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Full text of "Carpenter"

We Help You Get 

Sheetrock Jobs 




Sheetrock is a permanent, fire- 
proof wallboard made from rock. 
It will not shrink or pull away 
from the studding or joists. It 
assures the owner a lasting, 
satisfactory job. 

Carpenters find Sheetrock easy 
to put up. It comes in broad, 
rigid, ceiling-high sections. It 
saws and nails like lumber. It is 
ready immediately for decorat- 
ing; takes paper, paint or panels. 

If you want to increase your 
profits this year, get the details 
of our plan for bringing you 
Sheetrock jobs. Don't put it off. 
Mail the attached coupon today ! 

Sheetrock comes in standard 
sizes: % in. thick, 32 or 48 in. 
wide and 6 to 10 ft* long 



SHEETOOCK 



yhe FIRE PROOF 



W A L L BO A;RD 



UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

World's Largest Producers of Gypsum Products 
GENERAL OFFICES: Dept. I, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 



United States Gypsum Company 

Dept. I, 205 West Monroe St, Chicago, HL 

Tell me about your plan to get Sheetrock contracts. 



Address. 



Sheetrock is inspected and approved by The Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. 




LOWER 
PRICES 

NOW ' 
PERMIT 
DEALERS 
TO SELL 

GENUINE 

SAND'S 

LEVELS 

AT THE 

PRICE OF 

INFERIOR 

IMITATIONS 



DEALER FOR 
SAND'S 



Solid=set Wire Marked 
Spirit Glasses 

Sealed -In Accuracy 

r HEN we first originated and applied plate 
glass lens protection for spirit glasses a lot 
of fellows wrote how helpful it was to have a dust- 
proof, dirt-proof, water-proof level. 

When we originated and applied wire markers at 
each end of the bubble, a number of customers told 
us how handy it was to find exact center instantly. 
And many more expressed their admiration when 
SAND'S Aluminum Level was introduced, for it is 
the lightest and strongest level made — easy to read 
in dim corners, high or low. 

But in addition to all these features, SAND'S levels 
have provided sealed-in, non-adjustable and fool- 
proof accuracy for two generations. 

Day after day and year after year these levels have 
provided such unwavering, unfailing dependability 
that few of the old time craftsmen would consider 
any level but a SAND'S. 

Accuracy is as important today as yesterday. 

^nd every new SAND'S level must maintain the 

reputation of the SAND'S name. 

Ask for SAND'S Levels. Any good dealer can 
supply you. "Write for illustrated folder describing 
all styles. 

J. Sand & Sons 

4853 Rivard St., Detroit, Mich. 




It's Made 
Just for the 



The Interurban Special Carpenters' 
Overall is specially designed to help you 
keep your tools right on the job with you 
and make your day's work easier. 

It's made up of heavy white Boatsail 
drill and has the best of workmanship. 

Here are the 12 Special Pockets: 
Four Nail Pockets Three Pencil Pockets 
Two Front Pockets One Watch Pocket 
Two Hip Pockets Rule Pocket 

Try Square Loops Hammer Loop 

Screw Driver Loop 

Have your merchant order you 
a pair so you can see what they 
are. Or send us $2.25 and a pair 
will be sent prepaid. Return it 
and get your money if you don't 
like it. 

Sherman Overall Mfg. Co. 

SHERMAN, TEXAS 

We Make Every Pair Make Good 



An Opportunity to Increase Your Income 

Become a Contractor=Agent for 

AHrneta! Weatherstrip 

Right now, when building activities are not 
so good, contractors are turning their at- 
tention to side-lines as a source of income. 

Here's an Opportunity for You 
Agents wanted in every community to sell 
and install Allmetal Weatherstrip. There 
is big money in it. Homes, office buildings, 
public institutions, etc., are ripe prospects 
in these times of high coal costs. 

Allmetal Weatherstrip Agent 
Earns $5,000 

One of our contractor agents made $5,000 
during the past year selling and installing 
Allmetal. And it was 
during a year when many 
reverses were against 
him. In normal times 
his earnings could have 
been much bigger. We 
give you exclusive terri- 
tory and by our sales 
promotional plan assist 
you to land contracts. 
Try our Pecora Calking 
and Glazing Compound. 
An absolute seal for 
openings between frame 
and masonry. Maintains 
line of contact during 
shrinking, swelling or 
warping-a permanent seal. 

Ask for our selling plan. 

ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP CO. 
12654 West Kinzie Street, Chicago. 





THE 

EXPERT'S 
CHOICE 
FILE 



Does twice the work of an ordinary file — in half the time. 
The Expert's Choice increases the value of your time by 
over 50%. By spending 30 cents you can make it back 
on your first filing job alone. It's in the Quality — in the 
cut of the tooth and in the length of the stroke. 

Frank Luther. Chicago, says: "The Experts 
Choice File flies 18 hand saws and is cheaper at 
a cost of 50c than the ordinary file at any price." 
You get your money back if the Expert's Choice does not prove 
to be the most economical file you have ever used. DELTA 
SAW FILES are made for fine or coarse teeth— also for that 
extra hard saw. Buy your tools of the dealer who sell* 
Delta Files. He is the quality man. 



Tvinl fhffev Ilf your dealer cannot supply you. send us 20c, 
inutv/Hcr 2Sc or 30c for trial file, sent prepaid. "' 
this today — find out what a real file is 



Do 



S$^B 



"THE HIGHEST GRADEFILE MADE 
D ELTA " HAN D SAW"fl LETS 

CARPEKTERS'SPEC)AL 4 'VW" 
.'■:■•: ■hMECHAN.IGIS .FAVQRIiTE fa Y E » c V 



DELTA 

FILE 

WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, 
PA. 



Look for 
This Sign 
at Your 
Hardware 
Store 



The best Auger Bit File made — We will deliver on receipt of 30 cents each. 



Could You Plan and Figure Costs 
on a Home or Business Building? 



earn How to Handle mg joos as 
Foreman, Superintendent or Contractor 

Building is sure to "pick up" before long. People already nerd more homes, 
business will soon need more stores, shops, factories and warehouses. Greater 
opportunities than ever before are coming for building experts — men who know 
how to plan, estimate and direct work. 

If you are the workman on the job, this is your time to prepare to be the "boss." 
If you are now a foreman, get ready to hold a bigger job or to start as a con- 
tractor. 

If you are doing contracting in 
a small way, more knowledge of 
building methods will enable you 
to take on more profitable jobs. 

The man who can use his head 
to the best advantage is the one 
who will make the money in the 
building business. 

Complete Courses 
for men in the 
Building Trades 

Real blue print plans and speci- 
fications to study. Fully explained 
by our experts who have had years 
of experience in the building con- 
struction game. All this at little 
cost to you and on easy terms. 

We Teach You — 

Plan Reading. How to read a building 
plan. How to read dimensions. How to 
read detail drawings. How to lay out 
work from plans. How to stake out 
buildings. Practice in reading complete 
blue print plans from basement to roof, 
etc., etc. 

Estimating. Figuring amount and cost 
of materials. Estimating time and la- 
bor. How to figure carpenter work sucb 
as stairs, rooting, rafters, etc. Mill- 
work : window and door frames, mould- 
ings, cornices, etc. All about tbe steel 
square. Lathing and plastering. Exca- 
vations. Brick, stone and concrete work. 
Fireproofing. (ilazing. Plumbing. Heat- 
ing, Wiring, etc.. etc. 

Superintending. Methods of work on 
all classes of buildings. Uses and prep- 
aration of all kinds of material. Hiring 
and handling men. 

Also Special Courses in Architecture^ 
Drafting for Carpenters and in Plumbing 
and Heating and Ventilating, all taught 
by practical men. 

Send the Coupon 

Don't delay. At least find out about 
this practical training for bigger pay or 
more profits. Send for catalog. Get tbe 
coupon into the mail today. 




You Can 
Learn by 



This free lesson in Plan Reading shows how 
easily you can grasp the subject by the Chicago 
••Tech" method. Nothing to pay for this — sent to 
show how you can advance by taking a Chicago 
••Tech" home study course. Coupon brings it free. 



ra ea so g^ ^s u 

CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE, 
139 Chicago "Tech" Building, 
Chicago. 

Without obligation on me please send Free Trial 
Lesson on the course I have marked X below. 

I j Plan Reading and Estimating. 

|~1 Architectural Drafting. 



Name. 



Address. 



Post Office State. 

Occupation 




Good Carpenters 

Demand Good Tools 

The more particular a carpenter is 

about the tools he uses, the more like- 
ly he is to select Sargent Planes and 
Squares. 

Chief among the Sargent family of 
planes is the Auto- Set Bench Plane. 
With this plane you can remove the 
blade for sharpening and replace it 
again in exactly the same position, 
without re-adjustment. Made in six 
sizes. The Sargent book of planes 
will give full information about this 
and other Sargent Planes and will be 
sent free on request. 

Sargent Framing Squares elimin- 
ate the usual figuring required to 

get the lengths and cuts of hip. val- 
ley, jack and common rafters. The 
necessary tables are on the square. 
Simply measure and read. Sargent 
Framing Squares are made of the 
finest tool steel in nine finishes. 
Send for the Sargent Steel Square 
booklet. 

Sargent & Company 

Hardware Manufacturers 



55 Water Street New Haven, Conn. 




R; vG:E,.N T: 



■H A R-. O'VV A' RrS4 



GET A FREE COIR; 



IN 



DRAFTSMANSHIP 




LEARN DRAFTfr 
MEN NEEDED 

Salaries up to $100 per week. Here is i 
only OPPORTUNITY to get this Wond 
$40 Complete Drawing outfit, includin 
FREE — PRACTICAL COURSE IN 
CHANICAL DRAWING, — NOW OFFE 
TO YOU AS FOLLOWS 

YOUR 

NAME 

PAY BALANCE $9.98 ON DELIYERJ 

This is a remarkable offer, with which| 
can build your success in Draftsmanship. 
can put yourself in a class of trained 
whose services are always in Demand. 
Easy TO LEARN AT HOME IN T| 
SPARE TIME. And it is your one chanj 
earn the biggest money of your life, and|| 
be one of the most profitable investments! 
have ever made. 

The Day of big opportunities for Dill 
men is here, and on whom the mechanics 1 
dustries of America and the entire worlql 
pend. The work is LIGHT. PLEASJ' 
PROFITABLE — and No single profession 
day offers better opportunities. 

Outfit Consists as Follows: 

Eleven piece Professional Draftsman's drawing Instrument! 
structed of solid nickel silver and fine steel, and set into a 
some VelTet lined pocket book folding case 



also — one drawing board 
inch scale rule — supply 
French curve — pencils — eri 
One Protractor — Thumb 
Hon 01 the book — A PR 
DRAWING. It is a COt 
big words, no useless th< 
— every day ENGLISH — i 
No Matter what your pla] 
complete outfit, with a FK 



T-squan 
Tng paper. — tw< I 
rtle of waterproof drawing 
nd one FB:- E— 
L COURSE IN II 

i.lz'ziz matLera ..:_ ■ — ?ust 

that you use every day. I 

or the future, get Itois woi 

IBSE in PRACTICAL DRA* 



PARTICULARS FREE— OFFER IS LIMI' 
ACT NO W 

NATIONAL INSTRUMENT COMPANY 

4703 North Hamilton Ave. Chicago, lilt, 




When you want 
A Good Tool 
You go out and 
You ask for it 
By Name 



You insist 

Upon 

Only the kind 

Which you know 



getting- 



Is good 



When you want 

Good Sandpaper 

Go out and 

Ask for 

Behr's Brand of 

Garnet Paper 

or Behr's Brooklyn 

Brand of Flint Paper 

It is good 
And the best 
Is never too good 
For you 

And remember: 
It costs 
No more 
Than any other 
Brand. 



HERMAN 



& CO.. INC. 



In fiftieth year. 

33=65 Tiffany Place 

Brooklyn, New York City. 



'■ ■ ' * > m 




Do You Want 
A Better Job? 

THE only difference between success and failure 
is a matter of training. Edison and Steinmetz 
and Schwab and Vanderlip and Thayer and 
Wanamaker — these men did not reach their present 
success through luck or chance. 

They got into the work for which they were 
best fitted — and then trained themselves to 
know more about their jobs than anyone else. 
When opportunity came — as it always comes — 
these men were ready to grasp it and turn it 
into fame and dollars. 

You have just as good a chance to succeed as these 
men had — perhaps betterl Good positions are always 
■waiting . for trained men — positions that you can get 
11 you train yourself to deserve them. 

You can secure this training easily and quickly 
at home through spare-time study with the 
International Correspondence Schools, just as 
so many other men have done. The I. C. S. 
way is the practical way — the fascinating way 
— the profitable way. 

All that we ask is this: — Fill out the coupon printed 
below and mail it to Scranton. This doesn't obligate 
you in the least — but it will bring you full informa- 
tion about the I. C. S. Today is the day to send in 
that coupon. "Tomorrow never comes." 

iiiTBN™EiRVEsyiSF^H^Ls 



BOX 8835 
Explain, without obligating 
position, or in the subject, 
D ARCHITECT 

B Architectural Draftsman 
Contractor and Builder 
B Building Foreman , 

Concrete Builder 
3 Structural Engineer 
3 Structural Draftsman 
3 Ship Draftsman 
3 I'ltimber and Steam Fitter 
3 Heating and Ventilation. 
3 Plumbing Inspector 

B Foreman Plumber 
Sheet Metal Worker 
3 CIVIL ENGINEER 
3 Surveying and Mapping 
3 ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 

B Electric Lighting and Rya, 
Electric Wiring 
B Telegraph Engineer 
Telephone Work 
3 MECHANICAL ENGINEEK 
3 Mechanical Draftsman 
3 Toolmaker 

J Machine Shop Practice . 
3 CHEMIST " 

□ Pharmacy 

Name 



SCRANTON, PA. 

me, how I can qualify for the 
before which I mark X. 

□ Navigation 

D SALESMANSHIP 

□ ADVERTISING 

□ Window Trimmer 

□ Show Card and Sign Palatine 
3 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

3 Private Secretary 
3 Business Correspondent 
~ BOOKKEEPER 
_ Stenographer and Typist 
3 Higher Accounting 
™ COMMERCIAL LAW 
3 Common School Subjects 
3 Mathematics 
" GOOD ENGLISH 
ILLUSTRATING 
3 Railway Mail Clerk 
3 CIVIL SERVICE 

□ MINE FOREMAN OltENG'B 

BGas Engine Operating 
STATIONARY ENGINEER 

□ Textile Overseer or Snpt. 

B TRAFFIC MANAGER 
AUTOMOBILES ID Spanish 
B AGRICULTURE ID Teacher 
Poultry Raising I Q Banking 



Occupation 
& Employer. 

Street 
and Nn 

Clty_ 



Business 

.Address _ 



Canadians may send this coupon to International corre- 
spondence Softools Canadian, Limited, Montreal, Canada 







K 



: 



50 Years 

Experience 



-,-- 



in making Better Saws en- 
ables us to meet Today's De- 
mand for Lower Prices. 

Hundred of woodworking plants 
have found that riuther Brothers 
Patent Dado Heads enable them 
to save vast amounts in the time 
ordinarily required for intricate 
grooving. 

The saw consists of two outside 
cutters and enough inside cutters 
to perform the required cut. The 
outside cutters may be used sep- 
arately or in combination. 
The Huther Brothers Dado Head 
was developed after a thorough 
study of the needs for a saw of 
this 'kind, and as a result can be 
depended upon to perform cred- 
itably at all times. 
The experience of other wood- 
working plants can be made yours 
if you will write for complete cat- 
alogue of Huther Dado Heads, or 
order one on approval. It may 
be returned at our expense, if un- 
satisfactory. 



HUTHER BROS. 
SAW MFG. CO., INC. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



FLOOR SURFACING CONTRACTORS 

Make $5,000 to $15,GC0 orMore-Yeariy 



— 




New, uncrowded field. Architects 
and general contractors know the 
American Universal and prefer its 
work. They prefer to sublet the floor 
surfacing contracts, as it is a big 
business in itself. "We furnish office 
forms, advertising, etc., — in fact, we 
practically set a man up in business. 
Business comes easily. 

Re-Surfacing Old Floors 

Every building, large or small, is a pros- 
pect. Hundreds of floors right in your own 
vicinity need re-surfacing. The owners will 
be glad to have you do it when you show 
them how easily and quickly 
the work can be done with 
the American Universal Elec- 
tric Machine. Old floors 
made like new — new floors 
made perfect. 

Don't ever get caught out of 

work again — get into a big 

business of your own. Floor 

Surfacing Contractors pay for 

machines first month and make 

big profit besides. Write today 

for full information. Say 

whether you are a building 

contractor. 

Don't pass up this oppor- 
tunity to get into a business 
of your own. We want to 
help you make a decision. 
Kindly clip out this para- 
graph and fill in the infor- 
mation requested. ( ) I 
want to become a Floor Sur- 
facing Contractor. ( ) 
r- \ I am not now a contrac- 
g5(r A tor of any kind, but was 
in the following business 




( ) I am a Building 
Contractor and want to 
use it on my own con- 
tracts. Send us your 
name and address 
JKJS, and we will send 
¥^\ you complete liter- 
ature on our 
prop osition. 
Write today. 




The American Floor Surfacing 
Machine Co. 

Originators of Floor Surfacing Machines 
522 So. St. Clair Street, Toledo, Ohio, U. S. A. 



Iron and Steel Screen 




JERSEY 



Screen 



Your recommendation regarding the insect screen cloth to be used 
in making new screens or repairing old ones carries much weight 
with your customer. He is apt to depend on your knowledge and 
experience and then hold you responsible for the wearing quality of 
the screen cloth used. 

When you make your recommendation bear these facts in mind — 

1. Insect screen cloth made of iron or steel inevitably rusts 
quickly along the bottom of a screen — where moisture col- 
lects — and soon becomes useless. 

2. Insect screen cloth, made of alloys of copper — copper and tin 
(bronze), copper and zinc(brass), — is often of uneven quality 
and some of the wires will disintegrate long before the others. 
A screen with an opening large enough to admit flies and 
mosquitoes is little better than no screen at all. 

3. Insect screen cloth made of pure high grade copper, pro- 
duced by the Roebling process, cannot rust, is of uniform 
quality throughout, and is unusually stiff and strong. Under 
like conditions it will outlast any of the other metals by 
many years. 

jersey Copper Screen Cloth is made from wire which is 99.8 per 
cent pure copper. This copper wire is produced in the Roebling 
works by the Roebling process. It gives unequalled service under the 
most severe climatic conditions. It is the only screen cloth which 
can be expected to last when used near salt water or in the tropics. 

Hardware and building supply dealers throughout the country c 
Jersey Copper Screen Cloth in the roll. Furnished in stock wjd 
18 to 60 inches. Bright or dark finish. The latter is better bee: 
it always has an even, weathered appearance. 

If the dealer in your town can't supply you with Jersey Copper 
Screen Cloth drop us a line. We will see that you get it. 



tmsm&»w.ymiiimtmii^—T^7 — 



The New Jersey Wire Cloth Company 

C!Q SOUTH lROAD ST. 

T.-;e;ntOn New Jersey 



WUSMll 



Mr. Carpenter 




WINTER BREEZES 
WILL SOON BE 

LLOWING. 



Let Us Tell You 
How You Can 
Profit By Them. 



The 

Installation 

of 

FEDERAL 
METAL 
WEATHER- 
STRIPS 

Is a Very Profit- 
able Business. 



Write Today. 



FEDERAL METAL WEATHERSTRIP CO. 

1240 Fullerton Aye. Chicago 



When 

You Want 
The Best 




Ask for 
The GRIFFITH Master 
Builder for 64 vears known 
as the GERMANTOWN 

Master Builder. If you can- 
not he supplied at your local 
dealer's send for the Master 
Builder Catalog of Hammers and 
Hatchets. 

Griffith Tool Works 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Branch: 4139 W. Kinzie St. CHICAGO 

LOOK FOR THIS TRADE MARK 

On The Tool 



^GRIFFITH. 
MASTER 
.BUILDER, 




Don't Envy 

the. 

Dosses Job 



YOU 



Qd ft! 



R.ea d your 
Ouuo Tufure, 

by ichof you do fo-doy. Success is qeffinq. 
whcf you qo of fer-. Const r<Jt ''0" > s qoir>q 017 
every-Lubei-e-. look, of ifa nee^s. Every 
buildine uj'iII need a Co nf roc for-.. — — •»——- 

are the man to 

fill t.^af Job 

But you cannot fill \\ u>!(o-out knoujinq hcu) 
to reod blusprinfs, mate esfimofes, — 
secure contracts and 5uptryi.se- ujork 
"Houj" fo do these t^mes 13 rof fbrouj n irj 
your- vuo^y. I] 13 noj picked up, bof you. 
can be t rq 'ned ct b or Js -- in_your spare, 
•fime — by t 3>3fe"5 ujbicb meets _your- 
opprovol er^our rjorjey is refunded . • 
S|ort not/ — A_years t'lTJ* br'moa conforj qnd 
independence. 

CLIP THIS COUPON 

WESTERN SCHOOL OF ESTIMATING AND 
PLAN R.EADING., DENVER., COLOKAOO. 

ZIO WEST IJTH. AVE. 
Pleose send fo me a fi-ee copy ©f -- 

"MAKINQ TH^W>.l-C 
NAM E . 



ASSEESS. 



THE U. B. A. LEVEL 

ioofc adjustable. No holes to cut. 

Specially designed for progressive 
mechanics and to take place of level 
A or plumb bob. 

Superior to other 
adjustables 
in working fea- 
tures. 

Attach to any 
length straight 
edge your 
work requires. 

For all kinds of 
leveling, plumb- 
ing, grades and 
pitches. The 
simplest, and 
quickest to ad- 
just. 

Frame C. R. steel 

finished in Nickel 

and Black mat 

■ rust proof pro- 

; cess. We guar- 

_ J 'ifai antoe every one. 

Member L. TJ. 434, Inventor. Pocket size 
3ix4. Have your dealer supply you, if he 
cannot, send us his name and your money 
order and we vriil mail to you direct. 

Price $1.25 

THE UNION LEVEL SALES CO. 
1979 \V. 111th Street Chicago. 





The American Woodworker 

Gasoline, Kerosene, or Electric Driven 
Used on the Job or in the Shop 

Also Made With Band Saw Attached 

Let us send you our Bulletin No. 77 
describing this and other profit pro- 
ducers for the Carpenter, Contrac- 
tor and Builder. 

American Saw Mill Machinery Company 

136 Main Street, Hackettstown, N. J. 

New York Office, 50 Church St. 
Philadelphia Office. The Bourse. 




Cost less than Cord and Weight 
installation more durable, neater 
and more quiet. 

No breaking of Cords or rattling of Weights. 
Guaranteed for Ten Years 

WRITE FOR 

Catalogue, Blue Prints and full description 

PULLMAN MFG. COMPANY 



234 South Ave.g 



Rochester, N. Y. 






SNELL'S AUGERS AND BITS 
The Standard the World Over 

Established 1790] 




Selling Agents: 

JOHN H. GRAHAM & CO., 

113 Chambers St., 
NEW YORK, CITY. 



SNELL MFG. CO. 

FISKDALE, MASS. 



The M. F. B. Combined Lock and Butt Gauge 

The only Gauge made which will 
mark accurately for both sides of 
Lock with one stroke. Likewise 
will mark for both sides of the 
Strike-plate with one stroke. (See 
cuts Nos. 1 and 2.) Send Money 
Order. 

Price $2.50. Guaranteed. 

Manufactured by 




No. 1. Strike=plate. 

LOS ANGELES, 



. F. BIERSDORF 

547 San Julian St. 

Member of L. U. No. 158. 




No. 2. Lock. 



CAL. 




"As hard as fire and 
water can make them" 

— The Diss ton file-maker 

Disston makes between sixteen 
and eighteen million files a year. 
Some weigh a tiny fraction of an 
ounce. Others 135 lbs. Some are 
for a lady's fingernails. Some for 
gigantic chunks of steel. 

The supreme test of a good file is 
in filing the teeth of saws — steel cut- 
ting steel. And nearly a half- million 
Disston Files are used yearly in mak- 
ing Disston Saws — "the saws most 
carpenters use." No wonder Disston 
Files eat through the work in quick 
time ! No wonder the experienced 
filer enjoys the feel of a Disston File 
as it bites into the toughest metal ! 

Disston Files are Disston made 
from the steel to the packing ease. 
They are of good, true steel, "as hard 
as fire and water can make them." 

Send for new free booklet, "The 
File in History." 



\SSTto 




+ HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc. 

Philadelphia, U. S. A. 





A List of What Disston Makes 

And in these Saws, Tools and 
Files is that quality found in 

"The Saw "Most Carpenters Use" 

Back Saws 

Band Saws for Wood and Metal 

Bevels 

Buck Saws 

Butcher Saws and Blades 

Circular Saws for Wood, Metal,' 
and Slate 
Compass Saws 
Cross-cut Saws and -Tools 
Cylinder Saws 
Drag Saw Blades 
Files and Rasps 
Grooving Saws 
Gauges — Carpenters' 

Marking, etc. 
Hack Saw Blades 
Hack Saw Frames 
Hand, Panel, and Rip Saws 
Hedge Shears 

3 Ice Saws 

Inserted Tooth 
Circular Saws 

Keyhole Saws 
Kitchen Saws 

Knives — Cane, Corn, Hedge 
Knives — Circular — for Cork, 

Cloth, Leather, Paper, etc. 
Knives— Machine 
Levels — Carpenters' and Masons' 
Machetes 
Mandrels 

Milling Saws for Metal 
Mitre-box Saws 
Mitre Rods 

One-man Cross-cut Saws 
Plumbs arid Levels 
Plumbers' Saws 
Pruning Saws 
Re-saws 
Saw Clamps and Filing Guides 

Saw Gummers 

Saw-sets 

Saw Screws 

Screw Drivers 
Screw-slotting Saws 
Segment Saws 
Shingle Saws 
Slate Saws — Circular 
Squares— Try and Mitre 
Stave Saws 
Sugar Beet Knives 
Swages 

Tools for Repairing Saws 
Tool Steel 
Trowels — Brick, Plastering, 

Pointing, etc. 
Veneering Saws 
Webs — Turning and Felloe 







SAWS TOOL 



Entered July 22, 1 91 5, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of Congress, Aug. 24, 1 91 2 

Acceptance for mailing: at snecial rate of rjostage Drovidcd for in Section 1103, act of 
October 3. 1917, authorized on July S, 191S. 

A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and 
Kindred Industries. Owned and Published bv the United Brotherhood of ( 



Carpenters 



and Joiners of America, at 
Carpenters' Building, 222 East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 



Established in 1S81 
Vol. XLII— Xo. 1 



INDIANAPOLIS, JANUARY, 1922 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



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Saye Jbsf a Little Today 

Do you wish to acquire all the money you need? 

Then save just a little to-day. 
Don't think you v/ill suddenly fall into luck, 

It seldom has happened that way. 
Your chance for a fortune will always be slim 

Until you've a sum to invest; 
So make up your mind that right now is the time, 

Begin now to feather your nest. 

For the big things don't happen by luck or by chance, 

They are born of the deeds of the past; 
The small things we do every day are the things 

That really count at the last. 
Then do without something you think you would like, 

And save at least part of your pay; 
Don't drift unprepared to your future, my friend, 

But save just a little to-day. 

Get the habit of saving, of putting aside, 

Though it may seem a small thing to do; 
In the years that will come, with their trials and tasks. 

It may be the saving of you. 
It is too late to win the hard struggle for wealth 

After you have grown aged and gray; 
You must put in your bid when the moment is ripe, 

So save just a little to-day. 

— Herbert Gay Sisson, in Winter's News. 



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ORGANIZED STRENGTH 
(By S. B. Hodges, L. U. No. 037. » 




MAN'S success, of course, 
depends upon himself, but 
his success will be greater 
and he can reach his goal 
quicker if he will combine 
with others in various 
ways to promote the general interests 
in his line of work. A workman who is 
worthy of the name, will not lean upon 
others to hold his job. but he will quite 
likely do so to increase his individual 
skill, and he will freely join in with 
others in promoting the best interests of 
his trade. A craftsman who has excel- 
lent skill with neatness in turning out 
work, does well indeed when he con- 
siders himself a specialty salesman, and 
that he is daily selling his skill and the 
ability to turn out work at his particular 
trade. And in addition by considering 
himself a press agent for advertising his 
skill: for it depends very much on his 
ability as a publicity man, and as spec- 
ialty sale -man in keeping himself em- 
ployed. He is merely organizing his life 
forces to co-operate with him in earning 
a living, earning friends and patrons by 
using the power of organization. 

Individual skill will bring a man 
meager returns without some publicity 
in acquiring friends and patrons. A 
man's rise is measured by his selling 
ability and advertising ability, then it 
is made more certain when combined 
with dependability ; for in some respects 
we must lean on others in attaining suc- 
cess. Men succeed best who learn best 
to work in conjunction with others, in 
combining their skill and intelligence 
with other men's ingenuity. 

Any craftsman must be a creator in 
attaining his greatest success in addi- 
tion to the other qualities ; to be a cre- 
ator he must be a thinker, by studying- 
and reasoning. The wider of range and 
more carefully he reads, the larger will 
his success be by combining his creative 
genius with his other qualities ; for as a 
man is attaining success he is building 
himself. He inspires confidence in 
others by having confidence in himself. 
He is acquiring the good will of others. 
To create jobs for the jobless, a man 
must a thinker, a reasoner. an extensive 
reader on a broad range of subjects. 

We are up against the proposition of 
too many people, or too few jobs neces- 
sary to support them — many men with 



but few jobs open to them. A worker 
loves to work, a shirker to shirk, and 
the inveterate shirker may be the best 
salesman, the best advertiser, but he is 
lacking in dependability, and people will 
find it out. then he begins to lose his 
selling ability. To sell successfully or- 
ganize, to work successfully organize, to 
attain justice organize, to live in rea- 
sonable security organize, for acquiring 
an equitable taxation organize, for ac- 
quiring good government and keeping 
it. organize. Organization begets sol- 
idarity and is the soul of co-operation. 
Co=Operation the Conception of 
Organization 

Some day when the entire world 
awakens to the necessity of co-operation, 
on that day our advancement towards 
real achievement will gather to itself 
unexpected momentum, and enlarge 
as if by magic. It is a wonderful 
thing to have the friendship of a man or 
"woman, but far greater to have the 
friendship of many. If it were possible 
to acquire the good will of the entire 
world by any man. he would receive in 
return for this great accomplishment,. 
co-operation that would hake his slight- 
est wish come true as if by magic, co- 
operation comes through organization, 
organization is strengthened by good 
will, good will is a valuable asset for a 
salesman or publicity man to acquire in 
reaching possible markets. Faith in the 
skill or product sold, is faith manifested 
in one's self, and it is strengthened by 
combining with others for the general 
good of all. Co-operation is one of the 
highest aims of man, and one of the 
greatest, it makes all things possible that 
is desirable, useful or enjoyable. 

Co-operation begets faith. faith 
markets prosperity. Co-operation is a 
world-wide necessity, a combination 
of capital and labor, of nation with na- 
tion. Some one has said the great war 
was an effort of nature to get mankind 
firmly established on a co-operative 
basis, and get him weaned away from 
his solitary habits. However, man is a 
great stickler for personal rights, even 
though be trample* on other's individual 
rights. Organization teaches a man to 
respect other's rights as paramount in 
acquiring his own rights. Love is a 
necessity for successfully carrying on 
co-operative movements. However, love 



T II. E C A K, P E N T E R 



13 



Is such a mis-used word, an abused 
word, sometimes wo do not take Jl seri- 
ously when we use it, by using it as a 
blanket in deceiving others. 

Co-operation grows successfully 
through a proper conception of the value 
of love as an asset in selling one's wares, 
whether it be skilled labor, or the pro- 
duct of some one else's skill. A man 
who has only his skill at his trade to 
sell, is limited as to markets. So it is 
a wise thing to attain proficiency in 
Felling ability, advertising ability, by 
using all legitimate means in his power 
to bring it about. We do exceedingly 
well when we lean on others, but it is 
wise to pay in actual service when do- 
ing so, we live contentedly through will- 
ing service, service requires compensa- 
tion to give it a just valuation in a com- 
munity. Service is a price exacted by 
nature, and she teaches that service can 
best be rendered through co-operation, 
and it requires organization, and organ- 
ization is strengthened by good will is a 
result of a liberal use of the Golden Rule, 
and it is the handmaiden of love. 

Standard of Living Raised Through 
Organization 

'Business quite generally recognizes 
the value of acquiring the good will of 
former patrons of a business, and it is 
only plain, practical business sense, 
applied to the art of selling one's skill 
in working at some trade. If it is fair 
for business men to get together and 
combine in stabilizing commodities made 
necessary for the comfort and usefulness 
of mankind. Then it is fair for men 
having skill, or creative ability for sale, 
to combine in stabilizing the sale of this 
power; and making possible better living 
conditions for men rendering such use- 
ful service. Profiteering business men 
freely make use of the fact; that a man 
will develop the creative genius in him to 
the detriment of his business sagacity, 
and filch from him by devious means his 
discoveries. 

The time seems to be quite ripe for 
the co-operative spirit to be more widely 
manifested between the different groups 
of producers of commercial necessities. 
As there are certain interests deeply 
involved in maintaining a combative 
spirit between the different groups, it is 
becoming a necessity for the different 
groups to have a common ground to get 
together on, and derive from it the full 
power lying concealed in it. Perhaps a 



more liberal use of the Union Label, as 
it has some great potential power that 
is but slightly developed. It is a 
good will developer, a very essential 
force in business gel ling. 

We are beginning to see more clearly 
as the months go by, that the measure 
of prosperity in any given community 
is the amount of wages paid Its work- 
ers in return for skill and creative genius 
in producing commodities of use to man. 
And the individual's success is greater 
through obtaining a fair price for the 
service he renders to society. For the 
individual to get a fair wage he must 
organize, for his own and fellow man's 
good. The labor of many machines can 
make a few men very rich and arrogant; 
but this kind of wage fails to spread 
over the community, for the commu- 
nity's good. 

A steady wage for service sold at a 
fair price is the right of every man. who 
is rendering any service of use to man- 
kind. And a fair living wage can be 
maintained through organization, or by 
co-operation. Co-operation has the 
power of spreading the profits accrued 
through a community's industry more 
evenly amongst workers and developers.. 
And with the Golden Rule established 
between employer, workers, and the cus- 
tomers, it is a very powerful factor in 
bringing about prosperity for employer 
and worker, with community as the 
gainer, for prosperity follows as surely 
as night follows clay. If we expect to 
maintain any freedom, Ave must organize 
in combating the forces combining to 
curb our freedom. A more extended 
publicity is a powerful factor in keeping 
the spark of freedom alive and in good 
working condition. 

A Low Wage System Exceedingly 
Pernicious 

Destructive of accumulated wealth 
producing forces! Cheapens human 
life! 

Possibly the greatest blunder ever 
made by the great American Republic 
was the introduction of slavery, as a 
means of securing cheap labor: for cheap 
labor deflates the buying power of any 
community. It reacts as a curse on any 
community harboring the delusion! It 
reacts as a curse on any person practic- 
ing this delusive sentiment! It reacts 
as a curse on any person entertaining or 
promoting the low wage system in an 
effort to pauperize worthy and willing 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



workers of any community. A well or- 
ganized co-operative community center 
of associated organizations may be a 
logical solution for this enervating peril 
assailing our chief source of liberty of 
choice in choosing our manner of selling 
our labor and accumulated skill and ex- 
perience. 

Let us reason a little more closely on 
the phase. The measure of prosperity 
for a community is the amount of week- 
ly wage paid out to its workers content- 
edly busy on necessities and accesseries, 
useful for the health and happiness of 
the community's citizenship; or in fill- 
ing commercial demands on it. As the 
slavery of humans acted as a curse it 
now seems that the slavery of machines 
is beginning to react as a curse, under 
the method the machines are operated 
at the present time. If a man chooses 
to face the necessity of trying to sell in 
a non-buying market, let him continue 
going in his solitary way in trying to 
sell labor and capital, in the form of ac- 
cumulated skill and experience in an 
unorganized manner to well organized 
groups of greedy profiteers. 

The group spirit of our Republic is 
cemented closely, through a co-operative 
unionization of its component individual 
and homeruling states. And grouped 
under its capacious tent are all the little 
unions, each fitted to cope with its spe- 



cial phase of the one big union's national 
life in carrying on. 

Mure clearly we see as the months go 
by, that it is not dividends or accrued 
profits that brings in prosperity for a 
community; but it is the actual wages 
paid to its workers that determines the 
degree of prosperity. Defered dividends 
can still be paid on idle machinery, but 
it lacks the spreading power demanded 
by the citizenry. For a salesman to 
make sales on a non-buying market, he 
must be a booster of prosperity. As 
specialty salesmen are now having the 
freedom curbed in their manner of sell- 
ing wares, whether it is their own indi- 
vidual skill, or the finished product of 
some other person's. For his own good 
and his fellow salesmen's, he must or- 
ganize, and each organization must co- 
operate with other organizations for at- 
taining and maintaining the individual's 
rights, in choosing our manner of selling 
a useful service to earn a living. In 
some manner the earth we live on is so 
efficiently organized, that it seems to 
operate automatically, and that is prob- 
ably the highest possible form of attain- 
ment. Perhaps after all. gravitation is 
a form of love best suited to the need:; 
of inanimate life ! Who knows of a 
surity as to whether it is or not? Co- 
operate wisely to receive the more 
abundent life lying concealed in the co- 
operative community spirit awaiting a 
wise development. 



NEW WOOD LIGHTER THAN CORK 




N writing about a new 
wood for the insulation of 
building flooring, walls 
and ceilings, ''The Ameri- 
can Builder" says: 

''Balsawood has about 
the same insulating value as cork. It 
weighs about one-half as much as cork 
installed and roughly speaking has about 
one-half the strength of spruce. It is 
therefore structurally self-supporting. 
It is a Central American wood and in its 
natural state is too susceptible to rot to 
be of much commercial value. A process 
or treatment has, however, been de- 
veloped which counteracts this tendency 
to decay. By this treatment the wood is 
impregnated with a substance that ren- 
ders it water-resisting and at the same 
time does not materially increase its 
weight or change the appearance of the 
finished lumber, This wood is white, 

1 



soft and easy to work. The cell walls 
are extremely thin and there are prac- 
tically no woody fibers. The cellular 
structure is such that about 92 per cent 
of the total volume of the wood is 
"dead" air. 

"Until comparatively recently practi- 
cally the entire supply of treated balsa 
was used for life preservers and similar 
equipments and for the insulation of re- 
frigerators, refrigerator cars and cold- 
storage insulation. There is a supply of 
the wood now available, however, for 
such uses as the insulation of buildings, 
especially for floors over open porches, 
ceilings near rafters, and for lining 
floors, walls and ceilings or cold pan- 
tries. 

"Several months ago the American 
Balsa Company consulted with the 
Structural Service Committee of the 
American Institute of Architects as tq 



THE CARPENTER 



IS 



the most effective means of developing 
the proper use and avoiding the mis-use 
of balsa in building construction. It was. 
decided that the most effective means 
would be for the company to conduct an 
extensive investigation- of these possible 
uses, and before advertising the product, 
to prepare a techinal bulletin, describing 
in detail the proper uses, results to be 
expected, methods of installation and 
treatments of the finished surfaces when 
exposed. Much of this data has been 
collected and it is thought that in a short 
time this booklet will be ready for dis- 
tribution. 

"Treated balsa, as manufactured for 
general commercial use, is cut into strips 
from about 2 in. to 4 in. wide. These 
strips are dovetailed and glued together 
into panels from 8 to 10 ft. long. The 
maximum width of the panel is 27 in. 
The usual commercial width is 24 in. 
The panels are manufactured in the fol- 
lowing finished thickness: 1 in., 1% in., 
2 in. and 3 in. 

"The edges of the panels are made 
straight for butt joints, rebated for 
shiplap joints or splined. The spline, 
however, is not recommended for use in 
connection with a panel thinner than 
IV2 in. The weight of commercial balsa 
wood varies from about 6 to 15 pounds 
per cu. ft. The lighter weights have 
the greater insulating value, and the 
heavier weights the greater strength. 
For such uses as the insulation of ceil- 
ings, the 15 pound balsa would be the 
best, since the slight loss in insulating 
value would be more than offset by the 
advantages of the increased strength. 
For general refrigeration purposes, 10 
pounds is usual. For special refrigera- 
tion, and where strength is relatively 
unimportant, weighs as low as 6 pounds 
are used. 

"Where the panels are to be attached 
directly to wood studs or joists, slender, 
flat-head nails should be used. The use 



of cement-coated nails is strongly 
recommended. There is no danger of 
the wood splitting, but since the un- 
painted wood is comparatively soft, care 
must be taken not to allow the hammer 
to dent the finished surface. A nail-set 
should be used for driving the nails 
home, and if the finished surface is to 
be left exposed or painted, the nail-holes 
should be puttied. The panels may also 
be secured in position by covering tne 
joints between the panels with a wood 
mould and securely nailing the mould to 
the framing. 

"Balsa may be painted or enameled, 
and any paint or enamel suitable for use 
on white pine may be used. Painting 
or enameling materially hardens the 
surface, and thereby increase its re- 
sistance to denting. For the inside walls 
of refrigerators, where a cement finish 
is required, dovetail channels are cut on 
the face of the panels, to form a key 
for the cement mortar. It is possible 
that a similar construction might be 
developed for plastered walls and ceil- 
ings ; it is understood, however, that the 
use of balsa panels as a base for plaster 
is as yet largely in an experimental 
stage. The price of balsa wood in a 
recent quotation is given at fifteen to 
twenty cents per board foot f. 0. b. 
plant. The 15 lb. wood is cheaper than 
the lighter woods. 

"It would appear from the data col- 
lected that for the insulation of a ceil- 
ing, s.uch as described, the proper kind 
of balsa to use would be 24 inches wide, 
1 inch thick, shiplap panels of the 15 
lb. wood. 

"Balsa should not be left exposed to 
the weather before use. Since it has 
been especially dried and prepared, for 
insulating purposes, it should be stored 
under cover and protected the same as 
cork board or any other insulating ma- 
terial." 



NEAR EASTERN ART IN WOODWORK 

(By Evelyn Saxton Conner) 



N Cesarea in Asia Minor, 
where the Near East Re- 
lief has one of its large 
orphanages, and where 
the orphans are engaged 
in many kinds of indus- 
trial work, no department is more popu- 
lar than that of carpentry and cabinet 
making. 




In the latter branch of artistry the 
boys vie with each other in turning out 
nollins (clogs) and when they are found 
proficient in this class of work, they are 
assigned to little jobs in cabinetmaking. 

"How many pairs of nollins do you 
expect to make today?" the master 
cabinetmaker will ask. It is not unusual 
for the average boy to make four pairs 



16 



THE CARPE.N'TER 



of clogs in a day, sometimes fire. 

Proficiency as becomes an expert in 
the art of clog making, is followed by 
the more interesting stage of wood in- 
dustry, cabinetinaking, and carriage 
making. This is what the boys love to 
do and it is the sort of artistry for which 
the greatest demand will be made in the 
coming years. 

On account of the ravishes of war. 
with pillaging and burning incidental to 
war conditions, furniture everywhere in 
the Near East is in a state of rack and 
ruin while much that was precious has 
been totally destroyed. 

It lies with the rising generation of 
Armenians to perpetuate the art of wood 
carving as it was handed on by their 
race for generations, in spite of perse- 
cution. 

In fact, no furniture was more beau- 
tiful than that to be seen on sale in 
Near Eastern Cities. Great wooden 
screens, carved in the most intricate de- 
signs, from Lebanon Cedar, could be 
bought for a comparatively small 
amount. Cabinets and tables, doors and 
window casings, desks and tabourettes 
upon which were expended the artists 
best efforts, have been sought by con- 
noisseurs from all parts of the Western 
World who made collecting a hobby. 

Because of the fact that pictures or 
statues are not in use in Mohamedan 
countries, all artistic endeavor became 
centered in articles of furniture, doors 
and panels in use in homes and public 
buildings. 

Cabinetmaking and wood carving 
were, therefore, considered a high ex- 
pression of art, and in the time of the 
Seljuk Turks were brought to a state 
of singular perfection. 

Cedar is the wood most used for 
screens, caskets, boxes, tiny jewel cases, 
chest and all other knicknacs : It being 
light it is easily carved into flowers. 
leaves and nondescript designs, which 
rather than the figurative is the scheme 
in use in Eastern decoration. 

Circassian Walnut has been converted 
into the rarest pieces of furniture from 
the oldest times and it was because of 
the way it was treated by the wood 
artists that brought it into such promi- 
nence as a wuod of rare beauty. 

Treasures to be found in grand homes 
and museums in England were bought 
in the market places in Damascus and 
other Eastern cities for a trifling sum, 
by travelers with an eye for beauty. 



Not long ago, an American traveler 
in Turkey, while making a call at the 
American Mission Compound at Talas, 
noticed two logs of wood which had been 
used for chopping blocks. 

He purchased them for one dollar and 
had them taken away to the shop of a 
cabinet maker. Some weeks later, the 
people at the bare Mission House re- 
ceived a present of three pieces, a desk, 
a table and a china closet, each piece 
beautifully carved and finished to look 
like antique articles of Seljuk make. 
The logs were seasoned Circassian wal- 
nut, that had been cut more than a hun- 
dred years before. They had been 
bought for firewood and for less than 
it took to have them brought home. 

It seems that if it had been practi- 
cable to have the three pieces of furni- 
ture brought to the United States, they 
could have been sold as antiques for a 
large sum of money. 

The Near East Relief is endeavoring 
to revive the old art of wood carving 
and cabinet making, by employing the 
best native workers to be found, and by 
procuring the most beautiful pieces of 
old furniture to be used as models in 
their workshops. 

The orphans show an interest and 
skill in all sorts of carpenter work and 
cabinet making, which in the present 
stage of their development, indicates 
that the efforts of the Near East Relief 
to revive an old and beautiful art, shall 
not have been made in vain. 

Old Armenian wood artists, proud of 
their skill, often demonstrate their love 
for the work by making presents of 
carved wood handicraft, and they are 
glad to give then- services as teachers in 
their pride to have the art perpetuated. 

An American woman physician in 
Turkey was greatly surprised last 
Christmas by receiving a photograph of 
herself done in bits of cedar and wal- 
nut. It was an exact reproduction of 
an ordinary photograph, taken in New 
York some years before, was curiously 
wrought, and a faithful likeness. The 
frame was made of leaves that were 
carved from Circassian walnut, cedar 
and olive 'wood, in varied autumn colors 
exquisitely blended. 

This was the work of an old Armenian 
whom she had befriended, and she con- 
siders it a work of art which she would 
not part with for any amount of money. 

The workers in the Near East Relief 
orphanages are endeavoring to make 



THE CARPENTER 



good cabinet makers of the orphans un- 
der their care, and by the interest taken 
in the work at the present stage of their 
development, the efforts will not have 
been made in vain. 



But it remains to be seen, wii't' <t lip- 
old art in wood carving will be per- 
petuated in the children that arc taking 

an interest in the work as it is taught 
today. 



HARMONY OUR GREATEST NEED 

(By John Bowman.) 




HO runs this Government 
of ours — the business suc- 
cesses or the business 
failures? An authority 
on the subject estimates 
that 95% of all business 
men are failures, and as one of the 95%, 
I think we at least have the right to be 
heard. 

To prove I am qualified to speak for 
this majority, will say I am 76 years of 
age and am not at this writing out of 
sight of the poor house. This default 
on my part in spite of having been 
equipped by nature with exceptionally 
good health. 

Now, the neighborhood in which I 
live is made up largely of successful 
business men — good people and good 
neighbors as the world goes, but men 
who consider business of more import- 
ance than harmony and good feeling. 
For instance, I am often leaving home 
for a job of work at the same time some 
of them are leaving — they in their auto- 
mobiles, I on foot, and as a rule I pro- 
ceed on foot, for they seldom stop and 
ask me to ride. 

Now, I have some other neighbors who 
are carpenters, plumbers, bricklayers, 
etc. Some of them also own cars, but 
they are rarely so intent upon business 
but what they have time to stop and 
call, "Get in and ride, John!" Now 
those are fixed habits and motives in the 
different individuals and it is upon such 
observations that I base my conclusion 
that we are suffering now partly from 
what is termed "good business adminis- 
tration." 

All will agree that our troubles are 
due to lack of harmony, but the ques- 
tion arises as to what make us un- 
harmonious. Simply this — human na- 
ture is made up of many motives, many 
desires, and the clashing of those mo- 
tives and desires creates discord. For 
instance, one faction says, "Do away 
with rum!'' another says, "Extrava- 
gance" or "Profiteering" or "Unionism." 
Each of those factions, viewing the prob- 
lem, think they have the cure for our 



nation's ailment. My opinion is, they 
are all standing on an angle themselves 
and cannot possibly get a plumb line on 
the subject. 

The difficulty, as I see it, is that we 
have not yet learned the method of just, 
dealing. Justice is of a two-fold nature 
and can be given and taken. The Mosiac 
law was "An eye for an eye and a tooth 
for a tooth." This is the only law of 
justice in practice today — the law of 
taking justice, the law of force. The 
spiritual law of justice is that given by 
Christ — to get justice by first giving it. 
The popular cry will be, "It won't 
work," but I know better — it will work. 
As an example : I once worked for a 
man in the concrete business. His rule 
was not to hire a man for as little as he 
could, but to pay him as high wages as 
the job would bear — and oftentimes 
more. He would take a piece of work at, 
say $1 a yard. (Wages were about 
$2.50 a day at that time.) "Boys," 
he'd tell us, "I've got a good job — can 
pay you $3 a day on this one." And he 
would pay us the $3 a day and be satis- 
fied if he received a like amount for 
himself. He made us ashamed and we 
had to insist that he take more. 

Now, that man could get nearly any 
one of us to leave another job and go to 
him for less money. And with this 
method of justice he made a reasonable 
profit. Because of his square dealing 
with his workers, he received justice 
from them in return. 

Another thing I have discovered with 
humanity in general is, the fewer secrets 
a man's business requires him to have, 
the clearer the man and the business 
will be. I can't conceive that a busi- 
ness, requiring private cost marks, is 
productive of the highest standard of 
business integrity. However, a small 
proportion of selfish, dishonest men in ;i 
competitive business world can compel 
others to adopt their methods for protec- 
tion, consequently, if the prevailing 
methods of doing business could be dis- 
graced and the spiritual law applied to 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



business, we could then abolish strife in 
the industrial world. 

There seemed to be in our late war 
some hopes that it might be our last one, 
but in my judgment that hope is entirely- 
blasted, because since the cessation of 
that war, each and every country is try- 
ing its best to steal the commerce of 
other nations and it is just as foolish to 
expect a calm sea in a storm as to ex- 
pect peace in the midst of stealing. 

Statistics show that during this last 



war 93% of the Federal income was 
spent for the purpose of war. The con- 
tinuation of a system embodying that 
condition means the fall of our Govern- 
ment. 

Our greatest need at this time is 
harmony, and Paul gave us the secret 
of how to obtain it in Romans, the 13th 
Chapter, 8th Verse — "Love thy neighbor 
as thyself, love worketh no ill to his 
neighbor; love, therefore, is the fulfill- 
ment of the law." 



THE AMERICAN LABOR MOVEMENT 




//HINDER the above caption 
the "Alberta Labor News" 
says: 

"The American Labor 
Movement — and this ap- 
plies to all labor move- 
rs ~nts — is a product of unrest. So are 
all types of energizing. There is no end 
for it. So long as labor — work — is a 
necessity, that long will there exist a 
labor movement. 

"Motive drives energy. There must 
come from work, some result contribut- 
able in return to sustain or serve as an 
incentive — that which leads to, or im- 
pels more work or a continuance of 
work. Call the incentive whatever we 
may — life development to a higher order 
of reproduction or otherwise — it is the 
impelling force that leads on to work, 
more work. 

"Many orders of work are there in our 
civilization. Each order strives for ex- 
clusiveness in the endeavor to force de- 
pendability of all other orders upon it. 
This marks the period within which we 
now survive. 

"Orders of work are of classified ele- 
ments. Among these varied elements 
we find the capitalist order and the wage 
worker order. The life of these two 
orders, under the present industrial sys- 
tem, although sublimely dependable each 
upon the other, and so severely common 
in purpose, lines the two as most dis- 
tinctively competitors for the goal of 
mastery. 

"Our experience with the capitalist 
as an order well defines the policy pur- 
sued by that order to enforce the de- 
pendability upon it of all other orders 
in effecting and maintaining supremacy. 
Further, our experience is that the de- 
pendability of capital upon labor is the 
most obstructive barrier to the capitalist. 
This is naturally so and it is impossible 
of being overcome. 



"No two elements of modern civiliza- 
tion are more naturally antagonistic in 
their pursuit for supremacy than the 
orders of capitalists and wage workers. 
In their competition the capitalist order 
is dependable upon the wage working 
order to pay campaign expenses for both 
orders. 

"In-so-far as the enlistment of the 
force of other orders is concerned, let 
us admit that the capitalist order has a 
decided advantage. Capital is created 
and is ever present in its glittering en- 
trenchment. It is the pillar of the cap- 
italist order. It is ever awe-inspiring 
and seductive. Labor has not this ad- 
vantage. It is a creative force and is 
yet compelled to work to enforce an in- 
tervening screen between all other or- 
ders and the wage worker order. The 
capitalist has ascended to and set him- 
self up as the capital controlling order. 
At least the capitalist order is so recog- 
nized, and without capital, there could 
be no capitali t order. 

"In its well fortified position — forti- 
fied by its command of other orders — 
the capitalist order applies its militancy 
in its endeavor to deny to labor — the 
wage worker — its natural and inalien- 
able right to participate in the regula- 
tion, direction or control of capital — 
the product of labor. Thus we have the 
condition, the natural formation from 
which is the present age industrial prob- 
lem. 

"Of the various orders of society the 
wage workers' has seemingly been the 
slowest in comprehending its force of 
identification in the way of commanding 
respect from other orders for its rights 
to assert a group interest and energize 
for the development and promotion of 
that interest. This group identity was 
never invited or encouraged by any other 
of the orders. Neither can we omit the 
suggestion that the capitalist order for 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



many decades enjoyed the unified sym- 
pathy of all other orders in its discour- 
agement of the identity of the order 
rights of wage workers. Labor has been 
compelled to identify itself. 

"Wage workers in their course of en- 
forcement of their own identity as pos- 
sessed of rights to pursue the common 
ambition to control, as an order, have 
been compelled to overcome the obstruc- 
tive and destructive influences that have 
been within the power of the capitalist 
order to place in the course of labor's 
progress. These obstructive influences 
comprehend the disintegrating influence 
and elements within, as well as those 
without the order. All of this has made 
progress slow. All of this has added to 
the suspicious, discouragements and lack 
of faith that has so retarded progress 
and withheld understanding from the 
many yet individually unidentified in the 
movement — the so-called non-union 
wage worker. 

"The means of progress by wage work- 
ers is necessarily to be determined upon 
by wage workers. "We have long since 
learned that to be directed by the cap- 
italist is like being piloted into an alley 
by a hold-up man. We have learned 
that the results are similar. At the end 
we are compelled to resist or surrender 
our possessions. So the means of prog- 
ress must be determined by the wage 
earner himself and here we have the in- 
centive for organization. 

"The element of wage earners that 
has seen fit to deliberate upon and adopt 
the means of progress comprise those 
who are members of the trades and labor 
unions. All members of this element of 
wage-earners have determined that the 
means of progress is organization. And 
organization is the result. We, then, 
know that organization, so far as our 
inventive reasoning ability can or has 
directed us, is the institution through 
which we must progress as an order. 
But what shall be the method and pro- 
cess of organization? If we look for 
answer to the many who have given 
deliberative study to the subject, we 
must accept that their conviction is that 
the trades union, with federal responsi- 
bility, is the proper method and process. 
That, in Canada and the United States, 
is the American Federation of Labor. 

"It is not remarkable that from with- 
in the Federation of Labor, as well as 
from without, there should come forth 



those who believe the method and policy 
of the millions of Federation of Labor 
are all wrong, and assume that they 
have a shorter and more effective way 
to our objective. In such cases, our first 
thought is: How do they reconcile their 
endeavor and their professed hope of 
success with the fact that the multi- 
tudes of the trades unions are the 
thoughtful and reasoning element of 
wage earners who are prepared to de- 
fend the organization of their own cre- 
ation? What process of reasoning do 
they expect the trades unionist will ex- 
ercise to arrive at the conclusion that he 
had better tear down his own house and 
accept a plan offered by another for its 
reconstruction, when he has already 
tried that supposed new plan and long 
since discarded it? 

"The American Federation of Labor is 
a progressive organization. It came into 
being upon the principle of sound rea- 
soning and is based upon years of delib- 
eration. It is the successor of industrial 
unionism. Its policies and methods are 
subject to amendments and modifica- 
tions. It moves in the direction pointed 
out by the collective reasoning of its 
various units. The units are governed 
by their respective membei'ship. The 
majority rules. It is purely a demo- 
cratic institution. Its membership is 
voluntary- It should be apparent that 
when the individual withdraws and en- 
deavors to induce others to withdraw 
and follow some other method or proce- 
dure or organization that such individual 
is a disrupter rather than a constructor 
of organization and cannot fail to be so 
regarded by the millions who are spon- 
sors of the Federation of Labor Move- 
ment. 

"The Trades and Labor Union meth- 
ods and policies of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor within the last year have 
stood the test. The success that has at- 
tained during this period of depression 
and oppression has clearly vindicated the 
reasoning of the magnitudinous mem- 
bership of the American Federation of 
Labor. Its power of resistance has been 
tested. Its solidarity has been deter- 
mined. Not only has it withstood the 
batteries of the capitalist order, but its 
progress has been very little obstructed 
by the disintegrating machiniations of 
dogmatic exploiters of discarded the- 
ories and impossibilities. 

"The continued progress of the trade 
union movement is assured." 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



THE MAN ON THE SKY LINE 

(By T. L. Fritz, Secretary St. Louis, Mo., Carpenters' District Council.) 




&% TiF ^gk>^ TATISTICS prepared by 
**& the United States Govern- 
ment disclose the fact 
that 5,000,000 men are 
out of work, and it is a 
fair assumption that de- 
pending on these same men are millions 
of helpless women and children. Unem- 
ployment, with all its attendant evils 
of undernourishment, unwholesome liv- 
ing conditions, developing warped and 
diseased minds and bodies, is prevalent 
in this, the richest country in the world. 

A clamor of discordant voices fill the 
air, pretending to solve the problem. 
For instance, some scribe attached to a 
financial journal says the recent drastic 
cuts in the wages of steel workers would 
tend to stabilize conditions in that in- 
dustry, whatever that means. Locally, 
we are told that if building mechanics 
would cut their wages, our problem 
would be solved in spite of the fact that 
in scores of other cities where reductions 
have been made, there is still more un- 
employment and distress than in St. 
Louis. Yet, the men who brave the ele- 
ments on the sky line of our beloved 
city, striving and toiling to make this a 
worth while place to live, are compelled 
to listen to the Jackal chorus of these 
self-appointed and self-annointed proph- 
ets or profiteers shouting up to him "You 
are getting too much money for the job 
you have up there." 

By virtue of what service or sacrifice 
these men presume to advise the workers 
is not stated, but in a general way, 
among Master Builders and members of 
the Chamber of Commerce, whence this 
squawk eminates conditions are only 
right when their profits run far beyond 



the wildest dreams of the man of the sky 
line, showing clearly that their idea of 
prosperity is not based on the welfare 
of the workers who constitute the vast 
majority of citizenship, but rather is 
predicated on the success of them and 
their associates in exploiting our coun- 
try and its resources, as well as the 
great mass of their fellow citizens, gen- 
erally referred to as the public, and at 
the same time, they have the effrontary 
to pose as representatives of that same 
public. 

Will the worker inquire what is to be 
done? Let us hope so. It will serve no 
good purpose to sing the blues or to rant 
and rave about what our Government is 
or is not doing in this crisis. We might 
as well recognize the fact that in the 
conduct of the nation's affairs, it is only 
the council of the class formerly men- 
tioned that is sought, and the appeals of 
labor exciting only contempt on the part 
of those in power. 

It is the fault of no one but the work- 
er himself and his chosen leaders that 
this condition should obtain. Did we 
not, by our suffrage, place in power the 
very men who now trample on our dear- 
est rights and strive to defeat our as- 
pirations for decent living conditions. 
There are places in the world where the 
views of labor are given at least a re- 
spectful hearing, even where power is 
exercised, by "divine right," but in free 
America, where the voice of the people 
is supposed to be supreme, we have al- 
lowed ourselves to be divided over non- 
essential issues, while representatives of 
the small element in our population own- 
ing our country's wealth have worked 
unitedly to usurp the functions of our 
Government. 



HOLDING OUR OWN 
And What It Means To Our Organization 

HE past year has been one of great moment to us, and the lessons 
emanating from the world war have been used to a greater extent by 
the employers than by the workers ; the reasons for this are patent. 

There was a great deal said during the war about "progaganda," 
and it made a hit with the people. There was propaganda for this, 
that and everything. Acres of newspaper space were given over it. 
Tons of good newsprint paper were scattered all over the world in spreading it. It 
wa i dropped from aeroplanes, thrown from trains, floated on oceans, painted on 
rocks, distributed by sky rocket, etc. 

Hardly had the echoes of war died out until we realized that the employers had 
fully recognized the power of propaganda, and were using it to shape the minds 




THE CARPEXTER 21 

of the public into the channels of reduced wages, and endeavoring to point out the 
iniquities of the labor unions. 

Something had to he done to get the minds of the people off the stupendous steals 
that had been perpetrated by Big Business, Hog Island, aeroplane failure, snipping 
Board deals, nitro plants, Army and Navy camp steals, munition and supply deals, 
etc., for, if the minds of the people were not diverted to other things, and the power 
■of the press surpressed by liberal allotments from the above mentioned deals, things 
would have become mighty unpleasant for a great many prominent citizens who 
were connected with the so-called "Big Business" and one dollar a year advi ers of 
•our Government during the war. 

What better use could the employers put the propaganda to than that of villify- 
ing the very people who made it possible to win the war; the working people in 
general, and the unions in particular? 

We must get back to a state of normalcy. Yes, that was the battle cry, and the 
first step must be a TWENTY PER CENT CUT in wages. 

We must do away with those awful unions. Men get into them in spite of all 
we can do, and they fight to hold their wages much more effectively as a body than 
they can as individuals. Never mind the cost of living, or the war inflated cost of 
building materials ; if we make our propaganda on the reduction of wages, and the 
iniquities of the labor union strong enough the people won't think of us, they will 
only think that these are the things that are making life miserable for them. 

We must get rid of the paid union organizers, and cast aspersion on the unions' 
officers ; for as a very prominent employer said : 

"These union officers and organizers are not afraid of us, they 
know they won't lose their jobs if they talk back to us; they have 
a very ungentlemanly habit of disputing our figures, and are 
able to make the membership understand the difference between 
our profits and the wages we pay, so, if we can get those fellows 
out of the way with our propaganda we will have very easy 
sailing." 

Now, we know that in some localities, especially those where some special line 
of industries are predominant, such as iron and steel, copper mining, textiles, shoes, 
rubber tires, etc., and the industries have been shut down for months, thereby 
bringing about stagnation in other lines dependent on them, that; our membership 
have suffered, and in a few cases where the members were so situated that they 
could not leave their partly paid for home, the children who were just at the age 
when they needed the guidance of a father, or for other reasons too numerous to 
mention here, they were not able to roam about the country looking for a job, 
even though the prospects of getting one were good ; for a man of family doing this 
has to think he has to keep his family at home ; he has to live himself, and it is like 
keeping two families. Will the difference of what he can make in another city more 
than make up for what he could make in his home town if he accepted a reduction 
in wages there, and often times in his despair he thought he would vote in his 
union for a reduction, in the hope that this would stimulate building, and he would 
try to get along somehow. 

Good stuff, for the employers who already had got a lot of fat contracts and now 
In their greed says: "He stood for that reduction, he will stand for another for the 
same reasons," and the two reductions will make up for the insistent demand on the 
part of the prospective builder for reduced building cost, reduced rents, etc., which, 
somehow, are mighty slow to reduce. 

Now, there is where the activity of our Local Unions should come in : Don't let 
your members drop out and then call them scabs for doing so. Appoint committees 
:in your Local Unions, East, West, North and South. You will be surprised how 
many of your members will volunteer to call on those who are becoming delinquent, 
.and if they find a member out of work they may be able to help him find a job. If 
he is sick you will find a way to help him, or if his pride prevents him from corning 
to the meeting and letting others know of his distress, tell him of the dispensation 
.granted the Local Unions by the General President under date of October 21, 1921, 
copy of which was sent to all Local Unions. 

REMEMBER THIS: There will be more building in the next five years than 
you have any idea of. 




22 THE CARPENTER 

That it is harder to get a man back into the union once he has dropped out, 
because he is very often ashamed of his own weakness. Added initiation, a- 
nioucs, etc.. all militate- against him. 

TVe need every qualified carpenter under any of the sub-divisions of our Consti- 
tution in our organization. 

.A strong Local very seldom suffers reductions in wages, or have their Trade 
Bides destroyed by the employe: 

Vou don't have to have hundreds of members, but you do have to have a big 
percentage of the best grade of mechanics in your union, and it pays you to go 
after them. You will find the difference in your pay envelope, where it does you 
the most good. 

It don't do you any good to complain that your Local has no life in it. Get busy 
yourself and put life into it. 

If there is any fight in yon don't waste it fighting among yourselves : you have 
a big field in which to expend your energies, and do it so you will get some good 
out of it. 

YOUB UNION IS JUST AS GOOD AS YOU MAKE IT. 

• 

SOMETHING FOR CARPENTERS TO READ 

HE United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America was 
founded in Convention held ~n Chicago, August 12. 1881, with 12 
Local Unions and 2.012 members. Today it numbers 2,466 Local 
Unions with a membership of 353,587. 

The objects of the organization are to discourage piece-work: to 
encourage an Apprent: System and a higher standard of skill : to 
cultivate feelings of friendship among the men of the craft; to assist each other to 
secure employment: to reduce the hours of daily toil: to secure adequate pay for 
work done; to improve the trade: to elevate the moral, intellectual and social condi- 
tion of its members, and to furnish aid in cases of sickness, permanent disability, 
or death. 

Apprentices over IT years of age and under 21. and candidates over 50 years 
of age, can only be admitted as semi-beneficial members entitled to benefits of that 
class, viz: §25 to §125 in case of death. 

A candidate to be admitted to beneficial membership must not be less than 21 
and not over 50 years of age. and must be a journeyman carpenter or joiner, stair- 
builder, ship-joiner, millwright, planing mill bench hand, cabinet maker, car builder, 
or be engaged in running wood- working machinery. He must be of good moral 
character and competent to command standard wages. 

It pays a Wife Funeral Benefit from $25 to $75; a Member's Funeral Benefit 
form $50 to §300 and Disability Benefit from $50 - 400. In these benefits 
§2,261,697.75 have been expended during the past four years, and §7.444.074.30 
since the year 1883, when the benefits were inaugurated. In the past quarter of a 
century $2,750,000 was spent by the Local Unions for sick benefits, and the sum 
of $2,988,663.50 was appropriated by the General Office for strike and lockout pur- 
poses. This is fully §13.1 S3. 337. 80 expended for benevolent and charitable pur- 
poses. 

It has raised wages in hundreds of cities, and placed fully $15,000,000 more 
wages annually in the pockets of the carpenters of those cities than they would 
have received if they did not belong to the organization at all. At the same time 
it raised the wages of the non-union men. It also reduced the hours of labor to 
eight a day in 1.200 cities and nine hours a day in 200 cities, not to speak of many 
cities that have established the Saturday half-holiday. By these means 30,000 
more men have gained employment. This is the result of thorough organization. 

All carpenters are eligible to membership and this is an invitation to you, 
as an intelligent and up-to-date mechanic, to join the Carpenters' Union of your city 
without further delay. It is to your interest to hold membership in such a growing 
and powerful body. 



THE CARPENTER 

Official Journal of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 

OF AME RICA 

Published on the 15th of each month at the 

CARPENTERS' BUILDING 

Indianapolis, Inch 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OP 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA, 

Publishers 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Subscription Price 
One Dollar a Year in Advance, Postpaid 

The publishers and the advertising 
agent use every possible precaution avail= 
able to them against accepting advertise= 
ments from other than reliable firms, but 
do not accept any responsibility for the 
contents of any advertisement which ap= 
pears in "The Carpenter." Should any 
deception be practiced by advertisers at 
any time, upon members, their duty is to 
immediately notify the Post Office au= 
thorities. Therefore, address any com= 
plaints to your local Post Office. 



INDIANAPOLIS, JANUARY, 1922 

Starting the New Year Right 

We feel that we could not start this 
new year better than in having, a heart 
to heart talk with our Financial Secre- 
taries and we wish to assure them at the 
start that what is said is not intended to 
give offense, but for the purpose of im- 
pressing on their minds the importance 
of the position they hold. 

As all claims made on the General 
Office for donations, whether for death 
or disability, must come through the 
Financial Secretary, he should readily 
perceive the necessity of the General Of- 
fice having in its files the names of all 
the members of his Local, together with 
the dates of their birth and initiation; 
also the records must show the date such 
members went in arrears, squared up or 
were suspended and for the purpose of 



this record it is absolutely necessary 
that a monthly report of all transactions 
of the Local where its membership is 
concerned, should be sent to the General 
Secretary each and every month ; other- 
wise there is bound to occur a lapse in 
the records at the General Office and 
some member's claim be delayed in its 
payment, not through any fault of the 
individual member, but through the 
carelessness or oversight on the part of 
the Financial Secretary. 

We fully realize and appreciate the 
fact that most of the members of the 
United Brotherhood are not bookkeepers 
nor accountants, but we do know that 
the monthly reports, with the different 
captions, are so plain that "those who 
run may read," and we feel that any 
member of this United Brotherhood not 
qualified should decline to accept the re- 
sponsible position of Financial Secre- 
tary. 

In connection with this it will not 
come amiss if we give a brief outline 
of the transactions necessary to furnish 
the General Office with an accurate re- 
port. 

Start the report with the same num- 
ber of members as you closed the pre- 
ceedihg report; then in the space for 
"Members Initiated" (both beneficial 
and semi-beneficial), note the number of 
same. Next note all admitted on clear- 
ance cards, provided their cards have 
matured, in other words, if they begin 
paying their dues to your Local for that 
month ; the next step is to note the num- 
ber of members who squared up their 
arrears in full, including the current 
month ; the foregoing should be added 
together and the total inserted in the 
space provided. Then note the number 
of members who went three months in 
arrears, granted clearance, expelled or 
died; which added together and deduct- 
ed from the total given in the foregoing 
will give the number in good standing 
and upon whom per capita tax is to be 
paid to the General Office; always bear- 
ing in mind, however, that additional 
tax must be allowed on those squaring 
arrears for the months (hey were in ar- 
rears, starting with the month they were 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



rted and deducted for as in arrears, 
and on those deducted for as granted 
clearance. 

The next step to be taken is in filling 
out the body of the report under the 
different captions therein, viz : Expelled, 
Died. Squared Arrears, Members Three 
Months in Arrears. Members Initiated, 
Admitted on Clearance, Granted Clear- 
ance and Suspended. In noting these. 
care should be taken that the different 
transactions hare taken place in the 
month for which the report is made. 
thus avoiding duplications and double 
deductions. Care should also be exer- 
cised in reporting members admitted on 
clearance cards : as a member who comes 
from another Local and does not remain 
long enough to become a dues paying 
member of your Local, but transfers out 
to another locality, his name, together 
with the number of the Local he trans- 
fers from should be given and also re- 
ported as granted clearance, however, in 
such cases, it is not necessary to report 
such transactions on the face of the re- 
port, as it does not effect the member- 
ship of your Local numerically. 

Another duty that many of our Finan- 
cial Secretaries neglect is in obtaining 
and sending to this Office the street ad- 
dress of their members, blanks for which 
are furnished by the General Office, so 
that they may receive our official Jour- 
nal. "The Carpenter" and it is one that 
is the cause of much trouble, as mem- 
bers complain of not receiving their 
Journal. 

If our many Financial Secretaries, on 
reading this will heed the instructions 
given and take it in the same 
spirit with which it is written, we feel 
that we have started the New Year by 
doing some good for the membership of 
the United Brotherhood. TVe also 
feel that it will not be amiss if we again 
call attention to the necessity and care- 
ful observance of Section 40. Paragraph 
C. of the General Laws, which reads : 

"The Trustees shall audit all books 
and accounts of the Financial Secretary 
and Treasurer, and examine the bank 
book of the Treasurer monthly, and see 
that it is correct, and shall report to the 
Local Union, in writing, and semi-an- 
nually to the General Secretary, on 
blanks supplied from the General Office. 
and shall see that the Financial Secre- 
tary and Treasurer are bonded through 
the General Office, and perform sn 
Other duties as are provided for in the 



titution and lLaws of the United 
Brotherhood, and perform any other du- 
ties their Local Union may direct." 

* * * 

High Wages Myth 

How often have you heard the state- 
ment made that carpenters, bricklayers, 
hod-carriers and other building crafts- 
men get wages entirely out of proportion 
to either the skill or energy required in 
the performance of their work? 

That is a stock argument of the shal- 
low-pated critic of trade unions. It 
could come only from one who refuses 
to dig to the bottom of the case. 

In considering the wage question the 
element of opportunity for employment 
should be taken into account. It means 
nothing at all if a man gets .$100 a day 
if the number of days he can get em- 
ployment is so curtailed as to make his 
total annual earnings comparatively 
small. 

Take, for instance, the case of the 
carpenter. He gets $8 a day and aver- 
ages, if he is lucky, 200 days per year. 
This means a yearly income of $1,600 
per year. Is that too much? 

''But." says the afore-mentioned crit- 
is, "why doesn't he work more days?" 
The answer lies in the fact that industry 
is run on a hit-and-miss plan that in- 
evitably means waste of every sort- 
There is no attempt made to manage 
building operations so as to provide con- 
tinuous employment for building crafts- 
men. Building is usually undertaken 
when the supply of labor is so plentiful 
as to be cheap. 

If there was anything like real "man- 
agement" in the conduct- of industry, 
periods of unemployment would not be 
so frequently and hence the necessity 
for what seems to be disproportionate 
wages would be lessened. 

The inefficiency of "management" is 
responsible for most of the inequalities 
and waste in industry. 

* * * 

Tribute To Labor 

President Harding receives S75.000 
per annum as the head of a nation of 
more than 100,000.000 people and the 
President of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
is paid $65,460 per annum, said Con- 
gressman Parks of Arkansas. 

"Looking back across the years to the 

. :;ning of the life of Organized Labor 
and the day of starvation wages, what 
' . " l;e asked. 

"Without Organized Labor, without 



THE CARPENTER 



2C 



their battle for a just and fair wage and 
reasonable hour.-! of work, what would 
have been the conditions of labor today? 

"It was only at the command of the 
Congress of the United States that the 
railroads equipped their trains with safe- 
ty appliances for the protection of the 
lives, and the limbs of those who drive 
the locomotive, set the brakes or direct 
the train. I recall that again and again 
these men, seeking to earn their bread 
in the sweat of their faces — men who 
were free and not slaves — found it nec- 
essary to appeal to the lawmakers, and 
the Government once more stepped in 
and said that a man should not be re- 
quired to work more than 16 hours a 
day : and then, when the day of fast 
trains with the increased hours incident 
thereto came, and with the terrible re- 
sponsibilities of life and property in the 
hands of the employes they again found 
it necessary to appeal to the Government 
to say what should be a day's work. 

"From the day the first piece of steel 
was laid until this hour, the railroads 
have demanded from the laborer all that 
physical endurance would permit ; they 
have taken from the public every ounce 
of flesh they were able to extract : they 
have never yielded until they had fought 
every inch of the way and exhausted 
every remedy known to law; they have 
demanded of communities rights of way, 
station sites and bonuses ; they have re- 
ceived from the hands of the Govern- 
ment enormous tracts of land to induce 
them to extend their lines, until today 
their properties are worth $20,000,000. 

"Yet, while you and I and the world 

are sleeping after a day's work, these 

railroad employes, who are so severely 

censured when they stand up for what 

they deem to be their rights, and even 

threaten to strike, must go out into the 

night and into the storm and rain, doing 

their part to keep the wheels of trade 

^moving and to silence the howl of the 

wolf at the door. Shall we condemn the 

man for using the only weapon for his 

defense that he has?" 

* * * 

Strike Right Is Natural Right 

The strike is a natural right ; it is 
man's natural defense; it existed prior to 
the state itself and is a right which no 
society can annul, said Cardinal O'Con- 
nell, of Boston, in a pastoral letter. 

The reasoning of this churchman is a 
contrast with the claim of "can't-strike" 
advocates, that strikes should be out- 



lawed when they inconvenience the pub- 
lic — or. in other words, that a right can 
be set aside when it discommodes so- 
ciety; and that the state, created by 
man. can deny rights inherent in man. 

"It is a natural right of man to give 
or withhold his labor." said the cardinal. 
"It is man's defense against injury and 
oppression. Man's right to strike is then 
a natural right. 

"A strike is not war, save figurative- 
ly, but like war it should be considered a 
last resort. 

"The state has the right to suppress 
a civil war, but a strike should never be 
civil war. Sometimes incidental to a 
strike, but not at all necessary, and 
greatly to be deplored by true friends of 
labor, are intimidation, disorder, riot and 
vioelnce. A strike of itself does not 
imply any disturbance of the peace. 

"Strikes are called more frequently on 
account of failure to pay a just wage 
than for any other reason. If employers 
would recognize man's right to a juit 
wage, another great mile stone of prog- 
ress toward industrial peace would be 
passed. 

"There is plenty to go round in this 
rich country of ours. 

"The state should always maintain 
discipline, but the state has no right to 
prohit a just strike. 

"The evils and abuses of the present 
industrial system cannot be too strong- 
ly deplored. The aloofness of the em- 
ployer from the worker, the concentra- 
tion of wealth in the hands of the few. 
the' oppression of the worker are abuses 
which, while not universal, are alto- 
gether too common. Stories of excessive 
profits and low wages, of heartless dis- 
missals, or inhuman disregard of labor, 
are a disgrace to our democratic state. 

"We must not look upon labor as 
merely the expenditure of muscle or 
intellectual energy, or as a commodity 
to be bought and sold. There is a moral 
element which must be considered. Man 

is not an irresponsible machine." 

* * * 

Members — Attention 
In the November is<ue we suggested 
that our members try their hand in 
writing some article for publication in 
our official Journal. "The Carpenter," as 
we thought our readers would be inter- 
ested in getting something first-hand 
from those versed in our craft. We still 
think the same. Of course, if you can- 
not think of something to write, you 



26 



THE CAKl'DNTEE 



might run across an article or news item 
that appeals to you which would be of 
interest to other members of the United 
Brotherhood and should you do so, by 
all means send it in — it will be, at least, 
appreciated. 

* * * 

Throwing Men Out of Work 

Under the above caption "The Dear- 
born Independent" says: 

"An objection to disarmament now 
beginning to be heard is that it will 
throw men out of work. There are be- 
tween three and four million men un- 
employed in the United States and the 
unemployment problem in Britain has 
reached a stage so acute that extraor- 
dinary grants of doles from the public 
treasury are being made just to sheer 
off bread riots. If the building of dread- 
noughts in American shipyards and on 
the Clyde is halted there will be a cor- 
responding slump in all the steel found- 
ries and machine shops, causing thou- 
sands to be added to the already swollen 
ranks of disemployed breadwinners. 

"Such is the argument. It leaves out 
of account several important facts. 
Times are hard in Britain and in Amer- 
ica chiefly because of war waste and 
destruction and of the continuance of 
war expenditure on a war basis in both 
countries. Business is dull and factories 
closed down or running on part time be- 
cause of burdensome taxation to meet 
this wasteful expenditure. There is un- 
employment because the labor and cap- 
ital that should go into healthy construc- 
tive activity that would restore trade are 
going into the building of naval arma- 
ment and the making of big guns and 
shells. 

"How many miles of hard roadbed 
could be built for the cost of a single 
battleship? How many thousands of 
acres of swamp-land could be reclaimed 
or of arid land irrigated? How many 
houses could be built? 

"For the destructive, abnormal and 
uncertain jobs armament workers would 
lose through scrapping battleship-build- 
ing they would find many more profit- 
able and steadier jobs in productive and 
constructive industry making for the 
general welfare. Germany is already 
giving us an object lesson in this re- 
spect. There is practically no unem- 
ployment in that country today. 

"And if we shall not manage to tide 
over the temporary displacement of la- 
bor without serious hardship to the arm- 



ament workers, we shall show ourselves 
sadly lacking in intelligence." 

* * * 

Union Card Worth $18,000 To This 
Brother 

The "Miami Central News" recently 
commented favorably on the new Local, 
No. 15S3 of Lemon City, Fla., which 
closed its charter membership list with 
a smoker and a general good time. In 
mentioning the speakers on the occa- 
sion, particular attention was given to 
the address delivered by George Barnes. 

The most striking phase of his re- 
marks was an assertion about the extent 
to which his union card has financially 
benefited him throughout the 25 years 
he has held it. His first work as a 
journeyman carpenter began in 1906, in 
southern New Jersey, at $2 for a 10- 
hour day. Soon afterwards he joined 
his union. Ke has averaged not less 
than nine months' work each year since 
then. From the better wages and the 
shorter working hours obtained through 
his union affiliation, he has benefited 
$17,500 in the 25 years. Adding over- 
time pay and other incidental benefits, 
he calculates his union card has bene- 
fited him not less than $18,000 financi- 
ally — a conservative sum, too, he con- 
siders it. 

Without the carpenters' union, said 
Mr. Barnes, all carpenters probably now 
would be receiving about $3 for a 10- 
hour day. It should be clear to non- 
union carpenters, therefore, that the 
union vastly aids in keeping up their 
wages also. 

Furthermore, said Mr. Barnes, his 
study of political, economic, and indus- 
trial conditions in our country convinces 
him that our trade unions are not prog- 
ressing nor enlarging fast enough. 
Either the trade unions must become 
stronger or this country will witness an 
industrial civil war. This calamity can 
be averted only by expansion and pros- 
perity of our trade unions, he believes. 

* * * 

Rockefeller's "Union" Meets Predicted 
Fate 

The 1914 miners' strike in southern 
Colorado was followed by a company 
"union," approved by John D. Rock- 
efeller, Jr., and hailed by. President Wel- 
born of the Colorado Fuel and Iron 
Company as industrial democracy. The 
company is a Rockefeller unit. 

Tons of valuable white paper was 
used to explain the new system that 



THE CARPENTER 



27 



would end strikes. Hard headed trade 
unionists were called cynics and joy kill- 
ers when they predicted failure of the 
new "union," but their prophecy has 
been fulfilled. 

The company has reduced wages 30%, 
in violation of an award by the Govern- 
ment's bituminous coal commission, and 
in violation of the state industrial law 
which provides that thirty days' notice 
must be given before wages are reduced 
or workers strike. 

The commission took no action 
against the company and the coal miners 
suspended work. The company "union" 
has been forgotten and martial law pro- 
claimed, as in the days of Ludlow. 

* * * 

Sheer Profiteering 

Not satisfied with what they get for 
nothing from the reactionary press, the 
profiteers are indulging in columns of 
propaganda, paid for at advertising- 
rates. 

For example, the National Lumber 
Manufacturers' Association. 

Of all the profiteers who bled the 
country while better men were bleeding 
for the country, the lumber manufac- 
turers are about the worst. Perhaps a 
few thieving shipbuilders and some 
thieving ammunition makers (not all of 
them) were greedier profiteers. But 
even at that, the lumber profiteers were 
not far behind. 

Now these profiteers advertise that the 
high price of lumber is due to freight 
charges, which the railroads, in their 
turn, advertise to be due to high wages. 
Both assertions are false. 

The charges for lumber, brick, cement 
and everything else that goes into con- 
struction of buildings are from 65 to 
140% more than real trade conditions 
warrant. There is no excuse for this 
profiteering, which is not due wholly, or 
even mostly, to high freight rates or 
high wages", but is chiefly due to the 
monopoly and greed that ought to land 
some profiteers in jail. 

* * * 

The Labor Press 

In a course given at Whitman College 
on the labor problem, a study of the 
labor press was made. For months every 
editorial was carefully studied and its 
contents made note of. Mr. William B. 
Leonard, Department of Economies, of 
that college, after a brief summary, in 
which he comments favorably as a 
whole, says : 



"Many times Ave asked ourselves the 
questions, "What does labor want?" i- 
it an increase of wage's, shorter hours 
and an easier life? Yes, if we arc to 
believe the labor press. But these gains, 
while important, are subordinate to 
something bigger and finer. This some- 
thing seems to be the desire to secure 
right human relations, founded on jus- 
tice, in which the workers will find op- 
portunity for self-realization. In short, 
workers are struggling for happiness. 
Labor wants to become a prime factor in 
all vital matters connected with a pro- 
gressive economic and social life. We 
find ourselves in sympathy with these 
aspirations. 

"We were really surprised at the 
spirit, tone and character of the labor 
press. Its Journals are published by 
men, often strong and capable, who al- 
though without hope of financial gain 
for themselves, yet give to the cause of 
labor an untiring service with religious 
zeal. For their words of good council 
we shoudl indeed be thankful. They are 
helping educate a mass of workers at the 
bottom of our industrial system who, 
without the aid of Organized Labor 
movement, would surely be in a helpless 
situation. So long as the labor press 
retains its present sanity and vigor there 
is nothing to fear from it. In it there 
is vastly more good than evil." 

* * * 

Champion Carpenter's Vise 

A new carpenter's vise has been in- 
vented by one of our members, Mr. F. E. 
McGlinchy, L. U. No. 1174, Willoughby, 
O., and is now on the market. This 
vise is highly recommended by dif- 
ferent Locals that have given it a tryout 
and from what we hear of it we are 
assured that the carpenters will appreci- 
ate it. The vise is practical and a real 
time saver; weighing only four pounds 
and can be carried in the carpenter's 
kit. It will fasten to anything from % 
to 2% in. thick and should prove a boon 
for sawing bevels aud miters or for hold- 
ing sash or doors. Brother McGlinchy 
will be glad to answer any inquiries that 
are sent him and we assure him of our 
best wishes for his success. 

* * * 

News papers of the future will be 
smaller than those of today, predicts the 
business manager of a Brooklyn news- 
paper. If they are "narrower" than 
some of the present day "molders" they 
will be diminutive indeed. 




GENERAL OFFICERS 

OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD 

OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA 

General Office 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

JOHN T. COSGROVE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

GEORGE H. LAKEY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

THOMAS NEALE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind 



General Executive Board 
First District, T. M. GUERIN 
290 Second Ave., Troy, N Y. 



Second District, D. A. POST 
416 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



Third District, JOHN H. POTTS 
646 Melish Ave., Cincinnati, O. 



Fourth District, JAMES P. OGLETREE 
926 Marina St., Nashville, Tenn. 



Fifth District, J. W. WILLIAMS 
3536 Wyoming St., St. Louis, Mo. 



Sixth District, W. A. COLE 

810 Merchants National Bank Buildinj 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
1705 Chambord St., Montreal, Que., Can. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



NOTICE TO RECORDING 
SECRETARIES 

The quarterly circular for the months 
of January, February and March, con= 
taining the quarterly password, has been 
forwarded to all Local Unions of the 
Un : ted Brotherhood. Under separate 
cover six blanks have been forwarded 
for the Financial Secretary, three of 
which are to be used for the reports to 
the General Office for the months of 
January, February and March, and the 
extra ones are to be filled out in duplU 
cate and kept on file for future reference. 
Inclosed therewith are also six blanks 
for the Treasurer, to be used in trans= 
mitting money to the General Office. 

Recording Secretaries not in receipt of 
this immediate!}' should notify the Gen= 
eral Secretary, Frank Duffy, Carpenters' 

Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

© 

Through the Near East Relief 

America has saved from starvation 
100,000 orphaned children — innocent 
victims of the great war. 

Industrial education now being taught 
these children will enable them to be- 
come self supporting. 

There are 200,000 more outside the 
orphanage gates dying for want of food 
and shelter. 

Your organization can help to save 
them by making known the vital facts. 
For free literature address : 

THE NEAR EAST RELIEF, 
151 Fifth Avenue, New York 



All correspondence for the General Executive 
Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



Carpenters Stage Annual Armistice Day 
Banquet 

The carpenters of Marietta, ,Ga., L. U. 
1747, celebrated Armistice Day with a 
big banquet and entertainment at their 
hall over the Strand Theatre. More than 
200 union members and guests were 
present, among the latter being Mayor 
Brumby, William Tate Holland, Joe 
Black and others. Fully fifty ladies 
were present. 

The feast was tempered With mental 
feasts, served in the form of entertaining 
talks on the part of the mayor, Messrs. 
Holland, Black and Will Stephens. Mr. 
Jack Brooks acted as master of cere- 
monies in a very admirable manner. 



Claims Paid 




CLAIMS PAID FOR THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER, 1921 



Claim 

No. 



Name of Deceased or 
Disabled 



Local I 
Union 



Membership j 
Yrs. Mos. I 



Cause of Death or 
Disability 



44231 
44232 
44233 
44234 

44205 
44236 
44237 
44238 
44239 
44240 
44241 
44242 
44243 
44244 
4:24:. 
44246 
44247 
4424S 
44249 
44250 
44251 
44252 
44253 
44254 
44255 
44256 
44257 
44258 
44259 
44260 
44201 
44262 
44263 
44264 
44265 
44266 
442C7 
4426S 
44269 
44270 
44271 
44272 
44274 
44274 
44275 
4 127': 
44277 
4427s 
44279 
442S0 
442S1 
442*2 
442*3 
44284 
442R5 
44286 
442S7 
442RR 
442S9 
44290 
44291 
44292 
44293 
44294 
41295 
4129i; 
-! 1297 
4129* 
41299 
44300 
44301 
4 1X02 
•! 1303 
44301 
44305 
41300 



Charles Shafty 

Rufus F. Savidge 

John Allen Harding 

William H. Hume 

Isabelle Smith 

Henry J. Carter 

William C. Marshall 

Elizabeth Reuther 

James Lonie 

Henry George Lepard 

William Wilkinson 

George Bover 

Paul Egeroff 

Florence Hall 

Jennie Louise Hurlbert 

John Kinsella 

Ralph Carey 

Emory A. Davis 

Helen Nelson KirkDatrick. . . 

John Bublitz (Dis.) 

Johanna Caudet 

Louis Plude 

Anton Sternisa 

John Eckstein 

Charlotte Furphy 

Eva F. Colfer 

Victor Niemi 

R. F. Hemby 

G rover C. Cramer (Dis.) . . . 

Sarah A. Claffey 

Robert IT. Bassett 

Edvrard Zaepfel 

Philip A. Neidig, 

Robert A. Black 

Robert Brinson 

Ht nry Ott 

Jenette Hebble 

Phillip R. Stivers. 

Fountain H. Feaster 

William L. Wright 

Julius Zelle 

EHnore S. Walling 

Mary D. Beckman 

William Fred Semerau 

Es1 or Danielson 

Edward Charlton 

John W. King 

Abraham Kaplan 

Thomas Earle 

Sophia Adelia Groskopf . . . . 

Mary Agnes Sweeney 

Johanna Sclrwalback 

Sarah Elizabeth Morris 

Charles O. Mangans 

Charles W. Gardner 

William Douglas Bird 

Fary E. Dorsey 

Fred Buschhorn 

Gus Seegert 

A. Burt Carrier 

Gedion Gervais 

Robert A. Kinney 

Charles A. Orgibet 

Calista Anna Campbell 

Faud Engebrigssen 

John Russell McQuown . . . . 

David E. Mostrom 

Anna Tomljenovicu 

I. aura E. Anderson 

John Erickson \ 

Frank Richardson 

William Schneider 

William FcMabon 

Estella Sherick 

Louise M. Held 

Ai;a Mclchcr (Dis.) 



26 

37 

40 

52 

52 

198 

198 

261 

488 

503 

635 

764 

875 

950 

1069 

11 

22 

22 

43 

43 

43 

97 

105 

340 

759 

1032 

1929 

223S 

2264 

26 

33 

64 

90 

122 

200 

391 

427 

514 

50S 

648 

657 

953 

1596 

42 

62 

142 

168 

1S1 

199 

366 

432 

461 

638 

671 

1665 

1694 

3 

5 

11 

26 

134 

158 

360 

422 

±2C> 

798 

SOS 

1401 

10 

10 

10 

15 

75 

81 

SI 

100 



11 

5 

7 

1 

2 

4 

3 

9 

20 

21 

10 

2 

2: 

1 

18 

G 

21 

24 

27 

14 

27 

22 

5- 

2 

15 

1 

4 

4 

1 

14 

18 

2 

21 

21 

18 

11 

6 

16. 

21 

21 

2 

12 

11 

11 

2 

2 

9 

7 

26 

3 

14 

10 

2 

3 

18 

11 

30 

10 

13 

3 

3 

9 

7 

21 

19 

16 

9 

20 

35 

20 

15 

11 

5 

6 



4 
3 
2 

10 
4 
1 

10 
3 

11 
3 

11 
8 

10 

11 
2 
9 

11 
6 
9 
8 
6 

3 
3 

10 

10 
2 
9 

5 
6 
1 
2 
2 
8 

10 
8 
4 

10 
1 



7 
4 
6 
4 
1 

11 
3 
2 

11 
2 
3 
1 
4 
7 
6 
6 
6 
1 
4 
6 
9 



Pneumonia 

Apoplexy 

Cancer 

Endocarditis 

Pellagra 

Hemorrhage 

Peritonitis 

Burns 

Carcinoma 

Cerebral hemorrhage 

Myelitis 

Nephritis 

Tuberculosis 

Hemorrhage 

Cancer 

Myocarditis 

Strychine poisonin. 

Intestinal obstruction 

Mvocarditis 

Fall 

Thrombosis 

Cancer 

Suicide 

Accidental 

Tuberculosis 

Accidental 

Pneumonia 

Apoplexy 

Accidental 

Hemorrhage 

Heart disease 

Suicide 

Nephritis 

Myocarditis 

Cancer 

Carcinoma 

Embolism 

Paresis 

Tuberculosis 

Meningitis 

Paralysis 

Abscess 

Carcinoma 

Nephritis 

Convulsions 

Arterio sclerosis .... 

Heart disease 

Tuberculosis 

Pneumonia 

Apoplexy 

Peritonitis 

Pneumonia 

Nephritis 

Tuberculosis 

Intestinal obstruction 

Nephritis 

Paralysis 

Bronchitis 

Bronchitis 

Heart disease 

Heart failure 

Heart trouble 

Carcinoma 

Heart trouble 

Pneumonia 

Peritonitis 

Carcinoma ' 300.00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

75.00 

400.00 



Am't 
Paid 
$300.00 
75.00 
300.00 
50.00 
50.00 
200.00 
150.00 
75.00 
300.00 
300.00 
300.00 
25.00 
100.00. 
25.00- 
75.00) 
225.00. 
300.00 
300.00 
75.00 
400.00 
75.00 
300.00 
300.00 
100.00 
75.00 
25.00 
200.00 
50.00 
50.00 
75.00 
125.00 
100.00 
300.00 
300.00 
300.00 
300.00 
50.00 
300.00 
300.00 
300.00 
300.00 
50.00 
75.00 
300.00 
75.00 
100.00 
25.00 
25.00 
75.00 
75.00 
75.00 
75.00 
75.00 
25.00 
150.00' 
125.00 
75.00> 
300.00 
300.00 
125.00 
150.00 
150.00 
75.00 
75.00 
75.00 
125.00 



Tuberculosis 
Cerebral embolism . . . 

Heart trouble 

Myocarditis 

Cirrhosis of liver. . . . 

Hepatitis 

Intestinal obstruction 

Uraemia 

Accidental 



T II E C A R P E X T E R 



Claim 
No. 



Name of Deceased o: 
Disabled 



•: 1307 Kathrvn Gould 

44308 Lewis * E. Linton 

41309 Nellie Cramer 

44310 Efram Lind.-trom 

44311 Edna Lombard 

44312 Emma Eccles 

44313 Lienor E. Skoog 

44314 Daniel S. Burdick 

44315 John F. Travera (DIs.) . . 

44316 Herman Kreblein 

44317 William Silverwood .... 

44318 .wielard Lafrenais 

44319 Arthur Danison 

44320 Floyd Crandall 

44321 Myrtle Kerr 

44322 Fannie Reynolds 

44323 Lester Finiev 

44324 J. E. Bryan". 

44325 Joseph Hrdlicka 

44326 Anna Curran 

44327 William Hunt 

44328 Daniel J. Donocrhue 

44329 Blanche E. Leate 

44330 Henry L. Mr >rs 

44331 Elias Jones Roberts 

44332 Victor Nyman 

44333 Charles Horney 

44334 Joseph Donoyan 

44335 Paul'L. Gednev (Dis.) 

44336 Peter Cattell 

44337 John Killenbeek 

44338 Jane Sarah Koegel 

44339 Sarah Jane Koeael 

44340 E. J. McCann ' 

44341 Julia Geiser Pearl I 

44342 Emil Mildenstein 

44343 Jose Dayila 

443 44 James Louis Deems f 

44345 Titus E. FrankenSeld I 

44346 D. T. Taylor I 

44347 William Gerhardt 

44348 Fred Brozeit (Dis.) 

44349 Frank I. Grayat ' 

44350 Chri-tine Cameron 

44351 Marie Janea : 

44352 Margaret Strickland 

44353 Walter E. Evan- 

44354 Benjamin L. Cross ' 

44355 William H. Shaw ! 

44356 Emile Hill ' 

44357 Edward L. Taylor 

44358 W. E. Cover 

44359 Theresa SchHlinger 

44360 J. B. Denson 

44361 Iryin M. Pearsall 

44362 Joseph J. Tikal ! 

44303 I. J. Neff 

44364 Hilliard DeLoach ' 

44365 Josef Kalous ! 

44366 August Ferdinand Bertkan . . I 

44367 Axel Rosengreen 

44368 John Costello I 

44309 Hulda C. Larson 

44370 Ernest J. Henderson 

44371 James L. Brady i Dis.) 

44372 John Raynik j 

44373 Emma Tiernev ! 

44374 Dena Skold I 

44375 John Thompson I 

44376 Hannah Skoglund ■ 

44377 Adam Bantz 

44378 Thomas H. Binnall 

44379 Elina Deyida Pearson | 

44380 Marshall W. Davis I 

44381 Beverly Smith Holtzrnan . . . . 
443^2 John E. Wemple 

44383 Frank Duncan ' 

44384 Minnie Sinnett 

44385 Edward J. Pease 

44386 Llovd Wilbur Roberts 

44387 John Gilchrist 

44388 Rose Hronek 

44389 Wenzel Harvelik 

44390 Jemima Jane Taylor 

44391 Andrew Schwab 

44392 Augusta Goodell 

44303 A. E. Metzler (Dis.) 

44J 94 Thomas I. Thompson .... 
44395 William Albert Blakeney. 



Local 
Union 

122~ 

143 

158 

181 

201 

_ 

257 

474 

483 

630 

768 

B >1 

819 

387 

52 

2119 

2203 

2238 

2289 

2289 

31 

33 

40 

72 

80 

257 

318 

483 

483 

519 

591 

694 

694 

710 

757 

772 

982 

1160 

1465 

1846 

1 

9 

31 

33 

54 

73 

165 

167 

183 

331 

393 

812 

1051 

1101 

1172 

1143 

1153 

2066 

2090 

2090 

2090 

1 

62 

74 

90 

148 

185 

199 

210 

241 

415 

680 

7-7 

860 
1024 
1107 
1412 
■ 77 

:>:•- 

19 

19 

39 

42 

44 

47 
100 
109 
171 
362 



Mem! 
Yr>. 



.-rs ip' 



Cause of I 
Disr>" 



Am't 

Paid 



16 

21 

7 

35 

8 

24 

30 

18 

23 

2 

5 

16 

3 

20 

3 

.j 

4 

17 

1 

1 

24 

34 

5 

11 

10 



20 

14 

4 

7 

18 

18 

14 

20 

12 

3 

4 

17 

2 

34 

25 

10 

11 

15 

22 

1 

8 

15 

5 

8 

19 

1 

1 

16 

4 

15 

3 

9 

26 

16 

28 

25 

19 

16 

4 

24 

14 

20 

18 

16 

11 

15 

11 

18 

19 

4 

2 

14 

10 

2 

18 

15 

10 

32 

2 



3 
2 

4 
5 

7 
1 

8 
3 
2 
2 
4 
10 
9 
3 
4 



2 
10 



6 



4 

8 j 

4 
6 
6 
4 
7 
6 
10 

9 

9 
5 
4 
1 
3 
6 
2 

| 

2 



11 



3 

11 



Nephritis 

Intestinal ol 

Tuberculosis 75.00 

Hemorrhage 300.00 

Suicide 

Hemorrhage 

Appendicitis 75.00 

Oedema 

Accidental - 

Tuberculosis ] 

Paralvsis 300.00 

Nephritis I 125 

Minnyilis ' 150.00 

Hfart disease | 300.00 

.. - 58 •' 75.00 

Nephritis 75.00 

Hemorrhage 2 

Heart disease 300.00 

Tuberculosis 50.00 

Endocarditis 

Heart trouble 

Lethargia 

Pneumonia j 75.00 

Mitral insufficiency 3<"'0.00 

Diabetes mellitus ! 300.00 

Hemorrhage | 15 

Pneumonia i 300.00 

Cancer ' 75.00 

Fall 400.00 

Peritonitis 200.00 

Tuberculosis j 300.00 

Apoplexy 

Carcinoma 75.00 

Cerebral hemorrhage ! 300.00 

Intestinal obstruction f 75.00 

Heart trouble j 125.00 

Heart trouble 150.00 

Tuberculosis 2 

Cerebral hemorrhage 300.00 

Bright's disease 25.00 

Rheumatism i 300.00 

Fall 400.00 

Tuberculosis ; 300.00 

Myocarditis I 75.00 

Tuberculosis ; 75.00 

Carcinoma j 75.00 

Heart failure ! 50.00 

Giloma j 300.00 

Cerebral hemorrhage 125.00 

Peritonitis j 138.50 

Suicide 300.00 

Hemorrhage 1 300.00 

Tuberculosis } 

Typhoid fever | 50.00 

Dementia \ 125.00 

Myocarditis j 

Paralysis 300.00 

Nephritis 150.00 

Myocarditis 300.00 

Cancer 300.00 

Meningitis | 300.00 

Myocarditis 300.00 

Accidental < 75.00 

Cerebral hemorrhage 3 

Accidental j 400.00 

Meningitis | 200.00 

Carcinoma 75.00 

Mitral insufficiency 

Cerebral apoplexy" j :-:. 

Apoplexy ! 75.00 

Carcinoma | 300.00 

Heart disease 300.00 

Influenza 75.00 

Endocarditis ! 125.00 

Pneumonia 125.00 

Nephritis ? 125.00 

Hodgins disease 50.00 

Paresis 50.00 

Peritonitis 300.00 

Aooplexy I 300.00 

Paresis i 100.00 

Tuberculosis i 

Poisoning 296 



ttioa 



- 

-.' C 
Nephritis ! 200.00 



Uraemia 
Mitral : 
Convulsions . . 
Accidental 
Apoplexy 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



"laim 
No. 



Name of Deceased or 
Disabled 



41300 
44307 
44398 
44309 
44400 
44401 
44402 
■I4ii):; 
44404 
44405 
44406 
44407 
44408 
44400 
44410 
44411 
44412 
44413 
44414 
444 ir> 
44416 
44417 
44418 
44410 
44420 
44421 
44422 
44423 
44424 
44425 
44426 
44427 
44428 
44420 
44430 
44431 
44432 
44433 
44434 
44435 
44430 
44437 
44438 
44439 
44440 
44441 
44442 
44443 
44414 
44445 
44440 
44447 
44448 
44449 
44450 
44451 
44452 
44453 



Hamlin Miller 

Louis Negorski 

Mary Agnes Stawieki.... 

Rosina Oelker 

William Iluscliky, Sr 

William A. Kellogg 

Michael J. Daley 

Charlotte Haglund 

Jacob Kastner 

Christian W. Birzele 

Matilda Nadeau Bezeau. . 

Goldie L. Gougues 

Howard W. Navin 

Carl O. R. Nelson 

Harry B. Martin 

David Lewis (Dis.) 

Thomas F. Roberts 

Anna C. Vigar 

Charles E. Schorman 

Elizabeth Ann Orr 

Thomas S. Williams 

Clara Miller 

Arthur Ball 

Christian Clausen 

Otto Lohff (Dis.) 

Dudley E. Kenyon 

William E. Kircher 

Frank August Bjorkegren. 
Howard Evans Kennard. . 

Anna B. Olsen 

William L. Jones 

Jethro Nickerson 

Myra Edwards 

William Kruger 

Jacob Rasmuson 

Charles Raich 

John C. Gates 

James W. Stiarwalt 

Sebastian Hemberger 

Maurice Marcoux 

August Wischmann 

Whit Early 

Helen Zindars 

Fred Force 

Emma Reidasch 

Fred Fisher 

George Welch 

Ezkiel Van 

Anna Ellen R. Duval... 

Charles W. Watkins 

Nathaniel W. Haynes. . . 

Lillie Hemphill 

Francis Ford Blair 

William A. Harty 

John Johnson 

Lura Alice Dunham. . . . 
Nicholas Fox (Dis.) .... 
Max. Leitz 



Local 

V, ni cm 

395 
414 
414 
012 

674 

746 

746 

755 

808 

1234 

1375 

1504 

1898 

1367 

22 

24 

34 

55 

67 

131 

208 

208 

257 

331 

419 

470 

488 

493 

541 

608 

608 

624 

902 

1015 

1037 

1057 

1659 

1892 

2090 

2098 

10 

75 

SO 

302 

345 

422 

453 

750 

S94 

898 

1093 

1291 

1312 

1367 

1609 

1773 

2725 

1879 



Membership | 
Yrs. Mos. ] 



Cause of Death or 
Disability 



17 

4 

9 

7 

18 

30 

5 

2D 

17 

19 



13 

1 

19 

11 

17 

16 

14 

18 

3 

25 

20 

2 

21 

3 

3 

9 

1 

16 

25 

20 

11 

8 

14 

5 

13 

14 

26 

2 

35 

9 

15 

1 

9 

14 

17 

16 

1 

12 

6 

12 

6 

9 

5 

3 

15 

4 



4 
2 
2 

10 
7 
9 
5 
4 

10 
2 
6 
1 

11 
9 
3 
1 
8 
4 
9 
3 
1 
4 
2 
6 



7 
1 

2 

4 
5 
5 

10 
6 
7 
3 

2 
9 

11 
3 

10 
7 

11 

11 
4 
7 
2 

11 
1 
8 



112 Full beneficial claims 

35 Semi-beneficial claims 

65 Wife's claims 

11 Disability claims . . . 

223 



'.'.•nicer 

Heart trouble 

Tuberculosis 

Peritonil is 

< larcinoma 

Cerebral hemorrhage 

Tuberculosis 

Myocarditis 

Phthisis 

l »iabetes mellitus , 

Heart failure 

Peritonitis , 

Suicide , 

Accidental , 

Pneumonia 

Accidental 

Tuberculosis 

Pneumonia 

Ulcer 

Nephritis 

Cirrhosis of liver 

Stomach trouble 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis 

Fall 

Bright's disease 

Arterio sclerosis 

Cancer 

Accidental 

Enteritis 

Apoplexy 

Heart disease 

Paralysis 

Paralysis 

Typhoid fever 

Heart disease 

Heart failure 

Apoplexy 

Nephritis 

Fever 

Arterio sclerosis 

Tuberculosis 

Appendicitis 

Suicide 

Pellagra 

Thrombosis 

Myocarditis 

Cerebral hemorrhage .... 

Colitis 

Nephritis 

Paralysis 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis 

Myocarditis 

■Sarcoma 

Poisoning 

Accidental 

Tuberculosis 

Total 

$27,454.75 

3,225.00 

4,475.00 

3,950.00 



Am't 
Paid 

300.00 
200.00) 

75.00 

75.00 

125.00 

125.00 

300.00 

75.00 
125.00 
300.00 

75.00 

75. oo 
300.00 

50.00 
300.00 
400.00 
300.00 

75.00 
300.00 

75.00 
150.00 

75.00. 
300.00 

50.00 
40O.OO. 

50.00 
150.00 
300.00 

50.00 

75.00 
300.00 
125.00, 

75.00 

75.00 
300.00 



300.00 

125.00 

125.00 

300.00 

25.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

50.00 

75.00 

125.00 

300.00 

125.00 

25.00 

125.00 

75.00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

194.50 

75.00 

400.00 

200.00 



.104.75 



$39,104.75 



DISAPPROVED CLAIMS FOR THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER, 1921 



Claim 
No. 



Name of Deceased or 
Disabled 



Local 


Membership 


Union 


Yrs. 


Mos. 


2451 





11 


10 


18 


6 


104 


2 


3 


107 


4 


± 


174 


10 


5 


336 


2 





610 


15 


3 


627 


22 


8 


632 


8 


10 


753 


19 


8 


760 


8 


3 


1345 


7 


7 


1389 


2 





1460 


3 


4 


1786 


15 


1 


1829 


5 


5 


20S6 


2 


5 


2220 


2 


3 


2396 









Cause of Disap- 
proval 



Am't 
Cl'm'd 



5197 Ethel Robertson 

5198 William A. Wainwright 

5199 Edith Pearl Redding 

5200 Belle J. Dean 

5201 Jerry Iljas 

5202 Barbara Machmert 

5203 Thomas Wickham 

5204 E. A. Vann (Dis.) 

5205 Augustus F. Campbell (Dis.) 

5206 Bettie Love Greer 

5207 Millie C. Holly 

5208 John J. Landers 

5209 Edwin H. Marks 

5210 Charles L. Frederick 

5211 Marie Chott 

5212 Edward S. Lohr. 

5213 Frank Martin 

5214 Obediance E. Bryant 

5215 Robert Beard (Dis.) 



Not one year a member 

Three months in arrears. ...... 

Three months in arrears 

Semi, no wife donation due. . . . 

Three months in arrears 

Semi, no wife donation due. . . 

Three months in arrears 

Disability not permanent 

Disability not due to accident. 

Three months in arrears 

Semi, no wife donation due. . . 

Three months in arrears , 

Not filed within six months. . , 

Six months in arrears , 

Second wife's claim 

Three months in arrears 

Three months in arrears 

Semi, wife donation not due. . . 
Not one year a member , 



$25.00 

125.00 

50.011 
75 00 

300.00 

50.00 

300.00 

400.00 

400.00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

25.00 

150.00 

75.00 

300.00 

25.00 

50.00 

50.00 



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ou know about your business and the particular kind of work 
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American Technical 
Society 

Dept. G-361 Chicago 




Corro 




Mr. Van Gaasbeek Replies 
Editor. '"The Carpenter": 

In reference to the articles written by 
Mr. L. W. Cooper appearing in the De- 
cember issue of "The Carpent?r"' criti- 
cising my recent articles on stairbuild- 
ing. it is true that I advised Mr. Cooper 
that I would be very glad to have any 
constructive criticisms relative to the - 
presentation of the fundamental prin- 
ciples involved, but I have failed to find 
any constructive suggestions in his art- 
icle. He gives himself away and clearly 
proves that he does not understand the 
plan. 

He says that the second and third 
posts are rounded on the corner. They 
are not rounded, nor does the plan call 
for it. It does show a second line of 
travel from risers 4 to 13 in line with 
the face of posts 2 and 3. The three 
plans that he submits are typical of :. 
kind of stairs that are being put in 
many houses, which are a disgrace to 
the trade, and will only pass in :. 
cheapest and poorest :L - of work, and 
are only permissible because so few car- 
penters are properly informed in the sub- 
ject. He says it looks ridiculous because 
no structural necessity presents itself 
for this type of stairway. 

Mr. Cooper will find many dwellings 
if he looks for them, where three walls 
frame the opening for the stairway and 
because of limitations it is difficult to 
frame an easy ascending flight. You 
will find in my layout that the width of 
all winders and straight treads from 2 
to the landing on the line of travel are 
a uniform width, making an easy and 
comfortable stair to climb. He criticise 
the shape of my bull nose step, but does 
not say a word about my demonstration 
of the principles of kerfing invol - - 1, 
thus losing sight of the important issue 
for which the article was prepared. In 
order that the readers of ''The Car- 
penter' may have a clear understanding 
of what Pratt Institute is aiming to do, 
it may be well to ask ourselves two or 
three questions. 

What is our job, to train architects 
and designers or mechanics who usually 



work to an architect's drawing? How 
much time is a journeyman willing to 
give in the studying of a special branch 
of the trade? Do we aim to train spec- 
ialists or to give carpenters a broader 
knowledge of their trade? It seems to 
me that before a criticism like this 
passes, we must have our eye on the ob- 
jective point. Our job is to train car- 
liters. Mot boys who are to be future 
carpenters, but mature journeymen, 
ranging in age from 25 to 70 years of 
age, we therefore approach the subject 
from the viewpoint of what a carpenter 
needs to know. These men attend Pratt 
Institute three evenings per week, after 
working hard all day in the trade. Many 
of the men come from a distance, taking 
two hours to travel in either direction, 
arriving home at midnight or after. Men 
who deserve all the credit possible for 
their desire to be better informed on 
the more important trade processes. 

It is our policy to give them the de- 
sired information in the shortest time 
possible, so that we have tried to in- 
corporate as many : tht principles a- 
possible in the one problem. The shape 
of the "winders and the bull nose are 
matters of individual taste and judg- 
ment. The principles involved in laying 
out the strings and kerfing the bull nose 
step are fixed fundamental principles. 
If a mechanic can build a flight of stairs 
similar to my design, he can lay out any 
flight and can change the de ign to meet 
the requirements of the occasion. 

I would be glad to have Mr. Cooper 
register as a student in our stairbuilding 
class, which would put him in a posi- 
tion to better appreciate the problem un- 
der discussion. 

EICHARD M. VAX GAASBEEK. 

Pratt Institute, Brooklyn. N. Y. 



Appreciates Our Efforts 

Mr. Frank Duffy. General Secretary. 

Dear Sir and Brother: In behalf of 
the Tufted Textile Workers- of America, 
I take this opportunity of extending the 
thanks of the officers of the United Tex- 
tile Workers of America for the assist- 



THE CARPENTER 



ance ycrnr organization rendered in the 
campaign just closed in the South. 

Your representative proved very 
worthy on many occasions and the of- 
ficers of our Local Unions in the South 
expressed a sincere admiration for the 
manly way in which the organizers from 
your organization spoke to the workers. 
The campaign stopped all reductions In 
wages — saved the organizations that 
were on strike, and left a good feeling of 
respect for the American Federation of 
Labor and its affiliated International 
Unions. 

Words fail to express our apprecia- 
tion for the great aid rendered us during 
these trying times, when every Interna- 
tional Union is confronted with its own 
difficulties. 

Thanking you again, and with best 
wishes, I am, 

Fraternally yours, 
THOMAS F. McMAHON, International 
President, United Textile Workers of 

America. 



Questions the Ability of Our Readers To 
Solve Problem 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

If any of the "numerous replies" to 
Mr. J. E. Adams answers "the question 
asked" that party surely will be entitled 
to a gold medal, and will "surprise" the 
writer most of all. 

He does not ask for the "radius" of 
such an arc, you will notice, and men- 
tions only the "horizontal line." 

Awaiting with much interest the ab- 
solute reply. 

Yours truly, 

C. H. CORNELL. 
Box 1112. Wichita Falls, Tex. 



■ 



Sufferings That Grow Out of Strikes 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

I am attaching an editorial clipped 
from the "Catholic Standard and Times" 
of Philadelphia, which I believe worth 
publishing in our Journal, "The Car- 
penter," especially since the Phila- 
delphia press, as a whole, are continu- 
ously hammering Organized Labor and 
distorting the news appertaining to it. 
Fraternally yours, 

TOM HICKEY. 

The editorial mentioned in the fore- 
oing follows : 

"No striker can blind the fact that 
his action is bound incidentally to cause 
serious discomfort and grievous suffer- 
ing to many against whom he has no 



grievance whatsoever. If, nevertheless, 
he persists in its course, and refuses to 
return to his work in order to put an 
end to the sufferings occasioned by his 
walkout, this attitude must not immedi- 
ately be construed as callousness or in-. 
difference to human suffering or at- 
tributed to pure selfishness, There is no 
reason at all to assume tbat the laborer 
is more insensible to the afflictions of hi j 
fellowmen or more egotistical than any 
other class. 

"It should be remembered that the la- 
borer also has a family which is sub- 
ject to privations and sufferings, if hi ; 
wage is inadequate to meet the needs of 
his household. Those who self-righte- 
ously condemn the striker for inflicting 
suffering on others might consider for a 
moment the many sufferings he has gone 
through before lie decided to trust hi ■ 
case to the uncertainties of a strike. 

"A wanton strike, that would not hes- 
itate to inflict grave .inconvenience on 
others for the sake of a comparatively 
trivial gain and advantage, deserves se- 
vere condemnation. There must be a 
proportion between the objects sought 
and the evils which are likely to result 
from the cessation of work. But when 
these things have been properly and con- 
scientiously pondered, the striker cannot 
be held responsible for effects of his ac- 
tion, which he does not directly intend 
and which he permits, because it is the 
only way in which he can have redress 
of his wrongs. 

"To deny him the right to strike on 
account of incidental sufferings to 
othei'S, would mean to hand him over 
tied hand and foot to the exploiter. 

"Moral indignation is a fine thing; 
but it must not be directed only against 
labor. What about the employer who 
provokes the strike? Does he not share 
in the responsibility for the sufferings 
caused? Why is he not held up to pub- 
lic condemnation? Certainly, if any one 
deserved to be pilloried, it is the prof- 
iteer, and there are many such among 
us, even at this day. The sufferings 
caused by the various profiteers, wheth- 
er they be rent gougers or coal barons or 
other industrial magnates, are by far 
greater than those caused by the striking 
laborer. To be just is a very difficult 
thing. It is much easier to single out 
one phase of a situation and to make the 
most of that. Our dailies delight in do- 
ing that very thing. Labor is the ever 
ready whipping-boy; labor, the peg on 



rni c a b i> e :• 



which they hand their recriminations. 

