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Full text of "Carpenter"

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you 9 11 be glad in 1957 . . . 






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. . . you bought in 1947 










When thousands of carpenters were 
recently asked, "In your opinion, which 
make of handsaw is highest in quality ?", 
3 out of 4 said, "Disston handsaws." 
Many reasons were given, most of which 
add up to these: finer steel, longer life, 
better service. To quote a few — 

"Disston saws are tempered just 
right for filing and setting" 

"Three of my Disston saws are over 
40 years old" 

"The Disston saw has a perfect 
balance and the handles are made to 
fit the hand" 

In the extensive Disston line there are 
saws for every purpose. Specially 
popular among carpenters is the 
Disston D-8. 

HENRY DISSTON & SONS, INC. 

104 Tacony, Philadelphia 35, Pa., U.S.A. 





VVVV^A/VVWVVvVVV^A'^AA^/VVV\AAA'VVVVVVAA^ 

DSSSTON D-8 
The original Skew-back Hand Saw 



Medium weight. Made of the famous Disston Steel, 
specially tempered and hardened for faster cutting 
and to stay sharp longer. Cross-cut saws are 
made in 20-inch, 10 points; 22-inch, 8 and 10 
points; 24-inch, 8 and 10 points; 26-inch, 7, 8, 
10 and 11 points. Rip saws, 26-inch, 5Vi points. 



Ask your hardware retailer 
for a FREE copy of the 
Disston Saw, Tool and File 
Manual, or write to us direct. 




mf/w 



The saw most Carpenters use 




A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiner* 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXTII— No. 1 



INDIANAPOLIS, JANUARY, 1947 



One Dollar Per Tear 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents — 



Horizons Unlimited 



A leading industrialist predicts a 100% increase in living standards for American 
workers during the next thirty years if businessmen revise their thinking. He points out 
that high wages, short hours, paid vacations, sick leave, and all the other things labor 
has fought for for years help to create lasting prosperity and a stable economy. By 
the experiences of his own company he shows that these things can mean greater profits 
too. 



The Building That Flies 



Library Fund Starts 



12 

Shortly the largest flying machine ever conceived by the mind of man will take off 
from the blue waters of the Pacific adjacent to Los Angeles. This modern engineering 
miracle was put together by the skill, inqenuity, and know-how of Brotherhood men- 
members of Local No. 1553— who solved many problems and ironed out many "bugs" 
which developed in the construction of the all-wood giant of the skies. 

14 

In conformity with the action taken by the Twenty-fifth General Convention, a Library 
Fund has been started to rehabilitate the library at the Lakeland Home. More than 300 
Locals, Auxiliaries and Councils have already responded with contributions— an indica- 
tion that the Fund is going to be a real success. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS: 

Plane Gossip 

Editorials 

Official 

In Memoriam 

Correspondence - 

To the Ladies 

Craft Problems - 



10 
16 
18 
26 
27 
28 
29 



Index to Advertisers 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

In Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 
All contracts for advertising space In "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject Jo the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

P»*e 

E. C. Atkins, Indianapolis, Ind 4th Cover 

Henry Disston & Sons, Inc., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 1 

Fo'ey Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 32 

Frank's Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 3 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 3rd Cover 

Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, 

Mass. 4 

Paine Co., Chicago, 111 32 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, 

Conn, 3rd Cover 

Bowling Equipment 

Brunswick, Balke, Collender Co., 

Chicago, 111. 3 

Technical Courses and Books 

American School, Chicago, 111. 3 

American Technical Society, 

Chicago, 111. 31 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 4 

D. A- Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 4 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans i. 

Mason Engineering Service, Kala- 
mazoo, Mich. _• 30 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo._ 32 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y 3rd Cover 



KEEP THE MONEY 
IN THE FAMILY! 

PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 



BE READY FOR 
A BETTER JOB 
AT BIGGER PAY 




• Building boom is well under way. New homes 
and other structures to be built will provide a tre- 
mendous number of well-paid jobs. Men trained 
in Architecture, Drafting, Contracting, Carpen- 
try and related building trades will cash in BIG 
on their knowledge and skill. YOU can train in 
spare time at home, at low cost, for a big-pay 
job in this rich field. American School can help 
you to success just as it has helped others dur- 
ing its 50 years. Check, fill in and mail coupon 
NO \V\ _fo r_FR ^E_mf^rmation . 

AfVSERBCAN SCHOOL 

Dept. BI44, Drexel Ave. at 58th St., Chicago 37, III. 

Send me FREE information about your special training 
plan covering subjects checked below. 

□ Achitecfure & Building □ Automotive Engineering 
D Drafting and Design □ Diesel Engineering 



□ Contracting 
D Practical Plumbing 
D Air Conditioning 

□ Refrigeration 

D Electrical Engineering 



□ Mechanical Engineering 
D Plastics Engineering 

□ Aviation □ Radio 
G Business Management 

□ High School Courses 



sliming In 

The 

: I MASTER CHAMPION 

■jiEy<i • Lawn Mower 

"];■"'"■ vji Sharpening Machine 

j^m-f^ @ Saw Sharpening 
% • Machine 

\^ • Key Machine 

Phone LUcas 6929 

FRANK'S MANUFACTURING CO. 

2501-3-5 E. Imperial Highway Los Angeles 2, Cal. 




BOWL BETTER 

WITH YOUR OWN 

SH/uimwuk- 
INERALITE 

Custom-fit 
BOWLING 
BALL 



THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER CO. 
Branches in all Principal Cities 




New Opportunities 

f< f Carpenters 




Men Who Know Blue Prints 

are in demand to lay out and run build- 
ing jobs. Be the man who gives orders 
and draws the big pay check. Learn at 
home from plans we send. No books, — 
all practical every day work. 

SEND FOR FREE BLUE PRINTS 

and Trial Lesson. Prove to yourself how 
easy to learn at home in spare time. 
Send coupon or a post card today. No 
obligations. 

CHICAGO TECH. COLLEGE 

A-108 Tech Bldg. 2000 So. Mich. Ave., 
Chicago, 16, III. 

Send Free Trial Lesson and blue print 
plans and tell me how to prepare for a 
higher paid job in Building. 

Name 

Address 



OUTSTANDING 



FOR ACCURACY 

EASE OF HANDLING 



Langdon Acme 




One Thing in Common — Quality! 

to | ^ MILLERS FALLS 
^raSHr COMPANY 



Greenfield, Mass., U. S. A. 



— PRICE LIST — 



Label and Emblem Novelties 



Card Cases (Label) $ .10 

Key Chains (Label) 15 

Fobs (Label and Emblem) 50 

Gavel* (Label) 1.25 

Pins (Emblem) 1.00 

Buttons (Emblem) 1.00 



Ladies' Auxiliary Pins 1.75 

Cuff Links, pair (Roman or White) Gold. 1.50 

Belt Loop and Chain, Rolled Gold 75 

Match Box Holders 15 

Automobile Radiator Emblem 1.25 



In ordering these goods send all orders and make all remittances payable to 

FRANK DUFFY, General Secretary 

Carpenters' Building 

222 East Michigan St., Indianapolis, Ind. 




ON-THE-JOB POCKET KSR 

This new and revised edition of ^Carpenters and Builders' Practical Rules for Laying 
Out Work consists of short and practical rules for laying out octagons, ellipses, roofs, 
groined ceilings, hoppers, spirals, stairs and arches with tables of board measure, 
length of common, hip, valley and jack rafters, square measure, cube measure, measure 
of length, etc. — also, rules for kerfing, drafting gable molding, getting the axis of a 
segment, laying off gambrel roof and explaining the steel square. 



this convenient 50 page $1.00 postpaid. Money back guarantee if not entirely satisfied 
pocket size (4ix6j) guide 
to your job." 



SEND $1.00 TODAY 



D» Dftr^FDC 5344 Cinton Ave., So., Enclosed find $1.00. Please for- 
■ M« TCvUKITC9p Minneapolis 9, Minn. ward by return mail one of your 
Carpenters & Builders' Practical Rules for Laying Out Work. 

Name Address 



Horizons Unlimited 

The following' article is the partial text of a speech recently made before the 
Super-Market Institute by Charles Luckman, president of Lever Brothers. What Mr. 
Luckman has to say substantiates what labor has always contended; namely, that high 
wages, short hours, paid vacations, sick leave, etc. make for prosperity and economic 
stability. Mr. Luckman proves it by the experiences of his own company. 
By CHARLES LUCKMAN, President of Lever Brothers 

* * 

SHORT OF CRYSTAL-BALL gazing-, I know of only one way to 
measure the future of your business, or that of any business. This 
simply involves estimating tomorrow's performance on the basis of 
yesterday's accomplishments. Before doing this, however, let's be quite 
sure we can agree on whose past and whose future we want to stack to- 
gether. 

It is clear that the way Mrs. Joe Doakes sets her table and keeps her 
home is pretty much determined by the kind of a living standard her 
husband is able to provide. . 



Now, while this is an obvious fact 
about the way our economy func- 
tions, it suggests a number of impli- 
cations which we in business have 
been inclined to overlook. The first 
of these is that we must do more 
than pay lip service to the ideal of 
a progressively higher standard of 
living for the American wage earn- 
er. If, as salesmen, we applaud that 
attempt, then; as employers, we 
must also do our part to make that 
concept work for those employees 
who depend on us for the kind of a 
living standard they enjoy. I am 
frequently amazed at the ease with 
which we applaud the idea of a 
higher standard of living for all 
people, without apparently realiz- 
ing that our own employees are also 
part of the "people." It doesn't 
make much sense for us to do only 
a little for our own employees, 
while expecting other industries to 
do a lot, so that their employees 
will be good customers of ours. 

In thinking about the application 
of this principle to my own com- 
pany, I came upon some rather 



startling facts that carry implica- 
tions for the future which make 
Buck Rogers look like a rank con- 
servative. From our archives and 
records, I was able to reconstruct 
in part, a picture of our operations 
thirty years ago. In the era of 1915- 
1916, my company operated with 
180 employees. We made our mer- 
chandise in one small plant, and 
sold it from one sales office. Our 
total sales were less than one 
million dollars, and our competi- 
tive ranking was somewhere in the 
neighborhood of tenth place. 

The average plant employee 
working for us made 21 cents per 
hour, during a work week which 
consisted of more than 50 hours of 
work. He received no vacation with 
pay, and no paid holidays. Premium 
pay for overtime, or weekend or 
holiday work was unknown. By the 
same token, we made no provision 
to support him, or his family, in 
the event of sickness, accident, old 
age, or death. This was the picture 
then in 1915, and I might add, that 
at that time, we were considered 



THE CARPENTER 



to be rather liberal employers, 
judged by the standards of those 

cays. 

In the intervening thirty years, 
our management broadened many of 
its viewpoints, sometimes voluntar- 
ily, and sometimes with a little per- 
suasion from the bargaining agent 
chosen by our employees, the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor, which is 
certainly entitled to credit for the 
influence it has brought to bear upon 
our thinking and behavior as em- 
ployers. With this shift in attitude, 
which I might add, was not without 
parallel in many, many other con- 
cerns throughout the United States, 
a very significant thing for your 
business occurred. During this pe- 
riod of 30 years, we grew inwardly 
and outwardly to a point where to- 
day almost 6,000 Lever families now 
enjoy a standard of living which 
enables them to be good customers 
in your stores. 

And here is how your new cus- 
tomers were born. Our average 
plant wage of 21 cents an hour in- 
creased to Si. 13 per hour, while the 
wosk week shrank from 50 to 40 
hours. Premiums ranging from 
"time and a half to "'double time 
and a half" were instituted for over- 
time after eight hours, and for work 
on weekends and holidays. And, 
since your customers must pay their 
bills regardless of accidents, or ill- 
ness, or age, our employees receive 
the protection of a full pay envelope 
for 13 weeks in the event of sickness 
or accident. In addition, they are 
given a pension at age 65 which pro- 
vides them with an income equal to 
20 per cent of earnings at time of 
retirement, and this is over and 
above Social Security benefits. In 
the event of death, their families re- 
ceive a minimum of S2,ooo life in- 
surance which, like these other pro- 



tections, is furnished by the corn- 
pan}'' free of charge. 

I I aw these conditions entitle us. 
perhaps, to consider ourselves as 
rather liberal employers, judged by 
today's standards. But, as I said 
at the outset of this discussion, 
while the comparison between 1915 
and the present, uncovers some 
rather startling facts, it also carries 
implications for the future which 
make our present notions of liberal- 
ism seem as remote and antiquated 
as the ideas which passed for lib- 
eralism in 1915. 

My first and only factual state- 
ment about the future of your busi- 
ness is that it can and should double 
during the next generation if the 
leadership of American business is 
willing to establish as its objective 
for 1970 a standard of living for the 
American wage earners which is at 
least 100 per cent higher than the 
level of today. 

Now I submit that if we could 
progress as a nation during the las: 
30 years from an average of 24 cents 
pej hour to Si. 11 per hour, then dur- 
ing the next generation as a nation, 
we should certainly be able to 
increase average hourly earnings 
from Si. 11 to S2.22. 

I think we may expect a rapid 
growth in the extension of the an- 
nual wage principle, particularly as 
it becomes more apparent to Ameri- 
can business, that people who are 
irregularly employed make bad cus- 
tomers, whereas those whose employ- 
ment is stabilized not only spend 
their mone}" more freely, but also 
make much better credit risks. I 
believe too that sickness and acci- 
dent, regardless of duration, will, 
by then, be universally regarded as 
insurable risks. It will be obvious 
to everyone, that it is better for us 
all to pay a premium of a few pen- 



THE CARPENTER 



nies a day, and share the risks, than 
it is for the unlucky few to lose 
their income for protracted periods 
through no fault of their own. This, 
too, will be g-ood for your business, 
because your customers will not be 
forced to restrict their buying when 
their homes are darkened by the 
adversities of sickness or accident. 

In the same way, I believe that 
we will grow to realize, that if 
American industry can amortize and 
retire its obsolete plant equipment 
every ten years, it can certainly af- 
ford to set aside once every 25 or 
30 years a retirement fund large 
enough to provide for the comfort- 
able pensioning of its over-age man- 
power. On any basis you want to 
look at it, even the best retirement 
plans today are both inadequate in 
amount and overdue in application. 
Once again, when the day comes 
that the average American wage- 
earner receives both a timely and 
an adequate retirement income, your 
business will improve. There is no 
reason why the retired man of 65 
should not be considered as good a 
customer for you as the employed 
man of 35. And parenthetically there 
are, between the ages of 65 and 69 
a total of about 4 million people. A 
sizeable market — and a profitable 
one — if they have money to spend 
on your products. 

I also look forward to the growth 
of another national insight ; name- 
ly, that there is nothing particularly 
sacred about a 40-hour week." Busi- 
ness exists in order that people may 
live. People do not live in order 
that business may exist. Now in 
good living, leisure for recreation 
and self-improvement is a most 
powerful stimulant to increased 
business. 

Let anyone who doubts the value 
of universal education ask why the 
entire food and beverage industry 



spent only 4 million dollars on ad- 
vertising in 1915 as against over 200 
millions today. Isn't it obvious that 
the growing ability of advertising 
to sell your products is directly re- 
lated to the increase of our expendi- 
tures for elementary and secondary 
schools? For the simple truth is 
that advertising is completely in- 
effective, unless our population can 
read, write and understand English, 
and thereby raise the level of their 
expectancies and desires. We have 
made good progress in this direc- 
tion. In 1915, we spent about half a 
billion dollars nationally on elemen- 
tary and secondary education, as 
against almost 3 billion last year. 
But we can make a great deal more 
progress, because with a decreasing 
work week, it may be possible for 
us during the next 30 years to stim- 
ulate adult education in a like fash- 
ion. This would provide a powerful 
stimulus to the welfare and to the 
living standards of our nation. 

Why is it that during the past 20 
years American Business has be- 
come identified in the public mind 
as opposed to everything that spells 
greater security, well-being, or 
peace of mind for the little guy? 
Why is it that scarcely a month 
goes by these days but that some 
trade association or other decides to 
embark on a crusade to save free 
enterprise for America? I think the 
answers are pretty clear. We got 
the reputation we have because, by 
and large, we earned it. How? Well, 
we declared war on collective bar- 
gaining. We actually opposed in- 
creased taxes for education. We 
fought health and safety ordinances. 
The record proves that we battled 
child labor legislation. We yipped 
and yowled against minimum wage 
laws. We struggled against un- 
employment insurance. We decried 
Social Security, and currently we 



THE CARPENTER 



are kicking the hell out of propo- 
sals to provide universal sickness 
and accident insurance. 

"We did all these things without 
making one single constructive sug- 
gestion which would assure the 
American people of our desires to 
achieve the same results for them 
on a basis which would be more 
businesslike and less political. 
W "here on the record is there a sin- 
gle example to show that Big Busi- 
ness or Big Trade Association ever 
initiated a legislative program of 
benefits for the workers? Is it not 
clear that they have always waited 
until they were asked or forced to 
do so? Of course, I recognize that 
there have been isolated exceptions, 
but they merely serve to accentuate 
our general dereliction. 

We did all these things, and to- 
day we wonder why people don't 
like Big Business ! We wonder why 
it is necessary to start campaigns to 
save free enterprise from the dam- 
nation bow-wows. 

The answer is that we were doing 
everything within our power to 
prove to the American people that 
business was neither free nor en- 
terprising when it came to the sim- 
plest social needs of the community. 
To solve the problem we started to 
sell our brand of economics to a 
group of customers who were al- 
ready pretty sore at us. And the 
theme of this, "brilliantly timed" 
sales campaign was that all the 
other systems in the world are a lot 
worse than our own. There was no 
alternative theme possible, because 
we lacked either the conviction, or 
the courage, or the vision to tell the 
American people what we thought 
our system of business could do for 
them in the future. 

The average American is not in- 
terested in the number of bath-tubs 
in Russia, or in the telephone situa- 



tion in Sweden. He simply doesn't 
give a damn about the average life 

expectancy in India, and he is more 
or less indifferent to the kilowatt 
hours of electricity sold in Czecho- 
slovakia. What he wants to know is 
"When am I going to get modern 
plumbing?" and '""When can I afford 
a private telephone?" He is inter- 
ested in the future, as Kettering 
said, "because from now on I have 
to do all my living there." 

Nov.- the only way he will buy 
our method of doing business is if 
we satisfy him that we of business 
intend that system to work progres- 
sively well for him. 

W e cannot plant this conviction 
in his mind unless we do two things. 
First, we must mean it. And, sec- 
ond, we must merchandise our 
plans and policies the way we do 
our products. That means that, 
when we talk to the people of this 
country, we've got to stop making 
noises like a corporation. If our 
product advertising were written as 
badly as most of our institutional 
copy, we would have been out of 
business a long time ago. What 
we need are fewer negotiations and 
apologies and more affirmations and 
constructive plans. 

In this connection, some of you 
may wonder whether it is really 
wise for me. as an emplover. to 
state that I believe in higher wages, 
shorter hours, bigger pensions and 
so on. Isn't it "dangerous" to talk 
this way? Won't it put "ideas" in 
our employees' heads, and make 
"trouble" ? Aren't we running the 
risk that our employees will mis- 
take our objectives for a promise, 
our hopes for commitments ? 

My answer to these questions is 
that all employees can read, write 
and understand English. Conse- 
quently I refuse to sell them short 
on common sense! I believe that we 



THE CARPENTER 



of management can share our objec- 
tives and hopes with them, without 
fear of crucifixion. I am also clear 
that unless we share our visions of 
the road ahead, we cannot expect 
the men who work with us to un- 
derstand the temporary disappoint- 
ments that inevitably arise along 
the way. Furthermore, we cannot 
expect them to put forth that special 
effort which so often spells the dif- 
ference between disaster and sur- 
vival, unless they know the inten- 
tions within our mind and hearts. 

We must all go back and work 
for decent minimum wage legisla- 
tion in our own state. Forty per 
cent of the increased purchasing 
power will flow into your cash reg- 
ister. We must fight for • bigger 
educational appropriations, remem- 
bering that illiteracy is the enemy 
of every sales promotion. We must 
stimulate interest and discussion in 
established employment plans, with 
the personal knowledge that the as- 
surance of a stable income is a won- 
derful tonic for the appetite. We 
must start pension plans for our 
own employees as an example to 
the community, realizing that the 
average age of our population is in- 
creasing and that a mere token in- 
come for the aged not only consti- 
tutes a moral outrage but also makes 
for off-key cash register music. We 
must encourage efforts in our own 



community to insure against the 
hazards of sickness and accident. 
Bankrupt citizens are poor custom- 
ers. 

This is not to say that we should 
pursue a blindly idealistic policy of 
sweetness and light. Realism com- 
pels us to recognize that the abuses 
of Big Labor should be rectified and 
rectified promptly in the public in- 
terest. My entire theme here is that 
Joe and Mrs. Doakes deserve to be 
protected by safeguards against so- 
cially destructive selfishness wheth- 
er it stems from Management or 
Labor. 

My plea to you is that we of 
Business should take the first step 
forward under our own power; and 
for the first time, present to the 
American people a constructive pro- 
gram for the future which will en- 
title us to the leadership which we 
have so often claimed but so rarely 
exerted. 

In a word, let us reverse some of 
our historically negative attitudes, 
and become a force for enthusiastic 
progress each in his own commun- 
ity. And as we do these things, let 
us not forget the part that vision 
and enthusiasm should play in this 
undertaking. Let us discard fear, 
and share our hopes with America. 
There is no other road to together- 
ness. 



Two Bitter California Disputes Continue 

As 19 46 drew to a close the situation in the Redwood Lumber Industry of 
California remained virtually unchanged. So did the situation in the Hollywood 
movie studios. As this issue went to press the Redwood workers were battling as 
valiantly as ever for union wages and union working conditions despite the fact 
they have been on the picket line since January, 1945. Products from the nine 
major Redwood mills involved in the dispute are getting the cold shoulder from 
carpenters all over the western states. Redwood produced under fair conditions 
bears the label "APL-8." That which does not bear the "AFL-8" label is the 
product of one of the unfair mills and gets treated as such. 

In the movie studio situation the producers and the IATSE are still conducting 
their combined assault on bona fide unionism. However, the members of Local 
No. 946 are as determined as ever to protect their jurisdiction, their organization 
and the true principles of unionism. They are standing pat. 



-5 IP 



CAUSE AND EFFECT 

"When are workers going to stop de- 
manding wage increases?" asks an edi- 
torial in a national magazine. Trying 
to answer that question is like trying to 
answer "How high is up?" However, 
we can probably give as good an an- 
swer as any by telling the old chestnut 
about the soak. 

It seems this particular tippler peri- 
odically ended up before the local mag- 
istrate on a 'charge of being drunk and 
disorderly. Sure enough one fine Spring 
day he found himself standing before 
the bar of justice right on schedule. 

"Joe Doakes," said the judge with se- 
verity, "You are charged with habitual 
drunkenness; what have you to offer in 
the way of an excuse?" 

"Habitual thirst, your honor," replied 
the prisoner without batting an eye. 

That is the way it is with labor ask- 
ing for more money. When habitual 
price rises stop driving living costs into 
the stratosphere, labor will probably 
stop asking for more money except when 
increased productivity makes it feasible. 




"Of course my husband is only a 
amuteur carpenter." 



RUNNING WATER FREE 

After a year and a half of high-pow- 
ered statistics, graphs and charts (and 
very few finished houses), the govern- 
ment has finally conceded that its am- 
bitious housing program has bogged 
down. To millions of Americans who 
have searched in vain month after 
month for a place to live the govern- 
ment's admission is no news. Neither is 
it to one Chicago veteran who wrote 
his landlord as follows: 
Dear Sir: 

In spite of everything I can do the 
bathroom faucet refuses to work. Now 
I'm not kicking, mind you, but I was 
just wondering if it would be possible 
to have the hole in the roof shifted to 
over the tub. 

Sincerely yours, 



CORRECT DIAGNOSIS 

The car lay on its side. After turning 
several somersaults it was a complete 
wreck. It took the rescurers several 
hours to extricate the driver. Finally 
they worked him free of the wreck and 
rushed him to the closest doctor. 

"I'm sorry," said the doctor, "I can't 
do anything for him. You see I'm a vet- 
erinary surgeon." 

"That's all right," retorted the pa- 
tient weakly, "I was a jackass to think 
I could do sixty on those tires." 

Moral: Traffic accidents are increas- 
ing alarmingly so do not take any 
chances. Drive safely at all times. 



THE SCOTCH OF IT 

Sharp received a letter from his 
friend McTavish which bore no stamp, 
and he had to pay postage. The letter 
concluded: "You will be delighted to 
hear I am enjoying the best of health, 
old chap. Yours, McTavish." 

Sharp then wrapped up a large stone, 
and without paying postage, sent it to 
McTavish with the following note: 
"This great weight rolled off my mind 
when I read your good news." 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



IT ONLY LOOKS EASY 

Anti-labor forces throughout the na- 
tion greeted the issuing of the vicious 
injunction in the recent coal dispute 
with undisguised glee. What they over- 
look is that compulsion never dug any 
coal. And they also overlook the fact 
that the Thirteenth Amendment has 
never been repealed. In their short- 
sighted jubilation they sort of remind 
us of the pompous Colonel. 

This particular Colonel was always 
telling his subordinate officers and men 
that nothing was considered impossible 
by the Army. Time and again he im- 
pressed this fact on the men below him. 
One day he ordered a Captain to clear 
a right-of-way through a swamp. The 
Captain took a company of men with 
him and tried to carry out his assign- 
ment. However, the mud was so deep 
it was impossible for the men to work. 
When he told the Colonel the job was 
an impossible one, the Colonel scoffed. 
Again he ordered him to clear the right- 
of-way. 

For a whole day the Captain and his 
company toiled but they got exactly 
nowhere. When the Captain again re- 
ported failure, the Colonel snapped: 

"Hang it man, the Army can do any- 
thing. Put in a requisition for absolute- 
ly anything you need and the Army will 
get it for you. Now go make that road." 

The Captain obtained a requisition 
blank and sat down at his desk with his 
pen in hand. For some time he pon- 
dered. Finally he filled out the requisi- 
tion as follows: 

"I want twenty-five men eighteen feet 
tall to build a road across a swamp fif- 
teen feet deep." 



NOT VERY PARTICULAR 

An actual ad in the want ad columns 
of an Indianapolis paper: 

WANTED; Inspector. Splendid op- 
portunity for a man with a religious 
faith who does not drink nor use to- 
bacco. None other need apply. Blank 
Lock Company. 

What? It doesn't make any difference 
whether a guy parts his hair on the left 
or right? 

• • • 

Only fools and dead men don't change 
their minds. Fools won't and dead men 
can't. — John A. Patterson. 



APPEAL TO IGNORANCE 

A new hate group, patterned after 
Hitler's brownshirts, is endeavoring to 
gain a foothold in this country. To the 
eternal credit of Americans everywhere, 
the group is finding very tough sledding. 
Except for a few mal-contents who vis- 
ualize themselves as sort of American 
Fuehers, the group has gotten no 
place, since it appeals mostly to the 
ignorant, and Americans are anything 
but ignorant. 

Whenever we think of Americans 
joining such an organization, we re- 
member the sign we once ' saw on a 
service station in a barren part of the 
west. It said: 

"Yes, we have gas, oil and repair 
service, but don't ask us for informa- 
tion. If we knew anything we wouldn't 
be here." 

• • • 

NO COMPLIMENT TO THE APES 

When Darwin first propounded his 
theory that man is first cousin to the 
apes there was quite an argument start- 
ed and it has been raging ever since. 

In view of what man has been doing 
the last few generations we wouldn't be 
surprised if the apes weren't arguing 
about it now too — trying to disprove 
Darwin's theory. 




"I. •■' W.-J.: ".. .),, ," ■.■■ ,, '• I / 



"Here I am again with a few more 
changes I want made." 



12 



The Building That Flies 



SOMETIME in the very near future the world's largest airplane, the 
Hughes Flying Boat, will take off from the blue waters of the 
Pacific adjacent to Los Angeles. When the eight motor craft first 
becomes airborne, the skill and devotion and know-how of five hundred 
Brotherhood members will fly with it. They are the men who built it 
and shaped it. bit by bit, and piece by piece. 

It was in January, 1943, that the Hughes Aircraft Company decided 
to put together the largest air machine ever conceived by the mind of man. 
The war was at its height and big- 



ger and better cargo-carrying planes 
were desperately needed. The 
Hughes project received top prior- 
ity. Hundreds of highly skilled cab- 
inet makers and millmen were need- 
ed at once. To meet the challenge, 
the Los Angeles District Council 
organized Local Union No. 1553, 
known as Wood and Plastic Air- 
craft Workers. Five hundred of the 
most highly skilled artisans in the 
area were induced to take employ- 
ment in the Hughes plant. 

For several years these members 
of Local 1553 worked on the pro- 
ject. It was their skill and know- 
how that solved many of the most 
difficult problems. Out of wood 
they had to create parts that had 
heretofore been metal. Under their 
skilled hands the huge plane took 
shape and form. Their hands are 
now working on the details of final 
assembly. 

The Hughes Flying boat is one of 
the greatest engineering feats in the 
world. It is an all-wood proposition 
and it uses plywood in more intri- 
cate manners than any other project. 
The huge spars, ribs, small beams 
and braces, specially designed an- 
gles, and even the skin have been 
fabricated from birch and poplar 
veneers. 



For the skin, Phenolic resin glue 
was used and cured in hot presses. 
Laminating of the large beams and 
much of the general assembly was 
accomplished through the use of 
cold setting Urea-formaldehyde 
resin glue. Joints in the hull and 
skin below the water line were fab- 
ricated by the use of warm setting 
Resorcinol-formaldehyde resin glue. 

In parts of the huge flying boat 
wood craftsmen worked to toler- 
ances as close as .005 inch, this in a 
craft with a gross weight of 200 
tons and with a wingspan of 320 
feet. It is powered by eight 3,000 
h.p. engines. From the keel to the 
top of the 220 ft. hull is 30 ft. And 
from the keel to the top of the 
vertical stabilizer is 85 ft. 

Such dimensions are more quick- 
ly visualized if the plane is pictured 
on a football field where the wings 
would extend 10 feet over the g"oal 
line at each end of the field. From 
the keel to the top of the vertical 
stabilizer is approximately 8-J- stor- 
ies. The horsepower of the eight 
engines is roughly equivalent to 
that of seven modern locomotives 
whisking streamlined trains across 
the country. The plane could lift 
and carry a 60-ton tank. In addition 
the fuel (14,000 gallons) weighs 
about 42 tons in itself. 




Workers, most of them members of Local 1553, happily watch the great 
hull as it first moves out, starting the long haul from plant to assembly line. 





An aerial view of the Hughes Flying Boat as it is assembled in the grav- 
ing dock at Long Beach, California. Wings are mated and in position on the 
nun. Horizontal stabilizers and vertical stabilizer are in position ready for 
elevators and rudder. Slips are to stretch out before the dock and to clear 
tne two floats. White lines on tlie paving declare "no smoking" area. 



AT THE Twenty-fifth General Con- 
vention held in Lakeland last 
April, the matter of the library at 
the Home came in for considerable at- 
tention. The Home and Pension Com- 
mittee in its report to the convention, 
pointed out that the years have taken 
their toll insofar as the Home Library 
is concerned. Many books will soon 
have to be replaced and new books, 
magazines, and reading material will 
have to be ordered. 

It was the suggestion of the Home 
and Pension Committee that a special 
Library Fund be set up for the purpose 
of rehabilitating the library. That part 
of the Committee's report read as fol- 
lows: "To accomplish this purpose may 
we suggest a system of voluntary con- 
tributions to a library fund in somewhat 



the same way as we so ably fulfilled the 
needs of our Armed Forces through the 
medium of the War Cigarette Fund." 

The report of the Home and Pension 
Committee was unanimously adopted. 
Consequently in conformity with the 
suggestion contained therein, the Gen- 
eral Office on November 14 circularized 
affiliates of the Brotherhood regarding 
the Library Fund. The response to that 
appeal has been very gratifying. Al- 
most 3 00 Local Unions, District Coun- 
cils, and Auxiliaries have responded to 
date. In order to keep the library up 
to date, however, it will take a healthy 
fund. Of all the facilities at the Home, 
the library is undoubtedly the most 
cherished. 

Donations to the fund up to December 
15 are as follows: 



L. C. 
492 

923 

958 

1367 

74 

2 

105 

719 

197 

-OS 

1209 

1128 

1224 

1784 

362 

943 ■ 

02 

203 

377 

1477 

1008 

388 

839 

781 

30m 

1148 

1607 

106 

1761 

794 

1201 

1664 

1635 

2588 

696 

11 

259 

200 

1665 

345 

504 

1155 

3117 

669 

47 

133 

87 

1994 

627 

2048 

533 

90 



City and State Amt. 

Reading, Pa 25 00 

Cleburne. Tex 5 00 

Marquette. Mich 1" 00 

Chicago. Ill • 10 00 

Chattanooga. Tenn 25 00 

Cincinnati. Ohio a 00 

Cleveland, Ohio 5 ) 

Freeport. Ill 10 00 

Sherman. Tex 10 00 

New York (Brooklyn I 10 00 

Newark. X. J 25 00 

La Grange, 111 25 00 

Emporia. Kans 10 00 

Chicago. Ill 25 00 

South Bend, Ind 10 00 

Tulsa. Okla 25 00 

Chicago. Ill 10 00 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y 10 00 

Alton. IU 50 00 

Middletown, Ohio 25 00 

Louisiana, Mo 12 50 

Richmond, Va 25 00 

Des Plaines. Ill 5 00 

Princenton. N. J 10 00 

Galesburg. Ill 5 00 

Green Bav, Wis 10 00 

Biloxi, Miss 25 00 

Des Moines. la 15 00 

Newcastle. Ind 5 00 

Leominster. Mass 5 00 

Borger. Tex 12 05 

Bloomington, Ind 5 00 

Kansas City, Mo 50 00 

Bates. Ore 10 00 

Tampa. Fla 10 00 

Cleveland. Ohio 25 00 

Jackson. Tenn 25 00 

Columbus. Ohio 25 00 

Alexandria. Va 10 00 

Memphis, Tenn 200 00 



Chicago. 111. 
Columbus. Ind. 
Shelbyville. Ind. 



10 00 

5 00 

7 00 

Harrisburg. Ill 10 00 

25 00 
5 00 



St. Louis." Mo. 
Terre Haute. Ind. 



St. PauL Minn 25 00 



Natchez. Miss. 
Jacksonville. Fla. 
Corona. Cal. . . . 
Jeffersonville. Ind. 



I 

25 00 
25 00 
10 no 



Evansville, Ind 25 00 



L. D. City and State Amt. 

1098 Baton Rouse. La 100 00 

1434 Moberlv. Mo 10 00 

1658 Grove City. Pa 5 00 

950 New York. N. Y 5 00 

1175 Kingston. N. Y : 

537 Rahwav. N. J 1" 00 

1933 Claremore. Okla 

1SS3 Macomb. Ill 3 00 

1938 Crown Point. Ind 

1016 Rome, N. Y 50 00 

635 Boise. Ida 10 00 

860 Framingham. Mass 15 00 

60 Indianapolis. Ind 1 

626 Wilmington. Del a 

215 Lafayette. Ind 

599 Hammond, Ind 1 

2679 Bovill. Ida 10 00 

66 Jamestown. N. Y 

1595 Conshohocken. Pa 1 

2245 Fallon. Nev a 00 

993 Miami. Fla 

100 Muskegon. Mich 2S 

1278 Gainesville. Fla 2a 

1217 Greencastle. Ind 

58 Chicago. Ill 50 00 

437 Portsmouth. Ohio 5 00 

665 Amarillo. Tex 

64 Louisville. Kv 

985 Garv. Ind 25 00 

4M2 Atlantic City, N. J II 00 

36 Oakland. Cal 5 

253 Omaha, Neb 25 00 

1655 Sapulpa, Okla 

2340 Bradenton. Fla 

1613 Newark. N. J i 

417 St. Louis, Mo 5 00 

904 Jacksonville. Ill 25 

841 Carbondale. Ill 2 7 00 

1S46 New Orleans. La 5 00 

16 Springfield. Ill 25 01 1 

819 West Palm Beach. Fla 10 00 

586 Sacramento. Cal 10 00 

271 Chicago. Ill 1" 01 1 

284 Jamaica. N. Y 10 00 

1365 Cleveland. Ohio 10 00 

486 Bavonne. N. J 5 00 

1351 LeadviUe. Colo 5 00 

196 Greenwich. Conn 10 00 

83 Halifax. N. S 25 00 

322 Niagara Falls. N. T 25 00 

242- Chicago. Ill 25 00 

8 Philadelphia. Pa 50 00 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



L. U. City and State Amt. 

1 Chicago, 111 25 00 

1456 New York. N. Y 25 00 

10 Chicago, 111 25 00 

96 Springfield. Mass 5 00 

507 Nashville, Term 25 00 

1682 Richmond, Va 5 00 

462 Greensburg, Pa 10 00 

1241 Thermopolis, Wvo 5 00 

791 Brooklyn, N. Y 50 00 

918 Manhattan, Kan 10 00 

146 Schenectady, N. Y 50 00 

895 Tarrvtown, N. Y 10 00 

947 Ridgway, Pa 5 00 

189 Quincy, 111 5 00 

67 Roxbury, Mass 10 00 

S90 Holyoke. Mass 10 00 

662 Mt. Morris, N. Y 10 00 

2044 Ottawa, Kans 5 00 

10.35 Taunton. Mass 5 00 

2022 Perryville, Mo 5 00 

39 Cleveland, Ohio 10 00 

940 Sandusky. Ohio 25 00 

131 Seattle. Wash 50 00 

514 Wilkes-Barre, Pa 2 00 

72 Rochester, N. Y 10 00 

1715 Vancouver, Wash 25 00 

1207 Charleston, W. Va 10 00 

429 Montclair, N. J 10 00 

71 Ft. Smith, Ark 10 00 

160 Philadelphia, Pa 10 00 

1244 Montreal, Que., Can 10 00 

1438 Warren, Ohio 10 00 

1151 Batavia, N. Y 10 00 

801 Woonsocket, R. 1 10 00 

2207 Enuclaw, Wash 10 00 

1788 Indianapolis, Ind 5 00 

1210 Salem. Mass 5 09 

1048 McKeesport. Pa 25 00 

182 Cleveland. Ohio 25 00 

78 Troy, N. Y 10 00 

1403 Watertown. Wis 2 00 

292 Shawnee, Okla 34 00 

461 Highwood, 111 25 00 

171 Youngstown, Ohio 25 00 

162 San Mateo. Cal 10 00 

2812 Missoula, Mont 10 00 

5 St. Louis, Mo 10 00 

620 Vineland, N. J 10 00 

691 Williamsport, Pa 10 00 

110 St. Joseph, Mo 10 00 

2059 Bismarck, N. D 5 00 

948 Sioux City, la 25 00 

366 New York, N. Y 25 Q0 

297 Kalamazoo, Mich 25 00 

602 St. Louis. Mo 5 00 

359 Philadelphia, Pa 5 00 

7 Minneapolis, Minn 10 00 

830 Oil City, Pa 3 00 

329 Oklahoma City, Okla 100 00 

1643 Chagrin Falls, Ohio 10 00 

2258 Houma, La 10 00 

1102 Detroit, Mich 50 00 

639 Akron, Ohio 10 00 

132 Washington, D. C 15 00 

1693 Chicago, 111 20 00 

2800 New Orleans. La 5 00 

1328 De Land, Fla 10 00 

1042 Plattsburg, N. Y. 10 00 

1032 Minot, N. D 5 00 

866 Norwood, Mass 5 00 

448 Waukegan, 111 10 00 

677 Lebanon, Pa 10 00 

2079 Houston, Tex 10 00 

1172 Billings, Mont 25 00 

1298 Nampa, Idaho 5 00 

1672 Hastings, Neb 5 00 

1265 Monmouth, 111 5 00 

349 Orange, N. J 10 00 

411 San Angelo, Tex 5 00 

1443 Englewood, N. J 5 00 

1596 St. Louis, Mo 25 00 

822 Findlay, Ohio 10 00 

588 Montezuma, Ind 10 00 

788 Rock Island, 111 5 00 

1249 Fayetteville, Ark 15 00 

416 Chicago, 111 5 00 

871 Battle Creek, Mich 10 00 

1743 Wildwood, N. J 10 00 

2356 Ludington, Mich 10 00 

1932 Mobile, Ala 5 00 



L. U. City and State Amt. 

334 Saginaw, Mich 5 00 

633 Granite City. Ill 25 00 

483 San Francisco, Cal 10 00 

953 Lake Charles, La 10 00 

1470 Conway, Ark 5 00 

1818 Clarksville, Tenn 30 00 

1072 Muskogee, Okla 25 00 

183 Peoria. Ill 20 00 

1275 Clearwater, Fla 10 00 

1508 Lyons, N. Y 5 00 

47 Chicago, 111 25 00 

80 Bernardsville, N. J 10 00 

453 Auburn, N. Y 5 00 

1849 Pasco, Wash 10 00 

1489 Burlington, N. J 5 00 

222 Westfield. Mass 10 00 

1075 Hudson, N. Y 5 00 

425 Tuscaloosa, Ala 3 00 

1240 Oroville, Cal 10 00 

1384 Sheridan, Wyo 5 00 

264 Milwaukee, Wis 25 00 

1276 Central Valley, N. Y 5 00 

1079 Ridgefield Park, N. J 10 00 

971 Reno, Nev 10 00 

2014 Barrington, 111 5 00 

1051 Truro, N. S 5 00 

1835 Waterloo, Iowa 5 00 

1073 Philadelphia, Pa 5 00 

230 Pittsburgh, Pa 10 00 

753 Beaumont, Tex 10 00 

889 Hopkins, Minn 10 00 

643 Chicago, 111 10 00 

404 Willoughbv, Ohio 10 00 

1636 Whiting, Ind 5 00 

185 St. Louis, Mo 10 00 

616 Chambersburg, Pa 10 00 

605 Golconda, 111. 5 00 

1289 Seattle. Wash 25 00 

1204 Brooklyn, N. Y. 10 00 

1465 Frankfort, Ind 25 00 

1307 Evanston, 111 25 00 

1946 London, Ont., Can 10 00 

935 Princenton, Ind 5 00 

440 Buffalo, N. Y 25 00 

1206 Norwood, Ohio 25 00 

624 Brockton, Mass 10 00 

1723 Columbus, Ga 10 00 

198 Dallas, Tex 25 00 

867 Milford, Mass 5 00 

8 Philadelphia. Pa 5 00 

55 Denver, Colo ~. . 50 00 

Lake Co. Carp. D. C, Michigan Citv, Ind. 25 00 

Carp. D. C, Springfield, Mass. & Vic. . . 10 00 

Chicago D. C, Carp.. Chicago. Ill 100 00 

D. C. of Carp., Seattle & King Co. & Vic. 100 00 

Carp. D. C, Washington, D. C, & Vic. . . 25 00 

Carp. D. C, St. Louis, Mo 50 00 

Carp. D. C, Miami, Fla 10 00 

Twin City, D. C, St. Paul, Minn 10 00 

Miami Valley Carp. D. C, Davton, O. . . 50 00 

Essex Co. & Vic, D. C, Newark, N. J. 25 00 
Providence, Pawtucket, Central Fl. D. 

C, Providence, R. 1 10 00 

Carpenters D. C, Buffalo, N. Y 50 00 

Fall Cities Carp. D. C, Louisville, Kv.. . 10 00 

Carp. D. C, Rochester, N. Y 10 00 

Metropolitan D. C, Philadelphia, Pa. . . 25 00 

New Orleans, D. C, New Orleans, La. . . 5 00 

Troy & Vic. D. C, Trov, N. Y 10 00 

Grand Rapids D. C, Mich 10 00 

Ladies' Aux. 265, Longview, Tex 5 00 

Ladies' Aux. 165. Columbus, Ohio 4 00 

Ladies' Aux. 427, Pasco, Wash 5 00 

Ladies' Aux. 412. Vista, Cal 5 00 

Ladies' Aux. 4, Des Moines, la 5 00 

Ladies' Aux. 62. Los Angeles, Cal 5 00 

Ladies' Aux. 122, Kansas City, Mo 25 00 

Ladies Aux. 445. Terre Haute. Ind 5 00 

Ladies' Aux. 170, San Diego, Cal 10 00 

Ladies' Aux. 345, Waterloo, la 5 00 

Ladies' Aux. 252, Milwaukee. Wis 5 00 

Ladies' Aux. 198. Bellingham. Wash.... 5 00 

Ladies' Aux. 442. Evansville, Ind 10 00 

Ladies' Aux. 50, Rahway. N. J 5 00 

Ladies' Aux. 358, Placersville. Cal 5 00 

Ladies Aux. 232, Bakersfield, Cal 5 00 

John Howatt, Gen. Rep .? 25 00 

A Friend 10 00 

Total $4,684 55 



Editorial 




Even Senator Claghorn Knows It 

Using the recent coal strike as a convenient vehicle and John L. Lewis 
as a convenient whipping - boy, the anti-labor forces in this country have 
stepped up their attacks on organized labor to a new fury. In the press 
and over the air their hue and cry for anti-labor legislation is getting 
louder and more insistent. In one way or another they manage to lay the 
blame for all our ills at the doorstep of the unions. The high prices they 
blame on labor. The scarcity of goods they blame on labor. And if they 
can think up some kind of logical sounding argument they will soon be 
blaming labor for the poor weather we have been having. The way they 
tell it, everyone is opposed to labor. 

How much opposition there is to labor in the upper classes, we are not 
prepared to say. However, the record clearly indicates that there is one 
class of Americans which is not opposed to organized labor. That class is 
the workers. Figures show that working people all over the nation are 
flocking into the unions at an unprecedented *rate. North and south, east 
and west, boilermakers, bricklayers, store clerks and white collar workers, 
butchers and bakers, are signing up with their respective organizations at 
a rate never before equalled in peace time. Our own Brotherhood is climb- 
ing toward a new high, and the day when we will be a million strong is 
not too far off. 

An indication of sweeping trend toward unionism among workers of all 
kinds can be gleaned from the records of the National Labor Relations 
Board. In October that agency handled-the largest number of cases in its 
history; more than 1,400 in all, seventy-five per cent of them petitions for 
elections. Thirty-two per cent of the elections did not involve more than 
one union, and the average number of eligible voters per election was less 
than 175; an indication that unionism is now reaching out into even the 
smallest plants. And, best of all, over ninety per cent of those who were 
eligible to do so voted in these elections. In other words, nine out of ten 
workers cast ballots in the average NLRB election. When one considers 
that state and national elections which involve the welfare of the whole 
nation rarely entice more than sixty per cent of the eligible voters to the 
polls, the ninety per cent record chalked up in NLRB elections is a good 
indication of the eagerness with which workers are responding to the 
call of unionism. 

While the anti-labor forces are blasting away at unionism, the workers 
of the nation are flocking into the fold of organized labor at a rate never 
before equalled in peace times. The intelligent men in Congress will take 
note of this fact. The newspaper columnists and radio commentators may 
make it appear that unionism is in strong disfavor throughout the nation. 
But with the workers — the people who are directly involved — unionism is 
gaining in appeal. More and more workers are coming to realize that their 
own welfare and the welfare of the nation is bound up with strong demo- 



THE CARPENTER 17 

cratic unions that maintain the purchasing- power of the people by keeping 
wages and prices in some semblance of balance. More and more workers 
are becoming union members. Any legislation that tends to abridge or 
circumscribe their right to join a union or the right of their union to carry 
on collective bargaining in a free and democratic manner will circumvent 
the will of the majority. And not even Senator Claghorn can long ignore 
the will of the majority of the American people. 



A Refreshing Speech 

The lead article in this month's issue is a partial text of a speech by 
Charles Luckman, president of Lever Brothers, one of the major soap 
manufacturing firms in the nation. It is a sort of a "man bites dog" speech, 
in that Mr. Luckman, as a business man, espouses the cause of higher 
pay, shorter hours, annual wages, sick leave and all the other progressive 
steps most business has consistently opposed. He advocates these things 
not because he thinks it is the philanthropic thing to do but rather because 
he knows that it is the way to greater prosperity, greater economic sta- 
bility and a happier, healthier America. By the experiences of his own 
company he proves that it is the way to greater profits too. 

Within the next generation living- standards of the American worker 
can be made twice as high as they are at present if business leaders will 
revise their outmoded patterns of thinking, Mr. Luckman maintains. He 
points out that during the last thirty years the earnings of Lever Brothers 
employes have increased manyfold. And he frankly admits that American 
Federation of Labor union in his plants played a great part in bringing 
about this progress. During the same time the firm grew from 180 em- 
ployes to better than 6,000 at the present time. Logically, he sees no reason 
why the next thirty years should not see equally rapid progress. 

What Mr. Luckman now preaches has long been known to organized 
labor. The real foundationstone of prosperity is purchasing power in the 
hands of the working people. When working people have money, they 
buy things, and when they buy things the wheels of commerce hum 
because working people comprise the bulk of our citizenry. The more 
money they have, the more they buy and the faster the wheels of commerce 
buzz. It is as simple as that, and it is refreshing to have an industrial 
leader admit it. 

From time immemorial many employers have looked upon labor as a 
commodity to be bought as cheaply as possible and to be employed as 
sparingly as possible. They recognized that workers had to have purchas- 
ing power in order that prosperity could exist. What they sometimes 
failed to recognize was that their own workers were part of the general 
pattern. They were all for workers getting high wages — all workers, 
that is, except their own. Mr. Luckman's idea is that all employers should 
examine their own back yards first. They should make sure that their 
own workers are paid the maximum possible wage in order that the pur- 
chasing power represented by those workers can make its proper contribu- 
tion to the national prosperity. 

In other words, Mr. Luckman says, in effect, that business must stop 
looking on labor as a commodity and begin to realize that workers are 
customers. That is something this journal has long preached. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHISON 

Carpenters' Bnilding. Indianapolis, Ind. 



Fiest General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Bnilding, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General .Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Bnilding, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-Presideni 

JOHN Pv. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 
First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, Jr. Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 

111 E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 631 W. Page, Dallas, Texas 



Second District, W1I. J. KELLY 
Carpenters' Bid., 243 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District. ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence. S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 

Notice to Recording Secretaries 

The quarterly circular for the months of January, February and 
March, 1047, containing the quarterly password, has been forwarded to all 
Local Unions of the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in re- 
ceipt of this circular should notify Frank Duffy, Carpenters' Building, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 



Report of the Delegates to Sixty-fifth Annual Convention of 
the American Federation of Labor 

To the General Executive Board: 
Brothers: 

The Sixty-fifth Annual Convention of the American Federation of Labor was 
held in the Morrison Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, beginning October 7, 1946. 
647 Delegates were present. 

Addresses of welcome were made by: Mr. Wm. Lee, President of the Chicago 
Federation of Labor; Mr. R. Soderstrom, President of the Illinois Federation of 
Labor; Hon. Ed. F. Kelly, Mayor of Chicago; Hon. Dwight H. Green, Governor of 
the State of Illinois and Mr. Jos. Powers, Vice-President of the Chicago Chamber 
of Commerce. 

In the opening paragraphs of the Report of the Executive Council they say: 

Since our last convention in 19 44, the fighting war has ended on both European 
and Japanese fronts and we have commenced to work on the problems of restoring 



THE CARPENTER 19 

peace and plans to achieve the long-time objectives we hoped to realize after the 
war. Provisions for home problems of demobilization had been well worked out 
in advance and industrial transition to civilian schedules proceeded well at first. 
Military demobilization moved too rapidly because the military authorities had 
not prepared against the mischievous, if not traitorous, propaganda which broke 
out at home and in armies on foreign soil, to get the soldiers home at once. Many 
favored speedy demobilization. Most of the nation did not realize that a strong 
army was needed in the transition period to enforce the principles of the Atlantic 
Charter, to police conquered countries, and to enable us to stop aggressive action 
against weak nations. 

Although nearly a year has elapsed since the end of military action, treaties 
necessary to end wars have not yet been negotiated. Until treaties are determined, 
occupying armies will continue to prevent return to normal living and production. 

Decisions upon world agencies and their operation as well as the negotiation 
of world peace, have sharpened the differences in philosophy and procedures 
between national democracies and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. During 
the war and until lately the democracies failed to realize that the USSR was 
bent on imperialism and aggressive policies to expand its power. It is plain that 
free government is imperiled by further policies of appeasement. We expect our 
government to insist upon justice for all states whether small or large. 

Within our country we have practically complete reconversion and have attained 
a new record of peacetime employment. We are headed toward an end of scarcities 
in production which will make possible the end of wartime controls. There is 
world-wide need of the things we can produce. We in the Western Hemisphere 
have the best opportunity to demonstrate the value of free enterprise and free 
labor in peacetime production as we have already demonstrated their value in 
time of war needs. 

As our nation has become a world power with great economic resources and 
outstanding technical ability, the American labor movement must assume its share 
of responsibility for maintaining progress at home and for preserving free enter- 
prise and free labor in the new international agencies now being organized for 
international action. 

Our ability to benefit by the opportunities awaiting us will be a test of our 
faith and our ideals. 

This brief summary of trends and conditions makes plain the responsibility de- 
volving upon all organizations believing in democratic institutions and human 
rights and freedom. Upon free trade unions devolves the duty of making clear the 
meaning and purpose of democratic institutions and in proving by our policies and 
achievements the value of voluntary cooperation of workers to industry and to 
all other organized groups. To make such demonstrations effective, trade unions 
and trade union membership must demonstrate skill, experience, resourcefulness 
and responsibility. 

In order to maintain our freedom and opportunities we must give paramount 
importance to reviewing principles and practices and making sure that those in 
use assure the best results. Upon our effort and success depends in no measure the 
future of our free nation. 

Upon this convention devolves responsibility for strengthening our organization, 
reviewing objectives, and making plans for the future. Our report covers the 
period since the last convention — November 19 44 — with major emphasis on the 
post-war period. 

Some of the principal matters dealt with herewith follow: 

The United Nations 

Advisers to Economic and Social Council 

Control of Atomic Power 

Free Trade Unions in Europe 

Our Responsibility for Free Trade Unions 

Peace Treaties 

Maritime Department formed 

Benefits paid by National and International Unions 

National Labor Policy 

National War Labor Board 



20 THE CARP EX TEE 

National Wage Stabilization Board 

National Labor Relations Board 

Labor and tbe Courts 

State Labor Legislation 

Social Insurance Activities " 

Housing Legislation 

Federal Aid for Education 

Vocational Education 

Workers Education Bureau 

Organizing Work in tbe Soutb 

National Legislation 

Anti-Labor Legislation 

Immigration and Naturalization 

Healtb Program 

Social Security 

Reconversion 

Jurisdictional Disputes 

American Federation of Women's Auxiliaries and many otber similar matters 
all of which were referred to tbe different committees for consideration and action 
and report back to tbe Convention. 

Under tbe caption, "A. F. of L. Reviews'' the Council reported as follows: 

Tbe Executive Council bas made a tborougb study of our financial experiences 
for tbe past five (5) years. Tbis study shows tbat tbe General Fund income of tbe 
Federation increased progressively during 1941, 1942, 1943 and 1944 and tben 
dropped substantially in 1945. Tbe expenditures from the General Fund for this 
same period of time also followed this same general trend. 

In our study of the finances of the past five years, we gave particular attention 
to tbe organizing figures because organizing expenses constitute a major portion 
of our over-all outgo. In tbis connection, we find that it cost the American Federa- 
tion of Labor an average of -? 442.00 a month in 1940 to maintain a paid organizer 
in tbe field. In 1945, tbis average cost per organizer per month had risen to 3624. 
Under these circumstances, it seems reasonable for the Council to conclude that 
even if the General Fund income were to be maintained at the 1945 level for the 
next few years, we could not keep our finances in balance unless we reduced our 
expenditures for organizing purposes. In the final analysis, in tbe opinion of the 
Council, the present per capita tax rates established by the Seattle Convention in . 
1941 and which have been adequate to carry us through the past five years will 
not 'be sufficient in the future because of the increased cost of all our operations 
during this period of time. Salaries paid to organizers are higher; expenses for 
organizers are higher; salaries paid to office workers are higher; and our printing 
and miscellaneous expenses are also higher than they were in 1941. 

The trend in tbe past past two years is best indicated by the fact that despite 
a good income rate to the General Fund in the twenty-four (24) months since 
tbe start of our September 1, 19 44, fiscal year, the General Fund expenditures have 
exceeded income in the amount of §338,000. It is evident, therefore, that if- the 
American Federation of Labor is to meet the demands made upon it for organizing 
purposes and for adequate service to our affiliates, that there must be some in- 
crease in income to tbe Federation. The Executive Council therefore recommends 
to tbe convention of the American Federation of Labor tbat the income of the 
Federation be increased by the following changes in our constitution: 

Section 1. The revenue of the Federation shall be derived from 
a per capita tax to be paid upon the full paid-up membership of all 
affiliated bodies, as follows: From International or National Trade 
Unions, a per capita tax of two (2) cents per member per month up 
to 2 0.000 members, and one and one-half (l^c) cents per member" 
per month for members in excess of 200,000; from Local Trade 
Unions and Federal Labor Unions, thirty-six i36c) cents per 
member per month, eight and onehalf (8%c) cents of which must 
be set aside to be used only in the case of strike or lockout unless 
otherwise ordered by tbe Executive Council; tbe amount received 
by the American Federation of Labor on each initiation fee from all 



THE CARPEXTER 21 

directly affiliated local unions shall be 2 5 per cent of the total initia- 
tion fee received by the local unions from the individual, but in no 
case shall the amount received by the American Federation of Labor 
be less than one dollar; from Central and State Bodies $10 per year, 
payable quarterly. Revenue may also be derived from assessments 
when and as ordered by a majority vote of a regular or special con- 
vention. 
This was referred to the Committee on Law and was reported on as follows: 
Majority Report that: 

"The Executive Council's Report be adopted." 
The Minority Report that: 

The report of the Majority be amended by striking out 200,000 
members and substituting 300,000 members. 
This brought on a long and animated debate, after which the Minority Report was 
defeated and the Majority Report adopted. 

This means that we will pay 2 cents per member per month to the A. F. of L. 
on 200,0 00 members in good standing and 1% cents per member per month on 
members in good standing over 200,000. 

HOUSING 

On account of the interest manifested by the Delegates at our Twenty-fifth 
General Convention held in Lakeland, Florida, in April, 19 46 and the appointment 
of a Special Committee by the General President to consider the Housing question, 
we deem it advisable to insert in this report, that part of the Executive Council's 
Report on this important subject and the action of the American Federation of 
Labor Convention thereon. • 

"Under the caption, "Housing and Housing Legislation," the Executive Council 
says: 

Housing shortages which persisted through the war became critically acute as 
the country entered the decisive stage of the war effort, in the summer of 1944. 
Construction of public war housing to shelter war workers and their families de- 
pended upon the Congressional appropriation under the Lanham Act. In this final 
phase of the war production drive, Congress continued to be extremely niggardly 
in authorizing funds for public war housing, whose construction was essential to 
meet the mounting need. They were confined to a $15 million appropriation in 
December, 19 44, and $66 million in April, 19 45. This meant that the Federal 
Public Housing Authority, responsible for public war housing under the Lanham 
Act, was forced to cut down its program until it could do little more than complete 
the projects it had started. In June, 1945, a new Title V was added to the 
Lanham Act, authorizing construction of public war housing for distressed families 
of servicemen and veterans, who were affected by evictions or other unusual hard- 
ships. However, despite the President's recommendation, Congress failed to pro- 
vide for additional appropriation for homes under this title until the war was over. 
Since then $447,627,000 has been appropriated, but these funds have been used 
to transport demountable housing and erect it to meet special needs such as the 
housing for student veterans in colleges. 

In contrast, Congress proved extremely liberal in increasing the authorization 
for FHA insurance of privately-financed housing, built ostensibly for war workers. 
It repeatedly raised the limit of FHA mortgage insurance under the war-time 
Title VI of the National Housing Act, until the total wartime authorization for 
private housing reached $1,800,000,000. This was done despite the record of per- 
formance of private builders under Title VI, which as frequently pointed out by 
the American Federation of Labor, resulted in substandard shoddily built houses 
which war workers' families were compelled to buy at excessive prices because no 
other shelter was available to them. 

Exorbitant profits made during the war at the expense of war workers' fam- 
ilies whetted the appetites of speculative builders for more profits in the transition 
to peace to be made at the expense of the returning war veterans. Under the 
pressure of their concerted drive to extend the Wartime Emergency Title VI, and 
with the backing of the Federal Housing Expediter, peacetime extension of Title 
VI was written by Congress into the Veterans' Emergency Housing Act of 19 46, 
raising the authorization for FHA mortgage insurance on this emergency housing 



22 THE CARPENTER 

to $2,800,000,000, and permitting the President to further increase it to $3,800,- 
000,000. Thus the largest housing authorization made by Congress during the 
war and reconversion was to guarantee the risk of mortgage lenders and builders 
for the construction of substandard homes with no safeguards whatsoever to 
protect the interests of the home-buyers. 

This questionable legislation enabling the FHA to underwrite high interest rate 
mortgages on shoddy homes for sale at high prices was used as a flank attack on 
the A. F. L. -initiated large-scale program for the construction of soundly built 
homes, a program backed by veterans' organizations, civic leaders and all progres- 
sives. It was also a part of an attack to destroy the program of slum clearance and 
low-rent housing for low-income families, launched in 19 3 7 under the A. F. of Un- 
supported U. S. Housing Act. During the war all new construction of USHA 
housing was suspended. Many low-rent housing projects built for low-income 
families before the war were made available to families of war workers, service- 
men and veterans who could afford to pay full economic rent. The law required 
that at the end of the war the low rent character of these projects be reestablished. 
To make the low rents possible, it was necessary for the federal government to 
pay annual contributions which make up the difference between the low rents 
charged on public housing projects and the prevailing economic rent. The oppo- 
nents of public housing succeeded in getting House approval of a provision in the 
Government Corporation Appropriation Bill of 19 46, prohibiting the use of federal 
funds for annual contributions. Tbis was objected to by the Senate. The House 
then introduced new restrictions, the most crippling of which would require that 
only families with incomes in the lowest, fourth of all family incomes would be 
eligible for public low-rent housing. The A. F. of L. succeeded in eliminating 
this eligibility restriction, which would have dealt a death blow to the program 
labor has championed through the past decade. 

Although it early recognized the special needs for housing on the part of 
returning servicemen, Congress took little effective action to bring decent housing 
within the reach of the veterans' families on reasonable terms. The Servicemen's 
Readjustment Act, known as the "G. I. Bill of Right," enacted in June, 1944, 
contained in Title III special provisions for loans to veterans, guaranteed by the 
Veterans' Administration, to buy, build or repair homes. While this legislation was 
pending Congressional consideration, the A. F. of L. strongly insisted on the pro- 
visions essential to safeguard the veterans against excessive interest charges, spec- 
ulative prices and substandard construction of homes for which the veteran would 
eventually have to pay. Neither the original "G. I. Bill of Rights" nor the subse- 
quent amendments met these sound requirements. No adequate standards of 
construction and inspection have been provided and the private lenders were 
authorized to charge a four per cent interest rate on housing loans to veterans, 
made riskless by a complete federal guarantee. However, the provision which 
required the veteran to apply for such loans within two years after the enactment 
of the law was extended to ten years. 

As the housing shortage was rapidly intensified following V-J Day, the Congress 
became increasingly inclined to substitute stop-gap emergency measures for a 
comprehensive long-range solution of the nation's Number One domestic problem. 
In November, 19 45, Representative Patman introduced a bill establishing author- 
ization of maximum prices on newly built housing and a maximum on the resale of 
existing homes. The bill also provided for an allocation of scarce materials, a 
preference to veterans in the rental or purchase of homes, and a subsidy for the 
construction of low-cost housing. The Patman Bill, later named the Veterans' 
Emergency Housing Act, became law in a drastically changed form in May, 1946. 
As enacted, this law contained no maximum sale or rental provisions, and was 
largely limited to three main features: (1) peacetime extension of the emergency 
wartime Title VI with a large increased authorization for FHA insurance and an 
increase in the maximum sale price on a single family house to $9,000; (2) an 
authorization of $400,000,000 for premium payments or subsidies to building mate- 
rial manufacturers to stimulate production; and (3) authority to the RFC to 
guarantee markets for new-type building materials and prefabricated houses up to 
200,000 units. 



THE CARPENTER 23 

In the original premium payment and guaranteed market proposals, there 
was no provision" for minimum standards or specifications for materials or houses 
to be produced at public expense. At the insistence of the A. F. of L. a provision 
was written into the law requiring- that new type materials be tested for sound 
quality, and prefabricated houses be tested for durability, livability and safety. 

During the past two years, the American Federation of Labor led in insistence 
on early introduction of a far-reaching post-war housing program designated to 
meet the objectives laid down by our 1944 convention. The American Federation 
of Labor's program of recommendations was placed before Congress on January 15, 
19 45, by Chairman Harry C. Bates of our Housing Committee, at the hearings held 
by the Senate Subcommittee on Housing and Urban Redevelopment. 

In February, 1945, legislative proposals, designed to carry out this program, 
were presented by the A. F. of L. Housing Committee to Chairman Robert F. 
Wagner of the Senate Banking and Currency Committee with the request that a 
comprehensive post-war housing bill be introduced at the earliest possible date to 
assure the provision of a large-scale volume of home construction available to 
families of all incomes. These proposals were also submitted to Senator Robert A. 
Taft. 

On November 14, 1945, the General Housing Bill, embodying the major pro- 
posals of the A. F. of L. post-war housing program, was introduced under the bi- 
partisan sponsorship of Senators Wagner, Ellender and Taft. This bill, S. 1592, 
provided for the efficient and economical coordination of all housing activities of 
the federal government under the supervision of a permanent National Housing 
Agency with local commmunities having the major responsibility for carrying out 
the programs. The bill authorized the N. H. A. to aid localities in making surveys 
of their housing needs and plans for meeting these needs, provided these com- 
munities meet half the cost of such studies. The goals set by S. 159 2 called for a 
decent home for every American family and a volume of construction large enough 
to enable the construction industry to make its necessary contribution to an econ- 
omy of full production and full employment. 

S. 159 2 encouraged and aided private enterprise in doing the major part of the 
job of rehousing America. The bill sought throughout to improve old methods 
and to devise new ones by which privately built housing can be brought within 
the reach of the great mass market of middle income families. The FHA system 
of mortgage insurance would be geared to serve the great mass market of middle 
income families. Costs of home purchase would be reduced through lower inter- 
est rates and a longer period of amortization. Liberal terms would be given to 
non-profit corporations to build mutual cooperative housing developments. A title 
was added to the National Housing Act to encourage private investors to put their 
money in rental housing. Under the "yield insurance" formula, investors in much 
needed, moderately priced rental housing would be guaranteed an annual profit 
of 2.75 per cent. 

These programs should enable private enterprise to build 90 per cent of the 
new homes. In order to reach the goal of "a decent home for every American 
family," the bill improved the public low-rent housing program for cities and 
towns and extended it to rural areas. Each year for four years it provided for a 
maximum of 125,000 public housing units in urban areas and authorized annual 
contributions of $22,000,000 to maintain low rents. It also authorized funds for 
a publicly-aided rural and farm housing program. These provisions will accom- 
plish much of the task of rebuilding America. The rest of the task can be 
achieved by the provision of the bill for tearing down slum areas and rebuilding 
them with decent housing and needed community facilities. The primary responsi- 
bility for doing this job is left to local communities, who must present a detailed 
plan and provide a large share of the funds before becoming eligible for federal 
loans or grants. Private enterprise would share fully in this task of slum clearance 
and urban redevelopment. 

On April 15, 1946, the Senate not only passed S. 1592 with its major provisions 
intact, but also adopted by a vote of 51 to 20 the vital A. F. of L. sponsored amend- 
ment requiring that not less than prevailing wages be paid on all FHA insured 
construction. 



2 4 THE CARPEXTER 

Strongest possible support "was given S. 15 92 "by the entire membership of 
the American Federation of Labor. Despite these efforts, a small but strong lobby 
of the speculative elements in the real estate and mortgage lending field succeeded 
in blocking the Bill in the House Banking and Currency Committee. 

The A. F. of L.'s fight for the enactment of the Wagner-Ellender-Taft General 
Housing Bill received widest support from our membership throughout the nation. 
It is our purpose to redouble our efforts for the enactment of the A. F. of L.'s post- 
war housing program in the coming year. "We urge that it be given top considera- 
tion and be made the first order of business of the next Congress. 

After more than a year of study of the slum clearance and redevelopment needs 
of the nation's capital, legislation for the redevelopment of the District of Columbia 
was introduced early in 19 45. In its national campaign against public housing, 
the special interest lobby chose Washington as a testing ground. It succeeded 
in injecting into the bills, which were not dealing with housing as such, definitions 
of public housing designed to make it unworkable. The Housing Committee of the 
A. F. of L. cooperated with the Washington Central Labor Union in the long- 
drawn-out legislative fight that ensued. On October IS, 1945, the McCarran Dis- 
trict of Columbia Redevelopment Bill, S. 1426, was modified by its author to 
include the A. F. of L. -suggested amendments and was passed by the Senate. How- 
ever, the unworkable definitions of public housing were reinstated in the bill by the 
House and in the preadjournment rush the Senate repudiated its own previous 
stand, accepting the House version of the Bill. While he accepted the House re- 
vision, Senator McCarren gave Labor his commitment to lead in the fight in the 
nest session of Congress for workable public housing provisions previously adopted 
by the Senate. 

The Housing and Legislative Committees of the A. F. of L. have cooperated 
closely in their work on all phases of housing legislation, have received the fullest 
support from the officers of the A. F. of L. Building and Construction Trades De- 
partment and from A. F. of L. affiliates throughout the nation. The nation's 
housing need is urgent. The A. F. of L. housing program should be kept high on 
Labor's legislative "must" list for enactment in the coming year. 

Referred to the Committee on Building Trades and reported on as follows: 

The American Federation of Labor commends highly the work of its Housing 
Committee and of its Legislative Committee for the most effective and valuable 
service they have rendered in advancing the interests of wage-earners and the 
public generally in the cause of more and better homes for the American family. 
Despite the reverses due to the pressure of strongly organized and a well-financed 
special interests, which prevented the enactment of the A. F. of L.'s major post- 
war housing program, we have succeeded in focussing nation-wide attention on 
the housing goals and on methods of achieving those goals essential to our long- 
range program of large-scale housing construction. It is urgent that this work is 
intensified in the coming year, mobilizing the widest possible active support of all 
affiliates of the A. F. of L. in every trade and industry and in every community. 
On' the final success in the enactment of our housing program, full and steady 
employment in the coming years will largely depend. The establishment of mini- 
mum standards of safety, durability and livability of the American home will 
serve every family, every community and every worker in the years to come. The 
adoption of the prevailing wage requirement in the construction of all housing will 
be a foremost gain to mechanics and laborers in the building and construction 
trades. The American Federation of Labor is dedicated to the intensified and 
unrelenting fight for the attainment of these objectives. 

With these comments, your Committee recommends the adoption of this por- 
tion of the Executive Council's report. 

The report of the committee was unanimously adopted. 

MEMBERSHIP 

The total paid-up membership for the year ending August 31, 1946, numbers 
7,123,943. 



THE CARPENTER 



25 



The present officers were re-elected without opposition and San Francisco, 
Calif., was selected as the city in which to hold the Convention in 19 47. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. L. Hutcheson 
M. A. Hutcheson 
Frank Duffy 
C. A. Clancy 
T. D. Harper 
Chas. A. Hanson 
M. J. Sexton 
Geo. Osterkamp 

Delegates. 



Montreal Unions Dedicate New Home 




On the week end of November 9 a long cherished dream of Montreal 
carpenters became a reality when their fine new headquarters building was 
officially opened. The opening was a gala occasion. Some 1,300 hundred 
Brotherhood members and their friends visited the building during the 
day and attended the impressive ceremonies that officially dedicated the 
new building. For twenty-five years the various local unions that make 
up the Montreal District Council hoped and worked for a home of their 
own. When the fine new building (pictured above) was opened last No- 
vember they made most of the occasion. On hand were Second General 
Vice President John R. Stevenson and Executive Board Member Arthur 
Martel to help the Montreal members properly dedicate their new head- 
quarters. On hand also we.re General Representative Andy Cooper and a 
host of other prominent labor leaders in the Canadian Labor movement. 

Monday evening, November 11, a supper banquet was held in connec- 
tion with the dedication ceremonies. The Hon. Camillien Houde, mayor 
of Montreal, attended and gave an inspiring address. Other short ad- 
dresses were given by Vice President Stevenson, Board Member Martel 
and a long list of distinguished guests. During the week end festivities, 
special tribute was paid to nine old timers who were presented with twen- 
ty-five year pins. 

The new Montreal headquarters is modern in every respect. In addi- 
tion to a large auditorium, several smaller meeting halls and numerous 
offices, it contains a fine cafeteria in the basement. Congratulations to the 
Carpenters of Montreal on their fine achievement ! 



Not lost to those that lore them, They still live in our memory, 
Not dead, just gone before; And will forever more. 



%z&i in T^t&tt 

The Editor has been requested to publish the nam** 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother JACOB AMSLER, Local No. 366, New York, N. Y. 
Brother A. B. ANDERSON, Local No. 13, Chicago, 111. 
Brother WM. CARSON, Local No. 374, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Brother HUGH DEGNAN, Local No. 20, Staten Island, N. Y. 
Brother FRANK DONAHUE, Local No. 105, Cleveland, Ohio 
Brother WILLIAM ERICKSON, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 
Brother CHAS. FORD, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother J. H. FRY, Local No. 132, Washington, D. C. 
Brother LESLIE H. HENRY, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 
Brother JOHN P. HISCOCK, Local No. 56, Boston, Mass. 
Brother ED. O. JUNCK, Local No. 1751, Austin, Tex. 
Brother COONEY A. KAUFFMAN, Local No. 418, Greeley, Colo. 
Brother GEORGE LANE, Local No. 656, Holyoke, Mass. 
Brother JOHN KELLY, Local No. 13, Chicago, 111. 
Brother JACOB KUDESH, Local No. 13, Chicago, 111. 
Brother CHARLES G. LEWIS, Local No. 132, Washington, D. C. 
Brother J. ELMER LOCKHART, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 
Brother THOMAS MALONEY, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 
Brother CLARENCE MARSH, Local No. 2108, Shelbyville, Ind. 
Brother MARTIN MORTINSEN, Local No. 20, Staten Island, N. Y. 
Brother ED. POLKENHORN, Local No. 2762, North Fork, Cal. 
Brother GEORGE W. REEBE, Local No. 20, Staten Island, N. Y. 
Brother CHARLES ROLAFF, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 
Brother OTTO H. SCHMIDT, Local No. 261, Scranton, Pa. 
Brother FRANS SIIVONEN, Local No. 13, Chicago, 111. 
Brother JOHN G. SOUTAR, Local No. 13, Chicago, 111. 
Brother CHARLES SWANEE, Local No. 916, Aurora, 111. 
Brother WILLIAM C. THIEDE, Local No. 366, New York, N. Y. 
Brother MAX UMGELTER, Local No. 366, New York, N. Y. 
Brother EDWARD R. WHITTLE, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 




J. Lx^sS 



This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

Evansville Local Sponsors Xmas Party 

Carpenters' Local Union No. 90, Evansville, Indiana, gave its Christ- 
mas Party, December 7 for its members at the Central Labor Union main 
Auditorium. 

Luncheon and refreshments were served while music was played by the 
talented young- Spradley family. 

Brother Charles P. Stephan was master of ceremonies, introducing 
members with forty years or more of good standing and a large group of 
thirty-year members. Twenty-two forty-year members were in attendance ; 
one with 53 years' membership. 

Santa Claus then appeared and gave treats to the children present, much 
to their delight. 

Later tables were pushed back and dancing was enjoyed by all. The 
party was considered a huge success by all members. 

Officers of Carpenters' Local No. 90 are Paul Crump, president; Ber- 
nard Hoffman, vice-president; Roland Buttram, recording secretary; 
Michael Ahern, financial secretary; and Ervin Behrick, treasurer. Trus- 
ees are August Lindauer, James Atherton and Lee Boyle. William T. 
Schulze is business representative for the union. 



Local 1129 Honors Old Timers and Veterans 

. On October 9, Local Union No. 1129, Kittanning, Pa., held a banquet 
to pay homage to its old time members and to welcome back into the fold 
those members who served in the armed forces. The banquet was held in 
the spacious social hall of Fire Company No. 1 and the hall was filled to 
capacity. Roy M. Booher acted as toastmaster and did an exceptionally 
fine job. President Herbert Coggins extended the greetings of the Union 
to the guests present. Introduced during the course of the evening were 
Brother Harry Wibble, oldest living charter member, and Financial Secre- 
tary R. H. Toy, long a faithful member, both of whom are held in the 
highest esteem. Another charter member, Brother U. G. Hobough was 
unable to attend. 

Guest speakers included Judge Frank Graff of Armstrong Co., District 
Attorney W. A. Ashe, Paul Mitchell of Pittsburgh, and Mr. Woodward 
of Beaver Valley. Special tribute was paid to some fifteen members who 
served in the armed forces. 

The dinner was a sumptuous one and the entertainment following it 
was first rate. The evening wound up with dancing for one and all. 
Everyone attending declared the evening an unqualified success ; a tribute 
to the efficiency of the arrangement committee and the reception com- 
mittee. 




LINCOLN, NEB., LADIES KEEP BUSY 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 399 of Carpenters' Local 1055, Lincoln, Nebraska, sends 
greetings to our sister Auxiliaries. On September 22 we celebrated our 5th Anni- 
versary. We bad one charter member present, Mrs. J. P. Schneider, who has been 
present at all the meetings. We have 9 charter members still active. They are: 
Mrs. J. P. Schneider, Mrs. Hugh Crawford, Mrs. John Worster, Mrs. James Greer, 
Mrs. Frank Woerner, Mrs. Geo. Johnsen, Mrs. H. I. Lockwood, Mrs. Chas. Hurd, 
and Mrs. Geo. Heaton. We have one deceased charter member, Mrs. Wayne. 

We now have a membership of 50. We meet on the second and fourth Mondays 
at the Labor Temple. During the war years we did sewing for the "British War 
Relief" and "Red Cross" and have a Certificate of Commendation for the war 
bonds we acquired. 

Our social activities consist of a dance once a month and occasionally a pinochle 
party. Every three months we have a covered dish luncheon honoring all members 
who had birthdays in that time and we sponsor a family picnic in the park in the 
summer time. 

Carpenters' Local 10 55 helped us with a big Christmas party for all the kiddies 
last Chi'istmas. At this party a food basket was made up and given to a needy fam- 
ily. We send delegates to the Central Labor Union, and Label League. A sym- 
pathy chairman sends cards and flowers' to sick members. 

In the past year we have affiliated with the Federation of Labor and we sent 
one delegate to the convention at Scottsbluff and have contributed to help fight the 
anti-closed shop amendment. 

Sisters from any Auxiliary will be welcome to meet with us at any time. 

Fraternally yours, 

Josephine Butterfield, Sec, 

* Carpenters' Auxiliary No. 39 9. 



EVANSVILLE AUXELL1RY YOUNG BUT ACTIVE 

The Editor: 

Auxiliary No. 4 42 of Evansville, Ind., extends greetings to all sister auxiliaries. 
We so much enjoy all the letters from our sister organizations that we would like 
to tell a little of our activities. We are a young organization — only a year and a 
half old — but we have been plenty busy in that time. We have about sixty mem- 
bers so far. We held public bingo parties our first year as our money making pro- 
ject. We also held one card party. We donated to the Red Cross both in cash 
and service, to the March of Dimes and all other worthwhile charities. This year 
we delivered baskets to needy carpenter families and provided Christmas cheer for 
the less fortunate children. 

Despite all this activity, however, we have managed to have some very enjoy- 
able times on the social side. We have had two Halloween parties, a big Christmas 
party and a basket picnic. Our biggest party so far was our First Anniversary 
celebration at which time we entertained our families with a fried chicken dinner 
followed by a dance. This Christmas we sponsored an old-fashioned kid party 
just for the members. 

In closing, we would like to extend an invitation to any sister member to visit 
us. We meet the first and third Tuesdays of each month at Carpenters' Hall. 

(Mrs.) Merele Self, Rec. Sec. 
(Mrs.) Thresal Lichtenberger, Pres. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

(Copyright 1947) 

By H. H. Siegele 

LESSON 220 

As we mentioned in a previous lesson, 
the first work we did as an apprentice 
carpenter was running a boring ma- 
chine. We did all the boring for a 40 
by 80 heavy timber barn. It was per- 
haps the last heavy timber framing of 
any consequence done in that commun- 
ity. The contractors did the laying 
out and the framing of the tenons, while 




Fig. 1. ' 

the journeymen did the mortising. The 
heavy timber framing of pioneer days 
consisted of timbers that were hewed 
with a broadax, but on this job only a 
few of the heavier timbers were hewed, 
the rest were sawed at a local saw mill. 
A drawing made from a picture taken 
on that job, showing the apprentice 
running the boring machine, is shown 
by Fig. 1. 

Fig. 2 shows an auger bit, where 
we point out with indicators the side 
cutters, also called nibs; • the screw 
point, also called spur; the cutters, 
sometimes called lips; also pointed out 
are the twists, shank and tang. 



A gimlet is shown at the top in Fig. 
3, and a twist bit at the bottom. The 
gimlet is a handy little tool, especially 
when foreboring is necessary for screws. 
It is also used for boring small holes, 



Side Culler 




-Cutter ^ I wish 

Seven/ Point 



Shank Tung' 



Fig. 2 



in which capacity it has a wide field 
of usefulness. The size of the twist bit 
that we are showing was chosen for 
convenience in making the illustration. 
Twist bits can be obtained on the mar- 
ket in various sizes and in different 
lengths. What we are showing is a sort 




Fis 



of cross between a twist bit for drilling 
in wood and one for drilling in metal, 
which means that it represents all of 
the twist bits in use, both for drilling 
wood and for drilling metal. 

A screwdriver bit is shown by the 
upper drawing in Fig. 4. Such a bit 
should be in every carpenter's kit of 




Fig. 4 

tools, for there isn't anything better for 
driving screws that require consider- 
able force. The reamer shown at the 
bottom, is made for metal reaming, but 
it gives good results when used as a 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



H. H. SIEGELE'S BOOKS 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION. — Covers hundreds of prac- 
tical building problems, has 252 p. and 670 il. $2.50. 

BUILDING. — Has 210 p. and 495 il., covering form 
building, scaffolding, finishing, stair building, roof 
framing, and other subjects. $2.50. 

CARPENTRY. — Has 302 p., 754 il., covering general 
house carpentry, and other subjects. $2.50. 

BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— -Has 385 p., 
670 il., and about 7,000 building trade terms. $3.00. 

(The above books support each other.) 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry, 64 pages, brown 
cloth binding and two-color title page. Only $1.00. 

PUSHING BUTTONS. — The prose companion of 
Twights of Thought. Illustrated. Cloth. Only $1.00. 

Postage prepaid when money accompanies the order. 

S. H. H. SIEGELE gS? K n «i 

FREE — With 2 books, pushing Buttons free; with 3 
books, Twigs of Thought and Pushing Buttons free — 
books autographed. 



A similar job-made gauge used with 
an auger bit is shown by Fig. 8. In 
making such gauges, soft wood should 




Fig. 6 

be used. The U-shaped opening to the 
left of the gauge is made by boring 
a hole through the block and ripping 
out what is left to form the two legs 
that clear the twists of the auger bit. 



wood reamer. Because the wood reamer 
can only be used on material that can 
be cut away easily, the reamer shown 
has a definite advantage over it. 

How the gimlet, reamer and screw- 
driver bits are related by their use is 
shown by Fig. 5. Here number 1 
shows a gimlet with the point still in 
the hole that was bored with it. The 
shaded wormlike things represent bor- 
ing chips as they come out from the 
gimlet fluting. Number 2 shows the 
hole ready for reaming. Number 3 shows 
the point of the reamer in the hole 
for starting the reaming. The reaming 
finished is shown at number 4, with the 




Fig. 5 

screw above ready to be inserted. Num- 
ber 5 shows the screw driven home, and 
the screwdriver bit above, shown in 
part. 

Fig. 6 shows a chuck of a brace hold- 
ing a gimlet. By dotted lines we show 
the outline of a job-made gauge used 
with a gimlet in foreboring for screws. 
To the right we show the point project- 
ing % of an inch beyond the gauge, 
which would be about right for 1%- 
inch screws. Fig. 7 is a perspective 
drawing of the gimlet gauge. 




Fig. 7 

These legs should be left longer than 
needed, so that when the gauge is fin- 
ished the legs can be cut to the right 




Fig. 8 

length. The hole for the shank is 
bored with the grain of the wood, just 
large enough to permit the tang to go 
through. We are aware that there are 
bit gauges on the market, and we have 
used some of them, but up to this 








THEY HAVE' 

OUR CHART Big 27"x36" blue print chart 
on the steel square Starting Key. Also 
a Radial Saw Chart. Blue print shows 
how to find length of any rafter and make 
its cuts, find any angle in degrees, frame 
any polygon 3 to 16 sides, and cuts its 
mitres, read board feet and brace tables, 
octagon scale, rafter tables and much 
other valuable information. Radial Saw 
Chart changes pitches and cuts into de- 
grees and minutes. Every carpenter should 
have this chart. Now printed on both sides, 
makes about 13 square feet of copy showing 
squares full size. Price $1.00 post paid. Check 
or Money Order — No Stamps. 

MASON ENGINEERING SERVICE 
2105 N. Burdick St., Div. I, Kalamazoo 81, Mich. 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



writing we have not found one that is 
a complete success. The job-made 
gauge such as we are showing here, has 
many advantages — one of which is that 
when you are through with it it can 
be discarded. 




Fig. 9 



Fig. 9 shows a square applied to a 
timber on the 8 and 12 points, for the 
purpose of showing how to bore angling 
holes so they will be on the angle de- 
sired. It does not matter whether the 
holes are to be bored in a piece of 
timber, railing or on some flat surface, 
this method will apply. Let us start 
with the square in the position shown, 
and mark along the outside edge of the 
body and also of the tongue, which 
gives us the two important angles. The 




Fig. 10 



dotted lines at A show where a hole is 
bored at a right angle to the edge of the 
timber. This hole should be bored with 
the bit that will be used in boring the 
angling hole shown by dotted lines at 
B. Having done all of this, cut the 
timber as marked along the edge of the 
body of the square to obtain the block 
marked A. This block is then transferred 




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Coupon Brings Eight Big Books For 



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Name 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
address, and name and address of at least one business 
man as reference. Men in service, also give home address. 



to the point where the angling hole is 
to be bored, in this case, to the dotted 
lines shown at B, and put together as 
shown by the detail in Fig. 10. The 
two pieces should be securely fastened 
together before the boring for the an- 
gling hole is started. The shaded shank 
and tang of an auger bit, shows the 
position of the auger when the boring 
is done. Whenever a hole has been 
bored the block is removed and fastened 
again for boring the next hole. This 
process is repeated until the holes have 
all been bored. 



Pencil Points 

The man who can not sharpen a pen- 
cil, and does not intend to learn how 
to sharpen one, should never take up 
carpentry. The points on a carpenter's 
pencils tell more about his mechanical 
abilities than he can say about them 
himself. If the points are good, then 
the chances all favor the conclusion that 
he is a good mechanic, but if they are 
bad, then, even though he might be a 
good mechanic, he can not do accurate 



work, especially in finishing. And what 
is true of pencil points is equally true 
of the cutting edge of the pocket knife 




PAINE 

ANCHORS 



Hold Fast 



In Masonry 
and Concrete 



a carpenter carries; for the man who 
wants to work at carpenter work, 
Without carrying a sharp knife in his 
pocket, can never hope to go very far 
as a building tradesman. 

The accompanying illustration shows 
at a two views of a carpenter's pencil, 
sharpened to a chisel point. At b we 
show two views of a chisel point on an 
ordinary pencil for use in finishing. The 
view at top left also represents a cone- 
like or needle point. At c we show two 
dubbed off pencils, that can hardly be 
said to be sharpened. Such pencil shar- 
pening is always conducive to errors and 
inaccuracies. No carpenter should al- 
low himself to be seen on a job with 
such pencil points. 



Solid support for 
securing fixtures 
against shock, 
stress and vibra- 
tion. 

Fig. 910— Available in 

W, %" and W 

diams. in standard 

lengths. 

Fig. 911— For extra 

heavy anchorage. 

Write for Catalog 

THE PAINE CO. 



2967 Carroll Ave., Chicago, Illinois 




MAI ME- 

FASTENING hiVifTC 
and HANGING UlVILlJ 




/m&Mz NEW 



with FOLEY RETOOTHER 

It cuts a perfect row of new teeth on a handsaw 
in 3 minutes! (No need to grind off old teeth.) 
Saves time, relieves eyestrain, cuts filing time in 
half. You handle more customers and make more 
money. The Foley Retoother is a marvel for re- 
conditioning all hand saws with broken or un- 
even teeth, or hollowed edge due to poor filing. 
Cuts 20 sizes of teeth from 4 to 16 points per 
inch on all cross-cut, rip, back, mitre-box and 
panel saws. Quickly pays for itself and earns 
extra profits for you. Immediate Delivery. Send 
coupon for circular. 

Fh7FY MFC - fiTl i^ "Foky~Bl7g. 

'vLtl fflrU. \t\f. Minneapolis 13, Minn. 
Send full details on Foley Retoother 

Name 

Address 



LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your own busi- 
ness and be your own boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 

Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $5.00, 
and pay the balance of $25.00 at $5.00 per 
month, making a total of $30.00 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name and address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building C, Denver 2, Colorado 




MET #<>■ Zu" 



• If you have ever tried a Stanley No. 25 Screw 
Driver, you'll know the one we mean. It's the kind 
of a screw driver you reach for first - the sturdy, 
hand-fitting tool that does so many kinds of screw 
driving jobs quickly, securely, the way you want 
them done. 

The polished, alloy-steel blade is tempered its 
entire length. Patented bolster construction anchors 
blade in hardwood handle. Tips are accurately 
crossground to size. Handle is fluted for sure grip. 
Eight sizes for a choice. Buy a No. 25 next time — and 
good Stanley Tools always. STANLEY TOOLS, 
163 Elm Street, New Britain, Connecticut. 



THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLD 

[STANLEY) 



HARDWARE- HAND TOOLS- ELECTRIC TOOLS 



The powerful, heavy-duty 14" MalLDrill 
cuts Yz " holes in steel — 1" holes in wood 
with speed and ease. It is lightweight . . . 
easy to handle in close quarters . . . will 
not stall under hand pressure. Its power- 
packed performance drills holes in a 
hurry. Available in 110-volt AC-DC or 
220-volt AC-DC. Also }i " (two speeds), 
5/ 10" and %" models. 

Ask your Dealer or write for literature and prices. 
POWER TOOL DIVISION 

MALL TOOL COMPANY 

7751 South Chicago Ave., Chicago, 19, III. 
25 years of "Better Tools For Better Work". 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 

4vol$.*6 




Inside Trade Information Ons 

How to use the steel square — How to file and set 
saws — How to build furniture — How to use a 
mitre box — How to use the chalk line — How to use 
rules and scales — How to make joints — Carpenters 
arithmetic — Solving mensuration problems— '- Es- 
timating Btrength of timbers — How to set girders 
and sills — How to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs — How to build houses, barns, gar- 
ages, bungalows, etc. — How to read and draw 
plans — Drawing up specifications — How to ex- 
cavate—How to use settings 12. 13 and 17 on the 
steel square — How to build hoists and scaffolds — 
skylights — How to build stairs — How to put oo 
interior trim — How to hang doors — How to lath- 
lay floors — How to paint 



Inside Trade Information 

(or Carpenters, Builders, Join- 
ers, Building Mechanics and 
nil Woodworkers. These 
Guides give you the short-cut 
instructions that you want— 
including new methods, ideas, 
solutions, plans, systems and 
money saving suggestions. An 
easy progressive course for the 
apprentice and student. A 
practical daily helper and 
Quick Reference for the master 
worker. Carpenters every- 
where are using these Guides 
as a Helping Hand to Easier 
Work. Better Work and Bet* 
ter Pay. To get this assist- 
ance for yourself, simply Wl 
in and mail the FREE COU- 
PON below. 




THEO. AUDEL & CO., 49 W. 23rd St., New York City 

Mail Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides. 4 vols., on 7 days' free trial. If O.K. 
I will remit SI in 7 days, and SI monthly uotil $6 is paid. Otherwise 1 will return i hem- 
No obligation unless I am satisfied. 



Name. 

Addreai 



Occupation. 

EcicrcDce. . 




When you see exceptional performance by a 
portable power saw, look for an Atkins blade. For 
these "Silver Steel" blades with their fast-biting, 
slow-dulling teeth are built to bring out the best in any 
saw... to cut cleaner, straighter and cooler over longer 
steady cutting periods... to hold an edge on the 
toughest wood with less time out for blade changes. 

And when it's a question of new blades for your 

portable power saws, look for Atkins. Orders still 
top output considerably, but a little patience now 
will pay you well for a long time to come. 




ATKINS 



*While there are no Atkins-made 

portable power saw machines, many 

leading producers of such machines. 

use Atkins blades exclusively. 

{#) 

miiu 



E. C. ATKINS AND COMPANY 

Home Office and Factory: 402 S. Illinois St., Indianapolis 9, Indiana 

Branch Factory: Portland, Oregon 

Branch Offices s 

Atlanta • Chicago • Memphis • New Orleans • New York • San Francisco 

THE CARPENTER'S FRIEND FOR 89 YEARS 




FOUNDED 1881 

Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 




CONGRESS, TAKE NOTE! 



The duty of industrial states- 
manship today is to direct the vast 
social energy of organized labor, 
once dissipated in the struggle for 
union survival, into collaborative 
productive functions. Labor is 
ready and eager for such a creative 
future. Obviously, the rich contri- 
bution which organized labor can 
bring to our economy will not be 
achieved in an atmosphere of dis- 
trust or government hostility. 



-From a speech by President William 
Jj. Hutcheson, made in March, 1944. 




STREAMLINED beauty is practical design in 
a car. But it pays to remember it's what's 
inside the hood that matters. 

It's what's inside that counts with quality 
building products, too. Hidden, inside values 
the eye seldom sees. That's why building-wise 
people insist on Celotex Building and Insu- 
lating Products. 

They know the raw materials that go into 
Celotex are the best that nature can grow 
and money can buy. 

And rigid production controls all along 
the line guarantee uniformly high quality of 
every product bearing the Celotex name. 

Tireless laboratory research perfects mate- 
rials and methods still more . . . helps to main- 
tain Celotex leadership year after year. 



These, plus more than a quarter of a cen- 
tury of building materials "know how," are 
the invaluable ingredients in every Celotex 
product. 

They make a big difference in performance 
... in long life and low cost maintenance. A 
difference that has proved its value on hun- 
dreds of thousands of building jobs of every 
kind. 

There aren't enough of these famous 
Celotex products to go around now — 
but steadily increasing production is 
making Celotex materials gradually 
available in larger quantities. 

Building Board Celo-Rok Sheathing and Wallboard 

Interior Finish Boards Celo-Siding Cemesto Flexeell 

Celo-Rok Anchor Lath and Plaster 
Rock Wool Insulation Triple Sealed Shingles 




muwwWQx 



x m\\&\m ^wukv% 



THE CELOTEX CORPORATION • CHICAGO 3, ILLINOIS 



GZZ 



~1 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street. Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established In 1881 
Vol. LXVII — No. 2 



INDIANAPOLIS, FEBRUARY, 194: 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents — 



States Perverting Jobless Insurance 5 

By specious reasoning some state courts are perverting the Social Security Laws 
to such a degree that organized workers may be forced to. make a decision be- 
tween forfeiting their unemployment insurance or their union membership. 



Kaiser Tackles Housing 



10 

Industrialist Henry Kaiser attacks the housing shortage with a unique new con- 
struction plan. Kaiser's houses are half prefab and half built-on-the-job. Hun- 
dreds of them are now housing vets in and around Los Angeles, and from all 
appearances the experiment is working out fairly satisfactorily. 

The Same Sad Story --- 13 

A little delving into the reports of the AFL Executive Council for the years 

1919-1922 turns up some interesting reading. The parallel between conditions 

now and right after the first World War are a little frightening when one 
considers the debacle that followed the 1919 armistice. 

Library Fund --14 

During the past month some 133 Councils, Locals and Auxiliaries sent in con- 
tributions to the Library Fund which was set up for the sole purpose of re- 
habilitating the library at the Home in Lakeland. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS: 

Plane Gossip 

Editorials 

Official 

In Memoriam 

Correspondence - 

To the Ladies 

Craft Problems 



8 
10 
23 
24 
25 
27 
28 









Index to Advertisers - 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this 'will have to be our rule. . 



Entered July 22, 1915. at INDIANAPOLIS. 1ST)., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress. Aug. 24. 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3. 1917. authorized on July 8. 1918. 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be. In their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 
All contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," Including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Carlson Rules 31 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 32 

Frank's Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 4 

Greenlee Tool Co., Rockford, 111. 3 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 32 

Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, 

Mass. 4 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 4 

Ohlen-Bishop Mfg. Co., Colum- 
bus, Ohio 4 

Paine Co., Chicago, 111 32 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, 

Conn. 3rd Cover 

Bowling Equipment 

Brunswick, Balke, Collender Co., 

Chicago, 111. 31 

Carpentry Materials 

Celotex Corp., Chicago, 111. 1 

Doors 

Overhead Door Corp., Hartford 

City, Ind. 4th Cover 

Overalls 
The H. D. Lee Co., Kansas City, 

Mo. 3rd Cover 

Technical Courses and Books 

American School, Chicago, 111. 4 

American Technical Society, 

Chicago, III. 31 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, III. 32 

Home Builders Training Insti- 
tute, Chicago, 111 4 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 30 

Mason Engineering Service, Kala- 
mazoo, Mich. 30 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo— 29 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y. 3rd Cover 



KEEP THE MONEY 
IN THE FAMILY I 

PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 




FOR THIS TIMESAVINO 
WOODWORKING TOOL 




• This easy-reading GREENLEE 
HANDY CALCULATOR swiftly solves 
your woodworking problems. Just 
set the dial- convert linear feet to 
board feet; get slope per foot in de- 
grees; compare hardness, weights, 
shrinkage, warping and working 
ease of various woods. More, too: 
bit sizes for head, body, thread of 
screws; nail specifications; tool 
sharpening hints,- protractor. 6" 
diameter, fits your tool kit. Heavily 
varnished cardboard Special offer. 
Order now, send 10<£ (not stamps) 
in next mail. Greenlee Tool Co., 
2082 Columbia Ave., Rockford, III. 





. This "Greyhound" hand saw is a direct 
descendant of the pioneer "George H. 
Bishop" line started almost a century ago. 
Improvements have been made constantly 
with new designs to meet the requirements 
of carpenters on the job. Better steels now 
give improved cutting edge and longer 
sharpness life. Job-tested through the years 
to bring you a better hand saw. 



OHLEN-MISH0P 



906 Ingleside Ave 




Columbus, Ohio 



Get behind a 



SPIRAL SCREW 



and get ahead 
of the job 




YAHKEE TOOLS NOW PART OF 



Let the spiral 
do the heavy 
wrist work. A 
simple push on a 
sturdy "Yankee" 
drives or draws the 
screw with a spinning 
Good for years 
of smooth, willing part- 
nership with your good 
right hand. Three sizes, 
each with 3 size bits. Pop- 
ular 30A size, range of 
screws #2 to #8. For one- 
hand operation, buy the 130A 
"Yankee" with the "quick- 
return" spring in the handle. 
Send for the "Yankee" Tool Book 
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

Division of The Stanley Works 
Philadelphia 33, Pa. 



BE READY FOR 
A BETTER JOB: 
AT BIGGER PAY 




Thousands of 

Trained Men 

Will Be Needed 



• Building boom is well under way. New homes 
and other structures to be built will provide a tre- 
mendous number of well-paid jobs. Men trained 
in Architecture, Drafting, Contracting, Carpen- 
try and related building trades will cash in BIG 
on their knowledge and skill. YOU can train in 
spare time at home, at low cost, for a big-pay 
job in this rich field. American School can help 
you to success just as it has helped others dur- 
ing its 50 years. Check, fill in and mail coupon 
NOW. for FREE information. 

AMERICAN SCHOOL 

Dept. B244, Drexel Ave. at 58th St., Chicago 37, 111. 

Send me FREE information about your special training 
plan covering subjects checked below. 

D Achitecture & Building □ Automotive Engineering 
D Drafting and Design □ Diesel Engineering 



□ Contracting 

□ Practical Plumbing 
D Air Conditioning 
13 Refrigeration 

D Electrical Engineering 



H Mechanical Engineering 

□ Plastics Engineering 

□ Aviation Q Radio 
D Business Management 

□ High School Courses 



Specializing in 

The 

MASTER CHAMPION 

• Lawn Mower 
Sharpening Machine 

• Saw Sharpening 
Machine 

• Key Machine 
Phone LUcas 6929 

FRANK'S MANUFACTURING CO. 

2501-3-5 E. Imperial Highway Los Angeles 2, Cal. 





FREE FACTS: Use Our Training Plan 
to Learn at Home in Spare Time 

Do you want to be on the inside in the building boom — 
where big money is made? Learn about opportunities for 
Building Contractors whether or not you have previous 
experience in this field. Millions of dollars are going to 
be made in home and farm buildings, in construction 
of stores, garages, small industrial buildings. The 
building industry uses men with organizing ability by 
thousands in construction, supervision, management, 
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estimates housing demand at 40 billion dollars. Others 
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facts! Mail postcard today — no obligation. 
HOME BUILDERS TRAINING INSTITUTE, Dept.D-62 
7050 No. Glenwood Chicago 26, Illinois 



STATES PERVERTING 
JOBLESS INSURANCE 



By 
JOSEPH PADWAY 

AFL Counsel 



RECENTLY two very important decisions involving Social Security- 
Law were handed down by the respective courts of Ohio and Penn- 
sylvania. The issue in each of the cases was the question of whether 
or not unemployment compensation benefits would be paid to an unem- 
ployed union workman who refused to accept offered employment on non- 
union jobs in compliance with the laws of his organization. The facts in 
each case were basically the same. In each case an unemployed union car- 
penter had been referred to employment on a non-union job. In each case 
the laws of the union prohibited members from accepting employment on 
non-union jobs and disregard for this rule would mean expulsion from 
the union. 



Under the Social Security Laws 
of every state an unemployed claim- 
ant for compensation must be will- 
ing to accept suitable employment 
when offered. The issue in both 
the cases before the courts of Ohio 
and Pennsylvania thus came down 
to the question of whether the claim- 
ant in each case had refused to ac- 
cept suitable employment in refus- 
ing to accept employment on a non- 
union job, which would have caused 
a loss of union membership. 

While each state has its own So- 
cial Security Laws, and each can 
establish its own definitions for 
"suitable employment," the states 
are required to conform to certain 
standards which have been estab- 
lished by the Federal Government. 
One of the standards which has been 
established by the Federal Govern- 
ment that must apply in the Social 
Security Laws of every state is that 
no state can refuse unemployment 
compensation to an employee "if as 
a condition of being employed the 
individual would be required to join 
a company union or to resign from 



or refrain from joining any bona 
fide labor organization." 

