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Here you are! 




Write today for your copy of the Sheetrock Time Book. It's chock-full 
of building data. Also has handy memo pages for keeping track of your 
working time. Carpenters everywhere say it's the most valuable book of 
its kind. This coupon will bring you a free copy. Tear it ofi and mail it. 

Sheetrock comes in standard sizes: 3 /a in. thick, 32 or 48 in. wide and 6 to 10 ft. long 

UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

General Offices: Depk I, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, HI. 

Kte. O. S. Fat. Off. 

SHEETROGK 

The FIREPROOF WALLBOARD 

Mail this coupon today 

United States Gypsum Company 

Dept. I, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago. Illinois 
Send my SHEETROCK Time Book to— 

(Name) / • . .. " -..■,■■■ 

(Complete Address) _ 

Sheetrock is inspected and approved as an effective barrier to fire by the Underwriters' Laboratories. Inc. 

! 
I 



Beauty that is 
NOT Skin Deep ^ 




u_ 




WE are not all millionaires. We can't all 
afford real mahogany trim, for instance, in 
our homes. 

But with the combination of a real decorator and 
Johnson's Wood Dyes we all can have Beauty that 
a million dollars cannot beat. 

And Beauty that is not skin-deep. Because John- 
son's Wood Dye penetrates the pores of inexpen- 
sive soft woods it gives them a lasting, permanent 
color that deep scratches and mars will not remove. 

Johnson's Wood Dyes are made from old tested 
formulas that a quarter of a century's use has 
proven. They come in 17 different shades that can 
be lightened, darkened or intermixed to suit any 
color scheme. And they are easy to work with — go 
on without laps or streaks, dry in four hours, and 
will not rub off or smudge. 

Among the most popular shades are: 

123 — Dark Oak 131 — Walnut 

i2g — Dark Mahogany 126— Light Oak 

127 — Brown Mahogany 124 — Golden Oak 

130 — Weathered Oak 140 — Early English 






JOHNSON'S WOOD DYE 



17B171? BOOK ON WOOD 
T IV H* J& FINISHING 

It's the best book ever pub- 
lished on Artistic Wood Fin- 
ishing — the work of famous 
experts — illustrated in 
color. This book is written 
for the practical man — it 
gives covering capacity, in- 
cludes color charts, etc. We 
will gladly send it free and 
postpaid. 




r-— -— — — — — — 

I S. C. JOHNSON & SON, 
I Dept. C. 1, Racine, Wis. 
1 "The Wood Finishing Authorities" 
I Please send me free and post- 
, paid your 25c Book on Wood Fin- 
ishing. 
. I usually buy varnishes from 

' My Name 

. | My Address 

I City & State 




Build a Profitable Alteration Business 
with this Free Book! 



This book — "Better Homes 
from Old Houses" — has 
proved a real business-builder 
to carpenter-contractors all 
over the country. 

Between its covers all the com- 
mon types of old houses are shown 
with sound suggestions for making 
them more artistic, more comfort- 
able and worth more money. Pre- 
pared- by a staff of leading archi- 
tects, it is authentic in every detail. 
It's a book of suggestions — not of 
working plans. 

There are any number of old 
houses that could easily be im- 
proved in and around your town. 



The main difficulty is getting the 
owners to think "alterations." 

Put a copy in the hands of every 
man or woman in your town who 
owns an architecturally out-of-date 
house. 

Right there the "remodeling 
idea" starts ! Some of these house 
owners will send for you to talk 
plans and costs of alterations ! A 
good number will go through with 
the job now — others later. This is 
building business... 

Get your free sample copy of this 
book. Fill out the coupon, giving 
your name, and address, also name 
and address of your building sup- 
ply dealer. 



^C 



ROOFINGS 



THE BARRETT COMPANY, 40 Rector St., New York. 

Please send me free sample copy of your business-building book- — "Better Homes from Old Houses. 
The address of my building supply dealer is given below. 



Your Name Your Dealer's Name . 

Your Address Dealer's Address 

Town State 



S 




Sent Free 

Mail the Coupon for these 2 Books 
and Blue Print P 



If you are in any building trade, we want to send you these 2 books and 
blue prints at our expense. One of these books contains a lesson in Plan 
Reading prepared by the Chicago Tech. experts ; the other explains the 
Chicago Tech. method of training men by mail in the building trades for 
the jobs that pay the most money or for businesses of their own. All you 
have to do to get them is to mail the coupon. Don't send a penny. 

Get the Knowledge that Will 
Make You Worth More Money 



You may be as good a man as there is in 
the use of tools hut as long as you re- 
main a workman you won't earn more 
than the wage scale. It isn't manual 
skill that puts a man in the big pay 
class — it's the ability to use his head 
that brings the fat pay check or enables 
him to "go in for himself." That has 
been proved over and over again by 
workmen who took the Chicago Tech. 
training in the higher branches of build- 
ing and are now foremen, superintend- 
ents and contractors. 

J. B. Woodside of Oklahoma was a car- 
penter working for $6 a day when Ye 
took a course in training bv mail at Chi- 



cago- Technical College and was ad 
vanced to a foremanship, in 2 months, 
became a superintendent 5 months later 
and then went into contracting. 

Carl Testroat of Iowa is another man 
who got into a successful contracting 
business through this training as did J. 
G. Hart of West Virginia, and C. W. 
Busch of Kansas. 

Not only have workmen got ahead 
through this instruction but also con- 
tractors who were taking on small jobs 
because their experience was limited. 
Chicago Tech. has taught them how to 
handle the big jobs that pay the most 
money. 



Train by Mail 

Become a Building Expert 

Never before have there been such op- 
portunities as there are right now for 
men with expert knowledge of building. 
You can get ready for these big oppor- 
tunities if you will use some of your 
spare time to study at home under the 
direction of the Chicago Tech. experts. 
No time taken from your present work. 
All this will be explained when we send 
you the free books and blue prints. 

Plan Reading. Every man who has got 

very far ahead in any building trade can 

read blue prints. No man can expect to 

be a first rate foreman or 

superintendent until he 

knows what every line on 

a plan means and how to 

lay out and direct work 

from the architect's plans. 

By the Chicago Tech. 

Method you quickly learn 

to read any plan as easily 

as you read these words. 



DO YOU KnOW- 



Estimating. Of course a 
man who wants to be a 
contractor or to hold a big 
job in a contracting organ- 
ization must know how to 
figure costs of labor, ma- 
terial, and everything else 
that goes into any kind of 
building The Chicago 
Tech. course covers every 
detail x»f this important branch — tells 
you just how it is done from actual 
blue print plans. 

Superintending. How to hire and direct 
men, how to keep track of every detail 
of construction as it goes on, how to get 
the work done in the least time at the 
lowest cost is also fully covered in the 
Chicago Tech. Builders' Course. 



— how different materials 

are shown on blue 

prints? 
— how "sections" and 

"elevations" are shown 

on the plans? 
— how to lay out a build= 

ing from the plan? 
— how to take off quan= 

tities from the plan? 
— how to figure building 

costs? 
— why some lines on 

plans are shown dotted 

and others full? 



Also special courses in Architectural 
Drafting for builders, taught by prac- 
tical men. These explained in Special 
Catalog "D" sent on request. 

Don't Let Your 
Chance Slip Away 



and see that a job of building or some 
important part of a big construction pro- 
ject is done right and finished on time. 
Read the questions in the space below. 
Whether you will make a big success in 
the building business or not depends on 
whether you can answer these and many 
other question about building plans and 
specifications, that are all made very 
clear and easy for the Chicago Tech. 
home-study student. 

Only Part of Your 
Spare Time Required 

Getting this Chicago Tech. training does 
not mean quitting your work. If you live 
in Chicago, you can come to the evening 
classes at the College. If 
you don't live here, you 
can have the same instruc- 
tion by mail that you 
would get if you were on 
the ground. You get the 
same lessons — you are 
taught by the same ex- 
perts. The only difference 
will be that the lessons 
are sent by mail instead 
of given in person. 

Stay on your job. Draw 
your regular pay. But put 
in a few hours a week of 
your spare time to pleas- 
ant, interesting home 
study under the direction 
of experts of the Chicago 
Technical College. 
Hundreds of top-notch builders, superin- 
tendents and contractors, owe their suc- 
cess to this practical home- study course. 
There are 31 lessons and many sets of 
blue print plans in the complete course. 

Send the Coupon-Now 

It costs nothing to get the pay raising informa- 
tion which we will gladly send on request with 
the free Books and Blue Print Plans. We will 
explain clearly and completely how men, who 
had no better chances than you, are stepping 
into higher positions or becoming independent 
in businesses of their own. Mail the coupon 
today. 



I Chicago Technical College, 

Dept. 139, Chicago Tech. BIdg., 
I 118 East 26th Street, Chicago, III. 

I Please send me your Free Books and Blue Prints 
for men in the Building Trades. Send postpaid 
to my address below. 



If you don't make a bigger income this . 

year than you have ever made in your I Write or print name plainly. 

life it is because you will not prepare for . 

the jobs that are open to every trained I Name 

man in your trade. . 

I Address 

Not only are good workmen needed but 

there is a demand far beyond the supply | City State 

for men who can read plans, figure costs 1 

' Occupation 




All Steel 

Mitre Box 
No.17G 

Price $25 



It figures your angles, 

then cuts accordingly 



THIS mitre box is to the carpenter 
what a protractor is to the architect 
— a handy tool that does your angle- 
figuring for you — does it right, and saves 
time and trouble. 

It's equipped with a framing scale 
that reads both right and left from 90 
degrees. If, for instance, you want to 
cut a rafter for a 3 -foot rise in 12, you 
set the indicator on 3. The scale, to- 
gether with the arc, graduated in de- 
grees, on which all angles are indicated, 
makes it easy to cut at exactly the angle 
you want. This box cuts at any angle 
between 45 and 90 degrees right or left. 
An extra attachment enables you to cut 
at more acute angles. 



It's the only all-steel mitre box made. 
And it's trussed like a steel bridge — 
won't bend or break. Equipped with a 
28 x 5-inch back saw, which can be 
locked at any angle. 

Steel bottom plates are scored to pre- 
vent slipping. The stops can be regu- 
lated to saw to any desired depth. 

Other good tools for carpenters 

If you haven't a copy of the Goodell- 
Pratt Catalog No. 15, send for one now. 
It's free to carpenters. The catalog 
shows the entire Goodell-Pratt family of 
1500 Good Tools — many of them, like 
this all-steel mitre box, are of special 
interest to carpenters. 



GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY 

GREENFIELD, MASS., U. S. A. 



J/M cUmlt/u-. 



Makers of Mr. Punch 



WHY DEVELOP 
A GLASS 
ARM? 



Price $1.65 in U.S. A. 
2.00 in Canada. 




An epoch marking im- 
provement in the Ham- 
mer Industry. 

HELLER'S 

Shock Absorbing Hammer 

Featuring 

1. A rubber cushion liner between 
the handle and hammer head. 
Set under extreme pressure, thus 
preventing any loosening - whatever 
of the handle as the rubber cushion 
takes up all shrinkage. 

2. Long Life — free from handle break- 
age. 

.3. A rubber cushion liner eliminating 
shock and vibration to the arm. A steady 
day's work will prove this assertion. Try 
the new hammer and then your old fa- 
vorite. 

4. Finest Heller Hammer Steel. 

5. Drop forged and hand finished by ex- 
perienced craftsmen. 

6. A handle of finest selected second growth 
hickory procurable. 

7. A rubber liner serving as additional pro- 
tection for work around electric wires, -etc. 

Have your Hardware dealer supply you. If 
he is unable to do so, mail us your Money Or- 
der with his name, specifying weight and style 
hammer required and we will send direct to you 

Heller Brothers Company 

Newark, N. J., U. S. A. 
Good Tools Since 1836 



Mechanic's Tools 

FILES 
RASPS 
STEEL 




11 



4 

i\ 

i 





These Books 
will help you get 

the Wvll Board 

Jobs 

in your town 



Tie up with the prevailing 
idea that it pays to remodel 
andmodernize the older ,well- 
built homes. Thousands of 
people are thinking along 
those lines. Scores of home 
owners in your town are 
planning to remodel. It's 
good salesmanship on your 
part to go after this business. 
We canhelp you — Beaver Fi- 
bre Wall Board can help you. 

Write for the Beaver Plan 
Book and for samples of the 
series of booklets and folders 
we are prepared to mail to 
any list of names you would 
like to have circularized — 
or we will supply them to 



you in any reasonable quan- 
tity for you to distribute 
or mail to prospects. 

Remember: The more 
Beaver Fibre Wall Board 
j obsyou get , the more Beaver 
Fibre Wall Board we sell. 
That, frankly, is the reason 
we have worked out effective 
plans to help you get the 
work. Both of us profit by 
it. Let's do a little "team- 
work" and keep busy all 
winter. Mail the coupon, on 
the second page following, 
for full particulars of the 
Beaver proposition. 

THE BEAVER PRODUCTS CO., Inc. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
Thorold, Canada London, England 



fcEAVEk 

MtODUCTS 



i 

i 

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9 

9 

9 
9 
9 

9 
I 
9 

9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
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* 

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t 
9 
9 



9 
9 
9 

9 
9 

9 
9 



9 



and these booklets 
will help you get 

the Roofing 

Jobs 

in your town 

Right now is the time We have a splendid 

to start lining up roof- plan for circularizing 

ing work for spring. In the home owners in your 

the next two or three town for you without 

months dozens of home expense to you. Let us 

owners will realize that explain this business- 

they need new roofs, getting plan and tell you 

Don't let these custom- why you ought to tie up 

ers go out and find a to the complete Beaver 

carpenter to do the job Vulcanite line of roofing 

— go to them, introduce products. There are 

yourself to them and many important reasons, 

you'll get the work. Mail the coupon now 

We are anxious to help for com P lete particulars, 

vou as we are helping; the beaver products co., inc. 

i Buffalo, N.Y. 

hundreds Of Carpenters. Thorold, Canada London, England 



I 



y&RO OFS 




I 

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B 
& 
B 



The Beaver Products Co., Inc., Dept. H=i 
Buffalo, N. Y. (or) Thorold, Can., (or) London, £ng. 

Gentlemen: Please send me samples of the literature used 
to circularize carpenters' prospects for wall board and roofing 
jobs and give me particulars of your plan. 
Yours very truly, 

Name 

Address 

City Sfare 

tEAVEk 

PRODUCTS 



ZOURI KEY-SET STORE FRONT CONSTRUCTION 



It is profitable for a contractor to handle 
Zouri windows and store fronts. In 
addition there is the double satisfaction 
of installing a job that will be the pride 
of the owner and bring other profitable 
Zouri jobs in its wake. 

Free — our big, free, illustrated book showing the newest and 
best styles of modern windows and store fronts, also thoroughly 
explaining the popular Zouri Safety-Key construction. Write 
for your copy today. 




Factory and General Offices: 1608 East End Ave., Chicago Heights, 111. 



LISTED BY THE UNDERWRITERS LABORATORIES 




HEADLIGHT 

Carpenter's Overalls 

*"• UNION MADE, ^^s ^^M^m^k 

MADE OF EXTRA FINE QUALITY SAIL CLOTH fllgftililililllMOl 

15 FEATURES 

Which. Make This Qarment the Best Carpenters Overall Made 



i Every point of strain rein- 
forced with Bar Tacks. 

2 Three pockets in one on 
the bib. Safety watch 
pocket. Memo book pock- 
et. Pencil pocket 

3 Fourbignailpocketsmade 
of extra heavy army duck. 

4 Extra wide and high bib. 

5 Wide suspenders, will 
not slip ofi or cut into 
shoulders. 

6 Two big front pockets. 

7 Douole cloth at the front. 



8 2 side hammer straps. 

9 1 back hatchet or ham- 
mer strap. 

10 Patented safety rule 
pocket 

11 Big back pockets. 

12 Chisel or putty knife 

pocket. 

13 High back protects cloth- 
ing. 

14 Big wide comfortable 
legs. 

15 Extra pencil pockets in 
center of nail pockets. 



MY GUARANTEE TO YOU 

If, when this overall is completely worn out, 
you do not think that Headlight Carpenters 
Overalls are better, more convenient and will 
outwear any other overall made, I will give 
you bach your money. Beware of imitations. 
Demand the Genuine, 



Mail your order to our nearest factory if your local Headlight Dealer 
cannot supply you. 

LARNED, CARTER &. CO. 

World's Greatest Overall Makers 
DETROIT, ST.LQUIS, SANFRANCISCO, PERTH AMBOY, N.J. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO 
New York Officei 5-7-9 Union SquareCJiicago Oflice: 653 S. Wells St. 




~4"S •<••*••••••#••• •*••••*••• 



oots & hardware 




The Sargent Cutter of chromium steel 
holds its edge longer 



A BIG feature of every Sargent Plane is 
its cutter. This is made from chromium 
steel — one of the toughest metals ob- 
tainable. It takes a remarkably keen 
edge and holds it much longer than 
ordinary steel. The high-grade cutter 



is in keeping with the fine design and 
durable construction of every plane in 
the Sargent line. There are types for 
every purpose and preference. Two 
popular types are illustrated. See them 
at your dealer's and write for booklet. 

SARGENT 8b COMPANY, Manufacturers, 55 Water Street, New Haven, Conn. 






Adjustable 

Iron Bench Plane 

No. 414 




Sargent Auto-Set 

Bench Plane 

No. 714 



.,..0. .................. .....O.... •(...». -O. ...... .G-.i>"C-.»-. O" 



..a..j..j..r.-c-3-e" 




When Work Is Slack 



You can secure from many a home owner a re-roofing job, if you 
point out to him that Ruberoid Giant-shingles can be laid right 
over his old wood shingles and give him a roof that will need no 
replacement for years to come. 

Here are a few of the points that will convince your prospect : 



>..... 




1 He avoids the expense of ripping off the old wood shingles and 

• cleaning up afterwards. 
O No matter what the weather, his house is protected while the 

re-roofing is being done. 
^ His unsightly, leaky roof is changed into one of unusual beauty 

and durability— a roof which is 60 pounds heavier per square 
than he can get with the usual asphalt individual shingles. 



You, on the other hand, escape the dirt, time and trouble of 
removing the old shingles. You save labor by having 136 fewer 
shingles to handle and lay per square and 272 fewer nails to drive. 
You save time because Ruberoid Giant-shingles are the only heavy 
individual shingles with the self-spacing and self-aligning feature. 

Hitch up Ruberoid Giants to your winter program and keep busy 
all the time. 

RU-BER-OID 

GIANT- SHINGLES 



1 The extra thickness of Ruberoid 
' Giants adds 900 founds of pro- 
tection to the average roof. 

O Ruberoid Giants are the only 
' heavy individual shingles with 

the self-spacing and self-aligning 

feature. 

"2 Ruberoid Giants, with their 5- 
inch exposure to the weather, are 

especially adapted to laying over old 

wood shingles. 



The RUBEROID Co., Carpenter 

95 Madison Ave., New York 

Gentlemen: Please send me without obligation a sample and full information regarding 
Ruberoid Giant-shingles. 

Name . . „ 

Address 



90 Drafting Course Free 



Mail the Free Coupon Below 

There is such an urgent demand for practical, 
trained Draftsmen that I am making this special offer in 

order to enable deserving, ambitious and bright men to get into this 
line of work. I will teach you to become a Draftsman and Designer, 
until you are drawing a salary of $250.00 a month. You need not pay 
me for my personal instruction or for the complete set of instruments. 




$250 a 
Month 



Starting salary 
according to my 
agreement and 
guarantee.Drafts- 
raen's work is 
pleasant and 
profitable. Positions are open paying 

$3,600.00 a year in the best surroundings. 
They are open everywhere. Thousands of 
men are needed who have just the kind of 
training I will give you. You can get this 
training during spare time in your own home. 




Earn While Learning 



You can be earning a handsome in- 
come while learning at home. This is a special 
offer I am making. Absolutely no obligations of 
any kind in sending coupon. But you must write 
at once, as I limit the number of my students. 

Mail the FREE Coupon at once 

■ n.ii.. ■ „ ,,. . ,. — — . r for my 

book— * 'Successful Draftimanahip, ' ' also list of open 
positions and for the free offer to be earning good money at 
once while learning at home. This offer is limited and in order 
to benefit thereby — act at one*. 

Chief Draftsman 
Engineers Equipment Co. 

1951 Lawrence Ave., Div. 16-91 Chicago, DL 



Chief Draftsman 

Will Train You Personally 

on practical Drafting- 
room work Until you are 
competent and Until you 
are in a permanent posi- 
tion at a salary paying at 

least $250 per month. This is an 
exceptional opportunity for a 
few selected ambitious men, be- 
tween the ages of 16 and 50 
whom I will train personally. 




I Guarantee 

To instruct you until competent and in a 
permanent paying position at a regular 
Draftsman's salary of at least $250 per 
month and guarantee to furnish you free 
complete Draftsman's Working Outfit at 
once from the start. 



Free Drawing Instruments 
Free Drawing Table 

These are the regular working 
instruments and the kind of table 
I use myself. I give them free to you if you 
enroll at once. Send the Free Coupon Today. 

nBBnHHHiaiEMOlBBIBilllllU 

I Free Course Offer Coupon 

Chief Draftsman 
Engineers Equipment Co. 

„-§ 1951 Lawrence Ave. Div. 16-91 Chicago 

,? Without any obligation to me please 

■ mail your book. Successful Drafts- 

■ manship' ' and full particulars of your 

■ liberal 'Personal Instruction" offer 

■ to a few students. It is understood 

■ I am obligated in no way whatever. 









ARE YOU STILL 

CARRYING 

A TOOL BOX? 

And — is it 

getting you anywhere? 

Is that tool box you've been carrying 
getting you ahead? If you have ever 
wished that you could get into something* 
for yourself where you would not have to depend upon 
some other man for your weekly wages, here is your 
opportunity. Get an 

American Universal 



Fl/OOR StJRPAGIMQ MACHINE 



Get away from strikes, lock- 
outs, lay-offs and all the other 
disadvantages that go with the 
day job. Be your own boss 
and pocket all the profits your- 
self. 

Make Good Money AH Winter 

Don't let that old job of yours 
worry you this winter. An "Amer- 
ican Universal" floor surfacing 
machine will keep the money roll- 
ing in the year around. There 
are hundreds of old floors 
to be resurfaced all around 
you. 

Become a Floor Surfacing 
Contractor 

right now and start on the 
road to prosperity, happi- 
ness and independence. We 
have helped hundreds of 
others get started. We'll 
gladly help you. We 
can point out scores 
of former carpen- 
ters, fellows, just 




like you, who now have a big pay- 
ing floor surfacing business of 
their own — making more money 
than they could ever make in 
wages, enjoying life as they never 
enjoyed it before. Why can't you 
do as well? 

No Experience Necessary 

You need no special training. A 
small amount starts you with an 
"American Universal" electrically 
driven machine and everything 
you need. We furnish you sta- 
tionery, office forms, cards, adver- 
tising, help you get started, help 
you succeed. The "American 
Universal" does the work of six 
fast men — earns you six men's 
pay. It does perfect work — more 
beautiful work than any man can 
do by hand. Nearly every "Amer- 
ican Universal" man has more than 
he can do. Now is the time to get 
into the floor surfacing game. Send 
your name to us today for full par- 
ticulars of our plan, our Free Trial 
Offer and other valuable informa- 
tion, all free. Write now — quick, 
today. 



The American Floor Surfacing Machine Co. 



522 S. St. Clair Street 
Toledo, Ohio 



How Celotex can help you 
get extra work this winter 

WOULDN'T you like to pick up some extra jobs 
right now — profitable, inside jobs? Here is an 
easy way to get them. 

Feature Celotex insulating lumber for every job 
where protection against heat and cold is important. 
Your customers will be quick to appreciate its remark- 
able power of keeping heat in and cold out. The heat 
stoppage valueofastandard7/16inchthicknessof Celotex 
is equivalent to 2 inches of wood, 5 inches of plaster or 
12 inches of solid concrete. 

In attics, for instance. A lot of people in your com- 
munity will want their attics lined with Celotex when 
you tell them that it will save a big part of their fuel 
bills by stopping heat that goes right through ordinary 
roofs. 

Car owners are good prospects, too. Tell them how 
Celotex will keep the heat in their garages these cold 
winter nights; how it will reduce the risk of a frozen 
radiator. 

These are only a couple of the many places where 
Celotex is of special value in every building. 

Go after this extra business. You can easily make 
extra profits on Celotex jobs this winter. 

If you don't already know about this remarkable new 
building lumber and its many uses, or if your lumber 
dealer can't supply you with Celotex, write us. Just use 
the coupon below. 




INSULATING LUMBER 



There is a need for Celotex in every building 



Mail this coupon today 

It will bring you more informa- 
tion to help you get extra jobs 
with Celotex 



The Celotex Company, Dept. 21, 
645 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Please tell me more about how Celotex can help me get 
extra jobs this winter. 



Address... 



My lumber dealer is.. 





„,»'» / °'" 



t ,t' , ' 1 " i 




Sifii-'" 



For 84 years 



"The Saw Most Carpenters Use" 



Disston Try Square 
No. 5% . Iron stock 

nickel-plated, steel I'l'I'l'I'I'lUT 1 '!' 1 '!' 11 !' 1 '!' 1 '!' 11 ] 1 '' 1 " 
blade graduated to s A ' i ' A i 

l-8ths. Square in- 
side and out. 



Disston Marking and Mor- 
tising Giuge No. 89M. 
Boxwood, eraduated stem, 
brass slide 
and thumb- 
screw. 




adjustable 
Plumb and 
Level No, 
Arch top plate, 
two side views, 
solid brass ends, 
polished. 26 to 30 inch. 



Disston Mitre 
Square No. 10. 
Rosewood stock, 
heavy brass 
face-plate, 
special re- 
shaped steel 
blade. 



CARPENTERS were the first to 
use the saws made by Henry 
Disston in 1840. 

For he gave them a saw that ran 
easy, cut straight to the line, and cut 
fast without binding. 

Disston put balance into the hand 
saw; gave it the taper that made it 
work easy; created the Disston steel, 
that, fortified with Disston temper- 
ing, held the keenest cutting edge. 

And carpenters passed on to each 
new generation their knowledge of 
saws. 

The veteran leaving his last job 
told the apprentice that a Disston 
Saw was the saw for him to use. 

And so — for84years — the Disston 
Hand Saw has been famous as "The 
Saw Most Carpenters Use." 

Worthy of a place alongside your 
Disston Saw are Disston plumbs 
and levels, try squares, mitre squares, 
gauges and bevels — made to the 
Disston standard for accurate work 
and long life. 

Henry Disston & Sons, Inc. 

Makers of "The Saw Most Carpenters Use" 

Philadelphia, U. S. A. 



Hardware dealers the world around sell Disston Saws, Tools, and Files 



OIS 





Entered July 22, 191 5, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of Congress, Aug. 24, 1912 

Acceptance for mailing at SDecial rate of nostage provided for in Section 1103, act of 
October 3. 1917. authorized on July 8, 1918. 

A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and 

Kindred Industries. Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 

and Joiners of America, at 

Carpenters' Building, 222 East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana «^H§fe>5i 



Established in 1881 
Vol. XLV— No. 1. 



INDIANAPOLIS, JANUARY, 1925 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



That the open shop is now favored by the 
Stanley Manufacturing Company of New Bri- 
tain, Conn., who manufacture a number of car- 
penter's tools, known as the Stanley tools, was 
a declaration recently made by Mr. Stanley, Jr., 
an officer of the company at a conference held 
with Representative Charles N. Kimball and 
Business Agent McGrath at the plant of the 
company. This concern is constructing a large 
building at New Britain. The contractor is the 
Aberthaw Company of Boston. Non-union car- 
penters were found on the job. On complaint of 
Messrs. Kimball and McGrath, as representa- 
tives of our organization, Mr. Stanley arranged 
the conference, and to their astonishment made 
the above declaration. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



PRESIDENT SAMUEL GOMPERS IS DEAD 



SAMUEL GOMPERS, 
President of the Amer- 
ican Federation of La- 
bor, died shortly after 
four o'clock on the 
morning of Saturday, 
December 13, at San 
Antonio, Tex., at the 
age of 74 years. Mr. 
Gompers had attended 
the inauguration of 
President Calles, of 
Mexico, at Mexico 
City, and was there 
stricken with a recur- 
rence of the heart and 
kidney condition which 
had caused him seri- 
ous trouble before, es- 
pecially during the past 
two years. 

The reports of the 
.■attendant physicians 
; show beyond all ques- 
tion that death was 
hastened by the effect 
.of the high altitude of 
Mexico City on the 
^constitution of 
Mr. Gompers. At the 
last he was rushed to 
a lower altitude, and 
iby his own insistent 
request was taken on 
to American soil. He 
felt death coming up- 
ton him, and made a 
great and winning 
fight to keep life until he should have 
attained his last great wish, which was 
to die on the soil of the country he loved 
so well. 

His last words as he felt the end 
drawing near were characteristic of his 
love for America. He said: "God bless 
our American institutions. May they 
grow better day by day." 

The first part of the last sad journey 
was from San Antonio to Washington, 
D. C, where the body lay in state in the 
A. F. of L. Building for a short time. 
Then on to New York, where the lying in 
;state continued at the Elks' Club, of 
which Mr. Gompers was a member. On 
the morning of Thursday, December 18, 
services were held in the club, and later 
interment was made in Sleepy Hollow 
ccemetery, Tarrytown, N. Y., in the pres- 




THE LATE SAMUEL GOMPERS 



ence of official representatives of Organ- 
ized Labor, and all sections of the public 
life of the country. Our Brotherhood was 
officially represented by General Presi- 
dent Wm. L. Hutcheson and General 
Secretary Frank Duffy. A delegation 
from the New York District Council was 
also present at the ceremonies. The ac- 
tive pall bearers were the members of 
the Executive Council of the American 
Federation of Labor. 

Samuel Gompers was born in London, 
England, January 27, 1850. He was the 
eldest child of a family of eight. His 
father, Saul Gompers, was a cigarmaker. 
Samuel attended school from his sixth 
to his tenth year, when he was appren- 
ticed to a shoe maker, but shortly after 
entered his father's trade. 

His family came to New York City 
when he was 13 years old, and th© next 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



year (1S64) he assisted in organizing 
the Cigar Makers' International Union. 
His membership card is No. 1. He 
served the Local Union as Secretary and 
President for six years, and took an ac- 
tive part in the general labor movement, 
serving as President of the New York 
workingmen's assembly for two years. 
He was a delegate to every convention 
of his international and was first Vice- 
President many years. 

He represented his international at 
the first meeting of the International 
Federation of Trades and Labor Unions, 



power in a legislative committee, of 
which Mr. Gompers was chairman. He 
worked at his trade until 1887, when 
he was 37 years old. 

He was editor of the Union Advocate, 
first official magazine of the A. F. of L. 
In 1894 the American Federationist was 
established. This he edited up to the 
time of his death. 

He wrote numerous pamphlets in de- 
fense of the trade union movement and 
was unceasing in pleading the workers' 
cause. He was the first fraternal dele- 
gate (1895) from the A. F. of L. to tho 




CASKET CONTAINING THE BODY OF SAMUEL GOMPERS LYING IN STATE 
IN THE ELKS' LODGE ROOM, NEW YORK CITY 



held in Pittsburgh, November, 1881. 
This organization was merged into the 
American Federation of Labor, which 
was formed in Columbus, O., in Decem- 
ber, 1886. At the first meeting of the 
new organization Mr. Gompers was cho- 
sen chairman of the Committee on Con- 
stitution, and was elected President. 
This position he held from year to year 
without break until his death, with one 
(exception — 1894 — when he was defeat- 
ed by John McBride of the miners. 
Prior to the formation of the A. F. of L., 
the International Federation of Trades 
and Labor Unions placed its executive 



British Trades Union Congress. He re- 
jected many offers for political prefer- 
ment. 



WM. GREEN ELECTED 

As we go to press it is announced that 
William Green, formerly Third Vice- 
President of the American Federation of 
Labor, has been chosen by his colleague ; 
of the Executive Council to fill the va- 
cancy left by the death of the late Pres- 
ident Samuel Gompers. Mr. Green, at 
the time of his election, was also Sec- 
retary-Treasurer of the United Mine 
Workers of America. 




22 THE CARPENTER 

"THE AMERICAN CONTRACTOR" ON METAL TRIM 

SygcuF^-Jp-ek-^ INCE first hollow metal trim and doors began to be used in building 
construction the United Brotherhood has claimed the erection of 
them as part of our jurisdiction. There has never been any devia- 
tion or compromise in the attitude of our General Officers, whose line 
of policy in this matter has been approved by the General Conven- 
tions which have been held since metal trim first came into use. 

In other words, all along the line the attitude of the General Officers has been to 

carry out the oft-repeated and very clear instructions of the membership as voiced 

in convention, and ratified by referendum vote. 

During the course of the controversy, we as an organization have most of the 
time been without many enthusiastic friends, either among the rest of the building 
trades organizations, or the contracting employers. But time changes many things, 
and when a person, or an organization, is right, and sticks tight, the truth will 
sometimes come out through the delayed admission from their former opponents, 
that they are right. 

This may perhaps explain the somewhat remarkable statements which we here 
quote from "The American Contractor," of November 22, last, dealing with the 
metal trim question. Among other things this publication says in its editorial 
columns: 

"For twenty years hollow metal trim has been manufactured and used. 
Wherever it has been incorporated into a building it has been a success. There 
is no argument that with any logic whatsoever can be brought to restrict its 
use, and yet its use is being restricted. 

"It will be admitted by contractors and all others in the building industry 
that anything that illogicaJIy restricts the use of no matter what material is 
a menace to the upbuilding of the industry. 

"Therefore the decision of the National Board of Jurisdictional Awards, 
which gave the setting of hollow metal trim to the sheet metal workers, and 
which has resulted in the curtailed use of metal trim, is from the broadest 
point of view an iniquity" 

"The carpenter, who from time immemorial has been the craftsman trained 
to install highly finished interior trim, is still the man best equipped to install 
hollow metal trim — the decision of the Board regardless. 

"The decision itself was not made on grounds defensible under the econ= 
omics of the construction industry or of any other industry." 

The article then goes on to suggest that the award of the Board went to the 
sheet metal worker because we were not represented at the hearing. We have no 
quarrel with "The American Contractor" for adopting a viewpoint of its own on 
the subject But the powers and policy of our General Officers are another matter. 
They are determined by the authority placed in the hands of the General Officers 
by the membership through conventions and referendum. 

When we as an organization were invited to a hearing and a rehearing by this 
Board, our General Officers took the position that nothing could be done until the 
matter had been considered at our convention if the possibility existed that the 
work of the Board might interfere in any way with our jurisdiction claim. 

They knew they had no right to even discuss such a possibility unless they had 
the sanction and authorization of the membership. And the subsequent convention 
proved it by ordering them to stand by their policy. 

*' 

; 



THE CARPENTER 



23 



Now, out of it all comes this very plain if somewhat belated admission from, 
such an authoritative source as "The American Contractor." Later on the article 
rounds oft the new viewpoint in the same straight and vigorous manner in which 
it started out. It says: 

"It is time the cards are called and a decision is arrived at that is founded 
on the true economic facts of the case. If the National Board for Jurisdictional 
Awards is so constituted that it cannot operate its machinery to make the 
change, it is time its machinery be made modern. Not many such decisions 
will be needed to make so many men want to scrap the board that it will be 
scrapped." 

That is a matter for the Board and its affiliated members to decide. For our 
part, while we welcome this change of heart as proof of the wisdom of our policy 
as pursued from the very start, we propose to continue carrying on as we have 
always done. 

It is admitted that we are now doing the erection of 90 per cent of all the metal 
trim and door work. We have attained that condition because we are the only 
class of building tradesmen who can do the work satisfactorily. 

That is the ground upon which our jurisdiction claim is based, and we intend to 
continue to stand firmly upon it. 



GERMAN UNEMPLOYED 

Germany has now no state unemploy- 
ment insurance system. Since October, 
1923, however, a considerable part of 
the funds requisite for unemployment 
relief have been provided by equal con- 
tributions from employers and workers. 

All manual and non-manual workers, 
together with their employers, must pay 
contributions if they come under the 
compulsory sickness insurance system. 
In practice, this means all manual work- 
ers, and those non-manual workers 
whose salary does not exceed 2,400 
marks a year. But the payment of 
unemployment insurance contributions 
does not automatically entitle the in- 
sured person to benefit. 

Only those persons are eligible for re- 
lief who can prove that they are in es- 
pecially needy circumstances. Hence a 
considerable number of persons who are 
obliged to pay unemployment contribu- 
tions receive no unemployment benefit. 

Most of the requisite funds are de- 
rived from the compulsory contributions. 
In principle, the muncipalities pay l-9th 
and the workers and employers S-9ths of 
the costs. But the compulsory levy for 
unemployment is restrained to a maxi- 
mum of 3 per cent of the wages (work- 
ers and employers paying together a 
maximum of l 1 /^ per cent of the wage). 
If the fund thus raised does not meet 
requirements, the Reich makes up the 
difference. 



VALUE OF PRISON PRODUCTS 

Commodities valued at a total of $43,- 
462,518 were made in the prisons of this 
country in 1923 and sold in competition 
with free labor, according to a report 
recently issued by the United States 
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Clothing 
and textiles rank at the top of the list 
of goods made by convicts and placed on 
sale in open market, while binder twine 
runs second ; furniture, third ; brooms 
and brushes, fourth ; stoves, fifth ; har- 
ness, sixth ; hollow ware, seventh ; farm 
implements, eighth; bags (jute), ninth, 
and box shooks, tenth. In the employ- 
ment of convicts outside of prison walls, 
the list is headed by coal mines, the 
production amounting to $3,S00,000. 
Dairy and cattle raising produced $2,- 
183,141, while the production of lumber 
reached $256,800. 

Following is a list of value of the 
leading products of the prisons of this 
country, as reported by the United 
States Bureau of Labor Statistics: 

Clothing and textiles $19,111,548 

Binder twine 5,543,160 

Furniture 2,527,637 

Brooms and brushes 1,527,739 

Stoves 564,178 

Harness 494, S70 

Hollow ware 371,509 

Farm implements 322,045 

Bags (jute) 293,083 

Box shooks 124,685 



24 THE CARPENTER 



Special Notice 



At the recent convention of our Brotherhood in the report of the Gen- 
eral President reference was made to the property recently acquired, by 
the Brotherhood in Florida, on which to establish an Old Home and atten- 
tion was called to the fact that from the citrus fruits grown on this prop- 
erty would be derived a revenue which would go into the Home and Pen- 
sion Fund. It was suggested that there be selected in each Local Union, 
by the membership thereof, a committee to be composed of one or more 
members to assist in the distribution of this year's fruit crop to our mem- 
bership or through our members to outsiders. 

The crop for this year, which is estimated at about 35,000 boxes, will 
consist of tangerines, oranges and grapefruit. The early varieties are 
now ready for market and can be supplied either by box or carload lots 
f. o. b. Lakeland for $3.00 per box. In carload shipments, approximately 
365 boxes to a car, freight rates are quoted as follows : 

Boston $1.02 

New York 1.04 

Pittsburgh 1.04 

Philadelphia 92 

St. Louis 1 .01 

Cleveland 1.05 

Chicago 1. 16 

Cincinnati 92 

Buffalo 1.05 

Kansas City 1.10, 

By express single boxes would vary so in price that we are not giving 
any quotations thereon. The number of fruit per box will vary according 
to size: oranges 176-200-216-250-288-324; grapefruit per box 64-70-80-96. 

Orders as sent this office will be filled as quickly as possible after 
receipt of same. 

Trusting to receive the co-operation of the membership of your Local 
Union and District Council in the sale of the fruit, thereby increasing the 
Home and Pension Fund, I remain, 

Fraternally yours, 





General President. 



THE CARPENTER 



25 



ABOUT THE STANDING TREE — AND THE FALLEN 




EARLY all men whose 
daily work is the fabrica- 
tion of one of the great 
natural products into 
things of use and beauty 
for the service of man- 
kind, are interested in its origin and 
other facts about it. The interest of the 
true carpenter, in the wood which he 
works on, does not begin with it as lum- 
ber ready for the market. 

His interest and imagination link up 
the dressed board with the life of the 
standing tree in the forest, in those long 
years before the logger's axe and saw 
started it on its way to the timber mar- 
kets. The question of the extent, qual- 
ity, and kind of timber still available in 
the forests of the United States is closely 
allied with this aspect of our trade. 

In a general and vague kind of way, 
we think from time to time that with all 
the timber being used which the mem- 
bership of our Brotherhood handles in 
the course of a year the amount still 
standing in the forests must be getting 
less. It is. 

This question was recently dealt with 
by President Coolidge in the course of 
an address delivered before the National 
Conference on Utilization of Forest Pro- 
ducts,- held in Washington. 

Among other things the President 
mentioned were the following, taken 
from different parts of his address : 

"The era of free, wild timber is reach- 
ing its end, as the era of free, wild food 
ended so long ago. We can no longer de- 
pend on moving from one primeval for- 
est to another, for already the sound of 
the axe has penetrated the last of -them. 
We like to think that it took three cen- 
turies to harvest these immense forests. 
It is comfortable to believe that they 
will last indefinitely still. But in real- 
ity we have cut most of our timber not 
in the past three hundred but in the past 
seventy-five years, to serve the great ex- 
pansion of population and industry, and 
there is no reason to expect a decline in 
the rate of cutting as long as the forests 
last. 

"We do not know the forest situation 
down to the last acre and board foot, 
but we know it well enough to make us 
think and act. Of the old forest the first 
explorers met we have in area only one- 
sixth left, and in bulk of timber less 



than one-third. From overcutting and 
fire we have left on our hands something 
like 80 million acres of denuded forest 
land, most of it unfit for farming. Then 
we have about 250 million acres of sec- 
ond growth forest, much of it poor in 
quality and amount. Three-fourths of 
our cut is still from virgin forests, dif- 
ficult and distant of access, so that their 
products must pay for long freight hauls 
to reach the chief markets. 

"Expressed roughly, we have left 
about 745 billion cubic feet of timber. 
From this the annual drain is 25 billion 
cubic feet. This total drain is most sig- 
nificant when we reflect that, toward 
offsetting it, we have an annual timber 
growth of only 6 billion cubic feet; and 
even in our young forests, where this 
growth is taking place, cutting has al- 
ready outstripped growth. We must 
face the situation that at this rate we 
are not far from timber exhaustion. 

"To bridge this fatal gap between cut 
and growth we have never taken suf- 
ficient action. In fact our wealth of old 
growth timber has made us prone to 
ignore the gap and to leave our less 
fortunate descendants to struggle with 
it. But we cannot escape the penalties 
of our national neglect. 

"There is no easy road out of this 
unprofitable situation. The end of free 
timber is in sight. World competition 
for the world supply will leave no large 
dependable source of imports open to 
us. The use of substitutes hardly keeps 
pace with new uses for wood ; there is no 
likelihood that we can become a wood- 
less nation even if we wanted to. When 
the free timber is gone we must grow 
our wood from the soil like any other 
crop. 

"Strange as it may seem, the Ameri- 
can people, bred for many generations 
to forest life, drawing no small measure 
of their wealth from the forest, have not 
yet acquired the sense of timber as a 
crop. These immense stretches of cut- 
over land, mostly too rough or too sterile 
for tilling, have not awakened us to their 
vast potential worth as growers of 
Avood. Fully one-fourth of our land area 
ought to be kept in forest — not poor, 
dwindling thickets of scrub, hut forests 
of trees fit for bridges and houses and 
ships. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



"Handled by the best timber-cropping 
methods, our present forest lands could 
be made to grow even more timber each 
year than we now use. But much of 
our cut-over land, lying idle or half pro- 
ductive, is now an immeasurable loss. 
It pays little or no taxes, ii eeps few 
hands busy, it turns few wheels, it 
builds no roads. Idle forest land has 
scrapped schools, factories, railioads, 
and towns; it has dotted the land with 
abandoned farms; it has created a mi- 
gratory population. Our forest problem 
is a land problem of the first magnitude. 

"It is likewise an industrial problem 
of great importance. These great indus- 
tries that depend on the forest for their 
raw material — industries that, taken to- 
gether, rank about third in value of out- 
put among our chief industrial groups — 
must be preserved. They employ a very 
large number of wage earners ; they rep- 
resent an immense investment of capi- 
tal; around them are built whole cities; 
they feed the railroads with a vast flow 
of traffic. In the long run they depend 
for their existence on making our forest 
soils grow timber and on using that tim- 
ber without waste. 

"This brief sketch of the forest prob- 
lem would be incomplete if it did not 
mention the hopeful progress already 



made toward a better forest policy. Of" 
our total forest area of 470 million acres,, 
about one-fifth is in public OAvnership. 
Most of these public forests are safe- 
guarded from fire and dedicated to tim- 
ber growing. Of private forest lands — 
in extent much the most important part 
of our forests — a little more than half 
1 ave more or less adequate protection 
against fire. • 

"We must husband our supplies. 
Granted that we shall get into effect a 
big-scale program of timber growing, it 
would be poor business to go to the ex- 
pense of growing timber if we should 
persist in losing a large part of the crop 
by unsatisfactory ways of manufactur- 
ing and using it. Between cutting the 
timber in the woods and finally putting 
the product to use, nearly two-thirds of 
the total volume is lost. A third of this 
loss, it is estimated, can under present 
economic conditions and with tried and 
tested methods be saved — a yearly sav- 
ing nearly as great as all the timber our 
forests grow each year. Saving timber, 
it is obvious, will not only reduce the 
amount we must grow, but if started 
now on an effective scale it will relieve 
the timber shortage and make less dras- 
tic the social and economic readjust- 
ments this shortage will force upon us. 
A tree saved is a tree grown." 



FIGHTING ILLITERACY 

"The public schools," says the Na- 
tional Educational Association, "have 
lifted the general level of education in 
the United States. In 1880 there were 
6,239,958 illiterates — those who had 'no 
schooling whatever.' In 1920 there 
were 4,931,905 in this class. One person 
in every six in 1880 was without school- 
ing. At the present time, one in seven- 
teen has had no school training. 

"Despite the fact that schools are still 
virtually non-existent in some communi- 
ties and that millions of foreign-born 
illiterates have been admitted since 
18S0, there has been some progress 
made in reducing the total number of 
illiterates. Each ten years since 1890 
has shown some decrease in the number 
of people in the United States who have 
had 'no schooling whatever.' " 

Charts made by research workers of 
the Education Association show vividly 
the educational progress of the nation 
and demonstrate that school attendance 
has increased more rapidly than general 
population. 



ITALIAN LABOR REVIVES 

Italian labor papers report a big re- 
vival of the trade union movement in 
Italy, coincident with internal dissen- 
tion in the ranks of the Fascisti and a 
growing opposition to their rule. 

"The reconstruction of the trade 
unions," they say, "is in full swing: 
the workers are streaming back into the 
bona fide trade unions, especially the 
metal workers, textile workers and 
building workers. 

"Both in Venice and Savona trades 
councils have been re-established. One 
of the chief factors in this change is the 
internal disintegration of the Fascist 
Trade Union Movement. The illusion 
that the Fascist organizations can or will 
do anything for the workers is now quite 
at an end." 

The call is made to the bona fide 
trade unions to prove themselves worthy 
of their returning members. The work- 
ers must be brought to realize the neces- 
sity for stricter discipline; the mistakes 
of the past must be avoided in the 
future. 



THE CARPENTER 



LIFE AMONG THE WORKERS OF MEXICO 




PQ EXICO is chiefly an agri- 
cultural country, accord- 
ing to Mr. Jose Miguel 
Bejarano, who spoke at 
the recent convention of 
°&£^^>dL* !S <9 the American Federation 
of Labor, in the capacity of representa- 
tive of the Secretary of Agriculture of 
Mexico. 

In -his address, brief but replete with 
instructive facts about the life of the 
Mexican workers, he said: 

"I just want to say a few words about 
the agricultural conditions in Mexico at 
the present time. Mexico was hardly 
developed agriculturally, and during the 
dictatorship of Porfirio Diaz the country 
was forced from the beginnings of the 
agricultural stage into the industrial 
stage. About ninety per cent of the 
population were in the hands o£ capital, 
under the system of peonage and the 
sweatshop. The revolution had first to 
rescue the Indians from capital, then 
from the church, and not from igno- 
rance. 

"At the beginning we started to give 
back to the Indians a piece of land. 
Anyone requesting a piece of land to cul- 
tivate was entitled to all he could han- 
dle. Those are not lands we are taking 
away from anybody, but lands belong- 
ing to the Government. It was not only 
the question of giving land, but a ques- 
tion of giving agricultural implements 
and means of support until the harvest 
was obtained. 

"Then the question of education. "We 
began by starting agricultural schools 
and up to date we have schools second 
to none in the world. We have in con- 
junction with the Department of Edu- 
cation rural schools or rudimentary 



schools, where the principles of free, 
primary education are given. 

"Then the most important thing we 
have is the missionary teachers. Where 
the church missionary teachers used to 
go in days gone by under Spanish dom- 
ination, now the missionary teachers go. 
The working men in Mexico were in ex- 
ceptionally good condition to become 
educated, because they were living in 
cities. They are now perfectly well or- 
ganized. We have about 1,200,000 per- 
sons organized in Mexico, about ten per 
cent of our population. 

"It may be of interest for you to 
know that in Mexico City alone we have 
more teachers in proportion to the popu- 
lation than New York City. The prob- 
lem we have before us is to educate those 
masses and to educate the Indians, and 
the Federation of Labor of Mexico is 
taking that subject well in hand. Every 
laborer in Mexico who is educated is en- 
deavoring to give his share to the edu- 
cation of the Indians. Of the 16,000,000 
people in our country, there are only 
three or four million of actual consuming 
power; only about that number wear 
shoes. Just imagine, when they come 
into our system of civilization what buy- 
ing power they will have. 

"It is extremely foolish to try and 
make Mexico an industrial nation. We 
are still in the agricultural stage. We 
should develop agriculturally and get 
our manufactured products from those 
who are much further advanced. That 
is one of the main reasons why Mexico 
is one of the best customers the United 
States ever had. There was one year 
when Mexico imported from the United 
States more than all continental South 
America combined." 



SOME LOST, SOME WON 

Some trade union leaders have lost 
their seats in the British Parliament. 
These include A. A. Purcell, Frank 
Hodges, Ben Tillett, and others. 

Two trade union leaders have gained 
:seats for the first time. These are J. 
Bromley, of the Associated Society of 
Locomotive Engineers, and Ellen Wil- 
kinson, national organizer of the Na- 
tional Union of Distributive and Allied 
Workers. 

Forty-two miners' members have been 
<eleeted, as compared with 46 in the last 
parliament. 



THEIR POUNDS OF FLESH 

The net profit made by twenty-five 
national banks in New York City from 
September 14, 1913, to October 10, 
1924, according to the "Financial Age" 
in its issue of last November 1, is equal 
to 33 per cent of the capital stock. 

It amounted to $53,924,500, of which 
.$42,083,500 was paid in dividends to 
shareholders and $11,841,000 added to 

surplus and undivided profits. 

, * 

If a man can't smile, he's built wrong. 
If he can smile and won't, keep away 
from him. 



Editorial 




THE CARPENTER 

Official Journal of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 

OF AMERICA 

Published on tlie loth of each month at the 

CARPENTERS' BUILDING 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 
CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA, 

Publishers 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 



Subscription Price 
One Dollar a Year in Advance, Postpaid 

The publishers and the advertising 
agent use every possible precaution avails 
able to them against accepting advertise= 
ments from other than reliable firms, but 
do not accept any responsibility for the 
contents of any advertisement which ap= 
pears in "The Carpenter." Should any 
deception be practiced by advertisers at 
any time, upon members, their duty is to 
immediately notify the Post Office au- 
thorities. Therefore, address any com= 
plaints to your local Post Office. 

INDIANAPOLIS, JANUARY, 1925 



Death of Samuel Gompers 

SAMUEL GOMPERS, President of the 
American Federation of Labor, and 
life-long friend of our Brotherhood, 
is dead. In his passing not only has the 
trade union movement of this continent 
lost a stalwart champion of its rights 
and aspirations, but the workers of the 
whole world are the poorer for his loss. 

The great work of his life of course, 
was the building up of the American 
Federation of Labor, and in the public 
mind Samuel Gompers and the Federa- 
tion were one and the same thing. He 
devoted himself to the task at a time 
when the organization of the workers 
of this continent was in a very imprac- 
tical form. Out of the lessons learnt 
from many failures, and with the steady 



and loyal help of his colleagues, year by 
year the Federation grew. 

Samuel Gompers died as he had lived, 
in harness as he had always wished, and 
with more than the biblical three score 
and ten years behind him. It may be 
that it is yet too soon to correctly ap- 
praise in its fulness the value of his 
work, but he brought into it great cour- 
age, broad intelligence, humanitarian- 
ism, and a life-long loyalty to the cause 
of labor not only in America, but "the 
world over. 

He had his critics, lusty ones too, both 
within and without the labor movement. 
Unlike some of them he also had the fac- 
ulty of tolerance, and could see their 
A T iewpoint even when it was totally op- 
posite to his own convictions, and could 
swiftly give credit to the sincerity of 
a differing mind. He knew it took many 
kinds of men to make up this world, and 
perhaps the greatest tribute that could 
be paid to his memory would be to say 
that he was a very humau man in all his 
dealings with his fellow men. 

He worked from early youth tc ripe 
old age to advance the cause of the 
workers along lines which he believed 
would accomplish the things which en- 
dure. He has left us a great heritage, 
and nothing would have appealed to him 
as honor to his memory so much as, that 
we should continue ever building and 
improving the work which he began. 



Last Call for Action 

REGULATION of child labor 
throughout the United States will 
be a question of first importance to 
come before many state legislatures this 
month. It will arise in the form of a 
question as to whether or not the legis- 
lature shall endorse the proposed amend- 
ment to the Federal Constitution, em- 
powering the Congress to enact a federal 
law prohibiting the wage labor of young 
people below the age of 18 years. 

If this proposition is adopted by vote 
of three-fourths of the state legislatures 
then it will become federal law. If it 
is defeated then the blot of child wage 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



labor will remain for an indefinite time. 
Since the matter was referred by the 
Congress to the States an intense and 
bitter campaign has been carried on to 
defeat it, by those who wish to continue 
to profit materially from the wage labor 
of little children and young persons. 

No public question which has come up 
in recent years is of more serious inter- 
est to the trade unionists of this country 
than this of child labor. The highest 
ethical aspirations of the trade union 
movement require that every trade 
unionist should do his best in some way 
to help in carrying it to success. At 
this time victory is very far from cer- 
tain. Indeed it is menaced in the 
gravest possible way. 

This is practically the last call for 
action. Every trade unionist, both per- 
sonally and through his wider affiliations 
such as Trade and Labor Councils, State 
Federations and so forth, should have 
his shoulder to the wheel now. In but 
a little while it may be too late. It is 
no partisan political matter. It is a 
proposition embodying the highest hu- 
manitarian motives of the trade union- 
movement. 

With its success -we would share in 
the everlasting credit which would fall 
to the lot of those who struggled to wipe 
out forever the stain of child wage labor 
from the economic life of the United 
States of America. Therefore, let us do 
our duty now, to the full limit of our 
powers. Then, whatsoever may befall 
us, we shall know that we did our best 
in one of the worthiest causes which 
ever invited the help of Organized Labor. 



Wishing You A Happy New Year 

WITH this issue, "The Carpenter" 
extends to all members and 
friends sincere wishes that the 
New Year, which is before us all, will 
bring a goodly measure of happiness 
and prosperity. It is the season of good 
resolutions — but be careful. They are 
often born of passing enthusiasm not 
always backed by the consideration and 
grit needed to carry them through if 
they are too flowery. 

So far as our trade is concerned the 
coming year is one of good average 
promise, taking the prospects in the 
building industry the country over as a 
guide. Stabilization of conditions by 
agreements made last year in several 
important districts of our jurisdiction. 



has helped. This applies to the days 
ahead, as well as having affected a good 
deal of work which was continued under 
winter conditions to a degree perhaps 
greater than ever before. 

One thing we can fairly claim, and 
that is that our average wage at the 
commencement of this year is higher 
than it has ever been before under nor- 
mal conditions of our trade. Here is 
where we should do well to make our 
resolutions. Whether or not we are sat- 
isfied with what we have, we can be cer- 
tain that it is far and away beyond what 
our conditions would be without organi- 
zation. Therefore let us make our chief 
resolution brief but full of meaning for 
the future of our Brotherhood. It is 
"More Organization." 

This year finds us setting out anew on 
another quadrennial phase of our his- 
tory. A good way to celebrate it would 
be to so work during the coming year 
that by the time another comes round 
we can say with truth that our Broth- 
erhood is 500,000 strong. Let every 
member make and keep a New Year 
resolution that he will bring in at least 
one new member during the year. Not 
a great task that, if determination and 
sincerity are brought into it. That 
would be a great job done. It is one 
really worth resolving about, and next 
year it would do its own talking through 
the medium of dollars and cents in the 

pay envelope. 

• 

The Road To Ruin 

CELEBRATING the seventh anni- 
versary of soviet dictatorship, the 
third internationale at its recent 
meeting in Moscow sent forth more in- 
structions to the ilk in other lands to get 
inside the trade unions to propagate 
their dope. Having got in, they are then 
advised to get control by assuming of- 
ficers' positions and points of adminis- 
tration, so as to be "prepared to take 
over the operation of the unions, and 
later the government, when revolution 
comes" — jtist like that. 

On the North American continent the 
agency through which this propaganda 
is tried out is the Trade Union Educa- 
tional League, and its adherents are 
sprinkled here and there throughout the 
trade unions, both in the United States 
and Canada. Anyone looking or listen- 
ing for them need not be disappointed, 
for the noise they make is in inverse 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



ratio to their numbers and the ultimate 
effect they have on the common sense 
and gumption of the true trade unionist. 
But they would if they could, and it is 
always as well to remember that. 

Tolerance is a thing they have no use 
for — except to take all of the other fel- 
low's supply of it that he can be made 
to give them, and then repay him by 
abuse and deceit. For all who do not 
follow them are, in their opinion, boobs 
befogged with bourgeoise ideology. 

One of the reasons why they have 
decided to try and do their "stuff" inside 
the organizations is, that they have tried 
keeping it separate and distinct, where 
it could be plainly seen by all men for 
what it was worth, and the trade union 
movement, as such, would not fall for it. 
Now they figure that if they can make 
the movement pay for a little sugar to 
coat the pill with, they can ram their 
nostrums down its throat before it really 
knows just what is happening. 

The trail of this element is worthy of 
study. It is easily found and recognized 
by the wreckage they make of useful 
institutions which the workers have 
taken years to build ; and from the noise 
of the rattle-headed talk about what 
they are going to put in its place. In 
their hearts they completely and vici- 
ously despise the intelligence of the or- 
dinary workman. They regard him 
merely as a tool, and only intend to 
stand for what they look upon as his 
inferior mentality just so long as they 
have to use him to help them rivet their 
shackles of dictatorship on his hapless 
carcass. Then they'll show him where 
he gets off at — he with his talk of dem- 
ocracy and rule of the people by the 
people. 

They babble glibly about liberty, 
freedom, emancipation, and a lot of 
verbal molasses spread to catch the 
fancy of a prey for which they can hard- 
ly disguise their contempt long enough 
to get his feet into the sticky mess. 
What they really mean is liberty and 
freedom for them to put their plans into 
effect — and along with that goes the 
abusing of everyone who does not agree 
with them. Tolerance, which is the 
highest instinct yet applied to the regu- 
lation of human affairs, is something 
they have no use for. Fanaticism, bi- 
gotry, dogmatism, these are their stock- 
in-trade — a fine foundation for equity as 
between man and man. 



It would be a sorry day indeed, when 
the workers of this continent agreed to 
take their policies from this gang of pol- 
itical neurasthenics in Moscow. They 
are the violent and distorted product of 
the appalling illiteracy and despotism of 
the Czarist regime. Even so, that is no 
reason why we should be willing to sur- 
render our organizations to their propa- 
ganda, or behave as though we didn't 
know we were intended to pay for our 
own destruction by voting our treasuries 
over to them for their use. 

The purpose of our Brotherhood in all 
its work is to carry on as laid down in 
the Laws and Constitution written by 
the free votes of our members, and not 
according to the ulterior motives of a 
handful of dictators. In Local Unions 
they are easily detectable. They usually 
affect a profound demeanour, with, 
speech loaded to the guards with ap- 
parently super-anxious concern for the 
future of the workers. Abuse of all 
placed in authority by the membership 
is their specialty. "Playing the game" 
is not a term included in their repertoire. 
It is regarded as too "bourgeois" and 
would hamper their style too much with 
such so-called middle class morals as a 
reasonable amount of scruple and de- 
cency in their dealing with their fellow 
men. 

They do dearly love to get close to the 
treasury — the closer the better. That is 
in fact their whole trouble right now. 
When the war ended they started in to 
assault the trade unions, calling on the 
members to come out of them and into 
various new fangled organizations — and 
of course not to forget to bring their 
treasuries with them. That scheme 
failed. 

So now they want to get inside to try 
and do what they could not do from the 
outside. They are great believers in 
making the workers pay for their 
own destruction. It is best to get in on 
the ground floor of their work, for wher- 
ever they have been, it has proved a 
costly thing for the trade unions before 
they finally realized what it meant to let 
their affairs drift to any extent into the 
hands of this element. 



Canadian Disputes Act Challenged 

EGAL machinery for the arbitration 
of industrial disputes has been in 
existence in some countries for 
many years. Opinions as to its value 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



either to employed or employer are not 
unanimous. Curiously enough it seems 
to have reached its highest compulsory 
activity in Australia, where labor has 
been a more potent influence in govern- 
ment for a longer time than it has in 
some other countries. 

In Canada there has existed since 
about 1907 a law of this kind known as 
the Industrial Disputes Investigation 
Act, recognized perhaps more readily as 
the "Lemieux Act" on account of the 
name of its sponsor. Some labor critics 
of this measure frankly term it the 
"Lemon Act." Broadly speaking it pro- 
vides for compulsory inquiry into indus- 
trial disputes involving public utilities. 

Its machinery may also be voluntarily 
invoked by employers and employed in 
private industries, on the application of 
either party to the Labor Department of 
the Dominion Government. Inquiry 
however, is only compulsory by law in 
respect to public utilities. 

The boards of inquiry consist of one 
representative of the employes, one of 
the employers, and one is appointed by 
the Labor Department. The findings of 
these boards are not obliged to be ac- 
cepted by either side. It was realized 
at the outset that compulsion at that 
stage was not a wise thing to attempt. 
The~ essential object of the legislation 
was more subtle than that. It was to 
secure delay at that stage of the dispute 
when feeling ran highest. 

Hundreds of disputes have been dealt 
with under this act, and in many cases 
it has not been considered by Organized 
Labor as having operated in an entirely 
unfavorable way towards its interests. 
Year after year its work has been dis- 
cussed in the conventions of the Trades 
and Labor Congress of Canada, and so 
far all proposals to ask for its repeal by 
that body have been rejected. The con- 
sensus of opinion has always been to 
move for its amendment in such manner 
as would make it operate more in the 
interests of the workers. 

Now, after all these years, arises a 
peculiar situation, of great interest to 
the organized workers of Canada. After, 
numerous boards have dealt with very 
many disputes the legality of the whole 
act has been called in question. The 
Toronto Hydro - Electric Commission 
raises the issue, following the appoint- 
ment of a board by the Department of 



Labor to inquire into a dispute between 
the Commission and the Electrical 
Workers' Union. 

It looks as though the Commission 
feels it has a mighty poor case to go to 
any board with. In the meantime the 
issue is in the hands of the Privy Coun- 
cil in London, which is the highest court 
of appeal in the British Empire, for civil 
cases. Respecting the general merits of 
legislation of this character it may not 
be amiss to recall that proposals to work 
for a similar law in the United States 
were, turned down by the American Fed- 
eration of Labor. 

Also, the British Government, about 
ten years ago, sent a commission to. Can- 
ada to inquire into its workings, with a 
view to considering the enactment of 
such a law over there. It never went be- 
yond the report of the commission, 
which got a very frosty reception from 
Organized Labor in that country. 
• 

Be On Your Guard 

FIGURES covering that part of last 
year up to the end of November are 
the latest available, at the time we 
go to press, dealing with the amount of 
building construction work done last 
year as compared with 1923. From the 
beginning of the year until the end of 
November, the figures for the 36 eastern 
states, which cover about seven-eighths 
of the total amount of building construc- 
tion work done in the United States, 
were $4,154,753,100. 

That is about 13 per cent more than 
in 1913 for the same period, and 4 per 
cent more than for the whole of that 
year. Most of this work, however, was 
done in the Atlantic seaboard states, be- 
tween New York and the Gulf of Mexico. 
There are indications that this is the 
apex of the post war building boom, and 
that such figures will not be reached this 
coming yeai\ So be on your guard. 

Now, more than ever, is the time for 
us to watch with the closest scrutiny for 
any move to start a wage reduction cam- 
paign. To be ready for any such possi- 
bility active organization work must be 
promoted and carried on in each locality. 
New and old members alike should be 
aroused to be on the alert against any 
attack against our wage standards. The 
only true safeguard we have is the 
weapon by which we got them — Militant 
Organization. 




AUDELS NEW GUIDE: 



ENTIRE 

SET IS 

ONLY 




4HAMI1V UAI $ POCKET SIZE-FLEXIBLE COVERS 
111111 VI VULO. 1600 PAGES— 3700 TRADE ILLUSTRATION: 

Condensed Contents Audels Carpenters and BuildersGuides 



GUIDE NO. I 

43I Pages— 1200 Illustration* 
-How to know the different kinds 

(if wood. 
-How to use the different kinds 

of wood. 
-Complete detailed information 

on nails and screws. 
-How circular and band saws 

are handled. 
-How to use the steel square. 
-How to sharpen tools. 
-How to file and set iaw«. 
-How to make wood joints. 
-Complete information regarding 

joints and joinery. 
-How to build furniture. 
-How to make a work brnch. 
-How to make a mitre box. 
-How to make a mitre shooting 

board. 

-How to plumb and level work 
-How to use the chalk line. 



—How to lay out work. 

-How to use rules and scales. 

—now to use all of tha carpenter's 
tools, with over Cino illustra- 
tions showing specifically how. 

GUIDE NO. 2 

-How to understand carpenter's 
arithmetic. 

-How to understand geometry. 

-How to understand trigonometry. 

-How to solve mensuration prob- 
lems. 

-How to estimate the strength 
of timbers. 

-How to proportion beams. 

-How to use drawing instruments. 

-How to read plans. 

-TTnw to survey. 

-Tow to draw up specifications. 

-TTrnv to estimate cost. 

-How to build houses, barns, 
garages, bungalows, etc. 



GUIDE NO. 3 

— How to excavate foundations. 
— Hjw to build foundations. 
— How to make water-proof. 
— How to erect post foundations. 
—How to build forms for concrete. 
— How to proportion foundation 

footings. 
— How to frame houses. 
— How to set girders and sills. 
— How to frame joists. 
— How to construct a well hole. 
— How to frame a studding. 
— How to frame corner posts. 
— How to lay out and cut braces. 
— How to attach lath to corner posts. 
— How to frame temporary and 

permanent braces. 
— How to frame girts and rib bands. 
— Hnw to set window frames. 
— How to frame partitions. 
— How to distinguish various 

types of roofs. 



— How to use 'the settings 12, 1! 

and 17 on the steel square. 

— How to lay out mitre cuts. 

— How to use tangents, and ful 

detailed information coverins 

sky lights, scafford and hoisting 

GUIDE NO. 4 

— How to put on wood, fibre and 

metal shingles. 
— How to lay gravel roofs. 

-How to lay tin roofs. 

-How to hang doors. 

-How to frame windows. 

-How to put on siding. 

-How to put on exterior trim. 

•How to do cornice work. 

-How to build stairs. 

■How to lath. 

•How to lay floors. 

■How to put on interior trim. 

•How to paint. 

■How to give first aid to the 

injured. 



SOLVE YOUR 




Inside trade information for Carpenters, Builders, 
Joiners, Building Mechanics and all woodworkers. 
3700 actual examples of efficient construction work with new 
methods, ideas, solutions, plans, systems, short cuts, time and 
labor saving suggestions, new ways that cover the entire theory and 
practice of the subject illustrated by sketches and forms, all specific 
and practical. Audel's Guides give you the short cut, professional in- 
formation you want. No need to guess or take chances. 

MEW IDEAS and METHODS -SHORT CUTS 




Reasonable Price" 

I find the Guides 
e r y satisfactory. 
h e knowledge in 
lem is much great- 

than I anticipat- 

A very conveni- 

at size and price is 

reasonable that 
very carpenter 
aould possess a set. 
-Ralph M. Collem- 

Lowell, Mass. 

Good For Profes= 
ional Carpenters" 

It is the most 
a n d y reference 
ork that I ever 
ime in contact 
ith. It is the very 
ing that the build- 
g mechanic needs 
ery day for refer- 
ice. I wish to state 
rther there is not 
foreman or super- 
tendent who can 
ford to be without 
is valuable work, 
vish you unbound- 
success. — George 
Watson, 136 
■unson St., Long 
and City, N. Y. 



How to Use the Steel Square 12, 13, 17. 



(Example From Audels Guide No. i) 

As an example of the thorough and practical way in which 
each subject is handled, there are 52 illustrations and dia- 
grams and 47 pages given over to the different uses of the steel 
square. Many carpenters use the actual pages of the book as 
a hand guide in their daily work 

Here is a specimen illustration (reduced size) and the descrip- 
tion that goes with it. 

Rules 12, 13 & 17 on the Steel Square 

The lines radiating from division 12 on the tongue of the square 
to various points on the blade as seen in fig. M, are inclinations 
corresponding to the various roof pitches. 

The 12 inch mark on tongue and mark on blade opposite pitch 
desired is used to obtain cuts for common rafters. For octagon, 
or hip rafters use mark 13, or 17 respectively. In fig. S, the 
square is seen applied to a rafter with the 12 in. mark on tongue 
and 18 in. mark on body at the edge of the rafter corresponding 
to 5 pitch of common rafter. 

The inclinations A. and B, of the tongue and body of the square 
with the edge LF, of the rafter give the correct angles for bottom 
and top cuts for § pitch when placed in position; that is, when 
A is horizontal and B. vertical or plumb. 




USEFUL INFORMATION 




IN HANDY 
FORM 

"To Earn More, Learn More" is a true saying- that ap 
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In plain "language they give you /*& y ^ 
the "HOW'S" and "WHY'S"- A/^ c , 
the best approved methods of sA&Ssfr* v<$c&aS 



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GENERAL OFFICERS 

OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD 

OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA 

General Office 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

JOHN T. COSGROVE 

Carpenters" Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

GEORGE H. LAKEY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

THOMAS NEALE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 
First District, T. M. GUERIN 
290 Second Ave., Troy, N. Y. 



Second District 



Third District, JOHN H. POTTS 
646 Melish Ave., Cincinnati, O. 



Fonrtb District, JAMES P. OGLETREE 

Bradentown, Fla. 



Fifth District, J. W. WILLIAMS 

3948 S. Grand Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 



Sixth District, W. A. COLE 

810 Merchants National Bank Building 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
712 Chambord St., Montreal, Que., Can. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFI, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive 
Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



NOTICE TO RECORDING 
SECRETARIES 
The quarterly circular for the months 
of January, February and March, con= 
taining the quarterly password, has been 
forwarded to all Local Unions of the 
United Brotherhood. Under separate 
cover six blanks have been forwarded for 
the Financial Secretary, three of which 
are to be used for the reports to the Gen= 
eral Office, for the months of January, 
February and March, and the extra ones 
are to be filled out in duplicate and kept 
on file for future reference. Inclosed 
therewith are also six blanks for the 
Treasurer, to be used in transmitting 
money to the General Office. Recording 
Secretaries not in receipt of this imme= 
diately should notify the General Secre= 
tary, Frank Duffy, Carpenters' Building, 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

o 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

We are continuously having numerous 
complaints that members are not receiv= 
ing our official Journal, "The Carpenter," 
and upon investigation we find that in 
most cases it arises from the fact that 
the only address submitted to the Gen= 
eral Office is "General Delivery," and 
when sent this way, and not called for, 
the Postmaster sends same back to this 
General Office at quite an expense. 

We must therefore insist that the Fi= 
nancial Secretaries of each and every 
Local get the correct street address of 
every member of his Local in good stand= 
ing who does not receive the Journal, 
and submit same to the General Office. 

Careful attention to the foregoing will 
assist this Office materially in getting 
our Journal out promptly and to the par= 
ties interested. 

Financial Secretaries will also take in= 
to consideration that it is necessary to 
call attention on those same blanks to 
the names of members who are suspend= 
ed and granted clearance so that their 
names can be erased from the mailing 
list in the town or city in which their 
Local is located. If sufficient blanks are 
not furnished at any time, our attention 
should be called to same and they will 
be promptly forwarded. 



CorrQspondQncQ 




Conditions In Toronto 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

Newspapers published in Toronto, 
Canada, would convey the idea that To- 
ronto has a large building program. 

The Toronto District Council desires 
through "The Carpenter" to inform the 
membership that work is very slack, and 
winter coming on, we do not anticipate 
any change until spring at least. 

JOHN COTTAM, 
Secretary, Toronto District Council of 
Carpenters. 



Progress At Bay City 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 112, of Bay 
City, Mich., is now one year old, and in 
a sound and healthy condition. She 
looked rather sick for a time, almost 
dying, as many of the charter members 
dropped, but a faithful few kept her 
alive. With unceasing efforts, they have 
more than doubled her membership. 

During recent years, meetings have 
been held regularly twice a month, sev- 
eral parties have been given and one 
picnic, which was well attended by both 
the Auxiliary and Local Union. 

At our meeting of November 28, 1924, 
we had initiation of thirteen new mem- 
bers. L. U. 116 was well represented 
and we were favored with short address- 
es by President Ward, Business Agent 
Fry and Brother Roth. Afterwards a 
social hour lunch was served. 

We had expected a class of twenty 
candidates at this meeting, but owing 
to various reasons the others were un- 
able to attend. These we will initiate 
at our next meeting. 

Wonder what some of our sister Aux- 
iliaries are doing? Would like to hear 
from them occasionally through "The 
Carpenter." 

Fraternally, 
MRS. EMMA PAULSON, 
Bay City, Mich. 

• 

Conditions At Miami, Fla. 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

Owing to the recent influx of carpen- 
ters in Miami, Fla., we take this method 



of advising the Brotherhood in regards 
to working conditions here; it is a fact 
that we are having one of our greatest 
strides of improvements along the build- 
ing lines, but we have more men here 
to do the work than ever before. 

We are always ready and glad to wel- 
come fellow workers to our "Magic 
City," and glad to share our work with 
you, but it is only about sixty days 
until our building season will begin to 
decline, and only the larger jobs will be 
left incomplete, and will only employ 
about 50 per cent of the present number 
of men here at this time, November 11. 

We hope this letter will not be mis- 
construed, as it is written from the 
standpoint of only helping and advising 
— and not from a selfish standpoint, as 
we as fellow carpenters are always will- 
ing and glad to lend a helping hand, 
especially to our fellow workers. We 
only wish that the amount of building 
was twice as much as it really is, so we 
could welcome you to our city which 
in itself is a magnet. 

Any further information desired may 
be had by writing the Recording Secre- 
tary, G. F. McCollister, L. U. 993, 
Miami, Fla. 



Alton, 111., Is Twenty=five 

"Editor, "The Carpenter": 

On the evening of Saturday, October 
25th, last, L. U. 377, Alton, 111., cele- 
brated its twenty -fifth anniversary. It 
was a great occasion and a complete suc- 
cess from start to finish, due in no small 
measure to the splendid work of the 
members of Ladies' Auxiliary No. 29. 

Nobody was forgotten. Old or dis- 
abled members were fetched from their 
homes and taken back after the "do- 
ings." Brother Isaac Potter, who was 
too ill to be there, got a bouquet to re- 
mind him that he was not forgotten, and 
some good wishes to go with it. There 
was a fine feed too, and singing and so 
forth, in fact all the things which go 
to make a good time. 

The guest of the evening was First 
General Vice-President John T. Cos- 
grove, who gave a very interesting talk 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



on the history of our Brotherhood from 
its inception down to the present plans 
for an old age home and old age pen- 
sions. Everybody enjoyed his address 
very much. The gathering was one that 
will never be forgotten as long as the 
Local lives, which we all hope will be to 
see many more such anniversaries. 

JOHN F. CLARK, Secretary. 



Racine, Wis., Ladies' Auxiliary 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

The Ladies' Auxiliary 110 celebrated 
their first anniversary on the evening of 
October 23rd, last, by giving a hal- 
loween party. A fine program was given 
followed by lunch. 

Dancing concluded the evening's en- 
tertainment. 

About 200 were in attendance, as 
the carpenters of L. U. 91 with their 
families were our guests. We were in- 
stituted with 11 charter members. We 
now have 36, with several applications 
to be acted on at our next meeting. 

On November 20th we held a public 
card party, arrangements being made 
for a Christmas tree for the children. 
We meet the first Thursday in the after- 
noon, and on the fourth Thursday in the 
evening. Visitors are cordially invited. 
MARGARET PIERCE, 

Secretary, Ladies' Auxiliary No. 110, 

Racine, Wis. 

• 

A Good Time At Niagara Falls 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

An enjoyable event took place in the 
Carpenters' Hall, Niagara Falls, Canada, 
Wednesday, November 12th, in the form 
of a "social evening," when the mem- 
bers of L. U. 713 were "at home" to the 
members of the Builders' Exchange and 
local contractors, delegates to the Fron- 
tier District Council and a number of 
visiting brothers. 

At 8:15 the guests and members were 
escorted to tables where lunch was 
served, following which Brother Geo. 
Rewbury, chairman of the social com- 
mittee, called the gathering to order and 
introduced Brother John Flett, Canadian 
representative of the A. F. of L., as 
chairman of the evening, who referred 
in his opening remarks to the marked 
advancement of civilization in general 
and of the trade union movement in 
particular, when employers and em- 
ployes gathered together in a function 
of this nature. 



Mr. Arthur Ingham, representing the 
Builders' Exchange, spoke of the good 
fellowship existing between employers 
and employes. 

General Executive Board Member 
Brother Arthur Martel addressed, what 
might be called the two fraternities, cov- 
ering many points of interest to both. 
He also considered it a marked degree 
of modern civilization, when employers 
and employes crossed feet beneath the 
same tables in the banquet hall. He 
especially emphasized the need of an ap- 
prenticeship system as the only solution 
to offset the approaching day of special- 
izing in the carpenter trade. 

Community singing and other musical 
numbers rendered by members of the 
Local, gave a varied effect to the pro- 
gram, which according to various ex- 
pressions, was appreciated by all. 

F. S. LANE, 

Secretary, L. U. 713, Niagara Falls, 
Canada. 



A Kindly Tribute 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

I am writing you today because of the 
fact that I have just read your November 
number of "The Carpenter" and in that 
I read the report you made to your 
convention regarding the new home for 
the old carpenters that you are aiming 
to establish in Florida. When I read 
that report it pleased me so that I felt 
I must write you a letter and congratu- 
late both you and Brother Hutcheson on 
the splendid advances that the Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners are 
making. 

You know my old friendly feeling to- 
wards the carpenters, for in the early 
days of the organization I made my 
home at the Carpenters' Headquarters 
in Philadelphia and got my advice and 
early training under your old Secretary 
and founder, P. J. McGuire, and as you 
are, no doubt, aware our first Constitu- 
tion is almost a duplicate of the old 
Constitution of the Brotherhood of Car- 
penters. I have always watched the 
move of the Brotherhood with great in- 
terest, and when I read of the home you 
were establishing for the old members 
it made me feel mighty good, and the 
splendid point in that arrangement is 
that you provide to take care of the 
wife, as well as the carpenter himself. 
So many insurances and pension plans 
only take care of the member, and I 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



have always contended that the wife 
should be thought of and taken care 
of as well as the member himself. The 
truth is that in the 'industrial struggles 
the true wife bears a heavier burden 
than does the man. 

The program you have mapped out for 
your splendid home with its orchards in 
Florida, must in the end become a pay- 
ing proposition, if properly handled as 
your report shows. I imagine that it 
would be almost self-sustaining in a 
short time, if the Brotherhood local or- 
ganizations can be brought to take the 
interest in the handling of the fruits 
and the products that will be produced 
on that farm. It will be splendid work 
for the old carpenter to look after and 
gather the fruit — not alone the fruit of 
the tree, but he can refer to it as the 
labor of his Brotherhood which has done 
so much in the past years to improve, 
elevate and better the conditions of the 
carpenters of the United States and Can- 
ada. Again, I congratulate you on the 
splendid work that the Brotherhood is 
doing. 

Fraternally yours, 

W. D. MAHON, 
International President, Amalgamated 
Association of Street and Electric 
Railway Employes of America. 
♦ 

Information Wanted 

This is a picture of Thos. D. Johnson, 
formerly a member of L. U. 277, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. Anyone knowing of his 




whereabouts please communicate with 
Theo. D. Johnson, 436 East Wildey St., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

* * * 

William A. Hartlett, member of L. U. 
No. 1408, Redwood City, Cal., disap- 
peared from home November 10, 1924. 

Description; Age 45, weight 165 
pounds, height 5 ft. 9 in., light brown 
hair, slightly gray. Tattoo ring on third 
finger of left hand. American flag tat- 



tooed on back of left hand. When last 
seen he wore a gray shirt, brown suit, 
green plaid mackinaw, brown cap, and 
generally wears glasses. 

Anyone knowing Brother Hartlett's 
whereabouts please communicate with 
E. H. Buckley, President L. U. No. 1408, 
152 Oak Ave., Redwood City, Cal. 



8=HOUR DAY IN CANADA 

The results of a recent enquiry made 
by the Canadian Department of Labor 
to ascertain the present position of the 
eight-hour day movement in industrial 
undertakings in Canada were made 
known to the Select Committee on In- 
dustrial and International Relations by 
the Assistant Deputy-Minister of Labor. 

The enquiry showed that 54.22% of 
the employers of firms making returns 
work on eight-hour day, or 48-hour 
week, or less. 

The enquiry was based on return re- 
ceived from employers having fifteen or 
more employes in the various industries, 
excepting agriculture and fishing. Infor- 
mation was received from 5,263 employ- 
ers having 690,317 employes. 

It is interesting to note that the in- 
dustry in which the highest proportion 
of employers was working a 48-hour 
week or less was transportation, with 
91.5% and the industry in which the 
smallest proportion of the employes 
worked a 48-hour week and less was 
logging, with 19.23%. 



Paterson, N. J., Not Busy 

Work in the carpenter line in Pater- 
son, N. J., is not plentiful at this time, 
in fact some of the local old timers are 
not able to keep employed all the while. 

When there is anything doing there 
the local boys are always glad to help a 
newcomer make a start, but they do not 
want to see any more carpenters looking 
for work when there are already some 

not working. 

» 

Lewiston, Idaho, Is Quiet 

In Idaho, and the northwest generally 
the story has been circulated that build- 
ing conditions at Lewiston, Idaho, are 
booming. The reverse is the fact, for 
conditions are decidedly quiet, and not 
all of our members who are already 
there have been able to work steadily 
during the past summer. This news 
comes through our L. U. 398, in that 
city. 



Chips and Shavings 



A Happy New Year. 

* * * 

Now for that 500,000. 

* * * 

Are your dues paid up? 

* * * 

Those with the most complaints usu- 
ally have little else to offer. x 

* * * 

Pessimism is entirely destructive. It 
is the death warrant of hope without 
which life is impossible. 

A clear conscience is a wonderful as- 
set for good health. Nothing satisfies 
the conscience better than buying, wear- 
ing, and consuming union-made pro- 
ducts. 

* * * 

According to the Wisconsin Industrial 
Commission, of the 2,507 Milwaukee 
children receiving permits for first full 
time employment during the year 1923- 
1924, only 18 per cent were classed as 
sound and free from physical or health 
defects. 

* * * 

Four soviet physicians recommend 
Mr. Trotsky to leave Moscow "for a 
warmer climate." Since he wrote his 
last book that is exactly where his some- 
time friends Zinoviev et al. have been 
trying to send him. 

* * ♦ 

Massachusetts has voted to ~ allow 
child labor to continue not in Massa- 
chusetts itself, where child labor laws 
are in force, but in the southern states, 
where Massachusetts mill owners have 
investments or own mills. 

* * * 

Skilled labor has emigrated from 
Scotland since the end of the war to 
such an extent that it is said to be caus- 
ing genuine alarm to authorities and em- 
ployers, who were indifferent to it as 
long as it only operated to relieve the 
unemployed relief system. 

* * * 

Herbert Spencer rightly gives the first 
place in his educational scheme to the 
education which prepares the individual 
for direct self-preservation. The work- 



ers should make sure of a living before 
they seek any mental adornment. The 
"conquest of bread" should precede the 
cultivation of' roses. 

* * * 

The Trades and Labor Council of 
Winnipeg, Canada, at the invitation of 
the Board of Trade of that city, has ap- 
pointed three of its members to sit on 
the executive committee of the Board. 
In 1919 Winnipeg was the center point 
of the One Big Union, which subse- 
quently collapsed in such ignominious 
fashion. 

* * * 

Emma Goldman is very "fed up" with 
her experiences of soviet rule in Russia, 
and denounces it as the arch enemy of 
all the principles on which human lib- 
erty and freedom should be founded. It 
would seem that some distant fields do 
not look so green when the "close up" 
is obtained at a range short enough to 
be unaffected by the emerald streaks 
in the inquiring optic. 

* * * 

Quite a controversy is going on in 
British labor circles about labor min- 
isters of the late government having 
climbed into knee breeches, court dress, 
and such like sartorial gee gaws. They 
might have known when they did it that 
the time would come when they would 
get unmercifully jibed about it by their 
own people. The others quietly did it 
at the time, mixing their flattery with 
barely disguised contempt. 

The Agricultural Workers' Labour 
Union of Japan, with 395 affiliated Lo- 
cal Unions and a total membership in 
1924 of 40,857 persons, was founded in 
1921, and is the largest union in Japan. 
It admits as members both so-called ten- 
ant farmers and agricultural day labor- 
ers. At present it is not affiliated to the 
General Federation of Labor in Japan, 
but there are close ties of friendship be- 
tween the leaders, and the union also 
maintains friendly relations with other 
organized groups, such as miners and 
factory workers. 



Craft ProblQms 




The Stair 

(By H. H. Siegele.) 

I 

Stair building, just as any other 
branch of carpentry, is not difficult, if 
thoroughly understood. The apprentice 
often feels that this branch of the trade 
is too complicated for him, and for that 
reason, he often thinks of it with strange 
misgivings. This feeling is sometimes 
increased by the carpenter (the 'old 
head', perhaps) who himself does not 
thoroughly understand the principles in- 
volved in the science of stair building. 
Many, otherwise good mechanics, fail 
on some point when they come to erect- 
ing the stair. I wonder, sometimes 
whether there are very many carpenters, 
retired or still working at the trade, who 
can honestly say that they have never 
met with difficulties in stair building. 
I have a private feeling, pleasing, of 
course, that most of my readers, when 
they recall their experiences in stair 
building, can join with me in smiling 
over the 'boneheads' that entered into 
some of their stair work. And you who 
are smiling with me, know as well as I 
do that blunders always grow out of a 
lack of knowledge, rather than out of a 
complicated situation. I am making 
these preliminary remarks, because I 
want to impress on the mind of the 
reader, and the apprentice in particular, 
that if stair building seems difficult to 
him, it will cease to be so when he thor- 
oughly understands it. I do not mean 
by this that he must understand every 
branch of stair building before he can 
do any part of it successfully ; far be it 
from that, but I do mean that he must 
thoroughly understand the simple prin- 
ciples involved in the particular kind of 
stair work that he is doing. 

The first question that arises, when 
one starts to work on a stair, is the run 
and the rise. This is illustrated by Fig. 
1, where the run for the flight is 8 ft. 
3 in., or 99 inches, and the rise is 8 ft., 
or 96 in. To determine the run and the 
rise for the steps of this flight of stairs, 
it is necessary to know what will make 



an easy step. A simple rule by which 
this can be determined, is to make the 
sum of the run and the rise, in inches, 
equal about 17 in. (Avoid going above 
17 in.) Because the rise is a trifle 
smaller than the run, we will take from 
the figure 17, a figure equal to a trifle 
less than one-half of it for a trial divisor. 
One-half of 17 being 8%, we will take 
8. 96 divided by 8 equals 12, or the 
number of 8 in. risers necessary for the 
flight of stairs. Because the nosing at 
the landing of the stair is not counted 
as a tread, the number of treads are al- 
ways one less than the number of risers; 
which, in this case is 11. 99 divided by 
11, gives us 9, or the number of inches 
in the run of each step. This can be 




;.<?';. <?';!. fl.-/..?';.,?:. ?■»«?! 



-9-3- 



FlG. t. 

proved, either by subtracting 8 from 17, 
which results in 9 — or by taking an- 
other turn at it, and add S to 9, which 
gives us 17 ; thus proving that 9 and 8 
are in the right proportion for the run 
and rise, respectively, of each step. Now 
we have worked out the first problems 
for a flight of stairs where the rise and 
the run aie limited, each to a definite 
distance. Ill many cases the rise is the 
only distance that is definitely limited, 
and sometimes the case is the reverse. 
Occasionally, but not often, both the 
rise and the run are left to be deter- 
mined by the builder. When the rise is 
limited, figure out the rise for each step, 
subtract it, in inches, from 17, and the 



40 



THE CAKPEJTTER 



result will be the run, in inches, of each 
step. When the run is limited, the oper- 
ation is the reverse. And where neither 
the run nor the rise is limited, it is up 
to the builder to use his judgment to ob- 
tain the best results. By giving the 
illustration, shown by Fig. 1, a little 
study, it will be seen that the rise for 
the flight has been divided into 12 equal 
spaces of 8 in. each ; and the run has 
been divided into 11 equal spaces of 9 
in. each. These spaces represent, in 
their order, the risers and the runs of 
the steps in this flight of stairs. The 
dotted lines show how they have been 
transferred to their proper locations, 
which resulted in a stair with 11 treads 
and 12 risers. 

Fig. 2 shows a side view and a sec- 
tion of a pitch board, which is used as a 
templet for marking the carriages, or 
horses, as they are commonly called, of 



I 

ISM 



Fig. z,. 

a stair like the one we have been con- 
sidering. The pitch board, it will be no- 
ticed, has a guide nailed to the back of 
it, projecting about an inch beyond each 
side. 

Fig. 3 shows, a, the application of the 
pitch board; and, b, how the same re- 
sults can be obtained with the steel 



crooked timbers should never be used, 
and the edge from which the marking is 
done should be straight, else, there will 
be difficulties when the finished stair is 





Fig. 3. 

square. In fact, the steel square, if a 
guide is securely fastened to it, as 
shown in Fig. 4, can not be equaled for 
marking stair horses. The operations 
for marking stair stringers are practi- 
cally the same' as for marking stair 
horses. There are excellent steel square 
guides on the market, but the one shown 
by the illustrations will give good re- 
sults — it is simple and easily made. 

The material to be used for horses of 
a flight of stairs, should be sound and 
straight-grained. Twisted, defective or 




installed. A stair horse for a stair, such 
as is outlined in Fig. 1, is shown in Fig. 
5, cut ready to put into place. The dot- 
ted lines shown at a, indicate where it 
would have to be cut when the header, 
shown also by dotted lines, is to make 
the last rough riser. The continuous line 
at b, shows how the upper intersection 
should be cut in order to give the horse 
the full value of its strength. The 
method shown at b should always be 
used when the horse is not otherwise 
supported. It can readily be seen, that 
this must be taken into consideration 
when the stair opening is framed, be- 




FlG. 5. 

cause the header must be set back the 
distance between a and b. The method 
shown at a is not substantial without 
extra support. The relative position of 
the horse to the two floor lines, is in- 
dicated by dotted lines, and the first 
riser, as indicated, is 1 1-8 in. less than 
the other risers. This is done to permit 
a 11-8 in. tread, which will make the 
first finished riser equal to the others. 

In this article we have dealt with 
some of the implied first-principles of 
stair building, and have slightly touched 
upon the more practical results that are 
to be arrived at by applying these princi- 
ples to actual work. In the next article 
we intend to go from principles to the 
application of them, showing some of 
the results. 



THE CARPENTER 



41 



The Stair 
(By H. H. Siegele.) 

II 

No one can gain a full-rounded knowl- 
edge of carpentry, or of any other 
branch of industry for that matter, from 
books alone ; nor can it be said that one 
can attain the highest standard of effi- 
ciency from experience without book 
learning. Book learning and practical 
experience work hand in hand for the 
man who aspires to reach the upper 
round of the ladder of success. It is 
true, however, that a man who honestly 
does his best every day at whatever 
work he may be engaged in, can make a 
comfortable living, if he does not meet 
with some unusual misfortune. So I 
would say to the man whose idea of suc- 
cess is a comfortable living, to do his 
very best every day and he will succeed 
without encumbering himself with books. 
But the man who lives, not for a living 
only, but to attain the highest possible 
efficiency in rendering service to the 
world, must avail himself of every 
means that may be at his disposal, in 
order to succeed, eventually. Besides 
success, he will have a comfortable liv- 
ing thrown in as a by-product. 

The apprentice carpenter usually gets 
his first practical experience in stair 
building, on, perhaps, a cellar stair or a 
stair to some barn loft. This is natural, 
not because this kind of stair building 
is less difficult than the better class of 
stair work, for it is not, but because it 
is the least expensive should he make 
a mistake in his experiments. The prin- 
ciples of stair building on cellar stairs, 




Fig e. 

stepladders, porch steps, and stone and 
cement steps, are the same as on the 
very best class of stair work. The work- 
manship, though, can be said to be some- 
what different, but it should never be 
Jess than first-class — a plank stairway, 



although first-class, does not require as 
much skill and ability to make it first- 
class, as a well-finished stairway in a 
dwelling does. 

In Fig. 6 is shown a plank cellar 
stairs in place — this stairs is designed 
with the same number of steps, with ris- 
ers and treads to match, as is illustrat- 
ed in Fig. 1, Art. 1. Make a comparison 
of the two drawings. The head room for 
ordinary stair work should be about 7 
ft. from the lower corner of the header, 
allowing for the finish, to the nosing 
line. This is shown to the right of the 
figure. To establish the location of the 
headroom header we will take 7 ft., or 




Tig. 7. 
84 in., the head room, and add to this 
the 10 in. that are taken up by the 
joists, floor and ceiling, as shown to the 
upper right of the drawing, which gives 
us 94 in. The rise for each step of this 
flight of stairs being 8 in., we will di- 
vide 94 by 8, which gives us 11%. 
From this we will take 1, because there 
is always one more riser than treads, 
leaving 10%. The run for each step, in 
this case, is 9 in., so we must multiply 
9 by 10%, which will give us the dis- 
tance between the last riser and the 
head room header, or 96% in.; say, in 
round numbers, 8 ft. 1 in., which is the 
distance between the two headers in this 
stair opening. 

If a closed back is desired, on a flight 
of stairs as shown in Fig. 6, this can be 
accomplished with matched flooring or 
ceiling, as indicated by the dotted lines 
on the upper half of the flight. It will 
be observed that the bottom back corner 
of each step must be cut off, when this 
is done. 

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of parts 
of two steps housed into the stringer- 



42 



THE CARPENTER 



horse of a stairs like the one shown at 
Fig. 6. At a is shown how the corners 
should be cut off, not only for the sake 



Fig. 11 gives a perspective view of a 
well framed for a stairway. The mem- 




of appearance, but to prevent annoying 
interferences with traffic. 

Fig. 9 gives a detail of a templet to be 
used for marking the housing of the 




Fl G. 9. 

steps — the application of which is illus- 
trated in Fig. 10. After marking around 
the tongue of the templet, in the position 




shown, move it forward so that point a 
will come to point b, and the tongue will 
cover the part marked for the housing 
of the second step. The steel square, 
in position for marking the third step, 
is also shown in this figure. 




Fig. h. 

bers are called, a, trimmers; b, header; 
c, tail pieces. 

In this article we have been working 
in the basement of the house, particu- 
larly. Once we slipped away to look at 
a kind of a stepladder stairs reaching 
into a barn loft, it was simple ; then we 
examined some porch steps, where the 
rules were the same as on the stairs that 
we were building. Coming back we 
looked at some stone steps, and a flight 
of cement stairs leading into the base- 
ment again. 

In the next article we will see what 
we can do on the first floor. 



A Special Miter Box 

(By H. H. Siegele.) 

The miter cut for the intersections of 
round-edged casings is not always easy 
to make — that is, the cut on the head 
casing. The cut on the side casings can 
be made with a regular miter box, but 
the cut for the head casings must be 
made with a saw without the aid of a 
miter box, unless a specially prepared 
miter box is used. 

Fig. 1 of the illustrations shows a 
plan of such a miter box with a head- 




casing in it. The saw kerf shown at 
"b" is used to cut the miter of the casing 
to the right on the illustration. The saw 



THE CARPENTER 



43 



kerf shown at "a" is used to cut the 
miter of the head-casing to the left. 
The dotted lines show the parts of the 
casing that are ripped off after the miter 
has been cut. Fig. 2 gives an end view 
of the box, showing the casing in place 
for cutting, by dotted lines. The per- 
pendicular dotted lines show the depth 
of the saw kerf — also the direction the 
saw takes while the miter is being cut. 
A straight 1x2 nailed to a straight 2xS 
completes the box. The time that it 
takes to make the box is so small that 
no mechanic can well afford to be with- 
out one, in fact, its use insures accuracy 
and solves a rather difficult problem. 



A Door Stay 

An inexpensive door stay for tem- 
porary use, which in many cases will 
serve as a permanent fixture and give 
good service, is shown by the accom- 
panying drawing. It consists of. a gas 
pipe driven into the ground, in line with 
the foot-bolt of the door, where the door 
is to be stayed. Just enough clearance 




between the pipe and the door should be 
given, to permit the door to pass over 
without friction. The bolt pushed into 
the pipe stays the door. 

It will be found that this little trick 
will give excellent service for holding 
doors of hay barns, stock sheds, tool 
houses, machinery sheds, material sheds, 
garages and other buildings of secondary 
importance. 



An Adjustable Templet 

Staking out footings for columns 
where the footings are of various sizes, 
can be simplified by using an adjustable 
templet such as we are showing here- 
with. 

Fig. 1 shows the templet set for a 
footing 8 ft. square, the dotted line 
through the center shows where a line 
should be stretched to establish the cen- 




FIG. I. 

ter of the footings. The stakes as they 
should be driven are shown at the cor- 
ners. Fig. 2 shows the templet adjusted 
for staking out a footing 2 ft. 6 in. 
square. The center line of the footings 
is shown by the dotted line, and the 




fig. n, 



stakes as they should be driven are 
shown, as before, at the corners. Much 
time can be saved by the use of this 
simple device on large buildings where 
many and various sized columns are 
used. 



44 



THE CARPENTER 



Housing Head Casings 

Novelty casing with housed joints, is 
not a new thing, but there are many car- 
penters who have never seen any of it 
installed, and many more who have 
never installed this particular style of 
casing, which is, as the drawings indi- 
cate, nothing more than a plain round- 
edged or square-edged side casing, with 
a head casing made of heavier material. 

Fig. 1 shows a section of the joint be- 
tween the head casing and the side cas- 
ing. It will be noticed that the lip of 
the head casing laps down over the up- 
per end of the side casing. This will 




FIG. I. 



permit the unavoidable shrinkage of the 
head casing and yet not show an open 
joint. Fig. 2 shows a face view of the 
same joint — the dotted lines indicate the 
depth of the housing. 

Housing the head casing is not dif- 
ficult, simply nail the side casings in 




FIG.H 



line. If the casing is square-edged, a 
chisel and a hammer is all that is need- 
ed, but if round-edged, then the round 
should be cut with an auger that will 
cut so as to fit the round of the casing. 



A New Bridging Cut 

A number of years ago the writer was 
talking with a building superintendent 
about bridging and its value. 

"Most of the builders," said the man, 
"do not know how to cut bridging — the 
bridging you are putting in here is not 




Fig. I. 

cut right, if you want to obtain the best 
results, although, it is according to the 
specifications." 

On asking him how it should be cut, 
he picked up a piece of board and made 
a pencil drawing, corresponding to what 
is herewith shown by Fig. 1. Then he 
went on to explain how bridging cut as 
shown by the illustrations gave better 
results than if it were cut according to 
the customary method, that is, cut-to- 




place and then place the head over them 
and with a pencil mark the intersecting 



fit. The point that he stressed, and on 
which he based his argument, is shown 
on Fig. 2. By referring to this figure, 
it will be seen how the corner of the 



THE CARPENTHEET, 



45 



piece of bridging has forced an indenture 
into the side of the joist at the point of 
contact, which is indicated by the letter 
"a." This indenture is made when the 
bridging is nailed, and, according to the 
man's claims, is to prevent the ends of 
the bridging from slipping when the load 
is put onto the joists. 



Cutting Studding For An Incline 

A simple method for cutting studding 
for an incline, is shown by the two 
sketches accompanying herewith. Fig. 
1 shows the studding to be cut to make 
the incline shown by Fig. 2, in place on 
a pair of trestles. The studding are 
placed side by side with the bottom ends 
squared and in a perfect line. Then the 
lowest point of the incline, marked "a," 
is transferred to the studding on the 
trestles to the right and, in this case, is 
marked "a' ". The highest point of the 




incline is transferred to the studding on 
the extreme left — these points are 
marked, respectively, "b" and "b' ". 
Care must be taken in transferring these 
points so they will be marked on the 
same side of each of the two studdings, 
else the work will not come out right. 
In this case, it will be seen, the points 
are marked on the left side of the two 
marked studdings. After these points 
have been transferred, then place a 
straight-edge so it will cross point "b' " 
and point "a' ", and mark along the edge 
of it, cutting each of the studding at the 
longest point of this mark. The cutting 
done, place the studding in position and 
nail the top and bottom plates to them, 
then raise the section and brace it. If 
the incline is longer than what can con- 
veniently be handled in one section, di- 
vide the distance into as many equal 
sections as will make it convenient. 
The short and long points of each sec- 
tion can be obtained by dividing the rise 
of the incline into as many equal parts 
as you have equal sections. By adding 
the rise of one section to the length of 
the short studding of the section under 
construction, one will establish the 
length of the long studding of the sec- 



tion. The short studding,' of" course, 
will be the long studding of the section 
just raised. If the work is done from 
the high point toward the low point the 
operation is the reverse. 



WHY COAL IS HIGH 

Even Wall Street is staggered at the 
profits of the Delaware, Lackawanna & 
Western Coal Company and the Lehigh 
Valley Coal Sales Company. Although 
1923 was far from a normal year, Lack- 
awanna's profits were $5,500,000, and 
Lehigh's $2,500,000. These profits are 
approximately one-third of Lackawan- 
na's capital stock and one-quarter of 
Lehigh's capital stock. 



A Warning Against Fraud 

If any member is approached by per- 
sons representing themselves as solic- 
itors for the Cement and Engineering 
News, and who have receipt forms with 
the address "22 Quincey St." on them, 
they are advised not to hand over any 
money. It is stated that a number of 
our members in Cleveland were victim- 
ized by this method during the past 
summer. 

In a letter from Mr. Marshall Hay- 
wood, the publisher, it is pointed out 
that the address of the magazine is 
Peoples' Life Building, Randolph and 
Wells Sts., Chicago, and that the solic- 
itors mentioned are not authorized to 
represent the publication. Regret is ex- 
pressed that its name should have been 
used in this dishonest manner, and any 
persons approached by these solicitors 
are advised to invite the attention of the 
police to their fraudulent activities. 
• 

Conditions In Orange, Cal. 

Orange County, Cal., is pretty quiet 
just now, so far as building work is con- 
cerned, and there are more carpenters 
on the ground than there is call for. 



Keep Your Dues Paid Up 



A FRAMING GUIDE AND 
STEEL SQUARE BOOK 

This is one of the best small books for 
the carpenter and contractor ever published, 
has 222 pages, pocket size, gives rafter 
lengths for any building, and various other 
tables, cloth binding, Price $1.00 per copy 
postage paid. Write the Author D. L. Sig- 
mon, Box 362, Sheffield, Alabama, U. S. A. 



KEEPING THE MONEY ROLLING IN 
DURING THE WINTER 




iy 




DON ARNOLD 
Anderson, Indiana 

Just about this time of the year, when the bad 
weather sets in for the winter, the average car- 
penter begins to scheme to devise some way of 
keeping the money coming in, as very few have 
steady work during the winter months. Here 
is something that seems to do the trick. 

The above picture is of Don Arnold of Ander- 
son, Indiana, who states that he has surfaced 
as much as one thousand square feet of new 
flooring in an eight hour day and when it comes 
to reflnishing old varnished and shellaced floors, 
he can clean up from one hundred to five hun- 
dred square feet per day. Mr. Arnold operates 
an "American Universal" electrically driven 
floor surfacing machine and states that he is 
making as high as $40.00 per day and has no 
trouble in getting plenty of work to keep the 
machine going all the time. 

Many carpenters have bought "American Uni- 
versal" machines thinking they would use them 
only in their spare time so as to give them 
something to do while they were laid off from 
their regular work, but they have found sur- 
facing floors the "American Universal Way" so 
profitable that they are following it as a reg- 
ular business. 

Practically every reader of this magazine has 
at some time or another scraped a floor by hand 
and knows from experience that it's just about 
the hardest job on earth, especially when it 
comes to working on an old varnished floor. 
The "American Universal" machine makes life 
worth living when it comes to floor surfacing. 
It only requires a small amount of money to 
get started in this business and offers every 
carpenter an opportunity of getting into some- 
thing for himself. 

Any readers who desire further information can 
get it without any obligation on their part 
whatever by writing The American Floor Sur- 
facing Machine Company, 522 South Saint Clair 
Street, Toledo, Ohio. 



"Full Length Roof Framer" 

Is a book to save the time and brains of th« ex- 
perts and to avoid mistakes and trouble for the un- 
experienced. 

It is a book containing 230,400 different sized and 
pitched roofs. Each roof is worked out complete, with 
the length of every rafter in feet and inches and their 
bevels for the steel square. 

If your roof is pitched it is in this book, no matter 
what size or pitch. 

You can call off the lengths and bevels for every 
rafter, for any pitched roof as fast as the size of 
building is given. 

Experience or study unnecessary. 

We will prove these remarkable statements to any 
ambitious carpenter. 

Send no money until you receive the book. If at 
any time you wish to return book, your money will be 
returned immediately. 

Five years advertising in this magazine without a 
single complaint is our recommendation. Price $1.25. 

A. Riechers, Publisher 

Palo Alto, California 



The "INTERLQX" Thinks 

Invented by a Brotherhood Man 

Don't use a stick or guess at a measurement. 

The famous 

"Interfax" Master Slide Rule 



gives both inside and outside measurements 
instantly. 

Quick, accurate, durable and rustproof. Use 
it once, and you will never work without it. 
Write today for liberal selling inducements 
to mechanics. 

MASTER RULE MFG. CO., INC. 

84 1 C East 136th St., New York City 




MORRILL SAWSETS 

Set Saws Just Right 

"Saw Points" A Booklet On How To Joint, Set And 
File Saws. Free Upon Request. 

CHAS. MORRILL 

96 Lafayette St. New York. 




Tremendous Saving In Cost 

Easy, fascinating work with our SIM- 
PLIFIED PLANS. We furnish blue 
prints, diagrams, motor, cabinet pieces, 
ready-built horn, etc. You don't need 
to be a cabinet maker. A few hours as- 
sembling and you will have a fine in- 
strument at one-quarter the regular re- 
tail price. Will be the equal of any 
phonograph on the market in beauty of 
tone and appearance. Will play all 
records. Thousands have built their 
own machines and are securing satis- 
faction and pleasure. You too ca" 

build — do as well and save much money. AGENTS 

MAKE MONET making and selling these instruments. 

Write today for full details and our FREE OFFER. 
LUPERL PHONOPARTS CO. 

4936 N. Troy St. Dept. 28. Chicago, III. 




When you 



Re-roof for the last time 



for your customer 




JOHNS-MANVILLE Inc. 
292 Madison Ave., at 41st 

Street, New York City 
Branches in 62 Large Cities 

For Canada: 

Canadian Johns-Manville Co., Ltd. 

Toronto 



TArangA- 



—it won't be the 
last time for you 



THERE are no "last times" for the 
carpenter who handles Johns-Man- 
ville Asbestos Shingles. One good re- 
roofing job means many more and con- 
tinuous work means continuous profits. 

One re-roofing job in a town of 5,000 
brought in 30 others. And the end is 
nowhere in sight. Another job sold six 
new ones and started a business that 
now has ten or twelve jobs going on a 
great deal of the time. In another town 
one new Johns-Manville roof sold 3 car- 
loads of asbestos shingles and there are 
still plenty of prospects to work. That's 
why when you re-roof a house for the 
last time with Johns-Manville Asbestos 
Shingles there will be many times more 
for you. 



\^%JOHNS -MAnville 

\ BRAKE LININGS / ^^ 

Asbestos Shingles 



. PREVENTION 



A TOOL=BOX NECESSITY — THE TAINTOR 
POSITIVE SAW SET. The Tool which sets your 
saw Right. 

Is there a Taintor in Your Tool-box? If not, talk it over 
with your hardware dealer. Send for Book : "Care of Saws." 
Free to members of the Brotherhood. 

TAINTOR MFG. Co., 95 Reade St., New York City. 




A REAL CARPENTER VISE 

That fastens on a work bench or trestle and 
will hold your work solid. 

Circulars and lowest prices furnished your 
Local on application. Manufactured by 

F. E. McGLINCHY, Willoughby, O. 

Member — Local Union No. 1174. 




K& E 



MEASURING TAPES 

and FOLDING RULES 



Used for over 40 years where quick and accurate 
work is done. High quality without high price ! 

KEUFFEL&ESSERCO. 

NEW YORK, 127 Fulton SlfMl General Ollice and Factories, HOBOKEN, N.I. 

> CHICAGO ST. LOUIS SAN FRANCISCO MONTREAL^ 



Ask to see our com- 
plete line at your 
Hardware dealer's. 




MAKE EXTRA MONEY 

with an 
IMPROVED SCHLUETER 
Rapid Electric, Ball Bearing, Floor Surfacing Machine 
Carpenters everywhere are 



getting into the floor 
surfacing business with 
this handy, easily op- 
erated, rapid, automatic 
machine which costs but 
little and does the work 
of six men. Requires no 
previous experience to 
operate and does its work 
faster and better than 
any machine on the 
market. Surfaces close 
up to the baseboard with- 
out use of edge roller. 
A Five Year Guarantee 
which has proven satis- 
factory to 20,000 users 
covers each machine. 
Write for prices and 5 
day free trial offer. 

M. L. SCHLUETER 



5 DAY 
TRIAL 




230 West Illinois St. 



Chicago, Illinois. 



Let WHITE handle the job FREE 

Use this famous combination instrument on your work 
NOW. Good contractors, builders and architects find it 
ideal equipment with its exclusive features. No loose parts. 
Protected spirit level (no in- 
verting). Powerful 2 5 diameter 
lens. Combination level bars 
and transit standards prevent 
inaccuracies. Simple, depend- 
able, thoroughly guaranteed. 
Get it on 

io Days FREE trial 

No obligation. Write TODAY 
for full particulars. 

DAVID WHITE CO., INC. 

904 Chestnut St., Milwaukee. 



'WHITE'S p&lVEL 

, SPECIALLY MADB rOA^lA&CARPEMTEflS 




START NOW! 
You Can Be 
Independent 

FIVE DAYS 
FREE TRIAL 

One fair sized job will pay 
for the "Ideal" Floor Sand- 
er. It is sold at a price you 
can afford to pay. In the 
five days you have the ma- 
chine on trial you can make 
enough to pay for it. 
The "Ideal" is a practical 
floor sanding machine built 
for continuous service. Sur- 
faces right up to base board. 
Motor can be detached for 
other work in a few seconds. 
Write today, and we will show you 
the "IDEAL" will save still another 

BOETTCHER COMPANY 




7iow 

15% 



440 N. Peoria St. 



Chicago, III. 



Key to the Steel Square 

by A. W. WOODS 
LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

This little device, 
booklet of in- 
structions, with 
case suitable for 
carrying in the 
pocket should be in the 
possession of every me- 
chanic whose work 
deals in angles. 

Nothing can go further 
in teaching how to use the 
common Steel Square, 
price, post paid, $1.50. 
post paid, $10.00. 




Retail 
In dozen lots 



ECONOMIZE ! : ! 

AUTOMATIC SASH HOLDERS 



Do 

Avyaj 

With 

Sash 
We i « htt jg 
Cords, Pulley*, 
Balances. Ktc. 




Eliminate 
Window 
Pockets 
Battling & 
Other Nui- 
sances. Save 



•Time & Labor. 
Send $1.25 for trial set prepaid. Mention weight. 
of sash when ordering. Address Dept. C. 

