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Full text of "Carpenter"

' 



1 



THE 



CARPENTER 




GOODELL MITRE BOX 

MADE OF STEEL — CANNOT BREAK 

IFirst in Quality and 
Improvements 

Antomatlc stops for holding up saw. Corrugated 
backs. Graduated. 




Oatige for duplicate cuts and many 
other features. 

UNION MADE 



SEND FOR OIRCTri.AB "F" 



GOODELL MANUFACTURING CO., Greenfield, Mass. 



A Quick Drill for Wood and Metal 

"YANKEE" 





iH[Ly^yiv^.;.;^a^» 



This Drill cuts continually on both ^5j££^^ It has a chuck of new design (3-iaw) I 

forward and backv/ard strokes of » U;»U ^^^A^ 17.^1:»U1» that holds any straightway or twist 

the driving handle-no lost motion ^ Hlgll-graae KeliablC drill wilhroundshanknotover 3-16" 

—a real time saver. lool in every detail in diameter. Price, i2.50 postpaid. 

Send for our book of Labor-Saving "YANKEE"' Tools; a postal brings it 
Your Dealer Sells "YANKEE" TOOLS 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., Fairhill Sta., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



■mi 



/UFKJN 

Measuring Tapes and Rules 

ARE DEMANDED BY WORKMEN OF EXPERIENCE 
Eveiy teat proves them superior to all others. A trial will convince you 

TH E fuFfffM Pule HO' 



NEW YORK 



SAGINAW, MICH.. U. S. A- 

LONOON, EN6. 



WINDSOR, CAN. 




Fred T. Hodgson, Author* Editor, Architect, known to every reader of this 
Journal, writes to the Gage Tool Co., Vineland, N. J., as follows: "1 have 
examined your circular, with care, and do not find anything in it conflictins 
with the truth regarding your 'SELF-SETTING PLANES,' and I can, without 
hesitation, endorse every word you say regarding them.*' 
Sent on trial when not .old as per circular. GAGE TOOL CO., Vincland, N. J. 




^TMm^ 



)E:^ 



0JIFEMTEE 



S? '=Jf= ^=ir', fTP..=\S.^^ ^ 




A Monthly Journal for Carpenter*, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, 
Planingr Mill Men, and Kindred Industries 

Entered February 13, 1903, at Indlanaiiolls, Indiana, as second-class mall matter, under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879 



Volume XXXI— No. 1 
Established In laSl 



INDIANAPOUS, JANUARY, 1911 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



THE LUTTLE TOILER 



3y MILO LEON MORTON 



Elach winter mom ere yet approaching dawn 

Betrays its coming o'er the eastern hill. 
While o'er the still, white frozen earth shine 

on 
The far-off stars that heaven with radiance 

£11: 

A little sweet-faced girl I daily meet, 

Who lifts to mine an inoffensive eye. 
As through the cheerless and deserted street 
Slowly and timidly she passes by. 

And unelastic is the maiden's tread, 
Unfitting for a seeming girl of ten, 

The buoyancy of childhood crushed and 
dead — 
Obliterated by the greed of men. 

For she thus early goes to some machine 
That in a factory-prison waits for her, 

Where with the soulless iron is melted in 
The fresh young life that should her pulses 
stir. 



Yet gladly do the tired hands toil to aid 
The parents prematurely aged and worn, 

Who with the overworked and underpaid 
The hopeless burden-bearers yoke have 
borne. 

"But, oh! the shame of it, the fell disgrace!' 
My heart cries out whene'er this child I see. 

Whene'er beneath the stars I see her face 
That shyly in the gloom looks up at me. 

How \onP, O Carpenter of Galilee ! 

How long must sinless boys and girls be 
slain 
That some purse-proud, self-righteous 
Pharisee 
May build to thee a cold and costly fane? 

How long must in the mart child labor stand 
Like doves and lambs and iron and cop- 
per ore? 
How long must wrecks of childhood strew 
the strand. 
While wealth, complacent, revels on the 
shore. 



"How long, O Lord?" the ancients cried, 
"How long?" 
Since then the ages have revoiced the cry. 
The answer comes. "Till man shall right 
the wrong. 
Why ask 'How Long?' while stand ye 
idle by?" 




^ 



T Ihi a C a r p e 21 1 © r 

A FEW DROPS OF DOUBLE DISTILLED PESSIMISM 

From the Pen of an Optimist. 
(By Margaret Scott Hall.) 




Laugb and the world laughs with you, 
Grouch and you grouch alone. 

] BLUE optimist is about 
the deepest dyed anl 
darkest blue of any 
shade known. 

A happy, laughter-lov- 
ing heart rarely sinks to 
despair, but when it does 
it sounds the lowest 
depths. 

With a smile on the 
face and a sob in the heart we mingle with 
a multitude of our fellow creatures, many 
of whom may be in the same fix we are. 
It is always well to keep a calm surface. 
In slang terms — keep a stiff upper lip. But 
sometimes the most stoical can cheat them- 
selves no longer with the h-^bit of happi- 
ness they have persistently worn.. If a 
man, he goes into a fit of despondency; if 
a woman, she indulges in the luxury of 
tears. 

For man or woman at such a point, it 
is a positive pleasure to exchange the glad 
rags of joy for sackcloth and ashes and 
deep down in the heart depths take a good 
- wallow in the Slough of Despond. But, 
friends, let us take good care to struggle 
out on the bright side of the bog, for we 
know however dark the day the sun is 
still shining somewhere. 

A new year has begun and all optimism 
points us to better prospects and better 
general conditions for labor than ever be- 
fore. We know our watchmen upon the 
walls of organization are competent and 
prompt to tell us truly when we ask. What 
of the night? We may depend upon secur- 
ity when they answer all is well. This is 
all right to ponder when optimism is 
clothed in its right mind, but while wear- 
ing the temporary garb of sackcloth let 
the whole experience be enjoyed (?) 

What has A. D. 1911 to offer as improve- 
ment over the past for laboring people? 
Some of us took up the responsibilities of 
mature life twenty-five years ago. A quar- 
ter of a century is a lengthy battle, but a 
battle for existence it has been for the ■ 
majority of us. 



Many of us are tired veterans in this 
severe campaign, marching and serving 
without relaxation in the motley ranks of 
the toiler. For such of us the black win- 
ter of life is to be soon approaching. Gray 
hairs are appearing. Over the temples 
traces of snow are drifting — drifting 
silently, surely but unmistakably into the 
soft, dark billows of brown. 

On the march we have learned the beau- 
ties of brotherhood, and found happiness 
in extending always a helping hand. 
Through the optimist 's vision we clearly 
see the bright side, and it is sweet to re- 
member — 

There Is no winter in the heart 
Of him who doth a kindly deed ; 

Of what he gives he hath a part, 
And this supplieth all his need. 

But pessimism has the floor in this arti- 
cle, so we will let the grouch bug finish his 
work in peace! 

Under the corrupt systems of financial 
power industrial interests must continue 
to suffer. Plenty is arrayed against pau- 
perism and prosperity flaunts its abund- 
ance in the face of want. In this unequal 
conflict is a picture of raw recruits in 
arms against ^ the well-trained army of 
picked men. Adversity's legion marching 
against the bayonets of mammon's well- 
regulated forces. Necessity and numbers 
must eventually tell against manners and 
money. • ■ 

But for our twenty-five years of unre- 
mitting toils — what is there to show for 
it? We rear our children. By super- 
human effort and heroic self-denial only 
can a workingman educate his posterity 
and equip them properly for industrial com- 
petition. We must finish all tasks in their 
appointed season. Arriving at maturity, 
our children in their turn leave our protec- 
tion to enter the world of endeavor as in- 
dividuals. 

The law of change is inevitable. Bj' 
this natural law middle life is apt to find 
us with homes desolated by departures. 
Those who have must lose, and those who 
love much must suffer much. Pessimism 
counts its miseries and finds the years of 



T lb e Carpeintar 



endeavor fully rewarded by evil. It paints 
for us in the new year a vision of what? 
Empty arms, aching hearts, poverty still, 
and the frosts of age beginning to chill 
and blight a barren existence. 

But what is the use to sweat or swear 
over conditions favorable or otherwise. 
"Grin and bear it," whatever comes. The 
Slough of Despond is a nasty and detest- 
able hole to fall into. We have heard that 
it is a wholesome experience however, and 
after we scramble out and emerge into the 
sunlight, life is better worth the living. 

One who found out for himself said: 

For a man to appreciate heaven right well 
Let him have about fifteen minutes of h — 11. 

An optimist, though, who tries the ex- 
periment should offer apologies to the pub- 
lic for passing around samples of the 
"Blue Devils" to the world in general. 

If we know we are not beaten in our 



battles, hope will shine for us again. 
Through the lights and shadows, the ups 
and downs, we have had, we have reached 
the beginning of the new year. 

"We have done - our durndest, " ex- 
presses it all in reviewing the past. Lan- 
guage more forcible than elegant, but pes- 
simism is excusable in a suitable choice of 
eloquence. 

Infinite love keeps us and we will fear 
no evil. Well out on the right side, we 
will avoid the mire of pessimism and move 
forward happy and hopeful once more. A 
song of cheer for others downhearted will 
help us to always realize our fondest hopes 
and dreams. 

We shall part company with pessimism, 
for hope is a sweeter companion, and we 
know that always 

Some softening gleam of love and prayer 
Shall dawn on every cross and care. 



NOSINESS. 

(By H. B. Moyer.) 
IF I were ever called upon and its success can readily be attributed to 



r r , \ I J to depict on white paper 
l/y-^ with pen and ink my im- 

f^l' pression of man's most 

\^gj pronounced deplorable 

Jy characteristic, I should 

-'"^ "" draw a human figure 

with a nose some four 

J feet, several inches wide, 
and have said nose in- 
serted in the recesses of a receptable 
labeled "Other People's Business." 
"Nosiness" would be my caption. 

Contrary to the half-hearted, time-hon- 
ored masculine assertion, Nosiness does ex- 
tend further than the five o 'clock tea ta- 
ble, and it is not monopolized entirely by 
people sporting cork-screw curls and Tom- 
cats. 

Nosiness is a vice which can be found 
everywhere, from the gutter to the man- 
sion, from the bar-room to the church. 

Just what kind of an old world this 
would be without its busy-bodies, its scan- 
dal-mongers and such-like would be hard 
to imagine, for Nosiness has descended 
from the time of Eve and Adam. One of 
the most successful playS ever written was 
the well known "School for Scandal," 



the fact that the public of yesterday and 
today appreciated it, the piece being drawn 
from real life. 

Were it not for the ofttimes deplorable 
results some of the encounters arising from 
certain forms of Nosiness would be" highly 
amusing. For example, non-churchgoers 
in Toronto, Ontario, will hardly have 
changed much in their belief on the ques- 
tion of church-going, or derive much in- 
spiration from the recent spectacle of the 
Lord's Day Alliance and a popular mission 
movement in that city clashing over the 
proper way to conduct services. The mis- 
sion movement, a thoroughly deserving 
and enterprising institution, and one which 
was and is reaching people that the 
churches proper can never, or at least 
never have reached, was making use of 
moving pictures and special music at its 
services. Along came the L. D. A. with 
its long nose and started a row which at 
this writing is still waging. Among other 
expressions the L. D. A. used in referring 
to the mission scheme were ' ' cheap moving 
picture shows" and "vulgar theatrical 
band concerts." 

Not long ago in another city one minis- 



Tlhie Carpemiter 



ter from the pulpit denounced another 
minister who had dared to preach on a 
popular subject such as "The Labor Prob- 
lem." "Sensationalism," "Sunday vaude- 
ville," and other choice, appropriate terms 
were utilized by the nosy one, and one can 
only vaguely surmise where the battle will 
end, for it is only natural to suppose that 
some other reverend sir will deem it his 
duty to denounce B for having denounced 
A, and so on down or up the alphabet. 

But there is Nosiness with a reason as 
well as of the other kind, although the lat- 
ter is generally given the preference in 
accordance with that other marked char- 
acteristic of the human race, inconsistency. 
For example, no one for a moment doubts 
that there was reason for the now bumped 
and battered colonel of South African and 
Washington fame to poke around and find 
out what those warts on the industrial 
landscape known as the Trusts were doing, 
and just how much they were "doing" 
the American public. Nevertheless said 
trusts did not approve either of said Theo- 
dore nor his nosy methods. 

Nosy people seldom lack for material in 
which to "nose." Occasionally, however, 
they do find themselves a trifle shy of 
ready inviting stock, and in such emergen- 
cies they generally light upon labor. I 
personally know of a lady writer in Can- 
ada who devotes most of her time grinding 
out copy on " How to make the home en- 
durable" or "One way of making lettuce 
salad with spinach," but who now amd 
then, when she runs short of legitimate 
material for an article, takes a few slaps 
at Labor. Of course her long experience 
in mixing up literary pastry has given her 
a keen insight regarding Labor; therefore, 
when she refers to labor unions as ' ' gigan- 
tic trusts" it does not shock us nearly as 
much as if Sam Gompers or some other 
novice in the game made such references. 

You remember our friend Day of Syra- 
cuse, who used to slap Labor on the wrist 
once or twice a year, just to sort of keep 
in practice. Mr. Day's business is sup- 
posedly to run Syracuse University and 
imbue the young and wealthy with a thor- 
ough knowledge of Homer and the rest 
of it in spare moments when the Y. and 
W. are not worrying their youthful heads 



over the art of slugging a man behind the 
referee's back in a rugby match. 

Nevertheless the good man, from having 
carefully watched the janitor sweep the 
floor and put scuttles of good friend Baer's 
coal in the college stove, has managed to 
gain a fair knowledge of the labor situa- 
tion. Having advanced so far, it is only 
natural in the natural course of nosiness 
that he step in and tell Labor how it should 
and should not conduct its business. Had 
Labor been as grateful as such an action 
deserved it would have reciprocated by 
helping Mr. Day along in running his 
school. 

At the present writing there is a big 
street car strike on in Winnipeg. Almost 
as soon as the strike was called a number 
of the students of some college out that 
way got their manly craniums together and 
decided that the employes of the company 
were an ungrateful lot of prigs, and that 
they should be punished for their temerity 
in endangering the poor company's divi- 
dends just at Christmas time when divi- 
dends came in so usefully. In a word, 
these future greats became strike breakers 
and manned what few cars were run for 
a day or so. Fortunately the faculty of 
the college had sense enough either to real- 
ize the injustice of the thing or else were 
solicitous for the welfare of their charges, 
and called the wayward ones back to the 
fold. 

When one sits back in his old arm chair 
before a cheery grate fire and looks facts 
square in the face he realizes that life is 
far too short a period for the average man 
to even attend to his own affairs. No man 
ever lived who accomplished all that he 
wanted to or who did all that he could do 
that was right during his allotted space on 
earth. Why, then, do we persist in spend- 
ing precious time in the vicious habit of 
nosing into others' affairs? Why do oth- 
ers squander many of the few thousand 
days given them nosing into our affairs? 

Despite the countless obstacles encoun- 
tered the labor movement has been and is 
largely successful. How much easier, 
though, the battle should have been! Orig- 
inally the fight was one between capital 
on one side and labor on the other. Had 
it remained so the working masses of the 



Carpeimter 



world would be mucli nearer the goal of 
rights than they are. With the ever-pres- 
ent strike breaker, a not infrequently hos- 
tile press, prejudiced courts, and countless 
other influences as allies, capital in many 
instances is still reaping as much profit 
from the toilers' efforts as of yore, while 
the latter finds himself paying double and 
triple for what he wears and eats. 

If two men of anywhere near equal size 
engaged in battle on the street it is highly 
improbable that all or even nearly all of 
the spectators would jump on the back of 
one man and help the other fellow to a vic- 
tory. 
- In New York and other states they are 
legislating against boxing matches where 
two well-trained men, generally fairly 
equally matched, meet to decide physical 
and scientific supremacy. Football, where 
sometimes eleven men pile on one helpless 



man on the ground, is encouraged in every 
way. "Without defending the prize ring, 
it seems only fair to suggest that added 
legislation to prevent the crushing out of 
self-respect, health and even life itself 
from the bodies of toiling men, women and 
children would be more in place. 
. It is a peculiar fact that in many cases 
the very class of people who fight hardest 
to prevent brutality in the prize ring are 
those who fight Labor hardest in its efforts 
to ameliorate the conditions of the sweat- 
shop women and children. 

There always has been nosing — there al- 
ways will be. Let those who must nose 
be careful to not uproot the structures that 
ethers of more practical and worldly turn 
of mind are trying to build for the benefit 
of humanity in general and the unfortun- 
ate working classes in particular. If you 
can't upbuild, don't uproot. 
►-** 



Co- 



P 




LIBRARIES AS A PRACTICAL PROPOSITION. 

(By Joseph L. Wheeler, Assistant Librarian, Public Library of the District of 

lumbia.) 
HE saying, "Knowledge progressive, the indispensable men in every 

shop and ofSce are the ones who are look- 
ing for more knowledge. They are also 
the ones who are getting the most out of 
life. Their happiness is their own and can- 
not be taken from them. They do not 
have to follow the crowd to enjoy them- 
selves. 

But millions of men cannot have the ad- 
vantage of schooling. School and college 
are out of their reach — money comes first, 
and money does not talk to them of schools 
and teachers. Night schools and shop 
classes do not thrive in every town in the 
land. Study with them means a good deal 
of self-sacrifice. They must work out for 
themselves what others have from teach- 
ers. It is here that public libraries be- 
come of real and money value to the work- 
man. A library is a workman 's university, 
and what is more it is a wage increaser. 
Since libraries began to be run as they are 
now, to be of as much practical use as pos- 
sible, thousands of men have had wages 
increased by their knowledge increase. 

More reading is being done than ever 
oefore by workingmen on their own trades 
and crafts. Unions are forming study 



If \ Vj is power," is a true one, 

/^ Ji\ and truer today than on 

^^ ' any day since the begin- 

ning. Not necessarily 
book knowledge, for 
the expert man on the 
lathe, or in the core 
room, the man who 
stands above the rest in 
ability, in wages and in the confidence of 
his fellows, may never have looked into 
a book since his primary school days. 

Knowledge may come from practical ex- 
perience, the learning by trying to do for 
one 's self, or from having the master work- 
man at one's elbow. Now, more than ever, 
anything that a man may learn outside of 
the shop which will give him an advan- 
tage over his mates, is vital to him. Tech- 
nical education is the essence and outcome 
of this idea. By night school, by appren- 
tice classes, by trade school, countless 
minds are being fitted to make countless 
hands do better work. 

It will not do today to say that the prac- 
tical man can very generally be superiov 
to the man with a head training. The 



TSie C a r p e mi t 



classes in their own meeting halls and mak- 
ing organized effort to develop this side 
of the union 's activities. The union mag- 
azines are increasing the amount of space 
on craft instruction and getting first-class 
material, as for instance Mr. Rhodes 's 
series on mechanical drawing. Local 
unions in a few cases have small collec- 
tions of books. 

All this work, however, appeals to only 
a part of the ranks of labor. It is just as 
true that only a small proportion of the 
rich care to study, or even to read. Col- 
lege graduates may easily be found who 
have read nothing more than a few nov- 
els since they left the class rooms. Many 
factors discourage men from study. Long 
hours hinder it. A man who works a ten- 
hour day is waiting for the whistle to blow, 
and when he has had supper and sat down 
to read the paper or talk to the folks, he 
is in no shape to apply his mind to hard 
study. A small per cent, of men can do 
it. They are generally the ones who get 
ahead. 

Men often feel that they are too old to 
study or read. They seem to think that 
study is only for the boys, that it is too 
late for them to begin and so they never 
begin. This is due partly to the poor meth- 
ods of education which formerly existed, 
by which reading was made such a drudg- 
ery that it bred hatred of books. For all 
this, books have the power of giving the 
greatest pleasure. To sit down with a 
good book and- follow the author through 
foreign lands, or watch the description of 
some great battle, or to forget one's self 
in a detective story or a novel — these 
things make pleasant recreation. 

It is unfortunate that more men are not 
acquainted with public libraries. The pur- 
pose of a public library is to be of service 
to every man, by helping him to find the 
books he wants for business or recreation. 



At the present time the libraries are just 
awakening to the opportunities in indus- 
trial work. Large public libraries like 
those at St. Louis, Newark, Providence, 
Washington and Pittsburg have separate 
industrial departments, where men are in 
charge of the books and know the litera- 
ture so well that they can quickly help a 
student, a workman or a foreman, to find 
out just what he wants. Many men think 
that they are working on such a specialized 
part of a trade that it would be foolish to 
try to find any book on the subject. On 
the contrary there are very few subjects 
on which whole books have not been writ- 
ten, and still fewer on which some trade 
magazine does not have an article. Fur- 
thermore, this trade literature is written 
by practical men. In talking to workmen 
about books this expression has often been 
heard, "Well, books are all right, but what 
good does book learning do in the shop?" 
All the good in the world. Does it make 
information any the less true because it is 
written in a book, instead of told by the 
man at the next machine? The majority 
of books on trades are written by' practical 
men, and these are the books which libra- 
ries try the hardest to buy. It is safe to 
say that there is not a public library of 
any size in the country which has not dur- 
ing the last five years increased the propor- 
tion of money which it spends on industrial 
books. Everywhere libraries are trying to 
build up this part of their work. They are 
sending out word to the unions about their 
books and buying books recommended by 
workmen. Labor and libraries are getting 
acquainted, to the mutual advantage of 
both, and the day is not far distant when 
they will be working in a systematic man- 
ner to get books into the men's hands and 
thereby fulfill the motto of many libraries, 
"The best books, for the most people, at 
the least cost." 



Kindness and Courage. 



Question not, but live and labor 
Till your goal be won ; 

Helping every feeble stranger, 
Seeking help of none. 



Life is mostly froth and bubble. 
Two things stand like stone — 

Kindness in another's trouble, 
Courage in our own. 

— Adam Lindsay Gordon. 



The C a r p e mi t e r 

"AS WE ARE." 

(By Frank Duffy, General Secretary.) 



N "de Timmerman" (the 

r » -yT^ . J Carpenter), the weekly 

\j- ^-^' paper of the Holland car- 

1^] -c penters' union, we are 

<^ Jgl taken to task by a car- 

Jy penter who -visited this 

""^^^ -^ country recently and 

worked in Ni^w York 
City, for the methods 
used by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America in conducting and transacting its 
business both locally and nationally. Fault 
is found because our N^w York District 
Council will not allow carpenters arriving 
from foreign countries the privilege of work- 
ing where they please, with whom they 
please and for what they please. It seems 
to be wrong to ask them to join the union, 
to inform them that certain employers will 
not hire or keep in their employ any one 
who is not a member in good standing of 
the carpenters' unions, and to be further 
informed that working conditions must be 
observed, wages upheld, working hours 
maintained and the laws enforced. 

The old saying has it, that "God helps 
those who help themselves," and if the 
carpenters of this or any other country do 
not help themselves, how can they expect 
help from others. 

The carpenter coming to this country will 
receive a cordial greeting and a hearty 
welcome from the members of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America if he comes with the intention of 
joining our organization, and of standing by 
us and with us through thick and thin in 
maintaining our present working conditions. 
The American carpenters fought long and 
hard to establish these conditions and to let 
them slip away now without objections or 
hindrance is something they will not 
countenance, tolerate, stand for, or allow. 

The carpenter coming to this country in 
search of work, good wages, shorter hours, 
more comforts and better conditions should 
be willing to at least do his part to uphold 
and maintain these conditions, and not only 
that but to improve them if possible so that 
the coming generation may have better 



limes than we have had, and that their lives 
may run more smoothly than ours. 

It is all very well to find fault with us, 
but in doing so you should know and under 
stand what we have to contend with, what 
we have to battle against, what: obstacles we 
have to overcome, what sacrifices "-we have 
to make, what privations we havei-to'endme 
and losses to sustain in our fight for better 
things. 

It becomes necessary on our part to make 
' ' mandatory ' ' laws which must be enforced 
whether it hits, hurts or harms native or 
foreign born. 

One thing is certain, we cannot make- 
laws, -rules and regulations that wiU be' 
satisfactory to every one. If we did we 
would be the greatest set of men on the 
face of the earth. 

Our local oflicers, business agents,- repre- 
sentatives and organizers in New York City, 
Chicago, Boston, San Francisco and else- 
where are only doing their duty as specified 
in our laws when they insist that you must 
join the union; that you must carry a work- 
ing card; that you must observe trade rules; 
that you must maintain and uphold work- 
ing conditions; that you must obey authori- 
ty and that you must be a union man in 
every particular, and in every sense of the 
word. This ' ' go and come as you please 
system ' ' is played out. Y'ou must prove 
your sincerity and good faith by acts, not 
words. 1 

Your ' ' due book ' ' is your original, offi- 
cial passport, showing your financial stand- 
ing in your organization, but let me ask my 
European friend, would it be right for you 
to pay your dues and assessments to your 
union in Holland while you work in New 
York City and at the same time demand 
recognition from the carpenters' union in 
New York City, and further recognition 
from the District Council's officers at Fifty- 
ninth street, whom you find so much fault 
with on account of the ' ' red-tape system ' ' 
you speak of under which they operate in 
dealing with such cases as yours? Or in 
other words you expect to come into New 
York City, take advantage of good wages, 



T lb e C a r p e o t e r 



of the eight-liour day, a half holiday Satur- 
day, double time for overtime, better work- 
ing conditions than you have had elsewhere 
and pay nothing for it in return? "Oh, 
no!" that is not a fair proposition. The 
carpenters of New York spent thousands and 
thousands of dollars in establishing these 
conditions and they propose that you shall 
pay your little share if you work in New 
York City, to help retain these conditions, 
and not only that, but that you become a 
member of the organization as well. Again, 
is it fair that our own members from New 
Jersey, Connecticut and elsewhere on the 
American continent should come to work in 
New York City for higher wages and a 
shorter work day without paying for main- 
taining them? I will have to answer again, 
' ' No. ' ' Although they are our own brother 
members they have to buy a ' ' working 
card ' ' before going to work. This is not 
unreasonable nor can it be classed as dis- 
crimination. 

Further, if these members do not return 
home daily they will have to transfer their 
membership to New York City and thereby 
help to maintain the better conditions nnder 
which they are working. Business agents 
must, be paid, the District Council must 



exist and ofSces must be maintained. Our 
business agents are our representatives, 
elected by us and paid by us to look after 
our interests. You may not have them in 
your country, but we find them an absolute 
necessity in America. We are a cosmopoli- 
tan people, a cosmopolitan nation. We have 
all classes of men to deal with and there- 
fore no doubt we transact our business much 
different than you do yours. 

Our business agents report to our Dis- 
trict Councils and our District ■ Councils 
supervise and superintend the affairs — the 
working affairs — of our organization in 
New York City. So it is in Boston, Phila- 
delphia, Chicago, St. Louis, Indianapolis, 
Buffalo and elsewhere under our juris- 
diction. 

Our system is simple when once under- 
stood. To a stranger it may seem compli- 
cated. All we ask, is that when you land 
on American soil you immediately join our 
organization, become acquainted with its 
laws and live up to them. If you will do 
this you will find the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America one of 
the best labor organizations on the face of 
the earth. 



Nh «^ ^1 * ^ 



THE TROUBLES 

(By D. L 
HE subject I have chosen 
would make volumes 
and then the story 
would not be half told. 
Nor do I propose at 
this time to tell at 
great length how the 
poor, underpaid carpen- 
ter has to stand for all 
the trouble for the 
digging of the foundation to the top- 
ping out of the flue; if any one 
anywhere does any of the work wrong, 
if the whole building is not com- 
pleted in every way satisfactory, the poor 
carpenter has to take his full share if not 
all the blame, even if the fault lay en- 
tirely in work of entirely a different trade. 
If the bricklayers' walls are not level or 
the arches are not right it is the fault of 




OF A CARPENTER. 

Stoddard.) 
the carpenter, who in many instances is 
not paid but little, if any more than half 
what the bricklayer receives for his ser- 
vices. If the water stands in the gutters 
it is very seldom indeed that the tinker of 
a tinner is blamed, no, but the carpenter 
has to stand it all, and so we might go on 
nil along the line. 

It is a gross injustice that we are held 
responsible for the mistakes of the differ- 
ent trades we work with on the job that 
we have to stand for, but we are often 
blamed for many things that are done, or 
not done as you may be pleased to call it, 
even when many miles away, and this is 
being done in many ways. 

In substantiation I will give just one 

illustration. A short time ago I was called 

upon to do some work for a business man 

who is pretty smart, he ordered all his own 

8 



Tlhia Carpaoter 



material, and had me do the carpenter 
work. In ordering the front double doors 
for his business block he did not specify 
to the mill man just the kind or style he 
"wanted, but he supposed the doors would 
be halved and he intended to get a lock to 
fit that kind of construction. 

But when the doors were delivered they 
were beveled together, which I will admit 
is of the two, perhaps the more modern 
way, but not expecting that style, it was 
nothing surprising for the owner to at first 
want to lay the blame on me, but after 
laughing at him and mentioning the fact 
to him that I did not have a thing to do 
in the specifying of the kind or style of 
front, only assist in getting the exact 
measurements, he was reasonable enough 
to admit that I really was not to blame, and 
said it was all right. He then asked me 
to give him the exact bevel and thickness 
of door so he could get just the right 
kind of lock, that would fit nicely and 
quickly. The idea of doing things quick 
is surely a great idea though not a new 
one, especially with the many people who 
are trying to get something done real 
cheap. He went to the hardware store and 
was surprised to find that he could not get 
a lock with the proper beveled face; but 
the clerk talked him into getting a real 
fine lock and latch, and told him the car- 
penter could make it come with the bevel 
on the door, which is true to some extent 
on most any cheap lock, but it is not so 
when it comes to a fine cylinder latch. 
I averaged it up the best I could and set 
the lock in on a little bevel, but not 
enough to make it show too much on the 
cylinders. Now, I not only had a square 
lock to put on a beveled face, but I had 
a fine lock that is made so you can ad- 
just it to any size door, I should judge 
to the best of my memory without giving 
it particular attention at the time that it 
would easily have fitted to a door four 
inches thick, I had to cut it off with hack 
saw and file so it would fit a door 1% 
inches thick. This lock did not particu- 
larly strike my fancy, but the man had 
been led to believe the lock was just the 
right thing for the place, and all the car- 
penter had to do was to mortise out the 
door and put in a few screws — only a lit- 



tle job of a moment's work, so to speak. 

Now, it happended at this particular 
time that the man was not only in a hurry 
and anxious to get the job done cheap, 
but he was in a hurry to get into the 
building as well, and the poor carpenter, 
as usual, had to take the blame. 

I am an old, experienced carpenter, 
and not only used to building work in 
general, but to placing locks in particular, 
It did not bother me at all to put the lock 
on, nor to stand any criticism either. I 
knew enough about the trade to take my 
own part, and by so doing in the end, the 
owner was well pleased with the job, yet, 
on the other hand, had it been some 
young mechanic, I care not how good he 
might have been in a general way, if he 
had not been especially used to different 
kinds of locks, it is likely this business 
man would have tried hard to make him 
believe what the clerk told him, and tried 
so hard to hurry him that he might have 
overlooked something about the lock that 
would have caused him much unnecessary 
delay and worry. In fact, it might have 
caused him to turn out a poor job; he 
would then not only have been branded 
by this business man, but by other passers- 
by as well, as a bum mechanic, when in 
reality he might not have been to blame 
at all. The blame would lay with the 
hurry and bustle of the business man; 
with the lock maker, for not making a 
lock to fit beveled doors, and for not mak- 
ing them for different sized doors, instead 
of only about half making them for any 
old thickness and leaving it to the poor 
carpenter without the proper machinist 's 
tools at hand for the finishing and fitting 
of the lock. Possibly the most to blame 
of anyone in the entire transaction was 
the misleading clerk, who sold the goods 
under false pretenses, so to speak. Yes, 
we might say many were really more to 
blame than the poor carpenter, as is often 
the case, yet the poor carpenter has to 
take it all and in similar instances, has 
been branded a botch, when with the 
proper chance in the beginning he might 
have been a fine mechanic. Yes, more 
than one has gone down in life with a 
similar experience and have been blamed 
for the faults of others to the extent that 



Tlhe Carpaoter 



he, himself, has been lead to believe he 
is a poor mechanic, and- never after tried 
to be more than a common rough hand. 
Some may say that is not so, if a man is 
talented it will come out. While I will 
admit this is true to a certain extent, yet 
if it's in a man to be a good mechanic, he 
will be a good mechanic, but on the other 
hand, what is man any way, and how does 
it happen to be in him or not to be in him 
to become a good mechanic or anything 
else as far as that is concerned? Isn't it 
the surrounding circumstances that makes 
man what he is? Man, from -my view- 
point, is entirely made and his mechani- 
cal inclinations are developed by sur- 
rounding circumstances, not only through 
life, but even before his life began, but 
iiiost especially when he was a young man 
and the little things that may occur when 



he is learning the trade, as small as they 
may seem, simply shajfe his life to what- 
ever it may be. Therefore, don't blame 
the wrong man, don't give unjust criti- 
cism, help the poor carpenter up, don 't 
try to keep him down, help the young 
mechanic, even if you have to overlook 
his little faults. Yes, help him and he 
will not only soon be able to help himself, 
but be able to help you too, and help 
humanity in general. 

Don't try to keep the carpenter down, 
but try to build him up. The better the 
carpenter, the better your homes, business 
buildings, towns and cities, and yes, the 
better the world and all that's in it. The 
better the men, the better the women and 
the better the women the better the 
children, and with the world full of good 
people, life will surely be worth living. 



ADDRESS DELIVERED BY FRATERNAL DELEGATE, W. BRACE AT 
ST. LOUIS A. F. of L. CONVENTION. 



Mr. Chairman and Fellow Trades 
Unionists: I think my first words at this 
eonvention should be words of sincere 
thanks to the American Federation of Lab- 
or f or ■ the more than cordial welcome 
given Mr. Turner and myself and our 
wives since we arrived at New York. T 
could never forgive myself if I did not 
publicly bear testimony to the joy we 
felt when Mr. Hugh Frayne and Mr. Lar- 
ger came on board our boat to be our 
guides, philosophers, and friends until wp 
met your distinguished President and his 
colleagues later. 

Attending this convention or attending 
the British Trades Union Congress as a 
delegate is the legitimate ambition of 
every trades union leader. I, therefore, 
come to America with as great joy as I 
have ever begun any undertaking of my 
life, and I look upon it aa a red letter 
day in my trades union existence when the 
honor is conferred upon me of expressing 
the fraternal greetings of our own trades 
unionists. 

Since I have come here I have given 
some little attention to the movement as 
I see. it in your America. I hope I am, 
what you term in America, a man of too 



much "horse sense" to attempt to express 
an opinion upon your institutions without 
having time to give them proper study; 
but I have been here long enough to appre- 
ciate the magnitude of the task before you 
in this great American continent, thou- 
sands of miles in extent and with a mul- 
tiplicity of languages. And the problem 
of organizing is such that unless the move- 
ment were led by men of the stoutest and 
moat courageous hearts, they would faint 
by the way because of the enormity of the 
task and the responsibility before them. 
I, therefore, may be permitted to say to 
you leaders of labor in America that I 
honor you for the way you are tackling 
your responsibilities, and- I shall go back 
home and testify that only by the efforts 
of men of the mightiest courage is it 
possible to build up a great and powerful 
trades union movement on this great con- 
tinent. 

The task in Britain is a comparatively 
small one as compared to yours, but we 
are members of the same people. Through 
cable and steamship and Marconigram we 
are near neighbors and therefore we are 
heirs to a great inheritance, and I am 
anxious that this great continent, with 



10 



a r p a mi t 



Great Britian, as the English speaking peo- 
ple, shall be loyal to their destiny and shall 
establish the claims of humanity as the 
greatest possible undertaking that valiant 
men and noble women can accomplish in 
their day. 

One of the passages of Lord Morley in 
the life of Gladstone has a most pregnant 
sentence I should like to repeat: "In- 
spired with the belief that life is a great 
and noble calling, not a mean and grovel- 
ling thing to be hurried through as we 
can, but a great and lofty destiny." It 
is because trades unionists realize that life 
ought to be a lofty destiny that we decline 
to be hewers of wood and drawers of water 
for the privileged classes of any nation. 
It is because of my profound faith in the 
movement that I rejoice in coming before 
you as a trades unionist and a strong 
supporter of the trades union movement, 
which is the bedrock upon which all these 
great movements have been established. 

I was glad to hear Mr. Turner say it 
does not well become us to talk down our 
movement which has done so much for the 
amelioration of the conditions of the 
working classes in every country where it 
has been tried. I am a member of the 
Miners' Federation of Great Britain and 
I have for nearly twenty years been at- 
tending the International Congresses. I 
meet my brethren in Germany, in Austria, 
in France, and in Belgium. What do we 
find? That capital is impersonal. We 
have found that, irrespective of country 
or nationalities, trades unions are essen- 
tial and vital necessities if the laborer is 
to secure a return for service, fair condi- 
tions of employment, and wages of a 
character that will allow him to raise and 
maintain his family in some kind of com- 
fort and some kind of respectability. I 
have no patience with men who talk 
down the trades union movement. They 
are attacking a movement that has been 
built upon blood and suffering, whether in 
America, the United Kingdom, or the con- 
tinent of Europe. 

You have heard of the Barbarini vase. 
History says that it is one of two pieces 
of wonderful pottery created by a genius 
to hold the ashes of a great emperor. This 
vase became the property of the Duchess 



of Portland and was placed in the British 
Museum. If you go there you will see 
this little piece of pottery ten inches high 
and a few inches in circumference; look- 
ing at it you will think it entirely whole 
and complete; looking carefully you will 
find that it is lined and seamed, despite 
the intelligence and the high technical 
skill of the potters in this day to create 
in all its perfection such a vase as the 
Barbarini vase. One day a drunken man 
went into the British Museum and with 
a stone smashed this precious piece of 
pottery into a hundred fragments. What 
it took a genius to create a mad man des- 
troyed. I say to you, to the American 
people who do not know the history of 
this great trades union movement, whether 
in Great Britain or in America, that it is 
a splendid jewel to be jealously guarded, 
and no man can be a friend to the op- 
pressed and the poor who would, for any 
reason whatever, attempt to reduce the 
power of this mighty institution that 
stands betwen capital and often too help- 
less labor. 

In Great Britain we work largely by 
conciliation and arbitration. In our So- 
ciety and in many other Societies' we have' 
our conciliation boards selected for five 
years or for three years, as the case may 
be. An equal number of employers' and 
workmen's representatives meet. When 
we fail to agree there is an independent 
or neutral chairman called in. He has 
not full power to please himself but to 
give a casting vote for or against the 
proposition before the board. The miners, 
one of the most powerful organized trades 
in Great Britain or in the world, have 
their own conciliation board and their own 
minimum. Wages now are 50 per cent 
above the standard of 1879. We take a 
certain period and the rates and condi- 
tions of that period will be taken as a 
standard. The years 1879 and 1885 are 
the two periods taken in Wales, England 
and Scotland. Upon that period we have 
50 per cent; but there is a distinct proviso 
that no matter what the condition of trade 
may be, no matter what the selling price 
of the commodity may be, no matter what 
the cost of production may be, no instru- 
ment or power or institution or award 



11 



T Ih a C a r p e jm t a r 



shall bring wages below a 35 per cent min- 
imum upon tbe standard of 1879 and 1885. 

That, in a sentence, demonstrates the 
l^ind of work we do in the trades union 
movement. 

In the industrial field we must have tbe 
trades union. Tbe union must be power- 
ful to look after tbe interests of the in- 
dividual man, to look after the interests of 
the collective body in factory, mine or 
workshop, to deal with matters gen- 
erally such as this American Federation 
of Labor deals with. But side by side 
with its industrial effort, tbe trades union 
movement must be political as well. It 
is bound to be such in character. Tbe 
day has gone by, in my judgment, when 
trades unionists can afford to ignore their 
position in tbe political life of the nation. 
Capital is represented in tbe British House 
of Commons and powerfully entrenched 
in the House of Lords. Labor, therefore, 
must not be content t.,o stand in the outer 
lobby of Parliament asking other people 
to do for it what it should do for itself. 
Labor must go on the floor of Parliament 
and demand in the name of the organized 
workers that its desires be carried into 
effect. 

I listened with great interest to the 
more than admirable and eloquent speech 
of the Governor of Missouri from this 
platform, dealing with compensation. May 
I say to you trades unionists in America 
that I do not think we could have had a 
compensation law — at least I am certain 
we could not have had such a compensa- 
tion law as we have in Great Britain, to- 
day — were it not that members of the 
working people were in their places upon 
the floor of the Chamber and in the com- 
mittee rooms doing their part and taking 
their share in molding the law. 

I am not to be classed among those who 
do not recognize that there are men out- 
side of the ranks of the workers who have 
great sjnnpathy with them, I am always 
glad to receive the help of any section 
of the community that is willing to help 
us make the conditions of our people bet- 
ter than they arc, but no parliament can 
translate into law the real desires and nec- 
essities of the people unless men are there 
who are of the people, bone of their bone 



and flesh of their flesh, and who in their 
own lives and experience can tell the leg- 
islative authorities exactly the views and 
aspirations of those who are doing the 
work for the nation. 

Our compensation law provides that men 
and women shall get half their wages if 
they have been injured. The servant girls 
are protected; the woman who goes out 
to work in the villa of the rich or the 
cottage of the humble is protected. The 
laundry girls and the factory girls are 
protected. In case of an accident, half of 
their wages shall be paid; and let me say 
that it does not follow if their rules 
have been violated that they do not 
get compensation. As a matter of fact, 
our courts have held that the idea of wil- 
ful misconduct, the idea that a man or 
a woman would get hurt to secure com- 
pensation, is without the bounds of human 
reason. Although a man or a woman may 
violate the mining laws or the factory 
laws and as a consequence is hurt, the 
courts have held that it is not wilful and 
serious misconduct, but that it is an error 
of judgment, and you may fine a person 
under the law he has violated, but you 
have to pay the compensation. 

Tbe compensation law does not abolish 
our right under the common law or under 
the employers ' liability act. Say an em- 
ployer has been guilty of not taking all 
the reasonable precautions to protect the 
life and limb of his people and an accident 
occurs; we take that employer into court 
— not under the compensation law but 
under the employers' liability law or un- 
der the common law — and publicly ex- 
pose bim as a man who is guilty of not 
treating human life in all its sacredness. 
We are not limited as to the amount we 
can claim. Whereas, our limit under the 
compensation law in case of death would 
be three hundred pounds, time and again 
we have gone into court and secured four 
or five hundred pounds as tbe amount of 
compensation the court held the employer 
should pay under the liability law because 
he had not taken all reasonable precau- 
tions to safeguard the people in his em- 
ploy. We were enabled to secure this 
largely through our political activity. 



12 



T lb e Carpeimter 



We have our eight hours' act for the 
mines. No man, other than under a spec- 
ial order or for special reasons which have 
to be entered in a book, is allowed to work 
in the mines of the United Kingdom for 
a period longer than eight hours in twen- 
ty-four. Let me say as a kind of demon- 
stration of the power of the trades union 
that while we were able to win this meas- 
ure of reform through legislative enact- 
ment, the power of our organization en- 
abled us to retain our wages intact when 
the hours were reduced. 

The last speech I made in the House of 
Commons before adjournment in August 
was a speech calling upon the government 
to deal seriously with the awful waste of 
human life that had been going on in the 
mines of the United Kingdom. As I 
came across the water I secured one of 
the little bulletins issued on the vessel 
and was amazed to find that, heavy and 
appalling as the death rate is among the 
miners of Great Britain, the death rate in 
America is substantially 100 per cent more 
than that. Oh, men of America, it is time 
that great owners of capital and great 
powerful statesmen are taught by orga- 
nized labor that the great wealth of a 
nation is not property or silver or gold, 
but that the real wealth of a nation is its 
human Uvesl 

I am glad to testify that the home sec- 
retary, Mr. Churchill, recognizing there 
was a cause to be answered, here, has 
undertaken to have in the next session of 
Parliament a new mines bill which will 
embrace some of the things organized la- 
bor for years has been demanding in be- 
half of the men who go down, with an 
enormous loss of Ufe, to bring one great 
source of wealth to the nation. We are 
promised that we shall have a certain 
number of men appointed as mine in- 
spectors; they will be drawn from the 
working class themselves; so that we shall 
have an extensive investigation before 
accidents happen, and thereby prevent the 
awful loss of life. 

The tragedy of the labor movement is 
that our opponents are not always outside 
our ranks; the tragedy of the labor move- 
ment is when men of their own class turn 
against their fellows. A number of our 



trades unionists have become plaintiffs in 
an action, and as a consequence the trades 
unions of Great Britain are under injunc- 
tion to prevent them from using their 
money for political purposes. There is 
likely to be another general election with- 
in a few weeks. You cannot fight an 
election in Great Britain or in America 
without money. Payment of members of 
Parliament presupposes success at the 
polls. I am glad to see my friend W. B. 
Wilson in this convention, and if I may 
be permitted, I take this occasion to con- 
gratulate him upon his election to Con- 
gress. He knows there is an amount not 
only of labor but of expenditure to be 
undertaken before a man can succeed at" 
the polls. In my own Parliamentary elec- 
tion money was poured out like water to 
prevent us from succeeding. It cost my 
society twenty-four hundred pounds to 
win the seat I hold. What is the use of 
saying to men such as we are that they will 
pay members of Parliament and that they 
ought to accept that as meeting their 
views, when, unless they spend money 
in large amounts, it is impossible for la- 
bor to stand any chance against the rep- 
resentatives of capital in the contest for 
membership in the House of Parliament? 
We will accept payment of members of 
Parliament as a civic right, not as meet- 
ing our case but as the right of every 
man who serves the State to be paid for 
the service he renders to the State. We 
demand that the trades unions shall be 
free to spend their own money in their 
own way and for their own interests. 
What are we asking for? Simply the right 
to govern ourselves upon the democratic 
line of government. We are not asking 
for the right to spend the employers' 
money; not asking for the right to spend 
other people's money; we are simply de- 
manding the right to spend our own 
money in our own way according to the 
wish of the majority of our members. We 
are up against a great fundamental rule 
from which we cannot be driven back. 
The right of the majority to rule and 
govern themselves is a right which every 
body of people in every democratic state 
is bound to demand and maintain. 

There are two parties at least in Amer- 



18 



o 



tar 



ica, the Republican and the Democratic. 
Whichever party gets in power, the laws 
are made against the wishes of a substan- 
tial minority; suppose the minority says, 
' ' We do not like these laws and we are 
not willing to pay taxes or to conform 
to the laws." All the resources of this 
mighty nation would be brought to bear 
to make them obey the law, made not by 
unanimous vote, but by the vote of the 
majority. 

I was very much interested to see, 
speaking as a Welshman, that upon your 
records of last year you carried a reso- 
lution of compliment and congratulation 
to my distinguished countryman, Lloyd- 
George, because of his desire to deal more 
strictly with the owners of land in the 
United Kingdom. The landlords were un- 
willing to pay the increased taxes. They 
said, "We are not going to sign form four 
to give you the information you desire;" 
and they said, "We are not going to sign 
form seven," which would cause them to 
be taxed more than they were being taxed. 
The government said, "You may object as 
much as you like, but you have got to 
pay." If it is right for the landlords by 
majority rule to be made to pay all the 
demands under the budget, can it ibe 
wrong for the majority of the trades 
unionists to say that within their own 
trades unions the minority must obey the 
law of the majority and that we have the 
right to spend our money for political or 
other purposes as the majority think wise? 

Not only must we have the right to 
spend our money to keep members in par- 
liament, but we must have our right to 
local administrative bodies. What is the 
use of having a powerful parliamentary 
party and the means to win reforms 
through political machinery, unless we 
have on local administrative bodies of 
the country men who will give sympathe- 
tic consideration to the causes of reform 
that have been won through the imper- 
ial legislature? We call upon the gov- 
ernment to concede to the cause of labor 
the same principle of government by de- 
mocracy that is recognized by the wisest 
minds of every democratic state, no mat- 
ter in what part of the country it may 
be found. You can not claim for America 



or for Britain or for any other country 
that law by the majority is the soundest 
and best law and refuse to give that same 
principle of government to labor whether 
in the United Kingdom or in America. 
That is what we stand for. 

I have a profound faith in the power 
of organized labor when powerfully organ- 
ized and intelligently directed. The time 
has more than come when we must rouse 
ourselves up to the fact that we must em- 
phasize before the public our points of 
agreement, not our points of disagreement. 
Do not let us weaken the great movement 
for which we stand by allowing the public 
to think that because we differ in policies 
or in opinions, there is no room within our 
great democratic trades unions for such 
differences. We want to stand four square 
to push back the attack of capital. The 
attack is becoming acute that capital is 
making day by day upon the working peo- 
ple. It is because of my profound faith 
in the movement that I say we want to 
strike a new note, national, international, 
local and individual. Too long has it been 
thought that in the great contest of na- 
tions the determining factor as to whether 
we live or die as a great people will be 
settled by a few privileged families or a 
few millionaires. Nations must not forget 
that for every millionaire in every land, 
there must be millions of people who do 
not know where to turn for their next meal. 
In the great testing day of nations, when 
great America and imperial Britain shall 
stand face to face with the great crisis, 
the determining factor of whether we shall 
be reduced in power or strengthened will 
not be the wealth of the millionaires or the 
aristocratic families. It will be the meas- 
ure of comfort to be found in the homes 
of the people. 

I am satisfied that this movement of 
ours, with all its imperfections, is the one 
instrument that will bring pressure to bear 
upon nations to do some measure of justice 
to the wage earners. Think of Eome, im- 
perial Rome! that stood out mighty in en- 
gineering skill and mighty in military 
power! I have fished sometimes in the 
forest of Dean by the side of a road built 
by the Romans, and it is as perfect today 
as when it was made. But what of Rome? 



14 



T Ih e C a r p e mi t 



Eome lias been broken; swept into obliv- 
ion as a world power, not because she 
lacked skill or power, but because she 
failed to do her duty in her day to the mass 
of the people. In these days when nations 
are working for the mighty mercantile ma- 
rine it might be pointed out that Carthage 
was a mighty mercantile power in the days 
that are gone. Carthage did not lack ca- 
pacity or commercial skill, but Carthage 
was wiped out, not because she lacked pow- 
er, but because she failed to recognize the 
great human problems. In my own be- 
loved Wales, where we have a passion for 
education, where fathers and mothers 
make enormous sacrifices that their boys 
and girls may have a straight course from 
the elementary schools to the universities, 
I point out as I do here — "What of 
Greece? Greece gathered to herself all the 
culture of the world, but Greece is broken 
and swept away. She failed to realize her 



obligation to the people. ' ' The same great 
fundamental laws that broke Eome and 
Carthage and Greece will break America 
and will break Britain. 

The responsibilitj' is upon organized la- 
bor here and upon organized labor in Brit- 
ain, to tell this new note to the nations: 
that capital has its responsibilities as well 
as its privileges; that the call for the new- 
er and the higher humanity is a call the 
nations cannot afford to ignore with im- 
punity. And with a view of making this 
note strong and powerful enough to give 
us reform, I say to every trades unionist: 

Give us men — 
Men of every rank, 
Fresh and free and frank ; 
Men of thought and reading, 
Men of light and leading, 
Men of faith and not of faction, 
Men of lofty aim and action — 
Give us men, I plead again, 
Give us men ! 



LABOR SPYING AGENCY TELLS EMPLOYERS HOW USEFUL IT IS 



The clever, unscrupulous espionage 
practiced by employers upon their work- 
men is finely exemplified in the following 
circular letter, mailed to a large em- 
ployer in Albany, N. Y., from the Phila- 
delphia office of a spy supply house. 

The letter comes from the Eailway 
Audit and Inspection Company, whose gen- 
eral offices are in Brown Bros, building, 
4th and Chestnut streets, Philadelphia. 
The company has another office at 189 
La Salle street, Chicago. 

It is a work of art in its way and says 
in the heading that the firm "makes a 
specialty of steam and electric railways, 
gas, electric light and manufacturing prop- 
erties only. ' ' 

The firm names are E. C. Hathaway, 
president and treasurer; H. N. Brown, 
vice-president and general manager; Wal- 
ter H. Taylor, secretary and counsel; C. 
E. Harney, assistant treasurer, and T. C. 
Gary, superintendent. 

— Union Men Its Particular Target — 

The letter follows and talks loudly for 
itself: 



Philadelphia, December 1, 1910. 
To Co., Albany, N. Y.: 

Gentlemen — Some time ago we mailed 
you, under personal cover, a booklet in 
which we outlined in as brief a manner 
as possible, our experience in secret inves- 
tigations, and our methods of handling the 
work. 

We feel sure that there are times when 
you would like to know why there is delay 
and cause for worry on account of the 
machinery in your various departments 
being disabled, material spoiled and prod- 
ucts not up to the standard of work- 
manship; why finished products cannot be 
turned out in the required number of 
hours, keeping pace with your competitors. 
There may be numerous reasons, one or 
more of which exist in your plant, caused 
primarily by your employes, from the one 
who has the work under his or her juris- 
diction down to the ordinary laborer. 

One of the most stubborn evils for cor- 
porations to combat with is organized 
labor, and our experience has been that 
it is always best to avoid strikes, if pos- 
sible, by being well informed as to the 



15 



T Ih e C a r p a o t e ir 

actual existing conditions, through relia- and furnish investigators at any time you 

ble inside information, such as we are in may see fit to call upon us, in fact, would 

a position to give through our various be pleased to hear from you at any time 

methods used in this line of work, which regarding this character of work. We will 

places one in a position to know their be only too glad to give you the benefit of 

employes as to character, habits, move- our experience in any question that you 

ments, capability and efficiency, thus being may desire to ask without charge, and 

prepared at all times to act intelligently when you are ready for this class of work, 

upon any controversies that might arise, we would be pleased to serve you. 

Such information can be obtained Soliciting your patronage, we beg to 

through a secret service operative who remain, 

has been tested in our service on this Tours very truly, 

particular class of work, also who is under RAILWAY AUDIT AND INSPECTION 

fidelity bond to this company and who COMPANY. 

will work and mingle with your employes. By H. N. Brown, Vice-Pres. and Mgr. 

making daily reports as to the existing P. S. — A trial inspection will convince 

conditions. you of the efficiency of our service. 

We will be pleased to quote you terms — New York Call. 



Now. 

Rise, for the day is passing. 

And you lie dreaming on ; 
The others have buclcled their armor, 

And forth to the flght have gone ; 
A place in the ranks awaits you, 

Each man has some part to play ; 
The past and the future are nothing 

In the face of the stern today. 

Rise from your dreams of the future — 

Of gaining some hard-fought field ; 
Of storming some airy fortress, 

Or bidding some giant yield ; 
Your future has deeds of glory. 

Of honor (God grant it may) ! 
But your arm will never be stronger. 

Or the need so great as today. 

Rise ! If the past detains you, 
Her sunshine and storms forget, 

No chains so unworthy to hold you 
, As those of a vain regret ; 

Sad or bright, she is lifeless ever. 
Cast her phantom arms away. 

Nor look back, save to learn the lesson 
Of a nobler strife today. 

Rise ! For the day is passing ; 

The sound that you scarcely hear 
Is the enemy marching to battle — 

Arise ! For the foe is here ! 
Stay not to sharpen your weapons 

Or the hour will strike at last, 
When from dreams of a coming battle 

You may wake to find it past ! 

— Adelaide A. Proctor. 



16 



WJH 



u □ c 



C=l 



WHEN THE CORN IS IN THE SHOCK 



There's a sadness in the autumn 

When the sky is clear and still, 
When the gladsome year is dying 

And a haze is on the hill — 
Sadness that steals o'er the senses. 

All our merriment to mock. 
When the frost has hlanched the flowers 

And the corn is in the shock. 

There's a sadness in the rustle 

As the yellow leaves come down 
When they settle, as with sorrow, 

On the earth so bare and brown, 
Sadness that awakes emotion 

Such as never could unlock. 
When the frost has blanched the flowers 

And the corn is in the shock. 

There's a sadness in the sighing 

Of the winds through leafless trees 
That hut late in vernal gladness 

Swung out joyous to the breeze. 
Sadness that so soon those branches 

Wintry winds shall wildly' rock. 
When the frost has blanched the flowers 

And the corn is in the shock. 

There's a sadness in the autumn 

'Neath the rafters and the eaves, 
When the swallows cease to twitter 

And there's stillness in the leaves. 
Sadness when the summer warblers 

For their journey southward flock. 
When the frost has blanched the flowers 

And the corn is in the shock. 

There's a sadness when the autumn 

Of our lives is coming fast, 
When our laughing, joyous summer 

Like a dream is in the past. 
Sadness that soon age shall strike us 

And our halting footsteps block. 
When the frost has blanched life's flowers 

And its corn is in the shock. 

There's a sadness when the rustle 

Of our active days is o'er, 
When we reach the sere and yellow 

Of the somber autumn shore. 
Sadness that the sands are ebbing 

Like the ticking of the clock. 
When the frost has blanched life's flowers 

And the corn is in the shock. 

There's a sadness in the sighing 

O'er a closing life ill spent. 
Thinking of the wasted harvests 

That so often came and went, 
Sadness that no more forever 

Can be granted us a stock. 
When the frost has blanched the flowers 

And the corn is in the shock. 

There's a sadness in the silence 

And a pathos everywhere, 
When a loved one leaves forever, 

And we see the vacant chair. 
Sadness that no tongue can utter 

As we fold away a frock 
When the frost lias blanched life's flowers 

And its corn — an empty shock ! 

— Unidentified. 



J^M 



3 [=1 C 



□ 




VBUtal lanrnal at 

tHifi United lrntI|frIjnnJJ 
Qlarpp nt^ra anii MaimvB of Atiwnra 

Published on the 15th of each month at the 

CARPENTERS' BUILDING, 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA, 

PUBLISHERS. 

FRANK DUFFY, EDITOR 

Subscription Price, 
One Dollar a Year in Advance, postpaid. 

Address all letters and money to 

PRANK DUPPY, 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



INDIANAPOLIS, JANUARY, 1911 

As a result of the jurisdiction differences 
between the carpenters and the sheet metal 
workers, our U. B. was suspended from the 
Building Trades Department of the A. F. 
of L. at its recent St. Louis convention. 
The action was taken because of our non- 
compliance, as per decision of our G. E. B. 
and the Des Moines convention, with the 
decision rendered by. the Tampa convention 
of the B. T. D., held last year, to the effect 
that the placing of sheet metal and hollow 
steel trim in the buildings, the work in 
dispute should come under the jurisdiction 
of the sheet metal workers. 

As the laws of the A. F. of L. stipulate 
that a two-thirds vote is necessary for the 
suspension of any affiliated organization, 
as these laws further provide that the laws 
of any of its subordinate departments must 
conform to the laws of the parent body, 



and as the vote to suspend having stood 
thirty-one in favor and twenty-two against, 
the motion did not receive a two-thirds 
vote, and thus the suspension was illegal. 

"While the suspension means the unseat- 
ing of TJ. B. in all local and state building 
trades councils, it does not carry with it 
the suspension of our U. B.' from the A. F. 
of L., nor are, on its strength, any of our 
Local Unions debarred from representation 
in mixed central or state bodies. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

In our last month's journal we took 
occasion to comment on a case where a New 
York judge issued a rather sweeping injunc- 
tion enjoining the members of our U. B. and 
the A. S. of C. from exercising their right to 
refuse to work for the Albro J. Newton 
Company. In flagrant contrast to this judi- 
cial usurpation now stands the decision and 
opinion handed down on November 10, last, 
by another New York judge, the Hon. Ed- 
ward J. Gavegan, in the controversy between 
the Bottsford Dickinson Company, affiliated 
with the Master . Carpenters' Association, 
and the joint D.C. of Carpenters of Greater 
New York, which is a case analogous to the 
Albro Newton controversy. In the latter, 
as in the Bottsford Dickinson case, the Joint 
D. C. ordered a strike on account of the use 
of non-union trim in the respective build- 
ings, which constituted a violation of the 
trade agreement by which both parties are 
governed. 

Judge Gavegan, after going over the dif- 
ferent sections and provisions of the trade 
agreement, came to the conclusion that as 
the agreement calls for union labor, union 
hours and wages, and the trim to be used by 
the Bottsford Dickinson Company in the 
public school building for the erection of 
which they held the contract, was made by 
men who worked more than eight hours a 
day and were not paid the prevailing rate of 
wages of the locality, the Joint D. C. was, 
under the provisions of the agreement, justi- 



18 



Carpeoter 



fled to withdraw its men from the building. 
It appears to us that while Judge Crane's 
decision in the Albro Newton case is the re- 
flection of judicial prejudice, Judge 
Gavegan, in his opinion, shows impartiality, 
common sense and an unbiased mind. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

At the third convention of the Union 
Label Trades Department of the A. F. of L., 
recently held in St. Louis, thirty-one na- 
tional and international organizations were 
represented. From the secretary-treasurer's 
report we gather that the total number of 
organizations, so far affiliated with the de- 
partment, is thirty -nine, with an approximate 
membership of 508,000. The agitation car- 
ried on by the department according to this 
report, has been of far reaching effect and 
good results have been attained in many 
localities by an extensive advertising of the 
various union labels and the distribution of 
circulars 'calling attention to union-made 
goods and where to be had. One phase of 
this label agitation was the holding of label 
fairs, a number of which, during the past 
year, were held in various sections of the 
country. The goods exhibited at these fairs 
were either purchased outright from the 
manufacturer or sold on commission; in 
some instances the manufacturers themselves 
installed the exhibition. 

A proposition that our U. B. affiliate with 
the Union Label Department of the A. F. of 
L. is at this time being voted on by our 
membership; whatever the result of the vote 
may be, the fact remains that we ourselves 
have adopted a label for the advertising and 
recognition of which we need the co-opera- 
tion of organized labor in general. Hence 
it is but logical and in the interest of our 
members working in shops and mills espe- 
cially, that our U. B. be affiliated with the 
Union Label Department, which has for its 
special object the furtherance of the demand 
for the label of the different crafts and for 
union label goods. 

* ♦ * 

Calling attention to the as yet unad- 
justed differences between the Koken Bar- 
ber Supply Company and our U. B., the 
Western Barber, a journal published in 
Spokane, Wash., in its October, 1910, issue 
has this advice to give its readers: "Be- 



member this when you are buying, as this 
union is one of our strongest allies, and 
when you support them you are supporting 
your own label." 

We highly appreciate the spirit of soli- 
darity manifested in this advice. In our 
efforts to bring about an adjustment of 
the differences and obtain recognition of 
our label, of the support we may expect 
from organized labor, the support extended 
us by the men who are using the articles 
as are manufactured by the above firm, 
operates the most effectively and is the 
most valuable. 



Phase of Trade Education. 



Printers' Union Has Course with Nearly 
1,800 Students. 

A booklet being circulated among local 
printers brings to mind the fact that sev- 
eral of the great trade unions are deeply 
interested in technical education. The 
locomotive firemen's organization has a 
correspondence course which teaches fire- 
men how to produce the greatest amount 
of power from the smallest amount of coal. 
It is expected that this will save millions 
of dollars. Other unions are engaged in 
similar ventures in connection with their 
respective trades. The booklet referred to 
is a fine specimen of the printer 's art, and 
appropriately so, as it gives opinions of 
students about the course of instruction in 
printing directed by the International 
Typographical Union. The compositor's 
trade is highly developed, and specializa- 
tion has caused the decline of the old ap- 
prenticeship system. This has tended to 
depreciate the skill of the average com- 
positor. Three years ago the typograph- 
ical union began to cast around for some 
means whereby its members could over- 
come this handicap. Co-operating with the 
Inland Printer, a correspondence course 
was devised whereby the principles under- 
lying first-class typography could be 
taught. The instruction is not wholly the- 
oretical, for students are required to do 
practical work. In two and a half years 
nearly eighteen hundred students have 
been enrolled. 

(Continued on Page 44.) 



19 




GENERAL OFFICERS 

OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD 

OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 

OF AMERICA 

General Office, 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

General President, 
WM. D. HUBBE, Carpenters' Building, Indi- 
anapolis. 



XSeneral^Secretary, 
FEANK DUFFY, Carpenters' Building, Indi- 
anapolis. 



General Treasurer, 
THOMAS NBALB, Carpenters' Building, Indi- 
anapolis. 



First Vice-President, 

ARTHUR A. QUINN, 269 Madison Ave., Perth 

Amtoy, N. J. 



Second Vice-President, 
LEONARD FUNK, E 2307 Sth Ave., Spokane, 
Wash. . 



General Executive Board, 

WM. G. SCHARDT, Chairman, 4607 Kenmore 

Ave., Sheridan Park, Chicago, 111. 



ROBT. E. L. CONNOLLY, Secretary, Box 55, 
Birmingham, Ala. 



P. C. FOLEY, 1032 Fifth St., Edmonton, Al- 
herta, Canada. 



W. A. COLE, 236 Henry St., San- Francisco-, 
Cal. 



D. A. POST, 416 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



CHAS. 11. BAUSHER, 1370 Franklin Ave., 
Bronx, New York City. 

JOHN WALQUIST. 2528 Elliott Ave., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 



All correspondence for the General Executive 
Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



Report of Delegates to the Third 
Annual Convention of the Building 
Trades Department of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor. 

To the General President and General Ex- 
ecutive Board of the XJ. B. of C. and J. 
of A.: 

Brothers — The Third Annual Convention 
of the Building Trades Department of the 
American Federation was called to order 
at 10:30 a. m. Monday, November 28, in 
the assembly room of the Southern Hotel, 
by Mr. Edward Smyth, president of the 
Building Trades Council of St. Louis. Mr. 
Smyth kindly welcomed the delegates to 
the city, after which he introduced Brother 
Phillipi, president of the Central Trades 
and Labor Council, who welcomed the dele- 
gates to the city on behalf of that body. 
The following organizations were present: 

National Association of Asbestos Work- 
ers of America, 1 vote;- I. A. Bridge and 
Structural Iron Workers, 3 votes; Amalga- 
mated Society Carpenters and Joiners, 2 
votes; U. B. Carpenters and Joiners, 7 
votes; ■ American Brotherhood Cement 
Workers-, 3 votes; I. B. Electrical Workers, 

3 votes; T. U. Elevator Constructors, 1 
vote; I. U. Steam Engineers, 4 votes; I. A. 
Granite Cutters of America, 3 votes; I. U. 
Hod Carriers and Building Laborers, 3 
votes; L U. Wood, Wire and- Metal Lath- 
ers, 2 votes; I. A. Marble Workers, 1 vote; 
I. A. Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers, 

4 votes; Brotherhood of Painters, Decora- 
tors and Paperhangers, 5 votes; Operative 
Plasterers' International Association, 3 
votes; XJ. A. Journeymen Plumbers, Gas 
Fitters, Steam Fitters and Steam Fitters' 
Helpers, 4 votes; International Brother- 
hood Composition Roofers, 1 vote; I. A. 
Steam and Hot Water Fitters and Helpers, 
2 votes; Journeymen Stone Cutters' Ass'n 
of North America, 3 votes; I. TJ. Ceramic, 



20 



T Ihi @ C a r p e mi t e r 



Mosaic and Encaustic Tile Layers and 
Helpers, 1 vote. 

Brother Frank Duffy not being able to 
attend, President Haber appointed Brother 
Wm. B. Maefarlane in his place. 

Our delegates were appointed on various 
committees. 

Brother Hopkins served on the Commit- 
tee on President 's Report. 

Brother Maefarlane served on Resolution 
Committee. 

Brother Regan served on Committee on 
Laws. 

Brother Cosgrove served on Committee 
on Organization. 

Brother Greibling served on Adjust- 
ment Committee. 

The report of President Kirby was a 
very lengthy one and dealt with many im- 
portant matters pertaining to the building 
industry. It practically contained an ac- 
count of his work since the last convention 
and is well worthy of consideration. 

Herewith follows part of his report re- 
ferred to: 

— Postponement of the Convention — 

Since the- Tampa convention many Interna- 
tional organizations, through their executive 
officers, expressed their desire that the conven- 
tion of the department he held immediately he- 
fore or after that of the American Federation 
of Labor, instead of the second Monda/ in Octo- 
ber, in accordance with the constitution. Sev- 
eral communications were received and the 
matter was laid before the executive council of 
the department held at Atlantic City in June. 
It was decided by the executive council to take 
the matter up with the affiliated internationals, 
and Secretary Spencer was directed to com- 
municate with the general oflicers of each or- 
ganization and ascertain their position in re- 
gard to postponing the convention. The fol- 
lowing organizations signified their willingness 
to postpone the convention of the department 
until November 28 : 

Amalgamated Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners. 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join- 
ers. 

Brotherhood of Tainters, Decorators and Pa- 
per Hangers. 

iDternatlonal Association of Granite Cutters. 

International Association of Bridge and 
Structural Iron Workers. 

International Association of Tile Layers and 
Helpers. 

Operative Plasterers' International Associa- 
tion. 

International Association of Marble Work- 
ers. 



United Association Journeymen Plumbers, 
Gas Fitters, Steam Fitters and Steam Fitters' 
Helpers. 

International Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers. 

International Union of Ilod Carriers and 
Building Laborers. 

Journeymen Stone Cutters' Association. 

International Union of Elevator Con- 
structors. 

The following unions, according to their 
statements, expressed no objections, and, there- 
fore, were favorably inclined to the postpone- 
ment. 

International Union of Steam Engineers. 

International Brotherhood of Composition 
Rooters. 

International Association of Steam and Hot 
Water Fitters and Helpers. 

The Brotherhood of Cement Workers replied 
that the matter had been laid before the Ex- 
ecutive Board, but no action had been taken on 
the question. The Wood, Wire and Metal 
Lathers' International Union notified the de- 
partment of their opposition to postponement. 

Therefore, in view of the fact that thirteen 
International Unions voted in favor of post- 
ponement, three voted against interposing ob- 
jections, one took no action and one voted 
against, making a total in all of eighteen votes 
in favor of postponing the convention and but 
one opposed, I, therefore, decided that the 
wishes of the Internationals were so unani- 
mously in favor of the postponement that I di- 
rected Secretary Spencer to notify all of the 
International organizations that the St. Louis 
convention of the Building Trades Department 
would be held on November 28, 1910, instead of 
the second Monday in October. 

— Laws — 

I wish to call the attention of the delegates 
assembled to the necessity of compiling care- 
fully the laws that are to govern this body for 
the ensuing year. Many matters of seemingly 
trivial importance are taken advantage of by 
different parties, and cause us considerable 
trouble. 

We have witnessed in the past delegates 
seated in our convention who are delegates to 
and officers of local building organizations, not 
in accordance with this department. It is 
scarcely within the province of this convention 
to dictate who International Unions shall elect 
to represent them, but I believe in the interest 
of all, this department should not permit any 
delegate to be seated who is a delegate to or 
an officer of any Building Trades Council not 
strictly in accord with this department. A 
delegate may be a member of a local organiza- 
tion not affiliated with the department through 
no fault of his, and it would be working a 
hardship upon the individual — and an unjust 
one, too — to say that the delegate must come 
from organizations affiliated witli local Build- 
ing Trades Council, for the delegate can not 
be held responsible for his local unions, but he 



21 



T Ih e C a r p a o t e r 



can be held responsible for his individual 
actions, and if he persists in using his in- 
fluence and efforts along antagonistic lines, he 
should not be allowed a seat in the depart- 
ment. 

Section 8 reads as follows : "No organiza- 
tion shall be entitled to representation unless 
such organization is in good standing in the 
American Federation of Labor, or shall have 
applied for and received a certificate of atBIia- 
tion at least three months prior to a conven- 
tion of this department, and no person shall be 
recognized as a delegate whose National or In- 
ternational organization is not afliliated with 
this department." The word "or" in the fifth 
line should be changed to "and," and the words 
"Building Trades Department" should be in- 
serted after the word "affiliation." This would 
then read as I believe it was intended to, that 
"no organization shall be entitled to representa- 
tion unless such organization is in good stand- 
ing in the American Federation of Labor and 
shall have applied for and received a certifi- 
cate of affiliation in the Building Trades De- 
partment, etc., etc." 

Section 40 reads : "Where District Councils 
or central bodies in arvy organization exist, the 
representation to the Local Council shall come 
through that District Council or central body, 
as the case may be ; and all business between 
the councils and their aflBliated organizations 
shall be done through the District Councils, 
of the different organizations where such 
exist." In my opinion, this section was 
intended by the framers of our constitu- 
tion to provide that where several local unions 
of any International exist, they should form a 
District Council or central body, if they did 
not have one. Tliis section has been the cause 
of many disputes between Local Councils and 
the ofiBce of this department. The section says, 
"Where X)istrict Councils or central bodies 
exist." They interpret that to mean that it 
is not necessary to form one if one is not al- 
ready there and claim representation from 
each of their various local unions as per Sec- 
tion 36. 

I think the delegates of this convention will 
readily see the injustice of this, for, as an 
illustration, the Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
the Amalgamated Carpenters might have sev- 
eral local unions — one of millwrights, one of 
stalrbullders, one of framers and one of ship 
carpenters — this would" give them a great many 
more delegates than they were entitled to, were 
representation to come through the District 
council. Also believe that the word "organiza- 
tion" in the second line should be changed to 
"crafts." 

Section 4J reads : "Each Local Council shall 
establish an Executive Board, composed of the 
president and secretary and one delegate from 
each afliliated organization." This section is 
silent as to whether the president and secre- 
tary shall ,be allowed a vote In the Executive 
Council or otherwise. I will say, however, that 
I hav« ruled that the president and secretary 



are only to exercise their functions as chair- 
man and secretary, and have no right to vote. 
It my interpretation is agreeable to the conven- 
tion, the section should be rearranged, or if It 
is the desire to permit the president and secre- 
tary 'to vote, it should so state. 

— Local Affiliation — 

Considerable trouble is experienced in differ- 
ent localities in securing the afliliation with 
the Local Building Trades Councils of the local 
unions of the different Internationals connected 
with the department.' Representatives of the 
International are often prone to criticise other 
organizations for not compelling their unions 
to comply with the general laws. I wish to 
say, however, that in this there is very little 
room for criticism upon the part of any one, 
for, with the exception of one or two of the 
smaller organizations, there is not an Interna- 
tional but what some of their local unions are 
delinquent in this respect, and while some have 
more unions out of the Building Trades Coun- 
cils than others, the fact remains. When it is 
figured down to a percentage basis, it will be 
found that those who are most critical are 
most often open to criticism themselves. 

The Tampa convention asked all Interna- 
tional organizations to pass laws compelling 
their locals to affiliate. Some of the Interna- 
tional organizations have done this ; others 
have made the effort and failed, but taking a 
broad view of the subject, and my observations 
of conditions in the building trades in the last 
five years, leads me to believe that compulsory 
affiliation is well enough to talk about, "but 
if put into effect might be the means of caus- 
ing more trouble than it would adjust. 

The" labor movement has no police or mili- 
tary powers (and let us hope they never will 
have) to enforce its decisions, so, therefore, its 
work must be done in a broader and more lib- 
eral manner — that of education and persistent 
teaching of the benefits to be secured by fol- 
lowing closely to the teachings of consistent 
unionism. 

I have in mind at this moment an instance 
where an organization affiliated with the Local 
Building Trades Organization, through the in- 
stigation of their General Office, and against 
their will locally. Before this was done the 
council in that city did more or less effective 
work ; since their aiHliatlon the antagonistic 
disposition in that council has rendered it ab- 
solutely useless to such an extent that in six 
months' time they had no council. I only cite 
this as one illustration. Many localities since 
the Tampa convention have asked permission 
to admit organizations not in accord with the 
department, citing other localities where the 
same organizations are affiliated. These re- 
quests have always been denied, and while 
aware of the fact that in some councils organ- 
izations are associated, they are not affiliated 
in any place where an official protest has been 
made by any party whatever who are associ- 
ated with this Building Trades Department. 



22 



Tlhie Carpeintejr 



If, in some locality, a a organization has ob- 
tained membership prior to the Tampa conven- 
tion and the matter was never brought to the 
attention of the department ofiJcials, it is very 
evident that no one objected to their afBliation, 
and where such conditions exist little good can 
be accomplished by disturbing them. 

I again desire to call the attention of this 
convention to the fact of an unjust condition 
imposed upon a majority of the membership 
afBliated with the Local Building Trades Coun- 
cils by the minority. I have reference to the 
system of adopting local by-laws. While per- 
sonally not in accord with the present system 
of representation, either national or local, I 
am not dealing with that subject at this time. 
What I have in mind is purely of a local char- 
acter, and I wish to say that the sooner the 
laws of this department are changed so as to 
give Local Building Trades Councils the right 
to the referendum vote of the local laws, the 
sooner we will establish stable conditions in 
the Local Building Trades Unions throughout 
the country. 

I. is all well enough for us to say that one 
orgai. i/.ation should have as much to say as the 
other, i believe the representation in the Lo- 
cal Building Trades Council, so far as dele- 
gates are ooncerntd, is just. I am also of the 
opinion that enforcement of the laws of the 
local councils can safely be left to the present 
system of representation, but 1 reiterate more 
emphatically than I did at Tampa, it possible, 
the necessity of all 'aws that the local organi- 
zations are required to comply with be Brat 
submitted to their entire membership for their 
adoption or rejection. 

Many-of our critics have pointed to the State 
Building Trades Council of California as b--ing 
the model trades organization of the world, 
and I want to inform those same parties that 
what makes it the power that it is, is their 
system of representation and -taxation, and in 
my opinion they never would have reached 
their present stage of efficiency along any other 
course than that which they have adopted, and 
they have demonstrated liy their past decisions 
very plainly that the larger organizations of 
which so much fear has been expressed have 
at no time taken advantage of tlae smaller, 
but quite to the contrary, certain jurisdictions 
have been conceded to some of the smaller or- 
ganizations that in other localities have been 
denied them. 

Another prominent evidence of the benefits 
and the good results from the system advo- 
cated here is the fact that two organizations 
of carpenters exist in the city of San Francisco, 
and the best of feeling is maintained between 
them. I know of one or two instances where 
local councils have adopted the system and 
have never heard a complaint emanating from 
there in regard to any organization refusing 
to affiliate. 

— Working Cards — 

At the Tampa convention we had up to that 
time issued about 125,000 Building Trades 



23 



Council Cards, and there were several cities 
who printed their own cards. I, at that time, 
urged that some steps be taken to establish a 
universal working card system. During the last 
quarter we issued about the same number of 
cards from the office as we did a year ago, and 
there were issued by cities using cuts furnished 
by the department about as many more, making, 
all told, about 250,000 men carrying a Building 
Trades Department card. This is a fair show- 
ing, but I wish to again urge the necessity of 
some system whereby every Building Trades 
Council man will be carrying a card in some 
respects similar to his fellow-craftsmen in other 
cities. This can *be arranged at no great cost 
whatever. All that is necessary is that all 
secretaries order their cards through the Build- 
ing Trades Department, General Office or from 
the factory where they are made. In either 
case it will be immaterial so long as the cards 
are of a uniform size and color. Secretary 
Spencer has, by great labor, worked out a de- 
sign and made arrangements whereby cards 
can be secured from one factory and manufac- 
tured in a design that can not be duplicated. 
If this is done the different cities and State 
Building Trades Councils will be in a position 
to order their cards direct and can then dis- 
tribute them to their affiliated Local Building 
Trades Councils or local unions, as the case 
may be. 

The reason that I urged this is that it ^~ves 
us an opportunity to keep in touch with the 
growth and loss of our membership. If a city 
orders 1,000 cards one quarter, a hundred or 
more the next quarter or a hundred less, we 
know exactly what they are doing. 

It is hard for one not connected with the 
office of the department to realize how hard it 
is to secure reports from the secretaries of the 
various councils, but by adopting the working 
card system of universal size and design, the 
demand for working cards will always be an 
evidence of their progress or otherwise. The 
cards can b'e furnished absolutely blank on both 
sides If desired, and the Building Trades Coun- 
cils, state or local, may then print anything 
they desire upon them and any council who 
has been suspended for any cause whatever will 
be deprived of using this card, and when once 
an individual sees that his card is not the 
same as the building trades man of other cities, 
be immediately begins to ask the reason why, 
and this has in the past, and will in the future, 
materially strengthen the discipline of the de- 
partment over its Local Building Trades Coun- 
cils, and the discipline of the Local Building 
Trades Councils over its affiliated local unions. 
There has been no one thing in the past which 
has tended to strengthen the department so 
much as the universal working card, and the 
more it is used, the stronger our organization 
will grow. I know of several instances where 
organizations have withdrawn from the Build- 
ing Trades Council, and when the membership 
observed that the cards furnished them were 
different from those of other crafts, they im- 



T lb a C a r p a mi t a r 



mediately insisted on reafliliation, and tliis 
plan, if followed out for one year, will prove 
of sucli a* benefit that it will never be discon- 
tinued. 

I trust the Law Committee will give this 
matter their undivided attention, for anything 
that will tend to bind our members closer to- 
gether will at the same time promote the wel- 
fare of the affiliated Internationals as well. 

— State Building Trades Council — 

We have, as we had at the time of the 
Tampa convention, two State Building Trades 
Councils, and both are continuing to do good 
work and add to the prestige of the building 
trades in their respective states. 

The State Building Trades Council of Cali- 
fornia needs no comment, I believe, regarding 
their condition and ability to deal with local 
matters. The State Building Trades Council 
of California was created before the depart- 
ment, and made its laws governing its condi- 
tions as they applied at that time. Therefore, 
when the department was organized at Wash- 
ington, D. C, and made laws for the entire 
jurisdiction, very naturally there was consider- 
able difference. However, I wish to say that 
all of the tendency of the above-named organi- 
zations since that has "been in harmony with 
the department, and they are gradually amend- 
ing their laws and changing their conditions 
to conform with our laws. To have asked them 
to take Immediate action and upset the thor- 
oughly organized conditions they had created 
would have been unwise. It has frequently 
been pointed out to me that organizations are 
affiliated in San Francisco and elsewhere that 
are not permitted by the department. I wish 
to say to this that whatever organizations are 
affiliated now with the Building Trades Council 
of California were so affiliated before the de- 
partment was created, and I might add that 
there have been applications for affiliation re- 
fused for the reason that they were not in 
accord with this organization. 

The New Jersey Building Trades Council has 
always acted in strict accordance with our 
laws and are doing a great work, not only in 
organizing building trades men, but in pro- 
moting laws in the interest of organized labor 
as well. 

While we have not encouraged the formation 
of State Building Trades Councils — as . there 
are few states where the conditions are the 
same as in the two above mentioned — yet I can 
not help but express my opinion that the 
formation of State Building Trades Councils 
for building trades purposes would he a great 
benefit to the movement. I do uot think, how- 
ever, that where a small number of councils 
exist in a state much good can be accomplished 
through their forming a state council. 

— Plasterers vs. Bricklayers — 

Probably no International organization has 
ever been placed in the same position as that 
of the Operative Plasterers are at the pres- 



ent time. It seems in many localities the 
Bricklayers have been doing plastering. Some 
years ago, on account of trouble in New York, 
an agreement was entered into between the 
Operative Plasterers and Bricklayers, provid- 
ing for exchange of cards. This agreement the 
Operative Bricklayers have endeavored to abro- 
gate and I am compelled to say, owing to the 
attitude of some of the local unions of our 
affiliated organizations, it has been very diffi- 
cult for them to accomplish. The plasterers 
are only asking for that which has been grant- 
ed them by this department and over which 
there is no jurisdictional dispute. The Brick- 
layers have amended their title, and they are 
now known as the Bricklayers, Masons and 
Plasterers' International Union. The Plas- 
terers are very well able to cope with the situ- 
ation and have never asked for assistance other 
than not to take action against them. In 
some locals sympathetic action has been taken 
in behalf of the Plasterers, but where such 
assistance has been given the trades have done 
the same on their own volition. 

I wish to call the attention of this conven- 
tion to the fact that if the International Offi- 
cers are not in position to assist the Plasterers 
to secure the work which they are entitled, and 
to which there is no question over their rights, 
tbey are in position to prevent their locals 
from giving assistance to the organizations not 
affiliated with this department. 

I am positive that if the Plasterers are uot 
prevented by such action as just mentioned, 
they will soon have possession of all the work 
claimed by their craft. I would urge that the 
International Officers not only assist the Plas- 
terers wherever possible for them to do so, but 
prevent their local union from taking any stand 
against them. 

— Electrical Workers' Case — 
Perhaps nothing has caused the officers of 
this department and the labor movement more 
concern than the division in the ranks of the 
Electrical Workers. The duty of the interna- 
tional movement is very plain in the premises, 
and in looking back I can not help but express 
my opinion to the effect that had no considera- 
tion been given to the secession movement and 
their membership given to understand that 
they were in the wrong and would receive no 
recognition until they associated themselves 
with the international movement, conditions 
would be materially better than they are at 
present. The American Federation of Labor, 
at its Toronto convention, appointed a com- 
mittee to endeavor to settle their difficulties 
and try to bring the two warring factions to- 
gether. In this they have signally failed — not 
due, however, to any fault of the committee, 
as I believe they did as much, and perhaps 
more, than any three men could have done in 
a like position. 

In conversation with the members of the 
committee appointed by the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, they expressed their desire that 



24 



Tlhe Carpeot 



I co-operate with them and take no action 
toward instructing local Building Trades Coun- 
cils to unseat the seceding Electrical Workers. 
I desired to assist this committee in every way 
possible, attended their first meeting held in 
Springlield and assured them of my co-opera- 
tion. 

On February 13th the following communica- 
tion was addressed to me by them : 

"The Special Committee appointed by the 
American Federation of Labor for the purpose 
of taking up the dispute between the two fac- 
tions of the Electrical Workers, I desire to 
make a request in view of the situation which 
has developed since the recent Toronto conven- 
tion of the A. F. of L. 

"We have learned that there are at pres- 
ent several local unions affiliated with the so- 
called Eeid faction of the Electrical Workers, 
which are seated in local councils of the Build- 
ing Trades Department, this being in contra- 
vention to the laws of the A. F. of L. 

"In view of the tense feeling existing be- 
tween the two factions of the Electrical Work- 
ers and the many difficulties which must be 
overcome before amalgamation can be effected, 
our committee believes that no good purpose 
could be accomplished at this time by the un- 
seating of these Reld locals. 

"We, therefore, take the liberty of request- 
ing that you lend our committee such assist- 
ance as you can by not taking any action at 
this time which would bring about the unseat- 
ing of the local unions referred to, as such 
action in our opinion would. tend to make our 
labors difficult. 

"Trusting you will find it possible to comply 
with our request and to assist in the work that 
this committee have undertaken, we remain, 
"Fraternally yours, 

(Signed) "FRANK DUFFY, 

"A. L. URICH, 
"JOHN P. FEBY, 

"Committee." 

On February 16th I answered them as fol- 
lows : 

"I beg leave to acknowledge receipt of your 
favor of the 13th inst., in which your request 
that the Building Trades Department lend its 
assistance to your committee by not taking any 
action for the time being that will lead to the 
unseating of local unions of the Reid faction 
of the Electrical Workers. I beg to say that 
such a course will be repugnant to the Build- 
ing Trades Department, but if by its observ- 
ance it is possible to bring about a solidifica- 
tion of^he Electrical Workers in one organiza- 
tion under the banner of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor we shall cheerfully respect your 
wish'." 

And since that time there has been no 
change in the situation. 

Where Local Building Trades Councils have 
been formed, we have notified them that the 
seceding Electrical Workers could not partici- 
pate in the formation of the Building Trades 
Councils. We have repeatedly forbidden ad- 



mission of them into councils, but have taken 
no action against local Building Trades Coun- 
cils where the secessionists were seated prior 
to this communication. I may add at this time, 
however, that Grand President McNulty did 
not approve of the course followed, but in the 
interests of harmony, he raised no objections, 
and I feel now that the attitude assumed by 
him has been the means of strengthening the 
International organization of Electrical Work- 
ers in their position, as they have showed their 
desire to bring about an adjustment of the diffi- 
culty and were willing to waive their undis- 
puted rights in the interest of harmony. 

I feel, however, that this condition can not 
go on, and, in my opinion, all fjocal Building 
Trades Councils w'here the seceding organiza- 
tion of Electrical Workers are at present 
affiliated, should be instructed to unseat them 
at once and to assist the International Elec- 
trical Workers in reorganizing the craft. 

In the meantime I might add also that I feel 
that there are many organizations of Electrical 
Workers who have been led astray through 
misrepresentation and a lack of opportunity 
to l;now the true conditions, and I feel that 
it would not be asking too much for the or- 
ganizers of the various International organiza- 
tions to explain the situation to their members 
in the affected localities to the end that all 
Electrical Workers would be brought into one 
organization. 

It is very dangerous for the international 
movement that secessionists should be encour- 
aged or given any assistance whatever. Some 
organizations may feel that they are not affect- 
ed by the division in the craft above mentioned, 
but no one can tell when this trouble will arise 
within the ranks of some other affiliated In- 
ternational, and if a firm and determined stand 
is taken in this case, it may be the means of 
preventing a recurrence In some other craft. 
I can not emphasize this too strongly and urge 
that the International Officers take this home 
to themselves and in the interests of discipline 
in the ranks of their own organization, do 
everything in their power for the people who 
are now in need of assistance, assuring them 
that in case of like trouble the Electrical 
Workers will never be found wanting. 

— Hod Carriers and Building Laborers — 

This organization is at the present time, as 
it has been for years past, greatly divided. 
There are one or two different so-called Inter- 
nationals and hundreds of independent local 
unions of hod-carriers and building laborers 
scattered throughout the country. I shall not 
go back in the history of this movement farther 
than the Tampa convention, when an effort 
was made that would, if followed out, have 
solidified the hod-carriers and building laborers 
throughout the country and made of them one 
of the largest, strongest and best organizations 
under the banner of the American Federation 
of Labor. 



25 



T ]h a C a r p a im it e r 



The offlceis of this department, as well as 
those of the American Federation of Labor, 
have done everything in their power to solidify 
this movement. The matter was dealt with at 
the Denver convention of the department and 
also at the convention following at Tampa. In 
order to place this matter before the convention 
intelligently, I herewith quote the recommenda- 
tion of the Tampa convention : 

"We, therefore, recommend : 

"First — That the Executive Officers of the 
H. & B. L. I. Association be, and they are here- 
by ordered to furnish the President of this 
department on or before January 1, 1910, with 
a list of their local unions, number of members 
in good standing in each local union, a copy 
of their International constitution, and such 
other information in connection with their or- 
ganization as the President may require. 

"Second — That the state and local depart- 
ments of B. T. Councils be, and they are here- 
by ordered to furnish the President of this de- 
partment, on or before January 1, 1910, with 
a list of the Independent Hod-Carriers' Unions 
and their members in good standing, and such 
other information in connection with hod-car- 
riers' organizations in their various localities 
as the President may require. 

"Third — That the President of this depart- 
ment, acting in conjunction with the President 
of the Hod-Carriers' and Building Laborers' 
International Association, shall call a special 
convention of all the organized hod-carriers in 
the United States and Canada to convene in 
the city of Indianapolis, Ind., on or about the 
first Monday in May, 1910. 

"Fourth — That the representation to said 
convention be, and is hereby, fixed on the fol- 
lowing basis : 

"One delegate for one hundred members or 
less. 

"Two delegates for two hundred and fifty 
members. 

"Three delegates for five hundred members. 

"Four delegates for eight hundred members. 

"Five delegates for one thousand members or 
more. 

"Fifth — That the convention be held under 
the auspices and direction of the President of 
the department. That suspended, expelled and 
independent local unions pay an amount of 
money equal to 30 cents for each member in 
good standing on January 1, 1910 ; that said 
money be paid to the Secretary-Treasurer of 
this department on or before March 1, 1910, 
and held in custody by him until the conven- 
tion at Indianapolis completes its labors, at 
which time (except as hereinafter provided 
for), it is to be turned over to the duly author- 
ized officers elected by said convention. 

"Seventh — That the mileage of the delegates 
whose unions also had delegates at the Elmira 
convention be paid out of this special fund 
by the Secretary-Treasurer of this department 
before he turns it over to the duly authorized 
officer elected by the Indianapolis convention. 



"Eighth — That in the event the Executive 
Officers of the H. C. and B. L. 1. Association 
fail to comply with the order of this conven- 
tion and co-operate with the President of this 
department as hereinbefore specified, the Execu- 
tive Council is hereby directed to suspend the 
said H. C. and B. L. I. Association and re- 
quest the A. F. of L. to revoke its charter and 
then proceed without delay to organize that 
craft into one solid and compact International 
Union, under the protection of the Building 
Trades Department of the American Federation 
of Labor." 

This action was adopted after considerable 
discussion and a great deal of time spent, and 
had it been conscientiously adhered to by In- 
ternational Hod-Carriers and Building La- 
borers and by the independent local unions 
throughout the country, I am satisfied the 
much-desired object would have been attained, 
but opposition was started at once. 

The International Officers of the Hod-Car- 
riers and Building Laborers interposed every 
objection possible. Our office was refused a 
list of their local organizations ; I might add, 
however, that we secured their addresses 
through other sources. February 21st the fol- 
lowing communication was sent to all the local 
unions of the International Hod-Carriers and 
Building Laborers : 

Albany, N. T., Feb. 21, 1910. 
To the Officers and Members of all Local Unions 

of the International Hod-Carriers' and Build- 
ing Laborers' Unions of America : 
Dear Sirs and Brothers. 

Many inquiries have been received at the 
General Office of this International Union 
about the holding of a convention of the Hod- 
Carriers and Building Laborers in May, 1910. 
Our locals have also forwarded to us letters 
and blanks that have been received from the 
Building Trades Department of the American 
Federation of Labor. 

I beg to take this opportunity to inform 
all local unions affiliated with the I. H. & 
B. L. U. that there will be no legal conven- 
tion of the Hod-Carriers and Building La- 
borers held in May, 1910. The action of 
the Building Trades Department is illegal 
and unconstitutional and unbecoming any 
department of the American Federation of 
liabor. Therefore, I warn our locals to ignore 
entirely all letters, convention calls, etc., that 
may be sent to you by the Building Trades 
Department of the A. F. of L., and above all. 
do not send any money to the Building Trades 
Department. 

If any of our locals have sent money to the 
Building Trades Department, to Wm. .J. Spen- 
cer or Jas. Kirby, you should notify this office 
at once. 

If a convention of our organization is to be 
held at any time, you will be notified by the 
General Office. 

Trusting that you will carry out these in- 
structions for your own good, and the good of 



26 



T Ih e C a r p e mi t e r 



your International Union, and the labor move- 
ment at large, I remain. 

Fraternally yours, 

(Signed) D. D'ALESSANDRO. 

Attest: ERNEST VILLAHD, 

General Seeretai-y-Treasurer. 

We, however, went ahead with the instruc- 
tions of the convention, but owing to the fact 
of the dilatory manner in which tlie independ- 
ent unions responded, we were unable to call 
the convention at the time stated in the reso- 
lutions and deferred action until June, when 
we hoped to be able to have secured sufficient 
support from the independent organizations to 
make the matter a success. In this, however, 
we were not able to secure the co-operation to 
the extent that we were justified in believing 
we were entitled to. We received responses 
from seventeen cities who sent, as per instruc- 
tions, $1,366.80. This would represent 4,556 
men. Realizing that we would not be justified 
in following out the instructions of the Tampa 
convention to the extent of calling a convention 
and insisting on a complete reorganization, we 
had a conference with President Gompers and 
President D'Alessandro of the Hod-Carriers 
and Building Laborers, and it was decided that 
owing to the fact that we had not received 
sufficient responses from the independent or- 
ganizations, we would hold a conference In- 
stead at Indianapolis the first week in June 
and try to have the organizations who had 
paid their per capita tax, as per instructions, 
to affiliate with the International Hod-Car- 
riers and Building Laborers. The delegates 
representing the independents refused to asso- 
ciate with the International Hod-Carriers and 
Building Laborers unless there was a complete 
reorganization and an election of officers held 
at once. The conference was held at the head- 
quarters of the Brotherhood of Carpenters, and 
several days were spent in endeavoring to reach 
an understanding. On June 9th the Interna- 
tional Hod-Carriers and Building Laborers, 
through their representatives, submitted the 
following proposition : 

"Indianapolis, Ind., June 9, 1910. 
"The Executive Board of the International 

Hod-Carriers and Building Laborers : 

"In special session assembled at the Carpen- 
ters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind., considering 
that there is a conference between the Execu- 
tive Board of the International Hod-Carriers 
and Building Laborers' Union of America, and 
representatives of the Independent unions in 
accordance with the decision of the convention 
of the Building Trades Department at Tampa, 
Pla., and, 

"Considering that the constitution of our In- 
ternational Union provides in Section 41 for 
the chartering of independent unions under the 
most favorable conditions, he It 

"Resolved, That we, the members of the 
Executive Board of the International Hod-Car- 
riers' and Building Laborers' Union of Amer- 
ica, affiliated with the American Federation of 



Labor and the Building Trades Department, 
agree to accept under our membership the 
members' dues of the independent unions or 
expelled unions, upon the payment of 30 cents 
for each member, 15 cents of this to cover the 
cost of due book and 15 cents for the first 
month's per capita tax, and be it further 

"Resolved, That we, by special allowance, 
furnish a charter and supplies free ot cost to 
those unions which are represented or not rep- 
resented in this conference, but only for those 
who concurred in the cause of the Building 
Trades Department, that they will apply for a 
charter ; and, be it further 

"Resolved, That if the independent unions 
represented in the Indianapolis conference be- 
come affiliated at once as a whole, the Execu- 
tive Board of International Hod-Carriers and 
Building Laborers' Union, three months after 
date, will submit by referendum vote to all 
the locals in good standing affiliated with the 
International Hod-Carriers and Building La- 
borers' Union, the question that a special con- 
vention shall be called in the month of Feb- 
ruary, 1911, in a place to be designated by the 
Executive Board ; and, be it further 

"Resolved, That the Secretary, Frank Mor- 
rison, of the American Federation of Labor, 
shall have the privilege of examining the bal- 
lots ot the local unions voting on that refer- 
endum. 

"D. D'ALESSANDRO, 
"H. P. SMITH, 
"E. A. HOPKINS, 
"N. R. SOLITTO, 
"W. W. CORDELL, 
"A. PIERSON, 
"ANTONIO AMODSO, 
"ERNEST VILLABD." 
The independent organization, on the same 
day, submitted their plan, which is as follows ; 

"Indianapolis, Ind., June 9, 1910. 
"To the Officers of the General Conference, 
viz. : The Building Trades Department of 
the American Federation of Labor : 
"Gentlemen — We, the members of the inde- 
pendent unions, responding to the call of the 
Building Trades Department and the American 
Federation of Labor, come to the city of In- 
dianapolis for the purpose of holding a con- 
ference under the auspices of said department, 
and with full power to act, believing before 
we left our respective cities that we all, in- 
cluding the Executive Board of the I. H. & 
B. L. U., enter into this conference on an equal 
basis, according to the decision rendered at 
the Tampa convention, feeling it to be for the 
best interests of all concerned in the building 
industry. 

"We, the undersigned, representatives of in- 
dependent unions of laborers, submit and 
recommend the following : 

"Whereas, The present administration of the 
International Hod-Carriers and Building La- 
borers is deceitful and Incompetent, which has 
been proved by documentary evidence ; and. 



27 



T Ih @ C a r p e m t e r 



"Wbei'eas, The present administration of tbe 
International Ilod-Carriers and Building La- 
borers has openly discriminated by catering to 
one element exclusively ; and. 

"Whereas, We believe in the American labor 
movement, viz. : equality for all ; and, 

"Whereas, The present administration of the 
I. II. & B. L. U. refuses to give either justice 
or equality, we, therefore, demand that the 
present administration of the I. II. & B. L. U. 
be deposed from office and tlaat a convention 
of all laborers in the United States and Canada 
be called by the officers of the Building Trades 
Department and the American Federation of 
Labor the first weel; in July, 1910, the conven- 
tion to be held under the auspices of the same, 
for the purpose of consolidating all laborers 
in the building industry. 

"TIM DUNNE, 
"RALPH VBRRBCCHIA, 
"PATRICK .JUDGE." 

It will readily be seen that two propositions 
so widely divergent, with determined opposition 
against further concessions being granted, made 
the position of the representatives of the de- 
partment a difficult one. and we were, there- 
fore, compelled to adjourn without having ac- 
complished that for which we were called to- 
gether. 

Secretary Morrison was' present, also Vice- 
President Huber of the American Federation 
of Labor, Secretary Duffy and several others, 
who all used their influence in the interests of 
the mutual concessions, and while the repre- 
sentatives of the International Ilod-Carriers 
assumed the position that they could not take 
any action contrary to the constitution, never- 
theless their past actions proved that this 
statement was not correct. While this atti- 
tude was criticised by many of tbe representa- 
tives of the independent local unions, they 
themselves, by their frequent expressions, 
showed that many of them, too, were there 
with instructions. 