In complying with this require- 
ment of the Federal Government, 
the Social Security Law of each 
state contains language similar to 
that in the federal law ; however, the 
states vary in their interpretation of 
this language. 

Obviously, the purpose of the 
language is to protect the union 
membership of unemployed work- 
men and not to deny unemployment 
compensation benefits to workmen 
if they refuse to accept employment 
which would cause the loss of union 
membership. 

A sharp division, however, exists 
in the various states as to whether 
or not this language protects an un- 
employed workman in his union 
membership from every source from 
which his membership might be 
jeopardized, or whether the lan- 
guage was intended only to protect 
the workmen's union membership 
against acts of prospective employ- 
ers. 



THE CARPENTER 



This sharp division of opinion is 
nowhere better illustrated than in 
the comparison of the decisions of 
the courts of Ohio and Pennsyl- 
vania on this question. And a com- 
parison of these two decisions also 
illustrates that the narrow, restric- 
tive interpretation of this language 
which protects the union member- 
ship of the workmen only from acts 
of the employer can be supported 
only by resorting - to specious and 
misleading reasoning. 

The Supreme Court of Ohio in 
the case of Chambers vs. Owens- 
Ames-Kimball Company held that 
an unemployed workman is pro- 
tected by this language of the Act 
from the loss of union membership 
only from acts of his prospective 
employer and not from loss of em- 
ployment that might result from a 
disregard of union rules and regula- 
tions. The Supreme Court of Ohio 
held: 

"Tn our opinion, the legislature 

did not intend to delegate to la- 
bor unions, through the medium 
,of their rules and regulations, 
the power and authority to deter- 
mine that a member should not 
accept a referral to work and 
thereby qualify such member for 
unemployment compensation to 
which he would otherwise not be 
entitled because of the refusal of 
such a referral. . . . 

"Furthermore, the interpreta- 
tion of appellee would make the 
operative effect of a refusal to 
work depend entirely upon the 
whim or caprice of an organiza- 
tion to which the applicant for 
unemployment compensation 
might belong. It is within the 
range of possibility that a labor 
organization might adopt a rule 
that no member could work where 



Negroes are employed or where 
employment calls for more hours 
than four hours as a day's" work 
or where the place of business of 
an employer is more than a mile 
from the residence of the unem- 
ployed member or where an em- 
ployer fails to maintain certain 
facilities relating to the condi- 
tions of employment, even though 
not required by law so to do. or 
where an employer does not pay 
a wage equal to the union wage 
for the same kind of work. 

''Under such an interpretation, 
the right of the applicant for un- 
employment compensation would 
not be fixed or determined by the 
provisions of the statute but by 
rules adopted by organizations in 
which the applicant has member- 
ship. Such interpretation of the 
statute, and as a consequence its 
administration in conformity to 
such interpretations, is clearly un- 
tenable." 

On the other hand the Pennsyl- 
vania court followed realistic reas- 
oning and held: 

"The case comes to this: The 
claimant was obliged to decide be- 
tween the referred employment 
and the loss of his union member- 
ship. Is an employed workman 
obliged to accept suitable employ- 
ment when its acceptance sub- 
jects him to the loss of member- 
ship in an organization which is 
sanctioned and encouraged by the 
law, and thereby sacrifice valu- 
able property rights? Is an em- 
ployee who refuses referred suit- 
able work in such circumstances 
'without good cause'? 
* * * 

"Before the General Assembly 
definitely declared the policy of 
the State, the Supreme Court held 



THE CARPENTER 



that membership in unions con- 
stitutes property. The bundle of 
rights which membership in a 
union confers upon its members 
— -among them, the privilege of 
engaging in collective bargaining, 
the interest in sick and death 
benefits, and the opportunity to 
obtain and retain work within the 
member's trade at union rates — 
is property, so valuable and so 
thoroughly established in law that 
equity will restrain its impair- 
ment. . . . The member, however, 
holds title to this property upon 
the express condition that he com- 
ply with ' the duties and obliga- 
tions imposed upon him by the 
constitution, by-laws and the 
properly adopted rules of the 
union, and he loses it by his fail- 
ure to meet the conditions of 
membership. Equity will not in- 
tervene to save for him the prop- 
erty he has forfeited by his fail- 
ure to comply with them. . . . 
The loss of union status and its 
attendant consequences is a sub- 
stantial and an irreparable harm, 
so declared by our Supreme Court 
apart from, and before the enact- 
ment of, the Unemployment Com- 
pensation Law. 

* * * 

"We have 'the pressure of real 
not imaginary,substantial not tri- 
fling, reasonable not whimsical, 
circumstances,' and these com- 
pelled claimant's decision to re- 
fuse the referred employment. 
The threat of expulsion was real 
not imaginary: It was contained 
in the by-laws ; it was communi- 
cated by a reasonable union of- 
ficial to the claimant ; and other 
members had been suspended or 
expelled for the same cause. It 
was substantial not trifling: loss 
of membership in the union would 



deprive claimant of valuable prop- 
erty rights, the accumulated death 
benefits, and the opportunity to 
obtain and retain work at union 
rates." 

It is not difficult in comparing the 
two decisions to see the inherent 
weakness and fallacy of the reason- 
ing of the Ohio court. The decision 
of the Ohio court is predicated en- 
tirely on conjecture as to possible 
unreasonable rules and regulations 
that a union might adopt. However, 
in that case no question was involved 
of an unreasonable rule or regula- 
tion of the union. 

The entire labor movement would 
do well to interest itself intensely 
in this problem which has arisen 
and which is now, with more fre- 
quency, arising under the Social Se- 
curity Laws, for if the decision of 
the Supreme Court of Ohio is to 
become the prevailing law of the 
land, workmen and labor unions 
both will have suffered greatly. 
Union workmen will be given the 
choice of relinquishing their unem- 
ployment compensation or their 
union membership. We do not be- 
lieve that Congress ever intended 
to present to workmen such a choice 
but that Congress intended to pro- 
tect the union membership of work- 
men from being placed in jeopardy 
regardless of the source of the jeop- 
ardy so long as the jeopardy was 
not based on facetious or unreason- 
able rules and regulations of the 
union. 

The interpretation of the Social 
Security Laws must be closely 
watched if they are to fulfill their 
purposes, and in cases where the 
courts prevent the basic intent of 
the law, amendments must be sought 
in the legislative bodies. — Painter 
and Decorator. 




SIP 



NO FOOLING ABOUT IT 

As this is being written, the new Con- 
gress is only a few weeks old. Never- 
theless, some Congressmen — most of 
them elected to office on an avowed 
platform of sympathy for labor — are 
falling all over themselves introducing 
anti-labor bills. One and all, these pre- 
election "friends of labor" are trying 
to sell the idea they are doing what 
they are doing "for the good of labor 
itself." 

From where we sit, they sort of re- 
mind us of the timber owner who sent 
out to camp a crew of fifty loggers and 
three women cooks. When the gang 
left, the timber owner told the woods' 
boss to keep his reports short and in- 
clude nothing but essential figures. 

The next week he received the fol- 
lowing note: 

"Four per cent of the men has mar- 
ried sixty-six and two thirds per cent 
of the women." 

And that is about the way it is with 
these Congressmen. No matter how 
they try to disguise it with malarkey, 
tbeir aim is to cripple labor one hun- 
dred per cent. 




She 7nakcs the dumbest grades . . . hut 
even the faculty voted her the "Most 
likely to succeed." 



THEY KNEW AT THE TIME 

When Congress first convened, a sen- 
ator from a southern state was denied 
his seat temporarily after an investi- 
gating committee discovered during a 
hearing that he had received large sums 
of money as good-will contributions 
from successful war contractors. Dur- 
ing the hearing many witnesses testi- 
fied and it was surprising how many of 
them "forgot" where they got certain 
huge sums of money and how they dis- 
posed of them. Fifteen and twenty-five 
thousand dollar items slipped their 
minds completely in just a couple of 
years. 

The whole thing sort of brings to 
mind the Tennessee rookie who was sent 
to a northern camp. This lad hailed 
from Stump Hollow, Tenn. After being 
in camp for some weeks he applied for 
a furlough and carfare home, so he 
could visit his folks. Day after day 
went by without his hearing anything 
from his application. Finally he went 
to see the commanding officer to find 
out what was wrong. 

"The reason we haven't acted on your 
request," explained the officer, "is that 
nobody knows where that town of yours 
is. Nobody ever heard of it before." 

The rookie thought a moment. Final- 
ly he said: "That's kind of funny, Sir; 
they sure knew where it was when they 
drafted me." 

• • • 

THE GREATEST NEED 

One thing there is no shortage of 
these days is economic theories. There 
are a zillion economists in the country 
and they each have a special formula 
for bringing back normalcy and staving 
off another depression. Last month one 
of them released an especially involved 
report. From what we could gather, 
the gist of his idea is that currency 
should be made more elastic. 

Whether this is good or bad eco- 
nomics we are hardly able to say; but 
how about making it a little more ad- 
hesive at the same time? 



THE CARPENTER 



WE BETTER WORK FAST 

Right now the United Nations Or- 
ganization is burning the midnight oil 
trying to decide what to do with the 
atom bomb. The plan put forth by 
Bernard Baruch is being kicked around 
and batted back and forth. About all 
we can say is they better work out some 
kind of a plan and work it out fast, 
because right now we are in a position 
about like the fellow who went to see 
the doctor. 

"But doctor," he said, "if I take all 
this castor oil tonight, will I be well 
enough to get up in the morning?" 

To which the doctor replied: 

"All I can say, Brother, is you better 
be." 

• • • 

A LITTLE EMBARRASSING 

All during the last years of the war 
there were ugly rumors floating about 
that some really juicy scandals were de- 
veloping in the ship building industry. 
Recently the House Merchant Marine 
Committee made an investigation and 
released a report. This report showed 
some firms making profits of 4,000 and 
5,000 per cent on their investment. We 
would not be surprised if some people 
had some tall explaining to do, although 
the situation may be something like that 
of the drunk and the policeman. 

The policeman found the drunk wan- 
dering around the streets in the wee 
small hours in the morning. 

"What explanation do you have for 
wandering around at this hour of the 
night?" the officer of the law demanded. 

"Brother," replied the tippler, "if I 
had an explanation I would have gone 
home a couple of hours ago." 



NO JUSTICE IN IT 

Two old maids were sitting in their 
apartment. One of them was reading 
the newspaper. Suddenly she said: 
"Listen to this, Abigail. A woman in 
Denver has just cremated her third hus- 
band." 

"Isn't that the irony of fate," replied 
the other. "Here some of us can't even 
get one and other women have hus- 
bands to burn." 

• * • 

To know is not to be wise; many men 
know a great deal and are all the great- 
er fools for it. — Spurgeon. 



BREAK THE NEWS TO THEM 

Well, at long last the war is over. 
President Truman said so. We sure 
hope that the news finds its way to 
Greece and China and Palestine soon, 
where the Greeks and Chinese and 
Arabs and Jews are still acting like the 
rest of us acted between December 7, 
19 41, and August 14, 19 45. 

* * • 

THAT IS PROGRESS 

In the Spring of this year the na- 
tion will set into motion the greatest 
road building program of all time. A 
large number of super-highways will be 
started to link together many of the 
more populous areas of the east and 
middle west. 

The old cow trails where two cars 
could hardly pass without colliding are 
giving way to ten and twelve lane 
speedways where eight and ten cars can 
collide at one time. 

• • • 

THE SAD PART OP IT 

Jay Gould, the old railroad magnate, 
was once traveling on one of his lines. 
The train stopped at a small town for 
lunch and Mr. Gould entered one of the 
town's two restaurants. He ordered 
three boiled eggs. When the bill came, 
it totaled $1.75. 

"My, my," commented Gould, "eggs 
must be mighty scarce around here." 

"Oh, no," replied the restaurant own- 
er, "eggs are plentiful enough; it's the 
Jay Goulds that are scarce." 




^^'ell, ice don't hare much fun . . . hut 
ice make lots of money! 



10 



111 a unique venture Henry Kaiser builds houses 
that are half prefab and half built on the job 



Kaiser Tackles Housing 



A UNIQUE SYSTEM of house-building is being practiced in Los 
Angeles by Kaiser Community Homes, ambitious Henry J. Kaiser's 
company organized for the volume production of housing. About 

half the house is made in a sub-assembly factory and the rest built in 
the field. 

This combination of the advantages of factory methods with the archi- 
tectural variations possible through finishing a house on the building site 
has never before been tried on any substantial scale. It necessitates operat- 
ing a plant that is one of the largest woodworking establishments in the 
United States. For the Kaiser house is constructed essentially of ply- 
wood, that durable material which has been found to be stronger, weight 
for weight, than any known structural substance, not excluding steel. 

This bold stride down a new path 
toward providing thousands of 
average families with better hous- 
ing at lower cost would not have 
been possible without the foresight 
and cooperation of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters. By far 
the majority of the more than 500 
plant employees at Kaiser Com- 
munity Homes are members of that 
union, the remainder being under 
the A. F. of L. Painters' Union. 

Carpenters' Union officials in Los 
Angeles realized that if the new 
Kaiser approach to residential 
building were successful, it would 
mean continuing volume output 
serving a great mass market. These 
forward-looking leaders, concerned 
first of all with steady work at good 
pay for their men but also with the 
country's vast need of good low- 
cost housing, saw bright hope in the 
Kaiser program. 

Today, largely as result of their 
willingness to join in this unprece- 
dented venture, Kaiser Communitv 



Homes has become the largest 
house-building enterprise in the 
United States and is doing more 
than any other organization to sup- 
ply completed houses to veterans in 
great numbers. The Los Angeles 
plant now is turning out basic parts 
for 15 houses a day and soon will be 
producing 20 houses daily. More 
than 300 houses are finished in the 
field and another 900 are under way. 
V\ "hereas ten months is not an un- 
common building period in most 
parts of the country. Kaiser Com- 
munity Homes is completing homes 
in about 45 days. 

In the plant this has meant steady 
work at good wages, the union's 
prime objective. The average annual 
earnings of factory employes is 
comparable to the earnings of build- 
ing tradesmen in Pacific Coast areas. 
This demonstrates that volume fac- 
tory techniques in housing do not 
mean lowered wages. 

The Kaiser plant methods'are es- 
sentially simple. The factory prod- 




A general view of the assembly lines in the Kaiser operation where wall panels and floor 
panels are put together with engineering precision. Notice the large panels of plywood flank- 
ing the- assembly lines. Kaiser-built houses rely greatly on plywood for stability and strength. 




In the foreground is a combination built-in dressing table and clothes closet made into 
one unit. This unit serves as a partition between two bedrooms and offers each bedroom an 
identical dressing table and closet. In the middle background is a complete built-in kitchen 
cabinet. Both are on their way to the painting booth where the priming coat is applied. 



12 



THE CARPEXIER 



ucts are such basic sub-assemblies as 
wall panels, both exterior and in- 
terior; ceiling" and floor panels; 
kitchen cabinets ; huge storage wall 
closets that constitute room walls ; 
and accessories like garage doors. 
shutters, moldings, trellises, and 
service porch exterior panels. 

The remainder of the house is 
erected in the field. Thus the ex- 
terior surfacing of stucco mesh and 
stucco is applied there. Also built 
on the site are the roof framing, the 
entire garage except the doors, the 
porches, and various kinds of exte- 
rior trim. Only recently, plywood 
roof sheathing operations .were 
transferred from field to plant. 

The sub-assembly functions of the 
plant are divided into two main 
categories. Four bays of the factory 
are devoted to cabinet work on the 
kitchen unit and the storage wall 
closets. The remaining area is given 
over to several assembly lines where 
the various types of panels are fab- 
ricated. 

The cabinet shop operation 
utilizes pre-cut materials which are 
gradually built into small sub-as- 
semblies and finally, on large as- 
sembly tables, into the final product. 
Doors, drawers, shelves, cabinet 
back sections and other parts are 
machined and fitted, and move 
smoothly to the point where they 
are put together in the big floor-to- 
ceiling units. 

The completed cabinets travel in 
an assembly line into paint spray 
booths where they receive a prime 
coat before shipment to the field 
along with other essential house 
parts. 

To facilitate operations on the 
long assembly lines where wall sec- 
tions are fabricated, certain repeti- 



tive tasks are performed on nearby 
sub-assembly tables. Portions of 
two-by-four framing destined for 
panels may be similar, for example. 
in several distinct panel types. This 
job can therefore be done econom- 
ically on a sub-assembly basis. 

At the head of a wall panel as- 
sembly line, the framing is laid 

down, including any sections that 
may have been fabricated at an 
earlier stage. Here the entire room- 
width panel frame is securely 
nailed. When that operation is fin- 
ished, a conveyor chain sunk in the 
work bench-assembly line lifts the 
frame and carries it to the next 
station. 

The second job is applying" syn- 
thetic resin, a high-grade plastic 
glue, to the framing in preparation 
for the addition of the plywood 
sheeting. Long glue guns are used 
to spread the glue over framing sur- 
faces. Then the plywood panel is 
laid onto, the framing, and nailed or 
stapled tight at all points. The nail- 
ing and stapling has no structural 
purpose. It merely creates a firm 
bond while the glue is setting. 

W "hen the glue hardens it has be- 
come a plastic similar to Bakelite. 
The resulting bond between frame 
and panel produces what aircraft 
manufacturers call ""stressed cover- 
ing.'"'' Part of the stress and strain 
to be borne by the finished panel is 
transferred from the frame to the 
very surface of the plywood. This 
type of construction was common 
in Britain's Mosquito bombers and 
also is found in Howard Hughes' 
huge experimental plane now being 
finished at Long Beach. California. 
The entire panel thus constructed 
is nine times stronger than a similar 
panel would be if it were merely 
nailed. 



13 



Review of past AFVi reports disclose striking 
similarity between conditions now and in 1920 



The Same Sad Story 

• • 

WILL HISTORY repeat itself? One of the commonest subjects 
of discussion these days is : Will there be a depression, recession 
or shakedown as it is now called, after this war, such as took place 
soon after World War I ? It used to be called a panic or a crisis. Then it 
was a depression. Subsequently it was styled a recession. Now it is being 
called a shakedown or shakeout. Whatever it is called, workers recog- 
nize it as a period of unemployment and hardship. 

The subject of a possible depression after this war will be considered 
in this article, but before doing so, it is necessary to mention a number of 
matters which arise in one's mind 



when the question of whether his- 
tory will repeat itself is presented. 
To one who recalls the period after 
World War I, the following signifi- 
cant labor aspects of the years 1919- 
1922, occur : 

(1) The High Cost of Living; 

(2) The Coal Strike and the In- 
junction issue; 

(3) The Steel and Other Strikes ; 

(4) The Open Shop Campaign; 

(5) The Legislative Attacks on 
Trade Unions ; 

(6) The Communist Invasion of 
the Trade Unions ; 

(7) The Unemployment of Mil- 
lions in 1921-1922. 

In order to attempt an answer to 
the question of whether history will 
repeat itself, we must first briefly 
record the main labor and economic 
events of the period after World 
War I. As these events are unfold- 
ed reference will be made to the 
current scene, so one can determine 
for oneself whether history is re- 
peating itself. 

The reports of the Executive 
Council to conventions of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor for the 
years 1919, 1920, 1921 and 1922 con- 



tain interesting data on the seven 
subjects already enumerated. 

The High Cost of Living 
The 1920 convention of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor was held 
in Montreal, Canada, June 7-19. 
These dates are important, because 
the report of the Executive Council 
was necessarily prepared a month or 
more before the convention was 
held. The armistice ending World 
War I occurred on November 11, 
1918. By the Spring of 1920, that is, 
about 16 months after the Armistice, 
the rising cost of living became a 
burning question for the people of 
the land. Here it is today, about 16 
months after V-J .Day, and once 
again the high cost of living is 
arousing greater and greater con- 
cern among the people of the coun- 
try. Is history repeating itself? 

Here is what the Executive Coun- 
cil said, in part, in its report to the 
June 1920 convention of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor : 

"No single problem has had a 
greater bearing upon the welfare of 
the American wage-earners in their 
daily lives during the year just clos- 
ing, than the cost of living. Recent 

(Continued on Page 19) 



ALTHOUGH contributions have fall- 
en off considerably from the fine 
pace set shortly after the an- 
nouncement of the special fund for re- 
habilitating the library at the Lake- 
land Home, nevertheless some 13 3 
Councils, Auxiliaries and Local Unions 
have sent in donations during the past 
month. A total of $1,909.18 was re- 
ceived by the General Office for the Li- 
brary Fund between December 15 and 
January 21. Added to the $4,684.55 
accounted for in last month's issue, 
the total in the fund as of January 21 
stood at $6,593.73. 

The sole purpose of the Library Fund 
is to rehabilitate the library at the 
Home. Normal wear and tear have 
taken their toll, and many books now 
in the library soon will have to be re- 
placed. Many new ones will have to be 
purchased to keep the library up to date. 
Magazines and periodicals will also have 
to be added to the available reading 
material if the aged members residing 
at the Home are to derive the utmost 
benefit from the library. 

Of all the facilities provided for the 



guests of the Home, the library is en- 
joyed most and used oftenest. The 
old timers seem to find more relaxa- 
tion, entertainment and enlightenment 
in the library than in any other one 
thing. The Library Fund was started 
at the suggestion of the Home and Pen- 
sion Committee, whose report to the 
Twenty-fifth General Convention on the 
matter was adopted by unanimous ac- 
tion. It is the aim of the fund to put 
the library into first class condition and 
keep it there. 

Reading material has advanced in 
price considerably during the past few 
years. Book prices are fifty to a hun- 
dred per cent higher than they were 
and magazines and periodicals have 
practically all doubled their subscrip- 
tion prices. As a result the Home Li- 
brary has faced additional difficulties. 

Donations to the fund should be 
clearly designated as such by writing 
"Library Fund" on the check or accom- 
panying letter so that bookkeeping dif- 
ficulties may be avoided. Donations to 
the fund from December 15 to January 
21 were as follows: 



L. U. City and State Amt. 

1657 New York, N. Y 5 00 

2884 Jonesboro, Ark. 10 00 

1778 Columbia, S. C 23 68 

3038 Bonner, Mont. 5 00 

1404 Flora, 111. 5 00 

1337 Tuscaloosa, Ala. 25 00 

1093 Glen Cove, N. Y 10 00 

824 Muskegon, Mich. 5 00 

187 Geneva, N. Y 50 00 

1991 Bedford, Ohio 10 00 

964 Rockland Co., N. Y 25 00 

1590 Washington, D. C._ 25 00 

893 Grand Haven, Mich 10 00 

705 Lorain, Ohio 5 00 

1652 Portsmouth, N. H 5 00 

9 Buffalo, N. Y 25 00 

2281 Atlanta, Ga. 10 00 

1526 Denton, Tex. 10 00 

1464 Mankato, Minn. 10 00 

393 Camden, N. J. 25 00 

278 Watertown, N. Y 10 00 

2212 Newark, N. J 5 00 



L. U. City and State Amt. 

1618 Sacramento, Cal. 10 00 

2205 Wena tehee, Wash. 1000 

1567 Martins Ferry, Ohio 5 00 

1649 Richmond Hill, N. Y.__ 25 00 

1597 Bremerton, Wash. 10 00 

2190 Harlingen, Tex. 25 00 

1795 Farmington, Mo. 10 00 

12 Syracuse, N. Y 50 00 

1829 Ravenna, Ohio 10 00 

2194 Philadelphia, Pa. 5 00 

1689 Tacoma, Wash. 10 00 

25 Los Angeles, Cal 10 00 

957 Stillwater, Minn. 5 00 

1584 St. Anne de Bellevue, 

Que., Can. 50 00 

455 Somerville, N. J 10 00 

1552 Salamanca, N. Y 25 00 

1005 New Milford, Conn 5 00 

79 New Haven, Conn 10 00 

552 Atlanta, Ga. 25 00 

562 Everett, Wash. 10 00 

1934 Bemidji, Minn. 5 00 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



L. U. City and State 

350 New Rochelle, N. Y 

128Q Mountain View, Cal 

1142 Lawrenceburg, Ind. 

22 San Francisco, Cal. 1 

1770 Cape Girardeau, Mo 

1551 Three Rivers, Mich 

581 Herrin, 111. 

2763 McNary, Ariz. 

878 Beverly, Mass. 

2791 Sweet Home, Ore 

2199 Raton, N. M 

359 Philadelphia, Pa. 

204 Merrill, Wis. 

465 Ardmore, Pa. _ 

3173 Muskegon, Mich. 

121 Bridgeton, N. J 

472 Ashland, Ky. 

1856 Philadelphia, Pa. 

541 Washington, Pa. 

1220 Granville, N. Y 

3034 Salinas, Cal. 

177 Springfield, Mass. 

1846 New Orleans, La 

1436 Bangor, Pa. 

2393 Orlando, Fla. 

306 Newark, N. J 

510 Du Quoin, 111 

1439 McAdoo, Pa. 

8 Philadelphia, Pa. 

1211 Glasgow, Mont. 

1739 Kirkwood, Mo. 

982 Detroit, Mich. 

2280 Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

1150 Camden, N. Y 

603 Ithaca, N. Y 

1399 Okmulgee, Okla. 

231 Rochester, N. Y 

1144 Denver, Mass. 

1292 Huntington, N. Y 

1397 Port Washington, N. Y._ 

56 Boston, Mass. 

1118 Jacksonville, Fla. 

2009 Eugene, Ore. 

18 Hamilton, Ont., Can 

412 Sayville, N. Y 

1116 Twin Falls, Ida 

1768 Newark, N. J 

959 Boynton Beach, Fla 

1485 La Porte, Ind 

2517 Sweet Home, Ore 

1345 Buffalo, N. Y 

1441 Canonsburg, Pa. 

685 Chicopee, Mass. 



Amt. L. U. City and State 



Amt. 



5 00 
5 00 

25 00 

00 00 

10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

25 00 

10 00 

10 00 

10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

25 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 
50 00 
20 00 

26 00 
5 00 

25 00 
5 00 
10 00 
10 00 
20 00 
10 00 
10 00 

5 00 
10 00 
25 00 
50 00 
10 00 
10 00 
25 00 

6 00 
10 00 
10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

25 00 

5 00 

5 00 

25 00 

5 00 

10 00 

10 00 

5 00 

25 00 

10 00 

10 00 

25 00 

10 00 



842 

1137 

835 

339 

1038 



Pleasantville, N. J.. 

Jackson, Miss. 

Seneca Falls, N. Y._ 
Emporia, Kansas _. 
Ellenville, N. Y 



COUNCILS 

Cuyahoga Co. D. C, Cleveland, 
Ohio 

Jacksonville, Fla. & Vic, Jack- 
sonville, Fla. 

West Palm Beach D. C, West 
Palm Beach, Fla 

Detroit D. C, Detroit, Mich 

Morris, Somerset and Vic. D. O, 
Bernardsville, N. J 

North Shore D. C, Salem, Mass. 

Fox River Valley, D. C, 

Green Bay, Wis. 

Tacoma D. C, Tacoma, Wash._ 

Metropolitan D. C, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 



5 00 


30 





5 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


100 


00 


25 00 


25 


00 


15 


00 


10 


00 


25 00 


10 


00 


50 00 



AUXILIARIES 

Aux. 2 8 3, Bremerton, Wash. 
Aux. 417, Ponca City, Okla._ 

Aux 2, Toledo, Ohio 

Aux. 244, San Jose, Cal 

Aux. 421, Medford, Ore 

Aux. 23, St. Louis, Mo 

Aux. 202, Bozeman, Mont 

Aux. 400, West Hollywood, 

Cal. 

Aux. 307, Sioux City, la. 

Aux. 282, Reedsport, Ore 

Aux. 207, Spokane, Wash 

Aux. 13 5, Union City, N. J. 
Aux. 440, Columbia Falls, 

Mont. 

Aux. 450, El Cajon, Cal 

Aux. 432, Borger, Tex 

Aux. 352, Eau Claire, Wis. 

Aux. 366, Elgin, 111 

Aux. 222, Butte, Mont 

Aux. 287, Salem, Ore 

Aux. 258, Bloomington, Ind. 

Aux. 280, Rockford, 111 

Aux. 407, Glendale, Ariz 

Aux. 292, Vancouver, Wash._ 
Aux. 29 7, Jacksonville, Fla._ 
Aux. 241, Sedro-Woolley, 

Wash. 



25 00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
10 00 
2 00 

5 00 

1 00 
15 00 
10 00 

5 00 

2 50 
5 00 

3 00 
5 00 

10 00 
5 00 
5 00 
3 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 

5 00 



Total $1,909 IS 



RECAPITULATION 

Donations previously accounted for $4,6S4 55 

Donations received from December 15 to January 21 1,909 18 



Total available money in Fund as of January 21 $6,593 73 



Editorial 




Distortion Can Lead to Fetters 

It is no fun to pan the newspapers. By and large American newspa- 
pers are the best in the world. In almost all things but labor news their 
reporting is straightforward, factual, reliable and pretty much fearless. 
They give their readers more features and more information than any 
other newspapers in the universe. Only when it comes to reporting labor 
news do they fall down badly. For the past decade they have seemed bent 
on whipping up a sort of mass hysteria against labor. By inuendo at least, 
they have intimated that organized labor is driving the nation to the brink 
of absolute ruin. Inevitably they have made it appear that labor is at the 
bottom of all our economic ills. 

Remember the headlines of a few months ago when the coal mines 
were tied up by the strike? In case you may have forgotten them, let us 
give you a few examples: "Coal Crisis Perils Nation," "Trains Cut 50%; 
Nation Faces Starvation," "Steel Production Rolling to Stop," "Coal 
Strike Threatens Economic Collapse." The way the papers told it, the 
nation was on the brink of absolute ruin. Starvation, anarchy, joblessness 
and complete paralysis were just around the corner if the strike con- 
tinued even a couple of days more. 

Well, you can hardly blame the people if they assumed at the time 
that that was the true situation. The papers were unanimous in their 
predictions of doom. But what was the true situation? It seems it was 
considerably less dire than the newspapers would have us believe, to 
say the least. In fact, if Saward's Journal, a coal industry paper that 
labels itself as the "Weekly Coal Trade Newspaper," can be relied on, 
just prior to the strike the point was being reached where mine closures 
were imminent because of excessive stock piles of coal. Reportedly the 
Journal in its December 21, 1946, issue had this to say: 

"Many in the trade believed that production was too large and that 
supplies were accumulating at too fast a rate. This view is reported to 
have been shared by John Lewis, and the belief is rather widely held that 
one reason prompting him to call the strike was to see the huge above- 
ground accumulation of coal reduced before it began to affect the demand 
and force mines and miners into idleness because of lack of market. Mr. 
Lewis is a close student of trade conditions, and he knows that a weak 
coal market is a threat to wage stability, so there may be something to the 
theory that he wanted to see less coal above ground." 

The next week's issue of the same journal was even more worried about 
overproduction, as the following item indicates: 

"The mines have the manpower to produce as much coal as in either of 
the two preceding years, but how the market would absorb it is a question 
that nobody can answer with any certainty. . . . Because stockpiles in 



THE CARPENTER 17 

general were not greatly depleted at the end of the recent shutdown, the 
buying since then has not been of an urgent character. For that reason, 
as much coal is available as the piers can handle." 

• There you have the story. While the newspapers were vying with 
each other thinking up scare headlines about the cataclysm the coal strike 
was supposed to bring on, the coal industry itself was wondering what 
to do with its surplus. If that is fair, impartial or even factual reporting, 
we do not know what the words mean. 

We are not trying to imply that the coal strike was not a serious mat- 
ter. It was — especially to the half million miners involved who have long 
been waging a losing battle to keep earnings somewhere within shouting 
distance of prices. But the way the papers seized upon it and used it as 
a weapon for whipping up mass hysteria against labor makes an honest 
individual a little bit sick to the stomach. 

One of the pillars of our way of life is a free press. Anything that 
jeopardizes the freedom of the press threatens the perpetuation of our 
democratic government. To our way of thinking, nothing can lead more 
surely to a fettered press than continued distortion. Distortion undermines 
confidence. And once confidence is lost, neither the press nor any other 
institution can long remain free. Nobody should know that better than 
our newspapers. 



The Only Real Solution 

According to recently released statistics by the Department of Labor, 
there was a total of 4,700 strikes during the year 1946 involving some- 
thing like 113 million man-days of lost time. The total time lost due 
directly to strikes represented about one and one-half per cent of the 
total days worked by American workers in that period. 

' While one and one-half per cent is not a very high figure considering 
everything, there is no use denying the fact that strikes were a serious 
problem during the past year. Every man-day lost complicated the recon- 
version problem and placed another obstacle in the pathway to normalcy. 
However, in view of the aggravations, frustrations and inequities that 
piled up during the last months of the war and the first days of peace it is 
a wonder that the strike situation did not become much more serious. That 
it did not is a tribute to the good judgment and common sense of the 
average American worker. 

Right now special interests with axes of their own to grind are whip- 
ping up a frenzy against strikes and organized labor. The hue and cry 
for anti-labor legislation is echoing through the halls of Congress. A 
thousand "experts" are advocating a thousand different panaceas for in- 
dustrial peace. Attacks are coming on the closed shop, industry-wide 
negotiating, the right to strike, and just about every other prerogative 
labor still retains. And the sad part of it all is that to anyone really famil- 
iar with labor and the industrial picture the panaceas and cures being 
advocated almost all border on the verge of downright silliness. 

There is only one real solution to the current strike problem. One has 
but to look at the statistics compiled by the Department of Labor to find 



18 THE CARPENTER 

it. Last month the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the Department of Labor 
showed very simply what has been happening in American industry. From 
April, 1945, to October, 1946, consumer prices climbed sixteen and eight 
tenths per cent. During the same time average weekly earnings declined 
only two and seven-tenths per cent, but the purchasing power of weekly 
earnings decreased by sixteen and seven-eighths per cent. In other words, 
during the eighteen month period, prices climbed better than sixteen per 
cent and at the same time the purchasing power of weekly earnings de- 
creased by more than sixteen per cent. 

Now the real way to stop strikes is simple. Let the employers raise 
wages enough to wipe out the decrease in purchasing power of weekly 
earnings and at the same time let them lower prices enough to bring them 
down to a par with what they were in April, 1945, and the strike situation 
will be automatically solved. Workers like strikes less than any other 
one class. They strike only when necessity compels them to. Remove the 
necessity for striking and you automatically reduce strikes to an irre- 
ducible minimum. 

Labor peace cannot be brought about simply by passing laws any more 
than weather can be regulated by legislation. In order that peace and 
harmony can prevail in industry, workers must be convinced that they 
are getting a fair break — and that holds true whether they are organized 
or not. They do not object to the employer making a fair profit. They 
do not quarrel with the right of the employer to make a reasonable return 
on his investment. All they ask is the right to make a reasonable return 
on their investment of sweat and skill — a return that is embodied in an 
American standard of living. 

The people who hope to bring about industrial peace by legislation are 
doomed to bitter disappointment. If employers will raise wages as much 
as possible and cut prices as much as possible, maintaining for themselves 
a reasonable profit, the strike situation will really be settled. Outside of 
that there is no honest solution. 



A Problem of National Importance 

Congressman Everett M. Dirksen of Illinois last month brought to 
the attention of Congress a problem that should have shocked the nation. 
Every newspaper in the nation should have given it the same sort of ban- 
ner headline treatment labor news has been getting lately. However, if 
Dirksen's remarks rated any space at all in the average newspaper they 
got a little squib on page thirty-seven among the want ads and pile "cures." 

What Dirksen grew irate about was the shocking record of unfitness 
among our younger male population as shown by Selective Service sta- 
tistics. He pointed out that of seventeen million young Americans called 
up for military service during the war years, more than five million were 
rejected for reasons of physical or mental unfitness. "Think of it," he 
exclaimed, "more than thirty of every hundred young men between the 
ages of eighteen and thirty-seven were rejected." 

In a nation as enlightened as the United States, this is a sorry record 
indeed. To be considered as such, a living wage henceforth must be suf- 
ficient to include adequate medical care. 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



The Same Sad Story — Cont. from P. 13 

figures covering- the nation as a 
whole are not available for purposes 
of comparing - increases in the cost 
of living with the increase in wages, 
but the last figures of a general na- 
ture issued by the U. S. Department 
of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statis- 
tics, showed that, while since 1913, 
the average advance in the wages of 
organized workers was 55 per cent, 
the average increase in the cost of 
living was 83.1 per cent. There is 
no reason to presume that this mar- 
gin between wages and cost of liv- 
ing has decreased since these figures 
were issued. There are on the con- 
trary, statistics to show that the 
margin has materially increased. No 
statistics are needed to convince us 
that the increase in the cost of liv- 
ing has been a serious factor in the 
lives of the great masses of our 
people, and it is certain that there 
is no justification of any kind, either 
in fact or in theory, for the bulk of 
the burden that has been thrown 
upon the people in the form of in- 
creased prices." 

The Executive Council report re- 
ferred to a section of the declara- 
tion entitled "Labor, Its Grievances, 
Protests and Demands," adopted by 
the conference of representatives of 
organized labor in Washington, De- 
cember 13, 1919, dealing with the 
cost of living. This section of the 
Council report answered the charge 
that labor was a contributing factor 
in the rising cost of living: 

"The claim that increasing wages 
make necessary increased prices is 
false. It is intended to throw upon 
the workers the blame for a process 
by which all the people have been 
made to suffer. Labor has been 
compelled to struggle desperately 
to keep wages in some measure up 
to the cost of living . . . Existing 
high and excessive prices are due to 



the present inflation of money and 
credits, to profiteering by those who 
manufacture, sell and market prod- 
ucts, and to burdens levied by mid- 
dlemen and speculators." 

Coal Strike of igig 

The coal strike of 1946 is over. 
The parallel between the very re- 
cent strike and that of 1919 is an 
extraordinarily close one. 

The report of the Executive 
Council to the 1920 convention of 
the American Federation of Labor 
comments on the 1919 coal crisis in 
these words : 

"On October 25, 1919, President 
Wilson issued a statement to the 
country wherein he demanded a re- 
call of the strike order by the Unit- 
ed Mine Workers' officials, declar- 
ing the proposed strike to be 'not 
only unjustifiable but unlawful." 
This astounding action crystallized 
tremendous public opinion in oppo- 
sition to the mine workers and the 
Department of Justice instituted in- 
junction proceedings against the 
United Mine Workers in the federal 
courts with a view of preventing the 
strike. 

"On October 31, 1919, Judge Al- 
bert B. Anderson of the Federal 
Court District in Indianapolis, upon 
petition of the government, issued 
a temporary restraining order 
against the officers of the United 
Mine Workers. This order sought 
to restrain them from performing 
any act in furtherance of the strike 
and prevented legitimate inter- 
course with their membership. On 
November 1, 1919, some 452,000 men 
ceased work in response to the 
strike order and in violation of the 
terms of the injunction. On Novem- 
ber 8, 1919, Judge Anderson, sitting 
at Indianapolis, upon prayer of the 
government issued a mandatory 
writ of injunction wherein the of- 
ficers of the organization were giv- 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



en seventy-two hours to rescind the 
strike order." 

The Executive Council of the 
American Federation of Labor 
summed up its position as follows: 

"The attention of the convention 
is called to the paramount fact that 
the action of the court at Indian- 
apolis in introducing the mandatory 
injunction into the dispute between 
the miners and the operators, leaves 
before the organized labor move- 
ment and the workers of the United 
States in general, an issue w r hich 
cannot be evaded and an issue which 
can never be settled until it is set- 
tled in such a manner as to restore 
the liberties and the freedom which 
have been destroyed. So long as it 
is possible for courts to assume the 
power and the authority assumed 
by the federal courts in Indianap- 
olis, so long will it be possible for 
judges throughout the land to sus- 
pend and nullify rights guaranteed 
in the Constitution of the United 
States, rights without which democ- 
racy is crippled and incomplete." 

The Steel and Other Strikes 

The coal strike was only one. of 
the more important strikes which 
occurred in 1919. That year broke 
all previous records for the number 
of workers involved in labor dis- 
putes. There were reported by the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics to have 
been 5,154,733 employees at least — 
the actual figures were undoubtedly 
higher — engaged in strikes and 
lockouts in that memorable year. 
There were general strikes, as in 
the city of Seattle, Washington. 
There was the stoppage of the Bos- 
ton Police. There were two strikes 
of the harbor workers in the Port 
of New York. There were a great 
many other outstanding strikes. 
But, apart from the coal strike, the 
most noteworthy labor dispute of 



the year was the steel strike. This 
strike was tied up with the failure 
of the Industrial Conference called 
by President Woodrow Wilson. 
The arrogance of Judge Gary and 
the steel barons and their determi- 
nation to destroy the union in the 
s-teel industry are worthy of retell- 
ing if- even briefly. 

The Executive Council reports to 
the 1920 convention as follows in 
this connection: 

"Almost at the outset of the con- 
ference it was recognized that col- 
lective bargaining was the first prin- 
ciple upon which agreement should 
be reached. Upon this question the 
conference spent the remaining pe- 
riod of its life and broke, up unable 
to reach an agreement. 

"The employers' delegation would 
not accept any resolution on col- 
lective bargaining unless it was so 
worded as to be anti-trade union 
in spirit and to provide encourage- 
ment and support of company 
unions. 

"Through debate in open session 
and through committee meetings 
lasting many days, employers stub- 
bornly resisted every attempt at 
conciliation and it was this posi- 
tio n of obstinacy in defense of 
vested interests that led finally to 
the dramatic disruption of the con- 
ference with the departure of the 
labor delegation from the hall." If 
the employers' representatives had 
shown a genuine and sincere will- 
ingness to accept the principle of 
collective bargaining, the Industrial 
Conference would have laid the 
basis for a new day in America. 

There have been profound 
changes in the American economic 
scene, insofar as unionism is con- 
cerned. We are being told by 
spokesmen for employers and em- 
ployer groups that the principle of 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



collective bargaining is wholeheart- 
edly accepted today. But what of 
tomorrow? Have the employers 
truly made up their minds to meet 
with labor at the bargaining table? 
Or, will history repeat itself? 

Open Shop Campaign 

This leads logically to a consid- 
eration of the vicious, and un-Amer- 
ican Open Shop Campaign which 
was launched by employer interests 
in this country shortly after the 
world was made safe for democ- 
racy. These anti-union advocates 
launched a terrific barrage of prop- 
aganda. They did not stop with 
words. They went the limit — and 
we mean the limit — to destroy by 
fair means or foul the trade union 
movement. The Executive Council's 
report to the 1922 convention of the 
American -Federation of Labor will 
bear close reading today, in view of 
the clear signs alreadv that history 
IS REPEATING ITSELF. 

"There is scarcely a trade," says 
the Executive Council report, "in 
which there has not been conducted 
an organized campaign for the es- 
tablishment of the so-called 'open 
shop.' Not only employers but big 
business and high finance through- 
out the country have contributed 
financially to this campaign and an 
enormous fund has been used in 
propaganda work. Indeed, it is an 
undisputed fact that to a large ex- 
tent the campaign was the result 
of the work of professional propa- 
gandists who make it their business 
to sell their services to the highest 
bidder without regard to the char- 
acter of the work to be done." 

Communist Invasion 

A section of the Executive Coun- 
cil's report to the 1921 convention 
of the American Federation of La- 
bor is entitled "America and the 
Soviets." It is timely and pertinent 



today, as it was 25 years ago. Space 
permits only of the mere mention 
of the sub-heads : "The Camouflaged 
Trade Agitation," "Labor in Soviet 
Russia," "The War Against De- 
mocracy," "Bolshevist Designs in 
America — the Red Labor Union In- 
ternationale," which will indicate 
that not much has changed, so far 
as the Communist invasion of our 
labor organizations is concerned. 

Unemployment in ig2i-22 

The Special Committee on Unem- 
ployment authorized by the 1921 
convention, reported that "By the 
summer of 1921 we were faced with 
an unemployment problem of un- 
precedented proportions." It re- 
ferred to the estimate of the U. S. 
Department of Labor that there 
were 5,000,000 unemployed. The 
Committee submitted a comprehen- 
sive analysis of the unemployment 
situation to the convention, together 
with a series of constructive meas- 
ures. Finally, the Special Commit- 
tee pointed out that "stabilized em- 
ployment must wait the finding of 
controls to eliminate business crises, 
boom expansions and depressions." 

This final conclusion naturally 
raises the question concerning a pos- 
sible depression after this war, as 
occurred after World War I. 

The depressions of 1921-22 and 
1929-33 were primarily caused by 
the disparity between profits and 
the purchasing power of our peo- 
ple. We are now facing a critical 
time in the American economy. 

The representatives of business 
have it in their hands largely to de- 
termine whether the history of the 
next ten years will repeat that of 
the decade of 1919-29. Will they 
once again try to beat down the 
organizations of labor, which are 
the only instruments of the work- 
ers to maintain and increase the 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



purchasing power of the people? 
Will they seek to amass ever higher 
profits, and indulge in an orgy of 
speculation and wild-cat financing, 
as they did in the 1920's? Will they 
improve and intensify the methods 
of production, turning out more and 
more goods, while at the same time 
trying to hammer down wages and 
throw increasing numbers of work- 
ers on the scrap heap? 

Will the legislators in state and 
federal bodies repeat the history of 
the ten years of 1919-29 also? Will 
they turn a deaf ear to the demands 
of the vast majority of our people 
and listen very attentively to the 
representatives of special privilege? 
Will these legislators try to under- 
mine all existing labor legislation 
and by so doing, cripple the labor 



organizations? Will they try to 
hamstring the trade unions from ef- 
fective functioning, and prevent the 
workers from securing the neces- 
sary purchasing power to keep the 
whole economy going? 

American labor must point out 
to business and government the 
dangers to the entire free enterprise 
system inherent in such short- 
sighted policies. The workers have 
the most to lose and they must 
fight in the most determined man- 
ner to preserve and improve their 
organizations. They must, at the 
same time, give warning that any 
effort to revert to the methods of 
1919-29, mean disaster to our free 
economy and our free democratic 
institutions. — Metal Trades Bulle- 
tin. 



Rail Maintenance Union Head Dies 

Elmer E. Milliman, President of the Brotherhood-of Maintenance of 
Way Employes, died in a Detroit, Michigan, hospital December 31, fol- 
lowing an operation. 

A native of Mount Morris, N. Y., he was 56 years old. 

Brother Milliman was an executive in his organization for more than 24 
years and, at the time of his death, was serving his third term as President. 
During his career as a labor leader, he was an active member of the Rail- 
way Labor Executives' Association and served on numerous committees 
of the A. F. of L. and Railway Brotherhoods, always with distinction. 

President Milliman attended the Rochester, N. Y., Institute of Tech- 
nology, studying engineering. His earlier training as a telephone com- 
pany engineer provided the springboard from which he catapulted into the 
position of foreman for the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad. 
During his decade of service with this line, his interest in the lot of his 
fellow workers became such that at the age of 29 he was elected General 
Chairman of his organization for the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western 
System, embarking him upon a period of service which culminated in his 
election to the post of Secretary-Treasurer of his International Union in 
1922. He advanced to the presidency in 1940. 

Brother Milliman is survived by his widow, the former Esther D. 
Cumaer ; two sons. John and Elmer, Jr. ; his mother, Mrs. Frank Welch, 
and a sister, Miss Agnes C. Milliman. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

QiNiEiL Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vicb-Pbesidbnt 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 
First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, Jr. Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 

111 E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



631 W. Page, Dallas, Texas' 



Second District, WM. J. KELLY 
Carpenters' Bid., 243 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland. O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St.. Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



Special Attention to Financial Secretaries 

The attention of Financial Secretaries is called to the change in Sec- 
tion 45, Paragraphs A and B, which provides that members shall be notified 
by the Financial Secretary during the third and sixth of their arrearages 
at their last known addresses. These notices of arrearages may be secured 
from the General Office. In ordering same, please specify quantity of each 
(third and sixth month) desired. 



1092 
2946 
1106 
1122 
1150 
2940 
294.{ 
1156 
2948 
1174 
11811 
1191 
1205 



Klickitat, Wash. 
Yamhill. Ore. 
Evansville, Iud. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Camden, N. Y. 
Boligee, Ala. 
Columbus, Miss. 
Montrose. Colo. 
Hattiesburg, Miss. 
Warm Springs, Ore. 
Middleport, N. Y. 
Marietta, Ohio 
Montgomery, Ala. 



NEW CHARTERS ISSUED 

2950 Louisville, Ky. 2537 

2958 Ravalli, Mont. ■ 1352 

1215 Philadelphia, Pa. 2544 

1218 Boone, Iowa 1356 

1237 St. Charles, Ont., Can. 2937 

1238 Delbarton, W. Va. 2558 
2972 Jonesboro, Ark. 2687 
2H75 Ukiah, Calif. 2721 
1264 ' Shreveport, La. 2723 
1269 Trenton, N. J. 1368 
1286 Rock Island, 111. 1374 
2518 Hope, Ark. 1376 



Sudbury, Out., Can. 
Poland, N. Y. 
Shawano. Wis. 
Munising, Mien. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Cazadero. Calif. 
Auburn, Calif. 
El Centro, Calif. 
Lacoochee. Fla. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Mountain View. Mo. 
Fort Bragg, Calif. 



"$ 




n 3m t m rr x x h m 



Not lost to those that love them, They still live in our memory, 
Not dead, just gone before; And will forever more. 



%tsi x 



xtx ijptntt 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother RICHARD ARN, Local No. 213, Houston, Texas . 
Brother M. N. ASHER, Local No. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
Brother ARTHUR BALL, Local No. 638, Morristown, N. J. 
Brother A. P. BLOMBERG, Local No. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
Brother DICK H. F. COLLIER, Local No. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
Brother ROGER DARKE, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother FRANK H. DAVIS, Local No. 329, Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Brother HAROLD DUNFORD, Local No. 498, Brantford, Ont., Ca.n 
Brother NORMAN C. DUNN, Local No. 937, Dubuque, Iowa. 
Brother EDWARD J. FRIMAN, Local No. 747, Oswego, N. Y. 
Brother AMON F. GEORGE, Local No. 229, Glens Falls, N. Y. 
Brother ERNEST GREEN, Local No. 1752, Ontario, Calif. 
Brother EVERETT HARRISON, Local No. 213. Houston, Texas. 
Brother ADAM HEEGLE, Local No. 188, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Brother A. L. HOOK, Local No. 1212, Coffey ville, Kans. 
Brother RAYMOND R. ISRAAL, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother VICTOR JACOBSEN, Local No. 188, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Brother CHARLES JOHNSON, SR., Local No. 1456, New York, N. Y. 
Brother JOHN E. JOHNSON, Local No. 958, Marquette, Mich. 
Brother LEONARD KADOW, Local No. 1485, LaPorte, Ind. 
Brother GLEN KING, Local No. 190, Klamath Falls, Ore. 
Brother CHARLES KRENN, Local No. 1164, Brooklyn, N. Y . 
Brother JAMES J. LAVELLE, Local No. 261, Scranton, Pa. 
Brother JOHN WESLEY LEE, Local No. 302, Huntington, W. Va. 
Brother EMORY M. LEWIS, Local No. 1024, Cumberland, Md. 
Brother ANTHONY MAFERA, Local No. 1164, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brother F. C. MARTI, Local No. 916, Aurora, 111. 
Brother C. H. MILAM, Local No. 303, Portsmouth, Va. 
Brother CHARLES NOBIS, Local No. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 
Brother CARL QUIST, Local No. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
Brother WILLIAM L. ROSS, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 
Brother M. RYAN, Local No. 419, Chicago, 111. 
Brother EDWARD SCHMIDT, Local No. 1164, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brother M. J. SCHOOLCRAFT, Local No. 679, Montpelier, Vt. 
Brother ALEX SCHULTZ, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 
Brother JACK SMITH, Local No. 133, Terre Haute, Ind. 
Brother T. R. SUTHERLAND, Local No. 100, Muskegon, Mich. 
Brother STUART TUTTLE, Local No. 100, Muskegon, Mich. 
Brother J. J. VAUGHN, Local No. 213, Houston, Texas. 
Brother FRANK VOGEL, Local No. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
Brother MATT WAGNER, Local No. 1752, Ontario, Calif. 
Brother CHARLES WENDLAND, Local No. 657, Sheboygan, Wis. 
Brother ARTHUR W. WHITE, Local No. 72, Rochester, N. Y. 
Brother GRANT WHITE, Local No. 133, Terre Haute, Ind. 
Brother SAMUEL M. WRIGHT, Local No. 525, Coshocton, Ohio. 



CorrQspondQncQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

LOCAL UNION 246 HONORS ITS VETERANS OF WORLD WARS I AND II 

Twenty-seven years have passed since the signing of the Armistice terminating 
hostilities of World War I. Each year it has been the custom of Local Union 246, 
New York, N. Y., to honor in some way those of its members who served in that 
war and to revere the memory of those who paid the supreme sacrifice. 

Brother Gus Darmstadt, Financial Secretary, is the originator of these Veterans' 
nights and has through the years planned some celebration in their honor. Again 
this year he came to the fore with a gala celebration. 

Speakers for the evening were Brother Sam Sutherland, General Office Repre- 
sentative and past President of Local Union 246, and Brother Robert Johnson. 
Secretary and Treasurer of the New York District Council, both of whom delivered 
themselves nobly. 

Brother Darmstadt read the Honor Roll of the Veterans of World War I. Of 
the thirty-five brothers who served in that war, eight have passed away from 
wounds or gas poisoning and twelve are still active in the Local Union. Of the 
ninety-nine brothers who served in World War II, ninety-one returned to the 
Local Union and eight are still in service. Those answering the call were heartily 
welcomed. As a token of esteem it was moved that a donation of three months' 
dues be given to all those still active in the Local. 

Before adjourning for refreshments, a rising vote of thanks was given to 
Brother Darmstadt for his sincere efforts in making this meeting the success that 
it was. 



TAYLORVILLE MEMBERS STAGE TURKEY DINNER 

On Friday, November 22, 1946, Local Union No. 748, Taylorville, 111., celebrated 
its 45th Anniversary with a banquet for all its members and their families. 

Baked Turkey and all the trimmings were served to about 6 5 carpenters, their 
wives and families. 

Brother Halley Nash, President of Local Union No. 742 Decatur, was present 
and gave a nice talk. 

As the meeting was about to break up Brother Harold Cheesman walked in 
and we proceeded to put the Turkey to him. 

Everyone left well filled with food and fellowship and is looking forward to 
another Anniversary. 

Fraternally yours, E. L. Van Vleet, R. S., 

L. U. No. 748, Taylorville, 111. 



DU BOIS, PA., MEMBERS MARK 46th ANNIVERSARY 

The Editor: 

January 2, 1947, was the 46th Anniversary of the issuing of the Charter for 
Local Union 580 of Du Bois, Penna. With this in mind, the members, after their 
regular meeting, partook of a dinner well planned to suit the season and served 
by a committee that knew the appetite of hard working carpenters. 

Local 580 has seen a steady growth both in its membership and in better work- 
ing conditions. Fitting tribute was paid to the older members whose persistent 
efforts have made this possible. The year 19 47 was pledged as another year for 
even bigger and better things for both the members of Local 580 and the City 
of Du Bois. 

Fraternally yours, 

Don Hoover, Rec. Sec, Local 580. 



26 THE CARP EXTER 

LOCAL 22 FETES RETIRING OFFICER 

On Monday evening. July 2 7th, about 325 friends, including General Contrac- 
tor.? and representatives of local labor and civic organizations, gathered at the 
St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco, to attend a testimonial dinner in honor of Martin 
L. Bavage, former Financial Secretary of Carpenters' Local Union No. 22 who 
recently retired from active service in the Union's office after twenty-four years of 
honored and faithful duty. 

Many speakers of the evening spoke of the integrity and harmony brought 
about between employers and employes through the years by Mr. Bavage's efforts, 
and as a token of appreciation a beautiful diamond ring was presented to him by 
his numerous friends in the Building Trades. In addition to the banquet, a 
number of entertainers helped round out an evening of good fellowship. 

Those seated at the speaker's table; were Jack Welsh, Treasurer of Carpenters' 
Local Union No. 22; District Attorney Pat Brown; Judge Dan Schoemaker of the 
Municipal Court; Dewey Meade, President of the Building Trades Council; State 
Senator Jack Shelley; Joe Stuart, Past-President of Carpenters' Local No. 22; 
Frank Bond, President of the District Council of Carpenters; Archie Mooney of 
the State Apprenticeship Council; Abe Muir, General Executive Board Member of 
the Brotherhood of Carpenters: Judge Herbert Kaufman and Judge Melvin Cronin 
of the San Francisco Superior Court; Hon. Geo. Harris, Federal Judge; Geo. R. 
som, Secretary of the Building Trades Temple Association; Hon. William 
Malone. Chairman of the Democratic County Committee; Geo. R. R.eilly of the 
State Board of Equalization; Judge Twain Michaelson of the San Francisco Muni- 
cipal Court; Dave Ryan, Secretary of the District Council of Carpenters; John A. 
O'Connell, Secretary of the San Francisco Labor Council; Frank McDonald, Presi- 
dent of the State Building Trades Council; Robert J. Cains, President of Local 22; 
Martin L. Bavage, retiring Financial Secretary of Local 22; and many other 
prominent citizens. 

Respectfully submitted, Clement A. Clancy. Recording Secretary. 



HAMILTON" LOCAL PAYS TRIBUTE TO OLD TIMERS 

Local 18, Hamilton, Ontario, held one of the best-attended meetings in recent 
years on the night of December 17, when special tribute was paid to the old timers. 
Representative Andy Cooper was present to help enliven the proceedings. During 
the course of the evening, forty-one members of the Local were presented with 
service badges, several of them being for more than fifty years continuous mem- 
bership. Six of the youngest members present were accorded the privilege of 
presenting the honor badges to the old timers. Dundas Local No. 2034 had eight 
members who were entitled to service badges. 

During the course of the meeting the old timers gave the youngsters an 
example of spirited debate without rancor or clash of personalities. All in all, 
the evening turned out to be an interesting and enlightening one which everyone 
enjoyed, especially the youngster who got a good look at trade unionism in opera- 
tion at its best. 



PORT ARTHUR LOCAL HELPS OUT SANTA 

One hundred and ninety Port Arthur, Ontario, children — sons and daughters 
of members of Local Union No. 2 52 7- — had the time of their lives on the evening 
of December 19 when the Local Union sponsored a party in their behalf. Italian 
Hall was crowded to capacity for the occasion. A program of fine entertainment, 
including musical selections, dancing and balancing acts, kept the guests enter- 
tained. 

Highlight of the evening, however, was the appearance of Santa Claus, who 
entered the hall to the singing of Jingle Bells. Gifts from the beautifully decorated 
Christmas Tree were given each youngster. After the appearance of Santa, ice 
cream, candy and pop were distributed to the youngsters. Much later the young- 
sters departed for home, tired but happy. All who attended voted the first Christ- 
mas Party of Local Union No. 2 82 7 a huge success. Thomas Alder, Local Union 
president, acted as master of ceremonies, and W. E. Plunkett batted for Santa. 




FIRST CAPITAL, AUXILIARY FORMJED 

The Editor: 

December 19, 1946, was a big night for Local 1590 of Washington, D. C. 

The first Ladies' Auxiliary in this city was organized by them, and we of 
Auxiliary No. 46 7, wish to express our sincere thanks and appreciation for the 
work they did to make this possible. 

We also wish to thank them for their very generous donation of $100.00. 

Our elected officers are: Mrs. H. Stumpe, President; Miss D. Brinkman, Finan- 
cial Secretary; Mrs. D. Chase, Recording Secretary; Mrs. S. Brinkman, Conductor; 
Mrs. S. Carlson, Warden; Trustees, Mrs. M. Dellinger, Mrs. R. Crimmins and Mrs. 
M. Sarcia. 

Auxiliary No. 467 extends fraternal greetings to all sister organizations and 
would appreciate and enjoy hearing from them. 

Fraternally yours, Mrs. Dorothy E. Chase, Rec. Sec, 

1341 29th St., S. E., 
Washington 20, D. C. 



SAXTA ANA LADIES SPONSOR SERIES OF PARTIES 

Carpenters' Local Union No. 1815 and Ladies Auxiliary No. 216 of Santa Ana, 
California, recently inaugurated a series of parties, the first of which was held in 
November at Carpenters' Hall. Over a hundred members and guests attended and 
enjoyed a semi-pot-luck dinner and colored travel films shown by world-traveler 
Julia Anne Hyde. Door prizes added to the interest — especially since they were 
such worthwhile things as a turkey, duck, etc. 

■The December party was moved to a larger hall — a happy decision, since at- 
tendance jumped to 2 60. A delicious dinner and fine entertainment featured the 
evening. At each party we get new members. 

We have been very active during recent years. Every Thursday in our new 
club room we sew for the Red Cross all day, and once a month we hold a luncheon 
meeting. Our regular meetings are held the first Friday of every month and 
any visiting sisters are welcome to attend. 



HERMISTOX LADIES STILL VERY ACTIVE 

The Editor: 

Just a line to let you know what we are doing here at Hermiston, Oregon. 
Although there is just a small bunch of us left, we are still keeping Auxiliary No. 
429 very much alive. We are still holding two meetings a month as always. 

For the month of September we fixed up a small truck as a float and our 
parade entry got many fine comments. We had a small unfinished house sitting 
on the truck. A little boy and girl were nailing boards on it. On the other end 
of the truck we had a miniature store counter. Our president, Bertha Miller, 
stood behind the counter handling Union Label goods. On the sides of the 
float we had large signs reading "Carpenters' Local No. 933 and Ladies' Auxiliary 
No. 429." For the month of October we gave a Halloween party and pie social. 
With a fishing pond and wishing well we raised some money for the Community 
Chest. We also sponsored a fine Christmas party. We drew names for presents 
and we all donated to buy our president a lovely gift. 

Fraternally yours, Florence Russel, Rec. Se. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

'Copyright 1947) 

By H. H. Siegele 
LESSON 221 

Boring tools hold an important place 
in every mechanic's collection of tools. 
Boring tools, as we are using the term 
here, covers auger and drill bits and 
braces of all kinds, including any other 
kind of device that is used for operating 




Fig. 1 

any kind of boring or drilling tool. For 
the carpenter the brace and bit is the 
most practical, however often he is 
called upon to use power-driven devices 
for boring and drilling. 

While there are many kinds and 
makes of braces, in general they can be 
p,ut into two classifications, the ratchet 
braces and the non-ratchet braces. A 
ratchet brace of a good design is shown 
by Fig. 1. We are pointing out with 
indicators from left to right: The 




Fig. 2 

chuck, the ratchet (box ratchet); the 
bow, which is the bent part of the brace 
that constitutes the sweep; the handle 
and the head. 



In buying a brace the first thing to 
determine is the kind of brace you 
want, which means a brace that would 
best answer the purposes for which you 
are buying it. The second thing is the 
sweep. If the boring is heavy, as boring 
through tough wood or boring rather 
large holes, then you should have a 
sweep that will carry that kind of load. 
As a rule, a 10-inch sweep ( commonly 
called 5-inch) will handle auger bits up 
to 1 %i inches in diameter- — in tougb 
wood the pull will be hard for the larger 
bits. For light boring and drilling a 6- 
inch sweep ("commonly called 3-inch) 
gives excellent service, and for driving 
screws that can not be driven with an 




Fig. 3 

ordinary screw driver, the 6-inch sweep 
can not be excelled. 

In accurate boring fall boring should 
be reasonably accurate) as for mortise 
locks and so forth, the first thing is to 
be sure that the auger bit is started in 
the right direction. To do that it will be 
necessary to do a little sighting and 
testing. When the bit is started, take 
a firm position so that the head of the 
brace can be kept from wobbling by 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



holding it with the left hand somewhat 
as shown by Fig. 2, while you operate 
the brace with the right hand. If the 
auger bit is kept properly sharpened, 
very little pressure against the head 
will be necessary to make it cut, except- 




Fig. 4 

ing in cases of hard knots or pitchy 
spots. Whenever the workman must 
strain himself to force the auger bit to 
cut, it usually indicates that the bit 
needs sharpening. 

Fig. 3 shows two auger points. The 
one shown at the bottom is much easier 
to sharpen than the one shown to the 
upper right, because the former has the 
side cutters on the bottom and the 
latter has them on the upper side. At a, 
in both drawings, we show the back of 
the cutter, while at b we show the 
front. The heavy shading indicates the 
bevels made by the filing. The bottom 
drawing shows a file in position for fil- 
ing a cutter, which should always be 
done on the upper side — -this is also 



Fig. 5 

true of filing the cutters of the auger 
point shown to the upper right. The 
filing should be done in such a manner 
that the bevel will be uniform and the 
cutting edge perfectly straight. The 
side cutters should be filed on the inside 
— never on the outside. Filing the side 
cutters on the outside will cause the 
auger bit to bind in the hole. When 
the screw point needs sharpeninng, a 



Fig. 6 

knife-blade file should be used and 
special care is necessary to form and 
sharpen the threads. Do not over do 
the filing on the screw point. 

Fig. 4 shows two views of a bit exten- 
sion. The upper drawing shows the 
chuck open, ready for the bit to be in- 
serted. The key with which the bit is 



locked into the chuck is in place for 
fastening the bit. At the bottom draw- 
ing the bit in part is shown locked in 
the chuck and the key is pulled back a 
little. When the boring is underway, 
the key is pulled back to the tang of 
the bit extension. 

Fig. 5 gives a section, in part, of a 
French door, showing how to bore for 
the extension rod of a flush bolt. At A 
we show the first boring, which is done 
with a bit just a little smaller than the 
socket plate. This boring is shown run- 
ning upward. At B a little smaller bit 
is used to bring the hole back more 
nearly to center. This done, a small 



-#^t#§fl#lf^l#^^ 




Fig. 7 

bit, as shown, is used for boring the 
rest of the hole. The two first borings 
made it possible to manipulate the small 
bit in starting so it would bore straight 
to the housing for the operating lever, 



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Write your name and address clearly and 
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TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building C, Denver 2, Colorado 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



which is shown marked A in Pig. 6. At 
B, in this figure, we show the bolt 
coupled to the extension rod that con- 
nects it with the operating lever, as in- 
dicated by the dotted lines. Wben the 
operating lever is down, as shown, the 
bolt shown at B, is also down. When 
the lever is pulled up the bolt is pulled 
back into the socket. 

The top drawing of Fig. 7 shows a 
single cutter and single twist auger bit, 
which gives rather good results. These 
bits usually bore a little faster than 
other auger bits, due to the fact that the 
screw point has the threads set a little 



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Fig. 8 

wider apart. The bottom drawing show 
the back and the face, respectively of 
an expansive auger bit. The bit as 
shown has the large adjustable cutter 
in place. The figures shown on the 
face view, indicate that a hole from two 
to three inches in diameter can be bored 
with this cutter. The smaller cutter 
that comes with each bit is used for 
smaller holes. The cutters of expansive 
bits should be carefully sharpened, and 
when the bit is put into the kit it 
should be packed so as to protect the 
cutting edges. 

The Foerstner auger bit is shown by 
Fig. 8. This bit is especially suitable 
for boring short holes — also angling or 
curved holes. It is a handy tool to 
carry, and with a little experimentation 
a great variety of uses can be discovered 
for it. 



IRREGULAR PLAN 

(Copyright 1947) 

In the scrap-iron drives of this war I 
discarded many things that I thought I 
would never have any more use for. 
But I have already found a number of 
them that I could have used, and some 
of them I will have to replace with new 
ones. That is the way it is with craft 
problems. We are sure that we will 
never have any use for some of them, 
or even many of them, and then after a 
while we are faced with the very prob- 
lems that we knew would never come 
up. The craft problem we are dealing 
with here is one of them. 

Fig. 1 shows two one-line drawings, 
or diagrams of a double pitch roof that 
has a wider span on one end than it 
has on the other. At A we have a plan 
of the roof with 11 pairs of rafters, and 
at B we have a side view. The question 
is how to obtain the different lengths of 
the different rafters. 

Fig. 2 shows a pair of rafters for the 
wide end in place, and by dotted lines 



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the rafters for the narrow end are 
shown. To the right, shaded, a rafter 
:ut for the narrow end is placed 
igainst the rafter of the wide end and 























2 


J 


4 


S 


6 

7? 


7 


9 


s 


Jo 


rr 



wmmmmM 

B 



Fig. 1 

the difference in the lengths has been 
iivided into 10 equal spaces, the num- 
ber of spaces there are for the rafters 
af the roof. The points that mark these 
spaces are numbered from 1 to 11, one 
itnore than the number of spaces. Now, 
the longest two rafters are cut as long 
is the distance between 1 and A, the 
next two are cut as long as the dis- 




Fig. 2 

tance between 2 and A, the two follow- 
ing that, as long as the distance be- 
tween 3 and A, and so on, 4-A, 5-A, 6-A, 
until you come to the end rafters, 
which are cut as long as the distance 
between 11 and A. When these rafters 
are put in place in the order of their 
different lengths, the comb of the roof 
will be straight, but on an incline as 
shown at B, Fig. 1. 




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Trade Mork 

?Hi= toot -box Oi-rm wom*> 



1 



important 
NOTICE! 




2. 



At present We are unable to produce 
Lee (Union-Made) Carpenters' Over- 
alls because: 

u 1 We are. unable , to secikre the 
top quality, special 'vi'oven ma- 
terial -that goes' into every pair 
of Lee Carpenters' Overalls. 

There are not) enough skilled 
operators available at present 
5 to keep bur five Ilee factories 
busy. ' 

Leg Carpenters' Overalls will again be 
available ^when we can obtain the 
best quality material and when we 
have sufficient skilled Union Opera- 
tors to man the machines in the five 
great Lee factories. 

Lee is the Largest Manufacturer of 
UNION-MADE Work Clothing in the World 



THE H.O. 



LEE 



CO. 



Kansas City, Mo, Minneapolis, Minn. 
; Trenton, N. J. San Francisco, Cal. 

South Bend, Ind. Salina, Kans. 



N 



AUDELS Carpenters 
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How to use the steel square — How to file and set 
saws— How to build furniture — How to use a 
rnitra box-7-How toius.e the chalk line— JJow to use 
rules and scales— How to make joints — Carpenters 
arithmetic — Solving mensuration problems— ^Es- 
timating! strength of timbers — How to set girdera 
and sills — Mow to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs^ — How to build houses, barns, garb- 
ages, bungalows, etc. — How to read and draw 
plans — Drawing up specifications — How to ex- 
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interior trim — -How to hang doors — How to lath- 
lay floors — How to paint 



and student, 
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OVERHEAD DOOR CORPORATION • Hartford City, Indiana, U. S. A. 



CARPENTER 




FOUNDED 1881 



Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 




MARCH, 1947 



WARNING! KEEP AWAY! 




team* 



N-i.'ional Labor Service 

Labor knows the clanger of racial and religious discrimination! 












NOW AVAILABLE! 




Celd-sidinb 

V D n. n r- l^t n r> u- ■ 



TRADE MARK 




CELO-SIDENG is a superior insulation sid- 
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Board, famous for insulation and strength. 
It is Ferox-treated to resist termites, dry rot 
and fungus growth. All sides and edges are 
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asphalt, extra thick on the outside and 
surfaced with a durable, colorful finish of 
firmly imbedded mineral granules that 
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A MULTI-PURPOSE PRODUCT! 

Celo-Siding provides insulation plus sheath- 
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it's warm and draft-free in winter, cool in 
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IDEAL FOR ANY UTILITY BUILDINGS! 

Since insulated buildings can be built 
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THE CELOTEX CORPORATION • CHICAGO 3, ILLINOIS 



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NATIONALLY ADVERTISED! 

To tell your customers about this remark- 
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CELQ-5EDINC 

One of the Famous 




A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
» of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 
FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXTII — No. 3 



INDIANAPOLIS, MARCH, 1947 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents 



Legislation Holds No Lasting Answer 



General President William L. Hutcheson points our to the 80th Congress that in no 
field of human endeavor has government control been more of a failure during the New 
Deal years than it was in labor relations. At one time during the war there were as 
many as twenty-five different agencies dealing with one phase or another of labor 
relations, yet never in history were industrial relations in poorer shape. President 
Hutcheson masterfully answers those who maintain that labor difficulties can be cured 
by laws. 



A Tribute to the Home 



10 



The daughters of Patrick Gilchrist, old time New York member who recently passed 
away at the Home, pay a glowing tribute to the Home and the kind of treatment re- 
tired members get there. One cannot read it without realizing what the Home means 
to those who lay down their tools at the end of their active careers. 



General Executive Board Minutes 



12 



At its recent meeting in Lakeland, Florida, the General Executive Board considered 
many matters of a vital nature. Some of the decisions rendered are far-reaching and 
important. Every member should read them carefully. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS: 
In Memoriam 
Correspondence - 
Craft Problems - 



25 
26 
or 



• • 



Index to Advertisers 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act 
Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 
in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



of 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 
All contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," Including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

P.*. 

E. C. Atkins & Co., Indinapolis, 

Ind. 4th Cover 

Henry Disston & Sons, Inc., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 4 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 32 

Frank's Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 31 

T. C. Knife, St. Paul, Minn 32 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 3rd Cover 

Millers Jails Co., Greenfield, 

Mass. 31 

Paine Co., Chicago, 111 32 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, 

Conn. 3rd Cover 

Bowling Equipment 

Brunswick, Balke, Collender Co., 

Chicago, 111. 32 

Carpentry Materials 

Celotex Corp., Chicago, 111 1 

Boyle-Midway, Inc., New York, 

N. Y. 3 

Technical Courses and Books 

American School, Chicago, 111. 29 

American Technical Society, 

Chicago, 111. 31 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 32 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 28 

Mason Engineering Service, Kala- 
mazoo, Mich. 30 

A. Reicher, Palo Alto, Cal 3 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 30 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo— 28 
Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y.__3rd Cover 



" PULL LENGTH ROOF FRAMER " 

A method of framing roofs that is 

"FULLY PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHTS" 

Price $2.00 or sent C. O. D. $2.15 

A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 405, Palo Alto, Calif. 



THE CARPENTERS HANDY HELPER 

public mm 

has dozens of uses on every job ! 

For that "FINISHED TOUCH" 
Plastic Wood can be used 
for filling: 

• Nail holes 

• Cracks due to wood 

shrinkage 

• Countersunk screws 

• Old screw holes 

• Loose dowel pins 

• Broken railings 

• Split, cracked or splintered 

wood in bowling alleys. 

HANDLES LIKE PUTTY... 
HARDENS INTO WOOD 

Keep a supply of PLASTIC WOOD SOL- 
VENT on hand to control the consistency 
of PLASTIC WOOD. SOLVENT is also 
used for cleaning hands and tools. 

• On sale at all Builders' Supplies, 

Hardware and Paint Stores 



BUY THE 1 lb. CAN 





When thousands of carpenters were asked 
what makes of hand saws and how many of each 
make they owned, it was learned that they 
owned twice as many Disston hand saws as 
all other makes combined ... a convincing 
endorsement of Disston quality, for it comes 
from men to whom extra sharp, true cutting, 
long lasting saws are indispensable. Here is 
what a few of them say: 

"Disston saws are the best for any kind 
of work" 

"The Disston is of finer steel and well 
balanced" 

"Disston saws hold an edge longer" 

There are Disston saws for every kind of work 
. . . the fight saw for each job. An 
outstanding favorite among carpen- 
ters is the Disston D-8 shown below. 



DISSTON D-8 
The Original Skew-back Hand Saw 



Medium weight. Made of the famous Disston 
Steel, tempered and hardened for faster cutting 
and to stay sharp longer. Cross-cut saws are 
made in 20-inch, 10 points; 22-inch, 8 and 10 
points; 24-inch, 8 and 10 points; 26-inch, 7, 8, 
10 and 11 points. Rip saws, 26-inch, 5V2 points. 

HENRY DISSTON & SONS, INC. 304 Tacony, Philadelphia 35, Pa., U. S. A. 



Ask your Hardware Recailer 
for a FREE copy of the 
Disston Saw, Tool and File 
Manual, or write to us direct. 




p/ssroM 



The saw most Carpenters use 



LEGISLATION HOLDS I 
NO LASTING ANSWER I 



By 
WM. L. HUTCHESON 

General President 




N JANUARY 6 when the 8oth Congress took over the helm of the 
ship of state a great experiment came to an end. For fourteen 
years the nation blundered along under a system of planned 
economy. For fourteen years edicts and directives and bureaus and agen- 
cies flourished and grew and spun an ever-tightening web of government 
control around our industrial, economic, and even social life. By Novem- 
ber 5 the American people were satisfied that a planned economy was not 
the answer to our problems. They said so at the polls by the millions. 
From border to border and coast to coast they voted out of office New 
Dealers, economic theorists and advocates of a planned economy based on 
government control. 

tions and orders and edicts. Yet 
never in history have industrial re- 
lations been more ineffective; never 
has there been so much unrest, 
misunderstanding and downright 
chaos ; never have work stoppages 
been so frequent or so severe as they 
have been during the last few years, 
years in which labor peace has been 
a crying need of the nation. 

By now it should be clear even 
to Senator Claghorn that industrial 
peace cannot be built on a founda- 
tion of government control. Yet 
paradoxically enough, the 8oth Con- 
gress seems bent on forging a legis- 
lative straightjacket for labor. The 
Congressional hopper is bulging 
with bills placing restrictions and 
controls of one kind or another on 
industrial relations. For fourteen 
years the Republicans have been 
decrying government control, yet 
right now a host of Republican Con- 
gressmen are sponsoring bills to 
place employer-employe relation- 
ships under the strictest kinds of 
government controls yet seen. This 



If the new Congress received any 
mandate from the people it was a 
mandate to bring to an end the era 
of government domination of human 
relationships. Through a great de- 
pression the people tolerated ever- 
increasing direction from Washing- 
ton in the interest of the common 
welfare ; through a long and bitter 
war they submitted to ever-growing 
regimentation because national safe- 
ty dictated it ; but now that the de- 
pression has passed into history and 
the war has been won, they want no 
more of it. 

It is an indisputable fact that in 
no field of human endeavor has gov- 
ernment control been more of a 
failure than in industrial relations. 
Ironically enough, in no field has 
there been a greater degree of gov- 
ernment control. At one time dur- 
ing the war there were as many as 
twenty-five agencies dealing with 
one phase or another of labor mat- 
ters. Every normal function of la- 
bor has been hemmed in on all sides 
by a welter of rules and regula- 



THE CARPENTER 



despite the fact that fourteen years 
of New Dealism have conclusively 
proved that labor relations, of all 
phases of our economic life, are least 
amenable to government control. 

To those of us who lived through 
the war years with their endless di- 
rectives and directions from Wash- 
ington, the thought of further gov- 
ernment control of labor relations is 
genuinely frightening. For fifty 
years before the war labor and man- 
agement inevitably sat down around 
the conference table to thrash out 
their difficulties and differences. 
They talked and argued and debat- 
ed. Mostly they settled their dif- 
ferences without a test of economic 
strength. If occasionally agreement 
could not be reached without a 
locking of horns, at least in the end 
management and labor hammered 
out some sort of an accord which 
was agreeable to both and under- 
stood by both. When the difficulty 
was settled it was really settled. 

During the war years this sort of 
collective bargaining gave way to 
direction from Washington. Col- 
lege professors and attorneys and 
self-appointed labor "experts" (who 
neither toiled nor managed a day in 
their lives), sitting in high places 
along the banks of the Potomac, 
made the rules and regulations. 
They spoke with the infallibility of 
the Delphian oracle and none could 
say them nay. They issued direc- 
tives and decisions which neither la- 
bor nor management understood. 
They issued clarifications and clari- 
fications of clarifications. And the 
end result of it all was delay, con- 
fusion and chaos. 

Labor wants no more government 
controls. After the experience of 
the war years, progressive employ- 
ers should not want them either. If 
the years since 1941 made anything 



clear it is that the ivory towers of 
Washington are no place to get 
workable, feasible, understandable 
solutions to any problems in general 
and labor problems in specific. In 
his speech before our 25th General 
Convention, held in Lakeland, Flor- 
ida, last April, Federation Secre- 
tary-Treasurer George Meany epi- 
tomized it better than anyone I have 
yet heard when he said: "I submit 
to you that our experiences during 
the war told us better than anything 
else that the one thing labor must 
fight in the post-war period and 
the one thing labor must eliminate 
is control of labor relations by peo- 
ple in the political field." 

To these sentiments I subscribe 
wholeheartedly. In the last 65 years 
we in the' Brotherhood of Carpen- 
ters have come to understand our 
employers a little bit at least. And 
conversely they have come to under- 
stand us to some extent. We know 
each other's problems and difficul- 
ties and weaknesses and strong 
points. We speak the same lan- 
guage. And because we speak the 
same language we can meet on com- 
mon ground and work out under- 
standable solutions to our differ- 
ences. 

On the other hand Washington is 
and always has been full of brain 
trusters. I remember during the war 
a bureaucrat actually ordered a 
sheep raiser to postpone the lamb- 
ing season, and another brain trust- 
er ordered a sawmill to discontinue 
turning out mill ends while produc- 
ing lumber. Certainly I do not want, 
and I doubt if the employers Avant, 
someone in Washington who does 
not know a shoe mold from a sway 
brace dictating to us what our poli- 
cies and relationships shall be. And 
let us not kid ourselves that new 
labor legislation could bring us 
something - different. Legislation 



THE CARPENTER 



means laws ; and laws mean admin- 
istrators ; and administrators mean 
politicians; and politicians mean 
college professors and attorneys 
and other dwellers in the ivory 
towers. 

The insiduous thing about gov- 
ernment control is that it is always 
sugar-coated. But the sugar coating 
soon wears off and the medicine 
underneath is invariably bitter. To 
employers right now it might seem 
that laws shackling labor would be 
a desirable thing. Yet after the 
horde of administrators any new 
laws would create were through 
handing down their rules and regu- 
lations the sugar coating would 
have been long since worn off with 
the bitter medicine of hard reality 
showing through. 

In these days of many shortages, 
there is one thing of which there is 
no dearth; that is labor "experts." 
Congress is full of them. So are 
the newspapers and radio. Every 
backwoods lawyer who gets a ticket 
to Congress ; every newspaperman 
who is handed an assignment to turn 
out a column ; every commentator 
who gets a pile "cure" manufacturer 
for a sponsor automatically becomes 
an "expert" on labor overnight. 
They have all the answers we indi- 
viduals in the labor movement for 
40 or 50 years are still searching for. 
They are never hesitant about tell- 
ing us so. 

To these "experts" everything is 
simple as ABC. They have a law 
to cure every difficulty. Glibly they 
tell the people about it day after 
day. Some of them are probably 
sincere, but many of them are mere- 
ly parroting phrases of those who 
have an axe to grind and are willing 
to pay for having it ground. 

There are several misconceptions 
these self-appointed "experts" are 
all laboring under. Number one is 



that they invariably visualize the 
labor movement as a large group 
of workers belonging to unions 
only because closed shop agree- 
ments compel them to. Unquestion- 
ably there are a few individuals who 
carry union cards because the agree- 
ments under which they work make 
it mandatory that they do so. How- 
ever, the percentage is very small. 
The vast bulk of the organized 
workers belong to unions because 
they found out through bitter ex- 
perience that only through organi- 
zation can they hope to achieve 
something approximating economic 
justice. During the war the War 
Labor Board wrote escape clauses 
into many agreements initiating 
closed shop conditions. The num- 
ber of workers who took advantage 
of these escape clauses was so small 
that it can truly be classed as insig- 
nificant. 

It was this misconception that led 
Congress to pass the Smith-Con- 
nally Bill. Congressmen who voted 
for the bill labored under the delu- 
sion that the rank-and-file of labor 
carried union cards under some sort 
of compulsion. They thought that 
if the workers were afforded an 
opportunity to express their senti- 
ments by secret ballot the programs 
of the various unions would be sty- 
mied. Time has proved how wrong 
they were. The Smith-Connally Bill 
was passed. The number of strikes 
increased substantially. By percen- 
tages of anywhere from 85 to 95 per 
cent the workers, the rank-and-file 
workers, if you please, voted to 
back up the programs initiated by 
their unions. The Government soon 
found itself in the position of run- 
ning a sort of strike bureau. In in- 
dustry after industry, the rank-and- 
filers, by secret ballot, expressed 
themselves as being solidly behind 
their unions. 



THE CARPEXTER 



However, there are many Con- 
gressmen and self-appointed '"ex- 
perts" who still dream that the rank- 
and-file of labor is wedded to the 
labor movement via the shotgun 
route. They have preached the the- 
ory for so long that scorpion-like 
thev have stung themselves with 
their own poison. The world has 
moved on but they failed to move 
with it. It is about time that they 
caught up with reality. 

The second great misconception 
these individuals labor under is that 
legislation can correct difficulties 
which stem from basic human rela- 
tionships. Were this true, the world 
might be a happier place. If by law 
you could govern peoples' likes and 
dislikes, their hopes and their fears, 
their foibles and prejudices, the 
world might well be free of discord 
and strife. Eut fortunately or unfor- 
tunately no law or laws can dictate 
what people think and feel. Human 
thinking cannot be subjected to ex- 
act mathematical formulas. Since it 
cannot, no lav/ or laws can be de- 
vised to channel human relation- 
ships into any preconceived pattern. 

I have been part of the labor 
movement for fully half a century. 
During these years I have seen 
ideas, patterns, and theories come 
and go. But in all this time I have 
never seen a sound concept of 
labor relations incorporated into the 
American way of life but what that 
concept was based on the funda- 
mental premise that men must be 
free to work or not to work, to do 
business or not to do business, to 
accept or not to accept chances that 
the vagaries of ever-changing con- 
ditions present. These things must 
still set the criterion. If America is 
to meet its destiny, if government 
of the people, by the people is to 
endure, the element of self-deter- 



mination, consistent with the will of 
the majority, must be maintained 
and preserved, not only in labor re- 
lations but also in all other fields of 
human endeavor where human be- 
ings deal with human beings. 

No one can deny that the strike 
situation has been serious during 
the past year and a half. Strikes 
have crippled many of our basic ! 
industries and thrown obstacles in 
the pathway to normalcy. Yet in 
view of the aggravation.-, irrita- 
tions, and injustices workers suf- 
fered during the war years. I am 
surprised the strike situation has 
not been worse. Late in 1944 I wrote 
in our official journal, "The Carpen- 
ter," as follows : 

"Buck-passing, boondoggling 
and delay, coupled with the un- 
fair, unworkable Little Steel 
Formula, have created a morass 
of chaos unparalleled in Amer- 
ican labor history. And the sit- 
uation shows no promise of im- 
proving. Disputes are piling 
up faster than the War Labor 
Board can handle them. Cases 
are being kicked around from 
pillar to post for months and 
even years before decisions are 
handed down ; and when they 
are finally handed down they 
are more often than not so 
confusing and inconsistent that 
no one can understand them. 
Workers are becoming fed up 
and resentful. . . . While the 
situation is bad enough while 
the war is going on, it prom- 
ises to become much worse 
after the last shot is fired 
. . . Then there will be not stim- 
ulus of patriotism to keep men 
plugging away at their jobs in 
the face of mounting and end- 
less injustices. Then there will 
be no driving urge compelling 



THE CARPENTER 



employers to keep production 
lines going full speed regard- 
less of any other considera- 
tions. The real breakdown will 
come then unless a consistent 
and realistic labor policy is de- 
veloped in the meantime." 
Well, the breakdown came. When 
the stimulus of patriotism passed 
out of the picture, the dam of gov- 
ernment control which had been 
holding back a mounting sea of 
grievances and injustices broke, and 
the nation was flooded with a wave 
of strikes. That situation is now 
past. The grievances and inequities 
which developed under government 
control of labor relations are now 
largely remedied. The pathway 
ahead should be smoother. 

How smooth it will be depends 
on the employers, not on labor legis- 
lation. Department of Labor statis- 
tics show that during the last few 
months prices have advanced nearly 
17 per cent. During the same time 
the purchasing power of weekly 
earnings receded by better than 16 
per cent, despite 2\ per cent in- 



crease in take home pay. The real 
way to stop strikes is simple. Let 
the employers raise wages enough 
to wipe out the decrease in purchas- 
ing power of weekly earnings ; at 
the same time let them lower prices 
to bring them down to a par with 
what they were on V-J Day, and the 
strike situation will be automatic- 
ally settled. Workers like strikes 
less than any other one class. They 
strike only when necessity compels 
them to. Remove the necessity for 
strikes and you automatically re- 
duce the strike situation to an irre- 
ducible minimum. 

The duty of industrial statesman- 
ship today is to direct the vast so- 
cial energy of organized labor — 
once dissipated in the struggle for 
union survival — into collaborative 
productive functions. Labor is 
ready and eager for such a creative 
future. Obviously, the rich contri- 
bution which organized labor can 
bring to our economy will not be 
achieved in an atmosphere of dis- 
trust or government hostility. — 
The Federationist. 



One Redwood Firm Signs Up 

The first break in the thirteen-month old fight of the Redwood lumber 
workers for equality with the rest of the Pacific Coast lumber industry 
came late last month when the Hammond Lumber Company signed an 
agreement with the Redwood District Council. The new agreement pro- 
vides for union shop conditions, a minimum wage of $1.20 per hour, and 
a straight-across-the-board increase of thirty-five cents per hour in all 
classifications above the minimum. Hammond Lumber Company is one 
of the largest operations in the industry. Henceforth all products turned 
out by the company will bear the "AFL-8" label, the label which identifies 
all Redwood lumber made under union conditions. 

As this issue went to press, however, the eight other Redwood com- 
panies were resisting as stubbornly as ever the demands of the union 
for decent wages and decent working conditions. But the Redwood work- 
ers were holding out as determinedly as ever, too. With the capitulation 
of the Hammond Company, one of the major Redwood producers, the 
ranks of the defiant firms have been broken, but complete victory will not 
be won until the entire Redwood industry is put on a par with other lum- 
ber producing sections of the Coast. 



.T_TJljnjT-aJXa.TJXnJTJlJTJTJT J r LT-"L r L r LnjX 



A TRIBUTE TO THE HOME 

At a meeting of the General Executive Board held at Carpenters' 
Home, Lakeland, Fla., on January 6, 1947, the General President 
read the following letters to that Body. The Board ordered them 
published in "The Carpenter." 




LOCAL UNION No. 366 

OFFICE: 1891 WASHINGTON AVENUE 

Telephone TRemont 8-0446 

New York 57, N. Y '., December 5, ig46. 

William L. Hutcheson, General President, 
222 East Michigan Street, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Dear Sir and Brother: 

We are sending you a copy of a letter we have received from the 
daughters of our late Brother, Patrick Gilchrist, who passed away in 
the Home last month. 

We are aware of the great interest you take in the Home and 
we feel sure that you will welcome this magnificent tribute to that 
splendid institution you have done so much to create. 

We think that this testimonial to the Home and its staff might 
be brought to the attention of the Brotherhood and leave it to your 
good judgment as to the method and advisability of doing so. We 
also sent a copy to Mr. C. M. Goddard, believing he was entitled to 
know how much his efforts and the work of the staff are appreciated. 

Fraternally yours, 

JOHN HART, Financial Secretary. 

* * * 

330 E. 43 St., N. Y. C, Nov. 27, 1946. 

Mr. John Hart, Financial Secretary 

Carpenters Local 366 

1891 Washington Ave., N. Y. 57, N. Y. 

Dear Mr. Hart: 

This is to thank you for your very kind letter of November 19, 
telling us of the lovely tribute paid to our Dad, Patrick Gilchrist, at 
the meeting on November 18. We particularly appreciated it because 
he was such a fine gentleman, and always had a high esteem for the 
Union and its officials, as well as an affectionate regard for his 
brother members. 

Losing Dad was really a shock, as he had not been ill, and it 
was indeed very difficult to take, but we feel we must tell you and 



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the other members of the Local that we fully believe we would not 
have had him as long as we did if he had not been in the Carpenters' 
Home. We have made many trips to Lakeland to see him; in fact 
prior to the war we went down every year and spent about a week 
in Lakeland so we could be with him. This gave us ample oppor- 
tunity to observe first-hand the wonderful job that the staff in the 
Home were doing for all these men. Again in August of this year 
we were down and spent about a week with Dad. At that time he 
was in the hospital section and we realized more than ever the 
care and attention he was receiving. Our feeling then was that 
even if we had been very wealthy we could not have secured for him 
the service and attention he was receiving. 

Mr. Goddard, the Manager, has certainly done a magnificent job 
in running the Home, and I think you will be interested to know 
that on the street in Lakeland you can identify the members of the 
Carpenters' Home by their good-looking clothes and well-fed appear- 
ance. Not only is Mr. Goddard capable and an exceptionally fine 
gentleman, but he has a sympathetic understanding of these men 
and a sincere desire to make them comfortable and happy. 

The first time we visited Dad at the Home, which was I believe 
in 1936, we met Mrs. Wilson, the supervising or head nurse. Dad's 
friends down there all referred to her as "The Angel of the Home." 
As through the years we learned to know Mrs. Wilson, we came to 
understand how well-earned this title was. She has a personal and 
affectionate interest in every one of "her boys," as she calls them, 
and it has been a great consolation to know that although, due to 
the suddeness of his passing we could not be with Dad, Mrs. Wilson 
was there doing everything that could have been done, and from a 
professional standpoint, so much more than we could have done. 

Incidentally, we thought you might like to know that this sum- 
mer when we were at the Home the New York members were still 
happily reminiscing over the wonderful time the New York delega- 
tion to the Convention gave them when they were in Lakeland last 
April. While the visit of these men may have been of short dura- 
tion, the memory of the most enjoyable time they gave the mem- 
bers of the Home remained for many months after these men re- 
turned to New York. 

We are deeply sad in the loss of our Dad, but we do want the 
members of the Local to know that we are truly grateful that the 
sunset years of his life could be spent in a spot so beautiful and in 
a. place that he really appreciated and enjoyed. Our natural desire 
is to do something personally for each and every one of those on the 
staff who have been doing things for Dad over the years, but there 
is the realization we could not begin to cover them all individually, 
even among those we know, the doctor, the barber, the various 
nurses, the boys who took care of his tray and his room, the gentle 
and cheerful little colored girls, to say nothing of the many others 
of whom we are unaware; but we do want you to know that every 
last person down there is doing a wonderful job, and we are deeply 
grateful to them all. The Home is a credit to every member of the 
Union and an achievement of which they can all be justly proud. 

With grateful appreciation, 

Sincerely yours, 

Claudia and Mariette Gilchrist. 



[rirmjTJTTLnjTJTrLr^ 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

GijfERAL Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis. Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Fibbt General Vice-Presidext 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Exbcutive Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON. Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Second District, WM. J. KELLY 
Carpenters' Bid.. 243 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Fifth District. R. E. ROBERTS 
631 W. Page. Dallas. Texas 

Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 

Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District. HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District. ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence. S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



REGULAR MEETING OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE 

BOARD 

Lakeland, Florida, 
January 6, 1947. 
Since the issuance of Executive Order No. 9801 by the President of the United 
States, which terminated all wage and salary controls adopted under the Sta- 
bilization Act of 1942 and in accordance with circular letter of November 22, 
19 46, issued by the General President, the following trade movements were acted 
upon: 

December 2. 19 46. 
Plattsburg. X. Y. L. U. 1042. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
?1.37y 2 to $1.65 per hour, effective December 9, 1946. Official sanction granted. 
Gainesville. Ga. L. U. 1318. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.40 per hour, effective December 9, 1946. Official sanction granted. 

Crowley, La. L. U. 16 04. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.12% 
to $1.37i /2 per hour, effective December 15, 1946. Official sanction granted. 

December 9. 19 46. 

Newport. R. I. L. U. 176. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.65 per hour, effective February 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Sreator, 111. L. U. 495. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62 % 
to $1.75 per hour, effective December 1, 1946. Official sanction granted. 



THE CARPENTER 13 

Wilmington, Del. L. U. 626. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% 
to $2.00 per hour, effective January 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Carbondale, 111. L. U. 841. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.62% per hour, effective February 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Marion, Ohio. L. U. 976. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective January 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

High Point, N. C. L. U. 1315. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.12% to $1.50 per hour, effective January 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Lafayette, La. L. U. 189 7. Movement for an increase in wages from $1.12% 
to $1.37% per hour, effective February 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Odessa, Texas. L. U. 2206. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.75 per hour, and the 40-hour week, effective February 1, 1947. Official 
sanction granted. 

Winfield, Kans. L. U. 23 83. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective February 1, 19 47. Official sanction granted. 

December 16, 1946. 

Springfield, 111. L. U. 16. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 
to $1.87% per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Springfield, 111. L. U. 16. — (Millmen) — Movement for an increase in wages 
from $1.10 to $1.35 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Rome, N. Y. L. U. 1016. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% 
to $1.75 per hour, effective January 28, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Corpus Christi, Texas. L. U. 1423. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.75 (Journeymen) and $1.75 to $2.12% (Foremen) per hour, ef- 
fective January 1, 19 47. Official sanction granted. 

Elyria, Ohio. L. U. 1426. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 to 
$1.87% per hour, effective January 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Henryetta, Okla. L. U. 1943. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Front Royal, Va. L. U. 2033. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.37% to $1.62% (Carpenters) and $1.62% to $2.00 (Millwrights) per hour, 
effective January 16, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Norwalk, Ohio. L. U. 227 3. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.75 per hour, effective January 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Lower Anthracite Region D. C. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.37% to $1.65 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

December 19, 1946. 

Terre Haute, Ind., L. U. 133. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% 
to $1.75 (Carpenters) and $1.75 to $2.00 (Millwrights) per hour, effective De- 
cember 9, 1946. Official sanction granted. 

Knoxville, Tenn. L. U. 1002. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.45 
to $1.75 per hour, effective February 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Kilgore, Texas. L. U. 1671. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.50 per hour, effective January 27, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Oberlin, Ohio. L. U. 1968. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 
to $1.87% per hour, effective February 4, 19 47. Official sanction granted. 

Eastland, Texas. L. U. 2016. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective February 16, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Kirksville, Mo. L. U. 2057. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

December 20, 19 46. 
San Francisco, Calif.- — L. U. 3141. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
,$1.10 to $1.25 per hour, effective January 1, 1947. Official sanction granted with- 
out financial aid. 

December 27, 1946. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. Kent, Ottawa and Muskegon D. C. — Movement for an 
increase in wages from 92c to $1.08% per hour (Millmen) effective December 
15, 1946. Official sanction granted without financial aid. 



14 THE CARPEXTER 

December 30, 1946. 

Stamford, Conn. L. U. 210. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 
to $1,871,2 per hour, effective January 1. 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Grand Junction, Colo. L. U. 244. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.37i£ to $1.50 per hour, effective February 3, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Brazil. Ind. L. U. 431. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37 % 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Pittsburgh. Kans. L. TJ. 561. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37i /3 
to $1.50 per hour, effective February 20, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Herrin, 111. L. U. 581. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37 % 
to $1.50 per hour, effective January 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Fort Scott, Kans. L. TJ. 942. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to SI. 50 (Carpenters) and $1.00 to $1.22 (Millmen), effective January 1, 1947. 
Official sanction granted. 

Lake Charles, La. L. TJ. 953.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.87i/ 2 per hour, effective January 25, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Louisiana, Mo. L. TJ. 1008. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.90 (Carpenters) and $1.50 to $2.00 (Millwrights) per hour, effective Febru- 
ary 1. 19 4 7. Official sanction granted. 

Glasgow. Mont. L. U. 1211. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.20 
to $1.50 per hour, effective January 5, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Fort Lauderdale, Fla. L. TJ. 1394. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.87 1 2 per hour, effective February 23, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Salisbury, X. C. L. TJ. 150 5. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective February 15, 1947. Official sanction granted with- 
out financial aid. 

Casper, Wyo. L. TJ. 156 4. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.82% per hour, effective February 2, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Abilene, Texas. L. TJ. 1565. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.30 
to $1.75 (carpenter foreman) $1.50 (journeymen) and $1.62 % (power machine 
operators) per hour, effective February 9, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Verona, Mo. L. U. 158 6. — Movement for an increase in wages from 75c to 
51.00 (Millmen) per hour, effective November 1, 1946. Official sanction granted. 

McLeansboro, 111. L. TJ. 1S95. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.12i4 per hour to $1.37%, effective February 6, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Columbia, Mo. L. U. 1925. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.3 7% 
to $1.62% per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Natchez, Miss. L. TJ. 199 4. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
$1.62% per hour, effective February 12, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Bastrop, La. L. TJ. 2032. Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective January 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Centralia, Mo. L. TJ. 2099. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.62% per hour, effective January 1, 1947. Official sanction granted without 
financial aid. 

Glendive. Mont. L. TJ. 2425. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective February 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

January 2, 19 47. 

Durham, N. C. L. TJ. 522. Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.62 y 2 per hour, effective February 12, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Ithaca, N. Y. L. TJ. 603. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective February 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Freeport, 111. L. TJ. 719. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.62% per hour, effective January 6, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Clarksville, Tenn. L. TJ. 1818. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.25 to $1.40 per hour, effective January 3, 1947. Official sanction granted. 



THE CARPENTER 15 

Carpenters' Home, Lakeland, Florida. 
January 6, 1947. 

The General Executive Board met in regular session at Carpenters' Home, 
Lakeland, Florida, on above date. 

Report of the delegate to the Sixty-first Annual Convention of the Trades and 
Labor Congress of Canada, held in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, in September, 1946, 
was filed for future reference as it has been published in the December, 1946, 
issue of our official monthly journal, "The Carpenter" for the information of 
our members. 

Report of the delegates to the Thirty-ninth Annual Convention of the Building 
and Construction Trades Department of the American Federation of Labor held 
in Chicago, Illinois, in October, 19 46, was filed for future reference as it has 
already been published in the December, 1946, issue of our official journal, 
"The Carpenter" for the information of our members. 

Report of the Delegates to the Sixty-fifth Annual Convention of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor held in Chicago, Illinois, in October, 19 46, was filed 
for future reference as it has been published in the January, 1947, issue of our 
official monthly journal, "The Carpenter" for the information of our members. 

Local Union 48 8, New York City, N. Y., requests the General Executive Board 
to take under consideration the advisability of levying an assessment when that 
becomes necessary in order to continue paying fifteen dollars per member per 
month pension. 

This request is endorsed by Local Unions 366 and 2305, New York City. 

After careful consideration of this matter the Board finds that in accordance 
with our laws it has the right to levy an assessment when the General Fund is 
endangered, or when combinations of any kind try or attempt to disrupt or destroy 
the organization, but in no case is the Board authorized to levy an assessment 
for Home and Pension purposes. 

Owing to the growth of the organization involving increased duties on the 
General Secretary, the Board authorized the General President to appoint Albert 
E. Fischer of Cincinnati, as Assistant to the General Secretary. 

The following new policy was issued September 12, 1946, covering General 
Burglary Insurance: 

$ 5,000.00 Interior hold-up; 

$ 5,000.00 Messenger hold-up; 

$15,000.00 Safe burglary on three safes in the Headquarters Building, 222 
East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, 
through the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Mary- 
land — expiring September 12, 1949, was referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Public Liability Insurance on Passenger and Freight Elevator, 222 
East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, and Freight Elevator, 516 Hudson 
Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, in the amount of $10/20,000.00 through the United 
States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Maryland, expiring Septem- 
ber 24, 1949, was referred to our Legal Department. 

New burglary insurance policy on office furniture, fixtures and equipment 
at Headquarters, 222 East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, in the amount 
of $10,000.00 through the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of 
Baltimore, Maryland, expiring October 1, 1949, was referred to our Legal De- 
partment. 