HARDWARE SALES CO., Inc. 

30 Church St.. New York City. Room 416 




"LIGHTING FIXTURES" 

READY TO HANG 
Direct from manufacturer. 
Completely wired including glass- 
ware. 
Send for Catalogue No. 26. 

(Just off the Press.) 
"Special proposition to Dealers. 

Erie Fixture Supply Co. 

NO. -2. ERIE, PA-- 




9-Piece 



Read this Description 



Soft Cotton Comforter— Good size, soft and 
thick scroll stitch. Filled with pure, sweet, 
sanitary white cotton, with a good wearing 
cambric cover, la rich floral design, both 
sides alike. Measures about 71 s 76 in. Weight 
about 6 1-2 lbs. 

Double Plaid Blankets— Fine texture wool 
finished double cotton blanket. Has carefully 
stitched shell binding. Made with wool-like 
finish produced by special process. Practically 
as warm as all-wool blankets. Popular color* 
lngs. Size about 66 x 80 in. Weight about 
S 1-4 pounds. 

Scalloped Bedspread — Magnificently cro- 
cheted. Made of a close woven long staple 
New England cotton yarn. Bleached to srow- 
flake white. Launders perfectly. Size about 
78x90 in. Weight about 3 1-4 pounds. Coiners 
cut out so spread will lie perfectly smooth and 
flat upon the bed. Overlooked stitch scal- 
loped edges. 

2 Sets 3-Pfece Lace Curtains— Attractive 
Dutch Design. Good quality Nottingham 
weave. Each curtain is a 3 -piece Bet. End 
curtains are about 2 1-4 yds. long and about 
24 in. wide. Center valance Is 24 in. wide. 
Made with beautiful lace edge and famous 
overlocked stitch edge. Come headed and 
ready to hangon the rod. Will fit any window 
up to 70 In. wide. White only. Launder per- 
fectly. 2 complete sets with each outfit. 
2 Bed Sheets— Seamed, extra heavy .bleached! 
to a snowy whiteness, nicely hemmed and 
beautifully finished. Size about 90 x 72 1-2 in. 
2 Pillow Cases — Same quality as sheets — 
bleached to pure snow -flake white, nicely 
made and beautifully hemmed. Will give long' 
service and will launder perfectly. Size about 
42 x 36 in. Shipping weight of entire outfit 
about 15 pounds. 
Order by No. C7G11A. $1.00 with coupon 



Free Bargain Catalog 

Shows thousands of bargains In furniture, 
jewelry, carpets, rugs, curtains, silverware, 
stoves, talking machines, porch and lawn 
furniture, crockery— all on easy terms, sent 
with or without order. See coupon. 



Bedroom Outfit 



Wonderful Bargain! A complete oufit of bed equipment— nine useful pieces— things 
you need— things every proud housewife ought to have— and the whole outfit costs you 
less than 50c a week, just $2.00 a month — surely you can easily save that much on 
other things! Mail the coupon today and we will send you all these 9 pieces on approval. 

30 Days Trial — $2.00 a Month 

When yon get this complete 9-piece bedroom outfit, nse it freely for thirty days. See foryour- 
Belf the beauty and quality of each piece. Note how the curtains and handsome bedding beautify 
your bedroom. Then, if not satisfied for any reason, return the set at our expense and wo will 
refund your $1.00 at once and any express or parcel post you paid. But if you decide to keep 
the set, start paying only $2.00 a month until you nave paid $19.95— payments bo low and so con- 
venient that you will scarcely know you spent the money. Think of the value. Such an amaz- 
ing bargain and your bedroom like new 1 If you were to buy these pieces singly they would cost 
you almost twice as much as we ask on this great combination offer. Could you duplicate this 



offer ever, anywhere for spot cash ? 
We've smashed the cash price while 
giving almost a year to pay. We trust 
honest people anywhere in the U. S. 
No discount for cash, nothing extra 
for credit. No C. O. D. 

SendNOW 

Don't delay — 
Just send $1.00. 
Remember, $1.00 deposit; then 
thirty days' trial; then your $1.00 
back if not fully satisfied. You do 
not risk one cent — read that 
coupon NOW! 

Straus & Schram 

Dept. 301 1 Chicago 



Straus & Schram, Dept 30II Chicago 

Gentlemen :— Enclosed yoa will find $1.00. Ship 
special advertised 9-piece Bedroom Outfit. I am to 
have 30 days trial. If I keep the outfit. I will pay 
balance at $2.00 per month. If not satisfied, I will re- 
turn the outfit within 30 days and you agree to refund 
my dollar and any express or parcel post charges I 
paid. Pieces not sold separately. 

D 9-Plece Bedroom Outfit No. C7611A. Si 9. 93. 



Name 

St.. R.F.D. 

or Box No 

Shipping 

Point 

Post 

Office. State. — 

If you want only our Free Catalog i . 

of Home Furnishings. Mark X here L_J 



There Is No Better Machine 
Made Than the 

Lightning Electric; 

Floor 
Surfacer 

If you are interested in Floor 
Surfacing Machines be sure 
to write for the literature 
on the "Lightning Electric" 
— the highest quality and 
most economically priced 
floor surfacer on the mar 
ket. Will do the work 
of six to eight men 
and do it better. 

No Old- 

Fashioned 

Side Roller 

The "Lightning Electric" will surface right up to 
quarter round without the use of the Old-Fashioned 
and cumbersome side roller. Leaves NO waves or 
chatter marks in the roughest floors— will NOT vibrate. 

Five Day Free Trial 
and Five Year Guarantee 

Write for our five day free trial and our five year guaran- 
tee on the best Floor Surfacing Machine the world has 
ever produced. Costs you nothing to investigate and the 
machine pays for itself the first month. A business making 
proposition for the contractor or individual— write today. 

National Sanding Machine Company 

Formerly The Globe Mfg. & Dist. Co. 

Sales OESicet 

543-545 Vedder St. Chicago, 111- 




MAYES' LEVELS 

At Reduced Prices 

"MAYES" Aluminum Levels 
Are Light, Accurate, 
and Durable. All Vials 
j^. are Permanently 
Marked Set Solid, 
and Protected 
jk by Outside 

Guaranteed 



EVERY 
LEVEL 




No. 2424, $4.50 

24" 4 gl. Alum. Level 

No. 2426 $4.80 

24" 6 gl. Alum. Level 

No. 2828 $5.35 

28" 6 glass Aluminum Level 

No. 3030 $5.65 

30" 6 glass Aluminum Level 



If your dealer cannot supply you, send your 
order to us, and dealer's name and address. 
You pay dealer when level is delivered. 



Mayes Bros. Tool Mfg. Company 



Port Austin, Mich. 



"Old Fashioned" Quality 




This Is— 

the best known adze in 
the U S. A. Why? Be- 
cause it is the best — no 
one ever questions that. 

Ask your dealer to show 
you one of them. Write 
its for prices. 



THE L. & I. J. WHITE CO. 

15 Columbia St. Buffalo, N. Y. 



CARPENTERS' 



Among some of the tables Included are those giving 
full length of common, hip, valley and jack rafters, 
also the cuts required for any of these pitches. In 
these tables are given 2700 different lengths of raf- 
ters, 300 different lengths of braces and the proper 
cuts for same. 

The layout of roofs, including complete roof 
framing, stair building, the use of the steel 
square, etc., and in fact all the up-to-date 
information and "SHORT CUT RULES" for 
every-day use in a first class flexible bound 
pocket edition, size 4|x7 inches. 

Sold direct by mail only $1.00 Postpaid. 

D. A. ROGERS 

3101 Lyndale So., Minneapolis, Minn. 



SOLD On EASY Payments 

Write for C ^ ^ ^ Tne woodcraft 

Our Plan 




Handiest, dandiest bench saw on the 
market. Write for circulars today. 

E. A. POPHAL MFG. CO. 

Eighth Ave., So., Wausau, Wis. 



WELLS 
HINGE 
GUAGE 




Every carpenter needs 
this tool. Superior to 
anything now on the 
market. Gives the working lines -which leave 
no unsightly marks after the door is hung. 
Adjustable to binges up to 4 inches. Guar- 
anteed or money refunded. $1.50 Postpaid. 
Manufactured oy 

WELLS, JOHNSON, ODLAND CO. 



Box 1103 



Glendale, Calif. 



How to Read 
Blueprints 

and Plans. 



How to Use 
the Steel 
Square Suc- 
cessfully. 



What You 
Should Know 
About Car- 
pentry and 
Building. 



How to Build 
a Frame or a 
Brick Struc- 
ture. 



What You 
Should Know 
About Sheet 
Metal Work. 



How To Be a 
Sue cessf ul 
Building Su- 
perintendent. 



What You 
Should Know 
About Heat- 
iug and Ven- 
tilating. 



How to Write 
and Read 
Buil ding 
Specifica- 
tions. 



What You 
Should Know 
About Water 

Supply and 
Drainage. 



HoW to Esti- 
mate the Cost 
of a Building. 



What You 
Should Know 
About Plas- 
tering and 
Painting. 



How to Know 
Material and 
Select the 
Best. 



How to Build 
of Concrete 
and Steel. 



How to Care 
for Tools. 




sand Things 
ht to Know 



EVERY day in your work you get iip-against new problems — 
sometimes it is only some old "sticker" coming in a new way. 
Just the same, though, it takes a lot of time to figure them out. 
Don't do it. Here's everything worked out for you. Every problem, 
big or little, that you will meet in a day's work. Hundreds of new 
ideas and better ways of doing things. Hundreds of ways the other 
fellows are making money. Hundreds of ways you can make more 
out of the same work you are doing now. 

THY AND 
CONTRACTING 

frive great big volumes flexibly bound in genuine American Morocco with 2,138 
pages and more than 1,000 blueprints, plans, pictures and diagrams. It is the 
newest, most complete, most practical work of its kind ever published. Twenty- 
five well known experts prepared these great books, gathering the material from 
hundreds of different sources. Every man in the shop and on the job should have 
them. Written in such plain language that anyone can understand them. 

7 Days' FREE Examination 

Send the coupon for these great Carpentry and Contracting books TODAY. You 
can't afford to be without them and you don't take any risk at all. The coupon 
brings the whole set by express collect for a week's free examination. Use the 
books a week and notify us to get them back if they don't please you. If you like 
them, send us only $2.80 and $3.00 each month thereafter until $19. SO is paid. 
If you prefer to pay cash with order, send only $17.80. The return privilege 
holds good just the same. Send the coupon NOW. Remember — sending for the 
books does not obligate you to buy. 

AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY, Dept. G-I36, Chicago 

i American Technical Society, 

• 

.• Dept. G=i36, Chicago. 

i 

' Please send me the flTe-rolume Cyclopedia of. 

• Carpentry and Contracting, shipping charges 
' collect. I will send you $2.80 in seven days and 
I $3.00 each month thereafter until $19. SO has 
' been paid, or return the hooks at your expense. 



■ w i ■"•■■■• Tot' - .',-.»»• '■' " '-w and „ 



I'srouitfS. *mi«» ;-«&.- itm*' 

■ ■; ..'. Mffl ^WIBJBtf 1.IA01HG 

■ run* "';»£!#• -mmmz 

1 (i'wnmos mum. . 



\ Name 

J 
i 

I Street and No. 

I 

! City and State 

I 
I 

I Reference 

I 
I 
I 

I (Please All in all lines.) 




Send for Catalog 



Plumbing, Heating and Pneumatic 
Waterworks Supplies at Wholesale 



When in the market for Plumbing, Heating and 
Pneumatic Waterworks Supplies and you wish to 

Save 20 to 40% on Every Article 

order from us. Small orders are as carefully 
handled as large ones. Only house selling guar- 
anteed plumbing and heating supplies to all. 



B. KAROL & SONS CO., 804 So. Kedzie Ave., Chicago, 111. 



| ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP 

MR. CARPENTER 
GET STARTED NOW 
IN BUSINESS 
FOR YOURSELF 

You can earn more money — and 
never be idle a day from work, 
during the cold weather, installing 

ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP 

We want an agent in your lo- 
cality and will help you to double 
your wages — 

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY 

Write for particulars 



ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP CO., 

227 W. Illinois St., Chicago, 111. 
GENTLEMEN : — Without obligation please 
send ine samples and literature. 



NAME 



ADDRESS 

CITY STATE 



YOU NEED A 
HUTHER DADO HEAD 




The adjustable groover 
that cuts with or across 
grain. Easily adjusted with- 
out the use of screws, just 
add or remove inside cut- 
ters to make the desired cut. 
May be returned if not satis- 
factory. Sent on approval. 

Write for our new cata- 
log No. 43, showing many 
special tools for your saw rig. 

Huther Bros. Saw Mfg. Co. 

Rochester, N. Y. 




MAKE MORE MONEY— Be the ROOFTRUSSEXPERT in Your Town 
You are trained free of cost. More roof trusses needed today than ever before. Let 
1925 be your best year. You may be in open territory. 

Fill out the coupon NOW — use a pencil. 

AMERICAN ROOF TRUSS CO,Tacoma Bldg., Chicago, 111. 



Please send Free Catalog and full information. 



Name 



Address 



BB 



Let Us Help 



Some of you carpenters find difficulty occasionally in 
deciding what design to use in laying wood-board over 
old plaster or new studding. 

It may bother you too in figuring out just how many 
panels of certain lengths and widths you will require. 

We'd like to help you if you'll let us. 

Cornell's department of "Plan and Design" is for the 
purpose of furnishing blue prints which will save you 
time, worry and money as these blue prints show you 
exactly how to lay "Cornell" attractively and' how much 
to order. 

Just send us room dimensions showing location of win- 
dows, doors, etc., and we'll do the rest. 

It will simplify your figuring if you ask us to send you 
a "Specification Sheet" which you can fill out with the 
information we need; then mail to us and in return 
you'll get the blue print without one cent of cost. 

This company is always eager to help any carpenter in 
any way it can. 

Please remember that. 

May we suggest that you send for a "Specification 
Sheet" so you will have it ready. 



CORNELL WOOD PRODUCTS COMPANY 

General Offices: 190 N. State St., Chicago 
Mills: Cornell, Wisconsin 










^ 



f/j 



>v *& 



/# jr 







Cuts Mortises 

Impossible Any Other Way! 

The Champion will do those difficult and 
intricate mortising jobs and do them quickly 
and easily. It never spoils material once it 
is properly clamped to stock to be mortised. 
In fact, it makes no difference whether the 
wood is hard or soft, thick or thin, end wood 
or knotty wood, the Champion cuts clean, 
smooth and ten times faster than with ham- 
mer and chisel. 



— simple and easy to operate. Carried any- 
where. Balanced fly wheel insures uniform 
cutting. Cuts mortises with smooth bottoms 
and sides, in any size, from \" to 11" and 
from a round hole to a 6" slot. Year's guar- 
antee with each machine. Price complete 
with any two bite (1" to I") $40.00 f. o. b. 
factory. Extra bits to 11", $2.00 each. 

Money Back Guarantee 

If not satisfied after ten days' trial, return 
machine at our expense and get your money. 
Send today. 

New illustrated bulletin describing our 
motor driven model sent free on request. 

Colgan Machinery & Supply Co. 

301 Hayden Bldg., Columbus, Ohio. 



Faster than Twenty 



hand 



saws! 




Parks "Old Re- 
liable" circular 
rip and cross-cut 
saw jointer and 
borer $175.00 f. 
o. b. Cincinnati. 



Sawing andplaning takes 90% 
of the time of hand-work. 

Let Parks "Old Reliable" do all 
the hard Avork. Save your time for 
the work machinery can't do. 

Out on the job and in your shop a Parks 
multiplies your production by three to 
five. With extra jointer and dado heads 
you can make any kind of special cuts. 
Write today for catalog and information. 

THE PARKS BALL BEARING MACHINE COMPANY 

1549 Knowlton Street, Cincinnati, 0. 

Canadian Factory: 200 Notre Dame East, 

Montreal, Can. 




WEATHERSTRIPS 


g^g|k ^ Install Fed - 


«Bj V. oral Metal 


W'eathe r- 


s trips and become 
a contractor. 




There is lots of 
money to be 




made by the i n- 




stallation of 




-Federal Metal 




Weatherstrip and 




we want you to 




be our agent in 




your locality. 

W o r k is now 
plentiful and you 








can build a nice 
business for your- 
self as a weath- 








erstrip contractor 




and become in- 




ll^v dependent. 


fe^- Write us to- 


us send you full information about 


this profitable business. 


FEDERAL METAL WEATHERSTRIP CO. 


1240 Fullcrton Ave. Chicago 




THE 

EXPERT'S 
CHOICE 
FILE 



Does twice the work of an ordinary file — in half the time. 
The Expert's Choice increases the value cf your time by 
over 50%. By spending 30 cents you can make it back 
on your first filing job alone. It's in the Quality — in the 
cut of the tooth and in the length of the stroke. 

Frank Luther. Chicago, says: "The Expert's 
Choice File flies 18 hand saws and Is cheaper at 
a cost of 50c than the ordinary file at any price." 
You get your money Back if the Expert's Choice does not prove 
to be the most economical file you have ever used. DELTA 
SAW FILES are made for fine or coarse teeth— also for that 
extra hard saw. Buy your tools of the dealer who sells 
Delta Files. He is the quality man. 

Trial Offer If your dealer cannot supply you, send us 20c, 
*"'** 25c or 30c for trial file, sent prepaid. Do 
this today — And out what a real file id 



"THE HIGHEST GRADE FILE MADE" 
D E LTA " H AN D S AW " F I L E S 



CARPENTERS SPECIAL' 



MECHANIC'S, FAVORITE' 



EXPERT S CHOICE """WWII 

DOES. TWICE THE WOBnN- HALF T HE TIME" £'^"\ 



DELTA 

FILE 

WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, 
PA. 



Look for 
This Sign 
at Your 
Hardware 
Store 



in 1 1 Ml in nihil mIm ii I in ri i, 1 1 1 1..| i ii i tin j 1 1 1 l 

WOODWORK! NG MACHIN ES 



lbs best Aupj Sit File nude — We will deliitr on receipt of 35 cab each. 




The American Woodworker 

Gasoline, Kerosene, or Electric Driven 
Used on the Job or in the Shop 

Let us send you our Bulletin No. 77 
describing this and other profit pro- 
ducers for the Carpenter, Contrac- 
tor and Builder. 

American Saw Mill Machinery Co. 

136 Main Street 
Hackettstown, N. J. 




A lock mortiser which- does a good clean job, not 
only eliminates the tedious handwork of the old way 
but does a better job in one-fifth of the time. 

Very easily attached to the door centering itself 
and held in place by clamps which will not marr 
the door. 

Carpenters are now making a big profit with this 
machine doing lock mortising and you can do the 
same. 

Interchangeable so that it can be operated by 
hand or electric power. 

WRITE TODAY FOR FULL PARTICULARS. 

MASTIN & McKAIN 

265 North Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 



FOR PERFECT 
U. S. Pat. 



LEVELING 



Cash Price 




Matchless for Accurate Plumbing 



The World's Greatest Level & Transit Combined 

The G & B JUNIOR 

Convertible Level 

CASH OR EASY TERMS 

Your money cheerfully returned if not perfectly 
satisfied after 10 Days actual trial. The Telescope has 
wonderfully clear and powerful lenses together with 
all other necessary features of an accurate reliable 
Convertible Level and Transit combined. Complete 
and ready for any job. 
Send TODAY for full information and for Circular E. 

GEIER & BLUHM, Inc. 
672 River St. Troy, N. Y. 



For Absolute Protection 

Use The 

ttffi) BOLT 

NIGHT LATCH 

An extra security on glass doors, as key may be turned once 
backwards, locking bolt so it can not be forced or knob turned 
without proper key. Easily installed on any door. Ask your 
dealer or write us djrect. 

INDEPENDENT LOCK CO., Leominster, Mass., U. S. A. 






When 

You Want 
The Best 
Ask For The 

GERMANTOWN 
MASTER 
BUILDER 

— for 

66 years the 3tandard of quality. 
If you cannot be supplied at your 
local dealer's, send for the Master 
Builder catalog of Hammers and 
Hatchets. 

Griffith Tool Works 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



C ETTA R 
SHINGLES 



MILLIONS of dollars in 
capital is back of the 
propaganda to popular- 
ize substitute material in place 
of the old, tried and unsurpass- 
able roof of Red Cedar Shingles. 

You owe it to yourself to boost 
a wood product which requires 
your skill in applying it and 
which, if of selected quality and 
laid with good, rust-resistive 
nails, means less expense, long- 
er service and greater satisfac- 
tion to your customers. 



Interesting shingle 
sent you on request. 



literature 



Accurate and Light 



This is the level you want for 
overhead work. It's so light you 
can use it all day without tiring. 
And it's handier to get hold of, too. 
You can read it from any angle, 
even in dim light. 

Its accuracy is permanently built 
in at the factory — you can depend 
on it, year in and year out. 

Favorite Everywhere 

Sand's Levels have made good on 
the job for thirty years. If you 
like good tools you'll appreciate 
the many advantages of a Sand's 
Aluminum Level. 

24" 6 Glass Aluminum $5.50 

Other sizes proportionately low. 
Also a complete line of wood lev- 
els for every purpose. 

Look for the Name "Sand's" 
It's on the Genuine 



At Good Hardware Stores Everywhere 

If. yours can't supply you, order direct, 
mentioning dealer's name. 

Sand's Level & Tool Co. 



5851 Fischer Ave. 



Detroit, Mich. 



Boost your own game! 
RID CEDAR SHINGLE BUREAU 

38 South Dearborn Street 
CHICAGO ILLINOIS 



PROTECT YOUR VALUABLE 
TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT 

Mark your tools, sheeting, 
scaffolding, ladders, wheel- 
barrows, tool boxes, etc. by 
branding them. Put your 
mark on everything you own. 

Use an Everhot branding 
outfit. Brands continuously. 
Just light the Everhot torch 
and a continuous flame keeps 
heating the branding iron 
while you use it. Not nec- 
essary to put back in a fire 
to reheat, as with ordinary 
branding iron. Marks your 
property quickly, cheaply, 
and for all time. Branding 
your tools and equipment is 
good advertising. 

The Everhot is also used for 
a soldering iron or blow 
torch. 

Special brand designs made 
to order. Write for descrip- 
tive circular and low prices. 





Manufacturing Co. 

MAVft'OOD. ILLINOIS 



QOO Tested 
Home Plans 

Save Money For 
Builder an*0\mer 

A new book containing 200 Home Plans test- 
ed in actual building, provides a wonderful 
new aid to contractors and borne builders. With 
this book it is now possible to estimate accu- 
rately the cost of building all types of homes. 

Model Homes — At Less Cost 

In fact by building from these plans, carpen- 
ters and contractors are able to make many 
snort cuts that reduce the cost of building. 
Keith's plans can be used with the fullest con- 
fidence that every detail has been proved by 
practice. Possibilities for costly mistakes have 
been eliminated and maximum economy of ma- 
terial and labor will be gained, thereby helping 
the builder to obtain contracts. . 

Special Offer 

This wonderful book will be sent you under 
a special offer to builders. With this De Luxe 
Plan Book, you receive a year's subscription to 
Keith's Magazine, the recognized authority on 
home building for twenty-five years. Just send 
your name and address and pay postman only 
$3 plus a few cents postage upon arrival. 
Write at once. 

KEITH CORPORATION 

100 No. 7th St., Minneapolis, Minn. 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 

Acting promptly under 
the terms of Mr. Keith's 
unusual offer, you will 
receive a year's subscrip- 
tion to Keith's Magazine, i 
which for 25 years has been j 
the recognizee! authority ' 
on home building. Yearly 
subscription price $2.30. 



Keith Corporation, 
I ICO No. 7th St., Dept. 15-A. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
' Send me "Beautiful Homes" De Luxe Edition and 
| year's subscription to Keith's Magazine. I will pay the 

• postman only $3 plus a few cents postage. 

I Name 

! Address 

| City . State 

• If you send $3 with order, book will be sent postage 
l prepaid. 





The UBA 

Au Adjustable Combination 
Level And Plumb That Can 
Be Applied To Any Length 
Straight Edge Or Board. The 
Level With An Instant Adjust- 
ment And Immediate Results. 

USE IT AND PROVE IT 



No Level Has Ever Been 
Made Before Combining 
As Many Advantages As 
The UBA For Heavy And 
Light Framing and In- 
terior Trimming. The UBA 
Is Durable, Simple, Guaran- 
teed and Rust Proof. It Is 
An Indispensable Utility Level 
And Plumb In All Branches 
Of Carpentry, 




Size 3.,x4 incl.es, 

Price $1.25 

Order Through Your Local 
Dealer O? Send Us Your 
Money Order And We WW 
Mail Direct To You. Mention 
Name Of Dealer, 

UNION LEVEL MFG. CO, 

4649 So. Ashland Ave,, 
Chicago, 111. 




You Do Service To 
Yourself And Employ- 
er When You Put A 
UBA Into Action. The 
UBA Is Thoroughly 
And Rigidly Inspected 
To Maintain The High 
Standard Of Quality The 
Mechanic Insists On. Fin- 
ished With White Or Green 
Double Marked Bulbs. 




fn Canada 

Have Tpur Dealer Qrcjer From 

the walk:ruille HARDWARE 

COMPANY, Ltd, 

(Wholesale Only) 

Walkerville, Ontario, Canada. 



UJetiel 
Turlington 




Adjusted to the Second 2 1 Ruby and Sapphire Jewels 
Adjusted to Temperature 25 Year Gold Strata Case 
Adjusted to Isochronsim y our choice of Dials 

Adjusted to Positions {Including Montgomery R. B. Dial) 

New Ideas in Thin Cases 




'DcnVn 



Only One Dollar Down will buy this masterpiece of watch 
manufacture. The balance you are allowed to pay in 
small, easy, monthly payments. The Burlington — a 21- 
Jewel Watch — is sold to you at a price much lower than 
that of other high-grade watches. Besides, you have the 
selection of the finest thin model designs and latest styles 
in watch cases. Don't delay ! Write for the FREE Watch 
Book and our SPECIAL OFFER today. 

//J***..-* WhilShis 
UJjllQSpedcdfm-tsts 

Get the Burlington Watch Book by sending this coupon. 
Find out about this great special offer which is being made 
for only a limited time. You will know a great deal more 
about watch buying when you read this book. You will 
be able to "steer clear" of the over-priced watches which 
are no better. Remember, the Burlington is sent to you 
for only One Dollar down, balance in small monthly pay- 
ments. Send the coupon for watch book and our special 
offer TODAY ! Do not delay one minute 1 



Burlington Watch Company 

Dept. 16-91, 19th St. &. Marshall Blvd., Chicago 

Canadian Address: 62 Albert St., Winnipeg, Manitoba 

Please send me (without obligations and prepaid) your free 

book on watches with full explanation of your $1.00 down 

offer on the Burlington Watch. 

Print name and address plainly 

IJjmc _ 



Address . 




1 "The Story of 
Oak Floors" 

from the earliest times to the present 

day, contains 24 pases of information and 

suggestions valuable to contractors and builders* 

This free book 

saves you time and money 

Can you figure quickly the amount 
of oak flooring required on a job? 

How to do it quickly and accurately is con- 
tained in this book, with table of exact percent- 
ages required for each width of flooring. Also 
grading rules for oak flooring; standard measure- 
ments, thicknesses and widths (illustrated full size) 
standard weights and counts; proper uses of dif- 
ferent grades; handling oak flooring; laying,, 
scraping, and finishing; how to advise the owner 
to care for oak floors. 

Suggestions in color sent FREE 

Our new book "The Story of Oak Floors" 
contains plates of the new color finishes which 
harmonize oak floors with walls, hangings, and 
drapes. This book is now being advertised to 
over 70,000,000 people. Asmanywillconsultyou 
about color finishes, we would like to send you 
your copy by return mail, postpaid, if you will fill 
out and return the coupon below. Write today. 

Oak Flooring Bureau 

1051 Ashland Block, Chicago \ 

Please send meyour free, illus- I 

trated books, "The Story of ' 

Oak Floors" and "How and i 

Where to Use Oak Floors." ' 



Name., 



Address., 




Save^urStrer$th 




EXCESS baggage may be all right in 
the baggage car but you don't want 
it in your tool chest. Get a Star- 
rett Combination Set. Here's a Rule, 
Square, Level and Plumb, Marking Gage 
with Scratch Awl, Height Gage, Depth 
Gage, Center Head, Bevel Protractor for 
finding Angles, Miter and a whole set of 
Try Squares. Light and compact, tak- 
ing up but little room in the chest or on 
the bench. Handy to use, accurate and 
built to last a lifetime. 

Get a Starrett Combination Set and save 
your strength, save your time, save your 
temper, AND SAVE YOUR MONEY. 
Several different styles and attachments 
to choose from. Priced right. Write for 
Catalog No. 23 "E" for complete de- 
scription of Starrett Builders' Tools. 

THE L. S. STARRETT CO. 

World's Greatest Toolmakers 
Manufacturers of Hacksaws Unexcelled 

Athol, Mass. 




Starrett Com- 
b i n a t i o n 
Square with 
Protractor 
and Center 
Head. 



7027 






You can work 

one handed 

with the 

"YANKEE" 

Quick-Return 

Spiral Ratchet 

Screw-driver 

No. 130-A 

The spring in handle 
keeps the bit in posi- 
tion. In narrow and 
deep places, where 
your left hand cannot 
hold end of driver, or 
where you must hold 
object you are working 
on, you'll be thankful 
for this feature. 

And the way the 
spring brings the han- 
dle back after each 
push saves your 
muscles. 

In you push it — 
back it comes of its 
own accord — in again 
— back it comes — 
that's the way to drive 
(or draw) screws. 

Three bits come with 
the tool. Special at- 
tachments may be bad 
for drilling and count- 
ersinking. 

No. 130-A Quick-Return— Stand- 
ard Size. 

No. 30-A Standard Size, with- 
out spring in 
handle. 

No. I3I-A Quick-Return — Heavy 
Pattern. 

No. 31 -A Heavy Pattern— with - 
out spring In 
handle. 

No. 135 Quick-Return — Light 
Pattern. 

No. 35 Light Pattern — with- 
out spring in 
handle. 

Dealer everywhere 
Sell " YANKEE" Tools 




Some other 
"Yankee" Tools 

Ratchet Hand Drills 
Automatic Push Drills 
Plain Screw-drivers 1J 
in. to 30 in. blades 



A Book for Carpenters 

Write for the "Yankee" Tool book that shows 
and describes all "Yankee" Tools. Free to you. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, U. S. A. 

^ANKEE"TOOLS 

972afc Better TTtech&mc* 



CARPENTERS 

EARN MORE MONEY 

Become A 

Foreman 

or 

Superintendent 

We will show 

you how! 

We have several 
opportunities for 
men as Foremen or 
Building Superintendents. You must 
have practical knowledge, but no matter 
what you've done you must at least un- 
derstand how to work with Blue Prints. 

If you have done building work, no 
matter how little, and understand the 
principles of construction, we will train 
you in Blue Print reading, so that you 
can be placed as a Building Superintend- 
ent. You will be boss of the job and 
draw a big fat pay envelope every week 
with steady work. 

"Write and make your application for 
training today. Here is your chance to 
earn more money. We will send FREE 
Blue Print and all details. 

COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL EST. 1904 

Dept. C-24, Drexel Bldg., Phila., Pa. 




WHY WORRY 

ABOUT A LEAKY ROOF WHEN IT 
CAN SO EASILY BE CURED BY 




REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 



BAYONNE 

IS GUARANTEED ABSOLUTELY 

WATERPROOF 

It has been used as a roof and floor 
covering on thousands of Piazzas, 
Sleeping Porches, etc., and is recog- 
nized by Carpenters and Builders the 
country over as the standard of Roof- 
ing Canvas. 

Write for sample book "T" 

JOHN BOYLE & CO., INC. 

ESTABLISHED I860 

DUAN^ST. NEW YORK RESIST. 
ERANCH 1317-1319 PINE ST. ST. LOUIS 




V & B Vanadium 
Hammers are the 
final accomplish- 
ment of fifty- 
three years of 
quality hammer 
manufacture. 

' Mi / Made from spe- 

/f , / cial V & B form- 
JKi ' i}3g ula vanadium 

cSr- steel, handle d 

^1„^ with the finest 

hand- shaved second growth white hick- 
ory, and individually inspected — they 
are uniquely superior. 

The octagon neck and round faced pat- 
tern are neat and practical, and the spe- 
cial non-slip claw firmly grips either a 
brad or a spike. 

The wax hole is an additional patented 
feature, especially appreciated by those 
who work with hard wood. 

The patented Vaughan's Expansion 
Wedge, with which this hammer is 
equipped, firmly locks the handle tight 
— and is absolutely positive insurance 
of a tight head at all times. 

A special shaped handle, and carefully 
designed head gives a hammer of min- 
imum vibration and nice balance — and 
a tool of particular merit. 

WATOHftM & BUSHMILL 
MANUFACTUBIMg COMPANY 

2114 Carroll Ave -v v Chicago, III. U.S.A. 





PLIERS 




Most carpenters swear by 
Klein's. They are made for the 
professional mechanic, not the 
amateur. A sturdy pair or two 
of Klein's is as necessary as a 
fine saw or a well balanced 
hammer. They are bought by 
the fellow who is particular 
about his tools. Ask to see a 
pair next time you are in a 
hardware store. 



Math 



tas 



KLEIN 



&s 



ons 







O (fenced] ons of 
Good Cammlm 

Ma ydole Hammers 



YOUR Grandfather — if he was a 
Master carpenter — used a 
Maydole Hammer. 

He found them the best ham- 
mers he could get 

YOUR Father — in his turn — 
would as soon have used a 
monkey wrench as any hammer 
but a Maydole. 

He, too, found Maydole the 
best hammer he could get 

YOU, most likely, prefer a May- 
dole Hammer — 

Because ifs still the best 
hammer that human skill can 
make. 



WRITE for Pocket Catalog No. 
A-23, Useful Information 
Book and The Story of Maydole 
Hammers. Free. 

The David Maydole Hammer Co. 
Norwich New York 



Ma ydole 
Haxmners; 

T4 94 




Reading Architects' 

BLUE PRINTS 




Learn at Home! 

THE building trades are booming. Em- 
ployers everywhere are looking for men 
who can read architects' blue prints. Splen- 
did salaries and rapid advancement are 
offered men who have this special training. 

There is an easy, delightful way to learn. 
The International Correspondence Schools 
will teach you right at home in an hour a day 
of the spare time that now goes to waste. 

You will like the course because it is so 
practical. You work on actual blue prints 
— the same blue prints a contractor would 
use if asked for an estimate, or a foreman 
would receive from a contractor. 

In a surprisingly short time you can ac- 
quire a knowledge of blue prints that will 
be of great value to you in a salary way the 
rest of your life. 

Mail the Coupon To-day! 



■TEAR OUT HERE > 



INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS 

BOX 8830-B SCRANTON, PA. 

Explain, 'Without obligating me, how I can qualify for the 
position, or in the subject, before which I mark X. 



^ARCHITECT 
Architectural Draftsman 
Architects' Blue Prints 
Contractor and Builder 
Building Foreman 
Concrete Builder 
Structural Engineer 
Structural Draftsman 
Plumber and Steam Fitter 
Heating and Ventilation 
Plumbing Inspector I 
Foreman Plumber 
Sheet Metal Worker 
CIVIL ENGINEER 
Surveying and Mapping 

_ ELECTRICAL ENGINEEll 

B Electric Lighting and Itys, 
Electric Wiring 
3 Telegraph Engineer 
3 Telephone Work 

MECHANICAL ENGINEER 

Mechanical Draftsman 

Toolmaker 

Machine Shop Practice . 
3 CHEMIST 
3 Pharmacy 

Name '. 



3 Navigation 

3 SALESMANSHIP 

3 ADVERTISING 

3 Window Trimmer 

3 Show Card and Sign Painting 

J BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

3 Private Secretary 

3 Business Correspondent 

3 BOOKKEEPER 

3 Stenographer and Typist 

3 Higher Accounting 

3 COMMERCIAL LAW 

□ Common School Subjects • 
Q Mathematics 

C GOOD ENGLISH 

□ ILLUSTRATING 

□ Railway Mail Clerk 
C CIVIL SERVICE 
C Mining Engineer 

□ Gas Engine Operating 
C STATIONARY ENGINEER 

□ Textile Overseer or Snpt. 
TRAFFIC MANAGER 
AUTOMOBILES IQSpanlsh 
AGRICULTURE I □French 

3 Poultry Raising §QRADIO 



Occupation 
& Employer. 

Street 

end No 



Business 

.Address _ 



City__ . State 

Canadians may send this coupon to Inter-national Corre- 
tpondencs Sotoois Canadian, Limited, Montreal, Canada 




This shows a house insulated with Cabot's 
Quilt, ready to receive the outside finish. 
Russell S. Walcott, Arch., Chicago, III. 

Build your Houses 
Like Fireless Cookers 

A fireless cooker keeps hot because it 
holds the heat. It cooks the food 
with only a fraction of the heat re- 
quired in a stove, because the heat in 
the cooker cannot escape. 



Insulating 



99 



6i 



keeps the whole house warm in the same 
way. It insulates the house as the cooker 
is insulated and prevents the heat of the 
heater from escaping through the walls and 
roof. It saves coal enough to pay for itself 
in two hard winters, besides keeping the 
house warm and comfortable for all time, 
and reducing doctor's bills. 

"Build Warm Houses 

It is Cheaper Than Heating Cold Ones" 

Sample of Quilt sent free 

SAMUEL CABOT, Inc. 
Mfg. Chemists 

6 Oliver St., 
Boston, Mass. 

24 W. Kinzie St., 
Chicago. 

Mail 

SV\\ this 

' coupon 

. Samuel Cabot, Inc., 6 Oliver St., Boston. 

■ 24 W. Kinzie St., Chicago. , 

• Send me free sample Cabot's Quilt and I 

• full information : j 




Name. 
Street. 



» Town State . 



WHERE DO YOli BUY YOUR TOOLS? 

Don't you often find it difficult to procure some particular 
tool or style of hardware in the smaller stores? Since 1848 we 
have sold only tools of the highest quality bearing the "Trade 
Mark" of well known reputable manufacturers, all leaders in 
their particular lines, such as: 

HENRY DISSTON & SONS— Saws 

C. HAMMOND — Hammers and Hatchets 

BUCK BROS. — Chisels and Gouges 

Genuine RUSSELL JENNINGS Auger Bits 

YANKEE TOOLS — Hand Drills, Screwdrivers, etc. 

MILLERS FALLS CO. — Bit Braces and Tools 

You can save money* by buying your Tools and Hardware here. All 
members of The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners are 
entitled to a TOKEN entitling them to special prices in our store. 
This token may be had upon presentation of the attached coupon and 
your Union card. Call at your earliest convenience for yours. It's 
worth money to you. 

THE MOST COMPLETE LINE OF TOOLS 
& HARDWARE FOR ALL TRADES IN NEW YORK 





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DARK HENSON, of Liberty, Mo., has been 
shown the value of using machines of the 
proper size and taking them to the job. He 
moves his Wallace Universal Saw and his 
Wallace 6" Jointer to every construction job as 
soon as the foundation is in. 

He says he saves more than $100 on every 
$5000 house by using Wallace Machines not only 
for ordinary sawing and planing operations, but 
for making built-in buffets, bookcases, and man- 
tels right on the job saving a large part of the 
usual mill cost. He just hooks in on the nearest 
light circuit and is ready to operate. 

Easy Terms if Desired 

Wallace Portable Ma- 
chines can be obtained on 
easy terms with small cash 
payments, and frequently 
pay for themselves before 
they are paid for. 




Wallace Universal Saw 

Takes power from any light 
circuit ; rips or cross-cuts 
stock up to 2" thick at single 
or double angle ; dados, mold- 
ing, grooving. Absolutely ac- 
curate. Direct drive — 
no belts. 




Wallace 6" Jointer 

Takes power from any 
light circuit ; absolutely 
accurate ; will joint or rab- 
bet, cut molding, window 
sash, window stops, stair 
treads, beading. No belts. 
Direct drive. 

Wallace Universal Saw 
Wallace Plain Saw 
Wallace 6" Jointer 
Wallace b" Planer 
Wallace IS" Band Saw 
Wallace 6" Lathe 
Wallace Glue Pot 

automatic heat control 
Wallace Solder Pot 

automatic heat control 
Wonder Disc Sander 
Wonder Spindle Sander 



Send to-day for Catalog 402C and Price List 

J. D. Wallace & Co. 



154 S. California Ave., 



Chicago, III. 



Own Your Own-Make More Money 




it to you 



This instrument will add immeasurably to 

your efficiency and put you in the big builder class — • 
will do more to increase your business, income and 
prestige than any investment you ever made. The 
Aloe Convertible Level is the world's best — a com- 
bination of both level and transit and quickly converted to 
either. Very accurate — satisfies the most exacting — yet so 
simple that anyone can use it. 



FREE 
TRIAL 



Aloe Convertible Level * Transit-Combined 




EFFICIENCY 

Discard old, in- 
accurate methods. 
Don't rent an in- 
strument; don't hire 
others to level and 
plumb; do it your- 
self, faster, better, 
money. 




UTILITY 

You can use it for leveling 
foundations, walls, piers or 
streets — to run straight lines for 
ditches — boundary lines for 
fences — surveying lots and fields 
— plumbing walls, shafts and 
pillars. 

ACCURACY 

An instrument of ut- 
most precision. Takes 
sights either above or be- 
low the horizontal. Prac- 
tical for a hundred uses. 

You Learn To Use It In An 

No technical knowledge needed — no experience necessary. With 
our plain and complete instruction book, included free, you can put 
the instrument to use at once. It is simple in construction and opera- 
tion. Will do more to bring you success than years of plodding. 

Free Trial— Easy Terms 

Just $5.00 brings it to you complete— on 10 days' tE?fflH?B 

trial. If perfectly satisfied pay the balance in B* §K ■• P 

easy monthly installments-. Use it while you pay. ■» m%M*M* 

It earns money faster than the easy monthly pay- BOOKLFT 
ments come due. v****** a 



GET THIS BOOK— * 

Be alert to this great opportunity! Don't let 
negligence rob you of this chance — it may be the 
turning point in your career. Fill in the Coupon, 
mail it NOW and get your Free copy of our booklet, 
"Be A Bigger Builder," that tells you how to in- 
crease your income and standing. Success comes to 
the energetic. In fairness to yourself — investigate. 

A. S. ALOE CO. «H£ffl£T- 




MAIL coy PQ nIfor it 



A. S. ALOE CO., 624 Olive St.' 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Without obligation, send me your FREE 
book, "Be a Bigger Builder." Also full par- 
ticulars about the Aloe Convertible Level 
and details of your easy payment plan. 

Name. 



Address . 




You can saw and nail 

it the same as lumber 

Ques. I understand that Sheetrock is made from 
gypsum. Is it easily cut? 

Ans. By a special process, Sheetrock is made 
easy to cut. It saws and nails the same 
as lumber. 

Ques, What kind of nails are used with Sheet- 
rock? 

Ans. When nailing direct to supports, three- 
penny cement coated common nails (flat 
heads) make a good job. On old plastered 
walls, not furred, use the six-penny size. 
All nails are driven home. 

Ques* Will Sheetrock walls stay smooth and flat? 

Ans. Yes. Sheetrock won't warp or buckle 
because it is made from rock — not wood, 
pulp or paper. 

Ques, What about the fire-resistance of Sheet- 
rock? 

Ans. The Underwriters' Laboratories have 
tested Sheetrock for fire-resistance and 
their "Inspected" seal is on every Sheet- 
rock board. 



f 



T> C You'll find many other valuable (1 

•*■ ♦ ^* points about Sheetrock construe* 1 1 
tion described in the free Sheetrock Time 

Book. Mail this coupon today for your copy! I 



UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

General Offices: Dept. I, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 

Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. 



SHEETROCK 

The FIREPROOF WALL BOARD 

Mail this coupon today 



United States Gypsum Company 

Dept. I, 205 W. Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 
Send my SHEETROCK Time Book to— 



(Name) 



(Complete Address) _.... -- 

Sheetrock is inspected and approved as an effective barrier to fire by the Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. 






ATKI 



SILVER 
STEEL 



The March Of Progress 

In this age of progress 
the aits, sciences and in 
dustry, there is no other 
tool used by carpenters, 
mechanics and artisans 
that has reached the 
perfection of the 
Atkins Four Hun- t 
dred Saw. 



\" 




Years 
of Experience 



.j." . '' In our factories, this perfection 

>" has been obtained through years of 

«- ,.- study by metallurgists with expert 

mSP* knowledge of scientific heat treating, 

|P and by craftsmen skilled in the work of 

making saws to meet the definite needs of 

the times. 

"The Finest on Earth" 

The Elite of the Saw World, a saw extraordinary in 
quality and workmanship. Blade of SILVER 
STEEL which insures long wearing and edge-hold- 
ing qualities, two-way taper ground, mirror polish; 
fitted with Rosewood Handle, Improved Perfection 
Pattern — the handle that prevents wrist strain. 

Write for our Saw Sense book which ilius- 
tygte-s and describes Ihis and other pat- 
terns of Atkins Saws and Tools. Enclose 
o't cents for nail apron and carpenters' pencil. 

E. C. ATKINS & COMPANY 

Established 1857 The Silver Steel Saw People 

Machine Knife Factory: Home Office and Factoiy: Canadian Factory: 



Lancaster, N. Y. 



Indianapolis, Ind. 



Hamilton, Ont. 



BRANCH HOUSES 
Atlanta Memphis New Orleans Portland Seattle Paris. France 

Chicago Minneapolis New York San Francisco Vancouver. B. C. Sydney N. S. W. 



It's useful and it's free! 




You'll find the Sheetrock Time Book mighty handy for keeping a record 
of working time and figuring wages. It also has a lot of up-to-the-minute 
construction data. This valuable little 48-page book is free to carpenters 
and builders. Mail the coupon today for your copy. 

SfieetrocJc comes in standard sizes : % inch thick, 32 or 48 inches wide and 6 to 10 feet long 

UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

General Offices: Dept.4, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 

Reg. O. S. Pat. Off. 

SHEETROCK 

The FIREPROOF WALIBOARD 

Mail this coupon today 

United States Gypsum Company 

Dept.4, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 
Send my SHEETROCK Time Book to— 

(Name) 

(Complete Address) , _ 

Sheetrock is inspected and approved as an effective barrier to fire by the Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. 



Go get it 

SOME people kick because things don't come 
their way. The live ones don't "Wait"; 
they go and get it. 

We know of carpenters on idle days who have 
used their time profitably by suggesting to home 
owners many improvements to the house which 
the owners have wanted but didn't know what 
to do to accomplish it. 

Give these people a call. Suggest paneling the 
kitchen with Cornell Tile Board; the living-room 
with Super Cornell; the garage with "Cornell." 

We'll help you by furnishing free blue prints of 
the rooms showing how to lay "Cornell" in 
attractive designs. 

We'd like to help every carpenter in any way we 
can to a bigger, better New Year. 

You Push the Button. 



CORNELL WOOD PRODUCTS COMPANY 

General Offices: 190 N. State St., Chicago 
Mills: Cornell, Wisconsin 



^<^- 











Edge-holding is 
/■ ".* the. wor^thert des- 
: ' cti hpB 8 siftonds. Blue ' 
■ gibbon '0\m Hand -Saws. 
-.They cut fast drid- 
nm&\ h , hang r ight and.-: 
'e : a reciter'; sats s fact? on . 



;d£tjietf r to\s}iow you . 



Fitchburg, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. Chicago, .III. 





Here's A 



Have you seen the new improved 
Barrett Giant Shingles? 

They're extra large (12x14 inches) . Far 
thicker than the ordinary asphalt 
shingle. They're handsomer, more 
rugged. 

Giant Shingles can he laid quickly. 
With their 12-inch width — the maxi- 
mum width that can be satisfactorily 
fastened with two nails — fewer shin- 
gles are required per square. 

"While Giants are ideal for new con- 
struction, they're specially adapted for 



re-roofing. Because of their extra, 
weight and rigidity, they can be nailed 
down right over the old worn-out roof. 
This saves time, trouble and money. 

Giants never rot or rust — never need 
painting or staining. Moreover, they're 
fire- safe — proof against flying sparks 
and embers. 

They come in soft red, moss green and 
blue-black. Any man who takes pride 
in his work — who wants to give his 
customers a handsome, permanent, 
maintenance-free roof — will use Bar- 
rett Giant Shingles. 




ROOFINGS 



A Valuable Free Book 



"Better Homes from Old Houses" gives 
ideas for remodeling old-fashioned houses 
into handsome modern homes. Thousands 
of dealers are putting this practical book 



into the hands of owners of old houses — 
and supplying the materials needed when 
the alterations start. Send for your sample 
copy — it's a business builder. 



THE BARRETT COMPANY, 40 Rector St., New York. 

Please send me free sample copy of your business-building book — "Better Homes from Old Houses.' 
Tiie address of my building supply dealer is given below. 



Your Name Your Dealer's Name. 



Your Address Dealer's Address 

Town State 



I • • - III I 







Sent Free 

Mail the Coupon for these 2 Books 
and Blue Print Plans 

If you are in any building trade, we want to send you these 2 books and 
blue prints at our expense. One of these books contains a lesson in Plan 
Reading prepared by the Chicago Tech. experts; the other explains the 
Chicago Tech. method of training men by mail in the building trades for 
the jobs that pay the most money or for businesses of their own. All you 
have to do to get them is to mail the coupon. Don't send a penny. 

Get the Knowledge that Will 
Make You 



You may be as good a man as there is in 
the use of tools but as long as you re- 
main a workman you won't earn more 
than the wage scale. It isn't manual 
skill that puts a man in the big pay 
class — it's the ability to use his head 
that brings the fat pay check or enables 
him to "go in for himself." That has 
been proved over and over again by 
workmen who took the Chicago Tech. 
training in the higher branches of build- 
ing and are now foremen, superintend- 
ents and contractors. 

J. B. Woodside of Oklahoma was a car- 
penter working for $6 a day when he 
took a course in training by mail at Chi- 



cago- Technical College and was ad 
vanced to a foremanship, in 2 months, 
became a superintendent 5 months later 
and then went into contracting. 
Carl Testroat of Iowa is another man 
who got into a successful contracting 
business through this training as did J. 
G. Hart of West Virginia, and C. W. 
Busch of Kansas. 

Not only have workmen got ahead 
through this instruction but also con- 
tractors who were taking on small jobs 
because their experience was limited. 
Chicago Tech. has taught them how to 
handle the big jobs that pay the most 
money. 



Train by Mail 

Become a Building Expert 

Never before have there been such op- 
portunities as there are right now for 
men with expert knowledge of building. 
You can get ready for these big oppor- 
tunities if you will use some of your 
spare time to study at home under the 
direction of the Chicago Tech. experts. 
No time taken from your present work. 
All this will be explained when we send 
you the free books and blue prints. 

Plan Reading. Every man who has got 

very far ahead in any building trade can 

read blue prints. No man can expect to 

be a first rate foreman or 

superintendent until he 

knows what every line on 

a plan means and how to 

lay out and direct work 

from the architect's plans. 

By the Chicago Tech. 

Method you quickly learn 

to read any plan as easily 

as you read these words. 



DO YOU KnOW- 



Estiniating. Of course a 
man who Avants to be a 
contractor or to hold a big 
job in a contracting organ- 
ization must know how to 
figure costs of labor, ma- 
terial, and everything else 
that goes into any kind of 
building The Chicago 
Tech. course covers every 
detail of this important branch — tells 
you just how it is done from actual 
blue print plans. 

Superintending. How to hire and direct 
men, how to keep track of every detail 
of construction as it goes on, how to get 
the work done in the least time at the 
lowest cost is also fully covered in the 
Chicago Tech. Builders' Course. 



— how different materials 

are shown on blue 

prints? 
— how "sections" and 

"elevations" are shown 

on the plans? 
— how to lay out a build= 

ing from the plan? 
— how to take off quan= 

tities from the plan? 
— how to figure building 

costs? 
— why some lines on 

plans are shown dotted 

and others full? 



Also special courses in Architectural 
Drafting for builders, taught by prac- 
tical men. These explained in Special 
Catalog "D" sent on request. 

Don't Let Your 
Chance Slip Away 



and see that a job of building or some 
important part of a big construction pro- 
ject is done right and finished on time. 
Read the questions in the space below. 
Whether you will make a big success in 
the building business or not depends on 
Avhether you can answer these and many 
other question about building plans and 
specifications, that are all made very 
clear and easy for the Chicago Tech. 
home-study student. 

Only Part of Your 
Spare Time Required 

Getting this Chicago Tech. training does 
not mean quitting your work. If you live 
in Chicago, you can come to the evening 
classes at the College. If 
you don't live here, you 
can have the same instruc- 
tion by mail that you 
would get if you were on 
the ground. You get the 
same lessons — you are 
taught by the same ex- 
perts. The only difference 
will be that the lessons 
are sent by mail instead 
of given in person. 

Stay on your job. Draw 
your regular pay. But put 
in a few hours a week of 
your spare time to pleas- 
ant, interesting home 
study under the direction 
of experts of the Chicago 
Technical College. 

Hundreds of top-notch builders, superin- 
tendents and contractors, owe their suc- 
cess to this practical home-study course. 
There are 31 lessons and many sets of 
blue print plans in the complete course. 

Send the Coupon-Now 

It costs nothing to get the pay raising informa- 
tion which we will gladly send on request with 
the free Books and Blue Print Plans. We will 
explain clearly and completely how men, who 
had no better cbances than you, are stepping 
into higher positions or becoming independent 
in businesses of their own. Mail the coupon 
today. 



I Chicago Technical College, 

Dept. 239, Chicago Tech. BIdg., 
I 118 East 26th Street, Chicago, III. 



If you don't make a bigger income this . 
year than you have ever made in your I 
life it is because you will not prepare for ■ 
the jobs that are open to every trained I Name 
man in your trade. . 

Not only are good workmen needed but 
there is a demand far beyond the supply | 



Please send me your Free Books and Blue Prints 
for men in the Building Trades. Send postpaid 
to my address below. 

Write or print name plainly. 



Address 



City State. 



for men who can read plans, figure costs 



J, Occupation 



H ZOVRl KEY-SET STORE FRONT CONSTRUCTION 



A Ztouri indirect Key-Set window is a 
mighty fine reference for contractors. It 
has distinction and quality. Other store 
keepers like it — and come to the contrac- 
tor. Remember — Zourijobs are easier 
to handle — and pay most profit. 

free — our big, free, illustrated book showing the newest and 
best styles of modern ivindoivs and store fronts, also thoroughly 
explaining the popular Zouri Sajety Key-Set construction. Write 
for your copy today. 



®pra lOSpffFteMg, ©©map®!' 



Factory and General Offices 
1608 East End Ave. Chicago Heights, 111. 



LISTED BY THE UNDERWRITERS LABORATORIES 



'ontractors -Home 

Save Money By 

Building From 

Tested Plans 




A new book contains 200 Home Plans tested in 
actual building, provides a wonderful new aid to 
contractors and home builders. With this book 
it is now possible to estimate accurately the cost 
of building all types of homes. 

Model Homes — At Less Cost 

You are shown many short cuts that reduce 
the cost of building. Keith's plans can be used 
with the fullest confidence that every detail has 
been proved by practice. Possibilities for costly 
mistakes have been eliminated and maximum 
economy of material and labor gained. 

Special Offer 

This wonderful book will be 
sent you under a special offer to 
builders. With this De Luxe Plan 
Book, you receive a year's sub- 
scription to Keith's Magazine. 
Just send your name and ad- 
dress and pay postman only $3 
plus a few cents postage upon 
arrival. Write at once. 

KEITH CORPORATION, Architects 
100 N.7th St.,Dept.l5-B,IVIinneapo!is,Minr 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 

Acting promptly un- 
ier the terms of Mr. 
Keith's unusual of- 
fer, you will receive 
a year's subscription 
to Keith's Magazine, 
which for 25 years 
lias been the recog- 
nized authority on 
home build ins. 
Yearly subscription 
! price $2.50 



KEITH CORPORATION, Architects, Dept. 15-B, 
I ICO N. 7th St., Minneapolis, Minn. 

J Send me "Beautiful Homes" De Luxe Edition and year's 
I subscription to Keith's Magazine. I will pay the postman 

■ only $3 plus a few cents postage. 

■ Name 

' .,„ 

I Address „ 

s City .I..:..:: ' State 

I (Ifyousend$3with order, book will be sent postage prepaid.) I 




The best known small home near Chicago 
has a roof of Winthrop Tapers 

Probably no small home ever was in the public eye more 
than this Chicago Daily News Model Home built in the 
suburb, River Forest, to demonstrate right construc- 
tion and good materials to home builders. For this 
Model Home the supervising architect selected, without 
any solicitation, the distinctive, durable and beautiful 
Winthrops. 




Tapered Asphalt Shingles 



The strongest quality feature ever put into any slate-surfaced asphalt 
shingle is the exclusive, distinctive taper found only in the Winthrop. 
Snuggled close to the roof they offer the greatest thickness where exposed 
to weather and possible fire brands. 

These thick butts, due to extra coats of asphalt on both sides of the heavy 
felt core, cast the attractive shadow lines that made the old wooden 
shingles popular. Deeply imbedded crushed slate gives the outside surface 
beautiful and lasting colors — tile-red, sea-green, blue-black and golden-buff. 
We want you to have a free sample of this beautiful shingle, to feel and 
see its goodness and beauty for yourself. Just tell us what color you'd 
like to have. 

Beckman - Dawson Roofing Company 

838 F. C. Austin Bldg., ill W. Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 
Factories at Argo, Illinois, and Detroit, Michigan 



Spiral -Ratchet 
Screw Driver 

Price S 2«80 



The improved 
positive lock-nut 
permits auto- 
matic driving or 
draw in g ; will 
instantly convert 
■Into a ratchet 
screw driver, or 
will lock it rigid- 
ly for use as a 
p I a i n screw 
driver. Beveled 
edges prevent 
finger -pinching. 



S t ee 1 spiral 
nuts and steel 
s p i r a I, ma- 
chined at a 20 
degree angle. 




Automatic 
screw driver 

Perfected with 
new features 



THE action for automatically driving" or 
drawing- a screw is controlled by the 
shifter knob on the ferrule. 

Should you wish to use this tool as a plain 
screw driver or as a right or left-hand ratchet 
screw driver, merely drop the spiral to the 
lowest position, and set the lock nut so that 
none of the spiral appears. Then you can 
obtain the ratchet action by simply turning 
the shifter knob left or right, and the plain 
screw-driving action by turning the shifter 
knob to the centre position. The blade is 
locked so that screws can be either drawn or 
driven. 

The spiral nuts and the steel spiral are made 
of hardened steel, milled at a twenty-degree 
angle. Three tool-steel blades — hardened, 
tempered, and polished — are provided. 

Length extended, with blade in place, 18 
inches. Length closed, without blade, 10 
inches. Weight, 14 ounces. 

Other tools for carpenters 

The Goodell-Pratt Catalog No. 15 shows the entire line of 1500 
Good Tools — made by skilled toolsmiths for skilled workmen. 
Write for a copy. The catalog is free to carpenters. 

GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY 

GREENF.ELD, MASS., U. S. A. 



Makers of Mr. Punch 



GOODELL-PRATT 



1500 GOOD TOOLS 



*300 a Month Salary 
$ 450 on the Side at Home 




Chief Draftsman DOBE 



That's the kind of money my drafting 
students make. Read what this one says: 

"As a beginner I am doing fine. Am earning a 
salary of $300 per month, besides I made over $450 at 
home the last two months, drawing plans for private 
parties. The practical drafting training you gave me 
by mail put me where I am in less than six month's 
study. Thank you for all your personal interest and 
help you gave me so far.- ^^ JR 

(Name and Address upon request.) 



I Guarantee! 

Mail Free Coupon Below 

Write and I'll tell you how I make 

you a first-class, big -money -earning drafts- 
man in a very few months! I do this by a 
method no other man nor institution can 
imitate. I give you personal training at home 
by mail. And I mean just what I say. I train 
you until you are actually placed in a posi- 
tion paying from $250 to $300 a month. Six thousand 
draftsmen are wanted every month. Hurry up and 
register so you can start earning. 

FREE Draf ting Outfit and 
Drafting Table 

And more— I give you a whole set of drafting tools 
the minute you become my student. You get every 
t jol you need. A magnificent Drafting Table and set 
of instruments with which to build your success in 
draftsmanship. 

Take this offer now— while it is open. Remember — 
the draftsmen goes up and up to the fabulous incomes 
of engineers and architects. And I start you on this 
road— start you personally and stick by your side until 
success is yours. 

Free Book! 

Send Coupon TODAY WW 

No matter what plans you have for the future. Get 
this great book — "Successful Draftsmanship." Find 
out about the simply marvelous opportunities ahead 
now. How the world needs draftsmen, engineers, 
architects and builders. What great salaries and pos- 
sibilities there are! Send coupon for free book today. 

Chief Draftsman Engineers Equipment Co. 

1951 Lawrence Ave., Div. 16-92 Chicago, Illinois 



To Train Yon Until You Are 
In a Position Paying 
',50 to $300 a Month 




Chief Draftsman Engineers Equipment Co., 

1951 Lawrence Ave., Div. 16-92 Chicago, Illinois 

Without any obligation whatsoever, please mail your book, 
"Successful Draftsmanship", and full particulars of your 
liberal "Personal Instruction" offer to a few students. 




Name. 



.Age. 



Address , 

Post Office State. 




MILLERS FALLS 

i TDDL5 1 




Why do carpenters like 

Millers Falls Spiral 
Ratchet Screw Drivers 

so well? 

Here are 5 reasons: 

1. Beautiful appearance; a tool any 
man will be proud to add to his kit, at 
home or on the job. 

2. Ease of operation; free working 
spiral; practically noiseless. 

3. Superior shifting arrangement. To 
drive a screw, turn to the right ; to draw 
a screw, turn to the left. Set shifter at 
O for action as a rigid screw driver. Set 
lock and it becomes a ratchet screw 
driver. 

4. Long life of good work. New — but 
in its first 14 months it has stood the 
test in the hands of thousands of me- 
chanics. 

5. The better the tool, the better the 
work ; the better the work, the better off 
the workman. 

Have you tried it yet? Two styles, with 
and without Automatic Return ; three 
sizes. Lots of good hardware dealers 
are ready to show them to you. 

MILLERS FALLS COMPANY 
Millers Falls, Mass. 



m 



28 Warren St. 
New York 



9 So. Clinton St. 
Chicago 




''Plasfer on Ce I of ex 

"Celofex 

^Base board 

', '/t plaster ground 

(Finish Floor 
\Paper7 1 



; > YRouqh Floorina lo id djaqonol thruouf 

-Header" \ First Floor,' Joists - 16" o.c. 

" ••"'• .'.' ' .' \ 2"X4" Set in between jqis+s 
Beam FS II \ / fprVwi ilKnq cf Celotex 



j. i ?/ii -MZelotex oh 

Basement Wall basement ceil. 



-..:., :-^-;:..;*^ : -;-i:>":C/T\-- 



WOOD SIDING JON ; 
>A/OOD FRAMING 



t will pay you to know 
how to apply Celotex 

You'll get more jobs where Celotex Insulating Lum- 
ber is used this year than ever before. A forceful 
md extensive advertising campaign will tell home 
Jwners, architects and contractors everywhere about 
the advantages of Celotex homes. Home builders in 
pour own locality will read about Celotex in the 
Saturday Evening Post, House & Garden, House 
Beautiful and in their newspaper. They will use 
t in their homes. 

Carpenters who can work with Celotex will be 
more in demand than ever. 

It's easy to apply Celotex — but mighty important to do 
;he job right if your work is to give permanent satisfaction, 
t will pay you to study the blue print diagram above and 
:o read tbe specifications at the right carefully. They show 
1 frequent use of Celotex. And your work on this kind of 
1 job will be right if you follow the few simple points ex- 
dained there. 

Send for complete specifications free 

This is only one of many places where you will find Celotex 
xsed on your jobs. Others will be shown here each month. 
n the meantime, be prepared. Send for our booklet of com- 
pete specifications. It's free to every carpenter. Mail the 
:oupon below for your copy, today. 

Fhe Celotex Company 645 N. Michigan Ave. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Specifications 
for the use of Celotex 

As exterior sheathing and in- 
sulation and as plaster base 
and insulation for frame 
buildings with wood siding 

Framing: The sills, studs and plates 
shall be framed as in ordinary house 
construction, taking precaution, how- 
ever, to space the studs 16" on cen- 
ter. Any odd space required to make 
the over-all length should be located 
at one end or near the middle. Wher- 
ever it is necessary to have a hori- 
zontal joint in the Celotex, a 2"x2" 
or 2"x4" header shall be cut in be- 
tween the studs. No special framing 
or bracing is necessary other than is 
usual in frame construction. 

For ceilings, additional headers 
shall be cut in between the joists, not 
over 48" on centers, or the joists shall 
be securely bridged. 
Application : For sheathing, the Celotex 
boards shall be applied vertically directly to 
the wood frame work, without the use of 
wood sheathing, and set in place so as to 
have a bearing for nailing along the edges. 
When necessary to use more than one course 
of Celotex to cover the height of tbe build- 
ing, vertical joints shall not meet on the 
same stud. 

For walls, Celotex boards shall be applied 
vertically, to the studs. For ceilings, 
Celotex boards shall be applied lengthwise 
of the joists. For both walls and ceilings 
the boards shall be placed so as to have a 
bearing for nailing along all edges. 

Leave 3-16" space between adjoining 
boards, also at top and bottom of boards. 
Around window and door frames, or where 
a snug joint is desired, the Celotex shall be 
brought to moderate contact. DO NOT 
FORCE INTO PLACE. 

Nailing : Nail the Celotex, beginning at top, 
to intermediate studs ; then entirely around 
all edges of each board to studs, sills, plates 
or headers. Use standard 1£" roofing nails 
with |" heads. Space nails 4" apart, driv- 
ing nails until the heads are flush with the 
surface of the Celotex. Nails shall be placed 
approximately |" from the edge of the 
boards. 

Side walls : If wood siding is to be used, 
apply it directly over Celotex, nailing 
through Celotex to the studs. Siding boards 
shall butt over studs. 

Plaster grounds : Apply J" grounds over the 
Celotex, nailing back to studs. 



The Celotex Company, Dept. 22 
645 N. Michigan Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. 

Please send me your free specifi- 
cations for carpenters. 




JERSEY 




When Screen Time Comes 

WILL you get your share of the business repairing 
the window, door and porch screens that folks 
put away in their cellars or storerooms last Fall ? There 
will be a good many that will need new cloth, because 
they were not made with Jersey Copper Screen Cloth. 
Why not look up this work before the Spring rush? 

And when you repair those screens, will you be able to 
assure your customers that they will not have to renew the 
screen cloth every year or so ? You will, if you use Jersey. 

Jersey Copper Insect Screen Cloth cannot rust because it 
is made of copper 99. 8% pure. Jersey has a decided 
advantage over ordinary copper cloth, because the wire 
used in weaving it is made by a special Roebling process 
which gives it tensile strength and stiffness comparable to 
that of steel. In 16 mesh, it is a true insect screen cloth 
which will keep out mosquitoes as well as flies. 

Jersey Copper Screen Cloth can be obtained from many 
of the better hardware dealers. If you cannot readily 
locate a distributor, write us. We will send you samples 
and tell you where you can get it. 

The New Jersey Wire Cloth Company 

620 South Broad Street 
Trenton New Jersey 

er Screen Cloth 

Made o-f Copper QQ.&% Pure 




The length of fourteen inches 
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The ten-inch width gives proper 
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Sargent Planes 
and Squares 

are approved by every 
carpenter who uses 
them. You will quickly 
find that they are de- 
signed and built with 
an eye to the demands 
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own convenience. 
Sargent Planes and 
Squares not only will 
improve the character 
of your work, but they 
will cut down the time 
required to do it. 





SARGENT Planes, in the great 
variety of styles, have many 
features — but one feature com- 
mon to all of them is the chro- 
mium steel cutter. The tough- 
ness, keenness and long life of 
this cutter can be equaled in 
few, if any, other tool metals. 
There are Sargent Planes for 
every purpose. 



Sargent Framing Squares are 
the most accurately and com- 
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in use today. They do all of the 
calculating for you. The new 
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signed to fit the shoulder kit, 
is illustrated above, It is as true 
and complete as the Sargent 
one-piece type. 



Let us send you interesting booklets on Sargent 
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SARGENT & COMPANY, Mfrs. 55 Water Street, New Haven, Conn. 



^••t"*»»«©"9"«»©»0" 



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l ..C»O"©"0"0"0"0»»" 



riuml) Ilamm cr 
cut away to slioio 
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dle toitli- a turn 
of the screw. 



And you will 
say the same! 

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my 2o years at the car- 
penter's trade," says J. R. 
riercey, Conway, Ark. 



"It fits the hand as if it 
•were made to order," says 
J. A. Crist, Arcadia, Fla. 



"Whenever I lend my 
riurnb to any other car- 
penter, he tells me it is f. c 
nicest balanced hammer ho 
over used," says M. R. 
r.'arncr, La Junta, Colo.. 



LOOK FOR THE 

ed Handle 

WITH THE 

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kr Combination 
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^ 



right 



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>i 



YOU will say what the carpenter says 
when you try a Plumb Nail Hammer — 
the hammer that mechanics helped to de- 
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Just what you want in your hammer : 

— a larger face that works with you to hit 

the nail on t^e Lead; 
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close to the head of the hammer ; 
— claws bent more sharply, to make your 

nail pulling easier ; 
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handle always tig^t. 

Forged from Plumb Special Steel, armor-plate 
heat-treated, tempered hard for service, tough 
for wear. 

Your hardware merchant has this hammer for 
you. 

Price, $1.30 (except in Far We:;t and Canada). 

FAYETTE R. PLUMB Inc., Philadelphia, U. S. A. 





Disston Adjustable 
Plumb and Level No. 16. 
Arch top plate, two side 
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rjwrj 



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Iron stock nickel-plated; 
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Disston Mitre Square No. 10. 
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Disston Marking and Mor- 
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Disston Bevel No. 2. Rose- 
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Accurate ♦ ♦ ♦ for careful work 
Sturdy ♦ ♦ ♦ for long life 

Disston tools were made for car- 
penters — the men who know how 
a good tool can aid their work. 

Carpenters everywhere look for the 
Disston name when they buy a took 

They know the Disston Saw. And they 
know Disston Tools are made with the 
same exacting care. 

When next you visit your hardware 
store, ask to see Disston Tools — plumbs 
and levels, try squares, mitre squares, 
gauges, and bevels. 

Pick them up; note how they feel in 
your hand; notice the workmanship — how 
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You'll realize that they will help you do 
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Make them your own, and put them in 
your kit with your Disston Saw. 



HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc. 

Makers of "The Saw Most Carpenters Use" 
Philadelphia, U. S. A. 




r V Disston D-8— For 84 years ' 'The Saw Most Carpenters Use.' 

Hardware dealers the world around sell Disston Saws, Tools, and Files 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND M as second class mail matter, under Act oi Congress, Aug. 24, 1 91 2 

Acceptance for mailing at SDecial rate of Dostage Drovided for in Section 1103, act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 

A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and 

Kindred Industries. Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 

and Joiners of America, at 



Carpenters' Building, 222 East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 



o^j|!|s»51 



Established in 1881 
Vol. XLV — No. 2. 



INDIANAPOLIS, FEBRUARY, 1925 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



That the open shop is now favored by the 
Stanley Manufacturing Company of New Bri- 
tain, Conn., who manufacture a number of car- 
penter's tools, known as the Stanley tools, was 
a declaration recently made by Mr. Stanley, Jr., 
an officer of the company at a conference held 
with Representative Charles N. Kimball and 
Business Agent McGrath at the plant of the 
company. This concern is constructing a large 
building at New Britain. The contractor is the 
Aberthaw Company of Boston. Non-union car- 
penters were found on the job. On complaint of 
Messrs. Kimball and McGrath, as representa- 
tives of our organization, Mr. Stanley arranged 
the conference, and to their astonishment made 
the above declaration. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



WILLIAM GREEN, PRESIDENT, A. F. OF L. 




William Green, former Secretary- 
Treasurer of the United Mine Workers 
of America, was unanimously elected 
President of the American Federation 
of Labor to fill out the term of the late 
Samuel Gompers, which would have ex- 
pired on January 1, 1926. 

The election of President Green fol- 
lowed a call issued by Frank Morrison, 



Secretary of the American Federation,, 
who was serving as President following 
Mr. Gompers' death in San Antonio, Tex., 
for a meeting of the Executive Council 
to choose Mr. Gompers' successor. 

Mr. Green's election was made at a 
meeting of the Council held at the Elks' 
Club in New York, immediately follow- 
ing the Gompers funeral. 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



UNION GROWTH REQUIRES MORE DISCIPLINE 




HEN the workers form a 
union, they seek power 
and at the same time they 
assume responsibility. The 
more powerful their union 
becomes, the greater is 
iheir responsibility. Failure to realize 
this leads to many pitfalls and blunders. 
A powerful union having no sense of 
responsibility carries within it the seeds 
of its own destruction. It is always easy 
to bite off a large mouthful but chewing 
St is another matter, yet every union is 
plentifully supplied with those who are 
anxious and willing to bite off more than 
they can chew. 

Members such as these are willing to 
assume great responsibility, without 
once considering whether or not their 
union has the power that should back up 
that responsibility. 

Dynamite is power, highly concen- 
trated. Properly used by those who 
fully realize its power, it becomes an 
agent for the advancement of civiliza- 
tion. It clears the stumps from the 
field, it blasts the rock from the mine, 
it clears the way for the tunnel, it re- 



duces the ice-berg to 1 armless frag- 
ments, and it simplifies the problem of 
excavation to one of merely hauling 
away the debris. 

Placed in the hands of those who have 
no sense of responsibility dynamite be- 
comes a dangerous menace and an en- 
gine of destruction. 

The more powerful a union becomes 
the more perfect its discipline should be. 
With discipline, understanding and a 
higher average of intelligence, its mem- 
bership will become well informed of 
the prevailing conditions in their indus- 
try and the underlying causes of those 
conditions. 

Unions that run wild, end in the ditch, 
and the more powei*ful they are the 
greater is the smash. 

Unions that develop a sense of re- 
sponsibility, as they gain power, never 
bite off more than they can chew. They 
carefully consider every move, before 
taking any important steps. They weigh 
the chances of success or failure care- 
fully and look at every angle of the sit- 
uation before making a decision. 



OFFICERS PLEASE NOTICE 

The Recording Secretary of L. U. 
1725, Daytona, Fla., writes that it is be- 
lieved there are some union carpenters 
woi'king in Florida who have not de- 
posited their cards there, but are send- 
ing their dues back to Local Unions in 
other places. 

Secretaries and Financial Secretaries 
In other cities who may be receiving 
dues from members in Daytona, Day- 
tona Beach, Holly Hill, Port Orange, 
Ormond, or elsewhere are asked to no- 
tify these members that it is their duty 
to deposit their cards in the jurisdiction 
of the Local Union where they are 
working. 

It would also help if they would send 
this information to L. U. 1725, Daytona, 
Fla. The Secretary is Mr. Geo. Somers, 
Holly Hill, Fla. 



She Had Taking Ways 

Mistress : "You say you worked for 
the Van Twillers. Can you prove that?" 

New Maid: "Well, mum, I can show 
you some spoons and things with their 
initials on 'em." 



LOCAL UNIONS BEWARE 

Recently one of our Local Unions in 
the East was badly victimized by an 
individual with an advertising scheme 
called "The Friends of Labor." He ap- 
peared at their meeting with what pur- 
ported to be endorsements from other 
Local Unions, and secured further en- 
dorsement on the strength of that, and 
then went out and collected about $600 
from business concerns. 

The collecting part was the last heard 
of him, and his action has not done the 
Local Union or the movement generally 
any good in that section. 

Any Local Union approached with 
such a scheme should go very, very cau- 
tiously about endorsing it. The man 
who is said to be working this proposi- 
tion is described as about 35 years old, 
170 pounds, and big scar on left cheek. 



Mine Accidents Avoidable 

That two-thirds of the accidents in 
coal mines can be prevented is shown 
by a special survey of a group of mines 
recently made by the safety engineer 
of the survey bureau of a large insurance 
company, reported in "Coal Age." 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



PRESIDENT GREEN ON CHILD LABOR QUESTION 




NE of the first things 
which William Green, the 
new President of the 
American Federation of 
Labor did after taking of- 
fice, was to send a call to 

action to every labor organization in the 

United States. 

President Green declared that the 
Child Labor Amendment was "in a very 
distinctive way the work of our great 
leader, Samuel Gompers" and that rati- 
fication would be "a peculiarly impres- 
sive expression of our regard" for him. 

Addressing his proclamation to "The 
Workers of America," President Green 
said: 

"The most important and urgent task 
of this new year is the abolition of child 
labor. That children are employed in in- 
dustry and commerce to the detriment of 
their full growth physically, mentally 
and spiritually, is a challenge to the 
ideals of our Republic and to the hu- 
manitarian spirit of our nation. 

"As a nation we have twice expressed 
our desire to abolish child labor through 
the enactment of federal legislation, and 
our experience demonstrated the need of 
constitutional authorization to make 
such laws effective. This amendment 
is necessary to bring about unity in the 
regulation of child labor so that the chil- 
dren of all the states shall have equal 
opportunity to develop mentally and 
spiritually. The first step in securing 
that federal amendment was completed 
with its approval by Congress. The next 
step is ratification by the various states. 

"Forty-two state legislatures are to 
meet in the year 1925. To secure fa- 
vorable action upon the amendment 
authorizing Congress to limit, regulate 
and prohibit the labor of persons under 
eighteen years of age we must concen- 



trate our ability, our energy, our re- 
sources to that end. 

"The enemies of the amendment are 
resourceful and vigilant. Though we 
are trebly equipped because of the jus- 
tice, the humanity and the wisdom of 
our cause, there is grave need that we 
devote ourselves unreservedly to the rat- 
ification of the amendment by each of 
the states. I call upon all labor to do 
its full share. 

"This amendment was in a very dis- 
tinctive way the work of our great lead- 
er, Samuel Gompers. The abolition of 
child labor was a purpose upon which 
he had deep feeling. He organized .the 
Permanent Committee for the Abolition 
of Child Labor which formulated this 
amendment and urged its adoption by 
Congress. It will be a peculiarly im- 
pressive expression of regard for our 
former President to give the ratification 
of this amendment priority on all legis- 
lative programs. 

"In this purpose of fundamental im- 
portance not only to labor but to our 
nation, I appeal to all humanitarian and 
patriotic citizens that they give their 
support to this policy necessary for sus- 
tained national progress. 

"Though that portion of our move- 
ment which is in Canada is not directly 
concerned in this effort for the child la- 
bor amendment, yet they are directly 
affected by whatever standards we may 
secure. Is not the time opportune for 
the workers in Canada to weld another 
link in the bond uniting our economic 
movement by making the conservation 
of child life the paramount issue for the 
coming year? 

"This is an undertaking with com- 
pelling appeal to the heart of the whole 
world. I urge whole-hearted co-opera- 
tion." 



Lincoln On Labor's Rights. 

"I am glad that a system of labor pre- 
vails under which laborers can strike 
when they want to; where they are not 
obligated to work under all circum- 
stances, and are not tied down to work 
whether you pay them for it or not. 

"I like a system which lets a man 
'quit' when he wants to, and I wish it 
might prevail everywhere. 

"I want a man to have a chance to bet- 
ter his condition." — Abraham Lincoln. 



Human Waste In Industry 

The average total of lost time due to 
unemployment in the industries of the 
"United States is expressed in the unused 
labor of about 1,750,000 persons who 
are unemployed all the time, according 
to the United States Bureau of Labor. 
It is calculated for example that 700,000 
coal miners are idle more than half the 
time. 

It is figured that 3,500,000 men 
change jobs on an average once a year. 



THE CARPENTER 



23 



OPINION ON MERITS OF SOME STRIKES 




INOFFICIAL or outlaw 
strikes are the first steps 
toward industrial chaos, 
crashing wage scales and 
lowered standards of 
living. 

This is the emphatic warning against 
outlaw strikes given by the British Gen- 
eral Federation of Trade Unions, in its 
twenty-fifth annual report, issued on 
behalf of the management committee by 
W A. Appleton, Secretary. The report 
says in part: 

"Trade unionism cannot exist apart 
from trading and collective bargaining. 
The originating and dominating princi- 
ple of trade unionism is common ar- 
rangement in respect to wages, hours, 
and conditions, and this is impossible 
apart from the existence of collective 
authority. The unofficial strike is, 
therefore, the first stepping stone to- 
wards industrial chaos, towards crash- 
ing wage rates and lowered standards 
of living. 

"So seriously have these strikes sac- 
rificed the public interest, that public 
sympathy has been alienated, and what 
is even more dangerous to trade union- 
ism is that such strikes are antagonizing 
those workers who, understanding some- 



thing of trade and commerce, are not 
prepared to see either made the sport of 
men who are seeking to gratify personal 
ambitions These well-informed work- 
ers, who have hitherto been the back- 
bone of trade unionism are becoming 
disgusted. If they quit the movement 
all workers, skilled and unskilled, must 
ultimately suffer. 

"Some of the recent unofficial strikes 
of this character have been examples of 
folly and selfishness rather than of sol- 
idarity and sympathy. It may have 
been the intention of those who en- 
gineered sympathetic strikes to give as- 
sistance to other sections of workers, 
but if their action hurts ten times as 
many workers as it benefits, it savors 
very much of the practice of cutting off 
one's nose to spite one's face. 

"Another tragedy of the unofficial 
strike as recently practised is the misery 
which is unsympathetically inflicted up- 
on other trade unionists. Some leaders 
of these strikes have spoken contemptu- 
ously of the general public. Well, nine- 
ty per cent of the general public are 
workers, or the dependents of workers, 
and to the extent that these are incon- 
venienced and prejudiced the unofficial 
strike is anti-social. 



CHILD LABOR 

(By W. A. B.) 

Down in the depths of the factory's gloom 

They gather at early dawn, 
Where the ceaseless whirl of spindle and loom 

Goes on and on and on ; 
And the god of gold in the tainted air. 

An invisible Moloch stands, 
As he watches the fabrics woven there 

By the toil of childish hands. 

Backward and forward, over and up, 

Steadily still they go, 
But they hold to the lips a bitter cup, 

Whose dregs are the dregs of woe ; 
For the hopes of youth grow faint and die 

Held fast in those iron hands, 
And the cold, hard world has never a sigh 

For the patient, childish hands. 

Ah, ye, whose darlings, in flowery ways. 

Know naught of grim despair, 
Think of the heated summer days, 

And your children working there, 
Where never a cooling zephyr comes 

Through the factory's stifling breath, 
Where the looms weave on and the spindle 
hums 

In the treadmill 'round to death. 

And onward, onward, upward and back. 

In the close and crowded rooms, 
In a dizzy race on an endless track, 

Go spindles and shafts and looms; 
Till the angel of death with fateful glass. 

Shakes out the dusky sands, 
As the merciful, longed-for shadows pass 

Over worn-out childish hands. 

■ — The International Bookbinder. 



MORE APPRENTICES 

The apprenticeship commission of the 
New York Building Congress reports 
that 3,831 boys have been enrolled in 
the 67 apprentice classes, in which 7 
trades are being taught to indentured 
boys. This school work is carried on in 
connection with actual work at one of 
the trades. The following table shows 
the increase in the numbers of appren- 
tices in the crafts : 
Trade 1922 1923 1924 

Carpentry 392 1450 1581 

Painting and deco- 
rating 60 155 186 

Electrical 298 514 

Upholstery 65 111 

Cement masons 30 50 

Plasterers 253 

Bricklayers 1136 

Total 452 1998 3831 



The best way to judge the wheels in 
a man's head is by the spokes in his 
mouth. 




24 THE CARPENTER 

THE FOUNDATION OF LABOR'S PROGRESS 

:^§?c3f BOOKING backward, now that the latter days of Samuel Gompers are all 

^/\1>_ of a piece in the warp and woof of history, it becomes apparent that 

many of his utterances just previous to the hour of his death were 

pregnant with a feeling that his race was almost run. He was a 

man of remarkable mentality. 

Intuition was not the least or most inconspicuous of the gifts with which his 
mind was richly endowed. It would seem that this faculty attained an almost 
canny virility as his physical powers declined and the hour of death drew nearer. 

One of his very last admonitions was in an address, well nigh paternal, to the 
convention of the American Federation of Labor at El Paso, Texas. At that time 
he said: 

"So long as we have held fast to voluntary principles and have been actu- 
ated and inspired by the spirit of service, we have sustained our forward 
progress and Ave have made our labor movement something to be respected 
and accorded a place in the councils of our Republic. Where we have blun- 
dered into trying to force a policy or a decision, even though wise and right, 
Ave have impeded, if not interrupted, the realization of our own aims." 

It Avas a declaration of faith, full of intense sincerity and drawn from him by 
a premonition that it was perhaps the last opportunity he would have to bequeath 
to his colleagues and all the workers the best advice he could give from a long life 
full of practical experience of his subject. In similar strain he closed his address 
by saying: 

"Our movement has found these voluntary principles the secure foundations 
upon which the workers of all America make united effort, for our voluntary 
co-operation has ignored lines of political division separating the United States 
and Canada because economically Ave are a unit. Because we refused to be 
bound by arbitrary restrictions or expedients Ave have fostered cohesive forces 
which give play to the finer and more constructive faculties of the people of 
both countries. We are eager to join in an international labor movement based 
upon the same principles of voluntarism. We are willing to co-operate if we 
can be assured a basis that Avill enable us to maintain our integrity — a condi- 
tion necessary for our own virility and continued progress. 

"Understanding, patience, high-minded service, the compelling power of 
voluntarism have in America made what Avas a rope of sand, a united purpose- 
ful integrated organization potent for human welfare, material and spiritual. 

"Events of recent months made me keenly aware that the time is not far 
distant when I must lay down my trust for others to carry forward. I want 
to say to you, men and women of the American labor movement, do not reject 
the cornerstone upon which labor's structure has been built, but base your all 
upon voluntary principles and illumine your every problem by consecrated 
devotion to that highest of all purposes — human well being in the fullest, 
widest, deepest sense." 

In the light of events which came with tragic swiftness so shortly after, it can 
be seen that his words were a profound valedictory and farwell. They came from 
a full heart which had heard the last solemn call, and which in yet a little while 
Avould have gone to "that bourne from which no traveller ever returns." 



Editorial 




THE CARPENTER 

Official Journal of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 

OF AMERICA 

Published on the 15th of each month at the 

CARPENTERS' BUILDING 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 
CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA, 

PUBLISHERS 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 



Subscription Price 
One Dollar a Year in Advance, Postpaid 

The publishers and the advertising 
agent use every possible precaution avail- 
able to them against accepting advertise- 
ments from other than reliable firms, but 
do not accept any responsibility for the 
contents of any advertisement which ap- 
pears in "The Carpenter." Should any 
deception be practiced by advertisers at 
any time, upon members, their duty is to 
immediately notify the Post Office au- 
thorities. Therefore, address any com- 
plaints to your local Post Office. 

INDIANAPOLIS, FEBRUARY, 1925 

The New President 

THE mantle of Samuel Gompers has 
been laid upon the shoulders of 
William Green, former Secretary- 
Treasurer of the United Mine Workers 
of America. As the new President of the 
American Federation of Labor, he comes 
into office with the best wishes of all 
who desire to see the Federation con- 
tinue to grow, and achieve even greater 
things than it did in the past under the 
guiding hand of its founder. 

Mr. Green comes to his new post with 
a life-long experience and devotion to 
the interests of Organized Labor, to aid 
him in his difficult task. His knowledge 
of the trade union world embraces prac- 
tical work and experience of it in all its 
phases. He is a seasoned fighter, stead- 
ily progressive, not likely to be stam- 



peded, and with a cautious ingrained 
habit of wanting to be thoroughly satis- 
fied where he is going before he starts on 
his way. His long experience with the 
Miners has produced in him a leader 
of matured understanding and sound 
ability. 

He is 54 years old. His father, Hugh 
Green, an English miner, is still living at 
the home town of the Greens, Conshoc- 
ton, O., at the age of 91. Mr. Green's 
mother was Welsh. He first worked in 
the mines when he was 16, and before 
he was 21 was an officer of his Local 
Union. Since 1900 he has been an of- 
ficial of the Mine Workers. In addition 
he was for four years a Democratic 
member of the Ohio Senate, holding the 
positions of floor leader and President. 

The Workmen's Compensation Act of 
Ohio, one of the best on the American 
continent, is chiefly his work, also the 
Ohio Mine Run Law. After serving as 
President of his sub-district he became 
President of the miners in Ohio in 190G. 
Following that, in 1913, he became Sec- 
retary-Treasurer of the United Mine 
Workers, and continued in that capacity 
until his elevation to the presidency of 
the American Federation of Labor. May 
good health, loyal friends, and long life 
be given him to help him in the great 
work which lies before him. 



Coming Out In the Open 

MR. Bernard Baruch, former head 
of the war industries board, re- 
cently addressed a gathering of 
some of those who had been on the 
board. According to press reports of 
the meeting, Mr. Baruch suggested the 
formation of a sort of "Court of Com- 
merce," before which business men 
could appeal in times of over-production, 
poor business, and low prices, to be al- 
lowed to mutually fix prices for their 
wares, so that they would not have to 
sell them for less than they would if the 
market was good. 

Some people might not think that 
such a thing had any interest or signi- 
ficance for Organized Labor. As a mat- 
ter of fact, it was a cool and unenio- 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



tional proposal to quietly consign to the 
oblivion of the economic garbage can, 
one of the most sacred principles advo- 
cated by the opponents of trade union- 
ism. They have never ceased to main- 
tain that the law of supply and demand 
should be left absolutely free to deter- 
mine the price of all commodities on the 
open market. 

That has been their publicity policy, 
while at the same time they have neg- 
lected no schemes for preventing un- 
profitable competition among themselves 
in their various industrial groups. Real- 
ly, the only place where they want the 
law of supply and demand to Operate 
freely is in the labor market. They 
call it "the iron lav/ of wages," whereby 
the wages of the workers are to be sub- 
jected to the depression which an over- 
supply of men as compared with jobs 
will cause. 

Those who are pleased by catchwords 
and pretty phrases may object, and say 
that the labor of a workman is not a 
commodity. For boudoir economists 
that may be all right, but it does not 
bring much solid satisfaction to the 
workers when there are two of them 
going after each available job. The only 
protection they have then is their labor 
union, and it is the only thing that can 
effectively set at defiance the cruel dic- 
tum that, because there are more men 
than jobs, therefore those who have the 
jobs should be content to work for just 
whatever it pleases their employers to 
pay them. 

There is a lesson for us in Mr. 
Baruch's proposal, which practically 
suggests to the business men of this 
country that they can do themselves 
more good by co-operation and mutual 
understanding, than they can by cut- 
throat competition — and never mind 
about the old saying that "competition 
is the life of trade." 

It is the essence of trade unionism 
that by co-operation and mutual under- 
standing of oiir common problem we, as 
workmen, should combine to protect the 
price of the only thing we have in all 
this world to sell in return for our daily 
bread — that is our labor. The price we 
get for that determines whether we can 
live in decency and self-respect or, like 
so many beggars, be content with the 
crumbs which fall from the rich man's 
table. 

Knowing this, it is our duty as men to 
see to it that we do this job for ourselves 



and do it right. If we don't, then wo 

have no right to ask or expect anyone 

else to do it for us. The way to do it 

already solved for us by those of out 

kind who have gone before us. They 

founded and bequeathed to us our trade 

unions as existing institutions. 

It is up to us to use them, improve 

them, and constantly to set their merits 

before our fellow workmen, and the 

younger men who are coming into the 

workaday world. They are the only 

protection we have against the supply 

and demand claims as applied to the 

living bodies of men. Let us • at all 

times see this clearly, and remember 

what it would mean in bread and butter 

if we allowed ourselves to be deluded by 

specious argument designed to give us 

a different viewpoint. 

© 

Stick To Business 

T is a significant thing, borne out by 
the practical experience of all the 
large trade unions on the American 
continent, that in those localities where 
their membership sticks close to the 
main business for which they were or- 
ganized, there they have better wages 
and working conditions. Pick out a dis- 
trict where the members fritter away 
valuable time and energy on fanatical 
fads and idiotic "isms," and there you'll 
find conditions "all shot to pieces." 

These things divide and rend an or- 
ganization, splitting it into an aggrega- 
tion of factional weakness. They divert 
it from the chief and all important pur- 
pose for which it was formed — that is 
to get more of the material things of 
life for those who work at the calling 
which the organization covers. They 
are the best servants of those who would 
keep the workers down. 

Since time immemorial "Divide and 
Rule" has been the method of the few 
who would make the mass of men their 
tools. Anything which diverts the en- 
ergies of a trade union from the main 
business of keeping its members organ- 
ized for higher wages, shorter working 
hours and better conditions, is serving 
the ends of that tyrannical minority. It 
divides the organization, and its des- 
tinies then are not governed by its mem- 
bers, but by their employers. 

Usually, in theory, it offers a short cut 
to a worker's paradise. In practice it 
ends in a mud-hole, and bitter disillu- 
sionment, with the prospect of still bav- 



THE CARPENTEK 



2? 



ing to go back to the practical plodding 

work, of building step by step in solid 

fashion to obtain what the workers 

want. That trade union goes farthest, 

lasts longest, and brings home more of 

the bacon for its members, which keeps 

closest to the original work which it was 

organized to do. Stick to business, 

along the lines which experience has 

proven will bring good results. Pay no 

attention to the "ism" vamps on the 

side lines. 

©- 

The Harvest Is Waiting 

FROM all reports and indications 
there is reason to believe that the 
coming spring and summer will find 
work fairly plentiful in our trade 
throughout the country as a whole. In 
some districts it is predicted that the 
amount of work planned will tax the 
membership resources to take care of it. 
This applies more to the great cities and 
populous centers of the East perhaps, 
than to some other parts. 

While it is always wise to accept 
prophecy on this subject with caution, 
yet there does seem every reason to ex- 
pect a better than average year for the 
men of our trade. However, on one 
score there need be no hesitation. The 
best period of the year for organizing 
work is close ahead of us. Is your Lo- 
cal Union ready to meet it? Are you 
making plans for a local organizing cam- 
paign? 

Some of the very best organizing 
work that was ever done, ever will be 
done, or ever could be done, is by the 
man on the job being sure whether the 
man he is working with is a union man 
or not. And if he is not, then sticking 
at him with argument, persuasion and 
invitation, until of his own free will, 
and voluntarily, he becomes a member 
of our Brotherhood. 

This is February, remember. The year 
is well on its way, spring-time and sum- 
mer, harvest time in the organizing field, 
are just around the corner. Has your 
Local got its machinery ready and plans 
made? Think what we could do for the 
status of our trade if we could only at- 
tain that 500,000 mark this coming 
year. It could be done with ease, if 
every member would pledge himself to 
get a member. Let that be the slogan 
for 1925. 



They Are Watching 

THAT conference of building trades 
employers, held at Cleveland last 
month under the auspices of the 
National Association of Building Trades 
Employers, discussed other matters be- 
sides the five day week. Insofar as the 
resources of the gathering made it pos- 
sible, a general survey of the wage sit- 
uation all over the country, as affecting 
building .trades workmen, was made. 

This was not done with the idea of 
seeing what they might do to raise 
wages in any locality. Its object was 
to try and formulate some plan for a 
general reduction. Particularly was its 
attention directed at those cities where 
our wages are better than they have ever 
been before. For the present these 
scales are mostly covered for the present 
year at any rate by agreements. 

It would be a costly mistake however, 
to assume that this condition as a per- 
manent arrangement would be to the 
liking of those who made up the confer- 
ence. On the contrary, it is a constant 
source of dissatisfaction to them, and 
their minds never rest from trying to 
devise some means of breaking it down. 
The best help they could get would be 
for us to neglect the means whereby we 
established those conditions. 

We got them by organization. And 
by organization alone we shall keep 
them. Now is the time to remember 
that, and keep up the work and policies 
which translated mere theories and as- 
pirations into dollars and cents in the 
pay envelope. Nowhere do we get a cent 
more than is necessary to keep pace with 
the price of living and increased tool ex- 
pense. Organization is the answer to 
the question of how we shall hold what 
we have. 



Nobody likes a quitter. The whole 
world admires a man who will fight for 
his just rights and for principle. 



The struggle for better working and 
living conditions is world-wide and age- 
long. This struggle is a just and nec- 
essary fight. 



He who quits in this great movement 
for the education and advancement of 
the toiling masses is untrue to himself 
and his fellow-workers. He is a quitter. 



Official Information 




GENERAL OFFICERS 

OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD 

OP 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA 

Genebal Office 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Fibst Genebal Vice-President 

JOHN T. COSGEOVE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vicb-Pbbsident 

GEORGE H. LAKEY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Genebal Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Genebal Tbeascbeb 

THOMAS NEALE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind 



General Executive Board 
First District, T. M. GUERIN 
290 Second Ave., Troy, N. Y. 



Second District, WILLIAM T. ALLEN 
1803 Spring Garden St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Third District, JOHN H. POTTS 
646 Melisn Ave., Cincinnati, O. 



Fourth District, JAMES P. OGLETREE 
Bradentown, Fla. 



Fifth District, J. W. WILLIAMS 

3948 S. Grand Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 



Sixth District, W. A. COLE 

810 Merchants National Bank Building 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Seventh District. ARTHUR MARTEL 
1712 Chambord St., Montreal, Que., Can. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive 
Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



Report of Delegates to American Feder- 

ation of Labor Convention at El 

Paso, Tex., November, 1924 

To the General Executive Board. 
Brothers : 

The forty-fourth Annual Convention 
of the Ameinean Federation of Labor 
was held in Liberty Hall, El Paso, Tex., 
commencing Monday morning, Novem- 
ber 17, 1924. The delegates were wel- 
comed by the Mayor of the city, the 
congressman of the district, the Major 
General from Fort Bliss, representing 
the United States and the Secretary of 
the Texas State Federation of Labor. 

Delegates 

377 delegates were present with a 
voting power of 28,318, as follows: 

Number of National and International 
Unions, 90 ; number of delegates, 265 ; 
number of votes, 28,197. Number of 
Departments, 4; number of delegates, 
4 ; number of votes, 4. Number of State 
Bodies, 30; number of delegates, 30; 
number of votes, 30. Number of Cen- 
tral Labor Bodies, 57 ; number of dele- 
gates, 57; number of votes, 57. Number 
of Trade Unions, 17; number of dele- 
gates, 17 ; number of votes, 26. Num- 
ber of Federal Labor Unions, 5 ; number 
of delegates, 4 ; number of votes, 4. 

Total number of unions, 213; total 
number of delegates, 377; total number 
of votes, 28,318. 

Finances 

The report of the Secretary showed: 
Balance on hand August 31, 

1923 $224,276.16 

Receipts for year closed... 512,397.64 

Total income $736,673.80 

Total expenses 500,028.33 

Balance on hand August 31, 

1924 $236,645.47 

Membership 

The A. F. of L. consists of 
4 Departments. 
107 National and International 
Unions. 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



49 State Federations. 
855 City Central Bodies. 
458 Local Trade and Federal La- 
bor Unions. 
764 Local Department Councils. 
32,157 Local Unions. 
With an average membership for the 
year 1924 of 2,865,979. 

Executive Council's Report 
The report of the Executive Council 
dealt with many subject matters, such 
as: 

Child Labor. 

Women in Industry. 

Education. 

Immigration. 

Legislation. 

Insurance. 

Old Age Pensions. 

Workmen's Compensation. 

Banking and Credit. 

Convict Labor. 

Community Sex - viee. 

Information and Publicity Service. 

Labor Press. 

Labor Day and Labor Sunday. 

Jurisdictional Disputes, etc. 

Resolution of Complaint Against the 
Carpenters 

The Coopers' International Union in- 
troduced the following resolution of 
complaint against the Carpenters: 

Whereas, There has been in effect a 
verbal working agreement between the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America and the Coopers' 
International Union of North America 
regarding the building and erecting of 
tanks since February 7, 1916, which 
provides that the Coopers are to build 
the tanks and the Carpenters to build 
the platforms and roofs; and, 

Whereas, The United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America did 
not consistently live up to the agree- 
ment made with the Coopers' Interna- 
tional Union of North America. The 
Coopers' International Union of North 
America instructed their delegate to the 
Thirty-seventh Annual Convention of 
the American Federation of Labor, held 
at Buffalo, N. Y., November, 1917, to in- 
troduce the following resolution, and the 
American Federation of Labor records 
show that instructions were complied 
with: 

Resolution 

Resolution No. 119 — By Delegate 
James J. Doyle, Coopers' International 
Union of North America : 



Resolved, That this convention direct 
that signed agreement be entered into 
between the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners and the Coopers' In- 
ternational Union of North America, and 
approved of by this convention, and 
lived up to by both organizations ; and, 

Whereas, This resolution was referred 
to the Adjustment Committee of the 
Thirty-seventh Convention of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor, and the Ad- 
justment Committee's report on resolu- 
tion was to have the entire matter re- 
ferred to the President of the American 
Federation of Labor with instructions to 
arrange for a conference of both parties 
within ninety (90) days for adjustment 
and if occasion warrants it an agree- 
ment be drawn to safeguard jurisdic- 
tional rights of both parties; and, 

Whereas, The report of the Adjust- 
ment Committee was concurred in by the 
Thirty-seventh Convention of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor, the interna- 
tional representatives of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners; 
of America, and the Coopers' Interna- 
tional Union of North America met July 
15, 1918, at the General Office of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America at Indianapolis, Ind. ; 
and, 

Whereas, In the course of the debate 
it developed that at the date of July 15, 
1918, no disputes exist. The conclusions 
arrived at are as follows: 

1. If a local controversy should arise 
in the future it shall be referred to the 
Presidents of the two organizations for 
adjustment. 

2. In order to avoid future trouble 
the representatives of the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America proposed amalgamation of the 
Coopers with the Carpenters. The rep- 
resentatives of the Coopers claim a mat- 
ter of that kind would have to be rati- 
fied by their members. It was agree! 
that the General Officers of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America propose terms and conditions 
leading up to amalgamation. 

3. It was further agreed that one of 
the General Officers of the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America attend the next convention of 
the Coopers' International Union to be 
held in New York City, September, 1919. 

Whereas, The representatives of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 



30 



tffiE 6AKPENTSE 



Joiners of America did make a proposi- 
tion of amalgamation to the Coopers' 
International Union at the Coopers' New 
York convention, held September, 1919, 
and said proposition of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America was not accepted by the 
Coopers; and, 

Whereas, There had been no case of 
infringement of the jurisdiction of the 
Coopers by the Carpenters that had not 
been adjusted according to agreement, 
that the Coopers would build and erect 
the tanks and the Carpenters the plat- 
forms and roofs. It was quite a surprise 
to the Coopers' International Union 
when authentic information was re- 
ceived that the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America had 
issued a charter to Tank Makers in the 
city of Chicago, 111., that were known as 
Local Union No. 193 of the Coopers' In- 
ternational Union of North America. 
'This Local Union of Tank Makers and 
Erectors, No. 193, were granted a char- 
ter by the Coopers' International Union 
<of North America in 1903 and have been 
in continuous good standing with the 
Coopers' International Union, until after 
.a charter was granted them, October 1, 
1924, by the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America. These 
isame Tank Makers in Chicago, 111., have 
worked under a signed agreement with 
their employers endorsed by the General 
Executive Board of the Coopers' Inter- 
national Union, and there is at this date 
:a contract in effect covering -wages and 
■conditions, also granting use of Coopers' 
Union Label, which they have used for 
years, that does not expire until May 31, 
1925; and, 

Whereas, The Coopers' International 
Union sent letters of protest to Genera 
President Wm. L. Hutcheson and Gen- 
eral Secretary Frank Duffy of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiner 
<of America, protesting against the Car- 
penters and Joiners taking over any of 
the Local Unions of the Coopers' Inter 
national Union that are engaged in the 
manufacture and erecting of tanks; and 
Whereas, The United Brotherhood o*. 
Carpenters and Joiners of America have 
ignored this protest, and, it being a clear 
ease of abrogating their agreement with 
the Coopers' International Union of 
North America, also a violation of the 
decision and instructions of the Thirty- 
seventh Annual Convention of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor ; therefore, be it 



Resolved, That the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, in convention assembled, 
direct the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America to cancel 
charter or charters issued by that or- 
ganization to Tank Makers and Erectors 
and also direct that the agreement that 
has been in effect between the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America and the Coopers' Interna- 
tional Union of North America be lived 
up to, namely, that the Coopers manu- 
facture and erect tanks and the Car- 
penters build platforms and roofs. 

This was referred to the Adjustment 
Committee and was reported on as fol- 
lows: 

After hearing the representatives of 
the Coopers, your committee is of the 
opinion that inasmuch as the differences 
that have arisen in the past have al- 
ways been settled by conferences be- 
tween both organizations affected, the 
same can be done again in this instance, 
and therefore recommends that the Pres- 
ident of the American Federation of La- 
bor call a conference within ninety days 
of representatives of both organizations 
for the purpose of trying to effect an ad- 
justment. 

The report of the committee was 
adopted. 

Other Resolutions 

The Amalgamated Association of Iron, 
Steel and Tin Workers introduced the 
following resolution : 

Resolved, That our delegate to the 
Forty -fourth Annual Convention of the 
American Federation of Labor request 
the different organizations who claim 
jurisdiction over certain crafts in the 
steel mills, relinquish such jurisdiction, 
so that all men in the steel mills shall 
become members of one organization. 
Also that we request the support of the 
A. F. of L. and the labor movement in 
general to give us such moral support as 
is compatible with our welfare and their 
interests, to the end that the steel in- 
dustry be thoroughly organized. 

This was referred to the Committee 
on Organization and was reported on as 
follows : 

On this resolution a hearing was held 
at which several international officers 
appeared. 

Your committee finds that two re- 
quests are made on this convention: 

1. That the organizations having jur- 
isdiction over crafts employed in the 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



steel mills relinquish same, so that those 
working in the steel mills may become 
members of one organization. 

2. That the American Federation of 
Labor and the general labor movement 
give support and encouragement to the 
Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel 
and Tin Workers to thoroughly organize 
the steel industry. 

On the first request your committee 
non-concurs, for the reason that it in- 
terferes with the autonomy rights and 
jurisdictional claims of a number of or- 
ganizations affiliated with the American 
Federation of Labor. 

On the second request your committee 
concurs. 

The report of the committee was 
adopted. 

The following resolution was intro- 
duced by the representatives of the New 
York State Federation of Labor and the 
Central Trades and Labor Council of 
Greater New York. 

Whereas, Many so-called "trades 
schools" mislead the youth of America 
into the belief that through the processes 
of short and intensive training compe- 
tent mechanics are being created ; and, 

Whereas, Experience has demonstrat- 
ed that most of these institutions are 
more concerned with motives other than 
benefiting the youth of our land and can- 
not provide competent mechanics; and, 

Whereas, The Y. M. C. A. has entered 
this field of endeavor, and it having been 
demonstrated that it cannot train com- 
petent workers to enter our industrial 
life; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Forty -fourth An- 
nual Convention of the A. F. of L. ex- 
press its disapproval of this venture of 
the Y. M. C. A., and other similar so- 
called "trade schools," that it warns the 
youth of America against the wastage 
of time and money involved in patroniz- 
ing such institutions, and urges their re- 
turn to the apprenticeship system under 
union conditions of employment, so that 
knowledge of fundamentals may be co- 
ordinated with skill and training, and so 
that the guidance and direction of skill 
and training may be confined to those 
having attained competency in the 
trades and having an accui'ate knowl- 
edge of conditions within the trades. 

This was referred to the Committee 
on Education and that body offered the 
following substitute in its stead: 

Whereas, Many so-called public trade 
schools which are in reality financed and 



controlled by private interests, mislead 
the youth of America into the belief that 
through the processes of short and in- 
tensive training, competent mechanics 
are being created ; and, 

Whereas, Experience has'demonstrat- 
ed that most of these institutions are 
more concerned with selfish motives, 
rather than that of benefiting the youth 
of our land, and do not provide compe- 
tent journeyman mechanics; therefore, 
be it 

Resolved, That the Forty-fourth An- 
nual Convention of the A. F. of L. ex- 
presses its disapproval of these so-called 
"trade schools," which are in reality 
controlled and used by private interests 
to serve their own selfish purposes, that 
it warn the youth of America against the 
wastage of time and money involved in 
patronizing such institutions, and urges 
their return . to the apprenticeship sys- 
tem, under union conditions of employ- 
ment, so that knowledge of fundamen- 
tals may be co-ordinated with skill and 
training, and so that the guidance and 
direction of skill and training may be 
confined to those having attained com- 
petency in the trades and having an ac- 
curate knowledge of conditions within 
the trades. 

The substitute was adopted by the 
convention. 

The Molders' Union of North America 
introduced the following resolution: 

Whereas, The members of a number 
of the affiliated organizations have obli- 
gated their members when working at 
other trades than their own to become 
members of the trade union organization 
of such trades; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the American Federa- 
tion of Labor use its influence to the end 
that such rides shall be brought into ef- 
fect in all of the affiliated organizations. 

Referred to Committee on Resolutions 
and reported on as follows: 

We hold that trade unionists shoidd 
always be trade unionists, no matter 
when, where or how employed ; that af- 
filiation with one trade union does not 
give license or warrant to work at the 
trade or calling the work of which is 
vested in another trade union without 
first having become affiliated to the trade 
union having a rightful claim to that 
work. 

The observance and enforcement of 
this principle should be engendered not 
by means of compulsion but by the spirit 
of mutual respect, good will, voluntary 




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Condensed Contents AudeEs Carpenters and Builders Quid* 



GUIDE NO. I 

43I Pages— 1200 Illustrations 
-How to know the different kinds 
. of wood. 
-How to use the different kinds 

of wood. 
-Complete detailed information 

on nails and screws. 
-How circular and band saws 

are handled. 
-How to use the steel square. 
-How to sharpen touts. 
-How to file and set «aws. 
-How to make wood joints. 
-Complete information regarding 

joints and joinery. 
-How to build furniture. 
-How to make a work bench. 
-How to make a mitre box. 
-How to make a mitre shooting 

board. 
-How to plumb and level work. 
-How to use the chalk line. 



-How to lay out work. 

-How to use rules and scales. 

-How to use all of tha carpenter's 
tools, with over !ion illustra- 
tions showing specifically how. 

GUIDE NO. 2 

-How to understand carpenter's 
arithmetic. 

-How to understand geometry. 

-How to understand trigonometry. 

-How to solve mensuration prob- 
lems. 

-How to estimate the strength 
of timbers. 

-How to proportion beams. 

-How to use drawing instruments. 

-How to read plans. 

-How to survey. 

-How to draw up specifications. 

-How to estimate cost. . 

-now to build houses, barns, 
garages, bungalows, etc. 



GUIDE NO. 3 

-How to excavate foundations. 
-How to build foundations. 
-How to make water-proof. 
-How to erect post foundations. 
-How to build forms for concrete. 
-How to proportion foundation 

footings. 

-How to frame houses. 
-How to set girders and sills. 
-How to frame joists. 
-How to construct a well hole. 
-How to frame a studding. 
-How to frame corner posts. 
-How to lay out and cut braces. 
-How to attaoh lath to cornerposts. 
-How to frame temporary ana 

permanent braces. 
-How to frame girts and rib bands. 
-How to set window frames. 
-How to frame partitions, 
-now to d'stinguish various 

types of roofs. 



-How to use the settings 12, 
and 17 on the steel square. 

-How to lay out mitre cuts. 

-How to use tangents, and 
detailed information cover 
sky lights, scafford and hoisti 
GUIDE NO. 4 

-How to put on wood, fibre 
metal shingles. 

-How to lay gravel roofs. 

-How to lay tin roofs. 

-How to hang doors. 

-How to frame windows. 

-How to put on siding. 

-"mv to put on exterior trin 

-How to do cornice work. 

-How to build stairs. 

-How to lath. 

-How to lay floors. 

-How to put on interior trim 

-How to paint. 

-Ilow to give first aid to 
injured. 




OLVE YOUR PROBLEMS 

Inside trade information for Carpenters, Builders, 
Joiners, Building Mechanics and all woodworkers. 
3700 actual examples of efficient construction work with new 
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EW IDEAS and METHODS-SHORT OUTS 





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Lowell, Mass. 

iood For Profes= 
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It is the most 
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illi. It is the very 
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land City, N. Y, 



How to Use the Steel Square 12, 13, 17, 



(Example From Audels Guide No. i) 

As an example of the thorough and practical way in which 
each subject is handled, there are 52 illustrations and dia- 
grams and 47 pages given over to the different uses of the steel 
square. Many carpenters use the actual pages of the book as 
a hand guide in their daily work 

Here is a specimen illustration (reduced size) and the descrip- 
tion that goes with it. 

Rules 12, 13 & 17 on the Steel Square 

The lines radiating from division 12 on the tongue of the square 
to various points on the blade as seen in fig. M, are inclinations 
corresponding to the various roof pitches. 