The conference was adjourned without hav- 
ing accomplished that for which it was called. 

Secretary Spencer corresponded with all of 
the independent unions who had sent money to 
the department and urged that they take out 
a charter in the International Hod-Carriers and 
Building Laborers' Union. Several of these did 
so, while the money was returned to the others. 

I have no criticisms in this case other 
than as applies to the laborers themselves, 
both independent and national. Had either 
party worked in harmony with the Building 
Trades Department great benefits would have 
been derived ; had the officers of the Interna- 
tional Ilod-Carriers worked in unison w^ith us 
it would have been the means of strengthening 
their position as well as that of the Interna- 
tional, and had the independent unions done 
likewise, nothing could have prevented the de- 
partment from adjusting their differences. 

I am, therefore, of the opinion that the In- 
ternational Association of Hod-Carriers and 
Brick Laborers should receive the support of 



the Building Trades Department wherever pos- 
sible. 

It is true tha't they did not show a disposi- 
tion to assist the department to bring into 
their ranks the members of the independent 
locals throughout the country. It is, however, 
also true that the independent organizations in- 
sisted upon conditions that the officers of the 
International Association could scarcely be ex- 
pected to comply with, and I would, therefore, 
recommend and urge that the locals of the 
Building Trades Council give all the assistance 
in their power toward organized building la- 
borers in the above-named organization. 

— Chicago, "111. — 

One year ago this time the Building 
Trades in the City of Chicago were in 
a very chaotic condition. There was an or- 
ganization in existence known as the Associ- 
ated Building Trades, also a chartered Building 
Trades Council. The crafts were about evenly 
divided in the two organizations, but the great- 
est number of men were affiliated with the de- 
partment. About the time of the meeting of the 
Tampa convention some friction arose in the 
Painters' District Council, whereby a number 
of locals withdrew from the Painters' District 
Council arid formed what they termed the 
Painters' Joint Conference Board, and applied 
and were admitted to the Building Trades 
Council. This was not in accordance with the 
laws of the department, but the painters who 
withdrew from their council and Building 
Trades Council assumed that they were com- 
plying with the laws of the department by 
afliliating with the Local Council. 

I attended several conferences, in which 
President Gompers, acting as chairman, en- 
deavored to bring the two different factions to- 
gether, but the position assumed by the repre- 
sentatives of the Painters' District Council was 
of such a nature that it was impossible to 
effect a settlement. 

The Painters' District Council made and 
signed an agreement with the Master Painters 
of Chicago for 561c per hour. This was 
repudiated by the, painters affiliated with the 
Building Trades Council, and they refused to 
comply with it, demanding 60c per hour, and 
without much trouble succeeded in signing up 
an agreement with the contractors of Chicago 
for 60c per hour. The winning of this advance 
in wages for the painters affiliated with the 
Building Trades Council immediately brought 
the other local unions, who were affiliated with 
the Painters' District Council, in line with the 
Building Trades Department, so that at the 
present time they are all affiliated with the 
council. 

About the same time the Associated Building 
Trades seemed to have lost several of their or- 
ganizations, who then proceeded to form what 
was termed a "IMiddle-of-the-Road Organiza- 
tion." After several meetings with the repre- 
sentatives of the crafts forming the last-named 
organization, an understanding -was reached. 



T Ih a C a r p a in t 



and at the present time I am pleased to state 
that all of the building trades in Chicago are 
affiliated with the Building Trades Council, 
carrying a department card and working har- 
moniously together. 

— Evansville, Ind. — 

About the first of last May the carpenters, 
sheet metal workers and electricians moved for 
better conditions and increased wages. This 
was denied them by the contractors, and they 
asked for a committee to meet them to en- 
deavor to adjust the differences and effect a 
settlement, but unfortunately their advances 
were not met favorably — quite to the contrary, 
they were turned down without ceremony. 
They exasperated the contractors to such an 
extent that they refused to enter into any 
negotiations whatever. The trouble immediate- 
ly involved the painters, plumbers and plas- 
terers. The plasterers, however, withdrew 
from the Building Trades Council, leaving the 
Ave ti-ades named to fight their own battles. 

I was called to Evansville during the month 
of July and spent some little time visiting the 
different influential business men to endeavor 
to bring the contractors and mechanics to- 
gether, but the employers refused absolutely to 
meet any one, with the result that I left the 
city without having made any progress what- 
ever toward adjusting the trouble. 

The carpenters, in order to provide work 
for their men, bought a planing mill. This, 
for a time, was quite successful, and it 
seemed that the men would eventually win, 
but after a continuous struggle for some time, 
the organization was compelled to give it up. 

I could not pass this by without compliment- 
ing the building trades men in the city of 
Evansville for the magnificent fight that they 
put up and the manner in which they sup- 
ported each other, and I feel sure that where 
a council is composed of men of such caliber, 
it is only a matter of time until they will re- 
gain — not only what they lost — but get what 
they ask for as well. 

— Denver, Colo. — 

It is with regret that I am again compelled 
to report the conditions in Denver, having im- 
proved very little since the time of the con- 
vention. In fact, matters seem to have drifted 
along, and for a time appeared to be growing 
worse. These conditions are of the same char- 
acter practically as were reported at the 
Tampa convention and seem to be growing 
from bad to worse. The same obstacle against 
harmony seems to exist in Denver as main- 
tained there a year ago, and the prospects for 
bettering the conditions appear rather remote. 
The subject was brought to the attention of 
the executive council of the department at its 
meeting held at Atlantic City in .Tune by the 
following resolution : 

"Communications from the cement workers, 
sheet metal workers, plumbers and steam fit- 
ters, and organizer of Amalgamated carpenters. 



were laid before the council drawing atten- 
tion to the action of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters in refusing to work with mem- 
bers of the council unless said members would 
tear up the cards of the Building Trades Coun- 
cil, and further drawing attention to the non- 
afliliation of the carpenters, plasterers, electric- 
al w^orkers, lathers, stone cutters and granite 
cutters. 

"It was moved that the secretary of the de- 
partment be instructed to communicate with 
the International unions whose locals are not 
affiliated with the Denver Building Trades 
Council, requesting that an officer be sent to 
Denver, July 26, to compel their respective 
locals to affiliate, and that President Kirby be 
instructed to represent the department in Den- 
ver, and in such conferences as may be held, 
and to participate in the conference." 

Owing to matters over which I have no con- 
trol, I was unable to reach Denver until 
August 8. When I arrived in that city I 
found that the organizations that were not 
afflliated with the Building Trades Department 
had a temporary organization. I attended one 
of their meetings for the purpose of listening 
to their grievances against the Building Trades 
Council. One of their principal objections, as 
stated by them to me, was, that organizations 
were seated in the council that were not in 
accord with tjie department nationally, and 
that some of our organizations had representa- 
tives from local unions instead of from Dis- 
trict Councils and central bodies, according to 
our constitution. They also claimed that the 
amalgamated carpenters should be represented 
through a joint District Council with the 
Brotherhood, and they asked that a new elec- 
tion be held and new officers of the Building 
Trades Council elected. 

The first part of their request, applying to 
non-affiliated organizations and representation 
from central bodies and District Councils, I 
considered just and equitable. The latter re- 
quest that a new election be held and new offi- 
cers elected, I considered too ridiculous to give 
consideration, inasmuch as the same feelings 
were extant when other officers were in charge 
of the Building Trades Council. 

After going over the situation with all par- 
ties and spending a great deal of time with 
the International officers present the following 
plan was adopted : 

1. That all unaffiliated eligible unions shall 
become afflliated with the local building trades 
council on or before September, 1910. 

2. That all hostilities must cease im- 
mediately. 

3. That any Local Union or unions now 
affiliated with the Local Building Trades 
Council, not entitled to affiliation per the laws 
and decisions of the Building Trades Depart- 
ment, shall be suspended from membership on 
or before September 16, 1910. 

4. That where there are " two or more 
Local Unions of the same craft or Interna- 



29 



T lb e Carpeinther 



tional organization existing in the city, said 
Local Unions must be represented in tlie Local 
Building Trades Council tlirough a District 
Councii, in accordance witli Section No. 39 of 
the constitution of the Building Trades De- 
partment on or before September 16, 1910. 

5. In the event that any union or unions 
affected by this decision fail to abide by it on 
or before September 16, 1910, the officers of 
the Building Trades Department shall request 
their respective International organizations to 
revoke their charter immediately. 

6. In the event of the Local Building 
Trades Council refusing to abide by this de- 
cision on or before September 16, 1910, Presi- 
dent Kirby shall revoke the charter thereof, 
and immediately institute a new Building 
Trades Council in the City of Denver, strictly 
in accordance with the constitution of the 
Building Trades Department. 

7. All unaffiliated unions shall be required 
to take a working card of the Local Building 
Trades Council for each member for the months 
of October, November and December. 

8. President .lames Kirby shall preside at 
the meeting of the Local Building Trades 
Council on September 16, 1910, and see to it 
that this plan is put into effect in detail. 

On behalf of 
The United Brotherhood of Carpenters, 

O. L. BRADFORD. 
Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers, 

ROBT. BYRON. 
Lathers' International Union, 

WM. J. MeSORLEY. 
Brotherhpod of Painters, 

JOHN M. FINAN, 
International Brotherhood of Electrical Work- 
ers, 

F, J. McNULTY. 
The Building Trades Department, American 
Federation of Labor, 

JAMES KIRBY, President. 
A copy of this plan was sent to every Local 
Union in the city of Denver, and to every In- 
ternational organization affiliated with the 
Building Trades Department, and they were all 
asked to use their influence to the end that we 
might have a United Bhilding Trades Council 
in that city. 

I attended the regular meeting of the Build- 
ing Trades Council on September 16, 1910, and 
took charge of the meeting. I wish to say 
that at the meeting prior to that, which I at- 
tended, the Local Building Trades Council took 
action to comply with Instructions given above, 
and I found that they had carried out the let- 
ter and spirit of the law. Every organization 
was seated in accordance with the laws of the 
Building Trades Department, and much to the 
regret of the Local Building Trades men, the 
art glass workers, who had always heretofore 
been a part of the Building Trades Council 
had been unseated. The Brotherhood of Car- 
penters were present with a committee, who 
stated that if the Building Trades Council 
would respect their agreement until the expira- 



tion of same, that Is, not call strikes where It 
would affect the employers who had signed 
the agreement, they felt sure that the Brother- 
hood of Carpenters would immediately affiliate. 
This assurance the council refused to give, 
with the result that the carpenters have not 
as yet seen fit to affiliate with the Building 
Trades Council. The last information I have 
is to the effect that the stone cutters have 
since affiliated with the council, and the Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters, plasterers and granite 
cutters are still outside of the fold. 

The plumbers of that city had just passed 
through a long and serious lock-out, which 
grew out of the building trades fight. They 
are, however, regaining their own, and, if not 
now, will soon be in better condition than they 
were heretofore. 

I feel sure that had I been able to secure 
the personal assistance of some of the Interna- 
tional officers, whose organizations are not 
associated with the department In Denver, re- 
sults would have been different, but for some 
reason best known to themselves, the Interna- 
tional officers of several organizations were not 
present, and this, together with the fact that 
the Tampa convention rules against the action 
of the president of the department on a techni- 
cality, made the situation more difficult to deal 
with than it would have been otherwise. 

The only recommendation that I could make 
in the premises is that the International offi- 
cers urge their organizations to affiliate, and I 
realize at the same time how useless it is. 

— Newark, N. J. — , 

While Newark, N. J., is, perhaps, affected 
more in this case than any other city, never- 
theless, the same conditions prevail in other 
localities. There are several International or- 
ganizations in New York City whose Local 
Unions control that part of the State of New 
Jersey, of which Newark and surrounding ter- 
ritory is a part. While several International 
organizations concede the control of the above 
territory to their Local Unions of Newark, 
there Is a very successful Building Trades 
Council in Newark, and what hampers them 
quite frequently is the fact that the New York 
Building Trades men refuse to obey the orders 
of the Newark Building Trades Council. This 
confliction of authority frequently leads to 
complicated conditions. I could, if necessary, 
cite several organizations and several jobs 
where this has worked detrimental to the In- 
terest of all concerned. I believe that If a 
Building Trades Council is given jurisdiction 
in any locality, it should have absolute con- 
trol, and no members of an affiliated organiza- 
tion should have the right to come into its 
territory and work without strictly complying 
with the laws and orders of that council. To 
do otherwise is to create a chaotic condltloQ 
and a confliction of authority, which cannot 
help but destroy whatever good has been ac- 
complished by the Local Unions of the locality 
in which the Building Trades Councll is iltu- 



30 



Tlbe C 



ated. The laws of some of the Internationals 
permit their members to worlt in other juris- 
dictions without transferring. This is an in- 
ternal matter, over which the department 
exercises no control, neither is it necessary 
that they should, but all Internationals should 
compel their members to comply with the in- 
structions of the Building Trades Council when 
going from one locality to another. We have 
seen the spectacle of the mechanics quitting 
when instructed to by the Local Council, and 
of their being ordered back to work by the 
representatives of the Local Union to which 
they belong. In the city of Newark there 
exists an independent local union of tile layers. 
This organization was formerly seated in the 
Building Trades Council, but through the 
efforts of this office have been unseated. They, 
however, do the work in Newark regardless of 
the New York tile layers, and, in my opinion, 
they should be chartered by the International 
tile layers. I so recommended to their offi- 
cers, and while some of their International offi- 
cers appeared In favor, they seemed to be of 
the opinion that I should attend the tile lay- 
ers' convention and urge that such action be 
taken. I did not feel that it was the place 
of the president of the Building Trades De- 
partment to enter into controversy of that kind 
In the conventions of an affiliated organiza- 
tion. I felt that it would be presuming on my 
part to take such steps, but I believe that had 
the men who expressed themselves as favoring 
the chartering of the tile layers of Newark 
taken the same stand at their convention, 
there might have been different action taken. 
The New York building trades men will find it 
difficult to organize the tile layers of Newark 
without the assistance of the Newark me- 
chanics, and the Newark building trades men 
will hesitate to assist the New York Building 
Trades Council until there is a more thorough 
understanding regarding the observing of local 
rules, and while I am told overtures have been 
made by the tile layers of New York to those 
of Newark, nevertheless, there has been no 
adjustment of the misunderstanding, and while 
at this time the most acute conditions exist In 
the city of Newark, they prevail elsewhere to 
a greater or lesser extent. 

I bring this matter to the attention of the 
convention that some steps may be taken or 
some plan adopted whereby such conditions 
as outlined above can be eliminated or minim- 
ized. 

I suggest creation of permanent conference 
board and refer to special committee of New 
Jersey and New York. 

— Employers' Liability — 

I feel that I would not be doing justice to 
the mechanics of the building trades if I did 
not again urge them to take whatever politi- 
cal action that lies within their power to 
aboHsh the fellow-servant law and the as- 
sumed-risk act. Also, again, bring to mind the 
necessity of taking some action in our legisla- 



tive bodies that will abolish the system of in- 
surance that protects the employer against 
financial loss from injuries received by his 
workmen. I do not urge this in the spirit of 
antagonism against our employers, only in the 
fairness to ourselves and our families. If the 
casualty insurance companies, doing business 
as above mentioned, could be eliminated, I feel 
positive that more care would be exercised by 
our employers in the erection of their build- 
ings and In the use of up-to-date safety ap- 
pliances. So long as others flght their battles 
and pay their bills, it is immaterial to the em- 
ployer how many are injured, but once let the 
responsibility and loss be placed on those who 
are in position to prevent it and a great change 
will be immediately noticed. 

— Political Action — 

I have in several instances taken up matters 
with the government where contractors holding 
government contracts, were inclined to pay less 
than union wages, and in some Instances I 
have been successful in bringing pressure to 
bear ugon the contractors to pay the prevailing 
rate of wages, and that being done, the ques- 
tion of union and non-union immediately ad- 
justs itself, and I would again urge, as I did 
at Denver and again at Tampa, that whatever 
influence the building trades men can exert, be 
used to have congress take some steps that will 
cause government contractors to respect the 
wages and conditions in the localities where 
work Is done. 

Report of Secretary-Treasurer: 
Balance on hand September 1, 

1909 $ 2,278.68 

Receipts from all sources 20,396.01 

Grand total $22,674.69 

Total disbursements 18,851.13 

Balance on hand September 1, 

1910 .$ 3,823.56 

Your delegates introduced resolutions 

calling for representation according to 
taxation and the making of local B. T. 
department by-laws by the referendum 
vote. Also the resolution endorsed by the 
Des Moines convention, relative to the 
erection of hollow metal trim. 

Herewith follow the resolutions referred 
to; 

— Resolution No. 10 — 

By Delegates Wm. B. Macfarlane, James 
Hopkins, D. F. Featherston, J. T. Cosgrove, L. 
B. Regan, Wm. Greibling, James Kirby of 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners : 

Whereas, Much dissatisfaction is caused on 
account of the representation of Local Unions 
and District Councils of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of America in 



31 



TIbe Carpeot 



r 



local Building Trades Councils chartered by 
the Building Trades Department of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, and - 

Whereas, Such representation is not in ac- 
cord with the taxation levied — the minority 
controlling the majority while the majority 
pays the freight ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That representation of all bodies 
affiliated with the department, whether locally 
or nationally, be regulated proportionately, ac- 
cording to taxation paid. 

— Resolution No. 13 — 

Whereas, The laws governing the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and .Toine^i's of 
America are made by referendum vote of its 
members — a two-thirds vote of all members 
voting being necessary to make them law, and 

Whereas, Section 39 of the constitution of 
the Building Trades Department govern- 
ing Local Councils specifies that all laws and 
rules of Local Councils shall be submitted to 
all afl51iated locals for a referendum vote, a 
majority vote of the locals affiliated to be 
necessary for adoption of same ; provided, 
however, that such laws or rules have been 
previously forwarded to the General Ofiice for 
approval, and 

Whereas, Section 39 conflicts with the 
method and manner used by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America in making its laws, and 

Whereas, The constitution of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America prohibits any of its unions from 
afllliating with central bodies whose constitu- 
tions or by-laws conflict with those of the U. 
B. ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That all local laws, before becom- 
ing operative and in force, be submitted to 
referendum vote of the members of the organi- 
zations affiliated, a two-thirds majority vote of 
all members voting being necessary to make it 
law. 

— Resolution No. 15 — 

To the Third Annual Convention of the Build- 

~ing Trades Department of the American 

Federation of Labor : 

At the Sixteenth Biennial Convention of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, held in Des Moines, la., from Sep- 
tember 16 to 30. 1910, the following resolutions 
were read, concurred in by the convention and 
referred to the St. Louis convention of the 
Building Trades Department of the American 
Federation of I^abor : 

Whereas, The erection of the material known 
as hollow metal trim, sash and doors, metallic 
trim, sash and doors, and metal trim, was 
awarded to the carpenters by the Hon. Wm. J. 
Gaynor, who had been selected as umpire in 
accordance to all the laws and requirements 
laid down by the arbitration plan, in the mat- 
ter of arbitration between the sheet metal work- 
ers on .one side, and the .Toint District Council 
of Carpenters on the other, and 

Whereas. Our General Executive Board has 



ruled on several occasions that the U. B. of 
C. & J. of A. claims juri-sdiction over the erect- 
ing and placing of all hollow metal sash, 
frames, doors and trim, and 

Whereas, The carpenters have been erecting 
this material since it first appeared on the 
market, and are still erecting it in New York 
City, as well as in a number of other cities, 
for the reason that it is a strictly carpenter's 
proposition and requires the methods and skill 
of the carpenters to prepare the grounds in 
order to apply and properly execute the work, 
and 

Whereas, Every effort is being made by the 
sheet metal workers and the Kalameine Asso- 
ciation to deprive the carpenters of the erec- 
tion of this material ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, by the Sixteenth General Conven- 
tion of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and .Joiners of America in regular session as- 
sembled, That we declare emphatically and un- 
equivocally as a whole to retain the erection 
of steel and hollow metal trim, sash, and- 
doors, in accordance with the rulings of our 
General Executive Board ; and, be it further 

Resolved, That the oflicers of the American 
Federation of Labor and the officers of the 
Building Trades Department of the A. F. of L. 
be notified of our action, and that our dele- 
gates to the conventions of the A. F. of L. and 
the Building Trades Department are hereby 
instructed to carry out these resolutions. 

The report of the Executive Council 
dealt with many important matters, name- 
ly, the Metal Trades Department, Ameri- 
can League Professional Base Ball Clubs 
re Cleveland Club vs. B. L. Council, Ameri- 
can Brotherhood ,of Cement Workers vs. 
San Francisco B. T. Council and Elevator 
Constructors, appeal of International Asso- 
ciation Steam and Hot Water Fitters 
against action of Tampa convention and 
decision of Executive Council of the A. P. 
of L. thereon, Sheet Metal Workers' Inter- 
national Alliance vs. U. B. of C. and J. of 
A., International Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers, appeal of Wood, Wire and Metal 
Lathers' International Union against ac- 
tion of Tampa convention and decision of 
Executive Council of the A. F. of L. there- 
on. Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators 
and Paperhangers vs. International Broth- 
erhood of Composition Roofers, Marble 
Workers' International Association vs. 
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers' In- 
ternational Association re State Treads 
and Hodcarriers and Building Laborers re 
Tampa convention. 
(Continued on Page 33 in back of Magazine.) 



32 



GENERAL VOTE 



ON THE 



Amendments to the Con^itution 



AS AGREEX) TO AND ADOPTED BY THE 



Sixteenth Biennial Convention 



HELD IN 



Des Moines. la., Sept. 19 to Sept. 30, 1910 



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No. 31 


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No. 30 


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No. 29 


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No. 28 


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Proposi- 
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No. 27 


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Proposi- 
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No. 26 


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No. 25 


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Proposi- 
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No. 24 


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Proposi- 
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No. 23 


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Proposi- 
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No. 22 


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Proposi- 
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No. 10 


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No. 9 


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No. 8 


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No. 7 


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No. 6 


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No. .5 


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No. 4 


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No. 2 


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No. 21 


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No. 20 


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Proposi- 
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No. 19 


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No. 18 


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Proposi- 
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No. 17 


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No. 16 


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Proposi- 
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No. 15 


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Proposi- 
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No. 14 


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Proposi- 
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No. 13 


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Proposi- 
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No. 12 


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No. 11 


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Proposi- 
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No. 32 


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Proposi- 
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No. 31 


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No. 30 


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Proposi- 
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No. 29 


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Proposi- 
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No. 28 


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Proposi- 
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No. 27 


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No. 26 


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Proposi- 
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No. 25 




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Proposi- 
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No. 24 


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Proposi- 
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No. 23 


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Proposi- 
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No. 22 


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XXV 



Proposi- 
tion 
No. 10 


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tion 
No. 9 


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No. 8 


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No. 7 


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No. 6 


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No. 5 


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No. 4 


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Proposi- 
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No. 3 
Last Half 


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No. 3 
First Halt 


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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 2 


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Proposi- 
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No. 1 


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cocotococococococoeceocococococoeocoeococoeocoeocoeocococofocooo 



XXVI 



Proposi- 
tion 
No. 21 


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Proposi- 
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No. 20 


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b-OiTj<00«3lOaiCOi-H10t^-^t-as •lOr-lrH-^OlOOOO .COrHO-^OlfSt- 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 19 


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tr- -■^CjeO-'^t^ -O-^tD .t^Ot- .O --^Ol .CTJI-^C00 01M^001 -imb- 
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Proposi- 
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No. 18 


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Proposi- 
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No. 17 


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Proposi- 
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No. 16 


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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 15 


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r-t • 1-1 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 14 


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No. 13 


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'rj<cqcooirHcocqi-(i-icq 'Tji coi-(CQ(M iHcqcoi-(i-i-*rHco -cqco '^oa 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 12 


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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 11 


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XXVII 



Proposi- 
tion 
No. 32 


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Proposi- 
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No. 31 


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Proposi- 
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No. 30 


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Proposi- 
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No. 29 


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Proposi- 
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No. 28 


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Proposi- 
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■No. 27 


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Proposi- 
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No. 26 


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Proposi- 
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No. 25 


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Proposi- 
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No. 24 


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Proposi- 
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No. 23 


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No. 22 


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cjcococococococococococococococoeocococococococococococococccoco 



xxvni 





Proposi- 
tion 
No. 10 


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Proposi- 
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No. 9 


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CO '^rH 'iHCO - 'O . .OJ(M •-• -mot* -T^ . • • 'lOi-llO • • . 
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Proposi- 
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No. 8 


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Cq CM • • rH CM i-H 




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No. 7 


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Proposi- 
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No. 6 


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No. 5 


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Proposi- 
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No. 4 


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No. 3 
Last Half 


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No. 3 
First Half 


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No. 2 


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No. 1 


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XXIX 



Proposi- 
tion 
No. 21 


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Proposi- 
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No. 20 


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No. 19 


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No. 18 


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No. 17 


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No. 16 


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No. 15 


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No. 14 


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No. 13 


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No. 12 


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No. 11 


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No. 32 


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No. 31 


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No. 29 


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No. 28 


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No. 27 


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No. 26 


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No. 25 


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No. 24 


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No. 23 


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No. 22 


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XXXVII 



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No. 10 


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No. 9 


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No. 8 


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No. 7 


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No. 1 


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XXXVIII 



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No. 21 


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No. 18 


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No. 17 


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No. 16 


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No. 15 


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No. 14 


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No. 13 


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No. 12 


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No. 11 


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XXXIX 



Proposi- 
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No. 32 


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No. 31 


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No. 30 


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No. 29 


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No. 28 


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No. 27 


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No. 26 


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No. 25 


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No. 24 


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No. 23 


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No. 22 


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No. 10 


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No. 9 


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No. 8 


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No. 6 


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No. 5 


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No. 4 


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C^ ••iHrHi-l'CM i-l-iHrHiHf-HiHrH- (M i-l t-fX) CO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 9 


jsutbSy 


(O -t-fMOOiH .COlOt-QO -CO • -CCI - 'r-lQO • Oi ^ • • •OO^t-i-H<M - 
iHrH 'COi-lrH- ••iH'-Cg- ... ^r-H- 


JOi 


• CM'-'T-lrHrH-i— I'l-i'iHr-l-i— iT-HrH- -CO • • d CO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 8 


ISuibSy 


• lO •i-Hi-HrH • • -i-H • -tH r-{ tOlOi-l • • 

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JOJ 


t-lOl^-Tt^l^-I-lO(X>^r:>I-^coI-lt-lO■<t^coococoC5ClOit-t-ot-oo-^t^col^^locD 

I— li— li-Hr- iT-HCOCOrHiH i— li— Ir-li— li— li— 103 CO i— 1 CDCOrH?— (CO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 7 


!(Su™3t 


CM TjH .... 


Joa: 


t-Ot-t-aiCOOlOinCICOrHQOlO-^iJOOOrH-^OOOiaiOt-i-lt-OOtDOCOlOCD 
(M iHiHrHiHi-HCQCOrHi-l rHi-HiHi-Hi-li-llM -^ i-H (Ot-iHiHCO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 6 


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■ • • ■ CO - • ■ • t- ^ . . . . 

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joa 


t-Ot-t-^(MOt~lOlOOO.HCiOlOTt*OOOCO-*OC:CncOt-i-lt'COCOCiCOlOtD 
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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 5 


jBniBSy 


• • • 'in • • -COCO - • t- '^t* • 'I-l • 

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JO^ 


t^Ot>-»^COC<IOOOC<l01QOrH,-HlO'<:t1000cO'*t-01<3STj<b-Cqt-OOCDtDCO*^^ 
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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 4 


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. . . ■ b- Cvl • • lO -* -<*1 • OO • -* Ol * .1-1 • * Tt* • . lO - 


JOJ[ 


t-.Ot-t-rHOO00 .QOt-T-H .lO -OOOCOCOt-Oi -COt-CMt-CO^Ot-CO -(O 

(M I-l rHi-li-l-CarHi-l-r~l-iHi-ln-*i-i(M. -CO 1-1 ^Dt-r-H-CO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 3 
Last Half 


jsniBSY 


t-Ot-OOOcOi-lCOlO'^CO -rHlO -OO • -riCO -Oi -t- -t- -OOCOCOt- • 
1-) 1-li-H CO iH* i-l'iH'' CO* - • 'CqcOi-lrH* 


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■ t- .iHi-HOOlCQ .00(MrHt- -t^ • •COi-H r-i -COCOOS • -tO 

rH 1-H.CQ 1-1 -i-l-'i-lrH r-i ■ <M'-CO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 3 
Sirst Half 


ISUIbSv 


t- • -r-i ■TjHlOlOWQOiHOOCO-^OO -COrH • •airHt-Tj<l>.lr-<MCOCOb- - 


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■ - p-.i-H-Cl iH. -CO- -lO .»CO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 2 


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. .. .(^]Ti^ -.-iioco QO'i-i -"^ - .-00 

• • • • -co iH CM 


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t-Ot-t-OQOOt- .01COi-(ODTt<-^ .QOC\lCOC0050t-t-irDt-00«OOCOt>-lO 
M rHi-H r-(rH*CQCQi-l t-Hi-i- i-lrHCO CO r-( CC>«:'rHiH 


Proposi- 
tion 

No. 1 


!)Sutb3v 


lO^ • .1-lCO '00 • -iH i-HiHlO 


JOJ 


t>ot-oo>i:'ooojoo •ooeoi-it-(M'<i< .ooorHiooiosco •■^t-ootooTjicqoo 

(M tHF*' i-I'(M<Mi-( iH« iHi-ICQ CO- UDt-rHiHCvl 




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c<^cQcqc^^cQ(^3c^c^c■lG<]G^]ooc<^(^]CJc^]Cv^c^]c^^coc^lC^)caoocJc^]cococoeccoco 



LXXI 



Proposi- 
tion 
No. 21 


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;•; rH ••••■ lO •••••••■■•.' M 1-1 . • 

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JOjI 


CQ 1— (iHrHi— |i— lCO(MiHi— i i-Hi— 1 .rHi— IrHrH r-t i— i I— lOrHrHCO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 20 


IsuiuSy 


. - .rHCQ-...<M''T-l iH.. 


JOJ 


Cq I— (fHi— li— trHCOCOiHi— I iHi— 1 .i— li— li— (i— 1 rH 7-{ t.^if^^,_|ci-) 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 19 


IsniBSy 




JOJ[ 


■ d rH rHi-1 COCOr-li— 1 -r-i.!— ii— IrH ..,— | t— 1- i^^o,— (i— (CO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 18 


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. . .W'-'iH*-^ iH-rH 


.ioj: 


l--Ot-THCOC^IO-*lOCOCOi-IGOlO-^ ■OCOTtH(MOiOOCMI>-CDtr-OOlC'*COir:i!X) 
(M iHi-li-trHiHCOCMr-(r-< iH.H.rHrHi-1 (?] r-\ t-OOiHi-lCO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 17 


^sniESy 


Cvl-rHiHi-1 -COiH i-ICO i-H' • • i-\ 


.tOoE 


■ -t-CQ -i-lOOfD -OacOi-lTHlOrtl -OTtl • -CO -Tjlt-t-- • -lOCv] -i-H^D 
- - ■ iH'OJrHi— 1 I— (i— l«i— 1 ■• . ..t_t:_. cO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 16 


IsniiiSY 


(M« 1— li— li— li— ICO-i— 1 ^rH-rH>f— l(M*' -CQ -l^-r-l CO 


JOj: 


. •t-.lOCQ • - - •COCOca . • -CO -COrH •OSOlCOb- • . -lO . • ^ Cfi 
. ', T-l ••••CO •••rH-i-H • i-j ...t-..r^ 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 15 


4SuibSy 


r-{ ' •; 'tt^'X'l-l • .CO . -t-OO . .1-1 • • 


■10^ 


t-Ot-i-(C0CMO'<:tH10CMt-rH00inj^00O01t-l00Sait-L"'Tfl . •lO00<ML--CD 
(M C-Tr-tiHrHrHCOCQi-lT-l iHiHt-Hi-H rH (M-.tr-O0«-HrHCO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 14 


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-O . -b-C^l •lOlOt-OlrHOOlOTt^GO -CO -Oi-iasCNl .t-tr-00 • .C0L--IO 
•CM/'tH • COrH rH rHrHr4-rH-CT ■ r-\ • ■ rHCO 


Joa 


t- .1^00 -OOrH .000 O .Tt<lO00 .CDt^in . •lO'^O -rH 

rH*rHTHrH*rH rH-rH -rH ..t^t—pH- 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 13 


jsniBSy 




Joa 


t--OL--t-LOC]OiO ■O«:'T-Ht-l0TtH00OC0'*as0J .OOt^Cvl -COlOi-HCO -to 
CQ I— IrHi— IrHrH -rHrHrH rHrHr-irHr-irHOa • r~i r~{ . t^^tlrH -CO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 12 


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• • . . TJH ■ ■ • -^ 00 ■ • rH rH t- . • . cO • ■ 

• • • • 1-i . . • r-i rH . ■ 


Joa 


^>.Ob-tDrHOaOTt^rHTt^OOr^t-lOTt^OOOCOTJ^rHOS .0Ot^M< 'OOOCvl .IC(X^ 
<M rH rHrHrHCOrHt-lrH rHrHrHrHrHrHC<l • r-\ r-\ * t-lTD -rHCO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 11 


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• t-i • -O • • • ■•* • • r-i • -00 • • 'CO -OJ • • -t- ■ ■ -CO • ■ 

. . p_| ■ * - ■ • - ' . j-i . . . ... . , . ,_| . . 


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b-Clt-tDcOOqOTtHmCOOOrHt-lO'* -OCO-^lOOi ■lOt-CD -COOIO -lOtD 
rH rH rHrHrHCOCsIr^rH rHrH -rHrHrHCM -CO r-\ ■ b-t- -rHCO 




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l0'rit--000SrHC^Il0O0:il0<CC0C<]C0CDtr-rHC0CqrHC<IIr-THl>.C3D]lOb-0.]C0'<^ 
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(:>3 oi eg CQ c<] c^i CQ CQ c-1 eg <>] cvi (>i Cvi c^a oi eg cvi c<i c^i CQ c^i <>i C-] c^j oi CO CO CO CO CO c^ 



LXXII 



Proposi- 
tion 
No. 32 


^sniuSy 


rH ■ - --^ 

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JOJ 


t^ot-cooooioscDioooiooooin-^cooco'^ociC^-^t-ot-oc'^^rot-tD 

CM i-li-tT-l i-lCQT-lrHi-1 THrHi-iT-liHiHfM i-l t-H ^>■tD^r^CO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 31 


IsuT^Sy 


. • - cq Th---CO 

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■lOJ 


t-Ot-COOOCQOlOlO .lOOOOlOTjIOOOeO-^iHOlOSt-t-COt-OOCDCOCOt-CO 
(M i-lrHi-lrHrHCC-rHrH rHiHrHTHrHiHCQ i-l cpoOrHrH 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 30 


■(saiisSv 


T-(lO • • -O ■■ '(M Tjlt-OO- ■ • 't- 


.ioj: 


t-Ot-OOOr-ICQCOlOCSI .OOOiOCOOOOcO-^rHGiOit^t-OS ■ 'IQClCOt-ai 
CO C«3i-lrH rHCOCO'iH r-{ iH»HiH>-H(M rH --t-tDi-li-ltM 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 29 


jsuTuSy 


CQ -lot-' -rH 1-1 ■ .-tH -r-H- 

■ CO I— 1 • ■ ... 


Joa 


t-Ot^OOt-CMOOlO •l0C0Ob-10-^Q0OC0C0Ciai0l!::3t-Ob-00O«:JC0-<J^tD 
Cv] I— li— ii— 1 I— t'r-lrH?-t I— li— ti— (tHi— Ii— li— 1 i— 1 iH fc— Tt<i— li— ICO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 28 


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Joa 


t-Ot-CitOCvlO^iraCXIiMOCOlO •COOCOOOOlOiOlt-t-t- -tDCClCOt^CD 
•ri i-JrHrHiHi-ICOCOrHrH iH-rHrHrHrH(M i-i -CDCOrHiHcO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 27 


3SuibSy 


• - • •CM--.-i*-i-l.TH <M I:--- 


joa 


t^ot-OJcocMOlo^n<^^al^Hb-^OTt^coocoTt^ooalal'^b-(^lb-QOTt^l^ltDcD^ 

(M I— It— li— (i— liHCOCO i— I i— liHi-Hr-(i—trHi— 1 t— ( I^-CO iHCO 


Proposi- 
tion" 
No. 26 


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■loa 


t-Ot-GlCOCMOSlOlOOOiHi-Ht-lO .QOOCOCOlOOl -rHt-r-lt-OOlOOOCOlOCO 
O] 1— (i— (!-< iHCOrHrHrH i— I'l— li— IrHi— (i— 1 -i— 1 t^r^i— li—iCO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 25 


^snreSY 


lo . CD oa 

CO tH 


joa 


t-Ot-COOOOqOlO .OClTHT-lOOlOTHCOOSr-l-^OOOJOlt-t-lOt-COCOCOcOfc-CO 
<M I— It— li— li— (I— t'CO I— 1 iHi— li— 1 I— li— 1 CO i— 1 t-^CDrHiHCO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 24 


jsnjBSv 


CO iH • • • 


JO^ 


t-Olr-Olt-CMOCO -i:© •i-IOOir:3-*COO(MTj^O]aiCnt-b--*t-OOt-COO:i.'X5CD 
CO rHi-Hi— (1— It— I.CO-i— I t— It— li— li— li— li— (t— 1 rH i— 1 tDCD i— ICO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 23 


Isui^Sy 


- • . rH CO • . Ttl in ■* • -(M CO • •* • ' • 

• • • • • CO i-H 


Joa 


t-ot-cocooaoo *oob-l-lcolOTf^ooocort^l^-asal(^^^^-tDt-col^-coalTt^cD 

CM iHi-(THi-IiH-rHrHrH rHiHiHTHiHrHi-l rH COCO rHCO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 22 


jsnrea-y 


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t-Ol:-«Cil>.COOt-lO(Mt-rHt-lO'*COOCOTjlTjlOiC3iTtlt-lOt- -lOCOCO-^CD 
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c<lc^lc^^cgcgcocococoTJ^-.;t^Tt^T^^OlOlOlOCDtDt-ooooooaJcn,alOOOT-(T-lT-l 
oi eg cvi c<i (^] oi (>i oa G^] <^^ oi cvj c^i (^1 eg CO CI CI CN c^J c<i (>3- C.1 CI cvi (^^ CO CO CO CO c^ 



LXXIII 



Proposi- 
tion 
No. 10 


jshibSy 


• ■ -lO • -i-tCO • -O ■ -OS ■ ■ j-i <iO • • • 'i-H • ■ -COOS "(M •(>] 
- • ■CO'- .-<M--(M-- .... ...^^.(^.^ 


JOj[ 


COOOi -ClCOClCOt-t- .COOS .COCDC<],-i:DrHOO(M01 --rJ^i-H . -T-tcooim 
rHiHrH- r-li-t ^ <X> • •COt-<McO'*iHOqiOCO*i-l'rti--i-l tJI 

CO ... 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 9 


^suibSv 


Id -rHin . -CMIOCO -O • .00 • .OlO-X^i-l -t- ■ -i-H -CDCi 'Cit-lO 
CO • • r-l -CO • 'CM • • <M Oq ■tt^ . lO - • i-l • i-l i-H • i-l 'tJ^ 


JOJI 


;DOOO -COCOi— iCMlOt- -OOOi -"^CO -lO -OCO 'COCO -co • -I— l^DCM-^ 
iH"^* I— Ir-I COCO* 'CMOO'i— I'tHC'I'COi— i*TtH**rH rjl 

Cvl . . . ... 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 8 


IsniBSy 








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OOOlOaiMCOCOCOCDt-OOOOit- •0i0it-C0rHi-IOaiC0-^C0t-0;i-iTH050i 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 7 


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TjlOOlTtlOCOCOtDCOt-OGOOSOSrt* •i-Ht-^DrHIOOOCMCOT^COt-OST-lTjHt^Tfl 
i-HiHrHCOi-ltHi-lrHTjICOCq (Mi-l .COCOTt<rH<Mt^ i-l»-(TtHi-li-lrHC<!Tt<CO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 6 


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OS-*--rH-lO 

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ms[ 


'^OOSTjIOSCOCOCDtOb-OOOOSOS''^ -Ob-CDi-ICOOaiOr-lrHCMb-b-rHCQOSOS 
i-Hr-H'^CO i-(i-(.-l-^t<C00q (Mi-H -COCO^tli-ltMCO rHrHTi<rHiHiHCM-*eO 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 5 


jsniuSy 


■-(■■>-! (M • ■ ■ ■ eg ..j-i.. 


CMOai'*rHC0<Mt-OCDO0005Q0'*U:i00t~CDi-1OCNlC0C0rH-^Jlt-CCir-1tD0it- 
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eg Cv3 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 4 


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t~- 50»t-«*-C<l'.--*0-.--*' 

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■I-^Ti^CO r4rH.H-*COG>a t-HIC(MC0'^ 03t-t-i-!i-l •i-lrH»-lr4rJ4-<^ 

iH i-t 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 3 
Last Half 


ISUibSy 


■^ • 't- -COtO-^Ob- • .OICD -OS ■ ^O \0 -t~ .OS • • -OlCDCsieOfMCO 
,H • • CO ■ tH in CO • • Cq ■ O ■ (M r^ • i-i . CO • • ■ rH r-l W 


Joa 


. -OS -Cvl -t-COiH -OOO ■ -•"^i-l -OS .rHTtH .iHCOrHtM • .OsOt-in 
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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 3 
First Half 


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OSCO - -coco ■ -OtJIOOO • -TjiCOOilO 'CMOiTtl •■ -OS (M*^ • ■ 
• -T-HrH-'lO (M ■ -tD(M TJ^•(Mt-r^■•••^-^ ■• 


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CQt^ <MCO ■ •O1s!-'00-*-:^:D •i-HTHt--t-COi-l(M -vyOSOOl ■ 

CO-' f>THCO CO-rHi-H iHrH'^-?*- (M-^- 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 2 


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i-HIOrHt- • - • •CCIO . . . -in -OS • -in • • -i-l • • 

r-\ CO ' • • • i-\ C^ • ' • ' r-i • <0 ■ • eo ' • • •' 

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■^OOStDOcOOaOrH -OOOOSCZ)!— ICOi-H*^-^!— 1-^O(MC0t-1 -t^OlTHCMOSOS 
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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 1 


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• • • 01 ■ -i-HTti -t-cM • • • 't- • • • -CO -o • -oa 

■ • • • • i-H-CO ....(M.-.-rH-CO--'^ 


JOJ 


OOOS'-^incOtMr-HO •OOODOSCOmiOi-l-'JICOrHCOlOt-Or-l 'OOOSi-HtDOSOS 
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LXXIV 





Proposi- 
tion 
No. 21 


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Proposi- 
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No. 20 


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Proposi- 
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No. 19 


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1-1 -t- .CO • • lO • t>~ iHlC . • . -Ot-I^ - . .<M . . 

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Proposi- 
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No. 18 


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rHi-i-TlHCOiHi-li-Hi-lTt^CO • {MCOt-COCOT*HiHCa-*lOrHT-ICO i-Hi-tCMTtlCQ 




Proposi- 
tion 
No. 17 


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rHTj<COiH .•Oa..rH lO CO'^JI-CM.t-i-li-CiH i-(i-IC<l-<M 




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rH.t-1'^eO COCQCg ■rH.'* ... . tJI 




Proposi- 
tion 
No. 16 


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lO -COCICvlr-t .OitOt-i-HCO -Tt< -OllCOltD • -TflMlTHrH .t-Oqi-HCO -CO 
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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 15 


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No. 14 


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No. 13 


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No. 12 


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No. 11 


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No. 32 


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No. 31 


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No. 30 


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No. 29 


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No. 28 


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No. 27 


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No. 26 


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No. 25 


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No. 24 


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No. 23 


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No. 22 


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LXXVI 



Proposi- 
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No. 10 


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Proposi- 
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No. 9 


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No. 8 


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No. 7 


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No. 6 


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No. 4 


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No. 3 
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No. 3 
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No. 2 


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No. 1 


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LXXVII 





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No. 21 


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No. 20 


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No. 19 


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No. 18 


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No. 17 


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No. 16 


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No. 15 


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No. 14 


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No. 13 


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No. 12 


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No. 11 


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Proposi- 
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No. 32 


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Proposi- 
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No. 31 


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Proposi- 
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No. 30 


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Proposi- 
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No. 29 


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Proposi- 
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No. 28 


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Proposi- 
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No. 27 


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Proposi- 
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No. 26 


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Proposi- 
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No. 25 


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Proposi- 
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No. 24 


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Proposi- 
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No. 23 


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Proposi- 
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No. 22 


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LXXIX 



Proposi- 
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No. 10 


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No. 19 


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No. 25 


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No. 1.5 


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Proposi- 
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No. 14 


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com . . 01 CM to - . ^ in Oi rti • T-i ■ rl • - • -^ CO ^ CO (D 

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No. 13 


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Proposi- 
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No. 12 


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Proposi- 
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No. 11 


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LXXXIV 





Proposi- 
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No. 32 


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Proposi- 
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No. 31 


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No. 30 


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No. 29 


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Proposi- 
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No. 28 


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Proposi- 
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No. 27 


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Proposi- 
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No. 26 


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Proposi- 
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No. 25 


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Proposi- 
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No. 24 


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No. 23 


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No. 22 


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IjXXXV 



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No. 10 


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No. 9 


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No. 8 


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No. 7 


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No. 6 


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No. 5 


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No. 4 


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No. 3 
Last Half 


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^No. 3 
First Half 


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No. 2 


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-No. 1. - 


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LXXSVI 



Proposi- 
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No. 21 


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joj: 


T-f-^ tHi— It- OCM 1—1 I— li— Ii-HoO'— li— lt-<M 

cq CO 


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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 20 


jsnreSv 












JOJ 


I— iioiH -icoii— 1-^mco-^t^co .TJ^cc■^^o-^t^c^"l 

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M • CO 


•C3dr-lTf< •"^Oltr-i— ICO 
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Proposi- 
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No. 19 


?snre3y 


i-ItH{M rH*(M 


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Proposi- 
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No. 18 


ISuibSy 


CM-CQ rH-O-i-H 

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JOj: 


Olio .cocot^^-l-^i^oo■<i^t-co^o■*t-^ot-o-<:t10 

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CM CO 


• OCOrHTj^OJ-^O'-iHi-tCO 
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Proposi- 
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No. 17 


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Proposi- 
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No. 16 


jsuibSy 


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b- rH • rH i-i. ' r-K • 


Joa 


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Proposi- 
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No. 15 


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(M • CO 


• <3ilOrHTtiCOtMCJ^b-rHCO 
CJlt-l(MrHrHi-ICDrHr-l 


Proposi- 
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No. 14 


jsniBSy 


r-i • • -Ot-rHCM -^HtJI ^TflO^^JlCOOO ■ .-^iHi-l 
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•OlOrH-^CO -OlCOr-l • 
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Proposi- 
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No. 13 


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•CDOCOCD'^ -Tt^TiHCl^ -CO ■Tt<OlOOlO -Oi 
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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 12 


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joj: 


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CM ■ -CO 


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Proposi- 
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No. 11 


ISuibSv 


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• • CO tH • • . OJ rH . • 








JOJ 


rHtOlOCOlOt- -OO •'* •Tt^ -TtHlOfOOOMi|-l 
7-{ -^ rH <M • rH CO • r-{ - rH • rH CO CO CM b- r-i 
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t-OOO'-ClOlOOrHCMCMCMCO'^Th-^'^'^lOlO^COOOOOGiasOlOicSlOOOCJ 



LXXXVII 



Proposi- 
tion 
No. 32 


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joj: 


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rHrHrHlMi-lrHrHtDrHrH 


Proposi- 
tion 
No. 31 


^suibSy 










JOJ 


rHCOOCOtOcOait-t-i-lTHt^CO 


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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 30 


jsuibSy 


CO -Oft . . . 


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rHCO(MCOOt>i-lt-L--CQ'<^l>.CO 

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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 29 


^sntBSy 


















JOj: 


rHCOCMrHrH00i-tC;CMr-(rH rH 


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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 28 


?sniB3v 










Jtoa 


I— ItOOifOOJOiTHCOt-i— 1"^ -CO 
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CO 


OCJJrH-^l>.THO«rHeO 
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Proposi- 
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No. 27 


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Proposi- 
tion 
No. 26 


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LXXXIX 



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XCI 



T lb e C a r p a SI t 



Report of Committee on Tabulation of Vote on 
Constitutional Amendments. 



Indianapolis, Ind., Jan. 6, 1911. 
To Mr. Wm. D. Huber, General President, tJ. B. of C. and J. of A.: 

Dear Sir and Brother — We, you committee appointed to tabulate the vote on the 
amendments adopted at the Sixteenth Biennial Convention, held in Des Moines, Iowa, 
September 19 to September 30, inclusive, beg leave to submit the following report. We 
find that 1,040 Local Unions submitted votes on the amendments; eighty of which were 
thrown out on account of the votes not being returned according to the instructions sub- 
mitted by the General Secretary : 

— Votes Mailed too Late for Tabulation. — 

Local Union 428, Fairmount, W. Va. 

Local Union 468, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Local Union 530, Georgetown, Wash. 

Local Union 754, Fulton, N. Y. 

Local Union 1047, Poison, Mont. 

Local Union 1073, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Local Union 1347, Flatbusb, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Local Union 1786, Chicago, 111. 

Local Union 1795, Mishawaka, Ind. 

Local Union 1923, Devil's Lake, N. D. 

— Voted Either Without Local Seal or Official Signature — 

Local Union 50, Portland, Ore. 
Local Union 112, Butte, Mont. 
Local Union 113, Chesterton, Ind. 
Local Union 124, Bradford, Pa. 
Local Union 173, Munising, Mich. 
Local Union 319, Eoanoke, Va. 
Local Union 339, Ft. Worth, Tex. 
Local Union 356, Marietta, 0. 
Local Union 366, Sand Point, Idaho. 
Local Union 400, Hudson, Mass. 
Local Union 417, Colorado City, Colo. 

Local Union 567, Richmond Boro, N. Y. (Stapleton, N. Y.) 
Local Union 604, Murphysboro, HI. 
Local Union 702, Grafton, W. Va. 
Local Union 775, Hoquiam, Wash. 
Local Union 781, Princeton, N. Y. 
Local Union 835, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 
Local Union 1037, Marseilles, 111. 
Local Union 1196, Denver, Colo. 
Local Union 1364, Lancaster, Pa. 
Local Union 1771, Eldorado, 111. 
Six votes unsealed, unsigned and location unknown. 

XCII 



TIbe Carpent 



— Votes Not Specified in Figures — 
Local Union 108, St. Hyacinthe, Que., 



Local Union 341 

Local Union 525 

Local Union 623 

Local Union 721 

Local Union 806, 

Local Union 863 

Local Union 933 

Local Union 954 

Local Union 969 

Local Union 1001 

Local Union 1066 

Local Union 1127 

Local Union 1139, 

Local Union 1147, 

Local Union 1185; 

Local Union 1249, 

Local Union 1267, 

Local Union 1268, 

Local Union 1331, 

Local Union 1374, 

Local Union 1382 

Local Union 1389 

Local Union 1405, 

Local Union 1441 

Local Union 1451 

Local Union 1508 

Local Union 1518 

Local Union 1548 

Local Union 1552, 

Local Union 1566, 

Local Union 1605, 

Local Union 1663 

Local Union 1684 

Local Union 1686, 

Local Union 1779 

Local Union 1791 

Local Union 1810, 

Local Union 1851 

Local Union 1880 

Local Union 1903 



Can. 



Chicago, 111. 

Coshocton, 0. 

Danielson, Conn. 

NeTrton, Kan. 

Pacific Grove, Cal. 

Conneaut, 0. 

L'Ange Gardien, P. Q., (\in. 

Boston, Mass. 

Wclland, Ont., Can. 

Beeville, Tex. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Montreal, Can. 

Hollister, Cal. 

Baton Rouge, La. 

Moorestown, N. J. 

St. Stephen, N. B., Can. 

Warden, 111. 

Johnstown, N. Y. 

Brattleboro, Vt. 

Keyport, N. J. 

Sharpsburg, Pa. 

Santurce, San Juan, P. R. 

Red Bank, N. J. 

Cannonsburg, Pa. 

Monterey, Cal. 

Antigo, Wis. 

Douglas, Ga. 

New York, N. Y. 

Salamanca, N. Y. 

Lawrence, Mass. 

Moscow, Idaho. 

Bath, Me. 

Sherbrooke, Que., Can. 

Oak Creek, Colo. 

Calgary, Alta, Can. 

Cedar Rapids, la. 

Orofino, Idaho. 

Royalton, 111. 

Carthage, Mo. 

Gladstone, Mich. 



Local Union 1936, Calais, Me. 



— Total Vote For and Against Amendments — 

For. Against. 

Question No. 1 28,408 6,097 

Question No. 2 30,391 4,301 

Question No. 3 11,280 21,480 

Question No. 3 13,007 17,773 

Question No. 4 29,786 3,065 

Question No. 5 32,336 1,731 

Question No. 6 31,181 2,932 



xcin 



o t e r 



on No. 7 31,406 

on No. 8 29,873 

on No. 9 20,323 

on No. 10 23,893 

on No. 11 26,619 

on No. 12 29,553 

on No. 13 27,957 

on No. 14 18,527 

on No. 15 31,822 

on No. 16 .. 13,475 

on No. 17 16,922 

on No. 18 , .. 29,219 

on No. 19 '. 27,183 

on No. 20 .. 28,237 

on No. 21 28,495 

on No. 22. 28,415 

on No. 23 24,826 

on No. 24 24,553 

on No. 25 : 25,940 

on No. 26 25,509 

on No. 27 26,764 

on No. 28 29,806 

on No. 29 27,486 

— Amendments to Eitnal — 

For. 

Question No. 30, on Page 6, 27,767 

Question No. 31, on Page 3, 25,331 

Question No. 32, on Page 5, 25,353 



Quest! 
Questi 
Quest 
Quest 
Quest: 
Quest: 
Quest: 
Quest! 
Quest: 
Quest: 
Quest: 
Quest: 
Quest: 
Quest: 
Quest: 
Quest: 
Quest: 
Quest 
Quest: 
Quest: 
Questi 
Quest 
Quest: 



2,680 
3,509 

11,987 
8,260 
5,160 
4,081 
4,065 

15,390 
1,3.53 

19,366 

14,465 
3,287 
3,636 
1,706 
1,623 
1,431 
4,943 
2,414 
4,369 
1,872 
793 
512 
1,927 



Against. 
1,758 
2,758 
2,974 



Propositions Carried— 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 
25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32. . 

Propositions Lost— 3 (1st half), 3 (2d half), 9, 14, 16, 17. 

Committee on Tabulation : 

(Signed) VERNON FLETCHEE, L. IT. 359, Philadelphia, Chairman. 
CHAS. N. WILKINS, L. V. 637, Hamilton, 0., Secretary. 
C. B. HAUSE, L. U. No. 2, ancinnati, 0. 
B. H. GEAESSER, L. U. No. 9, Buffalo, N. Y. 
J. L. ADAMS, L. U. No. 11, Cleveland, 0. 



I 



XCIV 



arpaimter 



The Work of an A. T. of L. Organ- 
izer Appreciated. 

Editor The Carpenter: 

During tlie months of November and 
December we have had with us here in 
Vancouver, B. C, Brother J. A. Flett, 
organizer for the A. F. of L. (we say 
Brother Flett with double reason, since 
be is not only a brother unionist, but also 
a brother carpenter, who for many years 
has carried a card in the U. B.), and we 
wish to express through the columns of 
our Journal, The Carpenter, our apprecia- 
tion of Bro. Flett 's most fruitful work in 
this vicinity. He assisted our Local Union 
617 very materially in establishing new 
Local Unions in both New Westminister 
and Victoria, and at various times brigh- 
tened our hall by his presence at meetings, 
enlivening, encouraging and filling with 
enthusiasm the hearts of our members with 
his words of advice and council. 

It is the consensus of opinion in union 
circles here, as evidenced by a unanimous 
vote of thanks in appreciation of his ef- 
forts in this city, tendered him by both 
the Building Trades Council and the Labor 
Council, as well as by the U. B. and other 
organization, that Brother Flett is the 
most able, active and energetic A. F. of 
L. organizer it has ever been the good for- 
tune of Vancouver to entertain. 

Brother Flett, while here, besides ren- 
dering the U. S3, valuable aid in organiz- 
ing the Local Unions above referred to, 
secured charters for the sign-writers, mar- 
ble-cutters and setters, marble-polishers 
and helpers, for the upholsterers of Van- 
cover. His influence added to the efforts 
of the B. T. C. were largely responsible 
in swinging the Building Labor Union an 
independent organization, four hundred 
strong, into line internationally, and se- 
curing a charter for them; also in organiz- 
ing a B. T. C. in Victoria and the lathers 
of the same city. 

This is only the actual work done here 
by Brother Flett; the effect of his activity 
and result of his efforts may never be 
measured by words. May his days be 
long and his end be peace. May he long 
continue in the work he is so pre-eminently 
qualified to do, and may we soon again 

XCV 



have the pleasure of seeing Brother Flett 
in this vicinity in his capacity as organizer 
for the great A. F. of L. 

L. H. BURNHAM, E. S. 
L. U. 617 Vancouver, B. C. 



Iiook for the Union Iiabel. 

Editor The Carpenter: 

We are taking this course to call upon 
all union men and women and all those who 
are in sympathy with organized labor. 

We have been forced to recognize that 
the money power, individual firms and cor- 
porations are using their combined forces 
to bear against organized labor to crush 
it out. The courts throughout the country 
have granted injunctions against strikes, 
boycotts, unfair lists, pickets and so on, 
which means that organized labor has only 
one way open, and that is this — the Union 
Label, the laboring man's trade mark. 

Look for the label, ask for the label, tell 
your friends to ask for the label when 
buying furniture that you use every day in 
your house. Look for it everywhere and 
on everything you buy — refrigerators, 
desks, school desks, church seats, fixtures, 
etc. 

If you buy a billiard or pool table look 
for the label; if you play on a billiard or 
pool table look for the label before you 
play; the same with bowling alleys, ten 
pin and piano cases. 

The manufacturers of these goods say 
there is no call for the label. If all union 
men ask for the label it will be a great 
help to the toilers in the wood working 
industry, also interior fijiish, sash and 
doors. 

Don't lay this on the table but take it 
up under the head of unfinished business 
every meeting. 
CHAS. FEANKE, Prest. and Bus. Agt. 

Carpenters' and Millmen' Distnict Coun- 
cil, Muskegon, Mich. 



He who works for the general good works 
for his own good at the same time. 



The gate to justice is very. narrow for the 
poor, but wide open for the rich. 



p a n t eif 



Their Fight Still On. ft-;: : 

Editor The Carpenter: 

Will you kindly putllsh the following in 
the columns of your paper so the union 
men and retail dealers in your locality may 
be correctly informed of the true situation 
regarding the Marx & Haas lockout of St. 
Louis, Mo., and greatly oblige the under- 
signed: 

As our attention has been repeatedly 
called to the fact that the agents of the 
Marx & Haas clothing company have been 
circulating rumors to retail clothing mer- 
chants and union men in various localities 
to the effect that their fight against the 
United Garment Workers' unions had been 
settled, we wish to warn all retail dealers 
and union men to be on their guard and pay 
no attention to the misinformation that the 
firm's agents are circulating. 

The trouble is stiU on. We are in a bet- 
ter position today than ever before and more 
determined to fight this battle to a success- 
ful conclusion than we were at any other 
time. Organized labor can rest assured 
that we will keep up this fight until we re- 
gain our rights, namely, the right of organi- 
zation and recognition of our union. Our 
slogan will always be "Keep up the fight 
until we win." 

In conclusion we again thank the cloth- 
ing dealers and union men for their liberal 
support and ask them not to accept any 
statement of a settlement as correct until 
of&cially notified by our district council. 
Fraternally, 

OTTO KAEMMERER, 
President District Council No. 4, United 

Garment Workers of America, St. Louis, 

Mo. 



Investigations conducted by the New 
Jersey State Bureau of Labor show that in 
the last twelve years the wages of factory 
and workshop employes have advanced 22.2 
per cent., while the cost of the principal 
articles of food has increased 40.96 per 
cent. This, of course, means that the real 
wages of labor have fallen, that the stand- 
ard of living of American labor is sinking 
and approaching ever more that of the 
"pauper labor" of Europe. But let us con- 
sole ourselves vrith the fact that during the 



same period of time, the strength of our 
navy has been steadily increasing, so that 
now our Dreadnought tonnage is almost as 
great as that of Great Britain. — ^New York 
GaU. 



A Remedy for Worry. 

Hearts sometimes grow sick and weary 

With life's problems to be met, 
And the cares for aye corroding 

With eternal jar and fret ; 
But the love that shields and lieeps us 

Safe through worry and distress 
If we realize its power, 

Grants us peace and happiness. 

Hope and harmony eternal 

Are the privilege of men, 
Bible promises repeated 

O'er and o'er and o'er again ; 
If we fear not any evil 

Knowing Love is always near, • 
Optimistic thought will lift us — 

Perfect love shall cast out fear. 

Hearts sometimes grow sick with longing. 

Sighing for their own wild way, 
Weary with the rush of living 

And events we cannot stay ; 
But Love's infinite protection 

If we would hut understand. 
As a cure for every trouble 

Is always at our command. 

MARGARET SCOTT HALL. 



The Workers. 

The men who have muscle for sale 

Are making the world go round ; 
Without them, what plans would fall — 

What castles would fall to the ground ; 
No rails, on the lofty pass. 

Would gleam in the light of the dawn ; 
Then toast, with a brimming glass. 

The heroes who barter their brawn. 

They are bridging the chasm grand 

That baffled us many a day — 
Where the primitive made its stand. 

Holding civilization at bay ; 
They are setting the war-craft afloat 

Prepared for hate's iron hail ; 
Cheer them, with a ringing note, 

The men who have muscle for sale. 

The men who have muscle for sale 

Are browned by the glaring sun ; 
With duty their only grail 

They stand to their toil, each one ; 
And the good — who shall measure it all 

That they've won, when the sunbeams fall 
And they scatter, at evening's call — 

The men who have muscle for sale. 

— Arthur Chapman In Denver Republican. 

XCVI 



arpenter 



(Continued from Page 32 in front of Maga- 
zine.) 

Eeport of committee on executive coun- 
cil's report: 

The matter of the Sheet Metal Workers 

vs. Carpenters was discussed at great length. 

Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers 

vs. 

United Brotherhood Carpenters and Joiners 

of America. 

A lengthy and full hearing was had be- 
fore the committee on this controversy; 
representatives from the Amalagmated 
Sheet Metal Workers Allegiance and 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America appeared and argued 
their respective contentions. After care- 
fully considering the whole subject matter, 
both Eesolution No. 15, on page 52, of the 
second day's proceedings, and the recom- 
mendations of the Executive Council on 
page 58 — ' ' That the grievance against the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners be referred to the coming conven- 
tion with their recommendation, that if 
the organization still refuses to obey the 
mandates of the Tampa convention, that 
it be suspended from this department, and 
that like action be taken by the A. F. of L. " 

We non-concur in Eesolution No. 15 and 
recommend that the subject matter in dis- 
pute be referred to the Executive Councils 
of this Department, and the American Fed- 
oration of Labor for an equitable and final 
adjustment. 

Committeeman Luke McKenny asked to 
be recorded as voting in the negative on 
the foregoing recommendation. 

President Kirby — Are not the recommen- 
dations about the same in the two cases? 

Secretary Tveitmoe — About the same. 

Chairman Duncan — They are not the 
same. 

President Kirby — I want to be clear on 
that. 

Chairman Duncan re-read the report of 
the Committee on the Steam Fitters. 

President Kirby — According to motion 
made by Vice-President Eyan the two 
questions are before us on the recommen- 
dations of the committee. 

Vice-President O 'Sullivan — I desire to 
inquire as to whether the report of "the 
committee dealing with the question of 



the Carpenters and the Sheet Metal 
Workers is in conformity with the law 
of this department? I refer to Section 
37. This question has been decided by a 
most decisive vote in a convention of 
this Department. The only question this 
convention is called upon to deal with 
is the recommendation of the Executive 
Council in disciplining organizations who 
absolutely refuse to obey its laws or de- 
cisions. That was the only question be- 
fore the committee to decide, not to bring 
in a recommendation which to my mind 
and to the minds of many others has the 
purpose of reopening a ease that has al- 
ready been decided. 

Chairman Duncan — A resolution was 
brought before the committee and the 
committee had to report upon it. 

At the request of Vice-President O 'Sul- 
livan, Eesolution No. 15 was read. 

Vice-President O 'Sullivan — I am some- 
what surprised at the committee in giv- 
ing any consideration whatever to the 
resolution. 

Chairman Duncan stated that the com- 
mittee had recommended nonconcurrence 
in the resolution. 

Vice-President O 'Sullivan — I ask for a 
ruling on Section 37. Is this question of 
jurisdiction before the convention? 

President Kirby — The chair rules that 
the subject-matter is properly before the 
house to deal with as reported by the 
convention. 

Vice-President 'Sullivan — I am com- 
pelled to take an appeal from the de- 
cision of the chair, much as I dislike to 
do so. The law is specific. It says a 
jurisdiction once settled cannot be re- 
opened without the consent of the Ex- 
ecutive Council. I appeal from the de- 
cision of the chair. 

President Kirby — I hear no second. 
The committee will proceed. 

Delegate Tveitmoe, Secretary of the 
committee, spoke at length in favor of the 
report of the committee. 

Delegate Eedding spoke at length in 
opposition to the report of the committee, 
and stated that in the Tampa conven- 
tion the work in question had been con- 
ceded to the Sheet Metal Workers. Con- 
tinuing his statement, Delegate Eedding 



33 



Tlhie C a IT p e mi t e ir 



said in part: Everything seemed to be 
satisfactory until the carpenters refused 
to comply with the law. We did every- 
thing in our power to straighten mat- 
ters out, but they decided they were go- 
ing to do that work, no matter what the 
Building Trades Department said or what 
the American Federation of Labor said. 
They ignored the department. They felt 
as though they were greater than the 
department, and some of them have told 
you if they do not get what they want 
they will put the department on the bum. 
If we are going to have a department of 
building trades let us have fair play, let 
us be in a position to obey the laws, en- 
force them, and of anybody is greater 
than the department and repudiates the 
laws they took part in making it would 
be better to have them on the outside than 
on the inside, in my estimation. The car- 
penters have not only undertaken to do 
that work, but they have done it; they 
have told you so; they have threatened to 
put the Sheet Metal Workers out of busi- 
ness, and have tried in some parts of the 
country to do so, and still they are here 
deliberating in a convention of the depart- 
ment. They are here helping to make 
laws. If the laws suit them they will obey 
them, if they do not they will disobey 
them. That is their attitude to-day, and 
that has been their attitude for the past 
year. 

Vice-President Eyan discussed the ques- 
tion at some length, and said in part: 

The question before this body is not a 
jurisdiction question. That was settled, 
and settled decisively in Tampa. It was 
settled by the most decisive dieision 
handed down by this department, a vote 
of 35 votes against the carpenters and 13 
in favor of the carpenters, and the car- 
penters deposited 8 of these votes. Now, 
the question has no right here; it is here 
in violation of the law. It is brought in 
here when the law specifically states that 
anything once decided cannot again be 
introduced unless by and with the eon- 
sent of the Executive Council of this De- 
partment. The same law applies to the 
American Federation of Labor. The ques- 
tion of changing the laws is another mat- 
ter. You can come in and change a law 



without the consent ' of the Executive 
Council, but jurisdiction matters that have 
been decided in one convention cannot be 
reintroduced into another convention with- 
out the consent of the Executive Council. 
The only question that was brought here 
was whether the convention and its dele- 
gates were in favor of enforcing the de- 
cision. The law has been violated in 
bringing this question in the way it has 
been brought. They never took an ap- 
peal from the decision. They simply noti- 
fied us several months ago that they would 
not comply with it. We passed on that 
notification and brought that here; we 
did not bring the jurisdiction dispute here; 
that was settled at Tampa, and decisively 
settled. 

Delegate Alpine discussed the question 
at some length, and said in part: I do 
not want this convention to lose sight of 
the fact that the entire matter at issue 
is not the controversy between the Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and the Amalga- 
mated Sheet Metal Workers, but that the 
Steam Fitters, the I. A. as well as the 
U. A. Steam Fitters, are vitally concerned. 
I am not going to debate the question at 
this time; I propose to reserve my talk on 
the subject until such time as it appears 
necessary to enter at length into the mat- 
ter. I would like to ask the committee a 
question, however. I have in my hand the 
proposed plan of amalgamation, but I note 
there is nothing definite contained therein 
with regard to the time when the amalga- 
mation process should ensue. 

Chairman Duncan — The committee had 
under consideration that individual point. 
Because it was impossible for it to know 
what progress could be made along the 
line we have suggested, we thought it was 
better to leave the report of the commit- 
tee unencumbered by a specific date so 
that the parties who would be endeavor- 
ing to bring about the adjustment along 
the lines of the report could exhaust their 
fullest energies in that direction. 

Delegate Eau — If I am in order I will 
offer an amendment. 

I move as an amendment that an al- 
liance be entered into by and between 
the International Association of Steam 
Fitters and Helpers, and the United 



34 



T Ihi a C a r p a o t 



r 



Association of Plumbers, etc., whereby the 
Steam Fitters and Helpers of both orga- 
nizations can work in harmony and ex- 
change of cards can be provided, allow- 
ing the Fitters and Helpers of both orga- 
nizations the privilege of working in the 
territory controlled by either party; the 
aforesaid alliance to be brought about 
under the supervision of the Executive 
Council of the A. F. of L., and the Build- 
ing Trades Department. The Steam Fit- 
ters and Helpers to have complete auton- 
omy of their craft. (Seconded.) 

Vice-President Ryan — I have a substi- 
tute for the whole to offer, that the action 
of the Executive Committee of this De- 
partment be substituted for the commit- 
tee 's report and the amendment thereto. 
The report of the council is: 

"That the grievance against the In- 
ternational Steamfitters and the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and- Joiners be 
referred to the coming convention with a 
recommendation that, if the organizations 
still refuse to obey the mandates of the 
Tampa Convention, that they be sus- • 
pended from the department. It is fur- 
ther recommended that like action be 
taken by the A. F. of L. " 

The substitute for the whole was 
seconded. 

Delegate Macfarland — That destroys the 
original motion. It is not in order. 

Vice-President Eyan — ^Does the chair- 
man accept the substitute? 

President Kirby — The chair rules that 
the motion is out of order. 

Vice-President Eyan — ^I appeal from the 
decision of the chair. 

The appeal from the decision of the 
chair was seconded. 

Statements were made by Vice-Pres- 
ident Eyan and President Kirby. 

The chair was unable to decide on a 
viva voce vote. 

A division was called for, and a count 
by the Secretary showed that 23 delegates 
voted in favor of sustaining the ruling of 
the chair and 23 voted in opposition to 
sustaining the ruling of the chair. 

Vice-President Eyan requested a roll 
call. The request was supported by a 
sufficient number of delegates to war- 
rant the roll being called. Secretary 



Spencer proceeded with the roll call, 
which resulted as follows: 

Roll call on appeal from the decision of 
the chair by Vice-President Eyan on the mo- 
tion to substitute the report of the execu- 
tive council for the report of the committee 
on executive council 's report : 

Ayes — Delegates Kelso, Young (W. 
W.), Macfarlane, Featherstone, Kirby, 
Cosgrove, Griebling, Eegan, Hopkins, 
Goellnitz, Tveitmoe, Egan, Comerford, 
Hannahan, Zeigler, Pike, Duncan, Smith 
(A. N.), Bianchi, McSorley, McKenny, 
Moran, Donlin, McGivers, Smyth (E.), 
Ran, Garrett, Williams— 28. 

Nays — Delegates Kennedy (A. J.) 
Eyan, Young (M. J.), Tennison, Geng- 
enback, McNulty, Solomon, Raven, 
D 'Alessandro, Etchison, Cordell, O 'Sul- 
livan, Redding, Bobb, Kennedy (John 
F.), Hedrick, Kemp, Dougherty, Lucas, 
Alpine, O'Donnell, Leonard, Spencer 
Hurley, McHugh, Mitchell, Short, Gav- 
lak— 28. 

President Kirby — The chair is sus- 
tained. 

Vice-President Eyan — I raise a point 
of order. Under Roberts' Rules of Order 
the chair must get a majority to sustain 
his ruling. 

President Kirby — The rules of order are 
that in case of a tie vote the chair is 
sustained. 

Delegate Leonard — It does not seem 
that your ruling is correct. It gives you 
two votes, Mr. Chairman. I think 
Roberts' Rules of Order should decide. 

President Kirby — Is there a copy here? 
The chair takes the stand that he was 
sustained. 

Vice-President Ryan — I am satisfied that 
Roberts' Rules of Order will show that if 
the chair cannot muster a majority vote 
the appeal is lost. 

President Kirby— If Roberts' Rules of 
Order show I am wrong, I am willing to 
rule otherwise. Until I am proved wrong 
by some section of Roberts' Rules of Order 
that ruling will stand. 

The question was discussed briefly by- 
Delegate Macfarlane, Vice-President Eyan 
and Delegate Leonard. 

Vice-President Ryan — I move at this 
time to defer action on this matter until 



36 



r p e El t 



10 o 'clock tomorrow morning, and we will 
determine whether the chair is wrong or 
right. (Seconded.) 

Delegate Macfarlane discussed the ques- 
tion briefly, and opposed the motion to 
defer. 

On a viva voce vote the motion to defer 
was declared lost. 

Vice-President Byan asked for a divi- . 
sion on the question. A count of the vote 
by the Secretary showed that 27 votes 
were cast in the affirmative and 20 votes 
in the negative. The motion to defer was 
declared carried. 

President Kirby — The discussion on it is 
deferred until tomorrow at 10 o 'clock. 

President Kirby stated that the dis- 
cussion on the portion of the report of 
the committee on the cases of the In- 
ternational Association of Steam and Hot 
Water Fitters and the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of Amer- 
ica had been deferred at the previous ses- 
sion in order to ascertain whether the 
chairman was correct in his ruling that 
the chair was sustained on a tie vote. 
He stated that Eoberts' Eules of Order 
showed the chair was correct in his posi- 
tion, that when an appeal was taken from 
the ruling of the chair and there was a 
tie vote the chair was sustained. 

Vice-President Ryan stated that he ac- 
cepted the ruling of the chair. 

Secretary Spencer read the report of 
the committee, the motion to adopt the 
report of the committee and the amend- 
ment offered by Delegate Eau. 

President Kirby — It is exactly in the 
same shape as it was when the motion was 
made to defer action iintil 10 o 'clock 
this morning. 

Delegate Alpine — I would ask your rul- 
ing, Mr. Chairman, on the legality of the 
amendment offered by Delegate Eau. I 
maintain that the amendment is not in 
order, that it is a negative motion. My 
understanding of the matter is that the 
committee's report is a recommendation of 
a plan of amalgamation. Delegate Eau's 
amendment is an entirely negative amend- 
ment, and I ask the ruling of the chair as 
to its proper introduction. 

President Kirby — The chair makes the 
same ruling as he did in regard to the 



substitute, yesterday. It is foreign to the 
report of the committee and is out of 
order. 

The motion to adopt the report of the 
committee was discussed by Vice-Presi- 
dent Eyan, Delegate Kennedy (J. F.), 
Delegate Eau. 

Delegate Eau asked that the two ques- 
tions being considered by the convention 
be divided and considered separately. 

President Kirby — That cannot be done 
now. It was decided by motion that they 
would be considered together, and were 
so discussed. 

Delegate Eau — In that case I desire to 
offer an amendment, as follows: 

"Inasmuch as the subject matter re- 
ferred to your committee, namely, sus- 
pension of the International Steam Fit- 
ters' charter in this department also in- 
volves the taking of similar action by the 
American Federation of Labor, we rec- 
ommend that the subject matter be re- 
ferred to the Executive Councils of this 
Department, and of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor for joint action to affiliate 
the Steam Fitters and Helpers of the con- 
tending parties into an organization of 
Steam Fitters and Helpers solely, char- 
tered by the American Federation of La- 
bor and this Department, in which proper 
provision shall be made whereby the in- 
terests and autonomy of Steam Fitters and 
Helpers shall be conserved and protected, 
thereby ending the controversy on inter- 
nal affairs of the pipe fitting trades. ' ' 

President Kirby — That is practically 
the amendment I ruled out or order. 

Delegate Eau — It is strictly in line with 
the laws of this department and the laws 
of the American Federation of Labor. 

Delegate Eau — I desire to take an ap- 
peal from the decision of the chair. 
(Seconded.) 

Statements in regard to the appeal were 
made by Delegate Eau and President 
Kirby. 

A vote was taken by a show of hands, 
and the chair was sustained by a vote 
of. 35 in the aflSrmative to 10 in the nega- 
tive. 

First Vice-President Hedrick, in dis- 
cussing the question said in part: I be- 
lieve that any decision rendered by this 



36 



T Ih a C a r p e in t e r 



department ought to be lived up to for 
at least one year, and I can assure any- 
trade here that if they would come back 
and show that they had made every effort 
to enforce the decision rendered by this 
department and that it has created a 
•hardship on them, I would at least vote 
in favor of something that would help 
them out. I stand with the carpenter 
when he asks that the laws of the local 
councils be adopted by a referendum vote. 
I stand with the carpenter and the steam 
fitter when I know they are right. Eep- 
resentinl; a large organization, I know that 
from time to time three or four of the 
smaller ones will get together and put 
something over on us that is distasteful 
and it sometimes leads to disruption of 
our local councils. I believe now if the 
organizations in question will not agree 
to live up to the decisions that were made 
against them they should- stand suspended, 
and then it will give the executive officers 
of the American Federation of Labor and 
the incoming executive officers of this 
department an opportunity to settle up the 
affairs of this department once and for all. 
I do not say it carries with it the idea 
that a charter of their organization must 
be revoked. I believe that is a matter 
for the American Federation of Labor 
to consider. I believe suspension from 
this department will mean no more than 
suspension of the single organization for 
the nonpayment of dues. I realize if this 
department intends to continue after the 
suspension of these two organizations we 
will have to get together and amend our 
laws; we will have to finance ourselves in 
a different way, if we intend to continue, 
but I would rather that a hundred times 
than to stand here and say it is impos- 
sible to get a decision of this convention 
enforced. We are all law abiding citizens, 
or ought to be; we have to obey the laws 
on the outside, and I believe for the best 
interests of all concerned we should have 
a square, clean-cut vote here today as to 
whether or not the decisions of this eon- 
ention are to be lived up to. 
In discussing the question Delegate 
Featherstone said in part: A new indus- 
try presents itself ; it takes the place of 
wood. Just draw your attention to the 



opening of that door. Say it is metal. 
It goes up identically the same as wood, 
it is finished in exactly the same manner, 
it is erected by carpenters with carpen- 
ters' tools, and with the skill the carpen- 
ter learned on wood. That is what you 
are voting on. You will find one hundred 
carpenters working on it to one sheet metal 
worker. That is the situation. Go ahead 
if you will. I believe if the report of the 
committee is adopted good results will be 
brought about. We may get the short end 
of it at that — I believe we will. I pre- 
sume I am wasting my wind and wasting 
your time, as I did in Tampa. You took 
snap judgment there, evidently you are 
taking it now. I believe the committee 
acted upon the suggestion somewhat of 
the Carpenters when we asked them to 
make a thorough investigation of this 
thing and go into it somewhat deeper 
than they did in Tampa. I believe they 
gave that some consideration. You must 
take into consideration, in view of the 
fact that the Carpenters did not obey the 
Tampa decision, that there is some virtue 
in their action and that it calls for a 
little further and deeper investigation 
than was given it. 

Delegate Duncan spoke at length in 
favor of the report of the committee, and 
reviewed the action and discussion in the 
American Federation of Labor leading up 
to the formation of the Building Trades 
Department. 

Delegate Comerford — As this involves 
the revocation of two charters, I would 
ask if the same law prevails in the de- 
partment as in the American Federation 
of Labor, that it requires two-thirds ma- 
jority to revoke a charter? 

President Kirby — I do not like to pass 
upon points of order that do not affect 
the question before the house. The ques- 
tion before the house is the adoption or 
rejection of the report of the committee. 
Up to the present the revocation of the 
charter does not enter into it. 

Roll call on the motion to adopt the report 
of the committee on executive council's re- 
port in regard to the International Associa- 
tion of Steam and Hot Water Fitters and 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
.Joiners : 



37 



T Ih a Carpeiniter 



Ayes — Delegates Kelso, Macfarlaae, 
Peatherstone, Kirby, Cosgrove, Grieb 
ling, Eegan, Hopkins, Tveitmoe, Com- 
erford, Hannahan, Ziegler, Pike, Duncan, 
Smith (A. M.), Bianchi, McSorley, Mc- 
Kenny, Moran, Gayrlak — 20. 

Nays — Delegates Kennedy (A. J.) 
Eyan-, Young (M. J.), Tennison, Young 
(W. W.), Goellnitz, Gengenback, Me- 
Nulty, Solomon, Eaven, Egan, D'Alessan- 
dro, Etchison, Cordell, Price, 'Sullivan, 
Bedding, Bobb, Kennedy (J. F.), Hedrick, 
Kemp, Dougherty, Lucas, Donlin, Mc- 
Givern, Smyth (E.), Alpine, O'Donnell, 
Leonard, Spencer, Hurley, Rau, Garrett, 
McHugh, Mitchell, Short, Williams— 37. 

President Kirby— The report of the com- 
mittee is not sustained. 

Vice-President E3'an — I move at this 
time that this convention concur in the 
recommendation of the Executive Council 
of this Department. 

President Kirby — We vrill have the rec- 
ommendation of the council read. 

Secretary Spencer read the report of the 
Executive Council, as follows. 

"That the grievance against the Inter- 
national Steam Fitters and the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners be 
referred to the coming convention with a 
recommendation that, if the organizations 
still refuse to obey the mandates of the 
Tampa Convention, that they be sus- 
pended from the department. It is further 
recommended that like action be taken by 
the A. F. of L. 

The motion offered by Vice-President 
Eyan was seconded. 

Delegate Eau — I move you that the 
questions be divided and taken up sep- 
arately. 

Vice-President Eyan — I rise to a point 
of order. The questions were coupled to- 
gether and discussed together, with the 
understanding that they would be dis- 
posed of together. That has been the un- 
derstanding from the outset. That is why 
I made the motion. This motion to concur 
in the recommendation of the Executive 
Council disposes of them together, as the 
Executive Council disposed of them' toge- 
ther in their action at Atlantic City. I 
therefore hold the division of these ques- 
tions at this time is not in order. 



President Kirby — The motion to divide 
is just as much in order as the motion to 
couple them together. 

The motion to divide the questions was 
lost. 

Delegate Comerford — If this motion 
prevails the American Federation of Labor 
will be called upon to take like action. 
In that body it requires a two-thirds ma- 
jority vote to revoke a charter. Does it 
require a two-thirds majority in this de- 
partment! 

President Kirby — I am sorry that ques- 
tion has been raised. The only section in 
our laws that deals with revocation of a 
charter for violation of the laws therein 
is Section 20, which reads: 

"The Executive Council shall have 
power to suspend any organization char- 
tered by this department for violation of 
the law thereof; provided such suspen- 
sion is determined by a two-thirds vote." 

That means a two-thirds vote in the 
Executive Council. There is no provision 
in the constitution as to how many votes 
are required to suspend an aiBliated orga- 
nization. The laws of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor which were adopted at 
the Toronto convention provided that our 
general laws must conform to those of the 
American Federation of Labor and the 
laws of the American Federation of Labor 
require a two-thirds vote. Therefore, the 
chair rules that it requires a two-thirds 
vote to suspend an afSliated organization 
from this department. 

Vice-President Eyan — Then I will have 
to appeal from the decision of the chair. 
(Seconded.) 

Statements were made by Vice-Pres- 
ident Eyan and-President Kirby. 

The chair was unable to determine on 
a viva voce vote whether the appeal was 
sustained or not sustained. A show of 
hands was ordered, and a count by the 
Secretary showed that 22 votes were cast 
in the affirmative and 29 in the negative. 

President Kirby — The chair is not sus- 
tained. The point of order is well taken, 
and this convention will take action on the 
minority report. 

Delegate Donlin — As a member of the 
Adjustment Committee in Tampa I cannot 
consistently vote on this in its dual form. 



38 



The Carpeimt 



r 



I voted witli the Sheet Metal Worker on 
his proposition, and I also voted with the 
Steam Fitter. I do not see how a plast- 
erer can vote to affiliate two organiza- 
tions. We, today, are fighting the fight 
of our lives to keep from being gobbled 
up by a large organization, the Brick- 
layers. The Plasterers will decline to vote 
on this; we cannot do so consistently. 

President Kirby — It will be so noted. 

Delegate Macfarlane — I ask for a roll 
call on this. I think it is of sufficient 
importance. 

President Kirby — The motion is to sus- 
pend these two organizations. 

Vice-President Eyan — The recommenda- 
tion is that unless they comply with the 
law they be suspended from the depart- 
ment. 

Delegate Macfarlane — What is the use 
of haggling; the intention of the motion 
is to suspend these two organizations. 

President Kirby — I want the motion to 
be read again by the Secretary as it was 
made from the floor. 

Secretary Spencer read the recommen- 
dation of the Executive Council. 

President Kirby — That does not fix a 
time when we must have an answer from 
those people. 

Vice-President Eyan — This recommenda- 
tion was adopted last June. Were the 
organizations interested, officially notified 
of that action at that time? 

Secretary Spencer — I can only trust to 
my memory. Last June is almost six 
months ago. In the interim I have writ- 
ten a great many letters, but to the best 
of my knowledge and belief they were 
both notified. 

Delegate Duncan — The decision of this 
convention to compel us to vote on those 
two questions at one time is grossly un- 
fair. I have been consistent in my oppo- 
sition to the Steam Fitters having a 
charter of their own. If 'I have an oppor- 
tunity to vote to revoke, I will vote to 
revoke the charter of the Steam Fitters, 
and I will vote that the Carpenters' char- 
ter shall not be revoked. It is unfair for 
this convention to force me to cast my 
vote in opposition to the position I have 
taken. In doing so I will be half right 
and half wrong. I do not want to be half 



anything. I want to be whole something, 
and it is not fair to compel the delegates 
to cast a vote against their will. I still 
insist that the matter should be divided. 

Delegate Tveitmoe — I decline to vote 
because the motion is a dual motion, and 
is unfair and unjust. 

Delegate Moran — I protest against the 
action of the convention in carrying out 
the recommendation of the Executive 
Council until the rank and file can be 
heard from by referendum vote. 

EoU call on the report of the executive 
council in regard to the International Asso- 
ciation of Steam and Hot Water Fitters and 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners : 

Ayes — Delegates Kennedy (A. J.), 
Eyan, Young (M. J.), Tennison, Goellnitz, 
Gengenbaek, McNulty, Solomon, Eaven, 
D 'Alessandro, Etchison, Cordell, Price, 
O 'Sullivan, Eedding, Bobb, Kennedy (J. 
F.), Hedrick, Kemp, Dougherty, Lucas, 
Alpine, O'Donnell, Leonard, Spencer, Hur- 
ley, McHugh, Short, Mitchell, Williams, 
Gavlak — 31. 

Nays — Delegates Kelso, Young (W. 
W.), Macfarlane, Featherstone, Kirby, 
Cosgrove, Griebling, Eegan, Hopkins, 
Egan, Comerford, Hannahan, Zeigler, Bike, 
Duncan, Smith (A. M.), Bianchi, McSor- 
ley, McKenny, Moran, Eau, Garrett — 22. 

President Kirby — The chair, therefore, 
rules that the motion prevails and that 
this convention has approved of the action 
of the Executive Council. It now be- 
comes imperative for this convention to 
say when this is to go into effect. I will 
say, unless other action is taken, fhe 
chair will rule that the suspension takes 
eijfect immediately. That will be the or- 
der, and we will have further reports of 
the committee. The Secretary will cease 
to call the roll of the two organizations. 

Delegate Featherstone — If it is now, it 
is now, and it is up to us to get out of 
here. 

President Kirby — I am only fulfilling 
and continuing my duty as chairman, and 
doing my duty as President of the De- 
partment; otherwise I would take the 
same course as my co-delegates. I will 
continue as President of the Department 



39 



Tlhie Carpeoter 



to fulfill my duties as fairly as I know 
how until my successor is elected. 

Delegates Macfarlane, Featherstone, 
Cosgrove, Griebling, Eegan and Hopkins, 
of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners retired from the convention. 

In addition the convention decided that 
this was the Fourth Annual Convention 
of B. T. Department (not the third), and 
that the first one was held in Washington, 
D. C. The convention further decided to 
meet in the same city that A. F. of L. 
Convention meets. 

Owing to the fact that the action of 
convention on report of Executive Council, 
suspended the Carpenters, the same tak- 
ing effect immediately, your delegates had 
no other alternative but to withdraw, and 
took no further part in the deliberations 
of the convention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. B^ MACFARLANE, 

WM. GRIEBLING, 

JAMES HOPKINS, 

L. B. REGAN, 

D. F. FEATHERSTONE, 

J. T. COSGROVE, 

JAMES KIRBY, 

Delegates. 



American F eration of Labor. 

Washington, D. C, Dec. 5, 1910. 

To Organized Labor and Friends, Greet- 
ing: 

At the Thirtieth Annual Convention of 
the American Federation of Labor, held 
at St. Louis, November 14-26, 1910, the 
subject-matter of the situation in Los An- 
geles, California, came up and received the 
most serious consideration. It was clear- 
ly demonstrated that there existed in Los 
Angeles a deep-laid and sinister plan 
inaugurated and being carried out by the 
Merchants' and Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion of that city, the association acting 
as a subsidiary agent of the National As- 
sociation of Manufacturers, and that the 
plan has for its purpose a war of exter- 
mination of the organized labor move- 
ment of the Pacific Coast and the crush- 
ing out of the American spirit of man- 
liness and independence. 



It is not necessary to recount the strug- 
gle of years against the printers' union 
of Los Angeles, for it is well and generally 
known. Last May the employers provoked 
a contest with the brewery workers. A 
month later, in June, the contest was 
made upon the machinists, molders, boiler- 
makers, patternmakers and all others in 
the metal trades, as well as upon the 
leather workers. Union men of Los Ange- 
les were forced to take up the cudgel, not 
only in defense of themselves, but of the 
workers who were not members of organ- 
ized labor. It was a struggle to secure 
a living wage and humane conditions. 

The international unions of the trades 
aided their members in Los Angeles to 
the best of their ability. The trade 
unionists of California assisted to the full- 
est of their opportunities. The toilers of 
Los Angeles have made, and are making, 
one of the most gallant and heroic strug- 
gles on record. The National Association 
of Manufacturers, through its subsidiary, 
the Merchants' and Manufacturers' Asso- 
ciation of Los Angeles, controlled the of- 
ficers of the city government who acted 
as puppets and passed ordinances denying 
the men the right of peaceably walking 
the streets or talking with workers whom 
they may meet. Hundreds of union men 
have been arrested and persecuted and 
through a system of refined torture of the 
' ' Third Degree ' ' the endeavor has been 
made to fasten crimes upon peaceable and 
law-abiding workers who have been 
thrust in prison, as well as threatened 
with violent demonstrations of lynching. 

Through the agency of the Los Angeles 
Merchants' and Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion, innocent widows and wives have 
been ruthlessly taken from their homes, 
charged with murder or detained in 
gloomy corridors for weeks, while their 
little children were suffering for want of 
care. 

Union men and non-unionists alike are 
standing shoulder to shoulder in Los An- 
geles to defend, protect, and promote 
their interests and their rights — the rights 
of manhood, womanhood, and childhood. 

The organized labor movement of the 
continent, the American Federation of 
Labor, at its recent convention at St, 



40 



T Ih a Carpenter 



Louis^ after full consideration by unani- 
mous vote resolved to appeal to the organ- 
ized toilers of Anieriea for moral and finan- 
cial assistance; and this appeal is now 
made to all who love justice and liberty, 
to aid the workers engaged in the contest 
in southern California and along the 
Pacific Coast. All members of organized 
labor and friends are urged to take up 
this appeal promptly and to organize a 
system by which voluntary' contributions 
may be made. 

All financial contributions should be 
sent to Frank Morrison, Secretary, Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor, 801-9 G street, 
X. W., Washington, D. C, who will for- 
ward receipt to the sender, and due ac- 
knowledgment made and credit given. 
Each day's receipts will be transmitted 
promptly to our needy brothers on the 
Pacific Coast. The cause is just, the need 
imminent, and contributions should be as 
generous and prompt as possible. 
Fraternally yours, 
SAM'L GOMPEES, President. 
Attest: FRANK MORRISON, Seo'y. 
JAMES DUNCAN, First Vice-Pres., 
JOHN MITCHELL, Second Vice-Pres., 
JAMES O'CONNELL, Third Vice-Pres., 
D. A. HAYES, Fourth Vice-Pres., 
WM. D. HUBEE, Fifth Vice-Pres.^ 
JOS. F. VALENTINE, Sixth Vice-Pres., 
JOHN E. ALPINE, Seventh Vice-Pres., 
H. B. PEEHAM, Eighth Vice-Pres., 
JOHN B. LENNON, Treasurer, 

Executive Council, A. F. of L. 



Expulsions. 

Frank E. Tanner of L. XJ. 322 Niagara 
Falls, N. Y., was expelled by the Local 
Union for misappropriation of funds col- 
lected by him in his capacity as shop 
steward. 

B. Hancock, a member of L. U. 214 Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. was expelled for collecting initia- 
tion fees and appropriating the proceeds for 
his own use. 

Harry S. Hamilton and Oscar Jones of 
L. U. 1066, Jacksonville, Fla., have been ex- 
pelled by the Local Union for embezzlement 
of funds. 



Localities to be Avoided. 

Owing to pending trade movements, 
building depression and other causes, car- 
penters are requested to stay away from 
the following places: 



Ada, Okla. 
Altus, Okla. 
Asherton, Tex. 
Ashland. Ky. 
Austin, Tex. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Bartlesville. Okla. 
Battle Creek, Mich. 
Beileville, III. 
Big Springs, Tex. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Brantford. Ont.. Can. 
Chicago, 111. 
Cleveland, O. 
Denver, Colo. 
Detroit, lllch. 
Edmonton, Alta, Can. 
El Paso, Tex. 
Fort Myers, Fla. 
Glen Cove, L. I., N. 1 
Hartford, Conn. 
Hot Springs, Ark. 
Houston, Tex. 
Hutchinson, Kan. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Jollet, 111. 



Kenosha, Wis. 
Kewanee, 111. 
Kiamath Falls, Ore- 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Mulberry. Fla. 
New Bedford. Mass. 
New Orleans, La. 
New York City. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Owensboro. Ky. 
rhoenlx, Ariz. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Pittsfield, Mass. 
Pottsville, Pa. 
Sanford, Fla. 
Sayre, Pa. 
Seattle, Wash. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Vancouver, B. C, Can. 
Vicksburg, Miss. 
Washington, D. C. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 



Local Unions Chartered Last Month. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Macon, Ga. 

Uussellville, Ala. Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Rosebud, Tex. 

Amityville, N. Y. Largo, Fla. 
Lynn, Mass. 

Total, 9 Local Unions. 



Rejection of Candidate. 

I. H. Sterling has appUed for admission 
to L. U. 1212, Coffeyville, Kan., three times 
in succession and was rejected each time. 



What benefit is it to know a thing is 
wrong and not move to right it? 



A Level on a Plane. 

The carpenter who does many jobs out- 
side the shop is always trying to economize 
as much as possible on the number of tools 
he must carry. Many carpenters will be 
able to make use of a level combined with a 
jointer plane. It is made by letting into 
one side of the plane - a small level, such 
as may be bought for a few cents, sinking 
it far enough in to be out of danger of 
breakage. — Popular Mechanics. 



41 




-WtUAT ©Mt^- 
-Z^^[^ ©©DM:©- 



1 



J. n. Beau. 

Leaving Meriden, Miss., where I was at 
time of writing my last report, I went to 
Jackson, Miss. Here I met a number of 
the craft who for some time had contem- 
plated organizing as soon as circumstances 
would permit. I gave them the best of 
encouragement for the carrying out of 
their plan and hope to be able to report 
results later on. I next went to Demopo- 
lis, Ala., where L. TJ. 1316 is located, and 
which L. TJ. had maintained her good 
standing for many years, but from lack of 
energy and individual activity had lately 
almost gone to the wall. I reorganized 
.them under the same number. I then vis- 
ited Uniontown, Ala., where we had a L. U. 
which disbanded two years ago. The men 
here had been fortunate enough to retain 
the nine hours, but were deprived of many 
other advantages, that can only be secured 
through concerted action, during their dis- 
organized state. I organized the craft into 
a new L. TJ. under the charter number 1871 
and I hope this new L. TJ. is here to stay. 
Leaving TJniontowu, I went to Eufaula, 
Ala., where my presence was needed, L. TJ. 
1849 being in bad shape and business at a 
standstill. Only a few days more and the 
L. TJ. would have become delinquent. I 
got busy with the members and in two 
hours we had collected back dues enough 
to pay two months ' per capita to the G. O. 
In response to a call from Americus, Ga., 
I next visited that city and found that 
our membership was on the verge of mak- 
ing a demand upon the contractors with- 
out first having applied to the G. 0. for 
sanction of the movement. After advising 
our members on the requirements in such 
emergencies, they decided to defer action 
in the matter and in the meantime put 
forth a strong effort to more thoroughly 
organized the town. I feel safe in saying 
that from the time L. TJ. 1914 was organ- 



ized, though its membership is small, 
Americus has held its own. L. U. 1932, 
organized about eight months ago, has 
since more than doubled its member- 
ship and will outgrow itself in the ensuing 
eight months if present favorable trade 
conditions continue. While still in Ameri- 
cus, I was called to Macon, Ga., as it was 
found necessary to inspire new life into 
the membership and revive the movement 
in that district. I visited the three Local 
TJnions in the city, but failing to learn 
the condition of affairs in the district, and 
the non-union men being averse to joining 
the Local TJnions now in existence, I was 
at a loss as to what to do. Finally I sug- 
gested a new L. TJ., and on Friday, Decem- 
ber 9, I installed L. TJ. 1676 (colored) with 
twenty-four members paid up in full and 
many more proposed. By January 1, 1911, 
this L. TJ. promises to have a larger mem- 
bership than any in the city of Macon. Be- 
fore leaving I saw to it that every ofBcer 
required to give bond had made good in 
conformity with our constitution. This in 
itself is an improvement over some of the 
older Local TJnions in the district. Strict 
obeyance of our laws and strict business 
methods is conducive to progress, success 
and prosperity. As long as we live up to ,i 
our obligation and conform to the laws as 3| 
laid down in our constitution, there will 
be continued interest in our organization 
and plenty of life. I am at this writing 
in Atlanta, Ga., where a little pushing is 
always needed to keep things going. 



The man or woman who performs the 
small duties of life promptly and cheerful- 
ly is paving the road for great achieve- 
ments. — Advance Advocate. 



In these days everyone must push or be 
pushed, and if you would succeed you must 
get to work and push hard. 



42 



As Others Do. 

Editor The Carpenter: 

According to recent advices from Aus- 
tralia the Labor party is in power in that 
country and the people stand for social 
equality. There is a spirit predominant 
among its ranks which is for letting the 
toiler have his just dues and not allow the 
few to grow wealthy at the expense of the 
many. To this end they are about to adopt 
a system of taxation of land value on un- 
improved land, which exempts resident 
land owners for a value up to $25,000, but 
as stated, not the absentee. The tax on 
land value above the first $25,000 is one 
penny on the pound up to seven pennies 
on the pound for an estate valued at $500,- 
000. This would be a tax amounting to 
about $11,000 on $500,000 worth of land. 

In the case of an absentee the tax begins 
with the first pound of owned land value. 

A great achievement for the workers in 
Australia is the passage of a law providing 
that the commonwealth shall decide all 
labor disputes and decide what the hours 
of labor shall be. In fact, the government 
proposes to use wisdom in its policy and 
actions; it has decided that what is best 
for the workers, who really make it what 
it is, is best for the country. 

It would be well for the workers in 
America to take matters of this nature in 
hand in their deliberations, for sooner or 
later, as intelligent citizens, unions must 
go into politics. I don't mean they should 
select good men and send them some place 
or other; they will have to decide what 
they want and go after it themselves and 
independently of capitalist parties. 

