Angeles, Ca. — John H. Clay, Be- 
nito C. Gallegos, John Haas. 

725, Litchfield, III.— Glen Cole. 

739, Cincinnati, Oh. — Edward T. Meyers. 

742, Decatur, III. — William L. Landers. 

743, Bakersfield, Ca.— Mrs. Louden D. Bell. 
745, Honolulu, Hi. — Robert Shoichi Shinke, 

Yoshiji Suda. 
750, Junction City, Ks. — Steven V. Gascich. 
753, Beaumont, Tx. — Charlie H. Kennon. 
764, Shreveport, La. — Harold T. Griffie. 

766, Albert Lea, Mn. — Gerald A. Johnson. 

767, Ottumwa, Iowa — Mrs. Rex Kinion. 
769, Pasadena, Ca. — Walter Jacobsen, Mrs. 

Julius J. Schiebler, Jesse B. Wilson. 

771, Watsonville, Ca.— Ronald J. Norton. 

772, Clinton, Iowa — Anthony Jost. 

773, Braddock, Pa.— Paul Caliari. 
783, Sioux Falls, S.D.— Warren Wicks. 

795, St. Louis, Mo. — Ralph M. Contestabile, 

Mrs. Edward L. Durbin. 
801, Woonsocket, R.I. — George Guertin, 

Romeo R. Sweck. 
803, Metropolis, III.— Cecil Tolen. 
819, W. Palm Beach, Fla,— Anthony Col- 

angelo, Charles H. Haugh, Eugene 

Hevey. 
833, Berwyn, Pa. — John Cunningham. 

838, Sunbury, Pa. — Joseph A. Poltonavage. 

839, Des Plaines, III. — Robert Basler, August 
M. Callebert, Richard Del Boccio, 
David J. Kremer. 

845, Norwood, Pa. — Ivan M. Lucas, Francis 

J. Saunders. 
848, San Bruno, Ca. — Charles Steinbach. 

870, Spokane, Wa.— Albert H. Brown. 

871, Battle Creek, Mich.— Harold Geno. 
891, Hot Springs, Ark.— Roger C. Mears, Sr. 
902, Brooklyn, N.Y. — August Org, Carmine 

Rivelli. 



904, Jacksonville, III. — Charles H. Nunes, 
Sr., Truman B. Smith. 

911, Kalispell, Mt.— Mrs. Eugene C. Matkin. 

912, Richmond, Ind. — Mrs. Arbie Corder, 
Mrs. Robert Middleton. 

925, Salinas, Ca. — Delbert F. Barnes. 

943, Tulsa, Ok. — Johnnie Coonhead. 

944, San Bernardino, Ca. — George W. 
Hover, Cecil James, Charles W. Jobes. 

947, Ridgway, Pa. — George A. Geyer. 

953, Lake Charles, La.— Mrs. Henry H. 
Cryar. 

955, Appleton, Wise. — Charles Birk. 

958, Marquette, Mich.— Santo W. Alde- 
garie, Martin J. Herrala, Norman Peter- 
son, Joseph F. Stuer. 

965, De Kalb, 111.— Mrs. Fred Sprowls. 

971, Reno, Nev. — James Rasmussen. 

982, Detroit, Mi.— Herbert L. McKnight. 

993, Miami, Fla.— Mrs. Wilbur E. Roberts. 

997, Pottstown, Pa.— Martin J. Henry. 

998, Royal Oak, Mi.— Edward Dolan, Rob- 
ert Kahsin. 

1024, Cumberland, Md. — Stanley J. Bane, 

Russell B. Whitlock. 
1046, Palm Springs, Ca. — Okie Myers. 

1052, Hollywood, Ca. — Dwyane Clements, 
Motoshi Nakanishi, Nicholas S. Teneta, 

George E. Tozier. 

1053, Milwaukee, Wise. — Lawrence Lemke, 
Mrs. Emil Lentz, Jr. 

1073, Philadelphia, Pa. — Samuel Braverman, 

Harry Shanker. 
1084, Angleton, Tx.— Roy T. Quinn. 
1089, Phoenix, Az. — George Dame, Bernard 

W. Eastep. 
1091, Bismarck, N.D.— Otto D. Voegele. 
1098, Baton Rouge, La. — Jesse R. Farmer, 

Lloyd E. Thornton. 
1108, Cleveland, Oh.— Adam Schnur. 
1120, Portland, Ore. — Dominic Alfano, 

Orian V. Ren tf row. 
1128, LaGrange, 111. — Mrs. John Maves. 
1138, Toledo, Oh.— Rudy Yutzy. 
1140, San Pedro, Ca.— Dee Elliott. 

1146, Green Bay, Wise. — Henry Dubois, 
John H. Trofka. 

1147, Roseville, Ca.— Ronald H. Cumley. 
1149, San Francisco, Ca. — Hudson Ryan. 
1160, Pittsburgh, Pa.— Ernest Braun. 
1164, New York, N.Y.— Mrs. Tony Stauber. 
1176, Fargo, N.D. — Johannes B. Ramsholm. 
1178, New Glasgow, N.S., Can.— Mrs. Clif- 
ford D. Jardine. 

1184, Seattle, Wash.— Guy W. Faehnrich, 
John V. Josserand. 

1207, Charleston, W.V.— Ireland J. Vinson, 
Sr. 

1222, Medford, N.Y.— Harold Henderson, 
Sugurd Nilsen. 

1224, Emporia, Ks. — Mrs. Lloyd E. Johnson. 

1235, Modesto, Ca. — Steven L. Chapman. 

1237, Dawson Creek, B.C., Can. — Joseph H. 
Kubiski. 

1266, Austin, Tx.— Bailey M. Curry. 

1274, Decatur, Al. — Mrs. Ben F. Lentz. 

1280, Mountain View, Ca. — Francis S. Gen- 
try. _ 

1285, Allentown, Pa.— Robert C. Ritter. 

1289, Seattle, Wa.— William H. Frost, Rob- 
ert D. Lull, Reginald A. McKee, Darrol 
C. Owen, Edward O. Waldrop. 

1292, Huntington, N.Y.— Philip Gramb. 

1296, San Diego, Ca. — Ernie Billmayer, 
Owen E. Middleton. 

1298, Nampa, Idaho — Joseph F. Carroll. 

1300, San Diego, Ca.— John C. McKittrick. 

1301, Monroe, Mich. — Dody Jacobs. 
1303, Port Angeles, Wa. — Joseph Vane. 
1319, Albuquerque, N.M.— Arthur P. Grif- 
fith, Harold M. Trott. 

1329, Independence, Mo. — James H. Bloom, 
Curtis E. Richardson, Maurice Van 
Maele. 

1331, Hyannis, Ma. — Kusti O'Jala. 

Continued on next page 



APRIL, 1980 



37 



IN MEMORIAM 

Continued from Page 37 



1333, State College, Pa.— Andrew M. Blasko. 
1342, Irvington, NJ.— William G. Boiler, 

Donald J. Flaherty. 
1344, Portages, Wise. — James E. Koepke. 
1346, Vernon, B.C., Can.— Jack F. O'Neill. 
1365, Cleveland, Oh.— William J. Kuhn. 
1368, Kenton, Wa. — Mrs. Thomas J. Hines. 
1373, Flint, Mi.— Mrs. Jack Rahm. 

1393, Toledo, Oh.— Carl M. M^Lin. 

1394, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. — Mrs. Ferdinand 
T. Amato. 

1401, Buffalo, N.Y. — Theodore Koeglmeier, 
John S. Sniegowski. 

1402, Richmond, Va.— Carl J. Stover. 
1407, San Pedro, Ca.— Lloyd E. Curtis. 

Jacob Huck, Mrs. Lee Pounders, Robert 

Richina. 
1416, New Bedford, Ma.— William J. Dias. 
1419, Johnstown, Pa. — James W. Lamb. 
1421, Arlington, Tx. — Paul H. Anderson. 
1423, Corpus Christi, Tx.— George W. 

Green. 
1427, Vanier, Que., Can. — Leo Lemelin. 
1437, Compton, Ca.— Malcolm R. Elder. 
1445, Topeka, Ks. — Harry Dahlstrom. 
1452, Detroit, Mi. — Francis A. Beamish, 

Juozas Jarusevicius. 
1456, New York, N.Y. — Arne Larsen, Aul- 

ton H. White. 
1463, Omaha, Neb. — Melvin Eaton. 
1478, Redondo Beach, Ca.— Mrs. John F. 

Davis. 

1485, LaPorte, Ind.— Jesse R. Malchow, Ed- 
ward I. Witek. 

1486, Auburn, Ca.— Nels Rafdal. 

1497, Los Angeles, Ca. — Felipe Baltierra. 

1498, Provo, Utah— Elmer E. Backus, Jo- 
seph A. Bingham. 

1506, Los Angeles, Ca. — John Alton An- 
drews, Mrs. Desmond S. Christy. 

1507, El Monte, Ca.— Mack G. Logan. 
Claud H. Morefield, Ernest J. Schmoldt. 

1509, Miami, Fla. — Mrs. Robert F. Bauman, 

Ralph W. King. 
1512, Blountville, Tn.— Floyd Tester. 
1519, Ironton, Oh.— Arthur M. Wilkes. 
1529, Kansas City, Ks.— William L. Twy- 

man. 
1536, New York, N.Y.— Mrs. Isak B^n- 

schick. 
1554, Miami, Fla. — Arthur L. Mclntyre. 
1564, Casper, Wy. — Mrs. William E. Cop- 

perfield, Furd G. Dietsch, Lloyd A. 

Jones. 

1596, St. Louis, Mo.— Mrs. Robert E. Ker- 
koski, Mrs. Rudolph Novak. 

1597, Bremerton, Wa. — Ernest E. Olsen. 

1598, Victoria, B.C., Can.— Jack Boutillier, 
Cyril A. Gabler, Tom Money. 

1607, Los Angeles, Ca.— Billy J. Williams. 

1622, Haywood, Ca. — Robert Knight, Frank 
F. Livermore. Carmen Tritto. 

1635, Kansas City, Mo. — James E. Linville. 

1644, Minneapolis, Mn. — William Dise, Mrs. 
Richard J. Osier, Walter Sironen. 

1648, Laguna Beach, Ca. — Einar A. See- 
gren, George Untied. Jr. 

1664, Bloomington, Ind. — John Clifford Un- 
derwood. 

1683, Eldorado, Ark.— Mrs. E. H. Cottrell. 

1686, Stillwater, Okla.— Edwin H. Meek. 

1688, Manchester, N.H. — Ernest Bienvenue. 

1689, Tacoma, Wa. — Russell Krones, James 
Murrey. 

1691, Coeur d'Alene, Id.— Max E. Netz- 
bandt. 

1693, Chicago, III.— Bert R. Andrus, Ken- 
neth Kline. 



1701, Buffalo, N.Y.— Aram S. Moushlian. 

1715, Vancouver, Wa.— Ralph W. Ells, Mrs. 
Joe Noyes. 

1725, Daytona Beach, Fla.— William S. Fin- 
ney, Sr.. William W. Brown. 

1733, Marshfield, Wise— Cletus F. Hart, 
Henry F. Peterman. 

1741, Milwaukee, Wise. — Ladd A. Chernik, 
Hammond L. Mattison. 

1746, Portland, Or.— Mrs. John R. Staggen- 
borg. 

1750, Cleveland, Oh. — Irving Hershman. 

1752, Pomona, Ca. — Arnold R. Brady. Don 
Roseberry. 

1764, Marion, Va. — Mrs. Harvey S. Ander- 
son, Charles W. Mathena, Sr. 

1765, Orlando, Fla.— William G. Starling. 

1771, Eldorado, III.— Orville Louis Brown. 

1772, Hicksville, N.Y.— Henry Keeler. 
1775, Columbus, Ind. — Raymond S. Perkins. 
1780, Las Vegas, Nev.— Richard Small, Ollie 

Stephan. 

1784, Chicago, III.— Paul Kohler. 

1815, Santa Ana, Ca.— Ralph E. Chapman, 
Oscar P. Woodv. 

1818, Clarksville, Tn.— William F. C. Gil- 
more, Howard Rosenbaum. 

1822, Ft. Worth, Tx.— Samuel D. Bassham, 
Lester E. Graber, James E. Nelson, 
Lloyd W. Phillips, William E. Rains. 

1823, Philadelphia, Pa. — Mildred Graves, 
Max Schwartz. 

1836, Russellville, Ark.— Roy W. Bell. 
1839, Washington, Mo. — Mrs. Brian C. 

Todebusch. 
1846, New Orleans, La. — Herman P. Char- 

rier, Arnold C. Schaefer, James M. 

Thompson. 
1849, Pasco, Wash. — Mrs. Otto Gross, Clair 

Jim Rice, Charlie F. Taylor. 
1865, Minneapolis, Mn. — Aivars 1. Deme. 
1889, Downers Grove, III.— Mrs. Richard 

Backlund. Frank L. Beckous, Mrs. 

Frederick L. Dawson. 
1896, The Dalles, Ore.— Donald D. Peterson. 
1906, Philadelphia, Pa.— Paul A. Landis. 
1911, Beckley, W.V. — Vere L. Sampson. 

1921, Hempstead, N.Y.— Mrs. Raphel De- 
veau, Ernest G. Gatzki. Emil Katzinski, 
James Klausen, Carl Vogt. 

1922, Chicago, III. — Mrs. Garnett Harmon, 
Joseph Lecki. 

1929, Cleveland, Oh.— Toivo Maki. 
1936, Lewistown, Pa. — Charles Wilson, Jr. 
1959, Riverside, Ca. — Mrs. Gene Berg. 
1963, Toronto, Ont., Can.— Rogerio Car- 
reira, Reino Nurmela, Mrs. Viljo Suomi. 
1976, Los Angeles, Ca. — Charles Barsh. 

2006, Los Gatos, Ca.— Mrs. Gilbert S. Silva. 

2007, Orange, Tx.— Pete G. Wilson. 

2027, Rapid City, S.D.— Mrs. Donald B. 

Strachan. 
2040, Coburg, Ore. — Donald J. Niece. 
2046, Martinez, Ca. — Peter T. Cardinalc, 

Mrs. Robert C. Fleming. 
2155, New York, N.Y.— Frank Boos, Rich- 
ard Kruse. 
2164, San Francisco, Ca. — Chester Smith. 
2168, Boston, Ma.— Mrs. William H. Mac- 

Kenzie. 
2170, Sacramento, Ca. — Don Rhoades. 
2190, Harlingen, Tx.— Rollie Lee Parker. 
2203, Anaheim, Ca.— Felix E. Hollis. 
2209, Louisville, Ky— John W. Waters, Ben 

I. Woodward, Sr. 
2230, Greensboro, N.C.— Clyde J. Bryd, 

Frank W. Foley, Sr. 
2232, Houston, Tx.— Forrest A. Ratcliff. 
2235, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Leonard E. Berk- 

stresser. 
2239, Fremont, Oh.— Carl Scholt. 
2241, Brookland, N.Y.— Mrs. Michael Mos- 

kowitz. 



2250, Red Bank, N.J.— Dimond McKean. 
2252, Grand Rapids, Mi.— Charles O. Mauk. 
2274, Pittsburgh, Pa.— Mr. & Mrs. Forrest 

Henry, Albert T. Orsborn. Warren C. 

Spencer. 
2281, Atlanta, Ga.— William E. Kite. 

2287, New York, N.Y.— Henry Sinram. 

2288, Los Angeles, Ca. — Floyd J. Hussin, 
William J. Martin, Mrs. Tom Mitchell, 
Fred J. Trimble. 

2298, Rolla. Mo.— Robert A. Chrisco. 
2308, Fullerton, Ca.— Mrs. Robert F. De 

Hart. 
2315, Jersey City, N.J.— John W. Wilson. 
2332, Fergus Falls, Mn. — Rueben A. Nyhus. 
2361, Orange, Ca. — Emery R. Ramey. 
2375, Wilmington, Ca.— Cecil C. DeVore, 

Edward L. Meredith, Leland J. Strange. 
2391, Holland, Mi. — Lawrence Prins. 
2399, Mont-Laurier, Que., Can. — Roger 

Briere. 

2435, lnglewood, Ca. — Mrs. John H. Mc- 
Clintock, Mrs. Clifford Tubbs. 

2436, New Orleans, La. — Mrs. Euel Single- 
tary. 

2463, Ventura, Ca.— William L. Cass, Mrs. 

James C. Garcia. 
2466, Pembroke, Ont., Can. — Mrs. Frank R. 

Cotnam. 
2484, Orange, Tx.— Carl E. Shirley. 
2498, I.ongview, Wa. — Arthur J. Wessman. 

2519, Seattle, Wa.— Fred C. Johnson. 

2520, Anchorage, Alaska — Frederick L. Ben- 
nett, James W. Holben. 

2554, Lebanon, Ore. — George Dane Bilyeu, 

Guy E. Miller. 
2564, Grand Falls, Nfld., Can.— Clarence 

Ryan. 
2589, Seneca, Ore. — Laverne Porter, James 

R. Gullett. 
2592, Eureka, Ca. — Tracy Roby. 
2601, Lafayette, Ind. — William Reynolds, 

Paul W. Slaughterbeck. 
2605, Chambersburg, Pa.— William H. 

Shomper. 
2628, Centralia, Wa.— Mrs. Theodore Dorn. 
2633, Tacoma, Wa. — Mrs. Jesse R. Nance. 
2636, Valsetz, Ore.— Willard J. Dunaway, 

Vernon P. Gore. 
2693, Thunder Bay, Ont., Can.— Noe Huard. 
2739, Yakima, Wa.— Arthur M. Busey. 
2755, Kalama, Wash.— Paul Hadrich. 
2761, McCleary, Wash.— Royce D. Miller. 
2784, Coquille, Ore. — Steven J. Berning, 

Charles C. Fields. 
2816, Emmett, Idaho — Mrs. David Thorne. 
2825, Nashville, Tn.— Willie F. Buffington. 
2845, Forest Grove, Ore. — James J. Worlton. 
2848, Dallas, Tx.— Siegfried E. Eiselstein. 
2907, Wejd, Ca.— Paul M. Axford, Robert 

A. Shaw. 

2949, Roseburg. Ore.— Gerald R. Coen. Ray 

B. Cunningham, Mrs. Carl Elfering, 
Mrs. Darreld S. Hanna, Mrs. Carl A. 
Spuhn, Ronald S. Walker. 

2979, Merrill, Wise.— David H. Schneider. 

2982, Staunton, Va.— Robert B. Dull. 

3038, Bonner, Mont.— Ernest 1. Hallford. 

3099, Aberdeen, Wa. — Gustav A. Jacobson. 

3119, Tacoma, Wa.— Carl Dan. 

3154, Monticello, Ind. — Martin W. Snider. 

3161, Maywood, Ca.— Steve R. Contreras, 
Mrs. Lewis Diaz, Benjamin W. Haynes, 
Henderson Lowe. 

3182, Portland, Ore.— Howard A. Conley. 

3214, Grand Forks, B.C., Can.— Mrs. Nick 
Borisenkoff. 

9085, Perth Amboy, N.J.— Thomas P. Hu- 
danish, Sr. 

9345, Miami, Fla. — Paul L. Mayhew. 

9507, San Luis Obispo, Ca.— Donald L. Al- 
lison. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 




COLD WEATHER AID 

A Personal Cold Weather Breathing 
Aid recently introduced by Nebel's Ap- 
pliances, Inc. of Dolton, 111., enables the 
wearer to breathe air warmed by normal 
body temperature in- 
stead of cold outside 
air. The Cold 
Weather Breathing 
Aid does not inter- 
fere with even vigor- 
ous outdoor activity 
such as construction 
work, skiing, snow- 
mobiling, etc. 

Tests have shown 
that wearers of the 
device which con- 
sists of a clear, soft 
plastic Face Mask 
connected by flexible 
tubing to a light- 
weight Chest Pack 
worn under outer clothing, breathe air 
that is 50° to 55° warmer than outside air 
temperatures. Thus, if the temperature 
is — 5°F, the wearer will be breathing 
air that is a very comfortable 50°F. 

The Chest Pack, made of plastic, has 
a series of openings on the side worn 
next to the body, allowing body heat to 
enter and warm incoming cold air. Cold 
air, drawn into the Chest Pack through 
a large opening at the bottom, mixes 
with body-warmed air and is drawn into 




INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Audel 15 

Belsaw Planer 21 

Belsaw Sharp-All 23 

Black & Decker 29 

Chevrolet Motor Division 27 

Chicago Technical College 17 

Clifton Enterprises 23 

Cline-Sigmon Publishers 39 

Eliason Stair Gauge 19 

Estwing Manufacturing Co 35 

Foley Manufacturing Co 20 

Full Length Roof Framer 23 

Hydrolevel 23 

Layout Pencil 39 

Stair Square 31 

Vaughan & Bushnell 19 



the lungs as the wearer breathes. Ad- 
justable elastic neck and waist straps 
hold the Chest Pack snugly against the 
body in the most comfortable position. 

The Face Mask is held against the 
face over the nose and mouth by an 
elastic head band. A soft aluminum nose 
clip permits fitting the upper part of the 
Mask to the shape of any nose bridge. 
Exhaust valves at each side of the Mask 
open and close automatically as the 
wearer inhales and exhales. Moisture 
from exhaled breath, collects in a mois- 
ture trap at the bottom of the Mask. 
When this occurs, the Mask is removed 
and accumulated moisture can be wiped 
away with a handkerchief or tissue. 

All materials used in the Personal 
Cold Weather Breathing Aid are odor- 
less and are of the type used in ap- 
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tems. The chest pack and face mask 
can be readily cleaned with a film-free 
household detergent. For further infor- 
mation, write PERSONAL COLD 
WEATHER BREATHING AID, P.O. 
Box 62, Dolton, IL 60419. 



VENTING SKYLIGHT 




APRIL, 1980 



Announcement has been made by APC 
Corporation of the availability of Model 
DV, their new Venting Sky-Vue Skylight. 

APC's new Skylight offers all the im- 
portant features of their energy saving 
Sky-Vue Skylights plus an easy to use 
hand crank to open the skylight for re- 
freshing ventilation whenever needed. All 
units include an integral insect screen. 

Model DV is manufactured of weather 
and corrosion resistant materials and 
features insulated double dome construc- 
tion with non-sweating PVC inner frame. 
A self-flashing curb permits easy installa- 
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and 30 l /4" x SOW. 

For further information and catalog 
sheet write: APC Corporation, 44 Utter 
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PLEASE NOTE: A report on new prod- 
ucts and processes on this page in no 
way constitutes an endorsement or recom- 
mendation. All performance claims are 
based on statements by the manufacturer. 



39 



Be Better ■Informed:.'. 

Work Better! Earn More! 

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IN CONCLUSION 



SPERK UP, 

BROTHER, 

VOU HRUE 

THE FLOOR 



Americans Are Urged to 

Stand Up and Be Counted, 

This Month, As the 

New Census Count Begins. 

Why Not Stand Up in 

Your Union Meeting 

and Be Counted, Too . . . 



There's a famous painting by the late Norman 
Rockwell, reproduced on our back cover, which 
shows a middle-aged workman, dressed in simple 
work clothes, standing up in a town meeting and 
expressing his views on some public issue which 
concerns him and his neighbors. 

He might be protesting higher property taxes, or 
he might be saying that the town simply does not 
need another traffic light. In any case, he's "speak- 
ing his piece," and he's taking full advantage of 
one of the greatest freedoms provided in any 
democracy — the freedom of speech ... the freedom 
to express his opinion without fear of being jailed 
or kicked out of the meeting. 

Too often we take such freedoms for granted. 



Too often we let our opportunities to express our- 
selves slip away. 

I am reminded of this by many encouraging 
letters which I have received in my office in Wash- 
ington since becoming your General President in 
January. 

Our fellow members of the Brotherhood in the 
United States and Canada are concerned about 
many things in this spring of 1980. We want to see 
inflation turned around. We want to see the one 
million unemployed workers in Canada going back 
to work. We want to see the 6.3 million unem- 
ployed US workers on the job once again. 

We want to see our union operating efficiently 
and giving full representation in collective bargain- 
ing and settling grievances. We want to see our 
union organizing the unorganized. 

But, unfortunately, far too many union members 
aren't being heard . . . and aren't participating in 
our activities. 

They aren't being heard at the ballot box. Are 
you and the other members of your local union 
registered to vote in the primaries and the general 
elections later this year? 

They aren't being heard in the industrial plants 
and at the construction sites. Are you proudly 
wearing your union button to work? Do you dis- 
cuss your job problems with your steward and give 
him the support he needs? 

They aren't being heard at union meetings. 
When was the last time you attended a regular 
business meeting of your local union? When was 
the last time you voted in a union election of 
officers? 

In short, what kind of trade union member are 
you? Do you support your union brothers and 
sisters come fair weather or foul? Or do you just 
give lip service to your union membership? 

Among the letters which I have recently received 
in the mail was one from the executive secretary- 
treasurer of a West Coast district council. He sent 
us a copy of a letter which his council sends out to 
every new Brotherhood member in his council, 
shortly after he is initiated into the union. The 
letter extends the hand of fellowship to the new 
member and lets that new member know that he 
now "belongs" and he's needed. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



Other local unions and district councils are do- 
ing the same thing. 

As soon as a new member is enrolled in the 
Brotherhood recordkeeping department, he or she 
goes on the mailing list of The Carpenter Maga- 
zine. And this includes apprentices, journeymen, 
and industrial members alike . . . any member in 
good standing in our organization, to be exact. 

It is very important that we bring the vitality of 
these new members into our union. In unity and in 
numbers there is strength . . . and we all benefit. 

Our 33rd General Convention, a year and a half 
ago, mandated your General Officers to initiate a 
public relations program, designed to acquaint the 
general public with the purposes of our union and 
the good work we are doing. The program is also 
designed to acquaint non-union workers in our 
crafts and industries with the benefits and the 
necessity of union membership and representation 
... in short, to get them organized. 

This promotional program is now underway. 
We have a television "commercial" appearing on 
two national networks, and we are offering to all 
local unions and district councils a list of promo- 
tional materials for outdoor billboards, for news- 
papers, radio and television stations, and even 
material for county fairs and local exhibitions. 

As I stated earlier, it is time for you and your 
union to stand up and be counted. The tax man is 
counting you this month, if you live in the United 
States and send 1979 tax returns to the Internal 
Revenue Service. The US Census will come calling 
soon. Meanwhile, your local union leaders need a 
quorum at the next union meeting. I urge you to be 
there. 

The general public has many misconceptions 
about labor unions, and these misconceptions are 
not helped by some of the stories you watch on 
television or some of the news stories and com- 
mentaries which appear in general newspapers and 
magazines. 

Some screen writers and newspaper reporters 
are still talking about "labor bosses" and alleging 
corruption, and they're being encouraged by the 
National Right to Work Committee, and the Busi- 
ness Roundtable, the Associated Building Contrac- 
tors, and other groups trying to convince your 
neighbors that it's best to live in a "union free 
environment." 



A group of American labor unions is holding 
what they call "Big Business Day" on April 17. 
Most of Big Business won't like it a bit, because 
these unions and some consumer groups working 
with them will attempt to show the general public 
on that day just how unfair some of Big Business 
is when it deals with consumer problems and wage- 
earner problems. The unions on that day will try to 
point out some of the hazards of the workplace 
ignored by Big Business. They will expose some of 
the illicit shenanigans performed by Big Business 
in expanding sales and avoiding taxes — manipulat- 
ing stock, offering bribes, coercing legislation. 

Trade unions believe in the free enterprise sys- 
tem, but they do not believe in monopoly. They 
believe in collective bargaining, but they don't 
support corruption. 

It's time for the rank-and-file union member to 
help set the record straight. 




WILLIAM KONYHA 



General President 




FREEDOm OF SPEECH 



From an original oil painting by Norman Rockwell for a poster, 1943 

(one for a series on "The Four Freedoms"). 

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. 

George A. Hearn Fund, 1952 



May 1980 




United Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners of America 



TRIBUTE TO A GREAT LADY 

Our Next-Door Neighbor, 
The US Department of Labor 
Headquarters, Becomes The p 
Frances Perkins Building c 





Frances Perkins 

usaISc 





::::::!:i!!mmiiii;:ii!!ii!gieeiiiiiiiEiiiiSiiSi{i 

Hii 






GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Patrick J. Campbell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Sigurd Lucassen 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

John S. Rogers 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 
Charles E. Nichols 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENTS EMERITI 
M. A. Hutcheson 
William Sidell 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Joseph F. Lia 
120 North Main Street 
New City, New York 10956 

Second District, 



Third District, Anthony Ochocki 

14001 West McNichols Road 
Detroit, Michigan 48235 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

2970 Peachtree Rd., N.W., Suite 300 
Atlanta. Ga. 30305 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Boll 
Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140 N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116 

Seventh District, Hal Morton 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'I Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, John Carruthers 
5799 Yonge Street #807 
Willowdale, Ontario M2M 3V3 

Tenth District, Ronald J. Dancer 

1235 40th Avenue, N.W. 

Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2K OG3 




William Konyha, Chairman 
John S. Rogers, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

In processing complaints about 
magazine delivery, the only names 
which the financial secretary needs to 
send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 

In sending in the names of mem- 
bers who are not getting the maga- 
zine, the address forms mailed out 
with each monthly bill should be 
used. When a member clears out of 
one local union into another, his 
name is automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of the local union he 
cleared out of. Therefore, the secre- 
tary of the union into which he cleared 
should forward his name to the Gen- 
eral Secretary so that this member 
can again be added to the mailing list. 

Members who die or are suspended 
are automatically dropped from the 
mailing list of The Carpenter. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 



NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPENTER only cor- 
rects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not advise your own 
local union of your address change. You must also notify your local union 
... by some other method. 



This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 



101 Constitution Ave., N.W. 



Washington, D. 



C. 20001 



NAME 



Local No. 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



City 



State or Province 



ZIP Code 



€MEBMTM 

(ISSN 0008-6843) ^^^ ^^^ 

VOLUME 100 No. 5 MAY, 1980 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

John S. Rogers, Editor 

IN THIS ISSUE 



NEWS AND FEATURES 

Building Trades Legislative Conference Harry Conn 2 

General President Emeritus Sidell Honored 4 

Many Issues Face Labor Labor Secretary Ray Marshall 6 

A Blueprint for the 80s 

Three-Mile Island Cleanup by Union Labor 9 

Women Workers: Nieces, Daughters, Neighbors ...Sarah Weddington 12 

A Blueprint tor the 80s 

Hospital Cost Containment U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson 14 

Did You Know? Reform Through Legislation 16 

Why Do Industrial Plants Shut Down? PAI 18 

Report on the Lakeland Home for Aged Members 20 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Report 8 

Ottawa Report 1 1 

Consumer Clipboard: About Contact Lenses 21 

Plane Gossip _ _ 22 

Local Union News 25 

We Congratulate 29 

Service to the Brotherhood 30 

In Memoriam __ — 36 

What's New? 39 

In Conclusion William Konyha 40 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001 

Published monthly at 3342 Bladensburg Rood, Brentwood, Md. 20722 by the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, D.C. and 
Additional Entries. Subscription price: United States and Canada $7.50 per year, single copies 
750 in advance. 



THE 
COVER 



In special ceremonies, last month, 
in Washington, D.C, the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Labor's headquarters building 
was renamed the Frances Perkins 
Building. 

Four days earlier, April 10, the U.S. 
Postal Service issued a special stamp 
commemorating the 100th anniversary 
of Frances Perkins's birth. 

The building and the stamp are 
shown on our May cover, as is the 
United Brotherhood's own headquar- 
ters building, which is across Second 
Street, N.W., at the right of the 
picture. 

Some of our younger members and 
readers may ask: Who was Frances 
Perkins? 

She was America's fourth Secretary 
of Labor and the first woman to serve 
in a U.S. President's Cabinet. During 
the dark days of the depression of the 
1930s (from 1933 to 1945), Frances 
Perkins was an able advisor to Presi- 
dent Franklin D. Roosevelt on labor- 
management affairs. During the period 
of the New Deal, Ms. Perkins earned 
a reputation for championing the 
causes of human rights and better 
conditions for workers. 



NOTE: Readers who would like copies 
of this cover unmarred by a mailing label 
may obtain them by sending 50t in coin 
to cover mailing costs to the Editor, The 
CARPENTER, 101 Constitution Ave., 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. 



TRIBUTE TO A GREAT LADY 






\ 













i !!!!!! ailn "niHimiiiii,i,„; 

I ■■■■■■ Billciiiimi imi I, 

■ III III ill hi mi iii I'm 11']] = := j 




Printed in U. S. A. 



President Carter 

Among 

Building Trades 

Speakers 



BUILDING '■St^m 




GEORGIHE, KIRKLM1D EXPRESS RLRRIII 

ouer u.s. Economy, budget cuts 



BY HARRY CONN 

PAI Stall Writer 

Some 3,000 delegates to the legis- 
lative conference of the AFL-CIO 
Building and Construction Trades De- 
partment, meeting in Washington, 
D.C., were told by speaker after 
speaker that the nation is in a time 
of crisis. 

BCT President Robert A. Georgine 
gave three reasons for this view, de- 
claring: 

"First and foremost is the state of 
the economy and the crucial decisions 
which the President and the Congress 
will be making in the next few weeks 
and months to try to ward off eco- 
nomic collapse. 

"Second, as no one needs to be re- 
minded, we are in an election year. 
During 1980, we must choose a 
President, all members of the House 
of Representatives and one-third of the 
United States Senate. 

"Third, on the legislative front, the 
Congress is in the process of debating 
a number of bills which are crucial — 
really crucial — to the wellbeing of the 
15 building trades unions and its 
members." 

Georgine said the purpose of the 
conference was to make the voice of 
the workers heard in the areas of 
decision-making, adding: 

"But let's make a few more things 
clear. The economic sacrifice should 
fall fairly upon all members of so- 
ciety. Workers will accept sacrifice 
when the owners of capital are asked 
to accept the burdens in equal degree. 
Moreover, we need to have a voice in 
these decisions and to have the needs 



of the American construction worker 
considered." 

On the economy, Georgine sent out 
a "strong message" that the "contin- 
ued climb in the interest rates is not 
acceptable to us." He said it means less 
construction activity, fewer jobs, fewer 
hours of work and, eventually, lower 
wages. 

The conference also concentrated 
on key legislative issues, including 
preservation of the Davis-Bacon Act, 
pension reform and occupational safe- 
ty and health. 

AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland 
pounded hard on some of the same 
themes. 

"You must carry the message to 
Capitol Hill." Kirkland said, "that 
workers are deeply aroused by policies 
which sacrifice their jobs in a fight 
against inflation that is misdirected, 
mismanaged and lacking in compas- 
sion for the real victims of inflation — 
workers, the poor, the elderly and the 
disadvantaged." 

Kirkland added that "workers are 
tired of bearing the brunt of policies 
which contend that the way to fight 
inflation is to increase unemployment, 
to boost gasoline and heating prices, 
to raise interest rates and to drive up 
the cost of housing." 

He said that when the Administra- 
tion and the Congress seek to balance 
the budget by eliminating 500,000 
jobs, they are "adding one-half a per- 
cent point on unemployment and add- 
ing $10 billion to the deficit. This is 
not simply had economic policy. It is 
sheer madness." 

Kirkland cast some serious doubts 
on the future of the National Accord 
negotiated between labor and the Ad- 



ministration last fall. He said that "we 
have been repeatedly and falsely prom- 
ised a rejection of unemployment as 
an instrument of national policy . . . 
in the fight against inflation . . . But 
recent events have cast profound 
doubt on the strength and length of 
the sincerity of that commitment." 

The AFL-CIO president also issued 
a warning to the Democratic Party not 
to take labor for granted this election 
year. 

Noting that the Democrats are buy- 
ing the orthodox Republican economic 
policies of high interest rates and the 
so-called "balanced budget," Kirkland 
said he wondered how long labor can 
buy the proposition that there is a 
significant difference between the two 
parties. 

President Carter addressed the dele- 
gates and gave them the latest report 
on the Iranian hostage situation. He 
received rousing, standing applause 
when he declared "no one in the gov- 
ernment of the United States has apol- 
ogized to anyone in the government 
of Iran. The reason is that we have 
nothing for which to apologize." 

Carter said unions "have taken 
some heat for restraining wage de- 
mands. But because of your coopera- 
tion, wage increases have not been the 
cause of this speed-up in inflation. I 
need your continued restraint this year. 
In turn, I pledge a tough, expanded 
monitoring program to come down 
hard on unjustified price increases." 

Labor Secretary Ray Marshall told 
the conference that "the grim reality 
is that the labor movement of this 
country at this moment is facing an 
assault which is unprecedented, and 
Continued on page 38 



THE CARPENTER 




ABOVE: General President William Konyha greets President 
Carter with other Building Trades leaders in an anteroom 
of the conference hotel before he speaks to the delegates. 

RIGHT: The President received four standing ovations as 
he assailed efforts by certain elements before the Congress 
which would "destroy the gains that have been made for the 
working people of A merica." The President expressed 
continued support for nuclear power, massive energy projects 
and various measures designed to raise wages and 
strengthen unions. 





Sen. Byrd 



Kirkland 



Sec. Marshall 



Sec. Goldschmidt 



Georgine 




Dep. Sec. Sawhill 



Cong. Thompson 



Sen. Williams 



Cong. McCormack 



Father Bonadio 




LEFT: A special table was set up at the conference for the 
registration of Brotherhood delegates and to solicit continued 
support of the work of the Carpenters Legislative Improve- 
ment Committee (CLIC). Dave Casey, seated, who is the 
new legislative advocate for the Brotherhood, talks with 
William H. Lang, secretary of the New Mexico District 
Council. 