The 12 inch mark on tongue and mark on blade opposite pitch 
desired is used to obtain cuts for common rafters. For octagon, 
or hip rafters use mark 13, or 17 respectively. In fig. S, the 
square is seen applied to a rafter with the 12 in. mark on tongue 
and 18 in. mark on body at the edge of the rafter corresponding 
to 3 pitch of common rafter. 

The inclinations A; and B, of the tongue and body of the square 
with the edge LF, of the rafter give the correct angles for bottom 
and top cuts for \ pitch when placed in position; that is, when 
A is horizontal and D, vertical or plumb. 




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34 



THE CARPENTER 



co-operation and the full and complete 
adherence to trade union ethics. 

The report of the committee was 
unanimously adopted. 

The Journeymen Tailors' Union of 
America introduced the following reso- 
lution : 

Whereas, The Union Label stands for 
honesty in its relation to the public; and, 

Whereas, The public in general do not 
know the difference between various 
Union Labels; and, 

Whereas, An organization known as 
the Amalgamated Clothing Workers is 
using a label not recognized by the 
American Federation of Labor; be it 

Resolved, That the officers of the A. 
F. of L. be instructed to notify all unions 
connected with the A. F. of L. that the 
label of the Amalgamated Clothing 
Workers is not recognized by the A. F. 
of L. and should not receive the patron- 
age of Organized Labor, or friends of the 
labor movement. 

Referred to Committee on Labels and 
reported on as follows: 

Your committee recommends that 
Resolution No. 30 be amended as fol- 
lows: 

Strike out the third Whereas, and 
substitute in lieu thereof the following 
— "Whereas, There are organizations 
and associations infringing on the Union 
Label principle, not identified with or 
recognized by the American Federation 
of Labor" ; 

Also by changing the phraseology of 
the Resolving paragraph to read as fol- 
lows: 

Resolved, That the officers of the A. 
F. of L. be instructed to notify all unions 
connected therewith that the' labels of 
the Journeymen Tailors and the United 
Garment Workers of America are the 
only labels recognized in the men's gar- 
ment industry by the American Federa- 
tion of Labor. 

The resolution .as amended was unan- 
imously adopted. 

The President of the Textile Workers 
introduced the following resolution: 

Whereas, The Near East Relief char- 
tered by the Congress of the United 
States to conduct relief work in the Near 
East countries, now has in its care many 
thousands of orphan children who have 
no country and no governmental aid, be- 
ing absolutely dependent upon the gen- 
erosity of charitably-inclined people and 
organizations in this country ; and, 



Whereas, The larger percentage of 
these orphan children are under ten 
years of age, and their support must 
be continued until they are trained for 
self-support, such training being a part 
of the work of the Near East Relief, all 
the older children being taught trades 
that will make them self-supporting; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the American Federa- 
tion of Labor commends the work of the 
Near East Relief and recommends that 
Local Unions and central labor bodies 
co-operate in this humanitarian work of* 
saving lives of orphan children and 
training them for leadership in various 
trades in the Near East countries. 

Referred to Committee on Local and 
Federated Bodies and was concurred in 
by that body and unanimously adopted 
by the convention. 

The present officers were re-elected 
and Atlantic City, N. J., was chosen as 
the place in which to hold the convention 
in 1925. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. L. HUTCHESON, 
FRANK DUFFY, 
GEO. T. WALKER, 
JNO. HOWAT, 
ALEX KELSO, 
J. M. GAULD, 
J. R. WEYLER, 
HY SCHWARZER. 

Delegates. 



Report of Delegates to the Seventeenth 

Annual Convention of the Union 

Label Trades Department of 

the American Federation 

of Labor 

To the Members of the General Execu- 
tive Board. 
Brothers, Greeting : 

The convention was called to order by 
Mr. E. R. Bullard, Vice-President of 
the El Paso Union Label League, who 
extended fraternal greetings from the 
Organized Labor movement of El Paso, 
and then turned the convention over to 
President Hays of the Department. 

The Report of the Credentials Com- 
mittee showed eighty-four (84) dele- 
gates present, representing thirty (30) 
International Unions and one (1) fra- 
ternal delegate representing the Wo- 
men's International Union Label League 
and Trades Union Auxiliary. 



Me cabpenteS 



35 



President Hays presented a very in- 
teresting report dealing with the present 
situation of the Department, and em- 
bodying suggestions covering, Duties of 
Union Members, The Label and Public- 
ity, Label Boosting, The Methods Re- 
sorted to by Our Enemies, and conclud- 
ing with a number of Union Label 
Aphorisms. 

The report of Secretary -Treasurer 
Manning dealt with statistical and finan- 
cial matters of the Department and also 
Label Publicity and Propaganda. 

The following is the average member- 
ship upon which per capita tax has been 
paid by the affiliated unions: 
American Federation of Labor. . 1,021 
Bakery & Confectionery Work- 
ers' International Union of 

America 22,185 

Bakers' International Union, 

Journeymen 41,794 

Bill Posters and Billers of 
America, International Alli- 
ance of 1,600 

Bookbinders, International 

Brotherhood of 13,390 

Boot and Shoe Workers' Union. 37,078 
Brewery, Flour, Cereal and Soft 
Drink Workers of America, 
International Union of United 16,000 
Broom and Whisk Makers' 

Union, International 689 

Carpenters and Joiners of Amer- 
ica, United Brotherhood of . . . 25,000 
Cigar Makers' International 

Union of America. 27,750 

Clerks' International Protective 

Association, Retail 5,000 

Coopers' International Union of 

North America 1,533 

Electrical Workers of America, 

International Brotherhood of. 10,000 
Engravers' Union, International 

Metal 140 

Engravers' Union of North 

America, International Photo. 6,571 
Garment Workers of America, 

United 47,478 

Glove Workers' Union of North 

America, International 260 

Hatters of North America, 

United 11,500 

Horseshoers of United States 
and Canada, International 

Union of Journeymen 2,000 

Hotel and Restaurant Employes' 
International Alliance and 
Bartenders' International 
League of America 20,000 



Iron, Steel and Tin Workers' 

Amalgamated Association of. 2,230 

Leather Workers' International 

Union, United 1,000 

Machinists, International Asso- 
ciation of 500 

Meat Cutters and Butcher Work- 
men of North America, Amal- 
gamated 8,000 

Metal Workers' International Al- 
liance, Amalgamated Sheet. . 6,250 

Holders' Union of North Amer- 
ica, International 1,000 

Husicians, American Federation 

of 77,083 

Paper Makers, International 

Brotherhood of 3,000 

Polishers, International Union, 

Metal 2,000 

Plate Printers and Die Stampers' 
Union of North America, In- 
ternational 1,240 

Printing Pressmen and Assist- 
ants Union of North America, 
International 38,750 

Railway Employes of America, 
Amalgamated Association of 
Street and Electric 20,000 

Stage Employes and Moving 
Picture Hachine Operators of 
the United States and Canada, 
International Alliance of The- 
atrical 20,000 

Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' 
Union of North America, In- 
ternational 6,611 

Stove Hounters' International 

Union 650 

Tailors' Union of America, 

Journeymen 10,000 

Teamsters, Chauffers, Stable- 
men and Helpers of America, 
International Brotherhood of. 20,000 

Tobacco Workers, International 

Union 1,534 

Typographical Union, Interna- 
tional 68,846 

Upholsterer s' International 

Union of North America 7,500 

Wall Paper Crafts of North 

America, United 557 

Wire Weavers' Protective Asso- 
ciation, America 380 

The financial report of the Depart- 
ment showed the total income for the 

period from August 31, 1923, to August 

30, 1924, was $48,106.46, while the total 

expenditures during the same period 

were $40,432.99. The total available 

funds of the Department August 30, 

1924, was $35,151.94. 



30 



THE CARPEN1ER 



During the past year representatives 
of the Label Trades Department attend- 
ed the conventions of twelve (12) Na- 
tional and International Unions, and fif- 
teen (15) State Federations of Labor in 
the interest of the Department, and the 
promotion of the Union Label, Shop Card 
and Button, as well as attending meet- 
ings in almost a score of other cities for 
the same purposes. 

At the present time one hundred nine- 
ty-four (194) Union Label Leagues are 
chartered under the Union Label Trades 
Department. These are scattered in as 
many cities throughout the United 
States, and twenty -four of them were 
chartered during the past year. 

The Committee on the President's Re- 
port commended that official on his en- 
ergetic work during the year and rec- 
ommended that portion of the report un- 
der the heading "Union Label Aphor- 
isms" be made a part of the proceedings 
of the convention, as there are many 
things contained therein that will at- 
tract the attention of readers generally, 
among which we find the following: 

"Every purchase, influenced by the 
Union Label, is a bomb dropped into the 
'open shop' camp." 

The Committee on the Secretary's Re- 
port commended him in his expressions 
of sentiment and the recommendations 
he offered for Union Label promotion, 
and said in part: "We believe that the 
importance of the Union Label work can- 
not be too often called to the attention 
of the membership of all labor organiza- 
tions." 

The Committee on Propaganda and 
Publicity, in submitting its report, point- 
ed out that the Department had a dis- 
tinct and useful function to perform in 
handling label propaganda and publicity 
matters, and was doing its work well 
and accomplishing results, but at the 
same time it also showed that each af- 
filiated organization had a more direct 
and earnest duty to perform among its 
own members in order to get the fullest 
measure of co-operation from them in, 
for they alone are the ones that do the 
buying and must create a constant de^ 
mand for union labeled products. 

The convention adopted a number of 
resolutions, all of which dealt with label 
promotion matters and means, or firms 
that were unfair to the labor movement. 

With the re-election of the following 
officers for the coming year the Seven- 



teenth Annual Convention of the Union 
Label Trades Department adjourned : 
Mr. John W. Hays, President, 

Mr. Jacob Fischer, First Vice-Presi- 
dent, 

Mr. George W. Perkins, Second Vice- 
President, 

Mr. Matthew Woll, Third Vice-Pres- 
ident, 

Mr. Charles L. P>aine, Fourth Vice- 
President, 

Mr. Joseph Obergfell, Fifth Vice-Pres- 
ident, 

Mr. John J. Manning, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 
JOHN T. COSGROVE, 
WALTER GEBELEIN, ' 
THOMAS MURPHY, 
JOHN HEIDEN. 



Report of Delegate to the Fortieth An- 
nual Convention of the Trades and 
Labor Congress of Canada 
Held in the City of Lon= 
don, Ontario, Sep= 
tember, 1924 
The Fortieth Annual Convention was 
called to order by the President of the 
London Trades and Labor Council, John 
McGuire, who after welcoming the dele- 
gates, introduced various of the city's 
notables who further extended greetings 
to the delegates. 

After these addresses President Tom 
Moore officially opened the convention 
with a short address, stating that every 
delegate to the convention was a Cana- 
dian and a member of a Canadian Union 
and had the interest of Canada at heart. 
The purpose of the Congress in its 40 
years of existence have been for the bet- 
tering of the lives and improving the 
citizenship of Canada. This Congress is 
Canadian, untrammeled and unfettered 
in its work in the interests of Canada. 

We claim the right to say what is wise 
and just and we will not permit our em- 
ployers or any group to say they are 
superior in intelligence or integrity to 
the Trades and Labor Congress. 

The Credentials Committee reported 
on 257 credentials received, included in 
this number was the Fraternal Dele- 
gates, J. T. Brownlee, President of the 
Amalgamated Engineering Union, who 
represented the British Trades Union 
Congress; Walter W. Britton, President 
of the International Metal Polishers' 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



Union, representing the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, and Miss Mabel Leslie 
of the National Women's Trade Union 
League of America. There were 44 Can- 
adian representatives of international 
organizations; 28 from Trades and La- 
bor Councils and 182 from the various 
Local Unions. 

There were 66 resolutions dealt with 
during the convention, the main ones 
being those dealing with the eight-hour 
day, calling upon the Congress to re- 
affirm its declarations on this question 
and demand of the Federal Government 
the bringing into effect the finding of the 
Washington conference and the Inter- 
national Labor Office. Other resolutions 
which occupied a deal of the conven- 
tion's time were those from the so- 
called left wing or the Communist, 
which called for Canadian autonomy 
and the amalgamation of the various 
unions. The Resolution Committee re- 
affirmed the stand taken by the Congress 
last year on similar resolutions, namely 
"that these Were matters for the Inter- 
national Unions and the Trades and La- 
bor Congress which is a purely legisla- 
tive body should not interfere." The re- 
port of the committee was carried. 

There were several resolutions by the 
Ontario and the Quebec Provincial 
Councils as well as some from the Local 
Unions of carpenters. Most of these 
dealt with the fair wages clause in Fed- 
eral and Provincial contracts, amend- 
ments to the Workmen's Compensation 
Act, calling upon the various govern- 
ments to start all public work possible 
to relieve the unemployed situation, ask- 
ing of the government to bring into ef- 
fect legislation so that workers out of 
employment would receive benefits upon 
similar lines to that which is given at 
the present time to those under the 
Workmen's Compensation Act. 

All these resolutions were carried by 
the convention. 

Officers' Reports 

The Executive Board in their report 
gave in detail all the activities of the 
Congress during the past year. They 
had, through correspondence, continued 
active co-operation with the Internation- 
al Federation of Trade Unions and have 
used this medium in addition to others 
to bring to the attention of the workers 
of all countries the actual situation as 
to unemployment, wage conditions, etc.. 
existing in Canada and in this way com- 



bat much of the misleading propaganda 
that had been carried on to secure un- 
warranted immigration. 

With respect to old age pensions, the 
executive reported the steps taken by 
the Federal Government. They stated 
that it would be necessary for incoming 
Provincial Executives to urge upon their 
respective governments the necessity of 
co-operating to the fullest extent in se- 
curing action that will bring into effect 
this desirable legislation, the whole 
scheme being contingent upon the co- 
operation of the Provinces with the Fed- 
eral Government in voting their share of 
the amount necessary to provide pen- 
sions for the aged. It is estimated that 
the Federal Government's portion of the 
total yearly expenditures would amount 
to $11,860,920.00 as one-half of the 
total amount required. 

Dealing with international relations 
the report showed that considerable pro- 
gress had been made in the enactments 
of legislation beneficial to labor through- 
out the different countries of the world. 
It was contended that ultimately this 
would have its reflex on this continent, 
the convention approving and commend- 
ing the action of the Congress in hav- 
ing its representatives attending the In- 
ternational Federation of Trade Unions 
and the International Labor Office of 
the League of Nations. 

Fraternal Delegates 

Walter Britton, the fraternal delegate 
from the A. F. of L. in bringing the. 
fraternal greetings from that body, stat- 
ed that he was going to strike a new note^ 
that denotes the progress of the move- 
ment in the States. The A. F. of L. had 
broken away from the two old political 
parties and that when the election was: 
over the workers' nominee would be so> 
near to being elected that the people 
would not get over their dizziness for 
some time. He pointed out that the condi- 
tions and the labor problems were about 
the same, both in Canada and the United 
States, and there was one cure for all. 
He attacked the labor saving devices and 
declared that if all the plants were run 
on the same plan as the Ford Factory 
there would be 50 per cent more unem- 
ployment. Labor had got to find some 
way to combat this he said in closing. 

J. T. Brownlee, representing the 
British Trade Union Congress, gave a 
very interesting address, but he broke 
away from the usual beaten path of the 



38 



THE CAEPEXTER 



fraternal delegates in discussing some 
of the actions taken by the Congress 
during the week. He spoke in the name 
of the 4,490,000 workers of Great 
Britain. There is no spirit, no determ- 
ination, no vision among those young 
men who say we are going back. They 
say we need a new movement. He had 
heard that gospel preached when these 
young men were tugging at the business 
end of a feeding bottle. You would 
think that we had done nothing in the 
past to justify our existence. For the 
first time in the history of Great Britian 
the chosen representatives of the peo- 
ple occupy the seats of the mighty in 
the mother of parliaments. This had 
only been accomplished by close, patient, 
hard work and endeavor. We have 
fought election after election. We have 
succeeded in doing that which Ramsay 
McDonald and the rest of us never 
thought would come. You have got to 
work consistently, persistently, and con- 
structively and realize that there are 
other people in the world besides your- 
self if you wish to accomplish these 
things, he said. 

Miss Mabel Leslie, representing the 
National Women's Trade Union League 
of America, stated that the only way 
women could get decent working condi- 
tions was the organizing of as many 
women's trade unions as possible. 

She outlined the activities of the 
league and asked for all assistance pos- 
sible in the organizing of the women. 

Membership and Finance 

Secretary-Treasurer P. M. Draper, in 
his report, demonstrated that, notwith- 
standing the fact that the past year had 
been marked by considerable industrial 
depression, little loss, either in member- 
ship or finance had been suffered by the 



Congress. The membership for the year 
1923 was 121,842 while the membership 
for this year was 117,000, the drop in 
membership being partly accounted for 
by delayed payments of per capita tax 
which forms the basis for the compu- 
tation of membership. The total re- 
ceipts from per capita tax and other 
sources amounted to $27,190,30, while 
the total expenditures were $24,875.71, 
leaving a balance to the credit of the 
Congress of $2,314.30. This compares 
very favorably with the report of the 
last year when the total receipts 
were $26,471.97 and the expenditures 
$22,288.77. 

Election of Officers and Delegates 

In the election of President the Left 
Wing ran Tim Buck, of Toronto, one o-f 
the most active representatives of the 
Communists in Canada against Tom 
Moore, but the delegates by a vote of 
156 to 44 showed that they wanted sane 
and progressive action instead of the 
tearing down policy. 

The final results of the elections were 
Tom Moore, United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America, Presi- 
dent. P. M. Draper, International Typo- 
graphical Union, Secretary-Treasurer. 
James Simpson of the same organization 
was elected on the Executive Board with 
John T. Foster of the Machinists and 
Bert Merson of the Amalgamated Asso- 
ciation of Street Bailwaymen. 

Fraternal delegate to the British 
Trades Union Congress was James F. 
Marsh of the Carpenters, fraternal, dele- 
gate to the A. F. of L. John Colbert of 
the Street Bailwaymen. 

Ottawa, the capital city of Canada, 
was chosen as the next city in which to 
hold the convention. 

Fraternally submitted, 

T. JACKSON. 



DEATH ROLL 

JOHN PILDITCH, SR., L. U. 116, Bay City, Mich. 



Espanola, Ontario, Is Quiet 

Work at Espanola, Ontario, Canada, 
is very slack, and many of our members 
have left that place for other parts in 
consequence. The outlook for the future 
is not good. 



Keep Your Dues Raid Up 



In the Luxury Class Now 

Food prices in the United States have 
increased 43 per cent during the past 
eleven years, according to a statement 
just issued by the United States Depart- 
ment of Labor through the Bureau of 
Labor Statistics. 

© 

Ask for the Union Label 



ondoncQ 




About The Home And Pension 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

I desire to write to you in reference 
to the rules governing the elegibility of 
members of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America to the 
Home for the aged. I read that the 
delegates to the last convention believed 
that the age of 65 years and 30 years 
membership would qualify a member for 
admission to the Home. 

I wish to express my views concern- 
ing this question which is of vital im- 
portance to some of our members. There 
should be a proviso incorporated into 
the rules governing admission to the 
home also to the pension benefits, as 
it is not to be supposed that when a 
man reaches the age of 65 and is a 
member of 30 years standing in the 
Brotherhood that he wants to quit work 
and go to the home. 

Allow me to argue the point in ques- 
tion: If a man has enough pep to work 
at the trade say forty or fifty years and 
is in good health at 65 years, he still 
has pep enough to work for the comforts 
of life, and would much rather do it 
than to be idle and living from a pension 
and he would much rather work than to 
bid farewell to his old friends and leave 
his familiar surroundings and go to a 
new home, of course when a man must 
go then tbat is different. 

This home of the U. B. of C. and J. 
of A. for its members is supported in a 
small way by all members, why not 
make it accessible for all old members 
who are absolutely at the mercy of char- 
itable help from others. 

Take for instance a brother say of 
fifteen or twenty years good standing in 
a Local and cannot work for wages and 
yet be able to be around and do light 
chores, who perhaps has lost a wife and 
has been obliged to .break up his home, 
and is living amongst his children, who 
have a hard time of it to provide for 
their own families without the burden 
of providing for the father. 

Take for instance our little Local, we 
organized 18 years ago and there are 



none of the old men eligible to the home 
on the membership limit and never will 
be because of the youth of our Local. 

Brother Duffy do not for a moment 
entertain the thought that what I have 
written is from a selfish motive or a 
selfish point of view for I assure you it 
is not. I am now 67 years of age, 
worked 52 years at the trade, and rolled 
with a cant hook more heavy timber 
than any carpenter in this county. I 
worked pretty steady all last summer 
and fall. 

Our wage scale is 65 cents as you al- 
ready know, but to show you that I am 
no slouch I demanded 75 cents per hour 
and got it without complaint and now 
I would rather build a good house, barm 
mill or bridge than go to the sunny 
South and become a member of the- 
house. 

I hope that up to my last I may be- 
able to pay my mite towards the support 
of the home for the benefit of those less; 
fortunate than myself. 

In conclusion let me say this: If 
our Brotherhood is preparing a home 
for the aged carpenters, then make it 
possible for the homeless ones in our or- 
ganization who will suffer if we do not 
give them a home, to receive the charity 
and protection of our grand glorious 
Brotherhood. 

I will assume that not more than 20 
percent of the 2,000 members who 
qualify want to go to the home — not 
that it is not a beautiful place — but 
that there is no place like their old in- 
dividual homes. 

Fraternally yours 

JOHN A. MO WRY, R. S.. 
L. U. No. 928. 
19 Vine St., Danville, Pa. 



From Ladies' Auxiliary No. 26 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

In the December issue of "The Car- 
penter we note the mention of two 
Ladies' Auxiliaries. It is interesting to 
hear of others, and no doubt others will 
be pleased to hear of us. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



To begin, we, Ladies' Auxiliary No. 
26, Jersey City, N. J., have a member- 
ship of 60, although that is small and 
we should have many more, considering 
there are over 2,500 union carpenters in 
Hudson. Nevertheless, these few women 
are wonderful workers. Their first af- 
fair, a barn dance a year ago, netted 
§'•500 profit, and a euchre shortly after 
almost $300. 

Recently a package party and dance, 
^with a little short of $400 to their credit. 

"We feel the men of Hudson do not 
:realize the importance of this Auxiliary, 
:for if they did we would receive more 
: applications for membership, although 
we are received wonderfully if we go to 
them for assistance, and appreciate it 
very much, but this we would not have 
to do if we had the membership we 
should have. 

Speaking about the women being good 
workers, we gave a Christmas party to 
the children December 23, it certainly 
was a most wonderful party, and the 
committee in charge deserve a great deal 
cf credit, for there was a great deal of 
work attached to it. 

Everyone had a good time, a large 
tree, and Santa Claus appearing, dis- 
tributing presents and candies to the 
children. 

The Auxiliary also furnished some 
needy carpenters' families with Christ- 
mas dinners. These are a few of the 
good things the Auxiliaries do. So, men, 
wake up in every state in the Union, 
and get your women out to either join 
tor form a Ladies' Auxiliary to help aid 
our fathers, husbands and brothers in 
their daily toil. 

A Happy New Year to you all from 
Ladies' Auxiliary No. 26, Jersey City, 
N. J. 

MRS. E. HARDCASTLE, Secy. 



From Atlantic City, N. J. 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 63, of Atlantic 
City, N. J., wishes to report on the pro- 
gress we have made. 

We were chartered in April, 1921, and 
have now 60 members in good standing 
with prospects of more in the near fu- 
ture. We have a snug little sum in our 
treasury, a sick committee is always on 
hand to assist not only the members of 
our Auxiliary, but also the members of 



any Local Union in our district and their 
families. 

To those who are not in needy cir- 
cumstances flowers and fruit are sent. 
In some instances rent has been paid and 
fuel purchased. 

One of our members donated a piano 
to us, and the first meeting night of 
each month we have a supper with music 
and dancing. We invite the delegates 
of the District Council and the officers of 
the Locals, and have a very enjoyable 
evening. At this time we are working 
very hard preparing fancy articles for a 
bazaar to be held before Easter. We 
have a sewing circle and each member 
donated five articles to the bazaar, this 
circle meets every Thursday afternoon at 
one of the member's homes and oftimes 
prepares clothing for the needy. 

We have purchased dishes, knives and 
forks and do many things to help the 
men along the Union Label lines. 

The District Council kindly donates 
the use of the hall to us for meeting pur- 
poses and at times we have an oyster or 
sour kraut supper, these affairs are 
largely attended. 

We also organized Auxiliary No. 125 
of Ocean City, N. J., about a year ago 
and they are getting along fine. 

One of the drawbacks we have is the 
lack of interest on the part of the men 
to have their women affiliate with us. If 
they could realize the important part we 
could play in assisting them in time of 
need the battle would be near an end. 

We would be glad to receive any in- 
formation from sister Auxiliaries. 
Fraternally yours, 
MRS. J. L. BERNICKER, Sec. 
Auxiliary No. 63, 34 S. Michigan Ave., 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

o 

Saving the Babies 

White Plains, New York, is one of the 
safest places in the United States for 
babies. Its infant mortality rate in 1923 
was only 38, half the rate for the United 
States birth registration area. Move- 
over, the rate has been reduced from 130 
in 1911 by methods which any city may 
use. 



Only Inviting Trouble 

"Better let me write you a policy, 
Rastus," suggested the insurance agent. 

"No, suh," declared Rastus emphati- 
cally. "Ah ain't any too safe at home as 
it is." 



Chips and Shavings 



Safety first. Keep your clues paid up. 

* * * 

A working card in your pocket means 
a fatter pay envelope. 

sj. * ajs 

500,000 Members For 1925 

Are you watching the child labor ques- 
tion in your State Legislature? 

* * * 

1890 — Gimme a nickel, please. 
1924 — Come across, dad. 

* * * 

The jilted lover who blows his brains 
out has to be a good shot. 

* * * 

Never be afraid to speak your mind, 
but mind what you speak. 

* * * 

Are you a critic? How many new 
members have you to your credit in your 
Local Union? 

An optimist is a man who gets his 
shoes shined just before starting some- 
where in the street cars. 

He is well constituted who grieves not 
for what he has not and rejoices for 

what he has. 

* * * 

Czechoslovakia was the first industrial 
state among the European countries to 
ratify the eight-hour convention and in- 
troduce a statutory eight-hour day. 

* * * 

Unless three-fourths of the State 
Legislatures endorse a proposed consti- 
tutional amendment to abolish child 
wage labor it will remain as it is — a blot 
on the economic life of America. 

* * * 

500,000 Members For 1925 

9ft * * 

Don't be one of those fellows, who, 
when the Business Agent comes on the 
job, cannot say whether the man he is 
working with is a union man or not. 

* * * 

No, Genevieve, a bridal party has 
nothing to do with horses, though 
"altar" and "halter" sound a good deal 
alike, and some mean wretches say they 
amount to the same. 



If you work beside a non-union man 
you will sleep better o'nights if you stick 
at him until you have him sitting beside 
you in your Local Union meeting. 

* * * 

Have you picked out that non-union 
carpenter whom you intend to have be- 
come a member of your Local Union this 
year? 

Don't take evasions, or even plain 
"No" for an answer the first time you 
tackle that non-union man. The Broth- 
erhood was not built up that way. 

* * * 

The death toll in the mines of West 
Virginia for the month of November was; 
forty. Thirty -three Americans and 
seven of foreign extraction. 

:•: * * 

What is your State Legislature going 
to do about endorsing a constitutional 
amendment to abolish child wage labor 
in the United States? 

* * # 
500,000 Members For 1925 

* * * 

Building trades employers from cities 
throughout the United States attending 
a conference at Cleveland in January, 
went on record as opposing the 5-day 
week demand being made by labor or- 
ganizations in a number of localities. 

The conference was held under the 
auspices of the National Association of 

Building Trades Employers. 

* * * 

There are countless people in this 
world who "chew the rag" with no 
profit to anybody from their mumbling 
mastications, but see what chewing did 
for someone else : 

"Net profits, after deduction of taxes 
and depreciation, of the William Wrigley 
Jr., Company, for the nine months end- 
ing September 30. last, were $6,758,- 
836.16, according to a financial state- 
ment made public on October 21st." 

* * * 

Little Johnny Smart, whose dad is a 
carpentei', says he will be glad when 
metal entirely takes the place of wood 
lath, because "Dad is always bringing' 
home a broken wood lath and puttin' 
it in a handy place for quick action." 



Craft ProblQm s 




The Stair 
(By H. H. Siegele.) 

Ill 

While the apprentice and I were plan- 
ning and framing and putting in place 
the cellar stairs, the rest of the gang 
were raising the framework for the first 
story of our imaginary building, and I 
notice that the men have the joists in 
place with the opening for the stair 
framed, ready for the rough stair work. 

Many builders leave the rough stair 
work until after most of the rough work 
of the building is done, but we are going 
to do just as we think ought to be done 
on every building; that is, we will install 
the rough stairs right away, so that it 
can be used by the men working on the 
job, when it is necessary for them to go 
from one floor to another. 

The boss, I am sure, will approve of 
this method, because he knows that it 
costs him extra money every time a 
man must climb from one floor to the 
other, on a ladder that is seldom where 
it ought to be — perhaps, on some other 
job. While we are talking about lad- 
ders, which is in reality a branch of stair 
building, we will make one, so the men 
can use it when they need a ladder. 

Fig. 12 a, shows a 2x6, 16 feet long, 
to be ripped so the two pieces will be 
tapered as shown, for the two upright 
pieces. By tapering the uprights, we are 
proportioning the strength of the ladder, 
as well as eliminating unnecessary 
weight. 

At b we are showing how to space the 
rounds, or steps as we shall call them, 
on the uprights, and c shows the results 
after the steps have been nailed on. 

The architect has given uc a drawing 
of the rough stairs leading to the second 
floor, which is the same as what we are 
showing on Fig. 13. We notice that the 
complete rise for the two flights is 9 
ft. 11 in. 

The rise of the first flight to the land- 
ing is 7 ft. and the run, it will be seen, 
is 8 ft., 8 y 2 in. The rise for the return 



flight is 2 ft. 11 in., and the run is 3 
ft. 2 in. 

By checking these figures over with 
the rise and run for the steps, we will 



-7<fV 



f 



a. 



= <\} 



1 



IzG. fl- 



1 a 



n 

-•-so-* 



find that the architect has figured out 
both the rise and the run for us, and has, 
by his figures, given all the important 



THE CARPENTER 



43 



points, however, it is always a good plan 
to check over the architect's figures. 

The dotted lines on this figure show 
the positions of the newels. You will 
observe that the first rough riser of each 



Dotted line a, indicates the finished 
floor lines for points to work to many 
mistakes can be avoided. The reason 
for this is that the finished floors are not 
always the same in thickness, and some- 




8-8£ 



Fig. 13. 



flight is only 5% in., while the last 
rough risers of the two flights are Sy s 
in. to the finish floor line. This is fur- 
ther explained by Figs. 14 and 15. 

Fig. 14 shows by dotted lines the first 
finished riser and tread — the tread being 
iy 8 in. thick makes the rise for the first 




Fig. 14. 

finished step just 7 in., which is the 
same as the rise given on Fig. 13. Why 
the last rough riser is 8% in., is illus- 
trated by Fig. 15. 




F"i C. 15. 



times they are furred up. At b is shown 
how the horses for the second flight are 
supported. 



44 



THE CARPENTER 



Now we have readied a disputed ques- 
tion, particularly among carpenters. 
Some think that the face of the finished 



The nosing of the well is shown at C. 
Fig. 19 is a front view of the newel 
shown in Fig. 18 and shows, a, the bal- 




_Fl.G. 16. 

riser should come to the center of the 
newel, while others maintain that the 
back of the finished riser should line up 
with the center of the newel. 

"We hold that the latter method is 
correct, for there are good reasons for 
this contention, namely, the riser, the 
stringer and the finishing board for the 
well, all die into the newel relatively the 




same — that is to say, the back of each 
of these three members line up with the 
center of the newel, which is necessary 
in order to make the balusters and hand 
rail work out right. 

In Fig. 17 we are showing how the 
two risers will join the newel, when this 
method is used. Fig. 18 shows the finish 
of the well. The baluster is indicated 
by a, and in order to bring the finishing 
board for the well, marked b, in har- 
mony with the baluster, the back of it 
must line up with the center of the 
newel. This is assuming, of course, that 
this board is exactly one-half the thick- 
ness of the baluster, which is, ordin- 
arily the case. 




Fig. is. 

uster; b, the newel; c, the back of the 
string; d, the finishing board for the 
well, and e, the nosing. It will be seen, 
by comparing these three figures how 





rr~i 

a 




b 


a 


~*—y 




1= 


e 


I 










f 




\ 


i 
i 

i 

1 c 

if 


E 






i Fig. 19. 



logical the contention, that the back of 
the riser should line up with the center 
of the newel is. 

But logic does not always rule. The 
writer has in mind an instance where 
the foreman put in the rough work of 



THE CARPEXTES 



three Sets of stairs (ail open newel) on 
a large job, using the method which we 
have just explained, but when the stair 
builder arrived, who was a subcontrac- 
tor, every rough riser had to be chiseled 
off % of an inch. (Maybe you think 
that things didn't sputter around there 
for a while.) 

In Fig. 16 we are showing a stairs 
with the rough work all in, and tem- 
porary 1x6 treads in place, so that when 
the whistle blows the gang working on 
the roof can use it when they come 
down. 



The apprentice and I have done a 
pretty good day's work, putting up the 
landing, and framing and installing the 
two flights of stairs, besides making a 
ladder. Of course two journeymen 
could have done the work in much less 
time, but an apprentice does not get as 
much money for his work as a journey- 
man, so the older head working with 
him must give him a little of his time. 

In the next article we will take up the 
attic stairs, which is not very much of 
a job, but we will find something to keep 
us busy on stair work for the whole day. 



Utilize Old Wells 

Many homes in towns and cities which rises and turns near the top of 
throughout the country, have old wells the ground, leading to the kitchen sink, 
near them, which have been out of use where the water can be drawn as need- 
for years. The illustration herewith ed — see the illustration. 




given shows how such a well can be 
utilized to cool drinking water for the 
household. 

The pipeline which furnishes the 
water for the home is run into the well, 
then dropped below the water line and 
attached to a large pipe-coil. The other 
end of the coil is attached to a pipe 



Any one who is handy with tools can 
do the work of installing this unique 
water cooler. The pipes can be obtained 
from any plumbing shop, where they 
can be threaded and cut to the right 
lengths. The coil, also, should be made 
in the shop. After this has been done 
the job is comparatively easy. 



OYER 31600 PROFITS IN THREE 

Made by J. A. Thomas of Montgomery, Ala. 




The experience of 

Mr. J. A. Thomas, 

Montgomery, Ala. 

The manufacturers of the "American 
Universal" floor surfacing machine are 
constantly receiving letters, similar to 
the one quoted below, from men who 
have gone into the floor surfacing busi- 
ness the "American Universal" way. 
We thought the story of Mr. Thomas 
might prove of interest to a great many 
carpenters who find themselves- out of 
work during the cold winter months and 
other slack business seasons. 

"Im keeping my 'American Universal' 
busy all the time. As soon as I finish 
one job there is another waiting for me. 
It keeps me busy but I don't care as long 
as I can pull down $176.11 on one job 
like I did last week. 

"I have had my 'American Universal' 
for three months now. In balancing my 
accounts tonight T find that I have made 
$1,653.55 clear money since I started in 
the business, which amounts to over 
$100.00 per week clear profit for me and 
my "buddy" — the 'American Universal'. 

"I surfaced four bowling alleys yes- 
terday and had twelve calls during the 
day to go out and look over old floors and 



make prices on the work of resurfacing 
and finishing them. 

"I went out today while my operator 
was working and contracted for five of 
the jobs and never missed a prospect. 

"One contractor told me not to wait 
for orders from him but to go on the job 
and watch the houses and when the 
floors are ready to surface, to get on 
them. He told me to measure up the 
jobs and send the bills to him as the 
floors were finished. This fellow is not 
a big contractor but he builds about four 
houses a month, averaging about a thou- 
sand square feet to the house, which is not 
a bad customer to have on my books." 

The manufacturers of the "American 
Universal" electrically driven floor sur- 
facing machine with which Mr. Thomas 
and so many others have made such re- 
markable earnings, will gladly supply 
the readers with full information regard- 
ing how this machine can be secured on 
five days trial so that any carpenter can 
fully convince himself as to whether or 
not he wants to buy a machine. The 
Company is willing also to supply a lot 
of other valuable information regarding 
the floor surfacing business, all of which 
will be furnished without any obligation 
whatever to those inquiring. Address 
all mail to The American Floor Surfacing 
Machine Company, 522 South Saint 
Clair Street, Toledo. Ohio. 



ferr 




-on every old shingle roof 

HpHERE are probably dozens, if not hundreds or 
A thousands of old shingle roofs in your vicinity 
— remember that every one represents an oppor- 
tunity to get new business re-roofing with Johns- 
Manville Asbestos Shingles. 

Re-roofing with Asbestos Shingles right over the 
old wood shingles appeals to everybody. It is a 
thoroughly approved and time tested method. It 
does away with the mussy tearing off of the old 
shingles and gives the home owner a beautiful ever- 
lasting fire-safe roof. 

Get some of this business. *It is quick, clean, 
profitable work for you. Drop us a post card for 
details. 

JOHNS-MANVILLE Inc., 292 Madison Ave., at 41st St., N. Y. C. 

Branches in 62 Large Cities 
For Canada : Canadian Johns-MAnville Co., Ltd., Toronto 

v%^/Johns-MXnville 

\ BRAKE LININGS / A ^ A ^^H • _»^ 

Asbestos Shingles 



BRAKE LININGS 
ROOFINGS 
PACKINGS 
CEMENTS 



PREVENTION 




6 i" LONG. 
FITS YOUR FRAME. 



FREE miim EASY TURNING 

FOLLOW THE CURVES WITHOUT BINDING 

A different saw. Teeth filed and set. 

Ask your dealer. 

Note: Or we will mail direct to you. 

PRICE 50c per doz. Postage paid. 

Sizes — Coarse & Medium. 

Acker mann Steffan & Co., 4532 Palmer St., Chicago, HI. 

WRITE FOR YOUR FREE SAMPLE— TO=DAY 



Get into the Floor Surfacing Business 
While the Field Is Fiesh 

$40 to $50 a day easily earned 
with an AUTOMATIC— 

the result of 10 
years' manufactur- 
ing experience. 
Force 1< eed Lubri- 
cation — SKJf Ball- 
bearings — Wait- 
cey fcilent Chain 
— Holler Pressure 
Regulator — ALL 
Dust taken up on 
forward operation 
"with iN'ew Vacuum 
Kozzle. All work- 
ing parts inclosed. 
Write today — Let 
us tell you how to 
get started in this pay 
iiig business. J rce trial. 
Part it o w 11 — balance 
easy paymmts. 

The Little Auto- 
matic Surfacing Ma- 
chine (on table) is a 
wonder for removing 
varnish from desk 
tops, counters, elc., 
-or for all sorts of 
new work. 

Wayvell Chappell 
& Co. 

38 Jackson St. 

Dept. W 
Waukegan, 111. 





START NOW! 
You Can Be 
Independent 

FIVE DAYS 
FREE TRIAL 

One fair sized job will pay 
f»r Ihe "Ideal" Kloor Sand- 
er. It is sold at a price you 
can afford to pay. In the 
i | five days you have the ma- 
chine on trial you can make 
enough to pay for it. 
The "Ideal" is a practical 
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for continuous service. Sir- 
faces right up to base board. 
Motor can be detached for 
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Write today, and we witt sliow yon ti 
the "IDEAL" will save still another 1 

BOETTCHER COMPANY 




DAY 
TRIAL. 



MAKE EXTRA MONEY 

with an 
IMPROVED SCHLUETER 
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any machine on the 
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up to the baseboard with- 
out use of edge roller. 
A Five Year Guarantee 
which lias proven satis- 
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covers each machine. 
Write for prices and 5 
day free trial offer. 

M. L. SCHLUETER 

230 West Illinois St. Chicago, Illinois. 




The "INrERLOX" Thinks 

Invented by a Brotherhood Man 

Don't use a stick or guess at a measurement. 
The famous 
"Interlox" Master Slide Rule 
yes 



gives both inside and outside measurements 
instantly. 

Quick, accurate, durable and rustproof. Use 
it once, and you will never work without it. 
Write today for liberal selling inducements 
to mechanics. 

MASTER RULE MFG. CO., INC. 
S41C East 136th St.. New York City 



SOLD On EASY Payments 

Write for C ^ ^S Tx The Woodcraft 

Our Plan 




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Drill 
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Grinder 

Handiest, dandiest bench saw on the 

market. Write for circulars today. Power 

E. A. POPHAL MFG. CO. Plant 

1008 Eighth Ave., So.. Wausau, Wis. COM-INED 




Comes equipped for choice 
of gas or electricity. Has 
2 -light Benjamin socket 
for electricity only, with 
8- ft. silk cord ready for 
use; or comes with 6-ft. 
rubber hose, burner, man- 
tle and chimney for gas. 

Mahogany Finish 

Standard is 69 in. "high, 
3 in. in diameter. Highly 
polished French mahog- 
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The Shade 

Made in Fifth Avenue de- 
sign, 24 in. in diameter, of 
delft blue silk, shirred top, 
alternating plain and fancy 
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all, tinsel braid border with 
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The harmonious color 
scheme gives effect of red 
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Shipping weight, 27 pounds. 
Marshall Silky Fringe Pull -Cord* 
Also pair of Marshall silky 
fringe cords with 3H in. silky 
fringed tassels, giving an add- 
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7-Piece Cat Glass Set FREE 
For gas use, order by No. G8000A. 
For electricity, order by No. G8001A. 
Send only $1.00 with the coupon. 
$2.00 monthly. Total Bargain Price 
for lamp and (hade, $19.85. 

Free Bargain Catalog 

Shows thousands of bargains in 
home furnishings: furniture, jew- 
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All sold on easy terms. Catalog 
Bent free, with or without order. 
See coupon. 



7 Pes Genuine Cnt Glass 

EXTRA! EXTRA! Special Offer in 
addition to the amazing lamp bargain 
shown here: — Absolutely Free, this 
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of large floral design with appropriate 
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away free, a limited number of these 7- 
Piece Genuine Cut Glass Sets just to get 
new customers and to get them quickly. 
So read our offer now — and act today 
while these beautiful Cut Glass Sets last. 



With 5th Ave. Silk Shade 

(And 7-Piece Genuine Cut Glass Set FREE) 
Here is something you have always wanted— a beautiful floor lamp with 
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how this floor lamp and silk shade will look in your home, without risking 
anything. Send only $1.00 wiLh the coupon below, and we will send it com- 
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take all the risk. Speci al no w— 7-Piece Set Genuine Cut Glass FREE! 

Days Trial— $222 a Month 

Only $1.00 with coupon brings this smashing bargain on 30 Days Trial. When the 
lamp outfit comes, use it freely for 30 days. If you decide to keep it, pay only 
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to return it, we will refund your $1.00 deposit, plus any freight or express charges 
you have paid. No risk to you. Send coupon Now 1 

Decide now to see 
this beautiful floor 
lamp and silk 
shade in your home on approval on this price smashing offer. Think how the 
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tion guaranteed. 7-Piece Genuine Cut Glass FREE to those who order at once. 



Sale Price— Send Now! 



| Straus & Schram, Dept. 3012, Chicago, III. 



Enclosed find $1.00. _ 
Pieces Genuine Cut Glass Free. 
onth. If not satisfied, I 



as checked below with 7- 



turn the lamp and Btnde and 7-piece cut glass set within SO days 

aid you are to rotund my $1 plus all transportation charges. 

D Gas Floor Lamp No. G8000A, $19.85 i^cfa" s% e t n FrS5 
D Electric Floor Lamp No. GS001 A, $19.85 ) with Either Lamp. 



Name 

Street , R. F. D. 

or DoxNo 

SJiipping 
Point 



Post Office State 

II you want ONLY our free catalog ol homo turnishincs, mark X here G 



This is the way it started 



PROOFS I 

MffS^iS IS FrecL 



Let Beaver L 
Character t<m 



'Hani 

Vulcanite Al 
P h O D U| 



0-9 



Traverse «-«y, 



titeSV^gles- v dvaJlc e for sa^P GlN s 

Than^g you w . j. HlGG 

I atn ' Yours very truly, — 



HERE is an example of the manner in which the 
Beaver Products Company is helping directly 
to develop jobs for you and the other carpenters of 
the country. Here is a dentist up in Traverse City, 
Michigan, who was a live prospect for a roofing job 
— a prospect his local roofers and carpenters had 
overlooked. He, like thousands of other homeowners, 
read a Beaver Vulcanite advertisement in The Satur- 
day Evening Post and took the trouble to write us 
at Buffalo for "roofing" information. 

We immediately got busy — as we do on all in- 
quiries — and helped a roofer in Traverse City to get 
the job. The above letters and picture tell the story. 
And note particularly that this Traverse City roofer 
has made a lifelong friend and booster because he 



ROOFS 




and this is how it finished 3 



Offic. 






erSe City, Mich 



J gan 



comments ™ • nevv roof aS u 6 taken - I am / h ° Use 
specialty'? ? Th e maS l haVe ha <* m a nv / V much 
th *titis?LZ 0fia Z and? s J Who *d the ■ *££ fav <*able 



8 
* 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

1 
I 
4 



hooked up with the Beaver Vulcanite proposition. 
We can help you, too. Mail the coupon for particu- 
lars of our "Carpenter Co-operation' ' plan. It's a 
winner. Why not cash in on it ? 

BEAVER PRODUCTS CO., Inc. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
London. England Thorold, Ont., Canada 



BEAVER PRODUCTS CO., Inc. (Dcpt. H-2) 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Gentlemen: Please send me details about your "Carpenter 
Co-operation" plan which you claim will be a valuable plan 
for me to use. 

Name 

Address _ „ _ 

City State 




EAV 

fkODUCTS 




4 
4 
4 
* 



" 


"Old Fashioned" Quality. 




The Best- 


MM 


is none too good for the 
man who earns his iiving 
with tools. Crucible tool 
steel edge that will last 
l for years. 


dHjjgjBgf£g 

L. .'.. . ., 




Your dealer has them 
or will order for you; or 
write us for catalogue. 


THE 1 

15 Columbia S 


,. & I. J. WHITE CO. 

t. Buffalo, N. Y. 



Let WHITE handle the job FREE 

Tjse this famous combination instrument on your work 
NOW Good contractors, builders and architects find it 
Ideal equipment Willi its exclusive features. .No loose parts. 
Protected spirit level (no in- 
verting). Powerful 25 diameter 
lens. Combination kvel bars 
and transit standards prevent 
inaccuracies. Simple, depend- 
able, thoroughly guaranteed. 
Get it on 

lo Days FREE trial 

No obligation. Write TODAY 
for fuii paruculars. 

DAVID WHITE CO., INC. 

904 Chestnut St., Milwaukee. 






McGLINCHY CARPENTER VISE 

Jaws open 3", weighs 2 lbs., takes down, 
packs in any kit, will hold all your work solid 
and last a lifetime. 
Let me furnish your local circulars and lowest prices. 

Manufactured by 
F. E. McGLINCHY, Willoughby, O. 



Member — Local Union No. 1174. 




Nearly ONE MILLION MEN Have Used 

TAINTOR POSITIVE SAW SETS 

Are You One Of Them? 

Sold By Leading Hardware Dealers Everywhere 
Send for Book : "Care of Saws," free to members of 

The Brotherhood. 
TAINTOR MFG. Co., 95 Reade St., New York 



K & E 



MEASURING TAPES 

and FOLDING RULES 



Used for over 40 years where quick and accurate 
work is done. High quality without high price ! 

KEUFFEL & ESSER CO. 

MEW YORK, 127 Fulton Street. General Olflce and Factories, H0B0KEN, N. I. 

J CHICAGO ST. LOUIS SAN FRANCISCO MONTREAL* 



A "It to see our com- 
plete line at your 
Hardware dealer's. 




economize : : : 
AUTOMATIC SASH HOLDERS 



Do 

Away 

With 

Sash 
Weights. 
Cords, Pulleys, 
Balances 




Eliminate 
Window 
Pockets 
Rattling & 
Other Nui- 
sances, Save 
Time & Labor. 



Send $1.25 for trial set prepaid. Mention weight. 
of sash when ordering. .Address Dept. ('. 

HARDWARE SALES CO., Inc. 

30 Church St., New York City. Room 446 




"LIGHTING FIXTURES" 

READY TO HANG 
Direct from manufacturer. 
Completely wired including glass- 
ware. 
Send for Catalogue No. 26. 

(Just off the Press.) 
Special proposition to Dealers. 

Erie Fixture Supply Co. 

NO. 2. ERIE, PA. 




MORRILL SAWSETS 

Set Saws Just Right 

"Saw Points" Telling You "now To Joint, Set, 
And File Saws." Sent Free Upon Request. 

CHAS. MORRILL, Inc. 

96 Lafayette St. New York. 




Tremendous Saving In Cost 

Easy, fascinating work with our SIM- 
PLIFIED PLANS. We furnish blue 
prints, diagrams, motor, cabinet pieces, 
ready-built horn, etc. You don't need 
to be a cabinet maker. A few hours as- 
sembling and you will have a fine in- 
strument at one-quarter the regular re- 
tail price. Will be the equal of any 
phonograph on the market in beauty of 
tone and appearance. Will play all 
records. Thousands have built their 
own machines and are securing satis- 
faction and plrasure. You too can 

build— do as well and save much money. AGENTS 

MAKE MONEY making and selling these instruments. 

Write today for full details and our FREE OFFER- 
LUPERL PHONOPARTS CO. 

4936 N. Troy St. Dept. 29. Chicago, 111. 




Lay Down The Tool Box 
" ^ MAKE BIG 




?L00 it 

SURFACING 

The'American Universal" Way 

The "American Universal" Way offers you the oppor- 
tunity of a lifetime to get into something for yourself, to 
be your own boss, to build up a real business and make 
real money. 
The real money in the building game goes to the contractors, builders and architects. 
The fellow with the tool box isn't considered when profits are handed out. He gets his 
wages — nothing more — and he gets that only when he works. "American Universal" 
Floor Surfacing contractors 

MAKE $25.00 TO $40.00 A DAY 

every working day in the year — winter and summer — month in and month out — and 
they make it in a pleasant, fascinating way without strikes, layoffs, or idle periods to 
worry them. The man who goes into Floor Surfacing with an 

American Universal 

has a real business of his own. Every cent he earns is his, every effort he puts forth results in profit to himself — 
nobody else. He has plenty of work all the time. He can build and enlarge his business. He doesn't worry 
about poverty in his old age. He makes money enough in his big paying, ever increasing business to enjoy 
life, to buy himself and his family things they want and has money to save for old age and "rainy days." 

Are you free from such worries? Can you have and enjoy the things you want? Are you preparing 
for old age? Lay down the tool box, stop working for wages and wasting precious time in lay- 
offs, strikes and idleness. 

BECOME A FLOOR SURFACING CONTRACTOR 

right now an d start on the road to prosperity, happiness and independence. We have helped 
hundreds of others get started, we'll gladly help you. We can point out scores of former 
carpenters, fellows just like you, who now have a big paying floor surfacing business of 
their own — making more money than they could ever make in wages, enjoying 
life as they never enjoyed it before. Why can't you do as well? 
You need no special training. A small amount starts you with an American Universal Electric- 
ally Driven Machine and everything you need. Wefurnish you stationery, office forms, cards, 
advertising, help you get started, help you succeed. The "American Universal" does the 
work of six fast men, earns you six men's pay. It does perfect work — more beautiful 

work than any man can do by hand. Nearly every "American Universal" man has j 

more than he can do. Now is tho time to get into the floor surfacing Rr.me.^«fcpr ^' 
Send your name to us today for full particulars of our plan, our Free Trial Off "^■^Br S -1-1 

and other valuable information, all free. Write now — quick, today. ^^B^pS ^ 

The American Floor Surfacing ^BJ E^^ _, American 

Machine Company gfjF* Flo ° r Surfacing 

522]S. St. Clair St., Toledo, Ohio _j^^^^^ machine Co., 

^^^s' 522 S. St. Clair St., Toledo, 0. 

S Sirs: Please send without 

S obligation to me, complete informa- 

» > S tion and literature on your proposition. 

^* Name _ _ 

** Street 

+* City 
^ and State _ - 




TEAR OrF HERE 

MAIL THIS NOW 




"That's all 
I need to 
know — it's a 
MAYDOLE HAMMER!" 

Look for the name "D. Maydole," 
stamped on the head. It's absolute as- 
surance that the design, material and 
workmanship in that particular hammer 
is as near perfection as human skill, 
plus over SO years of experience, can 
make it. 

Ask any old-timer — he'll tell you there's 
'hang' in a Maydole Hammer that's lack- 
ing in hammers less carefully made : 
There's years and years of service in the 
press-forged steel heads : There's a grip 
in the claws of a Maydole that never lets 
go : There's a satisfaction in knowing 
that when you put a Maydole in your kit 
you've settled all your hammer troubles 
for a long time to come. In 1843, David 
Maydole — the founder of the business — 
said "I make the best hammer" and from 
t>at day to this, we have striven to hold 
the standard he set. 

If you are a hammer user, send for bur 
free pocket handbook 23A — it's worth a 
lot to a carpenter. 

The David Maydole Hammer Co. 
Norwich New York 



Hammerr 





Every Seam and every 
Button of 

Sweet-Orr 

UNION MADE 

OVERALLS 

is made to stand a 
strain like this. 

No matter how stren- 
uous your work, 
Sweet-Orr Overalls 
will give you real 
comfort and long 
wear. 

Your satisfaction is 
guaranteed. 

If your dealer can't 
supply you, write us. 



SWEET-ORR & CO., 
15 Union Sq. 
New York 



INC. 



First To Put The Union Label in 
Work Clothes 




KUPN 





You can bet it's Klein's he buys ! 

You will always find them in the 
tool chests of the skilled craftsmen. 
Powerful leverage, keenly rein- 
forced, comfortably shaped — 
Klein's are man size pliers for the 
tough job. 



Mathi 



las 



&S 



ons 




Its a fact! You can now ob- 
tain the first unbreakable 
planes ever manufactured. 
Drop forged — not cast — 
from a solid bar of V & B 
supersteel, they stand the 
falls that would break an 
ordinary plane. 

Made in the standard size 
and furnished with all vana- 
dium blade and walnut han- 
dle — finished in light grey. 
Why use brittle planes? Ask 
your hardware dealer to 
show you V & B drop forged 
planes. If he hasn't them, 
write us for catalog and send 
in his name. 

VAVSHAN & BVSHNBLL 

H^MUHACTP^lfsfq COMPANY" 

c^ia/cer-xr of" JF^inc "TooltT 

2114 Carroll Ave^" vChicago, IIL W.S.A* 



Black Diamond 



Files 



WOLJ'. 




Start 'em young to 
form a healthy res- 
pect for BLACK 
DIAMOND Files- 

BLACK DIAMOND 
Files have won your 
confidence because 
they make your work 
easier and improve 
its quality. Pass the 
good work along. 

Since 1863 the Standard 
of Quality 



An old homej 

modernized by %" 

Oak Flooring. 




Laid right over 
the old worn floor. 



No woodwork is 
disturbed except 
the quarter-round 
at the baseboard. 




Money for You 

Turn your spare time into profit 

by laying %" oak flooring 

in old homes. 



Many carpenters 
have increased their 
income by telling 
people in their neigh- 
borhood about oak 
floors. Show them 
how quickly and in- 
expensively you can 
lay permanent oak 
flooring over worn 
and unsightly J 
softwood floors. (%; 

Women will f| 
be glad to know 
that oak floors 
savehousework,that 
the cost is not more 




Nature's Gift of 



It will help you get 
the order. Wm. J. 
Benko of New 
Brunswick, N. J., 
writes; "I personal- 
ly distribute-d io 
books, and got 6 
jobs." You can do 
that too. 

Hoiv many books 
can you use! 

How to figure ac- 
curately the amount 
of flooring required 
is containedin"How 
and Where to Use 
Oak Floors," also 



than new carpets, J" at " re f °v* "* grading rules, stand 



and they add lasting 
value to their property. 

Free Cooks will help you 

"The Story of Oak 
Floors' ' contains plates of the 
new color finishes. Any 
home owner will look 
through this book with you. 



ard measurements, 
thicknesses and widths, 
proper storing, laying, scrap- 
ing and finishing. 

Free, if you 
mail this 
coupon. 



££ 



Oak Flooring Bureau 

831 Hearst Bldrr., Chicago 
Please send me "The Story of Oak 
Floors," and "How and Where to 
Use Oak Floors." 




Name., 



Address.. 
City 



State., 




HEADLIGHT 

Carpenter's Overalls 

* UNION MADE, fe^a^^jy^gsd 

MADE OF EXTRA FINE QUALITY SAIL CLOTH fK^OTE^PWy 

15 FEATURES 

Which Make This Qarment the Best Carpenters Overall Made 



1 Every point of strain rein- 
forced with Bar Tacks. 



MY GUARANTEE TO YOU 

If, when this overall is completely worn oat, 
you do not think that Headlight Carpenters 
Overalls are better, more convenient and will 
outwear any ot her overall made, J will give 
you baekyour money. Beware ofimitatiom. 
Demand the Genuine, 



2 Three pockets in one on 
the bib. Safety watch 
pocket. Memo book pock- 
et. Pencil pocket. 

3 Four big nail pocketsmade 
of extra heavy army duck. 

4 Extra wide and high bib. 

5 Wide suspenders, will 
not slip off or cut into 
shoulders. 

6 Two big front pockets. 

7 Douole cloth at the front. 

Mail your order to our nearest factory if your local Headlight Dealer 
cannot supply you. 

LARNED, CARTER Sl CO. 

World's Greatest Overall Makers 
DETROIT, ST.LOUIS, SAN FRANCISCO, PERTH AMBOY, N.J. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO 
New York O/ficej 5-7-9 Union SquareChicago Oflice: 653 S. Wells St. 



8 2 side hammer straps. 

9 1 back hatchet or ham- 
mer strap. 

10 Patented safety rule 
pocket. 

11 Big back pockets. 

12 Chisel or putty knife 
pocket. 

13 High back protects cloth- 
ing. 

14 Big wide comfortable 
legs. 

15 Extra pencil pockets in 
center of nail pockets. 



55% Saved In Heating Costs in Portland, Ore., by 
Insulating with Cabot's Quilt 



"iS 


;:.., '■:■"■ . ■ 






"tUb 




-' ""'.? - 




■' urns 









Residence of J. H. Hartog. 

I THIS HOUSE COST 55% MORE TO HEAT than 
THIS HOUSE was lined with building paper. 




with 



Residence of Dr. W. P.. Holden. 
F. Manson White, Architect 

THIS HOUSE. 

THIS HOUSE WAS INSULATED 

Cabot's Quilt. 
THIS HOUSE COST to HEAT, October .to 

May inclusive . . . $SS.72 
Average cost per month . 11. OS 



THIS HOUSE COST to HEAT, October to 

May inclusive . . . $138.10 

Average cost per month . 17.20 

The Heating Equipment was EXACTLY the Same in Both Houses (lG-Section Gasco Furnace). 

The Hartog house was only 7% larger in cubical measurement, but being a two-story house 

was naturally much easier to heat than the one-story house on account of easier radiation ami 

of the much smaller roof area; but the p— '— — — — — 

Quilt insulation reversed I 

fefpStfliJ this, so that it cost 55% j 

'1Ei H.-fi i ^TO gaK more to hent it than ' 

Ihe Holden house. I 




Samuel Cabot, Inc., 6 Oliver St.. Boston. 
5000 Bloomingdalc Ave., Chicaflo. 

Send me free sample Cabot's Quilt 
full information : 



FILL OUT THIS 

COUPON 

AND MAIL IT 



Name 

Street 

Town State. 



J! 




It 



Pays to Mortise 
the Champion Way! 



Putting the Champion mortiser on the job 
guarantees a ptri'tct mortise. It eliminates 
the risk of splintered edges, imperfect depths, 
rough bottoms and sides as is the case when 
mortising by hammer, chisel or brace and 
bit. Once the Champion is properly clamped 
to the stock to be mortised you are guaran- 
teed perfect results. 

The New Improved 
•IPhamtwon 



oriisen 

aBmage 




— saves time, labor and real money by its 
speedy, easy operation. Carried anywhere. 
Balanced fly wheel and rigid construction in- 
sure uniform cutting. Cuts a mortise from 
J" to li" wide and any length from round 
hole to 6" slot. Tear's guarantee with each 
machine. Shipped complete with any two 
bits (choice J" to 3") $40.00 f. o. b. fac- 
tory. Extra bits to li" $2.00 each. 

Money Back Guarantee 

If not satisfied after ten clays' trial 
return machine at our expense and 
get your money. Send TODAY! 
Fully illustrated bulletin describing 
this and our motor driven model sent 
free upon request. 




Colgan 

Machinery 

& Supply 

Co., 

Columbus, Ohio 



302 Hayden B!dg., 



THE 

EXPERT'S 

CHOICE 

FILE 



Does twice the work of an ordinary file — in half the time. 
The Expert's Choice increases the value of your time by 
over 50%. By spending 30 cents you can make it back 
on your first filing job alone. It's in the Quality — in the 
cut of the tooth and in the length of the stroke. 

Frank Luther, Chirago. says: "The Expert's 
Choice File flies IS hand saws and is cheaper at 
& cost of 50c than the ordinary file at any price " 
You get your money back if the Expert's Choice does not prove 
to be the most economical file you have ever used. DELTA 
SAW FILES aro made for flne or coarse teeth— also for that 
extra hard saw. Buy your tools of the dealer who sells 
Delta Files. He is the quality man. 

Trial Offer If your deaIer cannot supply you, send us 20c, 
25c or 30c for trial Hie, 6ent prepaid. Do 
thlj today — find out what a real file is 



YOU NEED A 
HUTHER DADO HEAD 




The adjustable groover 
that cuts with or across 
grain. Easily adjusted with- 
out the use of screws, just 
add or remove inside cut- 
ters to make the desired cut. 
May be returned if not satis- 
factory. Sent on approval. 

"Write for our new cata- 
log No. 43, showing many 
special tools for your saw rig. 

Huther Bros. Saw Mfg. Co. 

Rochester, N. Y. 




"TriE .HIGHEST GRADE FIDE MADE". 
D E LTA" M AND S A¥T FJ L ESS 



CARPENTERSS-SRECIAL' 



MECHANIC'S FAVORITE' 



- ; EXPERTS CHOICE «"r" c " 

. :pnc T.wi CE.-jHr wo»ii"in.'mal'f-t h'e : tibe "fe|M 

TH&.FltE.YoU WlLL.EVENXUALLf. USE %&£ 



DELTA 

FILE 

WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, 
PA. 



Look for 
This Sign 
at Your 
Hardware 
Store 



The besl Auger Bit File made-— We will dtHiu oo receipt a/ 35 ctsU each. 



EEG. TJ. S. PAT. OFF. 



BAYONNE 

IS GUARANTEED ABSOLUTELY 



It has been used as a roof and floor 
covering on thousands of Piazzas, 
Sleeping Porches, etc., and is recog- 
nized by Carpenters and Builders the 
country over as the standard of Roof- 
ing Canvas. 

Write for sample book "T" 

JOHN BOYLE & CO., INC. 

ESTABLISHED I860 

Dliftl/VT. NEW YORK RESIST. 
DRANCH 1317-1319 PINE ST. ST. LOUIS 



Carpenters &. Builders most essential Tool, 

G & B JUNIOR 
CONVERTIBLE LEVEL 

Level and Transit combined 

$5.00 will bring it to you. 
Level & Plumb with your own Instrument. 



10 Days 


Deposit 


free trial ^pj 


cheerfully 


and *$ 


P returned if 


Book of i 


3, no * 


Instructions a 


W satisfied 


Powerful / / 


9\ Easy to op- 


Lens system, IB 


«k erate. Noth- 


graduated j j 


I& ing to get 


circle, M 


lj& out of order. 


ground JJr 


1» Complete as 


Level Vial. m 


la shown. 
1 



U.S. 

Patents 



Easy 

Terms 



The most complete accurate and dur- 
able Convertible Level on the market. 
Send at once for Circular E. 



^L 



GEIER & BLUHM, INC. 
River St. Troy, N. Y. 



t 



There Is No Better Machine 
Made Than the 

"Lightning Electric 1 

Floor 

Surfaeer 

If you are interested in Floor 
Surfacing Machines be sure 
to write for the literature 
on the "Lightning Electric" 
— the highest quality and 
most economically priced 
floor surf acer on the mar' 
ket. Will do the work 
of . six to eight men 
and do it better. 

No Old- 
Fashioned 
Side Roller 

The "Lightning Electric" will surface right up to 
quarter round without the use of the Old-Fashioned 
and cumbersome side roller. Leaves NO waves or 
chatter marks in the roughest floors— will NOT vibrate. 

Five Day Free Trial 
and Five Year Guarantee 

Write for our five day free trial and our five year guaran- 
tee on the best Floor Surfacing Machine the world has 
ever produced. Costs you nothing to investigate and the 
machine pays for itself the first month. A business making 
proposition for the contractor or individual— write today. 

National Sanding Mashke Company 

Formerly Tha Globe Mfg. & Dist. Co. 

Safes G££i«e: 

543-545 Vedder St. Chicago, 111° 





CARPENTERS— BUILDERS 
CONSTRUCTION MEN 

EARN 
MORE 
MONEY 



Learn how to get 
ahead in the build- 
ing game. Don't be 
satisfied to be an odd jobber in your 
trade. Don't let the other fellows get 
the soft jobs, while you plug along try- 
ing to make both ends meet. Here is 
your big chance to get ahead. 
We have several opportunities for men 
as foremen or Building Superintendents. 
You must have practical knowledge, but 
no matter what you've done, you must 
at least understand how to work with 
Blue Prints. 

Write and make your applications for 
training today. Here is your chance to 
earn more money. We will send FREE 
Blue Print and all details of our plan 
for you. 

COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL EST. 1904 

Dept. C-25 Drexel Eldg., Phila., Pa. 



WEATHERSTRIPS 

Install Fed- 
eral Metal 
Weather- 
strips and. become 
a contractor. 
There is lots of 
money to be 
made by the i n- 
stallation of 
Federal Metal 
Weatherstrip and 
I we want you to 
be our agent in 
your locality. 

Work is now 
plentiful and you 
can build a nice 
business for your- 
self as a weath- 
I erstrip contractor 
; and become in- 
sist dependent. 

| Write us to- 
^^^ day and let 
us send you full information about 
this profitable business. 

FEDERAL METAL WEATHERSTRIP CO. 

1240 Fullerton Ave. Chicago 





Send for Catalog 



Plumbing, Heating and Pneumatic 
Waterworks Supplies at Wholesale 



When in the market for Plumbing. Heating and 
Pneumatic Waterworks Supplies and you wish to 

Save 20 to 40% on Every Article 

order from us. Small orders are as carefully 
handled as large ones. Only house selling guar- 
anteed plumbing and heating supplies to all. 



B. KAROL & SONS CO., 804 So. Kedzie Ave., Chicago, 111. 



ssnmMis 



The Sign 
of Master Workmen 

Novices and apprentices may start 
out with various other levels — but 
sooner or later they come to Sand's. 
Experienced craftsmen know. 
That's why no matter where you 
go, the majority of levels on the 
job carry the name "Sands". 
If you like good tools, the factory 
built-in accuracy and many other 
advantages of Sand's Lev- 
els will appeal to 




24 

6 Glass 

Aluminum «S>t)»*)U 

Sand's Wood and Aluminum Levels 
for Every Purpose 

At Good Hardware Stores Everywhere 

If yours can't supply you, order direct, 
mentioning dealer's name. 

Sand's Level & Tool Co. 



5851 Fischer Ave. 



Detroit, Mich. 



j ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP] 




Are You 



Busy 
Mr. Carpenter? 



You can make 
^_-±_i^ MORE MONEY 
and turn your spare time into 
profit by installing 

ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP 
Many carpenters have started in 
this work and made it an all year 
ronnd business. 

YOU CAN DO THAT TOO 
It is easy to install, effective and 
lasting. 
SEND BACK THE COUPON 

ALLMETAL WEATERSTRIP CO., 
227 W. Illinois St., Chicago, 111. 
Gentlemen : Without obligation please send 
me samples and literature. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY STATE 




A lock mortiser which does a good clean job, not 
only eliminates the tedious handwork of the old way 
but does a better job in one-fifth of the time. 

Very easily attached to the door centering itself 
and held in place by clamps which will not marr 
the door. 

Carpenters are now making a big profit with this 
machine doing lock mortising and you can do the 
same. 

Interchangeable so that it can be operated by 
hand or electric power. 

WRITE TODAY FOR FULL PARTICULARS. 

MASTIN & McKAIN 

265 North Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 




The American Woodworker 

Gasoline, Kerosene, or Electric Driven 
Used on the Job or in the Shop 

Let us send you our Bulletin Ko. 77 
describing this and other profit pro- 
ducers for the Carpenter, Contrac- 
tor and Builder. 

American Saw Mill Machinery Co. 

136 Main Street 
Hackettstown, N. J. 




PARKS 

Four-in-One" Cir- 
cular saw, band 
saw, jointer and 
borer $240 f. o. b. 
Cincinnati, O. 



Put this Parks in your shop! 

For the man who does "odd jobs" in his 
off time this Parks is a money-maker. 
Working alone you can turn out as much 
work as a four-man shop. With a few 
attachments you can do any thing in 
woodworking. 

You can make your Parks pay out fast. You can 
soon build up your own paying business in your 
epare time. Others have clone It — so can you. 
Write for Parks catalog and the story of "One 
Man Who Did It." 

THE PARKS BALL BEARING MACHINE COMPANY 

1549 Knowlton Street, Cincinnati, 0. 

Canadian Factory: 200 Notre Dame East, 

Montreal, Car.. 





WOODWORK! NG I MACHIN ES 



C ETTA R 
SHINGLES 



LONG years of slow growth, 
heat of Summer and Win- 
ter's cold, wind and rain, 
storm and stress — all these go in- 
to the making of Nature's unsur- 
passable material for covering the 
habitations of men — Red Cedar 
Shingles. 

Laid by the skillful carpenter, 
nailed with good, rust-proof nails, 
they provide a roof of unmatched 
beauty, economy and durability. 

Recommend to your customers this 
material which requires your labor 
and skill and insures your cus- 
tomer's satisfaction. 



Send for interesting literature. 
RED CEDAR SHINGLE BUREAU 

38 South Dearborn Street 
CHICAGO ILLINOIS 



For Absolute Protection 

Use The 

fTTTh DEflD 
ilW BOLT 

NIGHT LATCH 

An extra security on glass doors, as key may be turned once 
backwards, locking bolt so it can not be forced or knob turned 
without proper key. Easily installed on any door. Ask your 
dealer or write us direct. 

INDEPENDENT LOCK CO., Leominster, Mass., U. S. A. 






There! 

That's my idea 
of a Steel Tape- 

One that you can read. Look at the 
foot figure beside each inch mark. See 
how the bright figures fairly jump at 
you from the black background. They 
can't shrink or stretch and they're 
made by Starrett — which answers all 
questions as to their accuracy. 
If you're going to buy a Tape, tell 'em 
you want a Starrett Steel Tape. You 
won't go wrong, whether it's a Pocket 
Steel Tape (say the No. 500, made in 
5 lengths from 3 to 10 feet) or a 2o 
to 100 foot (No. 510) Steel Measur- 
ing Tape. 

There's also a Builder's Tape — the 
No. 540 — that's specially recommend- 
ed for Builders, Contractors and 
Architects. It's 62J inches long, one 
side graduated with 1-8 inch scale 
from 1 to 500 and the other side with 
1-4 inch scale from 1 to 250. A full 
tape is, therefore, either a quarter or 
a half of a thousand feet depending 
on the scale of the plans you're work- 
ing from. 

Ask your hardware dealer to show 
you Starrett Steel Tapes. 

THE L. S. STARRETT CO. 

World's Greatest Tool-makers 
Manufacturers of Hacksaws Unexcelled 

Athol, Mass. 





Be sure to write for a 
free cop// of the Starrett 
Catalog No. 23 "E". You 
will be surprised to see 
how many tools we make 
exclusively for the car- 
pentering and building 
trade. 



OOI 




•H0ORS 



New Sales Helps 



One of the most attrac- 
tively illustrated booklets 
on oak flooring is now 
ready for distribution 
among prospective home- 
builders. 

It tells the whole story 
of Perfection Brand Oak 
Flooring. You will find it 
of immense help in mak- 
ing sales. 

We also have some very 
successful envelope staff- 
ers for general distribu- 
tion that we are supplying 
free. 

Write today for these 
selling helps and full in- 
formation about Perfec- 
tion Brand Oak Flooring. 

Arkansas Oak Flooring 



Pine Bluff, Arkansas 



Take a Wallace Saw out on the Job 

You really have no idea what a convenience a Wallace 
Portable Universal Saw is out on a construction job until 
you have used one. These machines take their power 
from any lighting circuit, so they can be set up in the 
new building as soon as the foundation is in, — no spe- 
cial shed is needed. And you can take them from floor 
to floor as the work progresses, using them for the 
finish and cabinet work on each floor in turn. These 
saws rip or cross-cut straight o± at a single or double angle. The 
saw tips while the table remains horizontal — the safe way. And 
they will take special knives for grooving, dado cuts, molding, etc. 
Wallace Machines do the smallest 
work accurately, yet develop amaz- 
ing speed on large work as well. 
You can buy any Wallace Machine 
on easy terms if you wish. They 
enable you to save more than enough 
,to pay for them. 

Wallace Portable Machines 




Universal Sato 

Plain Saio 

16" Band Saw 

Glue Pot 

auto heat con- 
trol 

Disc Sander 



6'' Jointer 

li" Planer 

6" Lathe 

Solder Pot 

auto heat con- 
trol 

Spindle Sander 



Write today for Catalog 402C and learn of the many 
ways in which Wallace Machines will save you money 



J. D. Wallace & Co. 



CHICAGO 



154 S. California Ave. 



ILLINOIS 



#^C; 





An Adjustable Combination 
Level And Plumb That Can 
Be Applied To Any Length 
Straight Edge Or Board. The 
Level With An Instant Adjust= 
inent And Immediate Results. 

USE IT AND PROVE IT 



No Level Has Ever Been 
Made Before Combining 
As Many Advantages As 
The UBA For Heavy And 
Light Framing and In- 
terior Trimming. The UBA 
Is Durable, Simple, Guaran- 
teed and Rust Proof. It Is 
An Indispensable Utility Level 
And Plumb In All Branches 
Of Carpentry. 




fc>ize 3ix4 incnes. 

Price $1.25 

Order Through Your Local 
Dealer Or Send Us Your 
Money Order And We Will 
Mail Direct To You. Mention 
Name Of Dealer. 

UNION LEVEL MFG. CO. 

4649 So. Ashland Ave., 
Chicago, 111. 




You Do Service To 
Yourself And Employ- 
er When You Put A 
UBA Into Action. The 
UBA Is Thoroughly 
And Rigidly Inspected 
To Maintain The High 
Standard Of Quality The 
Mechanic Insists On. Fin- 
ished With White Or Green 
Double Marked Bulbs. 




In Canada 

Have Tour Dealer Order From 

THE WALKERVILLE HARDWARE 

COMPANY, Ltd. 

(Wholesale Only) 

Walkerville, Ontario, Canada. 




Building Trades 
Need Trained Men 

Thousands of good positions 
at good salaries 

THE building trades 
are still booming. 
Trained men are in de- 
mand at good salaries. 
Government experts 
estimate that 
billions of 
dollars will 
be spent for. 
construction 
this year. 

Today the most vital need of this great 
building program is men — trained men — 
men who can step right in and do the skilled 
work that building construction requires. 

There is a simple, easy, practical way 
by which you can prepare for a better posi- 
tion, at a bigger salary. You can do it 
right at home, in spare time, no matter 
where you live, through the International 
Correspondence Schools. 

A recent investigation of 13,928 students en- 
rolled in I. C. S. Building Trades Courses 
showed that 1921 had bec-ae Architects; 246 
had become Designers; 494 had become Chief 
Draftsmen; 2827 had become Draftsmen; 1845 
had become Contractors; 211 had 
become Assistant Foremen; 4030 
had become Foremen; 2354 had 
become Superintendents. 

You, too, can have the position 
you want in the work you like 
best ; an income that will give 
you and your family the home, 
the comforts, the luxuries you 
would like them to have. 

Mail the Coupon for 
Free Booklet 




■TEAB OUT HIREi 



INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS 



BOX 8831 -B 

Explain, ■without obligating 

position, or in the subject, 

J ARCHITECT 
Architectural Draftsman 
Architects* Blue Prints 

_ Contractor and Builder 

B Building Foreman 
Concrete Builder 
Structural Engineer 
Structural Draftsman 
Plnmber and Steam Fitter 
Heating and Ventilation 
Plumbing Inspector I 

R Foreman Plumber 
_ Sheet Metal Worker 
J CIVIL ENGINEER. 
j Surveying and Mapping 
J ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 
Electric Lighting and Rys, 
Electric Wiring 
Telegraph Engineer 

R Telephone Work 
MECHANICAL- ENGINEER 
Mechanical Draftsman 
Toolmaker 
_ Machine Shop Practice 
3 CHEMIST 
U Pharmacy 

Name ' 



SCRANTON, PA. 

me, how I can qualify for the 
before which I mark X. 

□ Navigation 

D SALESMANSHIP 
ADVERTISING 
Window Trimmer 
Show Card and Sign Palndnir 
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 
Private Secretary 
Business Correspondent 
BOOKKEEPER 
Stenographer and Typist 
Higher Accounting 
COMMERCIAL LAW 
Common School Subjects 
Mathematics 
GOOD ENGLISH' 
ILLUSTRATING 
Railway Mail Clerk 

= CIVIL SERVICE 

J Mining Engineer 

3 Gas Engine Operating; 
STATIONARY ENGINEERS 
Textile Overseer or Snpt. 

,. TRAFFIC MANAGER 

3 AUTOMOBILES I □Spanish 
AGRICULTURE iQFrench 
Poultry Raising | QRADIO 



Occupation 
& Employer. 

Street 

and No 

City_ 



Business 

.Address _ 



Canadians may send this coupon to International Corre- 
spondence Schools Canadian, Limited, Montreal, Canada 




Cyclone 



Shingles 

The greatest improvement 
ever made in asphalt shingles 

The Cyclone Shingle has features 
■which are not found combined in 
any one strip shingle. They are 
features which mean better roofs, 
economy in material and saving in 
labor. 

Every carpenter will be interested 
in these Cyclone points;. Double- 
locked butt which prevents cup, 
curl or blow-up. Long head-lap of 
6 7-10 inches; wide side-lap of 5 
inches; only 72 shingles required 
per square and only 216 nails 
needed. 

And the price is no higher than 
any other strip shingle. Write to- 
day for full particulars. Knowing 
and using the Cyclone will mean 
money to you. 

FORD ROOFING PRODUCTS CO., 

535=39 So. Franklin St., 

Chicago, 111. 



FORD ROOFING PRODUCTS CO., (402) 

535-39 So. Franklin St., Chicago, 111. 
Please send me full particulars of the Cyclone 
•without obligation. 



Name . 
Address 




*t>. \ 




Do you know why it's 
a gypsum wallboard? 

Ques. Why is Sheetrock made of gypsum? 

Ans. Because gypsum is the ideal material for 
walls and ceilings. It has been used for 
centuries in building the finest and strong- 
est walls and ceilings. 

Ques. How are Sheetrock edges reinforced? 

Ans. The long edges of Sheetrock are rein- 
forced by the covering material, an ex- 
clusive Sheetrock feature that insures a 
nailing-edge of great strength and tough- 
ness. 

Ques. Is Sheetrock thicker than ordinary wall- 
board? 

Ans. Yes, Sheetrock is about twice as thick as 
the ordinary wallboard. That's why it 
helps stiffen up the whole building. 

Ques. What are the sizes of Sheetrock boards? 

Ans. They may be had in 32-in. or 48-in. 
widths, and in 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10-ft. 
lengths. They are easily cut with a com- 
mon saw. 



P C You'll find many other valuable 
■"■ • *■'* points about Sheetrock construc- 
tion described in the free Sheetrock Time 
Book. Mail this coupon today for your copy 



i] 



UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

General Offices: Dept.4, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 

Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



SHEETROCK 

The FIREPROOF WALLBOARD 

Mail this coupon today 



United States Gypsum Company 

Dept.4 , 205 W. Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 
Send my SHEETROCK Time Book to— 



(Name) 



(Complete Address) .' 

Sheetrock is inspected and approved as an effective barrier to fire by the Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. 




SILVER 

STEEL 




A He -Man's Saw 

The Four Hundred Saw 
pictured on this page is 
in demand by master 
carpenters and arti- , 
sans who want some- / 
thing above the av- / 
erage in quality / 
and finish. / 





Are You 
K- Using This Saw? 

,4T^ The finest saw eA'er made. Manu- 
JfJ^ factured from Silver Steel, Atkins' ex- 
tf^V^ elusive formula. Tempered perfectly to 
jJFp^ insure long-wearing and sharp cutting 
gP^ teeth. Furnished in regular pattern, skew 
P- back, ship pattern, straight back. Ship pattern 
saws are made in 20 inch lengths only. Ground to 
a full four gauge taper, and will cut fast and easy 
with very little set. Mirror polish with Improved 
Perfection Rosewood Handle, the handle that pre- 
vents wrist strain. 

Order one from your hardware dealer and find out 
for yourself that it is 

In 26 inch length, price $5.65 east of the Rockies. 
Price slightly higher west of the Rockies. 



E. C. ATKINS 

Established 1857 

Machine Knife Factory: Home Office and Factory: 



Lancaster, N. Y. 



& COMPANY 

The Silver Steel Saw People 
Canadian Factory: 



Indianapolis, Ind. 



Hamilton, Ont. 



ERANCH HOUSES 
Atlanta Memphis New Orleans Portland Seattle Paris, France 

Chicago Minneapolis New York San Francisco Vancouver, B. C. Sydney N.S. W. 






... -as.' .. - --- 






This book shows you 




the easiest way to figure daily wages at all rates; also has memo pages for 
keeping track of working time and a lot of helpful construction data for 
carpenters and builders. The supply of these valuable books is limited. 
Make sure of your copy by tearing off and mailing the coupon now. 

Sheetrock comes in standard sizes: % in. thick, 32 or 48 in. wide and 6 to 10 ft. long 

UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

General Offices: Dept. 4, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 



Sea. O. S.Pat. OS. 



SHEETROCK 

The FIREPROOF WALL BOARD 



Mail this coupon today 



United States Gypsum Company 

Dept. 4, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 
Send my SHEETROCK Time Book to— 

(Complete Address) . 

Sheetrock is inspected and approved a: an effective barrier to fire by the Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. 




One man planned, built and owns this 
home thatched with Winthrops 

When Mr. H. J. Maughn of Toronto selected Winthrop 
Tapered Asphalt Shingles for this thatched roof he 
knew — as architect — that they would give him — as 
owner — the striking effect he wished. He knew, too — 
as contractor — that he would experience no difficulties 
in laying the roof. 

As owner, he was sure of the beauty, durability and gen- 
eral satisfaction his roof would give him. 




Inthrop 

Tapered Asphalt Shingles 



The strongest quality feature ever 
put in any slate-surfaced asphalt 
shingle is the exclusive, distinctive 
taper found only in the Winthrop. 
This taper not only causes them to 
snuggle closer to the roof but offers 
greatest thickness where exposed 
to weather and possible fire 
brands. 

These thick butts, due to extra 
coats of asphalt on both sides of 
the heavy felt core, cast the at- 
tractive shadow lines that made 



the old wooden shingles popular. 
Deeply imbedded crushed slate gives 
the outside surface beautiful and 
lasting color — tile-red, sea-green, 
blue-black and golden-buff. Why 
not be the man who builds a lasting 
reputation for putting on the best 
and prettiest roofs in your town? 
Let us send you free sample of this 
beautiful shingle. 

See its goodness and beauty for 
yourself. Just tell us what color 
you'd like to have. 



Beckman - Dawson Roofing Company 

838 F. C. Austin Bldg., 11 1 W. Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 
Factories at Argo, Illinois, and Detroit, Michigan 



The Blue Ribbon Saw-A Winner 





Take inventory. Look over your 
kit and find out if some of your 
tools need replacing. You use 
your hammer on all kinds of jobs 
— How about your saws. They 
are just as important — in fact 
more so. A good, fast-cutting, 
edge-holding saw means a lot to 
you. It does away with that 
muscle wearing pull you find in 
saws that are not built right and 
which dull easily. It is the steel 
in a saw that. counts. Besides that 
a good saw should be mechanically 
right and perfectly balanced. That 
explains just why the Simonds 
Blue Ribbon Saws please carpen- 
ters. s They are winners because 
they are the best. 

Ask your dealer to show you the 
Simonds Blue Ribbon Line Saws 



1 — Made of Simonds 
Steel. 

2 — Hardened and Tem- 
pered by Simonds 
Process. 

3 — Ground Thin Back 
and Specially Stiff- 
ened. 

4 — Every Saw Hung to 
Balance. 

5 — Edge-holding, Fast- 
cutting Saws. 

6 — Satisfaction Abso- 
lutely Guaranteed. 




Simonds Saw and Steel Co. 



Boston, Mass. 
Chicago, III. 
Detroit, Mich. 
New York City 



"THE SAW MAKERS" 

FITCHBURG, MASS. 

Lockport, N. Y. Portland, Ore. 

Memphis, Tenn. San Francisco, Cal. 

London, England Seattle, Wash. 

New Orleaks, La. 



Montreal, Que. 
Vancouver, B. C. 
St. John, N. B. 



This Super-Size Shingle 
Makes a Wonderful Roof 



Barrett Giant Shingles! 
Here's an improved super- 
size shingle that never fails 
to satisfy the most critical 
home owners. 

More economical: because 
with their 12-inch width — the 
maximum width that can be 
fastened with two nails — 
fewer Barrett Giants are 
needed per square. (The ex- 
Barrett Shingles perience of practical roofers 
BarrettRoll Roofings has proved that it costs al- 
most 50% less to lay Giants 
than ordinary shingles). And 



on reroofing jobs. Giants can 
be laid right over the old roof 
— a big saving in time, trou- 
ble and money. 
Low in Maintenance cost:: 
Thicker and tougher than, 
ordinary shingles, Barrett 
Giants won't rot or rust. And 
they never need painting or 
staining. 

Fire-safe: Slate surfaced in 
three handsome colors — red,, 
green and blue-black, thev 
are proof against sparks and 
embers. 



O^€o 



ROOFINGS 



A Valuable Free Book 



"Eettcr Tlomrs from O'd Houses" gives 
iUcas fcr rt-aioUc'.ing old-fashiontd houses 
into handsome modem homes. Thousands 
of carpenter-contractors are putting this 



practical book into the hands of owners of 
old houses— and supplying the labor needed 
when the alterations start. Send for your 
sample copy— It's a business builder. 



THE BARRETT COMPANY, 40 Rector St., New York. 

Please send me free sample copy of your business-building book — "Better Homes from Old Houses.' 
The address of my building supply dealer is given below. 



Your Name Tour Dealer's Name. 

Your Address Dealer's Address 

Town .".. state 



"«-~^"«B^ 




Sent Free 

Mail the Coupon for these 2 Books 
and Blue Print Plans 

If you are in any building trade, we want to send you these 2 books and 
blue prints at our expense. One of these books contains a lesson in Plan 
Reading prepared by the Chicago Tech. experts; the other explains the 
Chicago Tech. method of training men by mail in the building trades for 
the jobs that pay the most money or for businesses of their own. All you 
have to do to get them is to mail the coupon. Don't send a penny. 

Get the Knowledge that Will 
Make You Worth More Money 



You may be as good a man as there is in 
the use of tools but as long as you re- 
main a workman you -won't earn more 
than the wage scale. It isn't manual 
skill that puts a man in the big pay 
class — it's the ability to use his head 
that brings the fat pay check or enables 
him to "go in for himself." That has 
been proved over and over again by 
workmen who took the Chicago Tech. 
training in the higher branches of build- 
ing and are now foremen, superintend- 
ents and contractors. 

J. B. "Woodside of Oklahoma was a car- 
penter working for $6 a day when he 
took a course in training by mail at Chi- 



cago- Technical College and was ad 
vanced to a foremanship, in 2 months, 
became a superintendent 5 months later 
and then went into contracting. 

Carl Testroat of Iowa is another man 
who got into a successful contracting 
business through this training as did J. 
G. Hart of West Virginia, and C. W. 
Busch of Kansas. 

Not only have workmen got ahead 
through this instruction but also con- 
tractors who were taking on small jobs 
because their experience was limited. 
Chicago Tech. has taught them now to 
handle the big jobs that pay the most 
money. 



Train by Mail 

Become a Building Expert 

Never before have there been such op- 
portunities as there are right now for 
men with expert knowledge of building. 
You can get ready for these big oppor- 
tunities if you will use some of your 
spare time to study at home under the 
direction of the Chicago Tech. experts. 
No time taken from your present work. 
All this will be explained when we send 
you the free books and blue prints. 

Plan Reading. Every man who has got 

very far ahead in any building trade can 

read blue prints. No man can expect to 

be a. first rate foreman or 

superintendent until he 

knows what every line on 

a plan means and how to 

lay out and direct work 

from the architect's plans. 

By the Chicago Tech. 

Method you quickly learn 

to read any plan as easily 

as you read these words. 



Do You Know— 



Estimating. Of course a 
man who wants to be a 
contractor or to hold a big 
job in a contracting organ- 
ization must know how to 
figure costs of labor, ma- 
terial, and everything else 
that goes into any kind of 
building The Chicago 
Tech.- course covers every 
detail of this important branch — tells 
you just how it is done from actual 
blue print plans. 

Superintending. How to hire and direct 
men, how to keep track of every detail 
of construction as it goes on, how to get 
the work done in the least time at the 
lowest cost is also fully covered in the 
Chicago Tech. Builders' Course. 



— how different materials 

are shown on blue 

prints? 
— how "sections" and 

"elevations" are shown 

on the plans? 
— how to lay out a builds 

ing from the plan? 
— how to take off quan= 

tities from the plan? 
— how to figure building 

costs? 
— why some lines on 

plans are shown dotted 

and others full? 



Also special courses in Architectural 
Drafting for builders, taught by prac- 
tical men. These explained in Special 
Catalog "D" sent on request. 

Don't Let Your 
Chance Slip Away 

If you don't make a bigger income this 
year than you have ever made in your 
life it is because you will not prepare for 
Ihe jobs that are open to every trained 
man in your trade. 



and see that a job of building or some 
important part of a big construction pro- 
ject is done right and finished on time. 
Read the questions in the space below. 
Whether you will make a big success in 
the building business or not depends on 
whether you can answer these and many 
other question about building plans and 
specifications, that are all made very 
clear and easy for the Chicago Tech. 
home-study student. 

Only Part of Your 
Spare Time Required 

Getting this Chicago Tech. training does 
not mean quitting your work. If you live 
in Chicago, you can come to the evening 
classes at the College. If 
you don't live here, you 
can have the same instruc- 
tion by mail that you 
would get if you were on 
the ground. You get the 
same lessons — you are 
taught by the same ex- 
perts. The only difference 
will be that the lessons 
are sent by mail instead 
of given in person. 

Stay on your job. Draw 
your regular pay. But put 
in a few hours a week of 
your spare time to pleas- 
ant, interesting home 
study under the direction 
of experts of the Chicago 
Technical College. 

Hundreds of top-notch builders, superin- 
tendents and contractors, owe their suc- 
cess to this practical home-study course. 
There are 31 lessons and many sets of 
blue print plans in the complete course. 

Send the Coupon-Now 

It costs nothing to get the pay raising informa- 
tion which we will gladly send on request with 
the free Books and Blue Print Plans. We will 
explain clearly and completely how men, who 
had no better chances than you, are stepping 
into higher positions or becoming independent 
in businesses of their own. Mail the coupon 
today. 

Chicago Technical College, 

Dept. 339, Chicago Tech. Bldg., 

Ii8 East 26th Street, Chicago, 111. 

Please send me your Free Books and Blue Prints 
for men in the Building Trades. Send postpaid 
to my address below. 

Write or print name plainly. 



I Name 



Address 



Not only are good workmen needed but 

there is a demand far beyond the supply | City State. 

for men who can read plans, figure costs ■ 

* Occupation 



Use Jersey For Screening 




It won't be long now before you will be 
called upon to re-screen a lot of doors, win- 
dows and porches in your locality. The old 
insect screen cloth has rusted out because it 
was made of iron or steel, or may have gone 
to pieces because it was made of so-called 
"bronze". 

Here is a chance for you to add to your reputation by 
recommending' Jersey Copper Screen Cloth. Home 
owners will thank you for it. You may assure them 
that, once they use Jersey, their screen troubles are 
over for years. Pure copper cannot rust. 

The wire in Jersey Copper Screen Cloth is copper 
S9.87o pure. It is made by a special Roebling pro- 
cess which gives it stiffness and tensile strength com- 
parable to that of steel. Jersey is the only copper 
screen cloth made of this special wire. 

Jersey Copper Screen Cloth is sold by many mer- 
chants. It's time for you to see if your dealer has it 
in stock. If he does not handle it, write us and we 
will inform you how to get it. We have stores and 
agencies in many cities. 

The New Jersey Wire Cloth Company 

All Grades of Wire Cloth Made of All Kinds of Wire 

620 South Broad Street 

Trenton New Jersey 




Copper Screen Cloth 

, M ■ Made of Copper 99.8% Pure 



WHY DEVELOP 
A GLASS 
ARM? 



Price $1.65 in U.S. A. 
$2.00 in Canada. 




An epoch marking- im- 
provement in the Ham- 
mer Industry. 

HELLEfi S 

Shock Absorbing Hammer 

Featuring 

1. A rubber cushion liner Detween 
the handle and hammer head. 
Set under extreme pressure, thus 
preventing - any loosening whatever 
of the handle as the rubber cushion 
takes up all shrinkage. 

2. LongLife — free from handle break- 
age. 

3. A rubber cushion liner eliminating 
shock and vibration to the arm. A steady 
day's work will prove this assertion. Try 
the new hammer and then your old fa- 
vorite. 

4. Finest Heller Hammer Steel. 

5. Drop forged and hand finished by ex- 
perienced craftsmen. 

6. A handle of finest selected second growth 
hickory procurable. 

7. A rubber liner serving as additional pro- 
tection for work around electric wires, etc. 

Have, your Hardware dealer supply you. If 
he is unable to do so, mail us your Money Or- 
der with his name, specifying weight and style 
hammer required and we will send direct to you 

Heller Brothers Company 

Newark, N. J., U. S. A. 
Good Tools Since 1836 



mm \ 

The 

HELLER 
LINE 

Mechanic's Tools 

FILES 
RASPS 
STEEL 




MVALLS 



Kingston, ^- 

» Soyde Mly"26,W24 

duc tsCo.,^ c - 
Th e Beaver P« fteW oboote 

Gentler**: ^pb* a» nd fflao y 

X thai* V° u ^uest, an to bene- 

fitby^ etn ' -Roard and ^ tin lls an d so 

\th your Beaver Bo^ scal^ her 

^ Y ;v I ^ave put » t rne 

^o see it. y earance ** for you 

U^ andy ° U Vours sincerely, ^p. 

LEW ftom 

,„, Board P« duct 
e ibuyBeavet^ 

The Kingston 1- 



&EAVEK 

products 



This 







4 

Carpenter has discovered j 

the BEAVER proposition I 

Read the letter reproduced on the opposite 

page. It is from a carpenter at Kingston, N. Y. 

It is only typical of the many letters we have 

received from carpenters. It verifies what 

we've been saying right along.That is — there's 

a lot of good profitable jobs awaiting for the 

carpenter who ties up to Beaver Products and 

then lets the fact be known. Think of the 

homes that need porches enclosed, garages 

lined, attics finished, store windows enclosed, fl 

etc., etc. —all Beaver Fibre Board jobs. Then, 

there is Beaver Tile Board. Scores of home 

owners don't know there is such a convenient, 

economical way of having glistening white tile 

walls in their kitchens and bathrooms— work 

just waiting for some live carpenter. We'll 

help you get these jobs — advertise for you, 

etc. There's a coupon on the next page. Mail 

it for full particulars of the Beaver Carpen- ggk $ 

ter Co-operation plan. You might as well have Sll 3 

these profitable jobs. Send the coupon now. ^^ 3 

THE BEAVER PRODUCTS COMPANY, Inc. | 

Buffalo, N. Y. j 

Thorold, Canada London, England 

i 

t 

i 
i 

i 

i 

a 
i 



2% 



Stiffer ~~yet the price 



8 

I Let Us Send You a 

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j is nearly the same 

& Here is an extra heavy fibre wall board with ample strength 

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THE BEAVER PRODUCTS CO., Inc., Buffalo, N. Y. 

I 1 

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Factory and General Offices 
1608 East End Ave. Chicago Heights, III. 



LISTED BY THE UNDERWRITERS LABORATORIES 




HEADLIGHT 

Carpenter's Overalls 

* UNION MADE t ^r^nfjggffi^ti 

MADE OF EXTRA FINE QUALITY SAIL CLOTH ptaPiSPSSifflPMl 

15 FEATURES 

Which Make This Qarment the Best Carpenters Overall Made 



1 Every point of strain rein- 
forced with Bar Tacks. 

2 Three pockets in one on 
the bib. Safety watch 
pocket. Memo book pock- 
et. Pencil pocket 

3 Fourbignailpocketsmade 
of extra heavy army duck. 

4 Extra wide and high bib. 

5 Wide suspenders, will 
not slip oS or cut into 
shoulders. 

6 Two big front pockets. 



8 2 side hammer straps. 

9 1 back hatchet or ham- 
mer strap. 

10 Patented safety rule 
pocket. 

11 Big back pockets. 

12 Chisel or putty knife 
pocket. 

13 Highbackprotectscloth- 
ing. 

14 Big wide comfortable 
legs. 

15 Extra pencil pockets in 
center of nail pockets. 



MY GUARANTEE TO YOU 

If, when this overall is completely worn out, 
you do not think that Headlight Carpenters 
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outwear any other overall made, I will give 
you backy our money. Beware of imitations. 
Demand the Genuine. 



7 Douole cloth at the front. 

Mail your order to our nearest factory if your local Headlight Dealer 
cannot supply you. 

LARNED, CARTER & CO. 

World's Greatest Overall Makers 
DETROIT, ST.LOUIS, SANFRANCISCO, PERTHAMBOY.N.J. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO 
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THAT'S what they all say about 
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To begin with, they require no 
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They are made or* specially temp- 
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Most good carpenters specify them 
by name when they want a real file. 

That's a factl 

NICHOLSON FILE COMPANY 

Providence, R. I., U. S. A. 




Nicholson Files 

^a File for E\)ery Purpose 




Use Tee-Loks 
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You will find Ruberoid Tee-Loks to be 
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Moreover, a Tee-Lok roof gives satis- 
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There is greater headlap protection 



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The coupon is for your convenience. 



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95 Madison Avenue, New York 



Chicago 



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Address. 



At Last 
A Tile Board That's Right 



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Just send us room dimensions, opening, etc., and our 
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This service we offer any carpenter free. 



CORNELL WOOD PRODUCTS COMPANY 



General Offices: 190 N. State St., Chicago 
Mills: Cornell, Wisconsin 



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From tiny holes to large ones 
The exact tension for each job 

You don't have to guess Seven adjustable ten- 

at the right pressure if sions enable you to change 

you use a "Yanke e" the pressure to suit small 

Automatic Push Drill drills, large drills, soft 

No. 44. wood, hard wood. 

"YANKEE" Automatic Push Drill No. 44 

handle, that opens up toward 
chuck, for quick, easy selec- 
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is practically a special tool for 
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No. 41 is another automatic 
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Spiral screw -drivers Ratchet Hand Drills 

Quick Return Spiral Ratchet Breast Drills 
Screw-drivers Push Braces 

Dealers everywhere sell "Yankee" Tools 

"YANKEE" on the tool you buy means the 
utmost in quality, efficiency and durability. 



46 



North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, U. S. A. 

YANKEE"TOOLS 

97ta&> Betfei ?7iechciiuc± 




This is high praise 



Here is the Disston 
Adjustment— simplic- 
ity itself. When the 
guard-plate has been 
removed the bubble is 
trued by turning the 
round-head screw. A 
second screw locks the 
adjustment securely. 
Both screws work in 
wood — always easy to 
turn. No springs to 
get out of order. Pos- 
itive, simple, reliable. 



for a Plumb and Level 



Disston No. 3 Bevel 

This bevel has patented Disston 
Lock. It sets easily, and it 
stays set. A M turn of the 
thumb-screw locks it. No slip- 
ping of the blade. Nickel- 
plated iron stock, tempered 
steel blade. 




Disston No. 5% Try Square. All 
metal, tempered Disston-made 
Steel blade, nickeled stock. 
True inside and out. 




CARPENTERS tell us 
that the Disston 
Plumb and Level is as 
dependable as the Disston 
Saw. 

You know the Disston 
Saw. You have helped to 
make it famous. You 
know what such praise 
for a plumb and level 
must mean. 

"And," they add, "we 
can't say anything better 
about a tool than that." 

The Disston Saw is the 
world's standard saw. 
But it is more than that. 
It is the Disston stand- 
ard for every tool that 
Disston makes. 



Disston Plumbs and 
Levels are made of hard- 
wood picked and sea- 
soned with unusual care. 

The Disston Corru- 
gated Grip makes it easy 
to hold them under all 
conditions. 

Arch and end plates, 
level glasses, and all other 
details of the very best 
quality. 

The adjusting device is 
the simplest and most re- 
liable made. 

Your nearest hardware 
store can supply you. 

Henry Disston &. Sons, Inc. 

Makers of "The Saw Most 

Carpenters Use" 

Philadelphia, U. S. A. 



"The Saw Most 

Carpenters Use' 



Disston No. 16 .Adjustable Plumb and Level. Stock thoroughly seasoned 
hardwood, stained and polished. Arch top plate, two side views, solid brass 
end plates. Made in 20" to 30" lengths. A popular tool at a medium price. 

DISSTON 

SAWS TOOLS FILES 





TUB GfffiPDCTER 



Entered July 22, 191 5, at INDIANAP01IS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of Congress, Aug. 24, 1912 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918 

A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and 

Kindred Industries. Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 

and Joiners of America, at 



Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 



D 51 



Established in 1881 
Vol. XLV— No. 3. 



INDIANAPOLIS, MARCH, 1925 



One Dollar Per i'eur 
Ten Cents a Copy 



That the open shop is now favored by the 
Stanley Manufacturing Company of New Bri- 
tain, Conn., who manufacture a number of car- 
penter's tools, known as the Stanley tools, was 
a declaration recently made by Mr. Stanley, Jr., 
an officer of the company at a conference held 
with Representative Charles N. Kimball and 
Business Agent McGrath at the plant of the 
company. This concern is constructing a large 
building at New Britain. The contractor is the 
Aberthaw Company of Boston. Non-union car- 
penters were found on the job. On complaint of 
Messrs. Kimball and McGrath, as representa- 
tives of our organization, Mr. Stanley arranged 
the conference, and to their astonishment made 
the above declaration. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



THE OLD— THE NEW 

(By Frank Duffy, General Secretary, United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, Vice-President, American Federation of Labor.) 

SAMUEL GOMPERS 




HEN the news contained in 
the four words, "Sam 
Gompers is dead," flashed 
over the wires Saturday 
morning, December 13, 
*£> 1924, it was a surprise 
and a shock to the members of Organ- 
ized Labor the world over. 
From all sources came 
expressions of sorrow and 
regret. Even those who 
had no particular love for 
him were kind enough to 
hold their peace. In the 
presence of death friends 
mourned and enemies 
forgave. 

The President of the 
United States regretted 
his passing ; Congress and 
the Senate acknowledged 
the loss sustained. Am- 
bassador Jusserand of 
France, in presenting re- 
grets of his government 
to the Executive Council, 
after the body had arrived 
at the A. F. of L. Build- 
ing, Washington, D. C, 
said: 

"The American Feder- 
ation, the United States, 
the generality of laborers 
throughout the world have 
suffered a great loss in the 
person of that great citi- 
zen, Sam Gompers. A 
man of wisdom, of force, 
of conscience inaccessible 
to fear, he devoted to the 
welfare of labor his whole 
life, never allowing ques- 
tions not really connected with that one 
to interfere and retard progress. A true 
liberal, he loved justice and hated tyran- 
ny under whatever form." 

Friend and foe alike felt the loss 
keenly and would willingly have him 
back if they could, but the die was cast 
— he was gone forever 'from our midst. 

I knew him well, perhaps better than 
a great many. I was closely and in- 
timately connected and associated with 
him for over a quarter of a century. As 



a Vice-President of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor for the past eleven 
years, I should know the man. We were 
pals and chums and even as such dis- 
agreed sometimes over policies rather 
than principles, but that did not dampen 
our friendship for one another in the 




least. As proof of this, at the twenty- 
fourth annual convention of the A. F. of 
L., held in November, 1904, in San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., I nominated him for Presi- 
dent of the American Federation of La- 
bor for the coming term, and in doing 
so referred to him as "my friend, my 
fighting friend — Sam Gompers." 

I can say conscientiously and without 
fear of contradiction that his heart and 
soul were wrapped up in the A. F. of 
L., in its growth and progress, its de- 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



velopmeut and advancement. No won- 
der, for he was one of its founders and 
its President for forty-three years. 

Day and night, year in and year out, 
he willingly gave the best that was in 
him to make it not only the greatest or- 
ganization in America, but the greatest 
and best organization of labor in the 
world, and he lived to see that ac- 
complished. 

He was an idealist, a dreamer. Some- 
times when looking at him I wondered 
if he were not trying to pierce the future 
and see what lay in store for us. Be 
that as it may, he tried his best to put 
iis ideals and dreams into practice. 

He was the best known labor leader in 
the world, a deep thinker, an able orator, 
a clear writer, a lover of humanity. 

The earnestness and devotion of the 
man to the labor movement can best be 
told in his reply to the addresses of wel- 
come given at the last convention held 
in El Paso, Texas, in November, 1924. 
After speaking of the early efforts of 
labor to organize a National Union, he 
said: 

"In 1886 a national labor conference 
was called. This time it was designated 
a trade union conference to be composed 
of representatives of trade unions and to 
consider trade union problems. The de- 
liberations of that conference resulted 
in the formation of our present Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor with which the 
old Federation of Trades and Labor 
Unions was merged. This new federa- 
tion recognized only the trade union card 
as a credential and proposed to deal pri- 
marily with economic problems. It was 
an organization that had no power and 
no authority except of a voluntary char- 
acter. It was a voluntary coming to- 
gether of unions with common needs and 
•common aims. That feeling of mutual- 
ity has been a stronger bond of union 
than could be welded by any autocratic 
authority. Guided by voluntary prin- 
ciples our Federation has grown from a 
weakling into the strongest, best Organ- 
ized Labor movement of all the world. 

So long as we have held fast to volun- 
tary principles and have been actuated 
and inspired by the spirit of service, we 
have sustained our forward progress and 
we have made our labor movement some- 
thing to be respected and accorded a 
place in the councils of our Republic. 
Where we have blundered into trying to 
force a policy or a decision, even though 
wise and right, we have impeded, if not 



interrupted, the realization of our own 
aims. 

Men and women of our American 
trade movement, I feel that I have 
earned the right to talk plainly with you. 
As the only delegate to the first Pitts- 
burgh convention who has stayed with 
the problems of our movement through 
to the present hour, as one who with 
clean hands and with singleness of pur- 
pose has tried to serve the labor move- 
ment honorably and in a spirit of con- 
secration to the cause of humanity, I 
want to urge devotion to the funda- 
mentals of human liberty — the princi- 
ples of voluntarism. No lasting gain 
has ever come from compulsion. If we 
seek to force, we but tear apart that 
which, united, is invincible." 

Did he sense the end when he said in 
that same address: 

"Events of recent months made me 
keenly aware that the time is . not far 
distant when I must lay down my trust 
for others to carry forward. When one 
comes to close grips with the eternal 
things, there comes a new sense of rela- 
tive values and the less worthy things 
lose significance. As I review the events 
of my sixty years of contact with the 
labor movement and as I survey the 
problems of today and study the oppor- 
tunities of the future, I want to say to 
you, men and women of the American 
labor movement, do not reject the corner 
stone upon which labor's structure has 
been builded — but base your all upon 
voluntary principles and illumine your 
every problem by consecrated devotion 
to that highest of all purposes — human 
well being in the fullest, widest, deepest 
sense." 

In nominating him at the forty-fourth 
annual convention of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, President Perkins of 
the Cigar Makers' International Union, 
said : 

"Labor is just as severe as any other 
association in its demand that its leader- 
ship shall come with clean hands and 
possessed of the highest type of neces- 
sary qualifications to successfully lead 
in our great movement for the benefit 
and welfare of human kind. Happily, 
on this occasion, we have with us a man 
who has measured up to the highest pos- 
sible standard that labor or any other 
association may require of its leadership, 
one who has been tried and never found 
wanting, one who, by his experience, 
keen mind and well known character- 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



istics, possesses in the highest degree, 
character, judgment and courage. 

"I am sure that every delegate to this 
convention will not only be glad to again 
proffer to him the position he now holds, 
but to say to him that our only regret 
on this particular occasion is that we 
cannot give more. Possessing every re- 
quirement that makes for success, I am 
justified in nominating as President of 
the American Federation of Labor our 
venerable and beloved leader, Samuel 
Gompers." 

Delegate Fitzpatrick, of the American 
Artists' Federation, seconded the nomin- 
ation in one of the most eloquent and 
brilliant speeches ever delivered at an 
A. F. of L. convention. I quote only the 
salient points of that speech : 

"There are things which a man can 
do, and in the doing of them bring honor 
to another. There are things which a 
man can do, and in the doing of them 
bring honor to himself. It is this latter 
thought which comes to me as I arise to 
second the nomination of Samuel Gom- 
pers for the presidency of the American 
Federation of Labor. 

"It is a privilege and an honor which I 
deeply esteem, I, relatively a raw recruit 
in the labor movement, to rise and pay 
my respects to the veteran commander 
who, for almost half a century has so 
ably, so zealously and so successfully led 
the army of workers who have been 
fighting for the betterment, the progress, 
the happiness of every man and woman 
in this or any other country who earns 
his or her bread by the sweat of their 
brow. 

"It would be impertinence in me to try 
to tell all you men who have grown old 
in the service of the workers what kind 
of a man Sam Gompers is; it would be 
an impertinence for me to tell you men 
who have marched side by side with him 
all these long years, who have endured 
with him the heat of the day and the 
labor thereof, what kind of a leader of 
men and what kind of a comrade he is, 
and if I do not launch into any eulogy 
of Sam, it is not because he does not 
deserve it, but because in the eyes and 
the hearts of the men and women with 
whom he has been associated for fifty 
years he needs no eulogy. 

"But there are one or two things which' 
I am sure you will agree with me deserve 
to be recalled and to be remembered 
where Sam is concerned. In this age of 
growing and insidious menace it is well 



for us to remember that the man who 
for so long has borne the burden of the 
leadership of the American Federation 
of Labor may have had his faults, may 
have been obliged, in the interests of the 
great movement at large, to make cer- 
tain internal compromises which are 
necessary in the success of any universal 
movement ; but it is true — and I am sure 
there is no one, including his most bit- 
ter enemies, who can ever say that any 
selfish or material consideration has ever 
affected Samuel Gompers when it was a 
question of the essential movement and 
what it involves. 

"Two characteristics men admire, hon- 
esty and courage, and Sam has them both. 

"But if, in the course of nature, the. 
finger of time writes "exit" for Sam, we 
who have been associated with him can, 
in the face of all the world, say : "Take 
him, all in all, he was a man. We shall 
not look upon his like again." 

Needless to say, Sam was elected 
unanimously. 

In his closing address to the conven- 
tion, he said: 

"We shall never stop. Some of us 
may and will pass over to the Great 
Beyond, but there are others who will 
rise and take our places and do as well, 
if not better, than we have done." 

Sam Gompers, your race is run; your 
lamp of life is extinguished, but your 
good deeds shall live and redound to 
your glory and fame, when princes and 
lords are no more and statesmen are 
forgotten. We respect and honor you 
for the great work you have done, for 
the sacrifices you have made, for the 
legacy you left us, for the time you so 
earnestly, devotedly and willingly spent 
in our behalf. 

The tomb now, enshrouds him; let him 
rest in peace; — 

"and sleep in the shade 

Where in glory and honor his relics 
are laid. 

Sad, silent and dark be the tears . 
that we shed, 

As the night dew that falls on the 
grass o'er his head. 

But the night dew that falls, though 
in silence it weeps, 

Shall brighten with verdure the 
grave where he sleeps; 

And the tear that we shed, though 
in silence it rolls, 

Shall long keep his memory green 
in our pouls." 