About twenty years ago I lived in Van- 
couver, B. C. At that time that city had 
about 12,000 inhabitants; five years later 
it had 17,000. In 1895 the people exempt- 
ed 50 per cent, of improved land from tax- 
ation and Vancouver began to grow. The 



plan was so successful that 25 per cent, 
more of taxes was taken from improved 
land and improvements so rapidly in- 
creased that last January taxes were taken 
from- improvements altogether. 

Vancouver has grown from 17,000 in- 
habitants in 1895 to about 120,000 at pres- 
ent; the value of improvements has in- 
creased about seven times; skyscrapers are 
going up where shacks stood; 75 per cent, 
of the working people own their own home. 
Last year Vancouver issued building per- 
mits amounting to $7,258,000; in the first 
four months of this year permits were is- 
sued for buildings at a total cost of $4,777,- 
000. 

It stands to reason that if taxes are 
taken off improvements there will be more 
of them; the more improvements the more 
valuable land becomes and therefore the 
more land value to tax. The more you 
tax improvements the more they cost; the 
more you tax land the less it costs. There- 
fore, by taking the taxes from improve- 
ments and placing them on mere land val- 
ues, you make land cheaper without reduc- 
ing its worth. 

No wonder Vancouver was prosperous 
with such a system. Let us as carpenters 
advocate the exemption of improvements 
from taxes and the building industry espe- 
cially, the carpenter trade included, will 
be flourishing. Fraternally yours, 

THOS. COLGATE, L. U. 411. 

Eome, Ga. 



If I Were King. 

Editor The Carpenter: 

While recently waiting for a train at a 
railroad station, and being in a medita- 
tive mood, the thought came to me that 
if I were king over the labor movement I 
would gather around me only such men as 
could see beyond their own little circle; 
men who are alive to what is going on in 



43 



T Ih e Carpasiter 



other parts of. the world. * I would appoint 
as secretary of state a man whose mind 
was broad enough to see some good in the 
employer and so could meet him half way; 
a man who could assume the responsibility 
for his actions and not hide behind me 
when it requires a display of courage or 
a duty to perform; a man who would not 
be willing and continually seeking to dis- 
rupt my kingdom for the sake of getting 
my job. 

If I were king I would appoint as chan- 
cellor of the exchequer a man who could 
realize that there never was anything 
worth while gained without cost, and that 
the higher the outlay the better the quality 
of results procvired; a man who could see 
others spend money with a belief that they 
were at least returning as much service 
as he himself could return for the same 
amount of expenses; a man who fully con- 
curred in the old adage of: "Penny wise 
and pound foolish," whose palms never 
itched and whose fingers were free from 
glue. 

If I were king I would have teachers 
and contractors with hides like the ele- 
phant and the patience of Job, whose duty 
would be to listen to complaints and accu- 
sations of my fretful subjects and teach 
the alien. 

If I were king I would have a school out- 
side of my domain to educate the ignorant 
alien as to the benefits of my happy king- 
dom and invite him into the household. 

If I were king I would have dungeons 
into which I would cast rebellious subjects, 
and the darker the treason the deeper the 
cell, and a torture chamber for the vilifier, 
the liar, the- hisser, the knocker, the unfit 
office seeker and the Judas of my house- 
hold. Fraternally j^ours, 

THOMAS HICKEY, L. U. 359. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



The men and women of our day who are 
making real progress in life are the readers 
and thinkers, who, seeing a wrong, set 
about finding a remedy and applying it. — 
Advance Advocate. 



Phase of Trade Education. 

(Continued from Page 19.) 
The booklet before us gives comments of 
students on the course. These comments 
are not the opinions of apprentices and 
youths, though they are not missing, but 
for the most part come from men of ma- 
ture years, while two who have passed the 
sixtieth milestone bear strong testimony to 
the value of the instruction they have re- 
ceived. The commission having the work 
in charge prides itself on the thorough- 
ness of its system of education. It teaches 
principles rather than rules; it shows stu- 
dents the "reason why" of good work 
rather than examples of it. Drilled in 
these principles the student stands cleanly 
on his feet. He does not follow the style 
of this or that artist-printer; he applies the 
principles to the work in hand, and pro- 
duces a job possessing individuality. 

The lessons include actual work which 
is scrutinized by the instructors. How 
closely they examine the product of their 
pupils is indicated by a Yankee student 
who says: "It is almost impossible to slip 
anything by the instructors." 

Through the generosity of typographical 
unions, which spend from $8,000 to $10,000 
a year supporting the course, it is sold for 
less than the actual cost. Though cheap, 
it is not inefficient. An English-born stu- 
dent says the course beats the British 
seven-year apprenticeship system; a fore- 
man states that his work has improved 
greatly, while a young man has secured $6 
a week advance, and expects more. There 
are students who say they enjoyed the les- 
sons, and others who land the union for 
engaging in this work, which they are sure 
will aid immensely in the uplift of printer- 
dom, to which the typographical union is 
consecrated. 



The epochs of our life are not in the 
visible facts of our choice of a calling, a 
marriage, our acquisition of an office, and 
the like, but in a silent thought by the 
wayside as we walk; in a thought which 
revises our entire manner of life. — Emer- 
son. 



No young man believes he shall ever 
(lie. — .Tohn Hazlitt. 



The greatest of faults, I should say, is 
to be conscious of none. — Carlyle. 



4A 




17[g(o)ra[L@{SM ODK]0©ra 




Pittsfield, Mass. — Brother carpenters con- 
templating a change of locality will do well 
to steer clear of this city, as we have about 
one-third of our members on the street idle 
and nothing in sight for the winter. 
"•J* ♦$* ^ 

Santa Fe, N. M. — We would earnestly 
warn all traveling brother carpenters to keep 
away from this city until further notice. 
Many of our home brothers are out of em- 
ployment; trade is very dull and nothing 
doing. 

*5* ^ ^* 

Modesta, Cal. — Scarcity of work in this 
city and a desire to spare traveling brothers 
inevitable disappointment are prompting us 
at this time to advise them to keep away 
from this vicinity for the next six months. 
Judging from present indications there will 
be no improvement in trade conditions be- 
fore the elapse of that time. 

♦ '> ♦ 
Clarksbuj'g, W. Va. — This city is overrun 

with carpenters in search of work which is 
not obtainable as trade is very dull at this 
time. Most of our home men are walking 
the streets and any newcomer would certain- 
ly have to share their fate. Migrating 
brothers are advised to avoid this city. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Aurora, III. — "We desire to hereby notify 
traveling carpenters that trade in this city 
is at the present time almost at a complete 
standstill and no improvement of conditions 
in sight. As a result, many of our resident 
brothers are walking the streets, while 
chances for employment during the next few 
months are very poor. Be wise and avoid 
this vicinity until further notice. 

♦ ^ <♦ 

Fort Smith, Ark. — Traveling carpenters 
are hereby warned to keep aloof from this 
city until further notice. Building opera- 
tions here are at a complete standstill and 



as a result 60 per cent, of our membership 
is walking the streets in vain search of 
employment. The outlook for work is 
gloomier than it has been for the past few 
years. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Wichita Falls, Tex. — We would advise 
brother carpenters contemplating a change 
of locality not to come to this city. We 
have quite a number of our members out of 
employment at present, and though there is 
some work going on we have more than 
enough men to do it and some to spare. Not- 
withstanding the scarcity of work, our Local 
Union 977 is moving along nicely and in- 
creasing in membership. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Hartford, Conn. — This is a good place for 
carpenters to avoid at least until the spring 
season opens up. We have at this time about 
four hundred more carpenters in the city 
than are generally employed under normal 
conditions. There are four open-shop firms 
here and we are trying .to hold them down, 
which, however, is a hard task with about 
two hundred and fifty men idle and walking 
the streets in search of employment. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Macon, Ga. — With the assistance and 
under the guidance of General Organizer J. 
H. Bean, we have been able to bring about 
different conditions for this city and 
vicinity. We have succeeded in gathering 
into the fold some of those who heretofore 
have fought us in our efforts to organize this 
locality; all of the men seem full of union- 
ism and success is the slogan. From present 
indications, the time is not far off when 
Macon will be one of the most thoroughly or- 
ganized cities in the southern district. 
^ ♦*♦ ♦> 

St. Joseph, Mo. — It recently has been a 
frequent occurrence that carpenters came 
here from nearby cities, especially St. Louis, 
on the strength of advertisements appearing 



45 



T Ih e C a r p e o t a r 



in the daily papers, stating that carpenters . 
were wanted here. The facts are that a 
large number of our home brothers are out 
of employment as a result of trade being 
dull and work very scarce at this time. We 
would earnestly warn migrating carpenters 
not to pay any attention to these advertise- 
ments as they are false and misleading. 
Stay away from St. Joseph until further 
notice through the columns of this journal. 
■* ♦ ♦ 

Phoenix, Ariz. — The situation and outlook 
here is bright for a union city and there is 
considerable of building in contemplation, 
but there is any number of carpenters in 
town, and some of them without work. Non- 
union men are coming her« to winter and 
union men also by the dozens, some of 
whom, we are sorry to say, do not deposit 
their clearance card, but work on non-union 
jobs and thus work against the union. Under 
the circumstances ,we must call upon all 
traveling brothers to stay away from 
Phoenix until the situation is relieved and 
the many of our idle resident members have 
secured employment, when due notice will 
be given in The Carpenter. 
^ ♦ ♦ 

Great Falls, Mont. — Nine months ago, in 
an attempt to destroy the movement in this 
section the Chamber of Commerce and 
similar institutions locked out all the inter- 
national union men in the building trades of 
this city, and all through this battle Local 
Union 286 has been on the firing Une, and is 
yet holding its own. The struggle has been 
made unnecessarily hardy for us however, 
owing to the influx of union carpenters, who 
insisted on staying here and in many in- 
stances have gone scabbing. We are now ap- 
pealing to the entire membership of the U. 
B. to assist us in this protracted fight by 
warning their members to stay away from 
Great Falls, Mont., until the trouble existing 
here is over and trade conditions have re- 
sumed their normal state. 
^ *$^ *$* 

Durant, Okla. — For the past eighteen 
months work has been plentiful in this city 
and surroundings and all carpenters were 
employed. Under these favorable circum- 
stances, a few months ago, we made a de- 
mand for a wage increase from 37% to 40 
cents per hour to take effect March 1, 1911. 

46 



Owing to drought, however, in this section, 
the work having slumped and nothing doing 
in the building line, our best mechanics are 
walking the streets and chances to win our 
demand are rather poor unless trade condi- 
tions improve before it becomes due. At all 
events we would urgently request migrating 
carpenters to remain away from this vicinity 
for the next three months. We still hope 
that after the lapse of that time our demand 
will have been conceded and trade condi- 
tions improved; at present any newcomer 
will have to walk the streets with the rest 
of us. 

* ♦ ♦ 
Beware of Him. 
W. C. Craig, the subject of the sketch be- 
low and a member of Local Union 541, 
Washington, Pa., has left the L. U. 's juris- 
diction dishonorably. 




^''■ 



W. 0. CEAIG. 
He has defrauded his employers and 
brother members of various sums. Beware 
of him. _^_ 

Successful Trade Movement. 

Pittsburg, Pa. — In the latter part of Octo- 
ber the members affiliated with the D.-C. of 
this city voted on and adopted a rule mak- 
ing Saturday a half holiday. Our efforts in 
this direction have been crowned with suc- 
cess; we have now the half holiday pretty 
well in force all over our district, especially 
on all the work of the larger contractors, and 
it has not been necessary to call a strike on 
any job. Pittsburg can now be added to the 
list of districts working forty-four hours per 
week. We are now in better shape than we 
have been at any time since our strike in 
1906 for 50 cents per hour. 




The Tool Box of Today. 

(By Dwight L. Stoddard.) 
The tool box of today is made to meet 
the demands of the times and is an entire- 
ly different box from the one of days gone 
by. I have at the present time not only 
my big chest that was just the thing when 
I began my trade, but I also have my fath- 
er's chest that was practically the same kind 
of a box and was made some sixty years ago. 
These boxes as good as they were for years 
and years, are entirely too large for the 
present day and age. For a time, after the 
big box was too unhandy for the carpenter 
to carry the few tools that he needed for 



dangerous as well as annoying thing for the 
people on the street ear. In fact boxes with 
this arrangement became so objectionable 
that many of the street car companies re- 
fused to carry them. To overcome all these 
difiSculties and meet the demands of the 
times, the suit case box came into general 
use and is now recognized as the tool box 
of today. While there is no end to the 
styles of suit case boxes, many of them are 
very elaborate and expensive, but my idea in 
writing this article is not to explain the 
many different ones but to describe one not 
only cheap and very easily and quickly made, 
but convenient, practical and handy as well. 




the few days' work that he might do on the 
job, it was substituted by a small one which 
was really too small, for it would not hold 
the most important tool, the square, and 
therefore a hole was cut and the tongue of 
the square stuck through which was a very 



Some of the very best I have ever seen open 
in the center so when they are opened they 
take up about a square yard of space, and 
to move them from place to place they must 
be closed and the tools changed from a 
level position to, you might say, a plumb 



47 



T Si @ Carpemiter 



position; at least, if you are in a hurry 
to make a short and quick move it is a 
plumb good job to do it. The other boxes 
that open only part way in the center of 
the top are surely very poor protection for 
the tools and besides sometimes very un- 
handy to carry open, while the one I have 
illustrated can be carried open just as well 
as closed. 

The question is often asked, how big to 
make a suit case box. Now, in answer, this 
is my way or the way I made my box : Take 




Width of Box. 
a board for the bottom as long as your 
longest saw, and as wide as your widest one, 
now I will admit it can nicely be made nar- 
rower as the saws generally go in by setting 
them edge on the bottom, yet it often hap- 
pens in a hurry to put away the tool you do 
not want that you do not stop to put the 
saws all in their proper place. Therefore, 
if the box is wide enough, just lay them 
in right on the top of the rest of the. tools. 



.''■\ 




/ . "■ \ 




>■ y \\ 




_/• ,^ ,-'-'1v-' ,, ''T"r- 





Heighth and Length of Box. 
The height of the box should be high enough 
to take in a square of the full size, two foot 
blade and sixteen-inch tongue. While I used 
to prefer a squaxe with an eighteen-ineh 
tongue it is not at all necessary as one six- 
teen inches long will practically answer the 
purpose as well as thp longer one. It is 
true, to suit the little boxes of a few years 
ago I made a square with a twelve-inch 
tongue that would lay off joist, etc., etc., al- 
most as convenient and in many cases even 
more so than one with a longer tongue, and 
others invented the folding square. But 
with all these inventions they were never a 
success and not enough to allow the ordinary 
carpenter to do away with the old-style 
square that has stood the test for years 



gone by and will be the square for years to 
come. Therefore our box of today must be 
large enough to take in the standard square 
of today. It does not necessarily need to be 
quite sixteen inches high for the square can 
be put in with the corner of the blade and 
tongue resting on the bottom of the box and 
therefore fourteen inches and a half will 
barely let the square in, but do not make the 
mistake of getting it too small, let there be 
a little extra room, for an inch bigger than 
is necessary is far better than a bit too 
small. If you have a saw made to order like 
one I have, the box would need to be quite 
a bit longer to accommodate the saw than 
it would be for the square; but for an 
ordinary saw:, especially if you want to 
make them as short as you conveniently can 
the square and saw will take the same length 
of box. I am giving the size to make the 
bottom board and I guess the illustration 
and what has already been written gives 
you the size of all the rest; the ends and top 
made out of five-eighths lumber, the lighter 
the better. 

Rabbet both edges for three-eighths-inch 
front and back which is heavy enough for 
the ordinary box and surely need not be 
over half inch. Hinge the box in the cen- 
ter, not at the top like many of them, but 
the front side, so when the box is open the 
door is simply right side of the box and en- 
tirely out of the way. The box can be car- 
ried open just as well as shut, and is very 
handy many times as you want to move your 
box only a few feet or from room to room. 
The little till can be used as an ordinary 
hand box, either in or out of the box; it 
can be in the upper or lower groove as de- 
sired, or a till can be made for both places. 
Note the bottom of the till extends to fit in 
the groove and can be nailed up into the side 
of the till as illustrated; the till alone, or 
the side, can extend down to the bottom and 
the side nailed into the bottom as illustrated 
in the till in the box. By making the bot- 
tom groove wide enough the till can be slid 
over the edge of the open box and then drop 
down to the bottom of the wide groove, 
which goes down just below the edge of the 
box so it matters not how you tip up the 
box in carrying it open the till will not fall 
out. 

Of course, the till, or tills, as well as the 



48 



The C a r p @ im t e r 



bottom of the box can be partitioned off as 
desired, as' many would; while for others 
the box just as illustrated would suit the 
best as you can throw the tools in any old 
way, lock up the box and get away, no time 
being lost in arranging. Put on a lock that 
goes over and catches in the keeper and it 
will always keep itself just where it be- 
longs. 

In my box I put the saws, level, planes, 
etc., in the bottom of the box, then the 
smaller tools in the till, and the till being 
made narrow enough to leave a little space 
in front, the square goes in last, right in 
front of the till, therefore the square is the 
last tool put away and the first tool taken 
out. Yes, the old and faithful square is al- 
ways to the front. 



to an old one in order to get the cut. I don 't 
know how true it may be, but I know of one 
who, after getting it nailed together all 
right, while holding his saw before cutting, 
asked the boss ' opinion, ' ' How is that for 
slant?" 

A great degree of accuracy can be ob- 
tained by selecting good, clear stuff one inch 
or one and one-eighth inch or thicker for 
bottom. A steel square is not absolutely 
necessary, but upright cut should be squared 
up from bottom of box. 

For use in trimming a wide, shallow box 
with cuts of 45 degrees near both ends and 
a square cut in the middle is preferable ; also 
cuts for other angles if necessary, and if the 
saw is in good order correct mitres can 
be got every time. 



How to Make a Mitre Box. 

(By James Barry.) 
The mitre-box (our old familiar friend) 
is often not so "true" as it might be. I 
have heard about the trade school graduate 
and his first job after leaving college. When 
told to make one he got it nailed together all 
right, but had to set his brand new bevel 



The welfare of a labor union is in so far 
of greater importance than the welfare of 
the individual member, as the latter depends 
on the welfare of the former. 



Genius is always impatient of its har- 
ness. Its wild blood makes it hard to 
train. — Holmes. 



/ /?-^ 





4U 






Mw^ Mn0j^rj^. 







mmmmBm ««r 



r- 



"T_ 



J- 



-^ 



2)ic Uom S8o«='J)etittrtcment bcr SI. %. of i!. 

iifier itnfere SSriibcrfcftaft Berpngtc 

©u§|)enfioit. 



®er, bon ber re<3ten S?onbention be§ SBaus 
®e)3artement§ ber 2[. g. of S. ii6er un^ere 
Sriiberfdiaft berpngtcn ©uSpenfion Itegt 
eine ^uii^bilttonS^Streitigfeit gu ©runbe 
iiber bte nur hie SDJttglteber grofeerer ©tabte, 
tro ba§ umftrittene Sfaterial gur S8er= 
luenbung fontmt, flare (£in[id)t Ijaben f6n= 
nen. (£§ biirften ba^er aucl) an biefer ©teHe 
cinige SBorte ber 3IufIIarung ii6er bie gange 
SIngelegenljeit ermiinfcfit fein. 

3m Saufe ber le^ten ge^n ^a^re Ijat man 
in ben gro^eren ©tabten, unb trie e§ fc^eint 
mit ©rfolg, ben , SSerfuc^ gemadjt SeJIet* 
bungSgegenftonbe BergufteHcn v:\h in ben 
©ebSubcn eingufii^ren, hie enttreber au§ 
ipo^tmetaH befte^en ober eine SJletalliibergug 
l^aben. Sion le^teren finb glrei SIrten im 
(Se&rand), foId)e Bei henen ba§ ^nnere ber 
©egcnftctnbe (SCiiren, genfter, ^eljlleiften 
u. f. h).) mit etner SiJif^ung bon Stfdfie unb 
®ip§ gefiiHt ift, ein Slriifel lriel(5er ben 3ia= 
men „G:[ignum" fii^rt, unb au§ folc^en bei 
ireli^en ha§ Si^nere au§ ^olg befteljt unb bei 
henen SJietaHubergug an ©telle be§ gournirS 
au§ §oIg Irttt. ®tefe gtbeite art ift al§ 
„EaIamtne" Betannt. 

SSci ber Slufftellung bon S^iiren unb gutter, 
fommt Sarpentertcertgeug, al§ ha§ geeig^ 
netfte SBerfgeug gur aSerhsenbung, eBenfo 
tcerben Bei bem SfnBringen her SBefleibungen 
unh ^eBUeiften, SEinMs unb @e:^rung§= 
lacfjneiblobe Benu^t, tuctlirenb eine fogar 
ftumpfe ©dge BierBei hie gelrol^nlid^en erfor= 
berlicfjen ©tenfte leiftet. ®a§ §crngen ber 
cifernen SCiiren unb StnBringen ber eifemen 
gutterral^men, Bebarf borerft ber Stegutirung 
eine§ SSIinb^gutterS ia§ au§ §oIg Befteljt. 

S'JicCjt bie §erftellung biefer SCiiren, gen* 
fter unb anberer S8efleihung§gegenftanhe, aBer 
ha§ SluffteHen unb StnBringen berfelBcn inirb 
nun bon gtnei (Seirerten, hen Sarpentern unb 
hen fflfetaHarbeiten, alk iijnen gutommenbe 
JtrBeit Beanfpruc^t. SJon ben Earpentern, 
meil hicfe ©egenftonhe biefelBen finb tbie hie 
friiljer au§ $oIg berfertigten, toetl htefelBen 
S^eile eineS ©ebSuheS, im ^nnem beSfelBen 
anguBringen finb unh e§ gu biefer a3errii5:= 
tung her 33enu|ung bon Karticntertoertgug 
Bebarf. SSon hen fflJetaHarBeitem Inetl biefe 
©egenftonbe bon i^nen berfertigt unb aug 
WetaU Befte^en. 

®tefe fid) toiberftreitenbe Slnfjjrud^e ^aBen 
Tjautfadjlid) in 3?eH) ^orf gu ernftHc^er ©to= 



50 



rung her untcr Mrbettern fo notffienhigen 
harmonic, unh felBft gu StuSftanben gefii^rt 
unb BaBen hie 3uri§biJtion§5©treitigfeiten, 
bie alfo jc^t gu unferer ©uSpenhirung bom 
23au5®epartement fii^rten, Iftxaufbei^WO' 
ren. 

®ie ©uSpenfion erfolgte al§ SBeftrafung 
cineS ®i§gi|3linar=S3ergel^en§. Sie ©treits 
froge lag nemlic^ ber borigeS ^a^r in 
STampa, gla., ftattgefunhenen Stonbention 
be§ a3au=®efiartement§ gur ©dilidjtung bor 
unh biefe Sonbention entfdjieb, ba'fi bie um« 
ftrittene Sfrbeit hen SJJetaHarBeitern gu< 
fomme, tro^bem turg gubor, SRic^ter ©atjnor 
in ^eto glorl, her bon ben SKetallarBeitern 
felBft alS ©c|ieb§rid}ter in ber ©treitfrage 
borgefc^Iagen toar unb al§ foldier fungirte, 
gugunften her Sarpenter entfd^ieb unb einige 
anbere ©lahte biefe ©ntfd^eihung al§ 9^td^t= 
fc^nur gelten tie^en. 

Sagu fommt nod), ha^ bie S8aufontraI= 
toren in 3?eir ^orf berlangten, ha^ hie SIr= 
Beit bon Earpentem berricgtet trerbe unh bie 
SfetaHarBetter Biergu tnfompetent erflarten. 
@§ ift bann aao) borgefommen, baf; in einem 
©cBaube in 3'Jetri gort in bem le^tere tat= 
fiidjlidj bie SKetaHsSBefleibungggegenftanbe 
aufftellten unb anbradjten, hiefelben toieber 
entfemt toerben mu^ten, meil bie gauge S[r= 
Beit al§ gu fe^Ier^aft unh unBefriehigenh be- 
funben, unb bafj biefe SIrBeit barauf[}in bon 
Earpentern berric^tct Inurbe. 

2Bir ftel^en t)ier bor einer feljr bergloidten 
grage Bei ber e§ hem Uneingetoei^ten unb 
felBft hem ©ingetoeiljten f(^ttier fatten toirb 
gu entfdieiben tnelc^e ©eite im SRedite ift, hie 
Earpenter ober bie SJJetaHarBeiter. 

2Bie bem amS) fei, unfere EjetutibsSSe^ 
f)orbe fagte im ^anuar 1910 einen Sefdjiufe 
in tDeId)em fie oBige EntfdEieibung her feam^ 
paer SJonbention guritdtnieS uno aBermalS 
ba§ StuffteHen unh StnBringen bon Wetatl' 
SBefleibungSgegenftanbe fiir hie " Earpenter 
al§ eine ifinen gutommenbe StrBeit Beans 
fprud^te. S)araufl)in tourhe biefe StrBeit 
in SJeln g)orf unb anheren ©tdbten nac^ mie 
bor bon hen Earpentern berridjtet. 93eihe 
.§anbtungcn tourben bon her ©t. SouiS ^on= 
bention at§ eine Stufte^nung gegen bie 83e= 
fdjiiiffe unh S?onftitution§beftimmungen be§ 
©epartements aufgefafet unh unfere 23riiber= 
fd)aft tourhe mit 31 gegen 22 ©timmen fu§s 
pcnbiri. 

Sa nun aBer bie Sonftttution ber St. g. 
of 2. borfd)retBt, ha'^ bie (Sefe^e irgenb eineS 
iSrer SepartementS mit erfterer iiBercin^ 
ftimmen miiffen unb biefe eine Seftimmung 



T Ih a Carpeot 



entfjalt tDonad) eg gur ©uSpenfion irgenb 
einer affiltrten Organifatton einer gtricil)rit= 
id 2Kajoritat 6ebarf unb biefe 58eftimmung 
fomit au&j Bon bem SBau^Separtement gu- 
heoM£)Un ijt, roar btc mit meniger benn 
grDeibrittel aTJajoritat bcfc^Ioffene ©unpens 
fiou, imgefe^Iic^. 

2Ba§ bie Sragttieite ber (Su§penfion cm= 
betrtfft fo fet fiier Bemerft, ba^ biefelBe 
lebtglidj bie ©uSpenbirung unferer SKitgliebs 
fc^aft bon ben lofalen Sau^Eentralen, ober 
beren 9Iu§tritt nu§ bcnfelBen bcbmgt; bie 
gugefiorigleit unferer Crganifation gur St. 
g. of Q. unb bie SGertretung unferer QoiaU 
Unionen in lofalen ober ftaatltc^en Sentral= 
Brpern toirb burd) bie ©u§penfion nii^t 
Beeintrac^tigt. 

Sie ©jefutibe, unb ebentueH bie nac^fte 
S^onbention ber 21. g. of 2., irirb fic^ nun 
mit ber ©uSpenfion fotoie mit ber gongen 
ftreitigen Stngelegen^eit gmif(^en Earpenter 
unb SKetaHarfieiter Befaffcn miiffen, toaS bie= 
fen, trie f(^on oben angebeutet, infotoeit e§ 
fid) um bie ^urtSbittionSfrage ^anbelt, nidit 
tDcnig Kopfgerbrec^en berurfadjen burfte. 

S8ieIIei(^t toare e§ ratfam unb gtnerfs 
ma^ig toenn bie 2t. g. of S. bie grage einem 
unparteifc^en, fadjberftanfaigen Somite gur 
®ntfc6eibung unterbreiten miirbe. ®iefe§ 
Somite fonnte gtbet (ScbSube auSma^Ien in 
benen SUJetaH^Sefleibung gur SBertoenbung 
fommt unb in benen in einem berfelBen bie 
Sarpenter unb im anberen bie 2)IetaIIarbei= 
ter l3ie umftcittene Strbeit gu berriditen ^Sts 
ten, um bann gu entfdjeiben trelc^eS Oetoerl 
gu beren SluSfu^rung ba§ egeignetfte unb bie 
grofete Serei^tigung bagu bat. Stber aui) 
bie§ toiirbe nic^t gum giele fut)ren tcenn bie 
Stngeprigen beiber ©etoerte ni(^t bon brii« 
berlid|em ©eifte befeelt unb bereit finb auf 
bie eine ober anbere 2Beife ben fo nottoenbi= 
gen grieben unter fiifi toieber fierguftelten. 
•sidier ift, ba^ bie§ nur baburc| gefc^el^en 
tann, ba^ eineS ber beiben ©etoerle truf bie 
StuSfubnmg ier umftrittenen Strbeit bergid|= 
tet. SBergeffen toir nidjt, ba% toir cingebenl 
beg SlBarf patches „einer fiir Sttte unb StHe 
fiir ©inen," aHefammt ©lieber einer ein= 
gigen gamilie, ber organifirten Strbeit, finb, 
unb ba% ba§ ©etoerf tcctc^eg ben SSergic^t 
gu leiften tjat, ebentucK unter ben golgen 
ebenfof(^ti)er gu leiben r)at aU baS Pettier! 
gu beffen gunften eine Suri§biftion§fh:eitig= 
feit entfdjieben, unb bem bie umftrittene 2tr« 
beit gugefproc^en mirb im anberen gaHe gu 
leiben baben toiirbe. 

SBaren bie SBoubanbtocrler bon biefem 
®eifte befectt fo fbnnten ©tijrungen unb 
©treitigteiten, toie fie burcb StrbcitSborfdjies 
bungen unb ©infiibrung neuen SKaterialB 
benirfad)t, bermieben toerben unb e§ toiirbe 
gur ©d)iiditung bon ^surt3biftion§5@treitig< 
feiten nid)t einc§ fo foftfpieligen StparateS 
bebiirfen tote baS SausSepartement ber St. 

g. of a. 



®cr Sntcrnationolc .'jtotgarbcttersSongref?. 

(Son St. .§ein§, SBieSbaben.) 

^m Stnfdilu^ an ben internationaten 5par» 
teifongrefe fanb in i^opent^agen aud) ein ins 
iemationater ipoIgarbeiterJongre^ ftatt; eg 
ift befc^amenb fiir unfer gro^e Organifation 
in ben 93cr. ©taaten, ba^ toir toeber auf bem 
altgemeinen, noc^ auf bem fpegiellen J?on= 
grefe bertreten loaren. ®§ ift getoi^ nidjt 
ber finangielte 5punlt, ber un§ bon einer Se= 
fc^idung foldjcr internationaler Srmbgebun» 
gen' berfiinbert; bon feiten unferer englifc^» 
amcritanifdjcn SfJitglieber ift e§ too^I Tlari' 
get an befferem SBiffen, toenn nidjt (SIeid]» 
giiltigteit; nod) ift bie ameritanif^e Strbeit 
terbetoegung nid]t bagu getangt, ben leinen 
protetarifc^en iltaffenftanbpunft anguerten^ 
nen unb cnergifc^ gu bertreten; nodj gtau^ 
ben gu SSiete unter il^nen an bie 2ltogIid)£eit 
einer Samegie ober [ftodefeHer Earriere, bie, 
toie tocitanb einen jebcn ©otbaten SJapo^ 
tcong ben 3)Jarfd)aIIgftab in ben Eumifter 
t)inein tog, einem jeben gabritarbeiter ober 
^anbtoerter auc^ ermbgti^t toerbe. 

Sd) begtoeiffc feinen Stugenbtid ben guten 
SBitlen unferer ©eneralbeamten ober ber 
@eneral=®i:etutibe; aber baben bie nii^t bag 
3ted)t, fief) auf bie mangelnbe ^nitiatibe uns 
ferer fortfd)ritttid)en beutfd)en SoIalS gu be^ 
rufenV Sag gauge ^afir toirb auf bie ©j-e* 
futtbbeamtcn unb auf bie englifdien Unions 
raifoniert unb gefdjimpft. S)ie Sonbentio^ 
nen toerben bemac^taffigt ober gar nidit be« 
fdiidt, aber toenn einmal bie (Setegenbeit ba 
ift, eine toirtlic^ fortfd)ritttic^e, groggiigige 
grage in Stnregung gu bringen, unb fei eg 
btog, um bie grage in einer lonferbatiben 
amerifanifcfien Sonbention gur ©prad)e gu 
bringen unb bamit ben internationaten @e= 
banfen agitatorifc^ gu fiirbem, nim, bann 
finb unfere mebr ober toeniger tnallrotb an^ 
gelaufenen 93riiber nid)t gu finben. SBitter 
beflagte fid) in Sopenbagen ber ^ntemat. 
©etretar Seipbart bariiber, ba^ bon ben 
amerifanifc^en §otgarbeiters(Setoer!fd^aften 
nicbt einmal eine Stnttoort, gef(^toeige eine 
??ertretung gu er^atten fei. 

©g foHte mid) ungemein freuen, toenn 
biegmal ein Stntrag auf Sefdjidung beg im 
^a^xe 1913 in SBien abgubaltenben gnt- 
^ongreffeg ber ®eg JJIoineg Sonbention bon 
beut'fdier ©eite borgetegt toorben toare. 

iSortaufig toiH icB mii^ benn begnugen, 
ettoag ©ingetbeiten iiber ben Qnt. SSerbanb 
gu geben: 

Sn ©tuttgart, im ^abre 1907, toaren 12 ' 
S^ationen burd) 27 ®elegierte bertreten. 
®ort tourbe bereitg befcbtoffen, baf; bie WiU 
gtieber einer angefdjtoffenen Organifatton 
obne 33eitritt§gelb unb unter Stnre(Snung ber 
bigger geteifteten SSeitrage in bie Organifas 
tion beg fianbeg beitreten fiinnen, in toetd)eg 
fie auggetoanbert finb; toag benn glucllidier 
SBeife gum 5S^eit aucb bet ung in Stmerifa 
aboptirt tourbe. 



51 



T lb e Car 



o t © r 



S)er ^nt. Union ber Qoliaxbeitex: Qcfjoun 
20 SJationen, m'tt 35 SUerbiinben, an; fdmmts 
Itd^e SBerbctube ^dl)lten tm ^aijxe 1908 runt) 
275,000 2)£itglteber, lnobon allerbingS bie 
§dlfte auf S)eutfii)Ianb entftel. Saburc^ 
entfdHt ber §aupti^etl ber fincmjieHen folnol^I 
tote ber 2lr6ett§Ieiftung auf bie beutfdjen 
©enoffen, toaS biefe jebocl mc§t abtidit, bcU 
be§ gerne gu tragen, unb fiir bie 2Iugbret=' 
tung be§ 58erbanbe§ gu arbeiten; ttia§ fonnte 
bod) noc^ fo S8iele§ erreic^t liierben, toenn toil 
mit unferen 200,000 SKitgliebern beitreten 
iroltten, unb trie toiirbe biefer Seitritt buxd) 
unfer SBeifptel auf anbern, nocfi gemfte^enbe 
mirlen. 

Sluf bem bieSidrigen S^openSagener ^on* 
gre^ toaren 27 SSerbdnbe burcg 48 Selega- 
ten bertreten. Sie ^nt. Union gdl^It Iieute 
12 SSerbdnbe me^r al§ gur ^ext ber ©tutt= 
garter ^ongreffe^. 

©g gepren ^ur Union folgenbe Sdnber: 
Seutfc^Ianb, SdnemarJ, ginntanb, 3iorme= 
gen, ©djioeben, OeftreicI, Ungam, ©nglanb, 
grantreicfi, SBelgien, ©erbien, ©^Ineig unb 
Sulgarien. 

Ser italienifc^e SSerbanb ift feit ©tuttjjart 
tnieber gufammen gebroc^en. SBie man \itijt, 
betl^eiligen \xd) gmhe tion ben fidnbem bie* 
jenigen, bie auc^ ben S8er. ©taaten ben grbfea 
ten ^uroac^g letl^en. 

golgenbe Qeilen, bem beutfc^en Organ bet 
^olgarbeiter entnommen, getgen ben @eift, 
ber im ^nt. SJerbanbe l|errfct|t: 

„@rft ber fefte QufammenfcEiIufe ber ort= 
lid^en SBereine gu grofeen Qentralberbdnben 
gab ben ©elrerffcEiaften bie Sraft, bie fie 
gur ©rfiittung iEirer Stufgoben befi^en jniij» 
fen. 

„$abcn fic§ bie SBerbonbe anfang§ auS* 
fc^Ite6It(| auf nattonalem ©ebiet bet^dtigt, 
fo fiil^rte ber gortfd^ritt ber tapitaliftifien 
SntlcicEelung bagu, audj mit ben organftrs 
ten Serufggenoffen be§ 2lu§Ianbe§ Seriil^= 
rungSpunlte gu fuc^en. 2Iu§ ber Iletnen 
SBerlftatt, bie nur fiir ben lolalen SDJarft 
arbeitete, baben fic^ 9iiefenbetriebe enttoidelt, 
bie barauf angetoiefen "ftnb, i|re Slbfa^gebtet 
ftdnbtg gu bergrbfeem. SMe £anbe§grengen 
Juerben iiberft^ritten, e§ toirb fiir ben SBelts 
marft probugirt. S)ie ©rgeugniffe ber Slr^ 
better au§ femen ®egenben finben im etge* 
nen Sanbe Slbfa^ unb beretten burc^ i^re 
a3inig!eit benen, bie biefe ©egenftdnbe bt§= 
fier aHein fierfteHten, eine empfinblic^e Slon* 
furreng. S)ie bon ber Wegierung aufgeric^= 
teten JioUfc^ranlen ertueifen fidb bal§ al§ etn 
rec^t glx)cifd)neibigeg ©tfilnert; fie Seranlaffen 
bie anbcren ©taaten, Siepreffalien gu iii&en 
unb ftatt bie Sage ber Slrbeiter gu l^eben, 
inerben fie ein aifittet, il^re fiebenS^altung 
noc^ Ineiter ^erabgubriicEen. 

„©o bric^t fid) aHmdHid^ in ben S?opfen 
ber bentenben Slrbeiter oer ©ebanfe SBal^n, 
bie Sonfurreng an i^rer UrfprungSfleUe gu 
befdmpfen. SBir tooHen un§ ni^t gegen bie 
Sinfu^r auSIdnbifc^er ©rgeugniffe tuefiren. 
fonbem ba^in ftreben, bie Quetten gu tier=: 
ftopfen, toeldje bie biHige ^erfteEung fener 



SBaren ermoglidien. Stud) bie Strbeiter be§ 
2Iu§[anbe§ follen fid) organifiren. 2Bo foldie 
Drganifationen beieitS iporl^anben finb, tiegt 
eg in unferem ^ntereffe, i^nen jeben S8or= 
fd)ub gu leiften. @§ ift aud) unfer 9Sortf|eit, 
tuenn unfere auSIdnbifc^en SoUegen oug= 
reidienbe Qoijxie er^alten. Unb fiat man fid) 
erft gu biefer Sluffaffung buri^gerungen, 
bann ift eg nic^t mel^r trieit gu ber ®rtennt= 
nig, t>a^ bie ^ntereffen ber SBerufggenoffen in 
alien Sdnbem in fe^r ineitge^enbem Tla'QC 
gufammenfaHen. Sie SJotl^tnenbigteit, eine 
ftdnbige aJerbinbung mit ben @etriertfd)aften 
oeg Stuglanbeg gu untertialten, brdngt fid) 
auf. SJeben bem fc^riftlic^en SSerte^r er= 
toeift eg fic^ alg gtoedmdfeig, bon Rett gu 
geit in perfbnlic^en gufammentiinften bie 
SDJeinungen auggutaufi^en. Sie Organifa^ 
tionen lernen bon einanber, mit ber S^ii 
fommt man bagu, eine getniffe (£inf)eitlid)!eit 
in ben ©inric^tungen ber SSerbdnbe gu 
fc^affen unb toenn eg aud) big gur ©(^affung 
intemationaler Serufgberbdnbe na^ bem 
iyjufter ber nationalen gentralorganifatio^ 
nen nod) ein toeiter ©diritt ift, fo ift baS, 
toag inir in ben Borftel^enben ©a^en ange= 
beutet ^aben, bod) gleic^bebeutenb mit ®tap= 
pen auf bem SBcge gu btefem Qiele." 

S)ag ift eine bemiinftige, aner!enneng= 
toert^e Sluffaffung, ber fid) jebeg 2Kitgtieb 
ber a3rot[)er^oob onfc^Iiefeen lann. ©elbft 
bem auggefprod^enften ©goiften in unferm 
a^erbanbe miifete eg einleud^ten, bafe bie ^nt. 
Union fur ung bie Saftanien aug bem geucr 
tjolt. SBer fc^on fematg mitgearbeitet l^at, 
tnern eg gait, neu eingetnanberte gtaliener, 
^uben, spolen, Ungam u. f. to. in bie Dr= 
ganifation gu bringen, ober fie babon obgu^ 
fatten, ©trilebredier gu toerben, ber mufe 
fidj fagen, ba^ etn fc^toereg ©tiid Slrbeit 
bann boKbra^t ift, toem eg ber ^nt- Union 
bereitg gelungen ift, befagte ©lemente in bie 
Organifotion gu bringen, e^e fie fic^ bagu 
berleiten laffen, nac^ bem SoKarlanbe gu 
tommen. 

gotten toir in ^open^agen unfer SBertre^ 
ter ge^abt, bie bort ben Dft unb ©iibeuro^ 
paifdien ^olgorbeiter bie ameritanifdien 3ii= 
ftdnbe ber SBa^rl^eit gemdfe gefd)ilbert 5dt= 
ten, toiirben fid^ SBiele berfelben bebenlen, 
el^e fie burc^ i^re Stu§toanberung aug bem 
ategen in bie S^raufe gerat^en. 

&ir hjotten ^offen, ba'^ ber in " biefem 
^a^re gema^te ge^Ier fid) nic^t im .^a^^re 
1913 toieberbolen, ba^ bie U. SB. of E. anb 
^. in SBien il^rer ©tdrfe unb i^rer SBebeu^ 
tung gemdfe toirb bertreten fein. 



53 



SBo ift giii^arb ©Aliens? 

SRtd^arb ©c^Iieng, gebiirtig aug SBaiem, 
loirb gebeten Untergeid)netem, feinem 
greunbe ben er auf bem Sampfer ©rofeer 
ffurfiirft lennen lernte, feine Slbreffe gugu* 
fenben, unb ^ameraben bie i^n lennen finb 
erfu(^t i^n auf biefe Stufforberung aufmerl= 
fam gu mac^en. Sbtoin SBergner, 
SR. atoute 7, ebangbiEe, ^nb. 




La grave generale des Employes des 
chemins de fer en France. 

(par Alphonse Henryot.) 

Ce que nous avions predit dans un article 
precedent, vient d 'avoir lieu en France; le 
proletariat de la voie ferree, las d'attendre 
les reformes promises, s'est revolte contre 
les grandes compagnies des chemins de fer,- 
et a cesse son travail. 

Pendant trois-fois 24 heures, les gares 
parisienues, ainsi que celles de plusieurs 
grandes villes de France furent fermes; la 
vente de billets etait suspendue, ni la poste 
Hi les compagnies de transport n 'acceptaient 
des bagages et d 'autre marchandise, et la 
poste aux lettres ne f onotionnait qu 'au 
moyen d 'automobiles. 

On s 'imagine facilement le desarroi dans 
le elan bourgeois, la terreur sur les bancs du 
gouvernement; le pris des vivres se doublait 
a Paris, et pour peu que cet etat des choses 
eut ete maintenue, les grandes compagnies 
furent forces de eeder aux reclamations, plus 
que justifies, de leurs employes. 

Mais voila le point d'interogation que I'on 
est en droit de poser en ce moment: 
Pourquoi cet elan superbe a ete rabattu au 
bout de trois jours? 

Cette tentative de greve n'a pas avorte, 
faute de secour financier; ce n 'etait pas 
1 'argent qui a manque; de meme que le 
nombre des participants a ete assez grand 
pour garantir sa reussite. La sympathie du 
proletariat frangais ne faisait pas defaut 
non plus, puisque les eleetrieiens firent, 
surtout a Paris, cause commune aveo les 
grevistes de la voie ferree; meme les 
ouvriers masons, ainsi que d'autres branches 
du batiment se mirent en gr^ve et ajouterent 
au traeas gouvernemental. 

Les raisons de cet avortement Staient 
multiples; d'abord manquait-il de spon- 
taneite a ce - mouvement; point de mot 
d'ordre, point de jour fixe et de date pre- 
cise. De lour propre Initiative, les 



employes et ouvriers des chemins de fer, aux 
grands ateliers de la Chapelle, a Paris, 
jetaient bas leurs outils, 1 'augmentation du 
salaire demande depuis plus de vingt ans, et 
promis deja plusieurs fois, leur avait ete 
refuse net; d'autres suivirent leur exemple; 
beaucoup de colore beaucoup d 'enthusiasm, 
et beaucoup de bonne volonte, mais peu de 
discipline. Les chefs des organisations eux 
memes etaient obliges de se servir d 'automo- 
biles pour transmettre leurs ordres aux mem- 
bres du syndicat de la province. 

Voyant ce disaccord, ce manque d 'union 
dans les rangs des employes, le gouverne- 
ment avait beau jeu; 11 proclamait la mob- 
ilisation, c'est a dire il transformait les 
grevistes, qui jusque 13. n 'etaient que des 
ouvriers libres, des employes d'une Industrie 
privee (sauf ceux du resau de I'Etat), en 
militaires prenant leurs ordres du ministre 
de la guerre et mena^ant les refractaires de 
prison et d'amendes, et le tour fut joue. Et 
de dire que c 'est bien le gouvernement d 'uno 
Republic, le gouvernement d'un pays 
demoeratique par excellence, qui a trouve ce 
moyen douteux pour rester, selon lui dans 
la legalite. 

Cette maniere d'agire rappel le souvenir 
de la Commune ; en 1871 aussi, le proletariat 
parisien etait reste dans la legalite, le 
gouvernement d'alors s 'etait mis hors la loi, 
de meme que dans la seance a jamais 
memorable du jeudi, 27 octobre, le president 
du ministere, le renegat Briand, a laisse, 
aussi ciniquement que maladroit, echappe 
I'aveu suivant: "Le gouvernement est 
heureux que les evenements lui ont permit 
de rester dans la legalite, mais il est possible 
que des cas puissent se presenter oil le 
gouvernement se verrait force de sortir de 
la legalite, et de prendre des mesures 
contraire a la loi." 

Voila ce que chaque bourgeois, chaque 
eapitaUste pense. Sur ce point toute ia 
elasse capitaliste est d 'accord avec Mr. 



53 



Tlhe Car 



o t e"r 



Briand; contre les interets du cofEre fort, et 
du porte-monnaie bourgeois il n'y a pas de 
loi qui eompte. Mais, si au eontraire, cetto 
greve eut ete d'une duree plus longue, si 
elle aurait meritee avee plus de justesse le 
titre de greve generale, qu'est-oe que le 
gouvernement aurait fait? 

Le sang uous monte au front, rien que 
d 'y penser. La classe bourgeoise et 
eapitaliste, qui ne se gene pas d 'exploiter le 
proletariat a outrance, n 'hesiterai point de 
faire verser le sang de eeux qui a'op- 
poseraient a cette exploitation. Le denni- 
million de soldats des amies divers ne sont 
point la pour defendre la patrie contre 
I'ennemi etrange, eet ennenii etrange ne 
sert que d 'excuse pour maintenir cette 
armee, prete a tirer sur le vrai, le seul en- 
nemi de la classe gouvernemental et 
eapitaliste, sur la classe ouvriere. 

Si I'Empereur d'Allemagne, dans un 
moment de franclyse aussi stupide que 
brutale dissait aux soldats dans une caserne 
a Berlin : "Si je vous 1 'ordonne, vous 
devez tirer sur pere et mere, sur frere et 
soeur, ' ' les gouvernements du beaux pays 
de France ont ete assez prudents pour ne pas 
laisser echapper de sottises pareilles, mais 
ils n'ont jamais manque jusqu'a ce jour 
d'agir selon les maximes de I'Empereur 
toque et maladroit. 

Que I'on soit Men persuade que ce u'esii 
point la forme de gouvernement que la 
classe eapitaliste se donne, qui lui dietera 
sa politique envers le proletariat ; que ce soit 
la forme republicaine ou monarchique, que 
le chef du gouvernement s'appele president, 
roi ou empereur, tant que le regne restera 
entre la classe possedente, tant que le peuple 
permettra a une minorite sans scrupule de 
lui tirer la peau sur les oreilles, cette 
minorite poursuivera avec tons les moyens 
on son pouvoir, ce but; ni forme, ni 
politique, ni frontiers geographique y chang- 
eront la moindre des choses. Jamais, depuis 
que 1 'on eerit 1 'histoire, les armees 
nationales ont eommis des atrocites contre 
1 'armee ennemie Strangfere, comme la. force 
armee et mercenaire de la bourgeoisie a com- 
mise contre la classe ouvriere proclamant 
ses droits, ou essayant de I'affrancHr du 
joug eapitaliste. 

C'est done due purement au hazard, si la 
bonne saignee intentee n'a pas 6te applique 



cette fois au proletariat dissatisfait, maie 
que 1 'on en soit assure, ce n 'est que partio 
remise-. 

Quel enseignement devons nous tirer de 
cette greve morte? 

D 'abord la maxime indeniable, qu 'mie 
greve generale est forcement sinouymo avec 
revolt, qu 'une revolte, qui ne dependra pas 
de nous de voir se transformer en revolu- 
tion; n'est pas une chose que I'on pent 
proclamer. Le jour ou la classe eapitaliste 
obligera la classe ouvriere a .se servir de 
cette arme, que I'on ne se contente pas de 
reformes futiles, et ne se serve pas de 
moyens derisoires. Le proletarait ne devra 
pas risquer sa peau et ses os pour une 
augmentation de salaire de 2 cents par heure, 
mais bien pour changer le systeme, en abolis- 
sant une fois pour tout, le systeme 
d 'exploitation de I'homme par I'homme. 

Pour arriver a ce but il faudra d 'abord 
eduquer les masses, les organiser fortement -jj 
et les habituer a la discipline. II faudra * 
leur inspirer leurs droits d'homme, et leurs 
devoirs de citoyens, 1 'amour de la pustice, 
et la haine contre le systeme de classe qui 
nous gouverne depuis des siecles et que nous 
sommes las de subir plus longtemps. 

Une fois les masses proletarienncs 
prepares de cette maniere pour la lutte 
finale, nous doutons fortement qu'une 
revolution sanglante sera encore necessaire; 
si la classe eapitaliste ne cedera pas aux 
justes revendications des ouvriers, elle se 
mettra en dehors de la legalite comme le 
gouvernement frangais vient de le proclame, 
et elle en supportera les consequences. 



A Thought. 

Hearts that are great beat never loud, 
They muffle their music when they come ; 

They hurry away from the thronging crowd 
With Ijended brows and lips half dumb. 

And the world looks on and mutters — "Proud.' 
And when great hearts have passed away 

Men gather in awe and kiss their shroud, 
And in love they kneel around their clay. 

Hearts that are great are always alone. 
They never will manifest their best ; 

Their greatest greatness is unknown — 
Earth knows a little — God the rest. 

— Father Ryan. 



54 




CEABLE, C. B., of L. U. 1585, Lawson, Okla. 



^ 


Claims Paid 

During Dec. 1910 


i 



No. Name. Union. Am't. 

13912 Alex. Krolikowski .....' 1 $200.00 

13913 J. H. Neahous 1 200.00 

13914 Wm. W. Cannon 15 200.00 

13915 John McKeirnan 36 50.00 

13916 Mrs. Martha A. Owens. . 62 50.00 

13917 Aug. Bikenherg 73 200.00 

13918 George Steel 73 200.00 

13919 Mrs. Minna Schlack 80 50.00 

13920 James Kalafagldes Ill 200.00 

13921 Albert Johnson 247 200.00 

13922 Mrs. Lizzie Zlembinski. . 309 50.00 

13923 Adam Smith 581 200.00 

13924 R. M. Luttenton 651 50.00 

13925 Mrs. C. E. Cadieu 715 50.00 

13926 Gustave Gueth 723 200.00 

13927 George W. Simons 771 200.00 

13928 Mrs. E. C. McNaught. . . 802 50.00 

13929 Mrs. Rebecca Ford 107 50.00 

13930 Arthur Daigle 134 200.00 

13931 Albert E. Athey 550 200.00 

13932 Mrs. E. L. Williamson.. 667 50.00 

13933 Chas. W. Foreman 1391 50.00 

13934 A. M. Mullendore 1391 200.00 

13935 Howard T. Abbott 31 200.00 

13936 Joseph C. Pharoah 160 50.00 

13937 James M. Leddy 176 200.00 

13938 Mrs. H. C. Bristley 261 50.00 

13939 E. L. Nestell 334 200.00 

13940 Henry Kuvek 375 200.00 

13941 Louis Larsen 471 200.00 

13942 Albert Berls 1784 200.00 

13943 Mrs. Martha Schwandt. 1784 50.00 

13944 Timothy Crowley 10 200.00 

13945 Alfred A. Wills 22 50.00 

13946 Mrs. Rose Welsh 25 50.00 

13947 Wm. M. Milllgan 27 50.00 

13948 Mrs. G. E. McDonald... 33 50.00 

13949 Daniel McLean 33 50.00 

13950 Edward Roesner 72 200.00 

13951 Mrs. Clara Lester 578 50.00 

13952 Mrs. Martha Gale 80 50.00 

13953 Salvador Demarco (dis.). 129 300.00 

13954 Mrs. Emma J. Chansey. . 158 50.00 

13955 Thomas Hunt 242 200.00 

13956 Fred Kuehl 242 50.00 

13957 Mrs, Lillian Volquards.. 304 50.00 



No. Name. ■ Union. Am't. 

13958 Mrs. Emma Gassrow.... 416 50.00 

13959 Mrs. Mary Probst 416 50.00 

13960 Junius C. Walker 746 122.00 

13961 Mrs. Mary Jane Hume.. 1186 50,00 

13962 J. Berbe (dis.) 1505 200.00 

13966 Jacob Schwickerath (dis.) 5 300.00 

13964 B. Frank Demphey (dis.) 20 400.00 

13965 Mrs. Bella Alinky 138 50.00 

13966 Mrs. Mary Macheet 181 50.00 

13967 John Higgins (dis,).... 216 400.00 

13968 Robert Pfeiffer 242 200.00 

13969 Mrs. Charlotte Wilson , . 302 50.00 

13970 Isidore Lecuyer 342 200.00 

13971 Theodor Schrotz -, . 375 200.00 

13972 Mrs. Florentiena Rick,,. 419 50.00 

13973 John Thalman 419 200.00 

13974 Andrew Mecke 422 200.00 

13975 Dominick Euppert 515 200.00 

13976 W. W. Franli 810 200.00 

13977 Charles Dages 985 200.00 

13978 R. H. Patterson 98 200.00 

13979 Warren E. Casler 1672 200.00 

13980 John Migel 87 200.00 

13981 C. C. Benner 110 200.00 

13982 Otto W. Nielson 181 100.00 

13983 Mrs. Ida Drake 239 50.00 

13984 Frank Allard 1021 200.00 

13985 James W. Lauer 1145 200.00 

13986 Glaus Ortlund 62 200.00 

13987 Mrs. Gertrude Frank... 324 50.00 

13988 James C. Williamson,., 349 200.00 

13989 Adolph Rankel 550 200.00 

13990 Samuel P. Bloom 736 200.00 

13991 Chas. P. Sizer 984 50.00 

13992 Mrs, Mary B. Wilson... 996 25.00 

13993 James W. Scott 1738 200.00 

13094 Peter W. Lorish 19 200.00 

13995 J. H. Sampson 25 200.00 

13996 Chas. Vaillencourt 100 50.00 

13997 John Templeton 301 200.00 

13998 Peter Jorgensen 309 200.00 

13999 Mrs. Augusta Voeltz 522 50.00 

14000 Svend Jepson 613 200.00 

14001 Richard Henry 1582 200.00 

14002 Christ Kilgus, Sr 34 200.00 

14003 Mrs. Cora Beall 71 25.00 

14004 M, J. Walling 132 200.00 

14005 Herman Heidmann .... 188 200.00 

14006 Andreas Heilmann 209 200.00 

14007 Mrs. Margaret Henifan , . 215 50.00 

14008 Mrs. Marie Prochaska,. 308 50.00 

14009 Mrs. Marion Stovall . . . 318 50.00 

14010 C. R. Senters 339 200.00 



No. Name. Union. 

14011 Joseph Brachman 355 

14012 Friedrlch Brandt 375 

14013 George Nusbaum 464 

14014 Thomas McNamara .... 507 

14015 Nicholas Murphy 920 

14016 Chas. W. Stewart 1072 

14017 Wm. Cottrell (dis.) 1107 

14018 Mrs. Barbara Beal 1209 

14019 Mrs. Delia McKenzie . . . 1747 

14020 Berthold Kistner 5 

14021 O. Larkin 13 

14022 Morton A. Horner 274 

14023 Mrs. Edyth P. Serviss... 493 

14024 Mrs. Delia Earnest 906 

14025 Mrs. Minnie B. Rook. . . . 1476 

14026 Mrs. Berntine Larson . . 451 

14027 Mrs. A. M. Grundmann. . 460 

14028 Mrs. P. Wurtzler 592 

14029 D. E. Merritt 691 

14030 Wm. F. Saunders 746 

14031 Lars Lewis 1717 

14032 S. H. Scott 103 

14033 Mrs. Eva Eoehlk 13 

14034 Charles O. Peterson 32 

14035 Mrs. Amelia Bellerose. . . 99 

14036 Edward Fehrenbach 142 

14037 Mrs. Johanna Eilrich . . 419 

14038 Mrs. Elizabeth O'Connor 471 

14039 Elijah J. Watson 621 

14040 Andrew J. Carlson 639 

14041 Mrs. Anna Stromberg. . . 639 

14042 Mrs. Esther Maslow. . . . 727 

14043 James Farrell 867 

14044 Emil Chrlstel 55 

14045 Mrs. Mary E. Kline 55 

14046 J. E. Ormhelm 55 

14047 Mrs. Frances Mallett... 218 

14048 Mrs. Anna Streit 242 

14049 Alex. Ferguson 668 

14050 Mrs. Theresa Eeinhardt. 242 

14051 Mrs. Mary Artner 419 

14052 Mrs. Lillie Jalo 422 

14053 Mrs. Sallie Jones 1442 

14054 Englebert Loeper 1670 

14055 John Van Der Sloot 1352 

14056 Alvin E. Holmes 1591 

14057 John J. Daniels 1626 

14058 Jacob Steinert (dis.)... 12 

14059 Herman Bellfua 87 

14060 Carl Lotz (dis.) 182 

14061 Sam'l B. Bastian (dis.). 691 

14062 Albert W. Hardaker .... 760 

14063 August Braun (dis.).... 901 

14064 Daniel J. Malone 43 

14065 Joseph Augers 178 

14066 J. N. Allman 213 

14067 Jerome Nethenay 251 

14068 Mrs. A. A. Johnson 407 

14069 Mrs. Marie Nyholt 434' 

14070 John Leddy 453 

14071 August Post 1036 

14072 Jacob Vancura 1786 

14073 Alex. Anderson 181 

14074 Mrs. Ida Bleau 219 

14075 Louis Bourrienne 309 



arpeoter 

Am't. No. Name. Union. Am't. 

50.00 14076 Mrs. Golda Prissman... 427 50.00 

200.00 14077 David W. Hall 952 50.00 

200.00 14078 Stefan Specz 1784 100.00 

200.00 14079 H. R. Patterson 98 200.00 

200.00 14080 Tobias Kasofsky 504 50.00 

100.00 14081 Mrs. Elizabeth Eixen . . . 524 50.00 

400.00 14082 Charles W. Gibson (dis.) 701 100.00 

50.00 14083 Mrs. Mary J. Quillin.... 1514 50.00 

50.00 14084 Mrs. Lizzie Downes .... 109 50.00 

50.00 14085 J. H. Hearn 362 50.00 

200.00 14080 Emil A. Carson 434 200.00 

200.00 14087 Henry Valley 643 50.00 

50.00 14088 Mrs. Johanna Strom 1108 25.00 

50.00 14089 S. M. Davison (dis.) 362 400.00 

25.00 14090 Mrs. O. A. Edmondson. . 14 50.00 

50.00 14091 Edward I-Iurffi 20 200.00 

50.00 14092 Mrs. Anna S. Stromberg 106 50.00 

50.00 14093 Mrs. Heloise Tremhlay.. 134 50.00 

-50.00 14094 Wm. D. Auty 219 200.00 

50.00 14095 Leo Flolle 723 50.00 

200.00 14096 Robert W. Jones 591 50.00 

20o'oO 14097 Charles Rule 1297 50.00 

50^00 14098 A. B. Westlake 55 200.00 

200.00 14099 Mrs. Rebecca J. Muss... 64 50.00 

"5o'oO 14100 Henry Weins 87 200.00 

200^00 14101 Allen Kilborn 125 50.00 

"5o'oO 14102 Mrs. B. L. Carlson 167 50.00 

50^00 14103 James Gannon 250 200.00 

5o!oO UWi Edwin O. Wright 276 200.00 

20o'o0 14105 Mrs. Sarah Henderson . . 305 50.00 

"50 on 14106 Mrs. Lulu Lyons 318 50.00 

_„ „„ 14107 Frank Cole 348 200.00 

ou.uu 14108 Mrs. Lillie M. Hamm 348 50.00 

100.00 14109 Mrs. Mary Rocheleau... 351 50.00 

50.00 14110 Stanley Pachucki (dis.). 355 400.00 

nnnn 14111 Peter Nilson 457 200.00 

ou.uu 14112 .Jacob Zegel 490 200.00 

200.00 14113 Mrs. Marie Patvin 730 25.00 

50.00 14114 L. H. Proctor 1536 100.00 

t^n nn 14115 Vaclav Kubu 39 200.00 

ou.uu i4iig Mrs Barbara Cihak 54 50.00 

50.00 14117 R. E. Mason 55 200.00 

50.00 14118 Samuel L. Whaples 97 200.00 

>-,n nn 14119 Gust Erickson 98 200.00 

ou.uu 14120 James W. Cale 201 200.00 

50.00 14121 Walenty Majewski 242 200.00 

50.00 14122 John Hockanson 434 200.00 

900 00 14123 Mrs. Josephine Lefevre. 801 50.00 

,^„ ;^ 14124 Mrs. Pauline Rivera . . . 1283 200.00 

100.00 14125 Chas. Fawson 1367 105.00 

200.00 14126 Chas. H. Perry 1367 200.00 

900 00 14127 Mrs. Ethel McElreath... 1415 25.00 

Zrl'^^ 14128 J. B. Caldwell 276 200.00 

400.00 14129 Mrs. Sarah B. Woods. . . 79 50.00 

200.00 14130 Mrs. Clara Abramovitch . 723 50.00 

400 00 14131 Mrs. L. S. Williams.... 1072 50.00 

2QQ QQ 14132 Roy Drum 1769 200.00 

200.00 Total $29,377.00 

400.00 

gpQQ United Brotherhood of Carpenters 

50.00 State Councils. 

50.00 Massachusetts — President, John Hanigan, 98 

50.00 Front St.. Worcester, Mass. ; secretary, P. 

50 00 Provost, Jr., 75 Bond St., Holyoke, Mass. 

■^ New Jersey — President, Samuel Botterill, 118 

200.00 Main St., B. Orange, N. J. ; secretary, .Tames 

200 00 H. Reeve, 1446 Fladdon ave., Camden, N. J. 

■ New York — President, T. M. Guerin, 290 2d 

,J00.00 ave., Troy, N. Y. : secretary, John Rice, 523 

200.00 W. 50th St., New York City. 

_„ „f, Texas — President, R. S. Greer, Beaumont, 

ou.uu ,j,g^ . secretary, J. E. Proctor, 833 Colum- 

200.00 bian St., Houston, Tex. 

56 



DC 



OUR ADVERTISERS 



]I1 



A $75,000 Course 
of Home Training 
in Architecture 

The tnJy ideal method of instruction is the knowledge and 
experience of the very best experts combined into a course of instruc- 
tion and taught in a way most easy to understand, remember, and apply 
to practical problems. The training that most nearly meets these quali- 
fications is that provided by the International Correspondence Schools, 
of Scranton, Pa. At a cost of over $75,000 there has been prepared a 
complete Course in Architecture, written by the very best experts that 
could be obtained and taught after a manner that 1 8 years of experience 
with the most practical correspondence method of instruction in the 
world has proved to be thoroughly efficient and practical. The experi- 
ence in training thousands of men and women has proved that it is as 
possible for a man to become a proficient architect through this method 
of study as with any other known. To quote from an editorial in the 
Architectural Annual: "A college education is by no means necessary 
for it will be remembered that at the first Civil Service examination for 
positions at Washington it w^as not a college graduate or beaux arts man 
(though many of each class com- 



peted) that passed the highest 
examination, but a student of 
the International Correspondence 
Schools, of Scranton, Pa." The 
I. C. S. Complete Architectural 
Course contains nearly 6,000 pages 
of text and over 3,500 illustrations. 
It has enabled hundreds of ambi- 
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and has been of much assistance to 
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and mail the coupon today. 



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Box 1069, Scranton, Pa. 

Please explain, -without further obligation on my 

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Architect 


Electrical Engineer 


Architect'l Draftsman 


Electric-Railway Supt. 


Building Inspector 


Electric-Lightiug Supt. 


Contractor & Builder 


Electrician 


Structural Engineer 


Heat, and Vent Eng. 


Mechanical Engineer 


Ad Writer 


Mechanical Drafts. 


Bookkeeper 


Civil Engineer 


Stenographer 


Surveyor 


Civil Service Exams. 


Steam Engineer 


French 1 With 


Marine Engineer 


German > Edison 


Machine Designer 


Spanish J Phonograph 



Name^ 



Street and No.. 



City_ 



.State_ 



57 









Aberdeen, Wash. — R. B. Ellis, 512 Bui-leigh av. 
Albany, N. Y. — Tbos. Gilmore, Room 21, 

Beaver Block. 
Alton, III. — Roland Adams, 202 Pioneei- Bldg. 
Americus, Ga. — A. M. Perdue. 
Anadarko, Okla. — J. B. Wilson. 
Annapolis, Md. — George B. Wooley, 8 West st. 
Ardmore, Okla. — D. N. Ferguson, Box 522. 
Asbury Park, N. J. — A. L. Clayton, 1st st. and 

Central ave. 
Atlanta, Ga.— ^A. M. Copeland, 16 Kelly st. 
Atlantic City, N. J. — W. D. KautEmann, 1804 

Atlantic ave. 
Auburn, 111. — J. E. Higgins. 
Augusta, Me., Waterville and Vicinity — T. M. 

Rollins, 18 Cusliman St., Augusta, Me. 
Aurora, 111. — Peter N. Jungles, 47-49 LaSalle 

Bakersfleld, Cal. — W. Watson, 2615 K st. 

Baltimore, Md. — Wm. Albaugb, Boarder State 
Bank, Park ave. and Fayette st. 

Barre, Vt. — R. L. Hayward. 

Bartlesville, Okla. — George McConnell. 

Battle Creek, Mich. — Wm. Cartridge, 316 Kale- 
zoo St. 

Belmar, N. J. — Harry Redmond, Box 245. 

Bergen County, N. J. — John D. Carrlock, 388 
Ridgewood ave., Ridgewood, N. J. 

Binghamton, N. Y. — Jeremiah Ryan, 153 Wash- 
ington St. 

Birmingham, Ala. — G. F. Chisolm, 321J N. 
20th St. 

Boise, Idaho — J. B. Worley, 350 Sonna Bldg. 

Boston, D. C. — A. J. Hewlett, 30 Hanover st. ; 
L. U. 33, J. B. Potts, 30 Hanover St.; L. U. 
1393 (Wharf and Bridge), Joseph E. Kelly, 
19 Partridge ave., Somerville, Mass. ; L. U. 
1440 (Shop and Mill), D. S. Fitzgerald, 30 
Hanover st. ; L. U. 1824 (Cabinetmakers and 
Mill), E. Thulin, 30 Hanover st. ; L. D. 954 
(Hebrew), M. Goodman, 30 Hanover St.; 
: D. U. 386, Dorchester, John McCormack, 
272 Bowden St., Dorchester, Mass. ; L. U. 
_ 67, Roxbury, H. M. Taylor, 52 Bailey St., 
Dorchester, Mass. ; L. U. 443, Chelsea, Chas. 
Noel, 86 Grove St., Chelsea, Mass. ; L. U. 
937 (Hebrew), Chelsea, Kalman Disler, 96 
Arlington St., Chelsea, Mass. ; L. U.'s 441 
and 1653, Cambridge, and 629, Somerville, 

- J. F. Twomey, 234 Sycamore St., Waverley, 
Mass. ; L. U. 438, Brookline, W. H. Walsh, 
166 Washington St., Brookline, Mass. ; L. U. 
218, Bast Boston, C. H. Morrison, 16 Pope 
St., East Boston, Mass. 

Brainerd, Minn. — J. W. Welch. 

Bridgeport, Conn. — T. A. Flanagan, 36 Allen st. 

IBristol, Conn. — B. G. Waterhouse, Locust st. 

Brockton, Mass. — Walter Pratt, 158 Main st. 

Butfalo, N. Y. — Geo. H. Waldow, 12-14 Eagle 
St. ; Vincent Roth, 12-14 Eagle st. 

Butte, Mont. — Wm. O'Brien, Box 623. 

Camden, N. J. — 

Canton, 111. — John Burgard. 

Cedar Rapids, la. — C. S. Lightner, 19 Jime Blk. 

Central City, Ky. — James R. Reynolds. 

Charleston, S. C. — 

Chattanooga, Tenn. — 

Cheyenne, Wyo. — B. R. McKinstry, James 
Bros.' cigar store. 

Chicago, 111. — John Metz, president ; Daniel 
Galvin, secretary-treasurer ; Wm. C. White, 
Louis Schalk, J. H. Robinson, assistant 
business agents. No. 1, Albert Schultz ; No. 
10, W. S. Duel ; No. 13, Thos. P. Flinn ; No. 
54, Albert Ruzek ; No. 58, Chas. GrassI ; 



No. 62, Thos. RatclitC ; No. 80, Wm. Brims ; 
No. 141, John Broadbent ; No. 181, Thos. F. 
Church ; No. 199, J. C. Grantham ; No. 242, 
John Baumler ; No. 272, Clyde Farley ; No. 
416, Fred C. Lemke ; No. 434 ; Chas. Dex- 
ter ; Nos. 448, 461, 1727, 250, P. W. Par- 
ker ; No. 504, A. Weiustein ; No. 1307, R. 
Huffman; No. 1639 (Millwrights), John 
Plynn. Mill and Factory Workers : No. 
1367, Joseph Dusek ; No. 1784, Huber 
Stary ; No. 1786, Frank Kurtzer. Address 
of all officers and business agents : Room 
502, Cambridge Bldg., 56 Fifth ave. 

Cincinnati, O. — ^J. D. Pegg, 1228-30 Walnut st. 

Clarksville, Ark. — J. H. Cllne. 

Cleveland, O. — W. R. Yager, 717 Superior ave. ; 

Joseph Lobe, 717 Superior ave. 
Clinton, la. — Clause Rief, 331 14th ave. 
Cotfeyville, Kan.— W. S. Watson, 804 W. 12th 

street. 
Columbus, Ind. — R. L. Wheate, 333 Hlnman 

St. (Columbus, East). 
Columbus, O. — S. H. Baggs, Room 15 Deshler 

Block. 
Concord, N. C. — A. E. Bost, Box 190. 
Coshocton, O. — Fred Tish.. 

Dallas, Tex. — R. M. Means, 662 Roseland ave. 
Danbury, Conn. — Marton B. Mabee, 3 Brook- 
side ave. 
Dayton, O. — H. Foose, P. 0. Box 303. 
Denison, Tex. — J. M. Davis, 420 W. Texas St. 
Denver, Colo. — No. 55, W. H. Hayden, 318 23d 

St. ; No. 528, W. H. Sheidenberger, 1947 

Stout St. ; No. 1874, Thos. James, -1422 

Curtis St. 
Des Moines, la. — J. F. Gray, Trades Assembly 

Hall, 8th and Locust. 
Derby, Conn. — Steven Charters, 111 Wakelee 

ave., Ausonia, Conn. 
Detroit, Mich. — W. H. Quigley, Room 14, 

Lightner Bldg. 
Duluth, Minn. — Henry Trudeau, 2701 Helm st, 
Dyersburg, Tenn. — Lee Nichols. 
East Palestine, O. — George H. Alcorn. 
East St. Louis, HI. — Thos. P. McEntee, 204 

Metropolitan Bldg. 
Eau Claire, Wis. — Roy E. Curtis, 825 2d ave. 
Edmonton, Alta., Can. — J. M. McAfee, 1236 

7th St. 
Elizabeth, N. J. — J. T. Cosgrove, 605 Elizabeth 

avenue. 
Elmira, N. Y. — W. D. Miller, Metzger Block, 

cor. 3d and N. Main. 
El Paso, Tex. — T. E. Worsham, Box 631. 
Ensley, Ala. — W. T. Hutto, Box 666. 
Evansville, Ind. — Matt. Holdenberger, 1759 W. 

Franklin St. 
Fall River, Mass. — 

Fairfield, Conn. — H. U. Lyman, Box 224. 
Fargo, N. D. — A. J. McKenzie, 203 12th St., S. 
Farmington, Mo. — W. J. Dougherty. 
Fond du Lac, Wis. — Henry Kinkel, 438 Third 

Fort Dodge, la. — F. C. Woodbury, N. 16th st. 
Fort Smith, Ark. — L. C. Peacock, Alvord 

Hotel 5 A st 
Fort Worth, Tex.^W. B. Hemsell, 1616 S. 

Main. 
Galveston, Tex. — J. A. Johnstone, 2214J Ave. B. 
Gary, Ind. — L. U. 985, John T. Hekitt, Box 

306. 
Glen Cove, L. I., N. Y. — Hugh Duffy. 
Glens Falls, N. Y. — B. B. Gates, 12 Third st. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. — 



58 



3\\ OXJR ADVERTISERS [C 



ISARGENTI 

1 VBM f 



IRON BENCH PLANES 

ADJUSTABLE WITHOUT REMOVING CUTTER 

WITH PATENT FROG 




SARGENT 

1 VBM [ 



| i =i. » r i cUM l ne'w rapid adjusting bench plane permits 
adjustment of the frog forward or back without re- 
moving the clamp or cutter. Try the Number 9 (9 inch 

Smooth Plane). 

|i =*. i ririj,' nl cutters are made of the highest grade 
steel, hand tempered. They are unconditionally 
warranted. 

| i =*.^rirf:<.'a l wood bottom planes are constructed so 
that the frog is held in the iron frame work by machine 
screws which do not work loose. 

| i =*. i :iHjJhj 1 block planes Nos. 4306, 4307, 5306, and 

5307 are made with wrought steel clamps that will 
not break. 

| i=?;^:W:4?ial "V-B-M tools are the Very Best Made. 
Ask yo\ir dealer for them. "Write for catalogue. 

SARGENT & Company 

Manufacturers of Hardware 
for more than Sixty Years 



High Grade Tools, Builders' Hardware, Etc. 

11S8 I_eonaP(l Street, New YopK City 



T Ih e C a r p a n t e r 



Granite City, Madison and Venice — J. O. 
Lynch. 

Granville, 111. — Geo. P. Scott. 

Grayvllle, 111.— J. W. Badlsbaugh, Box 503. 

Great Falls, Mont. — H. A. Frentz, 705 7tli 
aye., N. 

Great Neck, L. I., N. Y. — Joseph W. Grady. 

Greensburg and Jit. Pleasant, N. Y. — M. Tou- 
hey, Box 78, Irvington-on-Hudson. 

Hamilton, O. — Chas. N. Wilkins, 602 S. 4th st. 

Hartford, Conn. — F. C. Walz, 247 Putnam St. 

Hartford, Ark. — J. H. Moore, Gwynn Postofflce. 

Holyoke, Mass. — Jacob Kreuter, 414 Maple st. 

Houston, Tex. — O. Olsen, 305i Main. 

Huntington, W. Va. — U. S. G. Allen. 

Ilion, N. Y. — W. C. Mack, 59 Railroad st. 

Indianapolis, Ind. — S. P. Meadows, Old Board 
of Trade Bldg., Room 33. 

lola, Kan. — Trott Williamson. 

Ithaca, N. Y. — 

Jackson, Mich. — George J. Johnson, 315 B. 
Franklin. 

Jacksonville, Fla. — Henry Liebock, 25th and 
Main. 

Jamestown, N. Y. — J. M. Kane, Box 112. 

Jersey City, N. J. — J. R. Burgess, 452 Ho- 
boken ave. ; James G. Larkin, 359 4th st., 
Hoboken, N. J. 

Kansas City, Mo. — No. 4, J. H. Dennis, 223 
College, Rosedale, Kan. ; No. 6, J. S. Smith, 
2044 Holmes ; No. 1391, F. B. Jones, 2527 
Summit, and J. C. Jackson, 5618 St. John ; 
No. 168, S. E. Pefley, 1217 Central ave. ; 
No. 1635 (Millmen), Alex. Peterson, Lafay- 
ette and Linden, Rosedale, Kan. 

Kensington, HI. — Jobji H. Leyoung. 

Kenton and Campbell Counties, Ky. — J. A. 
Norton, 15 St. Louis St., Covington, Ky. 

Kewanee, HI. — Gus Lindros, 817 Columbus 
ave. 

Keyport, N. J. — Samuel Stryker. 

KIngsville, Tex. — A. C. Moore, P. B. 293. 

Krebs, Okla. — E. D. Miller. 

Lafayette, Colo. — C. C. Jones, Louisville, Colo. ; 
Sam Hicks, Lafayette, Colo. 

Lake County, Ind. — W. C. Hunter, Hammond, 
Ind. 

LaSalle, 111.— R. J. Mcintosh. 

Lawrence, Mass. — A. B. Grady, 10 Butler st. 

Lawton, Okla. — W. M. Lane. 

Lincoln, Neb. — Fred Eissler, 217 N. 11th st. 

Little Falls, N. Y.— Alfred N. Smith, 54 Petre 
street. 

Lockport, N. Y. — Albert Nott, 237 Prospect st. 

Louisville, Ky.— H. S. Huffman, 107 W. Jeffer- 
son St. 

Los Angeles, Cal. — Geo. A. Wright, D. C. busi- 
ness agent, 538 Maple ave. ; J. W. Brooks, L. 
D. 158, 538 Maple ave. ; H. T. Hass, L. TJ. 
158, 538 Maple ave. ; T. J. Johnson, L. U. 
769, Pasadena, Cal. 

Lowell, Mass. — H. A. Lee, 48 Bartlett st. 

Lynn, Mass. — B. C. Walker, 62 Munroe St. 



Madison, Wis. — Frank C. Neibuhr, 123 Charter 

street. 
Manchester, N. H. — Jemery Gagnon, 1017 Elm 

street. 
Mayaguez, I'orto Rico — Louis Perocler, Box 

101. 
Marissa, 111. — Barnle Elliott, St. Clair court. 
McAlester, Okla. — R. A. Bradley, 508 S. 10th 

street. 
McKinney, Tex. — D. P. Wilmeth. 
Memphis, Tenn. — J. W. Harrison, 95 S. Second 

street. 
Merlden, Conn. — A. A. Lancenette, 332i Cods 

avenue. 
Middlesex, Mass. — John G. Coglll, 3 Glen 

Court, Maiden, Mass. 
Miles City, Mont. — Wm. Ruess. 
Milwaukee, Wis.— Adolf Hlnkforth, 318 State 

street. 
Minneapolis, Minn. — Morton Wefald, 20 Wash- 
ington ave., South ; George E. Brenner, 26 

Washington ave.. South. 
Moberly, Mo. — Jess. Mathir, 123 Thompson st. 
Moline, Davenport and Rock Island, III. — (Tri- 

Cities) — P. J. Carlson, 1320 38th St., Rock 

Island, 111. 
Monmouth, Iir.^John M. Hurst, Box 337. 
Monongahela, Pa. — M. A. Forester. 
Montclair, Bloomfleld and the Oranges, N. J. — 

John A. RIchter, 31 Hazel St., West Orange, 

N. J. 
Montgomery County, Pa. — Predrik G. Trunk, 

212 Kettenring ave., Ardmore, Pa. 
Montreal, Can. — J. E. Campeau, D. C. B. A., 

301 St. Dominique ; L. U. 134, L. Lefevre, 

127 St. Dominique st. ; L. U. 1244, Richard 

Lynch, 127 St. Dominique st. 
Muskegon, Mich. — Chas. Franke, 15 E. Isabella 

street. 
Nashville, Tenn. — W. H. Ferguson, Route 

No. 9. 
Newark, N. J. — John Stirling, 224 Plane st. ; 

O. B. Bedford, 40 Rowland st. 
Newport, R. I. — S. Cougdon. 
Newton, Mass. — M. L. Chivers, 251 Washing- 
ton St. 
New Bedford, Mass. — D. A. Houle, 187 CoUett 

New Britain, Conn. — J. F. McGrath, 79 Dwight 

New Castle, Pa. — J. W. Patterson, Trade As- 
sembly Hall. 

New Haven, Conn. — J. F. Plunkett, 97 Orange 
street. 

New London, Conn. — George Arnold, 557 Bank 
street. 

New Milford, Conn. — H. L. Nichols. 

New Orleans, La. — Herman Bremermann, 1326 
Mariguy St. 

New Philadelphia, O. — Jos. Born, 227 Grimes 
street. 

New Rochelle, N. Y. — John McLaughlin, 12 
Lawton st. 



The F. P. M. Coping Saw 

is guaranteed to cut all metals as well as wood and can be refiled. 

The best material is used in the manufacture of this saw. One F. P. M. 

blade will last as long as three dozen of the 
ordinary blades. Remember, our trade-mark is 
F, P. M., see that you get the genuine. 

F. P. Maxson, 

Member of Local No. 1 , U. B. of C. & J. of A. 

1031 Newport Avenue, 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

60 




Tlhe C 



mi t ar 



New York City — For Manhattan : David 
French, 142 B. 59th st. ; L. F. Storey, 142 
E. 59th St. ; H. W. Blumenberg, 142 E. 59th 
at. ; Jos. Crimmins, 142 E. 59th St. (shops 
and unfair trim). For Brooklyn: Henry 
Erickson, 255 Atlantic ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. ; 
Wm. O'Grady, 255 Atlantic ave., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Fred Dhuy, 255 Atlantic ave., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. ; Harry Lea, 255 Atlantic ave. 
(shops), Brooklyn, N. Y. For Bronx: C. 
H. Bausher, 497 E. 166th St., Bronx; Thos. 

■ Dalton, 497 B. 166th St., Bronx ; Frank Hol- 
lereith, 497 B. 166th St., Bronx. For 
Queens : George Lynch, 274 Fulton St., Ja- 
maica, L. I., N. Y. ; Aug. Nagel, 478 Broad- 
way, L. I. City ; C. C. Swenson, Mineola, 
L. I. For Richmond : Jas. Martin, 684 
Richmond road, Stapleton, S. I., N. Y. ; 
Julian Wazeter, 63 Richmond ave., Port 
Richmond, S. I. 

Niagara Falls, N. Y. — John H. Kew, 518 23d 
street. 

Norfolk County, Mass. — Edgar B. Noyes, 113 
East River St., Hyde Park, Mass. 

Norfolk, Va. — C. F. Jones, 71 City Hall ave. 

Northampton, Mass. — R. F. Ahearn, 31 Summer 
street. 

North Bristol, Mass., District — Clarence W. 
Mason, North Easton, Mass. 

Northeastern Ohio District — Wm. B. Austin, 
332 N. Union ave., Alliance, O. 

North Yakima, Wash.^0. F. Leiand. 

Norwich, Conn.— M. J. Kelley, Box 52. 

Nyack, N. Y. — W. S. Edwards, First ave. 

Oakland, Cal. — Dave L. Wilson, 1500 Llese 
ave., Fruitvale Cal. 

Ohio Valley, D. C. — B. Weakly, 3902 Jacob St., 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

Oklahoma City, Okla. — L. B. Nichols, Box 526. 

Olympia, Wash. — Geo. C. Burdick, Box 344. 



Omaha, Neb.. — Jas. Johnson, 3716 N. 30th st. ; 

L. D. 427, J. H. Hale, 2726 Capitol ave. 
Oneida, N. Y. — Elihu Ackerman, 88 Stone st. 
Oshkosh, Wis. — W. Cheney. 287 Wisconsin ave. 
Ottumwa, la. — Geo. W. Ferguson, 511 Jay st. 
Owensboro, Ky. — 
Passaic, N. J. — S. Greenwood, Emerald Hall, 

State St. 
Paterson, N. J. — Charles C. Gravatt, Norwood 

Bldg., cor. Main and Ellison sts. 
Pawtucket, R. I. — Theodore Malo, 355 Main 

street. 
Pensacola, Fla. — N. Launsbery, Old Armory 

Bldg., Room 1. 
Peoria, 111. — W. W. Reynolds, 319 Haywood. 
Perth Amboy, N. J. — Adolf H. Koyen, 230 

Madison ave. 
Philadelphia, Pa. — A. G. Hawes, Harry A. 

Heisler, R. W. Mercer, Louis Weber, John 

Bennett. Address of all business agents, 142 

N. 11th St. 
Pittsburg, Pa. — Secretary, J. C. Klephart,-; F. 

B. Allen, W. S. Bigger ; address of secretary 

and business agents. Union Labor Temple, 

Room 6. 
Pittsfield, Mass. — John B. Mickle. 
Pontiac, 111. — F. Sipe. 
Poplar Bluff, Mo. — Frank Jennings. 
Portchester, N. Y. — -Wm. F. Murphy, 115 

Mead ave. 
Portland, Ore. — R. O. Rector, 40 Grand Ave. 
Port Washington, L. I., N. Y. — Chas. T. Wig- 
gins. 
Poughkeepsle, N. Y. — G. W. Hllllker, 10 

Thompson St. 
Prince Rupert, Can. — Harry Bertaux. 
Providence, R. I. — Thomas F. Kearney, 96 

Mathewson st. ; Joseph N. Dulude, 5 Allston 

street. 




ISARGENTI 

Vv-b-mF 



WOODBOnOM 
PLANES 



It^TJUi^jBl "Wood Bottom Planes are made of selected beech, 
thorougtily seasoned. The frog screws will not work loose. 
They are machine screws engaging in the iron frame work. 
Cutters are heavy enough so that they will not jump. They 
are of best grade of steel, fully warranted. 
"Write for our catalogue. 

SaPQent &L C ompany 

Manufacturers of Tools and Hardware 
for more than sixty years 

11S8 Leonard Street, New York City 



61 



T Ihi a C a r p e im t e r 



Quebec, Cau. — 

Eahway, N. J. — L. A. Springer. 

Reading, Pa. — W. W. Werner, 24 N. 6th St. 

Reglna, Sask., Can. — Fred J. Richards. 

Red Bank and Long Brancli, N. J. — B. F. Lane, 
Station B. Long Branch, N. .1. 

Richmond. Va. — jas. J. Ranl^in, Labor Temple, 
5th and Marshall. 

Roanoke, Va. — L. G. Stultz, 709 ;2d ave., N. W. 

Rochester, Minn. — W. E. Thorn, 316 S. Broad- 
way. 

Rochester, N. Y.— G. H. Wright, 33 Penn St. ; 
A. Agreen, 459 South ave. 

Eye, N. Y.— Otto C. Berthold, Portchester, 
N. Y. 

Sacramento, Cal. — Geo. W. Douglass, 1019 J 
street. 

Saginaw, Mich. — Wm. L. Hutcheson, 115 Du- 
rand st. 

Salem, Mass. — Wm. Swanson, 4 Central st. 

Salt Lake City, Utah — .J. G. Wilks, 66-67 Conti- 
nental Block. 

San Antonio, Tex. — Albert Gmehlin, 133 Paso 
Hondo St. 

San Francisco, Cal. — Wm. Seagrave, C. Mean- 
well, F. J. Kreamer, Geo. Newson, W. W. 
Freeland ; address. Building Trades Temple, 
14th and Guerrero sts. For Alameda Coun- 
ty. D. L. Wilson, 761 12th St., Oakland, 
Cal., and A. P. Johnson, 761 12th St., Oak- 
land, Cal. 

Santa Monica, Cal. — M. J. Musser, 25 Ashland 
ave., Ocean Park Cal. 

Savannah, Ga. — A. J. Sours, 1609 W. Broad 
street. 

Schenectady, N. Y. — Chas. Gould, Scotia, N. Y. 

Scranton, Pa. — E. E. Knapp, 232 Lackawanna 
ave. 

Sesser, III.— I. Hill. 



Sioux Falls, S. D.— P. C. Almont, 413 E. 13th 
street. 

Sloatsburg, N. Y. — Chas. Morris. 

South Bend, Ind. — Burt Gllman, Gen. Delivery. 

South McAlester, Okla. — E. E. Lee. 

Spadra, Ark. — J. A. Jones. 

Spokane, Wash. — R. E. Carney, 9 Madison st. 

Springfield, 111. — W. E. Jolly, 1429 S. 2d st. 

Springfield, Mass. — W. J. La Francis, 14 Lom- 
bard St. 

Springfield and Millburn, N. J. — J. C. Stiles, 
Springfield, N. J, 

Springfield, O. — Geo. Allison, 611 W. Main st. 

St. Cloud, Minn.— Chas. B. Mitchell, 740 17J 
ave., South. 

St. Louis, Mo. — Emile Ruble, 3001 Olive St.; 
L. H. Proske, 3001 Olive st. ; Paul Wilms, 
3001 Olive St. ; Wm. M. Michaels, 3001 Olive 
St. : John Prehn, 3001 Olive st. 

St. Joseph, Mo. — Joseph Banger, Gen. De- 
livery. 

St. Paul, Minn.— Ed. T. I-Iellie, 352 Louis st. 

Summit, N. J. — John H. Pheasant, 15 Orchard 
strcGt 

Superior, Wis.— J. H. Hatch, 1701 28tb st. 

Syracuse, N.-Y. — J. T. O'Brien, 10 Clinton Blk. 

Tahlequah, Okla. — John L. Adair, P. O. Box 5. 

Tampa. Fla. — 

Teague. Tex. — J. H. Mayberry. 

Terre Haute, Ind. — Christ. Schuhmacher, 915 
Maple ave. 

Terrell, Tex. — Lawrence Stovall, Box 372. 

Toledo, O. — J. W. Beam. 314 Cherry st. 

Toluca, 111. — Frank McCoy, Box 8. 

Toleston, Ind. — L. U. 1117, C. Banta. 

Topeka, Kan. — A. W. Burkhardt. 

Tonaqua, Pa. — C. H. Stockley, 129 Oswegs- 
burgh St. 

Toronto, Ont., Can. — Andrew Millar, Labor 
Temple. 



Ford Patent Auger Bit 

Just the Bit for the Carpenter. 
Ready! Anytime, Anywhere! 

Made by a special process from abso- 
lutely perfect steel, bought in Fifty Ton 
lots to get the highest grade. Every 
bit is tempered just right and cannot 
breal^. Bores a clean hole. Will not 
clog up. Buy the Ford Patent Auger 
Bit of your dealer. JVrite us and we 
will send you circular telling how well 
they are made. 

FORD AUGER BIT CO., 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 




-*';»'^?--ifflLanaV 



62 



]] | OTJR ADVERTISERS | [[ 

OUR EMBLEM 

JEWELRY 



ATTRACTIVE, APPROPRIATE AND ACCEPTABLE 

Watch Charms, Cuff Buttons, Lapel 
Buttons, Emblem Pins and Rings 



PINS— EMBLEM PINS, in rolled and solid gold, hard enamel, hand- 
somely finished. Can be worn on the coat, vest, shirt or tie. Rolled gold, 25 
cents each. Solid gold, $ 1 .00 each. 

BUTTONS— SCREW-BACK BUTTONS, in rolled and in solid gold 
and hard ensimel finish, with patent screw-button backs. For wear in the lapel 
of the coat ; easily put on. Never come out. Rolled gold, 25 cents each. 
Solid gold, $1.00 each. 

— CUFF BUTTONS, in solid gold only, and hard enamel 
face, with dumb-bell shank. $2.00 per pair. 

CHARMS— WATCH CHARMS, in rolled and in solid gold, with hard 
enamel emblem on face ; reverse side smooth for engraving if necessary. Hand- 
somely finished in every respect. Rolled gold, $ 1 .25 each. Solid gold, $7.50 
each. Engraving extra. 

RINGS— EMBLEM RINGS, beautiful design, gold filled and in solid 
gold. Very much in demand by our members. Gold filled, $1.50 each. 
Solid gold. $5.00 each. 

BADGES— BUSINESS AGENTS' BADGES, of German silver and 
neat design, with U. B. emblem, enameled lettering and very substantial. 
$3.50 each. 

— OFFICIAL BADGES. The official combination parade 
and funeral multiple badge, containing lithographic reproduction in colors of 
our Union Label as well as our emblem. Prices as follows : One badge, 
$ 1 .5 net ; two and over, $ 1 .00 each, net ; six and over, 75 cents each, net ; 
twelve and over, 60 cents each, net. 



In ordering these goods send all orders 
and make all remittances payable to 

FRANK DUFFY, Gen'l SecV, Indianapotis, Ind. 



Tlha C 



r 



Tuxedo, N. Y. — Collin Haywood, Sloatsburg, 

N. Y. 
Trenton, N. J. — Geo. W. Adams, 116 Bayard 

Troy, n'. Y. — J. G. Wilson, Box 65. 

Twin Falls, Idaho. — E. E. Hodges. 

Utlca, N. Y. — G. W. Griffiths, 240 Dudley ave. 

Vancouver, B. C. — Sam Krenlngham, 820 12th 

ave., B. ; James Robinson, 112 Cordova st. 
Waco, Tex. — W. B. Fason, 1515 Cumberland 

avenue. 
Walllngford, Conn. — John I. Piper, 335 N. 

Calny st. 
Washington, D. C. — Geo. Crosby, Room 35, Le 

Droit Bldg. 
Waterbury, Conn. — 0. G. Stage, Box 25 ; office, 

119 Main st. 
Waterloo, la. — H. J. Amos, 115 Randolph st. 
West Chester, Pa. — Oscar Speakman. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. — J. H. Phillips, Box 542, 

Follanbee, W. Va. 
Westfleld, Mass. — R. C. Dean, 16 S. Maple st. 
Wheeling, W. Va. — E. J. Weekly, Majority 

Office. 
White Plains, N. Y. — J. G. Knapp, 54 Post 

Road. 
Wichita, Kan. — L. N. Meadows, 505 S. Oak st. 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Wyoming Valley D. C. — M. 

E. Sanders, Simon Long Bldg. ; Wm. J., Gal- 

vin. Room 70, Simon Long Bldg. 
Winona, Minn. — C. C. Jensen, 676 Huff st. 
Winnipeg, Man., Can. — A. W. Evans, Trades 

Hall, James st. 



Worcester, Mass — John Hanigan, Carpenters' 

Headquarters, 98 Front st. 
Wyandotte, Mich. — Chas. H. Renner, 80 Plum 

street. 
Yonkers, N. Y. — Irvine Hamilton, 114 Ashbur- 

ton ave. 
Youngstown, O. — Jos. M. Murphy, 98 Fruit St. 



The aggregate capitalization of the great 
trusts in the United States exceeds twenty 
billion of dollars, or nearly a quarter of 
the total wealth of the country. 



Oh, what men dare do, what men may 
do, what men daily do not knowing what 
they do! — Shakespeare. 



True men and women are all physicians 
to make us well. — C. A. Bartol. 



EVERY MECHANIC SHOULD BUY 

How to Frame a House, or House and Roof Framing 

By OWEN B. MAGINNIS 
SI It is a practical treatise on the latest and best methods of laying out, framing and raising 
timbers for houses, together vrith an easily understood system of Roof Framing, the whole 
making a handy and easily applied book for carpenters, builders, foremen and journeymen. 
Part I, Balloon Framing. Part II, Roof Framing. Part III, How to Frame the Timbers 
of a Brick House. Eighty Illustrations. One Octavo Vol., Cloth, Price $1.00. 

Also Roof Framing Made Easy 

^ A geometrical, easily comprehended system of laying out and framing roofs, adapted to 
modern building construction. The methods are made clear and intelligible by 76 engrav- 
ings with extensive explanatory text. One Octavo Vol., Cloth, Price $1.00. 
Send Name, Address and Cash for Books. 

Also EXPERT OPINION, and Candidates for Building and Tenement Inspector Coached 

By OWEN B. MAGINNIS 

Write 200 W. 146th St., New York City. 



Former BuUdins Inspector for 15 Years 




ISARGENTI 

1 v-B-M r 



IRON PLANES 



Wrought Steel Clamps do not break. They fit the hand. Easy and secure 
tlu-oat adjustment for fine or coarse work. Try our 4306 (Japainned 6"), 430'7 (Japanned 7"), 
5306 (Nickel 6"). 5307 (Nickel 7"). Write for our catalogue. 

SARGENT & CO., '^^''''%f'Sorni^nfi.ty%^f^^''' 1158 Leonard SI., New York 

64 



Model Shirts 
Are Right! 




Making 

and Reading 

Drawings 

For Home Study 



75 cents for paper 
$1 .00 for cloth binding 

Guaranteed to contain more in- 
formation than any $3.00 boot 



Write to • 



A. EDWARD RHODES 

Suite 9 Masonic Temple 
WILMINGTON, DEL. 



Write for Our Catalogue of Carpenters' Tools j 

^<X^__^ Under our "Ohio" trade-mark, which i8 a guar- 

Every Tool Covered .„^ .Jl^ antee of hiehest quality, we manufacture a tuli 



byaBroadGoaraDtee 



Under our - unio irau<=-."<». ■», .....-■. - - = 7 ., 
antee of highest quality, we manufacture a tuli 
line of 

Planes (both iron and wood), Chisels, Drawing 
Knives, Gouges, Auger Bits, Spoke -»">ti°.- 
Shaves, Bench and Hand Screws, 
. Benches, Cement Tools, Etc. 

I OHIO TOOL COMPANY, DeptU, Columbus, Ohio. Auburn. N.Y- 





TAINTOR POSITIVE SAW SETS 



Self-adjustins except 
turning the anvil to change 
the setting. Setting easily 
returned to. 

Numbers on anvil do NOT refer 
to number of teeth on taw. 

The tooth is in every 
way protected while being 
set, and is left in the best 
possible shape. 

Ask your hardware 
merchant for it, also to 
show you our Adjustable 
Handle. Double Plunger 
Set. Send for our free 
booklet, "Suggestions on 
the Care of Saws," 

TAINTOR MFG. CO. 

95 Reade St.,NEW YORK 



NOTICE, CARPENTERS! 

Guards against errors and omissions. Based on actual experience, "^' *'^«°;^- f jV"'^„^^^^^^ 
l;.KU rr, Jh.A in use to day. Now is the time to post yourself on this vital part ot the busmess. 




MAKE YOUR WORK EASY BY USING A 

MORRILL SAW SET 



TH E "SPECIAL" SAW SET. 




A Properly Set Saw Stays Sharp and Runs Easy True and Clean 
PRICE, $1.00, SENT PREPAID 

or ask your dealer to get it for you 

CHAS. MORRILL, fOZ NEW YORK 



Price List of Supplies Furnished by General Office 



Constitutions, per hundred $5.00 

Members' Due Books, each 15 

Official Note Paper, per hundred. . 50 

Application Blanks, per hundred ... 50 

Withdrawal Cards, each 50 

Interchangeable Receipting Dater 

for F. S., ink pads, etc 1.00 

Rec Sec. Order Book, each ropy . . 50 

Treasurer's Receipt Book, each copy 50 



Fin. Sec, Receipt Book, each copy. .$0.50 

One 100-paged Ledger 1.35 

One 200-paged Ledger, cloth-bound 2.00 
One 300-paged Ledger, cloth-bound 3.00 

One 100-paged Day Book 1.35 

One 200-paged Day Book, cloth- 
bound 1.75 

One Treasurer's Cash Book 60 





WORKERS UNION 

UNION^^SWIP 
Taclory No. 


f 


NAMED SHOES ARE FREQUENTLY 
MADE IN NON-UNION FACTORIES 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

No matter what its name, unless it bears a plain and readable 
impression of this UNION STAMP. All shoes without the 
UNION STAMP are always non-union. Do not accept 
any excuse for absence of the UNION STAMP. 