MAY, 1980 



FIRST ROW, from left: 
1 . General President Konyha 
presents a gold membership 
card to the honoree, 2. Board 
Members Green and Ochocki 
present a bouquet to Mrs. 
Sidell, 3. Secretary Emeritus 
Richard Livingston, 4. a view 
of the ballroom, and 5. AFL- 
CIO President Lane Kirkland. 



SECOND ROW, 1. First 
General Vice President Pat 
Campbell was toastmaster, 

2. Labor Secretary and Mrs. 
Marshall with Mrs. Sidell, 

3. (below 2) Sec. Marshall 
presents messages from Presi- 
dent Carter and Vice President 
Mondale, 4. General President 
Emeritus M. A. Hutcheson 
lauds the honoree, 5. General 
President Emeritus Sidell 
acknowledges the applause, 

6. General Treasurer Charles 
Nichols. 



THIRD ROW: 1. Second 
General Vice President Sig 
Lucassen makes a presentation, 
2. Building Trades President 
Bob Georgine tells of his close 
working relationship with the 
honored guest, 3. AFL-CIO 
Secretary Tom Donahue, 4. The 
Sidell family, three generations, 
5. General Secretary John S. 
Rogers, and 6. (below 5) 
Former General Treasurer 
Peter Terzick. 



President Emeritus Sidell 




HonoRED at uunsHinGTon TESTimonmi 



General President Emeritus William 
Sidell, who retired on December 31 
from the top office of the Brotherhood 
after almost eight years of diligent 
service at that post, was honored with 
a testimonial dinner, April 2, in Wash- 
ington, D.C. 

Nearly 2,000 well-wishers filled the 
International Ballroom of the Wash- 
ington Hilton Hotel to pay tribute to 



Sidell's four decades of Brotherhood 
service and his dedicated leadership at 
all levels of the North American labor 
movement. 

General President William Konyha 
and the other General Officers and 
Board Members participated in the 
program. First General Vice President 
Patrick J. Campbell was toastmaster 
for the occasion. There were addresses 



by US Labor Secretary Ray Marshall, 
AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland, 
Building Trades President Robert 
Georgine, and General President Em- 
eritus M. A. Hutcheson. 

Prior to the dinner, several councils 
and groups presented plaques and gifts 
as mementoes of the occasion, among 
them a special citation from Cong. 
Glenn Anderson. 32nd District of Cali- 



THE CARPENTER 




fornia, and a check for $10,000, do- 
nated to the American Parkinson Dis- 
ease Assn. campaign in General Presi- 
dent Emeritus Sidell's name, which 
was presented by the Luther Sizemore 
Foundation. Luther Sizemore, former 
secretary of the New Mexico District 
Council, made the latter presentation. 
Labor Secretary Marshall delivered 
to the gathering "personal words of 



appreciation" from President Jimmy 
Carter. The President said, in part: 
"Your leadership as President of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America has been in the 
finest tradition of the labor movement 
in this country." 

A special message was also received 
from Vice President Walter Mondale, 
which stated: "Throughout my public 



career, I have worked closely with the 
American labor movement. And in all 
those years, I never have known a 
person more committed to improving 
the lives of working men and women 
than Bill Sidell. The American people 
— both those who hold a union card 
and those who never will — owe a great 
debt of gratitude to you for your 40 
years of dedicated service." 



MAY, 1980 



HBspflmll (far ODd® §l§ 

LABOR LAWS WILL BE STREnGTHEnED, 

TRnininc PROGRnms to be ekphbded 

Seasona/ify of construction, increased productivity under study 



By Ray Marshall 
U.S. Secretary of Labor 




He has also taught economics at 
the University of Mississippi, 1953- 
57; Louisiana State University, 
1957-62; University of Texas, 1962- 
67; and the University of Ken- 
tucky, 1967-69. 

Marshall was born August 22, 
1928, in Oak Grove, La. After 
service in the Navy during World 
War II, he attended Millsaps Col- 
lege in Jackson, Miss., receiving 
his B.A. Degree in 1949. He re- 
ceived an M.A. from Louisiana 
State University in 1950 and his 
Ph.D. from the University of Cali- 
fornia at Berkeley in 1954. 



MARSHALL 

Ray Marshall was sworn into 
office as the Nation's 16th Secre- 
tary of Labor on January 27, 1977. 

As Secretary, Marshall is Presi- 
dent Carter's chief adviser on labor 
matters and is responsible for 
carrying out the Department of 
Labor's mission "to foster, promote 
and develop the welfare of the 
wage earners of the United States, 
to improve their working condi- 
tions, and to advance their oppor- 
tunities for profitable employment." 

Marshall was Director of the 
Center for the Study of Human 
Resources at the University of 
Texas and Professor of Economics 
there from 1969 until joining Presi- 
dent Carter's Cabinet. 



The past several months have been 
quite unlike any we have experienced 
in this country in years. Our attention, 
quite understandably, has been focused 
on events overseas. 

Despite our concern over these de- 
velopments, they have served the edu- 
cational purpose of reminding us that 
the United States is indeed part of a 
world community. These international 
events have provided us with the op- 
portunity to understand and effectively 
deal with the restraints we will face in 
the 1980's as part of the world com- 
munity. 

These restraints necessitate a real- 
istic balancing of our goals — but they 
also offer us the promise of unpre- 
cedented cooperation between labor, 
management and government. 

Our efforts to deal with unemploy- 
ment indicate the vast potential of 
such cooperation, and why it is so nec- 
essary for the future. Of course, any 
level of unemployment is not really 
acceptable. And we're not satisfied 
with the current level of unemploy- 
ment, either — but it is a long way from 
the 9% level it was at only a few 
years ago. 

More importantly, we have experi- 
enced a huge increase in total employ- 
ment. During the Carter Administra- 
tion, 9.3 million new jobs have been 
created — the largest such expansion in 
any three-year period in our nation's 
history. We hope to further that trend 
in the future, but it can only be done 
with the assistance of management and 
labor. 

Our current plans build upon the 
past steps we've taken to create mean- 
ingful jobs, jobs that help not merely 
the directly affected individuals but 
also the country. From fiscal year 
1977 through fiscal year 1983, con- 
sider these actual and planned spend- 
ing authorizations of the Carter Ad- 
ministration: $91 billion for energy, 
$35 billion for pollution control and 
abatement, $138 billion for transporta- 
tion, and $291 billion for housing and 



regional community development. This 
is a total of $556 billion, a total that 
represents thousands of new jobs and 
a better life for all Americans. 

Yet, it might be easy to lose sight of 
the fact that employment policies and 
programs don't always reach all seg- 
ments of our society. And the quality 
of life for all of us will be affected by 
how successful we are at reaching the 
disadvantaged. 

PLANS FOR CETA 

The revamped CETA program we 
have developed is now targeted to 
those people most in need of assist 
ance. In the years to come, our eco- 
nomic health will increasingly depend 
upon private enterprise. It is critical, 
therefore, that in training the disad- 
vantaged and unskilled, we prepare 
them for meaningful job opportunities 
in the private sector. It is equally im- 
portant to encourage the private sector 
to provide jobs and training, and we 
are doing just that under the New 
CETA, local business leaders partici- 
pate in the formation of job training 
and placement programs. They receive 
tax credit incentives to hire and train 
the disadvantaged. We've also cut out 
the red tape that discouraged partici- 
pation in the past. 

The New CETA also includes a 
major expansion of on-the-job train- 
ing, and assigns a central role to the 
Job Corps and other youth programs. 
Our past efforts have had some im- 
pressive results. Employment in cur- 
rent programs has accounted for one- 
fourth of the employment growth of 
all teenagers since December 1977, 
and approximately three-fourths of the 
growth for black teenage males in the 
1970's. 

Much work remains to be done, 
however. The Education and Employ- 
ment Initiative announced recently by 
the Carter Administration is a land- 
mark event. The additional funds the 
Labor Department is requesting in 



THE CARPENTER 



1981 and 1982 will mean that an addi- 
tional 450,000 young people will re- 
ceive employment assistance. Com- 
bined with existing efforts, these pro- 
grams will serve 2.5 million young 
people. This is a substantial and wide 
investment in America's future. 

During the decade ahead the pre- 
serving and strengthening of existing 
labor laws will become increasingly 
important as we seek to protect collec- 
tive bargaining and other worker 
rights. A free and democratic labor 
movement is an integral part of a free 
and democratic society, and is the best 
guarantee we have that workers will be 
adequately represented in the govern- 
ment and at the workplace. 

One such legal protection which we 
are determined to preserve and 
strengthen is the Davis-Bacon Act. 
This Act was passed in 1931 to keep 
the government from using its vast 
economic powers to depress or inflate 
the wages and living standards of con- 
struction workers in a locality. Instead, 
the government decided to use its pro- 
curement powers to encourage con- 
tractors to compete on the basis of 
efficiency and technical expertise. 

This philosophy is as valid today as 
when the Act was first passed. Davis- 
Bacon is one of the main sources of 
stability in a frequently unstable indus- 
try. The prevailing wage principle is 
important to all workers, not just those 
in the construction industry. In the 
coming decade we need to improve its 
enforcement and administration, not 
restrict it. The Labor Department re- 
cently initiated more efficient and ac- 
curate procedures for administering 
this vital law which will carry out Con- 
gressional intent and provide equitable 
services to all the affected parties. 

BETTER OSHA PROGRAM 

In the coming decade, I also look 
for a more effective and better man- 
aged Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration to insure a safer and 
more healthful working environment. 
With the help of the construction in- 
dustry and other groups, the Carter 
Administration has already done much 
to turn OSHA around and make it a 
more effective instrument for protect- 
ing workers. More than 1,000 unnec- 
essary regulations that had nothing to 
do with workers safety and health 
were eliminated. We are now concen- 
trating our efforts and resources on the 
really serious hazards threatening 
workers on the job. 

The Department recently announced 
the nation's first comprehensive policy 
to identify and regulate cancer-causing 



substances in the workplace. The car- 
cinogen policy, culminating over two 
years of intensive effort, provides a 
standards-setting procedure that will 
guide future OSHA regulatory activ- 
ities. Fundamentally important policies 
such as this, together with OSHA's 
"common sense" approach to work- 
place safety and health, form a solid 
foundation for improving the occupa- 
tional safety and health of workers 
throughout the 1980's. 

CONSTRUCTION SAFETY 

Construction workers, of course, 
face special occupational and health 
problems. This necessitates the use of 
occupational safety and health person- 
nel experienced in the industry, work- 
ing with special construction regula- 
tions. The Department has taken sig- 
nificant steps to strengthen its health 
and safety programs for construction 
workers. An OSHA task force has 
been created to insure that the Depart- 
ment concentrated on the most hazard- 
ous problems in construction. Training 
for OSHA compliance officers assigned 
to construction sites has been im- 
proved. Stephen Cooper, a 20-year 
veteran of the industry, has been ap- 
pointed special assistant to OSHA di- 
rector Eula Bingham for construction 
safety and health. 

Altogether, there should be sub- 
stantial improvement in the safety and 
health protection afforded construc- 
tion workers in the 1980's. One meas- 
ure of past improvement in enforce- 
ment is that in the last three years 
OSHA has referred three times as 
many criminal willful violations to the 
Department of Justice for prosecution 
as in the previous six years of the 
agency's existence. 

OSHA's compliance officers in the 
construction field are now taking 
courses developed with the assistance 
of the Building Trades Department of 
the AFL-CIO. And in the near future 
we can also look for an OSHA ad- 
visory group to determine how to 
adapt general industry health stand- 
ards to the construction industry. 

Improved labor-management rela- 
tions will be more important than ever 
during the 1980's. Because effective 
labor-management relations is good 
for both labor and business, the Labor 
Department has been active in estab- 
lishing tripartite committees in various 
industries, such as construction and 
steel, to deal with a wide range of is- 
sues of interest to labor and manage- 
ment. 

These committees, consisting of rep- 
resentatives from government, business 



and labor, have much to offer. They 
help resolve productivity problems, 
overcome labor market bottlenecks, 
and assist labor and management in 
defining and resolving issues. This type 
of cooperative approach, with its free 
exchange of opinions and information, 
is an idea whose time has come. 

One of the main characteristics of 
many of our economic problems is 
that no one group can solve these 
problems working alone. Business, la- 
bor or the government cannot by 
themselves solve unemployment, infla- 
tion, or our other economic problems. 
Whenever any one party is left out of 
the process, misinterpretation and mis- 
understanding result. There is a point 
at which adversary relationships bene- 
fit no one. In the 1980's it will be im- 
perative that government, labor and 
management recognize this fact. 

TRIPARTITE ACTIVITY 

The construction industry's tripar- 
tite committees called Construction 
Coordinating Committees (CCCs) 
have been working to improve pro- 
ductivity, enhance employment sta- 
bility and hold down inflationary pres- 
sures in construction. Each of the cur- 
rently active committees — in Chicago, 
San Francisco, Kansas City, Denver 
and Boston — consists of 25-35 official 
members. Their monthly meetings are 
open to all interested parties. These 
committees do not get involved in 
jurisdictional or collective bargaining 
matters. 

Among the current and long-range 
goals of the CCCs are: (1) reducing 
seasonal unemployment and the need 
for extensive unemployment insurance; 
(2) encouraging inter- and intra- 
agency coordination in planning major 
construction projects; (3) modifying 
certain government practices that tend 
to raise the cost of public construction; 
(4) reducing inflationary seasonal de- 
mands for labor and materials; (5) 
stimulating use of cold weather build- 
ing technology and nontraditional ma- 
terials, and (6) relating job training 
programs to industry requirements. By 
working with management and labor 
to achieve these goals, the Department 
is confident that productivity and sta- 
bility can be improved in the construc- 
tion industry in the years to come. 

Each committee produces a bid cal- 
endar, listing planned public construc- 
tion in its geographic area. These cal- 
endars show concentrated periods of 
planned public construction and can 
be used to give government agencies 
the option of rescheduling projects to 
slack periods during the year. The po- 

Continued on Page 10 



MAY, 1980 



Washington 
Report 




'79 UNION WAGES UP 7% 

Union wage rates for both building 
tradesmen and industrial workers rose 
an average of 7% in 1979, the Bureau 
of Labor Statistics has reported. 

Construction wage rates averaged 
$11.48 an hour in January, 1980 or 
$14.15, counting employer payments for 
health, pension and other benefits. 
Industrial wages, not seasonally 
adjusted, averaged $7.39 an hour in 
January, 1980 for durable goods and 
$6.28 an hour for non-durable goods. 
For total manufacturing, the average 
hourly wage for January, 1980 was 
$6.96, as opposed to $6.49 in January, 
1979. 

About one-fifth of the union members 
in cities surveyed (those with 100,000 
population or more) were in bargaining 
units for which rate changes became 
effective in the fourth quarter of 
1979. A year earlier, the proportion 
was one-fourth. 



DISABILITY BENEFITS RULING 

Workers receiving disability bene- 
fits at the time a strike begins 
against their employer cannot auto- 
matically be dropped from the benefit 
roles, the National Labor Relations 
Board ruled. 

The worker would have to "affirma- 
tively act" to show public support 
for the strike before the employer 
could justify withholding benefits, 
the Board ruled in reversing one of 
its Administrative Law Judges on a 
3-1 vote. 

At the same time, the Board majority 
ruled, an employer cannot require its 
disabled employees "to disavow strike 
action during their sick leave" to 
continue receiving benefits. 



PRICE WATCH CONCLUDED 

The AFL-CIO concluded its Price Watch 
program in February and expressed 
appreciation for the fine job carried 
out by volunteer monitors from the 
ranks of organized labor and from the 
non-affiliated and the unorganized. 

The Brotherhood and the Carpenter 
Magazine participated in the effort. 

The Price Watch program was started 
in February, 1979, by the late AFL-CIO 
President George Meany at the request 
of President Jimmy Carter. Subse- 
quently, the AFL-CIO Department of 
Community Services initiated a national 
Price Watch program, in 82 communities 
within 26 states and the District of 
Columbia. 

UNITED STATES REJOINS ILO 

The United States has rejoined the 
International Labor Organization 
because of steps taken by the United 
Nations agency over the past two years 
to "reduce the level of politicization" 
from its proceedings. 

America resumed its membership in 
February, with the delivery of a letter 
of notification from Sec. of State 
Cyrus R. Vance to ILO Secretary General 
Francis Blanchard in Geneva, Switzer- 
land. 

The United States left the ILO in 
November, 1977, after a Communist-Arab 
voting bloc increasingly used its 
forums for propaganda attacks, distort- 
ing the world organization's concept 
of worker-employer-government partici- 
pation in establishing international 
labor standards and rights. 

MORE WOMEN WORKERS THAN MEN 

Women made their mark in employment 
in 1979. 

For the first time, women made up 
more than half of the labor force, 
according to Labor Department unem- 
ployment statistics recently released. 

And two-thirds of the 2.1 million 
new jobs last year went to women. 

More adult women (5.7%) were unem- 
ployed than adult men (4.1%), but 
since December 1978 the percentage of 
women unemployed has declined just 
slightly while the percentage for men 
has inched up. 

ORGANIZED-LABOR STAMP 

The U.S. Postal Service will create a 
stamp honoring the American labor move- 
ment. The stamp will be issued August 
16, the birth date of the late President 
Emeritus of the AFL-CIO, George Meany. 



8 



THE CARPENTER 




Three-mile Island Cleanup 

to Be Handled 

by Skilled Union Labor 



With U.S. Labor Secretary Ray 
Marshall in attendance, labor and 
management officials met at Three 
Mile Island, Pa. March 24, and signed 
a major new project labor agreement 
covering recovery, maintenance, modi- 
fication and new construction work at 
the nuclear power plant. 

The agreement was reached between 
Metropolitan Edison Company, opera- 
tor of the plant, and 15 unions of the 
AFL-CIO Building and Construction 
Trades Department. Other parties to 
the Agreement are the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters and about 
10 contracting companies. 

Present at the ceremony in addition 
to Secretary Marshall, were Robert A. 
Georgine, president of the Building 
and Construction Trades Department; 
William G. Kuhns, chairman of 
Metropolitan Edison's parent organi- 
zation, General Public Utilities Corp.; 
Robert C. Arnold, Metropolitan Edi- 
son senior vice president and senior 
official at Three Mile Island, and gen- 
eral presidents of some of the partici- 
pating unions. 

The presidents in attendance were 
William Konyha, United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America; 
Martin J. Ward, United Association 
of Plumbers and Pipefitters; John H. 
Lyons, International Association of 
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental 
Ironworkers; Charles H. Pillard, Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers; and Angelo Fosco, Laborers 



Brotherhood Is Signatory 

to Recovery Project Agreement 

with Metropolitan Edison 



International Union of North America. 

Among union contractors signing 
the agreement were Bechtel Power 
Corporation, Gaithersburg, MD, Cat- 
alytic, Inc., of Philadelphia; Hirshman 
of Philadelphia; Modesto Company of 
the Harrisburg area, and H. B. Alex- 
ander Co. of Harrisburg. 

The agreement became effective 
March 31, 1980, and will cover proj- 
ects at both units of the nuclear power 
plant until they are restored to power 
operation or until all or part of the 
station is decommissioned. 

The agreement initially covers about 
450 members of the Building Trades 
unions currently working at the site. 
Over the several years the contract will 
be in effect, it will cover several thou- 
sand workers at Three Mile Island. 

Key highlights of the agreement in- 
clude: 

• Every craftsman who reaches the 
maximum allowable radiation exposure 
will be ottered alternative employment in 
non-radiation areas for an extended 
period of time. 

• Provides a management option for 
instituting a work schedule of alternating 



four 10-hour days rather than a stand- 
ard five-day week when this facilitates 
cleanup through more efficient schedul- 
ing. At the end of the initial four-day 
week, a second shift working four 10- 
hour days could start. In this manner, 
every calendar day can be worked except 
recognized holidays. 

• Prohibits all strikes or picketing in- 
cluding those over jurisdictional disputes, 
but does recognize possible support of 
local contract negotiations. The company 
is prohibited from instituting a "lock- 
out." 

• Establishment of joint labor-man- 
agement-owner committee which will pro- 
vide interpretation of the agreement as 
necessary. 

• Recognizes the unions as the primary 
source of employees and provides that 
the contractors will use any legal job- 
referral system provided for in local 
union agreements. 

• Rates of pay and fringe benefits will 
be paid as outlined in the appropriate 
local union agreements. 

• Recognizes the company's rights to 
utilize its own employees and those of 
specialty contractors in accomplishing the 

Continued on Next Page 



MAY, 1980 



Three-Mile Island 

Continued from page 9 

initial cleanup, decontamination and ra- 
dioactive waste processing. 

Georgine noted that "both labor and 
management at Three Mile Island have 
a firm commitment to establish an 
environment and work schedule which 
will allow skilled work of high quality 
to be done safely, efficiently, and at 
proper staffing levels without disrupt- 
ing other construction projects in the 
area." 

He said the building and construc- 
tion trades "are firmly committed to 
nuclear power as a significant part of 
our national effort to reduce depend- 
ence on foreign oil." 

Georgine noted that the alternative 
employment on radiation exposure 
"will provide a leveling of manpower 
and will serve as a means for insuring 
some degree of employment stability 
and longevity." 

Arnold said that optimum utilization 
of company employees "should allow 
the necessary recovery work by build- 
ing trades craftsmen to be done with 
radiation exposures as low as reason- 
ably achievable, but within regulations 
and with a stable work force." 

"All parties to the agreement rec- 
ognized that the amount of work re- 
quired in radiation areas will demand 
special attention to insure safety of the 
work force and of employment stabil- 
ity," Arnold said. 

He also noted that the "4-10" sched- 
ule provision could help reduce crowd- 
ing of work areas and allow better 
utilization of plant tools and equip- 
ment in addition to more efficient 
scheduling. 

Another unique feature of the 
agreement is the participation by 
Metropolitan Edison as owner in ad- 
dition to contractors. "Because of the 
unusual situation at Three Mile Island 
and the involvement of numerous 
Federal and State Agencies in approv- 
ing work projects, we believed it was 
necessary to be an active party to the 
agreement," Arnold said. 

The labor pact was reached after 
several months of negotiations and 
nearly a dozen formal bargaining ses- 
sions. 

The management team was headed 
by Attorney Vincent J. Apruzzese of 
New Jersey representing Metropolitan 
Edison. Joseph F. Maloney, secretary- 
treasurer of the Building and Construc- 
tion Trades Department, headed a 
labor negotiating team of senior rep- 
resentatives from each of the 15 in- 
ternational unions. 



UBC Campaign IHaues Into High Gear 



Under the mandate of the 33rd Gen- 
eral Convention held in 1978, the United 
Brotherhood has launched a major public 
relations campaign to convey to the North 
American public the important role of 
organized labor in building a better so- 
ciety. The campaign theme, "We're Build- 
ing the 20th Century," reflects the 
Brotherhood's active contributions to the 
enrichment of society. 

The national program includes a 30- 
second commercial, aired on CBS and 
ABC television networks and scheduled 
to run through October, as well as sup- 
plemental full-page TV Guide ads which 
appear the weeks the commercials are 
shown. 

District and state councils may also 
participate in this national program 
through promotion on the local level. 
In addition to videotaped copies of the 
television commercial and copies of the 
TV Guide ad, other advertising materials 
are available. These include 60-second 
radio commercials, poster-sized outdoor 
billboards bearing the campaign theme 
and the UBC emblem, newspaper ads, 
which are most effective in small com- 
munity newspapers, and self-adhesive 
poster blowups of these newspaper ads. 

Every local union, state, provincial, 
and district council has received a bro- 



chure which explains and includes an 
order form for these advertising supple- 
ments. Requests are arriving daily at the 
General Office. We encourage the sup- 
port and participation of all UBC mem- 
bers. 




The Colorado Stale Council has already 
started its advertising campaign. 
Executive Secretary Edward A . Rylands, 
left, kneels next to a display sign and 
places one of 10,000 UBC bumper 
stickers on a Yellow Cab, as Bob Forsyth 
of Yellow Cab looks on. 



Ray Marshall 

Continued from page 7 

tential value of a coordinated schedule 
is reflected by the fact that, on the 
national coverage, public construction 
traditionally accounts for about 25% 
of all construction activity. By using 
long-range planning techniques such as 
the bid calendar, seasonal unemploy- 
ment in the construction industry can 
be significantly reduced. 

A study done for the Department 
last year indicated that $5.7 billion a 
year could be saved by stabilizing 
employment in the construction indus- 
try. The biggest saving — almost $4 bil- 
lion — would result from moderating 
hourly wage rates in the industry. 
Workers, however, would earn higher 
annual incomes in a stabilized industry 
because they would work more hours 
per year. 

The Office of Construction Industry 
Services, which administers the CCCs 
for the Department, is also working 
with the local committees to improve 
the flow of important construction in- 
formation to the industry. The Depart- 
ment now maintains an extensive data 
bank on wages and benefits paid in the 
construction industry, publishes an 
annual report providing a comprehen- 
sive review of the industry, and distrib- 



utes a bi-weekly newsletter summariz- 
ing important information affecting all 
aspects of the construction industry. 

Construction Coordinating Commit- 
tees are but one example of the co- 
operative approach necessary to meet 
the challenges of the 1980's. The Car- 
ter Administration's Multilateral Trade 
Negotiations Agreement was historic 
because, for the first time, labor was 
directly involved in this type of trade 
negotiations. The agreements we 
reached on these policies will create 
thousands of jobs. 

But perhaps the centerpiece of fu- 
ture cooperative efforts is the National 
Accord on economic policy. Under 
the National Accord, labor, manage- 
ment and government sit down and 
hammer out agreed targets for wage 
increases, price increases, and overall 
government economic policies. The 
Carter Administration believes that 
the involvement of all parties in de- 
termining these policies is essential. 

We have entered the 1980's know- 
ing only that we face unprecedented 
challenges. These challenges may nec- 
essitate some fundamental changes in 
the way we live and work, but ulti- 
mately the solutions will arise from 
the old-fashioned ideas of cooperation 
and communication. That process is 
underway. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



Ottawa 
Report 




CANADIANS, BEWARE 

Two briefs submitted recently to 
Alberta Labour Minister Les Young have 
drawn criticism from the president 
of the Medicine Hat and District Labour 
Council. 

Barry Crittenden blasted as "anti- 
labour" two separate briefs, one a 
document submitted by the Right to 
Work Association of Alberta and the 
second a brief from the City of 
Edmonton, endorsed by the Medicine Hat 
city council, that proposes eight 
changes to the provincial labour act. 
The right-to-work brief calls for 
legislative changes to prohibit the 
closed union shop. 

"The name is misleading," Crittenden 
said. "What it really means is the 
right to scab." 

THREE PROVINCES RAISE MINIMUM 

Three provincial governments have 
decided to give their unorganized 
workforces a pay raise and will move to 
increase their respective minimum 
wages by the summer of 1980. 

Quebec Labour Minister Pierre Marc 
Johnson announced that the Parti 
Quebecois government would increase the 
minimum wage by 5% to $3.65 an hour 
effective April 1. This will mean an 
annual increase of $375 for a 40-hour 
work week. 

The government of Saskatchewan has 
also decided to raise its minimum wage 
rate by 150, bringing it level with the 
Quebec wage by May of this year. In 
July, P.E.I, will reach the $3 barrier 
for its base rate of pay. The current 
minimum wage in P.E.I, is $2.75 an 
hour. 

MAY, 1980 



Quebec's new $3.65 rate will mean an 
average weekly gross pay of $146. The 
same is true for Saskatchewan. In 
P.E.I, the new average weekly salary 
will be $120, an increase of $10 over 
the present minimum wage. 

The province joins nine other 
provinces and territories who have 
brought their minimum rate up to $3 or 
more, among them Ontario ($3) the 
Yukon ($3) and Manitoba ($3.15). 

The lowest minimum wage now is that 
of the province of Nova Scotia at 
$2.75 an hour. 

BOOKLET ON JOINT PLANS 

A new booklet, "Joint Participation 
in Pension Plans," has been prepared 
by Labour Canada to give individuals 
basic information about joint pension 
programs. It examines situations where 
employers and employees take joint 
responsibility for trusteeship of 
pension plans. Where joint trusteeship 
is not appropriate, the booklet shows 
the advantages to be gained by both 
parties through joint supervisory 
committees. Copies may be ordered from: 
Public Relations Branch, Labour Canada, 
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0J2. 



CANADA POST NOW METRIC 

Letters are now weighed in grams and 
parcels in grams and kilograms since 
the Canada Post Office went metric a 
few months ago. 

According to Les Wilson, financial 
supervisor of Postal Station B on The 
Mall in Ottawa, it took only three or 
four days for postal employees to feel 
completely at ease with the metric 
system. He adds that the system is so 
simple no previous training was neces- 
sary. 

Management had provided all counter 
personnel with a new postage slide 
rule consisting of outer case and 
insert to assist in calculating the 
amount of postage needed on mail items. 
Mr. Wilson says this slide rule is 
very handy and when postage rates 
change in the future only the insert 
showing new rates will be changed. 

"Metric conversion has caused no 
price change in postal rates," says 
Mr. Wilson. Size and mass limits, 
wherever possible, have been rounded 
in such a manner as not to impose any 
hardship on customers. He adds that 
employees find the rounded numbers 
easy to deal with and customers should 
not experience any significant change 
in their total postal expenditures. 
So far, Mr. Wilson says they have re- 
ceived no complaints from customers. 



11 





WORKERS 
OUR niEIES, 
DAUGHTERS. 





By SARAH WEDDINGTON 

Assistant to President Jimmy Carter 

Twenty years ago on a typical block in 
Pasadena, Texas, two women out of 
ten left their homes each morning to 
go to work. 

Today on that block, six women out 
of ten will be working outside their 
homes. An increasing number of 
women are strapping on tool belts as 
carpenters and construction workers. 

A majority of American women 
now work outside their homes, and 
this trend will continue in the new 
decade. Most of them work because 
they must. Two thirds of all working 
women are either heads of families, 
single, or married to men who earn 
less than $10,000. 

To them, a paycheck is not just pin 
money. It's money for rent, for food, 
for the basics of life. 

When we talk about women at 
work, we are not talking about strang- 
ers. We are talking about our nieces, 
our daughters, our neighbors, our- 
selves — and we are talking about see- 
ing these women in non-traditional 
jobs. 

"Non-traditional" occupations are 
ones that have had large numbers of 
men workers and few, if any, women 
workers. Construction trades, skilled 
crafts, technical fields, and professions 
in science, law, engineering and medi- 
cine have traditionally been dominated 
by men. For women, these jobs are 
non-traditional. 

In the 1940s, Rosie the Riveter be- 
came the symbol of the women who 
took on non-traditional jobs. For the 
first time in their lives, 2.9 million 
women became welders, machine op- 
erators and shipfitters. 



The motive was national defense. 
An absence of men made it easier for 
women to step into non-traditional 
jobs. 

They did step in, and they per- 
formed well. 

When the war ended, however, most 
women were gradually phased out of 
their non-traditional jobs. 

Today women are once again en- 
tering those skilled occupations. They 
know a woman makes more money 
standing over the typewriter, repairing 
it, than sitting at it, typing. She makes 
more installing telephone wires than 
plugging them into a switchboard. 
Learning a craft can bring job satis- 
faction and economic security. 

The better a worker's specialized 
skills, the more likely she is to win — 
and hold onto — a higher paycheck. 
During cutbacks, she stands a better 
chance of transferring these skills to 
other companies or other towns. She 
therefore retains some control over 
her own financial security and that of 
her family. 

But attitudes about appropriate 
roles for women and men are deeply 
embedded in our culture, and are not 
easily changed. 

LABOR UNIONS LEAD 

Labor unions can lead the way in 
opening job opportunities for women, 
making a commitment in action as 
well as words. 

We have a good example of leader- 
ship in Ray Marshall, a man President 
Carter has called "one of the truly 
great secretaries of labor who has ever 
served." 

Marshall has said that he "can think 
of no institution in America — except 




Ms. Weddington 

Ms. Weddington is a native of West 
Texas. She received a law degree at 
21; at 26, she argued and won a land- 
mark case before the US Supreme 
Court. After three terms in the Texas 
Legislature, she became the highest 
ranking attorney for the US Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. She became a 
special assistant to President Carter 
in 1978. Last year she was promoted 
to the Senior White House staff as 
Assistant to the President. 



maybe the Democratic Party — that 
has been as consistent and steadfast 
as the labor movement in promoting 
the interests of all Americans." 

Marshall has said that "a people — 
like a labor union — does not achieve 
greatness by self-serving accomplish- 
ments alone." 

I agree. The labor movement has 
distinguished itself as a force that 
fights for the rights of all people. 

The same can hold true in encour- 
aging women as carpenters, mill- 
wrights, even pile drivers and divers. 
Such jobs are one way to satisfaction 
in a day's work security in troubled 
economic times. 

Yet pressure from co-workers, fam- 
ily or friends often affects the success 
or failure of women in non-traditional 
employment. Fear of ridicule, even 
resentment, sometimes clouds a 
woman's decision to be a machinist or 
carpenter. 

Everyone has to learn somewhere. 
We all break into the system some- 
how. But because of stereotypes about 
what is "women's work," it is some- 
times harder for women to enter new 
fields. 

It is in this area, more than any 
other, that established workers can 
help overcome the stereotypes that 
keep women workers from equal op- 
portunity. 

Management, supervisors and all 
workers can move toward a realistic 
perception of women as workers. No 
one person can do it alone, but lead- 
ers and long-time workers can lead 
the way. 

I remember something Lane Kirk- 
land said during the discussion about 
putting the AFL-CIO on record in 
support of equal pay for work of com- 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



parable value. He announced that the 
executive council of the AFL-CIO had 
formed a special subcommittee to con- 
sider ways of getting more women 
and minorities on the executive coun- 
cil. 

Then he said, "I don't believe that 
the members of this council think that 
the earth would split and things would 
fall apart if on occasion — when faced 
with an issue of this significance — we 
departed from time-honored custom, 
tradition and principles." 

KIRKLAND'S ACTION 

Kirkland felt it was necessary "to 
accelerate the achievement of more 
dramatic, more significant more visible 
public recognition of the role and the 
contribution of women in the trade 
union movement." 

These national leaders can pave the 
way for us. 

But it is the day-to-day contact with 
workers that will bring the most last- 
ing results. Your personal support of 
a co-worker can make the difference. 

When a woman takes on an appren- 
ticeship, she commits herself to four 
years of learning, four years of chal- 
lenge, four years of growth. 

When friends and co-workers sup- 
port her investment, they help not only 
the worker, but the nation. The 
woman worker's wages go to help 
clothe the family, send children to 
school, keep food on the table. She is 
our neighbor, our niece, our daugh- 
ter — and her skill enriches us all. 
That's the "why" of it — why experi- 
enced carpenters and construction 
workers should encourage new women 
workers. 

Now for the "how" of it. 

It's much easier for a woman to 
break into any new field if she has a 
model to guide her. 

Established male carpenters can set 
an example to ease the woman work- 
er's transition by cooperating on the 
job, by refusing to harrass or embar- 
rass, by generously sharing of their 
experience and insight. 

The Federal regulations on equal 
employment opportunity for women 
and minorities in construction specify 
that contractors (where possible) as- 
sign two or more women to each con- 
struction project.* 

As the number of women in the 
craft grows, it helps to identify ex- 
perienced women carpenters and pair 
them with interested women appren- 
tices. This "mentoring" system has 



worked successfully in many com- 
panies and occupations. 

Women workers are not going to 
"go away." Today more than 60% of 
all American women 18 to 64 years 
old work. Forecasts predict that figure 
will continue to increase. 

Would it not be better for an in- 
dustry or a union to be at the fore- 
front of this movement, leading the 
way? 

A union and its members can set an 
example not only on the job, but at 
home and in the community, with 
daughters and neighbors. 

If a girl's friends and family have 
encouraged her to do only the things 
that are "right" for her sex, she be- 
comes used to that point of view. By 
the time she reaches high school and 
hears a counselor say matter-of-factly, 
"Girls don't take shop," she may 
merely nod. 

But schools, families and friends 
can play a significant role in expand- 
ing career choices for women. We 
must provide as many examples as 
possible to increase a young woman's 
job options. 

When fifth grade girls see a woman 
mechanic at work, they begin to think 
of that as a normal, natural career 
possibility for themselves. 

When high school students see a 
woman carpenter at "career day," that 
job turns into a very live possibility. 

VOCATIONAL CHANGES 

Vocational schools are improving 
courses and changing attitudes toward 
training women for skilled trades. 
Union members can cooperate with 
that effort in the community at large 
by advocating women for non-tradi- 
tional jobs. 



Last Labor Day, President Carter 
said, "the labor leaders and the mem- 
bers of organized unions again are in 
the forefront of the changes that are 
dynamic and are difficult in our coun- 
try. Times are not easy." 

We have many battles to win to- 
gether. Fair opportunity for employ- 
ment for all Americans — including 
women — leads the list. 

President Carter has been respon- 
sive to the needs and concerns of the 
labor movement — and he will con- 
tinue to do so. 

He has fought consistently and hard 
for labor law reform and labor-orga- 
nizing rights. He has preserved the 
Davis-Bacon Act — an act which the 
Republican members of Congress at- 
tempted to repeal nine times last year. 
He has formed a partnership with 
labor, forging a National Accord be- 
tween the Administration and AFL- 
CIO leaders — an accord that gives 
labor a strong voice in our govern- 
ment's economic policies. Under the 
Carter Administration, workers will 
not be the scapegoat for inflationary 
pressures. 