THE CARPENTER 



23 



WILLIAM GREEN 



William Green, the coal miner, is the 
new President of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor. I have been closely as- 
sociated with him for many years. As a 
Vice-President of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor I sat with him on the 
Executive Council for eleven years and 
discussed and debated the problems af- 
fecting labor. I have had ample time 
and opportunity to study the man and 
observe him in action. 

Like his predecessor, he is cool, level- 
headed, far-seeing, conservative, kind, 




yet aggressive. He is a staunch sup- 
porter of the principles and policies of 
the American Federation of Labor, a foe 
to radicalism, a fighter against injustice 
and wrong, a bitter opponent of tyranny 
in any form. 

International President, John L. 
Lewis, of the United Mine Workers of 
America can, perhaps, better speak for 
him than any other man. In nominating 
him as Third "Vice-President of the A. 
F. of L. at the forty-fourth annual con- 



vention, held in El Paso, Texas, last 
November, he said: 

"I need not in this convention extol 
the virtues or accomplishments of 
William Green, the Secretary-Treasurer 
of our great international organization, 
because many of you have learned to 
know him through years of attendance 
at these conventions and have for him 
that deep affection as a trade unionist in 
which he is held by his colleagues in his 
own organization. 

Suffice it to say that we who work 
with him — and we per- 
haps know him best — 
have come to have a most 
profound admiration for 
his capabilities as an of- 
ficer, for his fealty to the 
ideals of the trade union 
movement, for his stal- 
wart characteristics as a 
citizen of our country, and 
for the great good he has 
been able to perform in 
the trade union movement 
and in the civic councils 
of our nation. I take 
great pleasure in present- 
ing for the consideration 
of this convention the 
name of William Green as 
Third Vice-President of 
the American Federation 
of Labor." 

It is a pleasure to re- 
cord that through the es- 
teem and admiration in 
which he was held, he 
was unanimously elected. 
After the funeral of his 
predecessor he was elected 
without opposition by the 
Executive Council to the 
presidency of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor, 
and in accepting that of- 
fice, said: 

"By your action you have conferred 
upon me a great honor. It is the cli- 
max to a life of service beginning in the 
coal mines to the acceptance of the high- 
est honor that the workers of America 
can confer upon me. I deeply appreci- 
ate it. There come occasions in men's 
lives when the lips cannot express the 
feelings and emotions of the heart and I 
can truthfully say to you this is one of 
those occasions. I know that these last 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



days have been tragic days for every 
member of the Executive Council of the 
American Federation of Labor. We have 
been called upon to mourn the departure 
of — I think — the greatest labor leader 
the world has ever produced. Our hearts 
have been torn with sorrow because of 
his passing and along with that we have 
been face to face with the performance 
of a solemn duty and the discharge of 
a very great responsibility. I know 
your hearts and minds have been wrest- 
ling with conflicting emotions and clash- 
ing opinions. I have experienced that 
to an unusual degree and my personal 
experience must have been the experi- 
ence of every member of this Executive 
Council. Friendships formed through 
years of service, attachments that can- 
not be lightly broken, all of these have 
entered into the experiences we have 
undergone when these conflicting emo- 
tions of the heart and mind have clashed 
with each other. Many times we have 
been inspired to follow the feelings of 
our hearts but when the great interests 
of this Federation of Labor come before 
us we find that the love and affection we 
have for each other must be subordinated 
and our stern duty must be performed. 

"I have not been unconscious of the 
fact that for some time men have been 
saying very kind and friendly things 
about me ; it has come to me through 
sources of information that have been 
indisputable, and yet when these things 
came to me, I have been wondering like 
Shakespeare in Hamlet — "whether it is 
better to bear the troubles I now have 
or flly to those I know not of" — because 
it is a great responsibility to assume the 
mantle of leadership of this great organ- 
ization. It is a momentous decision. I 
recall another occasion when I was elect- 
ed the President of the Ohio Senate and 
called to leadership in a great legislative 
body. I felt the weight of responsibility 
very greatly. However, the decision has 
been made and I accept with feelings of 
very deep appreciation the honor you 
have conferred upon me and I shall 
serve in the best manner of which I am 
capable. 

"Another thing, by this action I sever 
my connection with men with whom I 
have worked in the cause I love, the men 
of the mines. It is not an easy thing to 
sever this relationship, personal and of- 
ficial, and I have been wondering 
whether I should or whether I should 
not. 



"Now my friends, here we are taking 
up the work of this American Federation 
of Labor, holding aloft the torch the 
great leader laid down, leading a great 
army of men filled with hopes and as- 
pirations, and I say out of the depths 
of my heart that if ever there was a man 
called to leadership who needed the sup- 
port and help of his associates it is I 
on this occasion. I covet your sympa- 
thy, support and advice. I shall lead as 
best I can and serve as best I can and 
if there ever comes a time when the sen- 
timent of the organized workers seems 
to demand that a change should take 
place, I shall retire gracefully, feeling 
that the honors that have been conferred 
upon me are all that any human being 
can rightfully ask. I say these things 
from the earnestness of my soul. I want 
you to believe every word I utter. I 
shall confer with you upon everything 
that affects the interests of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor. I want you 
to be candid with me and I will be can- 
did with you. In that way I want to 
build up a great movement of men hav- 
ing trust and confidence in each other, 
assuming the responsibilities of execu- 
tives and leaders so that our membership 
will rally behind us in carrying forward 
the great work of organization and hu- 
man welfare. Not mine nor any one's 
personal feelings must be considered, but 
the good of this organization. 

"I repeat again. I want our relationship 
to be of the closest and most cordial na- 
ture. I solicit your suggestions and ad- 
vice. I want you to talk with me frank- 
ly and candidly, and if I may, I will 
take advantage of every opportunity to> 
do the same with you." 

At the same time he issued the follow- 
ing statement to the press: 

"I have been chosen by the Executive 
Council of the American Federation of 
Labor to be the successor of our late 
lamented leader, Mr. Gompers. This 
high honor came to me unsolicited and 
unsought. I regard it as a call to ser- 
vice, and for that reason I feel it my 
solemn duty to accept and to serve. la 
making this momentous decision I am 
deeply conscious of the grave responsi- 
bilities which are being assumed. 

"The high standard of excellence in 
service, efficiency in leadership and ad- 
ministrative ability attained by Mr. 
Gompers during his long official and use- 
ful career is a challenge to the best and 
highest of everything which any human 



THE CARPENTER 



25 



being can give in the service of his fel- 
lowmen. 

"While Organized Labor feels most 
keenly the loss of our great leader, Mr. 
Gompers, every member may take cour- 
age and consolation from the fact that 
he left us a legacy of incomprehensible 
value. We have his trade union creed, 
his trade union philosophy, his writings, 
letters and recorded spoken words. All 
of these will serve as a guide in chart- 
ing and shaping our course and in the 
formulation of our policies. 

"It shall ever be my steadfast pur- 
pose to adhere to those fundamental 
principles of trade unionism so ably 
championed by Mr. Gompers and upon 
which the superstructure of Organized 
Labor rests. 

"In co-operation with my colleagues 
upon the Executive Council of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor and the chosen 
officers of all affiliated organizations we 
will carry forward the work of organiza- 
tion and education among the workers of 
our land. We will endeavor to promote 
collective bargaining, the observance of 
wage agreements and the acceptance of 
the Organized Labor movement by all 
classes of people as a logical, necessary 
moral force in the economic, industrial 
and social life of our nation. 

"While striving for the attainment of 
these praiseworthy purposes we shall 
ever be. mindful of our duties and obli- 
gations as American citizens. 

"Our devotion to America and Ameri- 
can institutions must never be success- 
fully challenged. 

"Our demand upon society for higher 
standards of life, better wages, inde- 
pendence and humane conditions of em- 
ployment must ever be based upon our 
inalienable right to the enjoyment of 
life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. 

"Our problems must be met and 
solved upon the basis of American fair 
play and in accordance with American 
traditions and American ideals." 

Knowing him as I do I have no hesi- 
tancy in saying to the American labor 
movement and the members thereof that 
Bill Green is — 

The kind of a man for you and me. 

He faces the world unflinchingly, 

And smites, as long as the wrong 
resists, 

With a knuckled faith and a force 
like fists ; 

He lives the life he is preaching of, 



And loves where most there is need 

of love; 
His voice is clear to the deaf man's 

ears, 
And his face sublime through the 

blind man's tears; 
The light shines out where the 

clouds were dim, 
And the widow's prayer goes up for 

him; 
The latch is clicked at the hovel 

door 
And the sick man sees the sun once 

more, 
And out o'er the barren fields he 

sees 
Springing blossoms and waving 

trees, 
Feeling as only the dying may, 
That God's own servant has come 

that way, 
Soothing the path as it still winds 

on 
Through the golden gates where his 

loved has gone. 

The kind of a man for me and you. 
However little of worth we do 
He credits full, and abides in trust 
That time will teach us how more 

is just. 
He walks abroad and he meets all 

kinds 
Of querulous and uneasy minds, 
And, sympathizing, he shares the 

pain 
Of the doubts that rack us, heart 

and brain ; 
And knowing this, as we grasp his 

hand, 
We are surely coming to under- 
stand ! 
He looks on sin with pitying eyes — 
E'en as the Lord, since Paradise — 
Else, should we read "Though our 

sins should glow 
As scarlet, they shall be white as 

snow" 
And feeling still, with a grief half 

glad, 
That the bad are as good as the 

good are bad, 
He strikes straight out for the Right 

— and he 
Is the kind of a man for you and 

me! 

• Bill Green, we know you of old. We 
love you for your manliness and 
straightforwardness. You have asked 
us for our support in the great work 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



you have under way and with which 
you have to contend. Our reply is, "You 
have it." Can we say more? 

To the doubting Thomases we say, 
"Let the dead past bury its dead." Be- 



gin again, put your shoulders to the 
wheel, help make the American Federa- 
tion of Labor what Sam Gompers want- 
ed and intended it to be — the best, the 
greatest, the cleanest labor organization 
in the world. 



APPRENTICESHIP IS SACRIFICED FOR PROFIT 




,<!^§P PRENTICESHIP 
conditions in the building 
trade in Washington, D. 
C, have been made the 
subject of a report by the 
United States Bureau of 
Labor Statistics. The document throws 
interesting light on the attitude of em- 
ployers there towards the young man 
seeking to learn one of the building 
trades. 

In effect it practically says that every- 
thing is done to discourage them, be- 
cause it is cheaper to develop handy- 
men specialists. Among other things it 
says: 

"The seasonal nature of the work ap- 
peared to be a factor in making it dif- 
ficult to hold apprentices and because 
of this fact, and the difficulty of giving 



the necessary technical training which 
can not be given on the job, the tendency 
among employers seems to be to employ 
such workers as helpers without giving 
them a chance to acquire thorough train- 
ing," the bureau reports. 

The study includes the various ap- 
prentice rules of the unions, but the out- 
standing feature of the report is: 

Specialization calls for helpers, rather 
than apprentices, and boys will not ac- 
cept this work because there is no 
promise for the future, and the appren- 
tice quota of the unions remain unfilled. 

The result is, says the report : 

"In not a single case where the num- 
ber of apprentices allowed by union 
rules could be calculated, was the al- 
lowed number being trained." 



WATCH FOR THIS FRAUD 

We have received numerous com- 
plaints from Local Unions in New Jersey 
and elsewhere that a man going under 
the name of Clark is travelling around 
working a fraudulent scheme on Organ- 
ized Labor. 

One of his favorite tricks is to go be- 
fore a Local Union asking endorsement 
for a Union Label pamphlet, so that he 
can then go out and get financial sup- 
port from business men and others for 
his scheme. Then when he has got the 
money he disappears. 

Should this individual appear and at- 
tempt to work his scheme in any more 
places, our Local Unions would be well 
advised to call the attention of the police 
to his little game. Remember the name 
— Clark. 



DON'T GET HOOKED 

From Los Angeles District Council 
comes a warning to all officers and mem- 
bers to watch for Ed. N. Hooke, form- 
erly of L. U. 131, Seattle, Wash., who, 
according to the Council, has defrauded 
some Secretaries. His method has been 
to get a Secretary to cash his check 
which has then come back from the 
bank marked "no account." 



BUTTE, MONTANA, QUIET 

Butte, Montana, is very quiet at the 
present time so far as building work is 
concerned. This despite the fact that 
misleading reports to the contrary are 
being sent out by interests opposed to 
Organized Labor. 

Moreover, the building prospects for 
the coming year are just about as dull 
as they can be. Very many old time 
carpenters there are now unemployed, 
and the only prospect which the city of- 
fers newcomers is that of walking the 

streets indefinitely. 

• 

Leave It To Mother 

Mothers can give children good care 
more economically than can institutions. 
This is proved by figures in the last an- 
nual report of the New York City Board 
of Child Welfare. 

In 1923, this board cared for approxi- 
mately 23,000 children and 8,500 wid- 
ows in their homes at a cost of $4,517,- 
106. As against this, the city paid $4,- 
032,700 to provide for 13,690 children 
in institutions. In other words, it cost 
New York $28.40 a month to care for 
a child in an institution and only a little 
over $15 to care for a child in its own 
mother's home. 



Editorial 




THE CARPENTER 

Official Journal of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 

OF AMERICA 



Published on the 15th of each month at the 

CARPENTERS' BUILDING 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

UNITED BROTIIERIIOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA, 

Publishers 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 



Subscription Price 
One Dollar a Year in Advance, Postpaid 

The publishers and the advertising 
agent use every possible precaution avail- 
able to them against accepting advertise- 
ments from other than reliable firms, but 
do not accept any responsibility for the 
contents of any advertisement which ap- 
pears in "The Carpenter." Should any 
deception be practiced by advertisers at 
any time, upon members, their duty is to 
immediately notify the Post Office au- 
thorities. Therefore, address any com- 
plaints to your local Post Office. 

INDIANAPOLIS, MARCH, 1925 

Make Hay While The Sun Shines 

FOR the purpose of reporting upon, 
and estimating conditions in the 
building industry "The American 
Contractor" bases its observations on re- 
ports received from thirty-six states, 
starting from the Atlantic seaboard. 
Dealing with this subject the journal 
says: "The outlook at the start of Feb- 
ruary can be stated, for the material 
market, for the labor market, and for the 
general condition of activity, in the one 
word 'up.' " 

For the last week of January alone 
the value of contracts awarded in that 
section was $76,399,200. Of that 
amount seventeen millions was for com- 
mercial building, and twenty-nine mil- 
lions for residential. There is every 
reason to believe that the coming season 
will be better than average, and away 



beyond some years in the matter of em- 
ployment. It is beginning now, and 
with it comes the best period of the year 
for us from an organizing standpoint. 

Every Local Union, District, and State 
Council should have its plans made and 
ready to put into effect. The very best 
foundation for those plans, and the best 
hope for their success is: "Let every 
member bring in at least one new mem- 
ber." The best business we know is for 
every member to be a business agent to 

that extent anyway. 

• 

The Thorny Path Of Progress 

CHILD Wage Labor must remain a 
part of the economic life of the 
United States of America, for 
some years to come at any rate. That 
point is settled by the failure of three 
fourths of the state legislatures to en- 
dorse the proposed federal constitution- 
al amendment which would have given 
the Congress power to "limit, regulate, 
and prohibit the labor of persons under 
18 years of age." 

There is no need to wait for an offi- 
cial statement from Washington. The 
returns from the various states have 
settled the issue for the present. The 
campaign of slaughter directed against 
this great humanitarian endeavor has 
been marked in all its stages by deliber- 
ate misrepresentation. Every argument 
but one, no matter how despicable or 
puerile, has been used to befog and pre- 
judice the case for the children. 

The one which has not been men- 
tioned by any of the opponents of the 
measure, but which is the real reason 
underlying their work is, that the pro- 
fits to be derived from the wage labor 
of children are something they do not 
intend to give up as long as they can 
by hook or crook keep them. Economic 
interest was the motive; masking itself 
behind every kind of hypocritical and 
specious argument. It was not an edi- 
fying spectacle for this, the greatest and 
richest country the world has ever 
known, to present before the civilization 
of our time. 

So we stand as we were, with more 
than one million children between the 



2S 



THE CARPENTER 



ages of 10 and 15 at wage labor every 
day in the United States. Of these 400,- 
000 are between the ages of 10 and 13; 
and it works out that about 12 per cent 
of all the children in this country be- 
tween 10 and 15 are thus employed. 

The fate of the proposed child labor 
amendment must be made no subject of 
final despair, but rather be accepted as 
a challenge to continued greater educa- 
tional work, so that in some happier day 
this blot may be removed. It is no new 
thing in history for the army of progress 
to meet check and rebuff. But it would 
be a new thing for it to admit defeat. 
In this case it will not, and the fight 
must go on. 



The Mouth of a Gift Horse 

UR Canadian brothers have learned 
long since, from practical experi- 
ence, to very carefully consider 
any pronouncement made by the Man- 
ufacturers' Association of that country 
with regard to organized labor. Recent 
l.appenings in that quarter show no 
reason for relaxing this vigilance, but 
rather for increasing it to meet a more 
subtle opponent. The traditional atti- 
tude of the Association towards the 
trade unions in Canada has been that 
of bitter opposition. 

Recently, however, at a meeting of 
members of the Association, held in 
Hamilton, Ontario, it was advised that 
this attitude be changed. The propo- 
sition carried, despite the desperate ef- 
forts of one or two to the contrary. The 
latter were given the consolation that 
if any member, or group of members, 
wanted to go on with the old policy op- 
enly, then they were free to do so; but 
the Association as such would not be 
seen in the business. 

In searching for the possible reason 
for this seeming change of heart, it ap- 
pears that the industrial relations com- 
mittte of the Association was of the 
opinion, that the old policy had alienat- 
ed the goodwill of the organized work- 
ers from the efforts of the manufactur- 
ers "to interest these forces in legisla- 
tion that is intended to be helpful to 
Canada." So there it is. Just noth- 
ing more nor less than an echo of the old 
fight between the high tariff and low 
tariff schools — protection and free trade, 
as they are called in Canada. 

Just about the only thing those man- 
ufacturers want absolutely free trade in 
is Labor, so they can have hordes of 



men on hand for every job available, as 
they have at present; and thus keep 
wages down. The political aspect of 
the case has no interest for this journal 
one way or another. But we can see 
need for our Canadian brothers seeing 
that it is workers' votes, and nothing 
more, that these manufacturers are con- 
cerned about. It will pay them not to 
be deluded by this seeming show of 
sympathy, but to give all their attention 
to the strengthening of their unions as 
the only absolute and certain protection 
they have for their wage rates, working 
conditions and general living standards. 

All else is myth and mirage. 

o 

Look to the East — And Ponder 

REPORTS from European trade 
union sources regarding the living 
standards of workers over there 
give a very gloomy impression. The 
war has certainly brought them no im- 
provement in conditions, and with its 
appalling aftermath of debt, has cast 
a shadow over their future which none of 
them living today will likely see lifted. 
True, that with more economic stability 
in the various countries there is not the 
panic of prices and purchasing value 
that existed a while ago, but it would 
not seem to be much more than the 
stability of steady misery. 

In Britain, the struggle is perhaps 
the most severe. In that pioneer coun- 
try of trade unionism they were well 
ahead, and had set a pace for the rest 
of Europe. Now they are being told 
that if they expect to do away with 
their appalling unemployed condition of 
nearly 2,000,000 registered workless, 
they must cut their wages to yet lower 
levels in order that their products may 
compete in price with those of the poor- 
ly paid workers of the other countries. 

At the same time that this is going on, 
the price of living goes steadily higher. 
Indeed, it is being proposed that the 
country go back to conditions of food 
control, much like those which obtained 
during the war. At any rate it is offi- 
cially suggested that the government es- 
tablish machinery to eliminate the 
middle man between producer and con- 
sumer. When one remembers the stub- 
born and conservative attitude of the 
governing element on that subject in 
years gone by, it is pretty certain that 
the situation now is nothing short of 
desperate. 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



They already have what is known as 
a "Food Commission" over there, and at 
one of its recent meetings the former di- 
rector of food production during the war 
advocated the establishment of a nation- 
al food board, backed by a $500,000,000 
guarantee put up by the government. 
The main things proposed as the work 
of the board were: 

Control and organize the import of 
wheat, exercise a general control over 
millers, and control the price of bread 
to the consumer over the bakers' 
counter. 

Control the import of meat. In- # 
spectors to grade cattle and pigs ready 
for sale. Central office to distribute to 
the butchers and bacon factories by 
shortest routes, weighing on arrival. 

Control the yearly price to be paid 
by a municipality or food board centre. 
Consumers to pay by means of a ticket 
to be bought at any post-office. 

The Board to contract for ten years 
ahead with farmers, and to guarantee 
that millers will make up a purchase 
price equal to $12.50 a quarter on rail. 

Under any conditions this would seem 
to make for the lightening of the work- 
ers' burdens in Britain, but the fact to 
be borne in mind at this date is, that 
it is a proposed remedy only brought 
to the front by reason of the desperate 
pressure of the price of living in Bri- 
tain. There is no suggestion that it 
can be regarded as a permanent solution. 
In fact, there is no permanency of out- 
look over there. It is a question of the 
hourly need of some scheme which will 
keep broken down machinery running 
from day to day. 

What a contrast it presents when 
compared with prospects of the "work- 
ers on this American continent, where 
opportunity and sound foundations for 
realizing future hopes are to be had in 
return for the normal effort of getting 
them. It is advisable that we should 
give heed to the conditions of the work- 
ers in Europe. Now, is the accepted 
time for us to take therefrom lessons 
for our own guidance. 

Compared with our numbers we are 
not so intensely organized as for 
instance the workers of Britain are. We 
need to be better organized, so that 
whatever the future may hold we shall 
be better equipped to keep those stan- 
dards of living which we have come to 
regard as a matter of course. Therein 
lies our chief weakness — that "matter 



of course." Actually there is never a 
moment when we are not in danger of 
having it challenged. More organiza- 
tion and keener vigilance are the only 
things which can protect it for us. Woe 
to the workers who forget that. History 
is littered with the record of their 
miseries. 



Seattle Does Not Forget 

IN 1919, the Central Labor Council of 
Seattle, Wash., was stampeded into 
a general strike which gave the labor 
movement in that city a black eye for 
a long time afterwards, not only locally, 
but nationally because of the nation- 
wide attention it got. That experience 
was a valuable one for the trade union- 
ists of that city, inasmuch as it was a 
lesson which has never been forgotten. 

That strike was engineered by the 
communists in the labor movement of 
Seattle at that time — an element which 
has always been a drag on the trade 
union movement of the northwest. It 
was a ghastly and costly failure. Aft- 
er it collapsed, as it was doomed to do> 
from the very start, those who framed 
it left the decent fellows to bear the 
opprobrium and clean up the mess.. 
Then, when that had been done and a. 
new start made, the communists came 
back and got busy again. 

But this time the Council decided to> 
bring then to a show down long before 
they were able to repeat their disrup- 
tive mischief. So, on the evening of 
February 4, the Council went to it with 
them. It was made a straight fight by a 
motion to unseat all delegates avowing 
themselves as communists, and any 
others not in accord with the policy of 
the American Federation of Labor. They 
were expelled by a roll call vote of 100' 
for, to 33 against. 

The Council is to be congratulated on 
the thoroughness with which the lesson 
of 1919, has been learned and acted 
upon. It knew that any temporizing 
or delay on its part, would only have 
been regarded by the communists as a 
sign of weakness, and an encourage- 
ment to them to make their propaganda 
still more raw. There is no middle 
ground between them and the genuine 
trade unionist. In their hearts they 
they despise him. and only use him for 
their ulterior destructive purposes. The 
trade unionists in the Seattle Central 
Labor Council evidently realize that, and 
have governed themselves accordingly- 



Official Information 




GENERAL OFFICERS 
OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD 

OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA 

Geneeal Office 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Geneeal Teesidext 

WJI. L. nUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Piust Geneeal Vice-Peesidenx 

JOnX T. COSGROYE 

Carpenters* Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second Geneeal Vice-Pbesident 

GEORGE H. LAKEY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Geneeal Secbetabt 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Geneeal Teeasueeb 

THOMAS NEALE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind 



Geneeal Executive Boabd 
First District, T. M. GUERIN 
.290 Second Ave., Troy, N. Y. 



Second District. WILLIAM T. ALLEN 
1803 Spring oarden St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Third District, JOHN H. POTTS 
646 Melish Ave., Cincinnati, O. 



Fourth District, JAMES P. OGLETREE 
Bradentown, Fla. 



Fifth District, J. W. WILLIAMS 

3948 S. Grand Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 



Sixth District, W. A. COLE 

810 Merchants National Bank Building 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Seventh District. ARTHUR MARTEL 

1712 Chambord St., Montreal, Que., Can. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFI, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive 
Board cust be sent to the General P^rp.tary. 



Quarterly Proceedings of the General 
Executive Coard, 1925 

Since the previous session of the General 
Executive Board the following movements were 
acted upon by correspondence. 

November 1, 1924. 

Athens, Tex., L. U. 1611. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 75c to 871c per Lour, 
effective January 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

November 6, 1921. 

Coffeyville, Kan., L. U. 1212. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 871c to §1 per hour, 
effective January 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as 
reports are made to the General Office. 

January 5, 1925. 

The regular quarterly meeting of the General 
Executive Board was called to order on the 
above date at 2 P. M. by Chairman Hutcheson. 
All members present. 

The appointment of Brother W. T. Allen, 
L. U. 277, Philadelphia, Pa., and Secretary of 
the Carpenters' District Council of that city 
and vicinity by the General President to fill 
the unexpired term of deceased Brother D. A. 
Post of the Second District on the General 
Executive Board was approved. Brother Allen 
was then obligated and installed by the Gen- 
eral President and took his seat. 

President H. Jensen of the Chicago, 111., 
District Council appeared before the Board and 
conveyed the well wishes of the District Coun- 
cil to the Board and informed them that a new 
home for the Carpenters' District Council was 
in course of construction and when finished 
requested them to accept the official invitation 
to attend the dedication that would later be 
sent them. 

Brother W. T. Allen thanked the General 
President and the General Executive Board for 
the confidence they had in him in selecting him 
as a member of the Board to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of D. A. Post of the Second 
District. 

The Board's attention having been called to 
the scurrilous literature circulated by F. W. 
Burgess, L. U. 8, Philadelphia, Pa., in viola- 
tion of Paragraph "J", Section 9, of the Consti- 
tution of the United Brotherhood, the General 
President was instructed to appoint a commit- 
tee to investigate the case and report its find- 
ings to the General Executive Board as soon 
thereafter as possible. The General Secretary 
was instructed to notify said F. W. Burgess to 
appear before the committee of the Board for 
hearing on the date mentioned, at Carpenters* 
Headquarters, Spring Garden St., Philadelphia, 
Pa. The General President appointed the fol- 
lowing committee : Board Members Duffy, Neale, 
Williams, Martel and Cosgrove. 

January G, 1925. 

Hamilton County, Ohio and Kenton and 
Campbell Counties, Kentucky District Council. 
Trade movement effective February 23, 1925. 
Not having received the required constitutional 



TIIE CARPENTER 



31 



vote, the General Executive Board cannot ap- 
prove same. 

O'Fallon, 111., L. U. 140. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from $1 to $1.25 per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Vallejo, Cal., L. U. 180. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from $8.50 to $9 per day, 
effective March 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Galion, Ohio, L. U. 214. — Movement for same 
rate of wages, i. e., 85c per hour. This being a 
continuance of the present wage scale, no 
action is necessary by the General Executive 
Board. 

Millville, N. J., L. U. 305. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 75c to 87|c per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Gainesville, Fla., L. U. 1278. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 70c to 80c per hour, 
effective March 1, 1925. Working 9-hour day. 
Official sanction granted with the understand- 
ing that the next movement be for a shorter 
work day. 

Sarasota, Fla., L. U. 1383. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 85c to $1 per hour, 
effective March 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
, ed ; financial aid to be considered later. 

North Bay,- Can., L. U. 1740. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from 75c to 80c per 
Lour and reduction in hours from 10 to 9 per 
day, effective June 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as re- 
ports are received at the General Office. 

Sweetwater, Texas, L. U. 2238. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from 87Jc to $1.00 
per hour, effective January 1, 1925. Official 
sanction granted. 

The action of the Executive Council of the 
A. F. of L. relative to securing the enactment 
of a law by the Congress of the United States 
to better protect the Union Label trade marks 
was received and filed as information. 

L. U. 1560, St. Louis, Mo. — Request for 
assistance in the organizing of the furniture 
and vehicle wood workers. The General Ex- 
ecutive Board is heartily in accord with or- 
ganizing all men working at tl.e trade or any 
of its branches and will give all assistance 
they can to that end. As organizing work 
comes under the supervision of the General 
President, the matter is referred to him for 
further consideration. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., L. U. 514. Request to cir- 
culate an appeal to all Local Unions of the 
Second District for funds to erect a monument 
to the memory of the late D. A. Post. The 
General Executive Board granted sanction to 
circulate said appeal and approved same. 

San Pedro, Cal., L. U. 2375. Request for an 
appropriation to be expended for organizing 
work. An appropriation was made to be spent 
under the supervision of the General President. 

The quarterly audit of the books and ac- 
counts was taken up at this time and continued 
throughout the day. 

January 7, 1925. 

The report of Delegates to the 44th Annual 
convention of the A. F. of L. was received and 
referred to the General Secretary for publica- 
tion in the "The Carpenter." 

The report of Delegates to Seventeenth 
Annual Convention of the Union Label Trades 
Dei.av tment of the A, F, of L, was received 



and referred to the General Secretary for pub- 
lication in "The Carpenter." 

The report of Delegate to the Fortieth Annu- 
al Convention of the Trades and Labor Con- 
gress of Canada was received and referred to 
the General Secretary for publication in "The 
Carpenter." 

The General President submitted his report 
to the General Executive Board. 

Reports were also received from the First 
and Second General Vice-Presidents. 

General discussion took place relative to the 
good and welfare of the organization and the 
questions of importance to be considered and 
acted on by the Board. 

Audits of books and accounts continued. 
January 8, 1925. 

York, Pa., L. U. 191. — Movement for an in- 
crease in wages from 80c to 90c per hour, ef- 
fective April 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in suc'i 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports 
are received at the General Office. 

Waxahachie, Texas, L. U. 332. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from 87| to $1.00 per 
hour, effective April 1st, 1925. Official sanc- 
tion granted. 

Audit of books and accounts continued. 

January 9, 1923. 

Audit of books and accounts continued. 

Springfield, 111., L. U. 16. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1.15 to $1.25 per 
hour, effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted when section 58 of the General Laws 
Las been complied with. 

Evidence submitted to the General Executive 
Board showing that Wm. Reynolds, a member of 
L. U. 2140, Detroit, Mich., is a member of the 
Trades Union Educational League, an organ- 
ization detrimental and contrary to the inter- 
ests of the United Brotherhood ; the General 
Executive Board orders said William Reynolds 
expelled from the United Brotherhood. 

Chattanooga, Tenn., L. U. 74. — Request for 
an appropriation for organizing purposes. Re- 
quest denied. 

Rockford, 111., L. U. 1523. — Request for an 
appropriation for organizing purposes. Re- 
quest denied. 

Phonix, Ariz., L. U. 1089. — Request for an 
appropriation to maintain a Business Agent. 
Request denied. 

Kansas City, Mo., L. U. 1529. — Request for 
an appropriation for organizing purposes. Re- 
quest denied. 

San Francisco, Cal., L. U. 1689. — Request 
for an appropriation for organizing purposes. 
Request denied. 

Frontier District Council, Niagara Falls, 
Ont., Can. — An appropriation of $300.00 was 
made to be expended for organizing purposes 
under the supervision of the General President. 

Ottawa, Ont., Can., District Council. — Re- 
quest for an appropriation for organizing pur- 
poses. Request denied. 

January 10, 1925. 

Audit of books and accounts continued. 
January 12. 1925. 

Audit of books and accounts continued. 

Newton, Iowa, L. U. 1133. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from S5c to 90c per hcu:\ 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as 
reports are received at the General Office. 

Appeal of C. C. Inman, L. U. 200, Columbus, 
Ohio, from the decision of the General Presi- 




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GUIDE NO. 2 

-How to understand carpenter's 
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-How to solve mensuration prob- 
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-How to estimate the strength 
of timbers. 

-How to proportion beams. 

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-How to excavate foundations. 
-How to build foundations. 
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-How to build forms for concrete. 
-How to proportion foundation 

footings. 

-How to frame houses. 
-How to set girders and sills. 
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-How to use tangents, and f 

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sky lights, scaff ord and hoistir, 

GUIDE NO. 4 

-How to put on wood, fibre a 

metal shingles. 
-How to lay gravel roofs. 
-How to lay tin roofs. 
-How to hang doors. 
-How to frame windows. 
-How to put on siding. 
-How to put on exterior trim 
-How to do cornice work, 
-How to build stairs. 
-How to lath. 
-How to lay floors. 
-How to put on interior trim 
-How to paint. 
-How to give first aid to 

injured. 




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How to Use the Steel Square 12, 13, 17. 



(Example From Audels Guide No. i) 

As an example of the thorough and practical way in which 
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Here is a specimen illustration (reduced size) and the descrip- 
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Rules 12, 13 & 17 on the Steel Square 

The lines radiating from division 12 on the tongue of the square 
to various points on the blade as seen in fig. M, are inclinations 
corresponding to the various roof pitches. 

The 12 inch mark on tongue and mark on blade opposite pitch 
desired is used to obtain cuts for common rafters. For octagon, 
or hip rafters use mark 13, or 17 respectively. In fig. S, the 
square is seen applied to a rafter with the 12 in. mark on tongue 
and 18 in. mark on body at the edge of the rafter corresponding 
to 1 pitch of common rafter. 

The inclinations A. and B, of the tongue and body of the square 
with the edge LF, of the rafter give the correct angles for bottom 
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A is horizontal and B, vertical or plumb. 




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34 



THE CARPENTER 



dent in the case of C. C. Inman vs., L. U. 200. 
The decision of the General President, sus- 
tained on grounds set forth therein and ap- 
peal dismissed. 

Appeal of Joseph Schipfer, L. U. 2090, New 
York, N. Y., et al., from the decision of the 
General President in the case of Joseph Schip- 
fer et al., vs. L. U. 2090, New York, N. Y. 
The decision of the General President sustained 
on grounds set forth therein and appeal dis- 
missed. 

In the complaints made by the Montreal Dis- 
trict Council, against the actions of L. U. 1558 
for non-cooperation in establishing better work- 
ing conditions and a distinct rate of wages, 
the General Executive Board directs the Gen- 
eral President to appoint a sub-committee of 
the Board to proceed to Montreal, Canada and 
investigate the charges made and report its 
findings to the General Executive Board at next 
regular meeting of the Board. 

The General President appointed Board 
members ; Cosgrove, Duffy, Guerin, Allen and 
Martel. 

Appeal of L. U. 1022, Parsons, Kansas from 
the decision of the General Treasurer in dis- 
approving claim for wife's funeral donation of 
Brother J. E. Walser. Decision of the General 
Treasurer sustained on grounds set forth there- 
in and appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of L. U. 37, Shamokin, Pa., from the 
decision of the General Treasurer in disapprov- 
ing claim for donation on the death of George 
Washington Kachlereis. Decision of the Gen- 
eral Treasurer sustained, on grounds set forth 
therein and appeal dismissed. 

Appeal cf Joseph Kramer, L. U. 1057, New 
York, N. Y., from the decision of the General 
Treasurer in disapproving claim for disability 
donation. Decision of the General Treasurer 
sustained, on grounds set forth therein and 
appeal dismissed. 

OmaVa, Neb., L. TJ. 253. — Request for an 
appropriation for organizing purposes. Re- 
quest denied. 

Winston-Salem, N. C, L. U. 1942. — Request 
for an appropriation for organizing purposes. 
Request denied. 

Muscle Shoals, Ala., D. C. — Request for an 
appropriation for organizing purposes. Request 
C^nied. 

Union Card and Label League, Rochester, N. 
Y. — Request for an appropriation. Request 
denied. 

The matter of advertising in our official 
monthly Journal "The Carpenter," was dis- 
cussed and laid over for further consideration 
before adjournment of this session. 

Audit of books and accounts continued. 
January 13 to 17, 1925. 

Audit of books and accounts. Audit com- 
pleted January 21, 1925. 

January 19, 1925. 

Wayne County District D. C, Detroit, Mich. 
— Requesting further information relative to 
the case of William Reynolds, former member 
L. U. 2140, Detroit, Mich. The General Ex- 
ecutive Board instructed the General Secretary 
to refer tie Wayne County District Council to 
the circular letter issued under date of April 
18, 1919 by authority of the General Executive 
Board and published in "The Carpenter" in 
the month of May 1919, which gives the infor- 
mation asked for. The Trades Union Educa- 
tional League having come into existence since 
the issuance of that letter and as its principles 
are contrary to the principles of the United 



Brotherhood, and the Board having ruled on 
March 24,1919 ; that any member, Local Union, 
District, State or Provincial Council affiliating 
with a body or organization whose principles 
are in conflict with the principles of the United 
Brotherhood, shall be expelled, the Board re- 
affirmed its former decision. 

Steubenville, Ohio, L. U. 18G. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1.25 to $1,371 per 
hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as 
reports are received at the General Office. 

Sharon, Pa., L. U 2G8. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from $1.00 to $1.15 per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports 
are received at the General Office. 

Huntington, W. Va., L. U. 302.Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1.00 to $1.25 per 
hour, effective March 10, 1925. Official sanc- 
tion granted when the provisions of section 
58 have been complied with. 

January 20, 1925. 
Neenah & Menasha, Wis., L. U. 630, (Shop- 
men) — Movement for an increase in wages 
from 57c to G8c per hour, effective April 1, 
1925. Official sanction granted ; financial aid 
to be considered later, in such sums as the 
funds will warrant, as reports are received at 
the General Office. 

Elmira, N. Y., L. U. 879, (Millmen.) — Move- 
ment for an increase in wages from 75c to 90c 
per hour and the 44 hour week, effective April 
1, 1925. Official sanction granted ; financial 
aid to be considered later, in such sums as the 
funds will warrant, as reports are received at 
the General Office. 

Jefferson City, Mo., L. U. 945. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from 871c to $1.00 
per hour, effective April 1, 1925. Official sanc- 
tion granted ; financial aid to be considered 
later, in such sums as the funds will warrant, 
as reports are received at the General Office. 

Warren, Pa., L. U. 1014. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 85c to $1.00 per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Oskaloosa, Iowa, L. U. 1034. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 80c to 90c per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed, when the provisions of section 58 of our 
General Laws have been complied with. 

Port Jefferson, N. Y., L. U. 11C5. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from 90c to $1.00 per 
Lour, effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Bedford, Ind., L. U. 1380. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 871 to $1.00 per 
hour, effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Keansburg, N. J., L. U. 1549. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1.00 to $1.25 per 
hour, effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Salamanca, N. Y., L. U. 1552. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 85c to $1.00 per 
hour, effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Waterloo, Iowa, L. U. 1835. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 95c to $1.05 per 
hour effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as 
reports are received at phe General Office. 



THE CARPENTER 



35 



Appeal of L. U. 52G, Galveston, Texas from 
the decision of the General Treasurer in dis- 
approved claim of J. Symington, L. U. 52G. 
The decision of the General Treasurer was 
sustained on grounds set forth therein and 
appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of L. U. 8G7, Milford, Mass., from 
the decision of the General Treasurer in dis- 
approved claim of the late Owen Brady, -L. U. 
8G7. The decision of the General Treasurer 
was sustained on grounds set forth therein and 
appeal dismissed. 

The question of Advertising in our official 
monthly journal, "T'.:e Carpenter," was given 
due and careful consideration. As the present 
contract with our Agent expires April 1, 1925, 
the General Secretary was instructed to secure 
further information for submission to the 
Board at next meeting. 

It having been brought to the attention of 
the General Executive Board that L. U. 376, 
of New York City, N. Y., issued for publication 
matter of an insinuating and scurrilous nature 
prior to the election of General Officers, the 
Board authorized the General President to ap- 
point a committee to investigate the case and 
report its findings to the next meeting of the 
General Executive Board. The General Presi- 
dent appointed the following Board members : 
Jo':n T. Cosgrove, Frank Duffy, T. M. Guerin, 
W. T. Allen and Arthur Martel. 

January 21, 1925. 

The following report was received from a 
sub-committee cf the General Executive Board. 
"Indianapolis, Ind., January 19, 1925." 

"We, the undersigned sub-committee of the 
General Executive Board made an audit of 
bonds, United States Certificates cf Indebted- 
ness and United States Treasury Notes in safe 
deposit vaults of the Indiana National Bank 
on the above date and find t v e following in 
custody of General Treasurer, Thos. Neale. 
Denomin- 
ation. Interest. Total. 
2nd Liberty Loan $1,000.00 4}% $50,000.00 
3rd Liberty Loan 5,000.00 4J% 75,000.00 
3rd Liberty Loan 500.00 4J% 4,500.00 

3rd Liberty Loan 100.00 4J% 3,500.00 

4th Liberty Loan 10,000.00 4',% 100,000.00 
4 th Liberty Loan 500.00 4}% 1,500.00 

Certificates of 

Indebtedness 42% 100,000.00 

United States 
Treasury 

Notes $100,000 4£% 100,000.00 

United States 
Treasury 

Notes 10,000.00 4J% 50,000.00 

United States 
Treasury 
Notes 100,000.00 4Z% 100,000.00 



Total - $584,500.00 

United Sti'-cs 
Post O l ti c i 
Certiiicate, 
Indianapolis, 

Indiana 500.00 

(Signed) 

JOHN H. POTTS, 
W. A. COLE, 
JAS. P. OGLETREE. 
The General Executive Board instructs the 
General Officers to investigate the terms and 
conditions under which Government Bonds can 
be procured. 



January 22, 1925. 

Stamford, Conn., L. U. 210. — Movement for 
an increase in wages. Sanction denied, as the 
provisions of section 58 of the constitution 
have not been complied with, not having a 25 
percent vote and the laws require a 55 per- 
cent vote. 

Butler, Pa., L. U. 500.Movement for an in- 
crease in wages from $1.00 to $1.25 per hour, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later. 

Peckville, Pa., L. U. 1G78 — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1.00 to $1.12$ per 
hour, effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later. 

The report was received from the Committee 
on tabulating the vote on election of General 
Officers and ordered published in pamphlet 
form to be sent to all subordinate bodies. 

The report of Committee appointed to tab- 
ulate vote on amendments to constitution 
adopted by the Twenty-first General Conven- 
tion, held at Indianapolis, Indiana, September 
22 to 30, 1924, was received and ordered pub- 
lished in pamphlet form to be sent to all sub- 
ordinate bodies. 

The Committee appointed by the General 
President on authority of the General Execu- 
tive Board to investigate .and report its find- 
ings to the Board relative to the scurrilous lit- 
erature issued by F. W. Burgess, a member of 
Local Union No. 8, Philadelphia Pa., prior to 
the election of General Officers in violation of 
Paragraph J, Section 9 of the constitution of 
the United Brotherhood ; made its report to 
the General Executive Board which was thor- 
ougly considered and discussed, after which the 
report was received and as the evidence pre- 
sented to the Committee clearly shows that 
said F. W". Burgess violated paragraph J, Sec- 
tion 9 of the constitution, the Board ordered 
F. W. Burgess expelled from the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

The Board ordered the General Treasurer 
to purchase $200,000.00 worth of Government 
Bonds. 

January 23, 1925. 

Joplin, Mo., L. U. 311. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 871e to $1.00 per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Uniontown, Pa., L. U. 1010. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1.00 to $1.12$ per 
hour and 44-hour week, effective May 1, 1925. 
Official sanction granted. 

The General Executive Board compiled the 
laws in accordance with the report submitted 
to the Board on January 22, 1925. by the Com- 
mittee tabulating the changes and amendments 
adopted by the Twenty-first General Conven- 
tion and approved by a two-third vote of our 
membership. 

There being no further business to come 
before the Board the minutes were read and 
that body adjourned to meet at the General 
Office,' March 25, 1925. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK DUFFY, 

Secretary. 



The spirit engendered in the worker 
by the Union Label produces greater 
efficiency in workmanship, in quality 
and quantity. 



Correspondence 




Ladies' Auxiliary No. 2 
Toledo, Ohio 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 2, Toledo, Ohio, 
just before Christmas undertook to look 
into the needs of our less fortunate 
brothers and sisters and their families, 
who through sickness or lack of work 
were in need, and found that we are do- 
ing a great good, not as a charitable act, 
but just as a boost toward a start again. 

We have also aroused the interest of 
the brothers of L. U. 1138, who have 
now appointed a committee to work with 
us. 

Fraternally yours, 

MRS. F. W. RANSOM, 
Rec. Sec. Auxiliary No. 2. 
West Toledo, Ohio. 

R. 9, Box 169-A. 



St. Louis Ladies' Auxiliary 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

We have organized a sewing circle in 
connection with Ladies' Auxiliary No. 
23, St, Louis, Mo., same meeting the 
first and third Wednesday of the month 
at the homes of the various members. 
Articles of fancy work are made for a 
bazaar which we give annually. 

With the proceeds of the bazaar wel- 
fare work is carried on. 

At the Christmas season this year, 
several baskets of food were delivered 
to brother carpenters' families who were 
in need. 

The Local Unions of our city are ever 
ready to help us in any of our under- 
takings and vice versa, we stand ready 
to help them in anyway whenever the 
opportunity arises. 

Fraternally yours, 

MINNIE RUHLE, Sec. 



From Los Angeles, Cal. 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 62 of Los 
Angeles, Cal., meets every first and third 
Thursdays in the evening and the second 
and fourth Thursday afternoons of every 
month. In ease there is a fifth Thurs- 
day we have a card party in the evening. 



We have always had an annual ball 
in February, this time to celebrate our 
fourth anniversary, and we have given 
one or more public dances a year. 

Near the first part of September we 
have our annual picnic to which we take 
the entire family. Then each year some- 
time before Christmas we' have a bazaar, 
which is a joint affair of the different 
auxiliaries, each having a separate 
booth. We use the fourth Thursday aft- 
ernoon to sew and do fancy work, meet- 
ing at the different homes. We general- 
ly take fifty dollars from the treasury 
to buy materials for the bazaar which 
has always proven very satisfactory and 
profitable. 

Just before Christmas we inquire 
among our own members and the car- 
penters' Locals if there are any real, 
needy and when the names are brought: 
to us we send them a Christmas box.. 

One Sunday in November the ladies: 
furnished the lunch at a house raising: 
for a widow of a Union carpenter. This, 
was a regular picnic besides bringing: 
two applications to us. 

In our meetings we boost the Union. 
Label. 

FLORENCE SCHMIDT, 

Rec. See., 
Ladies' Auxiliary No. 62. 

Los Angeles, Calif.. 

• 

Ocean City Ladies Auxiliary 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

Ladies Auxiliary No. 125 of Ocearn 
City, celebrated its first anniversary in. 
Red Men's Hall, Friday evening, Janu- 
ary 23. 

All present enjoyed refreshments and' 
dancing to music furnished by the- 
Somer Point band which is largely made* 
up of carpenters. 

We are proud to state that we have 1 
increased our membership having 21. 
members all in good standing, with ap- 
plications coming in at each meeting. 

We hold our meetings the 2nd and'. 
4th Friday nights in Red Men's Hall.. 
AMANDA DUCKWORTH, Secy. 
Auxiliary 125. 
Ocean City, N. J. 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



San Pedro, Cal. 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

The Ladies' Auxiliary No. 130, San 
Pedro, wishes to tell you a little about 
the organization. Our charter was in- 
stalled May 16, 1924. 

During the summer we organized a 
Sewing Club, meeting in all day sessions 
at the hall twice a month. We appoint- 
ed a committee of three to serve lunch- 
eon at noon. We decided we would give 
a Christmas tree for carpenters' kiddies. 
We finished two quilts and numerous 
things for a bazaar, the proceeds of same 
to be used for our Christmas party. 
Needless to say our bazaar was a suc- 
cess, we also gave a supper, the same 
night, the proceeds of which went into 
the general fund. 

We are happy to say our tree was a 
success in every way. 

Now we are in hopes the carpenters' 
wives that complimented us on our suc- 
cess will join us and help make the next 
year a banner year. 

Yours Fraternally, 

MRS. EDNA BYERLEY, 
Secretary of Ladies' Auxiliary No. 130, 
San Tedro, Cal. 

o 

Information Wanted 

This is a picture of Fred Miller, form- 
erly of L. U. 1314, of Oconomowoc, Wis. 
Dlis right name is John Grunert, anyone 




knowing of his whereabouts please com- 
municate with Mrs. Fred Miller, 911 
South St., Oconomowoc, Wis. Height 
5ft. 7 in., weight about 200 pounds, age 
about 40 years, rather dark complexion. 
* * * 

If this should come to the notice of 
anyone knowing a carpenter by the 
name of John Arthur Giving, or Gilday, 
who is believed to have been a member 
of the Brotherhood in New York about 
ten years ago, kindly get into communi- 
cation with Mrs. Marion C. Stiles, P. O. 
Box 5, Glendale, Cal. Mrs. Stiles writes 
to say that this man, who has rented a 



house from her, is very sick and deliri- 
ous. It is believed he has a wife and 
daughters somewhere in the East, and it 
is felt that they should be brought into 
touch with him if possible. 
* * * 
This is a picture of Harry Bryant, 
formerly of L. U. 158, Los Angeles, 
Calif. ; and who left there in January, 
headed east presumably in search of 
work. The day he left, his house was 




burned down and Mrs. Bryant was seri- 
ously injured. Her address is now 2645 
Pasadena Ave., Los Angeles. Anyone 
knowing the whereabouts of Mr. Bryant 
is asked to communicate with that ad- 
dress, or with the Secretary of L. U. 158, 
Francis Fildew, 1130 W. 110th St., Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

* ♦ ♦ 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts of 
George A. Gregory, formerly a member 
of L. U. 331, Nor^jjk, Virginia, please 
communicate with Mrs. Nettie Gregory 
Scull, 2 Greylock Apartments, Norfolk, 
Virginia. This inquiry is made in the 
interest of his daughter. 

* * * 

Benjamin Dresher is believed to have 
died in one of the western states about 
eighteen years ago, at some place un- 
known. Anyone having any knowledge 
of him or the place of his burial please 
communicate with Henry Dresher, 1429 
Spring Garden Ave., Berwick, Columbia 
County, Pa. 

* * * 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts of 
E. H. Smith, formerly of Des Moines, 
la., but believed to have been in the 
west for the past few years, please com- 
municate with Mrs. H. L. Anderson, 141 
E. Madison St., Des Moines, la. At the 
time this inquiry was received, February 
2, his father was seriously ill. The mis* 
sing man is described as being a big man 
with light hair, goes under the name of 
Ed, and as a rule was foreman on the 
job. He was also single and would now 
•be about 45 years old. 



Chips and Shavings 



Dues paid up? 

500,000 Members For 1925 

* * * 

A demand for the union label does 
more than give employment. 

* ♦ * 

Have you had that thrill yet of bring- 
ing in a new member to your Local 
Union? 

Every new member you get is a future 
dividend in the form of better wages and 
working conditions. 

Education, freedom, justice, humanity 
and fair dealing are all embraced in the 
Union Label, card and button. 

* * * 

Nine out of ten of a group of 3,300 
working children in Philadelphia recent- 
ly studied, were found to be in "blind 
alley" occupations. 

Never mind how tough that non-union 
guy may seem. Lots of that kind once 
they joined up have made good mem- 
bers. So stick at him. 

sj: $ $ 

11,000 conscripted laborers will be 
employed in Roumania on the construc- 
tion of railway lines, 8,000 on roads and 
4,000 will work on State farms and in 
State workshops. 

* * - * 

The California Industrial Accident 
Commission has ruled that a mosquito 
bite on the tongue is an industrial haz- 
ard and has awarded a laborer, $2,487, 
with $12.23 a week until he recovers. 

* * * 

There are about 264,000 crippled chil- 
dren in the United States, according to 
an estimate in the recently published 
"The Care, Cure, and Education of the 
Crippled Child," by the International So- 
ciety for Crippled Children. 

* * * 

Last year's fatilities in the nation's 
stone quarries killed 143 men and in- 
jured 14,990, according to the United 
States bureau of mines. There were 
:92,455 mer employed and they averaged 
276 days' wc:k for the year. 



More significant than many of the 
eulogies of Samuel Gompers is the simple 
fact that his estate is reported not to 
exceed $30,000 in value. That is pretty 
good proof that Samuel Gompers cared 
for other things more than wealth. 

* * * 

On December 21st last, the trade 
unions of Palestine celebrated the fourth 
anniversary of their founding. In honor 
of the occasion, all the workers of Pal- 
estine paid one day's wage as a contri- 
bution to cultural work among the work- 
ers. The educational work done by the 
trade union movement is steadily in- 
creasing. There is now a national li- 
brary containing 40,000 books. The 
movement also has its own publishing 
offices, reading rooms and evening 
schools, etc., in various parts of the 
country. 

The union label is an assurance of 
good working conditions;* a guarantee 
of skilled craftsmanship. 

* * * 

British Columbia has an eight-hour 
day law, with provisions for exempting; 
such industries as the board which ad- 
ministers the act may think fit. Rough- 
ly it works out that those industries 
where the workers are not organized are 
the ones which get exemption. Moral 
— don't rely upon politics, politicians or 
legislation. If you want the job done 
right do it yourself. Organize in your 
trade unions, keep them up to top pitch 
of efficiency. That's the only depend- 
able way yet found for getting some- 
thing like decency of treatment for 
workers in industrial life. 

More than one hundred orphan chil- 
dren of San Francisco had a Merry 
Christmas as the result of the generosity 
of the members of the Carpenters' Local 
Unions of that city. 

On Christmas Eve one hundred 
orphans were each presented with a 
beautiful bookcase, containing twelve 
story books through the officers of the 
Bay Counties District Council of Car- 
penters. 

* * * 
500,000 Members For 1925 



Craft Problems 




The Stair 

(By H. H. Siegele.) 

IV 

It is unfortunate, for many appren- 
tices today, that a great deal of the fin- 
ished stair material is gotten out by the 
mills. There was a time in the history 
of carpentry when almost all of this 
work was done, either on the job or in 
the carpenter shop — even hand rails and 
movddings were made, as it were, on the 
job. Doors and window sash were at 
one time mostly home-made. 



shown a little to the right, which ha i 
been scribed to the risers — see the dot- 
ted lines on the risers of the stringer. 
When these risers have been recut to 
the scribed lines (dotted lines on the 
drawing) the stringer can be nailed into 
place. 

Fig. 21 shows a stringer marked ready 
for the first cutting, after which it is 
scribed. The square in place for mark- 
ing a step on the stringer is also shown, 
and Fig. 22 is a reproduction of the pitch 
board shown in a previous article, which, 
if desired, can be used to good advantage 
for marking this stringer. 




fl G. 20. 

The discovery of better power for run- 
ning machinery, as well as the advent 
of highly improved machinery for doing 
this class of work, have taken almost all 
of this work to the mills; hence the ap- 
prentice working in the field gets very 
little experience, if any, in getting out 
the stuff for the better class of stair- 
ways. Occasionally, though, the ma- 
terial for housed stairs is framed on the 
job, so it is well for every carpenter to 
know how to do it, even though he gets 
very little of it to do. 

There is, of course, a great deal of the 
cheaper class of stair work which is 
usually done entirely on the job ; such as 
cellar and attic stairways. 

In Fig. 20 we are showing the rough 
work of a stair with the finished risers 
nailed to the horses. The stringer is 



FlQ.ZZ. 



The dotted lines at the ends show how 
to cut them to make them intersect with 




the base. Fig. 23 shows the stringer in 
place with the base fitted to it. It will be 
seen, by turning to this figure, that the 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



first three treads have been put into 
place. This was done after the stringers 
were nailed. 

The treads were cut square at each 
end, to a length that would make them 



having a quarter- turn landing near the 
bottom; Fig. 26 shows a three-flight 
stairway, with two quarter-turn land- 
ings; Fig. 27 shows a two-flight stair- 
way with a half-turn landing. Fig. 28 



ft 



Elft.jM. 



fit tight between the stringers. This 
method gives good results where econ- 
omy is desired. It is a much better 
method than the one where the stringers 



shows an arrangement that should be 
avoided as much as possible — a two- 
flight stairway with two quarter-turn 
winders connected by one straight step. 



« 



€J 



fia^m 



are nailed to the wall, full width, and 
both the risers and the treads are cut to 
fit between them. 

In the latter method it is difficult to 
obtain good joints, while in the former 



Fig. 29 shows the same kind of a 
stairway with two quarter-turn landings 
instead of winders; this is a somewhat 























+ 




t 


+= 














4j 


1 1 
Fl £»._2ft 


jf 
















t 


(• 




+ 


4 







II ff- 




lf* t 


"T 


1 


,, 





Fl G. z,f. 

better plan, however, objectionable. Fig. 
30 is a two-flight quarter-turn winding 



one this difficulty is almost eliminated 
by having the stringers scribed to the 
risers. The dotted fines above the land- 
ing, Fig. 23, show the position of the 
reUirn flight, which leads to the attic. 

Various forms of stairways are shown 
by the following drawings : 

Fig. 24 is a straight one- flight stair- 
way; Fig. 25 is a two-flight stairway 




Fig. £8. 



THE CARPENTER 



41 



stairway. Fig. 31 is what is known as 
a double-return platform stairway. Fig. 
32 shows a one- flight stairway with a 
quarter-turn winder at the top and at 
the bottom. 



i 



tt 



flG.S9> 

How to cut the horses for such a stair- 
way is illustrated by Fig. 33, which in 
principle, will apply on all other winding 
stairways of a similar construction. To 




Fr^v^o. 



the left can be seen the story-pole with 
the risers marked on it. To the extreme 
right and marked a, is shown the horse 



that will carry the first winders, at sec- 
tion A. 

It will be noticed that the points of 
the two risers have been projected with 
the compass; this is indicated by the 
two dotted quarter-circles, and dropped 
down to the horse marked a. The horse 
that is to carry the winders on the sec- 
tion marked B, is shown at b. The 



## 



tt 



OT 



n 



n 



n 



Fig. 37. 

points of these risers have also been 
dropped, which is indicated by the dot- 
ted perpendicular lines. 

The horse for the section marked C, 
is shown at c, and D, at d; while E and 
e are relatively the same as A and a. By 
giving the drawing a little study, it will 
readily be seen how simple a thing it is 
to frame a winding stairway. The prin- 
ciples relative to framing the finishing 
material for a winding stairway are 
identical with those explained above. 
But winding stairways should only be 
used when extreme necessity demands 
them. 

































— ..... _. 




/\ 




















F 


"i 


G. 


3 < 


I. 













42 



THE CARPENTER 



All of the different forms of stairways 
shown by these illustrations are what 
are known as right-hand stairways, ex- 



cipally with the rough stair work, which, 
by the very nature of the work, made it 
necessary for us to consider some points 




Fig. 33. 

cepting Figs. 30, 31 and 33. A right- 
hand stairway is one with the hand rail 
to the right, going up; while a left-hand 
stairway has the rail to the left. Figs. 
30 and 33 are left-hand stairways. 

Thus far we have been dealing prin- 



about the finished Work; in like manner, 
when we take up the finishing of the 
stair, we will look into some points of 
the rough work again. 

In the next article we will take up 
the finishing of the stair. 



Marking A Miter Cut With A Rule 

There is probably no tool, unless it 
would be the hammer, that is used as 
often and by as many persons, as the 
measuring stick, called a rule. Ordin- 
arily it is used only for taking meas- 
urements, but there are many other 
things that can be done with it very 
accurately, such as laying out octagons 




and dividing boards into equal parts, 
etc. One of the uses of a rule that is 
not so well known, is illustrated by the 
drawing, which is marking a miter cut 
on a board. 

By turning to the drawing, it will be 
seen that the figures shown on the rule 



are those of a three-foot rule. The rule 
being just 1 in. wide, when it is un- 
folded once, makes it easy to lay it on a 
board in a manner so a miter cut can 
be marked with it. 

The two points, 6 and 31, are made to 
intersect with the edge of the board, 
which, if painstakingly done, will make 
the position of the rule come on an angle 
of 45 degrees with the edge of the board. 
6 and 31 are not the only figures that 
will bring the rule to the 45-degree po- 
sition; 7 and 30 or 5 and 32, or even 
the reverse, 4 and 31 or 5 and 30, will 
give the same results. 

By making the points 31 and 5% in- 
tersect with the edge of the board, the 
rule will be in a position to mark a 
9-and-12 cut. If the rule is placed so 
that the points 31 and 5V 2 will intersect 
with the edge of the board, then a 6- , 
and- 12 cut will be the result. 

The 9-and-12 and the 6-and-12 cuts 
are respectively shown by the dotted 
lines on the drawing. If what has been 
explained above is understood, by ap- 
plying the same principles, other cuts 
can easily be worked out. 



THE CARPENTER 



43 



A Constructive Criticism 

In connection with Lesson 2, of "The 
Stair" series, which appeared on Page 
41 in our issue of January last, the fol- 
lowing letter and drawing dealing with 
Fig. 6, have been received and are here- 
with given, together with Mr. Siegele's 
acknowledgement. 



counting off 10% treads I find the head- 
room at this point to be about 6 ft. 4 in., 
instead of the 7 ft. in., as desired. 

By taking the same number of treads 
and risers, or making allowances for 
same when there is not sufficient, as in 
this case, you will obtain the necessary 
7 ft. in. headroom and will increase the 



V 


n 
Q_IA 1 


w 


■« ■'* 


^ 


* o I * 


1 




2 


i A 


3 






4 




5 




6 , >u 


7 *o 


8 


<• 


9 




10 




IP 


r 


Scale Vz in to 1 Foot 


V 



Editor, "The Carpenter": 

In the January issue of "The Carpen- 
ter" on page 41, an article on "The 
Stair" by H. H. Siegele, Fig. 6, concern- 
ing the position of the headroom header, 
I noticed an error, or possibly an over- 
sight on someone's part. 

Enclosed find rough sketch, scale % 
inch — 1 foot, of my interpretation of 
Fig. 6, and by following instructions, 



measurements between well hole headers 
from 8 ft. 1 in. to about 8 ft. 10 y 2 in., 
allowance for finish to be made. 
Fraternally yours, 

HUGH BAXTER, 
L. U. 202, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



The foregoing being called to his at- 
tention, Mr. Siegele replies as follows : 
"Mr. Baxter is correct. Fig. 6, so far 



44 



THE CARPENTER 



as the drawing is concerned, is correct, 
but the figures 8 ft. 1 in. should be 8 
ft. 10 in., or 8 ft. 10% in., as suggested 
by Brother Baxter. I will treat this sub- 
ject again referring to the error pointed 
out." 



Pitches 

(By Dwight L. Stoddard.) 

The last time I wrote on this subject 
I thought I made it quite plain. I asked 
if any one could make it plainer. The 
answer came that while I had handled 



much as it ran. Some claimed that a 
full pitch should be as high as the entire 
width of the building. It seemed to me 
for years that was the way it was un- 
derstood, in fact I have heard no claim 
lately that what we call one-half pitch 
should be called full pitch, but I have 
been surprised recently in the different 
opinions that exist about pitches. 

I herewith give an illustration of 
pitches as I understand them, on a com- 
mon roof pitch, I show the squares to 
indicate both the width of the building 
and the height of the rafter. One-half 



Pitch ls 




the matter very completely, there was 
too much to it to be fully understood. 
It did not seem then that there would 
need to be any more on the subject for 
some time, yet from the many things 
that have come to my attention lately, 
it seems that the average carpenter 
knows very little about pitches. 

There was a time when the main pitch 
was what was generally called one-half 
pitch, though some contended it should 
be called a full pitch, as it rose just as 



pitch is just as high as one-half of the 
width of the building, note the measure- 
ment is taken as the rafter is framed 
generally about the center of the rafter 
therefore the complete top of the fin- 
ished roof, after the sheathing, shingles 
and coping is on is something like 9 in. 
higher, as you will see by the illustra- 
tion. ■ 
Common roofs for bungalows of today 
are of less pitch. They are arranged to 
whatever pitch looks good to the one 



THE CARPENTER 



45 



who draws the plans regardless of just 
what it may be. 

Roofs are not framed to the exact one- 
third pitch, or any other pitch as much 
as formerly. The day is not far distant 
when they will be framed more by de- 
grees than by pitches, but even so the 
average carpenter should know pitches 
and how to frame them and have some 

idea how they are figured. 

© 

Exposed=Rafter Frieze 
(By H. H. Siegele.) 

With the bungalow came the exposed- 
rafter cornice, which gives „a rather 
pleasing effect and is, at the same time, 
less expensive than the closed cornice. 
The main difficulty that presents itself 
on this cornice is the finishing between 
the rafters. Almost every carpenter who 
Las had experience with this style of 
cornice, has a way to finish between the 
rafters that he thinks is better than 
all others. 

By the drawing we are showing how 
one builder finishes between the rafters 




whenever the choice of how to do it is 
left to him. We do not claim that this 
is the best way to finish this part of an 
exposed-rafter cornice, but we believe 
the method warrants consideration, and 
is suggestive — the idea that is here pre- 
sented may suggest something that may 
solve a problem for many of our readers. 
The drawing shows: a, 1x6 matched 
stuff (flooring or ceiling) % of an inch 
thick, onto' which the shingles are 
nailed ; b, a bed mould closing the open- 
ing left between the 1x4 frieze board and 
the ceiling. This moulding should be 
put into .place before the ceiling is fast- 
ened to the rafters. 



The 1x4 frieze, which is fitted between 
the rafters, is shown at c; d shows the 
fillet which is nailed onto the 1x4 frieze 
and continues the full length of the 
building. At e is shown the main frieze ; 
f shows the siding, and g a block nailed 
to the rafter onto which the 1x4 frieze 
is nailed. 



A Cornice Problem 

In Fig, 1 we are showing a section 
of a cornice and frieze of the bungalow 
style. It will be noticed that the very 
simplest construction possible has been 
employed. We have done this for this 
reason: A great deal of residence work 
is leaning toward simple construction, 
that besides giving service, gives a 
pleasing effect as well. 

The frieze must be notched out for the 
rafters enough to permit it to extend up 




to the plancher — a block, as shown by 
the drawing, keeps the upper edge in 
place. When the frieze is in place, the 
plancher should be nailed on — and that 
is the feature that we are stressing in 
this article. 

Fig. 2 shows an end view of a 1x6 
with two corners planed off about ^4 of 
an inch back. The boards to be used for 
this purpose should be selected from the 
sheathing material — there is always 
plenty of fairly good stuff to be found in 
this material. 

After the boards have been selected, 
take them on the bench, and with the 
plane set to cut rather deep, dress off 
the corners as shown by the drawings. 
The little facia can be made of the same 
kind of material. The writer has seen 
several jobs where this construction has 
been used with good results. 



500,000 Members For 1925 



Fired 



Do you work for day wages? Are you 
a carpenter working for someone else? If 
you are, you can more easily appreciate 
this fellow's misfortune — and you will un- 
derstand more fully why, at the age when 
he should be well fixed and in a position 
to spend the rest of his life in comfort, de- 
pendent on no one for support, he is prac- 
tically penniless — and out of a job, fired 
because he is too old to work. 

SOME FACTS STRAIGHT FROM THE 
SHOULDER 

Nearly everyone who works for others 
tries to save — tries to get enough money to- 
gether to take care of him and his family 
when old age overtakes him — but how 
many carpenters are successful in their 
efforts to accumulate a fair sized savings 
account? 

GOVERNMENT FIGURES SHOW 

That 82% of the Country's Men, at the 
age of 65 Are Dependent on Relatives or 
Friends for Support! The other 18%, who 
have money and are independent are Busi- 
ness Men, Not Fellows Who Have Worked 
for Others All Their Lives! The working- 
man can't save. There are too many bills 
to pay. His pay check comes every so 
often, but so does the grocery bill, meat 
bill, light bill, doctor bill, dentist bill, and 
a hundred and one other 
^bi incidental expenses. Then 

| - pj sickness often robs him of 

a couple of weeks pay. No 
Matter How Hard You Try, 
it's Practically Impossible to 
Save Enough Money From 
Carpenter's Day Wages or a 
Monthly Salary to Make You 
Independent in your Old Age! 





Did You Ever Hear of a Retired Carpenter? 

No, you never did — and what's more — 
you never will. You hear of retired 
Business Men. Business men can afford 
to Retire ! The carpenter who works 
for someone else never leaves the job 
until he is forced to — until fired — re- 
placed by someone younger. 

WHAT ARE YOU GOING BE? 

A Retired Business Man — or a Fired 
Workingman? 
It's up to you. Do your deciding right 
now ! The floor surfacing business will 
put you into something for yourself and 
make you and your family independent 
of your job. The "American Universal" 
electrically driven floor surfacing ma- 
chine replaces six hand scrapers — and 
turns out mucii better work. There's 
$25.00 to $40.00 a day in it for you as 
a floor surfacing contractor. Requires a 
surprisingly small investment — no spe 1 
cial training necessary. Beautiful work 
creates big demand — every floor (old or 
new) a prospect. Pleasant work — prof- 
its unlimited. 

Write for Full Particulars at Once. 

Act Now — don't turn this page until 
you have written to us for full partic- 
ulars and testimonials from "American 
Universal" floor surfacing contractors 
who are making big money, who are ac- 
tually enjoying life — and who will con- 
tinue to enjoy life as long as they live. 
Don't Wait Until Tomorrow. Write 
Today — Now ! 



THE AMERICAN FLOOR SURFACING MACHINE CO. 

522 Sooth St. Clair St Toledo, Ohio 



TEAR OFF HERE AND MAIL IT NOW! 

The American Floor Surfacing Machine Co., 
522 South Saint Clair Street, 
Toledo, Ohio, U. S A. 

Gentlemen : Please send without obligation to me, 
complete information and literature on your 
proposition. 

Name 

Street 



I City State. 




Up the roof 
in no time 



and down to the next job 

when you work with Johns- Manville 
Asbestos Shingles 

/ ~TpHERE is no quicker, easier way to 
-■ re-roof than by the Johns-Manville 
method. You have no old wooden shingles 
to rip off. It's just a matter of applying the 
new asbestos shingles right over the old roof 
—and then going on to the next job. 

Because the Johns-Manville method of 
application is so rapid, you can secure more 
profitable work than by any other means. 
There are hundreds of houses in every 
community that are prospects for Johns- 
Manville Asbestos Shingles. You as the pro- 
gressive carpenter will find a profitable busi- 
ness right in your own locality if you re-roof 
in this popular way. 

JOHNS-MANVILLE Inc., 292 Madison Ave., at 41st St., N. Y. C. 

Branches in 62 Large Cities 

For Canada : Canadian Johxs-Maxville Co., Ltd., Toronto 

\*W Johns-Manville 

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wonderfully comfortable and 
roomy divan — right to your 
home on 30 days trial. And spe- 
cial now— 7-piece set of.genu- 
ine cut glass with hand 
art decorations, FREE, 
If you send at once, 



ft 



Diriy $ 3 00 aMonthsS j 

. . , . . . deposit, plus any 

reight or express charges you have paid. But if you decide to keep the set, 
tart paying only $3.00 a month until you hnve paid $34.85. A full year to pay 
-at the rate of only a few cents a day. We have only a limited number of I 
ets. We trust honest people anywhere in the U. S. No discount for cash. ■ 
Hot one penny extra for credit. No C. O. D. 

Cut Price— Send No wlT i 

-end coupon and $1.00 today for this tremendous value. Compare it with 
inytning you can buy locally for anywhere near the same price— even for ■ 
ipot cash. Get your set while this offer lasts. 7 Piece Set of Genuine ■ 
Sut Glass FREE to those who order at once. 

Straus & Schram,Dept. 3013 Chicago. HI. ! 



6-pleces made of selected solid Oak throughout, finished In rich dull 
waxed, brown fumed oak. All four chairs padded; seats uphol- 
stered with brown Delavan Spanish leather, best imitation of sen* 
nine Spanish leather kn-wn- Large Divan, unusually massive and 
comfortable with beautifully designed back. Arms broad and com- 
fortable. Measures 46 In. wide outside and 36 In. long Inside. 
Thickly padded scat Is 19 in. deep. Hght. of back 22 In. Posts 
extra massive. Arm Rocker is massive, stately and comfortable, 
with beautifully designed back, wide, shapely arms and smooth 
operating runners. Seat 19 x 17 1-2 In. , hght. 36 In. Arm Chair If 
roomy and comfortable. Matches Rocker. Seat 19 X 17 1-2 in 
hght. 36 in. Sewing Rocker, attractive and useful; seat 17 
In. Hght. 35 in. Library Table — Beautifully designed ends to 
match chairs. Roomy magazine shelf below. Legs of 2 In. stock; 
massive, dignified. Top 23 1-4 x 34 In. Jardiniere Stand matches 
other pieces. 17 1-2 in. high; top 12 x 12 in. Entire set shipped 
knocked down construction. Easy to set up. Saves freight charges. 
Weight about 175 lbs. 

7-Piece Genuine Cut Glass Set FREE. Order by No. B7S93BA. 
no T B $1.00 with coupon, $3.00 a month. Price $34.85. 

Straus & Schram, Dept. 3013 Chicago, 111. 

Enclosed find $1. Ship special advertised 6 vtece Fumed Oak Library 
Set, with 7-piece Genuine Cut Glass Set, FREE. I am to have 30 days 
free trial. If I keep the Bet, I will pay you $3.00 monthly. If not 
satisfied, I am to return the set with the 7-piece cut glass set within SO 
days and you are to refund my money and any freight charges I paid, 
O 6-Piece Library Set No. B7593BA, $34.85 

Name 

Street, R. F. D. 

or Box No 

Shipping 

Point 

Poet Office State 

□ If you want ONLY our free catalog 
ol home furnishings, mark X hsr. 




No Extra Charge -Drawing lb oli and Table 

With My TraininP Course ,;/^v 



THIS adjustable and folding Drawing Table, also the complete set of imported Drawing instru- 
ments, made of high-class nickel silver, will be sent to you when you are my working student. 
I will furnish also all the other tools to complete the full Working Outfit, because I want ambi- 
tious young men and mechanics to get ahead. There is no extra charge for this Drawing Outfit, 
and Drawing Table. Only a reasonable tuition is charged for training you on practical drafting 
work UNTIL you are qualified as a REGULAR Draftsman. 

You May Earn Your Course f CrU&V&tttGG 



I have an offer whereby you may earn my regular 
$90.00 drafting course while you are my student if you 
will do certain work for me at home during your spare 
time, which will not interfere with your present work 
or position. I am doing all I can in preparing draftsmen 
for urgent calls which are being made by employers 
every day, for men to fill good-paying positions. There 
is a constant demand for skilled draftsmen. The work 
is light, pleasant and profitable. A draftsman's posi- 
tion leads to something better and higher up. There 
are many positions for good-paying home work where- 
by you may more than double your regular salary. 




to train you at home, during your 
spare time, UNTIL you have gained ChlefDrafUntan 
the required practical experience and Dobe 

UNTIL you hold a permanent position with my assist- 
tance. I guarantee to give your work my personal 
supervision, also, to furnish you with the complete 
draftsman's Working Outfit as shown above, the 
"Chief's Own Drawing Table" adjustable to different 
height and angle. Also, to send you all the instruments 
you need just as soon as you become my student, 
all to be included in the course without extra charge. 



Mail Coupon Today 
for FREE Book 

This coupon filled out and sent to me will bring my 
book "Successful Draftsmanship" and special offers to 
yon telling in detail abont the career of a draftsman. 
Prepare now for a better position to increase your in- 
come, and get in line for advancement. There is no 
obligation whatever to secure my special offer and free 
book. Write AT ONCE. TODAY. 

Chief Draftsman Dobe 

1951 Lawrence Ave.,Div. 1 e-93 Chicago,IU. 



Chief Draftsman Dobe 

1951 Lawrence Avenue, Div. 1 6-93 Chicago, Illinois 

Without any obligation whatsoever, please mail 
your book, Successful Draftsmanship", and full 
particulars of your liberal "Personal Instruction" 
offer to a limited number of students. 




Name Age. 



Address. 



Post Office State. 



I" Stucco 
on metal '•' 

4'xl^ wood ■'• ' y 
strips r"^ 
l6"o.c. -r 

Alternates ■' , 
that may be ' 
used .Wood .•«. 
lath in place ■ 
of metal lath '". 
on furring 
strips . Self .';. 
.^furring metal '; 
| lath or self ?aj 
f furring wire /' y 
mesh with- 2/^ 
out fur- 7" *" 
ring strips. 



—Celotex 

"""Plaster on Celotex 
-2"x4"Studs l6o.c. 
-/^"Plaster grounds 
— Baseboard 

Finish F.loor-o . 

'Paper-, A 



Rough Floor 7 | 

\ First Floor Joists 

:':-\ 2"x4" Set in 

3 m' \ between \jo.i sts 



Basement wall 



STUCCO ON WOOD FRAMING 



Howtodothejob right 

No, 2" Celotex application 
with stucco on wood framing 



Celotex Insulating Lumber is easy to ap- 
ply. But it's mighty important to do the 
job right if your work is to give permanent 
satisfaction. 

It will pay you to study the blue-print 
diagram above and to read the specifica- 
tions at the right carefully. They show 
a frequent use of Celotex. 

Your work on this kind of a job will be 
right if you observe the few simple points 
explained here. 

Free — complete specifications 

This is only one of many places where you 
will find Celotex used on your jobs. 

Others will be shown here each month. 

In the meantime, be prepared. Send for 
complete specifications — free to every car- 
penter. Mail the coupon for your copy, 
today. 




SPECIFICATION 

for the use of 

Celotex 

As An Exterior Sheathing 
and Insulation 

For Frame Buildings hav- 
ing a Stucco Finish 



Material : Sheathing and insulation 
for all exterior walls shall be Celotex 
Insulating Lumber, approximately 
7-16" thick, as manufactured by The 
Celotex Company, Chicago. 

Framing : The sills, studs and plates 
shall be framed as in ordinary frame 
house construction, taking precaution, 
however, to space the studs 16" on 
centers. Wherever it is necessary 
to have a horizontal joint in the 
Celotex, a 2" x 2" or 2" x 4" header 
shall be cut in between the studs. 

Application : The Celotex boards shall 
be applied vertically, directly to the 
wood frame work, without the use of 
wood sheathing, and set in place so 
as to have a bearing for nailing along 
all edges. When necessary to use more 
than one course of Celotex to cover 
the height of building, vertical joints 
shall not meet on the same stud. 

Leave 3-16" space between adjoining 
boards, also at top and bottom of 
boards. Around window and door 
frames, sills and plates, or where a 
snug joint is desired, the Celotex 
shall be brought to moderate contact. 
DO NOT force into place. 

Nailing : Nail the Celotex beginning 
at top, to intermediate studs ; then 
entirely around all edges of each 
board to all studs, sills, plates or 
headers. Use standard 1J" roofing 
nails with 1" heads. Space nails 4" 
apart, driving nails until the heads 
are flush with the surface of the 
Celotex. Nails shall be spaced ap- 
proximately |" from the edge of the 
boards. 

When walls are to be finished with 
stucco, apply self-furring metal or 
wire lath directly against the Celotex 
and nail through to the studs ; or 
apply h" x h" furring strips over the 
Celotex, nailing to the studs, and 
over these furring strips apply wood, 
metal or wire lath. Apply stucco to 
the base thus prepared in accordance 
with manufacturers specifications. 



INSULATING LUMBER | 

"There is a use for Celotex in every building" 



The Celotex Company, Dept. 23, 
645 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Please send me your free 
specifications for carpenters. 

Name 

Street 

City 



Taintor Positive Saw Sets 

have Set the Standard and Set the Saws for over a Quarter 
Century. Are they setting lour saws': 

If not, talk it over with your Hardware Dealer. 
TWO STYLES, REGULAR No. 7, and No. 7i WITH DOUBLE PLUNGER 

Send for Book: "Care of Saws." Free to members of the Brotherhood. 

Taintor Mfg. Co. 

95 Reade St. New York City. 





A poor nail set looks much like a good one. And any 

maker can say his set is best. That's why we GUARANTEE 

every SYRACUSE Nail Set. Crucible steel costs 60 to 100 

per cent, more than open hearth steel, but we use it exclus- 

vely. Send 25c if your dealer doesn't carry. 

SYRACU SE TWIST DRILL CO.. Syracuse, New York 



s cheaper to buy one good nail set than several poor ones 



MEASURING TAPES 

and FOLDING RULES 

Used for over 40 years where quick and accurate 
work is done. High quality without high price ! 

KEUFFEL CESSER CO. 

•EW YORK, 127 Futon Street Central OHla ani Factories, HOBOKEN, N. J. 

./CHICAGO ST. LOUIS SAN FRANCISCO MONTREAL* 



K& E 



Ask to see our com- 
plete line at your 
Hardware dealer's. 




tuuNUMizE i : : 
AUTOMATIC SASH HOLDERS 

Eliminate 
Window 
Pockets 
Rattling & 
Other Nui- 
sances. Save 




\v v i e h t t, Hg 

Cords. Pulleys, fj' 
Balances. Etc 



Send $1.25 for trial set prepaid 
of sash when ordering. Address Dept ,_ 

HARDWARE SALES CO., Inc. 

30 Church St.. New York City. Room 446 



Time & Labor. 
Mention weight. 
C 



Get into the Floor Surfacing Business 
While the Field Is Fresh 

$40 to $50 a day easily earned 
'with an AUTOMATIC— 

the result of 16 
years' manufactur- 
ing experience. 
Force Feed Lubri- 
cation — SKF Ball- 
bearings — Whit- 
ney Silent Chain 
— Roller Pressure 
Regulator — ■ ALL 
Dust taken up on 
forward operation 
with New Vacuum 
Nozzle. All work- 
ing parts inclosed. 
Write today — Let 
us tell you how to 
get started in this pay- 
ing business. Free trial. 
Part d o w n — balance 
easy payments. 

The Little Auto- 
matic Surfacing Ma- 
chine (on table) is a 
wonder for removing 
varnish from desk 
tops, counters, etc., 
or for all sorts of 
new work. 

Wayvell Chappell 
& Co. 

38 Jackson St. 

Dept. W 
Waukegan, 111. 






"LIGHTING FIXTURES" 

READY TO HANG 

Direct from manufacturer. 
Completely wired including glass- 
ware. 

Send for Catalogue No. 26. 

(Just off the Press.) 
Special proposition to Dealers. 

Erie Fixture Supply Co. 

NO. 2. EKIE- PA. 




Tremendous Saving in Cost 

Fasy. fascinating work with our SIM- 
PLIFIED PLANS. We furnish blue 
prints, diagrams, motor, cabinet pieces, 
ready-built horn. etc. You don't need 
to be' a cabinet maker. A few hours as- 
sembling and you will have a fine in- 
strument at one-quarter the regular re- 
tail price. Will be the equal of any 
phonograph on the market in beauty of 
tone and appearance. Will play all 
records. Thousands have built their 
own machines and are securing satis- 
faction and pleasure. You too can 

build— do as well and save much money. AGENTS 

MAKE MONEY making and selling these instruments. 

Write toda: for full details and our FREE OFFER. 
LUPERL. PHONOPARTS CO. 

4936 N. Troy St. Dept. 30. Chicago, III. 




—PRICE LIST— 

Label and Emblem Novelties 

Card Cases (Label) $ - 10 

Playing Cards (Label) (Pinochle only) .4o 

Key Chains (Label) :|j> 

Fobs (Label and Emblem) .SO 

Gavels (Labels) 1 -f2 

Small Pencils (Label) .03 

Large Pencils (Label) -04 

Rubber Tip Pencils (Label) -05 

Pins (Emblem) -50 

Buttons (Emblem) .50 

Rolled Gold Charms (Emblem) 1.59 

Solid Gold Charms (Emblem) T.aO 

Rings (Emblem) 5.00 

B. A. Badges (Emblem) J-C0 

Cuff Links (Emblem) 1-5 J 

Match Box Holders (Label) -15 

Belt Loop and Chain (Label) -75 

Pins, Ladies' Auxiliary (Emblem) 1.2o 

In Ordering These Goods Send all Orders and 

Make all Remittances Payable to 

FRANK DUFFY, Gen. Sec, Carpenters' Building, 

222 East Michigan St., Indianapolis, Ind. 



Let white handle the job free Mor tisine* Made Eas V 

Use this famous combination instrument on your work 0A *' ,, ATAC*\*V/ J-/C*0 JT 



Use this famous combination instrument on your work 
SOW. Good contractors, builders and architects find it 
ideal equipment with its exclusive features, No loose parts. 
Protected spirit level (no in- 
verting). Fowerful 2 5 diameter 
Perfect in HS*' 1 ^© lens. Combination level bars 

details. 'HliEr ancl transLt standards prevent 

Quality- lfnBM» inaccuracies. Simple, depend- 

built. : CBsC- able ' thoroughly guaranteed. 

Accurate. /f^ESflBESA Get il oa 

iXtfjpEEte ? 10 Days FREE trial 

No obligation. Write TODAY 
for full particulars. 

DAVID WHITE CO., INC. 

904 Chestnut St., Milwaukee. 



WHITE'S ^LEVEL 




SPECIALLY MADE FOR W/avWCARPE A/rf /?S 




MORRILL SAWSETS 

Set Saws Just Right 

"Saw Points" Telling You "How To Joint, Set, 
And File Saws." Sent Free Upon Request. 

CHAS. MORRILL, Inc. 

96 Lafayette St. New York. 



The "INTERLOX" Thinks 

Invented by a Brotherhood Man 

Don't use a stick or guess at a measurement. 

The famous 

"Interfax" Master Slide Rule 

siTi aa 

gives both inside and outside measurements 
instantly. 

Quick, accurate, durable and rustproof. Use 
it once, and you will never work without it. 
Write today for-- liberal selling inducements 
to mechanics. 

MASTER RULE MFG. CO., INC. 
841C East 136th St., New York City 



"Old Fashioned" Quality. 



Easier Work 

More of it, and a tool 
that will last twice as 
long. Doesn't that fill 
the bill? 

Your dealer has them 
or if you have trouble 
getting them write for 
our catalogue. 



THE L, & I. J. WHITE CO. 

15 Columbia St. Buffalo, N. 




There's no hard work or drudgery 
in mortising when you use a 
Champion Mortiser. And it does 
the job five times faster and a 
hundred times neater without 
danger of ruining the material. 

THE NEW IMPROVED 



■ — saves time and means bigger profits. 
Works equally well in hard, soft, knotty 
or end wood. Carried anywhere. Cuts a 
mortise J" to 11" wide and any length 
from round hole to 6" slot. Year's guar- 
antee with each machine. Shipped com- 
plete with any two bits — choice 4" to i". 
$40.00 f. o. b. factory. Extra bits to 
11", $2.00 each. 

Money-back guarantee. If not 
satisfied after ten days' trial, re- 
turn at our expense and get your 
money. Send today. Illustrated 
bulletin sent free upon request. 

We also make a motor 
driven machine for use 
on large jobs, etc. Ask 
for details. 




303 Hayden Bldg. 



Illustrated 
Bulletin Sent 
On Request. 

Colgan 

Machinery 

& Supply 

Co., 

Columbus, Ohio. 



5 DAY 
TRIAL 



MAKE EXTRA MONEY 

with an 
IMPROVED SCHLUETER 
Rapid Electric, Ball Bearing, Floor Surfacing Machine 
Carpenters everywhere are 
getting into the floor 
surfacing business with 
this handy, easily op- 
erated, rapid, automatic 
machine which costs but 
little and does the work 
of six men. Requires no 
previous experience to 
operate and does its work 
faster and better than 
any machine on the 
market. Surfaces close 
up to the baseboard with- 
out use of edge roller. 
A Five Year Guarantee 
which has proven satis- 
factory to 20,000 users 
covers each machine. 
Write for prices and 5 
day free trial offer. 

LincoIn=Schlueter Machinery Co., Inc. 

230 W-sr i"in n : s st. Chicago. Illinois. 




START NOW! 
You Can Be 
Independent 

FIVE DAYS 
FREE TRIAL 

One fair sized job will pay 
for the "Ideal" Floor Sand- 
er. It is sold at a price you 
can afford to pay. In the 
five days you have the ma- 
chine on trial you can make 
enough to pay for it. 
The "Ideal" is a practical 
door sanding machine built 
for continuous service. Sur- 
faces right up to base board. 
Motor can be detached for 
other work in a few seconds. 
Write today, and we will shoio you how 
the "IDEAL" will save still another 15% 




BOETTCHER COMPANY 



442 N. Peoria St. 



Chicago, III. 





Made 



"Red Devil' Bits 



The worm is constructed to 
take hold quickly and strong- 
ly — pulls itself in tractor 
fashion. No pushing — just 
turn the brace, that's all. 

No. 2400 

Made from special grade, carefully 
tempered steel. Single score, dou- 



ble twist. 






Size 3 4 5 
Price .65 .50 .55 


6 7 8 
.60 .65 .70 


9-l6ths 
.75 each 


Sze 10 II 12 
Price .80 .85 .90 


13 14 15 
.95 1.00 1.10 


16-lfiths 
1.15 each 


Size 17 18 


19 20 22 


24-l6ths 



Price 1.20 1.30 1.50 1.65 1.80 2.00 each 

No. 2403 

Single twist, rapid boring thread 

is designed for quick and easy 

boring. 10 inches over all. 

No. 2400 Size 10 II 12 I3-I6ths 

Price .80 .85 .90 .95 each 

At all dealers, or if not in stock, order from us. 

FREE : Handy Tool Booklet 

SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., Inc. 

Mfrs. of "Red Devil'' Tools 

271 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



^zSESiS^ 



METAL 
WEATHER 



Mr. Carpenter — 

Here's A Real Business 
Opportunity for You 

Go into business for yourself. 
Be the Federal Metal Weath- 
erstrip Contractor in your 
city. There is good profit the 
year around. The work is 
easy and pleasant. 
Your customers will be 
pleased with the quality and 
reliability of Federal Weath- 
erstrips. 

Write us today and we will 
send you our generous agency 
proposition. 

Federal Metal Weather Strip Co. 

1338=50 FuIIerton Ave., Chicago, III. 



Here's a story of success 
that might easily be yours! 

When you read this 
2| story you will say — 
"That's no trick. I 
could do it, too!" 

Why not? Multiply 
your carpentering skill 
with a Parks machine 
and you, too, can make 
big money. This man 
Wright, who went in- 
to the screen business 
down in New Orleans 
built his business out 
of the same ability you 
have. You can do the same in your 
town. 

Parks low prices on high-grade machines 
have put many good men in their own busi- 
ness. Are you one of those who will start 
this year ? * Write for a Parks catalog and 
the story of "One Man Who Did It." 

THE PARKS BALL BEARING MACHINE COMPANY 

1549 Knowlton Street, Cincinnati, 0. 

Canadian Factory: 200 Notre Dame East, 

Montreal, Can. 





woodworking Machines; 



There Is No Better Machine 
Made Than the 

"Lightning Electric] 

Floor 

Surl 

If you are interested in Floor 
Surfacing Machines be sure 
to write for the literature 
on the "Lightning' Electric" 
— the highest _ quality and 
most economically priced 
floor surf acer on the mar- 
ket. Will do the work 
of six to eight men 
and do it better. 

No Old- 

Fashioned 

Side Roller 

The "Lightning Electric" will surface right up to 
quarter round without the use of the Old-Fashioned 
and cumbersome side roller. Leaves NO waves or 
chatter marks in the roughest floors — will NOT vibrate. 

Five Day Free Trial 
and Five Year Guarantee 

Write for our five day free trial and our five year guaran- 
tee on the best Floor Surfacing Machine the world has 
ever produced. Costs you nothing to investigate and the 
machine pays for itself the first month. A business making 
proposition for the contractor or individual— write today. 

National Sanding Machine Company 

Formerly The Globe Mfg. & Dist. Co. 

Sales Offices 

543-545 Vedder St. Chicago, 111- 





CARPENTERS— BUILDERS 
CONSTRUCTION MEN 

EARN 
MORE 

MONEY 



Learn how to get 
ahead in t^e build- 
ing game. Don't be 
satisfied to be an odd jobber in your 
trade. Don't let the other fellows get 
the soft jobs, while you plug along try- 
ing to make both ends meet. Here is 
your big chance to get ahead. 

We have several opportunities for men 
as foremen or Building Superintendents. 
You must have practical knowledge, but 
no matter what you've done, you must 
at least understand how to work with 
Blue Prints. 

Write and make your applications for 
training today. Here is your chance to 
earn more money. We will send FREE 
Blue Print and all details of our plan 
to you. 

COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL EST. 1904 

Dept. C-25 Drexel Cldg., Phila., Pa. , 



/ 



Carpenters & Builders most essential Tool 

G & B JUNIOR 
CONVERTIBLE LEVEL 

Level and Transit combined 

$5.00 will bring it to you. 
Level & Plumb with your own Instrument. 



\i 



10 Days J$3B- 


1 

Deposit 


free trial ^fStT cheerfully 


and kSaJpa? returned if 


Book of l%\ not 


Instructions IS 


\A satisfied 


Powerful IE 


■k Easy to dp- 


Lens system, IS 


mi erate. Noth- 


graduated IS 


W, ing to get 


circle, IS 


■ft out of order. 


ground [S 


w Complete as 


Level Vial. IS 






t\ shown. 


/ 


';-:: .».;. 






Patents MC \ 






^V» Terms 



The most complete accurate and dur- 
able Convertible Bevel on the market. 
Send at once for Circular E. 



"* 



GEIER & BLUHM, INC 
672 River St. Troy, N. Y 



r 



WHY WORRY 

ABOUT A LEAKY ROOF WHEN IT 
CAN SO EASILY BE CURED BY 




EEC TJ. S. PAT. OFF. 



BAYONNE 

IS GUARANTEED ABSOLUTELY 

WATERPROOF 

It has been used as a roof and floor 
covering on thousands of Piazzas, 
Sleeping Porches, etc., and is recog- 
nized by Carpenters and Builders the 
country over as the standard of Roof- 
ing Canvas. 

Write for sample book "T" 

JOHN BOYLE & CO., INC. 

ESTABLISHED I860 

duaVe'W NEW YORK re 7 aVe 2 S t. 

BRANCH 1317- 13 19 PINE ST. ST. LOUIS 




THE 

EXPERT'S 
CHOICE 
FILE 



Does twice the work of an ordinary file — in half the time. 
The Expert's Choice increases the value of your time by 
over 50%. By spending 30 cents you can make it back 
on your first filing job alone. It's in the Quality — in the 
cut of the tooth and in the length of the stroke. 

Frank Luther. Chicago, says: "The Expert's 
Choice File flies IS hand saws and Is cheaper at 
a cost of 50c than the ordinary file at any price." 
You get your money back if the Expert's Choice does not prove 
to be the most economical file you have ever used. DELTA 
SAW FILES are made for flne or coarse teeth— also for that 
extra bard saw. Buy your tools of the dealer who telle 
Delta Files. H< 



Juy your I 

l the quali' 

T r fal Offer If your dealer cannot supply you. send us 20c. 
* * "" v ^ 25c or 30c for trial ale. sent prepaid. Do 
this today — And out what a real die is 



"THE HIGHEST GRADE FILE MADE 
DELTA "HAND SAW*' FILES 



CARPENTERS SPECIAL* 

t 

MECHANICS FAVORITE** 

t 

expert's choice * 

ooes tw ice the work-in-half t he t|me 
The File You Will Eventuallt Use 



DELTA 

FILE 

WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, 
PA. 



Look for 
This Sign 
at Your 
Hardware 
Store 



The but Augcj Bil Fik wit— We will dtliw *a (Wtisl «j 35 ctaif tick. 




Send, for Catalog 



Plumbing, Heating and Pneumatic 
Waterworks Supplies at Wholesale 



When in the market for Plumbing, Heating and 
Pneumatic Waterworks Supplies and you wish to 

Save 20 to 40% on Every Article 

order from us. Small orders are as carefully 
handled as large ones. Only house selling guar- 
anteed plumbing and heating supplies to all. 



B. KAROL & SONS CO., 804 So. Kedzie Ave., Chicago, 111. 



|ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP 

CARPENTERS 

CONTRACTORS 

DO YOU KNOW — that All- 
metal Weatherstripping is a 
good paying- business for you 
to start — 

that you can keep busy all 
the time — 

that any building, new or old 
is a real live prospect for 
you — 

that hundreds of carpenters 
everywhere have made this 
their steady work — 

NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED 
NO STOCK TO CARRY 

Let us send you particulars 
" - -* - "Send Back the Coupon* - - - - 

ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP CO. 
227 W. Illinois St., Chicago, III. 

Gentlemen: Without obligation, please send me sam- 
ples and literature. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY STATS 



YOU NEED A 
HUTHER DADO HEAD 




The adjustable groover 
that cuts with or across 
grain. Easily adjusted with- 
out the use of screws, just 
add or remove inside cut- 
ters to make the desired cut. 
May be returned if not satis- 
factory. Sent on approval. 

Write for our new cata- 
log No. 43, showing many 
special tools for your saw rig. 

Huther Bros. Saw Mfg. Co. 

Rochester, N. Y. 





LONG. 
FITS YOUR FRAME. 



FREE CUTTING EASY TURNING 

FOLLOW THE CURVES WITHOUT BINDING 

A different saw. Teeth filed and set. 

Ask your Sealer. 

Note: Or we will mail direct to you. 

PRICE 50c per doz. Postage paid. 

Sizes— Coarse &. Medium. 

Ackermann Steffan & Co., 4532 Palmer St., Chicago, III. 

WRITE FOR YOUR FREE SAMPLE— TO=DAY 




The American Woodworker 

Gasoline, Kerosene, or Electric Driven 
Used on the Job or in the Shop 



Let us send you our Bulletin No. 77 
describing this and other profit pro- 
ducers for the Carpenter, Contrac- 
tor and Builder. 



|p American Saw Mill Machinery Co. 

Ugl 136 Main Street 

W Hackettstown, N. J. 



J 

1 


... 


'J[ ^g| 


m 



A lock mortiser which does a good clean job, not 
only eliminates the tedious handwork of the old way 
but does a better job in one-fifth of the time. 

Very easily attached to the door centering itself 
and held in place by clamps which will not marr 
the door. 

Carpenters are now making a big profit with this 
machine doing lock mortising and you can do the 
same. 

Interchangeable so that it can be operated by 
hand or electric power. 

WRITE TODAY FOR FULL PARTICULARS. 

MASTIN & McKAIN 



265 North Kedzie Avenue, 



Chicago, Illinois. 




Cement blocks are rapidly 
replacing wood for building 

Get started now in a live business for yourself. 

You can earn more money manufactur- 
ing cement blocks. Let us send you full 
information describing this profitable 
block making machine. 

Cement Block Machinery Co. 

52 Columbia Street, 
Phone — Mulberry 5198. NEWARK, N. J. 




For Absolute Protection 
Use The 

DEAD 
BOLT 

NIGHT LATCH 

An extra security on glass doors, as key may be turned once 
backwards, locking bolt so it can not be forced or knob turned 
without proper key. Easily installed on any door. Ask your 
dealer or write us direct. 

INDEPENDENT LOCK CO., Leominster, Mass., U. S. A. 





Three si 




The Best 
for 68 Years 

It served your father and 
your grandfather faith- 
fully — just as it will serve 
you. 

GERMANTOWN 
MASTER 
BUILDER 

If not obtainable through your 
local mere.' ant, write for the 
Master Builder catalog of Ham- 
mers and Hatchets. 

Griffith Tool Works 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




C ETTA R 
SHINGLES 



LOOKING out for one's own 
bread and butter is both fair 
and necessary. For that rea- 
son we meet with attack the at- 
tacks of the makers of substitute 
materials. 

For the same reason, you should 
boost the use of a material which 
requires your labor and skill in 
laying and guarantees to your cus- 
tomer long service and big saving. 

Red Cedar Shingles of good qual- 
ity, applied with rust-proof nails, 
by an experienced carpenter are 
the ideal roof and sidewall cover- 
ing material. 

Let us send interesting literature. 
RED CEDAR SHINGLE BUREAU 

38 South Dearborn Street 
CHICAGO ILLINOIS 



24" 6 Glass 
Aluminum 




Accurate 
and Light 



"OU can depend on the 
accuracy for it's 
built-in, sealed and double sealed 
at the factory. It's there to stay. 
The aluminum models are so light 
you can use one all day without 
tiring. It's especially handy for 
overhead work. 

If you like good tools you'll ap- 
preciate the many superiorities of 
Sand's Aluminum Levels. • 

At Good Hardware Stores Everywhere 

SSNBSIEVELfi^TOOLGa 

3851 Fischer Ave., DETROIT, MICH.I 




"Hands Off" 

Brand your own name or initials on 
your tools, horses, scaffolding, tool 
chests, tool boxes, etc. Then thieves and 
borrowers will keep their "hands off" 
because a brand cannot be erased. 
Burn the permanent evidence of your 
ownership into all of your equipment 
with the Everhot blow torch and brand. 
Uses ordinary gasoline. Portable. Can 
be carried and used anywhere. Operates 
continuously — the flame keeps heating 
the brand all the time it is being used. 
The Everhot Torch can also be used 
for soldering, for melting, snow and ice, 
and for any heating purpose. 
Write and tell us what letters you want 
on your brand and we will advise you 
the cost immediately. 

Complete Everhot equipments as low as 
$14.00. 




i (America's *7$r , and"Q/H 

1W V HvJl&U iV\Jt JUL 

Manufacturing Ca 

MAYVOOD. ILLINOIS 



This Saw Will Cut Costs- 




Wallace 
Universal Saw 



Wallace Portable Machines 

Wallace 6" Jointer 
Wallace k" Planer 
Wallace 6" Lathe 
Wallace Universal Saw 
Wallace Plain Saw 
Wallace 10" Band Saw 
Wallace Glue Pot 

automatic 

licat control 
Wonder Disc Sander 
Wonder Spindle Sander 



and molding, window sash, 
stair treads, groove and 
tongue, as well as cross-cut- 
ting or ripping any stock up 
to 2" thick, straight or at a 
single or double angle. 

One carpenter reports that 
without his Wallace Uni- 
versal Saw he would have 
suffered a penalty on a hard- 
wood floor contract. He 
used the saw for cutting the 
flooring to length. It was 
set up right in the rooms be- 
ing floored, and plugged into 
a light socket. This is typical 
of hundreds of similar cases. 



Wallace Portable Machines can be taken to any construc- 
tion job as soon as the foundation is in. They are pre- 
cision-built and direct-motor-driven for fast, accurate, 
economical work. 

Write today for Catalog Ifi® C and price list 

J. D. Wallace & Co. 

1 54 S. California Ave. Chicago, U. S„ A. 




The UBA 

An Adjustable Combination 
Level And Plumb That Can 
Be Applied To Any Length 
Straight Edge Or Board. The 
Level With An Instant Adjust= 
ment And Immediate Results. 

USE IT AND PROVE IT 




No Level Has Ever Been 
Made Before Combining 
As Many Advantages As 
The UBA For Heavy And 
Light Framing and In- 
terior Trimming. The UBA 
Is Durable, Simple, Guaran- 
teed and Rust Troof. It Is 
An Indispensable Utility Level 
And Flumb In All Branches 
Of Carpentry. 





You Do Service To 
Yourself And Employ- 
er When You Put A 
UBA Into Action. The 
UBA Is Thoroughly 
And Rigidly Inspected 
To Maintain The High 
Standard Of Quality The 
Mechanic Insists On. Fin- 
ished With White Or Green 
Double Marked Bulbs. 



hizo 3+x-i inches. 

Price $1.25 

Order Through Your Local 
Dealer Or Send Us Your 
Money Order And We Will 
Mail Direct To You. Mention 
Name Of Dealer. 

UNION LEVEL MFG. CO. 

4649 So. Ashland Ave., 
Chicago, III. 




In Canada 

Have Your Dealer Order From 

THE WALKERVILLE HARDWARE 

COMPANY, Ltd. 

(Wholesale Only) 
Walkervllle. Ontario, Canada. 



FLOOR SURFACING 

OFFERS BIG OPPORTUNITIES 

FOR CARPENTER 




An old home, 

m< demized by 3 /b* 

Ouk Flooring. 



J. W. FLEMING, 
Blooniington, Indiana 

Many carpenters are laying down 
their tool boxes and going into the floor 
surfacing business where they can be 
their own boss and take all of the profits. 
It requires but a small amount of money 
to start in and as the "American 
Universal" electrically driven floor sur- 
facing machine does the work very rap- 
idly the owner can make very good 
money — $25.00 and more per day being 
not unusual. 

As floor surfacing is indoor work it is 
an all year 'round business and besides 
surfacing newly laid floors, there are 
thousands of old floors that need re- 
surfacing and it is in this field where the 
biggest money is made. 

Here is what J. W. Fleming has to say : 
American Floor Surfacing Machine Co. 
Toledo, Ohio. 
Gentlemen : 

A few lines to let you know what I 
think of my "American Universal" as a 
money maker. 

I clear anywhere from $20.00 to 
$30.00 a day with my "American 
Universal". I wouldn't take $1000.00 
for my machine the way it stands if I 
couldn't get another one just like it. 
I've only had the "American 
Universal" about five or six months, and 
I've already made close to $1,000.00 
dressing floors." 

Yours truly, 
J. W. Fleming, 402 E. 4th St., Bloomington, Ind. 
If any of the readers of this magazine have 
any inclination to get into something for them- 
selves and make good money ? tnen it would pay 
to look into this proposition. Nobody ever 
made any money working for the other fellow. 
When you get into someihing for yourself and 
become your own boss, then and only then will 
you begin to make big money and get some- 
where. The "American Universal" offers you 
the opportunity of a lifetime to get into your 
own business. Carpenters all over the country 
are waking up to the possibilities in the floor 
surfacing business. Why not establish your- 
self iu a business where you can make big 
money all t'e time? Write to Tlie American 
Floor Surfacing Machine Company, 522 South 
Saint Clair Street, Toledo, Ohio, where com- 
plete information can be obtained without cost 
and without any obligation whatever. 




Laid right over 
the oldwornfloor. 



No woodwork is 
disturbed except 
the quarter-round 
at the baseboard. 



Money for You 

Turn your spare time into profit 

by laying %" oak flooring 

in old homes. 



Many carpenters 
have increased their 
income by telling 
people in theirneigh- 
borhood about oak 
floors. Show them 
how quickly and in- 
expensively you can 
lay permanent oak 
flooring over worn 
and unsightly 
softwood floors. 

Women will 
be glad to know 
that oak floors 
savehousework,tliat 
the cost is not more 




It will help you get 
tlie order. Wm. J. 
Benko of New 
Brunswick, N. J., 
writes; "I personal- 
ly distributed io 
books, and got 6 
jobs." You can do 
that too. 

How many books 
canyon use? 
How to figure ac- 
curately the amount 
of flooring required 
is containedin' 'How 
and Where to Use 
Oak Floors," also 



than new carpets, J""" re '; < <"- tof grading rules, stand- 

, i j i • Everlasting Beauty ° , ° ' 



and they add lasting 
value to their property. 

Free Books will help you 

"The Story of Oak 
Floors' ' contains plates of the 
new color finishes. Any 
home owner will look 
through this book with you. 



ard measurements, 
thicknesses and widths, 
proper storing, laying, scrap- 
ing and finishing. 

Free, if you 
mail this 
coupon. 



Oak Flooring Bureau 

851 Hearst Bid?., Chicago 
Please send me "The Story of Oak 
Floors," and "How and Where to 
Use Oak Floors." 



Name 

Address.- 

City State ! 





Two thoroughbreds ! That's what 
they are — made for the craftsman 
that buys the best, when he adds a 
tool to his chest. 

V & B Vanadium hammers are 
made from special V & B formula 
vanadium steel, and handled with 
the finest hand-shaved, second 
growth white hickory. Octagon 
necked, and round faced — with a 
special non-slip claw, that firmly 
grips either a brad or a spike. 

You'll want, too, V & B Un- 
breakable Planes. They are drop 
forged — not cast — from a solid bar 
of V & B super-steel. Stand the 
falls that would break an ordinary 
plane. Furnished with all vana- 
dium steel blades and walnut 
handles, in the sizes you will want. 

Two tools of particular merit — 
get them for your kit. 

BUSHNUL 

HI Il@ COMPANY 

2114 Carroll Ave.-v v Chicago, III. U.S.A. 





The only man who 
could talk to the 
Superintendent 

"C"OON after I began studying," a student 
^ wrote to us the other day, "we had a 
change in management at our plant. I cer- 
tainly was glad then that I had decided to 
study in my spare time. For, thanks to my 
I. C. S. course, I was the only man in the 
organization who could talk to the Superin- 
tendent in his own language. As a result, 
I was promoted over men who had been 
here from ten to twenty years. My salary 
has been increased 90 per cent in the last 
ten months." 

THAT'S a true story of what just one I. C. S. stu- 
dent has done. There are thousands of others - . 
Every mail brings letters irom m«n and women tell- 
ing of promotions and increases in salary due direcHy 
to spare-time study. 

One hour a day, spent with the I. C. S. in the 
quiet of your own hom-j, will prepare you for success 
in the work you like best. Yes, it ■willl Put it up 
to us to prove it 

Mail this Coupon To-day 

SffiNATi^E'cTRRFspiSr^ils 



BOX 0832-B 
Explain, without obligating 
position, or In the subject, 
I] ARCHITECT 
J Architectural Draftsman 
J Architects' Blue Prints 
J Contractor and Builder 

§ Building Foreman 
Concrete Builder 
Structural Engineer 
j Structural Draftsman 
J Pin rubor and Steam Fitter 
3 Heating and Ventilation 
3 Plumbing Inspector 
3 Foreman Plumber 
3 Sheet Metal Worker 
D CIVIL ENGINEER. 

B Surveying and Mapping 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 
B Electric Lighting and BjSr 
Electric Wiring 
J Telegraph Engineer 
3 Telephone Work 
J MECHANICAL ENGINEER 
3 Mechanical Draftsman 

gToolmaker 
Machine Shop Practice , 
CHEMIST , 

3 Pharmacy 

Name 



SCRANTON, PA. 

me, how I can qualify for the 
before which I mark X. 
Navigation 

_ SALESMANSHIP 

3 ADVERTISING 

J Window Trimmer 

3 Show Card and Sign Painting 

3 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

3 Private Secretary 

3 Business Correspondent i 
BOOKKEEPER 
Stenographer and Tj-pla8 
IliTher Accounting 
COMMERCIAL LAW } 

3 Common School Subject* / 
Mathematics 
GOOD ENGLISH 1 
ILLUSTRATING > 
R=ilway Mail Cleric 
CIVIL SERVICE . 
Mining Engineer 
Gas Engine Operating 
STATIONARY ENGINEERS 

Textile Overseer or Snpf. 

3 TRAFFIC MANAGER 
AUTOMOBILES |nSponi«h 
AGRICULTURE ICjFrench 

J Ponltry raising yrjRADIO 



Occupation 
& Employer. 

Street 

and No 



Business 

.Address _ 



3-6-24 



Clty__ , State . 

Canadians may Bend this coupon to International Corre- 
spondence Sohoola Canadian, Limited, Montreal, Canada % 




7 Tools in One 



A rule, a square, a level, a bevel, 
a pitch-to-foot indicator and a 
plumb. All in a single tool and 
all Starrett. 

The 18 or 24 inch sliding blade 
is graduated in 8ths, i6ths, 
32nds, and 64ths of an inch. 
The 9 inch stock carries a re- 
volving turrett which is grad- 
uated on one side in degrees — 
with two rows of figures read- 
ing either right or left — and on 
the other side to show pitch- 
to-foot, the graduations show- 
ing 1-2 inch pitch. Levels are 
set in each side of the stock so 
that any incline by degrees or 
pitch-to-foot can be leveled 
either on top or under the work. 

In laying out work or cutting 
hips or valleys of different 
pitch, this tool will save its cost 
by saving time, calculations and 
possible errors. 

Ask your hardware dealer to 
show it. Send for Catalog 21 



7654 




THE L. S. STARRETT CO. 

World's Greatest 

Toolmakcrs 

Manufacturers of ITaclc- 

saws Unexcelled 

Athof, Mess. 




House near Chicago, showing its "under- 
clothing" of Cabot's Quilt, with furring 
strips over the Quilt, on which the out- 
side finish is laid. Roof also insulated. 
Leon E. Stanhope, Architect, Chicago. 

Underwear for Houses 

Underclothing makes people warm 
because it prevents the heat of 
their bodies from escaping. You 
can make your homes warm in the 
same way. 

Cabot's Insulating Quilt 

prevents the house heat from es- 
caping. It insulates the whole 
house and saves the heat from the 
heater — that costly heat. It keeps 
the house warm on the smallest 
amount of coal; saves one-quarter 
to one-half of the coal bill. Makes 
the house comfortable for all time. 
Preserves health and saves doc- 
tor's bills. Makes the house cooler 
in summer. Quilt is not a mere 
felt or paper, but a scientific in- 
sulator that makes the house like 
a thermos bottle. 