'"The sufferings of the innocent is a 
iheart-rending sight. Yet it must not 
make us unjust. If there is such suffer- 
ing in society, it is because there is 
wrong somewhere. And ultimately so- 
responsible for all the injustice 
that happens within it and that goes 
unpunished and unremedied. If society 
saw to it that justice were done by all, 
the right to strike would of course, be 
in abeyance, or cease altogether. As 
long as there is injustice, there will be 
strikes and there will be suffering. Suf- 
fering is the penalty which a commu- 
nity pays for countenancing social 
■wrong and tolerating social aba 
•■ 

The Union Label Collar Company 



: ■ - — :--ld •: :ra-> ~-a-a — e — y:.'. I V e si:- 
suceessful in our efforts towards build- 
ing up an organized local of Collar 
"Workers. But regret to say we have 
been unsuccessful and ask if you will 
lend us a helping hand by being con- 
sistent ■when purchasing eollars by de- 
:aaa:aa_: :"aa E-l". Brand Collar;. ta-ariar 
the Union Label, made in both soft and 
laundered collars. 

At present the firm is making a much 
better collar than they have in the past 
and they intend to continue to do so in 
order to try and build up a trade on 
Bell Brand Collars. We sincerely hope 
you will appreciate our efforts and help 
us by purchasing Bell Brand Collars, 
made in fifty-three different styles, both 
soft and laundered. 

What we would like to make plain is 
that you can buy collars from the Union 
Label Collar Company, direct, 139 Ham- 
ilton St., Albany, N. Y., providing your 
dealer will not carry them for you. Just 
have some of the boys get together, let 
them order the same as if they went to 
the store to buy two or three collars, as 
per their desire. Send the order along 
to the above company; same will be ac- 
cepted promptly. If you have not a 
catalogue, same can be procured from 
above company upon request. You will 
not only be consistent, but will benefit 
in the prices. 

Trusting yon will not overlook this 
appeal as we are in urgent need of help 
at the present time. Thanking you in 
advance for your courtesy in this mat- 
ter, and sincerely hope you will send in 



a club order, so as we can get some work 
to do, we remain, 

UNITED GARMENT WORKERS OF 
AMERI 
Local No. 261 
39 Second A \. y. 
• 

Likes Our Craft Problems 
Editor, "The Carpentei 

I have followed the trade for 36 years. 
including my apprenticeship of fire 
years and a few years Z - rorked 
wood pattern maker. I ^n a 

member of the Brotherhood neariv 25 
years, and in view of the foregoin" 
facts, I feel that I am entitled to a^little 
consideration from the editor of r 
Journal. 

I am in favor of rebuilding "The Car- 
penter." Lets have a larger and i 
official Journal, not that I have any com- 
plaint to offer, but as I am interested 
in the Craft Problem section of our Jour- 
nal, would like to see this section en- 
larged, and I feel sure that the Craft 
Problem section is the real fife of "The 
Carpenter" to the thousands of me- 
chanics who read it and are interested 
in their trade. 

I feel personally indebted to our many 
able contributors who have spent their 
time, talent and energy in writing on 
so many subjects that the large propor- 
tion of our members come in contact 
with daily. I realize that mechai 
in our line must be fortified with 
terns, methods, skill and practice, to 
solve the average craft problem, and 
they may be satisfied with their own 
ways, and do not care to read the opinion 
of others. Nevertheless, knowledge is 
power, we are living in an age of prog- 
ress, short cuts and rapid results is the 
■"watchword" of the present. 
Kespectfully yours. 

CHA.S. W. LAME. R. S. 
L. U. No. 155. Staunton, El. 
• 

Pass It On 

-- ~:z --.--_ i z'-'.'i zzl.~:.-z ±11' . 

- ;.-■- :: :z 

--■Z_~ :-'/-:-.. -;- >-;— fz.11 —-..: 

- i-- :: :-z 

-- "-- .--— ;; - —":-■:- ~:z z:z it. 
From yonr recollection blot 

Some day the owner's sure to soot it ; 

_ _-- i~. :z. 

— ~i— ::: 7:: .::;. 
• 

-::::: - : -~. :ae ra:-:a: ". f all aa- 

— --- ::----. " :. -;:aa: e - raoaer 

a for the Union Label, card and but- 

:ca. 



Casual Comment 



Co-operation is the method of all hu- 
man progress — so we call on all our 
members to co-operate with us in getting 

that 500,000. 

* * * 

As yet we have not been enjoined 
from demanding the Union Label. 

* * * 

Hitherto both in its spirit and in its 
progress the Washington Conference has 
disappointed the prediction of its en- 
?mies and exceeded the expectation of 

its friends. 

* * * 

The charges for lumber, brick, cement 
ind everything else that goes into con- 
struction of buildings are from 65 to 
140% inore than real trade conditions 

warrant. 

* * * 

There is no excuse for this profiteer- 
ng which is not due wholly, or even 
mostly, to high freight, rates or high 
wages, but is chiefly due to the mon- 
opoly and greed that ought to land some 

irofiteers in jail. 

$ % $ 

Wages have been' reduced, but high in- 
erest rates, bonus charges and commis- 
sion hold-ups are yet the rule in financial 
urcles. 

* * * 

The only persons represented in the 
Dackers' "shop representation" plan are 
he packers. It is the cat making con- 
litions for the mice. 

* * * 

The dead has arisen. Ole Hanson 
vho cut such fantastic capers while 
nayor of Seattle during the general 
strike in that city, has gone to Los 
Angeles and announces that he will join 
the grand army of real estate sharks 
operating in the Angelic City. 

* * * 

An Aberdeen professor predicts that 
i race of biped lizards will rule the 
world a million years hence. We have 
ong suspected that the worst was yet 
:o come. 

* * * 

The Anti-Tobacco Society will be 
[ileased on reading a news item from 
Utic-a, N. Y., to the effect that Edward 
Bubrey died at his home in Clayville. 
He was an ince sant smoker and was 
105 years old at the time of his death. 



The union busters have dune their 
worst. They have taken a crack at the 
organized workers and the unorganized 
have felt the full force of the blow. 

* * * 

All of those who could be frightened, 

bluffed out, coaxed out or influenced, 
in any way to come out of their unions 
are out, and still the union is larger, 
stronger and more powerful than it ever 
was in the good old days, before the 
war, when everything was normal. 

* * * 

The question in the public mind today 
is: What is making the price of building 
material higher? 

* * * 

The Department of Labor is the only 
department of Government which deals 
exclusively with problems of human 
progress and the relations of man to 
man, including that of employer and 
employe. 

The coal profiteers, another wing of 
the Wall Street army of national and 
international grafters, have been Avork- 
ing overtime and successfully at Wash- 
ington for which the consumer can ex- 
pect to pay double time. 

* * * 

The reereant employer has completely 
destroyed the unorganized workers' be- 
lief that single-handed he can fight for 
existence more successfully than organ- 
ized with his fellows. 

By the time the deflaters have finished 
with him, he will realize that his only 
chance to live better than cattle is by 
belonging to the trade union movement. 

* * * 

The Federal Trade Commission has 
incurred the displeasure of ''Big Busi- 
ness" for exposing profiteering and mal- 
practice in general among the big inter- 
ests. As a consequence, efforts are now 
being made to abolish the commission 
or cut its activities. 

* * * 

The cost of wars from 1793 to 1910 
was $23,000,000,000; while the cost of 
the world war from 1914 to 1918 was 
!R1SG,000,000,000, the property loss ap- 
proximating $109,000,000,000. After 
all, does war pay? 



3S 



THE CARPENTER 



American farmers lost between five 
and six billion dollars on last year's 
products, and thus deflation of the ac- 
tual wealth producers goes merrily on. 

* * * 

Samuel Unterineyer, attorney for the 
Loekwood Commission, recently de- 
nounced the United Steel Trust as being 
the greatest enemy of industrial peace 
in the country and expressed the 
opinion that its activities would have to 
be curbed. This will be no news to 
Organized Labor. Labor has known it 

for years. 

* * * 

A judge of Massachusetts Supreme 
Court recently issued an injunction pro- 
hibiting not alone '•picketing,'' but also 
the payment of strike benefits, if re- 
cent news articles are to be believed. 

* * * 

It is evident some Federal judges have 
become jealous, as they are credited with 
enjoining unions from collecting dues 
and organizing the unorganized. It is 
truly the age of competition, at least 
with the courts when it comes to issuing 
injunctions. 

* * * 

The New York Trust Company is au- 
thority for the statement that anthra- 
cite coal is twice as high in New York 
City as it should be. Evidently there 
are no coal barons among the trust com- 
pany's depositors. 

* * a 

American financiers hold at present 
approximately 25% of the world's sup- 
ply of gold and the percentage is rapidly 
increasing. American workers are 50% 

unemployed. 



which is the worst thing that could pos- 
sibly be done for the economic recovery 
of the United States and Europe. 

* * * 

Judged by some recent incidents, rail- 
road executives have placed the in- 
telligence of the members of the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission on a level 
no higher than they concede to the aver- 
age run of humanity. 

* * * 

Talk about "the crime of '73." It 
wasn't a circumstance to the "crime of 
1921." The men who destroyed the 
greenbacks and demonetized silver were 
"pikers" compared with the gentlemen 
who control our Federal Reserve Board. 

* * * 

This Board, overnight, reduced the 
value of the farmers' crops by eight 
billions, threw from three to five million 
workers jobless into the streets, and, ac- 
cording to the Senator from South 
Carolina, quadrupled our national debt. 

* * * 

By continually advocating the Union 
Label you will convince your weak- 
kneed brother of your optimism in the 
future of the trades-union movement. 

* * * 

Like the judge in New York State 
who declared that the judiciary repre- 
sented capital, Senator Edgs admits that 
members of the Senate represent the 
manufacturers. . 

* * * 

Some bright young man in govern- 
ment should rise and explain why the 
cost of living goes up while the cost of 
wheat, corn, hogs and cattle is going 
down. 



After the din and clatter about build- 
ing revivals when wages are reduced, 
these prophets are smoked out. Wages 
have been lowered but the revival has 

failed to materialize — why? 

* * * 

The best safeguard of any nation 
against autocracy and dictatorships, 
whether of an organized autocracy or a 
misguided section of the working peo- 
ple, is a strong, intelligent and well- 
organized trade union movement. 

* * * 

What could be more confusing than 
the business situation at present, with 
the tax bill that has finally been forced 
through the House, which pleases no- 
body, and they are still bent on getting 
through an old-fashioned tariff bill, 



The insidious, persistent and wide- 
spread propaganda of the Building Ma- 
terial Trust is the greatest ever attempt- 
ed to deceive our people. 

The big bankers and business people 
of Chicago recently held a number of 
conferences and decided to begin a war 
of extermination against the union shop, 
and it is announced . pledged $1,000,000 
for the purpose. 

* * * 

Strange as it may seem, the Chicago 
unionists have not been thrown into a 
panic because of the latest war declara- 
tion for the very simple reason they 
have heard such threats before and have 
had to fight every foot of the way to 
the position they now occupy. 






^ifE CARPENTER 



39 



Foreign Labor Notes 

TSihere were 2,943 coal mines worked 
in Great Britain in 1921, as compared 
with 2,807 in 1920. Of these, in 1921, 
512 were in Scotland and 16 in Ireland. 

* * * 

There has been a recurrence of labor 
unrest in Trieste, notably among the 
shipyard workers. These workers an- 
nounce that they purposed calling 
another strike, owing to a disagreement 

over wages. 

* * * 

Breaking all records in salary and 
wage increases, German trade unions 
and the Government, after long negotia- 
tions have agreed upon a "raise" for 
state and Government employes aggre- 
gating thirty billion marks annually. 
The raise comes in the guise of a "high 
cost of living addition," and it amounts 
to an average of 20 per cent of the wages 

or salary. 

* * * 

Notices are posted in North "Wales by 
employers announcing that work would 
be discontinued in the mines unless re- 
duction of wages and cost of working 
could be effected. 

* * * 

By Government mediation the strike 
in the paper industry, at Christiana, Nor- 
way, was settled and the mills have re- 
sumed operation. 

By order of the Governor in Council 
of the Presidency of Bengal at Calcutta, 
India, a conciliation board is inaugurated 
for the settlement of labor disputes. 

* * * 

In Italy unemployment is reported as 
decidedly decreased, due to a partial re- 
vival of industrial activities and emigra- 
tion to various countries. 



Information Wanted 

Anyone knowing of the whereabouts 
of Harry C. Miller, formerly of Cincin- 
nati, O., later of Dallas, Tex., kindly ad- 
dress Mrs. M. West, 501 E. 6th St., 
Davenport, la. 

* * * 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts of 
T. E. Adams, formerly a member of 
L. U. 622, of Waco, Tex.; last heard 
from at Lincoln, Neb., kindly address 
W. J. Paisley, Box 170, Waco, Tex. 

* * * 

Oscar D. Burgess, formerly residing 
at Gage, Okla., and also of Amasville, 
Tex. ; last heard from in July, 1921. 



Any one knowing of his whereabouts 

kindly notify Mrs. Mabel J. Burgess, 

Care of H. J. Emerson, 515 Portsmouth 

Building, Kansas City, Kas. 

e 

Carpenters' Union of Montgomery 
Banquet 

The members of Carpenters' L. U. No. 
2317, of Montgomery, W. Va., enjoyed 
a delightful banquet recently. 

C. C. Bradley, a member of Charles- 
ton L. U. No. 1207, made a most enter- 
taining and instructive address on the 
aims and objects of Organized Labor and 
particularly stressing the great need of 
closer affiliation of all crafts and more 
unity among the membership. 

Both President Roberts and Secretary 
Nutter of 2317 made short addresses in 
which they urged the membership to 
take a greater interest in organization 
work and assist crafts to organize. Sev- 
eral other members of the Local also 
spoke along the same lines. 

The entertainment was thoroughly en- 
joyed by all and the speeches made 
lasting impressions among those present 
which will bring forth results in the 
future. 

There is now a movement on foot 
there to organize a Central Body which 
will be of material assistance in the 
formation of new Local Unions among 
the crafts yet unorganized. 



1,000 Attend Annual Ball of Carpenters' 
Union Local 

Six Vaudeville acts given between 
dances did much to enliven the ball 
given by L. U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y, at 
the Labor Lyceum. About 1,000 persons 
attended. Officers of the different Lo- 
cals and of the District Council were 
present. Sidney Pease, Secretary, said 
that $1,500 would be realized from the 
ball, leaving a net profit of $600, which 
would go to the maintenance of the 
needy and aged members of the organi- 
zation. 

This was the third annual affair of the 
Local. Dancing started at S :30. An 
hour and half later souvenirs were dis- 
tributed to the children and to the men. 
Each of the children was presented with 
a pencil and each of the men with a 
five-foot rule. The ladies were served 
ice cream. A march by the children, 
led by the Chairmen of the different en- 
tertainment committees, brought the ball 
to a close. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



Some New Woodworking Tools 

E. C. Stearns & Co., of Syracuse, N. 
T., an old and reliable hardware manu- 
facturing concern, is placing on the 
market some new woodworking tools for 
the use of carpenters. One of the new 
tools is a woodmarking gage, 9 in. long, 
plainly graduated : it has a metal head, 
japanned, and has nickel plated set 
screws. They are also putting on the 
market a folding steel saw vise, made 
of channel steel, finished in black japan 
baked on and has two clamps for clamp- 
ing to the bench ; the clamps fold in 
oven with the jaws, making a small 
package convenient to carry in the tool 
chest ; the front jaw is faced with rub- 
ber to prevent vibration and noise ; the 
length of javrs is 11% in., and the whole 
clamp weighs only 1% pounds. The 
wholesale list price is $1.50 each. They 
are also putting out an all steel saw vise 
without rubber jaws for less than the 
above price. Any carpenters interested 
in this may communicate with E. C. 
Stearns & Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 



't's Nerve 



New Buildings 

Plans are being prepared for a $350,- 
000 Y. W. C. A. at Dallas, Tex. 

Chicago is to have a new memorial 
Masonsic Temple to cost $550,000. 

St. Louis, Mo., is to have a new Ma- 
sonic Temple at a cost of $1,500,000. 

A state library is to be constructed 
at Kalamazoo. Mich., at a cost of $300,- 
000. It is to be attached to the State 
Normal School. 

Unions in Trenton. N. J., are having 
plans drawn for a $400,000 Labor Tem- 
ple for that city. 

Architects in Philadelphia have been 
authorized to draw plans for a fine mu- 
seum for Woodward Ave., Detroit, to 
cost about $3,000,000. 

A new Masonic block is to be con- 
structed on 56th and State Sts., Chicago, 
at a cost of $800,000. 

A Masonic Temple is to be erected in 
Detroit, Mich., to cost $4,000,000 on 
plans by G. D. Mason and Company. 

The Church Hill Hotel Corporation. 
Chicago. 111., are having plans drawn for 
a $1,000,000 stone and brick hotel on 
State and Goethe Sts. 

A $600,000 hotel is to be erected at 
South Bend, Ind., on plans by J. S. 
Aroner & Company of Chicago. 

Belmont Avenue, Chicago, is to have a 
combined store and theatre building to 
cost $2,000,000, plans by TV. Alsehlager. 



e 



Nuxated Iron 



that helps make STRONG, MAGNETIC, 
FORCEFUL MEN, and women who 
make their over mastering presence felt 
the moment they enter a room. 



NUXATED IRON 

contains the principal chemical constituent of 
active living nerve force in a form which most 
nearly resembles that in the brain and nerve 
cells of man. It also contains organic iron like 
the iron in your blood and like the iron ia 
spinach, lentils and apples. Organic iron en- 
riches the blood and plenty of rich red blood 
means more nerve force, so tiat Xuxated Iron 
not only feeds what might be termed artificial 
nerve force to the nerve cells, but it stimulates 
the blood to manufacture a greatly increased 
supply of new nerve force. If you are weak, 
nervous or run-down, get a bottle of ZSTuxated 
Iron today, and if within two weeks' time you 
do not feel that it has increased your nerve 
force and made you feel better and stronger in 
every way, your money will be refunded. Sold 
by all druggists. 



A Methodist Episcopal church is to be 
erected at "Woodward and Marston 
Aves., Detroit, at a cost of $500,000,' 
plans by TV. E. N. Hunter, Detroit. 

A junior high school is to be built in 
North Beiger, N. J., at a cost of $750,- 
000. 



-s- 



Test of a Man 

The test of a man is the fight he makes, 

The grit that he daily shows ; 
The way he stands on his feet and takes 

Fate's numerous bumi;s and blows, 
A coward can smile when there's naught to 
fear, 

When nothing his progress bars, 
But it takes a man to stand up and cheer 

While some other fellow stars. 

It isn't the victory after all, 

But the fight that a brother makes ; 
The man who, driven against the wall, 

Still stands up erect and takes 
The blows of fate with his head held high, 

Bleeding and bruised and pale, 
Is the man who'll win in the by and by, 

For he isn't afraid to fail. 

It's the bumps you get, and the jolts you get, 

And the shocks that your courage stands, 
The hours of sorrow and vain regret 

The prize that escapes your hands. 
That test your mettle and prove your worth ; 

It isn'r the blows you deal. 
But the blows you take, on the good old earth, 

That shows if vour stuff is real. 

— Dallas Saturday Mght. 



THE CARPENTER 



41 



Health Talks 

(By "William Brady, M. D., Noterl Physi- 
cian and Author The Aspirin Habit) 
Cetyl-salicylic acid, more commonly 
known as "aspirin," is a coal-tar deri- 
vative widely employed as a pain-killer. 
Formerly it had the protection of a 
patent, which expired two or three years 
ago, so that any one may now manufac- 
ture and sell the drug. The patent hav- 
ing expired, we may also speak frankly 
about the drug here. A great many in- 
quiries from readers have been hereto- 
fore answered by mail only. 

The original excuse for resorting to 
this pain-killer is generally headache or 
neuralgia or some such pain. But the 
drug seems to take a hold upon the vic- 
tim, so that the headache or neuralgia 
comes more and more frequently ; or the 
victim falls into the habit of taking some 
of the drug to "ward off" or "prevent" 
a threatened headache, or the victim re- 
sorts to the drug to drown anxiety, 
fatigue or other unhappy emotion. Some 
women have taken as much as 100 
grains in a day. 

Now it is a peculiar fact that many 
victims of the habit go on for months 
and years abusing the drug before show- 
ing any great constitutional injury, 
whereas others succumb to its effects 
after comparatively short and moderate 
habituation. This is probably accounted 
for by idiosyncrasy ; just as certain per- 
sons cannot take quinine in any dose 
without serious results. The tcetyl- 
salicylic acid has the quality of a gen- 
eral analgesic — that is, it benumbs or 
relieves almost any kind of ache, pain 
or distress, for a short time. Of course 
it doesn't cure the disease; it simply 
clubs the nervous system into temporary 
insensibility, so to speak. It depresses 
the heart-regulating center in the brain, 
and lowers the temperature of the body, 
in health and in fever, but only in a 
poisonous way, at the expense of vitality. 
Like many other coal-tar derivatives 
which are pain-killers, anxiety-dis- 
solvers, fever-reducers, blood-destroyers 
and heart-weakeners, such an acetane- 
lide, phenacetin and antipyrin (and 
these enter into a thousand and one 
dangerous nostrums) aspirin has bad 
effects. 

It is unwise and unsafe to take even 
a five- grain dose of aspirin without care- 
fully remaining lying down for at least 
half an hour afterward. Disaster is 
courted when a dose of such a heart-de- 



pressing drug is taken and any active 
exertion immediately entered upon 
thereafter. 

In common with the other coal-tar 
derivatives employed as pain-killers, 
acetyl- salicylic acid interferes with the 
oxygen carrying function of the blood. 
A certain peculiar blueness of fingernails 
and lips (cyanosis) is one sign of this 
and should be a warning to the victim 
that the habit is endangering life. A 
strange numbness felt after a dose of 
the favorite dope is another warning. 
When these coal-tar pain-killers are 
abused in spite of such warnings, it is 
not unusual to see a ruin follow. Some- 
times "sudden" death occurs. Some- 
times the victim is committed to an in- 
stitution for the insane. 



Book Review 

In "The Hope of the Future," pub- 
lished by "The Cornhill Publishing Co. 
of Boston, Edward E. Eagle gives not 
only an interesting account of the travels 
through foreign countries, but by the 
study which he has given to the tims 
and methods of the British Empire, sets 
forth the need of close co-operation be- 
tween the Empire and the United States. 
Mr. Eagle's book will be read with in- 
terest by those wishing a better under- 
standing of the character and purpose of 
the Empire as it exists today. 



Courage 

Courage is something which you may And 

Wherever you go and in every place — 
It is being helpful and being kind, 

It is meeting the world with a smiling face ; 
It isn't of rank or of high degree, 

It isn't God's gift to a favored few ; 
Woman's as brave as a man can be, 

And a boy can shine with its glory, too. 

Hearts courageous are everywhere, 

The man who stands to his task by day 

And does his best with his bit of care, 
And still helps others along life's way, 

Is doing all that a brave man can. 

Oh, the world is peopled with souls like this, 

Who are humbly serving some lofty plan 
With never a sigh for the joys they miss. 

Who are braver than mothers fair 

Who go to the door of death and smile, 
With scarcely a moan for the pain they bear 

And never a thought for themselves the 
while ? 
Courage is born of a thousand deeds. 

It throbs today in uncounted breasts, 
It is keeping up with the daily needs 

And ringing true with the sternest tears. 

It is playing fair when a trick would win, 

It is being friendly and kind and true ! 
It is keeping clean when lured by sin, 

It is serving the many and not the few ; 
It is keeping on when the goal you miss, 

It is being cheerful in spite of care. 
And millions of people are doing this 

Round about us and everywhere. 

— Edgar A. Guest. 




How to Frame a Roof of Unequal Pitch 

(From a Practical Course in Roof Framing. By Richard M. Van Gaasbeek.) 

(Published By F. J. Drake & Co., Chicago, 111.) 

(Concluded.) 

To Lay Out the Valley Rafter. — The fence firmly against the top edge of the 

length of the valley and the plumb and valley and lay off the run on the side 

level cuts are laid out the same as for of the rafter, Fig. 14. 

the hip rafter. The return cut for the To simplify picking up the various 




Fig. 14 — Developed Length of Valley Rafter for Roof of Unequal Pitch. 



facia is the reverse to that of the hip 
and the birdsmouth differs. Take the 
run from the layout, Fig. 1, measuring 
from the facia line to the intersection 
of the hip rafter, or 13%, which should 
measure the same as the hip. Press the 



distances that will be required in laying 
out the bevels and cuts for the valley 
rafter, lay out a full size section of the 
facia and plate as shown in Fig. 15. 
Lay in the valley full size and where the 
outside edge of the rafter on side B in- 



THE CARPEXTER 



43 



tersects the wall line, square a line 
across at right angles to the center line 
until it intersects the center line as at 
3, Fig. 15. Also square a line across at 
right angles to the center line at the 
intersection of the facia lines until it in- 
tersects both sides of the rafter as at 
A- A, Fig. 15. 

As the hip and valley form a butt 
joint, no deduction need be made from 
the length obtained. Measure in from 



ure I 5 




Fig. 15 — Full Size Section Through S-S, 
Fig. 1. Showing Intersection of Val- 
ley At the Plate and the Facia Line. 

the facia line on a level line, the diagon- 
al of the projection A-B, Fig. 15, meas- 
uring on the center line of the valley 
from the intersection of the facia to 
where it crosses the plate or 2% in. and 
produce the wall line B, Fig. 14 and 
square this line across the bottom edge 
of the rafter as shown in the bottom 
view, and point off the center. To make 
a fit against the wall measure on the 
side of the rafter from the wall line B, 
Fig. 14, the distance B-3, Fig. 15, and 
produce another plumb line. Connect 
this line through the center as shown at 
4, Fig. 14. Measure down on the facia 
line from the top edge of the rafter % 
in., the width of the facia and produce 
the plancher level F. Measure up from 
the plancher level on a plumb line 2 in., 
locating the plate level G, noticing that 
the valley crosses the same plate as the 
long common rafters. To anake the 
turn on the facia line, measure forward 
on the side of the valley from the facia 
line A, Fig. 14, the distance A-l on side 
A and the distance A- 2 on side B, Fig. 
15, and produce plumb line 1 on side A 
and plumb line 2 and side B of the raf- 



ter, Fig. 14. Connect these lines on the 
top edge with the facia line on the cen- 
ter line of the valley. Cut at these 
angles on the top edge on plumb lines 1 
and 2 for the facia, on line F for the 
plancher level, on line G make a square 
cut and on line 4 on the bottom edge a 
bevel cut for the birdsmouth and on line 
T make a square cut for the butt joint 
against the hip rafter. The top edge 
of the valley is left square as the center 
line of the valley and the hip are in the 
same plane or alinement. 

To Lay Out the Ridges. — The run of 
the ridge is taken from the lay-out, Fig. 
1, measuring from the walT line to the 
intersection of the center line of the hip 
and valley or 14 in. on the long common 
side and 17 in. on the short common 
side. From this length deduct one-half 
the diagonal thickness of the valley T- 
W, Fig. 16 measured in the center line 
of the ridge and locate the center on the 
top edge. Set a bevel square on a line 
with the ridge and valley and apply 
the bevel to the top edge of the ridge 
and mark through the center point. Cut 
on this bevel on the top edge a square 
cut across the ridge. 

To Assemble Rafters. — Assemble the 
rafters as shown in the elevation, Fig. 
17. Set up and fasten the hip and val- 
ley rafters first. The center line of each 
must intersect at the apex. In fasten- 
ing the ridge keep the top edge of the 
ridge in line with the top of the plumb 
cut on the common rafters. This drops the 
ridge out of its normal position so that 
the top edge will not be in alinement 

Figure 16 




Fig. 16 — Full Size Section Through V-Y, 
Fig. 1. Showing Intersection of 
Ridge and Valley Rafter. 

with the center lines of the hip and val- 
ley. If the ridges were not dropped it 
would be necessary to bevel the edges 
on either side to the pitch of the roof. 
The top edge of the ridge on the long 
common side being % in. thick and the 
rafters one-half pitch, the ridge is one- 
half of % in. or 3-16 in. lower than the 



44 



THE CARPENTER 



center line of the hip. The exact loca- 
tion of the ridge where it intersects the 
valley may be determined by laying out 
a full size section as shown in Fig. 16. 
Square a line across at right angles to 
the center line of the hip and valley at 
the intersection of the ridge and hip and 
valley, thus locating the butt joint of 
the two rafters. Measure the distance 
on the layout R-S, Fig. 16 and set the 



C to E is the developed length of the 
hip rafter. 

A to E is the developed length of the 
valley rafter. 

D to E is the developed length of the 
long common rafters. 

G to E is the developed length of the 
short common x'afters. 




Fig. 17 — Elevation of Hip and Valley Roof of Unequal Pitch. 



ridge this distance from the point of the 
two rafters. The center lines on all raf- 
ters throughout the entire roof must be 
in the same plane so that the roof 
boards will lay flat. 

Development of the Rafters On the 
Plan. — Fig. 18 will serve to illustrate 
and prove the lengths and bevels and 
will explain in a graphic way how the 
lengths and bevels may be obtained. 

A to B is the rise of the hip and valley 
rafter. 

A to C is the run of the hip and valley 
rafter. 

B to C is the length of the hip and 
valley rafter. 



Angle H gives the bevel cut for the 
top of jack rafters 8, 9, 10 and 11. 

H-H-H-H gives the developed lengths 
of jack rafters 8, 9, 10 and 11. 

Angle I gives the bevel cut for the 
top of jack rafters 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. 

I-I-I-I-I gives the developed lengths 
of jack rafters 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. 

Angle J gives the bevel cut for the top 
of jack rafters 12, 13 and 14. 

J-J-J gives the developed lengths of 
jack rafters 12, 13 and 14. 

Angle K gives the bevel for the top 
cut on jack rafters 18, 19 and 20. 






THE CARPENTER 



45 



K-K-K gives the developed length of 
jack rafters 18, 19 and 20. 

Runs and Lengths of Rafters. — The 
runs are taken from the layout, Fig. 1, 
the lengths should be developed with 
the steel square. The measurements are 
taken on the center line on the top edge 
of the rafter and are listed in the ac- 



ridge hip or valley for the cutting 
length. If a model is made for practice 
to the same scale 'xs the layout, read the 
figures in the table as inches. For ex- 
ample, rafter 1, the run would read 



% 



12 



in. and the length 2 



r>% 



12 



in. 




Fig. IS — Developed Lengths of the Rafters On the Plan. 



company in g table, as in trade practice, 
full size, without any deductions. Make 
allowances where rafters intersect a 



The square being laid out in twelfths of 
an inch, it is an easy matter to check 
the work up accurately. 



46 



THE CARPENTER 



RUNS AND LENGTHS OF RAFTERS FOR HIP AND VALLEY 
ROOF OF UNEQUAL PITCH 



No. of 


Quantity. 












Rafter 


of Rafters 


Runs 


Lengths 


Remarks 


1 


1 


1* 


5%" 


2' 


5%" 


Jack Rafters on Short 


2 


1 


2' 


10%" 


4' 


io y 2 " 


Common Side. 


3 


1 


4' 


3%" 


7' 


2%" 


" 


4 


1 


5' 


9" 


9' 


8%" 


ii 


5 


1 


7' 


2%" 


12' 


2%" 


<< 


6 


12 


8' 


0" 


13' 


7y 4 " 


Short Common Rafters. 


7 


1 


8' 


0" 


13' 


7y 4 " 


Jack Rafters on Short 


8 


1 


6' 


6" 


11' 


%" 


Common Side. 


9 


1 


5' 


%" 


8' 


7y 2 " 


ii 


10 


1 


o 


7y 2 " 


6' 


2%" 


<( 


11 


1 


2' 


2Yi" 


3' 


8y 2 " 


ic 


12 


1 


2' 


9" 


3' 


10%" 


Jack Rafters on Long 


13 


1 


5' 


6" 


7' 


9%" 


Common Side. 


14 


1 


8' 


o 


11' 


sy*" 


" 


15 


1 


11' 


0" 


15' 


6%" 


ii 


16 


10 


11' 


0" 


15' 


6%" 


Long Common Rafters. 


17 


1 


11' 


0" 


15' 


6%" 


Jack Rafters on Long 


18 


1 


8' 


3" 


11' 


8%" 


Common Side. 


19 


1 


5' 


6" 


7' 


9%" 


" 


20 


1 


2' 


9" 


o 


10 %•• 


<c 


A 


1 


13' 


7y 3 " 


17' 


6" 


Hip Rafter. 


B 


1 


13' 


7y 2 " 


17' 


6" 


Valley Rafter. 


C 


1 


17' 


0" 


17' 


0" 


Ridge. 


I) 


1 


14' 


0" 


14' 


0" 


Ridge. 



House Framing 

(By Owen B. Maginnis. ) 




Fig. 2 — Sill Framed of Two Pieces. 



Fig. 1 — General View of a Frame Set Up 
Wrong and Incomplete. 

Referring to Fig. 1, the first floor 
beams will be seen at D. D. D. It will 
be noticed that they rest on the cellar 
girder, A, are notched or girded over the 
sills, B B, and their bottom edges rest 
on the stonework of the foundation or 
cellar walls. 

In Fig. 4, I show two more arrange- 
ments of sills which are even cheaper 
than the foregoing, inasmuch as they 
are made up of ordinary floor timbers 
spiked together, so as to form, as it were, 




Fig. 3 — Sill, Using a Floor Beam to 
Form It. 



THE CARPENTER 



47 



box sills. For very cheap work, as 
small houses or barns, they can be read- 
ily and economically introduced. No 2 



&zn 




"KZ^EJr-H 



ECT/ON OF SILL, 

Fig 4 — Cheap Sills. 

is especially suitable for barns, as it 
does away with much timber and labor, 
but it must be remembered that incom- 
plete sills of this description or char- 
acter should never be introduced when a 
few dollars can be spared to put in one 
of a better and more suitable form. Any 
sensible mind will readily understand 
that such sills must necessarily follow 
the settlement of the stone underpin- 
ning, and should this be uneven, the 
whole superstructure will, as a matter of 
consequence, strain and become injured. 



-§=I£EBS-6I 





Two More Examples of Sill 
Construction. 



This sketch shows two other methods 
of sill construction. At B is a 2x8 
placed on the wall, and A is a 2x6 spiked 
fast to it; C is a 2x4 studding spliced 
firmly to A and B ; D is spiked in the 
same manner, the end and side sills are 
both made the same way and spiked well 
at the corners, making a first-class box 
sill, and one that can be relied on in a 
cyclone. 

In proceeding, I think it best to give 
the reader, especially the beginner and 
young mechanic, a general description of 
the principal component parts of a sim- 
ple house framed on the balloon system ; 
then to instruct him practically in the 
various practical means and methods 
which must be followed when building 
houses of this class. I therefore most 
respectfully ask those who wish to ap- 
ply them in actual practice to become 
thoroughly acquainted with those im- 
portant instruments or tools absolutely 
necessary to proceed accurately, name- 
ly : the two-foot rule, ten-foot pole, and 
steel square. The last almost combine-; 
all three. 

Placing Cellar Girders. These will re- 
quire to be lifted into the place on top 
of the piers built for them in the cellar, 
and set perfectly level and straight from 
end to end. Some prefer to give their 
girders a slight crown of say 1 in. in the 
entire length, and it is a wise plan, be- 
cause the piere generally settle more 



48 



THE CARPENTER 



than the outside walls. When there are 
posts instead of brick piers used to sup- 
port the girder, the best method is to 




Wall Plates, Hips, Jacks and Common 

Rafters in Position In a Hip Roof 
temporarily sustain the girder by up- 
rights made of pieces of 2x4 joists rest- 
ing on blocks on the ground below. 
When the superstructure is raised these 
can be knocked out and the permanent 
posts placed, resting their bottom ends 
on a broad flat stone, to form a base or 
foundation footing. 

If the supporting posts and piers be 
not placed or built until after the build- 
ing is erected, then carpenters should 
exercise good judgment when jacking 
the girders up, to place them under it 
and not raise them so much as to strain 
the building, and it is always desirable 
to obtain the crown mentioned before. 
The practice of temporarily shoring the 
girders, and not placing the permanent 
supports until after the superstructure is 
finished, is favored by good builders, 
and it would be well for carpenters to 
know just how it should be done. 

Setting Sills. After the girder is in 
position, the sills are placed on top of 
the cellar walls, rounding side up and 
hollow side down, and are very carefully 
fitted together at the joints and leveled 
throughout. The last operation can 
either be done by a sight level or by fol- 
lowing the simple method I am now 
about to describe. 

Place %-inch blocks at short inter- 
vening distances on the length of each 
side, also one at either end, and set a 
long parallel straight-edge on them, also 
set a true level on the upper jointed edge 
of the straight-edge. The sill must be 
wedged up, or lowered down until the 
air bubble in the level tube is exactly 
in the center, and each piece must also 
be wedged up or lowered till the blocks 
all touch the bottom of the straight-edge. 
In all cases the whole length of the sill 
should bear solidly on the stonework, 



and it should either be bedded in mortar 
or made solid with chip pieces of slate, 
stone wedges or furring ;, and these 
should be inserted less than 2 ft. apart. 

Sills are generally kept back % or 1 
in. from the face of the stonework, to 
make the sheathing come flush with it, 
and allow the water table to project the 
thickness of itself (usually 1 1-3 to 1 3-8 
in.) to keep the water off the stone. 

Sills must be taken out of wind, that 
is to say, they must be level all around, 
so that when the carpenter sights them 
across with his eye (the other being 
closed), the surfaces will show as one 
line. 

All sill joists will require to be toe- 
nailed or spiked to draw them closer to- 
gether, and the running joints should be 
nailed dovetail fashion. When sills are 
made up of two thicknesses of plank, as. 
they sometimes are, they will need to be 
solidly spiked together, to form one, with 
"dovetailed" nails. 

As some of my readers may not clear- 
ly understand what is meant by "dove- 
tailing" nails, I will here state that a 
carpenter dovetails nails when he drives 
two with the points inclining to or from 
each other, so that they form, as it were, 
a dovetail. 

Setting First Floor Beams. This im- 
portant job is done by experienced car- 
penters in the following manner: 

The stairs and chimneys being con- 
ductors, or rather passing up from one 
floor to the next one above, and having 
timbers framed to form the openings, or, 
as they are technically called, "wells," 
the header and trimmer beams around 
them must be placed first. The proper 
method to follow then is, to place and 
nail one trimmer beam first, exactly in 
position on the sill, and then to insert 
its fellow opposite it, loose. When this 
is done the framed header may have its 
tenons placed in the mortises in the pair 
of trimmers, and the loose trimmer made 
parallel to the one that is nailed, that is, 
it must be the same distance apart at 
the sill end as the length of the header. 
When two headers are framed in, then 
it will only be necessary to straighten 
the trimmers from end to end. The trim- 
mers will likewise require to be set 
square to the sills. After the headers 
aare set, they and the trimmers should 
be solidly spiked together, keeping the 
headers square with the trimmers. 

The tail beams or joists are next 
olaced, the framed ends, with the tenons. 



Our Last General Convention 

recommended that we 

Advertise Our Label More Extensively 

In pursuance with instructions of the Twentieth General 
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the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 
be inaugurated, and the appreciation of the fact that continuous 
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that no better medium could be employed than HIGH GRADE 

PLAYING CARDS 

(Illustration below) 



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iAND /JOINERS OF AMERICA^ 




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The cards will b*> 
furnished in either 
(or both) regular 
and pinochle decks. 

Local Unions are 
urged to carry a 
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hand to meet de- 
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We hope our entire 
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seeing that their 
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ing cards for inno- 
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The Price Is Forty-five Cents Per Deck 

(Regular and Pinochle) 

and please bear in mind that we are furnishing a grade of cards 
fully commensurate with the price. The General Office sells the 
cards at less than cost. 

Send orders, accompanied by remittance, to 

FRANK DUFFY, General Secretary, 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Indiana. 



50 



THE C A R P E X T E R 






being slipped into the mortises in the 
header, and there solidly spiked to keep 
them in place. 

This practice of first placing all rrini- 
mer and header beams for stairs, chim- 
neys, hearths, or other openings which 
are framed around, should always be ad- 
hered to. because the openings are then 
sure to be in their proper position as 
denoted on the first floor plan. 

Having these set, the remaining single 
joists are carried in and placed on the 
sills, sparing them out at 12 or 16 In. 
between centers, as called for. The 
quickest way to space them is either to 
use a two-foot rule and (when 2 in. 
joists are inserted) to allow 10 in. be- 
tween for 12 in. centers, and 14 in. be- 
tween for 16 in. centers. 

The student will. I trust, understand 
that when 2 in. more is addded on. that 
is. 1 in. on each side, the centers of the 
timbers will be just 12 or 16 in., as the 
case may be. When all the floor tim- 
bers are in and toenailed to the sills, a 
strip is nailed across th etop edge to keep 
them from being overturned. This strip 
should be kept back at least 12 in. from 
the end. in order that it may not inter- 
fere with the wall posts or studding 
when raising. 

A temporary floor must now be laid 
on the beams, by placing sheathing 
board across them, and they should be 
so placed that there may be no traps in 
the floor. By traps, is meant the ends of 
the boards which project over one beam 
and do not rest on the next, so that when 
a man stands on the end it is a trap 
which, being pressed downwards by his 
weight, lets him fall between the beams. 
In every case the end of each board 
should rest on a joist or beam to prevent 
this occurring. Fig. 18 represents a sec- 
tion of a balloon frame floor with the 
bridging, which is put in for the purpose 
of bracing the floor, in position, also the 
lath and flooring. 

Carpenters should take care not to 
have a straight joint come over a cellar 
window, as there is always the liability 
of its coming apart, or sagging down 
under the weight of the studding above. 
All sills will invariably require to be 
placed rounding edge up. 

Sills of hexagonal or octagonal plan 
are to be laid down according to the 
plan on the template made for the cellar 
wall and be halved at the corners. 

Posts and Studding. Some carpenters 
and builders form their corner posts in 



balloon frames of two 2x4 joists spiked 
together to make 4x4 sticks, as it were. 

Some use 4x1 scantling, and others make 
them of one stick of 4x6. The posts and 
studding can be laid out from one pat- 
tern, which should be first framed just 
as the studs and posts will be. This can 




Isometric View of a Balloon Frame 
Floor. 

either be made out of a piece r -'f " s in. 
pine or a 2x4 stud, and it must be laid 
out for the gain for the girt strip or 
ribbon and squared at the top and bot- 
tom ends. The pattern should be per- 
fectly straight on edge and be without 
wind. 

"When a good pattern Is made the 
posts are first placed on the saw horses 
and laid out. The ends are also sawed 
off square and the gain is sawed and 
chiseled out for the strip. Next the wall 
studs are placed on their edges on the 
saw horses in quantities of 6. S or 10 at 
a time and the edges squared over from 
the pattern. Careful carpenters use two 
patterns, placing one each side of a num- 
ber of joists, when laid on the horses, 
and then squared across from end to end, 
or from gain to gain, thus making sure 
that they will be exactly right. Studding 
should be laid out on the rounding edge, 
so that the hollow edge will come on the 
outside or face of the wall. When the 
edges are marked the faces are squared 
over. Some prefer to lay the pattern 
on each piece singly, and mark the face 
of stud at once, thus avoiding the neces- 



THE CARPENTER 



51 



sity of squaring over the edge. This 
practice undoubtedly saves time, but the 
sawing must be done by good workmen 
or the joints won't be square. The rea- 
son I say this is, that though it. may 
seem very easy to saw a piece of stuff, 2 
in. thick, square, without a guide line, 
I find few who can do it exactly. The 
ribbon or girt strip is a strip of 1x6 
stuff; so the gain or notchmust measure 
this size. 



or walked upon thus preventing the 

jarring or straining of the green walls. 

It is an error to leave out cross beams 
or series of beams to admit hod-hoisters, 
etc., to pass up and down, as such omis- 
sions leave weak, unbraced sections 
liable to spring, jar or strain by wind 
pressure or other causes. 

All straps, irons and ties, and anchors 
should be put in as soon as the timbers 
are placed, and be very carefully fitted 




Floor Plan of First Story Timbers of a Small Frame House. 



— Setting Timbers — ■ 
A very important precaution which 
carpenters and framers should observe 
when raising and placing girders and 
floor beams on new buildings, is to avoid 
jarring the freshly laid green brick walls 
by moving and setting the timbers too 
roughly. This must be very cautiously 
done on the upper stories and the walls 
ought to be securely braced with each 
and every wood or iron column, both 
transversely and longitudinally before 
commencing to set the floor timbers. In 
heavy store and warehouse constructions 
either of brick, iron or concrete, these 
temporary adjuncts are indispensable. 

When there is a wide unsupported tim- 
ber span, say of 20 ft. or more, a tem- 
porary top and bottom plate with a few 
good upright joists or studs should be 
placed longitudinally or fore and aft 
under the middle of the span in order to 
prevent their springing when weighted 



and thopoughly nailed in order to avoid 
the possibility of a high wind or any 
other strain pulling them apart. If the 
anchors should not be on the job then 
temporary hardwood straps may be 
nailed on, but they are only a makeshift 
and their use should be avoided by or- 
dering the irons early. To omit putting 
the strap anchors on the longitudinal 
girders is a criminal proceeding, especial- 
ly on a high building or when the girders 
have a square butt joint. I can't say too 
much to carpenters about taking the 
greatest care in the details of their heavy 
framing, so as to avoid all danger of 
collapses or accidents, which are full of 
menace to the lives of mechanics and 
mean loss of reputation and money to 
all interested. 

Let us here, in connection with raising 
heavy timbers, impress on every carpen- 
ter the importance of being familiar with 
the proper knots for trying and fasten- 



THE CARPENTER 



ing his ropes to the timbers when lifting 
them up. As I have seen in many jour- 
nals some knots which, to my mind, are 



not reliable unless; made by a sailor, rig- 
ger, or some one thoroughly accustomed 
to ropes, I would recommend carpenters 

fti&At. 




^x6 

Corner JPost?* 



Plan Showing the Framing for a Bay "Window by Projecting the Floor Beams 

Outside the Building. 



to stick to the simple timber hitch, 
which is made by passing the rope once 
around the timber, taking one turn or 
hitch over the hanging line and twisting 




8 knot shown is the simplest and quick- 
est made. 

Wall plates are usually joined and 
fastened at all inside and outside angles 
and corners by overlapping or crossing 
each other their full width and well 




The Timber Hitch. 



it tight to fit closely to the timber as 
seen in the attached sketch. If it be 
necessary to lengthen any rope the figure 



A Square Knot, 
nailed through, also when there is a 
long, straight stretch of wall the cross 
joints should be kept far apart to obtain 
extra strength. 

The 4 or 6 in. bottom side of wall 
plates are laid out or spaced for each and 



T IT K C A 11 P K XTER 



53 



vertical joist or stud to stand straight 
and plumb over and correspond with the 
sill or under timber. Although some 
carpenters prefer to lay out plates after 
they are raised. When gables return on 
the ends some prefer to carry the plates 
across them, which may be done for 



A Fuure R»ft«r. -gdgESES-61 

A Pattern Rafter. 

economy and safety in raising the rafters 
and they hold the side walls together. 

Readers will comprehend what is 
meant by a projecting story, and will 
see that it is the pushing out of the 
front of the second story beyond the 
front of the first story below; also by 



made tliem (3 in., while the bases being 
% in. thick will be 7% in- Out butress 
is 3 Mj i"-> that being the most common 
width of butress, as in Fig. 7. Hence 
the string sets 2% in. from face of base 
and 1 y± in. from face of newel. That 
will locate our post. 

The steps are laid off to suit Fig. 3, 
but steps 7, 8 and 9 in Fig. 2 and 12, 
(which is a reproduction of Fig. 2), will 
be the same. Now cheek up the steps 
and other details and see if they equal 
the full length of the well hole. I have 
only shown the checking one way, but 
all dimensions should be checked. We 
next check our rise Avith the height and 
if all is well, we next make a pitch 




Laying out Beams or Rafters With the 
Steel Square. 

setting out the third story or gable be- 
yond the second story, thus getting a 
very effective front. This construction 
should be done carefully and with a close 
attention to the strains which will be 
permanently placed upon the timbers, so 
that there may be no overstraining of 
the timbers. 

Plan Showing the Framing for a Bay 

Window By Propecting the Floor 

Beams Outside the Studding. 



Continuation of Criticism of Stairbuild= 

ing Problems by R. Van Gaasbeek, 

of the Pratt Institute 

(By L. W. Cooper.) 
We did enough criticizing for a little 
while in the previous installment, let us 
now take the full length of our stairwell 
and put it on a rod, as in Fig. 5. On 
each end mark off 1% in., which brings 
to the inside face of string. Our steps 
cut 3 ft. 2 in. and as % in. on each end 

/ 

/ 




board, and put on it the name of the 
job and the address, and keep it till the 
job is finished. I show a pitchboard in 
Fig. 6. It should be about % in. wider 
than the rise and run require so that the 




■eagESE3-6i 



/^cgr . % 



4 .^a 



j/ 4 



//_£_ 



// 



ends can be clipped square with the 
hypotenuse. All edges and ends should 
be square and the little square on both 
ends should be equal width. 

Fig. 8 shows a side and sectional view 
of a templet, the same being in place at 

' y " 



"f. 



»f\ 



f / I 



-*\ 



liX 



Cut Stejosj'-Z" 



F*9 

goes into the housing, it leaves our 
strings 3 ft. 1 in. in the clear. The 
shaft of newel is usually made 5% in., 
but for convenience of scaling I have 



the 8th step, Fig. 9, as is also the pitch 
board. I show the templet with two 
margins, one for the wall and the other 
for the butress string. Some house them 



54 



THE CARPENTER 



both the same and rip off 1 in. from the 
butress string. The latter is more 
economical as yon then Lave a 1 in. 
strip left instead of nothing:. 

Now take a piece 1*4 in. by 10, sur- 
face one side and one edge and start 
with the 7th rise and lay off the Sth, 9th 
and 10th steps and risers. Lap the 
templet over straight edge of string and 
hold pitch board to it, marking the stei 




and rise and at the square end of pitch 
board with a sharp pencil. By marking 
to the square end of pitch board you are 
more accurate than by letting the end 
of pitch board run to a sharp point. 
Now, after housing it, take the steel 
square and mark the cut at the 7th and 
10th riser, where face of riser intersects 
the under side of step, as shown by 
hypotenuse of pitch board. Now, take 
two other pieces of string stock. They 
usually use 12 in., but as we have a low 
rise. 10 in. will make thenu As we 
have an equal margin over the 6th and 
7th rise, we need only draw a line at 
equal depth to where face of rise inter- 
sects top of step on common string, hold 
the square at 17 3-16 in. by the rise on 
said line, and mark the 6th step and 
7th rise and without moving square, 
turn the step side of pitch board to the 
square and the rise side toward the 5th 
step at the 6th rise and hold firm with 
one hand and move square around with 



of pitch board and lay the strings I 
_ ther in place, lav a light straight • g 
in line with the Gth and 10th si 
Measure down to The 7th and up t" tn 
10th. if both meas its are con 

or equal to three risers, all is well. 

Drive a pinch dog in at the nosini 
the b ash _ to draw them together. 
a couple of brads below step line so t 
will not slip. Turn over and glue 
nail a % in. piece of board about a f 
or so long over joint to hold same to- 
gether. Do not put them togeth 
though, till all the strings are gotten 
out. The lower end needs a piece gluel 
on to level it up so the base mold wfl 
intersect while the piece which euts 
against it must be cut level at the sam 
height above the step as also the top 
string is cut to suit the piece glued on 
to the string above, which it cuts 
against. 

It may be that the strings have to be 
molded, if so, they must be all built up 
and cut and fitted before they go to the 
shaper. Sometimes these places are 
eased instead of intersected, and some- 
times we have to use 13-16 in. stock 
against a plastered walL la that - 
we glue on above and below till we get 
the required width and angles, etc. A 
few more remarks about strings "will be 
necessary when we treat with the first 
step, shown in Figs. 3 and 4. 

We will now get out and cut our but- 
ress strings to suit the posts. The 
strings are housed onto the posts % in. 
We need to have a full size detail of both 
set of winders. They can be put on one 
sheet with two colors of pencil. We 
can mark up our -working plan as in Fig. 




the other, in position to square off from 
pitch board and mark the Sth step and 
6th rise. 

Now, start at the 10th step and lay 
out the 10th and 11th steps and risers. 
The other strings will be laid out in a 
similar manner. House these out and 
hold the pitch board at step line. - 
shown, cut both strings on hypotenuse 



12 and check up and see if the total of 
figures equals the size of well hole. 
Make two brackets similar to Fig. 11. 
The notch equal the projection of nosing. 
They should have two spurs in. Set the 
thin edge to riser line. First cut out 
the regular steps and risers which are 3 
ft, 2 in. : 3 ft. 2 in. will not cut out even, 
so don't cut off a short chunk and throw 



THE CARPENTER 



it away, leave the last length with it and 
save it for the winders, both steps and 
risers. 

After the required number of steps, 
risers and remnants are obtained surface 
and rip the risers to width, surface, nose, 
and rip, the steps. y,y the way, we have 
to buy 14 in. stock to get these steps 
out of. There will be a nice little rip- 
ping off of them, but put the rippings 




Ftcj.tO 

away and I'll tell you what to do with 
them later. Surface and joint both edges 
of the remnants, which we are going 
to use for winders. You set the brackets 
shown in Fig. 11 in front of the 4th 
rise. The dotted lines in Fig. 12 indi- 
cate the required length needed. Set the 
stock firmly against said brackets and 
take a light straight-edge and mark the 
back of the 4th step, leaving a bit of 
surplus for retriming. Cut off and re- 
verse the piece you cut off and you will 
still need a little block to fill out the 
corner in this step only, but you will 
have plenty of other corners that will 
supply. 

Number both pieces on the under side 
and lay both together (after they are 
cut j, close by the vise where you intend 
to joint and glue them, and proceed with 
the rest of the winders, reversing the 
piece you have left each time and using 
it to fill out the balance of winders. If 
you have to cut them by hand you can 
make the cut accurate enough that you 




only need joint then up with a plane 
after they are glued up, and only retrim 
the end. After you get them all cut and 
numbered start and joint them all up 
i*eady to glue, as you piled them all up 



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Three years advertising in this magazine without a 
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A. Riechers, Publisher 

Palo Alto, California 



For Stair and Angle work, Phare's Hex. Square Guides. 

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both tools, same m ' •. f/iyJK— " Wm ■ " ■ ' ■■•»;~j ) )ij ; 
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BEACON MFG. CO., Station B, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Canada: Moses Klw., 492 Yonge St., Toronto, Ont. Add Customs 




THE WOOD WORKER'S FRIEND 

f ' IT 

*' ■^_y c ^ r _,. ; 

Woodstock and lumber is high. With our Jointer 
Heads you can buy rough lumber of any kind and 
dress it to suit the job. Saves time, money and 
lumber. Would this be any object to you ? If so, 

set our circular prices. Sold on 30 day trial. 

Whisler Mfg. Co. Gibson, Iowa 




"T" PLUMB AND 
LEVEL 

Rustproof, being made of 
aluminum. Can be easi- 
ly attached, to any 
straight edge. Simple to 
adjust. Guaranteed ac- 
curate. Size 3Jx21 in. 
Price $1.00 Delivered. 

PIN MANUFACTURING 

CO. 
Box 1073, Detroit. Mich. 




Enjoy your 1922 "Ranger" 

Bt ODce. Earn money for the 
small monthly payments on Our Easy Pay- 
ment Plan. Parents often advance first 
email payment to help their boys along. 
FACTORY TO RIDER wholesale prices. 
Three bie model factories. 44 Styles, col- 
ors and Blzea in oor famon9 Ranzer line. — _ 
DELIVERED FREE, express prepaid, FOR 
30 DAYS TRIAL. Select bicycle and terms 
that suit— cash or easy payments. 

T:„-- lamps, horns, wheels, parts end 
irC 5 equipment, at half retail prices. 
SEND NO MONEY — Simply write today for bl« 
FREE Ranger Catalog ana marvelous prices and terma. I 

" Cycte Company gjg*t» 

°*P' H121 ShicagOBJOe'AsentsJ 

just as they belonged, you repile them 
in another convenient place as you joint 
them for glueing. All being ready, in- 
cluding the glue, put your face piece in 
the vice (which should be such that it 
does not spring your step), and hold the 
two faces together so that you can coat 
both pieces with a good hot glue. (I 



56 



THE CARPENTER 



don't recognize anything else as glue.) 
And rub well together, using plenty of 

"elbow grease." then release and set 
carefully on edge against the side of 
shop, as near vertical as possible and rub 



landing for the flight. I snow a section 
of a landing in Fig. 10. 

We will leave the post for the third 
installment. Kindly keep this volume 
till the nest installment appears, as I 




-S^EBS-61 



F*y 



./I 



the rest together in similar manner. You 
can dispose with a bunch of them that 
vray before your glue pot has time to 
chill. 

In a s:air shop vre are generally able 
to select stock remnants that will make 
our winders without much waste, but a 
short piece off the end canbe used for 
various purposes. I leave it to you and 
Mr. Tan Gaasbeek if this method used 
by men of the craft is not more simple, 
accurate, and economical than the one 
submitted on page 50 of the September 
issue. After the glue has set. scrape off 
the surplus glue, nose them, and put 
them on the detail again and mark them 
off definitely, and also put on pencil 
marks where they enter the post, for the 
benefit of the man who puts them up at 
the building. I told you to number them 
on the under side. He will look for 
said number when picking them out. 

Now clean them up and take a gauge 
and chisel and fit them 10 the strings. 
The 4th and 11th steps should fit as they 
are. but the rest will have to be housed 
forward a bit. owing to the step hitting 
the string on the angle. At the 6th and 
12th riser both the step and rL<er will 
have to be cut under. You will need one 



<5 

ttetgAt ?~§!i 

/© 

will doubtless refer again to these illus- 
trations. 



"Butt In" On the McGrath Triangle 

Brother McGrath's problem visualized. 

The writer in presenting his simple so- 
lution of this problem has in mind that 
thousands of our Brothers cannot under- 
stand the dead language so largely used 
in solving this problem in the November- 
Carpenter, and in order that they may 
have a look in on this important subject; 





p — ■ _ 


N 1 






B / 


N. A 




&/ 




T -A 


^ 


s B 






A \^ 



%.HLV.tq 

we say important, in estimating the 
quantity of flooring required for irregu- 
lar shaped rooms, the amount of sheath- 
ing for a cut up Roof, for Gables, etc. 
You need not dig up any square roots to 
solve the problem, just take your old 
square and a piece of board and lay 
down your proposition, divide triangle 



THE CARPENTER 



57 



\" on base line as at "C", square up to 

ighth of triangle point "E", repeat 

th triangle "A" squaring up from 

int "D", then a parallel line drawn 

th base line joining B and A as at "E" 

d you have it in shape for finding the 

mber of square feet. 

Be sure to divide base line of each 

angle in center as at C. and D. 

To prove this, cut off triangular points 

and B at lines O and D and transfer 

m to point E as shown bounded by 
dash lines, then you have it thrown 
o a right angled body. If we should 
ar that the General Secretary was 
ring his waste basket out for repairs, 

will likely go into this subject again. 
Fraternally Yours, 
ROWLAND HILL. 
U. No. 29. Cincinnati, O. 



What Is the Strength? 

The strength of timber is often asked 
m a carpenter required in buildings 
support certain weights. What is the 
ength of a spruce girder 8 in. square, 
tn between supports 15 ft? The same 
iber placed in position to support: 
STirst: A dead load. 
Second : A live load. 
Third : A distributed load. 
iVhat is the factor of safety for each 
these three? 



3rother Marker would also like to 
>w when four men use a grindstone, 
h wearing an equal amount off, the 
ne at start being 60 in., at finish 6 in. 
iiameter. 

Question : What was the amount each 
q wore off in diameter, the first start- 
at 60 in. and wearing his amount off, 
owed by No. 2, then third, and lastly, 
rth man. 

BERNARD MARKER. 
U. No. 894. N. Cobalt, Out., Can. 



enty=One Reasons Why a Man Should 
Belong To a Labor Union 

.. Because it tends to raise wages. 
s is proven by all sorts of evidence, 
i. Because it prevents a reduction in 
?es; reductions rarely come to well- 
anized labor. 

; . Because it aids in getting shorter 
rs. Ask the union men who are 
•king eight hours ; they can prove it. 
T can show a union card also. 

Because in union there is strength. 
' s is as true of wage earners as of 
;es. 



5. Because it makes labor respected. 
Power wins respect from employers as 
from all men. 

6. Because it gives men self-reliance. 

7. Because it develops fraternity. 
Craftsmen are all too jealous of and 
suspicious of one another even at best. 

8. Because it is a good investment. 
No other investment gives back so large 
a return for expenditure of time and 
money. 

9. Because it makes thinkers. Men 
need to rub intellects together in matters 
of common concern. 

10. Because it enlarges acquaint- 
ances. The world is too restricted for 
wage earners. 

11. Because it teaches co-operation. 
When laborers co-operate they will own 
the earth. 

12. Because it curbs selfishness ; the 
grab-all is toned down by the fear of 
the opinion of his fellows. 

13. Because it makes the job better 
place to work. The bully foreman can't 
bully the union card. 

14. Because it helps the family ; more 
money comforts, and a better opportuni- 
ty to improve your social conditions. 

15. Because it helps the state. Un- 
organized and discontented labor is the 
parent of the mob. The trade unions 
stand as a rock between the government 
and anarchy. 

16. Because it is universal. The 
trade union is coexistent with civiliza- 
tion. 

19. Because it pays death benefits of 
$100 and upwards. 

20. Because it stands for concilia- 
tion of all differences between employer 
and employe. 

21. Because a union man's card is 
treated with respect and consideration 
by all union men, and the bearer of a 
card is never without friends, and can 
always get assistance if in needy cir- 
cumstances. — Houston Labor Journal. 



Life 

A little sun, a little rain, 
A little loss, a little gain, 
A little joy, a little strife 

And this is life. 
A little work, a little play, 
Some kind deed done each passing day. 
A few good-byes, a setting sun — 
And life is done. 



The Union Label signifies merit in an 
article to which it is attached, as it guar- 
antees good, clean workmanship, as well 
as sanitary conditions and fair treatment 
by employers. 



OLD itENTUCK^ 

HOMESPUN TOBACCO 

I Craatti of the Kriest Crops Direct to Tfeii 



RIPE,RiCH,OLD-FASHIONLEAFSSS« 

OLD KENTUCKY HOMESPUN is no more like the manufactured tobacco than day is like 

night — free from chemicals and all other adulterations that undermine the health, that i 

conceal imperfections and delude the sense of taste. Grown and nurtured in Kentucky's j 

finest soil, cut at the proper time, carefully selected, aged and mellowed for chewing 

and smoking. Like old wine in the cellar, its rich, rare fragrance permeates the air. | 

Cured and "sweated" by the same method as employed in the early days, the method, 

our grandfathers used in preparing tobacco for their own use— every ftrace of harsh- 

i ness leaves it— nothing r co "bite" your tongue or parch your mouth; nothing to tirei 

your taste. No fancy packages, no decorations— just QUALITY and lots of it. Through- 1 

out the country— North s East, South and West, men have tested this fine old tobacco, 

and spread the newa of its inimitable quality. Grown right here 

in the greatest tobacco producing district in the world. We bank on it you 
have never tasted a (mcr flavored, mora satisfying tobacco ia all your 

life. Givetheold"cob"atreat— "lcad'er"uptothebrim. Cuto 

a"hunk"as big as your fist end slip it between your teeth. Smoke ( 

chew it will give yoa the keenest joy since the days of Old Bo urbon. 

"I have used the bei: rbseco they have in Canada, Eng- 
land and Ireland, but have ^cvcr tasted any as good as your Old 
Kentucky Homespun." — J. P. O'Connor, Gold Beach, Oregon. 

"I am a retired physician, 82 years old. Eaveused tobacco 
ever since I can remember. I chew but do not smoke. None 
gives me such satisfaction as Old Kentucky Homespun Leaf 
Tobacco. It is not only the most pleasant and agreeable but 
goes farther than any other kind and produces no ill effects." 
— S. S. Sutton, Kirby, Ark. 

"Your tobacco is everything a person can desire. Even 
wife enjoys its p!easant;aroma in the house."— A. C. Evering, 
Grand Center, la. 

"The tobacco came in'good shape and I like it fine. Have been imp 
apon long enough by the makers of high priced, doped up trash called to- 



the 



SB 



as IVloonlight- 



bacco."— C. L. Gate3, Morri3ville, Vt. 




We Pa j 
All Charges 



IACC0 BILL 75% 



V/e are growers of tobacco and seii none but our own crops, therefore exempt from all revenue 
tax. We pool our crops, placing them in our warehouses and share equally all the expenses of 
conducting our business.thus our expenses are reduced to a minimum. This co-operative mar- 
keting plan eliminates all middlemen; you deal directly with the growers, thereby effecting i 
saving to you of 75 per cent or more. 

Rose a Read These Money Saving Prices. We Pay Postage 

S Pounds, $2.98 10 Pounds, $5.85 20 Pounds, $ 1 1 .40 

pounds of our tobacco will make SS sacks of smoking, or 65 chewing or smoking twists. 

R3HjK£gB» With each order we include complete instructions (profusely < 
MS^F illustrated) showing how we Kentuckians make the old- 
fashion chewing and smoking twist, granulated, smoking.etc. 
Which do you prefer? The high-priced manufactured tobacco that has been adul- 
terated, sweetened, chemically treated, or otherwise "doped" in order to minimize the amount oJ 
real tobacco used, or do you want the OLD-FASHION KENTUCKY HOMESPUN that brings to 
you the cream of Kentucky's famous harvest in all its goodness. 

Pay only the price above when tobacco arrives. TRY THE TOBACCO 

BO DAYS and if it doesn't please you — if it doesn't suit your taste — ii 
It doesn't save you money — back it comca and every cent of your money will be 
returned without quibble or question. You Risk Nothing. Sign end mail the 
coupon today and enjoy the tobacco treat of your life. 



SEND NO MONEY 



m??. 



it 




Js/ TOBACCO GROWERS ASSOCIATION OFKY. 

SSr -^ ^ (Not affiliated with any other tobacco association.) 



Warehouse 313 Mayfield, Kentucky 

Send me pounds of Old Kentucky Homespun Tobacco bj 

\y parcel post prepaid. I will pay the price of $ on arrival; 

■*' If not satisfied after a 10-DAY TRIAL, I will return the tobacco i ' 
you will refund my money. 

Name 



> anc 



m 



Address 

(Check whether chewing □, smoking □, strong □, medium □, mildO) 



TOBACCO GROWERS ASSOCIATION OFKY 3S8& 




nothing extra for 
credit. No C. O. D. 



ly $1.00 down brings the set to your home for thirty days' trial, 
not perfectly satisfied, return the set at our expense within 30 days 
i we will refund your $1.00 plus aijy express charges you pay. If satis- 
i, start leaking small payments of $1.50 a month until you have paid 
.90 in all. We trust honest people anywhere in the United States. 

No discount for cash; 

t & Schram, Dept. SOI 1 . 35th St. , Chicago 

J find $1.00. Ship special advertised 28-Piecs Aluminum 
S=et. I am to have 30 days' freo trial. If I keep the set 
J Too 51.50 monthly. If not satisfied, I am to return the 
j Q 30 days and you are to refund my money and any 
I r express charges I paid. a „ - 

SNece Aluminum Kitchen Set No. A6729A. $13.90. S UnlyJl.OO with the eou- 

ri~n brings this 2S-piece 
"Lifetime Ware" Alum- 
inum set on 30 days trial. 
Money refunded If not sat- 
1 fied. We will also send our 
l'igBarg-alnCataloeof furnl- 
1'ire, rues, stoves and other 
homefurmshinggoods, free. 

Straus <£; Scfarans 

Dept. 3011 
W.35th St., Chicago 



Complete Set 66*f %{ 

GENUINE' 

Madam: a complete set of genuine "Lifetime Ware" Aluminum, each utensil 
stamped with the manufacturer's brand — heavy gauge, extra hard, pressed sheet 
seamless aluminum— and at a price less than is asked by others today for thin, oi di- 
nary aluminum ware! It heats quickly, will not crack, chip or peel, polish can't wear 
off. We, ourselves, had to charge $23.90 for a set like this only a few months ago; 

but now on a special factory offer we have 
smashed the price to $13.S0(on easy month- 
ly payments), lower than pre-war prices. 



B. F. D. 
Vo 



:i 

°8 ...State 

Vou Only Want Catalog, Put X in Box Below: 

ire,Stoves,Jewelry □ Men's,WoEen's,Children'sClothiDg 



Everything in the Kitchen of Pure Alu- 
mina— 28 Pieces 8fiST£Br*Bft5l5S! 

quart size, 8 1-4 inch inside, with a double boiler 2-quart 
capacity; one Colonial design coffee percolator (2 pieces) 
8-cup size with welded spout, deme cover, fully pcl- 
Ished; one roaster consisting of 9 pieces, measures 10 1-2 
Inches wide and 6 inches hUh. These 9 piaces have 
dozens of different uses, some shown In Illustration. In- 
cluding bread or bake ■ pan (7 pi^t capecity); stew or 
Euddingpan(7 pint capacity); pudding pan or mixlr./r 
owl (4 pint capacity); egg poacher (5 ejrgs at a time); 
muffin pan; biscuit baker with 5 custard cups or jelly 
moulds; deep locking self-basting rcaster, double boiler 
cereal cooker or triple steamer. The outfit also Includes 
2bread pans, 1 lip stew pan (1 overt capacity). 1 lip 
stew nan (1 1-2 quart capacity). Two 9-inch pie plates; 
two 9 1-2 inch extra deep cake pan?: ere colander with 
9 inch top, 5 1-8 inch bottom end 2 1-1 inch depth (can 
also be used as a steamer). 6-picce crrr.bination set, 
having 12 different uses as shown in Illustration, con- 
Bists of 6 quart convex kettle with cover, 2 quart cakj 
nnd pudding pan with cake tube; strainer or colander. 
Shipping weight about 1"! lbs. AH piece* (except the 
pie plates and bread pans) are highly polished, 
made of genuine pure sheet aluminum, extra hard, 
absolutely guaranteed the famous* 'Lifetime Ware." 
Order by No. A6729A. Send 51.00 with order, 
$1.50 monthly: Price, 28 pieces, 513.90* 




Send for Catalog 



lumbing , Heati ng and Pneumatic 
Waterworks Supplies at Wholesale 



When in the market for Plumbing, Heating and 
Pneumatic Waterworks Supplies and you wish to 

Save 20 to 40°o on Every Article 

order from us. Small orders are as carefully 
handled as large ones. Only house selling guar- 
anteed plumbing and heating supplies to all. 



B. KAROL & SONS CO., 804 So. Kedzie Ave., Chicago, 111. 




PRINT READING 



Ou: - new Special 
ss for Machinists, 
Pattern-makers. Iron -work- 
ers, Blacksmiths, and Building 
=men, qualify them by mail to 
read blueprints and become gang-fore- 
men. 



Taught from actual blue prints. Easy 
learn — no mathematics, Low prices. P 
as-you-learn Plan. Write for booklet i 
free sample blue print. Dapt. F-12S. 
dustrial Correspondence University, I 
1504 Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 




We not only 
of other vain 
far every: : d} 

Do Yon Want It? Ford If t<ffr< 

FORD WTLLSON, 141 



cOLVE this pn2zle. •win Ford Auto votes free. The letters of tee 
° alphabet are numbered: A Is 1, B is 2, ana so on. T'ne figures in the 
little squares to the left represent four trords. 1 20 is the letter "T".) 
What are the four words? Can vou work !t out? If so, send your answer 
quick. Surely you want this fine, new Ford auto. S,end no money. 
I have already ^Iven away many antos. Ton can own an auto. 

SEND ANSWER TO-DAY 

g!ve &vrzy this Ford auto, tret h-i-dreds of cellars in cash and scores 
able prizes. Bicycles, Guns. V.'a.ices, Talking Machines; something 
•. Everyone -who answers this can have a prise. There are no losers. 
cult to do. ETcrybccy ^zs» Someone gets th"s new, latest model 
pe. Electric stcrter ar_f lirhts. D>~> ycu ~^z.*. it? Write today and be rlrst, 

W. Ohio Street, Dept. 2735 Chicago, III. 




Building 
Phonographs 




derful 



print plans — ca=e mater 

arms, motors, fullinstr 



^e fiirnish evervtidn^ — bine 
erial.tone 
structions. 
Ton can easily make $100 to 
$200 a month in spare time. 
Even bays of 14 make them. 
They play any record. "Won- 
derful tone — equal to anv tod 
ever Beard. Sell to friends 
and neighbors. Write now 
for free blue print offer. 

O* "" " "— Pnono graph Co 

1214th St. Elkhart, Ind. 




DON'T BE CUT 

Until You Try This Won- 

Treatment. My internal 
method of treatment is the correct one, 
and is sanctioned by the best informed 
physicians and surgeons. Ointments, 
salves and other local applications give 
only temporary relief. 

If you have piles in any form- write for a 
FREE sample of Page's Pile Tablets and yoa 
will bless the day that you read this. Write 
today. 

E. R. PAGE, 3223 Page Bids,. Marshall, Mich. 



Will bring YOU 




---- little r.i-.-.er of 13 cts. ':::->::=*. 
tri'gyt" tie Pathfinder 13 weeks o 

Hah " 



ps 1 win 

n trial. 

y. pab- 



ependi^h'-e^ap^that 


-"Tf- 


story of 


['.- = ^-'.°^-°^---Vh"--~ 


. Taia i 


pienaii 


al weekly rappees a 1: 






csts bat $1 a year. If vc 


a want 


ro r-~.-w 


aa: :s g::r 1 ~- in. the '■" 


- i t'" : - 


:s vtar 


3. Ifvcuwant a tap-r in' 


--ar i — 


e V-i:h 


aai v:.:lr::~r; if v--j > 


—aid ap 


-='-'c- 3 


a paper vim: a pata e- 


erytiiag 
















' mis-iany. Tie Qateat 


.-a E-x 


5.a-.-=r3 














ntatitn. 5-.: IS cts. 


t: =h:v 


a a: y: a 



economize : : ; 
AUTOMATIC SASH HOLDERS 

Battling 



Other Xtii- 
Eauces. Save 
Time & Labor. 
Mention weight 
C. 




Send SI. 00 far trial 



prepaid, 
sash t;.=; craerirg. Address Dept 

HARDWARE SALES CO., Inc. 

Fifth A-ea-ae 



>*. T. 




MiilKHiltij- 
The Pathfinder, 517 



glad to invest ii 
Langdon Sta, 



a pr:":a:i:a 13 ve 

'new ra:ar~: = . ~Adi : ; 
Washington, O. 



C, 



Associated Phonograph Company 

Department 9 Cincinnati, Ohio 



OU can BUILD this 
PHONOGRAPH easily/ 

TREMENDOUS SAYING iN COST 




You don't need to be a cabinet maker. We 
have made it an easy and a pleasant job with 



Our Simplified Plans 



We furnish blue prints, diagrams, 
motor, and all metal parts com- 
plete. You build the cabinet and 
assemble. A few hours' work, and you will have as fine a type of phonograph 
as any produced, and at a price away below what you would pay in a store. 

Keep the Savings in Your Pocket 

Your machine will play all records, will have a wonderful tonal quality, excelled by 
none. No need now for any family to be without a phonograph because of the cost. 
THE MAKAFONE solves the problem. BUILD JT YOURSELF AT LESS THAN 
ONE-FOURTH REGULAR COST, but equal to the high priced cabinet machines. 
Free Records with each outfit. SEND TODAY FOR FREE CATALOG and full 
particulars of our wonderful offer. Many a manufacturer got his start in this 
way. Why not you? Build machines and sell to your friends. Ask us about this. 



I Kbb mp Bon on toa ni una m ■■§ m n 

WRITE TODAY! 



AGENTS ATTENTION a 

You can make and sell this machine froaj, 

our plans at a profit of $50 to $75 each. 

Others are selling two and three a week. | HODEKN PHONOGRAPH SOPTIT CO. 

Here is your opportunity to make big' " £32 Springer Bids., 313 So. CBotaii St, Chicago, ffl. 

money and become independent. Pleas- Q • cintlemso: Pieaso eend m« full psrtieuimra *r »wr 

ant and profitable work. START TODAY, m Manafoaa pf«j>o.ition, without .biicatras to «. 



MODERN PHONOGRAPH SUPPLY" £0. ■ Nanw 

632 Springer BIdg., 313 So-Cliaioa St., ChkagcID. B Street Address. 



Prove It At My Expense 



Don't send me oneeent— Just let me 
prove it to you as I have done for over 
72,500 others in the last six months. I 
claim to have the most successful remedy 
for bunions ever made and I want you to 
let me send you my Fairyffoot treatment 
Free. I don't care how many so-called 
cures, or shields or pads you ever tried 
without success— I don't care how dis- 
gusted you are with them all— you have 
not tried my remedy and I have such 
confidence in it that I will send you a 
sampse treatment absolutely FREE 
and afterwards afull size box C.O.D. 
which you can acceptornot just as you 
wish. Itisasimplehomeremedywhich 
relieves you almost instantly of the 
pain; it removes the cause of the bun- 
ion and thus the ugly deformity disap- 
pears—Just send name and address and 
Fairyfoot will be sent in plain sealed en- 
velope. Write today. 

Foo l Reme dy Co., 2207 Millard five., Dep i. 1 20 Chicago 



Don 9 t Wear a Truss 





LEARN TO READ BLUE PRINTS, and be in the 
I foreman's class. The day of the unskilled worker is 
I passed. A pound of brains Is worth a ton of muscle 
, these days. Put yourself in the front rank among 
j men that know how to take charge of a big job. By 
our simple method we train you quickly, in your 
spare time. Special course for each trade. Write for 
I Catalog B, Stating trade. 

Mechanical and Architectural 
Drawing 

I Taught by mail at your home in your spare time 
I without loss of time from work on the 

"PAY AS YOU STUDY PLAN" 

You can soon qualify for a successful draftsman. 

Draftsmen earn big money and are in demand. Books 
I and tools furnished free. Write for Catalog G. Do 

it today. 

COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL Est. 1904 

2MB Dept. 10. Drexel Eldg.. Phila., Pa. hsk 




B 1 



C.E, 



[ROOKS' APPLI- 
ANCE, the mod- 
ern, scientific inven- 
tion, the wonderful new 
discovery that relieves 
rupture will be sent on 
trial. No obnoxious 
springs or pads. Has 
automatic Air Cushons. 
Binds and draws the 
broken parts together 
as you would a broken 
limb. No salves. No 
lies. Durable, cheap. 
Sent on trial to prove 
it. Protected by TJ. S. 
Patents. Catalog and 
>,-;;■ vfi measure blanks mailed 

^i^i.^^iX^-j^iiLlM free. Send name and 

address today. 
BROOKS. 252F State Street. Marshall, Michigan 



--CAN MAKE IT 



in your spare time. Cab- 
inet 48 in. high, 22 x 22 
square. All panels are 
5-ply, Genuine Mahogany 
or Quartered Oak. MAKE 
THEM FOR YOUR 
FRIENDS. The profit on 
one will pay for your 
own. Complete Wood- 
work and II a r d w a r e 
$26.00. FREE BLUE- 
PRINT & CATALOGUE] 
ON REQUEST. 

Thje Carpenter & Cabinet 
Makers Supply Co. 




118 N. LaSalleSt. 



Chicago, 111. 



1 




PREMAX WALL TIES AND PLUGS 

Strong — Permanent — Correctly designed 

From your dealer or direct 

NIAGARA METAL STAMPING CORPORATION 

Division C Niagara Falls, N. Y. 




The Rustless Rule 

PIC. U.S. PAT. Of £ 

Made of Luminoy. a special alloy of Aluminum. 

Hire is THE Rule every Carpenter and Builder should have. It won't rust, 
weighs little, has brass joints, costs less than a steel rule, yet is just as 
durable, has large figures and accurate graduation, together with permanent 
legibility. 

Made in lengths 2 to 8 ft. If your dealer can not supply you send to us 
for printed matter and prices 



7 Lafayette Ave 



THE RUSTLESS RULE CO., INC. 



Buffalo. N. Y. 




These clamps are so proportioned to give greatest 
amount of strength possible for weight of material 
used. Special Feature Steel Screw. 

Extra Heavy pattern No. 610. 
Ask your Hardware and tool dealer or write 

E. C. STEARNS & CO. 

114 Oneida St., Syracuse, N. Y., U 




K&E MEASURING TAPES 

are well made, of good material, and are reliable. 
Prices Revised Send For New Price 
* KEUFFEL & ESSER Co. » 

NEU7YOR/<J2TFiJionSt. GenerJO^ca^jxaF^ori^.HOBOKBKN.t/, 

CHICAGO ST.LOUIS SAV FRANCISCO AONTR£AL. 

Slfa-20 S.DcarbomSt. 81T Locu^l SL 3CKH Second SL 5jforr*DaJhe5l.V 

Piawii^Miterials 'Mdhemahf^andSurveyii^Insh^ 



Nearly ONE MILLION MEN Have Used 

TAINTOR POSITIVE SAW SETS 

Are You One Of Them? 

Sold By Leading Hardware Dealers Everywhere 
Send for Book : "Care of Saws," free to members of 

The Brotherhood. 
TAINTOR MFG. Co., 95 Reade St., New York 

mranBgwwTBinwiy -fwft" nmr 





"Special" and No. 1 for hand saws not 
over 16 gauge. 

No. 3 for cross cut and circular saws 14 
to 20 gauge. 

No. 4 for Champion and "M" toothed saws 
14 to 20 gauge. 

No. 5 for timber and board saws 6 to 14 
gauge. 

CHAS. MORRILL, 93 Walker Street, NEW YORK, N.Y. 



The "INTERLOX" Thinks 

Invented by a Brotherhood Man 

Don*t use a stick or guess at a measurement. 

The famous 

"Interior." Master Slide Rule 



gives both inside and outside measurements 
instantly. 

Quick, accurate, no figuring, no mistakes, no 
lost time. Durable and rust proof. Use it 
once and you will never worJc toitliout it. 
Write today for full descriptive circulars. . 

MASTER RULE MFG. CO., INC. 
841C East 136th St., New York City 



BAYONN 



THE 



For the roofs and floors of piaz- 
zas, sleeping porches, etc. 






KEG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 

Is easy to lay and will not crack, 
buckle or peel, and is guaranteed 
waterproof. 

Write for sample book "T." 

JOHN BOYLE & CO., INC. 

DUANE ST. NEW YORK READF. ST. 

BRANCH HOUSE 
BRANCH 202-204 MARKET ST. ST. LOUIS 




Learn Mus 
At Home! 

New Easy Method 

Piano, Organ. Violin, 
Comet, Guitar, Banjo, 
Mandolin, Harp I 
Clarlni I , Flute, Saxo 

phone, Harmon; I Compo- 
sition, n, ill le, Piccolo, Sight 
Ringing, eto. No inn^. r net •! 
t In- aMIIty to play be shut 
out of your life, just write 
iis a postal today for our new 
Pree Book, fri Bh from the 
printer. Let us tell you how 
you can easily, quickly tho- 
roughly leant to play your fa- 
vorite musical Instrument by 
note in your own home, with- 
out a teacher, by our X< w 
Improved Home Study Method. Different, easier, than pri- 
vate teacher way — no tiresome, dry exercises — no Inconven- 
ience. No trick music, "no numbers." yet simple, wonder- 
ful, amazingly easy, for even a mere child. 

250,000 PUPILS! 

We have successfully taught over 250,000 people from 10 to 
CO. in all parts of the world! Hundreds write — "Hare 
learned more in one term in my home with your weekly 
lessons than in three terms with private teachers." "Every- 
thing is so thorough and complete." "The lessons are 
marvels of simplicity. My 11-year-old boy has not had 
the least trouble to learn." 

WONDERFUL NEW BOOK FREE! 

We want to have one pupil in each locality at once to help 
advertise our wonderful easy system of teaching music. For 
a limited time, we therefore offer our marvelous lessons at 
practically no cost — charges amounting merely to about the 
cost of sheet music, postage, etc. Beginners or advanced pu- 
pils. We have hundreds of pupils right here in New York, the 
musical center of America, who prefer our Home Study 
method in place of best private teacher. Get all the proof, 
facts, letters from pupils, amazing offer and fascinating New 
Book just issued, all free! Write postal today. Address U. S. 
School of Music. 1931 Brunswick Blclg. , New "fork. 





HERE ARE 100 complete plans for Bunga- 
lows, Houses, Barns and Garages which 
you can have for the asking. This Plan 
Book will enable you to give your clients a wide 
variety of plans from which to choose a home, 
a garage or a barn — and the complete cost of 
each. You will find the book invaluable in 
helping you sell your services. 
As you know, there is a purpose behind every 
free book. Our purpose is the sale of lumber 
and millwork at reduced prices. We planned 
this book to help you — and to help us indirectly. 
You are welcome to this useful book even 
though you never buy a nickel's worth from us. 
But whether you build according to our plan or 
your own, be sure to get our prices before 
ordering lumber and millwork. They will 
astonish you, and the qualitv of the lumber will 
please you. A Postal Brings this Free Book Without 
Obligation; Also Estimates and Estimate Blanks. 

-ast Side Lumber & Manufacturing Company 

EAST ST. LOUIS, ILLINOIS 




by modernizing o 1 d 
windows with the use 
of CALDWELL 
SASH BALANCES. 
They have stood the 
test for upwards of 
thirty-two years. 

Write for information. Dept. C. 

CALDWELL MFG. CO. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




THE Wayvell Chappell Automatic Ball Bearing Electric 
Floor Surfacing Machine is what you need to finish 
your new or old floors quickly and just 
the way you want them. 

As QUALITY of work is the first essen- 
tial in finishing floors, particularly new 
work in residences, flats, apartments, etc., 
all roller vibration must be done away 
with. It is remarkable how smoothly and 
steadily this ball bearing machine oper- 
ates. 

Only surfacing machine having roller 
sanding even with basebi ird from either 
side of machine, eloing aw.ty with uneven 
work of edge roller attachment. Remofes 
old varnish, paint, oil-soak, black, etc., 
rapidly, or cuts down warped 
edges quickly. Four sizes — 
for the largest areas or the 
smallest rooms. 

Write for folders. Accept 
our free trial offer. 

(Machines demonstrated al- 
so at our Branch Office, 921 
Washington Blvd.. Chicago.) 
Manufactured by 

Wayvell Chappeil & Co. 

137 N. Jackson St. Dept. A. 

Waukegan, III. 




Pat. 1912 



Outfit 




Delivered AT once 

Yes, I will give you this complete 
drawing outfit absolutely free. 
The instruments are in a hand- 
some high class, plush lined folding 
case. They are regular draftsman'3 
working instruments. Besides I will- 
give you absolutely free, a 20 x 25 inch 
drawing board, a 24 inch T square, a 
12 inch rule, a supply of drawing paper, 
two triangles, a French curve, pencils, 
erasers, thumb tacks, etc. 




600 




There is an urgent demand for skilled draftsmen. Com- 
panies are issuing calls every day for men to fill positions paying 
$3600.00 a year. Work is light, pleasant and profitable. • 




'aftsman 



I am Chief Draftsman of a large and well 

known firm. I have been doing the highest paying 
expert drafting work for a quarter of a century and 
I know just the kind of training that is demanded 
from men who get the big salaries. I train you by 
giving you actual, practical work, the kind you must be able 
to do to hold permanent, big paying positions. I give you my 
individual instruction. If your work is right, I will advance 
you rapidly. If it is wrong, I will show you where and make 
you do it right, and do all I can to make you an expert drafts- 
man and designer in a short time. 

Write Today Without Fail! 




Pay As You Wish 



end Coupon \ 

For New Book! \ 

Put your name and address on the coupon or a letter or a post 

card and send it to me today. I will send you absolutely free and post- a 

paid, my new book "Successful Draftsmanship," and the great special ■ 

offer that I am now making on which you get the comlete Drafts- ■ 

man's Working Outfit absolutely free. You assume no obligations ■ 

of any kind in sending in the coupon. Get in line for a big paying ■ 

position. Getting the book and full particulars of the special offer !? 

is the first step. § 

Chief Draftsman B&M 

Dept. 5311* 4001 Broadway Chicago, Ell. a 



What I want is the right kindoi 
men. Don't bother about ex- 
pense. I will give you the 
working outfit free if you get 
in at once. I charge a very 
small fee for training you to be 
an experienced draftsman. You 
can pay the small cost as suits 
you best 
iBBBBcaunsBKHiSEsriaBOHcaiiBnaBi 



Chief Draftsman D©fee 

Dept. 5311> 4002 Broadway Chicago, ffllnoi 

Without any obligation on me whatsoever, please, mail yoi 
book, "Successful Draftsmanship" and full particulars 1 
your liberal "Personal Instruction" offer to a few student 
It is understood that I am obligated in no way whatever. 



ROUND 



/5\ 

If — \^ss^ 

MTrNT APPLIED *0» 



PWDlEY CHAIN 




JMakes a Hit with Carpenter 
Contractor and Owner 




Acco Round Cord Pulley Chain happily satisfies 
everybody. The carpenter likes it because it's 
so easy to install. 

The contractor takes pride 
in its neat appearance after 
it's installed. 

The owner is glad to have 
strong, smooth-running and 
fire-proof chain instead of 
unreliable sash cord. 

Comes in three finishes — A. C. D. 
(Coppered Steel), S. R. P. (Special 
Rust Proof) and Hot Galvanized. 
Packed in strong cloth bag contain- 
ing 100 feet of chain with 40 weight 
fixtures. 



AMERICAN CHAIN CO., i„c 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

•Utrict Sales Office: Chicago New York Pittsburgh Boston Philadelphia 
Portland, Ore. San Fransisco 




T'Jor €rerlastiiiP Cccmomy) 

tOQK? GetOutoftheRut! 



F" W\ /? 
UJS/3 

The sign of Quality, 
Uniformity and Re- 
sponsibility stamped 
i on every piece. 



Make More Money 

To Carpenters, Contractors, 
Builders 




For general specifica- 
tions, see pane 458, 
Sweet's Architectural 
Catalogtie, 16th Edi- 
tion. 



Our free books tell you how you can make 
good extra money selling Oak Flooring, with- 
out interfering with your regular work. Or, 
if you happen to be out of work, during the 
slack winter period, your opportunity will be 
that much greater. 

Many of our friends in the building trade 
have made good money by following our plan. 

Write today for the books. They are free. 

OAK FWOMHGJm&m? 

105 1 Ashland Block Chicago, 111. 




SILVER 





CUT! 

You Said It. 



Ever try sawing with an At- 
kins Xo. 51 or Xo. 53. Silver 
Steel Hand Saw? If not, 
stop at your hardware deal- 
er and ask him to let you try 
an Atkins Saw. 

You'll find they cut faster, 
stay sharp longer and that 
they do not tire the wrist as 
other saws do. 

"A Perfect Saw For Every 
Purpose." 



Send 25 c for carpenters 
apron, pencil and Sav: 
Sense. 



E.C.ATKINS & CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1857 THE SILVER STEEL SAW PEOPLE 

Home Office aj\d Factory. IND1ANAP0US.LND1ANA 

Canadian Factory, Hamilton Ontario 
Machine Knife Factory. Lancaster N."Y. 

Branches Carrying Complete Stocks laTJx Following Cities: 



Atlanta New Orleans 
Memphis New York City 
Chicago Port I &rvd, Ore- 
Minneapolis SanFrancisco 



Seattle 
Paris. Fran.ce 
Sydney. N.S.W. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Sheetrock Insures 

Non-Warping Walls 




Sheetrock has every quality you 
have wanted in a wallboard. 
Made from gypsum rock, it can- 
not shrink, buckle or burn. It 
takes any decoration, and will 
last as long as the building 
stands. Sheetrock means satis- 
fied owners. 

Sheetrock is easily handled, too. 
It saws and nails like lumber, 
goes up quickly, makes tight, 
flush joints. 

Now is the time to start lining 
up the Sheetrock jobs in your 
locality if you want bigger 
profits this season. Let us send 
you details of a plan that helps 
bring in the business. Mail the 
coupon today! 

Sheetrock comes in standard 
sizes : % in. thick, 32 or 48 in. 
wide and 6 to 10 ft. long 



SHEE'EROCK 



ihe FIRE PROOF 



WA LLBOARD 



UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

World's Largest Producers of Gypsum Products 

GENERAL OFFICES: Dspt. I, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 



United States Gypsum Company 
Dept. I, 205 West Monroe St., Chicago, IIL 

Tell me about your plan to get Sheetrock contracts. 
Name 



Address. 



Sheetrock is inspected and approved by The Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. 




The home pictured above is Long- 
Bell Plan No. 292. Many retail 
lumbermen can show you floor 
plans of this home. If your lum- 
berman hasn't them, write us. 




This home is Long-Bell Plan No. 
485. Many retail lumbermen can 
show you floor plans of this home. 
If your lumberman hasn't them, 
write us. 



THE SMALL HOMI 

Comes Into Its Own 

This is the day of the small home. Yo 
see them everywhere and marvel at the: 
beauty and coziness. Nine out of ten c 
them are built of wood because beaut; 
coziness and "homeyness" are best obtaii 
able by building- with lumber. 

And, furthermore — 

Lumber is the least expensive buildin 
material you can buy today. 

Consult your lumberman. He should, t 
able to show you small home plans to f 
your needs. 

And remember — it is economy to buy th 
best of materials. 



oT 



^s> 



^\ 



T priG-Reix 

Nationally K n u w n 

Products 
Southern Pine Lum- 
ber and Timbers 
Crtosoted Lumber, 
Timbers, Posts, Poles, 
Ties. Piling, Wood 

Blocks 
California White 
Pine Lumber 
Sash and Doors 
Standardized Wood- 
work 
im nnd Oak Lumber ... 
Oak Flooring /cS2£ 



For dependable lumber of uniform 
high quality in all grades ask 
your lumberman for LOXG-BELL 
Trade-Marked Lumber. 



Tfte T pnG-ReLL T wmfoer C ompann 

R.A.LONO QUILDINO Lumbermen <m..- I&73 KANSAS CITV. N/IO. 




Be A Floor Surfacing Contractor 

Make $5,000 to $15,000 or More— Yearly 



This is a new, uncrowded field. 
Floor Surfacing Contractors are 
making big money resurfacing old 
floors in homes and office buildings 
and working with genera! contrac- 
tors who prefer to sublet the floor 



surfacing contract. It is a big busi- 
ness in itself. Business comes easily 
by American Universal Method. We 
furnish office forms, advertising 
cms, business cards — in fact, every- 
thing to set a man up in business. 



RE=SURFACING OLD FLOORS 

Don't Ever Get Caught Out of Work Again 

No Duli Seasons in This Business 



There are hundreds of homes and office 
buildings being remodeled — in every case. 
the floor is the first consideration. There 
are hundreds of Hours right in your own 
neighborhood that really need resurfacing. 
Hundreds of people can well afford to 
have the work done and will be glad to 
have you do it when you show them the 

American Universal Method. 
BSJk The machine is electrically oper- 



ated and surfaces more floors in a day than 
six men can elo by hand. Works alike 
on new and old floors and on any size, 
from cottage to largest auditorium. Sur- 
faces clear to wall without hand work. 

Contractors and architects prefer its 
work because it leaves no sander waves 
or chatter marks. Leaves job clean — 
vacuum fan leaves elust and dirt in bag. 
Machine will pay for itself the first month. 



Floor Surfacing Contractors Make $20.00 to $50.00 A Day 






P K 



"I am making floor surfacing 
a specialty with the 'Ameri- 
can Universal' and find it a 
good paying proposition. My 
average earnings are S2S.O0 

per day." 

k Geo. R. LaFlash, Mass. 

jk "I make the 'American 

Universal' way of floor 

W, surfacing a specialty 

}&\ now and my average 

""-~...;' ; v ;<ȣ) learnings are at least 

'#<%Wj §20.00 a day." 
\,^" •._**• ;%v. S®§sj§p J - A - Natzel, Ariz. 

■ " - v "My earnings in one 

day have been as high as $50.00 with the 'American Universal' ma- 
chine." E. J. Inman, Ohio. 

"We have owned one of your Floor Surfacing Machines for about two 
years. We find it earns us from $40.00 to $75.00 on each of our con- 
tract jobs." F. B. Westcott & Son, Neb. 
"I have made good with the 'American Universal' Machine. I have 



sanded about $700.00 worth of work in 
two months." T. J. Easley, Tenii. 
"The 'American Universal' is a dandy 
machine for cleaning and polishing dance 
floors. I have earned $S2.00 clear profit 
in a day, so you can see how well I am 
doing." Glen F. Bartlett, Oregon. 
"When this little town of 6.000 people 
was building, we made from $350.00 to 
$700.00 per month with the 'American 
Universal', but our best earnings per aay 
have been $100.00, $80.15, $63.50, S62.O0, 
aiid $80.00. M. L. Derstine, California. 
"I have earned as high as $50.00 with my 
'American Universal' machine and wish 
to thank you for the courteous treatment 
I have received from you." Edward Mc- 
Kernan, Nebraska. 

"I am well pleased with the 'American 
Universal'. I have made $30.00 in eight 
hours with my machine." P.. Waynick. Tex. 



Don't pass up 
this opportu= 
nity to get in= 
to a business 
of your own. 
Write today 
for complete 
literature. 







The American Floor Surfacing 

Originators of Floor Surfacing Machines 

522 So. St. Clair Street 



e Co. 

Toledo, Ohio 



THE AMERICAN FLOOR SURFACING MACHINE COMPANY 
522 So. St. Ciair St., 
Toledo. Ohic, U. S. A. 

Gentlemen: Please send me without obligation to me, complete information and literature on your proposition. 
The following information will no doubt assist you in advising me. 



□ 
□ 

□ 



I want to become a Floor Surfacing 
Contractor. 

I am not now a contractor of any land 
but was in following business: 



I am a Building Contractor and want 
to use it on my own contracts. 



NAME . 
STREET 
CITY 




OOM HOUSE FREE! 



—CARPENTERS- 
STOP PAYING RENT NOW! 

This offer is so liberal it is hard to believe, but it is true — every word is 
true. There are no strings to my offer and I will positively give a house 
away just as promised in this offer. You can get a home FREE if you send me your 
name quick and do as I say. 

Surely you have longed for the day to come when you could cease paying rent to a 
heartless landlord, and call your home your own. I am now offering you the golden 
opportunity to free yourself from the clutches of the money-grabbing landlord, and 
at no cost to yourself. Picture a handsome six-room house, nice lawn and pretty 
shrubbery and flowers growing in well-arranged beds. Don't you want a place like 
this, and free, too? Of course you do, so send me your name today — fill out the 
coupon and mail it to me before you lay this magazine aside. 

The House Oars Be Built Anywhere You Want St 

Don't hold back — don't say "no such luck for me." You can have the house built 
wherever you say — California, Maine or anywhere in the United States. It makes 
no difference where you want to live. This offer is open to all. 

I Will Even Buy a Lot For You 

Perhaps you do not own a lot, or have no place to build, but don't allow this to pre- 
vent your sending in your name and address, because I will arrange to buy a lot for 
you if you don't own one. This wonderfully beautiful and comfortable home can be yours if you 
promptly answer this advertisement, and do as I say. Don't take chances of some other person 
getting ahead of you, but rush the coupon to me at once. An offer like this may never come to 
you again. 

Costs Nothing To Investigate 

You run absolutely no risk whatever. It costs you nothing to investigate this won- 
derfully liberal offer. All I ask you to do is to rush me the coupon or send your name 
and address on a post card. 

RUSH THIS S"«"» «*FREE HOME COUPON — k -c m m 

8 C. E. MOORE, Pres. Home Builders' Club 

K Dept. 501 Batavia, Illinois 

Do not delay, but fill out the cou- - 

pon and send it to me before you H j want one of r free houses _ It is understood I need not 

lav this paper aside, iie the very » , . - T . , ... 

first to take advantage of this 1 send y° u one cent of m y own money. I risk nothing. 

liberal offer. Address B 

C. E. MOORE, President ■ Name 

Home Builders' Club g Street or R. F. D 

Dept. 501 Batavia, 111. a Town State 






/ I '■■■ 






50 Years 

Experience 

in making Better Saws en- 
ables us to meet Today's De- 
mand for Lower Prices. 



Hundreds of woodworking plants 
have found that Huther Brother's 
Patent Dado Heads enable them 
to save vast amounts in the time 
ordinarily required for intricate 
grooving. 

The saw consists of two outside 
cutters and enough inside cutters 
to perform the required cut. The 
outside cutters may be used sep- 
arately or in combination. 
The Huther Brother's Dado Head 
was developed after a thorough 
study of the needs for a saw of 
this kind, and as a result can be 
depended upon to perform cred- 
itably at all times. 
The experience of other wood- 
working plants can be made yours 
if you will write for complete cat- 
alogue of Huther Dado Heads, or 
order one on approval. It may 
be returned at our expense, if un- 
satisfactory. 



--'. 



HUTHER BROS. 
SAW MFG. CO., INC. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y 



Free Course ia Braitsmaoship 




QUICK SUCCESS and MORE MONEY 

Salaries up to $100 per week. Here is your only OPPORTU- 
NITY to get this wonderful, high-priced. Complete Drawing 
Outfit, including a FREE— PRACTICAL COURSE IX ME-. 
C1LANICAL DRAWING— now 

SEND NO MONEY 

We ship at once to any address in U. S.. you pay only SI 2.98 on 
arrival, no extras — -Write to-day for this remarkable offer, with 
which you can build your Success in DRAFTSiLAXSHIP. You 
can put yourself in class of Trained Men whose services are 
always in DEMAND. 

EASY TO LEARN AT HOME IN YOUR SPARE T!ME 
And is your one chance to earn the biggest money of your life, and 
will be one of the most profitable investments you have ever maele. 
OUTFIT CONSISTS of — Set large size Professional Draftsman's 
drawing instruments of Fine Nickel Silver, set into a handsome 
Velvet Lined pocket book folding case. si<e 4 by 8 1-2 inches 
closed — also One Drawing Board 20 by 24 1-2 inches — One 24- 
inch T Square — One 12-inch Standard scale rule — One Protractor 
— Supply of drawing paper — Two Triangles — One French Curve — 
Pencils — Erasers — One bottle waterproof drawing ink — Thumb 
Tacks— and one enlarged Edition FREE— A PRACTICAL COURSE 
IN 1IECHANICAL DRAWING. You cannot make a mistake by 
taking up drawing, so ACT NOW. 

OFFER IS LIMITED— Particulars FREE 

NATIONAL INSTRUMENT COMPANY 

4703 North Hamilton Ave. Dept. 3, Chicago, III. 



THE U, B. A. LEVEL 



ioo% adjustable. 



No holes to cut. 



Specially designed for progressive 
mechanics and to take place of level 
or plumb bob. 




i--^ 



Superior to other 
adjustables 
in working fea- 
tures. 

Attach to any 
length straight 
edge your 
work requires. 

For all kinds of 
leveling, plumb- 
ing, grades and 
pitches. The 
simplest, and 
quickest to ad- 
just. 

Frame C. R. steel 
finished in Nickel 
and Black mar 
rust proof pro- 
cess. We guar- 
,. s^[ antee every one. 



Member L. TJ. 434, Inventor. Pocket size 
3j|x4. Have your dealer supply you, if he 
cannot, send us his name and your money 
order and we will mail to you direct. 

Price $1.25 

THE UNION LEVEL SALES CO. 

1979 W. 1 nth Street Chicago. 






Ymi Arc: Asked To Plan And To 
Prepare Estimates On Building 
This House. Can You Do It? 




If you can't do it you are not yet in 
the real money making class — you are 
not a building expert. 

But, you can become an export simply by 
giving some of your spare time to home 
study under the direction of the Chicago 
"Tech" experts who will train you in any 
branch of building you want to take up. 
All this at little cost and on easy terms. 



.eady to Profit By It 

Get this training now and your opportunity will come. Building is to be 
resumed and there will be a big demand for men able to act as foremen and super- 
intendents on important work; also chances for the 
man who wants to go into business as a carpenter and 
for the small contractor to extend his business. 

T: 



in spare 



To get the paying jobs you must have the knowledge that will 
enable you to tell others what to do and how to do it. That is 
what we teach you. 



u 



Plan Reading. How to read a building plan. How to read 
dimensions. How to read detail drawings. How to lay out 
work from plans. How to stake out buildings. Practice in read- 
ing complete blue print plans from basement to roof, etc., etc. 

Estimating. Figuring amount and cost of materials. Esti- 
mating time and labor. How to figure work such as stairs, 
roofing, rafters, etc. Millwork : window and door frames, mould- 
ings, cornices, etc. All about the steel square. Lathing and 
plastering. Excavations. Brick, stone and concrete work. Fire- 
proofing." Glazing. Plumbing. Heating. 
Wiring, Etc. Etc. 

Superintending. Methods of work on 
all classes of buildings. Uses and prep- 
aration of all kinds of material. Hiring 
and handling men. 

Also Special Courses Architectural 
Drafting for Carpenters and in Plumbing 
and Heating and Ventilating, all taught 
by practical men. 




This free lesson in Plan Read- 
ing shows how easily you can 
grasp the subject by the Chicago 
"Tech" method. Nothing to pay 
for this — sent to show how you 
can advance by taking a Chicngo 
"Tech" home study course. Cou- 
pon brings it free. 



CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE, 
239 Chicago "Tech" Building. 

Without obligation on me please send Free Trial 
Lesson on the course I have marked X below. 



Send the Coupon 1 

Don't delay. At least find out g 

about this practical training for ■ 

bigger pay or more profits. Send | 

for catalog. Get the coupon into a 
the mail today. 



r~l Plan Reading and Estimating. 
I j Architectural Drafting. 



Name 

Address 

Post Office State 

Occupation 



00 

S a n d p a p 



\\ hen you want 
A Good Tool 
You go out and 
You ask for it 
By Name 

You insist 
Upon getting 
Only the kind 
Which you know 
Is good 

When you want 

Good Sandpaper 
Go out and 
Ask for 

Behr's Brand of 
Garnet Paper 
or Behr's Brooklyn 
Brand of Flint Paper 



good 
the best 



It : 

An; 

Is never too good 



For 



vou 



And remember : 
It costs 
No more 

Than any other 
Brand. 



1! E R MAN 



& i :o.. ixc 



In fiftieth year. 

33=65 Tiffany Place 
Brooklyn, New York City. 




Good Carpenters 

Demand Good Tools 

The more particular a carpenter is 
it the tools he uses, the more like- 
ly he is to select Sargent Planes and 
Squares. 

Chief among the Sargent family of 
planes is the Auto- Set Bench Plane. 
With this plane you can remove the 
blade for sharpening and replace it 
again in exactly the same position, 
without re-adjustment. Made in six 
sizes. The Sargent book of planes 
will give full information about this 
and other Sargent Planes and will be 
.sent free on request. 

Sargent Framing Squares elimin- 
ate the usual figuring required . to 
get the lengths and cuts of hip, val- 
ley, jack and common rafters. The 
necessary tables are on the square. 
Simply measure and read. Sargent 
Framing Squares are made of the 
finest tool steel in nine finishes. 
Send for the Sargent Steel Square 
booklet. 

Sargent & Company 

Hardware Manufacturers 
55 Water Street New Haven, Conn. 



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From Carpenters Helper 
to Electrical Contractor 



Mr. Schreck's 
Letter 

Phoenix. Arizona. 
May 3rd, 1921. 
Dear Mr. Cooke: 

For the first time in my 
life I urn paying an Income 
Tax. a fact for which I am 
greatly indebted to you. as 
It was your training that put 
me where I am. in business 
for myself and — well on the 
road to Success. 

Last September, a year 
ago, when I enrolled I felt a 
little skeptical. At that time, 
as a carpenter's helper, doing 
manual labor, 1 was only 
able to earn $75.00 a month. 

Today, thanks to your 
Bplendid Lessons and method 
of instruction, I am making 
considerably over $50U a 
month. 

Some time ago I started 
out to do Electrical work 
(wiring) on my own hook. 
all done in my spare time. 
By degrees I built up quite 
a little business for myself, 
and o u February 2 0. I 
filed a bond with the City of 
Phoenix to do wiring, all 
kinds, and went into the 
Electrical Contracting busi- 
ness under my own name. 

Mr. Cooke. I would not 
take $2,000 for your Course, 
and will unhesitatingly rec- 
ommend it to any person who 
is in earnest, and willing to 
sacrifice a little time to 
study. 

You may use my name as 
a reference, and depend on 
me to "boost" your School 
at every "spot in the road," 
for I shall always feel grate- 
ful for answering your ad- 
vertisement of an Electrical 
Course by mail. 

Sincerely yours, 

A. SCHRECK. 



Jumps From $75 to $500 a Month 

Here's the story of Art. Schreck, carpenter helper who jumped 
from $17.00 a week to more than $100.00 a week in a few months 
time. Read his letter. 

Are You Doing for Yourself 

No matter what kind of work you are doing — No matter how 
much you earn — you owe it to yourself to look into the thing that 
boosts a man's pay like this. Think of it.' Six times the amount 
he ever earned at the work he was doing. Let me tell you how I 
can help you do the same. 



Be An 




Will Train You 



Home 



Trained "Electrical Experts" are in great demand at the highest salaries, and 
the opportunities for advancement and a big success in this line arj the greatest 
ever known. 

"Electrical Experts" earn $70 to $200 a week. Fit yourself for one of these 
big paying positions — 

Today even the ordinary Electrician — the "screw elriver" land — is making money 
— big money. But it's the trained man — the man who knows the whys and 

wherefores of Electricity — the "Electrical Expert" who is picked out to "boss" 

ordinary Electricians — to boss Big Jobs — the jobs that pay. 

Get in line for one of these "Big Jobs" by enrolling now for my easily-learned, 
quickly-grasped, right-up-to-the-minute. Spare-Time, Home-Study Course in 
Practical Electricity. 

No Experience Necessary — Your 
Success Guaranteed J™ ffi ft™ «s > Va c 2Sg e 1 K 

graduate. My Course in Electricity is the most simple, thorough, and successful 
in existence, and offers every man. regardless of age. education or previous experi- 
ence the chance to become, in a very short time, an "Electrical Expert", able to 
make from $70 to $200 a week. I guarantee under bond to refund every cent you 
pay me if you are not satisfied after you have finished my course. 



FU 17 17 Electrical 
JOL Mil Hr Outfit and 

Use of Laboratory as well as consult- 
ing service and subscription to En- 
gineering Magazine. The big Outfit 
that I give you includes an electric 
motor and numerous tools and instru- 
ments not usually found in a begin- 
ner's set — the whole thing is free to 
my students. 




Get Started Now 

I want to send you my big book 
showing the opportunities in the elec- 
trical field and a sample lesson, free. 
You'll enjoy looking them over. The 
coupon brings both without any obli- 
gation on your part. 



Mail This 
Coupon 

Now 

L. L. 
) ' COOKE, 

Chief Eng. 
Chicago Engineer- 
ing Works, Dept. 282, 
2154 Lawrance Ave., 
Chicago, III. 

Dear Sir: Send at once Sam- 
ple Lessons, your Big Book, and 
full particulars of your Free Outfit 
and Home Study Course — all fully 
prepaid without obligation on my part. 





<§®(p>(?>l 
;reen < 



TRADE J E RS.'EY M ^ Rh 



Danger Points 



Relying upon your experience and reputation, 
your customers will want your recommendation 
regarding insect screen cloth for windows and 
doors. Your recommendation will be made 
on a basis of wearing qualities. Keep in mind, 
then, the danger points — 

Iron or steel screens 

Insect screen cloth of iron or steel rusts out in patches 
along the bottom of the screen where moisture collects. 

Screens of alloys of copper 

It is impossible to produce a mixture of two metals 
that is uniform throughout. Hence, such alloys will 
give variable service which is accentuated in such fine 
wire as is required for insect screen cloth. Some 
strands, therefore, will corrode before others. 

Jersey Copper Screen Cloth 

Here is an insect screen cloth made of 99.8 percent 
pure copper, by an exclusive Roebling process. It 
is the only screen cloth which can be expected to last 
when used near salt water or in the tropics. 

Hardware and building supply dealers throughout the 
country carry Jersey Copper Screen Cloth in rolls of 
stock widths, 18 to 60 inches. Bright or dark finish. 
But if the dealer in your town can't supply you, drop 
us a line. 



The New Jersey Wsre Cloth Company 

618 South Broad Street 
Trenton New Jersey 




A Thick Strip-shingle 



One reason for the great popularity of Ruberoid Strip-shingles 
among carpenters is its unusual thickness. It looks better en 
the roof than the ordinary shingle. It gives an impression of 
stability — of massiveness. Its edges cast strong shadows 
which contrast pleasantly with the deeply imbedded surface 
coating of red and green natural crushed slate. 



Home owners like the extra thick- 
ness, but this is by no means the 
only thing that has contributed to 
the reputation of Ruberoid Strip- 
shingles. Here is a shingle which 
•will not blow or curl up — a shingle 
economical to buy and lay because 
of its patented form — a shingle 
which offers you the possibility of 
many varied designs — finally, a 



shingle which is Ruberoid quality 
througli and through. 

Ruberoid Roofing and Shingles, 
because of their long service on 
thousands of roofs, have the con- 
fidence of home owners. Your 
reputation as a carpenter of sound 
judgment is made more secure if 
you recommend Ruberoid. 



95 Madison Avenue, New York 
Chicago Boston 




SHINGLES 
FEUS 



BUILDING PAPERS 
PLASTICS 



?ja£BnMM| 



S 





m 




In hard-to-get-at corners, where you can work only with 
one hand, you'll find the "Yankee" Quick-Return Spiral 
Ratchet Screw-driver mighty handy. 

There's a spring in the handle — just push! Blade makes 
three full turns to the stroke. 

Spring keeps bit in screw slot and forces the handle back 
for another push. Speed ! 

Draws screws out as easily as it drives them in. Saves 
time! Saves the man! 

"YANKEE" Spiral Ratchet Screw -drivers 



No. 130 (illustrated): Standard Size. 

For all general work. Three sizes of 

bits included. 

No. 131: Heavy pattern similar to No. 

130 but built larger and stronger. Three 

sizes of bits included. 

No. 135: Light pattern. Same style as 

No. 130. Three sizes of bits included. 



No. 30: Same as No. 130 but without 
spring in the handle. Three sizes of bits 
included. 

No. 31 : Same as No. 131 but without 
spring in handle. Three sizes of bits in- 
cluded. 

No. 35 : Same as No. 135 but without spring 
in handle. Three sizes of bits included. 



Write today for FREE Tool Book 

Illustrates and describes the complete 
line of ingenious time and labor-saving 
" Yankee " Tools. 

Dealers everywhere sell " YANKEE " Tools. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co. , Philadelphia 





A great too! to work wi 



It's shaped right, and made right! Be- 
cause of its tapering lines, it cuts easily and 
accurately. 

You can turn out quick, clean work with 
the Plumb Hatchet. Finish a job that makes 
you proud of your workmanship, and do 
it easier. — the balance and comfort grip 
handle take care of that. 

The Plumb Hatchet is forged from one 
piece of high-grade special-analysis steel ; 
given the Plumb armor-plate heat treatment 
and double temper so that its keen edge 
stands a tremendous lot of service.. The 
"eye" is heat-treated to prevent breaking. 

Ask your dealer for Plumb Hatchets. 
Carpenters say, "They're Worth More." 

Price $1.60 (except in Far West find in Canada) 

Fayette R. Plumb, Inc. 
Philadelphia U. S. A. St. Louis 



m \ 






"As hard as fire and 
water can make them" 

— The Disston file-maker 

Disston makes between sixteen 
and eighteen million files a year. 
Some weigh a tiny fraction of an 
ounce. Others 135 lbs. Some are 
for a lady's fingernails. Some for 
gigantic chunks of steel. 

The supreme test of a good file is 
in filing the teeth of saws — steel cut- 
ting steel. And nearly a half-million 
Disston Files are used yearly in mak- 
ing Disston Saws — "the saws most 
carpenters use." No wonder Disston 
Files eat through the work in quick 
time! No wonder the experienced 
filer enjoys the feel of a Disston File 
as it bites into the toughest metal! 

Disston Files are Disston made 
from the steel to the packing case. 
They are of good, true steel, "as hard 
as fire and water can make them." 

Send for new free booklet, "The 
File in History." 

° X ^7 ^ HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc. 

Philadelphia, U. S. A. 







A List of What Disston Makes 

And in these Sa^s. Tools artd 
Files is that quality found in 

"The Saw Most Carpenters Use" 

Back Saws 

Band Saws for Wood and Metal 

Bevels 

Buck Saws 

Butcher Saws and Blades 

Circular Saws for "Wood, Metal 
and Slate 
Compass Saws 
Cross-cut Saws and Tools 
Cylinder Saws 
Drag Saw Blades 
Files and Rasps 
Grooving Saws 
Gauges — Carpenters' 

Marking, etc. 
Hack Saw Blades 
Hack Saw Frames 
Hand, Panel, and Rip aaws 
Hedge Shears 

Ice Saws 

Inserted Tooth 
Circular Saws 

Keyhole Saws 
Kitchen Saws 

Knives — Cane, Corn, Hedge 
Knives — Circular — for Cork, 

Cloth, Leather, Paper, etc. 
Knives— Machine 
Levels — Carpenters' and Masons 
Machetes 
Mandrels 

Milling Saws for Metal 
Mitre-box Saws 
Mitre Rods 

One-man Cross-cut Saws 
Plumbs arid Levels 
Plumbers' Saws 
Pruning Saws 
Re-saws 
Saw Clamps and Filing Guides 

Saw Gummers 

Saw-sets 

Saw Screws 

Screw Drivers 
Screw-slotting Saws 
Segment Saws 
Shingle Saws 
Slate Saws — Circular 
Squares — Try' and Mitre 
Stave Saws 
Sugar Beet Knives 
Swages 

Tools for Repairing Saws 
Tool Steel 
Trowels— Brick, Plastering, 

Pointing, etc. 
Veneering Saws 
Webs — Turning and Felloe 






SAWS TOOLS FILES 



i 




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PMWIU1W1UU 



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intered July 22, 1 91 5, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of Congress, Aug. 24, 1912 

Acceptance for mailinc at special rate of postage provided for id Section 1103, act of 
October 3. 1017. authorized on July S. 1918. 



1 Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and 

Kindred Industries. Owned and Published by the T'nivod Brotherhood of Carpenters 

and Joiners of Am "rim. at 

Carpenters' Building, 222 East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 



Established in 1SS1 
Vol. XLII— No. 2 



INDIANAPOLIS, FEBRUARY, 1922 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



My friend, have you heard of the town of 
Yawn 

On the banks of the River Slow, 
Where blooms the Waitawhile flower fair, 
And the Some-time-or-other scents the air, 

And the soft Go-easys grow? 