These are solid accomplishments, 
not promises. 

We have developed the first com- 
prehensive youth employment pro- 
gram in our history. And we now have 
the greatest number of Americans 
working and the greatest percentage 
of our labor force employed than ever 
before. 

But this Administration needs part- 
ners to chart our course for the '80s. 
The men and women workers of 
America — together — can meet the 
challenges that face our country and 
build an even greater America. 



* Federal Register, p. 14896, Section 
60-43, Para. 9, 7 

MAY, 1980 




'A paycheck is not just pin 
money . . . It's money for 
rent, for food, for the 
basics of life' 



'As the number of women 
in the craft grows, it helps 
to identify experienced 
women carpenters and pair 
them with interested 
women apprentices.' 



13 



aflg^gS**** 



Hosp 



\\o\ 



Cos* 



By U.S. SENATOR GAYLORD NELSON 



Democrat Wisconsin 



SENATOR 



Nearly everyone in the country is 
suffering from inflation. One of the 
major causes of inflation has been and 
is the rapid increases in health care 
and hospital costs. Unlike the inflation 
caused by the OPEC increases in the 
price of imported oil, health care 
costs can and should be held down. 
The hospital cost con- 
tainment legislation that 
I have introduced in the 
U.S. Senate would do 
just that. 

In these days of infla- 
tion, people are feeling 
the pinch in what they 
can buy. Your union 
probably has negotiated 
some kind of cost-of- 
living protection for 
your paycheck. Even 
so, most people in the 
country are at best 
keeping pace with in- 
flation. Working people 
are not getting ahead. 

When inflation pinches, individuals 
have control over their spending in 
many areas; they can change their 
buying patterns to fight inflation. If the 
price of meat goes up, you can see the 
change when you go shopping and buy 
less meat. If you go to buy a new car 
and the price is too high, you can buy 
a cheaper model or not buy a car that 
year at all. The same is true for a new 
suit or dress. We have a way of cutting 
down our expenses on these items 
which at the same time tells the pro- 
ducers that something is wrong. When 
they see their sales drop, they know 
that their prices are just too high. 

Health costs, and particularly hos- 
pital costs, do not feel this type of 
consumer pressure. As a result, they 
have been increasing far faster than 
the general rate of inflation. Between 
1975 and 1977. the cost of hospital 
care increased between 14 and 20% — 
more than 2'/i times the increase in 
the general rate of inflation as recorded 
in the Consumer Price Index. The in- 
crease in hospital costs was even 
greater than the increase in the cost of 
food and fuel. 

In many ways, these hospital cost 
increases are invisible. You — as an 
individual consumer of health care — 




have no way to control them. If you 
need hospital care, you usually must 
go to the hospital used by your doctor, 
because doctors typically work out of 
only one or two hospitals. You cannot 
choose the hospital with the lowest 
fees. How many people do you know 
who checked hospital fee schedules 
before they have chosen 
a doctor? 

Once you get to the 
hospital, it is your doc- 
tor who decides just 
what services you will 
"buy." You yourself 
cannot decide whether 
an X-ray is worth the 
cost. It has been shown 
that doctors often do 
not know the cost of 
the services they order 
for their patients — and 
^fl they have very little rea- 
NELSON son to ask. You, the 

patient, also have very 
little reason to ask be- 
cause you don't pay the bill — at least 
not directly or immediately. 

Ninety percent of all hospital bills 
are paid by third parties — by the 
health insurance you have on the job, 
by Medicare or by Medicaid. Thus, 
neither you nor your doctor nor the 
hospital directly see or feel the pinch 
of rising costs. 

The hospitals get paid from the 
insurance companies or the govern- 
ment — under Medicare and Medicaid 
— for all the services they provide 
based on cost. There are few incen- 
tives in such a system to hold down 
costs. The more hospitals spend, the 
more they get. 

RUNAWAY MACHINE 

What this separation of consumer 
and payer has created is a runaway 
inflation machine. In 1968, the average 
cost of a hospital stay was $56 per 
day. By 1977, it was $173. By 1984, 
without some way to restrain in- 
creases, the cost of a hospital stay will 
average more than $400 per day. 

While you are not paying these 
bills directly, you certainly are paying 
them. The average American now 
works one month each year — one 




twelfth of his or her lifetime — just to 
pay for his or her share of the nation's 
health care bill. Every employed citi- 
zen now pays an average of $15 a 
week — $780 a year — to finance the 
nation's hospital bill. We pay this in 
several ways. While you are undoubt- 
edly covered by health insurance 
through your employer or union, about 
30% of workers in Milwaukee, for 
example, must pay part of their in- 
surance premium for hospitalization, 
and about 35% must pay part of their 
major medical premium themselves. 
Very few insurance policies cover all 
expenses — most of us also pay some 
of these costs out-of-pocket. We also 
pay as taxpayers, for federal Medicare 
and state and local Medicaid costs. 
Federal hospital expenditures have 
ballooned from $12.8 billion in 1973 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



to an estimated $29.2 billion in 1978. 
State and local spending increased 
from $6.5 billion to $11.9 billion in 
the same period. And if you, or your 
parents, are retired and receiving 
Medicare benefits, you know that the 
hospitalization deductible which the 
elderly must pay has jumped from $72 
in 1973 to $160 in 1979. 

While these statistics may seem stag- 
gering and the problem vast, we do 
not have to sit quietly and watch this 
inflation machine grow. We can hold 
hospital costs back if we try. We can- 
not do it as individuals because we 
have no control over costs and spend- 
ing. But the government can and 
should do it. The government must 
find a way to encourage hospitals to 
hold down their costs, to encourage 
doctors to order services with an eye 
to price, and to encourage insurance 
companies to hold down their pre- 
miums. The hospital cost containment 
legislation that I have introduced in 
the Senate this year is a good way for 
the government to do that. 

STATES SHOW THE WAY 

We know that it is possible to hold 
down unreasonable increases in hos- 
pital costs because several states, in- 
cluding Wisconsin, have done just 
that. The increase in hospital costs in 
1977 for the nine states with strong 
programs to curb hospital costs was 
much less than the increase in the 
other 41 states — -a 12% rate of in- 
crease for the states with mandatory 
control as compared to a nearly 16% 
increase in states without. 

The hospital cost containment bill 
that I have sponsored would put those 
savings on a national basis. In other 
words, this bill would require all 50 
states to do what Wisconsin has al- 
ready shown can be done to hold down 
spiraling hospital costs, and in the 
process cut government spending by 
billions of dollars and help fight infla- 
tion. The bill begins with a voluntary 
program to give each state a chance to 
put its house in order, but it quickly 
goes to a mandatory program with 
teeth if the voluntary standards are 
not met. 

The national voluntary goal for 
1979, for example, would be based on 
the general rate of inflation plus addi- 
tional costs that only hospitals have. 
We would look at the increase in the 
cost of goods and services actually 
bought by hospitals and add adjust- 
ments for population growth or 
changes in the age of the population 
and for any new services or service 
improvements. We are not asking hos- 
pitals to do the impossible; we are not 



asking them to lose money. Nor are 
we asking them to cut back on the 
quality of service. But there is no 
excuse when the rate of increase in 
hospital costs is 3.5 percentage points 
higher than the inflation in the goods 
and services hospitals use — as it was 
in the first three months of 1979. We 
are simply trying to stop that type of 
compounding of inflation on top of 
inflation. With the current rate of 
cost increases, the goal for 1979 would 
be set at 11.6% — a healthy cutback 
from the 13.2% increase we suffered 
in the first quarter. 

ELIMINATE WASTE 

There are many ways that hospitals 
could work toward this goal, without 
hurting the quality of care. What we 
are asking them to do is to eliminate 
waste, and to search for ways to make 
their operations more efficient — hos- 
pital by hospital. We could save liter- 
ally billions of dollars each year in 
the hospital industry by eliminating 
unnecessary beds, decreasing average 
lengths of stay, avoiding weekend ad- 
missions when the patient receives 
only minimal care until Monday, 
checking carefully on supply buying 
practices, eliminating unnecessary 
X-rays, making better use of very 



21 FULU BENEFIT 
180 DAYS OF 50%. BE 

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SURGICAL MEDICAL 

MAJOR MEDICAL EFFECTIN 



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Ston Aw. N«w York. NY. 10016 

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Embers name (last, fihsti 

STONE MARY 




The New Leader 



expensive, sophisticated equipment, 
and using energy more efficiently. 

If the national goal for holding 
down hospital cost increases was not 
met, then a mandatory program of 
cost containment would come into 
effect. Under a mandatory program, 
an allowable rate of increase would be 
set for each individual hospital in 
states not meeting the goal, with cer- 
tain exceptions. The allowable rate for 
each hospital would be computed 
using its costs of goods and services 
and its rating of efficiency. Efficient 
hospitals would be rewarded and in- 
efficient ones penalized. The manda- 
tory limit would be enforceable. Medi- 
care and Medicaid will refuse to pay 
the excessive costs and a tax of 150% 
will be imposed on excessive revenues 
collected by hospitals from non-gov- 
ernmental payors. 

If we do not enact legislation to 
hold down hospital costs, we will be in 
trouble. Without hospital cost contain- 
ment, health care costs will increase 
from an estimated $206 billion in 
1979 to $368 billion in 1984. Private 
insurance premiums for hospital care 
will more than double. The Medicare 
deductible, often a serious burden for 
the elderly on fixed incomes, will grow 
from $160 in 1979 to $276 in 1983. 
The national economy and the fed- 
eral budget are both under a tre- 
mendous strain. We cannot afford to 
wait. If we act now, we can bring 
hospital costs back under control. 

ESTIMATED SAVINGS 

The Congressional Budget Office 
predicts that this bill would save the 
American people more than $30 bil- 
lion in the next five years. If we do 
act: 

— We can reduce the drain on 
the Social Security Trust 
fund for Medicare pay- 
ments, and on state and local 
finances for Medicaid cost, 

— We can hold down the in- 
crease in the Medicare hos- 
pitalization deductible that 
must be paid by the individ- 
ual, 

—We can save on insurance 
premiums paid by both em- 
ployers and individuals, and 

— We can save on out-of-pocket 
health care costs. 

We can hold down the rate of inflation 
as a whole, to which health and hos- 
pital costs are a very important con- 
tributor. And we can relieve the strain 
on family budgets as well as those of 
governments and businesses. 






MAY, 1980 



15 




In Pursuit 
of Dignity: 
Reform 
Through 
Legislation 



Journeymen carpenters led the first strike in the Building Trades 
for a 10-hour day, way back in 1791. The Brotherhood continues 
to fight for legal protections and labor law reform. 



In the last half of the 19th Century, 
rapid industrialization took place in 
North America and revolutionized the 
lives of North American wage earners. 
In this predominantly industrial society, 
the capitalist, the industrialist, and the 
monopolist gained increasing strength 
while workers' rights, benefits, and op- 
portunities were rapidly diminished. 

The average work day was 12 hours 
long, and no laws protected women or 
children from the harsh realities of the 
factory system. Children as young as 6 
and 7 toiled in the mines and mills of 
North America. Working conditions were 
unhealthy and unsafe, and workmen's 
compensation and other protective legis- 
lation did not yet exist. 

By the end of the Civil war, prices had 
doubled while wages remained constant, 
and although employment was up, the 
economic position of the wage earner 
had declined drastically. In an effort to 
survive, workers joined together, seeking 
strength in numbers. There was a revived 
interest in labor organizations as workers 
fought for adequate wages, improved 
working conditions, and protective labor 
legislation. 

Little was accomplished with regard to 
labor legislation before the turn of the 
century. Government, in general, ac- 
cepted no responsibility for the worker. 
If anything, government aided and faci- 
litated the goals of industrialists. For 
example, during the great railroad strike 
of 1894 against the Pullman Co., the 
strike was defeated by the use of in- 
junctions and federal troops. Neverthe- 
less, a few significant pieces of labor 
legislation were enacted prior to 1900. 

FIRST LEGALIZATION 

In 1842, in the case of Commonwealth 
v. Hunt, the Massachusetts Court deter- 
mined labor unions to be legal organiza- 
tions. This was the first court decision to 
acknowledge the right of workers to 
organize. 

In 1840, President Van Buren signed 
into law an act which set the federal 
work day at 10 hours — a notable ad- 
vance. As early as 1791, journeymen car- 
penters from Philadelphia had led the 



first strike in the Building Trades for the 
10-hour work day. Although unsuccess- 
ful, their efforts inspired others in the 
Trades to action. Georgia carpenters in 
1802 presented the first 10-hour day peti- 
tion to a state legislature. Finally, in 
1825, 600 Boston journeymen carpenters 
led the first large-scale strike for a 
shortened work day. 

Despite the agitation for the 10-hour 
work day and its establishment in private 
industry in 1853, by 1880, many carpen- 
ters still worked 11 to 12 hours a day, 
earning a meager $2.42 for their hard 
day's work. 

A milestone for 19th Century wage 
earners was the legal celebration of 
Labor Day. Once again, carpenters were 
at the forefront of this accomplishment. 
Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of 
the Carpenters' union and editor of its 
publication, The Carpenter, fought for 
this. 

The early 1900s, often termed the 
Progressive Era, were critical years for 
North American labor. With industriali- 




Child labor laws were declared uncon- 
stitutional in the United States until the 
child labor provision of the Fair Labor 
Standards Act of 1938 was upheld by 
the U.S. Supreme Court in 1941 . 



zation sweeping the country at an ever- 
increasing pace, reformers worked to eli- 
minate some of the abuses created by 
industrialization. Canadian unions fought 
a battle for social benefits including age 
pensions and unemployment insurance, 
and U.S. unions, preaching "pure and 
simple unionism," sought better wages, 
hours, and working conditions. 

In 1903, the United Mine Workers of 
America ended a five-month strike when 
President Roosevelt intervened and rec- 
ommended arbitration as a means to 
achieve a settlement. This was the first 
time the Federal Government had stepped 
in without supporting business. 

CANADIAN ACTION 

The Canadian Government acknowl- 
edged the importance of workers in 1900 
by establishing a separate Department of 
Labour. The U.S. followed suit 13 years 
later by setting up its own Department 
of Labor which included a children's 
bureau. Prior to this, an Act of Congress 
in 1903 had created the Department of 
Commerce and Labor. 

The Federal Employee's Compensation 
Act of 1908 represented the first form of 
workmen's protection for on-the-job in- 
juries. Although it applied only to federal 
civil service workers, it soon led to other 
compensation laws of its kind. By 1911, 
10 states had workmen's compensation 
laws. By 1920, all but six states had 
them. 

In 1911, after the terrible Triangle 
Waist Shirt Co. fire in New York, which 
caused the death of 146 workers, an in- 
vestigating committee formed to study 
and eventually improve factory working 
conditions. Two great friends of labor 
led the investigating committee: Al 
Smith, later New York Governor, and 
Robert Wagner, later New York Senator 
and the sponsor of the Wagner Act. 

At about the same time that the U.S. 
was setting up its Department of Labor, 
it passed the Clayton Anti-Trust Act which 
limited the use of injunctions against 
picketing and other union activity. Sam- 
uel Gompers called these provisions the 
"Magna Charta" of labor. 

Robert M. La Follette, the great Wis- 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



consin Progressive, led a fight for im- 
provement of maritime working condi- 
tions which eventually became law in the 
1915 La Follette's Seamen's Act. At 
about the same time, the Adamson Act 
established an 8-hour day on the rail- 
roads. 

With the advent of World War I, the 
reform movement gradually ebbed. With 
conservative, Republican leadership in 
the White House, the 1920s were difficult 
years for labor. In Canada, as well, the 
decade began with a recession and ended 
with a boom and a bust. 

In the United States, children still con- 
stituted a large part of the work force as 
child labor laws were declared unconstitu- 
tional until the child labor provision of 
the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 was 
upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in 
1941. Except for certain exceptions, this 
set the minimum age of employment at 
16 years. The Fair Labor Standards Act 
of 1938 also provided for a minimum 
wage and overtime pay — two major ac- 
complishments for labor. 

The Federal Court System was used in 
the 1920s to frustrate actions of labor. 
The Supreme Court, for example, held 
that the Clayton Act did not legalize 
secondary boycotts or protect unions 
from injunctions, declaring that they in- 
terfered with trade. In Canada, the Indus- 
trial Disputes Investigation Act of 1907 
was the chief machinery for preventing 
strikes and lockouts. It was a federal 
piece of legislation which required a 
compulsory delay of striking while in- 
vestigations were underway. It provided 
for a board of conciliation and investi- 
gation which had the legal power to 
compel testimony. It was not until 1925 
that the courts ruled that the Federal 
Government had overstepped its bounds 
of jurisdiction. Parliament was forced to 
amend the legislation to apply only to 
disputes in the federal domain. 

NEW DEAL REFORMS 

The high point for American labor 
came in the form of Labor Legislation 
in the 1930s with President Roosevelt's 
New Deal. Roosevelt sought a "balance" 
in an economic system severely damaged 
by the Depression. He strived for a "bal- 
ance between the wage earner, the em- 
ployer, and the consumer" and sought 
to aid the "forgotten man." 

The objectives of the New Deal's 
Labor Legislation were: relief of the un- 
employment situation which had resulted 
from the Depression; an improvement in 
wages and a decrease in hours for low- 
paid sweat shop workers; the abolition 
of child labor; security against unemploy- 
ment and old age; and the right of labor 
to help itself through government recog- 
nition of collective bargaining. 

The Davis Bacon Act was passed in 
1931. It was especially important for car- 
penters, and it remains so even today. 
The Act provided for the payment of 
prevailing rates to laborers employed by 
contractors and subcontractors on public 
construction sites. 




This picture from the early files of the 
Pennsylvania Labor Department shows 
a worker without legs still carrying his 
lunch pail to a job. Federal and state 
safety laws, plus the Occupational Safety 
and Health Act — all supported by the 
Brotherhood — have helped to combat 
the hazards of the job site. 

Section 7(a) of the National Industrial 
Recovery Act, passed in 1933, gave em- 
ployees the right to organize and bargain 
collectively through their representatives, 
without interference, restraint, or coer- 
cion by employers. This had tremendous 
impact for the American trade union 
movement. 

Two years later, in 1935, the Wagner 
Act established the first national labor 
policy of protecting the rights of workers 
to organize into unions and to elect their 
representatives for collective bargaining. 
By denying employers the right to use 
anti-union tactics or to interfere with 
workers' rights to organize, the Act 
sought to promote collective bargaining. 
It was some time before Canada enacted 
similar legislation, but the Wagner Act 
provided goals which Canadian labor 
strove to reach. Provincial governments 
enacted various forms of labor legislation 
in Canada in the late 1930s, but enforce- 
ment machinery was still lacking as labor 
legislation was still in the hands of the 
Federal Government. As a result, pro- 
vincial legislation often was rendered 
ineffective. 

In 1935, the U.S. Congress also ap- 
proved the initial Federal Social Security 
Act. Its many provisions continue to help 
workers today. 

The 1940s and 50s were generally not 
the best time for labor legislation reform 
in both Canada and the U.S. In the 
U.S., labor reform took a back seat to 



the war effort. Following the war, con- 
servatism dominated the Congress. 

In Canada, striking was prohibited as 
the Federal Government extended the 
Industrial Disputes Investigation Act to 
all major war industries. In this wartime 
emergency, further additions to labor leg- 
islation were made, including recognition 
of workers' rights to join unions, and 
encouragement of collective bargaining. 
However, there was no provision for 
union certification, and there was no bar- 
gaining requirement for employers. Hos- 
tile employers continued to ignore legis- 
lative exhortations. It was not until after 
World War II that the provinces ob- 
tained jurisdiction over labor legislation. 

TAFT-HARTLEY ACT 

In 1947, U.S. labor experienced an- 
other setback when Congress enacted the 
Taft-Hartley Act, despite President Tru- 
man's veto. This Act prohibited the 
closed-shop situation and placed unfair 
restrictions on common site picketing. 
Labor is still fighting this Act today. 

During the 1950s, unions increased 
their efforts to prevent passage of State 
"right to work" laws which were per- 
mitted under Section 14(b) of the Taft- 
Hartley Act. These laws denied unions 
the right to have union-shop agreements 
with management. In spite of labor's 
efforts, these laws were in effect in 17 
states by 1954. 

The 1960s brought additional changes 
which affected U.S. labor. In 1963, the 
Equal Pay Act was signed which pro- 
hibited wage differentials based on sex 
for workers covered by the Fair Labor 
Standards Act. In 1964, President lohn- 
son signed the Civil Rights Act which 
contained the Equal Employment Op- 
portunity Title. Workers were no longer 
to be discriminated against on the basis 
of race, color, religion, or sex. This was 
an important step for the American trade 
union movement. 

Finally, the 1970s have witnessed sev- 
eral important gains for labor. The Occu- 
pational Safety and Health Act, passed 
in the early 1970s, has succeeded in 
directing attention towards bettering the 
working conditions of American wage 
earners. In addition, the Building Trades 
came very close to obtaining from Con- 
gress a Situs-Picketing Bill which would 
allow picketing of an entire construction 
site. They have been trying to obtain 
such a Bill since the Taft-Hartley Act 
imposed unfair restrictions on labor in 
the 1940s. Although President Ford 
promised to sign such a Bill if it ever 
crossed his desk, he chose to veto it. 

Canada also made a major gain in 
the 1970s by obtaining a comprehensive 
health care program throughout the na- 
tion. This has been a long time goal for 
American labor. 

The North American labor movement 
has come a long way in the past hundred 
years. Although we have not achieved 
our highly-sought goal of Labor Law Re- 
form, a successful past gives hope for a 
promising future. 



MAY, 1980 



17 




Why Do Industrial Plants 
Shut Down? 

Sometimes It's Due 
to Corporate Strategy 

Report Shows Some Plants Making 

A Profit To The Day Of Their 'Forced Deaths' 



The personal miseries brought on 
by plant shutdowns have been well- 
documented, but most economists and 
public officials have tended to pay 
more attention to the effects than the 
causes of these man-made disasters. 

The consequences are abundantly 
clear: massive, often long-term unem- 
ployment for the displaced workers; 
dramatic, often painfully lowered 
standards of living; disabling and 
draining physical and emotional prob- 
lems. The communities abandoned by 
the employers in turn suffer a seriously 
eroded tax base and face substantial 
increases in social service burdens. 

Two economists investigated the 
phenomena of why plants are shut 
down and came up with some fasci- 
nating results. Professors Barry Blue- 
stone of Boston College and Bennett 
Harrison of the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology found that a dis- 
proportionate number of closings 
could be tied not to large corporations 
or small businesses, but to decisions by 
giant conglomerates. 

More surprisingly, Bluestone and 
Harrison said, many of the businesses 
folded by the conglomerates actually 
were making a profit up to the day of 
their forced deaths. 

"A corporate and especially a con- 
glomerate closing," the economists re- 
cently told the House Committee on 



Small Business, "is more likely to be 
the result of a planned strategy to in- 
crease profits than is the closing of an 
independently owned business, which 
may well constitute a truly involuntary 
'failure.' " 

How does a conglomerate profit by 
closing a business? Especially a busi- 
ness which is making money? In many 
ways, the economists explained. 

They note that conglomerates are 
formed not to produce goods, but to 
produce money. While a 7% or 10% 
profit on invested capital might be a 
healthy return for a normal business, 
a conglomerate's managers might think 
less than a 22% return isn't worth 
their time and trouble — so they close 
the plant and write it off. 

Bluestone and Harrison offered a 
short course in how to wreck a busi- 
ness for profit: 

• Both large and small companies 
may run down their older facilities — 
by not replacing worn-out machinery, 
for example — and use the savings, 
often in the form of depreciation al- 
lowances, to reinvest in other branches 
of their own firms, or other enter- 
prises. 

• Companies may actually close the 
older facilities down altogether, put- 
ting the land and/ or buildings on the 
market, and selling off the machinery. 



• Multi-plant, multi-store and 
multi-office corporations may grad- 
ually shift some machinery, skilled 
labor, managers, or simply marketing 
responsibilities from their older to their 
newer facilities located in some other 
city, state or county. Thus, the older 
facility may remain in operation — at 
least for the time being — but at a 
lower level of activity. 

• Although a multi-branch corpo- 
ration may not physically remove any 
of the older plant's capital stock in the 
short run, the profits earned from that 
plant's operations are reallocated to 
newer facilities for use in new prod- 
uct development, for instance. 

Such "milking" of profitable plants 
is especially common among conglom- 
erates, whose managers have some- 
times described these acquisitions as 
"cash cows," according to Bluestone 
and Harrison. Such "milking," the 
economists said, increase the chances 
that a business will run into trouble in 
the future. 

It may be an old story that big fish 
eat the little fish, but unless the con- 
glomerate sharks, the "Jaws" of the 
corporate world, are brought under 
control, the jobs of workers and the 
economic well-being of many com- 
munities across the nation remain in 
danger. — PAI 




18 



THE CARPENTER 



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Indianapolis, Indiana 46268 



XI 003 



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MAY, 1980 



19 



Brotherhood Continues Care of Former 
Lakeland Residents, Awaits Home Sale 



The Brotherhood General Execu- 
tive Board, at its recent winter meeting 
in Florida, heard a status report on 
the Lakeland, Fla. Home for Aged 
Members. 

Board members were advised that 
the Brotherhood continues to provide 
care for 33 remaining, former resi- 
dents of the home. They were moved 
to other retirement and nursing homes 
almost four years ago and now have 
an average age of 87. Under a man- 
date of the 32nd General Convention 
in 1974, the union will provide nurs- 
ing and retirement care for these sen- 
ior members for the rest of their lives. 

The Home facility, meanwhile, is in 
the final stages of disposal. The orange 
groves adjacent to the Home — which 
were a source of tax-exempt revenue 
for the Home through an Act of Con- 
gress — were sold last year, and the 
General Executive Board now has be- 




The Lakeland Home 

fore it "an offer and acceptance to 
purchase" the Home from a major 
religious organization. Sale of the 
Home is expected to be consummated 
this year. 

The Lakeland Home for Aged 
Members was established by the Broth- 
erhood in 1928. Located in the heart 
of Florida's citrus belt, it was a haven 
for old-time members, aged 65 or 
over, in good standing, and with 30 or 



more years of membership. It was a 
self-contained community, with its own 
library, bakery, barber shop, audi- 
torium, golf course, fishing and boat- 
ing lake, and much more. 

By the 1970s, however, changing 
life styles among senior members, plus 
increased state restrictions on housing, 
nursing, and hospital facilities, caused 
the Lakeland Home to become a tre- 
mendous financial burden to the 
Brotherhood. 

The 32nd General Convention, 
which met in Chicago in 1974, di- 
rected the General Officers and Gen- 
eral Executive Board to dispose of the 
Home and to move the 120 residents 
then at the Home to other and com- 
parable facilities. The convention de- 
cided that "any monies derived from 
the future sale of the Home property 
should be placed in a special account 
for the purpose of insuring our obliga- 
tion of cost for the proper care of 
Home occupants for the rest of their 
natural lives." The "Home Account" 
is maintained at the General Office in 
Washington for that purpose. 



Local 586 Members Cement Levels to Drills 
To Solve Unique Problem at Railroad Museum 



For a Sacramento, Calif., contractor, 
using hand drills fitted with levels to 
drill holes through lO'/i-in to 13Vi-in 
laminated wood truss components was 
more economic than using a press drill — 
even though there were over 16,000 holes 
to drill. The trusses averaging 12-ft. in 
height with spans up to 114-ft., will be 
installed in a pre- 1900 type railroad 
bridge for the California State Museum 
of Railroad History in Sacramento. 

Members of Carpenters Local 586, 
Sacramento, are doing the work. 

The indoor 225-ft. long bridge that 
separates a turn-of-the-century round- 
house from the Museum's primary ex- 
hibit hall, will not only display a narrow 
gauge locomotive and four cars, but will 
also form a major structural element in 
support of the roof. 

The task of assembling the glulam 
trusses, which weigh up to 11-tons apiece, 
fell to Nielsen-Nickles Company, a Sac- 
ramento based general contractor build- 
ing the 110,000 square foot museum. 
Because of their tremendous size and 
weight, the trusses were put together on 
the ground at the site and lifted into 
place wtih a crane. 

l'/i-inch threaded machine bolts were 
used in assembling the 57 main trusses, 
55 secondary trusses and the 710 perlins, 
which were then joined by heavy steel 
plates up to 15-ft. long. 

Appropriately enough, when it came 
to drilling holes for the bolts, Project 
Manager Bob Lukins found that the 
"old ways worked best." Lukin's original 



idea was to use an electric hog drill 
press and "push the trusses through as- 
sembly-line style." In this case, the use 
of more modern machinery was awk- 
ward and time-consuming because the 
dimensions and weight of each truss re- 
quired the drill press be moved to each 
new drilling point rather than vice-versa. 

At first Lukins ruled out the use of 
hand drills as they tend to be inaccurate 
and project requirements set the toler- 
ance for the holes at one-eighth inch. By 
cementing levels to the hand drills, how- 
ever, Lukins could be sure the holes 
were plumb. 

The final step in the process has the 
assembled trusses set on concrete piers 
where they are bolted and welded to em- 
bedded steel plates. 

Originally, in the days of steam-driven 
locomotives, the truss chords and flanges 
for wooden railroad bridges consisted 
of single piece Douglas Fir Timbers. To- 
day, obtaining and transporting single- 
piece timbers of the dimensions required 
to construct trusses up to 16-ft. in depth 
and over 114-ft. in length is neither pos- 
sible nor desirable. As a result, glulam 
timbers are being used. 

Explained project architect, Merle Car- 
negie of the State Architect's Office, "the 
idea is to reflect what was used in many 
railroad structures, particularly in the 
western United States, while, at the same 
time, endowing it (the bridge) with more 
structural capacity. Single-piece Douglas 
Fir beams can't begin to take the stress 
that glulam beams do." 




Two members oj Local 586 work with 
the hand-drill and level combination to 
prepare the laminated trusses. Small 
square at center indicates bubble level. 



Nielsen-Nickles Company expects to 
finish its $8.5 million portion of the proj- 
ect this August, and the State hopes to 
open the museum by early 1981. The 
museum will house more than 50 loco- 
motives and cars and according to the 
curator of the Smithsonian Institute, "it 
will be one of the finest collections of 
19th century transportation in the world." 



20 



THE CARPENTER 




What Vou HIuieivs 
Wanted to Knoui 
Rbout Contact limes 




Contact lens wearers make up slightly 
more than 10% of the 110 million peo- 
ple in the United States who use correc- 
tive lenses. But the use of contacts is 
growing, thanks to improvements in fit, 
design, materials, and the lengthened 
wearing times. 

There are four basic types of contact 
lenses — hard, soft, intraocular and ex- 
tended wear soft lenses. These lenses are 
regulated as medical devices by the Food 
and Drug Administration, which means 
manufacturers must obtain premarket ap- 
proval by FDA to assure their lenses are 
safe and effective. Here's a rundown on 
the four types: 

HARD CONTACT LENSES 

About eight million people wear these 
lenses, which are made from hard plas- 
tics. Available since the late 1940's their 
use increased dramatically in the mid-50's 
after improvements in lens design and 
liquid solutions permitted people to wear 
them longer and with more comfort. 
Proper care in the handling and storage 
of these lenses will allow users to wear 
the same pair of lenses for years. 

These lenses can correct most vision 
problems such as far-sightedness that tra- 
ditionally have been corrected with 



glasses. Hard contact lenses vary in price 
from about $125 to $175 a pair. 

SOFT CONTACT LENSES 

These water-absorbing lenses, approved 
for marketing in 1964, are worn by about 
four million people in the United States. 
Last year two out of three new contact 
lens wearers chose this lens over the hard 
lens — in large part because no break-in 
period is needed. The foreign body sensa- 
tion subsides within minutes enabling the 
users to wear the soft lens immediately 
for up to 18 hours. 

These lenses, however, correct only a 
limited range of visual problems. They 
must be disinfected daily to prevent pos- 
sible eye infections caused by bacteria or 
other impurities that may be absorbed by 
the lenses. They also cost more — between 
$200 and $400 — and generally have a 
lifespan of a year or less. 

INTRAOCULAR LENSES 

These artificial "hard" lenses are worn 
by many patients who undergo cataract 
surgery in which their natural eye lenses 
containing cataracts are surgically re- 
moved and replaced with these permanent 
plastic substitutes. The complete opera- 
tion costs between $1,200 and $1,800 and 
often takes less than an hour. 



Not all cataract patients, however, can 
wear these lenses, but for the one in four 
who can wear them the advantages are 
impressive. For example, intraocular 
lenses do not magnify images or seriously 
impair peripheral vision as do the con- 
ventional extra thick cataract glasses. 
They also are more practical for older 
people who may not have the steadiness 
of hand required to place a conventional 
hard lens in the eye. 

EXTENDED WEAR 
SOFT CONTACT LENSES 

Also designed specifically for cataract 
patients, these lenses require no surgery 
and can be worn up to a month without 
being removed. 

The lens is made of a specially pre- 
pared plastic (similar to the conventional 
soft contact lens) that permits the trans- 
fer of oxygen in the air to the eye surface 
so that the eye will accept the presence 
of the lens on a semi-permanent basis. 

It is the newest type of lens approved 
by FDA. Wearing time may be extended 
to as much as six months when manu- 
facturers have completed clinical tests. 
Costs vary from $300 to $400 a pair. An 
extended wear soft lens for general use 
also is being tested. 



REMUS 



Under laws administered by the US 
Consumer Products Safety Commis- 
sion, an estimated 117 million potenti- 
ally hazardous products have been 
called back from the marketplace and 
consumers since 1973 (when CPSC 
was created). Most of these were vol- 
untarily recalled by manufacturers 
who established programs to repair or 
replace the products, or to refund the 
purchase price. Recent actions include 
the following: 



TelBtiision Antennas 

CPSC has issued a warning of a 
possible electrocution hazard to con- 
sumers who purchased approximately 
28,000 "Color Master" and "Video 
Master" outdoor television antenna 
kits. The antennas were manufactured 
by Lance Industries, of Sylmar, Cali- 
fornia. 

As required by law, the antenna 
kits are not labeled with warnings that 
consumers may risk electrocution if 



the antennas contact electrical power 
lines while being installed or removed 
from roof tops. 

Antennas are annually the largest 
single cause of electrocutions among 
consumer products, causing an average 
of approximately 200 electrocution 
deaths a year. Most deaths occur 
when the antennas brush against high 
voltage power lines while consumers 
are installing or removing them. 

Retailers have been instructed to 
supply consumers with copies of the 
precautionary labels and instructions. 
Consumers should not attempt to in- 
stall the antennas until they have re- 
ceived these warning notices. 

Consumers can obtain free warning 
labels and instructions by contacting 
Lance Industries, 13001 Bradley Ave- 
nue, Sylmar, California 91342. 

HOTLINE NUMBERS: 

Toll-free CPSC hotline 800-638- 
8326. Maryland only, 800-492-8363. 
Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Virgin 
Islands, 800-638-8333. A teletype for 
the deaf is available from 8:30 a.m. 
to 5:00 p.m. EST. National (including 
Alaska and Hawaii) 800-638-8270. 
Maryland residents only 800-492-8104. 



Children's Toys 

Toy Telephones. Montgomery Ward 
is recalling approximately 20,000 toy 
telephone sets offered for sale through 
its mail-order catalog. 

The phone sets were imported from 
Yugoslavia and are very similar to the 
toy telephones recalled last month by 
another U.S. firm. 

The sets include two battery-oper- 
ated toy telephones connected by means 
of a detachable cord. The two-prong 
plugs at each end of the cord look so 
much like real electrical plugs that 
children may try to force them into 
household sockets, thus receiving se- 
vere shocks or burns. 

The sets are ivory in color, and are 
equipped with working intercoms, sig- 
nal lights and buzzers. The name 
"Mehanotehnika" is printed on the 
bottom of each phone. 

While Montgomery Ward has re- 
ceived no consumer complaint of in- 
juries from the cords, CPSC staff 
reports that an 8-year-old girl was 
burned earlier this year when she 
forced a plug from a similar phone set 
(distributed by another firm) into a 
wall electrical outlet. 



MAY, 1980 



21 




GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., DC. 20001 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 



EARLY DIAGNOSIS 

A conceited young apprentice re- 
cuperating in the hospital had an 
extremely pretty nurse. He said to 
her one morning, "Nurse, I'm in 
love with you; I don't want to get 
well." 

"Don't worry, you won't. The doc- 
tor is in love with me, too, and he 
saw you kissing me yesterday." 

ATTEND UNION MEETINGS 

WHERE IT'S AT 

A door in a government building 
in Washington, D.C., is labeled: 
"4156; General Services Adminis- 
tration; Region 3; Public Buildings 
Service; Building Management Divi- 
sion; Utility Room; Custodial." It is 
a door to a broom closet. 

— Former Rep. Lester Johnson 

ARE YOT STILL CLICING? 

HOW MUCH IS LEFT? 

COUNSELOR: What's wrong? 
TAXPAYER: The IRS has just de- 
manded a recount of my blessings. 



JUDGE OF BEEF 

At the state fair, they were 
choosing which bull would win the 
prize as grand champion. There 
were two perfect bulls in the con- 
test. They were so evenly matched 
the judges found it impossible to 
decide, so they decided to let the 
carpenter who built the show barn 
pick the winner. The carpenter in- 
spected the two bulls then decided: 

"I choose this one." 