Sample of Quilt with full details, and 

reference to dozens of users sent 

FREE on application 

SAMUEL CABOT, Inc. 
Mfg. Chemists 

6 Oliver St., 
Boston, Mass. 

W. Kinzie St.. 
Chicago. 



Samuel Cabot, Inc., 6 Oliver St., Boston. 

24 W. Kinzie St., Chicago. 
Send me free sample Cabot's Quilt and 
lull information : 




Name. 
Street. 



Town... State 



KLEJN 



The pliers in 

your tool box come 

near being the most 

all-around emergency 

tools you have. No 

wonder you fellows are 

particular about them 

when you buy! 

Ask for Klein's. They 
are gluttons for punishment 
and will last you for years. 
Ask your hardware dealer to show 
you a pair of 8" Klein's Side Cutting 
and a pair of 6" Klein's Oblique. He 
carries a full line — look them over 
next time you're in. 




MathiasM^B Ely & Sons 

ImLLmBSlfl 




"That's all 
I need to 
know — it's a 
MAYDOLE HAMMER!" 

Look for the name "D. Maydole," 
stamped on the head. It's absolute as- 
surance that the design, material and 
workmanship in that particular hammer 
is as near perfection as human skill, 
plus over 80 years of experience, can 
make it. 

Ask any old-timer — he'll tell you there's 
'hang' in a Maydole Hammer that's lack- 
ing in hammers less carefully made : 
There's years and years of service in the 
press-forged steel heads : There's a grip 
in the claws of a Maydole that never lets 
go : There's a satisfaction in knowing 
that when you put a Maydole in your kit 
you've settled all your hammer troubles 
for a long time to come. In 1843, David 
Maydole — the founder of the business — 
said "I make the best hammer" and from 
that day to this, we have striven to hold 
the standard he set. 

If you are a hammer user, send for our 
free pocket handbook 23A — it's worth a 
lot to a carpenter. 

The David Maydole Hammer Co. 
Norwich New York 



Ma ydole 
Hammerr 







FURNITURE ' 
cr 1OHNS0N&S0K 



The 

Proper 
Treatment 

of 

Woodwork 
and Floors 



Did you ever stop to think that improper finishing can 
spoil the finest job a carpenter does? 

Know what should be done to that job after you leave it? 
The JOHNSON Book on Wood Finishing will tell you and 
the use of JOHNSON materials (Filler, Dyes, Varnishes, 
Enamels, Waxes, a complete line of the finest interior fin- 
ishes) will insure you full credit for your work by bringing 
out its finest points. 

FREE — a manual of wood finishing, the result of our forty years 
of experience, plus all the scientific and laboratory facilities at our 
command. "The Proper Treatment for Floors, Woodwork and Furni- 
ture", a book for the practical man that will interest every carpenter, 
whether he ever touches a paint brush or not. Contains proper meth- 
ods, covering capacities, color charts, etc. 

If you have a hobby for making furniture, radio cabinets, 
refinishing woodwork, etc., it will be invaluable. Send for 
your copy today. 



S. C. JOHNSON & SON, Dept. C. 3, RACINE, WIS. 
"The Wood Finishing Authorities" 



Send me free and postpaid your book 
"Woodwork and Furniture". 



'The Proper Treatment for Floors, 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



I usually buy materials of this kind from ■ 





Why you can be proud 
of SHEETROCK jobs 

It fits snugly — Sheetrock's strong, square nailing edges 

always assure tight, flush joints. 
Won't buckle — Made from rock, Sheetrock won't warp or 

pull away from the supports. 
"Won't burn — Sheetrock will not burn or ignite. It helps 

make walls and ceilings fireproof. 
Takes any decoration — Because Sheetrock stays smooth 

and flat it may be decorated any way the owner wants it. 
Mail the coupon for free Sheetrock Time Book 

UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

General Offices: Dept. 4, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 



Bee. U. S. Pat. Off. 



SHEETROCK 

The FIREPROOF WALL BOARD 

Mail this coupon today 



United States Gypsum Company 

Dept. 4. 205 West Monroe Stieet, Chicago, Illinois 
Send my SHEETROCK Time Book to— 

(Name) 



(Complete Address) 

Sheetrock is insbccted and approved as c:i effective barrier to f.re by the Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. 



! *5*4sS3S 




SILVER 





You Can Expect More Than 

Long Service From ATKINS 

SILVER STEEL SAWS 

You can expect easier and faster 
cutting and what's more, they 
will go through knots and green 
timber with ease and precision. 

Atkins Saws are famous for the su- 
perior quality of steel from which 
they are made and an excellent tem- 
per which gives them long life and 
remarkable edge-holding qualities. 

In addition to Saws, we manufacture 
Saw Sets, Plastering Trowels, Bench 
and Cabinet Scrapers, Hack Saw 
Blades and Frames, Braces, Grinding 
Wheels and kindred products. 

Specify your requirements to your 
h a r d ware dealer by name, say 
ATKINS and obtain. 

"The Finest On Earth " 

Enclose thirty-fire cents in stamps for nail 
apron, Saw Sense and useful souvenir. Men- 
tion your hardware dealer when writing. 

E.C.ATKINS & CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1857 THE SILVER STEEL SAW PEOPLE 

Home Office aj\d Factory, INDL^NAPOLIS.INDIANA 

CanjvdianF&ctory.Hamilton Orvtario 
Machine Knife Factory, Lancaster N.Y., 

Branches Carrying Comploto SeockalnTho Following Citfaa: 

Atlanta New Orleans Seattle 

Memphis New York City 

Chicago 
Minneapolis 



Portland, Ore. 
Scu\ Fraxvcisco 



Paris. Franca 
Vancouver, B.C. 




It's for carpenters 




This Sheetrock Time Book was prepared especially for carpenters. It has 
memo pages, useful data tables, up-to-the-minute building hints. Also 
describes the many practical uses of Sheetrock, the non-warping wall- 
board. This valuable 48 -page book is free. Send in the coupon below 
and your copy will come to you by return mail. 

Sheetrock comes in standard sizes: % in. thick, 32 or 48 in. wide and 6 to 10 ft. long 

UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

General Offices: Dept. 4, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 



Ree. O. S. Pat. Off. 




The FIREPROOF WALL BOARD 

Mail this coupon today 



United States Gypsum Company 

Dept. 4, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 
Send my SHEETROCK Time Book to— 

(Name) 



(Complete Address) 

Sheetrock is inspected and approved as an elective barrier to fire by the Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. 



SARGENT PLANES and SQUARES 
designed only for professional usel 




When you buy Sargent Planes 
and Squares, you are investing 
in two of the finest tools that 
carpentry and manufacturing 
skill have developed. Years of 
use in shops and on building 
operations have proved the uni- 
form excellence of Sargent de- 
signs and the constant quality 
of Sargent construction. The 
one high standard never varies. 
Every Sargent Plane is strictly 
a professional tool. 



The Sargent Auto-Set is a 
time and labor saver. The Auto- 
Set feature permits chromium 
steel cutter to be removed, 
sharpened and replaced without 
changing original adjustment. 
Never chatters when in place. 
Solid, compact, simply con- 
structed. The No. 414, also 
shown below, is one of the finest 
planes of this type ever made. 
See Sargent Tools at your deal- 
er's. Write us for booklets. 



SARGENT 86 COMPANY, Manufacturers 



Sargent Auto-Set 

Bench Plane 

No. 714 




ardware 




ironze Screens 

Rustproof as Copr. 
and 50% stronger 



Screens of Anaconda Antique and Golden 
Bronze Wire remain trim and taut, and free 
from sags and bulges because Bronze is tough 
and withstands rough usage where pure Cop- 
per might be damaged and rusted iron would 
break. 

For more than a quarter of a century leading; 
screen manufacturers have used American 
Brass quality Bronze Wire for screens. Bronze 
costs from 25c to 75c more per window or 
door than galvanized iron and but a few 
cents more than Copper. Yet with reasonable 
care, Bronze screens will last indefinitely 
where iron will rust to destruction. 

Anaconda Antique 



Ana&WA 

(rem mint to eenunnff 



Be sure to use cop - * 
per or brass nails or 
staples with Bronze 
Screen Cloth. Other 
nails rust — permit 
the screen to pull 
out and hurt your 
reputation for good 
work. 



The Tests Tell the Story 

Samples of various screen fabrics were subjected to the continuous action of 
salt spray solution for six weeks, thus duplicating the most severe weather 
conditions. These photographs taken after the tests are magnified five times. 





IRON WIRE 
After 6 weeks' continuous ex- 
posure to a strong salt spray, 
:his plain iron wire rusted 
:o destruction. Long before it 
ictually rusted through, it was 
jo weakened by corrosion that 
it broke at a touch. 



ENAMELED IRON WIRE 
Jilack enamel over iron wire 
only slightly retarded the pro- 
cess of rusting. At the end of six 
weeks, this sample was almost 
as badly weakened as the un- 
protected iron. 



The Facts 

Iron or steel screening is strong 
enough when new, but no pro- 
tective coating now in commercial 
use will prevent iron or steel from 
rusting. 

Unalloyed copper resists rust 
satisfactorily, but it is not as strong 
as bronze. 

Anaconda Bronze Wire is at the 
same time strong enough and 
hard enough for all practicalneeds, 
and absolutely rustproof. 

The American Brass Company 

GENERAL OFFICES: WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT 
Offices and Agencies in Principal Cities 

Canadian Mill: ANACONDA AMERICAN BRASS LTD. 
New Toronto, Ont. 




GALVANIZED IRON WIRE 
Galvanized iron gives longer 
life than enamelled wire but 
does not provide permanent 
protection. After six weeks of 
exposure, this sample was bad- 
ly corroded, and the fabric was 
greatly weakened. 




COPPER WIRE 
Unalloyed copper screen wire 
met the test much better than 
any of the iron samples. During 
six weeks' exposure, it corroded 
very little, but it did not meas- 
ure up to Anaconda Bronze for 
strength or hardness. 




ANACONDA BRONZE WIRE 
At the end of ten weeks of ex- 
posure to salt spray, four weeks 
longer than the tests given the 
other samples.Anaconda Bronze 
screen cloth has corroded very 
little and its strength is as great 
as the unalloyed copper before 
the test. 



Golden Bronze Wire 




Sent Free 

Mail the Coupon for these 2 Books 
and Blue Print Plans 

If you are in any building trade, we want to send you these 2 books and 
blue prints at our expense. One of these books contains a lesson in Plan 
Reading prepared by the Chicago Tech. experts ; the other explains the 
Chicago Tech. method of training men by mail in the building trades for 
the jobs that pay the most money or for businesses of their own. All you 
have to do to get them is to mail the coupon. Don't send a penny. 

Get the Knowledge that Will 
Make You Worth More Money 



You may be as good a man as there is in 
the use of tools but as long as you re- 
main a workman you won't earn more 
than the wage scale. It isn't manual 
skill that puts a man in the big pay 
class — it's the ability to use his head 
that brings the fat pay check or enables 
him to "go in for himself." That has 
been proved over and over again by 
workmen who took the Chicago Tech. 
training in the higher branches of build- 
ing and are now foremen, superintend- 
ents and contractors. 

J. B. Woodside of Oklahoma was a car- 
penter working for $6 a day when he 
took a course in training by mail at Chi- 



cago- Technical College and was ad 
vanced to a foremanship, in 2 months, 
became a superintendent 5 months later 
and then went into contracting. 
Carl Testroat of Iowa is another man 
who got into a successful contracting 
business through this training as did J. 
G. Hart of West Virginia, and C. W. 
Busch of Kansas. 

Not only have workmen got ahead 
through this instruction but also con- 
tractors who were taking on small jobs 
because their experience was limited. 
Chicago Tech. has taught them how to 
handle the big jobs that pay the most 
monev. 



Train by Mail 

Become a Building Expert 

Never before have there been such op- 
portunities as there are right now for 
men with expert knowledge of building. 
iou can get ready for tliese big oppor- 
tunities if you will use some of your 
spare time to study at home under the 
direction of the Chicago Tech. experts. 
No time taken from your present work. 
All this will be explained when we send 
you the free books and blue prints. 

Plan Reading. Every man who has got 

very far ahead in any building trade can 

read blue prints. No man can expect to 

be a first rate foreman or 

superintendent until he 

knows what every line on 

a plan means and how to 

lay out and direct work 

from the architect's plans. 

By the Chicago Tech. 

Method you quickly learn 

to read any plan as easily 

as you read these words. 



DO YOU KnOW- 



Estimating. Of course a 
man who wants to* be a 
contractor or to hold a big 
job in a contracting organ- 
ization must know how to 
figure costs of labor, ma- 
terial, and everything else 
that goes into any kind of 
building The Chicago 
Tech. course covers every 
detail of this important branch — tells 
you just how it is done from actual 
blue print plans. 

Superintending. How to hire and direct 
men, how to keep track of every detail 
of construction as it goes on, how to get 
the work done in the least time at the 
lowest cost is also fully covered in the 
Chicago Tech. Builders' Course. 



— how different materials 

are shown on blue 

prints? 
— how "sections" and 

"elevations" are shown 

on the plans? 
— how to lay out a build= 

ing from the plan? 
— how to take off quan= 

tities from the plan? 
— how to figure building 

costs? 
— why some lines on 

plans are shown dotted 

and others full? 



Also special courses in Architectural 
Drafting for builders, taught by prac- 
tical men. These explained in Special 
Catalog "D" sent on request. 

Don't Let Your 
Chance Slip Away 

If you don't make a bigger income this . j ■ — — 

year than you have ever made in your I Write or print name plainly, 
life it is because you will not prepare for . 
the jobs that are open to every trained I 
man in your trade. . 

Not only are good workmen needed but 
there is a demand far beyond the supply | 



and see that a job of building or some 
important part of a big construction pro- 
ject is done right and finished on time. 
Read the questions in the space below. 
Whether you will make a big success in 
the building business or not depends on 
whether you can answer these and many 
other question about building plans and 
specifications, that are all made very 
clear and easy for the Chicago Tech. 
home-study student. 

Only Part of Your 
Spare Time Required 

Getting this Chicago Tech. training does 
not mean quitting your work. If you live 
in Chicago, you can come to the evening 
classes at the College. If 
you don't live here, you 
can have the same instruc- 
tion by mail that you 
would get if you were on 
the ground. You get the 
same lessons — you are 
taught by the same ex- 
perts. The only difference 
will be that the lessons 
are sent by mail instead 
of given in person. 

Stay on your job. Draw 
your regular pay. But put 
in a few hours a week of 
your spare time to pleas- 
ant, interesting home 
study under the direction 
of experts of the Chicago 
Technical College. 

Hundreds of top-notch builders, superin- 
tendents and contractors, owe their suc- 
cess to this practical home-study course. 
There are 31 lessons and many sets of 
blue print plans in the complete course. 

Send the Coupon-Now 

It costs nothing to get the pay raising informa- 
tion which we will gladly send on request with 
t!'e free Books and Blue Print Plans. We will 
explain clearly and completely how men, who 
had no better chances than you, are stepping 
into higher positions or becoming independent 
in businesses of their own. Mail the coupon 
today. 

Chicago Technical College, 

Dept. 439, Chicago Tech. Bldg., 

118 East 26th Street, Chicago, III. 

Please send me your Free Books and Blue Prints 
for men in the Building Trades. Send postpaid 
to my address below. 



Name 



Address 



City State. 



for men who can read plans, figure costs 



Occupation 



Special offer to readers of 
"The Carpenter" 

Mail the coupon with 25c for full-size 
blue print together with detailed in- 
structions for Upsonizing any room. 
(State kind of room and whether new 
work or remodeling.) 




Ready! 
The most amazing wall and 

ceiling plan service 
ever offered you carpenters 



THE new Upson Blue Book and the Upson 
Blue-Print Merchandising Service is the 
most amazing help for carpenters ever offered 
by any building-material manufacturer. 

It represents nearly three years' work by 
eading architects of America as well as Upson 
executives. 

The cost has already exceeded $100,000 ! 

Do not confuse the Upson Blue-Print Serv- 



ice with any plan ever offered before. See 
for yourself ! 

Ask your Upson dealer ! Nearly all pi 
gressive lumber dealers are recognizing t 
leadership and dependability of Upson Boar 
and are stocking it. Many of these Ups< 
dealers already have the Upson Blue Boo 
But if your Upson dealer hasn't yet receiv 
his, don't wait! Mail the coupon for a fu 
size blue print to help you on your next jo 





Genuine Upson Board has the famous Blue -Center 



Shows how wallboard applied with proper trim 
creates dozens of prdfitdbte jobs 



The new Upson Blue Book shows 
v to apply Upson Board properly 
ier any given condition — whether 
new rooms direct to studs, in old 
>ms over old plaster, or direct to lath 
studs with plaster removed. 

£ shows details of attractive and 



appropriate decorative strips and all 
trim for each room. 

Any good carpenter by following the 
Upson Blue Book can build Upsonized 
interiors unsurpassed in beauty by the 
finest of interiors to be found anywhere, 
regardless of the material used. 



Forty detail blue prints prove Upson Board 
fittingly adapted for the finest homes 



Forty detail blueprints by some of 
aerica's most famous architects in- 
re an attractive Upson Board layout 
• every type of job in every kind of 
ilding. 

Several pages of reproductions of 
>sonized interiors show everything 
>m the most elaborate to the most 
iple style of Upson paneling. 



These illustrations include hallway, 
living room, dining room, bedroom, 
kitchen and bath, lined with Upson 
Board and Upson Fibre-Tile. Many 
of them are shown in colors, offering 
attractive color suggestions. 

The blue prints enable any carpen- 
ter to build any type of room for home, 
store, office or business use. 



Answers &ery prbbtemtf 
-—^ makes you a master wallboard craftsman 



As you know, every builder who 
pplies wallboard is constantly faced 
th difficult technical questions, 
lis new Upson Blue Book, already 
the hands of most Upson dealers, 
swers them quickly and completely. 

"How shall I treat the baseboard 
len the Upson Board is applied 



directly over old plaster and the old 
base is not removed?" 

"How can I apply wallboard with- 
out ugly nail marks showing in the 
center of the panels?" 

These and dozens of other puzzling 
queries are covered in detail on the 
pages of this wonderful new book! 



Special plue-print offer id tedders 
of Carpenter Magazine 



To prove the value of the most remarkable service ever 
offered by a building - material manufacturer, we have 
arranged this special offer. Simply fill in the coupon below, 
telling the kind of room you are interested in, whether it 
is new work or remodeling, and we will send you full-size, 
detail blue print with complete instructions. 




The 

Upson 

Company 

426 Upson 

Pt., Lockport 

New York 

Enclosed find 25c, 

for which mail me 

blue print 

Upsonizing 

fill in kind of room 



and whether old or new construction. 

Name 

Address 

Lumber dealer 




There is No Rule of Thumb! 



-SERVICE ( 
DEPARTMENT 



ijOHN% 

ARTISTIC 

WOOPJ 

msm 



The sign that dis= 
tinguishes the wood 
finishing specialist 
from the ordinary 
"paint store." 



There is no ordinary builder's rule-of-thumb-that 
you can use in the selection of wood finishes. You 
can't see knot-holes in them as in a piece of lumber. 
You can't measure or weigh them like a piece of 
prepared roofing. You can't tell by the "feel" of a 
varnish how long it will wear. 

But the name" JOHN SON" on any wood finish is 
always a safe rule to follow. It guarantees quality! 

We are not "paint manufacturers." We are wood 
finishing specialists. 

We know the carpenters' and the painters' prob- 
lems — and Johnson materials solve these problems 
because they are the result of forty years' practical 
experience, plus the finest laboratory and manufac- 
turing facilities in the world. 

Use Johnson's; Insist on Johnson's Varnishes, Enamels, 
Wood Dyes, Flat Wall Finish, Paste Wood Fillers, Crack 
Fillers and Waxes. 

S. C. JOHNSON & SON, RACINE, WIS. 

"The Wood Finishing Authorities" 

Brantford, Canada - London, England -- Sydney, Australia 



.. .We* 
-PROPER -j 



FOR FLOORS 
WOODWORK 

FURNITURE 



;.C JOHNSON &S0N I 



FREE! 



The Johnson Manual on Wood Finishing, "The 
Proper Treatment for Floors, Woodwork and 
Furniture." Written by experts for the practi- 
cal man. Tells exactly how to finish all sorts 

of jobs. Contains covering capacities, drying times, color charts, 

etc. An invaluable hand book if you have a hobby for making 

things for your own home, radio cabinets, tables, stands, etc. Send 

this coupon today to : 

S. C. JOHNSON & SON, Dept. C. 4, RACINE, WIS. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY & STATE 

DEALER'S NAME 



E 

.' ! '. ■ 



MiLLEBS FALLS 
TDD L5 



IIIIHIIIIII' ^"'" 



^ 



The better the tool, the better the work; the 
better the work, the better off the workman 

THAT applies to Millers Falls carpenter's tools. We've aimed to 
make better tools for the same reason that good carpenters use 
better tools— for the sake of better work. 

Millers Falls Ratchet Braces are particularly favored by men who 
live by the work they do with hand and tool. There's a full line of 
them; and they've made good for half a century. 

We have just issued a new Millers Falls Catalog 
We will be glad to send a copy on request 

MILLERS FALLS COMPANY, Millers Falls, Mass. 

28 Warren Street, New York 9 S. Clinton Street, Chicago 



K 



IB 



The above line 
shows the actu- 
al thickness of 
ordinary as- 
phalt shingles. 
Below the actu- 
al thickness of 
the JUMBO 
Self- Spacing 
Shingle. 



This patented 
shoulder auto- 
matically spaces 
and seals the 
slot so that rain 
or snow cannot 
blow through to 
roof boards. 




A Bigger, Thicker, Better-Looking 

JUMBO SELF-SPACING 
SHINGLE 



You don't need to space the 
shingles when you are laying- 
Vulcanite Jumbo Self-Spacing 
Shingles. This is taken care 
of automatically by the pat- 
ented shoulder on the left side 
of each shingle. This patent- 
ed, exclusive shoulder insures 
rapid, accurate laying and 
closes the upper part of the 
slot between shingles. Makes 
a tighter roof — rain, snow or 
ice cannot get through to the 
roof boards. It is also warm- 



er in winter, cooler in summer, 
and gives a roof of practically 
triple thickness. Carpenters 
everywhere are recommending 
Vulcanite Jumbo Self-Spacing 
Shingles, because they are big- 
ger (11x15 inches), thicker and 
furnished in red, green, blue 
black and the distinctive 
Autumn Blend. 

It is paying them to do so. 
It will pay you also. Send 
coupon for sample and de- 
scription. 



&ROOF 




The famous "6 Daring Tests" 
Prove Vulcanite's Quality 



You get extra husky quality in Vulcanite 
Jumbo Self-Spacing Shingles — that un- 
usual durability which is so forcibly dem- 
onstrated by the famous "6 Daring Tests." 
If you are not familiar with these convinc- 
ing demonstrations of roofing quality, let 
us send you FREE samples of Beaver 
Vulcanite and tell you how the "6 Daring 
Tests" can easily be made by anyone, for 
anyone. Carpenters who are capitalizing 
these tests are getting the cream of roofing 
work. Let us tell you how we co-operate 
with you. 

THE BEAVER PRODUCTS CO. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 




Mail the Coupon 
for FREE Samples 
and Full Particulars 




&EAVE* 

VULCANITE 

ROOFING 



The Beaver Products Co., Inc., Dept. H-4 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
Gentlemen: I would like to know more about 
Beaver Vulcanite Jumbo Self-Spacing Shin- 
gles. Please send samples and full particulars 
for carpenters. 

Name 

Srreer 

City Ctate : 



&EAVEK 

fkbDUCTS 







address or Writer 




OF AMERICA 

Union No J^ / 

DATE, 



^c<r&^&y>^^pts>^*4^t*^J(l </ ^OsQ, ^^u^s spi^uC* ,^0^* ^4T s^*^/ 
i**-**^ **c*r&f— ^£o&4> ^Zrt***^ f^b^*^ 

*&rx- J^L. *t****o~ j£^£Z^ y J<^~**Ju<C s*l> 

RU-BER-OID OCTAB .tisfcj 

Mr. Thamer is one of the thousands of union carpenters who swear by Ruberoid Octab 
Strip-shingles. It will pay you to talk to our local distributor or use the coupon below. 



The RUBEROID Co., 95 Madison Ave., N. Y. Carpenter 

Gentlemen: Please send me samples and literature describing Ruberoid Octab Strip-shingles. 

Name 

Address 



Brick 
■ Veneer - 

Wall Ties ■< 



Celotex 
*- Plaster 

tZx4-'studs l6"o.c. 
■/z" plaster grounds 
'-'Base boards 
V\ Fin. Floor. 
l M R^Pery ,/ I 



Rough Tloof- 

\ First Floor jbists 



Gelotex' 



semerrt Wall 



BRICK VENEER ON WOOD FRAMINCr- 



How to do the job right 

No. 3 — Celotex application with 
brick veneer on wood framing 

This is only one of many places where 
you will find Celotex Insulating Lumber 
used on your jobs this year. 

Others will be shown here each month. 

•You'll like to work with Celotex. It's 
easy to apply. But it's mighty important 
to do the job right if your work is to give 
permanent satisfaction. 

And your work will be right if you ob- 
serve the few simple points explained 
here. Study the blue-print diagram above 
and the specifications in the panel at the 
right carefully. The}' show a frequent 
use of Celotex. 

Complete specifications — free 

In the meantime, be prepared. Send for 
complete specifications — free to every 
carpenter. Mail the coupon below for 
your copy, today. 



SPECIFICATION 

For the use of 

CELOTEX 

AS SHEATHING AND INSULATION 
For Brick Veneer Buildings 

Material: Sheathing and insula- 
tion for all exterior walls shall be 
Celotex Insulating Lumber, ap- 
proximately 7-16" thick, as man- 
ufactured by The Celotex Com- 
pany, Chicago. 

Framing : The sills, studs, plates, joists 
and i - afters shall be framed as in or- 
dinary frame construction, taking pre- 
caution, however, to space the studs, 
joists and rafters 16" on center. Wher- 
ever it is necessary to have a hori- 
zontal joint in the Celotex, a 2" x 4" 
header shall be cut in between the 
framing. No bracing is necessary, 
other than is usual in frame con- 
struction. 

Preparation of Celotex ( Wetting) 

IMPORTANT! 

Celotex boards shall be moistened on 
both sides by sprinkling or spraying 
and piled not less than one day before 
application of boards to walls. 

Application : Remember Celotex is a 
lumber and must be sawed and handled 
like lumber. The Celotex boards shall 
be applied lengthwise of studs, joists 
and rafters directly to the wood frame- 
work, and set in place so as to have a 
bearing for nailing along all edges. 

Leave 3-16" space between adjoining 
boards, also at top and bottom of 
boards. The board is cut a scant four 
feet to allow for this space. Around 
window and door frames or where a 
.snug joint is desired, the Celotex shall 
be brought to moderate contact. DO 
NOT force into place. Where rafters 
project around face of studding. Celo- 
tex shall be cut to fit snugly around 
rafters and to form a close joint, with 
the roof insulation. 

Nailing : Nail the Celotex to inter- 
mediate studs beginning at top. then 
entirely around all edges of each board. 
Nail in like -manner to joists, rafters, 
sills, plates and headers. Use standard 
1J" roofing nails with j§" heads. Space 
nails 3" apart along edges, and 6" 
apart along intermediate rows, driving 
nails until the heads are l-16th below 
the surface of the Celotex. Nails shall 
be placed approximately 1" from the 
edge of the boards. 

Brick Veneer : Anchors shall be 
nailed through Celotex to the studs, 
staggered and spaced to suit the brick 
courses. The brick shall then be layed 
in the usual manner. It is preferable 
to allow 1" space between the Celotex 
and the brick. 




INSULATING LUMBER | 
"There is a use for Celotex in every building" 



The Celotex Company, Dept. 24, 
C45 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Please send me your free spec- 
ifications for carpenters. 




Is this news? 



Fireless cookers keep the heat in the utensils by sur- 
rounding them with wool, curled hair or even hay. 

This packing is always light in weight and bulky. That 
is what a good heat insulator should be. 

It is exactly what Cornell is too. Light and fairly 
bulky: full of millions of dead air cells which won't 
and can't radiate heat. 

Anything solid and heavy is not a good heat insulator. 
Wood in itself is a good insulator but made into wood- 
board like Cornell, it is even better. 

You'll find "Cornell" will keep rooms warm in winter 
and cool in summer if you lay it right. As a good car- 
penter we know you are quite capable of "Cornellizing" 
rooms and homes which will make money for you, save 
your customers money and give real satisfaction. 

That's what helps with business — yours and ours. 

We'd like to work with you. 

Write us. 



CORNELL WOOD PRODUCTS COMPANY 

General Offices: 190 N. State St., Chicago 
Mills: Cornell, Wisconsin 



.0^4* 







c 




The OLD 



Only 2 steps in using 
GF Duplex Bridging. 




A twist Of 
the wrist 
spreads the 
b ridging 
apart in the 
form of an X 




Four nails, driven 
through nail holes, 
and the job's done. 



The General Fireproofmg Co., 
Youngstown, Ohio. 

Please send me a free sample of ■ 
GF Duplex Steel Bridging. 

Name I 

Address J 

City State I 



— and the NETVl 

An old time and money-wasting 
job now made surprisingly simple. 

For generations, carpenters have been cutting, fit= 
ting and nailing wooden cross bridging. 

Now, with GF Duplex Steel Bridging, the job can 
be done in one=eighth the time, or less, and with 
half the number of nails, making the old cumber= 
some, puttering way both obsolete and expensive. 
GF Duplex Bridging is made in one piece of 
heavy steel, flanged and ribbed to give extra 
strength, and painted. It always remains tight 
since steel cannot shrink or split as does wood. 
It makes a neater job, and gives added space 
between joists for pipes, etc. And it comes flat 
in bundles of 25, ready for use— easy to handle 
— easy to install. 

This product tells its own story. Write for a 
sample, gratis, and an illustrated descriptive leaflet, 
prices, etc. 

THE GENERAL FIREPROOFING CO., Youngstown, Ohio 

Branches: New York - Chicago - Bo9ton - Cleveland - Omaha - Minneapolis 

St. Louis - Philadelphia - Atlanta - Kansas City - Syracuse 

San Francisco - Los Angeles - Milwaukee 



Export-Department. 



438 Broadway, New York City 
"Genflre-New York" 



Cable Address : 




STEELJjB RIDGING 



ZOURI KEY-SET STORE FRONT CONSTRUCTION 



The contractor who handles Zouri indirect 
Key- Set windows finds them easier to in- 
stall, in less time, with less labor and risk. 
This fneans a proportionately greater pro- 
fit per job. And each job, clean cut and 
satisfactory, lines up other jobs for him. 

Free — our big, free, illustrated book showing the newest and 
best styles of modern windows and store fronts, also thoroughly 
explaining the popidar Xouri Safety Key-Set construction. 
Write for your copy today. 




Factory and General Offices 
1608 East End Ave. Chicago Heights, 111. 



LISTED BY THE UNDERWRITERS' LABORATORIES 



Aloe Convertible Level and Transit Combined 



LevefoPliiinb Belte^Qukker— OwnYour Own 



FREE 
TRIAL 



m 



Brings 
it* to you 



Increases Your Income 

This instrument will add immeasurably 
to your efficiency and will do more to in- 
crease your business, income and prestige 
than any investment you ever made ; 
it will put you in the bigger builder 
class. The Aloe Convertible Level 
is the world's best — a combination 
of both level and transit and quick- 
ly converted to the use of either. 
Takes sights either above or below the 
horizontal. Absolutely accurate — satis- 
fies the requirements of the most ex- 
acting. An aid to lasting success. 



lou Learn To Use If 



in an 




No technical knowledge necessary. No 
previous experience needed. "With our 
simple and complete Instruction book, in- 
cluded free wilh every level, you can im- 
mediately put the instrument to work. Co 
simple anyone can use it. For leveling foun- 
dations, walls, wa'ks or curbings— to r''n 
straight lines or boundary lines— in sur- 
veying lota and fields— plumbing walls, 
shafts, trestles, posts and pillars, etc. , etc. 



Easy Monthly Payments 

Just $5.00 brings it to you at once—for a 
free trial. If perfectly satisfied, pay the 
balance in small monthly payments. 

Write For Free Book 

Our free book— "Be A Bigger Builder" 
—tells you how to increase your income- 
how to get the profitable jobs. Write for 
this book today. 



A. S. ALOE CO., 624 Olive St., St. Louis, 



MAll^?CGiiPON TObAY 



A. S. ALOE CO., 624 Olive St., St. Louis,Mo. 

Without obligation, send me yonr FREE book, 
"Be A Biereer Bnildpr". Also full particulars about 
the Aloe Convertible Level and cetaila ci your eaay 
payment plan. 



Name . 
Address. 




Build Up Your Alteration Business 

(Barrett Advertising Leads the Way) 



Here is a nation-wide campaign that is 
showing people how to improve their 
homes by practical alterations. 
Advertisements, appearing in the Satur- 
day Evening Post, leading farm papers, 
and 59 newspapers all over the country— r- 
all hitting at this one idea. People in 
your own community are saying to them- 
selves, "Wonder if my shabby old house 
doesn't need fixing up, too!" 
Behind this campaign stands The Barrett 
Book, "Better Homes from Old Houses" — 
a book full of ideas for alterations. Pre- 
pared by a staff of leading architects, it is 
authentic in every detail. 



This free book has built up alteration 
business for carpenter-contractors all over 
the country. Right in your town, too, are 
lots of old houses that could easily be 
improved. 

Make a list of every homely, out-of-date 
house in your town. Distribute the "Bet- 
ter Homes from Old Houses" book to the 
owner of each of these houses. 
►Some house-owners will send for you to 
talk plans and costs of alterations — a 
good number will go through with the job 
now — • others later. This is building 
business. 

Get your free sample copy of this book. 
Fill out the coupon. 



a^€o 



ROOFINGS 



A Valuable Free Book 



"Better Homes fiorn Old Houses" gives 
Ideas for remodeling old-fashioned houses 
into handsome modern homes. Thousands 
of carpenter-contractors are putting this 



practical book into the hands rf cwners of 
old houses — and supplying the labor needed 
when the alterations s-tr>rt. Sni-1 for your 
sample copy — it's a business builder. 



THE BARRETT COMPANY, 40 Rector St., New York. 

Please send me free sample copy of your business-building book- 
The address of my building supply dealer is given below. 



-''Better Homes from Old Housos." 



Your Name 



Your Dealer's Name 



Your Address 



Dealer's Address 













. 


«2jI 


t@MOK&S^5nB 


IBifUHHnill^ ■** 




"nlilfssjBSSE 






■ 


~- - -* .?'ii. 


M; " "V 


MUM 11 W*** 1 *! „ 




BHWIjffiri ^.^^^kBJW 1 


■rffl^^faf'-H 


^jmS^j 








■ BPRSS^^SHi 








PPiv- 


• 







Winthrop means an asphalt shingle 
with exclusive features 

This beautiful residence of Mr. Charles R. Murray, 
Hinsdale, Illinois, could not be roofed as it is with 
any shingles other than Winthrops — the only tapered 
asphalt shingles made. The taper is exclusive. 
Nothing takes the place of Winthrops. And when 
you realize that this roof had already given five years 
of satisfactory protection and colorful beauty to this 
house, when this picture was taken, there is no reason 
why other roofs should be considered for new or re- 
roofing jobs. 




Tapered Asphalt Shingles 



Do you want the shadow lines of 
the old wooden shingle roof? The 
thick butts of Winthrops cast 
those shadows. 

If you want permanency, the 
thick butts, built up of extra 
coats of everlasting asphalt, dou- 
ble the wearing thickness where 
exposure to weather comes. 
For beauty you have tile-red, sea- 
green, blue-black and golden-buff, 
in non-fading crushed slate, an- 
chored in everlasting asphalt. Use 
them solid or mottled. 



The thick butts of Winthrops lie 
flat and snug against the roof, 
tight against snows and rains, 
safe against sparks and falling 
firebrands. 

Winthrops can not rust, rot, split 
nor crack. They do not curl nor 
warp. They are easy to lay. 

Write for a sample in any of the 
colors. See this only tapered as- 
phalt shingle, which can be sup- 
plied by lumber dealers every- 
where. See your dealer, today. 



Beckman - Dawson Roofing Company 

in W. Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 

Also Manufactured by 

Lockport Paper Co., Lockport, New York 




This is why 

the head stays tight 



The Plumb Take-up Wedge ! 
It makes every Plumb tool al- 
ways safe to swing! 

With it you preserve the 
balance, the striking power, 
the easy swing, that make you 
want the Plumb Hammer for 
your own the minute you first 
hold it in your hand. 

A slight turn drives the 
wedge down, and the cone 
shape of the wedge expands 
the wood against all sides of 
the eye. Makes the red handle 

FAYETTE R. PLUMB, 



rigidly tight again in the black 
head. 

The Plumb Hammer works 
with you from the first blow 
you strike with it. And the 
Take-up Wedge, exclusively 
Plumb, keeps it just that way 
through years of use. 

Good hardware stores every- 
where carry Plumb tools — red 
handles fitted tight into black 
heads. 

With the Take-up Wedge, 
Plumb exclusively, to keep 
them tight. 

Inc., Philadelphia, U. S. A. 




PLUMB 

DOUBLE LIFE 



Hammers Hatchets 
Files Sledges Axes 




Disston No. 5Vi 
Try Square — all metal 

Tempered Disston-madeSteel 
blade. Nickeled stock with hol- 
lowed faces. True inside and 
out. Graduated to Ve" and cor- 
rectly numbered from head to 
end. 





The Try Square you want 



Disston Adjustable 
Plumb and Level 

The Disston No. 16 is a popu- 
lar model with carpenters. Has 
Disston adjustment — positive 
and simple. Operated by screws 
working in wood. No springs to 
get out of order. Disston qual- 
ity throughout. 




Disston No. 3 Bevel 

Has patented Disston Lock. 
Easy to set. It cannot slip. A 
quarter turn of the thumb- 
screw locks it. Nickel-plated 
iron stock; tempered blade of 
Disston-raade Steel. 




'The Saw Most 

Carpenters Use* 



is a try square as dependable 
as your Disston Saw 

DISSTON appreciates the recognition car- 
penters have given the Disston Saw. For 
three generations, they have made it their 
standard of quality in tools. 

You can get this same standard of tool sat- 
isfaction in your Try Square, too, by choosing 
a Disston* 

Tempered blade of Disston-made Steel does 
not buckle. It always lies flat on the work. 
Steel blade is properly numbered from head 
to end. 

Stock is accurately fitted to blade. Blade and 
stock are permanently fastened with steel rivets. 

It costs no more — but it's worth a lot — to 
own a tool you can trust. 

Ask your hardware man to show you a 
Disston Try Square* 

Henry Disston & Sons, Inc. 

Makers of "The Saw Most Carpenters Use" 

Philadelphia, U. S. A. 



DISSTON 

SAWS TOOLS FILES 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of Congress, Aug. 24, 1912 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918 

A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and 

Kindred Industries. Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 

and Joiners of America, at 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana a^g^si 



Established in 1881 
Vol, XLV — No. 4. 



INDIANAPOLIS, APRIL, 1925 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



That the open shop is now favored by the 
Stanley Manufacturing Company of New Bri- 
tain, Conn., who manufacture a number of car- 
penter's tools, known as the Stanley tools, was 
a declaration recently made by Mr. Stanley, Jr., 
an officer of the company at a conference held 
with Representative Charles N. Kimball and 
Business Agent McGrath at the plant of the 
company. This concern is constructing a large 
building at New Britain. The contractor is the 
Aberthaw Company of Boston. Non-union car- 
penters were found on the job. On complaint of 
Messrs. Kimball and McGrath, as representa- 
tives of our organization, Mr. Stanley arranged 
the conference, and to their astonishment made 
the above declaration. 



THE CARPENTER 



THE BUILDING OUTLOOK FOR 1925 




ENJAMIN H. Cram, econ- 
omist, who has completed 
an exhaustive survey 
of building conditions 
throughout the United 
States, says: 

"More than ordinary interest attaches 
to the building construction program of 
1925 as compared with last year. 

"The five-year intensive building pro- 
gram started in 1920 to fill the deficit 
created during the World War will be 
completed this year. According to a 
summarization of the survey 1925 will 
exceed the total building permits of 
1924. 

"In some sections belief is expressed 
that residential building has reached 
sufficient size to cai'e for normal growth 
of communities for the next 10 years, 
while other sections which showed 
marked growth since the depression in 
1920-21, residential building is still be- 
hind requirements. 

"Eesidential construction is most ac- 
tive in the industrial centers. Owing to 
increased facilities of plants and the 
moving of many industries from one 
section to another in order to overcome 
certain economic difficulties this class of 
building will continue to be a factor 
throughout this and seVeral years to 
come. 

"Much of the work started in 1924 is 
being carried into 1925. This is especial- 
ly true in the larger cities where con- 
struction of large office buildings, 
churches, schools and other public build- 
ings are under way. 

"In the Eastern section of the coun- 
try many old structures are giving way 
to new and larger buildings to keep pace 
with the progress of local conditions in- 
cident to the close of the World War. 

"The total building program of 1924 
was $3,547,251,571. While many of 
the projects scheduled for that period 



were held in abeyance for one reason or 
another other projects came into being 
which took up the threatened deficit. 

"This total will be equalled if not ex- 
ceeded in 1925. Aside from general con- 
struction of residential and business 
building the program of expansion of the 
public utility interests this year prom- 
ises to exceed by millions of dollars all 
former efforts along this line. 

"Building of hydro- electric works in 
the far West as well as those of smaller 
size in the Central States will command 
millions of new capital which has been 
provided for through recent bond issues. 

"Electric companies depending on 
steam power also have outlined large ex- 
tension programs to complete the super- 
electric transmission lines begun. Build- 
ing operations in the New England sec- 
tion will equal those of last year with 
some new work planned in the larger 
cities. 

"In the eastern states a similar condi- 
tion will prevail in the first half of the 
year, especially after weather conditions 
will permit of outdoor work. In the 
South Atlantic and Gulf Coast States a 
deficiency of new building exists. Build- 
ing construction that did not start until 
two years ago and much of the older 
buildings are giving way to larger and 
more modern structures. Florida, owing 
to intensive real estate campaigns and 
influx of northern resorters and investors 
to that section, will witness one of the 
largest building booms in its history. 

"The agricultural states promise more 
building this year especially in the rural 
communities which have not been bene- 
fited since 1920 because of the low price 
for farm products. Improvement of 
farm buildings in the Mississippi Valley 
section as well as in the northern wheat 
growing states will take a broader pro- 
gram." 



MEMORIAL TO SAMUEI GOMPERS IS PLANNED 



O supervise the work of 
bringing into being a fit- 
ting memorial to Samuel 
Gompers, President Green 
of the A. F. of L. has ap- 
pointed a committee. Mr. 
Green also calls attention to unauthor- 
ized activities which may be going on in 
this connection. 




All labor bodies are advised to give 
atteention to this, in a letter sent out 
by Mr. Green from the following ex- 
cerpt is taken. 

"In accordance with the instructions 
of the Executive Council of the American 
Federation of Labor, I have appointed 
a committee to have charge of the work 
of designing and creating a memorial 



THE CARPENTER 



23 



in honor of our beloved late President, 
Samuel Gompers. On this committee 
I have appointed Secretary Frank Mor- 
rison, Treasurer Daniel J. Tobin and 
Vice-Presidents Frank Duffy, Matthew 
Woll and James Wilson. 

"A number of sporadic, unauthorized 
and self-styled memorial committees al- 
ready are at work collecting money un- 
der the pretense that funds so raised are 
to be used for a memorial. 

"The committee which I have ap- 
pointed is the only authorized commit- 



tee and no others should be recognized 
in any way. It will save our movement 
much embarrassment if you will assist 
in conveying to your membership the 
fact that this committee has been ap- 
pointed by authority of the Executive 
Council and that it is the only commit- 
tee authorized to represent Organized 
Laboi in this labor of love and esteem. 
Our movement cannot tolerate the activ- 
ities of unauthorized persons or so-called 
committees in connection with this 
work." 



VIEWS ON HOME AND PENSION PLAN 




^S»g OW the site of the Home 
J$jj for our Aged Members, at 
Lakeland, Fla., appeals to 
an old-time former mem- 
ber who still retains his 
warm interest in our Bro- 
therhood, is revealed in a letter received 
by "The Carpenter" from Mr. A. Graves, 
of Greenwich, Conn. He was a member 
for 18 years, and took an honorable 
withdrawal card five years ago when en- 
tering the contracting business. In the 
course of his letter he says: 

"I have just returned from a trip to 
Florida and while there, I thought of 
the Home that the United Brotherhood 
was planning to build. 

"I went to Lakeland, a trip of 130 
miles, especially to see the land and 
what progress had been made with the 
Home. I believe your committee has 
selected one of the finest sites in Florida, 
which is about 4 miles out from the 
center of the city, beautifully situated 
on Lake Gibson. 

"I was informed that over 600 acres 
of this 1,700 acre plot were orange 
groves. A new cement road from the 
city directly through the center gives 
easy access to the groves, which were 
loaded with fruit. 

"While looking over the landscape, I 
could not help but think what a fitting 
place for the older members of the great 
Brotherhood to spend their declining 
years. I do not know what the plans 
are or how the members will be taken 
care of, but do hope that some portion 
will be allotted or sub-divided so that 
members will have a little spot to work 
and call their own, which is also an ideal 
place for truck gardening. 

"The city of Lakeland is proud to tell 
its visitors about this wonderful de- 
velopment. The Secretary of the Cham- 



ber of Commerce told me that the Broth- 
erhood will have their co-operation in 
this great undertaking. 

"If one member from each Local could 
visit this delightful spot, there would 
never be a voice. raised against paying 
any reasonable assessment to finance 
the building program. I hope when I 
visit Florida again, to see the Home well 
under way." 

In addition to the foregoing, we have 
received a letter of more than usual in- 
terest on the subject of the home and 
pension, from Brother Thomas Inman, 
of L. U. 44, Champaign and Urbana, 
111., in which he says: 

"In the February issue of "The Car- 
penter," we have an article written by 
John A. Mowry, in regard to the elig- 
ibility of members of the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America to the home for the aged. He, 
to some extent speaks my sentiments in 
regard to who should be admitted to the 
home. 

"I do not think any of us have a 
great desire to go to the home after 
we have reached the period of our earth- 
ly life, where we are compelled to lay 
down our tools, and let another man 
take up the work where we left off. But 
there are some of our number who, ow- 
ing to circumstances, or conditions, have 
not been able to provide a home or laid 
by enough of worldly goods to adequate- 
ly insure the comforts for old age. 

"Most of these are undoubtedly de- 
nerving men, and men whom we love 
to meet in our Locals, and associate with 
in our business and social life. They 
ai - e our fellow workmen, and are doing 
their 'bit' toward meeting the expenses 
of our organization. They began help- 
ing to pay for this Home for the Aged 
when we did. They have been just as 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



loyal to the union as we have. They 
expect to continue to help us pay for 
this home, and to contribute to the pen- 
sion fund as we do. 

"Xet there seems to be an unjust dis- 
crimination in the matter of specifying 
who is really eligible to admission to the 
Home, and who is entitled to the pen- 
sion. I have not so much objection to 
the 65 year age limit, although that 
should not be rigidly adhered to in all 
cases. But the 30 year membership is 
very unjust to some of our most loyal 
and faithful members. 

"There are some localities, where the 
need of a union was not felt until a few 
years ago, and in these localities there 
was no organization until such time as 
it was found necessary to meet changed 
conditions. Such has been the case 
everywhere we are organized. 

"This being the case, I do not think 
it right or proper to make the 30 years 
a member, the basis of admission to the 
Home, nor the right to the pension for 
the aged. I am not writing from a 
selfish standpoint for I do not think it 
will ever be necessary for me to ask 
admission to the Home, nor for the 
pension. I now have a good home, and 
perhaps enough other property to keep 
myself and good wife as long as either 
of us live. 

"The thing that I want to see in this 
part of our great organization is justice, 
and equal rights for all. "When I be- 
came a member of this organization, it 
was not solely for the purpose of better- 
ing my own condition, but also that of 
every other member of it. I believe in 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America as a 'Brother- 
hood/ and that in the broadest sense of 
the term. 



"I believe that each and every mem- 
ber should share, and share alike in the 
privileges, and blessings of our great 
institution. This they will not be per- 
mitted to do if we base eligibility to 
Home and Pension on the 65 year age 
limit, and 30 year membership limit as 
now planned. 

"Then again, to point out discrimina- 
tion made by the present plan: Each 
and every member of the organization 
is now paying toward the purchase and 
maintenance of the Home. And under 
the present plan there are several thou- 
sand who are paying that are already 
cut off from their rights to entrance in 
the Home or to the pension. No other 
organization in the world so far as I 
know asks men to pay for what they 
know they can never get. 

"My idea is that we ought to have 
this Home open alike to every member 
who is helping to support it, and to have 
every member entitled to a pension, who 
is paying into the pension fund. 

"And base the eligibility to Home or 
pension upon the merits of each in- 
dividual case, as the U. S. Pension 
Bureau does in similar work. Let us 
make the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America a real 
'Brotherhood.' " 

Editor's Note — In connection with 
Brother Inman's letter we wish to re- 
mind our members that for the present 
there does not exist any definite rules 
to govern the Home or pension. A group 
of proposals, having that object in view, 
was adopted by our last General Con- 
vention, and later submitted along with 
other proposed constitutional amend- 
ments to a referendum vote of our mem- 
bership, but was not carried by the nec- 
essary two-thirds majority of those 
voting. 



BOSTON CONTRACTORS NEGLECT APPRENTICES 




HE Apprenticeship Com- 
mission of the Boston 
Building Congress is find- 
ing it difficult to get con- 
tractors to employ the en- 
rolled apprentices who 
have entered indentureships through the 
activity of the commission. It appears, 
according to "The American Contrac- 
tor," that this negligence of the con- 
tractors is not caused by any dislike of 
apprentices or because of lack of ability 
on the part of apprentices, but is the 



result of a passive attitude toward the 
situation. 

Contractors with jobs coming up al- 
ways have a thousand details to think 
of and easily lose sight of the import- 
ance of calling the Apprenticeship Com- 
mission and asking that the allowable 
quota of unemployed boys be transferred 
to a new operation. 

The building trades of Boston have 
had no difficulty in securing apprentices. 
In fact, more than can be taken care of 
under the present employment arrange- 



THE CARPENTER 



25 



merit are already enrolled with the Ap- 
prenticeship Commission. 

The myth that American boys do not 
want to learn a trade has been exploded 
again. The difficulty of the commission 
lies not in finding young men for the 
trades, but in finding continuous em- 
ployment for them after they have be- 
come indentured. 

These facts were thoroughly discussed 
at an open meeting of the Boston Build- 
ing Congress and the various craft com- 
mittees. 

J. H. Pynchon, Executive Secretary, 
said that the difficulty lies in getting 
contractors to assume the responsibility 
of providing steady work for the boys. 
He pointed out that between 35 and 40 
per cent of the enrolled apprentices were 
unemployed at times during the past 
year. Discussion following this an- 
nouncement brought all to agree that 
the commission cannot successfully 



function unless the contractors are will- 
ing to co-operate and give the boys ap- 
proved by the commission the first work 
available. 

It was decided that the commission 
should not try to place any more new 
apprentices, but that it should devise 
ways and means to find work for all 
those who are at present enrolled. 
Speaking on this subject, William H. 
Sayward, of the Boston Master Build- 
ers' Association, brought out the fact 
that while labor is strongly behind the 
movement to train apprentices adequate- 
ly and keep them employed, most con- 
tractors have balked at properly inden- 
turing boys, and even at hh'ing unem- 
ployed boys, indentured to other con- 
tractors, who may be available at the 
commission's office. Success will come 
to the efforts of the commission when 
the contractors are properly enrolled, he 
claimed. 



THE HOUSING SHORTAGE IN THE U. S. 




4-ft B. John M. Gries, chief of 
the Division of Building 
and Housing of the De- 
partment of Commerce, 
says in the Journal of 
%&^>S&d Land and Public Utility 
Economics : 

"If the American people believed that 
good homes form the basis for a con- 
tented population and that unsanitary 
houses are bad, they must take a keener 
interest in the effort to have better 
homes at lower cost, because hundreds 
of thousands of families in the lower 
income groups are poorly housed at the 
present time. 

"There is no minimum standard estab- 
lished for a habitable dwelling; nor is 
there any theoretical standard that is 
generally accepted as a minimum. Is 
a house without a bathroom unsatisfac- 
tory? If so, a very high percentage of 
our rural homes must be counted out. 
If we judge by light and air, then many 
of our city homes are tinsatisfactory. 
If privacy is essential, we must reject 
many more homes. 

"The housing situation in the United 
States is never static. The average num- 
ber of persons in each "home" or house- 
keeping unit grows smaller with each 
succeeding census. The size of living 
quarters is decreasing. 

"Housing conditions in the United 
States as a whole are fairly good when 



contrasted with those of other countries. 
There are, however, several million fam- 
ilies living in quarters which are neither 
adequate from the standpoint of health 
nor conducive to good morals. 

"The present shortage of homes num- 
bers 500,000, which is approximately 
equivalent to a normal year's construc- 
tion. The very great majority of Amer- 
ican cities apparently require a net in- 
crease of from 2 to 6 per cent of existing 
dwellings each year. 

To remedy this state of affairs ho 
makes several suggestions, such as dim- 
ensional standardization of building ma- 
terials; possible development of large- 
scale production of houses; distribution 
of construction over twelve months of 
the year instead of seasonally ; extension 
of building and loan associations ; use of 
waste-eliminating house plans; develop- 
ment of standardization building codes 
and plumbing codes; elimination of fu- 
ture loss in street widening and the like 
through comprehensive city planning 
and zoning, and regional planning to co- 
ordinate the growth of cities with the 
semi-rural regions, which will later be 
annexed to them. 



Trust the Navy 

Biddie — "I suppose you have been in 
the navy so long you are accustomed to 
sea legs?" 
Middie — "Lady, I wasn't even looking." 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



TRUTH ABOUT PRISON MADE GOODS 




^ , (f^) c ^? RISON labor for private 
profit is the most lavishly 
tax- subsidized industry in 
the United States. Poli- 
ticians have dealt gener- 
ously with many great 
industrial organizations, but to none 
have they shoAvn such tender, paternal 
love as to the prison labor trust. 

By some strange process of reason- 
ing the American people seem to have 
arrived at the conclusion that the men 
who exploit convict labor perform some 
great social service, and thereby have 
earned unusual rewards. 

These wily people have not only been 
able to pile up enormous fortunes by 
prison labor contracts, but they have 
posed as public benefactors, philanthro- 
pists and model citizens. They have 
headed religious, social service and 
prison reform organizations and gath- 
ered to themselves both wealth and re- 
spectability. 

The favored gentlemen who operate 
their factories in prisons are presented 
by the taxpayers with rent, heat, light, 
drayage, power, supervision of working 
force, and labor, fed, housed, clothed 
and docile, for which they pay less 
than one-sixth the going wage in a given 
industry. 

Then, to crown this paternalistic gen- 
erosity, the convict labor exploiters, or 



their private employes, are given abso- 
lute and despotic control of the disci- 
pline of the prisons where they operate, 
and they are permitted to work the con- 
victs under the vicious "task" system. 

The "task" demanded in every in- 
stance is a greater production than free 
workers achieve. Almost universally the 
prison labor contractor's foreman has 
the determining power in the adminis- 
tration of punishments, and nine-tenths 
of all punishments administered to pris- 
oners are for failure to make the "task," 
and not for bad behavior. 

No other industry has ever succeeded 
in inducing the taxpayers to pay all the 
overhead, and the state to provide free 
labor at a fraction of the maintenance 
cost. Yet this is exactly what the prison 
labor contractors have "put over" on the 
American people. 

These conditions would not exist 
thirty days if the taxpayers refused to 
patronize convict labor contractors, and 
if every member of Organized Labor and 
every other decent-minded citizen de- 
manded the union label on their pur- 
chases. 

Don't waste your breath cussing the 
politicians and prison labor contractors. 

Don't buy prison-made goods ! 

The union label on all articles you 
buy is your only absolute protection. 



A Good Time At Lockport, N. Y. 

The carpenters of L. U. 289, of Lock- 
port, N. Y., held their banquet in the 
Odd Fellows' Temple on January 29th. 
About 300 were present, including 
ladies. Also Mayor and City Council 
and heads of city departments, county 
judge and bank president, and local con- 
tractors and their wives, the President 
and Secretary of all the labor organiza- 
tions of the city. A fine program was 
arranged — speaking, vaudeville, music 
and comedy, and wound up with danc- 
ing. Everyone enjoyed himself till the 
wee small hours. All went to their 
homes wishing the carpenters a pros- 
perous and peaceful year. 

• 

The more you know of the good that 
Is done by demanding the Union Label, 
card and button the more insistent you 
will become for them. 



Ask for the Union Label 



A Real Friend Is — 

One whose grip is a little tighter, 
One whose smile is a little brighter, 
One whose deeds are a little whiter, 

That's what I call a friend. 

/ 
One who'll lend as quick as he'll borrow, 
One who's the same today as tomorrow, 
One who will share your joy — and sorrow, 

That's what I call a friend. 

One who's thoughts are a little cleaner, 
One who's mind is a little keener, 
One who avoids those things that are meaner, 
That's what I call a friend. 

One when you're gone who'll miss you sadly, 
One who'll welcome you back again gladly, 
One who though angered will not speak madly, 
That's what I call a friend. 

One who is always willing to aid you, 
One whose advice has always paid you, 
One who's defended when others flayed you, 
That's what I call a friend. 

One who's been fine when life seemed rotten, 
One whose ideals you have not forgotten, 
One who has given you more than he's gotten, 
That's what I call a friend. 

— Burroughs. 



500,000 Members For 1925 



THE CARPENTER 



27 



A PIONEER PASSES ON 

L. U. 355, Buffalo, N. Y., has suffered 
a great loss in the death of Brother 
August Winkleman at the advanced age 
of 85 years. He had been a member of 
the Brotherhood since 1888. 

The deceased brother was a charter 
member of L. U. 9, and later assisted in 
the organization of L. U. 355, of which 
he was for many years Treasurer. 

In 1919 L. U. 355 entertained Brother 
Winkleman on the occasion of his 80th 
birthday, and there were present his son 
and grandson, who are also members of 
that Local, the former having held the 
office of Secretary or Financial Secre- 
tary for 26 years. 

e 

In the Evening of Life 

The following poem was composed by 
Brother M. M. Randall, 77 years old, a 
member of L. U. 81, Erie, Pa. Brother 
Randall, in the matter of years of mem- 
bership, is one of the oldest members of 
our Brotherhood. 

You ask me why I'm sad, 
Sit down beside me, lad, 

And I'll tell you of the grief that's in my heart. 
You may- scoff and shake your head, 
But my heart has turned to lead 
Since from the boys I worked with I had to 
part. 

It's the Brotherhood that I'm speaking of, 
The good old craft I love ; 
With its trials, its triumphs, and its fears. 
I've shared with the boys 
Its hardships and joys ; 

I've had to leave it, do you wonder at my 
tears ? 

My head is getting heavy, 

My legs a bit unsteady ; 

My eyes ain't got the strength they used to 

have. 
So it comes to me at last, 
That I'm a relic of the past ; 
And with my vision all the strength I've had 

has flown. 

I'm not complaining none, 
But I'm telling you my son, 
It really is a tough old load to bear. 
For my craft has not pensioned me, 
And I'm too old to work, you see ; 
And when you're old there are very few that 
seems to care. 

It's not poverty I fear, 
For I've saved a bit each year ; 
And I own a little home way down Ash Lane. 
It's near the railroad track, 
Just a plain, old-fashioned shack, 
And a garden that would make your face to 
shine. 

Now, my son, I'm nearly through, 

And I'll try to smile for you ; 

For I've always smiled, no matter where I've 

roamed. 
My craft will never shake me, 
They will make, yes, and take me. 
I'll speak it fairly till I enter my Everlasting 

Home. 



BUILDING ARTICLES COMING 

With this issue, the special series of 
Craft Problem articles by Mr. H. H. 
Siegele, dealing with stair building, is 
completed. 

Commencing with our May issue we 
plan to begin another series entitled, 
"Building A House," by the same 
author. These articles will be found to 
deal with the subject very thoroughly, 
and are offered in the sincere hope that 
they will prove helpful to all our mem- 
bers who wish to avail themselves of 
the instruction contained in them. 

Especially are they designed to assist 
apprentices, and younger men with lim- 
ited experience. But this must not for 
a moment be taken to mean that older 
members will not find them equally use- 
ful. On the contrary we believe they 
will be found to contain craft education 
of the highest value to all our members 
who wish to study them. 

• 

A Good Steel Square Book 

There has recently been issued from 
the press of the U. P. C. Book Company, 
Inc., New York, the third edition of the 
"Steel Square Pocket Book." The 
author of this excellent and standard 
work is Brother D. L. Stoddard, a mem- 
ber of L. U. 75, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Brother Stoddard will readily be re- 
membered as a contributor to our "Craft 
Problems" columns. The book was first 
published twenty-one years ago, is pro- 
fusely illustrated, and perhaps the best 
evidence of its worth and efficiency is 
the fact that it is still among the fore- 
most works dealing with the steel 
square and its uses. 

Some revision has been made in the 
latest edition, making the work even 
more valuable than it originally was. It 
is a work which all carpenters would do 
well to have in their possession. 

It can be obtained direct from the 
publishers, or from Dwight L. Stoddard, 
Route D, Box 8, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Price $1.00. 



Keep Your Dues Paid Up 



Steubenville, O., Quiet 

Some contractors in Steubenville, O., 
despite the fact that there are more than 
enough local carpenters available, make 
a practice about this time of the year 
of bringing in men from the outside. • It 
is largely with the object of offsetting 
any move for a wage increase, and in 
any case results in an over-supply of 
carpenters. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



W. T. ALLEN 




General Executive Board Member Elect 
for Second District 



PROGRESS AT PITTSBURGH, PA. 

"Work lias not been as brisk as it 
might have been in Pittsburgh, Pa., dur- 
ing the past winter, but the spirit of 
good fellowship has been kept alive by 
numerous entertainments given by some 
of the live Locals of the district. 

The first one, given by L. U. 430 in 
honor of their 25th Anniversary and 
was quite as swell affair. The next was 
the annual event of L. U. 142, being 
their 29th Anniversary, and was cele- 
brated in the lavish manner for which 
this Local is famous. 

Then, as a climax, the District Coun- 
cil, not to be outdone and without a 
word of protest, went right in the Wall 
Street of Pittsburgh, (Fourth Avenue), 
and bought for themselves a fine build- 
ing, to be used exclusively as a home 
for the carpenters, with the exception 
of the first floor, which will be occupied 
by the Brotherhood Labor Bank as soon 
as alterations are completed. 
• 

Right Church, "Wrong Pew 

Terence : " 'Tis a fine kid ye have 
here. A magnificent head and noble fea- 
tures. Could you let me have two dollars 
'till Saturday?" 

Pat: "I could not. 'Tis me wife's 
child by her first husband." 



WOMEN'S WORK IN TEXAS 

From the Texas State Council Oj. 
Ladies' Auxiliaries comes a breezy let- 
ter urging upon our members the need 
of helping all they can in the work of 
the Auxiliaries. Speaking of the work 
of the women, especially it goes on to 
say: 

"We now have ten organizations of 
Ladies' Auxiliaries, and expect to have 
ten more before the year is ended, have 
a paid up membership of 200 or more, 
and all are doing good work. 

"Dallas Auxiliary No. 3 has sent gro- 
ceries to needy families and flowers to 
those that are ill. They are alert at 
any time to help the one that needs 
them most. 

"Fort Worth has given already $40 
worth of groceries this year, and are 
planning the opening of their new Labor 
Temple on March 18th. 

"Austin, the capital of our great state, 
has money all the time and has just 
recently given a 42 party and cleared 
$25. 

"San Antonio is another one of our 
larger cities and is doing mighty good 
work." 

If only we had space to spare in "The 
Carpenter" it could be filled with ac- 
counts of the splendid work being done 

by the Auxiliaries. 

o 

Geneva, N. Y., Banquet Was a Success 

L. U. 187, Geneva, N. Y., recently held 
its fourth annual banquet, when about 
a hundred shared in tLe good things and 
entertainment provided. A feature of 
the evening was the presence of ten 
members with membership records of 25 
to 28 years. 

Addresses were given by the mayor 
and other prominent citizens, and pres- 
entations made to the members men- 
tioned as having such long membership 
in the Brotherhood. The evening's en- 
joyment was rounded out by a splendid 
entertainment, and those responsible for 
the entire affair received warm appre- 
ciation for their work. 



A Ghastly Affair 

My Bonnie bent over the gas tank, 
The height of its contents to see, 
She lighted a match to assist her — 
Oh, bring back my Bonnie to me. 



The Union Label helps to encourage, 
to inspire and to uplift. 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



PRESIDENT GREEN WILL HELP 

William Green, President of the 
American Federation of Labor, in re- 
cently accepting membership on the 
National Honorary Committee of the 
American Endowment Fund for dis- 
abled men, and orphans of veterans, 
said: 

"It affords me very much pleasure to 
accept your invitation to serve on the 
National Honorary Committee of the 
American Legion Endowment Fund. I 
recall that during the inspiring address 
of Commander Drain at the El Paso 
convention, referred most feelingly to 
this most worthy project that had been 
launched by the American Legion. 

"It was so humane and made such 
an appeal to one's highest and best sen- 
timents that I am indeed glad to ac- 
cept membership on the committee and 
render such service in forwarding this 
work of the Amei-ican Legion as I may 
be permitted to give. 

"It will afford me very great pleasure 
to meet Commander Drain at any time 
he may find it convenient to call. I 
extend a most cordial invitation to any 
other representatives of the American 
Legion who may find it convenient to 
do so to call upon me." 



AFTER EIGHTEEN YEARS 

The judicial committee of the British 
Privy Council has held that the Can- 
adian Industrial Disputes Act, popularly 
known as the Lemieux Act, is a viola- 
tion of the British North American Act 
(Canada's Constitution). The judg- 
ment, delivered by Lord Haldane, held, 
in effect, that under the B. N. A. Act, 
Canadian provinces have exclusive jur- 
isdiction in matters affecting property 

and civil rights. 

• 

HOURS OF LABOR IN BRITAIN 

During the past year the General 
Council of the British Trades Union 
Congress sent a questionaire to its af- 
filiated organizations for the purpose of 
ascertaining the normal working week 
recognized in industries in which mem- 
bers of the trade unions were employed. 
The result of this inquiry was as fol- 
lows: 
Hours Per Number of 

Week. Workers. 

40 24.500 

42 800,600 

44 305,687 

46 8,500 

46y 2 11,590 

47 964,224 

48 1,409,613 



DEATH ROLL 

JOHN BENNER, L. U. 2264, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



MADISON, N. J., CELEBRATES 

On Tuesday evening, February 10, 
1925, the members of L. U. 1058, and 
their families, gathered at Brittin Hall. 
Madison, N. J., and celebrated the 23rd 
birthday of the Local. The night was 
stormy, but 90 members and their fam- 
ilies braved the elements, and were 
well repaid. There was first a vaude- 
ville performance of professional and 
home talent, which was heartily en- 
joyed by all present. 

All then adjourned to the banquet 
room where a fine repast was served. 
Brother Geo. Allen, Business Agent, act- 
ed as toastniaster, and in his opening 
remarks stated that Local 1058 had the 
distinction of having still on our rolls 
all of our charter members excepting 
two, who haye died. 



Brother J. R. Burgess, Secretary Of 
the New Jersey State Council of Car- 
penters also gave a very interesting talk 
on unionism. 

Mrs. H. Higham, and Mrs. Burgess. 
President of Ladies' Auxiliary No. 26 of 
Jersey City, spoke of the benefits which 
could be derived from the Ladies' Aux- 
iliary, and urged the wives of our mem- 
bers to get busy and form an Auxiliary. 
Brother Herbert Lum kept all in good 
humor during the banquet with his 
witty jokes. 

A letter was read from First General 
Vice-President John T. Cosgrove, stating 
that a previous engagement prevented 
his being present. 

Dancing was enjoyed until the wee 
small hours of the morning. 



Keep Your Dues Paid Up 



Editorial 




THE CARPENTER 

Official Journal of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 

OF AMERICA 



Published on the 15th of each month at the 

CARPENTERS' BUILDING 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 
CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA, 

Publishers 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 



Subscription Price 
One Dollar a Year in Advance, Postpaid 

The publishers and the advertising 
agent use every possible precaution avai!= 
able to them against accepting advertise- 
ments from other than reliable firms, but 
do not accept any responsibility for the 
contents of any advertisement which ap- 
pears in "The Carpenter." Should any 
deception be practiced by advertisers at 
any time, upon members, their duty is to 
immediately notify the Post Office au- 
thorities. Therefore, address any com- 
plaints to your local Post Office. 

INDIANAPOLIS, APRIL, 1925 

Our Amended Constitution 

COMMENCING with the first of this 
month our amended Constitution 
and General Laws go into effect. 
Included therein are such changes as 
were approved by our General Conven- 
tion last September, and later sanctioned 
by referendum vote of our membership. 
Bound copies are now available in all 
Local Unions, and copies of the old Con- 
stitution and Laws which held good up 
till April 1 should be discarded. 

All members are advised to study the 
new Constitution as amended, so as to 
familiarize themselves with the changes 
which have been made. Indeed it is a 
good thing for members to give some 
attention to this study any time, • for 
they thereby become better informed 
about the foundation upon which our 



Brotherhood is based. Then, should oc- 
casion arise, they are in a position to 
know what should be done by a Local 
Union or other body to be in line with 
our General Laws. 

We do not claim to be perfect as an 
organization, but we do claim to be try- 
ing all the time to make our Laws bet- 
ter, so that they shall more effectively 
serve the interests of the men of our 
craft, and hand over a stronger Brother- 
hood to those who will follow us. Our 
General Constitution and Laws are writ- 
ten and sanctioned by the votes of our 
membership. They are, in their making, 
the product of democracy. 

Once made they are entitled to be ob- 
served until they are changed. We have 
all agreed to be ruled by the will of the 
majority in our Brotherhood. It is the 
only safe way to proceed, as long ex- 
perience has proved. Loyalty to our 
Brotherhood, coupled with constructive 
criticism within the bounds of courtesy 
and good will towards our institution, 
are the best safeguards for our future 
progress. May the new Laws which we 
have made for our guidance during the 
next four years redound to the future 
welfare of our Brotherhood. 



Residential Work Increasing 

OFFICIAL figures, dealing with the 
value of building contracts let 
up to the present month in 
36 states from the Atlantic sea- 
board west indicate that the pro- 
portion covering residential structures 
is greater than in other years since the 
war. The demand for eommei'cial build- 
ings, which was far ahead of the amount 
aAailable from 1920 onwards, has come 
nearer to normal, and much residential 
work which had been put aside for the 
time being is now getting under way. 

From our standpoint as carpenters 
this does not indicate any decreased de- 
mand for our labor. It means the re- 
verse; for taking dollar's worth for dol- 
lar's worth there is more carpenter work 
by far in residential buildings, than in 
the ordinary industrial or commercial 
structure. It also means a greater de- 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



mand for more skilled craftsmen of our 
trade. 

Looked at from a wider viewpoint the 
present situation indicates that the 
building industry is gradually coming 
back closer to the normal activity of 
pre-war days, at least insofar as abso- 
lutely new work goes. However, there 
is another good feature to remember. A 
very great deal of work which had been 
planned in the way of razing old build- 
ings, and replacing them by others of 
more modern and profitable design still 
remains to be done. 

Anyone interested in the building in- 
dustry, and having an observant eye, 
can see this work gradually being start- 
ed up in almost all sections of any city 
of reasonable size. In the downtown 
districts one, two, and three story 
stores, are being knocked down to make 
way for the larger structures which the 
expanding commercial importance of 
those districts makes necessary. Going 
further out, large residences, particular- 
ly on corners, which formerly were in 
the real residential districts are being 
razed to make way for apartment 
houses with stores on the ground floor 
to meet the business needs of those sec- 
tions. 

From all indications it looks as though 
residential work is going to take up a 
big part of the building programs for the 
next year or two. Incidentally, it will be 
interesting to note what effect the de- 
crease rush demand for commercial 
buildings will have on the winter work 
on that type of building, which has 
been a feature of the past few winters. 
Necessity in that respect has furnished 
some very valuable data on the feas- 
ibility of carrying on concrete work un- 
der very rigorous climatic conditions. 
• 

About That Conference 

IN our February issue, we took occa- 
sion to mention that a conference of 
building trades employers had been 
held at Cleveland, O., in January, under 
the auspices of the National Association 
of Building Trades employers. Only in 
an incidental way did we refer to the 
fact that they had discussed the five- 
hour workday question. We did not re- 
gard that discussion, or any resolution 
reached as the result of it, as being of 
more than trivial account in the deliber- 
ations of the conference. 

What we did stress was, that the con- 
ference was more concerned with de- 



vising some nation-wide wage reduction 
plan than anything else. And so it was, 
for in their hearts the employers who 
composed that conference do not look 
upon the five-hour day question as being 
one of anything like immediate practical 
concern. It merely served as a topical 
screen to hide the true purposes of the 
meeting. 

However, "The American Contrac- 
tor," in its issue of February 2Sth last, 
voices the view that the attitude of the 
conference towards the five-hour day 
question has practically squelched it^for 
the time being at any rate. We there- 
fore take this first opportunity to as- 
sure all who are interested that, insofar 
as this Brotherhood is concerned, and 
the five-hour day question, that confer- 
ence has not made one jot or tittle of 
difference. 

The journal referred to, in dealing 
with the matter, says among other 
things : 

"The movement against the five- 
day week that was initiated at the 
conference held under the auspices 
of the National Association of 
Building Trades Employers, has 
spread from coast to coast, and 
scores of associations, not only of 
employers, but also of architects, 
engineers, building supply dealers, 
and others, have gone on record as 
being opposed to any further re- 
duction in the number of hours 
worked." 

That is quite beside the mark, because 
the persons mentioned would not be the 
ones who could decide the question. If 
the carpenters, or any other group of 
workers, ever become sufficiently united 
on the matter of the five-hour day, and 
want to put it into practice, the opposi- 
tion of these others could have no re- 
verse effect. Incidentally the associa- 
tion, which adopts the title of "Nation- 
al" would have to be far more represen- 
tative nationally than it was at the time 
of the conference, in order to have the 
influence it would like. 

That is evident from reading the 
editorial, in which it is shown that the 
association does not include by any 
means the nation-wide representation its 
name would imply. Looking it all over 
in its latest aspect we see no reason to 
change our original estimate of the real 
purpose of this conference. That was, 
to co-ordinate and crystallize a nation- 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



wide sentiment among building trades 
employers, in favor of a general reduc- 
tion of the wages of building trades 
workers. That is the most immediate 
practical proposition on their agenda. 

So let us not be led on tangent trails, 
but see to it that we devote our energies 
without ceasing to the keeping up of 
that state of organization which has en- 
abled us to attain our present wage 
scales and working conditions. Let 
those with red herring appetites indulge 
their weakness if they will, but our most 
urgent business and interest lies right 
at home. 



About Labor Owned Buildings 

THE convention of the American 
Federation of Labor at El Paso 
adopted a resolution instructing 
the Executive Council to compile infor- 
mation regarding Labor Temples, meet- 
ing halls and other property owned by 
International unions, State Federations, 
Labor Councils and local unions. This 
will likely result in a good deal of sta- 
tistical information being obtained on 
the subject, and which may prove use- 
ful in localities where union bodies are 
planning to erect buildings of their own. 

The desire of Labor to own the build- 
ings in which its affairs are conducted 
is a very laudable one. It is also desir- 
able that in making plans to this end a 
keen and ever present appreciation of 
the financial side of it should be in the 
minds of its promoters. It is advisable 
not to let the sentimental aspect of the 
matter obscure its practical difficulties 
— as many a union body can testify out 
of its own experience. 

Propositions to erect and own labor 
temples usually start oft amid great en- 
thusiasm. All well and good, providing 
that enthusiasm is applied to the busi- 
ness of getting together the necessary 
finance to see the job through before it 
is started. But if it is only a sentiment 
gushing out of the general idea of own- 
ing such a place, and ends at that, then 
it is not very solid ground to work on. 

Any union body which plans such a 
place will do well to rely solely upon 
itself in getting together the money 
needed. Sending out broadcast appeals 
to union bodies in other localities to buy 
"bricks," or otherwise share in the cost 
of construction, is not a reliable way 
of going about it. Nor should a labor 
temple be started on its way with a big 
mortgage hanging around its neck. The 



fate of such propositions is usually fore- 
closure into the hands of mortgagees, 
and alienation of the property from bod- 
ies and purposes for which it was orig- 
inally intended. 

Building a labor temple is from start 
to finish a project which should be 
looked upon as a strictly business affair, 
and those in charge of it will do well 
not to allow sentimental enthusiasm to 
lead them into biting off more than they 
can chew. Many a local labor body has 
done that before today to its subsequent 



Baubles and Bread 

DIAMONDS, and their position in 
the world's general economic 
scheme of things, would not seem 
to suggest any relation to, or compari- 
son with, the status of the working 
man, and his efforts to better his condi- 
tion through economic organization. 
But there has just been made available 
for the instruction of all and sundry, the 
information that diamonds are actually 
so plentiful that, if they were allowed 
to come onto the world market without 
hindrance, they would be as cheap as 
glass beads are now. 

In the Kimberly district in South 
Africa alone there are enough diamonds 
available to do that. But the production 
and sale of diamonds is very closely con- 
trolled, and at no time are they allowed 
to come into the market in such quan- 
tities that the supply would exceed the 
demand, and thus depress the carat 
price. This is universally accepted as 
being all right. It means that those who 
control the diamond business have th' 
tightest union shop organization in the 
world. 

The point of it all, as we see it is 
this: that what the world at large is 
willing to agree to as regards these 
beautiful baubles, it is not willing to ac- 
cept as regards the living bodies of 
working men. When they organize for 
the purpose of getting a better price for 
the product of those bodies — which is 
their labor — then it is supposed to be a 
different matter. Yet there could be no 
question as to which were the most use- 
ful in the daily life of the world, or 
which had the highest moral right to 
combine for economic protection. 

It only goes to show the morass of 
moral values into which public thinking 
— or lack of it — can be led by the^econ- 
omic customs of an age. It also goes to 



THE CARPENTER 



33 



show that unless working men them- 
selves, realizing by sheer force of neces- 
sity the true viewpoint, organize them- 
selves to fight for and make good 
their rights, they would soon find them- 
selves without any. In a nutshell it is 
all the difference between freedom and 
bondage. 

A world which is willing to sanction 
greater protection to bits of stuff dug 
out of the earth, than to the living 
standards of its men and women, needs 
to be shocked into a higher sense of 
moral values. It is the one great job of 
the ti'ade union movement to do that. 
It is a good, clean job, too. It is the 
job of helping men to raise themselves 
in their own self-respect — the first step in 
making the rest of the world respect them. 



Still They Come 

IT is pretty hard at times to keep 
track of the number and variety of 
building trades employers' organiza- 
tions. Almost every week of late one or 
another of the trade journals has con- 
tained a report of the convention of such 
a body, and the record of its "reso- 
luting." There seems to be a bewilder- 
ing profusion of these bodies growing 
up, all doubtless taking themselves very 
seriously. 

The most recent of these gatherings 
to get publicity was the National Asso- 
ciation of Builders' Exchanges, which 
met in Los Angeles, Cal. Among other 
things it condemned the five day week 
idea, on the grounds that it would lower 
the efficiency of the worker, and in- 
crease the overhead expenses of the 
contractor. Whereat we should worry. 
Speakers predicted a pretty good year 
ahead for building, and some general 
reduction in wages. 

No very particular or convincing rea- 
sons were given for the latter. It was 
largely a matter of expressing a wish 
which made everybody feel happy. 
But don't forget that the will is there, 
working all the time and overtime, to 
make that wish a practical condition. 
This was echoed in the reported state- 
ment of Mr. 0. G. Norman, of the Build- 
ing Trades Employers' Association, of 
New York City, who was credited with 
the opinion that "building construction 
will be cheaper during 1925, labor 
wages will decrease, and the building 
industry will return to a condition of 
normalcy." 



This came after the retiring President 
had said : "There is still a shortage run- 
ning into millions, and for this reason I 
predict building activities for this year 
that will perhaps duplicate those of 
1924, if not surpass them." The truth 
of the. matter is, the so-called "experts" 
have not been able to keep any sort of 
a line at all on the building situation for 
the past three years, each of which has 
produced a situation which they had 
previously spoken of as impossible. The 
best they are doing just now is to make 
guesses, mostly wrong. It is up to us to 
see that the one about wages going 
down is put into that category too. And 
meanwhile, keep mindin' our business, 
and goin' along. 

• 

There's Something Wrong There 

WHEN a country has to adopt the 
principle of unemployment in- 
surance as an integral part of its 
laws, it is proof positive that unemploy- 
ment there is regarded as a chronic and 
permanent condition of that country. It 
is also proof of a deep-seated and un- 
natural way of doing things. 

It is evidence that Nature's way of 
guaranteeing to all men food, clothing, 
and shelter, in return for their willing- 
ness to apply their labor to the natural 
resources of the earth, has been funda- 
mentally interfered with. It also means 
that the government in question is will- 
ing to see large numbers of the people 
of that country degenerate under the 
influence of the "dole" or "hand-out" 
system, rather than investigate and ex- 
pose the real cause for such a rotten 
condition. 

No one who has seen the system in 
operation will be willing to admit that 
it is a self-respecting alternative to em- 
ployment. It bemeans alike those who 
give and those who receive. It is an 
official admission that the way of doing 
things is such that, while Nature is lav- 
ish in her guarantees of sustenance and 
opportunity to get it, man in his mode 
of government has divorced and ex- 
cluded thousands of his fellow men from 
the opportunity to have a sufficiency of 
the main things they need for their 
daily life, in return for their willingness 
to work for them. No country can claim 
to have things completely in accord with 
natural law which cannot assure to all 
its citizens bread and raiment and shel- 
ter in return for their labor. 



Official Infer. 





THE 



GENERAL OFFICERS 
OF 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD 

OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA 

Genebal Office 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Genebal Pbesident 

WM. L. HUTCHBSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Fibst Genebal Vice-Peesident 

JOHN T. COSGROVE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second Genebal Vice-Pbesident 

GEORGE H. LAKEY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Genebal Secebtabt 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Genebal Tbeasubeb 

THOMAS NEALE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Genebal Executive Boabd 
First District, T. M. GUERIN 
290 Second Ave., Troy, N. Y. 



Second District, W. T. ALLEN 
3832 N. Gratez St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Third District, JOHN H. POTTS 
646 Melish Ave., Cincinnati, O. 



Fourth District, JAMES P. OGLETREE 
Bradentown, Fla. 



Fifth District, J. W. WILLIAMS 

3948 S. Grand Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 



Sixth District, W. A. COLE 

810 Merchants National Bank Building 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
1712 Chambord St., Montreal, Que., Can. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive 
Board myst be sent tP the General Secretary. 



NOTICE TO RECORDING 
SECRETARIES 

The quarterly circular for the months 
of April, May and June, containing the 
quarterly password, has been forwarded 
to all Local Unions of the United Broth= 
erhood. Under separate cover six blanks 
have been forwarded for the Financial 
Secretary, three of which are to be used 
for the reports to the General Office, "for 
the months of April, May and June, and 
the extra ones are to be filled out in 
duplicate and kept on file for future ref= 
erence. Inclosed therewith are also six 
blanks for the Treasurer, to be used in 
transmitting money to the General Of= 
fice. Recording Secretaries not in receipt 
of this immediately should notify the 
General Secretary, Frank Duffy, Carpen= 
ters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

We are continuously having numerous 
complaints that members are not receiv= 
ing our official Journal, "The Carpenter," 
and upon investigation we find that in 
most cases it arises from the fact that 
the only address submitted to the Gen= 
eral Office is "General Delivery," and 
when sent this way, and not called for, 
the Postmaster sends same back to this 
General Office at quite an expense. 

We must therefore insist that the Fi= 
nancial Secretaries of each and every 
Local get the correct street address oi 
every member of his Local in good stand= 
ing who does not receive the Journal, 
and submit same to the General Office. 

Careful attention to the foregoing will 
assist this Office materially in getting 
our Journal out promptly and to the par= 
ties interested. 

Financial Secretaries will also take in= 
to consideration that it is necessary to 
call attention on those same blanks to 
the names of members who are suspend= 
ed and granted clearance so that their 
names can be erased from the mailing 
list in the town or city in which their 
Local is located. If sufficient blanks are 
not furnished at any time, our attention 
should be called to same and they will 
be promptly forwarded,, 



CorrQSDondQncQ 




Request of L. U. 132 

Mr. Frank Duffy, 
General Secretary, 
U. B. of C. and J. of A., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Dear Sir and Bro. : — 

At the meeting of L. U. 132 last Fri- 
day the report of the committee on tab- 
ulating the votes for General Officers 
and the amendments to the Constitu- 
tion were read, and L. U. 132 took ex- 
ception to their report which reads, 
"Credentials presented by Brother 
George Myers of L. U. 132 of Washing- 
ton, D. C, directing him to act as repre- 
sentative at the count of the votes for 
General Officers on behalf of James 
Walsh and C. J. Mulcahy." 

From the reading of the report it ap- 
pears that the credentials were issued by 
L. U. 132 when as a matter of fact, L. 
U. 132 did not know that Brother Myers 
had gone to Indianapolis, nor did No. 
132 authorize Brother Myers or any 
other member to represent any one at 
the counting of the votes, so L. U. 132 
has taken exceptions to that part of the 
report of the committee and have in- 
structed me to write you, calling your 
attention to the error, and request that 
you make correction of same and so pub- 
lish it in the next issue of the official 
Journal, "The Carpenter." 

Hoping to have a favorable reply, I am 
Fraternally yours, 

THOS W. WOLTZ, Bee. See. 
L. TJ. 132. 



Butte, Montana, Celebrates Anniversary 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

L. U. 112 celebrated on February 21st 
the 35th anniversary of our Charter, 
with a party to which all members and 
their families and friends were invited 
and the response to the invitation 
brought out more than 400 people. The 
halls were crowded to the last moment 
when the orchestra finished playing for 
the merrymakers. 

Our old standby, Brother Armstrong, 
opened the meeting with a few words of 
welcome and following introduced the 



toastmaster for the evening, Brother 
Taylor. The toastmaster made a decid- 
ed hit with his remarks, introducing the 
different entertainers. 

After the program a splendid lunch 
was served by members of the Local and 
the evening finished with a dance. The 
dance lasted to the small hours Sunday 
morning and all departed with compli' 
ments to the committee in charge and 
wishing, that on our next birthday we 
would have another party. 

Fraternally yours, 

VICTOR SCHEEN. 



Union Hill, N. J., New Auxiliary 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

Just a few lines to inform you of the 
recent inauguration and social of the 
new Ladies' Auxiliary Union No. 135, 
Union Hill, N. J. 

Inauguration took place on November 
12, 1924. New members were initiated 
and officers installed. 

A very successful party for the chil- 
dren was held during the Christmas 
holidays, and Santa Claus presented 
each child with a gift and candy. 

Our most recent social event was 
an old-fashioned barn dance, which also 
proved to be very enjoyable. 
Fraternally yours, 
AMALIE ASLAKSEN, Rec. Sec. 



Information Wanted 

This is a picture of W. B. Higgins, 
formerly a member of L. U. 225, At- 




lanta, Ga., from which he took clearance 
in June, last. From there it is believed 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



he went to Florida. He is described as 
an ardent reader and good conversa- 
tionalist, 62 years old, weight about 185 
pounds, clean shaved, wears glasses 
when on the job, has iron gray hair, 
scars on jaw, ear, and forehead. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
communicate with his daughter, Mrs. 
Maggie Smith, 315 Wylie St., At- 
lanta, Ga. 

* * * 

This is a picture of Robert McAloney, 
of Montreal, last heard of in Windsor, 
Ontario; height 5 ft. 7 in., hair mixed 




with grey, light mustache, tall and slim 
in build. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please communicate with Mr. 
Jack, 1467 Win. David St., Maison- 

euvre, Montreal, Canada. 
* * * 

This is a picture of Brother William 
Leonhard, of L. U. 1035, Taunton, 
Mass., who left his work Saturday noon, 
January 3rd, last, and has not been 
heard of since then. The missing broth- 




er was a man who stood in high regard 
of all who knew him. His description 
is: Age 36, weight about 185 pounds, 
height 5 ft. 9 in., dark complexion. 
Anyone knowing of his whereabouts 
please communicate with Geo. D. Lahar, 
305 W. Britannia St., Taunton, Mass. 
* * * 

Anthony Farelly, disappeared on 
December 23rd, while returning from 



work at 103rd St., Broadway Sub Sta- 
tion. Anyone knowing of his where- 
abouts communicate with P. Callahan, 
790 Columbus Ave., New York. The 
missing man is 5 ft. 9 in., dark com- 
plexioned, blue eyes, wore blue serge 
suit, black overcoat, black cap, black 
shoes, clean shaven. 

» 

Augusta, Me., Shakes a Lively Hoof 

The members of L. U. 914 of Augus- 
ta, Me., enjoyed a chicken-pie supper, 
followed by an entertainment and dance 
Thursday evening, February 12th, at 
their rooms in G. A. R. Hall. 

After the entertainment, followed an 
old-fashioned dance in which many of 
the older carpenters who had not danced 
for years were on the floor. 

This event was gotten up for the ben- 
efit of the members and their families 
with a few invited guests. There were 
about 150 present. President Fred B. 
Tobey was Chairman of the committee 
in charge of the event and this com- 
mittee have the thanks of the union for 
the painstaking work and the trouble 
they have been to in making it a success. 
• 

At KeIso=Longview, Wash. 

Kelso-Longview, Wash., is over- 
stocked with all lines of building trades 
workmen, and there are many unem- 
ployed there. For a long time now there 
has been a systematic campaign carried 
on to attract men to the place, and dur- 
ing the past winter it has been flooded 
with unemployed. Genuine and very 
keen distress has prevailed, and there 
is not, nor ever has been yet, prospect 
that there will be work enough to absorb 
the supply of labor available on the 
ground. Our L. U. 1707, at Kelso-Long- 
view is having a terribly hard fight to 
hold anything like a decent wage scale 
and working conditions. 



Are You Going To Colorado? 

Alamosa City, Colo., is no place for 
any man to go to seeking work. The 
Chamber of Commerce there has ad- 
vertised the city and the San Louis Val- 
ley generally. At the same time there 
is not enough work going on or in pros- 
pect for those who are already there. 
Communications received from there, 
written by workers who have fallen for 
the publicity, are full of bitter dissillu- 
sionment. 



Ask for the Union Label 



Chips and Shavings 



Wood alchohol, wooden heads and 
wooden overcoats — all in a row. 

How many members have you 
brought into the Local? If none — get 
one; if one — get another. 

* * * 

Life is a good deal like a A r audeville 
show. You think all the time that the 
next act will be better but it isn't. 

* * * ' 

The "Welfare Commission of Cali- 
fornia has established a minimum wage 
of $16 for women employed in laundries. 

* * * 

In the springtime the union man's 
fancy should turn to thoughts of that 
new member he intends having to his 

credit. 

* * * 

It used to be possible to find a copy 
of the Police Gazette lying around in the 
barber shop. Now it's Good Housekeep- 
ing and ladies' fashion journals. Wotta 
life! 

* * * 

It is pretty safe to say that none of 
the children of the honorable legislators 
who voted against the proposed federal 
child labor amendment are in any 
danger of being exploited child labor. 

* * * 

All workmen should be well enough 
trained in regard for their own interests 
to know that advertisements, by Cham- 
bers of Commerce advising workers to 
go to some particular place, are best 
ignored. 

*• * * 

For the ladies a good complexion 
secret is: 

"Get one pot of rouge and one rab- 
bit's foot. Bury them two miles from 
home and walk out and back once a day 
to see if they are still there." 

* * * 

North Carolina has made a census of 
its crippled children, finding 700 in the 
state, and is establishing local clinics to 
help those who live in rural districts, 
often far from hospitals and a long dis- 
tance from good roads or railroads. 



The Amalgamated Association of 
Street and Electric Railway Employees 
in 1924 paid out benefits to its members 
in one way or another at the rate $2.11 
a minute during the entire year, accord- 
ing to a statement of one of its officers. 

* * * 

There's a thrill waiting for you when 
the President says: "Any propositions 
for membership?" if one of them hap- 
pens to be that non-union man you have 
persuaded to join up. If you've not had 
this sensation try it. It's so good you'll 
want more. 

* * * 

In another two months your Local 
Union will be electing its officers for the 
ensuing year. Now is the time to give 
the boys the once over, and figure out 
those whom you think are the best fitted 
to fill the offices, bringing credit to 
themselves and progress to your Local. 

* * * 

We have frequently seen in this coun- 
try the spectacle of more men than 
work. It has been said that our normal 
situation is 10 per cent more men than 
jobs. Industrial slave drivers approve 
of that condition because, they say, it 
holds men more attentively to their jobs. 
— The Dearborn Independent. 

* * * 

Do you realize that the Constitution 
which you obligated yourself to abide by 
is not quite the same as it was a year 
ago? Get your new copy from the Sec- 
retary, and go over it. Of course most 
of it will be "old stuff," but at that it 
won't do you any harm to brush up on 

it; and the new parts, too. 

* * * 

The wage review for construction la- 
bor in this issue shows that what 
changes are being made are toward 
higher pay. There is about the same 
planning for building that there was at 
this time last year. Contracts awarded 
during February in 36 states amount to 
299 million dollars in estimated valua- 
tion. The combined total for the first 
two months of this year, $595,653,000, 
shows a decline of ^ of 1 per cent from 
the first two months of last year. — "The 
American Contractor," March 14, 1925. 



Craft ProblQms 




The Stair 
V 

(By H. H. Siegele.) 

Unless the stair plans, and particu- 
larly the details, show definitely all of 
the important points of the stairway, it 
is always well to have the mill furnish 
a copy of their working drawings for 
the stair, before framing the rough work. 
This will eliminate any discrepancies, 

b 



method is as reliable as the other, while 
neither of them should be necessary, 
where the architect has thoroughly 
worked out the stairway, and has given 
definite figures on his drawings. Slight 
variations between the mill work and 




F\ C. 3f. 




"/. .. ', H".:.'- 



c 






8 



between the mill and the job, in the in- 
pretation of the plans. Sometimes the 
mill sends a representative to the job to 
check over the rough work before they 
start work on the stair stuff. This 



F"i g,. as: 

the rough work, often cause considerable 
trouble, and the wise stair builder will 
do all he can to guard against it. 

Installing the finished stairway is 
usually one of the last jobs in finishing 



THE CARPENTER 



39 



a building. The reason for 
the stairway is one of the 



this is that 
things that 




is completed. If, however, the stair is 
used for traffic before the painter gets 
to it, the treads should be protected — a 
thin board tacked to the tread with fine 
brads is a good way to do this. 

Fig. 34 shows an elevation of a right- 
hand stairway with a bull-nose step, and 



F~IG. 3 7. 



an open stringer. Three steps are shown 
completed with the fourth one ready for 
the return nosing. This nosing was left 
off to show how the balusters are dove- 



7fG.3b 



-7IG3& 




tailed into the tread. The parts indicat- 
the owner takes a great deal of pride ed by letters are: a, newel; b, hand rail; 
in ; so by leaving it till the last, it can be c, baluster ; d, wall stringer ; e, open 
turned over to the painter as soon as it stringer; f, return nosing; g, return 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



cove; h, bull- nose; i, base; j, plastering 
k, moulding. 

A plan of the same layout is shown 
by Fig. 35, which shows, A, the tread; 
B, the bull- nose; C, the riser; D, the 
wall stringer cut down to show the 
housing for the riser. The dotted line 
shows the depth of the housing for the 
tread. E shows the center horse. 

How to obtain the member cut for 
the base moulding, where the base and 



This line gives the cut for the moulding. 
At b the same principle has been applied 




Fi G. 40. 



the stringer meet, is shown on Fig. 36. 
Set one leg of the compass at the angle 
where the upper edge of the base and 
the upper edge of the wall stringer meet, 
and strike off any convenient distance on 
the edge of the base as well as on the 
edge of the stringer. This is shown at 
a. Then set one leg of the compass at 
each of these points, respectively, and 
strike off any convenient distance in 
such a manner that the lines will cross 
each other. 

This done, connect the points where 
the two lines cross with the angle be- 
tween the base and the wall stringer. 




on a sharp angle, in the same manner 
the member cut may be obtained for any 
angle. 



THE CARPENTER 



41 



On Fig. 37 we show an elevation, and 
on Fig. 38 a plan of a stair with a 
closed stringer. The newel for the part- 
wall stringer is shown at a, Fig. 38. It 
will be noticed here that the horse next 
to the wall has been blocked out about 
2% in. in order to permit the wall 
stringer to slip in between the horse and 
the wall. 

Fig. 40 gives the height of the hand 
rail in figures ; also the lower end of the 
ly-shown flight has been cut off at point 
a, Fig. 37 — the cap for this newel and 
the hand rail are shown by dotted lines. 

The construction of the hand rail and 
the closed stringer are also shown. TLe 
newel at the upper landing, showing 
how the facia and the soffit die into it. 

Fig. 41 shows a part of a stringer 
with two steps marked ready for hous- 
ing and a third, which is indicated by 



Fig. 45 shows a step wedged into the 
stringer. The wedges should receive an 




Fl G. -f-3. 




Fl G. 4-3. 



a, housed out. The position of the riser 
and the tread is indicated at b ; and the 
spaces for the wedges are shown at c. 

Fig. 42 show sthe construction of a 
step, such as is ordinarily used for a 
housed stair. The block in the angle is 
glued and nailed into place after the 
flight of stairs has been put together. 
The riser should be nailed on to the 
tread as shown — avoid driving the nails 
into the tongue and grove. For this is 
liable to split the riser. 

Fig. 43 shows another construction of 
a step. Fig. 44 is a cheap construction, 
used principally for unhoused stairways. 



n g. ++. 



W 
\ 

\ 

\ 



\ 



szZl 




n g. +s. 



application of glue before they are in- 
serted. Drive the wedges with a ham- 
mer, using well- controlled, straight 
blows — not too many. 

Installing a finished stairway, in these 
days, if the important points are kept 




Fig. 46 



in mind, is not a difficult matter. Al- 
ways being sure of your movements, 



42 



THE CARPENTER 



skill and exact workmanship, are the 
principal requirements for producing ac- 
ceptable results. Use the level frequent- 
ly — try out often to make sure that what 
should be plumb, is plumb — and what 
should line up, lines up. Are the things 
that should be straight, straight? Does 
your work harmonize — does it look 
right? These are questions that the 
stair builder should constantly keep in 
mind. 

It was impossible to deal with all of 
the problems that confront the stair 
builder, in these articles, but we have 
endeavored to keep the practical side al- 
ways to the front. However, it is as 
impossible to be practical and not be a 
little technical, as it is to be technical, 
and not be a little practical. 

In the next and concluding article we 
will touch upon points that we have, 
and points that we have not, touched up- 
on heretofore. 



The Stair 
VI ' 

Every community has its quota of 
smart-alecs, who think it a wonderful 
display of wit, if they can send an ap- 
prentice on a wild goose chase ; perhaps, 
looking for a round- square, an eight- 
foot yard stick or a wood stretcher — 
terms that in themselves carry a con- 
tradiction, but that sound as reasonable, 
to the inexperienced as many other 
terms that they hear while they are 
starting to learn a trade. The writer 
has never had anything but contempt 
for the man who will amuse himself, at 
the expense of others, using the cheapest 
kind of worn-out, borrowed wit. " 

In order that the apprentice might 
know, we are giving below a list of 
terms used in stair building, with brief 
definitions : 

Angle newel. A newel located at the 
angle of a well. 

Baluster. A little column set between 
the hand rail and the stringer of a stair- 
way — sometimes called banister. 

Box stringer. A close stringer. 

Bull-nose. . The first step of an open 
stairway, terminating with a semi-circle. 

Cap. The top finish of a newel. 

Carriages. Stair horses. 

Close stringer. A front stringer that 
is housed. 

Cove. The moulding nailed under the 
nosing, 



Curtail step. The first step of a 
geometrical stairway, terminating with 
a curve whose radius is constantly de- 
creasing. 

Cut-and-mitered. A stringer cut 
square for the treads and mitered for 
the risers. 

Cylinder. The well of a geometrical 
stairway. 

Dog-leg. A platform stairway in 
which the front stringers come directly 
over each other. 

Double return. A stairway with a 
main flight, and two return flights, or 
wings. 

Double platform. Two quarter land- 
ings connected with a riser. 

Easement. Fig. 46 shows two ease- 
ments, a and b. 

Fascia. The finishing board on the 
landing beam. 

Fillit. Blocks used to fill in between 
balusters at the top and bottom. 

Flight. A section of stairs reaching 
from one landing to another. 

Flyer. A straight step. 

Geometrical. A stairway with a con- 
tinuous hand rail in which all the turns 
are made on a curve, or circle. 

Going. The run of a step. 

Goose Neck. A hand rail bent like the 
neck of a goose. 

Hand Rail Screw. The bolt with 
which two pieces of hand rail are held 
together ; also called a stair bolt. 

Housed. Gained, or routed. 

Housed stringer. A stringer that is 
housed both for the risers and for the 
treads. 

Header. The rough timber carrying 
the ends of the joists partly cut out for 
the stair openings. 

Headroom. The distance between the 
ceiling line of the header to the nosing 
line of the stair. 

Hand rail. The rail of a stairway to 
hold to when ascending or descending. 

Horse. A carriage. 

Half-space landing. A half-turn plat- 
form. 

Half-turn platform. A landing on 
which a half turn is made on passing 
over it. 

Landing. The floor space at the head 
or at the foot of a flight of stairs. The 
platform between two flights of stairs. 

Left-hand stairway. A stairway with 
the hand rail to the left, going up. 

Newel. A post to which the hand rail 
is fastened — a newel post. 



THE CARPENTER 



43 



Nose-and-miter. The return of a 
nosing on a step of an open stairway. 

Nosing. The round edge of a tread 
that projects beyond the riser. The 
piece that projects beyond the last riser 
of a flight of stairs, corresponding with 
the nosing of a step. 

Open newel stairway. A stairway 
with newels at the angles. 

Open stringer. A stringer with the 
rise of the steps cut on a miter and the 
going cut square. 

Pitch board. A templet for marking 
the steps on stair stringers and stair 
horses. 

Plank stairway. A stairway made en- 
tirely of planks. 

Platform stairway. A stairway with 
landings between flights. 

Quarter-space landing. A landing on 
which a quarter turn is made on passing 
over it. A quarter- turn landing. 

Quarter cylinder. A quarter-circle 
turn in a well of a geometrical stairway. 

Ramp. A bend in a hand rail. 

Right-hand stairway. A stairway 
with the hand rail to the right, going 
up. 

Rise. The perpendicular distance be- 
tween two floor levels connected with a 
flight of stairs. 

Riser. The vertical part of a step 
that -supports the tread. 

Semi-circular cylinder. A cylinder 
that makes a half- turn. 

Soffit. The member nailed under a 
fascia to cover the joint between it and 
the plastering. 

Springing tree. A stair horse. 

Stair. Stairs or stairway. 

Step. The combination of a riser and 
a tread. 

Staircase. The chamber into which 
the stairway is built. 

Stringer-horse. A stringer that, at 
the same time acts as a horse. 

Story pole. A pole on which the ele- 
vation of the steps of a stairway are 
marked. 

Templet. A pattern. 

Tread. The horizontal part of a step. 

Trimmer. One of the timbers with 
which the sides of a stair opening is 
formed. 

Wainscoting. Paneled wall lining for 
halls and stairways. 

Wall stringer. The stringer next to 
the wall of an open stairway. 

Wedges. Tapering pieces of wood 
used to hold the treads and risers in 
place. 



Wing. A return flight of a stairway. 

Winder. A step wide at one end and 
tapering to a point at the other. A 
winding step. 

— « 

Foundations 

(By D wight L. Stoddard.) 

There is probably nothing in building 
construction outside of carpenter work 
that has been used as long, considered 
as strong and durable and will likely be 
used practically for all time to come, as 
much as brick. 

Now it matters not how big or how 
high the brick building is the joists are 
simply laid on the brick, generally about 
4 in. and then all are leveled up- on the 
top by putting a thin chip or wedge un- 
der the right thickness wherever neces- 
sary that seems to be about as substan- 
tial a way as is known to make a build- 
ing good and solid, yet it mfght-seem to 
some as a kind of a shimmed up job. I 
remember being oh one job where the 
contractor said none of that shimming up 
for him, so when they got to the right 
height for the joist they bedded a plate 
and laid the joist on that and did away 
with the time, bother and worry. The 
trouble seemed to be on that job that 
the bricklayers were unable to get the 
exact height, one end being high made 
the floor twisted. In olden times we 
had to have a big timber for a sill, 
in later years we got away from timbers 
and heavy framing, and made our sill 
out of lighter lumber. Some think the 
best way is to lay it flat, others think 
that way is too liable to sag where the 
wall might settle, and therefore recom- 
mend putting the sills on edge and nail 
them into the end of each joist. I think 
this is the better way of the two, as illus- 
trated. Use them both ways and you 
make no mistake. When we got the 
lumber right from the sawmill there was 
something like an inch difference in the 
widths, and all ends had to be sized, but 
our dressed lumber of today is practi- 
cally sized, when it leaves the mill. 

The joists should be crowned up in the 
center enough not only to hold the heft 
of the floor, but all that will be put on it 
for years to come. If the building was 
to stand for fifty years and the joists 
should still be good and should be taken 
out and put in a new building very 
likely by that time they would be 
crowned about right to put them in bot- 
tom side up. Where there is no base- 



44 



THE CARPENTER 



ment under the entire house and the 
joists are near the ground, especially if 
there is liable to be much dampness, 
there is ho danger of the joists ever 
lasting long enough to be put into an- 
other building many years later, and 



ing heavy enough, or big enough to cover 
enough ground so there will be no danger 
of it settling. 

Brick, cement blocks, and solid ce- 
ment as well as many other materials 
make good foundations, with the proper 




.A 



FouKd/\tioK«s 



^... 



it generally pays well to have them 
well above the ground even if one has 
to go to some expense to remove the dirt 
below them. 

It never pays to put in a cheap, shal- 
low foundation. The foundation should 
not only be well below frost, but should 
go to rather solid ground and have foot- 



determinations and calculations, but as 
the entire building rests on its founda- 
tion, the very life and durability of the 
building depends on the kind of a foun- 
dation it has. If it does not have a good 
foundation it matters not how well the 
rest of the building is constructed, it 
cannot be expected to last for very many 
years. 



A Rafter Framing Detail 

(By Peter Gillespie, L. U. 288, Home- 
stead, Pa.) 
Enclosed please find detail of plan of 
rafter framing, using a 2x4 in. rafter 
bearer, instead of the usual ridge piece 



strong ridge. The greatest advantage, 
however, is found in raising the rafters. 
After the end rafters are raised, remain- 
ing rafters will rest on the bearer, the 
points will come together, making solid 
nailing for the sheathing. 




of 1 or 2 in. stuff. "When 2x8 in. rafters 
are used, 2x6 in. bearer can be used in- 
stead of 2x4 in. This plan forms a 



Make It Convenient 

(By H. H. Siegele.) 

Farmers, and frequently city folks, 
depend to a great extent on cistern 
water. Usually a pump directly over the 
cistern is all that you find, and if the 
cistern is not located under a porch or 
some other convenient place, it is up to 
the housewife to carry the water from 
wherever the cistern is. This labor can 
be saved by the use of a pitcher-pump, 
installed by the illustrations. 



THE CARPENTER 



45 



This is not altogether a carpenter's 
problem, but the carpenter who can sug- 
gest something that will solve a kitchen 
problem usually has a better chance of 
getting the job, than the man who can- 
not. Wherever there is city water to be 



who is handy with tools can easily do 
the installing himself. The pipes can be 
cut and threaded at the plumber's shop, 
after that they need only to be coupled 
up as shown on the drawing. The pump 
can be secured from any hardware store. 




Fi 3. Z. 



had and sewer connection, this problem 
is solved, but it must be remembered 
that a great deal of building is done on 
farms and other places, where these con- 
veniences cannot be had. 

Fig. 1 shows a face view of the ar- 
rangement in the kitchen. A pipe from 
the sink runs down below the frost line 
and away from the house to a place of 
discharge. The pump is fastened onto 
the top of a small cabinet, which, by the 
way, will be found a convenient place 
to keep little kitchen necessities, that 
otherwise would probably find a place 
on the back porch. Fig. 2 gives a side 
view of the layout, showing the pump, 
cabinet, foundation of the house, and 
the pipe leading to the cistern. Fig. 3 
is a section of the cistern, showing the 
pipe and the strainer at the end. 

It does not require an expert to install 
this little system of waterworks. A man 




mMMgMMZMgl& 



Fig. 3. 





Jersey Gives Satisfaction 

When your screening and re-screening jobs come along, 
advise your customers to use Jersey Copper Insect Screen 
Cloth. You can do so with absolute confidence. 

You know the wearing quality of copper. But Jersey is 
more than durable. When used in screens it does not get 
out of shape as ordinary copper screen cloth does. 

Jersey Copper Screen Cloth is made of copper 99.8% 
pure. The wire, which is made by a special Roebling 
process, gives it stiffness and tensile strength comparable 
to steel. Jersey is the only screen cloth in which this 
special wire is used. 

Jersey Copper Screen Cloth is made in both bright and 
dark finish, but most home owners prefer the latter as it 
goes through no weathering process. It is practically in- 
visible and stays that way. Jersey, 16 mesh, is a true insect 
screen cloth which will keep out mosquitoes and other 
smali insects as well as flies. 

Jersey Copper Screen Cloth can be obtained from most of 
the better hardware dealers. If you cannot readily locate 
a distributor, write us. We will send you samples and 
tell you how you can get it. 

The New Jersey Wire Cloth Company 

620 South Broad Street 

Trenton New Jersey 

All Grades of Wire Cloth Made of All Kinds of Wire. 



Copper Screen Cloth 

. 1 § Made o-F Copper 99.8% Pure ( 



Re-roof the Johns-Manville way 




—then you wont have to wait 
for new construction work 

IT makes very little difference to the carpenter 
who does re-roofing with Johns-Manville As- 
bestos Shingles whether new building con- 
struction is active or slack. The number of old 
roofs that need to be covered with asbestos 
shingles is so great that this field offers you an 
unusual opportunity for profit and steady work. 

The Johns-Manville way of "re-roofing for the 
last time" right over the old shingles eliminates 
all the dirt and mess that formerly went with 
this kind of work. And besides, it actually 
makes a better job. The best proof of this is the 
recent tremendous increase in the number of 
houses that have been re-roofed for the last 
time." Get your share of them. 

JOHNS-MANVILLE Inc., 292 Madison Ave., at 41st St., N. Y. C. 

Branches in 62 Large CUics 

For Canada: Canadian Johns-Manville Co., Ltd., Toronto 



t^y Johns-Manville 

Asbestos Shingles 



BRAKE UNINGS 




Prompt Delivery 



DDED equipment now en- 
ables us to guarantee full 
shipments of Perfection 

Brand Oak Flooring upon 

receipt of order. 



The demand for Perfection 
has increased so rapidly that 
for the past season we have 
been scarcely able to keep, 
up with this demand. 



This growing popularity of 
Perfection can only be due 
to the perfect matching, uni- 
form grading, and our na- 
tional advertising in the 
leading home magazines.- 



We have some attractive 
folders and a new beautifully 
illustrated book which we 
will supply for distribution 
among prospective home 
builders. 



Ask for samples and 
full information. 



ARKANSAS OAK FLOORING CO. 
Pine Bluff, Arkansas 



hy 

Veteran 
Carpenters 
Prefer the 

Maydole 





There's a 'hang' to a Maydole that 
makes you itch to bring it down on a 
nail. And it seems to improve with 
years of hard service. It's as different 
from an ordinary hammer as oak from 
soft pine. Why? 

Since 1843, when David Maydole per- 
fected the first adz eye 
hammer, the entire efforts 
of its makers have been 
, devoted to producing the 
best hammer that human 
skill could produce. The 
Maydole of today is more 
than mere steel and hick- 
ory — it's the result of 82 
years of accumulated ex- 
perience in hammer 
making. 

Ask your dealer to 
show you the Maydole 
and you'll see what we 
mean. 

Send for free pocket 
handbook 23 "A". It's 
mighty interesting and 
useful. 7 6 43 

The David Maydole Hammer Co. 
Norwich New York 



Hammer 




. 