BOOT and SHOE WORKERS' UNION 

246 Summer St. Boston, Mass. 
JOHN F. TOBIN, Pre.. CHAS. L. BAINE, Sec-y-TiMi. 












:^^^^xow^?>^^.v/>:^>:^■l■x■:•:^>:^:^^::^■^ww ....^.. 



lu^nisM'i-m 



««aMCT^amTOgj^«a!3KaMiqKJ^^ 



THE 



I 
I 



SjE^aSWSSaSmSSsSSmlsSs 



1^3^' 




<<•■ 



FEBRUARY, 19 



GOODELL MITRE BOX 

MADE OF STEEL— CANNOT BREAK 

First in Quality and 
I mprovements 




Automatic stops for holding up saw. Corrugated 
backs. Graduated. 

Gauge for duplicate cuts and many 
other features. 



UNION MADE 



gEND FOR CIROTTLAR "F" 



GOODELL MANUFACTURING CO., Greenfield, Mass. 



A Quick Drill for Wood and Metal 
"YANKEE" JFlv No. 50 



This Drill cuts continuEilly on both 
forward and backward strokes of 
the driving handle — no lost motion 
— a real time saver. 



It has a chuck of new design (3-iaw) I 
that holds any straightway or twist ' 
drill with round shanknot over 3-16" 
in diameter. Price, (2.50 postpaid. 



A High-grade Reliable 

Tool in every detail 

Send for our book of Labor-Saving "YANKEE** Tools; a postal brings it 

Your Dealer Sells "YANKEE" TOOLS 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., Fairhill Sta., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



/UFKtN 

Measuring Tapes and Rules 

ARE DEMANDED BY WORKMEN OF EXPERIENCE 
Eveiy test proves them aupeiior to all others. A trial will coavince you 

TH E /ifFMiN Pule HO' 



SAGINAW, MICH., U. S. A 

LONDON, ENQ. 



WINDSOR. CAN. 




Fred T. Hodgson, Author, Editor, Architect, known to every reader of this 
Journal, writes to the Gage Tool Co., Vineland, N. J., as follows: **I have 
examined your circular, with care, cmd do not find anything in it conflicting 
with the truth regarding your 'SELF-SETTING PLANES,' and I can, without 
hesitation, endorse every word you say regarding them." 
Sent on trial when not .old «s per circular. QAGE TOOL CO., Vincland, N, J. 





A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders. Machine Wood Workers, 
Planinff Mill Men. and Kindred Industries 



Entered February 13, 1903, at iDdlanapoUs, Indiana, as second-class mat! matter, under the Act of Coneress of March 3, 1879 



Volume XXXI-N«.2 
Established in 1881 



INDIANAPOUS, FEBRUARY, 1911 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 









WHEN EVERY MAN'S AN HONEST MAN 




Bu ROSS MORISEN. 






When every man's an honest man. 

And every woman loyal. 
Freemen shall reign in freedom's land. 

And every man be royal. 






Both parties shall be out of power. 
And their machines be broken ; 

"Trusts" will be things that we can trust. 
When only truth is spoken. 






The tariff wall that binds our land 
Needs but a breath to break it ; 

When each man's hand is a brother's hand. 
And reaches out to shake it. 






The price of food shall fall again 
And life becomes a pleasure. 

When business men are honest men 
And give an honest measure. 






Divorce shall die, and enmity 

And scandal cease forever, 
And every man to do his best 

Shall honestly endeavor. 

Hope, to courageous hearts and brave. 
Shall give the strength of twenty ; 

For men no more shall toil and slave 
And starve in midst of plenty. 

No more shall traitorous monsters drink 
The life blood of the nation. 

When Truth and Right and Justice rule 
In high and humble station. 

When every man's an honest man, 

And every woman loyal. 
Men shall be kings— as freemen can — 

For every man is royal ! 





The C 



SI t e r 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN, THE EMANCIPATOR. 

(By Alexander Law.) 




!T would be well for the 
workingmen of the nation, 
on each recurring anni- 
versary of the birth of the 
great martyred President, 
to review his life work 
and realize what he accom- 
plished in his day and 
1 generation for industrial 
emancipation. 
In his time, as at present, two industrial 
systems were contending for supremacy. 
He is recorded as having said in one of his 
speeches, ' ' This nation cannot permanently 
endure half slave and half free; it will be- 
come all slave or all free. ' ' 

It became all free, because he and others 
who believed in the principles of the 
Declaration of Independence insisted the 
inalienable right ■ of all men to life, 
liberty and the pursuit of happiness be 
applied to black as well as to white men. 
It cost about a half-million of lives and 
millions of money to convince the people 
there might be some truth in the statement, 
after all. 

Ben. Franklin once said : ' ' Experience 
is a hard school, but some people will learn 
in no other. ' ' It should not be necessary 
to repeat the experience of the civil war 
to convince the American people they 
will make no mistake if they realize 
the men who signed the immortal declara- 
tion were compelled to get down to funda- 
mentals to justify themselves in the eyes of 
the world in their desire to build a free 
and independent nation, in which all power, 
like living springs, should come from below 
and emanate from the people instead of 
being graciously bestowed on them by their 
self-styled superiors from above. 

That some, if not most of our modern 
slave-holders, the so-called captains of in- 
dustry and corporation magnates, are still 
in the school Ben Franklin spoke of is 
evident from the fact they insist their 
employes must work under such conditions 
and accept such hours and wages as they 
choose to impose on them, in spite of the 
self-evident truth embodied in the declara- 



tion, "Governments derive their just pow- 
ers from the consent of the governed, ' ' and 
it is a most encouraging sign of the times 
that all labor, organized and unorganized, 
is now beginning to realize that that ap- 
plies to our industrial as well as political 
affairs. 

The spirit of the Dred Scott decision 
still lives in our courts, and recent injunc- 
tion proceedings points to a parallel de- 
cision in the near future to the effect 
workingmen have no rights corporations are 
bound to respect. 

The spirit of the great Lincoln is also 
once more beginning to stir the waters of 
our national life. The insurgent movement 
emphasizes ' ' the soul of old John Brown 
is still marching on. ' ' The preservation of 
the union of states and the abolition of 
chattel slavery. Thanks to the great man 
the whole world delights to honor are 
accomplished facts. 

It is now up to the great union army of 
today to fall in line and stand for the 
preservation of the union of labor and the 
abolition of industrial slavery. Mr. Lin- 
coln's words are as applicable to the_ pres- 
ent time as when uttered some fifty or more 
years ago, ' ' This nation cannot permanent- 
ly endure half free and half slave." It 
will become all union or non-union. The 
American people must decide in the near 
future whether they will adopt the pluto- 
cratic system of industry, represented by 
the corporation, or the democratic system, 
represented by the labor organizations. 
They cannot have both and expect to have 
industrial peace in the nation from now on. 

We should, then, in the language of his 
immortal Gettysburg address, ' ' dedicate 
ourselves to the great task yet remaining 
before us; that from those honored dead we 
take increased devotion to the cause for 
which they gave the last full measure of 
devotion ; that we have highly resolved 
the dead shall not have died in vain; 
that the nation shall, under God, have a new 
birth of freedom, and that government of 
the people by the people and for the people 
shall not perish from the earth. ' ' 



T Ihi a Car 



t e r 



The only organization that can insure the 
next birth of freedom that is now due is 
the organized labor movement, and by fol- 
lowing the lines laid down by Thomas 



Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln, the plain 
people of the nation can achieve greater 
victories in the future than any the past 
had in store for them. 



POWER AND PROGRESS. 

(By Margaret Scott Hall.) 

"There's always a flght 'twixt the right 

and the wrong 
And the heat of the battle is borne by the 

strong." 




NOTWITHSTANDING the 
abundant success and won- 
derful progress made by 
organization in achieving 
industrial advantages, la- 
bor only dimly realizes its 
power. Its strength is 
still a latent fact in the 
sub-conscious thought of 
/Z\ the laboring world. 
Vast possibilities lie dormant in the un- 
used power of labor thoroughly organized. 
Realizing this peril to trust interests, capital 
recognizes the wisdom of forestalling in- 
dustrial development. Hence, great activity 
prevails in capital's precincts tending 
toward the effectual annihilation of the la- 
bor union. 

Capital's organization and labor's organ- 
ization are identical in pattern. 

The commercial concentration of forces is 
simply a match to the shoe worn on 
the other foot of the giant of in- 
dustrial discord. The two should keep step 
and one should not try to impede the prog- 
ress of the other in the work of improve- 
ment for humanity. The organization of 
capital should be directed as a supplement 
to help rather than hinder labor's organized 
efforts for upbuilding in the waste places 
of life. 

While organized labor, bearing the heat 
of the battle with wrong, does not 
comprehend its own strength of resources, 
capital anticipates the possibilities of the 
situation and makes the most of its op- 
portunities against the time of labor's per- 
fect awakening. 

Growth and aspiration are the right and 
privilege of every normal human being. 



To be deprived by any chain of circum- 
stances of such God-given right, and denied 
such privilege is an irreparable misfortune 
to any class or individual. Against such 
misfortune the organization of labor would 
strive to save and protect the overburdened 
masses. 

In the wide open volume of worldly vrrn- 
dom even a toiler may gain, by observation, 
a liberal education along some lines. 

But self-educated and self-made men, to 
attain their best, must avoid becoming 
bigoted or narrow. The school of experi- 
ence presents a broad and splendid cur- 
riculum and men are learning their lessons 
well. 

One of the most effective and fruitful of 
all truths there inculcated is that ' ' in union 
there is strength. ' ' A few object lessons on 
this line and impressions are made that 
can never be unlearned or forgotten. 

Students of economic conditions and pres- 
ent-day social problems tell us the world in 
general maturity and development has only 
just arrived at the experimental stage. 
Presumably they are reliable authority on 
such subjects for the evidence of existing 
conditions might seem to corroborate the 
statement. This being the actual fact, what 
a glorious future, abounding in power and 
progress lies before labor as a union. 

These students suggest co-operation as a 
universal experiment. TTiey plan religious 
union and industrial organization. 

The influence of Christian churches is 
asked to combine with the ancient majesty 
and steadfastness of the Jewish synagogue 
and creeds are requested to merge their 
identity in fraternal love, all uniting to 
repel the spirit of lawlessness and greed 



T Ih e C a r p a in t a r 



that appals our decent citizenship and 
threatens civilization itself. The good must 
co-operate to meet, counteract and control 
concerted evil. 

Preachers, rabbis and teachers counsel 
organization and urge religious unity. The 
world's toilers are finding a safe refuge in 
unionism and around this refuge rages the 
battle of right and vf rong. In the world 's 
experimental stage, the masses are waking 
up and the burden-bearers of the nations no 
longer bow in tame submission to the 
tyranny of their taskmasters. Throiigh 
every craft men are learning to prove by 
practical demonstration the strength of 
union. If not for humanity's sake, will 
not capital sooner or later, through a sense 
of patriotic duty, co-operate with labor in 
promoting the industrial welfare? 

Poverty's environment and a generation 
or more of inoffensive ignorance produces 
a class formerly known in -the South as 
"poor white trash." Other sections have 
indigent hordes for which provision of 



some sort must be made. Wherever they 
are, this type furnishes the human grist 
yearly gathered and ground in the con- 
scienceless commercial mill. The Southern 
factory and the Northern sweatshop attest 
to an ever-increasing supply of this material 
far in excess of the demand. 

These are our brothers, and we are ' ' our 
brother's keeper!" More and more men 
are acknowledging their responsibility re- 
garding the welfare of others. 

In the power and progress of unity, 
labor's share in the business of the world's 
so-called experimental stage is most pro- 
nounced. Among labor's hosts we have 
greatness and goodness to boast of. The 
ranks of labor's vast army of veteran toil- 
ers can furnish acceptable timber in the 
work of humanity's higher and better up- 
building. We have — 

"Men to match our mountains. 

Men to match our plains — 
Men with empires in their purpose, 

Men with eras in their brains." 



GETTING WHAT ONE PAYS FOR AND PAYING 
FOR WHAT ONE GETS. 




(By H. B. 

IFEIEND of mine whom 
we'll call Simpkins had 
occasion recently to buy 
some drugs. Naturally, 
he wanted to get them as 
cheaply as possible, so he 
did his buying at a 
' ' cut-rate ' ' pharmacy. A 
wholesale drug traveler 
afterward told him that 
while he had saved 40 per cent, on some 
articles, he had been overcharged 50 per 
cent, on the others. The store he patron- 
ized is one of a string of drug shops oper- 
ated by a company which has in mind the 
squeezing out of the smaller fry, and, while 
one portion of the public may actually save 
money on certain articles, the other por- 
tion makes up'the difference in the selling 
price of the cut-rate goods and unwitting- 
ly helps to establish another monopoly. 
Sometime ago I read of a hungry mortal 



Moyer.) 

who, looking for a cheap meal, entered a 
restaurant which had in its window a sign 
reading: 

"All you can eat for 10 cents." 

Beside the sign were two rolls and two 
hard-boiled eggs. The hungry one plunged 
into the bill-of-fare with the same abandon 
that some of our moneyed friends pitch 
into labor. When he had done, a bill for 
$1 was presented. Naturally Ke raised a 
kick and mentioned the sign he had read. 
The proprietor complacently pointed out 
the two rolls and the eggs, and smilingly 
remarked that the sign meant just what it 
said. 

And this leads up to the statement that, 
no matter how, where or when you look at 
the matter, one seldom gets more than one 
pays for. 

In this connection it is rather interesting 
to note that many human beings are prone 
to fancy that in some way or another they 



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can get around this fact. And even when 
failure is the result of nine attempts to 
beat the game, they generally try a tenth 
time. 

It is not hard to convince the average 
building contractor, for example, that he 
cannot, under anything like ordinary con- - 
ditions, buy first-class timber at third-class 
prices. Yet many of our builders have yet 
to learn that third-rate wages do not make 
successful hooks with which to catch first- 
class labor. 

Possibly it is good business to get both 
as cheaply as possible — under certain con- 
ditions. The chief condition is, of course, 
that they be first class. Just how he can 
be certain of receiving Al goods unless he 
pays Al prices is something for Mr. Con- 
tractor to ponder over. 

When a man has something he wants to 
sell he generally looks around for the best 
market for it. Old John Farmer has al- 
ways been given credit in the funny col- 
umns for being slow-witted and easily bun- 
coed. Such opinions may wear when the 
knight of the hoe is out of his own barn- 
yard and "doing" the town, but in his 
own stamping ground he is about as shrewd 
as they make them. In days gon^e by the 
farmer used to send his fruit to the com- 
mission merchants in the city and they sold 
it for what they could get, pocketed a 
healthy commission and a trifle more as 
evidence of good faith and sent the rest 
back to the farm. Sometimes a certain 
market was glutted with fruit and prices 
were accordingly poor. Now things are 
different. Mr. Farmer is a member of an 
association which for a small annual mem- 
bership fee takes charge of his fruit from 
the time it is delivered at the local station, 
carefully distributes it at different mar- 
kets, finds the highest prices for it and 
does business in a businesslike way. 

Tears ago workingmen with labor to sell 
used to glut certain markets with their 
wares and take what they would get for 
them minus possibly a commission from 
some employment agency. 

Now they do business through organized 
bodies which publish monthly (and in some 
cases, weekly) magazines which keep them 
posted as to conditions in various parts of 



the country, and assists them in obtaining 
the best prices for their labor. 

The association of which the farmer is 
a member guarantees its customers good, 
sound fruit and the farmers connected with 
it find it to their interests to feed their 
culls to the cattle instead of sticking them 
in the bottom of the barrel as they used to. 
Consequently, there is little or no trouble 
of any kind and both purchaser and pro- 
ducer benefit. 

Organized labor undertakes to keep out 
the culls from its wares by the local ex- 
amining boards, and although a bad one 
may slip through once in a while, the gen- 
eral result is that it offers the best that 
can be obtained in the labor market. 

Except in exceptionally prosperous times 
skilled labor is never scarce in communi- 
ties where the market price is good, and 
whenever a settled locality emits a cry for 
skilled labor, the answer can generally be 
found in the prevailing wage scales. 

Let us look at the unorganized side of 
the labor market for a moment. The in- 
dividual enters a market which he has 
heard is a good one. Nobody knows where 
he comes from nor what he has done in 
the way of carpentering before. Possibly 
he was a butcher before he took up a saw — 
a great many of the non-union workers per- 
form like butchers, anyway. Perhaps he 
carried pig iron around some steel mill. 
At all events he is like the prize in the 
penny grab-bag — he may, or may not be 
"there." If he is any good he'll probably 
soon join a union and go after the maxi- 
mum wages, and if he isn't of any account 
he is dear at any price, as many a con- 
tractor who has had good work bungled up 
could testify (if he would). 

From the non-union worker's standpoint 
it works out just as bad or worse (if possi- 
ble) than from that of the speculative con- 
tractor. 

Cy Perkins has just written Josh Ham- 
mernails in town from some big city say- 
ing that he has "caught on" at carpenter- 
ing, that wages are good, and that '''you 
don't have t' belong t' no durn fool union 
an' pay them there grafters one dollar in 
good hard cash every month f'r nothin'." 

Josh promptly packs his trunk and tells 



T Ih e Car 



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everybody in town where he is going. 
Some one else tells some one else and 
pretty soon the news is scattered all ovei 
the surrounding country, and everything 
that can lift a hammer is spending good 
coin of the realm for railroad fares to reach 
a market which by that time is probably 
fairly swarming with carpenters, would-be 
carpenters and never-will-be nail pushers. 

Out of this riff-raff the contractors hire 
and fire and hire, the men hoping against 
hope that by some miracle or another wages 
will go up to normal or better, the contrac- 
tors trying to make themselves believe that 
they stand a chance of getting first-class 
material out of a nondescript crowd like 
that at fourth or fifth rate wages. 

And this brings us back to the fact that 
the fellow who tries to get something for 



little generally gets nothing, and his trou- 
ble to boot. 

Outside of an out-and-out gambling den 
one seldom gets more than one pays for, 
and when '-ne gambles he stands to lose 
his all. 

Contracting is too precarious a game in 
itself without adding the non-union ele- 
ment of chance to it, as many a contractor 
who has skimped through a job by the skin 
of his teeth could give evidence, and the 
sooner employers realize that the union 
carpenter with skilled labor to sell is enti- 
tled to sell that necessity for a price fairly 
commensurate with the present high cost 
of living, that first-class labor is as essen- 
tial as first-class material, and that un- 
skilled, untried labor is a dangerous and 
costly experiment, the quicker the labor 
problem will be settled. 



^V* IQ *^ 



THE INTERNATIONAL LABOR CONGRESS AT COPENHAGEN. 

(By Alphonse H. Henryot.) 
(Translated from the French in our November, 1910, Issue.) 



On August the 28th, the representatives 
of the International Proletariat, for the 
eighth time, met in congress in the city of 
Copenhagen to deliberate on subjects of 
the utmost importance and interest to the 
working class of the entire world. There 
were about 500 delegates assembled in this 
imposing gathering. 

With the exception of Hungary, Fin- 
land, Japan and the Argentine Republic, 
the organized proletariat of all countries 
where labor organization is in evidence 
were represented and had sent delegates. 
Eeviewing the work of this congress, one 
of the subjects of vital importance under 
discussion was the problem of unemploy- 
ment and the means for the prevention, or 
combating of this product of our -vicious 
industrial system. Belgium, Switzerland, 
the Scandinavian countries and Germany 
presented statements on the advantages 
secured on these lines, and the measures 
adopted bj' their respective countries with 
a view, if not to remedy, to as least miti- 
gate the evil, while the delegates from 
France, England and Austria told what 
assured the congress that England would 



display a more solidary spirit at future 
occasions. 

In order to not be discriminative in my 
observations, I will state that the French 
workers, also, were reproached for lack of 
solidarity in connection with the Swed- 
ish strike, yet they had at least a plausible 
excuse to offer, viz.: lack of funds, emp- 
ty treasuries. While the English trade 
unions are commanding well-filled treas- 
uries holding millions of dollars, it is a 
deplorable fact that most of our French 
brothers are going so far in their revolu- 
tionary ideas as to see an infringement on 
their liberties in the compulsory payment 
of dues, even into their own treasury. 
Hence, they were unable to contribute any 
decent amount in support of the men in- 
volved in this gigantic fight, but the 
French delegates also gave assurance of 
their members contributing their due 
share at the next occasion. 

Militarising the tactics to be pursued in 
case a war should break out between ' 
European nations, a matter, from my view- 
point one of great importance, was 
another subject of deliberation at the 



The Car 



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congress. The Nestor of the British labor 
party, Keir Haxdie, recommended and 
valiantly fought for the general strike, at 
least in the industries turning out and 
supplying munitions of war, as the most 
eiEcacious means of stopping war. If the 
congress did not concur in the recommen- 
dation, it was not that the means proposed 
did not appeal to the delegates, it was be- 
cause they came to the conclusion that its 
application was as ^et impracticable in 
most of the countries. No doubt, the nest 
international congress will take more deci- 
sive steps in an endeavor to prevent or 
suppress war between civilized nations. 

Another subject equally important, oc- 
cupying the congress was that of Co- 
operative Societies, both productive and 
consummative (for producing or buying and 
selling.) This co-operative question may 
possibly evoke little interest among our 
brothers in America, but anyone who has 
had the opportunity to personally watch 
the progress, development and workings of 
these co-operatives in Europe, will better 
understand this movement and acknowl- 
edge the urgency of the discussions on the 
subject. 

In England, Belgium, Switzerland, Ger- 
many, Austria and even in Italy, these 
co-operatives are formidably established 
for many years. In the transaction of 
their business they are yearly handling 
sums of money representing millions of 
dollars. Their success, in Belgium and 
Germany especialh^, is so apparent as to 
seriously alarm their capitalist competi- 
tors, so much so, that they are now calling 
upon their governments for restrictive 
measures to cheek the business activity 
of these institutions. 

The Associated Capitalist Press has de- 
creed the suppression of all reports on the 
transactions of the International Congress, 
to what extent they have been successful 
in this ignoring policy in America is at 
present beyond my estimation. Here, in 
Europe, however, thanks to the powerful 
and extensive labor press, authentic and 
reliable reports were abundant. And when 
the capitalist press retaliated in an at- 
tempt at misinterpretation and misrepre- 
sentations, they were compelled to take 
notice of the stand taken and the resolu- 



tions passed by the International Peace 
Congress, composed of representatives of 
the bourgeois element that was being held 
simultaneously with the Copenhagen Con- 
gress and which under the moral pressure 
imposed upon it by the latter body, took 
issue with it on the war question. 

Having thus briefly reviewed the work 
of this impressive international gathering, 
permit me to ask a question: WhUe the 
proletariat of the entire civilized world 
was represented at Copenhagen, why were 
the representatives from the United States 
and from Canada so conspicuously absent? 
Do our brothers in North America deny be- 
ing part of the civilized world and have 
they no grievances, have they no fault to 
find with obtaining economic conditions, 
no protest to enter against the vicious in- 
dustrial system prevailing in their own 
they had accomplished or were endeavor- 
ing to accomplish, on the same lines. 
.Another subject dealt with by this con- 
gress was that of international solidarity 
among labor unions, in other words, the 
support to be extended to the workers of all 
countries in case of strike or lock out. In 
the course of discussion on this subject, 
the famous strike in Sweeden was com- 
mented on; it was pointed out that its 
favorable outcome was to a great extent 
due to the liberal support rendered the 
strikers by the organized workers in Ger- 
many, Austria and the little country of 
Denmark. At the same time, the attitude 
assumed during this strike by the workers 
in England, who had made no perceptible 
effort to loosen their purse strings in aid 
of their struggling Swedish brothers, was 
seriously found fault with. To the credit 
of the British delegates, be it said, how- 
ever, they sincerely deplored the tactics in 
vogue among the labor organizations of 
their country, which did not permit them 
to show their sympathy with the Swedish 
strikers in a substantial way, and they 
country as well as in others? The working 
people in the United States as well as in 
Canada are smarting under capitalistic 
oppression. The old age pension prob- 
lem is as yet not receiving legislative at- 
tention whatsoever, neither in the United 
States nor in Canada. The time when 
American legislatures or governments will 



r p a n t 



r 



undertake the providing for the superan- 
nuated worker, the invalid of toil, or the 
relieving of the unemployed, is still but a 
remote possibility. Even during times of 
industrial depression the American govern- 
ment makes little or no effort to furnish 
emergency work, state or municipal em- 
ployment to the unemployed to keep them 
and their families from starvation. 

When in 1893, Coxey's army marched 
to the White House in Washington, ask- 
ing for either work or bread, they were 
told: "Keep off the grass! " And when in 
1907, the starving unemployed in New 
York wanted to exercise their constitu- 
tional right and assemble in a public 
square, they were brutally dispersed by the 
police, the famous Captain Schmittber- 
ger, at that occasion, brandishing his club, 
saying, ' ' This is mightier than the consti- 
tution. ' ' 

Only the socialist party was represented 
at Copenhagen by seven delegates. This 
party is merely -a political party, but al- 
though it has a large number of trades 
unionists in its ranks and is in accord 
and in sympathy with the trades union 
movements and demands, none of its dele- 
gates held any mandate from any of the 
American trades unions. (This is an error 
the Western Federation of Miners and 
the Glass Workers had representatives at 
Copenhagen. — Ed.) 

The American Federation of Labor with 
its membership aggregating two millions, 
as well as the Canadian Federation of 
Labor, had no representatives at this im- 
portant and imposing gathering, capable 
to make thrones waver. And why? Are 
not the American workers deprived of 
their inherent rights under the injunction 
law? Will the United Hatters pay the 
$220,000 fine imposed upon them by a 
judge playing the part of a watch dog for 
the capitalist class? What are our 
brother carpenters in New York going to 
do about the injunction issued against 
them in the interest of a Cambridge firm? 
And the A. F. of L. oflScials sentenced to 
imprisonment at from three months to a 
year, will they go to prison? I hope not. 
But with a prison sentence staring them 
in the face and seeing their liberties 
abridged, would it not be logical, would 



they induce the Federation to make com- 
mon cause with the proletarians of other 
countries who have similar grievances? 
Would anyone dare to maintain that the 
workers on the American continent are 
not effected by the war evil and not inter- 
ested in its extermination? Without go- 
ing far back in history, let me remind our 
brother.? in the United States of the recent 
war with Spain. This war was entered 
into because it so suited the aspirations 
of a mercenary Wall street clique. It is 
with the breaking out of this war that 
the food prices started on their upward 
trend in the United States. It is this war 
which necessitated the increase in all in- 
direct taxation; it furnished the capital- 
ist combinations and the legislature a wel- 
come excuse for the raising of the tariff 
and the increase in the navy. It is dur- 
ing this war the imperialist policy and 
the cry for territorial expansion origi- 
nated, and as "appetite comes while eat- 
ing," as the Fench put it, the endless 
chain system was introduced in the United 
States with its naval and military bud- 
gets sufficient to satisfy the appetite and 
aspirations of any European monarchy. 

At this time, there is talk of fortifying 
the Panama canal — mind you, the powers 
that be, will not stop there; where there is 
an army and cannons, and a navy with 
ironclad warships, they are there for a 
purpose and for use. 

Not only the officers, eager to acceler- 
ate their promotion, are looking forward 
for war, but also the manufacturers of 
rifles and cannon, the shipbuilders, anxious 
to secure contracts, wish to see war break 
out, chauvinism and that false, silly, ex- 
aggerated patriotism that is being artifi- 
cially inoculated into the brains of the 
children in America, will do the rest in 
the arousing of the military spirit. 

We are told that the army and navy are 
destined to defend the country against 
foreign invasion, against the attack of an 
outside enemy; but past events have shown 
that in default' of an outside enemy, capi- 
talistic governments do not hesitate to 
use that very army or navy against their 
enemy within, the working class. 

The time has come for the labor orga- 



8 



T lb e Carpenter 



nizations on the American continent to 
enter into intercourse and closer relations 
with the workers of other countries and 
to join in the manifestations of the inter- 
national proletariat. And should they find 
that the question dealt with at these gath- 
erings do not concern the proletariat on 
their side of the Atlantic, let them pre- 
sent such of interest and import to them. 
What our brothers in England consider 
beneficial to them, will certainly not be 
disadvantageous to our brothers in Amer- 
ica. 

The restriction of foreign immigration 
has for years been on the labor program in 
America, but capitalists ' interests at all 
times on the lookout for cheap labor, for- 
eign or domestic, have successfully op- 
posed all measures in that direction. The 
participation of the American workers in 



the international labor congresses would 
undoubtedly in the course of time bring 
about an understanding between the wor- 
kers on both sides of the Atlantic, which 
would finally remove all cause for a de- 
mand on the part of the American wor- 
kers for the restriction of immigration. 
Let them be represented at these gather- 
ings, present their views on the various 
problems under consideration, expound 
their principles and way of thinking, and 
beneficial results will not be wanting. 

Three years hence, in 1913, the next 
international congress will be held in 
Vienna, Austria, the trades unions in North 
America should take the sending of a 
delegation in proportion to their numeri- 
cal strength and in commensuration with 
the importance of the occasion, earnestly 
into consideration. 



ADDRESS DELIVERED BY FRATERNAL DELEGATE FROM THE 

CANADIAN TRADES AND LABOR CONGRESS AT 

ST. LOUIS A. F. of L. CONVENTION. 



Mr. Chairman and fellow workers — It is 
my duty, my pleasure and my privilege this 
morning to convey to you from the Trades 
and Labor Congress of Canada the greet- 
ings of its affiliated membership and the 
wage workers generally throughout the 
-dominion. I have always been proud to 
be a member of the international labor 
movement; but after my experience here 
this morning, after listening to my fellow 
fraternal delegates, I am more than ever 
convinced that the future statesmen of 
this continent will be found largely within 
the confines of our international movement. 

I believe one of the greatest problems 
that confronts the workers of this conti- 
nent is, not so much to push on to accept- 
ing responsibility, as to prepare ourselves 
for the responsibilities that are fast being 
forced upon us. As compared with my 
young friend. Brother Turner, I have been 
only a short time in the international labor 
movement, but in that short time I have 
been made to feel that the trades union 
movement allied with the political move- 
ment is nothing more, possibly, than a 



training school for future statesmen of this 
continent. 

It is sometimes a habit among members 
of the organized labor movement to find a 
little fault in connection with the huge 
expense of holding such conventions ag 
this; but I ask any delegate here this morn- 
ing, after the experience we have already 
had in this convention, after the things 
we have been able to learn, if the value 
of the personal acquaintanceship and the 
value of the hand-clasp of those we have 
been reading about can be measured by 
the monetary cost? Who is going to esti- 
mate it in dollars and cents? Who is go- 
ing to put a price upon the bearing it will 
have upon the future labor movement of 
this continent? 

The speakers who preceded me have Je- 
ferred to the problems that confront the 
wage workers, not only on the American 
continent and the United Kingdom, but 
throughout the entire world; and just in 
proportion as members of the wage-work- 
ing class learn to understand this interna- 
tional character of the labor movement, 



T lb e Carpemiteir 



just so much will we make for its future 
triumph. Speaking from a continental 
standpoint, we have such issues as the in- 
creased cost of living and the same old 
nightmare my brothers referred to, that of 
unemployment, due to the introduction of 
machinery and the displacement of labor. 
We have all these problems to face. I will 
not go into them in detail, but I am of the 
opinion that all these problems we are 
grappling with at this time spring from 
the fundamental evil of corporate owner- 
ship of the means of life. 

As a representative of the Canadian 
Trades and Labor Congress it becomes my 
duty to explain to you as best I can some 
of the problems we are grappling with over 
there. At the last convention of the 
Trades and Labor Congress of Canada one 
of the subjects that occupied the attention 
of the delegates was that of immigration. 
That does not seem to affect the workers 
here as it does in Canada. The delegates 
will understand' that Canada is a new and 
a growing country. I want to impress upon 
the oflBcers of international unions, espe- 
cially the tremendous responsibilities that 
are being placed upon the shoulders of the 
organized labor movement in Canada by 
virtue of the number of people being 
poured into that country. In addition to 
the one transcontinental railroad we al- 
ready have, four more are being construct- 
ed, and as they are being built the authori- 
ties and every agency seems to be at work 
for the purpose of pouring into the coun- 
try the surplus labor of Europe and else- 
where. 

The development in Canada during the 
next ten years will equal a development it 
has taken forty years to produce in the 
United States. I remember, although I am 
a young man, the rush there was to the far 
West of the States a few years ago. That 
same or even a greater development, is tak- 
ing place in Canada. I want to impress 
upon the international officers the necessity 
of coming to the aid of the officers and 
members of the unions in Canada to help 
us organize and educate and care for the 
tremendous influx of popvilation into Can- 
ada at this time. 

Some three years ago the Canadian 
Trades and Labor Congress sent a repre- 



sentative to Great Britain to plead with 
the unionists there to prevent immigrants 
coming to Canada under misrepresenta- 
tions. We found the government and the 
employers against us, and were compelled 
to give up. Now we have resolved at the 
last congress to face the issues squarely 
and turn organizers loose in an effort to 
assimilate and organize and educate those 
men as they come in, and persuade them 
to join with us and face the problems as 
we have been doing in the past. 

At the convention of the Trades and 
Labor Congress in Victoria, in 1906, after 
a discussion of some two or three days, 
the delegates came to the conclusion that 
in the best interests of the workers 
throughout Canada they would declare for 
absolute independent political action. That 
declaration on the part of the congress '■■as 
been reaffirmed at every convention from 
then until now. I want to point out, how- 
ever, that the congress made a provision 
that in the carrying out of that declaration 
we grant provincial autonomy. The work- 
ers in each province can determine for 
themselves how best to carry out the dec- 
laration. 

There are so many things I might refer 
to in connection with this question that I 
scarcely know where to begin; but as my 
fellow fraternal delegates have so thor- 
oughly covered the necessity of the wage- 
workers, and especially the necessity of 
members of the organized labor movement 
going into politics, I do not believe it will 
be necessary for me to further emphasize 
that point. However, as I come from Brit- 
ish Columbia, I will touch on the situation 
there. The question of immigration is a 
burning question in British Columbia, more 
so than in any other portions of the Do- 
minion, on account of the orientals. There 
are between 35,000 and 40,000 orientals in 
the Province of British Columbia. We 
have occasion to believe that something 
more than resolutions may be required in 
the settlement of that problem. 

As a delegate to the Trades and Labor 
Congress for the last five or six years 1 
have introduced that hardy annual, that, 
inasmuch as the capitalists of the world 
create the wars they should do their own 



10 



arpemitar 



fighting. I appreciate, however, that all 
the privileges we, as workingmen en;joy, 
are granted to lis only in proportion to the 
power we have to secure them. For the 
last twenty or thirty years we have been 
educating the orientals by the best means 
that could be found in Germany, in Eng- 
land and in the United States. We have' 
had every ship carrying over the means 
of producing wealth, and the Japanese, at 
least, have demonstrated to us that they 
are masters at the art of warfare. They 
are also beginning to demonstrate their 
achievements in the industries. In pro- 
portion to this development among the 
orientals we have to handle delicately the 
question of the Japanese. Since we have 
had a little squabble with them on our 
coast a year or two ago their quarters 
there have been nothing more than an 
arsenal. I am opposed to militarism, bnt 
I am compelled to believe that because of 
this spirit of Japan that drives there 
orientals to take the position they do we 
may be compelled to reconsider our posi- 
tion in that respect and make up our 
minds to take action to preserve the white 
man on this continent. We had hoped 
that by education and probably by orga- 
nization we would be able to assimilate 
and make these people part of the inter- 
national labor movement, but that does not 
seem probable in the near future. 

In British Columbia I presume we 
have had nothing more than the growth 
and development you have had in this 
country. When I went to the province 
about twenty-one years ago the different 
industries were in the hands of individ- 
uals. Later they grew into the hands of 
companies, then into syndicates, and al- 
though we sing that "Britons never will 
be slaves, ' ' our timber interests are owned 
practically by Swift, Armour & Company; 
our coal mines are owned by another labor- 
skinning corporation, and our fisheries are 
awned by some other Americans in Britain. 
Whatever is left the Union Pacific owns. 
No matter what flag floats over Canada, 
our friend Pierpont Morgan seems to rule 
the industrial waves! 

We, as workingmen in the Province 
of British Columbia and in Canada, have 
made all this possible. Every privilege 



every corporation enjoys has been given 
to them by the working class. Years ago 
in Sunday school I read in the Good Book 
that "the Lord giveth and the Lord taketh 
away." So it must be with the workers. 
Every privilege we have given them we 
must take away if we are to defend our 
own interests. They have shown us /how 
to do it. The workers of British Columbia 
and elsewhere had voted for the represen- 
tatives of the old political parties, and, 
no matter whether they were Liberals or 
Conservatives, Demoerates or Republicans, 
they were no better than the principles 
their parties stood for, and that is the 
corporate ownership of the means of life. 
Where three of four corporations own the 
jobs of the citizens of that province we 
have been compelled to take action. As 
with the workers elsewhere, we never do 
anything until we are compelled to. Wo 
were compelled to take some radical and 
revolutionary steps there. When James 
Dunsmuir closed ^down the mines on Van- 
couver Island because the miners had asked 
for an increase in pay and had gone on 
strike, he said to the striking miners and 
to a royal commission, ' ' These mines are 
mine. Cannot I do as I like with my own 
property?" That proposition is correct, 
no matter how brutal it is. If the workers 
will walk to the ballot box on election 
day and confer the power to right the law 
and make it legal for them to own these 
things W6 must give them the right to 
do as they like with their own property. 

The E-.iners in British Columbia began 
to question their right to own that prop- 
erty. That in British Columbia was the 
birth of the Socialist party. They said 
when they got a majority tkey would make 
all this property the collective property of 
the working class. I remember how un- 
popular it was to be a member of that 
p^rty at that time. We had to carry on 
a campaign similar to that referred to by 
Mr. Turner this morning. However, since 
1903 the Socialist party in British Colum- 
bia has grown from a little group of less 
than a dozen men in Vancouver to a 
party that polled twenty- one per cent of 
the votes in that county, despite the 
fact that we have had only twenty-one 
candidates running in forty-two consti- 



11 



T Ihi e C a r p e ra t 



tueiicies. A great deal has been said about 
legislation that has been secured. All the 
legislation that has been referred to by my 
comrades and all I could refer to that has 
been passed in British Columbia came af- 
ter the appearance of a few labor members 
in that house. We first got the eight-hour 
day for bituminous miners and metalli- 
ferous miners, then we secured the Work- 
man's Compensation Act. That was all 
done within twelve months. Almost every 
province in Canada now has a Work- 
man 's Compensation Act. 

That word "compensation" is very of- 
ten misinterpreted. I have stood on the 
banks of Coal Creek in the Fernie Dis- 
trict, after an explosion that had killed 
236 bread winners. I saw the widows and 
children waiting for their loved ones to 
be brought to the surface — and then you 
talk to me about compensation. If all 
the corporations at this moment were to 
relinquish their right, title and owner- 
ship and hand over to the working people 
everything they have on earth, it would 
not compensate for the wrongs they haie 
perpetrated on our people for lo, these 
many years. 

It now costs money to kill a man in 
these particular provinces, and therefore 



there is less killing done. Where they 
were killing at the rate of four or five 
hunflred miners a year, after the first and 
second year we had the Compensation Act 
and had wrung from two mining corpora- 
tions in British Columbia $232,000, they 
got busy and brought in a measure which 
provides for mine inspectors. For the first 
time in our history they allowed the 
miners to name one inspector, the govern- 
ment to name one and these companies 
name the third. A miner can now go to a 
member of his own imion and inform him 
of gas in the mine without danger of 
losing his job. This is as it should be, 
according to the testimony given by many 
of the miners themselves. The real value 
of this Workman 's Compensation Act is 
to better fit us to fight the real battles 
for industrial, freedom. 

I hope that as a result of the magni- 
ficent addresses given by my fellow dele- 
gates, and as a result of the deliberations 
of this convention, some new ideas, some 
new thoughts will be planted in the minis 
of the delegates. I hope also that as a re- 
sult of the deliberations of this conven- 
tion we will go home bigger and betier 
men. 



Provincial Perspective. 

A pollywog lived in a mudpuddle small 

At a country crossing of unpaved roads, 
And he counted himself the greatest of all 

That puddle of pollywog would-be toads ; 
His position of ruler — above compare — 

Was absolute, e'en to the puddle's rim ; 
He was the nearest great of the near great 
there, 

And this mudpuddle was the world to him. 

In this tadpole example of local fame 

We trace human nature wherever we go. 
For pride, the world over, is always the same 

And swells heads the faster the less that we 
know ; 
We find this big fish in his own little sea — 

And that little sphere is the tiniest pail — 
Though a mud-cat minnow he really may be 

Treats all smaller fishes like he was a whale. 
MARGARET SCOTT HALL, 



12 




The Carpenter 



OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF 



The United Brotherhood 

OF 

Carpenters and Joiners of America 



Published on the 15th of each month at the 

CARPENTERS' BUILDING, 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA, 

PUBLISHERS. 

FRANK DUFFY, EDITOR 



Subscription Price, 
One Dollar a Year In Advance, postpaid. 

Address all letters and money to 

FRANK DUFFY, 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



INDIANAPOUS, FEBRUARY, 1911 



VITAL ISSUES. 

The proceeding.? of the last official meeting of the late General Executive 
Board, the report of the Compilation Committee, and that of the accountants 
auditing the books of the General Secretary appear in this issue of The Car- 
penter, each and all of which will undoubtedly be intensely interesting to our 
entire membership. 



<» ^ »» 



Seldom has the General Secretary used, in any of his official writings, the 
personal pronoun, "I,!' preferring the privileged "We," since it is generally 
conceded to be a prerogative. Under this concession attention is called to the 
matters just mentioned as involving "vital issues" of interest to all officers 
and members, in certain directions a personal, as well as an official concern. 



In the minutes of the General Executive Board, reflections appear against 
our integrity, honesty, truthfulness and business management, conduct and 
ability. 

The rank and file of our Brotherhood should have facts and figures, not 
insinuations or unsupported assertions. We thought we were competent, and 
had the right to run our office according to — not the G. E. B., but Sections' 
35-39 inclusive of our General Constitution, and perform duties otherwise and 

13 



e C a BT p e o t e r 



elsewhere prescribed. Nevertheless, being human, errors and mistakes are 
possible with everybody, which includes us. 

However, let it be understood that the endeavor has been to run our office 
as economically as possible, lessening or increasing its force or their hours of 
work or our own as business demanded. None complained ; instead, all enjoyed 
the work and worked on to the best of their ability. 



<^ ^» ^» 



A few years ago, in compliance with the wishes of the General Executive 
Board, we opened a stock book in which to keep a detailed account of supplies 
shipped out each day. This book was inspected from time to time by the 
Board, and as no complaints were made, we took it for granted that our method 
of keeping stock was satisfactory. 

Two years ago we decided it would be better to each day enter in our 
stock book all supplies shipped to each Local Union and total the whole at the 
end of each month, which course seemed satisfactory to the Board. 

In all this time we had no stock clerk. At the end of each month some 
stenographer would be detailed to take an inventory- and report stock on hand. 
This was regularly, and, to our best knowledge and belief, correctly done. 

In moving to our present headquarters the stock book in use was lost and 
has never yet been found. We then put a regular clerk on a new stock book, 
with instructions to go through all our orders, reports and correspondence 
covering the period of the lost book in order that we might have as correct 
account as possible of goods shipped during that time. When this was done, 
we thought we saw clear sailing. We informed the Board of the lost stock 
book and of our intention to procure a new one, and this also seemed satisfac- 
tory, as no complaint was made. 

Things apparently moved all right until after the April, 1910, meeting 
of the G. E. B., when our expense clerk informed us he had found a bundle 
of shipping slips for supplies, already paid for and forwarded to Local Unions, 
that had never been entered in the stock book as ever being shipped to their 
proper destination. We instructed him to have these entered up at the end 
of April, 1910. This was done, and when the G. E. B. met in July, 1910, this 
stock book, along with all other books demanded by the G. E. B., was submitted 
to them for their inspection and examination. During that session the Board 
took an inventory of all stock then on hand and so reported to the Des Moines 
Convention. See pages 265 and 266, Journal of Proceedings 1910. The Board 
also reported the following to that convention : 

"The reports of the expert accountants have been received regu- 
larly, and in addition to these reports your Board has, each quarter, 
gone carefully over the books, vouchers, bills and accounts of the 
United Brotherhood and found them to be correct." 
Besides that, on July 21, 1910, the Board reported as follows to the United 
States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Md., with which com- 
pany we are under bond in the sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars for the faith- 
ful performance of our duties as specified in our General Constitution : 
"To the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Company: 

"This is to certify that on the 16th day of July, 1910, the books 
and accounts of Mr. Frank Duffy, our General Secretary, were exam- 
ined and found correct in every respect, all moneys and property 

14 



T Ihi e Carpenter 

under his control or custody being accomited for, with proper securi- 
ties and funds on hand to balance his accounts, and he is not now 
in default. 

"He has performed his duties in an acceptable and satisfactory 
manner, and we know of no reason why the Guarantee Bond should 
not be continued. 

"Dated at Indianapolis, Ind., this 21st day of July, 1910. 

Name of Lodge: U. B. OF C. AND J. OF A. 
By (Signed) W. G. SCHARDT, 

Chairman of General Ex. Board. 
Official Capacity." 

In the face of all this we are at a loss to understand why the Board ordered 
the expert accountants to make a special audit of the affairs of our office. Yet 
we are not finding fault with or blaming them for so doing. "We raised no 
opposition then, nor do we now. Our offices are wide open for inspection any 
day of the year, while our books and accounts are at the disposal of any author- 
ized party for examination. 

What did the accountants find ? They reported : 

1. That they had examined the financial accounts of the U. B. and found 
them correct. 

2. That all moneys received at the General Office for supplies, tax or other 
purposes, were accounted for and entered up correctly on our ledgers. 

3. That all Locals Unions got the supplies they ordered and paid for. 

4. That the profit on the sale of supplies averaged 951/2 per cent, on cost. 
•5. That the profit on the sale of supplies, after deducting supplies for 

free distribution, and cost of expressage, freight and cartage, was over 63 
per cent. 

6. That supplies to be accounted for in detail are as follows : 

968 Due Books. 

1,003 English Constitutions. ^ 

351 French Constitutions. 

25,931 Application Blanks. 

8,159 Local Union Letter Heads. 

118 Treasurers' Cash Books. 

16 200-page Ledgers. 

25 300-page Ledgers. 

5 500-page Ledgers. 

79 German Constitutions. 

7. That the surplus of supplies on hand was as follows : 

2 E. S. Order Books. 

12 Treasurers' Receipt Books. 

31 F. S. Receipt Books. 

14 100-page Day Books. 

2 200-page Day Books. 

35 100-page Ledgers. 

41 English Rituals. 

105 German Rituals. 

65 French Rituals. 

1 Dater Outfit. 

145 Emblem Buttons. 

285 Emblem Pins. 

Of the 968 Due Books yet to be accounted for, 600 are in controversy be- 
tween the Adams Express Company and the General Office. Until recently 

15 



T lb e Carpaoter 

the Adams Express Company's office at Indianapolis claimed receiving only 
thirty-eight pounds, when they should have received seventy pounds, repre- 
senting 1,200 Due Books. Their Chicago office claims they received one hun- 
dred pounds. This weight represents 1,800 Due Books. We have since made 
claim on the express company for the value of the 600 Due Books in question. 
The balance of the 368 Due Books was used for organizers and organizing pur- 
poses, for granting clearance cards at the General Office, for extras ordered 
with new outfits for Local Unions by the General President, and for sam- 
ples, etc. 

The 1,003 Constitutions were used for organizing purposes, extras with 
outfits on orders of the General President, for use in the General Office, for 
use of committees, for use of lawyers in suits entered against us, for printers ' 
samples, etc. 

The 351 French Constitutions were used by the General President for 
organizing purposes in the New England States and Canada. 

The application blanks were used as follows : Twenty-eight organizers 
appointed in the last two years received 100 Application Blanks each as part 
of their outfit, making a total of 2,800. Twenty-five general organizers got 
on an average of four pads each during the last two. years — ^total 10,000. The 
balance was used for organizing purposes. 

The 8,159 Local Union Letter Heads, which equaled Siy^ pads, were used 
around the office : 

1/2 pad per week in membership dept. in two years. 50 pads 

In G. S. office in two years 10 

In shipping dept. in two years 6 

Use of G. E. B. in two years 8 

Use of committees at G. 20 

In other departments of G. 6 



Total 100 pads 

This leaves us with a surplus of letter heads on hand. 

At least twenty out of the 118 Treasurers' Cash Books were used in the 
General Office for keeping petty accounts of the G. P., G. S. and G. T., loca- 
tion of organizers, charters granted, unions lapsed, accounts of pins, buttons, 
etc., received and sold. 

The two, three and 500-page Ledgers balance the one and 200-page 
Day Books and 100-page Ledgers too many on hand. When the Ledgers 
were changed we used the two, three and 500-page Ledgers we had on hand 
when sending outfits to new Local Unions, as the old Local Unions would not 
accept them, but our stenographer gave us credit for sending out 100-page 
Ledgers in their stead. That left us with a surplus on hand. After deduct- 
ing the one and 200-page Day Books and the 100-page Ledgers from the sur- 
plus of supplies on hand, we have still $125.00 worth of supplies on hand more 
than we should have. 

To find this out, it cost the U. B. over Thirty-one Hundred Dollars in 
accountants' fees alone. 

The accountants further found that the stenographer who took stock made 
several mistakes, in fact, many mistakes, that he was not careful enough in 
checking up supplies shipped out, and that this, along with the loss of our 
stock book when moving into our new headquarters, caused all the trouble and 
misunderstanding. 

As far as our membership is concerned, two of our local financial secre- 
taries reported to us their total membership as 1,623 and 1,885, when in reality 

16 



T lb a Car 



n t a r 



these figures actually represented the per capita tax due the General OfSce 
of $16.25 and $188.50. This made a difference in these two unions of 2,689 
members. Add this number to the accountants' figures of 198,036 and you 
have a membership of 200,725, or thirteen more than we reported to the Des 
Moines Convention. 

All our accounts balance, leaving us an overplus of stock on hand. 



Confident that the minutes of the late Board as approved by a majority 
bear the marks of vindictive and malicious effort, we do not hesitate to place 
our rejoinder parallel with the Board's deductions. 

Finally, we are under Twenty Thousand Dollars bond. We challenge 
the production of the proof of incompetency, inability or dishonesty on our 
part. FRANK DUFFY, General Secretary. 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. 
Editor, The Carpenter. 



The question has been raised whether the Compilation Committee under- 
stood, disregarded or exceeded the powers and scope of the second paragraph 
of Section 24, since it is doubted whether "tabulation" could be construed 
to convey to, or invest those who perform it with judicial and absolute powers. 
Many feel that the throwing out of seven or eight thousand votes should, in 
justice to the interested locals and the candidates, be a matter of review by 
the next biennial convention — perhaps a very wise course to guide that body 
in so amending the law as to make the duties of the committee clear, specific 
and beyond the possibility of undue influence or personal preference. 

It may be said here that every officer or official is a servant of some higher 
power which expects the law to be performed without shaping, stretching or 
construing the law to serve individual aggrandizement. It is not to be denied, 
but regretted, that the desire for office is almost invariably greater than to 
lay down its burdens. In the first instance, many see eminent station and 
distinction, and more emoluments in the lure and luxury of official life, while 
less — indeed, it is conspicuously few — seek to continue in office to serve their 
fellow-beings. 



A circular letter recently sent out by 
James M. Lynch, President of the Inter- 
national Typographical Union, in which he 
strongly advises against working on Sun- 
day, and shows the advantage gained by 
his organization through the elimination 
of the practice in the printing trades, re- 
calls to our minds an interesting state- 
ment by a German professor, published 
some time ago, on the results of continuous 
experiments and personal investigations 
as to the effect of Sunday work on the 
human body. According to the learned 
professor's findingjs, the required daily 



out-put of vital force cannot be complete- 
ly restored by eating and sleeping. Sup- 
posing on Monday morning the vitality is 
equal to 500 points, on Monday evening it 
is, by the day's labor, reduced to 450 
points. A good night's rest will have the 
effect of again increasing the vitality. 
The increased vitality will, however, not 
extend beyond 490 points on Tuesday 
morning. Tuesday's labor again reduces 
the vitality to 440 points. On Wednesday 
it will again reach 480. With each day's 
labor goes an expense of vital force of 
fifty points, while by each day's eating 



17 



T lb e C a r p e HL t 



r 



and sleeping forty points are restored. 
At this rate there is a shortage in vitality 
of sixty points each Saturday evening, 
which shortage has to be made good by 
rest on Sunday and the two intervening 
nights in order that the laborer may be 
in proper physical condition to resume his 
or her daily toil on Monday morning with- 
out sustaining irreparable injury to mind 
and body. 

We have at all times discountenanced 
Sunday work as well as the practice, 
rather common some years ago in our 
trade, of working overtime. By working 
overtimg, be it on a Sunday or on a week 
day, we are depriving to a certain extent 
at least, our unemployed brothers of an 
opportunity to work; we are taking the 
bread and butter out of their mouths. The 
working of overtime, rare cases where it 
is unavoidable, is a violation of union 
principle and neither the trade nor the 
employer will suffer by its prohibition; 
for as Brother Lynch truly says: "It has 
been discovered tSat the worker can really 
do more work and better work in shorter 
days than in longer." 

* * *■ 

Much to our regret, yet unavoidably, our 
January, 1911 issue reached our members 
and readers at a rather late date of the 
month— through no fault of ours, however. 
As it would certainly have caused disap- 
pointment and consternation among ' our 
membership, had not as least the result 
of the general vote on the constitutional 
amendments and the report of the tabula- 
tion committee appeared in that issue, we 
were compelled to hold up the Journal un- 
til that committee had completed its work 
and their report was forthcoming. 

♦ ♦ ■♦■ 

We were exceedingly pleased early this 
month (January) to find on our exchange 
table a copy of a souvenir edition of the 
Bakers' Journal, the ofiSeial organ of the 
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' Inter- 
national Union of America, issued at the 
occasion of its twenty-fifth anniversary. 
The souvenir is a very handsome publica- 
tion, replete Avith interesting articles re- 
lating to the history of the organization, 
the obstacles it had to overcome and the 



success and victories achieved during the 
last twenty-five years. We heartily con- 
gratulate the Bakers ' Union at the oc- 
casion and sincerely wish them future suc- 
cess. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The case of the Albro J. Newton Com- 
pany against the U. B. and the A. S. of C, 
New York District, to which we referred 
in our December and January issues, came 
up for final decision on January 6th in the 
Brooklyn Supreme Court. The decision 
handed down by Justice Blackmar is a 
stunning blow to all organized labor. The 
judge makes the preliminary injunction 
permanent, claiming that our unions 
in New York and the A. S. of C. 
are in an illegal combination against the 
plaintiff. He calls the sending out of cir- 
culars by the defendants, containing the 
names of . firms working utider an agree- 
ment with them and omitting the name of 
the plaintiff firm a conspiracy to injure 
the latter 's business. Yet, at the same 
time, the judge admits that the unions 
were using only lawful means — the strike — 
in their fight against the plaintiff and try- 
ing to accomplish a lawful object — that 
of improvement of their conditions of 
labor. 

In making the injunction permanent. 
Justice Blackmar issued an order enjoin- 
ing the 'defendants, their attorneys, agents, 
servants, associates, confederates, and all 
persons acting in aid of or in connection 
with them, of any of them, from conspir- 
ing, combining or acting in concert in any 
manner to injure or interfere with plain- 
tiff's goodwill, trade or business, for the 
purpose of coercing it to employ union 
labor, either.' 

"First — By sending to any customer or 
prospective customer of plaintiif any let- 
ter, circular or communication printed, 
written or oral, which in terms or by in- 
ference suggests that labor troubles will 
follow the use of materials purchased from 
plaintiff or from any person, firm or cor- 
poration declared ' unfair, ' or whose ma- 
terial does not bear the union label, mean- 
ing plaintiff thereby, or 

' ' Second — By ordering, directing, re- 
quiring or by compelling by any by-law, 
rule or regulation, or any act thereunder, 

18 



p e ini t 



any person whatever to refrain from or 
cease working for any person, firm or cor- 
poration because they use material pur- 
chased of or furnished by plaintiff or by 
any person, firm or corporation declared 
'unfair,' or whose material does not bear 
the union label, meaning plaintiff thereby. 

"But nothing herein contained is to be 
construed to prevent peaceable strikes ex- 
cept those directed against customers or 
prospective customers of plaintiff for the 
purpose of injuring or interfering with 
plaintiff's good will, trade or business." 

In that famous contempt case, Gompers, 
Morrison and Mitchell have been sen- 
tenced to imprisonment for publishing the 
plaintiff's firm name in the We Don't Pat- 
ronize or unfair list. Justice Blackmar 
now sees a lawless act in the omittance of 
the name of the plaintiff in the list of fair 
employers sent out by the New York D. 
C, where it evidently had no right to be. 

Thus, by mere judge-made law, by so- 
called interpretations of the Constitution 
of the United States, organized labor is 
step by step deprived of its weapons of 
defense and reduced to a state of im- 
poteney. And there is grave danger of this 
usurpation of power by the courts to go on 
until the workers come to their senses and 
conquer the political power which rightfully 
and logically belongs to them. Therefore, 
and as even Justice Blackmar deigns to ad- 
mit that strikes are legal, let us by all 
means strike at the ballot box and wrench 
that usurped power from the courts. 



We are indebted to the Johns Hopkins 
Press for a copy of a monograph on "The 
Trade Union Label," by Dr. Ernest E. 
Spedden, in which he traces its origin, says 
the New York Times. The device was 
first generally used in 1875 as a result of 
competition in San Francisco between 
Chinese and white eigarmakers. Dr. Sped- 
den is informed by Miss Lucile Eaves of 
the University of Nebraska that in 1869 
the Carpenters' Eight Hour League of San 
Francisco had used a stamp on products 
of planing mills, in which the eight hour 
rule obtained, and he thinks possibly the 
eigarmakers profited by the example of 
the carpenters. 



In testimony given before the Congres- 
sional Committee of 1876-7 the device was 
referred to by one of the union witnesses 
as a "stamp," but the term "union label" 
was soon in vogue, and by 1878 fifty cigar 
manufacturers were using it in a con- 
certed effort to drive out the cheap Chinese 
labor. The Cigarmakers' OiBcial Journal 
of January, 1879, records that the label 
had come into use by at least one eastern 
manufacturer. 

From its employment in San Francisco 
the label spread among unions in many oc- 
cupations and to the chief countries of 
Europe and Australia. The attempt to 
identify the label with the "hall mark" of 
the mediaeval guilds has failed, in Dr. 
Speddens 's opinion. The hall marks were 
merely certificates of genuineness and had 
nothing to do with labor struggles and 
boycotts. The union label is distinctively 
in its origin a device of American trade 
unionism. 



But a Labor Boycott is Against 
the Law 

A new application of the boycott has 
been introduced into the labor world. The 
Citizens' Alliance of San Francisco has 
placed a sandwich man in front of the 
well known Philadelphia Shoe Company, at 
825 Market street. On one side of his 
banner appears the following inscription. 

"Do not patronize the Philadelphia 
Shoe Company. It is a union house. Free 
Americans patronize open shops only, where 
goods are made by free labor. Indorsed 
by Citizens' Alliance." 

On the reverse side is written: 

' ' Philadelphia Shoe Company adver- 
tises it sells union made goods. Such 
goods are products of closed shops. Free 
Americans should not patronize. Give 
your patronage to free labor and the open 
shop. Indorsed by Citizens' Alliance." 

There is no dispute between employer 
and employes involved in this action. The 
house that has incurred the wrath of the 
Citizens' Alliance has an enviable reputa- 
tion for fair dealing with all — the pub- 
lic and its employers. It has not taken 
part in any industrial controversy. 



19 



5 c 1 SECRETARY fe | 

••■■si %£STAlU.ISHi:i)A- 




(S 



o)BK] 




GENERAL OFFICERS 
OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD 

OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 

OF AMERICA 

General Office, 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

General President, 
WM. D. HTJBBE, Carpenters' Building, Indi- 
anapolis. 

General Secretary, 
FRANK DUFFY, Carpenters' Building, Indi- 
anapolis. 

General Treasurer, 
THOMAS NBALB, Carpenters' Building, Indi- 
anapolis. 

First Vice-President, 

ARTHUR A. QUINN, 269 Madison Ave., Perth 

Amboy, N. J. 

Second Vice-President, 
J. D. [McKINLAY, 235 W. 60tli St., Chicago, HI. 

General Executive Board, 

First District, CHAS. H. BAUSHER, 1370 

Franklin Ave., Bronx, New York City. 

Second District, D. A. POST, 416 S. Main St., 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



Third District, JOHN H. POTTS, 646 Shilleto 
St., Cincinnati, O. 



Fourth District, EOBT. E. L. CONNOLLY, Box 
55, Birmingham, Ala. 

Fifth District, .TOHN WALQUIST, 2528 Elliot 
Ave., Minneapclis, Minn. 

Sixth District W. A. COLE, 236 Henry St.. 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Seventh District. ARTHUR MARTBL, 1327 St. 
Denis St., Montreal, Can. 

EOBT. E. L. CONNOLLY, Chairman. 

CHAS. H. BAUSHER, Secretary. 

All correspondence for the General Executive 
Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



Expulsions. 

Solomon Israelefsky has been expelled 
by L. XJ. 1787, Nevpark, N. J., for misap- 
propriation of local funds. 

Albert Pollock, of L. U. 1787, Newark, 
N. J., was expelled for fraudulently re- 
ceiving money. 

J. C. Norris, of L. "U. 1004, Atlanta, Ga., 
Tvas expelled for misappropriation of 
funds belonging to the Local Union. 

W. Gr. Warden, the former president of 
L. U. 1582, Cincinnati, 0., was expelled for 
embezzlement of local funds. 



A Rejection Reconsidered. 

The rejection as a candidate of I. H. 
Sterling by L. XJ. 1212, CofPeyville, Kan., 
as previously announced, having been re- 
considered by the local union, his applica- 
tion -was again balloted on and he was 
admitted to membership. 



Localities to be Avoided. 

Owing to pending trade movements, 
building depression and other causes, car- 
penters are requested to stay away from 
the following places: 



Ada, Okla. 
Altus, Okla. 
Ashertffn, Tex. 
Ashland, Ky. 
Austin, Tex. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Bartlesville, Okla. 
Battle Creek, Mich. 
Belleville, 111. 
Big Springs, Tex. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Boise, Idaho. 
Brantford, Ont., Can. 
Chicago, 111. 
Cleveland, O. 
Denver, Cclo. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Edmonton, Alta., Can. 
El Paso, Tex. 



Fort Myers, Fla. 
Glen Cove, L. I., N. Y. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Hot Springs, Ark. 
Houston, Tex. 
Hutchinson, Kan. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Joliet, 111. 
Kenosha, Wis. 
Kewanee, 111. 
Klamath Falls, Ore. 
Laconia, N. H. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
,Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Mulberry, Fla. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
New Orleans, La. 
New York City. 



20 



T Ihi e C a, r p e o t 



Xorfolk, Va. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Plioenis. Ariz. 
Peoria, 111. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Pittsfleia, Mass. 
Portland, Ore. 
Pottsville, Pa. 
San Diego, Cal. 
Sanford, Fla. 



Ran Francisco, Cal. 
Sayre, Pa. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Spokane, Wash. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Vancouver, B. C, Can. 
Vicksburg, Miss. 
Washington, D. C. 
Waynesboro, Pa. 
Wheeling. W. Va. 



Local Unions Chartered Last Month. 



Owatonna, Minn. 
Vancouver, Wash. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Hollis, Okla. 



Marion, Mass. 
Carry, Pa. 
Gardiner, Me. 
Hamilton & Newham 
Mass. 



Total, 9 Local Unions. 



Hire Education. 



"What is a college, papa?" 

"A college, Pauline, is a cross tetnoen 
a country club and an orphan asylum." 

"Then why do such nice boys go there, 
papa?" 

"Because rich boys from sixteen to 
twenty are too old to be spanked and not 
old enough to reason. ' ' 

"Do they learn to reason in college?" 

"Not if the reverend professors can help 
it, daughter." 

"Then why do they go?" 

' ' They go to be got rid of, because they 
would misbehave at home." 

"Don't they misbehave at college, 
then?" 

"Well, yes; but their parents don't 
know about it, unless they go to the foot- 
ball games or read the police reports." 

"But don't their parents teach them 
morals, papa?" 

"Nay, nay, Pauline; it's cheaper to get 
it done by hired professors. ' ' 

"Do the professors know all about 
morals?" 

"Not at all, my dear; but they know 
exactly what parents expect them to say." 

"Is that what makes a complete curri- 
culum?" 

' ' No, dear, a complete curriculum is an 
imitation education furnished by endowed 
institutions at less than cost to those who 
are best able to pay for it." — Bolton Hall, 
in Life. 



The Large Family. 

Professor Thomas Carver's idea that 
large families among the rich and smaller 
ones among the poor would tend to lessen 
the cost of living and solve many pressing 
economics may be set aside. But there is 
one thing the professor says that is abso- 
lutely true, and that is: 

"Foxes think large families among the 
rabbits highly commendable. Those em- 
ployers who want large supplies of cheap 
labor, those priests who want large congre- 
gations, those military leaders who want 
plenty of cheap food for gunpowder, and 
those politicians who want plenty of voters 
all agree in commending large families and 
rapid multiplication among the poorer 
classes." 

These reasons are right. The poor are 
urged to breed, for the mills and the army. 
A large family furnishes good raw ma- 
terial. But the working class has passed 
the point where it believes that the mis- 
sion in life of the human being is to breed 
appendanges to machines. — New York Call. 



Freedom. 

How shall we sing great freedom's song 
That mareheth on, through ages long ; 
Her feet all scarred with shard and thorn, 
Her back bent by the burdens borne? 

What star is this upon her brow? 

A gleam that yearns all truth to know ! 

What song is ringing in her ears? 

It is the music of the spheres ! 

What pulso that fills her mighty soul? 

A mother's heart, that loves the whole !. 

What Ephod, shot with glittering gems. 

Shines vast between her shoulder hems? 

These are the kindly, gracious arts 

By which man grows his noblest parts. 

What girdle this — so broad and good? 

What golden cord and silver line 

Enwrap her loins, her garments twine? 

They're duty, courage, faith and prayer 

And hope triumphant o'er despair : 

And zeal that spreads the flame of love 

Till every tyrant shackle's clove ! 

And pity bending in the dust 

And bearing scorn (whene'er she must) 

To lift, to lighten, to reveal ! 

And from that dust to God appeal ! 

This is her form — so grand and free — 
That mareheth on to destiny ! 
■ This is the mother of us all ! 
And this is God-born liberty ! 

— Prof. John Ward Stimson. 



21 



T Ih e Carpenter 



Proceedings of Fourth Quarterly 

Session, 1910, of General 

Executive Board 

October Meeting (Continued). 

October 25th. 1910. 

All members present but Foley. 

Resolution No. 36, submitted by L. D. 774, 
New Yori: City, and referred to the Board by 
the convention. Sections 108 and 110 of the 
general constitution provide and specify the 
conditions under which members are and can be 
admitted as beneficial. The request contained 
in the resolution is denied. 

Resolution No. 63, submitted by Local Unions 
26, 192 and 1211, Syracuse, N. Y., requesting 
the services of an organizer to organize the 
shops and mills, referred to the Board by the 
convention. The G. P. is requested to comply 
with the request. 

Resolution No. 61, submitted by Local Unions 
Nos. 276, 1585, 468, 973 and 1399, referred to 
the Board by the convention. The resolution 
is laid over until the January meeting and 
the G. S. is requested to procure additional 
information as to conditions prevailing in New 
Mexico and Arizona. 

Resolution No. 13, submitted to the conven- 
tion by the D. C. of Buffalo, N. Y., and Local 
Unions No-s. 9, 355' 374, 440, 503, 1345, 1377, 
1668 and 1757, requesting an appropriation for 
organizing purposes and the services of an 
organizer for the shops and mills. The Board 
appropriates $1,000.00 and requests the G. P. 
to place a general organizer in the Buffalo 
district. 

Resolution No. 17, submitted to the conven- 
tion by the Wayne Co. D. C, Detroit, Mich., 
calling attention to the fact that the Bagley 
Tobacco Company were erecting new buildings 
with non-union men. This resolution was re- 
ferred to the Board by the convention with 
instructions to take up this matter with the 
Executive Council of the A. F. of L. and the 
officials of the Bagley Company. The G. S. 
is requested to communicate the facts in the 
case to the above-named organizations with 
the view of bringing about a settlement. 

Resolution No. 70, requesting the General 
Office to finance and carry on a campaign of 
organization against the non-union mills in 
Brooklyn Boro, New York City, referred to the 
Board by the convention. Inasmuch as the 
General Office is at present carrying on the 
work of organization in that district, the 
papers are filed. 

Resolution No. 54. requesting moral and 
financial aid in support of the men locked out 
by the Homestalce Mining Company, referred 
to the Board Ijy the convention. Inasmuch as 
we have rendered financial assistance to our 
members affected by the lockout, further action 
is deferred pending the action of the A. F. of L. 

Resolutions Nos. 1, 2, 52 and 55 in regard 
to the establishment of a home for the aged 
and infirm members of the U. B. and a sana- 
torium for those afflicted with tuberculosis 



were read. These resolutions were referred to 
the incoming officers by the convention. The 
papers are filed. 

Independence, Kan. Request from L. U. No. 
1198 for permission to circulate a letter among 
the Local Unions. The G. S. is requested to 
procure additional information. 

Rochester, N. Y. Request from the D. C. 
for financial assistance for organizing purposes. 
As the Board appropriated $500.00 for this pur- 
pose on September 21. the request is filed. 

October 26. 
All members present but Foley. 
The examination and audit of the books and 
accounts continued. 

October 27. 
All members present but Foley. 
The audit and examination of the books and 
accounts of the General Office continued. 

October 28. 

All members present but Foley. 

The examination and audit of the books and 
accounts continued. 

October 29. 

All members present but Foley. 

The examination and audit of the books and 
accounts continued. 

The New York State Council of Carpenters 
extended an invitation to the G. JS. B. to at- 
tend the annual convention, to be held at 
Rochester, N. Y., October 31. The Board 
authorizes Brother Bausher, the member of 
the G. B. B. from the First District, to attend 
the convention of the State Council and extend 
to the Council the best wishes of the Board 
for their future success and prosperity. 

On the 12th instant, while auditing the books 
and accounts of the General Office, the chair- 
man of the Board called the attention of the 
Board to entries of shipments appearing in 
the stock book during the month of April, 1910, 
for which no cash entry was found upon the 
financial ledger. As these entries in the stock 
book appeared to be such large amounts as to 
eliminate the probability of its being a mere 
clerical error, the G. P., G. S. and G. T. were 
called into the Board room and the G. S. was 
asked to explain said entries. The G. S. being 
unable to give a full and satisfactory explana- 
tion, it was agreed by the Board and the G. P., 
G. S. and G. T. that the expert accountant 
should be called in immediately to audit the 
books to discover errors contained therein. 
The G. S. was instructed to telegraph to the 
expert accountant to come to this office at 
once. The expert arrived the following day 
and began lihe investigation. He later in- 
formed the Board that it would probably re 
quire two weeks to complete the audit. On this 
date, October 29, the accountant reported that 
it would probably require another two weeks 
to complete the audit. The Board decided to 
adjourn, to be called together by the chairman 
of the Board when he receives the report of 
the accountant. 

(Note — As part of the minutes of the Octo- 
ber meeting appeared in the December Car- 



22 



T Ih e Carpeimter 



penter, the G. S. will publish the balance of 
these minutes in the same issue of The Car- 
penter in which the minutes of the January 
meeting of the Board are published.) 

The following matters were acted upon by 
the Board by correspondence with the G. S. 
in the interim between the October, 1910, and 
January, 1911, sessions of the Board. 

November 1. 

Atlantic City, N. J. Request from the At- 
lantic County D. C. for sanction and financial 
aid in support of a trade movement for an in- 
crease of wage from $3.60 to $4.00 per day, 
to go into effect November 5, 1910. Sanction 
granted. Financial aid will be considered by 
the Board as reports are received at the Gen- 
eral Office. 

November 15. 

Alton, 111. Request from L. U. No. 377 for 
additional financial aid in support of members 
locked out. The Board appropriates $800.00. 

November 19. 

Pittsburg, Pa. Request from the D. C. for 
official sanction of a trade movement for a 
Saturday half holiday. Sanction granted. 

December, 3. 

San Francisco, Cal. Request from the Bay 
Counties D. C. for an appropriation for organiz- 
ing purposes. The Board appropriates $500.00. 

December 8. 

San Francisco, Cal. Request from the Bay 
Counties D. C. for additional financial assist- 
ance in support of members involved in a trade 
movement. Appropriation denied. 

MINUTES OF G. E. B.— .JANUARY, 1911. 
Indianapolis, Ind., January 4, 1911. 

The regular quarterly meeting of the G. E. B. 
was called lo order on the above date, with 
Chairman Schardt presiding, and Bausher, 
Post, Walquist and Connolly present. 

The quarterly report of the G. P. was read 
and filed. That portion in regard to the with- 
drawal of the funds of the U. B. now on de- 
posit with the First National Bank of Tampa, 
Fla., will be considered later by the Board. 

Bridgewater, Mass. Request from L. U. No. 
1046 for financial assistance for organizing 
purposes. The Board appropriates $50.00. 

Newton, Mass. Appeal of the D. C. of New- 
ton, Waltham, Natick, Needham and vicinity 
from the decision of the G. P. in the case of 
L. U. No. 860, South Framingham, Mass., ad- 
mitting Michael H. Sweeney to membership. 
As the D. C. had not appealed within the time 
specified in the constitution, the papers are 
filed. 

Batavia, N. Y. Request from L. TJ. No. 
1151 that the G. E. B. reinstate Fred Lang 
to full beneficial membership, said Brother 
Lang having gone sis months in arrears. The 
6. P. had already decided in this ease that a 
member who owes six months' dues, or a sum 
equal thereto, must be reinitiated as a new 
member. The ruling of tlie G. P. is according 
to the constitution and is sustained by the 
G. E. B. 

Wichita, Kan. Appeal of L. U. No. 201 from 



the decision of the G. P. in the matter of pay- 
ing sick benefits. The appeal not having been 
taken within the time specified in the constitu- 
tion, the papers are filed. 

New York, N. Y. Appeal of Karoel Peszel, 
of L. U. No. 309, from the decision of the G. 
P. in the case of New York D. C. vs. Karoel 
Peszel. As new evidence has been submitted, 
the case is referred back to the G. P. The 
G. P. will instruct the D. C. to forward to 
this office a transcript of the evidence taken 
at the trial. 

January 5. 

All members present. 

New York City. Appeal of Phillip Fienberg 
from the decision of the G. P. in the case of 
the D. C. of New York City vs. Phillip Fein- 
berg. The decision of the G. P. is sustained 
and the appeal is dismissed. 

New York City. Appeal of Leon Soontupe 
from the decision of the G. P. in the case of 
the New York City D. C. vs. Leon Soontupe, 
wherein Leon Soontupe was tried by the 
Brooklyn Boro Committee and expelled for 
making misrepresentation as to his qualifica- 
tions for membership. The offense charged is 
a violation of the obligation and not a viola- 
tion of trade rules or by-laws, and is triable 
in a L. U. and not in the Boro Committee. 
The decision of the G. P. is reversed, the ap- 
peal is sustained and the appellant ordered re- 
instated in L. D. No. 1008. 

Newark, N. J. Appeal of John P. ilippold 
of L. U. No. 258, Brooklyn Boro, New York 
City, from the decision of the G. P. in the 
case of the Newark D. C. vs. John P. Hippold. 
The decision of the G. P. is reversed, the re- 
quest of the appellant for a new trial is 
granted and the Newark D. C. is ordered to 
return to the appellant the amount collecteo 
from him as fines. 

New York City. Appeal of Samuel Burnstein 
of L. U. No. 1008, Brooklyn Boro, from the de- 
cision of the G. P. in the case of L. U. No. 
1008 vs. Samuel Burnstein. The decision of 
the G. P. is sustained. The L. U. had no 
legal right to compel said Samuel Burnstein to 
transfer his membership to another L. U. The 
G. P. is instructed to have L. U. No. 1008 com- 
ply with his decision. 

January 6. 

All members present. 

Seattle, Wash. Request from the D. C. for 
an appropriation for organizing purposes. The 
Board appropriates $500. 

Chicago, 111. Communication from the D. C, 
accompanied by a bill for attorney fees in the 
injunction suit of the Mears & Slayton Co., 
amounting to $256.00. The bill is ordered 
paid. 

New York City. ' Appeal of Dennis M. 
Comeau from the decision of the G. P. in the 
case of L. U. No. 126, Brooklyn Boro vs. Dennis 
M. Comeau. The decision of the G. P. is re- 
versed and the appeal is sustained on the fol- 
lowing grounds : First, the charges contained 



23 



T lb e Carpeimtar 



no specifications as per Section 202 of tlie con- 
stitution. Second, the appellant was not tur- 
nislied witli a copy of the reply to the G. P. 
by the L. V., nor did the L. U. file its answer 
within the time specified in Section 95. 

New York City. Appeal of L. U. No. 309 
from the decision of the G. P. in the ease of 
the D. C. of New York City vs. Louis Feigin. 
The decision of the G. P. is reversed and the 
appeal «s sustained on the grounds that there 
is no evidence before the Board to show that 
the accused committed any viclation of any 
law of the U. E., as no copy of the charges 
and specifications or a full and complete copy 
of the minutes of the trial was supplied this 
oflSee as provided for in Section 95 of the con- 
stitution. 

Newark, N. J. The papers in the ease be- 
tween the Newark D. C. and L. U. 1787 were 
laid before the Board by the G. P. After a 
careful review of all the papers in the case, 
the Board recommends that a deputy be sent 
to Newark to endeavor to adjust this contro- 
versy and also the matter between S. Israel- 
efsky, A. Pollock and Jacob Keller and L. U. 
No. 1787. If L. U. No. 1787 persists in refus- 
ing to obey the constitution the G. P. is author- 
ized to suspend L. U. No. 1787 from the U. B. 
^-_ January 7. 

All members present. 

Niagara Falls, N. Y. Appeal of E. B. Coats 
from the decision ot the G. P. in the case of 
the D. C. of Niagara Falls vs. B. B. Coats. 
As the evidence before the Board shows that 
the appellant had paid his fine to the secre- 
tary of his L. U. before making his appeal, the 
matter is referred back to the G. P. to decide 
the appeal on its merits. 

New York City. Appeal of Edward Atkins 
from the decision cf the G. P. in the case of 
L. U. 1717 vs. Edward Atkins. As the ap- 
pellant did not make his appeal within the 
time prescribed by the constitution, the papers 
are filed. 

Charleston, S. C. Request from the D. C. 
for official sanction of a trade movement for 
an increase of wage from $2.50 to $3.00 per 
day, to go into effect March 1, 1911. Sanction 
granted. 

Hammond. Ind. Request from the D. C. for 
sanction and financial aid in support of a 
trade movement for an increase of wage from 
56% to CO cents per hour, to go into effect 
April 1, 1011. Sanction granted. Financial 
aid will be considered by the Board as reports 
are received at this office. 

Los Angeles, Cal. Request from the D. C. 
for sanction and financial aid in support of a 
trade movement for an increase of wage from 
$3.50 to $4.00 per day, to go into effect Jlarch 
1, 1911. Sanction granted. Financial aid to 
be considered by the Board as reports are re- 
ceived at this office. 

St. Louis, llo. Request from the D. C. for 
sanction and financial aid in support of a trade 
movement by tiie Cabinet Makers for an in- 
crease of wage from $2.97 to $3.20 per day 



and reduction of working hours from nine to 
eight per day, to go into effect April 1, 1911. 
Sanction granted. Financial aid will be con- 
sidered by the Board as reports are received 
at this office. 



January 9. 



All members present. 



Riverside, Cal. Request from L. U. No. 230 
for official sanction of a trade movement fot 
an increase of wage from $3.50 to $4.00 per 
day. Sanction granted. 

Kingston, Ont. Request from L. U. No. 249 
for sanction and financial aid in support of 
a trade movement for an increase of wage 
from 31 M: to 35 cents per hour, to go into 
effect May 1, 1911. Sanction granted. Finan- 
cial aid will be considered by the Board as 
reports are received at this office. 

Cedar Rapids, la. Request from L. U. No. 
308 for sanction and financial aid in support 
of a trade movement for an increase of wage 
from 45 to 50 cents per hour, to go into 
effect April 1,.1911. Sanction granted. Finan- 
cial aid will be considered by the Board as 
reports are received at this office. 

Madison, Wis. Request from L. U. No. 314 
for sanction and financial aid in support of 
a trade movement for an increase cf wage 
from 371/2 to 40 cents per hour, to go into 
effect May 28, 1911. Sanction granted. Fi- 
nancial aid will be considered by the Board 
as reports are received at this office. 

Decatur, 111. Request from L. U. No. 742 
for sanction and financial aid in support of a 
trade movement for an increase of wage from 
40 to 45 cents per hour and a reduction of 
working hours from nine to eight per day, to 
go into effect April 1, 1911. Sanction granted. 
Financial aid will be considered by the Board 
as reports are received at this office. 

Sandusky, Ohio. Request from L. U. No. 
940 tor sanction and financial aid in support 
of a trade movement for an increase of wage 
from 33 1-3 to 37 cents per hour, to go into 
effect April 1.' 1911. Sanction granted. Finan- 
cial aid will be considered by the Board as re- 
ports are received at this office. 

Muscatine, Iowa. Requests from L. U. No. 
1069 for sanction and financial aid in support 
of a trade movement for an increase of wage 
from $3.00 to $3.25 per day, to go into effect 
May 1, 1911. Sanction granted. Financial 
aid will be considered by the Board as re- 
ports are received at this office. 

Phoenix, Ariz. Request from L. U. No. 1089 
for sanction and financial aid in support of a 
trade movement for an increase of wage from 
$4.00 to $5.00 per day, to go into effect May 
1, 1911. Sanction granted. Financial aid will 
be considered by the Board as reports are re- 
ceived at this office. 

Redlands, Cal. Request from L. U. No. 
1343 for sanction and financial aid in support 
of a trade movement for an increase of wage 
from $3.50 to $4.00 per day, to go into effect 
.lanuary 1, 1911. The G. S. is requested to 



24 



Tlhe C 



o t er 



secure the latest information relative to the 
progress of this movement. 

Lebanon, Ohio. Request from L. U. No. 1361 
for sanction and financial aid in support of a 
trade movement for an increase of wage from 
§2.50 to $3.15 per day and a reduction of 
hours from ten to nine per day, to go into 
effect May 1, 1911. Sanction granted. Finan- 
cial aid will be considered by the Board as 
reports are received at this office. 

New York City. The G. P. submitted to the 
Board the papers of the Albro Newton Com- 
pany injunction case against the U. B., to- 
gether with an estimate from the attorney of 
the U. B., of the approximate cost of an ap- 
peal to a higher court. The Board authorizes 
the G. P. to instruct the attorney to appeal 
the case. 

January 10. 

All members present. 

Wallingford. Conn. Request from L. U. No. 
1626 for sanction and financial aid in support 
of a trade movement for an increase of wage 
from $3.00 to $3.28 per day and Saturday half 
holiday, to go into effect May 1, 1911. Sanc- 
tion granted. Financial aid will be considered 
by the Board as reports are received at this 
office. 

Waterloo, Iowa. Request from L. U. No. 
1835 for sanction and financial aid in support 
of a trade movement for an increase of wage 
from 40 to 45 cents per hour and a reduction 
of working hours from nine to eight per day, 
to go into effect May 1. 1911. Sanction 
granted. Financial aid will be considered by 
the Board as reports are received at this 
office. 

Pottsville, Pa. Communications from L. U. 
No. 228 in reply to a demand made by the 
Board on October 19, 1910, for an explanation 
in regard to certain sums of money paid on 
their strike roll, and also to the disbursement 
of an appropriation of $500.00 made by the 
Board for organizing purposes. An incomplete 
report received from L. U. No. 228 shows, 
among other things, that $200.00 of the amount 
appropriated for strike pay was used to pay 
the expenses of a delegate to the Des Moines 
convention. The G. S. will instruct L. U. No. 
228 to send to this office a complete and de- 
tailed statement of the expenditure of all 
money appropriated by the General Office and 
also return to this office the $200.00 used from 
the appropriation to pay the expenses of a 
delegate to the convention. 

Niagara Falls. N. T. Request from the D. C. 
for an appropriation for the purpose of enforc- 
ing trade rules. The request is denied. 

Great Falls, Mont. Communication from 
L. U. No. 286 in reference to members on 
strike roll during July. August, September, Oc- 
tober and November. The G. S. is requested 
to procure from No. 286 a clearer and more 
detailed statement than the one submitted, 
accompanied by receipts. 

St. Joseph. Mo. Request from L. U. No. 110 
for an appropriation for organizing purposes. 
This request is the same as the one for which 



the delegates from L. U. No. 110 appeared 
before the Board at the Des Moines convention, 
as shown in the minutes of September 26. The 
papers now come before the Board for the 
first time. The Board appropriates $250.00. 

Liverpool, England. Request from the Amal- 
gamated Union of Cabinet Makers of Liverpool 
for an agreement providing for an exchange 
of members on clearance cards without pay- 
ment of an additional initiation fee. The G. S. 
is requested to procure information as to the 
standing of this organization in the trades 
union movement. 

Denver, Colo. Complaint of W. L. Smith 
that he had been illegally deprived of strike 
benefits by L. TJ. No. 528. This matter came 
before the Board at the October session and 
was laid over awaiting additional information. 
The papers now before the Board show that 
this matter has been settled. The papers are 
filed. 

Baltimore, Md. Request from the D. C. for 
an appropriation for organizing in Maryland. 
The records at this office show that an organ- 
izer has spent the greater part of his time in 
that state for several years past. The reques*" 
for an appropriation is denied. The matter 
of organizing the towns mentioned in the com- 
munication is referred to the G. P. 

Los Angeles, Cal. Partial accounting re- 
ceived from the D. C. showing an expenditure 
of $268.00, for which amount bills to the 
amount of only $120.00 accompany the state- 
ment. The statement also shows an unex- 
pended balance of $232.00. The partial 
accounting is received and filed and the G. S. 
will notify the D. C. to forward to this office 
receipted bills for all money expended. 

Hornell. N. Y. Request from Millmen's Lo- 
cal No. 1295 for an appropriation for organiz- 
ing purposes. The Board appropriates S200.00. 

Kansas City, Mo. Request from L. U. No. 
1635 for an appropriation for organizing pur- 
poses and the appointment of an organizer 
from No. 1635. This request came before the 
Board at the October session and was laid 
over until the January meeting. The appro- 
priation is denied and the papers are filed. 

New York City. Bill presented by the D. C. 
for attorney fees in the Irving & Casson in- 
junction suit amounting to $667.67 was read 
and allowed. 

January 11. 

All members present. 

Omaha, Neb. Request from the Tri-Cities 
D. C. for information in regard to an appro- 
priation of $500.00 made by the Board Jan- 
uary 28, 1909, for organizing in the Tri-Cities. 
The G. S. is requested to give the D. C. the 
desired information. 

Wllburton, Okla. Appeal of L. TJ. No. 1276 
from the decision of the G. S. in disapproving 
the claim for benefits on the death of J. T. 
Case. The appeal not having been taken 
within the time required by Section 128a of 
the constitution, the papers are filed. 

Communication from Brother Thomas Flynn 
of Chicago, asking for information as to wages 



T Ihi e C a r p e in t 



allowed delegates fro-m tbe U. B. to the A. F. 
of L. convention. The G. S. will notify 
Brother Flynn that the allowance of delegates 
to the A. P. of L. are as follows : Wages. 
$4.00 ; hotel, $4.00, and incidentals $1.50 per 
day, a total of $9.50 per day and no wages 
allowed for Sundays. 

Lead, S. D. Complete accounting received 
from L. U. No. 1440 for mopey appropriated 
for relief of members on strike was read and 
filed. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Request from the D. C. 
for an appropriation to cover an alleged 
balance due the D. C. for strike pay. 
Until such time as the D. C. submits 
to this ofiBce an itemized statement of 
money expended from a former appropriation, 
with receipted bills attached, the request for 
an additional appropriation will not be con- 
sidered. 

Hamilton, Ohio. Partial accounting received 
from L. U. No. 637 for money appropriated for 
organizing purpo-ses was read and filed. 

Alton, 111. Request from L. V. No. 377 for 
additional financial aid in support of mem- 
bers on strike. The Board appropriates 
$150.00. The G. S. is requested to procure 
the latest information as to the conditions in 
Alton and instruct L. U. No. 377 to send to 
this office a complete statement of the ex- 
penditure of all moneys received for strike 
benefits. 

Toledo, Ohio. Request from L. U. No. 25 
for sanction and financial aid in support of a 
trade movement for an increase of wage from 
371/2 to 42 Vs cents per hour, to go into efl:ect 
April 1, 1911. Sanction granted. Financial 
aid will be considered by the Board as reports 
are received at this office. 

Lansing, Mich. Request from I,. U. No_ 1449 
lor sanction and financial aid in support of a 
trade movement for an increase of wage from 
27% to 35 cents per hour and reduction of 
working hours from ten to nine per day, to 
go into effect May 1, 1011. Sanction granted. 
Financial aid will be considered by the Board 
as reports are received at this oflQce. 

Charleston, 111. Request from L. V. No. 
518 for sanction and financial aid in support 
of a trade movement for an increase of wage 
from 35 to 40 cents per hour and Saturday 
half holiday, to go into effect March 1, 1911. 
Sanction granted. Financial aid will be con- 
sidered by the Board as reports are received 
at this office. 

Poplar Bluff, Mo. Request from L. U. No. 
1049 for sanction and financial aid in support 
of a trade movement for an increase of wage 
from $2.75 to $3.20 per day and reduction of 
working hours from nine to eight per day, to 
go into effect March 1, 1911. Sanction 
granted. Financial aid will be considered hy 
the Board as reports are received at this 
ofl3ce. 

Lead, S. D. Request from L. U. No. 1440 
for financial assistance. Request denied. 

Tampa, Fla. Request from L. U. No. 696 



for financial aid in support of members in- 
volved in enforcement of trade rules. The 
G. S. is requested to procure the latest in- 
formation as to the numher of members In- 
volved and the duration of the trouble. The 
matter in regard to the funds now deposited 
in the First National Bank of Tampa is laid 
over until later in the session. 

January 12. 

All members present. 

The entire day was devoted to the reading 
and discussion of a report submitted by the 
accountant. 

January 13. 

All members present. 

The entire day was devoted to the account- 
ant, who explained his report in detail. 

January 14. 

All members present. 

New Rochelle, N. T. Appeal of L. U. No. 
42 from the decision of the G. S. in disapprov- 
ing the claim for funeral benefits on the deatn 
of the wife of Thomas E. Slade. The decision 
of the G. S. is reversed, the appeal is sustained 
and the claim ordered paid, as the abstract 
of ledger and due book show that Brother 
Slade did not owe a sum equal to three 
months' dues at the time of the death of his 
wife. 

Portland, Ore. Accounting received from the 
D. C. for an appropriation made by the Board 
on September 23, 1910, for organizing pur- 
poses, was read and filed. 

The report of the delegates to the A. F. of L. 
convention, held at St. Louis, Mo., during 
November, 1910, was read and filed. 

The report of the delegates to the B. T. D. 
of the A. F. of L. convention, held in St. Louis, 
Mo., from November 2Sth to December 3rd, In- 
clusive, was read and filed. 

.January 16. 

All members present. 

Communication received from the B. T. D. 
of the A. F. of L. in regard to the suspension 
of the U. B. from the B. T. D., accompanied 
by a bill for per capita tax due the B. T. D. 
at the time of suspension. The communica- 
tion is filed and the G. S. instructed to pay 
the per capita due at the time of the suspen- 
sion. 

Hingfiam, Mass. Request from the South 
Shore D. C. for sanction and financial aid in 
support of a trade movement for an increase 
of wages from 43^4 to 47% cents per hour 
for 1911 and 50 cents per hour for 1912, to 
go into effect April 1, 1911. Sanction grantea. 
Financial aid will be considered by the Board 
as reports are received at this office. 

Clarksburg, W. Va. Request from L. U. No. 
236 for sanction and financial aid in support 
of a trade movement for a reduction of work- 
ing hours from nine to eight per day, to go 
into effect April 1, 1911. Sanction granted. 
Financial aid will be considered by the Board 
as reports are received at this office. 

Marlboro, Mass. Request from L. U. No. 
988 for sanction and financial aid in support 



26 



T Ihi e C a r p a n t 



r 



ot a trade movement for an increase of wage 
from 41 to 45 cents per hour and a Saturday 
half holiday during the entire year, to go 
into effect June 1, 1911. Sanction granted. 
Financial aid will be considered hy the Board 
as reports are received at this ofBce. 

Albany, N. T. Bequest from the D. C. for 
sanction and financial aid in support of a trade 
movement for an increase of wage from $3.25 
to $3.60 per day, to go into effect Aprtl 1, 
1911. Sanction granted. Financial aid will 
be considered by the Beard as reports are re- 
ceived at this office. 

Burlington, Vt. Request from L. U. No. 683 
for sanction and financial aid in support of 
a trade movement for a reduction of working 
hours from nine to eight per day, to go into 
effect April 1, 1911. Sanction granted. Finan- 
cial aid will be considered by the Board as 
reports are received at this office. 

Willimantic, Conn. Request from L. U. No. 
825 for sanction and financial aid in support 
of a trade movement for an increase cf wage 
from $2.75 to $3.25 per day and a Saturday 
half holiday, to go into effect May 1, 1911. 
Sanction granted. Financial aid will be con- 
sidered by the Board as reports are received 
at this office. 

Chicago, 111. Request from the D. C. for 
sanction and financial aid in support of a trade 
movement for an increase of wage and a 
Saturday half holiday for millmen, to go into 
effect April 1, 1011. Sanction granted. Finan- 
cial aid will be considered by the Board as 
reports are received at this office. 

January 17. 

All members present. 

Cleveland, Ohio. Request from the D. C. for 
an appropriation for organizing purposes. The 
Board appropriates $500.00, to be forwarded 
upon receipt, at this office, of receipted bills 
covering an appropriation made for a like pur- 
pose at the October meeting of the Board. 

Chicago, 111. Request from the D. C. for an 
appropriation of $8,000.00 to assist in defray- 
ing the expense of organizing the millmen. 
The Board appropriates $1,000.00. The records 
at this office show that from two to three gen- 
eral organizers are located almost exclusively 
in Chicago assisting in organizing the mill- 
men. 

Birmingham, Ala. Request from the D. C. 
for an appropriation for organizing purposes. 
The Board appropriates $500.00. 

East St. Louis. 111. Appeal of L. D. No. 
169 from the decision of the G. S. in disap- 
proving the claim for funeral benefits on the 
death of H. E. Marmaduke, late a member of 
said L. U. The decision of the G. S. is re- 
versed and the claim ordered paid on the 
grounds that L. U. No. 160 had no right to 
levy assessments for an additional funeral 
benefit, as funeral benefits are provided for in 
the General Constitution and paid by our Gen- 
eral Office. 

Rock Island, 111. Request from the Tri- 
Cities D. C. for an appropriation for organiz- 
ing purposes. This request came before the 
Board in October, 1910, and was laid over 



awaiting an accounting of previous appropria- 
tions. As the D. C. has not rendered the re- 
quired accounting, the papers are filed. 

Resolution No. 61, referred to the Board by 
the convention, was read and filed. 

January 18. 

All members present. 

The audit and examination of the books and 
accounts of the General Office was taken up. 

January 19. 

All members present. 

The audit and examination of the books and 
accounts of the General Office continued. 

An overcharge of $1.87 on the bill of J. O. 
Carson for services as stenographer at the Des 
Moines convention was ordered refunded. 

The chairman of the Compilation Committee, 
counting the votes for General Officers, ap- 
peared before the Board and asked that they 
be provided with boxes in which to store the 
ballots and returns and seal the boxes, in 
case any question arises as to the count. The 
G. S. is instructed to procure for the com- 
mittee, as per chairman's request, such boxes 
as they may info-rm him they need to properly 
care for the ballots. 

January 20. 

All members present. 

The audit and examination of the books ana 
accounts continued. 

The following overcharges were found on 
the bills and the amounts ordered refunded : 
D. F. Featherton, overcharge on bill for at- 
tending the A. F. of L. and the B. T. D. con- 
ventions, $35.00 ; Wm. B. Macfarlane, over- 
charge on bill for attending the A. F. ot L. 
and the B. T. D. conventions, $21.50 ; Carl 
Young, overcharge on bill for attending the 
A. F. of L. convention, $12.00 ; Wm. J. Kelly, 
overcharge on bill for attending the A. F. of L. 
convention, $21.50 ; A. M. Swartz, overcharge 
on bill for attending the A. F. of L. conven- 
tion, $21.50 ; Thos. F. Flynn, overcharge on 
account for attending the A. F. of L. conven- 
tion, $12.00, The G. S. will notify Brother 
Keagan to submit an itemized bill for his ex- 
penses attending the B. T. D. convention. Wm. 
J. Kelly's bill for services as an organizer 
shows an overcharge of $11.00 on hotel ex- 
penses for bill paid December 10, 1910. This 
amount is ordered refunded. 

January 21. 

All members present. 

The audit and examination of the books and 
accounts continued, 

January 23. 

All members present but Foley, who had 
asked to be excused from further attendance 
in order to return home. 

The audit and examination of the books and 
accounts continued. 

January 24. 
All members present but Foley. 
The audit and examination of the books and 
accounts continued. 

The G. S. is instructed to procure bids for 
200,000 copies of the constitution printed in 
English. Said bids to be procured from all 
27 



Tlhia Carpeote 



printers in this city who are qualified to bid 
on tliis worli and from qualified printers out- 
side of Indianapolis who are willing to sub- 
mit bids. All out-of-town bids to be F. O. B. 
Indianapolis. The basis of the bids to be our 
present constitution, with a stipulated price 
per page for additional pages, if required. 
Also 10,000 ccpies of the constitution printed 
in German and 5,000 copies in French, to be 
printed under like conditions. Separate bids 
to be submitted for the English, German and 
French constitutions. All bids to he sealed 
and sent to the G. E. B. by the parties sub- 
mitting bids and to be at this office not later 
than 2 p. m. February 2, 1911. 

As no Spanish constitutions have been sold 
during the two years just passed, the Board 
rules that no more constitutions be printed in 
Spanish unless ordered by the Board. 

The Board authorized the chairman to ap- 
point two members to call on the different 
printers in this city and ascertain if it is 
possible to secure competitive sealed bids for 
the printing of The Carpenter. Brothers Wal- 
qulst and Bausher appointed. 

The following communieaticfn was presented 
to the Board by the chairman of the Compila- 
tion Committee, counting the vote on election 
of General Officers : 

"Moved and seeanded that the committee re- 
. quest the C. B. B. to preserve all sealed boxes 
which contain ballots and returns, with the 
seals unbroken, until such time as they, the 
G. E. B., shall give permission to investigate 
same, should there be a contest or protest of 
said election. Motion carried, Zaring, Ryan, 
Robinson and Yager, voting 'Yes.'" 

The Board instructs the G. S. to place the 
boxes in a suitable place for safe keeping. 

January 25. 

All members present but Foley. 

The audit and examination of the books ana . 
accounts co'ntinued. 

Brothers Walquist and Bausher report that 
they have visited all printers in the city who 
are equipped to handle the printing of The 
Carpenter and qualified to do our printing and 
they expressed a willingness to submit bids on 
The Carpenter, provided that all bids are sub- 
mitted to the Board sealed. 

January 2C. 

All members present but Foley. 

The chairman ot the Compilation Committee, 
counting the vote for General Officers, appeared 
before the Board and requested that the G. P., 
G. S. and G. T. be asked to come to the Board 
room. The request was complied with and 
the G. P., G. S. and G. T. appeared in the 
Board room. The chairman of the Compila- 
tion Committee then tendered the majority re- 
port of the committee to the General Oflicers 
assembled. After much discussion the chair- 
man of the committee was informed by tne 
Board that the Board had nothing to do with 
the committee's work or report. The chair- 
man of the committee then, in the presence of 
the General Officers assembled, delivered to 
the G. S. the report, tabulation sheets anil 



minutes of their proceedings during the count 
of the vote for General Officers. 

The audit and examination of the hooks and 
accounts continued. 

Brother Reinke, the Secretary of the Cin- 
cinnati D. C, appeared before the Board and 
made a statement in regard to the conditions 
prevailing in the mills of that city. 

January 27. 

All members present but Foley. 

The audit and examination of the books and 
accounts continued. 