It lies in the valley of What's-the-use, 

In the province of Let-her-slide ; 
That old "tired feeling" is native there 
It's the home of the listless I Don't care — 
Where the Put-it-off s abide. 

The Put-it-offs smile when asked to pay up, 

And they say, "We'll do it to-morrow"; 
And so they delay from day until day, 
Till death slides up and steals them away, 
And the creditors beg, steal, or borrow. 

—Walter Pulitzer in N. Y. Globe. 




14 THE CARPENTER 

WHY IS IT? 

(By Second General Vice-President Geo. H. Lakey.) 

HY it is that at Chicago a so-called "Citizens Committee" composed 
of bankers, real estate men, lawyers, doctors, department store own- 
ers and everything but working men have organized and are setting 
themselves up as the "guardians" of the building public (self-ap- 
pointed at that, mind you), and have the Contractors' Associations, 
who employ men of all crafts necessary to carry out one of the most 
extensive building programs ever contemplated; in such a position that they, the 
employers, have not the right to meet and deal with their own employes without 
asking permission from this self-appointed Citizens Committee, and complying with 
a set of rules, or so-called "principles" laid down by these self-styled guardians of. 
the peoples' interest, and as Hennessey would say to Dooley, "What are these princi- 
ples?" "What are these rules?" Ah! there you are; the first one. of course, is the 
open shop, or in other words, closed shop against the union man, and worked out in 
such a manner that they permit certain employers to make agreements with some 
of the unions, and refuse to do so with the others ; then let the unions fight it out 
among themselves, and so long as they can keep them doing that their own troubles 
are minimized. 

Then, they find that the rules of the unions are bad, and they get a Federal 
judge who hasn't much to do except to act as Supreme Court for the baseball inter- 
ests, or a judge at a baby show, and a thousand other things that people who 
haven't much to do can find, and in a few weeks, or months if you please, to cure 
all the ills of the building trades, reshape these rules, readjust their wages, and at 
that downward — sure; there you are. 

But then, there are other ways of destroying the morale of the union member- 
ship, by helping the employers to destroy the apprenticeship rules, and establish one 
of helpers ; that is fine ; if your roof needs patching you have to get a carpenter and 
a helper to fit in a few shingles, then when the owner receives the bill the charges 
are for two men, and on the bill they are both journeymen, but the men themselves 
know the difference, the owner feels it, the contractor profits by it, and this idea m 
promoted by a so-called "Impartial Wage Board" at San Francisco. 

Now then, we hold for the following principles : First, the right of collective 
bargaining, the right to have something to say as to what our wages shall be, on 
what basis they shall be figured, and the right to tell the world that Ave are not 
satisfied with a mere living wage, for when we are young we are helpers; a few 
years while we are active and competent we are journeymen, and then we become 
general nuisances — superannuated. 

We want a wage scale so arranged that during the period of journeyman ship 
we get. something for the years we had to work for almost, nothing to get that far, 
and something to provide for the day when the insurance companies class us as 
hazards. 

Second, we want the right to make our own rules, so long as those rules are 
within the law and reasonable, and the writer has never known a union to undertake 
to make a rule unless there was some mighty good reason for it. 

For instance, some localities have rules that prohibit their members from work- 
ing on a building unless the proper building protection is put in, and in manj 
instances we have had to go to the State Legislatures, City Councils, etc., asking 
that there be incorporated in the building laws, or codes stringent measures for 
building protection. 

Why do we do this? 

When sky-scrapers first came into vogue they ran up many stories of steel frame 
work ; some men working above with heavy tools, and other men working below ; ai 
tool dropped it went clear through the building, and possibly through one of the nienr 
below; they called the ambulance and took that man either to the hospital or to the; 
morgue, the steward on the job notified the family, and that was the end of it, 
excepting that his wife could start to take in washing the day after the funeral to< 
support the kids. Were we wrong in asking for such a rule? 



TH'E CARPENTER 15 

Again we make rules for apprentices. We say that the American boy should be 
given a chance to learn a trade, and to learn it thoroughly, and we make stringent 
apprentice rules, and here is the reason why: 

"We found that an employer would take a young, active boy and he kept him 
driving the wagon and hauling material around from one job to another as long as 
he could, then he put him to nailing on sheathing and kept him at that as long as 
he could, and when the boy got tired of that sort of stuff ho quit and went to work 
for another contractor posing as a journeyman, and after he had been kicked and 
cuffed around for a number of years he really thought he was a journeyman. 

We think that our boys are entitled to a better chance than this, and we say 
to the contractor, that boy is working for a small wage and he should be given a 
chance at all the different branches of carpentry that go into the makeup of a 
building: that somebody should have a definite interest in that boy. and that, that 
somebody should be the contractor, the foreman on the job and the members of 
the union. 

In Chicago they had the finest apprenticeship system in the world for the reason 
that it provided that the boy should work nine months out of the year on the job, 
and during the months of January, February and March he should go to school. 
The unions co-operated with the contractors and the School Board in seeing to it 
that special training was given the boy during the three months at school so that 
at the end of the four year period the boy would have had three years actual experi- 
ence on the job and one year special technical training that would fit him to be a 
real journeyman. His wages were arranged in such a manner that they were paid 
in fifty-two (52) weekly installments, so that he got his pay while he was going to 
school, and' for every day he niissed school, without a doctor's certificate or a very 
satisfactory excuse, he would have to make it up in the finish for the contractor at 
any rate of wages he may see fit to pay him, and when he had finished his appren- 
ticeship with this contractor he had to appear before the Arbitration Board, com- 
posed of five (5) contractors and five (5) journeymen, and satisfy that Board that 
he had received the proper training, and if it was found that the contractor had not 
given that boy the proper training, the Board was empowered to place him, the boy, 
with another contractor, at any rate of wages the contractor was willing to pay 
him, and then make the contractor that apprenticed him, pay the difference between 
that and the going rate of wages. 

Now, do you wonder that we had to make those rules, and is it any wonder that 
some of the contractors complain that the rules were unreasonably hard on them? 
We don't think so. and in the long run we are quite sure that the contractors will 
regret the neglect of a proper apprentice system, and I think many of them do right 
now. 

The wi'iter does not undertake to say that the unions are infallible; that they 
do not make mistakes — they do. but the man who undertakes to say that some of 
the so-called "Radical Rules" are the outgrowth of selfishness would do well to 
give study to the reason why those rules are adopted. For instance, some trades 
undertake to regulate the amount of work a man should do in a working day. This 
sounds like a radical rule, and it is a ride that very seldom creeps into our organi- 
zation, but with some trades the Avork is of such a character that a certain number 
of yards of work can be accomplished in a day. Along comes an exceptionally 
active. industrious young fellow and he nearly doubles the ordinary amount of work 
that could be accomplished by the avergae men ; immediately the employer under- 
takes to set, as a day's work, the amount of work accomplished by this exceptional 
7iian, and in retaliation for that sort of attitude came the ride from the average man 
that they will sec the amount of work that the average man can accomplish and 
call that a day's work. 

I could go on and cite any number of so-called radical rules, but don't forget 
£his; that if it was not for an aggravated situation on the part of one party to an 
agreement tl!ose radical rules would not be brought out by the other party to the 
agreement. 

■ We would much rather get along with our employers, feeling that if the employer 
jg. successful in business we would have steady work, and as fair a wage as we 
c ald make him pay. We have no desire to always be at loggerheads with our 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



employers, but we surely do have to put our shoulder to the wheel to resist these 
so-called Impartial Wage Reduction Boards and Citizens Committees, whose pur- 
pose- are well known to us. 

Let os point out this fact to our members. That any city or town that has a 
large percentage of the best mechanics in the town in the union very seldom suf- 
fer an attack on the part of the employers. If the members in the union keep in 
mind the purpose for which they are organized and do not have their activities 
diverted by side issues that undertake to inject themselves into our very lives, and 
without our asking, then our unions are strong. 

Remember, there will never be peace so long as the employer is trying to hold 
us down to what he calls "A Living Wage - ' and which to us appears to be a mere 
subsistence. We are not satisfied with that, and so long as one party to an agree- 
ment is not satisfied, there can be no peace, but if we keep at it long enough, and 
with spirit enough, we can make him understand that we will go a whole lot 
farther with him and accomplish much better results if we were satisfied ; maybe 
then he will make up his mind to be satisfied himself with a reasonable profit and 
give us a chance to live. 

That is why we are constantly hammering at the membership to get into the 
organization those who properly belong there, and to explain to those who do not 
attend the meetings as regularly as they should, that belonging to the union means 
a whole lot more than "How much wages can we get." We have other obligations 
that are very important to us. One of them is to see that our boys get a chance 
to learn the trade as it should be. and the other is that in our declining years we 
do not be cast on the junk heap, or classed as general nuisances. 

We owe a duty to those boys, and we owe a duty to the men whose hair has 
grown gray at the trade, and we are going to honestly discharge our duty ; we 
will do it altogether if we can, but we will do it if there is only a handful of us 
left to carry out that principle. 



SOME ADVICE AND SUGGESTIONS FROM THE SECRETARY 01 

JAMES J. DAVIS 



LABOR 




seem 



me 



X looking over the great 
ranks of the American 
workers, as one sees them 
from the angle of the De- 
partment of Labor, the 
great need of the hour 
to be good will and the 
willingness to co-operate. And the great 
obstacle to this is a radical minority in 
those ranks, inside and outside the 
bounds of labor organizations. This un- 
ruly inclined group is too small to be 
called even a minority. It is an element. 
But it is large enough to cripple much 
of the work of the many great and good 
leaders of our workers who by their fair- 
ness and good sense are doing so much 
to stabilize our country during an econ- 
omic storm. 

More than once I have been called in. 
as a disinterested party with the moral 
weight of the country behind me, to help 
settle industrial disputes, and have seen 
those disputes prolonged and lost to the 
workers involved because of some un- 
ruly element in their ranks that refused 
anything approaching a fair adjustment, 
the leaders representing the 
irkcn ib these disputes have been fair- 



minded. They have seen the problem 
as it looks to the other side. They have 
been willing to make fair concessions in 
return for fan - concessions. They have* 
come into the council chamber filled 
with the spirit of conciliation. And in 
this attitude they have represented the 
vast majority of their worker consti- 
tuents. But too often the unruly few in 
their ranks have double-crossed their 
leaders' efforts, by refusing to stand for 
any concessions whatever in the spirit 
of fairness and equity. With them it 
has been whole hog or nothing. And 
by their clamor they have often utterly 
crippled the good work of their leaders. 

For nine months I have been Secre- 
tary of Labor, and time and again I 
have seen this crippling process pushed 
and these settlements spoiled by a rad- 
ical element. Hence I cannot escape the ! 
conviction that the foremost duty of all I 
organizations of workers is to root out I 
this element. Especially at a time bike i 
this, when we must all work together tc 
climb out of this industrial stagnation 
it is more than ever necessary for us a} 
to work and pull together. The bes 
interests of the labor organizations res 



T II K C A II PENTER 



1 



n a hearty backing up of their loaders. 
'Stand by your officers" is a slogan that 
should be uppermost in every worker's 
mind. Team-work alone brings results. 
Second only to this in importance is 
the need of every worker's doing a good, 
honest day's work for his pay. To say 
this, is not to support some industrial 
tyranny. It is only urging upon workers 
to turn out a fair product for a fair re- 
turn. We all know that the shirkers are 
few in number. But they, too, are dis- 
turbers. They cause a blot on the repu- 
tation of the organization. They, too, 
lay a heavy burden on their leaders. In 
every bargain with employers, "they are 
an item that hurts the deal. Every 
hard worker has to carry the shirker on 
his own back. My counsel to every or- 
ganization of workers in the country is 
this: "Root out your unruly radicals, 
quicken the few slackers. The better 
you are when you come to a bargain, the 
better the bargain you drive. And have 
faith in your officers. Pick your leaders 
with care, but having picked them, fol- 
low them. Trust them. Abide by what 
they say. Have confidence in their hon- 
esty. Then stick to the bargains they 
drive for you." 

These are no empty words. I con- 
stantly preach the gospel of good will in 
industry because I have seen the results 
of good will, both in industry and in the 
great world outside. I am head of an 
organization founded on the principle of 
good will, and the practical achieve- 
ments of that organization for the im- 
provement of the human lot are solid 
proof of the practical, paying worth of 
good will. 

As an expression of that spirit, let me 
point to Mooseheart, the home and the 
school where the members of our Loyal 
Order of Moose maintain, educate, and 
fit for life, 1,060 orphaned children who 
might otherwise have been pitched into 
the struggle for life utterly without help. 
When I was a puddler of iron and active 
in my union, nothing hurt me more sore- 
ly than the tragic results in a family 
when the bread-winner was brought 
home crippled or killed by accident, or 
dead from natural causes. Often the 
tiny children, without more than the 
rudiments of education and with no 
trade whatever, were driven out into the 
world to fight an unequal battle for their 
bare living. I have seen such families 
so dispersed that brothers afterwards 
never saw each other. It seemed to me 



one of the most cruel sides of life, some- 
thing unnecessary in a country like ours. 
So, as foon as it was feasible, thin 
Order established a little town of homes 
and schools for such children. Ai 
Mooseheart we welcome these children 
of our unfortunate members. It is not 
simply a home that we give them, bu1 
what it seems to me every child, regard- 
less of birth or education, should have a 
thorough education to gradual ion from 
high school, and as thorough a training 
in whatever trade seemed best suited to 
the child's abilities and liking. 

It has always been my contention that 
a trade is a splendid asset for any man. 
No man knows when misfortune may 
overtake him and sweep away his sav- 
ings or earnings or income — when he 
might become a public charge, but for 
his ability to support himself in comfort 
and dignity by employment at some ac- 
cepted trade. Hence Ave give these 
children at Mooseheart the trade they 
want, and train them in it till they be- 
come experts. The result is that when 
the child has reached the age of 17 or 
18, he or she has received an education 
as good as or better than any public 
schooling in the country and are 
equipped to face the battle of life with 
the full means for self-support. Nor is 
this all. 

Every child has the chance to use 
personal taste in the choice of clothing. 
Every child, later on, is paid something 
for the work done, and is taught to save 
the earnings. And between school hours 
and the hours in the shops, we provide 
outdoor sports, so that their bodies may 
be sound, in order to contain healthy 
minds. We teach them to understand 
and love the beautiful things of life. 
In consequence they go out in the world 
prepared to be good citizens and intelli- 
gent companions. If they have ability 
above the average, they may go on to 
college and into professional careers. 
But whatever be the measure of success 
that may come to them, we have en- 
dowed them with the power to make 
the most of themselves and of life. I 
know they are going to do much more 
good in the world than we have taught 
them to do. We have only sowed in 
them the seed of good will. They will 
find more effective ways of giving than 
good will practical expression. So the 
good work will perpetually expand. 

You may say that a spirit, like the 
spirit of good will, is a mere feeling that 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



cornes to nothing — a string of sweet- 
sounding words. I know it to be an 
actual force in the world, capable of the 
most practical and enduring results. I 
know that because I daily see these re- 
sults. Almost daily I have seen the 
spirit of good will settle protracted dis- 
putes in industry, so that the men who 
had been in dispute were glad to have 
yielded a little point here and there, in 
order to gain the great good of harmony 
and contentment and steady work. 

It is no idle saying that we must have 
the get-together spirit in our American 
industry. Nothing else will make it 
prosper. And nothing will create that 
spirit but the will-power of every one of 



us. Hence my constant counsel to the 
organization man to drop his grouches, 
and see that his brother workers drop' 
their grouches. Kill off the chronic! 
kicker, the shirker, the grouch, and the' 
radical who are never satisfied. This 
country has been largely made by its 
skilled and honest workers, the back-i 
bone of its citizenship. The number has! 
not diminished. Our people are becom-i 
ing better and better workers, and at the] 
same time better citizens. But we who | 
work have more work to do. We havei 
duties to perform. And one of those du- 
ties, the chief of those duties,' is to seel I 
that the ranks of American workers arell 
not sullied by the presence of radicals, I 
kickers and shirkers. 



IN THE NAME OF HUMANITY 

(By Hugh S. Cumming, Surgeon General, United States Public Health Service.) 

nr ^^, &>$£ T a recent health confer- wholesome food will cure, as well as pre-j 
ence in New York, B. C. vent infection. 




Davidson, Secretary of the 
International Association 
of Machinists, said : 
"YvHiat the worker wants 
is to knoAv the truth about, venereal 
diseases." A venereal disease is nothing 
short of a calamity to a worker, because 
it affects the creative impulse which is 
the laborer's greatest asset. And after 
all, the worker pays the price in money 
and in health. The industry may pro- 
vide the necessary medical treatment 
and give information about the disease 
to its employes, but the industry can 
pass on the cost of these measures to the 
consumer of its products. Because the 
laborer must pay the price, he wants to 
know the facts, and for this reason the 
International Association of Machinists 
and other labor organizations are gladly 
co-operating with the Government in an 
effort to get correct information about 
these diseases before their members." 

The Public Health Service and the 
State Boards of Health believe that one 
of the best methods of preventing and 
controlling a disease is to tell people "the 
truth" about it — what its effects are, 
how it is contracted, how it may be 
avoided and how cured. Yellow fever 
and malaria are fast losing their terrors 
because people know that exterminating 
the mosquito which carries the infection 
will prevent the spread of the disease. 
Tuberculosis, even, is ceasing to be the 
menace it formerly was, now that people 
know that rest, sunshine, fresh air, and 






And so with venereal diseases. Thes< 
diseases may affect the lungs and heart 
and nerves, they sometimes cause blind 
ness, creeping palalysis, and even in-! 
sanity. 

To acquaint people with the facta 
about venereal diseases, the Public 
Health Service and the State Boards of 
Health are distributing pamphlets, post 
ing placards, sending out lecturers, and| 
showing motion pictures and exhibits'. 
The pamphlets have been prepared for 
special groups as follows: A — -for men. 
B — for the general public. C — for boys. 
D — for parents. E — for girls. F — for 
educators. 

They may be secured upon request! 
from the State Board of Health at the] 
state capital or from the Public Health 
Service at Washington, D. C. 

These diseases are contagious, and in 
fected persons need prompt medical at 
tention to prevent their passing on in 
fection to others. For this reason, and 
because adequate treatment is both ex- 
pensive and difficult to secure, clinics- 
where free or inexpensive treatment is] 
given have been established throughout 
the country. Hundreds of letters are re-M 
ceived daily by the Public Health Service! 
and the State Boards of Health from per-j 
sons asking for addresses of clinics.j. 1 
pamphlets, and information of various 
kinds. 

The work of telling people "the truth'' 
about these diseases cannot be accom-, 1 
plished by the Government and the State 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



lards of Health alone. They have 
: ther funds nor personnel to carry on 
( ampaign which must eventually reach 
>ry man and woman, every boy and 
1 in America. They can reach only a 
v groups in every community, and it 
its with these "key" organizations of 
n and women to carry the work fur- 
•r. For this reason associations of 
rents and teachers, churches, libraries, 
.tors of newspapers, fraternal and la- 
t journals, and many labor, industrial, 
d commercial groups have been ap- 
)ached. 

During the first four months of 1921, 
i Government and State Boards of 
•alth have made a special effort to tell 
Mnbers of Organized Labor about these 
ieases and the need for eradicating 



them. The response to the request for 
co-operating has been most gratify 
Nearly one hundred labor Journals and 
papers have promised to give publicity 
to the work and are devoting space to 
items on the fight against these diseases. 
More than 1,500 Locals of labor organi- 
zations have asked the Public Health 
Service for pamphlets and other infor- 
mation. The Public Health Service is 
now sending a special message from the 
Surgeon-General to the Secretary of any 
labor union wishing to read it at a local 
meeting. 

It is only by enlisting the active, in- 
telligent interest of every man and wo- 
man in the country that this nation-wide 
movement against these diseases can ul- 
timately be successful. 



WHAT'S THE PROGRAM? 

(By TV. A. Black.) 




hundred years seems a 
long time when we look 
ahead. The possibilities 
and probabilities that lie 
in the coming century 
may be vaguely guessed 
by a review of the past hundred 3 r ears. 
is good to pause for a moment to re- 
?w and sum up the gains and losses. 
le whole story of industry in America, 
Organized Labor and of the develop- 
ent of the relations of the two lies 
[thin this eventful last century. There 
as not a mile of railroad a hundred 
;ars ago. The telegraph and telephone 
id electrical development in general 
.me in this period. Our wonderful 
rricultural implements have all come 
ithin three generations. The telephone 
|' common everywhere today is but a 
•oduct of yesterday. Less than fifty 
?ars ago the first phone was installed. 
;venty-five years cover the history of 
i.e automobile. It is but yesterday the 
ibmarine and the aeroplane appeared, 
here seems to be no limit to our cre- 
ive faculties in the mechanical line. 
[lie impelling force is to eliminate time 
id space. We crave to save labor. The 
hole system of what we call business 
•day exists because it saves work. Man 
ives time by exchanging what he pro- 
aces better than the other man can, for 
ie other man's products. 
Lai Mir has its century of history. It 
an integral part of the development of 
idustry and trade. We were still an 
gricultural people a hundred years ago. 



There were no cities to speak of. New 
York City was not as large as San An- 
tonio or Dallas. There were no great 
industries. The journeyman and em- 
ployer worked side by side. They were 
still close together. They knew each 
other and each other's families. There 
was independence because the worker 
could go out and work on the land any 
time he wanted to. It was in plenty 
then. 

The labor unions came into existence 
as the need arose. The history of Or- 
ganized Labor in America really dates 
from about 1825. It is true there had 
been some Locals organized for fifty 
years previous to that. The earlier 
movements were but as the planting of 
the seed that grew into the later Organ- 
ized Labor movement. The first Nation- 
al Union was effected in 1S50, just sev- 
enty years ago. In fact it was not until 
after the Civil War that great impetus 
was given to industry and Organized La- 
bor. It is well to emphasize and repeat 
one important fact. As industry de- 
veloped and grew and became more and 
more impersonal the need of organiza- 
tion of the wage earners became a prime 
necessity. As long as the need exists 
organization of workers will continue. 
Attack can not break it down. Attacks 
may weaken the oi'ganization at times, 
may even show the marks of disintegra- 
tion, but as long as there is need for 
co-operative working together men of in- 
telligence will stand by each other in the 
labor union. 



- 



i ;: E C A F.PE.N T t K 



During this less than century of Or- 
ganized Labor wonderful development 
has taken place. The three things usual- 
ly emphasized are shorter hours, better 
working conditions and wages. Every 
step to advance either of these factors 
has been resisted. The worker can 
measure his comforts by his pay en- 
velope, by the hours and working 
conditions and how they may effect 
his health. So hours of work and condi- 
tions of work and wages will continue to 
be the irritating cause of friction. 

While the condition, hours and wages 
for work are the irritating causes of dis- 
pute the real causes lie deeper. The 
greatest good accomplished by the or- 
ganization of workers has been educa- 
tional This education has been rais- 
ing the standard of general intelligence. 
The very earliest platforms of Organized 
Labor were progressive and in advance 
of the time. It touched upon political 
and personal life. It is in these plat- 
forms that we touch upon the real un- 
derlying causes that labor must act up- 
on. Quoting from John Mitchell, the 
early policy of the union may be summed 
up as follows : 

'The freedom of the public domain, a 
homestead law, the grant to the settlers 
of the right to the land, the making of 
homesteads inahenable. a national bank- 
rupt law. a mechanic's lien law. the 
abolition of imprisonment for debt, the 
equality of women with men. the aboli- 
tion of chattel slavery, the limitation of 
the ownership of land to 160 acres per 
man. the abolition of monopoly, and the 
right of the Government to carry the 
mails on Sunday. The workmen also 
demanded free and universal education 
as a step toward the emancipation and 
elevation of their class. " 

Every program of today must be kept 
true with the unaccomplished principles 
enumerated. No one will advise letting 
up on the struggle for hours and condi- 
tions of work and wages. It is still more 
important to work and work continu- 



ously for the removal of the underlying 
cause- of these business struggles. The 
workingman wants freedom and he must 
have it. Not only freedom of contract, 
but freedom of action of all kinds. 

The pioneers of the movement saw 
that the monopoly of the earth was the 
danger ahead. Land was cheap in th 
days : it could almost be had for t 
asking, but in those early days he 
manded that the limitations should 
160 acres. They saw the dangers 
monopoly and insisted upon its be: 
removed. It is encouraging and hope 
that the pioneers of the labor movement 
nearly a century ago saw the funda- 
mental basis on which progress must 
be made. It. also emphasizes the re- 
sponsibility of the men of today to go 
forward and carry out this progra: 
There should be no let up to the remo 
of monopoly and privilege. This m 
stand out clearly as the battle cry 
every Organized Labor man. 
growth and development of democracy 
depends upon it. Tnere can be no evad- 
ing of the question. 

The season for labor Conventions is 
here. In each the work of the past year 
will be reviewed. Many a Local fight 
will be recited and reasons given for the 
victory or defeat. It will still be a re- 
port on those immediate causes of 
trouble, "wages, conditions and hours. 
The labor Conventions of the near future. 
will be given more and more to attacks 
of monopoly and privilege, political ac- 
tion for principle rather than for party. 
Labor will test its friends by what they 
stand for and not what they may claim 
to stand for. Organized Labor in the 
United States has an honorable record 
of a century. That record carries op- 
portunity and responsibility and as laboi 
uses its opportunities and meets its ob- 
ligations of the hour it will go down tc 
defeat or on to final victory. Destiny 
is in the hands of labor. The hour is 
here and pregnant with great things 
Great men must rise to the occasion. 




.Lem b; 



BOTTT one hundred and 
sixty years ago a great 
period of unrest prevailed 
throughout this country. 
The Colonists were tiring 
of the yoke thrust upon 

;at Britain. But the king 



THE NATION'S MENACE 
(By Eay Vera Maple.) 

and parliament cared not for this. Th* 
Colonists objected to trial without jury 
To crush out this spirit of freedom. th< 
sugar act, which placed a tax of 6d. t 
gallon on molasses and 5s. per hundret 
weight . on sugar, and the stamp tax 
which provided that all legal document; 



T II K C A R l> E N T K II 



21 



should bear a stamp to be paid for by the 
Colonists, were imposed upon them with- 
out their consent. The Colonists drew 
up resolutions protesting against these 
measures without avail. They issued a 
declaration of rights, but it was unheed- 
ed. They were answered by the Town- 
send acts, which forbade the legislatures 
from passing any more laws until suit- 
able quarters were provided for the royal 
troops ; established a Board of Commis- 
sioners of the custom to enforce the laws 
relating to trade, and laid a tax on glass, 
lead, painters' colors, paper and tea. 
This was too much for the Colonists and 
discouraged by all their peaceful efforts 
to have their conditions improved, they 
went out on a strike, even to the extent 
of using violence and the Boston riot of 
March 5, 1770, took place. This did not 
check the king in his efforts to hold the 
Colonists in chains and large shiploads 
of tea were shipped over purposely to 
force the Colonists to pay the tax. But 
their spirits were aroused, they were be- 
ginning to awaken to their perils and 
they declared another strike, organized 
(a labor union?), the Boston Tea Party 
and threw all of the tea overboard. Still 
the king could not see what trouble he 
was brewing for himself; still he could 
not realize that it is impossible to crush 
a freedom loving spirit. Consequently 
he thrust upon the Colonists the five in- 
tolerable acts. Seeing that nothing 
would prevail the Colonists called the 
First Continental Congress, drew the 
Declaration of Independence, took up 
arms against Great Britain, with the re- 
sult that she was overwhelmingly de- 
feated and the Colonists gained their 
independence. 

About one hundred years ago another 
period of unrest began to arise in this 
country. Throughout the South the 
negro was held in bondage. Large num- 
bers of freedom loving men were begin- 
ning to feel that this was wrong. This 
condition was presented to the Southern 
slaveholders, but they paid no attention 
to it. Efforts were made to settle this 
issue peaceably aud by legislation 
through the Missouri compromise, but 
this had no effect. To all measures that 
were offered, the slaveholders turned a 
deaf ear. To fortify themselves they se- 
cured the fugitive slave law, the Kansas- 
Nebraska bill and the infamous Dred 
Scott decision. But freedom was still 
alive and the immortal Lincoln was 
elected President in 1860. At this point 



the Southern slaveholders were so ar- 
rogant as to think that they could se- 
cede, set up a government of their own 
and forever hold the negro in slavery un- 
molested. But alas, how they did de~ 
ceive themselves. They brought on a 
bloody and expensive Civil War. in 
which they were? completely defeated 
and the negro slave was given his free- 
dom. 

Today unrest is sweeping over the 
land. The working classes are aroused. 
For years they have seen the greater 
part of the gain brought about by their 
toil go into the hands of the employers. 
For years in spite of their wage in- 
creases they have found themselves but 
little better off, clue to the fact that the 
prices of life's necessities continually 
advanced more rapidly. For years they 
have been denied collective bargaining 
and proper consideration. During the 
war with Germany, clue to the fact that 
production was needed in abnormal 
quantities, these workers did secure iu 
a measure a few of their long fought for 
rights. But as they did they sacrificed 
in other ways that the war might be 
won to "make the world safe for democ- 
racy." And while they were making 
these sacrifices, 18,000 new millionaires 
were being made and while these new 
millionaires were being made 6,000,000 
children were being improperly cared 
for. During the war the workers received 
an average wage increase of 50.3 per 
cent, but prices advanced 95 per cent. 
And -while the average income of the 
workers was being increased 50.3 per 
cent, that of the employers increased 
202 per cent. These are the conditions 
which produce this present unrest. The 
working classes are economically and 
justly entitled to a certain per cent of 
the fruits of industry at all times and 
they are tired of seeing this per cent 
grow smaller, while that per cent which 
goes to. the employers grows larger. For 
years they have been trying peaceably 
and orderly to correct these evil condi- 
tions, which are a curse to humanity. 
What is the result today of their efforts'.' 
What answer are they now receiving to 
their just demands*.' 

Due to the fact that their wages do 
not increase as rapidly as prices they 
are unable to buy back their share of 
production. The war stopped ; European 
markets failed to materialize, which any 
sensible man could have foreseen three 
years ago. Manufacturers in their blind- 



22 



T II E C A R P E.N'TE R 



ness and gTeed speeded up production 
after the war. expecting to unload at im- 
mense profits onto Europe. These 
markets failing and the American w i .. 
ing man not being able to buy his share, 
due to his insufficient wage, a surplus 
product began to accumulate. Mer- 
chants seeing ruin staring them in the 
face, began to cancel their previous or- 
ders. Today §2.000.000,000 worth of 
goods are tied up in transit due to these 
cancellations. And as a result of all of 
this. 2,325,000 workingmen are now in 
enforced idleness. Unemployment with 
all of its sufferings is now sweeping over 
the land like a forest fire. 

Now to make matters worse, the re- 
actionary element among the employers 
is conducting a campaign to establish 
the "open shop." It is not an open 
shop, but a closed shop against union 
men. because one of their stipulations for 
employment is that the employe shall 
not join, affiliate with or have any deal- 
ings with a labor organization. The un- 
biased statement of the Interchurch 
Movement bears this out correct. They 
have the nerve to call it the '"American 
Plan," when nothing could be farther 
from real Americanism. Real Ameri- 
canism is full-fledged democracy. Dem- 
ocracy is the rule of the majority for the 
greatest good for the people as a whole. 
That this may be accomplished it is nec- 
essary to recognize all elements of so- 
ciety, allow each its proper sphere and 
give each its just rights and reward. 
Be mocracy is the application of the law 
of human progress, which is association 
on a basis of equality of opportunity and 
responsibility. If society obeys the law, 
real progress is made; if it does not so- 
cial decay sets in. The great empires of 
Egypt. Greece and Rome ewe their 
downfall to their disobedience of the 
natural law. 

Just as the Colonists demanded recog- 
nition from Great Britain, so today labor 
is demanding recognition from capital. 
Just as the king of Great Britain an- 
swered the Colonists with the sugar act 
and the stamp aet tax, so today capital 
is answering labor by its Bever act and 
the Eseh-Cummins bill. As the Colon- 
ists protested against these acts and is- 
sued the Declaration of Rights, so today 
labor has protested against these mod n 
acts and issued its Declaration of Right 
As the Colonists were answered by the 
Townsend acts, so today labor is an- 



swered by the state constabulary laws, 
courts and garnishee laws. As 
the Colonists were forced to go on strike 
agai:. obnoxious measures by the 

Boston riot and th Bost m Tea Party, 
so today lal or is. forced at times to go 
on striLe against its oppressors. 

As it was sought to settle the negro 
slavery question by the Missouri Coin- 
lay labor has tried repeat- 
edly to settle its differences with capital 
by compromise. As the slaveholders of 
the South only created more unrest and 
hastened their own doom by the passage 
of the fugitive slave law, so today these 
reactionary conservative employers are 
only creating more unrest and hastening 
their own doom by advocating and fos- 
tering such anti-labor legislation as was 
just mentioned above. And as a climax 
was brought to the slavery question by 
the Dred S :t decision so it may be that 
a climax will be brought to the Is 
question by the recent decision of the Su- 
preme Court in its Duplex Machine Co. 
case. But let us hope, let u< pray, that 
the close parallel, which we have just 
accurately drawn, will not be followed 
to its end. Let us hope and pray that as 
it required the Revolutionary War to 
give the Colonists justice, that as it re- 
quired the Civil War to give the black 
man freedom, that it will not require 
bloodshed or violence to give labor jus- 
tice and freedom. 

"With that end in view let labor be 
calm, cool and patient yet a little while 
longer. Let us study throughly the prob- 
lems that confront us. Let us let the 
public know our side of the case. Let us 
educate and organize to a man. These 
modem industrial kings, these present 
industrial slaveholders will soon run 
their course. The public will soon learn 
their hypocrisy and deceit. The public 
will soon realize the importance and jus- 
tice of labors demands and public senti- 
ment "will visit such a chastisement upon 
these advocates of un- American! -m and 
industrial autocracy, that they shall 
never recover from their defeat. But 
let the facts be made known, let the 
issue be clearly understood, and let it be 
known to all that this present period of 
unemployment, this present state of un- 
rest and all the evil that comes from it is 
justly placed at the doors of those who 
are today advocating the "open shop," 
the "American Plan," and that they are 
t : lav the nation's menace. 



ditorial 




Official Journal of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 

OF AMERICA 



Published on the loth of each month at the 

CARPENTERS' BUILDING 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA, 

Publishers 



FRANK DUFFY, Editor 



Subscription Trice 
One Dollar a Year in Advance, Postpaid 

The publishers and the advertising 
agent use every possible precaution avail= 
able to them against accepting advertise^ 
ments from other than reliable firms, but 
do not accept any responsibility for the 
contents of any advertisement which ap= 
pears in "The Carpenter." Should any 
deception be practiced by advertisers at 
any time, upon members, their duty is to 
immediately notify the Post Office au= 
thorities. Therefore, address any com= 
plaints to 3'our local Post Office. 



INDIANAPOLIS, FEBRUARY, 1922 

Does It Pay To Be a Good Standing 

Member of the United Brotherhood 

of Carpenters? 

The prompt payment of dues to your 
Local Union is a matter that should be 
given first consideration by every mem- 
ber of our Brotherhood, because upon 
the payment of your dues devolves your 
interest in the beneficial features of 
our organization. If you have not 
familiarized yourself with these fea- 
tures, then you should do so at once by 
referring to Sections 48, 49, 50, 51, 52 
and 53, of our General Laws. If 
you have not got a Constitution, then 
you should apply to the Secretary of 
your Local LTnion for one immediately, 
and after perusing the above sections, 
you will realize that it is worth while to 
be a member in good standing in an in- 



stitution like ours, for we know of no 
fraternal or beneficial organization that 
pays the benefits we do, upon the small 
per capita tax received. Just figure 
for yourself. 

If you are a beneficial member you 
pay monthly dues of not less than 75c 
per month, 40c of which is paid to the 
General Office: this totals .$4. SO per 
year and in the event of your death 
after one year's membership your bene- 
ficiary is entitled to $50.00, which is not 
a bad investment for $4. SO; if you are 
two years a member the General Office 
receives a total of $0.60, and in the 
event of your death after two years' 
membership, your beneficiary gets $100; 
if three years a member, the amount re- 
ceived by the General Office is $14.40, 
and your death benefits after three 
years' membership is boosted to $150; 
if four years a member, the amount re- 
ceived by the General Office is $19.20 
and your death benefits after four years' 
membership is increased to $200; and if 
you are five years a member, the General 
Office receives the total sum of $22 and 
your death benefits have increased to 
the sum of $300, which is the maximum 
amount paid on the death of a beneficial 
member. In addition you become en- 
titled after your first year's membership 
to a wife's funeral donation of $2.".. 
which is increased $25 on the second 
year's membership and an additional 
$25 on the third year's membership, 
making a maximum wife's funeral dona- 
tion of $75 on three years' membership 
or over. 

Then we have provided to pay you 
disability donations, in the event you 
become totally and permanently disabled 
from ever again following any branch <>.' 
the carpenter trade for a livelihood, as a 
result of accidental injuries, in amounts 
ranging from $50 on one year's member- 
ship to $400 on five years' membership 
or over. Semi-beneficial members who 
are those having joined after attaining 
the age of 50 years or apprentices, nor 
(nullified as a journeyman, are e 1 1 1 i 1 1 e ■ I 
to minor benefits, the risk covering their 
classification being greater, on account 
of age. etc, Sonic mcinbers say we are 



t ir e c a r p e nter 



paring- too much tax to the General Of- 
fice, but if they would only take time 
to figure for themselves, they would 
wonder how we are aide to continue to 
do business on such a small revenue. 
As we stated bei per capita tax 

on each member is 40c per month. $4.80 
per year, consequently yon would have 
to be a continuous dues paying- member 
for almost 63 years before you would 
have paid in the $300 your beneficiary 
would be entitled to at your death. If 
your wife died and you received $75 
donation on her death, then you would 
have to be a continuous dues paying 
member for nearly 16 years more, or a 
total of almost SO year--, before you 
would have paid in to the General Office 
the $375 you or your beneficiary had re- 
ceive (3 therefrom. In some cases a mem- 
ber receives $75 wife's death donation 
and at some subsequent period becomes 
totally ai Ip nnanently disabled and re- 
ceives $400 disability donation, making 
a total of $475 received by him. You 
can see in this case the brother would 
have had to belong to the United Broth- 
erhood for almost 100 years a full dues 
paying member before he would have 
paid in the amount he had taken out. 
saying nothing of the other benefits such 
as strike pay. etc.. which he may have 
received during his affiliation. 

You ak how do we do it? The ex- 
planation is simple : Members who have 
probably belonged to ou rBrotherhood 
for years have become negligent or care- 
less in the payment of their dues, and 
allow themselves to become suspended 
from benefits, and during the period of 
their suspension the member or his wife 
dies, or he meets with an accident that 
totally disables him. that brother loses 
his benefits, and it invariably happens, 
just at the time a member is in arrears 
that misfortune overtakes him and as a 
consequence, his widow or family suf- 
fers thereby. There is no excuse at this 
time at least for a member falling in 
arrears, for if he is unable to pay his 
dues, through lack of work, sickness or 
some other cause, if he will apply to his 
Local Union they will see that he is 
kept in full benefit standing, as Presi- 
dent Hntcheson Las granted a dispensa- 
tion to all Local Unions, allowing them 
to keep their needy m< lues paid 

when requested \ i until next 

spring, if they desire to do so. 

Other members drop out of the Broth- 
erhood entirely, some to enter other leg 



itimate business, some because of care- 
and some to allow them to 
"scab" ou their fellowmen. In all such 
r-ases. the Genera! Organization has prof- 
ited, for when a member has become 
suspended by owing a sum equal to six 
months' dues, he can only come back 
into our organization the same as a new 
member, by paying a new initiation fee 
and his record will date from his last 
initiation. 

We know it is not the wish of our 
membership that we shotdd profit 
through the mi-fortune of our fellowman 
and nothing would be more pleasing to 
the General Officers than the knowledge 
that every brother affiliated was in good 
staining and entirb-d to benefits. Mem- 
bers, don't think only of yourselves, re- 
member some of you have wive, 
children, fathers, mothers, sisters or 
brothers, who are dependent upon you. 
and if misfortune shoul -.me suddenly 
upon you. think of the great benefit the 
donations paid by our organization 
would be to them, and the small effort 
required by you to keep your dues paid 
up in full. 

Look in our .Journal each month under 
the caption of ''Claims Paid" and assure 
yourself of the great good accomplished 
for our members and tbeir families in 
their bereavement and then peruse the 
colums of "Disapproved Claims" and 
their reasons for disapproval and take 
warning by tho«e reasons, and see that 
in your case, at least, there will never 
be any cause for an adverse decision 
and you will find that it pays to be 
a good standing member of the United 
Brotherhood. 

* * • 

If Lincoln Were With Us Today 
Had Abraham Lincoln but lived in this 
day we do not believe this so-called 
"American Plan" propaganda would ever 
have been sprung on the public. He was 
too wise a man to have been deceived as 
to the purpose of what is implied in the 
"open" shop, which assails every prin- 
ciple that gives the working man a 
chance to determine his industrial con- 
dition. Lincoln would have seen the 
merits of the union shop as a means to 
industrial liberty and there is no doubt 
in our mind hut he would have given it 
support as the only adequate means for 
labor's protection. 

The "open" shop is a lie in that it 
does not operate as represented. So far 
as possible it is closed to labor that ex- 



THE CARPENTER 



25 



oreises freedom of organization and it is 
"open" sbop only on condition that labor 
yield its rights to the control of a master. 

As the foe of all forms of slavery, Mr. 
Lincoln would undoubtedly have sup- 
ported a principle giving to the working 
men the liberty to work out their destiny 
free from the shackles of an industrial 
autocracy. 

All those who thoroughly understand 
the principles of democracy give support 
to unionism. Lincoln would have un- 
questionably been found a supporter of 
trade unionism and this opinion is based 
on the fact that he was a true friend of 
labor in his life and in his public acts. 
He could not have been consistently a 
friend of labor and at the same time 
have been an opponent of the union shop. 

* *. * 

President of Barbers' International 
Union Dead 

Frank X. Noschang, for twenty years 
International President of the Barbers' 
Union, died at his home in Albany, N. 
Y., Thursday morning, January 5, 1922, 
at the age of 55 years. Mr. Noschang 
became president of the organization 20 
years ago when he was elected at the 
Saginaw, Michigan, Convention held in 
October, 1901 and which position he ha^ 
held continuosly up to the time of his 
death. Before that time he had been 
active in his own local union in Albany 
and had served as President of the New 
York State organization. He had made 
his headquarters at Indianapolis, Ind., 
in the Carpenters' Building for the past 
seven years. His death will be regretted 
by thousands of friends he has made in the 
labor movement throughout the country. 

* * * 

Labor Owned Company Produces 
Wonderful Picture 

The first economic drama ever pro- 
duced, and the first motion picture made 
by a strictly labor-owned company is 
now under way for distribution by the 
Federation Service, Inc., 729 Seventh 
Ave., New York. 

"The New Diciple," produced by the 
Federation Film Corporation of Seattle, 
is not based upon prejudice — but upon 
truth. It holds no brief for violence or 
disorder. Industrially, it is true — fun- 
damentally it is honest — economically it 
is sound. It exposes the hypocrisy of 
the so-called American plan, and shows 
the danger that awaits labor — both or- 
ganized and unorganized — if this wolf 
in sheep's clothing is permitted to gain 



a foothold. It is labor's picture and 
labor should support it. 

The picture has a superb supporting 
cast, including Tell Trenton, Margaret 
Mann, Alfred Allen, Norris Johnson, 
Walt Whitman and Arthur Hull, all of 
whom are well known in the motion 
picture world. 

All unionists should see the managers 
of the various motion picture houses that 
they patronize and ask when this picture 
is to be shown, and keep asking for it. 

Upon the support of this picture by 
Organized Labor the test will be made 
of whether or not labor and the general 
public will support this kind of drama. 
If so, then we may look for other pro- 
ducers to imitate, or at least make their 
productions more favorable to labor than 
they have in the past. 

* * * 

Near East Relief 

An appeal in behalf of the helpless 
orphans of Russian Armenia and the 
Bible lands of the Near East, has gone 
out from the national committee of Near 
East Relief through the, various state 
branches. 

Fraternities, churches, labor organiza- 
tions, individuals — are asked to remem- 
ber the children of a nation about to 
perish, except for American relief. For 
six years Near East Relief has been 
striving to save the child life of Armenia, 
a humanitarian movement only made 
possible by contributions from the pub- 
lic. "We believe that these children 
present -the most outstanding case of 
need to be found in the world today," 
says an appeal now going out. 

In its orphanages in the Near East the 
relief organization is now caring for 
thousands of these children while thou- 
sands more are wandering hungry and 
cold, homeless and helpless — and hope- 
less, except for their hope in America. 
It is declared that before spring many 
thousands of these children will in- 
evitably perish unless Near East Relief 
aid can be extended to them. A sym- 
pathetic public is urged not to forget 
that "these children are suffering mainly 
as the result of persecution because of 
their parents' Christian faith and be- 
cause their fathers served the allied 
cause in the war." 

Sixty dollars a year will save the life 
of one of these children and it may be 
paid $5 a month if desired. The na- 
tional headquarters of Near East Relief is 
situated at 151 Fifth Ave., New York City. 



2G 



THE CARPENTER 



Something To Think About 

Just a little "I will stuff" and you will 
be all right. This is a good principle 
for every member to follow in these 
strenuous times and it is especially good 
to hare in mind wh^n your organization 
needs you to do all the boosting you 
can. Jere L. Sullivan, writing in the 
"Mixer and Server"' said a "whole heap" 
when he said : 

"Don't let anybody park you off in a 
corner for two or three months with 
your engine shut off and your battery 
dead. There are a lot of fellows that 
want to hog the spotlight; they can't 
do it while you are messing up the 
front stage, and they may manoeuver 
things so as to shoot you back in the 
darkness where no one will notice that 
you are one of those present. 

"Be an active member, anyone can 
pay dues. Make up your mind that the 
fellows that have you numbered with 
the "also rans" ptilled the wrong guess, 
that instead of being material for the 
tall man with the black clothes and 
somber look, you are a regular go-getter 
and must be counted upon. 

"You've got a lot of that "I will" 
stuff in your frame ; all you need do is 
use it and step forward. Being a wall 
flower may suit some, but you're not 
that kind of book holder. There may be 
hunks of Edam laying around the ren- 
dezvous of your union, but you are not 
one of 'em, and it's right smack up to 
you to show the goods that you are made 
of. If you are waiting for some one to 
lay you out and put a lily in your hand, 
well, that's different, what we put on the 
blackboard won't interest you. so you 
can forget it ; forget that we drove down 
your street, for we had no intention of 
beating the undertaker out of a job." 
* * * 

Did Dante Hold Card In a Union? 

The following article appeared in the 
Literary Digest recently, showing that 
union labor is not at all a new thing, but 
was fostered by some of the really great 
men in history : 

"Dante held a union card, it now ap- 
pears, in the Apothecaries' Union of 
Florence, and devoted much of his en- 
ergies to fighting labor's battles against 
the aristocrats. So that while Dante's 
sixth centenary was hailed in all modern 
languages by eulogists of Italy's epic 
poet, who is ranked with Homer and 
with Shakespeare among the supreme 
figures of the world's literature, in some 



European countries they are also mind- 
ful of Dante's political influence on his 
time and of what one Italian commen- 
tator calls the modern characteristics of 
Dante's political ideas. 

"Some English writers recall that Mr. 
Gladstone counted Dante among the 
great leaders of his intellectual life, and 
they cite Viscount Morley's dictum that 
it were an idle dream to think that the 
dead hand of Dante's century and all 
that it represented is no longer to be 
taken into account by those who would 
be governors of men. 

"At a notable celebration in honor of 
the immortal Florentine held in the Sor- 
bonne, an Italian senator and former 
minister of public instruction. Mr. Fran- 
cisco Buffini, delivered an address on 
Dante and politics, in which he declared 
that politics is the pivot, if one may say- 
so, of the whole poetic machine of Dante- 

"Coming now to his labor union ac- 
tivities. Senator Buffini sees Dante the 
patriot standing between the syndical- 
ism (or labor unionism) and the league 
of nations of his period, and in defense 
of this rather astonishing collocation of 
phrases he points out that the Florence 
of Dante was a professional republic un- 
der the regime of arts and trades, a. 
veritable organization of syndicates." 
* « « 

The Way They Talk and — 
A large percentage of the members of 
Organized Labor denounce in the most 
vitriolic terms the capitalist press, but. 
many of these gentlemen give but little 
support to the labor press that speaks- 
for the rights and liberties of the com- 
mon man. The great majority of the 
labor publications are struggling to 
maintain an existence, simply because 
the great army of labor becomes 
thoughtless or indifferent to the strug- 
gles of labor editors, who, through their 
loyalty to the working class sometimes 
are visited by lengthy intermissions be- 
tween meals. The labor press cannot ex- 
pect support from powerful combinations 
that look upon the organs that are dedi- 
cated to the cause of the masses of the 
people as inimical to the interests of a 
class of privilege. The labor press can 
only be strong when the membership of 
the labor movement realize that labor 
publications must receive support from 
the class whose cause they champion and 
defend. The press that speaks for social 
justice and the rights of man should 
receive the undivided support of !■: I r, 



Official Information 




GENERAL OFFICERS 
OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD 

OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA 

General Office 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

JOHN T. COSGROVE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

GEORGE H. LAKEY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

THOMAS NEALE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind 



General Executive Board 
First District, T. M. GUERIN 
290 Second Ave., Troy, N Y. 



Second District. D. A. POST 
-416 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



Third District, JOHN H. POTTS 
646 Melish Ave., Cincinnati, O. 



Fourth District, JAMES P. OGLETREE 
926 Marina St., Nashville, Tenn. 



Fifth District, J. W. WILLIAMS 
3536 Wyoming St., St. Louis, Mo. 



Sixth District. W. A. COLE 

810 Merchants National Bank Buildinj 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
1705 Chambord St., Montreal, Que., Can. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive 
Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



Report of General President Wm. L. 

Hutcheson for the Quarter Ending 

December 31, 1921 

January 17, 1922. 

To the Members of the General Execu- 
tive Board. 

Brothers — Greeting : 

The period for which this report cov- 
ers is the last three months of the year 
1921. A year that brought conditions 
to our membership such as were never 
experienced by them during the life of 
the Brotherhood, due to the efforts, not 
so much of the direct employers of our 
membership but of the various business 
interests of the country endeavoring to 
force upon our membership a decrease 
of their wage scale and while in many 
instances settlements were reached be- 
tween the employers and our members, 
in many case., there was a prolonged en- 
forcement of idleness of our membership 
necessitating the arrangement for finan- 
cial assistance for many of them. 

Owing to circumstances and condi- 
tions the Brotherhood can well feel sat- 
isfied with the results obtained and while 
it is true that we have sustained a loss 
of several thousand members many of 
them were what might be termed war 
time carpenters and when work was re- 
duced to the regular construction work 
they found themselves unqualified and 
therefore sought other occupations. 
There were other members of course who 
were well qualified and long time mem- 
bers of the Brotherhood, who through 
force of circumstances found themselves 
unable to retain their membership in the 
organization. Those former members 
will, without doubt, again become mem- 
bers of our Brotherhood when work be- 
comes more plentiful and present indi- 
cations (from the reports received at this 
office) are to the effect that the year 
1922 will be an active year in building 
construction. 

Under date of October 21, 1921, I 
issued a circular letter to all Local 
Unions of the Brotherhood granting 
them a dispensation to assist worthy 
members, (who through force of circum- 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



stances were unable to keep themselve : 
in good standing ) to maintain their 
membership by paying the regular per 
capita tax to the General Office and from 
correspondence we have had with vari- 
ous Local Unions it is shown that many 
of our Locals have availed themselves 
of the opportunity afforded them to show 
that our Brotherhood is all that the word 
implies by rendering assistance to their 
members. 

Considerable correspondence was re- 
ceived at this office from Local Unions 
and District Councils of our Brotherhood 
wherein they called attention to press 
reports throughout the country to the 
effect that Government officials con- 
templated dispensing with the Depart- 
ment of Labor or consolidate it with 
other departments of the Government 
and the request was made that the un- 
dersigned enter, on behalf of the X T nited 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, a protest against such a 
step. The matter was given attention 
by the undersigned and an interview was 
arranged with President Harding at 
which he informed me that the present 
administration had no thought or inten- 
tion of either dispensing with the Labor 
Department or consolidating it with any 
of the other governmental departments. 

As per the action of the General Ex- 
ecutive Board at its last meeting. L. U. 
Nos. 22, 34, 4S3, and 10S2 of San Fran- 
cisco were suspended, Charters re-issued 
and the members enrolled. From re- 
ports received at this office indications 
are that the membership will soon be re- 
habilitated. 

There has been put forth an effort 
by some of the membership of the vari- 
ous Local Unions in the city of Toledo, 
O., to bring about a consolidation of the 
Local Unions but by vote of their mem- 
bership failed to approve of same. I am 
submitting herewith correspondence in 
reference to the matter and would re- 
quest that the same be given considera- 
tion. A similar condition exists in At- 
lanta. Ga., and I am also submitting with 
this report correspondence in reference 
thereto as well as correspondence of rel- 
ative conditions existing in Westchester 
County. X. Y. 

Since the last meeting of our Board, 
the membership of our organization in 
Cincinnati. O., has been envolved in a 
movement to resist a reduction in their 
wage scale and a change in their work- 
ing conditions with the result that many 



of them were out of employment for a 
period of several weeks and the General 
( office has paid to them their lockout do- 
nations as per the provisions of the Gen- 
eral Constitution. After several at- 
tempts through negotiations they finally 
reached an understanding with the con- 
tractors which provides for a reduction 
of their scale from $1 to 95c per hour 
and same has been approved by refer- 
endum vote of their membership. 

Other matters of interest pertaining 
to the welfare of our Brotherhood will 
be called to your attention during the 
meeting of the Board. 

Fraternally yours, 

WM. L. HUTCHESON. 

General President. 
© 

Carpenters Will Instruct Members 

Carpenters' L. U. No. 226, of Port- 
land. Ore., is starting a course of lec- 
tures dealing with a number of problems 
encountered in building construction. 
After each lecture questions and sug- 
gestions pertaining to the subject will 
be invited from the members. A large 
number of members have signified their 
intention of taking the course. 

The purpose of the union is to give 
each member an opportunity to become 
proficient in all phases of work, and each 
subject, taken up will be handled by 
some one particularly proficient in that 
line. 



Thrift 

Thrift makes manifest our character, 
reveals three outstanding qualities, and 
yields three products that are of uni- 
versal importance : 

The four elements of thrift are : 

1. Earning or production. 

2. Spending or choosing. 

3. Saving or conservation. 

4. Investment or accumulation. 
The three outstanding qualities are: 

1. Frugality or carefulness. 

2. Economy or good management. 

3. Judgment or wise decision. 

And the three products notably re- 
sulting from the practice of thrift are : 

1. Security of the state. 

2. Prosperity of the community. 

3. Happiness and welfare of the in- 
dividual. 

— Professional Engineer. 



The Union Label is an antidote for 
selfishness, that phase of our character 
which, dwarfs the soul. 



Claims Paid 




CLAIMS PAID FOR THE MONTH OF DECEMBER, 1921 



Claim 
No. 



Name of Deceased or 
Disabled 



Local 

Union 



Membership | 
Yrs. Mos. I 



Cause of Death or 
Disability 



44454 Anna Sibell 

44455 Louis A. Gordon 

44450 Elizabeth Pengel 

44457 Emma S. Webb 

4445S William G. Cox 

44459 John Christ Sorensen 

444G0 Laura Snow Wood 

44461 Gaudias Cote 

44462 N. Lind 

444G3 Bertha Drake 

44404 Owen Taylor (Dis.) 

44465 John Pugh 

444G6 Emerson E. Knapp 

444G7 John Fagan 

444G8 Josephine Brcuyette 

44469 Rochard B. Maynard 

44470 Sara M. Thompson 

44471 Kate Bradley 

44472 Mildred Eliza Ackerley 

44473 Charles Berard 

44474 Wladystawa Ziembicka 

44475 S. H. Nolen 

44476 Joseph J. Zednik 

44477 Henry Robert Trumpold. . . . 

44478 Mary Moliter 

44479 Karl Wetzel 

44480 Charles E. Torney 

44481 Herbert S. Pediso (Dis.)... 

44482 Charles W. Peck 

44453 Fredericka Dobratz 

44454 John L. Hall 

44455 J. L. Wigginton 

44486 James Franklin Bryant.... 
444S7 Thomas C. Hellegers 

44488 George W. Dunnican (Dis.) 

44489 Charles A. Lyon 

44490 Mary M. Brown 

44491 Sophie Johnson 

44492 Elizabeth Coffman 

44493 Jerry Wagner 

44494 Mary E. Johnson Voigbt. . . . 

44495 Victore Lanthier Demers . . . 

44496 Teresa Hernandez Jayierre. . 

44497 Harry Willour 

44498 Jessie Telzrow 

44499 Bertha Hurley 

44500 Rochus Germer 

44501 Lizzie Kirsch 

44502 Perley C. Simons 

44503 Alva S. Sulliyan 

44504 James Coker 

44505 Benjamin Hawkins 

44506 Paul J. Pagh 

44507 Hannah Albright 

44508 Frank Krueger 

44509 Mary Jane Price 

44510 Belle Z. Wbetstone 

44511 Charles G. Carson 

44512 E. E. Russ (Dis.) 

44513 May Martin Goff 

44514 William Altbrandt 

44515 George Bryant 

44516 Yvonne Belan?er Demers. . . 

44517 Albert J. Palmer 

44518 Nellie Farrenkopp 

44519 Anna K. Weayer 

44520 Etienne Martin 

44521 Alfred Gonya 

44522 Frederick W. Martini 

44523 Rudolph Redmann 

44524 Thomas A. Maxted (Dis.).. 

44525 Valletta A. Sipe 

44526 Thomas Johnson 

44527 Emma Skopec 

-! 1528 James C. McCurdy 

■1 '."29 John Edward Varney 



11 
11 
42 



91 
97 

134 
141 
155 
165 

252 

261 

277 

551 

642 

710 

1134 

1134 

1610 

1856 

36 

39 

47 

47 

61 

132 

197 

198 

264 

306 

3S8 

437 

490 

490 

486 

603 

791 

1155 

1330 

1372 

1558 

1633 

2041 

2141 

4 



55 

55 

67 

104 

15S 

165 

182 

185 

373 

434 

477 

600 

612 

712 

730 

747 

787 

790 

1021 

1021 

1122 

1224 

1308 

1419 

1 156 

1786 

1869 

1953 



14 
22 
25 
21 

2 
18 

8 
20 
22 
13 
11 

7 
31 
15 
15 
19 
23 
15 

4 
13 

2 
10 

7 
34 
15 

9 

9 
11 

7 
22 

1 
21 
11 
19 
17 



23 

19 

11 

11 

1 

2 

2 

2 

12 

20 

31 

4 

2 

18 

2 

19 

10 

6 

18 

4 

12 

2 

1 

23 

15 

5 

20 

15 

2 

14 

19 

5 

1 

32 

6 



8 

3 

6 

2 
11 

6 

3 

7 

1 
10 

6 

6 

7 
11 
11 

6 

7 

2 
11 

1 

6 

8 
11 

8 

6 

4 

3 

4 

5 

6 
11 

5 
11 

6 
10 

O 

4 
11 

4 

S 

4 -I 

3 

7 
6 
3 



8 

9 
1 
8 
10 



Pneumonia 

Myocarditis 

Diabetes 

Tumor 

Heart disease 

Sarcoma 

Uraemia 

Meningitis 

Intestinal obstruction 

Scarlet fever 

Fall 

Cancer 

Apoplexy 

Asphyxia 

Hemorrhage 

Apoplexy 

Anaemia 

Paralysis 

Tuberculosis 

Cerebral hemorrhage 

Tuberculosis 

Heart trouble 

Cerebral hemorrhage 

Septicaemia 

Pneumonia 

Suicide 

Cerebral hemorrhage 

Accidental 

Gangrene 

Arterio sclerosis . . | . 

Brignt's disease 

Anaemia 

Diabetis 

Carcinoma 

Accidental 

Tuberculosis 

Heart disease 

Angina pectoris 

Ulcer 

Myocarditis 

Myocarditis 

Fever 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis 

Paralysis 

Tuberculosis 

Arterio sclerosis 

Pancretitis 

Accidental 

Angina pectoris 

Ulcer 

Ulcer 

Myocarditis 

Cholecystitis 

Heart disease 

Apoplexy 

Ulcer 

Tuberculosis 

Accidental 

Myocarditis 

Pneumonia 

Mitral regurgitation . 

Bright's disease 

Pneumonia 

Lues 

Tuberculosis 

Heart disease 

Dysentery 

Dial) lis ' 

Accidental 

Accidental 

Erysipelas 

Carcinoma 

Heart disease 

Ulcer 

Suicide 



Am't 

Paid 

"§75.00 

300.00 

75.0D 
75.00 

lOO.OD 

300.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

400.00 

75.00 

B00.00 

300.00 

75.00 

300.00 

75.00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

50.( • 

300.0 P 

300.00 

KOO.OO 

75.00 

: >.00 

300.00 

400.00 

300.00 

75.00 

50.00 

300.00 

125.00 

300.00 

4HO.0O 

:J5.00 

75.00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

75.00 

25.00 

"0.00 

100.00 

50.00 
75.00 

125.00 
75.00 

200.00 

100.00 

300.00 

100 00 

300.00 

75.00 

300 00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

100.00 

25.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.0:i 

125.0 l 

75.00 

50 00 

125.00 

300.00' 

300.00 

50.0:i 

400.00 

7" 00 

50.00 

75.00 

100.00 

i 



BO 



TTI 



KPEXTER 



Claim Name of Deceased or 

No. Disabled 

44530 L. W. Simmons 

44531 Ralph Bobner 

44532 John Vandenbenden 

44533 Marie Larviviere Phaneuf. 

44534 David Peterson 

44535 Charles M. Campbell 

44536 Caroline V. Morse 

44537 James Banner 

44538 Stella Golubski 

44539 Benice Biel : . . 

44540 John Cos 

44541 Thomas Muldoon Clemens. 

44542 Eliza M. Martin 

44543 Ole Sjorslev 

44544 Herman F. Tidwell (Dis.). 

44545 Mablon V. McDonald 

44546 Frank Prinz 

44547 Mary Peterson 

44548 William M. Scott 

44549 Leila Davis Dumas 

44550 Bernbard P. DeBaets 

44551 Andrew G. Johnson 

44552 J. Marius Mathieson 

44553 William Deweese 

44554 Elizabeth Holland 

44555 George A. Miller 

44550 Pauline Curry 

44557 Anna Graham 

44558 George C. Orth 

44559 John F. O'Connor 

44560 Rafaela Sciartiello 

44561 Lawrence McCullen 

44562 Charles Goff (Dis.) 

44563 Emil Geir 

44564 S. A. Newberg 

44565 Horace J. Tatro 

44566 Hans Flademoe 

44567 Victor Crawford 

44568 Henry E. Munstermann. . . 

44569 Axel Josephson 

44570 Elizabeth Wyckoff 

44571 John H. Murray 

44572 Bertha Nettie Frasier 

44573 William P. Mozingo 

44574 Fred Koch 

44575 Herman Saar 

44576 Mary K. McKalvey 

44577 Jacob Krieger 

44578 Philip Chester Godfrey.... 

44579 John Eiben ' 

44580 Charles E. Record 

44581 Herbert Morris Williams... 
445S2 J. A. Frazier 

44583 Joseph L. Saucier 

44584 Charles K. Laib 

44585 Dorthea C. Hansen 

44586 Gabriel Ojala 

44587 Charles M. MacLeod 

4458S Anna Ohde 

44589 Mary E. Dean 

44590 Laura H. Beers 

44591 Callie M. Keith 

44592 Emma Francis Beaty 

44593 lima Hendrickson 

44594 John Scott 

44595 Milton Fred Gatchell 

44596 Hedwig Borowsky 

44597 Samuel Alavango 

44598 William J. Whorton 

44599 Walter H. Scruggs 

44600 Charles E. Healy 

44001 Joseph Lapointe 

44602 H. B. Parker 

44603 Grace Ellis Jenkins 

44804 M. C. Percy 

44005 Walter H. Mahan 

44600 Gertrude Hill 

44607 Elizabeth Wilcox 

44608 John P. Murray 

44G09 Joseph Bacon 

44C10 Edward Sacofsky 

44611Emma F. Burris '. 

44612 Hugh F. Gallagher 

41613 Mary E. Belle Christner. . . 

44614 Morgan Leonard 

44015 John Fletcher Morton 

44G10 Assumta Siano 

44617 Alice S. Hearting 

44618 Hersehell H. Woodyard 



Local 
Union 



Membersbipj 
Yrs. Mos. 



Cause of Deatli or 

Disability 

Cancer 

Apoplexy 

Bronchitis 

Tuberculosis 

Endocarditis 

Accidental 

Diabetis 

Heart disease 

Peritonitis 

Nephritis 

Heart trouble 

Apoplexy 

Carcinoma 

Intestinal obstruction . . 

Accidental 

Heart failure 

Accidental 

Tuberculosis 

Accidental 

Tuberculosis 

Carcinoma 

Sunstroke 

Peritonitis 

Ulcer 

Embolism 

Myocarditis 

Influenza .- 

Carcinoma 

Asthma 

Cancer 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis 

Accidental 

Peritonitis 

Carcinoma 

Diabetis 

Tuberculosis 

Myocarditis 

Tuberculosis 

Accidental 

Diabetis 

Nephritis 

Pellagra 

Cancer 

Suicide 

Lethargica 

Uraemia 

Carcinoma 

Endocarditis 

Nephritis 

Typhoid fever 

Heart failure 

Accidental " 

Heart disease 

Pneumonia 

Diabetis 

Accidental 

Accidental 

Cancer 

Endocarditis 

Pneumonia 

Cancer 

Heart trouble 

Angina .pectoris 

Senility 

Bright's disease 

Cancer 

Influenza 

Angina pectoris 

Peritonitis 

Sepsis 

Encephalitis 

Apoplexy 

Septicaemia 

Pneumonia 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis 

Pneumonia 

Pneumonia 

Septicaemia 

Endocarditis 

Carcinoma 

Angina pectoris 

Asthma 

Heart failure 

Accidental 

Diabetis 

Apoplexy 

Heart trouble 



2201 


2 


1 


2264 


2 





73 


19 





108 


1 


5 


1S6 


33 


1 


207 


1 


5 


220 


2 


2 


306 


23 


3 


341 


19 


2 


341 


9 





532 


11 


8 


541 


21 


u 


884 


2 


5 


1032 


22 


5 


1203 


8 


3 


1355 


4 


7 


1514 


12 


6 


1523 


2 


11 


2416 


4 


7 


1 


9 


4 


1 


14 


9 


1 


1 


8 


8 


21 


8 


52 


34 


4 


56 


3 


10 


73 


1 


8 


198 


5 


3 


200 


15 


1 


237 


20 


11 


246 


16 


o 


261 


3 


1 


608 


19 


11 


735 


31 


7 


947 


13 





947 


6 


4 


952 


5 


1 


1176 


2 


3 


1367 


2 


6 


1960 


3 


11 


2725 


5 


3 


2 


3 





13 


19 


7 


52 


14 


8 


55 


9 





224 


16 


4 


261 


14 


8 


277 


10 


2 


325 


19 


7 


366 


4 


1 


402 


6 


10 


665 


1 





770 


9 


3 


1028 


3 


2 


1239 


19 


9 


1307 


9 


8 


1631 


13 


7 


1929 


5 





10 


35 


9 


10 


25 


3 


75 


12 


6 


132 


9 


4 


158 


11 


8 


168 


1 





257 


4 


. 1 


273 


27 


1 


407 


1 


4 


427 


1 


9 


508 


1 


11 


515 


30 


3 


526 


4 


3 


595 


19 


6 


730 


2 


7 


931 


7 


9 


1071 


4 


1 


1228 


3 


6 


1345 


14 


1 


1745 


4 


2 


8 


21 


6 


22 


16 


1 


43 


11 


7 


51 


15 


4 


51 


18 


3 


51 


2 


8 


165 


16 


o 


296 


4 





308 


14 


4 


359 


15 





415 


16 


7 


764 


2 


2 



T XI E CARPENTER 



31 



Claim 
No. 



Name of Deceased or 
Disabled 



Local 
Union 



Membership 
Yrs. Mos. 



Cause of Death or 

Disability 

Pleurisy 

Uraemia 

Diabetis 

Accidental 

Uraemia 

Accidental 

Leukemia 

Tuberculosis 

Indigestion 

Tuberculosis 

Smallpox 

] tiabetis 

Septicaemia 

Accidental 

Nephritis 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis 

Angina pectoris 

Angina pectoris 

Carcinoma 

Carcinoma 

Anaemia 

Suicide 

Pneumonia 

Anaemia 

Tuberculosis 

Appendicitis 

Heart trouble 

Carcinoma 

Carcinoma 

Embolism 

Pneumonia 

Pneumonia 

Arterio sclerosis 

Endocarditis 

Nephritis 

Peritonitis 

Accidental 

Accidental 

Heart trouble 

Endocarditis 

Hemiplegia 

Endocarditis 

Cerebral hemorrhage . . 

Pneumonia 

Fall 

Pneumonia , 

Myocarditis 

Toxemia , 

Bright's disease , 

Accidental , 

Pneumonia , 

Aortic insufficiency 

Tuberculosis 

Cerebral hemorrhage 

Nephritis 

Appendicitis 

Nephritis 

Arterio sclerosis 

Uraemia 

Aortic insufficiency 

Pneumonia 

Cancer 

Edema 

Pneumonia 

Smallpox 

Pneumonia 

Arterio sclerosis 

Tuberculosis 

Poisoning 

Tuberculosis 

Cholecystitis 

Tuberculosis 

Carcinoma 

Pneumonia 

Paralysis 

Carcinoma 

Angina pectoris 

Accidental 

Accidental 

Tuberculosis 

Hemorrhage 

Fall 

Apoplexy 

Heart trouble 

Ulcer 

Tuberculosis 

Arterio sclerosis 

Accidental 



4-101!) Theresa Allen Scott. . \. 

44G20 William H. Douglas \. 

44G21 Anna Stierlin 

44G22 Andrew N. Petersen. . . . 

441121! Alp lion so Marois J 

44G24 Frank Borzyck 

44025 Clifton Jackson 

44626 Mollie Behnke 

44027 Clarence Ryks 

4 1628 Zella Mav Meyers 

44629 Ada C. Shepperd 

44630 Mary Gillen 

44G31 Guy R. Alcox 

44632 P. J. Nolan 

44G33 Amos A. Baldwin 

44G34 Ossa E. Hart 

44635 Max Postall 

44G36 Leonard H. Falk 

44637 Robert Stark 

44638 Henry Thule 

44639 William J. Buskey 

44640 Bernt Erickson Jaabeck. 

44641 Arthur W. Austin 

44642 Elizabeth J. Wood 

44643 Nellie Ruth Loring 

44644 Philip Forget 

44645 James W. Wright , 

44646 Thomas B. Simpkins 

44647 Thomas Eunson 

4464S Herman Saffir 

44649 Hattie May Davis 

44650 J. A. Beck 

44651 William H. Spengeman. . . 

44652 August Dickman 

44653 Alice Folsey 

44654 Otelia Hendrickson 

44655 Amelia Bjorkstrom 

44656 George F. Magnuson 

44657 E. T. Higgs 

44658 Bertha Van Velsor 

44659 Harriet Phillips 

44660 John T. Harrison 

44661 William Bobbins 

44662 Frederick John Brucksiecker 

44663 William F. Schmalgemeier. 

44664 John M. Wahlstrom 

44665 Joseph E. McDonald (Dis. 
446G6 George W. Crocker 

44667 Robert P. Linkletter 

44668 Rempt Ellenga 

44669 Albert Jutzi, Jr. 

44670 Emma Meyer 

44671 Anton Rosenlund ........ 

44672 Ullman E. O'Dell 

44673 Camille Fontaine 

44674 Amelia Passenheim 

44675 Blanche Morris 

44676 Lewis A. Johnson 

44677 D. A. Snodgrass 

44678 Mrs. A. D. Barefield 

44679 George E. Stagg 

44680 Frank Wells 

446S1 Charles A. Strom 

44682 John Jay Treadwell 

446S3 Nellie M. Cruver 

44684 Maud A. McKee 

44685 Arthur McLaughlin 

44686 John Dillon 

446S7 Hope Vernelle Riggs 

44688 Rav Morris 

44089 Emma Bronic 

44090 Edward Johnson 

44091 Henry Kraus 

44092 Enoch H. Lisle 

44093 Joseph Graham 

44094 James B. Williams 

44695 David Hawkins 

44696 J. C. Larmann 

44097 Carl M. Nelson 

44698 Nils P. Johnson 

44099 Joseph Lafrancois 

44700 William L. Graham 

44701 James P. Ankrom (Dis.).. 

44702 Charles J. Peterson 

44703 William Augustus Myers. . 

4 1704 W. S. Scott .' 

44705 Phillip H. Hand 

44700 Antoine Grimard 

44707 Erick Lindstrom 



857 
1 1 88 
1366 

1 156 
1616 

22S9 

2409 

7 

11 

44 

61 

63 

106 

124 

137 

232 

504 

585 

593 

698 

747 

787 

810 

901 

1187 

1408 

12S1 

2114 

62 

183 

208 

226 

262 

550 

791 

791 

791 

866 

993 

1093 

1489 

1065 

2127 

25 

58 

58 

67 

101 

139 

215 

242 

264 

264 

312 

390 

419 

574 

586 

627 

724 

773 

813 

866 

983 

1019 

1399 

1724 

43 

55 

55 

80 

180 

298 

318 

698 

943 

1188 

1212 

1753 

1753 

209S 

2218 

2 

15 

44 

98 

103 

134 

174 



7 

19 

1 



1 

1 

19 



12 

19 

9 

21 

21 

5 

12 

3 

4 

10 

20 

12 

15 

17 

13 

5 

4 

1 

18 

10 

4 

18 

21 

21 

5 

17 

5 

8 

9 

18 

16 

16 

2 

36 

23 

13 

12 

20 

3 

19 

16 

2 

5 

5 

21 

26 

2 

12 

3 

2 

7 

18 

1 

19 

3 

3 

3 

31 

9 

4 

12 

8 

27 

8 

28 

4 

19 

19 

12 

9 



L0 
4 
7 
3 



11 

10 
6 
7 
2 
3 
5 
1 
2 
9 
1 

1 
5 
2 
5 
5 
1 
1 
3 
7 
6 




5 
5 

7 
5 
3 

2 

8 

7 

9 

11 

g 

11 



3 

7 
7 

11 

11 
6 
4 
5 
6 

10 
1 
4 
4 

10 
5 
6 
7 
8 
1 


11 
4 
5 
6 
1 

11 




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y§„c^cg;««-a OJ. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



Claim 
No. 



Name of Deceased or 
Disabled 



Local 
Union 



Membership 
Yrs. Mos. 



4470S 



Hulda W. Sandberg. . . 

Alberta F. Jones 

Ellen Shafer 

Martin Wirtz 

Jennie M. Hunt 

William Woodruff 

Joanna Thomas 

John M. Dorman 

Robert Forrester 
Benjamin u. Bickforcl. 
Owen Lefler (Dis.) 

Mary Rada 

Julia A. Smithana . . . 
Patrick J. Coughlin... 

Loretta Higgs 

Martin J. Weinman. . . 

Olaf Wahlberg 

William H. Kark 

N. B. Evans 

Lewis P. Lamere 

Amos F. Harner 

Charles C. Neweomb.. 

Albert Stien 

William S. Graham. . . 



174 

2S3 

33G 

336 

501 

63S 

838 

1676 

1S56 

22 

29 

54 

115 

115 

115 

171 

271 

281 

392 

583 

838 

1296 

1635 

1978 



19 

21 

6 

20 

16 

8 

4 

26 

2 

1 

3 

23 

20 

4 

2 

22 

3 

3 

15 

5 

1 

1 



8 
9 
9 

11 
3 

1 



4 
11 

4 
7 

9 
3 
9 
7 
6 



Cause of 
Disa 


Death or 
bility 




Am't 
Paid 


Tuberculosis . 








Cystitis 




Cerebral hemorrhage 


75 00 


Asthma 






125 00 








300 00 




75 00 




75 00 


Pneumonia 


50 00 








300 00 


Fall 






100 00 








25 00 








75 00 




125 00 




75 00 




50 00 




25 00 




300 00 




150 00 




50 00 








125 00 








75.00 








50 00 






..$4 




Total . 


5,225.00 



135 Full beneficial claims. 

44 Semi-lieneficial claims 

89 Wife*s claims 

10 Disability claims 



278 



$33,050.00 
4.000.00 
6,075.00 
3,100.00 

$46,225.00 



DISAPPROVED CLAIMS PAID FOP THE MONTH OF DECEMBER, 1921 



Claim 
No. 



Name of Deceased or 
Disabled 



Local 
Union 



Membership 
Yrs. Mos. 



Cause of Disap- 
proval 



Am't 
Cl'm'd 



5216 Joseph Rohner 

5217 Edward L. Ramsey (Dis.) 

5218 Lena Messner 

5219 Amelia M. Reichert 



5220 Mary Norris 

5221 Henry John Hangeveld. 

5222 Aaron Frankowitz 

5223 Alanson P. Thompson.. 

5224 Arzelie Dion 



5225 Andrew J. Score. 

5226 John B. Sessions. 

5227 Angelina Mitchell 

5228 Canute Flodquist 

5229 Frank Kutzra . . . 

5230 Celestino Meza . . 



1 
11 

182 
207 

29S 

490 

60S 

700 

1125 

1184 
125S 
1572 
1899 
1955 
2020 I 



10 4 

9 6 

9 4 

32 7 



16 

1 

2 

20 



2 
3 
12 

4 
1 



11 
3 

11 

11 







Three months in arrears 

Not filed within two years. . . . 

Three months in arrears 

Semi, not entitled to wife do- 
nation 

Semi, not entitled to wife do- 
nation 

Semi, not two years a member 

Six months in arrears 

Three months in arrears 

Semi, not entitled to wife do- 
nation 

Not filed within six months. . . 

Three months in arrears. ... . . . 

Husband died before wife 

Not one year a member 

Six months in arrears 

Three months in arrears 



§125.00 

400.00 

75.00 

75.00 

75.00 

25.00 

100.00 

300.00 

75.0tl 

100.0c 

50.0C 
75.0f 
50.0C 
50.0C 
50.0C 



DEATH NOTICE 

WILLIAMS, J. B.. Local Union No. 943, Tulsa, Okla. 



Local Unions Chartered In December 

New York. N. Y. (Shorers.) 

New York, N. Y. (Marine Carpenters.) 

New Orleans, La. (Colored.) 

Denver, Colo. Redondo Beach, Cal. 

Oaffney, S. C. Belvedere. Cal. 

Burbank, Cal. Long Beach, Cal. 

Inglewood, Cal. 

Total, 10 Local Unions. 

• 

Completes Its Own Home 

Carpenters' Union No. 943 of Tulsa, 
Okla., has about completed its new 
Lome. 

The union owns two valuable lots in 
a good location, being far enough away 
from the business district to avoid the 
noise, yet close in enough to be centrally 
located. The building is 50x100 ft., two 
stories high and of brick construction. 



The ground floor will be occupied by 
store rooms and the second floor will be 
used as a hall for carpenters' headquart- 
ers and the meetings of other unions 
The money for the new building waf ( 
raised principally by assessment on th( 
membership of the union, which is th( 
largest Local in the state and has fough" 
the open shoppers to a standstill. 



It is not what you make, 
It is not what you spend, 
It is what you save 
That counts in the end. 

©» 

The Union Label, card and button as- 
sure better living conditions for the chil | 
dren. 



Charity Begins At Home 

iditor, "The Carpenter" : 

The writer is in receipt of a eoniniu- 
ieation, begging for funds for relief 
ork in the Far East. This association 
as for its chairman an ex-Governor of 
le State of Connecticut. 

The writer believes in extending aid 
> the needy. But he also believeth that 
iiarity begineth at home. It appears 
) the writer's mind (with the thou- 
mds out of employment, in this indus- 
•ial depression), that the afore men- 
oned raised funds for relief work in the 
ar East could be put to very good use 
ere at home. To-wit : A relief upon 
le tax payers of the country. Our 
ix payers today are carrying the burden 
P this depression upon their shoulders 
the writer means direct tax payers, not 
le capitalist tax dodger who have 
:hers pay their tax) , and are supplying 
mds for our municipal and state 
aarity boards. This is Point No. 1. 
i Point No. 2. Use these funds for 
ilucation, and educate our young men to 
income statesmen. Statesmen, taught 
lie true fundamental principles of 
smocracy, not the pupets of the Cham- 
er of Commerce and the machine cou- 
poned governors of an autocratic, userp- 
jig class of money mongers. 

The class that put the yoke of bond- 
,ge upon the neck of a free people, and 
eny them of their constitutional right 
E earning a living by the use of the 
lack list. This same class having 
:lium for the membership of Organized 
abor, yet, have the audacity to solicit 
lands of those they attempt to pauperize 
;ito subjection. 

It appears to Old Ironsides mind, that 
r e, the offsprings of those old lovers of 
.•eedom, who hath made it possible for 
s to retain our freedom, have fallen 
■sleep at the switch. 

Let us awaken from that torpid 
iumber of ours before it is too late, and 
'e be cast again into that cataclysm, 
ultima ratia regain," rather let us 
trive for "'the Candida pax." 



Maternally 
.. U. 97. 



HENRY E. GARDINER. 

New Britain, Conn. 



Thrift 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

A most appropriate editorial dealing 
with the building industry, which I sub- 
mit for your readers' consideration, was 
taken from the "Builders' Guide" of 
Philadelphia and reads: 

Thrift does not mean hoarding money. 
One thousand six hundred homes burn 
each day in the United States through 
lack of thrift. Think of it! and must 
of them preventable as they are the re- 
sult of carelessness on the part of the 
builder who does not protect the wooden 
structural members Avhere they are most 
liable to be attacked by fire. There are 
five most dangerous places that can be 
successfully protected by using fire re- 
sisting materials, for instance, over the 
heating plant, juts a little square of 
metal lath and plaster, ten feet, will cut 
down this hazard, underneath and 
around stairways, under inhabited floors, 
back of kitchen ranges, and a basket of 
metal lath used as a fire stop where the 
uprights and floor joists meet will stop 
these flue-like openings and prevent the 
flames spreading to all parts of the 
build-ing. " 

The Insurance Companies, who are 
interested in the Thrift Movement, 
would rather have a lower rate of in- 
surance and less fires, but we have to 
learn the difference between a hazard 
and a loss before this can be accom- 
plished, and to realize that the fire men- 
ace is always with us. 

If the money loss from fires in the 
United States for one year could be used 
for constructive work, it would build 
homes for the entire inhabitants for a 
state the size of Connecticut, which has 
a population of 1,320,858. 

Build your home like a battle ship 
and protect the most vulnerable points. 
This will be the best investment you can 
make. Money spent for fire prevention 
will save you thousands of dollars, if a 
fire should visit your home and that is 
what THRIFT means." 

Yours very truly, 

WHARTON CLAY. 



36 



THE C A R P E X TEIt 



Appeal To Organized Labor In General 

Editor. "The Carpenter": 

We have been struggling along from 
month to month, living in hopes the day 
would come when we would be success- 
ful in our efforts towards building up an 
organized Local of Collar Workers. But 
regret to say Ave have been unsuccessful 
and ask if you will lend us a helping 
hand by being consistent when purchas- 
ing collars by demanding the "'Bell 
Brand" collars, bearing the Union Label, 
made in both soft and laundered collars. 

At present the firm is making a much 
better collar than they have in the past, 
and they intend to continue to do so in 
order to try and build up a trade on "Bell 
Brand" collars. We sincerely hope you 
will appreciate our efforts and help us by 
purchasing "Bell Brand" collars made in 
fifty-three different styles, both- soft and 
laundered. 

What we would like to make plain is 
that you can buy collars from the Union 
Label Collar Company, direct. 139 Ham- 
ilton St.. Albany, X. Y., providing your 
dealer will not carry them for you. Just 
have some of the boys get together, let 
them order the same as if they went to 
the store to buy two or three collars as 
per their desire. Send the order along 
to the above company and same will be 
executed promptly. If you have not a. 
catalogue same can be procured from the 
above company upon rerpiest. You will 
not only be consistent, but will benefit 
in the prices. 

We trust you will not overlook this: 
appeal as we are in urgent need of help 
at the present time. Thanking you in 
advance for your courtesy in this matter 
and sincerely hoping you will send in a 
club order so we can get some work to 
do, we remain, 

Fraternally yours, 

UNITED GARMENT WORKERS OF 
AMERICA. LOCAL 261. 

Pearl Matson. Secretary- 
29 Second Ave.. Rensselaer. X. Y. 



Boosting the Union Label 

Editor. "The Carpenter" : 

There has been considerable talk of 
increasing membership and boosting the 
Union Label. 

I am going to submit an idea and 
would be glad to have it brought before 
the members of the United Brotherhood- 

In boosting the Union Label we have- 
to have union help. A union man will 
refuse to work with a scab and will go 



home to his wife and tell her his trou- 
bles when in a great many cases she is 
scabing on him and through no fault of 
hers, either: he is to blame for not get- 
ting her intere-ted in unionism. If that 
were done each union man would have 
a helper to boost the Union Label and 
we would soon be getting results. My 
idea is to form a Ladies' Auxiliary with 
every Local, not only the carpenters, but 
in every craft, and hold get-together 
meetings, socials, and dances, and to 
take in the wives and mothers of mem- 
bers and sisters of a certain age. It 
would be a great help in boosting the 
Label, also a great help when we went 
to the polls to support a labor candidate; 
a small initiation fee, one or two dollars, 
with monthly dues at 25c a month, or 
less, just enough to make it self-sup- 
porting. 

I am not veyr good at writeing, but 
I think you will be able to grasp my 
meaning, as we sure have got to do 
something if we are to make any head- 
way in gaining strength. 

Hoping this will meet with some re- 
sponse, remain, 

Fraternally yours, 

EDWARD UXGER. 
L. U. Xo. 334. 416 S. Washington Ave. 
Saginaw, Mich. 



A Freedom Party 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

The carpenters of L. U. Xo. 432 of 
Atlantic City, whose Charter was issued 
on January 9, 1900, saw good reason to 
conform with the established rule fol- 
lowed by those who attain their major- 
ity, so they celebrated the Twenty-sec- 
ond Anniversary of the organization on 
January 13th by a general "get to- 
gether" of the members and their fam- 
ilies in Odd Fellows' Hall, and to make 
the affair thoroughly harmonious, tht 
District Council of Atlantic County 
Ladies' Auxiliary Xo. 63 and the officer; 
of Locals Xo. 1704, 842 and 1619 wen 
invited guests. 

We were sorely disappointed in no; 
having the General Secretary with us, a 
he has always shown deep interest in o\r 
affairs. but the excuse he offered for no 
accepting our invitation was quite rea 
sonable, as the auditing at the Genert 
Office stood in his way. 

The Committee on Arrangements wer 
J. L. Bernicker, Chairman, R. C. G 
kill. H. W. Reeves, J. J. Beebe and X 
Prickett. who spared neither time noj 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



■ to make this the veal labor event 

I the season by entertaining the mern- 

in a manner enjoyed by 

i. A fully organized minstrel troop 

as engaged which formed the begining 

' the program and the performance was 

J ' a clean-cut professional nature, well 

orthy of honorable mi :;tion. this part 

one lasted well into the evening. 

Refreshments of ice cream and cake 
ere served to all and went well, 
Lngled with the strains of music 
mdered by a thorough union orchestra, 
u'li "on with the dance"' when young 
nl old alike shook a nimble foot to the 
tenanting melodies to such an extent 
tat the wee hours of the morning was 
ached without thought. 

All in all it was a night well worth 
hile and will be remembered in eon- 
■etion with L. U. No. 432 for some time 
> come. 

This Local was the inspiration of Or- 
anized Labor in Atlantic City and has 
town to a membership of 420 in good 
anding and only a few in arrears and 
•om its activities and accomplishments 
vree other carpenter Locals have sprung 
p in this district, with an aggregate 
lembership of about 1,200. 

We are now enjoying the fruits of our 
-ell spent efforts in rate of wages and 
ours of employment, considered the 
randard throughout the country. 
, At the time of our organization, con- 
itions were of such a nature as to war- 
int this step, from the fact that we 
ere compelled to work ten hours a day 
:>r $1.75. This movement has increased 
ur pay envelopes to SI per hour and 
nluced our employment to 44 hours per 
"eek. 

Hoping that all other Locals of the 
'nited Brotherhood may have the same 
pportunity to share in success equal 
x or better than ours, I am, 
Fraternally yours. 

J. L. BERXICKER. 

e 

Present Day Methods of Education 
Criticized 

Editor. "The Carpenter*': 

It is with regret, that we read in the 
tews columns of our daily press of the 
ction taken by some of our institutions 
•f learning-, relative to the present situ- 
tion in the railroad controversy. 

In the old school (which apparently 
las passed into oblivion, at least, it's 
uudaments, teachings are in that style) 
uen were taught in those days educa- 



-OLD KENTUCKY- 

SSTOBAGGO 



Direct From Our Farms to You 

The Cream of the Cnr-st cro;-,<; ICcntud-.y's hour.' 
can ppvl'.iee — fine, rich leav — lth that 

rare okl-fsobionc'd flavor ar:d fragrance tact orJy the 
"aging" can produce. We bank ca it you have never I 
finer flavored, more satisfying 
tobacco ia all ______ — 



your lifo 




Ripe* Rich. Old-Fashion Leaf 



„ Old Bei - B -- r. is DO more '- E 

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tint conceal imperii 

Crown and matured in Ksntueky's finest scil, cut "■ pre c 

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leaves it — nothing to "bite" your tongue or parch your rnaa'-— r.ctni.-s ■- 
tire your taste. Me!l * as the moonlight— frarr—t as^ 

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i= the best I avert sted. — W.E.S--:rcs.Si. iter.,,, Prr.r. . 

Tobeeee aai a T in every -wav. I no~ remlise hc^v foolish I have beer. — 

payin» exorbitant pr '-■-- ~-i the mid'dleraea ias-.etd of buyinj direct ;'.-::_ the 
; .:iation."— C.J.Bttdaf. Monletana, li'aia. ... 

■ .g -, ^ - r * b ac ^ C 2a the beat I have had smre 1^56 vrhea Abra. * - 

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REDUCE YOUR ^ISZC^ . 
TOBACCO BILL £ <3 

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No fancy packages. 



IY80NEY SAVING PRICES 

5 lbs. $2.98—10 lbs. $5.85 



(We Pay /III 
Shipping Changes) 

5 pounds will make 55 bic 
Bricks of smoking, or 65 cliewioc 
_r z .:.: z '■ -'■'-■ " - - 

Dtriec ~e send complete fllus- 

, - 
to make grxxw^otcd Bmoinoe, 
cfd-faa'nion chewing and smok- 
ing twists, citars, etc.. 

Send No Money 



WE PAY 
ALL 

SHIPPING 
CHARGES 



'I ry it 
ye 



or ten days— if i" 
' ^iffor 1 ' 



dissatisfied, sea jit back and 

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promptly without aaibble or 
question. You risk nothing. 

S:r.n and mail the cupon tcday 
and enjoy the tobacco treat ex 




,v.» H; i. 1 ','» ! i.*u-!.!JAmr 



TGBACC" SROIVERS AS5'M CF KENTUCKY, 

W-rehousejOi - Mayfield.. Kentucky 



rf 01 Kentucky 



- "^ rvi«^d my i 



> 
i 

.< 

* 

i 

t 

» N 

f Address 

Enter below pounds each gi 
J SMOKING: —mild — meciurti 

t CHEWING: — mild — medium 



— strong 
— strong 



3S 



THE CARPENTER 



tion ; an education which had for its 
fundamental principal the betterment of 
mankind, and the freedom of the work- 
ing class from the yoke of bondage, and 
their wanderings through the darkness. 

Apparently, those old methods of edu- 
cation are too tame for our latter day 
professors of learning, who aspire for 
greatness. It is written in sacred his- 
tory: "but it happened into them ac- 
cording to the true proverb, the dog is 
returned to his own vomit again, and 
the sow that was washed to her wallow- 
ing in the inire. 

Present, day methods of education, 
(that is, as taught by some proffi ssors 
of learning) is placing those fine princi- 
ples of the art in the same category, as 
the afore mentioned dog. and sow in 
sacred history. Of course, the writer 
does not expect anything more elevating 
for his fellow man, from our Chambers 
of Commerce, railroad barons, machine 
controlled governors, and their state 
troops. 

Why? Because this class have lost 
sight of God, and humanity, in their mad 
rush for gold and fame. There is an 
excuse for them, they are uneducated 
and ignorant, in all things but one; and 
that is the accumulation of wealth, and 
it matters not how or by what suffering 
they came to procure it. Apparently our 
institutes of learning have bowed the 
knee to the golden image. 

HENRY E. GARDINER. 

New Britain, Conn. 



Information Wanted 
Accompanying photograph of Dick 
Kiefi. who was last heard of in the fol- 
lowing places: Minneapolis. Minn.. 




Huron and Kansas. Any one knowing 

of his whereabouts kindly address John 

Elkers, 206% Main St.. Houston. Tex. 
* * * 

Information Wanted 
Nils Nelson, 57 years of age, left bis 
home in New York City on December 



2nd. He is 5 ft. S in. tall: medium 
weight and his left hand is deformed. 
Any one knowing of his whereabouts 
kindly address Adele Mattson, 615 E. 
141st St.. New York. N. Y. 

* * * 

As to the whereabouts of Frank Jack- 
man, about 60 years of age — last heard 
of near Los Angeles. Cal.. formerly be- 
longed to Local Unions at Kansas City, 
Mo., or Los Angeles. Cal. Any one 
knowing of him kindly advise Ms sister, 
Mrs. J. A. McDonald, 633 N. Congress 
St., Jackson, Miss. 

* * * 

The accompany photograph shows 
James B. Morgan, formerly a member of 
the Enited Brotherhood. Anv one know- 




ing of his whereabouts kindly address 
Mrs. S. Wright, 21 Pleasant Ave., May- 
wood, N. J. 

* * * 

Abe Feldman, a member of L. E. No. 
1922, has been missing since November, 
1921. He is 5 ft. 11 in. tall, weighs 165 
pounds; black hair and eyes. Any one 
knowing of his whereabouts kindly no- 
tify Jos. B. Fox, R. S., L. U. 1902, 
1320 W. 73rd St., Chicago, 111. 






Fight it Through 

In vour work and in your play, 

Fight it through ! 
Hang right on like yellow clay, 

Fight it through ! 
When a job you once begin, 
Through the thick and through the thin, 
Set your mind and heart to win ! 

Fight it through I 

What if others may have failed, 

E ight it through ! 
Though by powerful odds assailed, 

Fight it through : 
Eefuse to be an "also ran,'' 
Square your shoulders like a man, 
Grit your teeth and say "I can !" 

Fight it through ! 

Well, suppose things do look bad, 
Fight it through ! 

little pep. get mad ! 
Fight it Through ! 
When you know you're in the right, 
I: 's your duty, boy. to fight, 
- . in II your might '. 

Fight it through ! 



Casual Comment 



Lincoln believed in organization ; so 
do we. And the stronger the organiza- 
tion the more it can accomplish. This is 
one of the reasons we are after that 
500,000. 



53.9 per cent to 54.4 per cent of all 
dwellings. Not to speak of folks who 
live in "light housekeeping" and never 
can hope to attain the dignity of a rented 
"home." 



The odd thing is that while Mr. Ford- 
ney predicts that his tariff bill will 
bring in a revenue of $700,000,000, it 
it boasted that this American valuation 
clause alone erects a tariff wall around 
the United States so high that foreign 
goods will practically be kept out of the 
country altogether. 

$ # i)f 

Employers who are loudest in their 
demands for the "individual rights" of 
workers forget these rights when applied 
to employers. Let an emploj r er refuse to 
join the organization of his group and 

he is quickly put out of business. 

* * # 

Pity the poor milk dealer — not the 
little fellow with one or two cows, but 
the concern that deals in this commodity 
by the car load. We leam that the man- 
ager of one of these concerns told a 
Congressional Investigating Committee 

that he only made a profit of $200 a day. 

* # * 

In his message to Congress, 1863, 
Lincoln said: "Labor is prior and in- 
dependent of capital. Capital is but the 
fruit of labor, and could never have 
existed had not labor first existed." 

* >;: * 

Contrast the foregoing with what the 
open shoppers say, who term their cam- 
paign to establish the non-union shop 
the "American" plan of employment. 

Governor Allen's "can't strike law" 
appears to be working beautifully — for 
the employer, as a packing company in 
the state has defied the law and yet 
Wolff, of the packing company is free. 

Some mine operators object to the 
check-off system as it applies to the col- 
lection of union dues, but we cannot 
recollect that they object very strenu- 
ously to the check-off as it applies to 
rent, doctor's fees, store bill, etc. 

Cheering news. The proportion of 
rented homes in America increased from 



High rents and other increased living 
costs has junked the propaganda that 
high wages is responsible for high prices. 

The old joke about the packers "sav- 
ing every part of a pig except the 
squeal" has been reversed. They are 
now saving the "squeal." 

* * * 

If the farmers' "bloc" continues grow- 
ing in power you may see serious 
changes in the country. You might even 
see railroads run partly for the benefit 
of farmers, instead of seeing farmers 
run for the benefit of the railroads as in 
the past. 

* * * 

The first claim on a workman's in- 
come is his union dues and assessments, 
for it is by virtue of these payments he 
is allowed to work at a living wage. 
Workers who delay such payments rob 
themselves doubly. 

* * * 

As an incentive to peace, Yankee in- 
ventors have planned the world's most 
deadly gas and a new type of subma- 
rine that has a cruising radius of 10,000 
miles. It might help also if some one 
would dramatize the golden rule. 

One good way to break up the "buy- 
ers' strike" would be to reduce prices to 
the lowest point commensurate with 
sound business. 

Whatever happens while there is a 
scarcity of houses profiteering landlords 
do not fear a boycott. Families cannol 
"do without" shelter. 

Manufacturers of IS in. armor plate 
are begining to feel uneasy. 

* * * 

Of course the makers of explosives 
can find something to blow up besides 
hostile armies. There are, for example, 
tunnels and canals to be built, rivers to 
be dredged and land to be cleared, 



40 



THE C A R P E N 



ER 



It may be that if the nation-; take a 
ten-year naval holiday the end of that 
period will find them a decade behind in 
the art of naval construction, but i 
safe to assume that they will have ad- 
vanced far more than a decade in the 
arts of peace. 

* * # 

Much of the world is discovering that 
betvreen the respective glories of 
armament and the delights of bank- 
ruptcy there is no place for hesitancy in 
making a choice. 

* * * 

The latest addition to the anti-union 
forces is Alfred J. Beveridge, former 
United States Senator from Indiana. 
The ex-lawmaker has posed as a liberal, 
but his recent speech before the State 
Chamber of Commerce shows how easy 
this brand of "liberalism" slips into re- 
action's camp. 

* * * 

In his most flowry style, Beveridge 
reeled off his citizens alliance speech to 
the delight of business men who hike to 
hear Organized Labor and its struggles 
for improved working conditions listed 
with organized capitalists, whose goal is 
profits. 

* * * 

Be sure your sin will find you out if 
you do not give preference to the Union 
Label, shop card and working button. 

* * « 

According to figures made public by 
the National Industrial Board of New 
York the cost, in 1913, of constructing 
a workingnian's house — a story and a 
half house — was 81, 200. However, the 
report states, "the lumber bill alone for 
this house, at the present time is $1,380. 

* * * 

In view of the foregoing, what be- 
comes of the contention that labor's ex- 
actions are responsible for the high cost 
of building? 

* * * 

The rapid rise in the quoted value of 
Liberty Bonds confirms a suspicion that 
the process of transferring them from 
the people to the bankers has about been 
completed. 

* * * 

Farmers who are taking up economics 
will likely find the winter all too short 
when they attempt to reconcile a 35 per 
cent emergency tariff with 94c wheat 

* * * 

When labor becomes money — some- 
thing that can be exchanged in the 



market plar-e — everybody will be rich 

but millionaires and the politicians. 

* * * 

The President of the United States 
Chamber of Commerce says farmers vrill 
soon feel a larger demand for their pro- 
ducts. Possibly, but we wonder who 
has last season's products? 

* * * 

The mayor of Indianapolis. Lew 
Shank, in his inaugurial address showed 
he was for Organized Labor, first, last 
and always when he said: "The prac- 
tice of bringing strike breakers to In- 
dianapolis in times of labor trouble will 
not be tolerated. The first outsider that 
comes to this city, or the first rough 
neck that tries to organize a strike, gets 
out.' : 

* * * 

Demand the Union Label and thus, 
follow the "golden rule" instead of the 
"rule of gold." 

* * * 

"Where is this great accumulation of 
wealth that has come into this nation 
during the period of purchases at ex- 
horbitant prices by foreign nations? 
None will assume that it is with the 
unemployed. 

* * * 

The United States Senate voted to ap- 
propriate $100,000 for the unemployed. 
That gives 'em about 20c each. 

* * * 

Many wage cuts are prepared by 
company organized "unions." But the 
program is not working to the satisfac- 
tion of the promoters. 

* * * 

Although the wholesale price of beef 
is down to the 1914 level the vigilant re- 
tailer has succeeded fairly well in keep- 
ing the customer from realizing it. 

* * * 

At the present time the Labor Depart- 
ment has about 70 labor disputes pend- 
ing. This number does not include the 
struggle which the Labor Department is 
now making to maintain its existence 
because of the efforts of Big Business 
abolish the department altogether. 

* * * 

TVe are glad to note that the carpen- 
ters of Tonkers. N. Y., have signed an 
agreement with contractors which ex- 
pire July 1, 1922. 

* * * 

A 20 per cent reduction in quarry- 
men's wages is getting down to rock 
bottom 



T It K CARPENTER 



Foreign Labor Notes 



Hiring the first 10 months of the 
>|sent year there were 307 strikes in 
[an involving 40,245 persons. That 
■I ntry is gradually becoming civilized. 

* * * 

^ bill to endow motherhood has been 

sed by the Legislature of New South 

f.les, which is controlled by the labor 

ty. 

* * * 

ron and steel workers in the Dues- 
lorf (Germany) area, to the number 
50,000, have struck for an increase in 
ges amounting to 100 per cent. The 
sters have declared a lockout. 



The general strike which was recently 
lared in Genoa and the surrounding 
rict of Liguria has been called off, 
s a Central News dispatch from 
ne. The strike of the metal workers 
the same area, which has been in 
gress also has been ended. 

* * * 

failure to supply the miner sof the 
}ietz basin, in southern Russia, with 
*d stuffs has resulted in desertion by 
Forers, including more than half the 

'.led laborers, and in the substitution 
[lees-skilled workers from the "mob- 
lied" laborers. Discipline has de- 
corated, there being much "soldier - 
i|" and non-reporting for work. 

* * * 

There has been a recurrence of labor 
•est in Trieste, notably among the 
pyard workers. These workers an- 
lnce that they purposed calling an- 
er strike, owing to a dicagreement 
r wages. 

'The Daily Herald," of Adelaide, 
ith Australia, says: "If the arbitra- 
i courts are to go it will not very 
eh matter to the rank and file of the 
rkers so long as they determine to 
± together. In fact, the attitude of 
• capitalists, as personified by Premier 
rdwell, may be, indeed, a blessing in 
guise." 

* * * 

By the narrow margin of two votes, 
■ Labor Government of New South 
ties survived a censure motion 
•ught against it in the legislative as- 
nbly, It is a remarkable coincidence 
-t the Labor Government in Queens- 
d holds office by the same margin. 




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Add re: 



42 



THE CARPENTER 



Remarks On Liberty: By Abraham 
Lincoln 

The world has never had a good defi- 
nition of the word liberty, and the Amer- 
ican people just now are much in want 
of one. We all declare for liberty ; but 
in using the same word we do not all 
mean the same thing. With some the 
word liberty may mean for each man 
to do as he pleases with himself, and 
the product of his labor ; while with 
others the same word may mean for 
some men to do as they please with 
other men. and the product of other 
men's labor. Here are two. not only 
different, but incompatible things, called 
by the same name, liberty. And it fol- 
lows that each of the things is. by the 
respective parties, called by two differ- 
ent and incompatible names — liberty 
and tyranny. 

The shepherd drives the wolf from 
the sheep's throat, for which the sheep 
thanks the shepherd as his liberator, 
while the wolf denounces him for the 
same act, as the destroyer of liberty, es- 
pecially as the sheep was a black one. 
Plainly, the sheep and the wolf are not 
agreed upon a definition of the word lib- 
erty ; and precisely the same difference 
prevails today among us human crea- 
tures, even in the North, and all pro- 
fessing to live liberty. Hence we be- 
hold the process by which thousands are 
daily passing from under the yoke of 
bondage hailed by some as the advance 
of liberty, and bewailed by others as the 
destruction of all liberty. Recently, as 
it seems, the people of Maryland have 
been doing something to define liberty, 
and thanks to them that, in what they 
have done, the wolf's dictionary has 
been repudiated. — From an address at 
Baltimore. Md., April 12, 1864. 



Letter From a Union Carpenter to His 
Son, a Draftsman 

Dear John : You're still betwixt and 
between. Well, your "professional" 
workers stand between labor and cap- 
ital, truly enough. But only in the sense 
that you take the buffets and shocks 
from each — the '"brick-bats," as it were. 
As workers, you belong in the ranks of 
the workers. 

Roosevelt said: "If I were 
a wage earner of any sort, I would un- 
doubtedly join the union of my trade. 
If I disapproved of its policy, I would 
. . . fight that policy ; if the . . . 
leaders were dishonest, I would strive 



to put them out. I believe in the union 
and I believe that all men who are bene- 
fited by the union are morally bound to 
help to the extent of their power in the 
common interests advanced by the. 
union." 

Or listen to Lord Haldane, the British 
statesman : "It is with labor that the 
hope lies for tomorrow. I say this with' 
the greater confidence because the signs 
are increasing every day that labor is 
realizing that it must unite within its 
ranks the brain that plans as well as the 
hand that performs. Today we see the 
brainworkers turning more and morc 
surely toward the Labor party, and thai 
party is more and more ready to wel- 
come them. And the combinatior 
. . . must be irresistible." 

We all stood together in camp anc 
field and trench, to make the world saf< 
for democracy — carpenters, bricklayers 
teachers, laborers, clerks, riveters, en 
gineers and draftsmen alike. Why no 
all stand together now and do "squad j 
east.'* salute the rising sun of real in 
dustrial democracy and work together j 
each for all. in peace as well as war 
Political democracy is impossible ill 
modern times without industrial dem 
ocracy. "Let me control the jobs of th 
nation, and I care not who makes it] 
laws," the industrial barons may we 
say. 

So, why do you delay, son? Are yo 
like the canny Scot, who said, "I'm ope 
to conviction, Sandy; but I'd like to se 
the man who can convince me." And 
appeal to you again, son — and may th 
appeal haunt you day and night — get i 
line ! The time is fast approaching whe 
I shall have to look the facts in the fa( 
and say, even though it be of my 0"w 
son, "He who is not with me is again 
me." Let's go! 

With love. DAD. 



Use Your Head 

A woodpecker pecks 

Out a great many specks 
Of sawdust 

When building a hut. 
He works like a nigger 

To make the hole bigger — 
He's sore if 

His cutter won't cut. 
He don't bother with plans 
Of cbeap artisans, 

But there's one thing 
Can rightly be said : 
The whole excavation 
Has this explanation — 
He builds it 
By 
Using 
His 
Head, 



— Exchan* 




w To Determine the Length of Roof 
Rafters 

y Richard M. Van Gaasbeek, School 
of Science and Technology, Pratt 
Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y.) 

A. useful accessor for roof framers is 
>wn iu the illustration. From these 
grams the lengths of common and hip 
Iters can be conveniently and accu- 



marked off and at right angles a perpen- 
dicular line on which the rise will be 
marked off. To make a diagram for use 
in determining the lengths of common, 
jack and cripple rafters mark off on the 
base line from the perpendicular line 12 
one inch spaces and«number as shown in 
Fig. 1. Sub-divide each 1 in. space into 
% in. spaces. These spaces should be 
laid out accurately and the lines marked 

<12_ 
12 k 




One foot run, Common mftei 
ly determined. The diagrams should in with- a sharp knife. 



Said out on well seasoned stock, pre- 

IJibly 3-ply material, or better still, 

le of metal and machined. Draw a 

le line on which the runs will be 



■C3EXJE3-6I 

This base lino 
represents the run of 1 ft. of the com- 
mon rafter. From the base line on the 
perpendicular line mark off 12 one inch 
spaces and connect each division with 



44 



THE CARl'EN'TEK 



zero on the base line marked C. Fig. 1, 
giving the diagonal of the run and rise 
or pitch of the common rafters from 1 



*n \ 



representing the rise in inches per foot of 
run of the common rafter. 

To illustrate the use of the diagram 



A^ 




c 

a, 
S 





=^Eh 


\ 




1 ■ \ 






NJ 


' ' ' ^ rvi\ 










- y \\ y 








'. ■ . \ "" 




V\ * 




- \\\ \ 


Cs 












' 


















-^ 





a: 



* 









r 

V- 






8" 
to 

|- 

8. 



o; 



sT&. 









Nttfc* 



\& 






s:\ 



,^\ 






'Oi \ 



\ \ 



Ox 



^ 



Cn| <| Ou' oj *s Ool <Cl Q 

Rise in Inches per foot run of Common Rafter 



in. to 12 in. rise in 1 ft. Number the 
sub-divisions as shown, each number 



suppose the span of a building was 2«j 
ft. in., % pifch, the rafters rising 9 in 



TUK C.nii'E.N'TEK 



•i'.'j 



in 1 ft. The run of the common rafter 
would be 10 ft. in., or one-half the 
span of the building. Lay a rule on the 
9 in. pitch line on the diagram and meas- 
ure from zero on the base line to the 
intersection of the 10 in. perpendicular 
line and the !) in. pitch line as C-D, Fig. 
1, giving 12 1 /2 in. or 12 ft. 6 in., the 
length of the common rafter. In every 
case the run is measured from zero on 
the base line, the rise is measured from 
the base line, the length is measured 
from zero on the pitch line. 

To make a diagram for use in de- 
termining the lengths of hip and valley 
rafters, mark off on the base line from 
the perpendicular line 17 one inch spaces 
(17 in. being the diagonal of 12 in. and 
12 in. or the run of a hip rafter for 1 ft. 
of run of a common rafter) and number 
as shown in Fig. 2. Sub-divide each 1 
in. space into % in. spaces, laying them 
out accurately and marking the lines in 
with a sharp knife. This base line rep- 
resents 1 ft. of run of a hip rafter for 1 
ft. of a run of a common rafter. From 
the base line on the perpendicular line 
mark off 12 one inch spaces and connect 
each division with zero on the base line 
marked F, Fig. 2, giving the diagonal of 
the run and rise or pitch of the hip and 
valley rafters from 1 in. to 12 in. rise in 
1 ft. of the common rafters. Number 
each sub-division as shown. 

To illustrate the use of the diagram 
refer to the same problem as that used 
in finding the length of the common raf- 
ter, span of building 20 ft. in., with 
pitch of 9 in. in 1 ft. The run of the 
hip is the diagonal of the run of the 
common rafter, or the diagonal of 10 ft. 
in. and 10 ft. in. Lay a rule on the 
diagram, Fig. 1, and measure the di- 
agonal distance A-B, measuring from 
the 10 in. point on the rise to the 10 in. 
point on the run, or 14% in. full, or 
14 ft. 1% in., run of the hip rafter. 

To determine the length of the hip 
refer to Fig. 2. Lay a rule on the 9 in. 
pitch line on the diagram and measure 
from zero on the base line to the inter- 
section of the 14% in. perpendicular line 
and the 9 in. pitch line as E-F, Fig. 2, 
giving 1G in. full or 16 ft. % in., length 
of the hip rafter. In determining the 
length of a rafter the run is measured 
from zero on the base line, the rise is 
measured from the base line and the 
length is measured from zero on the 



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4% 



THE C A R PEXTEB 



pitch line. In determining the run of a 
Lip rafter the run of the common rafter 
;s measured off on the base and perpen- 
dicular line from the intersecting point 
of both, so as to form a perfect square, 
rhe run being the diagonal of a square 
whose sides equal the run of a common 
rafter. 



Concrete Stairs 

(By G. D. Mills, L. D. No. 910, 
St. John, N. B.) 

Flights of concrete stairs will vary 
in design, depending on the location and 
use, they are to be put to. The ordinary 
cellar steps, or two or three steps enter- 
ing a door, or front yard, can be provid- 
ed with forms by most any one. but if 
one or more flights are required, in a 
concrete building, to reach the upper 
floors, much care and careful considera- 
tion will be necessary, to properly de- 
sign them. 

In Fig. 1 will be found a view of the 
lower staircase of a wing on a concrete 
warehouse, which the writer built about 
twelve years ago. 



and boards, made to conform to the re- 
quired height and width, and cut diag- 
onally with a hand saw: a little care 
should be exercised in constructing this 
form, not to nail the boards on the line 
of cut. After the form is cut in two 
parts, the treads and : rs . :. be laid 
out on one of the parts with a view to 
setting the string up inverted, or upside 
down; compared with the ordinary 
of setting stair strings; two strings or 
half forms will be required, and the 
other two half forms can be used to con- 
struct the soffit, by connecting with 
boards cut to the width of stairs, the re- 
inforcing rods can then be placed on 
the soffit, and also in the vertical walls, 
the outside forms set in place, after 
which the riser boards can be nailed to 
connect the two string forms as shown 
in Fig. 2. 




The flight is not an open string, but 
is provided with a protecting wall, in 
liie event of a conflagration on the lower 
floor, thus affording protection to the oc- 
t-upants above, in making their escape. 
strings for this wall are provided 
from an ordinary c ucr< : forms of 2x4s 



recting 
usually 
le form 
slightly, in order to permit a man to pull 
the wires through, and tack the 8 in. 
stretchers to the form, after which the 
form wires can be wedged up on the 
outside, with two sawn wedges for each 
wire, 2 in. wide, and a nail drove half 
way through to hold them in place. 

The forms can now be filled up with 
concrete, and if the edges of treads are 
to be provided with metal protection this 
can be done before the mixture has set. 
by placing the angle iron or mason's 
treads in the mixture when it is soft, 
and they should be provided with count- 
ersunk bolts to hold in place. 



THE CARPENTER 



47 



How To Understand, Read, and Work 
From PJans and Specifications 

(By Owen B, Maginnis.j 

The subject into which we are about 
to enter is one which it behooves every 
carpenter, joiner and woodworker to get 
acquainted with in order that he may 
succeed in his craft and trade. 




The manual dexterity aud skill having 
been acquired and learned so as to be 
skilled, every mechanic should set him- 
self to study how to read and work 
from architects' and engineers' drawings 
and plans, and how is this to be done? 

Perhaps the best way to gain this 
knowledge, would be to attend a good 
evening or night high school where it is 
imparted free by a competent instructor 
and in the larger cities these schools 
may be found, but those residing in 
villages or country places would do well 
to write the correspondence schools and 
institutes who will furnish this knowl- 
edge by mail for a reasonable consider- 
ation. In the meantime I will endeavor 
to impart to readers the elements of this 
essential pax-t of a perfect mechanic's 
education. 

A "plan" according to the dictionary, 
is the representation of anything on a 



elevation of this building is shown at 
Fig. 4, so that every set of building 
plans should have at least four, for the 
proper guidance of mechanics and ma- 
terial men in carrying forward the ex- 
ecution of the workmanship and labor 
necessary to the full and entire comple- 
tion of the structure. 

Special parts or unusual features are 
named details, or detailed drawings and 
are either made to a very large scale or 
full actual size, and here we must ask 
ourselves what "scale" is? 

Scale in architecture or engineering 
is anything graduated as a measure, or a 
proportion of parts and is used so that 
by assuming a certain small part as a 
measurement or dimension to delineate 
the full size as completed. It is usual to 
take one standard lineal inch or parts 
thereof as being on paper, equal to one 
full foot of twelve inches, or parts there- 




of, as one-quarter of an inch. These 
flat surface, a sketch, scheme, or pro- 
ject; therefore, the plan of a house is a 
true and accurate representation of how 
it is to be built. 

Plans are of various kinds, but those 
mostly in use in building construction 



48 



T IT E CARPENTER 



and engineering practice are first hori- 
zontal sections of the work to be clone 
at the several tiers or stories and simply 




- &J3~- 

designated by the word "plan," as: First 
Story Plan (See Fig. 1). Second Story 
Plan (See Fig. 2). Third Story Plan, 



(See Fig. 3), which are those intended 
and presumably drawn for a lar^e sub- 
urban frame house. 

The front, side and rear views are 
termed elevations, and of which a side 
are sub-divided into 12 spaces each, of 
which is assumed to be equal to one 
actual full inch as shown on an or- 
dinary carpenter's pocket two-foot rule. 

For example, % equals 1 ft, the scale 
to which the plans represented in this 
article were made is one-quarter of an 
inch, divided into 12 spaces each, of 
which when drawn on paper is equiva- 
lent to one full inch and the whole 
quarter inch on paper is presumably one 
full foot of material or constructed work, 
so that every mechanic should purchase 
a scale rule, and try and learn its appli- 
cation and use. They can be purchased 
very cheaply and generally have the fol- 
lowing scales on a 6 or 12 in. instru- 
ment: y± in. scale, y 2 in., % in., 1 in., 
1% in., and 3 in., which means: 

% in. equals 1 ft. 

y 2 in. equals 1 ft. 

% in. equals 1 ft. 

1 in. equals 1 ft. 

1% in. equals 1 ft. 

3 in. equals 1 ft. 

And the parts of these would be 12 
in % in., 12 in y 2 in. — 16 in. in % in., 
12 in 1 in., eighths in 1 y 2 in. scale and 
quarter inches in 3 inch scale ; all of 
which may seem difficult to comprehend, 
but will not be difficult to grasp mentally 
after a little close study of a scale rule. 
The carpenters' rule may be used for the 




THE CARPENTER 



49 



1% in. and 3 in. scales and for this rea- 
son working drawings and details are 
usually laid out to these scales as being 
simpler to work from, although the % 
in. scale is preferred by many as more 
economical of paper. 