KiHiUl 

Gas or 
Electric 

The Lamp 

Comes equipped for choice 
of gas or electricity. Has 
2 -light Benjamin socket 
for electricity only, with 
8- ft; silk cord ready for 
use: or comes with 6-ft. 
rubber hose, burner, man- 
tle and chimney for gas. 

Mahogany Finish 

Standard is 64 in. high, 
3 in. in diameter. Highly 
polished French mahog- 
any finish. 

TheShade 

Made in Fifth Avenue de- 
sign, 24 in. in diameter, of 
delft blue silk, shirred top, 
alternating plain and fancy 
art silk panels. 12 panels in 
all, tinsel braid border with 
4-in. Chenille fringe. Amer- 
ican beauty shirred lining. 
The harmonious color 
scheme gives effect of red 
light shiningthroughablue 
haze — a rich warm light. 
Shipping weight, 27 pounds. 
Marshal) Silky Fringe Poll -Cora* 
Also pair of Marshall silky 
fringe cords with 3Vz in. silky 
fringed tassels, giving an add- 
ed luxurious effect. 
7-Piece Cat Glass Set FREE 
For gas Dsc order by No. G8000A. 
For electricity, order by No. G8001A. 
Send only $1.00 with the coupon, 

i,2.00 monthly. Total Bargain Price 
or lamp and shade, $19.85. 

Free Bargain Catalog 

Shows thousands of bargains in 
home furnishings: furniture, jew- 
elry, rues, curtains, phonographs, 
stoves, dishes, aluminum ware, etc. 
All sold on easy terms. Catalog 
sent free, with or without order. 
See coupon. 




' 










Brings this 



J? mil Hi 

7 Pes Genuine Cnf Glass 

EXTRA l EXTRA? Special Offer in 
addition to the amazing lamp bargain 
shown here : — Absolutely Free, this 
beautiful 7-Piece Set of Genuine Cut 
Glass, consisting of: Pitcher of 2 quart 
capacity and 6 tumblers each of 9 oz. ca« 
parity. Each piece is pure, thin and 
dainty; hand cat decorations consisting 
of large floral design with appropriate 
foliage. Will make a handsome display 
among your glassware. We are giving 
away free, a limited number of these 7- 
Piece Genuine Cut Glass Sets just to get 
new customers and to get them quickly. 
So read our offer now — and act today 
while these beautiful Cut Glass Sets last. 



FI0O1? Lamp 

With 5th Ave. Silk Shade 

(And 7-Piece Genuine Cut Glass Set FREE) 
Here is something you have always wanted — a beautiful floor lamp with 
handsome and elegant Fifth Avenue silk shade— to add an extra tone of 
elegance and luxury to your home. On this generous offer you can see just 
how this floor lamp and silk shade will look in your home, without risking 
anything. Send only $1.00 with the coupon below, and we will send it com- 
plete to your home on approval, equipped for use with either gas or electricity. We 
take all the risk. Speci al no w— 7-Piece Set Genuine Cut Glass FREE! 

30 Days Trial— $222 a Month 

Only $1.00 with coupon brings this smashing bargain on 30 Days Trial. When the 
lamp outfit comes, use it freely for 30 days. If you decide to keep it, pay only 
$2.00 monthly until you have paid the total bargain price of $19.85. If you decide 
to return it, we will refund your $1.00 deposit, plus any freight or express charges 
you have paid. No risk to you. Send coupon Now ! 

Sale Price— Send Now! WS&Si 

shade in your home on approval on this price smashing offer. Think how the 
nickels and dimesslip away for useless things; save them for something worth while 
that gives satisfaction for years. Send coupon with only $1.00 now! Satisfac- 
tion guaranteed. 7-Piece Genuine Cut Glass FREE to those who order at once. 

I Straus & Schram, Dept. j014, Chicago, 111. 

a Enclosed find $1.00. Ship special advertised Floor Lamp and Silk Shade 03 checked below with 7- 

H Pieces Genuine Cut Glass Free. 1 am to have SO days' free trial. If I keep the lamp, I will send 12 

H a month. If not satisfied, I am to return the lamp and shade and 7-piece cut glass set within 30 daya 

™ and you are to refund my $1 plus all transportation charges. 

D Gas Floor Lamp No. G8000A, $19.88 )ZjJ%£« &"S£2 
D Electric Floor Lamp No. G8001 A. $19.85 > Silt, Either Lamp! 



Name 

Street, R. F. D. 

or Box No 

Shipping 
Point 



Post Office State ^ .. 

• lt>J>ujpant ONLY our free catalog of home furnishings, mark X here O 




Carpenters Carpenters ; Car 



fiTTarraillillL l L»l¥ 



. Auc * V1 



Quw 

- 

-.....■' ; 



TOOLS 

STEEL 

Square 

S AWjFiLlNG 

UOJNERYJ 

^RNftURE- 



Guide 



Guide 



ENTIRE 

SET IS 

ONLY 



>i Per 
Month 



L BUILDERS 
WATHEMAT 
i DRAWING 
| PLANS 
SPECIFICATIONS 

; estimates ; 



HOUSE 

\ AN© 
i ROOF 

■ Framing . 

iLAYINGOOT 

Foundations 



rem 



USE THE 
;o U PON 
ON OPPO- 
SITE PAGE. 
GET TH IS 
SREAT HELP 
LIBRARY NOW! 




4UAAinVVAIC POCKET SIZE-FLEXIBLE COVERI 
nHllUI WULO. 1600 PAGES-3700 TRADE ILLUSTRATIO 

Condensed Contents AudeSs Carpenters and Builders Guid< 



GUIDE NO. I 
43I Pages— 1200 Illustrations 

-How to know the different kinds 

of wood. 
-How to use the different kinds 

of wood. 
-Complete detailed information 

on nails and screws. 
-How circular and band saws 

are handled. 
-How to use the steel square. 
-How to sharpen tools. 
-How to file and set saws. 
-How to make wood joints. 
-Complete information regarding 

joints and joinery. 
-How to build furniture. 
-How to make a work bench. 
-How to make a mitre box. 
-How to make a mitre shooting 

board. 

-How to plumb and level work. 
-How to use the chalk line. 



-How to lay out work. 
-How to use rules and scales 
—How to use all of tha carpenter's 
tools, with over 900 illustra- 
tions showing specifically how 

GUIDE NO. 2 

-How to understand carpenter's 
arithmetic. 

-How to understand geometry. 

-How to understand trigonometry. 

-How to solve mensuration prob- 
lems. 

-How to estimate the strength 
of timbers. 

-How to proportion beams. 

-How to use drawing instruments. 

-How to read plans. 

-How to survey. 

-How to draw up specifications. 

-How to estimate cost. 

-How to build houses, bams, 
garages, bungalows, etc. 



GUIDE NO. 3 

-How to excavate foundations. 
-How to build foundations. 
-How to make water-proof. 
-How to erect post foundations 
—How to build forms for concrete. 
-How to proportion foundation 

footings. 
-How to frame houses. 
-How to set girders and sills. 
-How to frame joists. 
-How to construct a well hole. 
-How to frame a studding. 
-How to frame corner posts. 
-How to lay out and cut braces. 
-How to attach lath to cornerposts. 
-How to frame temporary and 

permanent braces. 
-How to frame girts and rib bands. 
-How to set window frames. 
-How to frame partitions. 
-How to distinguish various 

types of roofs. 



— How to use the settings 12 

and 17 on the steel square 

— How to lay out mitre cuts. 

— How to use tangents, and 

detailed information cove 

sky lights, scaff ord and hoist 
GUIDE NO. 4 
— How to put on wood, fibre 

metal shingles. 
— How to lay gravel roofs. 

-How to lay tin roofs. 

-How to hang doors. 

■How to frame windows. 

■How to put on siding. 

How to put on exterior trln 

How to do cornice work. 

How to build stairs. 

How to lath. 

How to lay floors. 

How to put on interior trln 

How to paint. 

How to give first aid to 

injured. 







IOLVE YOUR PROBLEMS 

Inside trade information for Carpenters, Builders, 
Joiners, Building Mechanics and all woodworkers. 
3700 actual examples of efficient construction work with new 
methods, ideas, solutions, plans, systems, short cuts, time and 
labor saving suggestions, new ways that cover the entire theory and 
practice of the subject illustrated by sketches and forms, all specific 
and practical. Audel's Guides give you the short cut, professional in- 
formation you want. No need to guess or take chances. 

EW IDEAS and METHODS-SHORT CUTS 




asonable Price" 

find the Guides 
: y satisfactory, 
e knowledge in 
n is much great- 
han I anticipat- 
A very conveni- 
size and price is 
easonable that 
y carpenter 
aid possess a set. 
:alph M. Collem- 
Lowell, Mass. 

>od For Profes= 
nal Carpenters" 

t is the most 
n d y reference 
rk that I ever 
le in contact 
h. It is the very 
ag that the build- 
mechanic needs 
ry clay for refer 
e. I wish to state 
ther there is not 
oreman or super 
endent who can 
)rd to be without 
3 valuable work 
ish you unbound 
success. — George 
Watson, 136 
nson St., Long 
md City, N. Y. 



How to Use the Steel Square 12, 13, 17, 



(Example From Audels Guide No. i) 

As an example of the thorough and practical way in which 
each subject is handled, there are 52 illustrations and dia- 
grams and 47 pages given over to the different uses of the steel 
square. Many carpenters use the actual pages of the book as 
a hand guide in their daily work 

Here is a specimen illustration (reduced size) and the descrip- 
tion that goes with it. 

Rules 12, 13 & 17 on the Steel Square 

The lines radiating from division 12 on the tongue of the square 
to various points on the blade as seen in fig. M, are inclinations 
corresponding to the various roof pitches. 

The 12 inch mark on tongue and mark on blade opposite pitch 
desired is used to obtain cuts for common rafters. For octagon, 
or hip rafters use mark 13. or 17 respectively. In fig. S, the 
square is seen applied to a rafter with the 12 in. mark on tongue 
and 18 in. mark on body at the edge of the rafter corresponding 
to i pitch of common rafter. 

The inclinations A. and B, of the tongue and body of the square 
with the edge LF, of the rafter give the correct angles for bottom 
and top cuts for 3 pitch when placed in position; that is, when 
A is horizontal and B, vertical or plumb. 




/ 



USEFUL INFORMATION E>£$i NDY 

"To Earn More, Learn More" is a true saying- that ap- yd ^/ 



M 



/£<f 



plies to carpentry work. The better a man is equipped 
with practical working knowledge, the larger will ^Kf^/^ 
be his share in the great amount of money that is /^/t/' 
now being spent for building. These four 
practical assistants give you, step by step, y/L/Z/^ 
a progressive study course in modern ,4$?/ ^ .<? 
carpentry and house building. 



z<& 



x /ffl* 



In plain language they give you >/£^/' of 



Hi.! "HOW'S" and "WHY'S"— /^/.l 












the best approved methods of **&/ 

doing any building job well. /&$/ ™$ W&&^ 




EXAMINATION /$// V 



Xot a cent to pay until you see the 

books. No obligation 

unless you are satisfied. Fill 

in coupon in pencil. Send > -flfi 

now — today— get this great >^ v > 



ters and builders. 




f 



Lay Down The tool Box 

MAKE BIG 



FLOOR 

SURFACING 

The'American Universal" Way 

The "American Universal" Way offers you the oppor- 
tunity of a lifetime to get into something for yourself, to 
be your own boss, to build up a real business and make 
real money. 

The real money in the building game goes to the contractors, builders and architects. 
The fellow with the tool box isn't considered when profits are handed out. He gets his 
wages — nothing more — and he gets that only when he works. "American Universal'! 
Floor Surfacing contractors 

MAKE $25.00 TO $40.00 A DAY 

every working day in the year — winter and summer — month in and month out — and 
they make it in a pleasant, fascinating way without strikes, layoffs, or idle periods to 
worry them. The man who goes into Floor Surfacing with an 

American Universal 

has a real business of his own. Every cent he earns is his, every effort he puts forth results in profit to himself — 
nobody else. He has plenty of work all the time. He can build and enlarge his business. He doesn't worry 
about poverty in his old age. He makes money enough in his big paying, ever increasing business to enjoy 
life, to buy himself and his family things they want and has money to save for old age and "rainy days." 

Are you free from such worries? Can you have and enjoy the things you want? Are you preparing 
for old age? Lay down the tool box, stop working for wages and wasting precious time in lay- 
offs, strikes and idleness. 

BECOME A FLOOR SURFACING CONTRACTOR 



s 



right now and start on the road to prosperity, happiness and independence. We have helped 
hundreds of others get started, we'll gladly help you. We can point out scores of former 
carpenters, fellows just like you, who now have a big paying floor surfacing business of 
their own — making more money than they could ever make in wages, enjoying 
life as they never enjoyed it before. Why can't you do as well? 
You need no specialtraining. A small amount starts you with an American Universal Electric- 
ally Driven Machine and every thing you need. We furnish you stationery, office forms, cards, 
advertising, help you get started, help you succeed. The "American Universal" does the 
work of six fast men, earns you six men's pay. It does perfect work — more beautiful 
work than any man can do by hand. Nearly every "American Universal" man 
more than he can do. Now ia the time to get into the floor surfacing game.^^^^ ^" 
Send your name to us today for full particulars of bur plan, our Free Trial Offer^SH^ S Tho 

and other valuable information, all free. Write now — quick, today. jj^m P^^ ■ In™ 

The American Floor Surfacing ^£&' r. Am f '9 ail 

Machine Company ^Bf? F 'Z^Pn 9 

Ill IP „ Machme Co -< 

^^^ 522 S. St. Clair St., Toledo, 0. 

S Sirs: Please' send without 

S obligation to me, complete informa- 

TEAR OFF HERE * > .^ tionand literature on your proposition, 

MAIL THIS NOW ^ 

■f Name _ 

j^ Street 

4? City 
4T and. State. , , „...., 




HEADLIGHT 

Carpenter's Overalls 

«* UNION MADE j jz=^Z-^ !S L-z^LA 

FOR THE MAN WHO PREFERS A BLUE CARPENTER'S ^g^^g^^^gg 

OVERALL WE ARE NOW MAKING THEM FROM ~rr-n-nr-r -,-n-r 

HEADLIGHT SPECIAL WEAVE BLUE DENIM 
LOT 140 

The Best Denim Ever Put Into an Overall 



Also Made of 

Extra Fine Quality 

TOUGH WHITE SAIL CLOTH LOT 320 

Features 



Four big nail pockets 
Three pockets in one on 
the bib. Safety watch 
pocket. Memo book pock- 
et. Pencil pocket. 
Two big front pockets. 
Double cloth at the front 



Patented safety rule 
pocket. 

High back protects cloth- 
ing. 

2 side hammer straps. 
Chisel or putty knife 
pocket. 



MY GUARANTEE TO YOU 

H, when this overall is completely worn oat, 
you do not think that Headlight Carpenters 
Overalls are better, more convenient and will 
outwear any other overall made,! will give 
ypubackyour money. Bewareof imitations. 
Demand the Genuine. 



Mail your order to our nearest factory if your local Headlight Dealer 
cannot supply you. 

LARNED, CARTER &. CO. 

World's Greatest Overall Makers 

DETROIT, ST.LOUIS, SANFRANCISCO, PERTH AMBOY. N.J. 
TORONTO, ONTARIO 

New York Office: 5-7-9 Union Sq. Chicago Office: 653 S. Wells St. 



Let This Wallace 6" Jointer 

Make Millwork Profits for You 

PUT this efficient machine on every construction job as soon as the 
foundation is in, and use it to make all your millwork and interior 
finish. Joint doors, screens, frames, cabinet work, and window sash 
on it. The Wallace 6" Jointer takes its power from any electric light 
or power circuit. It is direct-motor-driven — no belts to slip. And it can 
be placed in a Ford and taken right out to any job, or used to turn out 
millwork in your basement or shop during slack time. 

One Massachusetts contractor 
makes a nice profit, turning out 
fluted porch posts on his Wallace 
0" Jointer. 

Wallace Portable 

Machines 

Wallace Universal Saw 
Wallace Plain Saw 
Wallace 16" Band Saw 
Wallace 6" Jointer 
Wallace 4" Planer 
Wallace 6" Lathe 
Wonder Disc Sander 
Wonder Spindle Sander 
Wallace Glue Pot 

automatic heat control 




Wallace 
Po r table 6" Jointer 



Send for Catalog 402 C and price list 



J. D. Wallace & Co. 



154 S. California Ave. 
CHICAGO, U. S. A. 



KLEfN 
PUEKS 



The pliers in 

your tool box come 

near being the most 

all-around emergency 

tools you have. No 

wonder you fellows are 

particular about them 

when you buy ! 

Ask for Klein's. They 
are gluttons for punishment 
and will last you for years. 
Ask your hardware dealer to show 
you a pair of 8" Klein's Side Cutting 
and a pair of 6" Klein's Oblique. He 
carries a full line — look them over 
next time you're in. 




Mathias 



KLEIN 



& Sons 




Vaughan & Bushnell Vanadium Hammers 
are the aristrocrats among hammers. 
Made from special formula vanadium 
steel — handled with the best grade hand- 
shaved second growth white hickory — 
designed with a special non-slip claw 
that grips either a brad or a spike — and 
equipped with a Vaughan's Expansion 
Wedge that firmly locks the handle tight. 

V & B Unbreakable Planes bear the same 
reputation as V & B Vanadium Ham- 
mers. They are drop forged — not cast — 
from a solid bar of V & B Supersteel, 
and stand the falls and accidents that 
would break an ordinary plane. They 
are furnished with all vanadium steel 
blades and walnut handles in the sizes 
you'll want. 

Your hardware dealer will heartily rec- 
ommend these two tools. Ask to see 
them when next you are in ! 



VAUOlHUUi 1 MISHNEUi 

MMlJEAOTf lli@ COMPAMY 

2114 Carroll Ave.-v -v Chicago, III. U.S.A. 



No Extra 



Tools and Table 

With My Training Course 

I am sending this drafting table to you when you euroll as 
my student because I want you to have the right kind of Draftsman's 
Working Outfit — because I want to help ambitious men and boys get 
ahead. This is the kind you will use when you have completed my 
course and have become a regular draftsman. 

Complete Drawing Outfit 

Furnished to 
myownwork- 




I Guarantee 



to train you in prac- 
tical drafting work, 

under personal supervision 
until competent as a regular draftsman and guarantee, further, to furnish you 
with draftsmen's complete working outfit, as shown above, the special Chief's 
own drafting table — all the instruments you need, just as soon as you be- 
come my student — all to be included in the course without extra charge. 

You May Earn a 
$9022 Drafting Course 

In addition to all my other offers, I have made arrangements whereby you may earn a regular 

$90 Drafting Course while you are my student. I have determined to do all I can in preparing draftsmen for the 
urgent calls which are being made for them, by offering every inducement possible to ambitious men anxious to 
succeed in a big way. There is a constant demand for skilled draftsmen. Companies are issuing calls every day 
for men to fill good paying positions. The work is light, pleasant and profitable; a trained draftsman can be rea- 
sonably sure of having a good job all the time. Besides, if he wishes, he can supplement that salary by home work 
which pays extremely well. ._■■■■■»■■ .__..«.. .»•«__»««■■■«>««■■■ 




Chief Draftsman Dole 



Mail 
Coupon 

for Free Book! 

This coupon, or a postcard 
or letter, will bring my 
book telling you all about 
the career of a draftsman. 
Get in line for a big paying 
position. Sending for the 
book and full particulars 
of my special offer is the 
first step. Write at once. TODAY! 

Chief Draftsman Dobe 

1951 Lawrence Ave., Div. 16-94 Chicago, III. 




| Chief Draftsman Dobe, 

1951 Lawrence Ave., Div.16.94 



Chicago, III. 



"Without any obligation whatsoever, please mail your book. 
"Successful Draftsmanship", and full particulars of your liberal 
"Personal Instruction" off er to a few students. It is understood 
I am obligated in no way whatever. 



Name. 



Address. 



.Age. 



A YEAR = AROUND, PROFITABLE 
BUSINESS FOR YOU! 

with the 
NEW MODEL IDEAL SANDER 

Establish a pleasant, well-paying business of 
your own. Don't work for the other fellow 
all your life I Be your own boss. Make real 
profits instead of mere wages! 

FIVE DAYS FREE TRIAL 
We will send you the New Model 
Ideal Floor Sander for five days' 
trial. No obligation. Costs you nothing. 
We will show how you can go into the 
business and pay for your Ideal 
Sander out of your profits on our 
time-payment plan. Don't wait. 
Write us today. 

BOETTCHER CO. 

440 N. Peoria St., CHICAGO. 




Y/h tie's Im proved 

New 
Duplex" Level 

A newly patented com- 
bination level-t r a n s i t 
priced at $35. A simple 
accessible lever makes 
the change from level to 
transit instantly. No lift- 
ing of telescope out of 
Wyes. No clamps or 
screws. 10 Diameter lens 
system. Five new features. 
10 Days Free Trial. No 
obligation. Write for literature, prices, terms. 

DAVID WHITE CO. INC. 
904 Chestnut St. Milwaukee, Wis. 




MEASURING TAPES 

and FOLDING RULES 

Used for over 40 years where quick and accurate 
work is done. High quality without high price ! 



K& E 



Ash to see our com- 
plete line at your 
Hardware dealer's. 



KEUFFEL & ESSER CO. 

MEW YORK, 127 Fulton Slreol General Office and Factories, H0B0KEN, N. tl 

-J CHICAGO ST. LOUIS - SAN FRANCISCO MONTREAL* 



A TOOL=BOX NECESSITY — THE TAINTOR 
POSITIVE SAW SET. The Tool which sets your 
saw Right. 

Is there a Taintor in Your Tool-box? If not, talk it over 
with your hardware dealer. Send for Book : "Care of Saws." 
Jfree to members of the Brotherhood. 

TAINTOR MFG. Co., 95 Reade St., New York City. 





A poor nail set looks much like a good one. And any 
maker can say his set is best. That's why we GUARANTEE 
every SYRACUSE Nail Set. Crucible steel costs 60 to 100 
per cent, more than open hearth steel, but we use it exclus- 
ively. Send 25c if your dealer doesn't carry. 

SYRACUSE TWIST DRILL CO.. Syracuse, New. York 



It's cheaper to buy one good nail set than several poor ones 



The "INTERLOX" Thinks 

Don't use a stick or guess at a measurement. 
Quick, accurate, durable and rustproof. JJse it once 
and you will never work without it. Write today 
for liberal selling inducements to mechanics. 

MASTER RULE MFG. CO., INC. 
841C East 136th St., New York City 



Invented by a Brotherhood Man 

The famous 
"Interlox" Master Slide Rule 
yes 

'Hi 1 Yi ■ " " 

gives both inside and outside measurements 
instantly. 



HAKE EXTRA MONEY 

with an 

IMPROVED SCHLUETER 

Rapid Electric, Ball Bearing, Floor Surfacing Machine 

Carpenters everywhere are 



5 DAY 
TRIAL 



getting fnto the floor 
surfacing business with 
this handy, easily op- 
erated, rapid, automatic 
machine which costs but 
little and does the work 
of six men. Requires no 
previous experience to 
operate and does its work 
faster and better than 
any machine on the 
market. Surfaces close 
up to the baseboard with- 
out use of edge roller. 
A Five Year Guarantee 
which has proven satis- 
factory to 20,000 users 
covers each machine. 
Write for prices and 5 
day free trial offer. 

Lincoln=Schlueter Machinery Co., Inc. 

230 West Illinois St. Chicago, Illinois. 




"Old Fashioned" Quality. 

Remember Thi's — 

You can do a half 
more work and do it 
easier with this adze 
because it stays sharp 
longer. 

Your dealer has them 
or if he tries to sell 
you anything else write 
for our catalogue. 

THE L. & I. J. WHITE CO. 

15 Columbia St. Buffalo, N. Y. 




ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP! 



CARPENTERS 

CONTRACTORS- 
HOME BUILDERS AND BUYERS 
KNOW THE VALUE 



that is why you should make this 
your business — there is always plenty 
of new building construction every- 
where, thru the SPRING and SUM- 
MER, to keep you busy — IT PAYS 
WELL — 

NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED 

NO STOCK TO CARRY, as we fill 
and ship all orders within 24 hrs. 
after being received. 

- - — - 'Send Back the Coupon 1 - - - - 

ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP CO. 
227 W. Illinois St., Chicago, III. 

Gentlemen: Without obligation, please send me sam- 
ples and literature. 



CITY .- STATE. 




MORRILL SAWSETS 

Set Saws Just Right 

"Saw Points" Telling You "How To Joint, Set, 
And File Saws." Sent Free Upon Request. 

CHAS. MORRILL, Inc. 

96 Lafayette St. N ew York. 



whm, 





Tremendous Saving In Cost 

Easy, fascinating work with our SIM- 
PLIFIED PLANS. We furnish blue 
prints, diagrams, motor, cabinet pieces, 
ready-built horn, etc. You don't need 
to be a cabinet maker. A few hours as- 
sembling and you will have a fine in- 
strument at one-quarter the regular re- 
tail price. Will be the equal of any 
phonograph on the market in beauty of 
tone and appearance. Will play all 
records. Thousands have built their 
own machines and are securing satis- 
faction and pleasure. You too can 

build — do as well and save much money. AGENTS 

MAKE MONEY making and selling these instrument.:. 

Write today for full details and our FREE OFFER. 
LUPERL PHONOPARTS CO. 

4936 N. Troy St. Dept. 31. Chicago, III. 



Get into the Floor Surfacing Business 
While the Field Is Fresh 

$40 to $50 a day easily earned 
with an AUTOMATIC— 

the result of 16 
years' manufactur- 
ing experience. 
Force Feed Lubri- 
cation— SKF Ball- 
bearings — Whit- 
ney Silent Chain 
— Roller Pressure 
Regulator — ALL 
Dust taken up on 
forward operation 
■with New Vacuum 
Nozzle. All work- 
ing parts inclosed. 
Write today — Let 
us tell you how to 
get started in this pay- 
ing business. Free trial. 
Part d w n — balance 
easy payments. 

The Little Auto- 
matic Surfacing Ma- 
chine (on table) is a 
wonder for removing 
varnish from desk 
tops, counters, etc., 
or for all sorts of 
new work. 

Wayvell Chappell 
& Co. 

38 Jackson St. 

Dept. W 
Waukegan, 111. 





YOU NEED A 
HUTHER DADO HEAD 




The adjustable groover 
that cuts with or across 
grain. Easily adjusted with- 
out the use of screws, just 
add or remove inside cut- 
ters to make the desired cut. 
May be returned if not satis- 
factory. Sent on approval. 

Write for our new cata- 
log No. 43, showing many 
special tools for your saw rig. 

Huther Bros. Saw Mfg. Co. 

Rochester, N. Y. 




House near Chicaao, showing its "under- 
clothing" of Cabot's Quilt, with furring 
strips over the Quilt, on which the out- 
side finish is laid. Roof also insulated. 
Leon E. Stanhope, Architect, Chicago. 

Underwear for Houses 

Underclothing makes people warm 
because it prevents the heat of 
their bodies from escaping. You 
can make your homes warm in the 
same way. 

Cabot's Insulating Quilt 

prevents the house heat from es- 
caping. It insulates the whole 
house and saves the heat from the 
heater — that costly heat. It keeps 
the house warm on the smallest 
amount of coal; saves one-quarter 
to one-half of the coal bill. Makes 
the house comfortable for all time. 
Preserves health and saves doc- 
tor's bills. Makes the house -cooler 
in summer. Quilt is not a mere 
felt or paper, but a scientific in- 
sulator that makes the house like 
a thermos bottle. 

Sample of Quilt with full details, and 

reference to dozens of users sent 

FREE on application 



SAMUEL CABOT, Inc. 
Mfg. Chemists 



6 Oliver St., 
Boston, Mass. 

24 W. Kinzie St., 
Chicago. 



Samuel Cabot, Inc., 6 Oliver St., Boston. 

24 W. Kinzie St., Chicago. 
Send me free sample Cabot's Quilt and 
full information : 




Name. 
Street. 



^E0E§K^ 



METAL 
WEATHER 



Steady Work 

for Carpenters 

— and Good Pay 

Be a Federal Metal Weather- 
strip Contractor. Have steady 
profitable work the year 
around, and be your own boss. 
As a carpenter, you will ap- 
preciate the efficiency of Fed- 
eral Weatherstrips. They do 
everything good weatherstrips 
should. 

We have a generous proposi- 
tion for carpenters who will 
represent us in their towns. 
Write for details today. 

Federal Metal Weather Strip Co. 

1238=50 Fullerton Ave., Chicago, III. 



Town State. 




EEG. TJ. S. PAT. OFF. 



TESTED and TRIED 

"REFERENCOUSINESS" 

Where good material and 
workmanship causes your 
customer to send his 
friends to you is the most 
profitable. Get this busi- 
ness by using 

"BAYONNE" 

"Write for sample book "T" and ask 
for one of our repeat memo pads. 

JOHN BOYLE & CO., INC. 

ESTABLISHED I860 

diIJSi'eV. NEW YORK re 7 aVe 2 st. 

BRANCH 1317-1319 PINE ST. ST. LOUIS 



There Is No Better Machine 
Made Than the 

Lightning Electric 1 

Floor 
Surfacer 

If you are interested in Floor 
Surfacing Machines be sure 
to write for the literature 
on the "Lightning Electric" 
— the highest quality and 
most economically priced 
floor surfacer on the mar- 
ket. Will do the work 
of six to eight men 
and do it better. 

No Old- 
Fashioned 
Side Roller 

The "Lightning Electric" will surface right up to 
quarter round without the use of the Old- Fashioned 
and cumbersome side roller. Leaves NO waves or 
chatter marks in the roughest floors— will NOT vibrate. 

Five Day Free Trial 
and Five Year Guarantee 

Write for our five day free trial and our five year guaran- 
tee on the best Floor Surfacing Machine the world has 
ever produced. Costs you nothing to investigate and the 
machine pays for itself the first month. A business making 
proposition for the contractor or individual— write today. 

National Sanding Machine Company 

Formerly The Globe Mfg. & Dist. Co. 

Sales Office: 

543-545 Vedder St, Chicago, 111- 





THE 

EXPERT'S 
CHOICE 
FILE 



Does twice the work of an ordinary file — in half the time. 
The Expert's Choice increases the value of your time by 
over 50%. By spending 30 cents you can make it back 
on your first filing job alone. It's in the Quality — in the 
cut of the tooth and in the length of the stroke. 

Frank Luther. Chicago says: "The Experts 
Choice File files 18 hand saws and Is cheaper at 
a cost of 50c than the ordinary file at any price." 
You get your money back if the Expert's Choice does not prove 
to be the most economical file you have ever used. DELTA 
SAW FILES are made for fine or coarse teeth— also for that 
extra hard saw. Buy your tools of the dealer who aelU 
Delta Files. He is the quality man. 

Trial Offer If your dealer cannot supply you. send us 20c, 
25c or 30c for trial file, sent prepaid. Do 
this today — find out what a real Qle is 



■jtfita 



"THE HIGHEST GRADE FILE MADE 

delta"hand SAW" FILES 



MECHANICS FAVORITE' 



EXPERT S CHOICE ? 

OOtS TWICE THE WORK IN HALF THE TIME 

THE File Yau Will Eventuallt Use 



DELTA 

FILE 

WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, 
PA. 



Look for 
This Sign 
at Your 
Hardware 
Store 



lie tal An(» Bit File nude — We will Mirer n receipt if 35 cub eitb. 



LEARN HOW 
To Earn 

More Money 




Make a few 
spare m i n u t e s 
pay you money. 
Learn how to get 
the biggest pay- 
ing job you ever 
had in your whole life. 

We will train you in your spare 
time and show you how to get one 
of these jobs by making you an 
Expert Blue Print Reader. Think 
how your pay envelopes will grow 
bigger and bigger every week. 

"We can do this for you no mat- 
ter what you're job is now. Just 
write and tell us your trade and we 
will send all details with sample 
blue print. 

COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL EST. 1904 

Dept. C-26 Drexel Bldg., Phila., Pa. 



G & B Junior u s - Pat 
CONVERTIBLE LEVEL 

Level and Transit combined 

Powerful Lenses, graduated circle, 

clamp screw, etc. Complete as shown. 

$5.00 will bring it to you. 



10 Days 
Free Trial 




Transit position 



Make sure the in 
strument you 
buy IS con- 
vertible. 

Sights can 
be taken 
4 ft. to £ 
mile. 




Cash or time 
payments 
deposit 
cheerfully re- 
turned if not 
satisfied. 



Easy to op- 
erate, noth- 
ing to get 
out of order. 



Instruction 
Book FREE 



Why pay a high price when we guarantee 
the G & B JUNIOR to fully answer your 
needs. DON'T buy an Instrument until 
you know all about the JUNIOR. 

Write AT ONCE for Circular E. 

GEIER & BLUHM, INC. 



672 River St. 



Troy, N. Y. 




When in the market for Plumbing, Heating and 
Pneumatic Waterworks Supplies and you wish to 



Save 20 to 40% on Every Article 
Send for Catalog 
B. KAROL & SONS CO., 804 So. Kedzie Ave., Chicago, 111. 



order from us. Small orders are as carefully 
handled as large ones. Only house selling guar- 
anteed plumbing and heating supplies to all. 




The UBA 

An Adjustable Combination 
Level And Plumb That Can 
Be Applied To Any Length 
Straight Edge Or Board. The 
Level With An Instant Adjust= 
ment And Immediate Results. 

USE IT AND PROVE IT 




No Level Has Ever Been 
Made Before Combining 
As Many Advantages As 
The UBA For Heavy And 
Light Framing and In- 
terior Trimming. The UBA 
Is Durable, Simple, Guaran- 
teed and Rust Proof. It Is 
An Indispensable Utility Level 
And Plumb In All Branches 
Of Carpentry. 





You Do Service To 
Yourself And Employ- 
er When You Put A 
UBA Into Action. The 
UBA Is Thoroughly 
And Rigidly Inspected 
To Maintain The High 
Standard Of Quality The 
Mechanic Insists On. Fin- 
ished With White Or Green 
Double Marked Bulbs. 



Size 34x4 inches. 

Price $1.25 

Order Through Your Local 
Dealer Or Send Us Your 
Money Order And We Will 
Mail Direct To You. Mention 
Name Of Dealer. 

UNION LEVEL MFG. CO. 

4649 So. Ashland Ave., 
Chicago, III. 




In Canada 

Have Your Dealer Order From 

THE WALKERVILLE HARDWARE 

COMPANY, Ltd. 

(Wholesale Only) 

Walkerville, Ontario, Canada. 



For Absolute Protection 
Use The 

DEAD 
XlWJ BOLT 

NIGHT LATCH 

An extra security on glass doors, as key may be turned once 
backwards, locking bolt so it can not be forced or knob turned 
without proper key. Easily installed on any door. Ask your 
dealer or write us direct. 

INDEPENDENT LOCK CO., Leominster, Mass., U. S. A. 






The American Woodworker 



Gasoline or electric 
driven. 

For use on the job or 
in the shop. 

Ask for Bulletin No. 
81, of these and other 
profit producers. 



AMERICAN SAW MILL MACHINERY CO. 




136 Main St.. Hackettstown, N. J. 



HANDY SAW 




When you fit up your shop 
Get a PARKS! 

Some day you're going 
to start a shop. When 
you do — r e m e m b e r 
money=making shops 
are those in which 
most work is done in 
least time, with least 
labor. 

That means Parks ma- 
chines — the world's 
greatest low-priced 
labor and time sav- 
ing carpentering 
equipment. 
If you already have 
a shop does it meas- 
ure up 100% as a 
money-maker ? 
Send for catalog of 
Parks t>ig line of sep- 
arate and combina- 
tion woodworkers. 



Parks "Jewel" 
band saw $75.00 




Parks "Old Reliable" 
circular saw and jointer 
$175.00. 



THE PARKS BALL BEARING MACHINE COMPANY 

1549 Knowlton Street, Cincinnati, 

Canadian Factory: 200 Notre Dame East, 

Montreal, Can. 





Y 



WOODWORKING MACHINES 



C ETTA R 



OUR interests and ours are 
identical; let's pull together! 

We are helping you by promo- 
ting the use of a roof and side- 
wall covering material that re- 
quires your labor and skill in ap- 
plying, and by working for the 
production and use of better grades 
of shingles. 

You can help us and keep your 
customers' good-will by recom- 
mending Red Cedar Shingles and 
by using good, rust-proof nails to 
insure their long endurance. 

Send for shingle literature. 
Boost your own game! 



RED CEDAR SHINGLE BUREAU 

38 South Dearborn Street 
CHICAGO ILLINOIS 



'st^J^fl^sL&yL^^^^^M^^^^^^^ 




TROJAN COPING SAW BLADES 

FREE CUTTING EASY TURNING 
FOLLOW THE CURVES WITHOUT BINDING 

A different saw. Teeth filed and set. 

Ask your dealer. 

Note: Or we will mail direct to you. 

PRICE 50c per doz. Postage paid. 

Sizes — Coarse & Medium. 

Ackermann Steffan & Co., 4532 Palmer St., Chicago, III. 

WRITE FOR YOUR FREE SAMPLE— TO=DAY 



6i" LONG. 
r ITS YOUR FRAME. 



Black Diamond 




You've always some 
consolation with 
BLACK DIAMOND 
Files in your tool box* 

They outlast «- and out- 
class—any file that sells 
for less when it comes 
to sharpening a saw! 

Since 1863 the Standard 
of Quality 

G. & H. BARNETT CO. 

1078 Frankford Avenue 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Owned and Operated by 

NICHOLSON FILE COMPANY 

Providence, R. I 





Get this Level 

No. 101 A — $15.00 
No. 101 €--$25.00 



WHICHEVER one you buy, 
after you've used it once 
you'll wonder how you got 
along without it. 

For builders' and carpenters' use 
in leveling foundations, running 
ditches, etc., etc., they are with- 
out equal. Simple and easy to use. 

No. 101 A — $15.00 — has 12 in. 
plain nickeled sight tube, without 
lenses, small eye aperture and the 
usual cross wires. 

No. 101 C — $25.00 — has 12 in. 
brass, nickel plated sight tube,, 
telescope lenses making the in- 
strument adjustable to distances, 
friction cap to protect lenses 
against dirt and breakage and the 
eye aperture is protected by a 
shutter. 

Both instruments are complete 
with wood carrying case, long legs 
and level vial. 

Ask your hardware dealer. "Write 
us for copy of booklet on use of 
Transits and Levels. Also for 
free copy of Catalog No. 23 "E". 

THE L. S. STARRETT CO. 

World's Greatest Toolmakers 

Manufacturers of Hacksaws Unexcelled 

Steel Tapes — Standard for Accuracy 

Athol, Mass. 




An old home, 

modernized by %" 

Oak Flooring. 




No woodwork is 
disturbed except 
the quarter-round 
at the baseboard. 



Money for You 



Turn your spare time into profit 

by laying %" oak flooring 

in old homes. 



Many carpenters 
have increased their 
income by telling 
people in their neigh- 
borhood about oak 
floors. Show them 
how quickly and in- 
expensively you can 
lay permanent oak 
flooring over worn 
arid unsightly 
softwood floors. 

Women will 
be glad to know 
that oak floors 
savehousework,that 
the cost is not more 




m mm 



It will help you get 
the order. Wm. J. 
Benko of New 
Brunswick, N. J., 
writes; "I personal- 
ly distributed io 
books, and got 6 
jobs." You can do 
that too. 

How many books 
can you. use! 

How to figure ac- 
curately the amount 
of flooring required 
iscontainedin"How 
and Where to Use 
Oak Floors," also 



than new carpets, * rai " r '\ s G ^ ° f grading rules, stand- 

, , , , , . Everlasting Beauty ° 

and they add lasting 



value to their property. 

Free Books will help you 

"The Story of Oak 
Floors' ' contains plates of the 
new color finishes. Any 
home owner will look 
through this book with you. 



ard measurements, 
thicknesses and widths, 
proper storing, laying, scrap- 
ing and finishing. 

Free, if you 
mail this r — 
coupon. 



Oak Flooring Bureau 

851 Hearst Bid?., Chicago 
Please send me "The Story of Oak 
Floors," and "How and Where to 
Use Oak Floors." 



Name. 




Address 

City State., 




Building Trades 
Need Trained Men 

Thousands of good positions 
at good salaries 

THE building trades 
are still booming. 
Trained men are in de- 
mand at good salaries. 
Government experts 
estimate that 
billions of 
dollars will 
be spent for, 
construction 
this year. 

> Today the most vital need of this great 
building program is men — trained men — 
men who can step right in and do the skilled 
work that building construction requires. 

There is a simple, easy, practical way 
by which you can prepare for a better posi- 
tion, at a bigger salary. You can do it 
right at home, in spare time, no matter 
where you live, through the International 
Correspondence Schools. 

A recent investigation of 13,928 students en- 
rolled in I. C. S. Building Trades Courses 
showed that 1921 had become Architects; 246 
had become Designers ; 494 had become Chief 
Draftsmen; 2827 had become Draftsmen; 1845 
had become Contractors; 211 had 
become Assistant Foremen; 4030 
had become Foremen; 2354 had 
become Superintendents. 

You, too, can have the position 
you want in the work you like 
best ; an income that will give 
you and your family the home, 
the comforts, the luxuries you 
would like them to have. 

Mail the Coupon for 
Free Booklet 

iTKN^acTRSiSr^oFLS 

BOX 8833-B SCRANTON, PA. 

Explain, without obligating me, how I can qualify for the 
position, or in the subject, before which I mark X. 




□ ARCHITECT 
U Architectural Draftsman 
3 Architects' Blue Prints 
3 Contractor and Builder 
3 Building Foreman 

B Concrete Builder 
Structural Engineer 
B Structural Draftsman 
Plumber and Steam Fitter 
3 Heating and Ventilation 
J Plumbing Inspector I 

B Foreman Plumber 
Sheet Metal Worker 
3 CIVIL ENGINEER 
3 Surveying and Mapping 
3 ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 

B Electric Lighting Dad Ry& 
Electric Wiring 
3 Telegraph Engineer 
3 Telephone Work 
J ME0HAN10AL ENGINEER 

§ Mechanical Draftsman 
Toolmaker 
Machine Shop Practice , 
3 CHEMIST 
3 Pharmacy 

Namp 



3 Navigation 

3 SALESMANSHIP 

ADVERTISING 
3 Window Trimmer 
3 Sbow Card and Sign Palntla* 
" BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 
Private Secretary 
Business Correspondent ' 
BOOKKEEPER 
Stenographer and Tj-pli* 
Higher Accounting 
COMMERCIAL LAW 
Common School Subjects > 
_ Mathematics 
_ GOOD ENGLISH^ 
3 ILLUSTRATING « 
Railway Mall Cleric 
CIVIL SERVICE 
Mining Engineer 
Gas Engine Operating; 
STATIONARY ENGINEER; 
Textile Overseer or 8nnt» 
TRAFFIC MANAGER 
AUTOMOBILES IDSpanUh 
AGRICULTURE IDFrenchi 
Poultry Ralilne | [J RADIO 



Occupation 
& Employer. 

Street 

and No 

City 



Business 
.Address - 



3-6-24 



Canadians may send this coupon to International Corre- 
spondence Schools Canadian, limited, Montreal, Canada 1 




What This Trade Mark Means To You 

The TUG-O-WAR Trade Mark on Overalls means 1871 cloth-quality, 
plus fifty-four years' experience in making Clothes To Work In. 

Seams double sewed — warranted never to rip. Buttons re-enforced — 
won't pull away. Plenty of pockets, where you want them most. And 
oversize cut that takes care of every bend, turn, or strain. Look for 
the name "SWEET-ORR" on the buttons. 

You must be satisfied with Sweet-Orr Overalls, or any Sweet-Orr gar- 
ment you may buy. If not, for any reason, your money back. 

SWEET=ORR & CO., Inc., 15 Union Sq., New York 

SWEET-ORR CLOTHES 

TO WORK IN 




Look for This Window Display 

There you'll find genuine Sand's Levels — 
the kind master craftsmen prefer. 

The Most Popular Sizes and Styles 

Step in and look tliem over. Prom this as- 
sortment you can quickly choose the one 
best suited to your needs. 

Built=ln Permanent Accuracy 

"Sand's Levels tell the truth." You can de- 
pend on them now — and as long as you use 
them. If you like good tools you'll appreci- 
ate the many advantages of a Sand's Level. 

At Good Hardware Stores Everywhere 

samss iEVEL&»roaLca 

5851 Fischer Ave., DETROIT, MICH. 



Saves Hundreds 
of Dollars 
in Mortising! 

The Champion mortiser saves hundreds of 
dollars in mortising costs over the old-fash- 
ioned brace and bit, hammer and chisel 
method. And it's five to ten times faster, 
removes possibility of spoiling material and 
does twenty times better work. 

The New Improved 
ionMortisen 



Makes no difference if wood be hard or 
suft, end wood or full of dowel pins. The 
Champion produces a clean cut mortise with 
straight sides, smooth bottom and uniform 
depth from round hole to 6" slot 1J" wide. 
Can be used on stocks i" to 21" thickness. 
Special base for mortising wide stock fur- 
nished on request. Sent complete with choice 
of any two bits (1" to |") $40.00 F. O. B. 
factory. Additional bits to U" furnished at 
$2.00 each. Year's guarantee with each 
machine. 

If not satisfied after ten days' trial, 
return machine at our expense and 
get your money. You run no risk. 
Send today! We also make motor 
driven model. Special literature on 
both these mortisers sent upon request. 




304 Hayden Bldg., 



Colgan 

Machinery 

& Supply 

Co., 



Columbus, Ohio 




. . says Houston builder 

W. O. Rae, L. U. 213, Houston. Texas, says: "I had a hand 
in the remodeling of Fort Ringold near Brownsville, where 
we used acres of Sheetrock for walls and ceilings. 

"I'm for Sheetrock because it is fireproof, durable, and 
always makes a good looking job. I know one when I see 
it — I've been a builder for more than thirty years.' 1 

Carpenters — our 48 -page Sheetrock Time Book shows 
how you, too, can erect lasting walls and ceilings at low 
cost with this better wallboard. Mail the coupon today for 
your free copy. 

UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

General Offices: Dept. 4, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 

Reg. V. 8. Pat. Off. 

SHEETROCK 

The FIREPROOF WALLBOARD 

Mail this coupon today 

United States Gypsum Company 

Dept. 4. 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 

Send my SHEETROCK Time Book to— 

(Name) 

(Complete Address) 

Sheetrock is inspected and approved as an effective barrier to fire by the Underwriters' 
Laboratories, Inc. 



SILVER 




JLW 





ATKINS SILVER STEEL SAW No. 51 \ 
Old Style Handle, Skew Back \ 




A well balanced saw or tool 
is a joy to own and a pleas- 
ure to use. 

Atkins Silver Steel Saws, Saw 
Tools, Saw Specialties, Plaster- 
ing Trowels, Hack Saw Blades 
and Frames have made thousands 
of friends among carpenters, 
plasterers and mechanics, be- 
cause of their scientific construc- 
tion which gives them the bal- 
ance and hang desired. 

Then add the superior quality of 
the steel, the fine workmanship 
and you have a combination 
known the world over as, 

"The Finest On Earth" 



Ask your hardware dealer to 
supply you. Write us for Saw 
Sense and AAA Hack Saw 
Chart. Send 35 cents for nail 
apron and useful souvenir. 



E.C.ATKINS & CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1857 THE SILVER STEEL SAW PEOPLE 

Home Office eo\d Factory, IND1ANAP0LIS.INDLANA 

C&n&di&nF&ctory.Hajrulton Orit&rio 
Machine Knife Factory, Lancaster N.Y. 

Branches Carrying Complete Stocks In The Following Cities: 

Atlanta New Orleans Seattle 

Memphis New York City 



Chicago 
Minneapolis 



PortlfArvd.Ore. 
Sojv Fr sxneiaco 



Paris. Frarvca 
VgLixcouver, B.C. 



Youll say the same thing 

"Tells a mighty interesting story". . . "A top- 
notch picture" . . . are typical comments 
from the thousands of carpenters who have 
seen the motion picture, "The Making, 
Application and Decoration of Sheetrock ." 

You'll like this picture, too. It has been en- 
dorsed by the General Office of the U. B. of 
C. & J. of A. Ask the secretary of your Lo- 
cal to arrange for a complimentary showing. 

UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

General Offices: Dept. 4, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 




R*ff. O. S. P.t.Off. 

SHEETROCK 

The FIREPROOF WALL BOARD 

Mail this today! 

United States Gypsum Company 

Dept. 4. 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 
We would like to have your special motion picture for carpenters shown at one of our meetings. 

Name. , _ 

Address „ _ 

L U. No Secy's Name „ 



sm 



-Celotex 
V- Plaster ' 
A 2x4 studs - l6"o.c. 

/ jfe " plaster qrounds 

o*t- Base board 

/ Finished R.oory 

/v Paper— -7 / 1 



\ Rouqh Floor— -^ 
?',\ First Fl oor joistls , 



Beam Fill 




-2x41 set in 



Celotex 



SHINGLES ON -W0OD FRAMING 



How to do the job right 

NO. 4 — Celotex application 
with shingles on wood framing 

Celotex Insulating- Lumber is easy to apply — 
but it's mighty important to do the job right 
if your work is to give permanent satisfaction. 

It will pay you to study the blue-print dia- 
gram above and to read the specifications at 
the right carefully. They describe a frequent 
use of Celotex— one that results in better con- 
struction at practically no additional expense. 

Your work on this kind of a job will be 
right if you observe the few simple points 
explained here. 

Free — Complete Specifications 

This is only one of many places where you 
will find Celotex used on your jobs. 

Others will be shown here each month. 

In the meantime, be prepared. Send for 
complete specifications — free to every carpen- 
ter. Mail the coupon for your copy, today. 





SPECIFICATIONS 

FRAMING: The sijls, studs, 
plates, joists and. rafters shall 
be framed a ; s in ordinary frame 
construction, taking precaution, 
however, to space the studs, 
joists and rafters 16" on center. 
Wherever it is necessary to 
have a horizontal joint in the 
Celotex, a 2" x 4" header shall 
be cut in between the framing. 
No bracing is necessary other 
than is usual in frame con- 
struction. 

PREPARATION OF CELOTEX 
(WETTING) : IMPORTANT 
Celotex boards shall be moist- 
ened on both sides by sprinkling 
or spraying and piled, not less 
than one day before application 
of boards to walls. 
APPLICATION : The Celotex 
boards shall be applied length- 
wise of studs, joists and rafters, 
directly to the wood frame 
work, and set in place so as to 
have a bearing for nailing along 
all edges. 

Leave 3-16" space between ad- 
joining boards, also at top and bot- 
tom of boards. The board is cut a 
scant 4 feet to allow for tbis space. 
Around window and door frames, or 
where a snug joint is desired, the 
Celotex shall be brought to moderate 
contact. DO NOT force into place. 

Where rafters project beyond face 
of studding, Celotex shall be cut to 
fit snugly around rafters, and to 
form close joint with the roof in- 
sulation. 

NAILING : Nail the Celotex to inter- 
mediate studs, beginning at top, then 
entirely around all edges of each 
board, nail in like manner to joists, 
raflers, sills, plates and headers. 
Use standard l|." galvanized roofing 
nails with g" heads. Space nails 3" 
apart along edges for sheathing, and 
2" apart for plaster and wallpaper 
base, and 6" apart along interme- 
diate rows, driving nails until the 
heads are 1-16" to |" below the sur- 
face of the Celotex. Nails shall be 
placed approximately 1" from the 
edge of the boards. 
SHINGLE FINISH: 1" x 2" furring 
strips shall be applied horizontally 
over the Celotex spaced to fit the 
shingles specified, and nailed through 
to the studs. Shingles shall then be 
nailed to the furring strips in the 
usual manner. 



INSULATING LUMBER 

'There is a use for Celotex in every building' 



The Celotex Company, Dept. 25. 
645 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Please send me your free specifi- 
cations for carpenters. 



Name 
Street 
City . 



With This Machine You 
can Double your Income 

Mr. Carpenter 




The 
BEAVER 

THE SPEED MAR- 
VEL is equipped with 
a 3 H. P. motor. It will 
crosscut 8-inch and rip 
4-inch hardwood, and 
is practically a complete 
woodworking shop in 
itself. The speed 
Marvel has a 6-inch cylin- 
der head jointer, and with 
it you can do regular plan- 
ing mill work. Leading 
builders and contractors 
in all parts of the country 
are using the Speed Mar- 
vel, and are enthusiastic 



Whether you work for yourself or for 
others, what you get depends on what 
you produce. Why should you be con- 
tent to work hard for less than half 
'of what you can make without work- 
ing nearly as hard? With THE 
BEAVER Woodworker you can start in 
business for yourself. The Beaver is" 
practically twelve machines in one, and 
will do twenty -three different woodwork- 
operations. It operates with a % H. 
Motor, from any eSectric light socket, 
and will rip or crosscut 2=inch hardwood. The 
company back of THE BEAVER Woodworker 
has had more experience in the design and 
manufacture of light- socket woodworking ma- 
chines than any other company in the world. 
Now that you have The Beaver, don't slave 
with a hand saw, or waste time 
fe) WiM& with toy saw rigs. Get the Bea- 

ver's record for performance. 
Performance is the only thing 
that counts. Fill out and mail 
the coupon today. It will point 
the way to double pay. 



We can also furnish 
a separate 4-inch 
Bench Jointer, and 
a 6-inch Jointer 
with stand, which x 
are unbeatable / 
for perform- / 
ance and/ to 

y HUTCHINSON 
S MFG. CO., 
109 Lafayette St., 
NORRISTOWN, PA. 




The Speed Marvel 

You wouldn't want to get 
along without the automo= 
bile or the telephone. Why 
stick to the hand saw, when 



price. 



/ 



about it. It makes more there's a much better way? / 
work for all, by reducing Mail the coupon now. / 
costs and encouraging It will lead to a bet= / 
building. ter day. / 

/ Name 

HUTCHINSON MFG. CO., / 

109 Lafayette St., S 

Norristown, Pa. / 

/ St. or R. D 



/ 



/ 

S Please send me full par- 
.' ticulars on the machines I 
/ have checked below. 



f~| The Beaver 
[~j The Speed Marvel 
|"~| 4-inch Bench Jointer 
J 6-inch Jointer with Stand. 



Business 



P. O 



State. 




t6 



The finest asphalt shingle that 
money can buy 5 '. 

When Mr. Clarence H. Adamson had to re-roof his home — 
one of the finest in Aurora, Illinois — he wanted to settle the 
roof question for all time to come. He started out to get the 
finest asphalt shingle that money could buy. 

When he saw Winthrops he bought them and laid them 
right over his old roof. They answered his requirements for 
the "finest" because they had all the good points of other 
asphalt shingles and then some of their own — especially the 
exclusive taper. 




Tapered Asphalt Shingles 



The only tapered — or wedge 
shaped — shingles made, Winthrops 
give double thickness to a roof 
where it is exposed to weather. 
Their thick butts lie flat and snug 
against the roof — tight against 
rain and snow, safe against sparks 
and falling Are brands. 

Winthrops can not crack, split, rot 
nor rust. They do not warp and 
curl nor blow off. The thick butts 
cast the shadow lines that made the 



old-fashioned roof of wedge shape 
wooden shingles so attractive. 
Winthrop colors, when laid solid 
or in mottled effect, are pleasing 
and permanent. The crush slate 
surface is non-fading and is an- 
chored in everlasting asphalt. 
Roof with lasting beautiful, easy- 
to-lay Winthrops. Write today 
for a sample of this finest asphalt 
shingle money can buy. Sold by 
lumber dealers everywhere. 



Beckman - Dawson Roofing Company 

838 F. C. Austin BIdg., 11 1 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

Manufactured also uy 

Lockport Paper Co., Lockport, New York 




Sent Free 

Mail the Coupon for these 2 Books 
and Blue Print Plans 

If you are in any building trade, we want to send you these 2 books and 
blue prints at our expense. One of these books contains a lesson in Plan 
Reading prepared by the Chicago Tech. experts; the other explains the 
Chicago Tech. method of training men by mail in the building trades for 
the jobs that pay the most money or for businesses of their own. All you 
have to do to get them is to mail the coupon. Don't send a penny. 

Get the Knowledge that Will 
Make You Worth More Money 



You may be as good a man as there is in 
the use of tools but as long as you re- 
main a workman you won't earn more 
than the wage scale. It isn't manual 
skill that puts a man in the big pay 
class — it's the ability to use his head 
that brings the fat pay check or enables 
him to "go in for himself." That has 
been proved over and over again by 
workmen who took the Chicago Tech. 
training in the higher branches of build- 
ing and are now foremen, superintend- 
ents and contractors. 

J. B. "Woodside of Oklahoma was a car- 
penter working for $6 a day w-ien he 
took a course in training by mail at Chi- 



cago- Technical College and was ad 
vanced to a foremanship, in 2 months, 
became a superintendent 5 months later 
and then went into contracting. 
Carl Testroat of Iowa is another man 
who got into a successful contracting 
business through this training as did J. 
G. Hart of West Virginia, and C. W. 
Busch of Kansas. 

Not only have workmen got ahead 
through this instruction but also con- 
tractors who were taking on small jobs 
because their experience was limited. 
Chicago Tech. has taught them how to 
handle the big jobs that pay the most 
money. 



Train by Mail 

Become a Building Expert 

Never before have there been such op- 
portunities as there are right now for 
men with expert knowledge of building. 
You can get ready for these big oppor- 
tunities if you will use some of your 
spare time to study at home under the 
direction of the Chicago Tech. experts. 
No time taken from your present work. 
All this will be explained when we send 
you the free books and blue prints. 

Plan Reading. Every man who has got 

very far ahead in any building trade can 

read blue prints. No man can expect to 

be a first rate foreman or 

superintendent until he 

knows what every line on 

a plan means and how to 

lay out and direct work 

from the architect's plans. 

By the Chicago Tech. 

Method you quickly learn 

to read any plan as easily 

as you read these words. 



DO YOU KnOW- 



Estimating. Of course a 
man who wants to be a 
contractor or to hold a big 
job in a contracting organ- 
ization must know how to 
figure costs of labor, ma- 
terial, and everything else 
that goes into any kind of 
building The Chicago 
Tech. course covers every 
detail of this important branch — tells 
you just how it is done from actual 
blue print plans. 

Superintending. How to hire and direct 
men, how to keep track of every detail 
of construction as it goes on, how to get 
the work done in the least time at the 
lowest cost is also fully covered in the 
Chicago Tech. Builders' Course. 



Also special courses in Architectural 
Drafting for builders, taught by prac- 
tical men. These explained in Special 
Catalog "D" sent on request. 

Don't Let Your 
Chance Slip Away 



If you don't make a bigger income this 
year than you have ever made in your 
life it is because you will not prepare for . 
the jobs that are open to every trained I Name 
man in your trade. . 

Not only are good workmen needed but 
there is a demand far beyond the supply | 



and see that a job of building or some 
important part of a big construction pro- 
ject is done right and finished on time. 
Read the questions in the space below. 
Whether you will make a big success in 
the building business or not depends on 
whether you can answer these and many 
other question about building plans and 
specifications, that are all made very 
clear and easy for the Chicago Tech. 
home-study student. 

Only Part of Your 
Spare Time Required 

Getting this Chicago Tech. training does 
not mean quitting your work. If you live 
in Chicago, you can come to the evening 
classes at the College. If 
you don't live here, you 
can have the same instruc- 
tion by mail that you 
would get if you were on 
the ground. You get the 
same lessons — you are 
taught by the same ex- 
perts. The only difference 
will be that the lessons 
are sent by mail instead 
of given in person. 

Stay on your job. Draw 
your regular pay. But put 
in a few hours a week of 
your spare time to pleas- 
ant, interesting home 
study under the direction 
of experts of the Chicago 
Technical College. 

Hundreds of top-notch builders, superin- 
tendents and contractors, owe their suc- 
cess to this practical home-study course. 
There are 31 lessons and many sets of 
blue print plans in the complete course. 

Send the Coupon-Now 

It costs nothing to get the pay raising informa- 
tion which we will gladly send on request with 
the free Books and Blue Print Plans. We will 
explain clearly and completely how men, who 
had no better chances than you, are stepping 
into higher positions or becoming independent 
in businesses of their own. Mail the coupon 
today. 

I Chicago Technical College, 

Dept. 539, Chicago Tech. Bldg., 
| 118 East 26th Street, Chicago, 111. 

I Please send me your Free Books and Blue Prints 
for men in the Building Trades. Send postpaid 

to my address below. 



— how different materials 

are shown on blue 

prints? 
— how "sections" and 

"elevations" are shown 

on the plans? 
— how to lay out a build* 

ing from the plan? 
— how to take off quan= 

tities from the plan? 
— how to figure building 

costs? 
— why some lines on 

plans are shown dotted 

and others full? 



I Write or print name plainly. 



AddresB 



for men who can read plans, figure costs 



City State. 

Occupation 



WHY DEVELOP 
A GLASS 
ARM? 




Price $1.65 in U.S. A. 
$2.00 in Canada. 




An epoch marking im- 
provement in the Ham- ^ 
mer Industry. 

HELLER'S 

Shock Absorbing Hammer 

Featuring 

1. A rubber cushion liner between 
the handle and hammer head. 
Set under extreme pressure, thus 
preventing' any loosening whatever 
of the handle as the rubber cushion 
takes up all shrinkage. 

2. Long Life — free from handle break- 
age. 

3. A rubber cushion liner eliminating 
shock and vibration to the arm. A steady- 
day's work will prove this assertion. Try 
the new hammer and then your old fa- 
vorite. 

4. Finest Heller Hammer Steel. 

5. Drop forged and hand finished by ex- 
perienced craftsmen. 

6. A handle of finest selected second growth 
hickory procurable. 

7. A rubber liner serving as additional pro- 
tection for work around electric wires, etc. 

Have your Hardware dealer supply you. If 
he is unable to do so, mail us your Money Or- 
der with his name, specifying weight and style 
hammer required and we will send direct to you 

Heller Brothers Company 

Newark, N. J., U. S. A. 

Good Tools Since 1836 



The 

HELLER 

LINE 

Mechanic's Tools 



RASPS 
STEEL 




ZOURI KEY-SET STORE FRONT CONSTRUCTION 



Satisfying the client is the best possible free 
advertising for the contractor. Z,ouri indi- 
rect Key-Set windows or store fronts raise 
the prestige of the contractor, and bring 
unsolicited business. Besides, they are 
' ' 'easier to install and more profitable to 
handle'*'* — say contractors. 

Free — our big, free, illustrated book showing the newest and 
best styles of?nodern windows a?id store fronts, also thoroughly 
explaining the popular Tjouri Safety Key-Set construction. 
Write for your copy today. 




Factory and General Offices 
1608 East End Ave. Chicago Heights, 111. 



LISTED BY THE UNDERWRITERS" LABORATORIES 




HEADLIGHT 

Carpenter's Overalls 

FOR THE MAN WHO PREFERS A BLUE CARPENTER'S j^^Jro^^^ii^Ol 

OVERALL WE ARE NOW MAKING THEM FROM 

HEADLIGHT SPECIAL WEAVE BLUE DENIM 
LOT 140 

The Best Denim Ever Put Into an Overall 



Also Made of 

Extra Fine Quality 

TOUGH WHITE SAIL CLOTH LOT 320 

Features 



Four big nail pockets 
Three pockets in one on 
the bib. Safety watch 
pocket. Memo book pock- 
et. Pencil pocket. 
Two big front pockets. 
Double cloth at the front 



Patented safety rule 
pocket. 

High back protects cloth- 
ing. 

2 side hammer straps. 
Chisel or putty knife 
pocket. 



MY GUARANTEE TO YOU 
If, when this overall 19 completely worn oat, 
you do not think that Headlight Carpenters 
Overalls are better, more convenient and will 
outwear any other overall made, J will give 
you backyour money. Beware of imitations. 
Demand the Genuine. 



Mail your order to our nearest factory if your local Headlight Dealer 
cannot supply you. 

LARNED, CARTER & CO. 

World's Greatest Overall Makers 
DETROIT, ST.LOUIS, SAN FRANCISCO, PERTH AMBOY, N.J. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO 
New York Office: 5-7-9 Unloa Sq. Chicago Offica 653 S. Wells St. 



i^skushowyou 




* E AVE k 

VKO DUCTS 



can now 



do 




or 







• IB 



ayments 

W Jg|F 




MC r ^3T , C^^W > VA/VW \/f\WT'Vt$ l 'i 



T?C7%A/ W^77^y^?^^y VW W \A/ V/ 



For WALLS /or ROOFS JJ|^k ^J 

Slate-surfaced Shingles and ^" S98 «^% ▼Products I 

Slabs to meet every require- W Co., Inc., 

ment of color and design ^w t, «• f p ' VT v' 

° A Buffalo, N. x. m 

Special Re-roofing Shingles .▼Gentlemen: I would ■ 

Slate- and Smooth -surfaced ▼ like to know exactly g 

Roll Roofing-in weights JF howl can offer re-roofing 

" £ or remodeling jobs on the | 

and finishes for every use ^^Beaver Easy Payment Plan. 

Built-to-order Roofs Am 

Roof Paints and Cement ^* 

^r Address ~ m 

> I 

j^ City State _ 

j& B KB CO EH BOH B3 IB H Bl BM BESS 



caver Fibre Wall Board 

«aver Tile Board 

leaver Plaster Wall Board 

iestwall 

eaver Gypsum Lath 

«aver American Plaster 
ypsum Partition Block 

eaver Architectural and Indus- 
trial Varnishes and Enamels 



The greatest opportunity 

contractors 





The Beaver Products Company has devised a plan to 
help you sell jobs to that great mass of home owners who 
need new roofs — who want to remodel their homes — 
but who have delayed for want of cash. Now, the bars 
to this great market have been let down. You have 
watched automobile dealers, furniture dealers, household 
appliance dealers, etc., do a tremendous business because 
they had an easy payment plan to o2er. 

We saw a great opportunity for you in this plan of selling. 
We took that opportunity and now YOU can tell any 
home owner in your town that he can re-roof, remodel 
or repair with Beaver Products and pay for both the 
material and your labor on easy monthly payments. Think 
what a tremendous field this opens for new jobs! 

YOU can take advantage of it 




KF7*WS&\/J WW WW 



wwww w w w \x* wy w 



zv er opened to carpenter 
o secure 



or 





iut here is the big surprise: You get all your money im* 
lediately upon completion of the job. You won't tie up 
cent. There is no red tape — nothing to involve you 
nancially. Our plan takes care of all such things. It is 
mazingly simple, and it puts every home owner in a 
osition to have his work done immediately. 

Ve can't go into details here. But we have prepared 
complete printed explanation of this startling financ- 
ng plan and surely you will want to know all the details 
—and exactly how you can start at once to operate under 
he plan. Mail the coupon on the preceding page, at 
nee. It will pay you to get started in this remarkable 
ilan before your competitors line up with it. 

:HE BEAVER PRODUCTS CO., INC., Buffalo, N. Y. 

—Mail Coupon for Details 




Er^^"w^*?w w www w 



W W y& W W WW W VJF V/ 



WKa."b This 
o You 

The Jersey Tag is your guarantee of a satisfied 
customer. Jersey Copper Insect Screen Cloth 
meets the requirements of the most discrimi- 
nating home owner. By recommending it, you 
may be sure that you are maintaining your good 
reputation as a carpenter. 

The tag — look for it — is a guarantee of quality, for 
Jersey Copper Screen Cloth is made of copper 99.8% 
pure. Copper is generally recognized as the most dur- 
able metal in common use. It stands the test of the 
hot, moist weather of the tropics and the constant 
dampness along the sea coast. 

An exclusive advantage of Jersey Copper Screen Cloth 
is that, due to the fact that the copper wire used has 
been stiffened and toughened by a special Roebling 
process, it compares favorably ivith steel in resiliency 
and strength. 

Jersey Copper Screen Cloth is sold by leading hardware 
merchants. Ask for it. If your dealer does not handle 
it, write us. Samples and information furnished on re- 
quest. Stores and agencies in many cities. 

The New Jersey Wire Cloth Company 

620 South Broad Street 
Trenton New Jersey 



TRADE 



J E RS E Y 




MARK ^>Sr 


•* ."--■i:s;:!!55!a»;;;;!»»;:. «»;.■:; 




Cedar Rapids, Iowa 
November 29, 1924 

Regarding the Ruberoid Giants 
on the Garmoe Home at Cedar 
Rapids, I can frankly say that 
the actual cost of laying this 
shingle has been cheaper than 
any other I have ever used. 
This, of course, is a lucrative 
proposition for any builder. They 
will not curl, and they stay put 
in any position desired. 

I would recommend this shingle 
to other builders above all 
other makes. 

{signed) Or a Halfhill 



"Cheaper To Lay" 

"^TO one speaks more strongly in 
-^ favor of Ruberoid Giant- 
shingles than the carpenters who 
use them. 

Ora Halfhill, who recently com- 
pleted one of his many Ruberoid 
jobs in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, ex- 
pressed the opinion of thousands of 
men who know and use this asphalt 
shingle. You will find his letter inter- 
esting reading. 

Don't forget that there are many 
types of Ruberoid Roofing Products 
at varying prices. Ask the Ruberoid 
Distributor in your town about them 
or send us the coupon below. 




ere is but one 



Ruberoid. Look for 
the Man on the Label. 



Chicago 



The RUBEROID Co. 

New York 



RU'BbR 

GIANT- S 



Boston 




The RUBEROID Co. 3 Carpenter 

95 Madison Ave., New York 

Gentlemen: Kindly send me information regarding- Ruberoid Giant-shingles, also the 
name of the nearest Ruberoid Dealer. 

Name 

Address 




— or a table, book-case, sewing-stand, 
chest, or chair? What man hasn't? And 
it is usually a whole lot better and 
more carefully made than any fac- 
tory job! 

But the finishing of it — that's the 
ticklish proposition! You either add 
100% to the beauty of your work — or 
you can botch the whole thing. There is 
no talf-way mark. 



Let us give you some tips. We have 
spent forty years studying wood-finishes 
and have boiled down the results of our 
study in this little book, "The Proper 
Treatment of Floors, Woodwork, and 
Furniture." You will find it a mighty 
handy and practical book to have around 
the shop! 

Send in that coupon for your copy 
today. 



S. C. JOHNSON & SON, RACINE, WIS. 

" The Wood Finishing Authorities " 
BRANTFORD, CANADA — LONDON, ENGLAND— SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA 

r 



SERVICE 
DEPARTMENT! 



pNsoiijI 

ARTISTIC 

W00D_ 



The sign that 
distinguishes a 
wood -finishing 
specialist from 
the ordinary 
"paint" store. 



S. C. Johnson & Son, Dept. C=5, Racine, Wis. 

New pointers on wood finishing are interesting to me. Send 
your FREF book, "The Proper Treatment of Floors, Woodwork 
and Furniture." 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



CITY STATE. 






Better work-more quickly done 
with Sargent Auto-Set Plane 




This is the Sargent 
Auto-Set Bench Plane 
No. 714- -believed by 
many carpenters to be 
greatest of all. 




TAKE the Sargent Auto-Set 
Plane out on a job with any 
other adjustable iron plane of 
the same size. The man with 
the Auto-Set will find the 
going easier. His work will 
be superior and more quickly 
done. Here are the reasons: 

The Sargent Auto-Set is 
lighter in weight as compared 
with other iron planes and less 
tiring to handle. Clamp is 
more rapidly adjusted. When 
cutter must be sharpened it 
may be removed and replaced! 



This is the Sargent 
Adjustable Iron Bench 
Plane No. 414 — which 
has no superior in its 
class. 



in a jiffy without changing 
original adjustment. Once in 
place it is absolutely rigid — 
non-chattering — even against 
or across the grain. Cutter is 
of chromium steel, which takes 
a keen edge arid holds it longer 
than most metals. The greater 
space between frog and handle 
also makes for freer action. 

All Sargent planes are made 
in popular sizes. — smooth, jack, 
fore and jointer. See them at 
your dealer's and write us for 
interesting descriptive booklet. 



SARGENT 

55 Water Street 



& COMPANY, Manufacturers 

New Haven, Conn. 




ools & Siardware. 




Build a Profitable Alteration Business 
with this Free Book! 



This book — "Better Homes 
from Old Houses" — has 
proved a real business-builder 
to carpenter-contractors all 
over the country. 

Between its covers all the com- 
mon types of old houses are shown 
with sound suggestions for making 
them more artistic, more comfort- 
able and worth more money. Pre- 
pared lry a staff of leading archi- 
tects, it is authentic in every detail. 
It's a book of suggestions — not of 
working plans. 

There are any number of old 
houses that could easily be im- 
proved in and around your town. 



The main difficulty is getting the 
owners to think "alterations." 

Put a copy in the hands of every 
man or woman in your town who 
owns an architecturally out-of-date 
house. 

Right there the "remodeling 
idea" starts ! Some of these house 
owners will send for you to talk 
plans and costs of alterations ! A 
good number will go through with 
the job now — others later. This is 
building business. 

Get your free sample copy of this 
book. Fill out the coupon, giving 
your name, and address, also name 
and address of your building sup- 
ply dealer. 



^^C 



ROOFINGS 



THE BARRETT COMPANY, 40 Rector St., New York. 

Please send me free sample copy of your business-building book — ''Better Homes from Old Houses." 
Tbe address of my building supply dealer is given below. 



Your Name Your Dealer's Name 

Your Address Dealer's Address . . . 

Town State 




No. 



745 



Saw Vise 
Price M. 50 




Note honv the 10-inch concave janus 
hold the saiu in a rigid double grip 




No saw can chatter 
or vibrate 
in this vise 

HERE'S the kind of saw vise that 
carpenters have long wanted. 
The jaws are 10 inches long and con- 
caved to give a rigid double grip on 
both sides of the saw. Thus chatter- 
ing, squealing and vibration are done 
away with. 

Because the powerful jaws are self- 
aligning, the clamping pressure that 
is applied by the knurled thumb screw 
is distributed equally over their en- 
tire length. Remove a screw and both 
jaws can be taken out and the vise 
packed awaj r in small space. 

Using aluminum wherever possible 
gives this saw vise lightness with 
strength. A ball-and-socket joint gives 
this tool flexibility in filing position. 
Clamps to any bench of from % to 
2% inches thickness. Height above 
bench, 9y 2 inches. Weight, 5 pounds. 

Other tools for carpenters 

Every carpenter should own a copy 
of the Goodell-Pratt Catalog, which 
shows the entire line of 1500 famous 
Good Tools — many made especially 
for carpenters. Write for it — it's free. 

GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY 

GREENFIELD, MASS., U. S. A. 



&e v&mith4L 



Makers of Mr. Punch 



LL-PRATT 



1500 GOOD TOOLS 




Screens of Anaconda Bronze 



Rust-proof as Copper, screens of Anaconda Antique and 
Golden Bronze are 50% stronger. They stand up under 
service that would injure the appearance and usefulness 
of Copper Screens and would bring about the complete 
destruction of Iron or Steel Screens. 

Install screens of Anaconda Bronze. The cost is but 25 
cents to 50 cents more per window or door than for gal- 
vanized iron — and your customers' satisfaction will be 
complete. 

Write for information regarding sales helps- 
Sent upon request. 

THE AMERICAN BRASS COMPANY 

GENERAL OFFICES : WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Anaconda Bhdnzb "Wire 

ANTiaUE AND GOLDEN 




See demonstra- 
tion at hard- 
ware dealers'. 

Try the 

"YANKEE" 

Ratchet. 



A "Yankee" Brace 

— everyway worthy to take its place 
with the famous "Yankee" Tools. 

Made for the man who values his time 
and labor, wants accuracy and efficiency, 
and sees the economy of paying a little more 
for the finest tool of its kind. 

With it you can hold any shape bit without 
loosening in work. Yet chuck releases bit at 
a. turn of the wrist. 

A finger-touch gives a smooth, silent, pow- 
erful ratchet that works without calling for 
a hand to hold chuck from turning back. 






«Zz\ 



No. 2100 



Hard Rubber Handles. 
— Unbreakable. D o 
not warp, shrink, 
crack or bind. Top 
handle steel-clad, ball 
bearing. Sweep han- 
dle caps held by pat- 
ented ".Yankee" 
method, preventing 
excessive handle 
play. 

"Yankee" Finish. — 
Nickeled and fin- 
ished in keeping 
with the perfection 
of its construction. 




Famous "Yankee" Ratchet. — Smooth as stem- 
wind of a watch, yet unbreakable. Dust-proof. 
Moisture-proof. Quick, positive ratchet shifter. 
New "Yankee" Chuck. — Ball bearing. Quick 
centering and accurate. Won't loosen in work 
with any bit; round, square taper, J^ in. 
Dealers everywhere sell " Yankee" Tools 

Write us for "Yankee" Tool Book 
NorthBros. Mfg. Co.,Philadelphia, U.S.A. 

"YANKEE" 

TOOLS 




Disston No. 3 Bevel 

Has the patented Disston lock 
that you need for careful work. 
A quarter turn of the thumb- 
screw locks it securely. No slip- 
ping. Tempered blade of Disston- 
made Steel. Iron stock, nickel- 
plated. 




Disston Adjustable Plumb and 
Level. An accurate, reliable 
tool at a popular price. Has the 
Disston adjustment, —a simple, 
positive adjustment operated 
with screws working in wood. 
No springs to get out of order. 



A Bevel You Can Depend Upon 

For it's made to the same standard as your Disston Saw 



CARPENTERS, for three generations, have 
paid their tribute to the Disston Saw. They 
have made it their standard of quality in tools. 

Disston appreciates this goodwill — and safe- 
guards it by making Disston Tools with the 
same exacting care as your saw. 

Disston No. 3 Bevel is a tool you will like 
to work with. This bevel has a lock that holds 
the blade where you want it. Just give the 
thumbscrew a quarter turn and the Disston 
patented lock holds the blade and stock so 
rigid that a bump or jar will not disturb the 
setting. And a quarter turn of the screw re- 
leases the blade for the next adjustment. 

The tempered blade of Disston-made Steel 
will not break nor buckle. The nickel-plated 
iron stock is strong and durable. This all-metal 
construction will give you years of faithful 
service and accurate work. 

Get the same satisfaction from your tools 
that you get from your saw. Buy DisstonTools. 

Henry Disston & Sons, Inc. 

Makers of "The Saw Most Carpenters Use" 
PhUadelphia, U. S. A. 

DISSTON 

I TOOLS FILES 




Disston No. 5V2 Try Square. All 
metal. Tempered blade of 
Disston-made Steel will not 
buckle; always lies flat on the 
work. Iron stock, nickel-plated. 
Square is true inside and out. 




"The Saw Most 

Carpenters Use" 




Entered July 22, 1 91 5, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of Congress, Aug. 24, 1 91 2 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 191S 



A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and 

Kindred Industries. Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 

and Joiners of America, at 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana a^g^si 



Established in 1881 
Vol. XLV— No. 5. 



INDIANAPOLIS, MAY, 1925 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



That the open shop is now favored by the 
Stanley Manufacturing Company of New Bri- 
tain, Conn., who manufacture a number of car- 
penter's tools, known as the Stanley tools, was 
a declaration recently made by Mr. Stanley, Jr., 
an officer of the company at a conference held 
with Representative Charles N. Kimball and 
Business Agent McGrath at the plant of the 
company. This concern is constructing a large 
building at New Britain. The contractor is the 
Aberthaw Company of Boston. Non-union car- 
penters were found on the job. On complaint of 
Messrs. Kimball and McGrath, as representa- 
tives of our organization, Mr. Stanley arranged 
the conference, and to their astonishment made 
the above declaration. 



BiiMBaiij— ate— Mafla— waa — — — , nmu 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



TRADE UNIONISM HAS EARNED ITS PLACE 

(By William Green, President of the American Federation of Labor.) 




RADE unionism has to its 
credit so much of solid 
achievement that there 
should be none today who 
doubt its necessity and its 
justification. 

Trade unionism has earned a place in 
the recognized institutions of democratic 
civilization. It has earned the right to 
the allegiance of all workers, on the one 
hand, while, on the other hand, it has 
earned the right to speak for the work- 
ers in the councils of industry. Trade 
unionism has passed the trial stage. It 
has come to its maturity out of long 
years of struggle and experience to an 
earned position of trust and confidence. 

That is the movement's belief in it- 
self; and that must be trade unionism's 
place in the life of our nation. 

The trade union movement is a move- 
ment of service. It is a movement which 
helps to get things done where other- 
wise they could not be done at all. 

It is the duty of every wage earner to 
belong to the union of his trade or call- 
ing and it is the duty of every industry 
to consult with the trade unions of that 
industry on every point that affects the 
work of that industry. This is so,- not 
merely so that trade unions may be 
recognized for the satisfaction of their 
own aims; it is so because that is the 
only way to achieve the best results in 
modern industrial life. The outlook is 
broader than wages, hours and condi- 
tions for those immediately involved. It 
extends to the whole social organization 
and contemplates the general welfare of 
all. The nation as a whole can not con- 
tent itself, or call itself well served, 
until every unit of industry and every 
group of workers function at their best 
and find satisfaction and justice in so 
doing. 

The rattle-trap factory, operating 
with half-skilled, resentful, unorganized 
workers, is a national liability which the 
nation can not afford and which it need 
not have. Contrast, for the sake of good 
citizenship, workshops in which the so- 
called "individual contract" binds the 
workers to unquestioning submission 



and a shop in which the trade union pro- 
cures for the workers an effective voice 
in the determination of all questions sur- 
rounding work and wages. Nothing so 
affects the patriotic ardor of the citizen 
as the citizen's own sense of justice se- 
cured or withheld. The man who knows 
that democracy has come into the place 
where he works must in every sense be 
the best defender of democracy. Men 
will defend those things which come in- 
to their own lives, bringing happiness to 
them and to their families. 

The comparison between the union 
man and his job and the non-union man 
and the job in which he is permitted to 
work is somewhat like that older com- 
parison of a man and his home and a 
man and his boarding house. 

Such devices as the "individual con- 
tract" and the injunction are used by 
reactionary employers to hold workers 
in submission to the edicts that come 
from "the front office." Such employers 
feel that to allow the workers to have 
any voice in matters affecting the work- 
shop is to begin a downward course to- 
ward loss of control, loss of discipline 
and ruination. There never was greater 
folly, or less understanding. 

The worker today can not go indi- 
vidually to his employer and get justice. 
There are too many workers and too few 
employers for that. It is a sheer, physi- 
cal impossibility. And the employer who 
thinks he can dictate fair terms with- 
out consulting his employes is just as 
mistaken as any autocrat has ever been. 
There have been contended slaves under 
autocratic rule, but there never have 
been good citizens. Autocracy and citi- 
zenship can not co-exist, either politi- 
cally or industrially. 

Trade unionism appeals to workers 
and employers — to all Americans, what- 
ever their station or position — as a con- 
structive agency for the promotion of 
justice in industry, for the elevation of 
human lives, for the education of the 
masses to high standards, to a greater 
dignity and to a fuller realizaton of the 
meaning of life and of the meaning of 
living together in a great organized 
society. 



THE CARPENTER 



23 



FARM WORKERS WAGES HAVE DECLINED 




'ARM wages are now well 
under the average for 
1924. They are slightly- 
less than the average for 
1923, but greater than in 
1922. The average 
monthly wages of farm labor without 
board is computed by the Department 
of Agriculture from information ob- 
tained from farms throughout the 
country. 

In general, farm wages follow the ups 
and downs of factory employment. 
When industrial employment is high 
farmers have to pay more to hold their 
help. When industrial employment re- 
cedes, the farmer finds it easier to hold 
his labor. 

Throughout the latter months of 
1924, employment, while on an ascend- 
ing scale, was less than for the corre- 



sponding months in 1923. This is re- 
flected in the gradual dip of farm wages 
to the present point after two years of 
ascent. 

The farmer's labor question thus dif- 
fers from that of the factory. When 
production is high and factories are run- 
ning at capacity, the factory wage scale 
is almost sure to be a rising one. Ap- 
parently farm wages are not so con- 
trolled. Farmers now are in a better 
position financially than since 1920, but 
nevertheless wages go down. In 1923, 
farm prosperity did not keep pace with 
industrial prosperity, but the level of 
farm wages rose despite that. 

At present industrial employment is 
on a rising scale, which may have an 
effect on farm wages during the next 
few months. 



WAGE RATES STEADY 

Only slight fluctuations in wage scales 
and other labor conditions in the build- 
ing crafts are expected to result from 
the spring readjustments for 1925 ac- 
cording to a national survey of the labor 
situation in the building industry by S. 
W. Straus & Co. Conditions are sum- 
marized as follows: 

Majority of building crafts appear 
willing to renew 1924 wage scales, al- 
though there is slight upward tendency 
in rates in some of the larger cities. 

No general downward revision of 
wage rates in sight, but unions in some 
smaller localities have decided to reduce 

rates slightly. 

© 

Stair Budding Book Wanted 

Brother Harold F. Cheesman, 619 
East 7th St., Alton, 111., is very anxious 
to secure a copy of a book entitled 
"Stair Building," by James H. Monck- 
ton. He has tried numerous publishers 
and booksellers without success, as the 
work seems to be out of print. If any 
reader has a second hand copy of this 
work for disposal he is requested to 
communicate with Brother Chessman at 
the above address. 




Headquarters of L. U. 213, U. B. of C. & 

J. of A., Houston, Texas. 

• 

Pensions In Montana 

Experience under the old age pension 
law enacted in Montana in 1923 shows 
that the cost is remarkably low. Of- 
ficial reports covering the first nine 
months' operations of the act give 
$65.50 as the average amount paid to 
persons pensioned. This is about $S7 a 
year, even less than the expectations of 
the legislature, which fixed a maximum 
pension of $300 a year for each eligible 
person. 



Fair Enough 

Captain — "If anything moves, shoot." 
Colored Sentry — "Yessah; an' if any- 
thing shoots, Ah move." 

• 

Keep Your Dues Paid Up 



Polite Talk About Uplift 

"Man, ef Ah didn't have no mo' 
brains dan what you' got, Ah'd — " 

"Hesh up, boy! Ef yo' brains was 
dinnamite, an' dey doubled ever' second 
for a hundred yeans an' den 'sploded, 
dey wouldn't blow yo' hat off on a windy 
day." 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



N. Y. TRADE SCHOLARSHIPS 

The New York State Department of 
Education offers scholarships to quali- 
fied trade and technically trained men 
and women who desire to prepare them- 
selves for teaching. Persons selected to 
hold these scholarships who satisfactor- 
ily complete the prescribed one-year 
resident industrial teacher- training 
course are licensed for life to teach their 
specific occupations in the public schools 
of the State. 

The salaries paid vocational teachers 
now range from $1,800 to $3,500 a year. 
Qualified men holding a teacher's license 
are not eligible for a scholarship. 

Each holder of a scholarship will re- 
ceive $1,000 for the period of one school 
year. This amount is paid in 10 equal 
installments. 

Holders will be required to be in at- 
tendance commencing in September for 
10 months in the industrial teacher- 
training department of the State Norm- 
al School at Buffalo. 

Persons interested and eligible should 
write to the Division of Vocational and 
Extension Education, State Department 
of Education, Albany, N. Y. for proper 
forms upon which to make application 
for a scholarship, as all applications 
must be on file on or before May 25, 
1925. 



No Boom At Cedar Rapids 

Cedar Rapids, la., is at this time more 
than sufficiently supplied with carpen- 
ters to handle any work which is going 
on there, or is likely to be done there 
for some time to come. 

It is reported that interests opposed 
to our Brotherhood have spread the re- 
port in other cities that a building boom 
was on in Cedar Rapids. The real situa- 
tion is, that building there is quieter 
than it has been for years. 



Philadelphia, Pa., Overstocked 

There are already more carpenters in 
Philadelphia, Pa., than there is work 
for, and a large number are unemployed. 
There is practically no carpenter work 
on the bridge and what there is, is non- 
union. 

The Sesqui Centennial plans have not 
been matured, and the people who are 
at the head of that movement do not 
know when they are going to get start- 
ed, and it certainly will not be as large 
an affair as the public might believe. 



FRED C. WHEELER RETIRES 

For 38 years Fred C. Wheeler, of Los 
Angeles, has been a member in good 
standing of the United Brotherhood, and 
in addition has been for ten years a 
member of the City Council of Los 
Angeles. 

Mr. Wheeler recently announced that 
he would not be a candidate for the 
office again this year, much to the regret 
of our Los Angeles County District 
Council. 

This feeling on the part of the Coun- 
cil was recently made the subject of 
formal resolution at a meeting of that 
body when it went on record, saying 
among other appreciative things, "that 
it regrets to learn of his determination 
to lay aside the cares of public service 
and heartily congratulates him upon his 
splendid record both in the City Hall 
and in the labor movement." 



Inquire At Charleston, S. C. 

The District Council of Charleston, 
S. C, is conducting a trade movement 
this year, which means a lot to those of 
our members who are affiliated with that 
Council. So any brothers who go there 
are urged to at once get into touch with 
the officers of the Council. 



Building Quiet In Salt Lake City 

Work in the carpenter line in Salt 
Lake City and vicinity is very quiet at 
present, and the outlook for the season 
is not very encouraging. Articles ap- 
pearing in the press, of a boosting na- 
ture would lead some to think that work 
is plentiful in that locality, but such is 
not the case, as many of the local mem- 
bers are unemployed at present. 
. © 

Calumet District Is Overstocked 

All the Calumet region, including 
Gary, Hammond, Indiana Harbor, Whit- 
ing, East Chicago, is overstocked with 
carpenters, and at this time there are 
many unemployed in that district. 
o 

North=West Pioneer Passes 

Old-time union carpenters of the 
north-west will learn with deep regret 
of the death of Brother Harry S. Fal- 
coner, of L. U. 452, Vancouver, B. C, 
who passed away suddenly on February 
26, last, at the age of 70 years, after 
being a member of the United Brother- 
hood for 35 years, during which time he 
had held every office of trust and confi- 
dence within the gift of the Local Union. 



Editorial 




THE CARPENTER 

Official Journal of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 

OF AMERICA 



Published on the 15th of each month at the 

CARPENTERS* BUILDING 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 
CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA, 

Publishers 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 



Subscription Price 
One Dollar a Year in Advance, Postpaid 

The publishers and the advertising 
agent use every possible precaution avail- 
able to them against accepting advertise^ 
merits from other than reliable firms, but 
do not accept any responsibility for the 
contents of any advertisement which ap- 
pears in "The Carpenter." Should any 
deception be practiced by advertisers at 
any time, upon members, their duty is to 
immediately notify the Post Office au- 
thorities. Therefore, address any com- 
plaints to your local Post Office. 

INDIANAPOLIS, MAY, 1925 

Stick To Your Standards 

WHEN one hears associations of 
employers loudly calling upon the 
workers in some industry to vol- 
untarily accept a reduction in wages, on 
the ground that it will stimulate that 
industry, it is time for all trade union- 
ists to stand pat and decline to be led 
led into such a proposition. No general 
reduction in wages has ever yet been 
proved to bring economic benefit to any 
community. 

On the contrary, there are any num- 
ber of practical instances where such 
a move has been followed by pitiful col- 
lapse of former decent living standards. 
Along with them, the industries involved 
have eventually gone into dissolution 
and ruin. Workers have migrated in 
thousands from the blighted areas, 



tradesmen have gone into bankruptcy, 
real estate values slumped to the lowest 
possible levels; and what were once 
prosperous communities have degenerat- 
ed into a poverty stricken nucleus, that 
only stayed there because it could not 
raise the ways and means of getting 
out of its plight. 

Go where you will, it will always be 
found that in the districts where high 
wage rates prevail there is found a more 
generally distributed prosperity and con- 
tentment. One does not have to rely 
upon trade union statistics either, to 
learn this. It is an established and ac- 
cepted truth, not challenged except by 
those who for very restricted and sel- 
fish reasons would have the workers 
give serious ear to this spider and the 
fly story about wage reductions stimu- 
lating industry. 

It might for the moment serve the 
ulterior purposes of employers who 
would not hesitate to bring temporary 
advantage to themselves at the expense 
of the community in general. But it 
has never yet brought anything but bit- 
ter dissillusionment for the majority of 
the people in any district where they 
have been foolish enough to be led away 
by such a shoddy theory. 



But Not Quoted On the Stock Exchange 

MEMBERSHIP in a trade union is 
an investment which has definite 
material value to the man who 
owns it. From it he draws dividends in 
the shape of better wages, working con- 
ditions, and those congenial relation- 
ships with men who work at the sani- 
calling as himself. In addition it in- 
spires and cultivates one of the most 
precious of all the possessions a man 
may hope to have in this life — self 
respect. 

It is one of the most important of all 
the influences which have gradually 
broken him away from the era of "tooth 
and claw," of selfish, suspicious, and 
savage isolation ; and from the old and 
vicious creed of "every man for him- 
self, and devil take the hindmost^" 



2G 



THE CARPENTER 



Trade unionism in this respect has 
played a foremost part in the civilizing 
processes of history, and its work is 
even now only beginning. 

It is good also for each member to 
realize that the more members there are 
in the union to which he belongs, the 
greater is the value to him of his in- 
dividual membership. It means added 
power to the means whereby he im- 
proves his standard of living ; and every 
new member initiated, means better div- 
idends on each separate union man's 
membership, in the shape of more of the 
better things of life for him and his. 
The higher the percentage of organized 
men in the calling at which he works, 
the higher the returns are for each one. 
' Not only in the mere material things, 
such as food, clothing, and housing, is 
this true, but also in things perhaps less 
material, but still vitally essential to 
that happiness which comes from un- 
selfish and helpful companionship with 
men in one's own walk in life. It is the 
camaraderie of craft, the spirit of "all 
for ope, and one for all." The whole 
range of its meaning and portent is en- 
folded in the one word "fraternity." 
This is the very life and soul of the 
trade union, and the true trade unionist. 
The bread, meat and sustenance of that 
portion of the workers which has the 
self respect and intelligence to realize 
that the solving of their problems must 
be the work of their own hands. 



To the Vanquished the Spoils 

SINCE the late unpleasantness in 
Europe was officially terminated, 
there has been no end _ of diverse 
opinion as to who won the war. The 
question has many aspects, but the one 
with which this present screed is most 
concerned is that of the workers and 
their wages over there. It came to our 
attention as a curious commentary on 
the matter, after reading an undoubted- 
ly reliable account of the awarding of a 
British shipbuilding contract to a Ger- 
man firm. 

It would appear that a well-known 
British shipping firm wanted five 10,000 
ton cargo motor ships built. The German 
firm which got the contract quoted 
prices $300,000 per ship lower than the 
lowest British tender. This contract was 
only finally let to the German firm after 
the buyers had offered to give the con- 
tract to any British firm which could 



undertake to build the ships for $50,000 
per ship higher than the prices quoted 
by the Hamburg firm. . This offer too 
could not be met, and so the work went 
on to the continent. 

The whole affair has raised a terrific 
row in British shipbuilding circles. 
While there exists the possibility that 
the German Government may be sub- 
sidizing shipbuilding firms to assist 
them in re-establishing their industries, 
yet that is admitted not to be the real 
and complete reason why they could 
tender so low. The real reason is, that 
wage rates over there are so much lower 
than trade union rates in British ship- 
yards, that the work went there. 

In the meantime British shipyard 
workers help to swell the total of nearly 
two million registered unemployed in 
Britain receiving the weekly "dole." 
They have fought steadily since the end 
of the war to maintain their wage rates, 
in other words, to uphold the living 
standards of the workers in the ship- 
building industry ; and this is what they 
get for their pains. No wonder they are 
sarcastic when they ask: "Who won the 
war?" 



Evolution In the Building Industry 

OOKING backward over a period of, 
say only twenty years, the build- 
ing trades mechanic can see that 
there has been an amazing process of 
evolution going on in the building in- 
dustry. It is never at a standstill, but 
ever changing, with new fabrics and 
processes coming fast on each others' 
heels. This has gone on so much and so 
quickly, that the building industry of 
today is in many respects scarcely rec- 
ognizable as the one in which many men 
still in the prime of fife served their ap- 
prenticeships. 

Recognition of this changing condi- 
tion is replete with lessons for any build- 
ing trades union which proposes to hold 
its membership, and its influence for the 
good of that membership. Analytical 
study of new fabrics and processes, and 
a correct understanding of their mean- 
ing to the future of the union and its 
members, need to be an established and 
continuous part of the work of the or- 
ganization. It is the law of life that the 
thing which would live must adjust it- 
self to its- surroundings. Without that it 
would perish. 



Official Information 




GENERAL OFFICERS 

OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD 

OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA 

General Office 
Carpenters" Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

TVM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Fiest General Vice-President 

JOHN T. COSGROVE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

GEORGE H. LAKEY 

Carpenters Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

THOMAS NEALE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 
First District, T. M. GUERIN 
290 Second Ave,, Troy, N. Y. 



Second District, W. T. ALLEN 
3S32 N. Gratz St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Third District, JOHN n. POTTS 
G46 Melish Ave., Cincinnati, O. 



Fourth District, JAMES P. OOLETREE 

106 E. Plymouth St., Tampa, Fla. 



Fifth District, J. W. WILLIAMS 
3948 S. Grand Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 



Sixth District, W. A. COLE 

810 Merchants National Bank Buildinj 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
1712 Chamhord St., Montreal, Que., Can. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive 
Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



Quarterly Proceedings of the General 
Executive Board, 1925 

Since the previous session of the General Ex- 
ecutive Board the following movements were 
acted upon by correspondence. 

February 23, 1925. 

Robstown, Tex., L. U. 2470. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $6 to $8 per day, 
effective March 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

March 25, 1925. 

The regular quarterly meeting of the General 
Executive Board was called to order on the 
above date. 

Montreal, Que., Canada, District Council. — 
Movement for an increase in wages from 65c 
to 75c per hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official 
sanction granted ; financial aid to be considered 
later, in such sums as the funds will warrant, 
as reports are received at the General Office. 

Westchester County New York District Coun- 
cil. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$8 to $10.50 per day, effective May 1, 1925. 
Official sanction granted ; financial aid to be 
considered later, in such sums as the funds 
will warrant, as reports are received at the 
General Office. 

East Coast Florida District Council. — Move- 
ment for an increase in wages from $1 to 
C 1.12 1 per hour, effective June 15, 1925. Offi- 
cial sanction granted ; financial aid to be con- 
sidered later, in such sums as the funds will 
warrant, as reports are received at the Gen- 
eral Office. 

Toronto, Ont., Canada District Council. — 
Movement for an increase in wages from 90c 
to $1 per hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official 
sanction granted ; financial aid to be considered 
later, in such sums as the funds will warrant, 
as reports are received at the General OfBce. 

Monmouth County New Jersey District Coun- 
cil. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1 to $1.25 per hour, effective April 1, 1925. 
Official sanction granted ; financial aid to be 
considered later, in such sums as the funds 
will warrant, as reports are received at the 
General Office. 

Fall Cities, Ky., District Council. (Millmen). 
— Movement for an increase in wages from 
COc to 70c per hour, effective May 1, 1925. 
Official sanction granted ; financial aid to be 
considered later, in such sums as the funds 
will warrant, as reports are received at the 
General Office. 

Central Pennsylvania District Council. — 
Movement for an increase in wages from 79c 
to 90c per hour, effective May 1, 1925. Offi- 
cial sanction granted ; financial aid to be con- 
sidered later, in such sums as the funds will 
warrant, as reports are received at the Gen- 
eral Office. 

Lower Anthracite Region, Pennsylvania, 
District Council. — Movement for an increase 
in wages from $1.10 to $1.25 per hour, effec- 
tive April 1, 1925. Official sanction granted. 

Lowell, Mass., District Council. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from $1 to $1.12} 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



per hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sane 
tion granted ; financial aid to be considered 
later, in such sums as the funds will warrant, 
as reports are received at the General Office. 

Davidson County, Tennessee, District Coud 
cil. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
80c to 90c per hour, effective April 1, 1925. 
Official sanction granted ; financial aid to he 
considered later, in such sums as the funds 
will warrant, as reports are received at the 
General Office. 

Boston, Mass., District Council. — Trade 
movement. Referred to the General Secretary 
to secure further information. 

Batavia, N. Y., L. U. 24. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 75c to 80c per hour 
first year, and 85c per hour second year, ef- 
fective April 1, 1925. Official sanction granted ; 
financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Bloomington, 111., L. U. 63. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1 to $1.25 per 
hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as 
reports are received at the General Office. 

Erie, Pa., L. U. 81. — Movement for an in- 
crease in wages from $1 to $1.15 per hour, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

In the appeal or protest of the Pittsburg, 
Pa., District Council and L. U.'s 211, Pitts- 
burg, Pa., 183 Peoria, 111., and L. U. 514, 
YVilkes-Barre, Pa., against the manner in which 
the Tabulating Committee reached its report 
on count of vote on election of General Officers 
— the General Executive Board decided that 
the District Council and Local Unions appeal- 
ing or protesting be notified that they will be 
given a hearing at Headquarters in Indian- 
apolis, Ind., on Monday, March 30, 1925, at 
10 A. M., at which hearing they could be rep- 
resented if they so desired. 

In order that a complete investigation be 
made the General Executive Board further 
directed that the Tabulating Committee be no- 
tified to be present at the said hearing. 

Telegram received from L. U. 1805, Detroit. 
Mich., relative to the situation and conditions 
as they exist in that city in our organization 
and after a careful consideration of same, the 
General President was authorized to appoint a 
committee to go to Detroit and make an in- 
vestigation of same and report its findings to 
the General Executive Board at present session. 

The General President appointed First Gen- 
eral Vice-President Cosgrove, General Secre- 
tary Duffy, Board Members Potts, Williams and 
Allen. 

March 26, 1925. 

Evansville, Ind., L. U. 90. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from $1 to $1.15 per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Chesterton, Ind., L. U. 113. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1.10 to $1.25 per 
hour, effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Canton, Ohio, L. U. 143. — Movement for an 
increase in wa?es from $1.15 to $1.25 per 
hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 



in such sums as the funds will warrant, as re- 
ports are received at the General Office. 

Kewanee, 111., L. U. 154. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 90c to $1 per hour, ef- 
fective April 1, 1925. Official sanction granted ; 
financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Munising, Mich., L. U. 173. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 871c to $1 per 
hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Vincennes, Ind., L. U. 274. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 90c to $1 per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Binghampton, N. Y., L. U. 281. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from $1 to $1,121 per 
hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as 
reports are received at the General Office. 

Hagerstown, Md., L. U. 340. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 80c to 87|c per hour, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Pueblo, Colo., L. U. 362. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from $1 to $1,121 per' hour, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are' 
received at the General Office. 

Elgin, 111., L. U. 363. — Movement for an in- 
crease in wages from $1.10 to $1.15 per hour, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Asheville, N. C, L. U. 384. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 871c to $1 per 
hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, in 
such sums as the funds will warrant, as re- 
ports are received at the General Office. 

Portsmouth, Ohio., L. U. 437. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from $1 to $1.12& 
per hour, effective April 1, 1925. Official sanc- 
tion granted ; financial aid to be considered 
later, in such sums as the funds will warrant,, 
as reports are received at the General Office. 

Ogden, Utah, L. U. 450. — Movement for an. 
increase in wages from 871c to $1 per hour, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Elmira, N. Y., L. U. 532. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from $1 to $1,121 per hour,, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Coshocton, Ohio, L. U. 525. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 90c to $1 per hour r 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports 
are received at the General Office. 

Galveston, Tex., L. U. 526. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1 to $1,121 per 
hour, effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Lincoln, 111., L. U. 568. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 871c to $1 per hour, 



^HE CAltPEtfTEft 



29 



effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports 
are received at the General Office. 

Hannibal, Mo., L. U. 607. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 90c to $1 per hour, ef- 
fective April 1, 1925. Official sanction granted. 

Chickasha, Okla., L. U. 653. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 87Jc to $1 per hour, 
effective April 6, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Sheboygan, Wis., L. U. 657. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 92|c to 95c per 
hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as 
reports are received at the General Office. 

Lebanon, Pa., L. U. 677. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 85c to $1 per hour, 
Millmen 60c to 70c, effective May 1, 1925. 
Official sanction granted ; financial aid to be 
considered later, in such sums as the funds 
will warrant, as reports are received at the 
General Office. 

Houston, Tex., L. TJ. 724. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 75c to 90c per hour, 
effective June 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

March 27, 1925. 

Pontiac, 111., L. U. 728. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 80c to $1 per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Norwalk, Conn., L. TJ. 746. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1 to $1.12l| per 
hoilr, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, in 
such sums as the funds will warrant, as reports 
are received at the General Office.- 

Oswego, N. Y., L. IT. 747. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 85c to $1 per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Roekford, 111., L. TJ. 792. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from $1.02J to $1.15 per 
hour, effective May 1,,1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, in 
such sums as the funds will warrant, as re- 
ports are received at the General Office. 

Cairo, 111., L. TJ. 812. — Movement for an in- 
crease in wages from 87ic to $1 per hour, ef- 
fective May 15, 1925. Official sanction granted. 

Wisconsin Rapids, Wis., L. TJ. 820. — Move- 
ment for an increase in wages from 75c to 85c 
per hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanc- 
tion granted ; financial aid to be considered 
later, in such sums as the funds will warrant, 
as reports are received at the General Office. 

Willimantic, Conn., L. TJ. 825. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from 92 Jc to .$1.01?, 
effective July 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Janesville, Wis., L. TJ. 836. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 85c to 90c per hour, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction granted. 

Massillon, Ohio, L. TJ. S81. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1.05 to $1.15 per 
hour, effective May 4, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considereed later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as re- 
ports are received at the General Office. 

Wellsburg, "Va., L. TJ. 893. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from $1.25 to $1.37 per hour, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction granted. 



Jacksonville, HI., L. TJ. 904. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 87Jc to $1 per 
hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, in 
such sums as the funds will warrant, as re- 
ports are received at the General Office. 

Lake Charles, La., L. TJ. 953. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 87|c to $1 per hour, 
effective May, 1925. Official sanction granted ; 
financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Pen Yan, N. Y., L. TJ. 996. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 80c to $1 per hour, 
effective May 10, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in 
such sums as the funds will warrant, as re- 
ports are received at the General Office. 

Greenville, Pa., L. TJ. 1000. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 95c to $1 per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Lincoln, Neb., L. TJ. 1055. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 87ic to $1 per hour, 
effective May 4, 1925. Official sanction granted. 

Batavia, N. Y., L. TJ. 1151. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 80c to $1 per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Wellsville, N. Y., L. TJ. 1182. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 80c to 90c per hour, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction granted. 

Manistee, Mich., L. TJ. 1226. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 65c to 75c per hour, 
effective April 20, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Ironwood, Mich., L. TJ. 1227. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 85c to 90c per hour, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Lisbon, Ohio, L. TJ. 1288. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 85c to 95c per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Ogdensburg, N. Y., L. TJ. 1354. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from 70c to 80c per 
hour, effective April 6, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as 
reports are received at the General Office. 

Menomine, Mich., L. TJ. 1246. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 85c to 90c per hour, 
effective May 15, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Keyport, N. J., L. TJ. 1374. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1 to $1,121 per 
hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as re- 
ports are received at the General Office. 

Okmulgee, Okla., L. TJ. 1399. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1 to $1,121 per 
hour, effective April 27, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later. 

Moberly, Mo., L. TJ. 1434. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 87 £c to $1 per hour, ef- 
fective April 22, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 



30 



THE CARPENTEB 



Jackson, Miss., L. U. 1471. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 75c to 85c per hour, 
effective April 16, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Kent, Ohio, L. U. 1499. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 95c to $1 per hour, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction granted. 

New Braunfels, Tex., L. U. 1701. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from 62Jc to 75c per 
hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as 
reports are received at the General Office. 

Escanaba, Mich., L. U. 1832.— Movement for 
an increase in wages from 90c to $1 per hour, 
effective June 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Medford, Ore., L. U. 1840. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 75c to 90c per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Burlington, Wis., L. U. 1841. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 75c to 90c per 
hour, effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Crown Point, Ind., L. U. 1938. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from $1 to $1.25 per 
hour, effective June 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Fredericktown, Mo., L. U. 1999. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from 60c to 75c per 
hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Gadsden, Ala., L. U. 2268. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 70c to 80c per hour, 
effective April 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Somerville, Ind., L. U. 2322. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 60c to 75e per hour, 
effective May 6, 1925. Official sanction 
granted. 

Haverstraw, N. Y., L. U. 2372. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from $1 to $1.12J 
per hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official sanc- 
tion granted. 

March 28, 1925. 

Telegram from L. U. 2177, Yonkers, N. Y., 
received in regards to conditions in that lo- 
cality. The matter was referred to the Gen- 
eral President. 

The General President reported that he was 
having an investigation made of the conditions 
of our members and families in the devastated 
district caused by the recent tornado and that 
reports were coming to him of the loss sus- 
tained by our members. The General Executive 
Board appropriated the sum of $5,000 for the 
immediate relief of our members. 

Boston, Mass., D. C, reported that the trade 
movement had been settled. Therefore no ac- 
tion was necessary by the General Executive 
Board. 

The report of the committee sent to investi- 
gate conditions in Detroit, Mich., District 
Council was submitted to the General Execu- 
tive Board, showing that the business of the 
District Council is not now conducted and has 
not been conducted for some time past in ac- 
cordance with our Constitution and Laws ; 
That in the majority of instances our Laws 
are ignored ; That in its present form and 
makeup the District Council is practically of 
no use and that it is more of a detriment and 
a draw-back to the Local Unions and members 
thereof than of any good ; That the Trade 
Union Educational League, an organization 
whose object is the overthrow of trade union- 
ism, and which is not in accord or in harmony 



with the principles of the Unilted Brotherhood 
receives more consideration than any other mat- 
ter coming before the District Council. In 
fact this League is advocated |and fostered by 
many of the delegates of the District Council 
in preference to the interests 6f our organiza- 
tion. All of which conflicts with the decisions 
of our conventions and the provisions of Para- 
graph E, Section 6, of our Constitution, which 
specifies : 

"The right is reserved to establish jurisdic- 
tion over any Local or Auxiliary Unions, Dis- 
trict, State or Provincial Councils whose affairs 
are conducted in such a manner as to be a 
menace to the welfare of the International 
Body." 

The committee recommended : 

1. That unless our Constitution and Laws 
are strictly lived up to and observed by the 
District Council in every instance, the Charter 
of that body be revoked. 

2. That unless L. U. 2140 immediately notify 
the General President that they have dropped 
Wm. Reynolds from membership, the Charter 
of that Local Union be revoked. 

3. That the General President be directed 
to consolidate the Local Unions in Detroit if 
he deems it necessary. 

The report and recommendations of the com- 
mittee were adopted. 

March 30, 1925. 

Windsor, Ont., Can., L. U. 494. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from $1 to $1.12J per 
hour, effective June 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, in 
such sums as the funds will warrant, as reports 
are received at the General Office. 

Nashua, N. H., L. U. 1616. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 90c to $1 per hour, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Weirton, W. Va., L. U. 1574. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from $1.25 to $1.37 per 
hour, effective May 1, 1925. Movement disap- 
proved because the agreement with employers 
has not been lived up to. 

Cuyahoga County District Council, Cleve- 
land, O. (Cabinet Makers and Millmen). — 
Movement for an increase in wages from $1 to 
$1.12J per hour, effective May 1, 1925. Official 
sanction granted ; financial aid to be considered 
later, in such sums as the funds will warrant, 
as reports are received at the General Office. 

Spokane, Wash., L. U. 9S. — Request for priv- 
ilege to circulate an appeal for financial aid to 
assist in erection of a building. Request denied. 

Renewal certificate on Fidelity Bond No. 
7864 in behalf of Harry R. Allen, chief clerk 
in the amount of $2,000 was received and re- 
ferred to the General Secretary for safe keep- 
ing. 

Sullivan, Ind., L. U. 706. — Appealing for 
financial aid in behalf of stricken families of 
miners. Request denied. 

The following full accountings were received 
for the expenditure of remittances made for 
the relief of men locked out and on strike : 

L. U. 213, Houston, Tex., September, 1924, 
$783. 

L. U. 1445, Topeka, Kan., June, 1924, 
$392.25. 

L. U. 452, Vancouver, B. C, September, 1924, 
$1,214.75. 

Kansas City, Mo., District Council, June, 
July, August, September, 1924, $29,263.50. 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



Baltimore, Md., L. U. 101.— Bequest that 
General Executive Board purchase tickets for 
vaudeville entertainment for benefit of sick 
members ; received and filed. 

A reply to an inquiry of the General Execu- 
tive Board relative to funds of the American 
Federation of Labor was received from Frank 
Morrison, Secretary of that body and placed 
on file. 

Request of the First Savings and Trust Com- 
pany of Tampa, Fla., to open an account with 
that institution was received and filed. 

Appeal of United Leather Workers for finan- 
cial assistance received. ,p he Board could not 
see its way clear to extend relief at this time. 

Jacksonville, Fla., L. U. 1017. — An appro- 
priation of $200 was made for organizing pur- 
poses, to be spent under the supervision of the 
General President. 

Hamilton, Ont., Canada, District Council. — 
An appropriation of $300 was made for organ- 
izing work, to be spent under the supervision 
of the General President. 