The report of the expert accountant who 
investigated the irregularities and improper 
entries made in the stock book, and for wbich 
the financial ledger showed no money having 
been received at the General Office, was again 
taken up by the Board. The minutes of the 
G. E. B. of October 29, 1910, show why and 
under what conditions this work was ordered 
done by an expert accountant. The word 
"stock," appearing so often in the minutes of 
the G. E. B. and in the accountant's report, 
refers to the printed supplies, such as due 
books, constitutions, ledgers, blank applica- 
tions, etc. The stock book is a book wherein 
there should be entered a correct record of all 
stoclv received from the printers and a correct 
record of all sto<;k shipped out of the stock- 
room. At the April, 1910, meeting of the 
G. E. B. a motion prevailed that two members 
of the Board be detailed to take an inventory 
of the sto^k on hand, and also the furnishings 
of the General Office (see minutes of the 
Board April 29, 1910). The chairman ap- 
pointed Brothers '^'alquist and Connolly. The 
Board adjourned Saturday, April 30, and the 
following Monday, May 2, the co-mmittee be- 
gan taking an inventory, assisted by two 
clerks of the office, John Burke, whose duty it 
was to keep the accounts in the stock book, 
and Frank Duffy. Jr., the shipping clerk. The 
inventory of stock was completed the same day 
and the following amount of stock found on 
hand : 32,916 application blanks, 53,507 Eng- 
lish constitutions, 3,682 German constitutions, 
2.220 French constitutions, 500 Spanish con- 
stitutions, 43.922 due books, 136 100-page day 
books, 301 200-page day books, 1,196 Treas- 
urers' cash books, 683 100-page ledgers, 809. 
200-page ledgers, 453 300-page ledgers, 180 
400-page ledgers, 6 500-page ledgers, 977 P. S. 
receipt books, 758 Treasurers' receipt books, 
259 R. S. order books, 191 English rituals, 384 
French rituals, 848 German rituals, 118,000 
L. U. letter heads, 45,800 organizers' letter 
heads. Rolled gold jewelry — 465 pins, 806 but- 
tons, 18 charms, 77 rings. Solid gold jewelry — 
94 rings, 5 charms. 90 pins, 50 buttons. 43 
pairs cuff buttons. Twelve German silver B. A. 
badges: fourteen sets of dater outfits. 

The committee waited at the office from 
Monday until Thursday for the purpose of 
comparing their inventory with the stock book, 
but as Mr. Burke had not completed the bal- 
ancing of the stock book at that time, or no 
definite assurance could be gotten from the 
G. S. as to when the stock book would be bal- 



28 



The Carpasit 



anced, the committee left for their respective 
homes, the comparing of the inventory with 
the stock booli to be done at the July meeting 
of the Board. Mr. Burke, who was supposed 
to Iteep the accounts in the stock book and 
who assisted the committee, had a copy of the 
inventory showing the amount of stock on 
hand. At the following meeting of the Board, 
during the first week in August, while prepar- 
ing the report of the Des Moines convention, 
the chairman appointed Brothers Post and 
Cole to take an inventory of stock on hand at 
that time. They reported that their inventory 
of stock tallied with the amount of stock 
shown in the stock book and that the inventory 
taken by Brothers Walquist and Connolly on 
May 2 also tallied with the stock book at the 
close of April. At the October meeting of the 
Board an examination of the stock book showea 
that the figures representing the balances as 
originally made in the stock book at the close 
of April, 1910, had been carefully erased and 
additional entries of shipments representing no 
legitimate transactions in April had been in- 
serted in order to make the stock book tally 
with the inventory taken by Brothers Wal- 
quisf and Connolly. The following are the 
totals of the additional entries in April and 
for which no cash returns could be found in 
the financial ledger for the same month : 
12,547 English constitutions, 6,930 due books, 
62 200-page day books, 149 cash books, 9 200- 
page ledgers, 50 300-page ledgers, 1 400-page 
ledger, 171 pins, 937 German constitutions, 
718 French constitutions. 

Your Executive Board can conceive of no 
reason why this should have been done other 
than to deliberately falsify the book in an 
effort to deceive the Board and to cover an 
apparent shortage of stock. The examination 
of the books later by the accountant showed 
that some of these entries made in this man- 
ner in April, 1910, were for stock shipped 
during the early part of 1909, more than one 
year previous. Many entries were positively 
fictitious and false, with no justification for 
their appearance in the book. Other entries 
such as under the head of due books for "Due 
Books Shipped to Organizers," "Orders Dupli- 
cated," "To Adjust Errors, Orders Omitted," 
and "Books Used for Clearance Cards," were 
evidently made to suit the exigencies of the 
occasion in order to make the stock book show 
up right, and not as a record of transactions 
for which documentary evidence was avail- 
able. On pages E and 38 of the accountant's 
report are statements relating to an alleged 
shipment of 600 due books to L. U. No. 10, 
Chicago. The G. S. claims that these 600 due 
books were shipped by Adams Express in Jan- 
uary or February, 1910, to replace a like 
amount lost in transit, but the G. S. was un- 
able to show any correspondence from L. U. 
No. 10 wherein they had made any claim that 
said due books were lost, nor was there any 
record of this "duplicate shipment," either In 
this office or the office of the express company, 
nor any document of any kind produced by the 



G. S. for the information of the Board or the 
accountant showing any knowledge on the part 
of the G. S. of said due books having been lost 
in transit or his having filed a claim with the 
express company until after the shortage of 
stock had been called to his attention by the 
G. E. B. The statement of the G. S. in re- 
gard to the shipment of these due books is 
disproven, as the express company disclaims 
any knowledge of this alleged shipment and 
the secretary of L. U. No. 10, under seal of the 
Tj. U., denies that any of the original ship- 
ment was lost in transit or that any duplicate 
shipment was received by him. The letters 
from L. TJ. No. 10 and the express company 
follow : 

"Chicago, January 21, 1911. 

"Mr. Wm. G. Schardt, Chairman of the 

G. E. B., Indianapolis, Ind. : 

"Dear Sir and Brother — As per our conver- 
sation held at the District Council Saturday 
evening, January 14, I find, on looking orer 
our books, that on or about December 2, 1909, 
Union No. 10 ordered 1,200 due books, and to 
the best of my knowledge, about a week later 
the due books were delivered by express, and 
that we did not send in a complaint to the 
General Office to the effect that we did not 
receive the full amount ordered. 
"Fraternally yours, 
"(Signed) J. H. STEVENS, Fin. Sec'y." 

ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY, 
35 S. Meridian St. 
"Indianapolis, Ind., January 25, 1911. 
"Mr. Frank Duffy. General Secretary, United 

Brotherhood of Carpenters and Jc^iners, City : 

"(Shipt. J. H. Stevens, Chicago, III., 

from Ind'pls, Ind., Dec. 3, 1909.) 

"Dear Sir — Replying to your letter of Janu- 
ary 24th, also yours of October 24th, wish to 
say we have examined our records thoroughly 
and are unable to find any record of a ship- 
ment from you going to A. J. Somer, 6235 
St. Lawrence avenue, Chicago, 111. Our agent, 
Chicago, advises that he is unable to find any 
record of delivering any such shipment. We 
find record ot shipping a box, 38 lbs., addressed 
to J. H. Stevens, 3856 S. State St., Chicago, 
111., December 3, which was prepaid, .$1.25. 
It is very evident that our weight of this ship- 
ment is not correct, as the charges on a 38- 
pound shipment would only be 80 cents, so 
no doubt we have made an error in entering 
the weight on our way-bill. We had this mat- 
ter up with our Chicago office and they can 
find record of delivering only one box to Mr. 
Stevens, this one being delivered on December 
6, weight of same being 100 pounds. I am 
enclosing you copy of our billing, covering 
shipment of December 3. This is the only 
shipment we can find any record of forward- 
ing to J. H. Stevens. 

"Yours truly, 
"(Signed) A. F. JONES, Agent." 

On Pages 11 and 15 of the accountant's 
original report is found a notation calling at- 



29 



T lb e C a r p a o t 



tention to 2,432 due books, which it is claimed 
were omitted from the inventories, but claimed 
to have been subsequently "discovered" by Mr. 
Burke in the latter part of July and entered 
to the account of stock on band, in the stock 
book, on July 29, 1910. Mr. Burke, who made 
this entry of 2,432 due books, was called In 
the Board room in the presence of the G. E. B. 
and the accountant and admitted that he had 
no knowledge of where these due books cam^; 
from, simply that he "found" them on the 
shelves of the stock room. He admitted hav- 
ing taken inventories on two different occasions 
with members of the G. E. B. and by himself 
on three other occasions without "finding" 
these due books. The accountant, on Page 1 
of his supplemental report, made after he had 
listened to Mr. Burke's statement, mentions 
these due books again as having been added to 
the stock in July, 1910, but that there was no 
corresponding record of their having been pur- 
chased by the U. B. It should be especially 
noted that an inventory of stock was taken on 
May 2 by Brothers Walquist and Connolly, as- 
sisted by Mr. Burke and Frank Duffy, Jr., and 
the 2,432 due books were not in the stock at 
that time. Again during the first week of 
August an inventory was taken by Brothers 
Post and Cole, assisted'by Mr. Burke, and they 
made no report to the Board that the 2,432 
due books had been found. Mr. Burke also 
admits taking separate inventories of stock 
for April, May and June, and that the 
2,432 due books were not in stock 
at either of said inventories, but claims that 
he "found them on the shelves" and entered 
them in the stock book on July 29. The reports 
of the accountants, Lybrand, Ross Bros, and 
Montgomery, both original and supplemental, 
are herein entered in the minutes of the G. 
B. B. at this time and are made a part of the 
proceedings of the G. B. B. of this date. This 
is to be construed as including all the detailed 
statements contained in said reports. The G. 
S. will instruct the printer to insert the num- 
ber of each page of the report, and letters 
where same are used Instead of numbers to 
designate pages, as they appear in the report. 
The G. S. is instructed to publish the entire 
proceedings of the January meeting of the G. 
B. B., including the reports of the accountant 
In one issue of The Carpenter. The Board rules 
that the G. S. be held responsible for all short- 
ages except such stock as it was necessary to 
distribute free in transacting the regular busi- 
ness of the U. B. 

On account of many irregularities that 
existed in the stock book under the old system 
of keeping accounts, a new system of bookkeep- 
ing has been inaugurated. 

January 28, 1911. 

All members present but Foley. 

The audit and examination of the books and 
accounts continued. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. Request from the D. C. 
for an appropriation for organizing in the 
shops and mills of that city. The Board ap- 
propriates $300.00. The matter in regard to 



the trade movement is laid over until the April 
meeting of the Board. 

Moline, 111. Communication in regard to 
Resolution No. 66, adopted by the Des Moines 
convention, appropriating $2,000.00 for organiz- 
ing the mills in the central Mississippi valley. 
At the October meeting this matter came be- 
fore the board and the G. S. was requested to 
communicate with the Tri-Cities D. C. and have 
it call a conference of the locals within the 
territory mentioned to devise plans for carry- 
ing on this work. The conference having been 
called, plans formulated and submitted to the 
Board, the Board approves same with the fol- 
lowing exception : The name of "The Central 
Mississippi Valley D. C." should be ebangea 
so as to eliminate the words "District Coun- 
cil." The G. S. is instructed to forward the 
appropriation when assurance has been re- 
ceived by him that the treasurer who handles 
the fund is bonded for a sufficient amount to 
secure the appropriation. 

In auditing the bills the Board finds that 
some organizers are entering charges on their 
bills for local telephone service. The Board 
rules that charges for local telephone service 
will not be allowed, as the allowance made to 
organizers for incidentals covers such expenses. 

The Board instructs the G. S. not to pay per 
capita tax to the A. F. of L. or similar bodies 
except on such "members as are reported in 
good standing" each month by the Local 
Unions. No per capita tax to be paid on mem- 
bers with outstanding clearance cards. 

January 30, 1911. 

All members present but Foley. 

The audit and examination of the books and 
accounts continued. 

January 31, 1911. 

All members present but Foley. 

The audit and examination of the books and 
accounts continued. 

The G. E. B. instructs the G. S. to print the 
proceedings of this meeting of the Board in 
the February issue of The Carpenter. 

February 1, 1911. 

All members present. 

The audit and examination of the books and 
accounts pertaining to the financial receipts 
and expenses of the U. B. was continued and 
completed. The report of the expert ac- 
countant was compared with the books of the 
General Office and the books and accounts 
found to be correct. 

The G. E. B. presented the retiring chairman 
with an emblem ring as a slight token of our 
friendship for him as a man and our appre- 
ciation of his services on the G. E. B., as a 
member and as chairman. 

The G. B. B. also, as a token of friendship 
and appreciation of services, sent to Brother 
Foley at his home in Canada an emblem ring. 

There being no further business to come be- 
fore the Board at this time the minutes were 
read and approved and the Board adjourned. 
R. E. L. CONNOLLY, Secretary. 

Attest. PRANK DUFFY, Gen. Sec. 



30 



a r p e 21 1 



REPORT OF EXPERT ACCOUNTANT TO GENERAL 
EXECUTIVE BOARD 



Pittsburg, December 31, 1910. 
Mr. Wm. G. Scbardt, Chairman General Execu- 
tive Board, United Brotherbood of Carpen- 
ters and Joiners of America, Indianapolis, 
Ind. : 

Dear Sir — Pursuant to your instructions we 
have made an examination of the stock ac- 
counts pertaining to the purchase and sale of 
supplies by the United Brotherhood of Carpen- 
ters and Joiners or America, and would report 
thereon as follows : 

Period of Audit — So far as the records 
and data were available, we verified the ac- 
counts for the two years ending June 30, 1910. 
The starting point of our work for this period 
was the statement of the stock on hand on 
June 30, 1908, as shown in General Secretary 
Dufty's report for the two years ended that 
date. The inventory at the close of the period 
is shown in the report of the General Executive 
Board for the two years ending June 30, 1910. 
Unfortunately all the recoi'ds for the interven- 
ing two years were not available, as. with the 
exception of one shipping book for the period 
from December 7, 1908, to February 15, 1909, 
no shipping books dating prior to April 23, 
1909, could be found ; likewise, with the ex- 
ception of three receipt books, covering a very 
limited period, no receipt books dating prior 
to April 20, 1909, could be found. We were 
informed that the old shipping books and re- 
ceipt books were sold for waste paper at the 
time of moving from the State Life building 
to the new Carpenters' Building in April, 1909. 
The absence of the above mentioned records, 
coupled with the fact that prior to 1909 the 
entries in the stock ledger were not made in 
detail for each individual shipment but for the 
daily totals of each kind of article shipped, 
rendered it impossible for us to verify in de- 
tail the correctness of the stock ledger entries 
for the six months ending December 31, 1908, 
excepting in so far as clerical errors appear 
in the stock ledger itself. The entries for the 
first four months of 1909 were also difficult 
to verify completely, and more particularly to 
discover omissions from the stock ledger of 
shipments actually made; as in the absence of 
the shipping books and receipt books we were 
compelled to rely on such data as could be 
found in correspondence, orders for supplies, 
loose shipping slips and the like. 

Complete records pertaining to the purchase 
of supplies during the two years were, how- 
ever, available and we have prepared a state- 
ment showing the amount of moneys which 
should have been received from the sale of the 
supplies purchased, after allowing for the 
quantities on hand at the beginning and end 
of the period. 



Special attention was directed to the entries 
made in the stock ledger under date of April, 
1910, which were not for shipments made at 
that time and for which credits to the ac- 
counts of the consignee did not appear in the 
financial ledgers under the date mentioned. 

We also audited the stock accounts for the 
first quarter of the present fiscal year, i. e., 
for the three months ending September 30, 
1910, and on Pages 70-71 submit a memor- 
andum of the errors and omissions found 
therein. 

Condition of Stock Accounts — We found that 
for a considerable part of the period of our 
audit the clerical work of keeping the ac- 
counts had been very poorly done. As you 
will see by the annexed schedule hundreds of 
errors and omissions of various kinds were dis- 
covered. A large proportion of these were in 
the accounts for the six months ending June 
30, 1909. 

We were informed that the reason for this 
was that the original stock ledger for this 
period was lost (it was thought in moving 
from the State Life building to the Carpenters' 
building) and the present stock ledger for that 
period was written up about July, 1909. As 
the shipping books dating from February 15 
to April 23, 1909, were not available, it was 
necessary to write up the ledger sheets from 
such other data as could be found, with the 
result that many shipments were omitted and 
errors made in the entry of others. The 
balances on June 30, 1909, as they appeared in 
the summary of stock account prepared in cou: 
nection with the loose leaves used as a ledger 
for the first six months of 1909, were carried 
forward to a new ledger opened as of July 1, 

1909. Owing to the numerous errors and omis- 
sions in the stock records prior to that date, 
these ledger balances in many instances did not 
agree with the stock actually on hand, and in 
the new ledger also some clerical errors were 
made, with the result that at the end of April, 

1910, at about which time stock was taken, 
there was a considerable difference between the 
quantities called for by some of the stock 
accounts and the stock actually on hand. A 
quantity of shipping slips dating back to the 
early part of 1909 were found and as the ship- 
ping books for a part of that period had been 
missing at the time the stock ledger for the first 
six months of 1909 was written up, it was con- 
cluded, without investigating the matter thor- 
oughly, that no entries for these shipment had 
ever been made in the stock ledger. These ap- 
parent omissions seemed to explain, in part at 
least, the discrepancy between the accounts and 
the quantity of supplies actually on hand and 
accordingly entries of these shipments were 



31 



a. r p a n t ® r 



made after the regular April, 1910, entries. Ttie 
difference still esiy.^'ng in some of ttie accounts 
after entering tliebe islips was explained, as 
test could be, as unrecorded shipments, dupli- 
cate shipments to replace supplies lost in 
transit, free distribution, etc. 

There was also an attempt made during the 
early part of 1910 to adjust the accounts which 
were icnown to be out of agreement with the 
actual stoclc by crediting those accounts in 
which the ledger balance exceeded the stocls 
on hand with the shipments of other articles, 
of which the stock on hand equalled or was, 
perhaps, in excess of the quantity called for 
by the stock ledger. In the instances in which 
this was done, and of which a statement is 
appended hereto ( Pages 58-60 ) the quantity 
credited equalled in value the quantity of the 
article actually shipped. 

Entries in Stock Ledger under Date of April, 
1910 — The entries made under date of April, 
1910, after the regular entries for that month 
had been made, which have already been re- 
ferred to in preceding paragraphs were thor- 
oughly investigated by us and o-n Pages 
XCIII-50 we have classified them according to 
the results of our investigation. Quite a num- 
ber of the entries were found to be entirely 
correct, as they were for shipments which had 
been made in the early part of 1909 and for 
which credit had never before been taken in 
the stock ledger. A second-class is composed 
of entries for actual shipments ; also in the 
early part of 1909, but for which credit had 
been taken at or aljout the time of shipment ; 
consequently the entries in April, 1910, are 
duplications. A third class consists of entries 
which are correct in so far that there had 
been omission to take full credit for the ship- 
ments when made, but there are errors in the 
amounts of the April, 1910, entries. Another 
class of entries comprises those which purport 
to represent roughly the quantities gf the dif- 
ferent supplies which had been either dis- 
tributed without charge or shipped without 
record thereof having been made. The last 
class consists of entries which purported to 
be for specific shipments but which we were 
unable to identify with specific transactions, 
excepting to the extent mentioned in the notes 
embraced in our schedule of these entries 
(Page 50). 

The entries included in the first three classes 
were all supported by shipping slips showing 
the date of the order, quantity and kind of 
article shipped, and number of the Local Union 
to which consigned. In every instance the arti- 
cles were paid for and credit therefor appears 
on the financial ledgers in the general office. 
We have shown on the schedules of these 
entries the dates on which payment was re- 
ceived and under which the credits appear in 
the financial ledgers. • 

In the last class of entries there are in- 
cluded thirty entries for shipments of 200- 
page Day Books to various Local Unions, the 
numbers of which are given. We learned, how- 
ever, from one of the clerics, that these entries 



were not made from any shipping evidence, but 
that from a Whitehead & Hoag Company bill, 
or some other record showing a series of Local 
Union numbers, enough numbers were copied 
into the stocli ledger to make the account 
balance with the stock on hand. This was, of 
course, highly improper, and, so far as we were 
able to learn, was done without authority from 
the General Secretary or any other officer of 
the Brotherhood. As a matter of fact, there 
was no shortage of 200-page Day Books, the 
apparent shortage being due to clerical errors 
in the stock accounts and failure to enter ship- 
ments which had actually been made and for 
which payment was received and credited on 
the financial ledgers (see Page LXXXIX). 

One other item in this last class which we 
would particularly mention is that of six hun- 
dred due books for Local Union No. 10. Gen- 
eral Secretary Duffy states that this represents 
a shipment made about January or February,. 
1909, to replace a similar quantity lost in 
transit, only one-half of a shipment of 1,200 
due books which had been paid for by L. U. 
10 on Decembei" 3, 1908, having been delivered 
to the consignee by the express company. We 
could find no express record of this duplicate 
shipment but were shown some correspondence 
between the General Secretary and the Adams 
Express Company during October, 1910, con- 
cerning the non-delivery of part of the original 
shipment, which it was stated went forward in 
two packages, but the matter is still undecided 
so far as a final answer from the express com- 
pany Is concerned. 

Other Errors in Stock Accounts — Many ship- 
ments, for which payment was duly received 
and entered in the financial ledgers, were found 
never to have been entered in the stock ledgers. 
Schedules of these appear on Pages 51-56. 
There were also shipments made to replace 
supplies lost in transit and to make good al- 
leged shortages in the delivery of supplies to 
consignee, for which credit had never been 
taken in the stock ledger. Such of them as we 
could find a record of are shown on Pages 
56-58, but we are inclined to think that there 
must have been others of which no record was 
kept, as the usual practice was to keep such 
shipments out of the shipping book, entering in 
the latter only regular shipments for which 
payment was received. 

Reference has already been made to an at- 
tempt to adjust certain of the stock accounts 
which were known to be out of agreement with 
the actual stock, by crediting those accounts in 
which the ledger balances exceeded the stock 
on hand with the shipments of other articles 
of which the stock on hand either equalled or 
exceeded the quantities called for liy the stock 
ledger. On Pages 58-60 are scheduled the ship- 
ments of certain articles which were posted 
to the credit of accounts of other articles in 
the stock ledger. It will be noted that the ag- 
gregate value of the quantities credited to ac- 
counts in the stock ledger equalled, after al- 
lowing for several small errors, the aggregate 



32 



Tlhie Carpeintar 



value of the articles actually shipped ; so 
that as far as the value of the supplies is con- 
cerned the credits taken in the stock ledger 
were accounted for by cash credited in the 
financial ledgers. Such a method of adjust- 
ing the stock accounts, however, is entirely 
wrong. We questioned the clerk who was re- 
sponsible therefor and he informed us that 
owing to his limited knowledge of bookkeeping 
(his regular work is that of stenographer) he 
knew of no other way to bring the stock ledger 
accounts into agreement with the stock actual- 
ly on hand. This erroneous way of adjusting 
the accounts was taken on his own initiative, 
no authority having been given by the General 
Secretary to do so, and in fact the latter had 
not been at all consulted in the matter. 

A considerable number of errors in entering 
quantities or entering shipments to the credit 
of the wrong account, such as 100-page day 
books to 200-page day books' account, or due 
books to constitutions' account and the like, 
were discovered and these are shown on Pages 
61-69. In some few instances there were sup- 
plies returned for which no charge was made 
in the stock ledger. In a number of cases the 
same error appears twice in the schedules, 
being necessarily under both of the accounts 
which it may affect. The net amount of all the 
errors pro^ and con is shown for each of the 
accounts affected thereby. 

We have prepared a summary of the errors 
and omissions pertaining to the stock account 
of each kind of supplies (Pages 47-XCII) and 
have included therein the totals of 'the various 
schedules referred to in preceding paragraphs, 
and also clerical errors in the stock accounts 
such as incorrectly carrying forward balances, 
omitting to enter purchases, etc. There are 
quite a - number of differences between the 
balances of the stock accounts as they appear 
In the stock ledger on December 31, 1908, and 
the balances on January 1, 1909, shown on the 
stock account summary which was prepared to 
accompany the loose stock ledger leaves for 
the six months ending June 30, 1909. On in- 
quiry we were informed that the reason for 
this was that at the time the stock account 
summary was prepared, the stock ledger for 
1908 could not be found and hence the balances 
entered in the st«ck account summary as of 
January 1, 1909, were gotten from an old 
memorandum which was supposed to show the 
stock on hand at that time. These differences 
are, of course, included in our summary of 
the errors in the stock accounts. This is espe- 
cially important in the case of the due books' 
account, as that account showed a credit 
balance of 2,522 on December 31, 1908, in the 
old stock ledger, whereas on the stock account 
summary there was charged as of January 1, 
1909, *a balance on hand of fourteen, a dif- 
ference of 2,536 due hooks to the detriment of 
that account. It is evident from the negligible 
balance entered on the stock accounts sum- 
mary that the stock of due books at that 
time was e^austed and it is most probable 



that orders were received and paid for during 
December, 1908, which were, in accordance 
with the usual custom, immediately entered to 
the credit of the stock account, though in the 
case of stock being exhausted the shipments 
would only be made later. Consequently the 
due books' account showed a credit balance, 
representing unfilled orders for which ship- 
ments were made in January, 1909, after a 
new lot of due books was received. As, how- 
ever, credit had already been taken in the stock 
ledger at the time the orders were received, 
credit would, of course, not be taken again 
when shipped in January, 1909. Hence,' the 
failure to carry forward the credit balance of 
the due books' account on December 31, 1908, 
to the 1909 accounts caused a discrepancy be- 
tween the ledger balances and the due books 
actually ifn hand, which was not due to an 
actual shortage of stock but due to a clerical 
error. 

As a matter of explanation it should be 
stated that it has been the custom in keep- 
ing the stock accounts to enter credits to the 
stock accounts when orders are received and 
paid for, even though in case of stock being 
temporarily exhausted shipment might be de- 
layed for some little time. Ordinarily, how- 
ever, shipments are made within one or two 
days after the order is entered. 

Purchases and Sales of Supplies — We have 
analyzed the purchases of supplies for the two 
years ending June 30, 1910. and have stated 
on Pages 38-44 the quantities, prices and total 
cost of the different articles purchased. You 
will note that we have separated the supplies 
into two general classes ; the first, those sup- 
plies which are purchased for the purpose of 
reselling them to the Local Unions, and the 
second, those which are for free distribution 
among the Local Unions, for General Office use, 
etc This latter class includes the various 
blanks which the officers of the Local Unions 
use in making reports to the General Office, 
published reports of the General Officers and 
the General Executive Board, printed lists of 
secretaries of Local Unions and District Coun- 
cils, monthly financial statement, circulars, 
etc., for all of which no stock accounts are 
kept. 

We have also prepared a summary (Page 38) 
showing the receipts from sales of supplies, the 
cost of the supplies sold (after allowing for 
the Inventories on hand at the beginning and 
end of the two years under review), and the 
gross profit on supplies sold, also the amount 
of expressage, freight and cartage paid and 
the purchase of supplies for free distribution, 
etc. 

In condensed form the figures appear as fol 
lows r 

Receipts from sales of supplies .$64,166.08, 

Cost of supplies sold 32,817.93 

Gross profit on supplies sold, before 

deducting cost of shipping ,i;31, 348.15 



33 



arpaimter 

(An averase profit of 95* per cent. a Local Union in their locality. A charter out- 

on cost.) fit includes now, among other things, only ten 

Expressage, freight and cartage (prin- constitutions and ten due boolcs instead of 

cipally on outgoing supplies) and' twenty-five of each as some years ago. It is 

purchases of supplies for free distri- stated, however, that exceptions are occasion- 

bution among Local Unions, for ally made and a larger number than ten sent 

General Office use, etc.' 13,381.14 with a charter outfit for a Local Union which 

is organized with quite a number of members 

Profit on sales of supplies remain- at the outset. In the stock ledger, however, 

ing after defraying cost of sup- unless extra constitutions and due books were 

plies for free distribution. Gen- actually paid for, credit lias only been taken 

eral Office use, etc .1;17,967.01 for a shipment of ten constitutions and ten due 

If the receipts from the sale of supplies to books as part of each charter outfit. Constitu- 
Local Unions as stated by us be compared with "ons are also used about the General Office 
those shown in the report of the General Sec- ^^ committees meeting there, by lawyers repre- 
retary for the two years ending June 30, 1910. senting the Brotherhood in litigation and for 
it will be found that there is quite a difference, various other purposes. Emblem jewelry, such 
the total, as stated by us, being $1,189.34 in ''^ a ring or watch charm, is sometimes sent 
excess of the amount shown in the General without charge to a volunteer organizer who 
Secretary's report. This apparent difference ^^^ made no charge for organizing a Local 
is reduced to $842.84 by the fact that in the Union. There are also occasions when an out- 
General Secretary's report receipts from with- A' '^ ^<^^^ gratis to Local Unions which have 
drawal cards, stated as $346.50, are entered ^^<^ 'lieir records destroyed by fire or similar 
separately, whereas in our statement they are disaster. Due books are occasionally used at 
included in the sales of supplies to Ijocal *'»« General Office for issuing clearances 
Unions. This difference of $842.84 is due to granted from the General Oflice. Unfortunate- 
the fact that the figure in the General Secre- 'y °» complete record has been kept of the sup- 
tarv's report is the result of a rather hasty P"es "^'^'i ^o^' ^^^^^ various purposes, but while 
scheduling of the supply items in the financial ^^ are, therefore, not in a position to corn- 
ledgers, which work is done at the end of each ?"*« ^'"^ precision the amount which should 
vear and not thoroughly verified. The total ^"^ allowed for supplies used in this way, it 
amount of the receipts for the two years is '^°^^ ^"'^ appear to us on the whole that the 
not affected by this difference, which on the before-mentioned amount ($286.43) is in excess 
surface would appear to be the case, as there °' t^« ^'^"i°g ^»'"e of the supplies probably 
would be an offsetting difference in the receipts ^° used, 
from per capita tax - -^° "^'^ connection we would summarize the 

Accounting for 'supplies Purchased— -tVe i^* differences in the stock accounts of the 

submit a statement showing the quan- various errors, omissions, etc.. reported herein 

title's of supplies for resale on hand on (see Pages 47-XCII for further details) were 

■Tune 30, 1908. the quantities purchased during adjusted : 

fbe two years ending .Tune 30, 1910. and the Supplies 

quantity on hand on the latter date. Deduct- not yet 

ing the last item from the sum of the previous ^ • Accounted Surplus 

two gives the quantities of supplies to be ac- for of 

counted for as sold or otherwise. These quanti- Page. in detail. Supplies. 

ties have been extended at the usual selling 15. Due books 968 -. . 

prices to show the total amount which ought 16. Constitutions 1.003 

to have been realized from the sale of sup- 17. Constitutions (German) 79 

plies if none had been lost in transit, dis- 17. Constitutions (French) ... 351 

tributed without charge, etc. The total amount 18. Application blanks 25,931 

realizable appears as $64,452.51: as against 19. Local Union note paper... 8.159 

this amount the receipts from sales of sup- 20. Rec. See's order books.... .. 2 

plies were $64,166.08: a difference of- $286.43. 21. Treasurer's receipt books.. .. 12 

It the quantities of stock on hand on June 21. P. S.'s receipt books 31 

30, 1908, and 1910, as stated in the reports of 22. Treasurer's cash books. . . . 118 

the General Secretary and General Executive 22. 100-page day books 14 

Board, respectively, are correct, or even ap- 23. 200-page day books . . 2 

proximately so, this difference would represent 23. llOO-page ledgers . . 35 

the selling value of all the supplies which were 24. 200-page ledgers 16 

used in some manner other than that of direct 24. 300-page ledgers 25 

sale at the usual prices. 25. 500-page ledgers ' 5 . . 

We were informed that some supplies, in 26. Rituals . . 41 

addition to being sold to Local Unions, are 26. Rituals (German)" .. 105 

also used as material for organizers, constitu- 26. Rituals (French) . . 65 

tlons and application blanks being sent to or- 27. Dater outfits . . 1 

ganizers without charge, and occasionally to 27. Bmlilem buttons . . 145 

persons who volunteer to attempt to organize 28. Emblem pins . . 285 

34 



jm t e r 



We would call your attention to the fact 
that these differences, more particularly those 
stated as "Supplies not accounted for in de- 
tail," are before making any allowance for 
supplies distributed free, used for organizing 
purposes, etc., excepting in the comparatively 
few instances in which a definite record of such 
use was to be found. It should also be re- 
membered that the stock ledger entries for the 
six months ending December 31, 1908, were, for 
lack of the necessary records, not susceptible 
of verification. In view of the large number 
of shipments which we found to have been 
omitted from the stock ledger during the period 
subsequent to January 1, 1909, it seems most 
improbable that there should not have likewise 
been omissions during the preceding sis months 
and any such omissions would account for a 
corresponding amount of these unaccounted for 
differences. Furthermore, there may have been 
some errors in the inventory of .Tune 30, 1908 ; 
in fact, it appeared to us that that inventory 
was probably made up from the stock ledger 
balances and not from an actual count of the 
stock on hand. If such was the case any dif- 
ferences between the stock ledger balances and 
the supplies on hand at that time naturally 
form part of the differences shown in the fore- 
going summary. 

While there is apparently a shortage in the 
200-page, 300-page and 500-page ledgers, there 
is a surplus of 100-page ledgers. This may be 
due to filling orders for 100-page ledgers with 
the larger sizes. Secretary Duffy informed us 
that after the Salt Lake convention a slight 
change was made in the ruling of the official 
ledger, and. in order to dispose of the old stock 
as rapidly as possible, ledgers of the larger 
sizes were shipped to fill orders for 100-page 
ledgers after the stock of the latter size was 
exhausted. 

It will also be noted that some other ac- 
counts beside that of 100-page ledgers would 
show a surplus of stock on hand over the quan 
titles called for by the stock ledger. 

On Page 70 we submit a schedule of the 
shipments entered in the stock ledger for which 
no credits appeared in the financial ledgers and 
which we could not satisfactorily account for. 
Considering the thousands of entries which we 
traced, frequently after a long search due to 
errors in entering Local Union numbers, this 
Is certainly a very small residue. It is more 
than likely that at least some, if not all, of 
these shipments are accounted for by credits 
on the financial ledgers, but under Local 
Union numbers other than those in the stock 
ledger. 

Verification of Membership on June 30, 1910 
— In further pursuance of your instructions, 
we examined the figures pertaining to the mem- 
bership of the Brotherhood on June 30, 1910. 
The membership on that date was stated by the 
General Secretary, on Page 4 of his report to 
the Sixteenth Biennial Convention, as follows : 

Reports received for June, 1910, show. .185,084 



Reports out (taking last report received) 

show 7,263 

Clearance cards granted in June (not 

deposited) 2,146 

Clearance cards granted In May (not 

deposited) 2,167 

Clearance cards granted in April (not 

deposited) 2,279 

Clearance cards granted in March (not 

deposited) 1,773 



Total membership in good standing. .200,712 

As a verification of the membership figures 
we compared the reports from the Local Unions 
for June, 1910, with the membership register 
and then scheduled the membership from the 
register. From this schedule we excluded the 
reports subsequently received from Local 
Unions which had not sent in their June re- 
ports up to the time the General Secretary's 
report of membership was made up. The 
schedule prepared by us showed a total of 182,- 
956 as compared with the 185,084 stated In the 
General Secretary's report, a difference of 
2,128. Of this difference 1,843 is due to errors 
in the entries in the membership register 
which we discovered during comparison of the 
reports from the Local Unions with the 
register. 

Two errors of considerable amount, con- 
tributing to this difference, were found. For 
Local Union 4 the membership register showed 
1,885 members, whereas the June report of that 
local showed only 738 members. On investi- 
gation it appeared that the May, 1910, report 
was made out by the secretary of the Local 
Union "For month ending June 1, 1910," and 
it was erroneously entered in the register In 
the June membership. In the Local Union's re- 
port 1,885 was entered in the space for mem- 
bership at the end of the month ; this may 
have been intended for $188.50, the per capita 
tax payable to the General Office, but as the 
figures have been scratched this is not clear. 

An even larger error was in connection with 
Local Union 252, which had a membership of 
sixty-five on June 30, 1910, but for which a 
membership of 1,623 was entered in the regis- 
ter. Investigation showed that in making out 
the report the secretary of the Local Union 
had inserted the per capita tax payable to the 
General Office, $16.25, in the space provided 
tor showing the membership at the close of the 
month ; when the membership was entered in 
the register this was not noticed and the mem- 
bership of the local was entered as 1,623 in- 
stead of the correct number — sixty-flve. 

A number of other errors were made in 
entering the reports in the register ; in each 
of two instances (Local Unions 792 and 1307) 
the entries in the register were for 300 mem- 
liers less than the actual membership as shown 
by the reports, and the report of Local Union 
1805, showing 224 members, was omitted en-- 
tirely. Other errors pro and con ranged from 



35 



The C 



in t e r 



one to 100 members, the net result of all the 
errors being that, as to those Local Unions 
from which reports had been received, the 
membership register showed 1,843 more mem- 
bers than the reports. 

The difference of 285 members remaining 
after deducting from the gross difference of 2,- 
128 the errors netting 1,843, as above, we are 
unable to explain in detail, as the adding ma- 
chine list from which the total of 185,084 in 
the General Secretary's report had been stated 
was not available for comparison with our 
schedule. 

Of the membership aggregating 7,263, which 
Is stated in the General Secretary's report as 
"Reports out," 5,779 represents the member- 
ship of Local Unions which have since reported 
a total membership of 5,787 showing that much 
of the 7,263 to have been substantially correct. 
In the remaining 1,484, however, were in- 
cluded 285 members of Local Unions which 
were over three months In arrears on June 30, 
1910, in the payment of per capita tax, and 
which should consequently not have been in- 
cluded in the report of membership in good 
standing. The membership of Local Union 763 
(110 members) was duplicated and two other 
items of forty-one and twenty could not be 
Identified with the membership of any Local 
Union ; the membership of Local Union 589 
(10 members) should not have been Included 
as that local, which was organized June 1, 
1910, paid its first per capita tax for July, 
1910. There were also errors aggregating 
eighty-nine members in the membership on 
which the last per capita tax had been paid 
by Local Unions from which no reports had 
been received up to the time we verified the 
membership figures. The result of the adjust- 
ment of these errors would be that instead of 
the membership in good standing, for which 
reports had not been received, being 7,263, it 
was : Membership of Local Unions for which 
reports for June, 1910, have since been re- 
, ceived, 5,787 ; membership of Local Unions 
which have not sent in June, 1910, reports, but 
which were not yet more than three months 
in arrears on June 30, 1910, 929 ; a total of 
6,716 ; a difference between the General Sec- 
retary's report and the correct figures of 547. 

The figures of clearance cards, granted in 
March, April, May and June, 1910, as stated 
in the General Secretary's report differ from 
those shown by our schedules for the various 
months but the net difference for the entire 
four months is only one member, the compari- 
son being as follows : 

General 

Secretary's Our 
Clearance cards granted. Reports. Schedules. 

1910— March 1,773 1,783 

April 2,279 2,205 

May 2.167 2,191 

2,146 2,185 



8,365 



8,364 



While in the General Secretary's report these 
clearance cards are stated to be "not deposited" 
this is true of only part of them. After going 
fully Iulo the matter we are of the opinion 
that the entire number of clearance cards 
granted in May and June are properly included 
in the summary of membership on June 30, 
1910, whether any of them had been deposited 
or not. A clearance card granted In May 
would not expire until the morning of July 1 
and one granted in June would not expire until 
the morning of August 1, and, as we under- 
stand it, the secretaries of Local Unions only 
enter on their monthly reports members re- 
ceived by clearance cards after the same have 
expired. Consequently, the members in good 
standing represented by clearance cards 
granted in May and June would not be in- 
cluded in the reports of Local Unions for June, 
1910. 

As to the clearance cards granted In March 
and April, however, it is, in our opinion, only 
proper to include in the statement of member- 
ship on June 30, 1910, these cards which were 
actually undeposlted at that date. On taking 
up this question with Secretary Duffy we found 
that, while it was admitted that our contention 
was correct. It was claimed to be a practical 
impossibility to determine accurately the num- 
ber of cards actually undeposited and for this 
reason the practice had been to include the 
total number of clearance cards granted in the 
respective months. It appears that in many In- 
stances the requirement that the coupon from 
the due book of a member depositing a clear- 
ance card be forwarded to the General Office 
Is not complied with and consequently the 
records at the General Office are Incomplete to 
that extent. This being the case, and also in 
view of the fact that over four months had 
elapsed between June 30 and the time we 
undertook to verify the membership at that 
date, during which time additional cards were 
deposited. It was not feasible for us to deter- 
mine the number of March and April, 1910, 
clearance cards which were actually outstand- 
ing and undeposlted on June 30, 1910. 

A considerable proportion of the 3,988 clear- 
ance cards granted in March and April, 1910, 
must certainly have been deposited prior to 
June 30, 1910, and, whatever the number may 
have been, it would, of course, correspondingly 
reduce the membership shown as of that date. 

In this connection we suggest that in future 
a daily record be kept of the number of clear- 
ances reported as being deposited, separated 
according to the month in which Issued. At 
the end of each month the total of the cards 
reported as deposited can be deducted from the 
number previously reported as outstanding for 
the various months. While this method will 
still not obviate the inaccuracies due to the 
failure of Local Unions to forward the clear- 
ance coupons for cards deposited, it will at 
least make the figures of outstanding clearance 
cards more nearly represent the actual facts 
than is the case under the present practice. 



36 



Tlhia Carpaot 



r 



Distribution of Tbe Carpenter — At your re- 
quest, we have considered the matter of a 
system of distributing your monthly journal. 
The Carpenter, which will insure the Broth- 
erhood receiving the total number of copies 
for which the printer is paid and the complete 
distribution of the entire issue_^ to the Local 
Unions. 

The present method, as you doubtless know, 
is to prepare in tlie General Office address slips 
giving the name and address to which the 
o.uantity of the journal allotted to each Local 
LTnion is to be sent. These slips are made out 
on the addressograph and in the corner of 
each slip is marked in blue pencil the number 
of copies to he sent to the address indicated. 
The aggregate of the number of copies marked 
on these slips, together with the number for 
use at the General OfEce, is supposed to make 
up the total number of copies which the 
printer is required to furnish under his con- 
tract. These address slips are sent to the 
printer, who is to use them in preparing the 
journal for mailing, wrapping the number of 
copies indicated in a bundle and pasting the 
slip on the wrapper. 

Some question havin,g been raised as to the 
lack of an adequate check by the Brotherhood 
on the nunaher of copies of The Carpenter 
which are actually printed and mailed by the 
printer, we suggest either of the two following 
plans for establishing such a check : 

That each month after the printing of The 
Carpenter Is completed, but before it is 
wrapped for mailing, the Brotherhood send one 
or more representatives to the printing plant 
.to count the number of copies printed and to 
certify to their count of each month's issue 
on the printer's bill before the same is paid. 
If it be desired to go still further, these repre- 



sentatives could also be in attendance during 
the wrappin.g and mailing of the journal so as 
to be able to state definitely that the entire 
issue for which the Brotherhood is being 
charged has been properly distributed. This 
latter check might, however, be as effectively 
maintained with consider.ably less work by 
weighing, say, 500 or 1,000 copies of each 
month's issue, and on this basis (after allowing 
for the weight of the copies sent to the General 
Office) calculate the weight of the copies to 
he mailed and compare it with the postage 
bills rendered by the postoffice. If the lagt- 
nientloned method be followed a statement of 
the calculation should be filed in the General 
Office with the printer's bill. 

An alternative plan would be to have the 
printer deliver each month's issue of the Jour- 
nal to the General Office where the number of 
copies would be verified by actual count. Per- 
sons doing wrapping and mailing work, who 
are now hired by the printer each month as he 
needs them, could be hired direct by the Broth- 
erhood and the wrappin.g be done In your own 
building and the wrapped bundles be hauled 
to the postoffice from there. This should estab- 
lish a very effective check, but would entail 
some additional expense for the extra hauling 
and handling required. The wrapping itself 
would, we should think, cost about the same 
whether done in the printing plant or in your 
own building, as the printer could, in the event 
of the work not being done by him, naturally 
make no charge therefor, or, if it is at present 
included in his contract, some allowance on 
his bill could doubtless he secured. 

Very truly yours, 
r,YBEAND, ROSS BROS. & MONTGOMERY, 
By Walter A. Staub, Manager. 



INDEX. 

Pages. 

38 Summary of Purchases and Sales of Supplies. 

.38-39 Purchases of Supplies for Resale. 

41-44 Purchases of Supplies for free distribution. General Office Use, etc. 

44-45 Inventories of Supplies. 

45-47 Statement of Selling Value of Supplies Purchased. 
47-XCII Summary of errors discovered in sto«k accounts. 
XCIII-50 Statements referring to entries In Stock Ledgers under date of April, 1!)10. 

51-56 Shipments omitted from stock ledger. 

5G-58 Shipments replacing Supplies lost in transit, etc. 

58-60 Attempted adjustments of Stock Accounts. 
61-69 Miscellaneous errors in Stock Ledger Entries. 

70 Entries in Stock Ledger Je-fwhlch corresponding credits were not found in Fi- 

nancial Ledgers. 

70 Entries in Stock Ledger for which corresponding credits were not found in 

Financial Ledgers for three mouths ending September 30, 1910. 

71 Sundry errors and omissions in stock accounts, three months endin.g Septem- 

ber 30, 1910. 



37 



T lb e C a. r p e SI t a r 

SCJI.MARY OF SALES AND PURCHASES OP SUPPT.IES. 
Two Yeai-s Ending June 30, 1910. 

Heceipts from Sales o£ Supplies — 

Sales to Local Unions $60,178.65 

Sales to District Councils 7SS.12 

Miscellaneous sales 290.31 

Chai-ter fees ($10.00 charter fee equals approximately tbe list value of supplies 

making up outfit) *2,909.00 

$84,166.08 

**Purehases of supplies for resale, Page 40 $32,479.81 

Inventories of supplies at cost. Page 45 — 

June 30, 1908 9,441.42 

$41,921.23 
June 30, 1910 9,103.30 

Cost of supplies sold ^ 32,817.93 

Gross profit on supplies sold, before deducting cost of shipping $31,348.15 

Average profit of 951 per cent, on cost. 
**Expressage, freight and cartage, principally on outgoing supplies. .$ 3,188.90 
**Purchases of supplies for free distribution among Local Unions, for 
use of organizers. General Office and General Executive Board, and 

miscellaneous disbursements for The Carpenter, Page 43 10,192.24 

13,381.14 

Profit on sales o4 supplies remaining after defraying cost of sup- 
plies for free distribution. General Office, etc $17,967.01 

Note — The above profit on supplies is subject to deduction for postage used for such sup- 
plies as were sent by mail. No separate account is kept of postage used for mailing sup- 
plies, all purchases of stamps being charged to postage account, which forms part of Gen- 
eral Office expenses. 

*One charter outfit was furnished without a rubber seal, and in this case $9.00 was 
paid instead of the usual $10.00 

'♦Purchases of supplies for resale $32,479.81 

Purchases of supplies for free distribution, etc 10,192.24 

Expressage, freight and cartage 3,188.90 

Total expenditures for "supplies for Local Unions" (see General Executive 

Board's report. Page 42) - $45,860.95 



PURCHASES OF SUPPLIES FOR RESALE, 
Two Tears Ending June 30, 1910. 



Articles. 'Vendors. Quantities. Prices Cost.- 

per 1000. 

Due Books C. P. 128,610 $ 82.00 $10,546.02 

Due Books F.-K. 102,872 63.91 6,574.29 



231,482 $17,120.31 

Constitutions — 

English C. P. 201,600 $ 8.14 $ 1,641.02 

German C. P. 10,050 18.65 187.43 

French ....". C. P. 5,000 24:95 124.75 

Spanish C. P. 500 232.00 116.00 



217,150 2,069.20 

38 



The C 



r 



Local Union 

Local Union 

Local Union 

Local Unii>n 

Local Union 

'Local Union 



note paper, 
note paper, 
note paper . 
note paper, 
note paper, 
note paper. 



Application blanks 
Application blanks 



Treasurer's receipt books. 
Treasurer's receipt books. 



U. & K. 
U. r. Co. 
U. P. Co. 
L. G. D. 
C. A. P. 
C.-B. P. 



C. P. 
C. P. 



Recording secretary's order books.. H. & F. 
Recording secretary's order books. . F.-K. 



H. &F, 
F.-K. 



Financial secretary's receipt books. H. & F. 
Financial secretary's receipt books. F.-K. 



100-page day books 
■.^'00-page day books 
100-page ledgers . . 
100-page ledgers . . 
100-page ledgers . . 



C. P. 
C. P. 
C. P. 
C. P. 
C. ]'. 



10,000 
10,000 
20,000 
20,000 

100,000 

103,400 

203,400 

24,000 

100,000 

124.000 

1,900 
1,000 

2,900 

700 

1,000 

1,700 

000 
1,000 

1,600 

291 
220 
300 
579 
1 



2.50 

2.00 

1.921 

2.25 

1.435 

1.38- 



3.88 
1.06!, 



$ .181 
.071 



.$ .181 
.07J 



.$ .181 
.071 



$ .791 
$ 1.08 
•f .95 
.59.6 



25.00 
20.00 
38.50 
45.00 
143.23 
142.70 



03.12 
106.50 



.$ 351.50 
70.00 



129.50 
75.00 



.$ 111.00 
75.00 



280.00 

345.08 

.59 



880 



414.43 



199.02 



426.50 



204.50 



180.00 



231.35 
237.60 



030.07 



200-page ledgers C. 1'. 

200-page ledgers C. P. 

200-page ledgers : C. P. 



300-page ledgers C. P. 

300-page ledgers C. P. 

300-page ledgers C. P. 



400-page ledgers C. P. 

400-page ledgers (;. P. 

400-page ledgers C. P. 



300 

072 

1 



S73 

1 
293 

388 

082 

1 

00 

123 



.22 




306.00 


.80.9 




402.84 
.80 




.« 


1.75 


.35 




395.55 


.96 




372.48 




•f 


2.25 


.65 




82.00 


.30 




167.28 



829.64 



709.78 



500-page ledgers C. P. 



*lnitials indicate 
C. P. 
F.-K. 

n. &F. 
u. p. Co. 

L. G. D. 
C. A. P. 
C.-B. P. 
G. J. M. 



17 



.$ 2.70 



vendors as follows : 

Cheltenbam Press. 

Folk-Keelin Printing Company. 

Harrington & Folger. 

Union Printing Company. 

L. G. Dynes Printing Comimny. 

Cobea's Affiliated Publications. 

Cobea-Bramwood Press. 

George .1. JIayor. 
I. S. S. S. Indiana Seal-Stamp-Steicil Company. 
W. & H. Whitehead & Hoag Compnny. 
F. I. G. F. I. Gorton & Company. 



202.03 
40.75 



39 



T lb e C a r p a mi t e r 



I^eather-Bound Ledgers — 

500-page C. T. 

600-page C. P. 

600-page CI". 

700-page CI'. 

800-page C. P. 

900-page C. P. 

1,000-page ._ C. P. 



Loose-leaf ledger for L. U. 434 .... C. P. 

Loose-leaf ledger for L. LT. 434 .... C. P. 

Treasurers' cash books C. P. 

Treasurers' cash hooks C. P. 



Withdrawal cards 



C. P. 



Special Printing Orders — 

Working cards C. P. 

By-laws C. P. 

Letter heads C. P. 

Cards C. P. 

Seals — 

Rubber G. J. M. 

Rubber r.. G. J. M. 

Rubber I. S. S. S. 

Rubber (without ink pads) ... I. S. S. S. 



9 

1 
13 
4 
1 
1 
4 



33 

Index 
771 
1,418 

2,189 

1,000 



4,150 

1,250 

2,000 

100 



198 
1 

211 
2 

412 



7.25 



.75 




100.75 


.25 




33.00 
8.75 
9.50 


.25 


$ 


41.00 




16.50 






2.23 


.27} 


$ 


213.96 


.27 - 




382.80 



various 
various 
various 
various 



.50 



.30 
.20 



50.00 

63.75 

7.75 

4.75 



99.00 
.30 

63.30 
.40 



265.50 



596.82 
26.50 



120.25 



163.00 



Metal 
Metal 



G. J. M. 

I. S. S. S. 



65 



87 



1.50 
1.25 



97.50 
27.50 



125.00 



Repairing seals I. S. S. S. 

Union label rubber stamps I. S. S. S. 52 

Daters G. J. M. 85 

Daters I. S. S. S. 48 

133 

Repairing dater . G. .1. M. - 

Emblem Pins — 

Rolled gold W. & H. 10.250 

Rolled gold F. I. G. 1,035 

11,285 

Emblem Buttons — 

Rolled gold W. & H. 6,088 

Solid gold W. & H. 2 

Emblem Rings — 

Solid gold W. & H. 60 

Watch Charms — 

Rolled gold W. & 11. 144 

Solid gold W. & IL 7 

Special W. & 11. 4 



.50 
.45 



per 1000. 

$195.92 

196.00 



.$195.92 
.70 



3.90 



42.50 
21.60 



$ 2.008.19 
202.80 



$ 1,192.78 
1.40 



.861 .f 
6.43J 



124.74 
45.04 
35.52 



1.05 
13.00 



64.10 
.20 



2,211.0.-. 



1,194.18 
237.00 



205.30 



40 



T lb e Carpenter 

Badges and banners W. & H. - At list prices ?4, 013.00 

less commission 390.87 



3.613.13 

' ?32,479.81 

PURCHASES OF SUPPLIES FOR FREE DISTKIBUTIOX AMONG LOCAL UNIONS, USE 
OF ORGANIZERS, GENERAL OFFICE AND GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD, AND 
MISCELLANEOUS DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE CARPENTER, INCLUDED AMONG 
PAYMENTS FOR SUPPLIES FOR LOCAL UNIONS. 

— Two Years Ending June 30, 1910 — 

Blanks for Reports by Local Unions, Reports of General Officers and General Executive 
Board, Circulars and Miscellaneous Printed Matter for use of Local Unions : 

Quantities *In 
Articles. 'Vendors. Purchased. Prices. Lots of. Cost 



6.00 


7,500 


s 


675.00 


6.18 






43.25 


6.50 


6,500 




338.00 



$2,240.17 



Reports of General Officers and General Execu- 
tive Board — per 1000. 

G. E. B., June 30, '08 H. & F. 2,500 $ 15.50 $ 38.75 

Gen. Pres., June 30, '08 C. P. 2,500 58.74 146.85 

Gen. Sec, June 30, '08 C. P. 2,500 143.10 357.76 

Gen. Sec, June 30, '09 C. P. 2,500 42.90 107.33 

Gen. Treas., June 30, 08 C. P. 2,500 30.50 76.24 

each. 

Trial of G. P C. P. 25 6.92 173.00 

per 1000. 
Proceedings of 15th Convention C. P. 2.700 496.40 1,340.24 

General Secretary's Monthly Financial State- 
ment — 

, Fifteen months H. & F. 112,500 

One month H. & F. 7,000 

Eight months H. & F. 52,000 

1,056.25 

Lists of Financial and Recording Secretaries 
(copies sent out quarterly as follows : Two 
to each Local Union, one to each District 
Council, one to each Business Agent and 
one to each organizer — 

H. &F. 38,000 34.74 4,750 1,320.00 

Financial Secretary's Monthly Report Blanks 
(6 copies sent to each Local Union every 
three months) — 

H. & F. 10.000 4.80 48.00 

H. & F. 45.000 4.60 15,000 207.00 * 

F.-K 50,000 3.10 155.00 



410.00 



Treasurer's Monthly Remittance Blanks (6 
copies sent to each Local Union every 
three months) — 



H. &F. 


10,000 




1.22* 






12.25 


H. & F. 


45,000 




1.00 


15,000 




45.00 


F.-K. 


52,000 




.76 






39.52 


tees' Semi-Annual Reports (two copies sent 




to each Local Union every six months) — 














H. & F. 


2,000 


$ 


5.50 


1.000 


$ 


11.00 


n. &F. 


3,000 




3.33s 






10.00 


H.&F. 


5,000 




2.90 






14.50 


H. &F. 


10,000 




1.75 






17.50 



96.77 



53.011 



•Where not otherwise specified quantity 
purchased was all in one lot. 

- 41 



The Car 



Bonds (two copies sent to each Local Union 
every six months) — 

H. & P. 
H. & F. 
H. &P. 

Ballots C. P. 

Letter of instructions, with 
coupon, to be returned with 
hallots C. P. 



200,000 



2,000 



o t e r 



4,000 


3.3YJ 


5,000 


3.35 


.0,000 


2.25 



lAOl 



8.25 



.f 13.50 
10.75 
22.50 

$ 281.00 



16.50 



297.50 



Statistical Report Cards — 

Postal (one sent to each Local 



Union 


every 


six months) . 


. C. P. 


1,000 


.$ 13.50 








H. &P. 


1,500 


14.33i 








H. &P. 


2,000 


13.121 








H. &P. 


3,000 


13.11§ 








C. A. P. 


3,000 


- 13.23s 


i-postal 






. H. &F. 


1,000 


2.50 








H. &F. 


1,000 


2.75 


^ 






H. &P. 


3,000 


2.28i 



13.50 


21.50 


26.25 


39.35 


39.70 


2.50 


2.75 


6.85 



152.40 



Circulars — 

Quarterly C. P. 

Quarterly C. P. 

Quarterly „ C. P. 

Quarterly C. P. 

Amendments C. P. 

Vote on Amendments C. P. 

Printing amendments in Ger- 
man C. P. 

Election returns C. P. 

Election of General Officers... C. P. 

A. W. W C;,P. 

A. W. W C. P. 

Change of officers C. P. 

Instructions how to form 

unions H. & P. 

Installation of new union C. P. 

Instructions to financial secre- 
taries C. P. 

Instructions to financial secre- 
taries C. P. 

Regarding errors in Pinancial 

Secretary's reports ...'.... C. P. 

Regarding errors in Pinancial 

Secretary's reports C. P. 

Form Letter No. 5 C. P. 

Form Letter No. 6 ^ C. P. 

Dedication of building C. P. 

Union label application C. P. 

Referendum C. P. 

Miscellaneous Blanks — 

Strike inquiry H. & F. 

Death claims (L. U.) H. & F. 

Death claims (doctors) H. & F. 

Applications for charter H. & F. 

Instructions to delegates C. P. 

Credentials .' C. P. 

Membership rolls H. & P. 



2,500 


,$ 19.50 




$ 48.75 


2,500 


19.14 




47.85 


5,000 


19.00 


2,500 


95.00 


.2,500 


19.40 


2,500 


242.50 


4,200 


18.70 




78.50 


4,500 


35.22 




158.50 
24.75 


4,600 


12.80 




58.75 


2,300 


21.10 




48.50 


5,000 


7.50 




37.50 


6,000 


6.25 




37.50 


1,000 


5.75 




5.75 


2,000 


3.32J 




6.65 


2,000 


6.25 




13.50 


5,000 


8.75 




43.75 


5,000 


5.90 




29.50 



5,000 



5.75 



10,000 $ 3.42J 



5,000 


9.00 


5,000 


1.55 


5,000 


3.00 


500 


37.50 


1,000 


22.00 


10,000 


- 5.30 



28.75 



5,000 


5.30 


26.50 


5,000 


5.35 


26.75 


2,000 


8.75 


17.50 


2,200 


8.86 


19.50 


1,000 


9.75 


0.75 


4,000 


24.62J 


98.50. 



1,204.50 



34.25 
45.00 
7.75 
15.00 
18.75 
22.00 
53.00 



195.75 



42 



T lb e C a r p e n t 



Organizers' Supplies — per 1600 

"Sometliing lor Carpenters to Bead" L. G. D. 40,000 $ .93i 20,000 $ 3T.50 

"Sometlilng for Carpenters to Read" H. & F. 80,000 .79i 40,000 63.5(1 
"Sometliing for Carpenters to Read" 

German H. & F. 20,000 1.37S 27.50 

Letterheads U. P. Co. 20,000 2.25 43.00 

Letter heads H. & F. 50,000 1.85 92.50 

Expense bills C. P. 4,000 4.87J 19.50 

Expense bills C. P. 4,000 4.75 19.00 

Binding constitutions In leather 
(Some of these went to Gen- 
eral Officers, G. E. B. and 

others) C. P. 229 .38 87.02 

Cards C. P. 7,400 sundry lots 66.65 

— The Carpenter — Supplies for Mailing, Binding, Etc. — 

Manila envelopes C. P. 43,000 $ 4.25 sundry $ 182.75 

Labels C. P. 10,000 .95 lots 9.50 

Labels H. & F. 20,000 .36i 7.25 

Labels C. A. P. 50,000 .23.6 11.80 

Prints of General Officers and G. E. 

B., 1898-1908, and cuts for 

.lourual C. P. 58.50 

volumes each 

Binding C. P. 20 l.SO 36.00 

Binding H. & F. 1 1.50 

Binding H. & F. 100 1.10 110.00 



458.17 



417.30 



For General Officer Use (Including G. E. B.)and Miscellaneou 

per 1000 

.$ 4.25 2,000 ,$ 

4.25 1,000-20,000 
4.37* 



Letter heads L. G. D. 

Letter heads C. P. 

Letter heads '. C. I*. 

Letter heads L. G. D. 

Letter heads C. P. 

Letter heads C. P. 

Letter heads C. P. 

Envelopes C. P. 

Envelopes • C. P. 

Envelopes C. P. 

Printing stamped envelopes L. G. D. 

Printing stamped envelopes C. P. 



Printing stamped envelopes. 
Printing stamped envelopes. 
Cards 



C.P. 



Clasp envelopes, lock. 



. . C. P. 



6,000 
50,000 
8,000 
1,000 
4,000 
4,000 

200 
1,100 
5,500 

200 

4,000 

114,000 

2,000 

200 

3,500 

15,000 



4.75 

4.75 

5.75 
12.50 

5.00 

5.91 
16.25 

1.00 

1.00 

.50 

6.25 

sundry lots 

per 1000 

14.50 



2,000 
2.000 



1.100 

2,000 
1,000 to 
32,000 



Clasp envelopes, lock C. P. 20,000 

Large manilla envelopes C. P. 1,000 

Clasp envelopes, clasp C. P. 5,000 

Receipt books G. P. 80 

Receipt books C. A. P. 80 

Receipt books C. B. P. 80 

Shipping books H. & F. 24 

Ledgers and day books C. P. 2 of each 

General Treasurer's receipts C. P. 10,000 

Membership filing cards H. & F. 100,000"' 

Membership filing cards H. & F. 100,000 

Miscellaneous filing and Index cards H. & F. sundry lots 

Miscellaneous filing and index cards C. P. sundry lots 

Daters, rubber stamps F. J. M. 

Numbering machine I. S. S. S. 

43 



7.50 



3,000 and 
6,000 
10,000 



5.45 
1.441 

.63 7-16 

.66J 
1.25 

3.25 
1.05 
1.11 



25.50 
212.50 

35.00 
4.75 

10.00 

23.00 
2.50 
5.50 

32.50 

3.25 

4.00 

114.00 

1.00 

1.25 

27.50 

217.50 

150.00 
18.75 
27.25 

115.60 
50.75 
53.50 
30.00 
74.55 
32.50 

105.00 

111. on 

107.50 

57.50 

35.75 

5.05 



e C a r p 

Miscellaneous stationery, lynijing, 

etc C. P. 

Canadian Lanner John Tweed 

Sundry half-tones and electros C. P. 

Federal injunction suit record C. P. 200 

Express on supplies to Salt Lake 
City 

— Supplies foi Shipping Department. — 

Pounds 

I'aper r C. P. 5,365 

Paper I. P. Co. 547 

Paper I. P. Co. 609 

Twine I. P. Co. 20 

Twine I. P. Co. 20 

pieces 

Tag board H. & F. 5,000 

Tag board H. & F. 2,000 

Mailing tubes C. P. 1,000 



o t er 



.54* 



1T.50 
24.00 

52.75 
108.50 

8.32 



1,932.77 



04 various 


f 214.60 


03.68 


20.10 


03.67 


22.38 


09.8 


1.96 


20.6 


4.12 


35 


1.75 


50 


1.00 




39.00 












$10,192.24 



INVENTORIES OF SUPPLIES VALUED AT COST. 

— 30th June, 1908— — 30th June, 1910 — 

Quantities. Prices. Value. Quantities. Prices. Value. 

Application blanks 85,407 $ 3.86 .f 329.67 9,980 $ 1.06J $ 10.63 

Constitutions — 

English 18,500 8.28i 153.27 40,892 8.14 332.86 

German 2,572 18.65 47.97 3,431 18.65 63.99 

French 858 24.95 21.41 2,110 24.95 52.64 

Spanish 500 .23.2 116.00 

Due books 44,581 82.00 3,655.64 45,929 **63.91 2,935.32 

Day Books — 

100-page 288 .791 228.96 95 .79i 75.52 

200-page 287 1.08 809.96 285 1.08 307.80 

Ledgers — 

100-page 265 .95 251.75 , 631 .65 410.15 

200-page 405 1.22 494.10 780 .81 631.80 

300-page 91 1.35 122.85 449 .96 431.04 

400-page 34 1.45 49.30 179 1.65 295.35 

500-page 18 2.25 40.50 4 2.75 11.00 

Treasurers' cash books 85 27i 23.59 1,113 .27 300.51 

Financial Secretary's receipt 

books 56 .18 10.08 895 .071 *67.12 

Recording Secretary's order 

books 64 .18* 11.84 42t .07* 3.15 

Treasurer's receipt books 132 .181 24.42 . 639 .07* 47.93 

Rituals — 

English 1,004 .18.7 187.75 101 .18.7 18.89 

German 774 .20 154.80 870 .20 174.00 

French 336 .20 67.20 393 .20 78.60 

Note paper. Local Union 17,221 2.25 38.75 103,800 1.38 143.24 

Union Labels — 

Large 194,674* 7.00 1,362.72 162,684 7.00 1,138.79 

Small 175,145* 4.50 788.15 150,505 4.50 677.27 

Withdrawal cards 338 26.50 8.96 641 26.50 16.99 

Daters 2 .50 1.00 11 .45 4.95 

44 



Tlhe Carpemilb 



Pins — 

Rolled gold 2,067 197.90 409.06 

Solid gold 103 .70 72.10 

Buttons — 

Boiled gold 617 197.90 122.10 

Solid gold 122 .70 S5.40 

Watch Charms — 

Hoiied gold 23 .87J 20.12 

Solid gold ..:.•; : 

Watch fots Have little selling value. 

Rings — 

Rolled gold 32 .75 24.00 

Solid gold 63 4.00 252.00 

Cuff buttons ; 

Match boxes Have little selling value. 

Business agent badges 32 2.25 72.00 



6t 


197.90 


1.19 


07 


.70 


46.90 


735 


197.90 


145.46 


61 


.70. 


42.70 


59 


.87* 


51.63 


3 


6.50 


19.50 



$9,441.42 



73 ■ 


.75 


54.75 


92 


4.00 


368.00 


78 


.17.7 


13.81 


10 


2.25 


22.50 



$9,103.30 



•The quantities of labels stated above as part of the inventory of June 30, 1908, are 
not the quantities as reported at that time. For explanation see Page 16. 

••The stock of due boolts on hand on June 30, 1910, was originally stated as 43,497 
and so appears in the stock ledger. Subsequently, however, a lot of due books was dis- 
covered which had been omitted from the inventory. This lot, numbering 2,432 due books, 
was entered in the due books account in the stock ledger under date of July, 1910, but 
as they were on hand on June 30, 1910, we have included them in the foregoing statement 
of the inventory at that date. 

tThese items represent orders received, paid for and entered in the stock ledger, but not 
yet shipped on June 30, 1910, on account of stock of R. S. order books and R. G. pins 
being temporarily exhausted. 

Note — With the exception of the changes mentioned in the preceding notes, and the 
correction of several minor errors, the quantities in the foregoing Inventory of June 30, 
1908, are as stated in General Secretary Duffy's report for the two years ended that date 
(Page 104), and the inventory of June 30, 1910, is as stated in the General Executive 
Board's Report (Pages 32-33). 



STATEMENT OF SUPPLIES TO BE ACCOUNTED 

THEREOF. 



FOR AND THE SELLING VALUE 



-Two Years Ending June 30, 1910- 



Inventory Purchases Inventory 

Articles. June 30, during June 30, 

1908. two years. 1910. 

Due books 44,581 231,482 45,929 

Constitutions — 

English 18,500 201.600 40,892 

German 2,572 10,050 3,431 

French 858 5,00" 2,110 

Spanish 500 500 

Local Union note paper 17,221 263,400 103,800 

Application blanks 85,407 124, UOO 9,980 

Rec. Secretaries' order books. 64 2,900 42 

Treasurers' receipt books .... 132 1,700 639 

Fin. Secretaries' receipt books. 56 1,600 895 

Treasurers' cash books 85 2,189 1,113 

Day Books — 

100 pages 288 291 95 

200 pages 287 220 285 

45 



Quantities 
to be ac- 
counted for. 
230,134 $ 



■169,982 
•6,696 
•3.145 



Selling 
Prices. 



Selling 
Values. 



176,821 

199,427 

3,006 

1,193 

761 

1,161 



484 
222 



.15 $34,520.10 



.05 
.05 
.05 



per 100 
.50 
each .50 
' .50 
.50 
.50 
.60 



1.35 
1.75 



8,499.10 
334.80 
157.'25 



884.10 
997.14 
1,503.00 
596.50 
380.50 
696.60 



653.40 
388.50 



T lb e C a r p e mi t e r 



Ledgers — 

100 pages 265 880 

200 pages 405 873 

300 pages 91 682 

400 pages 34 174 

500 pages (cloth) 18 17 

500 pages (leather) 9 

600 pages > 14 

700 pages 4 

800 pages 1 

900 pages 1 

1,000 pages 4 

Loose-leaf and Index.... ' 1 

Rituals — 

English 1,004 

German 774 

French 336 



631 

780 

449 

179 

4 



514 


1.35 


693.90 


498 


2.00 


996.00 


824 


3.00 


972.00 


29 


4.00 


116.00 


31 


5.00 


155.00 


9 


9.00 


81.00 


14 


10.50 


147.00 


4 


11.00 


44.00 


1 




12.00 


1 




13.00 


4 


14.00 


56.00 


1 




20.25 



101 
870 
393 



2,114 1,364 750 .50 375.00 

•The above quantities of constitutions to he accounted for are, after deducting 9,226 Eng- 
lish, 2,495 German and 603 French constitutions on hand on December 31, 1908, which be- 
came unsaleable by reason of amendments made at the Salt Lake City Conyention, which were 
embodied in the new edition effective March 1, 1909. 

Union Labels (transfer) — 

per 1000 

Large ,. . . . 194,674 162,684 •31,990 $ 10.00 507.25 

Small '....175,145 150,505 •24,640 7.50 

•The above figures of labels to be accounted for are the quantities actually sold and for 
which payment was received during the two years ending June 30, 1910. If the inventory of 
labels on June 30, 1910, as stated by the General Executive Board in its report is correct it 
would seem that the inventory on June 30, 1908, must have been not less than 194,674 large 
and 175,145 small labels instead of 144,000 large and 172,000 small labels (see Page 104 
of General Secretary's report for two years ending June 30, 1908). Secretary Duffy states 
that this may have been due to the inclusion in the Inventory of June 30, 1908, of an un- 
opened lot of labels (received in May, 1908) at the quantities paid for, viz., 110,000 large 
and 110,000 small labels ; since being opened, however, the quantities actually received were 
found to have been greater than the quantities billed and paid for. 

Inventory Turchases Inventory Quantities „ ... . 

Articles. June 30, during June 30, to be ac- p^j^^g^ Values. 

1908. two years. 1910. counted for. 

Withdrawal cards •338 1,000 641 697 $ .50 $ 348.50 

Special Printing — 

Working cards 4,0.50 4,050 various 59.12 

By-laws . : 950 950 various 51.50 

Letter heads 2,000 2,000 various 11.00 

Special cards 100 _ 100 various 5.50 

Seals — 

Rubber 403 403 1.00 403.00 

Metal 85 85 3.00 255.00 

Union label, rubber - 56 56 1.00 56.00 

Daters, rubber 2 145 11 136 1.00 136.00 

Emblem Pins — 

Rolled gold 2,067 11,285 6 13,358 .25 3,339.50 

Solid gold 103 67 36 1.00 36.00 

Emblem Buttons — 

Rolled gold 617 6,088 735 5,970 .25 1,492.50 

Solid gold 122 2 61 63 1.00 63.00 

Cult buttons 78 

(39 pairs) 

46 



arpeoteir 



Watch Charms — 

Rolled gold 23 144 50 lOS 1.25 135.00 

Solid gold 7 3 4 7.50 30.00 

Solid gold (special) 4 . 4 various 40.50 

Watch fobs 267 These have very little selling value. 

Rings — 

Rolled gold 32 73 tl-SO 

Solid gold 63 60 93 31 5.00 155.00 

Match hoxes 4,374 1,932 Have very little selling value. , 

Business agents' badges 32 10 22 3.50 77.00 

Badges and Banners — 

Selling value of badges and banners pur- 
chased from Whitehead & Hoag Com- ' ' 
pany and paid for by Local Unions 
and others during the two years.... 3,959.00 

$64,452.51 

•Approximate ; estimated by deducting purchases during the two years from the aggregate 
of stock on .Tune 30, 1910, and sales during the two years. 

•*No inventory of cuff buttons seems to have been talten on June 30, 1908, and as a stocli 
account for this article was only Itept during a part of the two years, it is not possible to 
say what quantity was sold. 

tit would seem that the inventory of rolled gold rings on hand on June 30, 1908, was 
incorrect, as it will be noted that while there were no purchases made during the two years, 
the quantity on hand on June 30, 1910, is shown as being greater than the quantity on 
hand two years- before. 

Note — A comparison of the quantities purchased during the two years, as shown in the 
foregoing statement, with the quantities, as shown in the statement of purchases, will 
disclose small differences in several instances. These are due to the fact that sometimes 
there are supply bills unpaid at the end of a fiscal year which are paid during the following 
year. In the foregoing statement allowance has been made for such bills unpaid on June 30, 
1908, and 1910, respectively, so that the quantities purchased may represent stoclc actually 
received during the two years. 



SUMMARY OP ERRORS DISCOVERED IN STOCK ACCOUNTS AND RESULTS WHICH 
WOULD APPEAR ON ADJUSTMENT THEREOF. 

— Due Books — 
Debits : 

Entries under date of April, 1910, which are duplications of entries made at 

or about time of shipment (Page XCVI) 1,600 

Error in entries dated April, 1910, which are partially correct (Page 49) 57 

Sundry credits taken under date of April, 1910, not for specific shipments, which 
are, for the purpose of this statement, now charged back to the due books' 
account (Page 49) 2,970 

Credit entries dated April, 1910, which have not been identified with specific 
transactions and which are, for the purpose of this statement, now charged 
back to the due books' account (Page 50) 1,160 

Excessive credit in stock ledger by reason of crediting to due books' account 
the equivalent (in value) of shipments other articles: 

Credits entered to due books' account 4,785 

Actual shipments 2,816 1,969 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions 351 

Errors in footings of due books' account in stock ledger ; 

Per 
Ledger 

Ledger, Page 94, credits 7,011 

Ledger, Page 117, credits 9,714 

Ledger, Page 120, credits 9,101 

Ledger, Page 129, credits 10,015 





Footing. 


Correct. 


Excessive 


6,981 


30 


9,614 


100 


9,091 


10 


9,915 


100 



■i7 



8,347 



Tib® C a r p ® SI t 



Credits : 

Shipments for which payment was received, but for which credit was not 

talien in the stoclt ledger (Page 51) 2,308 

Shipments to duplicate due hooks lost In transit, etc., for which credit was not 

taken In stock ledger (Page 5G) • 103 

Due hooks omitted from inventory of June 30, 1910, which were added to stock 

account In July, 1910 2,432 

Difference between balance to credit of due books' account in stock ledger on 
December 31, 1908, 2,522, and balance on January 1, 1909, in stock ac- 
count summary for January, 1909 2,536 7,379 

Note — The credit balance on the stock ledger on December 31, 1908, was 
probably due to entering orders not yet shipped, as the stock was temporarily 
exhausted. As, however, the shipments when actually made in January, 1909, 
would not be, and were not, again entered in the stock ledger, the credit balance 
should have been carried forward to the January, 1909, account. 
Due books not yet accounted for in detail 968 

— Constitutions — 

Entries under date of April, 1910, which are duplicates of entries made at or 

about time of shipment (Page XCV) 3,864 

Errors in entries dated April, 1910, which are partially correct- (Page XCVI) 336 

Sundry credits taken under date of April, 1910, not for specific shipments, which 
are, for the purpose of this statement, now charged back to the constitu- 
tion account (Page 49) 2,491 

Less constitutions bound In leather for distribution to General Officers. 

General Executive Board members and organizers 229 2,262 

Credit entries dated April, 1910, which have not been identified with specific 
transactions, and which are, for the purposes of this statement, now 
charged back to the constitutions' account (Page 50) 648 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions (Page 63) 2,344 

Errors in footings of constltvitions' account in stock ledger : 

Per 
pLedger. Correct. Excessive. 

Ledger, Page 33, credits 11,161 11,151 10 

Ledger, Page 49, credits 2,104 2,054 50 — 60 



9,514 



Credits : 



Shipments for which payment was received but for which credit was not 

taken in stock ledger (Page Bl) ■ 2,567 

Shipments to duplicate constitutions lost in transit, etc., for which credit 

. was not taken in stock ledger (Page 56) 169 

Insufficient credit In stock ledger by reason of crediting to stock accounts of 
other articles the equivalent (in value) of constitutions shipped (P. 60) ; 

Actual shipments of constitutions 6,912 

Credits entered to constitutions account 1,137 * 

5,775 

8,511 

Constitutions not yet accounted for in detail 1,003 

— Constitutions — ( German ) — 
Credits : 

Shipments for which pavment was received but for which credit was not 

taken in the stock ledger (Page 51) -- 

Shipment to duplicate German constitutions lost in transit (Page 57) . 20 

Insufficient credit in stock ledger by reason of crediting to stock accounts of 
other articles the equivalent (in value) of German constitutions shipped 

(Page 60) 115 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions (Page 63) 794 

Error in footing, April, 1909 — credits per ledger. 1,241; correct, 1.244 3 

10,013 
(Continued on Page LXXXVII.) 
48 



General Vote for Officers 



OF THE 



United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America 



arpenter 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON COMPILATION OF VOTE FOR 

GENERAL OFFICEFIS. 

Indianapolis, January 24, 1911. 
To the Officers and Members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 

America — Greeting : 

We, the undersigned, members of the committee elected at the Des Moines convention 
to count the vote for general officers, beg leave to report as follows: 

In pursuance to instructions received in the convention, we arrived in this city on 
November 20th, 1910, and on the following day organized and proceeded to receive the 
mail containing returns and ballots as opened by the G. S. Our first act was to pre- 
serve all envelopes containing ballots and returns and fasten ' same to returns so as to 
identify the date of mailing. In the interim of receiving mail for the first two days, we 
began to tabulate the vote from the returns alone, until we found in the returns from 
one local union in New York City a very great discrepancy in the figures, which com- 
pelled us to refer to the ballots. This we did against the protest of the G. P., G. S. 
and G. T., who stated that the ballots should not be opened except in case of protest. 
The committee then stopped all further tabulation and proceeded to open all the ballots 
and count the same. In the counting of the ballots we discovered that in many local 
unions great numbers of ballots had identical markings, leading the committee to be- 
lieve that one or two, or, in some cases, two or three men, marked large numbers of 
them. The ballots of some local unions bore' evidence of having been in the hands of 
the members and marked and folded individually, while from the same local unions 
there were large numbers of ballots looking as uncreased and dean (except for the X's 
marked on them) as when they left the printer. The votes of these local unions were 
not counted, although there was a division of opinion among the members of the com- 
mittee in regard to the throwing out of some of these local unions, as will be seen by 
reference to the minutes of the committee as incorporated in this report, as there was 
a separate vote taken upon throwing out of every local union, each member going on 
record (Brother John Zaring laying particular stress on the statement that he was in 
doubt about some of them, hence his vote). This marking of the ballots illegally was 
not confined to any one candidate, but was from both sides. In the case of one 
local union we discovered that the election returns were falsified; a false date of elec- 
tion was given, which was proven by the printed notices sent to members notifying 
them of the election. In another case we have letters from one local union in which 
said letters and election returns have the same namQ and address signed to both as B. S., 
each being in a difi^erent handwriting, and many more irregularities too numerous to 
mention. 

Many election returns were received without date (you will see by reference to 
minutes of committee there were 115 of them) and in these cases your committee sent 
a circular letter to each E. S., through the G. S., asking for date of election under seal. 
Where your committee received answers as_ requested their votes were counted, if elec- 
tion was held within the legal limit of time. 

All election returns, ballots and evidence have been preserved by your committee, 
packed in boxes supplied by the G. E. B. and sealed by paper seals, signed by four 
members of the committee. This was done for the purpose of preserving same in case 
of protest or contest. 

II 



r p e o t e r 



We further wish to state that the present method of election of General Officers 
seems to the undersigned, from the experience gained while acting on this committee, 
to be a clumsy and costly one, and if continued will ultimately wreck the organization, 
for which we give the following reasons : 

First — That it is a premium on illegal voting and sharp practice. 

Second — That it leaves with recording secretaries the power to disfranchise the 
local union by holding back returns and by not signing same, either through careless- 
ness or intent. 

Third — That the membership at large are voting more or less blindly, not from 
lack of intelligence, but from lack of opportunity to be acquainted with the merits and 
demerits of the various candidates for office, and have to accept the opinions of the dele- 
gates or others who may be interested parties, and finally. 

That this method is enormously expensive. We give you the following bills of cost, 
furnished by the G. S., bearing in mind that this does not include the cost entailed on 
each local union for meetings, postage, expressage, etc. (Many local unions senj their 
ballots in such a way that they could not be identified.) 

Printing ballots, wrapping paper, muscilage and twine $ 327.95 

Clerk hire — extra time 192.15 

Postage and expressage 589.40 

Telegrams and rubber bands 12.75 

Expenses of committee counting vote to January 21, 1911 inclusive 2,574.00 

Boxes for preserving ballots 22.50 

Total expenses to January 21 $3,718.75 

According to the votes tabulated the following candidates have received the highest 
vote : 

For General President — William D. Huber 20,446 

For First General Vice-President — A. A. Quinn 36,430 

For Second General Vice-President — J. T>. McKinlay 16,969 

For General Secretary — Frank Duffy 38,750 

For General Treasurer — Thomas Neale 29,729 

For General Executive Board — 

First District — Chas. H. Bausher 26,779 

Second District — D. A. Post 21,530 

Third District — John H. Potts 8,959 

Fourth District — R. E. L. Connolly 33,915 

Fifth District — John Walquist 20,385 

Sixth District — W. A. Cole 35,556 

Seventh District — A. Martel 35,729 

Upon the reading of this report before the committee, Brother Wesley Hall refused 
to sign it, but would not give any reason for so doing, stating that he would make a 
minority report, and absolutely refused to let the balance of the committee see his re- 
port. Therefore, at the writing of this, the majority of your committee are in ignorance 
in regard to what is contained in said minority report. 

THOMAS. P. RYAN, Chairman. 
W. R. YAGER, Secretary. 
JOHN ZARING. 
JOHN H. ROBINSON. 

ADDENDUM. 

January 25, 3:45 p. m. 
We wish further to report that it was only through the courtesy of General President 
Wm. D. Huber that the undersigned members of this committee were enabled to see the 

III 



e Carpaimter 



minority report, and if the members at large Tvill read attentively the minutes of the com- 
mittee it Trill be seen that the brother signing said minority report is on record for throw- 
ing out the votes of local unions Tvhich he claims the committee as a whole had no right 
to do. 

THOMAS. P. ETAN, Chairman. 

W. E. YAaER, Secretary. 

JOHN H. EOBINSON. 

JOHN ZAEING. 



MINUTES OF COMPILATION COMillTTEE. 

Committee met at 9 a. m. Monday, November 21, 1910. 

Brother Eyan was elected chairman. Brother Yager was elected secretary. 

Brother Schardt was granted a bearing before committee in regard to Local 
Union No. 1784 of Chicago not receiving enough ballots. 

Motion made and seconded that Secretary Duffy be requested to open his mail 
before the committee and that all envelopes be turned over to the committee. Mo- 
tion carried. 

Motion made and seconded that when we adjourn at noon and night the secretary 
take care of tally sheets. Carried. 

Motion made and seconded that all locals without date of election be notified 
to send in same with president and secretary's signature and seal of Local. Motion 
carried. 

Tuesday, November 22, 1910. 

Motion made and seconded that General Secretary forward ballots to L. U. 1158 
of Berkeley, Cal., said local claiming they did not receive ballots. Carried. 

• Motion made and seconded that General Secretary send blank return sheets to 
Local 828 of Menlo Park, Cal. Carried. 

Motion made and seconded that the general Secretary wire Local 339 Ft. Worth, 
Tex., and notify them that ballots were shipped to them on November 18th, and to 
wire immediately if they have not received them. Motion carried. 

Motion made and seconded that General Secretary wire L. U. 1784 that they can 
continue their election, also send them an extra blank report sheet. Carried. 

Motion made and seconded that letters from Local No. 322 and 14 be attached 
to their report sheets. Carried. 

Wednesday, November 23, 1910. 

Moved and seconded that the General Secretary forward ballots to L. U. 186 of 
Steubenville, Ohio. Carried. 

Friday, November 25, 1910. 

Motion made and seconded that the General Secretary forward ballots to L. U. 
362 Pueblo, Colo., by special delivery. Carried. 

List of Local Unions to be notified. whose returns do not bear date of election: 
87, 93, 112, 116, 150, 151, 235, 256, 268, 293, 303, 320, 343, 360, 370, 375, 381, 493, 496. 
505, 507, 524, 535, 555, 572, 582, 587, 603, 605, 609, 616, 625, 642, 685, 694, 711, 224, 
730, 764, 790, 794, 817, 819, 826, 856, 933. 934, 947. 969, 1046, 1063, 1074, 1077, 1114, 
1153, 1166, 1172, 1178, 1194, 1197, 1207. 1227, 1228, 1246, 1265^ 1330, 1342, 1361, 1374. 
1378, 1391, 1412, 1494, 1516, 1518, 1548, 15S2, 1598, 1602, 1610, 1619, 1715, 1744, 1810, 1811, 
1817, 1852, 1867, 1875, 1878, 1886, 1899, 1911, 1933, 1943, 653, 1082, 1499, 1692, 1809, 
1387, 1422, 1758, 1667, 56, 78, 154, 431, 1009, 1294, 261, 272, 724, 799, 923. 

Monday, December 5, 1910. 
Motion made and seconded that all communications in answer to letters asking 
for dates of election of General Officers bearing the seal of local and signed by 
Eeeording Secretary be accepted as official. Carried-. 

IV 



T Ihi e C a r p a o t a r 

December 7, 1910. 

Motion made and seconded that bal ots of L. XT. 178 be laid aside for investiga- 
tion. Carried. Saturday, December 10, 1910. 

Motion made and seconded that Secretary be instructed to request K XJ. 1391 to 

forward minutes of November 16, 23, 30, December 7, also to ask Brother Eedding- 

ton to make affidavit to statement which he made by letter to committee under date 

of December 5, 1910. Carried. ^ , ,, ,n-,« 

Wednesdaj', December 14, 1910. 

Motion made and seconded that Secretary write to secretaries of various locals 
asking them for a copy of the minutes o meetings in which proceedings of election 
of General Officers were recorded. Canied. 

Thursday, January 5, 1911. 

At 11 a. m. the committee took up the votes of the locals which were protested. 

L. U. 73 was taken up, protest of Brother William Michaels was read, stating 
that there were not 472 in hall. Moved and seconded that ballots of L. U. 73 be 
thrown out. Carried. 

Brothers Zaring and Hall voted No on motion. (Approved.) 

Protest from John M. MoCullough of L. U. 131 Seattle, Wash., also 0. S. Niles, 
of the same local, was read. Moved and seconded that ballots of D. XJ. 131 be 
thrown out. Motion carried by unanimous vote. (Approved.) 

Moved and seconded that all- local unions whose votes are thrown out be noti- 
fied. Brother Eyan declared the motion out of order. Brother Hall appealed from 
the decision of the chair. Yager and Hall voted No. The decision of the chair was 
sustained. (Approved.) 

Protest from L. U. 1391 was taken up, but after reading same and looking over 
votes it was moved and seconded that Vote of L. XJ. 1391 be tabulated. XJnanimously 
carried. (Approved.) 

Protest from Chas. Barkhausen, Williamsbridge, Bronx, N. Y., against counting 
vote of L. XJ. 138 of New York City, also one from Daniel P. O'Connell, President of 
No. 138. John P. Donovan, E. S. of No. 138, sent affidavits stating protest was 
not so. Motion, made and seconded tha vote of L. XJ. 138 be thrown out. Carried. 

Zaring and Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

(Ballots thrown out because a large number were marked by one person.) 

Other locals whose ballots showed signs of illegal voting were taken up. 

L. XJ. 22 of San Francisco was taken up. Motion made and seconded that vote 
of No. 22 be thrown out, as there were tigns of illegal voting. Motion carried. 
Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 8 of Philadelphia wa taken up. The ballots were gone over by 
the committee, as they showed signs of illegal voting. It was moved and seconded 
that the vote of No. 8 be counted. 

Hall and Zaring voted Yes. 

Yager, Robinson and Eyan voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 9 Buffalo, N. Y., was taken up, and as the ballots showed signs of 
a lot of them being marked by a few men it was moved and second'ed that the vote 
of No. 9 be thrown out. 

Hall and Zaring voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 10 Chicago, 111., was taken up, and as the ballots showed that a 
great many were marked by a few men it was moved and seconded that the vote of 
No. 10 be thrown out. Motion carried. 

Hall and Zaring voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 20 Camden, N. J., was taken up, and as the ballots showed evi- 
dence of being marked by a few men it was moved and seconded that the vote of 
No. 20 be thrown out. 



T Ihi e C a r p a o t a r 

Zaring and Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 23 was taken up, and as ballots did not arrive here before De- 
cember 15, the vote was thrown out. Ballots also showed signs of illegal voting. 

Friday, January 6, 1911. 

Vote of L. TJ. 115, Hartford, Conn., was taRen up. After going over ballots 
carefully, it was moved and seconded that the vote be counted. Motion carried. 

Byan voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XT. 117, Albany, N. Y., was taken up. Ballots were carefully gone 
over by the committee, and as they showed illegal voting, most of the ballots being 
marked by a few men, it was moved and seconded that the vote of No. 117 be thrown 
out. Motion carried. Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 126, Brooklyn, N. Y., was taken up. Ballots were carefully gone 
over, and as they bore evidence of a great many being marked by a few men, it was 
moved, seconded and carried that the vote of No. 126 be thrown out. Motion carried. 

Zaring and Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 160, of Philadelphia, was taken up, the committee went carefully 
over the ballots and they showed evidence of quite a few being marked by a few 
men. Moved and seconded that the vote of No. 160 be counted. Motion lost. 

Robinson, Yager and- Eyan voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 167 was taken up; committee went carefully over the ballots and 
found that most of them were marked by a few men. Moved and seconded that vote 
of No. 167 be thrown out. Motion carried unanimously. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 178, Montreal, Canada, was taken up. The ballots were gone over 
carefully by the committee and quite a few showed they had been marked by the same 
hand. It was moved and seconded that he vote of No. 178 be counted. Motion lost. 

Robinson, Eyan and Yager voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 214, Brooklyn, N. Y., was taken up and gone over carefully by the 
committee. Quite a few ballots showed they were marked by a few men, and it was 
moved and seconded that the vote of No. 214 be thrown out. Motion carried. 

/aring and Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 285 was taken up and ballots were carefully gone over. As they 
showed signs of being voted by several men, it was moved and seconded that vote of 
No. 285 be thrown out. Motion carried. 

Zaring and Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

The vote of L. TJ. 309, New York City, was taken up, and after the committee looked 
over the ballots it was moved and seconded that the vote be counted. The chairman 
declared the motion out of order, as evidence in the ballots showed signs of being 
marked by a few members. 

Brother Zaring appealed from the decision of the chair. The motion upholding the 
appeal was carried. 

It was moved and seconded that the vote of No. 309 be counted. Carried. 

Ryan and Yager voted No. (Approved.) 

It was moved and seconded that the ballots of L. U. 309 be kept with the other 
votes thrown out. Motion lost. 

Robinson, Zaring and Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

The vote of L. TJ. 318 was taken up and on going over the ballots carefully it was 
found quite a lot of them showed evidence of being marked by one man. Motion made 
and seconded that vote of No. 318 be counted. Motion lost. 

Robinson, Ryan and Yager voted No. (Approved.) 

The vote of L. TJ. 359 was taken up, and as the ballots showed that a great many 
had been marked by a few men, it was moved and seconded that the vote be thrown 
out. Motion carried. 

VI 



Tlhie C a r p e mi t e r 

Hall voted No. (ApjHroved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 410, Selma, Ala., was taken up and gone over by committee. After 
Seeing that quite a few ballots were marked by the same men it was moved and sec- 
onded that the vote of No. 410 be thrown out. Motion carried, Zaring and Hall voting 
No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 440 of Buffalo, N. Y., was taken up, and as the ballots showed 
about one-third of- them marked by one person it was moved and seconded that the vote 
be thrown out. Carried. 

Hall voted no. (Carried.) 

The vote of L. U. 575, New York City, was taken up and gone over carefully by 
the committee, and ,as the ballots showed that quite a few were marked' by the same 
person it was moved and seconded that the vote be thrown out. Motion carried. 

Zaring and Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 727, New York City, was taken up by committee and gone over 
carefully, and quite a few ballots bore the same mark. It was moved and seconded 
that the vote of No. 727 be counted. 

Motion lost, Robinson, Ryan and Yager voting No. (Approved.) 

Saturday, January 7. 

Vote of L. U. 761, Sorel, Que., Canada, was taken up and gone over carefully by 
the committee. Most of the ballots bore evidence of having been marked by one man. 
It was moved and seconded that the vote of No. 761 be thrown out. Motion carried. 

Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 801, Woonsocket, R. I., was gone over carefully by committee, and 
as most of the ballots were apparently marked by one man it was moved and seconded 
that the vote of No. 801 be thrown out. Motion carried. 

Zaring and Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 824, Muskegon, Mich., was taken up by committee carefully, and as 
most of the ballots showed same markings it was moved and seconded that the vote of 
No. 824 be thrown out. Motion carried, Zaring and Hall voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 877, Worcester, Mass., was taken up by committee and gone over 
carefully, and as most of the ballots bore the same markings it was moved and sec- 
onded that the vote of No. 877 be thrown out. 

Motion carried. Hall voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 887, Hampton, Va., was taken up by the committee and gone over 
carefully, and as most of the ballots were shown to have been marked by one person 
it was moved and seconded that the vote of No. 887 be thrown out. Carried. 

Zaring and Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 943, Tulsa, Okla., was taken up and gone over carefully, and as the 
ballots did not show any similarity of markings it was moved and seconded that the 
vote of No. 943 be counted. Motion carried. 

Ryan voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of Ll XJ. 961, Summit, N. J., was taken up by the committee, and the ballots 
showed signs of a good many being marked by same person. It was moved and sec- 
onded that the vote of No. 961 be counted. Motion lost, Ryan, Yager and Robinson vot- 
ing No. (Approved.) 

Monday, January 9, 1911. 

The vote of L. XJ. 1008, Brooklyn, N. Y., was gone over carefully by the commit- 
tee, and the ballots show signs of being marked by a few members; also the returns and 
letters received by the committee show that the alleged signatures of the Recording 
Secretary are two different handwritings. (Voted 818 — Oct. 30, membership 838.) 
Moved and seconded that the vote of No. 1008 be thrown out. Carried. 

Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

vn 



TIbe Carpenter 

Vote of L. U. 1013 was taken up by committee, and as the ballots showed signs of 
several being marked by one person it was moved and seconded that the vote of 1013 be 
thrown out. Carried. i 

Zaring and Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

The vote of L. U. 1036, Paterson, N. J., was taken up by committee and gone over 
carefully, and as the ballots showed signs of same markings it was moved and sec- 
onded that the vote of No. 1036 be thrown out. Motion carried, Zaring and Hall vot- 
ing No. 

(Voted 195— membership Oct. 30, 207.) (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1160, St. Jean, Quebec, Canada, was taken up and gone over carefully 
by the committee, and as the ballots showed signs of being marked by one person it 
was moved and seconded that the vote of No. 1160 be throv.'n out. Motion carried. 

Zaring and Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1168, Port Colborne, Canada, was taken up by committee, and as 
the ballots showed that quite a few were marked by one man it was moved and sec- 
onded that the vote of No. 1168 be thrown out. Motion carried, Hall voting No. 
(Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1209, Newark, N. J., was taken up by the committee and gone over 
carefully, and as the ballots showed markings by a few men it was moved and sec- 
onded that the vote be thrown out. Motion carried, Zaring and Hall voting No. (Ap- 
proved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1216, Gait, Ont., Canada, was taken up by the committee and gone 
over carefully. Motion made and seconded that the vote be counted. Carried. 

Yager and Eyan voted No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1442, Augusta, Ga., was taken up by the committee and ballots gone 
over carefully. A greater part of them showed the same marks, and it was moved 
and seconded that the vote of No. 1442 be thrown out. Motion carried, Hall voting 
No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1446, Albany, N. Y., was taken up by the committee, and as several 
were marked by one man with an indelible pencil it was moved and seconded that the 
vote of No. 1446 be thrown out. Motion carried, Zaring and Hall voting No. (Ap- 
proved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1474, Yauco, Porto Eoco, was taken up by the committee, and as 
the marking of the ballots was done by a few men it was moved and seconded that 
the vote of 1474 be thrown out. Motion carried, Zaring and Hall voting No. (Ap- 
proved.) 

The votes of L. U. 1481 and 1487 had no seal, but ballots showed markings by a 
few men. 

Vote of L. TJ. 1526, Wilmington, Del., was taken up by the committee, and as the 
markings were the same on most of them it was moved and seconded that the vote of 
No. 1526 be thrown out. Motion carried. Hall voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 1527, Wheaton, HI., was taken up, and as markings on ballots were 
evidently made by a few men, and as every member of the organization was voted, it 
was moved and seconded that the vote of 1527 be thrown out. Unanimously carried. 
(Approved.) 

The vote of L. U. 1565, New York City, was gone over by the committee, and as 
ballots showed markings by a few men it was moved and seconded that the vote of 
1565 be thrown out. Motion carried. Hall voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1584, St. Anne de Bellevue, Canada, was taken up, and as the bal- 
lots showed same markings it was moved and seconded that the vote of No. 1584 be 
thrown out. Motion carried. Hall voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1589, Arecibo, Porto Eico, was taken lip, and as the vote showed 

vni 



arpeoter 



signs of ballots being marked by a couple of men it was moved and seconded that the 
vote of 1589 be thrown out. Motion carried, Hall voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1592, Ocean City, N. J., was taken up, and as ballots showed same 
markings it was moved and seconded that the vote of No. 1592 be thrown out. Mo- 
tion carried, Hall voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1596 was taken up, and a letter was read from the secretary of said 
local, stating that he instructed the members to scratch the vote in the manner in 
which they were scratched. As the intent of the voter was shown in the markings it 
was moved and seconded that the vote be counted. The chairman declared the motion 
out of order, as he claimed the vote was not marked legally. The decision of the 
chair was not sustained. Motion lost, Rj'an, Eobinson, Yager and Hall voting No. 

Vote of L. U. 1635, Kansas City, Mo., was taken np and gone over carefully, and 
as they showed signs of similar markings on the ballots it was moved and seconded 
that the vote of 1635 be counted. Motion carried, Eyan voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. TJ. 1640, San Francisco, was taken up by the committee and gone over 
carefully. Motion made and seconded that the vote of No. 1640 be counted. Motion 
carried, Ryan voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1674, New York, N. Y., was taken up, and as the ballots gave evi- 
dence of similar markings it was moved and seconded that the vote of No. 1674 be 
thrown out. Motion carried. Hall voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 1677, Thorold, Canada, was taken up, and as the ballots did not 
show any similarity of markings it was moved and seconded that the vote of 1677 be 
counted. Motion carried, Eyan voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. XJ. 16S4, Sherbrooke, Que., Canada, was taken up, and as the ballots 
were shown to have been marked by one person it was moved and seconded that the 
vote of No. 1684 be thrown out. Motion carried, Hall voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1751, Sanford, Fla., was taken up by the committee and gone over. 
Moved and seconded that the vote of No. 1751 be counted. Motion carried, Eyan and 
Yager voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. U. 1784, Chicago, 111., was taken up by the committee and gone over 
carefully. Moved and seconded that the vote of L. TJ. 1784 be counted. Motion car- 
ried, Eyan voting No. (Approved.) 