Of course, it is usually in the practice 
of building construction, etc., to furnish 
the builder and mechanic plans with the 
dimensions figured on and for each part 
as will be observed in the first plan, Fig. 
1, which is a representation of the cellar 
or foundation plan of the supposed build- 
ing, so to explain it, we will figure up 
the layout and show how the sizes must 
tally to insure correctness. 

Commencing with the front measure- 
ments we add them together, thus : 
22 ft. 8 in 
13 ft. in. 



35 ft. 8 in. 
12 ft. 8 in. 



48 ft. 4 in., which would 
e the outside width, including the 
piazza foundation. 

The building line is placed 7 ft. 8 in. 
plus 1 ft. 8 in. back from this, and 7 ft. 
in. to the right side actually figures 
48 ft. 4 in. minus 9 ft. 6 in., which is 
38 ft. 10 in. 

It is usually in practice to start by es- 
tablishing a point, generally the left 
| hand front corner of the building proper 
! ,as A hi Fig. 1, at which the heel or cor- 
laer of a steel square may be set or 
placed at a nail or tack on the top of a 
stake or peg driven solidly and at the 
fixed level into the ground. 

A square angle having been obtained, 
all the measurements may be made from 
'his point by employing a 10 ft. pole 
)r tape line by laying off from A 48 ft. 
3 in., and so on. Going to the left hand 
, >r say south gable layout, stretch a line 
I is A-B for the outside face line of the 
wall and space off the indicated dimen- 
sions, which may be verified in the fol- 
owing manner, and total up to equal 
;hose on the right side. 

Right Side 

9 ft. in. 1st dimension 

8 ft. in. 2nd dimension 

15 ft. 8 in. 3rd dimension 

12 ft. 10 in. 4th dimension 

10 ft. 6 in. 5th dimension 

3 ft. 2 in. 6th dimension 

4 ft. in. 7th dimension 

5 ft. 6 in. 8th dimension 



Left Side 



11 ft. 6 in. 1st dimension 

4 ft. 2 in. 2nd dimension 

17 ft. in. 3rd dimes 

30 ft. 6 in. 4th dimension 

4 ft. 2 in. 5th dimension 

1 ft. 4 in. 6th dimension 



Total 68 ft. 8 in. 

Proceeding to the rear from the cor- 
ner, B, set off 9 ft. 8 in. plus 13 ft. in., 
which will locate the corner point C, and 
from C the sum of the different short 
dimensions must be computed to deter- 
mine the inside corner as D, 6 ft. square 
out. . From D mark the outside corner E 
and 12 ft. 10 in. down locate F. 

To project the circular bay window 
formation with the trammel rod, meas- 
ure off on it 4 ft. 6 in., as radius, and 
strike the semicircle in soft clay or 
earthly soil, cutting the line from H, 










-ei6Effis-6i 



fotal 68 ft. 8 in. 



and from H square out 2 ft. 8 in. and 
draw a line parade lto the wall line, then 
space off 4 ft. 1 in., 3 ft. 5 in., 3 ft. 5 
in., and 4 ft. 1 in., and S inches, which 
will complete the outline of the bay 
window. 

To layout the regular octagonal bay 
window on the left side I would recom- 
mend readers to follow the method 
shown in Fig. 5, viz : Square out 8 in. 
from the building line, then draw 
through its end parallel to the south line 
of building, as P-Q, Fig. 2, measure out 
to the right from T 4 ft., as R, and from 
R square up 4 ft., as R-S. Join S and 
T, which will give the sloping side of the 
octagon. Now, through S draw to tbe 
right parallel to P-Q, and set off its 
length 5 ft. in. Square down as be- 
fore, and repeat the same operation for 
the right sloping side. 

Of course, the steel square may be 
employed in getting these figures by 
taking 7 on the tongue and IT on the 
blade, but I am partial to working from 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



figured dimensions, as the slightest 
movement of the hands in applying the 
square is liable to distort the octagonal 
outline. 



Continuation of Criticism of Stairbuild= 

ing By R. M. Van Gaasbeek of the 

Pratt Institute, Third InstaII= 

ment, By L. W. Cooper, 789 

Lincoln St., Galesburg, III. 

We must next get out our bases for 

our posts. Each stair shop, (except 

where he is held to an architect's detail 1 . 

establishes a certain height for his 

gallery bases above the finished floor, 

also for the height of butress above floor. 

Some think 4 in. looks good, while some 

choose 5 in. or 6 in. The higher it is 

the more strength. If high enough a 

glueblock can be set between the floor 

line and post tenon. We will adopt 5 

in. for this job. The inside of base will 




be G in. clear, hence 6 plus 1% makes it 
7% in. over all. 

On a drawing board or any board with 
one straight edge we draw two parallel 
lines 7% in. apart, square off for top of 
landing base, measure down 5 in. to floor 
line, then one riser in center, then with 
the pitch board establish the top of 
string, also the bottom, then draw lines 
for the timber to be used, also for plas- 
ter and soffit mold, add sufficient margin 
for base to project below and you have 
the required length of landing base. 



We will find the length of the next 
one. The 13th rise is in center, also 
the 11th. so we will establish the top of 
string above the 13th rise with the 
pitch board and allow 1% in. above 
where the highest point of string hits 
edge of post, which will be the top of 
base. Now, as the 11th rise is also in 
the center, we need only drop down 
three risers, then square over to about 
% in. forward of base and lay out the 
10th rise and with the pitch board es- 
JO 




Fi % $.l5 



tablish the bottom of string, plaster, 
timber and soffit mold, and allow margin 
for base to project below and you have 
length of base. Add a little for trim- 
ming, and by the same method find the 
required length of first and second base. 
Glue up all the bases and keep the glue 
block far enough down from the top to 
clear the tenon. This should be done 
simultaneously with glueing up the 
winders and building up the wall 
strings, etc. 

Now we will cut our butress strings 
as shown in Fig. 15. The first and top 
string are both the same, as both risers 
are in center of posts, while the second 
string is shown in same figure, extend- 
ing above and below to the required 
length of first and third. The dotted 
lines show the face of post and the full 
line the end of tenon. The top of tenon 
is cut square to the face line of post, as 
also is the bottom one at lower end of 
string. We now have our bases glued 
up and strings cut. let us lay out the 
bases. Take the landing base, square 
the top, measure down 5 in. and mark 
the floor line. If there are any defects, 
turn them to the parts that will be cut 
out or covered. Mark the face of loth 
rise and lay out the 14th step, leaving 
a a keyway below step. .Square around 
to the string line, measure the height 
of string on plumb line, (they should all 
be the same), take the height of string 
above step, hold the end of rule at said 
height on the step line on base, mark 
the top of tenon, also the full height of 



THE CARPENTER 



51 



mortice. You know the full height, so 
.you need only measure the portion above 
■and let the rule figure the lower one. 
Your margin is 2% in. and the mortice 
should he at least 9-16 in. deep for a % 
in. tenon. Take the pitch board, draw a 
line at hack and lower corner of 15th 
rise and another one parallel below it for 
(he bottom of timber, then one for plas- 
ter and one for the suffit mold, allow 
margin and square off for bottom of 
base. 

Now allow for the floor and floor joist 
and cut straight through at back of 15th 
rise, but be sure it is cut so that it will 
slip over easy. If % in. floor is used it 
should be cut at finish floor line, but if 
5-16 in. hardwood floor is used it should 
be housed for the landing shown in Fig. 
10 and the rest of base run down to 
rough floor and let the finish floor cut 
against it. The 3rd base, square off for 
the top, allow margin above string 
(which, if a % in. butress cap is used, 
1% in. will be sufficient), measure por- 
tion of tenon above step, hold rule at 
bottom of said margin and mark top of 
13th step, also full height of tenon. 
Square around and lay out 13th step 
and rise, drop down and lay out the 12th 
step, as the 12th riser cuts against back 
of base, drop down one more rise and 
lay out the 11th step and rise, then drop 
down to the 10th, which takes you out 
of the base, measure the portion of 
string tenon above 10th step, lay out 
mortice as above directed, take the pitch 
board and mark for the timber, plaster 
and soffit mold and allow for margin 
and square off and proceed in same man- 



-gn£ESs-6i 




rza./S. 



ner to lay out the other two bases, tak- 
ing the location of riser from full size 
detail 

House out for steps, risers and tenons, 
leaving a key way under steps and back 
of risers. Clean up and nail a thin pro- 
tection board on top and bottom of base. 
Before they leave the shop the string 
should be tried into the base, and they 
should have just a full step from face 



of rise in string to face of rise in base 
and the tenons should enter, and fill the 
mortise. Before this subject gets fold 
we will consider laying out the newel 
proper, but first let me ^ive a simple 
rule to find the approximate length <>f 
base for glueing up. We will use Hi" 
3rd base for example. Take the vertical 
height of string, butress-cap. timber, 
plaster and soffitmold plus the margin 
above and below string, which in this 
case will total about 19% in. As you 
can readily see this already includes one 
rise, there being 4 risers in this base, we 
must add 3x6 3-16 in. or 18 9-16 in., 
making a total of 3S 1-16 in. to which 
it is well to add a safety margin for 
trimming, etc. Now we have decided to 
use a sunk panel post with 1 % in. cor- 
ners and margins. Our gallery rail is 
2 ft. 6 in. to the under side and our 
base is 5 in. high. We first lay off the 
floor (of landing newel) base, base mold, 
margin of 1 % in. above same, margin 
of. same height below rail, rail, same 
margin, and cap molding. 

It is necessary to lay out rail lines on 
one side only unless it be an angle post, 
but carry all other panel lines around 
newel 3 in. or 3~y 2 will be sufficient for 
tenon. All gallery newels will be the 
same, save that they may be angle new- 
els or a balustrade may continue straight 
on opposite side, except the landing 
newel. As the bases are made male and 
female, and the newel does not go in 
till the job is ready to finish, we cannot 
complete the height of rail from the 
housing lines on base, but we have the 
gallery rail height and we know that 
the rake is 4 in. lower, so we square 
around from the bottom of rail to a point 
over the 15th rise and drop down 4 in. 
and from this point take the pitch board 
and mark down the rake as shown by 
dotted lines in Fig. 13, add the panel 
margin and square over, take the ver- 
tical height of rake rail, add the margin 
above. 

There will be a small panel above the 
rake rail on landing newel. The rake 
newels will all be the same height. Lay 
out same as gallery newel, allowing for 
margins, rail and trimmings and you 
have established the rail height. You 
are now standing on the landing looking 
down at the 3rd newel in Fig. 13. You 
can follow the dotted lines clown to the 
12th rise. Now step down to a point 
where the 7th rise hits the wall string 
and follows the dotted lines in Fig. 14 to 



T II 



C A RTF X TER 



the 11th rise, then follow the c< : 

:: to the 10th. The 10th rise is 
about 1% in. forward froni the newel. 
You can drop down rhe full rise and 
subtract the rise on 1% in. which is, 
this -32 ::.. The bottom of rail 

is about the top of base mold. 

I told you to save the rippings from 
the steps. There should be S of them. 
but yon need 16 to make the four posts 
shown in Fig. 12. We will make the 
panels 5-16 in. deep, that will leave the 
shaft of post 5% in. If you have a shop 
equipped with plainer and buzz-plainer, 
make them a little strong so when they 
are glued up you can joint and square 
two sides and ran the other two through 
the plainer to the net size. These rip- 
ings are 1% in. Thick, joint one edge 
square, and run the other through the 
plainer to the same size. Set the saw to 
rip 5-16 in. by 13-16 in. high and rip 
out your corner from both sides. If 




Ft 



i 



17. 



not equipped with a buzz-saw, this can 
be done with a plough, using a narrow 
cutter and working from both edges. 
Glue these corners on and fill in for the 
rails and ends. ere. Clean up and glue 
on the cap molding, also the cap and 

(neck mold if such is used), but fit the 
last mold and tack it on so it can be 
easily removed when post is set. 

The top of base should be marked on 
newel and the base mold should be 
numbered so it will go back where it 
was fitted, should there be any varia- 
tion in newel. When setting the newel 
care should be taken to make the start- 
ing newel firm. It is well to locate and 
plumb it up. and drive eight wedges with 
glue, two on a side at the corners, but 
not so tight as to split the base. Nail 

'.: >ugh the top of the base so that the 
mold will cover, trim off wedges and 
nail on the ba m I. Xo harm to glue 
that either on starting newel. The 



angle newels are always rigid, hence less 
care is necessary. 

As this work goes with the finish we 
will go back and put up our stair first- 
Make a height rod and establish the 5th 
and 11th rise. Set a spike at about 1 
in. from corner at these height?. The 
method of cutting out a string for the 
landing header and intersecting it for 
base is shown in Fig. 16. Hold the rule 
plumb, and mark the height, then meas- 
ure at right angles from top of string 
and mark the bottom, draw a line con- 
necting these two points. We some- 
times have to meet a high base from be- 
1 w and glue on and cut plumb as shown 
by dotted lines and sometimes we come 
so close to the corner that a dog-leg is re- 
quired similar to what is shown by dot- 
ted lines at top of string. In turning a 
corner of boxed stairs this dog-leg would 
be much higher, especially in case of 




Fz'Q./d. 

winders when it is more practical to 
turn the grain of the dog-leg vertical. 

Assuming that our landing string is 
cut to suit these requirements, we cut 
the corner of the 14th step to suit base, 
lay the base in a clean place, and insert 
step in housing and with glue on a key, 
drive it home, squaring base with the 
step. Then lay the landing string on the 
floor and turn the other end of step into 
it and glue a key in it. Put in the 
landing ana landing riser and back nail 
and nail to post and string, proving the 
base with a square from the step. Now 
hook the lower end of string on the spike 
you drove at the height of 11th rise and 
set the post, landing step and riser in 
place and tack to wall, putting % in. 
furring behind the 1*£ in. string to bring 
it to the base line. Fit the 13th step 



THE CARPENTER 



nto the 3rd base and set in place with 
leg under step and a dry key in string, 
inking sure that the 13th step is level. 
tow insert the butress string, drive a 
ry key to hold step home and tack a 
all from ontside of string. The wall 
Mings can be put in place and if all is 
•ell nailed fast. 
Insert the 10th step and glue it fast, 
lambing and staying the base in place, 
'it the 6th step to the end base and 
lue and key, square with step, and set 
i place with a leg and a dry key in the 
all string. Insert the 2nd butress 
ring same as the top one, set the 3rd 
ep, plumb and square the base. The 
jrst base may have the bull nose housed 
i.to it or it may be set on top. If the 
ill nose be housed in it, they should be 
it together first, and it is easier to key 
) the first step and riser first, as they 
•e hard to reach, the 2nd rise can be 
serted and tacked before entering it in 
je string through. Then set the 2nd 
ep and glue key it to the base and in- 
rt the first butress string. If every - 
ing has come out right we may next 
;oceed to key up our common steps and 
:;ers. If they are tongued and grooved 
gether (as a good stair should be), as 
: Fig. 17. we start at the top and drive 
*r riser keys first, at the same time 
dving riser up home as well. Then 
top off surplus keys and drive the step 
fys. They seldom back tongue and 
pove the winders, as winders should 
It occur, save on cheap work. The 
Inders can now be filled in, back and 
b nailed and set carriage timbers. 
Jould this flight occur aboA'e another 
jht they should be furred on the wind 
! • plaster. 

In Fig. 9 an under-ease and over-ease 
! i shown under the wall string, the other 
'lings should be thusly fixed. The reg- 
t|.r timbers are shown to stop at head- 
l ;:. Easement lines are also shown on 
■".) bases at "a" and "b," Figs. 13 and 
e l Two by fours are heavy enough for 
e i;tair of this width. They can be cut 
"Im the wall string easements to face 
fjch the easement lines on bases and 
'•aild be level. 

1( Fig. 19 is perspective of the under 
'je of t stair as shown in Figs. 2 and 
;( l, timbered for plaster. Note the head- 
' which stop the regular timber and 
11 cross furring cut between the ease- 
c J nts lines on bases to the wall ease- 
ttSjQts. As mentioned above, the brack- 
•f may be notched over the winder tim- 



bers to support the winder steps. At 
"a" and "l>" you see a block set for 
nailing at t lie string ends and at "c" 

nailing for the gallery pilaster. 

Brackets can be set above them to 
support the winders, and the wind 
should be lathed with metal lath, as it 
takes less profanity to put it on than 
it does wood lath. The bracket shown 
under the 8th step, Fig. 9, is one of the 
most important things about a stair. 

I show these cut with a slight bevel 
on top. Set the bracket : o the forward 
corner touch.es the step, leaving the back 
a trifle open, drive one nail in lower 
point, to fasten it to the timber, toe one 
nail into back of step and riser and one 
in back of bracket to draw it up to step, 
then put two more into timber, five in 
all. The next bracket goes on opposite 
side. If a partition is set under a but- 
ress string, the face timber should be 
set so that the facia will lap over the 
plaster, if left open it is well to set it 
with outside of string and nail inch 
pieces across it and string to tie them 
together and carry the plaster ground. 
Set the glue blocks and if a base comes 
over a partition, knock off the protec- 
tion so they can plaster up close. 



Can Some One Answer? 

■ We first have a square of 8 in. sides, 
divided into four pans, viz : Two trape- 
zoids of equal size and two right angle 
triangles of- equal size, whose total area 
is 64 sq in. Then by re-arranging the 
same two trapezoids, and same two tri- 
angles into a rectangle, whose side meas- 
ure 5x13 in. we have 65 in. Why the 
difference? 

W. R. DICKSON. 

Lone- Beach, Cal. 




on 



& JUL lib 

Cross Section of a Saw Tooth Koof. 




FIRST PRIZE $3 




How Many Objects Beginnil 
With "P" can You Find iri 
This Picture? 



Follow these Simple Easy Rules 

1. Any man, woman, boy or girl living in the 
U. S. but residing outside of Batavia, III., 
who is not an employee of the Household Jour- 
nal, ora member of the employee's family, 
may submit an answer. It cost nothing: to try. 

2. All answers must be mail by May 30, 1922. 

3. Answers should be written on one side of 
the paper only and words numbered consecu- 
tively, 1, 2, 3, etc. Write your full name and 
address oji eaco page in the upper right-hand 

not write subscribers' names or 
any thing else on same paper with list of words 
arate sheet. 

4. Only words found in the English dictionary 
will be counted. Do not use compound, hyph- 
enated or obsolete words. Use either the sin- 
gular or plural, but where the plural is used 
the singular connot be counted, and vice versa, 
B. Woids of the same spelling can be used 
only once, even though used to designate dif- 
ferent objects, The same objects can be 
named only once; however, any part of the 
object may also be named. 
6. Tne answer having the largest and nearest 

)rrect list of words of visible objects shown 

! the picture that begin with the letter *'P" 

ill be awarded First Prize, etc. Neatness, 

style or handwriting have no bearing upon de- 

answerlng 



awarded 



i-operate 
le prize w 

lor will prizes be a* 
! of any group outsid' 
more have fc 



ciding the 

7. Candidates may ( 
thePuzz-e, but only < 
to any one household 
ded to more than one _. 
the family where two 
working together. 

8. All answers will receive the same consi- 
deration regardless of whether or not sub- 
scribtions for the Household Journal are sent 

9. Three prominent business men, having no 
connection with the Household Journal, will 
be selected to act as judges and decide the 
winners, and participants agree to accept the 
decision of the judges as final and conclusive. 

10. The judges will meet directly following 
close of the contest and annoucement of win- 
ners and correct list of words will be published 
In the Household J 
after as possible. 
Ijarger Puzzle Pictures Free 



'words will be published 
aal just as quickly there- 



i Request. 



nze 



COSTS NOTHING TO TRY— YOU CAN WBN $3 5 ©0 

This is, perhaps, the most liberal, the most stupendous offer of its kind ever appearing in this magazine. I 
not a dream but a reality, a golden opportunity for you to help yourself to $3000.00. It will be easy I Think what 
can do with this young fortune and then help yourself. 

It costs nothing to try. In this picture you will find a number of objects and parts of objects whose names begin l 
— -. the letter "P." Pick out the 

objects like "Pie" "Plank" 

etc. It's easy isn't it. Of 

course it is. The other objects 

are just as easy to see but the 

idea is to see who can get the 

most. This is not a trick. 

You don't have to turn the 

picture up side down. Put 

down each word as you find 

it and watch your list grow. 
Get the family around 

the table — see which one of 

you can find the most "P" 

words. You will be surprised 

to see how fast your list 

of words will grow in just a 

few minutes. Try it today, 

right now as you will never 

have an easier chance to get 

a big cash prize. 

Send in your list of 

words and try for the 



Winning answers will receive prizes as foil 

If $3.00 If $5.( 

If no worth of worth 

subscriptions subscriptions subscrip 



are sent 




are sent 


are set 


1st Prize $25.00 




$750.00 




$301 


2nd Prize 20.00 




250.00 




101 


3rd Prize 15.00 




125.00 




51 


4th Prize 10.00 




75.00 




2 ( 


5th Prize 5.00 




50.00 




i! 


6th Prize 5.00 




25.00 




.' 


7th Prize 3.00 




15.00 




. 


8th Prize 3.00 




10.00 






9'h Prize- . 2.00 




10.00 






10th Prize . 2.00 




10.00 




I 


(In the event of ties. 


duplicate 


prizes 


will 


be 


rjiven.) 




_ 



prizes. This is not a subscription contest — you don't have to do any canvass 
You don't have to send in a subscription to win a prize unless you want to, 
our Bonus Rewards for you make the prizes bigger where subscriptions are 
in. For example, if your puzzle answer is awarded firs* prize by the judges 
will win $25.00, but if you would send $3.00 worth of subscriptions for our 
monthly magazine you would win $750.00, or if your answer is awarded first r. 
prize by the judges and you have sent in $5.00 worth of subscriptions you wi 
win $3000.00. See list of prizes above. Nothing more will be asked of y« 
its easy, isn't it. I don't care how many similiar offers you have seen and i 
this is the most liberal of them all. 

BIG $200,000.00 COMPANK BACK OF THIS OFFER— This offer is n 
and published by a big $200,000.00 Illinois Corporation of years standing. a 
company widely known for its liberality and honest dealings. 

The Household Journal is one of the best borne magazines published. Fj 
with fine stories, fancywork, fashions, Home Helps, Gardening, Foultry, j] 
The subscription price is four years (43 copies) for $1.00. 

Puzzle Editor - THE HOUSEHOLD JOURNAL 



Department 1208 



EATAVS&, 1LLBNOSS 




1 n I A shingle that's different 
J\OW! from all others 

FLEXSTONE 

The slate-surfaced Asbestos simple 

YOU may now get at a reduced price 
many of the extraordinary merits of 
the famous Johns-Manville rigid as- 
bestos shingle — for Flexstone Shingles, 
although costing less, are all-mineral, 
fire-resistant, rot-proof. They are made 
of asbestos felt densely impregnated 
with asphalt, embellished with red or 
green crushed slate and are not to be 
confused witli ordinary slate-surfaced 
shingles. 

To produce an asbestos shingle that does not 
curl, rot or dry out, and still reach the price 
levels of ordinary rag felt shingles is an 
achievement — for the cost of rag felt is obvi- 
ously less than a fabric of rock fibre — asbestos. 

You can have Flexstone in roll form, in 
strips, or in single shingles. The type of roof, 
locality and personal taste will determine that. 
But be assured that whatever type you choose, 
Flexstone is a roofing of real asbestos and as 
such assures the maximum in service, economy, 
fire-safety and durability. For full particulars 
address nearest branch or New York head- 
quarters. 

JOHNS-MANVILLE Inc., Madison Ave. , at 4 1st St., New YorkCity 

Branches in 60 Large Cities 

For Canada: CANADIAN JOHNS-MANVILLE CO., Ltd., Toronto 

Flexstone Asbestos SJHnr/les 
are approvedby Underwriters' 
Laboratories, Inc., and take 
base rate of insurance. 




Asbestos Roofing 




(Size ii x 7 inches.) 



For the carpenter oa t!;e job there is no other hand 
book of similar publication that gives so fully the 
methods of laying out work and containing so 
many every day "rules and tables." 
Among some of the tables included are those giv- 
ing full length of common, hip, valley and jack 
rafters, also the cuts required for any of these 
pitches. In these tables are given 2700 different 
lengths of rafters, 300 different lengths of braces 
and the proper cuts for same. 

The layout of roofs, including complete roof fram- 
ing, stair building, the use of the steel square, etc., 
and in fact all the up-to-date information and 
"SHORT CUT RULES" for every-day use in a lirst 
class flexible bound pocket edition. 
Price to Members Only of U. B. of C. & J. of A. 

|~" "" " "" " — Mail this Coupon to" ~ — ' ' .» 

I D. A. ROGERS, 

| 3604 Stevens Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 

. Enclosed find $1.00 for which please send me your book 

I CARPENTER AND BUILDERS PRACTICAL RULES 

| FOR LAYING OUT WORK. 

I Name 

I St. and No .. 

■ City and State -. 

I The Book that will help you on the job or your money back. 



WhaU5c Will Bring You 

Only 15c gives you the Pathfinder 13 weeks EiV.n.Evi 4§ia 
ontrial. ThePathfinderisacheerfulillustrated rl UIII &E1«? 

■weekly, published at the Nation' s center for peo- R^3« $[■>»,■«?.£» 
pie everywhere; an independent home paper that EvflUOII § 
tells the story of the world's news in an interesting, 
understandable way. This splendid National weekly 
costs but $1 a year. The Pathfinder is the Ford of the "publishing 
world.® Splendid serial and short stories and miscellany. Question Box 
answers your questions and is a mine of information. Send 15 cents 
and we willsend the Pathfinderon probation 13 weeks. The 15 cent3 
doos nit repay us, but we are glad to invest in new friends. 
The Pathfinder! £55 Landgden Sia., Washington, D.C. 



W^BSil^MBmS^^ 



Cut out big profits. Anyone handy with ti 
can make a cabinet according to our drawl 
and simple instructions. We furnish meeli 
ical part3 at small cost. Drawings, blue pri 
parts, price list. etc.. free on request. Write today. 

Associated Phonograph Conipai 

Department 9 Cincinnati, 01 



For Twenty Years we have issued this Union Stamp for use under our 



-£pT CASE- 
WORKERS UNION 




UNION^RSTAMP 

Factory 



OUR STAMP INSURES: 

Peaceful Collective Bargaining 

Forbids Both Strikes and Lockouts 

Disputes Settled by Arbitration 

Steady Employment and Skilled Workmanship 

Prompt Deliveries to Dealers and Public 

Peace and Success to Workers and Employers 

Prosperity of Shoe Making Communities 

As loyal union men and women, we ask you 
demand shoes bearing the above Union Stamp 
Sole, Insole or Lining. 



246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
Cotllis Lovely, General President. Charles L. Baine, General Secretary=Treasuj 





e coupon today with only $1.00 
will sh?p this handsome 6-piece 
set of fumed solid oak right to 
me on trial. This great bargain 
>w you what astounding values 
& Schram offer on credit — a 
sonnt each month! We take all the 
:nd only $1.00 with the coupon. We 
set on SO days' trial. If not satisfied, 
tack and we will refund your $1.00 
freight charges you paid. If satisfied, pay Oily $2.70 a 
ntil you have paid the full bargain price of $28.90 in all. 



RicMy Upholstered, ah the foar 

are thickly padded on both seats and 
and upholstered with brown Delavan 
Spanish leather, the best imitation of genuine 
Spanish leather known. The upholstering is 
soft, of a rich brown color, resilient, and will 
give you the best possible service. 

Arill Chair la a roomy, dignified piece of 
furniture, comfortablo and bis enough for a 
very large person while not seeming too large 
for the ordinary occupant. Seat 19x171-2 
in., height 36 in. 

AriM ROCker Is a massive, stately, com- 
fortable piece, with beautifully designed back, 
wide, shapely arms, and smooth operating 
runners. Seat 19 x 17 1-2 in., height 36 in. 

Sewing Rocker Is unusually attractive 
and useful. Seat 17 x 17 in., height bb in. 

Reception Chair has heavy upholster- 
ing ana beautiful shape to match the o.bcr 
pieces. Seat measures 17x17 in., beight35in. 

Library Table Has 2 Bock Racks 

A beautiful piece of library furniture. Has 
two large end book racks, rocmy magazine 
shelf below. Lee 3 cut of 2 inch stock; mas- 
sive, dignified. Sides beautifully designed to 
match tBe^ chairs. Top measures 23 l-4x34in. 
Jardiniere Stand matches other pieces. 
A decoration to your living room or library. 
Carefully built throughout. Measures 17 1-2 
in. high; the top 12 x 12 inches. 
Entire suite is shipped knocked down con- 
struction. Very easy to set up. Saves in 
freight charges. Weight, about 175 pounds. 
Order by No. B6844A. $11. CO with 
coupon. $2.70 a month, price $23.90. 



When you get this imagnificent 6-piece 
libraryset.put.it in your living room or 
library and use it freely for 30 days. Don't 
pay another penny. Examine it thoroughly. 
Note the massif o Bolid construction— the beauti- 
ful finish— the fine upholstery and graceful lines. 
Compare it with anything you can buy locally at 
anywhere near the same price —even for spot 
cash. Then, if not satisfied, return the set at 
our expense and we will refund your $1.00 at 
oace, plus any freight charges you paid. 

A Year to Fay 



Jit Price 

1 Bargain Catalog 

H housands of bargains 
ftture, jewelry, carpets, 
Aiurtains, silverware, 
VI phs, stoves, porch and 
H niture, women's, men's 
■ 'en's wearing apparel. 



Don't delay! Prices at rock-bottom 
nowl Get this 6-piece library set on 
30 days' trial. We have only a limited 
number of sets ; they are therefore not 
listed in our regular catalog. We have 
reserved them for new customers only. Get 
your set while they last. The trial costs you 
nothing if not satisfied. Send the coupon 
today - NOW! 

Register 3012 
t West 35th Street, Chicago 



If yon decide to keep the set, start making-small 
monthly payments, so low and so convenient 
that you will scarcely feel them while you enjoy 
the proud ownership of so magnificent a set of 
furniture. A full year to pay— at the rate of 
only a few cents a day. We send our complete 
catalog; when we ship the set. We trust honest 

people anywhere in the United States. One price to all, cash or credit. 

bo discount for cash. Mot one ponnycxirafor credit. NoC.O.O 

IIIIllIIIIIIIIIlIIDIIIIIIMIIIIllSISSillllllUIIlinilllllllllllllilllllllll I 

I Straus & Schram, Reg. 3012 W. 35th St., Chicago 

S Enclosed find $1. Ship special advertised 6-piece Upholstered 

" Fumed Oak Library Suite 1 axn to have 30 days' free trial. If 

I keep tha suite, I will pcy you 52.70 monthly. If not satisfied. 



I am' to return "the suite" within 30 days and you are to refund 
my money and anv froirht charges I paid. 

rj G-Pieca Library Set No. B6844A. S28.90. 

Name 

Street, R. F. D. 

or Box No ....,.,.. 

Ski- ping 

Point 

Port 

Office State 

II Yon fJ-.?i;' Want Catalog. Put X - n Box Below: 
OFii.tilure, Stoves, Jewelry GMeus, Women's, Children's ClotaiDjj 



YOU can BUILD this 
PHONOGRAPH easily! 

TREMENDOUS SAVING IN COST 




You don't need to be a cabinet makers We 
have made it an easy and a pleasant job with 



Our Simplified Plans 



IK MAKAFONE 



Build i» 
Yooi£tlf" 



We furnish blue prints, diagrams, 

motor, and all metal parts com- 

• plete. You build the cabinet and 

assemble. A few hours' work, and you will have as fine a type of phonograph 

as any produced, and at a price away below what you would pay in a store. 

Keep the Savings in Your Pocket 

Your machine will play all records, will have a wonderful tona! quality, excelled by 
none. No need now for any family to be without a phonograph because of the cost. 
THE MAKAFONE solves the problem. BUILD IT YOURSELF AT LESS THAN 
ONE -FOURTH REGULAR COST, but equal to the high priced cabinet machines. 
Free Records with each outfit. SEND TODAY FOR FREE CATALOG and full 
particulars of our wonderful offer. Matty a manufacturer got his start in this 
way. Why not you? Build machines and sell to your friends. Ask us about this. 

AGENTS ATTENTION f--=«-»""— <■"««= — ■"■-■ 

You can make and sell this machine from « VV RITE TOD AY ! 

our plans at a profit of $50 to ST5 each, ■ * T * 

Others are selling two and three a week, g P n !>F.RN PHOVOGRAPH SUPPLY CO. 

Here is your opportunity to make big "635 Springer BMj^ 313 St. C&stm St, Ciicase, II 

S money and become independent. Pleas- 

9 ant and profitable work. START TODAY. 

KflDERN PHONOGRAPH SUPPLY CO. 

635 .jpringerBlda.,313So.CEatmSt.,Qikags,[n. 



- Gentlemen: Pleas* «end m 
tlaiiafoae preposition, «riu»u 


* fall particulars ct 9«CC 
obligation to me. 


Street Address.,***,; 


...,— U.**.. Jl 







Instant Bunion Relief 

ftWeltlttMy Expense 



Don'tsend meonecent— just let me 
prove It to you as I have done for hund- 
reds and thousands of others in the last six 
months. lelaimtohavethemostsuceess- 
ful remedy for bunions ever made and I 
want youtoletmesendyoumy Fairyfoot 
treatment Free. I don't carehow many so- 
called cures, or shields, or pads you ever 
tried without success— I don't care how 
disgusted you are withthemall— youhave 
not tried my remedy and I have such 
confidence in it that i wi!! send you a 
sample treatment absolutely FREE 
and afterwards afullsizebox C.O.D. 
which you can accept or not just as you 
wish. Itis a simple home remedy which 
relieves you almost instantly of all 
pain; it removes the bunion enlarge- 
ment and thus the agly deformity disap- 
pears—Just send name and addresa and 
Pslry'oot will be sent in plain sealed 
velope. Write today. 
Fcot Remedy Co., 2207 Milla rd Ave., Dept. 120 Chi cage 




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AUTOMATIC SASH HOLDERS 

Do jgro^ Eliminate 

Avray , — . | feS*^' — . ' — v Windcvc 

With t£* g §=| "ij_.jSj Pockets 
Sash —_=-..-— 

Weights, 
Cords. Pulleys, 
Balances. Etc 

Send SI. 00 for trial 
of sash when ordering. 

HARDWARE SALES CO., Inc. 

500 Fifth Avenue New York. N. Y. 




Time & Labor, 
set prepaid. Mention weight 
Address Dept. C. 



CARPENTERS: 

We can show you how to make 

$235 per IV.ONTH Up. 

in your own vicinity. WRITE 

WEATHERPROOF COMPOUND CO. 
709 FcJ ration B! ._.. Chicago, 111 




wners 



f 



To introduce the best auto- 
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Made under our new and ex- 
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inates Blow-Out — Stone-Braise 
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We want an agent in every 
community to use and in- 
troduce these wonderful 
tires at our astonishingly 
low prices to all motor car owners. 
Write for booklet fully describing this new 
process and explaining our amazing in- 
troductory offer to owner agents. 

Hydro-UnifedTireCo. 

DspL 84 Chicago, San Francisco, Pc";:owa,Pa' 



S20.00 Value Set MECHANIC 

Drawing Instrument 

Special Wholesale 

Price S6.65 Postpaid 

Pocket case 4x31 inch'1 
— velvet lined — instn. 
ments constructed 
solid nickel silver at 
steel — guaranteed. Ord 
now — supply limited. Fr I 
illustrated particulars. I 
K.iTiOVA! INSTRUMENT C 
v/u... '■' rfawjiou ' , - 




'cJ^MsSi— _:_;; 




THE 

EXPERT'S 
CHOICE 
FILE 



Docs twice the work of an ordinary file — in half the time. 
The Expert's Choice increases the value of your time by 
over 50%. By spending 30 cents you can make it back 
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You get your money back if tho Expert s Choice does not prove 
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SAW FILES are made for Dne or coarse teeth— also for that 
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Trinl fiffpv If vo" 1 dealer cannot supply you. send us ZOc. 
1 ""' ^"'*-» 25c or 30c for trial tile, sent prepaid. Do 
this today — Dnd out what a real Die is 



'THE HIGHEST BRAD E. FILE, MADE : 
DEL*A " H A * D SAW": FILES/' 

-■-•■;• I" ' ■■-■ ' .-::'•■•- -J?(y 

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M ECHANIC'S ■; FAV'pRfTer' , c " 
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The best Auger Bit File made — We will deliver as receipt of 30 ceatr each. 



Don't Wear a Truss 



An Opportunity to Increase Your Income 

Become a Contractor-Agent for 

Ailmelal Weatherstrip 

Right now, when building activities arc not 
so good, contractors are in ruing their at- 
tention lo side-lines as a source of income. 

Here's an Opportunity for You 

Agents wauled in every community t<> sell 
and install Allmetal Weatherstrip. There 
is big money in it. Homes, office buildings, 
public institutions, etc., are ripe prospects 
in these times of high coal costs. 

Allmetal Weatherstrip Agent 
Earns $5,000 

One of our contractor agents made $5,000 
during the past year selling and installing 
Allmetal. And it was 
during a year when many 
reverses were against 
him. In normal times 
his earnings could have 
been much bigger. We 
give you exclusive terri- 
tory and by our sales 
promotional plan assist 
you to land contracts. 
Try our Pecora Calking 
and Glazing Compound. 
An absolute seal for 
openings between frame 
and masonry. Maintain-; 
line of contact during 
shrinking, swelling or 
warpiug-a permanent seal. 

Ask for our selling plan. 

ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP CO. 
I26y 2 West Kinzie Street, Chicago. 





B 1 



(BOOKS' APPLI- 
ANCE, the mod- 
ern, scientific inven- 
tion, the wonderful new 
discovery that relieves 
rupture will be sent on 
trial. No obnoxious 
springs or pads. Has 
automatic Air Cushons. 
Binds and draws the 
broken parts together 
as you would a broken 
limb. No salves. No 
lies. Durable, cheap. 
Sent on trial to prove 
it. Protected by U. S. 
Patents. Catalog and 
measure blanks mailed 
free. Send name and 
address today. 
C.B. BROOKS. 252F State Street, Marshall, Michigan 




"T" PLUMB AND 
LEVEL 

Rustproof, being made of 
aluminum. Can be easi- 
ly attached to any 
straight edge. Simple to 
adjust. Guaranteed ac- 
curate. Size 3Jx2| in. 
Price $1.00 Delivered. 

PIN MANUFACTURING 

CO. 
Box 1073, Detroit, Mich. 



THE WOOD WORKER'S FRIEND 




Woodstock and lumber is high. With our Jointer 
Heads you can buy rough lumber of any kind and 
dress it to suit the job. Saves time, money and 
lumber. Would this be any object to you? If so. 
get our circular prices. Sold on 30 day trial. 
Whisler Mfg. Co. Gibson, Iowa 




oOLVE this puzzle, win Ford Auto votes free. The letters of the 

alphabet are numbered: A is 1, B Is 2, and so on. The figures In the 

%-m., little squares to the left represent four words. (20 Is the letter "T".) 

^ Whatarethefourwords? Can you work It out? If so, sendyouranswer 

«*» quick. Surely you want this fine, new Ford auto. Send no money. 

flV I have already given away many autos. You can own an auto. 

SEND ANSWER TO-DAY 

We not only give away this Ford auto, but hundreds of dollars in cash and scores 
of other valuable prices. Bicycles, Guns, Wa.ches, Talking Machines; something 
for everybody. Everyone who answers this can have a prize. There are no losers. 
n V m , [,j Nothing difficult to do. Everybody wins. Someone eets this new, latest model 
UO 100 Want It.' Ford Auto free. Electric starter and lights. Do you rant It? Write today and be first. 

FORD WILLSON. 141 W. Ohio Street, Dept. 2735 Chicago, I1L 




Are YOU Old At Forty? 

What Yon Should Know About the 
Glands of Your Body 



We Have Many 
Letters Like These 

Lawrence, Kansas. 
The Electro Thermal Co., 
Sieubenvdle, Ohio. 
The Electro T'ermal ap- 
pliance is an EXCELLENT 
INSTRUMENT FOE THE 
TREATMENT OF REC- 
TAL AND PROSTATIC 
CONDITIONS, and the 
most satisfactory rectal 
appliance I lave ever used. 
The instrument itself is 
HIGH GRADE and simple 
to operate. I am very well 
pleased with t"~e results 
produced through its use. 

Yours truly, 

Dr. R. C. Albright. 

Canton. Illinois, 
July 27. 1921. 
The appliance I bought 
from you some time ago 
for enlarged prostate saved 
me from an operation. Ir 
also helped my digestion 
and rheumatism. It is a 
God-send to suffering hu- 
manity, a trial will con- 
vince * the most skeptical. 
Tou may use this as you 
see fit with my signature. 
Yours truly. 

R". F. Cox. 



Some men of seventy are younger in vitality 
than other men of forty. A common cause, per- ; 
hi.ps the most common cause, of loss of strength 
and vitality in men past forty (and some of] 
younger years) is PROSTATE GLAND DIS- 
ORDER. Men whose lives have been the heart- 
iest and most vigorous are not exempt from the 
attacks of this disorder. We have published a 
little book called 

Prostatology 

which Trill tell you much you wish to know about the 
prostate gland and its functions — and how a disorder 
here may cause sciatica, backache, painful and tender 
feet, disturbed slumber and other painful disturbances. 
It will tell you of a Thernialaid. a simple means by 
which the essential of a new hygienic principle, done 
into convenient form corrects this prostate gland con-' 
dition and its attendant health faults. — a method thai 
is being endorsed by prominent Physicians. Physical 
Culturists. Chiropractors, Osteopaths and other leading, 
health authorities. The book will be sent free, with- 
out obligation upon receipt of your simple request 
Address 



MAIL THE COUPON 



NOW 



The Electro Thermal Company, 2002 Main Street, Steubenville, Ohio. 

Please send me without cost or obligation your free book. '•Prostatology." 

Name 

Address 

City State 




ivery Tablet 

One dose often helps com- 
mence to enrich your blood 
and revitalize your worn- 
out exhausted nerves — 
Nuxated Iron is organic 
iron, like the iron in your 
lood and like the iron in spin- 
ach. It is so prepared that it 
will not injure the teeth nor 
disturl) the stomach. It is ready 
for almost immediate absorp- 
tion and assimilation by the 
blood while some physicians 
claim metallic iron which peo- 
ple usually take is not absorbed 
at all. If you are not strong or 
well you owe it to yourself to 
make the following test : See 
how long you can work or how 
far you can walk without be- 
coming tired. Next take two 
five-grain tablets of Nuxated 
Iron — three times per day, after 
meals for two weeks. Then 
tost your strength again and 
;ee how much you have gained. Your money 
vill be refunded by the manufacturers if you 
lo not obtain perfectly satisfactory results. 
Vt all druggists. 





Carpenters, Bricklayers. Contractors, Build:rs and 
I others — Can you read Blue Prints? If not, learn 
: how. It will help yon hold your job— it will get 
' you a better job — it will increase your earning ca- 
pacity. Special Courses for each trade. Write, at 
: once, for Free blue print and Catalog B, Stating trade. 

ARCHITECTURAL, MECHANICAL. SHEET METAL 
AND STRUCTURAL DRAFTING 

quickly taup'it at home, in your spare time, on the 
''Pay As You Study Plan." Books and tools fur- 
nished Free. Write today for Catalog G. It means 
-. more pay. 

ESTIMATING— STEEL S0.UARE 

Practical Courses making the various details simple 

i and clear. It will give you the training that will take 

1 you out of overalls and put you into a boss' job. Do 

f not miss this opportunity. Write now for Catalog. E. 

COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL EST. 1904 

| nnnt ioa. Drexel Bldg., Phila.. Pa. 



7 <J 
for 30 days trj al on approval.Your 
Choice of 44 Styles, colors and sizeo 
ol famous Ranger Bicycles. Faetory- 
to-Rider let9 yon buy at wholesale 
prices, express prepaid, direct from maker. 

|2MosithstoFay^ r y R °aV g n i ? 

*■» at one©. Many boys and girla easily 
save the small monthly payments. Tha 
Ranger Is a better bicycle Cbia yoo caa 
buy anywhere at any price. 

TlJ«.»ja lamps, horns, wheels, cartoand 
«<» eQ'j.rjment at half ^3Ual prices. 
_ SEND NO MONEY. Elmpt, ^rtKe f or oar V-2. Was 
vated free Ranger catalog- with lowest orlces and 

~ Cycle Company'^ 
©cpt, H i2i«hicago k&V^' 00 ' 





MUSIC 

Learn to Play- 
Any Instrument 



New Easy Way K.TJ 



i our amazingly sim- 
ple Lome study uietuod yo' 
•an quickly 1 arn to play any instrumeir . 
Fake lessons without risk as outlined in o- . 
guarantee. You elon't pay a single penny un 
i'ss completely satisfied. Learn Piano, Or 
ran, Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, Cornet, Ilarj 
Cello, Ukulele, Saxophone, Piccolo. Clarinet 
Flute, Drums and Traps. TrorabonH, Voin 
and Speech Culture, Guitar or Kinging, etc . 
all by note. Every step simple as A. v,. ('. Vo 
will be astounded at your own ra;,id progress. . 

250,000 SUCCESSFUL STUDENTS 

e quickly learned to play and sins by this woudcrfu 

system. Your age makes no difference — wh-ih r 10 01 
GO. Lessons prepared by world-famous musicians. Ni 
aiperfluous technique — no dry or boresome Ihcnry. Study 
s actually fascinating. Be popular! Your leisure 
noments at home are all that is necessary- Costs 
iverage a few cents a lesson. 

Our free book ex-plains our remarkable new method in 
dotail. TtlL* of cui' students" success. Send for li 
today. Special introductory offer if you answer at 
once. Mail Jciter or postcard NOW. Instruments sup- 
plied when needed, cash or credit. 

U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

1932 Erunswick Bldg. 



New York City. 



THE Wayvell Chapped Automatic Ball Bearing Electric) 
Floor Surfacing Machine is what you need to finish 
your hew or old floors quickly and just 
the way you want them. 

As QUALITY of Work is the first essen- 
tial in finishing floors, particularly new 
work in residences, fiats, apartments, etc., 
all roller vibration must be done away 
with. It is remarkable how smoothly and 
steadily this ball beating machine oper- 
ates. 

Only surfacing machine having roller 
eanding even with basebi ird from either 
side of machine, doing aw.iy with uneven 
work of edge -roller attachment. Removes 
old varnish, paint, oil-soak, black, etc., 
rapidly, or cuts down warped 
edges quickly. Tour sizes — 
for the largest areas or the 
smallest rooms. 

Write for folders. Accept 
our free trial offer. 

(Machines demonstrated al- 
so at our Branch Office, 921 
Washington Blvd.. Chicago.) 
Manufactured by 

Wayvell Chapped & Co. 

137 fj. Jackson St. Dept. A. 

Wauktnan. III. 




Pat. 1912-1916 




Steel Bar Carpenter Clamp No. i 




Rolled from special quality of steel. "T" 
shape gives added strength. Notched on 
lower side for greater holding power. 



E. C. STEARNS 6c CO. 
114 Oneida St.. Syracuse, N. Y., U. 



S. A 



PREMAX WALL TIES AND PLUGS 

Strong — Permanent — Correctly designed 
From ycur dealer or direct 

NIAGARA METAL STAMPING CORPORATION 
Division C Niagara Falls. N. 




The Rustless Rule 

Made of Luminoy. a special alloy at Alum': 

Here is THi-: Rule every Carpenter and Bui: : baTe. It won't in 

weighs little, has brass joints, costs less than steel rule, yet is Just 
durable, has large figures and accurate graduation, tcgether with Pennine 
legibility. 

Made in lengths 2 to 8 ft. If yooi dealer can not supply you send to 
for printed matter and prices. 

THE RUSTLESS RULE CO., INC. 

7 Lafayette Ave. ELftalo. N 



The Improved Gem Scriber 

The Tool of Many Uses. One "Best 
Bet" for ail Wood Workers. (Price 45c.) 

Man us?veivbv P Brais & Company 

1349 East 90th Street, Cleveland, Ohio 



t4 



The Building Labor Calculator 



?? 



By Oordon M. Tamblyn. 

Gives tABOB E0UBS on: Excavations. Sheet Piling. Concrete. Beinforcing ^Steel Conaete FornK, Cemem Woft. 
Common Brick, Press Brick., Tile and Plaster Blcck Partitions. Stone Work. Terra Coda Bough Carpen^ 
Finish Carpentry, Lathing and Furring. Plain Plastering. Ornamental Plastering Interior Martae, Shee M| 
Work. Slate Boofs, Tile Boots, Composition Boots, etc.. Painting and Decorating, etc 
A Bungalow or a Skyscraper — Fire-proof or non-Fire-Proof. 

Simple — Accirate — Bapid. Send for descriptive literature. _ . 1 

WESTERN SCHOOL OF ESTIMATING AND PLAN READING, 210 W. 13th Ave., Denver, Co.orad.. 




K&E MEASURING TAPES 

are well made, of good material, and are reliable. 
Prices E.evissd Send For New Price 

* KEUFFEL & ESSER Co. ■ 




A TOOL=BOX NECESSITY — THE TAINTOR 
POSITIVE SAW SET. The Tool which sets your 
saw Right. 

Is there a Taintor in Your Tool-box? If not, talk it over 
with your hardware dealer. Send for Book : "Care of. feaws. 
Free to members of the Brotherhood. 
TAINTOR MFG. Co., 95 Reade St., New York City, 





SPECIAL 3 

SAWSET 



"Special" and No. 1 for hand saws not 
orer 16 gauge. 

No. 3 for cros3 cut and circular saws 14 
to 20 gauee. 

No. 4 for Champion and "M" toothed saws 
14 to 20 gauge. 

No. 5 for timber and board saws 6 to 14 
gauge. 

CHAS. MORRILL, 93 Walker Street, HEW YORK, R.Y. 



HAND SOAP 

Let Us Send Y'ou a Sample 
FREE 



WRITE TO 

The SKAT Company 
Hartford, Conn. 





The American Woodworker 

Gasoline, Kerosene, or Electric Driven 
Used on the Job or in the Shop 

Also Made With Band Saw Attached 

Let us send you our Bulletin No. 77 
describing this and other profit pro- 
ducers for the Carpenter, Contrac- 
tor and Builder. 

American Saw Mill Machinery Company 

136 Main Street, Hackettstown, N. J. 

New York Office. 50 Church St. 
Philadelphia Office. The Bourse. 



SNELL'S AUGERS AND BITS 
The Standard the World Over 



Established 1790J 




Selling Agents: 

JOHN H. GRAHAM & CO., 

113 Chambers St., 
NEW YORK, CITY. 



SNEIX MFG. CO., 

FISKDALE, MASS. 



F. B. Combined Lock and Butt Gauge 

The only Gauge made which will 
mark accurately for both sides of 
Lock with one stroke. Likewise 
will mark for both sides of the 
Strike-plate with one stroke. (See 
cuts Nos. 1 and 2.) Send Money 
Order. 

Price $2.50. Guaranteed. 

Manufactured by 




1. Strike=p!ate. 
LOS ANGELES, 



. F. BIERSDORF 

547 San Julian St. 

Member of L. U. No. 158. 




1CREASE YOUR INCOME 

j^J by modernizing old 
windows with the use 1 
of CALDWELL 
SASH BALANCES. 
They have stood the 
test for upwards of 
1 ty-two years. 

K te for information. Dept. C. 



CALDWELL MFG. 

ROCHESTER, N. 



CO. 



The "INTERLOX" Thinks 

Invented by a Brotherhood Man 

Don"t use a stick or guess at a measurement. 

The famous 

"Interlox" Master Slide Rule 

gives both inside and outside measurements 
iustautly. 

Quick, accurate, no figuring, no mistakes, no 
lost time. Durable and rust proof. Use it 
once and 11011 loill never work without it. 
Write today for full descriptive circulars. 

MASTER RULE MPG. CO., INC. 
84 iC East 136th St.. New York City 



m WINTER BREEZES 

r WILL SOON BE 

BLOWING. 



Let Us Tell You 
How Y o u Can 
Profit By Them; 




is Big Bool 



It has been used as a roof and floor 
covering on thousands of Piazzas, 
Sleeping Porches, etc., and is recog- 
nized by Carpenters and Builders the 
country over as the standard of Roof- 
ing Canvas. 

Write for sample book "T" 



ESTABI IEHED !?60 

DUANe'sT. NEW YORK READE ST. 
BRANCH 202-204 MARKET ST. ST. LOUIS 



HERE ARE 100 complete plans for Bun 
lows, Houses, Barns and Garages wh 
you can have for the asking. This P 
Book will enable you to give your clients a w 
variety of plans from which to choose a ho 
a garage or a barn — and the complete cost 
eacn. You will find the book invaluable 
helping you sell your services. 
As you know, there is a purpose behind ev 
free book. Our purpose is the sale of lum 
and millwork at reduced prices. We plan: 
this book to help you — and to help us indirec'j 
You are welcome to this useful book e* l 
though you never buy a nickel's worth from 
But whether you build according to our plar. j 
your own, be sure to get our prices bef ! 
ordering lumber and millwork. They \ 
astonish you, and the quality of the lumber \ 
please you. A Postal Brines This Free Bosk V/itf] 
Obligation; Also Estimates and Estimate Blacks. 

Last Side Lumber <& ManafacEariag Coi 

EAST ST. LOUIS, ILLINOIS 



OUND 



n — un^-p 



D PlfiLEY CHAIN 



PATTNT APPLIED *OP 



funs over Pulleys more 
freely than card 



There is nothing more exasperating 
than a stubborn window that refuses 
to go up and down. In such a case an 
investigation is very apt to disclose a 
badly worn sash cord, ready to break 
any minute. 

Sharp edges do not effect . "Acco" 
Chain. It runs smoothly and freely 
over any common round cord pulley 
and lasts a lifetime. It's easy to in- 
stall — no knots — no waste. 

In three finishes: A. C. D. (Coppered Steel), 
S. R. P. (Special Rust Proof) and Hot 
Galvanized. 

Packed in strong bags, 100 feet of chain 
with 40 weight fixtures. 

AMERICAN CHAIN CO., Inc. 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

District Sales Office: Chicago New York Pittsburgh 
Boston Philadelphia Portland. Ore. San Fraosiscp 





F" rvi /? 

Quality 

Uniformity 

Responsibility 



£verlastijip CconomyJ 

Make More 
Money 



SweettS 



Our Free Books Tell You How 



For general specifi- 
cations, see page 
&38, Sireet's Archi- 
tectural Catalogue, 
mh Edition. 



Many carpenters, contractors and builders find a 
profitable side line in selling Oak Flooring, without 
interfering with their regular calling. Their daily 
work puts them in contact with many Al prospects 
who buy Oak Flooring when they learn its advan- 
tages and its economies. 

Turn your practical building knowledge to account 
for yourself. Sales are easy when you know how. 

Write for the free books today. 

OAK VlOOWKGJMMAffl 

1051 Ashland Block, Chicago, 111. - 










STEEL 




CUT! 

You Said It. 

Ever try sawing with an At 
kins No. 51 or No. 53 Silvei 
Steel Hand Saw? If not 
stop at your hardware deal 
er and ask him to let you tr) 
an Atkins Saw. 

You'll find they cut faster 
stay sharp longer and thai 
they do not tire the wrist a* 
other saws do. 

"A Perfect Saw For Ever} 
Purpose." 



Send 25c for carpenters 
apron, pencil and Saw 
Sense. 



E.C.ATKINS & CC 

ESTABLISHED 1837 THE SILVER STEEL SAW PEOP1 

Home Office wvd Factory. INDlANAPOUS.rNWAN 

C&n&dWF&ctory.H&inilton Ontario 

M&chiite Knife Factory, Lcu\c tis t o r N .Y. 

Branches Carrying Canpkto Stocks bTht Following ClthV 

Atlanta NewOrleojva Se&ttla 

Mempkia New York City Ptvri». Fraixa* 

Chice.£fo Portloivd.Oro. Svdrve,y. N.A 

Mirmecpoli* Sai\Frarvci»co Vw\couv«r,B. 



It's Easy to Get 

Sheetrock Jobs 




With Sheetrock you can get 
many new construction and re- 
modeling jobs on which pulp 
wallboard would not be con- 
sidered. 

For Sheetrock is made of pure 
gypsum rock; it will not burn, 
warp or buckle. It saws and 
nails like lumber. Sheetrock 
walls and ceilings take any 
decoration. 

We will work shoulder to 
shoulder with you in lining up 
the many profitable Sheetrock 
jobs which exist in your locality. 
Ask for details of our plan. 
Mail the coupon today ! 

Sheetrock comes in standard 
sizes: % in. thick, 32 or 48 in. 
wide and 6 to 10 ft. long 



SEEETROCK 



WALL B O ARD 



UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

World's Largest Producers of Gypsum Products 
GENERAL OFFICES: Dept. I, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 



United States Gypsum Company 

Dept. I, 205 West Monroe St., Chicago, HI. 

Tell me about your plan to get Sheetrock contracts. 



Name- 



Address. 



Sheetrock is inspected and approved by The Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. 







For Dependable Roofs 

— Combine our Skill with Yours 



g the work right is only half the job. The other 
-and it's every bit as important — is choosing- the 
materials. 

's where the Barrett Everlastic trade-mark helps 
You can rely on Barrett Everlastic Roofings 
t the same confidence you rely on your own work- 
hip. For we know how to make dependable 
igs — we've been at it for sixty years. 

lastic Roofings are everything good roofings 
lid be. They're moderate in cost, handsome in 
pirance, easy to lay, very durable. 

of the four styles noted at the right can usually 
id over old roofing — a big economy in re-roofing 

stt Everlastic Roofings are carried by enterpris- 
j|[ealers everywhere. 



Company 



k Chicago Philadelphia Boston St. Louis Cleveland 

ti Plttsbuigh Detroit New Orleans Birmingham Kansas City 

Lflolis Dallas Syracuse Peoria Atlanta Duluth 

e City Bangor Washington Johnstown Lebanon Youngstown 

Toledo Columbus Richmond Latrobe Bethlehem 

Buffalo Baltimore Omaha Houston Denver 

THE BARRETT COMPANY, Limited: 
Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver St. John, N. B. 



Halifax, N. S. 




Everlastic Multi-Shingles 
Four shingles in one. 
Tough, elastic, durable. 
Made of high' grade water- 
proofing materials and sur- 
faced with mineral, red or 
green. When laid they 
look exactly like individual 
shingles. Fire-resisting. 
Need no painting. 

Everlastic Single Shingles 
Sanie material and art-fin- 
ish (red or green) as the 
Multi-Shingles, but made 
in single shingles, size 
8 x 12f inches. A finished 
roof of Everlastic Single 
Shingles is far more beau- 
tiful than an ordinary 
shingle roof and costs less 
per year of service. 

Everlastic 
Mineral-Surfaced Roofing 
The most beautiful and 
enduring roll roofing made. 
Surfaced with mineral in 
art-shades of red or green. 
Very durable ; requires no 
painting. Combines real 
protection against fire with 
beauty. Nails and cement 
in each roll. 

Everlastic 
"Rubber" Roofing 
This is one of our most 
popular roofings, a recog- 
nized standard among "rub- 
ber" roofings. It is tough, 
pliable, elastic, durable and 
very low in price. It is 
easy to lay ; no skilled la- 
bor required. Nails and ce- 
ment included in each roll. 











?«r 


1 ljg| 










: 








4gJk 












?*£"'..■ 


A 


* Jft* 






LOWER 

PEICES 

NOW 

PEEMIT 

DEALERS 

TO SELL 

GENUINE 

SAND'S 

LEVELS 

AT THE 

PRICE OF 

INFERIOR 

IMITATIONS 

ASK YOUR 
DEALER FOR 
SAND'S 
LEVELS 




^^^sfj 




I 


i ^^ j i 



Glass 
Plate 
Lens 
Protection 



SoIid=set Wire Ma 
Spirit Glasses 

Sealed -In Accuracy 

WHEN we first originated and applied plate^ 
glass lens protection for spirit glasses a lot 
of fellows wrote how helpful it was to have a dus 
proof, dirt-proof, water-proof level. 

When we originated and applied wire markers afl 
each end of the bubble, a number of customers tolc 
us how handy it was to find exact center instantly 
And many more expressed their admiration wher 
SAND'S Aluminum Level was introduced, for it is 
the lightest and strongest level made — easy to reac 
in dim corners, high or low. 

But in addition to all these features, SAND'S level; 
have pi'ovided sealed-in, non-adjustable and fool 
proof accuracy for two generations. 

Day after day and year after year these levels hav< 
provided such unwavering, unfailing dependability 
that few of the old time craftsmen would conside 
any level but a SAND'S. 

Accuracy is as important today as yesterday. 
And every new SAND'S level must maintain th 
reputation of the SAND'S name. 

Ask for SAND'S Levels. Any good dealer cai 
supply you. Write for illustrated folder describin. 
all styles. 

J. Sand & Sons 

4853 Rivard St., Detroit, Mich 








Southern Pine 

Lumber and 

Timbers 

Oreosoted Lumber, 

Timbers. Posts, 

Poles. Ties, Piling, 

Wood Blocks 

California While 

Pine Lumber 

Sash and Doors 

Standardized 

Woodwork 

Gum and Oak 

Lumber 
Oak Flooring 



Do You Want To Know What A Home Like 
One Of These Will Cost All Complete? 

TEAR out this page and take it to any retail lumber dealer. 
Ask him to show you the Long-Bell Plan Service. You 
will find these two charming small homes and their floor 
plans there, along with 56 others equally interesting. 

Choose the style you like best and the size to fit your needs, 
and then ask the lumberman to give you an estimate of the 
cost complete. The low figure will surprise you, for Long- 
Bell home plans are designed to provide good looking, well 
arranged small homes at low cost.' 

Most lumbermen keep on hand Long-Bell plans. If yours 
hasn't them, write us. 

For beauty, for permanence, and for the sake of 
the investment, build of good materials. Build 
with wood, the least expensive material you can 
buy today. To be assured of obtaining lumber of 
uniform high quality ask for lumber bearing the 
Long-Bell brand. 

We will send free to Contractors, Builders and 
Architects, a copy of our book "From Tree to 
Trade," the story of lumber from the woods to the 
finished product. Please mention this publication. 

TIl£ T ono-ReLL I nmber C ompami 



'■ ."' « " 




TRADE 
MARKE 



Be A Floor Surfacing Contractor 

$5,000 to $15,000 or More— Yearlj 

This is a new, uncrowded field. Floor Surfacing Contractors are making big mone 
resurfacing old floors in homes and office buildings and working with general contractor 
who prefer to sublet the floor surfacing contract. It is a big business in itself. Buslnes 
comes easily by American Universal Method. We furnish office forms, advertising cuts 
business cards — in fact, everything to set a man up in business. 

RESURFACING OLD FLOORS 

Don't Ever Get Caught Out of Work Again 

No Dull Seasons in This Business 

There are hundreds of homes and office buildings being remodeled — in every ca 
the floor is the first consideration. There are hundreds of floors right in your ow 
neighborhood that really need resurfacing. Hundreds of people can well afford to ha\ 
the work done and will be glad to have you do it when you show them the America 
Universal Method. 

This machine is electrically operated and surfaces more floors in a day than si 
men can do by hand. Works alike on new and old floors and on any size, frof 
cottage to largest auditorium. Surfaces clear to wall without hand work. 

Contractors and architects prefer its work because it leaves no sander waves or chat 
ter marks. Leaves job clean — vacuum fan leaves dust and dirt in bag. Machine wi 
for itself the first month. 

Floor Surfacing Contractors Make $20.00 to $50.00 A Da] 

"I am making floor surfacing a specialty w : ith the 'American Universa 
and find it a good paying proposition. My average earnings are $28.00 pi 
day." Geo. R. LaFlash, Mass. 

"I make the 'American Universal' way of floor surfacing a specialty no 
and my average earnings are at least $20.00 a day." .1. A. Natzel, Arizoni 
My earnings in one day have been as high as $50.00 with the 'Ameri 
can Universal' machine." E. J. Inman, Ohio. 

"We have owned one of your Floor Surfacing Machines for about tn 
years. We find it earns us from $40.00 to $75.00 on each of our coi 
ict jobs." F. B. Westcott & Son. Xebr/ 
"I have made good with the 'American Universal' Machine, 
have sanded about $700.00 worth of work in two months." T. I 
Easley, Tenn. 

"The 'American Universal' is a dandy machine for cleaning an 
polishing dance floors. I have earned $62.00 clear profit in a da: 
so you can see how well I am doing." Glen F. Bartlett, Oregoi 
"When this little town of 6,000 people was building, we mat 
from $350.00 to $700.00 per month with the 'American Universal', but our best earnings per day have been $100.0 
$80.15, $68.50, $62.00 and $80.00. M. L. Derstine, California. 

"I have earned as high as $50.00 with my 'American Universal' machine and wish to thank you for the courteo; 
treatment I have received from you. Edward McKcrnan, Nebraska, 
"lam well pleased with the 'American Universal'. I have made $30.00 in eight hours withmymachine." B. Waynick, Texa 






Lay Down the Tool Box— YOU Be The BOS! 
The American Floor Surfacing Machine Cc 

Originators of Floor Surfacing Machines 

522 So. St. Clair Street Toledo, Ohi 

THE AMERICAN FLOOR SURFACING MACHINE COMPANY 
522 So. St. Clair St.. 
Toledo, Ohio, U. S. A. 

Gentlemen: Please send me without obligation to me, complete information and literature on- yotir propositi 
The following information will no doubt assist you in advising me. 



□ 
□ 



□ 



I want to become a Floor Surfacing 
Contractor. 



I am not now a contractor of any kind 
but was in following business: 



I am a Building Contractor and want 
to use it on my own contracts. 



NAME 
STREET 



CITY . STATE. 




NICHOLSON FILES 

—every time for sharpening saws 

Experience proves that Nicholson Files give the 
best service — make the saw satisfactorily sharp. 

So, benefiting by experience, young carpenters — as 
well as every class of wood worker — carry Nichol- 
son Files in the tool kit. 

Sharp — tempered to cut steel quickly — and as uni- 
form as expert workmanship can make them. 



Nicholson File C© 




PROVIDENCE, R. 




I vrllSIX 

To Traiii You 

Until You Are Placed 
in a Position Paying 

Oto $ 30 

— Chief Draftsman Dobe 

Write and I'll tell you how I make you a first-class, big-money-earning drafts- 
man in a very few months! I do this by a method no other man nor institution 
can imitate. I give you personal training at home by mail. And I mean just 
what I say— I train you until you are actually placed in a position paying from 
$250.00 to S300.00 per month. Six thousand draftsmen are wanted every 
month. Hurry up and register so you can start earning. 







This $25^2 Outfit 
of Drafting Tools 

High-grade plated instruments. Every 
one you need. Packed in a handsome 
plush lined case. Just the kind I use 
myself. Write to me I'm giving it 
entirely and absolutely free. 




>emf This Free 
Goupon To Mi 



IHIIIIHHIIIIIIIIIIHH 
Chief Draftsman Dobe 

Dept, 5313 4001 Broadway, Chicago, 

Without any obligation whatsoever, please r 
your book, "Successful Draftsmanship," and 

It costs you nothing but 3 stamp to send the coupon 1: 8S^S t ? a g^ta§S." penoaal ^ 

for my free book, "Successful Drcfcsmanship" that 2 
tells you all. It tells you how b y students get the 

good positions and how I czn a.'ford to train you ■ 

until you get YOUR position. Remember, 6,000 men 7- Name 

wanted everymonth. So hurry. Register earlybecause 

I can take only a few students. Send coupon NOW! ■ 

Chief Draftsman Dobe *""" 

Dept. 5313 4001 Broadway, Chicago sa 





MILLER5 FALLS 

- Td D LS 



Millers Falls 
Carpenters' Tools 



FINE workmanship is a fine 
art that demands fine 
tools. Millers Falls Tools 
have been favorites with the 
best carpenters and mechanics 
since I 



tools — workmanlike tools. 

Two generations of Yankee 
inventive genius and patient 
skill have gone to the making 
of Millers Falls Tools, with a 
generous allowance of New 
England conscience thrown in 
for good measure. 

No wonder Millers Falls tools 
are good tools— through and 
through. 

us for the Millers Falls Handbook for 
Carpenters and Mechanics. 

MILLERS FALLS COMPANY, Millers Falls, Mass. 



Should you visit the Millers 
Falls factories in the Berk- 
shire Hills of New England, 
you would then realize why 
Millers Falls tools are worthy 

Write 




They Are On to Stay 



When you lay Ruberoid Strip- 
shingles, they are on to stay. 
Their unusual thickness and 
cut corners prevent their blow- 
ing or curling up. 

Felt, saturant, surface and back 
coating are all Ruberoid quality — 
the quality that has actually stood 
the test of time on thousands of 
roofs for over a quarter century. 



You can, therefore, unqualifiedly 
recommend them. 

Ruberoid Strip-shingles may also 
be laid in various attractive designs. 
Upon request, you can obtain a 
booklet showing these artistic de- 
signs in color, as well as an illus- 
trated application sheet. 

There is a Ruberoid Distributor 
near you. Talk it over with him. 



The RUBEROID Co. 

[95 Madison Avenue, New York 
Chicago Boston 




SHINGLES 
FEUS 



BUILDING PAPERS 
PLASTICS 




Ancient Egyptian relics 

made of unalloyed 

copper 



JERSEY 

Screen Cloth 



TRADE j ERSEY MARK 



The Durability of 
Unalloyed Copper 



Carpenters who have put Jersey Copper 
Screen Cloth on windows and doors know 
how it wears. It is not like iron and steel 
screens which rust away, nor does it cor- 
rode strand by strand as screens of alloy 
do. Jersey Copper Screen Cloth is made 
of 99.8% pure copper, produced by a 
special Roebling process which gives it the 
tensile strength of steel. 

Tropical climates and salt sea air are the 
most severe tests for screens. If a screen 
lasts under these conditions you may be 
sure it is a good screen. Jersey Copper 
Screen Cloth will stand the most severe of 
tests. 

Hardware and building supply dealers 
throughout the country carry Jersey 
Copper Screen Cloth in stock widths, 1 8 
to 60 inches, light or dark finish. But if 
you have any difficulty in being supplied 
write us and we will gladly see that you 
get what you want. 



The New Jersey Wire Cloth Company 

613 South Broad Street 
Trenton New Jersey 




Sargent Auto-Set Planes 



placed in exactly the same position, 

without re-adjustment. 

Ir has a thin cutter, bur the support 
for the- cutter is = ■: s-:hil above and below 
the elan:, tha: there is no tendency to 
chatter. The thin cutter has the ad- 
vantage of quicker grinding, 

Sargent Auto-Set Planes are intended 
for both heavy and very fine cuts — with 
or against the grain. Being "Sargent 
Mi le" they are fully guaranteed. 

Sen! for the Sargent Book of Planes 
containing full descriptions of the Auto- 
Set and other Sargent Planes. 

Sargent Framing Squares 

Another .Sargent Product that is 
a standard among fine workmen. am 

With Sargent Framing Squares 
there is no need to work out the 
lengths of hip. valley, jack and j 
common rafters. The necessary 
tables are all on the square. Sim- 
ply measure and read. HI 

The Sargent Steel Square book- H 
let give- full particulars of this 
a:. 1 o:he: Sargent Squares. Send ;•■ .'• 
for i: today. >■- 1 



Sargent & Company 

Hardware Manufacturers 
55 Water Street New Haven., Conn.: 






■ sya r 


G 


E: 


■N 


TM 


_ O C K S AND -H 


A H 


a w 


A R E.-_j 



*-'• 



w 







HUTHER ~ 
SAWS ^—^ 

A SAW FOR EVERY USE— 
A USE FOR EVERY SAW 



Huther Brothers Hollow Ground Saws 



HUTHER BROTHERS DADO HEADS 





for this 

LESSON 



If you are ambitious to make 
more money, you must get the 
training that will make you worth 
more. It's the man who best uses his head 
that becomes foreman and superintendent orl 
who gets the most business as a contractor. | 

This free lesson will show you how to easily 
become a building expert — how you can 
command a larger income. Not a penny to ^^ 
send for it, only the coupon. Mail it today. 




aising Knowledge for 
the Building Trades 



Chicago "Tech" Experts Will 

Train You In Your Spare Time 

For" twenty years we have been helping ambitious men to get into the big pay 
class by teaching them the higher branches of building — the things that make a 
man a planner and director of work. Any man can get tbis in bis spare time and at very 
little cost. If you feel your need of more training — if you realize what it means to be an 
expert in your line, look over the subjects below and get the coupon into the mail — today. 

Pay R 

Men 

P3an Reading. How to read a building plan. How to read dimensions. How to 
read detail drawings. How to lay out work from plans. How to stake out build- 
ings. Practice in reading complete blue print pl-ans from basement to roof, etc., 
etc. 

Estimating. Figuring amount and cost of materials. Estimating time and labor. 
How to figure carpenter work such as stairs, roofing, rafters, etc. Millwork: win- 
dow and dcor frames, mouldings, cornices, etc. All about the steel square. Lath- 
ing and plastering. Excavations. Brick, stone and concrete work. Fireproofing. 
Glazing. Plumbing. Heating. Wiring, etc., etc. 

Superintending. Methods of work on all classes of buildings. Uses and prepara- 
tion of all kinds of material. Hiring and handling men. 

Also Special Courses in Architectural Drafting for Carpenters and in Plumbing 
and Heating and Ventilating — all taught by practical men. 

Send the Coup 

All you have to do to get the Free Lesson 
and full information about Chicago 
"Tech" training is to put X in the cou- 
pon to show which subject interests you 
— then mail it. No obligation on you for 
asking this — no promise. We gladly 
send it all free. So send the coupon — ■ 
now. 



. I CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

CIO. m 339 Chicago "Tech" Building 
Chicago. 
Without obligation on me please send Free 

B Trial Lesson on the course I have marked X 
below. 



□ 
□ 



Plan Reading and Estimating 
Architectural Drafting. 



misn^^ms&Mass^ 



Xarne 

Address 

Post Office State. 

Occupation 




Two New Features on the 
Interurban Special 

We have just added Buttoned Flaps to hold 
the apron in place while stooping and Dou- 
ble Fronts to double the life of the overall. 

The Interurban Special Carpenters' Over- 
all is specially designed to help you keep 
your tools right on the job with you and 
make your work easier. 

It's made of heavy white Boatsail drill 
and has the best of workmanship through- 
out. 

It has 12 Special Pockets : 
Four Nail Pockets Three Pencil Pockets 

Two Front Pockets One Watch Pocket 

Two Hip Pockets Rule Pocket 

Try Square Loops Hammer Loop 

Screw Driver Loop 

Get your merchant to order you a pair so 
you can see what they are. Or send us 
$2.25 and we Avill send you a pair prepaid. 
If you don't like it you can return it and get 
your money. 

Shermam Overall Mfg. Co. 

SHERMAN, TEXAS 
We Make Every Pair Make Good 



When 

You Want 
The Best 




Ask for 
The GRIFFITH Master 
Builder for 64 years known 
as the GERMANTOWN 
Master Builder. If you can- 
not be supplied at your local 
dealer's send for the Master 
Builder Catalog of Hammers and 
Hatchets. 

Griffith Tool Works 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Branch: 4139 W. Kinzie St. CHICAGO 

LOOK FOR THIS TRADE MARK 
On The Tool 



^GRIFFITH, 

MASTER 
.BUILDER, 



THE U. B. A. 

It's On the Level 

The First ioo% Adjustable 

No Holes To Cut 

Specially designed for progressive 

mechanics and to take place of level 

or plumb bob. 

Superior to other 
adj u stables 
in working fea- 
tures. 

Attach to any 
length straight 
edge your 
work requires. 

For all kinds of 
leveling, plumb- 
ing, grades and 
pitches. The 
simplest, and 
quickest to ad- 
just. 

Frame C. R. steel 
finished in Nickel 
and Black mat 
rust proof pro- 
cess. Every one 
guaranteed. 

Member L. U. 434, Inventor. Pocket size 
3|x4. Have your dealer supply you, if he 
cannot, send us his name and your money 
order and we will mail to you direct. 
Price $1.25 

THE UNION LEVEL SALES CO. 

1979 W. I llth Street Chicago. 




From Carpenters Helper 
to Electrical Contractor 



READ 

Mr. Schreck's 
Letter 



Phoenix. Arizona. 
May 3rd. 1921. 
Dear Mr. Cooke: 

For the first time in my 
life I am paying an Income 
Tax, a fact for which I am 
rreatly indebted to you. as 
it was your training that put 
me where I am. in business 
'or myself and — well on the 
road to Success. 

Last September, a year 
ago. when I enrolled I felt a 
little skeptical. At that time, 
is a carpenter's helper, doing 
manual labor, I was only 
able to earn $75.00 a month. 

Today, thanks to your 
splendid Lessons and method 
r>f instruction, I am making 
■unsiderably over $500 a 
month. 

Some time ago I started 
3Ut to do Electrical work 
(wiring) on my own hook, 
all done in my spare time. 
By degrees I built up quite 
a little business for myself, 
and o n February 2 0. I 
filed a bond with the City of 
Phoenix to do wiring, all 
kinds, and went into the 
Electrical Contracting busi- 
ness under my own name. 

Mr. Cooke. I would not 
take $2,000 for your Course, 
and will unhesitatingly rec- 
ommend it to any person who 
is in earnest, and willing to 
sacrifice a little time to 
study. 

' You may use my name as 
a reference, and depend on 
me to "boost" your School 
at every "spot in the road." 
for I shall always feel grate- 
ful for answering your ad- 
vertisement of an Electrical 
Course by mail. 

Sincerely yours. 

A. SCHRECK. 



Jumps From $75 to $500 a Month 

Here's the story of Art. Schreck, carpenter helper who jumped 
from $17.00 a week to more than .$100.00 a week in a few months 
time. Read his letter. 

What Are You Doing for Yourself 

No matter what kind of work you are doing — No matter how 
much you earn — you owe it to yourself to look into the thing that 
boosts a man's pay like this. Think of it! .Six times the amount 
he ever earned at the work he was doing. Let me tell you how I 
can help you do the same. 



Be An 



ELECTRICAL EXPERT 

I Will Train You At Home 

Trained "Electrical Experts" are in great demand at the highest salaries, and 
the opportunities for advancement and a big success in this line are the greatest 
ever known. 

"Electrical Experts" earn $70 to $200 a week. Fit yourself for one of these 
big paying positions — 

Today even the ordinary Electrician — the "screw driver" kind — is making money 
— big money. But it's the. trained man — the man who knows the whys and 

wherefores of Electricity — the "Electrical Expert" who is picked out to "boss" 

ordinary Electricians — to boss Big Jobs — the jobs that pay. 

Get in line for one of these "Big Johs" by enrolling now for my easily-learned, 
quickly-grasped, right-up-to-the-minute. Spare-Time, Home-Study Course in 
Practical Electricity. 

No Experience Necessary — Your 

SllPPPQS CZ-tlCffCfn't't^f^fl You don't have to be a College Man; 

ou^v^cos \^\x<xl amccu you Uon . t have t0 be a high 3chool 

graduate. My Course in Electricity is the most simple, thorough, and successful 
in existence, and offers every man. regardless of age, education or previous experi- 
ence the chance to become, in a very short time, an "Electrical Expert", able to 
make from $70 to $200 a week. I guarantee under bond to refund every cent you 
pay me if you are not satisfied after you have finished my course. 

Get Started Now 

I want to send you my big book 
showing the opportunities in the elec- 
trical field and a sample lesson, free. 
You'll enjoy looking them over. The 
coupon brings both without any obli- 
gation on your part. 



Electrical 
Outfit and 



FREE 



Use of Laboratory as well as consult- 
ing service and subscription to En-, 
gineering Magazine. The big Outfit 
that I give you includes an electric 
motor and numerous tools and instru- 
ments not usually found in a begin- 
ner's set — the whole thing is free to 
my students. 




Mail This 
Coupon 
Now y 

/,, 

^ COOKE, 
^T Chief Eng. 

Chicago Engineer- 
ing Works. Dept. 283, 
2154 Lawrance Ave., 
Chicago, III. 

Dear Sir: Send at once Sam- 
ple Lessons, your Big Book, and 
full particulars of your Free Outfit 
and Home Study Course — all fully 
prepaid without obligation on my part. 




"As hard as fire and 
water can make them" 

— The Disston file-maker 

Disston makes between sixteen 
and eighteen million files a year. 
Some weigh a tiny fraction of an 
ounce. Others 135 lbs. Some are 
for a lady's fingernails. Some for 
gigantic chunks of steel. 

The supreme test of a good file is 

in filing the teeth of saws — steel cut- 
ting steel. And nearly a half-million 
Disston Files are used yearly in mak- 
ing Disston Saws — "the saws most 
carpenters use." No worder Disston 
Files eat through the work in quick 
time! No wonder the experienced 
filer enjoys the feel of a Disston File 
as it bites into the toughest metal! 

Disston Files are Disston made 
from the steel to the packing case. 
They are of good, true steel, "as hard 
as fire and water can make them." 

Send for new free booklet, "The 
File in History." 



xssro 




' HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc. 

Philadelphia, U. S. A., 



^ 




A list cf What Disston Makes 

Ai '. in Ite^e Sar*~. Tools and 
Files is that quality found in 

"The Soto "Most Carpenters Use" 

Back Saws 

Band Saws for Wood and Metal 

Bevels 

Buck Saws 

Butcher Saws and Blades 

Circular Saws for Wood, Metal,- 
and Slate 
Compass Saws 
Cross-cut Saws and Tools 
Cylinder Saws 
Drag Saw Blades 
Files and Rasps 
Grooving Saws 
Gauges— Carpenters' 

Marking, etc. 
Hack Saw Blades 
Hack Saw Frames 
Hand, Panel, and Rip Saws. 
Hedge Shears 

Ice Saws 

Inserted Tootb 
Circular Saw* 
frtfi * Keyhole Saws 
Kitchen Saws 

Knives — Cane, Corn, Hedge 
Knives — Circular — for Cork, 

Cloth, Leather, Paper, etc. 
Knives— Machine 
Levels— Carpenters' tnd Masons' 
Machetes 
Mandrels 

Milling Saws for Metal 
Mitre-box Saws 
Mitre Rods- 
One-man Cross-cut Saws 
Plumbs arid Levels 
Plumbers' Saws 
Pruning Saws 
Re-saws 
Saw Clamps and Filing Guidei 

~J Saw Gummers 
•QkXTj Saw-sets 
'<^-^ji. Saw Screws 

Screw Drivers 




Screw-slotting Saws 

Segment Saws 

Shingle Saws 

Slate Saws — Circular 

Squares — Try' *nd Mitre 

Stave Saws 

Sugar Beet Knives 

Swages 

Tools for Repairing Saws 

Tool Steel 

Trowels— Brick, Plastering, 

Pointing, etc. 
Veneering Saws 
Webs — Turning and Felloe 





AWS TOOLS FILES 



ntered July 22, 1 91 5, at INDIANAPOLIS, (WD., as second class mail matter, under Act of Congress, Aug. 24, 1 91 2 

Acceptance for mailing at SDecial rate of postage nrovided for in Section 1103, act of 
October 3. 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 

. Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machina Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, ami 
Kindred Industries. Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America, at 
Carpenters' Building, 222 East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 



istablished in 1881 
ol. XLII— No. 3 



INDIANAPOLIS, MARCH, 1922 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 






>i*y":r»>.>»>rw - :v»^ 



xmmm* 

i 



Fraternity 

If I could write one little word 

Upon the hearts of men, 
I'd dip into the font of love 

And write with golden pen 
One little word, and only one, 
And feel life's work on earth well 
done; 

For every heart would speak to me 

The one sweet word — "Fraternity." 

The angel throng would sing a song, 

The sweetest ever heard, 
If they could read in human hearts 

That precious little word. 
The kindly thoughts, the kindly deeds 
And treasures more than crowns and 

creeds; 
In these the angel hosts would see 

The children of Fraternity. 

— Anon. 



1 

stes mm, -mm m< : mi mmmmmzzmm mm mm. mm mm mm mm mm 



'4 



m<:mm.M 




16 THE CARPENTER 

AT LAST 

(By Second General Vice-President Geo. H. Lakey. ) 

T seem? the contracting interests of the country are getting wis 
to the fact that the trade associations of which we have heard g 
much in New York, and brought into the limelight by the Lock 
wood Committee investigation, are responsible for a very larg 
part of the high cost of building. Horace H. Herr. editor of th 
"American Contractor." is quoted as saying: 

•'Contracting interests, in many localities, are fighting mad and there is a likf 
lihood that an aggressive campaign to force certain material producers to sell i 
wholesale lots to contractors will be formulated when the National Association cj 
Builders' Exchanges meets in annual Convention in Memphis. Tenn.. February 20. 

"The situation is this : The retail dealers and local representatives of certai 
building material-, especially cement, have insisted that all material sold in thei 
territory should be handled as local business and the retailer paid a margin on ths 
business. In other years the contractor handling a big job r-ould buy direct from tb 
producer in wholesale quantities and get the benefit of the wholesale price. Grac 
ually this practice has been restricted until today it is almost impossible for th 
general contractor to buy direct even though the quantity goes into carload lots. 

■'Paying the retailer his margin increases the cost of construction and. in sotd 
instances, depending upon the local dealer means that the general contractor ca 
not be sure of a continuous flow of material to the job in quantities sufficient to pn 
vent interruptions to the work. This again adds to the total cost of the complete 
structure. 

Uses Club On Producers 

"The retail dealer submits that if he is to remain in business and be ready 1 
serve the public at all times, he cannot be deprived of the larger orders f( 
materials. The retailer has had a club to use on the producer in that he coul 
refuse to handle a product if the producer refused to allow him an agreed margi 
on such orders as were taken by the factory direct from the retailer's territory. 

"This controversy has been growing more acute from year to year. The low 
Master Builders called on the National Association of Builders exchanges last ye; 
to start action. But the Savannah Convention passed a resolution declaring for a 
open market and let it go at that. The question came up in the recent Annu 
Convention of the Associated General Contractors of America held in Cleveland at 
here again action was by resolution as follows : 

"Whereas. The growth of trade associations in the United States has caused tl 
establishment of trade agreements and practices which hinder economic distributk 
and restrict the right of individuals to buy certain construction materials in an op( 
wholesale market, and necessitates the payment of a differential to a local di 
tributor for no economic service rendered, and. 

"Whereas. The re-establishment of moderate and reasonable construction cos 
and the maintenance of the rights of individuals in industry demands that m 
dictatorial restrictions upon labor and trade be removed. 

"Resolved. That this association is unqualifiedly in favor of an open market f 
all materials needed in the construction industry, and is absolutely opposed to i 
combinations, whether manufacturers, material dealers, or contractors, wherel 
prices are fixed on the market, or controlled in favor of any particular interest ai 
against the interest of the general public. 

"The Memphis Convention of the builders' exchanges may confidently I 
expected to thrash out this proposition to the end of taking action which will for 
early adjustments. 

Confusion In Chicago 

"The labor controversy in Chicago, which has become of national importan 
because of the fact that Federal Judge Landis was the umpire, took a new turn tr 
week, which may mean more or less confusion in Chicago building circles for sever 
months. Judge Landis. amended his award on wages, granting slight increases 
the scale of three minor unions. The President of the Chicago Building Trad 
Council announced that while the decision seemed to be a "bad bargain" for tJ 
'anions, they would stand by the award. In the meantime a citizens' committ 



THt5 CARPENTER 



17 



3 COtne into the field to force the unions in line. When a union failed to get into 

e the citizens committee declared open shop in that union. Now, when the unions 

)W a disposition to accept the Landis program the citizens* committee shows no 

i position to call off the open shop policy in the crafts where it had been estab- 

llied during the long drawn-out controversy. The controversy has, therefore, 

| itched about until it is a fight between the Unions and open shop advocates rather 

in a controversy over the acceptance of Judge Landis's decision,'* 

You will note Mr. Herr's comment on the Chicago situation, and in the Feb- 

iry issue of our official Journal, "The Carpenter." we stated that the real purpose 

the So-called "Citizens' Committee" at Chicago was well known to us. We find 

:-h committees in many of the large cities masquerading under all sorts of titles 

d trying to make the public believe that they are the "protectors" of the "public 

crests." but between you and I, we believe their own interests are served first 

d if anything is left the public may have it; or in plain words, they all work 

the theory that we have no right to organize, "but they have." and now it seems 

? contractors realize that while they have been busy trying to inflict the un-Amer- 

11 shop plan on us another system of organization has crept upon them that is far 

j>re reaching in its effect than all the labor unions in the land. We know that it 

ferns to have become a popular pastime to blame the unions for the high cost of 

tiding and the reason for the popularity is, the ease with which such matter gets 

|play space and big headlines in the daily papers, and inasmuch as the average 

ider in these times has a grouch at the high cost of everything, it's easy to make 

in believe the unions are the cause of it all. 

j But remember this : That we do not propose to have our standards of living 

aged by the standards of those who have not enough interest in life to join some 

ganization whose business is to see that publicity is given to the right or wrong 

the labor situation. 

And if a ton of bituminous nut coal cost the consumer at Philadelphia, Pa., 

livered, $14.75, and that same ton of coal cost at the mine mouth, only $1.75, 

en it's our business to see that such a situation is made public, for as it affects the 

iners of coal, so it affects us. Right now the farmer is busy at Washington trying 

find out what is going to be done for him because he gets so little for what he has 

sell and can buy so little with the dollar he gets for it. There are trade associations 

other lines than the building industry and their effect is just the same no matter 

here they are, and it's our prediction that once the public gets wise to them, the 

bor unions will get a rest from the wave of pernicious advertising that has fairly 

utted the public press for two years or more now. 

© 

ARE LABOR UNIONS IN PERIL? 

(By Henry S. Spalding, S. J.) 




RE labor unions in peril? 
At the outset let me re- 
strict this question to the 
labor unions in the United 
States. In organization, 
in wages, in social and 
)litical influence labor unions in this 
>untry easily take the lead over the 
orkingmen's associations in Europe, 
ay loss which labor unions may suffer 
're must react in all parts of the world ; 
id if labor unions fail here they will 
ive little chance to hold out against 
e untoward influences of the Old 
'orld. Just as democracy is on trial in 
e western hemisphere and humanity is 
vaiting, and is watching its success 
ith bated breath, so too is labor union- 
m on trial here, and toilers in every 
irt of the world look with anxious 



minds to its failures or triumphs. Dur- 
ing the great struggle of our Civil War 
the nations of the world watched and 
waited for the outcome. If the prom- 
ising republic of the New World could 
not withstand political strifes for a cen- 
tury, would other nations choose this 
form of government? The labor strifes 
in this country are not less important. 
If labor unions fail here, will not that 
failure seal their doom in other lands and 
in centuries yet to come? 

We would not draw a fanciful picture 
of the perils which at present threaten 
Organized Labor in the United States. 
We are candid in our belief that the 
peril is here. Moreover this peril does 
not come in the form of misunderstand- 
ing, between employer and employe, al- 
though such misunderstanding is unde- 



IS 



THE CAEPEXIEE 



niable. It does not come in the form 
of internal trouble in the unions them- 
selves, although there is roo much 
jealousy, bickering and dissension. Ir 
aces not come as an aftermath of the 
war. although the war is leaving its un- 
mistakable marks. It comes from united 
and concentrated forces which will test 
to their utmost the power and the right 
of the workingmen to organize. These 
forces are made up of agencies of cap- 
italism, forces so numerous, so wide- 
spread in their influence, so determined 
to crush labor unions that their very 
existence is threatened. The peril, then. 
which threatens Organized Labor is not 
of a minor nature. It is not only seri- 
ous, but it touches the very life of the 
organizations. TVe are face to face with 
the portentous question : shall labor 
unions exist in the United States? 

Capitalists many deny and have de- 
nied any intention of destroying unions; 

and labor leaders may not be able to 
point out every source of danger or un- 
ravel every plot of their enemies, but 
they are well aware that the danger has 
come. 

A decade ago. when the question of 
municipal ownership of street cars. 
waterworks, lighting systems and other 
public utilities was so frequently mooted 
there suddenly appeared, syndicate art- 
icles in papers and magazines setting 
forth the disadvantages and failures of 
such systems. Any municipal street car 
system which failed in its service or in 
its finances was at once given publicity ; 
city and town lighting plants which 
broke down for a few hours and left the 
people in darkness, waterworks which 
did not give perfect service, in fact, any 
municipally owned plant or system 
which failed to function was at once 
cited as an example of the waste and in- 
efficiency of public utilities. By this 
nation-wide propaganda mistrust was 
created in the minds of the people 
against all public ownership ; and the 
snug capitalists held on to their shares 
and reaped rich dividends. A similar 
propaganda is at present going on 
against labor unions. Few capitalists 
are as bold as Judge Gary, who frankly 
states that he is opposed to labor unions: 
but numbers of capitalists are willing to 
join with the steel producer and combat 
the unions. For this purpose they are 
using the illusive phrase, "the open 
shop." 



It is not the purpose of this article to 
discuss the various possible definitions 
of the term ''open shop," but the open 
shop movement has become a snare and 
a deceit, and is used as a iierm for mis- 
informing or satisfying the general pub- 
lic, while in reality it is the means of ex- 
terminating union labor. Before the 
people an open shop means a shop where 
both union and non-union men work on 
terms of equality. It claims to be strict- 
ly American, to do away with many of 
the abuses of unionism and to protect 
those workmen who do not wish to be-" 
long to a union or who of themselves are 
unable to withstand the opposition of 
their fellow laborers. These things the 
open shop claims to do, while in reality 
if is seeking the destruction of unionism. 

While I am not submitting the evi- 
dence for the statements contained 
herein. I am not making the charges 
without proof to back them up in case 
they should be denied. I do not claim 
that there is a concerted action of cap- 
italistic agencies banded together to de- 
stroy unionism in the United States, and 
that this is being effected under the 
cloak of the open shop. And while not 
every open shop in the country is party 
to the scheme, there are more than suf- 
ficient to be a real menace to the very 
existence of union labor. 

In the first place, these so-called open 
shops, which claim to have no objection 
to members of unions and to admit such 
members on terms of equality with non- 
union men. in no way recognize the 
unions or their leaders. Managers will 
not deal with the leaders of the unions. 
but with the individual members. These 
employers absolutely reject the principle 
of collective bargaining. This policy of 
itself, if carried to its ultimate conse- 
quences, would be the ruin of labor* 
unions and their disintegration. Of I 
what use is it to a workman to be a 
member of a union if the union is not 
recognized, if it is powerless, if it has 
no acknowledged right of representa- 
tion? 

I claim, then, that the method of pro- 
cedure in the so-called open shop strikes 
at the very heart of unionism. It seeks 
to destroy unionism. Under this policy 
the unions are slowly being deprived of 
their power of representation and collec- 
tive bargaining. And at every turn and 
corner agents of the employers are there 
to answer: ''The unions give you no 
protection : leave them, be free. Your 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



leetings are noisy and useless; do not union men. Union men who have ap- 

ttend them." plied at some of these factories have 

In the second place this so-called open been thrust from the office, and this for 

hop policy is strengthened by a nation- no other offense than that they were 

dde system of propaganda. Do not members of Local Unions. I say that 

nagine that this is a policy of yesterday these factory managers make no secret 

r today. While no one may be able to of their entire policy towards unionism. 

ut his finger on the exact date of its and require the applicant to sign an 

rigin. it is sufficient to recall that the agreement that he belongs to no union 

i»pen Shop Review, published monthly in and that he will join no union. The 

'hicago and representing the policies of laborer who gave the writer the agree- 

wo powerful employers' associations, is ment printed below exacted a most 

ounding out its twentieth volume. No solemn promise that his name would not 

.ne can read the copies of this review be used; and he cited instances where 

yithout being biased against labor shop owners had hired men to "beat up" 

mions and without reaching the con- those who revealed their non-union 

lusion that the founders of the publica- secret agreement. 

-ion have at heart the gradual lessening NON-UNION AGREEMENT 

if the power of unionized labor and its (NO.) (DATE) 

inal dissolution. The undersigned, whose craft is that 

1 We are not surprised to read in the of a , 

leadlines of the daily press the frequent in accepting employment from 

tatement that the open shop policy has 

'>een adopted so widely throughout the in its shops in does 

i'ountry. St. Louis has made the claim so upon the understanding and agree- 

hat 68 per cent of its privately owned ment with said employer: 
nstitutions are operated on the open (1) That, as to said craft, said shop 

:hop plan; that in every contest for or has been operated, and will continue to 

igainst that policy the open shop has be operated, upon non-union basis and is 

Jvon; that fixture manufacturers, furni- non-union. 

ure manufacturers, manufacturing jew- (2) That said employer will not rec- 
filers, millmen's associations, boiler ognize, nor have any dealings with, any 
mops, etc., have all adopted the open labor union composed of persons en- 
shop policy; and that in one case the gaged in or representing said craft. 
( inion has about ceased to exist. The (3) That said employe is not a mem- 
•ailroads have engineered the open shop ber of any labor union. While employed 
! policy into their latest agreement with by said employer, said employe will not 
;:heir employes. While railroad labor become a member of any labor union 
jnionism is too strong to be immediately and will have no dealings, communica- 
;rushed, how can it withstand the ever- tions or interviews with the officers, 
increasing power that is gathering to de- agents or members of any labor union 
stroy it? In reporting the breaking in relation to membership by said em- 
down of unionism and its powers in rail- ploye in such labor union, or in relation 
roads and other industries the daily press to said employe's said employment, 
makes no apoligy for and offers no re- (4) That it is the intention and de- 
grets for the introduction of the open sire of said employer and employe that 
shop ; and gradually the people of this the employment relation between them 
country are coming to recognize the be kept entirely free from interference 
open shop as an American mstitution, as or intervention in any respect by any 
an improvement on past policies — as, in labor union, its officers or agents. 

fact, a movement for the good and pro- (Employe's name) 

tection of the poor workmen. (Employe's address) 

While most manufacturers still permit This document is worthy of the worst 

the union men to work in their factories, period of the latter seventeenth and 

without however in any way recognizing early eighteenth centuries, when it was 

their organization, others have grown so all but a criminal act to foster the spirit 

bold as to close the doors of their shops of labor unionism or to meet to discuss 

to any man who has a union card. Nor labor problems; when workmen with 

is this the exception ; and the writer grievances were forced to whisper their 

knows where in one community twenty- wrongs at fairs or funerals or church 

seven factories have shut their doors to services. Capitalists of our days are as 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



blind as were the rich factory builders 
of England in the past, K few months 
ago, when the writer called upon a well- 
known employer, he was told not to in- 
terfere with matters of business, that he 
(the employer) was opposed to all 
unions, that he would have no union la- 
bor, that there was too much theory be- 
ing preached, that the church should at- 
tend to church services and leave busi- 
ness to the men who managed it and 
were responsible for it. Then the 
writer went to the workmen, not to one 



of them or to a dozen, but to hunuieds 
of them, not in one factory, but in ma?.y 
factories. 

I have not space to relate nor would 
I shock the reader by relating all the 
things that I heard from these work- 
men. But I was more and more con- 
vinced of the open war against union 
labor. 

To sum up : There is an organized 
fight against union labor under the guise 
of the open shop, and the very existence 
of labor unions is threatened. 



WORKING HOURS FOR WOMEN 




ORE than eight million 
women are employed in 
"gainful occupations" in 
the United States, accord- 
ing to a survey made by 
the National Industrial 
Conference Board. A large number are 
employed in manufacturing industries, 
and in many cases under deplorable con- 
ditions. Legislation designed to improve 
the condition of the women compelled 
to leave their homes to earn a livelihood 
has been enacted in several states, while 
others have made but little effort to safe- 
guard women workers. Fifty-four and 
sixty-hour weeks are common in various 
parts of the country, while five states 
have failed to place a limit on the num- 
ber of hours women may toil. 

Daily working hours for women are 
limited to eight hours in the District of 
Columbia, Colorado, California, Wash- 
ington, Montana, Nevada, Utah, Arizona 
and New Mexico; in Kansas there is a 
law providing overtime for work over 
eight or nine hours, according to the 
industry ; in North Dakota the working 
day is limited to eight and one-half 
hours ; in Massachusetts, New York, 
Maine, Ohio, Arkansas, Michigan, Minn- 
esota, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, 
Texas, Idaho and Oregon to nine hours ; 
in Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Rhode Is- 
land, New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia, 
Kentucky, Georgia, Mississippi, Louisi- 
ana, Illinois, Wisconsin, South Dakota 
and Wyoming to ten hours ; in Tennessee 
and Vermont to ten and one-half hours ; 
in North Carolina to eleven hours ; in 
South Carolina to twelve hours, while 
no legal limitation exists in Iowa, Indi- 
ana, West Virginia, Alabama and Flor- 
ida. 

These latter five states have no limi- 
tation in the weekly working hours of 



women. The forty -eight hours a week 
limitation is prescribed in Massachu- 
setts, California, Oregon, Utah and North 
Dakota; in Illinois and South Dakota the 
legal limitation is seventy hours a week. 
In Ohio fifty hours ; in Wisconsin, Con- 
necticut and Delaware, fifty-five hours; 
in New Jersey, Wyoming, Kentucky, 
Mississippi, Louisiana, Georgia. South 
Carolina, North Carolina. Virginia and 
Maryland, sixty hours ; in Vermont, 
Washington, Montana, Nevada, Colo- 
rado, Arizona and New Mexico, fifty-six 
hours; in Tennessee, fifty-seven hours, 
and in all the other states, Maine New 
Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, 
Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska. Kansas, 
Missouri, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Tex- 
as, fifty-four hours. The variation as 
to weekly hours is, therefore, much 
greater than the variation as to daily 
hours. 

Night work for women is prohibited in 
more than one occupation in New York, 
Connecticut, Wisconsin, Nebraska, Kan- 
sas, Oregon and California ; in industry 
only in Massachusetts. Pennsylvania and 
Indian ; in mercantile employment only 
in South Carolina ; for railroad and 
street railway ticket sellers only in Ohio; 
in the District of Columbia the number 
of hours that may be worked at night is 
limited in the same manner as day work. 

State control of night work for women 
exists only in fourteen states : Delaware, 
Kansas, Maryland, Nebraska, New 
Hampshire and Wisconsin limit the 
night hours of all women wage earners. 
Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Kansas, 
Massachusetts, Nebraska, New York, 
Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina 
Utah and Wisconsin prohibit women 
from night work in certain occupations. 
Wisconsin and Nebraska limit night 
work to eight consecutive hours. Dela- 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



ware and Maryland limit hours to eight 
anc 1 - further specify definite hours as 
night hours. Kansas New Hampshire 
and Wisconsin limit night work to 
forty-eight hours. The number of occu- 
pations covered is, as a rule, small. The. 
laws of Indiana and Pennsylvania cover 
manufacturing establishments only. 

Mandatory minimum wage laws for 
women, with rates fixed by a commis- 



sion, are in force in Wisconsin, Minne- 
sota, North Dakota, Kansas, Arkansas, 
Colorado, Washington, Oregon and Cal- 
ifornia; in Utah and Arizona there is a 
mandatory minimum wage law with the 
wage fixed by law ; in Massachusetts 
there is a minimum wage fixed by a 
commission, but not mandatory ; in all 
of tlu» other States there is no law. 



LABOR CONDITIONS SOME AMERICAN EMPLOYERS WOULD FAVOR 

(By William Burgess.) 




H5?> ,<3S OU never read anything in 
S the newspapers or maga- 

zines about the Japanese 
labor movement, or the 
Chinese labor movement. 
A labor movement in 
these countries has as much chance for 
existence as the proverbial snowball in 
hades. Some attempts at organizing the 
workers of Japan have been made of late 
years, but with little success and along 
lines not conducive to progress and 
stability. In China trade unions are 
practically unknown. 

It is therefore easy to understand why 
some of our American employers favor 
the removal of all restrictions on Asiatic 
immigration. The labor conditions, and 
the general servility prevailing among 
the workers of Japan and China, would 
be welcomed by the gentlemen in control 
of American industry who lead the fight 
to crush trade unionism. 

During the war. when labor was 
scarce, some of our prominent Americans 
who have long fed at the trust trough, 
and who shared in the millions resulting 
from war contracts, were advocating 
that the bars be thrown down and five 
million Asiatics be permitted to enter 
the country, to be adsorbed in the vari- 
ous industries. These gentlemen were 
patriotic, of course, with emphasis on 
the "pay," and their eye on the wage 
and labor conditions that would follow 
the Asiatic influx. Luckily they did not 
succeeed, for with five million Japs and 
Chinese and their natural increase to 
contend with in the present state of un- 
employment, we might look for open re- 
bellion from the American workers. 

Where no unions of workers exist 
there is no progress. That is true the 
world over. And where unionism thrives 
there the greatest progress will be found. 
In Japan labor conditions are de- 
plorable and from my own personal ob- 



servation I am deeply convinced that the 
Government of our country should not 
permit the products of such conditions 
to enter our port at any price. 

"Most of the large textile manufac- 
tories are located outside of the big 
centers. The supply of female labor, 
which, of course, is the kind of labor 
most used, comes from rural districts. 
Agents are employed to scour the coun- 
try and secure this help. Both men and 
women are used for this purpose, the 
man and woman often getting together 
wages that will be sufficient to make re- 
turns to the parents, promising them 
good homes, educational and amusement 
facilities, and the care of a physician. 
These girls are herded together at sta- 
tions and brought to the factory. At 
the time I visited this mill there were 
two requisitions out, one for 600 girls 
for one factory and another for 300 for 
another place. The law does not permit 
children under 12 years of age to work 
in factories, but exceptions are constant- 
ly being made to this rule for various, 
but, in my opinion, insufficient reasons, 
so that I saw girls not over 10 years of 
age working in the shops. 

At certain railroad stations I passed I 
saw groups of merry-faced Japanese 
girls apparently in high spirits in con- 
templation of the new life to which they 
were going. On inquiry I found that 
these girls were consigned, under the 
care of these contractors, to certain tex- 
tile mills. These contracts are made 
generally for three years, but the sad 
fact is that at the end of three years 
there does not remain 15 per cent of the 
original group in physical condition to 
work. Many of these children die; 
others contract tuberculosis or kindred 
diseases, while still others escape from 
the work, many to lead lives of im- 
morality. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



In the woolen mills they -work 24 
hours a day, in two shifts of 12 hours 
each, beginning at 6 a. m. and 6 p. m. 
These groups are alternated from day to 
night shifts twice a month. 

The girls are called at 5 o'clock in the 
morning, which gives them an hour to 
dress and eat their breakfast. They 
have a quarter of an hour at 9 o'clock, 
half an hour at 12, and a quarter of an 
hour at 3 o'clock, both day and night 
shifts. After coming off work they are 
supposed to take a bath and have their 
supper or breakfast, as the case may 
be, and retire for their rest to the rooms 
just vacated by the girls of the other 
shift. 

All Japanese houses are known as so 
many rooms of so many 'mats' in size. 
These mats measure 3 ft. by 6 ft., 
so that an eight-mat room would meas- 
ure 12 ft. by 12 ft. This is the usual 
size of the dormitory rooms. Each mat 
is the allotment of space for one girl, so 
that eight girls sleep in this room, 12 ft. 
by 12 ft., which is practically con- 
stantly occupied. Each girl has her own 
lot of blankets, and on rising pulls them 
up and puts them in a little locker for 
her own use. An attempt is made to 
open these rooms (which, like all Jap- 
anese houses, are inclosed in sliding 
fronts, for ventilating purposes) for at 
least an hour between shifts. 

Labor is paid by the day. The spin- 
ners and weavers receive from 30c to 
40c a day ; menders from 17c to 20c a 
day. 

When it is considered that many of 
the employes are furnished three meals 
a day by the employers, for which they 
are charged 10c a day, it can readily be 
seen that the meager income these tex- 
tile workers receive is so reduced as to 
leave very little with which to clothe 
themselves and meet their own expenses. 

Inquiry as to the efficiency of the help 
revealed the fact that the spinners were 
about as efficient as those in England, 
and would be quite as much so were it 
not for their weakened condition through 
long hours and insufficient or poorly bal- 
anced rations. The menders were not 
half so good or quick as in England, and 
more were required on account of the 
poor weaving. The weavers were just 
Lalf as efficient, less about 25 per cent; 



that is, one weaver would attend to one 
loom, whereas the same person, man or 
woman, would attend to two looms in 
England, and about 25 per cent of ef- 
ficiency was lost by the stopping of the 
looms on account of the breaking of 
threads, due to poor spinning and other 
causes. No originality is shown in new 
patterns ; all designs of cloth are copied. 

A report on the pottery industry in 
Japan and China submitted to the Unit- 
ed States Potters' Association contains a 
brief section devoted to wages and work- 
ing and living conditions among these 
workers in Japan. Pottery workers are 
among the best paid labor in Japan ; they 
receive more consideration from their 
employers than is general in industries 
as a whole in Japan. In one of the 
largest plants a man was detailed to. 
watch riving conditions and to advise as 
to necessary increases in wages, thus 
anticipating the demand of the workers 
for wage advances. In this plant the 
management appears to be making 
efforts to look after the welfare of the 
operatives. 

They have dormitories upon the 
grounds to care for 700 of their working 
people. There is a large eating room 
with long table and benches, at which 
meals are served at moderate cost. 
Formerly the cost was 7%c, but on ac- 
count of the increase in rice and food- 
stuffs, the rate now is 10c per day. In 
another department was seen the day 
nursery, in which about 50 children were 
gathered, IS of them being infants, all 
under the care of three competent wo- 
men who care for, feed and amuse the 
children while their mothers are work- 
ing. Nearby is another building equip- 
ped as a hospital, with a dispensary. In 
connection with the establishment, there 
has recently been established a mill 
store. Puce, millet and other cereals are 
bought by the carload and ground or sold 
in their natural condition, along with 
other provisions, at cost sufficient only 
to cover the actual expense of purchase 
and distribution. 

According to the factory laws of 
Japan women and childrren under 15 
years of age are not permitted to work 
in excess of 12 hours per day. However, 
a notable exception is that workers in 
the silk industry may work 14 hours a 
day. 



Editorial 




THE CARPENTER 

Official Journal of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 

OF AMERICA 

Published on the 15th of each month at the 

CARPENTERS' BUILDING 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OP 

CARPENTER' 1 AND JOINERS OF AMERICA, 

Publishers 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Subscription Price 
One Dollar a Year in Advance, Postpaid 

The publishers and the advertising 
agent use every possible precaution avail= 
able to them against accepting advertise= 
ments from other than reliable firms, but 
do not accept any responsibility for the 
contents of any advertisement which ap= 
pears in "The Carpenter." Should any 
deception be practiced by advertisers at 
any time, upon members, their duty is to 
immediately notify the Post Office au= 
thorities. Therefore, address any com= 
plaints to your local Post Office. 



INDIANAPOLIS, MARCH, 1922 

Stand By Your Colors 

Within our memory, at no time have 
trade unions ever been put to such tests 
as at the present time. 

The war that is being waged against 
trade unions from every influential 
point, by the combination of manufac- 
turers, and every influence that they are 
able to bring to their assistance, law- 
yers, judges, and the press are knocking 
against it with all their might, but with 
little or no results ; only to make the true 
and tried union men stand more firmly 
together, determined that they shall 
have their just rights as union men. 

There is no such thing as putting the 
unions out of business so long as they 
are true to the principles of the organ- 
ization with which they are connected 
and true to themselves. 



If good judgment and common sense 
is applied in carrying on the business of 
the various unions, then there can be no 
such a thing as failure. 

Too many people join trade unions 
with the expectation of accomplishing 
great things in a short time, and be- 
cause results are not just as they ex- 
pected, they think the organization is 
worthless, and become dissatisfied be- 
cause of the' few dollars, and because 
such investment did not bring them 
fortune immediately. 

Let the war go on, as it is bound to. 
The labor movement is not a revolution- 
ary one but an evolutionary one. We 
will emerge from the struggle a great 
deal stronger than we have ever been. 
Think and work, and work and think. 
Stand ready at all times to make sacri- 
fices, if necessary. Attend your meet- 
ings ; encourage the disheartened ones ; 
show them the worth of your organiza- 
tion ; what it has done, and what it in- 
tends to do, to make the lives of its 
members happier, better, more prosper- 
ous and by doing this we lighten the 
burdens of the many toilers. 

Warned to Avoid Open Shop 

In these days, when the so-called 
"American Plan" (open shop), is hold- 
ing the stage it is indeed gratifying to 
note there are still some men left who 
have not lost their power of reasoning. 
Again the State of New Jersey takes the 
initiative, in a statement from the 
"Providence Evening Tribune, we read: 

Some of New Jersey's biggest busi- 
ness men, members of a committee of 
industrial relations of the New Jersey 
State Chamber of Commerce, in a re- 
port nflide public today cautioned all 
employers to avoid "anti-union coer- 
cion," to steer clear of the various 
"open shop" movements, and to co-op- 
erate with the workers in every possible 
way. 

The report pointed out that there are 
three roads open to employers. One is 
the road of constructive achievement 
within the shop; another is that of con- 
structive co-operation between organi- 
zations of employers and those of work- 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



men, and a third is that of the "open 
shop." This last movement, in the 
opinion of the committee, is "under- 
mining the confidence of labor in em- 
ployers and ruining the foundation for 
co-operation between them.'' 

"Similar campaigns in former periods 
of depression," the report continues, 
"have only resulted in redoubled growth 
of unionism and the adoption by it of 
more extreme measures in the periods 
Of prosperity which followed and there 
is no reason to beiieve that the result of 
this campaign will be different. Cam- 
paigns of this nature are leading to op- 
pression by employers and are playing 
into the hands of revolutionary elements. 

"The road of anti-union coercion ap- 
pears to us to be dangerous*. It ought 
by all means to be avoided." 

The committee strongly urges the 
maintenance of personnel departments 
in all big industries, and suggests the 
employment of experts in the problems 
of employers and employes. 

"The efforts of all concerned," the re- 
port concludes, "should be directed to- 
ward devising measures for the regu- 
larization of industry and reduction and 
prevention of unemployment." 

The report was written after a survey 
of nine months. It has been approved 
by the Executive Committee and adopt- 
ed by the trustees of the State Chamber. 
# * * 

New Jersey's Governor Back of 
Organized Labor 

Governor Edwards of New Jersey has 
some very pronounced views on the atti- 
tude of some members of the Court of 
Chancery in his state and in his annual 
message to the Legislature recently he 
did not beat around the bush in criti- 
cising them on their attitude towards 
labor. He said in part: 

"Employers have picked their judges 
to try cases because of the sympathies 
of the members of the court. He would 
have the law changed, or the Constitu- 
tion amended, so that persons charged 
with contempt of the Court of Chancery 
shall be tried personally by the dhan- 
cellor in the court nearest the place 
where the charges were made. Governor 
Edwards cited the recent decision of the 
Supreme Court on picketing, and said : 

"Some of our Vice Chancellors have 
gone so far as to adjudicate that the 
men on strike cannot do anything to aid 
or assist the strike, which, of course, 
would prevent the strikers from con- 



tributing strike benefits or even discus- 
sing the strike among themselves. 

"Lately it has been the practice of 
employers having strike troubles to seek 
out those members of our Court of 
Chancery who hold decided views in re- 
spect of the absence on the part of the 
strikers to picket or attempt to persuade 
others against taking their places, avoid- 
ing the submission of their litigation to 
other members of that court who do not 
hold decided views. 

"In some instances alleged strikers 
and their sympathizers have been sum- 
moned out of the localities where the 
disturbance occurred and have been 
compelled to journey to other counties 
to answer the process of the court. Some 
of the strikers have been tried for con- 
tempt in such counties and at consider- 
able distance away from the place where 
the contempt was alleged to have been 
committed. This is contrary, it seems 
to me, to establish principles of justice 
and equity and should not be continued." 

We heartily agree with the Governor's 
sentiments and only wish there were 
more like him — unprejudiced and un- 
afraid. 

* * * 

Carpenter's Square and Compasses 

We have just received from the au- 
thor Dwight L. Stoddard his latest book, 
"Carpenters Square and Compasses," 
and after going through same carefully 
we feel assured it will be of valuable 
assistance to members of the craft. The 
book is profusely illustrated which 
makes it easier understood. . The re- 
markably lucid presentation of methods 
for framing houses and roofs could not 
be bettered. Especial attention has been 
given to the study and use of the steel 
square, one of the most useful tools a 
carpenter carries in his kit, so that we 
can at once, without error, determine 
the rise and run of hip and common 
rafter, when this is necessary ; and any 
carpenter can readily post himself how 
to do this in a short time by becoming 
acquainted with the methods described 
therein, for a method is provided with 
the steel square for the ready solution 
of every length and cut required. A 
study of the index of the book shows 
other items, too numerous to mention, 
of importance to the carpenter. Our 
readers will remember Mr. Stoddard 
from the numerous articles on Craft 
Problems which he has contributed from 
time to time and we have no hesitancy 



THE CARPENTER 



25 



in recommending to them this iteresting 
treatise which he has so ably edited and 
published. 

* * * 

New York Contemplates the "Can't 
Strike Law" 

Governor Allen's "Can't Strike Law" has 
been the cause of the State of Kansas 
being open to ridicule for some time past 
but in the face of this the State of New 
York now comes to the front in an effort 
to repeat the farce. In commenting on 
this the "New York "World" says in 
part: 

"No more than a glance at the history 
of the Kansas industrial court, compli- 
cated as it is with the strikes it started 
and the strikes it failed to settle will be 
needed to prove to any unprejudiced ob- 
server that the principle of compulsory 
arbitration in industry is inapplicable in 
this country at this time. 

"There may be an age to come in 
which men will work at the bidding of 
a judge while their demands remain un- 
satisfied, but that era has not arrived. 
Even more distant is the date, if the 
present attitude of capital is any indi- 
cation, when employers will revise their 
pay rolls and run their business gener- 
ally — no matter what penalties are pro- 
vided — in accordance with judicial deci- 
sions. The laborer still works when and 
where he pleases, subject only to the 
law of necessity, and money is invested 
when and where the investor likes. 

"New York is too well aware of these 
facts to support and attempt to repeat 
the farce which has made Kansas ridic- 
ulous." 