Renewal of fire and extended coverage policy on Headquarters Building, 222 
East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, in the amount of $54,000.00 through 
the General Insurance Company of America of Seattle, Washington, expiring 
October 12, 1951, was referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of fire and extended coverage policy on Headquarters Building, 2 22 
East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, in the amount of $46,000.00 through 
the Merchants Fire Insurance Company of Denver, Colorado, expiring December 
23, 1951, was referred to our Legal Department. 



16 THE CARPENTER 

Renewal of Public Liability insurance on Printing Plant, 516 Hudson Street, 
Indianapolis, Indiana, in the amount of ?5 1O,<MH>.0O through the United- States 
Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore. Maryland, expiring October 12. 
1947, was referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Employers Liability Insurance ("Workmen's Compensation > re- 
states of Oregon and Washington amount statutory through the United States 
Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Maryland, expiring October 12. 
1947, was referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Workmen's Compensation Insurance for States of Indiana, Illi- 
nois. Pennsylvania. Minnesota. California. Wisconsin, Tennessee, Oklahoma. New 
York. Missouri. Michigan. Maryland. Louisiana. Kentucky. Iowa, Florida, and Con- 
necticut amount statutory through the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Com- 
pany of Baltimore. Maryland, expiring October 12, 1947, was referred to our 
Legal Department. 

Renewal of Public Liability insurance on 5 2 3-525 North Delaware Street. 
Indianapolis, Indiana, in the amount of 5 5 '10.000.00 through the United .States 
Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Maryland, expiring October 12. 
1947, was referred to our Legal Department. 

The General President reported that a satisfactory understanding was reached 
with Local Union 101. Baltimore, Md., in the controversy of that Local Union 
with the International Organization. New officers were officially elected and 
installed and Local Union 101 is now functioning as a Local of the Brotherhood 
in accordance with our laws. 

Local L'nion 101, Baltimore. Md.. invites the General Executive Board to their 
Sixth Annual Oyster R.oast. to be held at the Fifth Regiment Armory on Sunday. 
January 12, 19 47. The members of the Board appreciate this action of Local 
Union 101, but as the Board is in session at Lakeland, Florida, it will be im- 
possible for them to attend. 

It has been brought to the attention of the General Executive Board several 
times that some State Councils exceed the authority given them by our Laws and 
as this has reached a serious stage the Board authorized the General President 
to appoint a Committee of the Board to make a thorough investigation of this 
matter and report their findings to the next meeting of the Board. 

The General President appointed: 

First General Vice-President 

Board Member District No. 1 

Board Member District No. 2 

Assistant to the General Secretary. 

***** 

January 7, 1947. 

Brothers George Coughlin and Raleigh Rajoppi from the State of New Jersey 
appeared before the Board relative to the action of the Laborers in doing work 
which has always been done in the past by the Carpenters, after which the Board 
decided to send a Committee to appear before the next meeting of the Executive 
Council of the Building and Construction Trades Department of the American 
Federation of Labor to have this matter stopped. The General President ap- 
pointed the following committee: M. A. Hutcheson, Harry Schwarzer, Wm. J. 
Kelley and Chas. Johnson Jr.. to appear before the Executive Council of the 
Building and Construction Trades Department of the American Federation of 
Labor and present to them a copy of an action taken by the General Executive 
Board, which reads as follows: 

To the Executive Council of the Building and Construction Trades 
Department of the American Federation of Labor. 

Greetings: 

This communication is submitted for the purpose of informing your Council of 
the action taken by our General Executive Board at their recent meeting. 



THE CARPENTER 17 

All Local Unions and District Councils of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America be notified that the members of 
our Brotherhood will not use, erect or install any materials that are not 
handled by members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters or under 
the supervision of a member of our Brotherhood after it is delivered to 
the job site. 

Fraternally yours, 

WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman; 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary. 

The General Executive Board ordered the above communication be sent to all 
Local Unions and District Councils of the United Brotherhood. 

Phoenix, Arizona. — Request of the Carpenters District Council for Financial 
aid to test the constitutionality of "Right to Work Amendment" was carefuly 
considered, after which the Board appropriated the sum of $5,000.00 for that 
purpose. 

Brother C. M. Griffin, Local Union No. 19 8, Dallas, Texas, appeared before the 
Board favoring the granting of a State Charter to the Carpenters of the State 
of Texas. 

The matter was referred to the General President in accordance with the 
provisions of Paragraph A, Section 10, of our General Constitution. 



The General President appointed the following committees: 

Inspection of Rooms 

Frank Duffy 
Arthur Martel 
S. P. Meadows 

Inspection of Stock and Supplies 

M. A. Hutcheson 
Harry Schwarzer 
R. E. Roberts 

■ Balance of the members of the Board to audit the books and accounts of the 
Home. 

The Board authorized a circular letter be sent to all Locals in reference to 
typographical error in Paragraph D, Section 31 of our General Laws, relative to 
Honorary Members. 

The General President reported to the Board that A. J. Porth, a member of 
Local Union 201, Wichita, Kansas, was a delegate from that Local Union to the 
Central Trades and Labor Assembly of Wichita, that he was a delegate from the 
Central Trades and Labor Assembly of Wichita, Kansas, to the Sixty-Fifth Annual 
Convention of the American Federation of Labor held in Chicago, Illinois, in 
October, 1946, that on behalf of the Central Trades and Labor Assembly of 
Wichita, Kansas, he introduced a Resolution known as No. 13 to that Convention, 
the sum and substance of which deals with the years of controversy between 
the International Association of Machinists and the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America over millwright work which was part of the 
jurisdiction of the Brotherhood when the Brotherhood helped bring into ex- 
istence the American Federation of Labor in 1881. 

As this resolution is an infringement on the jurisdictional rights of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, Brother Porth should have 
refused to introduce it. If he had in mind his obligation he would have at least 
consulted the General Officers on this matter, as to whether or not it conformed 
to the general policy of the Brotherhood. 

Not having done so, the General President ruled that A. J. Porth is not quali- 
fied to continue as a delegate from Local Union 201 to the Central Trades and 
Labor Assembly of Wichita, Kansas. 



18 THE CARPENTER 

The General President further directed Local Union 2 01 to request the Central 
Trades and Labor Assembly of Wichita, Kansas to repudiate resolution No. 13, 
failure to do so Local Union 201 to sever affiliation with the Central Body of 
Wichita, Kansas. - 

The General Executive Board approved the action of the General President 
on this matter. 

A. J. Porth is not eligible to represent Local Union 201 at any time, nor can 
he hold office of any kind in Local Union 201. 

The General President was directed to notify Local Union 201 to forthwith 
withdraw from the Central Trades and Labor Assembly of Wichita, Kansas. 

* * * * * 

Appeal of Local Union 74, Chattanooga, Tennessee, from the decision of the 
General Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of the late 
James McKeehan. 

The claim was referred back to the General Treasurer for further consideration. 

***** 

Appeal of Local Union 27, Toronto, Canada, from the decision of the General 
Treasurer in disapproving the death claim of Mrs. Edith R. Anderson, wife of 
Hillard Anderson, a member of said Local, for the reason that the claim was 
not filed with the General Office within six months from date of death as the 
law provides in paragraph B, Section 5 3 of our General Laws. The decision of 
the General Treasurer was sustained and the appeal dismissed. 

***** 

Appeal of Local Union 541, Washington. Pa., from the decision of the Gen- 
eral Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of the late T. I. 
Piatt. 

The claim was referred back to the General Treasurer for further considera- 
tion. ***** 

Appeal of Local Union 2 81, Binghamton, New York, from the decision of the 
General Treasurer in disapproving the death claim of Abram C. D. Stone, a former 
member of said Local Union, for the reason that the claim was not filed with the 
General Office within six months from the date of death as the law provides in 
Paragraph B, Section 5 3 of our General Laws. The decision of the General Treas- 
urer was sustained and the appeal dismissed. 

January 8, 1947. 
The application for pension of William Solomon, a former member of Local 
Union 1572, McGill, Nevada, was disapproved for the reason that on August 31, 

19 44, he owed six months dues and was suspended. The Board approved the 
action of the General President in disapproving this application for pension. 

Request of the Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers International Union of 
America to enter into an agreement with the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America same as was entered into with the Operative Plasterers and 
Cement Finishers International Association of the United States and Canada on 
June 13, 1944, governing the fabrication and setting of screeds and forms used 
in connection with the placing and finishing of cement or concrete. 
The request was referred to the General President to comply with. 

***** 
Having under consideration the action of our last General Convention held 
in April. 19 46, on the recommendation of the General President that: 

Each and every Local Union and District Council of the Brotherhood 
adopt a By-Law and Working Rule, wherein they set forth that no 
member of the Brotherhood will use, handle or erect any material that 
is not made by members of our organization 
the Board directed that a Special Circular Letter be issued to all Local Unions 
and District Councils on this matter for compliance forthwith. 

The General Executive Board gave consideration to the filming of the various 
departments at the General Office, Indianapolis, Indiana, as well as the Home, 



THE CARPENTER 19 

Lakeland, Florida — also various branches of our trade. The First General Vice- 
President was authorized to proceed with this work. 

The dispute now of long standing between the Essex County District Council, 
New Jersey, and Local Union 1456, Dock Builders of New York City, was again 
brought to the attention of the General Executive Board and was carefully con- 
sidered, after which the Board reaffirmed its former action, taken in 19 3 S and 
again in 19 45. Inasmuch as no recent evidence has been brought forth or new 
issues presented the Board reaffirmed its action of 19 38 — which was unanimously 
approved by the 19 40 Convention, and reads as follows: 

In order to eliminate any further controversy the Board decided that 
" when any question arises as to the interpretation of the meaning of the 
agreement as to jurisdiction of work, the General President shall be im- 
mediately notified and he, either in person or by representative, shall 
make an investigation and render a decision which is to be accepted 
and binding on all parties. 
Request of the Cugahoga, Lake and Geauge County Carpenters District Coun- 
cil (Cleveland, Ohio) for reimbursement of the money said Council recently spent 
in raising the wages of its members from $1.65 per hour to $2.00 per hour was 
carefully considered, after which the request was denied. 



January 9, 19 47. 

Mt. Vernon, 111. L. U. 99 9. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37 i^ 
to $1.50 per hour, effective February 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Steubenville, Ohio L. U. 18 6. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.87 ^ 
to $2,121/, per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Attleboro, Mass. L. U. 327. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.35 
to $1.50 per hour, effective January 8, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Harlingen, Texas L. U. 2190. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37 ^ 
to $1.50 per hour, effective February 17, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

St. Genevieve, Mo. L. U. 2030. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.00 to $1.25 per hour for residential work and $1.25 to $1.50 for commercial 
work, effective January 1, 19 47. Official sanction granted. 

• Breese, 111. L. U. 1675. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.30 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Chickasha, Okla. L. U. 653. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37 Va 
to $1.50 per hour, effective February 3, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Portsmouth, Ohio L. U. 43 7. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted without 
financial aid. 

Golconda, 111. L. U. 605. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective February 7, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Payette, Idaho L. U. 426. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37^4 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

DeKalb, 111. L. U. 9 6 5. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Audit of books and accounts of the Home commenced. 

January 13, 1947. 

Spring Valley, 111. L. U. 631. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37 ^ 
to $1.75 per hour, effective January 1, 19 47. Official sanction granted. 

Prestonburg, Ky. L. U. 7 23. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective January 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Carlinville, 111. L. U. 737. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.12 14 
to $1.50 per hour, effective February 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Sterling, 111. — L. U. 69 5. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37 ^ 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 



20 THE CARPENTER 

Burlington, Vt. L. U. 683. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.35 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 15, 1947. Official sanction granted without 
financial aid. 

Audit of Books and Accounts continued. 

January 14, 1947. 
Audit of Books and Accounts continued. 

January 15, 1947. 

Audit of books and accounts completed and found correct. 

After very careful consideration on the question of Portal to Portal pay, the 
General Executive Board decided that all written or verbal agreements should 
be observed and if there are alleged violations of agreements, rectification should 
be made at that time, as is the policy of the Brotherhood and for members of 
the United Brotherhood not to enter any suit under the guise of Portal to Portal 
pay. 

Appeal of Ralph R. Reichman, a member of Local Union 5 6 3, Glendale, Cali- 
fornia, from the orders of the General President in removing him from the posi- 
tion as Business Agent of that Local Union was carefully considered. 

In referring to the proceedings of the Twenty-fifth General Convention, held 
in April, 1946, the Board finds that the records show that Resolution 59, which 
reads as follows, was adopted by the Convention: 

Be it resolved that the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America in the 25th General Convention at Lakeland, Florida, reaffirm 
that part ot the preamble to the oath taken at the time of admittance to 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, that we 
do not recognize the Communist Party as a political organization, or 
party — go further in that we: 

Do not recognize the Communist Party. 

And that this convention direct the General President to order any 
District Council, Provincial Council, Local Union or any other group 
functioning under the U. B. of C. and J. of A. to immediately discharge 
any business representative, officer, or employee of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, either elected or appointed, 
who is known, or recognized as a Communist or who has ever been 
registered as such on a political register. 

As Ralph Reichman was a registered Communist the General President, in 
accordance with the provisions of the above resolution, ordered him discontinued 
as Business Agent. The General Executive Board sustained the action of the 
General President and dismissed the appeal. 

January 16, 1947. 

SPECIAL CIRCULAR FROM THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD 

To All Local Unions and District Councils of the United Brotherhood of 

Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

Greeting: 

At the Twenty-fifth General Convention of the Brotherhood held in Lakeland, 
Florida, in April, 19 46, the General President in his report to that Convention 
recommended that: 

"Each and every Local Union and District Council of our Brother- 
hood adopt a By-Law and Working Rule wherein they set forth that 
no member of the Brotherhood will use, handle, or' erect any wood 
material that is not made by members of our organization. It would then 
become incumbent upon each and every member to observe that By-Law 
or Trade Rule the same as they would a Trade Rule setting forth that 
eight hours shall constitute a day's work, and we would be rendering 
assistance and help to one another that would be invaluable." 



THE CARPENTER 21 

This recommendation was unanimously adopted by the Convention and it 
now becomes the duty of the General Executive Board to see that it is put into 
force and effect immediately. 

Therefore, the Board directs that the following law be inserted in your 
By-Laws : 

"No member will use, handle, install or erect any material produced 
or manufactured from wood not made by members of the United 
Brotherhood." 

Fraternally yours, 

GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD 

WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary. 
***** 
Local Union 472, Ashland, Ky., submitted the following Resolution: 
"Realizing that unless some drastic action is taken to offset the ever-increasing 
anti-labor propaganda now being released by the forces opposing labor, we will lose 
all that has been gained by the years of united efforts. Now, therefore, this sixth 
day of January, we do unanimously adopt the following resolution: 

"Whereas: Due to much anti-labor propaganda now being put out by 
certain forces opposed to any form of liberty for the laboring men of 
this country, and particularly to our rights to collective bargaining, and 

"Whereas: Many of our present electors to this Eightieth Assembly 
of the Congress of United States have already expressed certain views 
, opposed to many of the rights and privileges of labor gained over a long 
period of struggling, and 

"Whereas: Labor as an organization as well as individually, now 
seems to be in a much better condition numerically and financially than 
at any time during its existence, and 

"Whereas: Due to war waste, and the extravagance of some of the 
boards of control, and the refusal of some manufacturers to produce cer- 
tain items for the market under controlled prices, the economic condition 
of the nation generally is in a very poor condition to put up any kind of 
a prolonged, concentrated effort, to oppose a solid front on the part of 
' Labor opposition to the enactment of any Anti-Labor legislation; now, 
therefore, be it hereby 

"Resolved: That we go on record as opposing any attempt at anti- 
labor legislation and so notify our International Officers, the Kentucky 
State Federation of Labor, the American Federation of Labor, and such 
other bodies as we think may be of assistance to us, urging them to 
call upon all affiliated bodies to pledge a wholly United Front to sup- 
port such a resolution." 

The General Executive Board endorsed this resolution and directed the Gen- 
eral Secretary to notify Local Union 472 that the Board will do evei*y thing pos- 
sible to protect the liberties and the rights of our members. 

***** 

Clinton, Iowa L. U. 772. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective February 18, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Portsmouth, N. H. L. U. 165 2. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.18 to $1.37% per hour, effective March 15, 1947. Official sanction granted 
without financial aid. 

Watertown, S. D. L. U. 1690. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.40 per hour, effective February 10, 1947. Official sanction granted with- 
out financial aid. 

There being no further business to be considered the minutes were read and 
and approved and the Board adjourned to meet at the call of the Chair. 

Respectfully submitted. 

FRANK DUFFY, General Secretary. 



22 THE CARPENTER 

REPORT OF THE DELEGATES TO THE THIRTY- 
EIGHTH ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE UNION 
LABEL TRADES DEPARTMENT OF THE 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 



To the General Executive Board: 
Greetings. 

The Thirty-eighth Annual Convention of the Union Label Trades Department 
of the American Federation of Labor vras held in the Morrison Hotel, Chicago, 
111., on October 4. 1946. One hundred and three delegates were in attendance, 
representing thirty-nine national and international unions. 

The report of the Executive Board of the Department dealt with many sub- 
jects, among which vrere the following: 

During the past year, the Union Label Trades Department of the American 
Federation of Labor has been more active than it has been during any period 
of the last decade. 

The principal function of the Union Label Trades Department is to publicize 
the seventy Union Labels, Shop Cards, and Service Buttons of the fifty-two affili- 
ated national and international labor unions that have adopted these official 
emblems to designate their goods and services. With this objective constantly 
in mind, officials of our Department utilize every channel of advertising — such as 
news releases, editorials, cartoons and pictorial features for the labor press and 
friendly newspapers. Exhibits. Union Label weeks, electrical transcriptions, motion 
pictures, movie slides and all other sources of publicity are used when available. 

UNION LABEL FEATURE SERVICE 

The Union Label Trades Department issues news releases, editorials, and 
cartoons regularly to all the labor press. These features have proven to be very 
popular with the editors of official monthly labor journals, weekly labor news- 
papers, and other publications. 

Special articles are prepared for annuals and other labor publications. 

The Department issues Union Label literature, posters, and mats of all Union 
Labels, Shop Cards, and Service Buttons which, with the names of unions and 
their officials, make an attractive weekly one-column feature throughout the year. 

The Union Label Trades Department desires to acknowledge the deep indebted- 
ness it owes to the editors of the official monthly labor journals, weekly labor 
newspapers and all other publications for the liberal display they have given to 
all of these Union Label features. 

Several national and international unions reserve space each month in their 
publications for special articles, cartoons and other features. A number of editors 
of labor publications of unions not affiliated with the Union Label Trades Depart- 
ment give liberally to the Union Label cause by setting aside space in each issue 
of their publications. Many organizations have reserved the back cover of their 
official organ for the Union Label Trades Department which is the best space 
available in any publication. 

THE UNION LABEL CATALOGUE-DrRECTORY 

Each year the Union Label Trades Department issues an official Union Label 
Catalogue-Directory which contains listings of union manufacturers, union mer- 
chandisers and other A. F. of L. unionized industries. It also contains facsimiles 
of all Union Labels, Shop Cards, and Service Buttons with the names of officials 
of our respective affiliated national and international unions that have adopted 
those union emblems. 



THE CARPENTER 23 

The Union Label Catalogue-Directory forms an official guide book for Union 
Label-conscious buyers and also a convenient and ready reference book for offi- 
cials of all branches of the American Federation of Labor. It is indispensable 
to the officers of various unions and auxiliaries who are desirous of keeping the 
members informed about all the Union Labels, Shop Cards, and Service Buttons; 
how they are displayed, and where merchants can obtain Union Label goods from 
manufacturers throughout America. 

Copies of the Catalogue-Directory are furnished without charge to national 
and international labor unions, state federations of labor, central labor unions, 
union label leagues, women's auxiliaries, editors of the labor press, full-time 
representatives and other authorized agents of the A. F. of L. 

RADIO BROADCASTS 

Since the last convention the Union Label Trades Department has broadcast 
as follows: March 29, 1945, Mutual Broadcasting System, a dramatization en- 
titled "Together We Fight"; June 30, 1945, Columbia Broadcasting System, an 
address entitled "Union Label and Postwar"; September 1, 1945, National Broad- 
casting Company, address entitled "The Union Label — Emblem of American Pros- 
perity"; March 21, 1946, American Broadcasting Company, address entitled 
"Union Label — A Peacetime Plan"; April 8, 19 46, Mutual Broadcasting System, 
dramatization, "The Shield of Protection"; July 4, 1946, Mutual Broadcasting 
System, dramatization, "Samuel Gompers — Patriot"; August 10, 1946, Columbia 
Broadcasting System, address entitled "Labor-Management Cooperation," and on 
Labor Day, September 2, 19 46, Mutual Broadcasting System, dramatization, "Peter 
J. McGuire — The Founder of Labor Day." 

VACANCY ON EXECUTIVE BOARD 

The Executive Board unanimously elected Dave Beck, International Vice- 
President, International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen 
and Helpers of America, to fill the vacancy on the Executive Board created by 
the death of Vice-President John M. Gillespie. 

NEW AFFILIATIONS 

The following organizations affiliated with the Union Label Trades Department 
since the last convention, held in New Orleans, November 17, 19 44: 

International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders and Helpers 
of America, January 1, 1945. 

Office Employes International Union, June 1, 1945. 

INVITATIONS EXTENDED TO AFFILIATE WITH DEPARTMENT 

Invitations have been extended to the following organizations to affiliate with 
the Department: 

The United Brick and Clay Workers of America. 

International Brotherhood of Firemen and Oilers. 

United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe 
Fitting Industry of the United States and Canada. 

ACKNOAVLEDGEMENTS OF COOPERATION 

The officers and members of the Executive Board of the Union Label Trades 
Department wish to express their gratitude to President William Green and 
Secretary-Treasurer George Meany of the American Federation of Labor for the 
splendid cooperation they have received from the entire staff of the A. F. of L. 
at headquarters in Washington. Through the columns of the American Federa- 
tionist and the A. F. of L. Weekly News Service — all items of interest concerning 
Union Labels, Shop Cards, and Service Buttons have been given wide publicity. 
We are also indebted to the other three Departments of the A. F. of L. — the 



24 THE CARPENTER 

Building and Construction Trades Department; tlte Metal Trades Department; 
the Railroad Employes' Department, and to the A. F. of L. organizers. - 

Likewise, we are indebted to the officials and organizers of all national and 
international unions affiliated with the A. P. of L., state federations of labor, 
central labor unions, local unions, union label leagues, and women's auxiliaries. 
We fully appreciate the loyal support that they have voluntarily contributed to 
the success of our Union Label crusade. 

AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Cash balances, as of August 31, 1946, were reconciled to the book accounts and 
confirmed by letter from the banks. Bonds and stocks or evidence indicating 
ownership of same as vested in the Department were examined and found to be 
in agreement with the financial records. Surety bond coverage in the penalty 
sum of $3,000 is carried on the positions of Secretary-Treasurer and Bookkeeper. 

The schedules of this report, made from the books of the Department, which 
are in agreement with the bank transactions, in my opinion, properly set forth 
the financial transactions of the fiscal year ending August 31, 1946, and the 
financial condition of the Department as of that date. 

Respectfully, 

JAMES E. GILLIS, 
Certified Public Accountant. 
The report was unanimously endorsed. 

RESOLUTION 

The following Resolution was unanimously adopted: 

Whereas, The editors of official monthly journals of national and international 
labor unions, affiliated with the American Federation of Labor, are contributing 
liberal space for the publicizing of Union Labels, Shop Cards, and Service Buttons; 
and 

Whereas, The Union Label Trades Department largely depends upon said jour- 
nals or magazines to reach the entire membership of A. F. of L. affiliated unions 
tlirough Union Label editorials, news items, special articles, advertisements, car- 
toons, and other releases; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Union Label Trades Department of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, in convention assembled, does hereby acknowledge the space so 
generously contributed by the official monthly labor journals. 

President Green of the American Federation of Labor addressed the Con- 
vention at length on matters pertaining to the Labor Movement. 

The following officers were elected: 

President Matthew Woll Photoengravers. 

First Vice-President John J. Mara Boot & Shoe Workers. 

Second Vice-President Jos. P. Curdy United Garment Wkrs. 

Third Vice-President Jas. M. Duffy Operative Potters. 

Fourth Vice-President Herman Winter Bakers. 

Fifth Vice-President Dave Beck Teamsters. 

Secretary-Treasurer I. M. Ornburn Cigar Makers. 



Respectfully submitted, 



M. A. HUTCHESON, 
T. SHEDAKER, 
TEX KENNEY, 
Delegates. 



Jin ffitmttvinm 



Not lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 



They still live In our memory, 
And will forever more. 



%t&i in l^tatt 

Thi Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother JOSEPH A. ARSENAULT, Local No. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 
Brother ELEK BARSI, Local No. 721, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Brother LEONARD BECHTOLD, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brother DELMAR D. BECKHART, Local No. 634, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Brother VAL BOEPPLER, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
Brother SYLVESTER C. COWELL, Local No. 634, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Brother WILLIAM R. CRUMP, Local No. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 
Brother JOSEPH E. CURRIE, Local No. 1835, Waterloo, Iowa. 
Brother FRANCIS DOWALTER, Local No. 1052, W. Hollywood, Calif. 
Brother MICH AIL J. DOWNEY, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
Brother L. W. DOZIER, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
Brother H. F. DUTCHER, Local No. 721, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Brother ANTHONY FABBRI, Local No. 620, Vineland, N. J. 
Brother J. A. GARRISON, Local No. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 
Brother L. H. GODDARD, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
Brother VIRGIL GRAY, Local No. 1050, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Brother MICHAEL GREENBERG, Local No. 366, New York, N. Y. 
Brother CHARLES O. GUINASSO, Local No. 222, Westfield, Mass. 
Brother DENIS GYONKE, Local No. 419, Chicago, 111. 
Brother G. E. HALL, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
Brother WILLIAM L. HALL, Local No. 620, Vineland, N. J. 
Brother C. A. HOSTETLER, SR., Local No. 764, Shreveport, La. 
Brother T. H. KELLEY, Local No. 1260, Iowa City, Iowa. 
Brother ERIC LEDROW, Local No. 1373, Flint, Mich. 
Brother FRANCIS M. LEE, Local No. 222, Westfield, Mass. 
Brother UNO LILLINQUIST, Local No. 620, Vineland, N. J. 
Brother THOMAS LINDSAY, Local No. 634, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Brother MARCUS LUND, Local No. 634, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Brother DENIS MAHONEY, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brother JAMES McCLINTOCK, Local No. 122, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Brother JERRY McCREARY, Local No. 1419, Johnstown, Pa. 
Brother M. L. McELROY, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
Brother OSCAR A. MILLER, Local No. 1067, Port Huron, Mich. 
Brother LOUIS MOEHLIS, Local No. 1835, Waterloo, Iowa. 
Brother CHAS. OBERTON, Local No. 1835, Waterloo, Iowa. 
Brother ROBERT O'NEAL, Local No. 1052, W. Hollywood, Calif. 
Brother ERNEST PALLADINI, Local No. 721, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Brother MARION F. PALMER, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 
Brother MATTEO PASSARELLI, Local No. 1050, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Brother WM. H. PETTITT, Local No. 1065, Salem, Ore. 
Brother GEORGE A. RAMMING, Local No. 132, Washington, D. C. 
Brother TORGUS SALVESEN, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brother PAUL F. SAMARIN, Local No. 721, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Brother KENDAL T. SCOTT, Local No. 207, Chester, Pa. 
Brother FRANK SHADE, Local No. 684, Dayton, Ohio. 
Brother ALBERT M. SHOUP, Local No. 1622, Hay ward, Calif. 
Brother ROBERT J. SMALL, Local No. 1991, Bedford, Ohio. 
Brother JOHN B. SOUTHWORTH, Local No. 634, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Brother GEORGE M. SP ANGLER, Local No. 1419, Johnstown, Pa. 
Brother J. D. SPRAGUE, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
Brother ALF O. STENERSON, Local No. 1622, Hay ward, Calif. 
Brother TRAVIS SURINE, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother JOHN J. TOWERS, Local No. 257, New York, N. Y. 
Brother CHARLES WALTER, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brother GUSTAVE WENTZ, Local No. 684, Dayton, Ohio. 



Corrosponcfence 







This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondent*. 

Local Union No. 60 Makes It 60 

On January 9th. Local Union No. 6 of Indianapolis. Indiana, played host to 
some thousand odd members and guests at the Murat Temple on the occasion of 
the Local Union's 6 0th birthday. With its usual flair for doing the unusual, the 
Local Union made the affair a memorable one. 

As the lady guests entered the hall, each was presented "with a beautiful. 
long-stemmed American Beauty rose. For several hours professional entertainers 
put on a variety show that equalled anything ever provided by the old vaudeville 
circuits. Following the show, a fine orchestra provided music for dancing in the 
Egyptian Room. 

Speaker of the evening was Second General Vice President John R. Stevenson 
who reviewed the progress of not only Local Union Xo. GO but also of previous 
efforts of Indianapolis' carpenters to build up an organization capable of improv- 
ing their wages and conditions. He called attention to the fact that as long ago 
as 1835 carpenters in the Indiana metropolis were endeavoring to organize them- 
selves. 

When the curtain finally rang down on the occasion it was clear to everyone 
that Local Union Xo. 60 had added another successful party to its long list of 
delightful affairs. 



Pittsburgh Local Marks 58th Birthday 

Local Union Xo. 211, Pittsburgh. Pa., wound up the year 1946 with a long 
to be remembered 58th Anniversary celebration. In conjunction with Ladies' 
Auxiliary Xo. 361, the Local Union sponsored two parties; one in the afternoon and 
one in the evening. The afternoon party was devoted to entertaining the children 
of members. Under the directorship of the Auxiliary, some 400 children were 
fed, entertained, and shown a general good time. In the evening an open meeting 
was held for members and their wives, followed by a fine cold lunch with all the 
trimmings. There was a good floor show featuring acrobatic dancing and juggling 
acts. The evening wound up with dancing and community singing. 

Brother Matt Dardis, president of the Local Union acted as master of cere- 
monies. During the evening he introduced notable guests. Brother W. H. C. 
Moore, eighty-seven years old and only living charter member of Local Union Xo. 
211 was unable to attend on account of illness. Brother James Minteer, next 
oldest member and first recorded apprentice accepted by Local 211 was on hand 
and he gave the guests an interesting review of conditions as they were when 
he joined the Union. He pointed out that the |2.00 per hour wage now in effect 
was as much as carpenters received for ten hours of gruelling work when he 
started in the trade. 

Also present at the meeting were M. Dale Cashdollar, secretary-treasurer of the 
Pittsburgh District Council, and General Executive Board member William Kelly, 
both of whom delivered timely and interesting addresses. 

By the time the last guest had departed the celebration was voted an un- 
qualified success by all who attended and The Carpenter joins them in wishing 
Local Union Xo. 211 many more years of success and progress. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

(.Copyright 1947) 

LESSON 222 

By H. H. Siegele 

The screw driver is not exclusively 
a carpenter's tool, for few persons reach 
maturity without having used it in 
some way. It is used for so many pur- 
poses for which it was not intended, 
that it is not only a widely used tool, 
but a widely misused tool. The misuses 
of the screw driver are due largely to 
the fact that it is a handy tool — close 
at hand and suitable to use for do- 
ing things besides driving screws. Such 
uses of the screw driver should not be 
condemned so long as it is used within 
the capacity of its strength — not the 
use of the screw driver, but the abuse 
of it, should be frowned upon. 

Screw drivers are classified according 
to the length of the shank and the blade 
combined. In size they run all the 
way from 2 V2 inches up to 12 inches 
long, and the thickness in most cases 
is in proportion to the length. Besides 
these sizes, there are screw drivers of 
special design, some larger and much 
stronger than those just mentioned, and 
some smaller and lighter in weight. In 
general, however, screw drivers that 
carpenters use can be placed in four 
classifications, the common, the bit, the 
ratchet and the spiral. The most prac- 
tical of these are the common and the 
bit. The other two have advantages in 
specific cases. 




Fig. 1 shows two views of a spiral 
or automatic screw driver. In the up- 
per drawing we point out the bit, the 
lock collar, the shifter, the shifter case 
and the handle. In the bottom drawing 
we point out the chuck and the spiral 



spindle. The screw driver is especially 
suitable for driving and lifting the 
smaller sizes of screws. In order to get 
the best results, foreboring or punching 
for the screws is necessary, and in cases 
of hard or tough wood, a touch of wax 
or paraffin should be applied to the 
point of each screw as a lubricant. This 
screw driver is provided with a set of 
three bits, small, medium and large. 
The spiral spindle, as shown, is made 
for driving as well as for lifting screws, 




Fig. 2 

which is governed by the shifter. When 
the shifter is pushed as far as it will go 
toward the bit, it will drive the screw, 
if it is pulled back as far as it will come, 
it lifts the screw, and when it is placed, 
at neutral or the center, the bit is held 
stationary and must be operated like 
the common screw driver. By turning 
the lock collar to the left the spiral is 
locked, and if the shifter is set at cen- 
ter you have a common screw driver, if 
the shifter is pulled back you have a 
ratched screw driver that lifts the screw, 
and if it is pushed toward the bit it 
will drive the screw. To unlock the 
spiral, turn the lock collar to the right. 

Fig. 2 shows three steps in driving 
a screw with an automatic screw driver, 
and one misstep. At A, the foreboring 
is shown with the screw ready to be 
inserted. At B the screw has been 
driven with the fingers as far as it will 
go and is ready for the screw driver. 
At C the screw driver is in place for 
driving the screw. At D is shown what 
often happens with an automatic screw 
driver, a marred surface. Due either to 
lack of skill or to carelessness, the bit 
jumped from the screw head to the 
surface of the material and marred it, 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



as shown. This often happens when 
foreboring is omitted and the screw 
turns to one side. But even when the 
screw is well started it can happen, 
principally when the screw driver is 
not kept in line with the screw. In 
operating an automatic screw driver one 
should try not to go faster than what 




Fig. 3 

his skill will justify. It is possible to 
become so skillful with this screw driver 
that great speed can be obtained, but 
that must be preceded by much prac- 
tice. 



If you are ambitious to have your own busi- 
ness and be your own boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 

Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $5.00, 
and pay the balance of $25.00 at $5.00 per 
month, making a total of $30.00 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name and address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building C, Denver 2, Colorado 



H. H. SIEGELE'S BOOKS 

CARPENTRY. —Has 302 p., 754 il., covering general 
house carpentry, and other subjects. $2.50. 

BUILDING TRADES DICTIONARY.— Has 380 p., 
670 il., and about 7,000 building trade terms. $3.00. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of prac- 
tical building problems, has 252 p. and 670 il. $2.50. 

BUILDING. — Has 210 p. and 495 il.. covering form 
building, scaffolding, finishing, stair building, roof 
framing, and other subjects. $2.50. 

(The above books support each other.) 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry, 64 pages, brown 
cloth binding and two-color title page. Only $1.00. 

PUSHING BUTTONS.— The prose companion of 
Twights of Thought. Illustrated. Cloth. Only $1.00. 

Poitaee prepaid when money accompaniei the order. 
Order u U CIPrn a? 222 So. Const. St. 
today. «■ «■ altWtLt Emporia, Kansas 
FREE — With 2 books. Pushing Burtons free; with 3 
books, Twigs of Thought and Pushing Buttons free; 
with 4 books, 3 $ 1 .00 books free — books autographed. 



Fig. 3 shows two views of each of 
four different screw driver points. At 
A we show a point that is often used,, 
which gives fairly good results so long 
as the driving is not too hard. At B 
are two views af a point that is often 




Fig. 4 

found, which is caused by using the 
screw driver for cleaning out slots and 
grooves and so forth. While this is not 
the approved point, fairly good results 
can be obtained with it on screws that 
turn easily. At C are two views of 
a point that is often used in cases of 
emergency — when the workman is 
caught with only one screw driver and 
must drive or draw several sizes of 
screws with the same screw driver. This 
point often saves the day, when the 
screws do not turn hard, but it should 
never be resorted to when it is possible 
to have different screw drivers for the 




Fig. 5 

different sizes of screws. At D we show 
the approved screw driver point. 

Fig. 4 shows two views of each of 
three different screw driver points. At 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



A is shown how the point shown at A, 
Fig. 3, fits into the slot of the screw 
head. At B we show the point shown 
at B, Fig. 3, and at C we show the ap- 
proved point and how it fits into the 
slot of the screw head. 

Screw drivers run in size from very 
small to very large, which should be 
remembered. For what we are showing 




Fig. 6 



in Fig. 5 are only samples." The top 
drawing shows a rather large common 
screw driver, where we point out the 
blade, the shank and the handle. To 
the left at the bottom, we show a stubby 
screw driver, which can be used in 
close quarters, and to the right of it, 
is shown the most practical size of com- 
mon screw drivers. 

Fig. 6 shows a ratchet screw driver. 
The ratchet is controlled by the shifter 
shown on the ratchet shell. When the 



as a guide for making the drawing. 
Otherwise he had little use for it. 

A screw driver combined with a flash- 
light is shown by Fig. 8. This screw 




Fig. 9 

driver has its advantages when screws 
have to be driven in dark places, and 
in such cases it is very practical. 

Two designs of offset screw drivers 
are shown by Fig. 9. Offset screw driv- 
ers are especially useful where screws 



Fig. 7 

shifter is pushed as far as it will go 
toward the bit, the ratchet is set for 
driving the screw, when it is pulled back 
toward the handle, it will lift the screw, 
and when it is set at the center, as 
shown, the bit is locked and you have 
a common screw driver. While this 
screw driver has its advantages, it is 
not as practical as the common screw 
driver. 

A screw driver with jaws for holding 
the screw is shown by Fig. 7. This screw 
driver has its advantages for driving 




Fig. 8 

screws where they can not be set with 
the hand; as, for long reaches or in 
tight places. The drawing was made 
from memory of such a screw driver 
that this writer once owned and lost. 
He missed it most when he wanted it 



BE READY FOR 
A BETTER' JOB 
AT BIGGER PAY 




Thousands of 

Trained Men 

Will Be Needed 



The Building boom is well under way. New homes 
and other structures to be built will provide a tre- 
mendous number of well-paid jobs. Men trained 
in Architecture. Drafting, Contracting, Carpen- 
try and related building trades will cash in BIG 
on their knowledge and skill. YOU can train in 
spare time at home, at low cost, for a big-pay 
job in this rich field. American School can help 
you to success just as it has helped others dur- 
ing its 50 years. Check, fill in and mail coupon 
NOW. for FREE information. 



Chicago 37. III. 

your special traininf 



AMERICAN SCHOOL 

Dept. B344, Drexel Ave. at 58th St. 

Send me FREE information about 
plan covering subjects checked below. 

□ Achitecture & Building □ Automotive Engineering 
D Drafting and Design [~l Diesel Engineering 

n Mechanical Engineering 



□ Contracting 

□ Practical Plumbing 
D Air Conditioning 

□ Refrigeration 

D Electrical Engineering 



D Plastics Engineering 

D Aviation D Radi* 

Q Business Management 

G High School Courses 



30 



THE CARPEXTER 



TWO AIDS FOR SPEED AND ACCURACY 




■x 



THEY HAVE 

OUR CHART Blueprint 27" X 36" 

"The FRAMING SQUARE" (Chart) 

Explains tables on framing squares. Shows how 
to find lengths of any rafter and make its cuts; 
find any angle in degrees; frame any polygon 3 to 
16 sides, and cut its mitres; read board feet rafter 
and brace tables, octagon scale. Gives other valu- 
able information. Also includes Starting Key and 
Radial Saw Chart for changing pitches and cuts 
into degrees and minutes. Every carpenter should 
have this chart. Now printed on both sides, makes about 
13 square feet of printed data showing squares full size. 
Price $1.00 postpaid, no stamps. 



SLIDE CALCULATOR for Rafters 



Makes figuring rafters a cinch! Shows the length of any 
rafter having a run of from 2 to 23 feet; longer lengths are 
found by doubling. Covers 17 different pitches. Shows lengths 
of hips and valleys, commons, jacks, and gives the cuts for 
each pitch, also the angle in degrees and minutes. Fastest 
method known, eliminates chance of error, so simple anyone 
who can read numbers can use it. NOT A SLIDE RULE but 
a Slide Calculator designed especially for Carpenters, Con- 
tractors and Architects. Thousands in use. Price $2.90 post- 
paid, Check or M. 0., no stamps. 

MASON ENGINEERING SERVICE 

2105 N. Burdick St., Div. 3, Kalamazoo 81, Mich. 



have to be driven or drawn in tight 
places. 

The Phillips screw driver has come 
into wide use in recent years. This 
screw driver is used on screws with 
deep slots in heads, which cross at the 
center but do not run to the edge of 
the screw head. Into the crossed slots 
the point of the Phillips screw driver 
fits, and with it the screw is driven or 
lifted, as the case might require. This 
screw driver has a definite advantage 
over the old type, since it will not slip 
out of the slots. But it can be used only 
on screws that have heads with the 
crossed slots. 



WANTS TO KNOW 

A brother wants to know about nail- 
ing. He sent sketches showing the dif- 
ferent ways he has seen, and wants me 



to tell him which methods are right, 
if any. 

Fig. 1 is a sort of diagram of a board 
for rough flooring or for boxing. To 
the left are shown three heavy dots, 




Ce.nit 



t£ io 2. inches 




Fig. 1 

which represent nails. They were driven 
all the way from one-half inch to two 
inches from the end. If the bearing 
is wide enough to permit it, the best 
results are obtained by keeping the 
nail about two inches from the end. But 
this is not always possible. Where joints 




ON-THE-JOB POCKET SEE 



Thii new and revised edition of Carpenters and Bullden' Practical Bules for Laying 
Out Work consists of short and practical rules for laying out ociagons, ellipses, roofs, 
groined ceilings, hoppers, spirals, stairs and arches with tables of board measure, 
length of common, hip, valley and jack rafters, square measure, cube measure, measure 
of length, etc. — also, rules for kerfing, drafting gable molding, getting the axis of a 
segment, laying off gambrel roof and explaining the steel square. 

"For ready reference carry . .... 

this convenient 50 page 51.00 postpaid. Money back guarantee if not entirely satisfied 

tTyfur Si J ? o e b." U6i) 9uide SEND $1.00 TODAY 



DA Rflf^BTRC 5344 Cinton Ave., So., Enclosed find $1.00. Please for- 
■ **■ >»Wwtl»5) Minneapolis 9, Minn. ward by return mail one of your 
Carpenters & Builders' Practical Bules for Laying Out Work. 

Name Address 



are made on 1%-inch material, the nail 
will often have to be placed about one- 
half inches from the end. On corners 
where the bearing is usually wide 
enough, the nails should not come closer 
to the end than two inches. 

To the right of Fig. 1, by the heavy 
dots, are shown three nails. At the 
two edges of the board the nails should 
be kept from one-half to three-fourths 
inch from the edge. If three nails are 
used to a bearing, the third nail should 
come approximately at the center of 
the board. A little horse sense is al- 
ways in order when rough boards are 
being nailed, which is to say that cir- 
cumstances often take priority over es- 
tablished rules. 




Fig. 2 

» Fig. 2 shows how to nail flooring. At 
A is shown a nail driven at a 45-degree 
angle, which is a good basic slant for 
nailing flooring. At B the nail is slanted 
too much, which is probably partly due 
to the slant of the grain. The space be- 
tween the nail and the dotted lines can 
be considered as a sort of No-Man's 
land, which should be avoided. At C 
the nail is started at a 45-degree angle. 
The space between the nail and the 
dotted lines indicates a sort of safety 
zone — any nail driven at a slant coming 
between these two slants is within the 
rule. Hammer marks, whenever they 
might appear, are always ruled out. 





Specializing In 


r Jf 


Ifo] 


The 

MASTER CHAMPION 


Hi 


S%x 


• Lawn Mower 

Sharpening Machine 


M 




• Saw Sharpening 
Machine 

• Key Machine 



Phone LUcas 6929 

FRANK'S MANUFACTURING CO. 

2501-3-5 E. Imperial Highway Los Angeles 2, Cal. 




FOR 
EXAMINATION 

SEND NO MONEY 



BETTER JOBS - BETTER PAY 

The Postwar building boom li In full 
•wing and trained men are needed. 
Big opportunities are always for MEN 
WHO KNOW HOW. TheBe books sup- 
ply quick, easily understood training and 
handy, permanent reference information 
that helps solve building problems. 



Learn to draw plans, estimate, be a live-wire builder, do 
remodeling, take contracting jobs. These 8 practical, pro- 
fusely illustrated books cover subjects that will help you 
to get more work and make more money. Architectural de- 
sign and drawing, estimating, steel square, roof framing, 
construction, painting and decorating, heating, air-condi- 
tioning, concrete forms and many other subjects are included. 

UP-TO-DATE 

EDITION 

These books are 
the most up-to- 
date and complete 
we have ever pub- 
lished on these 
many subjects. 
Coupon Brings Eight Big Books For Examination 

AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY Vocational Publishers since 1898 
Dept. G336 Drexel at 58th Street, Chicago 37, III. 

You may ship me the Up-to-Date edition of your eight 
big books, "Building, Estimating, and Contracting" with- 
out any obligation to buy. I will pay the delivery charges 
only, and if fully satisfied in ten days, I will send you 
$2.00, and after that only $3.00 a month, until the total 
price of only $34.80 is paid. I am not obligated In any 
way unless I keep the books. 

Name 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
address, and name and address of at least one business 
man as reference. Men in service, also give home address. 



One thing 
in common — 
Quality! 




For 
Trouble-Free 
Performance 

Proved design, fine workmanship and 
high quality materials are combined 
in Millers Falls planes to produce 
tools that can be relied upon for years 
of trouble-free performance. There is 
a Millers Falls plane for every job. 



MILLERS FALLS 

TOOLS 




MILLERS FALLS COMPANY 

Greenfield. Massachusetts 



New Opportunities 

f ° r Carpenters 




Men Who Know Blue Prints 

are in demand to lay out and run build- 
ing jobs. Be the man who gives orders 
and draws the big pay cheek. Learn at 
home from plans we send. No books, — 
all practical every clay work. 

SEND FOR FREE BLUE PRINTS 

and Trial Lesson. Prove to yourself how 
easy to learn at home in spare, time. 
Send coupon or a post card today. No 
obligations. 

CHICAGO TECH. COLLEGE 

C-103 Tech Bldg. 2000 So. Mich. Ave., 
Chicago, 16, III. 

Send Free Trial Lesson and blue print 
plans and tell me how to prepare for a 
higher paid job in Building. 

Name 

Address 



yfcu&Me NEW 



with FOLEY RETOOTHER 

It cuts a perfect row of new teeth on a handsaw 
in 3 minutes! (No need to grind off old teeth.) 
Saves time, relieves eyestrain, cuts filing time in 
half. You handle more customers and make more 
money. The Foley Retoother is a marvel for re- 
conditioning all hand saws with broken or un- 
even teeth, or hollowed edge due to poor filing. 
Cuts 20 sizes of teeth from 4 to 16 points per 
inch on all cross-cut, rip, back, mitre-box and 
panel saws. Quickly pays for itself and earns 
extra profits for you. Immediate Delivery. Send 
coupon for circular. 

FoFey WoiTcor jKBCKT " 

Send full details on Foley Retoother 

Name 

Address 



— Special- 



To 



who apply SLATE SURFACE Roofing 




WORKMEN: Send only 25c and ask for Ad- 
vertising SAMPLE Handle, also replaceable 
Blades of several shapes and uses. (Retail value 
$1.00). 

write 

The TT C* K"rVITl?ir 24 43 W. Larp Ave. 
I-VA JVTN UP llf St. Paul, 8, Minn. 




BOWL BETTER 

WITH YOUR OWN 

SoJiumwtck- 
INERALITE 

Custom-fit 

BOWLING 
BALL 



THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER CO. 
Branches in all Principal Cities 




Holes Come 
Easy . . . with 
PAINE 

Drill Bits- 




365 



If you drill by hand— do it 
better with Paine Star Drill 
Bits (375). Made of finest tool 
steel. Available in 4 point sizes. 
It you use a rotary drill (slow 
speed) do it faster with "Sud- 
den Depth" Carboloy Tipped 
Drill Bits. These new, improved 
bits are now selling at sub- 
stantially reduced prices. 
Available in many sizes. 
Write tor Catalog. 

THE PAINE CO. 

2967 Carroll Av., Chicago 1 2, HI. 
Offices in Principal Cities 



PAHTf' 

ASTENiNG htUlfCC 
id HANGING UlYILLJ 




flNBK 1* we 



STANLEY specializes in the distinctive appear- 
ance of fine tools. Examples of this are Butt Chisels 
No. 60 and Tang Chisels No. 61. 

The blades are forged from finest chisel steel - 
light, thin and tough - to take a keen, durable cut- 
ting edge. The handles are of special celluloid - the 
toughest non-metallic substance known. Both han- 
dles are designed to fit the hand comfortably. 

Fine to look at — finer to use — and made for wood- 
workers who want the finest of results. Buy them 
when next you need fine tools. 

STANLEY TOOLS 

163 Elm St., New Britain, Conn. 



[STANLEY] 

Trade Mark 

HARDWARE HAND TOOLS - ELECTRIC TOOLS 




Stanley Tang 
Chisel No. 61 



HOLES 




with 



3ne MallDrill handles all your drilling 
iobs. It has the speed and power to 
Irive all kinds . of bits ... it is easy 
o operate in close quarters . . . and it 
:an be serviced without dismantling. 
These handy, all-purpose MallDrills are 
tvailable in }4 " (two speeds), 5/16", 
?8" ? and \'%" capacities for 110-volt AC- 
)C or 230-volt AC-DC. 

tsfc your Deafer or write for literature and prices. 
POWER TOOL DIVISION 

MALL TOOL COMPANY 

7751 South Chicago Ave., Chicago, 19, III. 
25 Years of "Beffer Too/s For Better Work." 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 
(4vol$.*6 




Inside Trade Information 

lot Carpenters, Builders. Join- 
ers, Building Mechanics and 
all Woodworkers. These 
Guides give you the short-cut 
instructions that you want— 
includins new methods, ideas, 
solutions, plans, systems and 
money Bavine suggestions. An 
easy progressive course for the 
apprentice and student. A 
practical . daily helper and 
Quick Reference for the master 
worker. Carpenters every- 
where are. using theae Guides 
as a Helping Hand to Easier 
Work. Better Work and Bet- 
ter Pay. To get this assist- 
ance for yourself, simply fill 
in flrtd'mail the FREE COU- 
PON below. 



Inside Trade Information On: 

How to use the Bteel square — How to file and set 
saws — How to build furniture — How to use a 
mitre box — How to use the chalk line — How to use 
rules and scales — How to make joints — Carpenters 
arithmetic — Solving mensuration problems— ^Es- 
timating strength of timbers — How to set girders 
and sills — How to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs — How to build houses, barns, gar- 
ages, bungalows, etc. — How to read and draw 
plans — Drawing up specifications — How to ex- 
cavate—How to use settings 12, 13 and 17 on the 
steel square — How to build hoists and scaffolds— 
okylights — How to build stairs — How to put on 
interior trim — How to hanK doors — How to lath- 
lay floors — How to paint 



THEO. AUDEL & CO., 49 W. 23rd St., New York City 

Mail Audela Carpenters and Builders Guides. 4 vols., on 7 days' free trial. If OR*. 
I will remit Jl in 7 days, and SI nv-nthly until $6 is paid. Otherwise I will return i hero- 
No obligation unless I am satisfied. 




Occupation. 
Beierence. . 



ATKI NS 

1&&* Jtee* SAWS 



^ i "*w* 




" Yo ° b rv e ha^ h,s 

^ t ' sV ' hy , e r25y earS 
Atkins ^° Ve 



Sure — the care a user gives a saw has a lot 
to do with saw life. But equally important 
is the care that goes into the manufacture 
of a saw. In the case of Atkins Saws, 
perfect balance and correct design, / 
rugged blades of special tempered / 
"Silver Steel" keener teeth that stretch / 
the time between filings — are all / 
results of painstaking attention to 
every detail. That's why so many car 
penters rate an Atkins the easiest 
handling, fastest and freest cut- 
ting saw — the saw to depend 
on for finest finished work. It's 
also why so many veteran 
craftsmen are still using 
Atkins Saws bought when 
they first entered their 
chosen trades. 




E. C. ATKINS AND COMPANY 

Home Office and Factory: 402 S. Illinois Street, Indianapolis 9, Indiana 

m r j » <|f J Branch Factory: Portland, Oregon 

tlBiF^ Branch Olfices : Atlanta - Chicago • Memphis • New Orleans • New York • San Francisco 



THE CARPENTER'S FRIEND FOR 90 YEARS 



: 




tm 




MPENTER 



FOUNDED 1881 



Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 




M. A. HUTCHESON 
First Vice-President 



APRIL 





FRANK DUFFY 
General Secretary 



WILLIAM L HUTCHESON 
General President 



UNITED 
BROTHERHOOD 

of 

CARPENTERS 

and 

JOINERS 

• of 

AMERICA 





Drill pilot holes 
with one hand and a 



w 



YANKEE 



No. 41 Automatic Drill 

A "Yankee" No. 41 drills pilot 
holes in wood with a few easy 
pushes. Spring automatically re- 
turns handle after every stroke 
and revolves drill point to clear 
away chips. Magazine in handle 
holds 8 drill points . . . ^6 *° 
1%4 . . . easy to select, re- 
move and replace. Improved 
chuck prevents drill points pull- 
ing out in use, yet releases 
them with one, easy motion. 
All exposed parts chromium 
plated ... a lifetime tool. 

Write for "Yankee" Tool Booh 




New Opportunities 

f . or Carpenters 




NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

Division of The Stanley Works 
Philadelphia 33, Pa. 



Men Who Know Blue Prints 

are in demand to lay out and run build- 
ing jobs. Be the man who gives orders 
and draws the big pay cheek. Learn at 
home from plans we send. No books, — 
all practical every day work. 

SEND FOR FREE BLUE PRINTS 

and Trial Lesson. Prove to yourself how 
easy to learn at home in spare time. 
Send coupon or a post card today. No 
obligations. 

CHICAGO TECH. COLLEGE 

D-108 Tech Bldg. 2000 So. Mich. Ave., 
Chicago, 16, 111. 

Send Free Trial Lesson and blue print 
plans and tell me how to prepare for a 
higher paid job in Building. 

Name 

Address 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joinersi 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established In 1881 
VoL LXVII— No. 4 



INDIANAPOLIS, APRIL, 1947 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Contents — 



G. E. B. Declaration - 



6 



In this day of uncertainty, insecurity and doubt, the General Executive Board, on 
the eve of its inauguration for the forthcoming term, lays down a broad policy based 
primarily on the traditional concept of democracy that the element of self-determination 
must be preserved for all creeds and classes against the onslaughts of theorists, advo- 
cates of foreign ideologies and those who believe that might makes right. 

Bill Tells 'Em --------- 9 



As a member of a three-man committee representing the Ameriran Federation of 
Labor, General President Hutcheson points out some pertinent facts to the House and 
Senate Labor Committees in whose hands most of the anti-labor bills now rest. 



Library Fund 



. . _ -___--_ 13 

Although the large amount of official matter that had to be published in last 
month's issue of the journal made it impossible to tabulate donations to the Library 
Fund, Local Unions, Councils and Ladies Auxiliaries have continued sending in money 
to aid in rehabilitating the library at the home which provides guests with more 
pleasure and relaxation than any other one thing. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS: 
Plane Gossip 
Editorials - 
Official 

In Memoriam 
Correspondence 
To the Ladies 
Craft Problems 



14 
16 
19 
20 
21 
25 
26 



Index to Advertisers 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, nnder Act of 

-Congress, Aug: 24. 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

In Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 
All contracts for advertising space Id "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Carlson Rules 4 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 32 

Frank's Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 32 

Greenlee Tool Co., Rockford, 111. 3 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 31 

F. P. Maxson, Chicago, 111 30 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadel- 

delphia, Pa. 1 

Ohlen-Bishop Mfg. Co., Colum- 
bus, O. 4 

Paine Co., Chicago, 111 32 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, 

Conn. 3rd Cover 

The Speed Co., Portland, Ore. 4 

Bowling Equipment 

Brunswick, Balke, Collender Co., 

Chicago, 111. 32 

Carpentry Materials 

Johns-Manville Corp., New York, 

N. Y. 1 

Doors 

Overhead Door Corp., Hartford 

City, Ind. 4th Cover 

Overalls 

The H. D. Lee Co., Kansas City, 

Mo. 3rd Cover 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, 

Chicago, 111. 31 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, III 1 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 30 

E. W. Hoffner, Chicago, 111 29 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 28 

Mason Engineering Service, Kala- 
mazoo, Mich. 30 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo._ 32 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y. 3rd Cover 




KEEP THE MONEY 
IN THE FAMILY! 

PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 



• This easy-reading GREENLEE HANDY 
CALCULATOR swiftly solves your wood- 
working problems. Just set the dial: convert 
linear feet to board feet; get slope per 
foot in degrees; compare hardness, weights, 
shrinkage, warping and working ease of 
various woods. More, too: bit sizes for head, 
body, thread of screws; nail specifications; 
tool sharpening hints; protractor. 6" diam- 
eter, fits your tool kit. Heavily varnished 
cardboard. Special offer. Order now, send 
10$ (not stamps) in next mail. Greenlee 
Tool Co., 2084 Columbia Ave., Rockford, III. 





^OB^TESTEQ/ 



For 94 years 

OHLEN-BISHOP 

No. 20 
COMPASS SAW 




The special purpose saw of today is 
the outgrowth of necessity. Our ear'y 
founders worked closely with the 
trade to furnish the type saw needed 
for every job. The compass illustrat- 
ed above is only one of hundreds of 
special carpenter saws included in our 
complete line. When you ask for an 
OHLEN-BISHOP you are specifying 
a tool made right for the job — tested 
and proven throughout the years. 

OHLEN-SISHOP 



906 Ingleside Ave. 



Columbus, Ohio 



— PRICE LIST — 

Label and Emblem Novelties 



Card Cases (Label) % .10 

Key Chains (Label) 15 

Fobs (Label and Emblem) . .50 

Gavels (Labels) 1.25 

Pins (Emblem) 1.00 

Buttons (Emblem) 1.00 

Cuff Links (Emblem) 1.50 

Match Box Holders (Label) .15 

Belt Loop and Chain (Label) .75 

Pins, Ladies Auxiliary (Em- 
blem) 1.75 

Auto Radiator Emblems. . . 1.25 



In Ordering These Goods Send All Orders 
and Make All Remittances Payable to 

FRANK DUFFY, Gen. Sec, 

Carpenters' Bid., 222 E. Michigan St. 
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d// CARLSON RULES 



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Name Address 



General Executive Board Members 




CHAS. JOHNSON 

First District 




[HARRY SCHVyARZER 
Third District 




UNITED 
BROTHERHOOD 

of 

CARPENTERS 

and 

JOINERS 

of 

AMERICA 



R. E. ROBERTS 
[Fifth District 



Q} 




WM.J. KELLY 
Second District 




ROLAND ADAMS 
Fourth District 




| ARTHUR M ARTEL 
Seventh District '\ 



THE CARPEXTER 



A Declaration 

by the 
GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD 

* 

The year 1947 is rapidly developing into a year of 
crisis for our nation. At home, reconstruction, inflation, 
and deep-seated economic problems are harassing- our 
government. Abroad, grave international complications 
are jeopardizing the peace of the world. The concepts 
of liberty, equality, and individual freedom which the 
United States of America introduced to the world are in 
dire peril. Never in history has it been so important 
that American institutions and American individuals 
reaffirm their faith in the American way of life and all 
the noble things for which America stands. Never has 
it been so essential that they maintain rigidly and in- 
flexibly their faith in the principles laid down in the 
constitution and consecrated by the life's blood of un- 
told millions of liberty-loving Americans since 1776. 

The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, true to its long and honorable tradition of 
patriotism and loyalty, hereby renews once again its 
unshakable faith in the American heritage of democracy 
and democratic procedure. To the preservation and 
perpetuation of this heritage we pledge our hearts and 
hands. Whatever the days ahead may have in store; 
whatever obstacles and difficulties may arise : however 
confused and difficult the pathway may be from here 
on in. the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join- 
ers of America will continue to champion and defend 
the cause of liberty and justice and the dignity of man. 

Through the long and bitter war only recently 
concluded, the United Brotherhood faced its responsi- 
bilities unflinchingly. Some 75,000 members served with 
distinction in the various branches of the armed forces. 
Hundreds made the supreme sacrifice. Thousands upon 
thousands, some as gallant Seabees, some as civilian 
workers, but all with the smell of gunpowder in their 



T HE C A R P E X T E R 



nostrils and the sound of gunfire in their ears, built the 
ramparts all over the world from which the enemy were 
destroyed. And those who stayed home worked long 
and weary hours to provide the arsenal upon which vic- 
tory depended. No campaign failed, not one major 
attack was delayed a single day because some members 
of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America on the home front failed to fulfill their obli- 
gations. Of our whole war record, all of us can be proud. 

But the winning of the peace is posing problems no 
less crucial, no less fundamental, than the problems the 
war itself raised. Here and now, we, in whose hands 
has been placed the responsibility of leadership within 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America, pledge the same unqualified support to the 
winning of the peace that our Brotherhood devoted to 
the winning of the war. 

To this end our Brotherhood reiterates its determi- 
nation to oppose with all the vigor at its command the 
incursion of any and all foreign philosophies into the 
American labor movement, be they Communist, Fascist, 
or advocates of some other brand of totalitarianism. By 
dark and devious methods evil influences are today seek- 
ing to undermine the very foundation-stones of our 
form of government. We pledge an unremitting fight 
against them. However and whenever they are found 
within our ranks they will be purged. However and 
whenever we can assist other organizations within the 
American labor movement take similar action we will 
do so. 

To our fellow workers in other nations we extend 
the hand of brotherhood. In the war-torn lands the 
labor unions suffered greatly. Under the totalitarian 
heel they felt the ruthless lash of domination. Yet from 
the ranks of labor sprang the backbone of the resistance 
movement. Those union leaders who were not butchered 
outright took up the cudgels ag'ainst the foe and he- 
roically struck blow after blow for the cause of freedom. 
Before the war the unions in these unhappy lands com- 
prised the backbone of the democratic forces. Democ- 
racy will never be restored fully to these nations until 



THE CARPENTER 



free, democratic labor unions are once more thriving in 
their midst. Therefore, we pledge ourselves to lend all 
moral and financial support possible to the rebuilding of 
democratic labor movements in these countries. 

In our own country the forces of greed are once more 
in the saddle. They have combined their resources for 
a ruthless attack on the rights, privileges and very ex- 
istence of labor unions. We pledge an all-out fight 
against them. When the labor movement ceases to exist 
as a free and independent body within the structure of 
our nation, democracy will be on its way out. Men must 
remain free to work or not to work, to do business or not 
to do business, to accept or reject the chances that the 
vagaries of constantly-changing times present. All 
classes and creeds and colors must maintain the right 
of self-determination. They must have open to them 
ever-expanding avenues of self-betterment. Destruction 
of the labor movement served as a prelude to total dic- 
tatorship in every one of the totalitarian nations. We 
are determined to see that it shall not happen here. 

We reaffirm our faith in the free enterprise system. 
We believe that it has produced for us more of the good 
things of life than any other system ever invented by 
the mind of man. We believe that in the years ahead 
it can bring us even bigger and better things with a 
much higher living standard for all — a living standard 
subject to constant improvement. However, we must 
again point out that a free labor movement must always 
be an integral part of the free enterprise system. Free- 
dom is an ephemeral thing; all segments of our society 
must be free or eventually none will be free. 

Clouded and uncertain though the future may ap- 
pear, we have faith and confidence in the good judg- 
ment of the American people. In the darkest hours of 
our history their good judgment has surmounted seem- 
ingly impossible obstacles. We know it will do so again. 
For our part, we pledge that the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America, as it always has 
done in the past, will continue to work unceasingly for 
a brighter, more prosperous America with a greater 
measure of liberty, justice and security for all. 



General President Hutcheson Gives Some Cold, Hard 
Facts Regarding Labor to Congressional Committees 



BILL Tells 'em 



• • • 



IN HEARINGS before the House and Senate Labor Committees last 
month, General President William L. Hutcheson, as a member of a 
three-man delegation representing the American Federation of Labor, 
gave Congress some straight-from-the-shoulder facts about labor and the 
current agitation for legislation to curb labor's activities. Calm and col- 
lected despite efforts of some committee members to confuse and befuddle 
him, President Hutcheson talked intelligently and patiently. He minced 
no words and he evaded no issues. When the hearings were over, one of 
the committee members was moved to remark: "You are the first man 
who has come up here that is fair and open minded about what we are 
trying to do here." 



On the committee with President 
Hutcheson were Bill Green, A. F. L. 
President, and George Meany, A. F. 
L. Secretary-treasurer. For almost 
a full day they gave Congressmen 
their opinions of various union- 
shackling types of legislation now 
pending before both the House and 
the Senate. They told labor's story 
completely and thoroughly. They ef- 
fectively exploded the pet theories 
of those who have been maintaining 
that collective bargaining has bro- 
ken down. And when they were 
through, the committee members at 
least had a clear-cut picture of the 
position of the responsible part of 
the labor movement in the present 
labor crisis. 

- In his opening remarks, Bill 
Green questioned the validity of the 
arguments being used by those who 
are pushing- anti-labor legislation. 
In part, he said : 

"At the outset let me challenge 
the basis on which this legislation 
has been presented to the country. 
It is claimed to be a remedy against 
strikes. It is not. It is directed not 



against strikes but against the proc- 
ess of collective bargaining itself. 

"Does this legislation deal with 
the causes of industrial unrest that 
has swept the country since V-J 
Day? Does it reach the issues that 
were behind the disputes through 
which we have gone? The answer 
is categorically NO. 

"The record, which no one can 
dispute, shows that during the most 
critical period following the termi- 
nation of hostilities, 86 out of every 
ioo workers who engaged in a work 
stoppage did so only because they 
were caught in the economic vise of 
rising prices and declining postwar 
income. These postwar strikes did 
not take place because of a break- 
down of voluntary collective bar- 
gaining. They did not occur be- 
cause of the failure of unions to 
carry out the peaceful purposes and 
procedures to which labor is dedi- 
cated. The record shows that one 
basic cause of .that unrest was in- 
flation. The other major cause was 
government intervention into labor- 
manao-ement relations. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



"Not one of the bills relates in 
any manner to the problem of infla- 
tion, and all of them increase, rather 
than remove, government interven- 
tion. What, then, is the real purpose 
behind these laws? 

"Any fair-minded student of these 
proposals will inevitably reach the 
conclusion that the real purpose be- 
hind this legislation is to destroy 
unions and to wreck collective bar- 
gaining.'! - 

Categorically the A. F. L. repre- 
sentatives blasted one after another 
of the anti-union proposals con- 
tained in bills now up for Congres- 
sional action. They exposed the bills 
advocating imposition of open shop 
principles as nothing more or less 
than reactionary legislation nullify- 
ing the social gains of the past forty 
years. They warned that any 
abridgement of labor's right to 
strike would lead to complete chaos. 
They pointed out that cooling-off 
periods, elimination of the check-off 
system and outlawing of the boycott 
would increase rather than decrease 
industrial strife. 

In his innings before the House 
labor committee. President Hutche- 
son pulled no punches. In a straight- 
forward manner he laid the cards on 
the table and bluntly told the Con- 
gressmen what would happen if va- 
rious bills hamstringing labor were 
passed. When certain members of 
the committee tried to get him to 
admit that mandatory open shop 
principles might not injure the la- 
bor movement. President Hutcheson 
recited a little bit of history for 
their benefit. He told them of the 
open shop drive that Big Business 
inaugurated after World War I 
and of the chaos it brought on in 
certain sections of the country — no- 
tably the Pacific Coast. A partial 
text of his remarks reads as follows : 



Mr. Hutcheson : "I don't agree 
with George's statement that-, we 
were all wiped out, because we 
weren't. We fought it out. 

"Let me go a step further and 
show you what we had to do in that 
case. We had to supply material 
for the contractors who were will- 
ing to hire our men and other build- 
ing tradesmen, with the result that 
material yards were set up around 
San Francisco, and in that area, and 
we couldn't buy cement in the 
United States. We had to import 
a shipload of cement from Aus- 
tralia. 

"Through that method, however, 
we finally got them to the point that, 
as George says, there were many of 
those local organizations, ours in- 
cluded, where we lost a lot of mem- 
bers, but we didn't lose them all, 
because we fought the thing out. 
We spent a lot of money. 

"This is sort of an informal dis- 
cussion, and I don't want to be but- 
ting in. but the Bricklayers' Union 
had to buy a brick plant and go into 
the brick-making business in a boil- 
er plant in El Paso, Texas, because 
it was impossible to build a building 
on the Pacific Coast unless you 
agreed beforehand that it would be 
at least 51 per cent nonunion. You 
couldn't borrow money, and if you 
had all the money in your hands, 
you couldn't build the building be- 
cause they put an embargo on the 
shipping of building materials to 
the Pacific Coast. And the Brick- 
layers' Union, it is a matter of rec- 
ord, bought a brickmaking plant and 
shipped bricks from El Paso to the 
Pacific Coast in order to maintain . 
their union and fight the open shop. 

"And do you know when we came 
back? When the employers got 
tired of. contributing their millions 
to that open-shop drive. And here 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



you are trying to do the same thing 
by the law of the land. 

"Let me say further, Congress- 
men, that in that controversy I made 
a trip to San Francisco and had a 
conference with the gentlemen who 
were leading in that open shop 
fight, and I made a proposal to them 
that I would put them on a sales- 
manship basis. We would go out 
to the contractors, and if we could 
sell our ideas to the contractors, 
they were not to interfere. If they 
could sell theirs to the contractors, 
we would not interfere. And they 
would not accept the proposal. That 
is a matter of record." 

Mr. Landis: "Mr. Smith?" 

Mr. Smith of Kansas : "There are 
several questions " that I disagree 
with you about, but there is one that 
I agree with you on. 

"I have a great deal of respect 
for one thing you have said here, 
and I would like to make a speech 
about it, because you are the first 
man who has come up that I think is 
fair and open-minded about what we 
are trying to do here, representing 
as you do a lot of labor. 

"When you say you are not a poli- 
tician, though, I want to say: You 
are a past master. I wish I were as 
good as you are." 

Mr. Hutcheson: "Thank you, sir." 

That little, if any, of the ire of 
Congress is directed against such 
organizations as the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America or the other long-estab- 
lished, well-balanced unions in the 
Federation seems evident from even 
a casual perusal of the proceedings 
of the House committee. The fol- 
lowing dialogue is an excerpt from 
records of the House committee : 

Mr. Kelley: "Mr. Hutcheson, I 
could see very well why )-ou would 



not need the National Labor Rela- 
tions Act. It was set on the books 
to aid these unorganized members in 
setting up their own unions without 
interference from management. You 
have been in existence a long time. 
You are one of the oldest unions 
in the country, are you not?" 

Mr. Hutcheson : "One of the old- 
est." 

Mr. Kelley: "Well, then you are 
able to take care of yourself." 

Mr. Hutcheson : "We think we 
have done a pretty fair job." 

Mr. Kelley: "And you have dis- 
ciplined your members into union- 
ization, have } r ou not?" 

Mr. Hutcheson : "We have done 
what?" 

Mr. Kelley: "Your members are 
disciplined into unionization." 

Mr. Hutcheson: "I don't know 
whether they are disciplined in it, 
but they are educated in it." 

Mr. Kelley: "All right. Let us 
use the word 'educated.' 

"Then, also, the management, the 
people you deal with, have learned 
the techniques of handling union- 
ized labor." 

Mr. Hutcheson : "Quite true. And 
they have come to realize this: Men 
engaged in building construction 
have come to know that they are in 
the same category as the building 
tradesmen. In other words, they 
have no investment in a certain plant 
where they turn out products for 
sale on the public market. They 
have to wait. They have their equip- 
ment, of course, but they have to 
wait until someone wants to build 
a building. Then they go and en- 
deavor to get the job, and after they 
get it, they say to us tradesmen, 
"Come on. We have got a job for 
you and we have one for ourselves." 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



So the result is that when we sit 
down around the table, we realize 
that they have got just as much in- 
terest as we have in it, and they are 
just as much entitled to considera- 
tion as we are. And the result is 
that we have worked up, I think, a 
cooperative understanding." 

Mr. Kelley: "After all, there is 
such a thing as technique." 

Mr. Hutcheson : "Yes ; but I guess 
I perhaps have not been educated 
in that, I don't know." 

Mr. Kelley: "Now, would you not 
say this : Take a concern where the 
management has never had organ- 
ized labor. Do you think they know 
how to deal properly with them?" 

Mr. Hutcheson: "No; they are not 
familiar with that." 

Mr. Kelley: "That is what I am 
trying to point out. And my con- 
tention is this : That the longer these 
new unions are in existence, the 
better they will become in the mat- 
ter of working out their problems 
with management, and management 
working out their problems with the 
unions." 

Mr. Hutcheson : "In other words, 
Congressman, as I understand your 
statement, you are thinking of the 
youngest element in the labor move- 
ment, perhaps on the other side of 
the fence from the federation." 



■ Mr. Kelley: "Yes; that is .right. 
Exactly. You have got it." 
. Mr. Meany : "And the younger 
element in management ; not young- 
er in years, but younger in the sense 
they have not dealt with unions." 

Mr. Kelley: "That is right, and 
therefore I say that in time we will 
eliminate a lot of these so-called 
difficulties. That is my contention, 
and I think vou are an example of 
it." 

Mr. Hutcheson : "I quite agree 
with your analysis." 

Mr. Kelley: "That is why I bring 
it up today again. Because your 
organization is a good example of 
that." 

Mr. Hutcheson: "Well, we try to 
be a good example of good Amer- 
icans, anyway." 

What form Congressional labor 
legislation will take in the present 
session of Congress is unpredicta- 
ble. However, thanks to the testi- 
mony of President Hutcheson and 
Bill Green and George Meany, the 
representatives of the people at 
least now have an honest picture 
of the labor situation. They know 
that the discord and difficulties have 
stemmed almost entirely from the 
Johnny-come-latelies in the labor 
movement. We must now rely on 
their good judgment. 



Workers Still Strong for Unions 

While radio, press and certain members of Congress are whipping up 
a barrage of propaganda against organized labor, figures show that work- 
ers throughout the nation are flocking to the fold of unionism as eagerly 
as ever. The National Labor Relations Board recently issued a report 
covering its activities for the month of January. That report shows that 
out of 42,000 ballots cast in elections during the month, almost eighty 
per cent were cast in favor of collective bargaining by a labor organization. , 

From the foregoing it is clear that despite all the raving and ranting of 
those who are hoping to cripple the labor movement for ends of their own, 
the workers of the nation are still pinning their hopes for security and 
prosperity on union membership. 



Because of the large amount of official matter which had to be published in 
last month's issue of the journal, there was no room for a listing of contributions 
to the Library Fund received during the month. 

In the period from January 21 to March 20, seventy affiliates of our Brother- 
hood sent in contributions to the fund. They totaled $9 58.40. 

Donations to the fund should be clearly designated as such by writing "Library 
Fund" on the check or accompanying letter so that bookkeeping errors may be 
avoided. Donations from January 21 to March 20 were as follows: 



L. U. City and State Amt. 

161 Kenosha, Wis. $ 10 00 

368 Allentown, Pa. 10 00 

277 Philadelphia, Pa. 25 00 

1929 Cleveland, Ohio 25 00 

657 Sheboygan, Wis. 10 00 

76 4 Shreveport, La. 37 00 

246 New York, N. Y 50 00 

1108 Cleveland, Ohio 50 00 

2825 Nashville, Tenn. 10 00 

21 Chicago, 111. 10 00 

2122 Vandalia, 111. 25 00 

374 Buffalo, N. Y 25 00 

399 Phillipsburg, N. J 50 00 

2711 Escanaba, Mich. 25 00 

139 Jersey City, N. J 5 00 

2141 Scottsbluff, Nebr. 5 00 

1713 Huron, S. Dak 5 00 

772 Clinton, Iowa 5 00 

14 San Antonio, Texas 25 00 

1846 New Orleans, La '. 5 00 

1603 Bridgeport, Conn. 10 00 

488 New. York, N. Y 25 00 

81 Erie, Pa. 25 00 

2158 Clinton, Iowa 10 00 

359 Philadelphia, Pa 5 00 

141 Chicago, 111. 25 00 

578 Chicago, 111. 10 00 

8 Philadelphia, Pa. 5 00 

2836 Westwood, Calif. 5 00 

778 Fitchburg, Mass. 5 00 

754 Fulton, N. Y 10 00 

2912 Trenton, Ont. 10 00 

659 Rawlins, Wyo. 10 00 

385 New-York, N. Y 50 00 

SO Chicago, 111. 25 00 

20 Tompkinsville. N. Y 10 00 

29 Cincinnati. Ohio 25 00 

359 Philadelphia, Pa. 5 00 

2174 Chicago, 111. 10 00 

1846 New Orleans, La 5 00 



L. U. City and State 

28 8 Homestead, Pa. _. 

331 Norfolk, Va. 

2944 Greys Flat, Calif.. 

119 Newark, N. J 

232 Ft. Wayne, Ind. _. 



COUNCILS 

Cloverland D. C, Marquette, 
Mich. 

111. State Council, Peoria, 111. 

Sacramento D. C, Sacramento, 
Calif. 

New Orleans and Vic. D. C, 
New Orleans, La 

Metropolitan D. C, Phila., Pa. 

AUXILIARIES 

, Great Falls, Mont. 
, Marshalltown, 

Iowa 

, Muskegon, Mich._ 
, Klickitat, Wash._ 

, Lancaster, N. Y 

, Corpus Christi, 

Texas 

, Hermiston. Oreg._ 

, Springfield, 111 

, Roseville, Calif 

, Aberdeen, Wash._ 

, Clovis, N. Mex 

, St. Petersburg, 

Fla. 

, Grand Rapids, 

Mich. 

, Eatonville. Wash. 
Los Angeles. Calif. 

. Pueblo. Colo. 

Columbia. Mo. 

, Fresno. Calif. 

. Marquette, Mich._ 
, Hutchinson. Kans. 



Aux. 
Aux. 

Aux. 
Aux. 
Aux. 
Aux. 



L. Aux. 
L. Aux. 
L. Aux. 
L. Aux. 
L. Aux. 
L. Aux. 



201 
21 

3S7 
453 
128 
340 

429 
230 
338 
319 
346, 
325 



L. Aux. 318 



L. 


Aux. 


323 


L. 


Aux. 


262 


L. 


Aux. 


190 


L. 


Aux. 


436 


L. 


Aux. 


251 


L 


Aux. 


79 


L. 


Aux. 


235 



Amt. 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
25 00 
10 00 



5 00 
25 00 

10 00 

10 00 
25 00 

35 00 



1 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


10 00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


3 00 


5 


00 



1 00 

2 00 
5 00 
5 00 
2 00 

4 40 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



RECAPITULATION 

Donations previously accounted for $6,593 73 

Donations received from January 21 to March 20 958 40 

Total available money in Fund as of March 20 $7,552 13 



-5 IP 



SOUNDS LOGICAL, 

A man in Indianapolis recently ar- 
rested for trying to rob a bank, gave 
the police the following story of his 
activities: 

"I never tried to rob no bank before. 
I • never woulda' done it bnt I wanted 
to start a clothing store. You see I 
used to be a plain ordinary burglar. 
One night I broke into a clothing store. 
When I saw the eighty and ninety dol- 
lar price tags on twenty dollar suits 
I decided burglary was a piker busi- 
ness. So I tried to hold up a bank 
to get me a stake to go into the cloth- 
ing business." 

• • • 

TIMES CHANGE 

After perusing the latest catalog put 
out by a big mail order house, our old 
friend Joe Paup was moved to remark, 
"Women's behavior has certainly 
changed. I suppose in Grandma's day 
a girl set her cap for a man too, but 
it didn't use to be a knee cap." 

• • • 

The problem of life is not to make 
life easier but to make men stronger, — 
David Starr Jordan. 




Hold it a minute, Professor — 1 think 
the saic is caught in my zipper. 



TO THEM THAT HATH 

A judge, failing to be re-elected, was 
made cashier of a local bank. A man 
presented a check to be cashed. 

"Don't know you," greeted the new 
cashier. 

The customer produced a credit card 
and a lot of letters addressed to him- 
self. 

"Not sufficient identity," said the 
cashier, pushing the check back. 

"Why, Judge," protested the man, 
"I've known you to hang a man on less 
evidence than that." 

"That may be," said the judge, "but 
when you're paying out money you have 
to be careful." 

To our way of thinking, the new Con- 
gress is developing a philosophy about 
on a par with the above-mentioned 
Judge's: everything for Big Business 
and the monied boys and to heck with 
the struggle of the little guys for a 
chance to improve their lot and acquire 
for themselves a little place in the 
sun. 

• • • 

YOU CAN BELIEVE PAUP 

"A married woman may not neces- 
sarily know much about Parliamentary 
Law," says our old friend, Joe Paup, 
"but she usually ends up the Speaker 
of the House just the same." 



PREFERRED CUSTOMER 

A customer waiting for a small job 
to be done on his car watched a me- 
chanic change the oil in another car 
without spilling a drop, check the radi- 
ator, clean the windshield, wipe away 
all the greasy finger marks, place a 
clean cloth over the upholstery, wash 
his hands thoroughly and drive the 
car slowly out to the street curb. 

"Now, there's a real mechanic," the 
customer observed to the foreman. 

"Oh," explained the foreman, "that's 
his own car." 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



IT ENDS UP THE SAME 

Right now Congress is neck deep in 
the tax muddle. The twenty per cent 
reduction in income taxes which the 
Republicans promised at election time 
is failing to materialize. Excise taxes, 
sales taxes, luxury taxes, and profit 
taxes are all being scrutinized carefully, 
as Congressmen search for a way out. 

About the only comment we have to 
make is that in the long run it is go- 
ing to be little guys like you and me 
who will have to carry the bulk of the 
load. All the jockeying now going on 
in Congress sort of reminds us of the 
visitor to the army post. On this post 
was a cannon which was fired at ex- 
actly 6 o'clock each evening. One day 
the visitor got to talking to the soldier 
who looked after the cannon. 

"Do you fire the cannon at the same 
time each evening?" asked the visitor. 

"Yes, sir," replied the soldier, "at 
exactly six each evening, right on the 
dot. I check my watch every day with 
the clock at the jewelry store right 
down the street. 

Later in the day the visitor wandered 
into the jewelry store. He noticed the 
fine clock in the window. 

"That's a mighty fine clock you have 
there," he remarked to the jeweler. 

"It certainly is," replied the mer- 
chant. "Hasn't varied a second in two 
years. We have a perfect check on it 
too. Every evening at exactly six they 
fire a cannon over at the fort, and this 
clock is always right on the dot." 

That is the way it is with taxes; no 
matter how they juggle the tax bills 
around, it always amounts to the same 
thing in the end, — you and I carry the 
bulk of the load. 

• • • 

THE FINISH 

The lecturer was emphasizing the 
demoralizing effects of divorce and the 
evils thereof. 

"Love," he said, "is a quest; a pro- 
posal is a request; the giving of a 
daughter in marriage is a bequest. But 
what is divorce?" 

"The inquest," bellowed a voice from 
the balcony. 

• • • 

A duty dodged is like a debt unpaid: 
it is only deferred and we must come 
back and settle the account at last. — 
Joseph Forest Newton. 



NOT IE THEY BEHAVE 

"Congressmen no longer need fear 
the labor vote," says a headline in a 
recent issue of a business journal. Oh, 
no? Wait until next election time when 
the incumbents have to stand on their 
records. 

Congressmen who are toying with the 
idea of supporting anti-labor legisla- 
tion better remember the story of the 
Bowery bum. This particular bum 
walked into a gin mill and ordered a 
shot of rye. 

"Will this liquor damage my eyes?" 
he asked. 

"Not if you've got money to pay for 
it it won't, Bub," replied the barrel- 
chested bartender. 

• • * 
WISDOM ITSELF 

Two timid old ladies were being 
shown through an insane asylum. The 
inmates were congregated in the yard. 
One of the ladies asked a burly guard if 
he did not fear an attack from one of 
the inmates. 

Said the guard: "I think I'm strong 
enough to handle any of them." 

"But what if two of them attacked 
you at once?" questioned the visitor. 

"Well, I think I can handle any two 
of them," was the answer. 

Whereupon the other lady asked what 
would happen if all of the inmates at- 
tacked him at one time. 

"Look, lady," said the guard, "if 
these people were smart enough to or- 
ganize, they wouldn't be in here." 




By George, you just can't trust any- 
body these days — the Garage Man was 
supposed to have tightened these brakes 
this morning. 



ditorial 




As Ye Sow .... 

A certain Democratic senator who went down to defeat in the last 
election is still puzzled over the decision of the voters. "Why every- 
where I went," he says, "people swarmed to hear what I had to say. They 
came by the thousands and tens of thousands. A couple of nights before 
the election I would have sworn there weren't ten Republicans in the whole 
State. But when election time came there seemed to be an overwhelming 
majority of them." 

In following the hearings that are currently going on in Congress 
relative to proposed labor legislation, we are inclined to believe the mem- 
bers of the House and Senate Labor Committees are in a position some- 
what similar to that of the above-mentioned Senator. Thousands of indi- 
viduals have appeared before the committees to give testimony. Up to the 
time this was written, seven out of ten witnesses were representatives of 
management. In other words, better than two representatives of manage- 
ment appeared for each representative of labor. Naturally, under such 
circumstances, labor was at a considerable disadvantage in trying to pre- 
sent its side of the controversy. 

However, we are not much worried over the quantity of spokesmen 
for management. The story labor has to present is simple and it is sound. 
It takes no high-powered oratory to make it understandable. General 
President Hutcheson, together with Bill Green and George Meany, did a 
marvelous job of informing the solons of labor's aims, ambitions and goals. 
A dozen or a hundred more labor spokesmen could hard add any further 
important or significant facts. 

On the quantity of management representation we have no particular 
complaint. What we do have a complaint on is the quality of representa- 
tion. 

As Congressman Klein of New York recently showed, the vast bulk of 
the witnesses who appeared before the committees to present management's 
side were employers who made a botch of labor relations in their own 
plants. Many of them spoke for firms which have been found guilty of 
unfair labor practices by the National Labor Relations Board. It was these 
witnesses who were most vociferous in their demands for "curbs" on labor 
unions. 

Since most of the management witnesses appearing before the com- 
mittees were of this ilk, the committee members, like the senator we men- 
tioned in the beginning, might understandably assume there is no other 
side to the management attitude toward labor. The plain truth of the 
matter is that there is another side. It is the side on which most open- 
minded employers can be found. Last year there were something like 
25,000 collective bargaining agreements signed in this country. The over- 



THE CARPENTER 17 

whelming- majority of them were negotiated and signed peacefullv. In 
nine plants out of ten there is understanding if not downright harmony 
between the workers and the bosses. The sad thing is that these employ- 
ers, being satisfied with their employe relations, feel no compulsion to 
run to Congress to put in their dime's worth. On the other hand, the chisel- 
lers and grifters whose constant aim is to get something for nothing out 
of their employes as well as the general public cry their eyes out when 
anything interferes with their plans for mulcting one and all. 

Certainly the testimony of people who have been convicted of eA'ading 
basic laws of the land should not carry much weight. However, these are 
the very people who are now crying the loudest for anti-labor legislation. 

From all this one fundamental truth can be drawn. It is true now and it 
will still be true if a thousand new labor laws are passed. The truth is 
that employers only get out of labor relations what they put into them. 
If they put fairness and honesty into them, they get the same thing back. 

If they try to chisel and evade, their labor relations are never satisfac- 
tory. This sort of thing cannot be changed by law; for those who chisel 
under one law will go on chiselling under another. And no one has yet 
found a way of legislating peoples' thoughts and actions. 



The Wrong End of the Telescope 

Last month the Supreme Court of the United States handed down a 
complicated decision in the case involving John L. Lewis and the Mine 
Workers. The justices split a half dozen different ways on the questions 
involved, but the ultimate answer was that the fines imposed on Lewis 
and the Miners by the lower court should stand. Far and wide the news- 
papers hailed the decision as some sort of a victory. For whom it was a 
victory we are at the present writing unable to fathom. 

Certainly it was no victory for the Miners. For indulging in their 
supposedly fundamental right not to work when such work was odious, 
they had a substantial fine levied against them. It was not a victory for 
the mine owners, because they mine no coal with their gold-pointed pens 
and ball-bearing swivel chairs, and unless coal is mined they make no 
profits. Least of all was it a victory for the general public, because the 
general public must have coal ; and in order to get coal, miners must work; 
and in order for miners to work they must be given a square deal. 

It was just "victories" of this sort during the last few decades that 
lead to the current British coal crisis. Years of mistreatment of English 
coal miners drove thousands of them from the pits. Their sons who nor- 
mally would have kept the supply of miners up to par spurned the mines 
for other forms of employment offering more attractions. Along about 
the time the worst winds in twenty years were whipping down the British 
Isles last winter the people suddenly woke up to the fact that they had a 
coal crisis on their hands. 

W e can one day run into the same sort of rude awakening in this coun- 
try. In fact the groundwork is being laid for it right now. Congress can 
pass laws ; the courts can hand down decisions ; the newspapers can write 



IS THE CARPENTER 

all the editorials they want, but if the miners do not get a fair shake the 
coal is not going- to roll from the pits. Coal miners ire human beings. 
"When, if, and as they determine that work in the coal mines does not draw 
pay commensurate with the risk, skill, and effort involved, they are going 
to turn to other fields. Their sons are not going to follow their fathers 
into the pit and eventually an American coal "crisis" is going to develop. 

Such a crisis has already developed in education. For fifty years we 
neglected and ignored our teachers. Xow we are paying the penalty. The 
shortage of teachers is seriously jeopardizing education and our schools. 
The crisis developed despite the fact that there was no John L. Lewis 
among the teachers, nor was there ioo r T organization of teachers, such as 
exists among the miners. The teachers simply found teaching unprofitable, 
considering the education requirements, and demands made on them by 
the teaching profession. They migrated to better paying fields. Xow we 
are hastily trying to fit a lock to the barn door after the horse has wan- 
dered to greener fields. 

It is about time that Congress and the newspapers and the general 
public stopped searching for ways of needling John L. Lewis and 
started looking the coal problem in the face. L'nless the miners start 
getting a square deal right now. disaster is bound to overtake us sooner or 
later. It will not be John L.'s fault : it will not be the Miners' Union's 
fault; it will be our own fault for neglecting the miners. 

Those newspapers that have been gloating over the Supreme Court 
decision as some sort of triumph over Lewis had better stop looking 
through the wrong end of the telescope. Lewis is not the problem: the 
problem is coal. It Avill not be solved by penalizing Lewis or slapping a 
tine on the Miners' Union. It will be solved only when the men who 
produce coal are given a square deal and rewards commensurate with the 
risk, skill and tediousness involved in the work. 



Now Is the Time to Start 

November, 1948. may seem to be a long way off right now, but time has 
a way of slipping by rapidly. \\ ithout a doubt the elections scheduled to 
be held at that time will be the most important labor has faced since the 
Civil War. The Halls of Congress as well as most State Legislatures are 
today packed with more anti-union representatives than they have been 
in a long, long time. If more of the same are elected next year, wages and 
working conditions will be hard to maintain. Many of our elected officials 
today are sympathetic and sincere toward labor. However, they are fight- 
ing an uphill fight. If they get more opposition after the next election 
their hands will be tied. 

Effective political action must be planned beforehand. Now is the time 
for all of us to start laying our plans for November. 1948. We must watch 
the voting records of men now serving. We must analyze and assay the 
qualifications of new men coming up. When election time comes we must 
be in a position to "help our friends and defeat our enemies,'" as the Fed- 
eration has always preached. 



19 



BOARD MEMBER CHAS. JOHNSON IS OLD TIMER 



When on April 5 the duly elected officers of our Brotherhood took the 
oath of office for the forthcoming term only one new face was present. 
Brother Charles Johnson of New York was installed as General Executive 
Board member from the First District, a position he had been filling by 
appointment since Brother Guerin's death created a vacancy. 

To the union men and the labor movement of the Eastern Seaboard, 
Brother Johnson needs no introduction. Long an active worker in Build- 
ing Trades circles of New York, his wisdom and initiative have been 
utilized in many capacities. He has played a prominent part in many 
movements for better wages and working conditions for those who earn 
their livelihoods in the Building Trades. His friendliness, sincerity, and 
willingness to cooperate have made him many friends in all walks of life 
in his native state. 

Brother Johnson comes from a fine union family. His father, Charles 
Johnson, Sr., who recently passed away, was one of the pioneer union 
builders of New York City. Like his father, Brother Johnson entered the 
labor movement early and rose rapidly to positions of trust. 

Chas. Johnson was born in New York City, November 18, 1895. He 
followed the trade of dock building and became a member of the old In- 
dependent Dock Builders Benevolent Union of New York City, which 
had been in existence for a number of years. He became a member of the 
Brotherhood when that organization affiliated with the United Brother- 
hood in January, 1914, and was given Local Union Charter No. 1456, and 
he has been active in the Labor Movement ever since. 

In July, I922*he was elected President and Business Agent of Local 
Union No. 1456 and has filled those positions ever since. 

In 1933 and 1934 he acted as President pro tern of the Building Trades 
Council of New York City. 

At the present time he is Secretary of the Joint Labor Committee on 
heavy construction and railroad work of New York City. 

He represented Local Union 1456 at the 1924 General Convention of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, held in In- 
dianapolis, Indiana. 

He also represented that same Local Union at the General Conventions 
of the Brotherhood held in Lakeland, Florida, in 1928, 1936, 1940 and 1946. 

After a vacancy occurred on the General Executive Board First Dis- 
trict, the General President appointed him to that position and the Gen- 
eral Executive Board approved the appointment. 

At the Twenty-fifth General Convention held in Lakeland, Florida, in 
April, 1946, he was nominated for member of the General Executive Board 
for the First District, and as the other candidate for that position with- 
drew he had no opposition. 



Official Information 



, i .. i 




- ,,. ; : „i„im i . , ^ 



General Officers of 
THE EXITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

Qinebal Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis. Ind. 



First General Yice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Yice-Presidewt 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretart 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolii. Ind. 

General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District. CHARLES JOHNSON 
111 E. 22nd St.. New York 10, N. T. 



Fifth District. R. E. ROBERTS 
631 W. Page. Dallas. Texas 



Second District. WM. J. KELLT 
Carpenters' Bid.. 243 4th Are.. Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Sixth District. A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168. Santa Barbara. Calif. 



Third District. HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave.. Cleveland, O. 






Seventh District. ARTHUR MARTEL 

3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District. ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence. S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



Notice to Recording Secretaries 

The quarterly circular for the months of April, May and June, 1947, 
containing the quarterly password, has been forwarded to all Local 
Unions of the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in receipt 
of this circular should notify Frank Duffy, Carpenters' Building, Indian- 
apolis, Indiana. 



1378 Scranton. Pa. 

1385 Bainbridge. Ga. 

2733 Kountze. Texas 

1390 Dover. X. J. 

1395 Pittsfield. 111. 

2 73 6 Klamath Falls. Oreg. 

1407 San Pedro, Calif. 

1409 Sault Ste. Marie. Ont.. Can 

1410 Fort Francis. Ont., Can. 
1413 Pine Bluff. Ark. 

1415 New Ulm. Minn. 

142 4 Marysville. Ohio 

2742 W. Summer-land. B. C. Can. 

276S Kelowna, B. C. Can. 



NEW CHARTERS ISSUED 

142 7 Sussex, X. B.. Can. 
1454 Cincinnati. Ohio 
2771 Rutland, B. C. Can 
1442 



Atlanta, Ga. 

1460 Healdsburg, Calif. 

14 75 Chattanooga. Tenn. 

14S1 South Bend. Ind. 

1482 Canton and Vicinity, Ohio 

1506 Gait. Ont.. Can. 

2789 Areata. Calif. 

2 79 2 Klamath. Calif. 

1510 Charleston, S. C. 

2 79 5 Hayfork, Calif. 



Not lost to those that love them, They still live in our memory, 
Not dead, just gone before; And will forever more. 



%£&t in Tj^t&zt 

The Editor has been requested to publish the name* 
at the following Brothers who have passed awmy. 



Brother WALTER BARNES, Local No. 1296, San Diego, Calif. 

Brother JOHN BERNER, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Brother JOSEPH D. BOULANGER, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 

Brother C. S. BUTRIDGE, Local No. 197, Sherman, Texas. 

Brother GEORGE CANN, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 

Brother WALTER CLIFFORD, Local No. 249, Kingston, Ont., Can. 

Brother RICHARD CODERRE, Local No. 177, Springfield, Mass. 

Brother EDWARD G. FOWLER, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 

Brother WILLIAM FRANCIS, Local No. 249, Kingston, Ont., Can. 

Brother EARL THOMAS FRATUS, Local No. 229, Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Brother WILLIAM E. GIBSON, Local No. 249, Kingston, Ont., Can. 

Brother GEORGE F. GRAHAM, Local No. 94, Providence, R. I. 

Brother MILES HASSELL, Local No. 94, Providence, R. I. 

Brother G. E. HOGAN, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Brother CHARLES H. JOHNSON, Local No. 1921, Hemstead, L. I., N. Y. 

Brother ISRAEL KALMAN, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 

Brother JOHN KINGSTON, Local No. 249, Kingston, Ont., Can. 

Brother ERNEST KUNBERGER, Local No. 538, Concord, N. H. 

Brother ALBIN L. LUNDGREN, Local No. 34, San Francisco, Calif. 

Brother JOHN L. LUNDSTROM, Local No. 1130, Titusville, Pa. 

Brother CHARLES McINTYRE, Local No. 177, Springfield, Mass. 

Brother ALBERT MILLER, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Brother GEORGE M. MOHR, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Brother C. W. MOREL AND, Local No. 1296, San Diego, Calif. 

Brother JAMES MURPHY, Local No. 740, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brother PHILLIP MURPHY Local No 13, Chicago, 111. 

Brother JOHN V. MYERS, Local No. 284, Jamaica, N. Y. 

Brother ANTHONY NAWVICHIK, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 

Brother ANTHONY NUSE, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 

Brother B. L. PATRICK, Local No. 1130, Titusville, Pa. 

Brother J. W. PORTER, Local 3, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Brother J. B. SHOULTS, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Brother HAYS STEPHENS, Local No. 1335, Wilmington, Calif. 

Brother FRED W. STRAUSS, Local No. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 

Brother JOHN H. STRONG, Local No. 487, Linton, Ind. 

Brother WILFRED TESSIER, Local No. 94, Providence, R. I. 

Brother HOWARD VAN ORDEN, Local No. 429, Montclair, N. J. 

Brother PHILIP J. WIRZBURGER, Local No. 1035, Taunton, Mass. 

Brother EDWARD WYNN, Local No. 1335, Wilmington, Calif. 



CorrQspondQnco 




This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

New $150,000 Debt-Free Home 

Recently Local Union No. 1723 of Columbus, Georgia, dedicated its new, debt- 
free $150,000 home. With justifiable pride the Local Union showed off its mag- 
nificent new headquarters to the citizens of Columbus. However, the proudest 
individuals in the Union were J. R. Sweat, T. M. Mickelson, J. D. Lundy, L. E. 
Koon, and M. Shipp, the members of the committee who made possible this fine 




achievement. Ten years ago the Union set up this five-man committee to devise 
ways and means of providing a new home for the group. A few weeks ago they 
stood on the steps of the fine building pictured above and watched the finishing 
touches of the dream come true. 

The new home of Local Union No. 172 3 has a fine big auditorium, two smaller 
meeting halls, a large recreation hall for the enjoyment of members and a large 
parking lot in the rear. All woodwork is red gum and the meeting halls have 
indirect lighting and are finished with acoustical plaster. 

Thirty-two organizations are now renting from Local Union No. 1723 which 
is realizing a return of approximately $1,200 per month from its investment. All 
this is certainly an achievement fo which the officers and members of Local Union 
No. 1723 can be extremely proud. 



LOCAL UNION XO. 1596 CELEBRATES DIAMOND JUBILEE 

Winding up seventy-five years of continuous organization, Local Union No. 
159 6 of St. Louis on February 15 celebrated its Diamond Jubilee. It was in the 
year 1871 — ten years before the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 



THE CARPENTER 23 

of America was born — that the cabinet workers of St. Louis brought into existence 
the organization now known as Local Union No. 159 6. Ever since they have played 
an important part in the progress of the United Brotherhood. On the night of 
February .15 fitting, tribute was paid to all the old timers who gave so much to 
build both Local Union No. 159 6 and the United Brotherhood. 

Brother George Ottens represented the General President, and delivered a 
very inspiring address. He was extremely eloquent in praising the work of the old 
timers who pioneered the labor movement in the early days. He then presented 
to twenty-six of the old timers who showed a membership record of fifty years 
or more in the local, a Certificate of Honor and a souvenir billfold as a token of 
appreciation from the Local Union for the splendid service which these members 
performed for the Local in the early days of its existence. The speaking program 
was followed by dancing and refreshments. It is significant to note that the 
celebration was held in the fine, big building owned by the Carpenters District 
Council, with its mahogany paneled walls, whereas the first meeting was held in 
the back room of a tavern. 

The Local held its first meeting on December 8, 1871, and was known as 
"Schreiner-Arbeiter Schutz-Verin von St. Louis," (Furniture Workers' Protective 
Union) and it affiliated itself with the Amalgamated Woodworkers' Society. In 
1903 the membership voted to affiliate with the United Brotherhood. The minutes 
of each meeting have been carefully preserved and they show a continuous or- 
ganization from the date of its first meeting. 

: • : 

A FINE THREE-GENERATION TEAM 

Local Union No. 899, Parkersburg, W. Va., boasts of a unique three-generation 
team of union members. There are no better union men anywhere than the three 
members of the Gates family who hold membership in Local 899. They are: 

Issac Gates, the grandfather; C. E. Gates, 
the son; and William L. Gates, the grand- 
son. 

Isaac Gates and his son, C. E. Gates, 
were initiated into Local Union No. 899 
on September 2 4, 1919. Thirty-seven 
years later, on September 17, 1946, to 
be exact, grandson William L. Gates was 
initiated into the union. 
Grandfather Isaac Gates is still active in his work, although he finds it im- 
possible to attend union meetings as religiously as he did for many years. C. E. 
Gates, the son, has always been vei'y active in the affairs of the Local. He has 
held every office in the Local from two to six years. For the past four years he 
has been capably filling the office of treasurer. He seldom misses a meeting and 
is never too tired or too busy to serve his Union when necessity demand it. 
William L. Gates, the grandson, served three years- in the United States Navy. 
After being honorably discharged, he decided to take up the profession of car- 
pentry, which he is learning under the supervision of his father. 




TRI-CITIES COUNCIL HONORS GRADUATE APPRENTICES 

Diplomas for completing four-year on-the-job apprenticeship training courses 
were issued to seven members at the January 2 9 meeting of the Tri-City Car- 
penters District Council held at Rock Island, Illinois. Those receiving diplomas 
qualifying them as journeymen carpenters were: Kenneth Winter, Rock Island; 
Donald Covemaker and William Covemaker of Moline; Richard L. Sharp, Reynolds; 
James and Raymond Wells, Davenport; and Delmar C. Bell, Rapids City. Several 
invited speakers touched on the importance of apprenticship training, following 
which refreshments were served. 