Moved and seconded that both returns be added and tabulated. Motion carried. 
(Approved.) 

Tuesday, .January 10, 1911. 

Vote of L. U. 1793, Three Elvers, Que., Canada, was taken up by the committee 
and gone over carefully, and as the markings did not show much similarity it was 
moved and seconded that the vote of No. 1793 be counted. Motion carried, Eyan vot- 
ing No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. TJ. 1833, Humacao, Porto Eico, was taken up by the committee, and 
as the ballots showed similar markings, but not enough to warrant throwing out, it 
was moved and seconded that the vote of No. 1833 be counted. Motion carried, Eyan 
voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. TJ. 1932, Amerieus, Ga., was taken up by the committee and gone over 
carefully, and as the ballots showed signs of same markings it was moved and seconded 
that the vote of No. 1932 be thrown out. Motion carried, Hall voting No. (Approved.) 

Tuesday, January 17, 1911. 

Motion made and seconded that all parties concerned in this election shall wait un- 
til the committee makes its final report as to results of election. Motion carried. Hall 
voting No. (Approved.) 

Vote of L. TJ. 1787 was taken up and a protest, signed and sworn to by three 
members of No. 1787 was read, stating that the ballots were taken out of the hall and 
counted the next day at th ' Recording Secretary 's house and mailed from the Finan- 

IX 



T Ih e C a r p e mi t e r 

cial Secretary's house, only one teller being present when the ballots were counted. 
This statement was sworn to. 

Moved and seconded that the vote of No. 1787 be thrown out. Unanimously car- 
ried. (Approved.) 

January 20, 1911. 

Motion made and seconded that the vote of L. U. 13 of Chicago take same course 
as those of other locals which have been thrown out on account of being mailed too late. 

Eyan, Hall and Zaring voted Yes, Yager and Robinson No. (Approved.) 

Moved and seconded that the committee reconsider action taken in regard to vote 
of L. U. 10. Chairman declared the motion out of order and Brother Eobinson ap 
pealed from the decision of the chair, claiiKing that the Secretary made a mistake 
when he recorded the vote, as he voted No on the proposition, and he is recorded as 
voting Yes. The chair was not sustained. Motion lost. 

Yager and Eobinson voted Yes. (Approved.) 

Saturday, January 21, 1911. 

Moved and seconded that the committee reconsider action taken on Thursday, Jan- 
uary 5, in the case of L. U. 10 of Chicago, 111. Motion carried. 

Eyan, Yager, Eobinson and Zaring voted Yes, Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

Moved and seconded that the vote of L. U. 10 be tabulated. Motion carried, Zar- 
ing, Eobinson and Hall voting Yes and Eyan and Yager voting No. (Approved.) 

Moved and seponded that committee reconsider action taken against L. U. 8, Thurs- 
day, January 5, 1911. The chairman ruled the motion out of order, and Brother Zaring 
appealed from the decision of the chair. Chair not sustained. 

Moved and seconded that the committee reconsider action taken against L. XJ. 8. 
Eobinson, Zaring and Hall voted Yes, Eyan and Yager voted No. (Approved.) 

Moved and seconded that the vote of L. IT. 8 be tabulated. Motion carried. Eob- 
inson, Zaring and Hall voted Yes, Eyan and Yager voted No. (Approved.) 

Motion made and seconded that all Locals whose votes the committee has thrown 
out for evidence of illegal voting be notified by registered mail, stating cause for same. 
Motion lost. Eobinson and Eyan voted Yes, Zaring, Hall aiid Yager voted No. 

Brother Eyan stated the reason he voted Yes was because the committee acted on 
two Local Unions without oflBcial notice, and that all should be given some chance 
to be heard. Brothers Yager, Zaring and Hall voted No for the reason that the mo- 
tion was made by Brother Yager at the beginning of throwing out votes, but the mo- 
tion was defeated by members voting Yes at this time, and they did not wish to incur 
any extra expense on the U. B., which would be the case for the reason they would 
be obliged to remain at the General Ofiice awaiting answers from locals. (Approved.) 

Motion was made and seconded that the minutes as a whole be approved up to 
date. Motion carried unanimously. 

Brother Cole of the Executive Board appeared before the committee in the inter- 
ests of L. U. 22 of San Francisco, stating that said local used the official ballot box 
of the city of San Francisco, borrowed from the board of elections, and that they may 
have used more than one ballot box, as he claims to have seen two boxes in the hall, 
but does not know how many they may have used. (Approved.) 

Monday, January 23, 1911. 

Motion made and seconded that all official returns be put in a box, with ballots 
and returns thrown out by. committee and sealed, the same as other boxes. Motion car- 
ried. 

Hall voted No. (Approved.) 

January 24, 1911. 

Motion made and seconded that minutes of committee be incorporated in and pub- 
lished as part of report of this committee. Carried unanimously. 

X 



Tlhe Carpemtar 

January 25, 1911. 
Motion made and seconded that the balance of the committee stay in session until 
the committee gets a printers' proof sheet of committee's report and minutes and tabu- 
lation sheets. Motion carried. Zaring, Byan, Robinson and Yager voted Yes. 

Motion made and seconded that this committee request the G. E. B. to preserve 
all sealed boxes which contain ballots and returns with seals unbroken until such time 
as they, the G. E. B., shall give permission to investigate same, should there be a 
contest or protest of said election. Motion carried. 

Zaring, Eyan, Eobinson and Yager voted Yes. (Approved.) 

THOS. P. EYAN, Chairman. 
W. E. YAGEE, Secretary. 
JOHN H. EOBINSON. 
JOHN ZARING. 



XI 



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■(tlrHTtHODTtS-"^ •OiCOmCOlClOOiOrHtM'XSlCirH 
CO^t- .b-i-t rHrHCOCO 




mar) 5SX 


NNin5 -v ^nnx-av 


^DOOCJ-^t^OOOl lOrHrHOiOilOOlOt-COt^^lO 

(Mi-HrHCO(MrHCvlCOU:)(MC<lrHlO oacOOi-^Ot-rH 

CO rH ri rH , iH 


a 'u 


aNAVd AHHVH 


TH-^Oait--THrHrJHrHC\lCOrH -t-tOCOOS -t-CO 
rH rH i-H i-i • rH 

* 


XQHVHDS •£) KVITIIM. 


COI>-rHCOrHrHOCOCST*<rHrHOOrHOOOlO -CDrH 
rHr-ICO C3C<lC0rHCM lO COCO'i-lrH 
CQ rH ■ T-\ 


HsanH 'a iMvmiiW 


rHlOlOOasiOrHCOCOmeDCOrHCO-^OOCOCirHai 
ClCgrHCTrHrH rHrH r-{ r-i t-tOCO 

rH rH 






LOCAL 
UNION 

NUMBER 






















T-HCvlCOTflt-OOOCvTCO -^lO tOt-OOOiOrHCOlOCD 

cocococococotH'*-^'*'^'*-*'*'<*<iou:iioicic 



XIII 



« 
O 

m 

0) 

> 

U 

w 

2 

a 


•?S!a 1U 


laxHvw -v 


lOOar-ICQrH|--r-Hl^i:r)-*^lC(rC"*C:>)OCDO— (t-TW 
CO i-H IM <-! — ( —I T^ 


■jsiaq}9 


3703 'V "M. 


CDCCICOi— lOOOOCOCOQOlCCOCMOOOlOCMi— (lOOlO 
OtMCOCOGOCOlOiHOi OlCCOCOlO'-t'-lfM^O'-C 


"1 .2 
Q 


aoxoo-aj -a t 




xsinbivM. NHor 


St-rOOOt-CllOfTOCM •'^OCDt-.-Ht-OD.IGlTti 


aaow3DV7a ahhvh 




•jsiQ qit' 


AaiONNOo -1 "a "xaoH 


I— IC<]»-Ht-t-f>JlOl-^CDCOOOTtlOO(Mi— (1— li— icooa 
OCOCOCOlO^DCOr-lQO fOCOCOlOlOmT-HOO-^CO 
O- rH (M rH CO CO 


to 

« 


NosaHoxnH •i wvmiM. 


tHIM' cm lO lO I-H •OlCOi— ('CO 
I— 1 1— 1 I— 1 . 


saaxaj -a NHor 


CM -COCO^CCi-lrH -MtO -(My^COCOT-l,-! -lO 
CO • --^t^ • ■ Tt< l>- • 


aa7iM. NvwaaH 


lO • Tfl 1-1 • CO Ol r-I rH 


sravav aNvaoH 


o •iniHoqio ■ -co -loiocqco -im -lofot- 

Uti* Or-1-.-. - O -OJ---^ 


XXIM.aH "X NHOr 


CO- -Tfl •• rH • CO-COri* 


siAvan -0 T 


lO - --^CilO . -rH ■r-'OlrHr-lt-CO ' r-t Oi ■ 
• ■ rH C-l • • ■ i-H rH ■ fM 


SXXOJ "H NHOf 


CO .a;cot^o»-H-^tDOioiij::)c^Oica«o-*i-H03C: 

rH.T-lrHT?'r-( CO '^ COr-iCC 00 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


HnHonviaw aaxaa 


^CMCOt~CfitOt-COOOCOCDcMr:!OoCOCO'X)tDCO 
p:C-_ rHClc<llO rH COrH CM-^IO lOCQrH 
. ..^ fH rH CM 


xsoj -v -a 


ZjrO CDt-OcOOOOCOt-HcOlOOirHQOOOt-rJlCO 
^lOCMrHO-^JlOrHCO t-tMOrHCMi-H 0<MCM 
^ Oq rH ^ r-t rH eg 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


Aa7SS0a -V "MM. 


!l!l0t-CDO(MC0t-O(MOc0C<]C<lC--rHrHrHC0t- 
°*CO rHt-(M»0 lO COi-l Oint- CDCOrH 


HaHsnva -h saiavHO 


i;t~t^CqOlOt-rHt-lOt~THt-CMtOIMOTt4lOCS 

?:;ir:)C\IrHO.lT:H rHTjl ICcq^CO OrHOCvJrH 
2 Cv"] CM CO 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


siavHOira 'WM. 


Tt1-^C0G000l0C0C0Ci<MC<ll0l0Ot^tC) -rHiMtM 
QO^rHrHTtirH iM (MrH t-\ lO-COrHrH 


anvsN svHOHX 


fOoo-^iocot-ioiorocjDcooico<ococ<]ooo?o 

ir:ilr-(MrHasiOlO Cl COrHtD<MlOCOrHCOTj1(M 
CO O^ i-\ rH rH <M CM 


iC,03st,n30 


A^ana XNvaa 


CiCMCOOOt-CJDUDOOCOOOOmCOC^lrHOrHOt^t- 
TtHCMCOCMGOCDlOrHO rHcOCOCOfClOa, rHt~-^CO 
(M rH CMrHrHCQ r^rHT}^ 


d " 


aNiva 'Av "syHo 


COO<r>rHCvliX> •COCOT^CaOirti'^CMlCt- -COrHTjH 
rH-^rHrt'- COOCM ""^l 


aaiHsano t aana 


CirHCaCDtD'iHCMtr-CM -CO • -COmcOCMGOOO 
00 O] Cv] • • • -— t tJH rH rH 

f£, ... ,-1 


AaiNix^w -a T 


TtilOt-tDTjIOtOrHCD -Tt' •C0Tt<lCO<M'*O(© 
t-CO COj-(tH lO-CO- O O OrH 
CO CO rH ■ rH - rH CO CM 


sa70NAa-a "m. 'm. 


ICtOOrHCiCDOt^lOTtHCO •rH<MlOOJCC'00i-IC30 

CMCMCqrHrHrHrH rH VO* CO<MCO OCOr-l 


•saij-aoiA 


NNinb -v ariHxav 


t-CQCOCMrHCOCDt-COt-CMOlClb-OiOat-HtOOiT^ 
COCMcOCOlOtOlOrHO OiCSltDCgiOt-rH-.^'^CO 
!MrH (MrHrHrH rHrHTt< 


General 
President 


aNAVa AHHVH 


C» -TJHrHrHtDrHCOCM -COCOCO-^-tlCD -tUCXjCO 
i-\ • T-i y-H • i-^ • to rH 


xaavHDS •£) MvmiM. 


CO -OtJICDCO ■COCOrH'^COt-OrHCOrHrJItD':^ 
t--rHrHCOCM- COrHtDCO CO Oi 
O . CO ■ CO CM 


aaann "a HvmiM. 


C^3CMCOCiCOrHC^CM001^-OTt^ -CMOtOCit^COrH 
(MCMO] rHTjliOrHOi b-rH -rHCCCCl lOCOCM 
T-{ rH rH ■ rH r-{ 




LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 





















\ ' ' ' 


c»CiOrHcM'*iooo(MTt<ir:>cDt-c3oasoiob-OrH 

lOlOCDtDtO'XS'XlCDt-t-t-tr-t-t^t-COOOCOaiCl 



xrv 



js'a VL 



13X3 VW 'V 



irO10'^lir5c0L--cz>Cl00i— it^COO": 



--( rH CO — >; 



. CO Ca rH lO C\l Ol C30 



isia ^^9 



3703 'V 'iW 



to OT -^ CO lO O I 

I— 1 o:: CM r-t 1— I ro ' 



) as CO o CO ai T 



aoxooHJ "a t 



CO O in rH Ci 00 c 



>i— IClt^CO^CMCOl— (TtHClCO 



in w 



isinbivM. NHor 



t^ m t- CO '* CO < 



I CD o lO 1-4 CO CO 



aaoraaovia a^kvh 



COCO^t>OiOt- •c00005lOU^OO^i-ICni 



■5S!a ^11? 



A^^ONNO^ •i "a "xaoH 



COODCOi— li— lOOCOOCMi— llOOCOb-iH-^t-C 
I— li-IC<]rHOCaCv]i-l'XJCOCiOOi t-rHCOi-l< 



NOSaHDXriH'l HVmiM. 



COC<]COCOt— • Oi -COCQaitD -co 



o 



SHaX3<I '3 NHOr 



■ T-l - I-l O Tt< 



aaiiAv NviA[^aH 



CM CO iH • OS iH 



SMvav aNviOH 



00 CM (M i-H W (D 



iXIMSH "X NHOf 



SIAVaH '3 T 



■ CO r-' CO lO " 



SXXO^ "H NHOf 



r-t O CM O to IC 



iH iH CO lO i-l rH 



t- Ttl Ol CO 



00 .-(CO 



r-i • 00 OO 



■Xi CO O O 



CO m tM m -th 



1.2 .H 



-^O i: 



O": 



■i.aaSI.a^O 


Is 





"21 



XV 



NnHonvi^w aaxaa 



i-H^t-t—OtDtr-O-^COC 

r-i t- i-H i-l r-H IC iH C 



. lO lO t- lO CO lO OO 



xsod •¥ -a 



i-H CO CO i-H i-H - Cv] rH I 



A^ISSOH 'V 'WA 



CO OO CO C-l C] t- b- 



■ COCOt-COCOlOi-I^Cit-COTtt"^ 



1-1 ■ CO 1-1 CO I-H 



HHHsnva *H saiHVHO 



COCOCOlOt-COCOOtDt--' 
rH 00 CO 1-1 '^ .H I 



SiaVHOIIM 'MM. 



. CO lO O O . T-H to C 



< O- i-l -rH t- C] 



aivaN svMOHx 



coGit.-^ir:)-*ai(3otDooc 

.— (.-IC-ar-lOOi-IC^ltHCOrHi; 



Aaana sNvna 



lOCOCO-*ODCiCOOCDTfH< 
i-lCOCOi-ti-HCOCOiHCOCOC 



aNivd: 'M. 'svHD 



i-^iHsaHD '£ "aaHji 



AaiNiii^pM 'a T 



■ CO -^ tJh tH m CD 


OTpCOrHCOL--COliO • 
CD cq CO r^ C<i • 

r-{ T-H . 


- OO Tp 
• CI 


CO I-H LO CO LO T— 1 CO 
rH 


T-HC»CDt^'^-+iC\li-Hi-H 
r-H C-] I-H 


TtH CO CVT 

Cvl 


t- t- I-H --I O t- CJl 
CO rH 


COlO'^OOi'^CDC^lT-H 
iH CO CO CO 


• O rH 



Sa70NAaH 'iW "M. 



S-^i-Ht^cDOSCOOlO-^cacOb-mcOCD^CCT-irH 
i-HCM i-( r-Hi-t t-l^C-]C<lCO CvtCO 



NNin5 "v ^nnxav 



SNAVd AHHVH 



Tt4 iH >-H i-t O -^ lO 



. rH ^ CO O t-i (M 

i-i iH CO CO 



. TjH . xH ^ t- 



xaavHOS "o wvmiM. 



• ^ O rH CO 



aaann 'a wvmiM. 






It 

§ 
pq 

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a> 

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•»s!a iu 


laxavw 'v 


cr- io CO CO oi 
o rH o TtH a: 


TfiOrH .TjHocjimt-oicsjooos-^b- 

r-lOOCO .ClrHCOCMCOTjiCMrHt-l-^rH 
rH - rH rH iH 


•isia qjg 


aioo -v -M 


rH 7-i r-\ ■ i-H r-( i-H 




^OXOO^J '3 T 


rH'-i<(Mi-H ■ CO rHr-t rHOCMCO 
1— ( 


xsin^ivM NHor 


U:)--! iHrH-rH COi-l tJ^i-I COlO 


asoiMHovia AHHVH 


■ rH 


•is;a tut 


A7aoNN00 "I 'a 'xaoH 


(MlOCCrHCOCOCOO ■inirHCMCQt--^rHO0«Db-CNI 
OrHeD-*Cli-Ht>.CO •(MrHCOCatO-^lMrHCOCSIi-H 
i-H rH . 1— ( 1— 1 


o 

•c 

to 


NOsaHoxnH 'i Rvmi/A 


• (M 1-1 IC . CM yD CO CO 
1-H 


•rHrHOCOlO -COCOCO 
rH C3 ■ O rH 1-1 


s^axaj 'a nhoi 


00 •COOlCOTtHTjIr-l'* 


. 00 CO o • • ■ CI o: in 

• C] tH • • • rH 


aaaiM NvwnaH 


CO OS C<I !0 


CVI CO to t- 


i-HCOt-'^^COrHCOCOCO 
rH CM (O 


SP\[vavaNvaoH 




rH OO O] O 
rH CI 


• . . rH in rH • rH CI O 

. • • rH • d rH 


XXIMaH -X NHOf 


rH <M CO (M 


. t- Tti-lO 


rHrHC^inClrlddCim 
CI r-^ 


siAvan -3 T 


ClrHCOCOCOW^COOO 


• ■ . rH • CO in rH rH tC 
. . ■ . rH CM rH 


SXXOJ 'H NHOr 


OOCOlOi-HOOCOOOOJb-iniOCDcOTt^COO ■b-Tj^oO 
C<3CJ CM COCMr-( i-HrHi-H - CD 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonvi^H -aaxaa 


TticococO'-H .•^J^coTJ^(M^ncD^^-ooaJcoc<lt-cClco 

COrH CM -CDf-H-^ COO]>-(r-(OTt*-^ 


xsod 'V -a 


cMT-ioicMcsi^aitao.-Hco'^c^aicct-ocDOt-t- 

OCMCOi-HCQrHOOJ COrHCOCMi-1 i-lOt- 
I— t 1— 1 I— 1 rH 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


Aa^ssoH -v 'wa 


00 0]OJCDCO(^^0100«:> .OOlOCOOrnCD-^COrHt-- 
lO 03 CI rH GO • CO CO CM O lO CM 


^aHsnva -h saanvHo 


cocO(MOo<Mi-ipHOioroioo-*ooir:icot-coci 

ICrHrHtMCOiHCOi-ICOCvI CM'^CMrHrHT-HCOCSl 

T-H 


"1! 

Q 
C 
4 


I 


S^3VH^IPM 'MIA 


OlO-*00'COaO(MCiai -OSrHCOCMOOOOCOrHlCO 
1— (i— 11— 1 -^^CM- CM I— II— ICOtO 


a7V3N SVnOHX 


Tt<CM=C>CiOSCOlOCMCXilOC001COCMCO-*-<^00«Dt- 
1-1 OCMCM lOCMrHCM COCM^DCOi-t OCMCO 
rH T-l .-) rH I-H i-l 


i,03 


SI<°39 


Aa^na :aNVHa 


-^ICrHCOCO^i-frH •TjHt-O'^DlOt-COCOOiCJlC 

CM O-^COrHOlCO -0-3 -^CMt-•<:J^<M rHrHt-Ca 

_:.rH r-i ^ . ^ ^ ^ 


— a 

^^ 'rt 

01 .= 

S Si 
■a i 


aNIVJ *M. "SVHO 


O -COCOi-IOOfLD^CMlOiniCM •t-b-LOCOtDr-'Cfl 
rH' (MrH CO-(MrHOrHCO 

1— 1 


a-aiHS3H0 T aa^a 


o.-i'Mm.-icoiorHO ■'.ji.-irHioic'co •coc;':r: 

C3 rH rH rH rH • • i— 1 i— 1 


A3^NI:a^H 'a t 


-*eO(Mt-rHCO^ ■OOlCrHOaCNJt-i-H'Tj* -(MCMO 
to OrH CM't-rH (MlCi-l • t-lO 

T-( rH . 


SaaONA3H 'M. 'M. 


lOcO^OOO .t-tr-COlO(MlOeOCOCDQO(M01lOCJ 
C3 03(M.CMrH-^ i—i CTlrH 


•saj^-aoiA. 
lEjanao }s-[ 


NNin& 'V HJIHXHV 


rH lO CM ^ O CO O O •■* Cvl O -* t- 05 rH CO t- Tt^ CO 
C<]rHOTiHC0rHaiCC •CMrHTjICMtD'^ CM rHrHb- CI 
rH I-H r-\ • r-i r-i i—< 




^1 
a u 


aNAVJ AHKVH 


OiCDcOtOi-l .COCOCO .OrHC^J<:r5t- . .-^tJICD 
rH • CM rH • rH tH • ■ <M rH 


xanvHOS "O MvmiM 


COCQCQrHCOTHOrHCMrH -CQ'^OOClrHOOOlt^rO 

rH rH rH CO <M • ^ rH rH CO '^ 


HaanH *a mviiiim. 


CO -cooci .oooc<lTJ^(Mt-OTt^ocs] -Tt^too 

rH -OCOCM •lOrHCMGO CO<M COCM •rHt-t- 
rH • rH • iH iH . i-H t-H 






LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 






















C-] TjH lo t- a- 
oa oi oa c<i c<] 


O CI CO ^ IC 

CO CO CO CO cr 

rH rH rH rH r-i 


o t- o; ri c-1 CO ^ '-o t^ cc 

COCOCO-^Tt^TtiTtH'*-^-* 
rHrHrHrHrHrHrHrHrHrH 



XVI 



w 



w 



o 



•jsiQ qu 


lax^avR 'V 


ocoi-Ht-cob-^cocicacDooocMoiCT-Hoqt-u:' 

1-1 i-H 


•IsiQ 119 


a70D;V 'lA 


OCDCOtDiOrH'^CCCCICOThtb-'— iCOOOiOlOlOCQ 

(MtMcg t^-co'-lt^Tt^cMcOT^cocoT-^mcot^CNl'tl 

.-1 i-i 


u 

5 "5 

P 


HOXOOHd '3 T 


050CD -i-lrHCOi-lO •tC>t-^t-CDfOT-HlOOOTt< 
i-H •COrHCvl'i-l'-l i-Hr-liH 


isin^7VM.NH0r 


COCOCqiO^lOt-CO-^-^IOai'-ltOTtHOi-lrHtOO: 
rH t- CQi-f iHrHrHi-i lOOQ-* i-H 


aHOM:sovaa ahhvh 


OOi-tTj^T^OSCDtDOOOOOCOlOCSCO -t-CMi-HCDr-l 
I— t tOlO rH i-HtHi— li— lO* i— ICQiHrH 
i—l . 


"ISIQ ^^1? 


AIIONNOD -7 *a 'XaOH 


OtOOt-,-lrHCOOOOOS'*-*t^OOt-C<]t-CCQO 
(MCOCM t-tDrHr^CQt-!CQTt1CqC<li-(lOTtH^CaCO 
.-1 rH 


to 

5 

CO 


NOsaHoxriH -i iMvmiM 


t>C<JCM •OOrHcaTjIOGOTHrHi-l -lOCOrH-^OO 
• t- IM rH »-( 


snaxaa -a NHor 


. .(M-* -t, -fooQ ■ .coiHco • -cocai-i ■ 

■ - . - . -co • • CO 


aaiiM. NvwHaH 


• t- ■ I— 1 iH • 1— I ■ 


SKvavaNvio^ 


T-iCQWi-li-tb- •OOIO '(MOCOOSiH •O''*! -t- 
rH • rH • rH t- • <M rH ■ 


XXIAVaH "X NHOf 


. . . . ,— 1 


siAvan -0 T 


ITS -co - -co -c^io • i-{ -coo •(M«>caioco 

• • 1— 1 • . . rH • , 


SXXOd "H NHOr 


(MrH in tH (M-^T-ICMrH 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NiiHonvi^pi ^axaa: 


Oi(M«D •CMOOlOCOCOCJCOCC'T^COO't^'^i-Ht-lO 
rH • 'C' T— li— 1 I— loqi— (ThliHcOC0C\JrHi— 1 


xsoj -v -a 


THt-b-COcQOrHCOCDOJlClOairH -mCQCOi— It^ 
iHrHiH t>-(Mi-ICOC<]C<!(MCMrHa» -CQCvimiHOT 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


A37SS0H -V "MM 


rH CDtD CMrHiHi-HCOr-ftD-CO fOCM^ 


H3Hsnva -H sa7avHo 


COC<]CDt-t-GOC\llOOt^THt^rt<l>.OOTHO"*0] 
i-jrHi-H ^rHi-HOJ CMfHrHtDi-l03TtlTt1 
1— ( 



o £ a 



CD 



SlaVHOIM 'MM. 



o m ^ CO ^H t- - 



•«r-lrHt-MCOaDt-OM^O 



aiVSN SVWOHX 



5 (M Ol C<] -^ I 
H rH rH C<3 C<1 ( 



i^Dagi^uao 






Op: 



•S9IJ-33T^ 



A3ana ^Nvna 



3 CO lO rH CO < 
3 rH tJH tJI CQ ( 



aNIVd: 'M 'SVHD 



a^iHsaHO T 'aan^ 



i C\] lO QO lO 



aiir:icoococ>L--oi' 

CM CO rH rH r 



l>- C] • ri t- -* i-i t- rH lO 



Aa7Ni33M *a 'f 



CO Tt^ Og CNl C 



JrHlOCOCOOC^t-lO ■lO'^-^t-CO 
) CQ rH rH (M - r-\ r-i r-i 



saiONAa'a 'm. *m 



NNinb -v ^riHXHV 



4) 'O 

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aNAva AaavH 



xaavHDS "O wvmiM. 



CMCOC^rHrHOD ■ CO ^ 



HaanH 'a wvmiM 



T— (tDcirHo:)oacacot--^coiHeoc<] -cocovocdo 
I-^<Mr^r-^l^coI-^I-^coc^Ir-^ c-ioa -lO CO CO 



1.^ 

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XVII— Carp. 



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•»s!a tiu 


laXHVIM *V 


C0l0(M00l05DOI>--<i1fH<M(M<M!0cCC0C»Dt^00O 


•JSIQ t[59 


aioo -v 'M. 


^i-HL—COlOtOCJt-rt<OCiCJi-HCOOU:5C;t-COrH 
(MCO't^^t-iCMCOCMCsaCQi-llOCO-^t-lOCC i-li-H 


•o'B 

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soiooHd -a T 


. t- -^ CQ <M • O "* CD lO O CD CO OJ t- lO CO <D i-l GO 
- IC -^i— 1 • 1— 1 CO CO Ttl 


xsm5^Vi^A.NH0^ 


1— i«Dcoot-oiwoacioacooD •■^looQvo •cow 


anoMsov^a akhvh 


COtD(roCM<r)t-OOOaiTt*<MlO .CDmiHrHiHCOi-l 
1-1 


•;s!a Vi' 


Aa70NN03 -t: 'a uao^ 


•COOOlOTt^Clt-r-t -r-llOt-OOlOlOTjsCDt-OOi-l 
•OJtMrHr-HCvlCQCM "(Mi-Ht^CsICOCDIOCO iHrH 
• -^ --H T-i 


o 
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NOsaHOxnH 't ^vmiM. 


cgotD -ri - •mcQ'* ..-fi-i -cococa -CQ-^ 

i-l-*lO- --03 -CO * CO- 


saaxaa -a NHor 


»-l O O CO • • t^ r-t 

CO O] • • 

T-i ' ■ 


CO '^ CM 1-1 ■ tC ^ -co • • 

1—1 • 1—1 1—1 ■ • ■ 


aaiiM. NVMHaH 


CM l^- Ci CO - CO • ■ 
•^ ■r-\ r-i ■ (M • • 
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(M i-( t- .goicoi • • CO i-i 
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SMvavaNvio^ 


i-l QO O t- -^ ■ t- - 

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C^O'2 COr-ir-^t^C^C^^ - - 


XlIMaH *X NHOr 


• CXiOCMT-f -(M •r-iCQ'^COi-HCOt-iM - .t-ti-H 

• O 1-1 . ■ - . CO • ■ 

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siAvan -3 T 


i-liniTt<COrH -i-ICgi-l •rHi-ICM>#CO(M - 'i-tCO 
CM ■ • CM (M iH • • 


SXXOtI 'H NHOr 


CDcOlOOOi -OcTl .QOoDOCDr}^lOO■* -iHOQ 
t- CO CM • i-i ■ 1-1 tH 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


Mn:H9nv^3H "aaxad 


COOCiCMCOt-OOCDO'^00<Jli-(Ob-OC» -Tf^lO 
»-imi-( C\l.-l(Mr-( i-i CQCOCMCOCO • 
x+4 


xsoj 'v -a 


i-icDCit-co --^co^t-omi-icooooint-TticD 

CvJCOC^COiH-i-l r-l '^pHCM^CO i-i 
CO 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


AarrssoH "v 'ial/a 


C0T}it--C\]OC0Oi-lt-i-l^00t-O(Mlj0 ■ •rHCD 
1-I0t-CM«-I iHi-l CM<MCOi-IOQi-(Oa • • 

fM - . 


^ansnva -h sai^vHD 


i-t'-<Oiio^^ouot-i-(coc3i-<*<ioOiOooi>.i=>L:> 
1— icMt^cvi I— itMi—ii— I I— ii— icairacoco th 

lO 


1 

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siavHOiM 'WM 


lC^t-CO<^t-C<JCDCOinCOOlOCOCM-*COt>.-<#(M 
OlOrH T-( 1-1 tH i-li-ICMtM 
I— 1 


aiV3N SVKOHX 


Oil— lt^COOO:i— lOi— ib-COCMt— (MIOCMCD -COOl 

1-lt^ocor^l-^cMC^al-lI-lr-i^r:^l-lco^OTJ^co -i-n 
b- 1-1 


i.o. 


Sh°30 


Aaana ^Nv^a 


CM(MC000lOlO"^CD^i— l-^lOC^lCOCO-^iOb-COOl 
CMi-lt-TjIi-ICNICOCvlCQCMCOincO'^t-tOCO rH 


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1— loo ••^ -CMCOCMCOCDi— lTt<I>-COCOl0 1Ci 
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b- t^- 


a^iHsaHO '£ aana 


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rH^ -OOCDOCMIO • -COr-lOCOOi-lrJH 
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SQTONAaH 'AV 'AV 


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»HOt-b-C0(MO -CvIi-i(MCDO(Mt>-CO'<ft-COW 

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LOCAL 
UNION 

NUMBER 


■ 




















Gii-iCO'#COG0C:i-ICslCOlO^t-COCli-IC0"<* 

t^cxDcooDCOQOcociCiCiO>OiCic:tasc30o 
1-l1-t1-lI-iI-^I-^I-lI-f1-l.-lI-lIHI-l^-(T-((^^c^lC] 


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isxavw -v 


lOL--COt--i-ICQCOCOr-iC^ (>]i-H^COi-llOrHCOCO 

T-l T-H T-H 


•?S!a 1"9 


3703 -V VA 


lOCirHOCCiCO^OCSCOt^Tt^t-^ODOJCQO'— <CO^ 

"'— t I— 1 1—1 


■2 '5 
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■a.OlDOS.i -3. ■£ 


CJi— ICOi— tLOi— (r-*ai»-iClCOI>-rHO:iCOr-ioo -lOCO 
i-t OO i-f r-4 CO rH • CT 


xsmSiViYi. NHor 


T^ioci •?ot--^oioc<]CQOir:)ioiO"*cicoiocD 

I— ICCCQ- rH,— (COt— If— i (M 


saowaovia a-shvh 


COCsl i-HCM T-|-*C<lC>3»-ti-l 

1— t 


•JsiQ tut 


A'noNNOo ■! "a uaoH 


CMi:Oi— lir:)t-lO"^lOO<M^Ttt|>.|— *rHCOlOrHOCCO 

lOQD^t-rHCqCOcoOOCM OliHTH-^iHcMrHCOCO 

rH rH 


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K0S3H3XnH "T WVmiM. 


1— 1 r- 1 • ■ t— 1 


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saaxsd: -a nho: 


rHCl -Tt^ •CqrHrH'XJlO 


1-1 OC 1-1 CQ ■ CQ • -* ■ 


aa7iM. NVPMaaH 


GOCOCOTjix^PHfMCQb-Ol 


• i-\ • • ':0 CQ • CQ lO 
• • r-H • CO 


swvav aNV70H 


i-l • (M - 


XXIMaH -x NHOr 


,-tCOrHCOlOb-<^lOCr;rHrHTt* •<© -i-I - • • i-i 
lO iH ..... 
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siAvaa -3 T 


(Mai(MlO'~'r- ItOi— li— (CO -CO -OacO 'Tjl -rH ■ 


SXXOJ "H NHOr 


COT}HaOcOt>-i-lrHt-(:DCO'<i<OOlOtO^'<41tHlOCOU:) 
Cqcq I— (i— iOacO I— ICOrH 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonv73w aaxaa 


lOTj^l>-GOt-lOb-i-tOOGli-ltr-o"iO^ -OO -t-t- 


xsoa -v -a 


I— (C;i— (COOCOt^i— (CO-^lOOCO^lOCQCJrHCO'^ 
■^CQ I>-iHtHt— (1— l-^i— I i-H -^CJi— (cOi— iCCi— i 


1st 
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trict 


A37SS0H -V -WM. 


OCOGOO-^^t^iO'^CC«D»Ht-lOlO'^t-CDOC<l 
(MCD i-IC<lTHMCO<Ml>.Ca 


HaHsnva -h S33hvh3 


OlO'^C^COOb-i— flOrHCvJCQO'^COt-COOOOi 
IQ-^COi-iiHCMi-lrHC'^lfH ,_|rHi-t t- CQCO 


C 


Treas- 
urer 


SlaVH3m 'IMAl 


I— ItHC. COCOOOCOQOi— ICM-^t— t-GOi— I'l^t^tML^-CO 
<MC<]CO rHi-lr-HCQi-l i-! CQ iHCJ 


aiV3N SVMOHX 


t-i-HTj^T^COtD'T^lMirr'lMOl-rHintCGi-ICOOCOCQ 
CO lO b-f-(i-IC<lCqG:r-i FHrH-^COi-ICqT-ICQrH 

1-1 1-1 


^,oa 


SI<°3£I 


Aaana 3NVHa 


OOGlCgoOO-^^tDb-tHOOTt^COOr-tCClOCCOGl 
WOcOOOrHCMCOCOOCM <Mi-l-*T}HrHlOrH-^CC 
,H I— 1 1— 1 




aNIVJ -M, •SVH3 


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T-l CQ -Ttl I-l CI .-! 


A33NI23M 'a T 


t-'-'0 0:ilOOOOOOCQCQTHO:)?DOCOCOCQ -CQO 
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saaoNAaa "a^, -m. 


OOCt— ICDt-OCOi— IIOCO •CDCO'^OIOCQIOOOCS 
CO'—' 1— 1 1— It— (CQ • 1—1 CQ CO 


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NNin?) -v >inHxav 


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1-1 I-l »-l 




aNAVa AHHVH 


•'^CQrHCqrHL-- -CdO -t-COCQ • -tJICQCQC^J 
■ 1— 1 -^ • T— 1 — 1 • iH ■ • C^l 


xaavH3s '0 wvmiM. 


CQCOtJIOCO -OCQOCQ •-*CQ'*CQrHtOi-ICQ'^ 

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1— i 


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Cl"— ICQO-^CDCO-^aiTjHGOCQ'^CDCOi— lOOCDO 
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LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 






















CiOrHCOlO'X)t-GOOiOCQCOb--OOOiOrHCOeDQO 
OrHrlT-lTHrHi-liHi-ICQCQCqC^CClOqcOCOCOCOCO 
CQCQCQCQCQCQCvJCQCQ(MCQC5C3C3CQC3CqCQCQC] 



XIX 



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13XHVW "V 


Cl lO O Ci — f OJ CC CO cr 


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CarHCO-^-^OiC^CDThOCO 
CM CO rHrHC0t>CaQ0rHlO 


•isia^tig 


aioo "v "M 


ooiOrHThcot-irjcr: 
(Micocoi-HcgcMcacr 
I— 1 I— 1 


"S .a 
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HOXOO^d '3 T 


C-] f-i i-H - rH I— 1 I— 1 


xsin5ivMNH0f 


CO tH - - . 


aHOiMaovT:a ahhvh 


(MCOOacO r-li-tiHCOrH -t-l i-HrH -rt^ -^ 


•isja HJi' 


AI^ONNOO "T '3 "XaOS 


OrHCOOi-H'+'Ir-CvlOCOOOCOT-lCviaiOt-OOCq 
CQloailOr-tCaOCI(M(M.-Hi-l rHr-(C<It-(MrHi-llO 


w 

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N0S3H3XnH *1 PiVmiM 


CgoOqcCtM -f-IOClCiCsICO -TtHCMrHCg .QDi-Ht- 
i-H -i-Ht— iCOrH ■.— ( 'iHCO 


SH3X3d: -a NHOr 


1-1 C<3 O i-H rH • (M CO 
t- CO • CM 


• ■ rH • rH rH in ■ CO ^ ■ 


aa7IM. NVMH3H 


r-l CO lO CO • i-l rH tH 
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r-i -^ ' 'r-i -TtfrHlOOlCJ 


swvavaNviOH 


COCDCOtOCOWCOQO 

1-1 CI in 

T-H 


rHCMrH -(MOt-CgrH 

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XXIMaH 'X NHOr 


I— 1 -^ L— CM I— I -^ 1— I in 

I— t rH 


T-i T-l ■ -CM • CO 05 lO 


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SIAVaa "0 T 


CQCO-^ft^ 'CO-^Odi— 1 CO.i— t lO ■ 1— I O rH C--1 lO 
1— I • • t— i 


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SXXOd'HNHOf 


CQCami-Ht-tOCOt-Tt^lOCS] ■ r-\ CC iO -^ •CO'-HOi 
CvlC3iH(Mi-lrHi-H • r-i -CO 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NiiHonvi^'iAi Haxad 


i-HOOt-COOCOOOCgTHtHrH ■COO>*''-tCOlCtO 
COlOCOr-(rHr-|t-i i-H ■ rHCOCaCO 
I-H 1—1 


xsoj 'V -a 


ooocKi'^CLQi-iGOCsiiocviaitDiO'-iiramiooinit- 

COCslt-Cd i-HCMt-COC^ i-li-lrHi-l ZO -rH 
tH 


1st 
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trict 


A3T:SS0H -V 'MM. 


iraT-lrH^OOJOCOO'^lOlOlDCO'nTt^CCIlOrHi-fiH 
rHCOCQ rHrHCOCOrH i-l i-li-i CO tJ< 


HZHsnva -H sai^vHo 


lOt-tD-e^cococscocDooic .i-ia:tO':Dc<iioOioo 

CvimOiC^i-Hi— (i— ICO rH . r-i^CQlO 

eg .-( 


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rH 


aiV^N SVHOHX 


OOOtr*COCOCCTj1COOi-tCOrH^COCDCJCO'<^'X5CJ 
i-iyDCOeOrHi-'rHaiCOCM rHi-HrHCvlrHb- CO 


X^oa 


SL°aO 


A^ana 3NVH3 


O^tiTjirHrJiLOCDCOCOrHi-HcOTT^i-ICOt-tr-OQO 
C0i:;C0Oi-HCMC0t-C0(MC<] i-HrHCOmCSlOOrHTtI 
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aniHSSHO T aa^i: 


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01 CO I-H OJ 


CO -^ OO • rH rH rH • O CO l-C 
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AHINIX^SU 'a T 


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t-l(MCQC<l '^COi-t -iH '<:t1 
Cq - ,-1 


CO 
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sanoNAan 'M. 'M. 


t^CO<MOOOrH<D-*COTjHCO .rHlOCaOi -lOrH 
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■sale 
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I-83!A 


NNin5 -V HHHXHV 


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XQ-aVHOS •£) IA[VmiM. 


01010«3CClrHCOCSJ(MCOTtHOOrH'^lOrHaiO -lO 
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LOCAL 
UNION 

NUMBER 






















GiOrHCdCQlOCDb-CirHCQCO'^JilOCOCiOaiM^ 
cqoqC<]CNOslOqGOCq03Cq(MCqGvJCqc-]Cvl(MCyIO] 


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xsin&ivM. NHor 


tDCCCQiniTHCOCMrQCO^OlCvJi-IMCilOT-lCO^CD 
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aaowxDVia AaavH 


r^r^-^I-^CM iH f-lt--(>3t- CO 


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2nd General 
Vice-President 


aNIVi -M -SVHD 


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•s 

CO 


KosaHoxnH -i wvmiM. 




rH i-H <M Ol rH -^ 
rH t. 


CQrHlOCMCDOOCDCO'^ 
r-\ lO rH 
CM 


1-i O 

rH 


saaxad 'a NHor 


o <^ 
O 


CO rH • 


■ o eg 

■ i-\ 




aailAV NVWHSH 




CO 


00 (M CD 


CO CO -=^ oi <M • r-\ • cq 


CM ■ 


swvav aRvzos. 




Tj^^ 


• CO CO 


• r-i ia a> 1-f 'CMCClTjIt-rH • 


XXIMaH 'X NHOr 




CD IQ 


: : '^ 


■CQrHlO ■ • ■ -CD -IQ • 
. . . r-i • 


siAvas -0 T 


. . . . . . c<l • 


-SXXOX'HNHOr 


r-( >-l Ca • CO ira • • rH ■ 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonvi^w aaxad 


O -rH rHCMrH -CMCDCO- 


xsox •¥ -a 


-t^JHTtlCfiOOrHiHClt-aiTHt^lOCOOr-HlOTt^-HC^JC; 
^COi-H (MiHOO CO COlO-Tt^lO i-IQO 
CO 


1 ■<-) 

■S.a.y 


Aaissoa -v -wm. 


CD 


«rHCOrH-<tiaiC<lCOOOiaiCDU:iC<]aiCOCDOCM 
rH t- (M lO CO CD CQ t^ 

75" ^ 


^aHsnva -h sa7avH3 


_,^-CDalI-HTt^O(M<MrHtD^lJ0"^'^'^(M0l01 
OfM rHi-HrHi-HrHOaCMCO rH CD (M 


1 

4 

a 
C 


' 2 •-• 

J ™ (U 
1 ^ *- 


siavHom -WM. 




a7VaN SVHOHX 


TjirHCDOlC.lCO^-OrHGiOSrHQO OCO IQ OS 00 ITD i-H 
IqOi— ( I— (,— iGOrHi— (<Mi— f-^lO-^CD OQO 


i.3. 


SI.coo 


Aaana aNvna 


T^JlSt^CT.'TfllOCOrHlOlCOOOOOCOCOt-COOlb- 
CDo^^ COiHairHrH':^CCT7TCD-^t--i-lCD -^CO 


^ 

S3 

a " 


aNIVX -M. -SVHO 


Tj<O«3c0CDr-l -i-lrHCMOr-l • •TJ^QOr-H'^OOlO 
2L -rHlMr-l --COCDCqrH 


aaiHsano t aaaa 


rjl C-.i lO ■ 00 TjH rH 
C] O . CO 

CO M in CO -^ CO Ci 


COCOrHW - -rHCO • -rHCM 


AaaNia^w -a t 


COOS^^(^^T:t^O■^ -rHcgicco 
rH rH lO '^ rH CD 


SaiONAaa "AV -M. 


'^i-HG<]C0CDt^t-rHOiCOO0Cvl';}H .-fttHCOCaoqiOtH 
CO rH tH iH CQ ■ CO 




I-33IA 


NNin5 -v anHXHV 


in-^CDOitMin-^rHlOCOOOCOOOOsrHlOOO^fO 
CDOOtM COrHa:rHr^'*CQT^CD'i:t^CDr^CD Tjlt- 


■=1 


aNAVd AHHVH 


i-HCDCDrHT-HrH'* -CDOt- • • ■ -rHOq -COrH 
i-HrH • rHrH--.-rH • r-i 


xaavHOS 'o wvmiM. 


rHO'^ -(MCg-rJH .T^HrHCdCOrH -COCOIO 'lOOO 

CO • -CO - CD • cq 

o •■ • • • 

r-i 


Haann "a wvmiM. 


lOa30SCOCOC<103CqCDC<lrHCDC3:OTt< • -OOrHTtH 
CDCO COr-HQOrH i— irH-^lHiTHI^- • ' i— iOS 






LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 


O 
CO 






















a-. CD Oi 

O rH r-l 
CO CO CO 


Ttl lO CD Cl 
rH i-H rH I— 1 
CO CO CO CO 


rHCgcO-^lOCDb-OOCSOrH-rt^ 
Ca(MCvlCa<>3Cv](M(MCKlCOC0C0 

cocococococorococodijcoco 



xxn 



a 
o 
W 

u 

V 
X 

-^ 

M 

a 



■ma vi 


aaxavw 'v 


I— ICOOCdrHoiCiCOt-tr-CMCacOaiCOlCt^r-COt— 
COC-OCslOqoOl>-0(Mr-lrHr-l(MCOCv30qcO OOr-Hi— 
I— 1 I— 1 i-H 


•ISIQ qig 


3703 -V -M 


i-HCOOCMOOd-^COlOD:i-^<MCiCOirDt-CMCCCi 
yDCOtMCqcOCOTfiCvlT-HWi-ICO^iMCSlCO 00 T-i T-i 
i-H 1— i i-H 




1?) tn 

Q 


^OXDOHJ "a T 


t-COCXJi-(i-IO.-ICQC-'^CMOOCC]CMCMCC<M(Mt-CO 
CSJCOrHCQO i-lr-lC<] 


isin57VM. NHor 


OCSlCOCOClLOlCt--^CN]lOlOCO-^r:t1CqTt1COCOtO 


aaowaovia ahsvh 


fXJCOClrHi— lini-HlOt^ClCDCOGOCQb-OrHCCCClO 
COi— I COCli-HlOCq I— tCO tHCO CO 


•;s!a iJt- 


ATIONNOD -1 "3 UaOH 


CD 1>- Oi OOt-- -TfCQL-^CMT-(-*>COaiOOOb-C:CJOO 

-^cacsii-ioit-0(MOoai-((M(Mc\ii-ico i^- i-i 

I— I iH I— 1 


a 


NOsaHomn -i wvmiM. 


10 CO r-1 CM • CO 


CO oa w 


Sa3X3<I "3 NHOr 


d • • . . . 


t- ■ CM 


aa7iAv NvwHaH 


lo-^i-io •r^TJ^^:lO«D^r:) -lo ■ zo r-^ 

CO • -^ lO ■ • T-H 


CO rH rH 
CO 


swvav QNVlOa 


i-lCOrHlOCOOlO-<^OOTj1 .-^ -qocO • 
I-H (M I-I 


t- r-i • 


iXIM3H -X NHOr 


coco • •r-toCSiHCQCQi-ilO • • -CO 

• • 7-i tH ... 


• • j~\ 


siAvaa -3 T 


- r-t T-i 01 ■ • i-t • ■ 


SXXOJ -H NHOr 


CQCJi— It—lrH,— 'f-i— lOeOCDOOCO -coco -l>iH(M 
I— 1 I— fCO i-HC>3i-H I— ('CvlJ— i 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonvTiara a3X3a 


ccit— i-^cjoinjcooot-cococMoaaiO'CotDoooi^- 
03i— 1 I— itom cot^ I— 1 cacMco co 


XSO.I 'v -a 


lOCDOCOlOCD^GOCCi-<,-(CM»-l -COCCiH 
TpCMiHCOrHCOGOi-H'XJin.-li-lTt* • 


6| 52 
7| 5 
6| 11 


■S.2.H 


A37SS0a -V -WM. 


os'*cvii-i.-i-iHC:coco':o<Mt-c;t-coooo 
CQrHi-i T-ieoco<MirDT}i CO cai-< 


a3Hsnva -H S3aaVH3 


^0]CJ-:t<C5t-COCOr-iOi.HlOir2CvlCS]tOi-(lOa:'C<l 
COOq COi-IOlO t-t-i-tiH (N tH t- iH 


e 

a 

c 




saavH3iw 'WAi. 


CO •t^Tt^^ncor^t-cDu:),-^looocc(Mr^mooLO 


3'IVaN SVWOHX 


COCOCOCOt-C^ClCiCOT^^CMOLOi-f^-i-CSli-ILOTti 
lOi— li-HCOr-H00Oii— (OCOrHCacO r-((— ( rjl i— ( 

-H 


^,09 


SI.°30 


Ki.iaa XNvna 


t--*ciGOCfiT-.o':Dcoc:coTtH^c:;jn)COt- 

tDCOi— ICaCOOlTiiCMi— lt-HrHCMTH<M(NlCO 
I-H .— 1 I— 1 


9|| 831 

• 71 14i 

2| 17| 


m 1) 


3NIV<I -M. -SYHD 


I— ICOi— 1 -rHLO -CO^r-ir-iCsl^t— I— lOOrH 
t-l ■ CQ Cq • CSJ r-( 

I-H 


aKiHS3H3 T aa-aa 


ocrt-iQ':oco"*c<i<?aT-it^r-iT}iio -c^ioco 

f-f CO <© 


r- ■ CO 
1-'. 

LO ^ ■ 

CO 


AaiNix^w -a T 


t-ODrH •lOOCDcOGOt-Tf^OO -IC • - 

CO • lo Ci -^ eg ■ - • 

rH ... 


Sa70NAaH -Ai. -M. 


CO<M-:J<(?q<MQ0 .QOCi^CDCOCOC^JLOCO •Gli-I'sh 
iH<M rH-rHi-fi-l f-\ (M-03 i-H 


•said 
lEja 


[-83!A 

nag ;s-[ 


NNinC) -v annxav 


CO •r^oDO(^^T:J^(x>l-llOco'^cocsoolo^ococoCJ 

CD -CO1— ICOOOOCgOCvli— ((Mr^CqCvlCO OOtHi— ( 
1— 1 I— I rH 




aNAva A-aavH 


coio ■ -c<icqcocoCiaioqcsi<M -oi-- -loioi— 1 

rH ■ • in ■ O] CO ■ rH 


XaHVH3S 'O MVmiM. 


ClrHrHOO-^i-HGC. •L-rt'O ■COO'* " "lO -rH 
COrH COCacOC. ■t--COrH- CO --CO- 
,-H . ... 


Haann "a wvmiM. 


OCNIO -IjDCO -CO^CirHTtiO -CO -t-QO -t- 






LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 
















"" 






lOCDb-OOGiO!-l<MCOlOCDODaiOrH(M-*LOCOOO 
COCOCOCOCOTt^■rJ^Tt^Tt••»:J^Tt^"^-^lO^OlClOlOlOlO 
00 CO CO CO CO 03 CO CO CO CO C; CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CI 



XXIII 



T3 

ca 
o 
W 

O 


•JSIQ W 


aaxHvw -v 


'*l-iTt^V^cocQ^-^(M(M(MCM<M^:H(^^co(^]^-,-^(^lrH 

rH 1— 1 1— 1 


■jsiQ q;9 


a^o^ 'v -m. 


eoaicoQOoiocooocDCMb-ioajCQoroaicDCiCO 

^iH'^i-lTHCO'HCOCMCQCraCM'TjiCOcoCQOT-lCMi-l 


■J 

Q 


^oxooHj -a T 


• •ri^^-^-^(M^r:)OiO(Mlf:lI-l03CMcql:-a;1-lODoo 


- XSin&7VM NHOr 


CqiOOJCOOC^JCDOOt-COU^tDOOCOW'^COO -CO 
lOi-ICM(M CMOa MC:] i-H-i-i cq ■ 


aaoMsovia AaavH 


■■<:tlOCOt^cqt^COt--^OCO'X3CJt-C<10lOi-ICQ 


'5siaqii? 


Aa70NN0D -I -a "xaoH 


COr-(^i-H(rOCOrHCMi-H(MC<JCMlO(MCO<MOOOaT-H 


o 


NOSaHDXnH -1 MVmiM. 


lOCQ ■ •00i-HC\It-CC • •!— (CCOC-rHiHClO -i— 1 
■ • iH ■ ■ r-( CO • 


saaxaa -a nhoi 


.^CDC-lCMCv] • -t- .1-1 -lO .r-1 -OOiH • - 

• i-H . . ^ . . . . ^ ,, . . 

. . r-t • • • ■ • . 


aaaiM Nvwaan 


COCq^Ji -cqcOrHlO^^Cq -coo -t-r-iiXSCOlO • 
CO - i-i ■ 1— 1 • 1— 1 1— 1 • 


swvav aNv^oa 


cocq-^iHio ■i-HCMooco'X) -mQaco •oiQoeot- 

tH • I-l CO Cq • rH - CD 
- rH 


XXIMaH 'X NHOr 


cq -locqca -(Mioto -i-i -oqi-iic -b-co •'* 

• rH I— 1 • 


siAvaa -0 T 


. • • I— 1 • 1— 1 • tH 1— t ?H rH 


■ sxxoa "H NHor 


t- . :d Tfi cq rH c^J oo ^ • cq a: tH eo oo cq t- oo rn co 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NiTHonviaw aaxaj 


cqcDCi«:JCqGimai«DlOrHai-*Ob-COir5iX>OCO 
COi-H i-irH rH iH (MrHi-HrHt-cqrH 
1-i i-H 


xsod 'v -a 


':t^'':t^tDC<]al:cJcoooqoib-lf^colocqt-(r'oaJOD 

rH COrHCqrHrHcq-^CvJrHrHCOCqCq V::> Oi r~\ 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


Aaissoa -v •m/a 


inioocDrHoqoaoqrHb-oir^comrHiocococMb- 

rHrHrH rHC^J rHCOCirH 


aaHsnva -h sa^HVH^ 


oaiocq-rjiaico'^icrHutiocDb-ioioot^co'tooo 

COrHCOrHCqrH'-HrHmcClCqcqt-CqCOCgrHCNIrH 
. rH Cq 


o 

1- 
a 

a 


1 


SiaVHDIH "WM. 


CDlOOrH-^CqCD-^CqcOt^CD-^airHODrHcqClCC 
rH rHrHrHO] rHOirHrHrHrH (Mi— ItDrht 


aivaN svwoHx 


coiocoot-'^cqcoooi^Doociiocot-co^aiai 

COrHCOrHG\lrHrHrHirrrHrH T:tHcqC<i OOt-rH 


i^D3 


Sl.nsO 


Aajna SNvaa 


dGococqcocqt-(LDiot--coir>t^iO"^-^co^oot>- 

Tj^rHTtHCqcOcOrHcq-^CqCOCqCOCO-^C^OrH CM rH 
^ Oq rH 


II 

■ Is 


aNIVi 'Ai. "SYHD 


COCOCOCqCDoqCOCOlOrHCqoCvl •■^OlCOrHCOrH 
rH(M rHrH rHCq* rHrHr-'rHrH 


a-aiHsaHD T aaaa 


OC>3t-rH-t.^-.^COTt(miOrHCOCqb- -QOCOCQ • 
T—{ 1-1 rn rH • i—i r-\ ■ 
rH 


AaiNix^iu -a •[ 


coQOrHLocTvt-iMb-ococointcaocqinoo'^cqTti 

COrH CO CqrHCqiOCO 


saaoNAaa "m. "m 


CDt-OOCOcOCDCiOasCOCqoairHb-rHOb-OiOq 
rHrHrH rHCqrH CQrH >^ C^ ^ 


•saJi, 


I-33!A 

n9£) jsx 


NNinb 'V HHHXaV 


oaoicoc^]alli:)OilOrHlooq'x>■=fcqtDlr^cDrHOle^- 

^rH-^CMCOCOrHCSI-t:J10qcOCq«DCO-^CqOrHC<]rH 
rH Cvl rH 




4) « 


aNAVa ASHVH 


rH<:ococqcooicot-corHiooo -cMcqcqeqcqcq 

rH Cq • Cq 


xaavHDS •£) ravmiM. 


oir:i"^cviLoir:i -rHco-^^cDcorHcqcocooj -co 

tH rHrH-C\ItOCO T-i CMOirH-rH 
f-^ rH 


HaanH 'a ravmiM. 


OOSCOOOrHrHlQCslO •T:t^OO■^0 -COlOlOCg 
rH COrHCOrHrH rH -C^rHlOCOlO -tf. C^CO 






LOCAL 

UNION 
NUMBER 













::::::::::::::::::! 










rHcO'<^b-airHcqTj<ioi>-ooorHoqco-^t-ooa?o 

COCD^tOCDt^t^t-l^-t-t-OOQOOOOOOOCOaiClO: 

cooocococococi:icococococoo:)cococococococo 



XXIV 



us 

S 
1 

X 

M 
"a 

V 

a 
<u 
O 


•?s!a ^u 


7aXHVM *V 


ir3CMCO.-Hcoi>-c;ocoroooor.^i>-o;.-(aicoTt<oo 

i-HCO rH.-ICO-^lC'-li-tCCJOlCiOlOlOOeOCO'-l 
-1 OT Tt^ t-H 


•isia qig 


aioo -v 'lA 


:D<MCOi— (lOOOOO.— (CvlClCO<3C3b-0]0'— icoioco 
I— ICO 1— i>— ICOCMlCrHi— ItOcQCiCD^rJlOcHCOCOt— 1 
i-H O] TfH ^ 




■a'B 
in w 

Q 


Hoxoo^a 'a *r 


i-H'Xl'^lOlClOOOcOCOtD'tDt-i-HCOOrtiCniOOiOr-l 
tHi-H eg CMCOr-iCOCD 


xsin^ivAVNHOr 


1-lCO •'<*< -t-lt-COt-COOacOrHOOCqTtlOOiiHlO 
•1-1 r^ t- '^'^iHi-iCOi-lT-H 
eg CO 


a-aOMl^OVia AHHVH 


TjiTtH-^cooacot'ioic-^aiocooocob-t-oji-iTt* 

i-HCg I— Ir-li— 1 i-H!rOCOCO (M COi— i 


•}S!(i qii. 


AllONNOO '7 *a uaoH 


1— icg^-omoi'^cMcoc'aaitoeot'CXDicCTJTtHT— 110 

i-lCO rHr-1(MC<imi-HT-llOrHb-OSCOTtHi-(C\ICOrH 

1— ( I— 1 T— 1 1-H 


-4-1 

Q 


NOSHHOXnH "T HViniM. 


CO • 

1— 1 ■ 


rHco-^iocoeg-^CQcgrHt-t-ogcot-corH 
•-< eg eg i-i 


snaxad -a NHor 




oq 


-T-HcooicD -cgioiooocFieo .oooegog 

03 iH • 1-1 


aa7iAv NVMsaH 




M^ 


- •rHrH'(:t<CO'HCOCOrHtOiOcgO -COrH 

• • iH r-l CO tH CO CO ■ 

• • T-H 


SMvav aNviOH 




1—1 


• i-icoegrHCOT-iTticc)o.-iio -c] -egcg 
e] iH • 10 ■ T-i 
eg cv] ■ • 


XXIMaH "X NHOr 




i-Ht-ICO ■i-ICOCOr-IO5cceg-<:t<C0Ttit-00-*CQ . 
eg I— 1 r-( rH •' 


siAvan '0 T 




-T-trHeg -i-H .eg -f-h -egosegrt^rjitooo • 


SXXOdC "H NHOr 


COOO*n)t-t— (■^:tlTH-ri1(MCO"<:t1cgb-Tj1C<100cDC<ltOTH 
CCl i-l i-H i-H r-l 1-1 rH 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonvi^Pi Kaxaa 


.C<lCOCOOCgiO-^CQ«:'C<I'^(Mt-tDCOOOOOi-li-l 
r-lT-l CO ^ caoOi-iCMcO CMiH 

(M eg 


xsoa "v -a 


cDo"-ocooo^olO«ocolO>-(TJ^Tt^co■^cg^t-^r:JOO 

i-(CO Cgcg,-|rH eJT-HCDCO'^COaiCvlrH 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


AaiSSOH 'V 'MM. 


coea'-iiooaii-iioTjiTtHiooimrH'^eoo'Xjyso 

1— 1 ^ 


HaHsnva 'h sainvHo 


COCO'^^CD'JD 'CMOiaiCMi-lTt^CDi-ltDcOi-H-^CC 

eg -cq 'XJiHixJO'^cocococa 
• eg eg r-i 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


siavHom 'niA 


.I^-coos^:lTt^r^r^lO^^•co^-cg'rt^ClcoTHl^lOTJ^ 

i-HCO eg CDOl'-IOatDi-lrHr-l 


aivaN svpMOHx 


O'^t^lCCOOOl-^TjlrHtr-iXJCOrHlCiOOacOi-lt-.lO 

rnei i-tcoeaogi-H coi-nocgiococDcgcg 
— cvi e.1 1-1 ■* 


i^oasi.nso 


ARdaa sNv^a 


<:OTt^cocgcx)cooicoiccoegcnt-coa:iooicot-os 
i-(co r^1-lrtlcolf:lr^I-^oOl-l^-r^^r:)loo^ocot-^ 
__ T-t eg -^ T-H 


•33 


aNivd: 'iw 'svHo 




inti-tegrjiegaococg ■ -cgTj^cooooococDicco 

rH ■ • r-1 eg CO T-H 


aniHsaHO t aana 




OOrH • •!— ICOCOCOOOL-^O'-Hi— lOOGOOlt^lTD • 

I— ( • ■ eg 1— 1 CO -^ -^ 


AaaNix^H "a t 


Tt<ei ■ -i-it-cgt-co -corHt-^eaoocooicooi 

1—* ■■ eatH -co -^OCO COrHi— ( 

• . -eg tH i-i Tt^ 


Sa70NA3H 'M 'M 


Wasco .e].-(ooiHooK:)-*b-ir-o]oc<iooiococo 

• n-i rH 03 W to (M i-i -H T-H 


•sajj-aoiA 


NNinb 'V HriHXHV 


'^■^coc<ib-oocoiC'-HOoeg'^c£:icoioegTtico 

I— ICO I— li— 1tJHC01Oi-Hi— *t— COOOi— (OSlOi— ICOCOi— 1 

T-H eg CO ^ 


a S 


aNAVJ AHHVH 


•eQiH -iHiHCO'^'-HCOOO^Cvli-llOr-frHTjIcOi-H 

rH eg CO 


XQHVHOS •£) MVmiM 


• eg . eg • ic • ■* ■ t— -i— 1 t-iooot— legoiurtico 

• rHi-l- -00 t-O OirHi-ii-H 

■ eg eg ri 


HaanH "a HvmiM 


tocot- -iniotOrHi— 1«— legirtJiooocOTfiiOTHoocD 

I— ICO • T^tlCOtOi— li— 1 T— li— lOJCOlOi— If-Hi— 1 




LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 


s 






















cgco'^tDir-oocO'^iccDoooiegcoiot-oii— ICO 
ooooooi-iT-iT-iiHi-ii-<egeg(MC<icgcoco 
■t^ "^ Tf Tl^ "'^ '^ "Tt^ "^ tJh "^ Tt^ ^ '^ ■'j^ '^ "^ "^ "^ ^ 



XXV 



"2 

rt 
O 
W 

> 

3 
u 
0) 

H 

'ri 

a 
O 


■JSIQ qU 


laXHVPM *V 


CO o 
1— t 


CiCOlO'*000'*'*C<lt-OC-lCMOOCCiOOCOO: 
rHCOCOfMCMCQi-HCCrHCOrHC^lcOCslrHCM CO 


isia ^'9 


aioo 'v -M 


L--000-^f>]t-r-l'-lt-CaaiOi-li:0'-lt^'^00'-' 
i-tCacOCOtMCOcQ t-r-fCOi-lCacMCOi-lCS] CO 


Q 


^0X30^5 *a T 


"^lO<NI'*C0«:3CDlOlOC0i-ltr-lCt-C0CX)CiL0'<i*CO 
CJ r-1 (M 


isin5T:ViV\.NHor 


1-1 •C0<Mt-OO-^Q0aiC<IrHi-(Tt<m"«**'*Wr-H00 


a^aOMxovia A-a^VH 


COm-^b-lOt^COCOi— iCOCi"^"^O]b-O0'^OSCOCD 
I— IrHi— tr-iCOCQi— lcO»— 1 »~^ 


•?s!a ^ifr 


AiiONNOo "I -a -xaoH 


t-OSOOrHlQCit-T^i-lCiCvlOOOOit-COCO-^cOCl 
rHCOCqi-l<Mcai-lt-i-iCOi-Hi-IOC'lT-iC] (M 


Q 


NOsaHOxnn "i iMvmiM. 


rH 


. lO . cq OO ^ CO O . O 


CO ini CO -00 .CO 

rH • rH - rH 


snaxaj *a NHor 




• T-i -rHi-llOCQCDCOCO 

r-i 


tH Ol lO rH lO - Oi 
CO 


aa7iM NVPMHaH 


(M 


' • CO (M CQ lO CO Oi -r-i 
■ ■ f-\ - 


rH b- Ol t- CO rH t- 

co lr^ 


SHvav aNvnoH 


i-Hi-HrH'^ -r-irHcq-<^coinir:i 


■^ CD CO rH rH -r-i 
tr- • rH 


XXIMaH "X NHOr 


•O ■ lO r-l Tt< CQ '^ i-H.CO • Ci 
■ 1— 1 ■ I— i • 


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SIAVaH 'D T 


-r-l(>] -i-lrH(Mi-( -Oi-ltMCO •i-HtMrHCQ -rH 
■ 1-1 • iH • <D 


SXXOX *H NHOr 


■^ -(MCOCOCCCOtM ■aiCOT^'^T-l'«t<QOlOTt<'^CO 
■Ca<MC<lr-(r-l -cci ^ rMlHi 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonvT:3H naxaa 


i-li-H r-l r-lrH-rJH OOi-i (M-QQ 

• T-l 


xsox 'V *a 


C<100000t-CjCMI>-rHTt<t--^^OOtC>TjlOt>OS 
t-Hi-li-l (M»H tH CO r-(tDr-lr-((M ca 

1— ( 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


AaiSSO^ 'V 'PS[M. 


coTtHtDt-iot-ot-osir^iOt-HCNjcc'Cviaii-iTH'^o 


^3Hsnva "H sai^vHD 


1— ( -Cs] CO CO «— iClC<]i— ti— * CO- 
i-H 1— i 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


SiaVHOIW "lAIM. 


i-l CO CD rH t- 


aiVSN SVPUOHX 


COi— lOOOSCOt^OOOOOlOit— lOQOrHODCvlCM'^CO 
rHi— IcaO-lT— ItMCa tJH CO rHt-iHrHCO 00 
r-t 


i^oaSl.noo 


AJana XNv^a 


ooai^t-^cMocDt-ocQ-^ocai-tc-it-csGoo 

(MOOCQCaCOCO ODi-lTtlrHCClCOCOrHC<] tH 
CO i-i 


•3 1 
a CO 


aNivd: *AA. 'svHo 


lO^TtlO-«i4t>.CDrHi-lCO -'^COrHCOlOlO -COtJ* 
ri I— I ■ CO ■ 1-i 


a^iHS3H3 T *aaHJ 


CO ■TflOCOCOCOr-tOit^rHi— 1 -i— ti— IOTt<i— It— It^ 

1-1 ■ b- T-H Oi 


Aa^Nra^K -a 'r 


■C0C0CDO00rHO04CX)rHC0ClrHrHrtlC<]01C00i 
r-H 1-1 CO CO f-1 rH t- CO CO 


sa70NAa^ 'lA 'Nl 


-LOTt^<XiOI>-rHCOcOG<!rHODrH OtJI CO CD CO tH CO 
rHrHrH rH <MrHrH rHCOi-H r-i 


•S3JJ-30IA 


NNin5 -v ^riHXHV 


OOOcOlOt-OOOOlC-^rHCMCOOCOOCOt-OiCDCXl 
rHCqcOCQrH<MCOrHCOrHTt^rHG^COCOrH<M ■* 


General 
President 


SNAVi AHHVH 


00lf:)C<lT»<G<Ir:^COrHt-Cit--CO - --^rH . -lOO 
CO ■ ■ 03 rH • • (M 


xa^vHOS *o MvmiAfi. 


.cq .t-':i^oo^t-coocooo<^]oomr^cor^o 

CO CO rH rH CO -^ m 
rH 


■aaann 'a MvmiM. 


■lOCOOlTtfCO<MlO •rHO^Oi -rHt-COCD ■CM'* 
CQOJCQrHCvl "(M (M •C<l■^:t^rHrH • r-i 




LOCAL 

UNION 
NUMBER 




















lOCDt^OOrHCO'^COOrHOqCOTt^lOt-OOOrHCa-* 
COCOCOCOrf^-^Ttl-^lOiClOlCmiOlOlOCDCDCOCD 

XXVT 



■JSIQ 1U 



73XHVW "V 



CvJCO'^dCOOOTjHOr 

■^QOCiCOrHTHCOO<M' 

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■^STQ q59 



3703 "V 'M 



■^OOOOCOi— i-^i— (OOr 



HOXOO^d "a T 



T-t CO 1-H Ttl (M 



■r-<OO^C-- .OCOO-^t- 






xsmS'iVi'A. NHor 



aaow3ovia ahhvh 



■jsja 'Hi' 



ATI0NN03 -T "a "XaOH 



*^t-LOC^^(MC<i:Dt:-rH 



m 



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■a 



■g in o 



<C) a 



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saaxad 'a nhoi 



aaiiiVi. NvwaaH 



swvav aNvaoH 



C] 00 T-H CD 
1— 1 


Cq rt^ .-1 ,-1 ■ i-i 
CM CO --H ■ 


lO .-1 OO 
CO r-( CM 


■ ■Tt< t- 00 iH CO 


CI lO r-l t- 


CO • i-l C^ r-l <M 


■ I— I 


■ O T-1 in T-H 00 
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y:> i-H O) o 


lO C<! - - 


TJH CO I-H 


CO I— 1 Tt< lO CO 00 
t- (M 


Oi Tt* o o 
rH 00 t^ 

1— 1 


lO t-1 Tj< CO CO i-H 
i-H t- 


i-IC0Gv]O<SrHO«D00 
(M 1-t r-( 1-1 



XXIM.aH 'X NHOr 



SIAVaH 'D T 



CO0Oi-i<©i-ltO -CMiH • 
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CO rH I— i 


■CO ■ CO O tP 
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i-H T— 1 CM 
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SXXOJ "H NHOr 



GC lO CO CO ^"ci ■ 00 "^ T-i t- T# T-H m I-H lO O CM to lO 
•I— l-iniOa <M COtJh t-HCOi-H 



NnHonvn^iM ^3xaj 



^ CO CD "M - 
' lO rH CO 



xso<i 'v -a 



A37SS0H -V 'K/A 



^ C5 CO CD lO lO CO t- "* C3; <M CO Oi 1-1 
lOOO CO CO ICi-HC] GO 
CO 

h t- lO lO CO O CM b- CO CO t- <M 00 ^ 
OaCO COi-i-^Gl'-HCOCMCOr-icO 

ICMtr-COlOcO'^COi— lOrHCMlO CO~ 
310I-H T^i-lCOr- ICMCMCMrH 



H3Hsnva: 'h sai^vHO 



SiaVHDIP^I 'MM. 



; CZ> CD Gl O CD C] c 



a7V3N SVMOHX 



i^D3SI,n3£) 



AiRP.a 3Nvaa 



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).-lC^lr^COTt^■*lt>■rHl-^':t*COCMO 

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aNIVil 'M *SVH3 



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aniHsaHO t aa^a 



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QO LO in- CM L- 
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Sa70NA3^ "M. 'M. 



t- CD rH Tjl TjH "<^ CM 



Ttiait--lC .(OCOt^-^OOOOrHCO 
lOlO (M -cOl^rHCMr-l-^CMCM 



NNin^ *V HIIHXHV 



■^t-COOCO-rilcQOCjlOCTiCOlOCjit^O'^GlCOCD 
^COCjJQOi— lTt^CO'-HC<li-H<MCO-:t<COi— (CM-^"*CMt- 
T— 1 (M C-1 1— t T-H 






xxvn 



aNAVa AHHVH 



C] COi-(C\I T-l t-l-(M 03i-HrH 



xaavHDS ■£) MvmiM. 



HaanH "a wvmiM 



c<ixt-cooot-r^^cocomoo:ic<icooi«3{M'-Hoo 

COOO rH CO CacO CqcOTtHCarHC0CO?-HT— ti-H 

r-l * tH 



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l-OG:iOi-HCJCO-*COCOa>i-HCOCDOC'3CO-^lCCOt- 

cocDt-tr-i— t--t-t-b-c-cocoGOOioscic3ic:Gia; 



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1-1 r-i C<IrHrHcMrHiHOM<TjHrHCMCOrHCO-*'-l 


'^STQ t{;9 


aaoD 'v 'M 


COCO(X)CO,-li-fC']t-(rOt-Tt<lr-b-(MCOGOGOlO-*OS 
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-^ 'S 

in " 
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HOXOO^d *a T 


r-< 1-1 ■ CO "H 


xsin&T:vM.NHor 


i-( • Ol i-l tH CO i-H CO 


anoMiaovia ahhvh 


T-lt-aJ(MOOOS«Ci-^<MCOrHOab-fO!Mi£>aiCOC<lt^ 


'ista tjit' 


AaioNNOo -1 "a "xaoH 


Oioo<:DooGOi-iO]'^cv]ioosc^iO'-Hcoir:)CD(?Ji-(00 

1— IrH T— It— li— IC<]t— li— IOCMtHi— IrHtOr- iCO-<i*iH 


3rd District 


K0S3HDXnH*l MVmiA.V 


TflCOfMT— ICM • -lO -COtHIOi-H -1— ICO -t-CJ*"' 

• • • i-t CO .-( • 


ssax3^ 'a NHcr 




CaCM ■ y-\ -OO .CM -CO ■■* • -rHCOCMrH " 
. CO • • ■ rH 


aaiiM. NVMH3II 




COrH -OOrH -CO • 'OJCMt- • -rHCDOO • Oi 
• C-] • ■ • CM ■ • CO i-H ■ 


SMvav aNVToa 




TjSrH .COCOG']lOb-r^lOTt*Tt^T}^OrHOiCMOS<^] 
• rH CM rH CO 


XXIM.aH 'X NHOr 


com -lO-^ -1-110 ^WO -Tt^rH •i©rH'* .i-( 
T— ( - ■ I— 1 • 


siAvan -0 T 


•I— li— 1 '"^i— iTfiCM-^ ■ • -^ ■ ■)— (i— (i— 1 -t* 


SXXOd "H NHOr 


CMtHi— IC<llOt>- •!>- '(MtDCOClt-tMlJ::! -I— It— lOJ 
t-l 1— 1 • t— 1 • r-\ 1— 1 • 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonv^3piI naxaa 


COCDtM -OOCvlOOcOThllOlOCOCOCCiaiClOOCDOJtr- 
I— I -co (M -*T— (I— (C^]C>3CO 

■ r-i 


xsod[ "v *a 


"^COt-COlCOCOClOOtMrHaJCOO-rHt-rHOSCOTH 


1st 
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trict 


A37SS0H *V "HM. 


OJi-ICO ■Cfl■^00 0^■*CM':}^00t-C^]l00iO0Dl-l(D 
T-l • i-l CO i-l rH T-l 1-1 


^aHsnva -h sainvHo 


CCCOT-IOOOJOiCDCMCllOt-OlCOt-^OCDOm 
I-l CO CO i-lOi-^CQr-lT-llOrHrHT^i-l 

1— f t— 1 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


S13VHDIIAI 'niA 


i-lOOCO ■OirHcOOlC-lCOCOOO'^m -T^OOOC^t- 
■Oi rH I-l to rH ■CslrH<M<M 


aiV3N SVPMOHX 


GOi-llOCOi-lilMT-llOT-l'^OcOlOt-COCOOOCOCO 
I— Ir-i t-T— 1 C3 1— lTt<Tt<CO COlOiHi— (I— ii— t 


^.33SL°30 


A^ana sNv^a 


OOlt-OOCsICOCOb-i-HtDt-OlQDCMi-IOiOit-t-i-l 
rHrHT—l "*i— |i— ICOi— lrHOTt<-^i— IMCD CdCCCQ 
I— 1 


S3 


aNivd: 'M. 'svHo 


yZilOCO ■ • -COOi-lT-ICMCO-^iHOaai -Tt^lOTi^ 
• ■ ■ T-l • CO I-l 


a^iHsaHD T aa^^ 


CO rt^ C] 1— 1 C>T • 'CO ■ CO i^D m CM I— 1 • tJi • lO IC CO 
■ ■ • C- CM • • CQ 


AaiNra^M -a t 


■ CO rH CQ CO rH lO . 

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sa^ONAaH 'ia "m 


.Tt*t-t-ioosaj'soaiio«Dc<]c<iu:iioaiT^cM(M 

rH rH "rH ^ 


•saaj-aoiA 


NNin^ *V HJIHXHV 


OlOiOOQO^COCMrHC^aCOCvlrHt-rHCMGOlOr-lt-rH 
rHrH COrHrHCOrHrHOin-^rHOJOrHcOCvTCM 


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aNAVa AH^VH 


•COlO .cgCMOlrHrH •CDC^ICvlrH •Tt^Ot- 'CO 
rH rH * CM ■ rH CM ■ 


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CMrt^CO ■ Oi -COCDiHOaoOCMt- .Ot-CM-«*COIO 
r-\ ■ Ol ■ rH O - CM m CO 
■ ,~\ ' 1-1 


HaariH *a pMvmiM. 


C0CMrHQ0ClrHC>lOrHmC000OrHC0«000t- -CO 
r-{ rHi— IrH-rtlCMrHrH • r-i 




LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 



C 




















00lOC0Tt<l0000iOCaC0-<:t<m«30DrHC0Cl0OrH 
ISOiOOOOOOrHrHrHrHrHrHrHCMCaC'lCOCO 

tiTtimioinioicioioinjioioioioiomicioioio 

XXVIII 



■5S!cr rm 



•JSIQ 1)9 






7axavp\[ "v 



a^o^ 'v "m. 



>ioxooHd; "a t 



XSin&IV/W NHOf 



anoraaovia AaavH 



(M (M I— i rHi— It— (I— (T^rHi-HCOCOrHC<Ii— tC-3C0 



i-( •^(Mi-<C<!Ot^TjHC0C0<Z>THT-100CD^t-(CM-^ 



lOCOCM 'Cd -COlOTttTtlTjHCMOCMOO .Oii-iOOi-l 



■isia TO' 



A770NN0D "T "3 ■iSOH 



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Q 
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i^3aSI,n3£) 



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XXIX 



saaxaj '3 NHor 



3aiIM, NVW5i3H 



SMvav aNvioa 



XXIM.3H 'X NHOr 



SIAV3a '3 T 



o 

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•^(MC^lCvlCOi— (CO ■ -COWt-Ol 


<-t . CNI 






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. r-i • rH CM 1—1 • • 


t- . CO 




lO 


CO . CO 1- 




«D O] . 




T^ 


CM (M • 


CO 1-1 -^ CO 


Oi i-H • r-i 


CO CO CQ i-( rH 


rHCOC<l(MCM(MiHCS] • 


Oi cq -* . 


I— t 


CO - CO 


iHlCC^ ■ ■ ■ •i-((MCOiH'^ '-^ 
• • • • T-\ ■ CT 





SXXOd *H NHOf 



CDr-lTt*<Mi-tC<lb-00 -Ot-CO-^Ot- -(MCOOi 



NnHonvi^w Haxaj 



I— ii-HCOMfM-^OOCOrHt-i— ICOt-Ob-lOCOCvlOaOO 



xsod "v 'a 



A31SS0H *V "IMM 



^3Hsnva: "h S37avH0 



siavHom 'niA 



•GOOiC^ -OaCOCOCdrHi— llOt-OiCOCOlCCvlTjH 



aivaN svMOHx 



CO t- 00 t-H <M C 



A33na :hnv^3 



ICOOOOiCOi— 10r^OiCOCOCDl>■■^HOOt~ 
r^I-^l-iI— li-(i-( COCOrHOQi— li— ICO 



aNIVa 'lA 'SVH3 



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i-^iHsaHO *r aaH3 



COt-HC-lCOCOr-lTtl-* 



■ O Oi "^ CI ■ r-l 1-1 -CO 



A3aNi33pi -a T 



(M ■ Ci OS T-l 



Sa70NA3H 'M. "M. 



oa^D^lOCCIcClOCSi-HCOt- -CO^SIO -CDCOt-CD 



NNinS -v HfiHxav 



3NAV.I AHHVH 



CI . CO CO t-- 



■ CvlCOCOtM •!— (C<lTt<i— I -t^ -CMi— I 



XQHVHOS '0 HVmiM. 



tP - -^ CO (M 



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a3anH "a MvmiM 



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rHilMCOOOlOirOOtMCMCOCOCOOt- 

I-^T-^CiT-l^n(McD'-l(McoTt^co1-^r^ 


'3Sia ti;9 


aioo -v -M. 


CDc;.Goiomoic<]occcoT-icOTj^(Mcvi'*iocoOiOi 

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t^CNJGQt-OOlOOOOOit-lOCSlTtllO-^TjHlCiCOtr-OO 
r-liH(7q i-Hi-Hr-i (M riCO 


XSmSlVM. NHOf 


r-10-*:lHCO'— I'^OQ -Ol -rHCOO^TjICDOt— 'CO 


a^OMMDvaa a-shvh 


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•ISTQ q;> 


A^^ONNO^ -t 'a uaoa 


mCOQOinlOCOrHOaiOOOOCNlCOrHtMaiCMOOCSt- 
i-ICS]lOt-i-( iHi-l05iHlC!Mm>-{CNI0au^t- i-l 


to 

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NosaHoxnH 'a wvmiM. 


• CO CD CO 
CO 


cq .iHlO • - -C5C0 .i-lCOCD -CM 

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saaxaj -a nhoi 


I— 1 -^ I— i lO 


rHi-l -00 -CQCDiH 'COr-lCOfM -.-I 


aaiiM. Nvw^aH 


I-l lO O CM 
I-l iH I-l 


(M . -Oi-IWCOi-ICMTtlCMClt- • • 
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swvav aRYnos. 


CO rH '^ CO I-l 


OOCDCO •<M^^-Or^ •Tt<001>-(<M 
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XXIMaH -x NHOr 


tM I-l CO 00 • 


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sxxoa 'H NHor 


Oi -THt-i-l"* •i-IOOCMc<l(?^CD-*'^0(MG<lOaTlH 

•coca • VjO ,-( rHC^liHlO 


2nd 
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NnHonva^M HaxaJ 


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CQCOCOi-l r-i CdrH-^i-tCO rHCvlCOCM rH 


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OIOOCQQOCOOO •Tt<CDt-THC0tr-'^Ol-^t^i— tOlOO 
COlC ■ CO r-ii-iCO rH(MCD 


1st 
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Aaissoa -v -PiM. 


miO'^ao-^-^coioaiCOt-t-cDcicocq.-jcviCQco 

i-it-l CO Cvl C<i T-i (X> r-i 


aaHsnva -h saaavHD 


1— imcOrHi— (IOOCOCDOtHCDOCJi— li— (COdOOlO 
i-li-lincOi-I CDi-llOi-^COi-iOCIi-llOrH 


General 
Treas- 
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saavHOiw -wm. 


C0r-4CDcZ)C0t--i— ICOtH-Tj<COi— it^-^b-Ot^t— r-IO 
(M(MCOi-l 1-1 -rJHi-ICOi-ICvI i-l(MCg r-1 


aivaN svwoHX 


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rHi-ICOCD lO CslrHtO i-ICS]COCD 


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Aaana SNvaa 


QOi-lCQlOmOli-lrHCaoOlOi-I^CMCsllOt-CTJOt- 
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I— 1 


c " 


aNIVX 'M. -SVHO 


CO .t-lr-10m0irHOCDOCat000C0^t-a:(MO 
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aaiHsano t aa^a 


(MCOCDt^ -COi— Ii— ICIt— I03r-ll003-^0i— (lOCOCD 
COi— lr-1* CO <M I— (COi— 1 


Aa7Ni33w -a T 


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. C-] m ■ CM i-l (M 1-1 


saaoNAaa "m. "m. 


i-( -CQai -I-l .r-iOl -C^t-CO .(MCOCDO-^CM 
rH-rHiH- ■ (M-rHrHi-l-rHi-l CO 


•saij-93!A 


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t-oscocoioojcqorHcoasi-icocsjcoiocoiooai 

r-tCqcDOlrH .rHi-IOrHrJHCMCDi-ICMCO'^OOi-lr-l 
1— i 




aNAVa AHHVH 


^-(COr-^-<:t^(M ■ •(MGO-<:HCDCOCvICMT-tODT-lCD -^ 
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aaann "a wvmiM. 


C^OCDCDcOr-l • -i— iTfG001C0l0OCDC0<MOC0 
rHi-iTt<t- --"f^ rHO-: CMCv) GOi-l 




LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 




















^CqT*1t-CliH<MCO'^«D00i-ICDt--aiCqc0lO«Dt- 
OCOCDCDCDb-t-t-t-t-t-COGOCOCOGiCiCFSasOl 

XXX 



M 






o 



•jsid qji 



i^ia V9 



Q 



ISIQ 'W' 



NQ - 



•si.? 



i^oaSI.as^ 



_ □ 



Op: 

Is 






7ai,avw "V 



aaoD 'v "iw 



Hoxooad 'a t 



xsinftiViVi, NHor 



aaowxDvia a^hvh 



AITONNOO "I "a "XaOH 



NOSaHDXnH 'T MVITIIM. 



saax3<i 'a NHor 



aaiiM. NvwHaH 



swvav aNVToa 



XXIM.3H "X NHOr 



siAvaa -3 T 



SXXOJ "H NHOr 



NnHonvi^w aaxaa 



xsoj "v 'a 



Aaissoa -v -wm. 



aaHsnva -h saiavHO 



saavHOiw "wm. 



aivaN svwoHX 



Aaana SNvaa 



aNIVJ 'M "SYHO 



aaiHsaHD t aaaa 



AaiNia^w "a t 



Sa70NAaH 'AA. 'AV 



NNinS 'v annxav 



i-HCOCarHi— I'^COrHCOIDi— IIO i-l(MCMi— ICOCOCO 



CDO'HlOin)CClr-lOCOCOinCOaiiX>C<I(Mi-tC^CDOO 
r-iCOOarMrH-^COCacO<:DrHlO i-ICMCMt-ICOC0CO 



O^COlO'^COOt^COOOOlO 



- t- I>- CO GO • lO 



•t— 1 1— ICO iH rHr-l COi— t 



1— 1 Oi CO . rH i-l i-i CO I 



- I— i iH CO - 00 


i-l - CO ■ CNJ 


*" 


i-i CO ■ i-H ILD 


CO 




■ CO rH . • 


-^ 


03 • CO 00 iH <M ca 

03 


• 00 o ^ t- 




tH tJh i-H - CO 


o 

1—1 


lO T— 1 CJ rH -rj^ -^ 1— ( 


• • -^ r^ CM 




CO 1-t i-H CO ** 


CO 


■ CQ ^ <M • CM r-l 


CO M lO (M O 

* 




■ CO O -1-1 
i-t • 


uo 



(Mrt<Oi(MOS':t< •OCOCOriHi-l'^Tt<lOOlOOO(MCM 



t-rHT-lCO -lOrHOiCiOOOCDCMCMCXl-^OOai 



1 T-l tH CO 1-1 i-l 



00 Oi CD 


t- 


00 




O Oi O O CO t- • 
CO i-l rH CO iH CO • 


r^ 


O 
CQ 


CO 
1-^ 


O 

T-H 


CD t- 

CO 
* 


CO 

I— t 


CO to 00 ci b- 


CD CO 


CO 


CD 
CO 


CO 


t- CI Gl 
CO 


O CD 
CO 




r-t 


t- Tt< t- 

CM * CO 


i-lC<lC0t-CMCCGvl'rJ1O.C»aiC0 ■ 
CO i-i ri 1-1 Cq rH CO • 
* 


C-T 


t- 


t- 


1— t 


CO r-l 


rH 


00 CO CJ 
lO i-H 


Cfl 


CO 

1— 1 


C-1 


o 

CO 


t- 


o 

r-i 


CD 


t- Tjl OS 
CO 

* 


cq 


00 O O O 00 I— ' 
I-H CO 1-H CO CO CO 


O CO Tt^ 
iH C» CO 


CO 
iH 


lO ai Ci CI CD 
iH CO CO iH CO 


CD 


00 lO CI 


lo t-- ira 

rH CO CO 


r-i 


CO t- r* 
CO CO TI^ 


CO CO i-J 


CO 




m 


CO 


t- 


i-t'^lOOrHCOlOCO 
t-1 rH CO r-i 
* 




OS • 


CO 



COCOTt1rHeOl£OrHOl.--CDCOlOCDCMTj1 .,-icorHi-i 



•OSCiCOCOOCM -CO-^OOCOrHOOOtMCOClC 



• '^ 00 O . r 



lOlCOOSCSCOi— IrHCSOSCOt^OClO 



OJr. 



XXXI 



aNAVa AHHVH 



■ Tt4 lO lO CO o^ 



• CO ■ O • tH .00 



xaavHOS ■£) wvmiM. 



rHO .CO .Ol^^(MTj1f?;ica0D .{M -f-irHTH ■ m 



aaann 'a wvmiM. 



(Ji^^r-i-rHOiCQint^C 



S 



OOCiCDTHlOCDb-'-ICOCO-^CDOOOli-ICOCOTHCDt- 
CSOSOOOOC>rHrHrHrHi-HrHf-(C0C0C0C0C0C0 
lOlOCDCDOCDCDiXJCDCD^DtDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCD 



*-* 

nl 
O 

> 

u 

X 

H 

ei 
ti 
U 

a 

o 


■isiQ qu 


aaxavw -V 


^i-HCOOa t-i-IC0C0»O<M(M-<^ i-liH(MiH -CQ 


•JsiQ tH9 


aiOD -v 'M. 


oiocofOOst^cococoosO'^coaitMcc'coi-i -co 

'<:t<i-HCOfM l>..iH(rOCOlOCMC\l(rQ rHrHrHr-l -Cq 




aoxooad; "a t 


cq • cq ■ r-i r-i i-H . 


ismbivM NHor 


OOOOSCOOiCO-^rH -lOOOi-l-cflrHCCt-TtH •'^O 
I-H CO ■ t^ r-t iH ec ■ (M 


anowaovia ahsvh 


iH i-i -co cq CO i-i 


•JSIQ tHl7 


A^^ONNO^ -a "a -xaoa 


-lCiT:t<«00050irOrHCOlOCqcOt-OiiHlOlO<M -CO 

coiHcqcq t--iHcoi-i-^cqcqTti iHi-hi-hth -cq 


o 

.a 
o 

CO 


NOSaHDXnH 'T wvmiM. 


lO CO tH • 
CO rH ■ 


OTtHlOCqCOTtldrHrH 'i-HO ■ -rH 

CO cq CO >* ■ cq ■ ■ cq 

T-i ... 


saaxaa 'a nhoi 


• CM CO i-H 


lO • .rHrHrH -rH • -COrH - • • 
. . rH ■ • ■ ... 


aaiiM NvwaaH 


I-H I-H cq • 


COCOrH -O'^b-rH -ricq 
rH • cq . 


cq • - 


swvav aNviOH 


• • cq 


lo ■ • • lo CO cq 00 CO cq • 

... CO 


• • cq 


XXIM.aH 'X NHOf 


iH • • r-i 


O • rH • CD rH CO • • Cq CO 

r^ ■ ' ■ • 


rH ■ ■ 


siAvan -3 T 


<M • cq iH 


CO V.^' ■ lO rH ^ CO -co • 


Til ~:' . 


SXXOX 'H NHOf 


eooocqcit^t-cq .cqir-CitDiocooorHtD . - 

,-1 rH • (M 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NiiHonvi^Ki -aaxacE 


r-icocoCi .Ti^cooo^oQOr-ll-lc<]rJ^ooOl^--<:J^ -cq 

O^rH 'Ca -^rHi-ICOi-H 'Cq 


xsoa 'v -a 


o>-tcqcooiiOi-(ioooi~i-<:tHiocDiocqooT*<as ■ • 

Cqi-lCqrH lOrHCqCQ<X>i-lr-(pH rH •• 
iH -•■ . . 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


Aa7SS0a -v 'wm. 


COL--C0<^5 ■CDcOt-CqCOOt-l>rH!-HCO'r:t<CO ■ ■ 
Cqr-HCq •r-iCqcOrHi-l T-i ■• 


aansnva 'h saiavHO 


lO •aiCqOlOr-iCDiHTtl^cqt-QOiHt-t-O -iH 

iH- cq cDrH oorHcqco iH t-i-cq 
^ ■ 1—1 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


saavHoiw -hm. 


OiiHt-cq -cocorH ■rHT^iciocqiotocoiocqcq 

rH rH . cq • lO i-l -^ cq 

• ■ I— 1 


aivaN svwoHX 


to^t-co'oicqrHcqcoQOi-icqiot-'iDocococo • 

OliHcai-l lOrHC0C0lOi-l03 t-irH 


i.ossi.uso 


Aaana xNvaa 


oicocooooscqcoG^3co03Tfioiroajcq'*ii-ic-Tocq 
cor^co<^J t-rHCOcot-cqcqi-t i-ir-ioa.-irHcq 

tH 




aNIVdC 'M. 'SVHD 


OtHcd'^ .lOcoc^i .Tt^coI-^l^-r^^-cocQl>•lHcq 
rH . • cq CO cq 


aaiHSano t -aaaa 


i-{ -rii CQ Ca Oi ^ -co •t-COi-HCOrHTh'^Tt 


CO cq • 
Ih~co ih" 


AaaNiH^w -a t 


cqoosco ■ocococqt-t-iO'i^jii-icqTtiuD 

i-( T-l • rH CQ CO t^ 03 


saiONAaa "M. -m. 


cq 'TiHOs .ooomr-iOcqco«DO •coalcOTt^ • 

rH • rH • I— 1 i— i 




NNin?) -v HnHxav 


cqcDocoai>ococococicqoj(X)OC^ioocqoci 

'^rHCOCq t-1-HcOCOCOCqcqcO i-Hi-HCqrHrHrH 

t-i 


^1 


aNAVa AHHVH 


COrHlO^r* -b-i-H - -COOO 'CO •Tt<CqcOi-l -W 
r-i . rH ■• 00 ■ • 
. . rH • • 


xaavHOS 'O MvmiM. 


'X^COlOOi .incq • -COTflOJt- • -rhCOrHlOt- 
rH ' r-{ • • CO cq -^ ■ • rH 


aaann "a wvmiM. 


CO-^CD'^tlast-rHCOCOlOCqc^rHGiOlOCDrHlOiH 
cq cqiH ^rHCOCO r-{ rHiHiH 




LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 






















COOSCqCO'<^lOC£;t~GOaJrHCOtDt--050rHCO"*lC 

cqcqcocococococococo-^-tiTt<-rM'*ioicioioio 



IXXII 



o 

pq 

<u 

_> 

o 

lU 

M 

"H 

cd 
0) 

a 
O 


•?S!a qJi 


13XHVW -V 


CQlO-^COCOOlODOrHOi'^COOODt-COOOlOQC 




•?S!a 159 


3103 -V 'AA. 


TH^olraocsOit^t-lcoolC:cooooa)Tt^cQ-*oo■<^ 


Q 


HOXOOHd: '3 T 


t-COt-OOC<JiHi-ICOt-rHOCaOOOGOCOr:H'^ •!>- 
i-H COi-l i-lC>3i-(i-1i-IC<J 


xsin&iviWNHor 


C-] I— 1 T— 1 "* r-1 • I— I CO 


anoiMXDVia ahhvh 


iH (M I-H (M rH CO 


•is!a 1't' 


AllONNOO -1 '3 "XaOH 


i-Hi-llO'^D^^Oit-Tt^.HQOOOCOOOCD-^TjitMOOCO 
OqTj<COCQ<M C0«DC<1 lMCO(M<M(MfHCDi-l tJI 


u 

CO 

5 

u 


NOsaHoxnn 'i. MvmiM 


r-1 • CO • iH 




snaxaa 'a NHor 


-^iH -oq ■ • -COCO • io • • -iH -i-ioa 

. . .03 • ... 




aaiiM. NVPM^aH 


CO'^i-l ■ •t--*lOcOrHC<I -COrfit-lCMCQ • 


-* 


SWVaV QNVIOH 


com -t-H -T-ioaoi-fiH 'looo • -irii-H • - 

■ iH - • oq • ■ 


r-\ 


xxiiwaH 'X NHor 






rHiHCMfM • ■ •iHOqiHCOiH -^ilcOCQCO -OOrH 


SIAVaH '3 T 


-iH --^ . -COrH • -iH -i-Ht- CM rHOi ■ -t- 
• i-H . - . ■ . tH • • 


SXXOX'HNHOr 


rH -lO-^ •iHCOCOrHTHCg -COCOCOCOt^i-H -CO 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonvn^iAi naxax 


c-ioioooot-(Mt-C5«ot-cot-ootocoai-*too 

Tt<i— li— (i— 1CO(Mi— 1 rH rHCQ CQ 


xsoci 'V -a 


OOi— lOSlOOiC^t^COO'^fOOCOO'— IrHCDi— ItMTfH 
r-l rHi-trH tJi C<lCS]r-1.-lrHi-lTj1i-H (M 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


A31SS0H 'V *IMiW 


i-lTjli-ICqcOOqt-t-OCOlOiH'^OOiOCOCQCO!© 
OaCOi-lrH CqcgCKl iHCO i-h C<Ji-l 


H3Hsnva: 'h ssi^vho 


i-ICqOqr-l'^COCOlOMIt'CvlCM^GOCCt-b-'^CClO 
i-HCQCSltM 1-^■<:}^ iH i-H iH T^ ^ 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


S33VHDIIAI -lAIM. 


COlOOCOt-CDOi^OiT-HOeDrHCit-Qat-CMCOt- 
Cv] iH r-l CO iH i-l (M 


31V3N SVPIOHX 


OOi— (COIr-cOCOOt--^OOOl>-Cl(Mi— <i-HG:tTt^lOO 
rH <M (Mi— ICM COCOrH CM(MrHrHrHrHTjHrH -rt^ 


i,03s I.nao 


A33na :2Nv^3 


cO'Tt^oc:c;c■. Oi— icoCirHcoorHt— ■^cot-cO'* 

Cg^TjHCOCM -^t~Gvl COCOCaCQCdrHO-rH ■<i< 


C4 1) 
4) .y 


3NIVcI '^ 'SVHO 


COr-lGOOcO ■(MTHinTHt>CO(MlCOlCO'X>rHlf:) 
rH • CO rH rH (M Cv] CO 


a^IHSSHO T 'a3H3 


■t— »0 -rHeOCMOCOrHrHlOOSCQCOCQCO ■ 
• rH ■ t-H 


<M 


A31NI3:3K 'a T 


'©rHCQCDOSCO(M(Mt^CQCDTt<CQCOlO>-ICOCOi- 
T-i i~\ r-t r-t ^ GQ 


Sa70NA3^ *M. '/A 


<X>Ci'*rH<£) ..^t-t-CD<:Di-Ht-COCO'^"<^CO'£'CO 
rH CO .CO rH CM CM. 


lEianag jsx 


NNin& *V HnHXKV 


rH'^in)rHC0a5'X)OC0a>00C0OrHb-'Tt<rHtDC0C2 
CMtJICOCOCM fOt~CM (MCO(M(MCQrHt-rH '^ 


■Hi 


aNAVd AHHVH 


CMCit-00 • •CO'^tOrHOOrH .OqCDrHrHCO ■ ^ 
CO • ■ Cq --l ■ i-l I 


XQHVHOS '0 lAtVmiM 


t- 00 CO lO TtH (M rH Oi -* rH IC • ■ CM CD ■ tH CO -^ 
rH r-\ • ■ r^ ■ T-l ■ tJI 


H3anH 'a MvmiM. 


t-rHGlGvlQOO-'^OO^QOOlOqOOOt-rHCOCOOOCM 
rH (MCMrH rH-* rHCO<MrH rHlO 




LOCAL 

UNION 
NUMBER 




















t0C~-tr-aiTjilO':D0DOCMC0lO00aiOrHCMC0-*^ 
IQiniCD^Ob-tr^t^t-COCCOOODOOOOOiasOlOSOiO: 



XXXIII— Carp. 3. 