* * * 

Challenge Ignored 

In an editorial "The Nation" backs up 
Organized Labor's contention that the 
press of the United States has been 
unfair to labor and still is. "The Na- 
tion" further claims that the American 
press is not a consistent partisan. It 
says : 

"It is unfortunate but not surprising 
that the challenge issued by the Bureau 
of Industrial Research to the press of 
the United States to search its soul and 
its files and discover whether it has been 
fair and intelligent in its handling of 
labor news has been pretty generally 
ignored. Except for articles in the 
"New York World" and "Globe" and the 
"Christian Science Monitor," and a few 
sticks in other papers throughout the 
country, little notice has been given to 



(his well-considered demand. Notori- 
ously unjust in many labor controver- 
sies, the press has much to answer for 
to the workers of the country. Its at- 
titude has bred in labor a corresponding 
attitude of hostility, and a vicious circle 
of suspicion and suppression has thus 
been created. Perhaps it is inevitable 
that in the last analysis papers con- 
trolled by big business or by big business 
men are going to deal unjustly with la- 
bor; during bitter revolutionary strug- 
gles the newspapers will shinny on their 
own side. But the American press is 
not a consistent partisan. It aims, when 
too much is not at stake, to "give the 
news," and an increasing number of im- 
portant newspapers are employing spe- 
cial labor editors and seeking to give 
reasonable prominence to the labor ver- 
sion of the facts. The workers' suspi- 
cion of the press is easy to understand, 
but it is bad tactics. Where labor lead- 
ers have known how to approach the 
newspapers through trained publicity 
men or on their own initiative ; where 
they have put out facts in easily assim- 
ilable form, the newspapers have opened 
their columns with surprising hospital- 
ity. It is for the papers to get the news 
intelligently and to print it fairly; it is 
for labor to help them." 

When a paper as prominent as "The 
Nation," takes up the gauntlet it is time 
for Big Business to look to the error of 
its ways. 

* * * 

A Notable Achievement 

The Pullman Manufacturing Company 
have recently patented a new tape hook 
device in connection with their sash bal- 
ances, which will soon appear on the 
market. Carpenters will be especially 
interested in this new Pullman feature, 
as the importance and possibilities of it 
when one considers the expensive labor 
item involved for removal and replace- 
ment of old fashioned weights and cords 
and also the re-finishing of sash and 
frames. The installation or removal of 
balances is a matter of a moment only. 
No radical change of procedure at mill 
or on job is involved — simply the prepa- 
ration of a special, short groove inside of 
sash by means of a 3 V 2 in. cutter in less 
time than a groove for cords, practically 
one setting only of the machine being re- 
quired. The tape may be hooked or un- 
hooked instantly without disturbing the 
sash. You may fit and fasten sash into 
frame, put the stops all in place and 



THE CARPENTER 



leave installation of balances until last 
thing, if so desired. Altogether, we 
think it the most acceptable method of 
window balancing. 

Labor Opens Bank In Philadelphia 

The new Producers and Consumers' 
Bank, which was organized under the 
supervision of the banking committee 
of the Central Labor Union, opened its 
doors for business "Wednesday, February 
1st. This bank was organized under 
and by the direction of the organized 
wage workers of the City of Philadel- 
phia, of which there are approximately 
100 organizations of labor and nearly 
1,300 individuals holding shares of this 
institution. W. T. Allen, Secretary and 
Treasurer. Philadelphia District Council, 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America and also Treasurer 
of L. U. No. 277, is a member of the 
Board of Trustees. The bank, which is 
capitalized at $100,000,000. will cater 
to workmen particularly, and the officers 
and trustees are prominent labor men. 
It is founded on plans of the late Whar- 
ton Barker, one of the most prominent 
bankers of recent years. The Board of 
Trustees has our best wishes for their 
success. 

Capital and Labor 

On this subject, Bishop Schrembs of 
Cleveland, Ohio says : 

"If the open shop movement, which 
seems to be sweeping the country to- 
day, has for its purposes the destruc- 
tion of organized labor, it is a colos- 
sal mistake. 

"The right of the laboring man to 
unite with his fellows for protection 
of his interests and promotion of his 
welfare from every point of view is 
fundamental. Any effort to deprive him 
of this right or to interfere with its 
effective and lawful operation, must be 
frought with the most serious conse- 
quences to society at large. 

"Organized labor has made its blun- 
ders and may be perhaps charged with 
serious excesses here and there. 

"But neither is capital guiltless on 
this score. Capital is more blameable 
in this respect because from a human 
viewpoint it is more powerful, even bet- 
ter organized, and possessed of greater 
resources. 

"Capital and labor are mutually nec- 
essary to each other. Both have the 
right to organize. In fact, both must 



be organized. But instead of warring 
upon each other, both organizations 
should seek a just and effective mode 
of co-operation. 

"Collective bargaining is a fundamen- 
tal right — without it labor is at the 
mercy of the unsc . :ulous employer. 
There are employerr 10 are both rea- 
sonable and just and there are those 
who are unreasonable, selfish, greedy 
and unjust. 

"Collective bargaining will do no harm 
to the man who wishes to conduct his 
business honorably and justly. It is the 
only protection the laboring man has 
against the greedy and slave-driving em- 
ployer. 

"Honest employers have nothing to fear. 

"The question of the hours of labor 
must ever stand in relation to that other 
question of giving the laboring man suf-' 
ficient time for rest, recreation and for 
decent home life. 

It is very hard at times to locate the 
real source of big movements. On the 
surface it would seem this present war 
against Organized Labor is based on the 
necessity of stabilizing conditions and 
bringing them to a normal standard. 

"This, I take it. is the reason alleged 
by most of those who are engaged in this 
movement. 

* * * 

Death Calls Brother L. W. Cooper 

The many readers of Craft Problems 
in our Journal will learn with regret of 
the death of Brother L. W. Cooper, who 
died at his home in Galesburg, 111.. Jan- 
uary 2, 1922. Mr. Cooper had just start- 
ed a series of articles in criticism of Mr. 
Van Gaasbeek's problems on stair build- 
ing and had just completed the third in- 
stallment, recently published, when 
he died. Brother Cooper had been a 
member of the United Brotherhood for 
only a short while, having been initiated 
in L. U. No. 925 of Salinas, Cal., May 5, 
1920, from which Local he transferred 
in June of that year to L. U. No. 360 of 
Galesburg, 111., and in which Local he 
was a member in good standing at the 
time of his death. We extend our deep- 
est sympathy to his bereaved family who 

are left to mourn his untimely death. 
$ # * 

Wife of Board Member Dies 

As we go to press we are in receipt of 
a telegram announcing the death of Mrs. 
Martel, wife of Arthur Martel, member 
of our General Executive Board, at 
Montreal, Que., Can. 



GENERAL OFFICERS 

OF 

THK UNITED BROTHERHOOD 

OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA 

General Office 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

JOHN T. COSGROVE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

GEORGE H. LAKEY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

THOMAS NEALE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind 



General Executive Board 
First District, T. M. GUERIN 
290 Second Ave., Troy, N Y. 



Second District. D. A. POST 
416 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



Third District, JOHN H. POTTS 
646 Melish Ave., Cincinnati, O. 



Fourth District, JAMES P. OGLETREE 
926 Marina St., Nashville, Tenn. 



Fifth District, J. W. WILLIAMS 
3536 Wyoming St., St. Louis, Mo. 



Sixth District, W. A. COLE 

810 Merchants National Bank Building 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
1705 Chambord St., Montreal, Que., Can. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFF'S, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive 
r.or.rd must be sent to the General Secretary. 



Report of First General Vice=President 

John T. Cosgrove for the Quarter 

Ending December 31, 1921 

January 16, 1022. 
Mr. Wm. L. Huteheson, 

General President, 

U. B. of C. & J. of A., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Dear Sir and Brother: 

I herewith submit my report for the 
fourth or final quarter of the year of 
1921, and in presenting this report will 
state a great portion of my time during 
the last quarter has been devoted to 
routine matters at the General Office, 
and upon the various matters dealt with 
I have made complete detailed reports 
upon my return to the office ; in conse- 
quence of which I will only touch briefly 
on the general situation as viewed by me 
in the localities visited. 

During the early part of the month of 
October I proceeded to Washington, D. 
C., and upon my arrival in that city in 
company with Board Member Guerin 
and Brother Howay, met and conferred 
w T ith officials of the United Brotherhood 
of Maintenance of Way and Railroad 
Shop Laborers in an effort to consumate 
an agreement whereby the Maintenance 
of Way and Railroad Shop Laborers' Or- 
ganization would turn over to our Broth- 
erhood all bridge building carpenters, 
who at that time were holding member- 
ship in the above named organization. 
After a conference lasting several hours 
a tentative agreement was reached, but 
the same was reduced to writing the 
officials of the Maintenance of Way Or- 
ganization refused to sign same, offering 
as an excuse that they would be exceed- 
ing their authority unless the same was 
first submitted to their Grand Executive 
Board, with the result that no agreement 
was arrived at, and I am obliged to make 
the statement that I am of the opinion 
that the statements from the officials of 
the Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way 
and Railroad Shop Laborers to the of- 
ficials of the American Federation of La- 
bor are a mere matter of subterfuge and 
lack sincerety. 

From Washington I proceeded to New 
York where I conferred with the officials 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



of the New York District Council rela- 
tive to the existing conditions in that 
city and the progress they were making 
looking towards the consumation of an 
agreement with their employers for the 
year of 1922. 

From New York I returned to the 
General Offire and took up my usual 
duties. 

My next visit was to Newark, N. J., 
where I discussed with officials of the 
Essex County District Council the condi- 
tions existing in that district, and during 
my visit attended an entertainment 
given by the Cooncil, which was held in 
connection with a movement inaugurat- 
ed for the purpose of raising funds to 
purchase a building to be used as a per- 
manent home for the District Council. 

My next trip was to Lafayette, Ind., 
where I attended a meeting of L. U. No. 
215 and explained to them the purposes 
of our organization, and advised them 
as to the proper course to follow in deal- 
ing with contractors from other cities 
who were doing work within their juris- 
diction. 

My next visit was to Erie, Pa., where 
I attended and addressed a mass meeting 
of L. U. No. 81. While in Erie the 
Executive Board of the Pennsylvania 
State Council of Corpenters was in ses- 
sion and I also availed myself of the 
opportunity of attending their Board 
meeting. 

My next trip was to Norfolk, Va., 
where I attended a special meeting of 
the Tidewater District Council relative 
to differences existing between that 
Council and L. U. No. 605 of Ports- 
mouth, and gave instructions to the 
Council and L. U. No. 605, which, I am 
pleased to report, are being carried out, 
and I am sure will create harmony in 
the district as well as stabilizing the 
District Council. 

My final visit during the quarter was 
to Cleveland, O., on a matter of import- 
ance to our Brotherhood, and upon my 
return to the General Office I made a 
complete detailed report to you covering 
same. 

During the fourth quarter of 1921, in 
addition to visiting the various cities 
herein mentioned, I passed upon one 
hundred fourteen (114) sets of By> 
Laws, Trade Rules and Working Agree- 
ments, ninety (90) of which came from 
Local Unions, twenty (20) from District 
Councils, and four (4) from State Coun- 
cils. 



I also issued five hundred (500) 
transfer labels, twenty-two (22) rubber 
mill stamps, and one (1) brass die of 
our Label during the past quarter. 

During the months of October, No- 
vember and December, nineteen (19) 
firms were granted the use of our Label 
who previously had not used the same 
on their products. Eight (8) firms that 
had used our Label suspended business 
for reasons unknown to me, and four 
(4) firms were reported to this office as 
having been deprived of the use of our 
Label for failure to continue to observe 
union conditions. 

Trusting this report may merit your 
approval, and with best wishes and 
kindest regards, I remain, 

Yours fraternally, 

JOHN T. COSGROVE, 
First General Vice-President. 



Report of Second General Vice=President 

Geo. H. Lakey for the Quarter 

Ending December 31, 1921 

January 12, 1922. 
Mr. Wm. L. Hutcheson, 

General President, 

U. B. of C. & J. of A., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Deor Sir and Brother: 

I herewith submit my report for the 
fourth quarter, October, November and 
December, 1921. 

Early in October the fire-proof or hol- 
low metal trim situation became very 
acute at Cleveland, O., and in order to 
get at all the details entering into the 
situation it was necessary that I make 
three different trips to that city, as well 
as surrounding territory in Ohio. The 
information gathered has been imparted 
to you, and the whole situation now in 
your hands in process of adjustment; 
hence needs no further mention here. 

Later in October I proceeded to 
Wheeling, W. Va., where a stubborn 
fight has been on since last spring. In 
the start the fight was camouflaged as 
an effort on the part of the contractors 
to bring about a reduction in wages ; 
later it developed that the real purpose 
was the destruction of the unions, and 
in their efforts to bring this about the 
employers resorted to a most elaborate 
spy system. How any of the unions sur- 
vived this system speaks well for their 
solidarity and definite knowledge of the 
purpose for which they were organized. 
None of our Locals have been destroyed, 
and it is my belief that they will emerge 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



tronger and better for the experience 
hey have been through. 

While in that territory I visited 
Jteubenville, O., and found our Local 
here in good shape. The principal 
rouble is lack of work. 

I then took up detail matters here at 
he office and on these have reported to 
'ou in special reports. 

Pursuant to your orders I proceeded 
o Chicago where I met our officers, com- 
mittees, etc., as well as some of the em- 
>loyers. Also attended the meeting of 
he Building Trades Council as well as 
>ur District Council, and strange though 
t may seem, when President Jensen of 
he District Council and myself called on 
he President of the contractors we were 
old that the contractors were not in a 
>osition to meet and deal with their own 
>mployes without the consent of a "so- 
•alled Citizens Committee," who seem 
o have appointed themselves as "guard- 
ans" of the building public, but in my 
)pinion the real purpose is an effort to 
fasten open shop conditions on Chicago. 

In conclusion I want to thank you and 
rour colleagues as well as the local of- 
icers and members with whom I have 
?ome in contact during the past year, for 
ihe splendid co-operation my humble 
?fforts have received at your hands. 
Fraternally yours, 

GEO. H. LAKEY, 
Second General Vice-President. 



Proceedings of the First Quarterly Ses= 

sion of the General Executive 

Board, 1922 

January 17, 1922. 

The first quarterly meeting of the 
General Executive Board for 1922 was 
called to order on the above date by 
General President Hutcheson. All mem- 
bers present. 

The reports of the General President, 
First General Vice-President and Second 
General Vice-President for the quarter 
ending December 31, 1921, were re- 
ceived by the General Executive Board 
aud referred to the General Secretary for 
publication in "The Carpenter." 

An invitation was received from the 
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators and 
Paperhangers of America, Lafayette, 
Iud., to the opening of the General Of- 
fice Building of that organization to take 
place Thursday, January 26, 1922. The 
invitation was accepted and the General 
Executive Board will attend in a body. 



Appeal of Albert F. Wood, L. U. No. 
55 from the decision of the Gen ?ral 
President in the case of Albert F. Wood 
vs. L. U. No. 55, Denver, Colo. The de- 
cision of the General President was sus- 
tained on grounds set forth therein and 
appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of L. U. No. 624 from the de- 
cision of (he General President in the 
case of Reinholt Steinhilber vs. L. U. No. 
624, Brockton, Mass. The decision of 
the General President was sustained on 
grounds set forth therein and appeal dis- 
missed. 

Appeal of B. W. Post for Conrad An- 
derson from the decision of the General 
President in the case of Post for Ander- 
son vs. the St. Louis Mo. District Coun- 
cil. The decision of the General Presi- 
dent was sustained on grounds set forth 
therein and appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of L. U. No. 1846 from the 
decision of the General President in the 
case of S. H. Hinson et al. vs. L. U. No. 
1846, New Orleans, La. After reviewing 
all the evidence in the case the decision 
of the General President was sustained 
on grounds set forth therein and the ap- 
peal was dismissed. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., L. U. 514. — In the 
request of L. U. No. 514 relative to pen- 
alty imposed on a former member of 
said Local admitted to membership in 
L. U. No. 368, Allentown, Pa., the op- 
inion of the General President is ap- 
proved by the General Executive Board. 

Appea lfrom L. U. No. 742, Decatur, 
111., from the decision of the General 
President in the case of L. U. No. 742 
vs. O. M. Moore and W. H. Moore of L. 
U. No. 44. The decision as rendered by 
the General President was sustained on 
grounds set forth therein and appeal was 
dismissed. 

Appeal of L. U. No. 1462, Bristok, 
Pa., from the action of the General Pres- 
ident in awarding jurisdiction to L. U. 
No. 31, Trenton, N. J., over Morrisville, 
Pa. The action of the General President 
in granting jurisdiction to L. U. No. 31 
over Morrisville, Pa., was concurred in 
by the General Executive Board. 

January IS, 1922. 

South Shore District Council of Long- 
Island, N. Y. An appropriation of $400 
was made for organizing work, to be 
spent under the supervision of the Gen- 
eral President, 

Magna, Utah, L. U. No. 1984. — Re- 
quest for an appropriation for organizing 
purposes. Request denied. 



THE CARPENTER 



Roekford. 111.. L. U. No. 1523. — Re- 
quest for an appropriation of S500 for 
organizing purposes. Request denied. 

Savannah, Ga., L. U. No. 256. — An 
appropriation of $162 was made for or- 
ganizing purposes to be spent under the 
supervision of the General President. 

Montgomery County. Pa.. District 
Council, Norristown, Pa. — Request for 
an appropriation of $500 for organizing 
purposes denied. 

Charleston District Council. Charles- 
ton. S. C. Request for an appropriation 
of $600 for the employment of a Busi- 
ness Agent. Request denied. 

Flint. Mich. L. U. No. 1373. — An ap- 
propriation of $400 was made for or- 
ganizing work, to be spent under the 
supervision of the General President. 

Augusta. Ga.. L. U. No. 283. — Request 
for an appropriation of $300 for organ- 
izing purposes denied. 

Chattanooga. Tenn.. L. U. No. 74. — 
Request for an appropriation of $200 for 
organizing purposes denied. 

St. Louis. Mo.. L. U. Xo. 1560. — Re- 
quest for an appropriation denied. 

An invitation from the United Textile 
Workers of America to con-tribute in the 
erection of a monument was received 
and declined. 

The recommendations of the General 
President in reference to establishing 
one District Council in Westchester 
County. New York, was approved by the 
General Executive Board. 

In the matter of consolidating the 
Local Unions in Atlanta. Ga., and 
Toledo. O.. the General Executive Board 
sanctioned same. 

Appeal of the Colorado State Federa- 
tion of Labor for the financial assistance 
of the United Brotherhood to assist in 
an appeal in the case of the Industrial 
Commission of Colorado against the 
packing house employes. The General 
Executive Board ruled that in view of 
the fact that the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters for years has defended its 
members in law suits all over the coun- 
try without asking for financial assist- 
ance from other unions, it could not see 
why we should be called on now to as- 
sist individual states and it is the op- 
inion of the General Executive Board 
that appeals of this kind from State Fed- 
erations of Labor should be sent to the 
American Federation of Labor. 

Communication received from L. U. 
No. 1462. Bristol. Pa., relative to the 
case of John Thompson of L. U. No. 31, 



Trenton. N. J., and Peter Reiser of L. 
U. No. 1856 of Philadelphia. Pa. No 
new evidence having been submitted by 
L. U. No. 1462, the case cannot be re- 
considered. 

The law suits pending in Cleveland, 
O.. Boston. Mass., and San Francisco. 
Cal., were referred to the General Pres- 
ident for further attention. 

Williamsport, Pa., L. U. No. 691. — 
Movement to retain same scale of wages. 
80c per hour, effective April 1, 1922. 
Official sanction granted ; financial aid 
to be considered later, in such sums as 
the funds will warrant, as reports are 
made to the General Office. 

Peckville, Pa.. L. U. No. 1678.— 
Movement to retain same scale of wages, 
80e per hour, effective April 1. 1922. 
Official sanction granted ; financial aid 
to be considered later, in. such sums as 
the funds will warrant, as reports are 
made to the General Office. 

Bethlehem. Pa., L. U. No. 406. — 
Movement for an increase in wages 
from 70c to 80c per hour, effective May 
1. 1922. The matter was referred to the 
General President and members of the 
General Executive Board from the Sec- 
ond District for investigation. 

January 19, 1922. 

Cheboygan. Mich.. L. U. No. 2148.— 
Movement for the same scale of wages, 
72c per hour, effective March 1. 1922. 
Official sanction only, granted. The 
wages of apprentices to be regulated ac-' 
cording to the length of their employ- 
ment at the trade. 

Middle Anthracite District Council, 
Pa., (L. U. No. 905. Freehand, Pa.) — 
Movement for an increase in wages from 
76c to 87% c per hour, and 44-hour 
week, effective April 1. 1922. Official 
sanction granted, financial aid to be con- 
sidered later, in such sums as the funds 
will warrant, as reports are received at 
the General Office. 

Harrisburg. HI., L. U. No. 669. — 
Movement for the same scale of wages, 
Si per hour, effective March 1. 1922. 
Official sanction only, granted. 

Reading. Pa.. L. U. No. 492. — Move- 
ment for the same scale of wages of 75c 
per hour, effective May 1, 1922. Official 
sanction granted ; financial aid to be con- 
sidered later, in such sums as the funds 
will warrant, as reports are made to the 
General Office. 

Sherbrooke, Que., Can., L. U. No. 
1684. — Movement for an increase in 
wages from 50c to 60c per hour, and the 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



hour day. Official sanction granted; 
inancial aid to be considered later, in 
uch sums as the funds will warrant, as 
eports are made to the General Office. 

Kansas State Council of Carpenters' 
ecommendation that the General Execu- 
ive Board bring before the next General 
.Convention a plan to create and main- 
ain a National Home and Hospital for 
lisabled carpenters, their wives and 
iiinor children. The General Executive 
3oard referred the matter to the next 
jeneral Convention. 

I Twin Falls, Ida., L. U. No. 1116. — 

Resolution received from Local asking 

hat the per capita tax be reduced from 

40e to 30c per month. Request denied, 

nasmuch as a reduction in per capita 

ax would necessarily have to carry with 

t a reduction in death, disability and 

j strike benefits. 

Montreal, Que., Can., District Council. 
• — Renewal of agreement calling for 
ivage of 75c per hour, 8-hour day, effec- 
tive April 1, 1922. Official sanction 
granted, financial aid to be considered 
later, in such sums as the funds will 
warrant, as reports are made to the Gen- 
eral Office. 

Denver, Colo., L. U. No. 55. — Request 
to submit for referendum vote of mem- 
bership amendment to General Constitu- 
tion. Request denied, as laws were not 
complied with. 

The invitation from the International 
Union of Wood Workers to attend its 
Convention in Vienna, Austria, in June, 
1922, received, and it was decided that 
the United Brotherhood be represented 
by two delegates, the General President 
to be one of the delegates and he to ap- 
point the other. 

The following full accountings were 
made to the General Executive Board for 
remittances sent the following Local 
Unions and District Councils for the re- 
lief of men locked out or on strike: 
L. U. No. 1505, Berlin, N. H., 
July, August, September, 
October, November, Decem- 
ber $1,536.00 

L. U. No. 491, Corinth, N. Y., 
June, July, August, Septem- 
ber, October, November, 

1921 4,788.00 

L. U. No. 229, Glens Falls, N. 
Y., June, July, August, Sep- 
tember, October, November, 

1921 1,389.00 

District Council, Portland, Me., 

1921 7,176.00 



L. U. No. 258, International 

Falls, Minn., June, 1921 . . . 400.00 

L. U. No. 1338, Jonquieres, 

Que., May, June, 1921 2,070.00 

L. U. No. 286, Great Falls, 
Mont., September, October, 
1921 2,000.00 

L. U. 2289, Chicago, 111., Sep- 
tember, October, 1921 23,946.00 

L. U. No. 1260, Iowa City, 

Iowa, May, 1921 246.00 

District Council, Ohio Valley, 
Wheeling, Va., July, August, 
1921 8,268.00 

District Council, Morris and 
Union-Madison, N. J., July, 
August, 1921 570.00 

L. U. No. 1441, Cannonsburg, 

Pa., September, 1921 114.00 

L. U. No. 183, Peoria, 111., May, 

June, July, August, 1921.. 5,202.00 

L. U. No. 206, New Castle, 

Pa., April, May, June. 1921 1,524.00 

L. U. No. 81, Erie, Pa., March, 

April, May. June, July, 1921 5,956.00 

L. U. No. 1835, Waterloo, la., 
March, April, May, June, 
1921 3,859.00 

District Council, Fall River, 
Mass., May, June, July, 
August, 1921 11,862.00 

District Council, Worcester, 

Mass., April, 1921. 2,268.00 

L. U. 1456, New York, N. Y„ 

April, May, June, 1921 32,874.00 

District Council, Pittsburgh, 
Pa., June, July. August, 
September, October, 1921 . .71,S63.00 

L. U. 948, Sioux City, Iowa, 

May, June, 1921 2,598.00 

L. U. No. 1963, Livermore 
Falls, Me., May to Decem- 
ber, 1921 7,446.00 

Albany, N. Y., District Council, 

April, May, June, July, 1921 5,658.00 
Corinth, N. Y., L. U. No. 491. — Re- 
quest for continuation of strike benefits. 

Request denied. 

Livermore Falls, Me.. L. U. No. 1963. 

— Request for continuation of strike 

benefits. Request denied. 

Berlin, N. H., L. U. 1505. — Request 

for continuation of strike benefits. Re- 
quest denied. 

Ft. Erwards, N. Y.. L. U. No. 673. — 

Request for continuation of strike bene- 
fits. Request denied. 

Glen Park, N. Y., L. I'. No. 439. — 

Request for continuation of strike bene- 
fits. Request denied. 



How to Read Blue- 
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What You 
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How to Be a 

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What You 
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What You Should 
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How to Us 
Steel Squan 
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How to Write and 
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What You Should 
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How to Estiii 
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How to Care 
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that You Should 
how About Plas- 
Iring and Painting. 



Name. 



Address. 



City. ..n.im.iu i . i . . . ^ . ; State. 



Reference. 



■^■BPSfflnwBBnsssnsiEaKKar.; 



Please fill out all of these lines. 



THE CARPENTER 



Great Falls, Mont., L. U. No. 286. — sion of the General Treasurer was sus- 

Request for continuation of strike bene- tained on grounds set forth therein and 

fits. Request denied. appeal dismissed. 

Roswell, N. M., L. U. No. 511. — An Appeal of Hugo Hjalmarsen, L. U. No. 

appropriation of $180 was made for the 787, Brooklyn, N. Y., from the decision 

relief of men on strike. of the General Treasurer in disapproving 

New York, N. Y., L. U. 569. — Request claim for disability. The decision of the 

for an appropriation to cover tax. Re- General Treasurer was sustained on the 

quest denied. grounds that paragraph A, Section 51, of 

Knoxville, Tenn., L. U. No. 50. — Re- our General Laws state that a member 

quest for an appropriation of $500 for who becomes permanently disabled for 

organizing purposes. The matter was life by accidental injuries received not 

laid over until next meeting of the Gen- less than one year after becoming a 

eral Executive Board. member, etc. It is therefore apparent 

Washington, D. C, L. U. No. 132. — that the intent of the law is that the 

Requesting the General Executive Board date of the accident must be more than 

to reimburse Local Union for attorney one year after the date of the member 

fees due to action of a member of Local being admitted to the Brotherhood to 

taking claim for benefits to court. Ac- entitle him to donation and the amount 

tion was deferred by the General Execu- of donations for two, three, four and five 

tive Board pending result of the trial of years would therefore be reckoned on 

charges preferred against the member. same basis. The appeal is therefore dis- 

January 20, 1922. missed. 

Utah State Council of Carpenters, Appeal of Martha E. Doland from the 
Salt Lake City, Utah. — Appealing for decision of the General Treasurer in dis- 
financial assistance on behalf of four approving claim for death benefits of her 
Local Unions. The request was denied husband. John Roland, L. U. No. 420, 
for the reason that the General Execu- Detroit, Mich. The General Executive 
tive Board ruled that requests of this Board sustained the decision of the Gen- 
nature must come direct from the Local eral Treasurer on grounds set forth 
Unions to receive consideration of the therein and appeal was dismissed. 
Board. January 21, 1922. 

Appeal of Clement Tarditi, L. U. No. The quarte rly audit of the books and 

36, Oakland, Cal., from the decision of accounts was taken up at this time, 

the General Treasurer in disapproving iqoo 

claim for disability benefits was laid ■ y ' 

... ,. , ,. „ ,, ^ Audit of books and accounts eon- 

over untd the next meeting of the Gen- 
eral Executive Board and in the mean- 
time the case to be taken up with the January 24, 1922. 
Local Union Audit of books and accounts con- 
Appeal of R. S. Greer, L. U. No. 753, tinued. 
Beaumont, Tex., from the decision of the January 25, 1922. 
General Treasurer in disapproving claim Audit of books and accounts corn- 
for wife's funeral donation. The deci- pleted. 

January 26, 1922. 
The following report was made by the special committee : 
To the Members of the General Executive Board. 

Gentlemen : — We find the following bonds and certificates of indebtedness in 
the safe deposit vault : 

50 Second Liberty Loan, $1,000.00 each, 4%% interest $50,000.00 

15 Third Liberty Loan, $5,000.00 each; 4%% interest 75,000.00 

9 Third Liberty Loan, $500.00 each, .4%% interest 4,500.00 

35 Third Liberty Loan, $100.00 each, 4%% interest 3,500.00 

10 Fourth Liberty Loan, $10,000.00 each, 4% interest 100,000.00 

3 Fourth Liberty Loan, $500.00 each, 4%% interest 1,500.00 

Total $234,500.00 

5 Victory Loan Bonds, Canada, $5,000.00 5%% interest $25,000.00 

25 Victory Loan Bonds, Canada, $1,000.00, 5y 2 % interest. . . . 25,000.00 

Total $50,000.00 



THE CARPENTER 

Total in Bonds $284,500.00 

Certificates of Indebtedness 

No. 1834, March 15, 1921, 5%% interest $150,000.00 

No. 1881, June 15, 1921, 4 V±% interest 50,000.00 



Total .$200,000.00 

NOTE — Two $10,000.00 bonds, $20,000.00 is represented by receipt from George 
V. Tibbies, Clerk of Common Pleas Court, Hamilton County, O., as an attach- 
ment Bond in case of Cook vs. United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America. 

(Signed) 

T. M. GUERIN, 
D. A. POST. 



Sioux City, Iowa, L. U. No. 948. — An 
appropriation of $252 was made for the 
relief of men locked out as per report 
submitted to the General Executive 
Board. 

Tonopah, Nev., L. U. No. 1417. — An 
appropriation of $300 was made for the 
relief of men locked out. 

A communication was received from 
Mr. W. P. Welts, Director of the Na- 
tional Industrial Division of the Near 
East Relief, thanking the United Broth- 
erhood for the publicity giving condi- 
tions as they exist in the Near East, 
through the medium of our official 
Journal. 

The General Secretary reported the 
progress made in compiling and writing 
the history of the United Brotherhood 
and that he finds it a very tedious job. 
The work of research and correspond- 
ence with unions, officers and members 
in all parts of the country in search of 
information is a slow process, but with 
all that he has now reached the year 
1900. In the near future he proposes 
submitting what he has ready to the 
printer to be set up in galley form and 
corrected later. 

Vallejo, Cal., L. U. No. 180. — Report 
of conditions received by the General 
Executive Board, together with copy of 
proposed agreement. The Board ruled 
that the usual financial assistance will 
be given when the information desired 
is received at the General Office. 

San Jose, Cal., District Council. — Re- 
quest for assurance of financial aid from 
General Office to combat non-union shop 
conditions. The Board ruled that finan- 
cial aid at this time cannot be assured 
until the information desired is supplied 
to the General Office. 

Los Angeles, Cal., District Council. — 
The organizing campaign of Los Angeles 
and vicinity was agreed to and the Gen- 
eral President was authorized to give 



whatever assistance he considers neces- 
sary. 

Chicago, 111., District Council. — Re- 
questing financial assistance in behalf 
of L. U. No. 2200, Chicago, 111. The 
General Executive Board ruled that in- 
asmuch as the members - of L. U. No. 
2200 not having been called on strike 
or lockout, the General Executive Board 
cannot grant financial aid. 

Toronto, Ont., Can., District Council. 
— Request for continuation of organizing 
appropriation. Referred to the General 
President for further investigation and 
action. 

Mobile, Ala., District Council.- — Re- 
quest for an appropriation for organizing 
purposes. Referred to the General Pres- 
ident for investigation and action. 

Baltimore, Md., District Council. — Re- 
quest for an appropriation for organiz- 
ing purposes. Referred to the General 
President for investigation. 

Portland, Ore., L. U. No. 2416. — The 
sum of $200 was appropriated for or- 
ganizing purposes to be spent under the 
supervision of the General President. 
January 27, 1922. 

Cincinnati, O., District Council. — An 
appropriation of $173 was made for the 
relief of men on strike as balance of 
benefits. 

Appeal of L. U. No. 97, New Britain, 
Conn., from the decision of the General 
Treasurer in the disapproved claim for 
disability benefits of Daniel De Bay. 
The decision of the General Treasurer 
was sustained on grounds set forth 
therein and appeal dismissed. 

Peru, 111., L. U. No. 195. — Report rel- 
ative to lockout was considered by the 
General Executive Board after which it 
was referred to the resident officers for 
further investigation. 

There being no further business to 
come before the Board, the minutes were 
read and the session was adjourned. The 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



next meeting to be held commencing 
Monday, March 20, 1922. 

Respectfully submitted, 
FRANK DUFFY, 
Secretary G. 



E. B. 



Locals Chartered In January 

Piedras Negras, Coah, Mex. 
Sliidler, Okla. Athens, Tex. 

Eagle Pass, Tex. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Pomona, Cal. Huntington Park, Cal. 

Murray, Ky. Sulphur, Okla. 

New Castle, Ind. Oakland City, Ind. 

Paris, 111. 

Total, 12 Local Unions. 

• 

What's the Real Good? 

"What's the real good?" 
I asked in musing mood. 



Order, said the law <~oiir63 
Knowledge, said the school^ 
Truth, said the wise man; 
Pleasure, said the fool; 
Love, said the maiden; 
Beauty, said the page; 
Freedom, said the dreamer; 
Home, said the sage; 
Equity, the seer, 
Spoke my heart full sadly : 
"The answer is not here." 
Then within my bosom 
Softly this I heard: 
"Each heart holds the secret! 
Kindness is the word." 

— John Boyle O'Reilly. 



International Brotherhood of Painters Open Their New Home 

The new International Headquarters of the Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators 
and Paperhangers of America formally opened Thursday, February 26, at Lafayette, 
Ind. The opening was attended by representatives of many unions, among whom, 
were our General Officers and General Executive Board. And from all reports they 




General Office Building of The Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators and 
Paperhangers of America, LaFayette, Indiana 

thoroughly enjoyed the occasion. The Painters have a magnificent building well 
equipped for the management of their business. It is a four story structure, 60 ft. 
wide and 131 ft. deep and cost $200,000. The accompanying cut is a good picture 
of the new home and it is one that the membership may well be proud of. 



Claims Paid 




CLAIMS PAID DURING THE MONTH OF JANUARY, 1922 



[aim 
So. 



Name of Deceased or 
Disabled 



Local I Membership 
Union Yrs. Mos. 



Cause of Death or 
Disability 



Am't 
Paid 



1732 Wilhelmina Stigter 

1733 Mary Wilson 

1734 Otto Carlson 

1735 Amos Brewer 

1730 Edna Grimes 

!!737 Mrs. John A. Carlson 

'38 Martha Bund 

i39 Laura E. Miller 

:740 John R. Williams (Dis.)... 

741 Patrick J. Nally (Dis.) 

742 T. W. Coons 

T43 Frank Larson (Dis.) 

'44 Erancis A. Sefton 

'45 Louise Buse 

740 Swante A. Berg 

747 William E. Hagan 

748 Joseph Drinkwine 

749 Ancy Belle Kirkland 

750 Bertha J. Conrad 

751 Esther Meyer 

752 Matilda Witzel 

753 M. S. Hare 

754 Sarah Karrick 

755 Mrs. E. F. Van Walrauen. . 
[ 756 Charles Kenick 

757 Charles W. Hubbard 

758 Michael J. O'Brien 

759 Aaron Dean 

760 James A. Lee 

761 Martin Straka 

762 Samuel A. Wyatt 

763 Oscar Holdman 

764 Burton A. Gerdiner 

765 Emma Brosseau 

766 John Schild 

767 Augusta L. Hedberg 

768 Fred Walter Johnson 

'769 Andrew C. Schneider (Dis.) 

770 James A. Greer 

771 Joseph J. S. McManus 

772 Julius Leboff 

773 Fannie Collins 

; 774 Nellie W. Coe 

775 Mary E. Adams 

776 Filippo Turcone 

777 Harry Rasmussen 

778 Charles W. Bridwell 

779 Mary Elizabeth Hanes 

780 Christian Anderson 

781 Otis W. Miller 

7*2 Marv Miller 

783 Mary Noe 

784 Annie Gertrude Bedell 

785 L. Nettie Agnes Thompson. . 

786 Virginia Varin Masse 

787 Frank Ruther 

788 Angeline Crosby 

789 Charles A. Benson 

790 Lucas Cormier 

791 Alson O. Nickerson 

i 792 Benson B. Hicks 

793 Richard Williams (Dis.)... 

"94 Columbus N. Adams 

795 Sabra Isabel Schofield 

"96 S. S. Haines (Dis.) 

797 Herbert Hulme 

798 Joseph J. McCarty 

799 John B. Sessions'. 

1=800 Thomas J. Bishop. 

=801 Mrs. F. Beck.... 

=802 Samuel S. Ellis 

=803 Alexander Radcliffe 

804 Louis Weitsel 

805 Joseph Lingg 

806 Katherine Perkins . 

=807 Frances Hosticka 



4 


10 


8 


10 


29 


1 


11 


4 


11 


50 


1 


1 


75 


3 


5 


87 


2 


11 


87 


13 


8 


116 


1 


10 


125 


7 


5 


132 


8 


S 


139 


3 


6 


183 


15 


9 


328 


6 


11 


374 


21 


4 


434 


19 


7 


541 


20 





S67 


3 


3 


923 


8 


3 


976 


19 


7 


1324 


1 


7 


1560 


4 





1723 





4 


1725 


18 


3 


1920 


5 





2085 


2 


2 


3 


12 


5 


10 


29 


6 


31 


33 


7 


31 


11 


6 


54 


20 . 


9 


61 


14 


8 


61 


21 


5 


62 


15 


3 


67 


15 


10 


72 


27 


2 


131 


3 


4 


165 


. 2 


11 


199 


10 


3 


208 


21 


1 


276 


22 


7 


330 


2 


5 


348 


13 


6 


393 


17 


3 


568 


1 


9 


632 


2 


3 


635 


14 


5 


716 


2 


11 


769 


10 


8 


791 


15 


4 


841 


9 


2 


985 


9 


8 


1134 


11 


5 


1292 


5 


7 


1302 


15 


2 


1558 


S 


4 


1784 


11 


11 


21SS 


21 


1 


2237 


1 


8 


40 


1C • 


6 


55 


31 


7 


273 


18 


6 


273 


19 


9 


427 


2 


11 


624 


11 


6 


763 


9 


7 


797 


9 


11 


904 


3 


7 


1258 


3 


3 


1436 


IS 


10 


1960 


2 


11 


1964 


1 


3 


2066 


2 


11 





35 


8 


20 


1 


10 


26 


10 


9 


39 


6 






Pneumonia 

Carcinoma 

Suicide 

Heart failure 

Asphyxia 

Sepsis 

Apoplexy 

Typhoid fever 

Accidental 

Fall 

Accidental 

Accidental 

Heart failure 

Leukemia 

Pneumonia 

Pneumonia 

Cancer 

Heart trouble 

Heart failure 

Embolism 

Myocarditis 

Cirrhosis of liver. . . 
Bright's disease .... 

Gall trouble 

Apoplexy 

Tuberculosis 

Cerebral hemorrhage 
Bright's disease .... 

Apoplexy 

Myocarditis 

Encephalitis 

Heart trouble 

Typhoid fever 

Pneumonia 

Arterio sclerosis . . . 

Cancer 

Gangrene 

Fall 

Apoplexy 

Nephritis 

Accidental 

Tuberculosis 

Pneumonia , 

Eclampsia , 

Angina pectoris 

Appendicitis 

Meningitis , 

Cerebral hemorrhage 

Carcinoma 

Cancer 

Heart disease , 

Diabetis 

Pneumonia 

Pneumonia 

Tuberculosis 

Arterio sclerosis .. i, [ 

Dementia /.'.'. 

Bright's disease, \ \ \ 
Embolism ... . , 
Accidental . % . „ [ \\ \ 
Tuberculosis 

Fall .»...."".'] 

Embolism ]' m ' m 

Periton' cis 

Fall '.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Embolism. ......... 

Nephritis .......... 

Pneumonia 

Apoplc-xy 

Nephritis 

Heart trouble 

Accidental 

CelulitisJ 

Accidental 

Diabetis 

Tuberculosis 



$ 75.00 

75.00 

200.00 

50.0(1 

75.00 

50.00' 

75.00 

25.00^ 

4OO-..00' 

400.00 

50.00< 

400.00' 

75.00> 

75.00' 

300.00) 

300.00 

50.00 

75.00 

75.00 

25.00 

75.00 

50.00 

75.00 

75.00 

100.0P„ 

300.00> 

30Q.Q0< 

300.W 

12;kO0' 

500.00' 

300.00' 

300.00' 

300.00' 

7.~./'0' 

3O8UB0! 

75.001 

ioo.oo> 

400.00> 
300.0'.;* 
3Q0JMI 
lCKkW 

75/ »0 

•J5 00 
1OO.00 
3f,0.00 

25.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

75.00 

75.00 

75.00 

75.00 

■\-:.r, 00 

75.00 

50.00 

300.00 

300.no 

300.00 

400.00 

100.00 

75.00 

100.00 

75.00 

50.00 

50.00 

125.00 

50.00' 

50.00 
100.00' 
300.00' 
50.00 
75.00 
75.00 



38 



THE CARPEXTER 



Claim 
No. 



Name of Deceased or 
Disabled 



| Local 
I Union 



Membership 
Yrs. Mos. 



Cause of Death or 
Disability 



Am't 
Paid 

4, ,-J Cm 

BOOM 

i'o/ 

300.0C 
75.0C 
T5.(K 

300.0* 
300.CK 

4oo!o( 

S'.-O.i 

3 .'0.C 
75.' 
50 n 

12; o 



300. 
300. 



50.01 
75.0< ! 
25.0< 

30O.C" 

3o0.a 

75:0« 

25.0* 

300.C 

75.0 

300.'" 

300.0< 

300.0- 

300.' 

400.C 

200.O 

75.0' 

SO.Of 

400.0 

75.0 

75.0 ; 

400.0 

100.0 

200.0 

30O.0 

200.0 

300.0 

300.0 

300.0 | 

75.0 

300.0 j 

100.0 > 

75.0 

75.0| 

150.0 

300.0 

75.0: 

50.0 

75.0' 

75.0 

75.0 

50.0! 

75.0' 

300. 1 : 
son.': 

300.0 I 

125.0 

300.G 

75.C 

50.C 

300X 
125.C 
300/ 
300.C 
50.C 
400.C 

50.C 
125 ' 
300. 



44808 Harrv Vanderstine (Dis.,) . 

44809 Lewis Rockwell 

44810 Lillie E. Walter 

44811 Thomas W. Gerdes 

44812 George Wach 

44S13 Ida Rise 

44814 Mary Grace Spillman 

44815 Edward William Marsh.... 

44816 Frank Koerner 

44817 Ella Rothang 

44818 Lewis Van Popering (Dis.) 

44819 Nelson Oliver 

44820 Elmer Smith 

44S21 Mrs. L. L. Martin 

44822 Cvnthia W. Rennev 

44S23 Cornelius Mansel 

44824 Julia K. Littleton 

44825 Michael Berezowskv 

44826 William H. Clavton 

44827 Guy C. Welliver* 

44828 Frank Springman 

44829 Michael Larinkanis 

44830 Marceline Guertin 

44831 Effie Belle Cross 

44832 Flora Oman Spiker 

44833 Elizabeth Krautscheid .... 

44834 John William Matchett. . . 
44S35 Otto B. Johnson 

44836 James Yvleto 

44837 Julia Olson 

44835 Marv C. Morris 

44839 Alfred Johnson 

44840 Isabelle E. Murrav 

44841 Rov Blackwell Jones 

44842 N. " Olson 

44843 Richard H. Worley 

44S44 Julius Lenz 

44845 W. M. Morris (Dis.) 

44846 Robert E. Gordon 

44847 Karen Anderson 

44848 John Ferguson 

44849 A. B. Clark fDis.) 

44850 Charles Edward King 

44851 Anna C. Jensen 

44852 H. J. Amos (Dis.) 

44S53 Isaac Snow 

44854 Michael Holland, Jr 

44855 Elzear John Mousseau.... 

44856 Arthur P. Fontaine 

44857 George W. Thompson 

44858 Mauritz N. Lindstrom . . . . 

44859 Joseph Alose 

44860 Alphonsine Lavois 

44861 Emil Mundinger 

44862 James A. Moore 

44863 Laura P. LaPointe 

44864 Mamie Barnes 

44865 John Groff 

44866 John King 

44867 Dana A. Jones 

44868 Adah Tanheiss 

44869 Marv M. Bover 

44870 Annie S. Ca'rlson 

44871 Jennie Mavbelle Webb 

44872 John W. Paxton 

44873 Blanche Musielak 

44874 John Evans 

44875 Patrick McDonald 

44876 Ray C. Merwin 

44877 Andrew Carlson 

44878 Frank O. Meliln 

44879 Valentine Schumert 

44880 Margaret Phillips 

44881 Ame<die Fontaine 

44882 Baraba Pechauer 

44883 Zillia Vreeland 

44884 Charles E. Mitchell 

44S85 Fred W. Bailev 

44886 August Ericson 

44887 Richard Enoch Cox 

44888 James Prochazka 

44889 William H. Hurley (Dis.).. 

44890 John J. Hanlon 

44891 Catherine E. Hulstrunk. . . 
44^92 David J. Greer 

44893 Charles W. Chumnez 

44894 Lula Douglas 

44895 Joseph Baceari 

4-1S96 Henry R. Minion 



67 

119 

132 

183 

237 

308 

344 

349 

374 

374 

412 

420 

447 

526 

531 

540 

626 

687 

691 

691 

691 

907 

1075 

1256 

1802 

1922 

1995 

13 

54 

80 

80 

80 

117 

132 

141 

365 

440 

477 

764 

791 
1071 
1082 
1456 
1568 
1835 
2016 I 
19 
99 I 
99 • 

143 ! 

174 ' 

365 ! 

445 I 

488 ' 

645 I 

683 I 
1017 I 
1051 | 
1244 ! 
1394 ' 
1769 
43 

181 

213 

331 

334 

341 | 

366 

404 

429 

429 

433 

578 

861 

1146 

1209 

1572 

10 

22 

22 

54 

75 

78 

146 ' 

230 I 

259 I 

259 I 

275 I 

306 ! 



11 
19 
12 

2 
20 
19 
18 
15 
31 
21 

5 
13 
19 

3 

2 
15 
11 

1 
21 

6 

5 

3 
19 
15 

2 
13 

2 
15 
18 
17 

1 
18 
12 
20 
15 
22 
12 

8 

4 

4 

4 
14 

5 
14 
20 

2 

4 
21 

4 
35 

8 
31 

4 
26 

2 
11 

4 

3 
15 

6 

9 

20 

14 

12 

4 

5 

23 

35 

5 

5 

12 

23 

4 



19 
12 
16 
26 
23 

1 
22 
23 

2 
11 
14 
16 

3 
22 



10 
5 

10 
2 

10 
4 
8 
6 
6 
6 
7 
8 
7 
9 
1 
2 

10 

11 
1 
8 
5 
6 
7 
1 
2 

11 
4 



10 
8 

10 
6 
9 
6 
8 
7 
6 
8 
3 
3 
5 
6 
3 

10 
7 
4 
8 

4 
8 

10 

10 
9 

1 
6 


10 

11 

5 
7 
1 
5 
10 
9 
4 



11 

8 

8 
11 

6 
11 

5 
11 

1 

6 

8 

9 ! 

6 



Accidental 

Intestinal obstruction 

Tumor 

Pyelitis 

Pneumonia 

Myocarditis 

Pneumonia 

Heart failure 

Angina pectoris 

Carcinoma 

Accidental 

Tuberculosis , 

Tumor 

Eclampsia 

Embolism 

Heart trouble 

Tuberculosis 

Accidental , 

Nephritis 

Accidental 

Embolism , 

Pneumonia , 

Myocarditis 

Thrombosis 

Heart disease 

Cerebral hemorrhage 

Myocarditis 

Cerebral hemorrhage . 
Cirrhosis of liver. 

Eclampsia 

Heart disease 

Diabetis mellitus 
Mitral regurgitation . 

Heart disease 

Myocarditis 

Nephritis 

Nephritis 

Accidental 

Paralysis 

Intestinal obstruction 

Anaemia 

Accidental 

Apoplexy , 

Eclampsia , 

Accidental 

Meningitis , 

Suicide 

Heart disease , 

Tuberculosis 

Endocarditis , 

Accidental , 

Hemorrhage 

Nephritis 

Endocarditis 

Apoplexy , 

Abscess , 



Peritonitis 

Pneumonia 

Bright's disease 

Nephritis 

Heart trouble 

Nephritis 

Cirrhosis of liver ' 

Intestinal obstruction • 

Carcinoma 

Heart trouble 

Anaemia ' 

Nephritis ' 

Heart failure f 

Tuberculosis | 

Apoplexy 

Arterio sclerosis I 

Apoplexy 

Cancer 

Pneumonia ! 

Carcinoma I 

Suicide ' 

Heart disease 

Nephritis ' 

Mitral regurgitation I 

Nephritis I 

Accidental I 

Heart trouble 

Cerebral hemorrhage I 

Carcinoma j 

Accidental 

Pneumonia ! 

Pneumonia j 

Cerebral hemorrhage 



150.< 

300; 






THE CARPENTER 



39 



laim 
Vo. 



Name of Deceased or 
Disabled 



1897 Michael Frehler 

1898 Richard H. Hite 

1899 Richard E. West 

1900 Alice E. Noecker 

!901 Charles Jones 

(902 John Lund 

1903 Jose Alameda (Dis.) 

1904 Annie Muse 

1905 Annie McElvain 

1906 Edward C. Mueller 

1907 Peter Michels 

(90S John E. Pope 

1909 T. J. Rea 

1910 Fred J. Powers 

1911 Lillian Brirk 

1912 Michael Labriola 

1913 Caroline A. Fox 

1914 John F. Stephenson 

■1915 Erik Gustave Cronquist. . . 

1916 Henry A. Kaitting 

1917 John Freberg 

1918 Bertha B. Spaeth 

1919 Edith Renelt 

1920 Elizabeth Jane Hunt 

1921 Rosanna Marois 

' 1922 Solomon Schafer 

1923 Tillie V. Osterhont 

•1924 Glenadeane Motter 

1925 Peter See 

.1926 Charles Pascal Foster 

1927 Michael J. Moonan 

1928 Andrew Johnson 

1929 Olivina Leclair 

1930 William P. Annals 

1931 Catherine Holland 

1932 Bernard L. Piehl 

1933 Frederick Hartmann 

1934 Andrew G. Gustafson 

,'1935 Ellen A. Hofels 

11936 Arzelio Dion 

[1937 George W. Henry 

1938 Harmon E. Shipman 

1939 Alfred Carlson 

4940 Charles H. Mitchell 

.1941 Andrew Rager 

4942 Lloyd W. Cooper 

:1943 Joseph B. Turner 

1944 Samuel Goodwin 

i!945 Joseph E. Brodeur 

1946 Chrales Gokey (Dis.) 

1947 Charles H. Dwy 

4948 Cora A. Hyde 

4949 Joseph Grant Snyder 

14850 Edith I. Poulter 

1951 August Schilowsky 

1952 Allie Huskins 

1953 Alice Criswell 

1954 Frank Vaileneour 

4955 John T. Barrett 

1956 Robert V. Reynolds 

4957 Henry S. Rose 

4958 Elizabeth Hill 

'4959 M. Kucharski (Baker) 

■4960 George J. Lambert 

4961 Annie Ready 

•4962 Aloysius A. Hoffman 

4963 Harvey E. Robertson 

4964 James E. Flanagan 

4965 Irena V. Warren , 

4966 Augustus B. Davis 

4967 Edward E. Masters , 

4968 Lester Anderson , 

4969 Charles Beauregard (Dis) 



Local 
Union 



385 

388 

4S3 

492 

698 

1456 

1589 

64 

64 

81 

87 

132 

200 

206 

261 

620 

842 

842 

1695 

2184 

7 

22 

31 

56 

78 

129 

146 

200 

242 

253 

298 

385 

390 

747 

760 

791 

808 

808 

891 

1125 

1297 

1524 

58 

101 

120 

360 

483 

499 

585 

747 

804 

985 

1185 

1241 

2090 

2451 

55 

87 

132 

132 

241 

277 

277 

314 

540 

586 

595 

621 

705 

862 

950 

991 

1350 



Membership | 
Yrs. Mos. 



Cause of Death or 
Disability 



27 

1 

15 

20 

19 

3 

3 

19 

1 

3 

12 

8 

31 

2 

2 

5 

2 

16 

9 

2 

21 

21 

1 

9 

22 

20 

3 

3 

20 

21 

37 

13 

10 

20 

6 

21 

25 

12 

18 

7 

19 

13 

14 

31 

4 

1 

15 

1 

5 

15 

19 

13 

5 

20 

26 

1 

1 

19 

8 

8 

11 

4 

3 

1 

16 

1 

17 

4 

21 

17 

29 

11 

3 



1 
8 
3 

10 
8 
9 
8 

11 
7 

11 
4 

11 
5 

10 
3 
2 
8 
7 
3 
5 

11 
4 
3 
9 

10 
4 
7 
2 

10 

10 
8 
2 
5 
9 

6 

10 
8 
2 
8 
1 
5 
6 
6 
8 
S 
6 
1 

10 

5 
5 
7 


10 
4 
6 
5 
1 
2 
5 
5 
5 
9 
5 
6 
8 
4 
1 
3 
8 
5 
1 



Myocarditis 

Cancer 

Accidental 

Mitral regurgitation 
Cirrhosis of liver. . . 

Heart disease 

Accidental 

Cancer 

Catarrh 

Tuberculosis 

Mitral regurgitation 

Pneumonia 

Senility 

Accidental 

Sepsis 

Tuberculosis 

Tetanus 

Arterio sclerosis 

Tuberculosis 

Heart failure 

Ulcer 

Heart trouble 

Nephritis 

Tuberculosis 

Addison's disease . . . 
Arterio sclerosis 

Nephritis 

Accidental 

Myocarditis 

Cancer 

Pneumonia 

Tuberculosis 

Cerebral hemorrhage 

Pneumonia 

Ulcer 

Peritonitis 

Endocarditis 

Tuberculosis 

Cancer 

Cancer 

Cancer 

Mania 

Angina pectoris 

Cerebral hemorrhage 

Accidental 

Pneumonia , 

Endocarditis 

Cancer 

Myocarditis 

Accidental , 

Angina pectoris 

Hemorrhage , 

Paralysis 

Gangrene , 

Myocarditis , 

Septicaemia 

Smallpox 

Heart trouble , 

Tuberculosis 

Pneumonia 

Tuberculosis 

Nephritis 

Pyemia 

Embolus 

Carcinoma 

Heart disease 

Bright's disease . . . 

Tuberculosis 

Arterio sclerosis . . . 
Arterio sclerosis . . . 

Carcinoma 

Heart trouble 

Accidental 



Am't 

Paid 

>Ji0.0i) 

50.00 

.•;i)o.oo 

75.00 

300.00 

150.00 

200.00 

75.00 

25.00 

150.00 

125.00 

300.00 

300.00 

100.00 

50.00 

300.00 

50.00 

300.00 

300.00 

25.00 

300.00 

75.00 

25.00 

75.00 

75.00 

125.00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

300.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

75.00 

125.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

50.00 

50.00 

300.00 

50.00 

300.00 

400.00 

300.00 

75.00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

25.00 

25.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

75.00 

50.00 

75.00 

50.00 

300.00 

200.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

125.00 

200.00 



Total $41,250.00 



114 Full beneficial claims 

27 Semi-beneficial claims 

81 Wife's claims 

15 Disability claims . . . 



237 



.$28,200.00 

. 2,300.00 

5,450.00 

. 5.300.00 

$41,250.00 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



DISAPPROVED CLAIMS PAID DURING THE MONTH OF JANUARY, 1922 



Claim 
No. 



Name of Deceased 

Disabled 



5231 Edward Mas: 

5232 Frankie May 



on 1 Di£ 1 . 
Schriever . 



5233 Daniel DeBay 'Dis.) 

5234 Phoebe Youmans 



5235 Sfie Mar Wirt. 

5236 Annie Hefner . 



5237 Josephine Dekenia . . 

5238 Kalpb. L. Heimbach. 
3239 Francis Kupryes . . . 



Z'2-i'.' S:::'_i3. Flossie Eciiey. 
5241 Margaret C. Pitts 



5242 May Mortimer 

5243 Edouard Poirier 

5244 Benjamin G. Allan 

5245 Amanda Wagner . . . . 

524'i; K us:a V. Ailr^:-. . 

524, Hrr'::err A. Mrii-u-r. . . 

5248 William P. Donaldson. 

5249 T. Howard Wilcutts... 
525 'j Katie Bojka 

5251 William Clease 

5252 Dan. L. Shnler 



Local J Membership 1 
Union j Yrs. V of,. | 
' 70 



Cause of Disap- 
proval 



81 



151 

208 
246 

297 

624 

643 

785 

857 
859 

s> ; 
1387 

1456 
1531 
1743 
157& 
1902 
1966 
221°-:; 



21 

4 



22 
4 



2 
3 
1 
IS 
3 
2 

6 

4 



10 
2 



3 

IO 
3 
& 
8 
S 
9 

8 

2 
10 

1 



Disability not due to accident| 

Semi, not entitled to wife do- 
nation 

Disability not due to accident 

Semi, not entitled to wife do- 
nation 

Three months In arrears 

Semi, not entitled to wife do- 
nation 

Death of second wife 

Three months in arrears 

Wife ill when member was ad- 
mitted 

Semi, not entitled to wife do- 
nation 

Semi, not entitled to wife do- 
nation 

Six months in arrears 

Three months in arrears .... 

Three months in arrears .... 

Death of second wife 

Three months in arrears .... 

Three months in arrears .... 

Not filed within six months. 

Three months in arrears .... 

Three months in arrears. . . . 

Honorary member 

Semi, not two years a member 



Cl'B 

MM 



400 



60 
75 

50 

150 



DEATH NOTICE 

MOORE. JAMES A.. L. U. No. 64,5. East Las Vegas, N. M. 

FITCH. C HA RLES B.. L. U. No. 645. East Las Vegas.. N. M. 

COWPEB, JOHN D.. L. U. No. 595, Lynn, Mass. 



Ca'.-penters' Loca r , Union In Mexico 
The accompanying is a photograph of the first Carpenters' Union chartered 
■Piedras Negras. Coah, Mexico. L. D. L\o. 998 was organized by C. N. Idar, Gene 

Organizer of the American Federation of Labor. January 20, 1922, and started «. 
with a membership of 58. The officers of the Local, reading from left to right a 
Tomas Villarreal, Trustee; Arnulff- Rodriguez, Trustee; Ysaias Ruig, Busin 




.Agent: Rosendo Anchez, Chairman Sick Committee: Cosme E>. Cadena. Financl 
Secretary-Treasurer: Simon Carreon, President: Adolfo Suarez, Recording Sec 
tary: Jose Villarreal. Conductor; Leobardo Navarro, Guard. Standing behind L 
bardo Navarro is C. N. Idar. General Organizer of the American Federation of Lat) 
Standing behind Cosme C. Cadena y is Francisco A. Moreno, national representat 
of the Mexican Reginal Confederation of Labor, who rendered material aid in org.* 
izing the Local Union. 



CorrospondQncQ 




Congratulates Brother Cornell 

Mor, "The Carpenter" : 

low me to congratulate Mr. C. H. 
oiell for his criticism of replies to J. 
[<]. >wens problem. 

f course, the average pupil in the 
itl grade would know that "coveting 
Ion a horizontal line" is an absurdity 
m about 99 per cent would infer .that 
*.her Owens had inadvertently usee 1 a 
■tig term. 

r hile reading Craft Problems in the 
Iwjiary number I was strongly im- 
Ised with the truth of the Maxim 
lent amongst skilled men in shop and 
■I, viz: "Men that write books don't 
lo he work and men that do the w r ork 
lot write books, and much that is 
aiht in books "isn't so a'tall." 

he article in question is, I think, a 
;tiag argument in favor of the appren- 
ic:hip system instead of the correa- 
tclence school. 

Yours fraternally, 
I 72. A. C. MINOR. 



Something To Think Over 

3cjOr, "The Carpenter" : 

ere is something for our Journal 

may be of interest to our members,, 

k)| I think should be made an amend- 

t to our Constitution, and that is in 
felrds to Clearance Cards. I myself 
icjag as Financial Secretary, know 

t I am talking about. 
j|V T hen a brother takes a Clearance 
3dp and has his dues paid for one or 
M months in advance, that brother de- 
x.ts his Clearance Card in due time 
u the Financial Secretary of the LocaL 
k opting same notifies the Local is- 
lig the Clearance Card that there is 
ill or two months dues due the Local 
netting the Clearance Card, they so> 
Jl'n refuse to send the amount due. 

Jow, the Local issueing the Clearance 
D d has no right to that money, as they 
Ptse to pay per capita on that brother,, 
wile the Local accepting the Clearance 
Cd has to pay the per capita, and 
e ier the brother has to pay dues twice 
C« that month or else the Local would 
he to lose, also a great many Locals 



never notify the Local that issued the 
Clearance Card of its acceptance. 

While we are organized for protection 
that don't give a traveling brother very 
much protection when he has to pay 
dues twice for the same month, and I 
have known of cases where a member 
has dropped his membership rather than 
be bled for two months' dues in one. 

Trusting you may give this item space 
in our Journal, it may be the means of 
waking some of our Financial Secre- 
taries and Locals up. With best wish.es. 
I remain, 

Fraternally yours, 
L. U. No. 55. 

ROBERT CURRIE, F. S. 

• 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 63 Comes To 
The Front 

Editor, "Tihe Carpenter" : 

As I have not seen anything men- 
tioned of Ladies' Auxiliaries in "The 
Carpenter" lately, I therefore thought 
this w r ould be an opportune time to boost 
that part of our organization. Our 
Auxiliary, No. 63, was organized last 
April with 13 members and has now 
grown to a membership of 52 and ob- 
taining additional members at almost 
every meeting who are doing very good 
work, especially, along the Label lines. 

Only a short time ago it was almost 
impossible to purchase: union-made goods 
in our city, but now we can go out and 
procure almost anything from a collar 
botton up. 

On Labor Day we held a joint Labor 
Day picnic at Lily Lake Park, the first 
one in a number of years, and its suc- 
cess was due largely to the efforts of 
the Auxiliary which I can truly say that 
our ladies are some hustlers. A short 
time ago a sewing circle was organized 
for the purpose of holding a bazaar, 
which was held recently in the District 
Council Hall with a net profit of over 
$200, and its success was due to the 
able leadership of Mrs. Haeber Edelman, 
Chairman of the Bazaar Committee. 

Yours fraternally, 
G. O. T. SKINNER, Rec. Sec, D. C. of 
Atlantic County, N. J. 



Casual Comment 



With every member working in the 
interest of his organization it shouldn't 
be a hard matter to reach 500,000. 

* * * 

Now is the time to show the "open- 
shop" advocates what unionism means 
by doing our utmost to get new mem- 
bers. 

* * * 

Now that the wheat gambler has been 
relegated to the museum of economic 
atrocities by the Capper-Tincher Anti- 
Grain Gambling Bill, which went into 
effect in December last, the path is 
blazed for the elimination of those para- 
sites who "market" the farmers' other 
crops by the same method. 

* * * 
"Unorganized labor has been the chief 

sufferers in the wage cutting." That 
statement appears in a survey of the 
living cost situation, dealing with wages 
and prices. Some people will never 
learn. 

* * * 

Too much activity in the "open shop" 
program of the past year has caused 
many closed shops in the United States. 

# 3> * 

The real threat of the submarine is 
less against merchant vessels than 
again a nation's food supply and it is 
hard to understand why it is much more 
damnable to starve an enemy people by 
submarine warfare than by the old-fash- 
ioned blockade. Mankind's job is to end 
w r ar, not to try to civilize it. 

* * * 

If the operators still continue obdur- 
ate, they have no possible claim upon 
the sympathy of the country — but the 
country, except when the miners riot or 
march as an army, seems to forget all 
about West Virginia. 

Coal is high, the bottom has fallen out 
of the corn market, and the farmer, 
having corn to burn, is burning it. Hard 
coal is the one important commodity 
which did not drop a cent in price in the 
depression period, but has actually in- 
creased steadily. 

* * * 

We wonder why the "kept press" 
didn't tell the true story relative to the 
"merger?" of the Ft. Dearborn, Con- 



tinental and Commercial National Banks 
of Chicago? 

* * * 

It now seems that the Armour bank 
took over the Swift bank to prevent so 
great a public scandal that the facts 
would come out and reveal the condition 
of the meat packing industry. 

* * * 

Henry Ford raised railroad wages and 
reduced railroad rates. The old style, 
dyed-in-the-wool railroad sandbaggers 
reduced railroad wages and raised rail- 
road rates. Henry Ford absolutely re- 
versed the gears. 

* * * 

"Service to the public" does not apply 
to capitalists who close their plants and 
bring suffering to a community or to 
monopolists who seize natural resources. 

Editors and other "molders of public 
opinion" who thunder at Organized La- 
bor because of irregularities within its 
ranks, ignore the public statement by 
Samuel Untermeyer, counsel to the 
Lockwood Committee. 

"If the criminal combination of em- 
ployers that are still being sheltered un- 
der the roof of the Building Trades Em- 
ployers' Association were one-half a; 
amendable to reason and argument a; 
the officials of the unions have prover 
to be, the abuses, extortion and crimina 
conspiracies that have not yet disap 
peared from the building trades woulc 
soon be ended." 

Capital is against collective bargain- 
ing as a principle and a practice for tht 
workers. They are a unit in its use iif 
every angle of their business relation; 
with each other. 

* # * 

The strike in all its phases has beei 
discussed by all sections of the people 
The effectiveness of the strike has beei 
questioned. The right to strike has beei 
challenged. But there is one thin; 
which the strike has done. It has bee' 
of great service to labor ; because it ha 
educated and enlightened public opinion 

If wage slashing keeps up we'll sooi 
have another army of dollar-a-year men 



THE CARPENTER 



43 



Foreign Labor Notes 

The miners in the Asturian (Spain) 
strict, who had been on strike, resumed 

ork. 

* * • 

At Piedmont, Italy, cost of living is 
creasing and the local prefect is ask- 
g industries to make bonuses to labor 
order to meet it. The working day- 
nine hours and the Saturday half- 
jliday is abolished. 

* * * 

i At a conference called by the Lord 
iayor in Dublin, Ireland, the engineers' 
rike in force for several months was 
■ttled by the men accepting six shill- 
'.gs less on their weekly wage. This 
rike involved a number of interdepen- 
?nt trades. 



Information Wanted 

P. J. Van Loan, member of Local 5S3, 
ist heard from in San Francisco, Calif., 

November, 1921. Wife is ill, has six 
lildren to look after and no means of 
lpport. Anyone knowing of his where- 
bouts will communicate with Lee How- 
rd, F. S., Local 5S3, 1547 Fiske St., 
ortland, Ore. 

* * * 

Accompanying photograph of Dick 
iieft, who was last heard of in the fol- 
>wing places: Minneapolis, Minn., 




luron and Kansas. Any one knowing 
f his whereabouts kindly address John 
jlkers, 206^ Main St., Houston, Tex. 



THE WOOD WORKER'S FRIEND 




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Heads you can buy rough lumber of any kind and 
dres9 It to suit the Job. Saves time, money and 
lumber. Would this be any object to you? If bo, 
get our circular prices. Sold on 30 day trial. 

Whisler Mfg. Co. Gibson, Iowa 



30 DAYS 
TRIAL ^ 



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6842 W. Lake Dept. R-14 Chicago, III. 

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Write for booklet fully describing this new 
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troductory offer to owner agents. 

Hydre«U silted Tire Co B 

Dept. 84 Chicago, San Francisco, Poltstown, Pa- 



FordAirbo 



Join this great Auto Club and win Grand Prizes including Ford 
Sedan, complete with electric starter and sliding plate glass 
windows. The ideal carfor all-year use. 

Can you make out the two words spelled by the numbers in 
the picture? The alphabet is numbered, A is 1, B is 2, etc. What 
arothetwo words? 10,000 Sedan votes given for your answer. 
Many other valuable prizes and hundreds of dollars in cash 
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FORD WILLS0N. Mgr. 141 W. Ohio St. Dept.2736 , Chicago, 111. 




Craft Probloms 




Home Building 

(By Dwight L. Stoddard. ) 



Duplex — I show here a double duplex, 
though instead of being along side of 
each other, one is above the other and 
both families have all i.he advantages of 



Twin house is practically both double 
and duplex and any carpenter with en- 
ergy could soon get hold of a lot, borrow 
the money and build a home like this as 




TWIN HOUSE- 



FIRST FLOOR 



□ 



light and air on all sides. In my opinion 
a fine style for any one to build. I .see 
more and more how nice a real sun room 
would be, in fact if I ever build another 
home for myself the sun room will be the 
first thing I will consider, so here I have 
just suggested one on the side, it could 
be added later, and if you had a renter 
up stairs who desired it, you could build 
it two stories, however, I leave that and 
the porches to be planned as desired. 

Second floor is almost a complete 
duplicate of the first and if one built the 



\ 



L 



-3333ES-; 



far back as he desired. I only suggest 
the front part, all the carpenter would 
need would be his skill and nerve and 
in a very few years the three renters 
would more than pay for his entire 
home. 




"porches two stories there would be prac- 
cically no difference. 



Second floor is a duplicate, only th< 



THE CARPENTER 



45 



stairs at top and bottom are at different 
ends. 



FLAT '. or 



APARTMENT 
FIRST FLOOR 



k- 




-siEDes-si, 



Flat or Apartment — I show here the 
first, second and third floors front which 
could be carried back as far as required 




"Full Length Roof Framer" 

Is a book to save the time unci brains of the ex- 
perts and to avoid mistakes and trouble for the un- 
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It is a book containing 230.400 different sized and 
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the length of every rafter in feet and inches and their 
bevels for the steel square. 

If your roof is pitched it is in this book, no matter 
what size or pilcb. 

You can call off the lengths and bevels for every 
rafter, for any pitched roc.f as fast as the size of 
building is given. 

Experience or study unnecessary. 

We will prove these remarkable statements to any 
ambitious carpenter. 

Send no money until you receive the book. If at 
any time you wish to return bonk, your money will be 
returned immediately. 

Three years advertising in this magazine without a 
single complaint Is our recommendation. Price $1.25. 

A. Riechers, Publisher 

Palo Alto, California 



The IMPROVED Rapid Floor Surfacer 




Made in Several Sizes 



will surface right up to the 
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edges. Perfect results 

guaranteed. More 

than 20,000 in use. 

Send for Our Free 
Trial Offer 

M. L. Schlueter 

230 West Illinois 
Street, Chicago 



MAKE YOUR OWN 
PHONOGRAPH CABINET 

Woodwork machined to exact size. 
We do the hard part, the rest is easy. 
Send stamp for free blueprint. 

The Carpenters & Cabinet Makers Supply Co. 

n8 N. LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 



3 & 5=PLY VENEERED PANELS 

All woods — All thicknesses. For doors, cab- 
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for stocklist and prices. 

DUNN PLYWOOD CO. 
Oxford BJdg., Chicago, 111. 



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Mention weight 
C. 



Send $1.00 for trial set prepaid, 
of sash when ordering. Address Dept 

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500 Fifth Avenue New York. N. Y 



46 



THE CARPENTER 



with, as many rooms as would be wanted changed on all the floors, except this 
in each apartment. one. and the reason this one is different 

z --~ Z-- "AnTWE'.T '' f\' === T ' H T = " 



1 



H 



O 




\ 






m^i 



!= — A 






L, 



frc 



the rest of the 



» so one can walk out 
r these stairs or fowl 

lie same door. All 
/ the center would be 
nd platform a: each corner, 
k around from second floor 
I consider this an ideal flat 



Corner Apartment — I present here a 
plan. I think, is worthy of more than a 
passing glance. I only show one floor, 

for it eculd go as high, as desired, trac- plan and bulb 
tically without a change, except in the know all ear:- 
direction one walked towards the back to build a hoi 

stairs. However, :he steps would be ness. yet I est 



so as to 
to the X'._ 
home. 

Planing ani Building :-. Home — After 
suggesting the different styles of homes 
I will now show something of how to 
plan and build the home. Of course. I 
know all carpenters know all about how 
to build a home, for that is their busi- 
there are a few things 



■ ' ._ ~~ 



r— "~ 



£=E V 



; ■' . . :- 




J ;- : : --_ :: : . 



THE CARPENTER 



47 



hat the yonger ones can learn and I 
lave no doubt some of the older ones 
jave forgotten a few things. 
Foundation — Note the measurements, 



the front is a story and a half while the 
the front part and the studding going up 
the full height, each story is raised sep- 
arately, stopping at the plate, which may 




vork to them, for we must have a good 
'loundation to build on. 

First and Second Floor Plans — Study 
hem well, see how you like them and 
bicture in your mind just how they will 
ook when completed. 

i First and Second Floor Joist — All in 
Dlace, note where they are doubled and 
low the headers are put in. 

Roof — See the rafters all in their 
proper places? 

Skeleton Frame — This shows the 
louse raised and you can now see what 
perhaps you did not know before that 
';he back part, or kitten, is one story, 



be single, when each stud is exactly over 
each other as illustrated, though seldom 





gi " iSwgzrl "f^l^ 
do I use a single plate, I always like to 
double them, and you can see by the 

FRONT % ELEVATION 




center is full two story. I planned this 
fcjnd of a house to show how to construct 
-he different styles. Note the ribbon in 



-fengpcs-ff 



sections giving the heights that the 
plates are doubled. Note opening head- 
ers and all the construction. 



L 



48 



THE CARPENTER 



Front Elevation — Almost shows a 
complete picture and the exact position 
of the lumber on the house. 

Side Elevation — This is the kind of a 
drawing the carpenter has to work from, 
and is simply an outline. Seldom do we 
have them any other way. 

Perspective properly taken from the 
plan and elevation shows the house as it 
would be seen after it is completed. 




Good Construction — This was not in- 
tended to particularly show any part of 
the house shown previously. Any house 
built properly should show common win- 
dow openings fairly large, with truss 
crippled above. All the joists and crip- 
ples are spaced exactly 16 in. apart all 
over the building. 



! 11 P 
S 1 


i n n n .r ■ ir n n .n n. n n n 

I 1 1 S IS I I 1 ! I 1 1 


1 I 


I^KITTHk; 




1! II II II II II 








III 1 1 


II II II .11 II . 



GOOD CONSTRUCTION. 



Elevation Of Window — Shows the 
window complete both face and side 
view. Shows the house sided up, Note 




how it lines up at top and bottom of 
window. A few good ways to side a 
house is to space up one window and 
then lay out a stick and mark up every 
opening and that way the siding goes ort 
easily rapidly and correctly. I also show 
window for stone building which you 
will note is very much like window foi J 
brick building. 

Detail Of Stair — This illustration 
shows it just commenced as well as en- 
tirely completed. The larger detail 
shows both face and end view while 
most architectural drawings are drawn 




much larger and sometimes full size, but 
I believe this little drawing even after it 
is reduced by the engraver will be 




MY NEWEL POST 



THE CARPENTER 



49 



printed large enough so one can quite 
plainly see how the stairs were intended 
to be constructed, 

Newel Post — In my own home I con- 
structed one very much like the one 
shown here in the stairs, and while it 
may look like a clumsy affair in reality 
it looks quite well as it stands in my 
front hall and harmonizes with its sur- 
roundings. 

Detail Of Mantel — Shows the mantel 
I built in my house and stands by 
W 







the fireplace in the front room next to 
the front hall. The front hall stair new- 
el and all are built with plain oak while 
the front room finish, mantel and all, 
are finished with quartered oak. As I 
got plenty of lumber and cut it out and 
matched it up you can believe me, not 
only the mantel but the entire room is 
pleasing to the eye. Care of arranging 
each piece adds much to the appearance 
of the room. 

Inside Finish — I try to show here the 
general appearance, note the base and 



For Stair and Angle work, Phare's Hex. Square Guides. 

65c a pair: Recommended by Craft expert Bro. Stod- 
dard. Also Phare's feath- 
er-weight lilt Cage. 25c. 
85 cents will bring you 
both tools, same order, 
postpaid. Money order. TJ. 
S. post stamps, or coin. 

BEACON MFG. CO., Station B, Cleveland. Ohio. 

Canada: Moses Kdw., 492 Yonge St., Toronto, Ont. Add Customs 




base blocks, window steel and apron at 
the bottom and at the top how the heads 
all line up, and the complete finish that 




the picture mold makes, though I will 
admit today there is not near as much 
of that used as there used to be. 

Doors — Showing styles enough to 
complete the house, though of course, the 
styles of doors for all purposes, like any- 
thing else, are numerous. I give a few 
styles of finish. 

Corner Block Casing — Is a style that 
was used a great deal for a good many 
years. 

Common Band Casing — Was used to 
some extent and I suppose always will 
be. It makes a neat finished job. 

Cap Casing — Is not only a cap-head 
but a cap as well. At the top of the 





C»>s 


5" 


\orv 












1 1 


























1 1 














I 1 














1 1 




SECOND FLOOR COOR ' 














, 1 












1 1 










1 1 








I 




1 1 




BEAR OOOP 











! 




i 


c u 










< 




j 












i 






i 

! 


c n 


^ 












J 




J 


C 3 






FRONT DOOH 





50 



THE CARPENTER 



side casings it makes a rather pleasing 
appearance and is very easily put up. 



CORNER BLOCK CASING 





CUTE CUT CASING 



CURIOUS CARVED CASING 



Cut Out Casing — I finished a big hotel 
as well as many other jobs with casing 
much like I have illustrated here, but the 
reason I happened to give it the name I 



EsssssB g 



1 


1 



did was occasionally I have been called 
upon to get out some entirely by hand 
and not having a very good place to do 
the work, it was quite a little job to cut 
them out. 

Curious Carved Casing — The only 
curious thing about it is that instead of 
being carved out it is simply pressed into 
its beautiful form and it makes a fine 
finish for a head casing. It is quite plain 
and yet ornamental. 

Plan of Mullions — These show the 
plan, or end view, as well as the different 
methods of construction. 

Stone Basement Window — While I do 
not suppose you will ever have .this in 
your home, and the carpenter may never 
come in contact with it very much as 




the day of stone house construction may 
be passing away never to return, yet 
I do not believe this is entirely out of 
place and I believe some of the best car- 
penters can see some merit in it. I con- 
sider it good arrangement and good ar- 
rangement is good to study. 

It should be the effort of every car- 
penter to build his own home and there 
is no doubt if many of them built homes 
to sell to others they would be better ofl 
than to only build for contractors. 



mt 








PLAN 0FWIND0WS FOR WOOD BUI LDI N GS 
aNDFOf\ 8F^!C^ 




PLAN 2FMULLI2NS 



|*]tTHSD?F HANGING 
WH6HTiNtfARR?W 
MULLI9N 




ftmuwvw 




THE CARPENTER 



51 



We carpenters have the ability, if Ave 
only had the nerve, to not only be much 
more independent and better off, but be 
nine to do more for our fellow man at 
the same time. For one to spend his 
whole life for the benefit of the contrac- 
tor only is not always to spend one's life 
for the greatest good possibly to man- 
kind. The contractor looks out just a 
bit for himself at all times. 



927(30.45 nearly 
9 



Answers To the Grindstone Problem 

Regarding Brother . Marker's grind- 
stone problem, I give here a solution; if 
any brother knows of a more simple one 
I would like to know about it. 




'■€3gEE3-6i 



The area of the stone before Sq. In. 

use. is 2827.44 

The area of the stone after use 

is 28.2744 



The portion removed 2729.1656 

Divided by 4 gives the amount 

removed by each man. . . 699.7414 
Consider the diameter C C of circle B. 

Sq. In. 

Area of A 28.2744 

Area of B 699.7914 



728.0658 



Problem — To find the diameter of a 
circle when the area is given. 

Rule — Divide the area by .7854 and 
extract the square root. 

.7S54) 728.0658 (927 
70686 



21205 

1570S 

54978 
54978 

The squa.c root of 927 



604) 2700 
2416 



6085) 28400 

Diametes C C is 30 ^ in. nearly when 
the fourth man started work. 

Now consider the diameter C C of 
circle C. 

Area of circle A and B, leaving out 
decimals. 

Area of C 700 

728 sq. in. 

1428 

Apply the same rule as before and we 
get 42.64 in., nearly. The diameter C 
C is a bit over 42^ in. Likewise with 
the diameter d d of circle D you will find 
it about 52 in. 

To sum up, the first man wears 4 in. 
off the stone, the second man, 4% in., 
the third, 6 14 in. and the fourth 12 in. 
GEO. A. TURNER. 
L. U. No. 806. Pacific Grove, Cal. 

* * * 

In reply to question of Bernard Mark- 
er, L. U. No. 894, N. Cobalt, Ont, Can., 
in January issue of "The Carpenter." 

Inches 
of 

Diam. 

First man wore off 7.927 

Second man wore off ' 9.405 

Third man wore off 12.192 

Fourth man wore off 24.446 

Remaining 6.000 

Total 60.000 

Fraternally yours, 

S. L. SCHEFFY. 
L. U. No. 368. Allentown, Pa. 

* * * 

Herewith find answers to questions of 
Bro. Bernard Marker, as to the loads for 
spruce girder. 

Loads for spruce girder S in. square, 
and span of 15 feet between supports: 

Lbs. 

Safe dead load, not over 3,000 

Safe working load uniformily dis- 
tributed 2.550 

Safe load concentrated at center.. 1.270 
Yours fraternally 

A. E. BEECHEY 
L. U. No. 63. Bloomington, 111, 



52 



THE CARPENTER 



Another Problem 

In view of the interest taken in Broth- 
er McGrath's triangle, published under 
the head of "'Craft Problems," I would 
like to present a similar problem, that 
was published in a trade journal during 
the early eighties. The requirement is, 
to find the board measure in a timber 
stick that is 12 ft. long, and IS in. 
square on one end, and 6 in. square on 
the other. 

Fraternally yours. 
L. U. No. 115. HENRY MeDONALD. 



A Trap Nest 

Mr. President, may I have the floor? 

Chorus : Sit down ! Throw him out ! 

The Chair: If the brother will refrain 
from talking about roof framing he may 
proceed. Mr. President, we want to talk 
about chickens. 

The Chair: Go as far as you like on 
that subject. 

Some time back we got an idea into 
our head that our chickens were not 
giving ample returns for the high priced 



A/esr 



B 



fl B- 



feed we supplied and the conclusion we 
arrived at was. some of the chickens 
were "laying down on the job." We 
get that term from our boss. As several 
thousand of my brothers have a little 
back yard industry for supplying eggs 
for the family it is necessary that the 
non-layers or idlers be put in the soup 
as soon as possible. 

We became convinced that the trap 
nest was the great detector and accord- 



ingly sent our good money for a set of 
plans to build from. We swiped some 
glass boxes from a union painter and 
built exactly from that plan to a gnats 
heel, and there was great rejoicing at 
our home when we installed that effici- 
ency expert in our poultry house. Well, 
that contraption scared every hen so 
badly that the whole compudilum went 
on strike and we spent our time catching 
them and slipping them into the trap 
nest and throwing them out again, but 
it was no use, the fellow that took my 
money was an unmitigated liar, why, 
even a hen that wanted to lay and could 
not help it. would not lay in that box. 

We cussed that box, its inventor, the 
painter we stole the lumber from, and 
sassed our wife, but a nest box we must 
have if it took the hair off, so we began 
the dreamers stunt, and aided by a 
couple of shots of old Lancaster, we in- 
vented a trap nest that tempted the 
old rooster to make a try at laying. 

The chicken cranks in our ranks will 
find it profitable to use this nest, for by 




placing a leg band on each hen you wiL 
be able to make a record of her output. 

Make them for your own use. makt 
them to sell if you wish, there will be 
no infringment. 

The hinged top is slatted with spac 
left wide enough for the hen to run 
head and neck through, release 
through this door and note number 
leg band, place same number on the ej 
giving that number credit on the rec< 

The results are surprising, some nei 
lay, some will produce a few, others 
steadily for long periods. 




Give th 
best layers 



s setting hens eggs from yot 
only. 



THE CARPENTER 



53 



you don't get this trap nest infor- 
,i on let me know and we will prefer 
t ges against Duffy, "by heck." 

g # A. — Floor plan showing box sides 
n tilt board. 

;g. B — Top, showing hinged release 

[g. C — Open for business. 

ig. D — Trapped. 

ake in sizes to suit the breed. 

all pivot strip to tilt board, ends of 
i i strip project through sides of box. 
,. '. No. 29. R. H. 



Brothers, Take Notice 

he Wyoming Valley District Council 
a had a prosperous summer and fall 
1 ae building line, and we were obliged 
> all upon our sister Local Unions to 
s-;t us in furnishing the carpenters 
y the contractors. The forty-seven 
, ses built by the Chamber of Coni- 
i,ce with all tradesmen carrying union 
bIs are completed, other jobs in the dis- 
Ifc, shut down on account of the cold 
jfther, have caused a large number 
f.'ur members to walk the streets and 
; rill be impossible to place them to 
Ik until about the last of March. We 
i glad that we had the opportunity to 
*st our fellow brothers who came to 
i district last summer and trust that 
I may be placed in that position this 
( .ing summer. We advise any brother 
,'!) is thinking of leaving his home 
: n to come to our district to commu- 
:ite with us before he leaves, and we 
i. be glad to furnish him with the true 
('ditions of the district, 
'rusting that our request will be com- 
6. with, for the best interest of the 
thers and the Wyoming Valley Dis- 
it Council. 

R. M. WILLIAMS, 
» retary- Treasurer, Wyoming Valley 
District Council 



Carpenters Feast 

The annual supper of West Chester, 
. Local Union of Carpenters, No. 
>4. was held recently in the lodge 
ins on the third floor of the Thomp- 
| Bldg., on North High St., when there 
s a good turnout of the officers and 
mbers, who had a jolly time, the af- 
C being for "men only." 
The regular semi-annual business 
eting was held early in the evening, 
en besides the usual business, one 
•v member was elected. Then fol- 



lowed the feasting, there being an 
abundance of fried oysters and other 
good things to eat, with ice cream, 
home-made cakes, etc., followed by 
cigars. 

A merry time was enjoyed in story 
and song until after ten o'clock. The 
officers of West Chester Union are: 
President. William Ford; Recording Sec- 
retary, Wilfred G. Priest; Financial Sec- 
retary, Edward Thompson ; Treasurer, 
Joel Martin. The union has a member- 
ship of over sixty and is in a flourishing 
condition. 



Carpenters Have Well Attended Organ- 
ization Meeting 

A well attended meeting was held in 
the Carpenters' Hall, in Detroit, Mich., 
recently for stimulating organization 
among the carpenters. The size of the 
crowd indicated that the carpenters are 
taking a considerable interest in organ- 
ization and good results are expected. 

The meeting was addressed by a 
number of speakers, including O. E. 
Woodbury, International Organizer of 
the Carpenters' Union; E. W. Secord, 
president of the Michigan State Council 
of Carpenters ; John J. Scannell, secre- 
tary of the Michigan Federation of La- 
bor, and Charles Lewis, International 
Organizer of the Carpenters connected 
with the box making industry. Frank 
X. Mart el, Business Representative of 
the Detroit Federation of Labor, spoke 
also, having- left the Federation meeting 
long enough to speak to the audience. 

This meeting was the first of a series 
of gatherings that will be held to organ- 
ize carpenters. More are to follow. It 
appears from the activity of the Carpen- 
ters and other unions of Detroit that this 
will be a banner year for organization 
in the city. The Carpenters request 
that all their friends assist in creating 
interest in these meetings for organiza- 
tion purposes. Many more meetings, 
both "open" and "closed," are to be held 
in the near future to reach the workers 
of the city and build up the organiza- 
tion. 



Idle workers in Great Britain, accord- 
ing to governmental statisticians, at end 
of week of December 17, are numbered 
at 1,722,S00, an increase of 111,000 
over the previous week. Short- time 
workers are estimated at 250.000, a 
lower figure than the previous week. 



SAVE MONEY! 

HERE IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY 

You will need Drawing Instruments 
to draw your plans correctly. 



4* 





BUILDING TRAM 

K 




I.CS. 

BTHLDING TRADES' 
; HiNt)BOOK. 



Contents of Outfit 

1 Set Drawing Instruments. 

Drawing Board, 1Sx24 in. 

Tee Square, 24 in. long. 

Curve. 

Triangular Scale, 12 in. 

6 sheets Drawing Paper, 16x21 in. 

1 Bottle Drawing Ink, black. 

1 Pencil. 

Thumb Tacks, Eraser. 

PACKED IN CORRUGATED BOX 

for shipment $5.75 

THE FREDERICK POST CO. 

Manufacturers 
Factory: CHICAGO 

3635 N. Hamlin Av., P. 0. Box 803. 




409 PAGES. 263 ILLUSTRATIONS 

A reference book for every man con- 
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Blue P.rinLs, Weights and Measures, 
Formulae, Mensuration, Geometric 
Drawing, Structural Design, Ma- 
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Square, Plumbing, Heating, Estimat- 
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Thousands sold. Complete — practical— 
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Just tear out this advertisement and mail 
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address to the IpternationalCorresponder.ee 
Schools, Box 8836, Scranton, Penna., and 
this 409-page Building Trades' Handbook 
will come speeding to you by return mail. 
You run no risk. Money back if desired. 
International Correspondence Schools 
Box SSSG, Scranton, Penna. 



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Very little money and no experience 
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Write for complete information. 



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The new Tape Hook makes it pos- 
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Free illustrated catalog, full ofj 
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New 
Hook 
Tape 



'*>r*tiF' 



" '-'■:,'"- 




his roofing stands 
he blow-torch test 

Flexstone Shingles 
'ill stand up under 
ue severe heat of 
lie blow-torch. This 
■roves how thor- 
;ughly fire-resistant 
hey are. They are 
pproved by Under- 
.■riters' Laborator- 
! ?s, Inc., in class 
'•, and take base 
ates of insurance. 





~ different! 

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at a popular price 



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WARNING— 

They look just like the others 

Slate surfacing is a great lev- 
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all look alike on the surface. Flex- 
stone Shingles do not depend on 
the slate coating for their roofing 
value or fire-safety ; the bodv of 
the shingle takes care of that — 



asbestos fibres waterproofed with 
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Low in price 

Flexstone Shingles offer many of 
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Flexstone Roll Roofing, too 

Flexstone is obtainable in three 
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selected, ased, mellowed, cured .and "sweated^ b; ^s^™* ___ 

'_ . "»utt--nottlnsto 
Mellovras the moonlight— I raeranVas t he 



i your taste. 



from the cellar its rich, fragrant 

lovera the world over swear by ito i 

"For sixteen years I have trsed. ah 

ie the best I ever tasted."— W^E^t 

;isfactory in eveyy \rs 



Tobacco ( 



payn 



ociation."— C.J.IietAtff, Moniiwno, VoU. i„„r;».nV 

your tobacco i= the bastl have had Since IS5S when i \braham Vm com 
el toVe?her in the Suwy South. Tell «U Steeld-saM .era about it. - 

Vsk 



o and sell 
our ownf en 'PS— our co*>p- 
xketinz labia , elim, ^ es .."'' 
yo»7 dl ia! direct with the groww* *?£JSlYuBt 
Srs, ] Jo fanty pickages. no det orauona—juat 



ostever^ brand 2 oTihe market but your. 
•es St. Marps, Penn: _. , 

. I now realize haw fooli ill have been— 
of the mil dlemen instead Of bayint &*ect ™° m the 
." — C .J . Retsmff, Montesano, *Vas*. 
Say men, your ton 
and I Bmoked toeeth 
John F. Stout, Libby, M 

REDUCE YOUR ^mwrnitf w«» B w»« t . 
TOBACCO BILL 

revenue tax — all middlen 

thereby saving 75% or more.. 

Quality and lota o£ it. ^ _ 

MONEY SAVING PRICES 
5 lbs. $2£8— 10 lbs. $5.85 

(We Pay Ml 
Shipping Charges) 

5 pounds will make 55 bifi 
Backs of araokine, or 65 chewine 
or smoking twiata. With each 
order we send complete illus- 
trated instructions Bhowine how 
to make granulated smoking, 
old-faBhion chewine and amok-, 
lag twists* cigars, etc* 

Send No Monoy 

Pay only when tobacco air ives. 
Try it for ten days — if it fails 
to please you — if it doesn t euit 
your taste — if for any reasc ji you 
are dissatisfied, send it ba ik and 
your money will be r yturned 
promptly without qui! ;ble or 
question. You risk nothing. 
Sign and mail the coup &n today 
and enjoy the tobacco treat o£ 
your life- 



WE PAY 

SHIPPIK'G 

CHARGE" 



TOBACCO GROWERS ASSOCIA 



'* TOBACCO GROWERS ASS'P4 
J Warehouse |XS , ,„,,„ . _ 

Send me.... .TV/ponnds of Old Kentucky H03C 

5 prepaid. I will pay the price of S on a\ 

*. a 10-DAY TRIAL, I will return the tobacco and yo 





OF KENTUCKY, 

Mayfield, Kentucky 

un Tobacco by parcel post 
ival. If not satisfied after 
will refund my money . 



Name. 



f Addre99 • 

Enter below pounds each grade wai 

LSIVSOKING: — mild — medii 

CHEWING: —mild — medli 



— stro ng a 



LEARN TO READ BLUE PRINTS, and be It 

foreman's class. The day of the unskilled work 
passed. A pound of trains is worth a ton of m 
these days. Put yourself in the front rank ai 
men that know how to take charge of a big job. 
our simple method we train you quickly. In 
spare time. No drawing or mathematical knowi 
necessary. Special courses for each trade. Writ, 
dav for Catalog 3. Stating trade, also Free blue \< 

Mechanical and Architects 



Drawing 



Quickly t^Vs™ oTstVdT ^AN"™ 
You can soon Qualify for a successful drafts 
Draftsmen earn big money and are in demand.' 
our simple and practical method it is easy to 1 
Requires no previous education or training. Boos 
tools furnished free. Write for Catalog G. Do It t 

COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL Eft! 

S^sjiBt Dept. iO-B, Drcxel Bldg., Phila. , Pa. y 




If you have pros tat! 
order — bladder trouble — ge> 
frequently at night, there ia positive 
rapid relief for you — without drugs or main 
without pain or discomfort — privately at home, 
free book tells all. Doctors, Osteopaths, Physical 
ture directors. Sanitarium experts use and endorse 
method. Easily used by anyone. Very simple. No, 
terwhat yon have tried or how old your case. 
methods will bring results or money back. _ Wri> 
<? free illustrated booklet. Do it now. Relief ia at 1 

THE ELECTRO THERMAL COMPA1 

2805 Main Street Steubenville, > 



Don't Wear a Tr 




BROOKS' A 
ANCE, 

era, scientific 



ANCE, th< I 

___i, scientific I 
tion, the wonder 3 
discovery that 1 
rupture will be if 
trial. No obdj 
springs or pads!] 
automatic Air Ctj 
Binds and dral 
broken parts I 
as you would al 
limb. ' No salvl 
lies. Durable, ■ 
Sent on trial tM 
it. Protected W>\ 
Patents. Catall « 
measure blanks MM 
free. Send na « 
address today. ! 
C.E, BROOKS. 252F State Street, Marshall j-Jjl 

"T" PLUM »«* 
LEVE I 

Rustproof, beinWJ 
aluminum. Ca|e9 
ly attached ' 
straight edge, g 
adjust. Guan :«. 
curate. Size JiM 
Price $1.00 t«nj 
PIN MANUF^Ur 

CO 
Box 1073. Det . ■ 




The Union Label tends to make & 
unnecessary by making complian I 
union conditions and advantage • 
ness. 





Price ST 

Wj W»JP Complete Set 6i] 
— ■ 7SSm, GENUINE 

Wksvmmmmt*. ]!f adam j ? complete set of genuin 
Stamped with the manufacturer's br 
s^aw/ess aluminum— and at a price /e 
nary aluminum ware! It heats quickl- 
Off. We, ourselves, had to charge $2- 

30 Days Trial-Easy Payments 

rfrfaU^wl^us' &?r?° f , $L5 "° a ™0"th g untn°yo P uhave S pafd" 

■ — ' We t rust honest P e °P le anywhere in the United States. 

— «i— . i-mnnate No discount for cash; 

ISn^M 611 *- S013 -35th St., Chicago ! S^Ncfc T f> f n 

\ Aluminum Kitchen Set No, A6729A. 513.90. | Only $1.00 with the cou- 
pon brings this 2s-piece 
Lifetime Ware" Alum- 

' (rmm set on 30 days trial. 

V Money refunded if not sat- 

isfied. We will also send our 

••••••••••• pig Bargain Catalog of furni- 

ture. rugs, stoves and other 

Ihomef urcushinggoods, free. 
Straus &Scbram 

Only Want CaVaVogJKw'x^Bo'iBeiow.' Dept 3013 

ineLJemb Dr.Ws.Womea's. Children's Clothing B W. 35th St., Chicago 



s'"tijietime Ware" Aluminum, eac;h utensil 
amd— heavy gauge, extra hard, pressed sheet 
ts than is asked by others today f ov thin ordi- 
r„-will not crack, chip or peel, polish can't wear 
&0 for a set like this only a few months ago* 
' but now on a special factory offer we have 
smashed trte price to. $13.90 (on easy monthly 
payments), lower than pre-war prices. 

Everything in the Kitchen of Pure Alu- 
minum 



P-.CUD I 



jColo 



sids 



kettle and 

(3 pieces) 6- 

2-quart 



th a double boil 
lai assign coffee percolator .^ ., 
Idea epout, dome cover, fully pol- 
!Sting-of 9 pieces, measures 10 1-2 
:hes high. These 9 pieces have 
i, some shown In illustration. In- 
pan (7 pint capacity); stew or 
pacity): nudding pan or mixing 



Ished; one roaster 
Inches wid9 and 6 i 
. dozens of different us 
i .luihn.tr bread or bak 
] >uddmg pan (7 pint c . 

I Jowl (4 pint capacity^: egg poacher (5 eggs at a time)- 
I numn pan; biscuit baker with 6 custara cups or jelly 
I noulds; deep locking self-basting roaster, double boiler 
< :ereal cooker or triple steamer. The outfit alsf includes 
pans, 1 lip stew pan (I quart capacity), 1 lip 
1 '-2 quart capacity). Two 9-Inch pie plates; 
xtra deep cake pans: one colander with 
eh bottom and 2 1-4 Inch depth (can 
also be used as a steamer). 5-pieee combination set. 
having 12 different uses as shown In Illustration, con- 
sists of 6 1 quart convex kettle with cover. 2 quart cake 
and pudding pan with cake tube; strainer or colander 
S^'p^s weight about L 5 lbs - A " P'ece? rexcept the" 
pie plates and bread Dans) are hlehly polished. 
made of genuine pure sheet aluminum, extra hard! 
absolutely guaranteed the iamous"LifetimeWare.'> 
Order by No. AC72»a. Sand $1.00 with orcTer. 
$1.50 monthly: Price, 28 pieces, $13.90. 



I itew pan (1 1 
Sinch top, 6 1-8 Tn 



SKAT 



HAND SOAP 

Let Us Send You a Sample 
FREE 



WHITE TO 

The SKAT Company 
Hartford, Conn. S2 



iiiiiEi 

25c Brings Big 3 Ft.Telescqge 

View objects mile3 away just like they wei 
close. Watch people at a distance. See 
Moon and Stars as you never did before, 
Wonder Telescope opens over 3 ft. f 
sections, closed measures 12 inches 
Brass bound. You've always wan- 
ted one like this, get it now. 
Useful and Entertaining 
"Could tell color of aero- 

Slane 4 miles away." 
Ira. L. M. Yarb rough, 
Stringer, Mias.— "Can 



watch my boy until 
he reaches school 
2 miles away " 

Mrs. L. E 
Horn, Mau- 
mee. O.— 
"Can 



lile away and 
mountains on 

noon." A. C. 

Palmer, Indianapolis 

Special Offer B y 



fortunate purchase from a 
rge European manufacturer 
we can give you a bargain. Sup- 
ply limited. Send only 25c with 
order and on arrival deposit $1.70 with 
postman. If you prefer send $1.85 with 
_ _der in full payment. Sent post-paid. Satis- 
faction guaranteed or money returned ia f nil. 

& Co., 6832 E. End Ave. , Dept. soio , Chicago 



CARPENTERS, Weatherstrip men, etc., 

We teach you for $10. How to make 
$200 month up at Window and Door Calk- 
ing in your own vicinity with our "RAW- 
HIDE" Elastic Calking and Glazing Compound. 
Will not Crack and fall out. All Masonry 
Buildings need it. Saves Coal, Decorations, etc. 

WEATHERPROOF COMPOUND CO., 
709 Federation Bldg., Chicago, 111. 



er 



_ The Finest bicycle ever w built. 
44 Styles, colors, sizes; made In our new 
factory. SAVE »10 to $25. Cash or easy pay- 
ments. Delivered free on approval, ex- 
rress prepaid, for 30 Days' Free Trial. No 
i large unless you are satisfied. 

Tj M _^ Best quality at factory prices, ex- 
lb V9 press paid. Lamps, wheels, equip- 
ment, low prices. Write Today for low fac- 
tory prices and marvelous offers and terms. 



Cycle. -Company ggg y* r 

Oep« ^l $]tiCa$0 free catalog 




BUILD YOUR OWN PHONOGRAPH 



Cut out big 
1 can make 



profits. Anyone handy with tools 
cabinet according to our drawings 
and simple instructions. We furnish mechan- 
ical parts at small cost. Drawings, blue prints, 
parts, price list, etc., free on request. Write today. 

Associated Phonograph Company 

Department 9 Cincinnati, Ohio 

1195 GOODYEAR ALL-WEATHER COAT FREE 

Goodyear Mfg. Co., 433-R, Goodyear 
Bldg., Kansas City, Mo., is making an 
offer to send a handsome, Rainproofed, 
All-Weather coat to one person in each 
locality who will show and recommend 
it to friends. If you want one, write today. 



GET YOUR 

FREE 

$1.00 PACKAGE OF GENUINE 
YEAST VITAMINE TABLETS from 

your druggist today. 
IF YOU ARE THIN AND EMACI- 
ATED AND WISH SOMETHING 
TO HELP YOU PUT ON FLESH 
AND INCREASE YOUR WEIGHT, 
Yeast Vitamine Tablets should be used in 
connection with organic Nuxated Iron. With- 
out organic iron, both food and Vitamines are 
absolutely useless, asyour body cannotchange 
inert, lifeless food into living cells and tissue 
unless you have plenty of organic iron in your 
blood. Organic iron takes up oxygen from your 
lungs. This oxygenated organic iron unites 
with your digested food as it is absorbed into 
your blood just as fire unites with coal or 
wood, and by so doing it creates tremendous 
power and energy. Without organic iron in 
your blood your food merely passes thru your 
body without doing you any good. 

•Arrangements have been made with the 
druggists of this city to give every reader of 
this paper a large $1.00 package of Genuine 
Yeast Vitamine Tablets absolutely free with 
every purchase of a bottle of Nuxated Iron. 

I For Red Blood. Strength and Endurance | 

DON'T BE CUT 



piLES 



Until You Try This Won- 
derful Treatment. My internal 
method of treatment is the correct one, 
and is sanctioned by the best informed 
physicians and surgeons. Ointments, 
salves and other local applications give 
only temporary relief. 

If you have piles in any form write for a 
FREE sample of Page's Pile Tablets and you* 
will bless the day that you read this. Write 
today. 
E.R.PAGE.322B Page Bldg., Marshall, Mich. 



POULTRY RAISERS 

Send for the 

Eureka Egg Tester and Sex Indicator 





<5 O O. 



Male Unfertile Female 

And count your chickens before they are hatched. 
This device indicates whether or not the egg is fertile, 
or whether the egg will hatch a rooster or hen. Full 
directions with each order. 

Price 60 cents each— two for $1.00 post paid- 



Box 413, 



LOUIS STEINER, 



Monroe, N. Y. 




$20.00 Value Set MECHANICA 1 
Drawing Instrument? 

Special Wholesale 
Price $6.75 Postpaid 

Pocket case 4x8S inched 
— yelvet lined — instruj 
ments constructed o) 
solid nickel silver anc 
steel — guaranteed. Ordel 
now — supply limited. Fre> 
illustrated particulars. 
NATIONAL INSTRUMENT CO 
4703 N Hamilton Av, Chicago,! 



This Completeri) FP 
Drawing Outfit! I\LL 



■•v ; 



t^r 



You can have this complete Drawing Outfit absolutely free. It has 
everything needed: — A drawing board, "T" square rule, French curve, 
protractor, triangles, triangular boxwood scale, erasing shield, draw- 
ing ink, pencils, erasers, paper, etc. The coupon will bring you infor- 
Jbrmation as to how you can get this splendid outfit free. 

Eara$50.00to$100.00aWeek 

There are few professions that offer greater 
i possibilities than that of the expert drafts- 
\ man. If you want to get into a line of work 
:# that is uncrowded — where the job will 
seek you — where you will earn $50.00 a 
week or more, then here is your chance. Be- 
come a trained draftsman. 

Thousands of Jobs Are Open 

for the trained draftsman. Right now, while a great 
number of men of other lines of work are out of work 
you won't find the trained draftsman hunting for a job. 
The demand for men in this line far exceeds the supply. 
Take advantage of that fact, and without quitting your pres- 
ent job, in your spare time, get the preparation that will fit you 
for this profitable profession. YOU NEED NO PREVIOUS 
TRAINING. An hour or two after supper is all the time you 
need and in a few months you will have mastered this inter- 
esting job. 

Our Free Employment Service 

will assist you in placing yourself to the best advantage in this 
well-paying profession. Our improved system of practical 
instruction has reduced the method of becoming efficient 
in this work to a very simple process. It will help you to cash 
in quickly on your natural ability. 

Don't Turn This Page Until You Have Made Up Your Mind 

to find out all about our free offer to you. The coupon will bring 
full information and our free book. Send for it today — right now. 

AMERICAN SCHOOL 

Drexel Avenue & SSth Street Dept. D -3120 Chicago. U. S. A. 

...._»_<_. TEA R H E R E . ««=,*__„■_„__=_ - — . 

ICAN SCHOOL, Dept. D -3120 . Drexel Ave., & 58th St., Chicago, U. S. A. 

send me particulars on how I can get the Drawing Outfit Free and explain how I can get the job checked. This re- 

3 to put me under no obligation. 

:hine Drawing and Design □ Surveying and Topographical Drafting □ Structural Drafting 

intectural Design D Sheet Metal Pattern Drafting Q Sanitary Drafting and Estimating 




•Address. 



The M. F. B. Combined Lock and Butt Gauf fe 




The only Gauge made which will 
mark accurately for both sides of 
Lock with one stroke. Likewise 
will mark for both sides oft the 
Strike-plate with one stroke. (See 
cuts Nos. 1 and 2.) Send Money 
Order. 

Price $2.50. Guaranteed. 
Manufactured by 



No. 1. Strike=plate. 

LOS ANGELES, 



M. F. BIERSDORF 

547 San Julian St. 

Member of L. U. No. 158. 




No. 2. Lock. 



CAL. 



CARPENTERS HAND BOOK 

For the carpenter on the job there is no other hand 
book of similar publication that gives so fully the 
methods of laying out work and containing so 
many every day "rules and tables." 
Among some of the tables included are those giv- 
ing full length of common, hip, valley and jack 
rafters, also the cuts required for any of these 
pitches. In these tables are given 270*0 different 
lengths of rafters, 300 different lengths of braces 
and the proper cuts for same. 

The layout of roofs, including complete roof fram- 
ing, stair building, the use of the steel square, etc., 
and in fact all the up-to-date information and 
"SHORT CUT RULES" for every-day use in a first 
class flexible bound pocket edition. 
Price to Members Only of U. B. of C. & J. of A. ' 

I - ~ "" " "~~" "" """"Mail this Coupon to"" - ~ ' — ' — 
I D. A. ROGERS, 

3604 Stevens Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 

■ Enclosed find $1.00 for which please send me your book 
• CARPENTER AND BUILDERS PRACTICAL RULES 
| FOR LAYING OUT WORK. 

I Name 

! St. and No 

I 

■ Town and State 

I The Book that will help you on the job or your money back. 



CARPENTERS AHD ?Ultl>ERS 

, PRACTJCAL RULtS 



(Size 41 x 7 inches.) 



<.(, 



The Building Labor Calculator" 



By Gordon M. Tamblyn. 



Gives LABOR HOURS on: Excavations, Sheet Piling. Concrete, Reinforcing Steel, Concrete Forms, Cement Work] 

Common Brick, Press Brick,, Tile and Plaster Block Partitions, Stone Work, Terra Cotta, Rough Carpentrjl 

Finish Carpentry, Lathing and Furring, Plain Plastering, Ornamental Plastering, Interior Marble, Sheet Meta| 

Work, Slate Roofs, Tile Roofs, Composition Roofs, etc., Painting and Decorating, etc. 

A Bungalow or a Skyscraper — Fire-proof or non-Fire-Proof. 

Simple — Accurate — Rapid. Send for descriptive literature. , 

WESTERN SCHOOL OF ESTIMATING AND PLAN READING, 210 W. 13th Ave., Denver, Coloradq 



The "INTBRLOX" Thinks 

Invented by a Brotherhood Man 

Don't use a stick or guess at a measurement. 

The famous 

"Interlox" Master Slide Rule 



gives both inside and outside measurements 
instantly. 

Quick, accurate, no figuring, no mistakes, no 
lost time. Durable and rust proof. Use it 
once and vou will never work loithoitt it. 
Write today for full descriptive circulars. 

MASTER RULE MFG. CO., INC. 

841C East 136th St., New York City 



INCREASE YOUR INCOME 

by modernizing o 1 < 
windows with the us< 
of CALDWELI 
SASH BALANCES 
have stood tht 
for upwards o) 
thirty-two years. 

Write for information. Dept. C. 

CALDWELL MFG. CO. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




.w he3 i 

i^^ test 




The American Woodworker 

Gasoline, Kerosene, or Electric Driven 
Used on the Job or in the Shop 

Also Made With Band Saw Attached 

Let us send you our Bulletin No. 77 
describing this and other profit pro- 
ducers for the Carpenter, Contrac- 
tor and Builder. 

American Saw Mill Machinery Company 

136 Main Street, Hackettstown, N. J. 

New York Office. 50 Church St. 
Philadelphia Office, The Bourse. 



SNELL'S AUGERS AND BITS 
The Standard the World Over 

Established 17901 




Selling Agents: 

JOHN H. GRAHAM & CO., 

113 Chambers St., 
NEW YORK, CITY. 




SNELL MFG. CO., 

FISKDALE, MASS. 



:ilCK SUCCESS and ftflORE MONEY 

Saries up to $100 per week. Here is your only OPPORTU- 
ry to get this wonderful. $40.00, Complete Drawing Outfit, 
iiding a FREE— PRACTICAL COURSE IN MECHANICAL 
AWING— AT OUR SPECIAL OFFER. 



ENS 



MONEY 



ship FREE to any address in U. S., and you pay only 
98 on arrival— NO EXTRAS— Write to-day for this remark- 
■ offer, with which you can build your Success in DRAFTS- 
.NSHIP. You can put yourself in a class of Trained Men 
ise sirvices are always in DEMAND. 

SY TO LEARN AT HOME IN YOUR SPARE TIME 
I is your one chance to earn the biggest money of your life, and 

1! be one of the most profitable investments you have ever made. 
TFIT CONSISTS of— Set large size Professional Draftsman's 
wing instruments of Fine Nickel Silver, set into a handsome 

I: vet Lined pocket book folding case, size 4 by 8 1-2 inches 
icd— also One Drawing Board 20 by 24 1-2 inches — One 24- 
ih T Square— One 12-inch Standard scale rule— One Protractor 
upply of drawing paper — Two Triangles — One French Curve — 
"lis— Erasers — One bottle waterproof drawing ink — Thumb 
:ks— and one enlarged Edition FREE— A PRACTICAL COURSE 
MECHANICAL DRAWING. You cannot make a mistake by 

Iring up drawing, so — Guarantee Your Future and Act Now. 
OFFER IS LIMITED— FURTHER PARTICULARS FREE 

NATIONAL INSTRUMENT COMPANY 

3 North Hamilton Ave., Dept. M. Chicago, III. 



*irni2)ii^A t i?i^iir 

YPRESS 

THE WOOD ETERNAL" 

for INTERIOR TRIM is staunch and 

true.. Stands the moisture, heat and 

steam so prevalent in Kitchens, has 

a beautiful, clear, clean grain and 
takes all finishes perfectly. 

THIS TRADE-MARK IS ITS IDENTIFICATION 

k C 




M ^ W A 

Thade Mark Reg. U.S. PAT.Oncr 

Let our "Builders' Helps Depart- 
ment" aid you in getting the best 
service use of this remarkable, age- 
defying wood. SPECIFY it on the 
knowledge which you have and which 
you can confirm by writing us. 

SOUTHERN CYPRESS MFRS. 
ASSOCIATION 

1252 Poydras Building, New Orleans, La., or 
1252 Graham Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla. 




PREMAX WALL TIES AND PLUGS 

Strong — Permanent — Correctly designed 

From your dealer or direct 

NIAGARA .METAL STAMPING CORPORATION 



Division C 



Niagara Falls, N. Y. 




TheRustlessRule 



:. : :.? 7 '_'. . .;. --";.-' : -.. i ..-■.' - '-. '-'■ ~ ' ~- '■ *-!'. 

weighs little, has brass joints, costs less than a steel rule, vet is ju > 
::i .. ; ..::: i-_: = ; ^: i::-:_-.e zz ----*...- t.:g*:i.er with permanent 

~.-.T-' .--T7- 

:. r -:. ----i ■■ . : : : :' -.. If 7-: le 1". ;: : -z. '-.: = -7. 7 .7 7 ". - -= ; ~ _ u .1 

~ 7 . " - - " '.".-■* 7^7 ~ ~ '-'- 

THE RUSTLESS RULE CO.. INC. 
; Li;'i..r-.T A.r. Buffalo, N. Y. 



1 umbi ng, Heating and Pneumatic 
Waterworks Supplies at Wholesale 



rket for Plumbing. Heating and 
works Supplies and you wish to 



Save 20 to 40 °b on Every Article 

order from us. Sniall orders are as carefully 
handled as large ones. Only house selling guar- 
anteed plumbing and heating supplies to all, 

B, KAROL & SONS CO., 804 So. Kedzie Ave., Chicago, 111. 



Send for Catalog 



K&E MEASURING TAPES 






are well made, of good material, and are reliable. 
^-14,^ Prices Revised Send For New Price 

% ■; -KEUFFEL & ESSER Co. • 




Nearly ONE MILLION MEN Have Used 

TAINTOR POSITIVE SAW SETS 
Are You One Of Them? 



S:_:i E; L-^s. 



77-77— - ~~-- 
— 7i_--:5 :: 



TAINTOR MFG. C< 



95 Reade St., New York 





C-i::-.i - ■_ :■: - 7 : S-atl Eearini Eltctrid 
:i:j Machine is what you need to finish 
3 doors quickly and just 



" Special"' and 2Ja. 
o?er 1 ; 

JNo. 3 i : -7:;: en; e.zf circulr.r ;:. rs 14 
to 20 c 

X:. 4 ■-.: C:~. 7777:;"! 7777 ' II" 7:7:777; 77~s 
14 -: 2~> : 7:r. 

No. 5 for timber end board saws r " t« l-l 

7" 777. 

CHaS. ".SCr.F.ILL, S; i 1 ;':^ Z.-.\.. fii'W YORK, il.Y, 



~:r> is 7J7r firs: essen- 
particularly new 
apartments Etc., 
: be done away 
ow smoothly and 

Z ZZ-LC^-ZZZi ZZiZ- 

.- ha-ring roller 
«rd Emm either 

■ 7 ~7.h unexen 
bment. Kemore3 
' : i 7 1 - : ir ;:;.., 



133 .. 



: - = - ■■ : s. Co. 
=. :- St. Dept. A. 
• --- :. Ell. 




WHY WORRY 

ABOUT A LEAKY ROOF WHEN IT 
CAN SO EASILY BE CURED BY 




REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 



BAYONNE 

IS GUARANTEED ABSOLUTELY 

WA TERPROOF 

It has been used as a roof and floor 
covering on thousands of Piazzas, 
Sleeping Porches, etc.. and is recog- 
nized by Carpenters and Builders the 
country over as the standard of Roof- 
ing Canvas. 

Write for sample book "T" 

JOHN BOYLE & CO., INC. 

ESTABLISHED I860 

"2-H4 new YORK 70 " 72 



DUANE ST 

BRANCH 202-204 MARKET ST 



READE ST. 
ST. LOUIS 





Send For 
This Big BooK 

HERE ARE 100 complete plans for Bunga- 
lows, Houses, Barns and Garages which 
you can have for the asking. This Plan 
Book will enable you to give your clients a wide 
variety of plans from which to choose a home, 
a garage or a barn— and the complete cost of 
each. You will find the book invaluable in 
helping you sell your services. 
As you know, there is a purpose behind every 
tree book. Our purpose is the sale of lumber 
and millwork at reduced prices. We planned 
Uus book to help you— and to help us indirectly. 
You are welcome to this useful book even 
though you never buy a nickel's worth from us. 
But whether you build according to our plan or 
your own, be sure to get our prices before 
ordering lumber and millwork. They will 
astonish you, and the qualitv of the lumber will 
Please you A Postal Brings This Free Book Without 
Obligation; Also Estimates and Estimate Blanks. 

ist Side Lumber & Manufacturing Company 

PA.ST ST, LOUIS, ILLINOIS 



Mr. Carpenter 



! Wouldn't You 
Like to Be- 
come a Con- 
tractor and Be 
Your Own 
Boss? 