It was announced that sixty apprentices are now engaged in on-the-job training 
in the area — practically all of them veterans. 



24 THE CARPENTER 

GOVERNOR HONORS MASSACHUSETTS MEMBER 

Recently Robert F. Bradford, Governor of Massachusetts, paid a signal honor 
to Brother Sidney Smith, former secretary of the Boston District Council, when 
he named Brother Smith as a member of the State Board of Housing. The ap- 
pointment of Brother Smith to the important office is a recognition of the fine 
work he and the Boston District Council have done in the apprenticeship training 
program. Both are entitled to hearty congratulations. 




CHARTER MEMBER OF BROTHERHOOD PASSES AWAY 

When the Grim Reaper struck down Brother 
John Sthulfath on January 9, our Brotherhood 
lost our longest time member. Brother Sthulfatb 
was already a member of a carpenters' union 
when the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America was born in Chicago in 1881. 
In fact his organization sent six men to the 
Chicago convention which gave birth to the United 
Brotherhood. Brother Sthulfath has been a mem- 
ber ever since the organization came into exist- 
ence. 

Brother Sthulfath was a member of Local 
Union No. 224, of Cincinnati, Ohio, at the time 
of his demise. In April of 18 81 he first became a member of the Benevo- 
lent Organization of Carpenters of the State of Ohio. This organization 
was the outgrowth of "Casinos," of which there were three in and around Cin- 
cinnati. Total membership was about thirty men. Although it was originally 
known as Local Union No. 1, the Cincinnati union became Local No. 2 after the 
Chicago convention set up the Brotherhood. In later years when organizing 
work was expanding the Brotherhood in the Cincinnati territory, Brother Sthulfath 
joined Local Union No. 6 76 at Corryville. This Local eventually consolidated with 
Local 2 24 where he has held membership ever since. 

Just before his death, Brother Sthulfath wrote a short history of organizing 
aptivities in the early days in and around his beloved home city. He recalled that 
wages in 1881 were twenty cents per hour and the standard work week consisted 
of six ten-hour days. He reviewed the long struggle that preceded the establish- 
ment of the eight-hour day, and he paid special tribute to. the old timers who 
pioneered organization against many odds. 

In Sthulfath's passing, Local No. 224 and the entire Brotherhood lost a mem- 
ber whose loyalty and honesty have been a constant source of inspiration. Through 
sixty-five years of service he proved himself to be a union man to the core. 



BAY COUNTIES BROTHER HONORED 

Earl Warren, Governor of California, on February 25, 1947, appointed William 
P. Kelly Commmissioner on the California Apprenticeship Council. Brother Kelly 
is Apprenticeship Coordinator for the Bay Counties District Council of Carpenters. 

The Governor thereby gave due recognition to the work of the Bay Counties 
District Council of Carpenters in promoting apprenticeship training in the carpen- 
try craft. 

At the present time there are approximately 2500 apprentices under training 
in the Bay Counties area of whom veterans are about 90%. There are in opera- 
tion, at the present time, 36 carpentry classes, 11 millcabinet classes, and 3 ship- 
wright and joiner classes, with many apprentices unable to attend classes because of 
the lack of teachers. 

In cooperation with the California State Department of Education, a course of 
training is being developed, part of which is already completed and being used 
in classes. 



THE CARPENTER 25 

OWEN SOUND HOLDS FIRST ANNUAL BANQUET 

Local No. 2050, Owen Sound, Ontario, on January 22 held its first annual 
banquet for members and their wives. Turkey with all the trimmings headed the 
menu. Chairman J. Vanos gave a short speech of welcome and both Local Union 
President H. R. Robinson and past president E. Shipley added enjoyment to the 
evening by making a few appropriate remarks. 

The evening wound up with a euchre tournament and everybody present had a 
grand time. 



IDAHO FALLS LOCAL CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY 

On January 25, Local 609 of Idaho Falls, Idaho held its anual banquet in the 
Idaho Falls Armory. About 250 carpenters and their guests were present for this 
annual party of Local Union 609 of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Brother Joshua T. Evans acted as toastmaster for the evening while President 
Cecil Stalker presided. Among the guests introduced during the course of the 
evening were Mayor E. W. Fanning, L. E. Stalker, architect and newly elected 
president of the Idaho Society of Engineers; and M. C. Larson, Secretary of the 
Pocatello Building and Construction Trades Council of Pocatello, Idaho. There 
were also representatives of several other Pocatello unions present. 

A surprise program was enjoyed by all. It was put on by the members of the 
Eastern Idaho Progressive Society for the Blind. The program included several 
musical numbers, as well as an interesting talk by F. B. Kinney, Eastern Idaho 
home teacher for the blind. 

A delicious dinner was served by the Seventh LDS Ward Relief Society. Fol- 
lowing the dinner, the remainder of the evening was spent with the couples danc- 
ing to the music of Nelson's orchestra. A good time was had by all. 



DAVENPORT LOCAL HAS PARTY AND HONORS OLD MEMBER 

Carpenters' Local Union No. 4, Davenport, Iowa, holds meetings on the 1st 
and 3rd Mondays of each month. Monday night, January 20, 1947, the regular 
meeting was held and business transacted in the usual manner, but when the 
meeting was over luncheon and refreshments were served by a committee who 
received sincere thanks for a job well done. A musician was on hand with an 
accordion. Those present had a wonderful time. 

The party was really held with the idea in mind to honor an old member of the 
Local with an enviable record. He is: Otto Haase, born October 15. 18 71, joined 
Davenport Local No. 554, October 6th, 1891, has never been in arrears and 
helped organize Local No. 241 of Moline, Illinois. At that time we had two 
Local Unions in Davenport, 554 and 12 72. The two Locals merged in 1912 or 
1913 and Local No. 4 was the result. 



A DISTINGUISHED LIST OF OLD TIMERS 

With eleven members on its rolls each of whom boasts more than fifty years 
of continuous membership in our Brotherhood, Local Union 488 of New York City 
is proud of its distinguished list of old timers. Between them, these old timers 
represent 5 82 years of continuous membership in our organization. At its De- 
cember 2 3 meeting, Local No. 488 celebrated the thirtieth anniversary of the 
granting of its charter, and a special tribute was paid to these old timers who 
have contributed so much to the building of not only Local No. 48 8 but the United 
Brotherhood as well. 

Following are the members of Local 488 holding fifty or more years of continu- 
ous membership: General Secretary Frank Duffy, 51 years; John Anderson. 50 
years; Gus Johnson, 55 years; George Grimm, 50 years; Harry P. Eilert, 5 4 years: 
George Ruelius, 6 2 years; Peter Christiansen, 50 years; John Werner Johnson. 
50 years; Gus Yoerges, 50 years; Theodore Fuchs. 51 years; and Max Bunzel, 51 
years. 




WORDS OF WISDOM 

The Editor: 

I wonder if all carpenters' ladies read "To the Ladies" before they turn "The 
Carpenter" over to its rightful owner, as I do. It is in hopes of reaching the 
ladies who do not have a Ladies' Auxiliary to their Local that I am writing. 

If you organize an Auxiliary you will know what I mean. The benefits are 
too numerous to mention, not the least of which is bringing sincere, straight 
thinking family men out to local meetings. 

It is the custom to hold our meetings the same evening the Local meets, and at 
least once a month the meetings are followed by a social hour. It forms a 
closer bond of fellowship among the brothers and our men soon become the 
hardest workers for a stronger, better Local. Ladies with interests in common 
become acquainted and are unusually congenial and happy in their asociation. 

You will realize the importance of union men paying their dues promptly 
to receive its benefits, and will not resent the time and effort they spend on union 
work. 

After you are organized you will learn of ways to help all organized labor 
and feel you are a part of the biggest and finest movement of all times. 

We who are members are very happy and proud to be. 

Sincere greetings to all Carpenters' ladies from our beautiful North West. 

Fraternally yours, 

Mrs. Gladys Weirman, 
^ Washington State President, 

Ladies' Auxiliaries, U. B. of C. and J. 



AX INVITATION TO VISIT VENICE, CALIFORNIA 

The Editor: 

The members of Ladies' Auxiliary No. 400, Venice, Calif., would like to extend 
an invitation to any sister auxiliary member to visit us on our meeting night. 

We hold one business meeting a month and one social meeting. 

Although we are not considered a large group, we have done many things. 

Last Thanksgiving we held our annual Thanksgiving dinner for the members 
and their families. During Christmas week we held a Christmas party among the 
members, at which time we gathered a large basket of fruits and canned juices 
to take to one of Local No. 1052's members who has been in the hospital for the 
past three years. We also had a white elephane gift sale and the money went 
into our Sunshine Fund. This last year our Christmas donation went to the Salva- 
tion Army. 

I'm sure if any of you drop in on us you will find our articles that we read at 
each meeting of amusement and enjoyment, along with our pot luck lunch social. 

Our business meetings are held on the first Wednesday of the month and our 
social meetings on the third Wednesday of each month. You will find our Presi- 
dent, Mrs. Phyllis Rose always on hand to greet you, along with our other officers 
and members. 

Fraternally yours, 

EVELYN DE CLERCK, 

Recording Secretary. 



Craft Probloms 




Carpentry 

(Copyright 1947) 

LESSON 223 
By H. H. Siegele 

America would not be what she is to- 
lay, if it had not been for the part 




ing perhaps in isolated localities) made 
it possible for settlements to spring up 
along the frontiers, because with it the 
pioneers were able to build substantial 
buildings for shelter and for protection 
against Indian raids; for a well-built 
log house in those days was a veritable 
fortress, often saving the lives of whole 
settlements. 

. Fig. 1 is a drawing made from mem- 
ory of a broad ax that this writer used 
while he was still under his father's 
rooftree. It was among the first carpen- 
ter tools, if not the first, that he used 
in connection with building. Not many 
tools are necessary to build a log build- 



played in her pioneer days by the broad 
ax. This tools (obsolete today, except- 




28 



THE CARPENTER 



ing. The first of these is a common ax. 
for felling trees and chipping the logs 
for hewing. The second is the broad 
ax -with which the hewing is done. A 
cross-cut saw is used for cutting the 
ends of the logs. These three tools are 
all that are needed for framing a log 




Fig. 3 

house up to the roof, so far as the 
woodwork is concerned. The rafters are 
made of round timbers or poles with one 
hewed straight side. The bird's mouth 
(which looked like a real bird's mouth) 
•usually was cut with the ax, also the 
comb cut. The hand-made shingles 
were split out and were rather long, 
compared with present-day shingles. 
Light timbers with one hewed straight 
side were fastened to the rafters, onto 
which the shingles were nailed. The 
cracks between the logs, or chinks, as 
they were called, were closed with stiff 
clay mud, reinforced with straw. The 



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tical building problems, has 252 p. and 670 il. $2.50. 

BUILDING.— Has 210 p. and 495 U.. covering form 
building, scaffolding, finishing, stair building, roof 
framing, and other subjects. $2.50. 

CARPENTRY.— Has 302 p., 754 it. covering general 
house carpentry, and other subjects. $2.50. 

i The above books support one another. ) 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry, 64 pages, brown 
cloth binding and two-color title page. Only $1.00. 

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with 4 books, 3 $1.00 books free— books autographed. 



chinks were filled up flush -with the 
surface of the log walls. The interior 
was usually whitewashed, while the ex- 
terior was either whitewashed or left 
in its original state. 

A great many carpenters of today 
hardly know what a broad ax is, and 
perhaps have never seen real hewing. 
This is particularly true of the younger 
men. Fig. 2 brings out enough on this 
.subject to prepare any carpenter for 
hewing, should he find himself in an 
isolated place where he would have to 
hew with a broad ax. The illustration 
shows the logs sawed on one end, but 
in practice the logs are left just as they 
fall; in fact, the felling of trees is 
planned so that they will be in the right 
position for hewing when on the ground. 

The first thing the hewer does is to 
determine how much has to be hewed off 
in order to keep the heart of the tree 
as nearly at the center of the hewed 
timber as possible. Then he strikes a 
chalk line, as indicated by the heavy 
line pointed out on the drawing. The 
man shown to the right is in position 
for chopping off the surplus wood. He 
has in his hands a double-bit ax, which 
was commonly used a half a century 
ago and still is in common use. The 
section between C and C is split off to 
the lines pointed out with indicators, 
which should leave at least i., -inch of 







Fig. 4 



wood for the hewer to take off with the 
broad ax. The chopper chips this %- 
inch of wood with the ax to the depth of 
the hewing line. Then he proceeds to 
chop off and chip section after section 
ahead of the hewer, who follows up 
about as shown to the left. The broad 
ax shown is in about the right position 
for hewing. The dotted linue indicates 
that the handle is bent in order to give 
the hewer knuckle room. This is also 
shown by dotted line in Fig. 1 

At A is shown a chipped slab that is 
being hewed off. At B another chipped 
slab is started, which will be hewed off 
after the slab marked A is off. In this 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



manner the hewer works until he has 
one side of the timber hewed, and then 
starts on the other side. A good hewer 
in pioneer days would move right along 
with a broad ax, splitting a chalk line 
from one end to the other — that is, he 
would hew off one-half of the line and 
leave the other half on the timber. 

At D, to the left, is shown how the 
size of the timber to be hewed out was 
often marked on the end of the log, 
and by a heavy line is indicated the 
chalk line's relationship to the mark. 
At E is shown a part of the timber hew- 
ed on four sides. The short curved lines 
indicate cuts with the ax when the chip- 
ping was done, which always show up 
on hewed work. 





Fig. 5 

Fig. 3 shows by the upper drawing a 
a lathing hatchet, and by the bottom 
drawing a shingling hatchet. Most car- 
penters, however, use the hatchet shown 
at the top for both lathing and shin- 
gling. In fact, that hatchet is commonly 
called a shingling hatchet. The one 
shown at the bottom, is not used a great 
deal for shingling, so far as this writer 
has been able to observe. 

Fig. 4 shows to the left two edge 
views and a side view of the bit of a 
lathing hatchet, and to the right the 
same views of a shingling hatchet bit. 
:The edge view at a of each drawing 
shows the grinding for general use. At 
b is shown a hollow grinding, that is 
suitable only for soft wood, when there 
is no danger of hitting nails. 

Fig. 5 shows at the top a claw 
hatchet, seldom used by carpenters, and 
at the bottom, what is called a broad 
hatchet, commonly known as a hand ax. 



Fig. 6 shows at the top a half hatchet, 
which gives good service, and at the bot- 
tom a flooring hatchet. TIip design of 
this hatchet makes it especially suitable 




Fig. 6 

for laying flooring — it is also used as a 
hand ax. 

Fig. 7 shows to the left two edge 
views and a side view of a bit that repre- 
sents both of the hatchets shown in Fig. 




Fig. 



6. At a is shown a grinding bevel suit- 
able for general use, and at b a hollow 
grinding suitable for use in soft wood. 



IF YOU ARE A CARPENTER 

and have some experience in lumber YOU CAN LEARN 
to ESTIMATE CARPENTER WORK in a surprisingly 
short time. Forty-seven years experience in lumbering 
and Genera! construction brings to light new born meth- 
ods, such as grading labor on lumber and other items 
to prevent the estimator, or contractor from serious hid- 
den disaster until you have used grading labor or 
lumber you will still be in the dark. Haying some ex- 
perience in lumber, that is the place to start. The rest 
will ccme much easier after gaining a sound footing. 
These new born methods will give the answers, from 
farm buildings to skyscraper, homes, remodeling, re- 
pairs, wrecking, etc., 

A postcard, with your name and address and your ex- 
perience, will bring you the opportrnity to make your 
dreams come true. By return mail you will receive 
your FIRST LESSON FREE, no obligation. 

E. AV. HOFFXER 
3319 N. Clark St. Chicago 13, 111. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



when there is no danger of hitting nails. 
To the right are shown, A, a sample of 
what happens when the edge ground as 
shown at a is damaged by hitting nails, 
and B, what happens when the edge 
ground as shown at b is damaged in the 
same way. Compare what is shown at 
A with that at B. 




Fig. 8 

Fig. 8 shows a rig builder's hatchet. 
This hatchet has a longer handle than 
the ordinary hatchet, and is used ex- 
tensively by floor layers. Not only is it 
an excellent tools for laying flooring, but 
it gives good results as a hand ax. 



WANTS TO KNOW 

A brother wants to know the right 
way to fit joists to I beams. He made 
pencil sketches of a few ways that he 
has seen and wants me to tell him which 
is right. 

Fig. 1 shows a joist fit to an I beam, 
that at first glance looks all right. But 
it is wrong. At point A there is not 
enough play. The two points indicated 



at B are as they should be. Fig. 2 shows 
what will happen when the joist shown 
in Fig. 1 shrinks in seasoning. The lug 




Fig. 1 




Fig. 2 

at A will hug the I beam, as shown. The 
upper point indicated at B will be just 



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cC Demand the Best The Genuine 

F. P. M. SAWS AND BLADES 

The Saw of Superior Quality with a National Reputation. Manu- 
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F. P. MAXSON, Sole Manufacturer 

3722 N. Ashland Ave. CHICAGO, ILL 

TWO AIDS FOR SPEED AND ACCURACY 





ii, 



THEY HAVE ~ 

OUR CHART Blueprint 27" X 36" 



"The FRAMING SQUARE" (Chart) 

Explains tables on framing squares. Shows how 
to find lengths of any rafter and make its cuts; 
find any angle in degrees; frame any polygon 3 to 
16 sides, and cut its mitres; read board feet rafter 
and brace tables, octagon scale. Gives other valu- 
able information. Also includes Starting Key and 
Radial Saw Chart for changing pitches and cuts 
into degrees and minutes. Every carpenter should 
have this chart. Now printed on both sides, makes about 
13 sguare feet of printed data showing squares full size. 
Price $1.00 postpaid, no stamps. 



SLIDE CALCULATOR for Rafters 



Makes figuring rafters a cinch! Shows the length of any 
rafter having a run of from 2 to 23 feet; longer lengths are 
found by doubling. Covers 17 different pitches. Shows lengths 
of hips and valleys, commons, jacks, and gives the euts for 
each pitch, also the angle in degrees and minutes. Fastest 
method known, eliminates chance of error, so simple anyone 
who can read numbers can use it. NOT A SLIDE RULE but 
a Slide Calculator designed especially for Carpenters, Con- 
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postpaid, Check or M. 0., no stamps. 

MASON ENGINEERING SERVICE 

2105 N. Burdick St., Div. 3, Kalamazoo 81. Mich. 



about as it was when the joist was 
placed, but the joint at the bottom will 
be wide open, which is bad. Fig. 3 
shows what will happen when a heavy 
load conies on the floor. The point in- 





FOR 
EXAMINATION 

SEND NO MONEY 



Fig. 3 

dicated at A is bad, but what the upper 
arrow at B points out is much worse. 
The joint at the bottom in this illus- 
tration is what it should be. 



Learn to draw plans, estimate, be a live-wire builder, do 
remodeling, take contracting jobs. These 8 practical, pro- 
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to get more work and make more money. Architectural de- 
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UP-TO-DATE 

EDITION 

These books are 
the most up-to- 
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Examination 



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Big opportunities are always for MEN 
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lhat helps solve building problems. 

Coupon Bring* Eight Big Books For 




AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY Vocational Publishers since 1898 
Dept. G436 Drexel at 58th Street, Chicago 37. III. 

Tou may ship me the Up-to-Date edition of your eight 
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only, and if fully satisfied in ten days, I will send you. 
$2.00, and after that only $3.00 a month, until the total 
price of only $34.80 is paid. I am not obligated In any 
way unless I keep the books. 



Fig. 4 

How the end of the joist should have 
been framed in the first place is shown 
by Fig. 4. Here there is plenty space 




Nam* „ 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name end 
address, and name and address of at least one business 
man as reference. Men in service, also give home address. 



The SAW 

For Every 
Carpenter 



MODEL 60 




JtQMSkw 



Fig. 5 

for shrinkage at point A, and point B 
is only slightly open. Fig. 5, A and B, 
show what will happen when the joist 
shrinks. The bottom joint still is as it 
originally was. 



Carpenters throughout the country okay the Model 
60 MALLSAW. Inexpensively priced— it provides an 
all-around saw for cross-cutting or ripping rough or 
dressed lumber, grooving mortar joints, or cutting 
and scoring tile, limestone, concrete and other ag- 
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any regular electrical outlet. 

Watch for our ad in the April 5 issue of The Satur- 
day Evening Post. It features the Model 60 MallSaw 
. . . illustrates its uses . . . lists its price. 

Ask your Hardware Dealer or write direct. 

MALL TOOL COMPANY 

7751 South Chicago Ave., Chicago, 19, III. 



"A SuhJuftwrw* 



For Fastenings In 
Hollow Material 

PAIN 

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Get a firm grip in hollow material with 
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styles allow a wide range of uses. 
Ask Your Hardware Dealer or Write for Catalog. 
THE PAINE CO. 
2967 Carroll Ave. Chicago, Illinois 

Offices in Principal Cities 



PAIME 




FASTENING 
and HANGING 



DEVICES 



Customer: "That's a 
beautiful job. Pete." 
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rant beat the Foley 
for turning out a 
perfect rutting saw. 



Business 



With the Foley Automatic Saw 
Filer you can put yourself into a fine cash 
business with steady customers and make a good living. The 
Foley automatically joints the saw. making all teeth even 
in size, shape, spacing. The Foley is the only machine 
that files nil hand saws, also band and cross-cut circular 
saws. 

SEND FOR FREE PLAN— Shows how to start 
a saw repair shop. Xo canvassing. Send cou- 
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FOLEY^fe*^ SAW FILER & 



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Phone LUcas 6929 

FRANK'S MANUFACTURING CO. 

2501-3-5 E. Imperial Highway Los Angeles 2, Cal. 




LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your own busi- 
ness and be your own boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 

Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $5.00, 
and pay the balance of $25.00 at $5.00 per 
month, making a total of $30.00 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
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Write your name and address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building C, Denver 2, Colorado 




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UNIVERSAL JAWS 

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STANLEY] 




HARDWARE- HAND TOOLS ■ ELECTRIC TOOLS 




At present we are unable to produce 
Lee (Union-Made) Carpenters' Over- 
alls because: 



1. 



2. 



We are unable to secure the 
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There are not enough skilled 
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Lee Carpenters' Overalls will again be 
available when we can obtain the 
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great Lee factories. 

Lee is the Largest Manufacturer of 
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THE H. D. LEE CO. 

Kansas City, Mo. Minneapolis, Minn. 
Trenton, N. J. San Francisco, Cal. 

South Bend, Ind. Salina, Kans. 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 

[4vols.*6 




Inside Trade Information) 
for Carpenters. Builders. Join- 
ers, Building Mechanics and) 
all Woodworkers. Thesa 
Guides give you the ahort-cut 
instructions that you want— 
including new methods, ideas, 
solutions, plana, ey stems and! 



om-y ■ 
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.An 

for the 

Lice and student. A 
i.l daily helper and 



Carpenters 
the. 



ery- 

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Inside Trade Information On: 



as a Helping Hand to Easier 
Work. Better Work and Bet- 
ter Pay. To get this asaiat- 
ance for yourself. simply fill 
in and mail the FREE COU- 
PON below. 

How to' use the steel square — How to file and set 
saws — How to build furniture— How to use a 
mitre box — How to use the chalk line — Plow to use 
rules and scales — How to make joints — Carpenters 
arithmetic — Solving mensuration problems — Es- 
timating strength of timbers — How to set girders 
and sills — How to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs — How to build houses, barns, gar- 
ages, bungalows, etc. — How to read and draw 
plans — Drawing up specifications — How to ex- 
cavate- 1 — How to use settings 12. 13 and 17 on the 
steel square — How to build hoists and scaffolds — 
skylights — How to .build stairs — How to put on 
interior trim — How to han« doors — How to lath — 
lay floors — How *-o paint 




THEO. AUDEL & CO., 49 W. 23rd St., New York City 

Mail Audele Carpenter* and Builders Guide: 
I will remit Jl in 7 days, and $1 monthly until $ 
No obligation unless I am satisfied. 



Occupation. 
Rderecco . . 



CAR 




DOORS of INSTANT ACTION 



# Doors giving instant, trouble-free service are 
essential to efficiency in business and industrial 
structures. The "OVERHEAD DOOR" with the 
Miracle Wedge, built from quality materials and 
expertly engineered, provides this indispensable 
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TRACKS AND HARDWARE OF SALT SPRAY STEEL 




MIRACLE WEDGE 

OVERHEAD DOOR CORPORATION . Hertford City, Indiana, U.S. A. 




rHE 




MPENTER 



FOUNDED 1881 

Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 




MAY, 19 4 7 




SPRING CLEANING 



National Labor Service 



TCUP^ 



^^"^T-PY 10 CARPENTERS 

EE« I« V'own.h ° f 

DISSTON HAND^AWS^ - • 



'*f-i 



"^ mm 



||C 




lN a recent survey among thousands of 
carpenters, in all parts of the country, 92 out 
of every 100 reported they own Disston saws. 
The reasons they give for this outstanding 
preference include all the features that make a 
top quality saw. For instance, to quote a few: 

• "The Disston hand saw stays sharp 
longer and holds a better set." 

# "Disston saws are made of better 
steel." 

O "You cannot beat a Disston saw for 
good clean cutting and long life." 

Disston makes a complete line of saws for the 
carpenter. A widespread favorite of carpenters 
is the Disston D-8 illustrated and briefly 
described here. 



BT ABUWEP 1 MB 




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Medium weight, Skew-back pattern. Made in 20-inch 10 points cross-cut; 24-inch 8 and 
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Ask your hardware retailer for 
a FREE copy of the Disston 
Saw, Tool and File Manual, 
or write to us direct. 




HENRY DISSTON & SONS, INC. 

504 Tacony, Philadelphia 35, Pa., U.S.A. 



The saw most Carpenters use 





THedePOCTCR 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
VoL LXVII — No. 5 



INDIANAPOLIS, MAY, 1947 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents — 



It's Here - 5 

For the average American worker inflation and an economic breakdown are not 
something to think about or fear at some future date; they are both staring him in the 
face right now. At the bottom of it all lies plain greed on the part of Big Business. 

A Tribute to Uncle Bob 7 

Jim Barrett, a life-long friend and colleague of the late Bob Wyler, pens a well- 
earned and touching tribute to the fighting Kentuckian who spent his lifetime promoting 
the welfare of organized labor in general and the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners in specific. 



Texas City Local Hard Hit 



10 

The blazing inferno which laid waste the thriving Texas community took a terriffic 
toll among the membership of Local 973. 



General Executive Board Minutes 



11 



In a rather lengthy meeting the General Executive Board disposes of many matters 
of vital importance to the future and welfare of our Brotherhood. 

• • • 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
In Memoriam 

Correspondence 
Craft Problems - 



2G 
27 
28 



Index to Advertisers - 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917. authorized on July 8. 1918. 



LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your own busi- 
ness and be your own boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 

Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $5.00, 
and pay the balance of $25.00 at $5.00 per 
month, making a total of $30.00 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name and address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building C, Denver 2, Colorado 



Hand Pressure 
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plastics. Easily and 
quickly serviced. Five powerful models 
— W" (in two speeds), %", 5/16" and 
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for every drilling job. 

Ask your Hardware Dealer or write direct. 

MALL TOOL COMPANY 

7751 South Chicago Ave., Chicago, 19, III. 

See our advertisement in The Saturday Evening Post 

May 10th issue 





ON-THE-JOB POCKET K 



This new »nd revised edition of Carpenters and Builders' Practical Kules for Laying 
Out Work consists of short and practical rules for laying out octagons, ellipses, roofs, 
groined ceilings, hoppers, spirals, stairs and arches with tables of board measure, 
length of common, hip, valley and jack rafters, square measure, cube measure, measure 
of length, etc. — also, rules for kerfing, drafting gable molding, getting the axis of a 
segment, laying off gambrel roof and explaining the steel square. 

"For ready reference carry .. ..... . . 

this convenient 50 page $1.00 postpaid. Money back guarantee if not entirely satisfied 
pocket size (4Jx6|-) guide 
to your job." 



SEND $1.00 TODAY 



5344 Cinton Ave., So., 
Minneapolis 9, Minn. 



I"* B f^m B* \& ^A sw B» ^? jr m mneapuiis a, mum. waru uj 
Carpenters & Builders' Practical Rules for Laying Out Work 



Enclosed find $1.00. Please for- 
ward by return mail one of your 



Name Address. 



3 SUPER ASDS FOR CRAFTSMEN NOW! 




SUPER SI 
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BNGLE 



lj Q Clamps on shin- 
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for spacing courses. A convenient, accurate, labor 
saver for shinglers, carpenters. Case-hardened. 
nNI V 1t\n FA s,l)tt ed round-head screw for quick 
una. I »Wfc EH. mounting or adjusting. 



Postpaid NONE BETTER! 

Sharpens round shank drills from 3/32" 
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All Items at your Dealers 
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available for in- 
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other repeat angle 
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A must for every 
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A. D. McBURNEY 



939 W. 6th St., Dept. C-1 
Los Angeles 14, Calif. 



NOTICE 



The publisher! of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be. In their Judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 
All contracts for advertising space In "The Car- 
penter," Including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 


Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 


E. C. Atkins & Co., Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 


Page 
4th Cover 


Burr Mrs?. Co., Los Angeles 
Calif. 


4 

1 


1 Henry Disston &. Sons, Inc., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 


-Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 


32 


T. C. Knife, St. Paul, Minn 


4 


Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 


3 


1 A. D. McBurney, Los Angeles, 
Calif. 


3 


Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, 


32 


Paine Co., Chicago, 111. 


.3rd Cover 


Stanley Tools, New Britain, 
Conn. 


3rd Cover 


Bowling Equipment 


Brunswick, Balke, Collender Co. 


32 


Technical Courses and 


Books 


American Technical Society, 


31 


! Chicago Technical College, 


32 


! E. W. Hoffner, Chicago, 111 


4 


D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn 


3 


j H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans._ 


29 


Mason Engineering Service, 


30 


Tamblyn System, Denver,, Colo 


3 


Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y. 


-3rd Cover 



KEEP THE MOXEY 
EN THE FAMILY! 

PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 



— PRICE LIST — 

Label and Emblem Novelties 



Card Cases (Label) $ .10 

Key Chains (Label) 15 

Fobs (Label and Emblem i. .50 
Gavels (Labels) 1.25 

Pins (Emblem) 100 

Buttons lEmblem) 1.00 

Cuff Links (Emblem) 1.50 

Match Box Holders (Label) .15 

Belt Loop and Chain (Label) .75 

Pins. Ladies Auxiliary (Em- 
blem) 1.75 

Auto Radiator Emblems... 1.25 



In Ordering These Goods Send All Order* 
and Make All Remittances Payable to 

FRANK DUFFY, Gen. Sec, 

Carpenters' Bid., 222 E. Michigan St. 
Indi;uiapolis, Ind. 



To 



^Special'^ 

ROOFERS 

who apply SLATE SURFACE Roofing 




WORKMEN : Send only 5fic and ask for Advertij- 
ing SAMPLE Handle, also replaceable Blades: New Cus- 
tomers only. (Retail value $1.00 • 
REGULAR PRICES - Handles $4 Doz; Blades $1 Doz. 

write 

™* T-C. KNIFE STA^ilEL 



IF YOU ARE A CARPENTER 

and have had some experience in lumber YOU CAN 
LEARN TO ESTIMATE CARPENTER WORK in a 
surprisingly short time. 47 years experience in lumber- 
ing and general con>truction brings to light new bora 
methods such as grading labor on lumber and other 
items to prevent the estimator, or contractor, from 
serious hidden disaster. Until you have used grading 
labor on lumber you will still be in the dark. 
Having some experience in lumber, that is the best 
place to start, the rest will come much easier after 
getting a sound footing. 

These new bom methods will give you the answer, 
from farm building to skyscraper, or homes, remodel- 
ing, repairs, wrecking, etc. 

A post card with your name and address, and your 
experience, will bring you the opportunity to mak^ 
your dreams come true. By return mail you will re- 
ceive your FIRST LESSON FREE. No obligation. 

E. W. HOFFXER 
3319 X. Clark St. Chicago 13. III. 



It's Here 



(An Editorial) 

• • • 

r",|"^HE WIFE of the average wage earner in America is facing a 
crisis. The amount of money her husband brings home every pay- 
day simply is not enough to make ends meet. If there are savings, 
much as she dislikes to, she dips into them occasionally to keep the 
family's living standard up to a level that guarantees health and decency. 
If there are no savings, she lops off one after another of the less essential 
items. By one means or another she has been getting by. But the day of 
reckoning is rapidly approaching. That will be the day when she will 
not be able to provide even the barest essentials of living with the con- 
tents of her husband's pay envelope. 

Multiply the plight of the average housewife by fifty or sixty million 
and you get an accurate picture of the national crisis that is developing. 
Prices have so drastically outrun wages that actual hunger is stalking the 
lower income brackets. Week in and week out, prices continue to climb 
upward. Any wage increases that may have been gained by workers have 
long since been nullified by price increases. For the average wage earner, 
an economic breakdown is not something to think about or worry about 
at some future date. It is here right now for him and his family. 

If Congress is aware of the situation, it is giving no indication of the 
fact. While millions of workers are staring privation in the face, Con- 
gressmen are working themselves into a lather over legislation to curb 
unions and put an end to collective bargaining. The economic collapse 
that has already engulfed the millions in the lower brackets and now 
threatens all workers is getting virtually no attention in Washington. 

At the bottom of the price crisis is plain, simple greed on the part of 
Big Business. If anyone has any doubts on this score he should study 
the analysis of corporation profits recently compiled by the National City 
Bank of New York. The combined 1946 profits of firms studied averaged 
almost thirty per cent above 1945 figures. However, this does not give a 
true picture. Many corporations reaped profits of 100, 200, and even 300% 
above 1945. By and large, profits on sales were roughly doubled. Saddest 
of all, the companies that gleaned the greatest profits were those dealing 
in essential commodities — commodities that figure prominently in the 
cost-of-living budget of the average wage earner. 

Chain stores handling foods upped their profits by roughly 125%, and 
compared to some of the other chains they were pikers. Some mail order 
houses increased their profits by as much as 300%. Tobacco, silk, rayon, 
woolens, hosiery, cotton, clothing and apparel, leather and a host of other 
industries turning out essential items climbed into the 100% increase class. 
Companies making tires, rubber goods, etc., doubled their take. So did 
airlines, shipping firms, cement and lime companies and many others. 



6 THE CARPENTER 

But it was the paper companies that really went all out. Their combined 
profits were up practically 300^ . 

Lest someone say it is not fair to compare 1946 profits to those made 
in 1945, let us take a look at what 1946 profits mean in terms of invest- 
ments — the real test of profits. A study of corporation profits, industry 
by industry, shows that in most industries the percentage of return on 
investment for 1946 was one to two times higher than in the 1942- 1945 
period and six to eight times higher than in the pre-war period. 

In the meat packing industry, one corporation earned 15.5% on in- 
vestment in 1946 as compared to 6.8% for the average war year and 4.2^ 
for the average prewar year. Another climbed from 3.4^ during the 
immediate prewar years to 8.1% during the war years and up to 16% 
during 1946. In the textile industry, profit increases were even more 
spectacular. One company that averaged a 3.6^ return on investment 
from 1936 to 1939 chalked up an average return of 9.4% from 1942 to 
1945 and pushed returns up to a terrific 28.5% in 1946. Another jumped 
from a 4.1% prewar average to a stratospheric 38.4% for 1946. 

How long can our national economy survive the present trend of out- 
rageous profiteering? Xot very long, is the answer. The present trend 
can only lead to a crash that will make 1929 look like good times. In the 
years following the last war, profit-hungry corporations pushed their 
earnings sky-high. Wages failed to keep pace. By 1929 the capacity of 
the nation to produce goods was at an all-time high. At the same time 
the purchasing power of the people's dollars was shrinking because of 
the high prices. The inevitable result was a crash. 

What was true in 1929 is still true today. When too much of the con- 
sumer's dollar goes into profits and too little of it goes into wages, an 
economic collapse is unavoidable. That is exactly what is happening to- 
day. More of the consumers' dollar is going into profits today than was 
the case after World War I. Unless something is done and done soon 
the crash we are building up. to will make 1929 look like a picnic. 

Less than a year ago these same corporations that today are gouging the 
public for all they can take were crying out against price controls. "'Give 
free enterprise a chance" they insisted. They had all sorts of graphs and 
charts and arguments to show that production would solve our problems. 
They told a fine story about what supply and demand and competition 
would do to level off prices. A few weeks after they got controls knocked 
out butter dropped a cent or two a pound and their glee was unbounded. 
But ever since last June they have pushed prices up steadily. Production 
today is at the highest peak in our history and prices are still climbing. 
They have virtually doubled in the past year. Even the staid New York 
Times is concerned with the situation. Recently it stated : "It must be 
beginning to dawn on these manufacturers that they are killing the goose 
that lays the golden eggs." 

With the bulk of the world totalitarian today, it is no exaggeration 
to say that free enterprise is on trial. At the present time it is giving a 
very poor account of itself. Last month the President warned business 
that the existing situation cannot continue. To date it has shown no 
signs of improving. It had better start improving immediately or free 
enterprise may find itself in the same class as the bustle and peg-top pants. 



A Tribute To Uncle Bob 

The General President submitted to the Board a letter from Morton E. Christ, Financial 
Secretary of Local Union 109, Sheffield, Alabama, with a memorial written by Brother J. F. 
Barrett, publicity director of the American Federation of Labor, paying tribute to the memory 
of Bob Weyler, General Representative of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, who died April Z2, 19!,C>. The Board ordered the "Memorial" published in our 
official monthly Journal, The Carpenter. 



LOCAL UNION No. 109 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 

FORENCE -:- SHEFFIELD -:- TUSCUMBL4. 

April 3, 1947. 
William L. Hutcheson, General President. 

Dear Sir and Brother: 

Enclosed find copy of memorial written by J. F. Barrett, 
whom we all call "Uncle Jim," and which we have mailed to all 
local unions of the United Brotherhood that are affiliated with 
the Tennessee Valley Conference of Carpenters and the Alabama 
State Council of Carpenters. 

With kindest regards and best wishes, I am 
Fraternally yours, 

MORTON E. CRIST, 
Financial Secretary and Business Manager. 



Memorial to Uncle Bob Weyler 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 
April, 1947 

To the Officers and Members of Local Unions of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. 
Dear Sirs and Brothers: 

One year ago April 22nd, word was flashed from Louisville, Kentucky, that 
Bob Weyler had died that day. This short telegraphic message was followed by 
newspaper and radio announcements throughout the United States of America, 
giving the details of the death of Bob Weyler. In a thousand unions halls that 
week and in tens of thousands of homes through this country, the topic of con- 
versation was the sudden death of Bob Weyler. A million hearts were saddened 
by the announcement of the death of this good man. 

The press associations and wire services, the newspapers and radios referred 
to him as "J. R. Weyler, of Louisville, a representative of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America," but in the union halls and in the homes 
of union members reference was made to him as "Uncle" Bob Weyler, an endear- 
ing term that manifested the deep, true and reverent love that labor everywhere 
had for "Uncle" Bob Weyler. 

As a close associate, and co-worker and friend of Bob Weyler, I have suggested 
that the week of April 21, 1947, be set aside and recognized as a memorial week 
to the life and labor and accomplishments of Bob Weyler, and that the meetings 
of all local unions of the Carpenters being held during that week devote a portion 
of the program of their meetings to a memorial service in memory of Bob Weyler. 

I am asking that this message be read at your meeting during the week of 
April 21, and be spread upon the minutes of your meeting as a permanent testi- 



8 THE C A R P E XTER 

monial of a fellow-worker to the life and labor and achievements of one of the 
greatest men in the American Federation of Labor — my friend and your friend, 
Bob Weyler. 

I am especially anxious for the younger members of the Carpenters Union to 
stop for a moment and consider the great contributions made by Bob Weyler to 
the welfare and advancement, the protection and the opportunities, that the mem- 
bers of the Carpenters Union enjoy, because Bob Weyler lived and loved and 
labored as he did. I have worked with Bob Weyler in the organization of Car- 
penters' Unions back yonder in the days when almost everybody despised a Labor 
Union. I have been sitting with him in the lobby of a hotel, or eating at a 
restaurant when officers of the law came to us and curtly and firmly, and in many 
instances profanely ordered us to get out of town. 

I have been with Bob Weyler when the vigilantes came to our hotel room and 
forcibly took us out in the dark of the night and escorted us to the county line, 
and told us to be gone, and that if we ever set foot in that county again we would 
pay for our foolishness with our lives. I have been with him when we were 
escorted by other vigilante committees down into the darkness of the railroad 
yards, and with him pitched into an empty freight car, after which we heard the 
car doors being slammed to and sealed on the outside. I have been with him in the 
darkness of those lonely freight cars until the switch engine took the car in which 
we had been placed and put it into a train of cars, and finally the train crew with 
orders to proceed carried us for hours and hours without light, food or water, to 
a destination that we knew not and to a fate that we could not even guess or 
foretell until we had been released. 

Yet, none of these experiences ever dampened the ardor or interfered with 
the determination of Bob Weyler to carry the great message of the union to the men 
engaged in erecting buildings for the people of the state and nation. 

Although a man of quick temper, absolutely fearless, yet in none of these trying 
experiences did Bob Weyler ever lose patience or complain. Time and time again 
I have heard his deep, sincere, bass voice saying, "God forgive them, they know 
not what they do." 

Bob Weyler loved his fellow-man, and he loved the women in the homes of 
his fellow-workers, and he worshipped their little children. No one but an in- 
spired man of God and of the people could have lived the life and endured the 
hardships and overcome the difficulties that Bob Weyler did, except an inspired 
man of God and of the people. He worked for his brother Carpenters until he 
witnessed their advancement from a wage of $1.50 a day to $1.50 an hour. Bob 
Weyler worked at the Carpenter trade when a twelve-hour day was the ordinary 
work day, and he fought for the Carpenters until the generally accepted forty- 
hour week became the order of his trade. Bob Weyler has often wept because so 
many members of his Union in the early years could not write their own names, 
and he lived to see the day when the children of his members were High School 
graduates and graduates of colleges and universities. 

Bob Weyler never forgot for a moment the great sacred fact that Jesus Christ 
worked at the Carpenters' trade, and he never spoke to a group of men working 
at the Carpenters' trade without calling to their attention the sacredness of their 
trade, that had been sanctified and glorified by the Carpenter of Nazareth. 

The younger members of the Carpenters' Union cannot afford to forget for 
a moment the life and labor and the love of Bob Weyler and his co-workers who 
built the great organization into its present high standard of efficiency with the 
living and working conditions and the wages that you today receive and enjoy 
because Bob Weyler and his fellows sacrified as they did in order to build these 
conditions for you. 

Bob Weyler never concerned himself so much with conditions of the present 
day in which he labored and lived and loved, but all the time he was inspired with 
the hope of better and greater things for the Carpenters in the years to come. 
This thought of his, this philosophy, this all-absorbing thought of his for im- 
provement of conditions for the generations to come was best illustrated by the 



T H E C A R P E N T E R 9 

poem that he recited thousands of times in his speeches and appeals to the work- 
ing men to join the union of their trade in the A. F. of L. 

That poem is entitled "Building a Bridge for Him," and everyone who has 
heard Bob Weyler speak has heard him recite the following verse in his earnest, 
honest, sincere manner. That poem he so often quoted is as follows 

BUILDING A BRIDGE FOR HLAI 

An old man, going a lone highway, 
Came at the evening, cold and gray, 
To a chasm vast and deep and wide. 
The old man crossed in the twilight dim, 
The sullen stream had no fear for him; 
But he turned when safe on the other side 
And built a bridge to span the tide. 

"Old man," said a fellow pilgrim near, 

"You are wasting your strength with building here; 

Your journey will end with the ending day. 

You never again will pass this way; 

You've crossed the chasm deep and wide. 

Why build this bridge at eventide?" 

The builder lifted his old gray head — 

"Good friend, in the path I have come," he said, 

"There followeth after me today 

A youth whose feet must pass this way. 

This chasm that has been naught for me, 

To that fair-haired youth may a pitfall be; 

He, too, must cross in the twilight dim — 

Good friend, I am building this bridge for him." 

That is exactly what Bob Weyler did in life — build a bridge for the youth, the 
lad. for you younger members of the Carpenters' Union, that each of you might 
safely cross the chasm deep and wide. 

I appeal to you, each and every one of you, to rededicate your lives and your 
labor to the completion of the task begun by Bob Weyler, and so nobly performed 
by him throughout the years of his useful life. You must not, you shall not, forget 
for a moment the sacrifices made by Bob Weyler and his fellow unionists of his 
day. The suffering they endured, the sacrifices they made, the humiliation they 
experienced that you might enjoy the conditions that are yours today. If you should 
forget these things then you are not worthy of the sacrifices that have been made 
for you. If you are worthy then you, each of you, and all of you, will go and do 
as Bob Weyler did and make the future of the coming generations as greatly 
improved over present conditions as Bob Weyler and his co-workers improved the 
conditions for your enjoyment. 

Bob Weyler is not dead, because: 

"There is no Death! 

The stars go down to rise 
upon some fairer shore, 

And bright in Heaven's 
jewelled crown 

They shine forevermore! " 

So Bob Weyler is not dead. His star went down to rise upon some fairer shore, 
to rise upon this generation of men engaged at the Carpenters' trade, to shine 
through you and your children and your children's children forevermore. 

J. F. "UNCLE JIM" BARRETT. 



10 THE CARPENTER 

Texas City Local H< 

• * V* 

One of the hardest hit groups in the disaster which laid waste Texas 
City, Texas, was Local Union No. 973. Immediately upon receipt of word 
of the calamity. General President Hutcheson assigned General Repre- 
sentative Charles P. Driscoll to proceed to the stricken community and 
render all possible assistance. However, Representative Driscoll encoun- 
tered considerable difficulty in his efforts to aid the members of the un- 
fortunate Local Union. Almost a week after the explosion all roads lead- 
ing to the city were still blockaded and official permission to enter was 
denied to all but those on official business connected with saving lives. 
From his headquarters outside the blockade Brother Driscoll was doing 
his utmost to lend all possible help to Brotherhood members who suffered 
in the tragedy. 

Immediately upon notification of the disaster, the General Office sent 
the following wire to Joe Francis, Business Agent for the Local : 

"Representative Driscoll reports to us this morning the serious loss 
to the members of Local Union 973 in recent disaster to Texas City. It is 
with deepest regret we received this information and extend to all mem- 
bers who were harmed and to the families of those that perished our sin- 
cerest sympathy. AYould appreciate your advising us at once if further 
assistance can be rendered both financially and otherwise to the members 
of your Local Union. 

M. A. HUTCHESON. for the General President." 

Latest reports from Texas City revealed Local Union No. 973 very 
hard hit. Six members were identified among the dead; fifteen were miss- 
ing and believed dead; four were seriously injured. What the ultimate 
toll will be no one was able to even estimate as this issue went to press. 
The city was still far from normal and an accurate check was impossible 
to make. 

Brotherhood members throughout the nation were shocked and sad- 
dened to learn of the almost unbelievable misfortune that has befallen 
the members of Local Union No. 973 and their families. On behalf of 
all Brotherhood members every where we extend to them our profound 
sympathies and deepest regrets. 



Apprenticeship Manual Nearing Completion 

In line with the action taken by the Twenty-fifth General Convention 
held in April, 1946, the Apprenticeship Committee, under the direction of 
First General Vice President M. A. Hutcheson, has been busy compiling a 
standard manual on apprenticeship training. Recently the committee spent 
some time at Headquarters in Indianapolis working on the manual, which 
is now virtually completed in tentative form. Revisions and corrections 
are now being made, and as soon as these are completed, the manual will 
be ready for the printers. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

General Officii : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District. CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
631 W. Page, Dallas, Texas 



Second District, WM. J. KELLY 
Carpenters' Bid., 243 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MTJIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland. O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St.. Florence. S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary. 



REGULAR MEETING OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE 

BOARD 

March 31, 1947. 
Since the previous meeting of the General Executive Board the following trade 
movements were acted upon: 

January 16, 1947. 
Portsmouth, N. H. L. U. 165 2. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.18 
to $1.37 V:> per hour, effective March 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

January 17, 19 47. 

Clinton, Iowa L. U. 772. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective February 18, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Watertown, S. D. L. U. 1690. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective February 10, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

January 21, 1947. 

Binghamton, N. Y. L. U. 281.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Lincoln, 111. L. U. 568. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
¥•1.87% per hour, effective March 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 



12 THE CARPENTER 

Danielson, Conn. L. U. 623. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 1. 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Pontiac, 111. L. U. 728. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% to 
$1.65 per hour, effective February 20, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Ottumwa. Iowa L. U. 767. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.43 to 
$1.70 per hour, effective March 1. 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Milford. Mass. L. U. 867. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Texas City, Texas L. U. 9 73. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective February 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Newburyport, Mass. L. U. 9 89. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.65 per hour, effective January 1. 19 47. Official sanction granted. 

Ridgefield, Conn. L. U. 1119. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62 i 2 
to $1.8714 per hour, effective March 15, 1947. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Canon City, Colo. L. TJ. 1231. — Movement for an increase in wages from 87 %c 
to $1.25 per hour, effective March 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Frankfort, Ind. L. U. 1465. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.40 
to $1.60 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Princeton, 111. L. U. 1525. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% to 
$1.50 per hour, effective February 10, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Bicknell, Ind. L. U. 1712. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective February 11, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Hinton, W. Va. L. U. 1874. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.27% 
to $1.50 per hour, effective February 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Shelbyville, 111. L. U. 189 2. — rMovement for an increase in wages from $.1.2 5 
to $1.50 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without fi- 
nancial aid. 

Hollywood, Fla. L. U. 1947. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50- 
to $1.75 per hour, effective February 24, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Durango, Colo. L. TJ. 2243. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.37 % per hour, effective December 26, 1946. Official sanction granted. 

Providence, Pawtucket and Central Falls, D. C, Providence, R. I. — Movement 
for an increase from $1.50 to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanc- 
tion granted. 

South Shore D. C, E. Weymouth, Mass. — Movement for an increase in wages 
from $1.44 to $1.65 per hour, effective March 1. 1947. Official sanction granted. 

January 23, 194 7. 

East St. Louis 111. L. U. 169. — Movement for an increase in wages from $2.00 
to $2.25 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Fairmont, W. Va. L. U. 428. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.80 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Logansport, Ind. L. U. 2060. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.35 
to $1.60 per hour, effective January 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Peru, 111. L. U. 195. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62 % to 
$1.75 per hour, effective January 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Elwood, Ind. L. U. 652. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.35 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective March 9, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Sycamore, 111. L. U. 82 6. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective March 13, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Wellsville, N. Y. L. U. 1182. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.62% per hour, effective March 16, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Defiance, Ohio L. TJ. 2180. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.30 
to $1.60 per hour, effective May 15, 1947. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 



THE CARPENTER 13 

January 2 4, 19 47. 

Gardner, Mass. L. U. 570. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Princeton, Ind. L. U. 935. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective April 9, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Pleasant Hill, 111. L. U. 2177. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.75 per hour, effective February 4, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

January 27, 1947. 

Cambridge, Ohio L. U. 245. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.50 per hour, effective February 24, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Rahway, N. J. L. U. 537. — Movement for an increase in wages from $2.00 to 
$2.10 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

: Hamilton, Ohio L. U. 637. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Taylorville, 111. L. U. 748. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.62% per hour, effective February 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Princeton, N. J. L. U. 781. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.87% 
to $2.00 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Conneaut, Ohio L. U. 863. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.75 per hour, effective March 21, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Jacksonville, 111. L. U. 904. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% 
to $1.87% per hour, effective February 9, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

McAlester, Okla. L. U. 986. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Cloquet, Minn. L. U. 1844. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.75 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. L. U. 19 42. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.12% to $1.50 per hour, effective March 27, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

January 31, 19 47. 
Canton, Ohio L. U. 143. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without financial 
aid. 

York, Pa. L. U. 191.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.30 to $1.50 
per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 
• Atlantic City, N. J. L. U. 432. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.87% 
to $2.15 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without fi- 
nancial aid. 

Marion, 111. L. U. 508. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.3 7% to 
$1.50 per hour, effective February 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Jefferson City, Mo. L. U. 9 45. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.37% to $1.62 1/ 2 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Salem, N. Y. L. U. 1220. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective February 18, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Quincy, 111. L. U. 1366. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.02 to 
$1.25 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without fincial aid. 

Hartford City, Ind. L. U. 1738. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.25 to $1.62% per hour, effective March S, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Frankfort, Ky. L. U. 2058. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.70 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

February 3, 19 4 7. 

Great Falls, Mont. L. U. 28 6. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 
to $2.00 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Lewiston, Maine L. U. 407. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.37% per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 



14 THE CAKPEXTER 

Jackson, Mich. L. U. 651. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% 
to $1.80 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Xiles, Mich. L. U. 1033. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% 
to $1.80 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Indianapolis D. C. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.67% to $2.00 
per hour, effective April 15, 19 4 7. Official sanction granted. 

February 5, 1947. 

Lynn, Mass. L. U. 595. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.60 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without financial 
aid. 

Bangor, Me. L. TJ. 621. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to $1.50 
per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Ottawa, 111. L. U. 661. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$1.87 % per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without fi- 
nancial aid. 

Austin, Texas L. U. 1266. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.62% per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Ogdensburg, N. Y. L. U. 13 54. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.85 per hour, effective March 4, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

February 7, 1947. 

Oxford, Miss. L. TJ. 2303. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective February 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

AVhite River Junction, Vt. L. TJ. 2 256. — Movement for an increase in wages 
from $1.25 to $1.37% per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

February 11, 1947. 

Laurel, Miss. L. TJ. 2 5. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective February 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. L. U. 297. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% 
to $1.85 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without fi- 
nancial aid. 

Fort Madison, Iowa L. TJ. 3 73. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.35 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 9, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Galesburg, 111. L. TJ. 360. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without financial 
aid. 

Granite City, 111. L. TJ. 6 3 3. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.90 
to $2.25 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Johnson City, Tenn. L. U. 1517. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.40 to $1.60 per hour, effective April 10, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

February 13, 1947. 

Red Wing, Minn. L. U. 2083. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.3 7% 
to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Hudson, X. Y. L. TJ. 1075. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.87% per hour, effective March 1, 19 4 7. Official sanction granted. 

Parkersburg, W. Va. L. TJ. 899. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.50 to $1.62% per hour, effective January 14, 1947. Official sanction granted, 
without financial aid. 

February 17, 1947. 

Hagerstown, Md. L. TJ. 340. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.30 
to $1.50 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Pascagoula, Miss. L. TJ. 5 69. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 



THE CARPENTER 15 

Norman, Okla. L. U. 1060. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.45 
to $1.55 per hour, effective July 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Waterloo, Iowa L. U. 1835. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without fi- 
nancial aid. 

Springfield, Mass. D. C. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% to 
$1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

February 26, 1947. 
Champaign and Urbana, 111. L. U. 44. — Movement for an increase from $1.25 
to $1.62 per hour (Millmen) effective April 10, 1947. Official sanction granted, 
without financial aid. 

New Haven, Conn. L. U. 79. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% 
to $1.87% per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Albany, N. Y. L. U. 117. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without financial 
aid. 

Kewanee, 111. L. U. 154. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.62% per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Kingston, Ont., Can. L. U. 249. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.05 to $1.25 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Dubuque, Iowa L. U. 678. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.47% 
to $1.85 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Fulton, N. Y. L. U. 754. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Frederick, Okla. L. U. 1893. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.50 per hour, effective April 5, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Whitefish, Mont. L. U. 2125. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Fulton, Mo. L. U. 2137. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.12% to 
$1.37% per hour, effective April 18, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Scottsbluff, Nebr. L. U. 2141. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.3 7% 
to $i.50 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Greensboro, N. C. L. U. 2230. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.37% per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Greenwood, Miss. L. TJ. 2379. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 15, 1947. Official sanction granted without 
financial aid. 

March 5, 1947. 

Erie, Pa. L. U. 81. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.52% to $1.95 
per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted without financial aid. 

Collinsville, 111. L. U. 295. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.90 
to $2.25 per hour, effective April 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Belleville, 111. L. U. 433. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.90 to 
$2.25 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Council Bluffs, Iowa L. U. 364. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.45 
to $1.62% per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Manchester, N. H. L. U. 625. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.75 per hour, effective March 1, 1947. Official sanction granted without 
financial aid. 

Delaware, N. J. L. U. 399. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62% 
to $1.87% per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Longview, Texas L. U. 1097. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective March 3, 1947. Official sanction granted. 



16 THE CARPEXTER 

Albany. X. Y. L. U. 1446. (Millmen) Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.11 to $1.25 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, with- 
out financial aid. 

Ashtabula. Ohio L. U. 162 9. — Movement for an increase in wages from §1.62 y, 
to $2.00 per hour, effective May 1. 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Wood River, 111. L. U. 1808. — Movement for an increase in wages from $2.00 
to $2.25 per hour, effective April 11, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Tupelo, Miss. L. U. 2183. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.12 % 
to $1.25 per hour, effective March 31, 1.947. Official sanction granted. 

March 19, 19 47. 

Edwardsville, 111. L. U. 378. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.90 
to $2.25 per hour, effective April 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Westfield, R. I. L. U. 810. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.40 
to $1.65 per hour, effective April 1, 19 47. Official sanction granted. 

Worland. Wyo. L. U. 883. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.40 
to $1.50 per hour, effective March 26, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Baltimore, Md. L. U. 9 74. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.15 to 
$1.35 (millmen) per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, with- 
out financial aid. 

Greenwood, Miss. L. U. 1012. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective April 3, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Marshalltown, Iowa L. U. 1112. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.40 to $1.50 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Tuscaloosa, Ala. L. U. 1337. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37 i'o 
to $1.50 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without fi- 
nancial aid. 

Thompson Falls, Mont. L. U. 16 39. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.25 to $1.50 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Orlando, Fla. L. U. 176 5. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective May 14, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

* Eldorado, 111. L. U. 17 71. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.2 5 
to $1.50 per hour, effective April 3. 1947. Official san&tion granted. 

Chanute, Kans. L. U. 1926. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective May 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Ames, Iowa L. U. 1948. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.40 to 
$1.60 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without financial 
aid. 

Iron Mountain. Mich. L. U. 2065. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.37 % to $1.50 per hour, effective May 3, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Berlin, X. H. L. U. 2276. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.30 
to $1.50 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Brownsville, Texas L. U. 1316. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective May 3, 19 47. Official sanction granted. 

March 25, 1947. 

Fort Dodge, Iowa L. U. 641. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1:37% 
to $1.62% per hour, effective April 1. 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Corning, X. Y. L. U. 70 0. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective May 1. 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Kokomo, Ind. L. U. 734. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.55 to 
$1.80 per hour, effective April 27. 1947. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Shreveport, La. L. U. 764. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective May 15, 1947. Official sanction granted. 






THE CARPENTER 17 

Lawrenceburg, Ind. L. U. 1142. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
^1.50 to $1.70 per hour, effective June 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, with- 
out financial aid. 

Smithtown Br., N. Y. L. U. 116 7. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.S5 to $2.10 per hour, effective April 7, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Port Arthur. Texas L. U. 13 47. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.62 % to $1.87% for journeymen and $1.87% to $2.12% for foremen per hour, 
effective June 1, 19 47. Official sanction granted. 

El Dorado, Ark. L. TJ. 16S3. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
to $1.75 per hour, effective March 25, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

March 28, 19 47. 

Augusta, Me. L. U. 914. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.37 % per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. L. TJ. 135 7. — Movement for an increase in wages from 60c 
and $1.03 to 85c and $1.25 (Boxmakers) per hour, effective June 1, 1947. Official 
sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Amherst, Mass. L. TJ. 150 3. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective May 13, 1947. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

March 31, 1947. 

Regular meeting of the General Executive Board was held at the General 
Office. Indianapolis. Indiana, beginning March 31, 1947. 

All members present. 

Report of the delegates to the Thirty-eighth Annual Convention of the Union 
Label Trades Department of the American Federation of Labor held in Chicago, 
Illinois, in October, 19 46, was filed for future reference as it has been published 
in the March, 19 47 issue of our official journal, "The Carpenter" for the informa- 
tion of our members. 

April 1, 194 7. 

Appeal of Local Union 1933. Claremore, Oklahoma, from the decision of the 
General Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of the late 
JAMES ORYILLE MYERS. The claim was referred back to the General Treasurer 
for further consideration. 

Appeal of Local Union 8 24, Muskegon, Michigan, from the decision of the 
General Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of the late 
FRED NEISER. The claim was referred back to the General Treasurer for 
further consideration. 

Appeal of Local Union 9 5 5, Appleton, Wisconsin, from the decision of the 
General Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of the late 
FRANK SOHR for the reason that he was not in good standing at the time of 
death. The decision of the General Treasurer was sustained and the appeal dis- 
missed. 

The Committee appointed by the General President at the September, 19 46 
meeting of the General Executive Board to make arrangements for the installa- 
tion of the General Officers on April 5, 1947, for the next term of four years re- 
ported that all arrangements have been made for that ceremony to take place 
at the General Office in Indianapolis, Indiana, on Saturday, April 5, 1947. 

The General President called attention to the case of WM. SOLOMON, for- 
merly a member of Local Union 15 72, McGill, Nevada, whose application for 
pension was disapproved for the reason that on August 31, 19 4 4, he owed six 
months dues and was suspended. The claim of that Local Union for per capita tax 
overpaid was referred to the General Secretary for adjustment. 

The Committee on Apprenticeship ordered by the last General Convention 
held in April, 19 46, reported that the matter was well under way and it was re- 
ceived as a report of progress. 



18 THE CARPENTER 

Renewal of Bond of General Treasurer Meadows in the sum of $50,000.00 for 
one year beginning February 1, 1947, through the United States Fidelity and 
Guaranty Company, of Baltimore, Maryland, was referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Bond of Assistant Superintendent at Carpenters' Home, Lakeland, 
Florida, in the sum of $20,000.00 for one year beginning March 10, 1947, through 
the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Maryland, . was 
referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Workmen's Compensation Insurance on Employees in the State 
of Texas for a term of one year beginning March 14, 19 47, through the United 
States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Maryland, was referred 
to our Legal Department. 

April 2, 1947. 

Wellsburg, W. Va. L. U. 168 0.- — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.75 to $2.00 per hour, effective July 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, with- 
out financial aid. 

Macomb, 111. L. U. 188 3. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.3 7% 
to $1.50 per hour, effective April 21, 1947. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Cuyahoga, Lake and Geauga D. C. — Movement for an increase in wages from 
$.2.00 to $2.25 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, with- 
out financial aid. 

Cleveland, Ohio L. U. 509. — Movement for an increase in wages from 90c and 
$1.05 to $1.60 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, with- 
out financial aid. 

Pittsburgh and Vicinity D. C. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.35 
(in mills), $1.45 (in cabinet shops) to $1.60 and $1.70 per hour, effective June 
1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Saginaw Valley D. C. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Perryville, Mo. L. U. 2022. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.00 to 
$1.25 (residential) and $1.25 to $1.50 (Commercial) per hour, effective April 27, 
1947. Official sanction granted. 

'Madison, Wis. L. U. 314. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Camden, Ark. L. U. 529. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective June 1, 1947. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Dixon, 111. L. U. 790. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to $1.65 
per hour, effective April 1, 19 47. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

April 3, 1947. 

Mitchell, S. Dak. L. U. 1868. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.12% 
to $1.25 per hour, effective April 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Cleveland, Ohio L. U. 1365. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37% 
(cabinet men) and $1.30 (millmen) to $1.75 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. 
Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. L. U. 1225. — Movement for an increase in wages from 75c, 
80c, 86c, 92y 2 c, $1.05 and $1.22% to 25c per hour general increase, effective 
May 23, 1947. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Cadillac, Mich. L. U. 2210. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.45 
to $1.75 per hour, effective April 27, 1947. Official sanction granted, without 
financial aid. 

Hardin, 111. L. U. 2124. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.75 per hour, effective May 20, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Columbia, S. C. L. U. 17 78. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective May 1, 1947. Official sanction granted. 



THE CARPEXTER 19 

April 4, 1947. 

Our Legal Department brought to the attention of the General Executive 
Board and the General Representatives present the numerous Laws introduced in 
Congress and several states proposing the curtailment of the activities of Labor 
Unions, all of which were thoroughly discussed so that they might be better 
understood. 

Brother Albert E. Fischer, Assistant to the General Secretary, gave a full 
explanation of our new Financial Secretary's method of conducting his duties and 
reporting to the General Office monthly and quarterly so that in the future we 
may have complete and correct records of all Local Unions at the General Office. 

April 5, 1947. 

Installation of General Officers 

First General Vice-President Maurice A. Hutcheson in the Chair called the 
meeting to order and informed all present that the Honorable Charles Tuttle of 
New York, our Chief Counsel, had been appointed Installing Officer. 

He then called upon the Assistant to the General Secretary, Brother Albert E. 
Fischer, to call the names of the General Officers to be installed and the office 
each one is to fill. That being done, the Honorable Chas. Tuttle obligated and 
installed the following General Officers for the term of four years ending March 
31, 1951: 

GENERAL OFFICERS 

General President . Wm. L. Hutcheson 

First General Vice-President M. A. Hutcheson 

Second General Vice-President John R. Stevenson 

General Secretary Frank Duffy 

General Treasurer S. P. Meadows 

GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD 

First District Charles Johnson, Jr. 

Second District Wm. J. Kelly 

Third District Harry Schwarzer 

Fourth District 1 Roland Adams 

Fifth District R. E. Roberts 

Sixth District A. W. Muir 

Seventh District Arthur Martel 

Short addresses were made by the Installing Officer; Wm. Green, President of 
the American Federation of Labor; General Secretary Duffy and General Presi- 
dent Wm. L. Hutcheson. 

In closing the General President thanked all for being present and taking part 
in the ceremonies. 

The following District Councils were represented at the Installation: 

Alabama — (Birmingham) Jefferson County District Council. 

California — (San Francisco) Bay Counties District Council. 

District of Columbia- — .Washington District Council. 

Illinois — Chicago District Council. 

Indiana — Indianapolis District Council. 

Indiana — (Michigan City) Lake County District Council. 

Kentucky — -(Louisville) — Falls City District Council. 

Louisiana — New Orleans District Council. 

Massachusetts — Boston District Council. 

Michigan — Detroit District Council. 

Missouri — St. Louis District Council. 

Nebraska — Omaha District Council. 

New Jersey — (Newark) Essex County District Council. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



New Jersey — (Summit) Morris, Union and Vicinity District Council. 

New York — Buffalo District Council. 

New York — Ulster County District Council. 

New York — New York District Council. 

Ohio — (Cleveland) Cuyahoga District Council. 

Ohio — -(Cincinnati) Ohio Valley District Council. 

Ohio — (Toledo) Maumee Valley District Council. 

Oregon — Portland District Council. 

Pennsylvania — (Philadelphia) Metropolitan District Council. 

Pennsylvania — Pittsburgh District Council. 

Pennsylvania — (Wilkes Barre) Wyoming Valley District Council. 

Texas — Houston District Council. 

Washington — Spokane District Council. 

Washington — Seattle District Council. 

Washington — Tacoma District Council. 

Wisconsin — Milwaukee District Council. 

Canada — Montreal District Council. 

Canada — Toronto District Council. 

Canada — Vancouver District Council. 



10 

13 

16 

58 

62 

80 

141 

169 

181 



60 

90 

232 

352 

413 



Chicago 

Chicago 

Springfield 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

East St. Louis 

Chicago 



Indianapolis 
Evansville 
Fort Wayne 
Anderson 
South Bend 



CALIFORNIA 

2288 Los Angeles 



The following Local Unions were represented: 

ALABAMA 

103 Birmingham 

22 San Francisco 
132 Washington 
225 Atlanta 





COLORADO 


55 


Denver 


►ISTR] 


[CT OF COLUMBIA 




FLORIDA 


627 


Jacksonville 




GEORGIA 




ILLINOIS 


183 


Peoria 


199 


Chicago 


242 


Chicago 


377 


Alton 


416 


Chicago 


419 


Chicago 


434 


Chicago 


504 


Chicago 


578 


Chicago 




INDIANA 


565 


Elkhart 


599 


Hammond 


734 


Kokomo 


912 


Richmond 


985 


Gary 


1217 


Greencastle 




IOWA 


726 


Davenport 




KENTUCKY 



1337 Tuscaloosa 

3088 Stockton 

1590 Washington 

1723 Columbus 



643 
742 
839 
1037 
1185 
1539 
1538 
1693 
1922 
2094 

1236 
1380 
1485 
1664 
1761 
3117 



Chicago 

Chicago 

Des Plaines 

Marseilles 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Michigan City 

Bedford 

La Porte 

Bloomington 

New Castle 

Shelbyville 



64 Louisville 



69 8 Newport 



J 



THE CARPEXTER 



21 



7 64 Shreveport 



19 Detroit 
337 Detroit 
958 Marquette 



5 St. Louis 
4 7 St. Louis 
73 St. Louis 



LOUISIANA 

MASSACHUSETTS 

33 Boston 

MICHIGAN 

98 2 Detroit 

98 3 Detroit 

1102 Detroit 

MINNESOTA 

548 Minneapolis 

MISSOURI 

417 St. Louis 

602 St. Louis 

159 6 St. Louis 



18 40 New Orleans 



145 2 Detroit 
1513 Detroit 
2265 Detroit 



1739 
2119 



Kirkwood 

St. Louis 



429 


Montclair 


715 


Elizabeth 


246 


New York 


251 


Kingston 


257 


New York 


284 


New York 


298 


New York 


366 


New York 


385 


New York 


488 


New York 


60S 


New York 



11 Cleveland 

29 Cincinnati 

171 Youngstown 

182 Cleveland 

2 24 Cincinnati 



226 Portland 



S Philadelphia 

122 Philadelphia 

142 Pittsburgh 

160 Philadelphia 

165 Pittsburgh 

211 Alleghany City 

277 Philadelphia 



50 Knoxville 





NEBRASKA 






253 


Omaha 
NEW JERSEY 






1113 


Springfield 


1209 


Newark 






2212 


Newark 




NEW YORK 






740 


New York 


1577 


Buffalo 


791 


New York 


1663 


New York 


964 


Rockland County 


2236 


New York 




and Vicinity 


2241 


Brooklyn 


1162 


College Point 


2287 


New York 


1175 


Kingston 


2305 


New York 


1204 


New York 


2710 


New York 


1456 


New York 


2947 


New York 


1536 


New York 
OHIO 


3128 


New York 


8 73 


Cincinnati 


1393 


Toledo 


1108 


Cleveland 


1750 


Cleveland 


1138 


Toledo 


1871 


Cleveland 


1359 


Toledo 


1929 


Cleveland 






1957 


Toledo 



OKLAHOMA 

1072 Muskogee 

OREGON 

122 3 Marshfield 

PEN N S YL V ANI A 

288 Homestead 

333 New Kensington 

359 Philadelphia 

422 Rochester 

430 Wilkinsburg 

45 4 Philadelphia 

46 5 Ardmore 

RHODE ISLAND 

874 Newport 

TENNESSEE 



28 SI Portland 



500 Butler 

514 Wilkes-Barre 

616 Chambersburg 

83 3 Berwyn 

845 Clifton Heights 

1856 Philadelphia 

2131 Pottsville 

2 264 Pittsburgh 



74 Chattanooga 



22 



THE CARPENTER 









TEXAS 






198 


Dallas 


1665 


VIRGINIA 

Alexandria 

WASHINGTON 


213 


Houston 


131 


Seattle 


2552 


Spokane 


2635 


Seattle 


1845 


Snoqualmie 


2633 


Tacoma 
WISCONSIN 


2682 


Tacoma 


264 


Milwaukee 




CANADA 
Montreal 


1594 


Wausau 


1127 


Montreal 


27 
452 


Toronto 
Vancouver 


134 


Montrea 



The following State Councils were represented at the Installation: 
Illinois State Council New York State Council 

New Jersey State Council Ohio State Council 

Numerous congratulatory messages were received and read from Local Unions, 
District Councils and friends. 

Many floral pieces were received from Local Unions, District Councils, State 
Councils and friends. 

April 7, 1947. 

On April 18, 1944, the General President informed the Local Unions of the 
action of the General Executive Board regarding applicants being admitted with- 
out payment of Initiation Fee by presenting honorable discharge from the Armed 
Forces of the United States or Canada within one year after discharge. As is evi- 
dent from our records, many ex-servicemen affiliated. 

Three years have elapsed since this action was taken, and, after carefully con- 
sidering the entire matter, the Board decided to terminate this policy as of July 
1, 19 47; thereafter requiring all applicants to pay the initiation fee. 

The Board rules that the Contingent Fund does not provide for the payment 
of a death donation; therefore, if such donation is desired it must be raised on 
an entirely voluntary basis. 

The General President submitted to the Board a letter from Morton E. Crist, 
Financial Secretary of Local Union 109, Sheffield, Alabama, with a memorial 
written by Brother J. F. Barrett, publicity director of the American Federation 
of Labor, paying tribute to the memory of Bob Weyler, General Representative of 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, who died April 
22, 19 46. The Board ordered the "Memorial" published in our official monthly 
journal, "The Carpenter." 

April S, 1947. 
Audit of Books and Accounts of the General Office. 



By direction of the General Executive Board the General President sent the 
following letter to Local Union 201, Wichita, Kansas: 
To the Officers and Members 
Local Union No. 201 
Wichita, Kansas. 

Greetings: 

The General Executive Board now in session at this office gave consideration 
to the communication addressed to General Secretary Duffy as of the date of March 
29, 1947, wherein you set forth that at a special meeting held on March 27th 
A. J. Porth terminated all his official duties as an officer of Local Union 201, and 



THE CARPENTER 2 3 

that A. L. Manning was elected and installed to succeed him for the rest of his 
term. 

You further requested that the bond covering Porth be changed to cover Man- 
ning, instead. That communication was recognized by the undersigned under 
date of April 3rd. 

The General Executive Board also considered a communication dated April 4th. 
addressed to General Secretary Duffy, wherein the Recording Secretary, Brother 
John Goodwin, notified the General Secretary that at a special called meeting held 
April 3rd members of the Local voted to reconsider their action taken on March 
27th. 

The purpose and object of this communication is to inform the members of 
Local Union 201 that the General Executive Board decided that they could not 
accept the communication of April 4th as being an action that would in any way 
set aside the action taken at the special meeting held on March 2 7th and, there- 
fore, in conformity with the action of the General Executive Board they instructed 
the undersigned to notify your Local Union that this office will not recognize 
A. J. Porth as holding any office or official position in Local Union 201 and if the 
members of Local Union 201 wish to retain and maintain their standing in the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America they will have to see 
that these instructions are carried out; namely, that as per the action of the 
Local Union on March 2 7th, A. L. Manning will be recognized as Financial Secre- 
tary and Business Agent of your Local Union. 

Trusting to receive a prompt notification of compliance with these instruc- 
tions so it will not be necessary to take further steps to enforce the provisions of 
the General Constitution, I remain, 

Fraternally yours, 
(Signed) WM. L. HUTCHESON. 

WLGH General President. 

* * * * * 

Dodge City, Kans. L. U. 1542. — Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective May 19, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Iowa City, Iowa L. U. 1260. — Movement for an Increase in wages from $1.37^ 
to $1.50 per hour, effective April 8, 1947. Official sanction granted. 

Request of Cuyahoga, Lake and Geauga County Carpenters' District Council 
(Cleveland, Ohio) for reimbursement of money spent by said District Council in 
the sum of $9,295.00 in their recent strike in raising the wages of members 
from $1.65 per hour to $2.00 per hour. Request granted. 

***** 

The plan proposed by the New Jersey State Council of Carpenters for the set- 
tlement of jurisdictional disputes was carefuuly considered, after which it was 
decided that 

"The Board cannot see its way clear to endorse this proposition." 

Our relations to and affiliation with the Building and Construction Trades 
Department of the American Federation of Labor was carefully considered. The 
Board strenuously opposes the appointment of anyone as a referee not familiar 
with Building Construction. 

This, along with other matters, was left in the hands of the General President 
to use his best judgment. 

The General Executive Board gave consideration to the conditions now exist- 
ing in ^Hollywood, California, in the Motion Picture Industry, Avherein the Inter- 
national Association of Theatrical Stage Employees is furnishing the major Moving 
Picture Studios non-union men "Scab Carpenters" to do the work of members 
of our Organization. The Board authorized the General Secretary to place this 
matter before the Executive Council of the American Federation of Labor, re- 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



Questing that body ;o recommend to the next General Convention of the American 
Federation of Labor the revocation of the charter cf the International Association 
of Theatrical Stage Employees. 

***** 

The Committee on arrangements for the Installation of General Officers was 
given a vote of thanks for the splendid manner in which the entire matter was 

conducted. 

April 9, 1947. 

The Committee on "State Councils" appointed at last meeting of the General 
Executive Eoard held in January. 1947. submitted a partial report of their investi- 
gations "with certain recommendations. A general discussion took place covering 
the entire matter, after which the whole subject was referred back to the Com- 
mittee for further investigation and consideration. 

Audit of Books and Accounts of the General Office completed. 

A Sub-Committee of the Board examined the Securities held by the General 
Treasurer in the vaults of the Indiana National Bank. Indianapolis.. Indiana, and 
submitted the following report: 

We, the undersigned Sub-Committee of the General Executive Board, have 
made an audit of the Securities held by General Treasurer S. P. Madows, in the 
ts alts of the Indiana National Bank, and find the following: 

GENERAL FUND 

Treasury Due 19 63-6 8 

Treasury Due 1964-69 

Treasury Due 19 64-69 

Treasury Due 1959-62 

Series G Due 1953 

Series G Due 1954 

Series G Due 1954 

Series G Due 1957 

Series G. — Project Fund. 

Certificate of Indebtedness Due 1947 

\Held in Xeic York) 

Certificate of Indebtedness Due Dec. 1947 

t Held in yew Tort) 

Certificate of Indebtedness Due Dec. 1 & -i 7 

Held in yeic Tori) 

DEFENSE FUND 

50,000.00 U. S. Series G. Due 1953 

50.000.0''. L\ 5. Series G. Due 1954 

150,000.00 U. S. Certificate of Indebtedness Due 1947 

• Held in yew York < 



F :rek& -:ed — ? 1.0 0. 0.0 


U. 


= 


- Q Q ( 


U. 


s. 


5 . . 


U. 


s. 


: o o o . '". o o . o o 


u. 


s. 


5 [ D '"' . D 


u. 


s. 


5 . I 


r 


s. 


5 f, r , i", r, i u n 


u. 


s. 


] | 


D. 


s. 


2 0.0 


U. 


5 


25,0 


u. 


s 


500,000.00 


u. 


s 




u. 


5 



HOME AND PENSION FUND 



50, 
- 

50, 
50, 

100, 
300, 

5 . 
100, 

3 0. 

!■: ■: 



000.00 
000.00 
. 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 u 

o ■: ■: . : o r 



Series G. 
Series G. 

Series G. 
Series G. 



.Due 
.Due 
.Due 

.Due 



Series G Due 

Treasury Due 

Treasury Due 

Treasury Due 

S. Treasury Due 

S. Cert, of Indebtedness • Due Dec. 

'Held in yew York' 

. .00.00 U. S. Certificate of Indebtedness Due 

• Held in yew York) 



1953 
1954 
1954 

1^33 
19 5 7 
1947 
1 963-6 S 
1964-69 
1964-69 

1947 
19 4 7 



THE CARPENTER 



25 



GENERAL, FUND — ( CANADA ) 

107,000.00 Canadian Bonds Due 1959 

50,000.00 Canadian Bonds Due 1960 

50,000.00 Canadian Victory Bonds Due 1948 

50,000.00 Canadian Victory Bonds Due 1956 

100,000.00 Canadian Victory Bonds Due 1950 

We find $1,575,000.00 worth of these bonds are being held in safe keeping in 
New York City and are certified to us and to our Certified Accountants by the 
Indiana National Bank. 

(Signed) A. W. MUIR 

ROLAND ADAMS 
R. E. ROBERTS 

There being no further business to be acted upon, the Board adjourned to 
meet at the call of the Chair. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK DUFFY, Secretary. 




Thanks to the generosity of the large number of Local Unions, District and 
State Councils, and Ladies Auxiliaries which have made donations to the Library 
Fund, the guests at the Lakeland Home are assured of a modern, up-to-date 
library. During the past month some dozen affiliates of our Brotherhood mailed 
in contributions totaling well over $400.00. 

A number of periodicals have already been subscribed to for the benefit of the 
members living at the Home. A survey is now being made to determine what 
books will have to be replaced and how many new ones will have to be purchased 
in order to bring the library up to the proper standard. In the end, the Home 
Library should be the equal of any private library if contributions to the fund 
continue coming in. 

Contributions to the Fund should be clearly designated as such by writing 
"Library Fund" on the check or accompanying letter so that bookkeeping errors 
may be avoided. 

In the period from March 20, when the last report was made, until April 24, 
donations were received as follows: 



L. U. City and State Amt. 

493 Mt. Vernon, N. Y $ 30 00 

712 Covington, Ky. 10 00 

93 Ottawa, Ont., Can 10 00 

1846 New Orleans, La 5 00 

698 Newport, Ky. 100 00 

785 Covington, Ky. 10 00 

1162 College Point, L. I., N. Y. 25 00 

councils 

Metropolitan D. C, Phila., Pa._ 50 00 
Wyoming Valley D. C, Wilkes 

Barre, Pa. 10 00 



Ohio Valley D. C, Cincinnati__ 200 00 
New Orleans and Vicinity, D. C, 

New Orleans, La. 

AUXILIARIES 

373, Salina, Calif. __ 
149, Olympia. Wash. 
343, Niagara Falls, 

N. Y. 

L. Aux. 408, Hattiesburg, 

Miss. 

3 72, Atlantic City, 

N. J. 



L. Aux. 
L. Aux. 
L. Aux. 



L. Aux. 



5 00 

5 00 
5 00 

5 00 

2 00 



5 00 



RECAPITULATION 

Available funds, March 20 $7,552 13 

Receipts March 20 to April 24 477 00 



Total $S.0 29 13 

Less expenditures 243 68 



Total funds available April 24 ., $7,7S5 45 



Jin ffitm&xinm 

Not lost to those that love them, They still live in our memory, 
Not dead, just gone before; And will forever more. 



%z&i in T^zsttt 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother CLARE ABRAHAM, Local No. 102, Cincinnati, O. 

Brother JOHN W. ACKERMAN, Local No. 325, Paterson, N. J. 

Brother JOHN A. ANDERSON, Local No. 740, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brother WILLIAM BARTEL, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Brother ADAM J. BECK, Local No. 1055, Lincoln, Neb. 

Brother ARTHUR BELL, Local No. 1590, Washington, D. C. 

Brother LOUIS BERNSTEIN, Local No. 787, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brother JOSEPH E. BLUNT, Local No. 18S8, New York, N. Y. 

Brother CHESTER BORKOWSKI, Local No. 20, New York, N. Y. 

Brother JAMES A. BRESNAHAN, Local No. 33, Boston, Mass. 

Brother FRANK J. BRIDGES, Local No. 1798, Greenville, S. C. 

Brother JOHN BRUSTMAN, Local No. 808, New York, N. Y. 

Brother LAWRENCE BUTLER, Local No. 1590, Washington, D. C. 

Brother N. G. CARLSON, Local No. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother FRANK CARPENTER, Local No. 592, Muncie, Ind. 

Brother WILLIAM H. CASEY, Local No. 13, Chicago, III. 

Brother OLIVER STE CLARKE, Local No. 1888, New York, N. Y. 

Brother F. A. COLSON, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Brother BENJAMIN DEMEULE, Local No. 1210, Salem, Mass. 

Brother MICHAEL J. DOWLING, Local No. 366, New York, N. Y. 

Brother IRVING DYER, Local No. 878, Beverly, Mass. 

Brother E. E. ELLER, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Brother MAURICE FAHEY, Local No. 20, New York, N. Y. 

Brother A. M. FEHLMAN, Local No. 1938, Crown Point, Ind. 

Brother JOHN H. FENNE, Local No. 261, Scranton, Pa. 

Brother WILLIAM FINDLEY, Local No. 213, Houston, Tex. 

Brother MORRY FREEMAN, Local No. 33, Boston, Mass. 

Brother R. H. FREEMAN, Local No. 213, Houston, Tex. 

Brother JAMES GODWIN, Local No. 8, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brother ALFRED HANSEN, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Brother RUFUS P. HARLOW, Local No. 1516, Salem, Mass. 

Brother EARL HOWLETT, Local No. 213, Houston, Tex. 

Brother SAM KOFFSKY, Local No. 1590, Washington, D. C. 

Brother R. N. LAMBERT, Local No. 213, Houston, Tex. 

Brother LARRY LYNCH, Local No. 1590, Washington, D. C. 

Brother P. D. MARSHMAN, Local No. 213, Houston, Tex. 

Brother JAMES J. McGURRIN, Local No. 261, Scranton, Pa. 

Brother R. McROBERTS, Local No. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother EDWIN MILNER, Local No. 878, Beverly, Mass. 

Brother N. G. MORGAN, Local No. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother MURDOCK D. NICHOLSON, Local No. 33, Boston, Mass. 

Brother GEORGE J. NORIE, Local No. 924, Manchester, Mass. 

Brother O. OKSANEN, Local No. 1244, Montreal, Que., Can. 

Brother MICHAEL OTTINGER, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Brother ELMER PENNELL, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

Brother FRANK PERKINS, Local No. 35, San Rafael, Cal. 

Brother VINCENT PICCHIELLO, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Brother JOSEPH PIPES, Local No. 1752, Pomona, Cal. 

Brother J. E. PROCTOR, Local No. 213, Houston, Tex. 

Brother ROSCO B. RIGLER, Local No. 1055, Lincoln, Neb. 

Brother EDWARD ROHRKASTE, Local No. 378, Edwardsville, N. Y. 

Brother A. B. SENOR, Local No. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother E. M. SHEPPARD, Local No. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother S. S. SMITHYMAN, Local No. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother HERMAN STOEHR, Local No. 1602, Cincinnati, O. 

Brother MARVIN F. TATUM, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Brother JOSEPH TENHUNDFELD, Local No. 1602, Cincinnati, O. 

Brother S. TRAP AN, Local No. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Brother WALTER TURNER, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 

Brother RALPH W. WALLACE, Local No. 878, Beverly, Mass. 

Brother E. L. WILLIAMS, Local No. 213, Houston, Tex. 



CorrospondoncQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

Local 2163 Honors a Great Member 

At a meeting of Local Union No. 2163, New York City, held Friday, March 
21, 194 7, a large turn-out of members assembled to do honor to Brother Charles 
Barr, former Treasurer of the above Local Union. 

For more than forty years Brother Barr had been continuously in office, up 
to the time of his resignation at the end of last year. 

He was elected Treasurer of the New York Second Branch of the Amalga- 
mated Society of Carpenters and Joiners in 1906. and continued to serve in that 
office up to and since the old Amalgamated merged with The United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America in 19 25. 

This may not be a record in point of length of service; but the members of 
Local Union Xo. 216 4 do claim that the quality of service (though it may have 
been equalled) certainly never has been surpassed. 

In the course of the evening Brother Barr was presented with a check for 
$250. together with a framed testimonial which attested the appreciation of our 
members for a job well done. 

Brother Barr thanked the members of the local in a few well chosen words; 
and his allusions to "by-gone days" had an especial interest for our older mem- 
bers. '"Charlie" was then toasted at some length; others contributed song and 
story and an enjoyable aud memorable evening was brought to a close with the 
singing of "Auld Lang Sine." 



CHICKASHA MEMBERS REMEMBER HEROIC BROTHER 

On 2114 Idaho Street in Chickasha, Oklahoma, there stands a fine, white, 

modern little bungalow. It is neither pretentious nor imposing, but it stands 

as a monument to neighborliness, brotherhood and the great spirit of cooperation 
that exists among Chickasha's citizens. 

You see, that little bungalow is the home of Fred Thomasson. a member of 
Local Union No. 653,, who paid a high price for the victory that ended the 
recent war. Brother Thomasson returned from overseas with handicapping in- 
juries. With his wife and two children he found the housing situation little short 
of desperate. In return for the price he paid for victory he was getting back very 
little in the way of compensation. 

But the members of Local Union No. 65 3 eventually learned of his plight. And 
when they learned of it, they decided to do something. They took the initiative 
in a move to provide Brother Thomasson with a decent place to live. They ap- 
pealed to the citizens of the community for funds to buy materials. The response 
was good. Then with their own hands and with no thought of any pay they 
tackled the job of turning out a decent home for their fellow worker. Day after 
day they worked on the house. Plumbers. Painters and other building tradesmen 
also responded. In a short while the attractive place on 2114 Idaho was com- 
pleted. By the first of the year the Thomassons were ready to move in. 

Today Brother Thomasson is proud of his fine new home and all Chickasha 
is proud of the members of Local No. 653 and other building tradesmen who 
made it possible. 



Craft Problems 




Carpentry 

(Copyright 1947) 
LESSON 224 

By H. H. Siegele 



The level is a precision tool. It does 
not matter what kind of a level you are 
using, if it is not accurate, it is not a 
level in the sense that the word is used 
here. The same thing is true in speak- 
ing of objects — a thing is either level 
or it is not level. A word of caution 
should be injected here, for if one is a 
stickler for technicalities, what has just 
been said is impossible. This depart- 
ment has always stood for that which is 
practical, and what is said here must 
be considered on that basis. Precision 
from a practical standpoint is what this 
writer is striving for. 

One of the most practical leveling 
tools, the water level, is not used on the 
job as much as it should be. The rea- 
son for this is probably due to the 
fact that it is not at hand when it is 
needed, or if it is at hand, it takes a 
little time to get it ready. A garden 
hose with a glass tube inserted in each 




Fii 



end, filled with water, is all that is 
needed. 

Fig 1 shows parts of three rooms of 
a building with a water level in position 
for leveling. One end with a glass tube 
is shown at A, and the other end is 
shown at B. As a matter of precaution 
a water level should be tested before 



it is used. The test is simple. Bring 
the two ends together as shown to the 
left in Fig. 2. If the water line in one 
tube is above the other, somewhat as 
shown, it indicates that there is an air 
bubble in the hose, which must be re- 
moved to insure accuracy. A big differ- 
ence in the water lines indicates a big 
air bubble, while just a little difference 




Fig. 2 

means that the air bubble is small. An- 
other test is shown at the center of Fig. 
2. Hold the two ends together as shown 
(one by dotted lines) and pull one of 
them down. If the water does not ad- 
just itself readily, there is either some 
obstruction in the hose or else the 
hose has a kink in it. Whenever a test 
shows the water line of both tubes on a 
level, as shown to the right, the level 
is all right. 

Fig. 3 shows how to operate the glass 
tubes, where at A we have the estab- 



THE CARPEXTER 



29 



lished line, and at B the sought point. 
When the tube at A is placed to the 
mark and the water line is above the 



A 



• Established Line 



Sought 



Point/ 





Fis 



established line, bring the tube down 
until the water line is level with the 
established line. In case the water line 
in the tube is below the established 
line, raise the tube until the water line 
is on a level with the established line. 
When these two lines are together at 
A, a signal is given for B to mark the 
point. 

Let us turn again to Fig. 1. To begin, 
let the man at A hold the tube to the 
established line, while B brings the tube 




Fis 



to point 1. When the water line is on 
the established line, A signals to B, who 
marks the point. Then B goes to point 

2, and when the signal is given he marks 
this point, then he marks point number 

3, then number 4, and 5 and so on to 
number 9. Haviug these points, a chalk 
line is snapped from point to point, as 
shown by the continuous line. 



The aluminum level is one of the best 
levels on the market. It is light, strong 
and easy to pack. Fig. 4 is a drawing 
of an aluminum level. 

To test the plumb part of a level, 
place the level against the surface of 
a wall in a plumb position, and when 
the bubble is on center, mark along the 
edge. Then reverse the level, bringing 
the same edge parallel with the line, 
if the bubble centers, the plumb is accu- 
rate, but if yoif have to move one end 
of the level to center the bubble, then 



i i 



Fig. 5 

it is out of adjustment and should be 
adjusted before it is used. 

Fig. 5, A, B and C, illustrate how 
to adjust the plumb part of a level. 
Place the level against the surface of 
a wall, as shown at A, and when the 



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30 



THE CARPENTER 



bubble centers, mark along one edge, 
then reverse the level and center the 
bubble, which in this case would bring 
it in the position shown by the dotted 
lines. Mark along the edge of the level 
and you will have a V-shaped mark on 
the wall, as shown at B. A mark is 
placed halfway between the two upper 
ends of the V. as shown, and then the 
level is placed in the position shown 
at C. In this position the plumb is ad- 
justed sO that the bubble will center. 
After making the adjustment, check on 
it to be sure that it is right. 

At D is shown how to check on the 
accuracy of your o"w~n judgment, as to 
knowing when the plumb bubble is on 
center. Place the level against the sur- 



Fig. 

face of a wall in the plumb position, and 
when the bubble is on center mark along 
the edge. Then move the tool to one 
side, in this case, 4 inches, and bring it 
to a plumb position. When the bubble is 
on center, mark along the edge. Now 
rrfeasure the distance between the lines 
at the top and also at the bottom. If 
the two distances are the same, then 
you have formed a habit of accurate 
judgment, but if there is a difference 
in the distances, then you are careless in 
your judgment, which should be cor- 
rected. 

Fig. 6 shows a good way to test the 



level part of a level. Fasten two wedges 
to a firm base in the manner shown by 
the drawings. The top drawing shows 
a side view of the wed2es with the 




Fig. 7 

level resting on them, and the bottom 
drawing shows a plan of the base and 
the wedges. "When the wedges are in 
place, put the level on them, say. as 
shown by the dotted lines numbered 1. 
This position will show the bubble to 
the right, so the level will have to be 
moved to the left, or from 1 to 2, 
enough to bring the bubble on center. 
This done, mark the wedges at the ends 
of the level, as shown at 2 and 2 on the 
bottom drawing. Now reverse the level 
and bring the ends to the number 2 
marks. If the bubble centers, the level 
is true, but if the bubble shows to the 




Fig. 8 



left it indicates 
adjusting. 



[hat the level needs 



Fig. 7 is a continuation of Fig. 6. 
where the number 2 position is shown 
by dotted lines on the upper drawing. 



TWO AIDS FOR SPEED AND ACCURACY 




THEY HAVE 

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"The FRAMING SQUARE" (Chart) 

Explains tables on framing squares. Shows how 
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find any angle in degrees; frame any polygon 3 to 
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SLIDE CALCULATOR for Rafters 



Makes figuring rafters a cinch! Shows the length of any 
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2105 N. Burdiek St., Div. 3, Kalamazoo 81. Mich. 



THE CAR P E X T E R 



31 



The level was moved to the right enough 
to again center the bubble, which 
gave us position number 3. This posi- 
tion should also be marked on the 
wedges. At the bottom drawing the 
wedges show the three positions that 
the level has been in, numbers 1, 2 and 
3. Now divide the spaces between the 
2-marks and the 3-marks, as shown by 




Fig. 9 

the bottom drawing of Fig. 8 and num- 
bered 4. Place the ends of the level to 
these points, which will bring the bubble 
to one side, or in this case to the right. 
Now the level is in the position for 
making the adjustment. After the ad- 
justment is made, check the level by re- 




Fig, i.0 

versing it a number of times to make 
sure that the bubble will always center. 
If it does, the level is true.. 

Fig. 9 shows how to establish points 
by sighting over a level. The level is 
shown set for establishing the point to 
the right. The other two points are es- 
tablished in the same way, but the posi- 
tion of the level must be changed to 
bring it in the direction of the place 
where the point is to be established. 

Fig. 10 shows a detail of the upper 
part of the barrel used for a stand in 




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Name 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
address, and name and address of at least one business 
man as reference. Men In service, also give home address. 

Fig. 9. On this barrel a block is 
placed in such a way that the high end 
will be level across the end. Then the 
block is leveled from end to end and 
wedged up, as shown to the left, with a 
wedge like that show r n at 1. This level- 
ing can be approximate. Then place the 
level on the block, aiming it at the 
place where you want to establish a 
point. Wedge the low part of the level 
w r ith a slender wedge, such as is shown 
at 2, until it is on a level. This done, 
you are ready to sight over it and 
establish the point. Repeat this as often 
as necessary. 



LABEL of United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America 




This label stands for a wage commensurate 
with the labor performed, for superior workman- 
ship, the mechanical training and education of 
the apprentice and fair working conditions. 

Be sure to see that it appears on all store 
and bar fixtures, trim, cigar boxes and beer 
bottle cases and on all wood products. 

— ORGANIZE — 



New Opportunities 

*<f Carpenters 




Men Who Know Blue Prints 

are in demand to lay out and run build- 
ing jobs. Be the man who gives orders 
and draws the big pay check. Learn at 
home from plans we send. No books, — 
all practical every day work. 

SEND FOR FREE BLUE PRINTS 

and Trial Lesson. Prove to yourself how 
easy to learn at home in spare time. 
Send coupon or a post card today. Xo 
obligations. 



CHICAGO TECH. COLLEGE 

E-108 Tech Bldg. 2000 So. Mich. Ave. 
Chicago, 16, 111. 

Send Free Trial Lesson and blue print 
plans and tell me how to prepare for a 
higher paid job in Building. 

Kame 

Address 




^tat&Me NEW 



with FOLEY RETOOTHER 

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conditioning all hand saws 'with broken or un- 
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Cuts 20 sizes of teeth from 4 to 16 points per 
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Foley mfg.~co.~ l&Z£&g%Z. 

Send tull details on Foley Retoother 

Name 

Address 




MAKE CERTAIN 
■ the Best 1 



Carpenters agree that the bit 
brace is one of the most essential tools. 
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manufacture. The result is a brace that holds 
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When you choose your most important 
tool, make certain you choose the best — a 
Millers Falls Bit Brace. 

One Thing in Common — Quality I 



MILIEUS FALLS 
TOOLS 



MILLERS FALLS 
COMPANY 

Greenfield, Mass. 




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8931-L Venice Blvd. 



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THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COUENDER CO. 
Branches in all Principal Cities 








■• all THE best ideas of skilled workers in 
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Available in sizes 3/16" through 1 1/4" diameters. 

Ask Your Hardware Dealer or Write tor Catalog. 

THE PAINE CO. 

2967 Carroll Ave. Chicago, Illinois 

Offices in Principal Cities 



PAINE 

FASTENING nrWBfrC 
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AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 

4voIs.*6 




Inside Trade Information On: , pon beioW 

ffow to use the eteel square — How to file and set 
saws — How to build furniture — How to use a 
mitre box — How to use the chalk line — How to uso 
rules and scales — How to make joints — Carpenters 
arithmetic — Solving mensuration problems— ^Es- 
timating strength of timbers — How to set girders 
and sills — How to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs — How to build houses, barns, gar- 
ages, bungalows, etc. — How to read and draw 
plans — Drawing up specifications — How to ex- 
cavate—How to use settings 12, 13 and 17 on the 
steel square — How to build hoists and scaffolds — 
skylights — How to build stairs — How to put on 
interior trim — How to hanft doors — How to lath- 
lay floors — How to paint 



nsido Trade Information 

for Carpenters, Builders. Join- 
ers, Building Mechanics and 
all Woodworkers. These 
Guides give you the short-cut 
instructions that you want— 
including new methods, ideas, 
solutions, plans, systems and 
money saving suggestions. An 
easy progressive course for the 
apprentice and student. A 
practical daily helper and 
Quick Reference for (ho master 
worker. Carpenters every- 
where are using these Guides 
as a Helping Hand to Easier 
Work, Better Work and Bet- 
ter Pay. To get this assist- 
ance (or yourself, simply fill 
II the FREE C0U- 




THEO. AUDEL & CO., 49 W. 23rd St., New York City 

Mail Audels Carpenter* and Builders Guides. 4 vols., on 7 days' free trial. If O.fC 
7 will remit SI in 7 days, and $t monthly until $6 is paid. Otherwise 1 will return thenr 
No obligation unless I am satisfied. 



Name. 



Occupation. 
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CAR 



ATKINS 




For 90 years Atkins Saws have ranked 

high with carpenters. This is vital 

recognition. Carpenters handle saws 

constantly; they're qualified to know which 

saws give the best performance, the longest 

service. That's why you'll find so many Atkins 

saws in so many carpenters' kits. 

Reasons for this are sound. Atkins Saws are correctly 

designed, precision built, perfectly balanced. The 

"Silver Steel" used in them insures rugged wear. Strong, 

edge-holding teeth give the very maximum cutting between 

filings. 



E. C. ATKINS AND COMPANY 





nam 



Indianapolis 9, Indiana 



CARPENTER 




FOUNDED 1881 

Official Publication of the 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 

JUNE, 1947 





you 9 11 be glad 

in 1957 . 1 



□ □ □ □ 



. . . you bought 

in 1947 



MOW AVAILABLE! 




Celd-sidinb 



TRADE MARK 




CELO-SIDING is a superior insulation sid- 
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Board, famous for insulation and strength. 
It is Ferox-treated to resist termites, dry rot 
and fungus growth. All sides and edges are 
sealed against moisture by a coating of 
asphalt, extra thick on the outside and 
surfaced with a durable, colorful finish of 
firmly imbedded mineral granules that 
never needs painting! 

A MULTI-PURPOSE PRODUCT! 

Celo-Siding provides insulation plus sheath- 
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to erect, has strong walls, requires no out- 
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it's warm and draft-free in winter, cool in 
summer and is easy to heat and ventilate. 

IDEAL FOR ANY UTILITY BUILDINGS! 

Since insulated buildings can be built 
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THE CELOTEX CORPORATION • CHICAGO 3, ILLINOIS 



A Celotex product 

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building construction! 



NATIONALLY ADVERTISED! 

To tell your customers about this remark- 
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lications, telling them to see their lumber 
dealers for Celo-Siding. In addition, mer- 
chandising and display material is available 
to the Celo-Siding dealer, to help you tell 
the story of this remarkable product. 

READY FOR YOU TO SELL NOW! 

For complete information on how you can 
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Siding, see your Celotex representative or 
write us. Do it now! 

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Write us direct ordering number desired. 

[ELC-SiDINC 
One of the Famous 






THBCflBFQJTm 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXVII — No. 6 



IXDIAXAPOLIS, JUNE, 1947 



One Dollar Per Yeai 
Ten Cents a Cop3 



— Con tents — 



Class Laws Are Un-American - - - - 5 

For the past several months President Hutcheson has been devoting every possible 
moment to combating union-shackling legislation. La;t month he took to the radio to 
tell the American people why class legislation will never work in America. 



We Have the Formula 



10 



Although current production is highest in history and more peop'e are working than 
ever before, citizens in all walks of life face the future with little confidence. Why? 



Sixty-Two Years of Peace 



Energy, The Magic Key 



13 

Can collective bargaining really work without strikes, lockouts or industrial strife? 
Yes, says Lee Minton, president of the G ass Blowers Union. To prove his point, Presi- 
dent Minton cites the case of his own union which for sixty-two years has had nothing 
but harmonious relations with its employers — this despite bad times, great technological 
changes in the industry and varied demand for the products produced. 

19 

Twentieth Century Fund, after exhaustive study, find; that the key to our produc- 
tion miracles is not harder woik or more skill but rather a great expansion in the 
amount of power ouiput. 









OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Plane Gossip 

Editorials - 

Official 

In Memoriam 

Correspondence 

To the Ladies 

Craft Problems 



8 
16 
20 
21 
22 
2r, 
27 



Index to Advertisers 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22. 1915, at IXDIAXAPOLIS. IXD.. as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Auk. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917. authorized on July 8, 1918. 



NOTICE 

The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

Carlson Rules 4th Cover 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 32 

Greenlee Tool Co., Rockford, 111. 3 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 32 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 4 

The Speed Co., Portland, Ore 3rd Cover 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, 

Conn. 3rd Cover 

Bowling Equipment 

Brunswick, Balke, Collender Co., 

Chicago, III. 31 

Carpentry Materials 

Celotex Corp., Chicago, III 1 

Johns-Manville Corp., New York, 
N. Y. 4 

Doors 

Overhead Door Corp., Hartford 

City. Ind. 4th Cover 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, 111. 31 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 32 

E. W. Hoffner, Chicago, 111 3 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 30 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 28 

Mason Engineering Service, 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 29 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo 4 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y.__3rd Cover 



IF YOU ARE A CARPENTER 

and have had some experience in lumber YOU CAN 
LEARN TO ESTIMATE CARPENTER WORK in a 

surprisingly short time. 47 years experience in lumber- 
ing and general construction brings to light new born 
methods such as grading labor on lumber and other 
items to prevent the estimator, or contractor, from 
serious hidden disaster. Until you have used grading 
labor on lumber you will still be in the dark. 
Having some experience in lumber, that is the best 
place to start, the rest will come much easier after 
getting a sound footing. 

These new born methods will give you the answer, 
from farm building to skyscraper, or homes, remodel- 
ing, repairs, wrecking, etc. 

A post card with your name and address, and your 
experience, will bring you the opportunity to make 
your dreams come true. By return mail you will re- 
ceive further information. 

E. W. HOFFNER 
3319 N. Clark St. Chicago 13, 111. 




9 This easy-reoding GREENLEE HANDY 
CALCULATOR swiftly solves your wood- 
working problems. Just set the dial: convert 
linear feet to board feet; get slope per 
foot in degrees; compare hardness, weights, 
shrinkage, warping and working ease of 
various woods. More, too: bit sizes for head, 
body, thread of screws; nail specifications; 
tool sharpening hints; protractor. 6" diam- 
eter, fits your tool kit. Heavily varnished 
cardboard. Special offer. Order now, send 
10<t (not stamps) in next mail. Greenlee 
Tool Co., 2086 Columbia Ave., Rockford, III. 





Johns-Manville 



Get behind a 



SPIRAL SCREW 
DRIVER 



and get ahead 
of the job 




YANKEE TOOLS NOW PART 

(STAN LEY) | 

THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLO 



Let the spiral 
do the heavy 
wrist work. A 
simple push on a 
sturdy "Yankee" 
drives or draws the 
with a spinning 
start. Good for years 
of smooth, willing part- 
nership with your good 
ght hand. Three sizes, 
each with 3 size bits. Pop- 
ular 30A size, range of 
screws #2 to #8. For one- 
hand operation, buy the 130A 
'Yankee" with the "quick- 
return" spring in the handle. 
Send tor the "Yankee" Tool Book 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

Philadelphia 33, Pa. 



LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your own busi- 
ness and be your own boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
"reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 

Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $5.00, 
and pay the balance of $25.00 at $5.00 per 
month, making a total of $30.00 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
j course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name and address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building C, Denver 2, Colorado 




Class Laws Are Un-American 



For the past several months. General President Hutchison has been devoting every possible 
moment to combating the anti labor legislation which Congress has been determined to pass. 
Through personal contact, by letter writing, and even by the use of radio time. Bill has made 
knoirn his opposition and the opposition of our Brotherhood to labor shackling legislation. The 
folloiring ej-ccrpts are from a speech he made over station WLW and the National Broadcast- 
ing Company early last month. 

• • • 

Fellow Americans: 

NE OF THE BASIC PRINCIPLES of our form of government 
is that which is termed "Free Enterprise"'- — meaning' freedom of 

individuals, either singly or in unison with others to engage law- 
fully in pursuits of industrial, social, religious and economic life — with- 
out governmental supervision and control. 

In times of great emergency, reasonable restrictions may be neces- 
sary, but when the crisis is past restrictions are no longer justified. 

Both capital and labor are enter- — 

prises which may be justifiably con- ate and to sympathetically assist in 

trolled during times of national the problems and difficulties of their 

peril, but both of these should alike employers. If, occasionally, agree- 

be relieved of governmental re- merit could not be reached — and a 

straint and edict when the emer- strike ensued — at least in the end 

gency is over. Capital should be management and labor reached some 

free to lawfully pursue its way to- understanding which was agreeable 

ward its goal of achievement and to and understood and abided by 

so should labor be permitted an both. 

untrammeled pursuit of its legiti- An abrupt change in all this came 

mate objectives. during the war years when the col- 

For peace and harmony to reign lective bargaining heretofore de- 

between the two — for they are scribed gave way to directives from 

vitally dependent upon each other — ■ Washington. 

neither must be shackled with un- An abundance of college profes- 

just or discriminatory laws. sors and fledgling law graduates, and 

During more than fifty years be- self-styled labor experts (who never 
fore the last war (and I trust it re- had toiled nor managed a day in 
mains the last) labor and manage- their lives) made rules and regula- 
ment eventually sat down around tions and issued directives which 
the conference table to thresh out neither labor nor management un- 
their differences. They talked and derstood, nor could effectually apply 
argued and debated, and frequently and the grand and glorious result 
threatened, but in the majority of of all this was delay, confusion, ill- 
instances amicable settlements were temper and industrial chaos, 
reached and agreements were exe- With all this came maladjust- 
cuted without a test of economic ments, while war time price in- 
strength. creases and wage stabilization ex- 

Across these conference tables tended into the post war period, 

employers learned to know the With war's end industry recon- 

problems and difficulties of their verted to peace-time endeavors with 

employes, and converselv the em- as great dispatch as circumstances 

ployes learned to know and appreci- and relaxing of controls permitted. 



THE CARPENTER 



Labor met with ever increasing 
commodity prices, with the con- 
stant decrease in value of the dol- 
lar earned. Labor's demands for ad- 
justment which necessitated an in- 
creased wage, met with evasion or 
stern opposition. Hence labor in 
some instances — but not in all cases 
as it would seem, was required to 
resort to its one means of exerting 
economic pressure — the strike. 

It is deplored by all that some 
of these strikes seriously threatened 
our national economy and well-be- 
ing, and that in others abuses or 
violence resulted — which naturally 
follows when strife and its attend- 
ant ill-will exists between human 
beings, individuals or groups there- 
of. 

These unfortunate occurrences 
have supplied the excuse for the 
lurking foes of labor who are ever 
lying in wait for the slightest op- 
portunity to wage an attack on la- 
bors' rights. 

That attack began with a hue and 
cry for labor legislation to take 
from labor what it had, through 
legislation, through Court decision 
and through its own peaceful, har- 
monious agreements with industry 
obtained step by step throughout 
the years. 

The time-worn slogan "LET'S 
PASS A LAW" was brought forth, 
dusted off and brandished with cru- 
sade fervor. 

Naturally, and admittedly, labor 
did not want any labor or anti-labor 
legislation. Labor knows — and so 
does rightful thinking management 
know — that legislation is not the 
answer. 

The legislation now under enact- 
ment in the Congress is the fire- 
brand type which threatens to de- 
stroy the structure of peaceful in- 
dustrial relations which may re- 
quire years to abolish. Instead of 



allaying adverse feeling and 'restor- 
ing harmony between employer and 
employee, this legislation will 
create ill-will and bring about more 
labor strife than we have ever ex- 
perienced in the history of our 
country. 

Let us pause to note what this 
legislation proposes to do. The Bill 
passed by the House of Representa- 
tives would deprive labor and man- 
agement of the right to incorporate 
in their agreements, provisions for 
what the House misnames a "Closed 
Shop." This provision has been 
utilized and enjoyed by both man- 
agement and labor for more than 
fifty years, for it is recognized by 
both management and labor as a 
guarantee of peace and harmony, as 
well as a guarantee that there will 
be no work stoppages by reason 
of union employes being forced to 
work with non-union, non-dues- 
paying employees. 

As a further illustration of the 
impracticability of the "Closed 
Shop" proposition in the House Bill 
— The United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America re- 
quires every applicant to take a 
solemn obligation that he will not 
associate w i t h the Communist 
Party, or any similar subversive or- 
ganization. If the provision men- 
tioned becomes a law we will be 
obliged to accept all applicants for 
membership into our Brotherhood 
regardless of their affiliation with 
the Communist Party or any similar 
subversive organization. 

Not only would this procedure 
change the Clayton and Norris-La- 
Guardia Acts, but it would lead to 
government of industrial relations 
by injunction and lead to constant 
and unending labor strife. 

Other provisions just as far 
reaching in their intent and results 
are contained in the House Bill. 



THE CARPENTER 



The Senate Bill, although less 
drastic in all its details, is just as 
subversive of unionism and just as 
sure to foster strife between em- 
ployer and employe as the House 
Bill. 

The chairman of the Senate La- 
bor Committee has been quoted in 
the press as making- the statement 
that the provisions of the Senate 
Bill (in the majority) were the 
thoughts expressed by members of 
industry. 

We, of labor, have no objection 
to any group of citizens, express- 
ing their thoughts in reference to 
legislative matters, but if the Sen- 
ate Labor Committee thought it ad- 
visable to get the opinions of em- 
ployers, it would seem only fair and 
right that they, likewise, should 
have consulted representatives of 
labor. 

To follow out the foregoing sug- 
gestion the Legislative Committee 
representing the American Federa- 
tion of Labor contacted the chair- 



man of the Senate Labor Commit- 
tee regarding this matter, and he, 
the chairman, agreed that before 
any labor bill was brought out of 
committee he would contact the 
Legislative Committee representing 
the American Federation of Labor, 
but he did not carry out his 
promise. 

To endeavor to show the unfair- 
ness of the enactment into law of 
the Bills now pending in Congress, 
we would like to have it distinctly 
understood that we of labor are only 
asking that we be treated in the 
same manner as other citizens of 
our nation, and in carrying out the 
principle of our form of govern- 
ment — which has always recognized 
self-initiative and free enterprise — 
we should not have legislation that 
discriminates against any group of 
citizens. 

We never have had class distinc- 
tion in America. We should not 
have class legislation, neither 
should we have legislation by in- 
junction. 



John R. Alpine Passes Away 

A long and distinguished career in labor, government and industry 
came to an end early in April when John R. Alpine, succumbed to a long 
illness at his home "in New York City. Starting life as a plumber, Mr. 
Alpine played an important part in the organization of that trade. 

In 1904 he was elected a member of the general executive board of the 
United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and 
Pipefitting Industry and two years later was elected president. In 1908 
he became a member of the Executive Council of the American Federation 
of Labor, a position he held until his retirement 12 years later. 

During his distinguished career, Mr. Alpine served as labor advisor 
in the Department of Labor during World War 1. He accompanied the 
President to Paris in an advisory capacity during the peace conferences. 
Selected by President Hoover as a special assistant to the Secretary of 
Labor in 1931, he supervised the Federal Employment Service for some 
time. During his tenure in office, the Service produced splendid results. 

A capable organizer and a clear thinker, Mr. Alpine left a lasting 
impression on the entire labor movement. His memory will not be soon 
forgotten. 



-5 IP 



NOT SO FUNNY 

After twenty years in a mental insti- 
tution, Mr. Blank was being released as 
cured. On the morning lie was to be 
released, a number of attendants came 
to his room to wish him well. As a 
special privilege, the attendants allowed 
Mr. Blank to shave himself. He started 
out fine. But pretty soon, in turning 
to say something to one of the attend- 
ants, his razor slashed the string hold- 
ing the mirror and it crashed to the 
floor. 

When Mr. Blank turned back to get 
on with his shaving he looked at the 
blank wall. 

"Well, isn't that the irony of fate," 
he finally said. After twenty years in 
this place, on the very morning when 
I'm going to be let out, I cut my head 
off." 

And this sort of reminds us of the 
kind of thinking some of the people 
in Washington are doing on labor mat- 
ters. They are losing their heads over 
matters that require calm and deliberate 
consideration. 




Just like a woman — .§ i -s hasn't seen 
her boii friend 1<>r tiro years and then 
she turns oitt the liaht. 



A NECESSARY INVENTION 

According to a little squib in the 
newspapers, a New Jersey inventor has 
discovered a new type of binder that 
makes it possible to turn out long-last- 
ing, weather-resistant brick out of com- 
mon mud. If true, the new invention 
may make brick making obsolete. 

However, we are just a little skep- 
tical. Hardly a day passes but what 
some sort of revolutionary building ma- 
terial is announced. The years roll by 
and we never see any of these new 
super inventions. 

To our way of thinking, if someone 
wants to do something really big for 
building, let him discover some way of 
making building materials out of sta- 
tistics. For several years now the gov- 
ernment has been grinding out statistics 
on a twenty-four hour day basis. And 
the sad part of it is that the more sta- 
tistics the government turns out, the 
less houses there are for vets and other 
citizens. If some genius could only dis- 
cover some way of tying statistics to- 
gether in such a way that they would 
keep out the rain and cold our housing 
problems could be solved in short order. 

In the meantime, home buyers have 
to put up with something like the fol- 
lowing: 

A builder was making an inspection 
trip on a row of partly finished bunga- 
lows he was putting up. As he came 
to the first cottage he stationed his 
foreman on the other side of a wall and 
then called out, "Can you hear me?" 

"Yes, I can," replied the foreman. 

"Can you see me?" the contractor 
next called out. 

"No," replied the foreman. 

"That." commented the contractor, 
is what I call a good wall." 



There is no such think as an inevi- 
table war. If war comes, it will come 
through the failure of human wisdom. 
— Bonar I r*w 



THE CARPENTER 



STANDARD PROCEDURE 

"Ruth," moaned her long-suffering 
husband, "you promised you wouldn't 
buy a new dress. What made you do 
it?" 

"Dear," replied the modern Eve, "the 
devil tempted me." 

"Why didn't you say, 'Get thee be- 
hind me, Satan?' " the poor man in- 
quired. 

"I did," the little woman replied 
sweetly, "and then he whispered over 
my shoulder, 'My dear, it fits you 
beautifully in the back.' " 

And the thought just occurs to us 
that the "it fits you just beautifully in 
the back" technique is the standard 
operational procedure of the Com- 
munists, Fascists and other "ism" back- 
ers in America. 



LEARNING THE HARD WAY 

Latest of the C. I. O. Big Wigs to stub 
his toe on the issue of Communism is 
Joe Curran, president of the National 
Maritime Union. For years Curran 
waltzed along cheek by jowl with the 
Reds in his union. All was eggs in 
the coffee until Curran recently woke 
up to the fact that he was soon going 
to be on the outside looking in. Now 
he is bucking the Reds with all his 
might. 

Thus comes to a sad ending another 
epic of a man trying to carry water on 
both shoulders. Like a lot of his col- 
leagues, Curran has learned through 
bitter experience that you can't poke 
around in a hornet's nest without get- 
ting stung. He sort of reminds us of 
a boy who came to Sunday School with 
a "shiner." 

"Why, Johnnie!" exclaimed the 
teacher, "didn't last Sunday's lesson 
teach you that when you are struck 
on one cheek you ought to turn the 
other?" 

"Yes'm," replied Johnnie, "but he 
hit me on the nose and I only got one 
of them." 

• • • 

SO SAYS PAUP 

"Don't let the knockers worry you," 
says Joe Paup to the graduating class 
for 1947. "Remember no one who keeps 
kicking you in the pants can ever get 
ahead of you." 



WHO KNOWS? 

If you do not read the newspapers 
from beginning to end you miss some 
mighty interesting information. For 
example, the other day a Chicago news- 
paper carried a story on page two tell- 
ing about Britishers paying seventy-five 
cents a pound for potatoes in London. 
On page twenty-seven of the same issue 
was a story telling how our govern- 
ment was ruining untold thousands of 
tons of surplus potatoes by staining 
them with a secret dye that made them 
unsuitable for human consumption but 
suitable for hog feed at one cent a 
pound. On still another page was a 
story telling about the millions of tons 
of wheat that are being exported to 
England at two dollars per bushel. 

For years pigs could ride a straight- 
through car from one coast to the other. 
It took fifty years of plugging before 
the same privilege was extended to hu- 
man passengers who always had to 
change cars at Chicago. Who knows? 
Maybe in some bright future day hu- 
man beings may even be able to eat 
at the same price as hogs. 
• • • 

IT'S THE SEASON FOR IT 

The season being Spring, our fa- 
vorite philosopher, Joe Paup, uncovered 
his crystal ball and came up with the 
following: 

"Card playing can be expensive — but 
so is any game where you hold hands." 




What can I do for you — if anything? 



10 



We Have The Formu 

• • • 

WHAT is the matter with this country? 
Our factories and farms and mines are producing" goods at a 
rate never dreamed possible even a few years ago ; yet people in all 
walks of life are afraid and apprehensive of the future. Our national in- 
come is nearly twice as high as it has ever been in history ; yet many of our 
leaders are literally keeping their fingers crossed. Our working force is 
several millions higher than it was during the war years : yet the spectre 
of unemployment is peering over the shoulder of millions of our people. 
Why? Why should people in a country as rich in brains and resources as 
America face the future with little, if any real confidence? 

There are probably as many an- ' 



swers to this paradox as there are 
individuals thinking about it. The 
professors and the economists and 
the brain trusters have fancy and 
involved theories with which to ex- 
plain the unhappy situation. The 
bankers and industrialists have still 
other theories. But all the working 
man knows is that despite the fact 
he is working steadily at present 
he, can hardly keep his nose above 
water financially speaking. He 
knows that the wage increases he 
has received since 1941 have been 
more than gobbled up by skyrock- 
eting prices. Realizing this, he asks 
himself, "If I can't make a go of it 
now when I am working more hours 
than ever before, how am I going 
to fare when things tighten up a 
little and work becomes less plenti- 
ful?" 

For millions of workers in the 
lowest income group, inflation and 
an economic breakdown are not 
things to think about or worry 
about at some future date. For these 
people inflation and an economic 
breakdown are already here. In the 
manufacturing industries, the aver- 
age wage throughout the nation is 
somewhere in the vicinity of forty- 
five dollars per week ; which means 



that a large percentage must earn 
less than that amount. At todav's 
prices, the family head bringing 
home thirty-five to forty dollars a 
week cannot hope to maintain his 
little brood in anything even re- 
motely resembling living comfort. 
If there are savings, they are dipped 
into to supplement earnings so that 
a half-way decent standard of liv- 
ing can be maintained. Where there 
are no savings or the savings are 
used up. one after another of the 
less essential items have to be 
dropped. 

How can these people have con- 
fidence in the future when it is im- 
possible for them even to have con- 
fidence in the present? They are 
caught in the economic vise of sky- 
rocketing prices and lagging wages. 
They have had lots of promises of 
relief but month by month the jaws 
of the vise have tightened a little. 
The economic squeeze has unfail- 
ingly become a little bit more dras- 
tic. A little bit more tightening and 
actual starvation will be staring 
them and their families in the face. 

Though some Congressmen and 
many members of the National As- 
sociation of Manufacturers mav 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



think so, the American worker is no 
fool. He can do a little bit of think- 
ing on his own and he can remember 
things for more than a couple of 
days. For example, he can remem- 
ber back a year ago when the fate 
of OPA was hanging in the balance. 
At that time the NAM was flooding 
the nation with propaganda to the 
effect that OPA and price controls 
were holding back economic recov- 
ery. In June, 1946, the NAM said: 

"If OPA is permanently discon- 
tinued, the production of goods will 
mount rapidly and prices will 
quickly adjust themselves to levels 
that consumers are willing to pay. 
. . . Prices will be fair and reason- 
able to all." 

To those who have had to do the 
family shopping since June of last 
year, we do not have to point out 
how wrong the predictions of the 
NAM turned out to be. Production 
of all items has steadily climbed, 
and the prices of those same com- 
modities have climbed even faster. 

In the same month of last year 
(June), Senator Wherry of Nebras- 
ka said : 

"Mr. Bowles has said that if price 
controls were eliminated the price 
of meat would go up fifty per cent. 
Mr. Bowles is trying to scare us. 
My prediction is that without price 
control meat will cost less than to- 
day." (Meat prices are now prac- 
tically eighty per cent higher than 
they were in June, 1946.) 

Now these same forces that pre- 
dicted everything would be peaches 
and cream if price controls were re- 
moved are trying to sell the nation 
on the idea that curbing the unions 
will bring about an era of peace 
and prosperity. They are as wrong 
now as subsequent developments 
proved them to be wrong in 1946 
when they were damning price con- 
trols. 



We do not know why college pro- 
fessors and bankers are afraid of 
the future, but we do know why 
the average worker feels the same 
way. He feels that way because he 
knows that the forces of greed are 
now in the saddle. Day in and day 
out, ever since Germany capitulated, 
he has been told that production is 
the answer to all our problems. 
Month in and month out, production 
has climbed. Still his plight has 
worsened instead of improved. Pro- 
duction is now running something 
like thirty per cent above our best 
previous effort. At the same time 
the contents of his pay envelope buy 
less food and clothing than they 
ever did; this despite the fact he 
is working steadier now and earn- 
ing higher wages than he ever 
earned before. 

Through his union, the average 
worker has made a valiant effort to 
keep wages in line with prices. De- 
spite all his union could do, prices 
outran wages drastically. Now the 
same forces that knocked out price 
controls after making him glowing 
promises about lower prices are out 
to tie the hands of his union. No 
wonder he is skeptical. No wonder 
he faces the future without enthusi- 
asm. He remembers how the same 
forces of greed hamstrung the 
unions after the first world war. He 
remembers the profit orgy they in- 
dulged in after they reduced the 
unions to impotency. And lastly, he 
remembers the terrible depression 
that followed the bursting of the 
bubble. Now he sees the same forces 
playing exactly the same sort of 
game. And he knows the eventual 
result will be the same — depression, 
unemployment and privation ■ — if 
greed succeeds in its efforts to tie 
the hands of the unions. 

That confusion and fear should 
exist in a nation as enlightened and 



12 



THE C A R P E X T E R 



as wealthy as the United States is 
pathetic. Within ourselves, our ter- 
ritory and our people — we have all 
the elements necessary for perma- 
nent prosperity. "We have the re- 
sources, we have the technical 
knowledge, we have the brawn. We 
live under a system that places no 
limitations on a man's capacities or 
ambition — up to now. that is. Men 
have been free to work or not to 
work : they have been free to pro- 
duce goods or not produce goods; 
they have been free to practice self- 
determination in matters pertaining 
to their own welfare. And under 
these principles we have delivered 
more of the good things of life for 
more people than any other system 
devised by the mind of man. 

Despite the achievements we have 
made, we have still only scratched 
the surface. In the next thirty years 
we can double our standard of liv- 
ing and permanently banish poverty 
from our midst. We can do these 
things if we keep greed out of the 
saddle. We can do them if ALL 
men remain free to pursue their 
legitimate objectives without coer- 
cion or dictation from the govern- 
ment or from any other group. We 
can do them if we avoid discrim- 
inatory laws and undue restrictions 
aimed at any particular group. 

During the war years there was 
much talk of a formula for perma- 
nent prosperity. It was as simple 
as it was foolproof. It consisted 
of three parts: high wages; low 
profits : and tremendous volume. 
High wages are needed to maintain 
purchasing power. Low profits are 
needed to keep prices down so that 
more people can buy. Large volume 
is needed so that decent returns can 
be made on investments and jobs 
can be kept at high levels. Had that 
formula been followed, our return 
: normalcy migrht well have been 



accomplished. Instead, greed 
grabbed the reins. Prices were driv- 
en sky-high. The ability of the 
people to buy diminished and al- 
ready shrinking volume is making 
itself felt as a result. 

It is not yet too late to return 
to that formula. It is still there 
waiting for our nod of approval. 
It still offers us a way out of our 
difficulties. It still offers us a 
chance to banish fear of the future 
and a chance to build a lasting and 
sound prosperity. 

With most of the rest of the 
world engulfed in one sort of '"ism*' 
or another, America, with its free 
institutions and free citizens, offers 
these downtrodden peoples their one 
ray of hope. They look to us as a 
guiding beacon toward brotherhood, 
equality, and dignity in man. If we 
make our democratic way of life 
a prosperous and peaceful one we 
can inspire them to a continued 
struggle for the achievement of si- 
milar results in their own lands. If 
we bog down our economy in a 
morass of unemployment, privation 
and hardship : or if we fetter any of 
our free institutions which serve 
as vehicles of self-betterment for 
our common people, we take away 
from them their last hope for 
achieving a decent life for them- 
selves. 

We in America have now reached 
the crossroads. One way points to- 
ward peace and prosperity and con- 
tinued freedom for all our people 
and all our institutions. The other 
way points toward depression and 
misery at the end of a long highway 
of profit-grabbing, special interest 
and inflationary wingdinging. There 
is no choice. We must follow the 
way that points toward a better way 
of life for all of us. Now is the 
time to firmly plant our feet on that 
road. 



13 



Sixty -Two Years of Peace 

Can lasting industrial peace be established between labor and management? 
Yes, says Lee W. Minton, president of the Glass Blowers Association, whose union 
has for sixty-two years adjusted differences with employers without a single 
strike or lockout. The secret? Good old-fashioned collective bargaining, sincerely 
practiced by both sides. 

By LEE W. MINTON 

President, Glass Bottle Blowers Assn. of the United States and Canada 

* * 

NE of the mysteries of our modern age is wli3 r the problems of 
labor-management relations should throw our entire nation into a 
dither and churn up such a commotion in Congress over crackpot 
legislation which would do far more harm than good. 

Frankly, I can't see what the fuss is all about; for the problems of 
labor-management relations are essentially simple and can be easily solved 
through the application of good sense and good will by both sides. No 
new laws are needed. 




I know. I know because the union 
of which I am president and the 
industry which it serves have en- 
joyed peaceful and cooperative re- 
lations without a break since 1885 
— that's over sixty years, a long 
enough stretch to prove to any fair- 
minded citizen that we've got the 
right answer. 

What is this answer? Nothing 
more nor less than true collective 
bargaining. 

The glass container industry and 
the Glass Bottle Blowers Associa- 
tion of the United States and Can- 
ada have practiced true collective 
bargaining on an industry-wide lev- 
el since 1885. The results have been 
almost miraculous. The employers 
are gratified, the members of our 
union are well satisfied and the pub- 
lic is getting a real break through 
the record-breaking production of 
high-grade glass containers at rea- 
sonable prices. 

Unfortunately, our story is not 
Avell known. Perhaps we have been 
remiss until now, in hiding our light 
under a bushel. Certainly, the Con- 



gressional committees which have 
been giving recalcitrant employers a 
field day in airing their beefs 
against labor unions overlooked a 
good bet, if they were sincerely 
seeking the truth, in not inviting 
some of the employers in the glass 
container industry to tell their 
story. In this case, I believe the 
constructive truth about union-man- 
agement cooperation would have 
been more spectacular than the de- 
structive libels about labor-manage- 
ment strife. 

This story begins, really, some- 
where around the middle of the last 
century when glass blottle blowing 
was a highly skilled craft, entirely 
hand-operated. The industry was in 
a sad state, with production at puny 
levels, and completely lacking in 
stability. Prices, naturally, were 
high, yet wage income was low be- 
cause of irregular employment. 

The glass blower of those days 
was compelled to purchase all his 
wordly goods at so-called "company 
stores." He was paid mostly in a 
kind of scrip called "market mon- 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



ey." Certain amounts of his pay 
were withheld from him and retain- 
ed by the employer until such time 
as the "fires" were turned off the 
pots each summer and the workers 
more or less cast adrift. 

Under these conditions, profits 
were sketchy for management, the 
annual income of the workers un- 
satisfactory and the public paid too 
much for too little. 

Proud of their skill and artisan- 
ship and desirous of strengthening 
their economic power and prestige, 
the glass blowers began to organize 
into local unions. These fledgling 
organizations, after years of strug- 
gle for recognition, began bargain- 
ing with employers in the early 
Seventies and then developed a re- 
gional or district system a decade 
later. It was not until 1885 that a 
national system was developed, 
with weekly wage rates and piece 
rates established on an industry- 
wide basis covering all companies 
manufacturing glass containers. 

Ever since that day there has been 
alhiost perfect peace in labor-man- 
agement relations in this industry. 
Not a single general strike has in- 
terrupted production. During the 
whole long period of transforma- 
tion of the industry from a hand- 
operated to a mechanized basis, de- 
spite all the trials and upheavals 
involved, we kept our record un- 
marred. 

During the early Twenties the 
hand machine made its appearance. 
Then came the semi-automatic ma- 
chine and finally the fully auto- 
matic machine was installed in the 
industry. These developments rev- 
olutionized the industry. Mechani- 
zation, of course, caused an imme- 
diate and widespread displacement 
of hand blowers and lowered wages 
in the industry tremendously. But 
the skilled sflass blowers realized 



that they were bound to be displac- 
ed ultimately by the machines and 
agreed to adjust themselves to the 
inevitable change rather than fight 
a battle against industrial progress 
which would have been doomed to 
failure anyway. Our union, there- 
fore, instead of resisting mechaniza- 
tion, cooperated with the industry 
in the installation of machinery. 
Thus our members were able to pro- 
tect their job opportunities, even 
though they suffered an initial re- 
duction in wages. 

This policy of intelligent coop- 
eration with management, with a 
willingness to make temporary sac- 
rifices for the sake of even greater 
progress in the future, has paid off 
handsome dividends to the workers, 
to the industry and to the public as 
well. 

Today there are far more people 
employed in the industry than there 
were before mechanization. Wage 
rates have advanced tremendously 
during the past ten years and at the 
same time investors and stockhold- 
ers have been able to gain greater 
aggregate profits. The answer is 
high productiont — the only answer 
to the wage-profit-price problems of 
our times. 

Let's look for a moment at the 
industry's production record. With- 
out going back to ancient history, 
we find that 50,000,000 gross of glass 
containers were produced in 1939. 
By 1941 the total had increased to 
70,000.000 gross. By 1946 it had 
reached the huge level of 115,000,- 
000 gross, more than double the 1939 
figure. 

These production figures mean a 
great deal to the American people. 
They mean that such important 
items in our daily life as food, 
coffee, milk and beverages can be 
put in clean and sanitary glass con- 
tainers without any extra cost to the 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



consumer. The health and welfare 
of the American people are thereby 
promoted by good labor-manage- 
ment relations. 

I do not mean to claim that all 
these advances in the industry are 
due solely to effective cooperation 
between the union and employers. 
The inventive genius of the in- 
dustry, of course, has contributed 
greatly to its wide expansion of 
production. But it must be con- 
ceded that the practical and for- 
ward-looking policy of the union 
made it possible to attain the pres- 
ent huge volume of production. Our 
employers would be the last ones to 
deny that. 

Seldom, anywhere in the world, 
can there be found a more sincere 
and trusting and constructive de- 
gree of collaboration than exists 
between the owners and managers 
of the glass container industry and 
the union representing their em- 
ployes. 

We have been meeting together in 
annual conferences ever since 1885, 
and . we have grown to like and 
respect each other increasingly. 
Here's how our collective bargain- 
ing machinery works : 

During the month of July each 
year, the representatives of the un- 
ion and management meet in At- 
lantic City to discuss and settle 
mutual problems for the coming 
contract year. These conferences 
last from three to five days. Pro- 
posals are presented to the confer- 
ence by both sides thirty days in 
advance, so that the participants can 
be fully prepared to meet and nego- 
tiate all issues. By common con- 
sent, the conferences are conducted 
along good business lines, with a 
minimum of bitterness and a time- 
saving absence of tirades. The main 
idea of both sides is to get together, 
rather than to keep apart. 



Wage rates and working condi- 
tions, once agreed upon, apply to 
workers in all sections of the coun- 
try. In our industry we have suc- 
ceeded in killing the economic curse 
of geographical differentials. 

The contract itself is kept 
simple, so that it can be easily read 
and understood by all members. 
One of its most important provi- 
sions is that which lends stability 
to its terms. The president of the 
union and the secretary of the man- 
ufacturers' group are empowered to 
adjust any dispute that may arise 
between conferences. When they 
agree on a settlement, their decision 
becomes final and binding unless 
revoked by a future conference. 

The same principle is applied to 
local disputes which fail of solution 
at the local level. On motion of ei- 
ther side, the matter is referred to 
the president of the national union 
and the manufacturers' secretary 
for investigation and disposition. 
During this period the plant re- 
mains in operation and working 
conditions are not changed. If the 
two referees are unable to reach 
agreement, the dispute goes for 
final determination to the next con- 
ference, where a vote is taken on 
whether to uphold or reject the 
complaint. 

Sounds easy, doesn't it? Well, it 
is easy, provided both sides are 
willing to forego distrust and bit- 
terness and learn to have confidence 
in the other fellow's fairness and 
good will. That is what is most 
required in order to make collective 
bargaining effective. And our law- 
makers in Congress should please 
note, before irreparable damage is 
done, that true and effective collec- 
tive bargaining, with a full degree 
of free enterprise for both sides, is 
the only American way to preserve 
the American way of life. 



Editorial 




Theories Versus Fact 

In the April issue of the monthly pamphlet issued by the Consumer 
Bankers' Association there is some very interesting reading- Practically 
the entire pamphlet is devoted to an analysis of current business condi- 
tions and conditions as they should develop within the next few months. 
The pamphlet admits that distribution is all fouled up in the nation. In 
fact it is titled "Too Little And Too Late In Distribution." 

The part of the pamphlet that interested us most was the part that con- 
cerned itself with the backlog of orders for goods of all kinds. The 
writer seemed alarmed at the high percentage of orders for automobiles, 
washing machines, and other durable goods that turn out to be worthless 
when the dealer actually has goods to deliver. He tells about one manu- 
facturer of electrical gadgets who decided to test the validity of orders 
in the hands of sales outlets. By arrangement, the dealers in one isolated 
community were told that all orders in their files would be filled within 
ten days. This particular segment of pent-up demand melted rapidly 
when goods were actually forthcoming. Approximately three-fourths of 
the orders were cancelled when dealers called up their clients to tell them 
the goods were on the way. 

With the usual academic approach, the writer had a lot of involved 
theories as to why cancellations should run so high. He blamed duplica- 
tion of orders — that is, the same person ordering the same item from 
many dealers — for much of the trouble. He also blamed new competition 
entering the field, pipelines filling up. etc. 

Perhaps all his theories are right to some extent. There undoubtedly 
is a lot of duplication in orders because people want to get a car or refrig- 
erator as soon as they can : and most of them figure they can do better by 
having an order with several dealers. But the bald facts in the case are 
that the vast bulk of the American consumers have been priced out of 
the market. Increased living costs have eaten up savings. People who 
felt they were in a position to swing a new car eight or ten months ago 
are now finding it hard to meet ordinary living expenses out of their 
earnings. As prices climb higher more and more people find themselves 
in this predicament. 

It is no secret to any one that the real consumer demand in this country 
comes from the ordinary wage earners. They must be in a position to buy 
luxuries if durable goods manufacturers are to have anything even re- 
sembling prosperity. Right now they are not in such a position. Not only 
are the prices of luxury items beyond their reach at present, but worse 
yet, food and clothing prices are so high more and more families are 
finding it impossible to provide even the bare essentials of decent living. 
The situation cannot continue indefinitely. Something is bound to pop 
sooner or later. When it does, look out below. The crash is going to be 
terrible. 



THE CARPENTER 17 

Economists can develop all the fancy theories they want, but the 
simple truth is that the common people must have purchasing- power to 
keep the wheels of our economy humming. When too high prices or too 
low wages prevail, disaster follows. Right now high prices and low 
was:es are setting- the staere for trouble ahead. 



Less Fighting — More Farming 

Recently Congress placed its stamp of approval on substantial finan- 
cial aid to Greece and Turkey. Billions have already been "loaned" to 
England and France, and a host of other European countries are now 
knocking on our doors for financial handouts of one kind or another. 

As a labor journal, international finance and displomacy are admittedly 
beyond our scope. However, common sense is the basic component of 
all human relationships, and neither the diplomats nor financiers have a 
monopoly on common sense. From a common sense point of view, we 
cannot help but wonder about the ultimate value of some of these '"loans" 
as a stabilizing force in world affairs. Admittedly they are being made as 
a means of halting the march of Communism and building instead, some 
sort of a stable regime out of the confused and chaotic European picture 
which is undershot with all kinds of tensions, mistrusts and antipathies. 
And if our understanding of the matter is correct, sizable portions of 
most loans are earmarked for explosives and weapons of war. 

If our object is peace in Europe, it seems somewhat confusing that 
armaments should supersede foodstuffs in importance. To our way of 
thinking, what this world needs is less fighting and more farming. Until 
we achieve this desirable end. war will never be very far out of the 
picture. 

.That we are not alone in this belief is amply demonstrated by an edi- 
torial recently published by Farm Journal. Says that worthy publication: 

"What this world needs is tractors and plows, rather than tanks and 
guns . . . instead of sending diplomats in striped pants, maybe the U.S. 
ought to send a few good County Agents and Future Farmers of America 
armed with equipment that won't explode . . . the international confer- 
ences have not accomplished much. Perhaps a few Farmers' Institutes 
and Farmers' Weeks overseas would do more for the cause of peace." 

To our way of thinking, the above editorial comes close to hitting the 
nail on the head. Hunger and poverty breed discontent; and discontent 
leads to wars. TNT and gunpowder cannot alleviate hunger, but wheat 
and potatoes can. 

It is not our intent to be critical of either Congress or our diplomats 
or our foreign policy. In the face of existing conditions, they are prob- 
ably pursuing the wisest course. But our common sense tells us there will 
never be any lasting peace until farm machinery replaces war machinery 
as the No. i product of the world. 



A Sad Commentary 

Lobbying is rapidly becoming one of the major industries in Wash- 
ington, D. C. If the trend continues, we may eventually become a Lobby- 



18 THE CARPENTER 

ocracy instead of a Democracy. At the present time there are something 
like 738 persons working at the lobbying trade at the Capital. They are 
drawing down better than four million dollars a year in salary and the 
Lord only knows how much in expenses. The above figures were revealed 
by the latest report of the Secretary of the House. 

As might be expected, the vast bulk of these legislative gigolos are 
representing the big interests. Many of them draw down salaries that 
very definitely put them in the upper brackets. One lobbyist employed 
by the power trust reputedly knocks down S65.000 per year in salary, plus 
expenses that probably look like a sizeable chunk of the national debt. 

That so many lobbyists can flourish in Washington is a sad commen- 
tary on the state of our democracy. Surely these men must be delivering 
the goods or Big Business would not continue paying them, since all 
business is particularly sensitive in the region of the pocketbook. The 
ones who fail to deliver certainly do not last long. In view of the money 
they cost for wine, entertainment, and lavish living they must return the 
special interests that employ them substantial dividends. 

Any and all groups should and must have the right to make known 
their individual opinions on any piece of legislation: that is democracy. 
But when it comes to hiring smooth, in-the-know operators with unlimitied 
bank accounts to work for or against legislation, the time has come for 
democracy to do a little housecleaninng. 



The Women Must Do Their Share 

According to the American Federation of Women's Auxiliaries of 
Labor, there are approximate!}- two and a half million members in the 
various women's auxiliaries to trade unions. Something like thirty mi-llion 
women are eligible to join. In view of the present situation, the lack of 
organization among the wives and daughters of union men is not a par- 
ticularly happy omen. 

To anyone reading a labor paper it is no secret that the unions are 
under assult. In the halls of Congress as well as in the various state 
legislatures, anti-labor measures are filling the hoppers. Why: Because 
selfish interests are bent on smashing unionism and thereby paving the 
way for unlimited profits for themselves. The groups backing anti-union 
legislation are putting out a lot of propaganda about "protecting the free- 
dom of workers'' and "maintaining the American way," etc. but at the 
bottom of their fight against unionism is the old, selfish desire to dictate 
what wages and working conditions shall be. 

In America the wives are financiers in nine households out of ten. 
They have as great a stake in maintaining decent wages as the union men 
themselves have. A decrease in wages or an increase in prices hits them 
as hard as anyone. 

There is no limit to what women can do through their auxiliaries. They 
can boost union label goods, they can take political action (and the Lord 
knows that is something we are going to need), they can back up their 
union men. If all of us who work for a living are going to maintain decent 
living standards for ourselves, the women are going to have to do their 
full share. They cannot do it if only a small percentage is organized. 



J 



19 



ENERGY, The Magic Key 



ACKING UP manpower with machine power is the secret of 
America's spectacular achievements in both wartime and peacetime 
production, says the Twentieth Century Fund's new survey of 
America's Needs and Resources, which shows that in 1944 we turned out 
nearly 27 times as much in goods and services as we did in 1850, with a 
labor force only 8^ times as large but using 343 times as much mechanical 
energy in doing so. 

"Productivity is the key to future welfare," says Dr. J. Frederic Dew- 
hurst. Economist of the Fund, who directed a staff of twenty experts in 
the three-and-a-half year job of ■ 



compiling the survey and did the 
major part of writing and editing 
the report. "The only way to raise 
the ultimate ceiling on production, 
which is manpower, is through fur- 
ther increases in output per worker 
and per man-hour." 

Pointing to the use of machines 
and inanimate energy as the central 
factor in this process, Dr. Dewhurst 
says, "Over the long run the 'effi- 
ciency' of the individual worker is 
a minor element in the productivity 
of the labor force. The most ener- 
getic and skillful shoemaker work- 
ing long hours with the hand tools 
of a century ago could not remotely 
approach the productivity of to- 
day's semi-skilled operative, work- 
ing with the aid of automatic pow- 
er-driven machinery. 

"Over the past century we have 
achieved a fabulous increase in out- 
put per man-hour, not by working 
harder or more skillfully, but by 
constantly devising new and better 
machinery to augment human effort 
by the use of vast amounts of inani- 
mate energy. What our labor force 
will be able to turn out in the 
1950 decade depends on its size and 



on future trends in working hours, 
but more than anything else, on 
the extent of further gains in pro- 
ductivity." 

In making the survey's main esti- 
mates of what the total output of 
goods and services might be in 1950 
and i960 if our economic system is 
operated at high levels, Dr. Dew- 
hurst has assumed that productivity 
will continue to increase at the aver- 
age rate of increase for all the dec- 
ades between 1850 and 1940. This 
average is 18 per cent, and using it 
as a base the survey estimates 1950's 
total output of goods and services 
in the United States at $177 billion 
and 1960's output at $202 billion. 

In explaining how output goes 
up while hours of work go down, 
Dr. Dewhurst comments, "This les- 
sening of human toil and advance- 
ment of human welfare has been 
made possible by harnessing tre- 
mendous amounts of mineral energy 
(coal, oil, water power, etc.) to mul- 
tiply human effort — with all that 
this implies in terms of the applica- 
tion of scientific discoveries, engi- 
neering and managerial skills and 
large-scale capital investment." 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General "Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

PRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Second District. WM. J. KELLY 
Carpenters' Bldg., 243 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Third District. HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave.. Cleveland, O. 



Fourth District. ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



Fifth District. R. E. ROBERTS 
631 W. Page. Dallas, Texas 



Sixth District. A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168. Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Seventh District. ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON. Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary 

NOTICE 1 

At the recent meeting of the General Executive Board consideration 
was given to the question of eliminating the acceptance of former service 
men without the payment of initiation fee. 

The Board in reaching their conclusion decided that former service 
men had been given ample opportunity to express their desire of affiliation 
with our organization, and decided that the action for accepting former 
service men without the payment of initiation fee was to terminate July i, 
1947, which means on and after that date, all applicants will be required to 
pay the usual initiation fee. 



2803 Woodlake. Cal. 

1522 Martel, Cal. 

1541 Vancouver. B. C, Can. 

2818 Hattiesburg, Miss. 

2837 Newton, Texas 

2861 Vernon, B. C, Can. 

2865 Winslow, Ariz. 

2928 Winslow Chevalon Cp., 

Ariz. 

2930 Port Arthur, Ont., Can. 

1545 Kingston, N. Y. 

1546 Ashdown. Ark. 
1554 Buffalo. N. Y. 
2945 Superior. Mont. 
1561 McDonough, N. Y. 



NEW CHARTERS ISSUED 

1566 Newcastle, Ind. 3014 

2980 Campbellsville. Ky. 3015 

1600 Leamington, Out.. Can. 1716 

2557 Thorn, Cal. 1641 

1617 Greenport, L. I., N. Y. 1719 

2993 Plains, Mont. 1722 

1628 Minneapolis, St. Paul, 1724 

Minn. 3017 

2999 Estacada. Ore. 1728 

3001 Reston. Ore. 1744 

2990 Kamloops. B. C. 3019 

3003 Victoria, B. C. Can. 1755 

3004 Lvle, Wash. 2727 
3012 Frankfort, Ky. 3021 



Henderson. Ky. 
Shreveport, La. 
Richmond, Va. 
Little Falls. N. Y. 
Kimberley. B. C. C:i 
Arkadclphia, Ark. 
Liberal. Kansas 
Beaumont. Miss. 
Conway. S. C. 
Hattiesburg. Miss. 
Clarksville, Ark. 
Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Healdshurg. Cal. 
Bozeman, Mont. 



tsatsuiimMBBTm 




m 



em&rx&m 



Xot lost to those that love them, They still live in our memory. 

Xot dead, just «oue before; And will forever more 



lUesi in |3£HC£ 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother ERNEST ALVES Local No. 1887, New Braunfels, Tex. 

Brother ROBERT BODENBURG, Kent, Ottawa and Muskegon D. C, Mich. 

Brother WALTER B. BRADSHAW, Local No. 1382, Rochester, Minn. 

Brother CHAS. CARLSON, Local No. 141, Chicago, 111. 

Brother JOSEPH N. CARLSON, Local No. 141, Chicago, 111. 

Brother ALFRED DIXON, Local No. 141, Chicago, III. 

Brother JOSEPH DRASZKIEWICZ, Local No. 20, Tompkinsville, N. Y. 

Brother THOMAS DUCEY, Local No. 56, Boston, Mass. 

Brother HENRY EPSTEIN, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 

Brother VICTOR ERICKSON, Kent, Ottawa and Muskegon D. C, Mich. 

Brother GEORGE HAENDLEIN, Local No. 1596, St. Louis, Mo. 

Brother ENOK HAKONSON, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 

Brother EDW. JAEGERMANN, Local No. 141, Chicagao, 111. 

Brother EDWARD JOHNSON, Local No. 141, Chicago, 111. 

Brother PAUL E. JOHNSON, Local No. 141, Chicago, 111. 

Brother PEDER KNUDSEN, Local No. 865, Brunswick, Ga. 

Brother RADA KRAVLEV, Local No. 1154, Algonac, Mich. 

Brother VICTOR KULGREN, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brother GEORGE LEWIS, Local No. 2079, Houston, Tex. 

Brother CHARLES H. NELSON, Local No. 177, Springfield, Mass. 

Brother HENRY A. POHLMAN, Local No. 1, Chicago. III. 

Brother FRED PRUIM, Local No. 980, Chicago, 111. 

Brother FRANK RABY, Local No. 747, Oswego, N. Y. 

Brother JOHN SMALL, Local No. 734, Kokomo, Ind. 

Brother PETER STEIMERS, Local No. 105, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Brother JOHN O. STOREN, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brother CARL STROMBERG, Local No. 141, Chicago, 111. 

Brother WILLIAM WILLCOX, Kent, Ottawa and Muskegon D. C, Mich. 

Brother EDW. ZUELKE, Local No. 1382, Rochester, Minn. 



CorrQspondQncQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

LOCAL. No. 5 HONORS VETERANS OF BOTH WARS 

To commemorate the sixty-fourth anniversary of the issuing of its charter and 
to pay homage to the large number of members who served their country in the 
two World Wars, Local Union No. 5, St. Louis, Mo., on the night of April 19, 
sponsored a celebration and a dance at Carpenters' Hall, 3 60 6 Couzens Ave. 
About 1,800 members, friends, and guests were present to help the Union dedicate 
the night to these members who did their duties in the armed services. 

Over 150 members of Local Union No. 5 wore the uniform of one branch or 
another of the armed forces during the recent war. Three members made the 
supreme sacrifice and several are still in service. To all these men and the thirty- 
six veterans of World War 1 who are still members of the Union, Local No. 5 paid 
special tribute during the evening. 

The history of Local No. 5 parallels the history of the Brotherhood. In 1881 
there were three carpenters' unions in St. Louis. In April of that year they ap- 
pointed a five-man committee to explore the possibilties of forming a national 
union. After contacting other carpenters in other cities, a convention was called 
in Chicago, and it was at that convention that the Brotherhood was born. In 
18 83 the three St. Louis unions were consolidated into one local union, — Local No. 
5, which has been active ever since. Down the years Local No. 5 has played an im- 
portant part in the progress and growth of the Brotherhood and the advances 
made in the trade. 

At the present time the membership of Local Union No. 5 is about 1,180. 



LEAVENWORTH LOCAL COMPLETES 58 YEARS OF SERVICE 

On January 25, 1889, Charter No. 499 was installed at Leavenworth, Kansas. 
This year, Local Union No. 499, continuously active ever since, marked the fifty- 
eighth anniversary of the occasion with a fine turkey dinner and dance. Approxi- 
mately 300 members of the union and their families and friends were on hand to 
help the Union properly celebrate the occasion. With plenty of good food, good 
music, and good fellowship, everyone attending had a good time. 

During the course of the evening, Brother Wm. J. Lyons, a member of the 
Union for forty-seven years, recalled some of the triumphs and tribulations of 
the Union during its long and useful life. He told of conditions as they existed 
during the early days and the struggles that the union went through to bring 
wages and hours up to their present standards. 

Everyone attending voted the affair an unqualified success and all are looking 
forward to the day when the Union will complete its sixtieth year of service to 
the craftsmen of Leavenworth. 



LOCAL No. 169 PROUD OF ITS GRAND OLD MAN 

Local Union No. 16 9, East St. Louis, 111., is proud of its Grand Old Man. He is 
Brother Al Curtis who first joined the Brotherhood on September 3, 1890, at 
Sioux City, Iowa. Two years later he cleared into Local No. 169 where he has 
been active ever since. During his fifty-five years of continuous membership in 



J 



THE CARPENTER 23 

Local No. 169, Brother Curtis has filled every office in the Union except that of 
Treasurer. 

Keen of mind and hody, Brother Curtis recently celebrated his eightieth birth- 
day by putting on his first pair of glasses and staying on his job as saw filer for 
the Hercules Construction Company. During his career he worked as carpenter 
on the St. Louis World's Fair. He proudly recalls that at a very early conven- 
tion he had the pleasure of nominating Brother Frank Duffy for General Secretary. 

Brother Curtis is a storehouse of information about wages and working condi- 
tions in the old days. He recalls that wages were thirty-five cents an hour when 
he entered Local No. 169 — a good scale compared to the fifteen and seventeen 
cents paid in Sioux City. 

Local Union No. 169 is proud of Brother Curtis and extends to him congratu- 
lations on his grand career, with a pledge to maintain and improve the conditions 
he and his old-time colleagues helped to establish. 



L. U. 129 CELEBRATES 50th ANNIVERSARY 

Local Union No. 129 of Hazelton, Pa., celebrated its 50th anniversary with a 
dinner and entertainment program with two hundred and seventy-five (275) mem- 
bers present. Among those in attendance were representatives of the Carpenters 
Union from various cities. President William Opfer, a veteran of Local No. 129, 
outlined the progress of the local since it was chartered in 189 7. Brother O. Wm. 
Blaier of Philadelphia representing the General President, gave an inspiring talk 
on the union activities of the Brotherhood and in conclusion congratulated Brother 
George Pfrom for his 50 years of continuous membership. 

Among the other speakers were Edward W. Finney of Wilkes Barre, Pa., Gen- 
eral Representative; and Brother Theodore P. O'Keefe, Sec. Treas. of Pa. State 
Council of Carpenters; William Rutz, Business Agent, Wilkes Barre, Pa.; Brother 
William Grafius, Executive Board member of Pa. State Council; Carlyle Engle, 
Business Agent, Williamsport, Pa. Ralph Lyons, Business Agent, Harrisburg, Pa.; 
and Brother Stone also, of Harrisburg, Pa. were among the out of town Brothers 
in attendance. 

At the conclusion of the festivities the visiting members and members of Local 
No. 129 wished Brother George Pfrom many more years of continuous member- 
ship. 



PROVO LOCAL DEDICATES FINE NEW HOME 

Carpenters Local 149 8, Provo, Utah, has just completed construction of a Labor 
Temple which is surely a credit to a Local of any size, to say nothing of a small 
Local. The building is fireproof, mostly of concrete and steel, is 60 by 125 feet, two 
story and half basement. 

The ground floor is rented to permanent tenants, the rent from whom will 
maintain the entire building. The second floor is devoted entirely to offices and 
meeting rooms for A. F. of L. Unions. Seven Locals have offices in the building. 
There are three small meeting rooms, a ladies' auxiliary room, and a large hall 60 
x 72 for socials, dances-, larger meetings etc. 

The entire floor covering is of asphalt tile laid in a design of three colors with 
a large artistic A. F. of L. monogram as a center piece, made of white tile. 

The building has been under construction since Feb. 1946 and we held an open- 
ing party — a dance : — on May 3, 1947. Members of the Brotherhood who happen 
to be in Provo, Utah, at any time are invited to visit and inspect our new home. 

The building committee, consisting of Spencer Madsen, G. L. Wootton, T. F. 
Spalding, Geo. Higgins, D. C. Brimhall, and Lloyd Peacock have worked untiring- 



24 THE CARPENTER 

ly and have spent many hours planning and •working for the progress of the build- 
ing. Arlo Goulding and A. N. Hall -were building superintendants and Geo. Higgins 
has supervised purchases and subcontracts. 



-♦- 



LONGYIEW LOCAL CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY. 

On April 23. Local 109 7. of Longview. Texas, held its annual birthday party 
in the Community Center building. About 300 carpenters, their wive and guests 
■were present and, under the M-Ceeing of Brother Joe Redmon, all had an enjoy- 
able evening. 

A musical" program had been provided by the entertainment committee and 
was well received, especially a string trio and a prize winning brass sextette from 
the White Oak high school band. A hilarious interlude came, in the form of a 
hog calling contest between three nail-benders. 

But the high point of the evening was the awarding of two four-year scholar- 
ships to the winners of the Carpenter sponsored "Why I Want To Be A Teacher" 
contest. Miss Ruth Davis and Earl Carmichael. both members of Mrs. Curtis 
Morris' Civics class, were the winners. 

Mr. R. L. Speight and Mrs. Morris, principal and teacher respectively, were 
present and expressed their appreciation of the carpenters' generosity. 

Ice cream, cake, coffee and cold drinks were served by the carpenters (with a 
lot of assistance from the ladies of the Auxiliary, No. 2 61, of course). 



MANSFIELD MARKS 46th BIRTHDAY 

Local Union No. 73 5 of Mansfield. Ohio, celebrated its 4 6th anniversary with 
a banquet for all its members at the Sons of Herman Hall. 

Steak and all the trimmings were served to 200 members. 

Mayor Yaughn of Mansfield and Mr. Edw. J. Blonston. Manager of the local 
Social Security Office, were guest speakers for the evening; Mayor Yaughn speak- 
ing on the building construction of the city, and Mr. Blonston on the benefits 
derived by Social Security. 

The members were also favored with a talk from Brother Ben Godfrey of 
Columbus, Ohio, on Safety and Hygiene in Construction Building. After the 
dinner an hour's entertainment was enjoyed by all. It consisted of singing and 
dancing by entertainers from Columbus. 

The entertainment Committee was composed of Orland Thomas, Homer Gregg, 
and Philip Xeider. 

All were satisfied and look forward to another anniversary with anticipation. 



WAUSAU SPONSORS MEMORABLE BANQUET 

Nearly two hundred members of Local Union No. 159 4, Wausau, Wisconsin, 
gathered at the Eagles Hall on April 12, 1947, to celebrate the Local's tenth 
Anniversary. 

Delicious roast turkey and tender baked ham topped the banquet menu, after 
which our capable toastmaster, Brother Edwin Fromm, introduced the speaker 
for the evening. 

Brother Walter Jensen, President of the Wisconsin State Council of Carpenters, 
opened with a talk on pending labor legislation in the state: followed by Brother 
Jake Fredericks. Regional Director of the American Federation of Labor, who 
spoke on national labor laws before Congress. International Representative 
Howard Bennett, represented the General Office; Brother Henry Stanton. President 
of the Wausau Central Labor Union and Representative Raj' Zimick, a past presi- 
dent of Local No. 159 4 concluded the speeches. The speakers were excellent, the 
food superb, so everyone had a most enjoyable time. 




JERSEY CITY AUXILIARY ON ITS TOES 

Just a line to let you know that we of the Ladies Auxiliary No. 135, Jersey City, 
N. J., are still going strong after all the trying times of the war years. We still 
hold our meetings regularly although we only hold them once a month at present 
as most of the ladies seem to be too busy to attend two meetings a month. 

We had a lovely Christmas party, all the sisters and their husbands joining us 
in making it a grand affair. We had a turkey and a large Christmas tree with gifts 
under it for everyone. Everyone had a very enjoyable time. We also held a 
Valentine party which was also turned into a farewell party for one of our mem- 
bers who, with her husband was leaving for an extended visit to Holland. We 
gave them a fine sendoff with a large Bon Voyage cake and a small handbag, 
decorated with tulips and the Dutch flag, for each of them. 

Year in and year out we do our best to support every worthy cause. We 
donate to the Red Cross, T. B. Fund and a number of other similar projects. At 
present our membership is not very large, but we are hopeful that it will increase. 
We are particularly anxious to have all our old members back. We are taking 
this means of extending a hearty invitation to all our ex-members to come back 
into the fold. We miss them and would like to have them join us again. 

Auxiliary No. 135 extends greetings to all sister organizations. We would be 
happy to hear from as many of them as possible. 



JOPLIX AUXILIARY BOOSTING UNION LABEL 

We wish to tell you about our Ladies Auxiliary No. 446 of Joplin, Missouri. 

We have been organized for sixteen months. During that time we have enter- 
tained with Chi'istmas programs, Easter parties, pie suppers, valentine parties and 
picnics for ourselves and all members of the Carpenters' Local. 

This winter we published a booklet, "Union Made Merchandise and Where to 
Buy it." This booklet is to instruct all union people on their purchasing of goods 
carrying the union label. We ladies canvassed every store in our city to obtain 
this list. 

We have quilted three quilts to raise funds for donations to the Red Cross, 
the March of Dimes Campaign, Y. M. C. A. and to furnish Christmas baskets for 
needy families. 

We meet the first and third Tuesdays of each month. 

Our doors are always open to the Sisterhood and we welcome any of our 
Sisters who might be visiting or passing through our city. 



SAN PEDRO LADIES DOING GREAT WORK 

Ladies Auxiliary No. 402 of San Pedro, California, would like to bring to the 
attention of the other Auxiliaries and the Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners, 
the good work that we have done during the past four years. 

We have established a fund, known as our Sick Fund, which is made up of 
monies received for serving luncheons and raffling off chances on various prizes. 
From this fund we are able to visit our sick members and our brothers in the Pile 
Drivers Union, bringing them such things as flowers, candy, cigarettes, cookies 
and magazines. We have also done considerable work during the war in visiting 
both Army and Navy Hospitals in our locality, taking the injured and sick such 



26 THE CARPEXTER 

things as candy, cigarettes, books and magazines, "which we know made many of 
our boys very happy. 

Our auxiliary meets the first and third Fridays of each month in the Pile 
Drivers Union Hall, while our brothers are holding their meeting, and in this way 
we are able to coordinate our activities and assist our brothers whenever called 
upon to do so. 

At our last meeting, April 4, coming just before Easter Sunday, the Auxiliary 
at the conclusion of the Pile Drivers meeting put on an Easter party, serving tempt- 
ing refreshments, which were well appreciated by the members of Pile Drivers 
Union No. 23 75. 

In closing we wish to send sincere greetings to all Carpenters and Pile Drivers 
Auxiliaries and to all members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 



ST. LOUIS AUXILIARY AIDS ALL WORTHY CAUSES 

Ladies Auxiliary No. 23 of St. Louis, Mo., celebrated its Thirty-first Birthday 
on Saturday evening, February 21, with a gala banquet at the North Western 
Hotel. About 200 members, friends and guests were on hand to help the ladies 
mark this important milestone. 

Tables were decorated with American Flags and at each plate there was a piece 
of cherry pie with whipped cream on top. The speaker's table was decorated with 
a huge birthday cake, donated by District Council officers, and bowls of flowers 
at either end. Several officers of the District Council were present as special 
guests. 

During the course of the evening, Sister Jesse Stege, Auxiliary Chairman, was 
presented with a lovely lace table cloth and an apron to which was pinned a hand- 
kerchief from each individual member. Afterwards card games got under way to 
round out the evening. There were attendance prizes and prizes at individual card 
tables and the affair was topped off with a raffle which raised considerable money 
for the Auxiliary's treasury. 

Auxiliary No. 2 3 is composed of a group of very active ladies. The sick and 
needy are helped. Help is extended to the Red Cross, the Salvation Army, U.S O., 
and all the other worthy causes. During the war, the Auxiliary kept a stream 
of boxes going to boys overseas. Meetings are held the first and third Tuesdays 
and all carpenters' wives and daughters are extended a cordial invitation to 
attend. 

♦ 

TACOMA LADIES CELEBRATE BIRTHDAY 

Carpenters Auxiliary No. 26 7 of Tacoma has just celebrated its eleventh birth- 
day with a chicken dinner and dance at "The Firs". There were sixty-three guests 
present; among them were many of our husbands and some of the Building Trades 
Council members. 

We are continuing to be very active. In Oct. we had a carnival and bazaar 
which was our main money-making project for the year. Several of our Auxiliary 
members, together with the Carpenters of No. 4 70, put on a play for the annual 
Christmas program. We also had our annual Auxiliary Christmas party at which 
we had an attendance of thirty-five members. We were served a lovely ham lunch- 
eon and had exchange of Christmas gifts. 

In conjunction with the Auxiliary we also have a drill team and sewing club 
both under the able direction of Grace Robinson. In February we entertained the 
President of the Washington State Council of Carpenters Auxiliaries. Mrs. Gladys 
Wurman of Camas. It was through the effort of the Tacoma Auxiliary that the 
State Council was started. We feel that we have had a very successful past two 
years under the able leadership of our President Bernice Watkins, and we are look- 
ing forward to a brighter future. 

We regret the loss of one of our charter members through death. Our Sister 
Jane Knowles was well known as a very active member in the labor movement 
and many who may read this will regret her passing. 



Craft Probloms 




Carpentry 

(Copyright 1947) 

LESSON 22 5 
By H. H. Siegele 

The plumb bob, under the right con- 
ditions, is still the most accurate tool 
for plumbing that is in use. It is con- 
trolled by gravity, and so long as there 
is no interference with gravity its accu- 
racy is perfect. Wind pressure and mag- 
netism, however, often destroy its accu- 
racy. Any breeze will affect it, especial- 
ly if the plumb line is long. Some au- 
thors point out that a bulky plumb bob 
is responsible for the influence of wind 
pressure, but- that is not a correct con- 
clusion. A bulky plumb bob, in case of 
wind pressure, will show a greater dif- 
ference in the inaccuracy than a less 
bulky one will, but the inaccuracy is 
still due to the line. This writer has 
used plumb bobs under many and varied 
conditions, and it is his opinion that 
the plumb line is responsible, in case of 




Fig. 1 

wind, for the greater part of the inac- 
curacies of plumb bobs. A rather fluffy 
line which usually is thicker than the 
tightly woven line, if affected by the 
wind, will pull the bob much farther 
from the true point than the tightly 
woven line will. In plumbing with a 
plumb bob one should always wait for 
the windstill moment before marking 



the point. When a high elevation is 
involved, a very heavy plumb bob, using 
pliable wire for a line, will give the 
best results. 

Fig. 1 is a one-line drawing, or dia- 
gram, of a square building with the 
four outside walls up and in the process 
of being plumbed. The dotted lines at 
the right and left, represent sway 




Fig. 2 

braces, while at A and at B are shown 
plumb bobs in position for plumbing. 
In this arrangement, only the two 
plumbings that are shown are necessary 
to plumb the four corners, assuming, 
of course, that the framing has been 
done accurately. 

Fig. 2 is a detail showing how the 
line is fastened at the top, 7 inches 
from the corner, while at the bottom a 
point is established, also 7 inches from 
the corner. In plumbing this corner, 
the point of the plumb bob must inter- 
sect the established point and the edge 
of the bottom plate, as shown by the 
drawing. To complete the plumbing, 
the diagonally opposite corner is plumb- 
ed in the same way. It will be noticed 
by referring to Fig. 1, that only four 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



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i The above books support one another.) 

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sway braces will be necessary to hold 
the four corners plumb. 

Fig. 3 shows how to use the plumb 
bob to test the plumbness of posts, pic- 
ture frames, window frames, and so 
forth, by holding it up, as shown, and 




J ¥ 



Wf Wi ftS «H 



*/ 



Fig. 3 



sighting the line with the object. Fig. 
4 shows the test aplied to a post that 
is in a plumb position. 

Fig. 5 is a drawing of one of the 
handiest plumb bobs on the market. It 
has a reel for the line, which stops by 
friction in any desired position. The 
line has a hook on the end, which can 



be hooked on a nail, or on a linein case 
the plumbing is done from another line, 
then the plumb bob is pulled down to 
where the point is to be established. 




' t 






M. 



> * * lr 



. , y; ', . 



" to _ rj , d 



to 







Fig. 4 



When the plumbing is over, the line is 
wrapped onto the reel again. The dif- 
ferent parts are pointed out on the 
drawing. 



/?eel 




Bob 



Steel Poini 



Fig. 5 

Two much used plumb bobs are 
shown by Fig. 6. The one to the left 
has a strong shell of steel with the 



T H E CARPENTER 



29 



hollow part filled with mercury. It is 
claimed that this plumb bob comes to 
a stop much quicker than a solid steel 
or solid iron bob does. The bob to the 
right, is of solid steel, but not as bulky 
as the mercury plumb bob. The slend- 
erness of this bob has two advantages. 
First, it can be dropped through a 



To the right (Fig. 7) we have a 
perspective view of a plumb bob fas- 




rather small hole, and second, in case 
of wind, it will not be affected as much 
as a more bulky bob. 

Fig. 7 shows to the left two views of 
a rather practical plumbing tool, com- 
monly called plumb stick, in which a 
plumb bob is fastened to a straightedge 
with a groove cut through the center 
of one side, as shown. At the bottom 
an opening is cut out for the plumb bob. 
Just above this opening a metal plate 
is fastened, which prevents the plumb 
bob from flopping around when the tool 
is handled. 






Fig. 7 

tened to a straightedge in the well- 
established way. This fastening makes 
it easy to adjust the plumb line for 



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2105 N. Burdick St.. Div. 6, Kalamazoo 81. Mich. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



length, while at the same time it is 
securely held to the straightedge. 

Fig. 8 shows two details of the fas- 
tening of a plumb line to a straight- 
edge. This is the same as shown to 
the right in Fig. 7. To the left we 
have a front view of the upper end of 




Fig. 8 

the straightedge, showing, A, the line 
that holds the plumb line away from 
the straightedge. This is put in place 
first. At B is shown, in part, the line 
onto which the plumb bob is fastened, 
which is the second operation. At C 
we show how the other end of the line 
is wrapped around the two lugs, in 
order to hold the plumb line in the 
middle saw kerf. To the right we show 
the back view of the fastening. Line 
D runs through the center saw kerf and 
is, fastened on the plumb bob on the 
front side. Line E is end of the plumb 
line, which is held securely in place 
by line D. Study these drawings with 
the drawing to the right in Fig. 7. 

Fig. 9 shows a very practical way of 
plumbing from a line; that is, the 
plumb bob is thrown over the line and 
lowered to the place where the point is 
to be established, about as shown. With 



one hand the loose end of the line is 
held, while the three lines, 1, 2 and, 3, 
indicated by arrows, are lined up by 
sighting. When the three lines are in 
perfect alignment, the workman marks 
the point. This plumbing is especially 
practical when points are to be estab- 
lished in excavations from lines fas- 
tened to the original batter boards. This 
writer has used this method a great 
deal, and has found it accurate. Gf 
course, the workman must be pains- 
taking, which is necessary in any 
plumbing, in order to obtain accuracy. 

When a plumb bob is dropped, espec- 
ially a great distance, it takes some 
time to bring it to a stop. A bob can 




Fig. 9 

be stopped quickly from the upper end 
of the plumb line, by holding the line 
with the fingers and moving it in the 
opposite direction to swing of the bob. 




STEEL SQUARE 



HAND 
BOOK 



This new and revised edition of Carpenters and Builders' Practical Rules for Laying 
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Name Address- 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



After a little practice, one can bring a 
bob to a stop in just a moment by tbis 
method. 



A Puzzling Leak 

A public building during its first 
eighteen years of existence, had a leak- 
ing roof. The leaks appeared only dur- 
ing extra heavy rains or after snows, 
otherwise it would go on for months 
and sometimes over periods of a year 
o'r two years without showing signs of 
leaks. The roofer was called on to fix 
it, because he had guaranteed the roof, 
so he reinforced the flashing, bringing 
it up to the coping and sealing it. It 
seemed that the problem was solved, but 
then there came a heavy snow, and 
when it thawed the leaks were as bad as 




ever. A new roof was put on and it 
again seemed that the trouble had been 
eliminated, but again when a heavy rain 
came or a heavy snow, the leaks ap- 
peared. Following this experience, we 
were called on to supervise the fixing of 
the roof. We made an examination of 
the whole roof — there were no leaks to 
j be seen on the surface of the roofing, 
but when we examined the sleeves of 
the outlets, we found that they were 
sealed on the inside, but not on the 
outside. The problem was something on 
the order of what we are showing 
by the accompanying illustration. The 
downspouts were just a little too small 
to carry off the water of heavy rains or 
snows. In such cases the water backed 
up. filling the conductor head and part 
of the gutter, as we are showing by the 




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The saw most 
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A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXVII — No. 7 



INDIANAPOLIS, JULY, 1947 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents — 



Where Liberty Echoed 



Carpenters' Hall, Philadelphia, is firmly enshrined in the hearts of all Americans, 
for it was here that George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine and that whole 
host of Colonial heroes met and dreamed and planned of and for the America we 
know today. 



Dark Age's Return 



If the anti-labor forces of the nation have their way industrial relations will return 
to the era of the company thug, professional strikebreaker and industry-wide blacklist- 
items employers used freely in the early days of this century. 



L. U. 1394 Builds Good Will 



12 



Local Union No. 1394, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, contributes a day's work free of 
charge to two churches under construction as an evidence of good faith and civic- 
mindedness. 



One Campaign That Failed 



15 

By high-powered propaganda during and after the war, selfish interests endeavored 
to turn the veterans against organized labor, but 12,000,000 ex-servicemen have found 
that their best protection lies in union membership. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Plane Gossip 

Editorials - 

Official 

In Memoriam 

Correspondence 

To the Ladies 

Craft Problems 



10 
16 
19 
20 
21 
26 
28 



Index to Advertisers - 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22. 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Auk. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 




WOOD 

BAND SAW 

BLADES 



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There's an Ohlen-Bishop blade for 
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selection of gauge and points. 

OHLEN-BISHOP 



906 Ingleside Ave. 



Columbus, Ohfo 




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depth required, enabling anyone to 
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J.E.GASKELL 

R.R. 3 ( TO LEDO 7, OHIO 



New Opportunities 

*f Carpenters 




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THE CARPENTER 



LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your own busi- 
ness and be your own boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 

Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $5.00, 
and pay the balance of $25.00 at $5.00 per 
month, making a total of $30.00 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name and address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building C, Denver 2, Colorado 




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N OTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

E. C. Atkins & Co., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 4th Cover 

Henry Disston & Sons, Inc., Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. 1 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 32 

J. E. Gaskell, Toledo, O 3 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 30 

F. P. Maxson, Chicago, 111. 4 

Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, 

Mass. 3rd Cover 

The Speed Co., Portland, Ore. 4 

Ohlen-Bishop, Columbus, 0. 3 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, 

Conn. 3rd Cover 

E. Weyer, New York, N. Y. 3 

Bowling Equipment 

Brunswick, Balke, Collender Co., 

Chicago, 111. 31 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, 111. 31 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

E. W. Hoffner, Chicago, 111 3 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 30 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans. 29 

Mason Engineering Service, 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 32 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo._ 4 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y. 3rd Cover 



$1.25 with 7 Blades xlWAT/n* 

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CARPENTERS 

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The Saw of Superior Quality with a National Reputation. Manu- 
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If your dealer does not handle, write direct to me. 

F. P. MAXSON, Sole Manufacturer 

3722 N. Ashland Ave. CHICAGO, ILL 



I Where Liberty Echoed 

• • • 

Fifty-Jour years ago, Peter J. McGwire, Founder and first General Secretary of the United 
Brotherhood, wrote and published in The Carpenter the following account of the significance 
of Carpenters' Hall, Philadelphia, in early American history. This Fourth of July, as on any other 
Fourth of July for the past 170 years, thousands of humble Americans will visit Carpenters' 
Hall where Washington and Jefferson and the Adamses and the whole host of early American 
patriots laid the foundation for our glorious country. So long as there is an America, so long 
as men cherish and revere liberty, equality and brotherhood. Carpenters' Hall, Philadelphia, will 
remain a symbol of the ideals and philosophy which the founders of our country gave to the 
world. 

N THE business quarter of Philadelphia, on Chestnut street, between 
Third and Fourth streets, is a quaint old building- one hundred and 
twenty-two years old and richly replete with historic memories. The 
building is of brick with a low steeple, and of the old colonial style of 
architecture. It is in a splendid state of preservation and is known as 
"Carpenters' Hall." It was built in 1770 by the Carpenters' Company of 
the city and county of Philadelphia. 

The Carpenters' Company is one of the oldest associations of Pennsyl- 
vania, and the oldest industrial society in America. It was instituted about 
forty years after the settlement of 



the province by William Penn and 
maintains an uninterrupted exist- 
ence from the year 1724. Among its 
early members were many promi- 
nent in colonial history, and whose 
architectural taste 
andability as build- 
ers have left their 
impress upon build- 
ings that yet remain 
in Philadelphia as 
memorials of that 
early day. 

The object of the 
organization as ex- 
pressed in its Act 
of Incorporation, 
was much after the 
style of the guilds 
of Europe, those 
historic ancestors 
of the modern trade 
unions. And the so- 
ciety was patterned 
after "the Worship- 
ful Company of Carpenters of Lon- 
don," founded in 1477. The armorial 
insignia of this company in Phila- 
delphia are identical with those of 
the ancient body, the officers bore 
the same designation and its de- 




OLD CARPENTERS HALL, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



clared object, ceremonials and priv- 
ileges were in furtherance with the 
same idea. 

Its object was to cultivate and in- 
struct its members in the science of 
architecture and to 
assist members and 
their families in 
case of accident or 
need. It established 
a "Book of Prices." 
for the valuation of 
carpenters' work, 
and to quote from 
their ancient rules, 
"on the most equi- 
table principles, so 
that the workmen 
should have a fair 
recompense for 
their labor and the 
owner receive the 
worth of his mon- 
ey." This company 
charged an entrance 
fee of four pounds sterling, which 
kept out many journeymen carpen- 
ters and made the society one ex- 
clusively composed of "master car- 
penters." 

All the historic colonial Con- 



THE CARPENTER 



gresses and meetings prior to the 
Declaration of Independence were 
held in Carpenters' Hall. Here it 
was that in 1774. from September 5 
to October 20, the first colonial Con- 
gress was held, and it was on that 
occasion as afterwards on other oc- 
casions that the inspiring eloquence 
of Patrick Henry, the Adamses, 
John Hancock and the patriotic 
fathers of the country stirred the 
people of the Colonies to throw off 
the yoke of English domination. In 
this hall it was that Washington, 
Franklin, Lee, Randolph, Jay, Rut- 
ledge and the men of the first colon- 
ial Congress met, and afterwards 



at the State House on July 4, 1776, 

and gave utterance to the Declara- 
tion of Independence. 

After the Revolutionary war was 
over it was in this Carpenters' Hall 
in 1787 the convention to frame a 
constitution met and after four 
months' deliberation agreed upon a 
constitution for the "United States 
of America," making Carpenters' 
Hall memorable both for the first 
united effort to obtain a redress of 
grievances from the Mother Coun- 
try, and the place where the fathers 
of the Republic changed by the con- 
stitution a loose league of separate 
colonies into a powerful nation. 



LIBRARY FUND 



In the period from April 2 4, (when the last report was made in The Car- 
penter) until June 16 some $716.10 in contributions came into the Library- 
Fund, bringing total donations to the Fund well over the §8,000 mark. Under 
the circumstances, the Home at Lakeland, Florida, is virtually assured of having 
a fine up-to-date library as a result of the Twenty-fifth General Convention's de- 
cision to set up a Library Fund. Local Unions and Councils in virtually every 
state in the nation have donated to the Fund, and it is self-evident that the 
bigger the Fund grows, the better will be the library available to guests at the 
Home. 

Contributions to the Fund should be clearly designated as such so that book- 
keeping errors may be avoided. In the period from April 2 4 to June 16 contri- 
butions as follows: 



L. U. City Amount 

854 Cincinnati, Ohio 3 10.00 

Carpenters' D. C, New Orleans 

& Vic. 10.00 

Metropolitan D. C, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 50.00 

868 Cincinnati, Ohio 25.00 

8 Philadelphia, Pa. 5.00 

359 Philadelphia, Pa. 10.00 



L. U. City Amount 

1138 Toledo, Ohio 20.00 

748 Taylorville, 111. 25.00 

1846 New Orleans, La 5.00 

General Office 521.10 

Carpenters' Home, Lakeland, 

Fla. 25.00 

Ladies' Aux. 130, San Pedro, 



Cal. 



10.00 



RECAPITULATION 

Available Funds April 24, 1947 $7,785.45 

Receipts 716.10 



Total 38,501.55 

Expenditures 32.00 



Available Funds June 16, 1947 $8,469.55 



Dark Age's Return 



Y THE TIME this appears in print the fate of the Taft-Hartley 
Bill will have been settled. But we are not naive enough to believe 

that the Taft-Hartley Bill will settle the matter of labor legisla- 
tion. By now it is clear that the vested interests which authored and 
backed the Taft-Hartley measure will be satisfied with nothing short of 
complete legislative hamstringing of labor. Their goal is final and ir- 
revocable destruction of organized labor. Laws merely curbing labor 
or limiting its functions will not satisfy them. They want a return to the 
days of "rugged individualism" — which is a fancy name for wage slavery. 

During the days of debate on the • 

Taft - Hartley Bill, Congressman workmen and their families. 
Michael J. Kirwan of Youngstown, , Re had opportumty to recall that 



Ohio, a man who came up the hard 
way, vividly portrayed what the 
vested interests want and what 
American workers would face by 
a return to the "good old days". In 



his parents had been of the working 
class — that he, himself, had been 
reared in a company house. He 
recalled the hardships that he and 
they had endured on sweatshop 



opposing the Taft-Hartley Bill, wa ^ es and lack o£ fit working . con 
Kirwan pulled no punches. 

"I am opposed to this labor bill," 
he told the House, "because it will 
tend toward taking us back into 
the Dark Ages. 

"By Dark Ages, I refer to the 
period previous to the enactment 
of the Wagner Labor Act, to what 
happened in the 50 years before 
that law was put in the statue books. 

"The first major strike in this 
country took place at Pittsburgh, 
in 1892. Carnegie paid a man named 
Frick a million dollars- to break the 



ditions. He became remorseful and 
bitter. 

"When Carnegie sent him a wire, 
asking him to come to his office," 
Frick wrote back: 

"Til see you in Hell; we're both 
going there.' 

"The steelworkers' union was 
broken, together with the hearts of 
workers throughout the country. 

"Then we had the railroad strike 
at Chicago, in 1893. Railroad work- 
ers were shot down in the streets 



strike. Pinkerton detectives, police, by Federal troops. The men who 

soldiers and traitors were called in. participated in the strike were 

Many workers were shot from river black-listed all over the country, 

boats with Catling guns. "As they went to other cities to 

"Frick was shot in the neck by seek employment, they were asked 

Alexander Berkman, and, while re- for references or place of previous 

cuperating in the hospital, had many employment. The letters came back, 

days to dwell over the suffering and with the emblem of a broken car 

grief he had brought to countless wheel on the railroad letterheads. 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



That was the tip-off that they were 
not to be hired. 

"In 1902, along - came the miners' 
strike in the anthracite coal region, 
in which 140,000 persons participat- 
ed — including myself. 

"The strike lasted from April to 
October. We experienced the un- 
told hardships of eating only corn 
meal mush, of being evicted from 
company houses and being forced 
to live in tents — large families of 
8 and 10 children. 

"But a great deal was accom- 
plished toward better working con- 
ditions. We were given the right 
to work 8 hours a day, and got out 
from under slavery. The first ma- 
jor strike was won. 

"Previous to that time, represen- 
tatives of the commissaries or com- 
pany stores would search homes be- 
fore pay day, to find some article 
that had not been purchased through 
them. If found, the father and other 
mine workers in the family were 
•■certain to receive their discharge. 

"That was in the period so often 
referred to as 'rugged individual- 
ism' or 'free enterprise.' Do you 
believe the boys and girls of today 
would want to go back to that kind 
of living? 

"I remember the strike of 1904, 
at Pueblo, Colorado," Kirwan con- 
tinued. "No American should ever 
forget that one. 

"The miners and their families 
were evicted from company homes. 
The tents in which they found re- 
fuge were burned by troops. The 
men were arrested and transported 
to the plains of Kansas. Their wives 
and children were left behind, with- 
out food or shelter. 

"That is the era to which some 
refer as 'the good old days,' and to 



which they are so eager to have us 
go back. 

"Along came 1937 — just 10 short 
years ago — and the Memorial Day 
massacre. At a steel plant in Chi- 
cago 19 men laid down their lives 
and scores were injured by police, 
because they dared to form a picket 
line. 

"Now we seem to be drifting back 
into those so-called good old days. 

"It has been my privilege— and 
I consider it a privilege — to have 
participated in five strikes, three 
of them major ones, in my lifetime. 
I have had no regrets. I am grate- 
ful I had the opportunity, in small 
degree, to make some contribution 
to labor and its progress. 

"Working conditions have been 
made safer, sanitary, more endur- 
able. These are privileges my fel- 
low workmen strove for and 
dreamed of. They are worth the 
sacrifice, the suffering and depri- 
vations of many years. 

"If I had my life to live over a- 
gain, I would do the same thing. 
If right to join a union were taken 
away from me — I would be just as 
happy to have my life taken away. 

"I plead with you, my colleagues. 
Do not take away from any man or 
woman the right to join a union, 
nor the right to a closed shop. If 
any of you have ever worked in a 
steel plant, factory or mine, you can 
realize the situation. 

"If Congress is sincere in want- 
ing to pass a good labor bill, now 
is the time. But you will not ac- 
complish this by asking questions 
across a table. You will have to 
send Congressmen themselves into 
the mines, factories, steel plants, 
oil fields and railroad yards. 

"After you spend four or five 
months down in the bowels of the 
earth, in sweatshops, living in cab- 



THE CARPENTER 



ins and company houses, eating 
workers' food instead of at Fan and 
Bill's famous steak house, a good, 
honest and fair labor bill would be 
drawn up." 

These are the words of Con- 
gressman Kirwan, a man who knows 
from first-hand experience what it 
is to dig coal in the bowels of the 
earth or turn out steel in the heat 
and glare of a steel mill. For every 
man who works for a living; for 
every wage earner who believes his 
family is entitled to a decent living 
they are a warning and a challenge. 

Nor is Kirwan the only thinking 
American who visualizes a return 
to the Dark Ages of industrial re- 
lations under the Taft-Hartley type 
of legislation. Victor Riesel, famed 
columnist who has never been 
known for his sympathetic lean- 
ings toward labor, in his June n 
column blasted the Taft-Hartley 
Bill for its viciousness toward la- 
bor and expressed genuine fear that 
the bill would reintroduce another 
era of labor spies, finks, company 
goons and professional strike- 
breaking armies. In part he said: 

"The bill would upset the work- 
ing agreements which have covered 
11,000,000 American breadwinners 
for generations. 

"Who wants the open shop? No- 
tice that most of the States that 
have banned the closed shop are 
lands of cotton, fruit, wheat, corn. 
The factory-frlled states like New 
York, Michigan, Massachusetts, 
Ohio, New Jersey and Illinois have 
given that anti-closed shop band- 
wagon a quick brushoff. 

"Just think of 11,000,000 men and 
women refusing to work in open 
shops. Think of the possible vio- 
lence inside the factory if a non- 
union hand tried to take over a ma- 
chine near a union man with a dues 



book dating back to the hooped 
skirt. 

"Think, too, of other sections of 
the Taft-Hartley bill. Unions can 
be sued. Labor-relations will move 
out of the conference room into the 
court room. Assembly lines will 
be stalled while judges decide 
whether a union damaged some one 
during a walkout. The injunction 
would be back and the soap-boxers 
would be at every factory gate 
screaming to irritated workers that 
the 'capitalistic courts' are their 
enemies. I've heard those boys 
with the built-in speakers' platform. 
They can create disrespect for our 
judicial system and law and order 
quicker than you can draw a ham- 
mer and sickle. 

"But most of all I fear a return 
to the mid-Twenties and early Thir- 
ties — the days of strike breakers, 
goons-for-hire, labor spies and the 
money grubbing agencies which 
sold tear gas bombs and guns to 
labor and management. Read, as I 
just have, the old Nye and LaFol- 
lette Senate reports. See how these 
agencies planted men in factories 
to stir up trouble and sold their 
ghoulish guns and guards in both 
sides." 

To those of us who have spent 
decades in the labor movement, 
Riesel's words are no mere empty 
threat. The goon squads and pro- 
fessional strikebreaking organiza- 
tions of the Twenties and early 
Thirties are still too fresh in our 
minds. America is now at the 
crossroads. One way leads to a re- 
turn of the industrial relations of 
the Dark Ages; the other leads to 
industrial peace and prosperity 
through an expansion and broaden- 
ing of collective bargaining. Only 
time will tell which road it is go- 
ing to be. 



SIP 



BAD TO FOOL WITH 

One by one the higher ups in the 
CIO who have been playing ball with 
Communists are finding out that they 
are winding up on the short end of 
the stick. A good many of them are 
now trying to get out from under but 
they are finding it a little harder than 
they thought to get out with a whole 
skin. The more we think about it, the 
more we consider these fellows about 
like a guy named Agabashian. 

Into a tough waterfront saloon one 
day strode a big burly pug-ugly. "Any- 
one here named Donovan?" he demand- 
ed. A long moment of silence followed. 
Finally a meek little man in the corner 
stood up and said, "Yes, my name is 
Donovan." 

In a couple of strides the big bruiser 
was across the room. With one hand 
he held the timid little runt and with 
the other he beat him into insensibility. 

Twenty minutes later the little fellow 
regained consciousness. Painfully get- 
ting up, he shook his head and mur- 
mured: 

"I thought I could fool him. My 
name's not Donovan, it's Agabashian." 




"Replying to your employment offer, 
will say my present contract does not 
expire for two years." 



THE PPtlNCTPLE OF THE THING 

From Brother Wylie York, Local 19 8, 
Dallas, Texas, comes the following: 

It seems there was a cotton picker 
who asked a farmer for a job. "I'll pay 
you a dollar a hundred and your room 
and board," said the farmer. The first 
day the hired man picked only about 
one hundred pounds. The second day 
two hundred. The third day three hun- 
dred and fifty. The fourth day five hun- 
dred. The fifth day five hundred and 
fifty and the sixth day he picked six 
hundred pounds, yet he ate no more 
food than the rest of the pickers. The 
farmer came around and said "I will 
have to let you go." 

"What is the trouble?" the man 
asked. "Isn't my work satisfactory?" 

"Yes," the farmer replied. "It isn't 
that." 

"Do I eat too much?" the man asked. 

"No," the farmer replied. "It isn't 
that." 

"Am I a trouble maker?" the man 
asked. 

"No" the farmer replied. "It isn't 
that. As a matter of fact you are the 
best and cheapest man I have working 
for me because you pick more cotton 
than they^io but you don't eat any more 
food than the rest." 

"Then what IS the matter?" he 
asked. 

"Well, dang it," replied the farmer. 
"They just ain't no cotton picker worth 
six dollars a day." 



A FAIR ESTE\IATE 

According to a report by the Women's 
Division of the Department of Labor, 
there are now sixteen million women 
workers in our total working force. 

That seems to be about right, but 
we can't figure out why fifteen million, 
nine hundred and ninety-nine thousand 
of them want to get on the same bus 
we do at quitting time every night. 



J 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



A LITTLE BIT FAR-FETCHED 

As this is being written, Congress is 
about ready to pass the tax reduction 
bill. From where we sit, this bill looks 
something like the gold brick city slick- 
ers used to sell country yokels. While 
it lops a few pennies off the taxes of 
the common wage earners, it gives the 
people in the upper brackets substantial 
reductions. Despite all the efforts of its 
sponsors to camouflage it as a popular 
measure, the fact remains that it offers 
the most relief to those who need it 
least. 

Somehow or other the efforts of the 
backers of the bill to sell it to the 
people reminds us of the old chestnut 
about the fellow who served on the 
jury during a murder trial involving a 
beautiful woman who shot her husband. 

Telling a friend about it later, he 
said: 

"We were in a Heck of a quandary. 
The defendant was so pretty we just 
couldn't find it in our hearts to convict 
her of murder. On the other hand we 
didn't dare set her free for fear of 
what our wives would say. In the long 
run we found out her husband was an 
Elk; so we found her guilty of shoot- 
ing an Elk out of season and fined her 
$28.00." 



THE WAY TO GET ACTION 

Month by month since early Spring 
we have been told that prices are com- 
ing down. However, day by day the 
amount of goods a dollar will buy keeps 
shrinking and shrinking, price reduc- 
tions in sheep dip, buggy whips, alfalfa 
balers and a few other items never pur- 
chased by the average worker notwith- 
standing. To our way of thinking, prices 
will come down only when the people 
make them come down. 

Somehow or other the whole thing 
reminds us of the man who entered 
a barber shop to catch a quick shave 
before getting on a train. The barber 
plying the brush worked with madden- 
ing slowness. Despite all the admoni- 
tions of the customer for more speed, 
the barber just barely kept the brush 
moving back and forth. Finally the 
man in the chair could stand it no 
longer. In exasperation he cried: 

"Look, Bub, you keep the brush still 
and I'll wag my head." 



PLAY IT SAFE 

Nearly 500 Americans bumped into 
one form or another of violent death 
during the Memorial Day weekend. The 
number of victims of car crashes, 
drownings, etc. over the July Fourth 
holiday will be even higher, if predic- 
tions of traffic experts come true. The 
moral is: drive carefully, stay out of 
dangerous waters, take no chances, and 
remember Joe Paup's safe driving hint, 
— the one-armed drivers are headed for 
the church; some of them will walk up 
the isle and the rest will be carried. 

• • * 
WITHOUT TRAINING 

"For managers and overseers," pro- 
claimed a great Chinese landowner, "al- 
ways give me married men." 

"And for what reason?" a visitor in- 
quired. 

"Because," said the wealthy Chinese, 
"I abhor the muddled, unclear reports 
that have been sent to me by bachelors. 
They have never had to explain any- 
thing to a wife!" 

• • • 

A LITTLE DIFFERENT 

And while we are on the subject of 
explaining we cannot pass up the oppor- 
tunity to tell the one about the doctor 
on the witness stand. 

"Did you say this man was shot in 
the woods, Doctor?" asked the cross- 
examining attorney. 

"No," replied the medico, "I said he 
was shot in the lumbar region." 




It's too bad he wore ?iis NEW HAT 



12 



L 0. 1394 BUILDS GOOD WILL 



Fulfilling a promise made on May 3, when their wage scale was raised 
from $1.75 per hour to $1.87-2 per hour, the members of Local Union No'. 
1394, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on Saturday, May 17, donated a day's work 
free of charge to two churches under construction in that city. The free 
labor was the Local Union's evidence of good faith. During negotiations 
on the wage increase, construction on both churches was delayed almost 
ten days. It was not the desire of the Union to hold up construction, but 
economic necessity made it absolutely essential to increase the hourly 
rate in order that a decent living standard could be maintained. 

When agreement was reached, the Local Union, as evidence of its 
civic responsibility and as a pledge that the wage question has been 
solved for the remainder of the calendar year at least, voluntarily de- 
cided to contribute a day's work free of charge to the two unfinished 
churches. Bright and early Saturday morning, May 17, some forty mem- 
bers of Local Union No. 1394 showed up on the two jobs. By six a.m. 
they were working on the roof of the $350,000 First Baptist Church and 
completing the inside carpentry on the $100,000 First Methodist Church. 
With only a half-hour break for lunch, they worked straight through 
until two-thirty. During the lunch period, orange juice and chicken pur- 
lieu were served by the church members who were on hand in force to 
watch the progress of the work and keep refreshments handy. 

Other building trades unions were also contemplating the donation 
of a day's work to the two churches. 

In this day and age when unions are under fire from many sides and 
union-hating individuals in all walks of life are combining their efforts 
for an all-out assault against organized labor, the forward looking action 
taken by Local Union No. 1394 in donating a day's labor free of charge 
to the two churches under construction is a fine piece of public relations 
work. The officers and members of Local Union No. 1394 are in line for 
hearty congratulations. In addtion to building the two churches the 
community needs, they have undoubtedly built up considerable good will 
and a greater understanding of the problems and difficulties of workers 
among the people of Fort Lauderdale. Too few people realize that union- 
ism stands for brotherhood, neighborliness and cooperation as well -as 
for better hours and working conditions. The generous action of Local 
Union No. 1394 certainly must have gone a long way toward rectifying 
this misconception among the people of Fort Lauderdale and surrounding 
territory. 



A PROMISE FULFILLED 





Pictured above are members of Local Union No. 1394, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., working on the 
roof of the First Baptist Church of that city. From six a. m. to two thirty p. m. on Saturday, 
May 17, these members toiled free of charge as evidence of their civic responsibility and as a 
pledge of continued cooperation for betterment of the community. 




Another crew of Local Union No. 1394 members which devoted a full day's work free of 
charge to the building of the First Methodist Church in Fort Lauderdale. During the lunch hour 
both crews were served orange juice and chicken purlieu by members of the churches under con- 
struction. Both churches are being built by Caldwell-Scott Construction Co. 



14 



THE CARPEXTER 



Local Union No. 973 

INVITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS 
OF AMERICA 



Texas City, Texas 



May 28, 1947 



Mr. Frank Duffy, General Secretary, 
Carpenters' Building, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Dear Sir and Brother: 

The officers and members of Local Union No. 973 desire to 
take this opportunity to express their appreciation for the publica- 
tion of the account of the disaster which wrecked our city and dealt 
our Local a very hard blow. 

We would also esteem small space in The Carpenter to acknowl- 
edge contributions received by the Texas City Relief Fund of Local 
Xo. 973. This fund was started by donations froni our own mem- 
bers and it is still being subscribed to weekly by them for the 
sole purpose of taking care of the bereaved families of our Brothers 
and extending assistance to those seriously injured. These weekly 
donations have reached about 81,000.00. 

The following donations (wholly unsolicited) have been re- 
ceived: Local Xo. 1266, Austin, Texas, S50.00; Local Xo. 66, 
Jamestown, Xew York, S50.00; Local Xo. 64, Louisville, Kentucky, 
Sl.OOO.OO: Local Xo. 1740, Henderson, Texas, S150.00; Local Xo. 
526, Galveston, Texas, $1,000.00; Local Xo. 73, St. Louis, Missouri, 
S10O.00; General Representative Chas. P. Driscoll, S25.00. 

Words are inadequate to express the heartfelt appreciation of 
the committee appointed by our president, H. E. Woodhouse, to 
distribute this fund. On behalf of the many needy dependents the 
committee members do most sincerely thank all for these gratui- 
tious contributions. It makes the breasts of all us swell with pride 
to know that we belong to an organization such as the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America which has 
shown such sympathetic understanding to its brother members in 
distress. 



Joe Francis 

E. W. Xorwood 



Texas City Relief Funds of Local Xo. 973. 

W. J. Struve 



J. J. Strate 
W. H. Ellis 



^LT^JL^irmTLTTLTLTJinj^^ 



15 



THE CAMPAIGN THAT FAILED 

• • 

At least one campaign of the anti-labor forces in this country ended 
up in complete failure ; that was the campaign to turn the veterans against 
the unions. All during the war and for many months after the war, a 
ceaseless barrage of propaganda was directed toward alienating the ser- 
vicemen from organized labor. Y\ nile the war was on. workers on the 
home front were pictured to the servicemen as rolling in wealth and 
striking for more. AYar plant wages w r ere supposed to be anywhere from 
$150 to $300 per week. 

When the war was over the story changed ; unions were supposedly 
holding back veterans from good jobs and preferred treatment. Super- 
seniority was the peg on which the ■ 



anti-labor forces hung their hats. 

In the long run, however, the 
propaganda failed. Veterans learned 
that the unions were their staunch- 
est ally. Recently the Department of 
Labor issued a report on the subject. 

The study showed that over 12,- 
000,000 veterans have been absorbed 
in civilian jobs with practically no 
conflict — and it credited this show- 
ing both to unions and to fair em- 
ployers. 

'"Management and union deter- 
mination to give veterans every 
possible advantage within the 
framework of collective bargaining 
agreements made for satisfactory 
settlement of veterans' problems," 
the report declared. 

There were a few clashes, the De- 
partment said, but these occurred 
only where certain employers 
"sought to circumvent the collective 
bargaining process in an apparent 
effort to set veterans against non- 
veterans." 

The report cited instances where 
unions assured greater protection 



In union plants, on the other 
hand, "no jobs were designated as 
temporary in character, but rather 
each employe acquired seniority 
status after the completion of a 
probationary period," the report 
pointed out. 

Also, the Department made it 
clear that in general "unions and 
managements have made every ef- 
fort to restore the veteran to the 
identical position held by him prior 
to entrance into military service, 
and to grant accumulated senior- 
ity," plus all wage increases which 
the veteran would have received 
had he remained on the job. 

Where a veteran's former job no 
longer existed on his return, labor 
and management in union plants 
saw to it that such G. I. was placed 
"on a job for which he could qual- 
ify by experience," the Department 
explained. 

It also cited the fact that in many 
such plants, unions and manage- 
ments waived seniority and other 
rules in order to take care of dis- 



for the former G. I.'s than provided abled veterans who could no longer 

by law. For example, the Selective perform their old tasks. 

Service Act carries no re-employ- In many other ways, the report 

ment rights for employes classified showed, unions went to considerable 

as "temporary" prior to their indue- lengths to assure war veterans a fair 

tion into the armed forces. break. 



Editorial 




Maybe We Need The Wheaties Technique 

If you listen to the radio or read the newspapers at all, you are only 
too aware of the fact that America has become the greatest advertising 
nation in the world. From the time he gets up in the morning until the 
time he goes to bed at night, the average American has his eyes and ears 
assailed by advertising extolling the virtues of Wheaties or Ivory Soap 
or a thousand and one other products. As the result of this ceaseless 
advertising barrage, many of these products have literally become house- 
hold words from coast to coast. 

Hire good enough advertising counsel, spend enough money, and you 
can put over practically any product or idea in America. You have to 
look no farther than the current anti-labor legislation for a good example. 
Employers' associations spent millions upon millions of dollars knock- 
ing unions and blaming them for all our real and fancied economic ills. 
They kept up their campaign year after year and in the end they got a lot 
of people sold on the idea it was essential that labor be regulated. 

With the technique of advertising developed to a new zenith in Amer- 
ica, it seems strange that America should be doing such a poor job of 
selling itself to the world. In the recent war we made the major contribu- 
tion of arms and men. Since V-J Day we have been practically feeding 
the entire old world. Yet in spite of all this we are pretty much hated 
in many countries, including those we are helping most. 

Looking at it from a straight advertising angle, the product we have 
to sell, Democracy, is so far ahead of anything else the world has to offer 
today that no decent comparison can even be made. The poorest wage 
earner in the United States really lives a princely life when his lot is 
compared with the lot of any Europeans except those belonging to the 
nobility. He eats better, he wears better clothes, he faces fewer restric- 
tions, and he has less fears than any citizen on earth. You would naturally 
think he would be the envy of every European. 

However, such is not the case. The Communists are selling Europeans 
on the idea democracy is the greatest enemy of social progress. The 
Fascists are preaching that democracy is decadent. And all the other 
"isms" are knocking us one way or another. 

What we need is a slam-bang advertising campaign — the kind that 
puts "Crunchie-Wunchies" on your breakfast table whether you want 
them or not. With about one-sixth of the world's population and one- 
sixth of the world's territory we are now producing over half of the 
world's good. All the "ism" countries in the world, with ten times our 
population and ten times our resources, do not produce as much in a year 
as we do in a month. Consequently they do not get to consume as many 
of the good things of life in a year as we do in a month. 



THE CARPENTER 17 

The product we have to sell to the world should have no competition. 
Maybe what we need is a few commercial writers and silken voiced radio 
announcers representing us around the diplomatic tables. 



Look Who's Hurling Charges 

In their decade-old propoganda campaign, which was a buildup to the 
current drive for labor-shackling legislation, the vested interests of the 
nation have leveled many charges at organized labor. By endless repeti- 
tion, they have inferred that labor is undemocratic; that labor leaders are 
autocratic; that there is no responsibility in unions. The way they tell 
it, union officials are answerable to no one, and such being the case, they 
often act without the consent or approval of union members at large. 

That millions of Americans outside the labor movement believe this 
to be true is a tribute to the efficiency of the propaganda campaign financed 
by the vested interests. They have told the same tale year after year and 
naturally many people have come to believe it. 

Yet what are the facts? A little delving into methods used by unions 
in running their affairs as compared to the way affairs of corporations are 
handled shows that it is the corporations and not the unions that are run 
along autocratic lines. 

Let us compare a union with a corporation. Practically every union 
constitution we know requires an election of officers at stated periods. 
This is true at the national level as well as the local level. Most union 
officers are elected by referendum vote. As a result, union officers are 
directly elected by their members. Compare this with the corporation. By 
a complicated proxy system of voting, small groups of organized stock- 
holders control the destinies of corporations. While stockholders' meet- 
ings are held, they mean very little. Few individual stockholders attend. 
The stockholders who are organized, control things to suit themselves. 

By this method, the directors retain autocratic powers. They can and 
often do pour into reserve accounts earnings which might rightfully go 
to the stockholders in the form of dividends. They alter policies of cor- 
porations and make decisions regarding production. They hire and fire 
managers to suit their whims. And at the end of the year they are answer- 
able to no one except the stockholders' meeting which means nothing. 

On the other hand, union officers must face their membership at stated 
times. At these meetings they must account for their stewardships. They 
have to convince the men who will vote for or against them at the next 
election that all the actions they have taken were in the general interest. 
In fact, the action taken by officers between conventions or meetings are 
subject to membership approval. In labor unions membership meetings 
are the supreme law. What they say goes. In corporations, stockholders' 
meetings are only so much window dressing. The board of directors run 
the show without any fear of censure from stockholders or a lack of con- 
fidence vote at the next election. 