The crowd cheered the winner, 
as the chairman hung the blue rib- 
bon on it. 

Then the chairman leaned over 
the stall and asked the carpenter 
why he picked that bull. The car- 
penter said: 

"Because I think he will give the 
most milk." 

— Emil Buehler 
Local 1251 
New Westminster, B.C. 

BE IN GOOD STANDING 

HALF-COCKED 

MOTHER: My son swallowed a 
.22-caliber bullet, what should I 
do? 

DRUGGIST: Give him this bottle 
of castor oil but don't point him at 
anyone. 

— UTU News 




UNSKILLED LABOR 

1st PRISONER: You were making 
big money? 

2nd PRISONER: Yep. A half-inch 
too big. 



THIS MONTH'S LIMERICK 

A little fat worm told a friend, 
"Oh watch me, see how I can 

bend." 
This friendship seemed true, 
A romance ensued, 
'Till he found it was his other end!!! 
Mrs. Muriel Beaulieu 
Nashua, N.H. 




STREET PEOPLE 

A woman motorist who had 
bumped a pedestrian rather rough- 
ly leaned out of her car and said, 
"I've been driving a car for ten 
years. You must have been walking 
very carelessly." 

"Lady," said the jolted man acid- 
ly, "I guess I know something about 
walking; I've been doing it for forty- 
five years." 

ARE YOU REGISTERED TO VOTE? 

PRESIDENTIAL QUOTES 

Harry S. Truman once said that 
when he died he wanted to be 
buried in a coffin made of mulberry 
wood, "because I want to go 
through Hell a-crackin' and a-pop- 
pin'." 

• 

President Franklin D. Roosevelt 
liked to tell about the two young fel- 
lows from the Southern mountains 
visiting Washington. They were 
walking along Pennsylvania Ave- 
nue when they were startled by the 
roar of motorcycle cops escorting a 
black limousine. "It's the Presi- 
dent!" they heard someone call out. 

"Wonder what he's done, now?" 
asked one of the mountaineers. 



About a year after taking office 
as President, John F. Kennedy said, 
"When we got into office the thing 
that surprised us most was to find 
that things were just as bad as we'd 
been saying they were." 



Kidding Secretary of Labor Arthur 
Goldberg, in a speech before an 
AFL-CIO convention, President Ken- 
nedy told how Goldberg got lost 
while mountain climbing in the 
Alps. Search parties were sent out 
to find him. The Red Cross finally 
joined the rescue attempt, and their 
men went around calling out, 
"Goldberg! Goldberg! It's the Red 
Cross.' " Finally from the mountains 
came a voice: "I gave at the office!" 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



Introducing the fastest, coolest, most powerful 
professional jig saws we've ever made. 

So don't let the low prices fool you. 



Because even though they're priced right, these new Black & Decker 
Heavy-Duty Professional Jig Saws for wood and metal are no weekend 
warriors. They'll outcut, outrun, and outlast any professional jig saws 
on the market today. And we have the test results to prove it. 
The reasons for this kind of performance? Exclusive 
B & D features. Like the industry's only elliptical yoke drive 
for the most raw cutting power ever, and a curved track yoke 
mechanism for smoother, faster operating. 

Plus these B & D Heavy-Duty Professional features: 
A fully variable orbit switch that lets you change cutting action 
for faster cutting in all kinds of material. An instant 
off/on paddle switch— another exclusive— on the body 
grip model, and a trigger switch on the top handle 

models for your comfort. A full 1" cutting stroke 
for longer blade life. Improved dust clearance. 
Checkpoint'™' Brush System, 10' rubber cord set, ball 
bearing construction, comfort-engineered design, and more. 
Never before could you get this much jig saw for so little money. 
But see for yourself. Your Black & Decker 
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CUFF LINKS AND TIE TACK 

Excellent 

$0.00 
Set 



Beautiful set with emblem 
materials and workmanship 




OFFICIAL LAPEL EMBLEM 

Clutch back. Attractive small size. Rolled 
gold. 



$3-00 each 




The official emblem of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 
is displayed in full color on the jewelry 
shown here. Such bright and attractive 
articles are a good way for Dad to show 
membership in our Brotherhood. He'll wear 
them with pride on special occasions. . . . 
The materials used in the official jewelry 
and their workmanship are strictly first- 



EMBLEM RING 

This handsome ring has been added to 
the line of the Brotherhood's official em- 
blem jewelry. It may be purchased by 
individuals or by local unions for presenta- 
tion to long-time members or for conspicu- 
ous service. Gift boxed. Specify exact size 
or enclose strip of paper long enough to go 
around finger. 



Sterling silver, 

$53.00 

each 



class. There is a continuous demand for 
these items— especially as birthday gifts, 
as Christmas gifts, and as gifts for special 
union anniversaries. 

Please print or type orders plainly. Be sure 
names and addresses are correct, and that 
your instructions are complete. Also, please 
indicate the local union number of the 
member for whom the gift is purchased. 





)\'v') 



■Ir.f/. / 



belt buckle $5. 50 each 

The official emblem of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America is now emblazoned 
on special Carpenters' and Millwrights' belt buckles, 
and you can order such buckles now from the General 
Offices in Washington. 

Manufactured of sturdy metal, the buckle is 3Vi 
inches wide by 2 inches deep and will accommodate 
all modern snap-on belts. 
The buckle comes in a 
gift box and makes a 
fine Father's Day or 
holiday gift. 



T-shirt $3.00 each 

The General Office has small, medium, large, and 
extra large red-white-and-blue T-shirts like the one 
shown at right. They make good gifts. The price: $3 
each, in any quantity. Send cash, check or money 
order. 

Send order and remittance to: 

JOHN S. ROGERS, General Secretary 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, 

101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. 




Parkinson's Disease 
Campaign Continues 

The Brotherhood's special fund-raising 
effort for the American Parkinson's 
Disease Assn. continues to show results, 
with 28 local unions and two district 
councils sending in group contributions. 
In addition, seven individual members 
added to the monthly tally. 

Contributions not previously listed in- 
clude the following: 

Individual members — H. Schanz, Local 
246; Harold Tryon, Local 260; Donald 
E. Fink, Local 338; William Lillquist, 
Local 1746; Peter Mackeller, Local 2250; 
David Davidson, Local 2287; and Otis 
Hildahl, whose local was not identified. 

Local unions and district councils — 
The Wyoming District Council and the 
New York and Vicinity District Council, 
including Locals 20, 135, 246, 257, 284, 
298, 366, 385, 468, 608, 740, 787, 902, 
1162, 1164, 1204, 1456, 1536, 2117,2155, 
2163, 2241, 2287, 2632, 2682, 2710, 2947, 
and 3127. 

Funds are still needed. We urge you to 
send cash, check, or money order payable 
to: The American Parkinson's Disease 
Assn. c/o United Brotherhood of Carpen- 
ters and Joiners of America, 101 Consti- 
tution Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 
20001. Your contribution is tax deducti- 
ble. 

Brotherhood Exhibits 
At Cincinnati Ul Show 

The 35th Annual AFL-CIO Union- 
Industries Show will be held May 23-28, 
1980 at the Convention Center, Cincin- 
nati, O., and the Brotherhood will be a 
major exhibitor. The labor/management 
exposition, produced by the Union Label 
and Service Trades Department of the 
AFL-CIO, offers a unique opportunity 
for the public to see firsthand the pro- 
fessionalism and skills union craftspeople 
bring to their jobs as they make products 
and offer vital services to the consumer. 

The show is free to the general public 
and will feature more than 300 lively 
exhibits, working demonstrations, films, 
educational games and colorful displays. 
Hundreds of union workers, as well as 
representatives of government and of the 
leading U.S. companies, demonstrate the 
crafts they practice in their jobs, display 
their products and explain the services 
they provide. Many unique live demon- 
strations and working displays are seen 
only in the Union-Industries Show. 

An estimated $100,000 in prizes and 
free samples are given away to the thou- 
sands of visitors who see the six-day, free 
exposition. 

A major goal of the Union-Industries 
Show is to enhance the importance of 
the partnership between this country's 
union members and the companies which 
employ them — a partnership that not only 
produces superior goods, services and 
technology, but also insures fair wages, 
good working conditions and a high stand- 
ard of living for millions of citizens. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



Locni union rebus 



Detroit Employer's Late Benefit 
Payments Ruled NLRA Violation 



An employer's failure to make prompt 
payments to a workers' fringe benefit 
fund and its refusal to let the union audit 
the books constitute violations of federal 
labor law, the National Labor Relations 
Board ruled recently. 

The decision stems from a case involv- 
ing the Detroit Cabinet & Door Co. and 
Millmen's Local 1452. Since 1976, the 
employer had made tardy payments to a 
fringe benefit fund established in its con- 
tract with the union. In March 1979, 
the union asked that it be allowed to 
perform the audit to police the adminis- 
tration of its contract with the company. 

When the company refused, the union 
representing the mill-cabinet workers filed 
unfair labor practice charges. 

In its majority decision, the NLRB 
said that since the employer failed to re- 
spond to the complaint at various stages 
in the proceedings against it, the board 
considered union allegations regarding 
employer conduct as factual, and con- 



cluded that the company unlawfully re- 
fused to bargain with the union. 

Finding against the company were 
Chairman John H. Fanning and Member 
Howard Jenkins, Jr., who took issue with 
Member John A. Penello's dissent that 
the employer's behavior was no more 
than a simple contract violation, and not 
a breach of federal labor law. 

Fanning and Jenkins said that the em- 
ployer's delinquent payments may be con- 
sidered just as much an illegal renuncia- 
tion of its contract with the union as a 
flat refusal to make the payments would 
be. The employer also may be considered 
guilty of a mid-term modification of the 
agreement in violation of federal law, 
they said. 

If the company wanted to contest any 
of these interpretations of its conduct, the 
majority said, it should not have re- 
peatedly failed to respond to the board's 
proceedings against it. 



Revitalized VOC Program Promises to Increase 
Industrial Membership; VOC Committees Named 



The Organizing Department at the 
General Office in Washington, D.C., 
is taking a major step in protecting 
the welfare and security of each of 
the Brotherhood's members. Driven 
by its motto, "Workers helping work- 
ers to better their lives," it has revital- 
ized the VOC (Volunteer Organizing 
Committees) program to counter the 
growing threat of unorganized workers 
within the Brotherhood's jurisdiction. 

Introduced in 1974, the VOC Pro- 
gram is directed primarily towards or- 
ganizing the unorganized workers in 
the Brotherhood's industrial jurisdic- 
tion. The program is built on the idea 
of establishing VOC committees 
throughout North America to encour- 
age and enlist Brotherhood participa- 
tion. These VOC organizers are 
devoted to protecting the wages, 
working conditions, and job security 
that the Brotherhood has gained for 
its members. 

Local industrial unions are partici- 
pating in this great organizing drive as 
they begin to select teams of voluntary 
workers who receive special training 
in regional indoctrination sessions. 
Each voluntary organizer is well-pre- 
pared for his important job. 



The following is a list of the first 
VOC committees selected so far this 
year, as local unions help the United 
Brotherhood's Voluntary Organizing 
Program get underway: 

LOCAL 176, NEWPORT, R.I.— Rod- 
ney P. Bowley; Joseph Camara; Raymond 
Enos; Joseph Rodericks; William E. 
Stratford; Robert Viverios. 

LOCAL 1149, OAKLAND, CALIF.— 

Rick Anderson; Walter Clay; Paul Clutts; 
Ed Jackson; Paul Knudson; Ted Knud- 
son; Ted Newsome; Jim Odle; John 
Spediacci. 

LOCAL 2445, COLUMBUS, MISS.— 
Carolyn Harris; Thearthur Hike; Porter 
Stewart; Vance Stewart; Charlene Wilson. 

LOCAL 2679, TORONTO, ONT.— 
Ken Hopkinson, Mike Hutsulak, Art Mit- 
cham, Walter Oliveira, Victor Pereira. 

LOCAL 2713, CENTER, TX.— Robert 
Fountain; Mary L. Garret; Alvin D. 
Johnson; Mary LaBouve; Willie W. 
Swindle; Pearl Tanner; Linson White; 
Hazel Williams. 

LOCAL 2743, WOODVILLE, TX.— 
Joe Copes; Ade Graham; Rubin White. 

CENTRAL MISSOURI D.C.— John 
Batye; Charles Christy; Herbert H. Long; 
Ralph McCartney; Virgil Meyer; George 
Mundell; Maurice Schylte; Richard Wil- 
son. 



Three Labor-Studies 
Seminars Scheduled 

The General Office has scheduled three 
training seminars during 1980 for full- 
time local union and council officers. 

The week-long seminars are being 
held, as in the past, at the George Meany 
Labor Studies Center in Silver Spring, 
Md., just outside Washington, D.C. 

The 1980 seminar dates are as follows: 
April 27-May 3; May 4-10; and July 20- 
26. 

The training sessions are especially de- 
signed for newly-elected or appointed 
officers or business representatives and for 
those fulltime officers who have not pre- 
viously attended seminars. Section 31 C 
of the Brotherhood's Constitution and 
Laws requires all fulltime officers and 
business representatives to attend such 
seminars. All expenses for travel, food, 
and lodging are the responsibility of the 
local union or council. 



Former Lather Leader 
To HUD Region Post 

Richard P. Brankin, who has served 
for the past seven years as business man- 
ager of the Lathing Foundation of Chi- 
cago, has been named a regional labor 
relations officer for the U.S. Department 
of Housing and Urban Development. 

Brankin's new duties will include en- 
forcement of the Davis-Bacon Act and 
federal labor standards in HUD's Region 
V — the states of Illinois, Indiana, Michi- 
gan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. 

The new HUD official has been active 
in the labor movement for 32 years as a 
journeyman Lather, a Lathers' union 
official, and as a leader of the Lathing 
Foundation. 



Floor Coverers 1185 
Exhibits in Chicago 

Floor Coverers Local 1185 and the 
Chicago, 111., District Council exhibited 
at the recent Largest International Floor- 
ing Exposition (LIFE) in the Windy 
City. 

The local union had a display which 
featured the four phases of apprentice- 
ship through man's history — Babylonian, 
the British guild system, colonial meth- 
ods, and modern training. It distributed a 
colorful brochure explaining the skills of 
its members. 



A TTEND your local union meetings 
regularly. Be an active member of the 
Brotherhood. 



MAY, 1980 



25 



Bellingham Member's 69-Year Saga 

It's a long way and a long time between Tromst, Norway, 
in 1911 and Bellingham, Wash., in 1980, but Emil Olsen, 
88-year-old member of Local 1756, Bellingham, has weathered 
the years and the workload well. 

Still in good standing with his local union and "semi- 
retired", Olsen functions today as Emil Olsen Co., residential 
and commercial building contractors. It's an easy-paced, satis- 
factory living. 

But it's a far cry from his start in the trade at 20^ an hour, 
10 hours per day, six days a week, in a Northwest lumber 
mill, 69 years ago. 

Olsen emigrated from Norway in May, 1911, when his 
brother Magnus sent him tickets and fare money to travel 
from Bergen, Norway, to Hull and Liverpool, England, across 
the Atlantic to Quebec, then to St. Paul, Minn., and points 
west. Passage across the Atlantic cost $95 at that time. Cheap, 
you say. It represented two months wages for common labor 

back in Norway. 

Immigrants were 
supposed to have 
$25 or more with 
them when they ar- 
rived in Quebec. 

"Most of us had 
that much when we 
started out, but we 
didn't have it when 
we landed," Olsen 
remembers. "So 
four of us pooled 
our capital and 
gave it to one of 
us, who promptly 
went through the 
inspection line. He 
passed the money 
back to us, and, 
one at a time, we 
went through the 
inspection with the 
same $25." 
When he arrived at Bellingham, Olsen worked in a lumber 
mill by day and went to school at night to learn the Engish 
language. When he had learned the language well enough, he 
asked for a 10^ an hour raise and was fired. 

The next day a friend told him that there was a job available 
in a shipyard on Eliza Island. Olsen joined a labor gang at the 
yard. Work there was seasonal. It was operated by the Pacific 
American Canneries, and the yard at Eliza Island furnished 
pile drivers, tug boats, and fish scows for the company's can- 
neries in Washington and Alaska. 

Olsen got his big chance to become a shipwright when an- 
other worker quit. Pacific American Canneries set up a five- 
ways shipyard at Commercial Point in early 1916, and Olsen 
became a fastening foreman. In 1918 he joined Shipwrights 
Local 123. 

Shipyard work was at a standstill in 1921, and, by this time, 
Emil Olsen was married. He borrowed $35 from his father-in- 
law, who was a farmer and didn't like unions, and he joined 
Carpenters Local 756. 

An experience on a construction-repair job got him into 
contracting. In April, 1922, a local contractor was building 
Edens Hall at the Normal School. Olsen went to the site look- 
ing for work, but there were enough carpenters already hired. 
Shortly before this, a dynamite blast at the construction site 
had hurled a rock against the roof of a nearby building. "The 
Old Main", and had damaged a rake (the inclined portion of 
a cornice) and loosened an ornamental bracket which had to 
be replaced. The foreman had just let the job to repair the 
damage to a Mr. X on his bid of $25. 

"Go find Mr. X. He may need some help," Olsen was 
advised. 

Indeed, Mr. X did. He had the job but he couldn't figure 
how to get up to the rake and bracket without erecting a 




Emil Olsen at work. 



costly scaffold or staging up 50 feet, more than three stories 
from the ground. 

Emil Olsen offered Mr. X some advice. He noted an eight- 
foot circle sash in the gable which could be removed; he 
borrowed a small array of staging equipment from some paint- 
ers, got up in the attic, removed the sash, lowered the stage. 
Six hours after the job was started, it was done. 

The Carpenter scale at the time was $1.00 per hour. Mr. X 
gave Olson $6 and thanked him for his help and walked away 
with the remaining $19. Olsen had planned the work and done 
it. Mr. X had mostly watched. 

That day, Olsen decided to do some contracting on his own, 
and 58 years later he's still doing it. 



Lathers Join NJ Carpenters 




The regular January meeting of Local 2250, Red Bank, N.J., 
was highlighted by a merger with Lathers Local 346 of Asbury 
Park, N.J. and the presentation of the Lathers' charier to 
Carpenters Local 2250. 

Participants in the merger ceremony included: first row, left 
to right: Charles E. Gorhan, financial secretary, Local 2250; 
Stanley W . Boylan, secretary-treasurer, Local 346; Sigurd 
Lucassen, president, Local 2250 and Second General Vice- 
President of the Brotherhood; Louis A. Woolley, president. 
Local 346; Thomas Grant, business representative, Local 346; 
and James A. Kirk Jr., business representative, Local 2250. 

Second row, left to right: Brian W . Bedell, Walter R. Damon, 
and Gary L. Sutton. 

Not present: Eugene J. Bedell, ex-business representative and 
New Jersey state senator; Evan Bedell, and Harold Bennett. 



In the smaller picture, 
Stanley O'Hoppe, left, 
ex-business agent of 
Lathers Local 346 from 
1931 to 1939 and now a 
retired member of 
Carpenters Local 2250 
of Red Bank, New Jersey 
welcomes Thomas Grant, 
business representative of 
Lathers Local 346, 
Asbury Park, and his 
membership into 
Carpenters Local 2250 
of Red Bank, N.J. 



Housing Subsidies Step-Up Urged 

The AFL-CIO has called for passage of the Housing 
and Community Development Act of 1980 in an effort 
to head off the deepening recession in the housing- in- 
dustry. 

In testimony before the House Subcommittee on Hous- 
ing and Community Development, Henry B. Schechter, 
director of the AFL-CIO Department of Urban Affairs, 
said that "one of the chief generators of inflation in the 
economy has been a short supply of housing." 



h 


W T 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



Grant Building, Atlanta, Restored 
With Work by Members of Two Locals 



One of the South's oldest commercial 
buildings, the historic Grant Building in 
downtown Atlanta, Ga., has been re- 
stored for modern-day usage, with the 
skilled workmanship of Brotherhood 
members from two area locals. 

Designed in 1898 and considered the 
first example of "the Chicago school of 
architecture," the restored 10-story Grant 
Building opens up 120,000 square feet of 
leasable space for its new owners, Grant 
Associates, a Georgia limited partnership 
and becomes a major example of Central 
Atlanta business district renewal. 

Among the Brotherhood members em- 
ployed in the restoration work were 
Jimmy Ayres, B. W. Ward, Jimmy Davis, 
Carrol Peek, and Anthony White of Lo- 
cal 225, Atlanta, and Ricky Agan, Terry 
Ayers, and Superintendent Lewis Rags- 
dale of Local 1352, Carrolton. 

Most of the work of the Carpenters 
was drywall framing and placing and 
finishing new doors. New molding was 
needed on some floors, which were fin- 
ished in dark mahogany. 

Old wooden frame windows were re- 
placed by special order (due to size) 
grey aluminum frames. 

The second floor required most of 
the carpentry skills, but also the main 
lobby, fifth and sixth floors due to the 
restoring and replacement of molding, 
plus placement of 322 light fixtures on 
the second floor and 32 lights on the 
fifth and sixth floors. 

Some floor doors were restored and 
right-hand doors converted to left-hand 
doors. Locks were switched due to cost 
(new, near duplicated doors are $450 
each). 

Existing molding was fragile and 80 




years old, but attempts were made to 
save most. Molding circling the columns, 
a/k/a crown molding is original wood 
and a natural coloring. The oak hand- 
rails are also existing woodwork. The 
wainscoat are original. 

The demolition of drywall to allow 
union Electricians to replace some light- 
ing connections was necessary. Follow- 
ing the electrical work, the marble six- 
foot wainscoat was replaced by Brother- 
hood members. 

Because of heating and cooling ducts, 
the original 10 foot 6 inch ceilings were 
dropped on the majority of floors to 8 
feet. 

An open house celebration of "the 
grand new-old Grant Building" was held 
March 1 1 and 13. 

R. A. Jaffe Gets Top 
Job Corps Position 

Richard A. Jaffe, acting director of the 
US Job Corps since October and formerly 
its regional director in Philadelphia, has 
been appointed Job Corps director by 
Assistant Secretary of Labor Ernest G. 
Green. Jaffe succeeds Raymond E. 
Young, who retired last year. 




The litter of torn-out, decayed wood had 
to be removed from many floors of the 
Grant Building. 




New plumbing for new restrooms had to 
be installed, but Building Tradesmen sal- 
vaged what they could of original piping. 



The Grant Building as it now looks, and 
as an architectural drawing shows it. 



Est wing 



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Strongest Construction Known 

Unsurpassed in Temper, 
Quality, Balance and Finish. 

Genuine Leather Cushion 
Grip or Exclusive Molded 
on Nylon-Vinyl Deep 
Cushion Grip 



First and 
Finest 
Solid Steel 
Hammers 



Always wear Estwing Safety 
Goggles when using hand 
tools. Protect your eyes from 
flying particles and dust. By- 
standers shall also wear Est- 
wing Safety Goggles. 




HAMMERS • AXES • PICKS • BARS 

If your dealer can't supply you — write: 



Estwmg^^Mfg. Co. 



2647 8th St., Dept. C-5 
Rockford, IL 61101 



MAY, 1980 



27 




Carpenters' Hall, 
Philadelphia, Is, 
As It Should Be, 
A Union Job 



Carpenters' Hall in Philadelphia, Pa., 
was the cradle of American democracy 
more than 200 years ago. Once the regu- 
lar meeting place of the Carpenters' 
Company, which was a colonial prede- 
cessor of our own United Brotherhood, 
the historic old structure housed the First 
Continental Congress in 1774 and it was 
the site of the kick-off ceremonies for 1 the 
1976 observance of America's bicenten- 
nial. 

It was only fitting then, that when 
National Park Service caretakers, last 



year, decided to refurbish the old build- 
ing, they called for skilled members of 
the Brotherhood's Philadelphia Metropol- 
itan District Council to do the job. 

Working under a contract of Keefer & 
Kessler, Associates, Inc., members of 
Local 122 removed old molding and re- 
placed it, restored the cupola atop the 
building, and performed a thousand other 
tasks to put the building back in shape. 
The restoration project had the full sup- 
port of the General Building Contractors 
Assn. of the City of Brotherly Love. 



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Carpenters' Hall with the scaffolding in 
place for renovation work. The picture at 
left shows Jerome Glazier checking the 
weathervane. 




Jerome Glazier of Local 12 removes 
some of the old molding around a 
window of Carpenters' Hall. 




Much of the shop work was performed 
in the basement of the building. Semus 
Boyle makes a mortise cut. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



UUE COnCRBTULBTE 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



ENVIRONMENT POST 

At the end of July, 1979, the Maine 
Senate confirmed the appointment of 
Neil Hapworth, president of the North- 
ern New England District Council of 
Carpenters, as the first labor representa- 
tive on the state Board of Environmental 
Protection. 

The new appointee has strong feelings 
with regard to industrial expansion and 
environmental protection. He states that 
one of Maine's top priorities over the 
next few years is to provide for new 
energy sources. 

As for major energy projects, Hap- 
worth favors them all. He considers 
hydroelectric power the cleanest, and 
probably the cheapest, of our energy 
sources. In addition, he feels that while 
we are in great need of the energy that 
could be generated by coal and nuclear 
power, we must solve the critical prob- 
lem of waste. 

He was recording secretary and later 
business agent of his local and in 1974 
was appointed president of the Northern 
New England District Council. Hap- 
worth is also director of the Economic 
Resources Council of Maine. 



SALES AID STUDENTS 




O'Brien 



FULLE 



Throughout the entire year, Ladies 
Auxiliary 170 of San Diego, Calif., runs 
a booth of handmade articles at a local 
shopping center to raise money for 
scholarships presented to deserving sons 
and daughters of local Brotherhood mem- 
bers. In 1979, the auxiliary presented two 
$100 scholarships. William O'Brien, left, 
son of Russell O'Brien of Local 1571, 
received an award and plans to attend 
Grossmont College and San Diego State 
University. Laurie Fulle, right, grand- 
daughter of Fred Fulle, also of Local 
1571, received the other award and plans 
to attend Goshen College in Indiana. 
Mrs. Russell O'Brien and Mrs. Fred Fulle 
are members of Ladies Aux. 170. 



GEORGE MEANY AWARD 



II 




V 



Robert Miller, administrative assistant of 
the Orange County District Council, left, 
is presented the Meany Award by James 
G. Maynard, retiring president of the 
Orange County Council of the Boy 
Scouts of America. 



On December 1, 1979, Robert Miller, 
administrative assistant of the Orange 
County District Council of Carpenters, 
was presented with the prestigious George 
Meany Scouting Award for "outstanding 
contributions to the cause of scouting in 
Southern California." 

After a severe winter storm completely 
destroyed two Boy Scout camps on Cata- 
lina Island in 1978. Miller personally 
raised over $57,000 in labor and mate- 
rials to rebuild the sites. With help from 
the Orange County Carpenters Union, 
almost all of the estimated $109,000 
worth of damage to the camps was re- 
paired or rebuilt. 

Miller was also a key influence in the 
Orange County District Council of Car- 
penters' sponsorship of the 1979 Scout- 
O-Rama. 

Miller is a member of the Awahanee 
District Committee of the Orange County 
Boy Scouts of America. 

SCHOLARSHIP WINNER 

Local 413, South 
Bend, Ind., Scholar- 
ship Committee re- 
cently awarded a 
non-renewable $500 
scholarship for 1979 
to Beth A. North, 
daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard W. 
Beachey. 

Miss North now 
attends the School 
of Agriculture at Purdue University. 




Carpenters, 

hang it up! 

Clamp these heavy 
duty, non-stretch 
suspenders to your 
nail bags or tool 
belt and you'll feel 
like you are floating 
on air. They take all 
the weight off your 
hips and place the 
load on your 
shoulders. Made of 
soft, comfortable 2" 
wide red nylon. 
Adjust to fit all sizes 

Try them for 15 days, if not completely 

satisfied return for full refund. Don't be 

miserable another day, order now. 

Send check or money order to: 




Norman Clifton, 
member, Local 1622, 
Hayward, Calif. 
(Patent Pending) 



| CLIFTON ENTERPRISES 

I 4806 Los Arboles Place, Fremont, Ca. 94536 
I Please rush "HANG IT UP" suspenders at 
I $19.95 each includes postage & handling 
j California residents add 6%% sales tax 
J ($1.20). Canada residents please send U.S. 
I equivalent. 

j NAME 

| ADDRESS 

I CITY STATE ZIP 



Please give street address for prompt delivery. 



Ms. North 



The Perfect Gift 
for Father's Day 




The official Brotherhood 

Daymatic Self Winding 

Calendar Watch, made by 

Hamilton; yellow gold finish, 
waterproof, shockproof, 
quick-change calendar, 

expansion band, guaranteed 
in writing for one year. 

$49.50 

postpaid 

Send order and 

remittance to: 

JOHN S. ROGERS, 

General Secretary 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters 

and Joiners of America 

101 Constitution Ave, N.W. 

Washington, D.C. 20001 



MAY, 1980 



29 



CLARKSBURG, W.VA. 

Local 236 recently held an awards banquet 
for its 20 to 55-year members. Some of the 
members who received pins are pictured in 
the accompanying photograph. 

Front row, left to right: Manuel Lauderman, 
38-years; Salvatore Fillipine, 29-years-, Daril W. 
Stalnaker, 38-years; Joseph Z. Stalnaker, 
23-years; James E. Daetwyler, 33-years; and 
Norman Burky, 38-years. 

Second row, left to right: Aubrey McKisic, 
31-years; Frank S. Lopez, 49-years; Jim 
D'Annunzio, 45-years; and Cecil McEldowney, 
24-years. 

Third row, left to right: Robert L. Orsburn, 
president; Wade S. Bramer, 24-years; Ben I. 
Cayton, 22-yearS; Reuben S. Wasrud, 37-years; 
John E. Bruffey, 37-years; Charles E. Dixon, 
20-years; and Romeo 0. Gatrell, 32-years. 

Fourth row, left to right: Robert J. Dowell, 
21-years; Tony D. McClain, 40-years; Kenneth 
E. Posey, Sr., 18-years, and Paul McCartney, 
19-years. 

The following members also received pins: 

20-year members Walter S. Flanigan, Jr., 
Willis Lake, F. Joe Shookey, Ralph Skidmore, 
William Slaughter, Archie White, Ross White, 
Joseph Williams, and Willis Yeager. 

25-year members Harry Fox and Charles 
Riley. 

30-year members Emery Edgell, Kent Evans, 
Clark Lane, Everett Lane, Howard Miller, 
Elwood Riffe, Hillery Spaur, Ralph Stalnaker, 
Hayward Townsend, and James Wimer. 

35-year members Hazel Ash, Edward Betler, 
John Griffith, Jr., Cecil Lake, Russell Lake, 
George D. Nutter, Oral Rexroad, William 
Schetzel, and Willard E. Yeager. 

40-year members Okey Bramer and Argil 
Moody. 

45-year member Lawrence Long. 

55-year member Harley Dale Nutter. 

ANCHORAGE, AK. 

Local 1281 recently held a meeting to award 
service pins to its old-time members. The 
weather was so bad that only four of the 
eligible 19 members were present at the 
ceremony. They are, from left to right: Leonard 
Turner, 40-years; Carl Clemmons, 35-years; 
Richard Bruns, 30-years; and George Geesey, 
25-years. 




Service 

Te 

The 

Brotherhood 



A gallery of pictures showing some of the senior members of the Broth- 
erhood who recently received pins for years of service in the union. 




Clarksburg, W. Va. 



GRAND FALLS, NFLD. 

Last fall, Everett Boyd, recording secretary 
of Local 2564, presented service pins to 25 
and 30-year members on the jobsite at 
Horwood Lumber Company in St. Johns. 

Picture No. 1— Recording Secretary Everett 
Boyd, left, presents a 25-year pin to forklift 
operator Roy Butler. 

Picture No. 2— Recording Secretary Boyd, 
left, presents a 30-year pin to carpenter 
Harold Smith. 

Picture No. 3 — Recording Secretary Boyd, 
left, presents a 25-year pin to carpenter 
Walter Pack. 




Grand Falls, Nfld — Picture No. 1 




Grand Falls, Nfld.— Picture No. 3 

THE CARPENTER 



KANSAS CITY, KANS. 

Local 168 awarded service pins to many 
long-time members at a 70th anniversary party 
held on December 17, 1979. Members who 
received awards are pictured in the accom- 
panying photographs. 

Picture No. 1— From left to right: 60-year 
member Floyd Robinson; 30-year members Tom 
Ridenour, A. L. Myers, and Clarence Morgan; 
District Council Secretary-Treasurer Virgil 
Heckathorn; and Business Representative Jim 
Harding. 

Picture No. 2— From left to right: 25-year 
members Jack Miller and Jim Grander; District 
Council Secretary-Treasurer Virgil Heckathorn; 
and 25-year member Marius Pointelin. 



PROVO, U. 

On November 7, 1979, Local 1498 presented 
25, 30, and 40-year pins to its deserving 
members. The following members received 
awards: 

Picture No. 1— 25-year members, from left 
to right: Wade Bradford, Keith Dorius, 
L. S. Nielsen, Clair Mortensen, and Harlan 
(Jack) Hamon. 

Picture No. 2— 30-year members, from 
left to right: Don Christiansen, Amos Riding, 
Harold S. Lassen, Leo Pinarelli, Rulon Cook, 
Charles Hancock, and Zenas Lefler. 

Picture No. 3 — 40-year member G. Spencer 
Barnett, left, received a pin from President 
Max Whiting. 

The following members also received 
awards: 25-year members James E. Christen- 
sen, Charles Clark, John C. Patrick, Jack 
Watson, and Lonnie Kimball; 30-year members 
E. E. Backus, Charles Byrd, Terry Chidester, 
Verl Dockstader, Carl Edwards, Lynn Helbing, 
Roy Jasperson, Clarence Middleton, Urcle 
Moulton, Alva Nicol, Byron Parker, R. 0. Rock- 
well, Hugh Roylance, and John Schiro. 




Kansas City, Kas. — Picture No. 1 







Kansas City, Kans. — Picture No. 2 




Provo, U. — Picture No. 3 



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MAY, 1980 



31 



New York, N.Y.— Picture No. 1 



New York, N.Y.— Picture No. 4 



NEW YORK, N.Y. 

At a reunion held last fall, the officers of 
Local 135 presented pins to past executive 
board members who have served the 
Brotherhood for many years. 

Picture No. 1 shows, front row, left to 
right: Past executive board members Leon 
Spierer, Soil Kling, Samuel Bair, Philip 
Hubelbank, Harry Eckhaus, David Nagler, and 
Harry Bair. 

Back row, left to right: Present executive 
board members Stanley Marcus, trustee; Julie 
Kleinstien, vice president; Zelig Kindler, 
warden; Israel Hubelbank, business 
representative and trustee; Ernest Cohen, 
president; Melvin Eckhaus, financial secretary- 
treasurer, Bernard Shustrin, recording 
secretary, and Anthony Bair, conductor. 
(Trustee Marvin Bair was not present for the 
photograph.) 

Picture No. 2 shows Financial Secretary- 
Treasurer and District Delegate Melvin 
Eckhaus, left, presenting a 55-year pin to his 
father, Harry Eckhaus, past financial 
secretary-treasurer, Local 135. 

Picture No. 3 shows Business Representa- 
tive and Trustee Israel Hubelbank, right, 
presenting a 67-year pin to his father Philip 
Hubelbank, past president, Local 135. 

Picture No. 4 shows Persident Ernest Cohen 
presenting pins to past officers. From left to 
right: President Ernest Cohen, Leon Spierer, 
Samuel Bair, Soil Kling, and David Nagler. 

ALPENA, MICH. 

On December 19, 1979 Local 1132 had a 
coffee-and-Christmas get-together and gave 
out service pins. The names and years of 
service are as follows: 

40-years— Clarence Sawade. 

35-years— John Mahalak and John Seabrook. 

30-years — Clyde Haines, Raymond 
Januchowski, Harry Kraniak, Parry Pearson, 
Joseph Sefernick, Raymond Skiba, Walter 
Swiderski, and Robert Thompson. 

25-years— Harry Burroughs, James Bur- 
roughs, James Finley, Frank Hoppe, John 
Johnson, Donald Klein, Raymond Kriniak, 
George McQuire, John A. Pohl, Thedore 
Pokorski, Edward Przeslawski, Orlan Rees, 
Gearald Richert, George Rosin, Russell Ordway, 
and Donald Reinke. 

20-years— Joseph Brousseau, George R. 
Hinkley, Elmer Kowalski, Lloyd LaCross, Victor 
Lovo, Lester Minier, Paul Pesonen, Julius 
Souva, Leonard Sova, George Tebo, and 
Gordon Wollanger. 




New York, N.Y. — Picture No. 2 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

A group picture was taken at the recent 
Fifth Annual Banquet of Pile Drivers Local 
2436. 

Featured in the picture are members who 
were honored that night for membership of 
25 years or more. Membership pins were 
awarded to the following recipients: 

Seated, from left to right: Jessie Ballard; 
Norris Foret; Maurice Navilhon; Uel Lovell; 
Guy Singletary; Ado Hunt; John Parrish (95 
years old); Edmond Growl (82 years old). 

Standing from left to right: Loren Alford; 
Edward Falgoust; Baptiste Martina; W. R. 
Abney; L. B. Desadier, Financial Secretary; 
Anthony Tresek; Lloyd LeBlanc; Dominic 
Angelo; A. H. Fraychineaud; A. J. Fortmayer; 
Amery Englade; George Duvic; William Moore; 
Michael Tripkovich. 