The 

Installation 

of 

FEDERAL 

METAL 

WEATHER= 

STRIPS 

Is a Very Profit- 
able Business. 

Let Us Tell You 
About It. 

Write Today. 



FEDERAL METAL WEATHERSTRIP CO. 

1240 Fullerton Ave. Chicago 





THE 

EXPERT'S 
CHOICE 
FILE 



Does twice the work of an ordinary file — in half the time. 

The Expert's Choice increases the value cf your time by 

over 50%; By spending 30 cents you can make it back 

on your first filing job alone. It's in the Quality — in the 

cut of the tooth and in the length of the stroke. 

Frank Luther. Chicago, says: "The Expert's 

Choice File flies 18 hand saws and is cheaper at 

a cost of 50c than the ordinary file at any price." 

You get your money back u* the Expert s Choice does not prove 

to be the most economical file you have ever used DELTA 

SAW FILES are made for fine or coarse teeth — also for that 

extra hard 6aw. Buy your tools of the dealer who sella 

Delta Files. He is tho quality man. 

Trinl fiffpr If your dealer cannot supply you. send us 20c. 
mtiu.il vy/#c# 25c or 3Qc for trla , Qle geDt p:epald Do 

thU today — find out what a real die is 



o-THE HIGHEST 'GRAD E. .FILE MAD E . 
: E LTA" HAN D S AW- f I WE S - 



carpenter's special? 



MECHANICS PAVORITE 



EXPERT'S CHOICE 



.30;., 

TIME-* ""I 

: Sou" 111 



DELTA 

FILE 

WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, 
PA. 



Look for 
This Sign 
at Your 
Hardware 
Store 



4.— ^-TTBSffi^Bi 



ri»it^-'*-=q^^f»y^ 



lie besl Aujej Eil File made — We will delim on receipt ef 30 ceau eiclj. 



ROUND 




PIlCLEY CHAIN 



PATENT APPLIED POB 



Carpenters as -well as Conductors 
prefer ACCO" CHAIN to cord 





The adoption of "Acco" Chain in 
place of unreliable sash cord is in 
line with a similar advance in the 
general use of "Acco" Chain for signal 
cord in railway trains. 

"Acco" Round Cord Pulley Chain is 
guaranteed to operate freely and 
smoothly through eyelets or over pul- 
leys. Practically everlasting — will 
not kink, stretch or knot. Infinitely 
stronger than sash cord and more 
economical. 

There is no waste because there is no 
knotting, and it can be cut into exact 
lengths. No cutting by sharp or rag- 
ged edged eyelets and pulleys. 

Immediate deliveries in any quanti- 
ties. 



AMERICAN CHAIN CO., Inc. 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

District Sales Office: Chicago New York Pittsburgh Boston 
Philadelphia Portland, Ore. San Franissco 





K/1 /=t 



, ality 

Uniformity 

Responsibility 



Q^O Let Us Show You 
How to Make 
More Money 



You can easily sell Oak Flooring, as well as lay it. 
Your work enables you to know the live prospects — the 
people who would choose Oak Flooring in building the 
new, or remodelling the old home, if they only knew 
its advantages, economies and comparatively low cost. 

A special % thickness for overlaying old floors offers 
you a wide field, as every home owner is a prospect. 

Write for our three free booklets, in colors, containing 
information which, added to your practical knowledge of 
building, will make you a competent Oak Flooring sales- 
man. Let us help you make more money. Write today. 

OAK VlDOMmjmQMJffi 

1051 Ashland Block, Chicago, 111. 





Cornell helps me earn money all 
r ear 'round," says the Carpenter 



Having tried about, every kind of 
wallboard on the market, I've now 
adopted Cornell- Wood- Board for every 
job. I find that Cornell doesn't warp 
or buckle when correctly applied, be- 
cause it is made of pure wood fiber — 
and "Triple- Sized" in the process. 
This gives these rigid panels triple 
the ordinary protection against mois- 
ture, expansion, contraction, sound 
and variation in climate. Compari- 
son of walls of long standing prove 
that. It is light and strong, and 
easier to apply than plaster board. 



Cornell's Department of Design and 
Decoration supplies special interior 
drawings without cost to carpenters 
and contractors, showing the most 
artistic panel arrangements for any 
new work, alterations or repairs. 
Write or mail the coupon for full de- 
tails, and get in line for the Cornell 
jobs in your neighborhood. 

CORNELL WOOD PRODUCTS CO. 
Dept. CA=i 

General Offices 190 N. State Street Chicago, HI. 
Water Power, Mills and Timberlands in Wisconsin 



rnell 



Mail This For Plan to Increase Your Earnings 



omell Wood Products Co., Dept. CA-1, 
JO N. State St., Chicago, 111. 

Tell me liow I can Ret the Cornell jobs in mv neighborhood, and the benefit of 
your free plan service for Carpenters and Contractors. 



reet Address 



City State. 




JLW 








■ '..-.-. 






HB^< '■ jta -^ 




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W ~*j£iM*r' ' 




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CARPENTERS, CONTRACTORS 
AND SAW USERS! 

Ever try to saw a board with a 
Meat Saw? Or — let us put the 
question differently — have you - 
ever tried to do a job without' 
the proper tools? 

The man who thinks he is saving! 
money because he puts off the; 
purchase of an 

Atkins Itlei Saw 

or tool — that fellow is figuring" 
backwards ; he's not a money 
maker; he's his own worst 
enemy. 

It's up to us to furnish you with 
the proper saws and tools. They 
aren't luxuries for the man who 
needs them, but real necessities. . 



Write for "Sato Sense" — The 
Book of Facts. Send 25 cents 
for Carpenter's Nail Apron 
and souvenir Saw Comb. Mail 
to us at Indianapolis. 



E.C.ATKINS © COJ 

ESTABLISHED !8S7 THE SILVER STEEL SAW PEOPIX i 

Home Office w\d Factory. IND1ANAP0US.INDIANA 

CanadianFactoryHamilton Ontario 
Machine Knife Factory, Lancastc r N .Y. | 

tranches Carrying Complete Stock&lnThoFollowinfCitivn I 

Atlanta. New Orleans Se&ttlo 

Memphis New York City Pari a. France 

Chicago Portland. Ore. Sydney. N- Su* 

Minneapolis Snxv Francisco Vancouver, B.C I 



These Sheetrock advantage 
guarantee satisfied customer 

You can always depend on Sheetrock walls and ceilings 
to please your customers. For Sheetrock is made from 
gypsum rock and is non- warping, fireproof and perma- 
nent. It provides a notable resistance to heat and cold. 

Putting up Sheetrock is a carpenter's job all the way 
through. Sheetrock cuts, saws and nails like lumber. It 
is quickly fitted to the joists and studs and takes any 
decoration the customer prefers — papox •, paint or panels. 

Let us tell you about 
a plan which is helping 
hundreds of carpenters 
get Sheetrock jobs and 
increase their profits. 
Fill in and mail the at- 
tached coupon today! 




Sheetrock comes in standard 
sizes: % in. thick, 32 or 48 
in. wide and 6 to 10 ft. long 



SHEE'EROCK 



yhe FIRE PROOF 



I WAT/ LB OAR 



UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPAN' 

World's Largest Producers of Gypsum Products 
GENERAL OFFICES: Dept. I, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 



United States Gypsum Company 

Dept I, 205 West Monroe St., Chicago, HL 

Tell me about your plan to get Sheetrock contracts. 



Name. 



Address. 



Sheetrock is inspected and approved by The Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. 




For every steep-roofed building — 



I) matter what building- you're going 
roof, there's a Barrett Everlastic 
Ilofing exactly suited to the job. 



f r residences, private garages, 

Inches, schoolhouses, etc., Everlas- 

Single Shingles or Everlastic 

llti-Shingles (4 shingles in a strip) 

a: just the thing. They're economi- 

C and easy to lay and they are sur- 

" ed with fadeless red or green min- 

.1 which makes the finished roof 

slikingly attractive. 



r factories, farm buildings, sheds, 
ej., there are two styles of Everlastic 

11 Roofing to choose from — one 
nheral-surfaced, like the shingles — 
t| other the famous Everlastic "Rub- 
b|" Roofing. 

no matter what building you're 
jng to roof, the Barrett Everlastic 
el will insure honest value and long 

vice. 



Your Choice of Four Roofings 

Everlastic Multi-Shingles. The newest thing 
in roofing — four shingles in one. Tough, 
elastic, durable. Made of high grade water- 
proofing materials and surfaced with mineral 
in art-shades of red or green. When laid 
they look exactly like individual shingles and 
make a roof worthy of the finest buildings. 
Weather and fire resisting to a high degree. 
Need no plating. 

Everlastic Single Shingles. Same material and 
art-finish (red or green) as tbe Multi-Shing- 
les, but made in individual shingles ; size, 
8 x 12^ inches. A finished roof of Single 
Shingles is far more beautiful than an ordi- 
nary shingle roof and, in addition, costs less 
per year in service. 

Everlastic Mineral-Surfaced Roofing. The most 
beautiful and enduring roll roofing made. 
Surfaced with mineral in art-shades of red 
or green. Very durable ; requires no paint- 
ing. Nails and cement in each roll. 

Everlastic "Rubber" Roofing. This is one of 
our most popular roofings. Thousands upon 
thousands of buildings all over the country 
are protected from wind and weather by 
Everlastic "Rubber" Roofing. It is tough, 
pliable, elastic, durable and very low in 
price. It is easy to lay ; no skilled labor 
required. Nails and cement included in each 
roll. 



Company 



I York 
Rpburgb 

1 
Ikstown 

L'H'obe 



I real 



Chicago Philadelphia Boston St. Louis Cleveland Cincinnati 

Detroit New Orleans Birmingham Kansas City Minneapolis l>allas 

Peoria Atlanta Duluth Salt Lake City Bangor Washington 

Lebanon Youngstown Milwaukee Toledo Columbus Richmond 

Bethlehem Elizabeth Buffalo Baltimore Omaha Houston Denver 



Toronto 



THE BARRETT COMPANY, Limited : 
Winnipeg Vancouver St. John, X. B. 



Jacksonville 



Halifax. X. S. 




Month Safari 

t Hom< 




Chief Draftsman OOBE 



That's the kind of money my drafting 
students make. Read what this one says: 

"As a beginner I am doing fine. Am earning a 
salary of $300 per month, besides I made over $450 at 
home the last two months, drawing plans for private 
parties. The practical drafting training you gave me 
by mail put me where I am in less than six month's 
study. Thank you for all your personal interest and 
help you gave me so far.- (sigmd) JR 

(Name and Address upon request) 

To Train You 




rSmtC6{ PlacedlnaPosi 



to $300 a Month 



Write and I'll tell you how I make you a first-class, big -money -earning 

draftsman in a very few months ! I do this by a method no other man nor institution can 
imitate. I give you personal training at home by mail. And I mean just what I say. I train 
you until you are actually placed in a posi- 
tion paying from $250 to $300 a moKith. 
draftsmen are wanted every month 
register so you can start earning. 



Six thousand 
Hurry up and 



Free *25 Oat 

And more— I give you a whole set of drafting tools 
the minute you become my student. You get every 
tool you need. A magnificent $125 set of instruments 
with which to build your succ ess in draftmanship. 

Take this offer now— while it fc open. Remember— 
the draftsman goes up and up to the fabulous in- 
comes of engineers and archit< :cts. And I start you 
on this road— start you personally a nd stick by your 
side until success is yours. 

Free Book! 

Send Coupon TODAY MT 

No matter what pjans you have for the future. Get 
this great book — "Successful Craftsmanship." Find 
out about the simply marvelous opportunities ahead 
now. Kow the world needs draftsmen, engineers, 
architects and builders. What .great salaries and pos- 
sibilities there are! Send coupe n for free book today. 

Chief Draftsm an B®be 

Dept. 531 4 » 4001 Broada ay Chicago, Ell. 




Chief Draftsman Dohe 

Dept. 5314*4001 Broadway, Chicago,!* 

Without any obligation whatsoever, please mail you *> 
"Successful Draftsmanship", and full particulars <!• 
liberal "Personal Instruction" offer to few students. 



Name 

Address. . . . 
Post Office. 



.State i 



1 



Nationally Known 
Products 

lUthern Pine Lum- 
ber and Timbers 
eosoted Lumber, 
Timbers Posts, 
Posts, Poles, Tics, 
Piling Wood 
Blocks 
California White 

Pine Lumber 
Sash and Doors 
andardized Wood- 
work 
im and Oak Lum- 
ber 

Oak Flooring 




can bulkl a home like this. Consult 
retail lumberman. Ask him to show 
Long-Bell Plan No. 2062. If he 
t It, write us. There are 60 other 
s In Long Bell service. 




[Trade OMarlced 



ER 



When you think of LONG-BELL 
Lumber, think of more than good 
Lumber — Think of what that 
lumber will build— 




Homes of Charm and Distinction 

Long-Bell service includes something more 
than the manufacture of good lumber. It in- 
cludes a home plan service that is distributed 
to retail lumber dealers to make it easy and 
convenient for home builders to select appro- 
priate designs and to obtain estimates of cost. 

Go to your retail lumberman. Ask him to 
show you Long-Bell home plans. Choose a 
plan that will fit your needs and then ask the 
lumberman to give you an estimate of the 
cost of that home complete. You will be 
surprised at the economy, as well as the 
beauty and convenience, of Long-Bell 
homes. 



Build with Lumber, the least expensive material 
you can buy today. To be assured of obtaining 
lumber of uniform high quality.' ask for lumber 
bearing the LONG-BELL brand. 



The T pnG-fiean, Xjunber r. ompani| 

n.A.LONC UU1LD1NC L»ml>.ni>« nllH flu» KANSAS CITY, MO. 



iaakftWrUfur, 



3ES25ESEK3ES- 



COURSE IN 
DRAFTSMANSHIP 




FRE 



Quick Sue 



AND 



More Mo 



Our reman 
offer is read! 

you NOW — after many months of work, and thousands of cl| 
spent in completing and producing these outfits, — at our s\i 
price — we are now able to offer them to a limited number oiri 
that desire to advance to a better paying position. 

SALARIES Up To $100 PER WE!! 

Here is your only opportunity to get this wonderful, high priced! 

plete drawing outfit including a FREE PRACTICAL COURlJ 

MECHANICAL DRAWING— NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. | 

SEND NOMONEY-s^fpFRIi 

To any address in U. S., and yon pay only $11. OS on arrival — NO EXTRAS — wtf 
day for this remarkable offer, with which you can build your success in draftsnili 
You can put yourself in a class of trained men whose services are always in DEAI 
Great engineering and construction firms are searching feverishly for draftsmen 
day. Work is light, pleasant and profitable. 

EASY TO LEARN AT HOME IN YOUR SPARE TIME 



A few hours each wp'k, pleasantly occupied, are all that is necessary to lift you up into 
pendent and well paid draftsman class. You will find the evenings spent with your dawing t 
outfit the most pleasant of your life. Course is most simple, thorough, and successful. 
This is a dance to earn tho biggest money of your life, and will be one of the most profitab 
ments you have ever made. Everything used by expert draftsmen given to you. 
OUTFIT CONSISTS of — Set large size Professional Draftsman's daawing instruments of Fi 
Silver, set into a hand-ome Velvet Lined pocket book folding case, size 4 by 8 1-2 inches clo 
One Drawing Board 20 by 24 1-2 inches — One 24-inch T Square — One 12-inch Standard sc? 
Supply of drawing paper — Two Triangles — One French Curve — One Profm-tor — Pencils- 
One bottle waterproof drawing ink — Thumb Tacks — and one enlarged Edition FREE] — A PP.. 
COURSE IX MECHANICAL DRAWING. You cannot make a mistake by taking up drawin; 

SO— GUARANTEE YOUR FUTURE AND ACT NOW 

OFFER IS LIMITED — FURTHER PARTICULARS 1 

______ TEAR OUT AND MAIL TODAY 

National Instrument Company 

4703 North Hamilton Ave., Dept. A. Chit,' . 



□ 
□ 



Mark an X in one of the squares below. 
Please send me at once eomplete drafting outfit — with FREE course in mechanical drawing — for which ' n 
$11.98 on arrival — no'extras. All guaranteed as represented. 

Please send me more particulars — How I can become a successful draftsman with your complete draftin ut " 
Free Course Offer. 



NAME __ STREET. 

XOWN STATE— 



" - 



R= 



M '^^ A 
OS REGISTERED TRADEMARK IS INDEUBLY STAMPED IN THE END OF EVERY BOAED OF TRUE "TIDEWATER 1 ' CIPRES3. LOOK FOE IT. 




The Wood 
Eternal 



*> 



has no equal for porch construc- 
tion. It seems to be pretty fully 
demonstrated that for all porch 

construction, porch floors, porch col- 
umns, steps and rails, the rot-resistant 
quality of "The Wood Eternal" gives 
it unequaled investment value for this 
class of work. CYPRESS is famous 
for "staying put." 



Let our "BUILDER S' DEPART- 
MENT" help YOU. Our entire resources 
are at your service with Reliable Counsel. 



There is a liberal education in the Cypress Pocket Library on all phases 

of building — some with plans for Cypress Bungalows and other delight- 
ful things. Vol. 1 (free) tells all about it. Good idea to send for it. 



Southern Cypress Manufacturers' Association 

252 Poydras Building, New Orleans, La., or 1252 Graham Building, Jacksonville, Fla. 

SPECIFY AND INSIST ON "TIDEWATER" CYPRESS 
IDENTIFIED BY THE CYPRESS ASSN.'S REGISTERED TRADE-MARK. 
IF IN ANY DOUBT, PLEASE WRITE US IMMEDIATELY. 

nS REGISTERED TRADE- MARK IS INDEUBLY STAMPED IN THE END OF EVERY BOARD OF TROE ' •TIDEWATER• ' CYPRESS. TAKE NO OTHER. 




J* ^^f A 

ittuiRj'. US. (faunas 



nw M<« (Lit US [taarttt 



Dm tu> d« us mot» 




lack 



i 



Files 



For sharpening- every 
kind of saw, Black 
Diamond Files are the 
best. They put a keen 
edge on the toughest 
saw teeth in labor- 
saving time. 

Black Diamond Files 
are tempered to de- 
pendable hardness — 
made keen cutting 
and precise. Since 
1863 Black Diamond 
Files have been the 
choice of men who de- 
mand the utmost from 
files. 



G.& BLBarnett Co., 

1078 Frankford Avenue, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Owned and operated by 

NICHOLSON FILE CO. 
Providence, Rhode Island. 



HOW MANY 

GOOD 

WOODWORKERS 

ARE ] 
THERE 1 

Who follow good advice 



It pays us to make- 
as it pays them to ask 
for the Best Sandpaper 
bytheirbrands-BEHR* 

Garnet & Brooklyn Flint 

Your dealer will be glad to 
give you what you want. 



HERMAN 



& CO.. INC. 



BROOKLYN— NEW YORK 

SANDPAPER MAKERS FOR 50 YEARS 




ILLEH5 FALLS 

TOOLS- 



■ MiUers Falls 
Carpenters' Tools 



FINE workmanship is a fine 
art that demands fine 
tools. Millers Falls Tools 
have been favorites with the 
best carpenters and mechanics 
since 1868. 

Should you visit the Millers 
Falls factories in the Berk- 
shire Hills of New England, 
you would then realize why- 
Millers Falls tools are worthy 



tools — workmanlike tools. 

Two generations of Yankee 
inventive genius and patient 
skill have gone to the making 
of Millers Falls Tools, with a 
generous allowance of New 
England conscience thrown in 
for good measure. 

No wonder Millers Falls tools 
are good tools — through and 
through. 



Write us for the Millers Falls Handbook for 
Carpenters and Mechanics. 

MILLERS FALLS COMPANY, Millers Falls, Mass. 




They Are Easy To Lay 

Ruberoid Strip-shingles, because of their patented shape, are self -spacing. 
No chalk lines are necessary. You don't need to use as many nails as 
with ordinary shingles, although each strip is actually held by nine nails. 



When you have put on Ruberoid 
Strip-shingles, you can tell the 
house owner to forget about his 
roof. Ruberoid quality means just 
that. Thousands of roofs, upon 
which Ruberoid has lasted for 
more than a quarter century, 
prove this. 

Ruberoid Strip-shingles are of un- 



usual thickness, giving the roof a 
pleasing, massive appearance. 
They may be laid in varied designs 
by combining the colors and re- 
versing the strips. The new 
Ruberoid Strip-shingle folder 
shows some of these attractive de- 
signs in color. It will be sent to 
you upon request. 



The RUBEROID Co. 

95 Madison Avenue, New York 



Chicago 



Boston 






SHINGLES and ROOFING 




JERSEY 

Screen Cloth 



l^JERSEY^ 



Look for the Name 

Jersey Copper Insect Screen Cloth is the 
material to use for windows, doors, and 
porches. 

Iron or steel screen cloth rusts out in patches — no 
matter whether the wire is painted or galvanized. 
Near the sea and in the tropics it is especially 
short-lived. 

Alloys of copper (bronze or brass) will often disintegrate 
strand by strand. The weakness here is due to the fact that 
it is impossible to obtain a uniform mixture of two or more 
metals; hence, some strands are less durable than others. 

For insect screen cloth, unalloyed copper is more satisfac- 
tory than any other metal. Jersey Copper Screen Cloth is 
made of wire, 99.8% pure, by a special Roebling process 
which gives it approximately the tensile strength of steel. 
Even under the most severe conditions near the sea coast 
and in the tropics, it will give excellent service. 

Look for the name, Jersey Copper Screen Cloth, on the 
rolls. Only put on screens, cloth that you can recom- 
mend unqualifiedly. Many merchants carry it in stock; 
if you cannot obtain Jersey Cloth in your locality, write us 
(main office given below) and we will inform you how to 
get it. Stores and agencies in many cities. 

The New Jersey Wire Cloth Company 

618 South Broad Street 
Trenton New Jersey 




Why Maple outwears Stone 



Every shoe in the thousands that 
strike a stone sill, grinds off its toll 
of fine particles in an unchanging 
friction. But Maple builds up its own 
resistance to wear, because each pass- 
ing foot increases the polish on this 
hard -fibred, tight -grained wood, 
making it smoother and smoother. 

That is why Maple surpasses all 
other woods and all other materials 
for flooring. Because of its individual 
characteristics, Maple is used for 
floors in every good home, office, 
school, church, apartment, public or 
industrial building. 

Architects, engineers, contractors, 
builders — all who desire to give their 
clients the finest of counsel and ser- 
vice, will say "Floor with Maple. " 
Wherever wear is essential or beauty 
desired, it is the wood to choose. 
And to be sure of the grade and 
quality" you should have, see that it is 



flooring produced and guaranteed 
according to the rigid inspection 
standards of the Maple Flooring 
Manufacturers Association. 

MFMA flooring is made from the 
climate-hardened, slow-growth Maple 
of Michigan and Wisconsin — the 
source of the world's finest Maple 
for floors. 

Kindred woods of Maple are Beech 
and Birch, produced by the same 
high manufacturing standards. This 
trio of flooring woods offers a variety 
and versatility of surface finish which 
will satisfy any client you may have. 

Maple Flooring Manufacturers Assn. 
1056 Stock Exchange Building, Chicago 



The letters MFMA on 
Maple.Beech orBireh floor- 
ing signify that the floor- 
ing is standardized and 
guaranteed by the Maple 
Flooring Manufacturers 
Association, whose mem- 
bers most attain and 
maintain the highest 
standards of manufacture 
and adhere to manufactur- 



ing rules ■which economi- 
cally conserve every par- 
ticle of this remarkable 
■wood. Thistrademarkisf or 
your protection. Look for 
it on the flooring you use. 



MFMA 



Floor with Maple 



fori Are Asked To Plan And To 
Prepare Estimates On Building 
riiis House. Can You Do It? 



If you can't do it you are not yet in 
the real money making - class — you are 
not a building expert. 

But, you can become an expert simply by 
giving some of your spare time to home 
study under the direction of the Chicago 
"Tech" experts who will train you in any 
branch of building you want to take up. 
All this at little cost and on easy terms. 

Boom in Building Coming 
Get Ready to Profit By It 

Get this training now and your opportunity will come. Building is to be 
resumed and there will be a big demand for men able to act as foremen and super- 
intendents on important work; also chances for the „ , - . , « # • 

man who wants to go into business as a carpenter and F^f?JFF ifWZtJ, 




for the small contractor to extend his business. 

Train in Spare Time 
To Handle Big Jobs 

To get the paying jobs you must have the knowledge that will 
?nable you to tell others what to do and how to do it. That is 
,vhat we teach you. 

Some of the Subjects 

Plan Beading. How to read a building plan. How to read 
limensions. How to read detail drawings. How to lay out 
vork from plans. How to stake out buildings. Practice in read- 
Dg complete blue print plans from basement to roof, etc., etc. 

Estimating. Figuring amount and cost of materials. Esti- 
mating time and labor. How to figure work such as stairs, 
oofing, rafters, etc. Millwork : window and door frames, mould- 
Tigs, cornices, etc. All about the steel square. Lathing and 

lastering. Excavations. Brick, stone and concrete work. Fire- 

jroofing. Glazing. Plumbing. Heating. 

firing, Etc. Etc. BH (SHS ■■ EBB ■ 

; Superintending. Methods of work on 

11 classes of buildings. Uses and prep- 
I ration of all kinds of material. Hiring 
;nd handling men. 
| Also Special Courses Architectural 

'rafting for Carpenters and in Plumbing 
Ind Healing and Ventilating, all taught 

y practical men. 



esson 




This free lesson In Plan Read- 
ing shows how easily you can 
grasp the subject by the Chicago 
"Tech" method. Nothing to pay 
for this — sent to show how you 
can advance by taking a Chicago 
"Tech" home study course. Cou- 
pon brings it free. 



CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE, 
439 Chicago "Tech" Building. 

Without obligation on me please send Free Trial 
Lesson on the course I have marked X below. 



Send the Coupon | 

I 
I 
1 



] Plan Heading and Estimating 
] Architectural Drafting. 



Don't delay. At least find out 
bout this practical training for 
igger pay or more profits. Send 
ir catalog. Get the coupon into 
le mail today. 



Name. 



Address . 



Post Office State. 



Occupation . 



Who knows best how a tool should be made? 
The man who uses it, every time! 

162 (°i67 of ) carpenters say 



BECAUSE carpenters helped to 
design the Plumb nail hammer, it 
is only natural that expert mechanics 
should prefer it. 

Practical carpenters in every state 
were asked to criticise the Plumb 
hammer — to suggest improvements, if 
possible. They found the hammer 
perfect in every detail, 162 of them 
saying the balance of the Plumb hammer 
was better than that of any other make 
that they had ever used. 

"This hammer is perfect in every respect and 
I believe every real carpenter will say it is. 
I don't see how it can be improved by any 
one," writes J. E. Hasting-s, Conway, Ark- 
Tell your hardware dealer that car- 
penters prefer Plumb hammers, hatchets 
and files because 'They're worth more." 
Hammer, $1.50. 

(Escept in Far West and in Canada) 



u 



The Plumb nail 
hammer has a 
better balance 
than any other 
hammer I have 
ever u s e d . }5 




Building Activity 
Now Under 
Valuation 
New England $26,474,100 



in 27 States 

Contract Contemplated 



New York District. 

Phila. 

Pittsburgh 

Chicago 

Minneapolis 



62.330.000 
32,022,800 
22,452.700 
45.805,100 
8,443,300 



Bldg. 

1,188 
2,700 
1,880 
1,300 
1,460 
413 



Valuation 
$31,337,100 
84,980,900 
53,701.300 
44,700.300 
193,412,400 
17,247,900 



Bldg. 
1,463 
4.012 
3.051 
2,197 
2,807 
6!I2 



Totals (27 States).. $198,518,000 9,037 $425,379,900 14,282 

rom F\ W. Dodge Company 

Statistics 



■:\V 



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DISSTON 

SAWS TOOLS FILES 



1 

i cd July 22, 1 91 5, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of Congress, Aug. 24, 1912 
Acceptance for mailing at special rate of Dostage provided for in Section 1103, act of 
October 3, 1917. authorized on July 8, 1918. 

. onthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and 
Kindred Industries. Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America, at 

Carpenters' Building, 222 East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 



sblished in 1S81 
i XLII— No. 4 



INDIANAPOLIS, APRIL, 1922 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 




The First Union; The First Open Shop 

P N the beginning God made the earth in six days, and 

on the seventh day he rested. When He started 

j^J) to replenish the earth He made man in His own 

m image. God soon saw that it was not good for man 

to live alone, and then He made woman. 

Right there the first Union was organized. 

God, recognizing this Union, gave the man and woman em- 
ployment in Eden's beautiful garden. 

On a lovely, sunshiny day, when peaceful and amicable 
relationships were the only things known between God and 
man, the Open Shopper appeared on this sylvan scene, and with 
his store of false statements and gift of gab, he beguiled Mother 
Eve with the "great advantages" of the Open Shop, and per- 
suaded her to join the association. Then the two inveigled poor 
• Adam to join with them. 

The Creator, believing in the principles of Unionism, when 
these facts became known to him, escorted them to the gate and 
locked them out. 

One of the first proofs that the Master was a Fair employer 
is evidenced when he divided the 24 hours of the day into three 
equal parts, with only eight hours for labor — with a full day 
of rest on the seventh day. 

Time rolled on, and after a while a bright and shining star 
shone in the East — a Son lay in the manger. 

This child was our Savior, who grew up to be a Carpenter- 
Preacher, and all records of His life prove that He was a Union 
man, and God said, "This is My Beloved Son, in whom I am 
well pleased." 

So, my friends, upon the teachings of these Immortals, the 
very fundamental principles of Organized Labor are founded. 

—By W. C. Franklin. 



16 



THE CARPEXTER 



INCONSISTENCY 

(By John T. Cosgrove, First General Vice-President.) 




INCONSISTENCY is de- 
fined as fickleness, waver- 
ing; not true to allegiance 
of duty — not observing of 
promise. What a forceful 
indictment those words 
convey to a thinking person who is cog- 
nizant of the fact that a large number 
of the members of our various Locals 
must be classed thereunder. The defini- 
tion of the word "inconsistency", and 
the effect of that inconstancy must be 
apparent to every member of the United 
Brotherhood, who dislikes fickleness, 
wavering and unstableness, and as sci- 
ence teaches us there must be a cause 
for every effect, the thought naturally 
presents itself to a thinking person, 
what is the cause of the inconstancy of 
the membership of our Locals? 

In answer to that mental inquiry a 
great number of causes at once open 
up before our vision as being in some 
measure responsible for the inconstancy 
of the local membership. And one of 
the chief causes of inconstancy among 
our local membership, in the judgment 
of the writer is lack of patriotism or 
craft pride. Occasionally one hears a 
great deal about being patriotic to one's 
country and every loyal citizen ought to 
be a patriot to his country, which means 
to love his country, because he loves 
liberty. 

And taking the word "Liberty" to be 
the key-stone of the word "Patriotic" 
one wonders why it is that every mem- 
ber of our organization is not a most 
thoughtful enthusiastic patriot for his 
organization, because one of the vital 
tenents of our organization is based 
upon justice and liberty, for there is no 
other principle in the laws and practices 
of our organization than the liberty of 
choosing the conditions under which one 
should labor and the liberty of saying 
and determining what should be the 
compensation for his labor, which ought 
to make every member of the United 
Brotherhood a most ardent, self-sacri- 
ficing patriot. For the word "Liberty" 
comprehends the right to live as free 
men should live, which in a large meas- 
ure means to control and enjoy the pro- 
ductive power of his hands and brains, 
so that the material well-being of him- 
self and family will be provided for ad- 
equately. And that includes proper and 



healthful food, good housing, good edu- 
cation, and ample provisions for old age, 
and as the United Brotherhood aims to 
give all those rights to the men of our 
craft, it only seems natural to suppose 
that every member of our Local Unions 
would become powerful enthusiastic 
craft organization patriots impelled by 
the lofty principles involved in such 
patriotism. He should carry into his 
every day life the aims of our or- 
ganization, which teach the right of 
our craftsmen to enjoy the fruits of their 
labor. And the more earnestly the mem- 
bers of our Local Unions diffu-e that 
principle in their family life, the strong- 
er their own moral power will become. 
And the greater will the family support 
be if sacrifices have at times to be made 
for the breadwinner, and then one of the 
important causes of inconstancy in our 
membership will be wiped out. 

Our organization must have members 
who are valiant under trying circum- 
stances if inconstancy on the part of the 
membership is to decrease. We must be 
prepared, as members, to defend the 
principles of our organization when it is 
assailed, and every time we fail to do 
so, we weaken our moral power. Why 
should a member of a Local Union feai 
to declare he is a member of same? 
What is there to be afraid or ashamed ol 
in being a member of the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners ol 
America? Is the liberty to control one's 
own labor in conjunction with his felloe 
craftsmen anything to be afraid oi 
ashamed of? Therefore, let our mem 
bers prepare to defend their organizatior 
and give a reason for the faith that is ii 
them as did "Paul of Old." 

The membership of our organization 
who also hold membership in variou: 
fraternal organizations as a rule an 
eager to declare their membership ii 
those organizations, and none of thos' 
fraternal organizations make the leas 
pretense to increase or maintain th 
earning powers of its members, and ye 
our members who are also members o 
the fraternal organizations referred t 
will strive with all their power to buil 
up the influence and power and th 
membership of those fraternal bodies 
and sacrifice their own Local Union' 
interest to serve in some office of thos 
fraternal organizations, while their ow 



THE CARPENTER 



17 



jocal Union's membership dwindles, 
vhich had up to that time by its com- 
plied strength enabled those members 
o maintain their ability to command 
uch wages as would permit them to re- 
nain members of those fraternal organ- 
isations. 

So it seems to the writer that if the 
vocal Unions want to successfully com- 
<at with inconstancy in their member- 
hip they must adopt some form of pro- 
edure that will teach their members 
hat the greatest good comes to the 
reatest number when loyal service and 
rillingness to serve becomes the motto 
f a Local Union, and then inconstancy 
i the membership of the Local Union 
.-ill very largely decrease. And to fur- 
lier decrease these inconstancies of the 
lembership some form of inspiration 
hould be adopted by the Local Union to 
ncourage their members to become edu- 
ated in the labor movement by the 
ffering of small prizes to the members 
'ho set forth in writing their reasons 
or becoming members of our organiza- 
on and why they continue as members, 
nd in this manner inaugurate an edu- 
ational movement that may grow and 
lduce the local membership to willingly 
'udy labor literature and thereby have 
wider field for debate. 

Another cause of some of the incon- 
tancy of the membership in some local- 
ies can be ascribed to the arrogance of 
le local leadership. Many of the local 
■aders who, by the way, have become 
'aders by the consent of the member- 
lip of the Local Union, in some in- 
:ances forget the way by which they 
btain their positions and presume that 
leir will must govern the entire thought 
f the Local Union, and they will not 
>lerate an honest difference of opinion, 



and while the writer always welcomes a 
strong, intelligent leadership in the Lo- 
cal Union and thinks it essentially nec- 
essary to properly govern the Local 
Union, but when leaders of a Local 
degenerate until they become mere 
bosses and only show domination of 
their power without proper regard for 
the rule of reason behind it, then such 
arrogant leadership becomes a positive 
injury to the Local Union and in the 
end brings disaster not only to those 
who submit to such leadership but also 
the Local Union itself. 

Again, there is over- confidence on 
the part of many of the leaders and 
members of the Local Unions to bring 
about such changes as thoy desire in 
their wage scale and working hours, 
giving very little if any attention 
to the wishes of their employers in 
the matter. Those Local Unions point 
to the success that has attended 
their victories in the past in the blood- 
less battles that they have Avon, or in 
other words their employers have com- 
plied with their demands without resist- 
ance and forgetting that the emploj-ers 
have in the meantime become as well or- 
ganized as they were, the Local Unions 
still pursue the old tactics and a fight 
ensues, bitterly contested by both sides. 
Then it is those Locals are forced 
to learn by the inconstancy of their 
membership that more can be obtained 
and maintained by diplomacy than by 
the use of the sword, and that open 
rupture conflicts should not be resorted 
to until every form of diplomacy has 
been exhausted. Then the justness of 
the cause which the Local Unions stand 
for will command the fealty of the entire 
membership of the union, as well as the 
good will of the public. 




HISTORY OF THE LANDIS WAGE AWARD 

(By the Chicago Federation of Labor.) 



HE bulk of the trade union 
agreements of building 
crafts or trades expired 
May 1, 1921. All of the 
skilled building trades 
had been paid, for the two 
ears preceding that date, a uniform 
age of $1.25 an hour. 
During the month of April, 1921, com- 
ittees of the building trades unions and 
ie contractors' association met in an 
fort to formulate a new agreement, 
he only point in controversy was the 
age scale. The contractors insisted 



that the workers accept a reduction of 
25c an hour. In other words, they of- 
fered $1 an hour to all the trades whose 
agreements expired May 1. 

The workers' committee refused to ac- 
cept the same upon instructions from 
the various Local Unions. The senti- 
ment that prevailed in the unions in- 
dicated that they would be willing to 
accept a reduction of 10c or 12 %c an 
hour. 

On May 1 the Contractors' Association 
notified the Building Trades Council 
that unless they accepted the wage of 



18 



THE CARPEXTER 



$1 an hour they need not report for 
work. Such action resulted in a lockout 
of practically all of the building trades 
and brought about a complete stoppage 
of building operations except in a few 
isolated cases where contractors were 
not members of the association. 

The lockout continued until June 7, 
1921, when the committees of the con- 
tractors and building trades agreed to 
submit the wage controversy to arbi- 
tration and mutually agreed upon Fed- 
eral Judge J. M. Landis as the arbi- 
trator. Judge Landis accepted the ap- 
pointment, and the newspapers of Chi- 
cago heralded the news of his selection 
and the resumption of building operation 
as a great event. 

The only matter in controversy, as 
mentioned before, was the wage scale. 
Neither side, during the negotiations in 
the month of April, had injected any 
other issue into the situation, yet Judge 
Landis after accepting the position of 
arbitrator, a week later, called before 
him representatives of both sides and in- 
formed them that he regarded the work- 
ing rules of each trade as so closely re- 
lated to the question of wages that he 
could not undertake to fix a wage unless 
he would have the right to revise work- 
ing rules. 

Keep in mind that the working rules 
embodied in the agreements existing be- 
tween the contractors and the union had 
resulted from years of contractual rela- 
tions and had been evolved from the 
every day working experience of these 
employers and workers. Neither the con- 
tractors nor the workers were desirous 
of submitting these rules to Judge Lan- 
dis or to any other third party for revi- 
sion, yet. in view of the fact that the 
public sentiment had been aroused 
through the columns of the press so 
strongly in favor of a resumption of 
work, neither side had the courage to 
take issue with Judge Landis. 

The result was that they, by silence, 
agreed to permit him to consider work- 
ing rules in connection with the wage 
question. After a number of public 
hearings and a number of conferences 
wherein Judge' Landis would send for 
representatives of unions separately, 
with the contractors of that particular 
trade, and voice his suggestions as to 
changes which should be made therein, 
he finally announced his award on Sep- 
tember 7, 1921. 



It can be truly said that the Lane 
award satisfied neither contractor n 
worker; also it may be stated that 
is not humanly possible for any pers 
not thoroughly familiar with buildi 
trade operations, even after a study 
a year's time, to decide equitably wh 
should be the working rules of some 
trade unions or trades. Yet Judge La 
dis, with no building trade experienc 
after considering the situation for t 
short period of three months, durii 
which time he was occupied on t' 
bench, giving some attention to his j< 
as chief baseball umpire, some at pla 
ing golf, rendered an award fixing 
varied wage scale for some 30 tra< 
unions and setting up new working ml 
for those trades. The net result of t] 
award has been worse confusion in t! 
building situation in Chicago ever sine 

Immediately upon its announcemer 
the majority of trades walked off tlj 
job. The unions did not order a strik 
but the men left their work as indiri 
uals in protest against the inequitat 
wage fixed and the impractical and u 
just working rules laid down. In ord 
to complete many of the buildings tin 
under construction and because thi 
themselves felt the award was unju 
and inequitable, contractors in mo 
cases agreed to pay the old scale 
wages pending a rehearing before Jud; 
Landis. 

The unions petitioned for a rehearin 
the contractors expressed no objectio; 
thereto. The Judge fixed a date for 
rehearing, when suddenly there appear* 
upon the horizon an influence that hi 
not exhibited itself in the arbitrate 
proceedings previously. A " citizen 
committee" was formed, made up a 
most entirely of representatives of larj 
corporations bitterly anti-union in the 
policies. This "citizens' committee" pr 
tested and finally brought pressure 
bear upon the Contractors' Associate 
to protest against any rehearing unl 
first the men had returned to work und' 
the wage provided for in the Land 
award. 

In a number of instances contracto: 
in a particular trade got together wil 
representatives of the union, called upc 
Judge Landis and urged a revision < 
the wage scale in that particular trac 
and in some instances Judge Land 
agreed. Gradually a majority of tl 
trades returned to work either under a 



THE CARPENTER 



10 



mended scale by Judge Landis or under 
ae original Landis award. 

The master plumbers and their jour- 
eymen in conference agreed upon $1.10 
n hour as a wage — Judge Landis hav- 
\g granted the plumbers only 95 cents 
er hour — and signed a three year 
greement to that effect. In that case 
oth employer and worker disregarded 
ie Landis award. 

It is noteworthy that Judge Landis in 
ie issuance of his award mentioned the 
ict that carpenters, plasterers, elevator 
instructors, sheet metal workers and 
ainters were not parties to the arbitra- 
on, yet that he, Judge Landis, had or- 
?red considered the working conditions, 
izards, etc., of these trades and stated 
lat had they been parties to the arbi- 
ation he would have fixed a wage of 
L an hour for carpenters, 95c for paint- 
's, $1.10 for plasterers, 95c for elevator 
instructors and 95c for sheet metal 
orkers. 

The painters' agreement with their 
infractors does not expire until May, 
)22. Yet here we have the learned 
idge Landis, on ex parte evidence, fix- 
g a wage scale for five important trade 
lions in the building industry without 
anting those workers a hearing. This 
•tion of Judge Landis more than any- 
ing else aroused resentment and mis- 
ust towards the entire award. 

Other criticisms of the Landis award 
ere: 

First, that the award provides that 
e wage announced be not exceeded ; 

other words, that it was both a min- 
ium and maximum wage. The prin- 
ple upon which all wage scales of trade 
dons are founded is that the wage pro- 
ded is a minimum wage and that the 
iployer is free to pay in excess thereof 
r special skill and service. 
, Second, that the wage announced was 

sed upon his (Judge Laadis) opinion 

the skill connected with the trade as 
i?ll as the hazard and the opportunity 
r continuity of employment. 

Third, the award provided that the 
ides who were parties to the arbitra- 
in should compel the other trades, car- 
nters, painters, plasterers, elevator 
nstructors and sheet metal workers, 

t parties to the arbitration but for 

10m a wage had been fixed, to accept 
ch wage or refuse to work with them. 

After the end of the building season, 

8 latter part of November, the "citi- 
es' committee" before mentioned be- 



came extremely active, particularly with 
their publicity in the daily press. Their 
first announcement through the columns 
of the Chicago daily newspapers was to 
the effect that they were raising a sub- 
scription of $3,000,000 to enforce the 
Landis award ; also that they had com- 
pleted arrangements with all of the 
banks through the Chicago Clearing 
House Association whereby no individual 
or concern desiring a loan for building 
purposes would be accommodated un- 
less they provided in their contracts with 
the architects or builders that the build- 
ing operations must be performed on the 
basis of the Landis award ; also that no 
building contractor would be accommo- 
dated by the banks unless he adhered 
strictly to the provisions of the Landis 
award. 

Further announcement was made that 
the Chicago Association of Commerce, 
the Illinois Manufacturers' Association, 
the Employes' Association of Illinois had 
all agreed to urge their members to 
grant no contract to any building con- 
cern that did not adhere strictly to the 
Landis award. 

The sheet metal, master plumbing, 
carpenter, plasterer and elevator con- 
struction contractors were called before 
the "citizens' committee" and informed 
that unless they operated on the basis 
of the Landis award that the "citizens' 
committee" would bring into Chicago 
contractors in their respective lines to 
do the work with non-union men. 

The "citizens' committee" have an- 
nounced publicly that they have already 
collected a million and a half dollars to 
be expended in protecting contractors 
who operate under the Landis award 
and to fight any contractor who refuses 
to do so, as well as for the purpose of 
bringing into Chicago non-union work- 
ers of any trade where the union organ- 
ization refuses to work for the Landis 
wage. The net result is extreme con- 
fusion in the building industry. 

The carpenters' union not being a 
party to the arbitration proceeding, hav- 
ing many of its members employed di- 
rectly by individuals erecting homes or 
apartment buildings, those individuals 
being embarrassed by the action of the 
"citizens' committee" preventing them 
from securing loans to complete their 
operations,. have gone into court seeking 
an injunction to restrain the "citizens' 
committee" from interfering with the 
legitimate functions of their union and 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



from continuing the conspiracy that 
committee has developed against the 
carpenters' organization. 

At the conclusion of the hearing on 
the petition the court ordered the "citi- 
zens' committee" to cease sending their 
representatives and investigators out on 
jobs where building operation were in 
progress, or in any other way from in- 
timidating either contractors or workers 
pending the court's decision on the pe- 
tition. 

As to the motive of Judge Landis in 
rendering the award that he did, many 



trade unionists believe that the judge 
was extremely desirous of redeeming 
himself with the public press and large 
influential interests because he has, dur- 
ing the past six months been seriously 
criticised by the American Bar Associa- 
tion and members of Congress, for hold- 
ing down the job of chief umpire in base- 
ball at a salary of $42,500 per annum. 
In brief, union leaders believe the judge 
was anxious to make a hit with the big 
interests in order to have an ally to sup- 
port his retention of the job of Federal 
Judge and umpire. 



THE CHICAGO SITUATION 

(By Harry Jensen, President of the Chicago District Council.) 




^|°o°oo <ffi° jpggg NDER the decision of 
Judge Sullivan in the case 
of Carpenters' Union vs. 
Citizens' Committee to 
enforce the Landis award, 
the Citizens' Committee 
is a criminal conspiracy. The court con- 
demned the acts of the committee, but 
refused the union an injunction because 
one carpenter (out of 18,000) had been 
seen in a crowd that assaulted two 
workmen ! 

On the undisputed evidence and deci- 
sion of the court in that case, every 
member of the Citizens' Committee can 
be indicted, convicted and sent to the 
penitentiary. 

This Citizens' Committee is largely 
made up of enormously rich men who 
have inherited or grabbed millions from 
the public, and are now posing as friends 
of the public! Most of them are war 
profiteers. A few mean well, but they 
are being used as cats' paws by sinister 
leaders. If they want to help the pub- 
lic, why do they violate the law, as the 
court found they are doing? If they 
really want to help, why don't they dis- 
gorge part of their own ill gotten 
millions? Who ever helped the public 
by forming a criminal conspiracy? The 
court said they are unlawfully attacking 
the carpenters. Is that a public service? 
The truth is that this self-appointed 
committee is part of a nation-wide or- 
ganization of capitalists who have set 
out to crush labor unions. They pretend 
they want to "enforce the Landis 
award." They don't. The first union 
they attacked was the Carpenters' 
which was never a party to the Landis 
award. Not only so, but this committee 
has actually forbidden contractors to 



deal with the Carpenters' Union even 
under the terms of the Landis award! 
They threaten to ruin any contractor 
who does so. 

Millions of dollars are being spent in 
vicious and lying propaganda to destroy 
labor unions throughout the United 
States. These capitalists form vast 
combinations without limit, but they de- 
mand that workmen shall deal singly 
and alone with such combinations. They 
are seeking to deprive workmen of all 
right of collective bargaining, a right 
which the Supreme Court says is funda-' 
mental and absolutely necessary to pro- 
tect workmen from oppression and deg- 
radation. 

The Criminal Citizens' Committee is 
the enemy of all workmen and of the 
public. They have grown fat off of the 
public, and with smug hypocrisy, by lies 
and criminal practices, seek to destroy 
labor unions and to degrade working- 
men. 

They have publicly announced that, 
even if the Carpenters' Union offered to 
accept the Landis award, they would not 
permit it to do so! They have stated 
openly they would "put the screws on" 
any contractor who employed union car- 
penters even at the Landis scale, "by 
shutting off his credit at the banks." 
Their real aim is to destroy the union. 

Can any self-respecting workman 
yield to such dictation from a crimina' 
combination? The Constitution guar- 
antees workmen against oppression and 
slavery; against unlawful interference 
and dictation from strangers. This 
committee flouts the Constitution and 
the law. It sets itself above the law 
and the courts. 

To cover its real purpose, it blathers ( 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



about graft in the building industry; 
it palavers to rent payers. It is true that 
there has been graft in the building in- 
dustry. It is true that tenants have been 
gouged. So have there been graft and 
gouging in the banking industry ; in the 
retail trade ; in the coal industry ; in city 
and state governments. Where has there 
not been graft and gouging? Who has 
been benefited by these more than mem- 
bers of the Citizens' Committee? 

All the carpenters ask is to be allowed 
io work in peace for contractors who 
ivant to employ them. They do not be- 
ieve in graft or gouging. They want 
o see grafters prosecuted, whether they 
ire members of the union or Bankers 
)r Retail Merchants or members of the 
citizens' Committee, or any one else. 

The Carpenters' Union has 18,000 
nenibers in Chicago. They are law 
ibiding citizens and tax payers. The 
eeords of the crimnal courts will show 
hat in the past ten years, not five union 
arpenters have been convicted of any 
erious crime. There are more Bankers 
[han Union Carpenters in the peniten- 
tiary. The percentage of crime among 
jmion carpenters is less than one- third 
> f what it is among the general popula- 
[ion. 

The constitution, by-laws and work- 

ng rules of the Carpenters' Union have 

11 been held lawful in many courts, and 

jio court has ever held any part of these 

nlawful. 

During the war, carpenters' wages 
i r ent up 70 per cent, while the cost of 
iving went up over 100 per cent. Build- 
ug material went up 200 per cent. 
Vages now stand 57 per cent above 
re- war, while building material is over 
00 per cent higher, and going up again. 
On a large building, wages of carpen- 
?rs aggregate less than 5 per cent of 
'ie total cost. The architect alone gets 



5 per cent to 7 per cent; the contractor 
10 per cent to 20 per cent; and the 
bank that makes the loan, charges as 
commission, over and above the lawful 
rate of interest, 7 per cent to 20 per cent 
of the loan. The Daily Commission 
found that some mortgage bankers 
charged as high as 30 per cent commis- 
sion and 7 per cent interest. Some of 
the Citizens' Committee are in this busi- 
ness. 

The Carpenters' Union voluntarily re- 
duced its wages 15 cents an hour. At 
the present scale, the average carpenter 
earns about $1,600 a year — about one- 
half the amount a member of the Citi- 
zens' Committee spends on his limou- 
sine. 

The Carpenters' Union is a lawful or- 
ganization ! It is of the utmost value 
to its members. Only by united effort 
and through collective bargaining have 
workmen ever been able to secure from 
employers decent wages and working 
conditions. Without unions, men would 
still be working 15 hours a day, eating 
dry bread and living in hovels and in 
ignorance. Employers have bitterly 
fought every step of industrial progress. 
If unions are destroyed, workmen will 
again be reduced to virtual slavery. 

The Carpenters' Union will not be 
destroyed- No Criminal Committee can 
take from the carpenters of Chicago 
their constitutional rights to manage 
their own affairs. Carpenters may be 
deprived of their employment by this 
conspiracy ; their families may be de- 
prived of sufficient food and shelter; 
but with the consciousness that tkey are 
right, and that they are defending 
principles of the utmost importance to 
themselves and to all posterity, the 
union carpenters of Chicago defy the 
Criminal Citizens' Committee to do its 
worst. 



THE BITUMINOUS COAL CONTROVERSY; WHAT IS IT ALL ABOUT? 




c/g OHN L. Lewis, Interna- 
tional President of the 
United Mine Workers of 
America, clearly stated 
the principal issue in- 
volved in the present 
•ntroversy between the miners and 
ie bituminous coal operators, when he 
jdd in a speech at Shamokin, Pa., on 
jinuary 17: "We do not expect to fol- 
w the non-union worker down the 
dder of wage reductions to the morass 



of poverty and degradation which pre- 
vails below ; and we do not propose to 
have the non-union yardstick applied to 
our standard of living. 

"Coal operators are attempting to 
force the bituminous miners to accept a 
reduction in their wages which would 
place them on a level with the non- 
union miners of West Virginia, Alabama 
and other fields in which the union is 
kept out or driven out by armed gunmen 
and thugs in the employ of the coal 



THE CARPENTER 



companies. Mine workers in these non- 
union fields are helpless. They are un- 
able to enter any protest against wage 
reductions or any other whim of their 
employers by which their standard of 
living is lowered. Wages always have 
beene lower in the non-union fields than 
in the organized fields, because of this 
fact. Non-union miners have no protec- 
tion and must take what is offered if 
they are to work at all. 

When two large and powerful groups 
of operators in the Pittsburg field and in 
Southern Ohio served notice that they 
would refuse to meet with the United 
Mine Workers this month to negotiate 
a new wage and working agreement they 
served notice in effect, that they were 
out to break up the miners' union. 
Should they succeed in this attempt it 
would mean that the miners of those two 
fields would be reduced to the level of 
the wretched non-union miners of West 
Virginia. The United Mine Workers 
will not permit this to be done. 

"In announcing their refusal to meet 
with the miners and work out a new 
agreement to take effect on April 1st, 
these operators deliberately violated 
their written contract with the miners, 
which they signed in New York on 
March 31, 1920. In that contract was 
this clause: 

" 'Resolved, That an interstate joint 
conference be held prior to April 1, 
1922 ; the time and place for holding 
such meeting to be referred to a com- 
mittee of two operators and two mem- 
bers from each state herein represented, 
together with the international officials 
of the United Mine Workers of America.' 

"That agreement was as binding as 
any agreement ever signed by business 
men. Refusal by the operators to live up 
to this agreement was a shock to the 
public conscience and an assault on busi- 
ness morality. It was so indefensible 
that President Harding denounced their 
action and directed Secretary of Labor 
Davis to call upon the operators to live 
up to their agreement and meet with 
the miners in an honest effort to work 
out a new agreement. 

"One of the prime objects of these 
operators in staging their refusal and 
their violation of contract was to bust 
the union. But it must be remembered 
also that there are millions of tons of 
soft coal on hand, and a strike scare 
always boosts the selling price, thus 
giving the operators a fine opportunity 



to gouge the public pocketbook and clean 
up enormous profits. It has been done 
before, and why should it notbe done now? 

"One of the excuses the operators gave 
for refusing to enter a conference was 
that the miners would demand an in- 
crease in their wages, and that, there- 
fore, it would be useless to hold a con- 
ference. But the miners did nothing of 
the kind. They do not ask for an in- 
crease, but they do ask that the present 
scale of wages be continued in effect for 
another two years. They did not earn 
a living under the present scale in 1921, 
but they are willing to take the chance 
with it for another two years. They 
pin their faith to the hope for a revival 
of industry in the next two years that 
will afford them steadier employment 
and thus enable them to make a living. 

"Bituminous mine workers in the union 
fields were employed only on an aver- 
age of about 125 days in 1921. This is 
about 40 percent of full time. As nearly 
as it can be ascertained at this time, 
they earned an average of approximately 
$700 in 1921, which is about $13.50 a 
week. Every person who has to buy 
food, clothing and everything else for a 
family at present prices knows that it 
is impossible to keep a family above the ' 
poverty level on §13.50 a week. 

"Statistical experts say an annnual 
wage of $1,870 is necessary to keep a 
family of man, wife and three children 
in health, decency and a minimum 
amount of comfort in the bituminous 
coal mining fields of the country. Mine 
workers earned less than half that sum 
last year. Yet the operators propose to 
reduce their wages. 

"In the six year period from 1913 to 
1918 (and in 1918 more coal was pro- 
duced than ever before and all records 
were broken;, the average annual 
earnings of bituminous mine workers 
throughout the country were $873.74. 
Surely, it cannot be said that the miners 
are earning too much money at the pres- 
ent rate of wages. 

"Coal miners are not responsible for 
the high retail price at which coal is sold 
throughout the country. J. D. A. Mor- 
row, Vice-President of the National Coal 
Association, cornnionly known as the 
"Operators' Union," testified before the 
Interstate Commerce Commission a few 
weeks ago that the average selling price 
of bituminous coal in the United States 
in October, 1921, was $10.41 a ton, and 
that the miners received $1.97 a ton for 



THE CARPENTER 



23 



producing it. In other words, the miners 
got $1.97 for producing a ton of coal 
that was sold to the consumer for 
$10.41. "Who got the other $8.44? 
There is a gouge, but the miners do 
not get the money. If the public is in- 
terested in bringing down the selling 
price of coal they must look beyond the 
miners for the way to do it, for the 
miners are not to blame for the high prices. 

"Coal companies have sought to 
arouse a prejudice against the United 
Mine Workers of America because the 
Convention of the union declared for the 
6-hour day and the five day week, and 
the position of the miners on that issue 
has been both misrepresented and mis- 
understood. Operators say the miners 
want more pay for less work. That 
statement is not correct. Working 
steadily thirty hours a week, the miners 
can produce more coal than the country 
can possibly consume. They say they 
prefer reasonably steady employment 
six hours a day rather than irregular and 
unsteady employment eight hours a day. 
If they can dig all the coal that is needed 
in six hours why should they be required 
to work eight hours, they ask. 

"They want the assurance that they 
will have the opportunity to work 
steadily six hours a day. In that way 
they can make a living. But they do 
not and cannot make a living under 
present conditions. 

"The check-off is another issue in- 
volved in the present controversy be- 
tween bituminous miners and operators. 
The check-off is not generally under- 
stood by the public. Operators have 
attempted to make the public believe 
that through the check-off they are com- 
pelled to contribute to the maintenance 
and upkeep of the Miners' Union, and 
that, therefore, the check-off is a sinful 
practice that should be abolished. The 
coal operators do not contribute a single 
cent to the union. The check-off does 
not mean anything of that kind. Here 
is what the check-off means: A mem- 
ber of the United Mine Workers of 
America authorizes his employer in 
writing to deduct from his pay envelope 
a small part of his wages, already 
earned, to pay his dues to the union. The 
operator makes the deduction and remits 
the money to the union, just as he de- 
ducts other sums and pays them to the 
doctor, the grocer, the landlord or any 
other creditor. An operator has no right 
to deduct any money from the miner's 



pay envelope without the written order 
of the miner. It is not the operator's 
money that he sends to the union. It is 
the union miner's money. 

"Judge Anderson, in the Federal Court 
at Indianapolis, decided a few months 
ago that the check-off was illegal and he 
issued an injunction to prohibit its con- 
tinuance. But the United Mine Workers 
appealed to the United States Circuit 
Court of Appeals and that court com- 
pletely reversed Judge Anderson. The 
higher court held that the check-off was 
entirely legal and that it could not be 
enjoined. At that hearing Judge Baker, 
presiding judge, said the check-off was 
nothing more or less than an assignment 
of wages by an employe, and that any 
employe had the legal right to make such 
assignment. 

"Operators say they intend to abolish 
the check-off by refusing to agree to its 
continuance. But the United Mine 
Workers will not permit the operators 
to do anything of the kind. The check- 
off is here to stay. It has been declared 
to be legal. 

"The public is asking: Will there be a 
strike by coal miners on the first clay of 
April? It would be more accurate if the 
public were to ask whether there will be 
a suspension of work in the coal mines 
on April 1st. There is a vast difference 
between a strike and a suspension. 
Whatever happens on the first of April, 
it cannot be correctly designated as a 
strike. When workers go on strike they 
do so in protest against some wrong, and 
because they have a grievance. But a 
suspension is an entirely different propo- 
sition. If the miners refuse to work on 
the first of April it will be because they 
have no wage agreement whatever with 
their employers. They want to know 
what they are to get for their labor and 
under what conditions they are to work. 
They want to know these things before 
the first of April. If they do not find out 
and they refuse to work on the first of 
April it willbe a suspension and not a strike. 

"The United Mine Workers of Amer- 
ica do not want a suspension. They 
want to work. They must work to live. 
They have done and are doing every 
honorable thing within their power to 
avert a suspension. If the operators 
deal fairly with them there will be no 
suspension. But there is this difference 
between the miners and the operators: 
the operators want a suspension, while 
the miners do not." 



Editorial 




THE CARPENTER 

Official Journal of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA 

Published on the loth of each month at the 

CARPENTERS - BUILDING 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 
CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA, 

PriU.ISHERS 

FRANK DITFY, Editor 

ScTssmirTioN Price 
One Dollnr a Yoar in Advance, Postpaid 

The publishers and the advertising 
agent use every possible precaution avail= 
able to them against accepting advertise** 
ments from other than reliable firms, but 
do not accept any responsibility for the 
contents of any advertisement which ap= 
pears in "The Carpenter." Should any 
deception be practiced by advertisers at 
any time, upon members, their duty is to 
immediately notify the Post Office au= 
thorities. Therefore, address any com= 
plaints to your local Post Office. 



INDIANAPOLIS, APRIL, 1922 

Do Your Duty 

Do you do your duty to our unions? 
Are you not just a little bit careless as to 
its welfare and progress? Do you ever 
attempt to build it up? Did you ever 
put yourself to the least inconvenience 
to get new, members? These are ques- 
tions that each member should ponder 
over, and if you find you have been neg- 
lectful and careless in the past, make a 
new start. Remember '"it is never too 
late to mend. - ' Did you ever notice 
when something special has to be done, 
or when the ordinary routine work of 
your Union has to be performed, that the 
work is shifted upon someone else, usu- 
ally the "willing few," commonly known 
as the "clique." who work on and on 
until energy is gone and patience ex- 



hausted. The others take things calmly 
and unconcernedly, shirk all responsi- 
bilities, refuse to do committee work, 
only attend the meetings at intervals, 
take no part in the affairs of the union, 
except to find fault, and would not hold 
office if you paid them for doing so. 

Listen to them when they are nom- 
inated to fill any position that comes 
vacant, and you hear them "most re : 
spectfully decline." This should not be. 
Is it any wonder that the pathway of 
the past is strewn with the wrecks of 
trade organization? Human endurance 
has its limit. Human energy its end. 
It cannot be expected that the few ar- 
dent faithful workers will keep up their 
efforts forever. It is your duty to assist 
them, to encourage them, to take a more 
active part in the work of your union, 
to jump into the breach and help the 
"old boys" who have stood the brunt of 
battle in the past — to gain greater and 
nobler things. We all have an equal 
interest in the progress of our organiza- 
tion, we should all share equally in the 
work to be done and the burden to be 
borne. 

Paying "dues" and "assessments" are 
not the only "duties" required of us. 
Every man must do more than that if 
he wants his union to be successful. The 
"labor movement" required the unflag- 
ging support and the untiring activity oi 
every member within its folds. If yoi 
will not move in your own interest yoi 
cannot expect others to make sacrifices 
for you. Do your duty and do it well 
act a manly part, come to the front 
Take hold of the helm. Steer clear 0: 
all the difficulties you can. Encouragi 
your fellow-members to do likewise 
Make your meetings interesting. Wei 
come all visiting members. Invite gooi 
speakers to address you on the labo 
question, and you will find a wonderfv 
change take place in a short time. Ge 
out and "organize" and "organize" an 
"organize." 

Follow these instructions and you wi 
find before very long that you hav 
been more successful than ever you es 
pected or even imagined. 






THE CARPENTER 



25 



Against the Open Shop 

Everybody is not in favor of the "open 
shop." "The American Pressman" for 
the month of January, 1022, says: 

"All employers and newspapers are 
not in favor of the 'open shop' campaign 
now being waged by some of the more 
radical employers at the command of big 
capital. Sometimes the workers read 
so much propaganda against their or- 
ganization that they begin to believe 
that only trades unionists are against 
the 'open shop' idea. Then, too, the 
radicals want this impression to be reg- 
istered in the minds of real unionists so 
they can sow their seed of discord." 

The Scripps-McRae League of News- 
papers recently opened a campaign 
against the un-American open shop. The 
"Cleveland Press," a Scripps paper, lead- 
ing the campaign in Ohio, says: 

"A man or woman, not a member of 
a labor union, is likely to say, 'Well, 
what about it? What do I care about 
the unions? It won't make any differ- 
ence to me if the unions are smashed?' 

"But it will make a difference to you. 
It will make a difference to all of us. If 
the open shop triumphs generally, fol- 
lowed as eventually it must be by reduc- 
tions in wages and increases in working 
hours, the prosperity of the entire com- 
munity will be affected. 

"The merchant will suffer because low 
wages can't buy as much as high wages. 

"The money shortage will operate all 
along the line until it hits the profes- 
sional mau, none harder than the doctor, 
the dentist, the lawyer. 

"The unorganized worker, whether in 
shop or office, suffers because it is im- 
possible to injure one part of the eco- 
nomic body without affecting the body 
as a whole. 

"We are of two groups, we Americans 
— those who can live without working 
and those who can't. All of the later 
group will be affected by the success or 
failure of the open shop movement and 
a good many of the former group, 
whether they realize it now or not. 

"Hence the open shop movement be- 
comes something more than a dispute 
between corporations and unions. It is 
a matter of vast public concern, merit- 
ing the sober, analytical attention of 
every believer in fair play and the main- 
tenance of American standards. 

"The open shop almost always means 
the closed shop — closed to all men who 
believe that in union there is strength 



and that only by organizing, as their 
employers are organized, can they obtain 
and maintain recognition of their rights. 

"There are employers who say they 
want the open shop merely because they 
dislike to deal with the unions. They 
say they are for high wages and good 
working conditions. Doubtless many of 
these men are sincere, and indeed there 
are today factories in which union and 
non-union men work side by side at a 
wage rate and under conditions compat- 
ible with the union standards. But the 
employer hasn't always the full say. He 
is subject to circumstances and the con- 
ditions of competition. Standing to- 
gether, workers can resist unfairness. 
Fighting singlehandedly, which is the 
only kind of fighting they can do under 
the open shop, they can accomplish 
nothing. For instance, under the open 
shop there is nothing to prevent an em- 
ployer from taking advantage of the 
present widespread unemployment, driv- 
ing bargains with hungry men — indivi- 
dually, not collectively, playing off one 
man against another, whipping them one 
at a time. Let but one employer in an 
industry adopt this policy and all other 
employers in that industry would be 
compelled to follow suit. They would 
have to or competition would put them 
out of business. 

"It is an undeniable fact that under 
the open shop an employer can reduce 
wages and upset working conditions and 
however fair-minded and humane, he 
will do this rather than be put out of 
business by competition. 

"Little of the effect of the open shop 
can be seen at this stage of the war. It 
will be years before the full crop of the 
open shop sowing will be ripe, but the 
harvest is certain and the fruit will be 
bitter. 

"Collective bargaining goes by the 
board under the open shop. Without 
collective bargaining down go wages and 
up goes hours back to the dark ages of 
industrialism for the worker. The bosses 
being organized and the workers being 
unorganized, disorganized really, the 
bosses fix the workers' pay as they will 
and tell them how many hours they 
must put in for it. It is a "take it or 
leave it" attitude, with all the advantage 
on the side of the boss. 

"In the old days, before men organ- 
ized, the condition of the workers was 
little better than that of serfs. The 
twelve-hour and fourteen-hour workdav 



le 



THE CARPENTER 



vv^s common ind the wage paid was only 
enoui t krev body and soul together. 
Only by organization has labor bi*ought 
about its present standards. 

"In this fight against the open shop, 
a big responsibility is laid upon the 
unions and particularly upon the union 
leaders. Violence, intimidation, high 
handed methods — these, deplored and 
condemned by the great mass of union 
men, never have helped the cause of 
labor and never can. Sober, intelligent 
leadership, honesty and openness in pub- 
lic dealings, willingness to give a full 
day's work for a fair day's pay — these 
make for a favorable popular opinion, 
and it is popular opinion that gains the 
victory for one side or the other in every 
labor dispute. 

"And for those* outside the unions, 
bear in mind that there is no genuine 
prosperity save that born of protection, 
toil. When the producers, the workers, 
have no money there is no money for 
most of the rest of us. Business is bad. 
The foundation stone of all material well 
being is the toiler. Weaken him by un- 
derpay and overwork and you weaken 
the whole social structure. And the 
open shop in its final application means 
exactly that — under pay and over- 
worked, labor prone and helpless under 
the heel of the boss. 

"The open shop works its greatest 
benefit to those corporations which fat- 
ten on the misery of the mass." 
* * # 

Encouraging News 

In a newsy letter just received from 
N. K. Hatter, Recording Secretary of L. 
U. No. 2220 of Somerset, Ky., he gives 
quite an interesting resume of conditions 
in that part of the country and in writ- 
ing particularly about his Local, he says : 

"My little Local of 31 members are 
all busy and are not complaining of hard 
times. A few of us got together and 
bought three lots and built two houses 
on them; these two houses, worth about 
$9,000, gave four of us work all the win- 
ter and I see no reason why other car- 
penters could not do the same." 

The letter is interspersed with the 
writer's quaint philosophy and optimis- 
tic outlook on things in general. We 
were indeed glad to receive such a breezy 
letter from Brother Hatter at this time, 
and only wish we received more of them 
from other parts of the country with 
such encouraging news. 



Causes and Remedies for Unemployment 

The volume of unemployment in nor- 
mal times is sufficient to warrant con- 
certed effort on the part of economists 
and business men to remove certain of 
its causes, according to a report issued 
by the National Industrial Conference 
Board, New York City. This report, en- 
titled "The Unemployment Problem," 
survey of the extent of unemployment 
during normal periods and during the 
present business depression, discusses 
the cause and analyzes the remedies 
which have been suggested for it. 

The report makes a careful distinction 
between idleness and unemployment, 
which refer to very different conditions 
and arise from different causes. 

"Unemployment is clearly not an oc- 
casional or accidental condition to be 
met by charitable or philanthropic relief, 
but a continuing condition, at times be- 
coming acute. Its improvement is, in 
part, an industrial problem of the first 
magnitude. It concerns so large a num- 
ber of industrial workers and is so vital 
to industry through its effect on the buy- 
ing power of communities, as well as for 
many other reasons that it merits the 
united efforts of employers and the pub- 
lic toward understanding its causes and 
devising methods for its reduction." 

In attempting to remedy the causes 
of unemployment due to influences op- 
erating outside the plan, the report 
points out, there is need for a more ade- 
quate system of collecting and dissemin- 
ating information showing the trend of 
prices, the actual cost of operation and 
revenues from industry. 

The report considers also certain 
emergency measures which may be used 
to start the industrial system on the up- 
ward road to prosperity, such as part- 
time work for shifts of workers within 
the plant and the undertaking of con- 
struction work and repairs within the 
plant. Other emergency measures of 
value are : Reduction in prices of present 
stock of goods held by middlemen; re- 
vival of the building industry; the un- 
dertaking of public construction work, 
etc. 

The report emphasizes finally the im- 
portance of formulating wise political 
policies in connection with immigration, 
fiscal procedure, tariff and international 
relations, all of which have an important 
effect upon general employment condi- 
tions in industry. 



Official Information 




GENERAL OFFICERS 

OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD 

OP 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA 

General Office 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

JOHN T. COSGROVE 

Carpenters" Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

GEORGE H. LAKEY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

THOMAS NEALE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind 



General Executive Board 
First District, T. M. GUERIN 
290 Second Ave., Troy, N. Y. 



Second District, D. A. POST 
416 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



Third District, JOHN H. POTTS 
64G Melish Ave., Cincinnati, O. 



Fourth District, JAMES P. OGLETREE 
926 Marina St., Nashville, Tenn. 



Fifth District, J. W. WILLIAMS 
3536 Wyoming St., St. Louis, Mo. 



Sixth District, W. A. COLE 

810 Merchants National Bank Building 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
1705 Chambord St., Montreal, Que., CaD. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 

All correspondence for the General Executive 
3oard must be sent to the General Secretary. 



NOTICE TO RECORDING 
SECRETARIES 
The quarterly circular for the months 
of April, May and June, containing the 
quarterly password, has been forwarded 
to all Local Unions of the United Broth= 
erhood. Under separate cover six blanks 
have been forwarded for the Financial 
Secretary, three of which are to be used 
for the reports to the General Office for 
the months of April, May and June, and 
the extra ones are to be filled out in 
duplicate and kept on file for future ref= 
erence. Inclosed therewith are also six 
blanks for the Treasurer, to be used in 
transmitting money to the General Office. 
Recording Secretaries not in receipt of 
this immediately should notify the Gen= 
eral Secretary, Frank Duffy, Carpenters' 
Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

• 

Another Local Signs Up 

We have just received word from 
L. U. No. 2,4 of Batavia, N. Y., that they 
have signed up an agreement with the 
Batavia and New York AVoodworking 
Co., located at Batavia for another year 
at the same scale as at present with 
Saturday a half -holiday. 



Unemployment Situation In 
San Francisco 

Upon request of the San Francisco 
Building Trades Council, the San Fran- 
cisco Labor Council, and the California 
State Federation of Labor, the Board of 
Supervisors of the city and county of 
San Francisco, passed the following res- 
olutions, calling upon the Mayor to issue 
a, proclamation advising the eastern 
press of the unemployment existing in 
San Francisco and vicinity at the pres- 
ent time : 

"Whereas, The Board of Supervisors 
of the City and County of San Francisco, 
by appropriating $25,000 from the 
urgent necessity fund, has recognized 
the existence of extraordinary unem- 
ployment in our city ; and 

Whereas, The various welfare agen- 
cies of San Francisco are now meeting 
and devising ways and means to take 
care of the thousands of destitute unem- 
ployed now in this community ; and 



2S 



THE CARPEXTER 



Whereas. The Ia:iu~:rial Association 
of San Francisco is now running a series 
of advertisements in the newspape: 
eastern cities that there is a scarcity of 
building trades mechanics in San Fran- 
cisco: and 

W_ : -as. It is a well known fact that 
many skileld mechanics, residents of 
San Francisco, are now out of work: 
and it is a further undisputed fact that 
thousands of skilled workers formerly 
residing in San Francisco have been 
induced to move to other cities because 
of higher wages and more satisfactory 
conditions: therefore, be it 

Besolved, That the Board of Supervi- 
sors of the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, in regular session assembled. Feb- 
ruary 6, 1922, respectfully request His 
Honor, the Mayor, to issue a proclama- 
tion setting forth existing conditions of 
unemployment in San Francisco: fur- 
ther 

Besolved, That copies of said proc- 
.araatior be for— araea :o The Mayors of 
the principal eastern cities. 

Thanking you in advance, and with 
best wishes, we remain. 

Yours fraternally. 
BAY COUNTIES DISTRICT COUNCIL 
OF CARPENTERS. 

Y. H. MoLEAY. Secy.-Treas. 



and 



The .Mayor's Proclamation 
To the People of San Francisco 
Calif ornia : 

Throughout the United States, as in 
the countries of Europe, the period of 
reconstruction following the World T * 
has brought about an unemployment sit- 
uation with which every community has 
had to cope. San Francisco, like other 
cities, has an unemployment problem 
which a committee of public-spirited 
citizens, appointed by me, is striving 
sincerely to solve. 

San Francisco's problem is compli- 
cated by the fact that, added to our 
own numbers of unemployed, hundreds 
of thousands of others are attracted here 
from other points in the hope of obtain- 
ing work. The result is that we have 
not enough jobs to go around, and vari- 
ous agencies, whose appeal has been in- 
dorsed by the San Francisco Board of 
Supervisors, have asked me, as Mayor, 
to issue this public statement. 

We are bending every effort toward 
finding work for those who haven't it. 
but rhere is a great scarcity of openings. 
We are taking care of our own citizens — 



married men and ex-service men in par- 
ticular — first of all. I would strongly 
advise unemployed living elsewhere 
against coming to San Francisco at this 
time, unless they have sufficient means 
to tide them over a period of depression 
or have a job in advance, because the 
opportunity for employment in one's 
home community is much better than 
it is here. 

Sincerely. 
JAMES PYH.PH. JR. 
Mayor of San Francisco. 
February 10. 1922. 

Editor's Yote — The San Francisco 
District Council requested that the fore- 
going information be supplied our mem- 
bers and readers. 



Another Fake Exposed 
The Chamber of Commerce at Ama- 
ville, Tex., has been extensively ad- 
vertising through the press for help and 
we are advised by our Local, at that 
place, that conditions, as explained in 
these advertisements are false, as there 
are hundreds of men of all crafts walk- 
ing the streets out of work. 



Notice 
We have been requested by L. U. Yo. 
1 25 of Columbia, Mo., to notify mem- 
bers of the United Brotherhood not to 
pay any attention to notices appearing 
in the daily press relative to conditions 
at that place, as there is no work there 
for members of our craft. Members 
contemplating going there had better 
communicate with the Financial Secre- 
tary of the Local before making any 
arrangements. 



Information Wanted 
J. Rubin, who is shown in the accom- 
panying photograph was formerly a 
member of the United Brotherhood in 




Detroit. Any one knowing of his where- 
abouts kindly address J. Abramson. 516 
Laval Ave.. Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 



Claims Paid 




CLAIMS PAID DURING THE MONTH OF FEBRUARY, 1922 



:iaim Name of Deceased or | 
No. Disabled 


Local 
Union 


Mem 
Yrs. 


bership 
Mos. 


Cause of Death or 
Disability 


Am't 
Paid 




1 

8 

22 

25 

53 

62 

62 

67 

81 

98 

181 

259 

279 

290 

364 

424 

537 

632 

637 

652 

772 

854 

1094 

3094 

1735 

1928 

2292 

14 

29 

47 

206 

261 

2S4 

295 

40S 

008 

757 

976 

1082 

1290 

1345 

1354 

1504 

2725 

44 

66 

67 

73 

74 

SO 

14S 

149 

260 

273 

273 

306 

349 

426 

554 

5S5 

620 

696 

741 

927 

994 

1155 

1155 

1184 

1294 

1290 

1307 

1380 

1575 

1799 

7 

8 


17 
17 
26 

8 
15 
15 
26 
10 

4 
13 
24 
23 

2 
22 
14 
33 
10 

9 
16 

2 

1 
15 
19 

5 

2 

1 
3 

4 
5 

22 
21 
28 

4 
12 
20 
33 

7 

2 
15 

2 

19 
21 
15 

27 

7 

18 

9 

4 

3 

17 

24 

20 

22 

28 

10 

18 

21 

5 

S 

s 

21 

5 

20 

20 

2 

12 

12 

21 

4 

3 

9 

12 

2 

19 

3 

21 


8 
8 
3 
5 
7 

11 
7 

1 
6 
7 
2 
6 
7 
8 
8 
3 

11 
9 
9 
S 
2 
2 
3 
6 
5 
5 
3 
3 
7 
1 
5 
9 

10 
6 
2 
1 
5 
1 
5 
1 

11 



9 
9 

2 
6 
9 
1 
9 
8 

3 

10 
8 
3 
4 

7 
8 

11 
2 
1 
5 
5 
7 

11 
7 
5 
8 
8 
2 
4 
9 




$300 00 


I'.tTl Margaret H. Craig 

1972 Peter Joseph McMahon.... 
tn73 Warren H. Weston 




7r, mi 




300.00 
300.00 


t'»74 Adelaide H. Baker 


75.00 






75.00 




75.00 




300.00 


4978Ernest C. Yidal 




200.00 


4979 J. Enoch Carlson 




300.00 


I'.iso Marie Gilberts 




75.00 


1981 L J Nichols 




300 00 


1982 Charles Edward Watson. . . 




25.00 






75 00 






300.00 


1986 Joseph F. Foster 




75.00 




300.00 


1987 Marv J. Campbell 




75.00 


1988 August Stengel 


125 00 


1989 Chester W. Osborn 




100.00 


1990 Robert Guyon 




50 00 






300 00 


1982 Annie Eberts 




75 00 




300.00 




25 00 






50.00 


[996 Louise Casey 




75 00 


1997 J. J. Flvnn 




200 00 




300 00 


■000 Jacob Sudder 




125.00 




300 00 






300.00 


002 David I. Arhuthnot 




200 00 


•"003 Marie C. Bertram 




75.00 






125 00 






300 00 


006 William L. McKee 




75 00 


Christopher H. Miley 




100.00 






300 00 


009 Gertrude Harris MacLachlan 




50.00 






75 00 


"1 1 William H. Paquette 

012 Max. Moritz 




300.00 
300 00 






300.00 


014 Evelyn Elizabeth Conn 


75.00 


015 Charles A. Nelson 




300 00 


016 Effie McQuarrie 


75 00 


017 Thomas Dalziell 




2 1 


"Is Varne Shannon King 

019 Lawrence Keun 




75 00 




125 00 


!l -" Marie Von Pein 


Diabetis 


75 00 


"21 Michael Kavanaugh 




300.00 






125.00 
300 00 


"-1 John Frederick Betz 




125.00 


025 Marcus W. Harris 




125.00 


026 Frank Trabold 




300.00 


' H'orge R. Donaldson 




300.00 


028 I>aniel McCarthy 




300.00 


•29 Perl Gelder 




75.00 


•30 Adam Poter Kandle 




300.00 


•31 Charles P. Cates 




75.00 


Emma White 


75.00 


>33 Ella L. Durgv 




75.00 


•34 Marv Jane Waite 




50.00 


•35 Charles A. Weber. . 




75.00 


•36 Frank Doup 


1 25.HO 


>3] Amos B. Goodell 




300.00 


38 Amzie Lou Ella Thomas... 




75.uO 


'■;'•' Noma Ellen McMorrow 
'->" Delia King 




75.00 
75.00 


■J*l Frank William Hatcher.. 




125.00 


' '4- John E. Waite 




100. 00 


• 143 Alberta Wriggitt 


75.00 


* Hannah Johnson 


7 5. (XI 


" 45 John .Selfridge 




300.00 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



Claim 

No. 



Name of Deceased or 

Disabled 



Local 

Union 



45046 Alice E. Robertson 

45047 Hulbert Link 

4504S Margaret Mooney 

45049 Henrietta J. Jodray 

45050 Lena Bill 

45051 Elmer E. South-worth 

45052 John Roddy 

45053 Barnet Goldberg 

45054 Marie Yeuillette Julien 

45055 Victoria Wvnn 

45056 Robert E. Poe 

45057 William A. Carter (Dis.) . . . 
4505S Lula M. Buckles 

45059 Ole C. Olsen 

45060 Mathias Reichert 

45061 Josephine H. Eagles 

45062 Margaret Timberg 

45063 Mvrtle J. LaMar 

45064 Claudina S. Padilla Roman.. 

45065 Anna Kathern Hounihan... 

45066 William E. Cook 

45067 Edwin Taylor 

4506S Matey Simecek 

45069 William Henry Brooks 

45070 Vera M. Phifer 

45071 Laure Anna Anclaire 

45072 Samuel C. Ramsey 

45073 Samuel A. Landon 

45074 Emil Chilean 

45075 Edward Maher 

45076 Frank Lohne 

45077 David B. Jackson 

45078 George Davidson 

45079 Margaret Wallgram 

450S0 Ottie Bell Kneislev. . . 

45081 Mrs. A. G. Kerlev 

45052 Rav Nelson Miller 

45053 John Malone 

45084 Theodore Nolde 

45055 J. Paul Newcomer 

45056 Margaret Leonra Poundstone 

45087 Vernon Logan Bavles 

450SS Hazel Carnahan 

45089 Christine Knapp 

45090 James Frampton 

45091 Ida Jane Rav 

45092 Konrad Philippi 

45093 Genevieve Erickson 

45094 Oscar N. Nelson 

45095 Conner Hine 

45096 Pietv Jacobs 

45097 Alice Isabel Scott 

45098 Marie McCanley 

45099 Kelson E. Sherburne 

45100 Amelia M. Reichert 

45101 Jennie Hoke 

45102 Thomas Gilligan 

45103 John H. Thompson 

45104 Henry Canfield 

45105 Harriete E. Suddard 

45106 Martha N. Prestage 

45107 Johanne DeGroot 

45108 Phebia Eichler 

45109 George F. Ailshie 

45110 Jocab Goldstein 

45111 John J. Richards 

45112 Reinhard Fuelle 

45113 E. S. Sharpe, (Dis.) 

45114 Edna Alberta Griffith 

45115 George W. Rogers, (Dis.) . 

45116 Olie Moulder 

45117 Mary Kalfos 

4511S Nana Belle Mosby 

45119 Herman Erdman 

45120 Lewis J. Garfield 

45121 Cornelius F. Reynolds. . . . 

45122 May F. Patton 

45123 Florence Bowen 

45124 H. M. Johnson 

45125 Alfred Butcher 

45126 Charles G. Johnson 

45127 Netta T. Sanders 

45128 Thomas M. Smith 

45129 John H. Allen. (Dis.) 

45130 Henrv D. Landahl 

45131 Winifred Deane 

45132 Lelia Davis 

45133 Bertha Voss 

45134 Thomas Malloy ,.,,,,,,, 



26 
26 
33 
33 

47 

81 

90 

157 

134 

169 

331 

483 

681 

787 

808 

819 

1051 

1095 

1195 

1405 

1405 

1456 

14S3 

1562 

1704 

1793 

1906 

112 

131 

155 

246 

384 

449 

514 

526 

555 

711 

804 

957 

1010 

1480 

1618 

10 

11 

16 

23 

42 

5S 

58 

75 

75 

75 

122 

153 

207 

228 

338 

424 

655 

673 

688 

791 

993 

1399 

1750 

11 

75 

83 

186 

198 

207 

416 

427 

440 

501 

532 

561 

608 

655 

808 

808 

842 

912 

1188 

1297 

1888 

2310 

420 

736 



Membership 
Yrs. Mos. 



Cause of Death or 
Disability 



14 

25 

13 

10 

4 

12 

31 

3 

2 

23 

2 

25 

1 

2 

32 

1 

19 

2 

2 

3 

16 

3 

13 

13 

7 

1 

3 

15 

7 

14 

16 

21 

8 

24 

2 

9 

4 

15 

20 

2 

2 

4 

11 



13 

34 

7 

20 

1 

9 

13 

4 

22 

32 

4 

3 

2 

18 

1 

20 

9 

5 

1 

9 

10 

32 

2 

4 

13 

23 

10 

16 

9 

13 

10 

9 

19 

5 

37 

24 

7 

14 

15 

18 

2 

2 

11 



7 
7 

4 
10 
10 
9 
7 
9 
4 
S 
1 
5 
2 
3 
6 
8 
6 
4 
11 



10 
3 
5 

10 

11 
7 
3 
7 
3 
9 
5 
7 
6 
8 
9 
5 
1 
9 
8 

3 
1 
2 
3 
4 
1 

10 
9 
2 



11 
7 
3 
6 
2 

10 
1 
7 
4 
3 
3 
2 
8 

11 
1 
8 

11 
1 
9 
9 
4 
6 
5 
4 
6 
9 
5 

11 
8 
9 
5 
6 
1 
2 
6 
4 



Heart trouble 

Meningitis 

Nephritis 

Cirrhosis of liver. . . 

Pneumonia 

Empyema 

Myocarditis 

Tuberculosis 

Cancer 

Empyema 

Aneurysm 

Accidental 

Meningitis 

Myocarditis 

Pneumonia 

Tuberculosis 

Heart trouble 

Pneumonia 

Toxemia 

Accidental 

Endocarditis 

Heart disease 

Tuberculosis 

Dementia 

Endocarditis 

Placenta praevia . . . 

Epilepsy 

Pneumonia 

Carcinoma 

Atrophy 

Asthma 

Pneumonia 

Anaemia , 

Heart trouble 

Diabetis 

Peritonitis 

Tuberculosis 

Accidental 

Cancer 

Homicide 

Smallpox 

Goitre 

Heart disease 

Diabetis 

Carcinoma 

Myocarditis 

Endocarditis 

Nephritis 

Tuberculosis 

Pneumonia 

Stokes-Adams disease 

Myocarditis 

Toxemia 

Ulcer 

Heart failure 

Heart trouble 

Heart trouble 

Accidental 

Carcinoma 

Placenta 

Cancer 

Carcinoma 

Intestinal obstruction 

Tuberculosis 

Pneumonia 

Myocarditis 

Myocarditis 

Accidental 

Bright's disease 

Strain 

Carcinoma 

Pneumonia 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis 

Nephritis 

Cancer 

Apoplexy 

Tuberculosis 

Myocarditis 

Heart trouble 

Apoplexy 

Cancer 

Accidental 

Uraemia 

Tuberculosis 

Diabetis 

Mitral regurgitation 
Accidental 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



"laim Name of Deceased or 
No. Disabled 

45135 Frederick Trembly 

45136 Thomas M. Smallwood (Dis) 

45137 Frank Distel 

45138 |Robina Bruce K. Clarke... 

45139 Martha Royals 

45140 Mary Schoenheider 

45141 Frances Schweitz 

45142 Frances Pfletschinger 

45143 Thomas P. obbins 

45144 Mina Gaffney 

45145 Finer Osbakken 

45146 Thomas F. Kane 

45147 Arsene S. Sarrazin 

45148 Leda Beaudry 

45149 Ellen Grace Doll 

45150 Rainy Karrman 

45151 Anne Johnson 

45152 Frank Wasuk 

45153 Theresa Gelcich 

45154 Sarah M. Chrlsholm 

45155 Edward E. Brown 

45156 Albert Provost 

45157 Ferdinand Ott 

45158 J. Stewart MacDonald (Dis.) 

45159 Marshall J. Riggs 

45160 Ethel May Laird 

45161 Robert L. Gardner 

45162 E. J. Owens 

45163 John S. Anderson 

45164 Carl Brandt 

45165 Harry Zundel Fox 

45166 John D. Cowper 

45167 Horace W. Joscelyn 

4516S Alvina Francis Bruemmer. . 

45169 Carl Larsen 

45170 Edward C. Ash 

45171 Rose Fitzpatrick 

45172 William P. Donaldson 

45173 Katharina Sadrof 

45174 C. W. Tucker 

45175 Stella Douglas 

45176 Nils Nelson 

45177 Adolph Stark 

45178 William George Glassey. . . . 

45179 Peter J. Wolff 

45180 Herman Rolf 

45181 Herbert H. Lodge 

45182 Louise Grace Carmine 

45183 Mary A. Amos 

45184 L. N. Carr 

45185 John Krause 

15186 August Scheidbach 

45187 Ole Johnson 

45188 Elizabeth Coulter . 

15189 Charles J. Hagen 

15190 Ethel L. Blackstock 

115191 Louis H. Menne 

15192 Susan Emma Faux 

; 15193 Theodore Wickford 

15194 Vertna Snell Walliusrf ord . . . 

;" 15195 Ada Frick 

1 15196 William Wiseman 

15197 John H. Gerhard 

15198 Mamie Poteet 

1 15199 Wilbur Russell Comstock . . . 

! >5200 Edward Ziegler 

i 5201 James LaFayette Smith.... 
i .5202 George W. Bell 

5203 Maria Pignone 

5204 Michael Kristof 

I 5205 Frank W. Chard 

5206 Matthew Theisen 

5207 Peter Allen Lette 

5208 William A. Kilby 

I 5209 Nicholas Stahl • 

i 5210 Marshall M. Newton 

! 5211 Margaret Francis Morris... 

5212 William K. Watson 

5213 Arthur H. Curran 

i 5214 Edith May Fenner 

! 5215 Axel Blackrud 

! 5216 Daniel A. McDonald 

[5217 Charles E. Bennett 

,5218 Jane Enright 

5219 Ira J. Bailev (Dis.) 

5220 Michael Merdinger 

5221 William A. Hazelbaker 

5222 Geza Lakatos 

">223 Joseph W, Sheckleton 



Local 
Union 



1108 

1535 

1621 

27 

52 

183 

257 

264 

266 

278 

361 

595 

920 

1127 

1345 

7 

7 

9 

42 

51 

67 

96 

105 

132 

136 

183 

185 

198 

282 

1013 

509 

595 

766 

854 

1246 

1260 

1564 

1743 

1784 

2146 

11 

51 

62 

122 

192 

261 

362 

384 

483 

716 

742 

772 

948 

1023 

1143 

1412 

16 

36 

51 

64 

90 

101 

182 

198 

211 

257 

276 

283 

325 

879 

910 

916 

1174 

1307 

1401 

1499 

1650 

1852 

67 

104 

131 

218 

223 

273 

281 

349 

437 

608 

623 



Membership | 
Yrs. Mos. I 



8 

2 

8 

2 

4 

16 

7 

25 

18 

8 

15 

15 

18 

2 

4 

8 

19 

2 

14 

18 

9 

33 

9 

14 

18 

1 

7 

18 

22 

7 

6 

19 

16 

17 

10 

1 

3 

6 

9 

2 

8 

15 

12 

6 

20 

3 

13 

6 

15 

21 

8 

3 

6 

7 

16 

6 

11 

16 

9 

5 

9 

21 

20 

11 

16 

24 



4 
16 

9 
11 

4 
20 
14 
14 

3 

1 
12 

4 

7 
22 
23 
25 
14 
21 

7 
22 
13 



4 
1 

7 
c» 
3 
7 
9 

10 
9 
2 
1 
7 
9 
3 
1 
4 
9 

11 
4 
9 
8 
7 

8 

11 

11 

11 

8 
2 

11 
7 
6 
3 
2 
8 
3 
2 
2 
7 
6 
6 

10 

11 
9 

10 
8 

10 
9 
6 
8 
1 
7 
4 
6 

11 
7 
3 
3 
5 
9 





7 
10 
10 

1 



5 

3 

11 

8 

5 

2 

1 

6 

2 

10 

11 

10 

4 

9 

3 

3 

1 



Cause of Death or 
Disability 

Myocarditis (Bal.) .... 

Accidental 

Pneumonia 

Carcinoma 

Myocarditis 

Myocarditis 

Arterio sclerosis 

Arterio sclerosis 

Heart disease 

Exhaustion 

Anaemia 

Diabetis 

Nephritis 

Bronchitis 

Heart disease 

Nephritis 

Myocarditis 

Tuberculosis 

Heart trouble 

Peritonitis 

Carcinoma 

Carcinoma 

Pneumonia 

Accidental 

Cancer 

Eclampsia 

Accidental 

Myocarditis 

Syncope 

Pneumonia 

Oedema 

Pneumonia 

Cancer 

Pneumonia 

Cerebral hemorrhage . . 

Influenza 

Cancer 

Alcoholic poisoning 

Pneumonia 

Arterio sclerosis 

Embolism 

Cerebral hemorrhage . . 

Apoplexy 

Accidental 

Apoplexy 

Pneumonia 

Pneumonia 

Tuberculosis 

Myocarditis 

Arterio sclerosis 

Heart trouble 

Heart trouble 

Angina pectoris 

Myocarditis 

Cancer 

Pneumonia 

Apoplexy 

Pneumonia 

Apoplexy 

Hemorrhage 

Enteritis 

Pneumonia 

Septicaemia 

Cancer 

Nephritis 

Carcinoma 

Nephritis 

Aortic insufficiency 

Oedema 

Pneumonia 

Appendicitis 

Carcinoma 

Pneumonia 

Cancer 

Carcinoma 

Heart trouble 

Hemorrhage . 

Pneumonia 

Tumor 

Aortic stenosis 

Goitre 

Apoplexy 

Endocarditis 

Cirrhosis of liver 

Accidental 

Heart disease 

Nephritis 

Suicide 

Apoplexy 



Am't 
Paid 



225.00 
100.00 

75.H0 
50.00 

75.00 
75.00 
75.00 

75.00 

125.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

50.00 

75.00' 

300.00 

75.00 

100.00' 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00' 

300.00' 

300.00' 

400.00' 

300.00 

25.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

300.00 

50.00 

75.00 

300.00 

75.00 

25.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

300.00 

50.00 

300.00 

75.00 

75.00 

125.00 

300.00 

150.00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

75.00 

300.00 

75.00 

300.00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

125.00 

200.00 

300.00 

300.00 

125.00 

75.00 

50.00 

300.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

400.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

125.00 






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THE CARPENTER 



Claim 
No. 



Name of Deceased or 
Disabled 



Local 
Union 



Membership 
Yrs. Mos. 



Cause of Death or 
Disability 



Am't 
Paid 



45224Augusta Amelia Hjertstedt. . 

45225 Rachel Iona Six 

45226 Joseph J. Culbert 

45227 May Strom 

45228 Joseph Olsen 

45229 Elizabeth Turnbull 

45230 Minna Berry 

45231 Patrick J. Murphy 

45232 William Henry Kewley 

45233 Carrie Magoon 

45234 Mary Leduc 

45235 Henry A. Morrison 

45230 Hattie Drayton 

45237 Oscar Forster Orn 

45238 Charles F. Weaver 

45239 Janet Elizabeth Shaud 

45240 Arthur S. Darling 

45241 Earl W. Heller 

45242 Avila Chevallier 

45243 Charles B. Fitch 

45244 Lucinda Mandley 

45245 Leslie McCoy 

45246 Christopher Gallagher 

45247 Alfred B. Davenport 

45248 Robert M. McCann 

45249 Frances Mangis Knox 

45250 Sarah Guenther 

45251 Marcien Dubrulo 

45252 W. Dana Hilt 

45253 Oscar Henry Sweet 

45254 Mollie Moskowitz 

45255 Frederick Fisch 

45256 Delbert Stanford 

45257 August Schubert 

45258 Charles A. Holten 

45259 Ellis Resinger 

45260 Joseph Emmett Powell 

45261 David Baird 

45262 Martin Olson 

45263 Joseph Lavigneur 

45264 Marie Anna Mock 

45265 Morris Neville 

45266 John Raslavich 

45267 Andros B. Crockett 

45268 Bertha E. Johnson 

45269 David Wade 

45270 George L. Newhouse 

45271 John Wesley Lidy 

45272 Christian W. Hasdorff (Dis.) 



1060 

1326 

1432 

2315 

5 

10 

10 

11 

13 

23 

40 

52 

62 

75 

162 

532 

563 

585 

645 

713 

716 

895 

948 

1007 

1181 

1345 

1354 

1468 

1564 

1782 

1784 

2368 

2 

36 

73 

73 

87 

87 

134 

181 

218 

261 

642 

808 

1108 

1261 

1296 

1762 



19 
9 
5 
2 

1 

3 

25 

26 

8 

25 

12 

20 

5 

15 

9 

9 

5 

2 

37 

19 

5 

12 

2 

19 

1 

5 

15 

19 

7 

4 

2 

15 

1 

30 

19 

8 

6 

16 

6 

3 

5 

10 

7 

9 

25 

5 

13 

22 

1 



4 

5 
7 

4 
4 
7 
S 
S 
10 
1 
3 
5 
3 



4 
4 

1 
10 
10 
8 
5 
11 
6 
9 
2 
6 
2 
11 
5 
6 
6 
6 
1 
8 
1 
2 
1 
5 
9 
3 
8 
1 
11 
10 



Peritonitis 

Heart disease . . . 

Pneumonia 

Heart trouble .... 

Appendicitis 

Pneumonia 

Heart trouble .... 

Thrombosis 

Tuberculosis 

Myocarditis 

Heart disease .... 

Hemorrhage 

Pellagra 

Abscess 

Myocarditis 

Septicaemia 

Nephritis 

Asphyxiation 

Phthisis 

Meningitis 

Accidental 

Hemorrhage 

Nephritis 

Tuberculosis ..... 

Pneumonia 

Paralysis 

Hemorrhage 

Cancer 

Arterio sclerosis . 

Heart trouble 

Heart trouble 

Nephritis 

Influenza 

Uraemia 

Cerebral hemorrhaj 
Heart disease 

Appendicitis 

Nephritis , 

Carcinoma 

Pneumonia 

Pneumonia 

Pneumonia 

Accidental 

Apoplexy 

Endocarditis 

Pneumonia 

Nephritis 

Accidental 

Accidental 



75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

50.00 

50.00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

75.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

75.00 

100.00 

300.00 

300.00 

75.00 

300.00 

100.00 

300.00. 

50.00 

75.00 

75.00 

300.00 

75.00 

50.00 

50.00 

252.75 

50.00 

300.00 

125.00 

300.00 

300.00 

125.00 

300.00 

150.00 

75.00 

125.00 

300.00 

75.00 

75.00 

75.00* 

125.00 

300.00 

50.00 



Total $50,849.72 



141 Full beneficial claims $36,649.72 

46 Semi-beneficial claims 4,425.00 

108 Wife's claims 7,525.00 

8 Disability claims 2,250 00 



303 



$50,849 72 



DISAPPROVED CLAIMS PAID DURING THE MONTH OF FEBRUARY, 1922 



Claim Name of Deceased or 
No. Disabled 

5253 Jos. Pischnela 

5254 Willard B. Wixon. : 

5255 Stephen E. Lally 

5256 Olga Linca Laine , 

5257 Thomas Harris 

5258 Pauline Englebrecht .... 

5259 Eva Fox 

5260 Emily Buffe 

5261 Sylvia M. Witter 

5262 Louis Enzian , 

5263 Frank Hartz 

5264 John B. Faubion (Dis.). 

5265 George W. Timby (Dis.) 

5266 Martin Reagan , 



Local 
Union 


Membership 
Yrs. Mos. 


182 
327 
338 
787 
842 
1055 
1117 


22 
5 
4 
4 

16 
8 
4 


6 
5 
2 

1 
9 
3 


1208 


3 


10 


1295 


1 


9 


1474 
1546 
1907 
1980 


5 
2 
3 



3 

2 
8 



2375 


1 


11 



Cause of Disap- 
proval 



Am't 
Cl'm'd 



Three months in arrears 

Three months in arrears 

Three months in arrears 

Not filed within six months.. 

Section 48 

Not filed within six months. . . 

Semi, not entitled to wife do- 
nation 

Semi, not entitled to wife do- 
nation 

Wife ill when member was ad- 
mitted 

Three months in arrears 

Three months in arrears 

Arrears 

Semi, not entitled to disability 
donation 

Semi, not two years a. member 



$300.00 
75.00 

200.00 
75.00 

300.00 
75.00 

75.00 

75.00 

25.00 
300.00 
100.00 
200.00 



25.00 



CorrQspondQncQ 




Another Problem 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

Many craft problems have been pub- 
lished in "The Carpenter" Journal that 
have rendered material help and guid- 
ance to thousands of our fellow members 
in earning their bread and butter. But 
why does a man write and analyze a 
craft problem in detail so that other 
members thousands of miles away may 
derive benefit of his knowledge and ex- 
perience? Is it not because the United 
Brotherhood carries with it the germ of 
fraternity ? 

Here is a problem that the writer ap- 
peals to the editor of "The Carpenter" 
to publish it and equally appeals to fel- 
low members to answer it to the best of 
their knowledge and experience, which 
may result in benefiting the writer and 
perhaps many others of our Brotherhood. 

The writer met with an accident on a 
job which resulted m an incomplete 
hernia. Four surgeons were consulted. 
Two advised an operation, and two ad- 
vised to wait until there was a complete 
hernia before an operation was per- 
formed. 

I am not very anxious to have an op- 
eration performed, first, because of not 
being any too storng physically at this 
time, second, because I have personally 
come in contact with fellow members 
at different times who have assured me 
in a most sincere and friendly way that 
they have made spontaneous recovery 
from hernia without operations and with 
hardly any loss of time. But I made 
no notation of their experience, as I was 
not interested at that time for myself 
or knew anyone else that needed a mes- 
sage of help to whom I could convey. 
But at present, the information and ad- 
vice from personal experience of those 
who have been fortunate in making 
spontaneous recovery from hernia or by 
resorting to the injection method or any 
other method, thus avoiding the scalpal, 
would be of great encouragement and 
help to me and other members who may 
be similarly situated. 

It is perhaps fit at this time, to recall 
a few words from an article which ap- 



peared recently In a physical culture 
journal. It read in part: "Unfortunately 
during the last thirty years this country 
has suffered from surgical mania. 
Where one operation has been necessary, 
ten have been performed. A large 
amount of this unnecessary surgery has 
been performed on the abdominal or- 
gans. An incision is made through the 
abdominal wall and unless this wall is 
properly sewed up, there is apt to be 
a surgical hernia. It would be just as 
well to let nature cure it." 

Those brothers who believe that their 
information in bringing about a recovery 
from hernia would be of benefits to me 
will kindly address 

MARK GORDON. 
1036 S. Bonnie St. Los Angeles, Cal. 



Stabilizing the Dollar 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

As the Fifth Annual Convention of the 
National Federation of Federal Em- 
ployes, .which was held in New Orleans 
in September, 1921, a resolution was 
adopted placing the organization on 
record as being in favor of a bill (H. R. 
5513) introduced in the House by 
Congressman Hustecl of New York. This 
bill contemplates the creation of a mon- 
etary commission for the study and de- 
velopment of a plan for stabilizing the 
purchasing power of the dollar. 

It is believed that this subject is of 
fundamental importance to labor and 
that Organized Labor in general should 
make a careful study of the same. We 
have recommended such action to the 
officers and members of our Locals, and 
the matter is brought to the attention 
of your organization for such considera- 
tion as may be deemed advisable. 
Fraternally yours, 

LUTHER C. STEWARD, 
President, National Federation of Fed- 
eral Employes. 



RESOLUTION NO. 7S 

Adopted By the New Orleans 

Convention 

September, 1921 

George J. Hill, 



THE CARPENTER 



THE U. B. A. 

It's On the Level 

The First ioo r c Adjustable 

No Holes To Cut 

Specially designed tor progressive 

mechanics and to take place of level 

,or plumb bob. 



adjnstables 
in working fea- 
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Attach to any 
length straight 
edge your 

work requires. 

For _ ah i;:ih c: 



quickest to ad- 
just. 

Frame C. B. steel 
finished in Nickel 
and Black mat 
rust proof pro- 
cess. Everj cit 
guaranteed. 



Member L. U. 434, Inventor. Pocket size 
3Jx4. Have your dealer supply you, if he 
cannot, send ns his name and your money 
order and we will mail to yon direct. 
Price Si. 25 

THE UNION LEVEL SALES CO. 




1th Street 



Chicago. 



Auto Owners 

WBNTED! 

To introduce the best auto- 
mobile tires in the world. 
Made under our new and ex- 
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We want an agent in every 

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Write for booklet fully describing this new 
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Cept. 84 Chicago, San Francisco, Pottstown, P» 




J. Franklin Meyer. 

Resolution Regarding the Stabilization 
of the Dollar 

Whereas. The value of the dollar as 
measured by its purchasing power in 
general commodities has suffered exces- 
sive shrinkage since 1S96. and especially 
since 1914 : and 

Whereas, This has resulted in grave 
economic injustice to large groups of 
our population, particularly to salaried 
workers and wage earners unable to se- 
cure an equivalent increase in compen- 
sation, as well as to savings bank de- 
positors, life insurance policy holders, 
and owners of Liberty Bonds and other 
long-term investments; and 

Whereas. The economic injustice due 
to the depreciation of the currency is 
the chief cause of the prevailing unrest 
and dissatisfaction; and 

Whereas. Wage and salary adjust- 
ments can at best only temporarily cor- 
rect this injustice, because such adjust- 
ments are continually nullified by con- 
tinued fluctuations of the currency ; and 

Whereas, a bill (H. R, 5513 1 has been 
introduced into the House of Representa- 
tives by Mr. Husted of New York, pro- 
viding for the creation of a commission 
to investigate plans for stabilizing the 
purchasing power of the dollar so that 
it vrill at all times and under all cir- 
cc_ stances purchase approximately the 
same quantity of the necessities of life; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the National Federa- 
tion of Federal Employes endorses the 
purpose of the bill H. R. 5513. and urge 
that it be passed at an early date: and 

Resolved, That the National Federa- 
tion of Federal Employes be requested 
to immediately submit these resolutions 
to every Local for consideration and ac- 
tion, and be it 

Resolved, further, that the National 
Federation of Federal Employes invites 
the attention of other national and in- 
ternational bodies or Organized Labor to 
this action and the reasons therefor, 
with the suggestion that they take such 
action a- th^y see fit. 



Something To Ponder On 
Editor.'hThe Carpenter": 

My attention has been called to some 
resolutions which have been sent out for 
endorsement by a Local Union in Mass- 
achusetts and which provide for a re- 
duction in the per capita tax to the Gen- 
eral Office to 30c per month per member. 







Be A Floor Surfacing Contractor 

Make $5,000 to $15,000 or More— Yearly 

This is a new, unerowded field. Floor Surfacing Contractors are making big money 
resurfacing old floors in homes and office buildings and working with general contractors 
who prefer to sublet the floor surfacing contract. It is a big business in itself. Business 
comes easily by American Universal Method. We furnish office forms, advertising cuts, 
business cards — in fact, everything to set a man up in business. 

RESURFACING OLD FLOORS 

Don't Ever Get Caught Out of Work Again 

No Dull Seasons in This Business 

There are hundreds of homes and office buildings being remodeled — In every case, 
the tloor is the first consideration. There are hundreds of floors right in your own 
neighborhood that really need resurfacing. Hundreds of people can well afford to have 
the work done and will be glad to have you do it when you show them the American 
Universal Method. 

This machine is electrically operated and surfaces more floors in a day than six 
men can do by hand. Works alike on new and old floors and on any size, from 
cottage to largest auditorium. Surfaces clear to wall without hand work. 

Contractors and architects prefer its work because it leaves no sander waves or chat- 
ter marks. Leaves job clean — vacuum fan leaves dust and dirt in bag. Machine will 
pay for itself the first month. 

Floor Surfacing Contractors Make $20.00 to $50.00 A Day 

"I am making floor surfacing a specialty with the 'American Universal' 
and find it a good paying proposition. My average earnings are $23.00 per 
day." Geo. R. LaFlash, Mass. 

"I make the 'American Universal' way of floor surfacing a specialty now 
and my average earnings are at least $20.00 a day." J. A. Natzel, Arizona. 
My earnings in one clay have been as high as $50.00 with the 'Ameri- 
n Universal' machine." E. J. Inman, Ohio. 

"We have owned one of your Floor Surfacing Machines for about two 
years. We find it earns us from $40.00 to $75.00 on each of our con- 
tract jobs." F. B. Westcott & Son. Nebr. 

"I have made good with the 'American Universal' Machine. I 
have sanded about $700.00 worth of work in two months." T. J. 
Easley, Tenu. 

"The 'American Universal' is a dandy machine for cleaning and 
polishing dance floors. I have earned $62.00 clear profit in a day. 
so you can see how well I am doing." Glen F. Bartlett, Oregon. 
"When this little town of 6,000 people was building, we made 
m $350.00 to $700.00 per month with the 'American Universal', but our best earnings per day have been $100.00, 
1.15. $68.50, $62.00 and $80.00. M. L. Derstine, California. 

'I have earned as high as $50.00 with my 'American Universal' machine and wish to thank you for the courteous 
atment I have received from vou. Eelward McKernan, Nebraska, 
am well pleased with the 'American Universal'. Ihave made $30.00 in eight hours with my machine." R. Waynick, Texas. 




ay Down the Tool Box — YOU Be The BOSS 
he American Floor Surfacing Machine Co. 

Originators of Floor Surfacing Machines 

2 So. St. Clair Street Toledo, Ohio 



AMERICAN FLOOR SURFACING MACHINE COMPANY 
: So. St. Clair St., 
■do, Ohio, U. S. A. 

J tlemen: Please send me without obligation to me. complete information and literature on your proposition 
following information will no doubt assist you in advising me. 



I want to become a Floor Surfacing 

N CnntrnMrtr 



Contractor. 

I am not now a contractor of any kind 

but was in following business: 



i 



I am a Building Contractor and want 
to use it on my own contracts. 



NAME . 
STREET 
CITY 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



They set forth in the resolution that the 
reduction in per capita tax is being asked 
for in order to lighten the burden the 
members are now carrying because of 
the fact that in nearly every locality our 
members have been forced to accept re- 
duction in wages, and further, because 
a large number of our members have 
been out of work the greater part of the 
time during the past year. 

Now, I believe the records will show 
that the per capita tax on our members 
to the General Office has been 40c per 
month for many years past, and that al- 
though the wages of our members has 
been increased and working conditions 
greatly improved during those same 
years, and the work and duties at the 
General Office have more than doubled 
in that period of time because of the 
splendid increase in membership, no re- 
quest has been made by the General 
Officers or any one else for an increase 
in the per capita tax to enlarge the rev- 
enue with which to take care of the ever 
increasing death and disability donations 
and the increased amount of strike and 
lockout benefits constantly being called 
for by our members out on strike for 
better conditions and higher wages, or 
locked out by the employers in their 
efforts to reduce wages, and if possible, 
establish the open shop plan of operation 
in our trade. 

The attitude of our members in de- 
feating the proposition that was sub- 
mitted for referendum vote after our 
General Convention in 1920 which asked 
that $2 of each initiation fee be sent to 
the General Office to be used in adding 
to these amount of strike benefit to be 
paid to the members in need is still fresh 
in the minds of most of us. If out mem- 
bers had only taken steps to build up a 
good and substantial Treasury at our 
General Office during the times when all 
were working and earning good money 
we would have been in far better condi- 
tion to combat the millions of dollars 
we' had arrayed against us in the open 
shop fight during the past year. But the 
great trouble with us is that too many 
of us are unable to see past the end of 
our own nose and are content to let each 
day take care of itself. 

If our members will take the trouble 
to examine the financial statement is- 
sued monthly by our General Secretary 
they will be able to discover the amount 
of money that has been paid out since 
May, 1921, in strike and lockout bene- 



fits, and if they will peruse the report o: 
our General Treasurer as published ir 
"The Carpenter" each month they wil 
there find the vast amount of mones 
that is being paid out for death and dis 
ability donations, and then if they wil 
make use of the thinking powers thai 
God gave them they will wonder how 

in h our General Office gets alonj 

on the small per capita tax now beini 
paid by the members of this great organ 
ization. We boast of being the larges' 
and most powerful organization oi 
skilled mechanics in the world, and yc 
we are content to remain forever th( 
cheapest bunch it is possible to fine 
when it comes to the question of sup 
plying our. General Office, or even oui 
Local Unions, with sufficient funds t( 
carry on the work of the organizatior 
as it should be done. 

How often we hear complaints fron 
some of our members about the "tigh 
wads" at the General Office because thej 
will not cut loose the purse-string of oui 
General Treasury and permit the fundi 
to flow freely into the pockets of everj 
one who thinks he is entitled to financia 
aid, and, as a rule, the worst kickers or 
that score are the first ones to holler 
"cut down the revenue to the Genera 
Office — lighten the burden on the mem 
bers." 

Our members must bear in mind tha 
this is not the first period of depressioi 
we have gone through during the lift 
of the United Brotherhood, and that th< 
old boys who bore the brunt of batth 
in the days when it took some courage 
to proclaim oneself a member of a labol 
union did not spend their time in ai 
effort to curtail the efforts of our officer; 
and stifle the opportunity for progress 
and advancement, but on the other hand 
they devoted their time and efforts verj 
diligently in any way they could to hell 
in the struggle, and from their untirinf 
efforts was built our splendid Brother- 
hood through which the new comers 
are enjoying the fruits that have growr 
from the struggles and sacrifices of thosf 
who have gone before. Instead oi 
haggling for a reduction in the revenue 
to the General Office let us all get busy 
and assist in bringing back into the fold 
those erstwhile good and loyal members 
who were forced out of the Brotherhood 
by reason of no work and absolute in- 
ability to keep up their dues. If we will 
do this I will gamble that in the years 
to come we will look back with far more 



THE CARPENTER 



39 



pride on our efforts than will the fellows 
who have spent their time trying to cur- 
tail the work by and through a lack of 
sufficient revenue to make it possible to 
uttend to the real business of the Broth- 
erhood. 

Fraternally yours, 

THOS. P. MENTON. 



In Appreciation 
Editor, "The Carpenter": 

The Masonic Lodge of this city wishes 
o- voice its expression of appreciation 
for the kindly co-operation of the Car- 
icnters' Union No. 1249, Okemah, Okla., 
n erecting for Mrs. T. C. Martin the 
>arn recently built. 

We feel that as long as the milk of 
mman kindness permeates and controls 
he actions of men in handling the af- 
fairs of those who have met with ad- 
verse circumstances, such as attends the 
ase of Mrs. Martin, the community as 
veil as the individual will be benefited. 
* T ot only will the recipient of the acts of 
■:indness be benefited and grateful there- 
or. but, it is more blessed to give than 
ifceive. Mrs. Martin on every occasion 
't as conducted herself and family worthy 
>f the aid of all. Funds have been 
i laced at her disposal and have received 
■ lie most economic distribution and ex- 
penditure. She has at all times shown 
! erself and family grateful for the kind- 
iess shown her and it is our hope and 
esire that she will profit thereby. 

Permit me, on behalf of the lodge, to 
lank you one and all for this evidence 
;f charity and upright manhood. Com- 
mnities take pride in the fact that men 
|E your kind and caliber are residents 
lereof . 

Very respectfully yours, 

TOM HUSER, 
Secretary Okemah Lodge No. 234, 
A. F & A. M. 



Editors, Punctuate This 

funny old man told this to me 
fell in a snowdrift in June said he 
went to a ballgame out in the sea 
saw a jelly fish float up in a tree 
found some gum in a cup of tea 
stirred my milk with a big brass key 
opened my door on my bended knee 
beg your pardon for this said he 
it 'tis true- when told as it ought to be 
is a puzzle in punctuation you see. 
* — The Kablegram 



We Want You To Help Us In- 
stall The Screen That Eolls 
Up Like A Window Shade 




'ILL you help us 
install The Has- 
Rolup Screen 
this Spring? Or 
would you rather 
local agency for 
them and handle the whole 
proposition — making a 
profit on sales as well as installations? 
Write today and let us send you com- 
plete information. 

The March issues of national magazines 
will inaugurate a Hastings Rolup Screen 
advertising campaign that will reach the 
wealthiest and the most influential peo- 
ple in every community all over the 
country. Last Spring, a smaller cam- 
paign swamped us with inquiries ; and 
this year, we have prepared for a na- 
tion-wide demand. We will turn this 
business to our representatives wherever 
we have them ; but will handle it direct 
elsewhere. Ask us now about your ter- 
ritory. 

The Hastings Rolup Screen is made of 
rust-proof, corrode-resisting Monel Metal, 
rolled on a special shade-roller, and en- 
closed in a metal casing. It runs down 
the sides of the window frame in narrow 
metal strips, like weather strips, and 
due to its patented features cannot pull 
out at the sides. It is a permanent in- 
stallation ; once up, up to stay. Out of 
sight when not in use. The Hastings 
Rolup Screen covers the whole window 
in such a way that you can open the 
window any distance, either from top or 
bottom ; and is the final solution of the 
problem of screening casements. 

Write us today for complete 
information about this screen 
that is revolutionizing window 
screening. 