Under the circumstances, it seems somewhat ironical that corporations, 
invariably run by tight little cliques of organized stockholders, should 



18 THE CARPENTER- 

accuse labor, which is always answerable to the rank and file, of being 
autocratic. © 

Not A Penny for Non-Essentials 

There is an old Indian saying that goes approximately like this: "You 
fool me once, shame on you: you fool me twice, shame on me." It might 
be well for Congress to remember that saying. After the last war we 
allowed our national defences to go to pot. Economy-minded men on 
Capitol Hill cut defense appropriations to the bone. Even when storm 
clouds gathered ominously on the horizon, it was difficult to get Congress 
to take the threat seriously. 

Certainly that should have taught us a lesson, but somehow or other 
it did not. National defense is apparently going to pot again. A national 
magazine claims that we have exactly one division of infantry ready for 
instant action (and that below usual strength) ; part of one armored divi- 
sion ; and a raggle-taggle of other kinds of troops. With the international 
situation as tense as it is. this hardly seems adequate. Everyone appre- 
ciates the efforts of Congress to reduce expenditures, but with tension 
mounting all over the world national defense seems to be a poor place to 
practice economy. 

However, this subject of economy brings up another thought. There 
have been some rather disquieting disclosures of the way the Brass Hats 
in the armed forces have been spending money alloted to them. A Wash- 
ington, D. C. paper recently uncovered the fact that at Camp Campbell, 
Ky.. "an 18-hole golf course and a twenty-five acre artificial lake, stocked 
with game fish are just being completed." There are only twenty-eight 
officers and enlisted men alledgedly at the camp. Sixteen of the twenty- 
eight are officers. With the national debt as high as it is and tax burden 
as heavy as it is, building a golf course and lake seems a bit on the ex- 
travagant side. 

Recently the newspapers carried a story about some paintings stolen 
by the Nazis turning up at American Army headquarters in Germany. 
They were hanging on the wall of one of the Brass Hats who paid some- 
thing like S8.000 for them when he purchased them from an art dealer. 
From where we sit the idea of an Army Brass Hat spending S8,ooo of the 
tax payer money for paintings is little short of scandalous. A lot of little 
taxpayers have had to sweat a lot of blood to produce $8,000 considering 
what prices are today. 

AYe passionately believe that our national defenses must be kept strong 
and more than adequate to meet any emergency. However, the Brass Hats 
are not making it any easier to sell the public on the idea when thev toss 
around funds for non-essentials. It is going to take lots of money to 
keep up our defenses. Taxes must stay high to produce the money. 
But we are are all entitled to know that we are getting a dollar's worth 
of protection out of every dollar we spend. We need tanks and guns and 
ships, not golf courses or artificial lakes or fancy paintings. 

To paraphrase a famous quotation of a famous American patriot our 
motto must be : 

"Millions for defense; not a penny for non-essentials." 



Official information 




llili il llll l ill l lllllllllilllllilillllll 



General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Secretary 

PRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON. JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
631 W. Page, Dallas, Texas 



Second District, WM. J. KELLY 
Carpenters' Bldg., 243 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District. HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary 

Notice to Recording Secretaries 

The quarterly circular for the months of July, August and September, 
1947, containing the quarterly password, has been forwarded to all Local 
Unions of the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in receipt 
of this circular should notify Frank Duffy, Carpenters' Building, Indian- 
apolis, Indiana. 



NEW CHARTERS ISSUED 



1762 


Cleveland, Ohio 


1812 


2887 


Cuba, N. Mex. 


1820 


1763 


Riverton, Wyo. 


1821 


3022 


Nacagdoches, Texas 


1828 


3024 


Jonesboro, Ark. 


3026 


3025 


Jacksonville, Texas 


1853 


1775 


Gladewater, Texas 


1854 


1764 


Marion, Va. 


3029 


1789 


Bijou, Calif. 


1857 


1791 


Clinton, 111. 


1859 



Lake Cowichan, B. C, Can. 
Sandusky, Ohio 
New Albany, Ind. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Areata, Calif. 
Janesvile, Wis. 
Gainesville, Fla. 
Cambridge, Ida. 
Portland, Ore. 
Greenville, Texas 



2fn ffl 



in emoviam 



Not lost to those that love them, They still live in our memory, 

Xot dead, just gone bef ore ; And will forever more 



%tal in T$£&z£ 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother WALTER ARNOLD, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
Brother CHARLES ARTNER, Local No. 419, Chicago, 111. 
Brother HENRY E. BAIN, Local No. 1445, Topeka, Kan. 
Brother ELTON BONZO, Local No. 206, New Castle, Pa. 
Brother R. J. CLARK, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
Brother HOWARD P. CLAYTON, Local No. 384, Asheville, N. C. 
Brother GEORGE E. COMPTON, Local No. 110, St. Joseph, Mo. 
Brother FRANK CONLON, Local No. 2287, New York, N. Y. 
Brother FRANCIS J. CONNELL, Local No. 1335, Wilmington, Cal. 
Brother JOHN J. COOKE, Local No. 20, New York, N. Y. 
Brother MAURICE COUNIHAN, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 
Brother J. L. COURSON, Local No. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 
Brother OWEN E. DIXON, Local No. 601, Henderson, Ky. 
Brother RAYMOND DOLE, Local No. 871, Battle Creek, Mich. 
Brother ARRON DUNN DAVIS, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 
Brother GIACCHINO GIORDANO, Local No. 366, New York, N. Y. 
Brother MAX GOLDBERG, Local No. 366, New York, N. Y. 
Brother OLIVER GRIMLY, Local No. 59, Lancaster, Pa. 
Brother JAMES E. HENDRICKS, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 
Brother TILSON S. HIATT, Local No. 1445, Topeka, Kan. 
Brother MARK HOFFMAN, Local No. 1052, West Hollywood, Cal. 
Brother ED. V. KARBAN, Cuyahoga D. C, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Brother JAMES W. KINNIER, Local No. 122, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Brother CARSTEN S. LARSEN, Local No. 20, New York, N. Y. 
Brother JOHN C. McMANUS, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 
Brother ADOLF NELSON, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 
Brother O. OKSANEN, Local No. 1244, Montreal, Que., Can. 
Brother PETER OOL, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 
Brother EDWARD PENNETT, Local No 249, Kingston, Ont., Can. 
Brother HARRY PROPST, Local No. 1350, Seymour, Ind. 
Brother IAM QUIMBY, Local No. 374, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Brother ALVIN G. RENKEN, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
Brother PHILLIP ROCKELMAN, Local No. 945, Jefferson City, Mo. 
Brother E. J. ROSENBERGER, Local No. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 
Brother CHARLES SCHROEDER, Local No. 185, St. Louis, Mo. 
Brother JESSE B. SMITH, Local No. 1620, Rock Springs, Wyo. 
Brother ROBERT SMITH, Local No. 466, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., Can. 
Brother ROY H. SOUTH, Local No. 1335, Wilmington, Cal. 
Brother WILLIAM SWEARINGEN, Local No. 1445, Topeka, Kan. 
Brother JAMES E. THOMPSON, Local No. 122, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Brother ROSS B. WARTMAN, Local No. 249, Kingston, Ont., Can. 
Brother T. D. WATSON, Local No. 767, Ottumwa, Iowa. 
Brother T. A. WHITE, Local No. 764, Shreveport, La. 
Brother ART WOTTEN, Local No. 767, Ottumwa, Iowa. 
Brother R. J. YOST, Local No. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
Brother GEORGE F. YOUNG, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 



CorrospondoncQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

L. U. 366 HONORS OLD TIMERS 

In honor of its old-time members and in celebration of its 30th anniversary 
Local Union 366, New York, held a Reunion Party at the Bronx Winter Garden 
on May 16. Several hundred members and guests filled the hall to capacity and 
the unanimous opinion of all conceded it to be quite an enjoyable and memorable 
affair. Absent old-timers of L. U. 366 will be pleased to know they were not for- 
gotten and time out was taken to pay them respects. 

Business Agent Fred Johnson of Local Union 48 8 spoke of the pleasant asso- 
ciations he has had with the past and present officers and members of L. U. 366. 
He recalled the splendid records of Business Agent Charles Nobis and Fin. Sec. 
James Duigan who recently passed away. 

In the course of an admirable address President Charles W. Hanson of the 
New York District Council gave lavish praise to the old-time members. He re- 
minded his listeners of the deep obligation we owe to these loyal Brothers. For 
many long years, through good times and bad, they held solid the ranks of Union 
Labor under the banner of our great United Brotherhood which reached its 
present proud position only through the constancy and devotion of such men as 
these. He called on the younger members present to follow the fine standard of 
Unionism set by these worthy Brothers because in this principle of loyalty lies 
the future prosperity of our Organization. 

President Hanson concluded his address by asking for a demonstration of 
appreciation for the staunch and true members of the old guard. The great 
round of applause which followed was ample expression of the sentiment of all 
those present and an assurance that the efforts of these men will not soon be for- 
gotten. 

Among the old timers unable to attend was Brother Robert Cooper, ninety- 
three year old-member who dates his membership in the Brotherhood back to the 
year 1891. In sending in his regrets for being unable to attend the reunion, 
Brother Cooper said in his letter: 

"If you will look up my record you will see that I joined the United Brotherhood 
on July 1, 1891. Prior to that I was in the Amalgamated, and earlier still I was 
a member of the Carpenters and Joiners Union of Edinburgh, Scotland. Altogether, 
I have been a union member for over seventy years." 

Fraternally, 

John Hart, Sec. 



ARKANSAS STATE LSW COUNCIL HOLDS CONVENTION 

The Editor: 

Lumber workers from all over the State of Arkansas converged on Little Rock 
on May 24 and 25 for the regular convention of the Arkansas State Council of 
Lumber and Sawmill Workers. During the two days the delegates thrashed out 
a multitude of problems confronting not only the lumber workers of the state but 
also all workers everywhere. 

Major concern of the convention was the growing wave of anti-labor legisla- 
tion. It was the unanimous opinion of delegates that the enemies of labor will be 
satisfied with nothing less than a complete destruction of all organized labor. To 
combat the assaults being made on unionism, the convention laid plans for strength- 
ening the organization and enlisting the active aid of every man in the state who 
works for a living. 



22 THE CARPENTER 

One of the resolutions passed requires the State Council to look into the" record 
of every man running for political office and to pass on to all Local Unions the 
results of their findings so that all members affiliated with the Council can vote 
intelligently at the next election. Another resolution urges the American Federa- 
tion of Labor to work for legislation breaking up industrial monopolies if industry- 
wide bargaining is outlawed. The convention also stressed the need for emphasiz- 
ing the insurance benefits and economic benefits that accrue to workers through 
membership in organizations such as the United Brotherhood. 

Officers elected for the ensuing term were: President, John Thompson, Pine 
Bluff; secretary-treasurer, W. H. Marks, Fordyce; vice-president, W. B. Manning, 
Little Rock. 

Fraternally yours, 

John Thompson, Pres. 
• 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE COUNCIL HOLDS 29th CONVENTION 

The Editor: 

The Pennsylvania State Council held its 29th annual convention on April 10, 
11, 12, 1947, at Pittsburgh, Penn. Those present included 83 delegates, 2 fraternal 
delegates, 18 lady guests and 12 distinguished civic and state officials, as well as 
many prominent Labor Representatives. 

The Honorable Mayor Lawrence opened the first session with a hearty welcome, 
followed by the Honorable William L. Chestnut, Secretary of Labor in Pennsylvania, 
and Lewis G. Hines, Legislative Representative of the American Federation of 
Labor. 

The highlight address was made by General Representative O. William 
Blaier, and his remarks were well taken by all in attendance. 

We were pleasantly surprised by the late arrival of General Executive Board 
Members, William J. Kelly and Roland Adams. 

Many constructive resolutions for the good of the Brotherhood, were presented 
and proper action taken by the delegates. 

The following officers were elected: President — Edward W. Finney, Local 
Union 514; Secretary-Treasurer — Theodore P. O'Keefe, Local Union 454; 1st Vice- 
President — William A. Kendrick, Local Union 8; other Vice-Presidents — Ralph 
Lyons, Local Union 287; Thomas Smith, Local Union 1595; Daniel McGee, Local 
Union 129; William Grafius, Local Union 691; Homer Brown, Local Union 81*, 
Angus MacKay, Local Union No. 16 5. 

The Body selected the city of Reading for the 1948 convention. 

Fraternally yours, 

Theodore P. O'Keefe, Secretary-Treasurer. 



LOCAL 301 HONORS RETURNED SERVICEMEN 

The Editor: 

Local Union No. 301 of Newburgh, N. Y. honored its returned servicemen at 
a Dinner-Dance at Villa Nueva, Plattekill, N. Y., on April 18, 1947. Some 400 mem- 
bers and guests attended. President William T. McClintock served as toastmaster 
and introduced the Reverend Clare A. Perrigo, former army chaplain and guest 
speaker who gave a very interesting and amusing talk. Brother Harold C. Hanover, 
Secretary-Treasurer of the New York State Federation of Labor, had planned to 
speak but illness prevented him from attending. Fin. Sec. and Bus. Agt. B. H. 
Murray read the names of the honor roll members numbering 46, of whom 23 are 
still members of the Local. The new Honor Roll was then unveiled and each 
honored guest was presented with a handsome inscribed leather wallet. Following 
the dinner, dancing was enjoyed in the spacious ballroom to the music of Ray 
Nelson's Orchestra. The committee in charge consisted of William McFayden, 
chairman, Alex Rigatti, George Diegel, Fred G. Prange, John Barr, William T. 
McClintock, A. A. Scheitl and B. H. Harvey. 

Fraternally yours, 

Robert Goodbread, Rec. Sec. 



THE CARPENTER 23 

THREE-GENERATION TEAM 

The Editor: 

We of Local No. 792, Rockford, Illinois, are proud of our three-generation 
team of members. It is our opinion that few organizations can better the record 
of this trio. 

The three generations shown are Ernest Fairclough, grandfather; Harold Fair- 
clough, father; and Harold Ernest Fairclough, grandson. Brother Ernest Fair- 
clough, right in the picture, has been a member of Local No. 79 2 nearly twenty 
years. He has served as president and business representative and been a delegate 
to the Rockford Federation for a number of years. Although nearly seventy, he is 
still active in his work and in the labor movement. 

Brother Harold Fairclough, pictured 
on the left, has held membership in the 
Brotherhood for twenty-three years. At 
the present time he is recording secre- 
tary of the Local as well as delegate to 
and president of the Rockford Federa- 
tion Labor. He is commissioned as a 
volunteer organizer for the American 
Federation of Labor in this vicinity. 

Six foot, four inch Harold Ernest 
Fairclough, son and grandson, is a com- 
parative newcomer to the Local Union. A twenty year old veteran of World War 
II, he has already displayed the aggressiveness and sincerity of purpose long asso- 
ciated with his father and grandfather. 

With men like the Faircloughs in the labor movement, we need have no fear 
of its ultimate destiny. In addition to the Faircloughs, Local Union No. 792 can 
also boast of a fine roster of tried and true union men. Recently the Union awarded 
twenty-five year pins to thirty-one members who have completed a quarter of a 
century of continuous membership. We are proud of each and every one of them. 

Fraternally yours, 

William Karwelis, Pres. 




L. U. 288 CELEBRATES 60 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

The Editor: 

Over 250 members and friends of Local Union No. 28 8, Homestead, Pennsyl- 
vania, on the njght of May 21, helped the Union celebrate its Sixtieth Birthday. 
Veterans of Foreign Wars Hall has seldom witnessed a gayer or more friendly 
occasion. Under the watchful eye of Mrs. Hennessey, a union caterer, a delicious 
banquet was served; following which a splendid floor show kept the guests enter- 
tained for a large part of the evening. Joe Morone's orchestra furnished the 
music and Miss Billie Conley acted as mistress of ceremonies. Rev. William B. 
Claney of the First Lutheran Church delivered the invocation and Rev. Vincent 
Burke of St. Marys asked the benediction. 

President Edward Vansickle presided and Carl T. Westland acted as toast- 
master. Speakers of the evening were: Hon. Dr. John S. McLean, Burgess of 
Homestead; Ed. W. Finney, President, Pennsylvania State Council; and William 
J. Kelly, GEB member. Also introduced were Business Agents of the Pittsburgh 
District Council and Angus McKay, Seventh District Vice President of the State 
Council. 

A special tribute was paid to Brother William Bowden who made the supreme 
sacrifice in the recent war. Nine other brothers who served in the armed forces 
were also recognized. Brother Thomas Piper, who joined the Local Union in 1890 
and has the distinction of being the oldest member in point of service, was given a 
great ovation. With lots of good food, good entertainment and good fellowship, 
everyone had a fine time. 

Fraternally yours, 

Banquet Committee. 



24 THE CARPENTER 

PHILADELPHIA LOCAL MARKS 45th BIRTHDAY 

The Editor: 

Hundreds of members, friends, and guests taxed the facilities of Town Hall, 
Philadelphia, to near capacity on the night of Saturday, April 19, when Local 
Union No. 1073 celebrated the Forty-fifth Anniversary of its organization. Guests 
from as far away as Chicago were on hand to help make the occasion a memorable 
one. All who attended were unanimous in the opinion that the affair was a 100% 
success. 

Representatives from the Metropolitan District Council and every one of the 
twenty-four affiliated unions were on hand to congratulate the officers and mem- 
bers of Local Union No. 1073. There were also visitors from New York and 
Newark and Passaic, New Jersey. Representatives from the Pennsylvania Building 
Trades Council, the Pennsylvania State Council of Carpenters, the Central Labor 
Union, the Pennsylvania State Federation and a good many local unions were also 
present. General Representative William O. Blaier acted as toastmaster and 
turned in a commendable performance. 

The history of Local Union No. 1073 is the history of an uphill fight by devoted 
and conscientious union men. In the years of mass immigration, hundreds of 
Jewish Carpenters fled their homelands to escape preju.Vlice and pogroms. Large 
numbers of them settled in Philadelphia. They found religious and political free- 
dom but they found no economic security. Hours were mercilessly long and wages 
were poor. Alone and friendless, they became victims of pitiless circumstances. 
But not for long. In 1902 they organized despite blacklists and employers' 
threats. Against all kinds of obstacles they continued to march forward. Down 
the years they have played an important part in the growth and progress of the 
United Brotherhood. 

Fraternally yours, 

Louis Biller, Secretary. 



L. U. 395 HOLDS SUCCESSFUL SPRING DANCE 

The Editor: 

, The annual Spring Entertainment and Dance of Local Union No. 39 7, Whitby, 
Ontario, is an affair eagerly looked forward to by members of the Union. This 
year the affair was held in Legion Hall and by any standards it was voted a great 
success by all who attended. 

The committee in charge arranged a splendid program. Committee Chairman 
Pogue acted as master of ceremonies for the evening and did a fine job. The 
first part of the program consisted of several numbers by the Carpenters' Orchestra. 
There were several western songs, comic songs and other thoroughly enjoyable 
selections. Lunch was served by the ladies and the remainder of the evening was 
devoted to old time and modern dancing. Proceeds derived from the evening's 
affair are to be devoted to buying prizes and providing refreshments for the annual 
picnic which will be held in July. 

Fraternally, 

E. R. Waines, Rec. Sec. 



MONTCLAIR LOCAL HONORS VETERANS 

To honor the ten members who served in the armed forces during the war and 
the thirty veterans who joined the Union since the end of hostilities, Local Union 
No. 429, Montclair, N. J., on the night of January 28 held a reception and get- 
together. Each veteran was presented with an emblem pin of our organization 
and the ten men who went into the armed forces while members were credited 
with a year's dues. 

The entertainment committee did a splendid job of providing refreshments 
and entertainment. The large number who attended thoroughly enjoyed the eve- 
ning from beginning to end. 



THE CARPENTER 25 

CHICAGO LOCAL CELEBRATES DIAMOND JUBILEE 

Marking the start of its seventy-fifth year of continuous existence as a labor 
organization, Local Union No. 1784, Chicago, on Saturday, May 10, celebrated its 
Diamond Jubilee with a banquet and social evening. Plates were laid for some 
925 members, guests and friends Avho were present at the history-making occasion. 
Special guests of the evening were M. J. Sexton, president, Chicago District Council; 
John R. Stevenson, Second General Vice-President; and Henry Weinreich, business 
Agent representing the St. Louis District Council. A particularly inspiring address 
was given by Brother Stevenson which everybody present took to heart. 

It was in 1874 — long before the International was born — that the Chicago 
men of the trade banded together for their mutual protection and advancement. 
One year later, when the International Furniture Workers Union was organized, 
this Local Union became a part of that organization. When on January 1, 18 9 6, 
the Furniture Workers and the Machine Woodworkers International consolidated 
to form the Amalgamated International, this Local Union became a part of it. 
Ten years later it was granted Charter No. 178 4 by the United Brotherhood and 
ever since it has played an- important roly in the affairs of the Brotherhood. It 
has always been in the vanguard in the never-ending fight for better wages and 
working conditions. 

Recently the Local Union lost three of its staunch and tried members: Brother 
Frank Geiger, Otto Yanjock and Oskar R. Markus. Through the years these men 
by precept and example inspired their fellow members and their passing will long 
be missed. 

With one of the longest and most honorable records of any affiliate of the 
United Brotherhood, Local Union No. 178 4 merits the good wishes of the entire 
Brotherhood for another seventy-five years of stellar service. 



MARION LOCAL BOASTS UNIQUE FATHER-SON TEAM 

Local 9 76 of Marion, Ohio, has a unique father-and-son team among its mem- 
bership. It consists of Howard C. Hull and his three sons, all of whom are mem- 
bers of the Local. Brother Hull was initiated into the Union on June 4, 19 42. 
Son Howard C. Hull, Jr., was initiated October 11, 1945; son Harold C. Hull was 
initiated on November 8, 1946; son William H. Hull was initiated on September 
12, 1946. Howard, Jr., and Harold are serving their apprenticeships and William 
is a Journeyman. The father, Howard C. Hull, Sr., is also instructor for the class 
of apprentices in their related work. 



CANNERY CARPENTERS RIDE IN STYLE 

Carpenters who headed north this year from Seattle to man the salmon can- 
neries in Alaska rode in style. In contrast to the ten-day trip by boat which can- 
nery carpenters had to undergo in previous years, this spring they flew to the fish- 
ing grounds in airplanes, thanks to a new schedule introduced by Alaska Airlines 
to accommodate cannery personnel exclusively. 

Not only are the cannery carpenters riding in style, but they are also working 
for greatly improved wages, according to word from Local Union No. 1184 of 
Seattle which dispatches most of the cannery carpenters north. Monthly wages this 
year are $362.00 and $382.00 instead of last year's $322.95 and $340.57. Over- 
time rates are also increased from $2.06 to $2.26. Board and room, as usual, are 
included from time of departure until time of return. In 1937 wages were $150.00 
and $165.00 per month; which means that pay for cannery carpenters has been 
more than doubled by Local Union No. 1184 in the past ten years. 

Salmon canneries dot the coast of Alaska clear up to Bristol Bay. The season 
varies according to location but generally speaking it extends from May until 
September. Millions upon millions of cases of choice salmon are packed annually. 




AVASHINGTON STATE COUNCIL MEETS 

The Washington State Council of Ladies Auxiliaries of Carpenters and Joiners 
met for their eighth annual Convention on April 3, 4, 5, 19 4 7 at Yakima, Wash. 
The Ladies Auxiliaries were invited to join the State Council of Carpenters 
at their opening ceremonies, after which we retired to our own meeting. 

The Ladies State Convention was opened by the State Secretary, Mrs. Stella 
Weick of Yakima, Washington, who welcomed all delegates and visitors, and 
turned the meeting over to our State President, Mrs. Gladys Wurman of Camas, 
Washington. 

Twenty-seven delegates and officers responded to roll call. 
We consist of eleven Auxiliaries to date. We were happy to welcome Wenatchee, 
Washington, Auxiliary into our group this year. They have just recently re- 
newed their charter and joined our State Auxiliary- 
One of the interesting and important items discussed at our convention was 
the Labor Legislation Laws, which we feel each individual interested in labor 
should understand. To acquaint all Auxiliaries with the problems on labor, a 
Legislative Chairman was appointed to study all new Laws and send a condensed 
report to all affiliated Auxiliaries. Mrs. Myrrha Croccar of Camas, Washington 
was appointed Chairman with Mrs. Ethel Abbot of Olympia assistant. 



POLSON, MONT., LADIES SPONSOR GRAND DINNER 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 435, Poison, Montana, on the night of December 21, 
sponsored a turkey dinner to which the members of Carpenters' Local Union No. 
6 70 and their families were invited. The evening was a grand success. Following 
a sumptuous dinner at which none of the trimmings that go with turkey was 
absent, a fine Christmas program was presented. The evening wound up with 
dancing and general sociability. By the time the last guest had departed the event 
was unanimously declared the unqualified success the sponsors hoped it would be. 
One hundred and sixteen guests attended. 



GLENDALE, ARIZONA, LADIES HELP MANY AVORTHY CAUSES 

The Editor: 

Carpenters' Ladies Auxiliary No. 40 7, Glendale, Arizona, sends greetings to our 
Sister Auxiliaries. Our Auxiliary is a little over four years old. We meet once a 
month, the first Friday, at the homes of members. 

Our social activities for the Auxiliary members have consisted of a dinner and 
theater party, a Christmas party with exchange of gifts, and after our business 
meetings we have a birthday party for the members whose birthdays are in that 
particular month. Then for Local No. 906 and their families we have sponsored a 
Halloween pot-luck supper, chili suppers, bunco parties, and a weiner roast. Also, 
we served dinner to members of the State Council of Carpenters of Arizona and 
their wives when they held a convention here. 

We have contributed to the Library Fund of the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners, the Community Chest, and the Northside Community Hos- 
pital which is going to be built here. We expect to do more for the hospital such as 
making and furnishing drapes, curtains, etc. 

We hope to keep our Auxiliary growing and wish to extend an invitation to 
any sister member to visit us. 

Fraternally yours, Isabelle Wilson, Secretary. 



THE CARPENTER 27 

VENTURA LADIES KEEP THINGS HUMMING 

We, The Ventura County, California, Carpenters Ladies Auxiliary No. 433 send 
greetings. 

Since our Auxiliary was organized, January 2 2, 19 45, we have held meetings 
twice a month with a record attendance, and now have 45 members in good 
standing. 

At the close of each meeting our husbands, whose meetings are held at the 
same time in an adjoining room, join us for refreshments. Our Refreshment Fund 
is kept replenished by a raffle at each meeting. We also have a Penny Drill, the 
proceeds used for a Flower and Card Fund in remembering our members and 
their families in time of illness or death. 

Our second Anniversary was celebrated with a Pot-Luck Dinner for our mem- 
bers and their husbands. Two long tables were laden with plenty of good home- 
cooked food which served about 75 people. Honored guests were Mr. and Mrs. 
Cliff Mace, Los Angeles, our Business Manager and wife. The Auxiliary presented 
corsages to Mrs. Mace; our past President, Mrs. Aline Aubert; and our presiding 
President, Mrs. Kaethe Woodruff. 

We welcome any and all Carpenter Auxiliary members to attend our meetings 
held each second Tuesday of the month at the Labor Temple, 34 No. Ventura 
Blvd., Ventura, 7:30 P.M. and each fourth Monday at the Civic Center Bldg., 7th 
and C Street, Oxnard, 7:30 P.M. 



MINNEAPOLIS AUXILIARY GROWING 

Hello Ladies! 

We enjoy reading your articles in "The Carpenter", so here we are with a few 
words from the Ladies Auxiliary 152 of the Carpenters' Local No. 7 in Minne- 
apolis. On March 25, 1947 we observed our 21st year with a large banquet. 
Almost 100 members and their husbands were present at the Floyd B. Olson 
Memorial Temple. A delicious chicken dinner was prepared and served by a 
caterer, so we were all queens for the evening. We were entertained by a pro- 
gram of character readings and a play presented by Mr. and Mrs. Peterson en- 
titled "Before Marriage". Our President, Marie Olson, called on various members 
for comments. Our Junior Past President, Selma Elifson, and our Senior Past 
President, Jennie Falk, spoke on our activities. During the 21 years we have 
been organized, we have been active in the Red Cross, Kenny Foundation, March 
of Dimes and the Cancer Drive. During the depression we had quite a drop in 
our membership, but now we are gaining and have so far this year initiated 15 
new members. 

On May 2 7 we are giving a card and bunco party. We hope to acquire quite 
a little money toward our Christmas party. Last year Local No. 7 was kind 
enough to pay all our expenses for the Christmas party. 



LAFAYETTE LADIES FORGE AHEAD 

The Editor: 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 462, of Carpenters' Local No. 215, Lafayette, Indiana, 
wishes to extend greetings to all sister Auxiliaries. We enjoy all the letters from 
our sister organizations and feel that we would like to tell a little about our newly 
organized Auxiliary. We have just been organized since last October, but we 
are very proud to report that we have 49 members. We meet the second and 
fourth Wednesdays at the Y. W. C. A. 

Even though we have not been organized very long, we feel that we have 
accomplished quite a little! We have donated to the Red Cross in cash, and have 
just finished some sewing for them. Have also donated to other worthwhile chari- 
ties. We send cards and flowers to sick members. Right now we are planning on 
bringing a little cheer to the members of the Children's Home, here in Lafayette. 

We have held one Bake Sale and Bazaar, as a money-making project, which 
gave our Treasury a great start. 

Our Carpenters' Local No. 215 has assisted us very much in getting started, 
which we greatly appreciate. Mrs. Harry Wingard, Rec .Sec'y. 

Mrs. Phillip Eylens, Pres. 



Craft ProblQms 



r~ 




Carpentry 

(Copyright 1S47) 

LESSON 226 
By H. H. Siegele 
The stairghtedge is an old but in- 
dispensable tool. It is closely related to 
the level, both in its construction and 
in the things for which it is used. Many 
straightedges have leveling and plurnb- 



".. ^ " 







■'! 




Fig. i 



ing devices attached to them, as we 
shall show by the illustrations. In fact, 
a level consists of just that. 

A straightedge should be made of 
rather light material that will hold its 
shape well. If the wood is treated so 
that it will not absorb moisture rapidly, 
the straightedge will give much longer 
and more reliable service. The edges 
should be perfectly square and jointed 



in such a manner that they will be 
absolutely straight from end to end. Be- 
sides that, care must be taken in making 
a straightedge with parallel edges, so 
that it will be the same in width 
throughout its length. To accomplish 
this, the material should be ripped out 
so that only a small amount of jointer 
work will be necessary to finish the 
edges. For the last few shavings the 
jointer should be set so it will cut a 
very thin shaving, and the jointing 
should be done with extreme care. A 
straightedge should not be considered 
finished until after it has been checked 
and tested thoroughly, and all imper- 
fections corrected. 

Fig. 1 shows to the left a light 
straightedge with a plumbing attach- 




Fig. 2 
ment fastened to it. At the center we 
have the same kind of a straightedge 
with a block at each end. The leveling 
and plumbing attachments are the same 
as those shown on the other straight- 
edge. To the right we have a detail of 
the upper end of a light straightedge, 
with the plumbing attachment installed. 
No attempt is being made to represent 
any particular make or design in show- 
ing these attachments. What we are 
showing should be considered as sym- 
bols rather than anything that can be 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



found on the market. The reason for 
this is that there are so many leveling 
and plumbing attachments of different 
designs, that the choice should be left 
entirely up to the workman. An impor- 
tant thing that should be mentioned is 




Fig. 3 
that the attachment should be housed 
into the straightedge, somewhat as we 
are showing by the drawings. Fasten- 
ing the attachment to the side impairs 
the straightedge's usefulness greatly. 
The glass should be open to view from 
both sides of the straightedge. 

Fig. 2 shows to the left a light 
straightedge with three attachments on 
it. The upper one is for plumbing, the 
bottom one is for leveling and the one 
between the two is set so that the 
straightedge will be on a 45-degree 
angle when the bubble centers. To the 




right we are showing by the heavy lines, 
a sample of what can be laid out with a 
straightedge that has the attachments 
set for leveling, plumbing and for the 
45-degree slant. Another sample is 
shown by Fig. 3. Here an octagon is 
laid off. The first operation is to strike 



a circle whose diameter is the distance 
across the octagon desired. Then pro- 
ceed by marking the octagon as shown, 
using the level, the 45-degree and the 
plumb attachments. The straightedge 
must contact the circle in each opera- 
tion, as shown by the heavy lines and 
the parts of straightedges. 

Fig. 4 shows drawings of straight- 
edges that are mostly used for leveling 
and for making long lines. The one at 
A has edges that are parallel. The ad- 
vantage of this straightedge is that a 
level can be placed on it anywhere, par- 
ticularly at the ends and center. This 



Fig. 5 

is not true of the straightedge shown 
at B. Here the leveling must be done 
by placing the level on the straightedge 
at the center. This design has two 
points in its favor: First, it is lighter 
than the one at A, and second, leveling 
from the center is usually more accu- 
rate than from the ends. However, if a 
straightedge is properly made and re- 
ceives the right care, it should give ac- 
curate results, regardless as to where 
the level is placed. At C we show a 
straightedge with a block at each end, 
and at D we have one with short legs. 
The blocks and legs are used to clear 
the straightedge when humps or other 
obstructions might be encountered. To 
the right are shown end views of the 
different straightedges shown by Fig. 4. 



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30 



THE CARPENTER 



Fig. 5 shows at the top a straight- 
edge with parallel edges and three level- 
ing attachments. These attachments 
make it possible to do the leveling at 
the ends or at the center. The center 
drawing shows a straightedge that tap- 
ers toward the ends, with a leveling 
attachment installed at the center. The 
same kind of straightedge is shown by 
the bottom drawing, but instead of a 




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leveling attachment, it has a handhold 
cut at the center. 

For convenience the drawing of the 
straightedge shown by Figs. 4 and 5, 
represent rather short straightedges. In 
practice such straightedges run all the 
the way from 10 feet long up to 20 




Fig. 6 

feet. The most commonly used length, 
however, is 16 feet. Those that are 
shorter or longer are usually made for 
some special purpose. 

Fig. 6 shows a line level in three 
different positions. At C the level is 
halfway between the ends of the line, 
and the bubble is at center. At L the 
level is at the left end of the line, 
and the bubble is to the left, while at 
R the level is at the right end of 
the line showing the bubble to the right. 




i i ii i i n i i n i 



Fig. 7 

It is obvious from these three examples, 
since the line is presumed to be the 
same in the three cases, that the only 
accurate leveling that can be done with 
a line level, is by placing the level half- 




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THE CARPENTER 



31 



way between the two end fastenings of 
the line. 

Fig. 7 shows a pocket level that can 
be attached to a steel square or to a 
small straightedge. This level gives ac- 
curate results. 

Fig. 8 is a drawing of a pocket level. 
This level is mostly used by inspectors, 
superintendents, contractors, and so 
forth, for checking on work, such as 
window stools, tables and many other 
things. If used with a good straight- 
edge it will give accurate results. 

There is no tool used by carpenters 
that is so ruthlessly abused as the 



Fig. 8 

straightedge. This is not true in all 
cases, but it is in many. A straightedge 
should have top-priority care — it should 
never be left out in the weather when 
not in use, but this writer has seen 
straightedges out in rain or shine, after 
which they were still expected to pro- 
duce accurate results. After a straight- 
edge has been watersoaked and warped 
by uneven drying out, even though it is 
rejointed, it will not stay that way until 
it is thoroughly dry and kept dry. On 
the other hand, a straightedge that is 
properly made and cared for will give 
good service over a long period of time, 
with little if any rejoi'nting. 



BAD PRACTICE 

Whenever a double mudsill is used in 
form building, it always indicates that 
the earth under it is not solid. There 
are different conditions of soil that 
make it advisable to use the double 
sill. 

Fig. 1 shows, at the top, a cross sec- 
tion of a double mudsill and the bottom 
end of a shore with the wedges in 
place. The y 8 -inch cross piece that is 
shown is too weak to carry the load, 
and when the concrete is poured, the 
pressure will effect the sill as indicated 
by the arrows. At the bottom we show a 
plan of the sill, in part, and the cross 
piece with the shore resting on it. 

Fig. 2 shows what happened to the 




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sill when the weight of the concrete 
came on it. At the top we have a cross 




section and at the bottom a plan. 

Fig. 3, at the top, shows a cross sec- 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



TWO AIDS FOR SPEED AND ACCURACY 




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THEY HAVE 

OUR CHART Blueprint 27" X 36" 

"The FRAMING SQUARE" (Chart) 

Explains tables on framing squares. Shows how 
to find lengths of any rafter and make its cuts; 
find any angle in degrees; frame any polygon 3 to 
16 sides, and cut its mitres; read board feet rafter 
and brace tables, octagon scale. Gives other valu- 
able information. Also includes Starting Key and 
Radial Saw Chart for changing pitches and cuts 
Into degrees and minutes. Every carpenter should 
have this chart. Now printed on both sides, makes about 
13 square feet of printed data showing squares full size. 
Price $1.00 postpaid, no stamps. 



SLIDE CALCULATOR for Rafters 



Makes figuring rafters a cinch! Shows the length of any 
rafter having a run of from 2 to 23 feet; longer lengths are 
found by doubling. Covers 17 different pitches. Shows lengths 
of hips and valleys, commons, jacks, and gives the cuts for 
each pitch, also the angle in degrees and minutes. Fastest 
method known, eliminates chance of error, so simple anyone 
who can read numbers can use it. NOT A SLIDE RULE but 
a Slide Calculator designed especially for Carpenters, Con- 
tractors and Architects. Thousands in use. Price $2.90 
postpaid. Check or M. 0., no stamps. 

MASON ENGINEERING SERVICE 

2105 N. Burdick St., Div. 7, Kalamazoo 81, Mich. 



tion of a double mudsill, but instead of 
a cross piece, it has a %-inch block 
placed under the shore in such a man- 
ner that the grain of the wood runs 
parallel with the sill. What will hap- 
pen when the concrete is poured is in- 
dicated by the arrows. 

At the bottom of Fig. 3 we show a 
cross section of a safe construction for 




Mit&MeNEW 



with 



It cuts a perfect row of new teeth on a handsaw 
in 3 minutes! (No need to grind off old teeth.) 
Saves time, relieves eyestrain, cuts filing time in 
half. You handle more customers and make more 
money. The Foley Ketoother is a marvel for re- 
conditioning all hand saws with broken or un- 
even teeth, or hollowed edge due to poor filing. 
Cuts 20 sizes of teeth from 4 to 16 points per 
inch on all cross-cut, rip, back, mitre-box and 
panel saws. Quickly pays for itself and earns 
extra profits for you. Immediate Delivery. Send 
coupon for circular. 



Minneapolis 18, Minn. 
Send full details on Foley Retoother 

Name 

Address 



a double mudsill. Here a cross piece 
1 % inches thick is used under the 




Fig. 2 




Fig. 3 

shore, which has enough strength to 
support the load. 



YOU CAN DO YOUR LEVEL BEST WITH 



STANLEY 




CHERRY LEVELS 




No. 23 Level is made of seasoned, kiln-dried cherry wood, 
sealed against moisture. Its six "Cat's Eye" glasses are 
fully adjustable in pairs at any point of the circle, any 
angle desired, or for degree of pitch to the foot. Dust-tight, 
water-tight cases — adjustment protected by fixed cover 

plate so glasses remain true against accidental blows. Ask for Stanley 

Cherry Levels and other Stanley Tools by name. 

STANLEY TOOLS, 163 Elm St., New Britain, Conn. 



THE TOOL BOX 



[STANLEY] 



OF THE WORLD 



Trade MarK 



HARDWARE- HAND TOOLS '• ELECTRIC TOOLS 



SAVE TIME 



SAVE EFFORT 



with these 
Automatic Tools 



Use Millers Falls automatic 
drills and screw drivers to save 
time, effort and to do better 
work. The automatic drill drills 
eight different sized holes 
quickly and easily in wood, soft 
metals, wall board, plaster, etc. 
The automatic screw driver 
drives or draws screws, acts as 
a right- or left-hand ratchet or 
as a rigid screw driver. Both of 
these sturdy, smooth-acting 
tools carry the Millers Falls 
trademark, your assurance of 
quality. 

MILLERS FALLS COMPANY 
Greenfield, Massachusetts 
One Thing in Common — QUALITY ! 



MILLERS FALLS 

TOOLS 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 




Inside Trade Information Ons 

How to use the steel 9quare — How to 61e and set 
eaws— How to build furniture — How to use a 
mitre box — How to use the chalk line— How to uso 
rules and scales — How to make joints — Carpenters 
arithmetic — Solving mensuration problems — -Es- 
timating strength of timbers — How to set girders 
end sills — How to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs — How to build houses, barns, gar- 
ages, bungalows, etc. — How to read and draw 
plans— Drawing up specifications — How to ex- 
cavate—How to use settings 12. 13 and 17 on the 
steel square — How to build hoists and scaffolds- 
skylights — How to build stairs— How to put on 
interior trim — How to hang doors — How to lath- 
lay floors— How to paint 



Inalde Trade Information 
for Carpenters. Builders. Join- 
ers. Building Mechanics and 
all Woodworkers. These 
Guides give. you the short-cut 
instructions that you want— 
including new methods, ideas, 
solutions, plans, systems and 
money saving suggestions. An 
easy progressive course for the 
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Quick Reference for tho master 
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as a Helping Hand to Easier 
Work. Better Work and Bet- 
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In ' «nd mail the FREE COU- 
PON below. 




THEO. AU DEL & CO., 49 W. 23rd St., New York City 



Ma3 Audels Carpente 

I will remit Jl in 7 days. I .._, 

No obligation unlets I am satisfied. 



Name... 
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Occupation. 
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CAR 



ATKINS 

"^£* £%e* SAWS 





,_ , I do, s °° . 
* Y * I We h*> ,h ' S . 

Atkins fo' » 



Sure — the care a user gives a saw has a lot 
to do with saw life. But equally important 
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of a saw. In the case of Atkins Saws, 
perfect balance and correct design, / 
rugged blades of special tempered / 
"Silver Steel" keener teeth that stretch / 
the time between filings — are all 
results of painstaking attention to 
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penters rate an Atkins the easiest 
handling, fastest and freest cut- 
ting saw — the saw to depend 
on for finest finished work. It's 
also why so many veteran 
craftsmen are still using 
Atkins Saws bought when 
they first entered their 
chosen trades. 





mmm 







WW 

mi i H 



E . C. ATKINS AND COMPANY 

Home Office and Factory: 402 S. Illinois Street, Indianapolis 9, Indiana 

Branch Factory: Portland, Oregon 

Branch Offices : Atlanta • Chicago • Memphis • New Orleans • New York • San Franciso 



THE CARPENTER'S FRIEND FOR 90 YEARS 



CARPENTER 




FOUNDED 1881 



Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 




AUGUST, 1947 



AIR FORCE DAY - AUGUST 1 




IS PEACE POWER 



No nation devoid of aggressive aspirations 
ever shortened a peace or lengthened a war 
by being prepared. 




FOR THIS T1MESAVING 
WOODWORKING TOOL 




• This easy-reading GREENLEE 
HANDY CALCULATOR swiftly solves 
your woodworking problems. Just 
set the dial- convert linear feet to 
board feet; get slope per foot in de- 
grees; compare hardness, weights, 
shrinkage, warping and working 
ease of various woods. More, too: 
bit sizes for head, body, thread of 
screws; nail specifications; tool 
sharpening hints, protractor. 6' 
diameter, fits your tool kit. Heavily 
varnished cardboard Special offer. 
Order now, send 10<t (not stamps) 
in next mail Greenlee Tool Co., 
2088 Columbia Ave., Rockford, III. 





This "Greyhound" hand saw is a direct 
descendant of the pioneer "George H. 
Bishop" line started almost a century ago. 
Improvements have been made constantly 
with new designs to meet the requirements 
of carpenters on the job. Better steels now 
give improved cutting edge and longer 
sharpness life. Job-tested through the years 
to bring you a better hand saw. 

OMEN-BISHOP 



906 Ingleside Ave. 



Columbus, Ohio 



LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your own busi- 
ness and be your own boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 

Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $5.00, 
and pay the balance of $25.00 at $5.00 per 
month, making a total of $30.00 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name and address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building C, Denver 2, Colorado 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street. Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established in 1SS1 

Vol. LXVII — No. S 



INDIANAPOLIS, AUGUST, 1947 



One Dollar Per Tear 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Co nt ent s — 



No Compromise with Slavery 



In no uncertain terms the American Federation of Labor pledges itself to a 
fight-to-the-finish against discriminatory provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act. 
At a special conference called for the purpose of studying the Act, representa- 
tives from every affiliate of the Federation unanimously adopted a strong dec- 
laration calling for nothing less than repeal of the measure. 



Today's House Still a Bargain 



10 



Despite the fact that the cost of building a home is considerably higher 
today than it was before the war, facts and figures show that today's house is 
still a comparative bargain. 



The Hard Road Back 



14 



Two and a half years after V-E Day, Europe is still floundering around des- 
perately in an effort to rehabilitate itself. Against all sorts of shortages and 
handicaps, the building trades and woodworking trades of the continent are 
slowly but surely showing a few encouraging signs of regeneration. 



Is the Modern Worker Happy? 



19 



The last hundred years have seen a great change in the status of the average 
worker. He has gained much in the way of material things but he has also lost 
a few things in the way of personal satisfaction. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
Plane Gossip 
Editorials - 

Official 

Ln Memoriam 

Correspondence 

To the Ladies 

Craft Problems 



12 
16 
22 
23 
24 
25 

57 



Lndex to Advertisers 



29 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22. 1915. at IXDIAXAPOLIS. IXB.. as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress. Auz. 24. 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103. act of October 3, 1917. authorized on July 8. 1918. 



NO COMPROMISE WITH SLAVERY 



* * * 

NO compromise, no surrender, no retreat ! 
In one short phrase that summarizes the answer of the American 
Federation of Labor to the passage of the discriminatory Taft- 
Hartley Bill. Meeting in Washington, D. C, on July 9, representatives 
from virtually every organization affiliated with the Federation discussed 
and assayed the anti-labor law paragraph by paragraph. The evils and 
injustices contained in the act were exposed. The portions that endanger 
collective bargaining and hold the axe of government interference over 
the head of harmonious industrial relations were uncovered. In the end, 
the conference of Federation affiliates appointed a sub-committee to draw 
up a declaration of principles for 



the guidance of all organizations 
connected with the Federation. 

The six-man sub-committee, con- 
sisting of Matthew Woll, president, 
George Meany, secretary, William 
L. Hutcheson, Daniel J. Tobin, 
David Dubinsky, and Bill Green, 
after considerable study, presented 
a vigorous and clear-cut statement 
for the approval of the conference. 
In no uncertain terms the confer- 
ence as a whole voted its approval 
of the statement. Herewith we re- 
print it in full : 

A strong moving desire on the 
part of working men and women 
for the realization of higher stand- 
ards of living has served to estab- 
lish and stimulate the growth and 
expansion of labor unions. The pro- 
gress and development of labor un- 
ions have run parallel to the steady 
ever increasing demand of the 
workers for higher wages, improved 
conditions of employment, security 
and social justice. 

Time and experience have shown 
that the labor union is the instru- 
mentality which serves to promote 
the economic, social and industrial 
welfare of the workers everywhere. 



Even non-union workers have been 
the beneficiaries of the gains made 
by the organized labor movement. 

The organization of working men 
and women means the mobilization 
of their economic strength so that 
they may substitute collective ac- 
tion for individual action. The ma- 
terial, educational and cultural well- 
being of all classes of people de- 
pend upon an adequate financial in- 
come. To workers that means wages 
high enough to enable them to main- 
tain themselves in decency and com- 
fort and to establish a standard of 
living commensurate with the re- 
quirements of American citizenship. 

This is a noble objective. It 
squares with the American way 
of life. Workers everywhere 
should be encouraged, not hampered 
or hindered in their efforts to real- 
ize such a high and lofty purpose. 
Such an economic and social order 
would serve to perpetuate our free 
democratic form of government, to 
prevent the spread of Communism, 
or the acceptance of any totalitarian 
philosophy and to serve as a guar- 
antee of the preservation of our free 
enterprise system. 



THE CARPENTER 



Apparently the authors and sup- 
porters of the Taft-Hartley anti- 
labor law ignored all these facts. 
Their actions must be interpreted 
as meaning that strong serviceable 
labor unions must not be permitted 
to exist within our economic and 
social life, that only weak and im- 
potent unions shall be allowed to 
survive and that labor may have a 
shadow of a labor movement but 
not the substance. 

This fact is reflected in every 
word, line, sentence and paragraph 
of the notorious Taft-Hartley Law. 
It seeks to weaken, render impotent 
and destroy labor unions. It does so 
by striking a vital blow at free col- 
lective bargaining and substitutes 
a process of government domination 
over employer-employe relation- 
ship. The negotiations of closed 
shop agreements are forbidden and 
the regulations, limitations and pre- 
scribed methods which must be fol- 
lowed regarding union membership 
are all designed to make it impos- 
sible for labor unions to live and 
function effectively. 

In addition to the classification of 
Unfair Labor Practices in this Act, 
some stated and others vague, which 
employers may charge against labor 
unions, the Act provides that dam- 
age suits may be instituted for al- 
leged violation of contracts and 
there is re-established the abhor- 
rent principle and practice of gov- 
ernment by injunction. The purpose 
of those who supported the Taft- 
Hartley Act to effectively destroy 
labor unions, is made crystal clear 
in thi-s provision of it. 

The revision and reconstruction 
of the National Labor Relations 
Board has created confusion and 
uncertainty. Its • real meaning will 
never be clearly understood until it 
has been defined by the courts. Em- 



ployers and employes will" vehe- 
mently differ as to the real mean- 
ing of the provisions of the revised 
and newly created National Labor 
Relations Board. All of this will 
serve to promote strife between em- 
ployers and employes — the expendi- 
tures of large sums of money in 
court proceedings and a woeful 
lack of cooperation between man- 
agement and labor. President Tru- 
man emphasized this fact in his 
veto message when he stated: 

"The National Labor Relations 
Act would be converted from an 
instrument with the major purpose 
of protecting the right of workers 
to organize and bargain collective- 
ly into a maze of pitfalls and com- 
plex procedures. As a result of these 
complexities employers and work- 
ers would find new barriers to mu- 
tual understanding. 

"The bill time and again would 
remove the settlement of difference 
from the bargaining table to courts 
of law. Instead of learning to live 
together employers and unions are 
invited to engage in costly, time- 
consuming litigation, inevitably em- 
bittering both parties." 

Here the President set forth in 
simple language the evils of the 
new National Relations Board and 
the great dis-service to human rela- 
tions in industry which is bound to 
follow the enforcement of said 
amended National Labor Relations 
Act. Because the amendments to 
the National Labor Relations Act, 
as set forth in the Taft-Hartley Bill, 
are susceptible to varied interpre- 
tations and are confusing to the 
highest degree,we would prefer no 
National Labor Relations Board 
to the National Labor Relations 
Board with its administrative au- 
thority as set forth in the Taftn 
Hartley Law. 



THE CARPENTER 



5 



The Taft-Hartley Laws is filled 
with "Thou Shall Nots" or "Thou 
Must" to the officers and members 
of labor unions. The supporters of 
the Taft-Hartley Law virtually de- 
clare "Labor Unions must be made 
weak and ineffective." Their ability 
to serve working people, to preserve 
economic freedom and to establish 
higher standards of living for the 
wage earners of the nation must be 
limited and denned." 

The provision of the Taft-Hart- 
ley Bill which provides that it 
shall be unlawful for any labor or- 
ganization to make a contribution 
or expenditure in connection with 
the election of Members of Con- 
gress, strikes a vital blow at free- 
dom of speech and freedom of 
press. This section must be inter- 
preted as meaning that the support- 
ers of the Taft-Hartley Bill sought 
to make it a crime for labor to exer- 
cise the right of freedom of the 
press and freedom of speech in 
order to prevent them from being 
re-elected to Congress. 

The vicious feature of this sec- 
tion is reflected in the fact that it 
provides any officer of a labor or- 
ganization or any labor organiza- 
tion which exercises the right of 
freedom of speech or freedom of the 
press in opposing a Member of 
Congress who voted for the Taft- 
Hartley Bill for re-election, shall 
be guilty of a criminal offense, pun- 
ishable by a fine or imprisonment 
or both. Here in this section is 
reflected the hatred of Members of 
Congress toward labor unions and 
their fixed bitter determination to 
destroy them if possible. 

The National Association of Man- 
ufacturers and other employer or- 
ganizations may function and serve 
their respective memberships with- 
out any substantial interference on 



the part of government. They are 
practically free from legislative re- 
straints and limitations. The attor- 
neys who serve the National Asso- 
ciation of Manufacturers and who 
prepared and wrote the Taft-Hart- 
ley Bill saw to it that their clients 
were exempt from many of the pro- 
visions of the Act to which unions 
and their members are subjected. 

The Taft-Hartley Act is a strike 
and strife-provoking act. It should 
be properly classified as such. It 
will serve to prevent the workers 
from agreeing to incorporate a no 
strike pledge in written contracts. 
It means the end of sound labor 
management relations and the sub- 
stitution therefor of distrust, sus- 
picion and class hatred. 

And now the representatives of 
seven million, five hundred thou- 
sand members of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, after giving sol- 
emn consideration to all the facts 
herein stated, the provisions of the 
Taft-Hartley Act 'and its legal anal- 
ysis prepared by the Legal Depart- 
ment of the American Federation of 
Labor, herewith declare that the 
following be our pledge and un- 
compromising purpose : 

i — Because we believe many of 
the provisions of the Taft-Hartley 
Bill are unconstitutional, we will 
challenge the validit}^ of said sec- 
tions in the courts. In doing so, we 
shall avail ourselves of the oppor- 
tunity to appeal in accordance with 
court procedure to the Supreme 
Court of the United States. We 
shall exhaust every legal recourse 
at our command in the efforts we 
put forth to test the validity of 
this Act. 

2 — The repeal of this notorious 
legislation shall be our fixed objec- 
tive. We shall never be reconciled 
to the acceptance of this legisla- 



THE CARPENTER 



tion. We shall oppose it — fight it 
at every step and every opportunity 
— until we succeed in our efforts to 
bring about its repeal. Our action 
in this respect will be based upon 
the fact that we regard the Taft- 
Hartley Bill as a slave measure, 
un-American, vicious and destruc- 
tive to labor's constitutional rights. 

3 — We will organize, unite and 
concentrate our efforts toward 
bringing about the defeat of every 
member of Congress for re-election 
who voted in favor of final enact- 
ment of the Taft-Hartley Bill. 

4 — To protect our organizations 
against possible suits for damages 
and other vexations and destructive 
litigation under this law it is recom- 
mended that no-strike provisions 
be omitted from all future agree- 
ments, written or oral. 

5— In order that the workers of 
the Nation may be accorded a full 
and complete opportunity to vote in 
national elections we recommend 
that our organizations set aside this 
day as a holiday to be devoted sole- 
ly to election purposes. 

6— We recommend that the Ex- 
ecutive Council of the American 
Federation of Labor give full and 
complete consideration to the dec- 
larations of this conference and in 
addition prepare for consideration 
by the next Convention of the 
American Federation of Labor a 
program giving full effect to these 
purposes. 

This, then, is the answer of the 
American Federation of Labor to 
the Taft-Hartley measure. As the 
statement points out, the most effi- 
cient avenue of self-betterment 
open to American workers is union- 
ism. Nothing must be allowed to 
abridge or interfere with the right 
of workers to join unions of their 
own choosing. 



more 1m- 
the lives 
than the 



It is the considered opinion of 
this journal that American workers 
have a right to know how those who 
represent them in Congress conduct 
themselves on matters pertaining to 
the common welfare. No measure 
coming before Congress since De- 
cember, 1941, has had a 
portant bearing on 
of the common people 
Taft-Hartley Bill. Therefore, not 
since 1941 has it been so important 
that the people know where and 
how their representatives voted on 
the Taft-Hartley Bill when the 
chips were down. Herewith we re- 
print the House and Senate voting 
records on the Taft-Hartley Bill 
when that measure came back to 
Congress after the President's veto : 

SENATE 

For Overriding the Veto — 68 

Republicans— 48 



AIKEN 

BALDWIN 

BALL 

BREWSTER 

BRICKER 

BRIDGES 

BROOKS 

BUCK 

BUSHFIELD 

BUTLER 

CAIN 

CAPEHART 

CAPPER 

COOPER 

CORDON 

DONNELL 

DWORSHAK 

ECTON 

FERGUSON 

FLANDERS 

GURNEY 

HAWKES 

HICKENLOOPER 

IVES 



JENNER 
KEM 

KNOWLAND 
LODGE 

McCarthy 

MARTIN 

MILLIKIN 

MOORE 

REED 

REVERCOMB 

ROBERTSON (Wyo) 

SALTONSTALL 

SMITH 

TAFT 

THYE 

TOBEY 

VANDENBERG 

WATKINS 

WHERRY 

WHITE 

WILEY 

WILLIAMS 

WILSON 

YOUNG 



BYRD 

CONNALLY 

EASTLAND 

ELLENDER 

FULBRIGHT 

GEORGE 

HATCH 

HOEY 

HOLLAND 

MAYBANK 



Democrats — 20 

McCLELLAN 

McKELLAR 

O'CONNOR 

O'DANIEL 

OVERTON 

ROBERTSON 

RUSSELL 

STEWART 

TYDINGS 

UM STEAD 



(Va.) 



Against Overriding the Veto — 25 
Republicans — 3 

MORSE 



LANGER 
MALONE 



THE CARPENTER 



Democrats — 22 

BARKLEY McCARRAN 

CHAVEZ McFARLAND 

DOWNEY McGRATH 

GREEN McMAHON 

HAYDEN MURRAY 

HILL MYERS 
JOHNSON (Colo.) O'MAHONEY 

JOHNSTON (S. C.) PEPPER 

KILGORE SPARKMAN 

LUCAS • TAYLOR 

MAGNUSON THOMAS (Okla.) 

Senators Wagner and Elbert D. 
Thomas did not vote but were an- 
nounced as being against overriding. 
Senator Wagner was prevented from 
voting by illness and Senator Thomas 
was in Geneva, Switzerland, attending 
the International Labor Conference. 

HOUSE 

For Overriding the Veto 





Alabama 


ANDREWS 


JARMAN 


BATTLE 


JONES 


BOYKIN 


MANASCO 


GRANT 


RAINS 


HOBBS 






Arkansas 


CRAVENS 


MILLS 


GATHINGS 


NORRELL 


HARRIS 


TRIMBLE 


HAYS 






California 


ALLEN 


HINSHAW 


ANDERSON 


JACKSON 


BRADLEY 


JOHNSON 


BRAMBLETT 


LEA 


ELLIOTT 


McDONOUGH 


ENGLE 


NIXON 


GEARHART 


PHILLIPS 


FLETCHER 


POULSON 




Colorado 


CHENOWETH 


ROCKWELL 


HILL 






Connecticut 


FOOTE 


PATTERSON 


LODGE 


SHADLAK 


MILLER 


SEELEY-BROWN 




Delaware 


BOGGS 






Florida 


HENDRICKS 


ROGERS 


PETERSON 


SIKES 


PRICE 


SMATHERS 




Georgia 


BROWN 


PRESTON 


CRAMP 


VINSON 


COX 


WHEELER 


DAVIS 


WOOD 


PACE 






Idaho 


GOPF 


SANBORN 




Dlinois 


ALLEN 


MASON 


ARENDS 


McMILLEN 


BUSBEY 


OWENS 


CHIPERFIEDD 


REED 


CHURCH 


SIMPSON 


CLIPPINGER 


AL STRATTON 


DIRKSEN 


TWYMAN 


HOWELL 


VAIL 


JENISON 


VURSELL 


JOHNSON 







Indiana 


GILLIE 

GRANT 

HALLECK 

HARNESS 

JOHNSON 


LANDIS 
MITCHELL 
SPRINGER 
WILSON 




Iowa 


CUNNINGHAM 
GWYNNE 

HOEVEN 

JENSEN , 


LeCOMPTE 

MARTIN 

TALLE 




Kansas 


COLE 
HOPE 
MEYER 


REES 

SCRIVENER 

SMITH 




Kentucky 


CHAPMAN 

CHELF 

GREGORY 


MEADE 

MORTON 

ROBISON 




Ivouisiana 


ALLEN 
BOGGS 
BROOKS 
DOMENGEAUX 


HEBERT 

LARCADE 

PASSMAN 




Maine 


FELLOWS 
HALE 


SMITH 




Maryland 


BEALL 

FALLON 

MEADE 


MILLER 
SASSCER 


Massachusetts 


BATES 
CLASON 
GOODWIN 
HERTER 


HESSELTON 

ROGERS 

WIGGLESWORTH 




Michigan 


BLACKNEY 

COFFIN 

CRAWFORD 

DONDERO 

ENGEL 

HOFFMAN 


JONKMAN 

MICHENER 

SHAFER 

WOLCOTT 

WOODRUFF 

YOUNGBLOOD 




Minnesota 


ANDERSON 
ANDRESEN 
DEVITT 
HAGEN 


JUDD 
KNUTSON 

MacKINNON 
O'HARA 




Mississippi 


ABERNATHY 

COLMER 

RANKIN 


WHITTEN 

WHITTINGTON 

WILLIAMS 




Missouri 


ARNOLD 

BAKEWBLL 

BANTA 

BELL 

BENNETT 

COLE 


PLOESER 

REEVES 

SCHWABE 

SHORT 

ZIMMERMAN 




Montana 


D'EWART 






Nebraska 


BUFFETT 
CURTIS 


MILLER 

STEFAN 




Nevada 


AL RUSSELL 




N 


ew Hampshire 


COTTON 


MERROW 



New Jersey 

AUCHINCLOSS KEAN 

CANFIELD MATTHEWS 

CASE SUNDSTROM 

EATON THOMAS 

HAND TOWE 

HARTLEY WOLVERTON 



THE CARPENTER 





New Mexico 




Vermont 


AL FERNANDEZ 


AL PLUMLEY 






New York 




Virginia 


ANDREWS 
BUCK 


LEFEVRE 
MACY 


ALMOND 
BLAND 


HARDY 
HARRISON 


COLE 
COUDERT 


McMAHON 
NODAR 


DREWERY 
GARY 


SMITH 

STANLEY 


ELSAESSER 
GAMBLE 


POTTS 
REED 




"Washington 


GWINN 


RIEHLMAN 


HOLMES 


HORAN 


HALL, E. A. 
HALL. L. W. 


ROSS 

ST. GEORGE 




"W. Virginia 


KEARNEY 


TABER 


ELLIS 


ROHRBOUGH 


KEATING 


TAYLOR 


LOVE 


SNYDER 


KILBURN 
LATHAM 


WADSWORTH 




Wisconsin 




No. Carolina 


BYRNES 
DAVIS 


MURRAY 
O'KONSKI 


BARDEN 


DOUGHTON 


KEEFE 


SMITH 


BONNER 


DURHAM 


KIRSTEN 


STEVENSON 


BUL WINKLE 


JONES 






CLARK 


KERR 




Wyoming 


COOLEY 


REDDEN 


AL BARRETT 




DEANE 










No. Dakota 




HOUSE 


AL ROBERTSON 








Ohio 


For Sustaining the Vetc 


AL BENDER 


HESS 






BOLTON 


JENKINS 




Arizona 


BREHM 


JONES 


AL HARLESS 


AL MURDOCK 


BROWN 


LEWIS 






BURKE 


McCOWEN 




California 


CARSON 


McGregor 


DOUGLAS 


MILLER 


CLEVENGER 


RAMEY 


HAVENNER 


SHEPPARD 


ELSTON 


VORYS 


HOLIFIELD 


WELCH 


GRIFFITHS 


WEICHEL 


KING 






Oklahoma 




Colorado 


ALBERT 


RIZLEY 


CARROLL 




MOXRONEY 
PEDEN 


SCHWABE 
STIGLER 


LANHAM 


Georgia 




Oregon 




Illinois 


ELLSWORTH 


STOCKMAN 


BISHOP 


O'BRIEN 


NORBLAD 




DAWSON 


PRICE 


CHADWICK 


Pennsylvania 

KUNKEL 


GORDON 
GORSKI 


SABATH 


CORBETT 


MALONEY 




Indiana 


CROW 


McCONNELL 


MADDEN 




DAOUE 


Mcdowell 




Kentucky 


FENTON 


McGARVEY 




FULTON 


MUHLENBERG 


BATES 


SPENCE 


GALLAGHER 


RICH 


CLEMENTS 




GAVIN 


SARBACHER 




Louisiana 


GILLETTE 


SCOBLICK 




GRAHAM 


SCOTT. HARDIE 


MORRISON 




GROSS 


SCOTT. HUGH 




Massachusetts 


JENKINS 
KEARNS 


SIMPSON 
TIBBOTT 


DONOHUE 


McCORMICK 






KENNEDY 


PHILBIN 




So. Carolina 


LANE 




BRYSON 


RILEY 




Michigan 


DORN 


RIVERS 


DINGELL 


SADOWSKE 


RICHARDS 




LESINSKI 






So. Dakota 




Minnesota 


CASE 


MUNDT 


BLATNIK 


Missouri 




Tennessee 


CANNON 


KARSTEN 


COOPER 
COURTNEY 


GORE 
JENNINGS 




Montana 


DAVIS 


MURRAY 


MANSFIELD 




EVINS 


PRIEST 




New Jersey 




Texas 


HART 


NORTON 


BECKWORTH 


MAHAN 




New York 


BURLSON 


PICKETT 




FISHER 


POAGE 


BLOOM 


KLEIN 


GOSSETT 


TEAGUE 


BUCKLEY 


LYNCH 


JOHNSON 


WEST 


BUTLER 


MARCANTONK 


KILDAY 


WILSON 


BYRNE 


O'TOOLE 


LUCAS 


WORLEY 


CELLER 


PFEIFER 


LYLE 




DELANEY 


RABIN 




Utah 


HEFFERNAN 


RAYFIEL 




JAVITS 


ROONEY 


DAWSON 




KEOGH 


SOMERS 



THE CARPENTER 





No. Carolina 


FOLGBR 






North Dakota 


AL LAMKB 






Ohio 


GROSSER 
FBIGHAN 


HUBER 
KIRWAN 




Oklahoma 


JOHNSON 


MORRIS 




Oregon 


ANGELL 






Pennsylvania 


BUCHANAN 
EBERHARTEB 


MORGAN 
WALTER 




Rhode Island 


FOGARTY 


FORAND 




Tennessee 


PHILLIPS 






Texas 


RAYBURN 
THOMAS 


THOMASON 




Utah 


GRANGER 






Virginia 


FLANNAGAN 






Washington 


JACKSON 
JONES 


tolleFson 




W. Virginia 


HEDRICK 


KEE 




Wisconsin 


BROPHY 


HULL 



HOUSE 

Paired For Overriding the Veto 
Iowa 



DOLLIVER 
VANZANDT 



Pennsylvania 



HOUSE 

Paired Against Overriding the Veto 
Tennessee 



KEFAUVER 



GIFFORD 
AL LUSK 
WINSTED 
FULLER 

SMITH 
KELLEY 

McMillan 

COMBS 
MANSFIELD 



HOUSE 
Not Voting 

Massachusetts 

MARTIN 

New Mexico 
Mississippi 

New York 

POWELL 

Ohio 
Pennsylvania 
South Carolina 

Texas 

PATMAN 



Hail Carpenters Hall 



Editor's note : Because the shortage of paper restricts so drastically the number of pages we 
can publish in each issue, it has been necessary to dispense with publishing the many poems sent 
in by our readers. However, the following contribution by Brother Albert V. Horner of Local 
No. 2164, San Francisco, is so meritorious that not to publish would be a distinct loss. 

The Carpenter 

Dear Sirs and Brothers: 

I so thoroughly enjoyed the flawless, brief article "Where Liberty 
Echoed" on page five of your July issue of The Carpenter that, after read- 
ing it three times, I was inspired to venture to submit the following 
verse : 

Hail Philadelphia! So honored the source, 
Destiny chose is pursuing her course, 
Crowning with glory the Carpenter Trade 

More than a century and a decade, 
Hail to that bastion immortals trod, 

Fashioning Freedom while trusting in God. 
Sacred that symbol, revered by us all, 
Cradle of Liberty — Carpenters Hall. 

Albert V. Horner 
Local Union No. 2164, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



10 



Today's House Is ^4 Bargain 



DURING the past few years there has been a tremendous amount 
of varied and confusing propaganda about housing and housing 
costs. "While there is no denying the fact that house building 
costs have increased materially in the last twenty-four months, a sane 
analysis of facts shows that house costs are not out of line with the general 
inflationary trend which has affected our entire economy. In fact, figures 
show that houses still remain among the cheapest of commodities in spite 
of price tags that sometimes look startling. 

The above applies, of course,, to newly built houses only. There has 
been a tremendous increase in the sales price of second hand houses. 
Since these houses have mostly been built from ten to twenty years, the 
inflation in price is no way related to building costs. The added price 
represents nothing more or less than the owners desire to make a killing 
while the seller's market is in existence. It is when considering the price 
tag that adorns the new house of today in relation to other prices and the 
earnings of all workers today that the fact emerges that houses are still 
comparative bargains. 

William C. Sterner, a fair contractor in upper Xew York State and 
one time president and member of Local Union Xo. 493, Mount Vernon, 
dfgs up some interesting figures on this subject. As a man who has fol- 
lowed the building trade all his life as both worker and contractor. Mr. 
Sterner speaks with real authority. In an article entitled '"The House — 
The Cheapest Necessity" he shoots some of the propaganda surrounding 
housing costs as full of holes as a Swiss cheese. Since the article speaks 
for itself, we are herewith reprinting it: 

***** 

"In comparing the rise in various wage scales since 1939 and the rise 
in various commodity prices over the same period, two interesting facts 
are brought to light. First, the house is one of the necessities of life 
showing the least increase in price in the last eight years on a percentage 
basis comparison. Second, the building trades mechanic who does the 
erecting of the house is less able to buy the house he builds than any other 
tradesman or professional man when 1939 and 1947 incomes and prices 
are compared. 

"Even with the recent rise in home costs, the general public is now in 
a better position to buy a home than it was in 1939 with the lower prices 
that prevailed at that time. 

"A house costing $10,000 to build in 1939 costs approximately $14,800 
to build today. In the following table, the wages of various types of 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



income earners are compared and set against comparative building- costs 
for the two years. I believe the figures speak for themselves. Although 
the carpenter is the only building mechanic in the table, he is representa- 
tive of all building tradesmen. His is the plight of all building tradesmen. 

"This table indicates how much earning capacity each class of worker 
would have to barter to buy a $10,000 house in 1939, and how much 
he would have to invest today to buy the same house at the advanced price 
of $14,8000. 



To Buy A $10,000 House 
in 1939. 

A Carpenter worked 817 days 

A School Teacher, Policeman 
or average city employee 
worked 6 years 

A Domestic Worker worked 
3,600 days 

A Farm Hand worked 300 
months 

A Factory Worker worked 
2,000 days 

The Farmer had to produce 
the following: 

22,000 bushels corn 
or 

32,000 bushels oats 
or 

12,000 bushels wheat 
or 

100,000 lbs. cotton 
or 

140,000 lbs. pork 



To Buy A $14,800 

in 1947. Net Savings 

Now works 880 days or 63 days more today 



Now works 4 years 

Now works 2,600 days 

Now works 164 
months 

Now works 1,400 
days 

Now has to produce 
only the following: 

12,000 bushels corn 
20,000 bushels oats 
7,000 bushels wheat 
56,000 lbs. cotton 
64,000 lbs. pork 



or 2 years less today 

or 1,000 days less today 

or 13 6 months less today 

or 600 days less today 

Saves: 

or 10,000 bshls less 

or 12,000 bshls less 

or 5,000 bshls less 

or 44,000 lbs. less 

or 76,000 lbs. less 



"From the above one can readily see that the house is one of the cheap- 
commodities on the market today." 



A look at a few figures covering building material prices and building 
trades wages soon shows why the carpenter is less able to buy a house at 
today's prices than almost any other worker. In the first place, building 
material costs have advanced much more than building trades wages. The 
price asked for lumber — the largest single building material item in the 
average modest home — has increased by practically 190% according to 
F. W. Dodge Corporation and other financial analyists. By comparison, 
carpenters' wages on a nationwide basis haA^e increased by an average of 
only forty per cent. Most other wages have increased much more rapidly. 
These are the things that reflect the disadvantage of the building trades 
worker in today's inflationary economic setup, as indicated by Mr. Ster- 
ner's table. 




MAKE HASTE SLOWLY 

As this is being written, Congress is 
still tackling the problems of cutting 
down Federal expenditures and reduc- 
ing taxes. Ever since Congress convened 
shortly after the first of the year, tax 
legislation has been given more batting 
around than a two-bit baseball at a 
boys' Sunday School picnic. At this 
point the score still reads: no hits, no 
runs, all kinds of errors. 

With the general idea of cutting ex- 
penses and decreasing taxes, all of us 
are in full accord. But when it comes 
to weakening the Army and Navy or 
cutting out essential services that make 
for progress and prosperity to do so, 
we think caution ought to be the watch- 
word. 

After all there is the case of the 
Scotsman who took big steps to save his 
six dollar shoes only to split his eight 
dollar pants. 

• • • 
SO SAYS PAUP 

^'Middle age," says our old friend Joe 
Paup, "is the period in life when you'd 
do anything to feel better, except give 
up what's hurting you." 




That reminds me, George — I MUST 
return your lawn mower. 



REAL, DIPLOMACY 

Last November 5 the hopes of some 
candidates were fulfilled and the hopes 
of others were blasted into smithereens. 
The people went to the polls and spoke 
their pieces and the results wrote the 
ticket. For our part we were interested 
in the fate of a guy running for sheriff 
in a new Mexico county. Seeking all 
the support he could find, he one day 
called on a minister. 

"Before I decide to give you my sup- 
port," said the minister, "I would like 
you to answer a question." 

"Shoot," replied the candidate. 

"Do you partake of intoxicating bev- 
erages?" 

"Before I reply I would also like to 
ask a question," countered the office 
seeker. "Is that an inquiry or an invita- 
tion?" 

We never did hear whether the fellow 
made it or not. However, if the people 
rejected him it seems to us the State 
Department could use him to good ad- 
vantage. 

• • • 

CONGRESS MARCHES ON 

For the past couple of years Congress 
has been handling labor legislation like 
an oboe player with mumps working on 
Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. First it 
passed the Smith-Connally bill, which 
proved to be a flop. Then it brought 
forth the Case Bill which laid another 
big egg. Now the foes of labor on the 
hill are beating their chests about the 
Hartley-Taft Act. It all sort of reminds 
us of the Army doctor. 

A patient came to a field hospital 
with the complaint that he was unable 
to sleep at night. The doctor's advice 
was for the soldier to eat something be- 
fore going to bed. 

"But, doctor," the patient reminded 
him, "two months ago you told me 
never to eat anything before going to 
bed." 

The good doctor blinked, and then in 
full professional dignity replied, "My 
boy, that was two months ago. Science 
has made enormous strides since then." 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



A COMMENDABLE NOTION 

Some fifteen years and forty million 
dollars after its inauguration in 1932 
by President Hoover, the Reconstruc- 
tion Finance Corporation is going to be 
investigated. During all the years RFC 
has tossed about millions and billions 
to American business firms in the way 
of loans. And to date there has never 
been a real accounting. Jesse Jones, 
long time RFC head, consistently 
stymied any and all efforts to bring 
the long list of the corporation's deal- 
ings into the light of day. All notions 
along that line he managed to sup- 
press; which reminds us of the one 
about the floorwalker. 

A slick chick approached the floor- 
walker and asked, "Do you have no- 
tions on this floor?" 

To which the floorwalker replied, 
after giving the young lady the once 
over, "Yes, Miss, but we suppress them 
during business hours." 

Well, from the looks of thinks, the 
notion of bringing out RFC dealings for 
an accounting is all through being sup- 
pressed. The Senate Banking Commit- 
tee is taking on the job. Among the 
things it will try to find out is why 
so many RFC officials step into big 
paying jobs in industry right after RFC 
loans are granted. 



EVERYBODY WANTS TO GET 
INTO THE ACT 

Greece may prove to be the fuse that 
touches off the powder keg that throws 
the world into another disastrous war. 
The Russians want Greece Communis- 
tic; we want it democratic; the British 
want it monarchistic. Between the vari- 
ous factions, some first class chaos has 
been created in the little Balkan coun- 
try. 

Diplomacy being out of our line, it 
may be presumptious on our part to 
make a suggestion, but did anyone ever 
think of asking the Greeks what they 
want? 

• • * 

THE WAY TAFT WANTS IT 
"If the Taft-Hartley Bill does all the 
things its authors claim it does, next 
winter is going to be a cold one," says 
Joe Paup, beer-barrel philosopher, "be- 
cause a guy ain't going to even dare put 
on a union suit." 



REMEMBER IN NOVEMBER 

Probably because they were afraid of 
the people come election time, the Con- 
gressmen who promoted and passed the 
infamous Taft-Hartley Bill wrote into 
it a provision which supposedly prevents 
labor papers from exposing their records 
in Congress on labor matters. However, 
we are inclined to believe a lot of these 
stooges of the vested interests are go- 
ing to be warming back-porch rocking 
chairs come November, 1948. Those 
who so nobly fought for sanity and jus- 
tice in labor relations have nothing to 
fear. But those who held the gun 
against labor's ribs had better start 
looking over the Help Wanted columns. 
And this ought to make the story about 
the western editor apropos. 

It was in the West in the old days. 
The new editor of the little weekly was 
very young, shy and nervous. His speech 
to the Chamber of Commerce had 
flopped miserably, for the presence of 
bearded men with .45 pistols hanging 
at their hips had not helped his pres- 
ence of mind. 

He stumbled to a halt, finally, and 
sat down. Immediately, a group of his 
armed listeners arose and walked omin- 
ously toward the speaker's table. 

A grizzled old cattleman came over 
and placed a reassuring hand upon the 
youth's trembling shoulder. 

"Now, you jes' sit still, son," he said. 
"They ain't gonna hurt you — they's 
comin' fo' the program chairman." 




No matter where you go nowadays, 
the service is awful. 



14 



Out of the shambles of war, European nations 
are slowly reviving building and woodworking 

The Hard Road Back 

• • 

AS THE horrors of war recede farther into history, the building 
trades and woodworking trades in Europe are slowly catching up 
with the task of rehabilitating the areas devastated by the war. 
Everywhere building materials are short, skilled laborers are scarce and 
venture capital is anything but plentiful. Nevertheless, the woodworking 
trades and building trades are making a partial comeback. The Interna- 
tional Federation of Building and Woodworkers reports some interesting 
developments in various European countries. 
According to IBWW, the Belgian 



government recently began negoti- 
ating with Italy as to the possi- 
bility of importing Italian build- 
ing workers into Belgium to help 
with the tremendous reconstruction 
job facing the people there. The 
general idea is to admit Italian 
building tradesmen in closed groups 
under expert leadership. These 
groups must include enough skilled 
workers so that they can under- 
take the rehabilitation of whole vil- 
lages at one time without further 
assistance. Under the proposed 
plan, Italian building tradesmen 
are to enter Belgium for several 
month periods minus their families 
and in practice they are to be 
classed and treated as seasonal 
workers. 

From the Scandanavian countries, 
IBWW reports that on the initia- 
tive of the Norwegian government, 
a committee was established to ex- 
amine the possibility of inaugurat- 
ing a three week vacation plan in 
Norwegian industry. This commit- 
tee has proposed that, beginning in 
1948, a three week vacation be in- 
troduced all the way down the line. 
Under the plan recommended by 
the committee, two weeks' vacation 
is to fall in the summer months and 



the third week is to fall in either the 
spring or autumn months. During 
the vacation period full wages must 
be paid or an amount equivalent to 
six and a half per cent of annual 
earnings must be paid instead. The 
latter is of considerable importance 
to those w T ho work on a piece rate 
basis. 

The Norwegian trade union cen- 
ter has been requested to give pre- 
liminary advice on the plan. It is 
expected that the Storting will deal 
with the matter before the end of 
the present year. 

In the liberated areas of Poland 
there are more than 108 undertak- 
ings in the wood industry. In these 
factories the damage caused by the 
war amounts up to an average of 
30%. Eighty-five of the 108 enter- 
prises are working again. During 
the last quarter the total production 
was valued at 6,000 Millions Zloty 
on the basis of the exchange rate of 
1937. The central administration is 
trying to increase the capacity and 
to this end it has invested 40,000 
Million Zloty in the wood industry. 
The main objects manufactured in 
the liberated areas are: wooden 
cases, staves, office furniture, con- 
struction spare parts for houses, 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



barrels, floors, wooden toys, house- 
hold implements, wheelbarrows, ve- 
hicles, plywood, furniture veneer, 
and other first class furniture. 

According to information derived 
from a Polish source, 1,450 sawmills 
are managed by the Forestry ad- 
ministration. Seven hundred of 
these sawmills are situated in the 
liberated areas, no of which have 
recommenced their work. It is ex- 
pected that another 320 sawmills 
will start to work in the very near 
future, 173 of which are situated in 
the liberated territories. 

Holland is now reportedly receiv- 
ing lumber supplies from the Amer- 
ican zone in Germany. The first 
transport load of sawed lumber 
froni the American zone reached 
Amsterdam early this summer. It 
consisted of some two million feet 
of badly-needed boards and dimen- 
sion timber. Another forty million 
feet are expected to be delivered 
before the summer is over. While 
this total amount does not go very 
far toward satisfying H o 1 1 a n d's 
total needs for lumber, it does help 
to relieve the critical shortage of 
wood to the extent that a few of 
the most critical repairs can be 
made without delay. 

During the last year the Czecho- 
slovakian Co-operative Export So- 
ciety, CESTIX, has been in touch 
with British buyers concerning the 
sale of 1000 wooden houses to Eng- 
land. The houses will be built in 
Czechoslovakia in accordance with 
British construction designs. The 
first specimens of this type of 
house have been completed, and as 
soon as the Britnsh buyers have de- 
clared their approval, the mass pro- 
duction will start. 

In the course of the year 1946, a 
new law came into force in Hun- 
gary regarding forest resources. 



Under the new law, all the larger 
forest estates have become property 
of the state. Small individual hold- 
ings are not covered by this law and 
they still remain private property. 
Total forest resources of the nation, 
both state and privately owned, are 
estimated at sixty million feet. This 
year's cutting was expected to reach 
three million feet although it is 
doubtful if this goal will be reached. 
Even if it is, however, this amount 
will not even come close to meeting 
the nation's demand for wood and 
wood products. Consequently the 
possibility of Hungary exporting 
wood to other nations is practically 
non-existent. Since the new law 
placing larger forest holdings under 
the domination of the state went 
into effect, the government now 
owns seventy-five per cent of all 
timber resources in the nation. 

From her meager forests, France 
has been making a valiant effort to 
meet as much of her tremendous de- 
mand for wood as possible. The 
year 1946 saw a sixty per cent in- 
crease in the production of wood 
over the preceding year. B ut like 
most of her neighbors, France has 
far too little timber to meet even a 
very small fraction of her needs. 
Like other European countries, too, 
she is short of skilled help, hard- 
ware and most other building mate- 
rials. 

In reply to a query addressed to 
the English Parliament, the fact 
was uncovered that since Germany 
capitulated, 160,000 acres of forest 
land in the British occupation zone 
have been denuded. This represents 
something like three per cent of 
Germany's total forestry area. How- 
ever, it was disclosed at the same 
time that some 76,000 acres are be- 
ing reforested during the present 
season. 



Editorial 

■.-.;-.:. ; J X^^SgyV fall.!:' ■■ ■ '^' • ^lililJIh; 




A Good Rule To Adopt 

The Taft-Hartley Eill is now law. Over the President's veto. Congress 
enacted it and put it on the statute books. While it may be difficult for 
any conscientious individual to understand the kind of thinking" that 
prompted Congres to pass the law, the fact remains, nevertheless, that 
Congress did pass it and it now stands as one of the laws of the land. 
That being true, organized labor, from top to bottom, now faces the 
problem of living under the law as best it can and so streamlining itself 
that it can function with the utmost efficiency under the restrictions im- 
posed by that law. 

The vicious, un-American, anachronistic features of the law have been 
too thoroughly hashed over in recent months to need repeating here. The 
whole subject can be covered by saying that the Taft-Hartley Bill has 
set back industrial relations fifty years. It has revived, or at least opened 
the door, to all the old union-smashing devices of the turn of the century; 
the open shop, the injunction, the company union, the blacklist, etc. It 
has nullified most of the legislative guarantees which over the past fifty 
years have been built up to guarantee every worker the right to choose a 
bargaining agent without interference from anyone. From protecting the 
right of every man to join a union without fear of reprisal, it has switched 
to guaranteeing a few dissenters the right not to join a union and not to 
participate in collective bargaining. 

Yet all this does not change the fact that the Bill is now law. We have 
to live with it, so we might as well look it squarely in the eye and make 
our plans accordingly. Elsewhere in this issue is reprinted a declaration 
adopted by a conference of officials of all national and international unions 
affiliated with the American Federation of Labor. It sets forth in clear and 
understandable language a course of vigorous action. It pledges a court 
test of all provisions of the law whose constitutionality may be doubtful. 
And. most important of all, it pledges a never-ending fight until the law is 
repealed. 

As far as the American Federation of Labor is concerned, and as far as 
the international and national unions that make it up are concerned, the 
chips are down. Individually and collectively they are committeed to a 
never-ending fight until the measure is beaten, repealed, and erased from 
the statute books permanently. 

But individual union members, too, must bear a proportionate share 
of the responsibility in the fight. Each member of a union must realize 
that not only his union but also his standard of living is at stake. He must 
realize it is his fight and that what he does or does not do will have a 
bearing on the final outcome. 

Through the years, untold numbers of workers have laid down their 
lives to build and perpetuate the labor movement. Thousands have been 



THE CARPENTER 17 

jailed and beaten and run out of town. Millions have starved and suffered 
and sacrificed. But they never for a single moment stopped fighting for the 
cause. 

The fanatical zeal of these old timers must be rekindled again today. 
By comparison the burden we will have to carry will be a light one. But 
it is important that we carry it steadily and proudly. We must have faith 
in our unions. We must give them the best that is in us. And, most impor- 
tant of all, we must recognize and oppose all who belittle unionism when- 
ever and wherever we meet them. 



A Job For Uncle Sam 

Ever since the turn of the century, the American people have been 
watching with increasing alarm the growth of monopoly concentration in 
all lines of endeavor. Year by year the larger corporations have gobbled up 
more and more of their competitors. And the war only served to increase 
the pace of monopoly growth. As a matter of fact, six of the larger cor- 
porations have acquired almost half of the value of war plants sold by the 
government. Some 250 corporations now control or are in a position to 
control manufacturing facilities equal to all the manufacturing facilities 
that existed in 1939. 

Now size in itself and of itself in corporations is not necessarily a bad 
thing. Mass production is what brings prices of commodities down while 
wages stay up. When industrial empires are run on an honest and straight- 
forward basis, they do not necessarily injure our economy. The danger 
lies in the fact that corporations which monopolize their particular fields 
eliminate any yardstick by which their records can be judged. There is no 
way of knowing whether the public is being gouged or not. There is no 
way of knowing whether or not the products produced are the best possible. 
And in any field of human endeavor the tendency is to follow the line of 
least resistance when there is no competition. Regardless of how conscien- 
tious an individual or corporation may be, human nature begins asserting 
itself whenever competition disappears. Gradually the tendency to demand 
more and give less begins asserting itself. Before long an unhealthy condi- 
tion has developed. 

At present the government has several agencies charged with the re- 
sponsibility for policing monopoly growth. So far they have been more 
or less ineffectual. Monopolies show every sign of getting out of hand. 
Somewhere or somehow it is up to Uncle Sam to devise ways and mean 
of keeping things under control. 

• 

Frying Financial Dynamite 

Nearly 200 years ago, a number of spirited and patriotic Bostonians 
staged a little rumpus that has lived in history as the "Boston Tea Party." 
It all came about because the British government was rigging the price of 
tea. The colonists stood about as much rigging as they could. When the 
load became too heavy, they took direct action. 

We cannot help but wonder what would happen today if some of the 
participants in the Boston Tea Party could return to mortal form for a 



18 THE CARPEXTER 

little while. We wonder, for example, what they would think of the deal 
the nation's eanners are trying" to put over. 

Last year prices of canned fruits and vegetables climbed so high most 
people in the lower income brackets were priced out of the market. As a 
result, warehouses are still bulging with last year's pack. Now the ean- 
ners have Washington swarming with lobbyists to push a neat little plan 
they have devised. 

What they want is simple. It amounts to just this: you and I and the 
hundred and fifty million other citizens should underwrite a couple of 
hundred million dollars in the way of export subsidies for them to get 
rid of the remnants of last year's pack on the foreign market. They will 
dump last year's pack on the foreign market for what it will bring. Then 
you and I and the rest of the taxpayers will make up the difference in 
price. That way we can clean the decks for this year's pack and keep prices 
at their present sky-high levels. By this scheme we can guarantee the 
packers a high price not only for this year's pack but also for the remnant 
of last year's pack which did not sell because prices were beyond the reach 
of too many people. The packers have a lot fancier way of putting it. but 
what they really want is for you and me to pay a couple of hundred mil- 
lions in taxes for the privilege of continuing to pay exhorbitant prices for 
our canned fruits and vebetables. 

It may be hard to believe, but there are some officials in the Department 
of Agriculture actually pushing the scheme. An equally vicious price- 
fixing deal is also being rigged for the sugar market. This deal would 
obligate Uncle Sam to maintain present stratospheric prices of sugar far 
into the future. Several ex-employes of the Department of Agriculture 
who are now working for the sugar trust at salaries up to $40,000 per year 
are trying to master-mind the measure through Congress. 

* Maybe people have gotten a little bit soft since the 1770's but there 
must be a spot somewhere along the line at which they will rebel. If the 
sugar interests and the cannery interests can get Uncle Sam to guarantee 
them high prices when volume starts falling off. why not the bakers and 
butchers and car manufacturers and everyone else? If this policy is pur- 
sued, how will prices ever come down? It is bad enough paying present 
stratospheric prices, but if the people are going to have to shell out 
millions more in taxes to keep them there, the situation is soon going to 
become intolerable. 

For the past several years we have been hearing that production and 
more production is the only answer to our economic problems. If more 
production is going to mean higher taxes without any price relief, then 
Heaven help us all. 

The time has come for Uncle Sam to pick up his hole card and take 
a long, hard look at it. Some of the policies he has been pursuing lately 
are about as safe as frying dynamite, financially speaking. Like workers, 
farmers must have adequate returns to maintain their purchasing power. 
To the extent any program insures a decent return for farmers, it is satis- 
factory to the American people. But when it comes to underwriting 
profits for the sugar trust and the cannery combines, things are getting out 
of hand; especially when a little reduction in price would enable low 
income Americans to soon eat up any supposed surplus. 



19 



Is The Modern IVorker Happy? 

By EUGENE ROUNDSTREAM 

I * 

HENRY FORD, II., recently said in substance that if industrialists 
spent as much money trying- to find out what makes the worker 
happy as they do fighting labor, we would not have any industrial 
strife. A shrewder observation could hardly be made. 

There was a time in history when the worker was reasonably contented 
with his lot. That was before the Industrial Revolution which occurred in 
England in 1765 (in America about 1865). Since these dates the Industrial 
Revolution has been gradually destroying the most favorable conditions 
ever known to the worker. 



Before the Industrial Revolution, 
the master craftsman made the 
products of his trade in his own 
home where he was at times assisted 
by apprentices and journeymen. The 
apprentices and journeymen lived 
in the home of the master crafts- 
man. Occasionally, one of the work- 
ers would marry into the master 
craftsman's family. The methods of 
industry of that day were simple 
and the employer-employe relations 
intimate. The master craftsman 
owned the tools with which he 
worked and the raw materials used 
in production. Owning the finished 
articles, he received the profit from 
their sale. 

The individually satisfying fea- 
tures about the old handicraft sys- 
tem of production which we should 
bear in mind when considering the 
vast changes brought about in the 
worker's status by the Industrial 
Revolution were: 

(A) Handicraft production gave 
the worker an opportunity to ex- 
press his creative abilities and ar- 
tistic skills in the articles which he 
produced. The painstaking care that 
went into the making of hand-made 



articles that we prize so highly to- 
day, lifted the trades to a level of 
an art. 

(B) The worker enjoyed eco- 
nomic security because he owned 
the tools and the raw materials used 
in production. The rate of scientific 
change was such that the tools 
which the worker used were not 
changed frequently. Hence there 
was no technological unemploy- 
ment. 

(C) The handicraft system of in- 
dustry offered the worker the hope 
of steady advancement and eventual 
economic independence. An appren- 
tice could always look forward to 
the time when he would be able to 
buy a few simple and inexpensive 
tools and go into business for him- 
self. The steps from apprenticeship 
to master craftsman were easy ones. 

Then in 1765 came the Industrial 
Revolution which ushered in the 
present machine age. The Industrial 
Revolution took manufacturing out 
of the home and placed it in the 
factory for the reason that workers 
could not afford to buy the new and 
expensive factory buildings and ma- 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



chines. Corporations were formed 
to gather large amounts of capital to 
finance the cost of the new factories 
and machinery. And with the work- 
er's loss of control over his tools of 
production, also went his control 
over his conditions of employment. 
The worker was now at the mercy 
of the corporation or large employ- 
er. He had to take a job in a factory 
where he became a "wage slave." 
The master craftsman could no 
longer ask what he thought was a 
fair profit for his finished articles 
or for his labor. He had to take 
the wages that were offered him 
which meant that a part of his pro- 
duction could now be appropriated 
by the corporation. The Industrial 
Revolution substituted large-scale 
machine production for small-scale 
hand production. Where the work- 
er formerly made the whole article 
he had now to make only a small 
part of it. The Industrial Revolu- 
tion changed the lives of the work- 
ers as completely as it changed the 
products which they made. 

It is easy to underestimate the 
proportions of the world-shaking 
Industrial Revolution which con- 
tinues on down even to this hour. 
As J. L. and B. Hammond say in 
their book, 'The Rise of Modern 
Industry :' "The Industrial Revolu- 
tion must be seen in a perspective 
of this kind: as a departure in 
which man passed definitely from 
one world to another as an event 
bringing confusion that man is still 
seeking to compose, power that he 
is still seeking to subdue to noble 
purposes." 

The evil effects of the Industrial 
Revolution on the worker, some of 
which labor unions have since suc- 
ceeded in ameliorating, were: 

(i) Wages were low because the 
individual worker was powerless 



before the superior bargaining posi- 
tion of the corporation; 

(2) Hours of work for men, wo- 
men and children were from before 
sunrise until after sunset; 

(3) Since a machine could pro- 
duce more than an individual work- 
er using hand tools, markets could 
be glutted in short order. This de- 
stroyed the nice balance heretofore 
existing between production and 
consumption under the old handi- 
craft system of production which in 
turn led to the business cycle with 
its alternate boom and depression. 
(A depression, in the main, is 
caused by a disparity between the 
amount of purchasing power in the 
hands of consumers and the amount 
of consumers' good produced) ; 

(4) Destruction of the balance 
between production and consump- 
tion brought about the problem of 
lay-offs and large-scale, extended 
unemployment; 

(5) The air inside factories be- 
came laden with flying materials 
and gases that were injurious to the 
health of the worker; 

(6) Industrial accidents due to 
faulty machinery were numerous; 

(7) Since the worker now made 
with a machine only a part of the 
finished product, his work became 
monotonous, repetitive and nerve- 
draining; 

(8) Employers introduced the 
inhuman speed-up which was calcu- 
lated to wring the last bit of energy 
from the worker; 

(9) The worker's employment re- 
lations became impersonal for he 
seldom came to know his employer 
on account of absentee ownership; 

(10) Child labor; 

(11) Industry became concentrat- 
ed in the cities and, the worker, 
in order to be near his work, had to 



THE CARPENTER 21 

live in slums which grew up around our own day can be attributed to 

the factories. the Industrial Revolution which, 

_ , , . . ^ ., J _. T , since its beginning, has (i) thwart- 
On the brighter side, the Indus- , ,, f , V, • ., 

. , -r, 1a . ,__. .. , , ed the workers personality in the 

trial Revolution multiplied mans , ,. , , < , 

r it). expression of his work; (2) speed- 
productive powers enormously. But , ,, , r ., , j 

F , . r . . y , ed-up the worker frequently beyond 

this enormous increase in produc- ,, •-<■.• , • 1 a 

, ,, * , the point of his physical endurance ; 

tion should not cause us to lose , \ ■< , , ,, • , , 1 

. , . , . . .. ... n) destroyed the intimate employ- 

siafht of the industrial evils which w . , ,. , . , 

°, . , . . . er-employee relationships; and pro- 
still exist: depressions, technolog- 1 / ,, *.- z I 
I , ,ii-i e 1 duced many other unsatisfactory 
ical and other kinds of unemploy- work conditions _ Up to date< the 
ment bad working conditions, and kbor union hag been the Qnl effec _ 

standards of living that still otter ,. , . , ,. , ,, 1 , 

,. , , & r r , tive device to which the worker has 

too little by way of comforts and , u < , , £ 

J J been able to turn for an lmprove- 

w °" ment in his working and living con- 

Against these unhappy working ditions. The labor union has also 

conditions growing out of the In- been a beneficial force in society in 

dustrial Revolution and the organ- guiding the Industrial Revolution 

ized bargaining power of employ- toward intelligent social purpose. 

ers, men banded into labor unions It has lent stability to our social 

to seek redress of their grievances, order which has been rendered un- 

Much of the industrial unrest of stable by rapid scientific change. 



WORK STOPPAGES SHOW BIG DECLINE 

Time lost because of labor-management work stoppages in the first half of 
1947 was about 75 per cent below that lost during the first six months of 1946, 
according to a report released by the bureau of labor statistics, U. S. Department 
of Labor. 

Approximately 2,200 stoppages came to the notice of the bureau in the first 
six months of 19 47. During the first' six months of this year, stoppages involved 
about 1,560,000 workers as compared to 3,000,000 workers during the same 
period in 1946, when labor-management controversies reached their post war 
peak. In the same period in 1947 the time loss was between 20 and 21 million 
man-days, while in 19 46 it was nearly 89 million man-days. 

From January to June, 1947, there were 13 stoppages involving 10,000 or more 
workers each. The largest of these was the telephone workers' controversy in April 
and May involving over 300,000 workers, and the stoppage of over 200,000 bitu- 
minous coal miners in late June. In the same period of 1946, 18 large stoppages 
involving 10,000 or more workers were recorded. 

In the first six months of 1947 the conciliation service assigned commissioners 
of conciliation to 1,254 work stoppages, involving 8 50,000 workers. This repre- 
sented a decline of 22 per cent in the number of assignments compared with the 
first six months of 1946. 



KILLING BUGS IN FOREST 

While we are cussing the airplanes for killing so many human beings, the 
press service in the United States Department of Agriculture is showering blessings 
upon airplanes that are now spraying 387,000 forest acres with DDT insecticide. 

The prospects are that $60 million worth of timber will be saved in the Idaho 
panhandle from destruction by tussock moths. 

These enemies and other forest insects will be killed by airplane spraying. 

The U. S. forest service says that the new method will probably save the nation 
many millions of dollars in standing timber. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General "Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis. Ind. 



General Secretary 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District. CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
631 W. Page, Dallas, Texas 



Second District, WM. J. KELLY 
Carpenters' Bldg., 243 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave.. Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District. ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District. ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the Genera] Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary 

CONVENTION CALL, 

Pursuant to Section Four of the Constitution of the Building- and Con- 
struction Trades Department of the American Federation of Labor, you 
are hereby notified that the Fortieth Annual Convention will be held in 
San Francisco, California, at the St. Francis Hotel, Wednesday, October 
i, 1947, at 10:00 a.m. and will continue in session from da}' to day until the 
business of the Convention shall have been completed. 



CONVENTION CALL 

Pursuant to the Constitution of the Union Label Trades Department 
of the American Federation of Labor, you are hereby notified that the 
Thirty-ninth Annual Convention of the Union Label Trades Department 
will convene in the Italian Room of the St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco, 
10 a.m., Friday, October 3, 1947, and will continue in session until the 

business of the Convention is completed. 

• 

CONVENTION CALL 

You are hereby notified that, in pursuance of the Constitution of the 
American Federation of Labor, the Sixty-sixth Convention of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor will be held in the Civic Auditorium, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., beginning at 10:00 o'clock Monday morning, October 6, I947> 
and will continue in session from day to day until the business of the 
Convention has been completed. 



Jin fflLtm&vinm 

Not lost to those that love them, They still live in our memory, 

Not dead, just gone before; And will forever more 



%t&i in Tj^t&tz 

The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother CHARLES ALLEN, Local No. 186, Steubenville, Ohio. 

Brother FRANK BALEK, Local No. 298, Long Island City, N. Y. 

Brother J B. BARNES, Local No. 653, Chickasha, Okla. 

Brother JOE BAUMGARTNER, Local No. 657, Sheboygan, Wis. 

Brother LYNN F. BEVIER, Local No. 200, Columbus, Ohio. 

Brother THOMAS J. BREWER, Local No. 325, Patterson, N. J. 

Brother JAMES BYERS, Local No. 500, Butler, Pa. 

Brother EDWARD CHABOT, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

Brother ABRAHAM CHERLOV, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brother GEORGE CROCKER, Local No. 40, Boston, Mass. 

Brother ANTONIO DICARLUCCIO, Local No. 366, New York, N. Y. 

Brother JOHN PHILLIP DUNN, Local No. 622, Waco, Tex. 

Brother CARL ERIKSON, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brother L. J. GALLINA, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Brother J. D. HALL, Local Nb. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Brother THOMAS HAMMOND, Local No. 245, Cambridge, Ohio. 

Brother LEONHARDT HANFMANN, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 

Brother ODES C. C. KILPATRICK, Local No. 1565, Abilene, Tex. 

Brother WALTER KLEE, Local No. 500, Butler, Pa. 

Brother I. F. LAWS, Local No. 1517, Johnson City, Tenn. 

Brother MICHAEL MAISEL, Local No. 1782, Newark, N. J. 

Brother ELMER MARTIN, Local No. 186, Steubenville, Ohio. 

Brother LUCYON MONKOWSKI, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

Brother ENGEBRET MYSEN, Local No. 100, Muskegon, Mich. 

Brother CHARLES OCHS, Local No. 325, Paterson, N. J. 

Brother FRANCIS O'NEIL, Local No. 747, Oswego, N. Y. 

Brother S. E. PIGG, Local No. 764, Shreveport, La. 

Brother F. E. PITTARD, Local No. 345, Memphis, Tenn. 

Brother J. L. RANDALL, Local No. 245 .Cambridge, Ohio. 

Brother MILTON SIEGLING, Local No. 740, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brother LOUIS SLUKAN, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 



CorrQspondQncQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

SALEM, MASS., LOCAL HONORS VETS 

Local 1210, Salem, Mass., held a testimonial banquet and dance for their vet- 
eran members, also their sons and daughters of World War Two, at Saltonstall 
school hall recently. There was a large attendance, including many friends of 
the local union and the veterans. 

Among the speakers was .Mayor Edward A. Coffey, who welcomed the veterans 
and expressed appreciation for their services to the country. 