VANCOUVER, B.C. 

At a regular meeting, December 8, 1979, 
50-year pins were presented to two members 
of Local 2404. 

Jean Laloge, right, vice president of Local 
2404, pins a 50-year emblem on the jacket of 




New York, N.Y.— Picture No. 3 




Vancouver, B.C. 

Bill Byman, who joined the local on August 1, 
1929. 

Ted Robinson, left, joined Local 2404 
September 1, 1929. 

Byman and Robinson started work together 
on the same job, driving foundation piles for 
the Alberta Pool Elevator in Vancouver 
Harbour. This was in 1929, for Fraser River 
Pile Driving Company, still in business today. 

Their superintendant on this job was Jack 
Prevost, who at age 88 is still a member of 
Pile Drivers Local 2404 and has had continuous 
membership in Local 2404 since 1922. 




New Orleans, La. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



MINOT, N.D. 

At a meeting held on December 9, 1979, 
Local 1032 awarded service pins to the 
following members: 

Front row, left to right: Frank Heim, 
25-years; and Ray Wasson and Martin Broe, 
30-years. 

Back row, left to right: LeRoy Sorenson, 
25-years; Albert Robinson, 30-years; and 
Oscar Hoynes, 35-years. 

The following members also received 
awards: 40-year charter members Nils Olson 
and George Benton; 35-year member Clifford 
Souther; and 25-year members Walter Strecker, 
Charles Huber, and John Ehli. 

Since its December meeting, Local 1032 has 
merged with Local 1091 in Bismarck, N.D. 




Mi not, 
N.D. 



BROOKFIELD, ILL. 

On November 6, 1979, Local 1128 held its 
annual turkey raffle and pin presentation. 
President Lyle Allison presented pins to the 
following 25-year members: 

Front row, left to right: Glen Shadduck, 
Elroy Strohfeldt, John Juna, Jr., Joe Vorraso, 
and Daniel Levato. 

Back row, left to right: Lyle Allison, presi- 
dent, Roland Hellwig, Frank Krai, and Raymond 
Story. 

A 60-year pin was sent to retired Business 
Representative Elmer Swanson, who was unable 
to attend the ceremony. 




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Lake Charles, La. — Picture No. 2 




p * i if; 



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Lake Charles, La. — Picture No. 3 

LAKE CHARLES, LA. 



On January 16, 1980, Local 953 honored its 
longstanding members at a special ceremony. 
Financial Secretary Donny Brinies conducted 
the ceremony, and Business Agent Ronnie 
Cannon presented the pins and plaques 

Picture No. 1 shows 20-year members 
Lucien Ardoin, Kenneth A. Bailey, Sr., Will A. 
Benoit, Joseph R. Borel, Clifton Bourque, 
Gerald Darbonne, Tuillo W. Fertitti, Phillip 
Fournerat, Ted A. Gautreaux, Clifford Granger, 
Edison Guillory, Flanders Guillory, Grady 
Guillory, Harry Guillory, John L. Guillory, Lesby 

D. Guillory, Raymond J. Istre, R. L. Johnson, 
James C. Leger, Raymond L. Miller, Harold I. 
Slusher, J. C. Stanley, James B. Thigpen, J. P. 
Willis, and Hubert J. Woods. 

Picture No. 2 shows 25-year members 
Lindsey Aquillard, Lenest J. Arcement, Lloyd C. 
Brown, Whitney Champagne, Andrew J. Chap- 
man, Leo Cole, Eldridge Comeaux, Leslie J. 
Courville, Arthur J. Davis, Joseph A. Ducat, Sr., 
John W. Farque, James Fontenot, Bertram J. 
Fruge, Walter J. Fuslier, Fred J. Gautreaux, 
Herman Gray, Clifford Guillory, Anthony John- 
son, Adam C. LaBove, Lee P. Landreneaux, 
Gene Landry, Barney Langley, Wadie S. Miller, 

E. W. Milstead, Jr., Paul G. Moore, Harrison 
Ogea, William Ogea, Jack C. Powell, Sr., Harold 
L. Reeves, Milton P. Roy, James E. Steward, 
Julius Stewart, Warren Thibodeaux, Joseph B. 
Thibodeaux, and Hector Trahan. 

Picture No. 3 shows 30-year members 
Savan Abshire, Louis Benoit, Ralph C. Brame, 
Hill iard J. Broussard, Roy V. Broussard, Shelton 
Chaumont, Larry Cinquamino, W. T. Daughdrill, 
Forrest A. Fisher, Clarence Fontenot, Edward 
D. Fruge, William Gilbert, Sr., Melvin Gotreaux, 
Aladin J. Granger, Cassius Guillory, Clarion B. 
Hagen, Allie Hebert, Wilburn Hereford, Rodney 
Jensen, Forest Johnson, Henry J. Johnson, 



M 



Albert L. Kingham, Erwin C. Kulhman, Felix 
La Bove, Henry LeBlanc, Athan M. LeBleu, 
Walter LeBoeuf, Julian F. LeDoux, Elson Lopez, 
McKinley Marcantel, R. W. Martin, Jr., Thomas 
J. McBride, Norris J. Miller, Jake W. Perkins, 
Robert D. Peveto, Joseph P. Roy, John V. 
Scalisi, Kenneth C. Seaman, Ferdinand Soileau, 
James C. Tilley, James P. Turner, Rene VaSalle, 
and Burley Chapman. 

Picture No. 4 shows 35-year members 
Alexson Bellon, Nolance Blanchard, James C. 
Defee, Dewey Derouen, Wilson Derouen, Hamil- 
ton Fontenot, Martin K. Fontenot, E. C. Hill, 
Joe C. Houston, Clyde L. Irby, Hubert E. Kelley, 
Henry LeJeune, D. C. Lykins, Hiram Manuel, 
Andrew L. Mouhot, Joseph Nope, George Oliver, 
Wilfred R. Painter, Jennings C. Reeves, Dewey 
J. Savoie, Charles A. Smith, Leland Stanley, 
Alpha Stutes, Lonnie Welch, Hoyt, Williams, 
and Ivey B. Willis. 

Picture No. 5 shows 40-year members 
J. N. Calais, Paul Gobert, Richard H. Hames, 
Frank Hannum, L. E. Hatsfelt, Henry A. Henni- 
gan, L. E. Hennigan, Leo Marks, Phillip Perkins, 
and Houston L. Thibodeaux. 

Picture No. 6 shows 58-year member Joseph 
M. Guillory, and 56-year member Allen Airhart. 
Both members received special plaques for 
their years of service. 

The following members also received awards 
but were not present for the photograph: 

20-year members Robert G. Bailey, Joseph 
J. Cinquamino, Curtis J. Daigle, Wilroy Daigle, 
Elvin E. Dickerson, John L. Elrod, Freley J. 
Ford, Alford A. Gourdon, Robert E. Hogg, Marlin 
N. Holton, Delbert L. Hughes, Francis M. 
Hughes, A. N. James, Jr., Johnnie J. Johnson, 
Tonice LaFleur, Jules Lognion, Amos P. Martel, 
Alton Menard, Lester P. Myers, Alfred L. Smith, 
A. D. Sonnier, James J. Szydio, Wesley M. 
Taylor, Kenneth M. Thomason, Charles E. 
Tucker, Reeves Veronie, and Kenneth P. Welch. 



25-year members Cononal E. Airhart, Charles 
W. Bailey, Lee W. Begnaud, Wroe Bourque, 
Nolan L. Conner, Howard R. Davis, John B. 
Eaves, Sidney Ellis, G. A. Ely, Joseph Fontenot, 
Joseph Fuslier, Rubert C. Gordy, Albert D. 
Hooper, Emile Jennies, A. L. Johnson, Louis 
Landry, Edward Manuel, Elmer L. Martin, 
Herbert J. Miller, Robert J. Minnix, Frank E. 
Parker, Wilburn L. Robertson, J. Bruce Sim- 
mons, Harry G. Sullivan, Leonce Thibodeaux, 
George Wagner, James 0. Walker, and Curzy J. 
Young. 

30-year members James N. Anderson, Julius 
Arabie, Charles E. Bertrand, Guy Bickford, 
Levi Broussard, N. J. Bunch, L. S. Buttler, 
Joseph F. Chance, W. T. Cinquamino, Jack 
Clawson, Michale Evango, Harry T. Foreman, 
Dean J. Fuller, Howard Greer, David Hebert, 
Bryan Henry, 0. A. Ivey, C. W. Johnson, J. W. 
Maddox, Carl S. Mims, Oliver Mouton, Thomas 
Mixon, Charles Olson, Ralph L. O'Neal, Joseph 
J. Painter, Dewey C. Pearson, George R. 
Reeves, Sr., Oscar Reeves, Anthony D. Roy, 
Lawrence Simon, R. L. Terry, Terry J. Thibo- 
deaux, Johnnie Thigpen, J. D. Trahan, Mason 
Trammel, and J. D. Walters. 

35-year members P. J. Blake, Alva Lee 
Brooks, Floyd Carroll, Randolph Chauvin, Henry 
H. Cryer, Harvey Cryer, James E. Dees, Thomas 
Dronet, Austin Fontenot, Samuel Guillory, 
C. Eugene Hinton, Jr., Robert D. Johnson, 
James F. Kelley, Nolan Landry, Henry Langley, 
Claude Lognion, C. R. McGee, B. C. Naff, 
L. H. J. Primeaux, C. J. Rasmussen, B. L. Raw- 
linson, Claude Romero, Alexander Rougeau, 
and Roland Sadler. 

40-year members Frank Bellemo, Earl L. 
Ginbey, A. J. Roelzer, Leonard Sieben, and 
Jack Teall. 

45-year member Homer L. Pickles. 

61-year member Charles H. Fisher, who 
received a special plaque. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 




Lake Charles, La. — Picture No. 4 







* \ 



fr^-m^y p^i s 



Li 





Lake Charles, La. — Picture No. 5 



Lake Charles, La. — Picture No. 6 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

Local 32 recently honored two of its long- 
standing members with service pins. 

Picture No. 1 shows Mathew Rosso, left, 
receiving a 65-year pin from President Wilfred 
A. Goneau. 

Picture No. 2 shows Adam Letendre, center, 
receiving a 60-year pin from President Wilfred 
A. Goneau, left, and Business Representative 
Donald C. Shea, right. 



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in mEmoRinm 



The following list of 709 deceased members and spouses repre- 
sents a total of $903,054.52 in death claims paid for the month. 



Local Union, City 

1, Chicago, III. — Edwin L. Kaspari, Mrs. 

Charles Palonis. 

2, Cincinnati, Oh. — Mrs. Walter Feucht, 

Robert L. Hester, Sr. 

5, St. Louis, Mo. — Ralph H. Mennemeyer, 
George B. Post, Sr. 

7, Minneapolis, Mn. — Walter Fisher, Clar- 
ence Foss, Erik W. Johnson, Mrs. Gust 
Strandquist. 

10, Chicago, III. — Daniel Daoust, James B. 

Fitzpatrick, Albert Klancher. 

11, Cleveland, Oh.— Ralph L. Dunkin, Ed- 
ward Flowers, Eugene W. Howard, Ed- 
ward C. Leiden. 

13, Chicago, III. — Mrs. Roman Beshk, Frank 

Bozinovich. 

14, San Antonio, Tx. — Seabron S. Price, 
Conrado Villarreal, Jr. 

15, Hackensack, N.J. — Gunnar O. Anderson, 

Peter DeJong, Karl Menzel, Sr., John 
Morra, Sr. 

16, Springfield, III. — Mrs. Edward A. Nagel, 

George B. Shaw. 

18, Hamilton, Ont., Can. — Norman Stewart. 

19, Detroit, Mich. — Joseph Benoit, Glen E. 

Bowling, Elmer J. Manning, John A. 
Matson, John A. Olson, Mrs. Harry 
Padgett. 

20, New York, N.Y. — Salvatore Lobaito. 

21, Chicago, III.— Lee E. Hodock. 

22, San Francisco, Calif. — Charles L. Ham- 

belton, William A. Pelster, James A. 
Thrush. 

24, Central Conn. — Abraham Kosowsky. 

25, Los Angeles, Calif. — Mrs. John R. Earle, 

Mrs. Louis J. Spencer. 
28, Missoula, Mt.— Arthur R. Adler. 
32, Springfield, Ma. — Joseph St. Martin. 

34, Oakland, Ca. — Vernie F. Madsen. 

35, San Rafael, Ca.— Mrs. William G. 
Humphries. 

36, Oakland, Ca.— Ole E. Bratset, Herbert 
S. Butler, Mrs. Lawyer P. Christian, 
Alfred C. Hackbarth, Andrew Washing- 
ton. 

37, Shamokin, Pa. — Mrs. Joseph Wondoloski. 

47, St. Louis, Mo.— William H. Ginn. 

48, Fitchburg, Ma. — Joseph Bedard. 

53, White Plains, N.Y.— Michael J. Gobos. 

55, Denver, Co. — Harley Darner, Mrs. 
Charles F. McFate, Mrs. Ray E. Ruske, 
Howard L. Swanson, Alva C. Wilson. 

58, Chicago, III. — Vaner Erickson, Charles 
F. Kurzin, Wolodymyr Procyk. 

60, Indianapolis, Ind. — Mrs. Chester Ballard, 

Mrs. Earl L. Settles, Glover W. Shelton. 

61, Kansas City, Mo. — Clarence R. Dudley, 

Mrs. Marion O. Stephens. 

62, Chicago, III. — Carl O. Wennsten. 

64, Louisville, Ky. — Cecil Dobson, Shelby 

R. Heltsley, Louis G. Stearman. 
69, Canton, Oh.— Walter H. Steffe. 

73, St. Louis, Mo.— Charles W. Webb. 

74, Chattanooga, Tn. — Leslie Ainsworth, 
Judge E. Broyles, Herman A. Lawson, 
William M. Whaley. 

80, Chicago, III. — Mrs. Raymond Jaglowski. 

81, Erie, Pa. — Mrs. Clarence Davis, Walter 
Parsons. 

83, Halifax, NS, Can. — George Leaden, Mrs. 

Simon J. Mannette. 
85, Rochester, N.Y.— Mrs. Peter F. Pilaros- 

cia, William B. Somerville. 



Local Union, City 

87, St. Paul, Mn.— Berger Hallqust, Blan- 
chard J. Houghton, Robert W. Jackson, 
Harry S. Olson, Simon John Roinestad, 
Walter H. Wrightman. 

89, Mobile, Ala. — James F. Robertson. 

90, Evansville, Ind. — Russell W. Chapman, 
Joseph L. Dodge. 

91, Racine, Wise. — Hilmer M. Johnson. 

93, Ottawa, Ont., Can.— Walter Harry Birm- 

ingham. 

94, Providence, R.I. — Mrs. Pasquale Centore, 

Edmond Lacerte, Warren C. Nieforth. 

95, Detroit, Mich.— Edward H. Priestaf. 
99, Bridgeport, Conn. — Mrs. Angelo Baldo- 

vin, James Petrelli. 
101, Baltimore, Md. — Lee C. Dixon, Dean 
King, Mrs. Michael Labas. 

104, Dayton, Oh. — Paul E. Davidson, Jo- 
seph A. Kiefer, Mrs. Ramon C. Shull. 

105, Cleveland, Oh. — Anthony J. Petrarca. 
109, Sheffield, Al — Leo M. Abramson, Frank 

R. Garner, John H. Jackson. 
112, Butte, Mont.— Wilfred J. Gelling. 

116, Bay City, Mi.— John J. Zajac. 

117, Albany, N.Y. — Charles A. Buonagura. 

131, Seattle, Wa.— Frank H. Eggers, Lewis 
M. Olson. 

132, Washington, D.C.— Earl M. Godard, 
Joseph M. Richards, Jr., John W. 
Yerkie. 

134, Montreal, Que., Canada — Edouard L. J. 

Cyr, Henri Spenard. 
142, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Charles Bartgis, John 

F. Kist, Albert Nevers, Otto L. Saunier. 
144, Macon, Ga. — Chester Lewis. 
146, Schenectady, N.Y.— Mrs. Max H. Bal- 

fanz. 
153, Helena, Mt. — Joseph Granby. 
155, N. Plainfield, N.J.— William Rogers. 
162, San Mateo, Ca.— Mrs. Odus Odell. 
166, Rock Island, III.— Henry G. Kaselaw, 

Philip Peterson. 
169, E. St. Louis, III.— Robert Murphy. 
171, Youngstown, Oh. — John A. Anderson, 

Cesare John Eliseo. 
174, Joliet, III. — Roger Jones, Leonard J. 

Miklic, Raymond L. Reed. 
176, Newport, R.I. — Joseph S. Venancio. 

180, Vallejo, Ca. — Joe M. Eritano, Birtie L. 
Hutchison, Victor J. Metaxas, Eldon A. 
Nicholson. 

181, Chicago, III. — Mrs. Frank Knudsen, 
Alex S. Moczynski. 

182, Cleveland, Oh. — George Tropp. 

183, Peoria, III.— Stanley C. Allen, Billy W. 
Jones, Frank C. Schielein, Harry L. 
Taylor. 

184, Salt Lake City, Ut.— Grant Anderson, 
Allen S. Frost. 

188, Yonkers, N.Y. — Emilio Ciriello, George 

Watt. 
190, Klamath Falls, Ore.— Clarence F. West- 

lund. 
194, Oakland, Ca.— Elmer E. Emmett. 
198, Dallas, Tx.— Welborn L. Acker, Andrew 

J. Duncan. 
200, Columbus, Oh. — John H. Renner. 

210, Stamford, Conn. — Lester J. Boardman. 

211, Pittsburgh, Pa.— Stanley J. O'Halek, 
Frank Sepic. 

213, Houston, Tx.— Charles A. Welch. 
215, Lafayette, Ind.— Philip H. Hardesty 
Theodore R. Humphrey. 



Local Union, City 

218, Boston, Ma. — Mrs. George W. Parsons. 

225, Atlanta, Ga. — Hughie T. Johnson, John 
O. Phillips, Earl E. Waldrip, Sr., John 
N. Winters. 

226, Portland, Ore.— Walter G. Allen, Mrs. 
Edmond E. Charpentier, Theodore J. 
Resch. 

229, Glens Falls, N.Y.— Arthur J. Gordon. 
232, Fort Wayne, Ind.— Lloyd H. Clem. 
235, Riverside, Ca Mrs. LeMar E. Engel- 

man, Mrs. Walter Stillman. 
246, N.Y., N.Y.— Peter Giacoponello, Mrs. 

Andrew Lucas. 
255, Bloomingburg, N.Y. — Michael Ewanich, 

Mrs. Alex Rigatti. 
257, N.Y., N.Y.— Alois Ungerer. 
259, Jackson, Tn. — James Garland Carter, 

Fred Floyd. 
261, Scranton, Pa. — Fairse Ramey. 
264, Milwaukee, Wise. — Otto G. Boerner, 

Steve C. Husz, Harry W. Koch. 

266, Stockton, Ca. — William F. Brannon, 
Barney L. Burns, Alfred Jeremku. 

267, Dresden, Oh. — James Williams. 

269, Danville, 111.— Mrs. Charles G. Haworth, 
Guy U. O'Brien. 

278, Watertown, N.Y.— Wilford Brown, Mrs. 
Dale C. Myers. 

284, Queens Village, N.Y.— Martin Chris- 
tiansen, Edward Graveson, Frank Mo- 
loney, Peter S. Rutlin. 

286, Great Falls, Mt.— Walter H. Hansen, 
Bernard A. Korst. 

287, Harrisburg, Pa.— Mrs. Charles M. Rei- 
noehl. 

297, Kalamazoo, Mi. — Jack C. Dahmer, Fred 
G. Wood. 

299, Fairview, NJ. — Bjarne M. Berntsen. 

302, Huntington, W.V Mrs. Russell Crump, 

Carlos C. Perry. 

319, Roanoke, Va. — Mrs. Robert F. Camp- 
bell. 

321, Connellsville, Pa. — David F. Davis. 

335, Grand Rapids, Mi. — William Luurt- 
sema. 

337, Detroit, Mich. — Mrs. Price L. Higgins, 
Dutch Hunter, Robert H. White. 

340, Hagerstown, Md. — Earl R. Paden. 

341, Chicago, III. — Vincent Dorabiala, Adam 
Rewienko. 

345, Memphis, Tn. — Mrs. Howard W. 

Brown, Rubin E. Clark, Harold H. 

Wolfe. 
347, Mattoon, III.— Elbert H. Foltz, Foster 

A. Poe. 
367, Centralia, 111.— Loyd W. Burge. 
374, Buffalo, N.Y.— Charles W. Paulsen. 

383, Bayonne, NJ.— Mrs. Fred Kraft. 

384, Asheville, N.C.— Franklin Boyd Mc- 
Guire, Otho B. Pittillo. 

385, N.Y., N.Y.— William Kiniry. 

386, Angels Camp, Ca. — Paul L. Robinson, 
Vernon S. Sisson. 

391, Hoboken, N.J.— William Dendulk, Sr. 
393, Camden, NJ. — Frank Carpinelli. 

396, Newport News, Va. — Oliver E. Wilson. 

397, Whitby, Ont., Can.— Samuel P. Higgins. 

402, Greenfield, Ma. — Frank Behaylo. 

403, Alexandria, La. — Isom B. Immel. 

404, Mentor, Oh. — Delmar L. Alderton. 

433, Belleville, III.— Otto J. Grab. 

434, Chicago, III. — Mrs. Herman Kern, Wal- 
ter Van Dyk. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



440, Buffalo, N.Y.— Joseph G. Emer, Mrs. 

William R. Hagen. 
448, Waukegan, III. — Douglas Johnson. 

452, Vancouver, BC, Canada — Einar E. 
Auno, Benjamin Creviston, Dominique 
J. Melanson, Herbert J. Walsh. 

453, Auburn, N.Y. — Alexander Hanley. 
456, Media, Pa.— Charles E. Wells. 
458, Clarksville, Ind. — Dale Fouse. 

461, Highwood, 111. — Clarence B. Becker, 
Robert C. Cole. 

467, Hoboken, NJ. — Joseph R. Kostelac. 

468, N.Y., N.Y.— Howard Hodder. 
470, Tacoma, Wa. — Arthur Kristiansen. 
472, Ashland, Ky. — Victor McGuire. 
480, Freeburg, III. — Theodore Hagen. 

483, San Francisco, Ca. — Mrs. Jack Childers, 
Jack Palmer. 

484, Akron, Oh. — Donald A. Moughler. 
488, Bronx, N.Y. — Runo A. Carlson. 

507, Nashville, Tn.— Luther L. Nash, Carl 

Smith, John D. Finch. 
527, Nanaimo, B.C., Can. — Toivo K. Poro- 

maa. 
532, Elmira, N.Y.— Ermuld D. Dwyer. 

542, Salem, NJ. — Harvey L. Johnson. 

543, Mamaroneck, N.Y. — Peter Fassbender. 
548. St. Paul, Minn. — Leo O. DeMars, Glenn 

L. Ragan. 
550, San Leandro, Ca. — Dennis J. Gaddis, 

Walter F. Rogers. 
556, Meadville, Pa.— Gilson C. Taylor. 
558, Elmhurst, III. — Leonard Grygiel. 

562, Everett, Wa. — Mrs. Fred C. Hanenburg, 
Mrs. Eldor J. Linscheid. 

563, Glendale, Ca. — Iliff E. Anderson, John 
Babko, Mrs. James D. Whittington. 

573, Baker, Ore. — Jasper W. Howell. 
576, Pine Bluff, Ar.— Wade H. Sexton. 
583, Portland, Ore. — Leroy E. Simkins. 
586, Sacramento, Ca. — Dan A. Baughman, 

Marvin L. Endicott, Herman J. Gienap, 

Mrs. Carl D. Newell, Sr. 
595, Lynn, Ma. — Carl M. Anderson. 
599, Hammond, Ind.— Earl A. Todd. 
603, Ithaca, N.Y. — Bert Forsman. 

608, N.Y., N.Y.— John B. Ahem, Joseph F. 
Bottinelli, John DelaChiesa, Michael J. 
McDaid. 

609, Idaho Falls, Idaho— Wallace D. Welker. 

610, Port Arthur, Tx. — Mrs. Lucien Oubre. 
620, Madison, N.J. — Charles W. Benson, Sr. 

622, Waco, Tx.— Robert E. Horn, Helmer L. 
Peterson. 

623, Atlantic Co., N.J.— Mrs. Edward Duber- 
son, Mrs. Ralph D. Maholland, Mrs. 
Atlantic Vallozza. 

625, Manchester, N.H.— Albert A. Pelletier, 
Alfred A. Perreault. 

626, Wilmington, Del. — Ralph M. Bucking- 
ham, Alex A. Rogers. 

633, Granite City, 111.— Elmer Creath. 
635, Boise, Idaho — Melvin J. Eide. 
644, Pekin, III.— Mrs. Robert T. Schluter. 
658, Millinocket, Me. — Ervin C. Aldrich. 
670, Poison, Mont. — Ottis E. Harrison. 
674, Mt. Clemens, Mi.— Mrs. Donald De- 

Rusha. 
678, Dubuque, Iowa — LeRoy Klosterman. 
690, Little Rock, Ark Sam F. Stewart, 

John H. Wilburn. 

695, Sterling, III.— Henry B. Weaver. 

696, Tampa, Fla. — Alton G. Jeffcoat, Sr., 
Chester Larrabee, Pasquale C. LoCicero. 

703, Lockland, Oh. — Thomas DeArmond, 

Edmond James Snider. 
710, Long Beach, Ca.— Wilbur D. Yoder. 
715, Elizabeth, N.J.— Salvatore Autullo. 
721, Los Angeles, Ca. — Ivar Swanson. 
725, Litchfield, III.— George Briskovich. 
727, Hialeah, Fla.— Robert L. Finlen. 
740, N.Y., N.Y.— Harry Seligman. 



742, Decatur, III. — John M. Edwards, Edwin 
E. Meece. 

743, Bakersfield, Ca. — John Edwards, Elmer 
S. Gentry. 

745, Honolulu, H.I. — Norman F. Alvarez, 
Hiroshi Hayamoto, Mrs. Chiyuki Hi- 
raoka, John S. Kawakami, Hisami Ka- 
wano, William K. Nakama, Katsuhei 
Noto, Catalino B. Umipig_. 

751, Santa Rosa, Ca. — Harry W. Briggs, Ben 

D. Fowler, Eric Rasmussen. 

769, Pasadena, Ca. — James O. Creighton, 
Robert E. Kauffman. 

770, Yakima, Wa. — Louis M. Ackerman. 
777, Harrisonville, Mo. — Dorris (Doris) 

Cummings, Leroy Long. 
780, Astoria, Ore. — Ronald J. Larson, Mrs. 

Mervin A. Smith. 
792, Rockford, 111.— Carl A. Silver. 
801, Woonsocket, R.I. — Arthur Lariviere. 
803, Metropolis, 111. — Noel Clymore. 
807, Paden City, W.Va.— Floyd C. Cecil. 
811, New Bethlehem, Pa — Mrs. Walter 

Gray. 
819, W. Palm Bch., Fla.— Mrs. John J. 

Rigdon. 
824, Muskegon, Mi. — Joseph F. Snyder. 
833, Berwyn, Pa. — Howard Cunningham. 
838, Sunbury, Pa. — Mrs. Anthony Kalinow- 

ski, Mrs. John M. Mailleue, Mrs. Harry 

E. Miller, John C. Smith. 

841, Carbondale, 111. — Everett Freeman. 
843, Jenkintown, Pa. — Frank E. Sckupakus. 

848, San Bruno, Ca. — George A. Flach, 
Chester Lantz. 

849, Manitowoc, Wi. — George M. Hardrath. 
857, Tucson, Ar.— Edward E. Ellis. 

871, Battle Creek, Mich.— Mr. & Mrs. Peter 

Rhynard. 
891, Hot Springs, Ark. — Jesse L. Humphreys. 
899, Parkersburg, W.Va. — Clarence C. Flesh- 

er, William J. Moore. 
902, Brooklyn, N.Y. — Mrs. Salvatore Di- 

Giorgio, Salvatore Pacella. 
916, Aurora, 111.— Donald R. Luke, Sr. 
929, South Gate, Ca.— Vance V. Hallam, 

William Robinson. 
940, Sandusky, Oh. — Carmon Lee Zeiter. 

943, Tulsa, Ok.— Sam W. Stewart, Hubert 
D. Stites. 

944, San Bernardino, Ca. — Paul Arivett, 
Loran M. Hedley, Clarence C. Romsom, 
Charles S. Stowe. 

953, Lake Charles, La. — Ottis A. Ivey. 
958, Marquette, Mich. — Alvin P. Lewis. 
971, Reno, Nev. — George W. Gimson, Ken- 
neth Alvin Spencer. 
973, Texas City, Tx. — Mrs. John Lee Poston. 
978, Springfield, Mo.— Walter H. Routh. 

981, Petaluma, Ca. — Harold N. Jacobsen. 

982, Detroit, Mi. — Gene L. Schifle. 

993, Miami, Fla. — Daniel A. Gaffney, Mrs. 
Leo A. Hauser, Iverson N. Isler, George 
W. Longwell, Fredrick F. Palladine. 

998, Royal Oak, Mi.— Michael S. Kordus, 
Sylvester Peters, Henry J. Rohl. 

999, Mt. Vernon, 111. — William H. Anderson. 
1020, Portland, Ore. — Jack McDonald. 
1025, Medford, Wise. — Mrs. Fred Frisch- 

mann. 
1050, Philadelphia, Pa.— Frank Colelli, 
Candeloro DiPaolo. 

1052, Hollywood, Ca. — Max L. Boyer, Mar- 
vin P. Cate, John W. Clauson, Mrs. 
Paul R. Hanson, Frank Williams. 

1053, Milwaukee, Wise. — Simon Landinger. 
1065, Salem, Ore. — Edmond R. Flawn. 
1067, Port Huron, Mi.— Peter Dubs. 
1074, Eau Claire, Wi.— Mrs. Medric King. 
1084, Angleton, Tx. — John H. Duncan, G. 

W. Lincecum. 
1086, Portsmouth, Va.— Mrs. Pride E. Rouse. 



1088, Punxsutawney, Pa.— Charles R. Bril- 
hart. 

1089, Phoenix, Az.— Wm. Carl Madden, Jr. 

1097, Longview, Tx. — Buster Moon. 

1098, Baton Rouge, La.— Mrs. Thermon 
Alexander, Oscar D. King, Jesse J. Mc- 
Donald, A. C. Sallinger, John O. Smith. 

1100, Flagstaff, Ar.— Mrs. Duane E. Stewart. 
1102, Detroit, Mi.— Oscar Gates, Robert 
Shattleroe, Sr. 

1108, Cleveland, Oh.— Clyde F. Busic. 

1109, Visalia, Ca.— Mrs. Leonard Dale 
Davis. 

1120, Portland, Ore.— John C. Martin, Vic- 
tor L. Pegar, Dennis S. Richardson, 
Mrs. William Schlechter. 

1125, Los Angeles, Ca. — John R. Harrison. 

1134, Mt. Kisco, N.Y Charles Fowler, Mrs. 

Karl Haist. 

1138, Toledo, Oh.— Edward P. Schweitzer, 
William W. Wismer. 

1142, Lawrenceburg, Ind. — James D. Hill, 
Ralph A. Smith. 

1148, Olympia, Wa.— Mrs. Andrew C. Pfaff, 
Fred W. Silva. 

1149, San Francisco, Ca. — Loyd Eitel. 

1163, Rochester, N.Y. — Bernard Bazinet, 
Mrs. Michael A. Smelkoff, Mrs. Andrew 
Thoryk. 

1164, N.Y., N.Y.— Rudolph Ewald, Gustav 
Glum, Phillip Katz, Antonio Petrucci. 

1180, Louisville, Ky. — Adolph H. Nopper, 
Sr. 

1181, Milwaukee, Wi. — Bernard Acker. 
1184, Seattle, Wash.— Hans Otto Abraham- 
son. 

1199, Union City, Ind.— Melvin Eley. 

1204, N.Y., N.Y.— Mrs. Jack Cooper, Max 
Stoll, Herbert Weinstein. 

1205, Indio, Ca. — Lemuel Leo Perry. 
1222, Medford, N.Y.— Milton S. Overton. 

1226, Pasadena, Tx.— Mrs. William F. Wal- 
lace. 

1227, Ironwood, Mi. — Reino C. Rajala. 
1245, Carlsbad, N.M. — Adan Munoz. 
1260, Iowa City, Iowa — John L. Stahmer. 
1266, Austin, Tx. — Edwin Kretzschmar. 
1275, Clearwater, Fla.— Mrs. Albert R. 

Meyer, William P. Solay. 

1280, Mountain View, Ca. — Paul H. Dodson, 
Wayne F. Goen, Coy E. Hood. 

1289, Seattle, Wa.— Roy M. Broughton, An- 
drew E. Lundquist, Frank Shaw. 

1296, San Diego, Ca.— Albert Gibbons, Mrs. 
Yan Liszko, Mrs. J. W. Parker. 

1301, Monroe, Mich. — LaVerne A. Metty. 

1302, New London, Conn. — Joseph Kash. 

1303, Port Angeles, Wa.— Joe R. Stossel. 
1305, Fall River, Mass. — Mrs. L. Phillippe 

Dube, Stephen J. Furman, Mrs. Frank 
K. Makara, John L. Nicolson. 

1307, Northbrook, 111. — Lawrence Dallia, 
Oscar Johnson. 

1308, Lake Worth, Fla.— Ray C. Teague. 
1314, Oconomowoc, Wise. — Emile Bergman. 
1319, Albuquerque, N.M. — Abran E. Barela, 

John Marko. 
1329, Independence, Mo. — John R. Leakey. 
1332, Grand Coulee, Wa. — Dover H. Perry. 

1334, Baytown, Tx. — Melvin G. Trahan. 

1335, Wilmington, Ca. — Lawrence H. Jones. 
1338, Charlottetown, PEI, Can.— Linus B. 

Gamble. 
1345, Buffalo, N.Y.— William R. McDougall, 

Jr. 
1353, Santa Fe, N.M.— Phillip B. Williams. 
1359, Toledo, Oh.— Eber Battles, Rickey E. 

Simpson. 
1365, Cleveland, Oh.— Edward J. Ruzicka. 
1367, Chicago, III.— Gottfried Kappel. 
1373, Flint, Mi.— Maitland R. Schaar. 
1382, Rochester, N.Y. — Andrew Iversrud, 

Reinder P. Rozendal. 

Continued on next page 



' 



MAY, 1980 



37 



1397, Roslyn, N.Y.— Mrs. Stephen J. Scully. 
1399, Okmulgee, Ok. — Vernie L. Smith. 
1407, San Pedro, Ca.— Pete Salazar. 
1419, Johnstown, Pa. — Samuel Ferraro. 

1437, Compton, Ca. — Floyd G. Austin, Jesse 
McDonald. 

1438, Warren, Oh.— Robert W. Fee, Sr., 
William J. Lohret, Onni J. Maki, Ken- 
neth R. Roden. 

1452, Detroit, Mi. — Glenn B. Isenberg. 

1453, Huntington Bch., Ca. — Charles E. 
Kimbrough, Mrs. Gordon H. Ritschke. 

1454, Cincinnati, Oh. — Goodloe Gay, Jimmy 
S. Wilson. 

1456, N.Y., N.Y.— Mrs. Andrew Osterberg. 

1463, Omaha, Neb.— Dale E. McCumber. 

1478, Redondo Bch., Ca.— Richard L. Wil- 
liams. 

1489, Burlington, N J.— Walter W. Ander- 
son, Leonard C. Buchholz. 

1497, Los Angeles, Ca. — James H. Danner, 
Homer T. Haurigan, Angel Martinez, 
Paul J. Ulibarre. 

1498, Provo, Utah— Mrs. Afton M. Thacker. 

1506, Los Angeles, Ca. — Doy B. Deaton, 
Donald L. Green, Jack P. Parker. 

1507, El Monte, Ca.— Melton O. Watkins. 
1509, Miami, Fla. — Mrs. James M. Garey, 

Thomas Prebsy. 
1518, Gulfport, Ms.— Houston E. Stockstill. 
1527, West Chicago, III.— John D. Maurer. 
1529, Kansas City, Ks. — Robert Lee Mc- 

Reynolds. 
1532, Anacortes, Wa. — John H. Schneider. 
1534, Hopewell, Va. — Ervin J. Pettway. 
1536, N.Y., N.Y.— Willie Sharp. 
1544, Nashville, Tenn.— William P. Lord. 

1553, Hawthrone, Ca. — Mary L. Roberts. 

1554, Miami, Fla. — Manuel Corral. 

1560, Antigonish, N.S., Can. — Charles A. 

Doiron. 
1564, Casper, Wy. — Mrs. Leonard R. Parker. 
1569, Medicine Hat, AB, Can.— Peter Bisch- 

off. 
1571, San Diego, Ca. — Milo L. Johnson. 
1573, West Allis, Wise— George Godleski, 

Victor Krumenauer. 
1592, Sarnia, Ont., Can.— John P. Kayes. 

1596, St. Louis, Mo. — Abraham Portnoy. 

1597, Bremerton, Wa. — Mrs. Dewey R. Stev- 
enson. 

1607, Los Angeles, Ca.— Mrs. Rexford Col- 
lins, Fred C. Lee. 

1618, Sacramento, Ca. — Mrs. Frank S. Gray. 

1620, Rock Springs, Wy. — Henry P. Allison. 