ROLUP SCREEN COMPANY 

4 1 4C East 3 2nd St. New York City 



Casual Comment 



The greatest force for the betterment 
of the worker's condition lies in the 
worker himself Not by independent 
effort, but by uniting with his fellow 
worker and presenting a solid front — 
another reason for that 500,000. 

* * * 

Everybody cannot be officers, but 
everybody can help the officers make the 
organization a greater force for good by 
giving their active support and co-opera- 
tion. Try it and watch your union grow 
and prosper. 

* * * 

There is more reason for rejoicing 
than sorrowing over the results achieved 
by the conference on disarmament. The 
Four Powers' and the Five Powers 
agreements and other resolutions passed 
are tremendously important. 

* * * 

The "can't strike" wave has again 
struck New York and powerful business 
interests in that state are demanding its 
legislation. It would seem that today's 
turmoil and dissension in Colorado and 
Kansas means nothing to those who 
would handcuff workers to their jobs. 

* * * 

The man who steals a loaf of bread 
goes to jail. The man who steals a rail- 
road goes to Congress. The difference 
being, that the real thief always escapes 
because he owns the courts, and brings 
pressure to bear. 



be hard to replace. It only goes to shcn 
that the business of the nation cannot 
compete with the moving picture busi 
ness. 

* * * 

We think that injunctions in labo 
disputes become less popular with em 
ployers now that the weapon proves t< 
be two-edged. But so long as it is user 
to bludgeon one party into insensibility 
it is fair and politically expedient tha 
the other party should also feel itl 
weight occasionally. 

* * * 

Something should be done to reduc 
the -spread between the city price o 
farm products and the price received b 
the producer. Competition will not re 
duce the spread ; nor will public reguls 
tion. Co-operation, and nothing elsi 
will do it. 

* * * 

Wall Street can fool others, but 
never attempts to fool itself is tt 
hint contained in this statement by tl 
Wall Street Journal, which wage worl 
ers might remember with profit. 

* * * 

Organized Labor should fight to ho 
the conditions which it has foug 
for and secured by hard knocks and tl 
sweat of its brow during the past fif 
years. The only way to do this is 
make application for membership in t] 
union of your craft. 



The absurdity of the injunction 
against the union coupled with labor's 
successful counterblast has done some- 
thing to convince the public and the 
press that this particularly noxious 
weapon should be abandoned in all civil- 
ized industrial wars. 

# $ . # 

The farmer is getting less for his 
wheat today than at any time since 
1913. The price of flour has dropped 
from $13 a barrel to $6.50 within a 
year and a pound loaf could easily be 
isold for 5c if the bakers and jobbers 
would cut out their profiteering. 

While we deeply regret the retirement 
of Mr. Hays from the office of Post- 
master General as the public service 
loses in him an administrator who will 



The coal operators are preparing t 
"public" for a bitter fight upon the Un 
ed Mine Workers. Day after day tji 
"kept press" is offering anti-union pro 
aganda to show the reader the reaso 
ableness (?) of the operators in th' 
campaign to cut wages. 
* * * 

Secretary of War Weeks announc 
that he is in favor of conscripting eve 
man in the United States from 18 to 
years of age in the "next war." S< 
retary Weeks is just 61 years old. 

Labor history shows that there 1' 
been times during industrial depress! i 
in the past when the labor movent 
was almost completely annihiliated, W 
it always came back stronger than If 
fore, 




The UNIQUE And HANDY 

Reversible 
Brotherhood Fob 



A most convenient, and ar- 
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other, both beautifully enam- 
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Advertize Our Label 



PTFS. 



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The price 
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Send all orders with remittance to 

FRANK DUFFY, General Secretary 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan St., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



42 



THE CARPENTER 



L. U. No. 213, Houston, Tex. 
L. U. No. 213 dedicated their new 
home, in Houston. Tex.. February 3, 
1922. which is shown in the accompany- 
ing cut. The membership may well feel 
proud of their achievement, as their 
headquarters ranks second to none in 



Dedicates Their New Home 
the ceremony the crowd of 1.800 partic- 
ipants indulged in an excellent supper 
which had been spread for the occasion, 
after which they were treated to novelty 
dancing, recitations and musical num- 
bers, which were sandwiched in between 




the State of Texas and is owned ex- 
clusively by them. 

The dedication ceremonies was partic- 
ipated in by representatives from the 
General Office. State Council of Carpen- 
ters, State Federation of Labor, Local 
Central Body and several Locals. After 



the speaking. Altogether it proved an 
enjoyable affair and one that will be long 
remembered by those who attended. 
The Local at present has a membership. 
of 1.500 ■:-..:.''. tl-07 o.r-.- to be C':i:;'v.:v:'.:.o 
ed on the success of their endeavors ^ror- 



Carpenters Celebrate Anniversary 

An occasion of more than ordinary 
interest to the local carpenters was the 
celebration of the 20th anniversary of 
the organization of L. TJ. No. 9S9, Car- 
penters and Joiners of America at New- 
buryport. Mass. 

There were present out of the original 
41 members 12 who have retained their 
membership continuously, as follows: 
T. P. B. Houghton. John AIcLoud, G. W. 
Henderson. W. H. Warner, L. Gallant, 
G. A. Fort. N. A. Hewitt. R H. Brad- 
shaw. H. J. Gray. 0. W. Page, William 
Brewitt, John W. Pray. 

There was an address of welcome by 
President Hall J. Leigh, and a short his- 
tory of the organization by Secretary 
Frank S. Heath, the union being organ- 
ized February 10, 1902, by W. J. 
Shields. 



After listening to these interesting 
facts concerning the organization and 
adjournment was made to Carpenters' 
Hall, where a genuine Newburyj 
clam chowder was served by the chair- 
man of the committee. George Hende 
son, with other good things. Cigars w€ 
then lighted and the members and gues 
concluded a most interesting evening. 



Deflating the Labor Unions 

What seems to be a fact is that the 
is a drive against labor in respect b 
wages and the labor unions, and to it 
may be attributed the present state ol 
unemployment. The condition did nof 
come on: it was brought on. When the 
war fever was raging, a tide of higl 
prices set in and labor complained thai 
wages were inadequate to meet it. In- 
creases were hesitatingly, not to saj 



THE CARPENTER 



43 



grudgingly, given. Those increases 
scarcely kept pace with the huge profits 
that were being piled up by the great 
employers. Those profits were realized 
not on paper but in money. The Reserve 
Bank here piled up nearly $100,000,000 
on rediscounts to member banks without 
risk, because the security therefor was 
mre. Rediscounting was an aid to the 
•■•irnival of speculation that raised prices 
|:o dizzy heights. Labor demanded its 
ihare and got some of it in increased 
•ay. It could not have existed other- 
| vise. 

Suddenly there arose a demand for a 
eduction of wages, but the profits 
>f speculation had been successfully 
lathered. The demand was followed by 
closing down of mills and factories, 
'he result is a vast army of jobless men 
nd women. The main feature of the 
rogram of so-called deflation is the de- 
igned destruction of labor unions and 
le inauguration of the open shop. 
| The drive against labor was planned, 
he result is general disaster to all ex- 
l^pt those whose profits have been in- 
vested in things that cannot fail to pro- 
jace certain income. The big operators 
,iving got their gains into impregnable 
'aape started their war against labor 
id the end is not in sight. Frantic 
(forts are now being made to stem the 
tie of trouble that was set in motion 
|ith malice aforethought to make labor 
|'W in submission to intrenched money 
wer. It remains to be seen whether 
e whirlwind that usually follows the 
ising of the wind can be averted. — 
in New York World. 



Foreign Labor Notes 

The street car employes of Monte- 
jleo, Uruguay, have gone on strike for 
■ increase in wages. A limited num- 
|p of cars are being moved under the 
iard of armed soldiers. 

* * * 

iThe November cut of SO cents per day 
miners' wages in Scotland is the 
iviest ever made at one sweep in the 
tory of the industry. 

* * * 

}ne week of manual and agricultural 
I or is in future to be included in the 
J'.r's work of every Bulgarian school 

f boys and girls. 

— * 

?he back of a Thrift Stamp or a War 
S'ings Stamp is the best sticky paper 
f money that flies. 



ItlJetdel 
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CHAPTER VII 

How To Frame a Gambrel Roof 

(Reprint From A Practical Course In Roof Framing, 

Published By F. J. Drake & Co. i 

i Ev R. M. Van Gaasbeek. I 



A gambrel roof is a roof the slope or 
pitch of which is broken, that is. instead 
of the gable end having one continuous 
slope or pitch, it is composed of two 
slopes or pitches, the lower half of the 
roof having the greater pitch, see Fig. 2. 
The method of framing the rafter- is 
similar to that of any other equal pitch 
roof. The walls of the building form 
the lower plate upon which the sleeper 
rafters rest, a second plate being sta- 
tioned at the proper height to receive 
the upper rafters, being securely tied 
across the building to keep it from 
spreading under the weight. The upper 
and lower rafters are framed indepen- 
dently, the upper rafters to the lower 
pitch and the lower rafters to the steep- 
er pitch, the effect being of one roof 
placed upon another. The proper pro- 
portions to use in laying out a gambrel 
roof is a matter depending upon indi- 
vidual judgment and the needs and de- 
sires of the owner and architect. Some 
builders give the upper rafters a very 
flat pitch while others a very steep pitch. 
In this problem the knuckle joint is 
placed half way between the facia line 
and the ridge, thus making both sets of 
rafters the same length. 

— Specifications — 
Lower plate. % in. by 2*2 in. 
Epper plate, % in. by % in. 
Valley rafters. % in. by 114 in- 
Common and jack rafters. % in. by 

% m- 

Ridge, % in. by 1% in. 

Projection, 1% in. 

Facia, % in. 

Plancher level to plate level, lower 

rafters, 2^4 in. 

Pitch, (see development. Fig. 2). 
Dimensions, (see plan. Fig. 1). 
Rafters, spaced 2 in. on centers. 



Layout. — A full size working layout 
of the plan, Fig. 1, should be drawn on 
a board or sheet of detail paper. The 
layout will represent a scale of 1 in. to 
the ft. In applying the various measure- 
ment full size, substitute the word ••feet" 
for "inches*" in listing the runs and 
lengths of the rafters. Number each 
rafter and ridge as shown on the plan. 
Put the corresponding numbers on the 
rafters as they are laid out so as to in- 
sure their ready identification and proper 
location during the erection of the roof. 

It will also be necessary to develop 
an end view of the gable as shown in 
Fig. 2 so as to determine the pitch or 
slope of the upper and lower rafters and 
also the heights of the plate levels. A 
graphic method for laying out the slope 
of the rafters is shown in Fig. 3. The 
lower rafters form an angle of 60 de- 
grees with the plate level and the upper 
rafters 30 degrees with the plate level. 
making both sets of rafters the same 
length. Lay in a center and base line at 
right angles to each other of indefinite 
length. Bisect the angle as follows: 
with E as a center and any convenient 
radius scribe an arc. cutting the base 
line as at 1. With E as a center and the 
same radius scribe an arc, cutting the 
center line as at 2. With 1 and 2 as 
centers and the same radius scribe the 
arc as at 3. From E through arc 3 draw 
a line of indefinite length as shown by 
the dotted line, bisecting the right angle. 

Measure off on the base line from the 
center line E. a distance equal to the 
total run of the common rafters from 
the center of the ridge to the facia line, 
this being one-half the span of the build- 
ing plus 1 projection (11 y 2 in.) as at A. 
Fig. 3. From the point A draw in the 
top edge of the lower rafters at an angle 
of 60 degrees. The sides of an equilat- 
eral triangle, the three sides being equal 
form angles of 60 degrees. To form the 



THE CARPENTER 



45 



side of the triangle from the point A, 
use A as a center and with any conveni- 
ent radius scribe an arc, cutting the base 
line as at 4. With 4 as a center and the 
same radius scribe part of a circle. With 



until it intersects the center line as at 
Y. This gives the slope of the lower 
rafters at an angle of 60 degrees. 

The slope of the rafters can also be 
laid out with the steel square by using 




1 — Plan of gambrel roof from which the working laying out is made. 



i. as a center and the same radius arc 16% in. on the blade and 9% in. on the 
he circle as at 5. From the point A on tongue, adjusting the square so that 
he base line draw a line through arc 5 these figures lie accurately on the base 



46 



THF CARPENTER 



line, mark on the blade for the slope of 
the lower rafters. Measure off on the 
center line from the base line at S, a 
distance equal to the total height of the 

roof (11^2 in.) From the point T draw 
in the top edge of the upper rafters at an 



arc 6 draw a line intersecting the center 
line, which should meet exactly at the 
point T. The slope of the rafters can 
also be laid out with the steel square by 
drawing a level line through the point 
Y and using 16% in. on the blade and 




Angle 45 ~$ \\^ j 
->i 



FIG.2 



2 — End view, showing method of developing profiles of the common rafters 
the pitch, projection and plancher levels known, the plate 
levels can be determined. 



With 



angle of 30 degrees. A simple way to 
determine this pitch is to lay in another 
equilateral triangle. A quarter circle 
containing 90 degrees., the triangle 60 
degrees deducted from the 90 degrees 
will leave an angle of 30 degrees. From 
the point T draw a plumb line as at X. 
With Y as a center and any convenient 
radius scribe part of a circle. With X as 
a center and the same radius arc the 
circle as at 6. From the point Y through 



9% in. on the tongue, adjusting the 
square so that these figures lie accurate- 
ly on the level line, mark on the tongue 
for the slope of the upper rafters at an 
angle of 30 degrees with the jjlate level. 
With the top edge or outside lines of 
the roof determined, lay in a profile of 
both lower and upper rafters as shown 
in Fig. 2, according to the dimensions 
given in the specifications, so that the 
plate levels can be determined. In this 




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4S 



THE CARPENTER 



problem the knuckle joint is midway be- 
tween the facia line and the ridge, the 
edge of the upper plate forming the joint, 
making both sets of rafters the same 
length, locating the upper plate 5% in. 
above the lower plate and the main plate 
level 2 % in. above the plancher level. 

To Lay Out Lower Common Rafters. 
— Before setting the square, the rise in 
inches per foot must be determined, the 




ez&sz** Figure 3 
3 — Graphic method for laying out the 
pitch of the common rafters at 30 and 
60 degree angles 

run 12 in., a constant unit remains un- 
changed. The run of rafter No. 5, meas- 
ured on the layout, Fig. 1, measuring 
from the upper plate line to the facia is 
4% in. (See development, Fig. 2.) The 
total height from the top of the facia line 
R to the top of the upper plate level, 
Fig. 2. Y is 7%in. Thus with the total 
rise 7% in. and the total run 4% in., 
find the rise in inches per foot. 

Rise 12 
x — equals rise in inches per foot. 

Run 1 
7% 12 



4y± 



x — equals 20% in. rise in inches 

1 per foot. 

Solution : 
12 

7Y4 



3 

84 

87 
S7 divided by 17-4 equals S7 times 
4-17 equals 20%. 



87 
4 
17)348(20 y 2 
34 



Set the fence and square at 20 y 2 in. 
rise on the blade and 12 in. run on the 
tongue. Mark on the blade for all plumb 




^M^L_^ 



isaEDE&e- Fl Qf. 4 






End View 

4 — Developed length of lower com- 
mon rafter No. 5. 

cuts and on the tongue for all level cuts. 
Press the fence firmly against the top 
edge of the stock to be used for the 
common rafter and produce the facia 
line or the first plumb line to the ex- 
treme left, A, Fig. 4. Slide the square 
to the right, and measure on a level line 
from the facia line the run of the rafter 
4% in. and produce the plumb cut 
against the upper plate, giving the ex- 
treme length of the lower common raf- 
ters. 

No deduction is to be made from this 
length, but the end of the rafters should 
be notched out to receive the upper plate, 
forming a strong and rigid brace. Meas- 
ure down on plumb line from the top 



THE CARP E.N T E R 



49 



edge of the rafter, the thickness of the 
upper plate % in. and produce a level 
line on which the bottom of the plate 
will rest, as at S, Fig. 4. Measure in 
from facia line A, iy 2 in. the. width of 
the projection and produce wall line B. 
Measure down on the facia line from the 
top edge of the rafter, % in., the width 
of the facia and produce plancher level 
F. Measure up from plancher level F, 
on a plumb line, 2% in., locating plate 
level G. Cut on line A, for the facia, 
on line F, for the plancher level, on 
lines G and B, for the birdsmouth and 
on plumb line X and level line S for the 
notch against the upper plate. 

To Lay Out Jack Rafters. — The length 
of jack rafters Nos. 6, 7 and 8 are de- 
termined in the same manner as the 
preceding common rafter No. 5, as they 




&&&&*& 



End View 

5 — Developed length of lower jack" 
rafters Nos. 6, 7 and 8. 
are a part of the length. Take the runs 
from the layout, Fig. 1, measuring from 
the center of the valley to the upper 
plate or inner wall line. The three raf- 
ters are shown developed on the side of 
a single rafter, Fig. 5. In practice these 
would be laid out separately and are laid 



"FULL LENGTH ROOF FRAMER" 

Is a hook to save the time and brains of the experts 
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If your roof It pitched It Is In this book, no matter 
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with lengths and bevels of Hips. Valleys, Jacks and 
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Htre Is a roof at randum. Main roof 37 ft. 5 1-4 
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A wing to extend from center of each side of main 
building. One wing 17 ft. 9 3-4 in. wide, 12 ft. 6 
in. out with Hip roof. Other wing 21 ft. 11 1-2 in. 
wide, 15 ft. 7 In. out with Gable roof. Pitch of 
roofs 13 1-2 and 12. 28 in. centers. 

Keep this example and send for a book. If you do 
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HILL 
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50 



THE CARPENTER 



out over one another only to save space 
and to avoid repetition. Press the fence 
firmly against the top edge of the rafter 
using teh same figures on the square as 
before and produce the facia line or the 
first plumb line to the extreme left, A, 
Fig. 5. Slide the square to the right and 
measure on a level line from the facia 
line, the run of rafter No. 6, 4% in., the 
run of rafter No. 1,2% in-, and the run 
of rafter No. 8, % in., and produce the 
plumb cut against the upper plate, giv- 
ing the extreme length of the lower jack 
rafters. 

No deductions are to be made from 
these lengths, but the end of the rafters 
should be notched out to receive the 
upper plate, forming a strong and rigid 
brace. Measure down on plumb line Y, 
from the top edge of the rafter, the 
thickness of the upper plate % in., and 
produce a level line on which the bottom 
of the plate will rest as at S, Fig. 5. The 
lower ends of the rafters are beveled to 
make a fit against the side of the valley 
rafter. From the extreme length ob- 
tained with the fence and square, which 
is to the center line of the valley, must 
be deducted one-half the thickness of 
the valley measured on the line of the 
jack rafters, or one-half the diagonal 
thickness of the valley which is % in. 
full. Measure back on a level line from 
C, Fig. 5, on the side of the rafter, this 
diagonal thickness, % in. full and pro- 
duce another plumb line as at D. Square 
this line across the top edge of the rafter 
and locate the center. To lay out the 
top cuts so that the jack rafters will fit 
against the side of the valley rafter at 
the proper angle, measure forward on a 
level line from plumb line D, a distance 
equal to one-half the thickness of the 
stock used for the jack rafters or 3-16 
in., (the thickness of stock specified be- 
ing % in.) and produce plumb line 1. 

Connect plumb line 1 through plumb 
line D on the center line as shown at 2, 
top view, Fig. 5. This top cut can also 
be laid out with the steel square by using 
the length 23% in. (bridge measure of 
the run, 12 in. and the rise 20% in.) 
on the blade and the run, 12 in. on the 
tongue. Mark on the blade for the top 
cut. Rafter 7 rests on the lower plate 
which must be cut for the birdsmouth 
similar to the common rafters. This can 
readily be laid out by using a common 
rafter for a pattern or laying out as be- 
fore. Measure in from facia line A, 1% 
in., the width of the projection and pro- 



duce wall line B. Measure down on 
facia line A, from the top edge of the 
rafter, % in., the width of the facia, and 
produce plancher level F. Measure up 
from the plancher level, on a plumb line, 
2% in., locating plate level G. 

Rafter No. 6 cut on plumb line 1, on 
bevel 2, for the cheek and side cut 
against the valley and on line F for the 
plancher level. Rafter No. 7 cut on 
plumb line 1, on bevel 2, for the cheek 
and side cut against the valley and on 
line G for the plate level. Rafter No. 8, 
cut on plumb line 1, on bevel 2, for the 
cheek and side cut against the valley 
and on all thre rafters Nos. 6, 7 and 8, 
cut on the plumb line Y and level line S 
for the notch against the upper plate. 
Out one pair of jacks No. 6 and two 
pair of each No. 7 and 8. 

(To Be Continued) 

© 



Answers To W. R. Dickson's Problem 

Replying to W. R. Dickson in the Feb- 
ruary issue of "The Carpenter." The 
"why" in his rectangle of 5 ft. by 13 in. 



K - - - 3" H 

a\ 



encloses a space of 1 sq. in. Thus the 
square 8x8 in. is divided according and 
arranged according to Fig. 2, which 




looks good, but there is a hiatus of % 
in. between junction at the 3 in. line 
and the opposite triangle, leaving a nice 
little problem for Brother Dickson to 
find the metes and bounds of the vacant 
space. 



THE CARPENTER 



51 



Now, if someone will give ocular proof 
that one-half over of thirteen is eight, 
and a few more old timers it may help 
to relieve the tension for the lads who 
are learning a trade by the home fire- 
side, and cause grandpa to hum "Make 
Me A Child Again Just For Tonight." 
Yours fraternally, 

A. C. MINOR. 



Dear Sir — Replying to Brother W. R. 
Dickson's query in the February issue 




of "The Carpenter" Brother Dickson is 
slightly mistaken. There is no differ- 
ence any more than transferring $64 
from one pocket to another makes it $65. 




There only appears to be a difference. 
If you will note carefully in Fig. 1, 
', angles A and A are not equal to angles 
B and B, consequently, when Fig. 1 is 
re-arranged as shown in Fig. 2, lines A 
A. are not straight and between these two 
lines is the extra square inch. 

Yours very truly, 
L. U. No. 1029. E. W. STILLEY. 



Backing Hips and Channeling Valleys 

This subject is like the "harp of a 
thousand strings" because there are so 
many methods for doing it, from not 
doing it at all to doing it simply right. 

We have known a great number of 
ways or methods for backing hips, that 
p. we have known them for about five 



minutes, very recently a friend sent me 
a new method for backing a hip, but as 
we have only studied it a month we 
cannot pass on it as yet, you see, some 
of these twelve cylinder fellows hand 
you something to solve with a "Tin 
Lizzie" think tank that only gets you 
there and brings you back. 

To find an honest to goodness method 
for backings has given us more trouble 
than anything in roof framing, some- 

'HILL.METHOD* 



C£« TEfi 




thing that would be absolutely right 
through a simple application of the 
steel square. 

Ordinarily, on common light construc- 
tion it is not used, but on heavy hips 
and double valleys it is highly necessary 
and specified, then you need to know 
how to be "Johnny on the spot." 

"Well, here you are: This applies to 
regular (equal) pitches only. 

First, cut the side bevel to fit against 
the ridge.. Then apply the square as 
shown, flat against the beveled surface 
and square over as at C, then the dis- 
tance from C to A would be the gauge 
depth for doubled valley, any thickness. 

For hips. Find center on top edge 
of hip as at B, then with square in same 
position as shown slide it up to B, square 
over to edge and that is the gauge depth 
for each side for hip. 

This applies to any pitch, each sep- 
arate pitch having a different depth 
gauge. 

For irregular pitches we get the back- 
ings at the foot cuts in an equal simple 
way, but that's another story. 
Fraternally, 

ROWLAND HILL. 
L. U. No. 29. Cincinnati, O. 



Will Some Brother Oblige? 

Will some brother kindly explain the 
correct making of a flour bin, one that 
will show a straight front from the top 
of bin to the floor, without hinges? 

Fraternally yours, O. J. E. 

L. U. No. 55, Denver, Colo. 



52 



THE CARPENTER 



Information Wanted 

Will some brother explain how to con- 
struct the face mould for the wreath 
over the winders? 



to straighten from end to end. and if end 
sills are used, do the same with one end, 
when it is an easy matter to range the 
other side and end ; and if not the same 




Fraternally yours, 

WM. A. WOHLKEN. 



L. U. No. 52. 



Charleston, S. O. 



Another Contribution 

Have just been reading Brother Ma- 
ginnis's instructions on building a baloon 
frame, and want to add my mite on this 
matter. 

Referring to the box sill, I have often 
used a 2x6 for a wall plate, spiked to the 
under side of the same material as the 
floor joists, and nail through this into 
ends of joists, spacing on outside for 
joists before nailing together saves time. 

I want to give my method of leveling 
a building, which I like and think is a 
time saver. 

Sharpen a piece of 2x4 so that it will 
drive a few inches into the ground; cut 
to a length about equal to the height of 
the sill when driven into the ground ; 
step back from the building a convenient 
distance (according to length of same) 
and about midway of side; drive your 
stake, then lay your level on top and 
parallel with sill, tip the stake to one 
side or the other until level is true, step 
back so that in sighting across ends of 
level the eye will catch both ends of the 
sill, and when true it is an easy matter 



process will get the other side. 

If square sills are used I like to set 
the joists in the thickness of an inch 
board the same width as the joists 
(spaced on outside for joists) nail 
through this into joists, then fasten to 
sill ; this does away with staylath to hold 
joists and give a support to ends of sub 
floor, for of course this is laid on the 
diagonal and should be supported. 

In this city the ordinance requires a 
fire stop every story and sometimes half 
way up, so we frame each story inde- 
pendent of the other, no matter how 
many. 

If studding are long enough for two 
lengths, make a frame to butt square 
ends against, one at proper length for 
stud, also at second length, put in sev- 
eral studs and wedge or clamp so they 
will not move saw ends first the center; 
cut same length for side walls and parti- 
tions. 

For corner posts use three studs, let- 
ting the center one project half its width 
inside the others, thus leaving the corner 
ready for lathing from either way. 

Now lay studs for shoe and plates for 
both sides lengthwise in center of floor 
and space all for studs at the same time, 
then lay shoe to the outside, lay studs 



THE CARPENTER 



53 



on the floor and put a couple of 16(1 nails 
through both sides and plate into studs, 
leaving out for opening frame all open- 
ings while on floor, and when completed 
raise all or a part of side, as convenient, 
nail both ends, line up and nail to floor; 
proceed with both sides, ends and par- 
titions, plum up and there you are. 

I prefer to run up the sheathing now, 
as one can arrange to have a stageing 
come where it will be handy for putting 
on top plates, spacing for and nailing 
joists, cutting in headers between same 
if more than one story, and if only one 
story it is much more convenient to nail 
joists and rafters from a stageing than 
to crall over timbers like some do ; then 
the rafters are not in the w T ay of board- 
ing up the outside. 

The same process may be followed for 
as many stories high as one may want 
to go. 

Most residences in this locality ai*e of 
the bungalow style, so of course are open 
cornice, which may be made just as tight 
as a box cornice. 

A saving of time can be made by ap- 
plying primeing coat of paint to ends 
of rafters, finish side of ceiling or floor- 
ing used for projection before putting up. 

I have purposely left out many things 
like lapping top plate of partitions over 
side walls, etc., to tie building together, 
for your space is to valuable, and the 
average workman would feel that it was 
a slap at his intelligence, besides Brother 
Maginnis has covered all of little details. 
Very truly, 

S. C. DOUGLASS. 

4555 W. Othello St. 
Member L. U. No. 131. 



Figure It Out 

How many apples did Adam and Eve 
eat? 

Some say Eve eight and Adam two — 
a total of ten only. 

Now we figure the thing out far dif- 
ferently : Eve eight and Adam eight 
also — total 16. 

We think the above figures are en- 
tirely wrong. 

If Eve eight and Adam 82, certainly 
the total will be 90. 

Scientific men, however, on the 
strength of the theory that the ante- 
diluvians were giants, reason something 
like this: Eve 81 and Adam 82 — total 
163. 

Wrong again. What could be clearer 



than if Eve 81 and Adam 812 the total 
was 892? 

I believe the following to be the true 
solution: Eve 814, Adam and Adam 
8,124 Eve — 8,938. 

Still another calculation is as follows: 
If Eve 814 Adam, Adam 81,242 oblige 
Eve, 82,056. — Exchange. 



Bryan Says Unions Will Be Recognized 

Whatever may be thought of William 
J. Bryan's political stunts, it cannot be 
gainsaid that the illustrious Nebraskan 
is not a prophet. His theories advanced 
25 years ago on prohibition, equal rights 
for women, income tax, became realities, 
although at the time Bryan suggested 
these reforms he was branded as wild- 
eyed and hair-brained. Time proved 
Bryan's foresight was better than most 
people's hindsight. 

Therefore, the world at large will give 
serious thought and reflection to Bryan's 
latest predictions, that national and state 
laws will be enacted to vindicate labor's 
right to organize, to bargain collectively 
and to persuade wage earners to join 
organizations. These rights will be se- 
cured, Bryan promises, and the public 
will approve. 

Imagine the picture of horror by Big 
Business when it sees Organized Labor 
gaining its rights through popular will. 
Bryan does not say these reforms will be 
won over night. Oh, no, it means years 
of persistent effort, and concentrated 
political effort by labor, in which United 
States Senators and Congressmen will be 
made to respect the ambition of "a" ma- 
jority. As it is, Senators and Congress- 
men pay little or no attention to labor's 
demands unless the political district is 
close and one vote may decide an elec- 
tion. — Ex. 



The Majesty of Labor 

I hate your superstition, workingmen, 

I loathe your blindness and stupidity, 

Your pointed quips have never made 'me laugn ; 

Your senseless chat is wearisome to me ; 

Your shallow joy is not the joy I like ; 

But when I contemplate your ceaseless toil, 

Your quiet activity and sunless life. 

Your works of splendor, and gigantic strength, 

I bow my head in reverence to you. 

The cliffs are mighty in the wilderness : 

The woods are terrible when shook by storm/; 

The streams are awful in their hasty course; 

But cliffs and woods, and streams all disappear 

When touched by your unconquerable hands. 

Were you as wise as you are powerful. 

You would be happy, great and reverend. 

— Selected. 
« 

The Union Label can be made a great 
educational force if we constantly ad- 
vocate it. 



Hsi>00 Nile Cord Tires 



Brand new, absolutely first cord tires. Guaranteed 8,000 
miles and adjusted at the list price on that guarantee. The 
prices below include a brand new United States Tube. 

30x3 $9.50 32x4 $16.10 8s0i $22.15 

30x3-2 11.2-5 33x4 17.00 34x4^ 23.20 

32x3 ; ; 13.50 34x4 1S.60 35x43S 24.05 

31x4 14.10 32x4 1 -2 21.10 33x5 25.25 

Send no money. Just write today and tell us the size of your tires 
and the number you want. Tires will be shipped C. O. D. with section 
unwrapped for inspection. All tires have non-skid tread. 
CHARLES TIRE CORP. Dept 6">1 2824 Wabash Avenue, Chicago 




ibrd&rc^ 



Join this great Auto Club and win Grand Prizes including Ford 
Sedan, complete with electric starrer and sliding plate glass 
windows. Tie i deal car for all-year use. 

Can von make cut the two words swelled bv the numbers in 
the picture? Tie alphabet is numbered, A is 1. B is 2. etc. What 
are the two words? 10, "01 Setsn votes given for your answer. 
Many other valuable prizes and hundreds of cellars in cash 
given. Everybody wins! So easy you will be surprised. 



iven Mm 

A LUXURIOUS SEDAN, IDEAL ALL-YEAR CAR + 



We 



Send Your Answer Today. 

body gets this new Sedan free — freight an 

you! Send answer today, andyoucansharein theprizea. 

F0RB W1LLS0N, M?r. 141 W. Ohio St. Dept, 2736 . Chiciso, III 



given a- 
= . Some- 
It can be 




rewrtiy im A.ta 



UE PRINT READING 
Our new Special Taught from actual blue prints. Easy 
Courses for Machinists, loam nr> matllpmaHM T.n-ro nHcoi: Pa 




Courses Tor B 
Pa:terr-- makers. Iron -work- 
ers. Elaoksmirhs, aud Building 
Tradesmen, qualify them by mail to 
read blueprints and" become gang-fore- 
men. 



learn — no mathematics, Low prices. Pa 
as-you-learn Plan. Write for booklet a: 
free sample blue print. Dept. F-320. 1 
dustrial Correspondence University. In 
1504 Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



3 & 5=PLY 


VENEERED PANELS 


AU woods — All thicknesses. For doors, cab- 
inetwork ami wainscoating. Send stamp 
for sTocklist and prices. 

DUNN PLYWOOD CO. 
Oxford BIdg., Chicago, 111. 



MAKE YOUR OWN 
PHONOGRAPH CABINET 



The Carpenters & Cabinet Makers Supply Co. 

1 1 8 N. LaSalle St., Chicago, III. 



Standard Underwoods 

S 'Year Guarantee 

k Yes, this genuine Standard ViaibleWrffc- 
'.ingUnder- 
Iwood newly 8^ 
Irebnilt, at 
Im ach less 
Cthan factory ' 
rpri ce, yonra 
'for S-3.09 down 
, n d then easy 
"monthly payments. 
10 Days FREE Trial 

Try it for 10 days at our risk. 
ISoney back guarantee. Send now tor ^^«Sw era 

free book. Big bargain c£er. ^^ Keyboard 

TYP EW R TT E R EMPO RfUM 1404 Shipman Building 
SHIPMAN-WARD MFC. CO. Chicago, Illinois 





THE WOOD WORKER'S FRIEND 



piLES 

derful 



DON'T BE CUT 

Until You Try This Won- 
Treatment. My internal 
method of treatment is the correct one, 
and is sanctioned by the best informed 
physicians and surgeons. Ointments. 
salves and other local applications give 
only temporary relief. 

If you have piles in any form write for a 
FREE sample of Page's Pile Tablets and you 
will bless the day that yon read this. Write 
today. 
E.R.PAGE,322B Page BIdg., Marshall, rVIich. 




W;:d5:::i is.L lumber :s high With Mir Jointer 
He; is yon can buy rough lumber of any kind and 
i:e = ; it :: suit the ::'-. = ;"-= time, — aney and 
lumber. Would this be any object to you? If so. 
get our circular prices. Sold on 30 day trial. 
Whisler Mfg. Co. Gibson, Iowa 




We furnish mechin- 

'>----'— gi r'ue print*, 
t. Write today. 



Associated Phonograph Company 

Department 9 Cincinnati, Ohio 




Lay 

isbestos Shingles 
ght over the old 
shingles 

Saves money. 

Saves time. 

Saves labor. 

No muss or dirt. 

Old shingles are val- 
j uable as additional 
insulation and protec- 
tion. 

i Asbestos Shingles are 
fire-proof. 

I They make a roof of 
artistic beauty. 

! They last as long as 
the house. 

This booklet will bring 
i re-roofing business for 
: u. Send it to your pros- 
pts. 



:qsf&t 



mi 



Spring brings 

re-roofing prospects 



THERE is a clean, prof- 
itable Spring busi- 
ness in laying Johns- 
Manville Asbestos Shing- 
les right over old roofs- 

Johns-Manville Asbes- 
tos Shingles appeal to the 
owner because they are 
beautiful, permanent and 
fire- safe. He likes the 
idea of laying them over 
the old roof because it's 
cleaner and cheaper than 
tearing off the old shing- 
les. 

It's an easier job for 
for you, too. No ripping 
off warped shingles and 
rusty nails that fall on 



the lawn and make the 
owner kick. Just a 
straight nail- on job that 
brings you to the ridge in 
record time. 

And when you're done, 
the job is a credit to you. 
There isn't a better look- 
ing or more permanent 
roof than Johns-Manville 
Asbestos Shingles. It 
pleases the owner and 
lays the groundwork for 
future business. 

Ask your nearest Johns- 
Manville Branch to show 
you more about the sales 
possibilities of Asbestos 
Shingles for "re-roofing." 



l>rouj>h- 



JOHNS-MANVILLE Inc., Madison Ave., at 41st St. 

New York City 

Branches in 59 Large Cities 

For Canada : CANADIAN JOHNS-MANVILLE CO., Ltd., Toronto 



^hJTjohns -Manville 

Asbestos Shingles 



] 



brake un1ngs 
, roofings 
\ packings 

\ CEMENTS 

V 



PREVENTION 



-£ 



Protect 



DME 




Brand New Goods. 
Absolute satisfaction 
, guaranteed after ex- 
amination or money back. 



Keep one of 
these safety 
brand new 
automatics in 
your home 
and be fully 
protected a- 
gainst burglars, 
thieTes and hold 
up men. It's a ter- 
rible fright to wake up in the night— hear noises down 
stairs or in the next room— and realize your neglect has 
left you wholly UNPROTECTED. 

Buy one of these automatics and be always fully pro- 
tected. Handsome blue steel, gun-metal finish. HAS 
DOUBLE SAFETY and is practically "fool-proof." Ac- 
curate aim, rifled barrel, hard rubber comfortable check- 
' ercd grips, safety lever, 7 cartridges. Small, lies flat la 
pocket. 

SEND HO MONEY 

Order today. Just send your name and address and 

lay which automatic you want.. 

No. FD-no is 25-caL 7-shot, as illustrated. $Q.75 

Big Bargain. Our Price Z7 

No. FD-120 is larger size, 32-cal., military ni in Qp, 



phot, extra magazine 



$ I2- 



n> nr' pi. automatic, 

FREE. Big Value 

No. FD-125 30-cal. geuine Luger. 

Don't be misled by a gun that 1 o o a. s 

like a Luger. V> e sell tbis world lamed gurv.so • \:ieu- 

lously low because we buy in quantities. Sh(/ ts 9 ehots. 

Latest model. Has automatic magazine $f»Q 50 

ejector and safety attachment, only _SO 

Order today. Write clearly name, address. ^,id number 
of automatic you want. Send no cash. Wo uiip by re- 
turn mail. Pay Postman on arrival ou" price, plus 
postage. Send for free catalne. 

PARAMOUNT TRADW3 CO. 
34 West 23th Street, New York City 

Why Many Men 
are Old at 40 

Perhaps the most common 
cause is the disturbed condition 
of an important gland. Even 
men of iron constitution are not 
exempt from this amazingly com- 
mon irregularity. We have for limited distribution, an 
ethically accurate, educational and interesting 

FREE BOOK 

Its message may prove of unsuspected value to you. 
It explains how a disturbed condition of this vital 
gland may cause sciatica, backache, painful and 
tender feet, interrupted sleep and other extremely 
uncomfortable and often serious conditions. It tells 
of Thermalaid, a simple means by which the essential 
of a new hygienic principle, done into convenient form 
corrects this prostate gland condition and its attend- 
ant health faults without medicine, massage, or knife. 
The records of its success for five years is incontrover- 
tible. The book is free. Simply address 

THE ELECTRO THERMAL COMPANY 

2806 Main St. Steubenville, Ohio 



2 



3f| Bays' Free Trial 
^ffcaVT Select from 44 Styles, colors 
and sizes, famous Ranger bicycles. 
Delivered free on approval, express prepaid, at 
Factory Prices. You can easily Save $10 to §26. 
if desired. Parents 
often advance first 
n small payments. 

£*<)a** Wheels, lamps, horns, equipmentat 
IItcS half usual prices. Send No Money. 
Write for cur marvelous prices and terms. 

Cycle Company £;•»& 

Sep^L121 Chicago free catalog 



W™ 1 ^ Get Your 

rree 

$1.00 PACKAGE OF GENUINE 
YEAST VITAMINE TABLETS from 

your druggist today. 
If you are thin and emaciated and 
wish something to help you put on 
flesh and increase your weight, 
Yeast Vitamine Tablets should be used in 
connection with organic Nuxated Iron. With- 
outorganic iron, both food and Vitaminesare 
absolutely useless.as your body cannot cliange 
inert, lifeless food into living cells and tissue 
unless you have plenty of organic iron in your 
blood. Organic iron takes up oxygen from your 
lungs. This oxygenated organic iron unites 
with your digested food as itisabsorbed into 
your blood just as Are unites with coal or. 
wood, and by so doing it creates tremendous 
power and energy. Without organic iron in 
your blood your food merely passes thru your 
body without doing you any good. 

^Arrangements have been made with' the 
druggists of this city to give every reader of 
this paper a large $1.00 package of Genuine 
Yeast Vitamine Tablets absolutely free with 
every purchase of a bottle of Nuxated Iron. 



NUXATED IRON 



I For Red BIooAStrgngth and Endurance] 




Carpenters, Bricklayers, Contractors, Builders ani 
others — Can you read Blue Prints? If not, lear* 
how. It will help you hold your job — it will 
you a better job — it will increase your earning 
paclty. Special Courses for each trade. Write, 1 
once, for Free blue print and Catalog B, Stating trad 

ARCHITECTURAL, MECHANICAL, SHEET META 
AND STRUCTURAL DRAFTING 

quickly taught at home, in your spare time, on tbj 
"Pay As You Study Plan." Requires no previoilj 
education or training. Books and tools fumishej 
Free. Write today for Catalog G. It means more paj 
ESTIMATING— STEEL SQUARE 
Practical Courses making the various details simp) 
and clear. It will give you the training that will tak 
you out of overalls and put you into a boss' job. D 
not miss this opportunity. Write now for Catalog. 1 

COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL EST. 1901 

_____ Dept. I0A. Orexel Bldg., Phila., Pa. ___ 



Don't Wear a Tru* 

BROOKS" appliance, • 
■° modern, scientific Imr 
tion, the wonderful new 
covery that cures rupture 1 
be sent on trial. No obn ■ 
ous springs or pads, 
automatic Air Cushio 
Binds and draws the br(P 
parts together as you w ' 
a broken limb. No sal ■ 
No lies. Durable, ch ■ 
Sent on trial to prove • 
Catalog and measure bW 
mailed free. Send name 1 
address today. Never on « 
in stores. Don't be foolec' 
imitations. Look for ti e 
mark signature of C. • 
Brooks and his picture ' 
every appliance. None o » 
C. E. BROOKS, Inventor genuine. 

Brooks Appliance Co., 252 F State St., Marshall, m 




___. 





Now *22§i 
Price Slashed 

Send the coupon with only $1.00 and we'll ship this 
entire 6-piece fumed solid oak library set to your home 
on tria 1 . We've smashed the price ! A few months ago 
we had to charge $35.90 for this very same set. But now, 
because the factory needed money and we had the cash, 
we are able to cut the price way down to $22.85! And 

on easy monthly payments of only $2.50 a month! 

1| Only $1.00 brings the entire set on approval— 

% we take the risk. 

3© Days Trial! 

When you get this magnificent 6-piece library 
set, put it in your living room or library and 
use it freely for 30 days. Don't pay another 
penny. Examine it thoroughly. Note the 
ssive solid construction— the beautiful finish— the fine upholstery and graceful lines, 
mpare it with anything you can buy locally at anywhere near the same price — even for 
ot cash. Then, if not satisfied, return the set at our expense and we will refund your 

00 at once, plus any freight charges you paid. 

Inly $2.50 a Month |§I1 

re paid $22.85 — payments so low and so convenient that you will scarcely feci them. A 

1 year to pay— at the rate of only a fe^v c:nts a day— less than one fritters away every 
F for trifles. We trust honest people anywhere in the United States. One price to all, 
in or credit. No discount for cash. Notonopenny extra for credit. No C.O.D. in 



®t— Fumed Solid Oak 



Set is made of selected solid oak throughout, finished 
in rich, dull waxed, brown fumed oak. All tho four 
chairs are padded; upholstered with brown Delavan 
Spanish leather, the best imitation ox genuine Spanish 
leather known. The upholstering is a rich brown color. 

Arm Chaif Is a roomy, dignified piece of furni- 
ture, comfortable and big enough for a very large 
person while not seeming too large for the ordinary 
occupant. Seat 19 x 17 1-2 in. , height 26 In. 

Arm Rocker is a massive, stately, comfortable 
piece, with bcar/JfuMy designed back, wide, shapely 
arms, and smooth operating runners. Seat 19 x 17 1-2 
in., height 36 in. 

Sewing Rocker te unusually attractive end 
useful. Scat 17 x 17 in,, height o5 in. 
Reception Chair has berutiful shape to match 
other pieces. Scat measures 17x17 in., height35 in. 

Library TabJe— a beautiful piece of library fur- 
niture. Beautifully decigned ends to match chairs 
with roomy magazine shelf below. Legs cut of 2 in. 
stock; massive, dignified. Top measures 22 1-4 x 34 in. 
Jardiniere Stand matches other pieces. A 
decoration to your living room or librcry. Carefully 
built throughout. Measures 17 1-2 in, high; the top 
12 x 12 inches. 

Entire set shipped knocked down construction. Easy 

tosetup. Saves freight diaries. Wt. about 17511)3. 

Order by No. BG943A. 51.00 with 

coupon, $2.50 a month, price $22.85* 



tendCouponNowf 



REE Bargain Catalog 

nows thousands of bargains in 
irmture, jewelry, carpets, rugs, 
irtains, silverware, phono- 
"apbs, stoves, porch and lawn 
irmtare, women's, men's and 
uldren'8 wearing apparel. 



traus & Schram,, 

■- 



Don't delay on this special reduced price 
offer. Got the 6-piece library set on 30 
days trial. We have only a limited num- 
ber of sets. They are therefore not listed 
in our regular catalog. We have reserved 
them for new customers. Get your set 
while they last. Only $1.00 deposit brings 
the set on trial. Money refunded if not 
satisfied. Send the coupon today— NOW! 

Register 3014 
West 35th Street, Chicago, I1L 



Straus & Schram, Reg. 3014 W, 35th St., Chicago 



set, 1 will pay you S2.50 monthly. .. 
return the set within 30 days and you I 
and aay freight charsres I paid. 

6-Fiece library Set No. BG943A, S22.6F 



Name 

Street, E.F.D. 

or Box No , 

Skipping 

Point 

Pest 

Office. State. 

If you only want catalog put X in box below: 

: C Furniture, Stoves, Jewelry lj Men's, Women's Children'sCIolhais 



SKAT 



HAND SOAP 

Let Us Send You a Sample 
FREE 

WRITE TO 

The SKAT Company 
Hartford, Conn. s 




The IMPROVED Rapid Floor Surfacer 




Made in Several Sizts 



villi surface right up to the 
xalJ or baieboard without the 
use of edge-roller. 

Juit the machine you would 
~'-~- '■ '■-■ '- ---:-:--.; i.; ;_:. -_■ 
of wood floors, whether old 
or new. Will smooth down 

re.;: _ .v -.: . easily l1. 
joints or warped 
~ :;; Per'-:: reee'.is 
guaranteed. More 

thi- :. :.: :- _ie 



Send for Our Free 

Trial Offer 

M. L. Schlueter 

220 West III, roil 
Street, Chicago 



economize ; : : 
AUTOMATIC SASH HOLDERS 

Do 
Away 
With 
Sash 
Weights, 
Cords. Pulleys, 
Balances. Etc 

Send SI- 00 for trial set prepaid. Mention -=;-'--. 
of sash when ordering. Address Dept. C. 

HARDWARE SALES CO., Inc. 

500 Fifth Avenue >"ew York >". Y. 





T~ PLUMB AND 
LEVEL 
I'.:::;:: ::' le.rj -::; .'. 
aluminum. Can be easi- 
ly attached to any 
straight edge. Simple to 
adjust. Guaranteed ac- 

Priee SI. CO Deli isred. 

PIN MANUFACTURING 

CO. 
Box 1073, Detroit. Mien. 



THE GUNN SELF-FASTENING FOLDING SAW CLAMP 




Will instantly fasten itself to work bench, tool box. 

l:e:i ;:i=; :: -11= ::' Luneer r:.il ::" :"=-; = — ".: a-y 
suitable place — ir.1 -xi~.~z.-~~~ -::-~i :r -ills :: i:.r 
i of fastening; stands firmer than any 
:ii=i: 7T-- lee:— . ;::e~e e::.ils ir.il Ira es. 
'-.-'. zzzi.'-'.- '.'.'.- 'i.z. -/-- : -7.-'-.-- --_-\z\ ~-.z:.- 



Money 



Holds the Saw TIGHT — Anywhere! 



CLAN GUNS' FOLDING SAW CLAMP CO., 
P. 0. Box 643, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



For Twenty Years we have issued this Union Stamp for use under our 

Voluntary Arbitration Contract 



.WORKERS UNION, 



UNIONk; STAMP 

Factory 



OUR STAMP INSURES: 

Peaceful Collective Bargaining 

Forbids Both Strikes and Lockouts 

Disputes Settled by Arbitration 

Steady Employment and Skilled Workmanship 

Prompt Deliveries to Dealers and Public 

Peace and Success to Workers and Employers 

Prosperity of Shoe Making Communities 

As loyal union men and women, we ask you to 
demand shoes bearing the above Union Stamp on 
Sole, Insole or Lining. 



Boot&Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
CoJlis Lovely, General President. Charles L. Baine, General Secretary=Treasurer 










Why live with cracked 
walls and ceilings ? 

Fir them up today. Simply nail big Beaver Board 
panels nght over the old plaster. Paint the surface, apply , 
the decorative wood strips, and at small cost convert old 
rooms into attractive new interiors. There's no muss or 
litter, no delay. Beaver Boarding is quick, clean work that 
can be done in any kind of weather. 

Beaver Board is not only easy to apply but the result is 
permanent. The big panels are real manufactured lumber, 
built up from the long fibres of Northern spruce. Each 
panel is thoroughly sealed and sized by our exclusive 
patented Sealiiu pro cess. Beaver Boar d walls and ceilings 
1 Ul 1J.1I. 

Vsk your local carpenter or building material deale^ 

* yT)ll limit ubuut Dljili DlUlll. Ul IllikU i luu gh 
sketch of your old rooms, giving dimensions, location of 
doors and windows, and the type of room, and mail it to 
our Builders' Service Department at Buffalo. Our expert 
designers will prepare finished plans and send you photo- 
graphs of similar Beaver Board interiors, all without charge 
or obligation. 

.Genuine Beaver Board is handled by lumber and building 
material dealers everywhere. Ask the* one nearest you for 
sample and a copy of our booklet ''Beaver Board and Its Uses." 

THE BEAVER BOARD COMPANIES 

ADMINISTRATION OFFICES 

/ Buffalo, N. Y. Thorold, Ont., Canada London, Eng. 

^Dulrict Sjltj OfUri: .New York, Chicago, tanii; Cr.', Adasia and Buffalo 



repairs teams* you Jear th* 
trouble or crperut. Lie 
Beater Beard. Thecox u 
jurpruwily tele Bearer 
Board for fimir.inr an ordi- 
narylirrni room 
Jrorn Ji! up. 






boa 



BOARD 



BEAVER 
QUALITY 



suits unless (hi: 



FOR.. BETTEjRw WALLS &> CEILING^ 

If you are not already benefiting by Beaver Board's 

big advertising campaign and taking advantage of 

our pool car plan to cut shipping costs, write our 

nearest office for complete details today. 



Switzer's Improved Butt and Lock Gauge 




For Placing Butt. Mortising for lock, 
gauging for strike- plate. Length 3*4 
in., width 1% in., 9-16 in. thick. 

Design neat, sheet Steel case, dull 
nickel finish, marking spurs have 
slotted hole, permitting adjustment 
for clearance, overcoming difference 
in width of lock and strike-plate, be- 
ing fastened to blocks carried on 
screws revolved by means of knurled 
nuts, extending through indentures 
in. but below- surface of, the case. 

If not carried by local merchant, 
send $2.50 P. O. money order to 

J. D. SWITZER 
Box 1 132. Portland, Oregon. 



INCREASE YOUR INCOME 

by modernizing o 1 d 
windows with the use 
of CALDWELL 
SASH BALANCES. 
They have stood the 
test for upwards of 
thirty-two years. 

Write for information. Dept. C. 

CALDWELL MFG. CO. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




The "INTERLOX" Thinks 

Invented by a Brotherhood Man 

Don't use a stick or guess at a measurement. 

The famous 

"Interlox"' Master Slide Rule 



gives both insi 



itside measurements 



Quick, accurate, no figuring, no mistakes, no 
lost time. Durable and rust proof. Use it 
once and you will never work without it. 
Write today for full descriptive circulars. 

MASTER RULE MFG. CO., INC. 

841C East 136th St., New York City 




The Sargent 
Auto-Set 
Bench Plane 

Everycarpenter should 
have a Sargent Auto- Set 
Bench Plane in his kit. It is 
a true, clean and fast cutting 
tool that will not chatter on 
the most difficult job. 

The Auto-Set feature 
means a big saving of time. 
You can remove the blade for 
sharpening and replace it in 
exactly the same position 
without re-adjustment. The 
clamp and cap are in one 
part. There is ample handle 
room. Made in six sizes. 
Smooth or corrugated bot- 
tom. 

If you are interested in 
fine tools, you should have 
the Sargent Book of Planes 
which fully describes the 
Auto- Set and other Sargent 
Planes. A copy will be sent 
you free on request. 

SARGENT & COMPANY 

Hardware Manufacturers 

55 Water Street New Haven, Conn. 





The American Woodworker 

Gasoline, Kerosene, or Electric Driven 
Used on the Job or in the Shop 

Also Made With Band Saw Attached 

Let us send you our Bulletin No. 77 
describing this and other profit pro- 
ducers for the Carpenter, Contrac- 
tor and Iiuilder. 

American Saw Mill Machinery Company 

136 Main Street, Hackettstown, N. J. 



New York Office, 5 
Philadelphia Office, 



) Church St. 
The Bourse. 



The M. F. B. Combined Lock and Butt Gauge 

The only Gauge made which will 
mark accurately for both sides of 
Lock with one stroke. Likewise 
will mark for both sides of the 
Strike- plate with one stroke. (See 
cuts Nos. 1 and 2.) Send Money 
Order. 

Price $2.50. Guaranteed. 

Manufactured by 

M. F. BIERSDORF 

547 San Julian St. 

Member of L. IT. No. 158. 





No. 



1. Strike=plate. 
LOS ANGELES, 



No. 2. Lock. 



CAL. 




The Improved Gem Scriber 

The Tool of Many Uses. One "Best 
Bet" for all Wood Workers. (Price 45c.) 

Exc n i u u f siv% re b? F. Brais & Company 

1349 East 90th Street, Cleveland, Ohio 



tt 



The Building Labor Calculator" 



By Gordon M. Tamblyn. 

Gives LABOR HOURS on: Excavations, Sheet Piling, Concrete, Reinforcing Steel, Concrete Forms, Cement Wort, 
Common Brick, Press Brick,, Tile and Plaster Block Partitions, Stone Work. Terra Cotta. Rough Carpentry. 
Finish Carpentry, Lathing and Furring. Plain PlasUring. Ornamental Plastering, Interior Marble, Sheet Metal 
Work. Slate Roofs, Tile Roofs, Composition Roofs, etc., Painting and Decorating, etc. 
A Bungalow or a Skyscraper — Fire-proof or iion-Fire-Proof. 
Simple — Accurate — Rapid. Send for descriptive literature. 
WESTERN SCHOOL OF ESTIMATING AND PLAN READING, 210 W. 13th Ave., Denver. Colorado. 



SNELL'S AUGERS AND BITS 
The Standard the World Over 



Established 1790 




Selling Agents: 

JOHN H. GRAHAM & CO., 

113 Chambers St., 
NEW YORK, CITY. 



SNELL MFG. CO., 

FISKDALE, MASS. 




PRE.MAX WALL TIES AND PLUGS 

Strong — Permanent — Correctly designed 

From your dealer or direct 

NIAGARA .METAL STAMPING CORPORATION 
Division C Niagara Falls, N. Y. 




The Rustless Rule 



ir, . .:-.: -.-..: L =: iitu'.i tz^e. It ir:n't ruit, 

:s .::e = ;:.:.; : = .= .=;= :.._.:. ; i.a. ru.-. yt: is :'-=: 11 

tgths 2 to 8 ft. If your dealer can not supply you send to ui 

THERLSTLESS RULE CO., INC. 

B. Buffalo, N. Y. 




lumbing, Heating and Pneumati< 
Waterworks Supplies at Wholesale 



"VThen in the market for Plumbing. Heating and 
Pneumatic Waterworks Supplies and 3"ou wish to 

Save 20 to 



\% 



on Every Article 

order from us. Small orders are as carefully 
handled as large ones. Only house selling guar- 
anteed plumbing and heating supplies to all. 

B. KAROL & SONS CO., 804 So. Kedzie Ave., Chicago, 111. 



Send for Catalog 




K&E MEASURING TAPES 

are well made, of good material, and are reliable. 

Prices Revised Send For New Price I 

* KEUFFEL & ES5ER Co. • 












Nearly ONE MILLION MEN Have Used 
TAINTOR POSITIVE SAW SETS 

Are You One Of Them? 

Sold By Leading Hardware Dealers Everywhere 

Send for Bock : ' Care cf >;. — ." free to members cf 

The Brotherhood. 
TAINTOR MFG. Co., 95 Reade St., New York 




J 



FOR HAND SAWS 




Tui Way, rll Chappell Automatic Ball Betrinj Eleetrit 
J- Floor Surfacing Machine is what you need to finitb 
jMn new or old floors quickly and just 

"If ' gvillTY""-;? xTVJ'is the Z-s: ?==-- 



No. 1 for the expert, 

'•Special" for anyone. 

Nos. 3 & 4 for Cross-cut and Circular 

No. 5 for Timber and Board saws. 

CHAS. MORRILL: New York. 




sept T 



SET SAWS 

Just Right 



MCNEILL Manufactured by 

Wajvell Chapcell &. Co. 

137 N. Jackson St. Dept, , 

Waukegan, III, 



SSWSETS 





REQ. U. S. PAT. OFF. 



"BAYONNE" 



may be imitated but 
it cannot be duplicated 

Carpenters and builders the country over 
have for years used "Bayonne" as a cov- 
ering for tlie roofs and floors of piazzas, 
sun parlors, sleeping porches, etc. 

It is absolutely waterproof. Requires no 
white lead bedding yet lays flat. It has 
proved its efficiency by long years of 
service. 

. Write to the manufacturers for 
sample book "T" 



JOHN BOYLE & CO., INC. 

ESTABLISHED I860 



doame'It. NEW YORK 

BRANCH 202-204 MARKET ST. 



70-72 
READE ST. 
ST. LOUIS 



Mr. Carpenter 



Wouldn't You 
L i k e to Be- 
come a Con- 
tractor and Be 
Your Own 
Boss? 

The 

Installation 
of 

FEDERAL 

METAL 

WEATHER= 

STRIPS 

Is a Very Profit- 
able Business. 

Let Us Tell You 
About It. 

Write Today. 



FEDERAL METAL WEATHERSTRIP CO. 

1240 Fullerton Ave. Chicago 





-IE 

•CPERT'S 

40ICE 

;le 



es twice the work of an ordinary file — in half the time. 
e Expert's Choice increases the value of your time by 
;r 50%. By spending 30 cents you can make it back 
your first filing job alone. It's in the Quality — in the 
i of the tooth and in the length of the stroke. 
Frank Luther. Chicago, says: "The Expert's 
Choice File files 18 hand saws and Is cheaper at 
a cost of 50c than the ordinary file at any price." 
a get your money back if the Expert s Choice does not prove 
ie the most economical file you have ever used DELTA 
W FILES are made for fine or coarse teeth — also for that 
ra hard saw. Buy your tools of the dealer who sell. 
Ita Files. He is the quality man. 

'ial Offer If your dealer cannot supply you. send us 20o. 
25c or 30c for trial file, sent prepaid. Do 
■ today — find out what a real file is 



E HIGHEST GRADE FILE MADE" 
LTA"HAND SAW" FILES 



CARPENTERS SPECIAL* 
( 

MECHANIC'S FAVORITE^ 

r 
EXPERTS CHOICE - *■ 

-' 'Wi Ct IHt.WOat IN HALF T HE TIME 

" File You Will Eventual-lt" Use 



DELTA 

FILE 

WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, 
PA. 



Look for 
This Sign 
ai Your 
Hardware 
Store 



n» kul Abju Bit Flic nude — We will deliw as receipt <S 30 i-jli eeca. 




Get this 
$ 15«Book 

FREE! 



It tells the builder how to select a site, 
how to plan the rooms, and what mater- 
ials are best for various types of construc- 
tion. This $1.50 book is presented free. 

With Your BUILDERS' LIBRARY 

A $7.00 library for $5.00. All standard 
works. Sent on approval with our special 
return privilege guarantee. 

Hick's NEW BUILDER'S GUIDE 

Just out — latest revised edition covering 
masonry, roof framing, etc. Let these time- 
and worry-saving tables work for you. 

Cosarove's HOLLOW TILE CONSTRUCTION 

Fire proof construction clearly explained 
with chapters on walls, floors, roofs, parti- 
tions, etc.. with photographs and floor plans 
of finished buildings. 

Arthur's ESTIMATING BUILDING COSTS 

Time-saving short cuts — up-to-the minute 
tables — indispensable for correctly estimating 
all kinds of building work. 

YOUR OPPORTUNITY COUPON 



U. P. C. Book Company, Inc., 243 W. 39th St., New York 

For the enclosed remittance of $5.00 send me post- 
paid mv BTJUJDERS' I.Il'.KAKi together with FREK 
COPY of BUILDER'S GUIDE, with the understand- 
ing that if I return these books within 5 days my 
money will be promptly refunded. 



Name 
I Address 




mm 



F" N/1 /? 

UJ S ^ 

Quality 

Uniformity 

Responsibility 




or £veriastinp Cconomy) 

Increase Your 
Income 

Let us show you how 



Turn your practical building knowledge into money for your- 
self. Many of our friends among carpenters find a profitable 
sideline in selling Oak Flooring. Sales are easy when you know 
how. And your work puts you in contact with many Al 
prospects who will buy if they are only approached before 
they build. 

There is little you need to learn. Only a few selling facts and figures 
which our free booklets give you. The main thing is to know building — and 
that you know already. 

Xo capital is required to make good money for yourself by following our 
directions. It will not interfere with your work. Write for the booklets today. 
They are FREE. 

oak viQomtQjmMm 

of the U. S. 

1051 Ashland Block, Chicago, III. 



smiidPIfii* 







HH9H^raBHHBH^< ' 



Be a Weatherstrip Contractor 

Make $5,000 to $10,000 or More — 

Yearly Prepare for the Spring 

Building Boom 

Selling and installing weatherstrip is a 
new and uncrowded business. The Spring 
Season is going to be alive with oppor- 
tunities for the contractor-agent who is 
equipped to go after this business. 
Allmetal "Weatherstrip is favorably 
known and preferred by architects and 
general contractors. 

Get Our Selling Proposition Now 

Between this and Spring you can be 
equipping old buildings and landing con- 
tracts for new buildings to 
be put up later on. Every 
building is a prospect. Hun- 
dreds of buildings right 
now in your vicinity need 
weatherstrip. 

GET INTO A BUSINESS 
OF YOUR OWN 

Don't get caught out of 
work again — build up a 
business of your own and 
one that pays big. We 
furnish models and assist 
you to land contracts. 
Weatherstrip contractros 
make good money right 
from the start. 

Write today for complete 
information 

ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP 
COMPANY 

1264 West Kinzie Street CHICAGO 









3 Units 




K. L. M. 




adaptable 




to Any 




Kind of Sash 



Pullman 

UNIT SASH BALANCE 
With New Tape Hook 

Cost less than Cord and Weight in- 
stallation more durable, neater and 
more quiet. 

The new Tape Hook makes it pos- 
sible to fasten or unfasten the tape 
from the sash while sash is in place. 
Xo fussing with the stop; no man 
or scratches; no refinishing; no lo^t 
time, guaranteed for 10 years. 
Free illustrated catalog, full of 
Modern Window Operating Informa- 
tion, sent on request. 

Pullman Mfg. Co. 

234 South Avenue Rochester, N. Y. 
"PTJLLMANIZE YOUR WINDOWS" 



New 
Hook 
Tace 




Water Pouier, Mills and Timberlands in Wisconsin 



Cornell's Responsibility is Like a 
Guarantee Bond Behind Your Job 

Use a wallboard of known value made by a company of known 
responsibility and you take no chances. 

Our process of using pure wood fiber and "Triple-Sizing" with 
moisture-proof sizing enables us to guarantee Cornell against warping 
and buckling, if simple directions are followed in nailing it to the 
joists and studding, or over brick or damaged plaster. 

Cornell's "Oatmeal" finish is the handsomest effect in a wallboard 
of any kind and rivals costly wallpaper. The "Mill-Primed" surface 
means this board comes all primed for painting, thus saves the work 
and expense of a priming coat. 

Cornell costs less than lath and plaster. It is lighter than plaster- 
board, so one man can apply it. 

It is rigid, but not brittle — and does not crack, break or chip in 
hauling and handling. 

Write us for sample board showing "Oatmeal" finish, Book No. CA-2 
of Cornell Interiors and prices. Our department of Design and 
Decoration will furnish special drawings of Interior Panel arrange- 
ments for any job without cost. Write today or mail the coupon. 



/ For Book 
/ and Sample 

/ Send free color-book 
/ No. CA-2, of "Cornell 
* Interiors," sample board 
/ and prices to 

/ 
/ Name „ 

Eight lengths, 6 to 16 feet — two widths—" Cornell SS" and "Cornell i8" / 

/ Street 

CORNELL WOOD PRODUCTS CO. / 

General Offices: 190 N. State Street, Chicago, 111. / City State 

f Mail this to Cornell Wood Products 




/Co., 190 N. State St., Chicago, 111. ,„, 




SILVER 





YOUR CHOICE of HANDLES! 

Which style saw handle do you 
prefer, the old style, straight 
across shape or the new im- 
proved Perfection pattern? 

There are many carpenters who 
prefer the old style handle and 
many who like the new Per- 
fection pattern, therefore we 
make both styles and when buy- 
ing an 

Atkins silfi Saw 

you have }^our choice. Try them 
both — see which you like best. 

The upper saw in the illustra- 
tion, Atkins No. 53, shows the 
Perfection Handle and the lower, 
Atkins No. 51, shows the old 
style model. 

Ask your dealer to show ) t ou 
both styles, and take your choice. 



Send 25c for carpenter 
apron, pencil and Saw 
Sense Booklet. 



E.C.ATKINS & CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1857 THE SILVER STEEL SAW PEOPLE 

Home OfficS-M\d Factory, IND1ANAP0US.INDIANA 

CanttdianFacrory. Hamilton Ontario 

Machine Knife Factory, Lancaster N.Yv 

Branches Carrying Complete SfocksJnTne Following Cil>9i_ 

Atlanta New Orleans Seattle 

Memphis New York City Paris. France 

Chicago Portlaj\d,Ore. Sydney. N. S-™ 

°^i\Frarvcisco Vancouver, B-^» 



Minneapolis 




This 48-page 
Time Book is Yours 
for the Asking I 

Just what you've been wanting, too. The 
Sheetrock Time Book contains tables and 
other valuable data for carpenters and con- 
tractors. Return of the coupon brings you 
a copy , absolutely free. 

We are making you this present because we 
want you to become better acquainted with SHEET- 
ROCK, the fireproof, non -warping wallboard. Think of 
it! Ceiling -high sheets of specially toughened Gypsum 
Plaster, % inch thick and fibre surfaced, that you nail 
directly to the studding and joists. No lathing or plast 
ing. It costs no more than ordinary wallboard. 

U{J Don't forget to ask for your Time Book. Better send 
VWJ coupon now while you have it in mind. 

a ^k Sheetrock comes in standard sizes — % in. 

^ J thick, 32 or 48 in. wide and 6 to 10 ft. long 

SHEETROCI 



3he FIRE PROOF 



WALL BOARI 



UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPAN 

World's Largest Producers of Gypsum Products 
GENERAL OFFICES: Dept. I, 235 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 



United States Gypsum Company 
Dept. I, 205 West Monroe St., Chicago, III. 
Send my SHEETROCK Time Book to— 

Name 

Address 



Sheetrock is inspected and approved by The Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. 




It takes good roofing 
to make good roofs 

Your biggest business asset is your 
reputation for doing good work. Our 
biggest business asset is our reputa- 
tion for making good roofings. And 
we're guarding our reputation as 
carefully as you're guarding yours. 

That's why you can safely use Barrett 
Everlastic Roofings. You can use 
them on all steep roofed buildings, 
for they're made in six different styles 
— four styles of shingles, and two of 
roll roofings. 

It takes good roofings to make good 
roofs, so don't risk your reputation 
by using materials of unknown qual- 
ity. Everlastic Roofings are ahvays 
dependable. 

Write nearest branch for free book- 
lets describing- each style for laying. 



Your Choice of Six Styles 

Everlastic Octo-Strip 

Shi7igles. 
The latest development in 
the strip shingle. Beautiful 
red or green mineral sur- 
face. Made - in an unique 
form that offers a variety 
of designs in laying. 

Everlastic Mult i-Sh ingles. 
Four shingles in one. Made 
of high grade waterproof- 
ing materials with a red 
or green mineral surface. 
When laid they look exact- 
ly like individual shingles. 
Fire-resisting. 

Everlastic Single Shingles. 
Same red or green material 
as Multi-Shingles, hut made 
in single form ; size, 8x123 
inches. 

Everlastic Giant Shingles. 
Identical in shape with 
Everlastic Single Shingles 
but heavier and thicker. 
They are "giants" for 
strength and durability. 

Everlastic 
Mineral Surfaced Roofing. 
The most beautiful and en- 
during roll roofing made. 
Surfaced with everlasting 
mineral in art-shades of red 
or green. Combines real 
protection against fire with 
beauty. Requires no paint- 



/: verlastic"Rubber" Roofing. 
This is one of our most pop- 
ular roofings. It is tough, 
pliable, elastic, durable and 
very low in price. It is 
easy to lay ; no skilled labor 
required. Nails and cement 
included in each roll. 



Company 



New York Chicago Philadelphia Boston St. Louis Cleveland Cincinnati 
Pittsburgh Detroit New Orleans Birmingham Kansas City Minneapolis Dallas 
Syracuse Peoria Atlanta Duluth Salt Lake Citv Bangor Washington 
Johnstown Lebanon Youngstown Milwaukee Toledo Columbus Richmond 
Latrobe Bethlehem Elizabeth Buffalo Baltimore Omaha Houston Denver Jacksonville 

THE BARRETT COMPANY, Limited : 
Montreal Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver St. John, N. B. Halifax, N. S. 




Nicholson Files 

should be on every work bench 

There's a bit of pride about owning 
good tools - in selecting and using the 
best that modern methods can produce. 
That's why Nicholson Files are found 
on the benches and in the tool kits of 
experienced carpenters the world over. 

For cutting wood and metal — for keeping other tools in 
perfect condition — Nicholson Files and Rasps are un- 
excelled. 100% uniform, keen cutting from the first 
stroke, Nicholson Files are preferred the world over. 




LION ML 




PROVIDENCE 



l l s i 




tese two attractive 
mes are from the 
ng-Bell Home Plan 
rvlce. There are 
ire than sixty 
uers all equally in- 
■estlng. The upper 
Itare U Long-Bell 
ai) No. 360. The 
Tf oni Is Long- 
11 Plan No. 323. 
K your retail lum- 
r dealer to show 
i the entire service. 
he hasn't Long- 
11 plans write us 
d we will give you 
' names of dealers 
ting this service. 



Southern Pine Lum- 
ber and Timbers 

Creosoted Lumber. 

T : mbers Posts. Poles. 

Ties, Piling Wood 

Blocks 

California White 
Pine Lumber 

Sash and Doorc 

Standardized Wood- 
work 

Gum and Oak 
Lumber 

Oak Fkcring 




TRADE 
MARKED 



IS THERE any expenditure, any sac- 
rifice, that brings returns equal to the 
building of a home of your own? 
What could be finer, what joy greater 
for any man than to see his family happy 
and contented permanently under a roof 
of their own ! 

Truly, a home is "an investment with divi- 
dends finer than gold. ' 

Take the first step today. Go to a retail 
lumber dealer. Ask him to show you the 
Long-Bell home plan service. Select a home 
design that fits your needs and learn from 
the lumberman how economically Long-Bell 
homes can be built. 

Modern machinery, faithful adherence to 
high standards of workmanship, strict 
observance of the (trading rules and i 
pendable service hare enabled The Loi.i- 
Bell Lumber Company to apply the word 
Quality to its product — and these pro- 
ducts bear the Long-Bell trade mark. 

Ask Your Lumberman for LO[4G=BEl.L Brand. 



The T one-ReLL l umber r.oir panu 



.A.LONG OUlLDlrMG Lu 



AS CI fY MO 




The Sargent 

Auto- Set 
Bench Plane 

E^ery carpenter she 
hare a Sargent Anto-Set 
Bench Plane in his kit. It is 
a true, clean and fast cutting 
tool that will not chatter on 
the most difficult job. 

The Auto- Set feature 
means a big saying f time. 
You can remove the blade for 
sharpening and replace it in 
exactly the same position 
without re-adjustment. The 
clamp and cap are in one 
part. There is ample handle 
room. Made in six sizes. 
Smooth or corrugated bot- 
tom. 

If you are interested in 
fine tools, you should have 
the Sargent Book of Planes 
which fully describes the 
Auto- Set and other Sargent 
Planes. A copy will be sent 
you free on request. 

SARGENT & COMPANY 

Hardware Manufacturers 

55 Water Street New Hayen, Conn. 



AUTO -SET PLANE 




A Perfect Window 

Job Requires The 
Hastings Rolup Screen 

A thorough piece of work, finished in 
every detail, demands the Hastings 
Eolup Screen — the screen that rolls 
tip lite a window shade. 
This screen is made of rust-proof anti-. 
corrosive Monel nietaL that defies sea< 
air or city fumes and smoke. Because 
of its mesh it allows more light and 
gives better protection. 
Once rolled up in its metal casing (al- 
most invisible when painted to match 
the trim) it stays up overnight or; 
through the winter always ready for in- 
stant use. It solves the difficult storage 
problem, ever present in hotels and large 
buildings, and cuts overhead by allowing 
the windows to be washed without re- 
moving the screen. It moves at the lift 
of a finger, *but does not fly up. It can- 
not pull out at the sides where it is held 
by side grips traveling in narrow metal 
strips attached to the window frame. 
It is adapted to sash, dormer or case- 
ment windows and enables the window 
to be open at top, bottom or both, and 
remain screened. 

"Will you help us install the Hasting* 
Eolup Screen this Spring? Or would 
you rather get the loeal agency for them 
and handle the whole proposition, mak- 
ing a profit on sales as well as installa- 
tions? Write today for complete infor- 
mation. 



J 



; HASTINGS] 

1 Rolup fa^ee/is 



ROLUP SCREEN COMPANY 

414C East 32nd Street New York City 



drawing 





Complete Set 



Delivered AT once 

Yes, I will give you this complete 
drawing outfit absolutely free. 
The instruments are in a hand- 
some high clas3, plush lined folding 
case. _ They are regular draftsman's 
working instruments. Besides I will 
give you absolutely free, a 20 x 25 inch 
drawing board, a 24 inch T square, a 
12 inch rule, a supply of drawing paper, 
two triangles, a French curve, pencils, 
erasers, thumb tacks, etc. 

Drafting 
Salary 

demand for skilled draftsmen. Com- 
mies are issuing calls every day for men to fill positions paying 
5600.00 a year. Work is light, pleasant and profitable. 

Wali instruct 
Wma Personally 



3/ii e/ Draftsman 

I am Chief Draftsman of a large and well 

known firm. I have been doing the highest paying 
expert drafting work for a quarter of a century and 
I know just the kind of training that is demanded 
from men who get the big salaries. I train you by 
giving you actual, practical work, the kind you must be able 
to do to hold permanent, big paying positions. I give you my 
individual instruction. If your work is right, I will advance 
you rapidly. If it is wrong, I will show you where and make 
you do it right, and do all I can to make you an expert drafts- 
man and designer in a short time. 

Write Today Without Fail! 




I Guarantee 

to train yon until 
you are placed in 
a position paying 
$250 to $300 a 
month. 



Jend Coupon 

: or New Bookl 



Chief Draftsman Dobe 

Dept. 5315, 4001 Broadway Chicago, Illnols 

Without any obligation on me whatsoever, please, mail yonr 
book, "Successful Draftsmanship" and full particulars of 
your liberal "Personal Instruction" offer to a few students. 
j It is understood that I am obligated in do way whatever. 

• y°ur name and address on the coupon or a letter or a post ■ 

J I and send it to me today. I will send you absolutely free and post- a 

I !i rny new book "Successful Draftsmanship," and the great special ■ 

! ". l ™ ' am now making on which you get the comlete J)raf ts- ■ Ar _„ 

1 a Working Outfit absolutely free. You assume no obligations ■ I * ame 

' ny kind in sending in the coupon. Get in line for a big paying 

j tion. Getting the book and full particulars of the special offer 

I is first step. ■ 

Chief Draftsman Dobe 

>pt. 5315, 4001 Broadway Chicago, HI. Z 



jfflmii ibi 



■b 







J I R ST Y 

Screen Clojth 



Put On Screen Cloth Which 
Has Stood The Test 

The test for window, door, or porch 
screens is the hot, moist weather of 
the tropics or the constant dampness 
along the sea coast. 

Of the metals in common use by 
man, pure copper is the most dur- 
able. Near sea or lake, or in the 
tropics, pure copper will give the best 
results. It resists the corrosive action 
of the elements. 

Copper, 99. 8^7 pure, is used in the manu- 
facture of Jersey Copper Screen Cloth. It 
compares favorably with steel in tensile 
strength and stiffness. 

Maintain your good reputation by putting 
on screen cloth which will stand the test. 

Look for the name, Jersey Copper Screen 
Cloth, on the rolls. Only put on screens, 

cloth that you can recommend unquali- 
fiedly. Many merchants earn" it in stock; 
ir you cannot obtain Jersey cloth in your 
locality, write us main office given below) 
and we will inform vou how to get it. 
Stores and agencies in many cities. 



The New Jersey Wire Cloth Company 

618 South Broad Street 
Trenton New Jersey 




Roofing 
Individuality 

Distinctiveness and individuality are 
/hat every home owner wants when 
e builds. You can give distinctive 
haracter to your next roofing job if 
ou use Ruberoid Strip-shingles. 

>y combining the rich tones of deep 
.idian red and the cool sage green slate 
arfaced finishes, or by reversing the 
rips, nine different designs may be 
iid. One or another of these attractive 
esigns will unquestionably suit the 
rtistic taste of 
ny home builder. 



The RUBEROID Co. 

95 Madison Avenue, New York 
Chicago Boston 



The illustration shows but one of these 
designs. Lack of color prevents our 
giving you a better idea of the attrac- 
tiveness of this Ruberoid Roof. The 
natural crushed slate, the cut corners, 
and the unusual massiveness of this 
shingle, always assure a pleasing effect, 
regardless of the design selected. 

On request, we will gladly send you a 
book describingthis shingle and illustrat- 
ing the way in which different designs 
may be obtained 
through its use. 




5HING 





AND 



ROOFING 



What Carpenters Say About 
Pool's Interurban Special- 

The Special Carpenters' Overall with /. 

12 Special Pockets, 4 Convenient Loops ' Mm 
and Several Other Important Features. / : 

A carpenter in Baltimore, Md., says : "Would not 
wear any other kind." 1111111 

From Oran, Mo. : "They are the most serviceable ;_ 

I ever wore." j 3El 

Germantown, Pa. : "Materials equal to the best and 
the many pockets are a big convenience and save lots 
of trouble." SHelli 

Glens Falls, X. Y. : "Enclosed is money order for v$d 

another pair of Interurban Special Carpenters* Over- 
alls just like I got last year. They are the best I 
ever wore." 

Get your merchant to order you a pair so 
you can see what they are. Or send us §2.25 
and we will send you a pair prepaid. If you 
don't like it you can return it and get your 
money. 

Sherman Overall Mfg. Co. 

SHERMAN, TEXAS 
We Make Every Pair Make Good 




UNION 
MADE 







Tips to Builders 

"Check in" on what you know 
and what your customers know 
about 




(9 



cypr 4 . 

"THE WOOD ETERNAL 

and never forget this import- 
ant fact — 

"Cypress is the world's standard 
specialty wood for its particular 
uses, and not merely an alternative 
commodity." 

For General Outdoor Use, for all exterior 
trim on residences and all places suscep- 
tible to Rot influences. You will of 
course tell your customer to insist on 
"All-Heart" grade. 

When you buy. look for the 
CYPRESS Trade-ilark Arrow 
on every board. It's your 
guarantee of proper grading 

TuiM«lSiB.S.PxrOm= at tne mill 

SOUTHERN CYPRESS MANUFAC- 
TURERS' ASSOCIATION 

1252 Poydras Building, New Orleans, La., or 
1252 Graham Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla. 




SAVE 
MONEY 



The best method of splicing tim- 
ber on scaffolding, shoring, prop- 
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mation today. 



SCHENK 

TIMBER CLAMP CORI 

Managed bij Cosmopolitan Industries Inc* 

501 FIFTH AVE. NEWYORF 



iend for This 

7 REE Test Lesson 



Train in 
Spare 
Time 




>lan 
Leading 

you are aru- 

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u must get 

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it will make 

u worth more. 

s the man who 

$t uses his head that becomes Fore- 

in and Superintendent or w T ho gets 

i most business as a Contractor. 

is free lesson will show you how to 
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t a penny to send for it, only the 
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■e we give you simply an outline of our 
rses to show the ground they cover. Our 
alogs give complete information. 

iy Raising Knowledge for 
[en in the Building Trades 

n Reading. How to read a building plan. 
,v to read dimensions. How to read de- 
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it plans from basement to roof, etc., etc. 
ns of brick building fully explained. 

mating. Figuring amount and cost of 
.erials. Estimating time and labor. How 
igure brick work. All about cost of ex- 
■itions, concrete work, etc. Brick and 
ie construction. Concrete. Lathing and 
itering. Fireproofing. Glazing. Plumb- 
Heating. Wiring, etc., etc. 
erintending. Method of work on all 
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tContractors and in Plumbing and Heating 
Ventilation, all taught by practical men. 

ail the Coupon-Today 

■you have to do to get the Free Lesson 
full information about Chicago "Tech" 
nlng is to put X in the coupon to show 

' en subjects interests you — then mail it. 
obligation on you for asking this — no 

) mse. We gladly send it all free. So 

1 1 the coupon — now. 

^ W*_ M — ■ •_« ■— ■__ 



^CAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE, 
J39 Chicago "Tech" Building, Chicago, 
•out obligation on me please send Free Trial 
>n on the course I have marked X below. 

[J Plan Reading and Estimating, 
[j Architectural Drafting. 



p Office state _ 

ipatlon 



lLlJeu)el 
Turlington 




Adjusted to the Second 2 1 Ruby and Sapphire Jewels 
Adjusted to Temperature 25 Year Gold Strata Case 
Adjusted to Isochronism Your Choice of Dials 
Adjusted to Positions {Including Montgamtrw iS. R. Dial) 

New Ideas in Thin Cases 



Onh 




^DoWn 



Only One Dollar Down will buy this masterpiece of watch 
manufacture. The balance you are allowed to pay in 
small, easy, monthly payments. The Burlington — a 21- 
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that of other high-grade watches. Besides, you have the 
selection of the finest thin model designs and latest styles 
in watch cases. Don't delay! Write for the FREE Watch 
Book and our SPECIAL OFFER today. 



Write 



, WhMtes 

'SpecialOMfyts 



Get the Burlington Watch Book by sending this coupon. 
Find out about this great special offer which is being made 
for only a limited time. You will know a great deal more 
about watch buying when you read this book. You will 
be able to "steer clear" of the over-priced watches which 
are no better. Remember, the Burlington is sent to you 
for only One Dollar down, balance in small monthly pay- 
ments. Send the coupon for watch book and our special 
offer TODAY1 Do not delay one minute! 

iiiiiiiimiiitiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiuiiMiiiiiiiiiiniMi 

Burlington Watch Company 

Dept. 5315, 19th St. &. Marshall Blvd., Chicago 
Canadian Address: 62 Albert St., Winnipeg. Manitoba 

Please send me (without obligations and prepaid) your free 
book on watches with full explanation of your $1.00 down 
offer on the Burlington Watch. 



S Name — 
I Address 




THE 

EXPERT'S 
CHOICE 
FILE 



Does twice the work of an ordinary file — in half the time. 
The Expert's Choice increases the value of your time, by 
over 50%. By spending 30 cents you can make it back 
on your first filing job alone. It's in the Quality — hi the 
cut of the tooth and in the length of the stroke. 

Frank Luther. Chicago, says: "The Expert's 
Choice File files 18 hand saws and Is cheaper at 
a cost of SOc than the ordinary file at any price." 
You get your money back if the Expert's Choice does not prove 
to be the most economical file you have ever used. DELTA 
SAW FILES are made for fine or coarse teeth— also for that 
extra hard saw. Buy your tools of the dealer who sell. 
Delta Files. He is the quality man. 
Trinl fifffr I' your dealer cannot supply you, send us 20c. 

1 I IU.I KJII^I 25c or 30( , f()r trIa , fl , e _ gent prepald Do 

this today — find out what a real file is 



"THE HIGHEST GRADE FILE MADE 
E LTA " HAN D SAW" FJ LES 



CARPENTERS SPECIAL";^"" 

or;* 

MECHANICS FAVORITE*^"!' 



EXPERTS CHOICE ' 

I OOESTWiCt .THE WORK IN HAlF.THE TIME 



The File You Will EvENTUALur Use 



DELTA 

FILE 

WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, 
PA. 



Look for 
This Sign 
at Your 
Hardware 
Store ' 



^ imiBi aSB 



He best Auger Bit File made — We will deliver 01 receipt of 30 cut* each. 



When 

You Want 
The Best 




Ask for 
The GRIFFITH Master 
Builder for 64 years known 
as the GERMANTOWN 
Master Builder. If you can- 
not be supplied at your local 
dealer's send for the Master 
Builder Catalog of Hammers and 
Hatchets. 

Griffith Tool Works 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Branch: 4139 W. Kinzie St. CHICAGO 

LOOK FOR THIS TRADE MARK 
On The Tool 



.GRIFFITH, 

MASTER 
.BUILDER, 



SNELL'S AUGERS AND BITS 

The Standard the World Over 

Established 1790 
QUALITY GUARANTEED 



SNELL EXPANSIVE BIT 



SNELL SOLID CENTER 




Send 10c in stamps for sample %-inch Solid Center Bit. 
Selling Agents: 
JOHN H. GRAHAM & CO., SNELL MFG. CO. 

FISKDALE, MASS. 



113 Chambers St. 
NEW YORK, CITY. 



The M. F. B. Combined Lock and Butt Gauge 

The only Gauge made which will 
mark accurately for both sides of 
Lock with one stroke. Likewise 
will mark for both sides of the 
Strike-plate with one stroke. (See 
cuts Nos. 1 and 2.) Send Money 
Order. 

Price $2.50. Guaranteed. 

Manufactured by 




Strike=plate. 
LOS ANGELES, 



M. F. BIERSDORF 

547 San Julian St. 

Member of L. U. No. 158. 







ROOF AND DECK 
CLOTH 



REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 



"BAYONNE" 



may be imitated but 
it cannot be duplicated 

Carpenters and builders the country over 
have for years used "Bayonne" as a cov- 
ering for the roofs and floors of piazzas, 
sun parlors, sleeping porches, etc. 

It is absolutely waterproof. Requires no 
white lead bedding yet lays flat. It has 
proved its efficiency by long years of 
service. 

Write to the manufacturers for 
sample hook "T" 

JOHN BOYLE & CO., INC. 

ESTABLISHED I860 



oua 2 ne I4 st. NEW YORK 

BRANCH 202-204 MARKET ST. 



70-72 
READE ST. 
ST. LOUIS 



Mr. Carpenter 




Wouldn't You 
Like to Be- 
come a Con- 
tractor and Be 
Your Own 
Boss? 

The 

Installation 

of 

FEDERAL 

METAL 

WEATHER= 

STRIPS 

Is a Very Profit- 
able Business. 

Let Us Tell You 
About It. 

Write Today. 



FEDERAL METAL WEATHERSTRIP CO. 

.240 Fullertou Ave. Chicago 



Be A 

'Floor Surfacing Contractor 

F Make$5,000to$15,0G0 or More-Yearly 

New, uncrowded 
field. Architects 
and general con- 
tractors know the 
American Univer- 
sal and prefer its 
work. They pre- 
fer to sublet the 
floor surfacing con- 
tracts, as it is a big 
business in itself. 
We furnish office 
forms, advertising, 
etc., — in fact, we 
practically set 
man up in 
business. 
Business 
comes 
easily. 




Prepare For 
Spring Building Boom 

Building cannot remain inactive. The housing prob- 
lem is more serious now than at any time in history. 
The coming Spring will be alive with opportunities for 
those equipped to handle the work. The American 
Universal Machine is essential to hustlers. Get in 
on the ground floor — get the machine now. 

Re-Surfacing Old Floors 

Every building, large or small, is a pro-peel. Hun- 
dreds of floors right in your own vicinity need re- 
surfacing. The owners will be glad to have you do it 
when you show them how easily and quickly the work 
can be done with the American Universal Electric 
Machine. Old floors made like new — new floors made 
perfect. 

Don't ever get caught out of work again — get into 
a big business of your own. Floor Surfacing Contrac- 
tors pay for machines first month and made big 
profit besides. Write today for full information. 
Say whether you are a building contractor. 




Don't pass up this opportunity to get into a Busi- 
ness of your own. Write today for complete literature. 

The American Floor Surfacing 
Machine Co. 

Originators of Floor Surfacing Machines 
522 So. St. Clair Street, Toledo Ohio, U. S. A. 




p OOD sawing is simply a mat- 
^-*~ ter of using a good saw — 
the right one for the purpose. 

Laying out the work, proper 
marking and handling of the 
material may be done in the 
best possible way but when it 
comes to actual sawing it is the 
quality of the saw that counts. 
No saws and tools can do better 
work in your hands than Diss- 
ton Saws and Tools. 

Write for the Disston Saw, 
Tool, and File Book, and ad- 
dress your inquiry to Desk No. 1. 

HENRY DISSTON &S0NS,inc. 

Philadelphia, U. S. A. 




STON 

TOOLS FILES 



Entered July 22, 191 5, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of Congress, Aug. 24, 1912 

Acceptance for mailing: at SDecial rate of Dostage nrovided for in Section 1103, act of 

October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8. 191S. 

A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and 
Kindred Industries. Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of CarpenteTB 

and Joiners of America, at 

Carpenters' Building, 222 East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
I'ol. XLII— No. 5 



INDIANAPOLIS, MAY, 1922 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



Get It Done 

It isn't the job we intended to do, 
Or the labor we've just begun, 

That puts us right on the balance sheet; 
It's the work we have really done. 

Our credit is built upon things we do, 
Our debit on things we shirk; 

The man who totals the biggest plus 
Is the man who completes his work. 

Good intentions do not pay bills; 

It's easy enough to plan. 
To wish is the play of an office boy; 

To do is the job of a man. 

— Richard Lord. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 




BROTHERHOOD 

!N an address delivered be- 
fore the Federal Council 
of the Churches of Christ 
in America, at their an- 
nual meeting in Chicago, 
J. W. Cline, President of 
the International Brotherhood of Black- 
smiths. Drop Forgers and Helpers, said 
in part : 

"People can talk about the fatherhood 
of God, and forget the brotherhood of 
man. Some can talk about the Ten 
Commandments and forget the Sermon 
on the Mount. In my long experience 
in the interest of the wage earners, I 
have witnessed some evidences of the 
spirit of brotherhood in industry. Not 
all bad men are rich, neither are all rich 
men bad. Not all poor men are bad, 
neither are all bad men poor, but a rich 
bad man is far more dangerous to society 
than a poor bad man. We have too 
many poor men for a rich nation. It is 
true that Jesus said, "The poor you have 
always with you,'' but I don't remember 
reading, where He said that it was right. 
I know splendid characters who are large 
employers and have dealt with them who 
are not in sympathy with the present 
system of grinding the life out of a man 
for gain. In the early days when the 
apprentice boy joined himself to an em- 
ployer for a certain length of time, the 
employer took an interest in that boy. 
He watched him grow into manhood, a 
good mechanic, with a good reputation, 
and an unblemished character. Possibly 
he became the boy's father-in-law, and 
their interests were common. But 
changes have taken place and a drifting 
apart, until the corporation is to be dealt 
with now, and the apprentice boy is so 
far away from the head of the firm that 
they seldom meet, if ever, so their busi- 
ness is done through subordinates. The 
corporations have long since lost their 
soul, and it is now a cold-blooded finan- 
cial proposition. If you get into trou- 
ble, instead of appealing directly to your 
employer, as of old, you must follow a 
chain of subordinates who are trying to 
build themselves up into better positions 
at the expense, and the distress, of the 
man and his family, and finally we are 
liable to have the Bankers' Association, 
and the Board of Trade injecting them- 
selves into the case and the firms who 
are hiring union men boycotted. There- 
fore brotherhood is about the last thing 
talked about in our conferences today. 



IN INDUSTRY 

"What if we could establish real 
brotherhood in industry. Do you think 
we coidd swing such industries as the 
United States Steel Corporation into 
line? or the International Harvester? 
Could we induce the Big Packers or the 
Colorado Fuel and Iron Company, cr 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, or 
Governor Allen and his State Legisla- 
ture? Had human kindness operated in- 
stead of class hatred the Governor 
would have shrunk away from the 
thought of taking away from the poor 
miners the rights that our Constitution 
gives them, and the rights that the rich 
have and operate only in another way, 
the State of Kansas would not today be 
facing the shameful experience of call- 
ing out the National Guard to chase 
back to their homes the wives and 
daughters of the striking miners. 

"Brotherhood in industry is possible. 
Is it probable? That depends entirely 
upon the spirit that dominates both the 
employer and the employe. An honest 
employer has a right to expect an honest 
day's work for which he is willing to pay 
an honest wage. The dishonest em- 
ployer is demanding that every fiber of 
a man's being be energized for his own 
benefit and so he has installed every 
imaginable machine to increase output 
and decrease wages. So watchful is he 
in studying the movements of his em- 
ployes that a stop watch that divides a 
second is used so that even a fraction 
of that second is not wasted. That 
method is not the spirit of brotherhood, 
but the spirit of servitude. 

"If we are to have a true and honest 
program of brotherhood carried out, 
there must be a surrender of the spirit 
of the taskmaster and the servant on 
the part of those who control the des- 
tinies of the working classes. Brother- 
hood in industry is, to my mind, most 
vitally needed if we are to find a work- 
able way T to overcome the evils in in- 
dustry. 

"The report of the Commission of 
Inquiry of the Interchurch World Move- 
ment, which made such a searching in- 
vestigation of the steel strike of 1919 
and also its latest supplementary report, 
"Public Opinion of the Steel Strike of 
1919," should be read by every law- 
abiding citizen and let them determine 
as to the needs of brotherhood in indus- 
try. The greed for profits overshadows 
the spirit of brotherhood. It has with- 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



eld from the laborer who reaps our 
arvest, his wages, and an atonement 
ill be required. 

"If I thought Mr. H. G. Wells, who is 
lid to be the best known living writer, 
; correct in his diagnosis of world af- 
lirs, and if the world's ills are as seri- 
ns as that noted writer says they are, 
:ien brotherhood anywhere is an irri- 
escent dream and the decalogue has 
•ant influence in modern business. I, 
jr one, will not scrap my faith and 
How my hopes to drift into an abysmal 
arkness and bow to the powers con- 
•olled by the spirit of hatred, greed and 
ar. I live in hope that our Christian 
vilization is not going to drift into the 
uagmire of European militarism and 
lat it will not lose any of its luster in 
le presence of shintoism, atheism, ag- 



nosticism or other ism. 

"In the building up of the brotherhood 
in industry, there must be the spirit of 
toleration and recognition by both em- 
ployers and employes of their rights to 
protection. There can be no unity in 
threats of wage reductions and lockouts 
on one side, and their getting read., for 
strikes on the other side. 

"If the spirit of real brotherhood pre- 
vailed in industry, force would not be 
necessary for one is dependent upon the 
other. One organization, through its 
financial strength, would not intimidate 
and refuse employment to men who be- 
long to another organization, for the 
very life of trade lies in the mutual con- 
sideration of the rights of each, and 
there would be no such thing as auto- 
cratic rule in industry. 



AMERICAN LABOR LEADS THE WORLD 

(By W. E. Walling.) 




HE American labor move- 
ment differs from the la- 
bor movements of Europe. 
Since the time of Andrew 
Jackson (around 1830) 
we have had political de- 
mocracy in America's industrial regions, 
id soon after that we established uni- 
rsal education. If political democracy 
i to the present has brought labor only 
; part of what labor demands and ex- 
cts, it has at least given us a century 
democratic experience, training an'd 
actice, a century of thinking in denio- 
atic terms and a century of striving 
ward democratic goals. It is due to 
is good fortune of our history and not 
1 an inborn superiority of American 
irkers that the American labor move- 
.mt is the only labor movement in the 
•rid today that is built consistently 
a democratic foundation, has an ex- 
isively democratic policy and goal, and 
s never departed from democratic 
Ucies. 

Contrast the long democratic experi- 

' r, e of America with that of Europe. It 

s between 1867 and 1SS5 that British 

bor was even half enfranchised and 

iversal education established. The 

1 rmans have been educated as long as 

' have, but they got democracy only 

1 1918 — French democracy dates from 

TG, and the only previous democratic 

I •eriences of that country were brief 

1 olutionary periods — a fact which has 

1 ifused many French workers as to 



the relative values of democracy and of 
revolutionary violence. 

The superiority of American labor lies 
in the friendship it has made. For more 
than a quarter century it has worked, 
wherever possible, with American rural 
labor, the farmers. 

By its clean-cut political policy, grad- 
ually developed and still in the process of 
evolution, American labor has avoided 
all the confusion of a so-called labor 
party which is a labor party in name 
only — since every democratic country 
must admit and largely depend upon 
non-labor elements. Such a party is in 
reality a party of advanced democracy. 
To call it labor rather than democratic 
brings two evils. Not only is the labor 
movement likely to be invaded and 
swamped by outsiders, but certain ele- 
ments of labor are given by this name 
an opportunity to put forth the theory, 
as has commonly occurred in Europe, 
that labor can advance politically 
through a non-democratic or even an 
anti-democratic program independently 
of other groups of producers. Never for 
one moment has American labor favored 
or tolerated this drawing of class lines 
between one group of producers and an- 
other. If it has waged economic and 
political war against any part of society 
it has been a war directed exclusively 
ascainst parasites and exploiters. It has 
never preached or tolerated the theory 
that Organized Labor or industrial la- 
bor has a right to rule over any other 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



group of producers, but has sought to 
unite all producers against the common 
enemy. 

Amei'ican labor is today more united 
than labor of any country of the 
world with the possible exception of 
Great Britain. And this unity has been 
won and held against stronger influences 
making for division than exist in any 
other nation, since America has been 
the battleground of all the theories as 
well as all the prejudices of the workers 
of all Europe. Yet we are better united. 
The reason? Labor tends to unite on 
all labor questions ; labor tends to divide 
on all the non-labor questions that take 
up so much of the time and energy of 
the political parties of Europe. The word 
"solidarity" is more widely used in Eu- 
rope; actual solidarity is more advanced 
in the United States. 

American labor is for international 
unity. Every superiority it has achieved 
makes it that much more valuable to the 
labor world. It does not claim leader- 
ship, but it offers to the world of labor 
the' invaluable experience of the oldest 
political democracy and the leading in- 
dustrial nation. It hopes and believes 
that by following the American method 
of attending to labor affairs to the ex- 
clusion of the outside matters that di- 
vide labor the national labor movements 
of Europe and the entire world move- 
ment will achieve a new and more solid 
unity. It welcomes the new tendency of 
European labor to do as America has 
done in putting democracy above all 



social dogmas. It believes that a more 
substantial, more permanent and more 
effective labor internationalism can be 
erected on this basis — an internation- 
alism in which the working people of 
every great nation will be able to make 
a distinct and indespensable contribution 
to the whole. And it believes that such 
a movement will be able everywhere tc 
achieve its entire industrial, social and 
political program — so far as that pro- 
gram rests upon democratic principles. 

But great as have been its achieve- 
ments in the past, American labor looks 
to the future — and it is for the purposes 
of future development that the superior-, 
ity of its methods are most marked. It 
has not offered to solve in advance all 
the major problems of government and 
industry that the rising generation of 
workers will have to face. But it has 
done something better. Economically 
and politically, American labor has 
builded a solid foundation and has be- 
gun the erection of a structure no im- 
portant part of which will have to be 
torn down. It has left American labor 
free, freer than the labor of any nation 
of the world, to determine its own des- 
tinies — without an incumbering heritage 
of outworn theories or of colossal blun- 
ders due to the effort to put these theo- 
ries into effect. That American labor 
will utilize to the full the superior oppor- 
tunities offered by the superior freedom 
of the American movement no American 
and few who know anything about 
America will question. 



NO RECONSTRUCTION WITHOUT FAIR TREATMENT OF LABOR 

(By Hugh Frayne.) 




S a result of the great 
world war the labor prob- 
lem has been more prom- 
inently brought to the at- 
tention of the people of 
our country than ever be- 
fore and those who have never given this 
vital subject more than passing notice 
have been brought to realize that the 
whole social structure rests upon labor, 
and unless labor is fairly treated and its 
rights fully recognized, there cannot be 
a reconstruction of industrial and social 
conditions that will be fundamentally 
sound or that will remove the growing 
feeling of unrest and the spread of ex- 
treme radicalism in the country. 

That there is a keen social unrest 
spreading among the workers through- 



out the land no one can deny and to 
treat it with passive indifference is a 
very serious mistake as that is not the 
remedy to cure this unrest. Many of 
the common necessities of life are be- 
coming prohibitive to the working man 
and his family on account of the high 
cost of living, so much so that many 
families are compelled to deny them- 
selves those things which are necessary 
to sustain life. Values and profits are 
entirely too high ; much of it might be 
classed as profiteering and the purchas- 
ing power of the American dollar has de- 
preciated to a point where it is now only 
worth half of its full standard. 

To prevent this growing unrest that 
is leading many to the doctrine of Bol- 
shevism is the responsibility of every 



THE CARPENTER 



17 



one of us who believes that sane meth- 
ods rather than insane should be applied. 
How is this to be accomplished? By 
what plan or system can the country be 
brought back from a war to a peace 
basis without seriously affecting the 
whole social fabric? Are we to return 
to the old system of industrial war 
caused by the employers of the country 
continuing to deny labor the right to 
organize or that labor will not be per- 
mitted to have any say in the making 
of the conditions under which it will be 
employed? Is the standard of living of 
the American working man and his fam- 
ily to be placed at a point where he or 
they must deny themselves many of the 
common necessities in order to live at 
all? The old idea of a living will have 
to be revised so that every comfort of 
life, consistent with the station of the 
worker, shall be enjoyed by him and his 
dependents. Life's comforts must be 
graded upwards in future. Exploitation 
of all kinds must cease if we are to have 
a better world and a better life. Labor 
believes that it is entitled to this as it 
did most to save the woidd for democracy. 

The world needs balancing and Amer- 
ica must furnish her share, and perhaps 
the largest of the influence in that direc- 
tion ; we must be safe and sane conserva- 
tives. It is necessary that the leaders 
of this country should realize that the 
high tension which is now upon the peo- 
ple, despite the end of the great war, 
must be relieved. It is intensely neces- 
sary, not only for our own sakes but for 
the sakes of all the people of the world, 
that as soon as possible we should be 
put back on a sound basis. 

The war has demonstrated as never 
before the power of labor and its great 
importance in the affairs of the world. 
It has been clearly shown that there is 
no phase of the industrial life of our 
country that labor, in some form or 
other, does not enter. With this fact in 
mind, let us not make the serious mis- 
take of trying to reconstruct a great 
nation upon a foundation from which 
the rights of labor have been overlooked 
and expect the structure to endure. The 
greatest asset of a nation is labor; it 
should be protected in its rights. High 
standards for labor bring a higher de- 
velopment and the future should not be 
measured by the standards of the past. 
Labor should be accorded full recogni- 
tion and receive justice and equity in all 
its claims, 



In the stabilization of business, wrong 
impressions as to labor's importance 
should be righted for unless the labor 
problem is considered as part of the 
whole subject of reconstruction, indus- 
trial wars will continue to go on and will 
be more harmful to the nation's welfare 
because the workers have learned that 
they were the greatest factor in the war 
and feel that they are entitled to a larger 
share of the results of their labor than 
ever before. They will not be satisfied 
with the same consideration as that of 
the pre-war period. Unless this is done, 
a social unrest will be created that will 
have a more farreaching effect upon the 
affairs of the country than even the war 
itself, because it would be more perma- 
nent. 

Consideration should be given to the 
international aspect of this problem, 
having in mind that American living 
standards should not be jeopardized by 
that of any other nation. The unfair 
competition, either to business interests 
or to labor, must be prevented. Our 
country has assumed financial obliga- 
tions unheard of in the history of the 
world up to this time and we will be 
obliged to meet them in the way of tax- 
ations and will be called upon to finance, 
feed and supply the rest of the world 
with many of the things they cannot 
furnish themselves. Our standards for 
this reason must be kept at the very peak. 

It should not be the policy of big cor- 
porations or employers generally to ex- 
pand their profits through the exploita- 
tion of labor. High standards and con- 
ditions of employment for labor are es- 
sentially necessary for the fullest de- 
velopment of the after-the-war condi- 
tions as the great burden of taxation 
falls on the shoulders of the working 
people of the country. Hence, high 
wages and standards are necessary to 
meet this obligation. 

In the rehabilitation of the country to 
a sound and safe basis the general wel- 
fare of all should be carefully consid- 
ered, to prevent disarrangement of in- 
dustrial stability that would cause 
economic depression. If the idea of so- 
cial and economic justice to the workers 
is given due consideration I feel sure 
that the danger of the spread of Bol- 
shevism will be reduced to a minimum, 
if not entirely removed. This doctrine, 
as you know, thrives upon industrial un- 
rest and by removing the cause with the 



18 



THE C A R P E X T E R 



remedy suggested, the disease will soon 
disappear. 

Shall the American people accept this 
new doctrine as the only remedy to cure 
our social and economic ills? Shall we 
stop the wheels of progress and turn 
back the hands on the clock of time of 
centuries of enlightenment and destroy 
all the advancement that the world has 
made ; shall we substitute for our pres- 
ent form of government a system that 
has no ideals as a guide? Shall we per- 
mit the religion, the art. the literature 
and the cherished traditions of a nation 
to be swept aside for that which would, 
if put in practice, turn the human race 
back to days and conditions that existed 
in the iceand stone ages, or evenbef ore that. 

I do not believe the American people 
are ready now nor do I think they will 
ever be ready to accept this false philos- 
ophy which pretends to lead the way for 
social and economic justice to the work- 
ing people. It has an ulterior motive 
founded upon an impracticable theory of 
nationalization, even of the home, that is 
repugnant to all who believe that the 
sac-redness of the home must be pro- 
tected as that is the one place to which 
a country must look for its national life 
and greatness and the ideals that go to 
make up all that is cherished by those 
who believe in government and are will- 
ing to give their lives if necessary, in 
defense of those principles. 

Bolshevism is an impossible doctrine. 
If the workers of this or any other 
country are not to receive social and 
economic justice in any other way than 
through a revolutionary movement that 
would destroy government, then it is 
best that the world should cease to be 
rather than to live under a condition as 
proposed by the doctrines of Bolshevism. 
Shall civilization, which society has 
taken centuries to build up, be sacrificed 
for this new Utopian idea, this idea 
which is madness founded upon a false 
theory and unsound principles of eco- 
nomics. 

This is the greatest country in the 
world and it is only natural that we 
sometimes have reason to find fault with 
some of the legislation that has been en- 
acted but must we, because of this rea- 
son, tear down the very structure of our 
government because a few individuals 
at times may be placed in official power 
and abuse the power and privileges vest- 
ed in them to the great disadvantage of 
the people. With the right of franchise 



that every citizen enjoys, we have it 
within our power to change such laws 
as may not be in the interest of all the 
people. 

It is too much to expect that the or- 
ganized labor movement of America 
should be left to cope alone with this 
industrial unrest. It can be dealt with 
by a triangle of government, capital and 
labor working in full co-operation with 
each other and without force. I have 
repeatedly said that you cannot destroy 
Bolshevism by putting it in jail or club- 
bing it. or even by killing the individual 
bolshevist. and you cannot deport it. 
Here and there you may find a bolshevist 
propagandist who has violated the law 
and you may deport him, but he leaves 
the propaganda behind. The seed has 
been sown. The thing that bolshevism 
thrives on is social unrest and you will 
have destroyed bolshevism and the seed 
have cured social unrest. Improved in- 
dustrial life and the removal of many 
of the oppressive conditions that work- 
ers are living under will successfully 
meet the situation. It will not only re- 
move the extreme radical tendencies but 
in my opinion is the solution to the 
Americanization of the foreign element 
and will make them understand what 
America and American citizenship in its 
fullest sense really stands for. 

"Organize"' has been the watchword, 
of the American Federation of Labor for 
years. "Educate" has been likewise a 
slogan of labor for years. There are no 
better words today — no better guides to 
complete freedom of that industrial dem- 
ocracy which no better guides to the de- 
velopment has come to be the dream of 
mankind and the hope of the race. 

Let the message to the workers be one 
of encouragement and loyalty to the 
Government. Loyalty and solidarity in 
our organization so that Organized Labor 
in the future, as in the past, shall con- 
tinue to advance the cause of humanity 
and protect the interests of the working 
people of the nation, and bring into their 
lives more happiness and comfort 
through a greater and more improved 
condition, making the world better for 
all to live in. Let us strive harder by 
work, deed and action to make ourselves 
worthy of the great movement in which 
we are working for the cause of hu- 
manity. 

America has saved the world for dem- 
ocracy, now let us save democracy for 
the world. 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



PHE MOVE FOR SHORTER HOURS AT THE END OF THE 18TH CENTURY 
AND BEGINNING OF THE 19TH 

(By Frank Duffy.) 




NE of the most interesting 
subjects in the history of 
"The American Labor 
Movement" is that deal- 
ing with the reduction of 
the hours of toil. It dates 
rnck to the colonial days when men of 
he trades worked practically fourteen 
lours per day. 

In 1791 the "House Carpenters' Union 
)f Philadelphia, Pennsylvania" demand- 
•d a shorter work day. 

In 1796 the "House Carpenters' Union 
>f New York City" made a similar de- 
uand. 

In 1803 the "Shipwrights and Caulk- 
•rs' Association of New York" did like- 
vise. 

In 1806 the "House Carpenters' Union 
>f New York" followed suit. 

In 1812 the "Carpenters' Union of 
ioston" demanded a shorter work day. 

In 1822 "The Columbian Charitiable 

Society of Shipwrights and Caulkers of 

ioston and Charleston, Massachusetts" 

lemanded a 10-hour day. 

To reduce the hours of labor from 



fourteen to ten per day was a big under- 
taking and brought upon the working- 
men the indignation and opposition of 
employers and merchants alike with lit- 
tle or no sympathy, encouragement or 
support from the public. This move- 
ment was looked upon as a grievous 
one, the employers claiming "it would 
leave the men idle several of the most 
valuable hours of the day." 

In some places the movement was a 
success but in the majority of instances 
it was a failure. 

There was no uniformity of action 
among the workers in those days. Every 
city looked after its own affairs inde- 
pendently and alone. This caused the 
"Journeymen House Carpenters' Asso- 
ciation of Philadelphia" to call a Na- 
tional Convention of carpenters to be 
held in that city on October 4, 1836, for 
the express purpose of taking united ac- 
tion to establish the 10-hour work day. 
Even this was not successful. All these 
movements, however, had their effect in 
the final establishment of the 10-hour 
day a few years later. 



UNEMPLOYMENT IN THE NEAR EAST 




HE unemployment situa- 
tion in the Near East can 
no longer be called a 
crisis. It's a calamity, a 
catastrophe and anything 
else that describes abso- 
ute ruin. From Constantinople east to 
he Caspian Sea there is scarcely such^ 
1 1 thing as employment. After seven 
•ears of war, massacre and deportation 
aid" at last famine, the workers of 
Vrrueuia and Transcaucasia, are reduced 
a state of utter destitution. A large 
(fercentage of them have already per- 
shed, leaving behind them their or- 
>haned children, without shelter or pro- 
eetion. Four hundred thousand of the 
survivors in Transcaucasia alone, are 
lomeless and penniless. Their one hope 
ies in the response of their brother 
vorkers in America to the call the Near 
Sast is making in their behalf. 

The new Armenian Government, es- 
ablished last spring, is making every 
'ffort to save its people, but it is helpless 
cope with the results of seven years 
>f destruction and the famine which 



has spread from Russia into their terri- 
tory. They are doing their utmost in 
providing transportation facilities for 
food and supplies sent over from Amer- 
ica, in offering Government buildings to 
house the orphaned children, and even 
in turning over to the Near East Relief, 
16,700 acres of land for spring planting. 
But funds and food they are unable to 
give. The workers, who for these long 
years have striven so persistently to 
keep themselves and their families alive 
face annihilation today. 

Already starvation is in process. Cap- 
tain Paxton Hibben, one of the foremost 
authorities on the Near East, describes 
in an article in "Leslie's Weekly," what 
he saw when he visited Armenia last 
summer. 

"When I stepped off the train at Alex- 
andropol," says he, "I had to push my 
way through a crowd of refugees lining 
the platform of the station. There were 
among them hundreds of children quite 
naked, who elawed at my clothes and 
begged for bread, not in the sing-song 
of the professional child beggar of the 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



streets of eastern cities, but with a des- 
perate insistance, a sort of sobbing half- 
mad chatter, with the words "hunger" 
and "bread" tumbling over one another, 
with no sense in it all. The grown peo- 
ple were silently staring ahead of them 
with vacant eyes. What they wore was 
not clothing, but rags pieced together 
with bits of old sacking, disintegrating 
remnants of sheepskins and odds and 
ends like the filthy throve of garbage 
cans and back lots. And with that they 
were half naked, barefoot, and with un- 
kempt hair and incredible emaciation. 

"As I walked through the dim hall- 
way of the station I could scarcely make 
my way for the women and children 
huddled in heaps on the floor, lying all 
piled together, listless and uncaring 
whether they were stepped on or not." 

Expert craftsmen and unskilled la- 
borers are alike without work, and alike 
eager to do anything at all that will 
bring them in some food or that will re- 
pay the American organization for the 
aid they are extending. So far, the rail- 
road workers have been the most fortu- 
nate, for there is employment for them. 
And incidentally, the service they are 
rendering is one of the utmost value to 
their countrymen. The transportation 
of American foodstuffs is the one thing 
that will save the people of Armenia. 
During the past years, when manning a 
train was often a matter of life and 
death, these men have stuck at their 
jobs at the risk of attack and massacre 
by their enemies. 

It is to aid in the economic regenera- 
tion of Armenia, quite as much as to 
supply food and clothing and shelter 
which will tide these people " over the 
winter, that the Near East Relief is 
striving. Conditions are so desperate at 
present, that much of the industrial 
work which they have carried on in their 
orphanages and workshops has had to be 
abandoned in the concentration of effort 
on actual life-saving. For when children 
are lying dead in the streets because 
there is no food to give them, it is diffi- 
cult to apportion funds for carpenter 
shops and shoe factories. But even so, 
the organization appreciates that con- 
structive work must be done. Employ- 
ment bureaus, especially in Constanti- 
nople, are a part of the relief system. 
Unfortunately they are seldom able to 
assign an applicant to anything more 
than washing dishes or shining shoes or 



"hamaling," the Oriental method of 
carrying articles, from shoe boxes to 
pianos " by back." 

Their most practical means of con- 
struction, however, are the industrial 
shops established within the orphanages 
where the boys and girls are taught in 
some trade whereby they can, at the 
earliest moment, become self-supporting, 
and whereby some of the expenses of 
running the relief are defrayed. 

Many of these shops are carpentry 
shops. An order was recently given to 
one of the classes at Tiflis, Georgia, for 
making the furniture for the Italian 
bank in the city. The wood, Circasian- 
walnut, was furnished by the Italian 
firm and all the work done by the boys 
in the Near East Relief orphanages. Of 
course, the benches and tables used by 
the orphans themselves are made in 
these shops. 

The eagerness of the people to obtain 
work whenever possible is splendidly 
illustrated in a recent venture made by 
the Near East Relief at Rodosto, Thrace, 
where six hundred Armenian refugees 
from the war area of Asia Minor were 
given a portion of farming land on which 
to rebuild their homes. The refugees 
had scarcely landed before they began 
building. A few loads of lumber given 
by the Near East Relief furnished the 
frame work and this the men erected. 
The walls were built of mud and stones 
found on the ground, the roofs of red tile, 
made from clay or found among the 
ruins of the abondoned homes of the 
former residents. Within a few days 
after their arrival, each family had his 
own little home, with a hearth fire, and 
a front door, the first home they had 
enjoyed for many a year. 

It is such spirit as this which makes 
the rescue of these people imperative! 
A fine, industrious, independent people, 
forced by the most cruel succession of 
circumstances to seek charity or perish. 
At the soup kitchens throughout the 
Near East, $5 a month will save a life. 
One hundred dollars a year provides for 
the complete support of an orphan child. 
Over sixty thousand children are now in 
Near East Relief homes ; nearly as many 
more are being fed. But unless America 
gives continued and increased support 
thousands more of the four hundred 
thousand homeless men, women and 
children outside, will die of starvation 
and cold. 



THE CARPENTER 
SPEAKS FOR ITSELF 



21 




WHEN DO WE EAT? The old howl of army days is a pertinent question to 
lese veterans. Hired in New York by the committee to enforce the Landis award, 
fter arriving here they refused to work because of the existing labor troubles, 
abor leaders led them to the city hall to demand return tickets. Phil Collins, com- 
.ander of the Naval Post, American Legion, and William Q. Setliffe, State Legion 
djutant, are shown promising them food and housing for the time. "The Legion 
neutral in the labor fight, but for all veterans," said Collins. [Tribune Photo.] 

The illustration submitted is mute evidence of the length to which the 
3-called "Citizens Committee" at Chicago will go to foist upon the unions 
f that city their anti-union attitude, and yet this committee proclaim to 
le public that they are organized for the purpose of enforcing the Landis 
ward, of which the carpenters of Chicago never were a party to. 

The city of Chicago was over run with idle men, and the Citizens Com- 
littee had agents at New York and other cities hiring men to still further 
.lgment the army of unemployed and to such an extent that on March II, 
)22, the City Council at a special meeting appropriated money for the 
nmediate care of the men and render assistance that they might be able 
) return to their homes. The City Council is urging a Grand Jury inves- 
gation of the actions of the so-called Citizens Committee. 