James H. Golden president of the Massachusetts State Council of Carpenters, 
congratulated the veterans upon their part in the war. Patrick Cleary, local vet- 
erans' agent, congratulated the boys and extended the services of his office to them 

General Executive Board Member Arthur Martel of Canada gave a very inter- 
esting talk on the history of labor, especially the carpenters, an organization of 
800,000 men, under the banner of the Brotherhood of Carpenters all over America. 

In closing the speaking program the Toastmaster, Amable L. St. Pierre, pre- 
sented the retiring president, Louis E. Dumas, with a gold ring in appreciation 
of his loyal service to the local union in the past 43 years. The toastmaster stated 
that Mr. Dumas was a veteran of the labor movement and that his only goal was 
to aid fellow members. After a few remarks by President Dumas, general dancing 
and an entertainment was enjoyed by all. Present were delegations from L. U. 
888, 1516 of Salem, 878 of Beverly, 924 of Manchester, 962 of Marblehead, 1144 
of Danvers, 610 of Lowell, and the Association Laurier. 



CONVENTION CALL 

In accordance with the provisions of the Constitution notice is hereby 
given that the Sixty-second Annual Convention of the Trades and Labor. 
Congress of Canada will be held in the Royal Connaught Hotel, Hamilton, 
Ontario, beginning at io a.m. (City Time) Wednesday, September 24, 
1947, and will continue in session daily until the business of the Convention 
has been completed. 



1864 
3031 
1866 
1878 
3035 
1882 



Grand Rapids 
Laurel, Miss. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y 
Wellsville, N. Y. 
Springfield, Ore. 



NEW CHARTERS ISSUED 

Minn. 1907 Anderson, S 

1914 
3037 
3039 



Campbell River, B. C, Can. 



1916 



Taber, Alta., Can. 
Bossier City, La. 
West Lome, Ont., 
Tishomingo, Okla. 



Can. 



BILLION DOLLAR COMPANIES SHOW GAIN 

A recent survey reveals that there are now 45 companies with assets of more 
than a billion dollars each, more than double the number in the boom year of 
1929. 

Banks and insurance companies top the list. Metropolitan Life, with assets of 
more than $8 billions, is first, and Bell Telephone second, with more than $7 
billion. Several railroads are in the select club. 




REDWOOD AUXILIARY STARTS 25th YEAR OF SERVICE 

The Editor: 

Redwood Auxiliary No. 70 of San Bernardino, California, extends greetings 
to all sister auxiliaries. It has been quite a number of years since we have written. 

Our meetings are held at the Labor Temple the second and fourth Friday nights 
of each month. The first meeting is for business and the second is more of a 
social gathering. It may be a covered dish dinner, held early enough for the car- 
penters to attend the Local Union meeting, or it may be a party with the refresh- 
ments served after the men finish their business. After our business meeting we 
draw a name for the Mystery Prize — the winner bringing the prize for the next 
meeting. Our Penny March takes care of flowers and cards for sick members. 

We donate to many worthy causes such as Red Cross, Cancer Fund, Community 
Chest, etc. We recently donated a case of mlik for overseas. There is always a 
party at Christmas for our families. At the Labor Day picnic we took an active 
part in serving the dinner. 

We celebrated our twenty-fifth anniversary at the November social meeting. 
We had three charter member as guests of honor. During the year our hearts 
have been saddened by the passing of two of our beloved members whose faces we 
miss. 



Fraternally yours, 



Ethel A. Sultzer, Pres. 



HERMISTON LADIES INSTALL 

The Editor: 

Ladies' Auxiliary 429 of Carpenters' Local 933, Hermiston, Oregon had its 
installation of officers July 1st. 

Former President Bertha Miller declined nomination for president due to the 
fact that she has served for the last two years. The new officers who were installed 
are as follows: President — Anna Jacques, Vice-President — Laura Miller, Recording 
Secretary — Florence Russell, Financial Secretary — Anntoniett White, Conductress 
— Rhoda Belles and Warden — Lottie Brown. Bertha Miller presented each of the 
new officers with a lovely corsage. 

After the installation the Ladies initiated four new members into the Auxiliary. 
When the meeting was adjourned the ladies served cake, ice cream and coffee to 
the Carpenters. Evelyn Ford played the piano and a nice time was enjoyed by 
all who were present. 

Florence Russell, Recording Secretary. 



BEVERLY HILLS AUXILIARY LENDS HELPING HAND 

The Editor: 

We of Ladies' Auxiliary No. 400 of Beverly Hills, Cal., would like to report on 
our successful card party held on June 27. Everyone had a very nice time with 
five different card games and many tables of each game. 

The profits of the card party went for a very worthy cause we feel. Two 
brothers of Local No. 1052 were recipients of the profits. One has been very sick 
for a long time and one met with a very bad accident. 

This is not our only good deed as we still help another brother of Local No. 
1052 who has been in the hospital for over three years by sending cheery greetings, 
cigarettes and fruit juices quite often. 



26 THE CARPENTER 

We held election of officers at our last meeting with Sister Vera Logan elected 
President and Sister Eva Schmeir, Vice President. Our new Secretary, I'm sure 
will be glad to answer any inquiries she receives from other auxiliaries. 

The new Secretary can be reached by addressing Mrs. Arline Abild, 9016 
Melrose (Carpenters' Hall), Los Angeles, Calif. 

Yours truly, Mrs. Evelyn De Clerck, Rec. Sec. 
• 

HOUSTON DRILL TEAM WINNING APPLAUSE 

The Editor: 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 6, of Houston, Texas, attended the Forty-ninth Conven- 
tion of the Texas State Federation of Labor in Dallas, Texas, on July 1st, 2nd and 
3rd. Their drill team displayed their talent in a beautiful drill on the night of 
the second in the beautiful Ball Room of the Baker Hotel. 

They were feted at a banquet on Tuesday evening by the Convention and at 
a breakfast given the following morning by their delegate Mrs. Joe Ferguson, at the 
B&B Cafe. Mr. M. B. Menefee, one of the Carpenter's International Representatives, 
gave the team a luncheon in the Century Room at the Adolphus Hotel, in memory 
of his dear wife. All had a grand time and are preparing themselves to go to 
Fort Worth, where the drill team has been invited to exhibit their drill next year. 

The ladies of the drill team include: Miss Georgia Williams, Mesdames George 
Marquette, the drill Captain, Jo Ferguson, the president, Paul Sparks and F. W. 
Lucas, the drill leaders, John Parker, the incoming president of the Auxiliary; 
Frank Booth, Sam Hendricks, Billie Stein, J. S. Henson, Walter Thomas, H. L. 
Bryant, J. H. Burkhalter, J. M. Porter, Bert Porter, T. O. Porter, Robert Baldwin, 
Carl Olsen, Cecil Sparks, Junius E. Jones, W. H. Wilson, H. M. Rogers, E. E. 
McElroy, E. Thur, J. H. Thornton, Clyde Ballanger, E. Weigelt, A. B. Norris, and 
J. M. Yakey. 

Sincerely submitted, Mrs. Junius E. Jones, Reporter. 



PORT COLLINS LADIES AID MANY CAUSES 

The Editor: 

We of Ladies' Auxiliary No. 40 4 of Fort Collins, Colorado, would like to tell 
you some of the work we have done in the past year. At the present time we have 
41 members. 

During a great deal of our afternoon social meetings which were held once a 
month we worked on cancer bandages. 

We sent a ton of coal to a family with 5 children as the father was ill with 
polio. 

We donated to the cancer fund. 

We have all had a lot of fun working together on our different activities. 

Sincerely, 

Mrs. Eloise Mills, Recording Secretary. 



BAY CITY LADIES HONOR NEW OFFICERS 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 468, Bay City, Mich., on the night of July 9, installed 
Mrs. Marjorie Page as president to succeed Mrs. Dorothy Binkley. Other officers 
include: Mrs. Lucille Binkley, first vice-president; Mrs. Earl Brown, second vice- 
president; Mrs. Sophie Matuzewski, recording secretary; Mrs. Nellie Grover, finan- 
cial secretary and treasurer; Mrs. Bertha Schultz, conductress; and Mrs. Grace 
Lange, warden. 

Trustees are Mrs. Emma Fishborn, Mrs. Thelma Horner, and Mrs. Dorothy 
Shaw. Mrs. Agnes Ruhlig is publicity chairman; Mrs. Binkley, hospitality; and 
Mrs. Schultz, entertainment. 

Corsages, arranged by Mrs. Sophie Matuzewski, marked places for retiring and 
incoming presidents and a gift was given the retiring president by Mrs. Fishborn. 

Afterwards games for prizes got under way to round out the evening. 

Our Auxiliary meets the second Wednesday of each month. Our next meeting 
will be held on August 13, 1947. 

Mrs. Agnes Ruhlig, Publicity Chairman. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

(Copyright 1947) 

LESSON 227 
By H. H. Siegele 

The old measuring pole is rarely, if 
ever, used now on the job as it was 
before the advent of the steel tape. One 
of the first things that was done in 
starting a job in those days was to make 
two or three measuring poles, a 10-foot 
pole, a 16-foot pole and some old timers 
also wanted a 12-foot pole. All of the 
long measurements were made with 
these poles. Just before the steel tape 
came into general use, the cloth tape 
line was frequently seen on jobs, but it 
was not fully satisfactory. While such 
tape lines were new and stiff they gave 
rather accurate results, but after they 
were used for some little time, especial- 
ly if they happened to get wet, they 
soon became more of a nuisance than a 
help. 




Fig. 1 

Fig. 1 shows two views of a case for 
a steel tape, with the end of the tape 
pulled out a few inches. The end of 
the ring, or rather loop, is the starting 
point for measuring with a steel tape. 
This should be kept in mind when a nail 
is stuck onto which the ring is to be 
hooked — the nail must be offset enough 
to bring the end of the ring exactly to 
the starting point. 

This writer once worked on a job 
where the carpenter foreman had a steel 
tape with the starting point at the end 
of the tape rather than at the end of 
the ring. The carpenters on the job 
were informed, but the bricklayers were 
not. Then the brick foreman borrowed 
this off-standard steel tape to lay out 



some of his work. He did not ask for 
it, he just borrowed it and so was not 
informed. He started to lay out his 
work — then something seemed to be 
wrong, and he measured it all over 
again. By that time he was all set to 
give the carpenter foreman a real 
"bawling out" — and that was the way 




-loop z ft 



Fig. 2 



he found out that the measuring with 
that steel tape started at the end of the 
tape, and not at the end of the ring. 
The next day the carpenter foreman 
had the tape changed so that the end 
of the ring was the starting point. 

A steel tape that is properly cared 
for will give good service for a long 
time. The first few feet, and especially 




Fig. 3 

the first foot of the tape is where most 
of the tape trouble begins. This can 
be warded off for some time, by mak- 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



ing short measurements with the zig- 
zag rule. But even when this is done, 
the first few feet of the steel tape will 
develop trouble. Here, because of the 
usage, the tape usually breaks first. A 
frequent cause, however, of breaking a 
steel tape is trying to straighten out a 
loop in the tape by pulling it. 

Fig. 2 shows how the steel tape is 
used in squaring by using the 6, 8 and 



i 


I 


a d' 








J 








' 


f 














i 






*-/ 


0' »» 


« "*n' 




A 






















1 


r 





Fig. 4 

10 method of squaring. At number 1 
the end of the tape is hooked on a nail 
that has been stuck at the established 
corner of the building. At number 2, 
the two feet of the tape between 8 feet 
and 10 feet, is formed into a loop, and 
the tape is clamped together in such 
a manner that the 8-foot and the 10- 
foot points will intersect. Then 10 feet 
more of the tape is unrolled, which 



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QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of prac- 
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(The above books support one another.) 

BUILDING. — Has 210 p. and 495 il. covering form 
building, scaffolding, finishing, stair building, roof 
framing, and other subjects. $2.50. 

CARPENTRY.— Has 302 p., 754 il., covering general 
house carpentry, and other subjects. $2.50. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. 64 pages, brown 
cloth binding and two-color title page. Only $1.00. 

PUSHING BUTTONS.— The prose companion of 
Twights of Thought. Illustrated. Cloth. Only $1.00. 

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— books autographed. 



brings us to number 3. Here again a 
loop of 2 feet is formed, as shown. From 
number 3 the tape is run to the estab- 
lished corner, number 1. If the 8-foot 
or the 6-foot side of the triangle is kept 

■ £ 



■ 

A 


1 £■ 


i 




I 




/ ! 
















i ; 
i 
i i 


** " "5 


























s~ 




































\ I 








\ 


^ 








\>3^ 


s" 








\L^ 




r ii 










C 




- 




D 



mF 



Fig. 5 



on the building line while all the sides 
are stretched tight, you will have a 
square corner at number 1. 

Fig. 3 shows how the principle of 
the 6, 8 and 10 squaring method can 
be used with a small triangle as well 
as with a large triangle. At the center 
of this figure, 3, 4 and 5 are used to 
make the right angle, which figures 
were obtained by dividing 6, 8 and 10 
by 2. The large triangle shown, is made 




Fig. 6 

by multiplying 6, 8 and 10 by 2, which 
gives us 12, 16 and 20. The loops at 
the two angles, show how the tape is 
held, either with a clamp or with the 



THE CARPENTER 



29 



fingers. Clamping the tape together 
where the loops are at the corners, in- 
sures accuracy. But on the other hand, 
when there are three persons, each one 
holding a corner, if they are careful, 
good results can be obtained by holding 
the tape with the hands. 

Fig. 4 shows a floor plan of a house, 
the main part of which is 32 feet by 
40 feet. A simple way to square this 
building, when it is staked out is shown 
by Fig. 5. Stretch line A-B on the build- 
ing line, making it cross the established 
corner of the building, as shown at 2. 
Then set line C-D parallel to and 32 feet 
from line A-B. Now, at a convenient 



I* < 

** — t — > mm tm 




. Fig. 7 

point, exactly halfway between these 
lines, drive a stake, as at 1, and stick a 
nail in the top of the stake in such a 
way that it will be exactly half between 
the two lines. Hook the tape on this 
nail and get the distance from 1 to the 
established corner, number 2. Then 
carry this distance to number 3. Now 
stretch a line from E to F, crossing 
points 2 and 3, and you will have two 
of the corners squared. To finish the 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserye the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be. in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

Carlson Rules 31 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 32 

Greenlee Tool Co., Rockford, 111. 1 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, III 3rd Cover 

A. D. McBurney, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 31 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 30 

Ohlen-Bishop, Columbus, O 1 

The Speed Co., Portland, Ore 31 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, 

Conn. 3rd Cove 

Bowling Equipment 
Brunswick, Balke, Collender Co., 

Chicago, 111. 30 

Carpentry Materials 

Johns-Manville Corp., New York, 

N. Y. 32 

Doors 

Overhead Door Corp., Hartford 

City, Ind. 4th Cover 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, 111. 31 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 32 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 29 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 28 

Mason Engineering Service, 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 30 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo_ 1 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y. 3rd Cover 

Wahlstrom, San Carlos, Cal 31 




d I t k L W 



E 



HAND 
BOOK 



This new and revised edition of Carpenters and Builders' Practical Rules for Laying 
Out Work consists of short and practical rules for laying out octagons, ellipses, roofs. 
groined ceilings, hoppers, spirals, stairs and arches with tables- of board measure, 
length of common, hip, valley and jack rafters, square measure, cube measure, measure 
of length, etc. — also, rules for kerfing, drafting gable molding, getting the axis of a 
segment, laying off gambrel roof and explaining the steel square. 
"For ready reference carry 

this convenient 50 page Postpaid. Money back guarantee if not entirely satisfied 
pocket size (44x63) guide 
to your job." 



SEND $1.00 TODAY 



D. A. ROGERS 

Minneapolis 9, Minn. 



Enclosed $1.00. Forward by return mail your Carpenters & 
Builders' Practical Rules for Laying Out Work. 



Name Addr«»$. 



squaring of the main part of the build- 
ing, set line G-H, Pig. 6, parallel to 
and 40 feet from line E-F. This done, 
set line I-J parallel to and 10 feet from 
line E-F, and K-L. parallel to and 20 
feet from I-J. Finish the staking out 
by setting line M-N parallel to and 14. 
feet from line C-D. This is not only a 
simple way of squaring for staking out, 
but it is accurate. 



ft 



lejr 



rirrxjTinro *> i f u*i 21 u 



izjt 



D 


10, 


M 














1 k 


ll |t ( /ll to 


|3 


1? 


\7 


\G 


b 


W b 


lz |» 



Fig. 8 

Another use of the steel tape is shown 
by Fig. 7. Here a plumb bob is fastened 
to the end of the tape, as shown to the 
Tight, which is let down from the top 
of a structure until it touches the bot- 
tom, and you have the exact distance 
from the top to the ground. The dis- 
tance between the point of the plumb 
bob and the end of the tape should be 
measured with a rule, which in this case 
is 5 inches. This is added to the read- 
ing of the tape when the measuring is 
done. 

Fig. 8 shows at A, a 16-foot pole and 
at B, part of the figures on one side 
of such a pole, counting from left to 
right. At C we have a 12-foot pole, 
and at D, a 10-foot pole. At E we show 
part of the figures on the other side 
of the pole, counting from right to left. 
Now read the first paragraph of this 
lesson again. 



Drill pilot holes 
with one hand and a 



\\ 



YANKEE 



rr 




HI 

No. 41 Automatic Drill |j|J 

A "Yankee" No. 41 drills pilot 
holes in wood with a few easy 
pushes. Spring automatically re- 
turns handle after every stroke 
and revolves drill point to clear 
away chips. Magazine in handle 
holds 8 drill points . . . %6 to 
1 %4 • • • easy to select, re- 
move and replace. Improved 
chuck prevents drill points pull- 
ing out in use, yet releases 
them with one, easy motion. 
All exposed parts chromium 
plated ... a lifetime tool. 

Write for "Yankee** Tool Book 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

Division of The Stanley Works 
Philadelphia 33, Pa. 



BOWL BETTER 

WITH YOUR OWN 

MINERALITE 

Custom-fit 

BOWLING 
BALL 



THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER CO. 
Branches in all Principal Cities 




TWO AIDS FOR SPEED AND ACCURACY 




A.. 



THEY HAVE 

OUR CHART Blueprint 27" X 36" 

"The FRAMING SQUARE" (Chart) 



<■«! Explains tables on framing squares. Shows how 

■A; to find lengths of any rafter and make its euts; 

,. v <4 find any angle in degrees; frame any polygon 3 to 
16 sides, and cut its mitres; read board feet rafter 
^1 and brace tables, octagon scale. Gives other valu- 

■X ( i-'->!e information. Also includes Starting Key and 
Radial Saw Chart for changing pitches and cuts 
into degrees and minutes. Every carpenter should 
have this chart. Now printed on both sides, makes about 

13 square feet of printed data showing squares full size. 

Price $1.00 postpaid, no stamps. 



SLIDE CALCULATOR for Rafters 



Makes figuring rafters a cinch! Shows the length of any 
rafter having a run of from 2 to 23 feet; longer lengths are 
found by doubling. Covers 17 different pitches. Shows lengths 
of hips and valleys, commons, jacks, and gives the cuts for 
each pitch, also the angle in degrees and minutes. Fastest 
method known, eliminates chance of error, so simple anyone 
who can read numbers can use it. NOT A SLIDE RULE but 
a Slide Calculator designed especially for Carpenters, Con- 
tractors and Architects. Thousands in use. Price $2.00 
postpaid. Check or M. O., no stamps. 

MASON ENGINEERING SERVICE 

2105 N. Burdick St., Div. 8, Kalamazoo 81, Mich. 



— PRICE LIST — 




Label and Emblem Nov 


elties 

$ .10 






.15 


Fobs (Label and Emblem) . 


.50 




1.25 


Pins (Emblem) 


1.00 




1.00 


Cuff Links (Emblem) 


1.50 


Match Box Holders (Label) 


.15 


Belt Loop and Chain (Label) 


.75 


Pins, Ladies Auxiliary (Em- 


1 75 


Auto Radiator Emblems. . . 


1.25 

Orders 
le to 


In Ordering These Goods Send All 
and Make All Remittances Payab 


FRANK DUFFY, Gen 


Sec, 


Carpenters' Bid., 222 E. Michigan St. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



mm> 






SAW FILER 

Saves You Time, Money 

Now you can do expert saw filing at 
borne. Lifetime tool makes precision 
filing easy for even the most inexperi- 
enced. Two simple adjustments make 
it fit any type hand saw. Keep your 
saws extra sharp and true-cutting with 
a Speed Saw Filer. Complete with file, 
tread y to use. Money back guarantee. 
Cash with order, prepaid. (CO.D. 
postage extra.) 

THE SPEED COMPANY 

Dept. A 2023 N.E. Sandy, Portland 12, Ore. 




SUPER SHINGLE 
GAGE NO. 59 

Clamps on shingle hatchet blade for 
spacing courses. A convenient, accu- 
rate labor saver for shinglers, carpen- 
ters, home craftsmen. Case-hardened, 
slotted, round-head screw for quick 
mounting or adjusting. 




Only .30 ea. 

SUPER STAIR GAGE NO. 49 

Again available for instant 
attachment to carpenter's steel 
squares. Perfect for laying 
out stair stringers and other 
saw cuts. Precision-made 
nickel-plated steel fixtures 
with brass thumb screws. 

Only .75 the pair. At Dealers' or Postpaid. 

939 W. 6th St., Dept. C-2 
LOS ANGELES 14, CAL. 




A. D. McBURNEY 




FOR 
EXAMINATION 

SEND NO MONEY 



Learn to draw plana, estimate, be a live-wire builder, do 
remodeling, take contracting jobs. These 8 practical, pro- 
fusel; illustrated books cover subjects that will help yon 
to get more work and make more money. Architectural de- 
sign and drawing, estimating, steel square, roof framing, 
construction, painting and decorating, heating, air-condi- 
tioning, concrete forms and many other subjects are included. 

UP-TO-DATE 

EDITION 

These books aro 
the most up-to- 
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we have ever pub- 
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many subjects. 



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The Postwar building boom Is In full 
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Big opportunities are always for MEN 
WHO KNOW HOW. These books sup- 
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handy, permanent reference information 
that helps solve building problems. 



Coupon Bring* Eight Big Books For Examination 

AMERICAN TECHNiCAL SOCIETY _ Vocatio7al"Pubii"]iers sinclgls? 
Dept. GC36 Drexel at 58th Street. Chicago 37, III. 

You may ship me the Up-to-Date edition of your eight 
big books, "Building, Estimating, and Contracting" with- 
out any obligation to buy. I will pay the delivery charges 
only, and if fully satisfied in ten days, I will send you 
$2.00, and after that only $3.00 a month, until the total 
price of only $34.80 is paid. I am not obligated In any 
way unless I keep the books. 

Name . 

Address _„ ■ . 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's nam* and ' 
address, and name and address of at least one business 
man as reference. Men in service, also give home address. 




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A 10" 
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Carlos, Calif. 



CHANGE BLADES 
IN 10 SECONDS 



*QuiCK-CHANGE BLADES are 
featured on all Carlson Rules. 
CHIEF available in 6-, 8- and 10- 
fc, lengths; WHITE CHIEF and 
HOBBY in 6- and 8-ft. Keep a 
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«-f. VJW :» STEEL TAPE RULES 






ns-Monvi 



5 SHINGLES IH ONI 



"AMERICAN COLONIAL'' ASBESTOS SHINGLE! 




You can have a good steady, cash 
business of your own reconditioning 
saws with the Foley Automatic Saw 
Filer, which makes old saws cut like 
new again. The Foley is the ONLY 
Machine that files hand saws, also 
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call. 



F0LEY^^^5AW FILER 



t FOLEY MFG. CO. ffiLSMfc., 

» Send Free Plan on Saw Filing business— ti 

k. obligation. 

k. Name 



Address 



New Opportunities 

*£■ Carpenters 




Men Who Know Blue Prints 

are in demand to lay out and run build- 
ing jobs. Be the man who gives orders 
and draws the big pay check. Learn at 
home from plans we send. No books, — 
all practical every day work. 

SEND FOR FREE BLUE PRINTS 

and Trial Lesson. Prove to yourself how 
easy to learn at home in spare time. 
Send coupon or a post card today. No 
obligations. 

CHICAGO TECH. COLLEGE 

K-108 Tech Bldg., 2000 So. Mich. Ave. 
Chicago, 16, III. 

Send Free Trial Lesson and blue print 
plans and tell me how to prepare for a 
higher paid job in Building. 

Name 

A ddress 




STANLEY TOOLS, NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 
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[STANLEY] 

Trade Mark 

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on Every fob 



WITH A 






mm^ : M 




Model 70 is unusually light in weight . . . bevel 
cuts to 45 degrees . . . can be equipped for dado- 
ing, grooving and cutting asbestos, tile, concrete and 
light gauge metals. Other capacities also available. 

Ask your Dealer or write for literature and prices. 

POWER TOOL DIVISION 

MALL TOOL COMPANY 

7751 South Chicago Ave., Chicago, 19, III. 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 

4vols.$6 




Inside Trade Information On: pon t>£iaw.' 

How to use the steel square — How to file and set 
saws — How to build furniture — How to use at 
mitre box — How to use the chalk line — How to use 
rules and scales — How to make joints — Carpenters 
arithmetic — Solving mensuration problems— ^Es- 
timating strength of timbers — How to set girders 
and sills — How to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs — How to build houses, barns, gar- 
ages, bungalows, etc. — How to read and draw 
plans — Drawing up specifications — How to ex- 
cavate— How to use settinga 12. 13 and 17 on the 
steel square — How to build hoists and scaffolds- 
skylights — How to build stairs — How to put on 
interior trim — How to hann doors — How to lath- 
lay floors — How to paint 



Insld* Trade Information 

for Carpenters. Builders. Join- 
ers, Building Mechanics and 
all Woodworkers. These, 
Guides give you the short-cut 
instructions that you want — 
including new methods, ideas, 
solutions, plans, systems and 
money saving suggestions. An 
easy progressive course for the 
apprentice and student. A 
practical daily helper and 
Quick Reference for the master 
worker. Carpenters every- 
where are using these Guides 
as a Helping Hand to Easier 
Work. Better Work and Bet- 
ter Pay. To get this assist- 
ance for yourself, simply fill 
" ail the FREE COU- 




THEO. AUDEL & CO., 49 W. 23rd St., New York City 

Mail Audele Carpenters and Builders Guides, t 
I will remit SI in 7 days. and$l monthly until S6 ii 
No obligation unices I am satisfied. 



Name. 



Address. . , . 
Occupation. 
Rclerence . . 



CAR 




|of APPEARANCE and St*^ 

• The adaptability of The "OVERHEAD DOOR" 
to any style of architecture and any size open- 
ing has aided in making it the predominant 
choice among architects, builders and owners. 
Its ease of operation and instant, constantly 
dependable service are responsible for its con- 
tinued selection. This quality door is expertly 
engineered from highest grade materials. It is 
weathertight and tamper-proof. Specify 
The "OVERHEAD DOOR" with the Miracle 
Wedge for commercial, industrial and residen- 
tial use. 



TRACKS AND HARDWARE OF SALT SPRAY STEEL 




MIRACLE WEDGE 
OVERHEAD DOOR CORPORATION • Hartford City, Indiana, U.S.A. 



CARPENTER 




FOUNDED 1881 



Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 



SEPTEMBER, 1947 




TO THE SWEAT OF HIS FOREHEAD, THE SKILL OF HIS HANDS 
THE NATION ON LABOR DAY IN MUTE TRD3UTE STANDS. 



* 



IE CRUSADE 





8 Gan;zed ibbi 



pEGISTERe" ' 









<-■. 



■'•'•• 







tfrWr 




Upson Quality Products are 

Easily Identified by the 

Famous Blue -Center 



Ingenious, efficient, time-tested! 
The Upson FW»«^S^ 
A ied direct to stods. Upson F, ...»« 

sis t?«s *— u 6ly 

face nailing. 

,- „t.,« everywhere endorse the Upson 

SSSltaSS A few of their comments 

appear below. 

O] What carpenters say: 

-J U sed the Upson Fasteners to Jnsur^the ^t 
attractive job PO-B.Me because the, f e ^.^ 
sightly nail marks and otner su 
that no painter can hide successfully. G. J. LeN. 

"Not a* S in g le mark can be found on any of the 
work to indicate where it was fastened. I- •>• 

THE UPSON COMPANY • Lockport. New York 



■ ■ \ 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXVII— No. 9 



INDIANAPOLIS, SEPTEMBER, 1947 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents — 



The Fight For Human Dignity 



Against the forces of oppression, exploitation, and greed the International Labor 
Organization is waging a relentless war all over the world. Second General 
Vice President John R. Stevenson attended this year's ILO sessions as a labor 
advisor. The program adopted at this year's sessions may take five years to 
implement, but in the end it will add to human welfare and human progress. 
This is an account of the ILO meeting written by the late Bob Watt just before 
his untimely death. 



Humanity's Holiday 



11 



Labor day is one holiday in the year that reveres no man, living or dead; it is 
a holiday that commemorates no great conflict or conquest of one nation by 
another; it is a holiday that was created by, of, and for working people and not 
politicians. In fact, it is the only other holiday besides Christmas that is founded 
on and dedicated to an ideal. 



Oregon Councils Hold Joint Installation - 



19 

In a precedent-shattering display of solidarity, three Oregon District Councils 
hold joint installation ceremonies ; hereby serving notice on the world that 
organized labor will never surrender in the struggle for freedom, justice, and 
equal opportunity for all. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
Plane Gossip 
Editorials - 
Official - 

In Memoriam 
Correspondence 
To the Ladies 
Craft Problems 



Index to Advertisers 



• • • 



14 
16 
20 
21 
22 
25 
26 



30 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 





Send for Your 
FREE Copy 




The Disston Saw, Tool and File Manual 
tells how to choose, use and care for tools. 
Ask your Hardware Retailer, cr mail a postal 
card to us direct. 



STAYS 
SHARP LONGER 
. . LASTS LONGER 

TOO 



More Disston handsaws are owned by carpenters than 
all other makes of saws combined. When thousands 
of carpenters were asked what saws they owned, 92 out 
of a hundred named Disston. Why such outstanding 
preference? They gave many reasons which may be 
summed up in better performance, better workmanship, 
greater ease, and less frequent filing and setting. 
-Disston saws are made of the famous Disston saw 
steel, specially hardened and tempered to stay sharp 
longer and to give more years of good service. Among 
the most popular of Disston saws is the Disston D-23 
handsaw shown here. 

DISSTON D-23 HANDSAW 

Light Weight, Straight-back Pattern 

True taper ground — from tooth edge to back and from 
butt to point on back — with even gauge along entire 
tooth edge for easier, faster, truer cutting. Perfectly 
balanced with a precision that carries force of thrust 
directly to cutting edge. Cross-cut: 20-inch, 10 points; 
24-inch, 8 and 10 points; 26-inch, 7, 8, 10 and 11 points. 
Rip: 5Vi points. 

ASK YOUR HARDWARE RETAILER 
FOR A DISSTON SAW 



HENRY DISSTON & SONS, INC. 

904 Tacony f Philadelphia 35, Pa., U. S. A. 



NOW AVAILABLE! 




ELD-5IDING 



TRADE MARK 




CELO-SIDING is a superior insulation sid- 
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A MULTI-PURPOSE PRODUCT! 

Celo-Siding provides insulation plus sheath- 
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side painting or maintenance. What's more, 
it's warm and draft-free in winter, cool in 
summer and is easy to heat and ventilate. 

IDEAL FOR ANY UTILITY BUILDINGS! 

Since insulated buildings can be built 
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THE CELOTEX CORPORATION • CHICAGO 3, ILLINOIS 



A Celotex product 

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NATIONALLY ADVERTISED! 

To tell your customers about this remark- 
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The Fight For Human Dignity 

Editor's Note : Just before his untimely death aboard the steamer that was bringing him 
home from the recent J.L.O. conference at Geneva, Switzerland, Bob Watt, permanent AFL repre- 
sentative to that body, prepared the following report of tliis year's meeting. Present at the I.L.O. 
conference as a labor advisor was Second General Vice .President John R. Stevenson. The I.L.O. 
International Labor Organization is a permanent world-wide body to which is delegated the 
task of studying world-wide working conditions and living standards with the end in view of 
elevating both through international cooperation. It is the only world-wide association in which 
labor is permanently represented as such. The following account by the late Brother Watt sum- 
marizes the accomplishments of this year's I.L.O. meeting. 

By BOB WATT 

American Workers Delegate to I.L.O. 



THE International Labor Organization is the only official interna- 
tional agency which includes in its policy-making body repre- 
sentatives of workers and employers on a par with those of 
governments, the only world institution created after World War I which 
is functioning and the only one dedicated to promote social justice as an 
essential to the maintenance of peace. 

On June 19 the thirtieth session of the I.L.O.'s legislative body, the 
International Labor Conference, convened at Geneva, Switzerland. It 
opened on the theme of personal liberty, and its final meeting closed on 
the same note. In the often stormy debates which intervened could be 
seen the struggle between those 
who love liberty and "those who 
scorn it, between those who pa- 
tiently seek progress in the interest 
of the common man and those who 
agitate for the attainment of totali- 
tarianism through deceit and distor- 
tion. 

The keynote of the Conference 
was established in the opening ad- 
dress of Sir Guidhaume Myrddin- 
Evans, chairman of the Governing 
Body of the I.L.O. He emphasized 
that, "of all things in this world," 
the liberty of the person is the most 
precious and, for just that reason, 
one of the most difficult of all 
things to achieve and to hold. 

Many speakers echoed Myrddin- 
Evans' words. The theme was reit- 
ated in the speeches of the president 
of the Conference, Carl Hambro, as 
well as in the speeches by labor, em- 
ployer and government spokesmen. 



Having myself been selected by 
the workers' group as the workers' 
vice-president of the Conference, I 
had the opportunity to call atten- 
tion in the closing minutes to the 
fact that : 

"The I.L.O. has no meaning and 
will have no meaning unless it 
preaches and practices democratic 
liberty. Democratic liberty to me 
means freedom under law — under a 
law which is consistent with the 
fundamental rights and responsi- 
bilities of free men." 

But I also expressed my hope 
that every delegate had learned 
through the Conference, if that 
were possible, to have an even 
greater respect for the process of 
democratic discussion and respon- 
sible determination. To be quite 
frank, some of those present have 
not recently been accustomed to 



6 



THE CARPENTER 



genuine democracy but have become were as unfounded as they were 

insulting to delegates from other 
countries. Some of us undertook to 



very well \-ersed in the use of the 
word as a smokescreen for those 
who would demolish democracy. 
Among delegates and advisers, 
there were the Communists, some 
avowed and some hidden : there 
were fellow travelers and pinks; 
there were naive and misguided 
ones, too. Under the I.L.O.'s con- 
stitution, each member government 
is required to choose employer and 
worker delegates in agreement with 
the industrial or- 
ganizat i on s. if 
such exist, which 
are most repre- 
sentative. Since 
the membership 
of the I.L.O. in- 
cludes f i f ty-t wo 
countries, several 
of which are un- 
der Soviet domi- 
nation, and since 
the central organ- 
izations of work- 
ers even in some 
other countries 
are Communist- 
controlled, it is 
obvious that cer- 
tain delegations 
included a sub- 
stantial number of individuals who, 
either from choice or compulsion, 
follow the party line. 

The Communists and their fol- 
lowers displayed servile enthusiasm 
for the words and actions of the 
Argentine delegation, which was 
led by persons eager to shout the 
praises of Peron and to boast of 
the new "workers' democracy." The 
Nazis once followed similar meth- 
ods, made similar claims and asked 
similar praise. 

The workers' delegate from Ar- 




Second General Vice President John R. 
Stevenson (right) and Under Secretary 
of Labor David A. Morse confer at Geneva 
during the 30th I.L.O. session. 



correct the record amid efforts by 
the opposition to shout us down. 
Believe it or not, the Argentine 
group had the boisterous applause 
of the Communist group and even 
of certain individual Australians 
who profess merely to be left-wing 
Labor Party members. 

The episode was unpleasant and 
seemed alarming evidence of the 
affinity of totali- 
tarian of all 
sorts. However, 
there was one en- 
couraging after- 
math. Before my 
departure I was 
gratified to have a 
visit from a num- 
ber of the Argen- 
tinians who said 
there had been 
serious misunder- 
standings which 
they sincerely re- 
gretted. 

It is easy for 
some of us at 
home to underes- 
timate the impor- 
tance of the I.L.O. 
That would be a disastrous mistake. 
In the lineup of today between de- 
mocracy and dictatorship, the I.L.O. 
plays a role of vital importance. 

The International Labor Organ- 
ization provides one of the rare in- 
ternational forums where ideas can 
be exchanged by men and women 
outside of the diplomatic service. 
It brings together practical, experi- 
enced people, even though some 
governments, including our own, 
mav at times choose some who ap- 



gentina made certain allegations in pear extremely unsuitable for such 
his speech to the Coneference which assignments. 



THE CARPENTER 



It is because the I.L.O. is so im- 
portant to the development of a 
sound and durable peace and to the 
building- of a healthy international 
Order that I was concerned over in- 
dications that insidious influences 
were at work in some delegations 
and even among some members of 
the staff. It was for this reason that 
I warned the Conference that the 
I.L.O. would fail miserably if it 
ever allowed itself to become a pup- 
pet of individual ambitions or "the 
marionette of ideological manipu- 
lation, of any color or stripe." 

In admitting the real concern 
which I felt at the indications of 
manipulation by a few key individ- 
uals who are out of place today on 
the staff of the I.L.O., I am glad to 
report that I have some reason for 
confidence that the situation will 
largely be corrected before the next 
session convenes. 

On such issues it is good to be 
able to declare that the employer 
member of the Governing Body 
from the United States, David Zell- 
erbach, is ioo per cent in agreement 
with me. Zellerbach, who shares my 
belief in the urgent need for the 
maximum effectiveness of the I.L.O. 
at this time, likewise believes that 
strong steps should and can be 
taken to make the I.L.O. a truly 
international institution of first- 
rank importance, free from any bias 
against political or economic de- 
mocracy, private or competitive 

capitalism. 
# 
We do not ask that anything be 

slanted in our favor. We believe 
that the United States system can 
cheerfully invite the closest scru- 
tiny by any competent, unbiased ob- 
server. Incidentally, Zellerbach's 
address was one of the highlights of 
the Conference. He quoted exten- 
sively from A. F. of L. publications 



to contrast the free American sys- 
tem with the Russian setup. 

Daivd A. Morse, Assistant Secre- 
tary of Labor, was one of the two 
United States government delegates. 
He distinguished himself as chair- 
man of the highly controversial 
Committee on Freedom of Associa- 
tion. 

Senator Elbert D. Thomas of 
Utah was the other American gov- 
ernment delegate, with Congress- 
man Augustine B. Kelley of Penn- 
sylvania as adviser and substitute 
delegate. Both had attended previ- 
ous sessions. They are keenly in- 
terested in promoting improved so- 
cial standards through international 
cooperation. 

The men who accompanied me 
as advisers were of high caliber and 
I was highly pleased by .the fine 
teamwork which was manifested. 

Harry Fraser, president of the 
Order of Railway Conductors, 
served as my substitute on the Com- 
mittee on Social Policy in Non- 
Metropolitan Territories. It was a 
heavy assignment, as evidenced by 
the fact that this one committee pro- 
duced five conventions, all of which 
received more than the necessary 
two-thirds vote of the Conference 
and three of which won unanimous 
approval. 

John T. Kmetz, Executive Board 
member of the United Mine Work- 
ers, represented American labor on 
the Standing Orders Committee, 
which this year had a number of 
important and technical proposals . 
before it as a result of Governing 
Body action. He was elected work- 
ers' vice-chairman of the committee 
and helped materially to expedite 
the committee's work. The report 
which this committee brought in 
was unanimously adopted. 



3 



THE CARPENTER 



Peter T. Schoemann. vice-presi- 
dent of the United Association 
of Journeymen and Apprentices of 
the Plumbing and Pipefitting In- 
dustry, handled the Committee on 
Employment Service Organization. 
This committee was meeting for the 
first time. Its deliberations, there- 
fore, were exploratory and intended 
only to lay the basis upon which 
next year a convention and a recom- 
mendation on the organization of 
employment services may be draft- 
ed and submitted for adoption. 

Paul L. Siemiller of the Interna- 
tional Association of Machinists 
chose the Labor Inspection Com- 
mittee assignment and was elected 
workers' vice-chairman. This group 
produced a convention concerning 
labor inspection in industry and 
commerce which was unanimously 
adopted. 

J.'R. Stevenson, vice-president of 
the United Brotherhood of Carpen- 
ters and Joiners, served on the Res- 
olutions Committee. This proved to 
be a lively assignment. A resolu- 
tion introduced without previous 
consultation by the United States 
government in connection with wo- 
men's work was well - intentioned 
but needed some extensive altera- 
tions before it could be adopted. An 
even more important issue was in- 
volved in the resolution introduced 
by the veteran Leon Jouhaux of 
France hailing the crucial Paris 
meeting of the foreign ministers of 
Great Britain, France and Russia 
to lay European reconstruction 
plans, as suggested by Secretary 
of State Marshall, and reiterating 
I.L.O. readiness to offer all assist- 
ance within its scope. 

It was a damatic move, intended 
to demonstrate world support at the 
very outset of the Paris sessions. 
Needless to say, Communists pres- 



ent fell over themselves in support. 
Only Argentina raised difficulties, 
and those were in the nature of an 
attempt to record a desire for a 
worldwide conference. But the res- 
olution, after healthy debate, was 
unanimously approved by the com- 
mittee and adopted by the Confer- 
ence. (P.S. — The unanimity was ex- 
pressed before the U.S.S.R. decided 
to walk out of the Paris meeting.) 

A really tempestuous assignment 
fell to John H. Sylvester, vice-pres- 
ident of the Brotherhood of Rail- 
way and Steamship Clerks. He 
was the American workers' repre- 
sentative on the Committee on Free- 
dom of Association and did an 
effective job. That was demonstrat- 
ed by the criticisms which were 
hurled against him by the Com- 
munists, who marshalled nearly all 
their forces for this committee. 

Those who know John Sylvester 
will realize that he stood his 
ground without concern. In the dis- 
cussion it was easy to see where 
loyalties lay. and one could even 
evaluate the character of the W.F.- 
T.U. by noting what individuals 
salaamed to it in their speeches. 

The apologists for the WF.T.U. 
studiously ignored the fact that the 
American Federation of Labor long 
ago filed with the Economic and 
Social Council of the United Na- 
tions a Declaration of Human 
Rights which ranks as one of the 
finest descriptions of a code for 
individual liberty. They likewise 
ignored the fact that the* A. F. of 
L. has filed a later memorandum on 
freedom of association which, in 
comparison with the frothy ideology 
of the W.F.T.U. resolution, stands 
with redoubled impressiveness. 

The committee completed a reso- 
lution concerning freedom of asso- 
ciation and protection of the right 



THE CARPENTER 



to organize and bargain collectively 
which was adopted without dissent 
by the Conference. The committee 
recommended that the Conference 
in 1948 should consider the question 
with a view to the adoption of one 
or several conventions at that ses- 
sion and should also begin discus- 
sions on the application of the prin- 
ciples of the right to organize and 
bargain collectively and of collec- 
tive agreements, conciliation and 
arbitration. These proposals were 
accepted by a vote of 124 to o. 

Bernard Wiesman, a close friend 
and associate for nearly twenty 
years, attended the sessions as State 
Department adviser on the many 
important political, economic and 
financial problems which todav af- 
fect United States participation in 
the I.L.O. 

Physical arrangements were also 
in the hands of a State Department 
officer, Bruce Grainger, and were 
more competently handled than on 
any previous occasion in the dozen 
years of my participation in the. 
I.L.O. I have special reason to be 
grateful for the aid of other officers 
of the State Department on this 
journey, especially those at Geneva, 
Milan, Rome and Naples. 

The readmission of Austria was 
approved by unanimous vote in one 
of the Conference's major actions. 
Austria, once a foremost center of 
vigorous and democratic trade un- 
ionism, is now, two years after lib- 
eration from Nazi domination, still 
being bled by the Russian army of 
occupation while the other allies 
seek to establish a peace treaty and 
restore political as well as economic 
liberty and livelihood. 

Yugoslavia, never a country with 
a significant trade union movement 
and currently the most sovietized 
of the satellite states, has signified 



its intention of withdrawing from 
the I.L.O. and accordingly filed the 
necessary two years' notice of with- 
drawal. The step is regretted by 
those who, believing the I. L. O. 
should be universal,, have hoped that 
the exposure of representatives of 
any totalitarian state to the pro- 
cesses of democracy might possibly 
produce eventual benefits. 

The Yugoslav move may have 
been for bargaining purposes un- 
less it was simply a demonstration 
by Tito of his complete commun- 
ism. The reason for the first sup- 
position is that the World Federa- 
tion o'f Trade Unions, after the 
Communist bloc had for two years 
steadily refused to permit it to rec- 
ognize the existence of the I.L.O., 
suddenly decided last June to in- 
form the I.L.O. of its readiness to 
discuss terms of relationship. 

A telegram came before the Gov- 
erning Body, but the proposed 
"terms" purportedly had not been 
^disclosed before the Governing 
Body's session adjourned. Antici- 
pating a series of frills, I spoke on 
the subject briefly. I congratulated 
Jouhaux, Lombardo Toledano of 
Mexico and Chu Hsueh-fan of 
China, all members of the W.F.T.U. 
executive body as well as of the 
Governing Body of the I.L.O., for 
having succeded in convincing their 
W.F.T.U. colleagues at long last 
that the I.L.O. is not a wicked cap- 
italistic monster seeking to domin- 
ate the world. 

Many of those who have tried for 
three or four. years to waylay and 
sandbag the I.L.O. because they be- 
lieved it might be an obstacle to the 
W.F.T.U. are now perhaps aware 
that the W.F.T.U. needs props very 
urgently. Somewhat belatedly they 
turn toward the I.L.O.. But I trust 
that the United States will reso- 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



luetely refuse to allow the I.T.O. in 
any way to 'be used to sustain a con- 
sistently anti-American and anti- 
democratic W.F.T.U. 

Americans must realize that a 
world-wide campaign of propa- 
ganda, agitation, infiltration, incite- 
ment and sabotage is well under 
way against democracy. The same 
vicious attacks against the United 
States or against Truman, Marshall 
and Vandenberg are made against 
Bevin, Bidault and de Gasperi. In 
some countries the form is more 
direct. . 

What has occurred in Europe and 
Asia in the past three years con- 
firms that little if any distinction 
can be found between Hitlerism and 
Stalinism. We must remember the 
hideous price paid in the end for 
the early appeasement of Hitler. 
We must see to it that the decent 
people everywhere stand together 
and convince Russia that its im- 
perialistic nationalism and imperi- 
alistic communism must be aban- 
doned. 

fhe American people must take 
steps to tell the world the facts 
about our country. I was horrified 
at the extent to which real friends 
of the United States in other coun- 
tries have been confused by the 
flood of deceitful anti-American 
propaganda. 

I was disgusted at the alleged 
"broadmindedness" of many indi- 
vidual Americans who go abroad 
for some agency of our government 
or who secure very remunerative 
employment from inter-govern- 



mental agencies. Soviet efforts to 
strangle Austria and Communist sa- 
botage in France, Italy, China and 
other countries- don't worry these 
individuals. They don't quote 
Henry Wallace or Zilliacus, but 
they parrot their arguments. 

I trust that Secretary Marshall 
and the heads of other government 
agencies will take steps to screen out 
those whose loyalty to their country 
and to the institution of democracy 
is lukewarm or lacking, so that they 
will not be fattened at the expense 
of the taxpayers they barely tol- 
erate. As for employes of internar 
tional agencies, I fully agree jthat 
international-mindedness is neces- 
sary, but I doubt that anyone who is 
not first of all completely loyal to 
democracy can be a faithful em- 
ploye of an international agency. , 

Our nation must acquire a .com- 
plete, adequate, well-financed and 
shrewdly directed Foreign Service 
staffed by Americans who will truly 
defend and promote democracy. We 
need men and women of intelli- 
gence, loyalty, vision and practieal- 
lity. We need a "Voice of America" 
so powerful, so skillful, and so 
multi-channeled that it cannot be 
thwarted by the members of the 
most extensive and nefarious im^ 
perialism which has perhaps ever 
existed — Russian communism. 

In the meantime, let us help the 
I.L.O. to serve the cause of liberty 
by keeping it a clean, driving force 
for social and economic democracy 
among all nations which respect the 
integrity of the human individual,. 



DEATH CALLS FIREMEN'S PRESIDENT 

President John F. McNamara of the International Brotherhood of Firemen 
and Oilers died suddenly July 23 while on vacation at Hampton Beach, New 
Hampshire. Brother McNamara had given twenty years of distinguished leader- 
ship to his organization. He was sixty-five. 

Brother McNamara joined the Firemen and Oilers when he was still in his 
twenties.. At. the,19 27 convention of the international union he was elected pres- 
ident. He won re-election at every convention that followed. 



ii 



Humanity's Holiday 

• 

LABOR DAY rightfully belongs to American Workers who toil dili- 
gently day after day to contribute their share to the greatness of 
this Nation. 
Long before Labor Day became a legal public holiday it was celebrated 
by workers as a day of festive activity and rest from their daily tasks. It 
was the creation of laborers, not of politicians. It was the brain-child of a 
union carpenter twelve years before Labor Day was proclaimed a national 
holiday by Act of Congress. 

Peter J. McGuire, a native of New York City who joined the ranks of 
America's toilers while still a child, was the father of the observance in 
honor of the country's working people. 
In May, 1882, he stood before the 



newly organized Central Labor Un- 
ion of New York City and proposed 
that one day of the year be set aside 
as a general holiday for the working 
masses. 

McGuire suggested that the holi- 
day be known as Labor Day and 
that it be set for the first Monday 
in September, which would put it 
midway between two national -holi- 
days — the Fourth of July and 
Thanksgiving. 

Other delegates to the meeting 
enthusiastically embraced the idea. 
A committee was named and soon 
preparations were under way for 
the initial celebration of Labor Day. 
Approximately two years after this 
first Labor Day, the 26 delegates 
to the fourth annual convention of 
the American Federation of Labor 
held in Chicago adopted the follow- 
ing resolution: 

"Resolved, That the first Monday 
in September of each year be set 
apart as a laborer's national holi- 
day, and that we recommend its 
observance by all wage workers, 
irrespective of sex, calling or na- 
tionality." 



During the next few years or- 
ganized labor devoted its attention 
to securing state legislation making 
Labor Day a legal holiday. As 
early as 1887, Oregon enacted the 
first State law, but this measure des- 
ignated the first Saturday in June 
as Labor Day. This was changed to 
the first Monday in September in 
1893. Ultimately, 23 States pro- 
claimed Labor Day a legal holiday. 

The Labor Committee of the 
House of Representatives in May of 
1894 presented a favorable report 
on a bill making Labor Day a legal 
public holiday. 

By June 26, of that year Congres- 
sional action on the bill had been 
completed and two days later the 
measure was signed by President 
Grover Cleveland. The pen used by 
the President was turned over to 
Representative Amos J. Cummings 
of New York City, who sponsored 
the bill in the House. Cummings 
then sent the pen to President Sam- 
uel Gompers of the American Fed- 
eration. 

Thus, a dozen years after Mc- 
Guire first advanced the idea of a 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



special holiday honoring- labor be- 
fore the Central Labor Union of 
New York City, the proposal had 
the approval of the American peo- 
ple, expressed through their repre- 
sentatives at Washington. 

Over the years since 1882 much 
has been said concerning, the sig- 
nificance of Labor Day. One of 
the best statements was made by 
Samuel Gompers, president of the 
American Federation of Labor, in 
an editorial written 46 years ago 
for the American Federationist. 
While the reference to the Nine- 
teenth Century is remote, Gompers' 
remarks are timeless in point. He 
wrote : 

"No day in the calendar is a great- 
er fixture, one which is more truly 
regarded as a real holiday, or one 
which is so surely destined to en- 
dure for all time, than the first Mon- 
day in September of each recurring 
year, Labor Day. 

"Labor Day differs in every es- 
sential from the other holidays of 
the year of any country. All other 
holidays are, in a more or less de- 
gree, connected with conflicts and 
battles, of man's prowess over man, 
of strife and discord for greed or 
power, of glories achieved by one 
nation over another. 

"Labor Day, on the other hand, 
marks a new epoch in the annals of 
human history. It is at once a mani- 
festation of reverence for the strug- 
gles of the masses against tyranny 
and injustice from time immemo- 
rial ; an impetus to battle for the 
right in our day for the men, wo- 
men, and children of our time and 
gives hope and encouragement for 
the attainment of tne aspirations for 
the future of the human family. 

"It is devoted to no man, living or 
dead ; to no sect, sex, race, or nation. 
It. is founded upon the highest 



principles of humanity, as broad 
in its scope as the universe. 

"It was not given to but conquer- 
ed by labor, and established as a. 
holiday before. any legislature, state 
or national, enacted into law. 

"The marching toilers in the La-, 
bor Day demonstrations signalize 
no martial glory, brutal domination, 
conquests or warlike pomp. They 
are, in their essence, the manifesta- 
tions of the growing intelligence 
of the workers who recognize that 
peace is as essential to successful 
industry and real progress as air is 
to lung-breathing animals ; that jus- 
tice to the toilers has too long been 
denied; that in the midst of the 
civilization at the close of the Nine- 
teenth Century, wrongs, too gross, 
widespread and well known to re- 
quire mention here still abound; 
that if man is to be free in the time' 
to come, eternal vigilance must be 
exercised, organization of the 
workers proclaimed, maintained and 
extended; education of the educat- 
ed as well as the masses be furth- 
ered and nurtured, and agitation of. 
labor's wrongs endured and rights 
denied undertaken, with all the zest 
and energy begotten by devotion to 
a cause which is at once holy, noble, 
pure, lofty, just, wise and humane." 

Newspaper accounts have pre-, 
served for us the color attendant 
upon the celebration of the first La- 
bor Day in New York City when 
American labor, led by Peter J. 
McGuire, paraded in orderly fash- 
ion -through the streets of New 
York. 

Of the picnic in Elm Park follow- 
ing the parade, one newspaper said: 

"It had been arranged that each 
union would have a certain portion 
of the grounds marked out for it- 
self, and this facilitated a greater 
fraternizing than otherwise could 
have been observed. 



THE CARPENTER 13 

"As it was, fellow-workers and the best-received speakers, of 

their families sat together, joked course was McGuire himself, 

together and caroused together. . . . Whh eV ening came a still larger 

Americans and English, Irish and crowd for only a fraction of the 

Germans, they all hobnobbed and dt y s employers had decreed a holi- 

seemed on a friendly footing, as day> and the Central Labor Union 

though the common cause had estab- had advised all whose employers 

hshed a sense of closer brother- desire d them to work to do so. 

nooa - Fireworks and dancing both had im- 

From mid-afternoon to nightfall portant parts in the after dark por- 

there was speechmaking. One of tion of the festival. 



Bob Watt Answers Last Call 

Robert J. Watt, international representative of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, died suddenly aboard ship on the high seas July 22nd. He 
was on his way back to the United States after participating in the recent 
International Labor Conference at Geneva, Switzerland, which he had 
attended as the American workers' delegate. 

The cause of death was heart disease. Mr. Watt had suffered a heart 
attack some months ago, but after weeks of rest he had appeared com- 
pletely-recovered and had resumed his duties. He was 53 years old. 

Apprenticed as a painter in Scotland, Mr. Watt migrated to America 
soon after becoming a journeyman. He settled in the vicinity of Boston. 
Within a short time he became a leading figure in organized labor in that 
area. From president of his own local, Mr. Watt soon progressed to the 
presidency of the Lawrence Central Labor Union. From 1929 to 1937 he 
served as secretary-treasurer of the Massachusetts State Federation. 

Nominated at the AFL as the American workers delegate to the Inter- 
national Labor Organization in 1936, he showed such a grasp of interna- 
tional affairs that he was sooned named the permanent delegate. Since 
that time he has filled the post in an admirable manner. Labor through- 
out the world mourns his passing. 

Surviving Mr. Watt are his widow and two children. 



LIVING STANDARDS ON WAY DOWN 

Earnings of factory workers hit a new high in June of $48.91 a week, but in 
terms of "real wages" the workers are worse off than a year ago and in much poor- 
er position than during the war, Department of Labor reports showed. 

During the past 12 months, weekly earnings in manufacturing rose by less 
"than 13 per cent, while the official living cost index shot up 18 per cent. 

The gap is even greater compared to the peak wartime year af 1944. Weekly 
earnings then averaged $46.08 a week. "Take-home" pay now is only about 6 
per cent higher than the 1944 average, while living costs are 25 per cent greater. 

Thus, in terms of buying power, the earning of factory workers are 19 per cent 
below wartime levels. 

Furthermore, the June "take-home" wage of industrial workers will buy only 
as much as $30 did back in 1939, the Department said. 




is ip 



IT MUST HAVE BEEN A SAVELL, 
JOKE 

Two hours after reading a joke a 
young Oakland usherette was still 
laughing. A half an hour later she was 
hysterical, and still later she was un- 
conscious. Revived by a police emer- 
gency squad an hour later she was still 
laughing in an emergency hospital bed. 
Finally she responded to treatment. 

Since she couldn't remember the joke, 
doctors were baffled as to the cause of 
her outburst. • 

About the only sure thing is that she 
wasn't reading this column. 

• • • 

VOICE OF EXPERIENCE 

According to a recent announcement 
by a church organization, between ten 
and twelve billion dollars are lost an- 
nually by Americans who patronize var- 
ious kinds of gambling ventures. And 
this sort of reminds us of the favorite 
saying of an old horse player we know. 

"It is a well-known fact," he says, 
"that race horses are not allowed to eat 
the day before a race. With bettors it 
is usually the day after the race." 




We signaled! Because I had both 
hands on the wheel, she signaled for me. 



A DIFFERENT HORSE 

The daily papers are trying to point 
the finger of shame at organized labor 
because the unions have shown a deter- 
mination not to take the slave labor 
bill lying down. What the papers seem 
to forget is the Big Business fought the 
Wagner Act for years. In fact some 
industrialists haven't as yet, ten years 
after, stopped looking for ways and 
means of sidestepping the aet. ; 

And somehow or other all this brings 
to mind the old one about the two 
attorneys. 

Counsel for the defense was cross- 
examining the witness, a pretty girl with 
lovely big blue eyes. The lawyer leaned 
forward. . . 

"Where were you," he asked, "on 
Monday night?" 

The girl smiled sweetly. 

"Motoring," she replied. 

"And where were you," asked coun- 
sel, "on Tuesday night?" 

"Motoring," repeated the girl. 

Counsel leaned still closer. 

"And what," he murmured, "are you 
doing tomorrow night?" 

• The prosecuting counsel leaped to his 
feet. 

"Your lordship," he protested, "I ob- 
ject to that question." 

The judge shruged his shoulders. 

"And why do you object?" he in- 
quired, mildly. 

Prosecuting counsel drew himself up 
in righteous indignation. 

"Because," he snapped, "I asked her 
first!" 

• • • 

TIME FOR NAM TO ACT 

Believe it or not, a New York court 
has ruled that stockholders can sue com- 
pany executives who squander a firm's 
assets fighting unions. This hardly 
seems fair. No sooner does management 
get the handcuffs on labor through the 
Taft-Hartley Act than stockholders start 
getting some rights. Maybe the NAM 
ought to start sponsoring a law. 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



NOT VERY FUNNY 

Before marriage, a man yearns for a 
woman. After marriage the "Y" is 
silent. 

• • • 

SIMPLE MATHEMATICS 

In a recent radio forum in which the 
alarming divorce rate was the topic 
under discussion, a minister advocated 
a ban on marriage when the groom is 
considerably older than the bride. "A 
girl of twenty who contemplates marry- 
ing a man of forty should remember 
that he will be sixty when she is forty." 

For our part, we agree with the min- 
ister. How much better it would be 
for a girl of forty to marry a man of 
twenty. Then they could reach sixty at 
about the same time. 

• • • 
SORT OF COMPLICATED 

When the bombs were raining on 
England in the early days of the war, 
the courage and tenacity of the English 
people won the admiration of the world. 
The English are now showing the same 
kind of courage in the present economic 
crisis. Bankrupt, badly battered, and 
surrounded by all kinds of economic 
hurdles that look insurmountable, the 
English are nevertheless fighting vali- 
antly for economic recovery. Last month 
the already tight controls on the lives 
of Englishmen, were tightened even 
more by the adoption of new rules gov- 
erning imports and exports. They will 
mean even lower standards of living for 
the people for some time to come. 

Not being an international financier, 
the way the new English program will 
operate is not exactly clear to us. How- 
ever, it sort of puts us in mind of the 
beautiful but dumb girl who was taking 
a civil service examination. One of the 
questions asked was the following: 

"If a man buys an article for $12.25 
and sells it for $9.75, does he gain or 
lose by the transaction?" 

After pondering the question for 
awhile, the sweet young thing wrote 
down the following answer: 

"He gains on the cents but loses on 
the dollars." 

• • • 

PAUP ON SUCCESS 

"Success," opines Joe Paup, the poor 
man's philosopher, "is the ability to get 
along with some folks and get ahead of 
others." 



FIRST TIME 

As the Eightieth Congress was rush- 
ing things through early in July in an 
effort to adjourn before the heat of 
summer set in, there was considerable 
talk among members of both houses 
regarding an increase in the statutory 
minimum wage from forty cents to sixty 
or sixty-five cents an hour. Inasmuch 
as that was the first indication of any 
progressive action by the Eightieth Con- 
gress, we were sort of reminded of the 
Scotchman who was run over by a beer 
truck. For the first time in his life the 
drinks were on him. 

• • ' • 
NOT HARD TO DO 

In the dying hours of the last session 
of Congress, Senator Taft, of all people, 
introduced a measure calling for a Con- 
gressional investigation of runaway 
prices. 

Fifteen months ago, Taft was in the 
forefront of those demanding that free 
competition be given a chance to bring 
down prices. Over and over he reiterat- 
ed that a free hand to business was all 
that was needed to drive prices down- 
ward. He put over his program and 
prices virtually doubled. 

If he really wants to find out what 
caused high prices all he has to do is 
gather together Senator Wherry of Ne- 
braska and a few other of his cronies 
and take a good, long, collective, look in 
a mirror. 




A former second looie, ehf Can you 
guess what I wast 



Editorial 



" 




A Stench to Honest Nostrils 

We sincerely hope that Hitler is dead. In the years when his star 
was in its ascendency, the pompous little paper hanger often belabored the 
democracies as decadent, rotten, graft-ridden failures shot through and 
through with special privilege for the rich at the expense of the poor. If 
Adolph is still alive, the disclosures being made by the Senate War Inves- 
tigating Committee are certainly giving him plenty of ammunition for any 
future tirades against democracy. 

Most of last month the papers were full of charges and counter charges, 
made by many important people as the investigating committee delved into 
certain contracts awarded a West Coast, plane builder. We are in no 
position to know who is right and who is wrong. In fact we do not even 
care very much. What concerns us most right now is the rottenness which 
prevailed in some high places during the war years as disclosed by the 
committee's pryings into the contracts. 

Testimony presented to the committee showed that hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars were spent by one man alone in wining, dining, and enter- 
taining Brass Hats and other people in influential positions. Entertainment 
checks for a single evening ran as high as $5,000. Girl friends at $100 and 
$125 a night were common items on the expense account of the individual 
who did most of the kowtowing to the big shots for the company. When 
one realizes that all this money was charged to operating expense and' 
therefore came out of the taxpayer's pocket, the matter is enough to make 
one retch. 

While all this was going on, you and I were being urged to save and 
do without and buy bonds. If we even hinted that we wanted another five 
cents an hour to try to keep our heads above water we were cussed up 
one side and down the other as being unpatriotic and sure to bring on 
inflation. There never seemed to be anything inflationary about big shots 
throwing around millions; the only threat there ever was to inflation was 
a poor worker getting two dimes together in his pocket at the same time. 

And while all this lavish entertainment was going on at your expense 
and mine, you and I were trying to keep one jump ahead of the ration 
books. Remember how proud the missus was when she came home with 
a pound of pig knuckles or a can of Spam? Running across a couple of 
pork chops was the equivalent of finding a couple of diamonds. But there 
never was any shortage of thick sirloins or juicy T-bones at the Stork Club 
or the other swank clip joints where the taxpayer's money was being 
tossed around to entertain the Brass. 

Bad as our conditions were at home, they were infinitely better than 
those of the GI's. While they dodged bullets and survived on K-rations 
and dreamed of American girls they had not seen in years, certain Brass 



THE CARPENTER 17 

Hats were wining and dining- on choice morsels with $125 an evening hus- 
sies. Now the same GI's are getting money deducted from their pay envel- 
opes to help pay the debt. 

If there is any moral in all this, it is that war is a dirty, rotten, stinking 
mess from start to finish. It always has been and always will be. The 
burden always falls on the common people. We, the common people, 
therefore, have the biggest stake in seeing that no more wars come. 



A Time for Reflection 

Labor Day, 1947, more than any Labor Day in the past quarter century, 
ought to be a time for sober reflection. For the workers of America a 
bottomless abyss is yawning in the immediate foreground. It is an abyss 
of insecurity, depression and privation. As never before in the 170-year 
old history of our country, greed is in the saddle and riding roughshod 
over everything. 

Statistics reveal that corporation profits during the first half of this 
year reached unbelievable proportions. In fact they are so high that 
business publications are actually embarrassed and apologetic. Despite 
this fact, new price increases are being tacked on all along the line. Steel 
prices have already been jumped five to ten dollars a ton. General Motors 
has upped car prices as much as $168. Coal prices have been hiked as 
much as two dollars per ton. New markups are due in cotton textiles, 
clothing, and cloth goods of all kinds. A major shoe producer predicts 
price increases in shoes of around fifty per cent. 

Yet the Department of Commerce reveals that profits for the first 
six months of this year have climbed close to nine billion dollars. This 
is around eighty-five per cent above 1946 figures. In fact, profits for the 
first half of this year are higher than the total profits for any one whole 
year prior to 1941. At the present rate, 1947 profits will top 1929 by 100% 
although 1929 has long been considered the bonanza year of all time for 
business. 

To the housewife who has to stretch the weekly pay check to the 
maximum to keep her family fed and clothed, all this is no news. The 
price of everything she buys is going up by leaps and bounds. Any wage 
increases her husband may have received since 1941 are more than gobbled 
up by price increases. And the end does not seem to be in sight. 

In view of the fantastic profits business piled up from January to June 
it would seem that business had every reason for being satisfied. Yet 
such was not the case. Corporation heads railed against the unions and 
exerted tremendous pressure on Washington until they got the Taft- 
Hartley Bill enacted into law. Their theme song was that unions were 
driving them to the wall. If unions were hurting them so much, how does 
it happen that profits have climbed to all time highs? 

No, the Taft-Hartley Act was not passed because business was suffer- 
ing at the hands of labor. It was passed because greed is running rampant 
throughout American industry. And the greed will never be satisfied 



18 THE CARPENTER 

with anything less than the complete elimination of organized labor so 
that wages as well as prices will be under the complete domination of 
business. 

We have said it often before and we now say it again: the course the 
nation is now pursuing can only end in disaster. Every time prices have 
outrun wages for any length of time, collapse has followed. The same. 
will happen again. It may not be this month or this year or even this 
decade. But sooner or later the laws of common sense and economics 
will catch up with us. 

From Congress as it is now constituted we can expect very little. The 
present Congressional leadership represents the people and the interests 
which have consistently opposed social progress and have never recon- 
ciled themselves to accept the great social strides that have been made 
in the last two decades. Like the vindictive post-Civil War Congress 
.which all but wrecked the nation, the present Congress is bent on subju- 
gating human welfare to material welfare. 

So long as such a Congress exists, that long can the common people 
expect nothing but retrogression. Theoretically at least, the people 
are still the masters and public officials are still the servants. Next year 
we will be privileged to choose our servants once more. Consequently it 
becomes the business of all of us to look toward 1948. It becomes the 
business of all of us to study and examine the records of all Congressmen 
for whom we can vote. It becomes our business to see that men who 
have an interest in the welfare and progress of the common people are 
placed on the ballot where incumbents have aligned themselves with 
thcforces of greed. In fact it becomes the business of all of us to devote 
ourselves to politics as we never have before. Otherwise we may pay a 
heavy price. 



Being an American Still a Privilege 

August 14th marked the second anniversary of the surrender of Japan 
and the cessation of hostilities. However, the dislocations of war are 
still largely with us. Prices are exhorbitant. profiteering' is rife, and 
the threat of inflation hangs heavy over the whole economy. Housing is 
scarce, transportation is inadequate, taxes are burdensome, and many com- 
modities, including items of food, are still below normal in supply. 

Yet for all the irritations and inconveniences these 'things produce, we 
in America are so much better off than any other portion of the globe that 
no honest comparison can be made. There is not a one of us but what 
should get down on his knees each day and thank God that his ancestors 
had the foresight and fortitude to come to America when they did. And 
this applies especially to the Communists who wax fat on the bounty 
America produces in personal freedom as well as goods while railing 
against the system that made them possible. 



THE CARPENTER 19 

Oregon Councils Hold Joint Installations 

In a noteworthy demonstration of unity, solidarity and cooperation in 
these days when organized labor is under attack from many sides, three 
District Councils in Oregon on July 19th and 20th held joint installation 
ceremonies in the city of Eugene. The meeting was planned and spon- 
sored by the Central Oregon District Council, the Klamath Basin District 
Council, and the Willamette Valley District Council. All other District 
Councils in the state were invited to send representatives and practically 
all of them did. 

At 10 a.m. Saturday morning, July 19th, the three District Councils 
met in separate meetings to tackle the business at hand, a fact that made 
it possible for visitors to attend three District Council meetings in one 
day. That evening a banquet and dance was held for the delegates and their 
wives in honor of Brother Cecil Richards who recently retired as secre- 
tary-treasurer of the Willamette Valley District Council after many years 
of faithful service. Hundreds of friends and guests were present to pay 
tribute to Brother Richards. The highlight of the banquet came when 
Brother Richards was presented with a .30 caliber deer rifle suitably in- 
scribed. The presentation was made by Albert E. Fischer, assistant to 
the General Secretary, on behalf of the entire membership of the Willa- 
mette Valley District Council. After the banquet tables were cleared away, 
dancing was enjoyed until a late hour. 

Sunday, July 20th, the joint installation ceremonies were held. Newly 
elected officers from the three District Councils arose in a body and 
accepted the oath of office in a precedent-setting ceremony of dignity and 
solemnity. Albert E. Fischer, assistant to the General Secretary, acted as 
Installing Officer after appointing Brother Cecil Richards as Installing 
Conductor. 

Many special guests were iri attendance. Short addresses were deliv- 
ered by Kenneth Davis, secretary, Northwestern Council ; Frank Easter- 
dahl, Oregon State Council; Ivor Jones, president, State Council; Ralph 
Barkley, Coast-Columbia District Council; James Whallon, Portland Dis- 
trict Council; Tom Cruickshank, Coos Bay District Council; Don Reed, 
Blue Mountain District Council; Jerry Miller, Local 226, Portland; A. R. 
Major, Local No. 1273; and a number of others. 

The meeting disbanded with a unanimous conviction that lasting good 
had been accomplished and special appreciation was extended the General 
Office for the presence and assistance of Brother Fischer, Assistant to the 

General Secretary. 

+ 

BUILDING TRADES AMONG MOST HAZARDOUS 

For years the assumption has been rather general that the building trades 
constituted the safest kinds of work. Recently, however, this theory was blasted 
to bits when the New York State Workmen's compensation Board revealed some 
startling figures. From its experience files the New York agency showed that in- 
stead of being among the safest, the building trades are among the most hazard- 
ous of all occupations. 

Only a few industries show a higher percentage of disabling accidents over 
the years than the construction trades. This adds materially to construction 
costs, the Board pointed out. It urged greater attention to safety in building 
trades and more widspread use of proper safeguards in all types of construction. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOEVERS 

of AMERICA 

General Office : Carpenters" Building. Indianapolis. Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HFTl'HESOX 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis. Ind. 



First Genera:. Yice-Presidext 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis. Ind. 



General S'etretart 

FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEYENSoN 
Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis. Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building. Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District. fHARLES JOHNSON. JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St.. New York 10. N. Y. 



Second District. WM. J. KELLY 
Carpent^' Bldg.. 24.'; 4th Ave.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 



Fifth District. R. E. ROBERTS 
631 W. Page. Dallas. Texas 



Third District. HARRY SCHWARZBB 
124S Walnut Ave.. Cleveland, O. 



Sixth District. A. W. MUIK 
Box 116S. Santa Barbara. Calif. 

Seventh District. ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. I-awrenee. Montreal. Que.. Can. 



Fourth District. ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St.. Florem-e. S. C. 



WM. L. HUTr'HESON. Chairman 
FRANK DUFFY. Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary 

Attention Financial Secretaries! 

With the introduction of the new quarterly account sheets, a few Fi- 
nancial Secretaries have apparently become confused as to the proper 
manner of reporting members who have fallen in arrears, quit or resigned. 

A member must not be listed as in arrears, quit or resigned until he 
owes three months dues or a sum equal thereto. To do otherwise is to 
act contrary to the General Laws of the Brotherhood. Financial Secre- 
taries in doubt should read Section 45. Paragraph A and B. of our General 
Laws. 



NEW CHARTERS ISSEED 



3040 Callender. Ont.. Can. 

30 41 Tygn Valley. Ore. 

1923 Monahans, Tex. 
3043 Etna. Cal. 

1924 Rockmart. Ga. 
1955 Lindenhurst, N. Y. 



19 66 Hartford City. Ind. 

1007 Florence, S. C. 

1092 Harlan. Ky. 

3044 Indianapolis. Ind. 

1174 Shell Lake, Wis. 



Not lost to those that love them, They still live in our memory, 

Not dead, just gone before; And will forever more 



%t&t in T^t&tt 



The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother FREDERICK J. ALF, Local No. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Brother CHRISTIAN ANDES, Local No. 514, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Brother RANDOLPH R. ATKINSON, Local No. 2159, Cleveland, Ohio 

Brother MELVIN AVERY, Local No. 278, Watertown, N. Y. 

Brother LYLE E. BLACK, Local No. 278, Watertown, N. Y. 

Brother GEORGE BOSHER, Local No. 514, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Brother CHARLES H. BURNS, Local No. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Brother FRED BUTLER, Local No. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Brother J. W. CALLER, Local No. 1266, Austin, Texas 

Brother ERNEST COURSON, Local No. 278, Watertown, N. Y. 

Brother JAMES COX, Local No. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Brother DAVID CRAST, Local No. 278, Watertown, N. Y. 

Brother HOWARD C. DAILEY, Local No. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Brother CARL M. DINKINS, Local No. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Brother HARRY DODSON, Local No. 2287, New York, N. Y. 

Brother EDWARD C. DOWNING, Local No. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Brother ISAAC EDWARDS, Local No. 514, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Brother JOSEPH FORBES, Local No. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Brother HARRY S. GEBHART, Local No. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Brother HARVEY GIRARD, Local No. 747, Oswego, N. Y. 

Brother FRED I. GRANT, Local No. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Brother RICHARD T. HARRISON, Local No. 184, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Brother RICHARD HENDREICH, Local No. 419, Chicago, 111. 

Brother CHARLES A. HOWARD, Local No. 1665, Alexandria, Va. 

Brother R. E. JOHNSON, Local No. 1207, Charleston, W. Va. 

Brother OLLIE JONES, Local No. 177, Springfield, Mass. 

Brother CECIL G. MOUNT, Local No. 2108, Shelbyville, Ind. 

Brother ROBERT OSBORNE, Local No. 2287, New York, N. Y. 

Brother OTTO SCHMIDT, Local No. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Brother WILLIAM SCHUBERT, Local No. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Brother L. M. SNYDER, Local No. 268, Sharon, Pa. 

Brother FRED H. STOWE, Local No. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Brother A. A. TOUCHTON, Local No. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Brother ROBT. A. WALKER, Local No. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Brother WALTER WEDGE, Local No. 1067, Port Huron, Mich. 

Brother WILLIAM B. WILLIAMS, Local No. 1943, Henryetta, Okla. 

Brother JAMES R. WILSON, Local No. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

Brother ANTON WOLZ, Local No. 366, New York, N. Y. 



CorrosponctancQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

NEW YORK STATE COUNCIL HOLDS LARGEST MEET 

The Editor: 

The Forty-first Annual Convention of the New York State Council of Carpenters, 
held July 31, August 1-2, 1947, in the city of Elmira was one of the largest in 
point of attendance in the history of the Council. One hundred forty delegates, 
three fraternal delegates and a large number of guests attended. 

General Executive Board Member Charles Johnson, Jr., made an instructive 
and educational address to the assembled delegates which was generously applaud- 
ed. Board Member Johnson also acted as the installing officer. 

Frank X. Ward, of the legal staff of the United Brotherhood gave a thorough 
explanation of the Taft-Hartley Bill as it will apply to our membership. A lengthy 
question and answer period clarified the issue in the minds of all present. 

Resolutions on the N. Y. State Unemployment Insurance Law, the Compensa- 
tion Law, resolutions urging passage of the Wagner-Taft-Ellender Housing Bill- in 
the next Congress, suggesting changes in the tax law to allow more home building 
and pledging complete cooperation to General President Hutcheson in all efforts 
to secure repeal of the Taft-Hartley Bill, were approved by the convention. 

President Charles W. Hanson, Vice-Presidents Fred E. Johnson and Sam 
Sutherland, Secretary-Treasurer John McMahon, Board Members, David Scanlan, 
Edward McLaughlin, John S. Sinclair, William T. Bennis, William S. Quinn, James 
F. Doughty, John Heiden and Thomas L. Hanover were elected for the ensuing 
year. 

It was with regret that the resignation of George Mulholland as First Vice- 
President was accepted. George is retiring to become a gentleman farmer in up- 
stage New York. Fred E. Johnson, Local Union 488, New York City was chosen 
to succeed Brother Mulholland. 

Fomer General Representative John Ryan, was a most welcome visitor and 
received a cordial greeting from the assembled group. 

Fraternally yours 

John McMahon, Secretary-Treasurer. 



WHITBY CARPENTERS HOLD ANNUAL OUTLNG 

The Editor: 

Saturday, July 19th, was a big day for the carpenters of Whitby, Ontario. On 
that date, Whitby Local Union No. 397 sponsored its Annual Picnic at Lynbrook 
Park. Even the weatherman was on the side of the Union. The day was a beauti- 
ful one and the picnic drew a very large attendance from all over the district as a 
result. 

There was never a dull moment all afternoon. The committee on sports had 
everything well arranged. There were various kinds of races and contests for the 
kiddies; there were nailing contests for the women while the men concentrated on 
a horse-shoe pitching contest. At 5:30 the ladies had a beautiful supper ready and 
all sat down to enjoy it to the utmost. 

Free ice cream was provided by the Local Union all day long. Toward the 
end of the evening the ladies held a sale of home cooking which was not only amus- 
ing but also very successful. From every angle the day was a big success, and the 
members of the U^jon voted both the ladies and the committee on arrangements a 
sincere vote of thanks. 

Sincerely yours, 

E. R. Wanes, Recording Secretary. 



THE CARPENTER 



23 




LOCAL UNION No. 70, CHICAGO, HONORS OLD TIMER 

The Editor: 

All that the Brotherhood is today it owes in -a great 
measure to the old timers who worked and fought and stood 
by their organization through many trials and tribulations. 
One such old timer is Brother Pierre Pouliot of Local Union 
No. 70, Chicago. 

At its regular meeting held on June 20th, Local Union 
No. 70 voted to give a party in honor of Brother Pouliot, the 
only living charter member. Brother Pouliot is now eighty- 
seven years of age and has been a member in good standing 
for over fifty years. For many years he has been a staunch 
pillar in the Local Union and he has never lost his keen 
interest in the affairs of his Local Union and the Brother- 
hood. 

Fraternally yours, 

Wm. J. Raymond, Rec. Sec. 



LOCAL No. 9 CELEBRATES 66th BIRTHDAY 

From one end of New York State to the other, Local Union No. 9, Buffalo, is 
known as the "Mother Local of the Carpenters' Union in America." The soubriquet 
is well earned, for the Buffalo Union had its application in for a charter in the 
Brotherhood several months before the organization was even formed. When 
the eleven Local Unions met in Chicago to form a national union of carpenters, 
the application of the Buffalo carpenters for a charter was already in the hands of 
the committee handling the matter. 

On June 14th Local Union No. 9 celebrated the sixty-sixth anniversary of it's 
chartering with a huge banquet and show in the Grand Ballroom of the Statler 
Hotel: Some 600 members, guests and friends were on hand to help make the 
affair a memorable one. From beginning to end the evening was a great success. 
The food was superb and the floor show presented by the American Guild of 
Variety Artists and Actors was outstanding. 

A host of distinguished guests were in attendance and their remarks were 
inspiring as well as educational. GEB member Charles Johnson, Jr., representing 
the General Officers who were unable to attend, extended greetings and congratula- 
tions to the Union. In his remarks he discussed the vicious features of the Taft- 
Hartley Act and pledged the Brotherhood to a never-ending fight until the un- 
American law is repealed and erased from the statute books. Charles W. Hanson, 
President of the New York District Council, touched on the fine conditions that 
have been established in the trade throughout the state. A large number of other 
guests prominent in civic, social, educational as well as labor affairs also gave 
inspiring addresses. 

Brother Harold Hanover, former secretary-treasurer of the New York State 
Council, acted as toastmaster for the evening and turned in a very credible per- 
formance. Floral pieces, the gifts of Sister Auxiliary No. 128 and Brother Local 
No. 440 added beauty and charm to the speakers table. The real guest of honor 
of the evening was ninety-two year old Phillip C. Wirth, recording secretary at the 
time the Union became part of the Brotherhood. Still hale and hearty despite his 
advanced years, Brother Wirth attends meetings regularly and displays a keen 
interest in the affairs of the Union he did so much to build up and perpetuate. 

In June, 1956, Local Union No. 9 will celebrate its Diamond Jubilee, and all 
who attended the sixty-sixth anniversary party are looking forward eagerly to 
being present. 



24 



THE CARP EN TER 



PALATKA MEMBERS SOLVE A PROBLEM 

The Editor: 

Local Union No. 1500, Palatka, Florida, is setting an example of initiative 
and resourcefulness that well merits recognition. During the war years, work was 
comparatively plentiful in and around Palatka. After the war, work dropped off 

but plenty of projects were 
started in the surrounding 
territory. For awhile mem- 
bers of Local No. 1500 drove 
to work in these other dis- 
tricts in their own cars. But 
all too often they came to 
grief as the old cars broke 
down en route. 

To solve the problem, the 
Local Union recently bought 
a panel truck. Fourteen men 
are now riding back and forth to work in Jacksonville in the truck and getting 
there on' time. The plan has worked out so successfully that the Union is now 
contemplating procuring another truck to transport men to St. Augustine where 
more big projects are getting under way. 

Thanks to the truck idea, the carpenters of Palatka are keeping gainfully em- 
ployed and all indications are that they will continue to keep working for some 
time to come. 

Fraternally yours, 

W. R. Squires, Fin. Sec. 




READING, PA., BOASTS MANY OLD TLME MEMBERS 

The Editor: 

> Dreamland Park, near Reading, Pennsylvania, was crowded to near capacity 
en the afternoon of July 19th when Local Union No. 492 of that city held its annual 
picnic there. Games, contests and a highly interesting group of speakers kept 
things moving at a fast pace 
all day. Some eighteen pen- 
sioners out of a total forty- 
four in the Union were able 
to attend. 

It is interesting to note 
that the pensioners in Local 
Union No. 49 2, who range 
from sixty-five to eighty-six 
years of age, have better 
than 1.3 6 6 years of com- 
bined membership in the 
Brotherhood to their credit. 
We wonder if this does not 
constitute some sort of a record. 




A fine group of old timers 



Many special guests attended the picnic and helped to make it the huge success 
it turned out to be. Among the visitors was Brother Theodore O'Keefe, secretary- 
treasurer of the Pennsylvania State Council. 

Lunch and refreshments were served all day and the 32 5 carpenters and mill- 
men who attended enjoyed themselves immensely. 



Fraternally yours, 



Charles W. Bowers, Fin. Sec. 




CHATTANOOGA LADIES KEEP THINGS HUMMING 

The Editor: 

Greetings from Ladies' Auxiliary No. 38 6, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

When the Carpenters' Local No. 74 built their Hall in 1941, they didn't forget 
the Auxiliary. They furnished a lovely Lounge and a modern Kitchen for our use. 
The Kitchen is convenient for cooking for a banquet or for cooking that delicious 
Southern fried chicken that Local No. 74 likes so well. 

Our meetings are held in the Lounge, on the second Friday night of each 
month, and to make the meetings more interesting, we have an attendance prize 
for the lady drawing the lucky number. 

We donate to charity organizations and drives and send flowers to sick mem- 
bers of our organization. We sent some books and a quilt to the Carpenters' 
Home in Florida. During the war, Local No. 74 bought electric sewing machines 
for us to sew garments for the Red Cross to send overseas. This project was a 
great help to the needy families in other countries, for our members met and 
sewed faithfully. 

Most of our receipts are profit from a Coca Cola vending machine that we 
bought and placed in the Carpenters' Hall. 

We llave a Christmas party every year, and an occasional dinner or get-together 
for our members and the members of Local No. 74. The most recent social event 
was a dinner at the Southern Inn, with our husbands as our guests. Everyone 
enjoyed the dinner, especially B. F. Graves. He said it was the coffee he was 
admiring. 

Fraternally yours, 

Mrs. B. F. Graves, Recording Secretary. 



MILWAUKEE AUXILIARY HELPS MANY WORTHY CAUSES 

The Editor: 

Carpenters' Ladies Auxiliary No. 252 of Milwaukee, Wis., takes this opportunity 
to greet all Sister Auxiliaries. 

During the past year we have initiated ten new members, bringing our total 
membership to 75, all in good standing. We meet twice monthly; the 1st and 3rd 
Wednesdays. The birthday ladies of the current month furnish the cakes for the 
social which follows the business meeting on the 3rd Wednesday. 

Last fall and winter we sponsored a bowling team; we presented corsages and 
paid up memberships to two members who had reached the age of 70 years, and 
had been members of theAuxiliary for at least five years. We sent delegates to 
the Wisconsin State Convention of Women's Auxiliaries of Labor, and to the Wis- 
consin Co-op Conference. 

We have contributed to the Library Fund for the Home at Lakeland, Fla., the 
Community Chest, the Red Cross, the Milwaukee Rescue Mission, the Cancer Fund, 
and the Wisconsin Federation of Womens Auxiliaries of Labor. 

During the Christmas season we filled and distributed eight baskets to needy 
families. 

We hope to keep our Auxiliary growing and welcome any and all Carpenter 
Auxiliary members who desire to attend our meetings. 

Fraternally yours, 

Mayme May, Recording Secretary. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

(Copyright 1947) 

LESSON 228 
By H. H. Siegele 

The metal miter box (see Fig. 1) is 
a tool that in some quarters has given 
rise to controversies. It is a clumsy 
tool for the field carpenter to carry 
around with him, because it is almost 
impossible to pack in even a large tool 
case. In many localities rules have been 
adopted by carpenters to the effect that 
metal biter boxes, if they are used on 
the job, must be furnished by the con- 
tractor. This rule it seems to this writer 
is entirely justifiable, for no carpenter 
should be required to invest in any 
single tool as much money as it takes 




to buy a good metal miter box. Such 
miter boxes should be considered a part 
of the contractor's equipment, and 
therefore he should furnish them for 
his men when needed. The rules gov- 
erning the use of the metal miter box 
are mostly found in the larger cities. 
in small towns such rules are rarely 
found, for in most of these places the 
contractors are men who are at the 
same time journeymen carpenters and 
work with tools on their own and other 
jobs. In such localities, a journeyman 
carpenter today might be the contractor 
tomorrow, and vice versa. 

Cutting miters on small moldings by 
the reflection of the molding in the saw 
blade is a trick that every carpenter 
should practice. For many years this 
writer used this trick on quarter 
rounds, half rounds and other small 
moldings, and quite frequently he used 



it on bed moldings, and in emergencies 
on larger moldings. 

Once I was working with the con- 
tractor on a garage, and when it was 




about quitting time, the contractor, who 
was working on the garage doors, said 
to me "I would like to finish these 
doors." "We can do it," I answered. 
Then I got out my fine saw and picking 




Fig. 3 

up a piece of molding I started to cut 
it for the panels. "There is the miter 
box," he said. But I told .him that I 
didn't need it. In a little while I had the 
moldings cut and in place, ready for 
nailing. When I started to help finish 
the nailing, the contractor looked at me 
with astonishment. He knew about the 
trick, but never had seen it used like 
that. The trick is especially suitable for 



THE CARPENTER 



27 



use in cutting base shoe and quarter 
rounds. Any carpenter with a good 
judgment and an accurate eye can miter 




Fig. 4 
small moldings with it so that the joints 
will fit perfectly — rarely will he have to 
do recutting. 

Fig. 2 shows a saw applied to a half 
round for making a square cut by means 

ijhS Deyrees* Squai 






tare-) 



m 



ggg 5 ^' A \ 



Fig. 5 
of the reflection in the 
3 shows the same saw 
ting a true miter, also 
reflection, while Fig. 4 
pies of miters that are 
We are using the half 
these illustrations, but 



saw blade. Fig. 
applied for cut- 
by means of the 
shows four sam- 
not true miters, 
round in all of 
the principle is 



H. H. SIEGELE'S BOOKS 

CARPENTRY. — Has 302 p., 754 IL, covering general 
house carpentry, and other subjects. {2.50. 

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670 IL , and about 7,000 building trade terms. $3.00. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of prac- 
tical building problems, has 252 p. and 670 11. $2.50. 

BUILDING.— Has 210 p. and 495 11.. covering form 
building, scaffolding, finishing, stair building, roof 
framing, and other subjects. $2.50. 

(The above books support one another.) 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. 64 pages, brown 
cloth binding and two-color title page. Only $1.00. 

PUSHING BUTTONS.— The prose companion of 
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Postage paid when money accompanies order. 
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FREE — As long as they last, with 2 books. Pushing 
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Pushing Buttons free with 4 books, 3 $1.00 books free 
— books autographed. 



the same in cases of quarter rounds and 
other small moldings. In using the re- 
flection in the saw blade, the work- 
man's judgment and his eye must be 
trained so that when he looks at the 





^4-S degrees S/ . 


rSquare 




\ 


*\ / 


\ 


\ 




^v 


"^ / 


\ 


\ 


\l 



Fig. 6 
angle that the molding must fit, he can 
apply the saw to the molding and adjust 
it in such a manner, so that when the 
reflection shows the same angle, he can 
cut the molding and it will fit. This 
trick is a time saver for the carpenter 
who acquires the ability to do it skill- 
fully. 

Fig. 5 is a sort of perspective drawing 
of a wooden miter box with saw kerfs 
for two-way mitering and also for 
square-across cutting. Such miter boxes 
can be made on the job with short pieces 
of lumber and "little time. The bottom 
is made first, as shown by the bottom 
drawing. Two-inch stuff is used, which 



TWO AIDS FOR SPEED AND ACCURACY 




r£ 



THEY HAVE 

OUR CHART Blueprint 27" X 36" 

"The FRAMING SQUARE" (Chart) 

Explains tables on framing squares. Shows how 
to find lengths of any rafter and make its cuts; 
find any angle in degrees; frame any polygon 3 to 
16 sides, and cut its mitres; read board feet rafter 
and braee tables, octagon scale. Gives other valu- 
able information. Also includes Starting Key and 
Radial Saw Chart for changing pitches and cuts 
Into degrees and minutes. Every carpenter should 
have this chart. Now printed on both sides, makes about 
13 square feet of printed data showing squares full size. 
Pries $1.00 postpaid, no stamps. 



jPTnT n - "Sji 



SLIDE CALCULATOR for Rafters 

Makes figuring rafters a cinch! Shows the length of any 
rafter having a run of from 2 to 23 feet; longer lengths are 
found by doubling. Covers 17 different pitches. Shows lengths 
of hips and valleys, commons, jacks, and gives the cuts for 
each pitch, also the angle in degrees and minutes. Fastest 
method known, eliminates chance of error, so simple anyone 
who can read numbers can use it. NOT A SLIDE RULE but 
a Slide Calculator designed especially for Carpenters, Con- 
tractors and Architects. Thousands in use. Price $2.90 
postpaid. Check or M. O., no stamps. 

MASON ENGINEERING SERVICE 

2105 N. Burdick St., Div. 9, Kalamazoo 81. Mich. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



is jointed on both edges and then it is 
marked, as shown, for the miter cuts 
and for the square-across cut. This done, 
the sides, which must also be jointed are 
nailed on. Then the marks are con- 
tinued from the bottom to the upper 
edges of the sides on the edges. When 
the marking is finished, the saw kerfs 
are cut with a sharp fine saw, and the 
box is ready for use. 

Fig. 6 shows a simple miter box that 
is suitable for cutting small moldings, 
such as bed moldings and on down to 
the smallest moldings that are made. It 
is made with two-inch stuff, such as a 
2x4 for the bottom, and another 2x4 
for the back. The back is then marked 
as shown by the continuous lines and 
kerfed with a fine saw. The dotted lines 
show the direction of the sawing. 



LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your own busi- 
ness and be your own boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 

Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $5.00, 
and pay the balance of $25.00 at $5.00 per 
month, making a total of $30.00 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name and address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building C, Denver 2, Colorado 



Fig. 7 shows a similar arrangement 
for cutting bridging. Here a 2x4 is 
laid on a pair of tressels, and at one 
end a short piece of 2x4 is nailed on the 
edge for a back, as shown. This back is 
marked to the bevel that is needed for 
the bridging cut and kerfed. Then the 
narrow strip of bridging material is 




Fig. 7 



placed in the angles and sawed into 
bridging. A nail is stuck at the proper 
place to gauge the length of the bridg- 
ing pieces, as indicated. The first bridg- 
ing piece, heavily shaded, is shown cut. 
Fig. 8 shows four applications of the 
steel square for marking miters. At 
the top to the right the square is ap- 
plied for a true miter, by using 12 on 




Fig. 8 

each arm of the square, while to the 
left it is also applied for a true miter, 
using 16 on each of the arms. The latter 
application gives the workman a chance 
to locate the point on the tongue by the 
feel of the hand, while he locates the 
point on the body of the square with 
the eye. This is especially suitable for 
marking boxing boards and rough 
flooring boards, when these are put on 
diagonally. At' the bottom we show two 
applications of the steel square for mi- 
ters that are not true. Each of these 
applications gives a sharp bevel and a 



$1 .25 with 7 Blades x^NAF/n. 

v UNIO»UMADr 







jy 






CARPENTERS 

Demand the Best The Genuine 

F. P. M. SAWS AND BLADES 

The Saw of Superior Quality with a National Beputation. Manu- 
factured by a member of U.-B. of C. & J. of A. No. 1. 
If your deater does not handle, write direct to me. 

F. P. MAXSON, Sole Manufacturer 

3722 N. Ashland Ave. CHICAGO, ILL 



dull bevel, which are only four miters 
that can be marked with a steel square 
out of an unlimited number. 



FITTING WALLBOARD 

■ To fit a piece of wallboard into a 
place shown by Fig. 1, the following 
suggestion will help to make it fit 
snugly; 




Fig. 1 



Fig. 2 shows the first thing to do — - 
tack a piece of wallboard about as 
shown and cover it with stiff smooth 
building paper. Then make a wedge- 
shaped pointer, something like what is 
shown shaded at number 15. Mark the 
shape of the pointer on the paper temp- 
let at every point where the wall line 
changes directions, about as shown by 
Fig. 3. On this figure the unshaded 
pointers numbered 1 to 15, show the 
different approximate positions of the 




Fig. 



pointer for doing the marking. When 
the paper is marked, it would look 
about like what is shown in Fig. 4, ex- 
cepting the dotted-line points. Now 
fasten the paper templet on the wall- 
board to be cut, in such a manner that 
by placing the pointer exactly as you 
had it when you marked the paper, 
and putting a mark at the point of the 
pointer in each of the different posi- 
tions, you will have the points for 



New Opportunities 

f .°. r Carpenters 




Men Who Know Blue Prints 

are in demand to lay out and run build- 
ing jobs. Be the man who (jives orders 
and draws the big pay check. Learn at 
home from plans we send. No books, — 
all practical every day work. 

SEND FOR FREE BLUE PRINTS 

and Trial Lesson. Prove to yourself how 
easy to learn at home in spare time. 
Send coupon or a post card today. No 
obligations. 

CHICAGO TECH. COLLEGE 

M-108 Tech Bldg. 2000 So. Mich. Ave., 
Chicago, 16, III. 

Send Free Trial Lesson and blue print 
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higher paid job in Building. 

Name 

Address 




RCG.U S.PAT. OFF. 



Every cutting job — cross-cutting, ripping, dadoing, 
angle cutting, bevel cutting, mutiple cutting, mortis- 
ing, scoring, or cutting light gauge metals — can be 
done faster . . . better . . . cheaper with an Electric 
MallSaw. 4 Models with capacities of 2, 2£ 2f 
and 4£ inches. All have Universal motors. 

Ask Hardware Dealer or write Power Tool Division. 

MALL TOOL COMPANY 

7751 South Chicago Ave., Chicago, 19, III. 
26 Years of "Better Tools For Better Work." 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertise 


;rs 

jssories 
Page 

4th Cover 
31 

4 
31 

32 
29 
28 

3rd Cover 

30 
31 

3rd Cove 
32 

32 

32 

4 
31 

1 

looks 

31 
3rd Cover 

29 

27 
30 
27 
28 


Carpenters' Tools and Acc< 

E. C. Atkins & Co., Indianapolis, 
Ind. 


Burr Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Henry Disston & Sons, Inc., Phil- 


Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 


Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111. 

Millers Falls Company, Green- 
field, Mass. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Phila- 


The Speed Co., Portland, Ore 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, 

E. Weyer, New York, N. Y. 

Bowling Equipment 
Brunswick, Balke, Collender Co., 

Carpentry Materials 

Johns-Manville Corp., New York, 
N. Y. 


Plastic Wood, New York, N. Y.__ 
• The Upson Co., Lockport, N. Y. 

Technical Courses and I 

American Technical Society, Chi- 


Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y._. 
Chicago Technical College, Chi- 


Mason Engineering Service, 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 
D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo 



marking the board that will fit the 
place shown by Fig. 1. Having these 
points, mark the board from point to 
point as shown by dotted lines in Fig. 4 
In case the place you have to fit the 




Fig 



wallboard into has curved lines, or ir- 
regular and circular lines, you would 
proceed in the same way and use the 
different points for striking the lines. 




Fig. 4 

If the templet paper is carefully mark- 
ed and then the points are carefully 
transferred to the wallboard, you will 
have no trouble in making tight joints. 




STEEL SQUARE 



HAND 
BOOK 



Completely Revised 



This concise and handy little book illustrates and describes the best methods of using 
the carpenter's steel square in laying out all kinds of carpentry work. It is easy to 
understand as a picture of the square laying directly on the work shows exactly how the 
various cuts are made. Its compact and handy size makes it convenient to carry in the 
pocket, for quick reference. 



"For ready reference carry 
this convenient 50 page 
pocket size (4.1x63) guide 
to your job." 



Postpaid. Money back guarantee if not entirely satisfied 

SEND SI. 00 TODAY 



D. A. ROGERS 

Minneapolis 9, Minn. 



Enclosed $1.00. Forward by return mail your Carpenters & 
Builders' Practical Rules for Laying Out Work. 



Address. 



THE CARPENTERS HANDY HELPER 

mmt mm 

has dozens of uses on every job! 

For that "FINISHED TOUCH*' 
Plastic Wood can be used 
for filling: 

• Nail holes 

• Cracks due to wood 

shrinkage 

• Countersunk screws 

• Old screw holes 

• Loose dowel pins 

• Broken railings 

• Split, cracked or splintered 

wood in bowling alleys. 

HANDLES LIKE PUTTY... 
HARDENS INTO WOOD 

Keep a supply of PLASTIC WOOD SOL- 
VENT on hand to control the consistency 
of PLASTIC WOOD. SOLVENT is also 
used for cleaning hands and tools. 

• On sale at all Builders* Supplies, 

Hardware and Paint Stores 



BUY THE 1 lb. CAN 





FOR 
EXAMINATION 

SEND NO MONEY 



Leam to draw plans, estimate, be a live-wire builder, do 
remodeling, take contracting Jobi. Theee 8 practical, pro- 
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UP-TO-DATE 

EDITION 

These books are 
the most up-to- 
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we hare ever pub- 
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many subjects. 
Examination 



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The Postwar building boom Is in full 
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Coupon Brings Eight Big Books Fo_r 



AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY Vocational Publishers sineeg(8I 
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Tou may ship me the TJp-to-Date edition of your eight 
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Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
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rafter dial $1.95 Order from-. E. Weyer, Dept. H, 
P.O. Box 153, Planetarium Station, New York 24, N. Y. 



B 



USIMESS 



MAKE A GOOD LIVING IN YOUR OWN 

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Branches in ail Principal Cities 





■• ALL THE BEST ideas of skilled workers in 
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THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLD 



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HARDWARE HAND TOOLS- ELECTRIC TOOLS 



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\ for 

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Work 



Millers Falls No. 118 Breast Drill and No. 2 
Hand Drill are carpenters' tools — designed 
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Use Millers Falls drills to make tough 
jobs easy, easy jobs easier. 



MILLERS FALLS 

k TOOLS / 



MILLERS FALLS 
COMPANY 

Mass. 



Greenfield, 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 

4vols.*6 




Jnslde Trade Information 
Jot Carpenters, Builders. Join- 
ers. Building Mechanics and 
till Woodworkers. These 
Guides give you the short-cut 
instructions that you want — 
including new methods, ideas, 
solutions, plans, systems and 



money savim 
easy progress 
apprentice and 
practical daily 
Quick Refe 



- 



. An 






Carpent 



i for the 

student. A 
helper and 
for tho master 



„ ..-ing these Guides 
Of a Helping Hand to Easier 
Work. Better Work and Bet- 
ter Pay. To get this assist- 
ance for yourself, simply Wl 
— _. in and mail tha FREE COU- 

Inside Trade Information On: pom below. 

How to use the steel square — How to file and set 
Baw3 — How to build furniture — How to use a 
mitre box — How to use the chalk line — How to use 
rules and scales — How to make joints — Carpenters 
arithmetic — Solving mensuration problems— Es- 
timating Btrength of timbers — How to set girders 
and sills — How to frame houses and roofs — How to 
estimate costs — How to build houses, barns, gar- 
ages, bungalows, etc. — How to read and draw 
plans — Drawing up specifications — How to ex- 
cavate—How to use settings 12. 13 and 17 on tho 
Bteel square — How to build hoists and scaffolds — 
skylights — How to build stairs— How to put on 
interior trim — How to hanK doors — How to lath — 
lay floors — How to paint 




THEO. AUDEL & CO., 49 W. 23rd St., New York City 

Mail Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides. ' 
I will remit SI in 7 days, and »t monthly until $6 i 
No obligation unless I am satisfied. 



Occupation. 
Relcrence . . 



CAR 



■■■'"m Cr^d 



:' 

i 







For 90 years Atkins Saws have ranked 

high with carpenters. This is vital 

recognition. Carp-enters handle saws 

constantly; they're qualified to know which 

saws give the best performance, the longest 

service. That's why you'll find so many Atkins 

saws in so many carpenters' kits. 