1622, Hayward, Ca.— Howard C. Hill, Wil- 
liam A. Hollingshead, Floyd T. Keuhey, 
Robert J. Powell. 

1644, Minneapolis, Mn. — Marvin R. Carlson. 

1645, Glace Bay, NS, Can.— Jobe Snow. 
1650, Lexington, Ky. — Lloyd Hughes. 
1669, Ft. Williams, Ont., Can.— Wesley 

Brown. 
1689, Tacoma, Wa.— Mrs. Albert Kratochvil, 

Sr. 
1691, Coeur d'Alene, Id.— Jerry Stoddard. 

1693, Chicago, III.— Bennie H. Adcock, 
Adrian DePersia, Paul Weber. 

1694, Washington, D.C.— Mrs. Angelo Ba- 
vetta. 

1707, Longview, Wa. — Henry L. Swanson. 

1708, Auburn, Wa.— John E. Cyr, Archie 
R. Litvinenko. 

1729, Charlottesville, Va.— Ernest H. Hens- 
ley. 

1739, Kirkwood, Mo.— Fred I. Holmes. 

1750, Cleveland, Oh.— Mrs. Nelson F. Cal- 
lister. 

1752, Pomona, Ca. — George R. Johnson, 
James J. Sims. 

1772, Hicksville, N.Y.— William Firth, Hu- 
bert Josephs, Daniel Korshak. 

1780, Las Vegas, Nev. — Alexander J. 
Matrisciani. 



1784, Chicago, III.— Emil Horitz, Joseph 

Hutter, Victor Weber. 
1789, Bijou, Ca.— Harold D. Hunter. 
1811, Monroe, La. — Wilmer R. Pierce. 
1815, Santa Ana, Ca. — Robert F. Anderson. 

1822, Ft. Worth, Tx.— Olah J. Canady, 
Basil R. Looney, George W. Stewart. 

1823, Philadelphia, Pa.— Harry L. Buchanan. 
1827, Las Vegas, Nev. — Mrs. C. Wesley 

Bice. 
1839, Washington, Mo. — Mrs. Elmer O. 
Scheer. 

1845, Snoqualmie, Wa.— Ralph Piatt, Mrs. 
Walter Thomas. 

1846, New Orleans, La.— William H. Cook, 
Cornelius J. DeMunnick, Paul D. 
Dufour. Whitney J. Fonseca. 

1856, Philadelphia, Pa.— Oscar C. Mitchell. 

1856, Minneapolis, Mn. — Matthew J. Chock, 
Roy E. Englund, Donald E. Thorn. 

1869, Manteca, Ca. — Mrs. Jerry Bunyard, 
Clarence Marion Lutz, Raymond Wag- 
ner. 

1888, N.Y., N.Y.— Jeff Alston, Thomas 
Caines, Sidney Dove. 

1925, Columbus, Mo. — Mrs. William Harvey 
Hayden. 

1934, Bemidji, Mn.— Arlo H. Gerbracht. 

1948, Ames, Iowa — Mrs. Lowell Lewis. 

1953, Warrensburg, Mo. — Luther Chancel- 
lor. 

1963, Toronto, Ont., Canada — Elmar Gro- 
tans. 

1964, Vicksburg, Ms. — Allen N. Barrentine, 
Mrs. August Gray, James N. Thompson. 

1975, Calgary, AB, Can.— Charles Meekin. 

1976, Los Angeles, Ca. — Ramon H. Duran. 
1998, Prince George, B.C., Can.— Mrs. Mil- 
ton A. Roberts. 

2004, Itasca, III.— Clarence E. Gusterine. 

2006, Los Gatos, Ca.— Carl L. Harris. 

2007, Orange, Tx.— Hoyel P. Chandler. 
2018, Ocean Co., NJ. — Andrew Alonzo. 
2046, Martinez, Ca. — Mrs. Doyle Hester, 

Charles J. Overstreet, Benja G. Roberts. 

2054, Horsehead, N.Y.— James W. Stephens. 

2056, Clearlake Park, Ca. — Irving E. Ray. 

2067, Medford, Ore.— Fred Robert Shockley. 

2078, Vista, Ca.— Mrs. Kenneth M.Ammons, 
Samuel B. Smith. 

2087, Crystal Lake, III.— Kenneth Charles 
Berkley. 

2101, Moorefield, W. Va.— Melvin B. South- 
erly. 

2130, Hillsboro, Ore. — Kenneth Thomas. 

2132, LaFollette, Tn. — George W. Brown. 

2200, Gallatin, Tn.— Charles H. Stiles. 

2203, Anaheim, Ca — Mrs. Charles Donald- 
son. 

2239, Fremont. Oh.— Clarence S. Gonya, 
Clarence Kipps. 

2247, Juneau, Alaska— Mrs. Paul Emerson. 

2264, Pittsburgh, Pa.— Peter Peretin. 

2274. Pittsburgh, Pa. — George Mariotti. 

2287, N.Y., N.Y.— Harry Steininger. 

2288, Los Angeles, Ca.— Victor Beal, Sr. 
2310, Madisonville, Ky. — David E. Jones. 
2313, Meridian, Ms.— Charles E. White. 
2375, Wilmington, Ca.— Mrs. William L. 

Howell, Howard W. Smith. 
2398, El Cajon, Ca.— Mr. & Mrs. Theodore 

A. Brown. 
2400, Woodland, Me.— Robert Haskins. 
2435, Inglewood, Ca. — Sherman R. Bruning, 

Mrs. Robert L. Finley, Robert Thomas 

Miles. 
2463, Ventura, Ca.— Paul W. Arganbright. 

2470, Tullahoma, Tn. — Oscar Montoye, Jr., 
James L. Riddle. 

2471, Pensacola, Fla. — Mrs. Floyd Alton 
Stokes. 

2519, Seattle, Wa.— Stanley Bask. 
2530, Gilchrist, Ore.— Jacob Finstad. 
2554, Lebanon, Ore. — Mrs. Roy Huddleston. 
2580, Everett, Wa.— Herbert W. Conrad. 



2581, Libby, Mont. — James D. Ericksmoen, 
Junior Parker. 

2589, Seneca, Ore.— Mrs. Nolan O. Higley. 

2590, Kane, Pa.— John J. Repko. 

2608, Redding, Ca,— Wallace N. Hartsfield. 
2659, Everett, Wa.— Elmer C. Stark. 
2688, Elk Creek, Ca.— William Hastain. 
2690, Wabash, Ind. — Flora Jane Lancaster. 

2714, Dallas, Ore.— Mrs. Loyce C. Stallings. 

2715, Medford, Ore. — Melvin L. Jenkins. 
2767, Morton, Wa. — Marion A. Dykeman, 

Theodore H. Hibbard, John A. Matte- 
son. 

2805, Klickitat, Wa.— Mrs. Festus R. Eng- 
land, Arthur B. Modin. 

2842, Frankfort, Ind.— Marvin F. Beard. 

2881, Portland, Ore.— Albert Enson, Sr., 
George E. Roberts. 

2927, Martell, Ca.— Frederick N. Cardinal, 
Roy G. Pihl. 

2931, Eureka, Ca.— Thomas B. Terry. 

2942, Albany, Ore. — Mrs. Ira W. Adamson. 

2949, Roseburg, Ore.— William J. Burkhart 
Jr. 

2993, Franklin, Ind.— M. C. Jasper. 

3038, Bonner, Mont. — Martin Jorgensen. 

3074, Chester, Ca.— Stephen Barrera, Ed- 
ward Fauser, Joseph F. Knoll, Walter 
L. Smith. 

3088, Stockton, Ca.— Wright W. Herrick, 
Floyd J. Williams. 

3119, Tacoma, Wa.— Ellis O. Watkins. 

3127, N.Y., N.Y.— Adam Higgins, Hazel L. 
Jones, Rebecca Scarborough, Domingo 
Vargas. 

3128, N.Y., N.Y.— Benjamin Lupica. 
3130, Hampton, S.C.— Dan H. Fennell. 
3154, Monticello, Ind. — Shirley Lockard. 
9033, Pittsburgh, Pa.— Mrs. Earl C. Lloyd. 
9074, Chicago, III.— William Carroll. 
9088, Oakland, Ca.— Earl R. Vaughan. 
9422, Battle Creek, Mi.— George F. Bollnow, 

Jr. 

NOTE: 9000-members represent former Lather 
locals. ^^ 

Building Trades 

Continued from page 2 

which threatens the security of every 
union represented in this room today." 

He said anti-union and anti-worker 
forces of this country "have banded 
together to form a political machine 
of awesome strength" and that "huge 
amounts of money already have been 
raised to defeat some of our best 
friends this year," especially in Senate 
races. 

Marshall also warned that "if Ron- 
ald Reagan wins the Republican nomi- 
nation, the special interest groups and 
the anti-worker and anti-union forces 
of this country will coalesce behind 
him." 

Senator Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.), 
the Senate Majority Leader, had a 
similar warning, urging labor to "throw 
your full weight into the election . . . 
so that you will have a strong voice 
throughout government." 

Byrd also added a special note 
when he entertained the delegates by 
playing his fiddle and singing. 

The delegates, as in previous years, 
spread out on Capitol Hill to meet 
with their representatives and sena- 
tors. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 




TURNTABLE CUTTING 




A versatile high production Turntable 
Cutting System from Speed Cut, Inc. 
produces rafters, truss components, and 
production cutting of dimensional lumber 
on either fenceline or centerline measur- 
ing and cutting. One operator can cut 
the components for up to 150 trusses per 
day. The Turntable Cutting System is a 
precision industrial machine, but its 
simplicity of design keeps the cost at a 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Audel 19 

Black & Decker 23 

Chevrolet Motor Division Back Cover 

Chicago Technical College 33 

Clifton Enterprises 29 

F.stwing Manufacturing Co 27 

Full Length Roof Framer 39 

Goldblatt Tool Co 35 

Hydrolevel 39 

Stair Square 28 

Tremont Nail Co 31 

Vaughan & Bushnell 31 



low $7,450.00 f.o.b. factory, according 
to the manufacturer. 

One of the unique features of the cut- 
ting system is that the left side of the 
saw blade pivots around a point that is 
adjustable across the cutting table from 
the fenceline to the center of a 2 x 6. To 
maintain fence integrity the fence auto- 
matically moves in response to the cutting 
angle to line up the fence gap with the 
saw blade. 

A 22-foot measuring device consisting 
of stops set at one foot intervals on a 
moveable rail with a scale and pointer 
allow precise setting of length measure- 
ments. 

Interchangeable turntable rings with ad- 
justable angle stops provide fast, easily 
programmable setups for truss web pro- 
duction. Even hip, valley, and jack rafters 
can be cut without tilting the saw blade. 

The system's versatility also lends it- 
self to production of small orders which 
require frequent setup changes. 

For more information contact Speed 
Cut, Inc. P.O. Box 1125, Corvallis, 
Oregon 97330, Telephone (503) 928- 
1281. 



WANT A PET NAIL? 

A firm in Houston, Tex., has created 
for "the carpenter who has everything" a 
high quality, pedigreed Pet Nail ... "a 
nail you will be proud to own." 

The Pet Nail comes complete with a 
leash to help prevent it from getting lost 
and a sweater for special occasions. At- 
tractively boxed and affixed to a card 
which describes its uses and care, the 
Pet Nail will bring a lot of laughs on 
special occasions . . . for gag presenta- 
tions or as mementoes of a party or 
banquet. 

The Pet Nail retails at $3.00 each post- 
paid. It can be purchased singly or in 
quantity (48 to a master carton). Write: 
The Wholesale Mart, 2401 Lazy Hollow 
212-A, Houston, Tx. 77063. 




PLEASE NOTE: A report on new prod- 
ucts and processes on this page in no 
way constitutes an endorsement or recom- 
mendation. All performance claims are 
based on statements by the manufacturer. 




LAYOUT LEVEL 

• ACCURATE TO 1/32" 

• REACHES 100 FT. 

• ONE-MAN OPERATION 

Save Time, Money, do a Better Job 
With This Modern Water Level 

In just a few minutes you accurately set batters 
for slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, forms, fixtures, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 

HYDROLEVEL® 

... the old reliable water 
level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 
clear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 
leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
man operation— outside, in- 
side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anywhere you 
can climb or crawl! 

Why waste money on delicate *WV' 
instruments, or lose time and ac- 
curacy on makeshift leveling? Since 195(T 
thousands of carpenters, builders, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Send check or money order for $16.95 and 
your name and address. We will rush you a 
Hydrolevel by return mail postpaid. Or— buy 
three Hydrolevels at dealer price - $11.30 each 
postpaid. Sell two, get yours free! No C.O.D. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or money back. 

FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 

HYDROLEVEL 

P.O. Box G Ocean Springs, Miss. 39564 




Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
TIRE length of Common-Hip-Valley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is % 
inch rise to 12 inch run. Pitches in- 
crease % inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
ings for each pitch. The smallest 
width is % inch and they increase 
%" each time until they cover a 60 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof is 48'-9%" wide. Pitch 
is 7%" rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons, Hips and 
Jacks and the Cuts in ONE MINUTE. 
Let us prove it, or return your money. 



Getting the lengths of ratters by the span and 
the method of setting up the tables Is filly pro- 
tected by the 1917 & 1944 Copyrights. 



In the U.S.A. send $5.00. We pay the 

postage. California residents add 30 < 
tax. 

We also have a very fine Stair 

book 9" x 12". It sells for $3.00. We 

pay the Postage. California residents 
add 1 8 < tax. 



A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 405, Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 



MAY, 1980 



39 



IN CONCLUSION 



THE UIHOn BUSTER'S 

shell cnmE: 

now VOU SEE us, 

now vou noni 



No brass knuckles and 
billy clubs to achieve 
a 'union-free environ- 
ment.' Anti-Union 
seminars and 
psychological testing 
can do the job. 



A growing number of union-busting consultants 
are roaming North America these days, holding 
seminars for management officials at $500 a head 
and laying out "guidelines" designed to show plant 
managers and contractors how to avoid unions and 
even how the "break" unions. 

Their colorful road shows — with all kinds of 
sideshow banners about "union bosses" and "labor 
corruption" and "oppressive federal restrictions on 
business" — are mostly aimed at achieving what 
one management group calls "a union-free environ- 
ment". 

Basically, what these anti-union consultants, 
attorneys, and right-wing evangelists are trying to 
do is take away your right to bargain with your 



employer for better wages and working conditions. 
They would deny you the right of union repre- 
sentation before management when you have a 
grievance. They would say to you, in effect, that 
you don't need anyone to look after you and 
your job except your employer. Your employer 
knows best. 

In fact, they have mastered their art so well 
that some of them have prepared special question- 
naires for job interviews and psychological testing 
services which help employers to "hire beautiful 
people who do what they are told." They will tell 
a gullible employer that their psychological tests 
can detect which employee will join a union and 
which employee will not. 

There were Congressional hearings in Washing- 
ton, D.C., last October, on the subject of "Pres- 
sures in the Workplace," and it was brought out 
in these hearings that the union-busting industry 
is attacking unions and the rights of union mem- 
bers in five basic ways: 

One: It is mass-marketing these union-avoid- 
ance seminars in two and three-day crash courses, 
using expert practitioners of the hard-sell. 

Two: It is recommending to industrialists and 
business executives that they employ the services 
of attorneys skilled in the loopholes of federal 
and state labor laws — legal connivers who can 
delay certification elections and collective bargain- 
ing for years by maneuvers in the courts, through 
"surface bargaining," discharges, and decertifica- 
tion moves. 

Three, it is calling in industrial psychologists to 
develop and administer surveys which will weed 
out of an industrial plant or a construction crew 
the "rabble rousers, the misfits, and the egocentrics" 
who want to belong to unions. 

Four: It is stimulating the creation of manage- 
ment consultant firms who will send teams of egg- 
heads to guide an employer minute-by-minute 
through union organizing campaigns, and 

Five: It is infiltrating trade associations and 
even creating new trade associations which will 
combine all of the activities I have mentioned and 
tailor them for a coordinated attack on organized 
labor in a particular industry. 

If you're an old timer in the labor movement, 
I need not tell you that union busting is nothing 
new. In the old days, management goons and 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



strikebreakers were imported from the hills and 
backwoods, and — protected by police and national 
guard — they moved into a struck plant and took it 
over. Pinkerton men swung clubs and even fired 
revolvers on occasion to break the spirit and re- 
solve of early trade unionists. Faced with court 
injunctions, yellow-dog contracts and blacklists, 
any man or woman who stood up and led a group 
of oppressed workers against their bosses was 
doomed to spend his or her days in misery. 

Today, that sort of activity is all gone. The art 
of union busting has changed completely. No more 
brass knuckles and billy clubs; instead, we have 
attitudinal analyses, motivational surveys, and un- 
fair practices, all stuffed into briefcases by experts 
in gray flannel suits. 

It's much neater. There's no bloodletting, and, 
unfortunately, it's much more effective for grind- 
ing the wage earner and his union into the ground. 

In reading about union affairs over the past two 
or three years, you may have wondered why the 
Brotherhood and other unions were so concerned 
with labor law reform. I can explain it quite simply: 

The Labor Law Reform Bill — which came close 
to passage by the US Senate a little more than a 
year ago — would remove the roadblocks in the 
courts which these anti-union legal experts have 
thrown up over the past 45 years. It would permit 
workers in the 20 "Right to Work" States spread 
across the South and West to have union shop 
agreements once again and the same contract pro- 
tections provided workers in the other 30 states of 
the Union. 

It would make the National Labor Relations Act 
(the Wagner Act) of 1935, once more, the public 
policy of the United States. That act defines the 
law as "encouraging the practice and procedures 
of collective bargaining" and "protecting the ex- 
ercise by workers of full freedom of association, 
self-organization, and designation of representa- 
tives of their own choosing." 

Twice in the past 42 years, the US Congress 
placed strict limits on the ability of workers to 
exercise their right to organize free from employer 
coercion. The stated purpose of the Taft-Hartley 
and Landrum-Griffin amendments was to correct 
an imbalance in the law. But the result has been 
to create a gross imbalance in favor of those em- 



ployers who want to frustrate the right of their 
workers to organize. 

Union busters have rushed in to take advantage 
of the imbalance in our labor laws. Cross their 
palms with big money, and they'll play the old 
shell game — now you see the union, now you don't. 

And they're playing this game among our 
Canadian brothers, too. There are attempts to 
enact "right to work" laws in Western Canada, 
this year, and the union busters are moving through 
the other provinces, as well. 

So, I say to you, be on guard. Support your 
union when the chips are down. You'll be hearing 
more and more about the union busters, and we'll 
be telling you more about their activities. 

In the long run, we know, and we hope that 
you know that you can't keep a good union down. 




WILLIAM KONYHA 



General President 




EPAEST.MPG. EST HWY 



2026 



TOUGH MILEAGE TO BEAT. 

Remember Compare the "estimated 
MPG" to the "estimated MPG" of other 
vehicles You may get different mileage, 
depending on now test you drive, 
weather conditions, and trip length 
Actual highway mileage will probably be 
less than the estimated highway fuel 
economy lower in California 



1980 CHEVY EL CAMINO. Here's a downright practical half-ton pickup truck. Hard- 
working El Camino sports a 6y 2 -ft. cargo box with payloads up to 1250 lbs., including cargo, 
equipment and passengers. And impressive mileage ratings. Our closest sales competitor 
offers nothing like it at all. A big plus this year is Chevrolet's Three-Year Perforation- 
From-Corrosion Limited Warranty. See your Chevy dealer for details. Ask him about leasing, too. 



NO SIX-CYLINDER TRUCK 




CHEVY TRUCKS 



CHEV>RICKUPS ARE 

EQUIPPED WITH GM-BUilT ENGINES 

PRODUCED BY VARIOU&DIVISIONS. 

I SEE YOUR DEALER FOR DETAILS. 




June 1980 



tiled Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners of America 




Founded 1881 



Time Is 

Running Out 

In The Battle Against Inflation 



See article inside 



m- .. •" -* m%^0*P-^^' 



[t :^M: 





GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Patrick J. Campbell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Sigurd Lucassen 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

John S. Rogers 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 
Charles E. Nichols 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENTS EMERITI 
M. A. Hutcheson 
William Sidell 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



Secretaries, Please Note 

In processing complaints about 
magazine delivery, the only names 
which the financial secretary needs to 
send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 

In sending in the names of mem- 
bers who are not getting the maga- 
zine, the address forms mailed out 
with each monthly bill should be 
used. When a member clears out of 
one local union into another, his 
name is automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of the local union he 
cleared out of. Therefore, the secre- 
tary of the union into which he cleared 
should forward his name to the Gen- 
eral Secretary so that this member 
can again be added to the mailing list. 

Members who die or are suspended 
are automatically dropped from the 
mailing list of The Carpenter. 



First District, Joseph F. Lia 
120 North Main Street 
New City, New York 10956 

Second District, Raymond Ginnetti 
1 17 North Jasper Ave. 
Margate, N.J. 08402 

Third District, Anthony Ochocki 

14001 West McNichols Road 
Detroit, Michigan 48235 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

2970 Peachtree Rd., N.W., Suite 300 
Atlanta. Ga. 30305 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140 N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116 

Seventh District, Hal Morton 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, John Carruthers 
5799 Yonge Street #807 
Willowdale, Ontario M2M 3V3 

Tenth District, Ronald J. Dancer 

1235 40th Avenue, N.W. 

Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2K OG3 




William Konyha, Chairman 
John S. Rogers, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 



NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPENTER only cor- 
rects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not advise your own 
local union of your address change. You must also notify your local union 
... by some other method. 



This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



Local No. 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State or Province 



ZIP Code 




IN THIS ISSUE 



NEWS AND FEATURES 

Time is Running Out in Fight Against Inflation AFL-CIO Council 2 

The Double Burden: Inflation and Unemployment 4 

Change Seesaw Patterns of Construction Sen. Harrison Williams 6 

A Blueprint for the 80s 

Ray Ginnetti Named Second District Board Member 9 

Annual Budget for City Family of 4 Tops $20,000 9 

More Women Will Become Wage Earners Joyce Miller 10 

A Blueprint for the 80s 

Did You Know? The Variety of the Membership 12 

Political Action Is Everyone's Business 15 

Brotherhood Members Fight A Dreaded Disease 16 

Two 1980 Training Seminars Held _ 18 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Report 8 

Ottawa Report 1 4 

Local Union News 20 

We Congratulate 23 

Apprenticeship and Training 24 

Consumer Clipboard 26 

Plane Gossip 28 

Service to the Brotherhood 31 

In Memoriam 37 

What's New? 39 

In Conclusion William Konyha 40 

POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, O.C. 20001 

Published monthly at 3342 Bladensburg Road, Brentwood, Md. 20722 by the United Brotherhood 

of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, D.C. and 
Additional Entries. Subscription price: United States and Canada $7.50 per year, single copies 
750 in advance. 




(ISSN 0008-6843) 



VOLUME 100 No. 6 JUNE, 1980 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

John S. Rogers, Editor 



THE 
COVER 



The sands of time are running out 
in the worldwide battle against infla- 
tion. As Arab potentates buy more 
and more gold and more extensive 
real estate, and raise their petroleum 
prices to record levels, in order to 
achieve their ends, American and 
Canadian workers struggle to survive 
under double-digit inflation. 

Residential and commercial con- 
struction have dropped off drastically 
in North America, and the unemploy- 
ment level in the United States has 
passed 7%. 

In many areas, economic recession 
is already underway. Auto Workers, 
Steelworkers, Construction Workers, 
and Lumber and Sawmill Workers, to 
name a few, are in line for unem- 
ploment compensation in many cities 
today. 

Surely the time has come for con- 
certed action by the Congress and the 
Carter and Trudeau Administrations 
to "bite the bullet" and do the some- 
times unpleasant things which must be 
done. Partisan politics must be put 
aside, and our legislators and govern- 
ment officials must take the steps rec- 
ommended by organized labor to get 
the North American economy back on 
its feet. 



NOTE: Readers who would like copies 
of this cover unmarred by a mailing label 
may obtain them by sending 56V in coin 
to cover mailing costs to the Editor, The 
CARPENTER, 101 Constitution Ave., 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. 




Printed in U. S. A. 




A, 

SURGING 
PROFITS 






OUR COVER STORY 

Time 

Is 

Running 

Out 

In 

The Battle 

Against 

Inflation 



Strong and decisive 
measures are needed, 

Labor tells Congress 
and the White House 




B&*t. 



Remember the days when we dreamed of 
getting the wages we are going broke on now? 



ONlMPlXmiNT 





-H4- 4 ! 















I. 



nflation and recession dangers 
persist and threaten to weaken the 
American economy still further in 
1980. 

To move effectively and fairly 
toward price stability and full em- 
ployment objectives, the nation's 
economic policies must be focused 
more clearly and decisively. 

In dealing with inflation, correc- 
tive action must be directed at the 
specific problem sectors: energy, 
food, housing and health care. 

• Energy supplies must be ex- 
panded to free the country from the 
OPEC cartel stranglehold. Conser- 
vation, development of alternative 
energy sources and rationing should 
be the cornerstone of such a policy. 
Oil price controls should be con- 
tinued, and middle distillate and 
natural gas price controls imposed. 

• Farm production must be bol- 
stered and the gains from higher 
production shared by family farmers 
and consumers. Additional grain 
supplies resulting from the bumper 
crop and the limitation on exports 
to Russia should be aimed at stabil- 
izing domestic prices while assuring 
farmers a fair return. The bonanza 
that speculators and the grain deal- 
ers received from the Russian grain 
sales should not be underwritten by 
U.S. tax dollars as a result of cur- 
tailment of the sales. 

• The Federal Reserve Board 
should have reduced the discount 
rate on Feb. 15, rather than increas- 
ing it. The Federal Reserve should 
institute selective credit regulation to 
assure a continued adequate flow of 
funds channeled into low- and mod- 
erate-income housing and produc- 
tive investment. Additionally, the 
government should expand its hous- 
ing programs geared to low- and 
moderate-income families. 

• Health care costs must be re- 
strained. Hospital cost containment 
and control of professional fees are 
needed. A comprehensive national 
health insurance program is essen- 
tial for effective control of all health 
care costs. 

To curb inflation, the Administra- 
tion and Congress must move to ad- 
dress the real sources of excessive 
increases in these four problem sec- 



tors. Policies that tend to slow down 
the general economic activity and 
increase unemployment are the 
wrong way to attack inflation. 

The AFL-CIO is participating in 
the Administration's voluntary pro- 
gram of pay and price restraint as 
part of the National Accord de- 
signed to meet overall economic 
problems. In the Pay Advisory 
Committee, we have agreed to new 
wage policies that call for substan- 
tial sacrifice on the part of Amer- 
ica's working men and women. We 
are ready to bear our share of a 
burden of austerity, but we insist 
that the burden be fairly shared and 
translated into progress in reducing 
the rate of inflation. 



u 



I 



f voluntary efforts fail, the 

Administration and Congress should 
turn to a mandatory anti-inflation 
program that controls every source 
of income — profits, dividends, rents, 
interest rates, executive compensa- 
tion, professional fees, as well as 
wages and prices. 

There is no conflict between fight- 
ing inflation and fighting recession. 
In fact, the two efforts are comple- 
mentary. 

The government must pursue pol- 
icies that lead to economic growth 
rather than stagnation, recession 
and joblessness. The cost of lost 
production and lost investment for 
the future are inflationary factors. 
Interest rates, money supply and 
budget policy should be geared to 
healthy and balanced economic 
growth. 

Special programs to fight reces- 
sion are needed. Congress should 
enact: 

1. A stand-by emergency public 
works program. 

2. A counter-cyclical aid pro- 
gram to state and local governments. 

3. Adequate funding for public 
service jobs. 

4. Policies to counteract the 
severe housing recession. 

5. Mass transit and railroad re- 
habilitation, housing rehabilitation 
and other programs which also meet 
energy problems. 



nder current circumstances, 

we do not believe that a tax cut is 
warranted. If economic conditions 
deteriorate, first reliance should be 
placed upon direct job-creating pro- 
grams which provide more cost- 
effective stimulus than tax cuts. 
Such programs can be targeted di- 
rectly toward those bearing the 
burden of the recession. 

Trade policy should be geared to 
strengthening domestic employment, 
economic growth and price stability 
goals. Imports must not be allowed 
to disrupt domestic industries. A 
rational system of fair trade must be 
developed, including the negotiation 
with this country's trading partners 
of orderly marketing agreements 
and quantitative restraints. U.S. law 
and the new international codes re- 
stricting unfair trade practices 
should be vigorously enforced. 

The new government procure- 
ment code should not be used as the 
pretext to undermine or preclude 
enforcement of state domestic pref- 
erence laws which are excluded 
from that code. 

Export policies must be reviewed 
to stem the outflow of U.S. techno- 
logical know-how and to curb infla- 
tionary pressures in the United 
States caused by shortages of essen- 
tial goods and commodities. 

Foreign investment in the U.S. 
should be closely monitored, and 
domestic tax and preference policies 
should not encourage U.S. com- 
panies to invest abroad. 

The U.S. economy must be re- 
vitalized so that this nation can 
maintain and improve its national 
security, its international role, and 
its technological and economic well- 
being. America must retain a strong, 
diversified economy, providing ade- 
quate income and job opportunities 
for all American workers, with an 
undiminished commitment to human 
welfare and the special needs of 
America's disadvantaged people. 



THIS ARTICLE is the text of a state- 
ment on the national economy adopted 
by the AFL-CIO Executive Council at its 
February 1980 meeting. 



JUNE, 1980 



The Double Burden: 
Inflation and Unemployment 



The economy narrowly managed to 
avoid recession in 1979, but funda- 
mental weakness exists in many crucial 
areas. The outlook for 1980 is one of 
continued double-digit inflation and 
substantial increases in unemployment. 
The official government forecast 
anticipates that the current inflation 
rate will "slow" to 10.4% by the end 
of the year. Unemployment, is pro- 
jected to 7.5%, bringing the total 
number of jobless up to 7.9 million 
workers. But even though the "reces- 
sion" as charted by the overall statistics 
on the nation's output and income 
may, in fact, be "mild," as the Admin- 
istration anticipates, for millions of 
workers and would-be workers the 
prospects are bleak and the results 
traumatic. 

# Employment 

For workers the economy still has not 
recovered from the severe 1974-1975 
recession. Unemployment averaged 6 
million workers in 1979. 

The President's Budget and Eco- 
nomic Report recommended that the 
Humphrey-Hawkins goal of 4% un- 
employment by 1983 be delayed for 
two years to 1985 and that the 3% 
inflation target be pushed back for 
three more years until 1988. Adminis- 
tration officials claim that trying to 
achieve the original goals of the act 
would be inflationary and that the re- 
vised timetable represents a more real- 
istic statement of what is obtainable. 

Humphrey-Hawkins spells out pro- 
cedures for achieving full employment, 
while also curtailing inflationary pres- 
sures. A vigorous, growing economy 
would play an important role in pro- 
viding job opportunities for those will- 
ing and able to work and would help 
create an adequate supply of goods 
and services desired by the American 
people. 

Plans and policies are necessary to 
alleviate the current unemployment 
level as well as to preempt the pro- 
jected increase in unemployment. The 
budget proposes only one major new 
initiative, a youth training and educa- 



This report is excerpted from the back- 
ground paper which accompanied the 
AFL-CIO Executive Council statement 
on the economy on Pages 2 and 3. 



tion program to help meet the job 
problems of disadvantaged youths. 
This is an important new initiative in 
addressing the high unemployment 
problems of youths, but more is 
needed. 

Postponing the Humphrey-Hawkins 
goals postpones the basic economic 
goals of full employment, balanced 
economic growth and relative price 
stability. These goals should be vigor- 
ously pursued, not postponed. 

• Inflation 

During the early part of 1979, food 
prices were rising at annual rates of 
nearly 20% with particularly large in- 
creases for meat, fruits and vegetables. 
While these price surges moderated in 
mid-year, a renewed spurt of food 
prices occurred toward the end of the 
year despite the abundant harvests of 
1979. One of the factors pushing up 
food prices was the substantial quan- 
tities of grain diverted for export to 
Russia. Programs that recompense 
holders of cancelled grain shipments 
must be devised to prevent profiteer- 
ing at the taxpayer's expense, help 
lower food prices to the consumer, 
and directed at maintaining income 
for family farmers. 

Energy prices were pushed up repeat- 
edly throughout 1979, by the formal 
actions of the OPEC cartel and the in- 
dividual actions of oil producing na- 
tions. Imported oil prices at year-end 
were up nearly 80%. But domestic 
producers also benefited from OPEC's 
higher price levels, as the President 
initiated a program to decontrol all 
domestic oil prices by early 1981. Do- 
mestic oil-producers account for half 
of all oil consumption. Similarly, nat- 
ural gas prices rose rapidly as a result 
of a congressionally approved price 
decontrol program. 

Interest rates also added to inflation. 
The Federal Reserve Board raised the 
discount rate that it charges its mem- 
ber banks from 9Vi% in January 1979 
to 10% in July, to 10>/2% in August, 
to 11% in September, and to 12% in 
October. This 26% increase in the 
discount rate, in just a four-month 
period, helped push up all other in- 
terest rates. The higher interest costs 
were spread throughout the economy, 
and instead of alleviating inflation, ag- 
gravated inflation. 



Medical costs continued to rise. No 
action was taken to mitigate the rapid 
increases in professional fees, which 
rose by 9.9% during 1979, and Con- 
gress failed to act on the President's 
proposed hospital cost containment 
program. 

The Council on Wage and Price 
Stability set a price guideline during 
the first year of activities that called 
for firms to raise prices Vi % less than 
their average price rise in 1976-1977. 
This guideline was raised for the sec- 
ond year of the program to allow the 
average price rise for 1979-1980 to 
equal the 1976-1977 rate of price 
change. The original formulation pre- 
sumed that there would be a slowing 
of the rate of inflation to 6% by the 
end of 1979 instead of what actually 
occurred: an acceleration in the infla- 
tion rate to 13%. 



Wages 



Wage increases in 1979 lagged far be- 
hind the 13% rate of inflation. Aver- 
age hourly earnings increased by only 
8%, and the buying power of the 
average worker's wage declined by 
5.3%. 

In spite of the 1979 speedup in 
inflation, wage increases in 1979 were 
generally lower than 1978. The aver- 
age hourly earnings of production and 
non-supervisory workers in private 
non-farm industries grew at a rate of 
only 8.0% in 1979, down from 8.2% 
in 1978. Total compensation per hour, 
for all employees in the non-farm busi- 
ness sector, grew by 8.8% in 1979, 
down from a 9.0% level in 1978. 
Total compensation data include fringe 
benefit costs as well as salary changes 
for supervisory and non-production 
workers. 

Under major collective bargaining 
settlements, the first year wage in- 
creases, exclusive of cost of living es- 
calator clauses, for contracts negoti- 
ated in 1979 averaged 7.4%, down 
from 7.6% in 1978. The average effec- 
tive increase in all major union con- 
tracts in 1979 including cost of living 
escalator clauses was 8.8%, up from 
8.2% in 1978. The small increases in 
effective wage changes failed to fully 
reflect the 13.4% increase in consumer 
prices that occurred in 1979. 

COWPS had established a 7% wage 
guideline for the first year of the pro- 



THE CARPENTER 



gram. The 7% figure was relaxed to 
8% by COWPS for those groups not 
covered by cost of living escalator 
clauses. Thus, the average wage change 
for 1979 of 8% was in keeping with 
the revised guideline. 

For the second year of the program, 
a new Pay Advisory Committee was 
established to recommend appropriate 
voluntary guidlines for wage and sal- 
ary determinations. The 18-member tri- 
partite committee recommended a 
range of IVz to 9Vi% as the new 
guideline. It suggested that full cost of 
living escalator clauses be evaluated at 
1Vi%. The committee also recom- 
mended changes in the rules applying 
to the low-wage exception, incremental 
pay plans and tandem pay relation- 
ships. 

• Profits 

Corporate profits generally were quite 
rosy in 1979. Before-tax profits in the 
third quarter of 1979 were 14.3% 
higher than year earlier levels. After- 
tax profits showed a 19% rise, Pre- 
liminary figures for the fourth quarter 
of the year indicate substantial profit 
gains among oil companies, machine 
tool makers, copper mining companies, 
and aluminum producers. Losses, how- 
ever, were reported by companies in 
some sectors — notably auto and steel. 
Oil profits in many cases were more 
than doubled last year. Some of the 
largest increases were reported by 
Standard Oil of Ohio with profit gains 
of 163%, Texaco profits up 106%, 
Getty Oil up 83%, Conoco up 81%, 
and Mobil Oil up 78%. 

# Productivity 

Productivity data for 1979 provided 
mixed signals as productivity for the 
total private business sector declined, 
while productivity in manufacturing 
increased. In the total private business 
sector, productivity fell 0.9%. But in 
the manufacturing sector, productivity 
increased 1.8%. The decreases in pro- 
ductivity reflect the sharp slowdown 
in the rate of growth in overall output. 
In manufacturing, output grew at a 
faster pace and productivity rose. The 
statistical data for measuring changes 
in manufacturing productivity are 
more accurate than for non-manufac- 
turing. 

Since 1967, unit labor costs in man- 
ufacturing have been increasing more 
slowly in the United States than in 
other major industrial countries. In 
U.S. dollar terms, the increases in for- 
eign unit labor costs were substantially 
greater than in the United States in all 
major industrialized countries except 
Canada. Thus, the combined results 



of productivity and compensation 
changes and valuation of the dollar 
have placed the United States in a 
more advantageous position in com- 
parison with other industrialized 
nations. 