We deplore the idea of these self-appointed guardians of the peoples 
iterest in making the lives of our nation's defenders harder to live by 
taking them the innocent victims of the industrial war, and especially so 
hen about 90 per cent of the so-called Citizens Committee were "Stay at 
iomes" that showed us what real profiteering looked like, making life 
userable for the families of the men who were defending the honor of 
ae nation. 

Our members at Chicago have been put to considerable expense to send 
>en home, who have been lured to Chicago by roseate promises, and we 
Ppe other members will make inquiries through their unions before going 
> any other localities, for the more promising the employment offered the 
etteris the reason why you should investigate and save yourself much grief. 



Editorial 



THE CARPENTER 

Official Journal of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 
CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA ' 

Published on the 15th of each month at the 

CARPENTERS BUILDING 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 
CARPENTERS AKB JOINERS OF AMERICA, 

PUBI-ISHECS 

FRANK DUETT. Editor 

ScBscEirnox Peick 
One Dollar a Tear in Advance, Postpaid 

The publishers and the advertising 
agent use every possible precaution avail= 
able to them against accepting advertise= 
ments from other than reliable firms, but 
do not accept any responsibility for the 
contents of any advertisement which ap= 
pears in "The Carpenter." Should any 
deception be practiced by advertisers at 
any time, upon members, their duty is to 
immediately notify the Post Office au= 
thorities. Therefore, address any com= 
plaints to your local Post Office. 




INDIANAPOLIS. .MAY, 1922 

Something Fundamentally Wrong 
Every few rears, and the past two in 
particular, as regular as the seasons 
themselves we have constantly recurring 
periods of depression in many of our 
staple industries, and thousands of work 
people, who can only just keep their 
heads above water in the busiest times, 
are left without work. How they strug- 
gle through these terrible times is a 
mystery, for although the laboring pop- 
ulation have little wealth, a good num- 
ber of them seem to have been blessed 
with a double portion of English pride, 
and they resent nothing stronger than 
even the mere imputation of poverty. 

We hear on every hand that people 
are becoming mean, sordid, brutal and 
selfish, owing to the blind race for 
wealth; this nobody attempts to deny, 



and yet it is perfectly clear that the 
more raw material we can take from 
Mother Earth and transform into articles 
of utility, the wealthier the community 
must be. But alas! it is wealthier 
collectively and not individually, and 
the creed of present-day commercialism 
is "all for self and none for common- 
wealth." 

Such a pass as we are come to in a 
governed country is a blot on nature. It 
is not logical — for can it be logical that 
the greater the waste the better for the 
community? And yet if there were 
greater waste, would there not also be 
greater demand for labor? It is not 
right — it cannot be right that an idle 
class who tie up the land for private 
parks, game and such like should live in 
ease while those who create all the 
wealth, those who are the bulwark, the 
sinews, nay, the very life of the nation, 
should be reduced to live in such a state 
that death is often hailed as a welcome' 
release. 

In the face of all this, politica: 
omists calmly say that it is a necessary 
evil consequent upon the "law of supply 
and demand." But why? The supply 
is there — even to overproduction — and 
Heaven knows, there is sufficient de- 
mand. If this is the result of what they 
call the law of supply and demand, is 
it not high time that this law was 
thrown overboard and another tried in 
its stead? 

We, as a Christian nation, made great 
sacrifice of blood and treasure to help 
to bring about the abolition of slavery. 
and yet (although nothing is further 
from our thoughts than to advocate 
slavery j, the slave was in some res: 
better off than the number of strong and 
willing people who are wandering about 
the country today in a futile search for 
work. The slave more often than not 
had a humane master — it was only a 
small minority who were habitually ill- 
treated — and they would be well fed and 
kept in good trim by their masters from 
mere self-interest, for the owner could 
not expect as much or as good work from 
a half-starved creature as one who had 
a sufficiency of wholesome food. More- 



THE CARPENTER 



23 



over, if the slave fell ill, it was to his 
master's interest to treat him well and 
get him in good health again as quickly 
as possible that he might get back to 
work. 

Now, look for a moment at the posi- 
tion of the ordinary workman. He is 
usually paid such wages as will just pro- 
vide him and his family with absolute 
necessaries, and, in some cases, with a 
few inexpensive luxuries. If his health 
should break down he is left to struggle 
along as best he may, and as his income 
is cut off he probably gets insufficient 
nourishment and attention, and often 
manages to hang a millstone of debt 
around his neck, which has to be paid 
off at a few shillings weekly when he re- 
covers and- recommences work — pro- 
viding that his situation has not been 
filled in the meantime. As he becomes 
aged and begins to lose vigor a younger 
man will prohably take his place, and he 
will be supported either by contributions 
from his children (who themselves have 
in many cases households to maintain), 
or he will be left to end his days in the 
poorhouse. There is something funda- 
mentally wrong with a system that im- 
poses such conditions on a country that 
is supposed to be "the land of the free 
and the home of the brave." 
* * * 

Labor's Fight Against Compulsory 
Arbitration 

In commenting on the above caption, 
"Forbes," in its issue of January 21st, 
editorially says : 

"Organized Labor is up in arms 
•against the passing of any laws making 
compulsory the arbitration of labor dis- 
putes. Capitalists of a certain cast of 
mind urge that labor's opposition be ig- 
nored. Now, while it would doubtless 
save the public from much inconvenience 
were workmen compelled to settle all 
their disputes without stopping work, 
nevertheless, isn't it our proud boast that 
America is the land where freedom 
flourishes as nowhere else? 

"Where tried, compulsory arbitration 
has not proved a panacea for all econ- 
omic strife. 

"Not only so, but somehow, deep down 
hi one's heart there is a feeling that we 
ourselves would hate to be compelled to 
work for anyone on terms abhorrent to 
ns. I confess that I would not like to 
be subjected to any law which would 
compel me, under any and all circum- 
stances, to place a dispute with an em- 



ployer in the hands of a third party and 
be forced to work under conditions 
which I felt in my heart and soul were 
unjust. I cherish my own freedom so 
much that I instinctively shrink from 
anything which would even savor of 
abridging the legitimate freedom of any 
other human being. 

" Of course, advocates of compulsory 
arbitration claim that the legislation 
they advocate would not rob any man 
of his fullest freedom. But the central 
idea of such legislation is to prevent bod- 
ies of workmen from throwing down 
their tools. Personally, I would rather 
accept the risk of being subjected to very 
grave inconvenience than vote for any 
legal measure honestly regarded by mil- 
lions of my fellowmen as fastening up- 
on them something of the nature of, to 
use their own language, 'slavery.' " 

"I would put humaneness above in- 
dustrial considerations any day and 
every day. 

"But I am firmly convinced that any- 
thing and everything which is not hu- 
mane is unsound economically." 

Jjc * * 

Blame for the Jobless 

If employers were required to pay to 
furloughed men a dollar a day, over a 
period of thirteen weeks, the unemploy- 
ment problem would be all but solved, 
Prof. John R. Commons, of the Uni- 
versity of "Wisconsin, declared in a state- 
ment made to the American Association 
of Labor Legislation. 

"Unemployment insurance funds have 
proven successful where tried, and un- 
employment compensation laws are 
needed as an aid to industry in perma- 
nently preventing the worst conse- 
quences of seasonal and cyclical depres- 
sions, Professor Commons asserted. The 
state, he thought, cannot profitably 
longer ignore this question, which strikes 
at the very roots of fixed society. 

"Neither the wage-earners nor the 
state can prevent unemployment," con- 
tinued Dr. Commons. "All they can do 
is to partly relieve it. 

"The business-like way of doing it is 
to place the responsibility on the busi- 
ness men who alone are in a position to 
prevent it. 

Cooperative Societies 

Those of our readers who take an in- 
terest in progressive movements should 
exercise care lest they confuse the so- 
called Co-Operative Society of America 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



with the bona fide co-operative organiza- 
tions that have been and are being or- 
ganized all over the country. The Co- 
operative Society of America, which is 
wholly dominated by a man named Har- 
rison Parker and three or four others, 
has been having trouble in the courts for 
some time and is barred from doing 
business in quite a number of states be- 
cause of "blue sky" laws that serve as a 
check on shady transactions. It is 
charged that Parker and his associates 
stung investors for upward of $11,000,- 
000 in various undertakings, some of 
which are alleged to be clearly fraudu- 
lent while others may be only partial 
losses. It is unfortunate that they are 
scheming parasites who always succeed 
in feeding upon honest and bona fide 
movements by purloining a good name. 
Therefore, it behooves those who are in- 
terested in co-operation and who desire 
to join the movement to investigate the 
subject carefully before investing any 
funds. The All-American Co-Operative 
League, with headquarters in Washing- 
ton, is a bona fide organization. 
* * * 

Union Labor Big Asset To Country 

"Organized labor is America's great- 
est asset," declared Congressman James 
O'Connor, of New Orleans, in the course 
of a remarkable speech in the House of 
Representatives on the industrial situa- 
tion. He said in part: 

"I am for the Federation of Labor as 
an American who wishes to see his coun- 
try remain the land of the free and the 
home of the brave — not an imperial au- 
tocracy with a few thousand financial, 
industrial and commercial nabobs in con- 
trol of the destiny of the nation. The 
American Federation is the great in- 
strumentality by which American men 
and women have been able to secure 
even an approach to their share of the 
wealth they help to create." 

Discussing unemployment, Mr. O'Con- 
nor said: 

"Ponder over this startling and 
mournful statement : The former na- 
tional commander of the American Le- 
gion states that 200.000 men who were 
willing to go through hell to serve their 
country only a few years ago are with- 
out employment today, and that means, 
perhaps, without bread in the near 
future — and millions of their fellow 
workers walk the streets in our big 



cities, agonized and helpless, in the face 
of the most fearful calamity that has 
ever befallen our agricultural and busi- 
ness interests. 

"What a tragic commentary on a civ- 
ilization that can boast of the wonders 
that have been accomplished in the fields 
of art architecture, engineering and 
science." 

Mr. O'Connor called attention to the 
fact that the repeal of the tax on excess 
profits would save hundreds of millions 
of dollars to those corporations which 
have profiteered during and since the 
war. These profiteers, he said, were 
conducting a nation-wide attack on Or- 
ganized Labor, in order to divert public 
attention from their own misdeeds. 

"In order to bolster up their cry for a 
reduction in the pay of wage workers, 
and in order to head off and confuse the 
public," he said, "these artful dodgers 
shouted 'stop thief — stop union labor. 
Backed by a howling propaganda this 
ruse has been in a measure successful. 
But their triumph is only momentary. 

"Soon or late the American people will 
determine that it is watered stock which 
is the thief, and not union labor; that 
the open shop cry is bunk and guff to 
throw the inquisitors off the track, and 
to beat down Organized Labor first, and 
all other labor subsequently, so that the 
wage earners of America shall be the 
servants and the hirelings of the rich 
and opulent." 

Workers Educated In Co=Operation 

The St. Paul Labor College, organized 
by the Trades and Labor Assembly of 
the Minnesota pity, announces a course 
on Banks and Finance, including co-op- 
erative control of credit. Forty worker. 1 
are already enrolled for the course, 
which will be given by a banker in 
sympathy with labor's ideals. 

As the outcome of a course in co-op- 
eration in the Boston Labor College, the 
building trades unions have formed the 
Construction and Housing Company oj 
Boston, with $100,000 capital, which if 
not only building homes for workers, bul 
doing important construction work foi 
outside parties. General courses in the 
principles of co-operation are now be- 
ing provided for New York workers bj 
the educational departments of two oJ 
the larger labor unions, 



Official Information 




GENERAL OFFICERS 

OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD 

OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA 

General Office 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

JOHN T. COSGROVE 

Carpenters" Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

GEORGE H. LAKEY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

THOMAS NEALE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind 



General Executive Board 
First District, T. M. GUERIN 
290 Second Ave., Troy, N. Y. 



Second District, D. A. POST 
416 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



Third District, JOHN H. POTTS 
646 Melish Ave., Cincinnati, O. 



Fourth District, JAMES P. OGLETREE 
926 Marina St., Nashville, Tenn. 



Fifth District, J. W. WILLIAMS 
3536 Wyoming St., St. Louis, Mo. 



Sixth District, W. A. COLE 

810 Merchants National Bank Building 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
1705 Chambord St., Montreal, Que., Can. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFF'S, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive 
^oard must be sent to the General Secretary. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

We are continuously having numerous 
complaints that members are not receiv= 
ing our official Journal, "The Carpenter," 
and upon investigation we find that in 
most cases it arises from the fact that 
the only address submitted to the Gen= 
eral Office is "General Delivery," and 
when sent this way, and not called for, 
the Postmaster sends same back to this 
General Office at quite an expense. 

We must therefore insist that the Fi= 
nancial Secretaries of each and every 
Local get the correct street address of 
every member of his Local in good stand= 
ing who does not receive the Journal, 
and submit same to the General Office 

Financial Secretaries will also take in= 
to consideration that it is necessary to 
call attention on those same blanks to the 
names of members who are suspended 
and granted clearance so that their 
names can be erased from the mailing 
list in the town or city in which their 
Local is located. If sufficient blanks are 
not furnished at any time, our attention 
should be called to same and they will 
be promptly forwarded. 

We must also insist that the Financial 
Secretaries obtain the same information 
from all members newly initiated and 
admitted on clearance, together with 
those who have changed their address, 
and forward same to the General Office 
on the blanks furnished for that purpose 
each and every month. 

We also desire to call attention to the 
fact that it is not necessary to furnish 
each and every month a complete roster 
of 3 r our membership, and their addresses, 
only changes in same being necessary. 

By canning out the foregoing instruc- 
tions you will not only assist this General 
Office in facilitating the delivery of our 
official Journal, "The Carpenter," but 
you will do a favor to the membership 
at large. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



Convention Call of the American 
Federation of Labor 

The Forty-second Annual Convention 
of the American Federation of Labor 
will be held at Cincinnati, O., beginning 
at 10:00 o'clock. Monday morning, June 
12, 1922, and will continue in session 
from day to day until the business of the 
Convention is completed. 

Representation in the Convention will 
be on the same basis as heretofore. 

Questions of importance, will of neces- 
sity, occupy the attention of the Cin- 
cinnati Convention. Therefore, the im- 
portance of our movement, the duty of 
the hour and for the future, demand 
that our organization shall send its full* 
quota of delegates. 

The Convention will meet at the 
Armory and the Headquarters of the 
Executive Council will be at the Linton 
Hotel. 



Convention Call of the Union Label 

Trades Department of the American 

Federation of Labor 

The Fifteenth Convention of this De- 
partment will be held at Cincinnati, O., 
beginning at 10 :00 o'clock Thursday 
morning, June 8, 1922, and will con- 
tinue in session from day to day until 
the business of the Convention has been 
completed. Representation in the Con- 
vention will he on the same basis as 
heretofore. 

The Headquarters of the President 
and Secretary will be at the Linton 
Hotel, where delegates should present 
their original credentials immediately 
upon their arrival in Cincinnati. 



Landis Organized Baseball 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

At a meeting of L. U. No. 13, held 
Thursday evening. March 23. 1922. I 
was on motion instructed to communi- 
cate with all the Local Unions in this 
district, asking them to request their 
members to refrain from attending 
Landis organized baseball, also to com- 
municate with the General Office, asking 
them to have our request printed in our 
monthly Journal. "The Carpenter," 

With best wish I remain, 
Fraternally yours, 
L. U. No. 13. WM. R. DANIELS. 

Endorsed by L. U. No. 10, No. 181, 
No. 504, No. 1784, No. 1367, No. 448, 
Chicago District Council, 



Notice 

The Chamber of Commerce of Phila 
delphia, Pa., are spreading broadcast 
through the daily press, notices asking 
for mechanics and leading them to be 
leive that work has started on the Sesqpi 
Centennial exhibition buildings. W 
are advised by our District Council o 
that city that this is not true, as tt<\ 
have not as yet broken ground, in fact 
there is very little work there for tli 
men of that district and under the cir 
cumstances we would advise our mem 
bers to take up the matter with W. T 
Allen, Secretary-Treasurer of the Dis 
trict Council before making arrange 
ments for going there to work. 



Local Unions Chartered In March 
Childers, Tex. Atlanta, Ga. 

East San Diego. Cat Boyle Heights, Cal. 
Stanwood, Wash. 

Total. 5 Local Unions. 



Proceedings of the Second Quarterly 

Session, 1922, of the General 

Executive Board 

During the interim between the first and sei 
ond quarterly session of 1922, the followin 
was acted upon by the Board by corres 
pondence. 

January 30, 1922. 

Marion. Ind., L. U. 365. — Movement for th, 
same scale of wages, 80c per hour. 8-hour day 
effective March 1, 1922. Official sanction grant 
ed ; financial aid to be considereed later, ii 
such sums as the funds will warrant, whei 
reports are made to the General Office. 

March 20, 1922. 

The second quarterly 1922 session of th 
General Executive Board was called to order '■; 
General President Hutcheson on the above dar» 

The reports of the General President. Fir- 
and Second General Vice-Presidents were re 
ceived and filed. 

A general discussion took place relative t< 
the good and welfare of the organization ant 
the prospects for the coming vear. 

'March 21, 1922. 

Cleveland, O., District Council. — Full ac^ 
counting of appropriations made to Clevelani 
District Council for relief of men locked oir 
during the ye>ar 1921 received, accepted an' 
filed. The General Executive Board appropri 
ated the sum of $537.50 to reimburse the Dis 
trict Council overpaid. 

Secretary Schwarzer and Business Agen 
Ruddy of the Cleveland District Council ap 
peared before the Board relative to the present 
lockout brought about on account of the mer 
refusing to accept a reduction in wages an< 
other causes. After thorough consideration ol 
the case the Board decided to financially assi^i 
the Cleveland District Council as detailed re: 
ports are made to the General Office. 

Peru, 111., L. U. Xo. 196. — Request for strike 
benefits. Not having supplied the General Office, 
with the information asked for in accordance 
with the instructions of the General Executive 
Board at last meeting and not having followed 
out the advise given, the General Executiv 
Board cannot gTant financial aid, 



^_ 



THE CARPENTER 



27 



Charlotte, N. C, L. U. No. 2146. — The sum 
>f $200 was appropriated for organizing pur- 
iosck to be spent under the supervision of the 
Jeneral President. 

Knoxville, Tenn., L. U. No. 50. — An appro- 
bation of $500 was made for organizing pur- 
ines to be spent under the supervision of the 
Jeneral President. 

Oklahoma. City, Okla., L. U. No. 276. — Re- 

luest for an appropriation for organizing pur- 

loses. The General Executive Board referred 

equest to the General President to inaugurate 

I n organizing campaign. 

Aurora, 111., L. U. No. .916. — Request for an 
Impropriation for the purpose of keeping their 
members in good standing. Request denied. 

New Orleans, La., District Council. — Request 

fir an appropriation of $2,000 for the purpose 

f maintaining a Business Agent. Request de- 

ied and the matter of organizing was referred 

'■ o the General President. 

Killings, Mont., L. U. No. 1172. — The sum 
f !?r>00 was appropriated for organizing pur- 
oses to be spent under the supervision of the 
eneral President. 

Rockford, 111., L. U. No. 1523. — Request for 
u appropriation to be expended for organizing 
tirposes. Request denied. 

Omaha, Neb. — Twin City District Council. — 
pquest for an appropriation for organizing 
1 arposes. Denied. 
Great Falls, Mont., L. U. No. 286. — Protest 
, r ainst the suspension of G. A. Bosley from 
ocal Union by the General President for is- 
ling a circular letter advocating the forma- 
>n of "One Big Union." The General Exeeu- 
ve Board concurred in the action of the Gen- 
ii 1 President. 
' An emblem for the Ladies' Auxiliary Unions, 
i, insisting of the official shield of our organiza- 
»n in the center surrounded by a white circle 
ith the words : '"Ladies' Auxiliary of the 
uited Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
America" as suggested by Ladies' Auxiliary 
>. <>3 of Atlantic City, N. J., and submitted 
i the General Office by Brother R. C. Gaskill 
I is adopted by the Board as the official em- 
im for Ladies' Auxiliary Unions. 
! Magna, Utah, L. U. No. 1894. — An appro- 
iation of $24 was made for organizing pur- 
I ses to be spent under the supervision of the 
ineral President. 

I Salt Lake City, Utah, L. U. No. 725.— An ap- 
iopriation of $60 was made for organizing 
rposes to be spent under the supervision of 
■ General President. 

Toronto, Can., District Council. — Request for 
appropriation was denied. 
- ( Presidtmt Jensen, Secretary-Treasurer Galvin 
d Business Agent Taylor, representing the 
icago District Council, appeared before tin; 
ard relative to conditions as they exist in 
icago at the present time, particularly the 
lea in court. These matters were referred 
the General President for further infor- 
tion. 

March 22, 1922. 
3t Joseph County District Council, South 
ud, Ind. — Request for an appropriation of 
•0 for organizing purposes. Request denied, 
•luskegon and Muskegon Heights District 
-ineil, Muskegon, Mich.- — Request for an ap- 
»priation to maintain a Business Agent. Re- 
■st denied. 

Uigusta, Ga., L. U. No. 2S3. — The sum of 
>0 was appropriated for organizing work, 
be spent under the supervision of the Gen- 
1 1 President. 



Salt Lake City, Utah, L. U. No. 184. — Three 
hundred dollars was appropriated for organ- 
izing work, to be spent under the supervision 
of the General President. 

Cisco, Tex., L. U. 1410. — Request for an ap- 
propriation to make payment on Labor Temple 
Building. Request denied as the General Ex- 
ecutive Board is not authorized to appropriate 
funds to assist in payments on Labor Temples 
or homes. 

Appeal of L. U. No. 427, Omaha, Neb., from 
the decision rendered by the General President 
in the case of J. M. Hansen vs. L. U. No. 427. 
The decision of the General President was sus- 
tained on grounds set forth therein and appeal 
dismissed. 

Somersworth, N. H., L. U. No. 2429. — An ap- 
propriation of $432 was made for the relief of 
men locked out. 

Bristol, Conn., L. U. No. 952. — An appropria- 
tion of $288 was made for the relief of men 
locked out. 

Santa Rosa, Cal., L. U. No. 751. — An appro- 
priation of $60 was made for the relief of men 
locked out. 

Cleveland, O., District Council. — An appro- 
priation of $2,310 was made for the relief of 
men locked out. 

Sioux City, Iowa, L. U. No. 948. — An appro- 
priation of $132 was made as the final payment 
of benefits for relief of men locked out. 

Livermore Falls, Me., L. U. No. 1963. — Re- 
quest of Local Union to circularize the Local 
Unions in the State of Maine for financial aid 
in their present lockout was approved by the 
General Executive Board. 

Chillicothe, O., L. U. No. 1255. — Movement 
for same scale, SOc per hour, 8-hour day, effec- 
tive June 1, 1922. Official sanction only 
granted. 

Pembroke, Ont., Can., L. U. No. 2466. — Move- 
ment for minimum wage of 65c per hour and 
9-hour day, effective June 1, 1922. Official 
sanction granted ; financial aid to be considered 
later, in such sums as the funds will warrant, 
as reports are made to the General Office. 

Stevens Point, Wis., L. U. No. 1919. — Move- 
ment for same scale of 75c per hour, effective 
May 1, 1922. Official sanction only granted. 

Sheboygan, Wis., L. U. No. 657.* — Movement 
for same scale, S2|c per hour, effective May 1, 
1922. Official sanction granted ; financial aid 
to be considered later, in such sums as the 
funds will warrant, as reports are made to the 
General Office. 

Calgary, Alberta, Can., District Council. — 
Movement for same scale of wages, 90c per 
hour, effective April 1, 1922. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, in 
such sums as the funds will warrant, as reports 
are made to the (Jeneral Office. - 

Appleton, Wis., Fox River Valley District 
Council. — Trade movement. The provision of 
Paragraph II, Section 58, of our General Laws 
not having been complied with, the matter is 
laid over. 

Lebanon, Pa., L. U. No. 677. — Movement for 
same scale, 70c per hour, and 8-hour day. effec- 
tive May 1, 1922. Official sanction granted ; 
financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
made to the General Office. 

Lower Anthracite Region District Council. 
Pa. — Movement for same scale of wages, 80c 
to 90c per hour, effective April 1. 1922. Official 
sanction granted ; financial aid to be considered 
later, in such sums as the funds will warrant; 
as reports are made to the General Office. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Dawson Springs, Ky., L. U. No. 2124. — Move- 
ment for same scale of wages, 80c per hour, 
effective April 3, 1922. Official sanction only 
granted. 

Jersey City, N. J., L. U. No. 1985. (Box- 
makers and Sawyers.) Movement for increase 
in wages, effective May 1, 1922. Official sanc- 
tion granted ; financial aid to be considered 
later, in such sums as the funds will warrant, 
as reports are received at the General Office. 

Evansville, Ind., L. U. No. 90. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from 86c to 92Jc per 
hour, effective April 1, 1922. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as 
reports are received at the General Office. 

New Philadelphia, O., L. U. No. 1S02. — Move- 
ment for same scale of wages, 87Jc per hour, 
effective May 1, 1922. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Allentown, Pa., L. U. No. 1285. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from 60c to 70c per 
hour, effective May 1, 1922. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, in 
such sums as the funds will warrant, as reports 
are received at the General Office. 

Eau Claire, Wis., L. U. No. 1074. — Movement 
for same scale of wages, 70c per hour, effective 
May 15, 1922. Official sanction granted ; finan- 
cial aid to be considered later, in such sums 
as the funds will warrant, as reports are re- 
ceived at the General Office. 

Manitowoc, Wis., L. U. No. 849. — Movement 
for same scale of wages, 80c per hour, effective 
April 1, 1922. Official sanction granted ; finan- 
cial aid to be considered later, in such sums 
as the funds will warrant, as reports are re- 
ceived at the General Office. 

Decatur, 111., L. U. No. 742. — Movement for 
same scale of wages, 90c per hour, effective 
April 1, 1922. Official sanction granted ; finan- 
cial aid to be considered later, in such sums 
as the funds will warrant, as reports are re- 
ceived at the General Office. 

Ottawa, 111., L. U. No. 661. — Movement for 
same scale of wages, 87|c per hour, effective 
April 1, 1922. Official sanction granted ; finan- 
cial aid to be considered later, in such sums as 
the funds will* warrant, as reports are received 
at the General Office. 

Neenah, Wis., L. TJ. No. 630. (Millmen.) 
Movement for an increase in wages from 50c 
to 60c per hour, effective April 1, 1922. Official 
sanction granted ; financial aid to be considered 
later, in such sums as the funds will warrant, 
as reports are made to the General Office. 

Chester, W. Va., L. U. 435. — Movement for 
same scale, $1 per hour, effective May 1, 1922. 
Official sanction only granted. 

Windsor, Ont., Can., L. U. No. 494. — Move- 
ment for same scale of wages, 90c per hour, 
effective April 1, 1922. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
made to the General Office. 

Kankakee, 111., L. U. No. 496. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 85c to 90c per hour, 
effective April 1, 1922. Official sanction only 
granted. 

Chambersburg, Pa., L. U. No. 616. — Move- 
ment for same scale of wages, 60c per hour, 
effective May 1, 1922. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
made to the General Office. 

Rochester, Pa., L. U, No. 422. — Movement 



for same scale, $1 per hour, effective May 1, 
1922. Official sanction granted ; financial aid 
to be considered later, in such sums as the 
funds will warrant, as reports are made to the 
General Office. 

Tipton, Ind., L. U. No. 358. — Movement for 
same scale, 75c per hour, effective March 1, 
1922. Official sanction only granted. 

Danville, 111., L. U. No. 269. — Movement for 
same scale, 87£c per hour, effective April 1, 
1922. Official sanction granted ; financial aid 
to be considered later, in such sums as the 
funds will warrant, as reports are made to the 
General Office. 

York, Pa., L. U. No. 191. — Movement for 
same scale, 75c per hour, effective April 1, 
1922. Official sanction granted ; financial aid 
to be considered later, in such sums as the 
funds will warrant, as reports are made to the 
General Office. 

Lawrence, Mass., District Council. — Move- 
ment for an increase in wages from 85c to 90c 
per hour, effective May 15, 1922. Movement 
sanctioned without financial aid. 

Cornwall, Ont., Can., L. U. No. 2307 — Move- 
ment for minimum wage of 55c per hour, and 
9-hour day, effective May 15, 1922. Official 
sanction granted ; financial aid to be considered 
later, in such sums as the funds will warrant, 
as reports are made to the General Office. 

Kansas City, Mo., District Council. — Move- 
ment for same scale, $1 per hour, effective May 
1, 1922. Official sanction granted; financial 
aid to be considered later, in such sums as the 
funds will warrant, as reports are made to the 
General Office. 

The certificate covering the bond of $50,000 
on General Treasurer Neale was received and 
referred to the General President for safe' 
keeping. 

The certificate covering the bond of $2,000 
on Harry R. Allen, bookkeeper, was received 
and referred to the General Secretary for safe 
keeping. 

Taft, Cal., L. U. No. 1774.— Request to cir- 
culate an appeal to all Local Unions for finan- 
cial assistance was denied. 

The General Executive Board accepted the 
proposition of Coffield, Sanders & Company, 
certified public accountants, to make a quart- 
erly audit of the books and accounts for a fee 
of $500 for the year 1922. 

Philadelphia, Pa. — Request of P. W. Burgess, 
L. U. No. S and W. T. Allen, Secretary of the 
District Council, that the General Office open 
an account with the Producers and Consumers 
Bank of Philadelphia, Pa. Request denied. 

The following accountings were received and 
filed by the General Executive Board covering 
strike and lockout appropriations : 

Tonopah, Nev., L. U. No. 1417, during the 
month of January, 1922. 

San Francisco, Cal., District Council., dur- 
ing the months of June and September, 1921. 

Cincinnati, O., District Council, during the 
months of November, December, January, 1921 
and 1922. 

New York, N. Y., District Council, during 
Ihe month of February, 1922. 

Hoswell, N. M., L. U. No. 511, during the 
months of December, 1921, January and Feb- 
ruary, 1922. 

March 23, 1922. 

Bethlehem, Pa., L. U. No. 406. — Request re- 
ceived from Local Union to hold in abeyance 
1922 trade movements considered at the Jan- 
uary, 1922, session of the General Executive 
Board, which was referred by that body to the 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



General President and member of the General 
BKecutive Board from Second District for in- 
vestigation. General Executive Board com- 
plied with request. 

Appeal of Clement Tarditi, L. U. No. 36, Oak- 
land, Cal., from the decision of the General 
[Measurer in disapproving' claim for disability 
donation. The General Executive Board sus- 
laincd Ihe decision as rendered by the General 
Treasurer on grounds set forth therein and 
appeal was dismissed. 

Appeal of L. U. No. 157, Boston, Mass., in 
the disapproved claim for disability donation 
of Philip Bloomenfleld. The decision of the 
(jeperal Executive Board rendered October 20, 
1921, was reaffirmed by the Board. 

Appeal of L. U. No. 1117, Oilton, Okla., 
from the decision of the General Treasurer, 
account disapproved claim of J. E. Fox for 
wife's funeral donation. The General Execu- 
tive Board referred the matter back to the 
'jeneral Treasurer for further investigation. 

Appeal of August Engelbrecht, L. U. No. 
1055, Lincoln, Neb., from the decision as ren- 
lered by the General Treasurer in disapproving 
laim for wife's funeral donation. The deci- 
sion as rendered by the General Treasurer was 
sustained on grounds set forth therein and 
ippeal dismissed. 

Manchester, N. H., L. U. No. 2064. — An ap- 
iropriation of $1,446 was made for the relief 
if men on strike. 

The regular quarterly audit of the books and 
ecounts was taken up at this time and con- 
inued throughout the day. 

March 24, 1922. 

The audit of books and accounts continued. 

There being no further business to come 
j efore the Board, the minutes were read and 
he session was adjourned. The next meeting 
,o be held commencing Monday, June 19, 1922. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PRANK DUFFY, Secretary. 



carpenters first united as a labor body. 
The meeting hall in the new temple af- 
fords ample facilities for large gather- 
ings and all kinds of entertainment. 



Women Will Organize Auxiliary To 
Local Carpenters' Union 

Tulsa. Okla., carpenters and their 
ives and families had a big "house- 
arming" social affair in the new Labor 
temple recently. Plans had been made 
)r a general good time which everyone 
ajoyed from the old folks down to the 
ids. 

But the music, dancing and games 
ere not the main features of the pro- 
rain. The women in the families are 
reparing to organize a Ladies' Auxiliary 
i the local Carpenters Union. More 
tan fi.OOO women in Tulsa are eligible 
membership in the new organization, 
is stated by officers. Not only the 
ives, but the sisters, daughters and 
others will be included in the roll. 
The entertainment was in charge of 
r . M. Michaels, Ted Rau and W. E. 
'i'. Some of the older members of the 
• ion demonstrated the dancing steps 
1881 which were danced when the 



Union Pen Signs Treaties 

A trade union pen was used by Secre- 
tary of State Hughes in signing the 
treaties resulting from the International 
Conference on the Limitation of Arma- 
ment. 

The pen was made by David Fair- 
banks, 111 Throop St., Chicago, mem- 
ber of the Painters' Union. It was pre- 
sented to Secretary Hughes on Decem- 
ber 21 by Mr. Fairbanks and President 
Gompers of the American Federation of 
Labor. 

Wood from twenty-eight states was 
used in making the pen. It was mount- 
ed with a gold eagle and had a gold 
point. From the staff fluttered twenty- 
eight flags, each attached by a silken 
cord. 

The pen will be preserved by the 
Daughters of the American Revolution, 
in Colonial Hall where the treaties were 
signed. 



Owed To a Restaurant 

'Twas in a restaurant they met — 

One Romeo, one Juliet ; 

'Twas there he first fell into debt, 

For Romeo- d what Juli-et. 

« 

If We Only Understood 

If we knew the care and trials, 

Knew the efforts all in vain, 
And the bitter disappointment. 

Understood the loss and gain — 
Should we help where now we hinder? 

Should we pity where we blame? 

Ah ! we judge each other harshly, 

Knowing not Life's bidden force — 
Knowing not the fount of action 

Is less turbid at its source. 
Seeing not amid the evil 

All the golden grains of good ; 
And we'd love each other better 

If we only understood. 

Could we judge all deeds by motives 

That surround each other's lives, 
See the naked heart and spirit. 

Know what spur the action gives, 
Often we would find it better. 

Purer than we judge we should, 
We should love each other better 

If we only understood. 

Could we judge all deeds by motives, 

See the good and bad within. 
Often we should love the sinner 

All the while we loathe (lie sin; 
Could we know the powers working 

To overthrow integrity. 
We should judge each other's errors, 

More with patient charity. 

—Exchange. 



If you are acquainted with happiness 
introduce him to your neighbor. 



CorrospondoncQ 




A Few Notes From L. U. No. 89 

Editor. "The Carpenter": 

All things considered, the members of 
L. D. No. 89 have good reason for being 
thankful for the manner in which the 
work of the Local is going on. We have 
had a goodly number of members falling 
off. but are also recruiting new mem- 
bers right along. The members are re- 
ceiving the scale here despite the fact 
that the carpenters — so-called — are 
working at anything being offered to 
them. Work is scarce and most of the 
members have been working for "Hunter 
& Walk.** We have had a mild winter 
thus far and this has been a real God- 
send. 

L. D. No. 89 is actively assisting in 
helping to take care of the unemployed 
and has done what it could in supporting 
the "New Hope Committee" work. This 
is an organization which has formed af- 
ter the Central Trades Council here pro- 
tested against the unemployed being de- 
ported by the truck load and also being 
fined and sentenced by the judges to 
work the roads in convict uniform. We 
aim to keep in touch with the cases as 
they are called in court and take care 
of the men who have union cards by 
placing them in the New Hope Commit- 
tee Home where they have shelter and a 
bed with plain food until they can earn 
a few dollars by doing odd jobs. 

Brother Charles H. Franck was elected 
President of the Mobile Central Trades 
Council and L. U. No. 89 holds the best 
record for attendance at the Trades 
Council meetings. 

Under the active direction of L. U. No. 
89 steps are now being taken to con- 
solidate under one charter the different 
Local Unions of the United Brotherhood 
and this move when completed will be 
of no small benefit to the movement in 
this district. 

Members of the United Brotherhood 
and their friends will save themselves 
a lot of time, money and trouble by 
staying away from this coast country, 
and especially from the much written 
about Mussels Shoals project. 



The saw-mills offer the only real field 
for employment and they are over-sup- 
plied with wages ranging from 75c to $2 
a day for ten and eleven hours' work, 
compulsory trading at the company com- 
misaries. hovels to live in and a gunman 
ready to shoot your head off off if you 
even whisper anything about unions. So 
stay away from the mills and camps of 
the South. Organizers trying to get the 
men in the timber industry organized 
are kidnapped — beaten to a pulp — shot 
and even killed. This is in America in 
the year A. D. 1922 after the world was 
made safe for democracy, that is. for 
everybody everywhere, except in the 
sunny southland of the U. S. A. 

While thousands of men are out of 
work along this coast, the United States 
Shipping Board has hundreds of ships 
of all descriptions laid up in the "bone- 
yard" here. These ships are being placed , 
in commission. Ir would be a saving of 
many tens of thousands of dollars to the 
taxpayers of this country if the Ship- 
ping Board would keep these ships in 
repair, doing the work themselves, thus 
saving many, many thousands of dollars 
in profits which now go into the pockets 
of the dollar a day patriots and the work 
would put hundreds of skilled mechanics 
at work. Why not have the Brotherhood 
Local Unions agitate this matter and get 
in touch with our Congressmen and Sen- 
ators demanding that the Government's 
property be protected and safeguarded. 
THOMAS J. O'CONNOR. 

. Secretary L. U. No. 89. Mobile. Ala. 



Every Little Bit Helps 

Editor. "The Carpenter*': 

Just a little corner in our Journal, to 
show the brothers what labor can do, 
when everyone puts his shoulders to the 
wheel. 

At the city election, held in Clovis 
this week, we entered the race with three 
labor candidates for city commissioners. 
and had the satisfaction of electing all 
three of them with a majority of 532 
votes, or practically 2 to 1. 

One of the newly elected commission- 
ers is a member of our Local. Our wo- 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



men stood side- by side with our men, 
and to them is duo much of the credit 
for our victory. 

It was the hardest battle ever waged 
at the Clovis polls, and the victory will 
do much to stimulate unionism in Clovis. 
Fraternally yours, 

JAKE LAAN. 
L. IT. No. 671. Clovis, N. M. 



An Inquiry 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

May I ask through your columns 
a few questions of your trap-nest, 
brother? The way he has written about. 
the trap-nest we hardly know whether 
he is making a joke of the trap-nest or 
whether he really has something good. 
We have to read between lines of what 
he has written. 

Now, if we understand his scheme, it 
would be to have a trap-nest for each 
hen, which would cost from $3 to $5 
each. The hen would go in the nest at 
her leisure and would be trapped there, 
then she would lay her egg and stay 
there until such a time as the owner 
sees fit to come and take her number 
and let her out. 

Now, I am interested in chickens, and 
am open for new inventions, but I al- 
ways look at the financial points first, 
but if our brother can make his inven- 
tion plainer and show it is a paying 
investment, Ave are there to invest. 
Fraternally yours, 

D. C. PINGRBY. 
L. U. No. 2431. Chico, Cal. 



Protecting His TooS Box 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

Did you ever hear of a man being 
hoisted by his own petard or something 
like that? Well, that is what happened 
to me. 

Some years ago I invented a burglar 
alarm, but never done much with it. It 
consists of a tube to put in a blank 
cartridge, in which, when a spring is re- 
leased, sends the cartridge off with a 
bang. 

A few days ago I put this on my tool 
box, and connected same with a string. 
When I arrived at work I released the 
string and opened the box all right until 
Saturday morning. 

When I came on the job I opened the 
box without thinking of releasing the 
string and the cartridge went off with a 
great bang. 



This idea of protecting a tool box oc- 
curred to me a few years ago. There 
were a lot of loo] boxes being broken 

open, and I conceived (lie idea of placing 

a metal flask loaded with red pepper 
in the box and attaching a chain so that 
in case the box was broken open ami 
cover lifted, contents would fly up in the 
thief's face. 

Just at present I am in correspondence 
with one of the clock companies in ref- 
erence to an alarm. 

There are many ways in which a car- 
penter can devise schemes to protect his 
tool box from bein^ broken open. When 
it is generally understood that boxes are 
protected in a manner known only to 
their owners the art of breaking open 
boxes will become a lost one. 

WM. J. KELLY. 
4 Magnolia Ave. Jersey City. N. J. 






An Expression From Rome 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

Employers don't care whether they 
employ union or non-union men, as long 
as they get them cheap enough. There 
is always more building going on with 
us when wages are high, profits large 
and workers scarce, than when wages 
are low, materials cheap, and labor 
plentiful. The only way I see to bring 
such a condition and make it permanent 
is to tax land values only, by abolishing 
all other taxes. Such a tax, if high 
enough to secure enough revenue, would 
prevent land from being held out of use, 
and labor could more readily secure land 
at a nominal price or for nothing at all. 

This would relieve the labor market 
and these men using land would produce 
without, having to pay profits to others 
and this would cause a demand for other 
products, and eventually all laborers 
would be as well off as if they worked 
for themselves. ' 

Labor unions should study this, for 
there is absolutely no other remedy and 
labor unions can only take intelligent in- 
itiative when they realize this and insist 
on it. It is up to us to be superior to 
our employers, intellectually, for unless 
we are. we founder. Desiring that you 
p iblish this as an expression of the 
views of many members of L. U. No. 
1977, U. B. of C. & J. of A., Rome, Ga. 
Yours faithfully, 

T. COLEGATE, R. S. 
103 Myrtle St- Rome, Ga, 



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What You Should 
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How to Estintti 
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Please send 7ne the r, volume Cyclopedia of Carpentry and Con- 
tracting, shipping charges collect. I will send you $2.80 in seven 
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Please fill out all of these lines. 



34 



T II E C A 11 P E N T E R 



Without Co-operation We Stand Alone 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

Co-operation is a long felt need in 
unionism, but it is not adhered to by 
every union man. It is our desire to 
call to every man's attention the benefit 
that would be derived from co-operation 
and how it can be applied. 

We have the power to create demand 
for union-made goods, by -purchasing 
only such goods as are of union make 
and bear the union stamp. 

It is probably a daily occurrence with 
a large number of unionists to overlook, 
or possible forget, to inquire as to 
whether their daily purchases are of 
union make. 

If each and every one of us would 
atop to appreciate the assistance we 
would be rendering our own cause by 
purchasing only union made goods, we 
could readily see the result and effect it 
would have on non-union made goods. 

It is in union-made products that we 
are most interested and it should there- 
fore receive our first consideration when 
purchasing. 

The Cigar Box Makers' Local Union 
No. 2103 of Chicago, 111., U. B. of C. & 
J. of A., have long impressed this upon 
its members, with 100 per cent success, 
and therefore urge every union man 
when purchasing his cigar to ascertain 
whether it bears the Union Label of the 
Brotherhood on the cigar box and to 
further promote the sale of union-made 
cigars and cigar boxes. 

Fraternally yours, 
RICHARD FEISTEL, R. S. 



Real Brotherhood 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

I am enclosing to you a clipping from 
the Edmonton Journal, illustrating to 
you the spirit of L. U. Nos. 1325 and 
2607. 

There are many of them out of em- 
ployment, so that when the Home Build- 
ers' Exposition asked the carpenters for 
a donation, they offered to build their 
bungalows for them at the rate of 85c 
and to donate 40 per cent, which was 
accepted. The men registering got three 
days each. 

Everything worked out satisfactory 
and to the credit of the members and 
the Locals. 

Yours fraternally, 

JOHN LIDSTONE. 
L. U. No. 1325. Edmonton, Alta., Can. 



"Happening over atl the Home Bui 
ing Exposition at the noon hour, I 
one of the carpenter:* packing up 1 
tools, and he remarket], 'I have done n 
bit, now I will let the! other fellow hav 
a show.' 

"I noticed that the same men hav 
not been on the job on the different o(j 
casions I have been I around, and froi 
the remarks passed I came to the coi 
elusion that the carpenters are sharin 
up the work among them. I thought a 
the time that if the originator of th 
idea had been present and heard the re 
marks it would have done his heart goo< 
Ministers of the. Gosipel who have bee 
bewailing the selfishness that exists i 
the world would do well to come an 
see real brotherhood and unselfishness. 

"The minister of labor states tha 
there are 200,000 men idle in Canad 
and also that this state of affairs shoul 
not be in a country like Canada, 
would like to add that it need not be ii 
any other country, either, if pcopl 
would follow the example of the carpe 
ters of this city. Though I am not 
member of the union at present, I believ 
that if the union shows that it intend, 
to carry out this policy on other wori 
there 'is no doubt that a larger nunib^ 
of the men of principles and good trades 
men who are outside of the unions a 
present will join, as a great many hav 
been under the impression that wher; 
there was work a few of the friends al 
ways got it. 

"There should also be a proper systen 
for the operation of the idea so that taerj 
would be no misunderstanding. I wis! 
the carpenters the best of success if thej 
are trying to work out this most un! 
selfish system. For all must live, and: 
all must work." 






Short and To the Point 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

"We saw in the March issue of "Tin 
Carpenter" a report from Ladies' Aux 
iliary No. 63, and would like to send f 
few lines in regard to our Union, No. 6!) 
We were chartered September 2, 1921 
with a. membership of 14 and have beeij 
reading and studying unionism evei 
since and stand ready to assist the union 
in every way at any time. 

We have a delegate to the Building 
Trades Council at Vesaha every month. 
Our meetings are on the first and third 
Friday of each month. March 31st we 
held an old-fashioned box social and en- 






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36 



THE CARPENTER 



tertainment, which was thoroughly en- 
joyed by all who attended. 

We are doing community work with 
the money from our social fund. Trust- 
ing to hear through the columns of your 
Journal from other Ladies' Auxiliaries, 
I am, 

Fraternally yours, 

Tulare, Cal. PEARL GADD, R. S. 

• 

Discusses Henry Ford's Activities 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

New Kensington L. U. No. 333 of the 
U. B. of C. & J. of A., in one of their 
usual interesting meetings were favored 
by several of the brothers discussing the 
plan of Henry Ford's activities regarding 
Muscle Shoals. Speakers seemed to be 
of one opinion, that it was one of the 
greatest economical moves of the day, 
full of wonderful possibilities to the 
workers, both in an industrial and agri- 
cultural sense. And decided to use their 
influence, individually and collectively 
with the Congressman, urging their sup- 
port of Henry Ford's purchase of Muscle 
Shoals, also to ask the Boards of Com- 
merce of our vicinity to join us in our 
move. 

And we hope other Local Unions will 
lend their support toward the same end. 

We are trying to be progressive to 
advance our welfare as workers in all 
manner and ways we can. 

Yours respectfully, 
BERT POWELL, Rec. Sec. 
Springdale, Pa. 



high, weighs 12.0 pounds, blue eyes, fair 
complexion and hair black, graying. 
Any one knowing of his whereabouts, 



An Inquiry 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

Will some of your mathematical read- 
ers kindly give me working rules show- 
ing: 

7. How to find the most economical 
form of box or tank without a top to 
contain any given capacity, say 200 
cu. ft. 

2. How to find the form of a gutter 
made of three 10 in. boards (neglecting 
the thickness), to give its greatest 
capacity. 

Yours fraternally, 
L. U. No. 61. WILL JOHNSON. 



Information Wanted 

Ira H. Sumner, who is shown in the 
accompanying cut, disappeared from his 
home March 27th. He is 5 ft. 8 in. 




kindly communicate with Mrs. 
Sumner, Pinckneyville, 111. 



I. H. 



Charles V. Turley, who is shown in 
the accompanying photograph, was last 
heard from in Denver, Colo., some two 




years ago. Any one knowing of his 
whereabouts will kindly address Daniel 
Turley, 2900 Stewart St., McKees- 
port, Pa. 



An Irishman was gazing in the win- 
dow of an Indiana book store and the 
following sign caught his eye: 
Dickens Works 
All This Week for 
Only $4. 
"The divil he does!" exclaimed Pat in 
disgust. "The dirty scab !" 



Casual Comment 



If all the working people were organ- 
ized, the unions could wipe out the open 
<hop system tomorrow. Another reason 

for that 500,000. 

* * * 

The need of the moment is not so 
nuch for the formation of new unions 
is for new members in those unions al- 
ready formed. 

Under the contract piecework system 
he railroad slogan "Safety First" is a 
•all to the traveler to use any other 
ivailable means of transit than the rail- 
oad working upon that basis. 

* * * 

The relativity of labor, both mentally 
rid physically, permeates every atom 
nd electron of the social, political and 
iconomic life of mankind. 

* * * 

The public has had a sorry experience 
trying to protect itself from the ex- 
ertion of monopolies and with every 
jrm of social legislation. Child labor 
iws, women's protective laws, anti- 
ast laws and labor laws have fallen 
ider the blight of the one lone indi- 
tdual of the court who makes up a bare 
■ajority. 

* * * 

We wonder what the press agents of 
le wage-reducing class mean when 

jiey harp on falling living costs. Of- 
nal figures do not sustain their state- 
ments as the latest bulletin issued by 

|te Government shows a total increase 
living costs from December, 1914, to 
3cember, 1921. 

* * * 

Attorney General Dougherty has again 

ad the riot act against greedy retail 

lerchants, but his warning has evi- 

ntly not been heard by the profit-ears. 

* * * 

Keeping the home fires burning is not 
easy to do as it once was, thanks to 
fe coal profiteers, who doesn't seem to 
ow that the war is over. 



President Harding and his associates 
the conference are to be congratulated 
' the substantial achievements ac- 
nplished at the conference. But con- 
ciliations should not provide any ex- 
se for complacency. 



We wonder what the "Citizens' Com- 
mittee" of Chicago had to do with Judge 
Landis' resignation? 

* He * 

We are indebted to Federal Judge 
Learned Hand of New York for the judg- 
ment that there "is no such thing as 
natural rights." If recent decisions of 
judges are to be taken at face value, 
there are no other rights — natural or 
otherwise — that the judiciary is bound 
to respect. 

* * * 

We wonder why it is called the "agri- 
cultural" bloc when from what we learn 
it is composed of 14 lawyers, 1 farmer, 
2 live stock industry, 1 insurance, 1 
writer, 1 agricultural college President, 
1 well driller and 1 editor? 

If you believe the dangers of indus- 
trial bondage are remote, it may interest 
you to learn that recommendations re- 
quiring the incorporation of labor or- 
ganizations have been submitted to the 
United States Senate by Senators Phipps 
of Colorado, Warren of Wyoming and 
Sterling of South Dakota. 

Senator LaFollette addressing the 
Senate recently said: "The American 
worker is today receiving less wages 
than before the war. Instead of being 
a profiteer he is gradually being forced 
into a condition of abject poverty 
through conspiracy of large employers 
and the National Government." We note 
the daily press failed to print the Sen- 
ator's speech. 

tjf iji if; 

"There is no shortage of lumber, but 
prices will not be reduced," said J. H. 
Burton, President of the American 
Wholesale Lumber Association. This 
prediction is made at a time when wages 
in the lumber industry have been slashed 
below pre-war rates, and hours have 
been lengthened. 

* >i< * 

We read and hear a great deal about 
the "public." The question is who are 
the public? After you eliminate those 
who labor and those who employ labor, 
there "ain't no such animals" as the 
public, except perhaps a few people in 
the old ladies' home or other institutions. 



TradQ NotQs 




L. U. No. 1023, Alliance, O., have 
signed an agreement with the contrac- 
tors for a wage scale of 85c per hour. 

* * * 

L. U. No. 1S29, Ravenna, O., advises 
that they have signed up for the coming 
year with a scale of 75c an hour, 8-hour 
day and 48-hour week, no trouble what- 
ever, and all signed up for a closed shop. 

* * * 

Carpenters' District Council of of 
Indianapolis, Ind., reports that agree- 
ment has been reached with Contractors' 
Association as to wages and practically 
all working conditions. Present wages, 
92 y 2 c per hour, and working conditions 

to continue. 

* * * 

District Council of Pottsville, Pa., ad- 
vises they have renewed their agreement 
for another year with the builders with 
the same wages, 80c an hour, and 44- 
hour week and all other conditions as 

before. 

* * * 

L. U. No. 314 of Madison, Wis., ad- 
vises that they have signed an agree- 
ment with the local Contractors' Asso- 
ciation and will receive the same scale 
of wages for the coming year, of 90c 
an hour, as heretofore. 

* * * 

After serving 21 years as President of 
the California State Building Trades 
Council, P. H. McCarthy declined a re- 
nomination at the Annual Convention 
and was succeeded by First Vice-Presi- 
dent MacDonald. By unanimous vote 
the Convention elected McCarthy Past 
General Adviser. 

* * * 
Secretary-Treasurer Tveitmoe who 

also served for 21 years, retired because 
of ill health. The Convention agreed to 
plans for a state- wide organization cam- 
paign and an aggressive fight against 
the anti-union "American" shop. 

YTe have just been advised by L. U. 
No. 1753, Lockport, 111., that the car- 
penters of that district have at last won 
a hard fought battle and have signed 
an agreement with the Contractors' As- 



sociation after having been locked out 
for over a year. The agreement is for 
closed shop and $1 an hour. 



Foreign Trade Notes 
Engineering and carpentry will be 
taught the natives of New Guinea soon. 
The New Guinea Central Labor Adminis- 
tration plans to equip the islands with 
skilled native labor and eventually hopes 

to train natives in every trade. 

* * * 

Through the British Council General 
the Seamen's Union has submitted a re- 
vised scale of wages as a preliminary to 
the settlement of the Hong Kong strike. 

* * * 

The average German workers among 
the better paid classes, are actually 
earning less than Chinese coolies, hith- 
erto considered the lowest paid workers 

in the world. 

* * * 

A general strike has been proclaimed 
in Italy in all the ports of the Kingdom 
as an act of solidarity to support work- 
ers at Naples. The strike at Naples was 
precipitated by the refusal of workers 
to allow non-union members to be em- 
ployed on the docks. 

* * * 

Labor unions embracing every class of 
workers in Argentina have just been 
unified under a federation known as the 
Argentine Regional Labor Union. 
_* * * 

A lockout in Denmark which was de- 
clared recently affects members of nearly 
all industries, including the harbor work- 
ers in most of the ports, but not the 
seamen, affecting about 150,000 em- 
ployes. 

The Swiss natioinal council, after a 
long and violent debate, adopted a bill 
providing that fomenters of revolution 
or of general strikes henceforth shall be 
punished with hnprisomnent. 

* * * 

In the Scandinavian countries women 
are invading every field of human en- 
deavor, including dentistry and civil en- 
gineering. They are also establishing 
then- own newspapers, and entering pul- 
pits for which men can not be obtained. 



Craft ProblQms 




How To Frame a Gambrel Roof 

(Reprint From A Practical Course In Roof Framinj 
Published By F. J. Drake & Co.) 

(By R. M. Van Gaasbeek.) 

(Concluded) 



To Lay Out Valley Rafters. — Valley 
rafters of an equal pitch roof cross the 
plate at an angle of 45 degrees or the 
diagonal of a square, therefore, the unit 
to use in laying out the valley is the 
diagonal of 12 in. and 12 in., this being 
the constant unit used in laying out the 
common and jack rafters, or 17 in. The 
rise remains the same as for the com- 
mon rafters 20% in. Set the fence and 
square at 20% in. rise on the blade and 
17 in. run on the tongue, or for conveni- 
ence these figures can be divided by 2, 
or 10% in. rise on the blade and 2% in. 
rise on the tongue. Mark on the blade 
for all plumb cuts and on the tongue for 
all level cuts. Take the run from the 
layout, Fig. 1, measuring on the center 
line of the valley from the facia line to 
where it intersects the corner of the in- 
6% 

ner wall line, or . Press the fence 

12, 
firmly against the top edge of the stock 
to be used for the valley and produce 
the facia line or the first plumb line to 
the extreme left, A, Fig. 6. Slide the 
square to the right, and measure in on 
a elvel line from the facia line the run 
6% 

of the valley and produce the plumb 

12 
cut against the upper plate, giving the 
extreme length of the lower valley raf- 
ter. No deductions are to be made from 
this length, but the corners must be 
>eveled to fit into the corner formed by 
he intersection of the return and main 
Hates. To lay out the top cuts so that 
he valley will fit into the corner, square 
ine Y across the top edge of the rafter 
iiul locate the center point. From plumb 
ine Y, measure forward on a level line 
i distance equal to one-half the thick- 
tess of the stock used for the valley or 
\ iu. (the thickness of stock specified 



being % in.) and produce plumb line 5. 
Square this line across the top edge of 
the raf ;er and connect the outside points 
with the center as shown at G, top view, 
Fig. 6. 

This top cut can also be laid out with 
the steel square by using 13 % in. (one- 
half the bridge measure of the run 17 in. 
and the rise 20% in.) on the blade and 
8% in., (one-half the unit for the run 
17 in.) on the tongue. Mark on the 
blade for the top cut. To complete the 
layout of the lower end of the rafter 
square facia line A across the top edge 
of the rafter and locate the center point. 
To make the return on the facia line, 
measure back on a level line from facia 
line A, a distance equal to one-half the 
thickness of the stock used, % in., and 
produce plumb line 3, Fig. 6, on the side 
of the rafter. Connect plumb line 3 
through the center point on the top edge, 
as shown in the top view. This top 
cut being the same cut as that previously 
described for laying out the top end. 
The valley crosses the projection at an 
angle of 45 degrees, therefore, the dis- 
tance to be measured in locating the wall 
line is the diagonal of 1% in. and 1% 

2% 
in., the width of the projection, or . 

12 
To lay out the birdsmouth, measure in 

2i/, 

on a level line from facia line A, 

12 
the diagonal of the projection and pro- 
duce wall line B. Measure down on 
facia line A from the top edge of the 
rafter, % in., the width of the facia and 
produce plancher level F. Measure up 
from plancher F, on a plumb line 2% 
in., locating plate level G. To make a 
lit against the side of the plate, square 
wall line B across the bottom edge of the 
rafter and locate the center point. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



Measure back on a level line from plumb 
line B, on the side of the valley a dis- 
tance equal to one-half the thickness of 
the stock used for the valley or % in. 



plumb line 3, on bevel 4 for the facia, 
on line F for the plancher level, on line 
G make a square cut and on plumb line 
1, on bevel 2, cut for the birdsmouth and 




End Vieivv 

6 — Developed length of lower valley rafter B. 

and produce plumb line 1. Square this on bevels 6 on plumb line 5 for the fi 

line across the bottom edge and connect against the walls. Cut two valleys tli 

through the center point as shown at 2, same length in pairs, 
on the bottom view, Fig. 6. Cut on To Lay Out Upper Common Rafter; 



THE CARPENTER 



41 



— Before setting the square, the rise in 
inches per foot must be determined. The 
run 12 in., a constant unit, remains un- 
changed. The run of common rafter No. 
1, measured on the layout. Fig. 1, meas- 
uring from the inner plate or upper wall 
line to the center of the ridge is 7% in. 
(see development. Fig. 2). The total 
height from the top of the plate to the 
top of the ridge is 4^4 in. Thus with a 
total rise of 4% in- and a total run of 
7*4 in., find the rise in inches per foot. 
Rise 12 



Run 


1 












4V4 
7% 


12 
x — equals 7 in. 
1 


rise 


in 


inches 


per 




Solution 


12 
4% 

3 

48 











51 



29 4 

51 divided by — equals 51 times — 
4 29 

equals 7 in. 

51 
4 

29)204(7 in. 
203 



Set the fence and square at 7 in. 
rise on the tongue and 12 in. run on the 
blade. Mark on the tongue for all plumb 
cuts and on the blade for all level cuts. 

Press the fence firmly against the top 
?dge of the stock to be used for the 
valley rafter and produce the wall line 
>r first plumb line to the extreme left, 
A Fig. 7. Slide the square to the right, 
ind measure on a level line from the 
>vall line A, the run of the valley, 7%. 
in. and produce line T. the extreme 
ength to the center of the ridge. From 
his length deduct one-half the thick- 
H'ss 3-16 in. (the thickness of stock 
; pecified being % in. ) of the ridge and 
iroduce plumb line D. Fig. 7. the cutting 
ength of the rafter against the ridge. 
To form the notch over the upper plate. 



measure in on a level line from plumb 
line A, the width of the upper plate, % 
in., and produce plumb line B. From 
where plurnb line A intersects the top 
edge of the valley, produce a level line 
until it meets plumb line B, as at G. 
Cut on lines G and B for the notch over 
the upper plate and on line D for the cut 
against the ridso. 

To Lay Out Upper Jack Rafters. — The 
length of jack rafter Nos. 2, 3*and 4 are 
determined in the same manner as the 
preceding common rafter No. 1, as they 
are a part of the length of it. Take the 
runs from the layout, Fig. 1, measuring 
from the center of the valley rafter to 
the center of the ridge. The three raf- 




End View 

7 — Developed length of upper com- 
mon raftpr No. 1. 

ters are shown developed on the side of 
a single rafter, Fig. 8. In practice these 
would be laid out separately and are 
laid out over one another to save space 
and to avoid repetition. Press the fence 
firmly against the top edge of the rafter 
stock, using the same figures on the 
square as before and produce the firm 
plumb line to the extreme right. T, Fig. 
8, working from the ridge end of the 
rafter instead of from the facia line. 
Slide the square to the left and measure 
on a level line, from the ridge line, T, 
the run of rafter No. 2. 6 in., the run 
of rafter No. 3, 4 in., and the run of 
rafter No. 4. 2 in., and produce plumb 
line C, giving the extreme length of the 
upper jack rafters. From the ridge end 
of the rafter measure forward on a level 
line one-half the thickness of the ridge, 
3-16 in., from plumb line T and produce 
plumb line D, the cutting length of the 
jacks. 

The lower end of the rafters are bev- 
eled to make a fit against the side of the 
valley rafter. From the extreme length 
obtained with the fence and square, 
which is to the center line of the valley 



42 



THE CARPENTER 



rafter, must be deducted one-half the 
thickness of the valley measured on rhe 
line of the jack rafters, or one-half the 
diagonal thickness of the valley which is 
y 2 in. full. Measure back on a level line 
from plumb line C. Fig. 8. this diagonal 
thickness. % in. full, and produce an- 
other plumb line as at D. Square this 
line across the top edge of the rafter and 
locate th*e center. To lay out the top 
cut so that the jack rafters will fit 



ters. the constant unit for the run 
changes to 17 in., the diagonal of 12 in. 
and 12 in. Set the fence and square at 
7 in. rise on the tongue and 17 in. run 
on the blade. Mark on the tongue for 
all plumb cuts and on the blade for all 
level cuts. Take the run from the lay- 
out. Fig. 1. measuring on the center lire 
of the valley rafter from the upper wall 
line to the ridge, or 10*4 in. Press the 
fence firmly against the top edge of the 




FIG. 8 



End View 



8 — Developed length of upper jack rafters Nos. 2. 3 and 4. 



against the side of the valley rafter at 
the proper angle, measure forward on a 
level line from plumb line D. a distance 
equal to one-half the thickness of the 
stock used for the jack rafter. 3-16 in.. 
and produce plumb line 1. 

Connect plumb line 1 through plumb 
line D. on the center line as shown at 
2, top view. Fig. >. This top cut can al-o 
be laid out with the steel square by 
using the length. 13 7 S in. (bridge meas- 
ure of the run. 12 in. and the rise 7 in. I 
on the blade and the run. 12 in., on the 
tongue. Mark on the blade for the top 
cut. Cut on plumb line 1. on bevel 2. 
for the cheek and side cut against the 
valley and on line D for the cut against 
the ridge. 

To Lay Out Upper Valley Rafter.- — 
The rise of the valley 7 in. remains the 
same as for the common and jack raf- 



stoek to be used for the valley and pro 
duce a plumb line A. at the extreme left. 
Fig. 9. 

Slide the square to the right and 
measure in on a level line from plumb 
line A. the run of the valley 10 Vi ia - 
and produce plumb line T. giving the 
estreme length of the upper valley toj 
the center of the ridge. It will be better} 
construction to butt ridge D againstj 
ridge C and fit the valley into the corner 
formed by the intersection of the twoj 
ridges. To determine the cutting length- 
of the valley deduct from the upper en 
of the rafter one-half the thickness o. 
the ridge measured on the line of th< 
valley or one-half the diagonal thick 
ness of the ridge. ^4 in. 

Measure forward on a level line fro' 
plumb line T. Fig. 9, % in. and produce 
plumb line D. Square line D across the 



THE CARPENTER 



4.°> 



)p edge of the rafter and locate the ridges, measure forward on a level line, 
jnter point. To lay out the top cut so a distance equal to one-half the thick- 




nd View 

9 — Developed length of upper valley rafters A. 
iat the valley will fit into the angle ness of the stock used for the valley, % 
rmed by the intersection of the two in., and produce plumb line 1. Square 




10 — Elevation of gambrel roof showing how the rafters are assembled. 



44 



THE CARPENTER 



A NEW BOOK 

■•OX THE SQUARE" and COMPASSES 
FULLY ILLUSTRATED and explained by a 
Carpenter how Carpenters can use them 
Dailv. Instantly and Accurately. Mr Latest 
and Largest work OX THE SQUARE. 



Dwight L. Stoddard 



Route D. Eos 



Indianapolis, Ind. 



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This material is as essential to comfort and economy 
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Benjamin Franklin said: "He that 
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it might hare produced, even scores of 
pounds." Buy W. S. S. 



this line across the top edge of the rafter 
and connect the outside points with the 
center as shown at 2, top view. Fig. 9. 
This top cut can also be laid out with 
the steel square by using 9% in. (one- 
half the bridge measure of the run 17 in. 
and the rise 7 in.) on the blade and 8y 2 
in. on the tongue. Mark on the blade 
for the top cut. To complete the layout 
of the lower end of the valley produce 
a level line G. from the intersection of 
the top edge of the rafter and plumb 
line A, locating the plate level. Cut 
on line G for the plate level, on plumb 
line 1 and top cut 2 for the ridge cut. 

To Lay Out the Eidges. — The run of 
the ridges is taken from the layout. Fig. 
1. For ridge C, measure the extreme 
length of the roof from wall to wall, or 
2 ft. 8 in. For ridge D. measure from 
the center of ridge C to the facia line, or 
11% in. From this length deduct one- 
half the thickness of ridge C, or 3-16 in., 
making the net length of ridge D, 
11 5-16 in. 

To Assemble the Roof. — Assemble the 
rafters as shown in the elevation, Fig. 
10. Set up ridges C and D first, secur- 
ing them in place with the common raf- 
ters. Fasten the valleys in next, keeping 
the center lines in alinement from the 
facia line to the ridges, fastening the 
jack rafters in last. 

Runs and Lengths of Rafters. — The 
following table is prepared to assist the 
student in cheeking up his work. It is 
intended that the framer will take his 
runs from the layout and develop the 
lengths with the steel square and fence, 
using the table only as a matter of in- 
formation and assurance given that he 
has taken the proper run and determined 
the correct length of the rafters. The 
measurements listed in the table are ex- 
treme lengths on the center lines. Make 
allowances where rafters intersect a 
ridge or valley or hip rafter for the cut- 
ting lengths. It is suggested that the 
student make a model of the roof for 
practice, building it on the same scale 
as the layout 1 in. to the foot. In using 
the table read feet as inches, for ex- 

3 

ample, rafter 1, the run would read 7 — 

12 

4% 

and the length 8 . The square being 

12 



THE CARPENTER 



45 



The "INTERLOX" Thinks 

Invented by a Brotherhood Man 

Don't use a stick or guess at a measurement. 

The famous 

"Interlox" Master Slide Rule 



gives both inside and outside measurements 
instantly. 

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Write today for full descriptive circulars. 

MASTER RULE MFG. CO., INC. 
841C East 136th St., New York City 



id out in twelfths of an inch, it is an 
tsy matter to cheek up the work ac- 
lrately. 



I could hear Joe thundering away and 
imagined I could see his lightning, I 
knew he was worried, but I was too busy 
with my work to bother with him, so 
I worked on, but finally Joe says, 
"Dwight, come here, I will admit I am 
all balled up." Now, I mention all this 
to show how there are times when the 
very best mechanics have so much on 
their minds they get all mixed up, es- 
pecially if they try to do a lot of figuring 
on a dark, dreary day. I said, "Joe, 
Avhat is it?" He says, "there are 12 
treads from the landing," so I put my 
square on 12 and "they are 8% inches," 
so I put my other edge of my square on 
8% as you will see, he asked "how far 
it would be to the header" I said 8 ft. 
and 9 in., don't you see it there on the 



RUNS AND LENGTHS OF RAFTERS USED IN FRAMING GAMBREL ROOF 



c'o. of 
afters 



Quantity of 
Rafters 



Runs 



Lengths 



Name of Rafters 



B 
C 
1) 



38 
2 pair 
2 pair 
2 pair 
1 pair 

23 

1 pair 

2 pair 
2 pair 
1 pair 

1 
1 



6' 0" 

4' 0" 

2' 0" 

10' 3" 

4' 3" 

4' 3" 

2' 9" 

0' 9" 

6' oy 8 " 

2' 8" 

0' 11 y 2 ' 



8' 


4%" 


6' 


H%" 


4' 


7%" 


2' 


3%" 


11' 


W 


8' 


5" 


8' 


5" 


5' 


5%" 


1' 


5%" 


9' 


5y 8 " 


2' 


8" 


0' 


11%" 



Upper Common Rafter 

Upper Jack Rafter 

Upper Jack Rafter 

Upper Jack Rafter 

Upper Valley Rafter 

Lower Common Rafters 

Lower Jack Rafters 

Lower Jack Rafters 

Lower Jack Rafters 

Lower Valley Rafters 

Ridge 

Ridge 



Every Day Use of the Steel Square 

(By Dwight L. Stoddard.) 
1 1 have written so much on the subject 
lad fully intended to give the members 
rest, but after reading Brother Row- 
id Hill's article in the September issue 
deli I consider one of the most timely 
or written, especially when he said 
quare root — forget it." 
I was helping Brother Joe Mock build 
i home the other day, now Joe and I 
ve been together for about a third of a 
dury. I know him not only as a fine 
low, but an exceptionally fine me- 
anic, he is an expert with the steel 
lare on roof framing, but in putting 
Y stairs up in the attic I talked him out 
1 a winder and then his wife talked him 
^0 another change. It was rainy and 
J agreeable weather, he had many other 
Wgs on his mind that was worrying 
|o and while it was threatening thun- 
( !'. lightning and rain, I kept busy put- 
|g on siding to get as much on as 
I isible before the shower came up. 



square? I trust all the readers can, for 
it surely is as plain as print, much plain- 
er than lead pencil. 

He said it only lacked about an eighth 
of an inch of being 9 ft. 3 in. high. 
When he saw me put my square down 
with the twelfth side up he said 2-12, 
and there were 14 risers, so when I had 
my square at the height and number I 
brought it back, as you will see, to 1 ft., 
and it shows the risers would be 7 11-12. 
Joe, a far belter stair builder than I, had 
spent an hour and used language I am 
not going to put in print, and got no- 
where, only all mixed up, but my old 
square, as usual, instantly told the truth 
so plain there was no argument. The 
day cleared and the sun was soon 
shining. 

Now' when he goes to put up his bal- 
isters if the newels are 8 ft. apart and he 
wants to use about two dozen (or two 
dozen spaces, you will note there is al- 
ways one more space than balisters) the 
old square will show you that as 24 is 




Are You Old At Forty? 

What You Know About the 
Glands of Your Body 



Words from Grate- 
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A very grateful patron from 
New York writess 



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without giving it a thought. I 
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We have the original of these 
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files. Write to us for name and 
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enthusiastic patrons. 



Some men of seventy are younger in ac- 
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Please send me without cost or obligation your free book, "Prostatology. 

Name 

Address 

City State 



THE CARPENTER 



47 



o 8, so is 12 to 4, or in other words, 
paced every 4 inches, (not 4 between, 
»ut from center to center or edge to edge 
he way we generally get it, some may 
ay, "Well, that will work when it hap- 
icns to come in even feet that way, but 
hen I don't want to get them on the 
?vel, I want to measure up the stair." 

I will say my stair at home, meas- 
rlng up the stair, is 11 ft. 5 in. I have 

1 balisters, 22 spaces, as 22 is to 11-5 
lo is 12 to 6% distance of my own. 

Note by the illustration as we space 
rom further edge to further edge it is 
est to make your measurement accord- 

| lgly, or in other words, measure the 
ize of your thickness of one balister 

j lore than the exact distance between 
le newels. We may have been used 
> figure the thickness of the balister, 
: make the spacing come out a different 

[ay, but to me that's the handiest way 
have ever done picket fence, siding, 
lingles, and hundreds of other things 
indled the same way. 



.jueaky Floors and Doors; Also Creaky 
Stairs 

(By Owen B. Maginnis.) 
This is what a creak is, namely "a 
odification of crack." "To make a 
irsh grating sound, as by the friction 

hard substances." 

Now, let us get down to some prac- 
?al facts as to what causes squeaky 
id creaky floors, stairs, etc. Apart 
om all the theory as to their setting 
id laying out, which is lost time, if 
ey be not afterwards built in a good, 
!und, permanent and workmanlike 
aimer. Now, floors are not properly 
id nor stairs fixidly and thoroughly 
ilt if they make noises, creak or bend 
len walked upon, indicating that there 
some deficiency, either in the material 

mechanical workmanship, so let us 
oceed to consider what these may per- 
ps be. 

To many causes squeakings and 
takings may be attributed, first of 
lich might be the introduction of un- 
isoned timber and woodwork into the 
Instruction of buildings, even in the 
rders and floor beams, because if these 

wet or full of sap they will in the 
j >cess of seasoning, when covered, 
'; rp and shrink in the direction of, or 
^■oss in their width, thus forming a 
^ice between the under sides of the 
"■ :>ring boards and the top edges of the 
I Mr beams, so that when pressure or 



"FULL LENGTH ROOF FRAMER" 

Is a book to save the time and brains of the experts 
and to avoid mistakes and trouble for the unexperi- 
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If your roof it pitched it is in this book, no matter 
what shape, style, size or pitch. It has 230,400 roofs, 
with lengths and bevels of Hips. Valleys. Jacks and 
Commons. 

Hire is a roof at randum. Main roof 37 ft. 5 1-4 
in. wide, 43 ft. 9 1-2 in. long. Hip at one end. 
gable at the other end. 

A wing to extend from center of each side of main 
building. One wing 17 ft. 9 3-4 in. wide. 12 ft. G 
in. out with Hip roof. Other wing 21 ft. 11 1-2 in. 
wide, 15 ft. 7 in. out with Gable roof. Pitch of 
roofs 13 1-2 and 12. 28 in. centers. 

Keep this example and send for a book. If you do 
not know lengths and cuts of all Hips. Valleys, Jacks 
and Common rafters in 3 minutes after getting the 
system, return book. 

Send no money until you get book. Return at any 
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Four Years advertising in this magazine is our 
recommendation. Price $1.25. 

A. RIECHERS, Pub. 
Palo Alto, Calif. 




Woodstock and lumber is high. With our Jointer 
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CO. 
Box 1073, Detroit, Mich. 



For Stair and Angle work, Phare's Hex. Square Guides. 

65c a pair; Recommended by Craft expert Bro. Stod- 
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48 



THE CARPENTER 



weight, such as a person walking on the 
upper surface is placed upon one or 
several pieces, they will subside or sink, 
and spring up again, and in doing this 
the longitudinal joints will emit a 
squeaky or creaking sound, which is 
both disagreeable and disturbing to 
nerves, especially in the silence of the 
night, when persons are asleep or ill. 

In many single thicknesses these 
noises are often audible and often times 
too, in those of double thickness and 
should not be if the floor laying was 
properly done so that seasoned timber 
and wood are the first essentials to pre- 
vent too prevalent defects in our modern 
homes, notably of the smaller variety, 
in which most of us live. 

YTe note now different thickness of 
boards, especially on the "heading"' or 
"butt" joints, likewise insufficient or im- 
perfect nailing, many carpenters driving 
in the nails with too flat a slope so that 
they split the edges and do not go into 
the edges of the beams underneath. 
TVere they placed at an angle of not 
more than 45 degrees they would hold 
each board securely down on the tongued 
edge and prevent its springing down and 
up when trodden upon. Again, nails are 
very often set too far apart. 12 in. should 
be the farthest limit for secure nailing 
and less spliting should be done, all of 
which is caused by working very rapidly 
or through haste, due to saving time. 
Double floors ought to have a layer of 
building paper between each thickness 
to obviate creaky or subsidence, and to 
level up joints, and all heading joints be 
planed level and smooth. 

As to stairs which creak, what shall 
we say of this bugbear of every small 
householder or occupant, and where are 
they not? How could any novelist, fic- 
tion writer or story teller indite a yarn 
without them for none can complete one 
without mentioning a creaking stair step 
or floor board betraying, etc. 

In stairs we might state that the wood 
itself is often responsible for faults. It 
protests by creaks and squeaks against 
being trod on. pressed down and 
weighted because it is out of shape, by 
being warped, by being loose through not 
being fastened and nailed or in bending 
clown by not having sufficient support 
from below or under its bottom side in 
the form of good, stiff carriages and 
brackets. Carriage timbers under stairs 
should be of 3x6 timbers at least and 
have the 1% in. or 2 in. brackets nailed 



on opposite sides close up against tli 
under side of each step or tread an< 
should any tread be warped each brackc 
ought to be scribed to fit closely u] 
against the bottom side, all nailing mus 
be thorough, using cut Ironnails whe 
possible. 

We protest against the laying o 
floors before the roof >? covered in. as 
rain shower will surely swell up th 
flooring boards, causing them to shrin 
back again, warp up and bend when th 
roof is on. the walls covered in. then th 
heat, steam heat especially, will shrin ] 
them still more. This will cause floor 
to squeak and creak when trod upoi 
which should not be. Again, tongue 
should fit closely into grooves, but nr 
too tight. Floor brads give a better jo 
with less splitting than nails with head 
yet iron flat floor nails are better sti 
for a close, permanent job, so let v 
carpenters try to offset these too pn 
valent faults. 

Doors too often squeak by rabbin 
on saddles or through rusty hinges ; 
locks. A little oil applied to hinges aD 
locks in damp weather will easily an 
quickly remedy this, but all doors shoul 
be fitted to a nicety and if the hous 
settles, planed off and refitted to swin 
clear without touching. Let us make a 
our work permanent and noiseless as ft 
as possible, by good and thorough craft 
manship. 



Square Root 

(By G. D. Mills, L. U. No. 919, 
St. John, N. B., Can.) 

In continuing the subject of squa 
root investigation, and referring to ir 
last article on this subject, I might sa 
that this present analysis, is derived e: 
tirely from Proposition 47 of the fir 
book of Euclid, as expressed in Todhun 
er's "Elements of Euclid" while in tl 
last article, apart of the analysis was d 
rived from this proposition. It was al 
stated before that the analysis of Prop 
sition 47 of the first book was not th 
expressed in the first book, but serv* 
equally as well, and as the true analy? 
as expressed in the first book is essenris 
since the square root is derived from 
a condensed version will therefore 
necessary in conjunction with Fig. 
adjoining, which describes the line dra^ 
ing for the analysis. 

The analysis goes to show that t. 
line "A-e," from the appex of the rig 
angle "B-A-C," is a mean proportion 









Our Last General Convention 

recommended that we 

kdvertise Our Label More Extensively 

In pursuance with instructions of the Twentieth General 
invention, that intensive advertising of the Union Label of 
e United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 
: inaugurated, and the appreciation of the fact that continuous 
id cumulative publicity is the best asset, we have concluded 
at no better medium could be employed than HIGH GRADE 

PLAYING CARDS 

(Illustration below) 



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.AND JOINERS OF AMERICA, 




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The cards will be 
furnished in either 
(or both) regular 
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Local Unions are 
urged to carry a 
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hand to meet de- 
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We hope our entire 
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terest themselves in 
seeing that their 
friends use Brother- 
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percentage of people 
who don't use play- 
ing cards for inno- 
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hence the opportun- 
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through this me- 
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The Price Is Forty-five Cents Per Deck 

(Regular and Pinochle) 

i i please bear in mind that we are furnishing a grade of cards 
My commensurate with the price. The General Office sells the 
c ds at less than cost. 

Send orders, accompanied by remittance, to 

FRANK DUFFY, General Secretary, 



Crpenters' Building, 



Indianapolis, Indiana. 



50 



THE CARPENTER 



and divides the square "B-C-g-f," on the 
hypotenuse "B-C," into two rectangles; 
"B-d-e-f." which is equal to the square 
on "A-B," and "C-d-e-g" which is equal 



allelogram "D-B-C-F" equally, and the 
equality of the triangles thus obtained, 
are apparent without further analysis. 

A & 




to the square on "A-C," this is obtained 
as follows: The triangle "A-B-f" can 
be shown to be equal to the triangle 
"K-B-C," because the angle of the large 
square 90 degrees at "B," plus the angle 
of the right angle "A-B-C," at "B" is 
equal to the angle of the square "A-B" 
90 degrees, at "B," plus the angle of the 
right angle "A-B-C" at "B," thus the in- 
cluded angle for one triangle is equal to 
the included angle of the other and the 
sides of the triangles are also equal, each 
to each, ''K-B' ? is equal to "A-B," and 
"B-C" is equal to "B-f" they are there- 
fore equal, and have the same inclination 
or altitude, because of the equal included 
angles, which is in accordance with 
Proposition 3S of the first book of Euclid 
"Triangles on equal bases, and between 
the same parallels, are equal to one an- 
other" and the truth of this proposition 
is manifested in the first book of Euclid, 
Proposition 35, which reads: "Parallel- 
ograms on the same base, and between 
the same parallels, are equal to one an- 
other." A parallelogram can be defined, 
as a four-sided figure, which has its op- 
posite sides equal, and parallel, therefore 
a square is a parallelogram, so also is a 
rectangle. Fig. 2 describes a condition 
of this proposition. 

The square "A-B-C-D," is equal to the 
parallelogram "D-B-C-F," because the 
diagonal "B-D" divides the square 
equally in accordance with Proposition 
34 of the first book of Euclid, so also 
does the diagonal "D-C" divide the par- 




c 

Fig. 2. 
Nevertheless, if a line be drawn from 
"F" to "B" which is shown dotted, the 
parallelogram would again be divided 
equally in accordance with Proposition 
34 of the first book "The diameter bi- 
sects and divides it into two equal parts" 
and the triangle "F-C-B" would be equal 
to the triangle "D-C-B" which equality 
is not apparent without analysis. 

The preceding goes to establish the 
truth expressed in Proposition 41 of the 
first book of Euclid, which reads: "If a 
parallelogram and a triangle be on the 
same base, and between the same par- 
allels, the parallelogram shall be double 
of the triangle." Then because the tir- 
angle "K-B-C," standing on the base 
"K-B," which has been shown to be 
equal to one-half of the parallelogram of 
equal altitude on the base "K-B," which 
is the square on "A-B," and because the 
equal triangle "A-B-f," standing on the 
base "B-f," has also been shown to be 
equal to one-half of the parallelogram 
of equal altitude standing on the base 
"B-f," which is the rectangle "B-d-e-f," 
one triangle is equal to one-half of the 
square on "A-B," and the other is equal 
to one-half of the rectangle "B-d-e-f," 
therefore because the two triangles are 
equal, the square on "A-B" must also be 
equal to the rectangle "B-d-e-f," and the 
line "A-B" is the square root of the 
rectangle "B-d-e-f." A similar analysis 
with respect to the triangles "A-C-g" 
and "h-C-B" will show that the square 
on "A-C" is equal to the rectangle 
"C-d-e-g" and that "A-C" is the square 
root of the rectangle "C-d-e-g." 

This completes the analysis for Prop- 
osition 47 of the first book of Euclid- 
which tradition ascribes to the ancient 
Greek mathematician "Pythagoras" in- 
stead of "Euclid." This celebrated prop- 
osition has been widely demonstrated, 
and is deservedly popular, because of the 
many useful purposes it can be used for. 



T IT TC CARPENTER 



51 



Referring to Brother John Upton's 
irticle in the July issue of "The Car- 
tenter" in which he uses the numbers 
|- 4, and 5 in demonstrating this cele- 
>rated proposition, and these numbers 
ire the only even numbers, in their low- 
est terms, that can be used for the pur- 
>ose. We shall refer to Fig. 3, which 
lescribes this arrangement as usually set 
orth in arilhmetics. 

The square on the hypotenuse "5" 
s equal to the sum of the squares on 
he legs of the right angle 3 and 4 or 
> plus 16; these even numbers 3, 4, and 




Fig. 3. 

, can be multiplied by any one number, 
) increase the respective lengths when 
uch an operation is necessary, indeed 
le last foundation I squared I used the 
umbers 18, 24, and 30, multiplying 
ich number by 6, an operation which 
ma nwith a tape can perforin with 
reat accuracy, even greater than the 
istrument, because in squaring with the 
istrument, the target must be held ex- 
•tly plumb, in order to secure correct 
■suits. 

■, All the preceding with respect to 

! reposition 47 of the first book of Euclid 

is been both instructive and useful, 

it the method of measuring the square 

pot with a steel square is yet to be 

I 'scribed, it is however, quite similar to 

at described in my last article, except 

the former method, the rectangle was 

id out in two adjoining parts on a 

raight line, while in this method, the 

'o parts of the rectangle are folded 

er, one on the other, thus the rectangle 

wl-e-f" is the rectangle "C-B — B-d" 

<1 its square root is the line "A-B," 



so also is the rectangle "C-d-e-g" the 
rectangle "B-C — C-a, and its square root 
is the line "A-C." In order to apply the 
square it will be necessary after squar- 
ing up at the dividing point "d" to hold 
the square on points "B" and "C" so 
that its appex will just coincide with 
the right angle line from "d" and the 
point "A" can then be marked. 

Comparing this operation with that 
described in my last article, in which 
the square root of 48 was desired, we 
made 6 and 8 on a straight line adjoin- 
ing, while here "B-C" would be 8 in., 
and "C-d" 6 in., and the square root or 
distance to be measured, would be the 
"A-C." Similarly if we desired one part 
of the rectangle to be known as "I" we 
would lay out the distance "C-B" for the 
number "B-a" would represent "1 ' and 
the square root would then be the length 
of the line "A-B." 

Commenting on the two methods, the 
method described in my article, may 
seem to be more readily applied and un- 
derstood, but the method herein de- 
scribed requires less space, and the car- 
penter can judge for himself which is the 

most desirable. 

- — ■ c 

Answering the Timber Problem 

In answer to Brother McDonald's 
problem, will say that the stick of tim- 
ber 18 in. square at one end, 6 in. at 
the other end, and 12 ft. long, has "in 
one piece" the volume of 156 feet B. M. 

However, if cut into "what we now 
call" inch lumber there would be a loss, 
from the fact that a number of the 

O' 

boards at one end would run to a wedge 
point. As these points could not be con- 
sidered as board lumber, there would 
not be 156 ft in actual B. M. Divide 

12' Jon3 





timber into 9 parts, getting A center 
part 6 in square. 12 ft. long; four parts 
B each in. square at one end running 



52 



THE CARPENTER 



to a wedge point 12 ft. long; four parts 
C each 6 in. square at one end running 
to a pyrarnidical point 12 ft : long. A 
equals 36 ft. B. M. Place two "B M 
wedges together as in Fig. 2 and get a 
stick equal to A. Four parts B equal to 
72 ft. B. M. C having a base 6 in. 
square gives an area of 36 sq. in., and 
this multiplied by one-third of the alti- 
tude, or length which is 48 in., gives 
36x48 equals 1.728 cu. in. or 1 cu. ft. 
One cu. ft. equals 12 ft. B. M. Four 
parts C equal 48 ft. B. M. Then: 

1 part A equals. ... 36 ft. B. M. 
4 parts B equals. ... 72 fr. B. M. 
4 parts C equals. ... 48 ft. B. M. 

Total 156 ft. B. M. 

Tours fraternally. 

A. E. BEECHET. 
L. U. No. 63. Bloornington. 111. 



the mitre cut you take the distance Q-j 
on the blade and the distance A-B oi 



Another Puzzler 

The accompanying sketch shows two 
sides of a roof to be shingled and the 
question arises as to which side will re- 



f / 


/ / 


1 


t y 

i / 
i / 
i / 
i / 
i / 
i / 


/ 





quire the most shingles or whether the 
same amount will be required for each, 
the shingles being laid 4 2 o to the 
weather. 

H. CARDEv 
L. TJ. Xo. 2406. Brookton. Minn. 



How To Get the Cr.is for Purlins On 
Roofs of Equal Pitch 

(By G. C. Hooper.) 

On the side of a rafter that is in the 
desired position mark a plumb line A-B. 

At right angles to this line mark an- 
other line so that it intersects the plumb 
line at the bottom C-B. 

Take the distance C-A on the blade of 
your square and the distance C-B on 
tongue, now. by marking along the 
tongue you have the face cut. To get 




the tongue and mark along the tongu 
should the purlins be laid on steel trusse 
and it is not convenient to mark on th 
trusses the above can be laid out on 

board. 



An Original Door Frame 

I think the matter of members send 
ing to "The Carpenter" something ne^ 
and original is worth while. 



\ 



TVe dish out brains to every oth< 
craft that comes on the job. Why n< 

for each other? 



THE CARPENTER 



53 



Am showing here a drawing of a door 
rame that is original with me and has 
>een used by both masons and carpen- 
ers who pronounce it a success. 



efit to the membership I have other 
things I have learned in my 48 years 
of experience ;is carpenter and builder 
which may be of interest. 




The strip C gives a nailing surface full 
ngth of the frame, and is a guage for 
e brick mason to line up at this point. 
Should this effort prove to be of ben- 



Yours truly, 
C 



C. 



L. U. No. 510. 



HATFIELD. 
Du Quoin, 111. 



Two Paradoxes of Science Explained 

Is a cubical building the same width 
the top as at the base? Is a level wall 
raight? Yes, one would answer, if he 
id not considered the laws of physics. 
), replies the man of science. A para- 
•x? Read what H, Winifield Secor 



writes of this in "Science and Inven- 
tion" (New York.) 

When we build a house or other build- 
ing we might expect to find, upon accu- 
rate measurement, that the four walls 
measure exactly the same distance apart 
at the base of the building as at the 



J.. 



54 



THE CARPENTER 



top, he writes. But such is not the case, 
however, as physics proves to us, for up- 
on a little reflection it is evident to any 
one that this is impossible, especially 
when Fig. 1 is examined. Where only 
the usual methods of construction are 
applied, i. e., plumbing the walls with 




61 \\ 



DiFFEREKCE BETWE£W 

v$u.3 FoaTpoomr 

BA5E ORBlKM»NGLQ00 
, FEtf HIGH '«. 0472 FOOT 
I OR.5fo73 INCH 
/(ROycHlY^IWCHJ 



/ 






Fig. 1. 

the usual plumb line and weight, or bob, 
it is not possible for either the side walls 
or the front and rear walls to be parallel 
to each other, or the same distance apart 
at the top and bottom, except from in- 
accuracy of construction. 

They must be further apart at the top 
than at the bottom, as each individual 
wall will, if lined up with plumb bob, 
be on a different radial line from the 
center of the earth ; and the chord of the 
angle subtended between two radial 
lines, as shown in the drawing, will in- 
crease propressively as we move out- 
ward from the center of the earth. 

Building constructors, architects and 
engineers are familiar . with this fact, 
and in large buildings or other construc- 
tional operations this fact is taken into 
consideration. 

It has been computed that for a build- 
ing 1,000 ft. long and 1,000 ft. high the 
walls, if simply plumbed with a plumb 
and bob, would be % in. further apart 



at the top than at the base. As the 
height increases, so does the difference 
in the chords or distance between top 
and bottom walls. Further as the dis- 
tance between the two walls increases, 
the difference of chords at top and bot- 
tom of the walls will likewise be aug- 
mented. 

When it comes to building long con- 
crete walls, dams and other construc- 
tional projects a mile or more in extent, 
we once again bump unconsciously into 
the inexorable laws of nature, and for 
once in our lives find that a level wall 
is not straight, by any means ! The 
truth of the matter is that such a wall 
is curved and actually follows the cur- 
vature of the earth. The writer remem- 
bers hearing this point argued many 
times, and it makes an interesting point, 
for debate, you can well believe. 

Fig. 2 demonstrates that a straight 
wall cannot be constructed by leveling — 
that is, by levelling in the ordinary man- 
ner — for the reason that the level will 
act the same as the plumb bob, and it 





SWOT LEVEL 
















^^^^ C0MCOETX VW.L ^ -J ^ 


/^^** 1 




NiDIFFtKFJICE MTWt»«"iEVtLro"n»LUA«t> . 

\ACTU«L STRAKHTUrlE AKX/r f, FT PESIMILE , 

\ -ESEgEBS-61 / 







Fig. 2. 

simply indicates that the bottom of the 
level is at right angles' to a radial line 
pointing to the center of the earth, and 
at that particular point only. As soon 
as you move the level to a new point, 
even if only a few feet away, and pro- 
viding you had instruments sufficiently 
accui-ate to measure the difference, you 
would find that the level has indicated 
a tangential point on the earth's surface 
for that particular radial line only. 

It has been computed that, when' 
building a wall one mile long, the differ- 
ence between the actual wall as con- 
structed by levelling with spirit levels' 
and a dead straight line (sighted across 
the top of the wall by using a levelling 
telescope or surveyor's instrument) is 
Y 2 ft. In other words, if the wall was 
constructed two miles long by levelling, 
the top of it would curve upward in the 
center, so that if a perfectly straight 
lino or chord Avere drawn across the top 
of the wall there would be x /% ft. differ- 



THE CARPENTER 



G5 



ice between the line and the top of the 
[all at either end. For longer walls this 
fference increases, of course, and de- 
eases as the wall becomes shorter. 
Note — The foregoing facts are not 
vel, having been familiar to architects, 
. gineers and highly skilled building 
;?chanics as carpenters and masons for 
liny years. Still they are exact. Prac- 
lial bricklayers and masons regard the 
Terence so infinitesimal as to ignore it 
: applying plumb rules, although they 
ually tend to "draw in" when building 
)jh walls, chimneys, etc. 

OWEN B. MAGINNIS. 



Shorter Solution to the Grindstone 
Problem 

in answer to Brother Geo. A. Turner's 
V.uest for a shorter and practical solu- 
t|Q on Brother Marker's grindstone 
Iiblem than the one he has worked out 
i square root in the March issue. 

:?irst make the 60 in. circle then the 
6 1. circle in the center, form a circle in 




H space between, divide the diameter 
1 his circle just found in four parts, 
s 'l re across, and where the square 
to lies the circle it will give the divi- 
>i< point for each man's part. 
Fraternally yours, 

C. C. WINGATE. 
21 N. Smallwood St. Baltimore, Md. 
L. U. No. 100. 



jjie workers who strike in protest 
'gist their wrongs may be defeated, 
bu he public protest registered in the 
J e V nd for the Union Label is invincible. 




PLAN Of bLACt D 
SHOWING ME.THOD Of 
&IMLDIN&; UP 



•KlHgteS-61 



jQ^p. 



A practical method of tying rafters and floor 

joist together. These braces will relieve the 

upper portion of walls against outward thrust 

from the roof. 




join ANCMot 



POD '6 WALL 

MAY MOW (-LOOB. 




JOIST 



Z TILL WALL 



This illustration shows the same object being 
accomplished by using an iron rod and turn*- 
buckle in place of the timber frame. 



A consistent supporter of the Union 
Label can live in the faith that the 
whole world is on his side so long as 
he is true to the best that is in him. 




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'Asbestos 



INSULATION 

BRAKE UNINGS 

ROOFINGS 

PACKINGS 

CEMENTS 



FIRE 

| PREVENTION 

PRODUCTS 



Don't shovel off the old 
— -^ wooden shingles 

^j Lay Asbestos shingles right over them 

'% The thought of a lit— 
■r^. ter of broken shingles 
on the lawn and flower 
beds has made many an 
owner hesitate to re- 
roof. 

Johns-Manville As-**; 
bestos Shingles laid 
right over the old shin- 
gles put an end to this dirt and fuss. This 
fact alone will often make a sale. 

Add to this, the advantage of the greater 
durability, weather-proofness, and fire-safety 
of these shingles, and you have a proposition 
that every house-owner will carefully consider. 

Re-roofing with Johns-Manville Asbestos is 
an easy, quick, clean job. The owner appre- 
ciates it, and more than that, he tells his 
friends about it. And that's how many dealers 
have made a reputation. 

National advertising and sales producing 
dealers helps will aid you to build up a flour- 
ishing business re-roofing with Johns-Man- 
ville Asbestos Shingles. 

Write now to your nearest Johns-Manville 
Branch for particulars. 
JOHNS-MANVILLE Inc. 

Madison Avenue, at 41st Street, New York City 

Branches in o~ Large Cities 

For Canada: CANADIAN JOHNS- MANSVILLE 

CO,. Ltd.. Toronto 

This booklet hasbeen 
unusually successful 
in bringing in re- 
roofing orders. Send 
it to your prospects. 

Johns-] 

Asbestos Shingles 





Carpenters, Bricklayers, Contractors, Builders and 
others — Can you read Blue Prints? If not, learn 
how. It will help you hold your job — it will get 
you p better job — it will Increase your earning ca- 
pacity. Special Courses for each trade. Write, at 
once, for Free blue print and Catalog B, Stating trade. 

ARCHITECTURAL. MECHANICAL, SHEET 
METAL AND STRUCTURAL DRAFTING 

quickly taught at home, in your spare time, on the 
"Pay As You Study Plan." You can soon qualify for 
a successful draftsman. Books and tools furnished 
Free. Write today for catalog G. It means more pay. 
ESTIMATING— STEEL SQUARE 
Practical Courses making the various details simple 
and clear. It will give you the training that will take 
you out of overalls and put you into a boss' job. Do 
not miss this opportunity. Write now for Catalog. E. 

COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL EST. 1904 

______ Dept. I0A. Drexel Bldg.. Phils.. Pa. _____ 



BLADDER 
WEAKNESS 

A famous European chemist has given the 
world a rare discovery that soothes and allays 
inflammation and Weakness of Bladder. 

It is embodied in our PRO-GLANDIN that 
thousands are using. Prompt and safe results. 




Sleep 
all night 
in comfort 



If you want to enjoy unbroken rest all night, 
with ease, comfort, contentment and better 
health, then use PRO-GLANDIN Free 

50c Pkg'e FREE 



ALSO - SELF CARE" LEAFLET 

3Jo introduce we will give away 100.000 Pack- 
ages sent FREE, postpaid anywhere. Contains 
Trial supply of PRO-GLANDIN. and "Self 
Care" Leaflet telling how to treat yourself. 
Every Bladder sufferer should read it. Send no 
money. ]ust your address, and get all Free. 

H. W. WORTH 74 Cortlandt St., New York 



piLES 



'T BE CUT 

Until You Try This Won- 
derful Treatment. My internal 
method of treatment is the correct one, 
and is sanctioned by the best informed 
physicians and surgeons. Ointments. 
salves and other local applications give 
only temporary relief. 

If you have piles in any form write for a 
FREE sample of Page's Pile Tablets and you 
will bless the day that you read this. Write 
today. 
E. R.PAGE,322Ȥ Page Bldg., Marshall, Mich. 



There is 
Strength in 

E 





One dose often helps com- 
mence to enrich your blood 
and revitalize your worn- 
out exhausted nerves — 
Nuxated Iron is organic 
iron, like the iron in your 
blood and like the iron in spin- 
ach. It is so prepared that it 
will not injure the teeth ncr 
disturb thestomach.Itis ready 
for almost immediate absorp- 
tion and assimilation by the 
blood while some physicians 
claim metallic iron which peo- 
ple usually takeisnotabsorbed 
at all. If you are not strong or 
well you owe it to yourself to 
make the following test: See 
how Ion g you can work or how 
i far you can walk without be- 
i coming tired. Next take two 
five-grain tablets of Nuxated 
Iron-three times per day .after 
meals for two weeks. Then 
test your strength again and 
see how much you have gained. Your money 
will be refunded by the manufacturers if you 
do not obtain perfectly satisfactory results. 
At all druggists. 



znESsnisnsiz 

Enriches the Blood- Strengthens the Nerves 



s 




Owners 

MTED! 

To introduce the best auto- 
mobile tires in the world. 
Made under our new and ex- 
clusive Internal Hydraulic 
Expansion Process thatelim- 
inates Blow-Oat — Stone-Bruise 
— Rim-Cut and enables us to 
sell our tires under a 

10,000 MILE 



WWwv&JJ ^ e want an a sent in every 
ll^M community to use and in- 
troduce these wonderful 
tires at our astonishingly 
low prices to all motor car owners. 
Write for booklet fully describing this new 
process and explaining our amazing in- 
troductory offer to owner agents. 

Hydro-United Tire Co. 

Oept. 84 Chicago, San Francisco, Pottstown, P» 




Only $1.00 with the coupon below brings this sen- 
sational furniture bargain to your home on 30 
days trial. Complete 6 piece set of fumed^olid 
oak livingroom furniture including a wonderfully 
comfortable and roomy divan. Only $29.85 
for the complete set on this offer— on 
easy payments, too. $40 was the 
former price for a set like this 
a special factory sacrifice makes 
this slash in price possible now. 
Seize this opportunity on our special 
approval offer— we take the risk. 

30 Days Trial 

When you get this magnificent 6- 
piece library set, put it in your liv- 
ing room or library and use it freely 
for 30 days. Note the massive, solid 
construction —the beautiful finish— 
the fine upholstery and graceful 
•ili'Jil lines. Compare it with anything you 
can buy locally at anywhere near 

! same price— even for spot cash. Then if not satisfied for any reason, 
; urn the set at our expense and we will refund your $1.00 at once, plus 

/ freight charges you paid. 

)nly $2.70 a Month Xff*&*fty&s* 

ith until you have paid $29.85. A full year to pay— at the rate of only a few cents 
>y. This wonderful value is not listed in our regular catalog. We have only a limited 
iberof sets. We trust honestpeople anywhereinthe U.S. One priceto all, cash 
' redit. No discount for cash. Not one penny extra for credit. NoC.O.D. :■■■ 

rice Slashed!— Send Now 




New 
6-Piece Set 

Fumed Solid Oak 




Thia superb 6- piece set is made of selected solid oak 
tbrougnout, finished in rich, dull waxed, brown fumed 
oak. AH the four chairs are padded; seats uphol- 
stered with brown Delavan Spanish leather, the best 
imitation of genuine Spanish leather known. The up- 
holstering: is a rich brown color. 

Large Divan provides extra seating capacity. It la 
an unusually massive, comfortable piece with beauti- 
fully designed back. Arms are broad and comfortable. 
Measures 46 inches wide outside and 36 inches lone 
inside. Thickly padded seat Is 19 inches deep. Height 
of back is 22 inches. Posts are extra massive. 
Arm Chair is a roomv, dignified piece of furni- 
ture, comfortable and big enough for a very large 
person while not seeming too large for the ordinary 
occupant. Seat 19 x 17 1-2 in., height 36 in. 
Arm Rocker is a massive, stately, comfortable 
piece, with beautifully designed back, wide, shapely 
arms, and smooth operating runners. Seat 19x171-2 
in., height 36 in. 

Sewing Rocker is unusually attractive and useful. 
Seat 17 x 17 in., height SB in. 

Library Table — A beautiful piece of library fur- 
niture. Beautifully designed ends to match chairs 
with roomy magazine shelf below. Legs cut of 2 in. 
stock; massive, dignified. Top measures 23 1-4 x 34 In. 
Jardiniere Stand matches other pieces. A dec- 
oration to your living room or library. Carefully 
built throughout. Measures 17 1-2 in. high; the top 
12x12 inches. 

Entire set shipped knocked down construction. Easy 

to set up. Saves freight charges. Wt. about 176 lbs. 

Order by No. B6944A. $1.00 with 

coupon. $2.70 a month, price S29.85. 



ee Bargain Catalog 

0W9 thousands of bargains in 
"future, jewelry, carpets, rugs, 
•tains, silverware, phono- 
'P.ns, stoves, porcb and lawn 
Tiiture, women's, men's and 
laren's wearing apparel. 



Don't delay. Just send 
$1.00 along with the cou- 
pon as a deposit. If you 
wish to return the set after 
30 days, your dollar will be refunded, plus 
all freight charges which you paid. Remem- 
ber, this is a special, limited, reduced price 
offer. First come, first served. Get your set 
while this offer lasts. 80 days trial — we 
take all the risk. Send coupon now. 

faUS & OCllf BUI, West ZStl^tlt, Chicago, 111. 



Straus & Schram, Reg 3015 , W. 35th St, Chicago 

Enclosed find $1.00. Ship special advertised 6-PIece Fumed 
Oak Library Set. I am to have 30 days free trial. If I keep 
the set, I will pay you S2.70 monthlv. If not satisfied. I am 
to return the set within 30 days and you are to refund my 
money and any freight charges 1 paid. 
D 6 Piece Library Set, No. B6944A. $29.85. 

Name 

Street, R. F. D. 

or Box No 

Shipping 

Point 

Post 

Office .. -State 

II you only want catalog put x in box below: 

D Furaiture,Stoves,JeweIry □ MeB's,Women's,Children'sClothjnj 






CARPEHTERS AHI> BUJtDERS 

PRACTICAL RULES * 

^ ' FOR ; L/^IIiJC^bjUT^WdR^^v 




(Size 4i x 7 inches 



CARPENTERS HAND BOOK 

For the carpenter on the job there is no other hand 
book of similar publication that gives so fully the 
methods of laying out work and containing so 
many every day "rules and tables." 
Among some of the tables included are those giv- 
ing full length of common, hip, valley and jack 
rafters, also the cuts required for any of these 
pitches. In these tables are given 2700 different 
lengths of rafters, 300 different lengths of braces 
and the proper cuts for same. 

The layout of roofs, including complete roof fram- 
ing, stair building, the use of the steel square, etc., 
and in fact all the up-to-date information and 
•'SHORT CUT RULES" for every-day use in a first 
class flexible bound pocket edition. 
Price to Members Only of U. B. of C. & J. of A. 

"" "" "" — ~" ""Mail this Coupon to"" - """ 
I 0. A. ROGERS, 

| 3604 Stevens Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 

, Enclosed find $1.00 for which please send me your book 
' CARPENTER AND BUILDERS PRACTICAL RULES 
| FOR LAYING OUT WORK. 

I Name 

I St. and No 

I 

■ Town and State 

I The Book that will help you on the job or your money back. 




THE STANDEFORD CASING GAUGE 

Allows for % -inch parallel margin on the head jamb of do 
and window trim, by marking the side casing as indicated; Mai 
flush casings on their edge. The gauge is nickel plated steel, Ve: 
handy, quick and accurate. 

Send me 45c for the gauge, if you are not satisfied, I will refui 
your 45c and return postage promptly. 



R. P. STANDEFORD, 



P. O. Box 981. 



Kansas City, M 




Join this great Auto Club and win Grand Prizes including Ford 
Sedan, complete with electric starter and sliding plate glass 
windows. The ideal carfor all-year use. 

Can you make out the two words spelled by the numbers in 
the picture? The alphabetis numbered, A is 1, B is 2, etc. What 
ere the two words? 10,000 Sedan votes given for your answer. 
Many other valuable prizes and hundreds of dollars in cash 
given. Everybody wins 1 So easy you will be surprised. 

Send Your Answer Today. ^^S&f^t: 

body gets this new Sedan free— freight and tax paid. It can be 
you! Send answer today, and you can share in the prizes. 

FORD WILLSON, Mgr. 141 W. Ohio St. Dept.2736 , Chia*o, III. 




Given 

A LUXURIOUS SEDAN, IDEAL ALL-YEAR CAR 

rasp 



A school girl of 14 

recently won Auto 



Don't Wear a Truss 




C. E. BROOKS, Inventor 



T5ROOKS' APPLIANCE, the 
■^ modern, scientific inven- 
tion, the wonderful new dis- 
covery that cures rupture will 
be sent on trial. No obnoxi- 
ous springs or pads. Has 
automatic Air Cushions. 
Binds and draws the broken 
parts together as you would 
a broken limb. No salves. 
No lies. Durable, cheap. 
Sent on trial to prove it. 
Catalog and measure blanks 
mailed free. Send name and 
address today. Never on sale 
in stores. Don't be fooled by 
imitations. Look for trade 
mark signature of C. E. 
Brooks and his picture on 
every appliance. None other 
genuine. 



— COMBINED — 
Rule.Square.MiterGaoe 



Accnts Wanted 



Brooks Appliance Co., 252 F State St., Marshall, Mich. 



Pocket SizeJPost PAib : $.-1.25 y 
C.F.Benjamin Co., Milford.Conn 



BUILD YOUR OWN PHONOGRAP 



Cut out big profits. Anyone handy with '• 

can make a cabinet according to our draw 

and simple instructions. We furnish meet 

ical parts at small cost. Drawings, blue pn ■ 

parts, price list, etc.. free on request. Write today. 

Associated Phonograph Compav 

Department 9 Cincinnati, 



,Uv tli£s*jhzjf d&asv&L' (BaraAsd, Ca*rtsfi&*f*&~ 




V 




NOT if you use genuine Beaver 
Board. The cost of Beaver 
Boarding is surprisingly low, yet the 
results are as permanent as they are 
good looking. 

You can nail the big panels over 
old plaster or directly to joists and 
studding as easily as you would in 
finishing up new interiors. Either way 
you can count on a job that's eminently 
satisfactory. For Beaver Board walls 
and ceilings can't crack or fall. 

Genuine Beaver Board is knotless, 
flawless manufactured lumber, made 
from the long, tough fibers of white 
spruce logs. Each panel is sized by 
our patented Sealtite process, which 
makes a perfect painting surface. 
iNail up the panels, paint, if you 



:ose repairs 
won't be expensive 



tare to decorate, add the finishing 
wood strips and the job is complete. 
It's quick, clean work, with little saw- 
ing and practically no waste. There's 
none of the muss or litter that goes 
along with ordinary repair work. 

So, don't postpone needed repairs 
or remodelin g work ' 

Ji" l I'll- UP expense. Your locaT 

.carpenter or lumber dealer will gladly 
Allium itn i-nl I il i khuul 1JUJIT 
ing you want to do. See about it today. 
Or, send our Builders' Service De- 
partment in Buffalo a rough sketch, 
giving dimensions, locating doors and 
windows and specifying the type of 
room, and our expert designers will] 
prepare finished plans at no COitjoj] 
obligation to you. 



THE BEAVER BOARD COMPANIES 



. BuH.lo. N. Y; Thorold. On,.. C.n.d.; London, En|. 
c N.w 1 ork, All.ni., BuE.lo, Cbit.Jo .no k.n.«, i;,,". 



Above all. be sure j>ou use genuine Beaver Boat 
for the Beaver Quality trade-mark on the bae'i 
Panel. It is there for your protection. Insist upon 




tORiETTEK WALLS ^CEILINGS 





PREMAX WALL TIES AND PLUGS 

Strong — Permanent — Correctly designed 

From your dealer or direct 

NIAGARA .METAL STAMPING CORPORATION 
Division C Niagara Falls, N. Y 




The Rustless Rule 



Made of Luminov. a special alloy of Aluminum. 

Here is THE Rule eTeiy Carpenter and Builder should hare. It won't fist 
weighs little, has brass joints, costs less than a steel rule, ye! 
durable, has large figures and accurate graduation, together with pel 
- .;. -_r 

Made in lengths 2 to 8 ft. If your dealer can not supply you se;.. 



Lafayette Ave. 



THE RUSTLESS RULE CO., INC. 



Buffalo. N. Y 






FOR THE EXPERT 



The NO. 1 SAWSET is designed 
for the person who wishes to use 
his own judgment in setting a 
hand, band, jig. butcher or fret 
saw not over 16 gauge. 



CHAS. MORRILL 



New York 




::-rv 
JustKcht 



SAW5ETS 



-pHE Wayvell Chappell Automatic Ball Bearing Eleetf 
1 Floor Surfacing Machine is what you need:: 
new or old floors quickly and just the way you want the 

As QUALITY or work is the first essential in finish! 
floois, particularly new work in residences, fl 
meats, etc, all roller vibration must be done away «il 
It is remarkable how smoothly and ta 
steadily this ball bearing machine op- 
erates. 

Only surfacing machine having roll- 
er sanding even with base- 
board from either side of i 
machine, doing away with| 
tmeren work of edge roU- 
;: zz- .z':^-^-'. 7: :: =:.t-: = 

Write for folders. Ac- 
cept our free trial offer. 

(Machine demon- 
strated also at our 
Branch Office. 921 
Washington Blvd., | 
~'iLzz£Z.) 
Man. by Wayvell 

Chappell & Co. 

38 N. Jackson St. 

Dept. A. 

Waukeoan, I!!. "■" Pat. 1912-1816 





K&E MEASURING TAPES 

are well made, of good material, and are reliable. 

Prices Revised Send For New Price 

■ KEUFFEL & ESSER Co. * 

;~.. ■;■".-. "_--.-.-..•;.-.-_-: c-c^-~~c~:.-j--i-~-" sea z.rz: ■:-■: -J. 



a 



A TOOL-BOX NECESSITY — THE TAINTOR 
POSITIVE SAW SET. The Tool which sets your 
saw Right. 

I- there a Taintor in Tour Tool-box? If not, talk it over 
with your hardware dealer* Send for Book : "Care of Sayrs." ^© 
Free to members of the Brotherhood. 

TAINTOR MFG. Co.. 95 Reade St., New York City. 




THE GUNN SELF-FASTENING FOLDING SAW CLAMP 




Holds the Saw TIGHT — Anywhere! 



Will inst f fasten itself to work bench, 
board, joist, or pile of lumber, rail c: fence- 
suitable place — ar.d without screws or nails, or an 
jther means of fastening; stands firmer than u 
other — with their troublesome screws, nails and bracq 
Made of best malleable iron. 13 inches long; weia 
3 pounds: folds like a jack-knife; can be carried I 
coat pocket. Guaranteed not to break. 

Price. S2.00 at Most Good Hardware Stores, j 
or Sent Prepaid Anywhere for $2.00. Mones I 

Refunded if Met Satisfactory. 
CLAN GUNN FOLDING SAW CLAMP CO.. | 
P. 0. Box 643, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



3 & 5=PLY VENEERED PANELS 

All woods — All thicknesses. For doors, cab- 
inetwork and wainscoating. Send stamp 
for stocklist and pri - 

DUNN PLYWOOD CO. 
Oxford Bldg.. Chicago. 111. 



CARPENTERS 

Tobacco: Kentucky Natural iqiq Leai 

SAVE 2-3rds AND GET THE PURE ARTICLE 

Regular smoking 10 lbs., $1.50: 50 lbs., $6. 

Good smoking 4 lbs., 1.00; 10 lbs., 2. 

Chewing and smoking.. 10 lbs., 2. 

Select Chewing 3 lbs.. 1.00; 10 lbs., 3. 

Mild: Medi-i-: Sti : r Fire Air Cured and Buriey 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

PRODUCERS DISTRIBUTORS Murray, k 




The American Woodworker 

Gasoline, Kerosene, or Electric Driven 
Used on the Job or in the Shop 

Also Made With Band Saw Attached 

Let us send you our Bulletin No. 77 
describing this and other profit pro- 
ducers for the Carpenter, Contrac- 
tor and Builder. 

American Saw Mill Machinery Company 

136 Main Street, Hackettstown, N. J. 

New York Office. 50 Church St. 
Philadelphia Office, The Bourse. 




for Catalog 



1 umbing, Heating and Pneumatic 
Waterworks Supplies at Wholesale 



When in the market for Plumbing, Heating and 
Pneumatic Waterworks Supplies and you wish to 

Save 20 to 40% on Every Article 

order from us. Small orders are as carefully 
handled as large ones. Only house selling guar- 
anteed plumbing and heating supplies to all. 



KAROL & SONS CO., 804 So. Kedzie Ave., Chicago, 111. 



I a Weatherstrip Contractor 

ft ke $5,000 to $10,000 or More — 
early Prepare for the Spring 
Building Boom 

S :ng and installing weatherstrip is a 
n and uncrowded business. The Spring 
N ( ;on is going to be alive with oppor- 
11 ti'>s for the contractor-agent who is 
■ pped to go after this business. 
A letal Weatherstrip is favorably 
ki vu and preferred by architects and 
y.< ral contractors. 

G Our Selling Proposition Now 

B 'in this and Spring you can be 
iping old buildings and landing con- 
tracts for new buildings to 
be put up later on. Every 
building is a prospect. Hun- 
dreds of buildings right 
now in your vicinity need 
weatherstrip. 

GET INTO A BUSINESS 
OF YOUR OWN 

Don't get caught out of 
work again — build up a 
business of your own and 
one that pays big. We 
furnish models and assist 
you to land contracts. 
Weatherstrip contractros 
make good money right 
from the start. 

Write today for complete 
information 

^LMETAL WEATHERSTRIP 
COMPANY 

26 /est Kinzie Street CHICAGO 




LOSING MONEY? 



On your last job what did you make? 
Could your profits have been greater? 
Why not KNOW each time you esti- 
mate a job, large or small, by check 
ing up your figures with the 1922 
Revised Edition of 

The New 
BUILDING ESTIMATOR 

By William Arthur 

Over 1200 pages, 4y 2 x7, 
tables and illustrations, 
flexible keratol, $6.00. 
Ready in June. 

Send No Money 
Just this Coupon 




U. P. C. Book Company, Inc., 
243 W. 39th St., New York. 

Send me when published Arthur's NEW 
BUILDING ESTIMATOR. I agree to either 
remit $0.00 for the book or return it within 
5 days. 



Name 



Address 

I Subs, to The CARPENTER May 22 






41 



While were doing the 
Jot Jet's do it right!" 



^ 



Let's use this 




PATENT APPLIED FOR 






"If we put in sash cord, we're going 
to have trouble sooner or later. It 
will rot or stretch or cut on a sharp 
edge or something, and then we'll have 
to do the job all over again. 

"If we install "Acco" it will never 
wear out !" 

Acco comes in three finishes — A. C. D. (Coppered Steel), S. It. P. 
(Special Rust Proof), and Hot Galvanized. Packed 100 feet of 
chain with 40 weight fixtures in strong bag. Write for Prices. 

American Chain Co., Inc. 



District Sales Offices : 



Bridgeport, Conn. 

Boston Chicago New York Pittsburgh 

P