T3 

M 

ea 

o 

w 

u 

•3 

M 

V 

a 


•isia iiu 


laxHVPi 'V 




•?s!a 119 


a^oo *v *M 




•3 S 
o 


HOxooHd 'a T 




jLsinbivM NHor 


OCOt^OO -OCOlCTt^ .T}HCO-t^C<lT-Ha>O5rHr-100 
rH iH-C<10J •rHr-CccirHi-l f^O 


aHOiM:aDVT:a ahhvh 


iHr-(T— Itr- ■COi-HTt<tD-^aii— (i— It-COCDOlOOTt^ 
1— 1 tH'OQ I— It^CvI C:>r-lrH 


•jsra tj't- 


AaioNNOo -a "a 'xaoH 


o050DlOC<lt-GOTJ^ob-ocoolC^C{MTJ^oq^^-cD 

CO Ttii-l(M-*rHC<] mrHOTHi-HCMUDT-tCMCCl 

1-1 i-i 


o 

01 

S 


NOSaHOXHH -T wvmiM. 


THrH''«3 • 'OiCqTjICOCMCvlOlCOOO -CD -CO • 
rH ■ CO • • 
. . . ^ . 


snaxad 'a NHor 


• 'OSr-l • -CO '-^ ••HtHtH -iHOCDOC^ItH 
. ■ ■ • • • iH ri • »H rH 


aa7iM. NVKHaH 


rHCO -CO 'rH-^Oat- -(M •:© • -OOCO 
• r-\ ' ■ • iH • • rH 


• (M 


siMvav aNvio^ 


. . .OOiH .(MrHtM-^OarHb-CgCO -O 

. ■ . • oci cq ■ r-i 


lO . 


XXIMaH "X NHOr 


.,—1 .COrHrHrHrHCO •rHrHr-l"4^CQ • i—i 


rH 


SIAVan 'D *f 


OOrH -aiOO -CJCO • -b- -rHr-lrH 'rHrHW"* 


SXXOJ *H NHOr 


OOCO ■OD(MiOtMCOiH-*eOlOm-^rHtDlOlO«?t- 
rH • C^ i-\ C<3 Cq CO -^ 

rH 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonva^w -aaxa^ 


rHrHrHOOOt-OClOOOoaCsl-^fMCOmt-lOCOCO 
rH rH CQ rHCOt-rHrHrHrHrH 


xso<i "v -a 


Ca CO rHCO rH-eO'M'<*<CO rHCO rHrH 
• CO 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


AaassoH -v •I^[M 


t^COvHOOOiOlO(MrH«:'-^t--b-C<I'<^t-rHlOt:-iH 
rH iHrHrHrHfHCQCNIrH G<] r-{ 


HaHsnva -h saiHVHo 


ai(r)l005C0t-Q0C<lrH-*b-l0TH0lOt-CiO0atD 
rH (M rHCO r-i CNJiHOWrHrHCOrHCqrH 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


saavHOiM *p^M 


inrHrHtDCOrHaat-COt-rHrOrH-^OaOltO-^rHtD 
,—i T-\ C^lrH T-i Ca TiHCMrH t^-rHrH 


aivaN sviAiOHx 


0>(Xl001C'*iOC100CJ03Ci<Z;OiHOllOC3:trHOOC<l 
r-i CO CO COCOOlOarHOlr-iCM 


jC^oagt.naO 


Ajana :xNVHa 


TiHOOOSOrHlOrHtDrHOOtMtDCOlO-*':D-^Ot- 
CO IdrHCQlOrHCqrHlOCMai-^rHC^OrHCOC-l 


p^ a 

rt 4) 

si 

•a i 


aNIV<I 'M 'SVHO 


irsrHOiiOccoiinicocMcoinooTjHcoioioio -oirH 

^ CO rHlOrHOa-rHrH 


a^iHsano t aana 


(X>(M .OOrHT^rHTjHi:Dt--QOCO':D-*CM^OO^ini 
• CO rH r-i 1—i 


AaiNira^M -a t 


t^CO -OSCO -COCO ■ ■^COt-OlCQrHt- -CMtD 
• rH • ■ rH CO rH O • 
CO • 


Sa70NAaH 'M. "M. 


OCQ .rHrH^P'2^CO .CMOOOiCO-^CD'^mCD 
T-\ • rH rH -CMrHCQrH rHcO 

1—1, 


•saj£-3D!A 
lEJansQ isx 


NNiab -v ^nHXHv 


00505t-rHb-OCvlCMOOi{NlCOOt--T^T:tH(r)lOt:- 
CO ■^rH(MmrH0arH'^CQ0i^rHC\lOrH(MC0 




aNAVd AHHVH 


Oi(M .-(^aiCMCilOCOOit--^CDlOmOrH<DCOO 
rH • rH lO rH rH :t; rH 


xanvHOS '0 MvmiM 


UD(M -ClCO -TtlCOt- -Tj1CDTt<COtDlOrH 'OOS 
-CO -CO •THrHTt^C^]rH 'rH 
* 


naariH 'a nvmiAA. 


COlOOlO .inrHCO-tDrHrHt-CDCQ •Olt- •rJHOl 
rH rH-<MrH CO COrH- CO'rH 




LOCAL 

UNION 
NUMBER 




















00aiOrH':fH10l--C0OrH(MC0l0<XJC0 1Ct-G0rHT^ 
OiOlOOOOOOrHrHiHrHrHrHiHOaCMCMCOCO 
tOWDb-t-b-L^t-t-b-t-b-t-t-b-t-t-t-t-l^t- 



XXXIV 



■*sia ^u 



aaxHviM 'v 



1— ICOtDOaiOOt-t-t-COi-l'*Cii-Hi-HCDi-HCOas 
t^Oai— liHTH-rt^r-t I— li— ICMi— li— l<Mi— ItHCOGsli— ti— ( 



■;sta qi9 



3703 'V "M 



Ot>-m(rOOOOt-ai-^00'::}1lOC<lt-HlOrHCNj05 



^OXDO^d 'a T 



oi i-i eg (M t- ^ 



•cot- ■■'tIrHcOOli-tCaTtlioQO 
I— I • 1— t tH -^ 



in ^ 

p 



XSinf)7VAVNH0r 



(M CM T-( CO rH iH tJI 



aaow:a3vaa ahhvh 



rJH i-H ca • CO lO 



■js'a I't 



ATiONNOD 'I 'a "xaoa 



M<lOCO(>30COOt-ir:)t^«DO(Mt-'<^r-li-HrHT-Ht- 
Ttl C<1 1-1 r-( i-H CO <-i T-Ht-(i-(t-ir-((MTt1t-1O]C0i-|rH 



pq 



w 



o 



NOSaHDXnH "T wvmiM. 



Q 



esip 



^p i 



£ s '^ 






iS 



iC,03SI,nsO 



saaxaj "a NHor 



aaiiM NvwaaH 



SWVaV ONVTOH 



t-- 1— I • CO CO to • 

1!^ 


r-f - oa cq 


CO CM Csl TiH rH CO "^ 
03 CO 


?0 • CD rH i-l CO rH 


• iH CM rH 


lO CO CM '^ CO rH rH 


CO • • (M CO oa • 


CO • b- CQ 


C» rH lO rH t- Ol Oa 


t- t^ «D (M t- lO (O 


WOClrHlOrHCO'^iHCClincOCQ 

rH rH 



XXIMaH 'X NHOr 



siAvaa 'D T 



CO 


•CM -COCQrHrHcOlOiH • 


• lO CO ■ 


y-i CO • 


oo 


• ■ T-i • T~i • -CO CD . . 


• rH tH ■ 


CO 00 • 



SXXOa 'H NHOf 



lO -COlOCOcgcMtDcOlOTjH 



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^i-IGOOOCO-*0(LD(Mi-iCDi-HOCII>QO.-lfOOOi 
OCvICgi-IC^rHi-IrHr-ltHiHiHrHCMrHfHt-|.-ia)ir3 




CO 

3 


NOsaHoxnH -t wvmiM 


(M iH CO 


rH . . eg rH • M CO CO rH W (M rH 


tH r-{ 




saaxaj 'a NHOr 


- - iH 


lO .CqrHCO '(M -rH-^Ca 'CO 


'"S 




aaiiM. NvwaaH 


rH ■ W 


•COrHCM-* • •!> -cgrHrH • 


CO lO 
iH 




swvav aNvioa 


iH (M i-H 


^ -CO . • . .i-irHCOCq. • 


lO rH 




XXIMaH "X NHOf 


I-H rH ^ 


-^•i-HrHrHfMrHrH * r-i .(MrH 


lO tp 




siAvan -0 T 


• M iH ■ iH 




SXXOJ 'H NHOf 


CO rH rH ' * • rH • O] 




2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonv73K[ Haxaa: 


t-OOOlOlt-lOtMOiCq-^O-^WOirHt^COCMO 
COrH i-Hi-i rH rHrHCQ 




xsod 'v -a 


rHi-H'rHrH rH- r-i W W rHlO 




1st 
Dis- 
trict 


Aaissoa -v 'mm. 


OOO'^O'Ot-lO'-lCDCvjeOCC 'COlOrHlOCQOOiXl 
OJ rH rHrH -r-lrHrHrHrH 




aaHsnva -h saaavHO 


tOCa-* -lOCMOGOrH .OOOODOOOOO - -t-rH 
rHCq-r-irHrH • r-l, rH rH.-O0?D 

■ • rH 




1 
c 
C 


1 


siavHom -MM. 


loot- .OOt-^DCOCO ■COOC'JOlOlO -cgOrH 
rH • • 1-i i-\ r-i • rH '^t* CM 

rH 




aiV3N SVIUOHX 


OfOOO'X>(MOOOrHC<]a>COO;Cvlt--<*<oac0^t- 
OliHCQrHrHrHrH r-i i-\ r-l rHrH t-lO 




i£,03 


SI<°30 


Aaana XNvaa 


lOCOOSOOCOlOrHCOCMrHy^rHCOOOcOlOOOO 
OlCQ'MrHCarHrHrHrHiH.-lrHrH'MCMCvIrHrHrHb- 




— 

•a i 


aNiva "M. "syHo 


Ttl(MO;iO'^CC(MrH'*C<l -COrHCOrH -OOCO • 
rH rH rH • ■ rH rH rH • 




aaiHsaHD t aaaa 


COirOCq 'COrH • r-i • -COM^ ■ -OSlOrH 
rH • • ■ ■ rH ■ ■ rH 


o eg 

00 lO 




AaiNi33w 'a T 


CO CO CO • CM rH (M -r-i • • CO "* t^ rH »0 • 
00 . ... . 






saiONAaa "m. 'm. 


U3 lO O . CO -* (M OS rH . t- lO ?0 (M rH O rH O rH QO 
rH • rH rH rH • rH rH 00 




•S8Ja-so!A 


NNin5 -v annxav 


CD'*000(MOSTHrHCDlMOt-rH'^0|OCOTfl'*t- 
Ol(MCMrH(MrHrHrHrHrHrHrHT-tCM(M<Mr-lrHrHb- 

CM 






aNAVJ AHHVH 


tH *rH -CvlCOrHrH • • -rHrH -O • • -t^rH 
. . . . OJ ■ ■ • ■^ 




XaaVHDS "0 MVmiM. 


^ ... ,.., ..Oib- 




aaann 'a MvmiM. 


rH0:)C0O(Ml0C005«0(MrHWOC0rHOTt<l0aiW 
OlOJCMrHIMrHrH rHrHrHrHrHM G^rHrHCO 








LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 






































rHOO^lOCDOOOi-^lOCOClOrHCMCO'^lOai 
C7O0(MC<lCgtMCqcOCOCOCOTH*!tlTt<'<^T:HTH^ 

oooooooooooooooooo 


T-^ CO 

o o 



XL! 



O 

1 

3 
O 
U 
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a 

v 


■ISIQ Tm 


laxHVW "v 




CO to O 

rH lO rH 


•;s!a q;9 


aioo "v -M. 


■^OlOO«3a>C<]b-^'^CO-(tli-|t-lt^t-i-l'*rHO 
lOi— l(M I— 1 CJCIi— llCtMiHi— IrHtMi— flOi— 1 


5th 
District 


aoxDOHj "a ■£ 


■00 . eg -tf 1-1 CO ca CO CO lO O O CO Til rH O t- to OS 
• I-H • (M -^ r-H i-H 1-1 , 


isin&ivM. NHor 


•Or-l'^CqCMQOCqcOTHlOlOfMt-OaiOiTtlMi-l 
• CM tH Cq 


aaowxovaa AnavH 


"^-^■(^■^CvlCOCOi-ICOCOOOOlOiCOOOt-CSlcOtD . 
.-( 1-1 rH r-1 <M ■ 


•?S!a ^51? 


A'noNNOo "I "a "xaoH 


■^OOCOO>'*OOCOTjl-*OlON,-lOltDt-ailCrHO 
Ti<i— li— 1 1— t GMCMi— liOCg I— (I— irHi— llOi— ( 


Q 


NOSaHOXflH 'I MVmiM. 


iH - - rH 


saaxaa "3. NHor 


■ lO CO 




CO iH CO CO • • 'CO 


. rH • 


aaiiM. NVMaaH 


■ I- ■ 


• • QO 


OlOiCOlOOCDrJlcO 
CO 


. CD rH 

■ rH 


swvav aNV70H 


• ■* 00 


1-i CO • 


rH lO' - lO CO f-l rH • 


1-t Oi ^ 


XXIM.aH -x NHOr 


• lO . 


1-1 t-l ■ 


• CO lO CO • rH I-H rH 


1-H 


siAvaa -D 'r 


• CO T-f 


• -rHrHlO-^Cqin -rHCO •''^ ■'<i<rH 
. ■ 1-i ' ■ • 


SXXOJ "H NHOr 


-i-lCOCOlOWi-ltOlOCOU20P^'-l<31i-<fO -CI ■ 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NiiHonva^w HaxaJ 


•COli^i— ICOCOCO ■fHOiOi— (^i— lOOli— It— I— lOO 
•Ca r-\ -i-lrHr-lcOCOi-HrH CO' 


xsoa "v -a 


TtHlOT-tOO-^^COCO-^Ot-CO .(MOOt-OQOcqrH 
CO 1— ( I— 1 rH Oa • CJ CO 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


Aartssoa -v 'WM. 


•OCOlOt-C^lCOCOC^Ot-lCCS-^C^lT-lrHrtlrHOl 
• C<1 I— 1 rH 1— t CO 1—1 CO 


aaHsnva -h sa7avH3. 


ThrHOOlOrHCOOO ••^CiOlrHOaoOCD^T'CSCiOrH 
CO • 1-1 T-\ G<1 C<1 T-i r-i CO 


c! 




saavHom -wm. 


■ COt-TjHrHlOlOOacO(rOlOl>.OOt>-CDOC<IOOOaO 

■ CQ rH rH CO rH CO iH 


aivaN svwoHX 


Tt^oo^Dt-•^J^aJCOCiCO(^aolOlOc^lt^C3l^-co • 

COrH rHrHCMrHrHrHCO* 


^^03 


SI.°80 


T^ana sNvna 


TjHlOCDOOOOi-^OOCOCOOOlOOOCNlQOt-OlOOtyS 
lOrHCM rH CslfMrHlCCarHt-lrH03rHm 


^ a 

■« i 

a o 


aNIVi "M. -SVHO 


■OOrHCOrHCQO^COrHCO -Ot- ■'*IOQO -C^rH 
• CO rH • rH 


aaiHsaHD T aasa 


• T~{ -rHlHrHOOrHt-t-COrHrHT^OqCO -CLOOl 


AaiNi33Pii -a T 


' O ^ • 1-i i-\ Ol -OICQ -tHIOCOOO -COOarH - 

. rt . . -co • CO - 


saaoNAaa "Ai. -m. 


■^CDWtDlOlCCQrHCO-^COCsIrHcO-^CO -COt- - 
rH rH rH rH rH 


•sai 


anar) jsj 


NNin& -v aXlHXHV 


-e<COinOtOOOTj<OOlOailOTj<ClCOt-(CrH^CDO 
inirHOJ 1-H C^lCQrHlOrHrHrHrHOOrHlOrH 




"^1 

SS 


aNAVa AHHVH 


•OCO -r-HC<lrHCvl«Ot~Tt<'^ ■ -COt- 'COrHOO 
• 1-t • CO •• rH ■ rH 


xaavHOS "O wvmiM. 


• COCO ■ • -O -lOOcOlOOOCDOq . • -COC<I 
■rH ..-rH-rHT-l rH ■••CO 


aaann 'a wvmiM. 


Tt^Tt^ooOb-l^-cocOlOCOCQOOcot-co •rHOii-i ■ 
CO 03 rHrHrHrH rH-CQ CO- 






LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 




















■^iracooocioocicoicairHcacoT^Lot-ooocciio 

lOiOlOlOlOtOCOCOCOCOt-b-t-t-t-t-b-QOOOOO 

oooooooooooooooooooo 



O 

m 

u 

2 

a 

u 

o 


•jsta tiu 


7axavw -v 


(MOil>-l^lOCC'rHOcOfO-7fiaii:DO.IOajlOOOO(M 
'-llfSi-H'-ir-ltMCC'-HCICOCMr-lrHlOCOi-H ,-HCJ.-H 


•ISTQ: TI19 


aioo v "M. 


CJ.-tt-lOlOCO'-lOlCii-H-^Olt-i-IOCiCOlOCCIOQ 
.-l<:Di-tT-(,-HCgCO'-ICJCOCMrHi-(rt1C0rH iHOaiH 


■s '£ 


aoxooad 'a t 




ismSavM. NHOr 


CM i-H i-H Cvl • 


a^iowsovaa AaavH 


t- Tjl ■ O ■* TjH t- CO «D QOOi O O O t- . ^ tH OJ in 
1— I'rH i-H t— 1 iHr-ICOi— (■ rH 


•jsia mt, 


ATIONNOD -I -3. USOH 


1— (GOt-'^lOlCtDOOOOi— iTt^Clt-iHOOO-^i— IrHi— ( 


S 


NosaHDxnH -1 wvmiM. 


i-ii-iiocotM'* -oa -CO -cocdooio 

l-H 


r-\ "rii T-i 1-^ 

1-^ 


saaxaj -a nhoi 


f?]TtlOai-l -rHi-H •THrHrHr-f -CO ■ 


': 


<M rH 


aaiiAv NvwaaH 


i-H • • • 


(M 


1-i (M 


swvav aNvioa 


i-iCQrH<MOi-(C<3i-lcqir-i-(<MrHTHtHai • 
i-l (M (M • 


CD • 


XXIM.3H -X NHOr 


.CQ(M(M ' r-{ r-i -(Mt-CDCO -CO ■ ■ ■ 
■ i-f • CO • i-H • ... 


■ r-< 


siAvaa 'D T 


•OOTfl • -CO ■ -i-l(M ■ -lO • . -CMiHCMi-l 
. C<] . . . . . . ... 


SXXM "H NHOr 


■ tH iH iH . tH 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonvi^w aaxaj 


C<IcCOO00(r0C0C30Tj<0000OTjHC000CDC0Tj10irH 
CO T-H <-f !-( CO (M 


xsoa -v -a 


OoDt-COGOlOOCMr-tlOCDeCCOlOGO -IO-^COtH 
rHcvl (M(M CvlCMi-lTHrHrHrH. i-lrHi-H 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


A3^SS0a -V 'WM 


i-<T^C0GOTt1O]00CD,-l<:DCit-fOTt<<31 -r-lr-lt-M 
T— 1 1— 1 I— 1 I— 1 1— I Tt^ T— 1 - 


HaHsnva -h saaHVHO 


1— (■^^■^'^C^^OOi— (COt^Tj<COMT^lOT-H,— (lOCDWCl 
I— ( "-^ 0-] CI rH CO iH f-l C-l i—f rH 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


SiaVHOIW -WM. 


t-t,lO-:JHOt-CiOGOr-(OOCOOOl>-cOr-lt-lOCaTHiH 
1— ( I— 1 i-H i-< ■^ 


aivaN svwoHX 


init-C<ICOOO'~i'-'t--Or-I.HOi-iaii-tCOCCiOOTH 
lO 1— IrHC^Ol I— li— (i— (i-Ht— (i— ti— iCQ r-*i— It— 1 


^.33SI<«30 


A^ana SNvaa 


C] Ol I- lO lO lO =£5 O L-- rH -<# Oi t- C] O -^ lO CO CO eg 
t-ltDrHi-trHCOC^lrHrHCOCMr-ii-llOCMCJ i-HtMi-H 


2nd General 
Vice-President 


aNIVi 'M. •SVH3 


■0"*TtiaiOi~lC\] •CS]'*C<lT-IO'HCOCvli-ltCiC<] 

■ i-H 1-1 i-l r-l - CI 


a-aiHS3H3 T aaaa 


I— iCO<M '(MCOCMtDi— iTjlt— ii— (COO ■ -COfMi-lfO 

T^H . rH (M l-H ■ ■ 


AanNix^w 'a t 


(MCOrHCOCQOi-li-li-l-^O'^Cl-^OO-^ -iHOSCva 
rH rH rH rH rH CO ■ 


SQTONAaa "M. 'M. 


OlOO .|-iCOrH(C'rHCC>Tt<OlCS]COlOrH -CO-^t-W 
rH rH rH r-t • r^ 


IEI3a3£) }sx 


NNin5 -v annxav 


OOOt-mOb-'XJOt^CO^Oimb-OrHOOtDrHCv] 
rHlOrHrHrHCMGvlr-HrHCOO^rHrHCOCslCO rHCQrH 


a ■« 


aNAVJ A-aavH 


lOOi -rH -tDrJilOrHCOCOrHTtlCSrH -CO -COrH 


xaavHOS -o wvmiM. 


• CO -CO •cooo .lOrHOi .cocMt-aicocqincq 

• CM ■ rH rH • * <M , 
* 


aaariH "a wvmiM 


t>.(Mt-tO^Oat— mc001C<]0DOrHC0 .CQioicd 
lOrH rHrH (MrH rHrH-*rH' rHrH 
* 




LOCAL 

UNION 
NUMBER 






















I— aj<Z>rHLOt^OCOlO!^t--ClTtHLOt^CC 
CO GO Oa OS O O rH rH iH rH rH rH q:] C.] CI C 
OOOOrHrHrHi-HrHrHrHrHrHrHrHr- 


O C' 
CO CO 
rH tH 


^ to 

CO CO 
r-i rH 



xiiin 



O 
W 

"3 

u 

w 

M 

a 
O 


■wja iu 


73XHVIM "V 


COOt--^OlOOO.-tlOOT-Hc<:iOOC001<MO(±)0 


•}S!CI q;9 


aioo "v 'M. 


C0GMt-C<lOinOOC0t-(Mi-li-lt-i-(0ii-HOOiH 
1— 1i— 1 CQOOi— iCOIMt-COi-HrHOaCvI'— 1 iHiHi— lr-( 


tj 

in m 

P 


Hoxoo-aj '3 T 


• Olt-CQCvl -TjICMrHCO .a)Tt<COM< 


• CO in CO 


isin5iViVi.NHor 




in CO CO rH 


aHOMiHOVia A^SVH 


COr-1 -lOlOrHOtDOOL^lOOT^IlCait^T^Oqt- 


•IsiQ lit' 


AiaoNNOo 'T "a "xaoH 


-Ob-CMCDlOOOOOb-tMrHOl^OtMOSCMOOiOO 
■iH OJb-T-ICOOJb-rHrHrHiHtMr-l iHi-H 


Q 
-a 


NOSaHDXXlH'T PMVmiM. 


CO iH t- ■ 'sjl 
r-1 


OS - Ol rH . • -* t- rH 
CQ ■ • 




Cq - CO 


saaxad "a NHor 


: : : : : 


CD CO CO rH rH ■ CD W • 




. rH r-\ 


aailM NVKHSH 


•CO ■ lO •'•■^ 

• iH T-l 


rHrHt-CO .-^tlrHOOrH 
CD 




.o> • 


siMvav aNv^OH 


- (M • i-i lO 


CO rH CO • Cq rH ID Cd • 




r-< • CO 


XXIMaH 'X NHOr 


- • • • 1— 1 


CO O CO CO cq . ■ ^-^r-^ 
r-i , . • • 




■^ . tH 


siAvan -0 "f 


• iH • - CO 


iracOrHiH .COC<JCOrH 


t- . . . 


SXXOJ 'H NHOf 


. IQ . OJ rH W CD O CO rH t- -^ lO iTD Ol OS rJH ^ • Tt< 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonvi^w Haxaa 


. b- . CD CO - lO '(IH O Tt^ Tt< <M to CO ■ • . CO Ol (M 
Cvl ■ iH t- ^ . . - 


xsod -v -a 


CO»rair-ODCOlOOOCDcOC00001'*»OfOOS<MQOi-(01 

T— 1 tHIOi— li— li— 1 CO I— Ir- (rH i-H 
* 


■1st 
Dis- 
trict 


Aa^SSOH 'V 'IMM. 


COrHb-«505 -lO^tDOi -CvimcOOO -OC\]T-Ht- 
iH tH • lO rH ■ rH ■ rH 


HaHsnva "h sainvHo 


•O .tDrHlOOOCOC«01(?ClOtDin'«*105W0001-* 
•rH -rHCDrHlMrHca rHrHrHrH 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


siavHom 'PiM. 


• COt-rHlO •CaCvlCC]Tt<rHt-rHCOt- -rHOJCvIt- 
rH Oa • rH tD rH CQ • r-\ 


a7vaN svwoHX 


COCl •■^COlOOOrHTHrHt^COCDlOt^rHClOOTtl 
rH -rHlOrHOaCvlCMC^JrH i-\ * 


X,03SI,n3O 


Aaana :KNVHa 


CO(Mt--CDOilOCM<MOOc310lTHCOOCOOirHCS10rH 
rHrH cat— rHCOCOt-CM rHC<JCOrH i-HrHrHrH 


d « 
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SNIVX "M. 'SVHD 


. . . cq CO 


TtlOOOrH'^COrHrHrH 
rH r-i 


rH .. CO 


aniHsaHO t 'aa-aa 


■ CD b- CD CD 


OlCDrHlO .lOOOiOCO 
CO ■ CO 


00 m ■ (M 


AaiNi^ow *a -r 


CO ■ • CD t- lO CD CO 00 t- -.^ •COCOrH 

r->, ' • r~i r-\ CO rH 


• <M (M CO 


saaoNAan "iw 'm. 


.CD ' OH <D .COTjHOOiOincDCSIrHCOOlca-^COcO 

. rH in • 


•S31J-3DIA 

IBjanag )s-[ 


NNin5 'V HriHXHV 


COC<]t-CD(MlOCQCaTtlOiC<l-«i<rH01CS101rH001rH 
T-i 1-i CQt-rHCOCat-oarHfHCvlCOrH rHrH i-H 


^1 

Si 


aNAVJ A^avH 


• 't^TtlC^I .IOCOCO(M ■ .Cvl(>-CM -OCO -CD 

• • - rH r-i ' • r-i * ' r^ 


XQHVHOS '0 PMVmiM 


. . . .CO .-^JlOOCOrHCvlOaTjIoa ■ • -rHCOCa 
CD rH ... 


■aaann 'a MvmiM. 


COCO •COOOlO'^rHOt-- -OOt-OOOSlMOOt-CO 
rHrH 'Cqb-T-lrHrH* <Mt-4 (MrH 
* 




LOCAL 
UNION 

NUMBER 






















Ol O C3 CO 'XI l> 
CO tH tH ■<*< Tfl tJ 
irH rH rH rH rH T— 


rHlCb-00C0TjHC0CO"^L- 
WlOlOlOCDCDt^t-Wt" 
rHrHrHrHrHrHrHiHr-tr- 
rHrHrHrHrHrHrHrHrHr- 




1178 

ai79 

1182 



XLIV 



'is!a ^.^ 



;s!a q;9 



laxavw "v 



aiOD 'V 'AV 



Hoxooad: "a t 



U5 'loiomt-oai-icoiotDajmcMOTH -odcoco 



P 



xsin57VM. NHor 



CD ■* . CO -^ 



HfHCOC^l -CMOatD -rHClCO 



aaowHovia ahhvh 



OOSOOOCOt-OSCOOOoa-^lOri^ISCOi-l^t-COCO 



■js!a qifr 



AirtONNOo -T "a "xaoa 



m 



w 



o 



NosaHDxnn -t wvmiM. 



o -2 •- 



saaxaa 'a NHOr 



aa7iM. NvwaaH 



SMvav oNVToa 



XXIM.aH 'X NHOr 



siAvan -0 T 



CO -TtHccicq -1— loain^tiioco • m -^ -oi 



Tt< l-t . i-( I— I i-H l-( 



rH CO CM ■ (M i-H 



■ i-H CO iH CO C<1 



Ttl ■ i-H CM CO TtH 



C<] ■ I-H TJ^ • CSl ■* "<i^ 



SXXOJ 'H NHOf 



COCTlCSi— iCMOiOCMlOlOCOCOrHCOCOlO 



NnHonva^w aaxaa 



COCiCOCOb-^D -CMt-rHTtHCMTtlCOmCD "(MO 



xsoj 'V 'a 



CO -TtlOOCMiHtD-^CC>COCllOCMl>-(MCOTH'^OCO 



*Q. 



n ::i t^ 
0) ?^ <u 
O £ S 



O 



ijOaSI.aao 



CI] V 



0(i: 






Aaassoa "v "wm. 



aaHsnva -h saiavHO 



l£J -lOOSeOOOrHC^TtHU^OOOmcOOit^-^t-CDlO 



ICOSCDeocOOi-^lOOOTtlcOOOi-tt-OTH 'b-QOCO 



siavHom 'n.ML 



•^ •OOt-lOOO'^iH'^t^iOOlOCMOOCD -QOlOin 



aivaN svwoHX 



b-O^COOOiClOOtOb-t-OSt^i— (OlCMtDTHOOOSCO 



Aaana 3:Nvaa 



rHCiOcointiowt-com^cDeDoi-tio^tomoo 

1-1 (MiHCOr-trH i-li-lr-l(M iHCaCMiHCQrH 



aNiva -/A "SVHO 



aHiHsaHO T 'aaKJ: 



Aa^NI33p\I -a t 



tH 


■<# Gv] iH TjH CO . • ■ 


; toco 


(M O CM ■ ^ 1-1 CO 
rH 


rH 


U:J TtH CM Ttl tM CM -CO 


■ T-1 


• CO IC • IC CO ■ 
r^ • r-t • 




lO CO t-H lO • ' r-1 iO O • • 


• CO -<*^ -* (D rH iH 

rH 



Sa70NAaH 'M. "M. 



tDC^t-in(MTj<iHmiHt--^tDTH00»HfO -Oi -rH 



NNin?) "V SnHXHV 






XLV 



aNAVJ AHHVH 



rH -cgcOQOTtH '(M •COCdCDlO •■* • -t^OOiH 



xaavHDS '9 wvmiM 



• b- . iH CD 



aaann "a wvmiM 



< 
u 
o 
■J 



P4 

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pq 
S 

2; 



COir:)CDt-OOOlOCMCOTjilr-OOmtD(M-<i<(DQOOi-l 
QOOOOOOOOOOOaiCiOSOlOSOlOOrHrHrHrHlSQCM 
>— IrHtHi— li-HrHi— li— It— It— li-HrH(MO]CQ<M(MC<I0Q<N 
iHrHT-lTHTHT-li— It— IT-Ii-Hi-Ii— IrHiHi-HiHrHT-tiHiH 



■isia "Hi 



7axaviu "v 



COiHt^Oit^oOC^THCOin^i— loOCOCOCQOiHCJlo 
r-i T-HrHrHCOrHrHrHrHCq i-Hi-liHi-lrHlMi-i 



■jsia 1^9 



aioo "v 'M. 



aoxooaa: "a t 



P 



xsinftivM NHor 



in 


CD {M • m • CO r-H 


• t-H 


• CD 


• eo CO rH 


• rH 


^ 




cq 


lOirsO-^COOrHOiCDOSCD^lOlO-^JHrHCa 


03 





aaowsovia ahhvh 



•COCQOSOi'^OOCQCiCDlClOOiCloDb-lID 



•;s!a iJt' 



A770NN03 'T "3 "XaOH 



NOSaHOXjQH "1 MVmiM. 



iHCD -i-HCD '(Mi-t -COTtlcO -T-ICMi-H 



o 



Q 



saaxaa -a nhoi 



aaiiM. NVH^aH 



siMvav QNViO'a 



XXIMaH 'X NHor 



siAvan 'D T 



(M CO ■ Tji i-l CM iH t- 



SXXM 'H NHOr 



(Moat* -"^iHOOOOOO -OOi -rHOa -GOt-H 



iH ' i-H 00 



n " " 



NiTtHDnvi^w Haxaa 



ICOt-iH-^ -catHiHlomcOOacOcji-tt-lOi-) 



xsoa "v -a 



-""Qii 



Aanssoa -v •wm. 



'^ IC ■ 03 CI CM CD -^ ■ -CCSiH 'ICrHCOr-HCOCCIlo 



aaHsnva: "h sa^avH^ 



2 S ^< 



saavHOiM "raM. 



c»0 •CSSCDi-Ct^i-ii-CCOlOrHrH'^CDr-CcaooClrHrH 



aavaN svhohx 



OdrHt-rHCOTjICiOoaOClcDi-tc^sOit-COOacSS^i-^ 



^.33SIc°30 



cd a; 



"a S 



•S3J[j;-3o;^ 



Aaana 3Nvhj 



.aNIVa "M "SYHO 



aaiHsano t 'aaai 



r^TJ^t:^0]00O^>- ■ ■ ' • ■ 
iH 


. (M -<:H Cvl i-l . • ■ 






CO-^ -r-lcqi-ICOi-ICMtMlC • 


• Ca lO rH 1—1 I— 1 CO 1—i 



Aa7Ni33Hi -a •£ 



iHoa -^TtHCM^OacDmTt^U^CMCOiH'rHloOC] 'O 



sa70NAa'a "m. "m. 



caoa -COTjCTtlcMOO-^OOOat^OOCDcOi-tCOOlOl^ 



NNin?) 'v ^nnxav 



2| 

ft) 'O 
1) OJ 



aNAVJ AHHVH 



Ti^r^c0^^r-l -lOoa 'COCOiH -COcSi -iH •!>- 



xaavHDS 'O wvmiM. 



HaaxiH 'a wvmiM. 



COiH -t-Ol -OaT-COCMt-H -COCM -CMCMCMIO 



CO •■^ccioot-o(X)coot~T-(t-cx)^cot'<jsi-Hm 



•^ 5 w 

O O pq 

^ ^ Z 



cO'^t-oooiiocoocaiOfr'b-cDt-i-iatit-oiocioi 



li-tiHr-ti-lt-li-liHrHrHrHr-ii-lT 



XL VI 



a 

n 

> 

a 
u 
u 

2 

u 

o 


•WIQ KU 


aaxavw -v 


GOcOlO -LOfMOOCSCOrHCOc^lCOTfOOlOOi— (GO 


•IsiQ qjg 


31:00 -v 'M. 


GlCO^rHtOCqOiOSCOiHOlTjHCOrt^Or-ICQOtMCO' 


o 

a 


aoxooHj 'a T 


lO 


■* -CO -CMIr-COCO •COThrHrHt-cq 'OOC^I 


isinaivM. NHor 


CO 


■* • Ml CM CO -* CD C^ i-H -^ ■* -^ (M . Tt< Oi lO CQ 
•rHCMrH-<*< rH rH • j-i -^ 


aaOWXDVia AHHVH 


1—1 rH • tH Oa rH I— 1 


•?s!a qji? 


A710NNOO -1 "a 'XaOH 


00C0"^'-lC0C<lC0O01Ot'C0i-ll0OOi-IO03i-l 


3rd District 


NOsaHoxnH -a wvmiM. 


1-i 


<-! .(MOt-rHt- •{>aOCO .CMCOCOOrHCO 
(M . ^ . ^ 


saaxaa -a nho: 




i-HiHCO -rHO ■rHiH^ . . 


• CO • • • , 

• r-\ ' • • 


aaiiM, NVwaaH 


r-t 


--H rH OO rH rH 00 rH rH rH lO • • 


• ■ • • r-i 


swvav aNvioa 




CMt-cO -lOrHrH ■CO'X'rHCD 


Tt* . . . t^ 

. . - T^ 


XXIMSH -x NHOr 


t— ( 


I-H -rH -CvJrHCOrH •C>a -tH 


•r-i . rH <M 


siAvan -0 T 


iH 


CM -lOrHCOrHlOrH -tJI -CMi-H -r-i • XO ' 


SiXOJ "H NHOr 


IOCQOS -tJI .CO<M'X>i-10qrH<X)COt-lOT-l 'lO • 
r-l ■ rH . rH • • 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonvi^Pi aaxaa 


T-l • . T^ iH (M i-( iH Ti4 ' 


xsoa 'v -a 


t^i-HO ■i-lc<ll>-l001'MCO-:JHl>-(MeOC--(M -OlO 
rH-COCqCqCNl CM CM tH -tH 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


Aaissoa -v 'wav 


• t-H rH - CO rH i-H i-H ■ ri 


aaHsnva -h saiHVHO 




'^CCi-l •QOCMt-OJOJ'^eOlOOiCQOCOlOr-lO'* 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


siavHom 'WAV 


r- -lOt^CCiTHCDrHT^O^CvJ-T^CQCO 'CM 'OacO 
<M i-H i-t iH • • Tt< 


aaVHN SVMOHX 


(MCOCXJiHOrHCQOiOOCOTtlCOOi-lt-T-it-OirHa! 
i-H fOCMCqrtI CO C<] iH iHiH rH 


i.D3Sl,nao 


AJjna xNvaa 


a:)^oI^-c»!r>cMc»coco'*C3TJ1co^cocolr:lOCM■<:*^ 

i-Ht-H CO(MCM<r)(M-^ COrHi-li-lrHi-irHrH'^ 


M a 

OS U 

S3 

c5(i; 


aNIva 'Ai. •SVHD 


tH 


CO •COCgiOCOlOCOrH'^COCSlCOCOCOOCOrh 
r-i T--i r-i '^ 


aaiHsaHO T -aaaj 


ca 








'cO • r^ -COOiTtHOCOrHCOOl 
' rH ■ lO <M 




AaiNiH^iM -a T 


r-T^ 


Tt< CO ■ (M CO 


saioNAan "m. -m. 


lOCOt-QOOrHt^OO -OlO^COTjIt-lOtM •'<4HCM 
i-t (M iH • I-H i-l ■ 


IV13U3Q }s-[ 


NNin5 -v ariHxav 


OOCO-^OOCOMO-^COrJHOlTHcOCOOi-Hb-OCOrH 
rH i-l (M CM CO CO CM ■* CO i-H rH rH rH iH rH rH ^ 




aNAVa AHHVH 


• • lO iO CO •CM':^ -OOCOOWrH ■ -CO • -O 


xaavHOS '0 wvmiM, 


00 •-* -t- -rHlOC^OOCDOcQTtlrH -tJI . -00 
CO CM tM CM • rH • • CO 


aaann -a wvmiAi. 


rHCOOOCOtOfMt-COrHO -lOlOOOiCMfMOCOTtl 
rH' CMCJCM t— I- r-i r-i r-i r-i 




LOCAL 

UNION 

. NUMBER 




















O] CO 
00 00 
(M (M 
rH T-i 


C-OCOlO^t-l^t-OOOSfHCMCO 
OOOiOiaiOOrHrHrHrHCOfMCM 
OaCMtMCMCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCQCO 
rHrHiHrHTHrHrHrHrHrHrHrHrH 


Tt^ lO t- 00 C3i 
CM CM CM CM CM 

CO CO CO CO CO 

rH rH rH rH rH 



XLVII 



-a 

S 
o 
M 

1 

3 
U 
U 
X 

H 

a 
O 


•ISIQ qj^ 


laXHVJM *V 


OTHOilOOOaOCOCCIOb-OWCOOO'^T-ltD^t- 

CgiHr-1r-iC<IC<l-*(MC<IiHiH(MCOQOCOi-(rHCOi-liH 
(M CO CM 


•jsiQ qig 


aioo 'V 'M. 


i-iiOrHu:it-c<ii-HCQcooooocooaiTjir-(oi^(M 

COrHcai— (i— lOJ'^CvlOai— trHC^lCOlOC'li— tiHCO'— Id 

(M CO ca 


t; 

•a'S 
P 


HOXOOSd '3 T 


oq^t--*C0(NU:)OllOfQOllO00lOt-COC0«>'<^lO 
rH I— I 1-H CO CO 


xsmbiViWNHor 


lO-^C^JiHt-COCOOCOi-ii-IGOi-IOOOt-COi-HfOcO 
CNI I— ( CO Oi I— 1 
CO 


a^oiMiHovia A^avH 


Tjiiooa .<MTjiooeoc<icD •coioco'^'-iiooy^'* 

r-t rH'1-HT-l.-Hr-li-i • (MrHCvlr-t -^ 
-CM . ^ ^ 


•jsiQ qii, 


AiiONNOo -T -a -xaoH 


b-TjHtDmOOtMC0CMO00OG<lC<]C<IC0r-i00CC101 
r-(i-(rHrH.-IG\llOC<3C>]i-li-(Cv3fOOOS»-lr-lCOr-(rH 
--t CO t-H 


Q 

»-« 
CO 


NOsaHDxnH "T I^[vmIM. 


r-fC^ThCOCQcOCOlOi-ICQ - 


lOt-COrHrHCllOCO 
CM t- t- CO 

rH 


snaxad 'a NHOr 


- CO . rH CO • ^O rH rH 


r-\ 


rH CO lO O^ . • CO CO 
LO rH • • 
CO • - 


aa7iM. NVK^aH 


rH r-i • rH CO r-( O rH - 
rH 


CO 


TjH T-H Ci CO • 0:\ - C30 

CO CO 
—I 


SMvav aNV7o^ 


■ (M • -CO . (M CO rH 


CO 


XXIMaH 'X NHOr 






■ rH !>■ ■ rH • C] rH rH 

1—i 


r~i -rHTjlCOCO -rHrHrH 


siAvan -D *r 






■ r-{ • • rH rH ■ lO CO 


Ol CO rH T^ C30 rH • -r-i • 
CO ... 


SXXOd -H NHOr 


r-i rH rH • 'i* CM 
• • ■ 1-i 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


KiiHonvaow Haxaj 


Ci to ^ 'CM • <Ji ^ <£> Cf: 
■ r-i • CO rH 


coo5?cooaiocoir:i«:?o 

r-\ a> CJ iH rH 
r-{ 


xsox "v -a 




i-HocomGOCOoaob-TtHt-oqo:tot~-ocDcQ -o 

rHrHrHrH COrHrHrH rHCOl>-"^rH -^ ■ r-i 
CS] CO w • 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


AaassoH *v 'wa 


CO-^TtllOOOrHCOOGOCOTtlt-OCltDCNl^Dt^CDrHO 
r-i i-\ Oi a:> j^ CgTt^O COrH 
r-^ C<1 rH 


saHsnva -h saa^vHo 


■^ 'Ttl -rHrHt-OOTjIOQCOCacOlOOlt-'^OlOO 
1— 1 -r-i ■ iH lOr-lrH rHrHrHt--^ rHrHrH 
■ * CSl tH 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


saavHom -mm 


lOCOCD -t- -eoaiCO-^COCOrHirsOlCDCOCQCOOD 
• rH ■ CO rH -^ O 
■ ■ CO rH 


aivaN sviMOHX 


«DCSlTt1lC<OCO'<^OirHODCDCOtDCOI>-OC:tDOOCO 
rHrHrHrH rHCOrHCQ rHrHCOCOlOrH tJI rH 
CM C^ i—\ 


i.oaSt.nso 


Aaana 3:Nv^a 


COlOOmcQOOCaOTt^COairHOCQOOUtiCOCOlOrH 
C0rHC<lrHC0C01CC<JC0rHrHCMCOcOCOrHrHTt<rHOl 
(M t:J^ CO 


— 

rt 0) 

1) .^ 


aNIVd 'M -SVHO 


rH • I>- CO CO • Ci GO rH 
■ r-{ rH • 


tDCOrHCDOiCOrHtDCDC^l 
r-i r-\ r-\ 


a^iHsano *r 'aana 




CDIO -COO -^-^lOC^ 
- rH rH •' . 


•iHCOlCThWt^COCOCO 
CQ CO ri 

COTt<Ci"<*rHrHCJ-*-*in 

CO CO lO rH 
ZD rH 


AaiNia^iAi -a t 


O CO ~^ • CO 5B"rH CO to CC 
1-i . ■ rH rH 
. . CO 


saaoNAa-a 'ia 'aa. 


mb--^ ■ •lOCOG^lOCOrHCOlTDioCO^CO'^-^CM 
• • CO rH rH r-{ CO tD rH 


•S3IJ-30IA 


NNin?) -V HHHX^V 


COlCOmcOO'^COTflCOCSOOieDCOOSTHcOCOOi-! 
COrHCOrHCOCOlOCOCOrHrHrHCOt^COrHrHThrHCO 
CO CO C-1 


^1 


aNAVX A^HVH 


■ 1-i • • <^ .OiairHTji -rHCOcOt-rH-^tDcoGO 
• • r-i ' • r-i Oi r-i 


XQHVHOS '3 IMVmiM. 


CO . 'GOOl -OSrHCO • -C0t-t^b-C0rH-*y?ir5 

• . -r-i • ■ rH CO 

• . • - • t- r-i 


^aann 'a lAtvn-aiM. 


aiC0C>.lL--rHrH000irHa>OQ000C00:C0t--OiCDm 
rH rH CO CO ^ CQ CM rH CM (M rH rH CO 
* CO r-\ 




LOCAL 
UNION 

NUMBER 






















OrHC^l'-'COOCvlTt^LOrHCO'^int-aiOCOt-CO'^ 
COCOCO-^'^lOlOlOlOOCOCDOCOtOt-t-t-t-OO 

cocococococococococococococococococococo 



XLvni 



13 

s 

4) 

•l 

H 

5 


•ISTQ HU 


aaxHVPi "v 


CO ao oi as 

iH Tt< C<3 CO 


• 00 iTD oa cq lo ic c 

• I-l CM 1-1 CO 1-1 03 r- 


i-Ht-COOOODOrHTjl 
COrHCMrHrHCMrH?H 


•IsiQ Ti;9 


3700 -V -M. 


^Tj<C<lCO -i-HOai-HCOTHCQ CQrH(Mi-li-lr-lr-ti-l 


P 


HOXOOHd 'a T 


b-QOOOOiCOCOCOCOlO-^CDcOt^CNt— OllOCO -(M 
CO CO i-H fH 1-1 r-i 


xsin5iViVi.NHor 


CO ^ CO in •<}< Tji .100 -co 

1—1 I—I 1— ! • 1— 1 • 


CI o -* . t-m o o> 

r-\ T-\ r^ • T-{ 


a^OM^ovia AHHVH 


coo>i-t»nco(M(Moooqii>- 

iH i-i (M 


CO O CO • <© t^ rH Tt< 


%sTa ^^i7 


a7t:onnoo '1 'a 'xaon 


• to ^ Oi 

• CO Csl CO 


050i— l':C'<MTjH(;MOt-(Ml>-l>.(DT— IrH 
I— lOdi— iCqi— l<Mt— ICOl— i<Mi— li— liHi— li— 1 


3rd District 


NOsaHoxnH-i kvitiim 


C\l "ID O CO 


^ CO • 00 CQ eg 
• 1—1 


i-H . i-t • eg CO rH . 

- CQ - 


s^axaj 'a nhoi 


1-1 lo 1-1 oq 


l-l 1-1 1-1 rH ■ lO 


i-H C-a • ''i* CO • 




aaiiAY NVKHaH 


I— 1 


t- . 1-H (M CO t- 


■^ . i-H • CO t^ 


to 


SMvav aNvioH 


rt^ :D r-1 1-1 


CO ca I-l <M I-l '^ 


Tti cq ; CM ■* CO 




XXIMaH -x NHOr 


1-1 Th ■ Tt< 


i-lCO -co • •i-IClCO'-' • -(MtMCO 


siAvan *o T 


• ^ f^ r-i 


•rJ^I-tl-IGOI£^OJ<Mco -i-lCOCd -OJ 

- rH • rH ■ 


sxxod: "H NHor 


1-1 t- <M Oi 
rH cq 


rHCQOi'^i-iCO 'COt-rHrHCO-^OOm 
iH ■ rH 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NiiHonv^^M ^axaj 


Ol t- O CQ 
CO C] (M 


05-:t^rH'*00Tl^0i<Mt>-OC0OO -i-H 
j-\ rH 1-1 CQ rH rH rH • 


xsod "v -a 


'^ GO C<J Cl 
I— t 1— I I— 1 


OOOOiHt-CM •'^O-^lOt-Cli-ilO 
1— IrH CO i—i'CMrH tHi— 1 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


AaiSSOH 'V "MM 


Oj T^s CO t- 
(M CO 


lO(MCMCO<MTtHrHi-|-^CMrHCOrH01M 

1— ( 1— li— 1 CO rHrHi— IrHi— 1 


^ansnva -h saiHVHO 




^ O CO ^ 
CO Cq 


■r:tHCC10C-COGOaii-HCOOt--*OSrH<M 
iHrHrHCMrH rHi-H rH 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


siavHom 'WA 


IQ -^ 00 O 
CO rH 


CMrH(MCOCO«Ot^-^t-rHt-000(M-^ 
rH C<1 (M rH rH 


a7vaN svwoHX 


OOOOqOOO^O'^rHOJt^OTtlOOOcOi-IOOOaii-l 


i^oaSI.nao 


Aaana sNVHa 


COCOr-tCMaiCllOCOOJlOtDCO-^t-COOOOOOOiHCO 
i-lTtHCO^rt^ i-IC<Ii-ICOi-IC^]T-(CO'-l(Mr-Hi-trHrH!-! 




aNIVJ 'M 'SVHO 


•t^oom ■oai--i-ir-ioTtico'*'-(c<]iococqo3Tji 
1-1 l-l I-l I-l 


a^iHsano t aana 


^ a; oq t- o 


<X)co'ri<M -c; -co^qco -COOl -i-H 
1-1 ■ 

00 CO I-H «0 c5~CO - t- m iH CO O VQ b^i-i 


AaiNis^pi -a T 


Gi m to 1© 


saaoNAan 'm. 'm 


iH (M CM I— t ■ T—l 


•S3JJ-33IA 

jBjatiaf) }sx 


NNin& *V ^nHXHV 


COCDCO-*Ot^"*(MCO-»^lOiHCOt-C<]t-COt-iH(M 
rHTt^COCOi— li—iCvJiHCOi— ICMi— ICOrH<Mi— ii— IrHi— li— 1 


2| 

a m 


aNAva A-a^vH 


CQOO '1-1 .Tjlt^i-lrHtO ■ -iO -iH-^lOOO -t^ 


xa^vHOS '0 ]A[vmiM. 


CMOli-t ■ -"Xlt- -1-1 .(M •(MinrHTjHOOCa -t- 
-Tfl - ■ 1-1 - • • r-t 


^aann 'a MvmiM. 


osiHi-iiooGi'-toqco •Tt<cO'.*c<Jcai-iiooTHco 

I— ICQ-^i— i 1— ICO -OqiHCOi— (CM I— li— 1 




LOCAL 

UNION 
NUMBER 






















Ci'-icacoOb-CiO'^CQooGio--(C<]co'*b-ojir:i 

OOOlClOiOlClOiOOOOOi-lr-li-li-'i-trHiHOQ 
COCOCOCOCOCOCOTjHTtlTj*-^-rH-^rtlTil-}lTtHr3HTt<-«:J1 



XLIX 



OS 

o 
pq 

V 

> 


V 
X 

H 

2 

V 

a 

a 




•»s!a iu 


13XHVIM *V 


01 I— li— ITticOCJr-li— 1 I— ^1— it^i— ti— 1'— 'C1C-1 




•;s!a q?9 


3703 'V *M. 


C-lOt-Cg^r-it-OiOCCCCCl^t-CC-^CDOiCCOi 
C: i-lrHlOCOT-trHi-H i-Hi-Hb- r-li-Hi-HCM 





•a.OlDOS.d '3 T 


CO T-i r-1 • ca • ■ 


xsin5iViVi.NHor 


COCO'-fiX'rHrHOiHcccO -OCO^lOrHi-iTtHCOi-l 
CO -*i-|rH -i-iCMi-l i-Hi-l 


a^OMiHovia AHHVH 


■ (M I— 1 1— 1 CO ■ (— i 


•JSIQ 111/ 


AT70NN0D "T '3 "XaOH 


t-?— ll>-CQCOi— ti— lOlOCOCOi>-tOCvIlClOCOb-001 
CJ iHi— (t:J^cO»— 't-Hi— 1 I— i»— it— I— 'i-H"— 'iHCJ 


^0 
*G 

s 

»-< 

CO 


N0S3H3XnH 'T J^VITIIM. 


^10 •C0l0r-I0'-1(MCO .rH,-lrH -(MiHCQ • 




SH3X3<i -a NHOr 


• (M • C<l TTl lO 
I— 1 


; CI 


rH ■ . t- 




3a7IiW NVFiI^3H 


CO to «:> CQ CO to 

CO 


c:icq 


• m 00 rH rH lO • ># 




SHVav QNVIOH 


• 00 1-1 


r-\ ca 


CO r-i 


CaC]CJlOrHCOCOrH -CO 


XXIM3H 'X NHOr 


• (M • 


■ rH 


>— 'rHrH ■'inr-lrHrH ■ • ■ -rH 

CO . • . . 


siAvan *0 T 


• eg - 

. . 


CI ■ 


rHdlO •C^rHCOClC3'^rH -tJi 


SXXOJ -H NHOr 


. cq ■ -^ • • OCI CO rH 10 in GO CD L'^ • Cl Ci fO - (M 
■ iH • ■ ■ rH i-H - 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnKOnvi^P^ H3X3X 


■<*coir:)b-o<:Dio'*cqcarHi-tcoc;ir:'i>-Tt<-^GOic 

1— ( t-HCai-H I— (CMi— 1 I— 1 


XSO.I 'v -a 


GO (MCMT-HrH lO-i-HrH 




1st 
trict 


A3aSS0H -V 'WA 


t-CQ<MClCDi-lT^tD-^lO0Dt-t-Tj4 -COLOCiCJlO 
Cq CO CO • i-i 


H3Hsnva -H S31h:vh3 




•COCOCOCDCMtMOit-OO .Oi-HfTilOlOaOOii-HCO 
•t- cacO .^-lr-lTJ^,-^ (M 


General 
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urer 


S73VH0IIAL 'niA 


tDr-im .TiHOOtr-rHlOrt<TjiCDlj::iOqiCCOa:COCCCO 
(M • 1— 1 1— 1 I-H I-H CO rH 


a7V3N SVPMOHX 


i-H-^tMCOr-lt-lOGsICOOTjHCOCJO -Wb-t-CDrO' 
t— I-H COCOrH 1—1 I— |i— im-i— f rHt— 1 


^.33SI<a30 


AJ3na :hnvh3 


t-Ot-COlOCOOi-IO'^QOCiOOOlOt-^O-^CO 
Ci tHi— llO-^OJi— (t— 1 i-Hi— lOOiHi— 1?— ICQ{M 


— a 
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aNivd: 'M. 'svHo 


t- Cq iH CO CO -CD • CO CO CO i-l b- 10 c;3 -rHCDCa,. 


3HIHSaHD T aaH3 


■ 00 CO W 


OiCOCOTjItD^ .OOCOO' •i-HCi-^'^ 
rH rH r-^ • 

COOCOCOCOCQr-f -ICCO -(OCOIOCOCO 
CI ■ CO - 


A3'INIX3PiI 'a T 


- t- rH to 


SaaONASH 'M. 'M 


•rHrHTHrHiOCDC<lr-lUDTjH00Q0(M -t--<iH -COlO 
• rH ,-1 rH CO ■ 


■S9JJ-90IA 


NNin5 *v HnHx^v 


t-COt-COCOO'^COOCOCCOOOOr-tiob-lOOTtlCl 
a r-trHLO rHrHrH i— (rHt~?-HrHrHCQCQ 


2I 


aNAVd AHHVH 


• a r-i •rHlOCMrH^:J^rH .CQrHC31 -r-irH ■■^t— 

• rH - in - 


XQHVHOS ■£) WVmiM. 


CQb-COCOCO'^'^COrHrH -COrH-^lO •.•b-00<M 

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lOCDCQ -rHCOCDCSCDrHOOTHb-b- -CDlOCOCv] • 
■^ COrH r-i i—\i-i ■ r-i i—i i—i- 




LOCAL 

UNION 
NUMBER 


■ __ . 






















OO'^OOOlOt-aiOrHGOCOLOCQli^OCCOOllOOlO 
CQCOcOTjiTtf-^rfilOmiOCOCOb-CCoCOOrHrHO-l 



1 

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•JSIQ qli 


aaXHVIM 'V 


cct-i-(coco(MaoOitoioooOcMmcDeoccit-<©<© 


•isiavg 


3700 'V 'M. 


(MCOrH-^l>.'MOOaiCDir:)t^OcOt--*CO,-|OOlOlO 


o 

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^OXOOHd 'a T 


• • 1— 1 • I— 1 • * oa CO 


xsin5T:vM.NH0r 


coco (M rH i-H CQ * <M rH 


aHOIMlHOVia A^HVH 


lOCOC<li-lT-lr-H(Mt-rHlOOSlO.-100i-lCSl .tJ40W 

oa 1-1 * . ^ 


•IsiQ V^ 


A710NN00 "1 'a "XaOH 


^CDOrHt-0>QDClr-1<MC0OO'^ -CO -OWIJi-l 
COCJi— f(Mi— 1 03 CMOJi— li-H(Mi— 1 -i— ( -Ol^i— 1 


m 

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Id 


NosaHoxriH -a MvmiM. 


• cq ■ eg ■ • * CQ 


SHaxaa *a NHor 


00 -b- ■ -T-l . • ■CO'-H '-^ • 

CO - ■ ■ ... 


1-H 


i-H lO rH 


aaaiM. NVWHan 


•O -COb-f-i *i-HCgr-l -1— ICO 


IC 


T-l C<I t- 
1— 1 


SHvavaNVioH 


■■^i-IOqr-l'^.-f -tHCO-^ 'lOr-C 


I— 1 


^ O ■ 


xximaH *x NHor 


CO • I— 1 CM • CO I— 1 


.— I 


CO CO - 


siAvan '0 T 


•r-l • .(MCO • -i-HT-tCqcq -CQ 


lO 


O CO ■ 

fH cq . 


SXXOd *H NHOr 


• 03 r-l r-{ -rt* CO - ■ -CMOICD •■^<M -t— ICOOO " 
• • • • * 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


KnHonv73K[ Haxax 


tDO«000CD«:'C1t-'*C<10000-^C0c0C0ClO00G0 
T~i T-{ r-i rHi— 1 i-H *i— ii— (.— tCvJ 


XSOd 'V -Q 


0001^COi-(0«D(MCSJ-<*0(MC350ii-(COCOCOCl^ 
rHrH iHtMrHi-HrH * t-1,-1 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


A31SS0H *V "KM 


t-HTtit^ -t-cooocoinoiCscqajcocoTtH-^b-t-t- 
i-H ,H • (M * cq 


H3Hsnva: -h saiHVHO 




G\lrH Csli-H • COi— ( 1— 1 *i— IrHtMCqi— 1 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


S7aVHDIPi[ "WM 


CDOOlOOOb-CS •CQt-.lOCO-^t-lOOOt~OOlCit--i— 1 
1—ii—t • 1— ( I— li— It— (03rH 


aiVZN SVWOHX 


COT-iy^COr-lCOOOt-O.-im'XiOrHi-HGO-^cOCOb- 
i-Hr-1 i-fi-H (M OarHi-( t-irH<M rHC^I 


^i3aSI<°aO 


A^d:na :HNV^a 


OtOGOG<]OOi-(GOClb-'*OOOcOlO-*r-lC<lt-CMC£) 
COCM rHi— 1>— (Cv) OICOt— IrHCdi— (CMCQCaCgiCrH 


ll 

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aNivd: 'lA 'svHo 


LOCvl -CDt-H-^ - .•-lt^]CgCvl^^CO(MCOO(MCTlC<l 
- OJ • - (M r-H 1-t 


a^iHSSHO T aaHJ 


C-] • - I— ( • jH iH ?-< ?H 


A3'INi:H3tN[ 'a T 


t--rHlO -cqcOt-t-tMi-ICOCQlOCOb-b- •lOOO'* 


Sa70NAaH "M. 'M. 


CJi-Hb- -CO"— ( .03C<1iH01C<1CQIX><^cO -i— ICOI^- 
i-H • • f-i 1-i • T-H rH 




NNin& 'V HJlHXaV 


t-00rHOt--T-|00Ci"^-^00O.-l'*01(M<MOO00 
COO]i-li-(rHiH(M cqcvJf-Ir-lGgiHCMtMeMC^llOr-l 


■Hi 

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SNAVd: A^HVH 


,_(U^,_i -cOCvl -CO ■ -OJIO -COt-i— l(M 'CNlTtl 


XQHVHOS '0 PivmiM. 


CM • 1— 1 O] OO I— 1 I— I ■ i-H 


HaariH 'a wvmiM. 


CD •ICr-lTtHt-OO'-lt-COCOCO 'Oili^CM -COCMCO 
C<] ■ (M 1— 1 i-H • " • 03 CO 




LOCAL 
UNION 

NUMBER 






















co^ictMtoaocoTjHb-ir:irHoaooo(Mio«:>t-io^ 

CgiM(MCOCOCOTj1^T*^lOCD!LD<Cit-t^b-b-I>-QOOO 



LI 



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•isja iu 


1'3.1'^Yn 'V 




IT 


rHCgCMOOOlOOOlTH 

rH rH rH rH rH CM rH 


•JSIQ qj9 


aiOD 'V '£A 


COOOOiCQCOrHOOCOb-rHOOMirHCvlCvlt-CiOOQOlC 
CvlrH,-(GsJrHCO i-HCOrH ini-HrHi-lrH i-IC\lr-( 


in 2 

Q 


■aoxooHj *a T 


TJ^ in (M CO -^ QO • • 

tH 


OCIQO .05 • 't-lOOilOrH 
• 'r-i rH iH 


xsin^ivMNHor 


COOOOCQIOCO"*CO 


t- 


CMrHCO(MrH-*rHlO • 


anoM^iovia ahhvh 




CO rH CO • . ■ 00 O W 


•js'a 111' 


AllONNOO -T 'a "XaOH 


C<li-li-tOqrH(>] i-iOOrH T^.-li-(r-li-l rHCQi-l 


w 

5 

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NOsaHoxnH 't hvitiim. 


•^ 1-it-i 


i-HCOr-f -t-tOt-t-i-l'**^ 
* -00 •"*< 




«3 rH (M 




snaxaj -a nhoi 


i-( W r-l 


■<*^ tH 1-1 iH 
* 


rH 


rH . . 






\a CM 




aaniAV NviAinaH 


C<J (M O 


■ Oi (M r-1 


Tjl 


rH iH . • 






• im 




swvavaNviOH 


(M . ■* 


• -"il -r-i 


CO 




. (M 


1-i 


O r~i 
1— 1 




XXIMaH 'X NHOr 


eg CO iH 


CO CO • ; 


iH 




T-i CM 


\ 


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siAvan '0 T 


t- • Tt< 


CO CS3 1-1 - 


• ?H 


(M (M CM t- TjH . CO O 

T-i T-i • 1-i 


SXXOd'HNHOf 


WO>C0t-H«»00CO00 

cd 


TtH -inCOCd -rHGOrHOJ • 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NiiHonvi^w Haxad[ 


OS (M lO '^ CD CO tH . 


TtHOOrHlOlOtMt-OSrHCOO 
iH rH iH rH rH 


xsoa: 'V -a 


cot- ■C005t7at-C\lb--CO •CO'^CO -tH -t-o-^ 
iH -rHOJi-HOOi-l-lO ■ -T-l 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


AaassoH 'v 'ni^ 


ootH':DTHfX)t^i-Hcot-oOQOoa'«*<b-oa,-(coTt<cQ»r:i 

i-tiHiH tHOO lO r^r^lHr^ 


HaHsnva -h saanvHo 


<MOlOOCO .cot- . -Ol •OQt--* .t-«CTtHin)05 
iH tH - (M • • • • r-\ 


General 
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urer 


saavHom 'wa 


COlOt-COlOCSrHcq .i-lt-i-H<MTtHO]t-lO-rt<Ot- 
i—j iH • i-H t-H T— t iH 


aivaN svnouz 


OlCO^OOrHTtlt-tr-eOrHCOOlOi - -CO-^Ot- 
rH CMi-HCNJ OOrH LO •• iHCJ 


i^DaSt.nao 


Aaana :HNVHa 


(MOiOoainiOiOOot-cooDcO'-icooacDt-cooio 

CMt-H<MC<]i— (C<I I— iOOC-] lOf— (tHt— li— 1 i— (COi— 1 


— a 
SB 

S s 

Opt: 


aNrvd: -m 'svho 


. ^ Ca «? Tt< (M ■ lO 


■*rHCOCOCO(MTjHCOrHOOO 
1-t r-{ r-\ T—i 


aniHsaHD *f 'aana 




eg t- ■ -in • • • (M t- ■ 


Aa7Ni:a3iM "a t 




saaoNAan 'm. 'm 


t-CDt^coTt^Oii^lM^ •■* .cococo •cotMioo . 


•S9j£-ao!A 


NNin& -V KnHXHV 


coOTtidirsait-c^t-cgoor-iTHcooat-OiOocoeo 

C<lC<JiH(Mf-ICM i-iOOCO lOr-lTHr-1i-l iH(Mi-H 


a u 


aNAVd: AHHVH 


rH - • • • r-i • • r-i • ■ 

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XQHVHOS '0 IMVmiiW 




HaanH 'a n^fniiiA 


t-«:>i-iOTtH-Tt<t-cot-co .cgotM • - •odi-hw 

iH <MrH(M*i-|O0 -mrHiH • • -rHCM 




• 


LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 


t- CO 00 CM 

00 00 Oi o 

lo lo lo to 

iH tH T— 1 iH 


o 00 OO o in 

?— ( r-l CQ CO CO 
?D CO CO CD CO 
I— 1 rH rH 1—1 iH 


CDt-OCOCOT^Hincot-OSO 

coco'^"<*^■*m^:)mmwcD 

OCDCO<XiCOCDCDCOCDCOCD 





LII 



13 
O 
Hi 

u 

X 

W 

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■•?s!a VI 


73xavw -v 




intHcob-coooocr 

1— (COi— IrHrHiHi—tr- 


CO 

o 


■isia qig 


aaoD -v -M. 


CQ<Mi— liHi— li— iC<Ji— 1 1— (COi— li— IrHrHf-Hi— lOl 


in w 
(=1 


^oxooaj "a T 




isinbivN^ NHOr 


i-H ■ Oi ■ rH 


aaowaovaa ahhvh 


ocO'-t^-OIHr^TJ^M^os(^]OiOt^]alooc^ltDoil^- 

Ol T-H rH CO rH rH t- 


•ISTQ ^w 


A7aONN03 -I "3 UaOH 


cDC7icoir:)Ocgi-iociir-Qooiin)T-iir:)OOcDt--i-(cQiH 

CMi— (tHi— IrHr-li— lOi i— ICOt— li-it— irHr-li— 100 
I— 1 


_y 

3 

■a 

CO 


NOSaHDXnH -T MVmiM. 


00 -OdOOf-l .OOrHlOCDi-l .^XJi-lrHCq -CO 
CO • 


o 

CO 


saaxsd "a NHor 


. . i-H . . ,_( p-i p-i . Q5 
• ■ • • • r~i 


. CO rH rH rH rH - 




aaaiAV Nvraaan 


• • r-t CO i-H . • 1-1 CQ lO 


■ rH lO rH CD - - 


00 
CO 


swvav aNvao-a 


. «D ^ • CO i-i ■ rH i-H CD 


m >*l rH rH CO CO CO 




XXIM.3H -X NHOf 




. ■ Oi T-i 1-i • iH CO ri -^ 
• • ■ I— 1 


• M< CO rH CO ■>* • CO 00 
CO 


siAvaa -3 T 






■ --^rH • • -COi-l -CO -COtM^D *C0 -I-IO 

... . . - • ca 


SXXOa 'H NHOf 


• co<Mt-^ ■THcaco'-im •oicooo-*ookoo>t< 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NiaHoava^w aaxaa 


.lOOW-^CM-^OlrHCOGOlOOOCQ-^i-ICM -(MOO 

r-i 1-i tHi-Hi-Hi-ItH 'iH 

1-1 ■ iH 


xsoa 'v -a 


GO<M05001 -t-COOiHiH •lOi-iUDOO'CTHOiOS 
CO • 1-lrH 'CMi-lt-lr-liH 

- • iH 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


Aaassoa -v -mm. 


rHrHTtHlO^i— lOJTt^CQOOlCCOO^lr-OOCOTt*!— li— (CO 
r-1 iH i-H Tt< 


aaHsnva 'h saaavHO 


b-C-OTt<OOiHCMb-OOCO'^COCOt-OsO'^OCgCC' 

COiHi-1 iH CO tHrHiHtHCO 

1-H CO 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


SaaVHDIM "IMM. 


• C<Iai'X'CacOC«lC0■^i^l^--# -OCOCOIr-t- 'tHt- 

1-: ■ iH iH • ca 

■ - • iH 


aavaN svwohx 


OOt-tDO<Mlr-ClGOt-b-lOin)COiH'*COCOiHCQO 

rHCOiH 1— lO t— (C<] THtHrHi— li— ICO 

rH tH 


^l33SI<°30 


Aaana SNvaa 


00Cil0t>-C0C0rHG0rHC0Cil0C0m00t^00rHC0O 

COCOiHrHi— IrHCOrH rHCOrHrHrHrHrHi-HiH 

r-t 03 


si 

■a i 


aNiva 'M. "svED 


■ <-{ -Z:) T-i -CM -rH • -Lr:it-CQ -co -rHlOcOO 
rH ■ r-{ ■ , * ■ ' ■ CO 


aaiHsaHD t aaaa 


■i-lCOCDCO . -TjHrHlO .COiniOCO-^O] • ■ Oi 
CO CO • rH rH J-t ■ ■ ^ 


AaiNia^M -a t 


COCOOlrHOq • Oi -^ •rt*Tt1'*t^ •eO"*W<MrHTt* 
C^ ■ ■ ZD ■ t- 


saaoNAaa "m. "m. 




CD-^Tt*O100rHC0CO ■ - -COt- ■ a> r-i r^ -^ Oi r-\ 


•S3ia-ao!A 


NNinb "v annxav 


oocow:iOiocoi-(coaiait--inicoMHOJt-t-rHcqoi 

COCOi—trHrHrHi— lO rHCOrHrHrHrHrHiHfM 

CO 




aNAva AaavH 


• COCOrH -CO -CO- -t- -rHTjHCOt-r-lrH 'CO 
. . . - 00 


xaavHOS "o wvmiM. 


■CD-* -cot- • -COrHCO -COt-COrHrHrH .GO 
. . CO • -CD 

iH 


aaariH 'a wvmiM. 


00 -OOt-rHCOrHOlTD-^ .iCO-^JIIOrHt-aiCOeO 
• rHCOrH rHi-HrH -rHCQ iHrHrH rHCO 




LOCAL 

UNION 
NUMBER 






















W-^JHCOOOCOlCt-«OrHeO-^CDt-rHCOOOC-]THCDt- 
COCOCOCOt-t-t-OOOlOsaiOiaiOOOrHrHrHrH 
COCDCOCOCD<DCDCOCOCOCOCDCOt-t^b-l>-t^t-tr^ 



Lni 



•s 

m 
o 

m 

V 

o 

u 

M 

1 

a 

4) 

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•isjQ nn 


73xavw 'V 


OD-<i1COOC<DOC^tDlCTt^i-iOCC'^OOCClOOO(McO 
CO Ca T-ir-HrHi-l.-l.-iaiCO'-lCOt-- COr-l,-! 


•;sia: 1119 


aaoD v -M. 


t-OOQOOGOOMCDlO-^r-lt-iOOOOCMOOOCQcO 
CO (M i-lrHWr-it-li-HOOCO'HlMt- CMr-IrH 
1— 1 rH 




aoxooad "a t 


r-l Ci i-H 


xsin&avM. NHor 


1— IlONOi— ICOlOCdrHi— lOacOC^CqtiiCOCMtfiCM • 
rH Od I— 1 CD CQ GO (M 


aHOwaovrra AaavH 


TtflO-<:J< •tMlQ .<M -COCQCSOCOCCltMlOt-t-CO 
rH • • - lO rH <M CO rH 


•isia qjt' 


ATIONNOO -T. "3 UaOH 


OOOOOOb-CiCOC-lO-^rHcOiHCDcacOt-OOcO 
CO Oa t-trHfHTHiHI>-rO<-1C0CD Cv).-trH 

i-H <H 


w 

Q 
■a 


NOSaHOXXlH •! wvmiM. 


. lO . . iH - . 
. iH • • • - 


IH . rH OO -r-i 


CO ^ rH . . 

to . . 


saaxaj -a NHor 


• ! ) " *"* ; 1 




■ rH lO CO (M 
iH 


CO rH rH - . 


aaniM nvi/jhsh 


rH CO CC iH • . - 




(M rH Ci <M rH 

eg (M CO 


. . -^JH . . 


. SWVaVQNVlOH 


• CO CM • tH -* iH 
iH 




CO - ira lO (M 


rH ■ • b- rH 


xxmaH -x NHor 


. r-i . - . Cvl • 




r-^ . GO CO ■ 
- (M 


<M rH • 1-i ^ 


siAvaa -0 ■£ 


(MCOrH - •iHi— lOO-rJItHCOOSiHiHOiCO ■ -iHOO 


SXXOd "H NHOr 


lOt-.Cg05ir3CO . -Ot-lMCOCDOSiHiHCaTtl'^'* 

tH ■ • I— 1 CD Tfi 03 iH 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonvi^Pi Haxaa 


(MT^Tt<ast-CQOTpGOCO-*cOl0 03CviajiHCO(Ma) 
iH iH iHrH COiHCDOd 


xsoa -v -a 


t-CiTt*i-ttHC0O]CQt*iHCDCO-*TtlCDC0t^Tt1OSlO 
tH iHa>63lOTHCDr-t 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


AaassoH -v -wm. 


(MOlCO -«3C<l(MOr-ICOCOt-ir:ii-((MOG<]COir3<M 
iH iH iH in tH iH CD 


aansnva -h saiavHo 


COlQlCOtHGO ■GOTt<iHOOH^<?aiOcO'HlOl>-t>-C<I 
CQCM ■ T-HOCdOcOiHiHiH 

— • CI 1-H 


<L 

a 
C 




SnaVHDIM -PiAV 


COOOCOOCvJcOCOCOrHTt^CgOl-^t-Oa'^OiHOt-CO 
iH (M 03 CQ iH iH 

r-l 


aivaN svMOHX 


t^CDlO -<aDt-a>(MH^OOCOT^OlTh'*t>-OCDiH 
rH • iHi— (i— (iHOfHOiCO^ iH rH 


i^03 


Sl.°39 


Aaana sNVHa 


CgOCX^ClGOOCOt-lOT^rHcOtr-COHHt-QOCiH^Tt* 
r-lCO iH iHiHrHrHrHrHOCOrHCOCD rHr-lrH 
CJ rH 


0(i; 


aNiva -JA -svHo 


Cdb-COOfMCO -COC\l •t^GOlOOCl'*iHTHTt<(MO 

Ca -■ rH - CO Tt^ (M i-H 


aaiHsaHD T aaaa 


CO -C3 -iHOa -rHCO • -t-OlO -CQCOCOCv] . 

- ■ ^ ,-1 . 


AaiNra^w -a t 


CCOOiH '-^ -iOCQ -t^COCOrHiHCO t — ^ i-i -^ • 
tH • - - t- rH CO CD 


SaiONAaa 'lA -M. 


lOO(M ■r-(lr:jt-CQiHt--rHCO':t^COt-r-< -t-COrtH 
i—\' T~i lO iH 




NNin5 -v Hnnxav 


rHI::~COOOOai<MQOlO-^C<]->^lOCOcOCNlODOOCOTiH 
tHW C<1 rHrHrHrHrHOcOrHCOt- iHi— t,H 




aNAVa AHHYH 


rH -CO ■ - -CvlrH • -CdO-^ •rHCO'^OOCO - 
- . • . . ^ ^ . r-( 
. . . . . tH 


xaavHOS 'O wvmiM. 


•t- 'ClrH • - . ■ r-t -(MCO-^ait- -rHrH • 
• r-i .... .t^,_i,_(^ 
. ■ . ■ . * rH 


aaann "a wvmiAi 


rHt-lOrHb-OOt-lOCOOrHCQCQ .fC'^irHOTt* 
rH CQ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ to rH -CO ^1-^ 
* 






LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 






















GOCgTj^injOrHt-ClCOrhCDt-COOrHb-OllMOSO 

r^<^](^]cgcocococo■^'Tt^'<:t^■*T}^lOlr5^olOCDCDt- 



LIV 



■a 

O 

W 
■1 

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W 

2 

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•5sia iu 


aaxavw "v 


1— (1— Irtli— toqi— Icc]i3i,— ICMCQcQi— li— iirSi— irHCOi— 1-^ 
.-H rH ^ 


•;s!a qjg 


3700 -V "AV 


rHl0'-(O00C'JrH,-lC0i-lOt~Ot-CaGiOOOin 
.-HT-l-.iirHcO'-lc^Jo'-ICatMCOr-lrHlOT-li-lCOi-lTtl 


ifi.2 
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Hoxooaa "a t 


-^ eg ■ --H 1-H • ?-t - .-1 • 


xsinbivM. NHor 


rH CO 00 fO • i-l • 1-H - CO 
(M ■ • * 


aaowaDV7a ahhvh 


OsCMOCOOOCM'^TH'^'-IOSinoO -<MOS'©OS(MCQ 


■isra'nt' 


ATioNNOo -I 'a -xaoH 


rHt-'-ln-IOlMt-tO^O.HCOOOOtDOOiOrHrHT^JI 
iHi— iTjIr-ii— 11— lOCli-'COtMCOiHi— l"»tli— ^^^COI^TJ^ 

rH 1-1 


*M 

s 

■a 

CO 


NOsaHoxnH 'i wvmiM 


■ • ■ i-H rH rH ■ . -^ ^ . . . 


saaxaa -a nhoi 


■ rHt-H -ClT-HaiOO ■ '(M (M . -O 

•i-H (M ••r-t 


aaiiM. NvwaaH 


■ CMlOOJcOi— icot- -COi-H • ■ -lO • -CQ -CM 

CO tr~!^:i- co-i-i 

,— ( . ...... 


SWVaV QNVIOH 


<MiHC0(MO10Cvlt- - •i-HrH(MQOrH . - -COIQ 
to lO tH • • i-H ... 


xxiMaH 'x NHor 


^ ■ CO • cq • • 


siAvaa -0 T 


tH<MCO>-ItJh -OOCNI -i-ti-trH • -rH .(N! -r-fi-H 
i-H • • .... 


sxxoa 'H NHor 


CJrHoOlOCDCgOloOOClTtlcO'^t-'-lGO .CDi-HOOOJ 
iH C<1 <M CQ '— ' ■ I-H 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


RiUKoavi^vi aaxaa 


1— 1 00 (M tr- ■ • <M ■ i-H CM 

1-H . . . 


xsoa 'v -a 


t-rHOO-^COt-COOOOOiy^T-HCOaiQOOltOt-OOO 
i-HOl tH OJcOi-Hi-It-HCO i-HCO'-I i-lrH(M 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


AaissoH -v "raM. 


(Mt-lO'^CCCaOCD -t-lOOCO -C<IOS'X)lOrHi-l 
I-H (M CD<M'i— I rH -COrH TfH 


HaHsnva -h sa73VH0 


ClC5^CC>COOI>-a>^'^t-tOl>-CiCD -lOCOi— ICQ 
03 lOrHCOt-rH i-HCO rHOJ- COrHrH 
. Cv] T-H 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


siavHom 'lAiM. 


00O000DC-lCvlt-!(X> ■ -CD -COi-IO --^oOrHCq 
I-H -^ Oi -rH • • • cO-i—irHlM 
rH ... 


aivaN svwoHX 


COt-CO^COOOSOiCDi-lt-CiOiODrHOilOmrHCi 
CO OrHCgiOrHCMrHCO rHrt<rH i~i CM 


j£,03S I.asa 


Aaana acNvaa 


i-ltOrHOCOCOOOOOrHCqOOCMCOTtlOiT-IOrHt- 
rHrH-^t— <LOi— tCOOrHC^lilMCO'— IrHlOrHi— lCOrHTt< 

rH rH rH 


II 


aNiva -M. "SVHO 


^ (M • • rH - - rH 


aHiHsano t aana 


. to c^ fc^ t- CM ci ■Tt^ • . '.:d cq CO - t- - • Ci . i- 


A37NI33W -a T 


CvlC<lTjirHr-fCD<^COO • -CO -COCMOSCOvJl .-^ 
1-i ■* a:i ^ r^ • ■ COrH rH-rH 
CM rH . . . ^ 


saaoNAaa "m. 'm. 


t-iococsio<M-*ao .CDOICXHO -t- -toioc^co 

rH i—{ rHCM-rH CM ■ i—\ ' rHiH 


■saij-80!A. 
lEianag jsx 


NNinf) -v annx^v 


Oi'^rHCn OOCMCOCXiCDrHCOCDCMOlrHairHCMrHCJl 
I-H-* <MrH001rH(M(MCO'-lrHlOrHrHCOrH-<=:H 
T-i i-H 


•SB 
a m 


aNAVa AHHVH 


U:)<:DrHrHOO*'COlO . -CD -rHOlT-H . . - ■ i-{ 
1-i ■ ■ ' ,—ir-\----r-i 


xaavHOS '0 wvmiM. 


rH •<M^t-~T(H'*«:> . • . .'tH • '^ • -I-H -CO 
pH tDCM--'. .rH-'CO'i-H 
CO CM ...... 


aaann -a wvmiiw 


ira'-HO0L--t^OOQCCMtD>-iasCit- .t-CjSt-HTt^OCIt- 
rHCO t-rHCQrHCO -COrHrH rH(M 




LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 




















rH^OlcoTt^u:ltooco■Tt^LO^-aiOCM^s^-(^ot-■^ 

l^-t^t-CiOOOCOOOOiaiClOlCTjOlOOCSOrHrHCM 
b-b-t^t-t^t-t-t^t-t^t^t^t-OOCXJCSOODOOOOOO 

rHrHi— !rHi— ti— iiHi— (i-HrHrHrHf— IrHrHrHrHrHrHrH 



LV 





T3 

nl 
O 
W 

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t-i 

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a 

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•isia qu 


aaxHvi^r "v 


oo 

1— i 


■ l>-CO(OCOcoeO(M'^OOCOTt<rHiHlOOt>r-lCD 

i-HtMi— (rHiHi-HiHCJi— lOOi— Ir-IOJrHi-H i— 1 




•jsiQ CH9 


aioo 'v 'M. 


CO 

I— 1 


b-asCOCOC0CO(MTjl00*i<*''^i-HfH^Olt^rH?D 
I— lOatHiHi— (i-Hi— IC^rHOOr-lJ— IC<]iH i— 1 




p 


HOiooHj 'a T 






lO O «0 CD (© r^ . - -eg • O tJ* CO OO . rH CO 




xsin5av/Vi.NHor 






cqcocoiHTtiiHOTttco»n>coi-Ht- - .oo . • 

rH rH Cq I-H to • - • ■ 




anOIMXDVia AH^VH 


00 

I-l 


OOt-eOcOi-tCl • -CirH'rtlOeQCarH .rh 
rH rH . • rH rH 




"i^ia I't 


AaiONNOD -T 'a *xaoH 


CO 
i-H 


b-lOlOCO(M^-iC^!Tt^CO'»t^■^'-HCO'X>OSOOrHtO 
rH(MrHrHrHi-HrHClrHt>.rHrHrHrH rH 




u 
m 

3 




NOSaHDXnH "I ]AIVmiAi 






iHCO lO •iHCOrHrH • ■ • 




saaxaj -a nhoi 






■ • -CM ' lO ' • -to • '-^ -rHOO^ • 

■ . . . . . . CO ■ • 




aa7iM. NVMHaH 






•CJrH -Cd-^CgrH • Oi • r-i r-\ r-i • • • • 




swvav aNviOH 






r~\ ^ • i-i .rHrHcOOOeO -USfMrHCO • -O 




xxiiwaH -x NHor 










rHrH -i-IOOrHrH • -OrH -CO 

• -CO 




siAvan '0 '£ 






t-CgrH • -rHOO • •-■^t^CO -rHOOCO -^OiH 




SXXOJ 'H NHOr 


00 

I-H 


t~-<:t1lOOiC0iH . . -t-O-^OOlOtM -rHrH 
i-\ - • ' 1-1 




2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonvi^Pi Haxax 


W 


■ ■ rH CQ • ITS • 1-H 




xsox -v -a 


to 

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rHt-t-COCOlC • -COTtH •t-tOWCOr-irHC^J 
rHrHrHi— 1 ••rHtM* rH i-^ 




1st 
Dis- 
trict 


Aaassoa *v 'hm. 


00 
I-H 


■*COCDCO.-i^(M -OOt-COCOCD-^-^OirHCq 
rH • rH TjH 




HaHsnva "h sai^vHo 






• CI 


Tt^^rHOtMCOOcO •TjirHODinOCD 'OlO 
T-Hi-HrHrHrH iH03 -COrH r^ i-\ -rH 




General 
Treas- 
urer 


siavHom -WA 




COGlOlintM'^CllO 'CO .COQOb-COrHOTjH 
I-H ■ Oa ■ r-t 




aivaN sviAiOHX 


■ 00 CO 
1— 1 rH 


»COC000.-lt-C001C0Tt<Tt1C0'*05t-t-i-IC0 
Oq rH r-{ r-l <:£) i-\ i-\ 




i.oasi.nao 


Aaana :hnvhjI 


COCOQOail>.COCOCOC<lTHOOlOTHi-HOaCC>OC^3rHt- 
I— liHrHCMrHi— IrHi— (i— (ClrHCOi— (i— ItMi— li-Hi—li— 1 




— a 

s.-a 

a (A 


aNIVa -M 'SVHO 






OOi-HIr-lO • 'O . 'to .COCOOOCO ' i-< • 
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aniHsano 'f 'aana 






.rHrHi-(i-HCO •Tt<QOC<]OacO •(^J'!*^ ' - • 
■ tM 1— 1 • (M rH CD • ... 




AaiNi:a3iM "a t 






■^ r-i .CO -COrH - 'OOrHCOrH -iHrH • ■ 




saiONAan "m. "m. 


00 CO 
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lOtDOl-^cat-rH . -OlrHcOOitDCQ • -t- 
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•saij-aojA 


NNinC) 'V snHXHv 


00 CO 

T-l I-H 


OOOOCDCOCQCOCM-^OOCO-^rHIMCDaib-rHtD 
i-HCMrHrHrHrHrHCslrHQOrHi-HCsJrH i-i 






aNAVa A^HVH 




«D lO Oa <M .^1-1 . . IC - -^ tH W I-H o . - 

i-\ • • ■ CQ • r-\ • • 

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Xa^VHOS •£) IMVmiM. 


■ • (M • ■ .... 




HaanH "a nvn'JUA 


CO CO 


COOSlOt^COeOC] .00':O'«^CQt>-rHOirHrH;D 
i-{ rH -rHirarHrHrH r-i 




s 


LOCAL 

UNION 
NUMBER 


CO 
00 
rH 






























































CO 
CO 
CO 

I— ( 


tDOrHeOO(M^COCO'*CDOCQlCCDt-Tt<in) 
CO'^^JHlOCDtDCDCDt-t-t-OOOOOOOOCOOiOi 
OOOOGOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOCOCOOOOOOOOOCOCO 



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■s 

a 
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m 

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3 
U 

<U 

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•ISIQ VC 


laxHVK *v 


OD 


00 


t-OOOCOOSOOOCM-^'^'CDCOCO 
rHr-llO rHrH rHrHrHrHCdrH 




■?s!a q?9 


aioo 'V 'M. 


I— (tHIO i-li— I I— It-Hi— li— l(Mi— I 


in w 

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HOXOOKd 'a T 


. rH CM 


xsin^iViYi.NHor 


■^i-H -i-HOiOOaitMCOi-l -CMTtlOJCO • 
rH 


a^OM:HDVia ahhvh 


rH (M • rH 


•jsia qjt' 


AaiONNOo -1 'a "xaoH 


OOOOt-OCQt-t-OOOOTjICMCOr-llOCOCO 
rHrHTjl rHrH rHrHrHrH(MrH 


tn 

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NOSZHOXriH "T PMVmiM. 






1-i ■ 


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CO r-i ■ 




iMcq (M . 




SHaxsa: 'a nhoi 






• ■* lO • 


r-l 


■ rH • 




rH rH rH rH 


aaiiM. NVH^aaH 




rH . . 


CO 00 rH 
rH 


^^4 


rH 


(M rH • CQ 


SPivavaNvrEOH 


Oi rH . 


CD rH rH lO 






TtH - CO (M O 


XXIMaH "X NHOf 


'-' -^ ; 


iO ■ in rH 






CM lO 'CO • 


siAvan '0 T 


rH rH ■ ^ ^ . !iO rH rH 


rH rH • in CO rH 
rH rH * r-i 


sxxod: 'H NHor 


• ■ rH - 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonvT:^!^ ^axaj 


rH 1-1 rH rH 


xsoa *v 'a 


COt-i^^^^TjiCOlOTj^-^lOaJOi<MrH 
rH CO '~f i—\i-\ 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


AaassoK -v 'wa 




lOlOCMvnlJ^CirHCOOO^COaOb-W 
rH rH rH 


HaHsnva *h sainvHo 


cqiOCO'^CslO^'CiCOTtlOOOOrHOi 
CO »-< rH rH rH 


1 

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siavHom 'niA 


^'^rHOCOCCCQt^WSfOOO'^OOaiCOCO 
rH rH i-t iH rH 


aivaN svHOHX 


COCOccTj^'^eQlOCOOa'^'^t-'OlOODrH 
rH CO rH r-\ i-i 


i^o-. 


SL^^O 


Ai:ana xnvh^ 


^^t-COOOlt-OOoOlOCOOOCOTUCi^ 
rH ^^ir:, rHrH rHrHrHrHIMrH 




•m S 

s.-a 

■a i 


aNIVd -M 'SVH3 


CO Oq 
r-i I— 


■ IC • . -to .rHC»OrHOi'-H(M 
. . • . 1-i r^ 


aniHsaHO *r -aana 


Cq CO CO CD rH 
rH 


CDrHCQrHClfOTtlrH 


Aa7Ni:H3Pi "a t 


CM - 00 CO Tt* (M CO 


-HrHCNJlOrHMlr-lO 


Sa70NAa^ 'M. "AA. 


'^■J^'t-COt-rHCOCOrH-^ .^rrca 


OJ rH 


•ssij-aojA 

IBJ3U3£) JS^ 


NNinb "V HIIHXHV 


Ot-t-CslCOClt-ODGO^SClt-'^ID 
""• rHrH-^ rHrH rHrHrHrH 




aNAVa AHHVH 


• ; •ThOQCQCOrHlO'-H -rHCOrHOD ■ 


Xa^VHOS •£) HVmiM. 


<^ '^ • QO -rUlO ^ <^ a • T-i C^ • t^ iO O^ 
r^i-t rH ; 


HaanH 'a lAivmiM 


OiCOi>.c<lcO(M - -rHfCrHCOC^lOOOOcO 
rH xt< • ; rH 1-H rH 






LOCAL 
UNION 

NUMBER 


a 
a 


C 
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r- 


^ OO r- 
^ O r- 

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4 C 


c 
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r- 


1 '* 

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if 

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) C 
C' 
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S Cf 

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D 00 o- 

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IT 


cr 





1>> 



CD 

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Lvn 



o 

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X 

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•isra HU 


^aXHVH -v 


CDlCCOC<ll--(MC<llOlOOtOU:)COtC)CsIt-<N<MO 

lCU:>OT:t<-^COCMT-it--lOCOC<JTt<COOOCOt-i-ltD 
rH «— ii— t^T— (CMtDcOi— lOQ r-\ tH i-H 


■jsra "119 


3703 -V 'M. 


LOC>3ZLCO^«-ICvl.-ICO-e<COCqTt<'*GOCOt-lOlO 


•a 'S 

(=1 


•aOXOOHd "3 T 




xsinGnvM. nho: 




aaowsDVia ahhvh 


CO lUr-I^C^Ttl CO C^ -Tji rH rH 


%S!a cuf 


AIIONNOO -T "a "XaOH 


OrHOCSrHO -COO: COTj^iniGOCO'MCltMOOt- 
COOC<lCDCMCi •CDCO'^rHCMTjID^iODlCt-QDCO 
1-i Oi rH • ICi rH rH 


5 

CO 


NOsaHoxnH -t wvmiM. 


'^rHfo'-'^O^i-'OOOC^itDlCl 
Ci Z:0-*CnOrHC<ICOGO(M 
CM ;i] rH ^ rH -^ CO (M 


<M 
Cvl 


(M 00 rH 

00 t- i- 

rH 


saaxaj 'a NHOr 


10 1-i TC"10 -* CO • rH to • ■ 
"^ • rH rH 


CO 


CJ - Oi tr- 


aaiiM. NvraaaH 






t-t-'^COCDCOIMb-irsCO • • 
rH IC rH CO ■ • 


Gl 


io • 01 
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SMvav QRVzo-a. 








(M ■CO^DCO'^ '(MCOrH • -OC 
■ 00 (M ■ ■ -^ 


lO 


*n ■ CI 10 


XXIMaH 'X NHOr 






Ol •COl^t^CMrH-^rHCl • • -(M 
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■ • lO 00 

■ - 1-t 


siAvan -3 'r 


CO'sfHlOOlOrH 'OClCO - • -"^ 
• rH r^ . . . 


rH • CM CI 


SXXOJ "H NHOr 


t~ -OOt-CMCCCQCMrH-OrH • -intM-^ -OOl 
r-i . 1-i rH CMCO^ ■• O0CO-CMC<J 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonv73w aaxaa: 


OO^Clt-^rHO^aSTjioO 'OC 
<MrH<X) rH t-COt-CO 'Th 


CO -00 . t-- LO 

• CD • (M rH 

• rH • 


xsoa 'v "a 




cicoooio-^icioiocoooiio -cooQiooacio-* 

rH rHOiCOrHO-^COrHoiO] -CQoO O-rHCD 
CO r-^ TtlCJ-^lCCO r~( --^ C\l 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


Aaassoa -v •wm. 


10 -tOiHCOCgrHCqOMiom -rHloClCvlCOlO 
.ZLC:i/3C10«5COCOOO<M -(MrHCOt-CO 
CO .;Z|rHTflrHrH (M •-* r-i 


HaHsnva -h saiavHO 


CO CO ^h"<^ inOilOCOmL'^oq -COt-tr-lO -COO 
^ T-l M Cs] li^ Ci cq • T^ CO CD 00 ■ IC Oi 
^ =^ lO CO rH ■ 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


S7aVH3IK[ "MM 


Oit-OilO -t-rHTt^OOrH • -CO -tO -<MQO 
^ Oq_ -rH QOCO^^ --rH- -CO 


a7vaN svraoHX 


CDir)OOCNIOCOl010C<lcZ>«3lOCOrHC<]i:MC<10"* 
OO^lOt-OOCOCOOOOCSlTtHCOOOCDC-rHtD 
CO rH'-'i-H'^fM-TjilOCOr-iCvl ^ r-t CM 


i^03SI,U3r) 


xi£na SNVsa 


COCDot^CvimcDCOt-TrltClOCOOlCMCOCqcOt- 
lOrHlljlOb-rHoO'^-^COOaTji'^CC'^t— OCO 
rH IZJrHriHCMTjHCDCOrHOq Tt^ r-\ r-< 


2I 


aNiva "M. •svHo 


cc to ^^ t~ 0^ ■^ -COCiCO . -b-CO 
00 - . rH ^ T^ . • Tj< 


CM • CO CM 


aaiHsaHD t -aaaa 


tH rH «=> -* •* ■ lO rH . - 
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00 


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t- • CM rH 


Aa7NI33PiI "a T 


t-coOicoiocorH-^ocaioio 

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1-i 


rH (M lO CD 
CM CO t- t- b- 
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saaoNAaa "m. "m. 


■cO«^'^<^CQt-CO'X5rH - -b-rH"^ -lOlC 
(M ■ CO -H rH CO '5t< - • rH r^ - Cq ■* 


•saij-aojA 


NNin5 -v HJiHxav 


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t- <XJCD<:DOOiOrH-<:t^C»(^^Xt^TJ^OOCOt*Ot>. 
rH ClrH-^CMCOCD-^rHCq t^ r-i rH 




aNAVa AHHVH 


t^lOrH-^CMrJloqcqiOO • • -co • r-i • i-\ r-{ 
CM lO r-\ 


xaavHOS 'O wvmiM. 


OCD-^CQ-<^CvlrHC0OC0rH -COlO -lO -OCd 
rHOrH t-COrJI -rJH • -r-i 
rH 10 ... 


■aaaiiH "a wvmiM. 


GOCSiCqt-t~COCCCOt-(MCDlO .CO<M01(MQO(M 

CM rHCo:ocMOThOi05oocM ■'^aocDt-cqc: 

CO CTrH-^CO-^ CO CM --^ rH CM 




LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 






















aiOCMcococDb-rHaoc::t— coir 

CMtMtMt-tMr-lCOirO^OCOt-a: 
r-lr^r-|rHrHr^r-l(^ 


■^ cr, 

i-t r- 
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C?l CZ' LO 
lO rH '^JH b- 

co '<1^ Tt* 10 



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laxavw -v 


C:L~-"^iX500Ci030lOr- ICOi-HCQi— lOQOCDt^COlO 
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•}s!(j mg 


3703 -V -M. 






H0X30H.I -3 T 


"-l--* iHCQ ... ... 


ismbivM. NHor 




a^oM3ovaa AaavH 


Ot^ •OI>-t-<MOC<]i-t(©lOOi-H(MQO«DOtD.-t 
OOd 't^iH <:DCQO;i-tO]«:>Tt<rH r-lt-trtJCOr-l 
GO • to i-H rH 


•jsiQ qit? 


ATIONNOD -T. "3 "XaOH 


VD •t-<MCOTjH.-lc<]C0r-(<M(rOTjH .r-iCOt--<*COrH 
^ • rH .-- . ^ 


s 

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CO 


NOSSHOXriH -T wvmiAi. 