Reasons for this are sound. Atkins Saws are correctly 

designed, precision built, perfectly balanced. The 

"Silver Steel" used in them insures rugged wear. Strong, 

edge-holding teeth give the very maximum cutting between 

filings. 






E. C. ATKINS AND COMPANY 

VII ill !M Indianapolis 9, Indiana 



FOUNDED 1381 

Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 




OCTOBER, 1947 







jaw** - " >i-^5 

S% tB1R tY \>a» efe fnusa° d „ eV in6 



oi^' 






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tell their friends: 

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TIE CAQPEN1ER 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXVII — No. 10 



INDIANAPOLIS, OCTOBER, 1947 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents — 



Points of Policy on Taft-Hartley Act 



The General Office issues an outline of tentative points of policy regarding the 
new, vicious anti-labor law for the guidance of all subordinate bodies in the United 
States. 



Where Marx Went Astray 



A searching look into the fallacies of Communism. Karl Marx, the great Communist 
hero and authority, saw much exploitation and misery in his day, but he incorrectly 
diagnosed the reason for them; consequently the cures he proposed are no cures at 
all but rather palliatives which have a lot of bitter medicine beneath a sugar coating. 



Canada Eyes Mechanization 



13 

In her search for a brighter place in the sun, Canada faces many knotty problems; 
not the least of which is immigration. A prominent Canadian industrialist looks at the 
problem squarely and concludes that mechanization rather than immigration offers the 
brightest hope. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Editorials - 
Official 
Plane Gossip 
In Memoriam 
Correspondence 
To the Ladies 
Craft Problems 



16 
19 
20 
22 
23 
25 
26 



Index to Advertisers 



29 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



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POINTS OF POLICY ON 



Editor's note: The following self-explanatory communications dealing with the Taft-Hartley Law 
were recently sent to all U.S. Locals and District Councils affiliated with our Brotherhood. 
They outline the tentative points of policy adopted by the International in connection with the 
Law and they are herewith reprinted for the enlightenment and guidance of subordinate bodies. 



September 9, 1947 

TO THE OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF ALL 
LOCAL UNIONS AND DISTRICT COUNCILS. 

Greetings : 

The provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act require the filing of affi- 
davits by all officers of Local Unions and officers of the Interna- 
tional that they are not members of the Communist Party or affi- 
liated with such party and do not believe in or support any organ- 
ization that teaches the overthrow of the United States Govern- 
ment, and the Act requires the filing of financial reports on forms 
provided for that purpose and those forms can be obtained through 
Regional National Labor Relations Board offices. 

The General Office has completed the forms required and has 
forwarded them to Washington, D. C, which will permit Local 
Unions to file similar forms for any case they now have pending 
or wish to present to the- National Labor Relations Board in the 
future. 

However, the filing of the reports and affidavits is not compul- 
sory and no penalty is imposed on a union that fails to file the re- 
ports required by the Act except by the denial of the right to call 
upon the National Labor Relations Board under the Act. If at a 
later date a Local Union wishes to submit a case to the National 
Labor Relations Board the Local Union could then file the reports 
at the time of starting the proceedings under the National Labor 
Relations Act. 

We are enclosing a copy of the "Tentative Points of Policy" 
which have been adopted for guidance of Local Unions affiliated 
with our organization. 

In the event any changes are made, Local Unions and District 
Councils will be advised immediately. 

Fraternally yours, 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 



THE CARPENTER 

TENTATIVE POINTS OF POLICY ADOPTED AT 

CONFERENCE ON THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1947, AT 

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



i. The Brotherhood will maintain the principle that the construction 
industry ordinarily is INTRASTATE commerce and is not affected by 
the Taft-Hartley Act. 

2. The Brotherhood will maintain the principle that the employment 
of carpenters in the construction of a building- or other structure which 
is not itself a facility of interstate commerce is not an employment in or 
affecting interstate commerce. 

3. The Brotherhood will maintain that, as acknowledged in the new A .: 
itself, it has the right "to prescribe its own rules "with respect to the acqui- 
sition or retention of membership", and to determine its "self-organiza- 
tion"; and that these rights shall receive a liberal construction, favoring 
the freedom and self-determination of the organization. 

4. The Brotherhood will maintain that its Constitution. By-Laws and 
General Laws, having been adopted and existing before the enactment of 
the new Act, are not outlawed or annulled by that Act, but are protected 
by that portion of the Act which provides that no act performed before 
such enactment shall be deemed "an unfair labor practice". 

5. The Brotherhood notes, and its members will note, that the new I 

expressly states that it' does not make the quitting of his labor, or the re- 
fusal to render service, by any individual employee, acting on his own. an 
illegal or actionable act. 

6. The Brotherhood will maintain, and it is a fact, that the new Act 
authorizes the settlement of labor disputes by the ordinary proces-es of 
collective bargaining: and also authorizes the ordinary practice of peace- 
ful and orderly picketing, and the free expression and dissemination of 
views not amounting to threats or promises of .benefit, and the resort to 
ordinary strikes for securing desired rates of pay. wages, hours and work- 
ing conditions from the employer of the striking employees. 

7. The Brotherhood will maintain, and it is a fact, that prior decisions 
of the former National Labor Relations Board, holding that a craft unit is 
inappropriate for the purpose of selecting a representative for collective 
bargaining, are annulled by this new Act. 

8. The Brotherhood will maintain, and it is a fact, that a contract, law- 
fully arrived at by collective bargaining prior to the enactment of the new 
Act. whether for a closed shop or otherwise, continues to be valid and law- 
fully performable after such enactment, irrespective of its date of term- 
ination or absence of a date of termination, provided it is not renewed or 
extended or modified after the enactment of the new Act. 

9. The Brotherhood will maintain, and it is a fact, that the new Act does 
not make an unfair labor practice the performance of any obligation under 



THE CARPENTER 7 

a collective-bargaining agreement entered into for a stipulated period of 
not over one year, after the enactment of the new Act but on or prior to 
August 22, 1947, provided such agreement is not after August 22, 1947, re- 
newed or extended or modified and provided such agreement would not 
have constituted a violation of the law prior to the enactment of the new 
Act. 

10. The making of collective-bargaining agreements is a matter of Local 
autonomy, subject only to the requirements of the Constitution that such 
contracts shall not conflict with the laws of the International Body. 

11. No collective-bargaining agreement shall be signed, as witness or 
otherwise, by any General Representative of the International Body or 
any deputy of such representative. 

12. No collective-bargaining agreement shall be made by any subordi- 
nate organization in the name of the International Body, or shall purport 
to obligate the International Body in any way whatever. 

13. The filing in the General Office of collective-bargaining agreement 
or by-laws of a local body, or amendments thereof, shall be deemed to be 
solely for the purpose of observing whether such contract or by-laws or 
amendments thereof contain any term violative of the Constitution and 
Laws of the United Brotherhood and any approval thereof by the General 
Office shall have no other implication. 

14. Such filing shall not make, and shall not be deemed to make, the 
United Brotherhood a part to such collective-bargaining agreement or 
to its performance ; and the subordinate organization making such agree- 
ment is not, and shall not be deemed to be, the agent or representative of 
the United Brotherhood in the making or performance thereof. 

15. In view of the liabilities. imposed by the act and the difficulties of 
policing full performance by all individual members, collective-bargaining 
agreements should not contain any affirmative guarantee or covenant, 
written or oral, against strikes or other concerted refusals to render 
service. 

16. The Brotherhood will determine for itself what legal action it will 
take, or what -legal defenses it will interpose, for the purpose of safe- 
guarding in the courts the rights of the organization under the Constitu- 
tion of the United States or under aii} r other law. 

17. The Brotherhood adheres to its traditional position that the lav/s 
of the land be faithfully observed by it, its subordinate bodies and its 
members ; but that it reserves the right to test in the courts, by orderly 
procedure, the constitutionality of any law or interpretation or applica- 
tion thereof. 

18 With reference to the provisions of the new Act purporting to 
condemn as unfair labor practices certain union activites (previously law- 
ful) by way of strike, boycott or refusal to render service, the Brotherhood 
will, in an appropriate case or cases and by appropriate procedure, submit 
to the courts for determination all questions as to the interpretation, appli- 



8 THE CARPENTER 

cation and constitutionality thereof. This declaration of the general policy 
includes the defense of our union label; the defense of the provisions of 
our Constitution and General Laws concerning- our union label ; the defense 
of our traditional policies as to working with non-union men or on non- 
union material ; and the defense of our jurisdiction as defined by our 
Constitution and General Laws or as established by collective-bargaining 
agreements or general or local practice or custom. 

19. All Officers of the International Body and all its subordinate bodies 
should familiarize themselves with the provisions of the new Act; and, if 
questions arise as to the interpretation, application or constitutionality 
thereof, they should seek legal advise from the employed counsel. 

20. All questions of general policy with reference to the new Act are 
matters for consideration and determination by the General Office. 



LIBRARY FUND 



Paced by a S100.00 contribution from Local Union No. 101, Baltimore, 
Maryland, and two twenty-five dollar donations by the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict Council, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the Library Fund added another 
$196.50 to the amount available for rehabilitation of the library at the . 
Home at Lakeland during the last three months. Seven Brotherhood affili- 
ates made contributions to the Fund in the period from June 16 (when the 
previous report was made) until September 16. During the same period, 
expenditures amounting to $322.09 were made for magazines and other up- 
to-date periodicals. 

The Library Fund was created by last year's convention at Lakeland 
for the express purpose of building up the Library at the Home which has 
through natural wear and tear and obsolescence deteriorated considerably 
in recent years. Thanks to the generous support accorded the Library 
Fund, money is now available to build up an adequate library. 

Donations to the Fund should be clearly designated as such in order 
that bookkeeping errors may be avoided. Since the last report was made 
as of June 16, the following contributions have been made to the Fund : 

L. A. No. 250, Omaha, Neb $ 3.00 RECAPITULATION 

L. A. No. 42, Battle Creek, Mich. 3.50 Balance Available June 16, 

L.U. No. 1846, New Orleans, La. 15.00 194T $8,469.55 

Metropolitan D. C, Philadel- Receipts 196.50 

pbia, Pa. 50.00 

f . -^ __. _ , . Total $8,666.05 

L. A. iNo. 2 i 4, Snoqualmie 

"Wash g qq Expenditures 322.09 

L. U. No. 359, Philadelphia, Pa. 15.00 Available Funds Sept. 15, _ 

L. U. No. 101, Baltimore, Md. 100.00 1947 $8,343.96 



U^here Marx IVent Astray 

Editor's note — The following is a transcript of a radio broadcast recently made by ex-Congress- 
man Samuel B. Pettengill. Although the times when organized labor has been able to agree with 
Pettengill on national questions have not been too numerous, he is, nevertheless, a serious thinker. 
Even in this instance it is impossible to agree with everything he says. However, the following 
article contains so many basic truths and so much food for thought for those who may be inclined 
to be sympathetic toward Marxism that it seems worthy of repetition. 




OW that the whole Nation is talking about the Communist threat 
to the country — at home and abroad — it seems a good time to ask 
what is really wrong with Marxism. 
It was 99 years ago that Marx and Engels wrote the Communist mani- 
festo which began with the words "A specter is haunting Europe, the 
specter of communism." This sounds like today's newspaper. That was 
one year before gold was discovered in California; before the covered 
wagon began to roll across the plains. Please keep this date in mind. It is 
significant to what I shall say. 

A little later, Marx, in London, wrote Das Kapital, the bible of the 
Communists and Socialists. As a reporter, Marx was accurate. The condi- 
tions of the workers in England a century ago as he points out, were very 
grim. Women pulled canal boats . 



along the tow-path with ropes over 
their shoulders. Women were har- 
nessed, like beasts of burden, to 
cars pulling coal out of British 
mines. In the textile mills, chil- 
dren began to work when they were 
9 or 10 years old, and worked 12 
to 15 hours a day. It was said that 
the beds in which they slept never 
got cold, as one shift took the place 
of the other. It was said that they 
were machines by day and beasts 
by night. Tuberculosis and other 
occupational disease killed them off 
like flies. 

Conditions were terrible. Not 
only Marx, but other warm-hearted 
men, such as Charles Dickens, Rus- 
kin, and Carlyle poured out a litera- 
ture of protest which was read 
around the world. 

On his facts, Marx can scarcely 
be challenged. But his diagnosis 



was wrong and, therefore, the rem- 
edy he prescribed was wrong also. 

Marx said these terrible condi- 
tions were due to greed, exploita- 
tion, the theft by the owners of the 
mines and mills of the "surplus 
value" produced by the workers. 
That was his diagnosis and there- 
fore his remedy was to preach the 
gospel of hate, of the class struggle, 
of the redistribution of wealth, of 
the confiscation of property, and its 
ownership and management by the 
state, which always means the poli- 
ticians. 

Now, if that diagnosis and rem- 
edy were, and still are, in the main, 
correct we have no business fighting 
communism — either in Greece or in 
the United States. We should advo- 
cate it. It becomes mighty impor- 
tant to ask whether they were cor- 
rect. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



The diagnosis of Marx was partly 
correct. "Man's inhumanity to man" 
has always been a factor in human 
affairs. Greed can never be defend- 
ed whether in business or govern- 
ment. Sympathy for the underdog 
will always have its work to do. Al- 
ways, certainly in Communist Rus- 
sia — with its forced labor camps 
and human slavery. 

Greed and exploitation are not 
cured by socialism. Stalin and 
Molotov live like oriental poten- 
tates with state dinners that would 
make Nero and Caligula green with 
envy. All this, in the name of the 
downtrodden proletariat. 

But greed was not the main rea- 
son for the conditions which Marx 
described. If all the wealth of the 
owners of the mines and mills had 
been redistributed to the workers, 
it would haye relieved their condi- 
tion but slightly, and but for a little 
time. 

So the class struggle, as a remedy 
fgr these conditions was wrong. 
What was wrong? What was the 
real trouble? 

It was the low productivity of 
the workers, and, as workers can 
be paid only out of production — 
whether in England a century ago 
or in Russia today — wages must be 
low and hours of work long when 
production is low. 

Production was low because tools 
and equipment were poor, because 
human backs had to do what slaves 
or iron and steel do today here in 
America, because capital had not 
been accumulated to buy better 
tools, because freedom had so re- 
cently emerged from centuries of 
feudalism that the inventors and 
scientists and businessmen had not 
had a chance to dream and plan. 



They have had that chance, today 
here in America. 

Listen! In 1940, before the war 
increased our production, it was 
estimated that electric power alone 
in this country was performing 
work equal to the labor of half a 
billion men — 500,000,000 men — 
working 8 hours a day. That is 
equal to nearly 10 times the total 
human labor force employed in 
America and 50 times the number 
employed in manufacturing, and 
that leaves out steam power and 
gasoline power and windmill power, 
with their tremendous contribution 
for increasing the productivity of 
workers and lifting burdens from 
human backs. 

Is it any wonder that America 
outproduced the world in this last 
war? That wages are higher here 
than anywhere in the world ? 

While Marx preached the gospel 
of hate and the class struggle 
America gave the green light to 
the Edisons, the Whitneys, the Bur- 
banks, and the Fords. 

James Watt, the inventor of the 
steam engine which revolutionized 
the modern world, and those who 
followed him in the competitive 
struggle to make a better engine 
and sell it for less, did more to take 
women out of the coal mines, and 
off the towpaths of the canal boats, 
more to take children out of the fac- 
tories, than all the Socialists and 
Communists and politicians of the 
world combined. 

Yet Watt would be an unknown 
name today if one of these despised 
capitalists, a man named Matthew 
Boulton, had not risked $150,000 on 
Watt's invention. Would he, by the 
way, have dared to take that risk 
under today's taxation? 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



One measure of the progress of 
civilization is the mechanical horse- 
power and tools which supplement 
human labor. The steam engine did 
more to outlaw slavery, both in 
England and America, than all the 
political humanitarians put to- 
gether. The laboratories do more 
for mankind than the legislatures. 

Please understand me. Welfare 
legislation has its place. There must 
be laws to require safety appliances 
in coal mines — and they should be 
enforced, whether private owners or 
the Government runs them. There 
must be laws to require fire escapes 
from factories and hotels. There 
must be laws to require the inspec- 
tion of milk and meat. There must 
be laws for honest weights and 
measures. Otherwise, some men 
would risk death to human beings 
to make a greater profit. 

I do not disparage such legisla- 
tion at all. I endorse it as part of 
the responsibility of modern gov- 
ernment. 

I simply point out that if modern 
America were to go back to the 
same tools and horse-power that /we 
had when Benjamin Franklin was 
trying to capture lightning from the 
sky our production of wealth would 
at once go down 90 per cent, wages 
would go' down in proportion, hours 
of labor would rise to the limit of 
human endurance, and nothing that 
government, or humanitarians, or la- 
bor unions, or Karl Marx, could do 
would prevent it. 

I mentioned the discovery of gold 
in California in connection with the 
Communist manifesto of 1848. 

With pick and shovel and the pan 
with which men washed gravel from 
gold, did not men work long hours 
then for a meager return, or none? 
Did they not sleep in filthy cabins, 
live on jerked meat, and were cov- 
ered with lice? 



If you saw that great motion pic- 
ture, The Covered Wagon, you will 
recall, the scenes of terrible toll, 
men and women and children pull- 
ing the wagons across rivers, and 
the trackless desert, and over the 
Continental Divide. Families, on 
foot, pushed hand carts from the 
Mississippi to Salt Lake. 

Yet were those conditions due 
to greed and exploitation? No: 
they were working for themselves. 
What was wrong? Poor tools. The 
plow of the pioneer was a wooden 
plow, constantly needing repair. In 
a newspaper yesterday, I saw a pic- 
ture of a wooden plow used in 
Greece today. 

Up in Vermont where I was 
raised, on land then worth $2 an 
acre, a man back in my great grand- 
father's time dug some iron ore out 
of a hill. He put 100 pounds in a 
bag on his back and walked 80 miles 
through the wilderness to sell it to 
an iron foundry in Troy, N. Y., and 
then walked home — an infinite ex- 
penditure of human energy for an 
insignificant return. 

What was wrong? Greed? Ex- 
ploitation? The class struggle? No. 
He was working for himself. There 
was no relationship of employer 
and employe. No one was stealing 
the surplus product of his labor. 
He got all of it — and it was little, 
indeed. 

What was wrong? Why did he 
have to work so hard for so little? 
Poor tools. Today the steam engine, 
in the form of the modern locomo- 
tive could move his 100 pounds of 
iron ore 80 miles for 4 cents — or a 
ton, 1 mile, for 1 cent. Railroads, 
paved highways, motor trucks, and 
automobiles have solved his prob- 
lem, and will do it even better in 
the days to come if we stay Ameri- 
can. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



Let us say that James Watt, and 
the man who financed him, were not 
humanitarians. Let us say they put 
their brains and money together in 
a common enterprise for the profit 
motive. What of it? Was the re- 
sult good or bad? Did they take 
the women out of the coal mines, 
or did Karl Marx with his gospel 
of hate and class struggle? 

What did the profit motive do? 
It made Watt and his partner, and 
all who followed them, work to 
make better engines and offer them 
at a lower price to get the market 
from their competitors. 

Was the result good or bad? The 
profit motive is just as honorable 
and useful to mankind as the wage 
motive. Both can be pushed to ex- 
cess. But, both do infinite good. 

The wage motive prompts men 
to become skilled and efficient so 
they can produce more and earn 
more, and because they do, all of 
mankind benefits. 

The profit motive prompts men to 
make better tools, to cut costs, to 
sell cheaper, and again all of man- 
kind benefits. 

The radio, that sold only 25 years 
ago for S300, now sells for S30, or 
less, and a better radio. 

Has the result of the competitive 
struggle in the world of radio been 
good or bad? The result has been 
good — humanitarian, if you please. 

It brings the news of the world, 
good music, and discussion of pub- 
lic affairs to the remotest farm- 
house, to people on their sickbeds. 
It was not many centuries ago when 
starvation was a common occur- 
rence, even where 90 per cent of the 
people lived on land — -even in Eng- 
land. 

Was the conquest of starvation a 
humanitarian thing:? What con- 



quered it? \\ "ho conquered it? Karl 
Marx? Xo. 

The time in the field required to 
raise a bushel of wheat in America 
has gone down from 60 hours of 
human labor in 1830 to 2 hours or 
less in 1930. What did it? The steel 
plow, the tractor, the harvester, bet- 
ter seed, the conquest of insects and 
plant diseases, and cheap transpor- 
tation. American wheat now feeds 
millions today in the Europe that 
is adopting the philosophv of Karl 
Marx. 

Aluminium was so expensive in 
1870 that Xapoleon III of France 
had an aluminum table set for state 
dinners, more valuable than gold. 
Today aluminum is found in the 
American kitchen. 

Xo. my friends; Karl Marx did 
not have the answer. He lifted no 
burdens from human backs. The 
answer is free enterprise, kept com- 
petitive by antitrust and other laws. 
The answer is not in the class strug- 
gle. The answer is in the coopera- 
tion of the inventor and investor, 
and manager and the worker with 
his '"know how.'' The answer is 
constitutional liberty, which sets 
men free and says that what any 
man honestly makes is his ''to have 
and to hold." 

Wages can be paid only out of the 
product, and the larger the produc- 
tion the higher the wage. The more 
money that is invested in horse- 
power and equipment the more capi- 
tal that is put to work, the less 
children and women and men have 
to work at killing toil. 

Let's not divide mankind today 
in the struggle of classes: Let's 
unite men. In union there is 
strength. In harmony there is hope. 
Cooperation is Uncle Sam's middle 
name. 



13 



Canada Eyes Mechanization 



* * 



"VVER SINCE the end of the war Canada has been concerned with its 
future economic development and growth. Among the issues very 
definitely involved is that of immigration. There are advocates of 
greatly increased immigration, and there are advocates of continued 
limited importation of foreign families and foreign workers. 

At a recent meeting of the Standing Committee on Immigration and 
Labor, S. W. Fairweather, vice president of the Canadian National Rail- 
ways, presented a brief that is well worth reading. He theorized that 
mechanization rather than increase in working force holds the answer. 
"Increase in population should not be at the expense of a decrease in the 
standard of living," is the basis of his argument which we herewith reprint: 

"I recall in the years preceding 



the war the dearth of workmen 
trained in some precision operations 
— more particularly in mechanical 
lines — the few localities in which 
training workers in such lines were 
to be found and the full absorption 
of the few that were available. Our 
Canadian industry was in some 
measure still in its apprentice years 
with production in many lines out 
of balance with demand. The war 
industries, regrettable as their ne- 
cessity has been, have, in an impor- 
tant measure, developed these skills 
to a point where the products of 
Canadian workmanship have in 
many lines equalled, if not surpass- 
ed in quality, those of foreign coun- 
tries of long industrial experience. 
It has been reported that the best 
small arms ammunition produced by 
any of the allied countries was made 
in a Canadian arsenal employing 
men and women many of whom had 
little or no previous industrial ex- 
perience. The personnel of one of 
our largest plants producing guns 
was in large part recruited from a 
farming population, many of whom 
have resumed that occupation. In 



addition, particularly in the mechan- 
ical, electrical and chemical fields, 
Canada produced in wartime many 
lines that her normal production 
would never have visualized. This 
new Canadian industrial versatility 
has been further enhanced by the 
release into productive and techni- 
cal pursuits of the returned man 
whose intensive war training has 
developed skills and aptitudes that 
cannot fail of effect on Canadian 
production, while those who have 
elected post-war retraining in our 
schools and universities will soon 
make their technically-trained 
weight felt in Canadian industry 
and commerce. 

"The trend is increasingly toward 
a broader production; a widening 
in our lines of consumers' goods for 
export, and increasingly diversified 
production. While Canada with her 
wheat, her lumber, her base metals 
and other mineral products will con- 
tinue to be a heavy exporter of raw 
materials, her progress in their con- 
version to consumers' goods will 
increase. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



"On the other hand, employment 
in the basic agricultural and other 
extractive industries, i. e., mining, 
lumbering, etc., has fallen out of 
line with production in those fields. 
In agriculture, for instance, the 
rapid increase in the use of im- 
proved and more efficient agricul- 
tural machinery; extension of the 
use of fertilizer and pest controls; 
improvements in agricultural meth- 
ods and the introduction of grain 
and other seeds and plant strains 
better adapted to Canadian condi- 
tions, increasingly tend to raise 
production not only per unit of em- 
ployment but per unit of land occu- 
pation. The size of the farm in- 
creases and the farm employment 
and occupation declines. This is 
already apparent in parts of West- 
ern. Canada where the population 
has been falling off in the face of 
normal if not increased agricultural 
production. The same trend may be 
observed in metal mining, lumber- 
ing and fishing where production 
per unit of employment is trending 
upward due to increasing mechan- 
ization and improved techniques. 
The result is what might well be 
expected — not only have workers in 
war industries drawn from agricul- 
ture and other extractive employ- 
ment been inclined to continue in 
industry and to reestablish them- 
selves in industrial areas but there 
has been a noticeable shift of popu- 
lation to industrial cities marked 
by declines in rural population. 

"What I wish to make clear is 
that this decline is not accompanied 
by a falling off in agricultural and 
other extractive production. The 
fact is that the basic extractive in- 
dustries increasingly tend to pro- 
duce more with less people. 

"Studies looking to the formation 
of an immigration policy, from this 



viewpoint, seek an answer- to the 
following questions: 

"Should we move to increase agri- 
cultural population to the limit of 
available land with corresponding 
extensions of railway and highway 
facilities? 

"Will the world economy admit 
of profitable future markets for in- 
creased grain production? 

"What agricultural products 
might replace a declining world de- 
mand for Canadian grain? 

"What should be the optimum 
population for Canada? 

"I must confess that I have not 
got the answer to these questions 
but I would submit that any large 
increase in our agricultural popula- 
tion must visualize the extension of 
agricultural settlement in sections 
that in our current economy can 
only be regarded as marginal. The 
better lands, as developed, will con- 
tinue to be merged into larger units 
adapted to operation on a more 
economical scale, with a small pro- 
portion of farmers falling back 
through less favorable situations, to 
the point of subsistence farming. 

"It is true that a great part of the 
world's agriculture is conducted on 
a subsistence basis ; the question is 
how far can Canada go in this di- 
rection and still maintain the stand- 
ards of human values and culture 
that combine to promote national 
greatness. 

"The railway's interest in immi- 
gration lies in the prospect of in- 
creased gross and net revenue. The 
railway can have little interest in 
immigrants who would carry on at 
subsistence level. The average per 
capita gross earnings of Canadian 
railways lies between $50 and $70 
per year, of which from $10 to $15 
remains after payment of operating 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



expenses. Inferentially, immigra- 
tion leads to increased business 
activity and more traffic for the rail- 
way. More traffic, however, under 
average conditions, means that more 
capital must be invested in the rail- 
way for additional facilities, and 
possibly for branch line extensions. 
These economic factors set limits to 
the value of immigration to rail- 
ways, because if it is assumed that 
the average immigrant is as produc- 
tive as the average Canadian, the 
amount of capital which the railway 
could justifiably spend per immi- 
grant is $150.00 to $175.00. If more 
than this amount is expended, the 
railway industry would be adverse- 
ly affected. In contrast to these fig- 
ures it might be pointed out that 
the present investment per capita on 
Canadian railways is $274.00. 

"The point I wish to make is that 
to be beneficial to the railway indus- 
try, a high level of productivity is 
needed. This high level of produc- 
tivity can only be attained by mech- 
anization. As has been pointed out 
earlier in this memorandum, mech- 
anization has been progressing at a 
rapid rate in Canada, and in the 
primary and extractive industries 
we probably produce as much per 
capita as any country in the world. 
The process is continuing. Each 
year sees advances. The agricul- 
tural, lumbering and mining indus- 
tries, and more latterly the fishing 
industry, are becoming increasingly 
mechanized. One of the results is 
to produce a condition which is the 
equivalent of immigration at the 
rate of about 250,000 people per 
year. We can see the social effect 
of this trend in the reduction in 
rural and an increase in urban popu- 
lation. We can see it too in the de- 
pendence of our economy on for- 
eign trade. I read recently that one 



job in ten in the United States was 
dependent upon that country's for- 
eign trade. The corresponding fig- 
ure in Canada is more nearly one 
job in three. 

If we consider the problem of im- 
migration in relation to opportunity 
for trade expansion and of standard 
of living some doubts arise as to the 
timing of immigration. We must re- 
member that a program of mechan- 
ization is probably the most efficient 
means of raising our production. 
Markets for the increased produc- 
tion from this source must be found 
or, as an alternative, there must be 
emigration or a decrease in employ- 
ment. I repeat, the effect of mech- 
anization is the equivalent of 250,000 
immigrants per }^ear. If markets 
can be found at a more rapid rate 
than the increased production so 
created, then immigration would aid 
and assist in a further increase in 
the standard of living, otherwise 
not. It is in the mechanization of 
the primary and extractive indus- 
tries of Canada that I find the an- 
swer to the comparatively slow 
growth in the population of Canada 
and to the fact that notwithstand- 
ing immigration there has been also 
emigration. Believing as I do that 
the measure of human progress is 
not mere numbers but an increased 
standard of living, I do not con- 
sider this situation as an unfortu- 
nate one. Canada is a land of great 
opportunity. She may be expected 
to increase substantially in popula- 
tion, and I should hope that this 
increase in population would not be 
at the expense of a decrease in the 
standard of living. This objective 
can only be reached if we continue 
as in the past to use applied science 
to minimize human labor and substi- 
tute for it the power of the ma- 
chine." 



Editorial 




The Wrong Approach 

As will be noted elsewhere in this Journal, the General Officers of 
our Brotherhood have complied with the provisions of the Taft-Hartley 
Act by filing affidavits with the National Labor Relations Board to the 
effect that they are not members of the Communist Party or any other 
group seeking overthrow of the United States government. While our 
officers were happy enough to sign the affidavits, the idea of requiring 
them to do so is a little bit on the ludicrous side since individually and 
collectively they have been opposing Communism and all other sub- 
versive philosophies for many years. 

The idea is even more ludicrous when one considers that the law was 
written by Congressmen who have known Communists sitting in their 
midst, because members of Congress are not required to fill out similar 
affidavits. The affidavits are sent to a government agency whose employes 
do not have to take a similar oath of loyalty. The}^ are worked over and 
catalogued and filed by people who never swore before a notary public 
that they are not members of the Communist Party. Certainly all this 
hangs the taint of class legislation on the Taft-Hartley Act. 

But the ludicrousness of the Act does not end there, for it even goes 
a. long step toward defeating its avowed purpose of containing the Com- 
munists in the labor movement. For years our Brotherhood and most 
AFL, unions have waged a relentless war on Communists. In order to 
become a member of our Brotherhood, a candidate for the past twenty 
years, has had to swear that he is not and has not been a member of the 
Communist Party or any other revolutionary organization. Whenever and 
wherever we have found one in our midst we have given him short shrift. 
We have not only thrown him out of our organization but we have run him 
out of the industry as well. 

Now the Taft-Hartley Act, supposedly an instrument for stopping 
Communism in labor, says we cannot do that any more. If we find a Red 
in our midst we can throw him out of our organization but we cannot run 
him off the job because the Act says that the employer can discharge a 
man at the request of a union only for non-payment of dues. In other 
words, the Act theoretically says we must work side by side with Com- 
munists — something we never did when our anti-Red campaign rested in 
our own hands. 

To anyone who knows the first thing about the Communist movement 
in America it is no secret that organizations like the Brotherhood of 
Carpenters have done more to combat Stalinism in this country than any 
other group, not excluding the FBI. Bill Hutcheson has probably thrown 



THE CARPENTER 17 

more sand into the wheels of U.S. Communism than any other one indi- 
vidual in the nation. To require a man like him to sign an affidavit stating 
he is not a Communist is a little bit like requiring the President of the 
United States to swear he is not unemployed. 

After all, our Brotherhood was concerned about Communists twenty- 
five years ago. We realized then that they constituted a serious threat to 
all free institutions in America, and we began formulating a program to 
clean them out of our ranks. Now, all of a sudden, Congress wakes up to 
the fact that Communism is a menace, and the result is hasty, almost 
hysterical legislation aimed at crippling all labor. Thereby a good deal is 
explained. 

The Congressional approach to Communism is academic and theoret- 
ical; the union approach is realistic and two-fisted. Having no practical 
experience with the ways of Communists, Congressmen think in terms 
of legislative restraints and legalistic wrist-clappings; the unions, on 
the other hand, having had to contend for years with the disruption, deceit 
and character-assassination that the Communists use as their stock in trade, 
think in hard, realistic terms. They know that the way to deal with Reds 
is not with the velvet glove but with the brass knuckle. Experience has 
proved that this is the right system. 

In this nation there is no greater bulwark against Communism than 
labor organizations such as our Brotherhood. That the Reds have not 
made greater inroads into American industry is due largely to the realistic 
fight that unions such as our Brotherhood have made against them. Yet 
Congress has seen fit to pass the Taft-Hartley Bill which deals a body blow 
to all organized labor. Such folly can lead to disaster. 



Where the Shoe Really Fits 

Of all the propaganda used by employers' associations to discredit 
organized labor, the charge of "featherbedding" has been one of the most 
successful in building up resentment against unionism. The way the NAM 
and other employer groups have been telling it, organized labor is shot 
through and through with all kinds of featherbedding rules that increase 
manufacturing and building costs to prohibitive levels. Year in and year 
out they have repeated the same story over and over until a large part of 
the general public believes it. Yet what are the facts? 

Exactly one union was accused of featherbedding in Congress during 
the time hearings on the Taft-Hartley Bill were in progress. Not even this 
case was actually proven. However, featherbedding was used as one of the 
main excuses by the 8oth Congress for passing the Taft-Hartley Bill. A 
Congressional committee worded it thus : 

"An attempt is made to deal with a problem that is becoming a more 
and more serious menace to the productivity of our country and to the 
manufacture of goods at a cost within the reach of millions of our 
citizens." 



18 THE CARPENTER 

Brave words, these. Noble words, too, — if they only meant what" they 
said. But let us take a look at what these philanthropic Congressmen who 
worried so much about the cost of commodities getting out of line actually 
did. 

They voted to reduce corporation taxes by billions, thereby shifting 
the load to the common people. 

They voted out price controls with the assurance that prices would 
drop as soon as free enterprise was given a free rein. 

By Congressional authorization, thousands of foreign farm workers 
have been imported year after year at a cost of two dollars per head per 
day to you and me. These foreign workers did not benefit the genuine 
farmers; they went to the land holders of the vast farm corporations who 
derived the benefit of the millions you and I had to underwrite to bring 
them here. 

By Congressional action $63,000,000 of taxpayers' money was doled 
out to wool growers last 3 7 ear to keep prices up. 

Over $80,000,000 was similarly handed out to potato producers to 
enable them to keep prices up because a bumper crop was threatening 
to bring the price down to where you and I could afford to eat them. 

During the war and ever since, millions upon millions have been handed 
out to manufacturers and corporations in the form of subsidies and debt 
reductions. 

All these things swelled the profits of the corporations and increased 
the* prices we have to pay for commodities. Lumped together these things 
represent billions of dollars worth of featherbedding for big business. 
Yet this same Congress used the excuse of "featherbedding"' in organ- 
ized labor to pass the vicious Taft-Hartley Bill which points a dagger at 
the very heart of unionism. 

As we pointed out in last month's issue, estimated corporation profits 
for the first half of this year are close to nine billion dollars. This is 
more than any one full year's profits for any year prior to 1941. At the 
present rate, profits for 1947 will more than double 1929 profits, and 1929 
has long been considered the boom year of all time. 

And it is no exaggeration to say that these lush profits are mostly 
the result of featherbedding legislation passed by Congress for the benefit 
of big business. Still Congress has had the effrontry to place legislative 
shackles on organized labor because "featherbedding" is a threat "to the 
manufacturer of goods at a cost within the reach of millions of our citi- 
zens". Any featherbedding that may exist within organized labor is not 
two mills on the dollar compared to the lush handouts Congress has 
passed out to big business in recent months. If featherbedding needs cor- 
recting, it is the featherbedding Congress has recently indulged in on 
behalf of bigger and fatter corporation profits. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 
THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

General Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

General President 

WM. L. HTJTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President General Secretary 

M. A. HTJTCHESON FRANK DUFFY 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President General Treasurer 

JOHN R. STEVENSON S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind, 



General Executive Board 
First District. CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. ' Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 

111 E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District, WM. J. KELLY Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 

Carpenters' Bldg., 243 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 

1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 

712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. FRANK DUFFY, Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the General Secretary 

Attention Financial Secretaries! 

With the introduction of the new quarterly account sheets, a few 
Financial Secretaries have apparently become confused as to the proper 
manner of reporting members who have fallen in arrears, quit or resigned. 

A member must not be listed as in arrears, quit or resigned until he 
owes three months dues or a sum equal thereto. To do otherwise is to 
act contrary to the General Laws of the Brotherhood. Financial Secre- 
taries in doubt should read Section 45, Paragraph A and B, of our General 
Laws. 



Notice to Recording Secretaries 

The quarterly circular for the months of October, November and De- 
cember, 1947, containing the quarterly password, has been forwarded to 
all Local Unions of the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in 
receipt of this circular should notify Frank Duffy, Carpenters' Building, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 



DOING IT THE HARD WAY 

Maybe it is only the excessive heat 
playing hob with our imagination, but 
from where we sit it looks as though 
this summer has brought forth an extra 
heavy rash of "public opinion" polls. It 
is hardly possible to pick up a paper 
these days without having a "survey" 
of one kind or another hitting you in 
the eye. 

For some things these "polls" may 
be all right, but mostly we take them 
with a liberal dose of salt. Time and 
again, in labor matters they have proved 
to be untrustworthy. Questions they 
have asked have been leading, biased 
and loaded. And the conclusions they 
have drawn have been as erratic. 

Whenever we hear of a "public opin- 
ion" poll, we are always reminded of 
the old lady who was passing an insane 
asylum. Seeing an inmate on the porch, 
she asked him what time it was. The 
inmate pulled out a sun dial, a slide 
rule, a compass, a couple of T squares, 
and a barometer. After a few moments 
of concentration, he announced the time 
as ••4:17. 

"Wonderful," exclaimed the woman, 
"but what do you do when it is raining 
and the sun doesn't show? 

"Oh, in that case," replied the inmate 
soberly, "I just look at my watch." 




We got married last night after a 
party and I icanna see if I need glasses 1 



GETTING MIGHTY ROUGH 

Even the publications which speak for 
big business are getting embarrassed at 
the size of the profits which corpora- 
tions are now piling up. Nevertheless, 
price increases are once more being 
tacked on all along the line. According 
to one publication, second quarter pro- 
fits are 84% above profits for the same 
period last year. During this time, of 
course, the Taft-Hartley Bill was not yet 
in effect. Business was at the "mercy" 
of the powerful unions which were 
squeezing the life's blood out of them. 
That is why they had to have the Taft- 
Hartley Bill to protect them. 

The way the purchasing power of 
the pay envelope is going down while 
prices are going up, reminds us of the 
aviator who had to bail out. Floating to 
earth in his parachute, he was amazed 
to pass another man in a parachute 
going up. Before he could give voice to 
his amazement, the other fellow called 
out: "Don't get alarmed, Bub, mine's 
a tent. It's windy down there." 



PERTINENT SUGGESTION 

As the various branches of UNO 
struggle valiantly to bring some kind 
of order out of the chaos the war creat- 
ed in Europe, and as the various other 
peace delegations tackle the difficult 
problems of writing some kind of a 
durable and just treaty, our thoughts 
keep reverting to the shiny promises 
contained in the Atlantic Charter, the 
Potsdam Agreement, the Yalta Agree- 
ment and all the other bright and 
shiny pipe-dreams that were to guaran- 
tee peace on earth and goodwill toward 
men. They promised so much and are 
delivering so little. 

And somehow or other there comes 
to mind the comment of the farmer who 
clipped a coupon and sent for a book 
on "How to Grow Tomatoes." After 
looking it over for a couple of nights he 
wrote the publisher as follows: 

"The guy which writ the ad shoulda' 
writ the book." 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



SLIGHTLY INCRIMINATING 

At least one Senator who has had a 
chance to talk to his constituents after 
casting his vote for the Taft-Hartley 
Bill now seems a little perturbed by his 
act. He is Senator Cain of Washington, 
who now appears to have some doubts 
about the measure as well as some in- 
volved explanations as to how he came 
to vote for it. To us, it all seems a 
bit like a story a certain business agent 
used to tell. 

One day it was discovered that a sum- 
mer cottage up the canyon from a small 
Colorado mining town had been entered 
and pretty well cleaned out. About the 
only evidence left by the burglar was 
a lone overshoe. Suspicion finally nar- 
rowed down to a local character of un- 
certain habits, and enough circumstan- 
tial evidence was present to result in in- 
dictment. He demanded and got a jury 
trial. The prosecution's only tangible 
evidence was the overshoe, marked ex- 
hibit A. It was shown that it would fit 
the shoe of the accused. In spite of a 
vigorously prosecuted trial, however, 
and to the astonishment of the whole 
community, the twelve good men re- 
turned a verdict of not guilty. 

"When the judge had dismissed the 
jury and freed the prisoner, the latter 
suddenly said, "Your Honor, iff'n it's 
all right, and the prosecutor don't need 
it no more, can I have my overshoe 
back?" 



WASTED EFFORT 

Recently three top-flight U.S. Com- 
munists were convicted on charges of 
being in contempt of Congress. The 
charges were the outgrowth of the fail- 
ure of the three to testify before Con- 
gressional Committees when called on 
to do so. 

However, the interesting sidelight to 
the whole affair is the desperate but 
futile efforts the Reds made to get the 
trials postponed or kicked out of court. 
As much as $100,000 was supposedly 
offered to various prominent attorneys 
to try to induce them to protect the 
three men under indictment. And of 
course the usual smear tactics and char- 
acter assassinations were also tried. 
But it all went for naught. The trials 
were held and the men convicted. 

The futile efforts of the Reds to save 
their comrades sort of reminded us of 



the farm boy who came in one night 
all tuckered out. 

"What wearied you so, Son?"- asked 
his solicitous mother. 

"Well, you see," explained the boy, 
"Pa's been a-settin' out fence posts, an' 
I'm jest five feet tall. So I been a- 
layin' down an' a-gettin' up an' a-layin' 
down an' a-gettin' up all round his forty 
acre field, so's he could measure them 
posts ten feet apart." 



NO SUCH ANIMAL 

Almost one-third of American work- 
ers' families are dipping into their sav- 
ings because take-home wages are not 
high enough to make ends meet, a re- 
port by the Federal Reserve Board indi- 
cates. 

About the only comment we can 
make is that if the other two-thirds of 
U.S. workers' families are not tapping 
their savings once in awhile it is be- 
cause they do not have any. 



STILL A POWERFUL FORCE 

According to a scientific digest, man 
is about to bring the atom under con- 
trol. A new machine which can regulate 
the rate at which atoms can be split is 
nearly perfected, the magazine claims. 

If true, the report is very interesting. 
But we sincerely hope man has better 
luck with atom splitting than he had 
with Adam splitting. The first Adam 
splitting gave us Eve — a force which 
man still has not been able to control. 




Okay, Boss. What comes after "Dear 
Sir"? 



Jin fflltm&vi&m 

Not lost to those that love them, They still live in our memory, 

Not dead, just gone before; And will forever more 



The Editor has been requested to publish the names 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



Brother SIMON H. AARDEMA, Local No. 396, Newport News, Va. 
Brother THOS. ANDERSON, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother ALEXANDER ARRO, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 
Brother RANDOLPH R. ATKINSON, Local No. 2159, Cleveland, Ohio 
Brother EUGENE BAILEY, Local No. 132, Washington, D. C. 
Brother F. E. BARNETT, Local No. 184, Salt Lake City, Utah 
Brother JOHN BARTNIKOWSKI, Local No. 2194, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Brother JOHN BERTLEFF, Local No. 419, Chicago, III. 
Brother DANIEL H. BLACKWELL, Local No. 1296, San Diego, Cal. 
Brother MAX BUNXEL, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 
Brother E. S. CAMPBELL, Sr., Local No. 132, Washington, D. C. 
Brother HYMAN COHEN, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 
Brother JOSEPH D'ANGELO, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 
Brother OLIVER DEE, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother A. FOYSTON, Local No. 1244, Montreal, Que., Can. 
Brother JOHN DE FREYTAS, Local No. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brother JOHN J. GILLIS, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 
Brother F. L. GREEN, Local No. 44, Urbana, III. 
Brother PAUL HABERLAND, Local No. 488, New York, N. Y. 
Brother R. T. HARRISON, Local No. 184, Salt Lake City, Utah 
Brother C. E. HIGHTOWER, Local No. 1723, Columbus, Ga. 
Brother THEODORE HOFMAN, Local No. 1602, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Brother WILLIAM HUBER, Local No. 132, Washington, D. C. 
Brother MIKE JIRAVA, Local No. 1260, Iowa City, Iowa 
Brother GEORGE JUERGENS, Local No. 1602, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Brother ED. KARJELAINEN, Local No. 1244, Montreal, Que., Can. 
Brother H. KOLEMAINEN, Local No. 1244, Montreal, Que., Can. 
Brother VITAL LaCHAPELLE, Local No. 93, Ottawa, Ont., Can. 
Brother HARRY M. LARKIN, Local No. 747, Oswego, N. Y. 
Brother CHARLES H. LINDNER, Local No. 101, Baltimore, Md. 
Brother NORMAN R. McLEOD, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 
Brother DANIEL McRAE, Local No. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
Brother ERIC ORMAN, Local No. 787, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brother EDWARD E. PERRY, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 
Brother ADOLPH G. PRIEBER, Local No. 101, Baltimore, Md. 
Brother E. B. RICHARDSON, Local No. 734, Kokomo, Ind. 
Brother JOHN RONAN, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 
Brother WILLIAM N. SMITH, Local No. 396, Newport News, Va. 
Brother J. SPRACKLIN, Local No. 1244, Montreal, Que., Can. 
Brother STANLEY SPRENGER, Local No. 2194, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Brother PETER S. STEENSON, Local No. 67, Roxbury, Mass. 
Brother JOHN SUPER, Local No. 59, Lancaster, Pa. 
Brother DEXTER TAYLOR, Local No. 1602, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Brother JOHN VOEGELI, Local No. 246, New York, N. Y. 
Brother FRED WIEGEL, Local No. 980, Chicago, III. 
Brother JOHN T. YANCY, Local No. 1723, Columbus, Ga. 



CorrQspondQncQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible For Views Expressed By Correspondents. 

METROPOLITAN COUNCIL HOLDS GROUP INITIATION 

In the presence of a distinguished group of members and guests, the Metro- 
politan District Council, Philadelphia, Pa., on the night of Thursday, August 21, 
in a solemn and inspiring ceremony, initiated into the Brotherhood some 300 wood- 
working, mill, and carpenter apprentices. The group initiation was held in the 
Crystal Room of the Broadwood Hotel. General Representative William O. Blaier 
acted as installing officer and master of ceremonies for the evening. 

Members, guests and candidates sat down to a fine dinner as the evening's 
activities opened. Council President Richard O'Driscoll called the session to order 
with the pledge of allegiance to the flag, participated in by all in a very impressive 
manner. At the conclusion of the dinner, installing officer Blaier asked the 300 
neophytes to rise, thereupon in one of the most effective installation ceremonies 
ever witnessed in Philadelphia he obligated them into the Brotherhood. 

M. A. Hutcheson, First General Vice-President of the United Brotherhood, who 
was delayed due to late arrival of the plane, welcomed the new members into the 
United Brotherhood and in a brief address outlined the many advantages and 
opportunities that are available to the competent mechanic. 

Other Speakers included: General Executive Board Member Kelly; Charles 
Hanson, President of New York District Council; Charles Schwertner, Builders' 
Association; J. W. Currinder, Director, Veterans Vocational Training; Edward 
Finney, President State Council of Carpenters; R. Rajoppi, President and N. J. 
Cantwell, Secretary New Jersey State Council; Edward A. Kane, Senior Business 
Representative of the Metropolitan District Council and Vice-President, Pennsyl- 
vania State Federation of Labor; M. M. Hanson, Assistant Director of Apprentice- 
ship Training; and James L. McDevitt, President, Pennsylvania Federation of 
Labor. 

The Metropolitan District Council is proud of its new group of apprentices — 
ninety-five per cent of whom are veterans. They are the men on whom, in the days 
to come, the responsibilities of leadership not only in our Brotherhood but also in 
community, state and national affairs will fall. They will not be found wanting. 



NEW LONDON LOCAL. CELEBRATES 40th BIRTHDAY 

More than 500 members, friends, and guests of Local Union No. 30, New Lon- 
don, Conn., jammed the recreation building at Ocean Park on the night of July 
26th when the Union celebrated the fortieth anniversary of its chartering. Those 
in attendance enjoyed not only a first-class banquet but also a number of inspiring 
and educational addresses. 

Heading the list of special guests, was General Executive Board Member 
Charles Johnson, Jr., who predicted that the Taft-Hartley Act, "a law passed in a 
moment of hysteria," will disappear from the statute books as surely as did Pro- 
hibition, another act "a large part of the people did not want or appreciate." 
Other speakers included Rev. John J. Finn of St. Mary's Church; Joseph M. 
Rourke, secretary-treasurer of the Connecticut Federation of Labor; Robert J. 
Sullivan, president of the New London Contractors Association; Mayor Fred Ben- 
venuti; and General Representative William J. Sullivan. 

During the evening, a short history of organizing activities of New London 
carpenters, prepared by General Secretary Frank Duffy, was read. First efforts 
to build a carpenters' union in New London took place in the year 18 86 when 
Local Union No. 178 was chartered. This union lapsed in a few years owing to 
hard times. In 1898, Local No. 133 was formed and in 1905 Local No. 1411 was 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



also chartered. Two years later, on February 25, 1907, these two organizations 
were consolidated to form Local Union No. 30. Ever since, Local Union No. 30 has 
played a prominent role in the advancements made by both the Brotherhood and 
the trade of carpentry. 

During the past forty years Local Union No. 30, through wars and peace, 
through good times and, bad, has struggled constantly to build the community, ele- 
vate the standards of the trade, and improve the lot of those who work with their 
hands for a living. 



SHEFFIELD HONORS FIRST GI APPRENTICE GRADUATE 

Carpenters' Local Union 109 and the Tennessee Valley Authority awarded a 
journeyman's certificate to William J. Brink in ceremonies held in the Carpenters' 

Office, Sheffield, Alabama. He is the first 
carpenter apprentice of Local Union 109 in 
the employ of the Tennessee Valley Au- 
thority at Wilson Dam, Alabama to gradu- 
ate after taking training under the GI 
Bill of Rights. 

Mr. Brink entered the United States 
Navy November 14, 1942 and was dis- 
charged October 24, 1945, having seen ac- 
tive duty with the naval forces in both 
the Atlantic and Pacific theaters. Mr. 
Brink was in the employ of the Tennessee 
Valley Authority in the training program 
at the time of his entry into military serv- 
ice. Having served with distinction and 
returning with an honorable discharge, he re-entered the employ of the Tennessee 
Valley Authority and took up his training for carpenter under the GI Bill. 

At the ceremonies at which the certificate was awarded, reading from left to 
right were: J. S. Speer, field representative of the Federal Apprenticeship Com- 
mittee; R. B. Puryear, Jr., training officer of Tennessee Valley Authority; Mr. 
Brink; S. T. Ingram, president of Local Union 109; Morton E. Crist, financial 
secretary-business manager and Henry E. England, steward of Carpenters' Local 
Union of Sheffield. 




SOUTH SHORE COUNCIL HONORS TWO OLD TIMERS 

The delegates to the South Shore District Council of Massachusetts, gathered 
together for their annual meeting last month, paid special tribute to two old 
timers with a fine lobster supper at the Kimball Lobster House. The District 
Council was chartered in 1903. Even before that time, Brothers Howard Inman 
and Fred Corthell were active in the affairs of the Carpenters Committee of the 
South Shore, forerunner of the District Council. As founder-members of the Dis- 
trict Council, their enthusiasm and zeal soon elevated them to offices in the organ- 
ization. In the forty-four ensuing years they have continued to give their best to 
the organization they helped so much to build. They have been active delegates 
and committee members right up until the time of their retirement this year. 

President Karle Lovell welcomed the delegates and the two honored guests. In 
a brief address he reviewed the prominent part these two stalwarts played in the 
progress made down the years. 

John W. Knox, Business Agent for the Council, also paid a fine tribute to the 
help and assistance Brothers Inman and Corthell have rendered year in and year 
out. On behalf of the Council he presented to each of them an engraved testimonial 
and life-membership certificate, plus a gold ring with the Carpenters Emblem 
suitably inscribed. The assembly joined him in wishing them both many happy 
years to enjoy the fruits of their labors. 

The Council's annual meeting closed on a fine note of harmony and cooperation 
with all prospects pointing to another year of healthy activity and progress. 




SAN PEDRO AUXILIARY DOES MANY GOOD DEEDS 

The Editor: 

We, the members of Ladies' Auxiliary No. 130, San Pedro, California, would 
like the rest of the world to know what we, as a group, are doing and have done in 
the past year. We have at the present time some thirty members; around seven- 
teen of them being active in the work. Although we are few in number, we have 
built up our treasury and we are hoping to keep a nice sum ahead for our worth- 
while civic and charitable activities. 

At Christmas time last year we raffled off a quilt which was donated by our 
president and quilted by one of our members. The proceeds of the quilt — well 
over $100 — was added to our charity fund with which we take care of a ward for 
aged ladies at the Torrance-California City Hospital. We have installed a radio 
in the ward and a committee is on the job twice a month seeing that the needs of 
the inmates are satisfied and that a little sunshine and a few gifts are scattered 
among the thirty old ladies. 

We also sponsor a group of Blue Birds, one of our members being the personal 
sponsor to the group. Most of our money is made from the sale of greeting cards 
and gift wrapping papers — a project that has been a great success. 

We have sent books and money to the Home at Lakeland and we have sup- 
ported many other worthy causes. Recently we bought a piano for use in our 
hall. One and all we try to show the rest of the world what a grand thing unions 
are and what unhappy conditions would prevail without them. 

Fraternally, A. Jonto, Rec. Sec. 



COLORADO SPRINGS LADIES BOAST MANY ACTIVITIES 

The Editor: 

Greetings from Ladies Auxiliary No. 203, Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

In the past we have enjoyed your letters and ideas from the many other Aux- 
iliaries across the country, and we now want the ladies to know what we in Colo- 
rado Springs have been doing for the good of the order. 

In January we hold our annual dinner for our husbands and families; after 
which we have an evening of entertainment in which all participate. Following our 
evening meetings we entertain our families with bingo, quiz programs, cards, 
dances, and various other forms of fun. 

In July we hold our annual picnic for our families. Each family brings its 
own basket dinner and we of the Auxiliary furnish drinks and desserts. We usually 
wind up the picnic with an old-fashioned community sing with every body joining 
in. At Christmas time we have a party where the children put on the program 
and where Santa Claus shows up with treats for all. A dance follows for all Car- 
penters and their families. 

Our Auxiliary holds monthly luncheons and teas, after which we sponsor vari- 
ous forms of entertainment. We hold white elephant auctions and the proceeds go 
into our treasury. This last month we held a Tom Brenneman Hat Show from 
which we received a good deal of favorable publicity and comment. 

We would welcome letters and new money-making ideas for future use from 
any sister Auxiliaries. We also welcome any Auxiliary members who might be 
visiting in the Pike's Peak region to be our guests. 

Fraternally, Doris Bedient, Rec. Sec. 



Craft Probloms 



| /:, i ■■ 




Carpentry 

(Copyright 1947) 

LESSON 229 
By H. H. Siegele 

In the last several decades there has 
been a marked change in the ways and 
means of surfacing floors and finish 
material. When this writer started as 
an apprentice carpenter a gTeat deal 
of -fie finish lumber was surfaced on the 
bench. First the plane was used, then 
the finger scraper, and after that the 




Fig. 1 

smoothing up of the surface was done 
with sandpaper. But the present day 
carpenter, when it comes to finishing, 
dees not hare to do much of that kind 
of work. He finds most of the finish- 
ing material when it comes from the 
mills ready to put on. Surfacing with 
the plane, finger scraper and sandpaper, 




is the exception to the rule, so far as 
finish lumber is concerned. 

In much the same way floor surfacing 
has been taken over almost completely 
by the floor surfacing machine, or floor 
sander. Hand surfacing, if it is done 



at all in these days, is done around 
the edges or in places where it is im- 
possible to work with the machine, or 
perhaps on small jobs that do not just- 




Tig. 



ify bringing a floor sander on the job. 
Not withstanding all of these revolu- 
ary changes in regard to surfacing 
floors and finish material, every carp- 
enter sooner or later will have to do 
some of this work by hand. It is those 
exceptions that make it necessary for 




Fij 



him to know all he can about surfacing 
finish material and floors. 

Fig. 1 show; a sort of symbol of a 
floor surfacing machine. No attempt 
has been made to represent in any way 
any part of any floor surfacing machine 
that is on the market. The only reason 
for the illustration is to give the stu- 
dent an idea of such a machine. There 
are different makes of floor sanders on 
the market, and such machines are con- 
stantly being improved, which makes 



THE CARPENTER 



27 



it advisable for the prospective buyer 
to examine as many of them as he can, 
so that when he makes his choice it 
will be for the one that will give him 
the best service. 

Fig. 2 shows a hand scraper that can 
be used for surfacing floors or surfacing 
finish lumber on the bench. It gives 
excellent service, especially if the blade 
is properly sharpened. In Lesson 209 
the subject of sharpening scraper blades 
is covered, and the student is referred 
to that treatment for definite instruc- 
tions on the matter. 

Another good hand scraper is shown 
by Fig. 3. This one is more nearly suit- 
able for floor surfacing, but it gives 
good results when used on the bench 
for scraping finish material. It can be 
adjusted to almost any position that 
the workman might want, and is not 
hard to pack in a tool case. 

Two designs of a handy little finger 
scraper that should be carried in the 




be determined by the workman when 
he shapes it. 

Fig. 6 is a drawing of the old-fash- 
ioned scraper with the two long edges 
beveled with a flat file and then shar- 
pened with a burnisher. This tool, al- 
though rarely used today, is still a 




Fig. 5 



Fig. 6 

legitimate tool for the finisher to carry 
in his tool kit. It does not take much 
room in the kit and does not. add enough 
extra weight to be noticeable. But the 
mechanic that knows how to sharpen a 
finger scraper and how to use it, will 
find it the best tool that he can use 
for making an even surface — one that 
won't show scraper marks after the 
sandpapering has been done. 



pocket of every finisher, is shown by 
Fig. 4. The shape of this scraper should 
be determined by the workman himself, 
so that it will serve him in as many 
ways as possible. At A is shown a form 
with two straight edges, and different 
rounded edges. The half-round dott- 
ed line is a suggestion. At B a similar 
scraper is shown, which has only a 
short straight edge to the left. The rest 
of it is made up of different round 
edges, including the one shown by dott- 
ed line. Below each of these are shown 
edge views, giving the bevel, and by 
heavier shading how the hook has been 
formed with the burnisher. (See lesson 
209 about forming the hook.) 

Fig. 5 shows the design shown at A, 
Fig. 4, giving two applications of the 
scraper when used for cleaning mold- 
ings. It should be remembered that the 
moldings shown are small in proportion 
to the size of the scraper. The purpose 
here is merely to show how the scraper 
blade is to be formed so that it will fit 
the part of the molding it is to be used 
on. The size of the scraper blade should 







I—/ 



Fig. 7 



Fig. 7. Shows an end view and a side 
view of a sandpaper block. This block 
is made so that one-half of a regular 
sheet of sandpaper, cut lengthwise and 
doubled, will cover one side of the 
block, still leave enough of the sand- 
paper to give a hold for the fingers. 

Fig. 8 shows the same block, with 
a doubled half sheet of sandpaper in 
one of the slots. The paper is wrapped 
around the side of the block and over 
the edge, so that it can be held with 
the fingers while sandpapering. The 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



student should remember that this is 
only one way of making a sandpaper 



Fig. 8 

block. There are other "ways, and per- 
haps better ones. Every apprentice 




H. H. SIEGELE'S BOOKS 

ROOF FRAMING.— 175 p. and 437 U. Roof framing 
complete. Other problems, including saw filing. $2.00. 

BUILDING. — Has 210 p. and 495 il., covering form 
building, finishing, stair building, etc. $2.50. 

CARPENTRY. — Has 302 p., 754 il., covering general 
house carpentry, and other subjects. $2.50. 

BUILDING TRADES D ICTIONARY.— Has 3S0 p. 
670 il., and about 7,000 building trade terms. $3.00. 

QUICK CONSTRUCTION.— Covers hundreds of prac- 
tical building problems, has 252 p. and 670 il. $2.50. 

TWIGS OF THOUGHT.— Poetry. Only $1.00. 

PUSHING BUTTONS.— Illustrated prose. Only $1.00. 

Postage paid when money accompanies order. 

Order 

today. ■ ■■ " "" «»■-—» — — — tmpona, Kansas 

FREE— With 3 books, I $1.00 hook free; with 5 
books. 2 SI. 00 books free. Books autographed . . . 
In quantities of 12 or more, 20% discount, f. o. b. 

Chicago, Money-back guarantee. 



Hu eicrri c 222so.Consf.s1 
. H. blt-iaki-k. Emporia, Kansa: 



should train himself to become a keen 
observer, and whenever he finds a better 



way than the one he is using, he should 
forthwith proceed to acquire it. 

Fig. 9 shows a sandpaper block made 
for a special use. For instance, the 
mechanic is putting on moldings and 
frequently has to fix up a joint; such 
a joint can hardly be made uniformly 
smooth without using sandpaper. If the 
workman has a block shaped to fit the 
different curves of the molding he is 
working with, he can do a first-class job 
of fixing up the joints. At A the block 
has a flat side, while at B it has a 
larger half round than the one on the 
other edge. 



$1.25 with 7 Blades 




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THEY HAVE 

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"The FRAMING SQUARE" (Chart) 

Explains tables on framing squares. Shows how 
to find lengths of any rafter and make its cuts; 
find any angle in degrees; frame any polygon 3 to 
16 sides, and cut its mitres; read board feet rafter 
and brace tables, octagon scale. Gives other valu- 
able information. Also includes Starting Key and 
Radial Saw Chart for changing pitches and cuts 
into degrees and minutes. Every carpenter should 
have this chart. Now printed on both sides, makes about 
13 square feet of printed data showing squares full size. 
Price $1.00 postpaid, no stamps. 



SLIDE CALCULATOR for Rafters 



Makes figuring rafters a cinch! Shows the length of any 
rafter having a run of from 2 to 23 feet; longer lengths are 
found by doubling. Covers 17 different pitches. Shows lengths 
of hips and valleys, commons, jacks, and gives the cuts for 
each pitch, also the angle in degrees and minutes. Fastest 
method known, eliminates chance of error, so simple anyone 
who can read numbers can use it. NOT A SLIDE RULE but 
a Slide Calculator designed especially for Carpenters, Con- 
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postpaid, Check or M. O., no stamps. 

MASON ENGINEERING SERVICE 
2105 N. Burdick St., Div. 10, Kalamazoo 81. Mich. 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 
Burr Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 32 

Carlson Rules 29 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 32 

J. E. Gaskill, Toledo, O 31 

Greenlee Tool Co., Rockford, 111. 31 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 32 

F. P. Maxson, Chicago, 111 28 

A. D. McBurney, Los Angeles, Cal. 29 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 3rd Cover 

Ohelen-Bishop, Columbus, O 30 

The Speed Co., Portland, Ore 30 

Sharp's Framing Square, L. L. 

Crowley, Salem, Ore 4 

Stanley Tools, Jlew Britain, Conn 3rd Cover 

E. Weyer, New York, N. Y 30 

Bowling Equipment 
Brunswick, Balke, Collender Co., 

Chicago, 111. 32 

Carpentry Materials 

The Upson Co., Lockport, N. Y. 1 

Doors 

Overhead Door Corp., Hartford 

City, Ind. 4th Cover 

Overalls 
The H. D. Lee Co., Kansas City, 

Mo. 30 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi- ' 

cago, 111. 31 

Theo. Audel, New York, N. Y. 3rd Cover 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 32 

Frederick Drake & Co., Chicago, 

111. . 3 

Mason Engineering Service, 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 28 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 29 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 28 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo 30 



LABEL of United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America 




This label stands for a wage commensurate 
with the labor performed, for superior workman- 
ship, the mechanical training and education of 
the apprentice and fair working conditions. 

Be sure to see that it appears on ail store 
and bar fixtures, trim, cigar boxes and beer 
bottle cases and on all wood products. 

— ORGANIZE — 



CHANGE BLADES 
IN 10 SECONDS 



lUICK-CHANGE BLADES are 
featured on all Carlson Rules. 
CHIEF available in 6-, 8- and 10- 
ft., lengths; WHITE CHIEF and 
HOBBY in 6- and 8-ft. Keep a 
"spare" replacement blade on hand. 
SOLD BY LEADING HARDWARE DEALERS 




CARLSON 



STEEL TAPE RULES 



White Chief Tape Lines Are Mftd Under TJ.S. Pat. 2089209 



SUPER HAM-R-ADZ NO. 10 




Tool steel attachment 
quickly converts car- 
penter's hammer into 
efficient adz. Ideal for 
rough framing, scaf- 
folding — form build- 
ing. Easy to use and 
keep sharp. Fits poc- 
ket. Get yours today . 



SUPER STAIR GAGE NO. 49 




Only .75 the pair! 

A. D. McBURNEY 



Again available for instant 
attachment to carpenter's steel 
squares. Perfect for laying 
out stair stringers and other 
saw cuts. Precision-made 
nickel-plated steel fixtures 
with brass thumb screws. 

At Dealers' or Postpaid. 
939 W. 6th St., Dept. C-4 
LOS ANGELES 14, CAL. 




STEEL SQUARE 



Completely Revised 



HAND 
BOOK 



This concise and handy little book illustrates and describes the best methods of using 
the carpenter's steel square in laying out all kinds of carpentry work. It is easy to 
understand as a picture of the square laying directly on the work shows exactly how the 
various cuts are made. Its compact and handy size makes it convenient to carry in the 
pocket for quick reference. 



"For ready reference carry 
this convenient 50 page 
pocket size (4ix63) guide 
to your job." 



Postpaid. Money back guarantee if not entirely satisfied 
SEND SI. 00 TODAY 



I D. A. ROGERS 



5344 Clinton Avenue 
Minneapolis 9, Minn. 



Enclosed $1.00. Forward by return mail your Carpenters & 
Builders' Practical Rules for Laying Out Work. 



Name Address. 

I T«wd StaU 



Preferred by Master Craftsmen 




NO. 10 
JOINTER 



NO. C-6 RIP 



NO. C-5 
CUT-OFF 



You'll get high speed production 
from these circular saw leaders, 
manufactured to meet the exacting 
demands of carpenters and wood- 
workers. Proven designs stand 
up longer, cut faster and truer. 
Choose from the Ohlen-Bishop 
line. 



OHLEN-MISHQP 




906 Ingleside Ave. 



Columbus 8, Ohio 



Important Mrj*. 
NOTICE! 



At present we are unable to produce 
Lee (Union-Made) Carpenters' Over- 
alls because : 



1. 



2. 



We are unable to secure the 
top quality, special woven ma- 
terial that goes into every pair 
of Lee Carpenters' Overalls. 

There are not enough skilled 
operators available at present 
to keep our five Lee factories 
busy. 

Lee Carpenters' Overalls will again be 
available when we can obtain the 
best quality material and when we 
have sufficient skilled Union Opera- 
tors to man the machines in the five 
great Lee factories. 

Lee is the Largest Manufacturer of 
UNION-MADE Work Clothing in the World 

THE H. D. LEE CO. 

Kansas City, Mo. Minneapolis, Minn. 
Trenton, N. J. San Francisco, Cal. 

South Bend, Ind. Salina, Kans. 



If you are ambitious to have your own busi- 
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System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 

Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $5.00, 
and pay the balance of $25.00 at $5.00 per 
month, making a total of $30.00 for the com- 
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plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name and address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

Johnson Building C, Denver 2, Colorado 



nmPBEP SAW F ELI It 



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Unlike rafter tables, run is 
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readings. 

RAFTER DIAL $1.95 Order from-. E. Weyer, Dept. H, 
P.O. Box 153, Planetarium Station, New York 24, N. Y. 



p 


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GREENLEE 22 is a name it will pay you well to 
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was born out of the inse- 
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We have indeed much for which to be thankful. 
Our land is broad and pleasant; our cities are fair 
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SONS, INC 



REG. U.S. PAT. OFfu 



1104 Tacony, Philadelphia 35, Pa., U.S.A. 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

FRANK DUFFY, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXVII — No. 11 



INDIANAPOLIS, NOVEMBER, 1947 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Conten t s — 



Who's Kidding Who? 



A white collar worker takes a verbal slap at unions for being "greedy" enough to 
want to maintain a decent living standard for their members. As a devotee of individual 
bargaining she blames all her troubles on unionism instead of facing the basic fact 
that the worker who tries to go it alone these days soon finds himself in an economic 
vise, the upper jaw of which is stationary wages and the lower jaw of which is higher 
prices. 



In Justice to All 



To the average worker who has a healthy chunk taken out of his pay envelope each 
week by withholding taxes, it is no secret that the tax load is becoming cumbersome 
and in need of ultimate revision. The AFL Executive Council takes a look at the problem 
and makes some sound recommendations. 



Time for a Change 



12 

Eight years have passed since any substantial changes have been made in the Social 
Security Act. In those eight years our economy has progressed from depression to boom 
—a fact that seemingly dictates a need for thorough review of the whole Social Security 
structure. 



The English System 



19 



With a sizeable portion of English industry now nationalized, the natural question be- 
comes, what part is unionism going to play in such a setup? Here is a partial answer 
at least by a prominent English trade union official. 



* 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
Plane Gossip 
Editorials 
Official 

Di Memoriam 
Correspondence - 
To the Ladies 
Craft Problems - 



10 
16 
21 

22 
23 
26 

27 



Lidex to Avertisers 



32 



Although the war is over, the paper situation remains extremely tight. Our quota is so limited 
that we must continue confining The Carpenter to thirty-two pages instead of the usual sixty-four. 
Until such time as the paper situation improves, this will have to be our rule. 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS. IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8. 1918. 



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Who's Kidding Who? 



Columbus, Ohio 
October 28, 1947 
The Editor 
The Carpenter 
Dear Sir : 

I am a bookkeeper working in a contractor's office, and see your maga- 
zine, subscribed to by one of the carpenter foremen. 

In trying to run your union workers' pay up to the highest possible 
level, you apparently have selfishly lost any regard for other classes of 
people earning their living and whose rate does not sky-rocket with the 
cost of living as it is forced up by your greedy union demands. 

For a narrow, one-sided presentation of the labor situation bordering 
many times on misrepresentation of the facts, you certainly take the 
prize; however, instead of congratulations, I say "Shame on you!" for 
your bigotry. I am not a "crank" just one of the many caught in the 
middle by the greed and selfishness of the labor unions. When a depres- 
sion comes, your men will be the first to run to collect the unemployment 
insurance the employer has paid for. 

Sincerely, -. 

Dear Madam: 

This will acknowledge receipt of your interesting communication of 
recent date. After noting the contents very carefully, about all I could 
think of was the story of the two merchants who met on the street one 
day. Said one of them: "Say, did you hear about Jake? I understand he 
went into the clothing business in Akron and made $50,000." "Yeh," re- 
plied the other, "I heard about Jake, but you got it a little bit wrong. It 
wasn't the clothing business it was the hardware business ; and it wasn't 
Akron it was 'Buffalo; and he didn't make $50,000 he lost it." That is 
about the way j^our communication impresses me — it is fine in every 
respect except that the statements therein do not contain a shred of 
truth. 

You start out by accusing the unions of being selfish and you blame 
them exclusively for the high cost of living. If wanting to make a living 
wage is selfishness, then the unions are selfish. However, your communi- 
cation is one long plaint because you yourself are not making a living 
wage. If you consider the desire to make a decent living selfishness, then 
certainly } r ou must include yourself in the same category as organized 
labor. 

When you blame unionism for the high cost or living, you merely 
display your colossal ignorance of the economic facts of life. In the 
years since 1940 the unions of the nation have fought a losing battle 



6 THE CARPEXTER 

against skyrocketing prices. Despite the best efforts of organized labor, 
the spread between wages and prices has grown wider month by month. 
In recent months, wages have increased by some six per cent but during 
the same period the cost of living has increased by about sixteen per cent. 
The fact of the matter is that most workers are worse off now than they 
were three or four or five years ago despite higher wages because the 
higher wages will buy less goods at today's prices. If you think this is 
"bigotry" or "misrepresentation" do not take our word for it, write to 
the Department of Labor for the exact figures: or do you think that they 
are untrustworthy too? Recently Secretary of Labor Schwellenbach said 
in a speech that each month for the past fifteen months prices have pulled 
farther ahead of wages. 

If you read The Carpenter as you claim, you probably noted in a 
recent issue that the Department of Commerce estimates profits for the 
first six months of this year at close to nine billion dollars. This is well 
ahead of total profits for any other one full year prior to the war. It 
is the equivalent of total profits for the year 1929 — long considered the 
boom year of all time. In other words, by the end of June, 1947, business 
had already piled up more profits in the six month period than it did in all 
of 1929 which was supposed to be a bonanza year. How do you suppose 
the corporations amassed these profits? By lowering prices and worry- 
ing about whether or not your pay check was going to be sufficient to 
keep you out of the red? I hardly think so. You and I paid for those 
profits and we paid for them at the butcher shop and the clothing 
store counter and grocery store checking stand. Corporations cannot 
make 200% and 300% more (as they have done) on net worth than they 
made in any of the immediate pre-war years without prices going up. 

So when you blame union demands for present prices you are merely 
displaying an ignorance of facts that borders on the astounding. The 
struggle of the unions has been to try to maintain living standards, but 
despite all they have been able to do, the gap between wages and prices 
has grown wider steadily. As an employe in a contractor's office, you 
should be somewhat familiar with what has transpired in the building 
game. Lumber has increased 200% over pre-war prices. Brick and tile 
are roughly 125% above pre-war prices. So are paints and most other 
materials. According to the AYall Street Journal building, trades wages 
are up less than seventy-six per cent on the national average. Is it 
wages or profits then that are contributing most to building costs? Is it 
labor's fault the house that was built for $4,000 twenty years ago now sells 
for $10,000? 

The one thing I can agree with in your communication is the state- 
ment that you, as a non-union worker, are caught in an economic squeeze. 
But let me ask you two questions; why? and whose fault is it? Answer- 
ing the first one first, you are in the squeeze because you are a devotee 
of individual bargaining rather than collective bargaining. To my way 
of thinking, you are a walking testimonial of the value of unionism. You 
are an example of what the worker can expect for his services when he 
tries to go it alone instead of banding together with his fellow workers 
to engasre in a little collective bargaining:. As far as I can see you can 



THE CARPENTER 7 

think of no solution other than crying- over your unhappy plight and 
damning those who do have the good sense to band together in an effort 
to gain something approaching economic justice. 

But let us get on with the second question, whose fault is it? With- 
in the American Federation of Labor there is an organization for office 
personnel. It is known as the Office Employes International Union. 
Do you belong to it? Apparently not, since you seem to think union 
members have horns and forked tails. Instead of joining forces with the 
other people in your profession and going after a living wage, you 
seemingly prefer to stand alone. You do not like what you have, but 
your solution seems to be to try to bring everybody else down to your 
economic level rather than trying to pull yourself up to the higher 
standard. For years organized labor has preached that the individual 
worker standing alone takes it on the chin. Your communication certainly 
proves the point effectively. 

Nearly a hundred years ago, old Abe Lincoln said in effect (I am 
sorry I do not have time to run down the exact words) : "If your neighbor 
through diligence and thrift builds himself a fine house, do not waste 
your efforts to tear it down but rather so apply yourself that you can one 
day enjoy a similar fine home of your own." 

So, dear Madame, in justice to yourself as well as to the rest of the 
working people in the nation, this might be a good time for you to 
indulge in a little soul searching. When you blame the unions for exist- 
ing high prices, you are barking up the wrong tree. You do not have 
to take our word for it because, as we said before. Secretary of Labor 
Schwellenbach has pointed out the same thing, and he certainly is in a 
position to know. When you start feeling sorry for yourself do not 
blame the unions for your unhappy circumstances; rather remember the 
words of Abraham Lincoln. Instead of trying to tear down your neigh- 
bor's house, try to build one of your own. Fifteen million workers in 
this nation belong to unions. They belong because they have found out 
by bitter experience that only through organization can they hope for 
anything even resembling economic justice. You yourself are finding 
out the futility of trying to go it alone. However, like a lot of other 
white collar workers, instead of seeking the obvious solution to your 
problems (that is, membership in a strong, progressive union) you are 
feeling sorry for yourself and railing at those who have used better judg- 
ment. 

These are indeed unsettled and trying times. There is not one of us 
who works for a living but who is worried and plagued by a feeling of 
uncertainty and insecurity. When we find the eventual answers to many 
of our economic problems, those answers will stem from organized 
labor. I sincerely recommend that you think these things over. If and 
when you do, I am sure that instead of cussing organized labor which is 
fighting the same economic vise you complain of, you will become part 
of it and through collective action hasten the da}* when wages and prices 
can be brought into a better economic balance. 

Sincerely yours, 

Peter E. Terzick, Asst. Editor. 



In lustice To All 



WHEN the next Congress convenes shortly after the first of the 
year, taxation is certain to receive prompt attention. To the 
average American worker who has a healthy chunk sliced off his 
check every week by income taxes, the tax problem is a pressing and vital 
one. Prices being what they are, tax deductions work a genuine hardship 
on all working class families. However, the nation is in the middle of a 
complex crisis that makes mandatory adequate tax revenues. Regardless of 
personal sacrifices involved, national security should and must be given 
first consideration. 



The last session of Congress saw 
two tax reduction measures intro- 
duced. Both were vetoed by the 
President because he felt they were 
not timely. Both of them offered 
some relief to low income groups, 
but the relief was a sort of sugar- 
coating to make palatable substan- 
tial reductions in income taxes for 
the high income groups. With a 
new tax revision measure almost 
certain to come up in the next Con- 
gress, labor has a vital stake in the 
whole tax reduction question. 

That the American Federation of 
Labor is aware of this fact is 
amply proved by the concise, clear- 
cut set of recommendations on the 
subject made by the- Executive 
Council of that body to the San 
Francisco convention. 

The Executive Council, in a sec- 
tion of its report devoted to the 
subject of taxation, recommended 
that the federal tax structure 
"should balance the budget and 
yield substantial surpluses during 
periods of high employment." 

While seeing no immediate relief 
from the high level of taxation, the 
Council said that certain modifica- 



tion in the tax structures may be 
made that will "contribute much to- 
ward determining the degree of 
prosperity we maintain." The re- 
port declared : 

"Any and all such modifications 
in the federal tax structure should 
be made with the following objec- 
tives in mind : 

i. The proposed taxes should be 
adequate to provide for necessary 
services and to maintain the federal 
credit. 

2. The proposed taxes should be 
equitable, increasing progressively 
as individual income increases with 
due regard for the necessity of ex- 
empting the incomes of those at be- 
low minimum-subsistence levels. 

3. The proposed taxes should 
operate so as to keep the buying 
power of consumers at the highest 
possible level, so that production 
and employment may be main- 
tained. 

4. The proposed taxes should 
not combine with other economic 
measures to depress or retard the 
development of any area, or place 



THE CARPENTER 



it at an economic disadvantage in 
relation to other areas. 

"The gradual personal income tax 
should continue to provide the bulk 
of the national revenue. Any 
changes adopted should not jeop- 
ardize this basic tax source to our 
revenue system. If and when total 
revenue needs permit reductions, 
we favor increasing the exemption 
for those in the lower income group 
until income of a family of four is 
exempt up to $2500. 

"As total revenue needs will per- 
mit we urge the repeal of all excise 
taxes except those on liquor, to- 
bacco, and gasoline (providing in- 
come from gasoline tax is needed 
and used for highway develop- 
ments). These reductions in excise 
taxes which should be second in 
priority to income tax reduction for 
those at below subsistence level in- 
come, would mean tax savings of 
approximately $3.3 billion dollars 
based on excise revenue estimates 
for 1947. 

"New and increased taxes levied 
by state and local governments 
have in many instances taken the 
form of sales taxes, cigarette taxes, 
and other taxes that still further 
increase the load of taxes on con- 
sumption levied at the local, state, 
and national level. Approximately 
29 per cent of the $48 billion in 
taxes collected by all levels of gov- 
ernment are currently being de- 
rived from taxes on sales. State 
federations and local central bodies 
should vigorously oppose current 
campaigns that are being waged to 
decrease federal and state personal 
and business income taxes based on 
ability to pay, thereby throwing the 
burden for necessary governmental 
support increasingly on sales, ex- 
cise, and nuisance taxes which are 
most burdensome to taxpayers in 



the lower income groups. 

"In considering future tax meas- 
ures as they apply to business it 
should be borne in mind that busi- 
ness has been relieved of a consid- 
erable tax burden much sooner af- 
ter the cessation of hostilities than 
many economists thought advis- 
able. In the face of a definitely 
favorable post-war market for both 
durable and non-durable goods, the 
removal of price controls combined 
with the repeal of the excess pro- 
fits tax and reduction in the sur- 
tax rate contributed considerably 
to bringing about the inflationary 
conditions now prevailing. Discus- 
sions of further reduction in corpo- 
rate tax rates at this time we con- 
sider premature and ill-advised. 

"It seems to us advisable that so- 
cial security income and expendi- 
tures should be segregated from 
the remainder of the federal budget. 
A re-examination of the whole so- 
cial security revenue policy is over- 
due. 

"Present estate and gift tax sche- 
dules and laws should be re-studied 
with a view to increasing' revenue. 
Loopholes made possible by the 
creation of trusts, gifts, and powers 
of appointment should be closed. 

"We would point out in conclu- 
sion, that the present high level of 
federal tax revenue emphasizes the 
need for serious consideration and 
action on studies that have been 
made carrying recommendation for 
integrating Federal and State poli- 
cies and programs in certain fields. 
Such integration could result in 
eliminating much needless over- 
lapping and duplication, would 
make for a high degree of pro- 
gression, and could do much to 
eliminate conflicts among states, 
and between states and the Federal 
Government, in the tax field." 




A ROOF AT ANY COST 

We see by the papers that still an- 
other committee is scheduled to make 
an "investigation" of the housing situa- 
tion shortly. About a year ago we made 
the only constructive suggestion we 
have heard of for increasing housing; 
namely, that a hammer or saw or cant 
book be put in the hand of each of the 
zillions of investigators, administrators, 
coordinators or what have you now 
cluttering up the scene and getting in 
the way of the contractors and building 
tradesmen. We still think it a dandy 
idea. 

If this newest committee operates like 
some of its predecessors, it will spend 
plenty of time and money traveling 
around the country, and in the end it 
will come up with the startling disclo- 
sure that housing is a scarce item. That 
will finish its report. 

Possibly just to save the committee 
some time and money, we relate a sup- 
posedly true incident that occurred in a 
certain southern city recently — an in- 
cident that certainly indicates how des- 
perate the housing situation is in some 
areas. 

In this particular city a householder 
who is subject to periodic nightmares 




One moment, Boss — that raise you 
promised. Do I get itt 



: 'B#S I P 



placed the following ad in a local news- 
paper: 

"Room and board offered to refined 
lady who would not object to screaming 
in the night." 

Before the crack of dawn the next 
morning the telephone rang and a wo- 
man's tired but determined voice came 
over the wire. 

"I have just read your ad in the 
paper," it said. "Please tell me, how 
often would you require me to scream?" 

• • • 
THAT EXPLAINS IT 

Last Spring, Joe Paup, the poor man's 
Socrates, became a grandfather. Recent- 
ly a friend met him on the street. 

"How's that grand child of yours get- 
ting along?" the friend asked. 

"Fine," replied Joe. 

How old is it now?" the friend con- 
tinued. 

"Six months," answered Joe. 

"Talking any yet?" continued the 
friend. 

"No," replied Joe, "it's a boy." 

• • • 
LABOR GETS THE OUTSIDE 

We see by the papers that some of 
the Senators who put over the Taft- 
Hartley Bill are still traveling around 
the country trying to sell their baby 
(usually at $1,000 per appearance) as 
a fine piece of legislation. One of them 
was recently quoted as stating that the 
Wagner Act set up definite rights for 
labor, and the Taft-Hartley Act has 
done the same for employers, so now 
labor-management relations are on an 
even footing. 

From where we sit, this sort of ar- 
gument reminds us of the southern hill- 
billy whose wife divorced him. "Say, 
Zeke," said a friend one day, "what in 
the world did you do with that house 
you owned?" 

"Oh, we divided it," replied Zeke. 

"Divided your house?" rejoined the 
puzzled friend. "How?" 

"Fifty-fifty!" explained Zeke. "She 
takes the inside and I take the out- 
side." 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



IT'S ALL ON US 

"No End of Prosperity in Sight," says 
a headline in a business paper. As a 
wage earner, our first inclination is to 
ask, what prosperity? 

Figures recently released show that 
workers are considerably worse off now 
than they were last year and much 
worse off than they were during the 
war years because skyrocketing prices 
have reduced purchasing power. In to- 
day's "prosperity" the average worker 
is like the son-in-law in one of our 
favorite stories which goes something 
like this: 

A stranger arriving at the town hall 
of a certain small Southern town found 
the townspeople participating in a gala 
celebration. 

"What, may I ask, is the cause of all 
this excitement?" he inquired of one of 
the celebrants. 

"We're celebrating the birthday of the 
oldest inhabitant," was the reply. She's 
a hundred and one today." 

"Oh, yes," said the visitor; "I see her. 
May I ask who is that little man, with 
the dreadfully sad countenance, who is 
walking at her side?' 

The other laughed. 

"Oh," he replied, "that's the old 
lady's son-in-law. He's been keeping up 
the payments on her life insurance pol- 
icy for the past forty years!" 

• • * 

DEPENDS ON WHERE YOU SIT 

The convention of the Mortgage 
Bankers Association held in Cleveland 
last month cheered loudly when a 
speaker branded those who advocated 
a federal program to aid housing as 
"demagogues and loud-mouthed propa- 
gandists." Another speaker equally 
well received predicted that there would 
be an inevitable increase in mortgage 
foreclosures as a result of the GI home 
loan program which has already passed 
the five billion dollar mark in business 
transacted. 

The idea of money lenders cheering 
such speeches reminds us of the two 
draftees who were marching to the 
station during the recent war. Both 
sides of the street were lined with 
cheering throngs as the detachment of 
soldiers plodded on toward the depot. 

"Say," said one recruit to his buddy, 
"who are those people cheering?" 

"Those," replied the buddy, "are the 
people who are not going." 



NOTHING DOING 

The new longer skirt styles seem to 
have everybody in a dither. That in- 
cludes Uncle Sam who is carrying on 
an investigation to find out if there 
was collusion in violation of anti-trust 
laws among designers in setting the new 
styles. 

And the whole question of women's 
clothes reminds us of the miner who 
struck it rich and rushed home with 
his pockets bulging with big bills. 
Throwing several thousand dollar bills 
on the table, he said to his wife: "Here, 
take this and buy yourself some decent 
clothes." 

"I'll do nothing of the kind," re- 
torted the wife. "I'll get the same kind 
the other women wear." 

* • • 

AS PAUP SEES IT 
"A totalitarian nation," says Joe 
Paup, the Fred Allen of the tap room, 
"is one where they name a street after 
you one day and chase you down it the 
next." 

• * * 
PROGRESS 

High prices may be threatening our 
economy, war clouds may be clouding 
the horizon, juvenile delinquency may 
be increasing alarmingly but no one 
can say the news is all bad these days 
No, sir. The Census Bureau has just 
announced perfection of a system of 
scientific mathematics by which the 
unemployed will be accurately counted 
during the next depression. No more 
guessing. 




He talked so convincingly about the 
housing shortage — / rented it to him! 



12 



TIME FOR A CHANGE 



"Y "JT T HILE all people who depend on weekly paychecks for their 
Y/ \/ livelihoods are hard hit by present runaway prices, there is a seg- 
ment of our population that is face to face with downright priva- 
tion because of the inflationary trend in commodity prices. That segment 
is our old people — those who have retired from either choice or necessity. 
On fixed incomes these people struggle heroically to make ends meet in 
the face of skyrocketing prices. Month by month it is becoming more 
apparent that they are fighting a losing battle. 

At the present time there are something over 1,800.000 persons in the 
United States receiving a monthly amount from one or another of the 
funds created by the Social Security Act. These funds are maintained by 
deductions from your paycheck and mine. At the present time one per 
cent is deducted from the check of every worker in a covered industry 
and a similar amount is paid in by. 



each employer in such an industry.. 

The Social Security system was 
put into operation some twelve 
years ago. Eight years have elapsed 
since any significant changes were 
made in the original measure. In 
these eight years, great changes 
have occurred in our economy. \\ e 
have emerged from a depression 
economy to a boom economy. To- 
day's dollar will buy less than half 
of what a 1935 dollar would buy. 
Consequently benefit payment sche- 
dules that approached minimum liv- 
ing standards in those depression 
days do not even come very close to 
providing bare essentials of life in 
1947. 

That a revamping of benefit sche- 
dules under the Social Security Act 
is necessary today can hardly be 
disputed. Through no fault of their 
own our old timers are finding 
themselves impaled on the horns of 
an economic dilemma. Old age 
with its attendant infirmities, makes 
it impossible for them to increase 
their incomes through gainful em- 
ployment, and at the same time the 
benefit payments they receive 
through the Social' Securitv Act 



they helped to bring into being are 
insufficient to keep them clothed 
and fed. 

\\ riting in the October issue 
of the Federationist, Nelson H. 
Cruikshank, director of social in- 
surance activities for the American 
Federation of Labor, touches on the 
problem at some length. As one of 
the real experts on social security 
in all its ramifications, he speaks 
with unimpeachable authority, and 
we herewith reprint an excerpt 
from his fine article: 

"This system (Social Security 1 
has now been in operation for a 
little over twelve years. It has been 
eight years since any significant 
changes were made. In these eight 
years our economy has changed rad- 
ically, and further revision of the 
Social Security Act, in light of 
present-day conditions, is past due. 

"In the closing days of the first 
session of the Eightieth Congress 
a bill was introduced in the Senate 
by Senators Murray, Wagner and 
McGrath (S. 1679), with a compan- 
ion bill in the House by Congress- 
man Dingell (H.R. 4303), which is 
intended to meet this need. 



THE CARPENTER 13 

"The inadequacy of the present ered employment, instead of the 

benefit structure is clearly indicated whole time, as provided under the 

in the figures released b}^ the Social present law. 

Security Administration which "Now let us see how this would 

show that during- 1946 the average wor k out in a specific case. We'll 

monthly benefit paid a retired take an improbable case ruling out 

worker was only $23.90— for retired wage increases over . a period of 

women workers it was only $19.60. twenty years, just to keep the illus- 

The average monthly benefit paid tration simple. 

a retired worker and his wife — pro- «Q, mnni , 0^1 1 a *. a 

. ,. , . . , , , , F , buppose a worker worked stead- 

vidmg the wife had reached age 65 ;u r of <to-^ <^,- ™^ ±u t *. *. 

& & j ny at $250 per month for twenty 

—was only $39. vears beg - innirig . ig3? and then re _ 

"The new bill proposes to im- tiredi being g 5 years of age He 

prove the primary structure in would compute his benefit under the 

three direct ways. present law as follows : 

"The first of these would be a . 

change in the method of comput- Avera S e monthly wage $250 

hag the primary benefit.. Under the 4°% of first $50 $20 

present law the primary benefit is I0 % of remaining $200.. 20 

computed as follows: (1) take 40 Sub-tot" 1 §,ao 

per cent of the first $50 of average p lus 2O y "(^ "for 'each 

monthly wage (obtained roughly of 20 years).. 8 

by dividing the total wages paid to ' 'I 

the worker since 1937 to time of re- Primary Monthly Benefit $48 

tirement by the number of months "Under the proposed bill the 

he has worked in covered employ- same worker would compute his 

ment) and add to it 10 per cent of benefit as follows: 

the next $200 of average monthly . , , 

r \ aa 4. -c i-u Average monthly wage $2=;o 

wage ; (2) add one per cent of the & J ° T J 

sum thus obtained for each 'year 4°% of first $75 $30.00 

in which the worker received as IO % of remaining $175 17.50 

much as $200 of wages in covered Sub-total $47 zo 

employment. The sum of these fig- pj us 20 % /j-% f or eac j 1 

ures is the amount of the monthly Q f OQ vears actuallv 

primary benefit. und ; r the new biUj i % ' 

"The new bill raises the amount f or eac h quar ter) 9.50 

on which the 40 per cent is com- 

puted from $50 to $75 and adds 10 Primary Monthly Benefit $57 

per cent of the remaining $250 of "If the worker in our simplified 

average monthly wage instead of illustration had been able to aver- 

the present $200. age $300 per month over the period 

"The method of computing the of twenty years, he would benefit 
average monthly wage is changed still more from the liberalization of 
from a monthly to a quarterly sys- the formula. Under the present law 
tern, which will prove more equit- the computation would be the same, 
able for workers engaged in employ- as wages in excess of $250 per 
ment of an intermittent character, month are not included in the calcu- 
but in effect rules out only half of lation. If the bill were passed, he 
the time the worker was either un- would be eligible for benefits corn- 
employed or emplo}< T ed in non-cov- puted as follows: 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



Average monthly wage $300 

40% of first $75.... $30.00 
10% of remaining $225 22.50 



Sub-total . 
Plus 20% 



$52-50 
10.50 



Primary Monthly Benefit $63 
"He would also benefit by the 
provisions of the new bill if he 
were engaged in some irregular em- 
ployment. Suppose, for example, a 
worker worked for a period of 
twenty years beginning in 1937, but 
he was engaged in covered employ- 
ment for only half the time. The 
other half of the time he might be 
either unemployed or in employ- 
ment not covered under the law. 
Suppose his actual average month- 
ly earnings were $200 in both types 
of employment. Under the present 
law he would receive a primary 
monthly benefit of $33. Under the 
provisions of the new bill he would 
be eligible for a primary monthly 
benefit of $38.40. This needs to be 
qualified further in favor of the in- 
sured worker since, as I shall indi- 
cate later, many more types of em- 
ployment are covered by the new 
bill. 

"If our example were a chauffeur, 
working half the time for a truck- 
ing concern and the other half as a 
private chauffeur, under the present 
law he would still, on retiring at 
age 65 after twenty years of service 
at $200 per month, be eligible for 
the monthly benefit of $33, but since 
his employment as private chauf- 
feur would also be covered under 
the new law, his average monthly 
wage would not be reduced by 
the months of employment in that 
capacity, and he would be eligible 
for a primary benefit of $51 per 
month. 

"The proposed improvement in 
benefit structure is also reflected in 
the benefits payable to surviving de- 



pendents of deceased workers. 

"The foregoing illustrations an- 
ticipate the second means employed 
in the new bill for improving the 
benefit structure — namely, a change 
in the method of computing the 
average monthly wage on which the 
primary benefit is based. Under the 
present law the average monthly 
wage is lowered directly in propor- 
tion to the time the worker is either 
unemployed or not in covered em- 
ployment. The proposed formula 
still reduces the average monthly 
wage for time not in covered em- 
ployment but not in direct propor- 
tion. The new bill works out rough- 
ly that only half the time the work- 
er is not in covered employment 
counts against his average monthly 
wage. Also months in which he was 
unemployed due to disability are 
eliminated entirely from the wage 
computation, whereas under the 
present law such periods are all in- 
cluded in figuring the average. This 
is a sound social insurance prin- 
ciple as it relates the benefit not so 
directly to the actual amounts 
earned by the individual, which may 
have suffered as a result of unem- 
ployment or illness, but bases the 
benefit on his proved earning capac- 
ity. 

"The third direct method of 
lifting the benefit structure is 
through raising the minimum pri- 
mary benefit amount from the pres- 
ent $10 per month ($15 for retired 
worker and wife, or one child) to 
$20, with the minimum of $30 for 
man and wife, or other retired 
worker with one child. The maxi- 
mum amount pa}^able to a family is 
also increased from the present $85 
per month to $120. 

"There are other direct methods 
employed in the bill to increase the 
benefit and potential income of the 
insured workers. These include lift- 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



ing the amount a retired worker 
may earn without forfeiting bene- 
fits from the present $14.99 P er 
month to $30, extending the cover- 
age, lowering the eligibility age 
for women from 65 to 60 years, and 
by providing protection against dis- 
ability. 

"The proposed reduction of the 
retirement age for women from 65 
to 60 years — a reduction also applic- 
able to eligibility for wife's benefits 
■ — would make it possible for a man 
whose wife was a few years young- 
er than himself to retire at 65 and 
immediately draw the family bene- 
fit. 

"Perhaps one of the most signifi- 
can features of the new bill is the 
proposal to establish a National So- 
cial Insurance Policy Advisory 



Council to be composed of twelve 
persons representing labor and em- 
ployers in equal numbers and the 
public. 

"The present law, which affects 
most vitally millions of workers 
and their employers, is being ad- 
ministered without any direct par- 
ticipation or counsel from repre- 
sentatives of either management or 
labor. The proposal for an advisory 
council specifically authorized to 
make recommendations covering 
coverage, adequacy of benefits and 
methods of financing the program 
is, in the words of Senator Murray, 
one of the bill's sponsors, a recog- 
nition of the fact that 'to serve its 
true purpose, a social insurance sys- 
tem must be a democratic system 
of and for the people.' ' : 




Joseph Padway Called By Death 

Delegates to the Sixty-sixth Annual Convention of 
the American Federation of Labor sustained a severe 
shock when Joseph Padway, General Counsel for Fed- 
eration, passed away shortly after collapsing on the ros- 
trum while denouncing the Taft-Hartley Slave Labor 
Law, on Wednesday, October 8th. A bitter opponent of 
the law from the time it was first presented in Congress, 
Mr. Padway spared neither himself nor his health in 
leading opposition to the measure. His unremitting 
fight against the law undoubtedly contributed to his un- 
timely demise. 

Joseph Padway was born in Leeds, Yorkshire, England, July 25, 1891, 
and came to the United States as a young man after completing elemen- 
tary and high school studies in England. He attended the Marquette uni- 
versity law school in Milwaukee, from which he was graduated in 1912. 
He began practicing law in Milwaukee the same year. 

He served in the Wisconsin State Senate in 1925 and the following 
year was appointed a judge of the Milwaukee Civil court. He resigned 
the judgeship in 1927 to resume the practice of law. 

Padway's national fame as a labor lawyer began in 1938 when Presi- 
dent William Green of the American Federation of Labor named him 
general AFL legal counsel. He had been counsel for the Wisconsin 
Federation of Labor since 1915. 

He appeared before the United States Supreme Court many times in 
support of the constitutionality of the Wagner Act and other labor legis- 
lation. 



Editorial 




We Had Better Find Out 

This winter hunger is once more stalking a major portion of Europe. 
Millions of tons of American food will have to be shipped to the devas- 
tated nations before Spring or untold numbers will actually perish of 
starvation. That America intends to exert every possible affort to meet 
the crisis is a foregone conclusion. From the President on down to the 
ordinary citizen there is a unanimity of determination to see that at 
least the minimum needs of the impoverished people are sustained in the 
trying months ahead. 

With this determination of the United States to provide life and 
hope for the downtrodden of Europe we have no quarrel. On the con- 
trary, we urge everyone to cooperate willingly and wholeheartedly with 
the efforts being made to provide necessary foodstuffs for the needy 
abroad. However, we feel the time has come for Uncle Sam to do a little 
delving into the whole situation of food conservation, food prices and 
the trend of our general economy. There are far too many things in the 
picture that confuse and even terrify an ordinary individual who only 
knows, like the late Will Rogers, what he reads in the papers. 

For example, the headlines recently proclaimed that the President 
desired Thursday to be an eggless and poultryless day throughout the 
nation. It struck us as a splendid idea and we were quite elated until we 
turned to the inside of the paper. There, buried among the want ads. we 
found a little story that knocked the props out from under us. In this 
story, an official of the Department of Agriculture declared that eggless 
Thursday was going to mean a decline in the demand for eggs. and. 
therefore, the government was going to have to appropriate some three 
hundred million dollars to sustain egg prices. On still another page 
there was a story stating that the government was still destroying pota- 
toes because they are a drug on the market and a price collapse is in pros- 
pect unless surpluses are removed from the marke: 

We realize that economics is a complicated science ; we also realize 
that handling foods in million ton quantities is a big job. But our 
plain common sense also tells us that destroying food while millions are 
starving is neither logical nor practical. Somehow, somewhere along the 
line somebody has jumped the trolley. 

The government maintains that it is impractical to ship surplus pota- 
toes abroad because shipping costs in refrigerated ships would run as 
high as seventy dollars a ton. Instead the government buys wheat at 
three dollars per bushel and ships it to Europe. If we remember correctly, 
there are sixty pounds of wheat in a bushel. At three dollars per bushel 
the government pays roughly Sioo per ton for wheat. It takes another 
eight or ten dollars a ton shipping expenses to get it to Europe. So 



THE CARPENTER 17 

Uncle Sam economizes by pouring kerosene on the potatoes that would 
cost seventy dollars per ton to ship to Europe and spends $110 a ton to 
send wheat instead. Plentiful potatoes are destroyed and scarce wheat is 
purchased, which explains why the price of the latter hit three dollars. 

However, there is more to the story than that. The government did 
not get the potatoes it is destroying free. Indeed not. It paid for them. 
And it also paid as much as $1.35 per bushel for a lot of spuds that were 
never even dug up. Now, apparently, the same sort of financial wizardry 
is going to move into the egg picture. 

Maybe it all makes sense to some people but we certainly are not num- 
bered among them. To our way of thinking, the time is long past due 
for Uncle Sam to sit down and really try to figure out where in the Heck 
we are headed. First, somebody had better decide whether or not we 
are still operating under a free enterprise system. Under such a system, 
when potatoes became plentiful, the price would drop, more people 
would eat them and soon there would be no surplus. While the people 
were eating more potatoes they would be eating less wheat and wheat 
prices, too, would stay within reason. But somebody seems to think this 
sort of thing old-fashioned. Subsidies, price support, and a dozen other 
artificial methods of managing the farm economy are the newest wrinkles. 
None of them seem to be even remotely related to free enterprise. 

Most of us are right now struggling along trying to make ends meet, 
sustained almost exclusively by the hope that prices will go down one 
of these days and things will brighten up. If the government keeps pur- 
suing its present policy, however, lower prices are an idle dream. As 
soon as some commodity comes into adequate supply, the government 
starts buying, burning and plowing under vast quantities of that commod- 
ity lest the price sag a little. There is no use kidding ourselves; the gov- 
ernment at present is not interested in prices coming down. 

"We want to cut down our egg consumption to help Europe. But we 
do not want to do it if it is going to end up with Uncle Sam dumping 
into the river the eggs we save and then taxing us three hundred million 
dollars to keep up present stratospheric prices. That sort of thing just 
does not make good sense. Somehow or other some of the brain-trusters 
had better start figuring out just exactly how and where we are going 
and how we are going to get there or there is liable to be a smashup that 
will make the 1907 panic lo