Quebec, Canada, L. U. 730. — An appropria- 
tion of $400 was made for organizing pur- 
poses, to be spent under the supervision of the 
General President. 

Appeal of the Volusia County District Coun- 
cil, Florida, from the decision of the General 
President in the case of Paul Wooden vs. L. U. 
1725, Daytona, Fla. The decision of the Gen- 
eral President sustained on grounds set forth 
therein and appeal dismissed. 

Pittsburg, Pa., District Council's appeal : 
"Pittsburg, Pa., 

"February 3, 1925. 

'At a regular meeting of the Carpenters' 
District Council of Pittsburg and Vicinity, held 
on the above date, I was instructed to make an 
appeal against the election of General Officers 
for the years 1925-1929. 

"We, the Carpenters' District Council of 
Pittsburg and Vicinity, comprising Local 
Unions Nos. 142, 164, 105, 202, 211, 230, 237, 
255, 2S8, 333, 402, 430, 571, G99, 773, 852, 
890, 1186, 1252, 1273, 1382, 1430, 1732, 2264, 
hereby appeal against the actions of the Tabu- 
lating Committee who tabulated, or is sup- 
posed to have tabulated the votes as cast by 
the members of the various Local Unions of the 
United Brotherhood at the election of officers 
that was held during the week of November 
16th to 22nd, 1924, for the following reasons : 

First : The Tabulating Committee of five 
members which was selected in accordance with 
Section 9, Paragraph H, of the General Consti- 
tution, which paragraph specifies how they 
shall be elected and tbeir duties, and we claim 
that this Section has not been complied with, 
as this committee did not tabulate any votes, 
but simply tabulated the return sheets as sent 
in by the Local Unions and did not compare 
the statement of the Local Unions with the 
votes as cast by the members, which we be- 
lieve is absolutely necessary. The Local Unions 
are required to send tbe ballots to the General 
Office for comparison, otherwise what would 
be the necessity of sending the ballots to the 
General Office if they are not to be counted. 

Second: Paragraph I of Section 9, which 
reads as follows : "Any candidate shall have 
the right to be represented, without expense to 
the United Brotherhood, at the count of the 
votes, and have the right to examine any 
statement, sheet or ballot upon request." We 
claim that this section lias not been complied 
with to the fullest extent. This section, as we 
remember it, was placed in the Constitution for 



the purpose of allowing watchers during the 
entire period of the sessions of the Tabulating 
Committee for the purpose of eliminating any 
doubt of votes being counted for candidates 
other than they were cast, and in this case, 
the watchers who were duly authorized to rep- 
resent the candidates were not admitted to the 
sessions of this Tabulating Committee until 
the beginning of the second week that this 
committee was in session and if nothing else 
happened, we believe that the keeping out of 
the watchers and the working under locked 
doors of this committee for a period of one 
week, invalidated the entire election. Besides 
being eliminated from the committee room, for 
the first week, they were, time after time, 
eliminated from the committee room while the 
committee were in session for various periods 
which compels us to doubt very much the 
sincerity and honesty of the election. 

Third : The watchers were also prohibited 
from tallying or keeping count of the votes as 
cast for the various candidates that they were 
representing and not allowed to take any 
figures or make any notes, as far as the com- 
mittee's ruling was concerned. There was no 
way in which the watchers were able to carry 
out the purpose for which they were sent to 
Indianapolis. They were not even treated 
courteously, although they were the duly au- 
thorized watchers or overseers for the election. 

Fourth : That the Tabulation Committee 
opened all envelopes marked "Return" up to 
L. U. 500 in the presence of the watchers, 
but after Local 500 was passed, the Tabulation 
Committee opened all returns at a private ses- 
sion of the committee and when no watchers 
were present nor were they informed that it 
was to be done. 

Therefore, for these overt acts by the Tabula- 
ting Committee we are of the opinion that 
these acts invalidated the entire election of 
General Officers for the term beginning April 
1, 1925, and ending April 1, 1929, and hereby 
appeal to you to set aside and declare null 
and void the report of the Tabulating Com- 
mittee declaring their labors at an end and the 
various officers, whom they declared were elect- 
ed in accordance with the circular sent out by 
the General Office, under date of January 26, 
1925, and that a new election be held and the 
votes that will be cast in the new election be 
counted in strict accordance with the Constitu- 
tion and that no session of the Tabulating 
Committee be held wherein the watchers, if 
any, shall not be admitted to these sessions. 
Fraternally yours, 
CARPENTERS' DISTRICT COUNCIL. 
(Signed) 

WM. P. PATTON, Secretary. 
E. W. WILLIAMS, President. 
(Seal) 

A similar appeal was received from L. U. 
211, Pittsburg, Pa. 

In the protest or appeal of the Pittsburg, 
Pa., District Council against the manner in 
which the Tabulating Committee reached its 
report on election of General Officers, the Dis- 
trict Council was notified by wire under date 
of March 25, 1925, that the case would be 
heard by the General Executive Board on Mon- 
day morning at 10 o'clock, March 30, 1925, at 
the General Office, at which the District Coun- 
cil could be represented if it so desired. 

On the date set the hearing was held. The 
rittsburg District Council was represented by 
Brother E. W. Williams, President of the Dis- 



THE CARPENTER 



trict Council, also President of L. U. 211, Pitts- 
burg, Pa., who was one of the representatives 
from that District Council during the tabu- 
lating and counting of the vote on the election 
of General Officers by the Tabulating Commit- 
tee. The members of the Tabulating Commit- 
tee were also present. 

In the first reason for the appeal it is 
claimed that the election returns were tabu- 
lated and counted without being compared with 
the individual ballots cast by the members. 
The Chairman of the Tabulating Committee ex- 
plained that all the ballots received were placed 
in groups of ten in numerical order, so that if 
a request was made to compare the ballots as 
cast by the individual members with the re- 
turns as filed by the Local Union, they would 
be in position to do so without delay, but that 
no such request was made at any time by any 
of the representatives. 

The election returns being the official docu- 
ment received from a Local Union showing the 
number of votes cast for each candidate prop- 
erly dated, sealed and signed by the Tellers, 
the President and Recording Secretary of the 
Local Union, was the only document from 
which the committee could compile its report. 
However, if any election returns were pro- 
tested, then the ballots would be referred to in 
order to verify the election returns. To the 
question asked : "Was there any request made 
by any of the representatives of the candidates, 
that the election returns be compared with the 
ballots," the answer was "No, not by any one." 

In the second reason for the appeal it is 
stressed that representatives of candidates 
shall have the right to examine any statement, 
sheet or ballot upon request. When Brother 
Williams, representing the Pittsburg District 
Council was asked, "Were you denied the right 
to examine any return sheet from any Local," 
he answered "No, we were not." When asked, 
"Were you denied the privilege of comparing 
the ballots with the returns from the Local 
Unions," he answered "No." 

In the third reason for the protest it is 
claimed that the representatives of the candi- 
dates who are referred to as the watchers or 
overseers for the election, were not allowed 
to keep count of the votes as cast for the vari- 
ous candidates that they represented. It was 
pointed out that the Tabulating Committee is 
the only official authority to count the vote, 
that that committee was elected by the conven- 
tion to do that work and that no other body 
was authorized or empowered to do so. How- 
ever, representatives of candidates could be 
present to examine any statement, sheet or 
ballot if they so desired, but no such request 
was made by any one present. When the ques- 
tion was asked, "How the District Council got 
the idea that the representatives of the candi- 
dates were the overseers of the election," 
Brother Williams answered, "That is a miscon- 
ception." 

It was pointed out that the Tabulating Com- 
mittee represents the entire membership and 
not any individual candidate. While the rep- 
resentatives only represent certain candidates. 

In the fourth reason :Tor "the appeal it is 
claimed that the Tabulating Committee opened 
some of the official election returns when the 
representatives of the candidates were not 
present. It was pointed out that our laws 
provide that representatives of candidates may 
be present during ILe count cf votes, but they 
do not state anything about the opening of the 
envelopes containing the official election re- 



turns. Brother Williams replied "That he did 
not believe any votes were tabulated while the 
representatives of candidates were absent." 
Asked if he had any information in his posses- 
sion that the returns as recorded were not 
correct, Brother Williams answered "No, I 
have not." 

The hearing of the Pittsburg, Pa., District 
Council appeal or protest closed and action 
thereon deferred in order to give the represen- 
tatives of the other Local Unions protesting or 
appealing a chance to appear before the Board 
as they were also notified to be represented if 
they so desired. 

March 31, 1925. 

The regular quarterly audit of the books and 
accounts was taken up and continued through- 
out the day. 

April 1, 1925. 

Audit of books and accounts continued. 

Contract with advertising agent for our of- 
ficial monthly Journal, "The Carpenter" was 
ordered entered into by the General Secretary 
in conformity with the proposed agreement. 

April 2, 1925. 

Audit of books and accounts continued. 

April 3, 1925. 

Audit of books and accounts continued. 

April 4, 1925. 

Appeals or protests against the manner in 
which the Tabulating Committee reached its 
report on election of General Officers were re- 
ceived from : 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., L. U. 514. 

Peoria, 111., L. U. 183. 

L. U. 514, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and L. U. 183, 
Peoria, HI., did not send any representatives 
to the investigation and hearing. 

L. U. 183 did however, send the following 
letter with affidavit from Brother H. L. 
Elmore : 

"Peoria, 111., March 27, 1925. 
"The General Executive Board, 
"Frank Duffy, Secretary, 
"Indianapolis, Ind. 
"Dear Sirs and Brother: 

"Your telegram dated March 25th received 
and placed before the regular meeting of Local 
183 last evening and after some discussion of 
same it was decided to not send a representa- 
tive to Indianapolis at this time. 

"Brother H. L. Elmore, who represented 
Brother W. K. Brown during the tabulating of 
votes, was present at meeting and agreed to 
furnish a sworn statement of facts as he saw 
them which he did this morning and I am in- 
closing same with this letter. 

"It was the same report in substance made 
to Local 183 by Brother Elmore that caused 
the filing of protest you now have before your 
body. 

"With best wishes, I am, 

"Fraternally yours, 
"JOS. W. GRANT, R. S., Local 183. 
"1117 E. Corrington Ave. Peoria, 111." 

State of Illinois. ) 

)sa 
County of Peoria.) 

Herbert L. Elmore, being first duly sworn, 
upon his oath deposes and says that he is a 
member of L. U. 183, of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, 
located at the City of Peoria in the County and 
State aforesaid; that he was the ^ duly ap- 
pointed representative of Willis K. Brown, 
a candidate for General President at the last 
election of General Officers, for. said. Brother- 



THE CABPEITER 



33 



hood, under and by authority of Section 9, 
Paragraph I, of the Constitution of said organ- 
ization ; that as such representative he was 
present on the occasion cf the convening of 
the Tabulation Committee after the last gen- 
eral election for the purpose of tabulating the 
votes cast at said election ; that ' j and other 
representatives at that time endeavored to ex- 
amine statements, sheets and ballots pertaining 
to said election but such right was denied by 
said Tabulation Committee, which was a clear 
violation of said section and paragraph above 
cited ; that this affiant was present on such 
occasion seventeen days and during all of said 
time this affiant and also other representatives 
were even denied the right to have chairs or 
seats in the room where the Tabulation Com- 
mittee was at work ; that said committee in- 
structed this affiant that he should make no 
memorandum concerning the results of the 
tabulation and such instruction was enforced 
by the Tabulation Committee, that in substance 
this affiant was advised by said committee that 
his presence at the tabulation was not desired 
by the committee ; that because of the attitude 
of the committee this affiant was unable to 
learn little, if anything, concerning the tabula- 
tion of the votes and the results thereof, all of 
which was a violation of the section and para- 
graph quoted above. 

This affiant further states that the Tabu- 
lation Committee did not tabulate the votes in 
accordance with the provision of Paragraph 9, 
Section H, of the Constitution of the organiza- 
tion ; that the committee merely tabulated the 
votes of each Local Union according to the re- 
port of the Secretary of each Local Union, that 
the ballots were not individually tabulated and 
counted in order to ascertain if the Secretary's 
report was correct ; that the said last men- 
tioned section and paragraph provides that 
the votes be tabulated according to the intent 
of the voters ; that the intent could not be 
known without the tabulation and examination 
of the ballots ; that therefore the method of 
tabulation provided by our Constitution was 
flagrantly violated ; that the tabulation as a 
whole was unlawfully conducted by the Tabu- 
lation Committee. 

Further this affiant saith not. 

HERBERT L. ELMORE." 

Subscribed and sworn to by the said Herbert 
L. Elmore, before me, a Notary Public in and 
for said County and State this 27th day of 
March, A. D., 1925. 
(Seal) HENRY J. INGRAM, Notary Public. 

To these documents the Tabulating Commit- 
tee made the following reply to the General 
Executive Board : 
To the General Executive Board. 

Brothers : 

Be advised that careful consideration and 
review has been given and made of the resolu- 
tions of protest filed with you by L. U. 514 of 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and L. U. 183 of Peoria, 
111., as much is said therein of their belief and 
what appears to be, we are not qualified to 
answer, but a specific charge is made that 
representatives or watchers appearing before 
the Tabulation Committee were denied the 
right to examine any statement, slice! or bal- 
lot, and as. a consequence such claim of dcuial 
Is positively false. 

However, a statement made and sworn to by 
Brother H. L. Elmore, on March 27, 1925, can 
not be allowed to go without denial. In line 
eleven, of. said statement it. is. claimed that, he, 



Brother Elmore, and other representatives en- 
deavored to examine statements, sheets and 
ballots pertaining to said election of General 
Officers, but such right to so examine was 
denied by the Tabulation Committee. This 
statement, sworn to, is treacherous and false 
to the extreme, and challenge is hereby made 
against this commission of perjury. If any 
means are possible we sincerely ask for the co- 
operation of the Executive Board in bringing 
this pronounced defamer of character to make 
amends for the libelous expression herein re- 
ferred to. 

Most respectfully submitted, 
JOHN HALKETT, 
J. L. BERNICKER, 
L. G. KRAMER, 
TOM F. BAYS, 
JOHN M. SHIRK. 

Six witnesses testified that the representa- 
tives of the candidates were not denied the 
right to examine any statement sheet or ballot 
and that no request was made by any repre- 
sentative to do so. This contradicts the sworn 
statement of Brother Elmore. The General Sec- 
retary was therefore directed to communicate 
with L. U. 1S3 for a further explanation. 

During the investigation and hearing on the 
appeals or protests of the Pittsburg, Pa., Dis- 
trict Council, Local Union 211, Pittsburg, Pa., 
L. U. 514, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., L. U. 183, Peoria, 
111., it was clearly shown and proven that the 
Tabulating Committee did not deny L he repre- 
sentatives of the candidates the right to ex- 
amine any statement, sheet or ballot. In fact, 
the evidence shows that there was no such 
request made on the Tabulating Committee by 
any of the representatives of the candidates at 
any time while the vote was being tabulated 
and counted, nor was it shown that the Tabu- 
lating Committee erred in any way in tabu- 
lating and counting the vote. The correctness 
of the vote cast for each candidate is not ques- 
tioned. 

The Tabulating Committee again verified the 
statement in their report : 

"That at no time during the tabulation or 
the progress of same did any of the members 
making protest complain of treatment accorded. 
Neither did they question any decision made, 
or method of tabulation, or means used to ob- 
tain results of election." 

The Tabulating Committee is not accused of 
fraud or dishonesty, nor has it been shown 
that they erred in counting the vote. There- 
fore the General Executive Board reaffirms 
their former action taken at the January, 1925, 
meeting of that body in accepting the report 
of the Tabulating Committee as submitted to 
them at that time by the General President, 
printed copies of which have since been dis- 
tributed to all our Local Unions, showing that 
the following candidates were duly and regu- 
larly elected General Officers of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America for the term beginning April 1, 1925, 
and ending March 31, 1929, in accordance with 
our laws : 

Wm. L. Hutcheson, General President. 

John T. Cosgrove, First General Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

George H. Lakey, Second General Vice-Pres- 
ident. 

Frank Duffy, General Socretary. 

Thomas Neale, General Treasurer; 

T. M. Gucrin, G. E. B., First District, 

W. T. Allen, G. E. B., : Second District.. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



John H. Potts, G. B. B., Third District. 

James P. Ogletree, G. E. B., Fourth District. 

J. W. Williams, G. E. B., Fifth District. 

Wm. A. Cole, G. E. B., Sixth District. 

Arthur Martel, G. E. B., Seventh District. 

President Hedrick of the Building Trades 
Department of the American Federation of La- 
bor visited the Board and extended fraternal 
greetings. 

In the presence of many friends and mem- 
bers of our organization, the following Gen- 
eral Officers were duly and officially obligated 
and installed for the present term ending 
March 31, 1929 : 

Wm. L. Hutcheson, General President. 

John T. Cosgrove, First General Vice-Pres- 
ident. 

George H. Lakey, Second General Vice-Pres- 
ident. 

Thomas Neale, General Treasurer. 

T. I.I. Guerin, G. E. B., First District. 

W. T. Allen, G. E. B., Second District. 

John H. Potts, G. E. B., Third District. 

7 runes P. Ogletree, G. E. B., Fourth District. 

J. W. Williams, G. E. B., Fifth District. 

Wm. A. Cole, G. E. B., Sixth District. 

Arthur Martel, G. E. B., Seventh District. 

General President Hutcheson on behalf of 
the newly installed officers thanked those pres- 
ent for attending the installation ceremonies. 

A similar appeal to those already received 
from the Pittsburg District Council, Local 
Unions 211, Pittsburg, Pa., 514, Wilkes-Barre, 
Pa., and 183, Peoria, 111., from C. J. Mulcahy, 
endorsed by L. U. 632, Providence, R. I., was 
placed before the Board by the General Presi- 
dent, but as the Board had already acted on 
the aforementioned appeals no further action 
was necessary on this one. 

April 6, 1925. 

Communications addressed to the General 
Executive Board relative to a letter issued by 
L. U. 2140, Detroit, Mich., under date of Jan- 
uary 30, 1925, were placed before the Board 
and the reply of the General Secretary thereto 
was endorsed. 

Baltimore, Md., District Council. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from $1 to $1.10 per 
hour, effective June 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
as reports are made to the General Office. 

Columbus, Miss., L. U. 1544. — Movement for 
an increase in wages from 65c to 75c per hour, 
effective May 1, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Cornwall, Ont., Can., L. U. 2307. — Movement 
for an increase in wages from 55c to 65c per 
hour, effective June 1, 1925. Official sanction 
granted ; financial aid to be considered later, 
in such sums as the funds will warrant, as 
reports are received at the General Office. 

White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., L. U. 2427. 
— Movement for an increase in wages from 
66c, 9 hours to 75c and 8 hours, effective June 
1, 1925. Official sanction granted. 

Baxter Springs, Kan., L. U. 1025. — Move- 
ment for an increase in wages from 75c to 
871c per hour, effective June 1, 1925. Official 
sanction granted when the provisions of Sec- 
tion 58 of our General Laws have been com- 
plied with. 

The District Council of Montreal and Vicin- 
ity vs. L. U. 1558, Montreal, Can. 

The report of the committee of the General 
^EkecutiveJ^oard.sent to, Montreal, Canada, to 



investigate the charges jnade by the Montreal 
and Vicinity District Council against L. IT. 
1558 of Montreal showed that L. U. 1558 was 
derelict in its duty in to-operating with the 
District Council and the General Organizer in 
bringing about a better state of organization 
in Montreal and said union did not assist in 
establishing equitable arid agreeable working 
conditions, in fact opposed every movement in 
that direction. 

Under these conditions the committee recom- 
mended that L. U. 1558 bb reprimanded by the 
General Executive Board [for its dereliction of 
duty and that unless it ico-operates with the 
District Council and the General Office in 
bringing about a better sjtate of organization, 
as well as establishing equitable and agreeable 
working conditions in Montreal and Vicinity, 
that its Charter be revoked. 

It was also the opinion of the committee 
that there are too many Local Unions in 
Montreal at the present time ; that they be 
consolidated and that the General President be 
authorized to proceed with the consolidation 
as soon as possible. 

After careful consideration and discussion 
of the entire matter the report of the commit- 
tee was unanimously adopted. 

L. U. 376, New York, N. Y. — The report of 
the committee of the General Executive Board 
sent to New York City to investigate the com- 
plaints made against L. U. 376, Brooklyn, N. 
Y., for violating Paragraph J, Section 9, of 
our General Constitution, showed that said 
L. U. did endorse the platform of a certain 
candidate for election as General President, 
which contained planks in opposition to our 
Constitution and Laws and not in conformity 
with our obligation. The officers of L. U. 376 
claimed they did not know that in doing so 
they violated either our Laws or their obli- 
gation, and that if they had known they would 
never endorse the platform. They also claimed 
they had nothing whatever to do with the is- 
suance of any literature of a scurrilous or de- 
famatory nature. They knew very little about 
our Laws and the manner in which the business 
of a Local Union should be conducted. 

The committee recommended that L. U. 376 
be reprimanded for the careless manner in 
which it transacts business, for its non-observ- 
ance of our Laws ; for the indifference and dis- 
respect in which its officers and members look 
upon our obligation and that if the Constitu- 
tion, Laws and Rules of the United Brother- 
hood are not observed, lived up to and enforced 
in the future, as well as the decisions, orders, 
findings and rulings of the General President, 
General Executive Board and General Conven- 
tions, the Charter of L. U. 376 should be 
revoked. 

The report of the committee was adopted. 

Davidson County District Council, Nashville, 
Tenn. — Request for an appropriation for or- 
ganizing purposes. Request denied. 

Appeal from the five expelled members of 
L. U. 181, Chicago, 111., received and decision 
of General President sustained, but as each of 
these members pledged over his signature, prop- 
erly witnessed that he would sever all connec- 
tions with the Trade Union Educational League 
and apologize to the Local Union for his previ- 
ous actions, the expulsion was lifted and the 
five brothers restored to full membership. 

Communication received from the Workers 
Education Bureau relative to change in name 
of that organization was referred to the Gen- 
eral Secretary for reply. 



THE CARPENTER 



35 



Appeal of Mrs. Agnes McGovern, Auburn, 
N. Y., from the action of the General Treas- 
urer in disapproving claim account the death of 
John McCall, L. U. 453, Auburn, N. Y. Deci- 
sion of General Treasurer sustained on grounds 
set forth therein ami appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of L. U. 70S, Forty Fort, Pa., from 
the decision rendered by the General Treasurer 
in disapproved claim account Frank Progritz, 
L. U. 76S. Decision of General Treasurer sus- 
tained on grounds set forth therein and appeal 
dismissed. 

Appeal of Thomas King, L. U. 49, Lowell, 
Mass., from the decision rendered by the Gen- 
eral Treasurer in claim for disability dona- 
tion. Decision of the General Treasurer sus- 
tained on grounds set forth therein and appeal 
dismissed. 

Appeal of L. U. 54, Chicago, 111., from the. 
action of the General Treasurer in disapproved 
claim account the death of the wife of Toefil 
Zimkowski, L. U. 54, Chicago, 111. The decision 
of the General Treasurer sustained on grounds 
set forth therein and appeal dismissed. 

Renewal Bond of General Treasurer received 
and referred to the General President for safe 
keeping. 

April 7, 1925. 

Cocoa, Fla., L. U. 1233. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 80c to 9.0c per hour, 
effective May 20, 1925. Official sanction grant- 
ed ; financial aid to be considered later, in such 
:sums as the funds will warrant, as reports are 
received at the General Office. 

Further relief for the tornado sufferers was 
referred to the General President as necessity 
arise. 

The reports of the General President and the 
Vice-Presidents were received. 

The following report was received from the 
•.sub-committee of the General Executive Board. 
Indianapolis, Ind., 

April 7, 1925. 

We, the undersigned sub-committee of the 
'General Executive Board, made an audit of 
Bonds, United States Certificates of Indebted- 
ness and United States Treasury Notes in safe 
deposit vaults of the Indiana National Bank 
•on the above date and find the following in 
custody of General Treasurer, Thomas Neale : 





Denom. Int. 


Total 


2nd Lib. Loan 50 $ 1,000.00 4}% 


$50,000.00 


3rd Lib. Loan 15 


5,000.00 4J% 


75,000.00 


-3rd Lib. Loan 9 


500.00 4J% 


4,500.00 


3rd Lib. Loan 35 


100.00 4J% 


3,500.00 


4th Lib. Loan 10 


10,000.00 41% 


100,000.00 


4th Lib. Loan 3 


500.00 41% 


1,500.00 


4 th Lib. Loan 20 


10,000.00 41% 


200,000.00 


Certificates of 






Indebtedness 






No. 1059 . . 1 


100,000.00 42% 


100,000.00 


United States Treasury Notes : 




1 


100,000.00 u% 


100,000.00 


5 


10,000.00 41% 


50,000.00 


1 


100,000.00 4J% 


100,000.00 


Deposit with U. S. 


1 


500.00 




5785,000.00 


(Signed) 







T. M. GUERIN, 
ARTHUR MARTEL, 
W. T. ALLEN. 

The General Executive Board authorized the 
'General Treasurer to withdraw $200,000.00 
from the Indiana National Bank of Indian- 
apolis, Ind., and deposit it in a silent account 



in the Union Trust Co., of Cleveland, Ohio, if 
satisfactory arrangements can be made. 

Appeal of B. F. Adams, Los Angeles, Cal. 
The dispensation granted by the General Presi- 
dent is so recorded on the card of B. F. Adams 
at the General Office showing that his standing 
is clear, as the General President is authorized 
to grant dispensations in cases of this kind, 
the appeal is dismissed. 

The General Secretary was instructed to se- 
cure prices from accountants for auditing the 
accounts of General Office for present term. 

There being no further business to come be- 
fore the Board at this time, the minutes were 
read and approved and the Board adjourned to 
meet at the General Office, Tuesday, June 16, 
1925, at 10 A. M. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK DUFFY, Secretary. 



Late Brother J. M. Hervieux 

The late Brother J. M. Hervieux was 
born at Richelieu in the Province of 
Quebec in 1857. Subsequently he came 
to the United States where he resided 
for 48 years, of which 42 were spent 
as a resident of Springfield, Mass. 



A 


.;;,/;;■■.., f „ 



He joined our L. U. 96 in that city 
in 1S96, and was Financial Secretary 
from 1904 until the date of his death 
last February. 

For 20 years he was a delegate to 
the Springfield District Council, and 
Treasurer of that body for twelve years, 
besides being Treasurer of Massachu- 
setts State Council of Carpenters for 15 
years. 




Klamath Falls, Ore., Broadcasting 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

We are writing this letter to let you 
know what members would find if they 
came to Klamath Falls, Ore., this year. 

You will find that there are lots of 
men waiting- for a job. You will find 
that L. U. 190 has but one scale for car- 
penters and that is $1 per hour. You 
will find that the boys in No. 190 are 
trying to better themselves by enforcing 
all the laws in the Constitution, es- 
pecially Paragraph B, Section 46. 

This applies to Financial Secretaries 
as well as to the traveling members. We 
have found a number of union ( ? ) men 
who don't think it necessary to transfer 
when they can't get the scale on a job. 

We would rather feed a man than to 
have him scab on us, and we are going to 
look 'em over when they come to Kla- 
math Falls, and so we'd advise new 
comers to get into touch with either our 
business representative or the Secretary 
before you come, but remember that if 
you do come, bring that card along. 
Fraternally yours, 

C. D. LONG, Business Representative. 

L. U. 190. Klamath Falls, Ore. 
• 

An Easy Picture Frame 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

A very neat easily made picture frame 
can be made out of % in. oak flooring. 
Remove the under edge of the groove, 
bevel the edge, rip it any width from 
% in. to full width, stain it. 

If you have no regular stain, take 
your wife's black shoe dressing and you 
have a beautiful ebony frame. 
Yours fraternally, 

R. CLARK. 



Kansas City Auxiliary Social 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 122 of L. U. 61, 
Kansas City, Mo., is a little more than 
one year old. It is young, but healthy 
and growing, as we obligate new mem- 
bers each meeting night. 

We celebrated our birthday by an old- 
fashioned birthday party for our hus- 
bands and families. A good sociable 
time was enjoyed. We have over one 



hundred members now, but as we have 
several large Locals here we should have 
at least three times that number of" 
members, and are prepared to work to 
that end this next year. 

The wives, mothers and daughters of 
carpenters surely do not realize what 
they are missing by not organizing an 
Auxiliary. 

We would be glad to hear from all. or 
any of the other Auxiliaries. 
Yours fraternally, 
MRS. C. A. MAY, Secretary, 
1637 Mersington Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 



Flint, Mich., Auxiliary 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

The Ladies' Auxiliary No. 109, Flint, 
Mich., organized in October, 1923, meets 
every Thursday evening in the carpen- 
ters' office. Last fall we made a quilt 
and raffled it, which netted us $25. 

Every time we give an entertainment 
for the carpenters and their wives we 
get a few more interested in our Aux- 
iliary. 

Fraternally yours, 
MRS. W. V. PERKINS, Rec. Sec. 



Information Wanted 

This is a picture of Andrew Bourque, 
formerly a member of L. U. 595, Lynn, 
Mass., from which he took a clearance 
card May 24th, last. There is no record 
of this having been deposited, nor has 
any word been heard of him since last 




Christmas. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please communicate with Mrs. 
B. T. Porter, 104 New Park St., Lynn, 
Mass. The missing man is described as 
having red hair and brown eyes. 



Chips and Shavings 



Owing to an error on page 34, the 
name of General Secretary Frank Duffy- 
was omitted from the list of General 

Officers installed. 

* * * 

A bill has been introduced in the 
state legislature of West Virginia to la- 
bel convict-made goods. 

* * * 

A bill to limit the hours of working 
women in Tennessee to 50 per week is 
opposed by manufacturers. 

* * * 

Recent municipal elections in Sydney, 
Australia, gave a labor majority in the 
City Council, and the selection of a 
labor member as mayor. 

* * * 

In the spring time the union .man's 
fancy turns to thoughts of new mem- 
bers. Don't put it off. Get that one y6u 
have in mind this month. 

* * * 

The Oklahoma act compelling con- 
tractors to pay the wage rate current 
in the locality where a project is under 
way, has been declared unconstitutional 
by the Federal Court. 

* * * 

The spii'it of women is a priceless ally 
in the label struggle. Convince the wo- 
men — the buyers for the home — that the 
Union Label stands for fair play, and 
the battle will be won. 

* * * 

Under a law recently approved in. Bo- 
livia, employes of business and indus- 
trial concerns are to receive a yearly 
bonus equal to one month's salary, if the 
employer has made a profit in his busi- 
ness. 

* * * 

Trade unionists in Michigan State are 
supporting legislation that would in- 
crease compensation for fatalities and 
accidents in industry. Stricter state su- 
pervision over private liability com- 
panies is also urged. 

* • » 

About 38 per cent of the American 
people own their homes. The remaining 
62 per cent pay money to landlords. 



Rent money will, in a comparatively few 
years, pay for the house rented, but the 
landlord will still own the house. 

* * * 

Houses built of steel are being fea- 
tured in British building exhibitions. It 
is claimed that 800 men can build 150 
of these houses in a week, and the ex- 
periment is being keenly observed by 
unions in the building industry there. 

* * * 

Headquarters of the United Mine 
Workers, announces that the first wage 
agreement ever negotiated in the coke 
industry has been signed with the Con- 
solidation Coal Co. of West Virginia. 
This is significant when the opposition 
of West Virginia anti-union coal owners 
is recalled. 

* * * 

The best organizing period of the year 
is now immediately ahead of us. Let 
us see to it that we make the most of 
the opportunity. If we do that, then the 
close of 1925 should see us with that 
500,000 membership. Let us make our 
slogan: "Every member get a new mem- 
ber," and the job is done. 

West Coast cities are warning work- 
ers of unemployment in that section. 
Central bodies in many cities have is- 
sued statements on the labor surplus in 
their respective communities. 

The labor excess is especially true in 
the large industrial centers of Washing- 
ton and includes Seattle, Tacoma, Spo- 
kane, Bellingham, Everett, Grays Har- 
bor, Olympia, Kelso and smaller cities 
and towns of the middle state section. 

* * * 

There is too much talk of the so-called 
high wages paid to labor in the building- 
trades, according to Mr. W. J. Moore, 
President of the American Bond & 
Mortgage Company, and too little 
thought given to the fact that wages 
must be considered in relation to the 
work given in return. Efficient, uninter- 
rupted labor paid for at a high rate, is 
in the end more economical and satis- 
factory, than having operations retard- 
ed or held up altogether by discontented 
workmen, he says. 



Craft Probloms 




Building a House 

LESSON NO. 1 
(By H. H. Siegele.) 

Carpentry, while it does not hold a 
place as such, is, nevertheless, an art; 
and the carpenter who has learned his 
trade well — who can do any kind of 
carpenter work, so that it is substanti- 
ally done, and at the same time, har- 
monizes and is well proportioned, is an 
artist; though he is seldom recognized 
as one. 

Perhaps the reason for this lack of 
recognition is due to the fact that many 
carpenters are really not artists. They 
think of the trade as a means by which 
they can make a livelihood, perhaps a 
little easier than in any other way — 
they need the money, else they would 
not be working at the trade. All of 
which, is more or less true in the career 
of every carpenter; but there is still 
another side to the question. 

"While it is true that carpentry owes 
the carpenter a living, it is equally true 
that the carpenter owes to his trade his 
very best, not only in labor, but in skill, 
ability and thought. The carpenter-art- 
ist knows before he starts a piece of 
work with his tools, just how the fin- 
ished product will look before he begins; 
that is to say, he builds the house, men- 
tally, before the material is on the 
ground. 

He sits down and thinks it all over — 
weighs, balances, reasons — makes com- 
parisons and changes, thus eliminating 
many of the unnecessary alterations 
that otherwise would be made during 
the construction of the building. 

Just as we believe that a carpenter 
should think out a piece of work, before 
he begins it, just so, we, the apprentice 
and I, are going to sit down and think 
over this imaginary house that we are 
going to start soon. 

Can we handle the job? Yes. Have 
we a set of plans? No, but we can make 
them. Have we the equipment necessary 
to do the work? To an extent we have, 
that is, the "old head" has a good set 
of tools, but the apprentice, who has 



been depending on borrowed tools to a 
great extent, must have a set of tools. 

A complete set of tools? No. What 
kind, and how many should he have? 
In the first place, let him get the very 
best tools that the market has to offer, 
and at the top of his list, let him write, 
"hammer and saw," the two tools that 
have had more influence on the advance- 
ment of civilization, than all other tools 
put together. 

The world would stop immediately if 
the influence of the hammer and saw, 
in their various forms, were taken from 
it. So we will place at the top of the 
list a hammer, and next to it, a saw — 
a nine point. A steel square with the 
inches of one side divided into 12ths. 
Chisels — % in., y 2 in., % in., and 1 in. 
A hand axe. A key-hole saw. A rip saw. 
A 3 ft. rule. Planes — jointer, jack 
plane, smoothing plane and a block 
plane. An oil stone. An oil can. A brace 
and a set of bits. A pair of scribers. A 




wrecking bar with a hook for pulling 
nails. A carpenters apron. A level (the 
aluminum level is perhaps the best, if 
handled with care). A nail set. A pen- 
cil. A hand floor scraper. A burnisher. 
A flat file, and a screwdriver. 

This List of tools will keep the ap- 
prentice on his feet for some time, but 
he should keep himself on the look-out 
for other tools that he may need, as he 
goes on. And when he comes to a place 
where ne needs a new tool, let him buy 
it without hesitation. Never borrow a 
tool if you can buy one. Use your own 
tools. Having tools, of course, you will 
need a case to put them in, and so we 
will start the job by making a tool case 
for the apprentice. 

Fig. 1 shows a perspective view of a 
simple tool case, which is easily made 



THE CARPENTER 



39 



and inexpensive. The most prominent 
feature about this case as it is shown, 
is the pad-lock. And why do we show 
it so prominently? Simply because oc- 
casionally we discover that a tool thief 
slips into the gang, but nobody knows 
him. 

That despicable creature will pick up 
any little tool that he can easily con- 
ceal on his person and carry it away, 
looking as innocent and unconcerned as 
a judge, but very thoughtful. That's the 
reason we suggest to the apprentice at 
the very beginning to keep his tools 
locked up when not in use. 

In this connection we want to suggest 
that the apprentice should have a tool- 
marking punch, with which" he can 
stamp each of his tools, either with his 
initials or with his full name. And 
whenever a tool is added to his set, let 
the first thing that he does to it be to 
stamp it. 

If every carpenter would do this, 
many of the tool thieves, now operating 




almost without danger of detection, 
would soon be caught, after which they 
cither have to reform, or be branded as 
they should be branded — tool thieves. 

Fig. 2 shows a section of the case 
with the lid in a perpendicular position. 
It will be noticed that provision for two 
saws and the steel square have been 
made on it. A side view of a hand box 
set into the case is shown, under which 
can be seen two planes lying on the side. 

In making this tool case we have 
taken pains to make the case fit the 
tools, as well as the tools the case. The 
dimensions of it were governed by the 
demands of the various tools, and for 
that reason we have not given them. 
The case, as well as the tills should be 
put together with screws. 



The sides are made of Ys in. stuff and 
the top and bottom are made of y 2 in. 
three-ply stuff. Before applying the 
hinges and hasp, the whole box should 
be covered with canvass and should be 
given three coats of paint. This will 
make it water-proof. The corners should 
be protected with heavy sheet-metal, 
soldering the seams. See Fig. 1. 

Fig. 3 shows a plan of the case with 
the tills in place. The till marked a 




also answers for hand box, and can be 
lifted out and put back into the case 
without removing the tools in it, ex- 
cepting the square and the two saws, 
for which provision has been made on 
the lid. 

The till marked b is merely a sugges- 
tion, showing how its space can be sep- 
arated. This separation should be gov- 
erned by the requirements of the tools 
to be placed into the various spaces, 
rather than by the drawing. Fig. 4 
shows a perspective view of the hand 
box. 




Ti a. +. 

Now let the apprentice get a few saw 
files and get his saws into shape — his 
chisels and Land axe should also be 
sharpened, for tools, while they are 
sharp when they come from the store, 
are not in shape for giving the best re- 
sults. Results is what the boss wants, so 
it will be well for the apprentice to be 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



sure to keep his tools in good shape 
always. 

He should also keep a piece of pumice 
stone in his box, and whenever any of 
his tools become rusty, he should bright- 
en them up with the pumice stone. 

The apprentice should form the habit 
very early in his experience, of picking 
up his tools at every quitting time. For 
by doing that he will not only save time, 
but he will prevent his tools from be- 
coming lost. If the tools are placed in 
the same position in the case every time 
they are picked up, it soon becomes an 
easy matter to check them over to dis- 
cover whether any of them are missing. 

In the next article we will commence 
the house. 



Building a House 

LESSON NO. 2 
(By H. H. Siegele.) 

There are a great many things to be 
taken into consideration preliminary to 
starting a house. In the first article we 
had the apprentice fixed up with a set 
of tools, and a case to keep them in. 



Where this information can not be 
obtained by inquiry, it is advisable to 
make some tests in order to ascertain 
the exact nature of the ground where 
the basement is to be dug. 

These tests can be made with a 2 in. 
auger fastened to an extention rod long 
enough so that the test holes can be 
bored as deep as the basement is to be. 

Where rock or gravel are encountered, 
special provision must be made for re- 
moving it, which always means extra 
expense, and that is one of the princi- 
pal items to be kept in mind. 

Now we are ready to stake out the 
building, which we will do according to 
the sketch shown by Fig. 5. 

Measuring back 15 ft. from the front 
lot line, and to stakes driven at these 
points we will fasten the line a-b. Then 
with the squaring device, which is made 
of lx6's, we will proceed to square one 
corner. 

Point c being located at the corner, 
we will locate point d at any convenient 
place on the line a-b. 

Now the line e-g is fastened to stakes 
which are driven in such a manner that 































a 


^h 














f >A 










e-« — 


c* 


^^^ 


^^ 


, 








9 H 


r 
o 

-i 






6 > 


c^* 6 














r 

z 
m 






















/ 










-_> ~" 




































; 

c 


» 

a 




















< 


? a 












J-«- 
















i-k 






u 


Fig. ■s. 


















i-» 





The boss has pointed out to us the 
lot, and after having made inquiry, we 
found that we would not encounter any 
gravel or rock, on excavating for the 
basement. 



the line will cross, both point c and point 
f. Parallel to, and 28 ft. from line e-g, 
we will stretch the fine j-k. 

The line h-i is stretched parallel to 
and 30 ft. from line a-b. The batter 



THE CARPENTER 



41 



boards, which are shown by Fig. 6, can 
now be placed permanently. A perspec- 




tive view of one of the corners with the 
batter boards in place, is shown within 
the dotted lines of this figure. 

The dotted lines, both of the plan and 
of the perspective view, represent the 
out and the inside of the basement 




Fie. 7. 



Avails. Where these lines cross the bat- 
ter boards, a saw kerf should be cut, 




into which the lines can be inserted 
when the basement walls are located. 

While the excavators are digging the 
basement the apprentice and I will make 
two pairs of trestles, a bench, a long 




straight-edge, a short straight-edge, a 
10 ft. pole and a 16 ft. pole. Fig. 7 and 
Fig. 8 show, respectively, a side view 
and an end view of a trestle, which we 
believe gives better service than the 
trestle commonly used. 

It is made 4 ft. from center of legs 
to center of legs, in order to make it 




Fl G. 1 0. 



possible to set it onto joists spaced 16 
in. on center — this is illustrated by 
Fig. 7. 

Details of the bench are shown by 
Figs. 9, 10 and 11. The width should 




Fig. 8. 



Fi C. 11. 

not be over 30 in., thus permitting it to 
pass through a 2-S door. If the outside 
doors are less than that, the bench 
should be made accordingly. The ab- 
sence of braces on the legs of the bench 



42 



TIIE CARPENTER 



from the aprons down, makes it possible 
to move the bench over material easily, 
and also makes available the space un- 
der the bench for storing material, such 
as baseboards, moulding and other long 
stuff. 

Fig. 12 shows a 16 ft. straight-edge. 
Fig. 13 shows a 9 ft. straight-edge with 
a block nailed to one edge at each end to 
prevent the straight-edge from rocking 











£S=S^ ^^ 




1- 


FlC. 12, 


1 




FlG. 13. 




FlC. 1* 



when placed against studding that are 
not perfectly straight. Two straight- 
edge levels are fastened to this straight- 
edge; one for plumbing and the other 
for leveling. 

The steel tape has almost obsoleted 
the measuring poles, nevertheless, there 
are many places where measuring poles 
can be used to good advantage. Figs. 
14 and 15 show, respectively, a 10 ft. 
pole and a 16 ft. pole. They should be 
accurately spaced, having the figures 
placed on them, starting at one end for 
one side, and on the other end for the 
other side. 

Now, while the apprentice sits on one 
trestle and the "old head" on another, 
the two will together build the house, 
mentally, somewhat on this order: 

When the excavating is done and the 
footings are poured we will build the 
forms for the basement walls. Then we 
will build the runs for the concrete men 
— when the concrete is poured and has 
had time to set, we will remove the 
forms, and start working on the sills 
and joists. 

We don't want to forget to frame for 
the chimney and for the cellarway, and 
we want to be sure that when we do, 
we will have them located right. Then 
we will put down the rough floor, and 
frame and raise the outside walls as well 
as the joist-bearing inside partitions. 

Here we will have to be careful, to 
not only get the openings at the right 
places, but to get them the right size. 



We will plumb and brace these walls 
before we commence with the boxing. 
This done, the ceiling joists can be 
placed. On this building we will not 
put in the rough stairs right away, be- 
cause it is really not a two -story 
building. 

If it were a two- story building we 
would install the rough stairway at this 
time. When the rough floor for the 
attic rooms has been laid, we will raise 
the rafters, and sheathe and shingle the 
roof. 

This done, we will finish setting the 
partitions, put in the rough stairway, 
and get the building ready for the 
lather, setting the window and .door 
frames, as soon as the inside rough 
work is done. 

The porches can then be built, and 
when the lathing is done we can fit and 
hang the sash, also the outside doors. 
Now we will put the siding on the build- 
ing and complete the outside. 

When the plastering is done, we will 
start to finish the inside — set the jambs, 
case up the openings, put on the base, 
build the cupboards, if any, lay the floor, 
finish the stair, put on the finish hard- 
ware, and turn the job over to the 
painter. 

We did not mention the plumbing, 
which should be done before the lather 
does his work in the rooms where 
plumbing is to be done. When the 
plumbing has been roughed-in, the base- 
ment floor can be put in, and the base- 
ment finished, at which time the walks 
should also be made. 

The basement floor done, the furnace 
men can do their work — the tinners, 
too, can get busy. The wireing must al- 
so be done before the lather does his 
work. 

The wireing for lights and for tele- 
phone, now, but the time will come 
when important buildings, such as resi- 
dences for men who can afford it, pub- 
lic buildings, and business houses, will 
be wired so that all the principal depart- 
ments or rooms will be equipped with, 
not only a loud speaker radio outfit, but 
with a radio apparatus to transmit and 
receive pictures. 

The apprentice will see the time when 
radio will have a marked influence on 
architecture. 

In the next article we will go on with 
the house. 



THE CARPENTER 



43 



Screen=Mould Miter Box 

An old contractor of Emporia con- 
ceived the idea that we are herewith 
presenting. Every year a large part of 
his work consisted of making window 




screens, and in order to eliminate un- 
necessary labor in cutting the miters 
onto the screen mouldings, he rigged up 
the miter box shown by the drawings. 

Fig. 1 shows the plan of 
the box, the base of which 
is made from a piece of 
2x8 plank, 16 in. long. To 
one edge of the base he 
fastened two pieces of 
steel, spreading them with 
washers as shown. Be- 
tween these pieces of 
steel, at the center, he at- 
tached the three cornerel 
blade (a large mowing 
machine sickle blade), 
which is shown on Fig. 3. 



Between the blade and 
the outside piece of steel 
he inserted washers so as 
to hold the blade close to 
the inside piece of steel. 
The two edges of the 
blade were ground from 
the outside, thus giving it 
a shearing value when the 
lever, shown on Figs. 2 
and 3, was pulled either 
one way or the other. The 
steel was fastened to the 
base with long wood- 
screws, as shown on 
Fig. 2. 




On Fig. 1 are shown the guides to 
which the mouldings are held when the 
miter is cut — it will be noticed that a 
piece of moulding is shown in place; the 
dotted lines projecting beyond the shear, 
show the part cut off. The dotted lines 
shown at a right-angle to the moulding, 
indicate how the moulding must be 
placed to obtain the cut that will inter- 
sect with the one on the moulding. 

The contractor we mentioned above 
used this device exclusively for cutting 
screen mouldings, but it can readily be 
seen that other mouldings and even thin 




Fig. 3.- 

boards can be cut to a miter with this 
miter-box. The writer has seen the de- 
vice in operation, and knows that it 
gives good results; in fact, for cutting 
screen mouldings, it reduces the cost of 
labor about seventy-five per cent. 



Fig. 2 



Openings for Brick Structures 

There is probably little to be said 
about the finishing of the openings for 
brick structures, however, the method 
that we are showing herewith is prob- 
ably the simplest that can be employed. 
It should be remembered here, that sim- 
plicity does not necessarily mean a 
cheap construction, though, it may be 
economical. 

The very best of constructions are 
usually simple when you get down to 
first principles. Fig. 1 shows a door 
jamb with the casings and door stop in 
place. The point that we want to call 
attention to is the false-jamb, which is 
a 1x6. gauged to the width of the fin- 
ished door jamb, and permanently nailed 
to plugs driven into the brick wall at in- 
tervals of about twenty inches. The 
The positions of the plugs are shown by 
the dotted lines. 



44 



THE CARPENTER 



Fig. 2 shows a similar construction, 
excepting that the jamb is set on center, 




Fig. i. 




Fig. a. 

rather than to one side of the wall. Fig. 
3 shows a simple construction of a win- 
dow frame for a brick building. 

With indicators we are showing: a, 
stone sill; b, wood sill; c, stool; d, 




apron; e, lower rail of sash; f, parting 
bead; g, upper rail of sash — the stiles 
of the sash are constructed like the 
tipper rail; h, blind stop; i, brick mould- 
ing; j, head jamb — the side jambs are 
the same as the head jamb; k, inside 
casing; -1, window stop, m, sub sill. 

The dotted lines toward the top of the 
drawing show the form of the weight 
boxes on the sides of the frame, other- 
wise the construction is the same as the 

head piece. 

o 

Fastening Porch Steps 

Perhaps the most unsightly thing fre- 
quently seen about a building, is a poor- 
ly-fastened flight of porch steps. By the 
accompanying illustration is shown a 
simple, but substantial way of fastening 
porch steps to a porch. 

At a, is shown how a short piece of 
2x4 has been nailed to the face joist of 
the porch. The edge of this 2x4 should 
be so located that it will line up with 
the outside of the stringer, when the 
steps are set into position. After the 
steps have been put into place the exten- 




Fig. 3, 



tion of the stringer, shown at b, should 
be securely nailed to the 2x4 tie piece. 

If it is impossible to do this nailing 
from under the porch, then the upper 
step, marked f, should be left loose, so 
that it can be removed when the steps 
are fastened to the porch — after this the 
loose step should be permanently nailed 
into place. 

We are also showing by the drawing 
a substantial way of fastening the panel 
work of the sides to the stringer, by 
means of 1x3s. To the left, on the first 
step at c, we are showing by dotted line 
where the stringer is liable to crack, if 
it is not reinforced. 

This reinforcing can be accomplished 
by extending the 1x3 almost to the first 



THE CARP BITTER 



45 



riser, as indicated at e. The heavy dots 
shown on the 1x3s, represent a method 
of nailing. 



Nailing Siding 

(By H. H. Siegele.) 

There are a few points about nailing 
siding that we want to deal with in this 
article. 

Fig. 1 shows a face view of a corner 
board in part with three siding boards 



too close to the end. The result of 
such nailing is shown at c. 

The shaded outlines of the nails on 
Fig. 2 show how the nails should be 
driven with an upward slant. The dot- 
ted lines show the objectionable method 
of nailing; which, nevertheless, is com- 
monly used. 

The difference between these two 
ways of nailing lies in the fact that the 
upward slant throws the water out, 



CRACK. 



e^fc 



?'H» 




Fig. i. 

fitted to it. At a, we are showing where 
the end nail should be driven, that is to 
say, it should not be driven closer than 
2 inches from the end of the siding 
board; nor closer than a half inch from 
the edge of the siding board. 

At b, is shown the mistake that is 
commonly made on nailing the ends of 
siding boards. Here the nail is driven 



Fig. z. 



while the downward slant leads the 
water into the wood, thus causing the 
wood to rot around the nails, after 
which the siding becomes loose. 

The nails are shown set into the wood 
with a nail set. and the nail holes rilled 
with putty. This will prevent unsightly 
rust spots from coming to the surface of 
the painting after a few years of service. 




V6u LIKE a Saw. 
That's Better 



\ 



There is no guess- \ 

work about it. When % 
you buy a Simonds \ 
Hand Saw you get the \ 
best. 

Ask your dealer to show you. 



There is satisfaction in owning- a 
Saw that stands up and goes all 
the way with you. If it holds 
its edge and cuts easy and 
smooth it's a Saw that 
\ compares with SIM- 
ONDS BLUE RIB- 
BON L i n e — but 
you'll find few 
that do. 



:■■■:• 





Saw and Steel Co. 

Established /832 " Fjtchburg, Mass. 

Boston, Mass. • • • Chicago, III. 




Good 

News! 




Time payments for re-roofing jobs 
to make more work for carpenters 

YOU can now make more money than 
ever re-roofing with Johns-Manville 
Asbestos Shingles right over the old 
shingles. 

The new Johns-Manville Time Payment 
Plan makes these shingles as easy to sell as 
they are to lay. It greatly increases the num- 
ber of prospects you can sell to, making a 
plentiful supply of easy, quick, clean, profit- 
able work for carpenters everywhere. 

You get paid for the job immediately yet 
the customer has ten months to pay for his 
roof. Write for complete details of how the 
plan works. 

JOHNS-MANVILLE Inc., 292 Madison Ave., at 41st St., N. Y. C. 

Brandies in 62 Large Cities 

For Canada : Canadian Johns-Manville Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Asbestos 

and iu allied products 

INSULATION 

BRAKE LININGS 

ROOFINGS 

PACKINGS 

CEMENTS 






Asbestos Shingles 



CARP 




NTERS 

And All Other 
BUILDING MEN 



Here is a chance to earn 
more money. Learn Blue 
Print Reading and get a 
foreman's job. Learn quickly 
in spare time at home. We 
will help you get a good job. 
Don't worry about being out 
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permanent job with more pay. 
Write today. Tell us your 
trade. We will send you our 
plan free. 

COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL EST. 1904 

Dept. C-27 Drexel Eldg., Phila., Pa. 




MORRILL SAWSETS 

Set Saws Just Right 

"Saw Points" Telling You "How To Joint, Set, 
And File Saws." Sent Free Upon Request. 

CHAS. MORRILL, Inc. 



96 Lafayette St. 



New York. 



Nearly ONE MILLION MEN Have Used 

TAINTOR POSITIVE SAW SETS 

Are You One Of Them? 

Sold By Leading Hardware Dealers Everywhere 
Send for Book : "Care of Saws," free to members of 

The Brotherhood. 
TAINTOR MFG. Co., 95 Reade St., New York 




MEASURING TAPES 

and FOLDING RULES 

Used for over 40 years where quick and accurate 
work is done. High quality without high price ! 

KEUFFEL & ESSER CO. 

flEW YORK, 127 Fdlon Street, Genera! Ollice and Factories, H0B0KEN, N. t. 

ST. t,Qyi$ SAW FRANCISCO MONTREAL* 



A.tlc to see our com- 
plete line at your 
Hardware dealer's. 



Ljchicaso 





A poor nail set looks much like a good one. And any 
maker can say his set is best. That's why we GUARANTEE 
every SYRACUSE Nail Set. Crucible steel costs 60 to 100 
per cent, more than open hearth steel, but we use it exclus- 
ively. Send 25c if your dealer doesn't carry. 

SYRA CUSE TWIST DRILL CO., Syracuse, New York 



's cheaper to buy one good nail set than several poor ones 



The "INTERLOX" Thinks 

Don't use a stick or guess at a measurement. 
Quick, accurate, durable and rustproof. Use it once 
and you will never work without it. Write today 
for liberal selling inducements to mechanics. 

MASTER RULE MFG. CO., INC. 
841C East 136th St., New York City 



Invented by a Brotherhood Man 

The famous 
"Interlox" Master Slide Rule 

yes 

Ml 'll'llftllllW 

jives both inside and outside measurements 
instantly. 



A YEAR=AROCND, PROFITABLE 
BUSINESS FOR YOU! 

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NEW MODEL IDEAL SANDER 

Establish a pleasant, well -paying business of 
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We will send you the New Model 
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Sander out of your profits on our 
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BOETTCHER CO. 

440 N. Peoria St., CHICAGO. 

mmmmmmmammmmmmmmmm 




5 DAY 
TRIAL 



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covers each machine. 
Write for prices and 5 
day free trial offer. 

LincoIn=SchIueter Machinery Co., Inc. 

230 West Illinois St. Chicago. Illinois. 





"Hands Off 



» 



Brand your own name or initials on 
your tools, horses, scaffolding, tool 
chests, tool boxes, etc. Then thieves and 
borrowers will keep their "hands off" 
because a brand cannot be erased. 

Burn the permanent evidence of your 
ownership into all of your equipment 
with the Everhot blow torch and brand. 
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The Everhot Torch can also be used 
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Write and tell us what letters you want 
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the cost immediately. 

Complete Everhot equipments as low as 
$14.00. 




Manufacturing Co 

MAYVQOD. ILLINOIS 



» BE KKiKS^T Who* ecaic Poire 



:s 



at Wholesale Prices 

Are you overlooking the profit that 
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Any mason or carpenter can install Tile. We 

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Our Tiles are of the finest quality and we have Ra 

a largo variety of colors and patterns to f3jj| 

choose from. i s ij| 

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WRITE FOR CATALOG AND PRICES 

Lloyd Floor & Wall Tile Co. 

P. 0. Box 5064-A, Jij T//r 

Kansas City, Missouri. %CATAinrl 

lis 




FREE 

Tills Lufkln Steel Measuring Tape 
— as illustrated — is a necessity to any 
carpenter or contractor. We are giving 
it free to introduce our carefully 
Triple Tested Aluminum Lev 
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building foremen for their 
lasting accuracy. Your 
initials engraved 




level without 
charge If re- 
quested 



c n d Now— Prices 

Level — 12" — $2.75 — 

- $3.75 — 24" — 

$4.40 — 28" — $5.95. Send 

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and by return parcel post you will 

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fine aluminum Levels and a free Steel 

Measuring Tape. 

ALUMINUM LEVEL CO. of America 

P. 0. Box 5064. KANSAS CITr\ MO. 




No Extra Charge 

For This Outfit 

As soon as you are my working student, I send you 
without extra charge, an adjustable and folding draw- 
ing table, complete set of imported drawing instruments, 
alsoother tools to complete full working outfit. I charge 
only a reasonable tuition for training you UNTIL YOU 
ARE QUALIFIED as a REGULAR draftsman. 




To train yon on practical work under per- 
sonal supervision until competent as a reg- 
ular draftsman, and guarantee further to 
furnish you with draftsman's complete: 
working outfit, a Bpecial 'Chief 'sOwn"table 
and all the instruments you need— just as 
soon as you become my student— all to be in- 
cluded in the course without extra charge. 



Yon May 
Earn a 



Drafting 
Coarse 




by doing certain work for me at home dur- 
ing your Bpare time without interfering with 
four present work or position Find out about this special offer 
am making. There is constant demand for skilled draftsmen. 
Positions leading to something better and higher up. Many 
o portunities for high paid home work, by which you can double 
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Mail Coupon Soar FREE Book 

CHIEF DRAFTSMAN DOBE 

1951 Lawrence Ave., Div. 16*95 Chicago, III. 

Without any obligation to me please mail your book. "Success- 
ful Draftsmanship," and full particulars of your liberal ' 
Bona] Instruction offer to a few students. 



•Per- 



g Name ........................ Age. 

I 

I Address 

■ 

■ Poet Office State... 



IS NEW GUIDE 




4HARHHY VAIC POCKET SIZE-FLEXIBLE COVERS* 
IllinUI lULd. 1600 PAGES— 3700 TRADE ILLUSTRATIONS 
Condensed Contents Audels Carpenters and Builders Cuides 



GUIDE NO. I 
43I Pages— 1200 Illustrations 

-How to know the different kinds 

of wood. 
-How to use the different kinds 

of wood. - 
-Complete detailed information 

on nails and screws. 
-How circular and band saws 

are handled. 

-How to use the steel square. 
-How to sharpen tools. 
-How to file and set saws. 
-How to make wood joints. 
-Complete information regarding 

joints and joinery. 
-How to build furniture. 
-How to make a work bench. 
-How to make a mitre box. 
-How to make a mitre snooting 

board. 

-How to plumb and level work. 
-How to use the chalk line. 



-How to lay out work. 

-How to use rules and scales. 

—How to use all of the, carpenter's 
tools, with over 9no illustra 
tions showing specifically how. 

GUIDE NO. 2 

-How to understand carpenter's 
arithmetic. 

-How to understand geometry. 

-How to understand trigonometry. 

-How to solve mensuration prob- 
lems. 

-How to estimate the strength 
of timbers. 

-How to proportion beams. 

-How to use drawing instruments. 

-How to read plans. 

-How to survey. 

-How to draw up specifications. 

-How to estimate cost„ 

-How to build houses, barns, 
garages, bungalows, etc. 



GUIDE NO. 3 

-How to excavate foundations. 
-How to build foundations. 
-How to make water-proof. 
-How to erect post foundations. 
-How to build forms for concrete. 
-How to proportion foundation 

footings. 
-How to frame houses. 
-How to set girders and sills. 
-How to frame joists. 
-How to construct a well hole. 
-How to frame a studding. 
-How to frame corner posts. 
-How to lay out and cut braces. 
-How to attach lath to corner posts. 
-How to frame temporary and 

permanent braces. 
-How to frame girts and rib bands. 
-How to set window frames. 
-How to frame partitions. 
-How to distinguish various 

types of roofs. ' 



-How to use the settings 12, 13 
and 17 on the steel square. 

—How to lay out mitre cuts. 

-How to use tangent?, and full 

detailed information covering 

sky lights, scafford and hoisting. 

GUIDE NO. 4 

-How to put on wood, fibre and 
metal shingles. 

-How to lay gravel roofs. 

-How to lay tin roofs. 

-How to hang doors. 

-How to frame windows. 

-How to put on siding. 

-How to put on exterior trim. 

-How to do cornice work. 

-How to build stairs. 

-How to lath. 

-How to lay floors. 

-How to put on interior trim. 

-How to paint. 

-Hnw to give first aid to the 
injured. 




Inside trade information for Carpenters, Builders, 
Joiners, Building Mechanics and all woodworkers. 
3700 actual examples of efficient construction work with new 
methods, ideas, solutions, plans, systems, short cuts, time and 
labor saving suggestions, new ways that cover the entire theory and 
practice of the subject illustrated by sketches and forms, all specific 
and practical. Audel's Guides give you the short cut, professional in- 
formation you want. No need to guess or take chances. 

EW IDEAS and METHODS-SHORT CUTS 




sasonable Price" 

: find the Guides 
ry satisfactory. 
t e knowledge in 
im is much great- 
than I anticipat- 
A very conveni- 
; size and price is 
reasonable that 
;ry carpenter 
>uld possess a set. 
Ralph M. Collem- 
Lowell, Mass. 

ood For Profes= 
onal Carpenters" 

It is the most 
i n d y reference 
>rk that I ever 
me in contact 
th. It is the very 
ing that the build- 
s' mechanic needs 
ery day for refer- 
ee. I wish to state 
rther there is not 
foreman or super- 
tendent who can 
lord to be without 
is valuable work, 
vish you unbound- 
success. — George 
Watson, 13G 
nnson St., Long 
(and City, N. Y. 



Mow to Use the Steel Square 12, 13. 17. 

(Example From Audels Guide No. i) 

As an example of the thorough and practical way in which 
each subject is handled, there are 52 illustrations and dia- 
grams and 47 pages given over to the different uses of the steel 
square. Many carpenters use the actual pages of the .book as 
a hand guide in their daily work 

Here is a specimen illustration (reduced size) and the descrip- 
tion that goes with it. 

Rules 12, 13 & 17 on the Steel Square 

The lines radiating from division 12 on the tongue of the square 
to various points on the blade as seen in fig. M, are inclinations 
corresponding to the various roof pilches. 

The 12 inch mark on tongue and mark on blade opposite pitch 
desired is used to obtain cuts for common rafters. For octagon, 
or hip rafters use mark 13. or 17 respectively. In fig. S, the 
square is seen applied to a rafter with the 12 in. mark on tongue 
and 18 in. mark on body at the edge of the rafter corresponding 
to 3 pitch of common rafter. 

The inclinations A. and B, of the tongue and body of the square 
with the edge LF, of the rafter give the correct angles for bottom 
and top cuts for 3 pitch when placed in position; that is, when 
A is horizontal and B, vertical or plumb. 





EFPL INFORMATION 



IN 
FORM 



HANDY / 



"To Earn More, Learn More" is a true saying that ap- SJ^s 
plies to carpentry work. The better a man is equipped /jSt/jC" 



with practical working knowledge, the larger will > ^** /j ^ - 
be his share in the great amount of money that is /^. / <$ 
now being spent for building. These four S^yS "^ 



* S 



> 



practical assistants give you, step by step, A//^^ 
a progressive study course in modern >^vJv^ ^ <:^W 



4%^ 



y 4$r. 



\<? * s > 



Mv <f 




carpentry and house building. XcXV 

In plain language they give you SC X / <v< -J>& * *.*& 
the "HOW'S" and "WHY'S"— S^/j* 
the best approved methods of **&/+. 
doing any building job well. /J&S r 

EXAMINATION 









>*« 



\ T ot a cent to pay until you see the 

books. No obligation to buy 

.lnless you are satisfied. Fill 

in coupon in pencil. Send 

now— today— get this great 

'ielp library for carpeu- ~'^b S ^? 

ters and builders. /cy/.^ 






><J, *c< % 







, & 



Get into the Floor Surfacing Business 
While the Field Is Fresh 

$40 to $50 a day easily earned 
with an AUTOMATIC— 

the result of 16 
years' manufactur- 
ing experience. 
Force Feed Lubri- 
cation — SKF Ball- 
bearings — Whit- 
ney Silent Chain 
— Roller Pressure 
Regulator — ALL 
Dust taken up on 
forward operation 
with New Vacuum 
Nozzle. All work- 
ing parts inclosed. 
Write today — Let 
us tell you how to 
get started in this pay- 
ing business. Free trial. 
Part d w n — balance 
easy payments. 

The Little Auto- 
matic Surfacing Ma- 
chine (on table) is a 
wonder for removing 
varnish from desk 
tops, counters, etc.. 
or for all sorts of 
new work. 

Wayvell Chappell 
& Co. 

38 Jackson St. 

Dept. W 
Waukegan, 111. 





YOU NEED A 
HUTHER DADO HEAD 




The adjustable groover 
that cuts with or across 
grain. Easily adjusted with- 
out the use of screws, just 
add or remove inside cut- 
ters to make the desired cut. 
May be returned it not satis- 
factory. Sent on approval. 

Write for our new cata- 
log No. 43, showing- many 
special tools for your saw rig. 

Huther Bros. Saw Mfg. Co. 

Rochester, N. Y. 



G & B Junior u s Pat 
CONVERTIBLE LEVEL 

Level and Transit combined 

Powerful Lenses, graduated circle, 

clamp screw, etc. Complete as shown. 

$5.00 will bring it to you. 



10 Days 
Free Trial 




Transi: position 



Make sure the in 
strument you 
buy IS con- 
vertible. 

Sights can 
be taken 
4 ft. to I 
mile. 




Cash or time 
payments 
deposit 
cheerfully re- 
turned if not 
satisfied. 



Easy to op- 
erate, noth- 
ing to get 
out of order. 



Instruction 
Book FREE 



Why pay a high price when we guarantee 
the G & B JUNIOR to fully answer your 
needs. DON'T buy an Instrument until 
you know all about the JUNIOR. 

Write AT ONCE for Circular E. 

GEIER & BLUHM, INC. 



672 River St. 



Troy, N. Y. 



I ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP | 




MANY GOOD 
CARPENTERS 



All over the country 
have started in this 
work and built a 
very successful busi- 
ness for themselves 
in a short time. 

EASY TO INSTALL 
NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED 

Our prompt service and ALLMETAL 
quality ipill please you. 

- - — - "Send Back the Coupon* - - - - 

ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIP CO. 
227 W. Illinois St.. Chicago, III. 

Gentlemen: Without obligation, please send me sam- 
ples and literature. 



CITY STATE. 



The Balanced Tool— 

GERMANTOWN 
MASTER 
BUILDER 

Balance, weight, design, con- 
struction — all just right be- 
cause 68yearsof quality man- 
ufacture are in back of it. 



At your local mer- 
chant or write for 
Master Builder cat- 
alog of Hammers and 
Hatchets. 



Griffith Tool Works 
Philadelphia, Pa. 





Made from spe- 
cial grade steel, 
hand forged and 
hand tempered. 
Send 80c for a 
"Red Devil" 
Auger Bit No. 
2400-10-16ths 
in. size. 

Mechanic's tool 
booklet free. 

SMITH &HEMENWAYCO.,Ioc. 

Mfrs. of "Red Devil" Tools 
for Over a Quarter Century 

111 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 



You Owe It 
To Yourself 



• — to look into the re- 
markable development 
in "Red Devil" Auger 
Bit construction. Made 
with a single scorer 
opposite tl.e one cut- 
ting lip, it pulls itself 
into the wood in trac- 
tor fashion, cutting 
away a deep, course 
chip. This principle re- 
duces the fric- 
tion 50 per cent, 
bores with or 
against the 
grain of any 
ood, without 
logging or 
splintering 





SANDS LEVELS 

In A Complete Assortment Of 
Our Most Popular Numbers 

Look for this display in hardware windows. 
Genuine Sand's Levels are worth looking 
for. Their accuracy and convenience on the 
job are advantages recognized by master 
workmen everywhere. 

Compare Them 
and You'll Buy a Sand's 

Sand originated the spirit plumb and level. 
Nearly all the improvements since copied 
in other levels have been first used in 
Sand's Levels. The first aluminum level on 
the market was a Sand's. Sand's gives you 
the improvements first. 

Get a Sand's Today and Be Satisfied 

"Sand's Levels Tell the Truth" 

SANDS LEVEL &*TOOL CO 

5851 Fischer Ave., DETROIT, MICH. 




Setters 
Made ! 



bA y %e 

R00F^°DECK CLOTH 

RE6. U. S. PAT. OFF. 

An absolutely waterproof 

roofing canvas, for low 

pitched and flat roofs, also 

for the floors of piazzas and 

sleeping porches. Lays flat 

and stays flat. Will not crack, 

buckle or peel. No white lead 

bedding required. 

Write for sample 000k 
"T" and for one of 
our repeat memo pads. 

JOHN BOYLE & CO., INC. 

ESTABLISHED I860 
DUANEST. NEW YORK READE ST. 
BRANCH 1317-13 19 PINE ST. ST. LOUIS 




There Is No Better Machine 
Made Than the 

"Lightning Electric 

FIoop 
Surfaeer 

H you are interested in 
Surfacing Machines be sure 
to write for the literature 
on the "Lightning Electric" 
— the highest quality and 
most economically priced 
floor surf acer on the mar- a 
ket. Will do the work J£ 
of six to eight men /*& 
and do it better. 

No Old- 
Fashioned 
Side Roller 

The "Lightning Electric" will surface right up to 
quarter round without the use of the Old-Fashioned 
and cumbersome side roller. Leaves NO waves or 
chatter marks in the roughest floors— will NOT vibrate. 

Five Day Free Trial 
and Five Year Guarantee 

Write for our five day free trial and our five year guaran- 
tee on the best Floor Surfacing Machine the world has 
ever produced. Costs you nothing to investigate and the 
machine pays for itself the first month. A business making 
proposition for the contractor or individual — write today. 

National Sanding Machine Company 

Formerly The Globe Mfg. & Dist. Co. 

SaScs CtZleei 

543-545 Vedder St. Chicago, III 




A Raise in Pay 

for Carpenters! 



/^ESS^s 



;WEMHEft 



You don't have to let 
the standard wage 
scale limit your earn- 
ings. You can make 
more money as a Fed- 
eral Metal Weather- 
strip contractor, and 
you will have no slack 
season. 

If you want to increase 
your income and be 
your own boss, you 
owe it to yourself to 
investigate our agency 
offer. Others have 
found it very profitable 
— so will you. 



'Write us today. You can't lose 
anything, and you stand a 
mighty big chance of coming 
out ahead. 



Federal Metal Weather Strip Co. 

1238=50 FuIIerton Ave., Chicago, III. 




Hand-Made 
Adze. 

The kind that it is a 
pleasure to work with. 
Tool steel edge, — last 
for years. Ask your 
dealer to see one. If 
he doesn't care to 
please you, write for 
our catalogue. 



THE L. & I. J. WHITE CO. 

15 Columbia St. Buffalo, N. Y. 




Tremendous Saving In Cost 

Easy, fascinating work with our SIM- 
PLIFIED PLANS. We furnish blue 
prints, diagrams, motor, cabinet pieces, 
ready-built horn, etc. You don't need 
to be a cabinet maker. A few hours as- 
sembling and you will have a fine in- 
strument at one-quarter the regular re- 
tail price. Will be the equal of any 
phonograph on the market in beauty of 
tone and appearance. Will play nil 
records. Thousands hare built their 
own machines and are securing satis- 
faction and pleasure. You too can 

builel — do as well and save much money. AGENTS 

MAKE MONEY" making and selling these instruments. 

Write today for full details and our FREE OFFER. 
LUPERL PHONOPARTS CO. 

4936 N. Troy St. Dept. 32. Chicago, III. 




Lacing wood tor Dniiamg 

Get started now in a live business for yourself. 

You can earn more money manufactur- 
ing cement blocks. Let us send you full 
information describing this profitable 
block making machine. 

Cement Block Machinery Co 

52 Columbia Street, 
Phone— Mulberry 5198. NEWARK, N. J. 




Cabinet 

Shop 
Special 

No. 7 

$250.00 

as illustrated 
with motor 



This Parks is tbe most compact, convenient 
machine with such wide capacity yet de- 
signed strong welded angle-steel frame. Has 
circular rip and crosscut saw, Cinch joint- 
er, 16-inch band saw. Lathe and shaper 
may be added at small cost if desired. Op- 
erated on any light socket by % h. p. motor. Re- 
member, this is a real woodworker — not a toy. 
Write for circular and complete Parks catalog 

THE PARKS BALL BEARING MACHINE COMPANY 

1549 Knowlton Street, Cincinnati, 0. 

Canadian Factory: 200 Notre Dame East, 

Montreal, Can. 




1 11 1 1 III 1 n 1 il h 11 1 Hi ml in 11 1. 1 iii 1 1 1 11 1- 1 1 11,11 1 

WOODWORK! NG MACHINES, 



Thru Knots 

or Dowel Pins! 

No need to fear knots or dowel pins 
when cutting a mortise with the 
Champion Mortiser. It works with 
equal ease in any land of wood, 
whether hard, soft, cross-grained or 
end wood. Cuts a perfect mortise of 
any desired length, width and depth 
"slick as a whistle." 

The New Improved 
■ IPhampJonMoHisen 

■ / %*i«i i Mife'MiwA*l.ii.mii.iiii.i].rf 

— is five times faster than the old- 
fashioiitd hammer, chisil and brace 
and bit method. Carried anywhere. 
Cuts a perfect mortise J" to 1\" 
wide and any length from round hole 
to 6" slot. Can be used on stock 1" 
to i\" thickness. Special base for 
mortising wide stock furnished on re- 
quest. Year's guarantee with each 
machine. Sent complete with choice 
of any two bits U" to 3") $40.00 
f. 0. b. factory. Additional bits up 
to 11" furnished at $2.00 each. 
After ten days' trial if not satisfactory return machine at 
our expense and get your monty. You run no risk. Send 
today. Circular upon request. 

1 We also make 
motor -driven 
model, es- 
pecially suitable 
for large jobs. 
Ask us about it. 

COLGAN 

MACHINERY & 

SUPPLY CO. 
305 Hayden Bldg. 
Columbus, Ohio. 






THE 

EXPERT'S 
CHOICE 
FILE 



Does twice the work of an ordinary file — in half the time. 
The Expert's Choice increases the value of your time by 
over 50%. By spending 30 cents you can make it back 
on your first filing job alone. It's in the Quality — in the 
cut of the tooth and in the length of the stroke. 

Prank Luther. Chicago, says: "The Expert's 
Choice File files 18 hand saws and Is cheaper at 
a cost of 50c than the ordinary file at any price." 
You get your money back if the Expert's Choice does not prove 
to be the most economical file you have ever used. DELTA 
SAW FILES are made for fine or coarse teeth— also for that 
extra hard saw. Buy your tools of the dealer who sell* 
Delta Files. He is the quality man. 

Trial Offer lf y QUT dealer cannot supply you. send us 20c, 
25c or 30c for trial flle. sent prepaid. Do 
thui today — find out what a real file is 



"THE 'HIGHEST GRADE FILE MADE" 
DELTA "HAND SAW" FILES 



CARPENTERS SPECIAL' 



MECHANICS FAVORITE 

5 

EXPERT S CHOICE * 

DOES TWI CE THE WOHK IN HALF T H[ TIME \ 

The File You Will Eventualut Use 



DELTA 

FILE 

WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, 
PA. 



Look for 
This Sign 
at Your 
Hardware 
Store 



■ffig-'ar-"' ~*- tuJ - 



Tlt liul Auju Bit File mjiic — We Hill deliver on receipt tf 35 cut> each. 



w 

C ETTA R 
SHINGLES 

OESN'T it rouse your"Irish", 
Mr. Carpenter? 

To see this propaganda, 
backed by millions of dollars, to 
popularize substitute roofing for 
nature's unsurpassable product — 
Red Cedar Shingles — which re- 
quire your skill in laying? 

You should miss no chance to 
boost your own game by boosting 
all wood construction. The future 
of your trade depends upon it. 

Your name on the margin will 
bring you interesting shingle liter- 
ature. 

RED CEDAR SHINGLE BUREAU 

38 South Dearborn. Street 
CHICAGO ILLINOIS 



Plumbing, Heating and Pneumatic 
Waterworks Supplies at Wholesale 



When in the market for Plumbing, Heating and 
Pneumatic Waterworks Supplies and you wish to 



Save 20 to 40% on Every Article 

iiiiij ( 

Send for Catalog 
B. KAROL & SONS CO., 804 So. Kedzie Ave., Chicago, 111. 



order from us. Small orders are as carefully 
handled as large ones. Only house selling guar- 
anteed plumbing and heating supplies to all. 



55% Saved In Heating Costs in Portland, Ore., by 
Insulating with Cabot's Quilt 




THIS HOUSE COST 55% MORE TO HEAT than 



THIS HOUSE was lined with building paper. 




Residence of Dr. W. B. Holden. 
F. Manson White, Architect 



THIS 



INSULATED with 



THIS HOUSE. 

HOUSE WAS 

Cabot's Quilt. 
THIS HOUSE COST to HEAT, October to 
May inclusive . . . $88.72 
Average cost per month . 11.08 



THIS HOUSE COST to HEAT, October to 

May inclusive . . . $13S.10 

Average cost per month . 17.26 

The Heating Equipment was EXACTLY the Same in Both Houses (16-Section Gasco Furnace). 

The Hartog house was only 7% larger in cubical measurement, but being a two-story house 

was naturally much easier to heat than the one-story house on account of easier radiation and 

of the much smaller roof area ; but the e— — — — — — — — — — — — — — - 

Quilt insulation reversed 
this, so that it cost 55% 
more to heat it than 
the Holden house. 




FILL OUT THIS 

COUPON 

AND MAIL IT 



1 Samuel Cabot, Inc., 6 Oliver St., Boston. 
[j 5000 Bloomingdale Ave., Chicago. 

. Send me free sample Cabot's Quilt and J 
1 full information : 

| Name . ' I 

I Street | 

■ Town State I 




For Absolute Protection 
Use The 

k\ DEAD 
W) BOLT 

NIGHT LATCH 

An extra security on glass doors, as key may be turned once 
backwards, locking bolt so it can not be forced or knob turned 
without proper key. Easily installed on any door. Ask your 
dealer or write us direct. 

INDEPENDENT LOCK CO., Leominster, Mass., U. S. A. 






The American Woodworker 



Gasoline or electric 
driven. 

For use on the job or 
in the shop. 

Ask for Bulletin No. 
81, of these and other 
profit producers. 



AMERICAN SAW MILL MACHINERY CO. 




13 6 Main St.. Hackettstown, N. J. 



HANDY SAW 





The UBA 

An Adjustable Combination 
Level And Plumb That Can 
Be Applied To Any Length 
Straight Edge Or Board. The 
Level With An Instant Adjust= 
ment And Immediate Results. 

USE IT AND PROVE IT 



No Level Has Ever Been 
Made Before Combining 
As Many Advantages As 
The UBA For Heavy And 
Light Framing and In- 
terior Trimming. The UBA 
Is Durable, Simple, Guaran- 
teed and Rust Proof. It Is 
An Indispensable Utility Level 
And Plumb In All Branches 
Of Carpentry. 




Size 3Jx4 inches. 

Price $1.25 

Order Through Your Local 
Dealer Or Send Us Your 
Money Order And We Will 
Mail Direct To You. Mention 
Name Of Dealer. 

UNION LEVEL MFG. CO. 

4649 So. Ashland Ave., 
Chicago, 111. 




You Do Service To 
Yourself And Employ- 
er When You Put A 
UBA Into Action. The 
UBA Is Thoroughly 
And Rigidly Inspected 
To Maintain The High 
Standard Of Quality The 
Mechanic Insists On. Fin- 
ished With White Or Green 
Double Marked Bulbs. 




In Canada 

Have Tour Dealer Order From 

THE WALKERVILLE HARDWARE 

COMPANY, Ltd. 

(Wholesale Only) 
Walkerville. Ontario, Canada. 




TROJAN COPING SAW BLADES 

FREE CUTTING EASY TURNING 

FOLLOW THE CURVES WITHOUT BINDING 

A different saw. Teeth filed and set. 

Ask your dealer. 

Note: Or we will mail direct to you. 

PRICE 50c per doz. Postage paid. 

Sizes — Coarse & Medium. 

Ackermann Steffan&Co., 4532 Palmer St., Chicago, III. 

WRITE FOR YOUR FREE SAMPLE— TO=DAY 



6i" LONG. 
"ITS YOUR FRAME. 



Duplex Steel Bridging 

cost less installed 

than wood 

—And yet how much better, from 
the standpoint of both owner and 
builder. Strong, light, permanent, 
installed in one=eighth the time, with 
half as many nails required. 
Supplied in convenient flat bundles 
of 25, in six sizes for 8", 10", and 
12" joists and for 12" and 16" joist 
spacing s. Easily shipped and 
handled. 

With its many advantages, Duplex 
Steel Bridging will cut your bridging 
costs more than half. Write at once 
for free sample and illustrated folder. 



Here's the 
old way 
Wood bridging to 
be cut by hand — 
Two pieces, each 
with two or more 
nails on each 
end. Always the 
chance of split- 
ting, warping, 
and loosening, 
after installation. 

A puttering time 
and money-wast- 
ing job. 




And here's 
the new! 
GF Duplex Steel 
Bridging, in 
bundles ready 
to nail. Light, 
strong, everlasting. 
One piece and only 
four nails to drive. 
And costs less, in- 
stalled than wood. 



THE GENERAL FiREPROOFING CO. 
Youngstown, Ohio 

Export Dcpt. 438 Broadway, New York City — 
Cable Addr. "Genfire-New York" 




STEELJ LBRIDGING 



The General Pireprooflng Co., Youngstown, Ohio 
Please send me a free sample of GF Duplex 
Steel Bridging. 

Name 

Address 

City State 



REMODEL 

Hundreds of homes right in your neighbor- 
hood need to be "toned up" this spring. Many 
of them have old worn floors'. 

Every old worn floor is your chance to 

Make More Money 

The idea of a new oak floor is the easiest thing 
to sell, because it makes everything else in the 
room look better, newer, and more up-to-date. 
It makes an old house modern. 



An old home 
modernized by 
Oak Flooring 




Get in touch with a local oak flooring dealer, 
get samples and prices, figure the cost of laying 
yourself, and call on your neighbors. Show 
them how inexpensive the remodeling job will 
be. Quote cost by the room, not by the 1 000 
feet. The low cost will surprise your prospects 
and you. 

We Will Help You 

as we have many others. Write for "The 
Story of Oak Floors," a 24-page book in colors, 
to show your prospects. Wm. J. Benko of 
New Brunswick, N. J., got 6 jobs by distribut- 
ing 10 books. You can do it, too. 

Other free literature gives you technical in- 
formation on measurements, standard thick- 
nesses, widths, and grades ; also how to handle, 
lay, scrape, and finish oak flooring. 

Send this coupon today. 

Oak Flooring Bureau 

851 Hearst Bldg. Chicago 



» Oak Flooring Bureau 

851 Hearst Bldg., Chicago 
. Please send me "The Story of 
i Oak Floors." and "How and 
Where to Use Oak Floors." 

. Name ,„ J 

> 1 

I Address " 
1 
I City , State . 




1 

I 

ij si 



A good husky pair of 
end-cutting Klein's 
ought to be in your 
tool chest. Next to 
your hammer and saw 
you will find it the 
handiest tool. 

Klein's are made to 

last for years. Sturdy 

tools for the 

man-sized job ! 




Reading Architects' 

BLUE PRINTS 




Learn at Home! 

'TPHE building trades are booming. Em- 
-8- ployers everywhere are looking for men 
who can read architects' blue prints. Splen- 
did salaries and rapid advancement are 
offered men who have this special training. 
There is an easy, delightful way to learn. 
The International Correspondence Schools 
will teach you right at home in an hour a day 
of the spare time that now goes to waste. 
You will like the course because it is so 
practical. You work on actual blue prints 
— the same blue prints a contractor would 
use if asked for an estimate, or a foreman 
would receive from a contractor. 

In a surprisingly short time you can ac- 
quire a knowledge of blue prints that will 
be of great value to you in a salary way the 
rest of your life. 

Mail the Coupon To-day! 

BOX 8S34-B SCRANTON, PA. 

Explain, without obligating me, how I can qualify for the 
position, or in the subject, before which I mark X. 

□ Navigation & 

□ SALESMANSHIP 

□ ADVERTISING 
D Window Trimmer 

□ Show Card and Sign Painting; 

□ BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 
Q Private Secretary 

□ Business Correspondent i 

□ BOOKKEEPER 

B Stenographer and Typist 
Higher Accounting 

□ COMMERCIAL LAW \ 

□ Common School Subjects i 

a Mathematics 
GOOD ENGLISH I 

□ ILLUSTRATING 
U Railway Mail Clerk 

B CIVIL SERVICE . - 
Mining Engineer 
n Gas Engine Operating: 
C STATIONARY ENGINEE16 

□ Textile Overseer or Snpt. 
H TRAFFIC MANAGER 

y* □ AUTOMOBILES I □Spanish 
" '□ AGRICULTURE •□French 

□ Poultry Raising JHRADIO 



Math 



las 



Bsra I%JLiL I W e®h 



(J ARCHITECT 

H Architectural Draftsman 
architects' Liue Prints 

□ Contractor and Builder 

□ Building Foreman 

B Concrete Builder 
Structural Engineer 

□ Structural Draftsman 

□ number and Steam Fitter 
M Heating and Ventilation' 

□ Plumbing Inspector I 
Foreman Plumber 
Sheet Metal Worker 
CIVIL ENGINEER 
Surveying and Mapping 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 
Eleotrlo Lighting and Rjs, 
Electric Wiring 
Telegraph Engineer 
Telephone Work 
MECHANICAL ENGINEER 
Mechanical Draftsman 
Toolmaker 
Machine Shop Practice 

I CHEMIST 
| Pharmacy 

Name 



Occupation 
& Employer. 

Street 

And No 



Business 

_Addrcc3 _ 



City State . 

Canadians may send this coupon to Internatiotial Corre- 
, Qpondence Solwote Canadian, Limited, Montreal, Canada f 




JcVf»Here are two thorough-going 
"**ir tools of real outstanding 

merit. Made for the craftsman 

that buys the best! 

V & B Vanadium hammers are 
made from special V & B formula 
vanadium steel, and handled with 
the finest hand-shaved, second 
growth white hickory. Octagon 
necked, and round faced — with a 
special non-slip claw, that firmly 
grips either a brad or a spike. 

V & B Unbreakable Planes are 
drop forged — not cast — from a 
solid bar of V & B super- steel. 
They stand the falls that woidd 
break an ordinary plane. Fur- 
nished with all vanadium steel 
blades and walnut handles, in the 
popular sizes you will want. 
They'll make a worthy addition to 
your kit — ask your dealer. 




mjuhiractuihik 



2114 Carroll Ave.-v <v Chicago, III. U. S. A, 




You Need 

This File! 

The NICHOLSON 
Slim Taper is a time 
and labor saving saw 
file. It requires no 
breaking in, cutting 
the metal rapidly from 
the very first stroke. 
It is scientifically tem- 
pered to make it with" 
stand hard and con* 
stant usage. And it 
is not easily dulled. 
Made in all the re- 
quired sizes. "Making 
good" -« everywhere. 

NICHOLSOM FILE CO. 

Providence, R. 1„ U. S. A. 

-«a Tile for 

Every Purpose! 




IT'S A FACT- 

There's more power to your 
elbow when you're working 
with a Starrett Combination 
Square. 

Hardly a job comes up that 
you can't use this tool to ad- 
vantage because— in a single, 
accurate tool — this Starrett 
No. 94 gives you the use of a 
Rule, a Square, a Miter, a 
Depth Gage, a Height Gage, 
a Marking Gage, a Level 
and a Plumb. 



Then, there's the Builders' 
Combination Tool, No. 439, 
that's also a great time and 
labor saver, especially in stair 
and roof work. 

THE L. S. STARRETT CO. 

World's Greatest Toolmahers 

Manufacturers of Hacksaws Unexcelled 

Steel Tapes — Standard for Accuracy 

Athol, Mass 

STARRETT 

COMBINATION 

SQUARE 





Wliy noi send lor 
a free oopy of Cat- 
alog No. 23 "E"7 
It describes tlwjse 
and 2200 other in- 
teresting and val- 
uable tools. 




"I Recommend 

The Maydole Hammer" 

"You can't go wrong on a May- 
dole Hammer. It has been the 
standard since David Maydole per- 
fected the first adz eye hammer 
in 1848." 

Years of hard service are packed 
into its press-forged steel head 
and clear, seasoned hickory han- 
dle. The face has just enough 
crown and the beveled claws will 
easily outpull the ordinary ham- 
mer. And it has a 
balance, a *h a n g', 
that has taken 
years to perfect and 
that you won't find 
in any other hammer. 
Make sure that the 
name "D. Maydole" is 
stamped on the hammer 
head. It means that 
your hammer is the 
finest that an organi- 
zation devoted exclu- 
sively to the making of 
hammers for 82 years 
can produce. 
Tour dealer sells and rec- 
ommends the Maydole. 
Send for free pocket 
handbook No. 23 "A". 

The David Maydole Hammer Co. 
Norwich, New York 7052 




Hammer" 





You can get a million dollar guarantee on a ninety-eight cent hand-me- 
down, but it doesn't mean anything. 

Anyone can "guarantee" Overalls as good as SWEET-OKRS, but when 
it comes to duplicating the garments — that's a horse of a different 
color. SWEBT-ORR have maintained Overall leadership for 54 years 
by using only the finest denims, the highest grade workmanship, and 
charging fair prices. 

You have never known complete Overall satisfaction unless you've 
worn SWEET-ORRS. Insist on them every time. If not satisfied for 
any reason, your money goes back to your pocket. 

SWEET=ORR & CO., Inc., 15 Union Sq., New York 



EET-ORR CLOTHE 



TO WORK IN 




Level^Plumb BetteP-Quicker— OwnYbur Own 



Aloe Convertible Level and Transit Combined 




I! 



Brings 
it to you 



Increases Your income 



This instrument will add Immeasurably 
to your efficiency and will do more to in- 
crease your business, income and prestige 
than any investment you ever made ; 
it will put you in the bigger builder 
class. The Aloe Convertible Level 
is the world's best — a combination 
of both level and transit and quick- 
ly converted to the use of either. 
Takes sights either above or below the 
horizontal. Absolutely accurate — satis- 
fies the requirements of the most ex 
acting. An aid to lasting success. 



lou Learn To Use It in ' an 



No technical knowledge necessary. No 
previous experience needed. With our 
simple and complete instruction book, in- 
cluded free with every level, you can im- 
mediately put the Instrument to work. So 
simple anyone can use it. For leveling foun- 
dations, walls, walks or curbings— to 
straight lines or boundary lines— in sur- 
veying lots and fields—plumbing walls, 
shafts, trestles, posts and pillars, etc., etc. 




Easy Monthly Payments 

Just $5.00 brings it to you at once—for a 
free trial. If perfectly satisfied, pay the 
balance in small monthly payments. 

Write For Free Book 

Our free book--"Be A Bigger Builder** 
—tells you how to increase your income- 
how to get the profitable jobs. Write for 
I this book today* 



A. S. ALOE CO., 624 Olive St., St. Louis, Mo. 



Wallace Machines for Speed 

PUT Wallace Poi'table Machines on every construction job and 
see how they speed up progress! More speed nieans more 
work, for every home-builder wants his house finished in a hurry, 
and the man who combines speed with highest quality work gets 
the business. With a Wallace Universal Saw and a Wallace 6" 
Jointer you can do on the job most of the interior finish you now 
buy from the mill. These machines take their power from any 
light or power circuit. They are all direct-motor-driven. You can 
put them into a car and have them working on the job in a few 
minutes. And^they are precision-built for absolute accuracy. 

Wallace Portable 
Machines 

Wallace Universal Saw 
Wallace Plain Saw 
Wallace 16" Band Saw 
Wallace 6" Jointer 
Wallace h" Planer 
Wallace 6" Lathe 
Wonder Disc Sander 
Wonder Spindle Sander 
Wallace Glue Pot 

automatic heat control 

Send for Catalog 402 D and price list 

Wallace 
Universal Saw 

JT\ \%T 11 O (T* 154 S.California Ave. 

• U. W aiiaCe CL vX>. Chicago, u. s. a. 





™L / an ^ our 



We are celebrating our 40th successful 

Year of Tool-Making. We are giving away 

4fl yearg '/ $40.00 in Trade Checks to every Carpen- 

■ ter, Bricklayer, Plasterer, Cement Finisher 

or Tile Setter who will send us the coupon 

below — properly filled out. This amounts 

to $1.00 for every year we have been in 

business. Our 1925 — 40th Anniversary 

Handy Book and Catalog also sent free to you 

upon receipt of coupon. It is just hot off the press 

— contains 176 pages chucked full of the most use- 
ful information and largest selection of 

Masonry Tools ever shown ! Send for your 
\« m free copy of the catalog and $40.00 in Trade __.. __ 

lu/y Checks NOW! No obligation on your part \ ••■» — — - — ....^ 

whatsoever, to buy a dime's worth ! If you ' Goldblatt Tool Co., | 

do not want to use coupon — use a post card ! I L 518 B - ,^ a,nt l£ st,> 

■ Kansas City, Mo. 

' Gentlemen: 
! 12 ii« V «p» -n ^"V ■ Wit limit any obligation on my l 

mr-OJU.OlO.LL liMIl ^Vll Trade Checks and copy of your I 
P%-f%f'lTp' . rvftF" -To ■ , * ^TJTl 1;l - 5 Anniversary Catalog. | 

^\J<^fjMcigrges[ Exclusive Jousiness of its ]$,nd\ name . j 

$6 151 8B W alnut St., Kansas City, Missouri m ^^ addbess I 

Goldblatt Tools arffr TTyT*nr-» n .^.-tiSWl I 

used in all parts of rli*£j£K J "?-WJVKII-I«IiL^^* I 1 

the world / P *^ iH 1 1 ■ =M *t*l'J J Z*>*^ \ ,-„„■»»■» —■u.-^Jl 








Carrying that 
tool box! 

It won't 
get you 
anywhere! 

Some day you will be getting too old to put in the 
usual eight hours of daily grind. And when that time 
comes, the chances are that you will be practically penni- 
less. Without any income or working strength you will simply 
be — out of luck. 

Government figures show that 82% of the country's men, at the age of 65, are dependent 
on relatives or friends for support! The other 18%, who have money and are independent, 
are business men, not fellows who have worked for others all their lives! The working-man 
can't save. No matter how hard he may try, it's practically impossible to provide for an 
independent old age. 

IT'S UP TO YOU! 

Do you want to be one of the 82% or one of the 18% who have money and are independ- 
ent? We know your answer, and we can tell you how to get into the 18% class. Listen: 

More and more carpenters every year, all over the country, are grasping the opportunity 
afforded them by the modern method of surfacing floors. Most of them originally answered 
just such an ad as this, and today they are making big money as floor surfacing contractors. 
Anyone who is industrious can make a success of this business. The wages of six men can 

jfljl^ be earned in one day by one man with the 

American Universal 



and you can do a better job to boot. A small amount of money starts you. 
No special training or experience required. Floor surfacing is interesting 
work in a new uncrowded field. 

Every new floor must be surfaced. Every old floor represents a resurfacing 

job for you. We show you how to get the work, in fact, help you in every 

^ way to get started right and make money. Sign the coupon, mail it today and 

we'll tell you about our Free Five Day Trial Offer. No obligation on your 

part whatever. 




TEAR OFF HERE AND MAIL IT NOW! 

The American Floor Surfacing Machine Co., 
522 South Saint Clair Street, 
Toledo, Ohio, U. S. A. 

Gentlemen: Please send without obligation to me, com- 
plete information and literature on your proposition. 

Name 



Street 



City. 



State. 



Don't turn this page 




until you have asked 
for your copy of the 
Sheetrock Time Book. 
Contains daily wage 
tables, memo pages, di- 
mension tables, hints 
on modern wall con- 
struction and other 
useful data. It's free to 
carpenters and build- 
ers. Fill in and mail 
the coupon now! 



Sheetrock comes in standard sizes: 

% inch, thick, 32 or 48 inches wide 

and 6 to 10 feet long 



UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

General Offices: Dept. 4, 205 W. Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 



K«». U.S.P.t.Of. 



SHEETROCK 

The FIREPROOF WALL BOARD 

Mail this coupon today 



United States Gypsum Company 

Dept. 4, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 
Send my SHEETROCK Time Book to— 

(Name). 



(Complete Address) 

Sheetrock is inspected and approved as an effective barrier to fire by the Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. 




SILVER 
STEEL 



ATKINS NO. 53 

Here is a saw that appeals to 
high class mechanics for gen- 
eral carpentry work. It is 
the most popular saw on 
the market today. The 
blade is genuine SILVER 
STEEL, taper ground 
Atkins exclusive dem 
askeen finish. Skew 
back, regular or 
ship pattern. Im- 
proved Perfection 
handle of apple 
wood, embossed, 
highly polished. 
Fastened to 
blade with 
three nick- 
eled screws 
and medal- 
lion. 





wxy This is our best 
JT Saw. Tbe Four 
Hundred. Preferred 
by master carpen- 
ters. Furnished in reg- 
^ ular pattern, skew back ; 
ship pattern, skew hack ; 
Ilpr regular pattern. straight 
PP back, ship pattern, straight 
* back. Fitted with Improved 
Perfection Handle, which pre- 
vents wrist strain. 



Another popular saw; a companion 
to No. 53. Straight back, regular or ship pattern. Sil- 
ver Steel blade, fitted with Improved Perfection Handle. 

The No. 51. Made of Silver Steel, regular or ship pattern. 
Applewood handle of the old style block pattern, polished 
and embossed. 

Place your order with your hardware merchant. Send 35c 
for high grade nail apron and ask us to send you free, car- 
penter's pencil and "SaAV Sense." 

E. C. ATKINS & COMPANY. 

Established 1857 THE SILVER STEEL SAW PEOPLE 

Home Office and Factory, Indianapolis, Indiana 

Canadian Factory, Hamilton, Ontario 
Machine Knife Factory, Lancaster, N. Y. 

Branches Carrying Complete StocJcs in The Following Cities : 

ATLANTA NEW ORLEANS SEATTLE 

MEMPHIS NEW YORK CITY PARIS, FRANCE 

C'UC.AGO PORTLAND. ORE. VANCOUVER B. C. 

MINNEAPOLIS SAN FRANCISCO 



in* one sheathing! 




Patented inter' 
locking lap 
edges assure a 
solid, wind-tight 
joint 




Gyp-Lap, the new sheathing perfected by the 
United States Gypsum Company, serves a 
fourfold purpose. 

It is first of all one of the strongest, most last- 
ing sheathing materials ever placed on 
the market. 

Being made from gypsum, it is also a splendid 
insulator— helps keep buildings cool in sum- 
mer, warm in winter. 

Gyp-Lap backs up clapboards, stucco or brick 
veneer with an effective fire-stop. 

Because it is made with an interlocking, wind- 
procf joint, Gyp-Lap makes , building paper 
unnecessary. 

Gyp -Lap comes in large sheets which are 
erected quickly and at low cost. Your Sheet- 
rock dealer sells it. Mail coupon for sample 
and descriptive folder. 

UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 

General Offices: Dept. 404, 205 West Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 

Yp-UP 

I TRADE MARK REGISTEREO ^^^^^^ 

The FIREPROOF Sheathing 





Heats Home for 
25t a Week! 



"X can run my Bulldog furnace steady for fourteen days 
in normal weather conditions on the actual cost of fifty 
cents." So writes F. R. Redetzke, of Cleveland, North 
Dakota, and he adds: "Hard to believe is it? That's what 
some of my neighbors thought until I showed them! We 
have an unlimited amount of grain screenings in this 
country. That' s the fuel I am using." 
That's what the Bulldog does with about the lowest grade 
fuel you can think of! Here's what it does with coal: 

2 1-2 Tons Heats 5 Rooms 

"There ia no heater to compare with the Bulldog. I burned 2 J4 
tons of coal last winter and heated 5 rooms and bath." — Walter 
Geary, Gloucester, Mass. 



Heats Seven Rooms Instead of One ! 

"Tour letter received asking about the Bulldog Furnace. We 
have had ours in about six weeks and so far it does all Babson 
Bros, claim for it. We bave seven rooms, four on the first floor 
and three on the second, and it heats them fine. We find it takes 
a little more coal to heat the whole house than it did to h n at ono 
room with a stove using chestnut coal."— J. B. Smith, 19 Elm St., 
Somerville, N. J. 

Cuts Coal Bill In Half 
"I had a hot air furnace in our 7-room house before I got the 
Bulldog and our house was always cold. With the Bulldog it only 
takes half as much coal and we had weather below zero, and the 
house was nice and warm in the morning when we got up. We 
never bave the draft on more than half an hoar at a time, and it 
has the place red hot. It keeps the fire all day in mild weather." 
—Jess T. Conrad, 1211 W. Arch St., Shamokin, Fa. 



No Money Down ! 

Comes Completely Erected. You Install It Yourself, 



The Bulldogis sent to you for free inspection. Then, if 
satisfied, you make only small monthly payments at our 
remarkably low price. Write today! Don't miss this 
chance to cut down your fuel bills! Install a Bulldog 
Furnace. It comes to you completely erected — goes 
through any door— fits any height of basement— and 
you install it yourself in less than two hours! In fact, 
H. B. Keater, of Libertyville, N. Y., says he installed 



his Bulldog in 28 minutes! Don't put up with the old 
fashioned stove heat or some outworn furnace — when 
you can so easily get the greatest advance in scientific 
heating at an astonishingly low price. The Bulldog burns 
almost any kind of fuel, from hard coal to cheap screen- 
ings. Keeps a wood fire over night. We have factory 
connections in both east and west and ship from the 
nearest point. 



Send/orFreeBooki*n 

Learn how to have all the heat you want — where you want it— and 
save money! Remember the Bulldog is different— and better! 
Complete combustion of gases save 25% of your fuel bill. Exclu- 
sive Gable-Top Radiator receives all the direct rays of the fire. 
Exclusive oblong fire-pot is not only ideal for coal, but enables you 
to keep a wood fire over night. Remember— the Bulldog is sent for 
free inspection— then small monthly payments at an amazingly low 
price 1 Send for Free Book TODAY I 

BABSON BROS,£ s a c fi 



ornia Ave. 
Chicago, 111. 



Babson Bros., Dept. A-169 

19th St. and California Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Without obligating me in any way, pleaso send mo 
your free catalog and special offer on the Bulldog 
Pipeleas Furnace. 



Namt. 



Addrcts. 



MAIL 

COUPON 

FOR FREE 




Celotex for summer cottages 
pays you in three ways 



Now, for the first time, cottages that have 
the usual comforts of the city house, yet 
can be built easily and quickly at small 
expense. Celotex Insulating Lumber 
makes them possible. 

Celotex has, first of all, insulating or 
heat-stop value several times as great as 
that of wood. It keeps out the beating 
rays of the hot summer sun — and keeps 
in the heat generated to warm the cottage. 

You can profit by using Celotex to 
build summer cottages in three ways. 

First: Tell your customers these desir- 
able advantages — you will interest them 
and get more jobs building Celotex cot- 
tages. 

Second : You will make real money on every 
job. The large size boards, light in weight, are 
easily sawed and nailed — you finish the job more 



"NSULATINO LUMBER 

' There is a use for Celotex in every building" 



quickly. Celotex is applied direct to the stuc 
and joists as interior or exterior finish or botl 

Third : Celotex also builds you good will- 
carpenter's greatest asset. Satisfied customei 
will recommend you to friends and prospects. 

Prepare for this profitable work by sendin 
for information and complete specifications r< 
garding Celotex Insulating Lumber ; these bool 
lets are free to carpenters. 

They contain interesting and simple rule 
which should be observed to obtain the best n 
suits. These books have many blue print cut 
and pictures illustrating every use of Celotex. 

Send the coupon for these valuable booklets. 

THE CELOTEX COMPANY 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, 

MILLS: NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Branch Sales Offices: 
(See Telephone Book for Addresses.) 



Boston Los Angeles 

Cleveland Miami 

Dallas Milwaukee 

Denver Minneapolis 

Detroit New Orleans 

Kansas City New York 

London (Eng.) Philadelphia 

Canadian Representatives : Alexander Murray 

Company, Limited, 
Montreal Toronto Halifax Winnipeg Vancouvc 



Pittsburgh 
Portland, Ore 
Salt Lake Cit 
San Francisc< 
Seattle 
St. Louis 
St. Paul 



The Celotex Company 
Dept. 26, 

645 N. Michigan Ave., 
Chicago, 111. 

Please send me the general 
hook and specifications on 
Celotex without charge. 



Name 



Street 



City State. 




. and more profit per job— 
with Barrett Giants! 



Tctt Shingles 
rrctt Roll Roofings 



Contractors report very 
definite savings in the cost 
of laying shingle roofs — 
with the new Barrett 
Giants ! 

These Giants are larger than 
ordinary shingles (i2"xi4"). 
Comparison with ordinary 
individual shingles shows 
196 fewer shingles and 392 
fewer nails per square. 
Here's a cut of practically 
one-half in laying costs. 
You'll find these rugged 
shingles 100% right for re- 



roofing jobs. No need to rip 
off the old shingles. You 
can lay Barrett Giants right 
over almost any worn-out 
roof. Time-saved — expense 
saved — the litter of remov- 
ing old shingles entirely 
done away with! 
They're handsome and fire- 
safe — surfaced with ever- 
lasting mineral in moss 
green, soft red and shadowy 
blue-black. 

Ask your lumber dealer to 
show you Barrett Giants. 



ROOFINGS 



A Valuable Free Book 



"Better ITomes from Old Houses" gives 
Ideas for remodeling old-fashioned houses 
into handsome modern homes. Thousands 
of carpenter-contractors are putting this 



practical book Into the hands of owners of 
old houses — and supplying the labor ncedfd 
when the alterations start. Send for your 
samplo copy — it's a business bulld«.r. 



rlE BARRETT COMPANY, 40 Rector St., New York. 

ease send me free sample copy of your business-building book- 
ie address of my building supply dealer is given below. 



''Better Homes from Old Houses." 



ur Name 



Tour Dealer's Name 



ur Address 



Dealer's Address 
State 



WHY DEVELOP 
A GLASS 
ARM? 



Price $1.65 in U.S. A. 
$2.00 in Canada. 




An epoch marking im- 
provement in the Ham- 
mer Industry. 

MELLE.K S 

Shock Absorbing Hammer 

Featuring 

1. A rubber cushion liner between 
the handle and hammer head. 
Set under extreme pressure, thus 
preventing any loosening whatever 
of the handle as the rubber cushion 
takes up all shrinkage. 

2. Long Life — free from handle break- 
age. | 

3. A rubber cushion liner eliminating 
shock and vibration to the arm. A steady 
day's work will prove this assertion. Try 
the new hammer and then your old fa- 
vorite. 

4. Finest Heller Hammer Steel. 

5. Drop forged and hand finished by ex- 
perienced craftsmen. 

6. A handle of finest selected second growth 
hickory procurable. 

7. A rubber liner serving as additional pro- 
tection for work around electric wires, etc. 

Have your Hardware dealer supply you. If 
he is unable to do so, mail us your Money Or- 
der with his name, specifying weight and style 
hammer required and we will send direct to you 

Heller Brothers Company 

Newark, N. J., U. S. A. 

Good Tools Since 1836 



The 

HELLER 
LINE 

Mechanic's Tools 

FILES 
RASPS 
STEEL 





*Ata*iUffn KNOWS 



Sent Free 

Blue Print Plans — and 

these 2 Books. Mail the Coupon 

Don't send a penny. We want every Carpenter to have these 2 books and blue 
print plans at our expense. "How to Read Blue Prints" is the name of one book. 
It's a free lesson in Plan Reading prepared by the Chicago Tech. experts. The 
other book tells why "the big money goes to the man who knows" and explains 
the practical Chicago Tech. method of training men in the building trades for 
the jobs that pay most money — or for a business of their own. Mail the coupon 
— and the books will be sent you free, at once. 

Train—in spare time—to make more money 
Plan Reading, Estimating, Superintending, Construction 

We train you by mail 



This Is the time to make up your mind if you 
are satisfied with a scale wage, or if you want a 
salary- Decide if you want to be bossed — or want 
to be the boss yourself. More knowledge will 
qualify you to direct other men — or have a busi- 
ness of your own. Be an expert in Plan Reading, 
Estimating. Superinten'ding, and Construction 
Methods. Then you will double and re-double 
your income. Chicago Tech. Experts are prac- 
tical men. They've been through every angle of 
plan reading and construction work. They will 
train you — by mail — in a short, simple course. 
You can take this course in your spare time. 
Hundreds have become superintendents, or built 
a money-making business of their own this same 
way. The Chicago Tech. Books tell all about it 
— what others have done, and what you can do. 
There are big jobs waiting for the man who 
knows. Mail the coupon now. 



Chicago Technical College, 

Dept. 639, Chicago Tech. BIdg., 

118 East 26th Street, Chicago, III. 

Please send me your Free Books and Blue 
Prints for men in the Building Trades. Send 
postpaid to my address below. 

Write or print name plainly. 

Name 

Address 

City State 

Occupation 



What Every Carpenter Ought to Know 

Did you ever stop to think that ordinary "paint" can spoil the finest 
job a carpenter does? 

Every carpenter ought to know something about wood finishes. 
Every carpenter ought to know that "Johnson's" means the finest pro- 
tection his work can have. 

Try it yourself! There's always some job about the home or shop 
and we want you to know JOHNSON goods. Then you can talk turkey 
to Brother Painter and know what kind of treatment your work is 
getting. 

Here's Our Offer 
to Any Member of the U. B. of C. & J. 

*40^«— Value /br— > $ 18^ 



A gallon each of six standard JOHNSON products — 
materials you have use for every day— $28.00 worth for $18.50, 
freight prepaid, plus — 

FREE— A $9.00 Weighted Polishing Brush (with sand- 
ing attachment) — a necessity in the home and on the job — 
wherever good floors are laid. 

FREE — The famous JOHNSON Portfolio showing the complete 
effect of 36 different finishes on all the actual woods now in general 
building. (Value $3.00). And our Manual of Wood Finishing that tells 
how it is done [value 25 cents). These two books belong in every car- 
penter's hands. 

This assortment consists of one gallon each: — 

Johnson's Perfectone Undercoat 

Johnson's Glocoat Enamel 

Johnson's Permacote, Flat Wall Finish 

Johnson's Floor Varnish 

Johnson's Flat Varnish 

Johnson's Floor and Finishing Varnish 

An opportunity never offered the trade before. 
Yet why not? It is your work that is made or 
marred by the finish. Take advantage of it NOW! 




S. C. Johnson & Son, Dept. C. 6, Racine, Wis. 

"The Wood Finishing Authorities" 

Enclosed find $18.50 for which please send me 
immediately, all transportation charges prepaid, 
your $40.25 special offer to members U. B. C. J. 



ADDRESS 



CITY & STATE Local No. 



A Carpenter Did This 
with "Super Cornell" 



i 


3 1- B ' 

l*;J 


! "1 1 


J 


■■^jjpw"-' 


i 
j 


_^ 








;; .■■'■ ..,■■: 


.-.. 



Once a Garage — 

Now an Apartment 

A carpenter in Evanston, 111., assisted by our free Plan 
Service has made a most attractive five-room apart- 
ment out of a garage using the new extra-thick "Super 
Cornell" for all walls and ceilings. 

If you like to tackle remodeling and making-over work like 
this, we can help you by designing the paneling. 

This enables you to handle the whole contract with the 
profits which surely are worth while. 



Just give us the room dimensions with location and size of 
doors and windows and we'll furnish you with the necessary 
blue prints. All we ask js that you use "Cornell" or "Super „j. / 



Cornell" to do the job. Use the coupon. 






<y. 



CORNELL WOOD PRODUCTS COMPANY V/^ 



General Offices: 

190 N. State St. 



Chicago 



111. 








YOU pride yourself on good work 
—just as we do on good tools. The 
main idea at Millers Falls has always 
been to make tools you will respect. 

Millers Falls Hand Drills, for example. 
A complete line of them— to suit any 
kind of work or any preference. No. 5 
is popular with many carpenters. 

They are all described— with the latest 
improvements— in our new catalog. 

Copy sent on request 
MILLERS FALLS COMPANY 

Millers Falls, Mass. 

28 Warren Street 9 So. Clinton Street 

New York Chicago 




The better the tool t 
the better the work; 
the better the work, 
the better off the 
workman. 



1 



r. 