CO b- ^ CO 

CQ CM t- rH 
rH 1-^ 


O L-~ CO rH rH ^^ t- 
T-\ O:, 1>- rH Cvl CO 
O 1-1 


1-i r-i CO '^ - CO 
1-i t- - CO 




Sa3X3<I "3 NHOr 


CO • • 






Oa rH 






• rH in - - . 




aa7IM. NVWH3H 


CO • • 

1—i • ■ 






CO 00 






■ -CO ' i--( • 




swvav aNV70H 


O • • 

T-H ■ • 


1-\ 


CO CO 


• (M 




• 1-H GO -CO - -^ 




XXIM.3H 'X NHOf 


1—i • • 






. . c; • ■ ■ ■ 


siAvaa -3 T 


ca . - 


GO ■ a> r-\ • ■ ■ 




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1st 
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ASTSSOH -V 'WM 


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NnHonvi^M Haxad 


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2nd General 
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aNIVX *M. 'SVHO 


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2nd 
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CO 


OOC0T}<t>-i— (C'lcOCOOOoOUOb-t-COCO'-H 

t-^i— icocoCOcocoT^t— 1 "^t^c-]T}^^>.coGoco 




■jsicr tijg 


aioo 'v 'M 


CO r-1 




•o 'is 

«n .2 

O 


HOxooHd -a T 


CD 


ilDCOlOCO -tJICOCOCO -^ocg-^Oi -lO 
t^ • ■ CO fH 1— * I— 1 ■ 




xsin6ivAi.NHor 


I— 1 

C3S 


CD-*OOCOOOi-li-lCOOO'^t-Tj<'^(-*OCl 
t- CO'-lrHiHCO r-l i-ItJ1 COiH 




aHOP^[:aDV^a a^hvh 


T-t 

oo 


t-COOO^t-OOOOO -rHOOTHCOCOlOt- 
.-( i-lrH rH f-\ 'CO (MCO 




•JSiQ IJl' 


ATIONNOD -T '3 'XaOH 


CO 
CO 


OiOi-itO'-HOOOcOCOCDCO'^Ttlt-t-COr-l 
tDi-IC0COCO(MCQ-^t<.H lOCOTjIt-COrHCO 
I— 1 




P 

CO 


NosaHoxnH 't PMvmiM. 




TtICO -COi-li-lOOt- .-<iH.-(O0CC>rHOiCOO0 
• 1-i ■ tH >4^ 




S^aX3^ '3 NHOr 




O .CO-^COIO^IH) •CQCO'*COt-( -CCICO 
f— I ■ 




aaiIA\ NVMH3H 


CD 

to 


OSrHr-i^CO-^CO-^ -rHt-COlO •'^DCOrH 
i-H rH • co- 




SMVaVQNVlOH 


CM 
CO 


rn 
I-H 


rHCOiHOSCO 't-t • ■'^lOlO -OCO 
• ■ ■ ,-\ 




^ XXIMSH -X NHOr 


CO 


t>. 


■lO --t^COrH . .QDCO -00 • f-i T-\ 




siAvan *0 T 


CO 


CD 


•CO ■ -iHrHrH -COrHCOb-rH -tH 




sxxoa -H NHOr 


CO 
CO 


ot-aiioiob-T-)oot-H •^lO'^coi-icoco 

1— 1 I— li— (i— 1 tHi— l*C0 T-HrH i— f 




2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonv73pi[ Haxsd 


CD 
t-H 
CO 


OOQOOiCDt-COCOlOCOCOioOlOCOb-OCO 
t-T— I I— 1i— ICO COCOrH rH 




xsod 'V 'a 


CO 

00 


t-C0CDi:0t-00OlCrHl0c0t-00'^OOC5 
CI COrHi-lrHi-Hi-t CO COl>CgCOi-H 




1st 
Dis- 
trict 


ASISSOH 'V "MM. 


to 


CO'^i-(rHCiOO':t<tD-*COolOtD"rt1COt:-l>- 
t-i-lrHCOt-l f-H TJH CO 




H3HSnva -H S31HVH0 


CO 


tJIIOi— (i— lCOCOOOl>.CllCot>-lOTt<COlO'^ 
Oi iHCO Oa CO lO'-H'^COCOrH 




a 

a. 
C 


^ >- 

Ji 


SiaVHOIM 'WM. 




r-imt-t-t-C0CDO5 •COcO-'^COCOOOCOO 
■* i-Hi-l •W'-HCOCOi-l 




aiVSN SVHOHX 


O 00 
CO 


miOt-ODCOCOOlOCOCOrHCaCQ-^CQCOt-H 
CO i-ICOCOCO COiH TfirHCOt- COCQ 
I— 1 




1,03 


Sl.^aO 


A^ana snv^j 


<M CI 

oo i-l 
CO 


i-IOlOt^-^i-t'-Ht-COOOcD'OOOt-rHCOi-t 
b-i— ICO-^O-lCOCOrHrH lOGOTf^t-COCOCO 
I— 1 




_ 


aNIV<I *M. -SVHO 


TJH . 


LTi-Hi— ICOCvli— I'^LO'— t •b-COCOi-HI^-t— trH 
t- 1-1 • >H i-i I-H 




a^iHsaHO T aan^ 


t- o 

(M 


t^ -COt-i-Hi— |Tt<OC0T— ICOOJIO •1—1 -CO 
I-H rH rH ■ r-t • rH 




AaiNis^M -a T 


eg • 
o • 


■^00 ■ iO b- CD Cq ■* tH t- CO CO CQ lO -coio 
lO -co CO iH rH rHW'CS] 




saaoNAaa "m. -m. 


CO . 
CO ■ 


lOrHiHCOOOClCOCDt- ■CDCl'^OCOrHCS 
CO COrHrH rH ' r-i COCO 




•saj^-aoi^ 


NNin5 'V HIIHXHV 


THt^CDO-^tD^t^-COcOCOCDOCD^t-rHThtrH 
CDI-(CD^-tO.l'*C0C-]Cq■«J^l-l lCCQ-^t-C003CO 
CO «-( 




gs 


aNAV£ AHHVH 


CO i-H 


Oa -lOCOOOCO'* -rHrHCOOlO -CO -t- 
t-i . rH I— 1 




xanvHOS 'o wvmiM. 


COOOIO •'* -OllOCD ■ -OOOlOCO -COCQ 
O lOr-1- -i-l tJ1--tH i-H 'Cq 
Tt< 1-1 ■ ■ • ■ 




HaanH 'a MvmiM. 


1-1 CO 
CO 


lO -OrHTjiOCOrHCOCDt-OCOlOOSCOCO 
rH-COTtlCOrH t~\ COiHCOt-CO CO 








LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 










































coooodt-cocot^oooiooocoiooco-^cooo 
i-(coioioix>CDi:Dt-Qoocot^t-cocococoir:itD 

rHi-li-Hi-lr-li-ICqCOC^CO 



LXXV 



> 

o 

a> 

K 

w 

ClJ 

i-i 
<u 
a 

Hi 

o 


■jsra qu 


TaxHVPM 'v 


L- t-^ CO '^ --^ >>• to CO Ol C I «:> Tt< Ol CO rH Tt< CO '^ Ol IH) 
T^Cvl(:crHOgi-(i-|,-((M.-1 i-lT-HcO'^CJClrHT-Hi-l 


•jsiQ qig 


3103 -V "M. 


co^colO(^^«:'0-rt^l>.(MOlocot>.Oi'*'^coTJ^l^- 

lOCvltO'-IC<l«-(i-(rHG^lr-I rH,-IC0C01MC<Ii-1rHT-( 


o 


^OXOO^<I *a T 


CO'^O^^t-lOCOlh -CgrHCQas«*Cv]CO{M -CO 
^ O r-( Cvl - 
i-l 


xsinbivMNHOr 


lOQOo<^^OOCOr-l -I— i -rHCOCO"^!— ICD01t-Tf<0] 
1-1 r-i CO ■ • CO ' rH 


anoMSovia ahhvh 


-^JHCDcOt-t-00 •iHCDCQCOi-ICOlO»niC»i-tt-. -CM 
CO CM i-H -1—1 I— 1 rH CMrHt— li— t -rH 


•?s!a qii7 


AiioNNOo -1 'a uao^ 


OiTHcc'io-^co«D'^u^c<iio^cgi>.ocoioajcoco 

(MCOlOi-l'-ii-trHi-ICgi-t i-Hi-HCO'^tMCvl i-ti-H 

rH 


In 
Q 

CO 


N0S3H0XnH *! HVmiM. 


.-(iHlOrHOTtli-l -OlCSlt-it-lCMCMOqcO '-^ •-* 
CO OO • iH • - 


saax3j *a NHOr 


Cq •'^JJCMCQ 'CO -i-H .QqeOCv]rH"^Cv]b-lO ■ 




aaiiM NVMHSH 


(MtMcO -lO-^COrHtD ■ -i-l .t-OJ •lO'*r-l 
rH ■ I— 1 I— 1 ■ • • 1— 1 




SHVaV QNVIOH 


tDQOOi'^ajrH -COi-l -rH Cai-lrHCOW-^CQ - 
• I— 1 • 




XXIM3H "X NHOr 


i-HWCM -CO •r^ • O-l ■ • -i-tOGO-^rHrH - 
OJ ■ ■ • ■ ■ • rH I-H 




siAvan '0 T 


lOCOOr-ias -OO 'CD -I-H 'CqCO -COrH • • 
r^ . . . . . . . 




SXXOJ *H NHOr 


t-cMooot-i-i -i-iio • •ooiocvJco'-icjicqcoco 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonvi^w Haxad 


TtHrHiOWCDCOCvJCaoOarHCq-^^TtHOOrHOlOS • r^ 
rHI-HCO OrHrH <MrH rH WrH 
1—i 


xsoj 'V -a 


t-OlO-^CDCO-^cOO •lOCOCiTtHo'OlCt-TtltD 
Tt^rHcOrHCM iHrH* CQCOrHrH r-i r-t 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


A37SS0H "V 'MM. 


Tt<t^-^'*C0rH'*CN10S •t^eOCOOcO^^t-CMrHCa 
(MrHrHrHCvl r^ • COrH rH 


HaHsnva -h sai^vHo 


ClCOO<MlOlOrHCOC<]CM •rHOOOOlOlOOCQOqm 
Cq lO OrH rHCMrH-rHrH (MrH rHrHrH 

. rH 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


SiaVHOIP^ 'KtA 


C<30i-^COrHrHCqrHt-<MrH05000lOCO(MlO -CM 
rH C<1 Oi rHrHrHrH COrH r-\ ■ 


aiVSN SVHOHX 


TjICa'^rHTtirHrH r-\ • tX) C<i r-^ i-i i-^ i~\ 


i.DsSI.nso 


AJana sNvna 


cob-xt^tDCOI>-COlOCQ(^]O^OCOlOT^^t-Oit-T}^t^- 
lOOacOrHcqrHrHrHCOrH rHrHCO"*C<ICMrHrHrH 


Is 


SNIVdL "VW 'SVHD 


COO0CDC0Oq■^-=J^ ' O-l -rHrH CM COrH -rHCM ■ iO 
lO >-H ■ CI • CM • T-i 


aniHsaHO t aa^a 


.TJlCMCOOacq -{MrHCO- -(MCvlb-CMlOCg • " • 

lO - . ■ ^ ... 


AaiNis^iM 'a 'f 


CO-^C^TtHt-CO ■rHrH(MrHt--^lO(M'XiGOOrHC-] 
CO rH TjH rH • _ j-i tH i-^ 


saiONAan "M. 'm. 


cioioc»t>OrH -coio ■couttOco-'^iocoiooqas 

1-i i—\r-\-T-{- 1-t rH 


•sajj-30!A 


NNinf) -v "anHXHv 


(X5C0rHlOt-00-^lO0aCqCDTHrHt-C<|lOt-CO"^t~ 
lOC<IOrHC<lrHrHrHCOrH rHrHcOCO(M(M,rHrHrH 
rH 




aNAVd AHHVH 


lOb-rHOaCOrHUDCDin •rHrHCQrH .lOlOrH ■ rH 
T-i r-i • 


xa^vHOS '0 MvmiM. 


rHrHrJ<COt-rH .CO -CM -rHlCiyUOOeDinoO • • 

rHOO • -rH-rHCOTjH rH-' 

rH • • ■ ■ ■ 


HaanH 'a MvmiM. 


t^rHWrHOOO -rH. t- -CDCO^rHCOtOOl -tHO 
TjIC^rHrHCgrH- CM* rHrH-rHrH 




LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 
























rHl0rHlC«D03<M10rHQ0OCMC0OTjH|>-aiC0rHrH 

tocob-t^t-ooaioirHCDOrHCOcoeo'^t^iofOOiO 

(MCMfMCQOqCQCJtMfOCO^'^'^-^r^-r^-^Tt^Ttlir: 



LXXVI 



'js?a vc 



^3xavw 'v 



r-ICvIi-llOlO"*C<I i-trHiH -i-liHi-ltM iHCQCO 



?S!a V9 



aiOD 'V "M. 



HOXOOHd "a T 



t-^'nr-(lCO0i-H«C3t-HTj<00'<^ .COThT-10c<lQO 



in w 
Q 



ism&avM NHor 



c:icofMoi-^ioascMTtioorocQco-i^i-((Mcoi-Hio<o 



a^0W33V7a AaavH 



mai^i:ccDaji-tcQO!Dioot--<j*Oicocoi-HT^oo 



■isra v^ 



ATIONNOD "T "3 •Xaoa 



m 



M 



o 



NOsaHoxnH 't MvmiAi 



lO CO Tt^ . ^ OO 



Q 



a -2 .H 
nS5 



saaxaj 'a nhoi 



C-l t- 01 • '^ CO t-t 



aa7iAv NvwaaH 



swvav aNVTOH 



XXIM.3H "X NHOr 



siAvaa "0 T 



SXXOJ "H NHOr 



t^ eg t-H iH CJ CO 



i-l CO (M r^ • (M CO 



lO . (M CO t-i ■ t^ 



.COfM •!— (Wt^f-HcgOSrH'HOO^t^ 



NIlHOnvl^M ^3XaJ 



xso<i "v -a 



CO lO 



t}< CO I— ' rH ?~I I— 1 t-t • 






c i; "^ 

rJ t^ n 

4) r, *=> 



j£^33Sljn3£) 






Op: 

u 









LXXVII 



A3T:SS0H -V "P^tM 



HaHsnva "h saisvHO 



-^COr-HCMC-lt-OCaCJCO-^t-irS-^COCvlCCtMCO'^ 
I— I T-l Ttl (M <M t-i i-l 

i-Hi-H i-lTiHi-li— I r-4<-H i-HiHrHrHCg CO 



SiaVHOIH 'MM. 



ot--*05oo^b-iot--cjwocc-^t-T-(m»n'^o; 



aivaN svwoHX 



(rJ1cgOC0t-Ol0Tt*01G0t0t-t-CD 



Aaana 3Nva3 



aNIVd: "M 'SYHD 



aniHsaHD t 'aaHJ 



AaiNix^w "a T 



lo o Tt^ CO a: i-i ■ T-i • 

i-l CO CO 


T-1 CO t- tH CQ ir- 

1-1 I-H 


Tt^ ^ CO 




y • r-t t-i r-1 Ol 


ca CO - 


CO t- • IC iH CD CO • i-H 

iH CO 


(O CO CM iH •* CO r- 


•-CO t- 

• I-l 



sa^ONAan 'M. 'M. 


.OqcOi-HOiTH(MTjHlOlOCDTj400CJailCOlO 'Tt^ 
(— 1 1— 1 •— 1 (-H I-H I— 1 • <M 


NNin^ "V HnHX^V 


-<*<-^ai(-ii-i'<*<c<]^t>-cocoooooo(oio .i-Hiho 

iHC<]i— lUOO'^CJ iHrHiHCMi— ii— it-HOJ -fHoqcO 


aNAVd AHHVH 


eco'* -co 'Cot-iH -to • ' r-t ^ a t' • -i-i 




i:E)01C0CN]t-OrH • • -CDt-I •OaM<<D'*<M(MCO 



xaavHOS "O wvmiM 



aaann "a wvmiM. 



< 
o 
o 
>-) 






ClrHt-CvltCit-t-OIOGOOOfHtMCDOr-llOQOr^ 
Oi-fi-ltMCQCOlOCDCOCDOOCJOOCa-^tDCDCOOG 

iniioiraioioiomioioioioiootocc'tcco'XJco':^ 



•JSIQ qi^ 



^axHVIA[ -v 



'?S!a ^1)9 



aiOD -y "M. 



HOXOOHd 'a T 



■■^coeoca -coos«o .r-*OiH ■iHcv:]ooicfo" 



xsin2)ivM, NHor 



aaowxovia ahhvh 



) r-( CO rH 00 t^ Ca 



■ "* <M (M - (D in Oi * CO 



■}S!a ^'> 



A170NN00 -1 -a •xaoK 



NOsaHOxnH 't: wvmiM. 



a 
O 



a 

■a 






-■o i 



2 S ^ 

J) M u 

o S b 



i,D9SI,U30 



_ a 



Op: 
n o 









saaxaj -a nho: 



aaiiM. NvwHaH 



r-i Oi tr~ CQ C^ 



1-1 ■ "^ lO CO 



SPMvav aNvio'E 



!:> CO • CO CM <^ 



XXIMSH "X NHOr 



siAvan 'D *f 



• CO OQ CO CM rH 



SXXOJ *H NHOr 



Oeo -OJCMt- •C?l'--t .COrH 



CO - O rH 



NnHOilVl^IM H3X3J 



I— I 00 -^ i-H 



■^ CO I— I CO 



i-t i-H CM tH 



T-l i-i rH Tji 



in ?o CO CO CO 



xsoj 'v -a 



' 1-H to O CO lO O 



A3^ssoa -v 'wm. 



• rH • T-H t- CO 



H3Hsnva: 'H shikvho 



JCOOOOlOCJl -oaooCOr-lCDtMC-OOi-i 
1— li-Hi— I • r-i Tti i-I 1— li-l i-l 



S7aVH3IPM "MM 



■COOOO -to,— ii-HCM -C<]OOOOCD(M 



aiVSN SVHOHX 



Ajjna 3NVHJ 



) O tr- CO 00 -^ CO O 



aNIVJ -M. -SVHO 



aaiHsaHD T aana 



AaiNiaapi "a t 



iOQOCMi-tCOlCCMCOT-H 

i-l i-H 


Tti Tt< 


- I-l 


rH Cq CD • . 


i-Hb-CMCMCMi-l -t-CO 
I— 1 • i-H 


to o 


■ O 
• I— 1 


Oa ■<:t^ rH t- O 


-^COO'^IO-^CMCOCO 
(M Ol Oi 


lO CD 


CO - 


to CD - OS rH 



saiONAaa "M. "M. 



CM ^H ':t^ CO r 



• CD CO OO 00 r-t 



NNin?) -V HXIHXHV 



3NAV.I A'aaVH 



■ i-t rH • - ^ OQ lO 



xaavHOS "O wvmiM. 



OOO -CQ 'i-HajT-toa -OlOrH 



HaanH 'a wvmiM. 



) rH t- <M ■* (M 



>-l 
< 
O 

o 
I-l 



P4 
pi) 
n 
S 



OC0O"^rHt^00r-lCD-*O'*CDC0C0'rt<i— (COTtlOO 
CqCsllOmt-C»ODOiCiCDCQCg(MCOCDCDrHCJ-Ti<'^ 
tr-t-b-t-t-t-t-t-t-OOOOCOOOOOOOCiOCiOSOJO; 



Lxxvni 



13 
1- 

g 
pq 

V 

^> 

3 
O 
01 
X 

W 

'rt 

M 
V 

a 

V 

O 


•JSJQ 1U 


laxHViM -v 


-t-cit-aiOiioofOGocDOcoast-o 


lO rH Oi 
r-i r-i 1-i 


•jsiQ qJ9 


3703 -V 'M. 


-.OlOlt-OOOlOOCOQOlr-i-iCOOi'Ot^ •tHi-hOS 
•COCCI '^rH CQCMrHTjHr-tC<lT^C<10a 'i-lrHrH 


U 

Q 


H0X30H.I *a T 


■ C<] m CM (M tH CO 


OOrHTjH .-"^rHCOCOCOlO ■ " 
i-< i-{ • r-i rH • • 


xsinS^viWNHor 


• iH to ir3 GS O CQ 

• I-t 1-1 


O •lOOSOt-oa^CO 'OrH 
• rH rH rH • rH 


aHOW^DVia AHHVH 


■1005 •t-oqi-HooiooocaoicQcoosoqt-i-to 

t-H*rHrHCQ CCI >*rH CQ 


•TsiQ ^ii? 


AIIONNOO -1 '3 UaOH 


-tDcviyscoaiioocoQOt-T-ii-i-^ioco 
•ojco coi— 1 cMoai— icoi— ((MTjioacj 


t- rH Oa 

r^ r-i 


'5 
5 


NOsaHoxriH 't jAivmiM. 


• CD -co . rH rH 


rH rH in 


• CO ^ ■ 
CO • 


in CO rH 

1-i 


SHaxHj -a NHor 


T— 1 I— 1 C<] - I— I I— ( 




• . CO 


CO r-t 


rH 




CO 


aailM. NVPIH3H 


■ lO CO f-l . 






■ r^ r-i 


r-{ CO 
rH 


rH 




rH 


SPMvavaNviOH 


rH TtH rH - OS 






rH . CO 


CO 00 


CO 


rH 




XXIMSH "X NHOr 


r-l C-l 00 • QCI 






■ CO in 


T-^ "^ 






rH 


siAvan -0 T 


i-l TjH • -CO 


CO 


-^ t- lO O CC] rH 
rH rH 




■ rH ■ 


SXXOJ -H NHOr 


i-HlO-^ ■ .CDCOOlOb-CO»HTt1rH<X)rH 
rH'.iH (M(-l i-H rHi-( cq 


• M^ to 

1-i 


2n(l 
Dis- 
trict 


NiTHonva^pNT ^axaa 


■ Oi'^ -t- *>-< 'lOlOOO • -OO 'CM 
CO • Ol • • tH • • Cv! • rH 


o 1-i • 

rH 


xsod 'v -a 


■ Oir-lt-OOCO'^OGOTj^Oi'-ltMCOCOin) 
• r-i 1-HtH CvIt-I.-|<Mi-Ii-1(M<Mi-I 


O O rH 
rH Ca 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


A3aSS0H -V 'PIM 


-coio -tt<cqio -t-y^co • -t-iooo 

• CO • tH - • 1-H iH iH 


00 CO rH 


HaHSXlVa "H S31HVH3 


-oiot-ocoiMoiococoT-ii-icao:'* 


t^ 00 Oi 
rH 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


siavHom -MM. 


OlOSCOCaiDi-lrH -COC<llO»-HOJ-^i-|OOlOlO -t-H 

Tj< • eg 


aiV3N SVWOHX 


>:jiaiio»ni-it-ooict-cooicqooooicOii-(aj 

i-|T-l(M rH CarHrHTjH r-<COC<lC<]rH rHi-i 


^i33SI<°3G 


Aj^na :hnvh3 


■^T-lOL"-COai^OCOOO«DT-ICJOt-000'^rHO 
C<l(MCO i-lr-I W<Mi-H-<^i-ICgiOC<lCMCarHi-l<M 


II 

Is 


aNivd: *M. *svHo 


-rH(M -CO •i-lO-':^ -lO • -lOiHOO -(Mr-I • 
• 1-i ■ C^ • ••tH 


aHiHS3H0 'f aa-aa 


I— 1 • • ■ ■ rH t-H 1— 1 • rH 


AaiNix^iM *a T 


-^ot-cDcqcg'- -(O • • -iHOiHt-b-cq -oa 

t-l rH oq (M rH 


saaoNAan 'm. "m 


l^)Tt^Or^O«^'^ -OOOi-IrHinOOt-rHt-CMCDt- 
rH 1-i T-i r-i . r-i CQ 7-\ r~\ rH 


•saij-SDiyy 


NNinc!) -v HnnxHV 


0S(>-rHt--rH01ir:)OC00l0irHCll::^00b-OC0rHai 
rHCacO -^rH (MCvlrHCOi— IrH-^OacaO-lrHrHrH 


2| 


aNAVd AHHVH 


HMOOrH .t^rHrH -rH ■ -rHTtH • -OOrH • -CM 
rH • - ■ ■ • ■ • • 


xaavHOS *o PivmiM. 


OOTHi-Ht-OlCd ■ --^rHrH • tH CO -rHCOCg • ■ 
CO • . • <M ■ 


HaariH 'a HvmiM. 


ictr-t>- -cqotcicjoooooiomoiosoDooTHrHai 

r^ CO • rH CQrHrHTHrHrHOlCOrHrHrHrHrH 






LOCAL 

UNION 
NUMBER 


in rH Ol CO rH 'Tfl 

CO Ir^ t^ GO rH t-H 

Oi Ci Cl Ol O O 

rH rH 


CO 

o 


t-tO-yDCOTtHi^OCO 
injCDt-OiOlOiOO 
OOOOOOrHr- 


1-i Ol 

1—i r-i 
1-i T-{ 


rH CO 
rH rH 
1—i 1-i 


to 

CO 
rH 
rH 



LXXIX 



•s 

a 
o 
M 

V 

> 

(J 

<u 

X 

W 

M 

V 

a 

U 

O 


■)s!a vi 


laXHVIM *V 


Ot^TjH0100CXIt>.«i:)CDC0Oi-l(MOC0C0lCCSrHi-l 
rH t— 1 (M 1— iT— Icai— ICOrHCMfH i-Hi-HtH'— ' 


•jsiQ tjig 


3703 -V 'M 


01t^TH0SC00it-CD':0^Or-lC0OOOl0t-CMO 
T— 1 rH 1— li— (Oqt— ICCii— ICMi— 1 I— ll— (-^i—l 


P 


^oxooHJ -a T 


Tt<i-I -CS] •COrHCOt-CO'-l.-lCM .03i-1lO?OOCO 


I.Sin&7VM NHOr 


''JliHOi-ICOtMlOeDi-lCi'yDrtHmOCOtMi-lOCM"^ 
I— 1 CO Csl r-1 


aHOM^IOVia A^HVH 


1— 1 I— 1 - I— ( rH i-H 
iH 


•JsiQ Vi' 


ATI0NN03 "I -a 'XaOK 


Oiooc^3aiGOtc>l^-lX>^DcoocDTt^Olr:llrD■^<^3Cif-l 

iH i-H rHr-lrHi-HCgiHCvlr-l iHiHCOi-l 


W 

5 

CO 


NOSSHOXIIH -T MVmiAA. 


. . to 


. . . rH (M CS ■* 


SHaxad -3 NHor 




. rH ■ 7-t 


. . . ■ 00 


• rH rH CO CO eg rH 


aaaiAv NVPi^aH 


iH 


■ • rH <M 


rH rH (M rH ■■* 




• CO CO • CQ 


SMvav aNvioH 




CO 


CO eg CO rH 


rH ■ •'^ T-iZO 


O 

eg 


• -^ cq t- • 


XXIM3H 'X NHOf 






eg 


. (M . -CO -eg . • Oi 




y—lQ^i-^COi-i 








siAvan '0 T 


iH 


rHCOrHt* -CMCM • -^D-^ • 


T-l ■ CTi ^ . 


SXXOX 'H NHOf 


(M«D0ii-lC0C0C0C0O'^inirJii-l •-^COeOtDO''* 
1— 1 1— 1 I— i Id r- ( ■ r-l rH 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NiiHonva^Pii Haxaa 


'<J*rHtOtr-iHi-lrHiHa>l>-<MrHt-OCgOCl-^ascO-* 
1-H CO CM i-H 


xsoj *v -a 


<X?CDOO(Mb-(M«D<Xit-iHOOOOO --^CDCQi-llOOO 
rH rH rH CO • i-\ rHrHiM 
rH 


1st 

Dis- 
trict 


A31SS0H -V 'WM. 


(MrHrHCM'^COrH -(OlOOlOCO -(MCOlr-Ttlb-fO 

rH • O • 


^aHsnva 'h sshc^vho 




QOCDCOt-'^OiOaiO-^rHrHCMOT^COOlCDlCOS 
rH rHrHrH COrHCQrH rHCO 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


SiaVHOIH 'KtA 


t-rHrHb-T^(Mtr-CMCDCD<MCC'<M -tCTtlcqcO-^US 
1-^ CO • rH 


aavaN svkohx 


cob-(^]cgT^o ■iX!0'*ooiocooo(M'<iib-ooco 

i--i r-i ■ i-\ i-\ r-l (MrHCMrH riCO 
■ r-i 


^,oaSI,nar) 


Aaana aiNvna 


OOOCOOJOOb't-OOtDOOrHinOlOeCilCOCQrH 
rH r-l rH rHrHC<]rHCDrHCMrH rHCM^rH 


£^ 

d " 

s s 
0(i; 


aNIVJ 'lA *SVHO 


CI 


' r-i -O ■rJltMOCOt-rHC^'^CO -, OOCM 
• T^ • rH rH ■ rH 


a-aiHSano t 'aa-aa 


lO ■ 


OtMrHrHt- -OlCg -O 
rH • • rH 


rH ■ • CD CO rH rH 


AaiNra^M "a t 


rHlOrH -COrH -COt-lCWO • 
rH - O 
rH 


• lO rH CO t- CO Th 

eg 


saiONAan "M. "M. 


■ rH T^ rH • 


•S3IJ-3DIA 


NNin5 'V HflHXHV 


Ot-COClOOt^COaj-aDCOOrHlOOlOlO-^OlOCO 
rH i—{ 1-^ r-ir-iO^'r-iZOf-iOir~i tH r-i "^ i—i 




aNAVa AHHVH 


r-^ ■ ■ -COCO . .QO'^CMTjHrH -COCOtD 't-CO 
. . . . - - • CM 


xa^VHOS '9 wvmiM. 


CqCM . . ■ T-i -co -(M -lO • • • -Oi -CvJrH 
. • . r-\ . -,—1.... -rH 


HaanH "a MvmiM. 


t-COTHOl^Ot-OCOt-QOCNI-^OCOCOrHOCOlO 
r-{ T-\ T^ 1-t ^ r-i C^ 1-1 OJ 
1-H 




LOCAL 
UNION 

NUMBER 























CO tH 

CO Tj< 

i-i 1-t 

1-t l-i 


lOOO-^rHlOCOlOb-QOt-b- 
TjH-^OrHCQ-^lOaiOJTPlO 
rHrHIMCgcqcgMtMCOCOCO 


rH -* eg to CO W b- 
t- t- CO 00 oo o o 

CO CO CO CO CO -^ "Jt^ 
rH rH rH rH rH rH rH 



LXXX 



13 

tH 

O 
W 

> 

3 
O 

p3 

u 

a 
v 
O 


•ISIQ TJ}^ 


laXHVM 'V 


1 

OtMrHOirO'^'-lrHOiOOOrHcOtDOlCrHailOrH 
1— li— l^rHi— Ir^rMCOi— 1 CO"— liH t— ICli-H CO"—! 


•jsia qJ9 


aioo -v 'M 


aiCOi-IOCOCMCOT-ia5GOCOCQlClQOC-l.-HOlir:)CO 
--(^i-ii-lTtl(MCOi-l (Mi-Hi-H r^CM1-^ COt-H 

rH 


Q 


HOXOOHd 'a T 


^(MOt^i— (cOOii— It-COCOtDrHCO -CO -CO -i— 1 
i-l CO 1-1 . ^ . . 


i,sin5ivM.NHor 


CQ • 'CMC^lOOt-lt-lOr-ICMCOCQOqO-^r-ICC -00 
* • rH (M T-H 


aaoMxovna ahhvh 


COiHrHrHOaSCOMi<D-^lOO<Mcq -00 --^inco 
rH iH CM <M 1-1 ■ W • CO 


'isia q^i7 


at:7onn03 -1 *a 'xaoH 


i-1C^rHOC<100CslrHGOCOOCO-Tt<COOt-i-Ha>lOO 
?— ti— (1— ti— li— iCOOlCOi— I COi-Ht— 1 ^r-lt-H COrH 

I— ( 


Q 


NOSaHDXnH "1 PMVmiM. 


i-lrHCM -i-HQO(MeOCvl 


■(MrHrHOtD -rHrHrH 


snaxad -aNHor 


1— 1 i—i CO • • CO (M i-H . 


. ,— 1 . . 


lO • • • (M 


aaiiiw NVMHaH 


i-(iHi-H .Cqt-r-lCQ(M 

i-l 


1-i ■ <-^ • 


rH - . . CM 


s]/ivavaNviOH 


^ ^ • iH oa ■* . 


y-\ 


CM {M Tt< (M 


Tt^ ■ rH rH . 


XXIMaH -x NHOr 


7-{ tH . Gi cq IC t-i 




• . CM rH 


T^ • rH . . 


siAvan '3 '£ 


i-t - • • • rH GO 


■ CO CO Tt* -CO 


t- rH • rH • 
1-i • 


SXXOd 'H NHOr 


Clio • ■t-tDOJCO'* •'t*<lOt- • -rH -t-COCO 
• • rH C-1 -CM • • O ■ CO 


2iid 
Dis- 
trict 


NnHonv^^K naxaa 


^ .T-l • -CsCNlt-Clt^t-COtMTHOTt^ -ClOOCO 
• I— 1 • - (M <M I— I ,— I ^ . CO 


xsoj "v -a 


COCO •OirD^rH:D«DrHCCtM>*tD •cO'-ft-QOCi 
i-H'rHrHcO CMi-HiH •CO'-H 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


AaassoH -v 'niA 


i-lrHt-TfiTji^i-lfHCO •<X)C<l'<:tHCOOOS -Oi-ii-l 
1— t rH • 1— 1 T^ • rH 


-saHsnva: -h saiHVHO 


Oa:C0OOOCVlO't*<00ir3-^C<J ■ -rH -rHTj^rH 
r-i rHfOrHCOrH (MrHrH--t>.- COr-t 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


siavHOiPM 'niA 


0■^!J^Or^■rt^(^] •t-OCICMCO'^rH -CO -lOrHir:) 
rH -rH ■ rH rH • CO • 


aivaN sviMOHX 


t-OrHOOOOilOOiOGOCOOJb-Ot-'HlOTj^t-. 
rH rHCO rH ClrHrH r-t ^ J-^ CO 


^^oagt.uao 


Ajiana xNV^a 


rHfJirHO-^THrHrHOlCOOlOtDOOOCCJr-lCfimcO 
rHrHrHrHrHTttCMCOrH COrHrH rHCMrH COrH 


fe:2 
"Si 


aNiva: 'm. "syhd 


CO • •rHrHOOCDCO'^'MrHCMtDO^ 
■ • 1-i 


CO • 


asiHsaHo *f 'aana 


r-l -rHrHCOt^rHCOlOrHr-lrHCM 


CM ■ r-i (M CO 

rH ■ r-^ 


AaiNis^w 'a T 


0]rH -COrHt-COO^ -COtOCOCOOCOrH ■ • • 
. (M rH CO rH •■ ■ 


saiONAan 'm. 'm 


L^o •looca-^cO'^intTjHOiOco -co ■ -^ a • 


■S3IJ-SOTA 

lEiauaO }sx 


NNin5 'V HHHXHV 


rHCOrHOCOTjHCQtMCOOOOiniTtlOOOOr-iailOO 
rHrHrHrHrHrJI OOCOrH COrHrH rHCIrH COrH 


General 
President 


aNAVd AHHVH 


CO -rHrHlOCOCOrHt- • • i-i f-i - • iO ■ • • • 
• rH • • . - CO ■ • • • 


XQHVHDS -G HVmiM. 


^rH . . -t-OOrHlO • -t-COrH -»> - -rirH 


HaanH -a Hvmiivi 


COCO •GlO'aiSOOClt-OOOOCOb-OCDrHO'^CO 
i-t ■ rHCOrHCO COrHrH rHOOrHrHCOrH 


• 


LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 






















O T-H CO CI '■-O CO CD rH 
~1 xji H^ lO lO t- L— CI 


O CO 

cr. o 
TjH to 

rH rH 


L^ C] CO fO O 
rH LO O t-~ CO 

lo lo in lo lo 

.— ( rH rH rH r-l 


CT o rH in ir:) 

C» Oi Oi Oi o 
lO LO IC in «0 

r-l r-^ 1-* i-> r^ 



LXXXT 



rt 
O 

m 

u 
W 

2 
a 
O 


•?sra qu 


7aXHVW 'V 


o CO y: 

i-t i-H 1- 


COt^rH C-rHlOOi^^CCOltC 
1-i 1-^ . C-]rHCD rHrHr- 


00 ic 

rH 


t- o- 




■4STa t{i9 


aaoo -v '/A 


r-(i— ti— li— 1 t— !■ (Mf— it^ 1— ti— Ir-H tH- i— I 








o 

5 '5 

in . w 
Q 


HOXOO^J *a T 


CirOOiTjiCO . ■ .OOr-ICC 'COCO .^tDlCtOrH 
--i ... ^ . 


xsin5ivM NHOr 


(M CJ . C] CO (>1 t- . CO Th <M CO Ol rH CD Tj< Oa" ■ rH lO 

I— 1 • tH 1— 1 t— ( • I— 1 


aKOiMSDvaa a-shvh 


T-HOOt-t-CO ■CMGIOCO.-H -^SOO - -t-CD -r-l 
I— f TtH • • • 


'?sia q^t' 


A'noNNOD -1 "a "xaoH 


lOcgcDcot^o:; ■Oi'-(-^iocoooOcoco-<^ 

i-HrHr-ii-H • OlrHC::) rHrHr-l rH 


lO CO 

rH 


3rd District 


NOsaHoxnH 't pivmiM. 


i-t C-] 


t- • -rHOS -i-trHt-TtifXl 


eg CO 


■ rH 

■ rH 


s^axaj 'a NHor 


(M CO, 


rH rH - .. rH CO ■•• • 


CO • 


■ CO 


aaiiM. Nvw^aH 


r-i Cvl 


(Mcocgco . .THrHCgCOCQ 


CJ rH 


Th eg 


SKVaV aNV70H 


; '-' 


CI C-3 - r-H ■ O • ^ . r-. rH 


C-l r-i 






XXIMaH "X NHOr 


• T-iCO ■ • •-• • 1--. r~{ ^ -Oli-i 


• ^ 






siAva-a •? T 


i-H -(M -T-l -CO -lOiHCO -CMCT 


• r^ 






SXXOJ 'H NHOr 


•lOi— I"— ti— 1 .OQ -ODtCirH 't-COCD -lO 


CO rH 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NiiHonvi^H Haxad 


□OOOOlOCMCiOa •Tt<QO00C<lt-i-(CDCOt- 

I— 1 • irt) I— t I— 1 


CO t- 


XSO.I *v -a 


t-'^oococDcot-Oit-ooiot^i-if-^ -woo 




1st 
Dis- 
trict 


A37SS0a -V 'PIM. 


CirHrHCacO ■COOSOStJHoOOCOCD.-ICvI-^ 
rH • tH eg 


^ Oi 


^ansnva 'h san^vHo 


cDi-Hici-icotMco ■(^](^]al'-^lot--rJ^eOr-l 

1— tiH i-H ■i—Tt^i— li-Ht— ( 


CO OO 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


SiaVH3II\[ 'WA 


TjHCOlOirDCDTtHlO -CaOi-H 'THOOi-l-^lOOOC^Jt- 

i-H eg • 


aivaN svwoHx 


i-hot— tQoc-]ooTt<aiajmooit^iou2'^i— (coioo 

I— (iHrM 1— (lOi— Ii— li— 1 rH 


i^Dasi.nao 


A^ana iHNvna 


to-^cDcooocg -oioioooioocacoooiniotr-cc 

i-Hi— IrHrH r-l- COrHtr- rHrHrH rHi-H i—i 




aNivd: 'M. 'svHo 


•rHCgi>- -001— 1 •00COCOrHCirHCDr^Cg■Ti^ .pH 
• ■ ■ I— 1 rH 


aniHsaHD *r 'aa^a 


lOCC. GOrHtOcg -OlrHlO^^J^COrH -t-^rHt-^ 
rH ■ C-l • 


AaiNix^iM "a T 


■CgrHTtHrHCMb- •lOCQ.-HO^lCOCO • •■* ■ -lO 
CO .... 


saaoNAan '/a 'm 


■t-ThrHrH -rH -t-lOCO •'^OO • .CCCD .CD 


IEjana£) }st 


NNin& "V HnHXHV 


lOTt^t-(Mt-Cg .aiQ0CDl>-O:00<MCD00CC>rHCOt^ 
rHrHrHrH r~\ • rHO rHrHrH r-\ r^ i-f 


^1 


aNAva: ahhvh 


CO •THl>-rt< . . -THOa'<:t< -rHOSMlrHin ■ . • 
• • r-\ • r-i ... 


XQHVHOS •£) WVmiM. 


Cq ■ .IQ^rHOi 'CO -CO • • i-i -t-CCl • .CD 


naariH "a Mvmim 


OTtl03rH -rH •ClTHlCrHOJ t- CO CQ ■ Oi rH b- O 
rHrHrH -rH- rHi-HlO i-l • t-\ t~\ 




LOCAL 

UNION 

NUMBER 
























l-OCMCDrHTjICDCvIiniLO-fJ^OlOOOCD 
--HCgCvlcgcO^-^CDCDClOrHrHinCD 
OCOCDCDX>CDCDCDCDCDl>-t-t-I>-t- 


nil 

1780 
1804 


O CO 

r^ CO 
00 OO 



Lxxxn 



Id 

> 

U 
X 

H 

2 
a 


•isra qJi 


^3XHVIM -v 


c^ 


l> 


CD IT 

rH r- 


<M OJ CD 


•isiQ qi9 


aioo 'V *M. 


ca t^ 10 10 (M 00 50 

r-( T— 1 1— ( t— ( 




in 2 




■aOJLDOSd *a T 


tH CQ 


rH 10 CO 


ISin^lVM. NHOf 


iH CO • 


• CQ ■ 


a^OM:HDvaa a^hvh 


., -b oa :d 10 i-i c<] . 


•jsiQ qit7 


ATIONNOO -1 '3 'XaOH 


rH t- 10 ai C7i 00 <X) 

>— I I— I . 


5 


NOSaHDXnH "T PMVmiM. 


CI ca .-H TiH . cq . 


s^axad -a NHor 


rH 




LO . ■ 


aaiiM. NVPiHaH 


1—t 




• CO • 


swvavaNviOH 






rH 


LQ CO rH 


XXIMSH "X NHOr 






rH 


r~{ . ,—i 


siAvan -3 *r 




03 rH 


r-\ • CO 


SXXOd -H NHOr 


1-1 (X) Ca rH • 1-1 1-1 


2nd 
Dis- 
trict 


NOHonv^^pi Haxad 


CO :0 lO • CO TjH to 

. rH ■ rH 


xsod "v "a 


iH iH 10 ■ '^ - 
tH f-H • ■ 


1st 
Dis- 
trict 


A37SS0^ 'V 'MM 


r-l C<J Tt< 10 CO CO T-H 
tH r-t 


H3Hsnva "H saanvHo 




t- CO 10 


General 
Treas- 
urer 


SiaVHOIPi -WA 


i-l '^ 

T— 1 


lo in • 


aivaN sviMOHX 


iH CO «5 in 

I— 1 I— 1 


CO T^ CD 


^.33SI<°30 


A33na XNVH3 


CM <X> CO lO CO Ol <© 
rH rH rH rH 


2nd General 
Vice-President 


aNivd: 'M. -svHo 


• CO lO i-l CO rH • 
rH 


aniHsaHO *r aa^a 


CO • • ■ • CO Tjl 


Aa3Ni3:3M 'a t 


Ci rH ■ CO CQ rH rH 


saaoNAan *m. 'm 


■ . ^ t~i Oi •<H r-i 




NNini!) -v "anHXHv 


CM t> CO 10 (M 01 CD 
,— ! r^ t-H r-t 


a u 


3NAVd: AHHVH 


Oi r-i . ■ CM CO • 


XQ-aVHOS '0 MvmiM. 


• CO • • <M • - 


HaariH "a wvmiM. 


CO CO lO Oi CD CD 
rH rH rH 






LOCAL 

UNION 
NUMBER 


CO 

2 


CO 
r-i 


CO Ol 

in «2 

00 CiO 
1-t rH 


eg CO T^ 

en rH rH 
00 OS Oi 
rH rH rH 






o 



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pi; 
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n 

o 

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-00 a 

2 S ^- .,g £ 
S iS oj 00 P- 2 

fe Ph J- 

o 01 ■ ■ " <^ 

-o: to ^«:> 
■-^ Oi X -^ °'- 

§ -S ^ .g § .2 , - 



c 'i; .;:; « 



M t- I --f- CO i3 

►^ f-H £ tc 01 to 

o -Si .^-S", 



R 
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M 

w 

o 

en 
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* -ij "^ 






. CO ^J' 



CQ-g 






piO 






R ri r^ r-> -u _r -- 



„ ,■ K m t- ja 






.si^« 



l^j 



a •" 
o --^ 

m 00 



«2 "S K I -^'' 
i t£ -3 « a 5 tT 

:s -i5 g -s "^ J p 



"^ tiQte-i 



fi^ ^ 



■-5 M rVj ■'-' .-H -rH . 

oj O"^ pq t, ^-i" 

^ J S <E rO <M S 



O t, ^'-+J 



Ph 



■- CO 



Lxxxni 



tH p3 >< O <» "5 
<J PL| H cf P^ c 



T Si e C a r p e o ib a r 

To the President of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, In- 
dianapolis, Ind.: 

Dear Sir — For and on behalf of the Compilation Committee of the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, elected at the last general convention 
for the purpose of tabulating the ballots cast by each Local Union of this United 
Brotherhood for the candidates at the election just held by said United Brotherhood, 
I herewith beg to submit the following written report of the result of said election: 

rOE GENERAL PEESIDENT. 

Votes. 

Wm. D. Huber 29,987 

Indianapolis, Ind., L. U. No. 75. 

Wm. G. Schardt 23,130 

Chicago, 111., L. U. No. 1. 

Harry Payne 6,525 

Rock Island, 111., L. U. No. 166. 

FOR FIRST GENERAL VICE-PRESIDENT. 

Arthur A. Quinn 48,119 

Perth Amboy, N. J., L. U. No. 65. 

FOR SECOND GENERAL VICE-PRESIDENT. 

W. W. Reynolds 11,804 

Peoria, 111., L. U. No. 183. 

J. D. MeKinley 24,081 

Chicago, 111., L. U. 62. 

Fred J. Cheshire 11,653 

Spokane, Wash., L. U. No. 98. 

Chas. W. Paine 9,383 

New Orleans, La., L. U. No. 76. 

FOR GENERAL SECRETARY. 

Frank Duffy 50,471 

Indianapolis, Ind., L. U. No. 75. 

FOR GENERAL TREASURER. 

Thos. Neale 40,935 

Indianapolis, Ind., L. U. No. 1, Chicago. 

William Michaels 15,826 

St. Louis, Mo., L. U. No. 646. 

FOR MEMBER OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

From the First District. 
Chas. H. Bausher 32,221 

New York City, L. U. No. 478. 
Wm. A. Rossley 22,558 

Worcester, Mass., L. U. No. 23. 

FOR MEMBER OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD. 
From the Second District. 

D. A. Post 80,651 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., L. U. No. 514. 

Peter McLaughlin 24,170 

Philadelphia, Pa., L. U. No. 8. 

LXXXIV 



Tib. e Carpesiter 

EOE MEMBER OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD. ;■ 

From the Third District. 

John H. Potts 11,625 

Cincinnati, Ohio, L. XJ. No. 667. 

J. C. Eeavis 4,001 

Paducah, Ky., L. U. No. 559. 

John T. Hewitt 3,808 

Gary, Ind., L. U. No. 985. 

Roland Adams 10,218 

Alton, 111., L. U. No. 377. 

Herman Wilde 7,285 

Milwaukee, Wis., L. U. No. 552. 

John E. Peters 5,249 

Rockford, 111., L. U. No. 782. 

Wm. L. Hutcheson. .. 14,655 

Saginaw, Mich., L. U. No. 334. 

FOR MEMBER OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD. 
From the Fourth District. 

R. B. L. Connolly 41,915 

Birmingham, Ala., L. U. No. 296. 

FOR MEMBER OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD. 
From the Fifth District. 

Harry Blaokmore 21,973 

St. Louis, Mo., L. U. No. 73. 

John Walquist 23,319 

Minneapolis, Minn., L. U. No. 7. 

J. E. Proctor 10,071 

Houston, Tex., L. V. No. 213. 

FOR MEMBER OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD. 
From the Sixth District. 

W. A. Cole 46,586 

San Francisco, Cal., L. U. 1640. 

FOR MEMBER OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD. 
From the Seventh District. 

A. Martel 46,356 

Montreal, Canada, L. U. No. 1127. 
The above contains all the votes received from all locals voting whose re- 
turns reached the ofSce of the General Secretary on or before December 15, 1910. 
These results are taken from the tabulations made by the entire committee, but 
for some reason or other the remaining members of the committee have assumed to 
act in the capacity of judges of the election, and have attempted to throw out votes, 
when, in their opinion, the ballots were subject to scrutiny. So, for instance, they 
have undertaken to decide whether or not individual ballots were marked by the ' 
members who cast the votes or whether, perhaps, they may have been marked by 
other persons. 

While the general result under the return herewith made, so far as the per- 
sons elected is concerned, is almost identical with that submitted by the remain- 
ing members of the committee, I am firmly of the opinion that the other members 
of the committee have taken upon themselves an authority which might establish 

LXXXV 



If IP e Ki t e r 



a dangerous precedent in the organization if it were permitted to go unchallenged. 
By their acts they have undertaken to disfranchise certain Local Unions and their 
members by arbitrarily throwing out the votes of such Local Unions. Under our 
constitution every member has a voice in its affairs, and especially in its election of 
officers, and no person's vote should be cast aside except for cause under our con- 
stitution. I am of the opinion that under our constitution the Compilation Com- 
mittee has no right to scrutinize the ballots and deliberate upon the question of 
whether the ballot was marked by the person who cast it; but even if the commit- 
tee has such power I think it is beyond human possibility for anyone to decide 
whether a ballot was marked by the person who cast it. This is proved by the fact 
that the other members of the committee themselves at one time during their de- 
liberations threw out the vote of Local Unions Nos. 10 and 8, because of similiar- 
ity in the marking of ballots, and yet later on changed their minds and decided to 
count these votes. If these members were finally unable to determine whether the 
ballots of these locals had been marked by the same persons, then I contend they 
were likewise unable to determine this question with reference to the other bal- 
lots thrown out for the same reason. I am therefore led to the conclusion that the 
purpose in throwing out these votes, was different than that which the other 
members of the committee used for their justification in doing so. 

I herewith submit a copy of the tally sheets as prepared by the entire com- 
mittee, showing the votes cast for each candidate, and by excluding such votes as 
have been properly cast aside the remaining totals at the bottom of the pages when 
added together will show the vote for each person as herein indicated. 

The persons receiving the highest number of votes as above set out have been 
elected. 

Dated at Indianapolis, Ind., January 24, 1911. 

THE COMPILATION COMMITTEE, 

Attest: GERTEUDE FLOWEES. By WESLEY C. HALL. 



LXXXVl 



T lb e C a r p e mi t e If 

REPORT OF EXPERT ACCOUNTANT TO 
GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD 

(Continued from Page 48.) 
Debits : 
Credit taken under date of April, 1910, for "orders duplicated, exclianged and 
omitted," now charged back to German constitutions account for the pur- 
poses of this statement. Page 49 934 

Surplus of German constitutions 79 

— Constitutions — (French) — 
Debits : 
Credit taken under date of April, 1910, for "orders duplicated, exchanged and 
omitted," now charged back to French constitutions account for the pur- 
poses of this statement, Page 49 518 

Credits : 
Shipment replacing English constitutions which were to be returned but were 

lost in transit. Page 57 20 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions. Page 64 147 

167 

French constitutions not yet accounted for in detail 351 

— Application Blanks — 

Debits : 
Difference between stock ledger balance on December 31, 1908, 60,257, and 

balance charged as of January 1, 1909, on stock account summary for 

January, 1909, 29,890 30,367 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions. Page 64 510 

Error in Footing, Stock Ledger, Page 14 — 

Credits per ledger 12,400, should be 11,400 1,000 

31,877 

Credits : 
Shipments for which payment was received, but for which credit was not 

taken in stock ledger. Page 52 5,350 

Shipments to duplicate blanks lost in transit etc., for which credit was not 

taken in stock ledger. Page 57 400 

Error in carrying stock ledger balance November 30, 1908, 57,750, forward to 

December 1, 1908, as 57,850. . 100 

Error in footing, stock ledger. Page 5 ; credits per ledger, 11,300, should be 

11,310 10 

Debit entry of April 25, 1910, "C. O. returned unused," evidently made to 

balance ledger account with stock on hand, eliminated for purposes of 

this statement 86 

5,946 

Application blanks not yet accounted for in detail 25,931 

— Local Union Note Paper — 
Debits : 

Purchase of 20,000 sheets per Union Printing Company's bill, January 22, 

1909, omitted from stock account summary for January, 1909 20,000 

Excessive credit in stock ledger by reason of crediting to the Local Union note 
paper account the equivalent (in value) of shipments of other articles, P. 60 : 

Credits entered to L. U. note paper account 2,400 

Actual shipments 400 — 2,000 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions Page 65 38 

22,038 

Credits : 
Shipments for which payment was received but for which credit was not taken 

in stock ledger. Page 53 •.' 7,300 

Shipments to duplicate paper lost in transit, etc., for which credit was not 

taken in stock ledger. Page 57 300 

LXXXVII 



airpeiniteir 



Difference between stock ledger balance on December 31, 1908, 721, and 
balance charged as of January 1, 1909, on stock account summary for Jan- 
uary, 1909, 7,000 6,279 — 13,879 



Local Union note paper not yet accounted for in detail 8,159 

— Eecordlng Secretaries' Order Books — 

Credits : 

Shipments for which payment was received but for which credit was not taken 

in stock ledger, Page 53 100 

Shipments to duplicate order books lost in transit, for which credit was not 

taken in stock ledger. Page 57 2 

Insufficient credit In stock ledger by reason of crediting to stock accounts of 

other articles the equivalent (in value) of R. S. order books shipped, P. 60. . . 37 

Error in carrying forward stock ledger balance of 40 on August 31, 1908, to 

September 1, 1908, as 140 '. 100 

Charge under date of April, 1910, "returned from C. 0." (charter outfit), evi- 
dently made to balance ledger account with stock on hand, now eliminated 
for purposes of this statement 1 

Under date of July 22, 1909, this account was charged with the return of 2 R. 
S. order books by C. Bausher and D. A. Post : no credit had been taken, 
however, when these books were shipped on March 22, 1909, to be used as 
samples for securing printers' bids 2 



242 



Debits : 



Purchase per Harrington & Folger, December, 1908, bill omitted from stock ledger 200 
Balance on December 31, 1908, per stock ledger not carried forward to stock 

account summary for January, 1909 12 

Difference between credit balance on June 30, 1009, per stock account summary, 

76, and credit balance entered in stock ledger on July 1, 1909. 89 13 

Error in carrying stock ledger balance of 174 on September 30, 1908, forward to 

October 1, 1908, as 166 8 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions . 7 — 240 



Surplus of R. S. order books 2 

— Treasurers' Receipt Books — 

Credits : 

Shipments for which payment was received but for which credit was not taken 

in stock ledger. Page 53 27 

Insufficient credit in stock ledger by reason of crediting to stock account of 
other articles the equivalent (in value) of treasurers' receipt books shipped, 
Page 60 6 

Difference between stock ledger balance on December 31, 1908, 76, and balance 
charged on .January 1, 1909, on stock account summary for January, 1909, 
154 78 

Under date of July 22, 1909, this account was charged with the return of 2 
treasurers' receipt books by C. Bausher and D. A. Post ; no credit had been 
taken, however, when these books were shipped oh March 22, 1909, to be 
used as samples for securing printers' bids 2 



113 



Debits : 



Purchase per Harrington & Folger, December, 1908, bill omitted from stock 

ledger 100 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions 1 — 101 



Surplus of treasurers' receipt books 12 

LXXXVIII 



T Ihi a C a r p a o t e r 

— Financial Secretaries' Keceipt Boolis — 
Credits ; 

Sliipments for wliicli payment was received but for wliicti credit was not taken 

in stoclJ ledger, Page 53 18 

Net amount of sundry errors. Page 65 1 

Difference between stocls ledger balance on December 31, 1908, 187, and balance 
cbarged on January 1, 1909, on stock account summary for January, 1909, 
194 7 

Charge under date of April, 1910, "returned from C. O." (charter outfit), evi- 
dently made to balance ledger account with stock on hand, now eliminated 
for purposes of this statement 3 

Under date of July 22, 1909, this account was charged with the return of 2 
F. S. receipt books by C. Bausher and D. A. Post ; no credit had been 
taken, however, when these hooks were shipped on March 22, 1909, to be 
used as samples for securing printers' bids 2 

Surplus of financial secretaries' receipts books 31 

— Treasurers' Cash Books — 
Debits : 

Sundry credits taken under date of April, 1910, not for specific shipments, 
which are, for the purposes of this statement, now charged back to treas- 
urers' cash books account. Page 49 144 

Credit entries dated April, 1910, which have not been identified with specific 
transactions and which are, for the purposes of this statement, now 
charged hack to treasurers' cash books acccunt. Page 50 2 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions, Page 66 3 

149 

Credits : 
Shipments for which payment was received but for which credit was not taken 

in stock ledger. Page 54 17 

Shipments to duplicate cash books lost in transit, etc., Page 54 2 

Difference between stock ledger credit balance on December 31, 1908, 7, and 

debit balance charged on January 1, 1909, on stock account summary for 

January, 1909, 5 12— 31 

Treasurers' cash books not yet accounted for in detail 118 

— One-Hundred-Page Day Books — 

Credits : 
Shipments for which payment was received, but for which credit was not taken 

in stock ledger. Page 54 12 

Error in carrying stock ledger balance of 158 on October 31, 1908, forward to 

November 1, 1908, as 168 10 

Difference between stock ledger balance on December 31, 1908, 122, and 

balance charged on January 1, 1909, on stock account summary for 

January, 1909, 258 136 

Debits : 158 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions Page 67 4 

Purchase from Cheltenham Press, December, 1908, bill omitted from stock 

ledger 50 

Error in carrying stock ledger balance of 264 at September 30, 1908, forward to 

October 1, 1908, as 174 90 — 144 

Surplus of 100-page day hooks 14 

Two-Hundred-Page Day Books — 
Credits : 
Shipments for which payment was received but for which credit was not taken 

in stock ledger. Page 55 19 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions Page 67 ,. . . . , 2 

Difference between stock ledger balance on December 31, 1908, 227, and 
balance charged on January 1, 1909, on stock account summary for Janu- 
ary, 1909, 266 39 

LXXXIX 



p a o t a r 



Under date of July 22, 1909, this account was charged with the return of 
two 200-page day boolts by C. Bausher and D. A. Post ; no credit had been 
taken, however, when these books were shipped on March 22, 1909, to be 
used as samples tor securing printers' bids 



-One-Hundred-Page Ledgers- 



Credits ; 



62 



Debits : 

Credit taken twice under date of April, 1910, for shipment to L. U. 943, March 

5, 1909, which had not been entered in stock ledger at that time, P. XCVI 1 

Credit taken under date of April, 1910, "to adjust errors, orders duplicated 
and not recorded," which, for the purposes of this statement, is now 
charged back to the day books account. Page 49 29 

Entries in stock ledger dated April, 1910, which have not been identified with 

specific transactions, Page 50 30 — 60 

Surplus of 200-page day books 2 



Shipments for which payments were received, but for which credit was not 

taken in stock ledger. Page 54 10 

Shipments duplicating ledgers lost in transit, etc., for which credit was not 

taken in stock ledger, Page 57 2 

Difference between stock ledger balance, December 31, 190S, 158, and balance 
charged on January 1, 1909, on stock account summary for January, 1909, 
181 2S 

Charge under date of April, 1910, "returned from C. O." (charter outfit), which 
was evidently made to balance ledger account with stock on hand, now 
eliminated for purposes of this statement 8 

43 
Debits : 

Sundry errors and omissions 7 

Purchase per Cheltenham Press, May, 1910, bill omitted from stock ledger .... 1 — 8 

Surplus of 100-page ledgers 35 

— Two-Hundred-Page Ledgers — 

Debits : ■ 

Credit taken under date of April, 1910, for "shipments unrecorded," now 
charged back to 200-page ledgers' account for the purposes of this state- 
ment. Page 49 9 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions. Page 68 12 

Difference between stock ledger balance on December 31, 1908, 253, and balance 
charged on January 1, 1909, on stock account summary for January, 
1909, 246 7 

Purchase per Cheltenham Press, May, 1910, bill omitted from stock ledger. ... 1 

29 

Credits : 

Shipments for which payment was received but for which credit was not taken 

in stock ledger. Page 55 , 7 

Sample sent to printer for which credit was not taken in stock ledger. Page 58 1 

Error in carrying stock ledger balance of 380 on September 30, 1908, forward 

to October 1, 1908, as 383 5 — 13 

200-page ledgers not yet a,''Counted for In detail 10 

XC 



The Carpenter 

— I^EeefiKBdied^aee Leagers — 

Defitnt: 
C^smt taken aad^ daie cf *prf i. 1910^ £ar "orass o^^tiEd. to a^iiESt sro!s.~ 

eSe, Boir e bM Btil Iiac& to SCOipaee le^ga;^ aeensBt for tte pee ga ees of t&ls 

atjii »■! Hi T^^ ^ aO 

DiSexeBte faet<re£B sok& ledger teteurp «b Dec^Eser 31, 1908. 9, aad ialsBee 

tbaijoal OB JaBBSsiy 1, 1909. ce sto<& aeei^at sosiBaix for Jaa., 1949. 3 1 

Fan&sse per C&eK^ibszB Pres^ Deeaalier. 1908, tia tiwHlH l Cra^ ^D^ ledge- 1 

saiipniij i air «6ic& paj^i^it «as Eecdred Isoc Sor wMe& ereffit was sot tzksi 

ig sfaiA i LdfeU. B«8e S IT 

^axis *J>»w*g»tg asd q>gtpfc* Sir £»j <w t^ -r, p. 6S 2 

RltiWllfy scmES &Bd HP»*gg«iiWg ... ..-___._. ._. ^ 

Bnnir !b tsazjiag E£ac& ledger laiaBee <£ SS oa Septeeb^ 30. 190^ ffirsaipd 

to Oetofea- 1. 190&. as SS ^ 1 

Trf^r iare al July 22. 1909. ais aeeooBE was ff»ar^d wit& f&e ratoiB o£ two 
E'-'I-^ffige ledgers tif C. RawsNr asd D. ^ Foec; bo oeffit. ted 6eeB tafcpw. 
E<D -J t.BT, wfeea %£se boofcs wefe ^i^ged ob SEanA 22. 1909^ to be used as 
samples fiir "'''"^"c { ■ rin t mo :'' H^ 2 — 27 

; I ; i-r ledgers ao% yiefe aceoosted tor is ^p^^*^ ,..-.- 25 

— F<Mr-aiBdEed.F&ee Ledgers — 



EM: Its: 



; ?f ApoL 1910. Sx "s&qi^KBfs Bo£ reeoided.' osw 

--age BeiTggr«r aesiMiBt for t&e tMi !ii <ifc>a» oC ^fa ststc- 



^5 of sp«aal iedie- Skt L tT. 115, pec CSelt^iisa^ Press;, - FteteoazT'. 

* ^ ' ::oc e^arged ih stiK& aceovB£ sBaaasr. alS&EiQ^ ece^t was 

1 r^eeBsei; 190S (wfeaa ocdered) Ecr efc ijm x — r of saae 



;;-; = ;-: " r - '- - :; r^^i- -=as c^eened. tec for wt»?e& oreffit was sot ts&ea 
SiLinple sest to twiHU g for w&ie& credit was BOt takeB ia stock ledger. P. 38. . 1- 

— Ffre-HOB&ed-Page ledsezs — 

Debfts: 
DifftJtuse cetwees stock ledger Imtanre oa Dece^ier 31. 1S4$. 9, aod tsIsiHe 

e haifee d oa JaBoarr 1. 1909, oe stock aeeoont saasazy for 3ss^ 1909. 4 
PBrdiase per C^etteo&aB Press, Febrtasj. 1910. bin. 13, eEKered ia stock 

ledger as 4 

Pnrcfeases ps- C&gjJtFnteff* Pces^ bills Bot estered ia sto^ le^er: Fetsroaiy. 

1909. 1: May, 1910. 1 

Crediis: 
Sh!pn»'nlj - for wfaid pajseet was Eeeeired. bat for w%ie& CEedit was aot 

taken la stock ledger. Page 55 

Biror - 1- 

aOO^ps^e ledges sot yet meeaaiste& tor ia GeralT - - . - 



&effit£: 

SftiiMTOrts Ssr wM^ psy^^t was leeshred bet £c^ wlsi^ ent dli. -aas n.-:- zsi^n 

m stoA ledg^. Ps.^ 55 30 

Free ^si^asat to L F. 1553 ufit siteed ia stock le^er. Page 5S 2 

D iEtafca ge betwe^ stock ledg^ ft»t»i»>c ob Decester 31. ISOS, 84C^ aad bslaace 
c&arged «a JaaosFy 1, 1909. oa sto<& seeoiiat ssi^aazy far Jaasary. 
ISOO. S53 - : 13 



45 



xcr 



T Ih e C a. r p e o t 



Debits : 
Net amount of sundry errors, Page 66. 



Surplus of rituals 41 

— Rituals (German) — 

Credits : 
Sliipment for which payment was received but for which credit was not taken 

In stock ledger, Page 55 1 

Error in stock ledger entry. Page 66 1 

Difference between stock ledger balance on December 31, 1!508, 772, and 

balance charged on January 1, 1909, on stock account summary for 

January, 1909, 875 103 



Surplus of German rituals 105 

— Rituals (French) — 

Credits : 
Shipment for which payment was received but for which credit was not taken 

in stock ledger, Page 55 ] 

Difference between stock ledger balance on December 31, 1908. 335, and 

balance charged on January 1, 1909, on stock account summary for 

January, 1909, 399 64 



Surplus of French rituals 65 

— Dater Outfits — 
Credits : 
Shipments for which payment was received but for which credit was not 

taken in stock ledger. Page 55 10 

Debits : 

Omission of charge for dater exchanged, P. 69 1 

For the six months ended June 30, 1909, the daters' account was not kept on 
the stock account summary ; according to our figures the balance on June 
30, 1909, was 12, but the balance entered in the stock ledger on July 1, 
1909, was only 4 8 — 9 



Surplus of daters ■ 1 

— Emblem Buttons — 

Credits : 
Shipments for which payment was received, but for which credit was not taken 

in stock ledger. Page 56 271 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions. Page 69 53 

Shipments to duplicate buttons lost in transit, etc., for which credit was not 

taken in stock ledger. Page 58 8 

Entry under date of April, 1910, charging buttons' account "To adjust error 

on account of pins shipped and charged as buttons," now eliminated for 

the purposes of this statement 162 



Debits : 494 

Excessive credit in stock ledger by reason of crediting to buttons' account the 
equivalent (in value) of shipments of other articles : Credits entered to 

buttons' account, 68 ; actual shipments, 24 Page 60 44 

Difference between stock ledger balance- on December 31, 1908, 974, and bal- 
ance charged as of January 1, 1909, in stock account summary for Jan- 
uary, 1909, 669 305 — 349 



Surplus of emblem buttons 145 

— Emblem Pins — 
Credits : 
Shipments for which payment was received, but for which credit was not taken 

in stock ledger. Page 56 546 

Duplicate shipments to replace pins lost in transit, etc., for which credit was 

not taken in stock ledger. Page 58 6 

XCII 



I'lhe Carpaot 



r 



Error in carrying stocli ledger balance of 1,278 on August 31, 1908, forward to 

September 1, 190S, as 1,308 30 

Difference between stock ledger credit balance on December 31, 1908, 327, 
and debit balance charged as of January 1, 1909, in stocit account sum- 
mary for January, 1909, 844 1 ^ 1,171 



1,753 



Debits : 

Credits taken under date of April, 1910, wliich are now charged back to pins' 

account for the purposes of this statement Page 50 171 

Net amount of sundry errors and omissions Page 69 35 

Excessive credit to pins' account by reason of crediting to pins' account the 

ecquivalent (in yalue) of shipments of other articles. Page 60 2 

Purchase per Whitehead & Hoag Company's bill of October 26, 1908, omitted 

from stock ledger 1,056 

Error in carrying forward stock ledger balances : Balance of 974 on Septem- 
ber 30, 1908, forwarded to October 1, 1908, as 970, 4 ; balance of 585 on 
October 31, 1908, forwarded to November 1. 1908, as 358, 200 204- 

Surplus of emblem pins 



1,468 



285 



CREDIT ENTRIES IN STOCK LEDGER UNDER DATE OF APRIL, 1910, WHICH ARK 
CORRECT. THESE ENTRIES ARE FOR ACTUAL SHIPMENTS, MADE AND PAID 
FOR ON PREVIOUS DATES, BUT NOT ENTERED IN STOCK LEDGER AT TIME 
OF SHIPMENT : 



Entries in Stock L'edger, 

April, 1910 : 
L. U. Nos. Quantities. 



Dates of Payment, 

Per 
Financial Ledgers. 



Entries in Stock Ledger, Dates of Payment, 

April, 1910 : Per 

L. U. Nos. Quantities. Financial Ledgers. 



-Constitutions — 



33 



51 
91 
129 
133 
154 
181 
195 
202 
258 
281 
300 
372 
390 
434 
465 
579 
631 
683 



1477 
1554 



1909. 
450 March 25 

Note — The shipment to L. U. 33 con- 
sisted of 500 constitutions, but credit 
was taken in the stock ledger for only 
50. hence the supplemental entry for 450 
in April, 1910. 



200 

150 

300 

50 

10 

1,200 

12 

75 

150 

100 

100 

50 

25 

200 

2 

25 

50 

55 







779 


550 


190E 


. 


850 


20 


March 


19 


978 


50 


April 


15 


980 


45 


April 


20 


1003 


50 


April 


7 


1057 


15 


March 


4 


1082 


300 


April 


13 


1105 


2 


April 


8 


1208 


100 


April 


5 


1250 


10 


April 


14 


1314 


50 


March 


25 


1326 


200 


March 


26 


1370 


12 


April 


17 


1521 


30 


April 


20 


1550 


2.J 


April 


12 


1640 


300 


March 


29 


1691 


100 


April 


13 


1705 


60 


April 


8 


1727 " 


25 


April 


12 


1840 


100 




4,748 


— Constitutions 


(German) — 




1909 


. 






April 


20 






April 


3 







1909. 


April 


21 


April 


12 


April 


7 


April 


15 


April 


21 


April 


16 


April 


15 


March 


25 


April 


17 


April 


13 


March 


15 


April 


19 


April 


13 


April 


20 


March 


26 


April 


a 


April 


12 


Feb. 


26 


March 


30 


April 


17 



XCIII 



Tina C a r p a El t 



390 
1239 



— Constitutions (French) — 
1909. 
175 April 20 

25 Feb. 15 

Note — In February, 1909, credit was erroneously taken for 25 "English" con- 
stitutions shipped to L. U. 1239 instead of the "French" constitutions, 
which were actually shipped. The credit to French constitution ac- 
count in April, 1910, is therefore correct, but a corresponding charge 
should have been made to English constitution account, which was 
not done. 



200 







— Due 


Books — 

Forward, 


886 








1909. 






1909. 


61 


50 


April 12 


1171 


12 


March 31 


87 


100 


Feb. 24 


1198 


20 


March 6 


142 


200 


April 13 


1230 


24 


Feb. 20 


199 


50 


April 5 


1262 


12 


April 3 


292 


100 


March 27 


1385 


15 


March 4 


335 


50 


Feb. 19 


1397 


50 


March 30 


372 


20 


April 17 


1561 


12 


April 12 


379 


25 


April 13 


1632 


1 


Jan. 4 



Note— The L. 'D. No. of this entry 
should evidently be 579 instead of 379, 
as a shipment of 25 due books was 
made to L. D. 579 on April 13, 1909. 
for which credit had never been taken 
In stock ledger. 



Note — Fifteen due books were 
ordered and paid for on January 
4, 1909. The financial secre- 
tary of L. U. 1632 claimed he 
only received fourteen due books, 
and on January 30, 1909, one due 
book was sent to make good the 



390 
479 


100 
10 


April 
March 


20 
6 




alleged shortage. 


UO-I^C gwuu \.IX\^ 


530 


40 


Feb. 


18 


1633 


5 


Feb. 15 


565 


19 


Feb. 


23 


1761 


25 


March 30 


677 


10 


April 


5 


1840 


12 


April 17 


707 


25 


Feb. 


23 


1873 


IS 


March 27 


751 


25 


April 


12 


1924 


25 


Feb. 23 


862 


25 


Feb. 


17 


1931 


12 


April 19 


878 


10 


April 


20 








1096 


15 


April 


12 




1,129 




1122 


12 


March 


5, 






1 



886 



-200-Page Day Books- 



139 
943 



1900. 
March 15 
March 5 



-Treasurer's Cash Books- 



1057 
1257 
1293 





1909. 


1 
1 
1 


April le 
March 31 
April 3 



XCIV 



a r p e n t 



r 



CREDIT ENTRIES IN STOCK LEDGER UNDER DATE OF APRIL, 1910. WHICH ARE 
DUPLICATIONS OF CREDITS FOR SHIPMENTS MADE AND PAID FOR ON PREVI- 
OUS DATES AND ENTERED IN STOCK LEDGER ON OR ABOUT DATE OF SHIP- 
MENT. 



Entries in Stock Ledger, 

April, 1010 ; 
L. U. Nos. Quantities. 



Dates of Payment. 

Per 
Financial Ledgers. 



Entries in Stock Ledger, Dates of Payment, 

April, 1910 : Per 

L. U. Nos. Quantities. Financial Ledgers. 



-Constitutions- 



73 

04 

166 

Note- 



300 

100 

50 



1000. 
April 14 
April 5 
March 29 



-The shipment to L. U. 166 consisted of 
200 copies, hence the entry of April, 
1910, tor flfty copies was only a partial 
duplication. 



1066 



.N'ote 



150 



1909. 
April 



-This shipment should evidently 
read L. U. 1068 instead of L. U. 
1066, as no shipments were made 
to the latter local in 1909, and 
the last remittance received from 
it was in March, 1909. 



193 
252 
266 
316 
326 
427 
450 
462 
401 

Note- 



545 
623 

645 

Mote- 



55 

90 

350 

500 

25 

600 

100 

50 

75 



-The entry in the stock ledger in March, 
1909, of which the April, 1910, entry is 
a duplication, reads for L. U. 490, but 
it was evidently intended for L. U. 491, 
as no shipment was made to L. U. 499 
and the quantity corresponds to the 
above-mentioned shipment. 



April 


12 


Feb. 


27 


March 


23 


March 


29 


March 


31 


April 


21 


April 


12 


April 


1 


March 


25 



30 

12 
50 



April 16 
April 15 
April 9 



-The entry in the stock ledger in April, 
1909, of which the April, 1910, entry is 
a duplication, reads for L. U. 643, but 
it was evidently intended for L. U. 
645, as no shipment was made to L. l). 
643 and the quantity agrees with the 
above-mentioned shipment. 



1117 




150 


1213 




15 


1321 




20 


1379 
1405 




75 
150 


1412 




75 


1694 




25 


1774 




100 


1795 




50 


1796 




100 


1S6S 




200 


1876 
ISSl 




12 

10 


1914 




10 


Pittsbuigii, 
D. C. 


4 


iviiscei 

(R. 


laucuua 

Harry) 


2 


Miscellaneous 




(W. 


J. Bryne 


) 1 


Miscellaneous 




(W 


J. Lent) 


1 



3,864 



April 19 

April 8 

April 13 

April 20 

March 29 

April 13 

April 19 

April 5 

March 17 

April 12 

March 23 

April 8 

Feb. 23 

April 14 

April 5 

April 5 

April 5 

Feb. 20 



841 


40 


March 30 


878 


25 


April 20 


957 


50 


March 27 


1028 


72 


April 20 


1043 


40 


March 29 


1061 


100 


April 8 



xcv 



T lb e Carpeimter 



"Due Books- 



3 

148 
158 
197 
263 

Note- 



281 
371 
464 
511 
551 
657 
669 
683 
732 
796 
810 
824 



25 

100 

200 

20 

13 



1909. 
March 29 
March 25 
March 29 
April 



15 



March 24 



-The March, 1909, entry in the stock 
ledger reads L. U. 268, hut it was evi- 
dently intended for h. U. 263, as no 
due books were shipped to L. IJ. 268 In 
March, 1909, and the amount corre- 
sponds with the shipment to L. D. 263. 

50 

25 

50 

20 
100 

15 

24 

20 

10 

26 
100 

67 , 

Note — The April, 1909, entry in the 
stock ledger is (or 100 due hooks, but 
should be for only sixty-seven, as thirty- 
three books of the order had been 
shipped and entered in March, 1909. 



May 


24 


Feb. 


25 


April 


19 


March 


31 


March 


30 


April 


14 


April 


12 


March 


8 


March 


5 


March 


5 


March 


2 


April 


2 



838 
877 
917 
1065 
1091 
1112 
1129 
1140 
1175 

Note- 



1252 
1289 
1342 
1393 
1393 
1400 
1440 
1449 
1499 
1667 
1671 
1751 
1783 



943 



— 200-Page Day Books- 
1909. 
March 5 



20 
40 
50 
22 
30 
10 
25 
25 



1909. 

March 29 

March 8 

March 29 

March 29 

March 10 

March 30 

March 29 

March 29 

March 31 



-The L. U. No. on the ship- 
ping slip reads 1175, but It 
should read 1195. This is con- 
firmed by the ledger account of 
L. U. 1195, which shows a credit 
of 90 cents on March 31, 1909 
(six due books at 15c). 

24 

12 

10 
100 
100 

24 

20 

6 

' 10 

150 

25 

12 

20 



March 


1 


March 


9 


March 


29 


March 


29 


March 


29 


March 


8 


Feb. 


1& 


March 


31 


Feb. 


18 


March 


31 


April 


15 


April 


8 


March 


8 



1,600 



Note — This shipment was not entered in the stock ledger at time of shipment, but 
in making entry in April, 1910, to correct the omission, the same shipment was en- 
tered twice. 



CREDIT ENTRIES IN STOCK LEDGER UNDER DATE OP APRIL, 1010, WHICH ARE 
"PARTIALLY" CORRECT. THESE ENTRIES WERE MADE TO RECTIFY THE OMIS- 
SION TO TAKE FULL CREDIT FOR SHIPMENTS MADE AND PAID FOR ON PRE- 
VIOUS DATES, AND IN THIS RESPECT THEY ARE CORRECT. THE AMOUNTS OF 
THESE ENTRIES, HOWEVER, ARE INCORRECT. 



Entries in Stock 


Dates of Payments, 


Ledger, April, 1910 : 


Per Financial Quantiti- 


.. U. Nos. Quantities. 


Ledgers. shippec 




— Constitutions- 




1909. 


2 200 


March 25 200 


592 150 


March 24 150 



Additional credit Amounts 

which should by which 

Quantities have been 

^or which taken when 

credit was taken correcting 

; at or about entries were 

shipped, time of shipment, made. 



correcting 

entries 

of April, 

1910, are 

excessive. 



20 
50 



180 
100 



20 
50 

678 50 50 

Note — This shipment was actually made, but It was in error as the order was for due books. 
The constitutions were subsequently returned to the General Office and consequently no 
credit should have been taken for the shipment. 

XCVI 



T lb e Carpemitar 

820 25 April 5 25 5 20 5 

947 150 March 29 150 15 135 15 

1257 206 March 31 20 20 186 

Note — No credit was taken for this shipment at the time it was made, but when the entry of 

April, 1910, was made the shipping ticket was misread and the amount entered as 206 

instead of 20. 

1555 15 April 3 55 50 5 10 



796 



600 



140 



460 



330 











—Due 


Books — 








1038 


13 


Feb. 


IS 




13 


12 


1 


12 


1811 


15 


Feb. 
Feb. 


19 
27 




10') 
15 ) 


15 


10 


5 


1945 


43 


April 


14 




43 


40 


3 


40 




- 71 








81 


67 


14 


57 



•Part of charter and outfit. 



CREDIT ENTRIES IN STOCK LEDGER 
UNDER DATE OF APRIL, 1910, OTHER 
THAN FOR SPECIFIC s^HIPMENTS TO 
LOCAL UNIONS. 

— Constitutions. 

Quantities. 

Organizers (leather bound) 229 

Note — Represents constitutions which 
were specially bound and distributed 
gratis to General Executive Board mem- 
bers, General Officers, organizers, et. al. 

Committee (tabulating) 64 

Note — This is an estimate of constitu- 
tions used by sundry committees meet- 
ing at General Office for tabulating vote 
and other purposes. 

Printers (samples) 50 

Lawyers (claims) 300 

Note — This is a rough estimate of the 
copies sent to lawyers for use in legal 
proceedings in connection with claims in 
litigation, etc. 

International organizations 100 

Note — Estimated number of copies given 
other organizations. 

New Local Unions 1,250 

Note — This is an allowance for extra copies 
of constitutions supplied to newly organ- 
ized locals in excess of the usual allow- 
ance of 10 copies to each charter and 
outfit. 

Office use 150 

Note — Rough estimate of number of copies 
used in General Office. 

A. F. of L 24 

B. T. D 100 

Note — Estimated number of copies fur- 
nished American Federation of Labor 
and Building Trades Department of A. 

F. of L. at various times and used at 
their conventions. 

Central and state bodies 24 

Note — Estimated number of copies fur- 
nished sundry trade bodies. 
To adjust error, omitted orders 200 

2,491 



— Constitutions (German) — 

Quantities. 
Orders duplicated, exchanged and omitted 934 

— Constitutions (French) — 

Quantities. 
Orders duplicated, exchanged and omitted 518 

- — Due Books — 

Quantities. 

Carl Young (organizer) 100 

P. J. Rush, H. L. Cook (organizers) 245 

Orders duplicated 975 

To adjust error, omitted orders 1,275 

Books used for C. C. (clearance cards).. 375 
Note — Estimated number of due books 

used in connection with clearance cards 

issued from General Office. 



2,970 
— Two-Hundred-Page Day Books — 

Quantities. 
To adjust errors, orders duplicated and 
not recorded 29 

— Treasurers' Cash Books — 

Quantities. 

G. P. - 

H. Allen 2 

Office use 1 

Orders omitted, to adjust errors 13i> 

Wm. B. Denoe 3 



144 

— Two-Hundred-Page Ledgers — 

Quantities. 
Shipments unrecorded 9 

— 300 Page Ledgers — 

Quantities. 

Office use 1 

Orders omitted, to adjust errors 49 



50 



49 



The Car 



in t a r 



Pour-Hundred-Page Ledgers- 



Sbipment not recorded 



Quantities. 
1 



• — Pins — 

Quantities. 

To adjust error on account of buttons 
shipped as pins 162 

Note — A corresponding debit entry ap- 
pears in the Buttons account in April, 
1910. hence this entry does not repre- 
sent a credit to the stock accounts as a 
whole. 

To Mr. Huber, not recorded 



9 



TJ. 10 on December 3, 1908, having 
been delivered to consignee by the ex- 
press company. No record of such 
duplicate shipment, other than this 
entry of April, 1910, has been found. 

13 SCO 

Note — 100 due books shipped to L. U. 13 
on April 17, 1909, were paid for and 
entered in stock ledger under that date. 
There was also 200 due books shipped 
to L. U. 13 which were paid for on Oc- 
tober 11, 1909, and entered in the stock 
ledger under that date. 

Miscellaneous -r. 10 

Miscellaneous 50 



171 



1,100 



CREDIT ENTRIES IN STOCK LEDGER 
UNDER DATE OP APRIL, 1910, WHICH 
HAVE NOT BEEN IDENTIFIED WITH 
SPECIPIC TRANSACTIONS. 

— Constitutions — 
Entries in stock ledger, April, 1910 : 
L. U. No. ' Quantities. 

Miscellaneous 100 

Miscellaneous 33 

Miscellaneous 1.5 

1784 ' . . . 500 



648 



Note — There was no shipment of 500 con- 
stitutions to L. U. 1784, but there was a 
shipment of 50 English and 150 German 
constitutions which was paid for and 
credited in ledger account of L. U. 1784 
on March 11, 1909. The shipping slip 
of March 11, 1909, from which the ad- 
justing entry of April," 1910, was made. 
Is torn and the item of 50 English con- 
stitutions was evidently misread as 550 ; 
as credit had been taken for 50 constitu- 
tions at time of shipment, additional 
credit was taken in April, 1910, for 500 
constitutions. 



— Due Books- 



L. U. No. Quantities. 
10 600 

Note — In reply to our inquiry. General 
Secretary Duffy states that this entry is 
for a shipment made about January or 
February, 1909, to replace a similar 
quantity lost in transit, only one-half 
of a shipment of 1,200 due books to L. 



Two-I-Iundred-Page Day Books : 
Entries in stock ledger, April, 1910. 
i.. U. No. Quantities, 

28 

31 

35 



110. 

188. 

146. 

240. 

326. 

367. 

491. 

500. 

508. 

563. 

581. 

646. 

965. 

986-. 
1068. 
1214. 
1220. 
1236. 
1290. 
1314. 
1390. 
1399. 
1423. 
1585 . 
1681. 
1840. 



30 



-Treasurers' Cash Books - 



L.U. No. 

390 

1924 



Quantities. 

1 

1 



50 



T Ih e Carpeoter 



SHIPMENTS OF S 


UPPLIBS 


FOR WI 


IICH 








Dates of 




PAYMENT WAS 


RECEIVED BUT 


FOR 




Shipments 


Payments per 


WHICH 


CREDIT 


WAS NOT TAKEN IN 


L. U. No. 


Quantities 


Financial Ledgers. 


THE STOCK LEDGER. 
























- 




— Constitutions — 








— Due 


Bool£S — 


Dates of 




26 


500 


1909 


May 


20 










104 


110 


1909 


April 


27 




Shipments 


, Payments per 


160 


200 


1909 


Feb. 


23 


L. U. No. 


Quantities 


Financial Ledgers. 


186 


100 


1909 


Jan. 


30 


3 


50 


1909 


June 


29 


191 


50 


1909 


March 


18 


75 


150 


1908 


Dec. 


31 


229 


20 


1909 


April 


5 


81 


25 


1910 


Feb. 


7 


292 


100 


1909 


April 


19 


98 


100 




April 


9 


293 


20 


1909 


April 


9 


116 


100 


1908 


Dec. 


31 


-385 


25 


1910 


Jan. 


15 


133 


25 


1910 


April 


13 


407 


100 


1909 


Jan. 


21 


146 


100 


' 1909 


Dec. 


10 


418 


25 


1909 


Oct. 


28 


147 


200 


1909 


Feb. 


15 


420 


25 


1909 


April 


9 


177 


100.1 


1908 


Dec. 


16 


475 


18 


1909 


Aug. 


9 


218 


125 


1909 


Jan. 


11 


483 


200.2 


1909 


Jan. 


5 


252 


50 


1909 


Jan. 


11 


531 


100 


1909 


May 


20 


254 


25 


1909 


Feb. 


27 


659 


25 


1909 


Dec. 


15.4 


258 


43 


1910 


April 


7 


690 


100 


1909 


April 


23 


259 


12 


1909 


Jan. 


11 


711 


2 


1909 


Feb. 


20 


263 


12 


1910 


March 


10 


827 


10.3 


1910 


Feb. 


16 


334 


25 


1909 


April 


23 


827 


150.3 


1910 


Feb. 


16 


336 


20.2 


1909 


Dec. 


22 


855 


100 


1909 


March 


9 


400 


10 


1909 


April 


13 


970 


25 


1909 


Nov. 


10 


414 


25 


1910 


Feb. 


7 


1122 


20 


1909 


March 


5 


418 


. 60 


1909 


May 


10 


1168 


50 


1909 


April 


30 


436 


10 


1909 


Dec. 


13 


1177 


50 


1909 


April 


30 


514 


50 


1909 


July 


30 


1258 


15. 


1909 


April 


2f 


601 


50 


1909 


Feb. 


lo 


1264 


20 


1909 


April 


27 


678 


30 


1910 


Feb. 


21 


1271 


10 


1910 


Feb. 


3 


723 


100 


1909 


March 


15 


1391 


50 


1909 


June 


10 


754 


25 


1009 


Feb. 


15 


1475 


20 


1909 


April 


14 


827 


10.4 


1910 


Feb. 


16 


1476 


16 


1909 


March 


26 


827 


150.4 


1910 


Feb. 


16 


1571 


24 


1909 


March 


15 


833 


50 


1910 


Feb. 


21 


1582 


150 


1909 


March 


8 


855 


33.3 


1909 


Jan. 


28 


ie05 


8 


1909 


March 


26 


871 


25 


1910 


Feb. 


21 


1782 


30 


1909 


Feb. 


20 


884 


50 


1909 


Sept. 


20 


1820 


12 


1909 


Feb. 


8 


926 


25 


1910 


Feb. 


21 


1895 


5 


1909 


April 


23 


989 


10 


1909 


June 


28 


1896 


1 


1909 


May 


29 


1003 ' 


20 


1909 


May 


12 


1013 


30 


1909 


Feb. 


15 


1172 


50 


1909 


April 


24 


1924 


50 


1909 


Feb. 


23 


1475 


20 


1909 


April 


14 


Portland, 










1491 


20 


1910 


Jan. 


3 


D. C. 


1 


1909 


May 


17 


1519 


15 


1910 


Feb. 


14 












1532 


25 


1910 


May 


2 




2,567 








1535 


12 - 


1910 


Jan. 


3 


1 shipped 


June 2, 1909. 






1562 


6 


1909 


Feb. 


11 


2 shipped 


June 23, 


1909. 






1571 


24 


1909 


March 


15 


3 shipped 


February 


8, 1910. 






1655 


50 


1909 


April 


29 


4 applied 


aeainst credit on 


Local U 


nion's 


1728 


6 


1910 


April 


26 


account in financial ledgei 






1742 


10 


1909 


June 


28 












1746 


10 


1909 


April 


30 








Dates of 




1757 


50 


1910 


May 


2 




Shipments 


Pa 


yments per 


1765 


24 


1909 


June 


28 


L. D. No. 


Quantities 


Flna 


ncial Ledgers. 


1874 


50 


1909 


Feb. 


10 












1911 


16 


1909 


Feb. 


13 


— 


Constitutions .(Germa 


n) — 




1945 


25 - 


1909 


June 


28 


406 


50 


1910 

(Shipped 1 


March 
ilarch 4, 


15 
1910) 




2,308 








433 


25 


1909 


May 


15 


1 shipped January 


5, 1909. 










(Shipped 


June 23, 


1909) 


2 shippe 


a .January 


4, 1910. 






499 


6 


1909 


June 


30 



3 shipped February 28, 1909. 

4 shipped February 8, 1910. 



81 



51 



T Ihi a Carpentar 



L. U. No. 



Shipments, 
Quantities. 



Dates of 

Payments per 

Financial Ledgers 



L. U. No. 



Shipments, 
Quantities. 



Dates of 

Payments per 

Financial Ledgers. 



-Application Blanks- 



66 
66 
66 
91 

106 

156 

218 

281 

281 

286 

326 

335 

363 

444 

511 

514 

538 

538 

586 

603 

610 

659 

665 

763 

T78 

781 

827 

827 

875 

879 

918 

942 

971 

1023 

1353 

1397 

1412- 

1456 

1547 

1563 

1570 

1605 

1634 

1840 

1886 



150 
150 
300 
100 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
200 
100 
400 

50 
100 
100 
100.1 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
100.4 
100.3 
100.3 
100 
100 
100 
100 • 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

50 
100 
100 
100 

50 
100 
100 
100 



1909: 

1909, 

1909, 

1909, 

1909, 

1909 

1909, 

1909, 

1909 

1900 

1900 

1909, 

1909 

1909, 

1909 

1910 

1909 

1909 

1909, 

1909, 

1909, 

1909 

1909 

1909 

1909, 

1909, 

1910 

1910, 

1909, 

1909, 

1909, 

19 

1910, 

1909, 

1909, 

1909, 

1909, 

1909, 

1909 

1909 

1009 

1909, 

1909, 

1909 

1909, 



May 

June 

Aug. 

April 

April 

March 

April 

March 

April 

June 

March 

May 

March 

Feh. 

.Ian. 

May 

March 

April 

May 

April 

March 

Dec. 

June 

Feh. 

March 

Feb. 

Feb. 

March 

March 

June 

March 

March 

Jan. 

Nov. 

June 

March 

March 

April 

April 

June 

May 

Feb. 

May 

April 

March 



10 

1 

30 

15 



12 
17 
30 

1 
31 

8 
16 
23 

4 
23 

a 

_5 
13 
19 
19 
15.S 

1 
25 

5 

8 
16 

8 
10 

2 

8 
29 
10 
19 

5 
30 
23 
20 
30 

3 

3 
15 
15 
17 



— Local Union Note Paper — 



17 100 
51 400 
58 200.1 
74 100 
116 200 
159 100 
252 100 
100 
200 
200 
100 
200 
100 
200 
400' 
200 
100.4 
100 
500 
100.3 
200 
100 
200 
200 
100.2 
200 
100 
100 
200 
200 
200 
100 
200 
200 
100 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
200 
200 
100 
100 



317 

366 
, 374 

418 

434 

545 

593 

620 

691 

781 

782 

801 

827 

977 
1018 
1057 
1093 
1226 
1245 
1250 
1275 
1307 
1384 
1399 
1474 
1524 
1524 
1695 
1699 
1705 
1818 
1839 
1840 
1843 
1945 
1945 
St. Paul, D. C. 



1909 


.Tan. 


G 


1909 


Jan. 


2 


1909 


March 


15 


1909 


May 


20 


1909 


Feb. 


8 


1909 


Jan. 


18 


1909 


Feb. 


27 


1909 


Feb. 


5 


1909 


June 


15 


1909 


Jan. 


25 


1909 


April 


27 


1909 


April 


12 


1909 


April 


16 


1910 


Feb. 


7 


1909 


March 


25 


1909 


March 


25 


1909 


Feb. 


8 


1910 


April 


29 


1910 


March 


19 


1910 


Feh. 


16 


1909 


May 


10 


1909 


March 


10 


1909 


April 


16 


1909 


March 


11 


1909 


Sept. 


9 


1909 


Jan. 


25 


1909 


April 


13 


1909 


Jan. 


20 


1909 


May 


27 


1909 


Dec. 


14 


1909 


Jan. 


25 


1909 


April 


14 


1909 


Jan. 


4 


1909 


Nov. 


22 


1909 


April 


23 


1910 


Jan. 


13 


1909 


May 


29 


1909 


Feb. 


27 


1909 


April 


28 


1909 


April 


17 


1909 


June 


19 


1909 


April 


23 


1910 


March 


21 


1909 


March 


4 



5,350 
Shipped June 7, 1910. - 
Applied against credit on Local 

account in financial ledger. 
Shipped February 8, 1910. 
Shipped February 3, 1909. 



7,300 

1 Shipped February 25, 1909. 

2 Sent by mail October 8. 1909. 

3 Shipped February 8, 1910. 

4 Shipped February 3, 1909. 



58 



T Ihi e C a IT p e mi t e r 









Dates of 




1568 


2.4 




1910, 


May 


20 




Sliipments, 


I'ayments pe 


r 


1598 


1 




1909, 


April 


12 


I.. U. No. 


Quantities. 


Financial Ledg 


era. 


1612 


1 




1909, 


June 


10 










1673 


1 




1909, 


Feb. 


27 


— Recording Secretaries 


' Order Books- 


- 


1717 


2 




1910, 


March 


14 


25 


2 


1909, Felj. 


8 


1846 


1 




1909-, 


April 


14 


42 


2 


1909 


Feb. 


3 


1922 


1 




1908, 


Dec 


31 


119 


3 


1909 


. April 


1 


1931 


1 




1909, 


March 


1 


169 




1908 


Dec. 


31 


Holyoke, 












193 




1900 


April 


12 


D. C. 


1 




1909, 


Feb. 


IS 


201 




1909 


May 


6 


Des Moines, 












217 




1909 


Jan. 


14 


D. C. 


1 




1909, 


March 


8 


224 


1.1 


1909 


Nov. 


26 


New Eochelle 












250 


1.5 


1910 


Feb. 


14 


B.C. 


2 




1909, 


May 


7 


257 




1909 


April 


5 














271 




1909 


Feb. 


9 




100 










327 




1909 


Jan. 


4 














335 




4909 


March 


8 


1 Shipped 


December 


2, 


1909. 






340 




1909 


April 


19 


2 Shipped 


June 1, 1910. 






349 




1909 


May 


17 


3 Shipped 


February 


11 


1910. 






359 




1909 


April 


19 


4 Shipped 


June 14, 


1910. 






375 




1909 


April 


16 


5 Shipped 


March 7. 


1910. 






378 




1909 


Jan. 


11 


6 Shipped 


February 


8, 


1910. 






420 




1909 


Jan- 


2 














432 




1909 


April 


17 










Dates of 




478 




1909 


April 


15 


Shipments, 




Payments per 


504 




1909 


March 


o 


L. U. No. Quantities. 




Financial Ledgers. 


507 




1909 


June 


1 














556 




1910 


Jan. 


14 


— Treasurers' 


Receipt Books— 




570 




1909 


April 


14 


50 






1909, 


June 


1 


586 




1909 


April 


19 


150 






1909, 


March 


12 


590 




1909 


June 


1 


239 






1909, 


May 


12 


595 




1909 


Feb. 


24 


263 






1909, 


March 


24 


617 




1909 


April 


27 


281 






1909, 


June 


10 


637 




1909 


June 


5 


326 






1909, 


April 


17 


653 




1909 


Jan. 


2 


432 






1909, 


April 


17 


734 


1.2 


1910 


May 





545 






1909, 


April 


16 


793 




1909 


June 


1 


717 






1909, 


March 


-8 


827 


1.6 


1910 


Feb. 


16 


720 






1909, 


May 


10 


875 




1909 


March 


10 


771 






1909, 


April 


13 


895 




1909 


Feb. 


15 


781 


1.2 




1909, 


Feb. 


8 


901 




1910 


April 


25 


827 


1.1 




1910, 


Feb. 


16 


948 




1909 


Sept. 


22 


855 






1909, 


Jan. 


28 


993 




1909 


Feb. 


15 


862 






1909. 


Jan. 


23 


1008 


2 


1909 


April 


12 


879 






1909, 


March 


15 


1077 


2 


1910 


June 


15 


906 






1909, 


Oct. 


18 


1096 


2 


1909 


-April 


12 


1022 






1909, 


June 


9 


1107 


1 


1909 


April 


3 


1035 






1909, 


April 


24 


1168 


1 


1909 


April 


30 


1040 






1909, 


Jan. 


28 


1197 


1 


1909 


Feb. 


23 


1094 






1909, 


Feb. 


4 


1209 


o 


1909 


July 


31 


1132 






1909, 


Feb. 


lf> 


1214 


2 


1909 


April 


9 


1257 






1909, 


March 


31 


1216 


1 


1909 


Jan. 


4 


1547 






1909, 


April 


30 


1295 


1.3 


1910 


Jan. 


22 


1653 






1909, 


June 


10 


1391 


1 


1909 


June 


10 


1931 






1909, 


June 


4 


1391 


1 


1909 


Dec. 


9 


East Orange, 












1405 


1 


1909 


June 


10 


D. C. 






1909, 


Jan. 


20 


1498 


1 


1909 


May 


1 














1499 


1 


1909 


June 


1 




27 










1561 


1 


1909 


April 


12 














1565 


1 


1909 


April 


2?, 


1 Shipped February 


8, 


1910. 






1567 


2 


1909 


March 


5 


2 Shipped February 


3, 


1909. 







53 



Tlhe Carpenter 











Dates of 










Dates of 








Shipments, 


Payments per 




Shipments, 


Payments per 


L. D. 


No. 


Quantities. 


Financial Ledgers. 


L. U. No. 


Quantities. 


Financial Ledgers. 




Financial Secretaries 


Receipt Books 


_ 




— 100-Page Day 


Books — 
















174 




1909, 


Dec. 


« 


79 






1909, 


May 


27 


296 




1909, 


Feb. 


15 


340 






1909, 


April 


19 


386 / 




1910, 


June 


10 


383 




1* 


1909, 


Feb. 


15 


478 




1909, 


Feb. 


11 


414 






1909, 


Oct. 


11 


548 




1909, 


Nov. 


3 


513 






1909, 


May 


17 


623 




1909, 


Feb. 


11 


567 






1909, 


Aug. 


26 


827 


l# 


1910, 


Feb. 


16 


691 






1909, 


March 


11 


851 




1909, 


April 


26 


762 






1909, 


Nov. 


19 


1207 




1909, 


Aug. 


10 


827 




1.2 


1910, 


Feb. 


Ifl 


1316 




1909, 


Feb. 


15 


846 






1909, 


Dec. 


16 


1329 




1909, 


Aug. 


16 


879 






1909, 


March 


15 


1681 




1909, 


May 


19 


985 






1909, 


March 


20 












1168 






1909, 


April 


30 




12 








1560 






1909, 


.Tan. 


12 


•Shipped February 8, 1910. 






1757 






1909, 


Dee. 


10