• Trade 

In 1979, the trade deficit was reduced 
slightly from $28.4 billion in 1978 to 
$24.6 billion in 1979. The deficit was 
reduced as a result of a 26.5% in- 
crease in exports while imports in- 
creased 20%. Total exports now 
amount to $181 billion with imports 
amounting to $206 billion. 

Oil imports accounted for 29% of 
all imports — up from 24% of imports 
for 1978. The dollar value of oil im- 
ports jumped from $42 billion to $60 
billion. Oil imports amounted to 3 bil- 
lion barrels, up 2% from 1978, but 
150 million barrels less than imported 
in 1977. 

The trade deficit may worsen in 
1980 as a result of increased oil prices 
and trade disruption with Iran and the 
Soviet Union. A U.S. recession could 
dampen demand for imports, but im- 
ports will continue to cause serious 
economic problems regardless of a re- 
cession in the U.S. 

# Outlook 

A 1980 recession is forecast by most 
economists. The Administration proj- 
ects in line with most other economic 
forecasters an increase in unemploy- 
ment to 7.5% by the end of 1980. 
However, some economists predict 
that the recession may bring unemploy- 
ment to close to 9%, as occurred in 
the 1974-75 recession. 

The economy needs some positive 
programs to counter the recessionary 
forces. The economy is beset with the 
following major weaknesses: 

• Real spendable earnings are down 
by more than 5%; 

• State and local governments are 
retrenching in the wake of inflation, 
high interest rates and taxpayer re- 
volts; 

• Huge consumer debts are hang- 
ing over individuals, and many people 
are using up their savings in an effort 
to maintain their standard of living. 

• The federal government's fiscal 
policies are moving rapidly toward 
substantial restraint. 

A recession in key sectors was al- 
ready evident in early 1980. Both the 
housing industry and the auto industry 
were depressed. 

Various stimulus programs are needed 
to deal with an overall recession. The 
Humphrey-Hawkins Act calls for 



counter-cyclical employment policies 
that include accelerated public works, 
public service employment, state and 
local grant programs, and other spe- 
cific job-creating programs targeted to 
alleviate unemployment. The existing 
CETA law has provisions for in- 
creased public service jobs as unem- 
ployment levels rise above 4%. 

Funds for already-authorized hous- 
ing programs could be approved by 
the Congress to increase housing sup- 
plies. This could be achieved through 
expansion of the Brooke-Cranston pro- 
gram and by release of the $10 billion 
already paid back to the federal gov- 
ernment from mortgage sales and re- 
payments under the Emergency Home 
Purchase Assistance Act. " 

With many forces feeding recession, 
strong and decisive federal initiatives 
and national programs are essential. 

The AFL-CIO fully recognizes the 
serious problems facing workers as a 
result of increasing tax burdens. How- 
ever, we agree with the President that 
a general tax cut at this time would 
not be appropriate. Such a tax cut 
would divert funds from direct job- 
creating programs, from measures to 
help the disadvantaged, and from the 
programs needed to meet new and in- 
creased commitments for the nation's 
defense and for attainment of energy 
goals. 

We also are deeply concerned by the 
huge array of business tax cut pro- 
posals that masquerade as devices to 
increase capital formation, enhance 
productivity, encourage savings, re- 
duce consumption and the like. Since 
capital spending rose rapidly in 1979 
and is predicted to increase by nearly 
11% in 1980, tax cuts are not needed 
to encourage capital outlays. These 
devices are costly tax loopholes that 
further rig the tax structure against 
workers and other low- and moderate- 
income taxpayers. These loopholes un- 
dermine the ability of the government 
to provide essential services, facilities 
and protections. 

Tax cuts must be evaluated in terms 
of equity as well as their effectiveness 
in achieving the goals of full employ- 
ment, economic growth and price sta- 
bility. 

Workers and consumers must not 
be forced to bear the double burden of 
fighting inflation by sacrificing their 
jobs and their standard of living. Effec- 
tive policies to achieve full employ- 
ment would also reduce inflationary 
pressures and, therefore, offer the best 
hope of achieving a balanced economy. 




JUNE, 1980 



HUE IMI5T (HRI1GE 
SEESHUI PRTf ERRS 

01 ronsTRumon 




Senator Williams 



Senator "Pete" Wil- 
liams' name appears 
as author of every 
major piece of legis- 
lation enacted dur- 
ing the past decade 
to improve condi- 
tions for American 
workers. He was first 
elected to Congress 
in 1953 and became 
a US Senator from 
New Jersey in 1958, 
re-elected to office 
since that time. 



By U.S. Senator 
HARRISON WILLIAMS, JR. 

Chairman, Subcommittee on Housing 
and Urban Affairs 

At the start of a new decade, people 
often take stock of their accomplish- 
ments and make plans for the future. 
Members of the Senate, too, devote the 
weeks between sessions planning 
agendas for the coming months, ana- 
lyzing critical needs and initiating 
legislation to meet those needs. One 
resolution which heads my list for the 
1980's is to try and steady the seesaw 
existence facing a construction indus- 
try torn between increasing demand 
and tight money policies. 

Oftentimes the construction indus- 
try is considered the bellweather for 
economic predictions. Employing 
hundreds of thousands of people na- 
tionwide, this market is often the first 
to suffer during economic downturns. 
These days the industry is suffering 
from tight federal money policies de- 
signed to curb inflation, and from pes- 
simistic economic predictions which 
have kept people out of the housing 
market. 

In some areas of the country, for 
instance, the price of new homes has 
jumped 35% over last year, and 
around 18% interest rates on mort- 
gages have become the norm. As it 
stands now, even moderate income 
families cannot afford to buy a median 
priced home. At the same time, people 
born during the post war baby boom 
began swelling the pool of eligible 
homebuyers, keeping demand strong. 

As we open the new decade, hous- 
ing policies begun in the 1970's are 
still in ferment. 

While federal subsidy programs 
suffered in the mid-1970's under 
Nixon Administration moratoriums, 
the traditional single-family housing 



market which had enjoyed prosperity 
in the early years of the decade, has 
begun to experience problems of its 
own. The energy crisis, recession and 
unprecedented inflation drove interest 
rates up and production down. Con- 
struction of private rental housing also 
fell victim to economic forces. Overall 
starts for single and multifamily hous- 
ing units dropped from 2.35 million 
in 1972 to 1.160 million in 1975. 

Beginning in 1976, and running 
through the first nine months of 1979, 
single family housing experienced 
another boom. Housing starts in 1978 
reached 2.02 million and nearly four 
million units were sold. Inflation 
played a paradoxical role, helping to 
propel the resurgence and at the same 
time creating conditions that spelled 
trouble ahead. 

As the number of eligible home- 
buyers increased, money market cer- 
tificates offered by lending institutions 
helped assure credit availability. 
Meanwhile, housing attracted those 
seeking a hedge against inflation. 
Others purchased second or third 
homes as speculative ventures. Prices 
soared from heavy demand, as well as 
from inflation in construction costs, 
and interest rates followed suit. On 
October 6, 1979, the Federal Reserve 
Board took stern action to bolster the 
dollar overseas and to cool inflation 
throughout the economy, the immed- 
iate effects of which have been re- 
stricted credit, still higher interest 
rates, and the weakening of the single 
family housing market 

Today, all signs point to a crisis in 
single family housing production, at 
least for the first half of 1980, and the 
continued decline of rental housing 
for the foreseeable future. While basic 
demand for homeownership, com- 
bined with speculation and the avail- 
ability of mortgage money have kept 
the housing market in high gear for 



many months, hundreds of thousands 
of families have been squeezed out of 
the housing market. 

Economists have predicted severe 
drops in housing starts this year, and 
noted that the up and down cycles 
which housing has endured during the 
70's has contributed to inflation in the 
industry. Wide swings in construction 
disrupted all aspects of the industry 
from labor availability to materials 
suppliers. 

Multifamily housing construction, 
chronically ill since the moratorium, 
also found its condition worsening 
through the end of the previous 
decade. A host of economic troubles, 
derived from our intractable inflation- 
ary spiral and the cost of energy, 
plagued current owners and prospec- 
tive developers alike. The share of 
private construction of rental units 
dwindled steadily as the proportion of 
federally subsidized units increased. 

A recent report by the General Ac- 
counting Office catalogued in unmis- 
takable terms the seriousness of the 
production crisis afflicting rental hous- 
ing. Vacancy rates have reached his- 
toric lows, the report noted, and un- 
subsidized rental housing production 
is the lowest in 20 years. Just to meet 
the needs of low and moderate income 
people, experts estimate that the na- 
tion must produce 670,000 new and 
substantially rehabilitated units a year 
for the next ten years, and must an- 
nually perform moderate rehabilita- 
tion on another 570,000. Production 
rates for such housing are only a frac- 
tion of what is needed. 

Underlying this situation is the in- 
ability of current owners to derive 
sufficient income from rents to offset 
leaping operating costs, and to find 
adequate capital to maintain their 
buildings in decent shape. Potential 
developers have enormous difficulties 
in putting together profitable projects, 



THE CARPENTER 



especially through conventional financ- 
ing sources. Moreover, federal subsidy 
programs, beginning in Fiscal Year 
1979, experienced a steep decline in 
funding, largely due to inadequate 
Administration funding requests. The 
inevitable result will be the deteriora- 
tion of many good projects, building 
abandonment, conversion of existing 
projects into condominiums, and de- 
pressed production of new units. 

For many individuals, this trend 
spells real hardship, because renting 
represents their sole or most suitable 
housing choice. This is particularly 
true of young families or single peo- 
ple embarking on their careers, the 
poor, and a large proportion of el- 
derly people. The extent to which we 
allow the supply of rental housing to 
shrink has a direct bearing on hous- 
ing costs. 

Considering housing's contribution 
to the inflationary trend, it is not un- 
reasonable to bring some degree of 
restraint to that sector of the econ- 
omy, most specifically its speculative 
aspects. It is unreasonable, however, 
to expect that housing should bear the 
brunt of any anti-inflationary policy. 
Yet, it is the broadly restrictive ap- 
proach to the Federal Reserve's anti- 
inflation program that threatens to 
trigger an unsupportable decline in 
housing production at the very time 
the demand is growing at unprece- 
dented levels. 

A housing recession could have dire 
effects for the entire economy. Hous- 
ing contributes about 4% to our GNP. 
The projected decline in starts from 
1979 to 1980 will mean the loss of 
about 200,000 jobs and $1.5 billion in 
federal, state and local tax revenues. 

As Congress began its first session 
of the 1980's, efforts to stave off re- 
cession in the single family housing 
market and to rescue rental housing 
from its steady decline toward extinc- 
tion were high priorities. 

At the end of the last session, the 
Administration offered legislation, 
which I sponsored in the Senate, to 
update and improve our most im- 
portant countercyclical housing pro- 
gram — the Emergency Home Pur- 
chase Assistance Act. This program, 
first enacted in 1974, permits lending 
institutions to make below market in- 
terest rate loans for single and multi- 
family housing. These loans are sold 
to the Government National Mortgage 
Association (GNMA) at face value, 
which in turn holds the mortgages in 
its portfolio, or sells them at a dis- 
count, absorbing any loss as a federal 
subsidy. The program is triggered 
when the Secretary of Housing and 



Urban Development finds that eco- 
nomic conditions warrant its activa- 
tion. About $10 billion in funds re- 
captured from the program's previous 
implementation is available for the 
purchase of mortgages, upon release 
of those funds by Congress and upon 
Secretarial findings of the need to im- 
plement the program. This amount 
could assist between 150,000 and 200,- 
000 mortgages. The proposed legisla- 
tion would update the mortgage and 
sales price limits of the program to 
reflect rising costs since the program 
was last used, and would revamp the 
authority for setting interest rates 
(currently established at 1Vi%) to 
give the Secretary more flexibility 
in establishing rates that reflect pre- 
vailing market conditions. Enactment 
of this legislation would assure that 
we have a workable program standing 
by to head off a sharp downturn in 



"Efforts to stave off 
recession in the singte 
family housing market and 
to rescue rental housing 
from its steady decline 
toward extinction must be 
high priorities." 



"One of the most important 
tools to open the housing 
market to those now shut 
out can be tax exempt 
mortgage revenue bonds, 
issued by states and 
localities." 



the housing industry. The Subcommit- 
tee on Housing and Urban Affairs, 
which I chair, scheduled hearings in 
late January to review the state of the 
housing market and the need for reac- 
tivation of the emergency assistance 
program, and to determine whether 
the Administration's proposal needs 
any fine-tuning. 

Over the long term, housing afford- 
ability will have to be assured to the 
broad range of average income Amer- 
icans, not just the 18% of families who 
currently can afford a median-priced 
new home. One of the most important 
tools to open the housing market to 
those now shut out can be tax exempt 
mortgage revenue bonds, issued by 
states and localities. I recently intro- 
duced legislation to improve the use of 
such bonds. This measure would estab- 
lish three general bond issue categories. 
The first would allow state housing 



agencies to continue to issue such 
bonds. The second would allow com- 
munities to use bond proceeds to assist 
homebuyers without income restric- 
tions, but only if communities con- 
tribute a portion of the federal funds 
they receive equal to 5% of the value 
of the proposed bond issues, and if the 
bond proceeds are used with a local 
revitalization program. Lastly, com- 
munities not wishing to make such a 
contribution or match would be per- 
mitted to lend bond proceeds to people 
earning no more than 120% of median 
area income, with half of the loans 
going to those earning below the med- 
ian income for a given area. The bill 
also would not permit use of the bonds 
to encourage condominium conver- 
sion and it would not restrict their use 
to assist multifamily rental housing 
development. The bill also discourages 
speculation in single family properties 
by restricting assistance to owner- 
occupied residences. 

The problems of rental housing 
must be attacked along a broad front. 
At present, I am developing legislation 
which I believe will offer a compre- 
hensive means of reviving rental hous- 
ing in this country. While the details 
of the legislation are still under con- 
sideration, the general elements it 
must include are clear. First, we must 
encourage current owners to maintain 
their properties as rental housing. 
Preservation of existing buildings can 
be every bit as important as construc- 
tion of new ones. We must assist 
rental property owners in finding 
means to meet operating expenses, 
especially for utilities, and to secure 
capital necessary for rehabilitation 
and building repair and maintenance. 
Tax incentives and improved pro- 
grams of refinancing can help in this 
endeavor. 

Secondly, it will be necessary to 
discourage condominium conversion 
and to ameliorate its effects where it 
does occur. Locally developed con- 
dominium conversion plans, which in- 
clude assistance for displaced persons, 
mechanisms to facilitate tenant pur- 
chases of buildings or individual units 
and promoting the preservation of ex- 
isting rental structures, can play a 
crucial part in bringing condominium 
conversion under control. 

Thirdly, we must heighten our ef- 
forts to improve our public housing 
stock. Increased federal funding for 
modernization and for operating ex- 
penses will prevent the loss of decent 
housing stock and the additional pub- 
lic expenditures that such loss entails. 
Improved management techniques and 
Continued on page 30 



JUNE, 1980 



Washington 
Report 




TEAMSTERS INVITED IN 

The Teamsters say they have received 
a formal invitation to reaffiliate with 
the AFL-CIO and will make a final deci- 
sion at the union's next convention 
in June 1981. 

"The invitation to reaffiliate is 
being discussed and considered within 
the entire Teamsters union," an IBT 
spokesman said. 

Reaf filiation talks were instigated 
by AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland 
shortly after he took the helm of the 
federation last fall. Contacts also 
were initiated or renewed with two 
other large non-affiliates, the United 
Auto Workers and the United Mine 
Workers. 

The Teamsters, with 2.3 million mem- 
bers, is the largest union in North 
America. The 103 unions affiliated with 
the AFL-CIO have about 13.6 million 
members. 

REPORT ON ASBESTOS USE 

Reaffirming that there is "no safe 
level" for exposure to asbestos, an 
interagency study group has recommended 
that the substance be eliminated from 
all U.S. workplaces. 

In the meantime, the group urged, the 
Occupational Safety and Health Admin- 
istration (OSHA) should approve a limit 
for exposure to the mineral that is 20 
times stricter than the current 
standard. 

"All commercial and several non- 
commercial forms of asbestos cause dis- 
ease," Dr. Anthony Robbins, director of 
the National Institute for Occupational 
Safety and Health (NIOSH) told 
reporters. 

"There is no safe exposure level . . . 
no known level below which asbestos- 
related diseases do not occur," Robbins 
declared. 



HOUSING SUPPORT SOUGHT 

Stressing the impact of housing 
shortages on inflation and unemploy- 
ment, AFL-CIO Director of Housing and 
Monetary Policy Henry Schechter called 
for stepped up government support for 
housing and community development for 
Fiscal 1981. 

Testifying on the Housing and Com- 
munity Development Act of 1980, 
Schechter told a Senate Housing and 
Urban Affairs panel that "one of the 
chief generators of inflation in the 
economy has been a short supply of 
housing. " 

"Resultant rapid rises in prices of 
existing and new homes and in rents 
have been instrumental in raising the 
cost of living," he said. "Another 
inflationary aspect is declining pro- 
ductivity in older urban areas, as 
there is a lag in needed renewal of 
both private and public capital." 

The result, said Schechter, is a 
decline of the community and job 
losses. 

WATCH THAT THERMOSTAT 

President Carter has extended for 
another seven months the federal pro- 
gram setting temperature limits in most 
workplaces and other non-residential 
buildings. 

Under the program, which is designed 
to conserve energy, most non-residen- 
tial buildings are supposed to be 
cooled to no less than 78 degrees in 
summer nor heated to more than 65 
degrees in winter. 

Some buildings are exempt from the 
program for reasons of health, hygiene 
or safety — hospitals or some food 
processing plants, for example. The 
Carter Administration says the program 
is saving the nation between 200,000 
and 400,000 barrels of oil or its 
equivalent each day. 

SMALLEST UNION'S BIRTHDAY 

The nation's tiniest and least 
well-known union celebrates its 80th 
anniversary this year and says it isn't 
at all envious of the United Brother- 
hood, whose membership is now more than 
783,000. 

Unknown it may be, but American 
workers and indeed the nation itself 
would have a hard time getting along 
without the International Association 
of Siderographers because they make the 
plates that print the nation's cur- 
rency. The union comprises 19 members. 

Some unions, commented the IAS 
official wryly, have more people than 
that in their bookkeeping departments. 



THE CARPENTER 



Ray Ginnetti 

Named 

Second District 

Board Member 




GINNETTI 



General President William Konyha 
has named Raymond Ginnetti, pres- 
ident of the Pennsylvania State 
Council since 1972, to succeed 
Sigurd Lucassen as General Execu- 
tive Board Member from the Second 
District. 

Ginnetti was born in 1918 in 
Philadelphia, Pa. Fresh out of high 
school, he went to work in a wood- 
working mill as an apprentice, and, 
in 1936, he was initiated into Mill- 
Cabinet Local 1050, following in 
the footsteps of his father, James, 
who was a charter member of the 
local. He has been a member of that 
local ever since. 

During World War II, Ginnetti's 
carpentry career was interrupted for 
several years. He served in Hawaii 
after being drafted by the Army in 
1941. In fact, he saw action quickly 
there. He was in Schofield Barracks 
on December 7 when the Japanese 
struck Pearl Harbor. 

Following the war, Ginnetti mar- 
ried Margaret Scott and resumed 



work in the field of carpentry. In 
1947, he was elected recording sec- 
retary of Local 1050, and he held 
that position for 18 years. 

In 1952, Ginnetti was appointed 
Organizer for the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict Council of Philadelphia, and, 
in 1954, former General President 
M. A. Hutcheson appointed him as 
a general representative. 

In 1961, Ginnetti was elected vice 
president of the Pennsylvania State 
Council of Carpenters. Three years 
later, he was elected vice president 
of the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO, and 
he became a member of the Execu- 
tive Council. In 1972, he became 
president of the Pennsylvania State 
Council. 

Ginnetti is presently a member of 
Pearl Harbor Survivors Association 
Bell Chapter No. 1 and a charter 
member of Sons of Italy Delaware 
Valley Labor Leaders Lodge. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Ginnetti 
have three children — Ronald, Ray- 
mond, and Margaret Molt. 



Annual Budget 

For City Family 

Of Four 

Tops $20,000 



Soaring prices pushed the govern- 
ment's hypothetical annual budget for 
the typical American city family of 
four to $20,517, last fall, a sharp rise 
of 10.2% from the previous year. 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics esti- 
mates also that an urban family living 
at a lower, more austere level would 
have needed $12,585 a year in 1979, 
while a family on a higher budget af- 
fording a few luxuries would have re- 
quired $30,317. The lower budget esti- 
mate was 9% higher than a year 
earlier, the higher budget 10.6% more. 

The budget levels, reflecting the cost 
of goods and services as of last Oc- 
tober, have since been outdated by 
further increases in consumer prices. 
Taking into account rises in the gov- 
ernment's consumer price index from 
October through March, as well as 
higher federal income and social secu- 
rity taxes, the AFL-CIO's Department 
of Research estimates the intermediate 



budget today would be $21,981, the 
lower budget, $13,480, and the higher 
budget $32,676. 

Many American families fall far 
short of the middle-level living stand- 
ard reflected by the intermediate bud- 
get. The Census Bureau reports that 
the median income of .all families with 
one wage earner in 1978 — the latest 
year for which it has statistics — was 
$14,239. 

Other U.S. households have annual 
incomes that fall even below the gov- 
ernment's poverty guideline, which in 
1979 was $7,410. Meanwhile, all 
Americans face eroding purchasing 
power as inflation rages close to the 
20% mark. 

The latest family budget estimates, 
like those of previous years, are for a 
precisely defined urban family — a 38- 
year-old man employed full time, his 
nonworking wife, and their 13-year- 
old boy and eight-year-old girl. The 
couple is assumed to have been mar- 
ried 15 years, and the family is settled 
in the community. The husband is an 
experienced worker, and the family 
has an average inventory of clothing, 
house furnishings, major durables, and 
other equipment. 

The budgets, which are based on a 
hypothetical list of goods and services 
drawn up by BLS in the mid-1960s, do 



not represent how families actually do 
or should spend their money, the gov- 
ernment emphasizes. Rather, they re- 
flect assumptions about the manner of 
living at each of three relative stand- 
ards of city living. Nearly three- 
fourths of all Americans live in cities 
and metropolitan areas. 

While the government does not pre- 
pare budgets for rural families, it does 
compare differences between metro- 
politan and non-metropolitan areas. 
Metropolitan areas are those with over 
1 million people and non-metropolitan 
areas have populations between 2,500 
and 50,000. 

For the lower budget, costs were 
6.3% higher in metropolitan areas 
than in less urban areas. The metro- 
nonmetro differences were 12.2% for 
the intermediate and 18% for the 
higher. Total budget levels were lowest 
in small cities in the South. 

BLS said the intermediate and 
higher budgets rose more than the 
lower budget last year because of large 
increases in homeowner costs and 
social security contributions. 

The Social Security contribution 
rate rose to 6.13% from 1978 to 1979, 
and the maximum income on which 
contributions are made increased from 
$17,700 to $22,900. 



JUNE, 1980 



feGOuM ftoir fc §8)§ 

moRE uiomEn will BEtomE 







• • • 



noDinc strehcth to unions 



By JOYCE D. MILLER 

President, Coalition of 
Labor Union Women 



'The increase of women in 
unions has kept nowhere near 
the pace of the increase of 
women entering the labor 
force.' 



'Union women know that there 
is no greater avenue to 
economic equality than a union 
contract.' 




JOYCE 
MILLER 



In addition to being president of the 
Coalition of Labor Union Women 
(CLUW), Ms. Miller is vice presi- 
dent and director of social services 
for the Amalgamated Clothing and 
Textile Workers Union, as well as 
executive director of the Sidney Hill- 
man Foundation. She was a motivat- 
ing force in the establishment of 
CLUW in 1977 and became its first 
president. While serving as a leader in 
other women's organizations, she is 
also a member of various government 
and labor committees and councils. 
Holding advanced degrees from the 
University of Chicago, she began her 
work life as an assembler for the 
Leaf Gum Company of Chicago and 
as a wrapper for Marshall Field's. 



One of the most profound changes 
in the social, economic and political 
climate of this country has been the 
vast increase in the role women have 
come to play in the labor force. Over 
the past three decades, unprecedented 
numbers of women have entered the 
labor force and are literally reshaping 
the market place. 

There is no doubt that Americans 
have witnessed tremendous improve- 
ments in the status of the working 
woman. Equal opportunity laws have 
been enacted which have resulted in 
both the improvement of wages and 
in the hiring and promotions of 
women; obtaining credit has been 
made easier; more women are enroll- 
ing in college in non-traditional fields, 
such as chemistry, mathematics, biol- 
ogy and engineering. We have seen 
women move into jobs traditionally 
reserved for and dominated by males. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

In unions, it has been gratifying to 
see an increase in the number of 
women trade unionists now serving on 
international union executive boards. 
In addition, many unions have estab- 
lished women's departments to deal 
with the special concerns of their 
female members. 

Women have been an active part of 
the American labor movement since 
its inception. The struggles of working 
women have been waged since the 
very beginning of trade union history. 
But not nearly enough is known about 
women's role in labor history. Women 
have earned their place in the labor 
movement — they have fought for it 
and they have died for it. 

As far back as 1824, it was women 
weavers who struck in solidarity with 
their male coworkers to defeat man- 
agement attempts to cut back wages 



and increase hours. It was women who 
launched the first trade union press in 
New England mill towns exposing the 
dangerous hazards and conditions in 
the mills. Connecticut women worked 
in the New England Workingman's 
Association for the first child labor 
laws passed in 1842. During the sec- 
ond half of the 19th and early part of 
the 20th century, it was women union- 
ists who were in the forefront of all 
the fights for the eight hour day and 
the 40 hour week. 

Women formed their own unions — 
the United Tailoresses — as early as 
1825 and struck for higher wages and 
better working conditions. 

The Women's trade Union League, 
made up of union women and social 
activists outside the trade union move- 
ment, was formed in 1903 and partici- 
pated in union drives, strikes, and 
political activity. The Hart Schaffner 
and Marx strike of 1910 was led by 
14 young women involving finally, 
over 45,000 workers, resulting in the 
recognition of a union in 1914. 

Not many history books record the 
death of Fannie Selkins, a mine work- 
ers' organizer; or Ida Brayman who 
was shot and killed during the Gar- 
ment Workers' struggle in Rochester 
in 1931; or Ella Mae Wiggins, a Tex- 
tile strike leader in 1929. The work of 
Mother Jones has been widely docu- 
mented with her involvement with 
women's and children's issues — such 
as child labor laws — and her continued 
efforts to organize mine workers. 

SHIRTWAIST WORKERS 

During these hard times of strikes 
and struggles for decent working con- 
ditions, and a living wage, the em- 
ployees of the Triangle Shirtwaist Co. 
were experiencing circumstances com- 
mon in the industry in 1910 — weeks 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



of unemployment, employees paying 
for needles, electricity, boxes on 
which they sat during working hours, 
paying for damaged work, employers 
setting back clocks to cheat employees 
for time worked, etc. They belonged 
to a company union and met secretly 
to try to join the International Ladies' 
Garment Workers Union. Workers 
were tricked into acknowledging out- 
side union membership, and were sub- 
sequently laid off with the excuse that 
there was no work. Immediately ad- 
vertisements appeared for new shirt- 
waist operators and the laid off em- 
ployees went on strike. Prostitutes and 
thugs were hired to fight the pickets, 
and scabs replaced the striking work- 
ers. Following a rousing speech by 
Clara Lemlich, an executive board 
member of Local 25 of the ILGWU, 
the general strike began. 

After much bloodshed, imprison- 
ment and tremendous personal sacri- 
fice, 339 shops settled, and in about 
300 most terms were agreed to. 

Workers at the Triangle Shirtwaist 
Co. returned to work without a union 
contract. On March 25, 1911, the 
tragic fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist 
Co. occurred. 146 workers, mostly 
women and girls jumped to their 
deaths because the factory doors were 
locked to keep out Union Organizers. 

During times of war, the Civil War, 
World War I and World War II, new 
occupations were opened to women, 
first in office work, in nursing — in the 
1860s — then as teachers and govern- 
ment employees. Female bookkeepers 
in the 1860's received $500 a year — - 
while males doing the same job — 
$1800. 

During World War I women were 
placed in more and more positions 
that were left void by men. They be- 
gan driving ambulances and taking 
over most office jobs. During World 
War II women became the back bone 
in the factories, supplying the Armed 
Forces with arms, ships and planes. 
They drove buses, tractors and trains. 
Women held non-traditional jobs be- 
cause of the country's dire need for 
workers. Again industry was discover- 
ing that women could do the jobs as 
well as men. However, as soon as a 
peace time economy returned, men 
were rehired and women once again 
were searching for decent paying jobs. 
Higher paying blue collar jobs were 
no longer available to women. 

Today, there are 41 million women 
in the workforce, who are still fighting 



for equal pay for equal work per- 
formed, in order to satisfy their 
economic need. 

This need is especially pronounced 
for the 7.5 million families that have 
female-headed households where over 
60% of the female heads must work. 
As of 1976, 43% of all women in the 
labor force are single, widowed, 
separated or divorced. They work to 
support themselves and their depend- 
ents. The important point is that 
women are not "secondary" workers; 
nor are they working for "pin money." 
Rather, they work because they must 
— trying to maintain a decent stand- 
ard of living. 

CHANGES IN THE ROLE 

In view of the current picture, at- 
tention must be given to the strides 
women have made over the past few 
decades. No longer is sex discrimina- 
tion quietly tolerated, nor do women 
workers blindly accept secondary 
status. Changes in the role of women 
within the family, as well as within the 
workplace and the larger society are 
coming to dominate the consciousness 
of policy makers in government, busi- 
ness and unions. The growing voice 
of women with legitimate claims of 
injustice continues to provoke long 
overdue changes and progress in many 
areas. 

One of the most effective avenues 
for the redress of inequality is the 
growing activity of women in unions. 
But the increase of women in unions 
has kept nowhere near the pace of 
the increase of women entering the 
labor force. The rate of unionization 
among women workers is currently 
12%, compared with approximately 
33% among men. In numbers, nearly 
15 million men are represented by 
unions, compared to less than 5 mil- 
lion women. 

Union women know that there is 
no greater avenue to economic equal- 
ity than a union contract. In addition 
to the number of women on executive 
boards of international unions, women 
have also been appointed to standing 
committees of the AFL-CIO and a 
woman serves in the AFL-CIO Civil 
Rights Department to deal with the 
problems of women unionists through- 
out the federation. There are ever- 
increasing numbers of stories about 
women in the labor press. 

In their quests to achieve their right- 
ful place in labor unions, and in the 



job marketplace, the Coalition of 
Labor Union Women was launched 
in 1974 to work within the framework 
of the labor movement and to achieve 
the four main goals : 

1. To strengthen the role and par- 
ticipation of women within their 
unions and within the entire 
trade union movement; 

2. To seek affirmative action in the 
workplace, and to obtain equal 
rights for women in hiring, pro- 
motion, classification and pay; 

3. To encourage union women to 
play an active role in the legisla- 
tive and political processes of 
their unions and the nation; 

4. To organize the millions of un- 
organized women workers. 

CLUW enables union women from 
over 60 national and international 
unions to link their efforts with other 
women's groups in support of health 
security, full employment, OSHA, 
child care, equal opportunity and 
equal pay for all workers, and passage 
of the Equal Rights Amendment. 

Through its efforts and accomplish- 
ments, CLUW has been recognized 
by the labor movement and elected 
officials throughout the country. 
CLUW has alerted many unions and 
employers as well, to the needs of 
workers. 

FEWER LEADERS 

Women still have a long way to go. 
Few have risen to leadership positions 
in industry and in the labor move- 
ment. On the average, women today 
are earning only 57% of men's earn- 
ings, putting women who head fami- 
lies into the poverty category six times 
more often than those headed by men. 
Women are still working out of 
economic need, as they did when 
Mother Jones, Fannie Selkins, Ida 
Brayman, Clara Lemlich, Pauline 
Newman, Dorothy Belanca and Bessie 
Hillman were in the forefront leading 
strikers to achieve decent economic 
standards. 

There have been many changes and 
many improvements in recent years; 
changes and improvements long over- 
due the 51.3% of the entire popula- 
tion of this country. As the popular 
commercial says, "You've come a long 
way, Baby." However, what it doesn't 
say is, "But, Baby, you still have a 
long way to go." 



JUNE, 1980 



11 




Brotherhood 
members Employed 
in many. 
Diversified 
Industries 



Approximately one out of every four members of our organization 
is an industrial worker. The Brotherhood's new and vigorous 
Industrial Section serves a wide variety of allied trades. 



The United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America has 
expanded its membership over the 
years to include a broad and diverse 
scope of interest, while maintaining 
its primary jurisdiction as defined by 
its charter from the American Federa- 
tion of Labor. 

U.S. and Canadian workers seeking 
union representation and assistance in 
dealing with management, no matter 
what their occupation, have received a 
receptive ear from Brotherhood leaders. 

Carpenters, millwrights, piledrivers, 
and other construction craftsmen, still 
make up almost three-quarters of the 
total membership, but the industrial 
section is growing steadily. Today, 
more than one out of four members of 
the Brotherhood is employed in our 
industrial jurisdiction. We have in our 
ranks not only lumber and sawmill 
workers and workers in prefabricated 
housing, but we also have members 
who work in plants which manufacture 
casket hardware, rings and jewelry, 
guitars and banjos, fire apparatus, wire 
harnesses, and much more. 

In some cases, the Brotherhood's 
expanded jurisdiction has evolved from 
its historic past. Today's Millwrights, 
for example, work almost exclusively 
with metals, installing conveyors, set- 
ting up huge turbines, installing ma- 
chinery in mills. But the earliest 
millwrights, who were some of the first 
craftsmen to join the Brotherhood 
back in the 1880's, worked primarily 
with wood, creating wooden gears, 
turntables, and water wheels for early 
grist mills and the early textile mills 
of the Northeast United States and 
Canada. 

Commercial underwater divers are 
also in the jurisdiction of the Brother- 
hood. How did this come to be? Be- 
cause in the early days of this century, 
Dock Builders, who worked with big 
wooden pilings and massive planking 
to create the docks and wharfs of our 
major ports — and who have always 



been members of the Brotherhood — 
needed divers to go into the murky 
waters of harbors and set pilings and 
remove obstructions. To protect such 
workers, the Brotherhood appealed to 
the AFL and obtained permission to 
enroll them in the organization. 

Lumber and sawmill workers needed 
protection from exploitation, too, and 
they came to the Brotherhood for 
assistance. Today the Western Council 
of Lumber, Production, and Industrial 
Workers and the Southern Council of 
Industrial Workers, which also con- 
tains large numbers of lumber and 
sawmill workers, are two of the most 
dynamic subdivisions of the Brother- 
hood. 

As unorganized workers come to us 
for help and no other union is pre- 
pared to represent them, our leaders 
consider the advantages of Brother- 
hood representation for all concerned 
and make decisions. 

As a consequence, the UBC repre- 
sents peat-moss gatherers in the Mari- 
time Provinces of Canada, musical 
instrument makers in the Middle West 
(the founder of the Brotherhood, Peter 
McGuire, was at one time a piano 
maker, incidentally), manufacturers of 
fiberglass canopies and fiberglass boats 
(boat builders have long been mem- 
bers of the Brotherhood), producers 
of portable toilets in Ohio and toilet 
seats in Mississippi, and a host of more 
interesting and unusual occupations. 

The changing makeup of the 
Brotherhood parallels changes in the 
American labor movement itself. 

The American Federation of Labor 
recognized in the aftermath of World 
War I and during the years of the 
Great Depression that a great mass of 
unorganized workers was being ex- 
ploited in North America's major 
industries without effective support 
from the trade unions. With protec- 
tions afforded organized labor by The 
Wagner Act (The Labor-Management 
Relations Act) under the New Deal 



of President Franklin Roosevelt, an 
AFL drive was formed to unionize 
auto workers, steelworkers, and others. 
As the big industrial plants were or- 
ganized, attempts were made to bring 
every wage earner in the plant into one 
big bargaining unit — one "catch-all" 
local union. This was called "vertical 
organizing" i.e., from top to bottom. 
This approach soon caused disputes 
with the traditional craft unions, which 
organized "horizontally," creating bar- 
gaining units limited to their own 
skilled crafts. 

Two factions formed in the AFL — 
one determined to protect craft and 
industry jurisdictions, led by the Broth- 
erhood's General President William 
Hutcheson, and the other determined 
to wrest control of the AFL for the 
great masses of industrial workers with 
no regard for craft or industry juris- 
dictions, led by John L. Lewis of the 
Mine Workers. 

Lewis and his faction walked out of 
the AFL and formed the Congress of 
Industrial Organizations, and for two 
decades the AFL and the CIO were at 
loggerheads, raiding each other's juris- 
dictions. 

This finally came to an end with the 
signing of a no-raiding pact between 
the AFL and the CIO and the eventual 
merger of the two organizations in 
1955. 

In the quarter century which has 
elapsed since that historic occasion, 
united American labor has turned its 
attention back to its major objectives: 
organizing the unorganized, improving 
wages and working conditions. 

As technology and science create 
new products and services throughout 
the North American continent, new 
occupations and new job classifications 
will come into being. Many specialty 
workers still unheard of may some 
day be proudly wearing the union 
button of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 




The rich soil of eastern Arkansas, along 
the west bank of the Mississippi River, is 
ideal for growing rice. Brotherhood 
members are employed in Arkansas by a 
major rice producer in all phases of 
production — drying the grain, processing 
it, and maintaining the plants and 
equipment. 