= Synbi&ducing = 

me FREEODUST SUPER SURFACER 

In presenting- this new floor surfacing machine to the trade we sincerely believe that its 
realization means an achievement that is revolutionary. 

Among the outstanding features that insure the superiority of the FREE-O-DUST Super 
Surfacer are, — greater cutting speed, total elimination of all vibration, which insures a 
mechanically perfect and uniform finish, can be operated right up to baseboard without 
shifting the drum or using a small side drum, and as indicated by the name of the machine, 
— FREE OF ALL DUST. Our unique dust collector and vacuum fan construction collects 
every particle of dust EVEN WHEN THE MACHINE IS MOVING FORWARD ! No retrac- 
ing by backing up in order to take up the dust. 

This last feature alone unquestionably marks a very important progress in floor sur- 
facing machine development as it will multiply the scope and possibilities of the floor sur- 
facing business. It will also protect the health of the operator by preventing him from 
inhaling the poisonous substances that often accumulate in wood flooring. This is partic- 
ularly true when resurfacing old floors. 

Sold on 5 days trial and money back guarantee if not thoroughly satisfied. 

Write for free literature and full information. 

ELECTRIC ROTARY MACHINE CO. 

3835 W. Lake St., Chicago, U. S. A. 



M an u fact u r cr s of floo r s u r f a c i n g m a chines for 20 years 



a?rrjTnwsTwr«ii u,j n,i.miigp»j«ii.m«i'»in..»iai— ^fl 



-" 



;■!■'■:■■:':■■:.•;-■?•■:■: .. ■ -■ " ■■;■:.. ■'•" ' \- . , ?•■■'■ :| 




All Steel 
Mitre Box 

N M285 

Price $25 



It figures your angles, 

then cuts accordingly 



THIS mitre box is to the carpenter 
what a protractor is to the architect 
— a handy tool that does your angle- 
figuring for you — does it right, and saves 
time and trouble. 

It's equipped with a framing scale 
that reads both right and left from 90 
degrees. If, for instance, you want to 
cut a rafter for a 3-foot rise in 12, you 
set the indicator on 3. The scale, to- 
gether with the arc, graduated in de- 
grees, on which all angles are indicated, 
makes it easy to cut at exactly the angle 
you want. This box cuts at any angle 
between 45 and 90 degrees right or left. 
An extra attachment enables you to cut 
at more acute angles. 



It's the only all-steel mitre box made. 
And it's trussed like a steel bridge — 
won't bend or break. Equipped with a 
28 x 5-inch back saw, which can be 
locked at any angle. 

Steel bottom plates are scored to pre- 
vent slipping. The stops can be regu- 
lated to saw to any desired depth. 

Other good tools for carpenters 

If you haven't a copy of the Goodell- 
Pratt Catalog No. 15, send for one now. 
It's free to carpenters. The catalog 
shows the entire Goodell-Pratt family of 
1500 Good Tools — many of them, like 
this all-steel mitre box, are of special 
interest to carpenters. 



GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY 
GREENFIELD. MASS., U. S. A. 

Sc cj&mUh&z 

Makers of Mr. Punch 



600DELLPRATT 

1500 GOOD TOOLS 




10 Spoke Wheels 
Riveted Leg Braces 
Steel Leg Shoes 
Handle Clamps 
Double Cornered Trays 
g" Cold Rolled Axles 
Malleable Axle Brackets 
Self-Oiling Bearings 
Clear Maple Handles 
Flush Riveted Spokes 



Strong in Every Part 

Al Suitable Type For Every Wheelbarrow 

Service 

There is no item of equipment which is more important than 
the wheel barrows on a building job. No piece of equipment 
receives less care or more abuse. None which gives more 
constant annoyance and expense than poorly made, cheaply 
built, shaky, squeeky barrows. The Sterling barrow is built 
for hard service. It is strong, rigid, well balanced. It is 
equipped with self-oiling bearings which help the wheeler, 
and save the barrow. 

If your dealer won't supply you we will. 
Bulletin No. 38 tells the Sterling story. 

Sterling Wheelbarrow Co. 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 




fir 



Every roll of Jersey Copper Screen Cloth is 
marked by this tag. Look for it, because it is 
your guarantee that you are getting Jersey 
Copper Screen Cloth made of copper 99.8% puie. 
Jersey Copper Screen Cloth has extra stiffness 
and tensile strength due to the special Roebling 
process by which the wire is manufactured. 
This unusually stiff wire is used exclusively in 
Jersey Copper Screen Cloth. So, in order to 
assure yourself that your screen jobs are going 
to be of the greatest durability (copper 99.8% 
pure) and serviceability (stiffness and tensile 
strength comparable with that of steel), look 
for the Jersey Copper Screen Cloth tag. 

Send for a booklet which tells all about copper 
for screens, or ask your dealer for a sample. 



The New Jersey Wire Cloth Company 

620 South Broad Street 
Trenton New Jersey 




Copper Screen C! 

1 I Made of Copper 99.8% Pure 




Z0UR1 KEY-SET STORE FRONT CONSTRUCTION 



Bystanders ahvays remark on hoiv easily Zouri 
Indirect Key -Set Windows and Store Fronts are 
installed. The public remarks on their handsome 
appearance. The owner finds them safe and dur- 
able. For these reasons, Zouri Store Fronts are 
business- getters for the man who installs them. 

Free — our big, free, illustrated book showing the newest and 
best styles of modern windows and store fronts, also thoroughly 
explaining the popular 7.ouri Safety Key-Set construction. 
Write for your copy today. 



Factory and General Offices 
1608 East End Ave. Chicago Heights, 111. 



LISTED BYTHE UNDERWRITERS' LABORATORIES 




HEADLIGHT 

Carpenter's O verall s 

VNiON MADE s ±~i l. g — i-m w j ; 

FOR THE MAN WHO PREFERS A BLUE CARPENTER'S W>^££^&$3fr~j€m 

OVERALL WE ARE NOW MAKING THEM FROM 

HEADLIGHT SPECIAL WEAVE BLUE DENIM 
LOT 140 

The Best Denim Ever Put Into an Overall 



Also Made of 

Extra Fine Quality 

TOUGH WHITE SAIL CLOTH LOT 320 

Features 

Four big nail pockets 
Three pockets in one on 
the bib. Safety watch 



pocket. Memo book pock- 
et. Pencil pocket. 
Two big front pockets. 
Double cloth at the front. 



Patented safety rule 
pocket. 

High back protects cloth- 
ing. 

2 side hammer straps. 
Chisel or putty knife 
pocket. 



MY GUARANTEE TO YOU 

If, when this overall is completely worn out, 
you do not think that Headlight Carpenters 
Overalls are better, more convenient and will 
outwear any other overall made,/ will give 
you back your money. Beware of imitations. 
Demand the Genuine. 



Mail your order to our nearest factory if your local Headlight Dealer 
cannot supply you. 

LARNED, CARTER &_ CO. 

World's Greatest Overall Makers 
DETROIT, ST.LOUTS, SAN FRANCISCO, PERTH AMBOY, N.J. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO 
New York O/ftce: 5-7-9 Union Sq. Chicago Oflices 653 S. Wells St, 



www 




Write for these two 

'-'they tell you about the 



fcEA 



partial payment plan 

Home owners, store owners, building owners are anxious 
to re-roof, remodel or repair on Beaver's easy payment 
plan. The carpenter who offers this great convenience 
gets the lion's share of the work. Yet he assumes no 
financial responsibility for payments —he gets his cash 
at once. The carpenter doesn't worry about collections. 
Under Beaver's financing plan all such matters are 
taken care of for the carpenter. 

MAIL THIS NOW! 

f^ flfl ^ aft fwv aaaa flfik^^ /■/>> ££k "*> £A ££* MMMMMMMA 



www 




www 



booklets TODAY 

great opportunity offered by 

VEkS 

for home improvements 

Such a convenient plan for home owners lets down the 
bars to a great new market for live carpenters and con- 
tractors. By using it you can have work ahead for Jk 
yourself and your men the year around. w\ 

Surely, you want to know exactly how to profit by this remarkable j 

plan. All details are given in the booklets shown above. Mail <r the ■ 
the coupon now. Get these books. Read them. Learn exactly ^"^products 1 
how to go ahead and get the business under this plan. ^ c dS^SIs 100 " B 

f Buffido, N. Y. D 

^A. Gentlemen: Plep.se send U 

^^^ ^me your booklets teliine me " 

^ ^■^^■raJH^ta^^ ■^r ' 10w * can get business by using B 

^^■^^^^^■^^^■^^■^^^^^^^^^^^^■^^^^^^^^■■G^H l^^^^k your partial payment plan. 8 

^ S'Na™— - | 

>rftiv\/^/*/tt/vsA%/^/ttdysrf*\ i*\ff Addreaa — | 

City State jj 




CUPPOSE you have just completed a 
*-* Ruberoid Giant-shingle job — 

What benefits have you derived? 

1. — A saving in labor — 136 fewer shingles 
to handle and lay per square and 272 
fewer nails to drive. 
2. — A saving of time — Ruberoid Giants are 
the only heavy individual shingles with 
the self- spacing feature. 
3. — On a reshingling job you escape the 
dirt, the time and the trouble of remov- 
ing old wood shingles, for Ruberoid 
Giants are especially adapted to laying 
right over them. 

What benefits has your client obtained? 

1. — A better roof — -60 pounds heavier per 
square than the usual, standard-size in- 
dividual shingle. 

2. — A more durable roof — Ruberoid Roofs 
are still giving excellent service after 
thirty years' use. 

3. — On a reshingling job he saves the ex- 
pense of ripping off old shingles and 
cleaning up afterward. 

Try Ruberoid Giants on your next roofing job. 
The coupon is for your convenience. 

RU-BER-O) 

GIANT- SNJNGLfES 



Ruberoid Giant- shingles 
are 10* width 14* high 
surfaced 
tile-red. *r 



CARPENTER 



The RUBEROID Co., 

95 Madison Ave., New York City 

Gentlemen : Please send me without obligation a sample and 
full information regarding Ruberoid Giant-shingles. 



Name. . 
Address 





«««""*i 



^r Smoother Cutting 
Simonds DlueWhhonSaws. 



Carpenters want the best saws, 
not only because they cut fast 
and easy, but also because a good 
saw helps make better work. That 
applies to Simonds Blue Ribbon 
line. 

How your arm senses that satisfied 
feeling when you grasp the handle 
of a Simonds — and that feeling of 



appreciation as the keen edge goes 
through the cut — straight and true 
without a falter or muscle-wearing 
tug. — That's a Simonds. 

Our 71 straight back saw shown 
here is a popular style of carpen- 
ters' saw, although there are several 
other styles of the same high qual- 
ity to pick from. 



Tell your dealer you want a Simonds 
Blue Ribbon Saw 



Simonds Saw and Steel Co. 

Estabished 1832 — Fitchburg, Mass. 




i_i. I 



Hell be still 

at the end of the day 



going strong 



SIZE for size, the Sargent 
Auto-Set Bench Plane is 
lighter than other iron planes. 
But this isn't the only reason 
why the carpenter who uses 
it conserves his strength. The 
way it cuts through toughest 
wood — smoothly, rigidly — and 
across or against the grain or 
over knotty surfaces — saves 
energy and oftentimes temper. 

SARGENT & C O M P 

55 Water Street 



Sargent Auto-Set 

Bench Plane 

No. 714 



Cutter is of edge-holding 
chromium steel. It may be 
removed, sharpened and re- 
placed without changing orig- 
inal adjustment. 

Those who stick to old favor- 
ites will find the Sargent 400 
line (illustrated here also) the 
finest planes of this type ever 
made. See Sargent Planes at 
your dealer's. For booklet write 



ANY, 



Manufacturers 
New Haven, Conn. 



Sargent Adjustable 
Iron Bench 
Plane 
414 




&> hardware 



Here's a hatchet 

you don't have 

to rewedge 

See that the hatchet you buy has 
a red-handle, with a black head. 

Then you will know it is a 
Plumb Hatchet, with the Plumb 
Take-Up Wedge that keeps 
heads tight. 

With a blade tapered for fast, 
tireless cutting and balanced for 
true, easy strokes. 

Forged of a steel that Plumb 
armor-plate methods temper and 
toughen for years of use. 

And the Take-Up Wedge, (ex- 
clusively Plumb) keeps black 
head and red handle working to- 
gether for years ! 

FAYETTE R. PLUMB, INC. 
Philadelphia, U. S. A. 



Instantly, with a turn 
of the wrist, you re- 
tighten the head of any 
Plumb tool. V-shape of 
wedge expands wood of 
handle against all sides 
of eye, all the way in. 





PLUMB 

DOUBLE LIFE 



Hammers Hatchets 
Files Sledges Axes 




Look for 

Red Handle 
Black Head 

EXCLUSIVELY 

PLUMB 

Color Combination 
registered as trade mark 
in U. S. Patent Ojpte 




M ' 1 ! ! : I ! ; ' ; ! ; i ~ ~ M]TTTj 



4 




Disston Mitre Square No. 1 1 

Two tools in one. An accurate 
try square, and an efficient mitre 
square for marking 45o angles. 

Tempered blade of Disston-made 
Steel. Nickel-plated iron stock, at- 
tached with heavy steel rivets. 

Square is true inside and out. 




Disston Adjustable 
Plumb and Level 

The Disston No. 16 is a popular 
model with carpenters. Has Disston 
adjustment — positive and simple. 
Operated by screws working in 
wood. No springs to get out of 
order. Disston quality throughout. 



Made to the standard 

of your Disston Saw 



An accurate mitre and a sturdy 
try square are combined in 
Disston "Mitre Square No. 11 

TWO tools in one! Disston Mitre Square 
No. 1 1 gives you in one tool an accurate 
45° mitre, and a reliable try square. Saves 
time. Speeds work. 

All metal! The blade is made from Disston 
Steel, tempered the Disston way. Nickel- 
plated iron stock is permanently fastened 
with heavy steel rivets. 

Made by Disston — the maker of your saw. 
And made with the same exacting care. 

You can trust the Disston name on a tool 
as on a saw. 

For the saw is the standard in the Disston 
Works. Every tool must meet that standard 
to bear the Disston name. 

It pays to use Disston tools. 

Henry Disston & Sons, Inc. 

Makers of "The Saw Most Carpenters Use" 
Philadelphia, U. S. A. 

DISSTON 

SAWS TOOLS FILES 




Disston Mitre Square No.10 

For those who prefer a wood 
stock. Tempered blade of Disston- 
made Steel extends through stock. 
Rosewood stock is attached with 
four heavy brass rivets. 

Stock is faced with heavy brass 
plate, fastened with countersunk 
screws* 




"The Saw Most 

Carpenters Use" 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND,, as second class mail matter, under Act of Congress, Aug. 24, 1912 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918 

A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and 

Kindred Industries. Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 

and Joiners of America, at 



Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 



51 



Established in 1881 
Vol. XLV— No. 6. 



INDIANAPOLIS, JUNE, 1925 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



That the open shop is now favored by the 
Stanley Manufacturing Company of New Bri- 
tain, Conn., who manufacture a number of car- 
penter's tools, known as the Stanley tools, was 
a declaration recently made by Mr. Stanley, Jr., 
an officer of the company at a conference held 
with Representative Charles N. Kimball and 
Business Agent McGrath at the plant of the 
company. This concern is constructing a large 
building at New Britain. The contractor is the 
Aberthaw Company of Boston. Non-union car- 
penters were found on the job. On complaint of 
Messrs. Kimball and McGrath, as representa- 
tives of our organization, Mr. Stanley arranged 
the conference, and to their astonishment made 
the above declaration. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 

PAY AS YOU ENTER— IT IS BEST 




Buying things without 

paying for them, is be- 
coming a habit with thou- 
sands of people in all 
walks of life. Ten, or 
even fifteen years ago, 
they would not have dreamt of obligat- 
ing themselves to the installment plan 
as they do today. 

The feeling then was to bite off no 
more than one could chew, and that was 
conducive to a sense of self-respect and 
independence. It was living within one's 
means, and not taking a mortgage on 
the future, which might have to be paid 
off at the price of standing for a lot of 
things in the way of mean treatment. 

The time payment system is rapidly 
becoming almost a mania, and it is 
fraught with a good deal of serious men- 
ace to the interests of trade unionists. 
Certainly if they allow themselves to 
become involved in it very deeply it is 
dangerous. 

Some might say they did not see that 
it has anything to do with trade union- 
ism one way or another. But it has, and 
in this way : If a trade unionist is up to 
the eyes in debt, which he can only pay 
off by relying on his wages coming in 
the same each week, that debt acts as a 
goad to make him hang on to his job 
at all costs. 

If his employer should come along and 
cut his wages five cents an hour, or even 
ten cents for that matter, he is not in a 
position to resist with the same power 
that he would have were it not for that 
debt. And if hundreds of his fellow 
workers are in the same condition, then 
that is reflected in the lowered resistive 
force of their union. 

The result is they will likely give way 
to the demands of their employers, who 
may know full well the position their 
workmen are in in this respect. They 
know that the mass of working men are 
scrupulously honest, and will pay their 
debts to the last penny. And some of 
them do not scorn to use that knowledge 
to reduce their pay rolls. 

That is one of the sinister ideas lying 
back of many of the profit sharing plans 
one hears about; to get the workman in- 
volved financially, believing that if that 



can be done he will prove easier t< 
handle when it eomes to reducing hii 
wages. 

The time payment system, besidei 
that aspect of it, is a sign of the times 
It is the outcome of a consumers 
market which, in a cash sense is already 
supplied. The point of saturation hai 
been reached, and beyond that poin 
purchases are only made by going int< 
debt, and taking a chance that the fu 
ture will pay. 

In the normal way of buying and sell 
ing, most of the things which 'are sole 
today on the installment plan, are reallj 
sales which rightly belong to a futun 
date. But production is becoming eve: 
more rapid, and on larger scale. T< 
meet it comes the "high-powered" sales 
man, assisted by the natural desire o: 
the prospective buyer to possess wha 
he has for sale. 

Leaving the future to take care o: 
payment seems quite easy, compare< 
with the longing for the article. Thei 
the deal is made and the shackles are on 

Many a trade unionist has rued th< 
day he walked into such a trap, whei 
he has afterwards realized on the job 
or at his union meeting, that it has 
robbed him of his full power to resis 
threatened encroachments on his wages 
and general working conditions. He has 
found himself chained by debt to his 
job. It is in no sense a good or self -re 
specting condition for him to be in. 

It is not necessary to make a com 
plete and blanket condemnation of th« 
installment system. If a man use if 
very judiciously, not biting off mon 
than he can chew, and so that he cat 
see his way clearly out of any deal hi 
goes into, then all well and good. Bu< 
absolutely, and without any equivoca- 
tion whatever, if it in any way tends to 
curb his militant regard for his trade 
union principles, thereby making him a 
weak link in his union, then he should 

leave it alone entirely. 

» 

The Boss Was Out 

Short-sighted Lady (in grocery)-- 
"Is that the head cheese over there?" 

Salesman — "No, ma'am, that's one of 
his assistants." 



THE CAHPENTEIt 



23 



1925 BUILDING PROGRAM SHOWS INCREASE 




HE April volume of build- 
ing contracts was the 
largest monthly total on 
record, according to F. W. 
Dodge Corporation. Con- 
tracts awarded that 
month in the 36 eastern states (which 
include about seven-eights of the total 
construction volume of the United 
States), amounted to $546,970,700. 
This was an increase of 14 per cent over 
March, and 13 per cent over April of 
last year. 

Last month's record included the fol- 
lowing items:: $256,414,300, or 47 per 
cent of all construction, for residential 
buildings; $95,432,400, or 17 per cent, 
for public works and utilities; $63,- 
968,900, or 12 per cent, for commercial 
buildings; $46,567,900, or 9 per cent, 



for industrial buildings; and $33,154,- 
600, or 6 per cent, for educational build- 
ings. 

Total construction started during the 
first four months of this year has 
amounted to $1,623,540,000, compared 
with $1,515,043,200, for the first four 
months of last year. The gain is a little 
over 7 per cent. Of the $108,000,000 in- 
crease to date this year, $52,000,000 
represents the gain in public works and 
utilities projects. 

In addition to the increase in actual 
work started there is also a big gain in 
prospective work. Contemplated new 
projects reported in April amounted to 
$760,207,600, an increase of 25 per 
cent over the amount reported in April 
of last year. 



ONE CRAFT, ONE UNION— A PERSONAL TRIBUTE 

(By A. Journeyman.) 




ig #2S^ RIOR to 1923 I worked at 
my trade as a carpenter 
in Canada, and was al- 
ways a member of the 
United Brotherhood from, 
the time I became a jour- 
neyman. I was what might be called 
fairly good in the matter of attending 
meetings of the Local, which was in one 
of the largest of the western cities. 

In a modest way I did my part, hold- 
ing office from time to time, and not 
missing many chances of bringing stray 
ones into the fold. During that time I 
always thought of the Brotherhood in its 
international sense, and took part in 
many a verbal battle in favor of it as 
the one organization of our craft for 
the American continent. 

I did that because it seemed to me 
just plain horse sense, from the stand- 
point of my interest as a carpenter and 
a working man. Later I was to realize 
the complete and true value of that con- 
ception. 

In 1923 trade conditions in the lo- 
cality in which I lived had become very 
poor, and like many more of my fellow 
members, I came to the United States, 
bringing my family with me. 

Also, in my pocket was my member- 
ship card and clearance, all paio up and 
in order. I came to one of the largest 



cities in this country an absolute strang- 
er, with the need of going at once to 
work to take care of my family re- 
sponsibilities. 

Then I realized to the fullest extent 
the blessing and practical meaning of 
belonging to the organization of my 
craft, which was international in its 
scope, service, and influence. 

"Without it I should have been help- 
less. As it was, when I landed at my 
destination I went straight to the head- 
quarters of the local District Council, 
and deposited my card. I did not have 
to tramp the streets, a stranger looking 
for a job, nor did I have to ask my fel- 
low member, the Business Agent, for a 
job. 

After he had taken charge of my card 
he asked me if I was ready to go to 
work. I surely was, and said so. There- 
upon he gave me a job to go to, at nearly 
twice the wages I had been getting the 
year before. 

More than that, I being a stranger, he 
went out of his way to take me to the 
place where the job was, and showed me 
the easiest way to get there from the 
temporary lodging I had taken. 

That's what I call real service, time 
brotherhood, and international frater- 
nity. I do not imagine my experience 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



is any different from that of many- 
others who have come south in recent 
years. But I was deeply impressed with 
it, for it proved to me in a practical way 
what I had long believed — that one or- 



craft, is the best and only sound policy 
for the carpenters on this North Amer- 
ican Continent. 

The proof of the pudding is in the 
eating — I have had my share, and it 



ganization of all the members of our was good. 



CARPENTERS' TEAM WORK IN FLORIDA 

(By Chas. A. Poore, L. U. 993, Miami, Fla.) 




HERB is nothing that has 
been done in the last 
forty years by the frater- 
nal societies, and the 
unions that has shown 
a greater advancement 
in civilization, than the establishment of 
homes for their dependents. The Home 
at Lakeland can be made self sustaining. 
Its location is ideal, even in our be- 
loved Florida, and we consider this 
Home site among the hills and lakes, 
surrounded by citrus groves excellent. 

What better spirit can man show to 
man, than to place him in such an en- 
vironment in his declining age? And 
all this through the principle of co- 
operation. 

Here in Miami we have a little co- 
operative OAvnership, and it is proving 
really interesting and valuable to us. 
We secured a site for our carpenters' 
hall. The lot cost us $6,030 cash. We 
dallied along until the hall we were 
renting at $70 per month was let to a 
non-union concern for repairs, when 
there came an agitation to move. 



We owned the lot for five years be- 
fore we decided to build. Then we ap- 
pointed a building committee with 
authority to secure a loan to build with. 

The Chairman of the committee went 
to the President of a bank in Miami, and 
he refused to loan to the Carpenters' 
Union, but said he would buy the lot, 
and offered $20,000 for it. But we got 
a loan, and erected a building three 
stories high, 47x106 ft. on the ground. 
The Carpenters' L. U. 993 has had a 
home for thirty months, and in another 
five years they will be free of debt. At 
present the building is valued at 
$100,000. 

With the business interests of Miami 
going strong for "open shop" no one 
knows what the condition of our union 
would have been if we had not pushed 
this move to a conclusion. As it is, it 
has been pointed out through one of our 
daily papers that the more the open 
shoppers fight the unions, the better en- 
trenched the unions become, and refer 
them to the home we have estab- 
lished. 



CHILD LABOR IN CHINA 




HILD labor in the Peking 
rug factories is the sub- 
ject of a special study in 
a supplement to the 
Chinese Social and Pol- 
= £ ^ itical Science Review. 
Attention is called by the workers to 
the fact that the Peking rug industry, 
like many other industries in China, is 
in a state of transition from a small 
shop to a factory basis. Most of the 
rug shops are owned by individual pro- 
prietors with small capital, and neither 
employers nor workers have any form 
of protective organization. 

The shops are dark and overcrowded, 
with no attempt at sanitation, and the 
workrooms serve also as dormitories for 



the workers. The working hours are ap- 
proximately those of daylight ; only 
three shops in Peking are working less 
than 12 hours a day. 

Almost three-fourths of the employes 
in this industry (it is stated) are ap- 
prentices, who as a rule receive their 
food and clothing and a very little 
money, but no regular wages. The boys 
are brought in from the country at the 
age of 11 or 12 years, and sometimes 
younger, to serve under a contract for 
three years. 

During this time they are entirely un- 
der the control of the shop owner, living 
in the shops in which they work and 
receiving no moral or educational train- 



T II E CARPENTER 



25 



ing and no physical care. Large num- 
bers of them contract tuberculosis and 
other diseases. 

The system, add the writers, is practi- 
cally one of indentured child labor. 



Moreover the apprenticeship is practi- 
cally a "blind alley" and for most of 
the boys there is no future, as, when the 
apprenticeship period is completed other 
boys are brought in to take their places." 



HOW INDUSTRIAL SOIL IS FERTILIZED 




IG business continually 
points to the "modest" 
dividends paid by many 
corporations as an answer 
to the frequent charge of 
excessive profits. 

The Wall Street Journal uncovers the 
hypocrisy of the modest dividend claim 
by calling attention to the disposition of 
the net profits of the United States Steel 
Corporation during the last twenty-four 
years. 

The corporation "earned" $2,027,- 
176,664 net for stock, but only paid out 
in preferred and common dividends 
$1,176,473,763. What became of the 
difference amounting to over $800,000,- 



000? The corporation "plowed it back" 
into its plants, which means that 42 per 
cent of the net profits was used to en- 
large the business. 

When this "plowing back" began, the 
common stock was not worth much, but 
with the earning capacity of the cor- 
poration's plants increased by the 
"plowing back" process, United States 
Steel common mounted away above par, 
and the interests which own it have 
cleaned up millions of dollars. 

Declaring modest dividends and plow- 
ing large portions of earnings back into 
plant equipment is one of capital's clever 
devices to conceal profits and disarm 
public opinion. 



An Epic of the Soil 

Oft did the harvest to their sickle yield, 

Their furrow oft the stubborn glebe has 

broke ; 
How -bowed the fields beneath their sturdy 

stroke ! 

Let not ambition mock their useful toil, 
Their homely joys and destiny obscure; 

Nor grandeur hear with a disdainful smile 
The short and simple annals of the poor. 

The boast of heraldry, the pomp of pow'r, 
And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er 
gave, 

Await alike th' inevitable hour. 

The paths of glory lead but to the grave. 

Nor you, ye proud, impute to these the fault, 
If memory o'er their tomb no trophies raise. 

Where through the long-drawn aisle and fret- 
ted vault. 
The pealing anthem swells the note of praise. 

But knowledge to their eyes her simple page, 

Rich with the spoils of time, did ne'er unroll ; 
Chill penury repressed their noble rage, 
And froze the genial current of the soul. 

Full many a gem of purest ray serene 

The dark unfathomed caves of ocean bear ; 

Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, 
And waste its sweetness on the desert air. 

Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife, 
Their sober wishes never learned to stray; 

Along the cool sequestered vale of life 

They kept the noiseless tenor of their way. 

— From Gray's Elegy in a Country Churchyard. 



Horse Sense 

That horse knows as much 



Charlii 
as I do. 

Matty — Well, don't tell anybody 
might want to sell him some day. 



Then Why Not In The U. S.? 

Argentine passed a child labor law ap- 
plying to the entire country on Septem 
ber 30, 1924. Under the new law 14 
is the minimum age for employment in 
any industrial or commercial establish- 
ment. 

Children under IS may not be em- 
ployed more than six hours a day and 
36 hours a week — a higher standard 
than exists in any State in the United 
States. 

Night work and employment in cer- 
tain dangerous occupations are prohibit- 
ed for boys under IS years of age and 
women of all ages. 



An Appropriate Appointment 

Brother Travis H. Lynch of Tonopah, 
Nevada, has been appointed a member 
of the State Board for Vocational Edu- 
cation. Mr. Lynch is Financial Secretary 
of Tonopah L. U. 1417, and is well 
known in Nevada as an active worker in 
labor circles. 



You 



Look Out For Stolen Tools 

Brother V. Alberts, L. U. 1212, Cof- 
fey ville, Kan., at the beginning of last 
month had his entire kit of tools, 
marked "V. A." stolen, and would ap- 
preciate any news as to their where- 
abouts. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



THE WISDOM OF PAYING DUES IN ADVANCE 

(By F. A. Silky, Financial Secretary, L. U. 2049, Los Angeles, Ca*.) 




ERY few members fully 
realize the importance of 
keeping their dues paid 
up in advance. Following 
are the reasons why dues 
should not only be paid 
strictly up to date, but should be paid 
in advance: 

As soon as a member lets his dues 
run behind, he automatically deprives 
himself of the benefits which the Broth- 
erhood wishes to bestow on him, no mat- 
ter how long he has paid his dues in the 
past. 

When a member is out of work, or 
sick or dies, that is when he needs as- 
sistance the most. In view of that fact, 
every member should set aside enough 
for the payment of his dues at least 
three months ahead. 

The matter of paying dues by the 
month is poor policy, because during 
that month he may possibly be out of 
employment, and due to the fact that he 
is financially embarrassed he may get in 



arrears with his dues and just at that 
time, if he is not paid up, he automati- 
cally cuts himself off from all benefits. 

A member owes it to himself and to 
his family to make provision for sick- 
ness and benefits when he is in a posi- 
tion to do so, and not wait until he 
is in dire circumstances and when it is 
absolutely impossible to raise the money 
to pay his dues. 

If any member would inquire of the 
Financial Secretary, he will find that 
there are many members who are re-, 
sponsible for themselves and family be- 
ing in a needy condition just because 
he has been negligent in this one matter 
— namely, his dues. 

Now, take this to heart and see to it 
that you do not only keep your dues 
strictly up to date, but at least two or 
three months in advance. By doing this 
you will possibly save yourself, your 
family and your Local from an embar- 
rassing position. 



WORKS COUNCILS IN THE UNITED STATES 




NDER the title of "The 
Growth of Works Coun- 
cils in the United States: 
A Statistical Summary," 
the National Industrial 
Conference Board of the 
United States has published a brief re- 
port containing information regarding 
the number, status and distribution of 
workr councils in operation. 

In the United States there are now 
over 800 works councils in operation, 
covering over 1,000,000 workers. This 
represents a rapid and practically con- 
tinuous growth from 1917 to 1924. 

The growth from 1919 to 1924 was as 
follows : 



No. of Councils No. of Workers 
Year in operation covered 

1919 225 391,400 

1922 725 G90.000 

1924 814 1,177,037 

The number of works councils in the 
State of Massachusetts rose from 11 in 
1919 to 31 in 1922 and 105 in 1924. 
States having more than 10 councils 
are : New York, GO ; Washington, 45 ; 
Illinois, 39; Ohio, 30; Pennsylvania, 30; 
Connecticut, 28; California, 27; New 
Jersey, 19; Maryland, 18; Minnesota, 
13; Wisconsin, 11. There were 302 
councils which, owing to the large area 
covered, could not readily be divided by 
States. 



Union Dental Clinic 

Members of the International Ladies' 
Garment Workers' Union have estab- 
lished in New York a successful dental 
clinic which has given 30,000 treat- 
ments at a cost of $70,000. Profits will 
be invested in more equipment and ex- 
tending the children's free clinic. The 
clinic is run on the co-operative plan. 



Tools Stolen At Mattoon, III. 

Brothers D. C. Woodward and L. Jen- 
kins, of Mattoon, 111., L. U. 347, in April 
suffered the loss of all their tools by 
theft. Those of Brother Woodward had 
the initials "D. C. W." on them. 



500,000 Members For 1925 



THE CARPENTER 



27 



BRIGHTER FUTURE FOR MEXICAN WORKERS 




MEXICO is today guided by 
the belief that the work- 
ers must be given the full- 
est opportunity to im- 
prove their conditions, C. 
A. Vargas, labor attache 
to the Mexican embassy at Washington, 
D. C, told the recent annual convention 
of the Workers' Education Bureau, held 
in Washington, D. C. 

"Fifteen years ago the political con- 
stitution and the law-making bodies of 
Mexico were significantly silent on the 
matter of labor legislation," said Vargas, 
who continued: 

"Our present Constitution, the out- 
come of the revolutionary period, states 
quite clearly that the workers have the 
right to 'organize for their own protec- 
tion; provides adequate safeguards 
around women and children engaged in 
gainful occupations, and establishes well 
known and generally recognized prin- 
ciples of labor legislation. 

"It will ever be to the credit of the 
Mexican trade union movement, also 
born out of the last 15-year struggle for 
freedom, that after the inevitable and 
necessary period of agitation that fol- 
lowed its birth, it settled down to the 
orderly task of building up its organi- 
zation to deal intelligently with the 
problems of the wage earners and watch 
diligently and demand observance of the 
labor principles embodied in the politi- 
cal Constitution adopted in 1917. And 
it will ever be to the credit of the Obre- 
gon and Calles governments that they 
gave the wage earners the opportunity 
to develop their organization and place 
it in a position to be a wholesome and 
influential factor in shaping the des- 
tinies of Mexico. 

"Unlike the old regimes, the present 
government is guided by the well found- 
ed belief that Mexico can not be pros- 
perous if her wage earners are not given 
the fullest opportunity to improve their 
working conditions and raise their econ- 
omic, social and intellectual standard. 

"It is guided by the conviction that 
one of Mexico's paramount needs is to 
cut deep into the percentage of illiteracy. 
Accordingly, school facilities are being 
extended throughout the country as 
much as the revenues permit. While ap- 



propriations for military and naval pur- 
poses are being steadily reduced, those 
for educational purposes are being in- 
creased. 

"Special attention is being given to 
the needs of the rural population, and 
besides the purely elemental or primary 
schools, there are now hundreds of agri- 
cultural and vocational schools, and ex- 
perimental farms established through- 
out the country, in striking contrast 
with those regimes which concentrated 
on the higher courses of a purely gram- 
marian education for the few and com- 
pletely ignored the every-day, practical 
needs of the native population of the 
country in the matter of education." 

Touching upon relations between 
Mexico and the United States, Mr. Var- 
gas paid a warm tribute to the work of 
the late Samuel Gompers in fostering 
better feeling between the peoples of the 
two nations. The speaker said: 

"For inspiration in the task of hu- 
manizing international relations let us 
all turn to the memory of that great 
champion of labor and humanity, 
Samuel Gompers, the late President of 
the American Federation of Labor. Be- 
cause of his devotion and unremitting 
efforts in promoting a friendly under- 
standing between the peoples of the 
United States and Mexico the memory 
of Samuel Gompers is very dear to us 
Mexicans. Therefore, we say to you, the 
work of promoting enduring peace and 
friendliness between the United States 
and Mexico should be made a part of 
the program of the Workers' Education 
Bureau, and there is no better way of 
achieving that, we believe, than by 
faithfully interpreting to the American 
people the ideals and the aspirations of 

the people of Mexico." 

• . 

Old Age Pensions 

Adoption of three new old age pen- 
sion laws, in California, Wisconsin and 
Nevada, thus far in 1925, and the crea- 
tion of official commissions in four addi- 
tional states to study the problem of old 
age with a view to legislation, show 
substantial gains in the movement to re- 
place the poorhouse system with home 
care of aged dependents, according to a 
report published by the American Asso- 
ciation for Labor Legislation. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



IT MAY SOUND ALL RIGHT— BUT 




BUILDING material con- 
sisting of ashes and water 
has been invented by an 
architect of Horten, Nor- 
way. It is predicted it 
will smash construction 
cost. Gas concrete is the name of the 
material, according to a report issued by 
the American Chemical Society. 

Its report, in part, says: 

"The raw materials that enter into 
the making of gas concrete are mainly 
cement, lime and ashes from bituminous 
alum slate used for burning the lime. 
The ashes are ground very finely with 
lime and are then mixed with the neces- 
sary amount of cement and a substance 
forming gas when mixed with water. 



"After mixing with water the mass 
is cast into low-walled molds, which are 
filled only half full. After some time the 
mortar begins to rise and soon will reach 
the level of the molds. 

"It is allowed to harden somewhat 
and is then cut into bricks of any shapes 
or sizes, which are finally hardened like 
the ordinary concrete bricks. It has a 
crushing strength of approximately 
thirty kilograms per square centimeter 
and a very high insulative power against 
heat as well as sound, nearly like that of 
wood. 

"The bricks are cheap in production, 
as the greater part of the raw materials 
— the ashes and the water — costs 
nothing." 



VERY GOOD ADVICE 

There is something of sacredness 
about the contents of a letter. The 
writer often reveals more of himself on 
the written page than he would in direct 
conversation. This revelation of course, 
is designed only for the eyes of the 
correspondent. 

In this country a wholesome respect 
has been built up for the sancitity of a 
letter but it is not so respected in many 
other countries where the opening and 
reading of sealed mail becomes, at 
times, so prevalent that the practice has 
earned the appelation "cracking seals." 

The average American would be 
filled with wrath and the timid soul 
would shrink with horror at the ^thought 
of a third person, and a stranger at that, 
reading his "personal correspondence." 

5Tet, that is exactly what happens to 
21,000,000 letters a year and will con- 
tinue so long as letter writers fail to put 
teturn addresses on their envelopes. 

When a letter, without a return ad- 
dress, can not be delivered for any rea- 
son, it is sent, after a certain time, to 
the Dead Letter Office. 

There it is opened and read — not for 
the possible scandal it may contain — 
but with a view to finding some clue 
which will enable forwarding on to the 
addressee or returning to the sender. 

Out of every five letters received at 
the Dead Letter Office such a clue is 
found in one and it is sent merrily on 
its delayed way to one or the other of 



the two persons most interested in its 
disposition. The other four are de- 
stroyed. 

Every person knows his own address 
and if he would put it on the envelope, 
the contents would remain inviolate and 
the letter would be returned with notice 
of non- delivery. — United States Post 
Office Department. 

• 

Take Notice 

Mr. Frank Duffy, Secretary, 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, 
Carpenters' Building, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Dear Sir and Brother: 

We have received information from 
officers of National and International 
Unions in Detroit, Cincinnati, Chicago, 
and Toledo, that checks which they 
have endorsed upon request of L. A. 
Sterne have been returned to them 
marked "No Funds." 

We are advised that Mr. Sterne in re- 
questing this favor represented himself 
as being connected with the office of the 
American Federation of Labor at Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

This is to advise you that while L. A. 
Sterne was employed at headquarters for 
a number of years, he has had no con- 
nection with A. F. of L. headquarters 
since 1921. Yours fraternally, 

FRANK MORRISON, 
Secretary, A. F. of L. 



Keep Your Dues Paid Up 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



NEW YORK BUILDING FIGURES 

During the first quarter of the current 
year construction started in New York 
amounted to $165,283,000, a decrease 
of 41 per cent from the first quarter of 
1924. The comparison is not as serious 
as the figures indicate because the first 
quarter of 1924 was one of the most ac- 
tive in the building history and must not 
be regarded as a normal condition. 

March building contracts in New York 
City amounted to $48,556,500, accord- 
ing to F. W. Dodge Corporation. While 
this was a 26 per cent increase over Feb- 
ruary, it was a 63 per cent drop from 
March of last year, which had the 
largest monthly building total on record. 
♦ 

THE MAN WITH THE HOE 

(By Edwin Markham.) 
Bowed by the weight of centuries, he leans 
Upon his hoe and gazes on the ground, 
The emptiness of ages in his face, 
And on his back the burden of the world. 
Who made him dead to rapture and despair, 
A thing that grieves not and that never hopes, 
Stolid and stunned, a brother to the ox? 
Who loosened and let down the brutal jaw? 
Whose was the hand that slanted back this 

brow? 
Whose breath blew out the light within this 

brain? 

Is this the Thing the Lord God made and gave 

To have dominion over sea and land ; 

To trace the stars and search the Heavens for 

power ; 
To feel the passion of Eternity? 
Is this the Dream He dreamed who shaped the 

suns 
And pillared the blue firmament with light? 
Down all the stretch of Hell to its last gulf 
There is no shape more terrible than this — 
More tongued with censure of the world's blind 

greed — 
More filled with signs and portents for the 

soul — 
More fraught with menace to the universe. 

What gulfs between him and the seraphim ! 
Slave to the wheel of labor ; what to him 
Are Plato and the swing of Pleiades? 
What the long reaches of the peaks of song, 
The rift of dawn, the reddening of the rose? 
Through this dread shape the suffering ages 

look ; 
Time's tragedy is in that aching stoop; 
Through this dread shape humanity, betrayed, 
Plundered, profaned and disinherited. 
Cries protest to the Judges of the World, — 
A protest that is also prophecy. 

O masters, lords and rulers in all lands, 
Is this the handiwork you give to God, 
This monstrous thing distorted and soul- 
quenched ? 
How will you ever straighten up this shaj?e. 
Touch it again with immortality ; 
Give back the upward looking and the light ; 
Rebuild it in the music and the dream ; 
Make right the immemorial infamies ; 
Perfidious wrong, immedicable woes? 

O masters, lords and rulers in all lands. 
How will the Future reckon with this Man ? 
How answer his brute question in that hour 
When whirlwinds of rebellion shake the world? 
How will it be with kingdoms and with kings — 
With those who shaped him to the thing he is — 
When this dumb Terror shall reply to God, 
After the silence of the centuries? 



PRESIDENT GREEN'S VIEWS 

William Green, President of the 
American Federation of Labor, in a 
statement declares the "decision of the 
Supreme Court of the United States re- 
garding the powers and constitutionality 
of the Kansas industrial court is a clear 
vindication of the position regarding the 
Kansas Court of Industrial Relations 
taken by the American Federation of 
Labor," and "completely destroys the 
Kansas industrial act." 

"While I have not had an opportunity 
to study this decision carefully," he said, 
"my impression is that it most clearly 
establishes the principle that wages, 
hours of employment and working con- 
ditions in private industry can. not be 
fixed by law. 

"Through the decision compulsory ar- 
bitration has received a death blow and 
voluntary agreements and voluntary 
bargaining between employer and em- 
ploye is firmly and, we hope, perma- 
nently established." 



TO TORNADO SUFFERERS 

To assist any member whose home 
was destroyed in the recent tornado in 
a section of the middle west, Brother O. 
D. Bartow, Box 523, Woodbury, N. J., 
is willing to permit the use of his pat- 
ented concrete construction process, by 
any member proving his membership in 
the United Brotherhood. Brother Bar- 
tow claims that his process will enable 
buildings to withstand tornado con- 
ditions. 



Ecclesiastes Teaches Unionism 

"Two are better than one, because 
they have a good reward for their labor. 
For if they fall, the one will lift up his 
fellow, but woe to him who is alone 
when he falleth ; for he hath not another 
to help him up. And if one prevail 
against him, two shall withstand him. 
and a threefold cord is not quickly 
broken." 



He Went Up On High 

Ben Higgins never would be passed. 

He bragged his car's endurance. 
He passed six cars with backward 
glance, 

His wife has his insurance. 



The Union Label is a priceless gift of 
power and helpfulness. 



1 '■■-"■■' ■■ — 

Editorial 




THE CARPENTER 

Official Journal of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 

OF AMERICA 



Published on the 15th of each month at the 
CARPENTERS' BUILDING 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OP 
CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA, 

Publishers 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 



Subscription Price 
One Dollar a Year in Advance, Postpaid 

The publishers and the advertising 
agent use every possible precaution avail* 
able to them against accepting advertise* 
ments from other than reliable firms, but 
do not accept any responsibility for the 
contents of any advertisement which ap- 
pears in "The Carpenter." Should any 
deception be practiced by advertisers at 
any time, upon members, their duty is to 
immediately notify the Post Office au- 
thorities. Therefore, address any com- 
plaints to your local Post Office. 

INDIANAPOLIS, JUNE, 1925 

So That's That 

COMPULSORY arbitration of indus- 
trial disputes, together with tie 
fixing of wages and working houarsi 
by law, has been declared unconstitu- 
tional by the Supreme Court of tk& 
United States. The issue was decided 
recently, in the form of a case referred 
to the Court, from the Kansas Court of 
Industrial Relations. The Kansas law 
creating the court was a notorious pro- 
duct which made its appearance during 
the term of Governor Henry Allen, and 
from the very beginning was opposed by 
Organized Labor. 

The law was supposed to relate to 
what those charged with its administra- 
tion pleased to call "essential indus- 
tries." In its practical working, it was 
a powerful instrument to deprive organ- 



ized workers of the material improve- 
ment in their wages and living condi- 
tions, to which they had established 
their right by virtue of organizing them- 
selves for that purpose. Furthermore, 
it was destined to have the effect of 
sapping the militancy of labor unions, 
by legally depriving them of the need 
of struggling for the object for which 
they were formed. 

A labor union, like an individual, is 
kept "fit" by exercise, meaning, the 
necessity of keeping continually alert 
and vigilant, to protect itself from the 
impositions and encroachments of in- 
fluences which would tend to make it 
"flabby" and "soft." That was only one 
of the insidious effects of the Kansas 
law. Another was, that it worked 
against the organization of working 
men, because the non-union man could 
lean up against the excuse that the 
court had the first and last word in de- 
ciding what he should do with his labor, 
and the price he was to get for it. 

The action of the Supreme Court has 
done more than give a knock-out blow 
to the Kansas product. It has squelched 
ideas of the same principle being em- 
bodied in legislation by other states. 
Of course, to students of the subject, it 
was no new thing making its first ap- 
pearance in the industrial world. Aus- 
tralia for years has been saturated with 
that kind of legislation, much to the 
regret of the workers of that continent, 
where fines and imprisonment are the 
punishments for disobeying its man- 
dates. 

Canada, from 1907 until this year, 
had a law of somewhat the same kind, 
and which was the object of keen and 
sustained criticism at the annual con- 
ventions of the Trades and Labor Con- 
gress of Canada. In its day, somewhere 
about 1912, it was seriously investi- 
gated in its workings by a representa- 
tive sent specially to Canada by the 
British Government, with a view to the 
possibility of similar legislation being 
■enacted over there. The proposal was 
opposed by the trade unions of Britain, 
and it was allowed to languish into ob- 
livion. 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



It all comes back to what old-time 
members and students of labor union 
history have long since known. Don't 
trust your interests as workers to poli- 
ticians and legislators. Anytime they 
start talking about their solicitude for 
the welfare and advancement of Or- 
ganized Labor, it is time for union men 
to stay up nights if necessary to watch 
what they do. For the most part they 
have no regard for Organized Labor, 
when that would run contrary to the 
economic interests of those who furnish 
campaign funds and other election ma- 
chinery. 

Let the trade unionist keep his mind 
and understanding clear at all times 
about this business of who is his best 
friend. The meeting hall of his union, 
the faces of his fellow members, and an 
ordinary mirror, will show him his real 
friends when it comes to protecting his 
material interests as a workman. Leg- 
islation is a very dubious, and certainly 
a second rate and treacherous substitute 
for those things. His union is his only 
real protection, and its fighting power is 
best maintained by him realizing that. 
lie has been fooled often enough by 

legislation. 

o 

Labor A Tabooed Subject 

THOSE profound persons to whom 
the duty of writing the official 
histories of nations has been as- 
signed, have made a consistent practice 
of ignoring the part which labor organ- 
ization has played in the industrial and 
social life of peoples. The workers, and 
their struggles to raise the standard 
cf their daily lives, would seem to have 
been beneath the contempt of these 
academic scribes. 

The result is, that the young student 
can learn nothing of this from the or- 
dinary text books, which are considered 
suitable for his tender intelligence. At 
least one American educator is of the 
opinion that this is a deliberate and in- 
tentional policy. Prof. Edward O. Sis- 
son, professor of Philosophy in Reed 
College, Portland, Ore., has written a 
book entitled "Educating For Freedom," 
and in the course of a chapter called 
"Educative Use of History," finds occa- 
sion to remark as follows: 

"Most of this history was sub- 
merged even while it occurred, and 
little record has ever been made of 
it until our own day. 



"It is only three or at most four 
generations since laboring men 
were indicted in both England and 
the United States for daring to 
unite for the purpose of raising 
their wages and improving their 
conditions of life. 

"But these feeble beginnings of 
labor organizations certainly proved 
to be one of the most potent seeds 
of history now to be reckoned with 
by everyone who desires to under- 
stand his times. 

"Yet even now our school in- 
struction practically ignores the 
whole movement; the most trivial 
and inconsequential topics get more 
space and consideration. 

"In the education of an Ameri- 
can citizen in the twentieth cen- 
tury, the history of labor is far 
more worthy of a quarter or a 
semester of study than the history 
of any foreign country, not except- 
ing even Greece or England. 

"One of the grave defects of his- 
tory as it is Avritten and studied 
today is its prevailing silence and 
neglect toward this great and grow- 
ing interest." 

The learned professor has not made 
any remarkable discovery, and doubtless 
would be the last to claim that he had, 
but in devoting a portion of his book to 
bringing this to the attention of those 
who will read it, he will likely be the 
cause of some seeking deeper knowledge 
on this subject than they might have 
done but for his mention of it. 

To those who have been in close touch 
with the question it has long been real- 
ized that the so-called courses in econ- 
omics, which are given in the great uni- 
versities and colleges, are not based up- 
on the fundamentals of economics at 
all. They are more often specialized 
lines of instruction, designed for the es- 
tablishment in the mind of the pupil of 
a certain viewpoint which will fit in 
with the current economic thought of 
the day. 

The true and everlasting fundamen- 
tals of economic knowledge are land and 
labor, and the economic structure of any 
age is, at bottom founded upon the ap- 
plication of human labor of hand and 
brain to the natural resources of the 
earth. From thence and thence only 
comes all real wealth, no matter 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



how complicated the superstructure of 
finance and trade above it may be. 

But perhaps if college students were 
required to commence their studies of 
the subject at that point, it might be 
feared by some of those who have great 
influence on the policies of educational 
institutions that their young minds 
would not thereafter so easily fit into 
the grooves of thinking which are 
awaiting them at the conclusion of their 
studies. 

To give thought to the existence and 
work of the labor movement might seem 
to some to be beneath their dignity. If 
so, then they are in danger of paying 
dearly for such purblind contempt. The 
labor movement is here, and here to 
stay, as an integral part of the indus- 
trial and social life of the world, and it 
would profitably behoove any man lay- 
ing claim to general intelligence of what 
is going on about him, to be informed 
as to its history, accomplishments, and 
aspirations. 

But that there is lamentable lack of 
that is evident. The average business 
man, who could tell you the very last 
thing in the way of information about 
raw materials, processes of manufacture, 
markets and so forth, connected with 
the industry in which he is interested, 
can as as a rule tell one nothing really 
reliable about labor organization. His 
attitude is generally one of ill-informed 
antagonism towards something which 
he does not in a general sort of way 
like. 

At the best he only thinks of it in con- 
junction with his pay roll, and not as a 
powerful economic and social- force, 
working to raise the living standards of 
the mass of the people — that is those 
who do the world's work. If his teach- 
ers had only thought fit to instruct him 
about it in his youth, a. good deal of mis- 
understanding, trouble, and expense 
might have been saved him. 

9 

Credit Where Credit Is Due 

RECENTLY a well known public 
man, addressing a meeting of busi- 
ness men, said that there was no 
place for agitators in the ranks of Amer- 
ican working men as long as so many 
of those working men owned automo- 
biles and their own homes. The reason 
for this, he said was, because working 
men in America were so much better 
treated than in other countries, where 



the agitator of the type he was thinking 
of existed. 

Well, there are agitators and agita- 
tors, and we take this opportunity of 
rising in our place and saying that, if 
American working men in many cases 
do own their own homes and maybe a 
flivver too, it is not in any way due to 
the voluntary generous treatment of 
their employers. The real and only rea- 
son is, that they are organized in trade 
unions which, by agitation of a reason- 
able and militant kind, have enabled 
them to establish for themselves wage 
scales and working conditions which 
bring them some of the worth while 
things of life. 

The credit belongs to them, and :not 
to those who would arrogate that credit 
to themselves, after it has been made a 
fact by the constitutional and common 
sense agitation of the trade unions of 
this country. Render to Caeser what is 
Caeser's, and don't let us forget what 
would have been our lot if these things 
had been left to the employers' unions. 
The trade unionists of this country got 
what they have got for themselves by 
their own efforts, and in face of the 
vicious opposition of employers. 

It is only about a century since it was 
a crime punishable by imprisonment for 
workmen to band themselves into unions 
for the purpose of raising wages and 
improving working conditions. And 
likely enough, if we abandoned the pro- 
tective organizations we have estab- 
lished by agitation to do away with that 
kind of treatment it would not be so 
long before it would be brought back 
again. 

As we said, there are agitators and 
agitators, and it is sound social and in- 
dustrial policy to keep alive the agita- 
tion which has established the trade 
unions of this country which have en- 
abled some workmen to own their own 
homes and flivvers. Until they are all 
in that position it has not completed its 
work. And then it needs to keep on 
holding what it has got. 

: 9. 

This Way Out 

FOUR months ago, Mr. Trotsky was 
invested with the Soviet Order of 
the Trot, by the dictatorial junta 
headed by his friend Mr. Zinovieff, and 
urgently assisted to take a prolonged 
vacation in the Caucasus. Now the an- 
nual Soviet convention at its meeting 



THE CARPENTER 



33 



has reversed the process, and Mr. Zino- 
vieff has had the decoration conferred 
on him ; and Mr. Trotsky has come trot- 
ting back. 

Just what it will eventually mean in 
respect to the economic policy of Russia 
remains to be seen. But in the meantime 
it is a practical demonstration of the 
playful way these people have of knif- 
ing each other in the back. As dicta- 
tors they are of necessity despots, and 
viciously jealous of each other, besides 
being hogs for popularity with the mass- 
es whom in their hearts they so thor- 
oughly despise. 

Their race is about run, and they 
show that they know it, by easing up 
and making concessions to the great 
mass of the common people of Russia, 
whom they have always regarded as so 
much human material on which to try 
out their hare-brained experiments. 
When the Avhole gang of them have got 
out or been put out, there will be a 
chance for the common people of Russia 
to go to work and lay the foundation of 
real democratic government and Mr. 
Trotsky won't be in the picture either. 
♦ 

Who Pays The Piper Calls The Tune 

ENDOWED colleges and universities 
in the United States draw 28 per 
cent of their income from railroad 
stocks and bonds, representing a total 
value of $148,270,993, according to the 
Bureau of Railway Economics. It is a 
revelation of the most profound import- 
ance that these great institutions, which 
have so much to do with molding the 
mind of the country's youth, should de- 
rive so much support from this quarter. 

For one thing, it is hardly to be ex- 
pected that the teachings authorized 
would be of a character which would 
tend in even a remote degree to impair 
the value of those stocks and bouds as 
dividend producers. In other words, 
trade unionism, with its policy of striv- 
ing for higher wages and other improve- 
ments, which would mean a reduction 
of those dividends, need not expect to 
get any sort of a fair show. 

Indeed, the material offered in those 
colleges as true, in the way of informa- 
tion about workingmen and their en- 
vironment generally, is notoriously arti- 
ficial and distorted* What is more, there 



is some reason to think that not a few 
of the "learned professors" engaged in 
pumping such philosophies into the 
youth given over to their care, do not. 
themselves believe a lot of what they 
are required to teach as being funda- 
mentally true. 

It is merely a question of bread and 
butter with many of them, inured to the 
cynical viewpoint that those who pay 
the piper have the right to call the tune 
here as anywhere. Incidentally, the en- 
tire teaching profession from lowest to 
highest grade is poorly paid itself. In 
the colleges referred to, the children of 
the workers do not figure among the 
students. The authorities are conserva- 
tive and discriminating, preferring to 
choose their pupils from those walks of 
fife where it is felt that "higher educa- 
tion" will be best invested, and later 
used as a continued bulwark to privilege 
and property as represented by the 
sources of income upon which many uni- 
versities depend, 

— •■ 

Be Ready For the Future 

THE wheels of industry in Europe 
are turning more and more every 
day now in the business of pro- 
ducing the normal wants of the nations 
over there, and the markets of the world 
at large. It is only from that source that 
the mighty financial obligations of both 
victors and vanquished in the late war 
can be met and liquidated. The effect, 
of it is beginning to be felt everywhere 
in a feverish and increased competition 
for trade. 

The United States with its tremendous 
home market, plus a purchasing power 
directly due to the militancy of its trade 
unions in fighting for decent wage rates, 
may not ever feel this competition as 
much as those nations which are stag- 
gering under a load of debt. But even 
here it is already being realized to a 
definite and noticeable extent in some 
lines of industry. The building trade 
taken the country over, is as yet very 
far ahead of normal times in respect to 
output and demand. But it will be well 
for us not to relax one iota in our organ- 
izing enthusiasm, and every other meas- 
ure we have learned to rely upon for the 
protection of our wage standards and 
general living, conditions* 



Official Information 




GENERAL OFFICERS 
OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD 

OF 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA 

General Office 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis. Ind. 



Fibst General Vice-President 

JOHN T. COSGROVE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

GEORGE H. LAKEY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, led. 



General Treasures 

THOMAS NEALE 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 
First District, T. M. GUERIN 
290 Second Ave., Troy, N. Y. 



Second District, W. T. ALLEN 
3832 N. Gratz St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Third District, JOHN H. POTTS 
646 Melish Ave., Cincinnati, O. 



Fourth District, JAMES P. OGLETREE 
106 E. Plymouth St., Tampa, Fla. 



Fifth District, J. W. WILLIAMS 

3948 S. Grand Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 



Sixth District, W. A. COLE 

810 Merchants National Bank Building 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
1712 Cbambord St., Montreal, Que., Can. 

Wii. "L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFS, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive 
.Board mjist be .sent to .the General Secretary. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

We are continuously having numerous 
complaints that members are not receiv= 
ing our official Journal, "The Carpenter," 
and upon investigation we find that in 
most cases it arises from the fact that 
the only address submitted to the Gen- 
eral Office is "General Delivery," and 
when sent this way, and not called for, 
the Postmaster sends same back to this 
General Office at quite an expense. 

We must therefore insist that the Fi- 
nancial Secretaries of each and every 
Local get the correct street address of 
every member of his Local in good stand- 
ing who does not receive the Journal, 
and submit same to the General Office. 

Careful attention to the foregoing will 
assist this Office materially in getting 
our Journal out promptly and to the par- 
ties interested. 

Financial Secretaries will also take in- 
to consideration that it is necessary to 
call attention on those same blanks to 
the names of members who are suspend- 
ed and granted clearance so that their 
names can be erased from the mailing 
list in the town or city in whi-h their 
Local is located. If sufficient blanks are 
not furnished at any time, our attention 
should be called to same and they will 
be promptly forwarded. 

We must also insist that the Financial 
Secretaries obtain the same information 
from all members newly initiated and 
admitted on clearance, together with 
those who have changed their address, 
and forward same to the General Office 
on the blanks furnished for that purpose 
each and every month. 

We a'so desire to call attention to the 
fact that it is not necessary to furnish 
each and every month a complete roster 
of your membership, and their addresses, 

only changes in same being necessary. 

. e 

Keep Your Dues Paid Up 

— • 

.500,000 Members For 1925 



CorrQspondQncQ 




About Looking For A Job 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

The writer is one of a committee of 
L. U. 115, Bridgeport, Conn., appointed 
to make a survey of the "methods used 
in seeking a job." 

It is a contention of the writer, and 
some others, that the present lack of 
definite methods in seeking a job results 
in much wasted energy ; and of ttimes 
does harm. 

In most localities, men out of work 
go froni job to job seeking employment, 
and in slack periods this means that 
many of our craft are going to the same 
jobs. 

Maybe some localities have already 
solved this problem, and if so, details of 
its" operation will be greatly appreciated. 

At first though the solution would 
seem very, very simple via a rotation 
list, but there are so many varying de- 
sires, abilities, prejudices, etc., both on 
the part of the journeymen and with 
the employers, that the plan becomes 
rather involved. But the writer firmly 
believes that somewhere in this Broth- 
erhood of ours will be found a funda- 
mental idea that can be whipped into a 
good, serviceable plan to remedy the 
present chaotic methods. 

Isn't this a good subject to bring up 
under the "Good of the Order" at the 
next meeting of your Local? 
Fraternally yours, 

LOUIS ATWATER, 

P. O. Box 783, Bridgeport, Conn. 

© 

What Auxiliary No. 28 Is Doing 

Editor, "The Carpenter" : 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 28 meets the 
first and third Tuesdays of the month 
in the homes of the members, and do 
sewing for the less fortunate. We are 
members of the Federated Club, help 
furnish milk for the schools and at 
Christmas time several baskets are 
given to the needy. 

We piece quilts and have cooked food 
sales, which are very successful, the 
proceeds going to our treasury to help 
carry on our work. 



On Labor Day we have a basket din- 
ner at the park for the carpenters and 
families. 

Our annual entertainment is on New 
Year's night when we have a dinner and 
program for the Auxiliary and families. 

We are not as large an organization 
as some of the Auxiliaries, but a merry 
bunch and always willing to do our part 
to help others. 

MRS. D. J. RIDGWAY, Ree. Sec. 
Ladies' Auxiliary No. 28, Bartlesville, 

Okla. 



Ladies' Auxiliary No. 21 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

We have been organized nine years 
February 3, 1925, and our present mem- 
bership of 28 is about one-third of the 
union carpenters' wives in this city. 

We meet at the Carpenters' Hall the 
first and third Tuesday afternoon of 
each month. We recently held a social 
to which all union carpenters and their 
families were invited. Our membership 
committee got busy and six applications 
were handed in the same evening. 

We usually have work of some kind 
to do at our meetings which brings us 
money for our treasury. There are not 
many of us but we are on the job. 

MRS. GRACE B. ADAMS, Rec. Sec. 
Ladies' Auxiliary Union No. 21, Marsh- 
allton, Iowa. 

• 

First In Vermont? 

Editor, "The Carpenter": 

We wish to notify you of our newly 
formed Ladies' Auxiliary No. 72. We 
have twenty-four charter members and 
nineteen of the brothers are honorary 
members. 

We believe we have the distinction of 
being the first Auxiliary in Vermont. 

We hold our meetings after the 
brothers have theirs, and generally have 
a social hour with refreshments. 
Fraternally yours, 
FLORA LORD, Rec. Sec. 
Ladies' Auxiliary No. 72, Barre, Vt. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



ONE HONOR ROLL OF 1924 

The year 1924 witnessed the passing 
of many trade union executives. These 
included : 

Samuel Gompers, President, American 
Federation of Labor. 

James J. Freel, President, Interna- 
tional Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' 
Union. 

John Voll, President, Glass Bottle 
Blowers' Association. 

Edward J. Cantwell. Secretary, Na- 
tional Association of Letter Carriers. 

Adam Huebner, Secretary, Interna- 
tional Union of the United Brewery, 
Flour, Cereal and Soft Drink Workers 
of America. 

George Nolte, Vice-President, Broth- 
erhood Railway Carmen. 

Alex Russell, Executive Secretary, 
Granite Cutters' International Associa- 
tion. 

Martin J. Conroy, Vice-President, 
United Association of Plumbers and 
Steam Fitters. 

Daniel A. Post, General Executive 
Board Member, United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America, for 
22 years. 

James P. Fox, Vice-President, Inter- 
national Union of Bricklayers, Masons 
and Plasterers. 

F. C. Bolan, Vice-President, Interna- 
tional Brotherhood of Blacksmiths, 
Drop Forgers and Helpers. 

Chris Evans, former Secretary, Unit- 
ed Mine Workers of America. 

The year also marked the passing 
of T. V. Powderly, one time grand mas- 
ter workman of the Knights of Labor; 
Joseph Buchanan, nationally-known la- 
bor writer and old-time labor editor, 
and Wm. McCabe of New York Typo- 
graphical Union, who was grand mar- 
shal of the first Labor Day parade in 
the United States, September 5, 1882. 



Miami, Fla., Celebrates 

More than 800 carpenters, members 
of L. U. 1407, Miami, Fla., with their 
wives and friends, recently celebrated 
the fourth anniversary of the Local 
Union with an evening of merrymaking. 
An address by William Jennings Bryan, 
good music, refreshments galore and 
dancing, all combined to make the even- 
ing an outstanding event among the so- 
cial affairs of No. 1407. 



UNITY NEEDED THERE 

The following table shows the respec- 
tive memberships of the six national 
trade union centers which exist in 
Holland : 

N. V. V. (affiliated with I. F. T. U.) 
179,229 members, or 46.27% of all the 
organized workers (on January 1, 1923, 
43.7%). 

R. K. V. (Roman Catholic) 101,110 
members or 26% (on January 1, 1923, 
27%). 

C. N. V. (Protestant) 53,967 members 
or 13.8% (on January 1, 1923, 13.9%). 

A. N. V. (Neutral) 32,222 members 
or 8.29% (on January 1, 1923, 10.18%). 

N. A. S. (Communist) 13,527 mem- 
bers or 3.48% (on January 1, 1923, 
4.8%). 

N. S. V. (Syndicalist) 8,110 members 
or 2.09%. Total, 388,865 members. 

If we add to the above total of 388,- 
865,, the trade unions which do not be- 
long to any national center, such as some 
of the clerks' and shop assistants' 
unions, and the civil servants' unions, 
we obtain a total of 517,900 organized 
workers (manual and non-manual). 
• 

Information Wanted 

This is a picture of Charlie P. Humph- 
reys, who was working in Philadelphia 
a short while ago, as a carpenter. Any- 




one knowing of his whereabouts please 
communicate with Miss Naomi Humph- 
reys, 210 W. 9th St., Mishawaka, Ind. 
* * # 
Isaac Walmsley, formerly of Brad- 
ford, England, is requested to commu- 
nicate with Robert Walmsley, 16 Winter 
St., Haverhill, Mass., when he will hear 
of something to his advantage. It is be- 
lieved that Isaac Walmsley was form- 
erly a member of the Amalgamated Sec- 
tion of the United Brotherhood in San 
Francisco. 



Chips and Shavings 



Japanese cotton mills work 22 hours 
daily in two shifts, employing female la- 
bor at night. 

* * * 

Almost 3,000 women were appointed 
as postmistresses during 1924. Texas 
led in the number appointed, with 166. 

* * * 

It is estimated that there are 224,- 
000,000 people, or 71 per cent of the 
entire population of India, engaged in 

agriculture. 

* * * 

If good judgment and common sense 
are applied in making purchases, an in- 
crease in the demand for the Union 
Label, card and button is sure to follow. 

* * * 

This is the month when we nominate 
officers of Local Unions for the coming 
year. Look 'em over now, and select 
those whom you think will be best fitted 

for the 3 ob. 

* * * 

According to reports in the Japanese 
press, unemployment is very serious in 
Japan. An investigation made by the 
Bureau of Social Affairs shows that 
more than 932,000 workers are out of 
employment. 

J. J. O'Brien, Vice-President of the 
Iowa Federation of Labor and for more 
than 20 years President of the Musca- 
tine Trades and Labor Assembly, died 
recently. He was 63 years of age and 
had been a printer for 40 years. 

* * * 

The International Typographical 
Union »ow has 2,414 members on its 
roll of old age pensioners, of which num- 
ber 61 are women. The pension pay- 
ments for the fiscal year of 1925 will 
aggregate approximately $1,000,000. 

In Alabama 41.2 per cent of the negro 
children of school age are not enrolled. 
In 1920, it would appear, of negro chil- 
dren between the ages of 10 and 14 
years living in rural districts of Ala- 
bama 23.6 per cent did not attend 
school; in Georgia the percentage for 
that year was 32.5; in Louisiana, 40.9; 
and in Mississippi 26.2. 



There are now only six states in the 
United States, besides the District of 
Columbia, without workmen's compen- 
sation laws, according to a bulletin is- 
sued by the United States Bureau of 
Labor Statistics giving the status of 
compensation legislation at January 1, 
1925. The deficient states are Arkansas, 
Florida, Mississippi, Missouri, North 
Carolina, and South Carolina. 

* * * 

The year 1924 was marked by 18 
fewer strikes and lockouts in Canada 
than 1923, which in turn (together with 
1922), had shown the least number of 
disputes since 1915. Including ten dis- 
putes carried over from the previous 
year, there were 73 disputes during 
1924. The number of workers involved 
was 32,494, as compared with 32,868 
in 1923, and the time lost was 1,770,825 
working days, as compared with 768, ~ 

494 in 1923. 

* * * 

The thirteenth annual meeting of the 
United States Chamber of Commerce 
was scheduled to meet in Washington at 
the end of last month. The official call 
said the main subjects to be considered 
were: "The European Situation, Ameri- 
can Business Conditions, Commercial 
Treaty Policy, the Merchant Marine, the 
Federal Trade Commission, Agriculture, 
and Congress and the American Public." 
From the order of procedure it is evi- 
dent "the public" wasn't considered 
very important. 

* * * 

The National Woolen Mills Company 
of Parkersburg, West Virginia, makers 
of made-to-measure clothing for men, 
for years a union concern, broke its 
agreement with L. U. 350 of the Jour- 
neymen Tailors Union of America, on 
the 24th day of January, 1925, and de- 
clared for the so-called "open shop," 
causing a lockout of 1S7 union mem- 
bers, men and women. This lockout 
came without a word of warning, or pre- 
vious notice, as the agreement with the 
union does not expire until September 
16, 1925, according to a circular issued 
by the union. 



Craft ProblQms 




Building a House 

LESSON NO. Ill 
(By H. H. Siegele.) 



Whether or not moving pictures will 
be transmitted by radio during the life 
time of the apprentice, does not worry 
us in the least; Ave are sure, however, 
that houses will not be built by radio 
for a long time, so we might as well go 
ahead with the house that we started 
two articles back. 

Of course, we will bear in mind that 
science has made many discoveries 
within recent years, the effects of which 
will live as long as civilization itself, but 
science, with all of its marvelous 
achievements has never found a substi- 
tute for work — and it will be well for 
the apprentice co remember that if he 
is to accomplish anything worth while 
during his life time, he will do it through 
the medium of work. On the other hand, 
he should learn early in his career how 
tc attain accomplishments, as a builder, 
with the least possible expenditures of 
labor. 

"We have been speaking about work, 
and i.Lat is what wa are coming to. The 
excavators are through with the digging, 
and the concrete men have the footings 
poured, so the next thing to be done is 
form building. 

Form building is an important part 
of our trade, and the man who under- 
stands how to build forms, is a skilled 
mechanic, as much as the man who can 
build a stair or frame a roof. 

We are aware of the fact that there 
are those who think that almost any- 
body can build forms — and those people 
really have forms built by almost any- 
body; but the results, if carefully ana- 
lyzed, will be indicative of poor business 
ability, rather than what they were 
hoping for, economy. 

The inexperienced form builder usu- 
ally goes at form building just as he 
would go at building a permanent build- 
ing — forgetting, for the time being, that 
this work is merely a temporary sup- 
port for the green concrete, which, af- 



ter the concrete has set, must be re- 
moved. 

Because of this misconception, he uses 
altogether too many nails, thus, not only 
increasing the cost of erecting the forms, 
but, as is often the case, doubling the 
cost of removing them as well. No more 
nails should be used than just enough 
to hold the forms in place. 

Of course, for bracing, and for work 
where the strength depends entirely on 
the nailing, plenty of nails should be 
used. Bearings depending entirely on 
nails, should be avoided as much as pos- 
sible, and defective material should not 
be used for either shores or braces. 

By referring to the basement plan, 
Fig. 16, on which the footings are indi- 
cated with dotted lines, and the walls 
are shown by the continuous lines, we 
can readily obtain an idea of the amount 
of form work we have to do. Fig. 17 is 
a detail of the hatchway steps. 

The grade door, is a much better ar- 
rangement for obtaining passageway 
from the outside to the basement, but 
for the sake of economy, and because 
we did not have the necessary space for 
a grade door, we have chosen the hatch- 
way. 

Concrete, if good cement and good, 
clean gravel and sand is used, is in 
many ways the best material that can 
be used for foundation walls. It has a 
great compressive strength, but its ten- 
sile strength has no value, from a prac- 
tical standpoint, unless it is produced by 
means of reinforcing, 

In Fig. 17 we are representing the 
reinforcing by heavy dots, and a dotted 
line near the bottom of the hatchway 
steps. Each footing shows two rein- 
forcing rods. The size of the rods must 
be determined by the amount of strength 
necessary — a half or a five-eighths inch 
rod will answer the purpose for ordinary 
residence work. 



THE CARPENTER 



39 



The cross rods for the steps can even This does not involve any extra expense, 
be smaller, and still answer the purpose, but it makes a marked difference on the 
The risers of the steps shown on this ease of the steps. 




r 


V 




"1 


,F 


i 


>:>•• 


1 


i 
i 


•-'.pV 


1 
| 


i_ 






-J 



p — IPW 



drawing, are about an inch out of plumb 
—the reason for .this is to give toe-room. 



1 
1 
1 


Stsfe 


1 
1 
I 


L 


- 




J 








it 



O 



9-9 ► 



Fig. 18 is a detail of a double form 
for the outside wall — to the left is 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



shown the run on which the concrete is 
wheeled to the place where it is poured 




into the forms. By selecting a straight 
plank to start with at the point indicated 
by a, it will be an easy matter to 
straighten out the forms at the top. 

A brace, such as is shown at k, should 
be placed at each joint of this starting 
plank, the purpose of which is to hold 
•the top of the forms in a general line. 

At 1, is shown a foot brace nailed to 
a 2x6, the purpose of which is to hold 
the bottom of the forms in line. The 
upright, b, should be cut from 2x4 stuff 
to a length that will work into the build- 
ing without much waste. 

The ledger, marked c, can be a stud- 
ding cut to the right length. The 2x4 
shown at d, is the first piece to be nailed 




The excavator should not be ]6ermit- 
ted to throw more dirt at this place 
than what is necessary to fill in between 
the dirt-bank and the concrete wall. 

The indicators at e, point out the 
spreaders, and f shows the wires — num- 
ber 12, bendable wire usually gives the 
best results. The upper tie-piece is 
shown at g, and h shows the top plates. 

The uprights, of which we will have 
more to say in our next article, are 
pointed out at i. 

At j, is shown a nail, which is some- 
what exaggerated, representing the 
grade line. A grade-nail stuck at inter- 
vals of from four to six feet on the 
grade-line, will be sufficient to guide the 
concrete man in bringing the top of the 
wall to a fairly even finish. 

On Fig. 19. which is another method 
of forming for an outside wall, the 
grade-nail is shown on the inside form 
— the reason for this is that the outside 




Fl c. 19. 



into place when the run is built. A pile 
of loose dirt is represented under the 
run by the dotted line, dots and loops. 



7 l/V/'' 



form is not reliable — it may settle, and 
thus cause rather embarrassing difficul- 
ties. 

This method of form building is not 
to be recommended, although, under cer- 
tain conditions satisfactory results can 
be obtained with it. The only advantage 
that it offers is that it reduces the ex- 
cavating — the labor that is saved on 
the outside forms, if any, is balanced 
by the extra amount of labor necessary 
in bracing both the inside and the out- 
side forms. 

The greatest danger, and therefore the 
greatest objection, that this method pre- 
sents, is the danger of the bank caving 
in, not only while the forms are being 



THE CARPENTER 



41 



erected, but even while the concrete is 
being poured. 

Fig. 20 shows a section of the outside 
wall as it will appear after the forms 
have been removed and the space be- 
tween the dirt bank and the wall has 




Fl G. 20. 



been filled in. The width and the thick- 
ness of the footing are shown by figures, 
and the reinforcing is indicated by 
heavy dots. 

In concluding this article we want to 
say a few words to the apprentice. The 
older heads may know what I want to 
say, but the apprentice, if he is really 
in earnest about learning the trade, will 
listen until I am through. 

The last illustration shows the forms 
removed, and since we were taking the 
lead in the work, the nails have all been 
taken out, and the lumber carefully 
piled, at a place where it will be con- 
venient, when it is to be used in the 
building. 

Besides that, each kind, and as near 
as possible, each length has been placed 
on a separate pile; thus it will not be 
necessary, when a certain kind or a cer- 
tain length of material is needed, to 
move a lot of carelessly piled lumber, 
in order to get it. 



Another thing: By referring to Fig. 
2.0, it will be observed that, not only tine 
filling in has been done, but, the ground 
around the building has been leveled. 
We did this because the carpenters will 
save more, by having level ground to 
work over, than the leveling of the 
ground will cost in the beginning — and 
it will cost less in the beginning, than 
it will after it has been packed by 
working over it. 

If the apprentice wants to enjoy his 
work to the extent that it will be easy 
for him to do his best (if he does not 
want that, let him lay aside his tools 
and choose something else for a voca- 
tion) then he should fix his ideals early 
— let him say within himself, "I ?m 
going to do my best to reach the very 
top of the building industry," for with 
that saying he will go a long way 
toward gaining his ideal. 



Building a House 

LESSON NO. IV 
(By H. H. Siegele.) 

In these articles we are dealing with 
problems, relative to building a house, 
that seem to us to be important, es- 
pecially, with the apprentice in mind. 
It should be remembered, though, that 
with the phrase, "that seem to us," we 
are limiting the subject matter within 
the bounds of our own experience and 
judgment. 

We may handle a situation success- 
fully, by using a method that we un- 
derstand, while another man may try to 
handle the same situation with that 
method, and fail utterly — whereas, if he 
would use the method that he is fa- 
miliar with,, he might even accomplish 
better results than we could accomplish 
with our method. 

What we want to say, is that we are 
not trying to change the proved and 
well-known methods of the experienced 
carpenter, but wo are endeavoring to 
point out to the apprentice the most 
important problems about building a 
house, so that he can more intelligently 
choose the methods that will give him 
the best results, and, at the same time, 
avoid the ones that are questionable or 
unsatisfactory. 

That does not mean that he will 
choose the methods that we are suggest- 
ing, we do not want him to do that, but 
■what we want him to do is to inform 



42 



THE CARPENTER 



himself as thoroughly as he can on the 
various problems, and then work out a 
method, or methods of his own, which 
will give him better service than any- 
borrowed method could. 

In Article III we spoke about nailing 
forms — in Fig. 21 we are illustrating a 
method of nailing forms that is suffici- 



the length of the board. At the end of 
the board two nails should be driven. 

This nailing is more than what is nec- 
essary, when the forms do not stand idle 
long enough for the sun to warp them 
— if the material is straight, in such 
cases, a nail at every other bearing is 
sufficient. 



|*-2'-o"— 4*-&'-o*-~J 




F) G. 21. 

ent to hold any forms in place. The dots 
between the dotted lines indicate nails, 
which in this case are 6 penny common. 
(Never use box nails, because the heads 
do not have enough strength to hold for 
pulling them.) 



At the center of the section of forms 
shown on this figure can be seen how 
all the joints have been made on one 
studding, this is much better than 
breaking the joints. 

Fig. 22 shows a section of forms built 



Fig. zz. 



The nails in this case are staggered, 
that is, one bearing has the nail driven 
at one edge of the board, and the next 
bearing has the nail driven on the other 
edge of the board, and so on through 



with the joints broken. This makes a 
good form, but it involves unnecessary 
labor, both for erecting and for remov- 
ing the forms. Moreover, more oi the 
lumber is destroyed while the forms are 



THE CARPENTER 



43 



being wrecked, than would be, if the 
joints were all made on one studding. 

Usually the man who insists on 
breaking joints, also insists on using two 
nails to each bearing — sometimes 8 
penny commons, at that. 

We have in mind one job, it happened 
to be a by-the-day job. The man that 
built the forms used 8 penny common 




nails, two to each bearing. It was win- 
ter when the forms were taken down. 
Everything was frozen hard, besides 
nailed to stay, plus. Although the 
weather was cold, it was an easy matter 
to keep warm — the difficulty was to 
keep from getting "hot." 

The uprights for the forms that we 
have just considered were cut to the 
studding length. Fig. 23 shows the 







fefe 
ft"* £ 



-r>r^< 



studding length as being 8 ft. 8% in., 
and the distance between the rough floor 
and the bottom of the ceiling joists as 
9 ft., 1% in. The difference is the 
amount of space taken up by the bottom 
plate and the double top plate. 

A little scheme for marking the stud-" 
ding is shown by Pig. 24. Take a 
straight studding, cut to the right 
length, and nail a 1x2x4 on the end as 
shown at a. 

Use this studding as a pattern for 
marking the studding — the end piece 
must be kept tight against the end of 
the 2x4 to be marked, in order to obtain 
accuracy. 

Being sure of this, mark along the 
end of the pattern with a pencil, as 
shown at b. 

Fig. 25 is a section of the basement 
wall showing the anchor bolts, some- 
what exaggerated, that should be put 
into the wall for the purpose of anchor- 
ing the coal room partition to the walls. 




F\ Q. £5. 



Fig. £6. 

This is the only substantial way to fast- 
en a wood partition to a cement or brick 
wall. 

Fig. 26 is a detail of the cellar win- 
dow frame. The sash having three 
lights, each measuring 10x16, so the 
width of the frame at the rabbeted edge 
would be three times 10, or 30 in. for 
the glass ; twice 2, or 4 in. for the stiles, 
and twice %, or y 2 in. for the two 
parting mouldings; over all, 34% in. 

The height would be, 16 in. for the 
glass, 2 in. for the top rail and 3 in. for 
the bottom rail; or over all, 21 in. 

Fig. 27 is a detail of the cellar door 
frame. The width of which is 2 ft. 6 in. f 
and the height is 6 ft. and 6 in. We 
are showing it rabbeted, which is, in 
many cases, not necessary. 



44 



THE CARPENTEK 



Fig. 28 represents a section of a con^ 
erete basement wall. To the left of 
which is shown a crack, similar to 




H G. &7. 



cracks that frequently appear on base- 
ment walls not reinforced with rods. 




Fi G-. &8. 

This crack could have been prevented 
had the wall been reinforced, in the 
manner indicated by the dashed lines, 
with about y 2 in. rods. 

The basement walls of the house that 
we are building will be reinforced about 
as indicated by Fig. 28. We have met 
builders, who contend that reinforcing 



has no value in basement walls, but we 
can not agree with them, however much 
we want to respect their opinions. 

Experience has taught us, that, even 
though cracks might appear in rein- 
forced walls, the reinforcing, neverthe- 
less, will keep the cracks from opening. 

Of course, our experience is limited to 
a locality where the ground is somewhat 
treacherous — in localities where a good 
rock bottom, or its equal, is to be had, 
reinforcing basement walls perhaps 
would not be justifiable. 

If the foundation is firm, the other 
part of the building, which we will begin 
to deal with in the next articles, will 
hold its position throughout many years 
of usefulness. 



Elevation Pole 

A reliable method for establishing the 
various elevations of a building con- 
structed of brick and reinforced concrete 
we are illustrating with Figs. 1 and 2. 

Fig. 1 shows a section through a wall 
of a three story building — the wall is 
made of brick, while the floors are con- 
structed of reinforced concrete. 



Top of Slab 

-^■Bottom of 5lab 



Top of Window. 




Fig. 2 shows the elevation pole with 
the various points marked on it Begin- 
ning at the bottom and working up, we 
have: Top of base, top of sill, top of 
window, bottom of slab and top of slab. 



THE CARPENTER 



45 



Other important points should be 
marked on the pole at the right eleva- 
tions. It will be seen that the pole ex- 
tends a few inches above the top of the 
slab. The purpose of this is to keep it 
from becoming covered with concrete or 
lost. 

When the forms for the first floor are 
being built, the pole for the basement 
should be set in place, after the various 
points have been marked on it. The pole 
reaching from first to second floor should 
be put in place when the second floor 
forms are built. 

In the same manner a pole should be 
placed for all other stories of whatever 



building it may be used on. All of the 
important points should be clearly 
marked on the elevation pole. A nail 
stuck at each of the points for setting; 
the target on will prove to be a time 
saver. 

From these points all of the import- 
ant points of each story should be ob- 
tained. The pole should be located in a 
place where it will be easily accessible 
with the leveling instrument. Fig. 1 
shoAvs the elevation poles for three 
stories setting end on end, as they 
should be when in place. When the 
building is done the poles are cut off 
flush with the surfaces of the concrete 
slabs. 



A BuiIt=Up Truss 

The question, whether a built-up truss 
has as much strength as a one-member 
truss, has often been discussed. The 
quality of the material, rather than the 
number of members, has more to do with 
the strength of the finished product, 
than anything else. 

Where everything else is equal and 
the material used is perfectly sound and 



to the building as well as to the contents 
of the building. 

We are showing a drawing of a five- 
member built-up truss. The clamps 
holding the foot of the rafters to the 
chord should be slightly sunk into the 
chord to prevent slipping. The beveled 
washers at the upper ends of the rods 
should also be sunk into the rafter for 
the same purpose. A little study of the 



5-ZX*" 



£"B0LT5 A o.c 




£Xfc" CLAMPS 



straight grained, we believe that the 
one-member truss is the most substan- 
tial, because it is not impaired, as the 
built-up truss is, by the boring for the 
bolts. While on the other hand, if the 
material is cross-grained, as is very 
often the case, then we hold that a built- 
up truss is the better, for it would be al- 
most impossible for the grains of the 
various members of a built-up truss to 
all run in the same dh*ootion; thus if one 
member is rendered useless by a season 
crack, the other members will still re- 
tain enough strength to support the load. 

A season crack in a cross-grained 
member of a one-member truss may re- 
sult in an accident causing much damage 



drawing will explain the construction of 
this truss. 

The principal thing about building a 
truss is to give all butt-joints a full bear- 
ing, that is to say, the joints should be 
tight throughout, not as is often the 
case, open on one side. The selection 
of material, which we have dealt with 
above, is another important, feature. 



Thinking you should do a thing will 
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POCKET SIZE-FLEXIBLE COVEI 
1600 PAGES-3700 TRADE ILLUSTRATIO 



4 HANDY VOLS. 

Condensed Contents Audels Carpenters and Builders Guid 



GUIDE NO. I 
43I Pages— 1200 Illustration* 

— How to know the different lands 

of wood. 
— How to use the different kinds 

of wood. 
—Complete detailed information 

on nails and screws. 
— How circular and band saWS 

are handled. 
—How to use the steel sfluare. 
— How to sharpen tools. 
— How to file and set saws. 
— How to make wood joints. 
— Complete information regarding 

joints and joinery. 
— How to build furniture. 
— How to make a work bench. 
— How to make a mitre box. 
— How to make a mitre shooting 

board. 
— How to iplumb and level work, 
— How to use the chalk line. 



How to lay out work. 
— How to use rules and scales. 
•How to use all of tha carpenter's 
tools, with over 900 illustra- 
tions showing specifically how. 

GUIDE NO. 2 

■How to understand carpenter's 
arithmetic. 

■How to Understand geometry. 
•How to understand trigonometry. 
■How to solve mensuration prob- 
lems. , 

—How to estimate the strength 
of timbers. 

— How to proportion beams. 

— How to use drawing instruments. 

— How to read plans. 

— How to survey. 

— How to draw up specifications, 

—How to estimate cost. ', 

— How to build houses, barns. 
garages, bungalows, etc. 



GUIDE NO. 3 

How to excavate foundations. 

—How to build foundations. 
— How to make water-proof. 
—How to erect post foundations. 
—How to build forms for concrete. 
— How to proportion foundation 

footings. 
—How to frame houses. 
—How to set girders and sills. 
—How to frame joists. 
—How to construct a well hole. 
—How to frame a studding. 
— How to frame corner posts. 
— How to lay out and cut brades. 
—How to attach lath to corner posts. 
—How to frame temporary and 

permanent braces. 
—How to frame girts and rib bands. 
— How .to set window frames. 
—"How to "frame partitions. 
—How to distinguish various 

types of roofs. 



— How to use the settings 1! 

and 17 on the steel squar 
— How to lay out mitre cuts 
— How to use tangents, and 

detailed information 

sky lights, scafford and hois 

GUIDE NO. 4 

— How to put on wood, fibre 

metal shingles. 
—How to lay gravel roofs. 
—How to lay tin roofs. 
—How to hang doors. 
— How te frame WindoWa. 
— flow to put on siding, 
—How to put ort exterier w 
—HOW to do cbrhice work-. 
—HoW to build stairs-. 
—How to lath. 
—How to lay floors. * 

— How to put on interior If 
— How to paint. 
-Hnw to give first aid t( 

injured. 





OLYE YOUR PROBLEMS 

Inside trade information for Carpenters, Builders, 
Joiners, Building- Mechanics and all woodworkers. 
3700 actual examples of efficient construction work with new 
methods, ideas, solutions, plans, systems, short cuts, time and 
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practice of the subject illustrated by sketches and forms, all specific 
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EW IDEAS and METHODS-SHORT COTS 





Reasonable Price" 

I find the Guides 
i r y satisfactory, 
h e knowledge in 
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than I anticipat- 

A very conveni- 

t size and price is 

reasonable that 
ery carpenter 
ould possess a set. 
•Ralph M. Collem- 

Lowell, Mass. 

iood For Profes= 
ional Carpenters" 

It is the most' 
a n d y reference 
ork that I ever 
me in contact 
ith. It is the very 
ing that the build- 
g mechanic needs 
ery day for refer - 
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ford to be without 
is valuable work, 
wish you unbound- 
[ success. — George 
Watson, 136 
unson St., Long 
land City, N. Y. 



How to Use the Steel Square 12, 13, 17, 

(Example From Audels Guide No. i) 

As an example of the thorough and practical way in which 
each subject is handled, there are 52 illustrations and dia- 
grams and 47 pages given over to the different uses of the steel 
square. Many carpenters use the actual pages of the book as 
a hand guide in their daily work 

Here is a specimen illustration (reduced size) and the descrip- 
tion that goes with it. 

Rules 12, 13 & 17 on the Steel Square 

The lines radiating from division 12 on the tongue of the square 
to various points on the blade as seen in fig. M, are inclinations 
corresponding to the various roof pitches. 

The 12 inch mark on tongue and mark on blade opposite pitch 
desired is used to obtain cuts for common rafters. For octagon, 
or hip rafters use mark 13, or 17 respectively. In fig. S, the 
square is seen applied to a rafter with the 12 in. mark on tongue 
and 18 in. mark on body at the edge of the rafter corresponding 
to 2 pitch of common rafter. 

The inclinations A, and B, of the tongue and body of the square 
with the edge LP, of the rafter give the correct angles for bottom 
and top cuts for 2 pitch when placed in position; that is, when 
A is horizontal and B, vertical or plumb. 




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STEEL 
SQUARE 
POCKET 

BOOK 

By 
D. L. Stoddard 

Tb2^HaguS 4 2 xoi inches — 160 Figures 

A PRACTICAL and handy boiled down reference 
book, giving the best methods of using a square. 
Fits the pocket and can be referred to quickly, 
as it is thoroughly indexed. 

One feature which will commend itself to practical 
carpenters, builders and contractors is an absence of 
reference 'letters on the illustrations. 

Instead of having to hunt for reference letters the 
reader will find an exact engraving of the square 
itself laid on the work, so as to give all points, 
lengths and quantities sought. 

CONTENTS BY CHAPTERS 
1. Description of the Marks on Steel Squares. 2. 
Practical Applications of the Steel Square. 3. Laying 
Out Different Figures by Using the Steel Square. 4. 
How to Find Different Pitches and Degrees. 5. Laying 
Out Common Rafters. 6. Hipped Koof Problems and Hop- 
pers. T. Octagon. Hexagon and Circle Roofs: 8 Uneven 
Pitch Roofs. 9. Miscellaneous Roof Problems. 10. Tow- 
ers. 11. Stair Problems. 12. Siding and Shingling. 13. 
Calculating by the Square. 11. Miscellaneous Problems. 
SENT FOR FREE EXAMINATION ' __ 

U. P. C. BOOK COMPANY, INC.. 
239 West 39th Street, New York. 
Please send me for 10 DAYS' FREE EXAMINA- 
TION one copy of Stoddard's Steel Souare Pocket Book. 
If satisfactory I will remit $1.00 or return the book. 

Name 

Address 

Subscriber to Carpenter. June, 1925. 



All Woods Look 
Alike To The 

"Red Devil" Bit 

Hard or soft woods are no 
match for the "Red Devil" 
Auger Bit. Made with a sin- 
gle scorer placed opposite the 
one cutting lip, which re- 
duces friction fully 50%. 
Pulls itself in — no pushing. 

No. 2400 — shown above. 

Made from 3-16ths to 
24-16ths inch inclusive. All dealers sell 
them. Send 80c for a sample No. 2400 
10-16ths in. size. 

Mechanic's tool booklet free 

SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., INC. 

Mfrs. of "Red Devil" Tools 
271 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

"l5T 



te.*!Ml«il 




M&d?e 



Mortises Like This 
are Easily Cut 

with 
The New Improved 



You can cut mortises five times faster 
and easier and a hundred times bet- 
ter with the Champion Jiortiser. No 
chance of spoiling the stock once the 
machine is properly set. A most val- 
uable and economical tool to have 
on the job no matter where you are. 
Easily carried. Cuts a mortise per- 
fectly from h" to II" wide and any 
length from round hole, to 6" slot. 
Can be used on - stock \" to 2%" 
thickness. Year's guarantee with each 
machine. Complete with choice of any 
two bits (I" to I") $10.C<> f. o. b. 
factory. Additional bits up to 14 
furnished at $2.00 each. 

Carpenters and contractors everywhere 
use it. Send for the Champion. If 
not satisfied after ten days' trial, 
return machine at our expense and get your money 
back. ■ 

We also make motor-driven 
models for 
use in larger 
buildings etc. 
Send for circular 
on this and our 
hand driven model. 

COLGAN 
MACHINERY &. 

SUPPLY CO. 
306 Hayden Bldg. 
Columbus, Ohio. 





Get the New Model Ideal 
Floor Sander on Our 
Easy Payment Plan 

You can get an "Ideal" at once and pay 
for it out of your profits on our time pay- 
ment plan. Many men have taken advantage 
of this offer and made enough to pay for 
the machine before the first installment 
was due. Why can't you do the same? 
We want to tell you all about this 
plan, and show how we will help 
you start a floor surfacing business. 
Merely mail us a postal card, saying. 
"Tell me about your Easy Payment 
Plan on the Ideal Sander". We 
will do the rest. 

Every day's delay means money 
lost. Don't put it off. Write us now. 

BOETTCHER CO. 

440 N. Peoria St., CHICAGO. 




FREE 




SEND 
NOW! 



This Lufkhi Steel Measuring Tape 

— as illustrated — is a necessity to any 

carpenter or contractor. We are giving 

it free to introduce our carefully ^A 

Triple Tested Aluminum Lev- ^^p^ 

els. Recommended by all ^/0^ \a 

building foremen for their .^ajcpj i^p ^ 

lasting accuracy. Your .^^^*2mP^ 

initials engraved °n^C^^S e n d Now— Prices 

level .^ttiout^jg^^P^ Level — 12" — $2.75 — 

chargeifre- ^^\\££»^18" $3 75 24" 

Queste d.^^^j^->1.40 — 28" — $5.95. Send 
^rf^ft^W^^Money order, Name and Address 
^^^Jagp^and by return parcel post you will 
(jp^^^^reeeive all charges prepaid, one of these 
^kgj^^nne aluminum Levels and a free Steel 
^5< Measuring Tape. 

ALUMINUM LEVEL CO. of America 

P. 0. Box 5064. KANSAS CITY, MO. 



s: H HUSKS ^ at Whoi psai p Pain 



at Wholesale Prices 



S3 Are you overlooking the profit, that 

goes with Tile Work? 

Any mason or carpenter can install Tile. We 

furnish complete instructions with every order. 

Our Tiles are of the finest quality and we have Rra 

a large variety of colors and patterns to Ej£| 

f choose from. BS 

Our Ceramic Mosaic Floor Tiles, Glazed y~,,-.; 
■Wall Tile and tile trimmings are sold direct P$| 
to you at lowest prices. I^a 

IS] WRITE FOR CATALOG AND PRICES js^l 
§§ Lloyd Floor & Wall Tile Co. 

P. 0. Box 5064-A, Jj/ tile 

Kansas City, Missouri. M CATALOG I 



y/. V.'.VJV.'.Y/.'ft' tf.-.'fryj 




21 Jewels 

Nothing less than 21 Ruby and 
Sapphire jewels is good enough 
for the Burlington masterpiece. 

Quality and Style 

Adjusted to second— temperature 
isochronism — positions, 25 year 
gold strata case, in 100 designs. 
Unsurpassed quality, rock-bot- 
tom prices. $1 down brings 
your choice. Balance in small 
monthly sums. 

Send Sffiff FKEES®®& K^Tfr&X 

Find out about this big special offer made for a limited time I 

Burlington Watch Company Dept. A- 

19th Street and Marshall Boulevard Chicago, Win 






MORRILL SAWSETS 

Set Saws Just Right 

"Saw Points'* Telling You "How To Joint, Set, 
And File Saws." Sent Free Upon Request. 

CHAS. MORRILL, Inc. 

96 Lafayette St. New York. 



Here's A Better 
JOB For YOU! 

The building busi- 
ness in getting bet- 
ter now. Better Jobs 
are coming along for 
the carpenter, build- 
and bricklayer ; but, he 
must be trained for this 
work. Now is the time for 
you to plan for one of these good 
jobs. Learn Blue Print Reading 
and get the training. You can do 
it in spare time. Write for par- 
ticulars today. Learn how to earn 
more money and become a foreman. 

Columbia Cor. School 

Dept. C-27, Drexel Bldg., Phila., Pa. 




Taintor Positive Saw Sets 

have Set the Standard and Set the Saws for over a Quarter 
Century. Are they setting Your saws ? 

If not, talk it over with your Hardware Dealer. 
TWO STYLES, REGULAR No. 7, and No. 7i WITH DOUBLE PLUNGER 

Send for Book: "Care of Saws." Free to members of the Brotherhood. 

Taintor Mfg. Co. 

95 Reade St. New York City. 




MEASURING TAPES 

and FOLDING RULES 

Used for over 40 years where quick and accurate 
work is done. High quality without high price ! 



K& E 



As7c to see our com- 
plete line at your 
Hardware dealer's. 



KEUFFEL & ESSER CO. 

MEW YORK, 127 Fulton Street. General Oltln inf Factorial, HOBOKEN, N. *. 

J CHICAGO ST. LOUIS SAN FRANCISCO MONTREAL* 




Cash or Terms 




Q & B 
Junior 



Convertible Level 

Accurate, simple to operate and reasonable. 

Before YOU Buy 

Send for our instructive Circular E. It is free. 
GEIER & BLUHM.Inc, 672 River St., Troy, N. Y. 




The "INTERLOX" Thinks 

Don't use a stick or guess at a measurement. 
Quick, accurate, durable and rustproof. Use it once 
and you will never work without it. Write today 
for liberal selling inducements to mechanics. 

MASTER RULE MFG. CO., INC. 

841C East 136th St., New York City 



Invented by a Brotherhood Man 

The famous 
"Interlox" Master Slide Rule 



gives both inside and outside measurements 
instantly. 




A poor nail set looks much like a good one. And any 
maker can say his set is best. That's why we GUARANTEE 
every SYRACUSE Nail Set. Crucible steel costs 60 to 100 
per cent, more than open hearth steel, but we use it exclus- 
ively. Send 25c if your dealer doesn't carry. 

SYRACUSE TWIST DRILL CO.. Syracuse, New York 



It's cheaper to buy one good nail set than several poor ones 



EXTENSIBLE DOOR JAMB GAUGE 

A new tool invented and placed on the market by a union 
carpenter which Is used in setting door jambs to square jambs 
at bottom and gauge opening to desired size from 2' to 3' 6". 
Locks in place by means of thumb nuts. Can also be used 
to measure glass in sash, width of enclosed stairs, risers and 
treads. Blades serve as "T" squares for drawing table. Made 
of clear maple. A very serviceable tool. Price $2.50, postpaid. 

HALLBERG AND JOHNSON, Box No. 185, Galesburg, Illinois. 




For Absolute Protection 

Use The 

mw) BOLT 
NIGHT LATCH 

An extra security on glass doors, as key may be turned once 
backwards, locking bolt so it can not be forced or knob turned 
without proper key. Easily installed on any door. Ask your 
dealer or write us direct. 

INDEPENDENT LOCK CO., Leominster, Mass., U. S. A. 








Level\PlumbBetta^ftuickei^Own\&urOwii 



FREE 




Aloe Convertible Level and Transit Combined 



Brings 
if to you 



Increases Your Income 

This instrument will acid immeasurably 
to your efficiency and will do more to in- 
crease your business, income and prestige 
than any investment you ever made ; 
it will put you in the bigger builder 
class. The Aloe Convertible Level 
is the world's best — a combination 
of both level and transit and quick- 
ly converted to the use of either. 
Takes sights either above or below the 
horizontal. Absolutely accurate — satis- 
fies the requirements of the most ex- 
acting. An aid to lasting success. 



iou Learn To Uj 



No technical knowledge necessary. No 
previous experience needed. With our 
simple and complete Instruction book, in- 
cluded free with every level, you can Im- 
mediately put the instrument to work. So 
simple anyone can use it. For leveling foun- 
dations, walls, walks or curbings—to run 
straight lines or boundary lines—in sur- 
veying lots and fields— plumbing walls, 
shafts, trestles, posts and pillars, etc., etc. 




Easy Monthly Payments 

Just $5.00 brings it to you at once— for a 
free trial. If perfectly satisfied, pay the 
balance in small monthly payments. 

Write For Free Book 

Our free book— "Be A Bigger Builder" 
—tells you how to increase your Income- 
how to get the profitable jobs. Write for 
this book today. 



A. S. ALOE CO., 624 Olive St., St. Louis, Mo. 



MAIL COUPON TODAY 



A. S. ALOE CO., 624 Olive St., St. Louis,Mo. 

Without obligation, send me your FREE book. 
"De A Bigger Builder". A 'so full particulars about 
the Aloe Convertible Level and details of your easy 
payment plan. 



Name . 



Address. . 




Hand-Made 
Adze. 

There is no adze made 
that will wear longer or 
stay sharp longer than 
White "Old Fashioned" 
Quality adze. 

Ask your dealer to 
see one. Be sure it is a 
White. 

Write for catalogue. 

THE L. & I. J. WHITE CO. 

15 Columbia St. Buffalo, N. Y. 



DAY 
TRIAL 



MAKE EXTRA MONEY 

with an 

IMPROVED SCHLUETER 

Rapid Electric, Ball Bearing, Floor Surfacing Machine 

Carpenters everywhere are 
getting fnto the floor 
surfacing business Willi 
this handy, easily op- 
erated, rapid, automatic 
machine which costs but 
little and does the work 
of six men. Requires no 
previous experience to 
operate and does its work 
faster and better than 
any machine on the 
market. Surfaces close 
up to the baseboard with- 
out use of edge roller. 
A Five Year Guarantee 
which has proven satis- 
factory to 20,000 users 
covers each machine. 
Write for prices and 5 
day free trial offer. 

Lincoln=SchIueter Machinery Co., Inc. 

?30 w»st Illinois S*. Chicago. Illinois. 





The American Woodworker 



Gasoline or electric 
driven. 

For use on the job or 
in the shop. 

Ask for Bulletin No. 
81, of these and other 
pro£t producers. 



AMERICAN SAW MILL MACHINERY CO. 



136 Main St.. Hackettstown, N. J. 




'First to put the Union Label in Work Clothes" 




Forget the weather — if you're wearing 
Sweet -Orr Fast Color Khakis. 

Work half the day in the rain — the other half in the broiling sun. That 
combination may flatten YOU but — weather conditions don't mean a 
thing to Sweet-Orr Khakis. 

They're absolutely fast. Supplied in all popular shades and weights. 
Pants — Coats — Breeches. And they'll never rip. 

You must be satisfied with Sweet-Orr Khakis, or any Sweet-Orr gar- 
ment you may buy. If not, for any reason, your money back. 

SWEET=ORR & CO., INC., 15 Union Sq., New York 

SWEET-ORR CLOTHES 

TO WORK IN 



^^ TROJAN COPING SAW 



: J *sr^s**tsr*'*Jstjt^>*s 




6i" LONG. 
■ITS YOUR FRAME. 



BLADES 

FREE CUTTING EASY TURNING 

FOLLOW THE CURVES WITHOUT BINDING 

Teeth Filed & Set Oil Hardened & Tempered 

Guaranteed To Outlast Any Other Brand 

If your dealer can not supply you order direct. 

Price 50c per doz. Postage paid 

Write for FREE sample. Mentioning Dealer's name 

Sizes Medium 1=16" wide. Coarse 3=32" wide 

Ackermann Steff an & Co., 4532 Palmer St., Chicago, III. 




Prompt Delivery 



ADDED equipment now en- 
ables us to guarantee full 
shipments of Perfection 
Brand Oak Flooring upon 
receipt of order. 



The demand for Perfection 
has increased so rapidly that 
for the past season we have 
been scarcely able to keep 
up with this demand. 



This growing popularity of 
Perfection can only be due 
to the perfect matching, uni- 
form grading, and our na- 
tional advertising in the 
leading home magazines. 



We have some attractive 
folders and a new beautifully 
illustrated book which we 
will supply for distribution 
among prospective home 
builders. 



Ask for samples and 
full information. 



ARKANSAS OAK FLOORING CO. 
Pine Bluff, Arkansas 



There Is No Better Machine 
Made Than the 

"Lightning Electric' 

Floor 
Surfacer 

fi If you are interested in Floor 
Surfacing Machines be sure 
to write for the literature 
on the "Lightning Electric" 
— the highest quality and 
most economically priced 
floor surfacer on the mar- 
ket. Will do the work 
of six to eight men 
and do it better. 

No Old- 
Fashioned 
Side Roller 

The "Lightning Electric" will surface right up to 
quarter round without the use of the Old-Fashioned 
and cumbersome side roller. Leaves NO waves or 
chatter marks in the roughest floors— will NOT vibrate. 

Five Day Free Trial 
and Five Year Guarantee 

Write for our five day free trial and our five year guaran- 
tee on the best Floor Surfacing Machine the world has 
ever produced . Costs you nothing to investigate and the 
machine pays for itself the first month. A business making 
proposition for the contractor or individual — write today. 

National Sanding Machine Company 

Formerly The Globe Mfg. & Dist. Co. 

Sales Of Sice t 

543-545 Vedder St. Chicago, 111. 




PARKS 

Cabinet Shop Special No. 7 
$250.00 

as illustrated with motor. 



Make 
money on 
the side 
with 
this Parks 



Put this Parks Cabinet Shop Special No. 7 in your 
basement. Plug Into a light socket. Then turn out 
all kinds of special work to order— toys, furniture, 
cedar chests, radio cabinets, screens, etc. Make your 
spare hours worth real money — hand bench work Is 
too slow. This Parks, with band saw, jointer, cir- 
cular saw and motor is only $250. Add $25 for 
shaper, $15 for lathe. $2.50 for sander. Send for 
special circular No. 7. 

THE PARKS BALL BEARING MACHINE COMPANY 

1349 Knowlton Street, Cincinnati, 0. 

Canadian Factory: 200 Notre Dame East, 

Montreal, Can. 





WOODWORKING MACHINES; 



BA M" C 

ROOF ^° DECK CLOTH 

P.E6. U. S. PAT. OFF. 

An absolutely waterproof 

r o o fi n g canvas, for low 

pitched and flat roofs, also 

for the floors of piazzas and 

sleeping porches. Lays flat 

and stays flat. Will not crack, 

buckle or peel. No white lead 

bedding required. 

Write for sample "book 
"T" and for one of 
our repeat memo pads. 

JOHN BOYLE & CO., INC. 

ESTABLISHED I860 

dJaVeV NEW YORK RE ^ E 2 ST . 

BRANCH 1317-1319 PINE ST. ST. LOUIS 




TheWorkWatch 
of Millions 

TheAll-AroundWatcli 
of Millions More 

It Costs Little 

and Keeps 
Reliable Time) 




Models $1-75 to $11 




When Wood 
"Cuts Like 
Paper 



» 



IT'S an indication 
that a first-class 
file has been used to 
sharpen the saw 
teeth. 

For every filing purpose 
known to wood workers, 
there's the right BLACK 
DIAMOND File. 

On a file the BLACK 
DIAMOND trade mark 
means— "Since 1863 the 
Standard of Quality." 

G. & H. BARNETT CO 

1078 FRAIMKFORD AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., U.S.A. 

Owned and Operated by 

NICHOLSON FILE CO. 
Providence, R. I., U.S.A. 




mMMS 





Most carpenters swear by 
Klein's. They are made for the 
professional mechanic, not tho 
amateur. A sturdy pair or two 
of Klein's is as necessary as a 
fine saw or a well balanced 
hammer. They are bought by 
the fellow who is particular 
about his tools. Ask to see a 
pair next time you are in a 
hardware store. 

Mathias gf ■ ITMkJ &Sons 

I— IluLrErfHFt Bffll 



Carpenters 

Wanted! 



/ffipfiS^ 



METAL , 
WEATHER 



We want carpenters, 
who are anxious to 
start a business of 
their own, to handle 
Federal Metal Weath- 
erstrips. By represent- 
ing us in your town, 
you can make a good 
income the year 
around. 

Carpenters all over the 
country who are Fed- 
eral Weatherstrip Con- 
tractors are making 
big profits. You have 
the opportunity of do- 
ing the same. 

We have a worthwhile 
proposition that will 
interest you. Write us 
today and get the 
details. 



Federal Metal Weather Strip Co. 

1238=50 Fullerton Ave., Chicago, 111. 




T 



C ETTA R 

siiimgi.es 



HIS is your fight, too, Mr. 
Carpenter ! 



They're spending thousands 
upon thousands to "put over" sub- 
stitute roofing. 

Every Carpenter in the land 
should consider his bread and but- 
ter — help promote wood construc- 
tion — r ecommend Red Cedar 
Shingles for roofs, sidewalls and 
re-roofing. 

Your name and address on the 
margin will bring our Grading 
Rules and other interesting liter- 
ature. 

Boost your own game! 



RED CEDAR SHINGLE BUREAU 

38 South Dearborn Street 
CHICAGO ILLINOIS 



SUPERIOR SUPER 
WOODWORKER 

"THE COST CUTTER" 




A real woodworker with a 
Swinging arbor and a tilting table 
that will work fast and accurate 
for you. Let us send you our new 
bulletin fully describing the Su- 
perior Super Wood-worker. 

JONES SUPERIOR MACHINE CO. 
1262 W. North Ave. Chicago, III. 




SANDS LEVELS 

[n A Complete Assortment Of 
Our Most Popular Numbers 

Look for this display in hardware windows. 
Genuine Sand's Levels are worth looking 
for. Their accuracy and convenience on the 
job are advantages recognized by master 
workmen everywhere. 

Compare Them 
and You'll Buy a Sand's 

Sand originated the spirit plumb and level. 
Nearly all the improvements since copied 
in other levels have been first used in 
Sand's Levels. The first aluminum level on 
the market was a Sand's. Sand's gives you 
the improvements first. 

Get a Sand's Today and Be Satisfied 
"Sand's Levels Tell the Truth" 

S&NBS LEVEL &TOOL CO 

851 Fischer Ave., DETROIT, MICH. 




V & B Vanadium 
Hammers are the 
final accomplish- 
ment of fifty- 
three years of 
quality hammer 
manufacture. 

Made from spe- 
cial V & B form- 
ula vanadium 
steel, handled 
with the finest 
hand- shaved second growth white hick- 
ory, and individually inspected — they 
are uniquely superior. 

The octagon neck and round faced pat- 
tern are neat and practical, and the spe- 
cial non-slip claw firmly grips either a 
brad or a spike. 

The wax hole is an additional patented 
feature, especially appreciated by those 
who work with hard wood. 

The patented "Vaugban's Expansion 
Wedge, with which this hammer is 
equipped, firmly locks the handle tight 
— and is absolutely positive insurance 
of a tight head at all times. 

A special shaped handle, and carefully 
designed head gives a hammer of min- 
imum vibration and nice balance — and 
a tool of particular merit. 




c^H&AL&jr**- qjT JF r ir%& "Tool,* 

2114 Carroll Ave--* -v Chicago, III U.S.A. 



Two Incomes 

Good Salary; Paying Home Work 

Read this letter from a successful Dobe student 

'As a beginner J am doing fine. Am earning a salary of 
$S00 a month, besidts I made over $450 at home the last 
two month*. The practical drafting training you gave me 
by mail put me where I am