Commercial divers of Pile Drivers Local 
2375, Los Angeles, Calif., do under- 
water work offshore. The first Brother- 
hood divers, a half century ago, assisted 
Dock Builders in setting pilings and 
performing other underwater tasks. To- 
day our diver-members have much work 
throughout North America in the off- 
shore petroleum industry. 



At Culver City, Calif., Brotherhood 
members manufacture commercial and 
military helicopters as well as ordnance 
systems and vehicles for the US space 
program. This all grew out of Howard 
Hughes' efforts during World War II to 
develop the famous H-4 plywood Flying 
Boat, once called the "Flying Spruce 
Goose." 




At a plant in East Texas members of 
Local 2713, near the small Community 
of Center, produce top quality parquet 
flooring from Southern hardwoods. These 
members are inspecting and packing the 
parquet squares for shipment. Several 
years ago this local union sponsored a 
housing development for its members 
and their families. 



Molded toilet seats, padded toilet seats, 
and other bathroom products are the 
specialties of the Beneke Corp. of 
Mississippi. The finished seats on the 
conveyor system, which are shown in 
the photograph above, are manufactured 
by members of Local 2445 and are 
shipped all over North America and 
the world. 



Many members are employed in the 
mobile home industry, and many work 
in the prefabrication of housing. The 
units shown above were small, welU 
insulated units prepared by West Coast 
members for shipment to Alaska. They 
served as housing for workers on the 
Alaska Pipeline. They were shipped by 
barge from Long Beach, California. 



The picture at right 
looks like a news 
photo of a major naval 
battle, but it's not. It's 
a collection of model 
naval vessels created 
by Brotherhood mem- 
bers in Hollywood, 
Calif., for a major 
movie. One of the 
vessels and the work- 
shop in which it was 
created is shown at 
far right. 




JUNE, 1980 



13 



Ottawa 
Report 




SUPPORT OF BOISE CASCADE STRIKERS 

The Executive Council of the Canadian 
Labour Congress has expressed its full 
support for members of Lumber and Saw- 
mill Workers Local 2693 on strike 
against Boise Cascade Canada, Ltd. in 
Fort Frances, Ont. and Kenora, Ont. 
CLC has resolved to make every effort 
possible to resolve the conflict and 
bring the company back to the bargain- 
ing table. 

The unions representing employees of 
the multinational in collective bar- 
gaining agreements are the Canadian 
Paperworkers' Union, United Paperwork- 
ers' International Union, International 
Association of Machinists, Interna- 
tional Brotherhood of Electrical Work- 
ers, International Union of Operating 
Engineers, and the Office and Profes- 
sional Employees International Union. 

VICTORY OVER RADIO SHACK 

The United Steelworkers of America 
have scored a bittersweet victory in 
their ongoing battle with Radio Shack, 
a division of Tandy Corp. 

After a long and bitter strike that 
was riddled with company spying and 
harassment, a 200-member local union 
finally managed to win a contract from 
Radio Shack. Not only did the union 
win union security (Rand Formula) from 
the company, but the Steelworkers 
became the first union in the world to 
have wrangled a contract from Radio 
Shack. 

Unfortunately the union's battle 
hasn't ended. Just as things seemed to 
be quietening down, the company decided 
to pursue its anti-union course, firing 
two and laying off 11 of the strikers 
including all but one of the local 
union executive. 



THE MICHELIN SITUATION 

Gerald Yetman, Nova Scotia Federation 
of Labour president, challenged the 
federal government recently to include 
specific obligations upon the Michelin 
Tire Company before they get any addi- 
tional federal grants. 

Yetman said that any subsidized plant 
to be located in Nova Scotia should 
employ Nova Scotians first and people 
from the location primarily. After the 
company meets that obligation and uses 
the period of plant construction to 
train Nova Scotians for the jobs, they 
should have to hire workers in the tire 
industry from plants which are closing 
down. 

"For example," he said, "there are 
reports of 650 rubber workers losing 
their jobs at the Whitby, Ontario, 
Firestone Plant." 

Questioning whether foreign owned 
and controlled multinationals should be 
given huge grants without meeting' spe- 
cific obligations, Yetman said "perhaps 
when such great amounts, which will be 
in excess of flOO million for the Nova 
Scotia plants, are given the government 
should demand an equity position in 
the company." 

Yetman charged that Michelin Tire has 
put the Canadian government as well as 
the province in "serious straits" say- 
ing that by "using threats with the 
government of Nova Scotia in 1971 
Michelin was able to get legislation 
to prevent strikes at their Granton 
plant during the construction period." 



CLC URGES ARGENTINA BOYCOTT 

The Canadian Labour Congress along 
with affiliates, church groups and 
civil libertarians, on March 24 marked 
the fourth anniversary of the seizure 
of power by the military junta in 
Argentina, by calling on the federal 
government to, among other things, halt 
any further sales of Candu reactors 
to Argentina. 

Four years ago in March the General 
Jurge Videla, with the support of the 
military, seized power, overthrowing 
the democratically elected government. 

In four short years since Videla 
took power more than 15,000 people have 
disappeared and more than 8,000 jailed 
for their alleged opposition to the 
military dictatorship. Although the 
junta had set out to destroy the 
Argentinian trade union movement, 
Videla had until early April used ad 
hoc means including imprisonment, tor- 
ture and death, to stop the labour 
movement from continuing its fight 
against the repressive regime. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



CLIC Works For You 
In Many Ways 



Political Action Is 
Eueryone's Business 



Election year 1980 is a crucial year 
for the Brotherhood, as it is for all 
Americans, and we in the trade union 
movement have a special obligation to 
participate in political affairs. Whether 
we like it or not, Congress makes more 
and more decisions which affect our 
lives and our ability to improve our 
wages and working conditions. If we 
do not speak up now and actively take 
part, especially this year, our nation's 
political strength could easily fall into 
the arms of the wealthy and privileged 
special interest groups of our country. 



14 YEARS OF WORK 

The Carpenters' Legislative Improve- 
ment Committee, referred to as CLIC, 
was founded in 1966 because the 
Brotherhood recognized the great need 
for legislative work on Capitol Hill. 
CLIC is the Brotherhood's voluntary 
political program which allows our 
members to have an effective voice in 
the nation's political process. By soli- 
citing voluntary contributions from 
Brotherhood members it, in turn, of- 
fers donations to candidates for the 
United State Senate and the House of 
Representatives who will best serve 
the needs and interests of Brother- 
hood members in particular and all 
working people in general. 

The Brotherhood's Legislative De- 
partment works on Capitol Hill for 
passage of laws in the interest of our 
members. But the laws passed by Con- 
gress are only as good as the people 
who make them, and in this day of 
mass media, political campaigning is 
a very expensive business. Samuel 
Gompers stated many years ago that 
labor must support its friends and de- 
feat its enemies. This is where CLIC 
fits in. The friends of organized labor 
who run for public office depend on 
our voluntary contributions for sup- 
port, to counteract the wealthy special 
interests that often bankroll labor's 
opponents. 



All funds spent by CLIC for politi- 
cal campaigns come from voluntary 
contributions of Brotherhood mem- 
bers. CLIC collects these contributions 
in several ways. 

One way is through the local union. 
Every year CLIC mails receipt books 
and decals to local unions and asks the 
local financial secretaries to solicit one 
or more dollars from each of their 
members as a contribution. Each indi- 
vidual who makes a donation becomes 
a charter member of CLIC, and those 
who contribute ten dollars receive a 
special CLIC lapel pin. All local 
unions who give to the fund are given 
special credit by publication. CLIC 
also collects contributions at State 
Council conventions. 



CHECKOFF SYSTEM 

Finally, CLIC accumulates funds by 
means of a checkoff list. All of the 
Brotherhood's General Officers and 
General Representatives, and approxi- 
mately 800 of our members, feel that 
CLIC is so important that they con- 
tribute 1 % of their income, on a reg- 
ular basis, to the Committee. This type 
of support has allowed CLIC to be as 
successful and as effective as it is 
today. 

Complete and well-audited books 
are kept on all CLIC receipts and ex- 
penditures. In addition, CLIC is in full 
compliance with the stringent account- 
ing and reporting requirements of the 
new Federal Election Commission. 
This Act requires that all money used 
by organized labor for political pur- 
poses come from voluntary sources. 

CLIC campaign contributions are 
made where they will do the most 
good. Our legislative staff recommends 
candidates who, on the basis of their 
past performance and future prospects, 
will help advance labor's goals. Over 
the years CLIC has supported candi- 
dates from both political parties and 




CLIC Director and General Treasurer 
Charles Nichols displays three types of 
certificates available to Brotherhood 
members who voluntarily contribute 1% 
of their salaries to the CLIC program. The 
small certificate in his right hand is a 
pocket-sized certificate of membership. 
Below it is a larger version of the cer- 
tificate of membership which is suitable 
for framing and which is also awarded to 
each individual member contributing 1%. 
Finally, the largest certificate at the bot- 
tom is presented to local unions in honor 
of their members who belong to the 
CLIC 1 % Voluntary Payroll Deduction 
Club. 



from all sections of the country. All 
of these candidates have been able to 
get their message to voters with the 
help of CLIC. 



EVERYONE'S BUSINESS 

CLIC receives contributions from 
many dedicated and concerned mem- 
bers of the Brotherhood. Yet, many 
members still do not realize how im- 
portant political action is and how 
devastating the setbacks to labor would 
be if the conservative, anti-labor forces 
ever get control of Congress. The truth 
of the matter is that in a democracy, 
politics is everyone's business. The 
laws passed by Congress have, and will 
continue to have, especially great im- 
pact on those of us in the building 
trades. Your contribution to CLIC is 
your way of being heard. It is your 
investment in a Congress that will be 
responsive to the needs and goals of all 
working people in the United States. 



JUNE, 1980 



15 



Brotherhood members 
Fight o Dreaded Disease 



A medical scientist at the New 
England Medical Center Hospital 
in Boston examines the tissue cul- 
tures from his laboratory and pond- 
ers his next moves. He is Dr. John 
Growdon of the Department of 
Neurology conducting research un- 
der a grant from the American 
Parkinson's Disease Association. 

In a medical laboratory at the 
Washington University School of 
Medicine in St. Louis, Mo., another 
researcher studies an array of test 
tubes and makes pencil notations in 
a record book. He is Dr. George 
Frederick Wooten, Jr., studying 
"Age Related Changes in the 
Plasticity of Basic Ganglia Neuron" 
under a research grant from the 
American Parkinson's Disease As- 
sociation. 

Both men are exploring the basic 
chemistry of the human body, 
searching, ever searching for better 
ways to treat Parkinson's disease. 

The basic treatment for the dis- 
ease today is a pharmaceutical called 
L-Dopa, discovered and developed 
by Dr. George Cotzias. L-Dopa has 
lengthened and saved lives, as it 
alleviates suffering, but it is not the 
final answer for many Parkinson's 
disease patients. It produces un- 
comfortable side effects for some 
patients, and it does not cure. So 
the search for new drugs goes on. 

Parkinson's Disease is a disorder 
of bodily movement. Its main fea- 
tures are difficulty in starting move- 
ment and slowness of movement, 
stiffness or resistance to passive 
movement, and shaking (tremor). 

It affects mainly older people of 
either sex. It is rare before the age 
of 40 and most common in persons 
over 60. It is estimated that as many 
as a million and a half people in the 
United States are affected. Some 
cases are steadily progressive if un- 
treated, but others remain mild for 
years. 

Last year, the American Parkin- 
son's Disease Association made re- 
search grants to 23 medical scientists 
at 20 institutions across North 



America. Men and women are at 
work under APDA grants at such 
institutions as the University of 
Miami Department of Pharma- 
cology, the Rutgers Medical School 
at Piscataway, N.J., the East Ten- 
nessee State University College of 
Medicine in Johnson City, Tenn., 
and the Mount Sinai School of 
Medicine in New York. 

Aided by funds contributed to the 
Brotherhood's Parkinson's Disease 
Campaign, medical science is slowly 
but surely solving the puzzles of the 
dreaded disease. 

Today's victims of the disease are 
being treated at 15 clinical centers. 
Information about the disease is 
being distributed at these centers, as 
well. 

The United Brotherhood has been 
leading the fund-raising drive of the 
American Parkinson's Disease Asso- 
ciation for the past five years. Since 
1975 the Brotherhood has sponsored 
special fund-raising dinners and 
solicited funds through The Carpen- 
ter, your official magazine. 

The Carpenter magazine has pub- 
lished a list of donors to the cam- 
paign in recent issues. It plans to do 
so again in the future. 

We urge you to contribute to the 
1980 drive now. If you have already 
contributed once, why not make a 
second donation to this worthy 
cause? 





General President Emeritus William 
Sidel, as national campaign chairman for 
APDA, appeared on a New York tele- 
vision show with Pia Lindstrom (daughter 
of Actress Ingrid Bergman), right, to 
discuss the problems of Parkinson's 
disease sufferers. Ms. Lindstrom was 
hostess of the talk show. 



Patients with Parkinson's disease fre- 
quently have difficulty walking due to 
postural instability, shuffling, and diffi- 
culty initiating walking. If specific prob- 
lems with walking are not solved by the 
suggestions noted below, a more specific 
program of physical activity may be in- 
dicated. (If this occurs, a physical ther- 
apist in your area should be contacted 
after an evaluation by your physician to 
make appropriate recommendations). 

1. When walking or standing, your 
feet should be spread apart approxi- 
mately 10 inches for better balance. Do 
not allow your feet to cross or balance 
will be impaired and lost. 

2. Exaggerate lifting up your feet as 
if marching when walking. This avoids 
the tendency to shuffle and scuff. Con- 
centrate on lifting toes when walking 
to avoid tripping. Stepping over low 
objects placed on the floor will help 
you to improve the height of your 
steps. When first trying this, have some- 
one stand by in case of balance loss. 

3. Consciously exaggerate your nor- 
mal arm swing when walking. This im- 
proves the cadence of walking and 
eliminates the look of being stiff and 
rigid. Practice can be improved by hold- 
ing a rolled magazine in each hand and 
by placing weights in purses or objects 
which act as weighted pendulums. When 
walking, you should make every attempt 
to look straight ahead and not at the 
floor. 

4. Take as large steps as possible 
when walking. This can be accentuated 
by placing magazines or objects on the 
floor and trying to walk over these 
objects without stepping on them. 

The "Walking Hints" for Parkin- 
son's Disease sufferers, above, are 
from the booklet Home Exercises 
for Patients with Parkinson's Dis- 
ease, distributed by the American 
Parkinson's Disease Association. 
Your contribution to APDA makes 
such booklets possible. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 




Haue Vou and Vour Local Contributed? 



Aid to those who suffer from the dreaded Parkinson's Disease is the special 
cause of the three-quarters of a million members of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. If every member of the Brotherhood con- 
tributes at least one dollar to the American Parkinson's Disease Association's 
1980 Drive, think of how much we can do to relieve suffering, aid research for 
a cure, and educate doctors and citizens to the nature of the disease. But give 
more than a dollar. (Every contribution of $5 or more will be gratefully 
acknowledged.) 

GIVE GENEROUSLY to the Special Brotherhood Drive! 



1. Pull Out The Envelope 

2. Insert Your Contribution 

3. Enclose The Completed Coupon 
Below 

4. Mail It All Back To The General 
Office Right Away! 



The APDA is not one of the "glamour" charities. It does not 
share in revenues from the United Way or other federated 
drives. Your contribution is direct and more meaningful. 



Send cash, check or money order. Make 
check or money order payable to: The 
American Parkinson's Disease Association. 

Fill out the coupon below and mail with 
your contribution in this postage-paid 
envelope. 

Be sure to give us your local union 
number, so we can credit your contribu- 
tion along with those of your fellow 
members. 




CUP COUPON AND INSERT IN ENVELOPE WITH DONATION 




Yes, I want to help. I want to show what Brotherhood members can 
accomplish when they join in a worthy cause. Here's my cash, check or 
money order amounting to: $ __. 



Won't You Help? Your 

contribution is tax 

deductible. 



NAME 




LOCAL NO. 


ADDRESS 


CITY 


SIGNATURE 


State or Province 


Zip 



JUNE, 1980 



17 



$3 




Two 1980 Training Seminars Held 
Ht George Itleaau Labor Studies tenter 



At the end of April and in early 
May, two of the Brotherhood's three 
leadership training seminars sched- 
uled for 1980 were held at the 
AFL-CIO Labor Studies Center in 
Silver Spring, Md. The training 
classes were directed toward new 
fulltime local and district council 
officers and business representatives 
of the United Brotherhood. From 
April 27-May 3, 35 members of 
the Brotherhood participated in the 
seminar. From May 4-May 10, 30 
participated. 



Participants in these first two 
seminars received training in leader- 
ship skills and instruction in the 
law of labor-management relations. 
In addition, they were presented 
with reviews of the Davis Bacon 
Act and of collective bargaining de- 
velopments. 

Participants spent one day during 
each of the week-long sessions at 
the General Headquarters in Wash- 
ington. Here they were addressed by 
General President Konyha and the 



other General Officers, and they 
were given a tour of the building. 
A graduation ceremony was held on 
the final night of the training semi- 
nar at the Labor Studies Center, 
and each participant received a di- 
ploma for successfully completing 
the course. 

A third and final training seminar 
for fulltime local and district coun- 
cil officers has been scheduled at 
the George Meany Labor Studies 
Center for July 20-25. 




One day of each week-long seminar was spent at the General Office in downtown Washington, D.C., where the General 
Officers discussed with seminar participants the problems of the Brotherhood and the future plans of the organization. From left, 
above, the officers include: General Secretary John Rogers, First General Vice President Pat Campbell, Second General Vice 
President Siguard Luccasen, General Treasurer Charles Nichols, and General President William Konyha. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 




FIRST 1980 TRAINING SEMINAR — These are the names, titles, and home cities of participants in the Training Seminar at the 
George Meany Labor Studies Center from April 27-May 3. (SHOWN ABOVE.) 



Donald J. Andrews, Organizer, Washington D. C. District Council, 

Washington, D.C. 
Gene Bergstrom, FS & BR, Local 1258, Pocatello, Id. 
Fred Bogsrud, FS, Local 751, Santa Rosa, Calif. 
Douglas Bone, Asst. BR, Local 1263, Atlanta, Ga. 
Mark Wesley Boyd, FS & BR, Local 635, Boise, Id. 
Fred Braito, BR, Local 483, San Francisco, Calif. 
Cletus C. Brandt, BR, Local 792, Rockford, 111. 
Ralph Branum, BR, Local 2239, Fremont, O. 
Otis P. Clutts, BR, Local 1149, Oakland, Calif. 
Charles L. Colvin, BR, Local 899, Parkersburg, W.Va. 
Walter F. Darnell, FS & BR, Local 3024, Atlanta, Ga. 
Michael J. Dooley, BR, Local 454, Philadelphia, Penn. 
Carl J. Greene, BR, Local 198, Dallas, Tex. 
Thomas W. Hancock, BR, San Diego District Council, 

SarTDiego, Calif. 
Cecil Henderson, BR, North Coast Counties District Council, 

Santa Rosa, Calif. 
Dale Henton, FS & BR, Local 400, Omaha, Neb. 
John G. Heyer, FS, Local 1108, Cleveland, O. 
Lawrence E. Hocevar, BR, Local 404, Mentor, O. 



John A. Lima, BR, Local 755, Superior, Wis. 

Lewis E. Maag, BR, Orange County District Council, Orange, Calif. 

Paul J. Makela, BR, Local 36, Oakland, Calif. 

Calvin C. Nicholls, Asst. BR, Palm Beach County District 

Council, West Palm Beach, Fla. 
John L. Orr, FS & BR, Local 190-L, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Sam Palminteri, BR, Local 488, Bronx, N.Y. 
Glen O. Parks, FS & BR, Local 88-L, Oakland, Calif. 
Neilan Polston, BR, White River Valley District Council, 

Vincennes, Ind. 
Dustin R. Price, BR, Local 400, Omaha, Neb. 
M. D. Reineke, BR, Orange County District Council, Orange, Calif. 
Bill D. Ross, BR, Local 1281, Anchorage, Ak. 
Frank X. Schnur, BR, St. Louis District Council, Local 73-L, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Carmine Sedita, BR, Local 20, Staten Island, N.Y. 
Wm. Wayne Simmons, BR, White River Valley District Council, 

Vincennes, Ind. 
James J. Taraba, BR, Local 80, Chicago, 111. 
Homer Van Horn, FS, Local 1138, Toledo, O. 
Jon J. Ward, BR, Local 448, Waukegon, 111. 



SECOND 1980 TRAINING SEMINAR — These are the names, titles, and home cities of participants in the Training Seminar at the 
George Meany Labor Studies Center from May 4-10. (SHOWN BELOW.) 



Alan N. Anderson, BR, Local 1948, Ames, la. 

John R. Batsell, Rep. North Central Texas District Council, 

Arlington, Tex. 
Leonard Calloway, FS & BR, Local 329, Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Joseph Daneff, Sr., BR, Local 400, Omaha, Neb. 
Zelda Davis, FS, Local 1447, Vero Beach, Fla. 
Salvatore DeAnni, BR, Hudson County District Council, 

Ridgefield, N.J. 
James Michael Eunice, Asst. BR, Palm Beach County District 

Council, West Palm Beach, Fla. 
Ray Girves, BR, Local 1281, Anchorage, Ak. 
E. Wayne Glotfelty, BR, Northwest Indiana District Council, 

La Porte, Ind. 
Harlow Haagensen, FS, Local 20, Staten Island, N.Y. 
Glenn R. Jones, Asst. BR, Local 30, Evansville, Ind. 
James B. Kerlee, Asst. BR, Local 1597, Bremerton, Wash. 
Charles B. Maddera, Organizer, Broward County District Council, 

Ft. Lauderdale. Fla. 



William R. Martin, Asst. BR, Local 1216, Mesa, Ariz. 

Gary Moran, BR, Local 1906, Philadelphia, Penn. 

Keith Mulholland, BR, Local 906, Glendale, Ariz. 

George Powell, BR, Local 1890, Conroe, Tex. 

Pierre B. Sain, BR, Local 2375, Wilmington, Calif. 

Sam Schafer, BR, Houston District Council, Houston, Tex. 

Robert Schultz, BR, Local 982, Detroit, Mich. 

Robert Shrimpton, BR, Local 400, Omaha, Neb. 

Andris J. Silins, Sec, Boston District Council, Boston, Mass. 

Robert Sopher, BR, Local 1457, Toledo, O. 

Eric J. Steinleir, Jr., Organizer, Washington, D.C. District Council, 

Washington, D. C. 
Harvey Tumbleson, Sr., Asst. BR, Local 1281, Anchorage, Ak. 
Martin C. Umlauf, BR, Local 54, Brookfield, 111. 
Norman A. Vokes, BR, Local 107, Worcester, Mass. 
Richard J. Williams, Organizer, Seattle District Council, 

Seattle, Wash. 
Timothy W. Wirth, FS & BR, Local 651, Jackson, Mich. 
George Zurow, BR, Local 1400, Santa Monica, Calif. 




local union news 



Millions for all-union projects: 



Retires at O'Hare 



Southern California Craft Unions 
Planning Huge Mortgage Fund Pool 



Several Southern California Build- 
ing Trades unions, including the Broth- 
erhood, are planning to pool hundreds 
of millions of dollars in pension funds 
to create a vast source of new mort- 
gage money for the ailing construction 
industry. 

Union officials say the fund could 
be investing $100 million a month be- 
fore the year is out. 

Aside from helping a credit-crunched 
industry and spurring job creation, 
said one leader, the program will guar- 
antee that projects are staffed com- 
pletely by union labor. 

The pension funds are loaned only 
on projects using AFL-CIO and Team- 
ster workers, and union-made building 
materials are called for. If jobs are 
completed on those conditions, they 
can qualify for union mortgage money. 

A total of 11 AFL-CIO affiliated 
construction trade unions and the 
Teamsters have taken steps to broaden 
the program to include their own pen- 
sion funds. Among the larger of these 
unions, in addition to the Brotherhood, 
are the Operating Engineers, Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers and the Laborers. 

One Building Trades leader said that 
while money occasionally would be 
loaned at below-market rates — he cited 
the recent construction of a training 
facility for the blind as an example — ■ 
funds for commercial projects would 
be at the going rate. 

"We may loan (housing money) at a 
lesser rate," he said. 

He said there were two basic reasons 
why the unions are getting more heav- 
ily into the mortgage business. 

First, he said, "we want to keep con- 
struction on a regular pace — which 
means our people work and there's 
money coming into the (pension) 
funds." 

Second, he said, union leaders are 
realizing they don't have to put "mil- 
lions and millions of dollars into the 
hands of bankers, insurance companies, 
money managers." 

"They (union leaders and members) 



don't know where their money's going" 
under those circumstances, he said. 
"This way we know it's being used in 
good ways." 

When the funds go to non-construc- 
tion or non-union jobs," he added, 
"we're getting our throats cut with our 
own money." 

California Members 
Aid Elderly Woman 

When Darrel Dietrich saw the elderly 
woman's crumbling home in Clovis, 
Calif., he was shocked. He started a drive 
to get it repaired. 

Before the utility company official was 
done, 145 people, mostly members of the 
United Brotherhood in the area, had 
donated time and materials to build 75- 
year-old Emma Traylor a new home, 
valued at $25,000 and all she needed for 
her senior years. She moved from a 
240-square-foot cottage with a leaky roof 
into a new 600-square foot cottage com- 
plete with an indoor bathroom. Brother- 
hood members put together the entire 
structure by working on weekends. 




After "25 years of loyal service" to 
Chicago's O'Hare Airport, Cleve B. 
Fitliian of Local 80, shown at center in 
the picture, has retired as superintendent 
of skilled trades. A testimonial dinner 
was held in his honor, where he was 
presented with an engraved plaque 
expressing the City of Chicago's gratitude 
for his work and a 35-year pin for his 
service to the Brotherhood. 

Shown with Fithian in the picture are 
Robert H. Larson, financial secretary of 
Local 80, left, and James J. Taraba, Local 
80 business representative, right. 



Bent Nail Award for 1980 Presented 




The Bent Nail Award for 1980 given by Local 1507, El Monte, Calif., was 
presented at the 44th Convention of California State Council of Carpenters in 
Anaheim to Harry V . Dawson, Jr., of Local 1140 after 32 years of service to the 
Brotherhood. Dawson retired last January. 

Three past recipients of the award were present. Seated left to right: Charlie 
Nichols, General Treasurer; Bill Sidcll, General President Emeritus; and Mario 
"Rocky" Sarracco, retiree. 

Standing, left to right, John Randolph, warden; Virgil Jacobson; Tony Frias, 
trustee; Richard Green, business agent, who also presented the Bent Nail 
Award, Recipient Harry Dawson, Bill Bennett, recording secretary and business 
agent, Carl Campbell, financial secretary, treasurer and business agent. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



Two Craft Ideas 




A newspaper in Oklahoma City, Okla., 
says that Brotherhood member Howard 
Ray "hit the mail on the head" when he 
erected the mail box shown above. Mrs. 
Ray says that "lots of people do double- 
takes" as they pass the house, and the 
men at work now call Ray "Hammer 
Head," she says. 

The box is made of sheet metal and is 
three feet in length. The handle is a 
12-inch utility pole sanded and varnished 
to look like the real thing. 




Forrest Handley of Local 1426, 
Elyria, O., decided that some of his old 
tools — a wooden plane, a plumb bob, 
etc. — would add ornamentation to a 
table lamp. He produced the lamp shown 
above in his spare time. 



BOYCOTT | 

Volunteers are picketing approximately 
100 Winn-Dixie stores throughout the 
U.S. Sunbelt to inform the public that 
Winn-Dixie Stores are the target of a 
nationwide boycott by the AFL-CIO. 
Bob Comeaux, national boycott coordi- 
nator, says, "Winn-Dixie is the number 
one labor law violator in the food indus- 
try today. We're glad to see this coalition 
helping to inform the public." 

The National Labor Relations Board 
is currently investigating unfair labor 
practice charges filed against Winn-Dixie 
in Raleigh, Montgomery, New Orleans, 
Atlanta, and Jacksonville, Fla., the cor- 
poration headquarters. 



VOC Committees 
Named by 2 Locals 

Two more local unions, last month, 
joined the growing number of Brother- 
hood locals renewing their volunteer 
organizing activities. 

A VOC (Volunteer Organizing Com- 
mittee) group was formed by Local 2233, 
Knoxville, Tenn., and has begun its work. 
Committee members include: Charles 
Kirby, Allen Perry, Chris Bozeman, Mary 
Glasgow, Sherry Blair, David Wilson, 
Danny Plemons Ralph Hensley, Nancy 
Newarski. 

A VOC committee was also estab- 
lished by the District Council of Kansas 
City, Mo., with James Harding as chair- 
man, and members Donald Adams and 
Henry L. Brown. 



Benevolent Members 
Get Special Cards 

Local 366 of Bronx, N.Y., is offering 
special recognition to its long-standing 
benevolent members. With the approval 
of the New York District Council, it has 
prepared, printed, and distributed to its 
benevolent members a gold card which 
states, in part: "This is to certify that 
Brother is a benevolent mem- 
ber, having attained the age of 65, retired 
from the trade and having 30 years of 
continuous membership in the United 
Brotherhood." 

On the reverse side of each card is the 
address and telephone number of the 
local union, plus the telephone numbers 
of the various fringe benefit funds. 

The cards are mailed to each eligible 
member with a letter from Financial Sec- 
retary Joseph Cardita. 



Pallet Plant Workers' 
Vote Favors Local 2633 

More than 60 employees of the Girard 
Wood Products pallet-manufacturing op- 
eration at Puyallup, Wash., recently 
voted for representation by Local 2633 
by a large majority. 

A petition for an NLRB election had 
been filed on March 12, and the election 
was held April 17, according to Dennis 
McGinnis, business representative of the 
local. A total of 85% voted for the union. 

The local union was assisted by Broth- 
erhood Representative Earle Soderman. 
The local is proceeding with contract 
negotiations. 



Women now make up nearly 50% of the 
nation's workforce and they are 
America's number one consumer power, 
a power which is especially significant 
when consumers buy union. 



A boycott is an invisible picket line. 




FREE BLUEPRINTS and TRIAL LESSON 

—for your greater success in Building 

Beginners, craftsmen, even foremen and 
superintendents, have sent for these free 
blueprints and trial lesson in Plan Reading 
as a means of trying out Chicago Tech's 
home-study Builders training. Learn how 
you can master Plan Reading— Estimat- 
ing — and the practical details of all types 
of construction in your spare time at 
home. Mail coupon below or phone 
TOLL FREE — see how you, too can pre- 
pare for a better job — higher income, or 
start your own contracting business. 
• PHONE TOLL FREE (24 HRS.) 

1-800-528-6050 Ext. 810 
CHICAGO TECH/School for Builders 

2000 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago. 111.60616 



CHICAGO TECH/School lor Builders Veterans 
Dept. CR-60, 2000 S. Michigan Ave., Check 
Chicago, III. 60616 Here l_l 

Please mail me a Free Trial Lesson, Blueprints 
and Builders Catalog. I understand there is no 
obligation — no salesman will call. 



The Perfect Gift 




The official Brotherhood 

Daymatic Self Winding 

Calendar Watch, made by 

Hamilton; yellow gold finish, 
waterproof, shockproof, 
quick-change calendar, 

expansion band, guaranteed 
in writing for one year. 

$49.50 

postpaid 

Send order and 

remittance to: 

JOHN S. ROGERS, 

General Secretary 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters 

and Joiners of America 

101 Constitution Ave, N.W. 

Washington, D.C. 20001 



NHIF 




AfiF 






STATF 


7IP 







JUNE, 1980 



21 






NJ Retirees Honored 
I 9 




Two members of Local 325, Palerson, 
NJ. — both of whom had been working 
on a multi-million dollar water treatment 
plant in Wanaque, NJ. — were honored at 
surprise parties on their recent retire- 
ments. 

Plaques were prepared for each of the 
men by their co-workers. Presentations 
of these plaques are shown in the pictures. 

In the top picture, Retiree George 
Mende receives gifts from Business Agent 
Jack Tobin. 

In the lower picture, Local President 
John Bteeker, right, presents a plaque to 
Retiree John Bettn. Recording Secretary 
William Malloy is seated at right. 




Last October, Mrs. Carrie E. Reihard, 
of Local 1806, Dallastown, Pa., retired 
from her position as a line loader at the 
Yorktown Division of the Wickes Cor- 
poration, Red Lion, Pa., after 25 years 
of service. Shown in the picture, from 
left, are: Yorktown Representative Scott 
Davis, Mrs. Reihard, and President of 
Local 1806, Bruce Lutz. 



Canada's Forests Need 
Renewing, Says Writer 

In 1979 the Canadian forest industry 
employed one out of every 10 working 
Canadians and ranked as the country's 
number-one export, reaping about $12 
billion per year. 

Yet the industry's future is in a peril- 
ous condition, endangered by short- 
sighted government policies and corpo- 
rate greed, according to Canadian labor 
columnist Michael Decter. 

Yearly, the Canadian tree harvest con- 
tinues to outstrip replanting, says Decter. 

In 1979 the Canadian Council of Re- 
source and Environment Ministers pub- 
lished an alarming report, Forestry Im- 
peratives For Canada. Unless remedial 
measures are undertaken, the report un- 
derlines, Canada will be unable to sus- 
tain the current industry, much less ex- 
pand it. With one million jobs at stake, 
prompt action is imperative. 

Considering that it takes 60 to 100 
years to regenerate forest resources in the 
Canadian Shield, the term 'renewable re- 
source' must be used with caution. In 
order to maintain a bare minimum of 
future production, it has been estimated 
that at least $100-200 million dollars in 
reforestation work per year will be 
needed. 

Currently forest operators must truck 
wood farther and farther to mills. 

In Ontario, where one third of the 
annual 400,000 acre cut is not restocked, 
companies truck wood as far as 200 
miles away. Both Newfoundland and 
New Brunswick face serious wood supply 
problems. The Alberta Government has 
taken $25 million from its Heritage Fund 
to aid reforestation in the province. But 
even this effort is small when set against 
the total problem. 

Canada has 70 million acres of in- 
adequately-stocked forest land. It is add- 
ing 500,000 acres a year to this backlog. 

It is time for serious action, says Dec- 
ter, from provincial governments as own- 
ers of the resource, from the federal gov- 
ernment as a main beneficiary of forest 
revenue, and from the industry itself. 

Pennsylvania FED 
Hears Bush of "CIO" 

In Pittsburgh, Pa., State AFL-CIO 
President Harry Boyer will never forget 
his introduction of one of the presiden- 
tial candidates who addressed the orga- 
nization's recent 21st annual convention. 
Boyer's notes had him introducing 
George Bush as the former director of 
the CIA. Either the print was slightly 
blurred or else it was one of those classic 
slips-of-the-tongue. Boyer introduced 
Bush as former director of the CIO . . . 
and, as might be expected, the whole con- 
vention exploded in a roar of laughter. 
But before Boyer could correct himself 
Bush interjected, "I'll take that." And the 
convention exploded a second time. 




'Workers helping workers . . . 
to better their lives . . . UBC 
... We do it better.' That's 
what the T-shirt says on back 
and front in red, white, and 
blue. 

The General Office in Wash- 
ington has small, medium, large, 
and extra large like the one 
shown in the picture. They may 
be ordered in quantity for a local 
organizing drive, a social event, a 
local-union bowling team ... or 
singly, if you just want to show 
your pride in the union. 

The price: 
$3 each in any quantity. 

Send cash, check or money 
order payable to: General Secre- 
tary, c/o Organizing Depart- 
ment, UBC, 101 Constitution 
Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 
20001. (Be sure to list size and 
quantity.) 



"As kids, 
we started smoking 

because it was smart. 
Why don't we stop 

for the same reason?" 



Harold Emery in 
The Reader's Digest 




American Cancer Society, f. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



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HARD HAT EMBLEM-Add the Broth- 
erhood's officio/ emblem to your 
hard hat. Your local union can now 
order Hard Hat Emblem Decafs 
(with adhesive on the back) at 
$3.35 per hundred for distribution 
to your local membership. Individ- 
ual members can order a single 
emblem t free of charge, by writing 
direct to the UBC Organizing De- 
partment at the General Office. 
Send all orders to: Organizing De- 
partment, UBC, 101 Constitution 
Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 
20001 



' 



JUNE, 1980 



UJE COnGRRTUinTE 



UNION DIPLOMAT 

Anthony Ramos, executive secretary 
of the California State Council of Car- 
penters, was a member of a delegation of 
American trade unionists who recently 
visited the Peoples Republic of China at 
the invitation of the All China Federation 
of Trade Unions. The visit was arranged 
by the US State Department. 

In the group were a Machinist, a Long- 
shoreman, a member of the United Food 
and Commercial Workers International 
Union, and other union leaders. There 
were visits to factories, communes, gov- 
ernment offices, and several cities. 

COLLEGE SUPPORT 

Jack Tobin, business representative for 
the Passaic County, N.J., District Council 
of Carpenters, recently completed a two- 
year, 8-course program with the Union 
Leadership Academy at Rampo College 
in New Jersey. 

In November of 1978, Jack coordi- 
nated a seminar at Ramapo College for 
the Bergen-Passaic County Building 
Trades on the threat which right-wing 
conservatives pose to la